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Bosnia Strains Revive Threat of NATO Air Strikes Eases; 

Clinton ‘Hopeful’ on Serb Pullout 


By Daniel WUliams 

Woshfapm Pat Service 

SS^ TC 5Lj"« Bcyonc} the faxe at ' 
Sarajevo, the current mternatkmal maneu- 

wrs over Bosnia may decide whether the 
Balkars remain an; arena of cooperation bo- 
tween Washington and Moscow bra sia y of 
iwved confrontation between the nroTfor- 
roer Cold War. adversaries. 

v, Baris Y «taia’s rqection of the 

NATC) ultnnatum to the Serbs and Washing- 
ton’s tdsetVenl w^cormng Russian pace- 
making moves are symptoms of underiyina 
suspicion- infecting the re&tionship. ; • 

don't know whether they are good 
; guys OTbadmys," ah administration official 
said of the .Russians. ^There’s no question 
that When one deals with the Russians in the 
Balkans, you have to watch your back.” 

In an effort to placate the Russians, Presi- 
dent Bill Chmon will telephone Mr. Yeltsin i 
before anybombing takes place, a senior U.S. 
official said Saturday. 

- Since the Gulf war, Russian- American re- 
lations have been harmonious ona number of 
foreign policy issues, including Bosnia, on 
which consultations have been dose. But in 
recent months, strains have developed 
around the issues that grate on Russia’s grow- ' 
Lag nationalist feelings: NATO expansion. 

. eastward, which was delayed in part to ease 
Russian fears; the West's concerns about 
Russian mtoventkmin former Soviet states, 

. and perceptions in Moscow of Russian sub- 
mission to U.S. foreign policy objectives. 

. fa Bosnia, the two rides hare been unable ' 
to reconcile fundamentally different views of 
the war. .... 

The United States regards the Muslims as 
the victim of Serbian aggression, while the. 
Yeltsin government sees the conflict as a dvfl . 
war in which the Serbs. Muslims and Croats' 
share responsibility for the problems and 
horrors. 

It is the differing viewpoint with Moscow 
that undaiies American skepticism over Rus- 
sia'? diplomatic and TmEthry indveTb toe ; 
i Balkans last week, when it announced that it 
| had persuaded the Serbs to withdraw or shift 
their heavy guns frbtn around Sarajevo. Rus- ' 


sa also planned to send 800 peacekeepers to 
’ reinforce the United Nations troops there. 

-The move evolved from Mr. YeHsn's rga> 
tioo of the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion’s threat to bond). Before intervening 
dipkanatically, he signaled his opposition in a 

of ways, UB-cffkaals said: in a letter to 
and a telephone conversation with Mr. CKa ton 
ns-weD as by being unreachable for two days 
early last week when Mr. Clinton tried to c&Q 
him. ■ 

■ la the phone cooversation, Mr. Yeltsin 
told Mr. Gin ton of Russian opposition but 
pledged to press' the Serbs to comply with 
NATO’s demands. In return, he asked Mr. 
Clinton to press the Muslims to reach a 
negotiated settlement that closely resembled 
one on ibe table that would keep many Sorbt- 

- an war intacL 

Mr. Clinton resisted the request to press 
the Muslims, insisting that they were die 
victims. But he. did repeat a pledge to get 
more closely involved in pending peace talks. 

In Mr. Yeltsin’s letter, he opposed the 
NATO bomb threat and indicated that its 
unilateral nature showed a lack of respect for 

-. ■ NEWS ANALYSIS 

Russia, a U.S. official said. The Serbs are 
historical allies of the Russians, and failure to 
jyotcct them would set off bationalisticrevul- 
aon in Rusaa. 

■ Moreover, the continued existence of 
NATO, an alliance meant looppose the Sovi- 
et Union, is openly questioned by Russian 
officials. R itteaghgq hn^q- riit pmBj am j Avu 
not recognize a NATO or American role in 


It woold be difficult to' get Russia ro agree 
to cut off the Serbs if the Muslims werefaemg 
supplied. But a peace agreement would offer 
Washington the diance to keep the war con- 
tained and to save fives. Moscow’s sdf-or- 
' darned role as protector of the Sobs would be 
intact, and the Serbs would probably succeed 
in separating from the rest of Bosnia, their 
qeenflil goal. 

.. . And peace would spare the United States 
and Russia die threat of their first major 
break since the collapse of the Soviet Union. 


OLYMPIC QQQ PODIUM 


Fickle Wind for Skiers 

Its going to bohard to surpass Norway .; 
as an accommodating Olympic host 
Jens Weissflog, 10 years after Iris first 
Olympic triumph, for East Germany^, 
won the large bill ski jumping comped- , 
lion when the favorite, Espcn Bredo- 
sen. had the wind die on Iris second 
jump. The Norwegian had set a h£Q 
record with his first jump. 

If® Uphill From Here 

In a of skis and a dash of instant 
replay, Katja Seizmger of Germany, 
Picabb 'Street of the Uzrited States and 
Isolde Kostner of ltaly fini s he d 1 - 2-3 
in the downhill part of the women’s 
cfMr hnred —-as they had in the previ- 
ous day’s dawrihni chHmpkjnafaip. But 
under the new rules, PexnflteWiberg of 


Sweden, Vreni Schneider of Switzer- 
land and Kostiaes’s teammate Morena 
GaHirio stand a : better chance of win- 
ning when tbe slalom half of the com- 
bination is run Monday. • 

Bobbing Out the Door 

The Swiss driver Gustav Wcder, 32, on 
the final ran, won the two-man bob- 
sled in the second-dosest finish in 
Olympic history, became the first re- 
peat winner in the event, then an- 
nounced that- this would be his last 
Olympics. That was good news for a 
teammate; Reto G&tschi, an Olympic 
rookie, who couldn’t maintain the sum 
lead he hdd after Saturday’s first two 
nos, . ._ 

Olympic report' Pages 15, 16 and 17 



By Alan Cowell 

fie* York Tones Service 

AV1ANO AIR BASE, Italy — The threat of 
immediate NATO air strikes around Sarajevo 
appeared to diminish cm Sunday night as de- 
fense ministers from the United States and 
other allied nations monitored the Bosnian Ser- 
bian response to an ultimatum to remove heavy 
weapons or face retaliation. 

A senior American official said in Washing- 
ton that no decision had been made on enforc- 
ing the ulthnutmn. There has been “do decision 
to bomb, no derision not to bomb,” he said. 

The official said President BID Clinton had 
spoken fay telephone with President Boris N. 
Yeltsin or Russia oq Sunday afternoon and bad 
told him that he was encouraged by Serbian 


efforts to comply with the ultimatum but that 
“no decision on air strikes was yet taken.” 

In Paris, President Franqou Mitterrand esti- 
mated that Bosnian Serbs had withdrawn or 
handed over to UN peacekeepers 90 percent of 
their artillery around the Bosnian capital and 
added that ‘The reason” for possible air strikes 
“appears to have vanished.” 

Yasushi Akashi, the United Nations’ senior 
civilian in former Yugoslavia, said heavy snow 
in recent days and icy roads meant that “not all 
weapons” left in the exclusion zone around 
Sarajevo would be removed by the deadline. 

But the U.S. defense secretary. William J. 
Perry, said UN forces had reported that they 
were able to travel ail over the 20 - kilometer ( 12- 
mile) zone. 

“If artillery pieces cannot be disabled, they 
are able to put a guard over it," Mr. Perry said. 


w*i . 

* ✓ • • ■ f \ * , - , 


adding. “We would consider that full compli- 
ance.” He spoke after meeting defense minis- 
ters from Britain. France, the Netherlands and 
Italy in Avraoo. 

In Washington. President Clinton said Sun- 

Can the mix: of menace and diplomacy used in 
Sarajevo work elsewhere in Bosnia? Page 5. 

day that he was encouraged by reports that Se 
Serbs were moving weapons away from Saraje- 
vo. Asked whether be was hopeful that air 
strikes would not have to be carried out. the 
president replied. “Tm hopeful because of tvhat 
I see happening.” 

The united Nations said in Zagreb, the Cro- 
atian capital that the withdrawal appeared to 
be proceeding satisfactorily hours before the 
2400 GMT expiration of the ultimatum. 



. 'O*-*' 5 ... :■■■ 

' t'*-. 




Chu6o LtfWi/Tbc AaoxuoJ Prru 


U.S. Nsvy techmtians among a plane aboard the carrier Saratoga as tbey prepared for air strikes on Serbian weapons in Bosnia. 

Russian Reform: They’ll Do It Their Way 


By Serge Schmemann 

New York Times Service 

The writer recently compkled a second assign- 
mail as Moscow bureau Jdef of The New York 
Tunes. 

MOSCOW — Mikhail Zhvanetsky, Russia's 
most papular comedian, was recently asked 
about reform. 

“Much has changed, bm nothing has hap- 
pened,” he began, tat then paused in feigned 
confusion. “Or is it that much has happened, 
and nothing has changed?” 

Tfre joke echoed tile discussions that fiH 
kitchens and courtyards, toe commentaries in 


the papers, toe debates that resound from many 
distant foreign capitals. 

Extraordinary changes have come to Russia, 
thing s no one would have dreamed of a few 
years ago. 

Bui old ways have proven tenacious. No 
sooner had President Boris N. Yeltsin crushed 
rate hostile legislature than Russians elected 
another, dominated by chauvinists and Com- 
munists. And toe new deputies began by voting 
themselves cars, apartments and salaries 
matching those of cabinet ministers. 

Ajfter a brief parade of reformers, the cabinet 
uniter Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin 
hasjreveited to what toe economist Grigory A 


Yavlinsky describes as “typically Soviet” — a 
coalition of industrial interest group 8 scram- 
bling to secure inflationary credits, backed by a 
bloated bureaucracy and shady businessmen 
who have made nrifeans speculating on infla- 
tion. 

Their only .discernible strategy, says Yegor T. 
Gaidar, the sidelined pioneer of radical reform, 
is “let it go as it’s going.” 

Nine years after Mikhail S. Gorbachev pro- 
claimed the process of perestroika, or restruc- 
turing, and two years after Mr. Yeltsin presided 
over the breakup of the Soviet Union, many 
Russians wonder whether Russia has entered 

See RUSSIA, Page 4 


Powerful Israel? Or Endangered Israel? 


By David Hoffman 

WesUngtaa Past Service 

JERUSALEM — In years past, Israeli fund- 
raisers often took American Jews to an outlook 
on Mount Zion, where they could get a view of 
toe old Great Lise, the pre-1967 border that 
defined Israel's sense of vulnerability. 

In recent months, American Jews visiting 
here have once again been flocking to Mount 
Zion, but this time for a different view. They 
want to see toe grave of Oskar Schindler, toe 
German businessman who saved more than 
1,000 Jews during Weald War fi and whose 
stray is told in Steven Spielberg's “Schindler's 
list” 

The shift in tableaus is a small bm idling 


glimpse of an important change in Israel’s rela- 
tionship with Jews abroad, especially those in 
the United States who have long been a bul- 
wark of head’s political and financial support. 

For the first time in many years, the close 
bonds forged by the image of Israel as a be- 
sieged, garrison state are bring loosened as 
Israel negotiates peace with its Arab neighbors 
and toe Palestinians. Now, instead of present- 
ing their country as a tiny, vulnerable democra- 
cy struggling to survive in a hostile Arab neigh- 
borhood, some Israelis are talking about a 
different approach: portraying Israel as a re- 
gional superpower mat can afford to be less 
reliant on largess from overseas. 

Tins nascent idea is stiD in dispute but could 
have wide implications. If Israelis adopt a more 


self-confident and self-reliant view of their 
place in the world, they may be more willing to 
take risks in making peace with neighboring 
Arab states. At toe same time, a more “nonnal* 
Israel could ease tta sense of crisis that histori- 
cally has prompted Jews in the Diaspora to 
pour hillions of dollars into toe stale. 

Among Israelis, debate stiO rages over wheth- 
er the country has really come any closer to the 
long-sought goal of greater security and self- 
sufficiency. The letjda of toe opposition Likud 
Party, Bmyamin Netanyahu, has staked his 
future on the premise that Israel's security re- 
mains endangered. If there is another Middle 
Pp$ t war. or if the experiment in Palestinian 

See ISRAEL, Page 4 


Lieutenant General Sir Michael Rose, toe 
UN commander in Sarajevo, refused to sLv 
whether he would recommend air strikes, if 
Serbian guns remained in place unguarded past 
toe deadline. Bui toe BBC reported from the 
besieged city that be has decided Serbian forces 
had adequately complied, although the report 
did not directly quote him. 

General Row said that 41 positions at which 
Bosnian Serb heavy arms were positioned had 
been identified, and that 32 of them had been 
inspected by UN forces. Or toe 32. 23 were 
empty and nine were occupied, he said. Of toe 
nine, five were already under UN control, and 
toe other four were in toe process of being taken 
under UN control be a dried. 

“There has been some significant progress." 

See BOSNIA. Page 5 

In Sarajevo, 
Pondering 
The Price 
Of Peace 

By John Kifner 

A\-w York Time* Sen-ice 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia- Herzegovina — “I am 
more afraid of this peace than the shelling," 
Fuad Gadzo said gloomily over his coffee at toe 
milk bar toe other day. 

"When it’s shelling, I know I have to hide,” 
be explained. But now. “people are already 
relaxed — and they can start shooune any- 
time.” 

The milk bar is a comfortable little neighbor- 
hood place, a couple of steps down off a steep 
hill. 

A single room crowded with tables, stools 
and a bar, framed drawings and photographs 
on toe w alls, it is toe kind of spot that could be 
found aQ over Sarajevo when it was known as a 
cosmopolitan city rather than a city besieged. 

These days, toe regulars take their change in 
the form of gray photocopies of German marks 
stamped to indicate that they are good only in 
that bar for another coffee or beer. 

“Of course it’s better to hare peace than war. 
toe question is what is toe price." Mr. Gadzo 
went on, his eyes haunted. “What would peace 
mean if we are' still paying 80 marks for a kilo of 
sugar?” Eighty marks is about $47. 

“We wall be’ in danger of starvation,” he said. 
“We Sarajevans will be like aa endangered 
species." 

Snow has been falling for a week, and as toe 
city waited for the outcome of a North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization ultimatum ordering toe 
Serbian forces to remove their heavy guns from 
toe surrounding mountains, a while blanket 
covered toe gutted buildings, toe sandbagged 
defenses, toe piles of automobiles destroyed by 
shells or stupas. 

In a way. toe streets where more than 10,000 
people have died in the last 22 months seemed 
almost picturesque again 

On toe steep, narrow streets of toe old quar- 
ter, with its mix of slim minarets and overhang- 
ing balconies from toe Ottoman Empire and 
toe stolid baroque hulks of the Austro-Hungar- 
ian era, young boys sledded and skied, and the 
sidewalks and roadways were crowded with 
walkers — black-market gas goes for the equiv- 
alent of S20S a gallon — many pulling home 
supplies on old-fashioned sleds with high run- 
ners. 

Two yean ago. Mr. Gadzo, a young mechani- 
cal engineer, and a handful of other Muslims 
became alarmed over a bustle of activity by the 
Sabs in the hill villages, the appearance of 
convoys of weapons and the digging of gun 
emplacements by the old regular Yugoslav 
Army, whose officer corps was dominated by 
Sabs. 

The Muslim men formed a group called toe 
Patriot League, and their handful of hunting 
rifles was the dry’s first line of defense. 

Now, like most men in the city a part-time 
soldier, Mr. Gadzo is resting from rotation on 
toe front line at toe eastern edge of the city. 

“The Serbs have achieved what they want, 
they occupy what they need," he said. “I put as 
much faith in this peace plan as 1 have in every 
other peace plan — nothing.” 

At the bar, the men were riveted to the 
television, cheering Slovenia's downhill racer, 
Spela Premar, in the Olympics as if the old 
Yugoslav federation had not broken up and 
there was still one team. A decade ago, toe 
Games were held in Sarajevo, to some perhaps 

See MOOD, Page 5 


For U.S. Scientists^ End of Cold War Brings a Big Chill 


Kiosk 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

SaeYe* Times Service : 

NEW YORK — With the end cf.tte Cold 
War. iota in mathematics and the pbyacai 
sciences have shaiply.ffind ted m th eJJmted 

5 vS 

***.*** * 

search itself. . , , ■ ■ 

- Although Americans. still wm Nbbd pares 
and publish thousands rfpapas, some Scan ~ 


Newsstand Prices — _ 

Andorra ...^.9 JO FF u«emboure&Ljr 
Antilles..— UJ0 FF ; 

OKTwroonJ^OgA gg^^ffiSSR-- 

E9V* Sautfi Arabia J.QQR, 

France-.-9.0Q ^SenefloL~~9«CFA 
Gabon..:..-.«ocFA spoir\— - Z00PTAS 
Greece — JHB Dr. Tunisia ^.IjOD Din 
I vory Coast .1.120 CFA Turira/.-T.Ul^OCO >■' 

Jordan. -TJO UAE.w-BJ0Dlrfr ; 

£Son...USSlJ» U-S. AA3.1&TJ SLIP 


cists are deeply disturbed by- this treed. They 
say the lack ct jobs, end . deduting national 
support of KKOce when the puzzles yet to be 
solved are mere and more difficult, have begun 
to sap the vjgmr of American research. 

7 The (toctine in .support is reflected at umvep- 
aties, winch art cutting the number of tktetoraJ* 
lft/fil cpndidaies they teach, asd m boardrooms, 
'where compKiks. are" denjanding_ more and 
more that soeaahave some immediate pact** 
cal rise.. • /•/. - 

ThrsonlanK^by the sec grave conse- 
quences, both imcfloctnal and perarataL They 
JiMaJessei^ctfttafrte-w^ 
a! approach that had given many ' researchers 
toe freedom 10 they 

^minority lot® b«J 

mu te repres e n ted in the classroom and toe lab- 
oratory. . 


’ 'Reflecting, too new practical approach, an 
"at & Jsr$e dsctioaics coipaafwa 
said: “Our scientists ha ve won enough Nobri 


prizes to jast toe company fora ktfig time to 
come. What we need now is focused research 
aimed at making a profit for tins company. Tm 
taBong about bottom-line commercial surviv- 
al” 

. “Focused research” « also a major new 
theme at the National Science Foundation, one 
rftoe mam federal agencies financing research 
in the United States. Hie foundation has re- 

caved steady increases in funds each year, and 

the White Hoase has called for an increase of 6 
percent for the coming year, to bring its bodget 
to &2 billion. 

But a Swyrte appropriations subcommittee 
headed by Senator Baroara Mikulski of Mary- 
land has demanded that 60 percent of toe 
.foundation's. budget should “maximize toe re- 
turn rat toe public's investment in science and 
technology and to ensure lhai federal resources 
art used efficiently and appropriately.” 

.Tins has . translated, many scientists argue, 
into increased spending ro technolOTy applica- 
tions at. the expense of basic saeitific research 


— the traditional role of foundation spending. 

The job market appears to be getting worse 
with each wave of corporate layoffs and univer- 
sity gram reductions. Many scientists and 
mathematicians have been compelled to seek 
jobs outride their fields, or to EU temporary 
academic or industrial positions with neither 
security nor benefits. 

In ait artide in toe magazine Physics Today, 
Dr. Leo P. Kadanoff, MacAithur "professor of 
physics and mathemati cs at toe University of 
Chicago, wrote that in toe United States “all 
the props for science have begun to weaken.” 

He added: “Government has become unpop- 
ular. The mffitary has started to shrink. Corpo- 
rations are concerned with tomorrow’s stock 
value and have lost interest in promoting ap- 
plied research- Anti-scientific threads have be- 
come evident in many parts of popular think- 
ing.” 

Moreover, he said, “nothing we scientists do 
is Hkrfy to arrest our decline in numbers, sup- 
port or social value.’’ 


Swigs Voters Ban Foreign Trucks 


Up and — 7 

Coming /ZrS. A 

An occasional series about v 
the leaders of tomorrow. 

A Welsh fanner’s son, Bryn Terfel is learn- 
ing at 28 how to sing opera’s horde roles — 1 1 
and to live on a heroic scale. Page Z 

General New* 

Nelson Mandeb blamed his Zulu rival for a 
massacre of ANC election workers. Page 4. 
The Japanese pm to rest toe myth that ton 
would not eat tnade-in-Amaica rice. Page 7. 


Books 

Bridge 

Crossword 


Page 4. 
Page 4. 
Page 18. 


ZURICH (Combined Dispatches)— Swit- 
zerland approved a proposal on Sunday to 
protect the Alps by banning foreign trucks 
from crossing the country by road and forc- 
ing them to travel by rail 

Some 52 percent of toe electorate in a 
referendum and a nugority of toe country’s 
cantons voted for toe proposal. 

The initiative, proposed in 1990 by a group 
of environmentalists, will face ail foreign 
trucks to transfer to the railroads within 10 
years. Domestic vehicles and those importing 
to or exporting from Switzerland would be 
exempt 

Switzerland's coalition government ap- 
pealed to voters to reject the proposal saying 
it would violate international transportation 
treaties. 

The government fought long and hard to 
maintain its 28-ton limit asd nighttime and 
weekend truck bm. (Reuters, AP) 







W-W. *»*■ 




INTERNATIONAL 


iM iTjl HI 


TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1994 


A Welsh Farmer’s Son Soars Into Opera’s Stratosphere 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Erik Jpsen 

Iniemaltciwl Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Bryn Terfel is en- 
joying the good life famously. He 
is putting; the finishing touches on 
his spacious apartment in the 
heart of Kensington, building his 
collection of fine wines and duti- 
fully catching up on his fan mail. 

Dressed in blue jeans and sport- 
ing tousled shoulder-length hair, 
thick beard and a heavy gold 
necklace, the 6-foot-3-inch. 240- 
pouod Mr. Terfel looks more like 
the rugby player he once he 


An occasional series V 
about the leaders 
of tomorrow. 


thought he might become than the 
world’s hottest new bass baritone 
that he now arguably is. 

With a new exclusive recording 
contract with Deutsche Grammo- 
phon and a schedule of perfor- 
mances that takes him reassuring- 
ly deep into 1998, Mr. Terfel has a 
future that does not lack for cer- 
tainty, fame or income. But in 
hindsight anyway, it never has. 

“He is one of the greatest tal- 
ents of the last 15 or 20 years," 
says Sir Georg Solti- The conduc- 
tor sets the date for Mr. Terfel’s 
“bursting onto the scene" as 1989, 
when at age 24 he “won" the Car- 
diff Singer of (he World Competi- 
tion. 

Perhaps the greatest testament 


mate success. “It would have been 
worse if he had won,” said Mat- 
thew Epstein, the general (Erector 
of the Welsh National Opoa. 
"The pressures of winning are just 
too great." 

As it was, Mr. Terfel's showing 
got him a contract with the Welsh 
National Opera. As be puts it, that 
meant “three steps up the ladder" 
rather than a sudden disorienting 
rocket to the top. 

For a budding opera singe, 
p aring js eveiythmg- Patience and 
the strength to say "no" to impre- 
sarios and conductors desperate 
to sign up the latest phenomenon 
are aD too rare. But a voice too 
quickly shoved onto the stage in 
heroic Wagnerian roles can all too 
often be a voice forever ruined. 

A few years ago, Mr. Terfel re- 
calls, he tentatively accepted one 
of those roles. Shortly afterward 
he found himself sitting with 
mounting horror through a per- 
formance of Wagner’s “Flying 
Dutchman." 

“I heard a Wagnerian orchestra 


for the first lime and realized they 
are loud, ver-r-ry loud," he said. 


to success is its ability to wipe 
away the messy imperfections of 


history. In fact, in that 1989 com- 
petition Mr. Terfel managed sec- 
ond place, a fact that few can now 


Many insist that the second- 
place finish guaranteed his ulti- 


are loud, ver-r-ry loud," he said. 
The next day he called up and 
canceled 

At 28, he intends to husband his 
talent carefully for the next few 
years. In that wish he has plenty of 
support “1 hope he will go on 
singing Mozart for a while,” said 
Rudou Hern ay, Mr. Terfel’s 
teacher for the last decade. “It is 
strenuous enough." 

It is also a course attractive 
enough for someone learning not 
only bow ultimately to sing heroic 
roles but also how to live on a 
heroic scale. Mr. Terfel admits he 
likes the trappings of success. 

His career has offered opportu- 
nities aplenty to survey the gilded 
landscape up close. In January he 
came away from three weeks of 
performing in Offenbach's Tales 



Snowdonia region of North 
Wales. 

Mr. Terfel's origins — or the 
juxtaposition of humble origins 

with a sophisticated vocal art 


form — have become a vital part 
of his public persona. Pal Chris- 
tian Moe, the director of vocal 


Saturday, he developed a tidy in- 
come. Along the way from child- 
hood into adolescence he also de- 
vdoped a habit of perforating and 
a high comfort level with it that 
have served him. well as a profes- 


< iintr.s* Said to IpKepm^jon 

Orion* < its report the most comprehensive account of anmraiy 
detention ever published. • 


recordings at Deutsche Grammo- 
phon, says that Mr. Terfel has 
more than a great voice. “He lends 
hims elf weQ to promotion,” said 
Mr. Moe. “First of all he comes 
from a farm, plus he is quite a nice 

guy” 

In short, Mr. Terfel loons large 
not only as a talent but also as a 
tale in and of himself. It is a tale 
that he tells as well and as con- 
vincingly as he sings Mozart, 
Mahler and Verdi. 

John Hefin Jones, Mr. Terfel's 
father (the ringer dropped his last 
name in favor of his noddle name 
when he joined the performers' 
union and was told they already a 
Welshman named Bryn Jones), 
describes their hometown of 
Poniglas as “very small." 

A total of 14 houses plus acha- 
pd and a school, “except the 
school is closed now," Mr. Jones 


“Singing wasn’t serious; it was 
fun," Mr. Terfel said. Singing did 


TSn&ia man under idagsentoice forprinnn& 
among-otber things, aimniagp manuat to 11 Tibetan nans anatedjn a 

base and a variety of 


At 28, Bryn Terfel plans to husband hts vocal talent carefully. 


added. As for neighbors, he put 
the nearest ones at “two fields 


of Hoffmann" with Plirido Do- 
mingo, fascinated anew by the 
wages of megastardom. “In Vien- 
na, everywhere Domingo went, he 
did not have to pay the bill," Mr. 
Terfel said with enthusiasm. 

Even the seeming drudgery of 
megastardom strikes a positive 
chord. Two years ago, after finish- 
ing a performance of Saint- 
Safins’s “Samson and Delilah" in 
Spain at 3 AM, Mr. Terfel stood 
by dumbfounded as Jose Carreras 
patiently spent hours signing 
autographs. “If the superstars do 
things like that, they must really 
enjoy it," he reasoned. 


As a bass baritone in a world 
where fame has a way of favoring 
tenors — from Enrico Caruso to 
Luciano Pavarotti — Mr. Terfel 
wifi, even at the peak of his career, 
have to foot some of his own res- 
taurant bills. Still ever the student 
of the good life to come, he happi- 


ly asks waiters to soak labels off 
the pricey bottles of trine served 


the pricey bottles of trine served 
gratis to ms renowned colleagues. 
At home he carefully inserts those 
labels into his wine book and his 
mental blueprints for celebrations 
of successes yet to be sung. 

It is not at all a bad fate for the 
farmer’s son from the rugged 


the nearest ones at “two fields 
away." 

It was in North Wales that Bryn 
Terfel discovered just how handy 
a good set of vocal cords can be. 
At the age of 4 he joined his par- 
ents and older brother in their 
Saturday ritual of (he eisteddfod, 
traditional competitions staged 
from one end of Wales to the 
other and featuring everything 
from recitals to choirs to singing 
with a harp accompaniment. Even 
as a boy soprano, Mr. Terfel 
ranked as a well-paid success. 

“Fust prize was £8, pins some- 
times you got a cup," he remem- 
bered. By entering and winning as 
many as six competitions on a 


become serious, however, when he 
won a place at London’s presti- 
g ions GmWhah School of Muse 
and Drama is 1984. For his audi- 
tion, Mr. Terfel had to sing not 

botalso for the lirsTtimck Eng- 
lish, not WeWi- 

He grew up speaking Welsh, a 
factor be and omen credit for his 
ease with German and Italian, op- 
eratic scores. “It is moire guttural 
and mace frontal” he explained 
alter a throat-dearing, teethjan* 
gling demonstration, of (he seven 
Welsh vowda 

When he is at home with Ids 
wife, who grew 19 two villages 
away and who r especting thezr 
Gist baby in June, his chosen 
tongue remains Welsh. Home, 
though, is the one thing Mr. Terfel 
laments he does not yet have. 

“I need a place I can put a 
snooker table," be insists. That 
will come later in the year, when 
he and his wife move into a new 
house by the sea in Cardiff . With a 
schedule of concerts, operas and 
recording dates that limits home 
fife, Mr. Terfel has learned to trav- 
el heavy, to take the essential dc- - 
meats of his. fife with fata. 2Jzs 
entourage always indodes his wife 
and frequently his parmts. 

And then there are the golf 
dubs. Although he calls it an an- 
noying sport, Mr. Terfel has set 
out to conquer it as he would a 
new opera. His staA^jgolf vid- 

at least to his optimism that tins 
game too can be mastered. 



Bd^tEfil by String of Bombings ! 

«pir .past fRentersV — Nine suspected Irish Republican Army fire- 
bombs hit a string S toops, bus and iwtanr^ a^ Belfast on 


fdkwed a. wave of sewra^fircbomte in 
London stores on Saturday tiat wooded wnh a.^nut mcdiqg 




to a Northern Ireland peace initiative. 



3 Wounded in Egypt Tourist Attack 

CAIRO (NYT) r-Tbe night train from Cairo to|ACKydr ^« mg ma & 



for their own safety. . \ - . . 

No group immediately, took respODsflaEty far the' attack. Reuters 
reported from Asyot that ctatadg^/oumf at the scene of the tram a tt aot, 
about 200 mfta (325 kilometers) south of Cairo, wexelinscribed with 
miKfr>nt gkigans EVe “Islam Is Ccgnma* 1 *.!^ was the first attack QQ 
Vwn wi tn renr y tryprirfs. The mffjtgnfc. have attacked tour buses and Nile 
cruise ships in the past. 

China Nears 1.2 Billion Population 

BERING (Rentes) — China’s population wiR exceed \2 bflhou tins 

popuktionr^^wi 1.186 bilEon at the end of' 1993, and 
that in 1994 there would be a net increase of 15.5 imllRm. ■ 

A national population conference in 1981; set a target of 1 2 bflUon for 
the year 2000. Bmcrts predki that, with a maintenance of China's rigid 


Q & A: Australia Remains Above the U.S.- Japan Fray, Sort Of 


urns at one child per family, the population w31 
1 km in the year 2044. 


Japan and the United States 
are both key economic and politi- 
cal partners for Australia. In 
Canberra , Senator Gareth Ev- 
ans, the Australian foreign min- 
ister , discussed the U.S.-Japan 
trade conflict and its impact on 
the Asia-Pacific region with Mi- 
chael Richardson of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


Q. Australia has a large trade 
surplus with Japan and an almost 
equally large trade deficit with the 
United States. Where does it stand 
in the conflict between them? 

A We have made it very clear 
that we are not taking sides in any 
direct way in this dispute. We see 
fault on both rides. 

So far as the United States is 
concerned, we unequivocally do 


not support managed trade or 
quantitative targets. But although 
we take the Japanese view of the 
downside of managed trade and 
associated btlaieral sanctions, we 
believe that Japan could do more to 
open its markets. 


Q. Would Australia and other 
Aria-Pacific countries suffer much 
in a U.S.-Japan trade war? 


DUTYFREE ADVISORY 



A Like most other countries of 
the ropon, we stand to be signifi- 
cant losers from an extended trade 
war between the United States and 
Japan, particularly if it has the ef- 
fect of prolonging the recession in 
Japan and reducing demand for 
imports, such as minerals and ener- 
gy commodities. 

That would be a most unhappy 
development and me that would 
cut across an emerging commit- 
ment to genuine trade liberaliza- 
tion based on a multilateral ap- 
proach. Such a trend has been 
evident in the recently concluded 
Uruguay Round of global trade ne- 
gotiations and in the work of the 
Aria Pacific Economic Coopera- 
tion forum. 

Q. Were you surprised that the 
dispute came to a hod at this time? 

A. It all seems a bit of a throw- 
back to the past, rather than look- 
ing forward. 

One can understand America's 
agony over its continuing trade def- 
icit with Japan. Australia, however, 
has a very substantial trade deficit 
with the United States, a good deal 
of which is contributed to by Amer- 
ica's own restrictive access prac- 
tices in areas like dairy products, 


sugar, and so-called voluntary re- 
straint arrangements on steeL 
We would tike to think that we 
were getting beyond the age doa- 
ble standards in these particular 
matters. 


Q. Hasn’t Japan been notorious- 


ly slow in opening its market to 
fesrign goods and services? 

A. I don't think that should be 
exaggerated. If you look at the 
amount of imports per capita that 
nations take, mere is a significantly 
higher absorption by Japan of im- 
ports from America than there is by 
the United States of imports from 
Japan. 

That is a point that should be 
made more often, even though the 
aggregate trade figures between the 
two countries still show a startling 


Nonetheless, we do think that 
the age of managed trade is over. 
Australia is a competitive supplier 
to the Japanese market. Along with 
a lot of other countries, we have a 
very major self-interest in ensuring 
that the United States does not 
solve its deficit problems at our 
expense. 

Q. Are you concerned that the 
dispute between the United States 
ana Japan could escalate into a 
broader cffliflicJ, souring a relation- 
ship that is central to stability and 
security in tire Asia-Pacific region? 

A We drink that cooler heads 
will prevail on those fronts, even if 
we are not absolutely sure of it on 
die economic front. Tbercis simply 
too much at st^ far bodi epun- 
tries and for the region as a tvhafe 


peak at about L56 bOBom in the year 2044- . . 

The policy is' successful in many urban areas, but m rural areastnany 
women arc prep are d to pay the fi xes imposed for having more children. 
The newsservice said tS^grrarnri^cameliomtnigrantwoilErs who 
have poured into dries from tire ccwnlryridn They cscape the tight 
rafltmte Hurt tegnlflie femfly planmiig in settled populations. 


New Zealand Welcomes U.S. Move 


WELLINGTON (Renters) — New Zealancfs prime minister, Jim 
Rn jg w add Sunday that a move - by Washington to upgrade contacts 
partly after a seven-year standoff was “apowtiroatep " .. .. 


wouki rcanam suspended. 7he U^. State said last wedc that 

it had decided to resimielri^irlevdpc^tical oontacts halted in 1987 when 
a leftist government banned ships canymgnudear weapons or powered 
by nuckaf foe! from entering New Zealand watexs. ; 

The action in effect destroyed the three-nation ANZUS (Australia, 
New Zealand, United States) defense pact . . 


Yemenis SignRec<mdIialioiiPact 


Q. Yet isn’t it true that much of 
the progress in opening the Japa- 
nese market to imports has been 
the result of foreign pressure, par- 
ticularly from the United State? 

A Weil that is true, and Austra- 
lia has been a major beneficiary. 
That's why we are not being exces- 
sively robust in avrcritidsmsat the 
present time. 


Everybody acknowledges that 
e Japan-tLS. defense rdation- 


the Japan-UiL defense relation- 
ship is mie of the great regional 
stabflraers. If the security ties were 
undennmed as the result of a trade 
dispute that got out of hand, it 
would have potentially quite disas- 
trous flow-on consequences for the 
region as a whole and every coun- 
try in it 

But I just don’t think that will 
happen. 


AMMAN,. Yemen (AFP) — Yemen’s rival leaders signed a reconcilia- 
tion accord here Sunday arte a standoff of several months that threat- 
ened to split the country aonL 

President AH Abdallah Saleh of Yemen, and his 'southern rival, Vice 
Presided! Afi Salem Bad, signed the agreement pairing for. economic, 
poirtical and security reforms. A ideal tif 35 other Yemen officials also 
signed the deal in' the presence of King Hussein of Joradan; Yasser 
Arafat, the leader of the Palestine Liberation Organization; Esmat Abdd 
Megmd the Arab Leagpc chief, and Yussef ibn Aland Abdullah, Oman’s 
minister of state for foreign affairs. 

Tbel8-pointaccOTd caflsfca - Mr. Baid to cede contrd over oil fields in 
tiie south and Colonel Saleh to yield on security and financial mattes, to 
save the 1990 union between the former Mamst'Sourii Yemen and pro- 
Western North Yemen. . 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Testing Week for Hong Kong 


4 Airlines Fail Bomb Detection Test 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — Governor 
Chris Patten's drive for greater de- 
mocracy in Hoag Kong despite 
Chinese opposition faces its first 
major legislative hurdle this week, 
which if cleared will open the way 
for his most contentious reform 
buL 

The colony’s legislature will vote 
os Wednesday on a partial reform 
trill. Bui even though this contains 
changes that would scarcely ruffle a 
feather in a true democracy, its 
passage is not guaranteed because 
of fierce opposition locally and in 
Beijing. 

Political pundits and pro-democ- 
racy legislators predict that the 
mini-bill, which includes reforms 


like lowering the voting age to 18 
from 21. will scrape through. 


Failure to get even these reforms 
through the Legislative Council 
would be a blow to Mr. Patten and 


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would leave Hong Kong without 
arrangements for elections later 
this year and next — the last elec- 
tions before the British colony's 
1997 return to China. 

“If the whole thing gets blocked, 
then of course au hdl breaks 
loose,” said Emily Lau, an inde- 
pendent legislator. 

If the legislation is passed, Mr. 
Patten is expected to publish his 
final reform bill on Friday. 

This is likely, but not certain, to 
contain the proposals to which 
Beijing and its Hong Kong sup- 
porters object most strenuously, 
such as giving all of the colony’s 2.7 
million workers a second vote in 
occupational-based constituencies. 

Mr. Patten hinted strongly last 
month that be would send the final 
reform bill to the Legislative Coun- 
cil soot after the mini -bill was 
passed. 

In October 1992, Mr. Patten pro- 
posed reforms foe local elections 
this year and for local and Legisla- 
tive Council polls in 1995. Talks 
with China began six months late 
but achieved nothing. 

Last December, Mr. Patten pub- 
lished the mun-biU, saying this left 
rune to discuss the contentions is- 
sues. But a furious China said Mr. 
Patten had killed the chances of a 

negotiated settlement. 

Apart from lowering the voting 
age, the mini-bin abolishes govern- 
ment appointment of local council 


members, lowers the number of 
popularly ejected legislates to one 


lows local members of China's par- 
liament, the National People’s 
Congress, to run in Hoag Kong 
elections. 

Rumors are flying that Elsie Tu, 
a legislator who opposes Mr. Pat- 
ten, is organizing ajoves to block 
even the mnfi-buL But Ms. Lan, 
who is strongly pro-democracy, 
said the public was sick of the end- 
less delays and bickering. 

“My hunch is that it's going to be 
passed," she said. “The community 
is very fed np and want to get on 
with it After all, the proposals are 
very mmimaL" 

Hong Kong voters, at least those 
who have made their minds ■ up, 
seen to bade the mini-bill An 
apimoa poll in the Sunday Morn- 
ing Post newspaper found that 36 
percent for passing that bill and 16 


-LONDON (AFP) — Four airimes at Heathrow International Airport 
failed to detect Bike bombs placed in luggage by government security 
officials, raising feaiir of a posable repeat of the Lockerbie disaster, the 
Sunday limes newspaper reported. 

The use of X-ray machines by Britain’s Virata Atlantic, tfaeU-S. 
cankrs United ana American, and Dutch KLm fafied to uncover the 
deactivated bombs planted in children’s dolls, although they contented 
detonators* cables and Semtex plastic e^ripaove. The explosive had beeti 
chemically neutralized to avoid an acria e nt during the January security 
check. United Anitaes dismissed an employee after fafling the Depart- ' 
meet of Transport test, the paper added. ' 

A Semtex bomb desroryed a Pan American 'Wodd Airways flight over 
the Scottish town of Lockerbie in 1988, kHfing all 276 people onboard, 
after security ^ogicaris m Frankfort foiled to detect the device. 

^ Egnop ia bn derided its national earner Ethiopian. 

Wade A^^s^^^^aniines to thetaSu^OT^^se. ^°^*(Reuten) 
^ D^Ix»d(a-Ha^ Koag£^as by Virgm Atlantic Airways will begin 
Tuesday, ending theconlRM on direct flights held by British Airways and 
Ollrey Pacific and probably meaning lower teres on tire route. Airftae 
officials aid analysts estimate that Virgin’s ffighte with Airbus A-340s 
will pat TO to 20 percent mine seate on the route, wdl abcw fbrtcasts of 
passenger growth. (Reuters) 


percent against. But 50 percent 
were “dotft knows". 


Fonr hotels were dosed by the stom knWmra«tS : 

200. AU other hotels were operating: but lack of water and air comfitiao- 
mg could affect tourism, on which Mauritius refies for hundreds of 
mufibris of dollars a yean ' ' • . . . (Reuters) 

Tliis "Week’s Hobdays 


Talks on Kurils to Resume 
Agence Fnmce-Pmse 
TOKYO — Japan and Russia 
wiD resume talks on the disputed 
Kuril islands on Feb. 21-22 inMas- 
caw, but a major breakthrough is 
unlikely, Japanese newspapers re- 
ported Sunday. 


Banking and govertHnent offices will bedosed or servioes curtailed in 
the fqJkwing countries and their dcpemlcnries this week because of 
national and munnns hnlvfaw 


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TUESDAY: Syria: . ' ’ 

WED NESDAY: Brand Gayana, Russia, Switxedmd. . . 

THURSDAY: Estonia. - 

FRIDAY; Kuwait, Sri Laofca, TbaSaad. “ Sources: JP. Morgan, Reuters- 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. FEBRUARY 21. 1994 


Page 3 


;’:b ■/ 



±POUm </ NOTES 1*- 



For First Time Since 3 76 , Democrats Are Retaking Turf 


By Richard L. Berke 

jVffl' Tori: 7>«« Service 

WASHINGTON — The Republican bumper 
Stickers that proliferated after the 1992 elect: cm 
read: “Don’t Blaine Me. I Voted for Bush." The 
'Democrats have finally come up with a rejoinder 
“Thank Me ... 1 Voted Clinton-Gorel” 

The market for these newly minted red, white and 
blue stickers may be bigger than o^ce thought. For 
ail of President Bill Clinton’s troubles, for all the 
' conflicting ideological messages and for all the flaws 
in the Democratic political operation, for all the 
noise from Senator Bob Dole, tbe language from the 
While House seems to be catching on. It is meant to 
« hold on to tbe liberal camp while budding a bridge to 
more centrist terrain. 

There has been a small yet significant movement 
of people to the Democratic fokL H began even 
before the 1992 election and accelerated throughout 
Mr. Qimon’s first year in office. 

For the first time since 1976. the Republican Party 
Is no longer gaining at tbe expense of the Democrats. 
The nation’s basic partisanship — the degree to 
-which people think of themselves as Democrats, 
•Republicans or independents — remains closely 
balanced. But Democrats have widened their advan- 
tage in partisan loyalty to eight percentage points 

over Republicans, twice what it was five years ago. 

The shift comes equally from people who identify 
themselves as Republicans and independents, ac- 


cording lo a series of New York Times.' CBS News 
poils. 

“They’re gening credit for going baric :o the 
center.” said Kevin Phillips, a Republican analyst 
who predicted years in advance the realignment of 
the old Democratic South to the Republican Party. 

“h is significant.” be said, “because if you b:os.e 
out issues which tbe Democrats made the most gains 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

— you’d get crime and welfare reform. That gives 
them a booster shot. Thai’s also bad news for the 
Republicans." 

Ver Mr. Phillips asserted that the movement 
should not be overemphasized because there is ac 
suggestion that “tbe Democrats are establishing any- 
thing that’s got any depth.” 

Indeed, the trend hardly portends a major party 
realignment. Tbe biggest question is still where the 
19 million people who voted for Ross Perot in 1992 
will end up in this year’s midterm elections and in 
the 1996 presidential race. 

But tbe Democrats’ gains are not simpiy from 
faJlen-away members who were drawn back to the 
fold in the afterglow of Mr. Clinton's election to the 
White House, and they suggest that the party has the 
potential to win over a significant proportion of 
independents. 

The possibilities among younger voters are strik- 
ing. For the first lime since 1 984. more Americans in 
the 18-to-29 age group identify themselves as Demo- 


crats than Republicans i31 percent to 29 percent!. 
This is important because the loyalties of younger 
voters often ? rick with them for life, and the young 
teac tc- reflect the way political forces are moving 

AiihcLgh the position of political parties has de- 
clined with the advent of television in recent ce- 

caces. party ioyalty is still important, li gives ihe 
dominant party a starting advantage in an election 
year. Ar.ti pells on voter loyalty are even more 
reliable indicators of public semimem than voter- 
regi it ration figures, which are incomplete and often 
biiieri toward* the dominant party in any local juris- 
diction. 

NlzrLn P. Wauenbirtg a political scientist at the 
Lniversii} of California ac /nine, said the pattern 
fa - . crLtg Democrats was “really reactive to the presi- 
dent's overall approval and the economy.” 

Wha: is more significant, he said, is what the 
numbers say about Republicans. “The fact that 
some of the gains have receded is another indicator 
mat tee Democrats are going to be a majority party- 
in the Congress and tbe state legislatures well into 
the list century.” be said. “The Republicans are 
slipping" 

The Republicans, of course, are furious. Mr. Clin- 
ton is stealing their best lines on the biggest issues of 
the day. from crime to welfare reform. ( He even cited 
an old health care proposal of Richard Nixon in his 
State of the Union message last month.) The public, 
pells shew, barely distinguishes the parties in their 
ability to reduce’ tbe budget deficit or curb crime. 


Frank Luntz. a Republican pollster who advised 
Mr. Perot in 1991 fears that Democrats could be 
gainin g 2 n edge in winning over the Perot voters. 
Watching Mr. Clinton deliver the Slate of the Union 
■message. - he said, “sent a shiver down my spine — no 
one’s hearing what the Republicans are saying The 
Democrats control the While House, the Congress, 
the bully pufpiL" 

Even if the Democrats can sustain and build on 
their gains, a return to the party's dominance of two 
decades ago is difficult to imagine. In 1976, as the 
country was reeling from Watergate and Jimmy 
Carter' was elected president, 40 percent identified 
ihemsetves as Democrats and 20 percent as Republi- 
cans. But tbe edge diminished in the years of the 
Reagan administration, as the Republicans ab- 
sorbed supporters of George C. Wallace and the 
right-leaning “Reagan Democrats.” 

Had the Republicans been able to reject George 
Bush, the stage might finally have been set for them 
to overtake the Democrats in partisan allegiance. 
Instead. Mr. Clinton fractured the Republican coali- 
tion, with considerable help from Mr. Bush, who 
could not keep up the momentum of tbe Reagan 
years, and from Mr. Perot. 

AJ From, president of tbe Democratic Leadership 
Council, a centrist organization from which Mr. 
Ginton developed many of bis campaign positions,' 
envisions a grand era of Democratic dominance that 
leaves little room for tbe liberals who are battling for 
a piece of the Clinton agenda. 


n SlqtalrfWanttl, 

FresHtent Canton speaking after an address m Wastfngtoain 
which he reaffirmed U.S. commitment io NATOs trttiatatnm. 

Clintons to PayWhttewater Legal Fees 

WASHINGTON — When President Kfl Clinton complained the 
other day that the special investigation of his Whitewater land 
in vestment “is going to cost the taxpayers tmBipns of dollars,* he (fid 
not mention that it wiB most likely cost Irim a Jot as wriL ... 

The White House has said the Clintons are footing their own bills 
for the services of David' Kendall of Washington’s Williams & 
Connolly law firm to represent them in the inquiry ondertakenby 
Robert 6. Fake Jr M the special counseLThe probe, which could tike 
a year to 18 -monthS) focuses on the Whitewater investment and the 
first couple’s ties to a failed savings and loan owned by their business 
partners. James and Susan McDougaL 

Concerns that the Gintons -were using White House lawyers to 
h^rite persona/ matters had prompt ed three Republican members 
of the House appropriatiims sulxx Mnmi ttce that funds the White 
House to seek assurances that ho. public funds were being used. 

Bernard W. Nussbaum, * White House counsel, replied in a Feb. 
10 letter that his office and White House staff had respemded to 
Whitewater queries from Congress arid reportess. But he said no 
public funds were bang. used to pay Mr. Kendal) and “no White 
House staff members are acting as lawyers for the president and first 
lady where there is no'officul nexus.* . 

A White House official said this meant, basically, that Mr. 
Kendall would handl e inquiries from Mr. Flske while while House 
’ lawyers would deal with issues such as Republican requests for 
■ congresaonal hearing. 

The Clintons and Mr. Kendall have not mentioned his fee, but 
defense lawyers say S300 to S400 an hour is typical for a partner at a 
top firm. Mr. Kendall could give the Clintons a discount of sorts, 
offering tp represent them in the investigation for a set fee, as some 
other defense lawyers da - .. (WP) 

A ‘Swamp Camp'fdr Young Fmlonm 

BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVJvFlorida —Attorney 4 
General Janrit ■ Reoo travekd to one d£ the jnost: remote spots in. 
Florida, a vast ^«tHy-pnririt filled withaffigaton and patsonous 
snakes, tio announce the Cfinton adnarisaaion’s latest response to 
violent juvenile crime: swamp camp. . .. 

