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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



Paris, Wednesday, February 23, 1994 


No. 34,519 


■Tech Hits, 


Japanese 

Advanced TV 
Now Outmoded 



In Nuclear Plan 


■ ■ ■ By Andnew-Pollack 

Nets York Times Service - . 

TOKYO — In what could endup beingthe 
death knefl for one of Japan’s most ama dous 
-technology projects, a senior tdeconunumca- 
uous regulator said Tuesday that the gpvon- 
ment feoemsidering abandoning the nation’s 


-The official’s statement, winch provoked 
panic in the Japanese dectrbnics industry, is an 
admission that the "HDTV system, which was 
once a symbol of Japan’s industrial prowess, 
has now fallen tedmoJogically behind develop- 
ments in the United States. 

Akimasa Egawa, the director-general of the 
broadcasting adnigustrafioh bureau in the 
Ministry of Posts and Tdecxxnrmmications, 
said the ministry was now considering mo ving 
from the' existing system, winch uses analog 
technology, to one using newer digital technol- 
ogy, such as is being developed hi the United . 
States; ' " - 

“The world trend is digital/ 1 Mr. Egswa 
voicing what many Japanese officials have 
known but- did. not saypobfidy. He also sug- 
gested that trade friction could arise if Japan 
maintained hs own system. He added that die 
ministry-hoped to reach a conclusion by the 
summer. •' 

If Japan were to i 

it could pave the way* for a single 

standard far the next generation of television 
broadcasting. Europe has decided "to abandon 


By David E. Sanger 

■ Mew York Tones Semce 

TOKYO — Bowing to international pres- 
sure, the Japanese government has derided to 
postpone,, for as long as 20 years, a series of 
multibilKojy-doflaT projects that would add tre- 
mendously to the world oversupply of plutoni- 
um, Japanese and American officials say. 

The decision, to be announced in the next 


and stemmed- largely from the international 
outcry lastyear over Japan’s sea shipment of a 
ton of plutonium, a highly toxic and radioactive 
material that is a fuel for nuclear weapons. 
Several of Japan’s Asian neighbors banned the 
shipment from passing through their waters, 
fearing an acridem or terrorist incident. 

But the government’s derision is also moti- 
vated by fears among Japan’s huge utility com- 
panies that the country’s poficyof creating a 
“nuclear fuel cycle 7 * — turning midear waste 
into phitonhnn foel — was quickly becoming a 
financial fiasco, one that could cost them bil- 
lions of dollars. 

Japaneseoffkials say they have no intention 
erf abandoning their fuel-recycling policy. But 
the delays are dearly mi effort to back away* 


and many of them concede tint they were 
be scope of international protests 
1 the fiat plutonium shipment. Of- 


'll 

dby 


iriafly, two or so sea shipments are planned 
annually for the next 18 years, altbongh-tbat 
plan - also seems brand to be drastically 
chi 



■ •’ -,v 



Fed’s Policy 
For Rates Is 
Clear: They’ll 
Have to Rise 


Markets Remain Calm 
As Greenspan Averts 
Talk About Timetable 


_ Mike Stephan/ Agmcr Fnaa-Prcuc 

WOMEN PRIESTS APPROVED — A woman helping cany a coffin Tuesday to symbolize the “last rites of the Church of 
EngJamT Airing a demonstration at Westminster Abbey m London against ordaining women as priests. At the same time, ending a 
five-year debate, the dmrdr's General Synod gave final approval by a show-of-hands vote to admitting women into the priesthood. 


one. 


The trinmpb of American-style HDTV, 

something almost mwirnginaM g. fiw. ymra agp 

could also result in moreToyaltypayments for 
developers of the American sysiemand greater 
opportunities for American cn mp amwt to seD 
microchips, video equipment and tdeviaon 
programming in Japan. 

Mr. EgawaV comments do not constitute 
official government policy, andsome officials 


it to do with that plutonium is becoming 
oblem. Tokyo dearly fears that the 
bifities will mount in crating years if 
i is unable to bom all of the plutonium it 
plans to produce or import Plutonium stock- 
piles would only add to suspicions abroad. 


A Top CIA Agent Held as Soviet Spy 



the plug on the, analog. tetfmolQgy, which is 
known as Must The govomnott must first 
figure out what to do about the consumers who . 

sion ^J^a§*tion, any'^td^Sem. would 
notbereadyf oryears. r 
Still, the comments are have thrown the In- 





its options open in case it ever needed to devel- 
op nuclear weapons of its own. 

, Looming large against this background is 
North Korea,- which is widely suspected of 
-operating a nuclear weapons program. Even 
Without a weapons project in Japan, many 
Ariau nations say, the mere presence of large 
amounts of phrtooium in the country consti- 
tutes a latent nadear capability. 

- ‘Y)OTbaacpoE(yisst^mpifloe 1 botnowwe 
are looking out ait the yw 2020, oir maybe 


Cotnpiied by Oar Staff Fran Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — A senior ClA officer 
and his wife were charged with spying for 
Russia for nearly a decade on Tuesday, and 
Washington lodged a stiff protest with Mos- 
cow. 

“It is a very serious case.” said President Bill 
Gin ion, grim faced, shortly after the Justice 
Department announced tbe arrest of AltLich 
.Hazen Ames, former chief of tbe CIA's Soviet 
counterintelligence branch, and his wife. “We 
wiD be immediately lodging a protest to the 
Russian govenunenL” ; 

Mr. Clinton declined to say more about the 
case, which officials said involved more <h.m 
SI .5 milli on in payments by Moscow to man 
. once privy to highly sensitive U.SL intelligence 
secrets. Mr. Clniion acknowledged that the 


matter would force some re-examination of 
increasingly close U -Russian relations, and 
he ordered up a top-level review of damage 
done to V S. intelligence. 

Mr. Ames, who was chief or the Soviet 
branch of tbe CIA's counterintelligence group 
from 1983 to 1985, was accused of spying for 
the Soviet Union, and later Russia, until his 
arrest, the Justice Department said. 

He and his wife were accused of placing 
government secrets in “dead drops" in the 
Washington area for pickup by the KGB. the 
Justice Department said. He met with Soviet 
and Russian agents in Washington and in for- 
eign cities and made “frequent large deposits of 
cash, not explained by his known income, into 
. various accounts” after those meetings, court 
papers said. 


Justice Department officials described it as 
one of the biggest spy cases ever because of the 
amount of material allegedly passed and the 
sensitive nature of the compromised informa- 
tion. 

The subject of whether the Russians had 
been able to penetrate U-S. intelligence with a 
high-level “mole” has long been a favorite topic 
of debate and speculation among intelligence 
experts, as weD as a perennial inspiration for 
spy novelists. 

Mr. Arnes had been under investigation for 
two years, although the CIA had suspected the 
existence of a mole since 1985, according to a 
federal law enforcement official. 

Dee Dee Myers, the While House press sec- 


See SPIES, Page 9 


OLYMPIC 




PODIUM 


The Biggest Surprise 

In the biggest smprise of theseGames, 
Italy V cross-country ski team de- 
throned the gods of Norway's most 
hallowed natioiial sport with a split- 
second finish that won the gold medal 
in the area’s 4xTWdkxneter relay. race. , 
With 150,000 spectators cheering 
wildly, Silvio Fatmer of Italy held off a 
furious challenge by- Norway's" five- 
time gold medalist. BjornDahlie, beat- 
ing him by half a length. 

The Biggest Turnaround 

With Japan appearing to have the team 
jumping title in hand, Jens Weissflog,, - 


'the large bill individual champ ion, said 
to Masabiko Harada: “Congratula- 
tions on winning the gold medal.” 
Then Weissflog soared 135.5 meters to 
tie the- bill record — and the Japanese 
anchorman. Harada, who won the 
1983 world championsbip, landed a 
jump c# just 97.5 meters. That gave 
Germany the gold, in one of the biggest 
turnarounds in Olympic history. 

The Big Moment Arrives 

Seven weeks of ceaseless speculation 
and courtroom drama later, Nancy 
Kerrigan and Tonya Harding have 
nothing left, to do at the Olympic 


Games but take to tbe ice. A preview of 
the women's figure skating competi- 
tion. which begins Wednesday night, 
looks at the event, the judges and the 
top skaters. 


It’s Solely South Korea 

It was South Korea’s day in tbe first 
two short-track speed-skating races. 
Kim Ki Hoon. defending his title, won 
the men’s disputed 1,000-meter race, 
that his country's women’s team set an 
Olympic record in the 3,000-meter re- 
lay. 


Olympic report: Pages 21, 22 and 23 



Jens Weissflog of Germany soaring to tbe dafskmgestpm^, which lifted Ms team to victory in toe jimqpcag event an Tuesday. 


UN Aide Was 'Very Close’ 
To Ordering Bosnia Strike 


Compiled fy Ow Staff Fruit Dispatches 
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Heraegcvina — The 
United Nations came “very, very close” to 
ordering air power against waning parties in 
Bosnia after five UN soldiers were wounded 
Tuesday in a mortar attack near Tuzla. a senior 
official of the UN Protection Force said here. 


The attack near tbe northeastern city was the 
wont involving UN forces in Bosnia since the 
inauguration of Sarajevo's most successful 
cease-fire 13 days earlier. It came as the U.S. 
secretary of defense, William J. Perry, warned 
American lawmakers that the NATO mission 
in Bosnia was “not yet over.” 

General Jean Cot, commander of the UN 
Protection Force in the former Yugoslavia, said 
it was “only because there was no absolute 


commander for Bosnia-Herzegovina, had asked 
for air cover but that General Jean Cot had 
declined. 

The Swedish Defense Ministry said it was 
unclear whether tbe convoy had been targeted 
or hit by accident. The Swedish soldiers, travel- 
ing in a convoy of the UN force’s Nordic 
battalion, were wounded north of Vares outside 
Tuzla, in northeast Bosnia, tbe Defense Minis- 
try in Stockholm said. 

Four suffered shrapnel wounds, while one 
suffered eye injuries. Defense Ministry officials 
said. 

ft was not known on Tuesday who was re- 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK —Treading a fine line between 
throt tling the economy and spooking the bond 
market, the chairman of tbe Federal Reserve 
Board, Alan Greenspan, said Tuesday that the 
Fed had to continue raising short-term interest 
rates to curb inflation psychology during the 
next year or so. 

Ever since Mr. Greenspan disclosed at the 
end of last month that the TJ.S. central bank 
was shifting from easier to tighter money for 
the first time in five years, nervous bond inves- 
tors have demanded more inflation insurance 
by raising yields on long-term Treasury bonds 
iiy about one-third of a percentage point. 

’ In his semiannual explanation of the Fed’s 
policies to Congress on Tuesday, Mr. Green- 
span declared: 

“To promote sustainable growth, history 
suggests that real sbon-ienn rates are more 
likely to have to rise than fall from here. I 
cannot, however, tell you at this time when any 
such rise would occur ” 

This seemed to have reassured Wall Street 
bond bears just enough that the Fed will not 
relax m the face of a temporary downward blip 
in the economy without simultaneously worry- 
ing Congressional Democrats that be might loll 
the recovery, which has been stimulated mainly 
by low mortgage and auto loan rates. 

The Treasury bond market, after hiccuping a 
few ticks while he spoke, settled at a yield of 
6.60 percent for 30-year bonds, shaving a bit off 
last week's close of 6.62 parent. The stock 
market picked up a few points on most indexes 
aside from those for volatile small-company 
shares. And the dollar lost ground against other 
major currencies since Mr. Greenspan did not 
announce an immediate boost in rates, which 
some market players had been expecting and 
which would have made the currency more 
attractive to hold. (Page 141 

Mr. Greenspan devoted much of his testimo- 
ny to explaining why the central bank had 
moved while inflation was quiescent. 

The lesson of postwar economic manage- 
ment. he said, was “the key role of inflation 
expectations." 

“Any attempt to force-feed the economy be- 
yond its potential have led in the past to rising 
inflation as expectations ratcheted higher and 
ultimately not to lower but to higher unemploy- 
ment," he said. 

Defending the decision to raise the federal 
funds rate on Feb. 4 by one-quarter of a per- 
centage point to 3 J percent as “low-cost insur- 
ance." be continued: “If the Federal Reserve 
waits until actual inflation worsens before tak- 
ing countermeasures, it would have waited too 
long.” 

What confused Congress was why the Fed 
raised rates when inflation was not only quies- 
cent but the consumer price index actually fell 
to zero last month. 

Asked about this by Representative Paul E 
Kanjorski. Democrat of Pennsylvania and 
chairman of the House subcommittee on eco- 
nomic growth. Mr. Greenspan turned the ques- 
tion around and asked why the Fed should 
continue to accommodate the economy with 


cheap credit when it is already growing com- 
fortably at an average of just above 3 percent 


means of delrrminine the origin of the shell 
sibTe; 


e an opportunity for a negotiated 
peace in Bosnia. • Flexjtrifity is bring shown 
toward tbe Serbs in tbe Sarajevo hffls. Page 9. 


that h was not possible to use the air force” 

The chief of staff of tbe Nordic battalion 
with the UN force in Bosnia, Colonel Alf 
Goorsjo. gave a different account. He said that 
Swedish peacekeepers had called for air cover 
when they came under attack, and that two 
British Harrier jets responded. 

“We asked for air cover, and two Harriers 
came over,” he said in an interview with Reuters 
television. “Neither we nor they could identify a 
target so we could not call for an attack." 

NATO, which forced Bosnian Serbs to pull 
heavy weapons back from Sarajevo under the 
threat of bombing, has also said it will use force 
if UN peacekeepers are attacked in Bosnia. 

Following the attack Tuesday, an official at 
UN Protection Force headquarters in Sarajevo 
said, “We came very, very dose to using air 
power." 


A source at the Untied Nations in New York 
said that Sr Mi chad Rose of Britain, the UN 


sponsible for the attack. Both Serbs and Mus- 
lims hold positions in the area. 

Tuzla. held by Muslim-led Bosnia govern- 
ment forces, has become one focus of diplomat- 
ic efforts since the NATO ultimatum forced 
Bosnia Serbs to puli their heavy guns away 
from Sarajevo. 

Mr. Perry, testifying in Washington before 
tbe House Armed Services Committee, ex- 
pressed relief that air strikes had not been 
needed, but he added, “The mission is not yet 
over.” 

He said that the NATO chain of command 
was working smoothly and that all ihe countries 
ready to participate in air strikes around be- 
sieged Sarajevo agreed on how to proceed. 

UN peacekeepers continued efforts to con- 
trol tbe remaining Serbian guns in the (20- 
kiiometer) 12-mile exclusion zone around Sara- 
jevo. and relief airlifts and convoys, suspended 


this year. 

“Inflation requires financial tinder, which at 
the moment is lacking and which we have no 
inclinatioD to provide,” be said. 

What confused bond markets were recent 
reports that growth in the final quarter of last 
year may have reached almost 7 percent. When 
tbe inevitable slowdown comes — and Mr. 
Greenspan said it would this quarter in part 
because of a cold snap and the California earth- 
quake — the question remained whether the 
Fed could stifl be trusted to hold firm in its fight 
against inflation. 

Mr. Greenspan hoped his testimony repre- 
sented a positive answer without actually say- 
ing it in so many words, thus frightening other 
financial markets os tbe Fed did when it for- 
mally announced Jan. 31 that rates were start- 
ing Up a gflin. 

“The problem is dial each wants the other to 
move Gist,” said Astrid Adolf son of MCM 
Moneywatch. “The bond market wants to see 
higher short-term rates before they feel com- 


fortable lending money long term at lower 
i the F 


for one day as a precaution, resumed Tuesday. 

(AFP. AP. Reuien. WP) 


yields. The Fed wants the long-term market to 
r-alm down before it makes the move its waiting 
for. Both are going to have to writ a little longer 
for everyone to calm down.” 


U.S. 



at 


By Clay Chandler 

Washington Past.Sermx 

. WASHINGTON-- When PepuyTVeasnry 
Secretary Roger C Altman hdpto Jlttfflamt 
Bill Clinton decide what position the United 
States would take in trade talks with Japan 
earlier tins month, be could drawatteyearsaf 
dealing with Japan in private business; 

Mr. Altman, who joined the aomunstratton 
from a Wall Street investment banking am. 
can tick off the difficulties he encountered m 


acEem, fight 
“You’d walk along the ride streets downtown 


for shelf apace in Tokyo. 

long the si 


A Japanese executive died foul bait with 
(he Tinted States an ceBuhrphoues. Page 19. 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra 9-0° LaKOTtwrs «L.Fr 

Egypt. ~..E.P . s^i Arabia 

France.. — 9.00FF Senegal. .J.H0CFA 

Gabon .960 CFA Spa ; n “. .^00 PT AS' " 

Greece.—.— 300 Dr. fonlsia'^~l-Q00 Din . 
Ivory Coast .1.120 CFA Turkey -T- L.15,000 

Jortfan...... I UAE. 

Lebanon— US$1 JO U.S. Mil- (Fur.} SU0 


and see thousands of small consumer electronic 
shops," he sod.- 

But, he said, it was viraialh'imxisribte tog# 
Duracefl batteries into those outlets. They were 
all controlled by big Japanese producers Hke 
Matsushita or raucavhe saS- - 

Experiences like that one underlie the din- 
ton administration's tough trade policies to- 
ward Japan. The team' the president has as- 
signed to manage America’s relationship with 
its most important trade partner is made up of 
neither scholars steqsto in- the subtleties of 
Japanese language and offline, nor striped-suit 

diplomats, versed in the complexities of the 
U -S.-Japatiese security relationship. - - 

Instead., most of than are business profes- 
sionals like Mr. Altman, or the National Eco- 


nomic Council chairman. Robert E. Rubin, and 
Mr. Rubin’s deputy, W. Bowman Cutter, men 
who gained their knowledge of Japan in tbe 
school of hard knocks, trying to help U.S. 
companies pry open markets in Japan and fend 
off a seemingly unstoppable invasion of Japa- 
- nese competitors at home. 

In its Tint year in office, this team has labeled 
Japan a renegade nation in the global economy 
and encouraged Mr. Clinton to insist that To- 
kyo pro mise specific and measurable progress 
in opening Japan’s economy to foreign prod- 
ucts. At Hs White House meeting with Mr. 
Clinton earlier tins month, tbe Japanese prime 
minister, Morihiro Hosok&wa, rejected that ap- 
proach as “managed trade," prompting U3. 
threats of trade sanctions. 