The camp, modeled on the CSvflian Conservation Corps of tbe 
1930% is the first of what While House officials envision as ‘Tast. 
chance” detention centos on federal lands where felons under die 
age ofl 8 will work on environmental cleanup preiectswhile provid- 
ing low-cost labor for the Natkmall^ScTVKe,. 

Under a Senate resolution passed in November, the Youth Envi- 
ronmental Service camps wiB be admirdstoedjointly by. the Justice 
and Interior Apartments. Other YES ramps are bang-planned in 
Utah, and at tbe National Arboretum in Washington, while the 
Department of Agriculture is looking at setting nhrilar camps in 
national forests in Oregon, Norti (Srcfinatmd In dian a. - 

The Florida comp, based at the ate oS an abandoned sawmill, will 
be home to as many as 20 young cffendereconyictalof crimes such 
as murder, rape and violent robbery. Under the direction of oounsd- 
ors rather than guards, they will spend up toa year dealing trails and 
building boardwalks. They also wiB reooye counseling ana vocation- 
al training. f-WJ) 

WiMuMphliVoto Invalidated for Fraud 

PHILADELPHIA —Baying Ptdaddphia’s dection system had 
collapsed under the "massive scheme” of a Democratic candidate to 
steal a state Senate election in November, a federal judge has taken 
the rare step of invalidating the election and has ordered the seat 
filled bv the Republican candidate. - • ■ ; ' ' 

Tbe action did for the Repobficsns what the Section had not: It 
enabled them to regain costal of the state Senate, which they lost 
two years ago. 

Judge Clarence G Newcomer of VS. District Court ruled that the 
Democratic candidate, Wflfiam G. Stinson, had stolen the Action 
from Bruce S. Marks in North PMftdefohia’s 2d Senatorial District 
through an elaborate fraud in whidi hundreds of residents' were 
encouraged to vote by absentee ballot even though they had no kjpl 
reeson, such as a physical dfcabifity or a scheduled mp outside tee 

“fa man y 1 S *nstanc«. according te Republicans who testified at a 
four-dav hearing last week, Democraoccampaign wxkersfosged 
dozens of names on absentee halloa of pedpk who woe fivii^ m 
Puerto Rica serving time in prison and, m op? case, had bccn acad 
for some. time. - . - : * . ' 


US. Aides 
Propose 
Returning 
To Unesco 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
State Department has recommend- 
ed to President Bill Clinton that the 
United States rejoin the United 
Nations Educational, Scientific 
nnri Cultural Organization. 

Under the Reagan administra- 
tion, tbe United Stales withdrew 
from the Paris-based Unesco 10 
years ago on the grounds that it was 
wasting money and was hostile to 
free enterprise and a free press. 

In making the recommendation, 
the State Department has advised 
waiting until late 1995 at tbe earli- 
est, and more likely until 1997, say- 
ing there is no money in the 1995 
budget, and perhaps not the next 
year’s, to cover tbe $65 million in 

annnnl dues. 

Tbe White House has failed to 
act on tbe recommendation for 
more than four mpnihs, officials 
said, because il ia snort cf cash and 
because K fears that conservative 
groups wiU vigorously oppose any 
dedskm to rejoin. . v ; 

An interagency working group, 
beaded by the State Department, 
called for rejoining after conclud- 
ing that Unesco was now managed 
much more efficiently and bad be- 
come less ideological. 

In addition, the working group 
^md Unesco was now working on 
many activities that Washington 
'enthusiastically supports: a global 
-literacy project, special education 
programs far women and giris. pro- 
jects' supporting freedom of the 
press, and education programs cm 
the environment and rat fighting 


Just Before Talks, Mexican Rebels Toughen Stance 


By Tim Golden 

Slew York Times Scrncc 

MEXICO CITY — On the eve 
of talks to resolve the peasant 
uprising in the southern state of 
Chiapas, the rebels’ militaiy com- 
mander discounted government 
hopes of a prompt settlement 
saying his troops woo Id lay down 
their arms only after fundamental 
changes were made to democra- 
tize tbe Mexican political system. 

In an interview at a safe bouse 
in tbe mountains of Chiapas, tbe 
rebel leader, who catk hinwtf 
Commander Marcos, said his Za- 
patista National Liberation Army 
would also demand broad auton- 
omy for Indian regions of the 
country and a reorientation of tbe 
government’* economic policies. 

The Tapntisias * insistence on 
sweeping political and economic 





1 


. -y i* 4 1 


sf'44JBas 


^•jr %.•**'* 




■mm 






mem officials announced that the 
insurgents had agreed to narrow 
their agenda to the problems of 
Chiapas. Mexico’s second-poor- 
est state. 

Officials bad described that 
condition as essential to persuad- 
ing hard-line members in the ad- 
ministration of President Carlos 
Salinas de Gortari io support a 
negotiated settlement. 

But Commander Marcos, said 
the rebels had accepted the agen- 
da only under 'government pres- 
sure to get the dialogue started. 
He said they had never put aside 




s BPS** • 



Ocmdo Maptflon/Agcna Frana-Prcw 

Red Cross membors during a patrol in tbe mountains near San Cristobtf de las Casas to offer assistance to refugees. 


The rebels' stand appears con- 
siderably tough" than what gov- 


If tbe United States decides to 
rqoin, that will close a chapter on 
the Cdd War fights between Wash- 
ington and Moscow in which 
American officials worried that So- 
viet-backed ideologues had too 
modi sway ova powerful interna- 
tional organizations. 

Since becoming secreianuener- 
al of Unesco in 1988, Federico 
Mayor Zaragpza of Spain, has 
hoped to woo back the United 
States. He has worked to make the 
organization’s programs more 
practical and less political and to 
cut fat from the budget. He has 
sla&ed' Unesco’s payroll to 2^00 
workers from slightly more than 
4,000. 


their demands for national eminent representatives are ex- 
change and would not sign a peeling to hear when they sit 
pace agreement that did not ful- down with 15 rebel leaders and 
fill them. Catholic Church mediators Mon- 

“We cannot believe that there day in the colonial dry of San 
can be a democratization of the Cnstobdl de las Casas, 
state of Chiapas or the municipal- Several officials have rejected 

ities where the Zapatista National the Zapatistas’ position as impos- 
Liberation Army is located but able. .And allbough Commander 
not the rest of the country," he Marcos said the rebels would not 
said. “We don’t fool ourselves, break a cease-fire that has held 
Either the democratic process is for five weeks unless attacked, 
national or there is not a demo- others raised the prospect that the 


crane process. 


conflict might drag on well be- 


yond the presidential elections 
scheduled for Aug. 21. 

“We cannot give up things that 
wiB destabilize the political order, 
the social order or the basic eco- 
nomic strategy of the govern- 
ment,” Manuel Camacho Sobs, 
the president's envoy to the talks, 
said in an interview Friday in 
Mexico City. “The cost of doing 
that would be to increase conflict 
rather than reduce it." 

Tbe Zapatista demands dearly 
represent z bargaining position. 
But they also seem to reflect the 
rebels* belief that in the weeks 


since they declared war on the 
state just as the North American 
Free Trade Agreement took effect 
on Jan. 1. they have galvanized an 
opposition io Mr. Salinas's poli- 
cies that transcends their fixniied 
military suength. 

“What is at stake in Chiapas is 
no linger just Chiapas or even 
Mexico, but perhaps even the 
free-trade agreement or the whole 
neoliberal project in Latin Ameri- 
ca,” Commander Marcos said, re- 
ferring to the wave o» economic 
changes in Mexico and other Lat- 
in American countries. 


These have included openings 
to foreign trade, the privatization 
of slate enterprises and the resto- 
ration of growth with little if any 
improvement in the lives of the 
poor. 

“Not because we have that 
moral force,” Commander Mar- 
cos added, “but because people 
are saying, ‘All right, what hap- 
pened’here? What is going to hap- 
pen elsewhere? What costs are 
there going to be?* ” Motioning to 
the three reporters before him, he 
added, “If mat were not true, you 
ail would not be here.” 


Farrakhan Is Welcome, NAACP Says 


New York Times Service han And the Nation of Islam, which 

BALTIMORE— Leaders of the has /been criticized recently for 
National Association for tbe Ad- ami- Semitic and anti- white re- 
vancement of Colored People in- maiks by one of its senior officials. 


told to invite Louis Farrakhan to a 
meeting of prominent Macks, de- 
spite outside criticism. 

Speaking after a meeting of tbe 
NAACPs board, its leaders said 
the group would resist any pressure 
to distance itself from Mr. Farrak- 


he decisions and actions of the 
CP are made by the leader- 


at Kean CoDege in Union, New 
Jersey, a chief deputy of Mr. Far- 
rakhan’s, Khalid Abdul Muham- 
mad, said Jews were the ’‘blood- 
suckers of the black nation." 

.After widespread public criti- 


shib of the NAACP,” said William ^sm. Mr. Farrakhan demoted Mr. 
Gibson, chairman of the associa- Muhammad, describine the tone of 


Cor Air Bogs Hazardous 
To Infants, Agency Says 


Quote/UnqiKrter- i, - ^ 

President CKnton, addressing the nation: “T havenot sept Ameri- 
can around units into Bosnia. And I will not send Amencan ground 
forcS to impose a settlement that the parties to ftat conf&t do not 
But America’s interests and the resppnabihties of Amenca’s 
leadership demand our active involvement m the' search for * 
solution.” 


Away From Politics 


By Frank Swoboda 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Parents 


lion's national board. ‘’Other 
groups may request, may implore, 
may even demand, but that does 
not change our posture in regards 
to how we make decisions." 

Speaking of Mr. Farrakhan. 
Benjamin Chavis, an NAACP di- 
rector, said on Saturday, “He is 
invited, and we will welcome him to 
the summit.” 

The NAACP, which is sponsor- 
ing the meeting, has yet to decide 


Muhammad, describing tbe tone of 
his remarks as “repugnant.” But 
Mr. Farrakhan defended tbe con- 
tent of the remarks. 

The uproar has put the NAACP 
in a delicate position. Tbe group 
has recently’ tried to forge closer 
ties with the Nation of Islam, as 
have other prominent blacks like 
Representative Kweisi Mfutne, 
Democrat of Maryland, chairman 
of tbe Congressional Black Cau-! 


seat passenger by the 1998 model its location and date, though offi- cus: Representative Maxine Wa- 


never should let their infant cfafl- and 


year. 

Light trucks, including minivans 


-diea ride In the front seat of a car 
Chat has a passenger-side air bag, 
according to the ILS. government. 


ir infant chfl- and pickups, which now make up 
it seat of a car nearly 40 percent of tbe U.S. mar- 
r-sidc air bag, ket, must nave double air bags by 
. government. 1999. Pickup trucks and some small 


rials said it would be held this year. 
Last November, in a fiery speech 


ters. Democrat of California; and 
the Reverend Jesse Jackson. 


The National Highway Traffic 

Safety Adarinistratirasays that if b ® caus « often Jjj» 

an ah- bag deploys, a chfld faring backseat* and cMdren must be 
ihi» hu Jofotv canred m car seats m the front 

All 50 states and the District of 
experts, conld be lolled, or severely Qjjnmbia hare laws requiring driv- 

. ... , .... . . . - ers to secure children in safety 


Would-Be de Gaulle Killer 
Is Dead in Paraguay at 71 


We fly to 
the For East 
more often 
than any 
other airline. 


injured^ 

' Many parents put their infants in 
the front seal so they can keep an 


The Associated Press 

many ^micuwpuiiunj uuuu^ seats. PARIS — Georges Walin. who 

the front seat so they can keep an ^ ini{ic ^ ^ it took pan in one of the assassm3- 

eye on them, retrieve u»r pacifiers would require the manufacturers of *wn attempts against President 
or comfort them when they cry. safety seal s to put warning Charles de Gaulle that inspired the 

■ Although safety experts agree labels on than stating that children 1571 n°vd by Frederick Forsyth 


The find irf a new d*® 0 * stake ihiigs sharply reduces ^ risk -of 

found that the mrft°ne. oM Uffirn^rorajoprc^ brain 
r^}7f ram hemorrhaging, an often lethal medics] disaster that occurs 
inside the head. Dr,.Kassefl,smd that if 


er to Spain. He settled in Paraguay 
in 1965. 

in his last years. Mr. Warin lived 
in a small bouse on an allowance 
from the French Consulate. He suf- 


-SrneMs. Walkers story. “Rosclily,” because hoffendcdaconser- 

■ ' rlrwt 

asssssss^SSSSSL- 

was^ftenuutinnun penally,: 

THa New Yoik City Transit Artbrnily has f* nearly 40,000 fwe 
‘ ,h over S50QJ W0. into^ciratiacop in six weds wh no 
SlSWSJVl *> of ftnnd, oeknub ay., 

AP, Reuters, LAT, NYT 


--.Although safety experts agree labels on them stating that children 
that the rear seal is the safest place never should be put in the front 
in (he car in the event of a crash, yai in a car equipped with a pas- 
they also say the rear-faring child's senger-side air bag. 
safety seat NTers protection even in 5 ^ that airbags do not ore- 
the front of the car. sml a hazard to older children. *But 

But the air baghas changed that it recommended that all children in 
When the child’s seat is strapped safety seats sit in the back, 
into the front seat there isn’t 

enough room in most cars to allow 
the air bag* to inflate fully without 

damming into the car seaL , . _ 

' The bag inflates with such force To our readers in Gemmiy 
that the impact can snap a baby's ks new been easier 

neck or severe brain damage. to sdsri* and sow 

although tbe traffic safety agency r' |U fr°f, 

fii^mSSSsas 

The govenunent warning comes ~~ 

at a time when more cars are being from Austin 

equipped with dnver and passenger mflia toa-free 06608155 

air bags. All cars manufactured for be 06069 175413. 

sale in tire United States must have 
air bags for the driver and front- 


1971 novel by Frederick Forsyth fered from arthritis and had been 
and tbe 1973 film The Day of the bedridden since undergoing sur- 
Jackal,” has died at his home in gery last year. 


Paraguay. He was 71. 

Mr. Watin, condemned to death 
in absentia in 1963 but pardoned in 
an amnesty in 1 968, died of a bean 
attack Saturday at home outside 
tbe capital, Asuncion, a Foreign 
Ministry spokeswoman said. 

Algerian-born, Mr. Watin op- 
posed de Gaulle's derision in July- 
1962 to recognize Algerian inde- 
pendence. 

On Aug. 22, 1962, bullets shat- 
tered tbe windows of de Gaulle's 
limousine as it rolled through a 
Paris suburb, but the president was 
unscathed. Mr. Watin, one of nine 
persons convicted of planning tbe 
attack, fled to Switzerland and lai- 


An Epidemic Follows 
S umatr a Earthquake 

The AssLciated Press 

JAKARTA — An epidemic of 
diarrhea has broken mu among the 
survivors or tbe earthquake that 1 
killed at leas 215 people on Suma- 
tra Island. 

Poor sanitation In tem dues that 
provide tbe only shelter for the tens 
of thousands left homeless is caus- 
ing the outbreak, said Djauhari Ta- 
Ub, who heads the emergency medi- 
cal operation in Liwa, the town 
nearest the epicenter of the 
Wednesday quake. 



Singapore Airlines offers you 42 flighis from 14 
European cine? to Singapore cverv week. All connect to 
aver 300 flights to the Far East, Australia and New 
Zealand, and of course, all have inflight service even * 
other airlines talk about. SinGAPQRE AIRUHES 







RUSSIA: Extraordinary Changes Have Occurred, but the Old Ways Are Proving Tenacious 


Continued (ran Page 1 

irreversibly on a path of Western- 
style development, or whether it is 
only passing through another of its 
short-lived lurches. 

□ 

Mulling Russia's plight, an old 
woman at the fanners' market 
reached for old folk wisdom: The 
Russian, she declared, won’t budge 
until the roasted rooster pecks him 
in the rear. 

These days, that son of wisdom 
is invoked so often that it takes on 
the quality of a self-fulfilling 
prophesy, as if it is a given that all 
Russia’s endeavors are doomed to 
founder in some congenital Rus- 
sian inertia. 

True, Russia has won extensive 
freedoms, it has changed in many 
ways, and despite upheavals, it has 


so far avoided collapse, civil war 
and revival of dictatorship. The 
subways still run, Moscow streets 
are clogged with cars, and there has 
been no mass hunger. 

But the failures are glaring. The 
gap with the West has not been 
closed, as Mr. Gorbachev promised 
in 1985, and economists wonder 
how the country will make it 
through spring. 

Instead of shaping a new middle 
dass. the weakening of state con- 
trol has fostered crime. A report 
recently prepared for Mr. Yeltsin 
said that up to 80 percent of all 
private enterprises in Russia were 
paying heavy tribute to the the ar- 
mies of racketeers and bandits that 
have sprouted across Russia. 

Streets that once knew no crime 
have become dangerous. An order- 
ly at Moscow's First City Hospital 


reported an average of 40 serious 
mugging victims daily. Eight lead- 
ing rankers have been killed in the 
last year. 

Haphazard credit and export 
have enabled a handful of 
to amass fortunes, 


last year from the fifth to the third 
leading cause of death. 

□ 

To many Russians, the Decem- 
ber election was disheartening not 
only because of the large vote for 
the extreme nationalist Vladimir V. 


'Russia is not an underdeveloped or a 
developing country. It’s a misdeveloped 
country.’ 

A Western baHmeseman 


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which they flaunt in the finest tra- 
dition of the old Russian mer- 
chants, racing through Moscow in 
their exotic sedans with heavily 
aimed bodyguards. 

Except for a small fraction that 
has found support abroad, the in- 
tellectual elite of the Soviet Union 
— scientists, professors and writers 
— feels increasingly forsaken and 
alienated. 

Optimists justify the negative 
factors as an unattractive but nec- 
essary process of “primary capital 
accumulation.” But little of that 
capital has stayed in Russia; the 
government estimates that S25 bO- 
Gon has gone in the last two years 
to Switzerland, Austria, Cyprus, 
North America and other distant 
havens. 

Life expectancy, low in the old 
Soviet Union, has sunk further 
with deteriorating health care; 

According to new figures, the life 
expectancy for men dropped from 
62 in 19%2 to 59 in 1993, while 
infant mortality rose from 17.8 per 
1,000 to 19.3. Trauma deaths — 
accidents, suicides, murders, mili- 
tary casualties, poisonings — rose 


Zhirinovsky, but also because bare- 
ly 50 percent of the electorate both- 
ered to vote at all. 

The vote has been extensively 
dissected in Russia and abroad. AD 
agree that those who stayed away 
and those who voted for Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky did so above all to register 
anger at the impoverishment, inse- 
curity, crime and mismanagement 
that have marked recent years. 

As many of the states emerging 
from Communist dictatorships 
have learned, only when people 
have enough to eat do they really 
embrace democracy. 

A growing number of Russians 
have come to realize that seven de- 
cades of systematically suppressing 
initiative and demonizing enter- 
prise have left a mind-set that wiD 
take at least a generation to alter. 
□ 

“Russia is not an ‘underdevel- 
oped’ or a ‘developing' country,” a 
Western businessman mused. “It’s 
a misdeveloped country.” 

The evidence is everywhere. Rus- 
sian cosmonauts soar over primi- 
tive villages listing in mud, their 
gnarled meat wasted by vodka. Rns- 



FLAXES... 


Do not miss die 
Fdbruray 24th edition 
of the international 
Herald Tribune. 


YOU WILL HAVE A UNIQUE SURPRISE! 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


PERSONALS 


MAY THE SACHS Hbotj of Jw be 
adored Ihraoahool the worid, now 
and fa ever. Wed Heart of Jew. 
pray far w Saint Jude, vmriosr of 
m i rodea, pray far us. Sant Judo. Mp 
of the hqptfan, pay far us. Amn. 
Say Ns prayw nme Anas a day, by 
fa ninth day your prayer wfl be 
a nsw er ed ft nos neve been known to 
fad P u b E caton nut be promaed. 
Ttxnk you Sacred Heart of Jots aid 
Scat Jude far d) pray ws onw er ed 
Pieces continue la loaii after os. 

MDL 


VALENTINE 

REPLIES 


FOR MY LOVH.Y TWO MOTHS. 


FertfvHang Xon^SingaporeMaiKwi 
I wfl always heasure these pebais 
. God I aw them ! 


I wfl sing k> Uou and you d day fang. 
I lave you so much and Uoundw me 
’ happy^lfappy Vafanteie ad 
" Moth I 

BOTH 


"HOW DOB IT AIL BEGM? 
Who Knows. And Why? Sane Answer, 
ton Sniffle. 


The aid Dtramtan - „ 

pnmaL wrarfir'g way bod and far 
down Something wheperma deep- 
My dew BT. you ore tauter than s* 
rest. Gxit wot to vmAz slowly with you 
in Guta Bend Je "WaFy I tame bad 
to youl Qudta. 

hflGHTS IN GBffVA ABE COLD Her 
love far you never grows ctdfa Kyra 
bis Murk and both nave a lad. Soon 
Jen yd return to the fold. 


HUNTRB5, 
fax hearts now. 
Hw*et 


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sian athletes reap Olympic gold 
while Siberian coal miners die in 
Dickensian befl-holes. 

The new rich shed sheaves of 
$100 notes at new discotheques and 
casinos, while old women huddle in 
tenements wondering where to 
raise the $200 that the cheapest 
burial now costs. 

These extremes of extraordinary 
achievement and oppressive' back- 
wardness, this image of an outside 
world perpetually leaving Russia 
behind, have fed the widespread 
conviction among Russians that 
they are different, that they stand 
apart with a destiny of their own. 

The notion of “Holy Russia” 
runs deep, of a people lacking the 
German s mdustriousness or the 
American's entrepreneurship, but 
endowed with unique spirituality 
and mission. 

One fateful variation on that te- 
net was the Bolsheviks' conviction 
that Russia was destined to pave 
the way to a new order. The con- 
temporary version is the argument 
among nationalis ts and fl m n r m i- 

nisutnat the way of the West is not 
for Russia, that it must follow hs 
own coarse, taking into account its 
“collectivist” traditions and spiri- 
tual values. 

□ 

The bold ambition of the first 
team of reformers assembled by 
Mr. Yeltsin — young, Western-ori- 
ented economists led by Mr. Gai- 
dar, then 35 — was to break the 
ancient cycle. 

Instead of trying to restore the 
powers of the fallen Soviet state 
and attempting another reform by 
diktat, they tried something new — 
to curb the state. 

When Mr. Gaidar freed prices on 
Jan. 1, 1992, he surrendered one of 
the government's most powerful 
ec ono mic levers. The subsequent 
program to distribute "privatiza- 
tion vouches” was in part an ai- 

S l to convince Russians that 
of item had a tangible share 
in their state. 

Finally, the r e f orm er s tried to 
choke sooalism into submission by 
clamping controls on credits and 
money printing. 

The reformers breached the de- 
fenses, but then stalled. Within sev- 
eral months the political opposi- 
tion hardened. Military and 
industrial lobbies, backed by par- 
liament and the Central Bank, 
forced the reformers to fight .a rear- 
guard battle against inflation in- 
stead of moving on structural re- 
forms. None of the internal or 
foreign investment that aright have 
generated progress materialized. 

The resignations of Mr. 
and the finance minister, Boris G. 
Fyodorov, concluded the first 
phase of Russian reform. Mr. Cher- 
nomyrdin vowed that reform 
would continue, but what be meant 
scented more a neo-Soviet reform 
from cm high thaT1 the withdrawal 
of the state that Mr. Gaidar tried. 




Is to Blame 
For Deaths 

The Associated Pros 

^JOHANNESBURG — Ndsan 
Mandela on Sunday impliatly 
blamed Iris black rival, unef 
. Mangpsuthu Butfrdezi, for a mas- 
sacre of -young African National 


♦ 


..... Mr. . Mandela* the ANC .leadfir, 
accused the head of the Zulu-based 
Ink&iha Freedom Party of fanning 
violence with his opposition to the 
' country's first gQ-gace 'ejection. 


ISRAEL: Changing Relationship- 


3 Afghan Gunmen Hold 

16 Pakistani Children 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — 
Three Afghans armed with pistols 
and hand grenades said they would 
release 16 Pakistani schoolchildren 
kidnapped rat Sunday rally after 
food supplies were delivered to the 
bdeagaercd Afghan capital, Ka- 
bul. 


Confined froD Page 1- 

self-rule goes awiy, hopes for an 
end to thesk^e mentality- that has 
always dominated land coaid be 

iltnhwl . ; 

But there are sig ns that Jews in- 
the Diaspora already think Israel's 
survival is no longer as threatened 
as it once was. Israeli military lead- 
ers acknowledge that brad faces 
fewer threats to its existence today 
than at almost any time in its histo- 
ry. As a result, Jews abroad are 
drifting focus to the problems of 
asamSarion, for example, md to a 
new interest in the history and 
meaning of the Holocaust. ' 

Even as Load’s leaders express 
hope for a new era of peace and 
prosperity, however, they are not 
giving up cadi from abroad. This 
includes not only the $3 billion in 
annual U.S. foreign aid, but also $2 
billion a year in private donations 
to support social, educational, cul- 
tural, political and civic institu- 
tions. 

The latest debate over this lar- 
gess was opened by Deputy For- 

X Minister Yossi Bohn, a leftist 
was an architect of the agree- 
ment with the Palestinians. Speak- 
ing to the Women’s In ternational 

Zionist Organization, Mr. Betfin 
said money from abroad might be 
better spern on Jewish education in 
the donor’s country and . to help 
bring teenagers to Israel for visits. 

“If our economic situation is bet- 
ter than in many of your coun- 
tries,” he said, “bow can we go on 
asking for charity?” 

Anrid howls of protest, Mr. Bei- 
lin added: “You want me to be .the 
beggar and say we need the money 
for the pora people. Israel is a_rich 
country, I'm sorry to tdl you.” . 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 


reacted with fury, denouncing Mr. 
Beffin’s remarks as “moreme; ■ 

- Fund-raisers also reacted with 
alarm. “The whole thing was foot 
ish to say, it was a terrible bhm- 
.dex/’ said Raya Jagiom, president 
of the Women's International 71- 

rmfcf fTr g n ntyatinn “World Jewry 

Wanted to be partners; they wanted 
. to participate ( in building the 
state:” . 

In the late 1970s^one California 
fund-raising appeal Cor Israel fear 
tured a picture of a washing ma- 
chine, and. called -on 'Jews to con- 
tribute to their - poor cousins in 
outlying Israeli “development” 
towns who did not have such a 
modem appliance. The campaign 
was a big success: But times have 
change d, and Israelis- today enjoy 
not' only washing madmtes, but ' 
also tbe latmiapancse cars- and; 
compact disc players. 

En Sagi, an dcononristaiid jfirecr 
tor of Economic Models Ltd; said 
Israel could easfly* septa* dona- 
tions from abroad by boreovnng. 
“Israel is not desperately 'deptm- 
derrt on the sooney now, he said. 
“Suppose they cut if off fra whatev- 
er reasrai. Oar standard of living 
will. drop by perhaps 1 percent Ift 
riot a very big deal” ! < . 

What the money from abroad 
does provide is a safety net in a 
wide variety of services thallsraeti 
governments do not fund. The 
women's International Zooist Or- 
ganization; for example, rims a 
^shelter fra .prisy^apvides hdp far 
single 1 motiKxs,offers legal' advice- 
to immigrants arid runs 167 day 
care centers. “The government 
couldn’t do it,” raid Mbs Jagiom. 

Likewise, Teddy Edlek, Jertisa-. 
lem's framer mayor, raised money 
from around the wosld : tD under- 
write public works and other pro- 
jects. ’ ’ ’■ 


■ oos and knives on Saturday to 
: 13 ANC stqjportxss 13 <rf them ‘ 

teenagers — preparing for a voter) 
education program in a Natal vil- 
lage 500 kflosnetos (300 miles)' 
sonthcastof Jciuuinesbarg. 

' Mr.Macddadxd not name Ghief 
Bnthdezi,Tnit cited calls from leadr 
ers in the Natal region la resist the 
April 26-28 vot& . . 

- “One of tlH^n has gone so far as 
to say he does not want iota and to 
promise the people of Natal that 
tbere wiH be no Woodshed in the 
course of their campaign to disrupt 
the election,” Mr. Mandela said at 
a news conference: 

•• ^Grief p Tithriezi told a rally of his 
'fpIlowtTs last weekeod that bis call 
for mi election bc^cott could lead 
-to viotence. 

Natai is conadered an Inkatha 
st mngKnM, and much of the politi- 
cal^ ykdence_ there has been bttweea 
saptimteas of the ANC and In- 
kama. The pdice said Sunday that 
they had no dues to die identities 
of (he killers, but ANC officials 
were quick to lay blante. 

In a statement Sunday, Chief 
Buthderi said, “I condemn this 
carnage in the- strongest possible 
teons;nraraitybecanse(tfttwtrag- 
ic loss of Ufe of young people, but 
because such . acts.of viotence can 
only further polarize ran- society." 

Pctitical violence is .-expected to 
increase as South Africa prepares 
for flte.vote: Inkatha, fearing ANC 
dominance in a post-apartheid 
South Africa, opposes the election, 
and its leaden have called fra 
membriis to roast It peacefully. 

“Thosewho don’t wmt people to 
vote” were responsible for the mas- 
sacre,* local ANC official, Zabuse 
Mlaba, said Samrday. He said the 
Brea had prevkwsty been calm. 

. A pribce sergeant. Ben Lom- 
bard, said four attackers aimed 
with assaidt rifles opened fee on an 
abandoned house where the victims 
-were sleeping. They then hacked at 
the bodies of thor .victims with 
knives, he said. 

• TWyeof the dead were youths 
tmdear tiie age of 18, the police sirid. 

■ 3 Killed m Gan Batdes 

Three people were killed In gnu 
batties with the poEce on Sunday, 
Agcnce Francc-Presse reported 
frranJohannesbarg. 

The kflfirigs took Sunday’s death 
(oD m the Johannesburg region to 
five, according to the police, who 
said thc fight broke out in the Hack 
eastern, suburb of Tembisa when 
loe tried to stop a subjected stp- 
track. " 




BOOKS 


JOHN MAYNABD 
KEYNES: Vol. H, The 
Economist as Savior, 1920- 
1937 

By Robert Skidelsky. Illustrated 
731 pages. $37.50. Viking 

Reviewed by Christopher 
Lehmann-Haupt 

I N the fust volume of Us monu- 
mental biography, “John May- 
nard Keynes: Hopes Betrayed, 
1883-1920,” Robert Skidelsky fit 
together like the parts of a ma- 
trushka doll the multiple lives of his 
subject — the Bloomsbury aes- 
thete, Ihe Cambridge don, the gad- 
fly journalist, the currency speaila- 
lor, the lover of young men, the 
adviser to statesmen — and showed 
how Keynes was able to encapsu- 
late his seemingly conflicting per- 
sonae. 

In his second volume, subtitled 
“The Economist as Savior, 1920- 
1937;' Skidelsky, a professor of po- 
hticaJ economy at Warwick uni- 
versity, shows how the figure who 
emerged in Volume I proceeded to 
transform his composite character 
during the era between the two 
world wars. 

The homosexual fell in love with 
and married the ballerina Lydia 
Lopokova, much to the consterna- 
tion of the Bloomsbury set which 
wrongly predicted (hat the mar- 
riage wouldn’t last and never quite 
forgave the oouple when it did. And 
the journalist-don became the 
economist-statesman and wrote 
“The General Theory of Employ- 
ment, Interest and Money” (1936), 
perhaps the preeminent theory of 
economics of the 20th century. 

As Skidelsky portrays it, 
Keynes's personal transformation 
was Dot what it might superficially 
seem, a case of the rebel against 
Victorian conventionality scoring 
an image of respectability. To the 
contrary, by marrying Lopokova. 
Keynes was aUe to keep Ms artistic 
side alive as he moved into the 
realm at public affairs. This cre- 
ativity was not jost reflected in his 
buying of paintings and acting as 
Ms wife’s impresario, but also in 
the extent to which Ms economic 
theory achieved the stature of art. 

In describing that theray, the au- 
thor states that few economists in 
history have written as well as 
did. 

lepeatedly, Sdddslry stresses 


WHAT THEY’RE READING 


man at the U.S. Embassy’s 

office, is reading “Berim; Coming In 
From the Cold" by Ken Smith. 

“These are fascinating insights 
that are beautifully expressed by tMs 
British poet who was resident in 
Berlin at the time the Wall came 
down. It makes particularly interest- 
ing — and sometimes poignant — 
reading in tight of how Berlin has 
developed in the subsequent years.” 
(Michael KhDaibach, 1ST) 



letter to Keynes from Oswald Falk, 
a stockbroker and actuary who was 
Keynes's closest associate in the 
Qty; “3 wonder whether analysis is 
your fundamental mental process, 
whether it doesn't follow, with a 
somewhat grudging struggle at ra- 
tional justification, rather than pre- 
cede synthetic ideas, which are 
your real delight, and with which 
from time to time you startle and 
shock the majority. 

In a charming gumtiing up of the 

moral nature of economics, 
himself warned 

iofhis 

“One has to be constantly on guard 
against treating the material as 
constant and homogeneous. It is as 
though the fall of the apple to the 
ground depended on the apple's 
motives, on whether H is wrath- 
while falling to the ground, and 


whether the ground wanted (he ap- 
p ie to faE. ana on mistaken calcula- 
tions on the pari of the apple as .to 
how far it was from the center of 
(he earth.” ■ . , 

Of course the personal transfor- 
mation dial Skidelsky dramatizes 
in fids volume is not so organic or 
complete that h makes fra a seamr 
less stray. There are stiftiigany aides 
to Keynes: the journalist, .the 
teacher, the poEtiaan,-. the social 
animal, the committee member, the 
speculator who eventually amassed 
a fortune, the collector of paint- 
ings, the founder of the Cambridge 
Arts Theatre and the economist 
( A donnish idee that the author 
rites has it that while time was 
created to keep everything from 


edto 
ing in 


dge. Skidelsky has 


:■ Lehmann-Haupt- is 
onthe staff of Ihe New York'. 


BRIDGE 


Keynes i 
Repea 


ing. In the introduction to “The 
Economist as Savior,” he quotes a 


By Alan Truscott 

N ORM RUBIN of Mbnticedo, 
New York, who served as 
tournament co-chairman in the 
Tri-State Regional Championships 
in Port Chester, New York, report- 
ed the diagramed deal from the 
Swiss Teams. He was North, play- 
ing with Jon Green of Kingston; 
New York. East bid his hand ener- 
getically, showing his 5-6 distribu- 
tion in spades and diamonds. This 
permitted his partner to bid Gw' 
diamonds, an accurate advance 
save, doe to fafl by just one trick 
against an easy four hauls for 
North-South 

However. North naturally perse- 
vered to five hearts and South was 
in jeopardy at that leveL The spade 
jade was led and allowed to winl. 
South won tile nest spade lead with 
the a ce and drew two roonds-of 
trumps ending in bis hand. 


Since East .was known to-have a 
spado-diamond hand, it was res-' 
sooable to hope that West held the 

queen-jack of dubs. He therefore 
led a dub and when West played 
low finessed die ten. successfully. 
So far So good: The top dobs were 
cashed, and the spark loser in the 
dosed hand was discarded. But 
when South then led a diamond 
West was able to win and play, Ms 
remaining trump. With only one 
trump remaining in dBqmty.Sbuth. 
could not escape the loss of another 
diamond trick fra down one. 

. The post-mortem revealed jhat 
South could have n^tel^ craitraet 
if he had kdadnb^ without draw- 
ing any trumps. .He would. then 
have been able to draw one round 
of tramps, maneuver the ^padedis- 

card and snrrenrier a digm/wi .. 

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two diamond jruffs are scored,' but 
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had to create a narrative that keeps 
his subject from beco mi ng infinite- 
ly heavy. 

As" if he were taking apart the 
matnchka doll again, fie story he 
writes is varied to the paint of frag- 
Tnentffriness. TMs is by no means a 
bad thing. Sections of the densest 
theoretical analysis are followed by 
. fizri mje rifl g gossip. One moment 
; yduarfc laved by die liquid 
of Keynes: “Hthad every reason to 
be coibssally sdf-coufidenl, and so 
he was. The only obvious areas of 
matrost had to do with Ms physical 
appearaiKe and Us sprateng voice, 
fuseveswer 


:ioos ' 

He did his Best to tom himself into a 
nomiaHooking member of the Es- 
tablishment, Wifi militar y mOUS- 
tadie. and City suits whkh he wore 
even in fie cramtry.” 

Are the theoretical sections in- 
comprehensible to fie uninitiated? 
Wwhrath^^ranoLSkiddsky t 
has a gift for describing the terrain 
before he wades in. “The basic idea 
is that, fcAbwing asfamp m oofiut, 
fie economy is likidy to nmintne 
round a low level' indefinitely art- 
less 'something is deme* to improve 
investment prospects.” That is die 
essence of the iCeynesian revoln- 
tit^Erijnomieswerenrasdf-r^n' 
lating, as dasacal theory had held. 

■ Something had to be done, 


bdd two hearts and no dubs, in- 
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Page 5 



essons oj Sarajevo 



By William E. ScEumdt 

New York Times Service 

ZAGREB, Croatia — As Bosai- 

an Serbs begffix to give up fadr 
siege of Sai^evo last -week. after 22 
months; poHmg. bade guns and 
under threat of NATO air 
strikes, officials at the United Na- 
ftoos headquarters here wondered 
if they had found at last the right 
balance of men are and diplomacy 
to break Bosnia’s brutal cycle" of 
bloodshed and viokace. 

Sir Michael Rose; the British: 
general , who commands " United 
Nations peacekeepgng troops.- nr 
Bosma-Herz^ovina, wait so far as 
to say that theoperittxm-m Saraje- 
vo could be a model employed in 
other parts of the country, as lopg " 
as more UN peacekeepers are dis- " 
patched to Ms command. . 

“The logic that has been, applied 
hete and the processes that have 
been, agreed by the two dements 
involved are certainly applicable 
elsewhere, ""declared General Rose. 

- He did not say where that might 
be, biit then: is no shortage of can- 
didate sites, from Srebenica in east- 
ern Bosnia, Cat Off lw Rrnmmi 
Serbs, to the ancient Herzegovina 
city of Mostar. There, Bosnian 
Croats, backed by Croatian regu- 
lars, have enforced a brutal 
that m the fim mne dAys of Febru- 
ary atone kiQcd 37 people. •" 


_ The hrganodm of. wavin g Sc 
big stkk — and making it dear it 
.uul be used — does offer bompd- 
Hng possibilities. In Mostar, for ex- 
ample, the Croats would be highl y 
Susceptible to.threats of retaliation 
by the NorfaAtiaaircTreatyOrga- 
tazaboa, wore it to ever borne. to 

- NEWS ANALYSIS . 



Final Decision 
RestefiihljN 

C ompiiaiby Ow Sin&Fnpi Dirptndta 

AVIANO, Italy — NATO 
and the United Nations have 
established a joint chain of 
command to decide whether to 
launch air strikes in Bosnia, 
but the order for' the first at- 
tack rests, with the UN. 

Y asushi Akashi, representa- 
tive of die UN secretary-gen- 
eral, Butros Butros Ghali, 
would deride whether Bosnian 
Serbs have complied with NA- 
TO’s ultimatum to trice heavy 
arms from around Sarajevo. 

Me. Akashi would then re- 
lay his derision to Admiral 
Jeremy M. Bocffdaofthe Unit- 
ed States, commander of NA- 
TO’s southern forces/ln case 
of noncouroKance, 'Admiral 
Boorda wotdd give tho com- 
numd for air atiadcs to start 
(Reuters, AP). 


■ But even if the UN and NATO 
manage to enforce the Serbian 
withAuwriwitbomdioppiimurii!- 
glebombi UN strategists inZagrcb 
and elsewhere "caution thatitispre- 
, mature to conclude they have dis- 
covered some magic formula. The 
lessons of Sarajevo, they say, may 
not apply as well in other pans of 
the country, as a result of differ- 
ences in everything from imam to 
local grievances. 

- "Given the frustrations we have 
endured nntQ now in dealing with 
the -situation in theformer Yugo- 
slavia," a senior UN official said in 
Zagreb oh Sunday, "it would be 
foolish not to take a look at what 
we appear to have accomplished in 
.Sangevo,toseehowwccan apply it 
dsewhero- 

“But we have to be realistic: 

" atnation is different,- «id 
what worked in" Sarajevo wfll not 
necessarily work in central Bat 
. nit” . 

More important, there is wide- 
spread agreement that it is much 
too early to measure the tang-term 
consequences of the Sarajevo oper- 
ation, particularly since tbe threat 
of NATO strikes is still in the air. 
The siege of the Bosnian capital 
may have been broken, and the 
tiffing stopped for row, bot no one 
is wining yet to say what effect it 
will have on the larger conflict. 

Bosnian Muhins, in particular, 
are wary, and worry that using UN 
peacekeepers — especially Russian 
troops — to freeze the Serbian 
gains around the Bosnian capital 
has ohjy increased the Kketihood 
that. the city wiD be partitioned, 
fans serving a tang-held Serbian 
ambition.. 

Onehas only to lode to the situa- 
tion inside Croatia, they say, where 
UN operations to secure me peace, 
in areas seized bjr Belgrade-backed 
ethnic Serbs during the fighting in 
1991 have resulted in . a de facto 
partition of Croatia: Serbian rebels 
behind UN Enes now control over 


X) percent of Croatian territory, 
keeping lie Zagreb government 
out. " 

■ Moreover; breaking the siege of 
Sarajevo' raises an even more trou- 
bling question: Are both sides there 
now-frceio use their weapons dse- 
where? Although they nave lost 
some of their guns to UN control, 
Bosnian Serbs can now redeploy 
- the rest to other areas, perhaps for 
another offensive later this year, 
once the international furor over 
Sarajevo ebbs. 

Charles Dick, an analyst with tbe 
Center for Conflict Studies in Lon- 
don, said he expected to see the 
Serbs concentrate their forces 
around Muslim pockets in eastern 
Bosnia, uichiffing Srebrenica, Gor- 
azde and Zaapa, where they want 
to consolidate territory. 

The Muslims, too, may want to 
reinforce other fronts, perhaps in 
parts of central Bosnia, where the 
Bosnian Army has been fighting 
Croats. 

Despite these fears, however, 
some diplomats believe the combi- 
nation of events and circumstances 
in Sarajevo has brought interna- 
tional policy to a land of water- 
shed. Buoyed by Moscow’s dra- 
matic entrance onto the stage last 
week, when Russian troops were 
offered as an incentive to persuade 
the Serbs to back down, both Vitali 
L Churkin, the Russian special en- 
voy, and Foreign Minister Andrei 
Y. Kozyrev have urged that multi- 
national talks be convened imme- 
diately, to capitalize an the mo- 
mentum generated by tbe new 
situation created in Sarajevo. 

But success so far in breaking the 
siege of Sarajevo suggests that tbe 
United Nations may deride more 
may be gained by a step-by-step 
approach, cleaving off specific 
problems, like Mostar or Sreben- 
ica, to dear the way toward a later 
comprehensive settlement. 

Charles E Redman, the Ameri- 
can special envoy to the former 
Yugoslavia, was in Germany over 
the weekend, nudging Croats and 
MusHms to come to terms in cen- 
tral and western Bosnia. 

He declared flatly Saturday that 
the chance for peace between 
Croats and Muslims in Bosnia had 
been increased by what has hap- 
pened around Sarajevo. 

“I do believe,” be said, “that 
what has been happ ening with re- 
gard to Sarajevo has to encourage 
everybody in the process to think 
seriously about a solution and to 
realize there is help from the out- 
side wedd.” 



Mdn ViAadomK/Agoicr Ftmo-Piebc 

Crowds greeting Russians troops Sunday as they passed through Pale, Bosnta-Herzegovina, on their way to join UN forces in Sarajevo. 

BOSNIA: Threat of Air Strikes Appears to Diminish Bosnian Serbs 

Give Russians 


Continued from Page 1 
Defense Secretary Malcolm Rif- 
kind of Britain said of Serbian ef- 
forts to pufl back the big guns that 
have bombarded Sarajevo. “But 
the advice we have received is that 
it win not be possible to come to a 
conclusive judgment until mid- 
night has passed. It must be for 
those on the ground to advise as 
soon as physically possible after 
midnight whether compliance has 
occurred or not occurred.” 

By midnight, he meant midnight 
GMT, which is 1 A.M. Monday in 
Sarajevo. 

As tbe American and NATO 
ministers held their talks in Aviano, 
some of the 40 U5. combat planes 
that would attack targets around 
Sarajevo roared off from Aviano to 
patrol Bosnian skies as part of 
long- running operations to prevent 
unauthorized intrusion into Bosni- 
an airspace and to support UN 
forces on the ground there if they 
are asked to do so. 

Hundreds of Italians switched 
from their Sunday afternoon stroll 
to gather at the end of the runway 
with children and binoculars and 
watch the dull-gray American 
•lanes slice into overcast skies, 
for Bosnia. Tbe growl of 


jet engines echoed far into the night 
as tbe deadline approached. 

For F-16 pilots, Sarajevo is a 30- 
minute run from here, but the war- 
planes at Aviano are only one pan 
of a much larger force of some 170 
American, British, Dutch, French 
and Turkish airplanes at bases in 
Italy and on carriers in the Adriat- 
ic. 

Italy has offered tbe use of its 
bases, but not combat planes to 
bomb the former Yugoslavia if air 
strikes are ordered. Turkish pilots 
would patrol the skies over Bosnia 
but would not participate in 
strikes. 

By the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization's account, UN officials 
and commanders with peacekeep- 
ing troops on the ground must first 
reach an assessment of whether 
Bosnian Serbs have complied with 
the ultimatum and then deride 
whether to request NATO strikes 
against artillery that has not been 
moved or disabled. Just hours be- 
fore the deadline expired, the 
NATO ministers here declined to 
give a definitive assessment of the 
Bosnian Serbs' compliance with 
their demands. 

Mr. Perry, however, said UN 
forces on the ground had reported 


that they could visit aU of the Serbi- 
an gun positions in the exclusion 
zone around Sarajevo, and added 
that it would be regarded as “full 
compliance" if artillery pieces that 
could not be moved were disabled 
and placed under UN guard. 

The seeming hesitancy of the 
NATO ministers as the’ deadline 
approached for what could be the 
alliance's first-ever combat mission 
also reflected concerns about the 
ability of American and other 
planes to carry out strikes in tbe 
bad weather that has dogged Bos- 
nia for weeks. 

In recent days, American pilots 
based at Aviano have said that low 
douds and snow could hamper 
their missions, despite the ad- 
vanced technology of the F-16. FA- 
18. F-I5E and A- 10 planes sta- 
tioned at tbe base. 

Mr. Perry said bad weather con- 
stituted a “significant handicap" 
for aircraft seeking to identify and 
lock onto targets in the heavily 
wooded and snowbound Bosnian 
terrain. 

“Weather could be a hindrance 
to air operations, but it will not 
stop them completely," he said. 


Warm Welcome 

AgerhY Fnmce-Presse 

PALE Bosnia- Herzegovina - 
Several-hundred Bosnian Serbs 
cheered Sunday as Russian soldiers 
drove through Pale heading for the 
front lines near Sarajevo, where it is 
hoped here that their presence will 
deter the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization from launching air 
strikes. 

Initial units from among the 400- 
sirong Russian paratrooper force, 
which is to join United Nations 
forces around Sarajevo, were given 
a boisterous welcome by the inhab- 
itants of this self-proclaimed Bos- 
nian Serbian capital, 30 kilometers 
(15 miles) from Sarajevo. 

From Pale, the Russian contin- 
gent was to travel to Lukavica, tbe 
main Serbian-held barracks, on tbe 
outskirts of Sarajevo. Earlier Sun- 
day. an advance party of Russian 
officers met with UN Protection 
Force officials to work out the de- 
ployment of the Russian troops. 

The Russians’ convoy of about 
100 trucks transporting troops and 
military equipment extended for 
several kilometres. 


MOOD: 

Price of Peace 

Cod runted from Page 1 

tbe high point of the city's exis- 
tence: “Yes! Yes! Go! Go!" the 
men. a mixture of ethnic national- 
ities, shouted. Then she fell and the 
men slapped the bar and groaned 
in disappointment. 

“That’s the way it used to be 
here," said Anin Tomic, a doctor at 
Kosevo Hospital which parches up 
the wounded and sorts out the dead 
when the mortar sheds fall. The 
daughter of a Croatian father and a 
Montenegrin woman now married 
to a Serb who is serving with the 
Muslim-led Bosnian government 
army, she sat around tbe table with 
her friends, two Muslims. “I want 
to cry." 

At Oslobodjenje. the daily news- 
paper that has stubbornly kepi 
publishing from the basement of its 
bombed-out building near the 
front line, reporters were huddled 
around a wood-burning stove, 
chain-smoking, grumbling that 
they were not allowed into the 
press pools the United Nations was 
organizing And they were wonder- 
ing, like many people in Sarajevo, if 
tbe evolving peace plan meant that, 
finally, their dty was to be divided 
with something like ihe so-called 
green lines that cut across Cyprus 
or BeiiuL 

“They will probably create lines 
of division of the city.” said Rasim 
Cerimagic. the political editor. “It 
will be a new status quo. and it will 
last for years." 

Like others in Sarajevo, be point- 
ed out that simply silencing the 
guns last week did not end the 
siege. Tbe city is still surrounded, 
its roadways cut off, water and 
electricity fitful most of its normal 
life throttled. 

“Sarajevo re main s a closed city,” 
he said. “For us, aD that tbe ultima- 
tum means is that there won't be 20 
people killed in a day. We will get 
only two or three from snipers. Our 
death penalty has been replaced by 
a life sentence.” 

A high government official, 
slumped tiredly in his office late 
last week after days of shuttle con- 
sultations by United Nations offi- 
cials and diplomats, agreed that a 
partition or the Sarajevo area now 
seemed inevitable. He also worried 
that the withdrawal of the heavy- 
weapons would only mean more 
brutal fighting elsewhere in Bosnia. 

The neighborhood coffee shops, 
the newspaper, the hospital and 
countless other institutions the 
people have buOt have done far 
more than the sometimes bumbling 
government to keep tbe city alive, 
grimly dinging to its tradition 
urbanity. 


tr 

5 


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Page 6 


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1994 


OPINION 


Rcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PV WASHED WITH THE NEW VI AUK TIMES AND THE WASHlfH.TIWI POST 


A Russian 'Contribution’ 


Relief for Sarajevo? 


With luck, Bosnia’s Serbs would have 
pulled out or yielded their siege guns around 
Sarajevo by the time the United Nations ulti- 
matum eamm doe Sunday night. That dear- 
able result was perhaps more likely to happen 
after President Bill Clinton's renewal of his 
pledge on Saturday to send American planes 
m NATO on an enforcement mission if the 
Serbs do not fully comply. He is detennined, 
and for good reason, to try to restore at least 
some part of the credibility that NATO and 
the United States with it have lost in their 
dithering over the 22-month-old Bosnia wax. 

Mr. Clin ton gave Moscow credit for making 
a “very important contribution*' with its initia- 
tive to dispatch Russian peacekeeping troops to 
Bosnia — under a UN nag The action is 
immediately important in helping the Serbs 
decide to bow to the UN Sarajevo ultimatum. 

There remains for us an element of uncer- 
tainty and anxiety about this action, too. No 
one can be 100 percent cer tain where it wiQ 
lead. Will Russia move into a more active nrfe 
in the overall Bosnia government talks? 

The early are that Russia means to 
become a political advocate for the Serbs, while 
expecting the United States to speak more for 
the interests of the Muslim-led Bosnian govern- 
ment, as Washington has been doing. That 
would put Russia and America in a posture of 
competing and cooperating at the same time. 


Abrupt Russian Move 


Russia, after days of pouting over feeling 
shoved aside by NATO in Sarajevo, has dra- 
matically and unilaterally rewritten the script 
by cutting a deal with Bosnian Serbs and 
moving Russian troops into place around the 
besieged Bosnian capital Taken by surprise, 
Washington had little immediate choice but 
to accept Moscow’s fait accompli. But it most 
not back off from its own principles and 
policies merely to let Boris Yeltsin please 
Russian nationalists who want to shift Mos- 
cow’s policy in the Balkan* toward a more 
partisan and coofroniatianal path. 

Acting independently America and other 
Western powers, Moscow worked out its own 
arrangement on Thursday with Bosnian Serb 
leaders. It provides for withdrawal of Serbian 
artillery from the Sarajevo area in exchange for 
the deployment of Russian troops there under a 
United Nations flag. Russia’s abrupt move 
could wok out weO for everyone if it simply 
r ep r es en ts a face-saving way for the Serbs to 
pull back their big guns. Besides saving Saraje- 
van lives, that would spare NATO from having 
to follow through on a risky bombing cam- 
paign, and would ease the growing pressure on 
Moscow from Rusaan nationalists. 

But, unsettlingly, Russia insists that its deal 
“negates” the Feb. 9 NATO ultimatum, which 
threatened air strikes unless Serbian artillery 
around Sarajevo was either pulled back or 
placed under UN control. Moscow also wants 
Sarajevo under direct UN administra- 
tion. But that would wrongly erode the au- 
thority of the Bosnian government, effectively 
potting it out of business. 

President KB Clinton and other NATO 
leaders must make three things dear at once: 


Any Russian troops deployed around Saraje- 
vo should be under unambiguous UN com- 
mand. The Headlin e on withdrawing or sur- 
rendering control over Serbian artillery still 
stands. And the West will not coerce the 
Bosnian government into peace arran ge ments 
that it reasonably resists. 

Still unknown is where President Yeltsin 
has struck the balance between trying to bead 
off Russian nationalists and actually accom- 
modating their demands. In the eyes of the 
nationalists, and probably of most Russians, 
the Bosnian Serbs are ethnic and religious 
brethren. Yet the Bosnian Serbs' leaders and 
their patrons in Belgrade are the declared 
political enemies of Russian reform and re- 
formers like Mr. Yeltsin. 

Is Mr. Yeltsin’s dramatic gesture meant to 
protect the brotherly Serbs in their continued 
war of aggression against Bosnia, or to ma- 
neuver them into accepting a face-saving way 
out? The answer will be known only as events 
play out mi the ground in the next few days. 

In the best case; a concerted push by the 
United States, Europe and Russia could help 
achieve a fair peace, which cannot be confined 
to Sarajevo but must encompass aD of Bosnia. 
Such a peace would bring an end to attacks on 
civilians, ft would leave the government side 
with a workable economic base and maritime 
access to the outside world. And it would 
provide territorial arrangements allowing the 
secure passage of people and goods between 
an goveramcnt-co enrolled dues. 

Saving Bosnia requires more than sur- 
rounding an isolated Sarajevo with Russian 
soldiers whose impartiality cannot be taken 
for granted — unless they are under direct 
United Nations command. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Olympics Deserve Better 


They can it “CBS Morning News,” so it 
seemed fair to think that it was a news show. 
But while Dan Jansen, the American speed 
skater, made the climactic race of his career 
Friday rooming, viewers were treated to co- 
anchor Paula Zahn’s riveting observation that 
her husband was in town and Hfe in liHeham- 
mer was like “winter camp." 

The weather person stumbled through what 
looked to be a pQe of giant Lincoln Logs and 
commented on his propensity for bong in 
shots with the rear ends of animals. There was 
also — believe us — a shot of soup boiling. 

Ms. Zahn’s partner Harry Smith then ad- 
vised that all who wanted to be even more 
protected from the news on the nearby ice 
rink where Mr. Jansen was skating should 
turn down the sound. It was Mr. Smith’s long- 
winded way of saying. “Let’s go to the video- 
tape — later, when the advertising depart- 
ment says it is aU right." 


No one begrudges CBS its money. But you 
ould think it saved enough on John Mad- 


would think it saved enough on John Mad- 
den’s salary to let us in on the most interesting 
moment of the Olympic week. 

The network cannot plead lack of gear or 
zeal. One thing we have learned this past week 
is that everyone involved in American broad- 
casting can send cameras across the tundra 
and pack ice just to get a shot of Tonya 
Harding lacing her skates. There was, in fact, 
something especially galling about seeing end- 
less shots of Miss Harding and Nancy Kerri- 
gan ignoring each other while Dan Jansen set 
a new world record. Mr. Jansen has long been 
the world’s fastest and most star-crossed skat- 
er. In seven races in four Olympics he had 
failed to win a single medal most recently on 
Monday. The 1,000-meter on Friday was his 
last chance. Finally, he won gold. 

A network spokesman says it was a ^judg- 
ment call.” Toe network has to satisfy two 
audiences, he said — morning viewers who 


want things when they happen, and nighttime 
viewers who want the suspense of not know- 
ing. Also, the competition was stiH in progress 
when the news show ended; Mr. Jansen had 
taken his turn, but others had not. 

By this logic, no championship prize right 
could be broadcast unless there was time for 
the entire undereanL Note to network spokes- 
men; When you are defending a financial 
deriaon, have the grace to say yon did it for 
the ratings and the money. 

In fact, “CBS Morning News" telecast a 
number of other events as they happened 
during the week. For example, it showed Mr. 
Jansen Monday morning when he slipped on 
the final turn and added another grim notch 
to his stick of Olympic failures. 

Next time around, the International Olym- 
pic Committee should examine how it awards 
exclusive television rights. They should not be 
rights to black out the news in favor of reports 
that one of the producers is celebrating a 10th 
wedding anniversary at “winter camp." 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Comment 

Russia's Entry Is Welcome 


The larger objective should be a partition 
agreement for the whole country that permits 
a viable Muslim state with access to the sea. 
Strictly European efforts to bring this about 
have been unavailing. It will take old-fash- 
ioned. arm's-length cooperation between tbe 
United Slates and Russia to achieve a real 
peace and to keep turmoil from spreading in 
the Balkans. Thai should be the lesson Wash- 
ington learns from Moscow's dramatic entry 
into the Bosnian crisis. Russia's intervention 
was welcome and helpfuL 

— The Baltimore Sun. 



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m 


Let’s Get 


■!;| I 

• 4‘ 1 


Another Psvastaiing 
Hot-Air Strike. 




Into Focus 


The first question that is bound to arise is 
whether and how to translate a Sarajevo 
cease-fire, if it takes, into calm in the other, 
less publicized but still desperate conflicts 
going on elsewhere in Bosnia. 

The second pressing question for tbe Unit- 
ed States is to define the terms at a political 
settlement in Bosnia that are meant to be 
served by American military action. This wflj 
require a difficult process of consultation be- 
tween the United States and Bosnia's Mus- 
lims, the parly most dependent and now, with 
Russia’s arrival on the diplomatic scene, even 
more dependent on Washington. 

On Saturday the president died a long and 
useful list of American geopolitical and hu- 
manitarian “interests” that, be said, justify 
participation in Sar^evo air strikes. He did so 
speaking as a commander in chief who may be 
about to send American military men into 
combat. Yet those “interests" constitute no 
less compelling a reason for earlier American 
efforts to address tbe agony of Bosnia. In an 
answer to a question mat he took after Us 
morning talk, Mr. Clinton gave an incomplete 
explanation, saying that earlier there had been 
no “consensus" for military action. That 
leaves open, of course, the possibility that he 
could have done much more to create a con- 
sensus than he chose to do. For tbe moment, 
nonetheless, perhaps it is enough to hope that 
the end of the siege of Sarajevo is within sight. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 





ByBobHeibeit 


N ew. YORK — The Wmta- :- 7 * 
Olympics have bee n m e sm eriz- "3r.. 

- mi Forget about the lew-rent Har- >V • 

■ ding-Kerrigan melodrama " .and. the .^ c 
embarrassing loss of mediaperepee- 
rive ao -that stay. ThCf Otompiw. ^ y 
..have been fabutoasin spite « loose ^ ■/. ;l 
distractions. V->- i 

_ Imaddition to ihee^tenremgeri-v- ' 

men an d^ wor^m^ffi^roadiing ath- ' 

: letic perfection, theOlytepic Games ' ; 

ait loaded with extraordina^ mdi-rJLy- 
- vicinal sagas — 'incredible, human / .. • 
. dramas, both joyooe .and ;hearir " 
breakmgty tragic. - - : A ; 

They are far more than, entertain-; '•fl 
meat. Turn ’on. the television au3;>.", 
there Is Ycgard Ulvang, thd Nprwe- ; . ■ 

pan cross-country stang champion ---: i ■ 
and three-time O^mpic gold medal . *< • : 
winner, struggling to compete while.. i i ' 
tormented by the mystery, of whar'iil 
happened to his older brother. 

- Last October, Ketil Ulvang went !y ' 
jogging in the bleak and unforgiving *£* : 
terrain that surrounds, the. famil y^ ■ ] 
home in KukfebeS, in the northera^ “ ' 
most reaches of Norway- He never 
made it home. Vegard was is Italy at ; ; 

‘ ll» limr> fmfmnc f nr Hi* fH wnn ii y 'li si ' ' 


\o n 


WH 


SMS 


iSERBS* 


Trying a Strategy of Failure on Trade With Japan 


aPU- 

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et h " ' 
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jp--'.; - 

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fill*' 

TOt' - 

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the time, 


W ASHINGTON — The only 
Rood trade agreement with Ja- 


YY good trade agreement with Ja- 
pan is no trade agreement with Japan 
— that is the sentiment held by a 
large chunk of the American elector- 
ate. Up to a point, President Bill 
fTinrnn and his tough-minded trade 
negotiator, Mickey Kantor, seem to 
tea the same way. 

Despite the beating that they are 
taking in much of the American press 
for their to-the-brink tactics, the 
president and his special trade repre- 
sentative may be playing a winning 
hand with Japan. 

Tokyo resemble Ronald Reagan’s 
first-term approach to aims control 
agreements with the Soviet Union. 
Mr. Reagan was not interested in 
w arhead totals and throw weigh L 

He wanted a fundamental c hange 
in Soviet behavior. Without that 
change, he said repeatedly, arms con- 
trol agreements were meaningless. 
Even when tbe turn came in U.S.- 
Soviet relations under Mikhail Gor- 
bachev, Mr. Reagan kept repeating. 
"Trust but verify." 

Aims control was as big a political 
liahOity in 1980 as trade agreements 
with Japan are today. Mr. Reagan 
could safely raise the negotiating bar 
a beyond Moscow’s ability to jump. 
Politically, no agreement with Mos- 
cow was belter than a controv e rsial 
agreement with Moscow. 

Aided by luck, timing and Mr. Gor- 
bachev, Mr. Reagan got the change in 
behavior. It is a good omen for Mr. 
Clin ton and Mr. Kantor in then- 
brinkmanship with Prime Minis ter 
Morihiro Hosekawa. Tokyo’s fragile 
coalition government has already re- 


q uences of policies that make Japan 
more independent and assertive on 
the world scene. 

The conversation at The Post was 
largely a dialogue of the deaf, with 
reporters challenging Mr. Kantor on 
details of Japan ese-U.S. trade and 
Mr. Kantor responding that the real 
problem was the long-term pattern of 
behavior of tbe Japanese. He dearly 
suggested that Tokyo is cheating on 
tbe “great majority” of 33 existing 


By Jim Hoagland 

main* Japan to the brink that die administration 
usertxve on has been cartful not to disclose fully 
in public. Instead of accepting Mr. 
he Post was Hosokawa’s political weakness as a 
: deaf, with reason not to push on mute, Clinton 
.Kantor on & Co. see il as an opportunity to force 

trade and Mr. Hosowaka to rem in Japan’s pow- 

hat tbe real erful bureaucracy and change rts re- 
n pattern of smetive behavior on trade. 

. He dearly This White House feels that it has 
rhrmtmg on little to lose politically in punning 


U-S-Japanese trade agreements. Why, 
he implied, sign another one unless it 


he implied, sign another one unless it 
is ironclad and in America’s favor? 

This was Mr. Reagan talking about 
the Soviets, circa 1984. Mr. 'Kantor 
made the parallel explicit, saying that 
his philosophy with the Japanese is 
“Trust but quantify." He that 
there has to be a “speedometer” in the 
form of a “framework agreement” to 
measure progress in reducing Japan’s 
massive trade surplus with the world. 

Between his lines, I beard from Mr. 
Kantor a sense of a strategy in going 


what I would call “a strategy of fefl- 
urc” on trade with Japan. Mr. Clin- 


ton and his chief of staff, Thomas 
McLarty, have been deeply influ- 
enced by tbe polling and analysis of 
D aniel Yankciovich, president of the 
Public Agenda Foundation, who 
wrote durma tbe 1992 campaign: 
"The pubuc is persuaded . . . that 
tiie American- Japanese relationship 
is zero-sum, with Japan the winner 
and the United States the loser . . . 
The only vision of future American- 
Japanese relations acceptable to the 
public is one that creates a new pat- 


tem of competition and cooperation.” 

Polls timing the campaign showed 
that Americans in large numbers be- 
lieve dial the United States always 
loses in a g nig g trade agreements with 
foreign countries, irrespective Gradu- 
al results. Changing that perception is 
one of govamnenfs major mom. 

That is in part what Mr. Clinton 
and Mr. Kantor are embariced upon in 
the confrontation with Japan. They 
take dear risks. Mr. Hosotawa could 

fan. US. consumer demand for Japa- 

nasgpimihirfgflnfl the fli»flirtif»tmr y im- 

pact of Japanese imports rob America 
of leverage if a real trade war erupts. 
Japan may-come up with a deal mat 
Mtmwrdy looks good bat does tote to 
rednoe Tokyo's trade surpluses. 

But Presutent Clinton has a shot at • 
a major triump h if thing* break his 
way. He is ant to change UJS.- Japa- 
nese psychology as much as statistics. 
And even if there is no a greement, 
having squeezed Japan without pro^ 
voicing disaster would serve him well 
at the polls in 1996. 

The Washington Post •••; 


He returned to Kukenes immediately V, . „ ' j q - ■ 

to join the-search for hishrotbo; bul j 

the search partywas hampered by*-? V ,l L 

snowstorm, andKetil.was not founds-. ;r?' iiOHh sV 
. On Feb. II, during ajpresscorifer- • ^ 1 ; ‘ 

enceatlheOlyi^HCS, V^aidmate ‘ -w'- * 

.a tearful vow to "return in the. r; - ' . - 

qningtime as soon as. the Snow a V .^ jensr-f ^ “ ' 
gone totn to fhtd.him .* ' - * '- V, slou-"- 
“ “ *• “ sites - - -■ 


The.Oiynqjics alsogaveustlK xa- 
rirational examrfe of the ferodous 


Remarkable and Enduring Partnership 

By Roger Buckley 


sponded to the openly declared ‘fail- 
ure’’ of the Climon-Hosokawa talks 


ure” of the Climon-Hosokawa talks 
in Washington this month by promis- 
ing to open Japanese markets more 
widehrio foreign goods. 

At The Washington Post the other 
day, Mr. Kantor, speaking with al- 
most ideological fervor, challenged 
a reporter who said that the admin- 
istration's hard-nosedness puts Mr. 
Hosokawa's government in danger. 
Mr. Hosokawa’s position on trade, 
not Mr. Clinton's, brought danger of 
collapse in Tokyo, Mr. Kantor said 
disingenuously. 

What a change. A senior U.S. offi- 
cial admits that Washington will sit 
on the sidelines and let a Japanese 
government endanger itself. 

Mr. Kantor argued that Japan is 
now mature enough to face strong 
U5. pressure and respond. 1 took his 
pram, even if I did not get the sense 
that the administration has really 
thought through the long-term conse- 


the United States and Japan offers an 
occasion to reconsider the entire rela- 
tionship. Amid charges and counter- 
charges over closed *n*rkrt* and 
state-industry collusion, the accom- 
plishments and the faffing* of the 
past risk being forgotten. 

To concentrate on Motorola’s le- 
gitimate complaints about curbs on 
tetecomraunicatioiis access to Japan 
is to ignore tbe wider issues of a 
remarkable and enduring partnership 
between the two largest national 
economies in the world. 

IT history is any guide, the differ- 
ences between President BID Clinton 
and Prime Minister Morihiro Ho»_ 
sokawa wifi eventually be contained. 
Neither side is likely to act in a way 
that could demolish what has been 
the foundation stone of stability and 
security in the Asia-Pacific region 
since theeariy 1950s. 

Selective sanctions are probable. 
Yet, paradoxically, this should then 
lead noth sides bade to tbe negotiat- 
ing table. Once tbe hawks have had 
their day, moderates will be able to 
suggest face-saving measures. 

Of course, American politicians 
are seizing on tbe record trade deficit 
of 560 billion with Japan to argue 
that the only way to get action from 
Tokyo is to deploy the big stick. But 


economists warn that bilateral bal- 
ances are not the heart of the matter: - 

The United States is in an assertive 
mood on the trade from and pres- 
sures may soon be applied agunst 
other trading partners that have sub- 
stantia] surpluses and protect indus- 
tries against inqxjrts. 

No government has dean hands 
in a highly competitive global mar- 
ketplace, and Japan is certainly 
guilty in certain areas. Yet ties be- 
ta be sufficiently 1 mature Ut'hanSe 
such economic mid financial squab- 
bles without putting the wider rela- 
tionship at risk. 

Unfortunately, the present sound 
and fury tend to obscure the record of 
the pasL There have been a succes- 
sion of U-S.-Japancse trade issues 
since the early 1970s. There is no 
reason to assume that tbe present 
fight over autos and insurance will be 
the final round of the trade bout 
Nonetheless, it is worth remembering 
that lengthy talks did eventually pay 
off for the United States in opening 
the door to the Japanese beef, citrus 
and rice markets. 

It is significant that both President 
Qintcn and Prime Minister Hoso- 
kawa are taking care to avoid any 


linkage between die economic dispute - 
and snared political and MCuritycaF 
ceras-Thezr statements after the faded 
economic’ summit last week stressed 
common interests ranging boro. the. 
future stability of Northeast Asia. to. 
environmental and aid projects. 

Neither side wants a repetition of 


spirational example of the Ferocw»f_‘ 
Norwegian speed skater Johann Okr ’ f ' 
Koss, a national hero whose. evwy^-j 
app em an ce is greeted by crowds 
ing Norwegian flags and-agnspro- : 
daiming, “Kesris thc Bossl ” 

Mr. Koss is a presned student and-- 1 .' 
the son of two doctors. A<omfrafr ^ 
able Hfe is pretty much his fra tht >^- . 
asking, but apparently he has other 
things on has mind. A CBS profile - 
showcdbmsurmuiukdby cofldnHi^rj 
in Eritrea in East Africa. The diil- Jj.^ 
drenwereorphmis. virtinKofthewar : " 

with Ethkqna. Mr. Koss was there on , 4 ^ 
a humanitarian mission. He said he 
wanted to show ihe youngsterartted ’ 

.. *yoo are. not alanchr thisiwoild.” . 

Another scene showed Mr. Koss ^ 
running while holding the hand of a y£ 
blind boy in.Nraway. Tlrat was dur- ’ x .; 

■ ing the Johann Kras Games, an an- j, - vv 

■ nnal event fix disabled youngsters. 

Tbe fittle boy was in the stands and 
cheering wildly on Wednesday when -T-v 
Mr. Koss set a world record and won 

a gold medal in the l r 500-jnctcr race. >i ./ > 
Thejift to viewers of the Winter.... •' y 
Olympics is rite abstdntdy compel- . ^ 
ling-glimpse it provide of the. hu- 
manity feDow creatures around — • 
.tbcplancL We- get to watches- they- r-*,* 
z striye f ra pcrfection, and we grt to 
' see'hbw they' cope with all those "•‘J? 
dcmcaits -r- physical, emotional and ■ 


j± ' „ 
<ad -• - " ’ 
iSSfc--- . 
C9 ’ 

ffi* 1 -- : . 

J ' - " 

saoi'v- 
darai - 

JliEt': •' 

ikiPrCT--; 

10 f*.'-'- : - 

KuSr=‘ - 
c: ' • 
a:i _ 
bi ' 
iOc it-- ' -■ 

•. ’ . 
-• 

Hf.w, — . 
dsL - ii 
Bir’ri 
olL-:: 2 r. >. 
air'..' . 


the early {*asc of. tbe-U^.-J^ariese mystical drat donqaie to make 


relationship when differences in I960' 
over American baauganaqgdnents' 
and Jmanese rearmament came clos- 
er to destroying ties than any of the 
later trade disputes. • 

Present problems pall against the 
I960 security crisis and later trade 
frictions. Certainly Americ an critics -, 
arc right to point out that in thrpost- 
Cold War raa there most be a new 
bass for the U-S.-Japanese rdation- 
dnp. But It ought to be constructed 

rat proper knowledge of what went 
right for two generations. 

. A more equal affiance requires that 
Japan act responsibly and that ihe 
United States treat its Pacific partner 
with morcrapecL After the shouting 
is over, it win be vital to gk bade to 
basics and bone up on history. 


bc^/TtowrThe PsychologvOf Op- 
■timal Experience,’’ writes: ‘The brat 


The writer, who teacher history at 
tee International Christian University 


in Tokyo, « author of " US-Japan 
Alliance Diplomacy, 1945-1990.” He 
contributed this comment to tee Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


The West Should Back Values, Not Personalities 


P ARIS — The handlmg of tbe Sa- 
rajevo bombing ultimatum In* the 


i. rajevo bombing ultimatum by the 
United States and the other Western 
powers has reflected two fallacies in 
the Western approach to Russia and 
the ex-Communist world since 1989. 
Those two fallacies might be called the 
Affective and the OmnisdeoL 

The first causes the West to identify 
its interests with individual Russian 
leaders, according to the latiers’ will- 
ingness to follow current Western 
ideas of bow Russia should reform 
itself. This then leads the West to 
shape its policies on other matters — 
such as bow to deal with Serbia — 
according to how this is perceived as 
affecting the fortunes of those leaders. 

In dealing with Yugoslavia, the 
Western governments have repeated- 
ly been constrained m what they did 
by concern for what their action 
might do to Boris Yeltsin's domestic 
political standing, possibly promot- 
ing his nationalist rivals and feeding 
pan-Slavic tendencies. The objective 
realities of tbe international situa- 
tion in which Russia and the other 
ex-Commmust countries find them- 
selves, and of the international struc- 
ture in which they have to construct 
their future, has been neglected. 

The second fallacy is that of West- 
era Omniscience. 'We believe we 
alone understand world problems, 
Tbe ideas currently in fashion in 
Western chdes are presented as truths 
of general validity and application. 
Other countries not only should adopt 
them but will be constrained by reality 
to do sa Never mind that our ideas 
change from one decade to the next. 

This fallacy unhappily provides 
the orienting principle of the Clinton 
administration's foreign policy, as 
this has been described by tiie admin- 
istration's National Security Council 
director ar i y the Suie Depart- 
ment's polic. jpokespeople. 


By William Pfaff 


They say that Western-style demo- 
cracy and market economics are pre- 
vailing everywhere in the world be- 
cause of their self-evident truth and 
efficacy; American policy need merely 
attach itself to this general trend in 
order to emerge, in a better world, as 
the triumphant sponsor of the values 
that have made inis new world. 

This is a kind at ersatz dialectical 
materialism, a naive and sentimental 
imitation of Marx's belief in the“in- 


The leaders and people of the re- 
ion need evidence that a structure of 


The leaders and people 
of the region need to 
see democratic values 
firmly and predictably 
defended by the West. 


evitable" march of history toward 
universal communism. Events in 


universal communism. Events in 
Russia, and in Eastern Europe and 
the Balkans, have, of course, demon- 
strated no such inevitable move- 
ment toward liberal society. 

Quite the contrary. The reform 
leaders of tbe ex-Communist world 
need a firm and civilized structure of 
international security in thdr region, 
one that rewards respect for peaceful 
and democratic standards of conduct 
and provides punishments for not ob- 
serving those standards. 

That supposedly is what NATO 
was to offer Eastern Europe, togeth- 
er with the eastward extension of the 
European Union and other Europe- 
an institutions, and the incorpora- 
tion of Russia into the economic as 
well as political institutions of inter- 
national cooperation. Bui tittle of 
this has happened. 


gion need evidence that a structure of 
political values is at tbe foundation of 
the prosperity, and political and so- 
cial success, of Western Europe, the 
United States and the other democra- 
cies, and that this structure is one to 
which they can attach themselves, to 
enroy its benefits and hs security. 

Tbey need to see democratic values 
firmly and predictably defended by 
the WesL Only that can convince 
them not only that these are wrath- 
while values but that they will win 
oul Exactly tbe opposite has been 
demonstrated in the Yugoslav case. 

Tbey have to be persuaded that 
more is to be gained by joining this 
system than by an anarchical pursuit 
of national or ethnic advantage and 
individual national aggrandizement. 
Serbia's successful aggression has 
been teaching the latter lesson. 

And Serbia's standard of conduct 
risks becoming the norm, not only fra 
tbe countries of Eastern Europe and 
the ex-UitSJL, but even fra some 
governments in or on the fringes of 
NATO and tire European Union, 
which perceive the security and polit- 
ical gains of the past half-century 
being lost and the West's authority 
undermined by its acquiescence in . 
aggression, and aggression's gains. 

Order will be re-established today, 
if it is re-established, not by interven- 
tion in the internal political and re- 
form processes of Rusia and the oth- 
er ex-Comrnunisi countries, or by 
personal persuasion or personal di- 
plomacy, bul by creating or strength- 
ening international institutions that 
provide Older, predictability, security 
and the defense of democratic values. 

This is the only thing that can 
help now in Yugoslavia. It is what 
Russia needs, toother with the oth- 


er former member nations of die 
U.&SJL, and also Hungmy, with its 
external minorities, am! Romania 
and Slovakia, and Greece and Mao- ' 
edxxaia, and others. 

Unless a Climate Of international . 

security and peaceful potitical'con-’ 
dnet is xe-dnmahed in Eastern and 
Southeastern Europe, thing* could 
become moefa worse than they are 
now. It is necessary fra ihe United 
States and the European democracies 
to defend their own valnes. 1 If tbey- 
don’t, they couldjose them. 

International Herald Tribune, 
c Los Angdes Times Syndicate. 


■timalE^oience,’’ writes: ‘The brat i 
moments usually occur when a per- . 1 
son’s body or mmd is stretched to its „ 
Emits in avoluntaiy effort to acconi- "• • 
(dish something difficult and worth- • • •’ 
wbfle." That , is wbae we are aB • l 
watching at the Olympics — human- 
ity in full flower. ' 

The cameras may be trained on ! 
Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan •* 
tat thestc^ is elsewhere. The stray is = 1 
about the Bosnian team, and anchor- 
man Greg GumbeTs accurate' com-' 
mmtdiat‘^iK>st of there atiiletrawll * r: { 
end up in refugee camps after ; tta- ■~ l - 
Games are over." The stray is abput ^ :/ 
speed skater Kristen Talbbt, whbse':'.^" 
mps were sore for a wink: bccanseshe^ _-_i 
donated bone marrow to her brother; " 
and abooi Drann Roffe-Stcmrottov , 
the veteran. American slow wfo.was-^i 
so nervoas she neariy threw up aithe 
top of the slope before taking off ariflTv ' 
winning the gold, j :i 

And tUsyeax, especially, thesidiy 
is about Dtmcan- Kennedy- ol 'the - - 
United States Inge team because his^ . 
stray is the polar raiposite ef tbe . 
pathetic - Harding-Kerrigan casfc : 
Whereas Tonya Harding’s aSso- c 
dates attacked and! att e m p ted to '• 
maim her teaurniare, Mr. Kennedy 
. was beaten by slrmbMai; in O 

ny last October. as he blockedthe 


doorway of ahar to 


them front, 

Robert Hp-. 


X^. 


kins, who is black. ' . 

■ Mr. Kennedy’s hoprafor amedal- i‘ 
.ended, of course, when he cradted . 1 
on the- luge tradc last Tne^hrirl'lt * 
doesn’t matte-. He’s a hero, and fut- i 

ther evidence that . despite all thc: 
attention It is getting, Hardm^Krr- . , 
rigan ia not tbe atray of thisyeafs L"; 
Winter Olympics. ; 

The New York Tones. " v i ' 


i ; 

1 -I- 


‘ L. X . 


Lk?*' 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEABS AGO 

1894k Lynch Mob Kills . 7*** l*t writed with keenanxie^ygs- 


NEW YORK — A disgraceful lynch- 
ing tookplace nearBirnnngham,Ala- 
bama, yraterday [Feb. Iffl. On Satnr- 
dsy night a neffo assaulted a white 
woman, imtninghsr so severely that 
she died Soon after that outage a 
posse of aimed men came upon, two 
negroes who took flight Tins was 
takes as -evidence of guffi/fte lynch- 
ing party concluded that one of the 
men was the assassin, tat could not 
decide which. “Let’s hang them both 
and make sure of it!" someone shout- 
ed. The su gges ti o n received general 
approval and the two. mm were- 
hanged to a branch of a tra It has 
awe transpired that the two^ were law- 


worid, waited with ketaiamriwfr jWr . 
today [Feb. 20} for die first tairam. : 
to announce how the Frendi ftemior 
was progressing; An offkaal taDetin ■ 
wsoed at six o’clock in tbe evening 
said: “M. GQneneenr9 mru mtitfio 


mv* 


1944: Tmk Bafly Bit ^ 

UNITH) STATO pacific FIeET “ 1 
M^lhyOERS, PEARL HAR- W ; ; V : 
Proa our New Yart edf; v . 
gm:] The United States PadSc- \ 
rlfct. has, sunk nmeteen : Japanese _ v _ ' 
destroyed 2Ol emany 0aiies •’£ 

the Japanese island basticra^TnA, - A- 
mjjpartial settiemcnt^ fOr Eeari- 7 &j 
ChraterW.l»;,:.5 

lt 7 Pnr tf irt -T 71 n ^ ‘ ILL ■ 



n , n .. . *5 Flea commandec .in -) 

1919: Framer Recoyers = , <***,]&& today [Feb. Tty&tfap- : } 


more serious than at first believed^ 
M-Oemencean’s contfitijn pvraho 
cause fra seriovs.a#refastisio£:An 
Fans; arid indeed, tul the civilized 







. " - ■ r:..’ ! . '• ‘-v^y 






AOJH 


u* 


Y*SJ> 


\ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE- MONDAY. FE3RI AKA 21. 1994 


Page 7 


Made-in-U.S.Rice Buries Japanese Myth 


! By Andrew Pollack ; “ 
i New ^txrtc jritnes. Service 

■ArTOKYO — As the fibt-evw 
rnpment of California rice Was *6^ 
■Qg on sale in Tokyo this month, 50 
people lined op outside one Savu 
upermarket here before the doore' 
opened. The acre's entire load of 
1.500 pounds; an amonnt that 
vould normally takethreedays to 
jdl, was gone -in two nod a. half 
tours. 

•Maybe It was just curiosity, 
vfaybe it was th6 price— halj that 


t was the shortage erf dOTnestic nee, 
vhiefa is why dteforeaga -stuff is 
,*einE allowed in. .’. - - r - 


\ In any event, itwais the shatter- 
ing of anotberrnyth' about the Jap- 
anese consults. Who said the Jap- 
anese would never eat foragn rice? 

| With the United StaieS:arid Ja- 
pan on the brink, ofa trade, war; one 
Question is this: On whose side are 
Jw Japanese ccmsuinos? :''i . : ‘ - 


products, which would nuke than 
a natural ally of the United States? 
Or do they have a predisposition to 

bSer^d-to-^oe^^^^rS' Ja- 
pan lnc.?r- -i .. .* 

The United Stales, in this and 
previous trade battles, has por- 


Stfli a Secretto . v; 
North Koreans 

l The Associated Tress 

SEOUL --- Almost a week after 
[agreeing to accept international 
I nuclear inspections. North Korea is . 
| suD keeping the hews a secret from- 
its people. i ' . 

; Nevertbekss, South Korean offi- 
• clsIs say the' North probably wiH 
stick to' its agreement with- die In- 
!• ternational Atomic Energy Agency 
os nuclear inspections. - 

North Korean press organiza- 
tions have, yet io report on the 
country’s announcement Wednes^ 
dev that it would allow the Viemu* 
based atomic agency-, a UN-nuclear, 
watchdog, to inspect its seven 1 den 
dared nuclear facilities. 

Adding to concero^'asof Sunday 


to b; sue Castor theagency inspec- 
tors, Sonth Korea’s Yon nap n ews 
agency said in a dispatch from .Vi- 
enna. ' ’ “ ' 

But Foreign -Minister -Han -$mg- 
jco. returning io Sepul onSaturday 
from Washington* said .there was ; 
no reason to beBwe that the North . 
would back downon inspections. 

until it- reoriwaa 
firm U.S. promise that high-lewd 
talks on improving U.S.-N csth Kp-” 
rean ties would be held, . 


' trayed- itsdf ■ as the champion of 
Japan’s downtrodden consumers, 
who would see greater variety aid 
. lower, prices if only imports could 
surmount various trade barriers. 

Japan lends to argue that the 
inarm is open and that if foreign - 
products do hot sell well, h is. be* 
cause vendors are not doing 
enough to meet the raacting sfen- 
dards of Japanese consumers. 

Perhaps the Japanese have a 
point in some ! ways Japanese can- • 

-;V 1 NEWS ANALYSIS- 

smteTs cto differ Tram Americans. ; 
-But there is also- evidence. to sup= 
port President Bill Chiton's as- 
sumption " that the' Japanese con- 
sumer can be- boohed. For one 
thing, recession has made that con- 
sumer a mdre priCe^»nsdous com- 
parative shopper- - . 

' Tnuv Japanese consumers have. 
.. notpoured out in support of recent 
U.JLdemands for grater access to 
Japan’s automobile, idecommum- 

- cations or ihsurimee markets. " 

BuUhatisbecamean organized 
consumer movement barely easts 

- in Japan* and the consumer groups 
that do edst often seem to be dose-; 
jy aligned with certain businesses. 

- Many consumer groups,; for in~ 
' stanbe,; opposed the tearing of Jar 
pan’s rice market with the argn- 
. amt that ■ foreign rjbe would be 
- tainted by chemicals. A few years 
aga such gtriups also joined with 
sm^shopkeqjers to oppose easing 
. restrictions ;on large stores like 
Toys. W Vs, evea though these; 
large stores, usually' offer lower 
prices than jean’s mom-and-pop. 


. Take the Big Mac. McDonald’s 
i& the largest restaurant chain in 
Japan. Or., the Macintosh. _ Last 
year, Apple Computers sales in Ja- 
pan grew. 75 percent, making it the 
second largest vendor of personal 
^mpnters behind NEC, the Japa- 
nese gianC . 

"There’s never been any evi- 
dence that consumers rqected a 
product because it is foragn,'’ said 
George Fields, who has bear a mar- 
ket researcher in Japan for 27 
years.-. 

‘ xf there is any reason for the 
failure of more' products to sefl in 
Japan,- belaid, it is that the distri- 
bution system can block foragn 
products or raise their prices exces- 
sively. Indeed, others say, being 
foragn, especially for luxury prod- 
ucts, is a plus. ' ' 

Foreign products are becoming 
even more acceptable because of 
the rise of the yen, which makes 
imports less expensive. The latest 
issue of Nikkei Trendy, a mag azme 
about consumer life styles, features 
■ a 40-page cover story on the rush of 
imports under the thane “Beat the 

Japanese Market-" 

The recession is also helping 
shatter other myths about Japanese 
consumer. A few years ago, for 

instance, it was the gospel that Jap- 
anese consumers cared only about 
[ quality and sendee, not price. Low- 
ering a price often made the prod- 
uctless attractive- 
But consumers are now shunning 


high-priced department stores, 
with their legions of obsequious 
sales daks, m favor of discount 
stores, which are spreading, Mail 
order is also on the rise. 

Still, Japanese consumers are far 
from identical to American or Eu- 
ropean consumers, particularly in 
their emphasis on quality'- 
ll js not enough in Japan lor a 
product to work. It must be perfect 
down to the paint job and packag- 
ing. This is a country, after an. in 
which farmers hang weights on 
budding cucumbers so that they 
will grow straight instead of 
curve! . , , 

Apple, for instance, quietly 
learned that what was acceptable in 
the United States would not pass 
muster in Japan. “We bad com- 
plaints from resellers because the 
mamiak were upside down in the 
box," recalled Ian Diery, executive 
vice president. 

Tiro Yanase, whose company is 
theJapanese distributor of General 
Motors cars, likes to recall the time, 
about a decade ago. when he invit- 
ed the head of quality control at 
General Motors to the pier in Yo- 
k ohama, where Mr- Yanase had 
lined up 20 GM cars fresh off the 
boat and 20 of bis customers. 

AH the customers said they 
would not buy any of the cars, 
generally because the paint was 
slightly scratched. “But what does 
that have to do with the engine?" 
the puzzled quality control man 
asked. 






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: -1— «- * r-S! ii i ill “I i ■ i — ' FnouSiha VriffFraw^FKue 

SORRY, COME BACK LATER — After his party defeated the Malaysia ruling 


' ; But if COTSunras dm’ t . speak 
with their voices, they do with their 
wallets. And many foreign prod- 
ucts, from Levi's jeans to Anstca- 
Eaa beef and French skis, are being 
snapped up. 

GennanRigJite Groups 

Move to Stop Benetton 

. / - Ratten " 

BONN--Ge«f^hpman-rig^ 
groups legal action on Sunday 

against the Italian clothing compar 
ny Ben ettrai' for -using a picture of 
the blood-drendied clothes of a 
soldier kffled in Bosnia as a fashion 
advertisement ' . . 

- The groups, the Society Tor 
Threatened People and the Center 
f or Exposing WarCrinjes. said titcy 
. had asked. me federal proseoribrs 


had asked theTedezal proseqrtbrs 
office in' Karisruher to investigate 
whether Betiett(mviotated interna^ 
ttooaLlaw ^by'explcating the Bosni- 
an war. Thetmagepf a bloodiedT-, 
shirt withr^a Inillet hole and 
camoufl^e cwmbat. pants is bong, 
usedlw Bcnettc«iin:a$15 nrillion 
f^mp aign in itewspapcjs and mr 
billboards in 110 countries. . . 


die 


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S AIRBUS INDUSTRIE 

TAKING THE WORLD VIEW 


iNTfl^wnoN-U-i 







/ 


Page 8 


WMKSpY 


INTEUISATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY .21, 1994 


INYBRNATIONAL BOND PRICIS 


M 

Mol Price Vld Trsv 


Provided by Credit Suisse First 
Boston Limited, London, Tel: 
322 40 00. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. Feb. IS 


Canadian Dollars 


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an our flights, no matter which of our 44 international destinations in 40 countries around the world you are 
visiting- Tantalisingly spicy eastern dishes. Or wholesome, hearty western food. Decisions. c^^PlA 
decisions. Our choice of hot in-flight cuisines is just another reason to look a? us now. 



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International Herald Tribune, Monday, February 21, 1994 


Page 9 




Flush Fi 

Pokpi 

- . i - By Martm HoweH" - : v .>.•- ; •* 

' * ■ ; -. • _!• - Bx^MW »«*:. '. ...-• ; , 

al oanL .^--frokRfaaad Cd, tb&grtwndnstn- 

S “St 1 * **» Wnrifitait raised 

China. 

mainly foradStic^^ bm 

now has mnr<- 7i,rr “ V ®snncnt4 m CSina, where the company 

Pokphand^exe^ e ^^^^^ p ^ Tony Asvmntra, 

of last wSk ' ^ i flo ^ tn «' rate ^t« wcre sncccssfoIly soi&at the end 
. ■ ma n ^ ,TEsei itc3d the comf^ny’s biggest fund-raising to 

TI* company ntfsed 

chSte^Srf^S^- SlSOmfflion in to first 

ntternationaldebt 

all the poultry for the country** seeorities gale. '-'' 
Kentucky. Fried Chicken foa- ■-- '-- -- '.'-•- • ■• *•- .. 

Iwirfou 

uteHong Kong and London stock-e xchange 

•^ anDffi y> ** Bought a-* group of China Twsniess&i- frrim the 
Lnearavanom family of Thafland. 

“With the completion last’nontb. of the acqifigtiori- of J 16 busi- 
nesses to China from the ICbearavaporir Farrofy t te group has ruy m 
reacted sufficient size and, maturity to develop: indqjendeiitly,” 
said Mr. Asvamtra. “This )PRN issue reflects our commitment to a 
strategy of organic growth for the benefit of our shareholders.” 
Potphand has been criticfted in the pastj by analysts for, raising 
capiUl through stock issues,. debiting the eararogg stream for exist- 
ing shareholders in the .process, '•'. • - "'■- ;• i- v v‘-. . 

Among the company’s investments is:4ffrpfert^Ccfc Shangbai Da. 
^ang (Group) Sto&Co,, an agribusm^ cxsi^jany whose glares are 
hsted an the Sha n g h ai Stock Exchange and TO percent of New York- 
hsted Ek-ChorMotorcyd^ ope of ffrma’k largffrt ipnbwryH pmwlrftrc 
The notes, whkiLwOlbe hated on die Luxembourg" Stock Ex- 


. . • _ .... 

A senior economics adviser to the Chinese go vemg ient said 
Sunday that the Hoar of forragn capital mto the country^ would 
contnroeapace this year; draule* state-eafiwj^^tiactira in she 
real estate business,- Agehce France-PresSe repohed fromBegmg. 

Li Yue, secretary-gearicalTf tteCJram^s&x^tmof Enterprises 
With Foreign Investment said thM.Whfle- die property hoom of 
recent years had becn curbedbyite fitftjtaunRoii credit, emerg ing 
sectors — ~ ,J -“~ J - ' — *— * — -•-=- 


vs. Joblessness: EU Will Keep Score 


CartGewitu isilL 







THE TRIB INDEX 


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’. ?’ ■-■ '-hodok 


. ; ■' By TomBuerkle 
and Alan Friedman 

' . • Insernationd.HtnU Trtbtme 
BRUSSELS — Fearing -that its prescription for 
fighting Europe's employment aids could die a guiet 
death, the European Commission plans to devise a 
scorecard 10 show how well each European Union 
member dation is following its recommendations, 
comaussioa officials said in interviews. 

The 12 nations' scores will relate to policies advo- 
cated in the white paper on growth, competitiveness 


and. employment that was approved by European 
leaders in December. They wffl be contained in a 
report to the EU suromii meeting on the Greek island 
Of Corfu on June 24 and 25. 

The commission has no power to compel member 
governments to act on the while paper, so its only- 
weapon is moral suasion. It will use us scorecard to 
analyze Ihc countries' performance on key recommen- 
dations such as reducing soda] security charges, espe- 
cially for low-paid workers; deregulating labor mar- 
kets; and improving education and job training, 
particularly for the one-half of Europe's jobless people 


who have been without work for more than a year. 

The report win be compiled by aides to Jacques 
Ddois. the commission's president. Henning Christo- 
phersen. economics commissioner, and p3draig Flynn. 
empJovmen! and social affairs commissioner. 

Mr. Flynn, 53. an energetic former politician from 
Ireland, last week began a tour of European capitals to 
discuss jobs and other issues addressed in the White 
Paper. He said in an interview that the findings would 
be presented **in a table on who is doing what, on who 
is following the white paper." 

A commission official was more blunt; “This is an 


attempt to give the process real impetus. There is a risk 
that this tiung could just die." 

While Mr. Flynn was reluctant to describe his tour 
and the report as an attempt to pressure European 
leaders, be is dearly embarked on on an aggressive 
campaign to convert Europe's words inlo action and 
get the white paper implemented. 

‘it will make no impact unless they act on it.' 1 Mr. 
Flynn said. “If they deride not to do it, they will be in 
contradiction of their own request." 

His message is that national governments, not the 

See JOBS, Page 11 



PAL Investor Ready to Sell 

: . •-.••. Xoap&rf fry Ovr Staff Frvm Dt&auhcs 

..MANILA — A major shareholder .in Philippine Airlines is at- 
tempting to sell his stake in the financially troubled carrier, execu- 
tives aped news reports indicated Sunday.’ 

. . Lock). Tan, a Ftbpino-Ghinese tycoon who controls 51 percent of 
P. R. Holdings Inc. — winch in turn owns 67 percent of the airfare — 
is searching for a buyer because he is unhappy with the status of his 
5.1 haffion peso (5185 m3Kon) investment m PAL, an aide said. 

The. aide added that the sultan of Brunei, a Malaysian group and 
another FOipmo-Cbmesc investor were among those bring ap- 
proached as potential buyers. 

The Philippine Daily Inquirer of Manila said Mir. Tan was 
offering his stake at “acquis non cost, no interest, no prenanm” to 
Sultan Muda Fta«a»n?l KrdViah of Brunei. 

- Tte shift came a day after P. FL Holdings called for a revamp of 
rite Dag carrier to reverse its declining profits and demanded the 
appointment of a' new president and a new auditor for the airtine- 

Stparatfily, the PA1. president and t-lurirman^ QudpS Dt aning uez , 
said the ajrane had a net income of 56.9 nriUkm pesos for the nine- 
mouth period that ended in December, but would have earned 641 
nriKon pesos if not for heavy costs caused by planes grounded for 
safety checks and by write-offs for unserviceable parts. 

A statement by the PAL board after an emergency meeting 
Saturday did not specify if Mr. Dominguez would remain president. 

• The sale of Mr. Tan's stake, if completed, would give the new 
owner an ccnrivaknl 33 percent direct ownership in PAL. But direct 
control. can be exercised only if P. R. Holdings Is dissolved and PAL 

See PAL, Page 11 


‘or Showdowns 

Bloc Vows to Resist Inroads 

By Michael Richardson 

Interrusional Herald Tnbune 

SINGAPORE — Asia- Pacific countries will form a united front 
and restrict access to U.S. and European airlines if the United States 
and the European Union try to “pick off individual Asian countries 
one by one” in bilateral negotiations on air traffic rights, the head of 
a group representing 15 carriers in the region said Sunday. 

Cheong Choong Kong, rhairman of the Orient Airlines Associa- 
tion , said members of the group were worried that the United States 
and the European Union, which are both developing new external 
aviation policies, would use their negotiating strength to maximize 
the access of their airlines to the fast-growing .Asia-Pacific area while 
applying curbs on entry into their own aviation markets. 