Members of Mr. Clinton's Japan team are 
quick to deny that their personal clashes with 
Japan Inc have contributed to the failure of 
tins mouth’s talks. They say tough trade poli- 
cies are the only way Jo get results with Japan, a 
nation they criticize for decades of failure to 
live up to agreements. “This b a serious, sober 


exercise," Mr. Altman said. “It's not a vendet- 
ta." 

While they stress they also have had positive 
encounters with Japan over the years, they 


acknowledge privately that their experiences 
have left them fed up i 


up with Japan's restrictive 
practices, wary of Japanese assurances and con- 
vinced of the need to quantify Tokyo’s progress 
in opening its markets. 

Conader the lessons learned by Joan Spera, 
the under secretary of state for economic af- 
fairs. As an executive at American Express Co r 
she found rat that overcoming legal obstacles is 
no guarantee of equal access to Japanese mar- 
kets. 

In tbe 1980s, American Express was finally 
granted tbe right to issue credit cards in Japan, 
but Mbs Spero had to make dozens of trips to 
Tokyo before the company could win member- 
ship in a trade association that controlled credit 
data and the communications networks neces- 
sary to process credit card transactions. 

Similarly, while Commerce Under Secretary 


Kiosk 


St Petersburg Reactor Is Shut Down 



£:• 

m. 

The Dollar 

Maw YoiX. Tuw. dme 


I'ffL JS 


pwiasctosB 


DU 


1.7236 


1.7304 


Pound 


1.479 


1.4752 


Yen 


105.545 


10627 


FF 


5.8583 


5.8825 


See TRADE, Page 9 


Genera! News 

A UN agency had no indication North Ko- 
rea agreed to nuclear inspections. Page 5. 
South Africa's foot soldiers are forging a 
peace in the township wars. Page 1 


MOSCOW (AFP) —One of four Chemo- 
byJ-type reactors at the SosnovyBor nuclear 
power plant near Sl Petersburg was shut 
down Tuesday after a breakdown in its cool- 
ing system, Interfax news agency reported. 

Radiation reached 180 microroentgens an 
hour but had slipped to 20 microroentgais 
an hour two hours later. 

Sosnovy Bor is equipped with four reac- 
tors of the type used in the Ukrainian Cher- 
nobyl complex, the site of the world’s worst 
peacetime nuclear disaster in 1986. 

Experts consider tins type of reactor the 
most unstable in the former Soviet Union. 


Kravchuk to Resign 

, (Reuters) — President Leonid M. 
Kravchuk has decided not to run for re- 


float Review 


Paged. 


dcction in voting due to take place in June, 
Ukrainian television said Tuesday. 


f 


I 




1 





South Africa’s Foot Soldiers Are Forging a Peace in 


By Bill Keller 

New York Tima Service 

TOKOZA, South Africa — By the faint light 
of a half moon, four army foot soldiers ad- 
vanced along streets scarred by urban combat. 

They passed a ghostly no-manVland of 
scorched houses and entered a lane of match- 
box bungalows. Suddenly, they came upon 
their first battle of the night. They tensed and 
moved in. 

“O.K_ stop that, stop that!” Private John 
Lrphoto yelled in Zulu to a tall man in white 
overalls who was beating his girlfriend in the 
middle of the muddy street The soldiers coaxed 
the drunken couple apart as neighbors con- 
verged from their tiny yards, noisily joining in. 

Three weeks ago. this neighborhood, at the 
epicenter of South Africa's township political 
wars, could be counted on for a nightly harvest 
of bullet-riddled and burned corpses. Now the 
only conflict the foot patrols encounter on a 
typical night aside from an occasional potshot 
is domestic. 


It is too early to say that normality has 
relumed to Tokoza and the adjoining township 
of Katlehong, the black settlements east of 
Johannesburg that have borne the brunt of the 
rivalry between the African National Congress 
and the Inkafea Freedom Party. 

But since the army poured in hundreds of 
soldiers, most of than black, on foot patrol, 
replacing the high-riding armored vans of the 
mainly white riot police, the townships have 
become the most heartening news in South 
Africa. 

The death toil has fallen from eight or 10 
each night to one. A tacit curfew has been 
lifted. Children are returning to schools. Refu- 
gees have begun rec laiming their abandoned 
houses. Traffic is flowing on roads that had 
been barricaded and bedeviled by snipers. 

The pacification of Tokoza and Katlehong, if 
it holds, will be a triumph for the South African 
Defense Force, long regarded as an instrument 
of apartheid, and for the African National 


Congress, which risked the wrath of its most 
militant followers to bestow its blessing on the 
army. 

Peace in these townships has raised hopes 
that South Africa can contain its destructive 
impulses sufficiently to hold a credible election 
in April, and even to deliver on promises of law 
and order thereafter. 

The anti-riot faces of the South African 
Police, known as Internal Stability Units, have 
been the mam instrument of Oder in troubled 
townships. But they are reviled by blacks as 
brutal occupies?. 

That leaves the army. Its regular forces num- 
ber 70.000, two-thirds of them black, although 
die officer corps is overwhelmingly white. 

Like the police, the anny comes tainted by its 
enforcement of apartheid, but its leaden nave 
been quicker to adapt to the change 

When die riot police were withdrawn at the 
beginning of February, the anny deployed 
1,800 men here. At any given time, about 400 


men are on the streets, mast of them on foot 
They are backed up by roadblocks, sentries 
perched high on water towers with night-vision 
goggles, and helicopter patrols. 

“It’s visible policing that has made all tire 
difference," said Meverett Koetz, who watches 
the townships east of Johannesburg for the 
National Peace Secretariat, a multiparty orga- 
nization set up to combat violence. 

Leaders of frikarl^ which predominates in 
the mainly Zulu neighborhoods huddled along- 
side several migrant workers’ hostels, have as- 
serted that ibe troops are biased against them. 

The four men in dire drab uniforms who 
worked this night in the shadowy side streets of 
Tokoza got anoticeabfy cookr reception in the 
Tnkatha area. 

During a two-hour patrol in the streets 
around Angola Hostel, a migrant workers’ com- 
pound dominated by Infatha, they twice beard 
gunshots, once dose enough to make them 
scramble fa cover. 


“Every nkht they shoot at us,” said Private 
David Ramapaeane, 2L shrugging nervously. - 
'‘TbeZuhisdon’tlikeiis.".. 

As they crossed into an ANC block, the 
.soldiers relaxed, and the private said. “Here, we 
don't get problems.” •/.- • 

The soldiers say, and residents confirm, mat 
there has not been a sii^e partisan battle in the 
area sinco they took up patrols. Homs after 
ni ghtfall, people were still opt waling neigh- 
bors. . 

Compared to- the riot police, who roared 
through, the -triwn in tank-Ske riot vans, disr 
mounting only to conduct searches at gunpoint, 
the soldiers are a light presence. 

They are not easygoing coristaWes .'ni^ 
work m groups of four a six, spaced an both 
sides of the street, dntdfeg assault rifles. But 

fhqy will di gtCSS thei f p j nnd s todut, OftO 

escort a frightened woman hone. 

“You talk to citizens, you learn the area, ” 
win riwiignant Johann Botha, an inteffigeoce 
officer fa the army group stationed here “If 


^driremaxmfita^yehjrfc.^^f^tincat- 

feme lock to >ltl When thepeoj^OTtireffoond 
cansee your feces, whethe r youYe smflmg or. 
not, tben they start trusting yoo? 

“As soon as we stabilize thcarea,” paitm -, 
ant Botha said* “well send-in_thc engneenng. 
asps to fix roads and get rid of the rabble, fix . 
sevras and water. So when ce peacekeeping 
fore* inbres. ioto the area, lfs stable and the 
infrastractore is livable.”- 
The anny is scheduled to make way for a 
jefetpeacekeepingfotrehy ApriL^wivalEly 
both the armyandthe ANC concede tins may 
bealonger-asagnment- - 3 •’ 

Residents say that the townships? troubles 
have' beat suppressed not resrfviecL 
vigilan te self-defense units still operate m 

file nssmnedto 

have anus caches in the hoods.' The mfetary, 

admits there Is tittle hope of disanmng the 
warring sides anytime soon. 


Kohl Party Urged 
To Renew Values 


Return 

HAMBURG — Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's campaign man- 
ager said Tuesday that Germa- 
ny needed a “conservative re- 
newal” to bring back family 
values and a sense of civic duty 
during a marathon election 
year. 

Peter Hintze said at a con- 
gress of Mr. Kohl's Christian 
Democratic Union that Bonn's 
center-right coalition faced an 
uphill struggle in 19 elections 
this year. Eliminating in a fed- 
eral poll on Oct 16. 

But Mr. Hintze, the Christian 
Democratic Union's secretary- 
general, told delegates that Mr. 
Kohl’s policies were slowly win- 
ning back support after a deep 
slump in popularity in opinion 
polls. 

Mr. Hintze echoed Mr. 
Kohl's call this week fa new 
thinking , saying, “We stand fa 
a conservative renewal of our 
society.” 

Mr. Kohl had called on dele- 


gates to rally “against the pre- 
vailing wind.” 

Siam ideals as duty, family, 
hard work and civic pride bad 
been neglected and lampooned 
in Germany fa years, Mr. 
Hintze said. 

“Today, we all know how im- 
portant these virtues are,” he 
said. 

“For us. they are the bases of 
a free and responsible society.” 

The opposition Social Demo- 
crats, whose campaign focuses 
squarely on creating more jobs 
and bringing new blood to 
Bonn, accused the Christian 
Democrats of trying to divert 
attention from problems that 
arose during its nearly 12 years 
in power. 