Mr. uteong. who also is managing director of Singapore Airlines 
Ltd., was opening an international aviation conference. The two-day 
meeting is to end on Monday. 

While many Asian airlines are expanding and profitable, most 
European and U.S. carriers are struggling to shake off heavy overca- 
pacity and accumulated losses. 

An expert committee recently proposed that the EU establish a 
common external aviation policy before June 1995 to match its 
liberalized internal policy. 

Dominique Pavard, bead of the policy coordination unit of the 
European Commission's transport directorate, said Sunday that the 
aim was to “achieve a market-oriented aviation trading regime." She 
said this would send a dear signal to non-European states and air 
carriers that the European Union's policy would be consistent and 

See ASIA, Page 11 


Mirror Group 
Raises Bid Price 
For Independent 


Mercedes Kicking Tires on Swatch Car 


By Brandon Mitchener ' 

. * '" ' InienuBumd Herald Tribune . 

FRANKFURT -—'When the Mercedes-Benz 
rhairnnin, H rimii i Werner, arrived at the .Gene- 
va aiiio show last March, the S watch bn his 
wrist generated at least as much attention as the 
hour/ cars he was sent to promote. 

This Tuesday, attention will ag ain shift to 
Mercedes and Swatch when die board of Daim- 
ler-Benz AG ? which owns Mercedes, cqtuits the 
pros and cons of promoting a car uniting the 


best characteristics of each; sturdy, safe, trendy 
and cheap. 

If everything adds up, Mr. Werner could 
unveil a prototype as soon as March 8 at this 
year’s Geneva auto show, Mercedes sources 
said Sunday. 

For the German company, the project, which 
is still under wraps, promises access to the 
future car market’s hottest segment — small, 
environmentally friendly cars for increasingly 
crowded cities — in a way that would not 


jeopardize its standing as a leader in luxury. 

For Swatch, a production and marketing 
venture with Mercedes would offer access to 
deep pockets and automaking know-how with 
no marketing strings attached. The Germans 
would be happy to help make the cars in ajoint 
venture and leave the selling entirely to Nicolas 
Hayek, the father of Swatch, whose marketing 
genius created SMH AG and saved the Swiss 

See CAR, Page 11 


Bloomberg Bustnas V mi 

LONDON — A consortium led 
by Minor Group Newspapers PLC 
said Sunday that it bad raised its 
offer for Newspaper Publishing 
PLC to 350 pence (55. 17) per share 
from 261.6 pence. 

The offer matched the price per 
share paid earlier this month when 
Tony O'Reilly's Irish newspaper 
chain. Independent Newspapers 
PLC, bought a 24.99 percent stake. 
It values Newspaper Publishing at 
£73.65 million. 

The owners of Newspaper Pub- 
lishing. which owns The Indepen- 
dent and The Independent on Sun- 
day. said the Mirror Group's initial 
bid had not been high enough. 

That offer included cash and 
new common Mirror shares; it also 
proposed a full-cash alternative at 
250 pence per common share. 

The Mirror Group consortium 
includes Promotora de Informa - 
denies SA, publisher of Spain's El 
Pais newspaper; Espresso Interna- 
tional Holding SA. which publishes 
Italy’s La Repubblica newspaper: 
and Newspaper Publishing's 
founders, including the editor of 
The Independent, Andreas Whit- 
tarn Smi th. 

The consortium already owns a 
47.08 percent stake in Newspaper 
Publishing. 

Mr. O’Reilly’s 24.99 percent 
stake in Newspaper Publishing, 
which cost him £1 8.4 minion on the 
open market, makes him the big- 
gest tingle shareholder. His move 


came the same day the Mirror 
Group bid £29.1 million for a 52.92 
percent stake in the company. 

Carlo Caraoriolo. the chairman 
of Espresso, said the Mirror 
Group consortium was “con- 
vinced that the future of The inde- 
pendent and The Independent on 
Sunday will be best secured 
through an association with j 
strong U.K. newspaper group and 
believes that MGN offers the 
greatest benefits in this regard." 

He added, “We trust that this 
offer will now by recommended by 
the independent directors of News- 
paper publishing with a view to 
ending as soon as possible the pre- 
sent damaging uncertainty about 
the company's future." 

The Sunday Times stud the News- 
paper Publishing chairman, lan Hay 
Davison, would not recommend the 
offer. The newspaper did not die 
any sources in its report. 

On Friday, the Department of 
Trade and Industry said it had 
received an application from the 
Mirror Group partnership for 
consent to acquire Newspaper 
Publishing. The group has been 
considering raising its bid since 
early this month. 

Michael Heseltine, the trade and 
industry secretary, told British law- 
makers at the end of last week that 
he had not received an application 
from Mr. O’Reilly's Independent 
Newspaper group for consent to 
gain a controlling stake in Newspa- 
per Publishing. 


London Notebook 


It 9 s Top Trouble II 

n Bank 



• ..aMprJtMair May 

Mowr: :\\vm "1 TJJ» \!Oa 

type ■ - 1#4« -rtow -»*fl 



i Bank, for 

Reconstruction and Development will soon lose the head of one of 
its two banking regions has reopened some old wounds at the 
London-based bank set up three stonny years ago to spur economic 
growth in Eastern Europe. 

Will Mario SananeUi, who departs the EBRD to bead Italy's 
Banca Nazkaale dd Lavoro, bo replaced by someone from inside, 
from outside, or perhaps by no one at all? ‘ 

“From at pure organizational point of view it probably makes 
senSfc to have just one man heading banking," said a memberof the 
board of directors. “But the politics in a place like tins makes.these 
decisions complicated.” . - 

Indeed it does. If Mri Saxondli were not to be replaced, the theory 
is that Ron Freeman, who now heads banking operations for the 
northern zone of co untries served by the EBRD would take over the 
r unning of the southern zone ihat has been led by Mr. SarrineQL 
That would at last put the operations tide of the bank under one 
leader, a native that has been ranch debated; but never implemented. 

In November; the bank’s new president, Jacques de Larosifere, 
swept aside die old, much-maligned organization that had split the 
bsufle between rate aim lending to the private sector and one lending 
to the.pubhc sector. In its wake he put two regional divisions, each 
empowered to look after the private and public sectors in their areas. 
■^Ai the time of ibe reorganization some wondered whether having 
aconsnlship wiih two men in charge of tte'bariimg.systerrrmade a 
lotof seosein the long run." said Jam Coleman, Canada’s represen- 
tafive an the bank’s board. - 

Mr. SarrineDfs departure how brings the old dream of a unified 
command structure back within reach. On the other hand, bank 
insiders saint put that Mr. Freeman has one major- strike against 
him: He rs an American in an institution that the bapk's ' European 
directors see as primarily a creature of ibeir own wiH. 

. Whatever the outcome of the struggle to replace Mr. SaidneDi, 
bank insiders say that one of the biggest problems facing manage- 
ment is staff morale. Bankas 'active' in Eastern Europe report a 
recent flooded job applications written on EBRD stationery. 


Are EcoBortusts Doomedto aF^al Carve? 

'tike any. financial. center worth its salt, London is awash in 
cpDriCotistit Their drily prognosticationshave long been vital parts 
of . the process by which governments as weB as markets navigate. 

. Too bad; says Paul Ormenod. In a book drieotit next month called 
“The Death of Economics,* Mr. Onnerod, an economist himself, 
heaps sotori on his .fellow practitioners and on the state of- the 
“disairi'aSriictf* itself. ..... 

“Economics is really like science before Newton," he masts. “A 
few tiring? wiO stand the- test of timeout the reg is meaningless." 

Mt-Orhaaod dies a tiffany of economists’ misdeeds. He notes a 
recent study by the Organization, for Economic Cooperation and 
Development which condndetf that its seven member governments' 
owii economists would have come dosenotbe truth over thelast five 
yaps if they had .simply forecast that growth, and inflation rates for 
the next year- would be the same ps they woo the previous year. . 
OHfc prescriptions? Farsaxtec, that his colleagues pay mare atten- 
tion to cultural and historical factrasandlcss^ to mathematical models. 


Sqttuttl^ - 

.In'tbd l?nd where ^ liie wima 1 sun rises as bte as B. bogs the 

horizon for the : course tif the day. '-slips away again at 4 PAL. mid is 
rarriy visible through’ lie dduds anyhow, few people nan even 
rcmtthber where they puilb^ sunglasses — ifmdeed they own any. 
- Into tins inhospitable climate has strode z most nntikdy retailer; 
SoflgJsss Hut, the Miami-based company that .ialh itsrif as the 
world's hugest seller of sunglasses. .* 

* Last Jonerit opened anoutlet at Heathrow Airport, sensibly i n the 
departure lounge. Now; however, it is daimgly moving away from 
the airport, beachhead and., into- the darkest heart, of Britain in 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1994 


* 





Page 11 


^J5!!55««»l Bowl Issoes 


(mflBont) 

jjg»<5i9RatoHfctoi 


weak 


Traders to Hang on Greenspan’s Words Tuesday 


Terms 


^Cbmmerddcfe $100 2004 ft 


100 


CS First Boston 

$150 

2004 

V* 

100 

— 

NMOAdrfe. foes *50%. pGdcter, Peabody.) 

Below bmortbUbor. Mnmum vkercst 5%. NMoo**ie. Fees 

Krung Thai Bonk 

$100 

2001 

1.20 

100 

— 

O*or 6-monih Ubor. Noneollable private (^acanient Fees not 
dndoiad. Denornwttons J500 JXXX {Chenacd Bank.) 

Londesbbnk 

RheinJand-Pfdz 

$500 

1998 

1/16 

993? 


Betow frm onth Lbor. Nonafebte. fees 0.12%. jUWi 
Brokers fcttl.) 


DM500 

1999 

fiber 

.99 JO 

— 

tnteiest the Guards Rbor. Noneoflafale. Fees 0.30% 

(ComaersfaanL) 

Credito hofiano 

m 200,000 

1999 

V* 

100 ft 

— 

Ow 3-roonth Ubor. Rooffered ex 99.90. Uoomloble Fees 
(150% {Credito SctonoJ 

Sumitomo Heavy 
Industries 

r 6,000 

1998 

Oats 

100ft 

— 

Oror 5fnon0i Ubor. BeoHered ot par. NoncalVXJe. Fees 
030% Deoorairtcfcora SKUXXX {SteedOBfa Hnanee kvl) 

riAaa-vaupons : 

BMWUJ.Cap,tof 

$300 

2004 

6% 

101-65 

99m 

Reoffored at 99.85. NonmiahJe. Fees 2% (Goldman Sadis 
: 1*1 J ' 

™ropean Investment 
Bank 

$500 

2004 

6 

99762 

98.55 

- NonctiUda. Fees CL32S% (SG. Wcrfaug Securities 

General Bechic 

Capital Corp. 

$100 

1996. 

414 

98-49 

99.28 

-Noneq&able. Fun^bte Vfltb oustandog issue, raising total 
amount to 5350 mfiion. Fees 0.1879% [Lehman BrathersJ 

Kommuninvest 

$100 

1999 

556 

99m 

98 A0 

NoneoHabto. Fees 030% Denamnemons SlOOrtXX (Fuy Ml 
finonocj 

Dresdner Rnance 

DM 1,000 

2004 

614 

10lM 


Reoffared at 99% Nomdabfe. Fees %% (Dresdner Be s*J 

Bonque NationaJe de 
Pais 

£200 

1999 

m 

IOi.03 


■ Beoffnred at 99^3. Noncattabb. Fees T?S% flehnxxi Brqthem 
Ml] 

KFW Inti Finance 

£200 

2004 

6ft 

100775 

' — 

Keofiered at 99.10: Nonealabie. Fees 2% Denomina&aai 
fltWto (J7. Morgan Seeuribo^J 

Sweden 

£200 

1999 

6ft 

99.40 


Nonaslobh. Feet 0^S% (LB5J 

Compognie G^nerole 
desEoux 

FF 2,000 

2004 

6ft 

10071 

9 too 

Beoffmd at 99.135. NoncdUiie. Fees 2% (Sobttfc Gfcnte- 
altL) 

Crfecfit Local de 
France 

FFl^OO 

2005 

6ft 

100764 

100.15 Noncoflahtfa Fun^pUe with outstanding issue, raising total 
«mouni to 3 bMon francs. Fees DJt5%_ (Oitfe Gonxnerool da 
.. Franofaj 

lie de France 

FF800 

2002 

5ft 

100 MS 

98J0 

Reoffitrad at 9979. Nancafiabla. Fees 1ft% (Crfitfit Gomraer. 
dcri de France.] 

SorifrK G6n6rde 

‘ ff 300 

2004 

6ft 

99ft 


Merest wd be until Dec 1994, ihereafter 1570% less 

1^5 times 'the Saxxtih Bbor. Nauuitolale. Fungible with 
auMamfing hum, robing tteal naut to 1.1 falion Aaa 
Fees <150% Denominations 1 raiSon francs. (SeditkGMr- 

Westdeutsche 

Landesbonk 

>300 

1995 

zero 

100 

• — 

Redemption amaute or maturity w3 be Mmd to the S8F 120 
IDOtoO francs. (CrW Lyorawisj 

ABB Inti Finance 

HL 200,000 

2004 

..8ft. 

701^5 

99X0 

Nanatekdiie. Foot 2% (Deutsche Besik. J 

DSL Finance . 

m. 500,000 

2004 

8ft 

101ft 


NoncdUde. Fees 2% {IMU BmA.) 

CrrtSt Local de 
France 

C$250 

2006 

6ft 

101. 

97.10 

Beofiered at 99% Nonctetobie. Foes 256% (Pimba 0*xtd 
Mteiefa.) 

Export Development 
Corp. 

050 

1997 

5 

99785: 

97-85 

Reatfaied te 9IL4B5, Nonctelctle. Fun^lo uiiih outstandirg 
■■sue, rasing total to C$200 mSoa. Fees 1 WO. (Hatexas 
Basic) 

Morgan P-P.) & 
Company 

0250 

2004 

6ft 

101.114 

98J» 

Jteaffwd at 99^64. NonctebUe. Fees 2% Sehmar Brothers 
WLj 

Motel Austrdh 
Finance 

Aus$7Q0‘ 

2001 

6ft 

701 J? 

96L38 

fboRwadcOtoM. Nwtldh. Fees >X% (Morgan Stanley 
Inti) 

Toyota Fkraice . 
Australia 

. AteSlOO 

1997 

5ft 

100.15 

9875 

Noncolafaie. Fees 1M% (Hanfaros Bad.] 

Ford Credit Europe. 

Y 20^00 

1997 

254 

10023 


UrmnAMd Fm DmmimUm— 1l>.n«nn yq>. (Merrfl 
Lynch Intlj 

Sumitomo Heavy 
Industries 

riflOO 

1998 

3ao 

101AS 

. — . 

Beoffiered at 7 00% NoratekiMs: fee 116% Denoeentebni 
10 aCon yen. (Dtewa Europfa) 

Equlty-Untod 

Bangkok Brink 

$400 

2004 

3ft : 

TOO . ' 

—7. 

NanadUde. OxiwrtUe te 230 bteti per share cmnd a 2578 
baM per doBa-. Mandteary ooweraon in 1 9B7 if dock trades 
at more than 322 fate#, fees 2tt% (Morgan Stanley Ml] 

fifinvest 

$W 

.2004 

3ft 

100 

. • - 

-Bedeethtede from 1998 to yield 75S% GawertiUc either 
lOOXet rtinest Developmiwi Corp. teg pesos per shoe, or 
65% irto FDC at sane price and 35% iteo tamest land te 
: 1430 pesos, a 1440% premeem. Exchange rate set ct 2775 
pesos per dolor. Fees not &dond. [Peregrine Securities) 

Keisei Electric Railway 

. . $250 

1998 

1 

100 

— 

Noncafatde. Each $10,000 note with two wararts exerds- 
able irto company's shores ct cm expected 2H% premium. 

Fees 2W% Ten® to be set Feb. 22. ^tamuro Inti) 

Maeda Corp. 

.$200 , 

1998 

1ft 

ioo 

— 

Noocofabie. Each S5JOO ncte with one warrant exercactee 
into corapeny's dxxes te 17S1 yen per share and at 107.40 
yen per data. Fees 2S4%. {Domm Europe). 

Nippon Comsys 

$100 

1998 

1ft 

100 

T. 

NoarfaWe. Each $10^000 note with two waranis e»» 
able into axnpaiy's dtam ot 1/76 yen per than and at 
10330 yen per doBor. Fees 2%%. (NUd Europe.) 

Nippon Denro Ispat 

. $100 

2001 

open. 

100 

“■ . 

Coupon indented o»3 to 3JHL Noncdoble. Gonrertede te on 
expected lO to 1S% premium. Fees 2V5% Terea to be set Feb. 
28. (SjGl Worfwrgj 

SXLCorp. 

$200 

1998 

1ft 

.100".. 


Noncdkdde. Badi $1(1000 note vteh heo vnxrorts exerds- 
aU» into comporry'i stives te 1,374 yen per share end at 
10465 yen per dolor. Fees 2%% (Ycmaiehi Ml Europe.) 

h&sen 

DM190 

1998 

0J75 

100 


NanadkUe. Eadi 5/XDsrxrt note with five warante exerds- 
able Mo company's Acres te 3*414 yen per share and at 
60^ yen P* tnmfc. to ,2K% (Nqomu Baft.) 


Catysfed ty Ow Swff frva DuponAffl 

NEW YORK — Treasury bond traders 
said financial markets would scrutinize the 

day^^e^dcraJ Reserve Board chairman, 
Alan Greenspan, for hints about where the 
economy is headed and how ifce Fed plans to 
react to its potentially strong growth. 

Mr. Greenspan is expected to face some 
criticism and tough questioning from a 
House of Representatives subcommittee on 
banking when he presents his annual review 
of the Fed's interest-rate policy. 

The centra] bank raised short-term inter- 
est rates Feb. 4, for the Gist time in five 
years, to try to convince traders and inves- 
tors that its vigilance against inflation was 
beyond reproof, some analysts said 


Rut in the rat} weeks since then, it appears 
that, rather than reassuring traders and in- 
vestors, the Fed made them more nervous. 


U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

The markets seem to have increased their 
focus on inflation in the expectation that the 
Fed will have to raise short-term rates aaain 
soon. This has led to a sell-off in the bond 
market and a jump in interest rates. 

“Hie interest-rate hike validated the mar- 
ket’s inflation fears," Matthew F. Alov, a 

S vemmem securities specialist ai CS first 
ston, said “The market must have asked 
itself: Why would the Fed move to raise 


interest rates unless there was, in fact, a 
problem with inflation?" 

The bond market, which like other U.S. 
markets will be dosed Monday for the Presi- 
dents' Day holiday, tumbled last week, with 
the 30-year Treasury bond ending at 95 4/32, 
down 2 26/32 points on the week, a& the yield 
soared to 6.63 percent from 6.41 percent. 

The yield is now a third of a percentage 
point higher than it was immediately before 
(he fed pushed sbon-lcmt interest rates up a 
quarter of a point to 325 percenL 

One trader said last week’s market the 
decline was part of a “global financial-assets 
re-evaluation.” He added: “AH the markets 
have been rallying for a long time. We’ve run 
out of that trade right now." 


Over (he past Dye years , he said, investors 
have come to believe that “you can always 
buy a dip." But room for doing that is 
running out, he said: “Look at the five-year 
note. Another 50 basis points in fives and 
you've undone the entire last year’s trading." 

The U.S. Treasury is to sell $24 4 billion of 
three-month and six-month bills in its week- 
ly auction Tuesday, followed by $17.0 billion 
of two-year notes Wednesday and SI 1.0 bil- 
lion of five-year notes Thursday. 

Traders said they would wait until after 
Mr. Greenspan's testimony to decide how to 
handle the supply of bonds in the market. 

“It’s not a lot of supply,” a trader said. 
“It’s just enough to give die market a little bit 
of tribulation." (Reuters; NYTl 


Debt Sale 
And EPO 
For Smurfit 

Bloomberg Business News 

ST. LOUIS — Jefferson Smurfit 
Cora, reacting to what it said were 
much improved market conditions, 
plans to sell SI billion of equity and 
debt to the public as part of a $2J> 
biffioa recapitalization. 

The transaction is part of a plan 
to reduce the paper and packaging 
company’s debt load resulting from 
a leveraged buyout in 1989 by Jef- 
ferson Smurfit Group PLC, an 
Irish conceal that owns 50 percent 
of Jefferson Smurfit Corp., and 
Morgan Stanley Group Inc. 

Jefferson Smurfit Corp. said it 
planned to raise about $400 million 
by siting as many as 16.8 million 
shares in an initial public offering. 

Jefferson Smurfit Carp., with 
sales of S3 billion in 1992, is one of 
the largest American makers of pa- 
perboard and packaging materials. 

A collapse in the price of Hner- 
board after it was taken private in 
1989 hurt the company’s abffity to 
pay its debts and prompted it to 
restructure operations. 

After faffing to about $295 a ton 
in 1993 from 5410 a ton in 1989, 
Iinerboard prices are expected to 
improve this year as the U.S. econ- 
omy improves. 

Jefferson Smurfit Corp.'s chief 
financial officer, John R. Funke, 
said the company planned to sell 
the equity, which may be offered 
for about $20 a share, because of 
recent improvement in the value of 
paperboard slocks. 

‘The market is right for the pa- 
per cyclicals,” he said. 

A subsidiary of Jefferson Smnr- 
fil Group plans to buy 5100 million 
of common shares in addition to 
those sold in the public offering. 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Feb. 21 - 26 


A schedule at O » week's economic era 
bnenaai events, compttod tor the troem*- 
tfcanaf Herakt Tnoune by Bloomberg Bus- 


Asla-Pactftc 


* Fab. 20 Rangoon Fortegn Munster 
AM Almas at inaenesm begins four-say 
visit to Burma. 

a Fab. 21 Hong Kong Snares m toy 
maker RocfcapettaHoumgs begin tracing 
on the Hong Kang Sock Exchange fol- 
lowing Its initial public oner. 

PalJIna U.8. negotiators begin two days 
Of talks with Beijing officials on China's 
appBeaSon to pin GATT, 
a Fob. 22 Hoag Koqg January con- 
sumer price mdex. Outlook; annual rata of 
8 per cent to 9 percent 
Hoag Kong Vagin Adamic launches 
Hong Kong-London service, creaking 
into * route donunasd fiy British Always 
and Cathay Pacific Aavrays. 

Now M2 Team rep res ent ing as top 
British companies, together with Trade 
Minister HichmU Needham, arrives lor 
Wte with Inoien business leaders, 
a Fab. 23 Tokyo Deputy Prime Maes- 
tor Zhu Rongji of China begins nine-day 
visit vs leperi. 

Singapore Finance MmsterRlcnaro Hu 
to ouiBna government's annual spending 
and revenue plana. 

Hong Kong Legislati v e CouncS sched- 
uled to vote on political reforms support- 
ed by Governor Chris Patten. 


a Fab. 24 Tokyo 1993 revised indus- 
trial production figures 
■ Fab. 25 Hong Kong Government 
expects to pubtsh the second part or its 
poutcal reiom legislation. 

Europe 


Ms wea k Roam De- 
canter wholesale price index Forecast. 
Up 42 percent m year 
Frankfurt February cost of living index 
for Western Germany. Forecast: Up 0.3 
percen in mo rn n . up 33 percent in year. 
Frankturt January M3 money supply 
from feurth-quarter base. 



a Fab. 21 Frankturt IG Mmaii urvon 
board meeting to deeds on a possible 
Strike caflot 


■ Fab. 22 London Revised founn 
quarter grass domestic product Fore- 
cast; Up 0.7 percent tn month, up 2.5 
percent m year. 

Paris January trade balance. Forecast; 
67 tkUion Irene surplus. 

Roma January consumer pnea index tor 
maior cities. Forecast Up 0.4 percent n 
month, up 4 2 percent in year 
a Fab. 23 ftwntaiUam 1993 consum- 
er spending. 

a Fab. 24 London January new vehi- 
cle reg or aborts. 

Frankfurt 7h*rd round of wage talks m 
German banking sector. Also third round 
ot wage talha for public sector workers, 
a Fab. 25 Amsterdam Foreqn trade 
sra sites lor September 1993. 

London January trade balance with 
countries outside the European Union. 
Forecast £790 million ooficd. 

Pari* January final consumer price in- 
dex. Forecast Up 02 percent tn month, 
up 2.1 percent m year 
e tab. 2S Frenldurt Group Of Seven 
meeting of finance m inis ter s ana central 
bankers to discuss Russia and the world 
economic euboOk. 

Americas 

• tab. 21 United States Presdetfs 
Day holiday. Banks, government offices, 
stock end bond markets are dosed. 
Mexico Ctty Daimler Benz opens the 
weeklong exhibition Technogenna/Max- 
ico *94 at the Sports Palace. 


e Feb. 22 Ottawa Finance Mmstar 
Paid Martin to unveil fiscal 1994-1 995 Ca- 
nadian federal budget Outlook: Defied 
ranging from 44 billion dollars to 46 bimon 
dollars. 

New York Conference Board releases 
results of Its February consumer confi- 
dence survey. Outlook: 82.7. 

Washington Federal Reserve Chairman 
Alan Greenspan testifies before a Senate 
Banking subcommittee in his semiannual 
a dd ress on the state oi me economy. 
Washington Federal Communications 
Commission sxpecied to vote on whetnsr 
to seek more cuts in cable rates. 
Washington Senate begins debate on a 
proposed constitutional amendment » 
require a balanced federal budget 
e tab. 22 New York Oracle Systems 
Corp. holds fourth annua! conference lor 
software developers on the East CoasL 
Earnings exp ec ted . Manpower Ino. No- 
vell Inc.. SPX Corp. 

• Fth. 24 Wa shi ng to n January dura- 
ble goods orders. 

Washington tnUal weekly state unem- 
ptoymen! insurance claims. 

• Feb. 25 Washington December im- 
port/ export prices. 

Ottawa January industrial product and 
raw materials price Indices. 

Earnings ei pe ctod. Appfi o d Bfosaenca 
International Inc. 

• Feb. 25 New York Apple Computer 
Inc MacFak ‘H features new Apple Com- 
puter products and workshops conduct- 
ed by New York Madnioah Users Group. 


Fed Chief Disputes Bank Plan 

Reuters 

ORLANDO, Florida — The Federal Reserve Board chairman. Alan 
Greenspan, criticized on Saturday a plan to create a angle U.S. bank 
regulator, saying it would irreparably harm the Fed by ranting it into an 
out-of-touch “ivoiy lower." 

Any savings from sudi a move would prove fleering and would hun 
economic growth, as wdl as waken the U.S. central bank's powers to 
oversee the economy, Mr Greenspan told a meeting here of the Indepen- 
dent Bankers Association of America. 

In November, the Treasury Department imveQed a proposal to merge 
the regulatory dudes of the four existing bank agencies into one Federal 
B anking Commission, a plan that must be approved by Congress. 
Officials say it would promote economic growth and save up to $200 
million a year by cutting duplicate regulation among agencies. 

The Fed’s role in regulating banks would be reduced, but it would still 
oversee monetary policy that moves short-term interest rates. Mr. Green- 
span argued that a single regulator who lacks responsibility to oversee the 
economy was “likely to inhibit prudent risk-t akin g by banks." 


Seoul Spells Out ’94 Sell-Off 

Agertcc France- Prase 

SEOUL — The government unveDed on Saturday a major privati- 
zation program under which it will sdl S25 biffion of stock in dozens 
of wholly or partially owned companies this year. 

Analysts said that most of the 47 companies had semi-monopoly 
status, making them especially attractive to investors. 

Under the plan, $8.6 biffion of state shares in the 47 companies 
and 10 others are to be sold to the private sector through tbe stock 
market or open bidding by 1998. Sixteen other state-controlled 
companies would be subjected to mergers or the readjustment or 
their business lines. 

State-owned concerns affected include Citizens National Bank, 
Korea Housing Bank, Korea Heavy Industries & Construction, 
Korea Tobacco & Ginseng Coqx, Korea Fertilizer and National 
Textbook Printing Co. 

The government also will seC stock h bolds in Korea Exchange 
Daewoo Shipbuilding, Kia Specialty Steel, Asiana Airlines, 
Lucky Metals, Dongbu Chemical and Samsung General Chemical. 


JOBS? EU Will Keep Score in Members 9 Battles Against Unemployment 


Confirmed from Page 9 

iterative conmnssian itself, must 
iyVi» rimng ps in labor laws, taxes 
ad regulation if the Union is to 
■verse a nearly 30-year-old trend, 
f rising unemployment. The runn- 
er of jobless in tire EU is nearly 18 
union, and Mr. Flynn said n 
Hild rise to 20 mfflkm before beg- 
inning to level off next year. 

“It's really our only catalyst,” a 
ynnrrission official,' who spoke on 
mdiikm of anonymity, said. “The 
lea is to use this as.a m ea n s of 
ressure." . ." 

Mr. Flynn’s tour started , last 
eek with a vial to The Hague for 
ee tings with Prime Minister - 


ttimd Lubbers, who is the leading 
candidate to snccecd Mc. Delors as 
commission presidenL The Nether- 
lands girts nigh mark* from the 
commission for some steps it is 

taking , incl udin g a proposed wage 
freeze and attacks on welfare 
•abuse.- ■ ■ ; . • •' ~ • • 

On Friday.Trir. Delors, the driv- 
ing force behind the white paper, 
went - to Rome, where he joined 
Prime Minister Carlo Gamps in a 
conference an unemployment 

The going may be tougher latex 
in the month when Mr; Flynn visits 
London- 'Britain's almost exdusve 
focus on slashing the welfare state 
and labor oosts conflicts sharply 
with the thrust of the white paper. 


which says that low wages alone 


without necessarily boosting j( 
and competitiveness. So far, Mr. 
Ftynn is scheduled to meet with the 
chancdlar of the Exchequer, Ken- 
neth Clarke, and Employment Sec- 
retary David Hum out not Prime 
Minister John Major. 

' Mr. Plyim will inrampt his Eu- 
toar to travel with Mr. 

to Detroit for die 
'meeting of the Group of 
industrialized nations on 
employment on March 14 and 15. 

The commission has started to 
devdop plans for trans-European 
road -ana rad networks and “infor- 
mation highways" as called to in 


the white paper. But, although 
those infrastructure projects are 
considered crucial to Europe's abil- 
ity to compete in the 21 st century, 
they will give almost no near-term 
boost to employment, Mr. Flyrm 
said. 

The structural barriers that Eu- 
rope must tear down to begin creat- 
ing jobs are almost (he exclusive 
rince of national governments, 


province c 
he added. 


CAR: Mercedes Board Is Kicking Tins on Swatch Car 

Contiimed from Page 9 - . 


industry from extinction, 
decision to bnM. a Swatch 

fade by Mercedes” would 
per sona] milestone for Mr. 
r and Mr. Hayek, both of 
sic c harismati c mdrwdua>- 

anated by each other's ideas 

ramplishmenta. . 

ould also add to a sudden 
f diversification by } Senraj 
ikecs in gpneraL Mercedes' 
layerische Moiorea Woke 
sentiy bought a oontrcmg 


interest in Rover uidU which makes 

poputo foOT-wberi drive vehicles 
and a classic town car, the Kfizn. In 
April BMW is to begin selling a 
sew compact car of its own. And 
last wea, Audi, a dmaon of 
Volkswagen -.AG,.' announced it 
wonk! build a sew small car in 
Germany starting in 1996. 

: “The game rules mow business 
have totally charted" Mr. Werner 
said last wed: m Frankfurt, citing 
new trade blocs, changing consum- 
er vakus and - growing global comr 
-petition. ■ ' 


: fit the same conversation, Mr. 
Warner also said it was thinkable 
that Mercedes would link up with 
SMR,’ winch has been searching for 
an automotive partner to its ven- 
ture to more than a year. *Td 
never say no.” he said. 

On Sunday, company sources 
confirmed that Mercedes would 
a collabaratioQ with SMH 
y this week. But they insisted 
that critical details — such a s bow 
the vehicle would be built and 
whether it would sport the Mer- 
cedes star-— renamed unresolved. 


ser- 


ASIA: Bloc of Carriers Vom to Resist Western AirUnes 

the position outtoed . by J Mr. ^nw3tia&ns,thm small oounr 
f hfong \ . . tries sriEdeady be disadvan (aged." 

. He added: “The Asia-Pacific 
aviation industry will have no 
deice but to dose ranks." 

Mr. Cheong said that division of 
the aviation, world into negotiating 
, blocs would set up new barriers to 
growth. As a result, he added, U.$- 
and European cantos “would find 
themselves restricted in catering to 
the Asia-Pacific travel boom." 


yard cautioned that 
in reaching a con*- 

juld OTtbemdereK 
sc attitudes of EU 
sd from “veryfiberai 


Airlines 


said be agreed 


with 


Analysts, however, said that 
even if regional airlines were pre- 
pared to adopt lough negotiating 
tactics -against the West; it was not . 
dear that tbck goveramentswrald 
provide fuEsuppon.- 
Still Mri Cheong saiiihat the 
European Union and the United 
States “should reodgnto vlhai if. 
they choose to pick eff inffividua} 
Asian countries one by ate inbOai-' 


The commission wants to see 
structural problems tackled before 
an economic recovery takes hold. 

“As soon as they get a bit of 
growth theyTl forget about it, and 
well be back in five years’ time in 
an even worse position,” a conunis- 
skm official said. 

PAL: 

Investor Set to Sell 

Confirmed from Page 9 

shares hdd by the group are as- 
signed to main sharenoldent. 

Besides a possible deal with the 
sultan of Brunei, the aide to Mr. 
Tan said a Malaysian group also 
was being courted to buy the stake. 
The P. R. Holdings chairman, Luis 
Virata, has been flying frequently 
to Kuala Lumpur in an attempt to 
forge a deal, be added. The group 
was not identified. 

In addition, repeals said that a 
local food and real estate- based 
magnate, John Gohongwa, was on 
Mr. Tan’s list of posable buyers. 
Mr. Gpkongwd said Sunday he 
had been looking at PAL as a possi- 
ble investment since last year. 

' '“It was offered to me, tat I don’t 
know now what’s happening to 
PAL.” he said, adding that he need- 
ed to assess the camels finances 
before reaching a decision. 

Mr. Dominguez defended the 
company’s performance, ri ting var- 
ious savings measures imjflemental 
daring his taiare, indodmg drastic 
cuts in foreign staff and negotia- 
tions to defer the delivery of sis 
Airbus A-340s ordered in 1992. 

(Reuters, Af, AFP) 


Soity and Ifamer in Fact 

* The As soci a te d Pros 
LOS ANGELES — Sony Pic- 
tures Entertainment Inc., which 

paid $500 nullion to Warner Broth- 
ers Inc five years ago to obtain the 
services of the producer Jon Peters 
and partner Peter Guber, have 
reached an agreement with Mr. Pe- 
ters allowing him to work to other 
studios. Mr. Peters declined to 
comment on the accord, which was 
announced Friday and could allow 
him to return to Warner, where his 
biggest hit movie was “Batman." 


Euromarls 
At a Glance 


Eurobond Yields 

Fed UFcfa.ll Yr bfea Yr low 


Uis. lone tern 

424 

624 

OS 

621 

U5.S, man Km 

ste 

657 

54* 

645 

US. i, mart twin 

S20 

5X4 

520 

4JB 

Pound sterthw 

4J» 

633 

6J» 

626 

Prendi treocs 

S.I3 

4X5 

4.13 

557 

ItoUass lire 

mo 

7.B 

172 

7.91 

Dantstixmoa 

6JJ 

630 

627 

630 

Swedisbkreea 

7J1 

7.M 

7J1 

7J4 

ECU, MS term 

LCl 

629 

640 

6IS 

ECU, mdm tern. 

US 

527 

605 

551 

Cu.1 

645 

65E 

672 

631 

Aes.s 

645 

663 

674 

659 

KZ.S 

445 

613 

639 

5te 

Yee 

1W 

110 

Ml 

157 


Source: Luxembourg Stuck Exchange: 


Waefcly Sales 

Primary A4orfcH 


Feb. 17 


Stiutetiti 

2540 

NOBS 

\MUQ 

1 

■TWO 

MOBS 

347940 

CsewrL 

140 

— 

35170 

25620 

Ruts 

19150 

— 

14X3.10 

TUI 

ECP 

rare 

1570.10 1MBU0 

442950 

Total 

•tftBJA 

441150 12441.90 

S44040 


Odd E endear 

s mm s ne« 
SiroteMt 1121930 2U25JB mSBJB 41,10138 

Caorert. 4T930 MB30 Z20130 LTKlM 

FRKl U1UD 148130 SJ4S.10 1908JO 

ECP 0*130 739040 04M30 2S371J0 

Tteal 2Z49UD 3atMS4fi WJJISD 7174730 

Source: Evnoctear. Coder. 


LOMBARD ODIER INTERNATIONAL 
MANAGEMENT SA. 

Registered Office: 

6, Avenue Emile-Reuter, L-2420 Luxembourg 

Dnisions of thr Board of Directors taken by Chrular Resolution. 

The Board of Directors resolves that Europe 1992 will distribute a 
dividend out of the net income from investments which according to 
the shares outstanding should result in a dividend per share of USD 
Q.05. The dividend will be paid on March 4, 1994 to those 
shareholders registered on February 25, 1994. (The cx-dale will be 
February 28, 1994.) 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


'■> ° 


Currency Management Corporation Plc 

Winchester Bouse, 77 UmdOD VkU • London EC2M 5M) 
TeL 071-382 9745 to 071-382 9487 


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Co mp etitive Rates & Daily Fax Sheet 
Call For further information & brochure 


Libor Rates 

ihmmu 

UA* 37/14 

DMtscharaart tn 
F*oond stmios 5V16 

FrWK* frnnC 6*1 

ecu tin* 

Yen 7V14 


Feb. 18 
»iaa«ii unoate 
31/14 3» 

5» SI1/U 

53/14 53/14 

«Vi» 4W 

4SA4 43/14 

9U T* 


Sources: Ltoyas Bank. Reuters. 


Last Week’s Markets 


AM figures are as of dose et trading Friday 

Stock Indexes 

United State* Feb. 18 



Money Rates 

Urared State* Feu.16 Feb.it 

Discount rate ZOO 300 

Prime rate U» bJBO 

Federal funds rate 3 3/16 3 1/16 


138240 

2064) 


137K90 +0.11 % 
2SM90 +045% 


NDdte1225 1&M0. 19,991. —5.14% 

2151.97 209041 + 2 W% 


DAX 

Hoes 


Hang Sens 1082500 114DLOO — &90% 
Yffirtd 

MSCIP 62U0 0140 +IM0% 

WorU Index From Morgan Stanley CaXtat Inti. 


Discount 
Call money 
3-montfi teteraanfc 
Cerawey 
Lombard 
Coll money 
3-month Interbank 
nrttmn 

Bank Dose rote 

Calf money 

3-month interbank 
oow Feb-M 

London pro. flitS 379RS 


1* 

2Vb 

Vfs 

646 

6.10 

SW 

SUL 

5X0 

SVm 

Fean 

38185 


116 

23/16 

2*b 

6X6 

616 

595 

SV6 

9* 

5 3/16 

cne 
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Page 12 


MUTUAL FUNDS 


Close of trading Friday, FSb. 18. 


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NAGvBp 1022 — XB Bondn 1106 -46 USGrBI 12JJ0 —05 GblnvAnllU —15 EQtln 1847 —05 MOTE P 11.11 —12 Wn llg +41 

NAGvC 1171-48 Equilv 10.99 -47 USGvBt 671 -44 GbUtvBt 1603 —15 Eoldx 1737 —08 NCTEAP 057 —09 Munlnt n 11S0 -JB 

PrGrttiApl2.16 +41 BovfwkJs Invpst: UtflBl 12X6—30 GnmaA 14J7 —10 ErCopAPnll.lB+29 NMTEp 1026 — 12 SmCopn 1*51 +.18 

PrGrfWp 12X18 +41 STYieldn 9X8 —03 CMwnftta Funds Gnmafit 142B— .10 Europe 3028 +51 NYTEP 1144 —0? OfronMA 1003—06 

Qusr A p 3421 +.15 BwiOn 1046 —06 Balance n 1610 —05 NkAAAunAl*27 — 49 ExtotFdn 101X2— X6 OHTE A pll J8 —10 Gcfctoion Soda Fmfcr: 
STNUoo 9.16—03 Eouitvn 1029 —47 ComStkn li63 +43 MDAAunAIXlS — ,10 FkMFdn 1929 +XH PATEp 1055—08 CoPGr 16B +55 

STAAOtt 9.16 — 43 BeocHB 3166 —24 Fixed n 1327 —12 MIMunA 1610 —13 Fifty 1186 +42 TnTEAp 1U9 — 10 Gtilnc 1429—16 


iBTVpll.ll — XB Growth P 1Z59 +26 RBB Gvt px 1028 — .14 MDMuf InllM —10 EmAASp TJX? +41 

X2iAp38J6 +2X Encomep-lllB — XB RCM Rjnd.21XS .+21 USnd hi 10X7 -76 F»E« KJ8.+.14 

riB 3823 +21 Europe p 1871 +28 RSI TTwfc ' USUicTn 10X7 -76 FEKfi 1233 _ 

fp 1*03 +.13 PtonrFdP2333 _ AtSBd ' 2Z.7S —2* VOEgHo 12X1 — 09 JSWtfhS 1231 +44 

SbcApUM — 70 PlnMBdplQ62 — ,10 Corn 3526—29 - VtfBtT n 1*XI — 08 ThlrdAvV_ 1750— 42 


EquihrpnUir —03 
Govlnc 1156 —10 
Gnnc .3147 —08 


p mn m 

GrtnBr ?0S9 —09-'.. 
M»E«A 1252 +XB * 


1*71—04 toOGr 2359 +44 BnGr 36» +38 i VAAAtlTnllJM -79 Hion«*enOrawe L MEoA 1252 i-XD 
1466—05 Rorr U p 19X0 . inffld 2559— .10 i VrfAunltllXU— 09] BrtnA 1255— 07 1 NYTF 1176 —U 


U41 +.10 USGvA ‘ 9X3-781. IATT 


26.13 —13 ItWtGv 1130-24 RHAspc 10X3 — 01 Equ*yAp15X7 +45 EqlnB. 1222—08 MNhtS 1046 —TV . ■ 

522 —04 Ifut&rAcSlGXX —02 jCMSC 1770 +73 56vtA 1176—10 GrwthBt 2128 +.10 Mfenktf 11 XU -XB . « 

523—05 M NTE 11.10—09 SAMI Pfdnf-93 +43 IncGraAoUXl —03 tocoRMBl 830 — 05 MJnnTF 1375—11 w 

>*81—02 NaJITE 11XM —13 SJrfpEnnl734 +2S MhtA 974 . HBf 1274—10 MO Ins 1168—78- ... 

i 422— XH PocEurG UX0 _ SkGwttinH17 — 05 MM . 1892 +75 OporSt 2946 +43 NatfTF 1045 —09 ■ • 

i 508 —04 Sector P 1739+37 SOSTEfl HUB MB - 1877 +45 BrvcMeffl 12XT +JO NDTF 1147 —05 - * 

2613— 12 V|*jep 1954 —05 StMn 1044—07 AAoGovtA 1226—04 SWGVB 9X6 -XJ2 USSv i860— S-' 1 * 

1027—' 13 PtarfTNtx BUS— 08 gerBln 1171—01 AAuCalA 1253— 08 TaxBS 11*30 —18 WattMUlndt 


Ous'A D J4JI 4. is Bnndn 1QJM J16 Bcdonce n 1 HI 0 — J15 MAMiiiA1127 — 09 ExrtMniOljCZ — M OKTEAP11J8 —.10 CflMn w iWttftitfy: Gfwttin 17JJ0 — JF7 LTMFIVp 10 j06 — MS MNotlSt 10-79 —v0? GtobEnvp11.11 ^01 Growth P 12-59 +A RBB Gvt PX10J8 — +14 MDWuftnKlW — JO EnttASp TL47 +JH BWjtypnlJ.17 — 

STMtaP 936-^73 1029 =47 ^mSSiM5-10 rSmo . 8W +2S WTCp I0S -M cSS? iKTs 1348 ^06 I xnfTYm PX1 0XI 7 -M NJ^Wt 1145-11 Oo^Ap38M +30, hromep-1118 -» ROriRrt 21X1 .*21 IM^In 10^-0* ..MM »vtac -M J 

STAAOtt 9.16 —43 BeocHB 3166 —24 Fixed n 1327 —12 Ml AAunA 1610 — 13 Fifty 1046*42 TnTEAp U39 —10 GtHnq 1*79—16 InvBp 1578 .Lb^erFtortB NYMnB t 4 —09 GtoUB 380+21 E wapep 1841 +28 H SMtoj* ~ SS5 IH? ^ -S S2 HSw.--?IS "^S 

Techp 2846 + JO BSEmpDW 1042 — 18 Govt 831 —42 AANAItonAlSXO — .12 GNMn 1041 —48 UIUAp 1032 —15 Grtnc 1521 +XS6 LTGvAP 873—01 ™Vn vn —49 SSUSSSS in vS _*• uZmrS Eai 

Wldincp 1.90 . Bow* mark Funds: Grthn 27.15 +23 MOMuB 113.15 —10 GtaBd 1228—18 VATEAp 1191 -78 InflEa 1772 +.15 MATE! 1*19 —12 Rmdn 23.96 +.16 OHMB1 1141 —12 GvtSecA ptOW —03 PtoMBdPlOXJ —10 3SJ6—39 VdBiTn ]*XI — Xg ThlrdAvV17X 0 — 42 GWr —7*- ■■ 

AmSdUth FUndK Baitwed 1035 -JU IrttStkn 1331 +42 MuBcfi 1 14X8—10 GtaBcIn 13X5—13 FtoFwxls Mtrtlnc 1*46—12 MpTEB 11JB7 —IB . UWn _ .112 0—03 P«fi t 21J5 —21 WYUA *71 — « MCr. ZU* +M BTjGr 3t» +3| VAMdr iniTj^g TltontoraBnnfk „ . M EgA 1233 »Xg - 

Btfance 1245 — XB Bond An 2025 —IB AAunin 1161-47 AAuniBdA 1448 — 10 GvtSecn 1116 — .13 Bond np 19.94—25 •*&& 1576+42 NYTElD 12X1 -49 Uw n toSayly gAAWt HSi —09 HTY^ }*** 5°g HjP WXO ■ 2SS9 —10 VqMogltllX M —09 ^tjA U^-77 NY TF 1171 —U .. 

Band 11.06 -XH DivGrAn 1043 -46 Speton 2031 +.10 NCAAuA 13J6 — 13 GroCo 2930 -JJ9 GtoUipn 933 +41 SmcCop 20X2—4 4 ST3r«e 6XH —04 terton U3C —08 PhrxSt 13X1 —12 ^0.1^ P 'JX6 —32 PtaTTtfee P21 46 +^ SITE 1^40 +41 WeMd* ■. ^wlhA 2231 +.10 STBdp 10.10 . +■ . 

Eauitv 1506 _ EqldxA n 10.95 —05 Common Sens* NCAAuBt I3J5 — ,13 Grow* 22X7 —43 Growth np!379— 08 Goldman SadtoJ task SpcfEAp 15J8 +24 GtoBdn IMB -71 STGBf 656 —74 JnfriTE p 1546 — Id gTtoC 3^—41 _M*U -36X7—11 BkOPe . ?I-I* +4g 

Gvtln 9.79 -45 FocGrA 1189 —03 Govt 1197—1* NY AAunA 1*95 — .10 Hmd 1*78—12 AAuIrfdlpn SX7 +41 AcSGv 925 _ SiXdEBp 1690 +24 Growth pnl341 —21 SpVIBt 1575 +77 ftvGrAp 1196 — W Ta>f«P123 — U RiAtowwn SJJ TS ^ WA - ~ ^-1^— >1° * 

LtdAAal 1058 —04 ShfDur 1043 . Grolrc 1646 —47 NY MuBt 1*95 —.11 InsAAun n l*X» — 12 Fwdq lnen 1157-73 GovAo 925 . SpOraA 859 -45 ln®in U56 +20 ar Dv Bt 12X8 —11 MStncGrAMja +.15 JXSGvp 11 35-79 ReoGmp ^l SX* +73 J*£ +■” SE22»* V 5S* lwF fr« M 

RegEq 17.1B —03 SiBdAn 2025 —04 Growth 1563 + 46 OHMuA 13J7 — J* IrrtBdn 1164 —49 (torts Fond* ShrtTF 1114—44 SpcOpsB 857 —05 5mC npnJ *14 +48 Tochet ,478 +.19 MtotocA W— ]0 9 *8f Jtf BBjf. .. .Se& MIH BX» +43 : gnra«A HJ0 +.10 AJm ]120— K - 

Amcnalnc 7il4 -39 StvCalA 1164 -41 AlknB 1320—14 OHMuBt 1X37 — 49 InwGvfn 9J9 -45 AstABp 1*45 — « STGov 929— JB SM re Ip 730 -JH UfdAkb** 72. &XCTJCP 1226—04 OBB of J1JS-M « g SWGvA 9S —01 COTE XJ-7'. 

Ambassador Fid: r USGvA 19.98 —04 Comnan CBPltafc PAAAunA 1696 — 15 IntlGrln 1802 —05 Co»Adp 94X2 — 34 Gavelt Funds TakExfh 11JJ7— 11 MIMo 10J6 —41 W«nBt 9.10 — 22 NYTxB n TIM —16 Em«Gr *0X4 +45 Tim —M IMC 1891 +JJ TarotfA. 12X7 — M FLjrgd 11^—08 

BokicF 1036 —OS USTIctkA H20X4 — .1 7 Eatylnco 1242 +43 PAMuBI 1696 — .14 InvGBn 7JS — .11 Cert Mo 1724 -.16 1 DvtpBd 9X5 —10 J Hancock FTOddm: | B»idDebP923 — 01 WKSncfl t_ 929 -74 OpWn 11^+48 Govfn 9X3 —10 MDy 1146 —06 CasApA 1424 +.0 TgjA- 1*30 —18 GraSOc p 1729 —07 ' 

Bondn 9.94 —08 Beaham Group: Fxdln 10J4 — 08 TXAAuA J 1X7 —18 Japcxin 1*95 +45 Rctocro 29X6 -26 EmaMk 1932 —10 AvTech 1150 +49 DMjglriF«X5 +£l AWrftnmnfK PA1EArt*68 —.16 ftqic 10X4 —08 MLM 972— » CsMaB US1 +.10 US&/A 9X3 —0B MTf 922—08 ." 

CoreGrFni7.11 —.10 ArtGovn »* .. Growth 1132 - 48 VAAAuA 1727 — 17 LatinAmn 17.50— 53 G*Gfttip 1S.1S +JB GIGvIn 927—77 EnvmAp 9,17 —10 Eq 1990 p 1*25 —.03 AstAflnf 1U6 +JH SpeUAo 26.13 —.13 IhSfGv 1130 —24 RlAAspc 10X3 — 01 EqutyApl5X7 +XH EqlnB. 1Z» —78 MNhtS 1046 —TV , ■ 

Growth n 1355— X» CaTFin 1126 — X59 intiEa 13,78 — 05 VAMUBI 1727 —.17 uoMun 947 —.08 GovTRp 841-49! bffiEn 1348—07 GOnBt 9X1 —XU Fdvdup 1341 tXXJ CccApp# 18*7 +XJ2 ShtncAp 522 —04 IfutGvArtlGXU —02 K3MSC 1770 +73 GKWtA 1196—10 GrwthBt 2128 +.H M/nnkrt 1146 —05 . • 

IdxStkn 1*08 —05 CnTFin n 1D29 — 12 IntlFI 1189 +.01 Dreyfus StratogiC: LowPrr 1817 +.19 Grwlhp 3.94 -41 PfcStg 1112—13 GtobAP 13J3 -43 GCqp 11337 +41 R«Bd«nl03l +41 ffrtotflt 522 —05 M NTE 11.10-79 3AMIPfdnf23 +43 IncGTOAoUXl —03 tncaroeBt 830 — 05 MJnnTF 1*65—11 « 

inrBanan 9.73 —.06 CaTFSn IDXtO —03 MunBd 1196—10 GIGrp 3605 —29 MITFn 1*11—12 HiYldP 9.04 -43 SmCbs 172* +XB GtoCBt 1157 — ffl Gimcp 845 —X» Grin 1*14 +75 ShjSTTAp *81 — 02 NafflE 11 34 — 13 SfrfpEqnT734 +2S tocftotA 954 •» HBT 1274—10 MO Ins 1058 — 78 • .. 

Irtish: n 1185 —23 CalTFH n 950 — 47 NJMun 11X6 — X39 Growth P 38J4 _JW AANTFn 1130 — 11 TF MN 10J1 — JI9 ■ GvtEaty n 23X1 — JJ7 ffltnA 9X1 —XU Oo vtSdC P 223—02 AAetLBeStotoSfc SftnGrAp 522 —05 PocEskG 1660 _ SfcGwftinW.17 — 75 InSA . 1822 +55 OPtfOt 2946 +43 NatfTF 10X5 —79 ■ 

3mCDGrnl*30 -.11 CafTFLu U5J — .17 Shninf 1153—42 Income P 1*56 —13 Maeetfm 7102 +28 TFNet 71.15 —10 jGrrafisaaAWJtoaafck GtoORx 17X0+57 HaTTFTr 4,92—07 CaaApA 1056 +44 SfrhtvAp MB —44 Sector p 1739 +XZ7 SWTRn VUB MfB 1877+45 ProcMafSttfl +J» ND TF 1147— 05 - ' 

Ambassador tow ■ EqGron 1*M—a5 Composite Group: tnvA 2145—09 Mktlnd nr 3*83 —16 TFNY 1134 —46 EstVofpn 23.12 +48 GfTecti 1893 +25 Trad^p 1145—13 CasApB 1051 +XM TaroefD 2613—12 _Vtfijep 1954 —65 Shflaln 1044—07 AAoGovtA 12J6 —M SWGvB 9X6 —02 USGv 1160 —13 M 

Bondn 9.94 —48 1 EurBdn 1043 +.12 BdStkD 1*11—05 invBt 21.68 —09 MATFn 1*03 —08 US Gvt 9.75— 10| CcvtncD 1326 — 09 GoidA 1611—33 TFCTP 10X1 —10 CobAdC 1QXC +75 TxFrfl 1027— 13 PtarflTW MTS— Hi SerBIn 11 Jt —01 AAuCalA 1223— XB TmBffl 11230— II MMdal UtBa* * 

CoroGrn 17.10 —ll GNMA n 10J1 — JJ6 Growth p 12X2 +JU Ouprae Mutual: MWSecnllM — JJ7 Farlrorahnrsfc ■ OHTFo 1338 —11 Gofcfit 1647 —33 TkFrC0lplU2 — 10 EqtncA 1120 +.12 TxFrAp 1828 —12 MaNt TSWEq 1148—01 MiiFLA 1355 —09 TOraetB 1*56—12 TafRef 1255 +46 ' - 

Grwtnn 1395 —07 1 CckJlnn 1191 —ID inosFdP 922 —09 infCovn 1059 —09 Munain 856 —OB AdBW? 940 OppVol p 1868 +.J9 PdcScj 1553 —28 TFH-p ill —06 EfltocC 1149 +.11 TJmep 1857 +77 BoJX» 2105.— 05 7JWHX 70J8 —70 MuUtM- 677—00 U5GOVB? PJ9 — « Growth ^MJl 

IntBond n 9.93 —46 1 incGron 1*92 — 09 1 NW50P 1*87 +36 KYTFn 7X8 —XH NYHYn 1*76—16 Bondr 10JH — M GH76NTE 10X4 — 13 RsBkA 20X9 —04 TFMOp 5X1—03 EainvstA 1154 +74 TotRtAp 881 . BdkfiC *727—23 TSWW1 11X4 +.16 MunNtA ,1478 — HI Thertiburi M: Umm ■'ltipi - -*te 

InttSlkn 1185 -221 LTreasn 9.94 -25 TaxEkP 7.91 -.09 KYSMfn 430 - NYlnsn 12.03 —13 GlSrn 9.06 -06 1 G+«aTTE 1054 —11 RgBkBl 20X2 —04 TFNJ a 538—04 EalnyC 1357 +XU TatRffln 877 _ Eqlnclx 3349 —15 RdhTanen 1724 +44 MuNJA 1AM — ,11 MMU 1337—08 MtlO - 1045—10 Z. 

SmCoGr nl430 -.11 : NTTFln 11X» — XH USGav p 1QX5 — 11 EBIPundr NewMktnl*97 — 30 Aitonlnet 11.16 — 47 . Greenspmo 1425 + 4S J Hancock Save** TaxNY p 1147 —09 GovSecA 734—06 LJ5Gvtp 9 JS — 07 Grtnc n 23X0 +49 Rembrandt Rendu MuNYA 1156— DO LidTUi 1235 —54 Gtohd 954 +44 . 

TFlmBdnl052 —US I NTTFLn 11 2D —.14 ! Conestoga Funds: Equity [1 6027 +X» NewAAin 13X3 +48 OHFcrtp 1153 —11 1 Guertton Fond* j Acn A 1*27 +46 TFTXp 1049 —12 rtlncA 666 +XH VatStAp 1457 +JU InffidM 1122—75 AtiaTl ■ 973—8 5HT5Y 612 —IB LRICtf 1221 —05 WctfBt 821 +415 ' 

Ambassador Ret A • STTreflin 9.96 —02 1 Eqxty 1549 —05 Rex a 54X5—15 OTC 24X9 +29 Iffll r 1248 —15 AS Alloc 11.16 —07 AchBt 1222 +47 TFPAP 525 -45 Wlncfl 665 +42 Oi8 rt— I EBW88: MhAjrt.n22.il +44 BatTTn 1047 +JT1 USGVtA TUI —05 LMGVfp 1*55 — 76 Wartiure Ftacue ' 

Bondf 9.96 —03 1 Tnrl99SnM53 —.15 incmx 1059 —10 income P 6S2S —IB OnTFn 1170 —11 44WtflEa 650 -JB GaGhdl 1152+41 BdAO 1078 -46 TF HI p 520 —.05 InflEqp IQXfl +.10 AltAMA 11.95 —06 STBondnM36 — 02 GTictnTrrlD55 +48 UfflAp 1*79—13 Lmunpl3X7 —45 Gfhton lUS +36 + 

CoreGri 17l0_.il TartOdOh 70X1 — .93 UdMaJ * 10J0 — .07 1 MultlRx _ Ovrsec 2S40 - 20 '.Fprqm Ftiodfc Bondn 1121 —06 BclBa 10JO — 46 TF MJ 5.16—06 IndFxlnf 815 +.14 CATE A 1135 —09 SpGrn 3234 +JH GwthTrn 1053 - Sn*ShDftilllO— 71 MUM 1325 —48 CDpApphU21 _ „ 

Grwtnl 13.95 -07, TartaC5n49X6-l.l5 ConnAAutuot .EtfonVonCK PacSU 1942 —23; InvBnd 1176 —48 PcrkAv 2949 -48 BandAfp 1538 — 15 TFWAp £21—46 ModAilB 935 - MutncA 11.10—15 1VStiMnia22— 08 WfiEqTTnnxiO +42 SrrfirthGf H03 -71 Ttaiuev 1130 „ EhiGthn 3*54 +.13 ■ . 

IntBc+dl 9.73 — 04 TVS0i0r>U37 — 124 Sevr 1881—10 Oitoao 7442 — X5 Puritan 1625—06 InvSW *34 - Stockn 29X7 -.17 Mv Ap 7548—43 VtduAPPPl74J +43 MadAstA 93 8 -41 SiraGrA 1371 +26 Preto i i p d Croton SJGvFTT 9X7—06 snUBBawSferoeAi TOwer Plitxto: ' “ Snnft-7 i* 

intlSik i 1075 -32, TarOTIS n 2724 -123 , Grwth 1SX2 -41 EVSrfc 1159 —82 RoalEat h 1*02 - 31 MEBnd 1183 —39 TcxEx 1103—131 USGvA p 1112 — ll US Govt *?J _45 AAodAsfC 939 +71 ST Govt 5143 - AaetAfl 1142 — 79 SmCBBT UU4 +J0 AcSGv A P 921 —01 Qx»A»llX3 —08 MMUHl+n •■* 

SirCcGrTNJO *.11 1 Tort020n19.l3-l.CS, Income 9.84 — 03: Growth B 823 +.02 RotGrn 1824—09 TaxSvr 10X2 —XU USGovt 1028 —49! USGvBt 1111—11 LtfheranSr« RschBatC 9X3 _ USGvIA 1QJ3 — 11 Fxtflnn 1027—07 TEFTTYnUlA —OB AdWAp 27X5 — 32 LAMn 11X0— « 21 * 

TrWBdt 10X2 -.05; TNofen 1141-46 TsrRtf 1*78-45; incflcsp 676 _ SrtTBdn 9X9 — 43 1 Pounder* Group: HTirsEa p 13.17 —06 JAVBol 1325 *41 BnPflYd 9.96+71 TaxExA 83 1 —07 VRGA 927 —42 Growth n i*» -20 TakFTTTnlD.14 — 42 AaGrAp 27X2 +X0 TafaRet 1111 —08 ira^an ISM — IS - 

Amsare Vimogc , UWIncon 9.61 - TT.COPtevft 2048 —32 ; MunBd 10X7—09 ST Wldn 1049 —44: Bainp 9.11 -43 H7MSF1 w10J4 — 11 KSAAUi 1*75—41 Fund 17.95 —46! TkEkB 630 — 08 PBHGGrn 15JB +2S Win 1176+34 Voft«TrnM2a —71 ApprAp 11.17 —JS LSGv 70X9 Mlartn ■ 

Eayirv iDi? aeroorGrawB IcwoFaiid*: ' STGWi 929—10 SmallCao 11.10 -.15 . BtoeChprciX* -.07 HahfnOto 9.T3 . IICSIAAunLni55 -47 Inatmex 884— .1} AMMatac 11X14 —08 PFAMCaMc STGcvn 1040 — 02 RtfWtovTrtf: TtfGAp 12X2 — .1* Trademark NYAhinl niSS ^76 '1 

Fxlnco -.117 _X8 i Bonn 1748 -.31. aacnAn 1049 -02 < STTsyp 55.77 -43 SE Asian 1*54 —37 1 Ducvo 2ixi -.1? HcnarariavPdK -Koufmipinr *9 -43 AtoS .672 —.12 MMwasfe Bakxi 10X3-77 Vafcieo 11X6 . Balanced 1720 — 04 TOOn 103XT-2X7 &SynxloS+41 Utaa^AaMifi— 2s 

mtdiTF x 1036 — .10 1 101 on 11.95 -os; Ealdx Ilxs —13 SpcEgtp 8X8 -XH SttcSic 19X6-47 Frnrrp 23X6 -21 BOG 1035 — 03 Kemper Ponds OeoGr 1162 -.13 AtfiUSGvt 9 49 - CopApn 73.92 +49 Price Rtodtt EaGra 1846+43 Ti Cff^mroJJS * 13 * 

AmerAAdvanh I SmCoGr 1 65 -44 00901 9.98 —10; TrodGvt 1121-47 sh-Ooot HAS —25 1 Gov Sec 9J2 — 15 STGv 943 —43 ArtGovx 8X4 —04 MAS FWd* Govlp 1020—11 DJvLOwn 1*10 — 04 AdUS .476 - „ Ealncom 18X3 — IS CcMuAP 1U1 ^73 Svj^fSmS?” n* 

Sctotif! i?.3S — .07 ; Bemstoin Fde ! GrEan 7124 —.06 Trodtrve 728 -.01 Trtndn 59X0 -27; Grwfhnp 1297 -42 5mCoGr 10X3-46 BtoeOn 1291 —22 BaktoaednriJ7— 03 tofCSvp 7IJM — 09 EmeroMlcridXS — M Balm 1127—05 ham 1520—35 WviSftncpaxi ^44 SGovIm^^— n Sv« if ' . 

Eau.tr n 14.53 -04; GvSnOunl2A? -.04 WlSdn 1040 -.04 Trad Tati px 84 1 — 21 USBln 10X8 —48 1 Rsscrtn 1275 -.11 ’ USGcvt 1004 —09! OM 7X9 — 44 1 EmerGrnl7J0 +.14 Le*WXt1IAll77 — 13 EnhEqn 11X8 —46 BCTiG 1174 +45 ReynBICh 1*83 +71 FtJValA pB44 +^W Tre™™riac Groe TV, ^ 

:nilEar/rl2X9 -4B| VrtDurn 1*61-06 mUGrit 13.96 —IS > Eaton V Lid Mhn UtOIncn 15.14-291 Sdeeipn 7.91 -43 Harbor Funds: 1 DMncos 8X5 -Oil Bwjavn *1X1 +45 LeshTsvA 920 —15 Ealncn 11J4— 04 CoTTxn 10X2—10 RtotafhmGnxiR. GIOBAp 30X4 +26 Ack 3T^M7 — 41 Gwfh IJJ S+llo . 

LtdTrmn IOM -34 intern 13J4-.15' ValEaRonl3M-.il , OHTsFt 10.17 — 48 \ Valuer) 4141 -46 i WWnGrolBX* -.15 Bend 1123 —08; EnvSvc 1175 —02 1 Fxdlfilln 1128— 13! CHTF 12X9 —14 Intln 1*12+74 CraAPrn lin — 04 BJneQip 3*62 +73 HBncADc W21 -21 CATFAo 1QJ3— ra oISvEn n 

AmerCarttot ! COMun 13X5 — JJ? CewpniGr 1»2* — 1? CoT*Ft 1048 — C7 WHdw 1142 -.10 FMMab>5aito7»FdS C=Apcn1742 +24 FLT* 10X3-49 FxdJnctl 11J9 —12 1 TFWp 11.13—06 MgdBdl 11)007 -78 DfVGroi) 71X5 -71 RT«Bfp2BX7 +73 fafCAA 853—47 QliS» n» *S ' hmn lift 

CmjiA p 16JI — J? DivMun n 13JE — X8 : CawenOa 1285 -48 , FLTxFi 10X4— C3 PkMhyStfetfs: | Botoncw: 10.X — 7» Growth n 13X6 -48 GWnc* 9.19—08 GlFnin 10X9 +41 I USGovLM 846 — 16 MklCai 1422 +.10 Eqlnc n 16J5 — 10 GovSecnxl326 — 29 WNYa 8X7—47 BrtGAD wra 1+3 WiSw«iFi>u_S > 

CmsTgo 14X1 — C7 j NY/Ayn h I3X? —46 I Crobhe Huntu MATxFf 1040 -07 Air 17X2*20 Gq/TScc 1035 —Xt Irtfln 25.12 —19 Grlh 1190 -XB HYStCSn 941 — XO IMonefta 1873+76 SmCpG 1922 +7* EaWxn 13X6—07 Growth p 25X9 —17 UdMUB Ovfncp * 827 — W w^vnl liif Him ‘ • 

CpBdBs 7.12 —45 1 mnvain 16X7 -.01 I auaUp 1329 -XJ2. MiTxFt 1C7»— 08 AmGowr 2156 —Oil MiaCcD 10X2-75 irBGr 11X2+45 HIYMds 1029 — 09 ItWEqn 15X4 — 11 McntflMC U4T +.12 SmCpV 1X18 +.11 Europe ft 1*36 +2> MMCOPP 28.12 +71 LHfTrs 7X9 — « Gr^S T1»Zra ."T^ *n 

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iumrBNATlomXi HERAUP TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 199* 


Page 13 



Cq Marietta Dei 
Partof U.S. Savings 
On Dynamics Deal 


WOU0 STOCKS IH REVIEW 


SHORT COVER 


Via Agwi fi u ie j rfW B xa 


whether to raise local interest rates to the U.S. curved as a h2L f -heart«Unieresi-raie cut bv the 
level The association, however, decided lute Bundesbank, the CAC-40 index feu -3.31 
Friday to keep the colony’s prime interest rate points, or 1 percent, to 2.251.78. 
unchanged at 6.5 percent. 


By Andrea Addson 


New York Tima Savtu 
NEW YORK —Marta Mariei- 


ietta od the transaction, was not 
available for-eomm^ - 
Bui Daniel W. Smith, director d 


Amsterdam 

Pmfh- taking last week 
port from a German interest-rate easing. 

CBS all-share index closed at 2S8 JO 

Undon 

big losers. Royal Dutch lost over 3 percent, cre p l mg^ last week as the market 

faffin g to 208.70 gmldera. Unflews dose was ^ caught between hopes for interest-rate cuts 
225 emkkrs, down from 230.60 guilders-. and worries about poor economic indicators. Singapore 

The Straits Times Industrials index fell 7.33 
points, to 2334.27, as li.S.-Japanese trade ten- 


The Bundesbank’s rale cut, seen as largely 
symbolic since the reduction did not extend to 
the more important Lombard and repo rates, 
failed to convince investors of an important, 
long-term trend. 


TtfFwvrmie u..[- inn.- i. v . . With a 1 bOhon guilder Stock isarc imminent, yjjg jqjupoaj Times-Stock Exchange 100- 

■ ^ YORK Omste prqcct at the to 50-70 guildm. up 3.7 fmnis, 10 3.3816. 

■u proofed n^raeaiciffl^iKm.sail j, catoB, indufe a Oi percSTfall in indusiriil 

Frankfurt 

The ma ^geri a respectable gam last ployment in January and a weak nse in banking 

wed; hri p—* ' by the Bundesbank's half-point credits would force Cha n cellor of the Exchequer 
reduction of : its disebont rate, to 535 percent, Kenneth Clarke to reduce interest rates, 
on Thursday. ■ Shares fdl on Friday, however, following 

The DAX index finished the week at 2,151.97 weakness on Wall Street and the publication of 
points, up 6136 points, or 3 percent. a study by Nomura Research Institute revising 

Analysts said the market was encouraged by downwards its forecasts for the Financial 
■ the discount rate count, even though the Lom- Times 1Q0 index, sees as ending the year at 
bard was left unchanged, because it meant the 3300 points and not 4,000. 
central b™* was likehr to lower its securities Among companies announcing earnings, 
repurchase rale over the next few weeks. AD Glaxo gamed 40 pence to 679 after a 22 percent 


). unless the. Pen tar Martm. Marietta’s taxing. . 
gives the company a share of ' He . noted that William J. Ferzy, 
savings it expfectsthe traosac- before be became secretary of de- 
fense, advocated belping out cru- 
cial military suppliers whose viabil- 
ity was threatened by Pentagon 
spending cuts. 

Fcracample, the Navy wDl buy a 
third Seawotf submarine for 523 


lion to bring. 

The S2Q8-S milli on transaction 
with General Dynamics, agreed to 
in December, needs tbe approval of 
the Federal Trade Commission, 
which is not expected before April 


sioos pushed investors to the sidelines. 

Fraser Neave fell 4 percent, to 1830. while 
Inch cape lost 3 percent, to 5.75. Singapore 
Land dropped 14 percent, to 6.90. 

Tokyo 

Prospects for a rising yen after U. E-Japauese 


Unilever Acquires Russian Company 

ROTTERDAM (Reuters) - Unilever Group »id Sunday it had 
acqiSdaMpercent stake in Sevemoye Siyamye. a Russian producer of 

fr TS^^OT^A^Dutch consumer-produce, wnccro said 
ibe!U^m^mp^a>' , s private shareholders had been paid in cash for the 
on nmm! «aVe He declined to disclose the amount- 

is based in Si. Petersburg and hM 1 .000 employees. 

Iran Buys 5 South Korean Tankers 

TPHR AN (Reuters) — Iran has placed a S490 million orderfor live oil 
Korean company and is negotiating for 16 more, an 

0 Tfc general dir«,or of Nanonal 

saa kl£W=b 

oapad,y of 1.5 million metric urns. 


In the meantime, Martin Manet- WniaatoawttclDsi^ 
ta is seeking what could be apreco- Beane' -ton' jmtattm 


trade talks failed last week seat the 225-issue 1 * A Unit of AF.C 

Nikkei Stock Average down 1 .031.10 pants, or 5 ElgCtTOiUX tO ACCTULTC LIDll OI ADu 
percent, to 1K959.60. Tbe brcod^ Tokyo Stock ^ _ gccudux AB of Sweden 


dent-setting concession from the fae, be cause reopram® **> jajes ^charged on coQateraKzcd loans rise in half-year profits. 

Defease Department, to give it a to' banks, with the limited amount of funds British Airways fell 3 pence to 472 despite 


“Martinis 

Smith said. 


same 


. - ■■ _ _ W „ D , available at the discount rate forming a floor tripling its third-quarter profits from the 

at 5450 mfflkm, to be reafized by Spamsam. Manip uoo^ r OT German money-market rates and the emer- period in the previous yea r. Hanson shares were 
consolidating the- two companies? tnrcHiE^tiiet«cicTOOTBasKingiOT The repo rale is steady at 287 pence, down 2 pence, after pub- 

space4aundimg operations. . . ; a go vernm ent rotaiay. . ■ ^ to guide interest rales between the two. fohinz, strong results. 

“Ite opportunity to shmemthe M ntm Mmem c o ateads^jh at ^ Deutsche Bank S 

savings rennportant to making this J^SSS^riSES^canse of in- gamed 35 Deutsche marks for the week to end 

TTv^anlr, 9830 to 35930; andBayerische Ver- 
emsbank 930 to 51Z70. 


1. sulqea to antitrust clearance. AEG is a unit of Daimler-Benz AG. 

Iberia’s Argentina Stake to Be Raised 


Giaramita, a spokesman: for the de- 
fense-contracting and. aenxqnce 
company, said Fnday. 

^Ihe transaction is aborted, Mar- 


particulaily risky 
tense competition . 
in other countries that 1 
gio ve mmenlr sub sidized. 

Among Martin Marietta’s con- 
solidation choioes are transferring 


Milan 


tm Marietta wffl have to pay Geoer- to Denver General Dynamics? At- 
alDynauricsaSlRmilBcn penahy. las rodtet building business, wtech 
“We haven't ddsmuned tritat ‘ * ' 

we're going to do yet,” Glens Flood, 
a Pentagon spokesman, said of the 
Martin Marietta 
rotary of Defense 


has 2,400 employees in San Di^p. 
It is idso possiblethal MartmMap- 

etta’s 5300-anployee astraiantics 

Undaseor division, yritich. builds beav 
M Deutcfa, load Titan rockets in Denver,< 


The Bank of Italy’s decision to follow the 
Ge rman interest-rate cuts helped the Mibtel 
index move up 57 pouts, to 10.973. Fears about 
the strife in Bosnia limit ed the gains. 

. Hong Kona share prices tumbled last week. ^ 5? * 

witolte emScI pressured by fears of rising P®£“ 1 ' to rf!,’ 31111 Monlcdlson up 0 
rafM Uo7 from 1,163. 


HongKong 


- wboisnegotiating with M^tmMar- - be moved to San Diep>. 

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


interest rates. 

The Hang Seng Index dived 678. 15 points, or 
‘ '6 percent, to dose at 10,825.88 on Friday. 

Brokers said most investors were awaiting 
thr Hong Kong Bank Association’s derision 


Paris 

With France f ailin g to follow what was per- 


Price Index fell 3 percent, to 1357.11 points. 

Sony fell 260 yen to 6.030 yen and Toshiba 28 
to71S yen. Toyota was down 30 yen at 1,870 yen 
and Nissan down 12 at 826 yen. 

Financials also declined, with Nomura Securi- 
ties down 60 yen ai 2.190 yen and Fuji Bank 
down 90 at 2350 yen. 

Zurich 

m a 

The market rose Iasi week, despite nervous- gj^Qg ^trfs (APj — A rgentina plans to transfer 28 percent of the 

ness over European interest rate tre nds. T he ^ ^ f onner iy ^rate-owned airline Aerolineas Argentinas to the 

Swiss Performance Index .edged up 1 percmti w Spanjsh President Carlos Menem said. 

26.42 points to 1.92536 from last weeks The Areeniinian government still owns 43 percent of tjjecarner. Iberia 
1.899.14. „ owns 30 percent and has operated the airline since late 1 990. Mr. Menem 

Switzerland's failure to follow the Bundes- ^ how y, e ^ansfer 0 f shares would be earned out. 

bank’s example of cutting its discount rates m 
German v disapoointed the market and foreign 
investors withdrew to the sidelines. 

SBS was one of the bigger winners after 
announcing impressive profU figures for last 


StfSCT ^ “ M55 ’ UK ^ ** 


For the Record 

Pdian btenadond AMiik said revenue 


OTC Consofidated fratfii® for week 
ended Friday, Feb. IB. ' 
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/ 




73 m 



Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY: 21, 1994 


M O 


A Y 


SPORTS 


Arizona Duo Upstages Bruins’ Backcourt 


The Associated Press 
Arizona’s front line, which has 
played second fiddle to UCLA's 
touted backcourt this season, came 
up with a big stop in Tucson. 

Khalid Reeves scored 23 points 
and Damon Stoudamire added 22. 


COLLEGE BASKETBALL 


8) lost Ervin Games. David John- 
son and Jarrell Evans to fouls. 

No. 2 North Carolina Virginia 

56: Jeff Mchuus scored a season- 
high 16 points and North Carolina 
(21-5, 94 Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence) went on a 1 9-2 second-half nm 
while holding Virginia (13-9, 7-6) 
without a basket for 1 1 minutes. 

No. 3 Connecticut 81, Provi- 


dence 73: Dcmydl Marshall scored 
its and Connecticut (22-3, 12- 


27 

2 Big East) remained undefeated in 
13 home games. Providence fefl to 
12-9 and 5-8. 

No. 7 Michigan 72, No, 20 Min- 
nesota 65: Jalen Rose scored 25 
points and Michigan (194, 1 1-2 Kg 
Ten), playing at hone, won its 
eighth straight and ended the Gold- 


en Gophers’ (18-8, 8-5} four-game 
winning streak. 

No. 16 lreSana 82, No. 9 Pttnfae 

80: Todd Liadaaan made two free 
throws with seven seconds to go and 
the Hooaera (16-5, 9-3 Big Ten), 
playing at home, won despite 39 
points from Glenn Robinson, the 
nation's leading scorer, for Purdue 
(214,94). 


No. U Kentucky 77, Vandshat 
fifc Trams Ford scored 22 points - 
and die visiting Wildcats (20-5, 9-3 
SEC) took control with a 274 run 
midway through the Best half. Van- 
derbilt (13-9. W) pulled within six 
twice in the final mmoles. 


and UCLA's O’Bannon brothers 
were held to half their average Sat- 
urday as the 1 5 th- ranked midcats 
beat the eighth-ranked Bruins, 98- 
74. 

In the Pacific-10 race, Arizona 
(214, 10-3) moved within one 
game of first-place UCLA (18-3, 
11-2), which beat the Wildcats 74- 
66 last month. 

Ed CBannon finished with nine 
points and Charles O’Bannon had 
six as UCLA committed 19 nun- 
overs, while forcing just nine. 

No. 1 Arkansas 90, Mississippi 
73: Corliss Williamson played only 
five minutes in the first half be- 
cause of foul trouble then scored all 
19 of his points in the second half, 
in Memphis. The Razor backs (20- 
2, 10-2 Southeastern Conference) 
led, 61-54, but the Rebels (11-11.4- 


Lewis’s Heart Damaged by Virus 


AVer York Times Semce 

NEW YORK — A viral infection severely damaged 
the heart of Reggie Lewis, the Boston Celtics* captain, 
leaving him vulnerable to the abnormal heart rhythm 
that killed him on July 27, according to his death 
certificate. 

Dr. Stanton C. Kessler, the associate chief medical 
examiner of Massachusetts who signed the death certifi- 
cate, said in interviews Friday that a virus was round in 
Lewis’s bean and that it caused myocarditis, an inflam- 
mation that scars and enlarges the heart. Kessler said 
Lewis's myocarditis had healed but his bean remained 
scarred and enlarged when he collapsed and died while 
shooting baskets at Brandeis University. 

The death certificate, based on the autopsy finding*, 
is expected to help resolve a widely publicized medical 
dispute among a number of Boston's leading cardiolo- 


gists and other experts who evaluated Lewis after he 
collapsed during a playoff game on April 29. Kessler 
said the findings appear to support the group of 12 
experts assembled % the Celtics, who conducted that 
Lewis had an abnormal heart. 

Dr. Arnold Scheller, the Celtics' team physician, 
who asked that the group be organized, said then that 
Lewis had a potentially life-threatening condition. 


■ Bradley Out lor Season 
Shawn Bradley, the 76ers rookie center, will miss 
the rest of the season with a dislocated left knee cap 
and a s light bone chip. The Associated Press reported 
from Philadelphia. 

Bradley was hurt in Philadelphia's 109-93 loss to 
Portland, when he went up for a shot and his knee hit 
the knee of the Blazers' Harvey Grant. 


Boston Cofege 89, No. 14 Syra- 
cuse 83: In Boston, BUI Curley 
scored 23 points and keyed a deci- 
sive 9-0 nm as Boston Co llege (18-7, 
9-5) moved into a second-place tie 
with Syracuse (l?-5, 9-5).. and 
Georgetown in tire Big EasL : 

No. 17 Florida 88, South CaroB- 
na 64: Dan Cross had a career-high 
six 3-pointers and finished with 24 
pants far the Gators (21-4, 11-2 
SEC). The visiting Gamecocks (6- 
16, 2-10) were led by Janae Watson, 
with 12 points. 

No. 18 Saint Loms 73, No. 21 At- 
abaraa-Krmmgham 72: Saint Louis 
(20-3, 6-3 Great Midwest) ran its 
bemre winning streak to 14 in over- 
time. It was ihe third straight loss 
for the Blazers (18-6, 64). 


Nortbwestm 75, Na 24 Wiscon- 
sin 71: Kevin Rankin got 23 paints 
as Northwestern (11-10, 2-10 Big 
Tea) beat Wisconsin (15-7, 6-7). 


Whitbread 
Resumes -V 


The Associated Pros \ ' ~ 

AUCKLAND, . New Zca- ' 
land — Tokia, the joint New 
Zealand-Japanese entry skip* 
peredby Chris Dickson, led the, 

' 1 4-yadn Bm out of Wahanaia 
Harbor an.Sund&y at the start . 
of the fourth leg of the Whrt- 
bread.Roond the Wdiid race: 
Eight boats in. the fleet 
jumped the gun and ax — 
•W nutavYamahai fr «Knfo > . 
Pescanova,' Dolphin : and 
Youth, Infinnn Justitia and- 
Meat Cup — had to tack tack . 
after being recalled by the 


starter. Two other' yachts 
anekerede 


Brooksfidd and Hein 
rimed to restart and. velflcdy •„ 
To face a penalty. ; - * 

Tokia die leadinz vacht in 
the Whitbread-60 dass and 
the overall race leader, made a 
conservative stain -flat paidl 
dividends. Dickstm took To- 
Irio past the first marie an the 
5£14-nautical mile journey to 
Puniadd Este,Urugnay, in‘38 
minutes, 47 seconds. 


Wales and Ireland 



' " Reuter* ■ >. 

LONDON Wales and bdand 
ended 12-year waits wffl© Ftenoc 
and Fhgijnitf began gbooy assess- 
ments d; wharwent wrong anone of 
^etriost startling five Natrons rog* 
by weekends iareoeot memory^ : 

■ . -Wades’s 'Stenting 24*15 home 
victory over Fihnce and the even 
. inare nnexpectcd l3-T2 victory by 
the Irish M'Twkkonham, unheard 
of since 1982, left only the Welsh 
vrifh a chance- of eomptetk® the. 
Grand Siam. The revitalized Welsh 
t&nvwhk&fimshed aitbeTjottom- 
of the s&mlBiralast year, oeeds-a ; 
victory -in zts finaigame at TWki- 
enhamonMarchlvtoc^mjleteits 
■ first dean sweep sstioe 4978.- - . 

The Welsh peck, based around 
'Scott Qmnntil, gave its most 6om- 
pdliog performance for years 
against the startled French. A try 
by QuinneU. after 15 minutes 
helped td-grv6 tfid home team an 
11-3 lead at half-time and although 
die Frencfi foughF&CR to 17-15 
could . not freak ihe Welsh 
resistance.'’' ' 

• - r 


Thierry Lacroix who missed ax 
kicks out of «ghL was twice wide 
with penalty attempts., which 
would nave allowed France tore- 
grin the lead, tearing tbestagiMDr 
former the OiyrBpfc hnrdrer N^et 
Walker to dmcb the matdi with a 
burst down the left tqochlme. 

The .Trench, often in dwanay, 
-were suitably impressed. 

“Waks was very ag gress ive in 
^ofrmtse: and caused us problems," 
Olivier Roumat, the captain, con- 
ceded. ‘Tt’s good for rugby: that 
they are bade.” - -v?~ 

, Irdand owed a lot to wmger St- 
moDL Geogbegan tn its victoiy ow 
England. - 

Geogbegan scored a try three 
minutes before half-time and was 
responsible for the vital Eric Bwood 


? x :«- " 


-sr\ 


i v 


I r-f* 




S’ , 


2* i 






penally uw ” . 

vantage in die second half. Geoghe- 
- gan caqght a Jonathan C aB ard chip 
naming backward toward hts own 
Hriebutdnded the English attackers 
and forced Rob Andrew to concede 
a penalty wi thin kicking range at the 
other end. : 


. 

if • 

' 

f**; 


5*' 


SCOREBOARD 

NBA Standings 






EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W L 

Pd 

GB 

New York 

35 15 

J00 

— 

Orlando 

29 20 

592 

SW 

New Jersey 

25 24 

510 

91* 

Miami 

25 25 

JOB 

10 

Boston 

28 30 

400 

15 

Phlladetohta 

2D 38 

JOO 

15 

Washington 

14 34 

Central Dtotston 

-320 

19 

Atlanta 

35 15 

.780 

— 

Chicago 

34 15 

594 

Vl 

Cleveland 

26 24 

520 

9 

Indiana 

24 24 

500 

10 

Charlotte 

23 28 

489 

life 

Milwaukee 

15 38 

.294 

20to 

Detroit 

13 38 

.255 

22V2 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Dtabtao 



W L 

PCt 

GB 

Houston 

38 13 

735 

ft 

San Antonio 

38 14 

731 

— 

utan 

33 19 

435 

S 

Denver 

74 28 

J80 

i2te 

Mlnnesaia 

15 34 

J06 

21V, 

□alias 

8 45 

Podflc Dlvtslen 

.118 

31 

Seattle 

38 12 

7» 

— 

Phoenix 

33 18 

473 

3 » 

Go Men Slate 

38 20 

400 

7 

Portland 

29 21 

580 

8 

LA Lakers 

18 31 

J67 

1BV, 

LA Clippers 

17 32 

347 

WW 

Sacra manta 

17 33 

340 

20 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 

Milwaukee SSS 24— WA 

Charlotte HNS 28-99 

C: Hawkins 7-1311-11 26 E. Johnson 1M0M 
21 M: Norman 12-18 1-56 Baker 7-13 &4 20. 
RefiotnnH— WUtwaukoo Ml Norman 101. Ohor- 
totte 49 (Coition 101. Asii*t»— Mlh«auke« 24 
(Batw,MunlBClc7),Ciiartalt»2B(Baiwesl91. 

2S 22 33 33—113 

34 38 2S 27-110 

NJ.: K. Anderson 17-33 M 42. Edwards 8-19 
M 19. W: diearwv 14-26 14 31, Adorn* 7-14 2-2 
17. Rc boon dt h lw Jersey 53 (Coleman 11), 
Wash in gto n « (Emsonlll.AMsts-NowJor- 
ser 19 lAnUoraon 12), WasMngton 29 (Adorns 
12 ). 

Denver 33 22 31 34— l»f 

OUGOgO 28 27 23 14— 84 

□ : R. Wirt! ants 8-14 0-0 lfi. Abdul-Rouf 8-V5 2- 
2 IB. StWi 9-13 18-12 28. C: Plppen M* M 18, 
Orntt 8-12 3-4 15. RobOIIWgi Donver 92 (Mu- 
tombo 13), CMcaoo 57 IPIoeen 101. Assists— 
Donver 25 (Pack«).Oile»o 2i (Armstrong 7). 
Seattle 15 21 34 23— 99 

Orta ado 40 35 33 28—134 

S: 5ctiremgf 7-13 (HI 18. Gill 7-18 8-7 20. 0: 
Scott 8-19 3-2 23. OT4«al 18-19 8-7 38. Rg- 
boonds — Seattle 53 (Payton 8), Orlando <1 
( O’Neal 20). AMM — Seattle 24 (McMillan 61. 
Orlando 35 (Anderson 12). 
davafeaid a n 31 23— u 

Minnesota a 8 It 15-71 

C: Deugnorty4-U7< 11 Price 7-17 2-2 17.M: 
West 7-18 M 17, RJder 7-15 7-9 22. Reboonds— 
Cleveland a U.WllUams 11). Minnesota 54 
(Uratav 181. Assists— Cleveland 20 (Prleo 7). 
Mlnnesaia 19 (Smith 8). 


37 18 ta 23— ft 
Phoenix 35 34 27 25-113 

LJL: Campbell 11-21 3-42$, Lvndi 9-14 5423. 
P: Bartley 13-18 5-7 32. CobaifcK 9-18 3-4 20. 
RUMii o di Uu Angelo* 50 (Campbell M», 
Phoenix 59 (Green 10). Assists— Los Angeles 
22 (Van Exel 4). Phoenix 20 dCJotanon 91. 
PNtadeMla 24 28 25 34— 93 

Portland 31 34 34 H— 189 

P: Waathenooon 7-15 MIS. Barra* 9-193-2 
22. P: C Robinson 13-18 3-S 20. Strickland 8-15 
4-7 20. R eb o u n d* — m nodeWilq 58 I Weather 
spoon. Kidd 10). Portland 59 (Grant 13). A*- 
slits Phuodwphla 73 ( Barmll. Portland a 
(Slrtddond 12). 

Atlanta 24 29 a 22-97 

LA dippers MSB 34-91 

A: Wilkins 7-20 4-419, Will's 0-0 38 19. Ehto 
8-10 33 20. LA.: Spencer 8-120-2 16, Morning 
10-347827. Rebounds— Atlanta 45 (wtllb 13). 
Los Angeles 52 (Manning 13). Assists— Atlan- 
ta 23 (Willis 8). Las Aneeles 23 (Manning 9). 
Utah 14 M 28 23-41 

Sacramento 16 26 17 31 — 90 

U: K. Malone 7-225-10 19, Spencer 6-11 2-6 14. 
S: Simmons 7.124-4 la Rlctimond 6-22 14-1527. 
Robeands— Utah 71 (Spencer 18), Sacramen- 
to 66 (Stmmans 13). Assists— Utah 16 (Stock- 
ton 10), Sacramento 14 I Webb 4). 

SATURDAYS RESULTS 
Detroit 21 32 24 38-105 

Dallas 20 22 20 38— 96 

D: Ml Hs 8-13 6-7 22. Du mors 13-25 W-15 40 D: 
Madifaum 6-18 5-7 1& Jackson 8-18 2-2 la Re- 
booeds Detroll 55 (Anderson 17). Dallas S 
(Jonas 13). AssUti— Detroit 13 (Hunter 4), 
Dallas 36 (Jackson 71. 

Fhaeata 15 25 28 30- 80 

Houston 27 28 Si 21—106 

P: Barkley 594-t ia K. Johnson 5-13 40 14. 
H: Thorpe 9-9 2-4 2a Maxwell 9-20 4-4 25. Re- 
bounds — Phoenix 57 (Green 10). Houston 57 
(Thorpe 18). Assist? — Phoenix 23 (Ainpe 5). 
Houston Z3 (Horry 5). 

Miami 34 17 21 27- 96 

Sat Amenta 34 32 22 21—180 

M: Rice 9-19 3-2 21. Long 6-1 189 Tl.Smitti 10- 
201-234.S: Robinson 9-21 1-319. Reid 9- 154-722. 
Rebou n d M iami 56 (Selkstv 111. San Anto- 
nios? l Rodman 26). Assists — Miami 14 (She ir 
6). San Antonio 19 (Rablnaon 71. 

LA dippers 26 21 2* 23- *3 

Utah 28 28 22 0-1* 

UL: Morey no 6-18 4-7 1A Harper 11-22 8-14 
3a U: K. Malone 10.188936. Chamber* 9-1580 
ia Rebounds-Lo* Angeles SO (vouglrt 13). 
Utah4l (Spencer 121. Assists— Las Angeles 25 
(Manning, Jackson 7), Utah 28 (Stockton 121. 
Baden 17 21 31 11—90 

Golden State 29 28 17 27— Ml 

B: Brown ai4 2-3 19. Douglas 7-13 2-2 16 G: 
Owens 8-12 3-5 19, Webber 7-17 58 20. Re- 
bounds— Boston 49 (Radio 11). Gotdsn Slate 
51 (Webber 9). Ass is t * B oston 20 (Douglas 
4), Gotdsn State 23 (Owens 61. M:Normcn 12- 
18 1-5 2& Edwards 59 0-0 Kt Baker 7-13 49 2ft 
Murdock 5-145.3 1£ Day M2 8«M. Barry 1-43- 
4 a Lohous 1-2 0-0 Z Mayberry 5-10 (Hi 11 
Strong 04 M a Totals 4342 15-23 M6. 


Connect I cut 81. Providence 73 
Fairfield 94, Iona 91 
Fordham 71 Lafayette 68 
Georgetown 71 SL Jatata 61 
La Salle 77, Loyola, iil 43 
Maine 127. Vermont 88 
Marts! 71 Wagner 67 

N.C. -Greensboro 80. McL -Baltimore County 83 

Now 99. Holy Cross 91 

New Hampshire 64. Hartford 58 

Niagara 81 Siena 78 

Ohio SL 4a Penn St 57 

Perm 61 H a r v ard 65 

Princ e ton 56 Dartmouth SO 

Rider 79, Mount St. MarVs. Md. 58 

Robert Morris 91. Long 1 stand U. 82 

Rutger* 71 SI. Joseph's 72 

Seton Hall 81 Miami 83 

St. Frond* Pa. 89. SL Frond*. NY 74 

Towson Si. 87. Campbell 72 

Vlihmova 93, Pittsburgh aa TOT 

Yale 81 Cornell 86 

SOUTH 

Alabama 86 Tonnassce 70 
Alabama St. 121. Grombilng St. 78 
American U. 65, WHilam O Mot 57 
Appalachian SL 81 DavMson 80 
Arkansas 9a Mississippi 73 
Auburn 76. MisstaalPPt St. 65 
Austin Peay 81 Tennessee Tedi 74 
Bethune-Coak man 71. Delaware St. 68 
Cent. Florida 81, Stetson 77 
CoD- of Charleston Ida Centenary 74 
Florida 88. South Camllna 64 
Florida St. 79, Oemson 71 
Georgia HR, LSU 84 
Georgia Southern 61 VMI 61 
Georgia St. 61 Eta. International 59 
Georgia Tech 71. Wake Forest 69 
Howard U. 77. N. Carolina A&T 68 
Jacksonville TO, SW Louisiana 68 
James Madison 79, East Carolina 74 
Kentucky 77, Vanderbilt 49 
Liberty 90. Charleston Southern 81 
Marshall 81 Citadel ^ 

Maryland 96 Loyaio. Md. 71 
M&-E- Shore 61. Ftarlda AIM 57 
Mbs. Volley St. 81 Jackson SL 78 
Morehead St. 101. Tonnrtltartln 9R OT 
N.C -Asheville 81 Wtathroo 73 
NE Loubtana 81, North Texas 73 
NW Louisiana 121 Texas-Arttaoton Ml 
New Orleans 76 Texos-Pon American 64 
North Carolina 69, Virginia 38 
Old Dominion 100. George Mason 72 
Radford 80, Coastal Carolina 84 
Richmond 46 MC-Wllmtaotan ft 
SE Louisiana 71 Mercer 58 
South Ahtaamo EX Louisiana Tcdi 53 
Tulane 86 Southern Mbs. 79 
Virginia Tech 65. South Florida 40 
W. Carolina 86 Tn-C hc ttano uuu 82 
MIDWEST 
Ball St. 77, Kent 57 


N. Illtnab 86 Youngstown SL 57 
NE lllfnob 81 Cent. ConnedlQil St. 54 
Northwestern 71 Wisconsin 71 
OMo U. 86 Botrfmg Green 70 
1 II I Inals 71 Drake 71 
51. Louis 71 Alo.-Blrmlngtmm 72. OT 
Tulsa 71. SW Missouri St. 64 
Valparaiso 81 Wb.-Gr*on Bay 58 
W. Michigan 97. E. Michigan 78 
WbrtWIwoukee 70, E. I Ml do** 99 
SOUTHWEST 

Ark. -Utile Rock 81. Lamar 71 
Houston 87, Baylor 82, OT 
McNeese St. 76 Texas- San Antonio 78 
Oklahoma SL 9a Nebraska 80 
SW Texas SL 71 NkhoQs SL 82 
Southern Meth. 81 Texas chrtsnan 64 
Southern U. 156 Prairie View 91 
Stephen FJtastta 86 Sam Houston SL 58 
Texas ABM 71 Rice 61 
Texas Southern 96 Alcom St. <2 
W. Kentucky 71 Arkansas St. 51 
FAR WEST 

Air Force 91. Utah 89. OT 

Arizona tt, UCLA 74 

CS Norttirldge 96 Sa cr amento SL 54 

Gonmga 7 & Portland 71 

Idaho B. E. Wa shi ngton 84 

Iowa St. 81 Cotarada 78 

Lang Beach SL HI Nevada 64 

N. Arizona 86 Montano SI. 72 

New Mexico SL 81 Cal St.-Fullorton 88 

Oregon 96 W ashington SL 87 

fticlflc 76 Scm Jose SL 62 

Papperdtaw 76 Sat Diego 57 

San Diego SL 106 Toxas-El Pam 85 

San Frandsco 106 Loyola Marymount 183 

Southern Cal 66 Arizona SI. 56 

DC Santa Barbara 61 Utah St. 68 

Washington 61 Oregon SL 49 

W eber SL 86 Montana 75 

Wyoming 76 Colorado SL 72 

FRIDAY'S RESULTS 
EAST 

Brawn 56 Cornell 54 

Delaware 89, Northeastern 81 20T 

Drexei 71 Boston U. 43 

Duawesne 46 Wat Virginia tt 

Fotrtefgh Dickinson 79. Monmouth, NJ. 70 

George Washtapton CL SL Bengvertfure 73 

Penn 77. Dartmouth 67 

Princeton 61 H ui w u i U 52 

Yale 71 Columbia 51 

FAR WEST 

Boise SL 77. Idobo SL 41 
P m a er dl ne 86 Sen Frandsco 82 


Ottawa 

9 

44 

8 

26 14? 273 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Costal DMNM - 


W 

6 

T Pis OF OA 

Toronto 

33 

17 

11 

7$ 200 186 

Detrail 

34 

19 

5 

73 261 281 

Dallas 

32 

21 - 

7 

71 214 192 

St. Louis ' 

30 

21 

8 

68 191 193 

Chicago 

27 

28 

8 

60 177 168 

Winnipeg 

tt 38 7 

PaeMcObbtaa 

41 ■ 174 2*5 

C*garv 

30 

21 

9 

68 220 IBS 

Vancouver 

29 

28 

2 

68 198 1*4 

San Jase 

22 

28 

11 

55 167 192 

Anaheim 

23 

XI 


SO W 184. 