“h is a bit strange to see the 
secretary -general of the largest 
ruling party calling for 'change 
in German/ after 12 years of 
the center-right government,” 
declared Dagmar Wiebusch, a 
Social Democratic spokeswom- 
an. 


Wmsi 



Looking on at the congress of the Christian Democratic Unioa in Hamburg on Tuesday were, from left, the party’s secretary-general, 
Peter Hintze, die CDU parliamen tary leader, Wolfgang SchSuble, Quncdor Hefanut Kohl, and the muster of labor, NorbertBHhn. 


Pope Condemns Marriage of Homosexuals as Threat to Family 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 

ROME — Fueling a heightened debate in the 
United Slates and Europe over homosexual matri- 
mony, Pope John Paul 0 chastised such unions 
Tuesday as “a serious threat to the future of the 
family and society” and said they could not be 
“recognized and ratified as a marriage in society.” 

The Pope's comments occurred in a 100-page 
letter on family values that not only restated the 
Vatican’s familiar views on contraception, divorce 
and abortion but also seemed designed to erect a 
moral bulwark to prevent Catholics from supporting 
the notion of homosexual or lesbian marriage. 

The document was issued two weeks after the 
European Parti ament in Strasbourg offered support 
for the idea of homosexuals’ marrying and adopting 
children. In its wider context, though, the letter 
seemed certain to illuminate anew the gulf between 


Vatican doctrine and those who consider it irrele- 
vant to modern social realities. 

The letter conflicted directly wife fee practise of 
several cities in Italy that permit fee public celebra- 
tion of gay and lesbian marriage by local officials. A 
group of legislators has proposed the enactment of a 
national law le galizing such weddings, even though 
opinion surveys show a majority of Italians opposed 
to the idea. 

The question of homosexuals adopting children is 
yet more controversial in Italy, according to opinion 
surveys showing few Italians in favor of the idea. 

The Pope's letter — addressed directly to Catho- 
lics rather than to bishops a priests — was drafted 
long before the most recent European Parliament 
decision and was timed to coincide with fee UN 
Year of fee Family. 

Since fee European Parliament voted Feb. 8, how- 
ever, fee Pope has taken issue strongly wife fee 
nonbinding resolution, telling worshipers in Rome 


ac Sunday lhal the assembly was wrong in “inappro- 
priately conferring an institutional value on deviant 


The Pope said: “Marriage, which undergirds fee 
institution of the f amil y, is constituted by the cove- 
nant whereby a man and a woman establish between 
themselves a partnership fa their whole life. 

“Only soch a union can be recognized and ratified 
as a marriage in society. Other interpersonal unions 
which do not fulfill fee above conditions cannot be 
recognized, despite certain growing trends Much 
represent a serious threat to tot future of fee family 
and society itself.” 

“Human beings are not the same as the images 
proposed in advertizing and shown by the motion 
mass media,” his letter said. 

The Pope's recent utterances have aroused criti- 
cism from homosexual and other groups, wife Ital- 
ian environmentalists saying they perpetuate “odi- 
ous discrimination against homosexuals.” Claudia 


Roth, a German, who sponsored fee European reso- 
lution, called fee Pope s views “totally reactionar y . 

■ Britain Lowers Gay Age' 

LONDON — Parliament voted Monday night to 
lower to 18 from 21 the age of consent fa sex 
bet w ee n men. The vote came after a debate over 
whether this would create equality before the law a 
encourage sexual exploitation of young men.. . . 

. Thedecisioii represented a compromise between a 
drive led by homosexuals to reduce fee age of con- 
sent fa homosexual men. to 16 — fee same as itis foe., 
heterosexuals and lesbians — and resistance by same 
Conservatives to any change at alL 

The vote wffl bring Britife lwdoserinro. line wife 
fee reft of Europe, where the age at winfe homasac- 
uals can have sex legally ranges from 12 in Spain to 
18 in Germany and some other countries. Britain 
was the last West European country to have a 
consent age of 21. 


Catholic-Imposed Moral Conduct Leaves Italians Bickering 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Tima Service 

ROME — For Dr. Anna Maria Rizzi, fee choice 
was clear if difficult. Like other doctors across Italy, 
she had to decide Much birth-control method to 
prescribe for a patient, 28. 

Dr. Rizzi refused to prescribe birth-control pills 
because, as a Roman Catholic, she prefers “natural 
means.” 

After fee patient called Coni ere Della Sera and 
fee national daily put fee story on its front page, 
papers throughout the country did likewise, express- 
ing outrage feat religious considerations motivated 
the doctor's decision. 

This recent case has divided physicians, patients, 
health administrators, church figures ana politi- 
cians. 

The furor probably would have subsided had not 
the Vatican newspaper, L'Osservatore Romano, 
published an article earlier this month by a theolo- 
gian. the Reverend Gino Concetti, arguing that 


health professionals such as Dr. Rizzi enjoyed a 
“right of conscientious objection” to products or 
procedures they deemed immoral 
Father Concetti did not specify fee products, but 
every Italian knew what he was talking about 
Last month Pope John Paul Q, addressing a dele- 
gation of Italian pharmacists, cited a 1974 appeal by 
Pope Paul VI fa pharmacists to refrain from selling 
“products that demean man and his dignity.” 

But Pope John Paul also cited fee moral responsi- 
bility of pharmacists in treating “certain forms of 
illness that are spreading wife impressive rapidity, 
and are at times the result of a mistaken idea of 
freedom and human dignity." 

Franco Caprino, president of the Pharmacists 
Guild in fee Lazio region around Rome, said phar- 
macists “cannot dose our eyes” to birth control and 
the prevention of disease. “Isn't it better to take fee 
pill than to have an abortion,” he asked, “and to use 
a condom rather than get an infection?” 
Giacomo Leopardi president of fee Federation of 


Italian Pharmacists Guilds, agreed that pharmacists 
faced wife fee prevalence of these diseases bad to 
choose “the lesser evil, and that’s the condom.” 

Ten year? ago the Vatican and Italy signed a 
revised Concordat that ended Catholicism's status as 
fee stale rehgjon. But the two sides continue to 
wrestle wife fear relationship. 

As Italy prepares fa elections, fee focus of fee 
dispute has become an extension of “conscientious 
objection" beyond military service to areas like 
health care. 

When Italy legalized abortion in 1981, the law 
guaranteed doctors that they could refuse to perform 
abortions on grounds of conscience. Elsewhere in 
health care, the line is less dearly drawn. 

“The law speaks dearly, making objection avail- 
able only far abortion.” said Dr. Daniio Poggiolim, 
president of the National Federation of Physicians 
Guilds. “But given feat we are not able to take into 
account physicians’ moral and religious convictions, 
we shall open a debate cm the issue.” 


“I think there is an intrusion of fee church into the 
domain of the state," said Dc. Fernando Aina, atop 
immunologist and a leader in the fight against AITS. 

A program to add 6,000 hospital beds for AIDS 
patients has been halted, he said, and information 
about AIDS has virtually disappeared from televi- 
sion and the schools as fee disease continues to 
spread. Last year, fee Health Ministry stud, 4,729 
AIDS cases were reported, bringing the number to 
21,463, placing Italy second only to Ranee among 
European nations. 

While the sale of condoms poses less of a chair 
lenge, health care officials most figure out how to 
deal wife refusal to dispense other contraceptives. 

“Yew can sell condoms a not,” said Piero Uroda. 
president of the Association of Catholic Rimma- . 
cists. “They are not drugs and everyone can makeup 
his own. mmd. But the pQ2 is prescribed for meno- 
pause, to regulate the menstrual cycle, even fa 
Don’t tell me we’re supposed to question out cus- 
tomer?." 


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Delors Tells Greece: Lift Macedonia Embargo 



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Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The president of 
fee European Commission. Jac- 
ques Delors, wrote to Prime Minis- 
ter Andreas Papandreou of Greece 
on Tuesday demanding feat Ath- 
ens take urgent steps to end its 
trade embargo against the former 
Yugoslav republic of Macedonia. 

In a move feat intensified fee 
diplomatic pressure on the Greek 
government, the commission said 
Mr. Delors had expressed to Mr. 
Papandreou his concerns about the 
legality of Greece's actions. 


In Athens, meanwhile, the gov- 
ernment rejected calls from its Eu- 
ropean Union partners to lift fee 
embargo. 

“It is inconceivable that Greece 
would sacrifice base principles of 
its foreign policy fa public rela- 
tions.’" a government spokesman, 

Evangdos Venizeios. said. 

EU foreign ministers bad criti- 
cized Greece for its imposition of 
the embargo against Macedonia, 
wife which it is locked in a diplo- 
matic dispute. 

They warned Greece, which is 


the current holder of the rotating 
EU presidency, that it would be 
brought before the E u ropean Court 
of J[ustice unless it could justify its 
decision. 

“We have asked Greece to pre- 
sent its legal justification of the 
embargo,” Foreign Minister Jac- 
ques Poos of Luxembourg said. “If 
it is not acceptable it mil trigger 
action is fee Luxembourg Court of 
Justice.” 

His comments reflected the gen- 
eral condemnation of Greece by 
EU members. 


Mr. Venizdos responded in Ath- 
ens by saying: “Greece is ready to 
back its position at all levels and in 
all international institutions. Bat 
the issues not legaL It is political." 

Mr. Papandreou said last week 
that Greece would stop the neigh- 
baring Balkan republic from using 
the port of Salonika, its main trade 

route, except fra- supplies of hu- 
manitarian food and medicine. 

Athens wants fee republic to re- 
move fee Macedonian star from its 
new flag and change hs constitu- 
tion. 


AlgeriaFrees 
TVo Militants 

Ageace France- Prase 

ALGIERS — Two leaders of the 
banned Islamic Salvation Front 
have been freed from prison, ac- 
cording to the public prosecutor in 
Btida, just south of here. 

The official press agency APS 
said Tuesday that fee two men 

were All Djjeddi, in charge of fee 
fundamentalist movement’s politi- 
cal relations, and Abddkader 
Boukhamkham, a member of hs 
supreme oountiL Each had been 
sentenced to four years. 


WOULD BRIEFS 

EU and Austria Deadkxied in Talks , 

BRUSSELS. (Renters) .~ the .European Uskm and Austria failed 
T uesday to resolve differences in their taPa on entry terms for Vienna-by. 
Tuesday’s deadline, Foreign Munster Alois Mock af Austria said. 

Mr. Mbck said they were affliar apart on important Issues of trucks 
driving -through fee Alps, agriculture and art Ansriian demand to be. 

heshkl te*suIl ; bopGd fa successfry^nfe week. “I. stiff prefer to be; 
optimistic.” he added. 

Transport Minister "Viktor KEma said Aetna’s room fa maneuver m 
Sunday Urban trucks fraoferir mountain roads frcaneariy next eentmy. • 


TURIN (Reuters.) — Former Prime Minister :Gkjvaimi Gaia on. 
Tuesday became thefiratm^poUttianfo be trifeoucharges resulting 
from Italy’s corruprion investigations. .’ 

Mr. Goria,wbo was nrtm court because of illness, dories accusations 
thatheagreed toacutofa7bffl^^(^lnrilBoa)lKibefebcpaidby 
companies given a ccc tract to build a hafeztafi m Ms home town a Asti in. 
Italy’s northwest. “ 

9 in Pem Army JafledOver Killings 

LIMA (Rented) — The bigW roffitary court in Pent has sentenced' 
five anny officers and four nancqmmnsioeed afficera.to prison fa then- 
role in the 1992 slayings of nine students and a university professor 
suspected of guerrilla activity. . • =• •* 

Two majors received fee haishest pehalties, 2Q-year sentences for 
having-directed a squad t h at abdneted the IQ sheet s fro m La Cantata' 
University on July i?, 1992, and kilksdfeem boms-hter, a court officer 

Fo^noncoimmsrioo^ officers w^^^^d out fee killings woe 
sentenced to 15 years in prison for the samecrimes as their superiors, he 
said. AggneraLncolfflidaiHia.cs^^ from one to five, 

years fa negligence- and ofea crimes in fee case^ he added. 

Pakistan Tightens Rules on Refugees 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Al)— Outrage over fee taking of hostages 
by Afghan gunmfe tins week has prompted the government rotighten 
security at refugee camps and encou ra ge fee fanagn as to go home. 

Three Afgim kidnappers lock abort 70 schocwfeshortage ana bus 
Sunday. The gunmen were. loped by commands 'Monday night in. 
Islamab ad after "a'404taf ortiefefeafeebegs wtJre'nnhannedT 

Ahmt TmilHnw Af ffium mad* jn Pgtrvhiq ^ 

France to Restart Bispated Reactor 

PARIS (A P) — De spite years of cOMrovcrsy and tciAmcal problems, ' 
commerdal-sme. endear. breedajeuXai^^^^^^^Vqynet, leadadf* 


commercial-size, nuclear, breeder jeadeg; DfHtnniqne Voynet, leader of 
France’s Green Party r xmdlYiesday. • -v-',.::!-';'. ~ ‘ 

•: Miss -Voynet, whose cgvjroumentaBst party strenuously opposes Bie 
reactor, said after fee Bnd members of other parties met wife Prime 
Minister Edouard BaBa3ur 'feat sbe expected the government to an- 
nounce itsplms .Weduesd^.^y-v ; .. 

The |S bafidri'StroeF^fi&rfMmt war feet do*ramJulyI990 after 
repeated leaks m th£ cooShg system; ' - " *- ■. ' 


MONTREAL (Reuters) — Quebec’s separatist Parti Qa6b6cois has' 
ousted the'goveni mg lfeerals from a previous liberal stronghold in a 

_ 8 *The S^Q^b6cods omdidahfr Marcd Landry. beat. his liberal 
opponent, Nkok Appleby-Arboor, fry mere than 2,600 ^ votes in' unoffi- 
ciiu tallies, ending 37 years of Liberal representation in theBanaventure. 
district of eastern Quebec. 


Correction 

■ - A Reuteradisp&tch in Monday’s editions stated incorrectly fee number 
of fatalities caused by a cydcoe in Mauritius. Two people ^^were JdDedL 

TRAVEL UPDATE ~ 

Hidi Court Sides Wiflute Bumped 

WASHINGTON (Reuters)— -TheS^remeCc^ reaffirmed Tuesday - 
that an airline passeraer bumped from an overbooked flight can fee for' 


The high court denied, without any comment, an appeal by Northwest 
Airfines fii& arguing feat a 1 978^ federal affine tieregmatkm tsw prevents ;■ 
the 50,000 passengers who arebmtqKd from flights each year from suing 
under differing state laws. • 

The case involved William West; ^Montana lawyer who was bumped 
in 1986 from a^Noifewqst Airfines fH^itfroai Great Faffs, Montana, to - 
Arifegfen,- Vsgjnia.- He had purchased a batavfandabfe fed nouex- 
changcabfc tkkeL He was offered H98 in “denied beading" compensa- - 
firm - a tte choice of lak^ tmofeer.ffi^ ^feednlfe ta arrive m the' 
Wafemgton-area six hours later than the original flight. He rejected the ' 
offer aim sued £a SlQfiOO irr actual ifaiwp* and SS dflQO in punttivif 
damages. The Supreme Court rufegdeared the way tor a trial ' 

Gun* pack e d FJorenc^s Uffizi art pBtry on Ttfedfe fa the re- ' 
^^m^a^^^fflfedahgtifaTtoorn, dariage d mMayby'acarb ^ bfetf ’ 


for Izmir, a pot in western Turkey, following tbebofehigcgi of frmmdng ' 
arrangement^ the conqiany sad Tuesday in Zurich. ~ flfaght-Rulder) 
Aboctt 45,000 pestfcide packets fro m aftachfeip arestffl adrift in fee - 
North Sea and beading for tiw Damfe and German coasts, the Dutch 
authorities said Tuesday. ’ ?'• ' (AFP); 

Anfeorities in fee BrazSan cerntd c ity of Fortaleza,?! holiday resort 

oml^^of^^m and a&ie killed eight . 

persons and affected 9JXXLra the lasttwomanfes. . r (Roomy 


7 , ■ K 

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Martha rushed in to break Herbert of 
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Page 3 


APOLITICAL NOTES A 


Cflnton Promote jJfgjwig Learning’ 


r-'Wdding charts to show how education can 
w&SS6S^ at ?“L 1,0081 earoings, President Bill Cfimon 

^®S^ s SS esda) ' “ a 1114 

If' we-realiy want America to grow jobs and increase earnings, we 
WH have to dramatically improve the levels of eAieatkm of the 
. Mr. CiiniontoJda^jft presidents and adnrims- 

*° S * an w,lh tepn*bo6t* s, bat we can’t stop 

Kir. Clinton, in a speech, to the American Coondl do Education, 



■ Any hoptfwc have to hook the American economy, to the 21st 
cent ury." he said, depends .on making sore, the educational system is 
responsive to “the demands of the times.* 

He told the university officials, ’Ttix dear that thefoture of our 
ecoa»ny,,Mjd therefore the fabric of our society, is in no «™n 
measure in your hands. ” 


* 4 . ,^ mwaa iui c, uapmg young people cam 

ropaeyior college by performing community service; school- to- wort 
'programs; re-employment programs; getting society more in- 
vdvedm leajuingimtiatives. (AP) 


labor to Drop Record Sum on Itaatth Plan 


^BAL HARBOUR. Florida — Organized labor has ann o un ced 
that it win snend at least SlQnrilBonj fteinftirtgi^ nn at ipp^nanc^ 
sident Qm ton’s overhanl of the health cans system 


- to promote rresuuan yjm ton's overhanl of the health care, system 
andbeatback alternatives in Congress and attempts to compromise 
away its base features. 

'The only other issue to generate spending approaching that 
magjntude was the. unions’., unsuccessful campaign to step the 
presidenrs enactment of the North American Free Trade Agreement 
lastfalL That long-open wound m labor's hide has suddenly healed 

as the two jades tam to an issue on which they agree. 

The federation president, Tjiii h ki itian fi- wjmuM the drive on 
uw*raal health care to the ones (bai led to enactment of the Social 
SpQiiity Act in the davs of the New DeaL “We intend tn camp aign as 
hard as we can for as long as it takes,” Mr. Kirkland s ai d . 