Las Angeles 

21 

>1 

8 

48 213 229 

Edmonton 

IS 

38 

9 

39 184 229 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
ADonHc DtvUfam 


Major College Scores 


SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
EAST 

Boston College 89, Syracuse 83 
Brawn 61, Cotomblo 9 
Buc knell 96 Lehtoh 88 
Conblus 81 St. Peter* 49 
Colgate 96 Army 83 


Bradley 76 Wtdrtta SL 81 


w 

L 

T Pb GF 

GA 

Butter 77. Evansville 75 

NY Rnngars 

37 

16 

4 

71 286 

149 

Cent. Michigan 76 Akron 66 OT 

New Jersey 

31 

19 

7 

619 208 

142 

Chkoaa SL 96 Cent. St. Ohio 81 

Washington 

28 

25 

5 

61 « 

174 

Cleveland Si. B5. W. IIDnob 68 

Florida 

25 

22 

W 

80 183 

159 

Detroit Mercy 86 Xavter. Ohio 82 

Philadelphia 

Z7 

29 

4 

58 zra 

228 

IIL-Chtcogo 86 Wright SL 78 

NY 1 standee* 

23 

28 

6 

52 191 

191 

Illinois SL 67. Cralgtfton 54 

Tampa Bay 

22 

31 

7 

51 159 

180 

Indiana 82. Purdue 80 
Indiana SL 82. N. lawa 73 

Northeast Dtvtsics, 
Moatreal 31 21 8 

70 1*8 

189 

Iowa 83. Illinois 69 

Boston 

38 

19 

TO 

78 191 

184 

Kansas SL 89, Oklahoma 78 

Pittsburgh 

29 

19 

11 

89 213 

211 

Michigan 72. Minnesota 65 

Buffalo 

29 

94 

4 

64 198 

158 

Ma-Kansas city 77, S. Utah 68 

Quebec 

23 

30 

S 

51 188 

202 

Murray St. 96 SE Missouri 95 

|i m Hu, ■ 1 

HUT nm j 

21 

33 

6 

48 175 

70 


FRIDAY'S RESULTS 

Ottawa g O 9-4 

N.Y. Ranger* I 1 1-8 

First Period: N.Y .-Grave* 38 [Messier. 
Amonta). SeceM Period: N.Y. Mratler 24 
{Graves). Third Period: N.Y.-Grares 39 
(Larmar. Zubov), (pp). Shots on goal: O (on 
Rlclher) 8-134—34. N.Y. (an Btalngtan) 6-lV 
13-36 

Edmeoton t 1 6—1 

Detroit 1 3 1-8 

First Ported: IXTraper 2 (McCarty, Burri. 
Second Ported: E-Grtevel (Bro*dn)i D-Kav 
sta ntlrew 1 (Yzer mu i, LWstram); D-Yzermon 
14 (Cothry. Udstnxn); OSheppard44 (Coftev, 
Chtaston}. Third Petted: D-McCarty 11 (Cof- 
fey. Prtmeau). Sbeb an god: E (an Chevel- 
dae) 3-12-7—9- D [on Rantard) T4-TM — 42. 

8 18-1 
2 1 1—4 

First Parted: B-Dowe 2 (Ktonytev. 
Bodper); (PP). B-Audette If (PlonttaSmeh- 
■IkL (pplSecopd Period: B-Mov 14 (Audefta, 
SmehUk); FKudetski 34 (Bomea Smith). 
Third Period: B-Audette 28 (Smehflk. 
Plonta). (pp). Shota on pad: F (on Hasok) 14- 
84-36 B (an Vwtoiasbroudt) 79-10-26 
N.Y. I j taoder t 1 8 e— 1 

watbfeigtaa 8 2 1-3 

Pint Period: N.Y. -Hague 25 (KnnP. King). 
Second Parted: W-Burridge 17 (Peak* Jo- 
haem); W-KArbtleh 25 (Bondra Hunter). 
(pp).Thhd Perted: W-lotrata 8 (Burttdge , 
Cota). (pp>. Shot* an geat: N.Y. (00 Tabar- 
acct) 11-48-3S.W (on McLennan) 9-11-9-29. 
Chicago 8 1 3-7 

W inni peg 1 1 0— * 

FM Period: C-Goutet 12 (Smllh, Ruutta); 
W-Oarrtn Shannon 10 (McBean. Emerson); 
ppC-Wflklitson 3 (Dubbaky) ; C-Smltti 5 (iWrr- 
phv. Roenick). Second Period: YFEmersaa 23 
mcachuk); C-Raenlck 28 (NowanOwllos). 
(ppLTWrd Period: c-Oteflos 12 (Smith, 
Ruutu); (pp). C-Roen)cfc 27 (Noonan, ato- 
nes); loo). CDubtnskr 2 IKueera. Shank}: 
Shoes oo goal: C (an Essenaa) 15*9—22 w 
(on Balfour) 11-14-19—66 
■mien ■ 0 l— I 

St LflUb 8 8 3-3 

TMrd Period: SL -Shanahan 35 (Hull, Jan- 
ney): (pp). SL-Huti 42 (Duchesna Jam); 
(no). B-Oafe* 23 ( Bourque, Neely) : Sl^Prok- 
borev7 (Brawn). Shots angeal: B (on JasedU 
15-12-14—41. Si. (on Rtsndoau) 34-8-T7. 
CafeOT B 2 8-3 

• 4 8—1 

Period: C-Klslo 4 CYbwhoy, Peltt); 
D-Coartnall 17 (Evmoa Cavdllal); D-Mo- 
dm 38 (Uxhrlg); CMoclltab 21 (Reichrt. 
Roberts) ; tap). D-Lodywd 8 (N.Bratan.Mo- 


dono); |pp).OGagna*2D(Courtad1.l6.Big- 
tan). (pp).Sbab aa peal: C (on Wakaluk) 8-18- 
Rf— <36 O too Vernon, KkkU 12*7—27. 

• 2 2-4 

■I 1 1 — I 
Fhrd Parted: LArMcSoriey 4 (Gretdcr, 
Huddvl- Second Period: p-RecchlJi (Dtnooa, 
Zemer); P-Undros 31 (Dlnean, Rad nr); 
(pp).CXrLoqg3 (Druce, SVdorLThira Peri- 
od: P-Ret)i>erg27 ( BrincfAmour, Urefood); P- 
Uid i u* 32 (Brtocf Amour); tonJUAj-Rychel 9 
(Druce. Svdor). Shot* on port :P lonStaaber) 

13- 1M-3L UA. (on Rouaed) 8-13-12—33. . 

Quebec '8 18-1 

AadMlm ■ ■ ' • ■ S— 9 

second Ported: Q-Youngll (Gusarov.' Ru- 
dnskr). (pp). Shot* on seal: Q (itaTngnutt) >- 

14- 3 — 25. A (an Fbet) 12*7—26 

' SATURDAY’S RESULTS . 

Tampa Bay 18 3-4 

• ,J l 3-4 
Nj.-MacLean.27 (Nieder- 
wnr. Nfchoib); loo). N-L-MacLeaa 26 T- . 
Joseph 9, (Grattan. Creighton), (pd) Second 
Period: NJHtlchoH* 12 ( Nl edm«wr). 
Third Period: fCLOank* 12 (Guerin, Car- 
nwitar); T-tOlma 23 tGold. Oratton>: N-Lr 
Ho9fk 5 (NtohonaMPCLean); T-Crelghtoo7 
( Bureau. Andertaon); T-Gndton 8 Uoeertil. 
Shots eg goal: T (an Twreri) 8-13-15-36 NJ. 
(on Punwl 13*-ii— 3L ' 

Ottawa h. 8 6-8 

ILY. Wanders 3 18-4 

First Period: N.Y^Kfop 23 (Maiekhov, 
Thomas) ; tLY.-Matafchov 4 (Hogtnu Fhdtay) l 
N-YrHogue 28 (Finney, Ferraro), second Pe- 
riod: N.YrFtattor 12 (Haga* Ferrara). Sheb . 
en goal: O (an Hextaii) 15*14-37. N.Y. (on 
Modify) 14*13-36 

ILY. Rmgn . 118-3 

H m itard 8 13-4 

First Period: K.Y.-TTkkaran 28 (Larmer. 

KovoievJ. Secaed Started: I F6andwsan a 
{Patrick); (pp). N.Y^Larmer 15 (TtWuxwn, 
Kopevtse v)r (re>). ll P roop TO (Cun- 
noywori ta Janssens). TMrd Portae: H-Cae-' 
astof (Zatapsid, Praop); H^ferbertc X (Go* 
■eta Patrick), (oh). Shota on go*: N.Y. Ion 
Burke) 484 1 7. H tan RkMor) T2-144-JL 
' 8 8. « 

11 1-4 

M * * ta ws 22 (SdemMor. 
Brunet). Second Period: MCamohouae 28 
(Brtseb**. Oatombult}. T» hd Period: M- 
B*lows23 (DJPtatro); P^logr22 (USamueta- 
son, Froncb); ffrLeC3a)r T2 (OdeMn). (on). 
Shota a* oo*: P (on Roy) 7*-11— 27. M (an 
Barrane) 12-11-4-27. 

Taranto 1 l 1-3 

FM Period: E-WetaMl» (Byofcln. Krav- 
Ctiuk); (PP). T-Amtraydiuk 45 (Miraaov. GIF 
rrxiur). topUSecond Period: T-GU1 4 CGH- 
mour).' TMrd Pa rte d : T-Andaraon a 1 
(AndrovdMk, Glbnour); E-Mdesodaoti 1 
(weight). Shota op goat: E loo PMvM »* 
18—27. T (on Rantard) FI VI 1-06 
Los Anpote* 2 1 M 

Saa Jew. a 2 •—* 

Fir* Ptatod: ), Los Antuds. DonneitY 14 
(Conortwr); bhlSJ^Mokwgv 18 (Lor-. 
Ionov); LArttobitaille 32 (Sydor. Gretzky); 
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"owtoy^EwMrt* 

Ali times am GMT 

JSSn?^ " W ^'* <»n«ned 

i»or ?) ?* run,< ^ 30: «“»nd fun. 
Ctoorty Skflng - Woman*# 

4x5-Womatef reteyT©3a omws 

■ ' gSg ? -*»***««- 

% Sweden vs. Canada. 

. 14TOStovaWa vs, France. 1630; Untt- 
■dSWaava.4taly.i90o 

Mondays TV 

. EUROPE ■ • 

Ail times are focal 

'■ *Z** - ORF: 0600-1730, 2015- 

■ 2355. : 

•'■ BrtWn - BBCSfc 1415-1556; 2000- 

- 2230, 2S1 5-2355. 

WP* - BNT/Channet 1 : 1030- 
150Q;CbanrW2:i555«i0(j. 

Croatia - HHT/TV2: 1355-1920 
* 2245-0045. . "• 

,- §S^SSP : 171M74S - ^ 
; *1858— ’■.""•rum. 

- nwnm a rtf , - OR: 1020-1145. 1450- 
1730,2130-2215.2333-0033. 

■' Estonia - ETV: 1120-1245. 1355- 
" 1945.2130-2400. 

’ FtatanO — VLE/TVf: 1110-1830, 
.2055-001 5; TV2; 1900-1930. 

- “ FR2: 0924-1255. 170* 
1955; FR3: 1255-1400. 2005-2030; 
TP I'. 2050-2245. 

Gccawiy - AftD: 0915-1740, 2015- 
2230. 

- Grows® - ETt: 0830-0900, 1700- 
1BOO. 2200-2330; ET2:1 915-1 945. 

fangmy MTV/Channel 1 : 1207- 

1237: Channel 2: 1455-1730, 1905- 
' 2055, 2200-100. 

* toaland - RUV: 0925-1045. 1825- 
1855. 2200-2255, 2® 5-2345. • 

Italy - RAEh 0925-1145, 2415-2600: 
> RAM: 1155-2020. - 

1 Lahrta - LT: 1120-1245. 1915-1945. 
< 0030-0100. - 
l Lithuania - LRT: 1355-0000: 

L umn b ouiy - CLT: WghBghts on 
waning news, >900-2000. ; . , 

. Macedonia - MKRTV/Chamel 1: 
0625-1020, 1155-1345, 1 £25-1900; 

- Channel 2 0920-1045. 1255-1450. 
1755-2200; Channel 3: 1155-1350. 
1355-1830, 1715-1745. 1755-1830. 
1885-2130, 2230-2300. 

Monaco - TMC/IT: 0930-1345, 
1615-1925. 2005-2230, 0045-0245. 
NoflMrtanda - NOS: 0900- 1725, 

. 1840-1850.2030-2315. 

Norway - NRK: 0900-1750; 2000- 
- ' 2400; TV2: 1845-1900, 21302330. 

. Poland - 7VP/PB1: 0915-1100. 
1830-1855, 2130^2300; PR2: 1105- 
1400, 1605-1725, 1905-2100, 0005- 
0106. 

Portugal - TV2: 23002320: HTP1-. 
1100-1120. 

Romania - RTVR/Channoi 1: 1120 
1245, 15001650, 1915-1945, 2200 
0100; Channel 2: 1555-1830. 

Rutota — RTO: 1355-1530, 1830 
1900. 21400030; RTR: 12201400. 
1655-1930.21352205. ' 

Slovakia - 8TV/SK; 08002300. 
Slovenia - RTVSLO; 0905-1355. 
17001845. 1956-2015.20302305. 


edules and Events 


RTVE: 09302400 7VE2: 

1445-1500. 

8VT7TV2: 1015-1145. 
1445-1855, 20000145. Channel i: 
-^55-1730.2145-2300: . 

•dtartMtf - TSR/TSt/DRS: 0830 
140°-1 600; S+: 1300-1730. 
10002300. 

Turtsey - TRT: 13302030, 2115- 
*400. . 

Vbtitoa - - 0TRU/UT1: 11801245, 
?«0-1440. 1650-1645, ,1955-0100; 
UT2: 19101946. - . 

Slwpeport — 0600-conflnuouedover- 
«0«.' 

asw/paorc 

AU times are focal 
AurtraBa - Channel 9; 2030-0100. 
»wp Zeofeni - TV1; 07000800. 
21302400. 

Japan NWt 22002400 (general); 
12301500. 1800-0630 (satellite): 
13001500, 19002200 (Ht-Viston). 
Papua Naw CMnea - EMTV: 2100 
2330. 

China - CCTV: 2100-2400. 

Hong Kong ~ TVB: 24000100. 
Sewtt Kona - KBS: 10001300; 
MBC: 14301730 24000130 
Malaysia - TV3: 2315-0015. ' 
Shtgapon - S8C/Channrt12:240O 
0100. 

STAR TV /Priam Sports - 0900 
1445; 1600-conthvuous coverage. 

NORTH AMERICA 

. M times are EST • 
Canada - CTV; . 06301200. 1500 
1700. 20002300. " 

United States - CBS.-0700-0900. 
13001800, 20002330, 0107-0207. 
Mexico - Televisa: 07001100.1700 
1900, 23302400 

. Tuesday’sEvents 

AS times are GMT 

Cross Country — Men's 4x10 kUome- 
terfety.0830; . 
loe Hockey - ConsoteHon matches. 
1530,2000. - r. . . 

Short Track Speeiielredng - Men's 
1,000 meters, 1800; Women's 3,000 
meter relay, 1800 . 

SM Jumping - 120 meter teem com- 
psHtan.itSDL 

' Tuesday 1 * TV 

- BIROPE . ■ 

AS times are local 

Austria - ORF: 06001800 2015- 
2100,22300000. 

Britain - BSC2: 1415-1500; 1630 

1730.19202100. - 

Bulgaria - BNT/Channel 1:1630 

1945, 21554X00 ■’«•••.• 

Croatia - HRT/TV2: 1225-1505; 

1«0-1925; 23300030' - 

Cypnm - CYBC: 1715-1745, 2030 

210022362300 . . 

each RsprtMte - . CTV: 0915-1545. 

.1945-2015, 23200005. 

Danmark - OR: 10201545, 1855- 
1920 21302215. " 

Estonia - ETV: 11201645, 1915- 
-1945,-2130-2200. -. 

Finland -. YLE/TVI: 11101815. 
^55-21 00; TV2: 1900-1930. 

FTanc* - FR2: 10T5-1252; FR3: 
1355-1 51 5,~2005-2030 l . . ' 

Gannany - ZQF: 1003-1600, 2100 
2145. ■■■■* 

Qresc*' ~ . ET1: 0830-0900; ET2: 
1915-1945. ■ ■ 


Hungary - MTV/Chann& i; 1207- 

1237, 2005-2010. 23102340. 

Iceland - RUV; 09201145. 1820 
1855, 2315-2345. 

Italy - RAJt: 10001245; RA12: 0015- 
0200; RAJ3: 1950-2020. 

Latvia - LT: 11201345, 1915-1945, 
00300100. 

Lithuania - LRT: 21302150 
Luxembourg - CLT: Highlights on 
evening news, 19002000, 
Macedonia - UKRTV/Chamet f: 
09201145. 1525-1800, 1955-2230; 
Channel 2: 1125-1406. 1715-1745, 
1755-1830; Channel 3: 1755-2130, 
22302300. 

Monaco - TMC/IT: 1015-1230, 
17501925. 23400015, 02000315. 
Netherlands - NOS: 1000-1510. 
16201753; 18401860. 20302350 
Norway . - NRK; 10001750. 2000 
0030; TV2: 18401900. 

Poland - TVP/PR1: 1015-1100. 
18301855. 22002300; PR2: 1100 
1245. 16001725. 19002000. 
Portugal - TV2: 23002320; RTP1; 
1100 - 1120 . 

Roma nia - RTVR/ChannaJ I; 12SO 
1345, 19101945, 00900100. 

Russia - RTO: 12201445. 2140 
2200, 00300115; RTR: 12501510, 
18200130. 

Slovakia - STV/SK: 0600-0830, 
10201505. 18101845. 

Slovenia - RTVSLO: 1000-1550. 

17001845, 19502400 

spate - RTVE: 1 0002400; 7VE2: 

14401500. 

Sweden - SVT/TV2: 10101300, 
1400-1500; Charnel 1: 13001400 
20002100 . 

Bvritxedand ~ TSR/TS1/DRS: 0930 
1500; S-f : 19002230. 

Tnritey - TRT 18002000, 2200 
0030. 

Ukraine - DTRU/UTl: 11201345. 
1915-1945. 00300100. 

Euwepo rt - DBOO-conflnuoua cover- 
aoe. 

ASUL/PA&F1C 
Ail times are local 

Auetndta - Clwinei 9. 20300100. 
New Zealand - TV1: 07000800, 
21302400 

Japan - NHK: 22002400 (general); 
12301500. 18000630 (satellite); 
1300.1 500k 19002200 (HFVwion). 
Papua New (Unee - EMTV: 2000 
2200. 

China - CCTV: 1S3O21S0, 2300 
2400. 

Hoag Kong - TVB: 24000100 
South Korea - KBS: 10001300; 
MBC: 14301730. 24000130. 

Malaysia — TVS: 2315-0015. 
Singapore - SBC/Charmd 12:2400 
0100. 

STM TV/Primo Sports - 0600-con- 
tfnuoos coverage. 

NORTH AMERICA 

All times are EST 

Canada - CTV: 06300900. 1430 
1700,20002200 

United States - CBS.0700-0900. 
20002300, 0037-0137; TNT: 1300 
1800. 

Mash a * - Televisa: 07001100, 1700 
1900.23302400. 

informati on prwkJed by the IOC. TWI. 
anditxSvidual broadcasters; compfiad 
by tiie International Herakl Tribune. 


Tarasov Edges 
LucktoWinin 
Tense Biathlon 


Tfur Assuiuied Press 
■ ULLEHAMMER — Sergei 
Tarasov of Russia compensated Tor 

three missed urgrts with superb 
cross-country skiing to win the 
men’s 204ulOTieter biathlon Sun- 
day ax the Winter Olympics. 

He finished only 3.4 seconds 
ahead of Germany’s Frank Luck, 
providing one of the closest finish- 
es in Olympic history. 

**I wish the course would hove 
been 200 [meters] longer, then may- 
be 7 could have caught him," said 
Luck, who was the secoad-to-lasi 
starter in the field. He also missed 
three targets. - 

The bronze medal went to anoth- 
er German, Sven Fischer, who had 
two misses. 

Tarasov, 24. had a winning time 
of 37 minutes, 253 seconds for his 
first major title. 

“When I missed at the first series 


Russia, Heating Up, Beats Czechs 






of shots; my nerves lost their grip 
and I jost let go and almost didn't 
care.” he said. “I wasn't sore of my 


victory until Frank Luck bad 
crossed the finish line." 

Tarasov, who missed the 1992 
Games when he became seriously 
01 a few days before the opening 
ceremonies, won the first World 
Cup event this season and was 
third overall going into these Olym- 
pics. 

Patrice Baifiy-Salms, one of the 
favorites, was die big disappoint- 
ment in the event The Frenchman, 
who leads the World Cup overall 
standings and has three victories 
fins season, was more than two 
minutes behind and wound up 13th 
after four misses. 

Riafhlnw is a combination of 
shooting and cross-country skiing. 
In the 20K, the biathletes go 
through the shooting range four 
times, shooting a 32-caliber rifle 
twice prone and twice from the 
standing position ax Dve targets in 
each series. 

Each miss adds a one- minute 
penalty to the competitor’s total 
time: 

■ Dahlie, Lnndberg Win 

Norway sewed a double triumph 
cm Saturday as two cross-country 
doers pm on sublime performances 
in hoot of 80,000 ecstatic fans. 
Reuters reported. 

Bjorn Dahfie won bis second 
race of the Games to become the 
mast successful man in the history 
of Olympic Nordic skiing. 

Two hours earlier, his teamma te. 



A3: Na=E3|)ia3*'A$aks Freau-Praj 

Sesgei Tarasov’s skis, not his rifle, led him id the biathlon Tictwy. 


Fred Borrc Lundberg, won the 
Nordic combined to send the 
crowd into a frenzy of flag-waving 
and cowbell-ringing. 

Lundberg' s victory, all but se- 
cured with two huge leaps in Fri- 
day’s jumping portion, gave Nor- 
way h first Olympic gold medal in 
the Nordic combined in 10 years. 

The fans had in reserve even 
more adulation for Dahlie. a na- 
tional hero, as be woo the fifth 
Olympic gold of his career and 
thud medal this week. 

He is one gold short of equaling 
the overall Winter Games record 
held by Lydia SkobHkova of the 
Soviet Union, who won six in speed 
skating in the 1960s. 

Dahlie, 26, adnritred to some 
fear during the 15-kilometer pur- 
suit race as he tried to defend his 


IS-ieccnd lesd from the first leg 
against Vladimir Smirnov of Ka- 
zakhstan. 

”1 was afraid all the time because 
I was really tired on the uphill sec- 
tions and worried Smirnov might 
catch me," be said. “I was getting 
more tired all the time. 

“Bat the fans were amazing; un- 
believable. They were so noisy I 
couldn’t fed or hear my own 
breath." 

Dahlie blew kisses to the 30.000 
people inside the Nordic stadium 
and pirouetted over the finish. 

Smirnov was stoic in defeat, a 
position he has become accus- 
tomed to when racing Dahlie. 

“Eighteen seconds is too much 
when Bjorn is skiing as w ell as he is 
now." said Smirnov. 


77ir- Aitetiatfd Press 

ULLEHAMMER — Russia 
pined momentum heading into the 
Olympic hockey medal round, 
beating the Czech Republic 4-3 on 
Sunday for its first victory over a 
strong opponent- 

Russia got two power-play goals 
in the second period after the 
Czechs overcame a 2-0 deficit with 
two goals late in the first. 

Jiri Vykoukal cut the lead to 4-3 
with 45 seconds left in the match, 
bul the Czech* couldn't score with 
a two-man advantage for the last 34 
seconds. 

In other matches Sunday, Fin- 
land. the surprise power of the 
tournament, outclassed Germany, 
7-1. and Austria defeated Norway, 
4-2. in a battle of also-rans. 

The Finns (5-0) concluded pre- 
liminary play as the only undefeat- 
ed and untied entiy in fire 12-team 
tourney. They earned the top spot 
in Pool A, followed by Germany, 
the Czech Republic and Russia, all 
with 3-2 records. 

Monday’s game between the 
United States and Italy will decade 
the final playoff team in Pool B, 
with the winner to face Finland in 
the quarterfinals on Wednesday. 
C anaria Sweden and Slovakia have 
clinched the other Pool B berths. 

Norway, which became the only 
team to lose all five of its prelimi- 
nary-round games, joins a consola- 
tion round with Austria, France 
and either Italy or the United 
States. 

Russia’s two wins were over Nor- 
way and Austria. Losses to Finland 
and Germany marked the second 
time in the team's history as the 
Soviet Union, Unified Team or 
Russia that it had lost twice is one 
Olympics. 

Russia’s power-play goals by 
Andrei Nikoii&hin and Valeri Kar- 
pov came seven minutes apart. 

Nikolishin connected at 12: 12 on 
a 10-footer from the right side. 
Goalie Petr Briza was flat on his 
back after making a save 5 feet in 
front of the crease and could not 
stop the rebound shoL 

Karpov’s second goal made the 
score 4-2 at 19:01. Briza slopped 
Oleg Sbargorodski's shot from the 
left point and tried to cover the 
puck with his glove. But it slipped 
out and Karpov backhanded it in. 

After Vykoukal scored, Briza left 
for an extra skater with 37 seconds 
left. Three seconds later, Russia 
was penalized for delaying the 
game when goalie Andrei Zuev de- 
liberately lifted the pock into the 
stands. 


In the Finiand-Gennany match, 
the Finns' dominating offense took 
control early, leading 3-0 after the 
first period. Finland has given up 
just four goals in five games and 
has ouishot their opponents, ISO- 
64. 

The Finns got two more goals in 
the second period and then rwo 
more in the final two minutes of the 
game to complete the rout. 

■ In Saturday !r matches: 

Sweden 6, United States 4: The 
U.S. team's string of three come- 
from-behind lies was ended as Pa- 
trik J »hHn got bad three goals and 
an assist for Sweden, which can 
wrap up Pool B’s (op spot with a 
victory Monday over Canada. 

The U.S. team still needs to at 
least tie Italy on Monday to ad- 
vance to the quarterfinals. If Italy 
wins, it enters the quarterfinals. 

The Swedes opened a 4-1 lead 
after two periods before goals by 
Peter Ferraro and Brian Rolston 
made it 4-3. After Roger Johans- 
son's power-play goal put Sweden 
up by two, Rolston scored with 
9:09 to go. 

But the rally ended there for the 
U.S. team, as Hakan Loob scored 
with 59 seconds left 

Tommy Sale. Sweden's second- 
string goalie; stopped 2] shots, in- 
cluding breakaways by David Sac- 
co and Darby Hendrickson. 

John Lilley beat Sale 10:38 into 
the game but Sweden soon look 
command. Juhlin scored at 12:29 
and then again 3:36 later to put the 
Swedes ahead to stay. 

Juhlin and Roger Hansson 
scored 216 minutes apart in the sec- 
ond period for Sweden's 4-1 lead. 
Juhlin and Rolston lead all goal- 
scorers in the tournament with five. 

Italy 7. France 3: Italy kepi alive 
its meager hopes with the help of 
two goals from Stephan Figliuzzi. 

The loss elimina ted France from 
the medal round The French fell to 

0- 1-3 while the Italians improved to 

1- 0-3. 

Slovakia 3, Canada 1: Slovakia 
reached the bodcey playoffs in its 
first Olympics, and set up a possi- 
ble playoff meeting with Lhe Czech 
Republic, which already has quali- 
fied. The countries were created 
out of the former Czechoslovakia 
on Jan. 1. 1993. 

Down 2-1, Canada began a pow- 
er play with 1:55 left. But goalie 
Eduard Hartmann was outstand- 
ing. stopping four shots. 

Jozef Dano clinched the game 
with an empty-net goal with 11 
seconds remaining. 


OLYMPIC SCOREBOARD 


MEDALS 

4j 

COUNTRY 

O 



T 

Norway 




15 

Russia 




15 

Italy 




W 

Germany 




n 

United States 



8 

7 

Canoda 



2 

6 

Austria 




4 

Netherlands 

0 



"4 

Franco 




3 

Swtfzerfemd 

I 


a 


Kazakhstan 

0 



2 

Japan 


1 


2 

FbitoKl 




2 

Belarus 




1 




SUNDAY** RESULTS 
MRS UMWOn 
M K Hm art W - 
G: s*rael Toram. Rasta 
5: Frank Lock. German* 

B: Sven Ftaefter, Ser raw - 


a : SwtB.! (GwaovWKtar oarf Danct) 

. * s: Swttx.it lltatoOak^oadOoldoAjdkllnJ 
B: Italy l (GenBtar Huber wtf SWono TIocO 
SU Janptao . . 
uneHAUkMsfen 
B: Jen* WtUsfloa. Gamwny 
S: Esaen Bredaav Morwov 
B: Andrea Odd mw. Austria 


. G: JoWn Otav -tCoo. Korwcv 
: S: Kkrii Started. Wm w 

B: Bart Udd M W Nataerton as 

7 SATURDAY'S RKULTS 

Alpine «a 
wwari PowpM M 
. G: Kotto SaUnaer. Geraow 
' ptenbo Street. United States 

• _B: taetde Kostnar. itotr. 

crao-ewtenr - - 


G: Stfm tta HtAestodt Norway 
s: Lb Me intros. United States' 

B: EHiMta KdwnWWfc Buteo 


Gi Gsrda MWMUtetisft ttotr ■■ 
5: Sum Erdraana, Germany ■ . ' 

B: Andrea teamur. Austria 
-sme skates 
MAUN Mdm. 

• Gc Johan Otov. Kta* 'Nanay 
5: Matte RBsrao, Neibertonds 
B: Fatten Zondttra, NrttMrimds 
-TUESDAY'S -RESULTS 


Gi.Dtann AafteGMorottar,. U.6. 
S: Btetana Gtadtadimw RUBta 
Br lsokfe KOfnev Italy . .. .1 . 


Gi'LTvfcov Egoroya Russia 
S: ManMe DC Cento, Italy. 
B; MorjtHJbu Wro Ri brn l 


G: E.' Gordeeva and -S. Grinkov, Russia 
Si N. MBNanknok ana a. Dmltriav, Rim 
B: L ttrassear and L Otar, Canada 
-' MONDAY'S RESULTS. 


G: Thomas AbBoanL Nanny 
S: Blorn DahUc. Nenwy r . 
0: MflCa Mvtfvte, Finland •. 


COMBINED 


CROSS 

COUNTRY 


G: Goars Hack),' Germany 
S: Mortals Frock. Austria . 
8: Arodn Zwwte, ntey 


g: Aieteandr GaMisy, AKsta 
S: SefoM Klevchenvet. Rassta 
B: Mandbu HW1L Japan . 

SUNDAYS. RESULTS 


G: Bloro DaMta. Narow . . 
s: vfadhntr-Sadrnoy. Kataktatai 
B: sjMo Fauner. ttotr • 


G: tammy mob -U nttod States . . 
S: Kirill Andre AanedL Norway 
B: Edwaro Paifli<tosky,«snate . 

Cross Country SUine 

. . BBwrt BWk m da ri 
G; Nunuela.Dl .Oetriw Holy . 

S: Lvuoov Esorova, Russia 
B: Ntno Gcvrft*. Russia • 


G: Alewtf unnonor, IBMSlo 
S; Elvt* Stalk* CenoO*, 

B-. Pft«ps» Condteiro Franca 
Nordic ComMnad 
tsdSytdaat - 

G: Fred Borm LundDers. Nraway 
S: Tatamort Kona J««r» 

BrBtartaEna^^ay 

MateMtoMn 

G: Baanta BWr. United States . . 

S.- Staon Aoctv Ccnod o 

B: FranxWta SCtwita Oemwar 
FRIPAY^l results 
B iatWoe 

WMMtf 15 KBOBtetam ■ 

6 : Mwtom eeeam. omas* 

S; Aista Bricnd, F ranca 
0: urauta DW. 0*on»iY . 

L WP 

e: ^ 

Speed StetteO 
. Mates LOte M*** 

G: Don 

S: tear ZBoteovrtr. Brtwte 

B: swtte-icleiirtwwo. leaBaa. 

THI/mRAV* 5 RE SULTS 

- AWteWNB . ■_ 

BbwSeteriOtaatssafcte 
G: Mortars top wtef. 

S: Tormmr Mo*. ... 

_ B: taatit to** aomartr wjw : 

Cm Ctasotrv SW*te 
uhi w *mw**«ri 

_C: atom DoBItor Nor* * . . 

S: Vtodtmlr 

8 : Marco Aianttea W 


G: Johann Otav Kass, Norsimr 
S: KMO Stertetl' Norway ; • ■ 
B: tontls Rtssma. Ns toarton*. 


DOWNHUt 


• WOMEirS COMBINED (DtamhUD— L 
Ktea SsUratr, G ermany. 1JI8; 
ZPl U tooSt r w* , U^. t JRt>; 1 Unldr KostoT, 
Italy. ldES; V Atanka Oaan Stauenta. 
Irtasn & PoniHta Wtest&SrmdMv IrtUBt 4 
Moreno GatTWo, tfatv. Tr2S7T; 7, Vteni 
Seiswider.SMttNrknd. ISSfl; 1 End Kmso- 
bata. Japan. 1J9 JO; % HlUe Gent, Gvmm, 
IrtMto IGFIarencn Maanoda Front*. 1 ait.lL 
j t.Blbfona Psrta, ihrtv.i :».!& OJeantee 
UidsNanwr.ldMI.'UMsrttoEillGsn 
many. l:2Ma;U. Svsttano GkitflJChovQ, Rbj- 
- X o. t :»A5; 15. Mlrtan Voot Gernesiv, 
-ldMlt U. Varvara Z standw ta, Russia 
liMMt 17,- Bottom MmYKv Italy. 1^747; n, 
Otaa Vsdkxtcva tcnnAhston. TJ9J*; 19, 
SMto Fretnar, SJovonta, 1.-J971; 2B,tWcHNle 
Ruthvon, Canoda \09S7. 

‘ -21 Erfte HaiwvteWM a. In- 
add StneckV Austria 1 rtftSTj rx Anla Hnos. 
Austria 1-Jton j X twmtaue PWettar. US- 
1 iXM ; » Katta Kama Stovetda i^osta a*, 

LuctaMMMved*fco,Slovafclal:30J0; 27.AU- 
harta Fora Ramarda VJU9i 38 Natalta 
Buna thnsta. l-JUl; SWtaMdtano Kesrifw- 
W Hungary, ldW; X, otaa Intawo 
Ukraine, 1:3UA 

' ZLZatiStasoott Austral iaJ:«A*.», Mira 
GoteulvRussial dUO; 33, Untka HravOLSto- 
verfa 1-MAO; 34, OahMa Racz, KiwaYi 
1J425; as, Krtattno PoOhnahna Ukraine, 
lOSXtXFnnaaeaSlmmtysMXAramylbKL 
1:37.14; 37, Vsroniave DunaUtv, Betahna 
MBA -3L Jena Her Taylor, Aroonttaa 
1:3?, 18; 37. .Gahrieta QaUano, AmsnHna 
lasts*; Marta ZMtg. Ramantaj, DNF; Julta 
Paristarv UX D5Q. 


SKI JUMPING 


G; Lwtaov eaemn_ 

SiManurtaWOmtortWV 

B; SWanto 


G: Swttana ea*f»n<ww *to*“ 

S: Emese Hunyo^*^y° 

B: Goodta peetedeto' Gannany 

WEI»E5UArSW« n - 7S 
H****” 0 *^- ■ 

Gi toaa4Jtc Brtteortl. wate" 

St Swuel 3BoaF»«av-.^J 0 - 

B; GroteWD- FrtnKe 


WOMEJTS ’ DtMriwiuAC-. ktea i*-. 
dnpsv Germany.! rniwitajw eecnnrtii'7 
. pKxteo Street. UJL l:3L5V; 3. Isolde Kostner. 
Italy , laMJSr 4- MnrHna. Sib .Gormdnv,. 
-V.VM % Catoerine Pace,Ccrnda,l zB.pi t, 
Me ta nle Sachet; Francs. I'JBMs 7, Hilary 
LtadtL.-UJK, 1:3744? 8 Varvara ZefcnsKaki, 
Rotate, \:BM i% RemHJd^Wjaru, Stedter 
lrt7Al: J0.Kdtta Koreaswvsrta, 197JA *■ 
tLJeanafteLumta, Norwoy.iazjB? ttMte- - 

tarn- Vogt'Gemiobr, tWMi TS Florence' 
Mosnodo, Rm 1:37«? WMnrena GaUt- 
tia noly, ysrtnBnrstattnatas!. 

AastriotliisttU. «, AtantaotxmLasvsnid, 
l;S&07? J7 4 VtaO«taa Gtaetacheyo, Rumta. 

1 JS.T0i tf. tewhorinu Gutaneotm. Germany; 

1 JtU; It.-Kerrto tee O a iS totf.; CooteBr 

1,-3122; n m bo b GaimijuSi Isaac v - 

2L“nrtKOUd6a»o, japayl-ja27;2Z>«bll. 
. ZwtrtBOsn. Svffltartoijd;; V*!»r ZL Sates' 
Fratnar, Stanrta liSMBt M, Otaa Vtato- 
crtavaKamWWrsfcTmstfKBdriteniMsr- 
Bhr ttety, iJBASt CavoowotfiL 

Fn«aLi:38jS;Z7^rtetoSam«lr*rtr.Ui, 
iaaJt:2«,HrtdiZeaer-BarfTkr,Swtt»r|and 
1 XtMi ThVathBtta Bouvtar. FTonce, MTUSt 
30. Mtchdta RuttwRLOnadB, ISA 
3L At* Hobs Austria JdfcRtr 32. Undo 
MedzRuvteu, Sovokkv 31 vrsni 

SctmeUer. Swttiertand, ilVA SC ErWa 
Henson, Sweden, NetattoBuea 

Russia, iriBja.-SLMlKtetoFsrtoltaRiania, 
t;tU7; V, OtesLagfmea, Unhe IMU7; 

31lMfw«oleuta.nHabv1M12t: 
KectmM.HmoQrvj ia ttEM artshni, 

Rnmc n l a 1U5J3L 

. a ErnndKa StaNrivrick. Areeretna, 

. T:ciW.- Fodhfudra . Ukrutna 

. 1‘jtaSS! 43.:-GatttWo..*Qdno, Amntlnd.- 
1 e^Jrinttar Tartar, Armrvtna 1 MSI ; 

bsnMw DttgoBr.'Ms tai r OHF; taertj 
SineeU, Austria DNF; Rmeta Gostocta; Aus- 
tria DHF; BBNano Aira.ii*, DNF,. ■ 


. LAStGE HILL RVFNT — L Jen* WetoflOO. 
Gerrecsir. estf meters, QU 2«J POSits; Z 

■ esoenUryrtsssa Nonwoy.T3SA12Za. HAS: % 
Andreas TtoWergtr, Austria ms- vns, 
7SUH A Tahanaba Otatsa jama 1T7JS, 

TOSS & Jam Marian Sotatiiea Flniona I T74J, 

‘ mi 331.1; fc low Ottawa Norway, U7-& 
'now aafjt; Z,JaroslavSoiada Czech Repub- 
. Ra1T7JkTUi322A.-&JtayaNtaMuitaJapaa 
" 1ZU. 7I6i ZMJ; 9, RoOwrt Meoflo Sloverta, 
ma 1T3UTI7A BLDKSar MoUmU Franca 

mmm - 

t. It, ChrWol Miner, Germany, 122i IBZS 
ZOO; 12, Hehu KuttaV Auetrki, 1UA I13i 
3t7A: n. Atatfdto Horada Jonon, HU W A 
HM; H Noriokt KasaL Jem, HOB, «9i 
WUJ IS. OtafsrTboma GrimoBY, «2i KU, 

. . M27; lARaiieribCecsaltolr.totelUA m2; 
.17. Oyyfed Bern. Norway, 1I2A TCBA 117* n, 
... Rolnio YTlrxrm, Altana m& HIA 1t2*l W. 

StrfUlHonwctwr, Anshla W7i 10SA MLS; 
V 301. hum LunardL Italy. 1114 Wli 171A 
ZLN kstae Oetaam, Fronc*^ OSiTOI i 17LD; 
■':3k Art-PsUm NMtofa. FWanA W7A Wi 
xnU; ZL Stoeve Detaua Frahoa iOA RQA 
1363? M Monricws jartde, Grrmany, WfA 

■ «S HM;a Joans Potter I AtnoerwFtatand, 
ItaiWi ItHAi ta,.ChrWtan Meeer. Austria 
3BX6 WXL MOS; to. Matas Ktadn*. Stownfa. . 

- WUkW&lSSJtAMOrtte Svaeerica swoUo 
' toil «&4.T3Z»;» Zbynek Krempotc, Cadi 
'. Rmte»a&>06Afli15Wj»UstekwOM» 
.Ca* RenubBojSifBJttaU. 

Si. gutefedi Stavlen, rokaid, MX row, 
14M: 3^ ftarilfe Italy, 9Zi K5, Mftft a 

'* Mo6aEZ)umStotanto^^l4(U;34Mi- 

- tael Morttateoa SsMdea KSWJl 1403; 30 
Jotss4«Jete05,»74WA3353;aSyt»tate 
FMteb«etelrfDE& 77AV1* IXU 37. A»- 

■. drtoveryritinwitezattteAy7A^ u ^> 38 ' 
FWirt PcRfcSoyofcfcmnims; », joi 

Rma Ctacri tixoMk. AHA BA 13*7: 40 
'.Fredrik Joho nss op, Sweden. MS, 100 HU 
. , 4fc Johan Rmnsistarv Srwdctb «&' 87i 
1MJ? 42, MMdwfl'EsUna RuBhb no I0& 
IWJ; 40 Sta te H ea ri fc TaW, Norwpy,l7JlWi 
'IHJtM.StonlStav Pokhima Russia I7i S&H, 
HUi 45,AUr0stov Stowry, SkwaWa WA82A 
T06J.-40 JWlHtdlaKfcUAAAVLO W2.V; 47, 
Nteotas Jean-Pros:, France, 700,163.77,1 f <0 

- AJezondre Ko&xiknv. XnzBkitttan, S7A SU, 
MJ;4QDitert Tch e togto fc a Rn U fc KlO M fc 
BM; 30 WD Holme. UL UA 8L5, 9SA 

ff| J MorttaTnsmS»dttertena77A»J,6t3; 
32, Vbsrl GryfcMML Ukraine. BUS, St a 83.7; 
A Randy Water; U&. yiS.9aa.SfJ: 54, Alex', 
andra SlntaMkb Eetarite. 300. 03& 404: a 
Kafctai Tsokahe, Georete, 42J7; St. 

Staflan 1te9tes»8NBdMkM&tat «3: 57. 
Alexei SctuSanldne, Russla77A77J>. 582; 5B. 
JCnftot «etes»y, Ksstassian, =s, s&z 


MESTS 13 IUIJDMETGR FREE PUR- 
SUIT— L Worn Dow le, Nnneoy. 1:00: OBJ 
OSiMM, M3L0>; Z Vladimir Smirnov. Ka- 
snkhelan. 1:00:304 (34:0#A34:38J»; 1 Silvio 
Fawier, Italy. 1:01:404 I34:40A 2S:OOJ»; 4, 
MUco Myttvta, Finland. 1:dl:Si9 (3SJ0.9. 
2S:0S4);&MlktMtl Botvtnov, Russia, i : 01 -sr* 
[M:S9A 240601; O Jrsri Rasanen. Fhuand. 
1.-02:017 U4JQ7,25:3UJ); 7. Stum Slyzrtser- 
Nerway. 1:«:0K7 137:107, 24:94). 

t Jotonn MMhtaOB, Germany, 1:82:313 
(30:412, 25:500); 9, Gteryta VOmetta, Italy. 
lA3\A(34:41A25ri04);kl, Marco Ateareila 
Italy, 1:02:30 (37^2.1,34:424) ; 11. Alois Stod- 
loOer. Austria 1:02:57.1 11702.1. 2sa54t; 12 
AMnd Prokmrorav. Russia 1 :£0.-07j U7: JOS 
23 Jem: U JerssnkB Wtaoer. Switzerland, 
1:03:074 (37:124, SKSSO); 14, Joctien Behle, 
Genmiy, T^DJZI OI:aiT. 23:294); IS. Jan 
ORossoa Sweden. 1^3:124 (37:4 SA, 25:47 JO). 


NORDIC 


COMBINED 



INDIVIDUAL (Jump patois oed Crw 
Caaetrr petals to anree t lieses) — l, Fred 
Borm Lundbem, Norway (3474: 7M470) 
4S7snaaMsj Z Takanort Kono,Jman 1 3894; 
30S445) 444445; X Blorta Gnasn Vta. Horwav 
(24 05: 9015731 444.173: 4, Kctlll OBlmsnj, Jo- 
m (2314; 2074501 410550; 1 Aon Morkvordf. 
Estonia <2434; 190.135) 433435; 0 Htppolyl 
Kempt, S wmer laid |216 l5j 207425) 424125: 7. 
Jean-Yves Caendel. Switzerland (2220; 
MSB) 477.410; 6 Trend Eton 1 Elota Nor- 
way (2814; 220406! 42L500; ». Sytvnte Ctrfl- 
taume. France (2024; Z1BJ9S1 4204*5; IX Mo- 
SBU Abe, Japan (2074; 212JB0) 419400. 

Tl.KnutTom Apelona, Norway (Wl 2B*44S) 
4U.U5; 12 ABar LevandL estonto (1974; 
zaS2M 411420; IX Todd Lodwlc*. Undid 
States, (2204; T7XWB 410975; 14 Jerl MantBa, 
Ftatand (21X5; 193.115) 405415: IS, Antaees 
Sdud Swtfaeriand (1904; 106*0) > 4044W; 74 
Dmvtra Pratemln. Ukraine 0205; 19&B3S1 
40U3S; 17, Fabrics Guy, France (1914; 211475) 
40Z075; IX F ro n Wssfc Malta Cadi RsMOOc 
0014; 199475) 40L175; 19. Juntstii Ksoowrz. Jo- 
PCSl (2203; T79JB5) 39*405; 2XTep(S ui P0 t unto . 

Ftohald 11926; 204700) 39*700 
31. Stantotaw Ustupskl. Poland (NOLO; 
H&SS57 393485; 22 TDomas Abratb. Germa- 
ny (1*44; 1944001 matte; 2X Thomas Owner. 
Germany <1*74: 191J35) 30X825; 24 Masnor 
Frahnuth. Estonia (1335; 210.905) 3*7,0$; 25. 
Tapto Nurmeta, Rnland (1874: 200.185) 
3B7.1BS; 26. Mktad Gtadta. Sovakld (1844; 
202 JB0) 3BS78D; 27. Mario Sledier. Austria 
COLO; 17*7751 38SJ7S: 7X Etienne Goar, 
France 77924; )99480>3M8N);2»,RyanHec9t- 
moa uj_ (19)4; 192400) 384400; 3X Tim Te- 
IraouU, U4. (1854; 19X455) 204455. 

31 Milan Kacens, oedi ReauWlc (W44; 
189730) JBX736; 21 Zbvmk Panek. Cxech R6- 
ettatle (1714; 212*55) 3S34S5; 3X Andrea Ce- 
CQixItatY fins; WM40) 301240; M.Btoohane 
MidHs. France 11714; 21X140) 3SL140: 15 
Roland Bran Germany 12094; nzeei 
.382405: 35 John Jarrett. U5- 0755; 2W9S) 
382495: 37. Felix Coltwou, Austria (19X3; 
190240) 3807«;4X KtamMramtnen, Ftatand 

rwziw 174420) 371410; 39. Umar Atuve^Este- 
OlO (7 Mi 20535) WU35; *X Georo Rkdel- 
sp etwer. Austria 0934; m.7251 359.125. 

<1. Retort Stadelmarxv Austria (1905; 
UU151 34X515.- *X Falk Samoa r. Germs ary 
tuxs: 19S08S) 361585; 4X Valeri Stoliarov. 
Russia (1144: 18X415) 360775; H Andrea 
Laasx Holy 11404; NUW 3H4J0; «-5w*> 
day Dooormskl. Russia OC24; 1809)5) 
340385; 46, Atoriaa WUes* tottzertand CUM ; 
' 13X630)33X130; 47. Dimitri DoubrovskL Russia 
113*4; 79*415) mou; 4X Valeri Kotolev. Rus- 
Mo (uojO; 151.188) 531.180; 49, Simone PlnasK, 

uoiy < UU; 161450) 3294581 5asergel ZBUar- 

■iro, Betafi* (Mi* mam msmsi. mm 
Badd*dx5kMiUa(1405; 185995) 32X495; 52. 
4 torttoBayw,$lavedclo (MZ4: 1405»> 3O80N; 
HUrteav Kepbl. Qecn1toxra»& 000400. 


BIATHLON 


MEWS 20 KILOMETER UrtWritarpMsta 

parantbeaas)— 1, Seroel Tarosou, Rusrita S3 

ralnutexlSJseaondi (» i XFiwfc 

many. 57:2X7 Ol; X Sven Fischer, Germany, 

57:414 12); X Atowtaw Panov, Botenm 

97A) iW* X J«*» StotetoeB. Senram', 


51:1X1 (2), X Andreas Zlneerte. noly. SX:541 
131 : 7. Mark KtrUncr, Germany, 59:144 (4); 
X Serael Tctopttov. Russia. S*:31M 151; *. 
Syllest Gtlmsdol. Narway.57riX4 (3*; ta, Al- 
lred Eder. Austria, 59:43.9 10). 

11, Petr GartMX Ciech Republic. 59:4X9 
(1); IX Toros DoWy, Ukro)ne-5*i51.1 O); 11 
Patties Ball tv- Sal Ins, France. 5*^X5 (41: 14 
Roman Zvonkov, Ukraine. 1:00:0X8 (0); 15, 
Ptoraltorta Carrara, ftaly, 1:00:142 (41; IX 
Alva Udras. Estonia, 1:00:145 (2); 17, Jlrl 
Hotutec tocn Republic. 1:08:184 (1); IX 
LudwlQ Greater. Austria 1:08.-214 (Si; 19. 
Gundon Uoenlrks, Latvia 1:00:2X5 (2): 50. 
UDfriM Putbstor, Italy, 1:00:27.1 15}. 

31. Ghoo rone VasHe, Romania 1 : 80 : 3 37 
I2t ; 22, Patrice Favre. Italy, 1:00:4X3 (3)1 2X 
Victor Mafaamv. Betarus, 1:08:427 (4),- 24 
Valeri Medradtsev. Russia 1 :80vS44 (2) : 25. 
Lel( Andemta Sweden 1:01:037 (1); 2X Vi- 
taly Mahylenea Ukraine. 1:01:074 (3); 27, 
Per Brandt. Sweden 1 :ta :09A (31; 2X Vadim 
Sactotirta. Bciarvs. 1:07:094 til: 29, Jane 
Ozbott.Slavemal -.01:19.1 (3); 30. Horn E*or- 
anto. Flniona 1:01:484 (6). 

3L Janas Panvtk.Munpory,l:ln:4L*(4);3a, 

Lionel LourtnL France- 1:01:424 (3); 33, ttarv- 
sprier ICitabri, SmtzeriiML 1:01:04 (1); 34 
Ivon Masortk, tocti Republic. 1:01:4X4 (3): 
3S. Valeri Klrienka Russia 1:01:4X3 (U: 36. 
Ole Etnar Blorndataa Norway. 1:01-514(4}; 
37. AttwnasiasTsak Iris. Greece. 7:01 -JL7(1); 
3X Jure vetepec. Stoverta 1:01 JX 4 (2); 2*. 
Jan Zlemlania Palana 1 ^S:0X4 (4) : 4a Oleas 
MotoMns, Latvia. 1:01:0X1 14). 

41, Time Seppata, Flntana 1:02.-074 13); *Z 
UH Jocwnssoa S weden. 1 rfg: 142 (4); vxste- 
ven Cvr. Canoda 1^K;2X7 (SI; 44 Nerve 
Ftandta, Francs. 1:07:254 (4): 44 Jean-Marc 
Ctwbtoi. Swttzertana 1:02:274 (4); 44 Hal- 
yard Hanevoid, Norway, i:djjxo ( 4); 47, 
Franck Penat. France. 1:02:574 (3): 4x 
Franz Srtsocer. Austria l:03:0M (7); 49, 
Glean Rinwriuv Canoda 1:03:0X9 IS); 5X Lu- 
lus KreicL Stauakto. 1:03:2X0 (51. 

51, Dmttrt Pantov. Kazakltstan. 1-.(D:29A 
ut; 52, Jan Apse TVkSum, Norway. t:<B:JL7 
(3); 5X Evauert Redkln. Briaras. 1:03:319 
(6); 54 I an woods. Britain. 1:03:440 (3); 54 
Mictwri DUan. Britain. 1:03:444 (1); 56. Po- 
wet Siadek. Slovak la 1 :03:5L7 (3i; 57, Martin 
PtortsrtwHer, Austria 1:03:543 17): 58. Gln- 
taros Jastaskas. Lithuorto, 1:84:0X9 (6); 59, 
Bastion Lekan. Slovenia 1:05:113 (3); M. 
Kreastmlr VMenav, BiHoarla. 1:05:21* (41. 

61, U rmas KaMMae, Estanlal :05rt32 (7) ; 6X 
Mtsoo KadatOrJapan.1 : 05:344 (7); 6XVnesta«r 
2Jem Manta, potona 1:05:4X8 (6); 64 Jan En- 
ata us- \MJRJ (4); 6& Curtb Sctiretaer, 
US- 1:07:414 (6); 64 Glenn Otocrv Sweden. 
1:07:554 17): 67, Jan Waites. Poland, 1:08:1X5 
- (7)>‘4XVesDHirita(MLF1r4arHLl:08^49.1 110); 
69, Katlu Otaste Estonia 1.-17:27,4 (101: 7B 
Vestal Gherote. MoUava i:H-JX4 [9). 


BOBSLED 


TWO-MAN BOBSLED— 1. Swtfzerkmd-I 
(Gustav Weder.Danat Addin) 3RIIIUITOX3081 
seconds (523X SX9L 5X7X 5U5); X Switzer- 
tenon 1 < Rets Gaetschl, GutOo Addta) 3:3046 
(5UX 5274 5279. 5249); 1 ltaty-1 (Gunltwr 
Hutor, Stetono Tted) 3:31.01 (5t6l, 5X80. 
5209. 5241); 4. Germany-) tRudi Lachner, 
Markus Zbnratnnain) 3:3178 (5274 5X09, 
SL7k 5X19); X Austria- 1 (Hubert Sdmesser. 
Thomas Scnradl 3:3143 (52.71, 5102. 5244 
5346); X Britota-i (Mark Taut. Lannox Paul) 
3 -JUS (5277.5115,5199,51241; 7. Cadi Ro- 

pabHe-l (Jlrl Dsawa, Pave* Polamsmrl 

3:32 ti (5204 521X530203427.- tie. Ccmxta-l 
( ® terra Loederv David Macaoctornt 3:3X18 
Ul»X SUX 5X11.5119); 9, ttdV-11 iPosauoiB 
Gesutta, AnteMa TartaoBo) J:»XS (SZ.« 
5U3. SUB. 5341). 

H. Britoifrit (Stan Oason, Paul FWd) 
3:32)0 (5246. 5X3X 5341, DL46)i »e. LaWo4 
(Zlnlls Ekmanb, Aldia tellers) 3 32B3 
5X41 *« 7Q f 5146); TV, Germiatv-li (Ssbp 
D csWkdtr. Bflgdon Mi»m) 3:3204 tSKB. 
5£4X XL7X SUOi «, UJL-U (Brion S*"® - 
DM Rondy Jones) S JUS (5249, SX37. 5204 
S34JJ; 14 United States-) < Jhn HerteridiMd 
Chip Minton) 3:3141 t5U5.SUS.SP9.53sn: 
K.Ca«0«a-ll (Christopher Loll. Gtanrov Gil- 
bert) 3:31# (5249. 5171 53J1 5156); IX Lnl- 
vfo-ll <5andb Pntsix Adrts Phtew) MB* 
(5X31. 514S, 53JX5X52J; l7,Austrta-II (Kurt 
EtaDerner, Martin sdNetaencner) 3:3359 
(53,11 5X61 SLa, 5X61); «. JOPan-1 1 

TaicevmU.Hlrasl»tSuwW>3:3*»t5Xn^H. 

5347. 5343); 19, Japan-1 tTashlo Waklta To- 
kbriri Ohert) UL« (5ZO. SUL SSAJ.Sitf) i 
2&Czedi Reacts ic- II (Pavel Pwkar. Jan «e- 
blen) 3:3425 (5X44 5142, 5344 5305). 

31 France-1 (atrtstertieFtadier.MD Roa- 
ert) 3-J43D (5544 5160, 5M7, 5179); l ine 
dwv; iFre*a -justatssoR, Hans arbera) 


3:3453 I534X 5X69, SUB, 53M1: 7X France- 1 1 
(Gabriel FouraHaue. Phttfcpe Tendvnl 
3:3(80 15X54 5X7X 5X5X 5X90); 24 Nether- 
land>-< (Rob Geurrw Robert De Win 3:3507 
(5X5XSX«X53J45Xa9);2XBuisorto-l IZveto- 
zor I vanor VHdarav. Valentin Gueora Atanas- 
sov) 3:3581 1517X5X0X542X5X97); 26, Russta- 
I torn Sukhonjetonka Andrei Gorohov) 
3:36J» (5X8X 541), 5409, 5401 ); 27. Austraho-l 
t Just In McdonakL Glenn Carroll) 3:3647 
(540X5X94 5421.5427) ; 3X Hunoory-l (Nicho- 
k& FrankL Mlkka Gvulol) 3:3706 154145*27, 
5414 5449); 29,Russto-lf (Viaflmtr Yefhnov. 
Oteg Petrov t 3:37.10 1541*. 5421. 500. 54*0): 
30. Romania- 1 IFIarimt Enactte. MM Dumb 
t ratal) 3JU8 iiti5. MJa, 54C. «*»> 

31. Monaeo-i (Albert Grtmatel. Gilbert 
Bees!) 3:3X27 (5414 5471 $457. 54831; 3L 
Ukraine- 1 (Ataxel Joukov. Alexandra Bor- 
lloutl) 3:3X7* (5471. 54M, 547X5461); 3 XBds- 
nkiHeraeaovlno-l (Zdravto Shrink. Zoran 
Sokolavtc) 3:3907 (5476,548X5482.5*66); 34 
Graece-i (Graaorv SeoolcL Christadoulas Ma- 
rinos) 3:3940 (54BX 54BX S50X 5471); 3X 
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Armento-I Uoseoh At master. KennmtiTope- 
)kwt) 3:398) (5485, 55JB, 5492. 5501). 

37. Trtaldod aid Toboao-i (Grasorv sun, 
Curtis Harry) 3:03* (5i09.54BXS5.145s.iai; 
3X Vfraln (skmds-f (Kritti SudztarakL Faeu R. 
Schultz) 3:4X78 (55.1t. S5.1X 5524 55251; 39. 
America! Samoo-i (Tla Muaautulta. Brad 
Kll Iz) 3: 410* (5557. 5X25. S506.SS.16);*X Puer- 
to RIcp-I (John AmriMto, Jorge Bonnetl 3:4121 
155 7X5&4XSJX5S. 19); B.SanMarino-l IDOv 
CrescemtnL Mike Cracenzll 3:4123 (5534 
55.11. 55JS. 5543); *Z Vlrain I stanch- 1 1 (Z»- 
cnary ZoOer. Paul Zorl 3^so) 15401. S4S7. 
541X5428); Jamalca-I (Dudley Stokes. Wayne 
Thomas), DSQ tourth ran 15X5?. 5301. 53761. 


SPEED 

SKATING 


MEN’S 1X000 METERS— 1. Johann Otav 
Kan. Norway, 13 minutes. 3X55 seconds, 
world record (old record: 13:4304 Kassl : Z 
Klrtl Store! kL Norway. 13:4925; X Sort VMd~ 
karoo. Netherlands. 13:5473: 4 Falko Zond- 
»tra. Nritter Winds, 13-5X25; S.Jororolr Rodke. 
Potond. 14:0X8*: 6. Frank Dittrich, Germany, 
14:0433; 7. Rintle Rltsmo. Netherlands, 
14:0928.' X Janas Schoen. Sweden. 74:1X15.- 9. 
Mtenaet Hodschletl. Austria 1«:12J99; IX 
Christian Emlneer. Austria. 14:1X14 

U.TasheakQltokawaJaton 14:1700: IZAn- 
Orey Arutrienfca Russia 14:1X42: IX koruhlro 
Sata JBpara U:tXU; 14 Yevpenv Sanarov. Ko- 
-skhstan, M:2U2; 15. Rooerio SiBhel. Italy. 
1C27.5B; 14 Per Be nu t aoifc Sweden. I«:4804 

WOMEN'S 58* METERS — J, tank Blair. 
OS. 3*25 seconds: 2, Susan Audi. Canada. 
3901: X Franziska Schenk. Germany, 39.70: 4 
Xue RuUiana, Chtao, 3*21 ; X Yoo Sunhex 
South Korea, 39*3; 4 Monteue Garbrechl. 
Germans’. 39.95; 7, Svetlana Boyarkina. R wr- 
ite, 4X17; X Edei Therese MriseBv Norway. 
«L30; 9, Jin Hua China. 4023; IX KvokeShl- 
mazakL Jam 4X34 

11. Yana Chunvuan, Chtao, 4X37; IX anaeta 
Houck. Germany, *X38; IX Ye (Mdaba China, 
43JOi 14 Totnom! Okazael, Jaoon, ASS; IS. 
AnkeBaler.Germanv.4X5e; iXMicheiieMar- 
ton. Canada 4X71; 17. Ofcsnp Ravtkrva. Rus- 
ga4D72; 1X5Wt»K(KWteee. Jopon,«)L«; 1*. 
Oiristlno Aotllnkj Netherlands, <ii» : to. (He) 
Kristen TaBoL (72_and Svetlana FedrtUna 
Russia 4UX 

22. Natalvtl Potadcova. Rumta 41 A6; 2X ML 
haeto Doscate. Romania 41.13.* ZX Peaay Cta- 
sen. U2. 4L13; 25. Mavuml Yo nmnulu . Ja- 
pan. 4)20. 24 Undo Johnson CcmdX 41,42; 
27. Entese Antal. Austria 4LS*: 2X Kona ML 
yauaa Saudi Korea 41.06; 29. Corsseta Her*, 
beha rtemonia 4J.75; JO, Krtsntna Eurea 
H un gary, 4X29; Si, Jeong Bae-vouna south 
Korea 4223; 3Z, Chun He^ioa sooth urea 
4X05: 33. Cairteno lb May, Canada &JS; 
Michelle Kline. U.S, 03a 


HGURE 


SKATING 

Bl-L. 


MHnSlNGLES— L Atari Urmonm. «Wr. 
4to.15iactoredPkiciniB;XEivisSta|ka Can- 
ada 30: 3 PMfiooe Candela ra. Franz, 45; *, 
vuctor Petranfea UkrainxBJ: x Kurt Brown- 
tea Canada U; 4 Brian Brito*. ULX. 108; 7, 
Eric MUteL France, MW; X Scott Day O. U4 
1U; 9. BtovcnCouein, Britain. 1X5; taSetos- 
(ten Britten. Gortoda, 140; H. Ofeg Tannrev. 
Rmla.145,- 12, MesriwuKoelvaina Jonon 
16* iXWdiaelTyllMMLDeniTKak.1&5: 14 
Cornel Gheorshe. Romania 222; 15. Igor 
Fashkavich. Russia, 22JL 


ICE DANCING (Original Program)— 1, 
Jayne Torvill end Christopher Dean, Britain, 
OAfoctoredptoctaBs: 2. Mala Usova and Alex- 
ander Zhulin. Russia 12; X Oksana Grllectuik 
and Evgeni Ptatov, Russia 18; 4 Susanna 
Rahkamo and Petri Kekka Ftalona 24; X 
Sophie Montetfe ond Pascal LBvanchy, 
F ranee. 37); 6. An lei I ka Krylova and viadtmlr 
Fedorav. Russia X6; 7. Irina Aomanava and 
(ear V a i u Bm A a Ukraine. 42; X Katarina 
Mratova and Martin Slmecek. Czech Repub- 
lic. 48: 9, Jennifer Goobbee and Hendrvk 
Scnamtoraer. Germuiv. 54. 

IX Shae-Lynn Bourne and Vlcter Kntatz, 
CM da 48; II. 7 at llano Navko and Samuel 
Genllon. Belarus. IX AIM Sterotedou and 
Yurts Rastulvayev, Urbekistaa 72; Ha AAar- 
earlte Drobiazka and Povllo6Vanoaas.Lllhu- 
ante. 72; 14 Eilrobefn Punsaian and Jerad 
Semi tow. UJ4. X*; IX le n mgeig Nau end Luc 
Moneoer, France,98; 14 Radmila Chrobokava 
aid Milan Brzv. Czech Republic. *8: 17. EUzo- 
tfett5taknlnliEova<aitfDntHriy Kasartvaa K»- 
jokhs l ua 102; IX Agnieszka Damonska ond 
Martin GtewadO, Potond. 1X8: 1*. Svetlana 
OWMhevb and Atexander SosneiAo, Ukraine 
114; 2X Enlko BCTkesend Szltard Toth, Hunga- 
ry, 120; 21,D»nora Nurdbovovaond Muetvum 
Settorov. Uzbekistan. 1X4 


HOCKEY 



jjjfr 


POOL A 




W 

L 

T Pis GF GA 

x-Flnland 

5 

0 

0 >0 

25 4 

xJSertwmv 

3 

2 

0 6 

11 14 

* -Czech Rep. 

3 

2 

0 6 

16 11 

s-Rusrta 

3 

2 

0 6 

20 )« 

Norway 

0 

5 

0 0 

5 19 

Austria 

1 4 

POOL ■ 

D 2 

13 28 


W 

L 

T PIS GF GA 

s-Swe<ten 

3 

a 

1 7 

21 10 

< -Slovak to 

1 

0 

2 6 

20 12 

*-Co nooa 

2 

i 

1 5 

14 9 

united Slates 

0 

i 

3 3 

14 16 

Italy 

1 

3 

D 2 

14 24 

France 0 3 

x-aavonceti to quarterfinals 

1 1 

* 21 


Sunday *x Remits 
Russia 4 Czech RenuMr 3 
Finland 7, Germany 1 
Norway X Austria • 

Saturday's Results 
Slovakia X Canada l 
Italy 7. Primes 3 
Sweden 4 United States * 

SUNDAY’S RESULTS 
Norway 1 1 8-2 

Aurtria 1 1 2-4 

First period—), Norway. Ole ESUW DriD- 
Strom (Erik Kristiansen! (pe>: X Austria. 
Andreas Puscnnlk IWoltaong KromoLPonri- 
Wes— Marfv OWimaa Aut (Hooking); Tom- 
my Jakobsen, Nor (dwrolno). 

Second period— X Austria James BurtorwL 
Norway.Marlus Roth (Sveln Enek Noraebo). 
Penoltte— Enosibert Under, Aut (slosMne); 
Morp an And Often, Nor (roughing); Kenneth 
Strong. Aut. double-minor Irougfitaol; Mari- 
ta Roth, Nor (holding). 

rated period — 1. Austria, Gerhard Pwschn/k 
(Marly Dallmon); 4 Austria Rob Davie 
(Werner KerHxMorty DOIlmon) (pp). Penal- 

lies — Dieter Kolt, Aut (hoWtael; Mkhael 
Shea. Aut (trlpplne): Trend Mognusaen, Nor 
isiaditae); Dieter Ko», Aut Itatertarence). 

Slots on goal— Norwov 15-9-14— 31 Austria 
8 6 6-1). CoaRe*— Norway. Jim Marthtasen 
It* shots. IS saves). Austria Ml chart Pus- 
choctier (3X361. 

OeiiiM d r 8 8 t— I 

Ftatand 3 2 2-3 

First period— 1, FtekmX Jere Lehfinen 
($akuKal«i.vniePellanen) (PP);2.Flntand. 
Janne O loner (Tern LeMarae); X Finland 
iHflm Ntenvlnen (Marfut PafcJ. Fenoirtes- 
— Saku Krivu, Fin (holding!: Georo Franz. 
Ger IhoMteg); Somt Kopanea Fin ( stash- 
ing j; Thomas Brans, Ger i cross-check ino): 
Andreas Nlederbergcr, Gor (holding). 
Second perio d 4 Finland, Morto Klprusov 
(Mika Uatate. Janne Oilmen); 5. Ftelriid 
MMco Makrta ( Raima MMmlaen). PenetUaa- 
- Janne Laridumen. Fin [cnorutngl: WoJf- 
9ong Rwnm*r, Ger (tritotno) ; Tteto Juttia 
Fbi (hooking). 

TBtnJ period— X Germany, Benoit Ooucet 
(Dieter Hnwi); 7, Ftatand, VUtePeJteMnX 
Finland, Mka Makrta (Rot mo HrtmUvml. 
Fenalttes— Jovson Meyer. Ger (haldlne)i 
-tome Laukkonen, Rn (holding). 

Shot* ae goate-Gcrmanv 2+4-14. Finland 
12-19-13— «. Gcritee— G er m a n y, Helmut De 
Rear l« shots. 37 sows). Flniona, jormo Mr I- 
i/r U-:3.-. 


Russia 2 2 8-4 

Czech Republic 2*1-3 

First earied— 1, Russia, Valeri Karpov, X 
Russia. Dmitri Denisov. X Czech Republic. 
Petr Hrbck (ae) ; 4, Czech Republic. Jan Aline 
(Kamil KasnM. Penalties Tomas Srsen. 
Cze (hten-sllcUfte); Radek TouaaL to 
(boa rdlna); Czech Republic bench, served bv 
Tomas Srsen (tea many men); Sergei Soro- 
kin, Rus (stash hot. Dmitri Dordsor. Rus 
(hoakinai. 

Seated period— X Russia. Andrei Nikollshifi 
(no) ; X Russia, Valeri Karpov (pp) ; Psoaltte- 
s— Otakar Janeckv, to (reuahlna); Serort 
Berezin, Rus fstashlnp); Bedrtch Sceroaa 
Cze {interference); MIKttlav Hontva to 
(hold teg). 

Third porte d 7 , Czech RcpuMfc. Jlrt Vy- 
kaukal (Tomas Srsen I. Penalties— AWsander 
Vinogradov. Rue (Interterencel: Jon Aline. 
Cze (roughing | ; Alexander Smirnov. Rus 
(reutfiteo I •" Andrei Zuev. Rus. served by Ser- 
art Berezin (delay ot game). 

Shots on eeat— Russia 8-138— 29. Czech Re- 
public 10*10— 2X Goalies— Russia. Andrei 
Zuev (58 Shots. 25 saves). Czech Republic. 
Petr Brua 129-25). 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
Canada I 0 8-1 

Slovakia l 1 1—1 

Firs* period— 1, Canada, Paul Karlya; X 
Slovakia, Jozef Dano (Ztemund PalttY). Pen- 
stttee— Derek Mayer, Cm (tripping); Lubo- 
mtr Sekeras, Svk Itrtpptng): Bradley ScMe- 
Ort. Can (hlghrilicklng). 

Second period— X Stovokta, Robert SvoMa 
(Branistov janos) (op). PeneMtes — Mark 
Art toy. Can thokllng); Roman Konlsek, Svk 
thooWtio); Bradley scMeaei. Con (rough- 
ing); Jon VarhoUk. Svk (cross-checking) ; 
Robert Svebta Svk (ctwriTina); Grao Porks. 
Can (rtoaMno); Robert Petrovlcky. Svk 
(charging). 

Third parted— 4 Slovakia. Jozef Darn (Pe- 
tar 5taetmr. Jergus Baca) .- (rtven) . Penalties. 
— Lutomlr Sekeras, Svk (hokAng); Paul Kar- 
lya. Cun {hooking): Lutomlr Sekeras. Svk 
(hooking). 

Shots OB goa l Q gtado 4-17-9— 2& Stovaklo 
1084—27. GooUe*— Canada. Carey Hlrscti 
(26-24). Slovak te. Eduard Haitmm (25-24). 

llnBad States 1 8 3—4 

Sweden 2 2 2—6 

FfiTB period— I. USA, John Uttev (Jeffrey 
Lazoro);X Sweden, Patrtk Juhlin (Mats Nov 
lund); X Sweden. Potrlk Juhlin (Magnus 
Svensson, Charles Berghmd). Penalitee— I Da- 
vid RubertvuSA (hooking); Roger Htmsson. 
Swe (triPPteo). 

Second period— 4, Sweden, Patrtk j uni in 
(Mats NartunX LeH RoUfail (pp). X Sweden. 
Raaer Hansson. Penalties— Christian Due- 
Bole. Svk t holding); David Sacco. USA Ide- 
lavof oome); Brett Hauer, USA [cross-check- 
Ins); Travis Richards. USA (hooking): John 
UlteY. USA ( si atone) : Prter Ferraro. USA 
tel towing). 

TUrd period— 6. USA, Peter Ferraro (Craig 
Johnson, Edward Crawlev); 7. USA, Brian 
Rofsten (Theodora Drury, Peter Ctevogltec 
X Sweden. Roger Johansson (Patrlk Juhlin) 
(00): 9. USA, Brian Roteton (David Roberts, 
□avid Sacco) (pot; )X Sweden, Hakan Loob. 
Penoittes— Christian Due-Bale. Swe (slash- 
ing); Peter LovWette, USA (rgvrtdng); Sto- 
lon Orrukag, Swe (hooking); Peter Fonberg. 
Swe I rough tag): Edward Crowley. USA 
(holding}. 

Shots oa goal— United States 1X5-10—25. 
Sweden 1X164-37. Goal l*s— United stales, 
wuchort Dunham (37 shots. 31 saves). Sweden. 
Tommy Sato (25-21). 

IteN 2 3 1-7 

France 1 2 0—3 

Hrtf period— 1, Daly. Stoftm FWIuzz! 

(Mourtzfti Moral) (pO) :X France, Benoit La- 

parte (po) ; X Italy. Philip OIGaetane. Penot- 
rtos— Arfftanv Ctrartti, DO (roughing).' 
Franck PotonkowskL Fra (rougWng); Benoit 
LdPOrie. Fra (boarding); Eric Lemarav*. 
Fra (Interlercncx): Bruno Zarrille. lla 
(crosocnerttlno): Stefan Ftelluzzl, l)a Itrio- 
pfngtl Anthony CirertlL no (hooking). 

Second pe ri od- 4. Italy. Stefan FlgllmL 1 
ihdy, Palrldi Brugnoli (Roland Ramoser);x 
France. Christaahe Vllle {dpI; 7, Franco, 
Herrick Mala (Benoit LaPOrte); X Holy, Lu- 
eta Topaffgh (Gaetano Orlando. Bruno Zor- 
rWo); Peneilles— Vezlo Socratlnl. Ito Itfitar- 
lorenceJ; Gaetano Ortondx ita mowing); 
Steotnne Barm, Fra (Intert er ence); Plerrlck 
Mala. Fra (heoklng). 

TUrd period 9 , Italy. Mawrlzio Mansi 
<m»; IX Itnfv. Bruno Zanillo (Gaetano Or- 
lando} (on). Penaffles— Franck PoiankPwsU, 
Fra (Interference): Amranv ciratllL Ita (In- 
terference): Ctalstashe villa. Fra, double- 
minor (nugnlRb): PhU K>0lGamna,iM.(tou- 
Uxminor (rouahtno). 

5MM ee poo)— Italy 7-7-7—31. France 14-78- 
11—35. CeM tat — Italy. David DelRno (35 
dtots. 32 saves), Franca, Petri Yionen (2B.i«). 


1 












Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1994 


*•* 


SPORTS 


Swiss Veteran 
Takes Bobsled 
Title 2d Time 




.Vfu- York Tima Service 

LILLEHAMMER — It was the second- 
closest iwo-raan bobsled finish in Olympics 
history, and Gustav Weder of Switzerland, 
who won the gold medal in the 1992 Olym- 
pics. won it again on Sunday. 

He heal his teammate. Reio GOtschl the 
leader after Saturday's first two runs who 
was making his Olympic debut at the age of 
28. After the last two runs were completed. 
Weder’s Lime was 3 minutes. 30.81 seconds, 
just five-hundredths of a second ahead of 
Gotscbi Wader’s pusher, Donat Acklin. is 
the older brother of Guido Acklin. who 
pushes for Gfitschi. 

Only the 1968 Games in Grenoble, 
France, had a tighter finish, when Eugenio 
Monti of Italy and Horst FloLh of Germany 
finished in a dead beat, and Monti was 
declared the winner because he had the fast- 
est heat time. 

GQnther Huber and Siefano Tied cap- 


tured the bronze. Italy's first Olympic bob- 
sled medal since 1972. three-tenths of a sec- 


ond behind Weder. Two of Huber's brothers, 
Wiifried and NorberL woq medals in the 
luge doubles on the same track last week. 

The two U.S. teams finished a disappoint- 
ing 13th and 14th. despite new all-American 
sleds designed with the help of the stock-car 
racer Geoff Bodine. Brian Shimer and 
Randy Jones finished one spot ahead of 
their teammates, Jim Herberich and Chip 
Minion. 

The Americans had anticipated placing a 
great deal higher in the standings. Shimer’s 
sled was 2.04 seconds behind Weder, and 
Herberich’s sled was 2.60 seconds back. 




MqnStam/Kcan 

Gustav Weder. left, and Donat Acktin celebrated a come-from-betead victory over Swiss teammates in the two-man bobsled. 


“I thought my fourth run was pretty 
good," said Shimer. "But when 1 saw the 


time. 1 was dumbfounded to see that 1 was 
that far back. 

"But there's potential there that we need 
to tap into. Hopefully, we can draw some of 
that from the four-man later this week. 1 had 
high expectations coming in. I'm disappoint- 
ed, but it's been a long, tough year.” 

Herberich, meanwhile, also had some rea- 
son to see a silver lining. "Today, the third 
run was better than the ones yesterday.” he 
said. "The fourth was great. I couldn't haw 


anticipated driving any better on that fourth 


run. I thought our starts went well today. 
They were competitive with most of the 
teams. We just could never find the speed all 
weekend.” 


The Norwegians Keep (Mining, and Coming 


Reuters 

LILLEHAMMER — Officials laid on 
23 more trains and brought in more traffic 
police Sunday as they continued trying to 
cope with far more spectators than expect- 
ed. 

With clear skies, the start of winter holi- 
days in southern Norway and the country's 
gold medal haul having tempted thousands 
to attend the Games, crowds estimated at 
about 1 50,000 on Saturday caused traffic 
jams in Liliebammer, which is normally 
home to 23,700 people. Officials bad antici- 
pated about 100,000 people arriving each 
day this weekend 

Tor A une. a spokesman for the organiz- 


ing committee, said that police had report- 
ed that the E6 highway, the main Oslo- 
Lillehammer road, “was dose to its 
capacity” on Saturday. 


“A few more cars and everything would 
have stopped." Aune said. 


He said extra traffic control police would 
staff intersections to help ensure there were 
fewer jams in town but some congestion 
was inevitable. 


But most people travel to the Olympic 
region by bus or rail, so Norwegian State 
Railways was running 23 extra trains on 
Sunday. 

Ullehammer's police chief. Ante Huuse, 


said he was expecting similar crowds on 
Tuesday, when the Norwegian team was to 
defend its 4xKLkflometer cro ss country 
skiing relay title. 

Meanwhile, organizers asked local au- 
thorities to pot down more grit on roads 
and paths before Sunday’s ski jumping 
competition at the Lyggardsbakkene arena, 
where a crowd of 33,000 came to see Nor- 
way’s Espen Bredesen come in second. 
About 30 people, at last count, have fallen 
and broken bones at the Games, with a 
U.S. nordic combined skier, 71m Tetrad t, 
breaking his leg after slipping on the ice in 
I .illehamm er on Saturday night. He will 
mi« Wednesday’s team competition. 


By Christopher Ciarey 

. New York Tinuss Service - ' 

LILLEHAMMER — Jens 
Weissflog of Germany had just fin- 
ished pumping his small fists at the 
bottom of the large hill. Far up the 
snow-covered ramp, Espen Brede- 
sen moved his wide skis into place 
and, amid the din, readied himself 
for tire jump ofhislife; 

From his precarious perch, Bre*. 
desen appeared to . have the. undi- 
vided attention of the entire Gud- 
b rands valley. In ' the stadium . 
below, nearly 40,000 impatient 
Norwegians and .their king were 
waving their Pyg* and stomping 
their boots with the Olympic flame 
for a backdrop. In the distance, . 
thousands more without tickets 
strained for a glimpse of their latest 
local hero from atop roofs, tree 
Kmbs and snow sculptures. 

Bredesen waited until his coach 
Trend Jo ran Pedersen , lowered his 
left arm to give the start signal and 
then dropped into a crouch. The 
closer he came to takeoff, the load- 
er the roar came from below, and 
when Bredesen finally took flight, 
the stadium itself began to tremble. 

But then, like the sound of a lug 
roller after it hits the beach, the- 
nimble quickly and inexorably fad- 
ed away to polite applause. 

Espen the Eagle had landed; 
Espen the Eagle had come up shcffL 
Weissflog, not the Norwegian, had 
won the gold medal 

"Perhaps people are sad that I. 
took the gold away from their 
hometown favorite, bat everybody 
tries their best, and Espen has had a 
lot of dramatic success this season, 
said Weissflog. 29, who won ins last 
Olympic title a decade ago on the 
normal hill in Sarajevo. 

Bredesen, the World Cup leader, 
had raised his nation's aheadyiofty 
expectations with a magnificent 
first jump of 135 5 meters, giving 
him the m record and, witn the 
accompanying high marks for style, 
a very comfortable 10-point lead 
over Weissflog heading into the fi- 


Satajevo, where Weissflog won the 
norma! MB and took star' on the 
lame hilL But in recent years, the 
slightly built man wbose nickztame 
is "tire Flea” has experiaiced more 
Iowa, than hig hs, 

take many top athletes in East 
Germany, be bad to readjust after 
die fall of the Berlin Wall, which 
meantnnendtohisstae-si«>port- 
edexisteiK»UkeBrotesai,hewa8 
set bade by the advent of the V 

style, in w^jun^'spreadlheir 
ski tips afan takeoff to get more 
lift AflerfirasMng 33d on foe large 
Ml in the 1992 Olympics with tie' 


old style, he coatemplatoi reutt- 
Sentbut ultimately decided to lose. 
some weight and push on through 
LtUchamme r. 


Whether Weissflog strikes gdd 
again this week on the normal WE, 
the mastery will not endure. He 
aheady has announced that Uns 
season wfl] be his last. He is tired of 
the travel and wants more taw 
with his wife and young son. In 
May, he will begin working run- 
time for a health-insurance compa- 
ny and leave the jumping to the 
young ones. 


QnHarding 9 s Side, 



: ' By Christme Brennan . 

. Waskm/ptm Peer Serrta 
HAMAR— In Tonya Harding’s 
camp, there were, finally, some mo- 
ments of reHcfon Sunday. . 

The U-S. figure skater, who has a 
sprained right ankle, practiced wdl 
oaring her second training session 
of the afternoon to the constant 
applause of her coaches and U.S. 
Olympic officials dying to boost, 
her sagging spirits: ■- 
"It’s all right,” she shouted to 
reporters who asked about ber.au- 
kleas she left the training rink 
adjacent to the Olympic Amphithe- 
ater. “If s better. • ~ 


. risen returned to the ice on Sunday 
and performed her difficult combi- 
nation jumps bcautifully but bad: 
.some trouble with a couple of triple 
jumps. 

“ Harding, in ber first practice sesr 
sion dm afternoon, failed to cv en- 
try a triple jump of any kind in her. 
short program, and also completely 
omitted her combination jump. Bm 
die rebounded nicely in the later 
session mid, try the time she was 
fmiiihftri . had completed four of 1 

i:er. t. 


five triple axds. the difficult, three- 
Md-a-h all- revolution jump she 


For the Men, 
A New Era 


In Skating 


By Jere Longman 

Sew York Times Service 

HAMAR — Figure skating's old 
guard was officially ushered out 
when three young insurgents took 
the gold, silver and bronze in the 
men’s competition. 

Alexei Urmanov, a 20-year-old 
Russian from Sl Petersburg, won 
the long program and the gold 
medal Saturday night, dispelling 
the notion that he was merely a 
jumper. Although he landed eight 
triple jumos, he also skated a flow- 
ing, cohesive program to music by 
Rossini. 

Urmanov had been fifth at the 
1992 Olympics but had broken a 
fool ana was not expected to be a 
medal candidate with former gold 
medalists such as Brian Boitano 
and Viktor Petrenko and the reign- 
ing world champion, Kurt Brown- 
ing of Canada, in the field. 

Elvis Stqjko. a 21-year-old din 
biker and karate black belt from 
Canada, performed a tribute to the 
late martial arts star Bruce Lee. 
landing seven triple jumps to win 
the silver medal and gain redemp- 
tion for a seventh-place finish at 
the 1992 Games. 

Stojko received seven scores of 
5.9 for technical merit but he re- 
duced a triple axel to a single and 
left out a combination jump early 
in his program and suffered as in 
the past in his artistic marks, re- 
ceiving only a 5 J from the Russian 
judge. 

Philippe Candeloro. a 21 -year- 
old Frenchman, skated a moving 



But the German, who has often 
been Bredesen’ s equal this season, 
found the wind conditions more to 
his liking on his second attempt 
and recorded the second-longest 
jump of the day: 133 meters. 

Suddenly, Bredesen the rmal 
competitor ctf the dear and crisp 
afternoon, was under considerably 


Nancy Kerrigan, meanwhile, 
skated with a mistake or two in 
each of die two practices Sunday,- 
but continued, to appear upbeat 
and completely oblivious to Har- 
ding.whohasrbeen linked to’fire 
Jan. 6 attack on Kerrigan’s right 
lmw» Harding has denied any' 
wrongdoing. 1 V -- : 

- But Evy ScotvoM, <me of Kerri- 
gan’s coaches, made it dear that . 
the Kerrigan camp doesn’t hold 
Harding —Or her workhabittr-in 
high regard. 

"I haven’t watched her pro- 
gram,'’ Scotvold said when asked 
about how Harding looked, qukUy 
adding, *! don’t think she’s done 
one since she’s been had” 


hasn't hit in 'competition in three 
years. 

Gale Tanger, a UiL fi&ire skat- 
ing team leader, said doctors were 
monitoring Harding's ankle, but 
she has not been given any medica- 


tion. 


“We are . concerned about it,” 
Tanger said. "We are watching it. 1 
thought she looked very good to- 
day. When yon see a happy skater,,. 

seeagoodpricticefol-. 

that/ 1 * 


ViJ - ■■ UVM J 

yoo usually j 
low that” 


Scotvold said he was very - 

pleased with Kerrigan's prepara- 
tion for the competition. The draw' 
to detereedne the skating order is 
scheduled tot Monday. The tedrni- , 
cal program is-Wednesday; the free. 

tote, Friday. 1 - 


Harding has consistently 


greater pressure. A fair jump would 
e; he needed a very 


stopped* in die midst of her pro- 
throughout her first Jour 


"It’s great,” heaald “It couldn’t- 
be batter fbr/wbere we want her to 


no lon^r suffice; 
good one. But his 122-meter effort 
would prove about five meters too 
short for the gold tfiot even a per- 
fect 20 for style from the Norwe- 


be right now. She’s a lot more expe- . 

bs has 


gian judge could tip the scales), 
although he 


’ still finished ahead of 
Andreas Goldbetger, the bronze 
medalist from Austria. 


I don’t think I let anybody 
desen said “I 


Juji kaotonMgtixt Foox-Prcn 

No. 2 Elvis Stojko shook bands with No. 3 Ptifippe Candetoro, as .Alexei Urmanov of Russia reigned supreme in men’s figure skating. 


performance to music from “The 
Godfather" but lost his composure 
near the end of his program, tam- 
ing a triple axel into a single and 
falling to the ice. Still, be remained 
in third place and took the bronze. 

Boitano, the 1988 Olympic 
champion, moved up two spots af- 
ter the short program on Thursday 
but could finish no higher than 
sixth. 


The short program had produced 
an extraordinary jumbling cf the 
projected order of finish. Boitano 
fell during a triple axel a jump that 
requires three and a half revolu- 
tions, and skidded all the way jc 
eighth place. 

That was one spot above Pe- 
trenko, who stumbled early. 

Still another favorite. Browsing, 
fell on a triple jump, then seemed 


tc give up entirely, spuming half- 
heatedly for his finale and mouth- 
ing the word "unbelievable" as the 
judges seat him down to an irre- 
deemable 1 2th place. 

The four-and-a-half- minute long 
program, which accounted for two- 
thirds of the scoring, began as an 
inelegant repeat of the short pro- 
gram. with skater after skater 
crashing to the ice. 


Finally, after 12 forgettable skat- 
ers in the 25-man lineup, it was 
Bdtano's turn. 


Boitano stiH held out slight 
for a medal but that was quit 
extinguished when he again strug- 
gled with the triple axd. He didn't 
fall this time, but he stumbled, 
which threw off his rhythm for a 
double-toe combination jump. 


down today." Bredesen 
wem a silver medal and the Norwe- 
gian people must be happy with 
that because I am happy wtti) that.” 

Silver certainly represents an im- 
provement over the 1992 Olympics, 
when Bredesen, in bis fust major 
competition after switching to the 
V style of jamping, finished an em- 
barrassing last on the normal hill 
and third- to-last on the large hilL 
Norwegian journalists immediately 
nicknamed him “Espen the Eagle," 
in honor of the Impless British ski 
jumper, Eddie “Tnc Eagle” Ed- 
wards. 

Bredesen swallowed his pride, 
polished his V and proceeded to 
make a remarkable comeback, win- 
ning the large hill at last year's 
world championships and 'then 
winning the prestigious four-stop 
Springertoumee in January by 
beating Weissflog on the final jump 
in Bischofshofen, Austria. 

But though winning the Sprin- 
gextournee will make you a house- 
hold name in Europe, it is the 
Olympics that introduce jumpers 
to the world at large. Weissflog is 
no stranger to this larger forum. 

A product of the East German 
spoils system, he and the mercurial 
Matti Nykaenen of Finland were 
the dominant jumpers in 1984 in 


tys of practice. On Friday, -she 
armed out of the rink with , half 
her practice sriD rem aining ; on Sat- 
urday, she, cried lac several imnutes 
before rctuimng to the ice. ^ 

When asked what . lie thought 
about a skater who behaved as 
Harding had the oast few days, 
Scotvold said the ratter “probably 
has problems.” 

He continued; “Maybe the skat- 
er isn't ready, maybe they’re not 
disciplined. Our skaters don’t 
barge off the ice: Yon can’t do it 
twice in a career withus.”..' 

When Hardys, coach, Diane 
Rawlinson, was asked about Har- 
ding’s actions, rite , called herpo- 
pH’s first three Olympic practice 
sessions “incredible,’ 1 but said, 
“Yesterday, Tonya wasn't skating 
well because she wasn't happy 
about a picture in the paper.” ; ••• 

It was undearwbat photo that 
was. 


rienced ; coming in, here, She 


before [she won a bronze medal in 
1992] and learned from having an 
off performance at the world ebam- 
[fifth plaCe -in: 19931? 
learned fromher mistakes.” 


The popular impression here is 
that netther Kerrigan nor Harding 
is paving any attention to the other. 
But Scotvold said that’s not emire- 


: Scotvold arid that Kerrigan was. 
mentally tougher because of the 
attack "Unit severrety Tmrised the 1 
knee-amber landing leg, -.-i'. 

“This has made her stronger and 
very determined,” he said. 

- Kerrigan also weighs 10 pounds 
(about ASMoemas) las than_sbe 
did at. the world, championships in 
March, down from 120 to about ‘ 
110 pounds, he said. 

“It makes you quicker, gives yea 
more endurance," he said. 

AH of which led Scotvold to say 
he believed “three people can win 
die gold medal” and Kerrigan, be 
said, was one of them. He playfully 
refused to divulge the other two 
na m es, but did say they finished in 
the top five at the 1993 world 
championship*. - Oksana Baiul of - 
Ukraine won, .followed by 



na 


son last Thursday 

dress she was wearing when she 
was attacked in Detroit — was sot 
coincidental. 


“Sire wanted to nuke a state- 
ment: Tm here, Tm in the. same 
outfit,' ” Scotvold said with a smile. 
“Nancy Ekes to tease a little. She 
wants to have fun.” " 

After taking a day off from skat- 
ing Saturday and altnidingBannje 
Blair’s speed-skating race -and the 
men’s free-skate competition, Kcr- 


Japan’s Yoka Sato. 

Harding’s name is nowhere to be 
found on that list because she fin- 
ished fourth at last year’s U.S. na- 
tionals and failed to .quality for that 
competition. 

Sootvofrf said the key for Kerri- 
gan was to not get nervous. 

“If she just stays cql m, shell 
have a fun we^k,” he toid. 

And bow does fr&convmce her to 
remain calm? 

“If I knewhowiodo it,” Scot- 
void said, T<f .mafce even more 
mcmey than Nancy." - 





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INTERNATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1994 


Rage 17 




& 

Uses m m 




It was dfeji to on Sander for Germain's Katja Seizinger, who maintained her downhill performance at Satantay > 5^^^fle^ **“ 


Seizinger-Street-Kostaer, Again 


By Ian Thomsen 

iHimultmol Hrnld Tribune 

HAMAR — Johann Olav Koss 
won his third Olympic gold medal 
Sunday, and it is difficult to say 
whether he pushed time or was 
swept up by it. The time itself is 
both s nddle and an answer — 13 
minutes, 30.55 seconds over 10,000 
meters — buttbe performance was 
indelible and legendary, and short- 
ly thereafter his subjects were an- 
nouncing plans to build a statue, 
because that is how they remember 
the liices of him. 

In custom they would like to 
place it inside the Viking Slip are- 
na, which was built for these Win- 
ter Olympics. The Viking Ship is 
the symbol of andem Norwegian 
strength turned upside down, with 
its descendants invited underneath 
to see the evolution of that 
strength. Koss is a 25-year-old 
Norwegian who attends medical 
school and donates his prize money 
— reportedly 225,000 kroner 
(530,000) for each of Us three 
Olympic victories — to the interna- 
tional charity, Olympic Aid. His 
time was 12.99 seconds better than 
his own world record. 

“I don’t know if I know what I 
have done," he said. “I am just as 
surprised by the time as you are. I 
am really surprised.'’ 

Another Norw egian. Kjell Stem- 
lid, finished second in 13:49.25, or 
18.70 seconds behind Koss, with 
the 1992 Olympic champion. Ban 
Veldt amp of the Netherlands, 
third in 13:56.73. Both admitted 
knowing they could not win after 
being preceded by Koss in the fifth 
pairing. They were the last to admit 
what every one else had understood 
before the race began. The Norwe- 


Perhaps, because Koss is admitted- 
ly not a sprinter. Nonetheless, his 
performance — each of his three 
gold medals was won in world-re- 
cord rime — has been the best of 
these Olympics, with a week left to 
run, and’ii has happened in a coun- 
try which dared to anticipate it. 

The previous time the Olympics 
visited here, in 1952, gold medals 
had been won in the three longest 
distances by Hjalmar Andersen. 
He was whai every Norwegian 
skater wishes to become. 2nd he 
haunted the races swirling this haH 

Each rime Koss came around 


Sunday, his Dps parted like a vacu- 

lis nood eve 


uni and his hood ever-dark enin g 
over his damp brow, the people 
would roar a battle ay until he had 


gone past; jben their eyes moved to 


clock. With each lap they could 
see be was taking more time off of 
the world record. And so he was 
shot our of ih at lap and into the 
next one by a sound not unlike 
cannon. 

Everything in the Viking Ship 
sounded like war. from the trum- 
pets to the bdQs that mimicked sol- 
diers running to the bellowing 
screams. In fact it was nothing like 
that. It was the opposite. 

Afterward Koss would thank the 
crowd and his Goman opponent in 
the pairing, Frank Dittrich, who 
had made room in his lone while 
being passed in the 22dlap. “It was 
a little inspiration." Koss said, “to 


have somebody in back of you, 
somebody during you." 

Eadi of the three remaining pairs 
contained a Dutchman, his greatest 
rivals — Vddkamp, Falko Zand- 
stra (fourth] and Ttatje Ritsma 
(seventh). Standing out of his 
crouch in victory, Koss continued 
to encircle the track like a king and 
like a ghost. He has not wished to 
leave the Viking Slip this wweek 
until all of the races have finished. 
While present be has not been beat- 
en. The skin was right around his 
eyes and his face raw as he glided 
along the inner lane, bending down 
to shout — encouragement, one 
would guess — as the others sprint- 
ed hopelessly past him. 

The Dutchmen wore black arm- 
bands in memory of Rintje Ritsma. 
3 19-year-old from the Dutch youth 
team wbo bad died in a car accident 
Saturday afternoon. Only Vdd- 
kamp sustained a fight, remaining 
within 116 seconds of Koss after 
five laps. 