Asked how much die unions would spend to sell the president's 
plan, Gerald Shea, head .of the American. Federation .of Labor- 
Congress of Indus trial Organizations' health care tw»m t sad, “It’s 
weHtwer $10 miIfion.aiid it could be double that.* (NIT) 


Quote/UnQuote 


Catherine Moore, spokeswoman for the Democratic National 


$3E2iiriilibn last year, but has ^jcst most of h: “We^e not memit to 
sit here on- top of piles of money. We had the responsibility of 
supporting the Mute House. It's aburden we're happy to bear” 

. (WP) 


Main Rural Worry About Health Care Is Getting Some 


By Adam Ciymcr 

,Va‘ York Times Service 


PARKSTON, South Dakou— The big problems of 
health cans' sound very different in small fanning 
towns than they do in Washington. The issues that 
congressional subcommittees will begin voting on in a 
few days are remote, often irrelevant and frequently 
unknown in the rural Midwest 
Several days of conversations here made it dear that 
the big problem is less how to pay for health care than 
io make sure that time is health care to pay for. 

Few people concentrate on worries about bureau- 
cracies and health insnrance purrhaang alliances, 
though they have their doubts, instead, they talk 
about recruiting doctors and using other medical 
workers more efficiently. 


lor and laboratory chief at the 25-bed Landman- 
Jungman Hospital in Scotland. South Dakota. 25 
miles (40 kilometers) lo the southeast, "Doctors have 
to start dropping their egos, and they have to let the 
nurses and the physicians' assistants do more.” 

The health care issue arrived in South Dakota on 


Friday with a visit by Hillary Rodham Clinton to 

Lennox, a preemptive Republican attack that morning 


in Sioux. Falls by Senaior Phil Gramm of Texas and a 
sudden surge in news coverage of the subject 


It was clear from comments by people who beard 

pie ir 


Mrs. Clinton, conversations with people in Parks ton 
and in Scotland, and in a discussion with nine South 


Dakotans assembled to talk about the subject, that 
one crucial issue seems lo have a consensus behind it: 


Gale Walker, the administrator of the 30-bed Sl 
B enedict’s Hospital in Parkston, said: "Here it’s not 
'Do I have a amice?’ It is ‘What do I do to find a 
doctor or a nurse practitioner?* * 

Or, said GutimnDer. the assistant adnrinistra- 


the idea that the United States ought to see to iL that 
everyone has health insurance. 

After the group discussion. Kate Hdigas, executive 
director of the South Dakota Nurses Association, said. 
"1 think until we have universal coverage, the rest of 
the pieces will not Til* 

She continued: “We should be able to afford some 


basic health coverage for everyone. I believe that it is a 
right and we have to be able to afford it." 

Lots of people do have a vague idea of bow the 
presidem's plan might affect them, at least ;n some 
meaningful particular. Roy D. Nvberg. who runs the 
Ace Hardware Store in Sioux Falls, thinks he could 
noi afford to increase his health insurance payments 
for workers to the level the plan demands, although ne 
thinks tile nation needs universal coverage. 

Cecelia Humphrey. 85. a resident of a Sioux Falls 
nursing home, told Mrs. Clinton: “One thing I'm 
pleased about is we get to keep our doctor. I couldn't 
live without mine." 

But as to the alternative plans from Republicans 
and other Democrats, hardly anyone knows what is in 
them. Dr. Phillip Barker, a family practitioner at St. 
Benedict's, dismisses them because “most of them fail 
to provide universal coverage." 

If there is one shared concern among South Dako- 


That same concern came through from the nine 
South Dakotans. 

Evelyn Peterson, a retired nursing educator who 
likes the Clinton plan's emphasis on preventive care, 
still worries that “every model that we've been given 
for rural health cane has been developed in an urban 
area, so it doesn't fit." 

Vince Crawford, the director or the Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital in Sioux Falk, said, “One-size- 
fits-ill is nuts." 

He said if (here was one message he could send to 


Washington, it would be “there needs to be a great 


tans, it is a profound fear that Republicans like Mr. 
Gramm have capitalized on: that wa 


Washington uses a 
“one size fits ail" approach, as the Clinton plan's 
severest critic puts iL 


deal of flexibility so that South Dakota and New 1 
City can each solve their own problems.” 

One principle of the Clinton plan does seem i.-rele- 
vam here. A basic hope of the administration is that 
the philosophy behind its proposals, known as man- 
aged competition, will lower costs. It requires groups 
of doctors and hospitals to compete for patients' 
business. But South Dakota has only three cities of 
more than 25,000 people and only in Sioux Falls is 
there a big enough medical center for competition to 
be imaginable. 


Retroactive Taxes: 
Is a limit at Hand? 


By David G. Savage 

Los Angela Time Service 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court appears poised to re- 
verse nearly 60 years of giving Con- 
gress and the states virtually 
unchecked power to impose taxes 
retroactively. 

Later this month, the high court 
will consider the case of a Southern 
California tax attorney who lost 
$630,000 for a diem in 1987 be- 
cause Congress retroactively re- 
pealed an estate-tax deduction it 
tad created in 1986. 

Some tax experts are predicting 
the court will use the case to say 
that Congress has gone loo far. 

Richard Samp, chief counsel of 
the Washington Legal Foundation, 
is representing 22 Republican US. 
senators who want the court to re- 
strict retroactive taxing. 


“This will mean for the first time 
there is some constitutional limit 
on wtat Congress can do," be said. 

But the millions of Americans 
who must pay higher taxes this 
spring because of retroactive tax 
provisions should not take heart 
Tax experts and constitutional law- 
yers are nearly unanimous in pre- 
dicting that the court uriD not 
tamper with that sort of retroactive 
provision. 

Congress historically has made 
ehangps in tax rates retroactive to 
the first of the year, because the 
Internal Revenue Service cannot 
easily tabulate income taxes if the. 
rates shift in midyear. 

The constitution clearly bars ex 
post facto laws. But since 1798 the 
high conn has interpreted that pro- 
vision to limit only criminal laws. 






■ * 



Jnc CjvaiEiu/Tbc Amitmtd Pn&i 

MEXICO ACCUSED OF RIGHTS ABUSES — A refugee from die lqinsing in Mexico’s Chiapas state waiting to be fed io 
Ahanrir ano. As peace talk* went into a second day Tuesday, a prefiminary report of the International Commission of Jurists 
accused government forces of serious human rights violations, including summary executions and arbitrary detention of rivifians. 


Clinton Aide Shakes Up White House for Midterm Elections 


• By Richard L Berice • . 

Hot York TiimaSenux, . 

WASHINGTON —-As White House 'officials wor- 
ry^ bout the potential for significant Democratic de- 
feats in this year's midterm elections. President Bill 
Clinton has given one of his closest advisers the job of 
bringing .focus to the troubled political operations at 
the While House arid the -Democratic National 
Committee. . 


Mr. Ickes, a New York lawyer who was named 
deputy While Horse chief of staff late last year, 
already is coordinating efforts to pass the president's 
health care legislation and is charged with controlling 
political damage over the inquiry into the involvement 
of the president and Hillary Rodham Ginton with 
Whitewater Development Co. 


.The aide. Harold M. fetes, has begtm lmldmg 
weekly meetings with presidential aides aadDemo- 
oatic officials to coordinate a strategy fbrmhmmzing 
loaMrm'NbvedriW: . u: ’ *-•;/' r n ' ■' 
-Wlfflcoffidak acknowledge that theparty that wins 
tbe-WfartcHbigc habitually pays ait the polls two years 
later, their goal is to protect the already narrow margin 
of safety in the Senate; where the Democrats now 
dominate, 5644, and in the House, where nearly 40 
memberctave announced retirements. . 

On' Severer issues, mefudmg the North - American 
Free Trade Agreement and the budget, the admnua-;. 
(ration won victories last year with bare majorities. 

Adding to the nervousness, and prompting the 
Write House to dictate dunums at the Democratic 
Nationid Committee, is the Republicans’ string of- 
victories in all six major dettions since the election of 
Mr. Clinton. 


. Officials view the rapid rise of Mr. Ickes as impor- 
tant because he is a veteran operative who ran the 
successful Democratic National Convention in New 
York in 1992 and carries weight with the Gintons. 


said Joan N. Baggett, the White House political direc- 
tor. “I think you’ll see the president a great deal in the 
Midwest — Illinois, Mi chigan and Ohio — as well as 
some of the Northeast, New York and Pennsylvania." 

Mr. Ickes played down the difficulties. Blit Demo- 
crats outside the White House have been more blunt in 
describing confusion in the party and the While 
House; and the struggle to turn a structure that suc- 
ceeded in lbe presidential campaign into one that 
melds campaig ning and governing. 


Last year, the Democratic National Committee de- 
voted itself, and millions of dollars, to fighting for Mr. 
Clinton's programs rather than promoting the pros- 
pects of individual Democrats, leaving the party chair- 
man, David C. Wilhelm, open to criticism from Capi- 
tol Hill 


> In a> recent interview. Mr. Ickes said:"*‘What we 
wantto do is nail down and focos oor strategy for die 
*94 elections. We’re also starling to take a hard look at 
where the White House resources should be put — the 
presidaifs time and what stales and districts should 
be emphasized.” 


“If they’re trying to push health care reform instead 
of budding voter ffles, they’re down the wrong road in 


Mr. Ickes is developing a political agenda in which 
the emphasis for Mr. Qmion will be on travdmg to 
promote his plan to overhanl the nation's health and 
welfare systems, as wefl as other programs. 


While he will do some camprigningfor Democratic 
candidates, most of those activities vnU be left to Vice 
President A1 Gore, Mrs. Clinton and, to a lesser 
extent, cabinet members. 