"I think that's a dm* that will 
stand for at least 30 years," Vdd- 
kamp said. “It’s a race that really is 
almost impossible, but be did it. 
When you see somebody skating a 
result uke that, you can only thmk 
that is the way it’s supposed to be." 

So disappointed was Veidkamp 
that he would leave the arena pre- 
maturely, believing his teammates 
and Storelid would overtake him. 


After his race, sulking cm a bench, 
he fdt something grab his shoulder. 
He looked up — twice — to see 
Koss now standing over him, out- 
fitted like a visitor from the future. 

Koss worea black radio headset 
— the modern la ore! for Olympic 
champ ions — with a radio trans- 
mitter strapped over his shoulder 
and a microphone in his hand. He 
was giving a five interview as he 
skated his celebratory revolutions. 
For more than an hour it was like 
the currents of the Viking ship were 
swirling him round and round. He 
crouched to cheer Storelid onto the 
silver medal, and then skated over 
to interview him, of a B things. 

The original Vikings would nev- 
er have believed what has become 
of them. Invited to the victory 
stand, the gentlest champion took 
one step up and jumped high, his 
arms in salute to his ancestors’ 
overturned hull. An old man 
named Hjalmar Andersen was 
standing inside the Viking Ship, 
and be looked from the statue of 
himwff in 1952, which is imposed 
near the finish line, and then he 
took in the sight of this young man 


jumping up and down. He locked 
back ai ' 


and forth, and their poses 
were exactly the same. Then the 
Vienna Waltz began and Koss 
stepped back into the current with 
the silver-medalist, Storelid, for a 
final victory lap along the frozen 
whirlpool of time. 


K were celebrating Koss’s per- 
1 


A Torrid Torvill and Dean 
Tear Up the Ice Once Again 


The Associated Pros . 

RJNGEBU — Katja Semnger, 
Picabo Street and Isolde Kostner 
repeated their 1-2-3 women’s 
downhill finish in the combined . 


it’s unHkely that any of them 
will add another medal when the 
race is completed. 

“I don’t expect anything,'’ said 
Sezzmeez; who gave Germany its 
second grid medal m Alpine skting 
on Saturday. 

Tm not gong to cry if 2 don’t 
get a medal, that’s far sure," said 
Street, 22, whose ^ver is the 
downhill was the fourth Alpine ski- 
ing medal far the United Kates in 
these Games. 

The real wrimers in the com- 
bined downhill were PentiHa Wi- 
berg of Sweden, Viraii Schneider of 
Switzerland -and Marcna GalEzio. 
of Italy. AS three stand a better 
chance of winning under the sew 
rules when they enter the slalom 
half of the combination Monday at 
HafjeS. 

Rather than use a complicated 
paints system to damnum combi- 
nation results, the International Sid 
Federation this year wrat toa sua- 
pfetime aggregate. Since the slalom 
15 a two-nm event, the combined 
now is weighted toward slalom spe- 
cialists such as Wiberg, Schneider 
and GalEzio. 

Seizmger's run in the combined 
downhfifwas 1 roinnte, 27.28 sec- 
onds. Street was at 1:28.19, and 
Kostner, of Italy, the bronze med- 
alist in both the downhill and su- 
per-riant slalom, had 1:28J>2. 

Wiberg had a time of 1:28.70, 
and Schroder was at 1 :28.91. Gal- 
firio had a time of 3:28.71/ 

Most of Semnger's timeadvan- 
tage over the gate skiers could be 
gone after the slalom’s first run. 

“I think Fermlla Wiberg and ria- 
lam specialists most help me if I 
want to have a chance for a medal," 


standings. Trailing the overall by 
just a print, she probably will over- 
take the Swiss because she «l«n «iri« 
hr the downhiH 

“I just rid every day and if it’s 
enough to win a medal, that’s 
OJL," Wiberg said. *1 don't think 
about the scoring system. I just go 
as fast as possible.* 

Of the three downhill leaders, 
Street has the best shot of 1 
a medal Street was a 1 


racers boycotted a downhill prac- 
tice at Hafjefl, the org anize r s re- 
lented. Sefr /ingp r said Saturday’s 
race proved that tire downhtHers 
had been right all along. 

“It was a really great course for 
the Olympic Games," she said. “It 
was a technhal course; it absolute- 
ly was not dangeions. There was no 
place where you had to flrawcour- 


She leads tbs downfall] standings, a 
title she won the last two seasons, 
and ranks among the top in ssper- 
gjam, with victory in last year's 
world championships and an 
Olympic bronze in 1991 


“I think it was a really vety inter- 


With the Olympic grid and the 
World Qtp downhill title, Seizinger 
has achieved two of her career 
goals. The third is the World Cup 
overall rifle. 


ist in the combined at the world • esting course far the athletes and 
chamnfaiships last year in Japan, also an interesting course for the 
but she had to win the 


the do wnhill 

portion todo it. 

“I don't, have the expectation for 
the combined like I rid yesterday" 
-Street said. "The whole world was 


public. 

Seizinger is the best 
cm the women’s World 


racer 

tircoit. 


“My own aims — this is the big- 
gest pressure for me," she said. *T 
don’t think of the people s tanding 
behind me. I have my own aims 
that I want to satisfy. 


formance as he glided past in his 
baggy warm-up suit. They were vic- 
tory laps before the victory. 

He removed his everyday clothes 
until all he had on was the red, 
skintight uniform of a superhero. 
After his opening lap of 35.12 sec- 
onds, he skated the remaining 24 at 
a spectacularly even range of 32 to 
3191 seconds. 

“1 cannot imagine jt was possible 
to skate like that," he said. Tm 
really in shock at the moment.” 

Perhaps his achievements this 
week pale compared to those of 
Eric Heidcn, the American who 
won all five speed dating grid 
medals in 1980. with a world record 
of 14:28.13 in the 10,000 meters. 


Counted by Our Staff From Dispatches 

HAMAR — Torvill and Dean 
brought their passion and perfec- 
tion bade to Olympic ice /fanring 
Sunday nigh t 

Performing a majestic rhumba 
filled with quick steps and flowing 


spins, Jayne Torvill and Christo- 
pher Dean rekindled memories of a 


d e cad e ago, when they redefined 
the event at the Sarajevo Games. 
They received two perfect 6.0 
marks for presentation, from Brit- 
ain and Ukraine, and set up a 
three-way contest for the grid med- 
al Monday night in the free dance. 

The world champions, Maia 
Usova and Alexander Zhuhn of 
Russian, were second, followed by 


ipa 

chnk and Evgeni Platov. Both cou- 
ples had tied for first in the com- 
pulsory dance. 

Heading into the free dance, 
worth 50 percent of the total score, 
Torvill mid Dean are tied with 
Usova and Thnljn Gritschuk and 
Platov are third. Whoever wins 
Monday night wiQ take the grid 
medal. 

“It's been a challenge." Dean 
said with obvious relief. “It feds 
good being 10 years away and still 
being competitive with the best of 
the world.” 

On this night, they were better 
than the rest 

With Dean's former wife, 1992 


day. incmdmg mysdf. Today, no- 


body really was expecting much 
from me, and that's a better foefing^ 
“I bad a dream come true for me 
and that’s going U> be 
of hard to 


On 

flown 


Saturday, 5 
atooghKvi 


flashed 


L-vitfjefl course — a 
course the womerisracers pkaded, 
threatened and cajoled tojjet to use 
for their dawnhfll — leading at ev- 
riming interval and winning the 
' in 1 minute, 35.93 seconds. 
Only Street, at 1:3639,* and 
Kostoer, at 1:36.85, could get with- 
in a second of th©21-year-«d Ger- 
man • 


This race originally was sched- 
oled for tbedownhffl course at Haf- 
jefl, a rid resort farther south where 
the men’s and women’s slalom and 
slalom races are to be hdd. 
after a World Cop race there 
last winter, the. women racers said 
the HafieQ course was too flat arid 

demanded that the downhill be 


Wiberg trails Schneider in both 
the World Cup overall and slalom 


switched to Xvitfjdl, the ate of the 
men’s downhQL 

At first, organizers said Kvfrfjell 
was too difficult for women. Then 
they said it would cost too much to 
move the event. Lata they said it 
would create enviuonmcrital prob* 



Blair Pockets Her 4th Gold Medal, 
And Has Eyes on History-Making 5th 


By Jere Longman 

New Font Times Service 


But in the end, alia top-flight 


fed BWWTte AaodMed Pico 

Pfcabo Street knew ha time in the combined downhffi was good. 


HAMAR — Bonnie Blair won 
ha fourth gold medal by skating 
the 500 meters at the Viking Ship 
arena in 3925 seconds, her fluid- 
fastest time ever. And if, a month 
short of her 30th birthday, she wins 

r d at 1,500 meters, or. more tike- 
at 1,000 meters at these Games, 
she will stand on her own pedestal: 
the most decorated American 
woman in Olympics history. 

Only die swimmer Janet Evans, 
the diver Pal McCormick aod the 
sprinter Evelyn Ashford have won 
as many Olympic gold medals 
among American women. 

“I really don't think about the 
history part until the whole thing is 
ova,” Blair said. 

Others, less bound fay historic 
tunnel vision, were oukk Saturday 
to note the singularity of ha 
achievement: This was Bhtir’s third 
consecutive Olympic victory at 500 
meters. Her performance didn’t 
match ha world-record time of 
39.10 seconds at the 1988 Olympics 


in Calgary, but it was considerably 
faster than ha mark of 40.33 sec- 
onds cm an outdoor track at the 
1992 Games in Albertville, France. 
No speed skater, man or woman, 
had ever won the 500 meters at 
three consecutive Olympics. The 
National Basketball Association 
has a word for it three-peal. 

“If the Chicago Bulls can do it, I 
can do it," Blair said. 

“Nobody expected that another 
girl would win," said Franziska 
Schenk, the 1 9-year-old German 
who took, the bronze medal. 

Skating in the tlmd pair with 
Monique Gaibrecbt of Germany, 
Blair slashed to a solid start, her 
skates furiously scraping the ice, 
and powered through the first turn, 
her compact build allowing ha to 
skate full throttle where a larger 
skater has to tap tightly cm the 
brakes. 

In the backst retch, Blair 
switched fluidly from the inside 
lane to the outer, and in the final 
turn, she was greeted by Bonnie's 
Army, some 60 relatives and 
friends wearing gold lamfc hats and 


sweatshirts, waving flags and bob- 
bing like corks as they jumped up 
and down and cheered her on. 

The race had seemed so smooth 
and effortless to Blair that she 
didn’t fed the normal lactic bunt 
that turns legs to rubber and (eaves 
the finish hne shimmering like a 

taunting mirage: 

“It didn't feel like the line was 
faraway," Blair said. "1 almost fdt 
like I could have kepi going.” 

After the finish. Blair pumped 


ha fist and appeared to high-five a 
1. Fourth 


OLYMPIC NOTEBOOK 


‘ Complied by Ota Staff From Dispatches 

Six years after Jamaica's bobsled 
team thudded down the track at the 
Calgary Olympics on tte crew- 
men's ntyda, its two-man crew at 
UHehaanMf was disqualified. Sun- 
day for a different reason: The 
brakeman s stomach. 

Driver Dudley Stokes, brakauan 
Wayne Thomas and their fled 
weighed in 3.6 kilograms (8 
pounds) aver the 390 kilogram hm- 
rt 

“Onr brakeman’s weight cycles 
up and down a lot,” said Leo 
Campbell, the Jamaican team chief 
and bobsled federation president 

“We know (hat we erred in sot 
managing it more ctosdy.^hc said. 

• Forecasters say the sunny 
weather that has blessed the Lflle- 
haimner area for the past weds is 


cheese than ever. Ibe dairy 
Ismderiet Gudhrandsdal 
has sold 5:7 toot of goar cheese 
during Janitaxy. 

“TEs is an increase of almost 


There has also been a 
increase of sour cream and cream.* 

•An Iranian who said he was 
headed for U&efaammer has been 
detained in Oslo after' three kilo- 
grams (65 pounds) of raw o pium 
wm fauna rafns'c&c.ihe police 


The man; who was not named, 
arrived Friday on a ferry from Kid, 
Germany, and told customs oES- 

spot check an fab car, mat he had 
intended to drive to the Olympics. 

“He said he wanted to see Nor- 
way ami that Ik thought this was a 
go6d time to viat,"-saia a 


KMv krito 


Wednesday. . 

The organizing committee s 
sp ok e sman. Tor Anne, said there 
was a flight chance of some fight 
mow on 


convicted, his stay could test more 
than three years, m prison. ' 


. • A Norwegian mffitery belicop- 
ta iechiridan working at the Olya- - 

theri skffifa rdre 
Gerhard, is presides* of the ^ ^ Games is nammal, an . 


hjMtwna QIyii^ncOrgainzmgCcan- 

mirwi, was involved in a 
»ar with a Arid who matched most 
Of a mSo krona banknote ($135) 
from her hand in U ktoni pcr. 

Police have repeatedly wacnw 
visitors about pickpockets ana oth- 
er thieves who are in Ufiehmnnier 
because of the Games. 

• For reasons not entirel y de st; 
although it does involve a record of - 
sorts, ims bit of intelligence was o» 
Saturday’s Olympic nows network: 
“The people- of Gudbrandsda- 
ten" — the area that makes op-ffae 
Olympic region —“arc catingmore 


surgeon said. 

gor Gmmac Aas-Aunc said 
the 59-year-old engineer had died 
Friday afta faffing ill Ttmdqyin 
Hamar, headquarters of lbs Olym- 
pic Brigade heEcopta squadron.'.' 

Aas-AunesaditwasthonriUJhfi 
technirian faadcontracwd iEe dis- 
ease in htt home district of Oest- 
Md,soathof Osfo on the Swedish 
border. . .. 

Aas-Aune said other membaiof 
flKsonadron had now bean vacd- 


(NTT, LAT, AP, 'Rotten, AFP) 


Close Encounters at the Village 


By William Drozdiak 

: Washington Post Service 


. LUXEHAMMER — It seemed tike a typi- 
cal lazy Sunday afternoon as the sun 
streamed through the windows of the recrea- 
tion area in the Olympic Village. But among 
the .1,900 athletes living there during the 
'Whiter Games, even the lounge lizards did 
not conceal their intense competitiveness. 

Swedes and Italians woe engaged in fero- 
aous battle at the video console playing Mor- 
-tal Rcaabat. American hockey players were 
vying far a tet of Mng golf dm* as the prize 
[<ffthebestGlympicsc<mmmhug/^Vhai- 
lMiK and Koreans were hi a higfa- 

stakes bet an who would wm the ski jump. 
” Jeff Woodard, a member of the 17.S. bob- 
fled team, sat back and absorbed the global 
human panorama compressed into tme room. 
“A lot of us figure we will never get a chance 
. to ogdy Has kind of experience again, so 
we’re making the most of It At times, it 
resembfesabig fraternity or sorority house.” 

■ , Woodard, who played safety to UCLA 
and earned a -black belt in karate before 
becoming an Olympk: brahanan, said the 
-intinute cunotmdm^ gave (he athletes a 
better oppoctumfy to get to know each other 
than in eariia Olympics, when they woe 
segregated according to sport and national- 
ity- \ 

“We’re all j umping around from table to 
table inthe cafeteria mtrodncmg ourselves. 
The toughest competition is finding a seal 
. around the Argentine and Italian '.women. 
Hey, there's one now. Excuse me. Hey, Ste- 
lamaT” be said, interrupting an interview to 
an understandable re as on. 

Aware that bringing together the world’s 
: best athletes for up to three weeks is bound to 
generate romance, the Olympic authorities 
have taken plenty of precautions to prevent 
the spread of AIDS. Literature about sexual 
disease -is dissemin a te d in five languages. 


Baxes of condoms are freely distributed in 
bathrooms throughout the Village. 

“I received a box so big that i thought it 
was supposed to cany my Walkman," Woo- 
dard said. “Then 1 realized that everything Td 
heard about Scandinavia most be true." 


'to several athletes, the big gos- 
sip in the Village concerns the vain crosade 
by Alberto Tomba. the Italian flti star and 
weti-known lothario, to rekindle a romance 
with the German Anting c hampi on Katarina 


For recreation between 
events, the athletes enjoy 
competition oi a 
personal kind: video 
games, minigolf, a little 
betting on events — and 
there’s the mixed sauna. 


of a howling good time. And the movie (he- 
ater is not breaking any attendance records 
with such dubious celluloid gems as “Hocus 
Pocus" and “Love Field.” 

The Olympic Village discotheque has also 
proved to be a disappointment; some athletes 
say the lousy music and no-alcohol policy is 
driving a lot of them into town for late-night 
partying. Bui others say they are too busy 
preparing for their events this week and don’t 
want to stay up dancing 'til dawn. 

Chris Coleman, another U-S. bobsled team 
member, said he was trying to avoid tempta- 
tion but made an exception cm bis birthday 
tm Friday. 

“I saw Dan Jansen win his gold medal and 
I figured I had even more reason to cele- 
brate,” he said. “So I went a tittle crazy by 
staying ont late at the Zipper Chb downtown 
th the CBS crowd. Bui m be ready for the 


wi 


Witt. Tomba and Witt woe rumored to be a 
hot couple in previous Games but so far she 
reportedly has rebuffed all overtures while 
she fumes ha routine for Wednesday’s fig- 
ure-skating competition. 

Other basons between lesser celebrities are 
sad to be simmering in the mixed sauna, 
which has turned out to be ooe of the most 
pcmular gathering spots for the athletes. 
“Yon just make an early reservation, get in 
and lode the door if you want privacy,” said 
one aficionado, who requested anonymity 
because be did not want to court any trouble 
with ins coach- 

Some relaxation activities have proved to 
be a bust. The library, as might be predicted, 
is deserted most of the time. AT-shtrt trading 
party did not turn out to be everybody’s idea 


big race next Saturday.* 

Far athletes from the struggling nations of 
Eastern Europe and the forma Soviet Union, 
the affluence and abundance they see that 
many Westerners take to granted still as- 
tounds them. The Village cafeteria offers a 
cornucopia of steak, chicken, pasta, vegeta- 
bles and salmon in endless variations: 
smnl«fl, marinated, poached and baked. 

“There is so much rich food (hat I find I 
cannot digest it," said Vadim Sash min, a 
biathlon athlete from Belarus. “It’s so good 
that I am not used to it. So I’ve been faying 
here on a little fish and 2 lot of tea and fruit." 

Despite the breakup of the Soviet empire, 
Sashurin that friendships among ath- 
letes from Russia, Ukraine and otha repub- 
lics still endure from the days^ when they were 
part of the mighty Soviet sports madanr. 

“It’s funny, but I guess the athletes are the 
last people to think we should have remained 
one country," he said. “But it’s easy to get 
that kind of crazy idea living here in the 
Village." 


cameraman. Fourteen pairs re- 
mained, but her time would stand 
1. Susan Anch, a 27-ycar- 
Canadian with asthma, raced 
>t Blair’s archrival, the 1992 
medalist Ye Qiaobo of Chi- 
na, but Ye has slowed after a knee 
injury and could only push Auch 
toward a silver medal in 39.61, at- 
most four-tenths of a second be- 
hind Blair, in this race, four-tenths 
of a second is a lifetime. 

“As a competitor, I wouldn't 
want to say she's unbeatable, but 
she' s very, very good," Audi said of 
Blair. 

Biair does not appear to be en- 
cumbered fay any great introspec- 
tion about her acco mp lish men ts, they too have chnnys a 
After the Tace, when Audi declined their third place finish at t&e Ei 
to say that Blair was unbeatable. 


dance silver medalist Isabelle Du- 
cfaesnay, looking on — as well as 
his fianefie, forma women's world 
champion JHJ Trenazy — the Eng- 
lish stars were mesmerizing. It 
wasn’t as hypnotic as “Bolero,” 
their 1984 free dance that earned a 
scoreboard full of perfect marks for 
artistry. But i( was dose enough. 

Dressed in black costumes with 
green sequins, the couple's two- 
minute routine to “Ibe History of 
Love" sped by. 

Eight judges had them first. They 
had no marks below 5.9 for presen- 
tation and nothing under 5.8 for 
composition. 

“I fdt more nervous today than 
in the cotnpulsories," Torvfll said, 
“because we knew we had to do 
wdl in this section to have a 
chance.” 

TbeyTl also have to be superb in 
the free skate, which they almost 
totally revamped after finishing 
second with it at the European 
championships. They won that 
event thanks to a complicated scor- 
ing system. 

“We have put more highlights in 
it,” Torvill said. “We fed it is more 
appealing and technically more dif- 
ficult now." 

“We’re just hoping to remember 
all the steps," she added. 

Usova and Zhulin performed a 
suluy rhumba to Quincy Jon- 
es’s“Black Orpheus.” Usova skated 
in a black vdvet costume with yel- 
low flowers that more than made 
up to ha fashion faux pas in the 
compulsories, when she wore what 
looked like a white nightgown. 

Their fluid, leasing dance, high- 
lighted by dever dips and spins, 
earned tin: 1992 bronze medalists 
five marks of 5.9 and one first- 
place vote, from Belarus. 

Next up were Gritschuk and Pla- 
tov, whose intricate routine wasn’t 
nearly as stylish, but it included 
several difficult maneuvers, includ- 
ing a prvot in which she holds his 
leg rather than his hand. 

Natalia Dubova, the coach of 
Usova and Zhulin, said she was just 
concentrating on the skating and 
not the possible positions an Mon- 
day night 


But they wjfl need some luck,” 
id of her < 


she said of 1 


Blair said only half -jokingly: “Bel- 
la watch what von say. I'm right 
hoe:” 

Blair is more popular outside of 
ha country than at home. In Mil- 
waukee, where she lives and trains, 
she goes unnoticed at the grocery 
store. In the Netherlands, she is 
Michad Jordan. Before Saturday’s 
race, Dutch fans serenaded her 
with a chorus of “My Bonnie Lies 
Ova the Ocean.” 

“1 don’t think I would enjoy hav- 
ing the reputation of Michad Jor- 
dan where you’re constantly in the 
fimdight," Blair said. “But Td like 
to be a little more because more 
people would know what our sport 
is all about." 

She played down her relative 
lack of commercial endorsements, 
saying she skates to enjoyment. 


not money. How long wiD she keep 

*“ laid. 


il 19? Ooe more season, Blair sail 

The next world championships wiD 
be hdd in Milwaukee mid. she said, 
“it would be too difficult to at in 
the bleachers and watch a competi- 
tion where I’ve been faring.” 

After that, she will let go. She 
wants to finish college before her 
nieces and nephews do, she joked. 
She has talked about being in the 
supermarket and seeojg women her 
age with babies. 

“Tm not getting uy younger," 
she said. “You can't keep going cm 
and on and oa. I’ve got to put a 
stop to it soon and go ou with the 
rest of my life, liy to finish school 
and be as normal as possible.” 

Why quit when you're still the 
best? 

Blair thought for a moment. 

“WeTI see," flic said. “Don’t tell 
my family. They’ll lofl roe." 


charges, adding that 
since 
Euro- 
peans. 

Americans Elizabeth Punsalan 
and Jerod Swallow, 1 4th after com- 
pulsories, skated better in the origi- 
nal dance bur didn’t move up. 
When they finished, American, 
Norwegian and Swedish flags — 
plus a Cleveland Browns b anner — 
waved in the crowd. 

Punsalan. of Broadview Heights; 
Ohio, suffered personal tragedy 
three weeks ago when ha father 
was stabbed to death. Her brother 
was arrested. 

The crowd enjoyed their perfor- 
mance and haled their marks, 
which ranged from 4,4 to 5.1. 

“The marks could have been 
more imaginative," Swallow said. 
“This is our first year bade at (he 
world level and we have to re-estab- 
lish ourselves." 

The 1991 UJS. champions, they 
did not make the U.S. world team 
the next two years before winning 
the national title last month. 

(AP, Rearers) 


TO OUR 
READERS 


GREAT BRTOUM 


ft’s never 
been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 
Just call 
toll-free: 
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Page 18 


EVTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1994 





Kjfc&oqaUa 

John Dreyfuss and his wife Mary Noble Ours spent 16 years restoring this house in Georgetown: “For many, many years this boose was thought to be imxxnprefaensaife.” 


Mind Over Matter: Saving a Grand House 


By Cathy Horyn 

W ASHINGTON —To a lot of people. 

the house at 3400 Prospect Street in 
Georgetown is an enigma. Its Pall a dian 
facade suggests a London apartment 
building, circa 1 890. but from around the 
corner and across the Potomac, one can 
plainly see that the house on the hill is a 


once there had been rolling land down to 
the Potomac, there was now M Street, and 
a view blighted by commercial rooftops. 
Where once there had been a graceful 
Georgian bouse, there was now a massive 
addition whose facade seemed completely 


at odds with the rest of the property. 




Oji 

An occasional scries 
about people for whom 
sri/e is a wuv of life 

m 



perfect example of Georgian architecture. 
What this 18th-century jewel is doing in 
the middle of a 19th-century shell of brick 
and mortar is something that only John 
Dreyfuss would dare to understand. 

He was 28 years old when he cam e home 
from Yale University, a man as unpre- 
pared as any for the snares of fate. He had 
abandoned graduate school ra architec- 
ture to become a sculptor, and to help his 
father, an architect and builder, with a 
property whose historical significance was 
all that stood in the way of its demise. 

Although Halcyon House could claim a 
provenance equal to that of a James River 
plantation — It had belonged to Benjamin 
Stoddert, the first secretary of the U. S. 
Navy and a pallbearer at the funeral of 
George Washington — modern life had 
radically altered its appearance. Where 


the time John Dreyfuss arrived, in 197 
the house had entered a state of glorious 
ruination. 

“The only thing s holding the building 
together were the laws of inertia," he says. 

Dreyfuss did not intend to take on a 
project that would occupy the next 16 years 
of nis life. That he did is a measure not only 
of his courage but of his imagination. For 
what might have become a subdivision of 
tow bouses or a station on the Washington 
subway line, as his father and partners had 
once proposed, became instead one of the 
largest independent restorations in the dty 
— 30,000 square feet (2J500 square meters) 
of private living quarters, apartments and 
studio space. This month, Dreyfuss and his 


wife, Mary Noble Ours, will finally occupy 
q He 


Halcyon House. 

They are a couple whose diverging styles 


masculine interiors," says Ours, who has 
spent months orchestrating wall colors; 
floor tiles (limestone to slate), and now 
must face the daunting task of furnishing a 
bouse with 12 fireplaces, a music room and 
a library. For the past sb years the Drey- 
fusses have lived on the top floor of an 
adjacent town bouse. A few weeks ago. 
Ours brought some furniture over to the 
main house to see how it would look in the 
larger space. “It looked like doll furniture.” 
she says. 

For Dreyfuss, the renovation has really 
been one of mind over matter. Once it 
became clear that preserving the house 
was the only way to evw make it salable, 
Dreyfuss came up with a bold, and contro- 
versial, plan to stabilize the one-and-a- 
quartcr-acre ( a half hectare) property from 
further erosion down the MIL “You either 
see this as a problem or part of the design 
process," he says. So he proposed digging 
out the yard, and building a 9,000-square- 
foot underground dumber that would 
jort the bouse as well as provide him 
i studio and office space. Although the 


have come together cm a grand scale. "Mary 
; like a picture." says 


Noble sees everything 
Dreyfuss. in reference to his wife’s work as 
a portrait photographer. Those portraits, 
whether of children in her studio or of 
young riders at a county fair in her native 
West Virginia, possess a kind of warmth 
and dignity that is also reflected in the 
couple's surroundings. “We both like pretty 


dty initially rejected the plan — it took 
Dreyfuss nearly five years to win approval 
— he believed that modem memanics 
were not at odds with a house that had 
previously been stabilized by Albert Ge- 
mens's 19th-century addition. 

“For many, many years this house was 

thought to be incomprehensible," says 
Dreyfuss. “But I never thought it was odd. 
In fact. 1 think Clemens [a nephew of 


Mark Twain] was a genius. By balding 
this tremendous facade, he was in effect 
creating a barrier between the bouse and 
the outside world, ft would have been 
ludicrous to live in an 18th-century house 
in the middle of a growing dty. It would 
have been like living in a museum.” 

By last summer, the tenaced garden was 
completed, and the Dreyfusses were regu- 
larly enter taining friends with luncheons 
by the pooL In a noisy dty, with planes 
flying down the Potomac toward National 
Airport, it was hard to imagine a more 
private urban retreat. . 

Of course, people are always asking 
Dreyfuss what all this cost, since no expense 
appears to have been spared. But he won't 
say. “Although money is always the impor- 
tant consideration," he says, “ultimately it 
is a test of will." Some of the maintenance 
costs win be borne by tenants (apartments 
were included in the Gemens’ wing), and 
the Dreyfusses win probably lease the 
house to charitable groups for special func- 
tions. As far his own feelings about the 
project as it nears completion, Dreyfuss, at 
44, is nothing if not pragmatic. 

“To be able to take on a house like this 
you must first be willing to give it op," he 
says. “You may not be able finish it Or 
you may just finish it and never get to live 
in iL But whatever happens, you can never 
think about the enc 


Cathy Horyn is the fashion editor of The 
Washington Post 


LANGUAGE 


FYI: Clip Your Words ASAP 


. By William Safire:. . - 

W ASHINGTON — John Horae Tooke, ; t&e radi- 
cal En glish pg ti ti d ari aiKldenc of ; the 18th 
century, should be a hero to Americans, especially the 
fast- talking. With anti-colonist feeling at its height, he 
tried to raise money for the relief <& Americans “mur- 
dered by the king's troops at Lexington and Con- 
cord”; for this activity he was prosecuted, jailed for a 
year, forced into retirement in a oountry house known 
as Puiiey. 

There. I am informed by Pat Winter of New York, 
he turned from politics in l786 io write a treatise on 
language, “The Diversions of Puriey,” wMch offered: 
Mswond and ours an insight into uhrenatioos. 

“Words have been called vringpd, and wdl they 
deserve that name," Tooke wrote, but com- 
pared with the rabidity of thought; they have not the 
smallest claim to that title. Philosophers h&ve calculat- 
ed the difference of velocity between sound and tight 
But who will attempt to calculate the difference be- 
tween speech and thought! What wonder then . . . 
the stretch to add such wings to their ccmvtariition as 
might enable it . . . to keep pace in some measure 
with their minds." 

That stretch was the technique of abbreviation^# 

V- .Ln.4 mam InriJtr nT 


if yOn cannot make sense of •■that sentence aboat^ 
Health aadHuih^- Services, youarelivingia the put 
and heed, help from your health ^mamtea^e oigahi^^ ! 
ration- as soon" as possible.) Better stay away from ' 
NPR, as it could" stand for National Performance - 
' Review, New Production Reactor. Naval Petroleum- 
Restates or National EubKc Radio. . . ■ 

' la tbe dti days— BC which 
is “before Chomsky” — abbreviations, would nse a - 
period to chop- off a word, as m obbr. That's. still in ; 
vogue Hike inc. and efftj, and many. .riew. caps are • 


introduced without explanation. .Maw’s' advertised 
ts^p^cashmere sweaters: “Sale $99.99 1 


Form. J 1.60” 

UIITUIJ M UH i i i M Kiliniw-T- . - T. i 

Do you have to SB out Form 160 to buy m sweater?. ■ 

No; the erty has-been dropped 

t^saJe storas, that would be/y^ gdtting rid of die; . 


U: 


You want to dha-dovm a phrase by jaguBHig-U.^._ 


using initials, which sometimes take the form of aero-, 
nyms, to quicken our speech. 

Tooke! thou shouldst be living at this hour: never 
has the shortening been so hotly in the fire. As the pace 
of fife increases and as rime becomes more valuable, 
linguadipping is rampant 
Acronyms' abound m the race foe brevity. Some are 
patterned after existing words: “Physicists argue 
whether the universe’s missing mass is in WIMP&T 
writes Norman Olsen of PeckskilL New York, “which 
stands for Sreakly interacting mastive particles,' or in 
Machos, ‘msssivti, compact halo objects.’ *V J ' 
Initialese without any relation to existing words has 
been pnwtmting Did the FBI tell the CIA what the 
KGB was doing? The frequency with which, the points 
are dropped in these initialed agencies, aka “alphabet 
agencies,” causes great teeth-gnashing among copy 
editors. (The initials aka, for M alw known as,” have 
replaced alias in the civilian adoption of police lingo.) 

□ ... 

This practice sometimes gets out of hand. Morton 
Zahitsky, a tax lawyer in Portland, Oregon, notes that 
he told a colleague, “The 4Gl(k) passed the ADP 
because tire NHCEs received a QNEG" He would 
never take the time to say, “The 40 l(k) plan passed the 
Average Deferral Percentage because the Non-Highly 
Compensated Employees received a Qualified Nan- 
Elecove Contribution.” . • - 

To a sophisticated layman — I suppose I should 
change that to lay reader — he might say, “The 40l(k) 
plan passed the nondiscrimination test of the IRS." — 
assenting the listenerwould know he was referring to 
the Internal Revenue.Service, known to Hnguadippmg 
moonshiners defending their dills with shotguns as 
“the revenooers.” To an unsophisticated audience? 
“The client,” Zalutdry says, “would be told. The plan 
is O.K. this year.”* 

FYI: In health reform. Bill Gin ton wants HHS to 
get HMO’s operational ASAP. (For your information. 



m Connecticut, a mate 

die sign appears 


copy by a nxxiiilatar-danoduiator. We «nnputav 
whizzes, flipping through Wired (wMch-CKi be eon. 
stmed as amagaznie. a tntivifi title or a&gtuy 

of mind), call it a modiem Sieve Deyo. a» The " 
Puget Sound. Ccanputer User (I' read 
iwwtiini-san article “Morph Me, Babyl” M vtjuAxh^ iia 
trend, in TV ads that shifts shapes to catrfi ti>e eye;-the 
word domes- from the Grade root ' morph, “shape,;' 
form,"” source_of metamorphosis, which is wheTthe;-. 
lan guag e is going. through- • ' v - ,i ■ 

. ' i J.1- : 

The world of transportation shaves words arid ' 
phrases But no other. Lot* twtyoorahpiane wimtowr 
see the words no step co the vaag. ^.. “ponoi .aep . 
bear and certainty not “If you stomp your bigfaQioa 
this delicate spot, you'll break the wing in half, dum- 
my!” : .. 

; On the- Merritt Parti 
apparently taken 
“Depressed Stonn 
- In San Francisco, the Metropblitno. Transportation ' 
C ommissi on cheerily describesfte “acronym-zone" in-: 
.8 panmMet for motorists: as yon zip down the fasmfiatr i 
lfoy^ane^for “ttigih oompancy ydriclt" note life 
signs for Trcerinfa on your wayrown the 21C (Tamar 
portation Mormatipn Center) to the TOC (Traffic. 
Operations Center). : . -J. • .' _ V V;_ 

Compression is allr Allan Metcalf, executive seen’. 
tary of the American. Dialect Society, reports the. 
group’s choice fen- the phrase that best typified 1993 
was irformmm siqrerfdgfnvoy- This expression is, qf . 
course, a monthfuL taking a fullsecond to get out. In a 
few mbirths; it is sure to br called xt& ird<Ai$way, 
since b&tiitainmem ^^and! supd- are expemiabie. Then, in 
a. Tew years, as wi all bxSt back fondly at antiquated !- 
fiber optics, it will be tite irtfenmv. The next smp wm - 
lead to /-worg Next cmtoy, the phrase that fills our ■ 
mouths. today will zip by in the mink of an-/. • 

New York Timet Service . 



UYDERNAHO KAL 
CLASSIFIED 

AppeanonPiag>4- 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Today 


Toil mi om 


won 

Una 

W 

Htflh 

ton. W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

CSr 

«lgm 

10flM 

11/52 

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19/50 

1103 a 

AmManjoin 

104 

T/34 

c 

3/37 

205 c 


5/41 

ore 

ih 

7/44 

-307 r 

Aim 

13/55 

TIM 


1305 

7/44 stl 

Soreefcna 

ism 

8/40 


urn 

10 /sa c 

Bitvado 

3/37 

-2/2B 

nn 

6/43 

•101 c 

Bmbi 

002 

-4BS 

eh 

307 

-3/27 a 


307 

:os 


4/39 

205 c 

Budntoa 

206 

■2(29 

an 

1/34 

2/28 1 


-IOI 

-30/ 


104 

-4/2S an 

Costs Dm Sd 

18/54 

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9 


1203 a 


0/46 

1/34 


9/48 

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EdHwtfi 

3/37 

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* 

7/44 

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Fbrpneo 

ll/S? 

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13/55 

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Frnridut 

002 

-5/24 

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2/35 

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Geiwve 

7/44 

3/37 

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0/46 

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HdsMi 

■am 

*02 


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UOTrtd 

9/4B 

5/41 

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B/48 

205 ah 

LnPa4nas 

20/79 

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24/75 

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14/57 

9/42 


17/02 

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Lcndm 

3/37 

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UaM 

12/53 

6/43 

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17/02 

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Mtvr 

aw 

405 


11/52 

307 c 


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-14/7 


-3/27 

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307 

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Mr* 

14/57 

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-12/11 


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Pokna 

14/57 

10/50 


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11/52 e 

Pam 

VST 

1/34 


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Prauua 

■131 

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104 

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4.-39 

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IH5 

3/37 


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SI FStfenburg 

-4/25 

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104 


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c 

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T BUnrt 

■2/29 



-1/31 

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Warton 

7/44 

3/37 


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V4nno 

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3/37 

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002 

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-1/31 

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ZUncn 

4/35 

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stl 

7/44 

104 C 

Oceania 


22/71 


ah 

71/73 

1M11 pC 

Sv**y 

24/75 

17ftB 

1 

20//9 

1BJ04 pC 


Forecast for Tuesday trirougri Thursday, as provided by’Accu-WeaJher. 



Ja Ui U iM ni 


North America 

The warm spell will end 
Tuesday m Hie Northeastern 
United States, and there a a 
good chance lor snow and 
Ice in New York City 
WeWtesday. Snow is l*ety h 
Detroit and Toronto Wednes- 
day. Cofct in Chicago Tues- 
day through Thursday. 
Warm this week In Miami 
and Oitando 


Europe 

Snow will (all midweek in 
Denmark. Sweden and 
southeastern Norway. From 
the United Kkigdom to Ger- 
many d win be cold Ihrough 
Wednesday, maybe wttfi rain 
and snow. Waves ot wind 
and rain wil hit Portugal and 
northwestern Spain; France 
wilt be showery vrtti a warm- 
ing trend. 


Asia 

Gusty winds will sweep Bei- 
jing, Korea and Japan, 
including Osaka through 

a - * o, Tuesday into 
lesday It will be brisk 
and neatly rain-free. North- 


ern Japan wffl be stormy with 
'In Hong 


wind, ram and snewr 
Kong, Shanghai and Taiwan 
there may be rainy weather 
begktrmg Wednesday. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today 
High Low 
OF Of 

Bow iww \sia • 

Cam 1BW4 SMfl s 

Damascus 15*58 SMI ■ 

Jerusalem 15/M BMC a 

Linr 23/70 3J37 a 

ftyadh 2507 tSSS • 


W Htyh 


Low W 

OF OF 
17/82 lono pc 
rtMsa 7/a* pc 
12/53 205 pa 

14/57 7/44 pc 

25777 3.77 a 
28/78 12/53 pc 


Today 

Mob Cow * >W kow W 
OF OF OF OF 

BunwaNroa 3ZA9 20/58 a 31<58 1&-B4 pc 

Caracas »/M 23/73 pc Z9«* 24.75 pc 

Lm xm 21/70 pc 27/80 21/70 sc 

Malm Cay 2 Vn 10/50 a 23/73 BMfl pc 

HodnJdnato 37798 24/75 pc 3071X20779 9 
Saldago 23/0* 11152 1 29/04 12.50 pc 


Legend: s-sunny. DC-party douuy, c-cto£n}y, Wshc»»a. t CxndButttxma, r-n*i, s^anew fcortea. 
sn-BWW. Hm, w-wewmr. Ai maps, torecaata and data provided by Msw-Waathar, he. 5 1890 


Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow 


tegh 

Issm 

W 

Ma» 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

tei0Bk 

35/95 

24/75 

a 

3403 

24/75 pc 

BoimB 

1102 

-307 

4 

B/43 

-700 a 

Hong Kong 

uw 

1305 

s 

19« 

15*9 pc 

Wnla 

30/86 

21/70 pc 31KB 

23/73 a 

Man IM« 

22/71 

9M8 

1 

73/71 

10*0 ah 

Sait 

409 

■6C2 

1 

30/ 

002 C 

Shanghai 

1203 

002 

a 

1203 

307 pc 

Snppn 

3006 

MfO 

1 

3904 

24/75 pc 


21/70 

1306 

PC 21/70 

16*9 pc 

Tokyo 

1305 

-IOI 

■m 

9/48 

•1/31 pc 

Africa 

Alpora 

<804 

1203 

* 

20/88 

13/55 pc 

Cape Town 

25/77 

1305 

• 

2700 

1509 pc 

Cojtoa 

22/71 

9/48 

a 

21/70 

11*2 pc 

Horam 

22/71 

5/41 

1 

29/84 

B/48 pc 

L-Hpi 

3301 

24/74 

a 

33/81 

28/79 pc 

NambD 

26/79 

9M8 

a 

2B/B2 

14*7 pc 

Timei 

1806 

9148 

n 

21/70 

12/53 pc 

North America 

Anchonpo 

-12/11 

-19/-2 

PC 

0/18 

-17/2 pc 

flftirta 

1804 

1102 

Ml 

1702 


Boston 

1305 

2/35 

Mi 

6/41 

-4 .-2S pc 

Oacagp 

205 

0/22 

a 

-IOI 

-4/25 pc 

Doraer 

7/44 

-3/27 


104 

7120 c 

O 0 S 0 * 

307 

002 

c 

307 

002 pc 

Winckil 

2802 

M« 


2B4H 

21/70 pc 

Kunran 

23/73 

1702 

*1 20*8 

10/50 ah 

LD3 Angaiaa 

17/02 

8/48 

9 

18/86 

9/48 pc 

(ton 

2904 

21/70 

PC 2B*4 

20*8 pc 

Wmmpoh 

-40S 

-130 

PC 

-7.00 

•11/13 e 

Mcrtnwl 

408 

-9/18 

C 

0 O 6 

-130 pc 

Ttessou 

27-80 

2008 

pc 27, W 

20 me pc 

NanYort 

14/57 

307 

*h 

B/43 

0-29 pc 

Ptoowz 

18/64 

B«6 

K 23/73 

9*48 • 

Str.Frm. 

12.W 

7.144 

«h 

f702 

ff« 8 ah 

SuOo 

8/46 

307 

r 

9/48 

3/37 * 

Toorto 

403 

■700 e 

002 

-7/20 pc 

•IfcBionstai 

1801 

BM3 

* 

9W8 

1/34 pc 


ACROSS 
t insertton mark 
a Rock layers 
ix Kojak portrayer 
m It frequently 


finds itsetf in hot 
water 


ie Cracker Jack 
prize 

17 Peter Rrtch 
movie "Raid on 


IB Saw 

ie Chicken 

king 

*1 Starving near 
home, maybe 

aa Communion or 
baptism 

Z3 SALT concern 


r Language from 
which “sorona’ 


as China: Prefix 
as Path lor 
Confuctans 


Solntioo to Pn*de of Feb. 18 


□BQQD CnE3GJ 3U3I1 
BnBQH DQBQ □□□!! 
□osnaannma anaa 
□Esaag aanasaag 
agaa asaag 

EEuElil G3EQ 3303 
□atno hob asaaaa 
bob naanoga gaa 
QQBnaa atna Hinas 
□ago aao saasa 
asogg aaaa 
□□□□sgao aaaaaa 
□□a a sggsaa^gaai 
agog sago □□□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□ aaoao 


271 

" •‘Sarong* 
comes 

aa Article in Der 
Spiegel 
ao Hollered 
3fl Kon-Tlkl wood 
34 Cool, as coffee 
ss Computer unit 
3S Idiot box 
30 Cash reserves . 
4a Loan org. 

43 Beatty's co-star 
in 'Bonnie and 
Clyde' • 
as Paul's singing 
partner 
as Watermelon 
waste 

4# To ntUdly ' 

4* Actor John - - 
ao Word with lack 
or label 

82*1 YOU 

Babe' 

53 Prize money ■ 

54 Sugar type 

ae Gym exercises 
■•Enters 
hetter-skefter 
*a Works a deal on 
ao Leased one 
ei Founded 


DOWN 

1 01 the heart 
a Amelia Earhart 
S-B- 

a Roundup aits , 

■ 4 Actress Sonrner 
S- — kwdn do 
aX-rat ed [ , 

7 Countdown .' .. 

' - beginning - 
. -•Profoflower 

a Aids and . 

10 House cate 
ti Balkan country . 

12 Fite' companion 

13 Quarterback 
. Ken 

ur Divulge 

30 Put ammo in. 

23 Hot-dog 
as.Tendedtots 

37 Became httehed 
n Cooper's -- -~ 
Burnppo 

31 Superman 
symbol 

33 Grant opponent 
33 Enchant Bke 
Samantha 
J« Where things 
. vanish . 

37 Absolutely 
bland 


© NewYorkThtusEditedbjWm Shorts 
■\ rnr 




.IF"'" ■ 



t BmsB 



__ 


38 Group with HQ 
In Brussels : 
,33 Debate siffler 
so Understood ; 
41 Undarltne ' 


42 powdy person;,.' »3Tnting.-tower j 
44GuttarlBt Ted ^ r- 

47 Spotter • ' ssMom'agiri - 

48 Em and Bee . SpokW : - 7 


■1 Schnozzola 


intersection 


a-ii.-;-, .. 
sour- . 

QflSPrJ"-t -1 

wk xj"..;. 

tali. "* " 

It; . 

«krx - 

V7. 

lo JCi't * 

tfifeNjl". • 

SP^sT-v 





Someone back home would also love to 
hear the sound of your voice 


Dial direct from Norway with AT&T. Just dial 800-190-11. 

After a day of cheering, shouting, oohing and aahing at the Olympic Winter 
Games, we know you’ll want to share all the excitement with people back home. 
That's why we've made it so easy with AT&T. 

Amwhere in .Norway, simply dial SOO-1 90-11. in other countries, dial the access 
number from the list on the right. An English-speaking AT&T Operator or voice 
prompt will help complete your call to the U.S. or more than *0 other countries. 
INe your AT&T Calling Card or call collect. You'll get economical AT&T rates and 
keep hotel -surcharges to a minimum. 

Of course, with AT&T you also know you'il get dear. == 
crisp connections. So there's no need to raise vour voice. "S 


AT&T 


AEKT Access Numbers. 
How to call around the world. 


1. Using die chan bekw. find the country you are calling from. \ 'T 

2. Dial the corresponding aIBT Access Number. . \ ~ 

5- Ad AT&T Eagf isispeaidag Operator or voice prompi wilt ask far the phone number.you wish to ctil or connect you to 3 
Customer Service representative. ■ v • : 


lb receive your free waHet card of KSSS^'Aceess Numbers, fust^ dfetl the access brsnrtMsrof 

thecountryswiretaaiKlaric.lbrCuajfner^^ 1 - - ... 


*Ws>i 


COONT8Y ACCESS NUMBERS COONTBY ACCESS NUMBERS COtCTTKY ACcraS NUMBERS 


Ait 




ASIA /PACIFIC Greece* 

00-800-1311 . BoBvia*. : . .. . 

i fc:- 1 ; jA l f & j 

Australia 

0014-881-011 Hungary* 




10811 Iceland*. 

999-001 Chile 


Guam 

018-872 Ireland 



Hong Kong 


mii"i i 


India* 

000-117 IJechtenmda* 


■ Vt '■ :-U9. 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 Lithuania* 


... . 190 

Japan* 


: WOWlll . Guatemalan, 

• ,-r • '. r 190 

Korea 

009-11 Malta*' 

0800490-110 Ghyanartt - .. 

165 

Korea 09 

11* Monaco*- 


-. : : 123 

Macao 

. 0800-111 . Netherlands* 



Malaysia* 


ly 3 It 


New Zealand 



.. . - : to. 


105-11 Portrait 

05017-1-288 Pfiftit , . t 

-• *. ■ 193 


155-5042- Romania.' 

01-800-4288 ’ -Suriname 

1 •'-•156 

Saipan* 

235-2872 Slovakia 
unruti n .111 

00-420-00101 Uruguay ' ' 


Sri Lanka 


wTwii . raKznetara ■ .Buwil-lZO 

020-795-611 - • ? '"-CARESBEAN • 

Taiwan* 




Thailand* 




EUROPE ILK. 



Armenia** 



Anstrb*m 

022-903-011 Bahrain ' 

'<.«?« 1« li iB 7 '.IMWCB 


Belgium* 




Bulgaria 



KiS-VISSVM 

Croatia* 

99-3WW11 Kuwait 



Cyprus* 



'' : --^80tLS72-28flr 

Czech Rep 


■ 1-89WO0 i- 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 Turkey*. • 

5 v*v ria<* ifiTThTn 

• -w«4oi 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 AMERICAS ■ *•. GambS^': 

00111 

France 

19*-0tKLl . Aiyemina* 

[*» C: 5-Yi $ '-‘i -' 


Germany 

m'l.hiai 1 ,/ \am —!■ i— 










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