“California wiH confinne to be our favorite stop," 


my opinion,” said Brian- Londe. a former executive 
director of the Democratic Party. 

The While House operation has been regularly 
faulted by Democrats in Congress and elsewhere as 
rudderless and ineffective. Many critics say the prob- 
lem is not lack of talent, but a diffusion of authority. 

Mark A. Siegel, an aide to President Jimmy Carter, 
said: “The political talent of this While House is 
dearly at a higher level than what we saw in the 
previous Democratic White House, but the political 
dedaon- making process seems to be less structured.” 
He added, “ueariy, Hamilton Jordan was in charge 
of politics at the Carter White House. He frequently 
made the wrong calls, but he was always ma kin g the 
calls. Here, there is not one central focus to the 
process.” 


Mr. Wilhelm, who was Mr. Clinton’s campaign 
manager in 1992, said in defense of the strategy: “Our 
focus in 1993 was the president's legislative agenda. 
And I think that's where it should have beat because 
the president’s success and the Democratic Party’s 
s ucce ss e s are inextricably linked." 


But to underscore his intention to shift emphasis 
this year, he has pledged to allocate $2 million to help 
House candidates, and 57 million for senatorial and 
gubernatorial candidates. 

In the last month or two. Mr. Wilhelm also has 
replaced almost all top aides at the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee, and installed more people with 
campaign experience and links to the White House. 

He has hired Debra DeLee, the top lobbyist at the 
National Education Association, as cnief of staff, with 
wide authority to handle coordination. 


“We know it’s going to be tough.” Mr. Wilhelm 
said. “We know the historical trends. The history of 
midterm elections is challen ging, to say the least." 


Oliver North’s Faceless Opponent Suddenly Poses a Threat 


*1 t 


By Kent Jenkins Jr. 

Washington Post Soviet ' 

WASHINGTON — Forget the 
Founding Fathers. Inihe battle for 
Virginians Republican nomination 
to (he Senate, James G Miller 3d is 
j — v--_ : — from acon- 
1 the comedian 

iidd. 

“1 get no respect,” Mr. Miller 
waded— using the comedian's re- 
fnrin — to a roomful cf laughing 
Republicans meeting in Norfolk- 
last weekend. He recounted the in- 
soils, such as a columnists desorp- 
tion that. he has “abaul'as. much - 
charisma as a. slide, rule” and his. 
own staffs decision to take h is pio- 
ture off campaign brochures. 

“What yon see before you,". Mr. 
Miller said, waving the photokss 1 
— - “is not just another pretty 


flier, 

face: 


When you're in second place, 
vou learn the art of .sdf-depreca- 
tifa, and Mr. Miller has bad lots of 
practice the last fewmonths. 

Against his famous competitor, 
Oliver L. North, he has been over- 
shadowed, vastly ootspent and all 
but written off by most in his party. 

. But .in recent. days, the former 
Reagao, administration budget di- 
rector < has taken the- offensive 
against Me. North for the first tune. 


Last weck, he was endorsed by a 
group at retired senior military of- 
ficers who criticized Mr. North’? 
rote in the. Reagan administration’s 
arms-for-hostages scandal. 

. Many Republicans say Mr. 
MDkr shews increasing .strength 
among those who wfll choose the 
Senate nominee at a state party 
convention in June. . 

At a weekend meeting of about 
300 Republican activists, Mr. 
Miller conceded that be continues 
to trail Mr. Nort h but contended 
that his campaign is- making up 

ground. - 

“We’ve got the - momentum. 
We've got our peopler out there 
cranking," Mr. M3ter said. “A few 
weeks am" the North people were, 
saying that the convention was just 
a formality. Now ‘they're worried 
enough to engage us. The move- 
ment is in our direction.” 

' Several senior Republicans 
agreed with the assessment of 
Lany J. Sabato, a political scientist, 
at the- Umversity of Virginia, who 
said' that Mr’ MOtertaa elevated 
himself “from. the longest of long 
shots to a credibk onderdog.” 

Ttowiniw.wffl gam-a dunce at 
the seat to -which -Charles S. Robb, 
a Democrat, hopes to be rejected. 

. Republican, leaders saST Mr. 


Millcrt apparent progress reflects 
a combination of factors, i: 
a skilled grass-roots campaign 
the party’s concern that Mr. 
North’s Iran-contra history will 
frighten away voters m November. 

The first significant test of both 
candidates' or ga nizat io ns will be in 
the coming weekend, when they 
begin registering delegates for die 
state convention. 

Officials with the North cam- 
paign contend that they remain far 
ahead and are not troubled by re- 
cent events. After the military retir- 
ees endorsed Mr. Milter last week. 
North aides made public records 
showing that Mr. Mifler received a 
.student draft tiefennoit daring the 
mid-1960s and accused him of 
avoiding service in the Vietnam 
War. They say their counteroffen- 
sive blunted any potential MDler 
movement. 

. ' “We won’t get everybody," said 
Mark Merritt, a spokesman for Mr. 
North, “but we continue to pfle up 
delegates. They’ve got the insiders, 
but we’ve got the people;” 

The first group to rally around 
Mr. Miller consisted of Reagan 
alumni A long list of senior Rea- 
gan aides' — including Edwin 
Meese 3d, George P- Shultz, Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger and Frank G 


Cartuca, all former cabinet mem- 
bers — have endorsed their old 
colleague, saying be is better quali- 
fied than Mr. North to keep Ron- 
ald Reagan's torch alight. 

Devotion to Mr. Reagan remains 
strong among the Virginia Repub- 
lican faithful and Republican ac- 


tivists say those endorsements have 
helped Mr. Miller. 

Using the abortion issue, Mr. 
Miller has picked up support by 
positioning himself to the right of 
Mr. North. 


Mr. Miller believes abortion 
should be allowed only in cases of 


danger to the life of the mother. 
Mr. North would allow abortion 
also in cases of rape and incesL 
Both first-time candidates are 
staunch conservatives who disagree 
on few issues and vehemently op- 
pose gun control, the Clinton 
health care plan and tax increases. 




India Invesmari 


New Delhi 
18-22 April 1 994 

Unique Ppportunities for 
profitabfeinvestment 
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Textile And Readymade Garments Industry 
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Away From Politics 


• The Federal ComraiHiicaOoos 
Crammssion has voted to whice 
rates for many cable television scr- 
vires by 7 percent TU 


sboukTbe m "effect by imd-May.’ 


The agency only cut rate s for 
service it regulates, somaim^ re- 
ferred io as “expanded base It 
includes such channels as ESPN, 
C-SPAN and CNN. 


• Martin Marietta Corp. has a^eed 

to pay a SI mdfioo settlement m 
connection with a federal probe of 
suspected fraudulent business 
practices at NASA’s Johnson 
Space Center, a Houston TV star 
lion reported. 


Ojght this pan weekend from the 
carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower, 

based m Norfolk, Vu^ma; - 

• Concentrations of cMoroOao- 
rocafbtets are sfiS increasing in the 
atmospher e since industrial nations 
agreedio phase out raanufactureof 
the ozone-depleting chemical, T®* 
searcbers ialo af a symposium To 
SanTnandsco. But the rate of ihat 
increase has been cot in half: The 
CF& increased at the rate of 4 
percent . annually through 'the 


1980s, but the rate has now slowed 
to about.2 percent. 


• A man and his 2-year-oM son 
were both diot in the bead by a man 

in ir 


who got out of the car in from of 
than at a stop sign in Pomona, 
California, walked up and “just 
opened fire," the police said. Inves- 
tiga tore say they believe the shoot- 
ing was an act of gang retaliation. 
Frank Cota, 35, and his son. 
Mathew Frank Cota, were in criti- 
cal condition. A?. Rmerx lat 


m Lieutenant Simmon W«ta*n 
has become the first woman m 
qualify to fly combat aircraft 
navy warships: Lieutenant Wort" 
man. 26 flew her fmal qualifying 





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Page 4 


INTERIS ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1994 


Death Penalty View Isolates a U.S. Justice 


The Assoaaed Pros 
WASHINGTON — Justice Har- 
ry A. BJackmun of the Supreme 
Own, who has long voiced his 
growing concern about capital 
punishment, said Tuesday that he 
now considered all death penalty 
laws unoonstitutioaaL 
Justice Bbdmnin thus became 
the only justice on the nine-mem- 
ber high court to oppose capital 
punishment under all circum- 
stances. 

“From this day forward, I no 
longer shall tinker with the machin- 
ery of death,'’ Justice Blackxnun 
wrote in a dissenting opinion from 
the court’s denial of an appeal by a 
Texas death row inmate, Bruce 
rallirw 

The court’s action was taken 
without comment. Mr. Calling is 
scheduled to die by lethal injection 
on Wednesday. 

“For more than 20 years 1 have 
endeavored — indeed, T have strug- 
gled — along with a majority of this 
court to develop procedural and 
substantive rules that would lend 
more than the mere appearance of 
fairness of the death penalty en- 
deavor, n Justice Blackxnun sakL 
“Rather than continue to coddle 
the court’s delusion that the desired 
level of fairness has been achieved 
and the need for regulation eviscer- 
ated,” he said, “1 feel morally and 
intellectually obligated simply to 
concede that the death penalty ex- 
periment has failed.” 

The sole response to Justice 
Blackxnun was provided by Justice 
Antonin Scalia. who in an opinion 
concurring with the court's denial 


of Mr. Cahins's appeal said the homosexuality, and that he wrong- 
death penal ty “beyond doubt" was ly was denied a trial. He entered the 


constitutional. 

“Convictions in opposition to 
the death penalty are often pas- 


Foreign Service in 1982, and in 
1983 was sent to Belgrade. 

Upon reluming to the United 


■donate ana deeply held,” Justice States in 1984, Mr. Krc admitted 
Scalia said. "That would be no ex- that while overseas be had engaged 


cuse for reading them into a consti- 
tution that does not contain them.'' 

Justice Scalia took Justice Black- 
mun to task for “describing with 
poignancy the death of a convicted 
murderer by lethal injection.” 

“He chooses, as the case in which 


in homosexual conduct with a 
number of people, including a mili- 
tary attache from a non-NATO Eu- 
ropean country and two nationals 
of a Communist country. As a re- 
sult, the information agency ended 
his appointment to the Foreign 


to make that statement, one of the Service and gave him a job in its 


his affairs, and left to bleed to 
death on the floor of a tavern,” 
Justice Scalia said. 


aimed at giving some Vietnam vet- 
erans and their families a uew 
chance to sue chemical makers over 
exposure to the toxic herbicide 
Agent Orange. The court, without 
comment, tinned away arguments 
that those who discovered their ill- 
nesses after the 1984 settlement of 
a nationwide class-action lawsuit 
should not be bound by the agree- 
ment. 

• The court refused to order the 
FBI to release its files on the 1975 
disappearance of the former Team- 
sters union president Jimmy Hoffa. 
The court, without comment, 
turned down a Detroit newspaper 
reporter's argument that the gov- 


less brutal of the murders that regu- domestic dvil service. The court, without comment, 

lariy come before us — the murder win a setback for federal gov- turned down a Detroit newspaper 
of a man ripped by a bullet sudden- eminent contractors, the court re- reporter's argument that the gov- 
ly and unexpectedly, with no op- fused to disturb a law that allows erament cannot withhold the docu- 
portunity to prepare hims elf and people to sue in the government's meats because it is unlikely anyone 
his affairs, and left to bleed to behalf over alleged fraud and share will be prosecuted in the case, 
death on the floor of a tavern,” in any awards. The court, without Mr. Hoffa disappeared July 30, 
Justice Scalia said. comment, turned down a constitu- 1 975, from a restaurant in a Detroit 

The Supreme Court banned the tional challenge to the law, enacted suburb. His body was never found, 
death penalty in 1972, but in 1976 by Congress in 1863 but mostly The FBI conducted a nationwide 
approved of state attempts to rein- unused until recent years. Lower investigation into Mr. HoEfa’s dis- 





approved of state attempts to rein- 
state iu Since that 1976 ruling, 228 
convicted murderers have been ex- 
ecuted. 

In other cases on Tuesday, the 
Supreme Court issued these rul- 
ings: 

■ The court turned down the ap- 
peal of a former Foreign Service 
officer with the U.S. Information 
Agency, who said he lost his job 
boa use he is homosexual. Without 
comment the court let stand nil- 


unused until recent years. Lower investigation into Mr. HoEfa’s dis- 
co urts upheld the law, called the appearance and accumulated 


False Claims Act about 

• The court rejected two appeals case. 


400 volumes of files in the 


A CURTAIN FALLS IN CAMBODIA — A stranded French construction wwtewsrts to 
the Tode Bassac Theater, one of Phnom Penh’s best-known landmarks. Ten 


Vittorio Rieti, American Composer for Diaghilev and Balanchine, Dies at 96 


New York Times Service 


decades. Mr. Rieti wrote music for 


Vittorio Rieti, 96, an American more than a doaen ballets, seven Frederick Stock, Willem Meugd- 


perfonnances were Fritz Reiner, 
Frederick Stock, Willem Meuad- 


composer who fashioned need ask- 


ings that threw out Jan Krc’s law- cal scores for the ballets of Serge a! concertos, as well as chamber Mr. Rieti was bora in Egypt to 


five symphonies and sever- berg and Arturo Toscanini. 


Washington residence, Blair Derek Jantim;52, iBritidi'ffln 
House, cued of a stroke Sunday in director, died of AIDS. Sunday in 
Vega Baja. . London.. A; campaigner for gay 

Ml Collazo and Griserio Tone- rights in Britain, Mr. Jarman 
sola tried to .shoot thor way into shocked andprovol 
the temporaiy residence Nov. 1, audiences alike wi 
1950, in an effort to gain support films such as “Sebas 
for the Puerto Rican independence Klee” in the 1970s. 
movement Mr. Trimmn, who was p^j 

strong at Blair Hoarse whfleto leader of the Indian 
White House was bang re novated , rat ^ e< i'n mrt day 0 

was not hurt, but Mr. Tacresdla ■_”* ■ - j-«. _ j . u. 

i^a TO.e ^ ™ 

Donaha uprising t hat left 32 people *■***« 

fon « nlnTOnnaia 
death, but Mr. Tinman commuted Ebrf Yamaia, 98, 
this to life in 1952. President Jim- .priest of theTeajdai 
my Carter freed him in 1979. died of pneumonia ! 


suit against the agency. 

Mr. Krc contended that the 
agency violated his right to equal 
protection undo 1 the federal consti- 
tution exclusively because of his 


DiaghileY and George Balanchine, music for a wide variety of instru- Italian parents, and educated in 
died Saturday in New York Gty. mental combinations, songs and Italy. But bis music — in its craft 
Mr. Rieti had suffered a bad fall at choral works. rad economy of means — shares 

his home, breaking several ribs. His mttstc was widely performed, sim ila rit ies with the work of . the 
In a career that spanned eight Among the conductors who led French group of composers Les 

Six, particularly that of Poulenc. 

The music of Stravinsky, a dose 

— — friend, was also an important influ- 
ence. 

DER INDUSTRIEPALAST 

m mam ^ SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) 

_ — Oscar Cribem, 80. a Puerto Ri- 

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ON THE GRAND TRUNK 
ROAD: . 

A Journey into South Asia 

By Steve ColL 307 pages. $23. 
Times Books. 

Reviewed by 
William Shawcross 

S TEVE COLL takes us on an 
e xhilar ating, rollicking journey 
along die Grand Trunk Road, the 
highway that runs across northern 
India. Kipling wrote of its rather 
grim and desolate qualities, noting 
that “the police are thieves and 
executioners but at least they do 
not suffer any rivals." Not much 
Juts changed. I ,t 

CoH, a reporter for The Wash- 
ington Post, follows Kipling along 
the 900-mile (1, 450-kilometer) 
stretch of the road between Delhi 
and Calcutta, driven by a gaunt 
Sikh in a 10- ton Tata truck. — “a 
two axle, six wheel, top heavy steel 
box that looks to drivers of oncom- 
ing cars like one of those carnivo- 
rous contraptions from the “Mad 
Max’ movies." 

Like the rest of the book, this is 
an exciting ride. 

“India's truck drivers are mod- 
em heirs to the traders, conquerors, 
robbers and religious seers who 
have traveled the Grand Trunk 
Road for centuries.” As ever, the 
road is stunningly dangerous — 


leader of the Indian state of Guf* 


pan. Tbejsect was founded in 806 
by the priest Sajcfao (767-822). .. 

Thomas Ronald McGntin, 59. a 
former publisher of the. Dallas 


shocked ami provoked critics And Tnnes Herald and an executive of 
jnvKwwtt* alike with lov^budget the Times MpOTCorp^ has died 
fihnssuch as “Sebastiane” and “Ju- heart ^fiscgS c-^ - 

Wee” in the 1970s. . 1 WMWV », a Rnteh 

- .water who was the coauthor of a 

j5^S*3?JE? .Me .Aa&.JM Harbor ppb- 


cades. After becoming its- -drirf 


of me British government, died 
Febl l6:.at;'Bodsina, Cornwall. In 
“Betrayal*! Pteari Harbor," he and 
an AtafraThttr code-breaker. Eric 


Nawi who died last year, contend- 
an mdnstrud power by attracting jfam jf the British -had shared 

t n iw im inwMinMtl ' . . ' *■»" . ^ - “ ■ ' ■ 


foreign investments. 

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II I II I IKJkJI HK~I I ^ Q30 _ 25001 -693 /Fax 030 -25001 -408 

Management GmbH Mease ask ibr Mr,. Cremer 

A Project of the Grundkred it Bank-Group 


more than 1,000 people are kiHed in 
accidehts along it evoy year and 
the carcasses of trades, buses and 
cars lie on the verge, “resting Eke 
fossils in the exact petition.' in- 
which their accidents lot them." 

The book opens with some ratt- 
er gruesome descriptions of the tal- 
ent for political assassinatxm inln- 
dia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and 
Afghanistan. It is, he says, “an. ad- 
vanced art characterized by grandi- 
ose thenxs of betrayah revenge and 
collective struggle . . political 

killers in modem South Asia often 
stalk their victims with fanatical : 
commitment" 

In a-wretched north Indian vil- 
lage railed Chopra, dose to China, 
Cofl investigates and takes apart 
the failure of JL World Bank pro- 
gram of deforestation. He cranes id 

fc conclusion that the villager^ 
Eke everyone dse, wanted to im- 
prove thdr krt as quickly as possi-. 
ole, and were wiUmg to wodc very 
hard to do so. Neither the bank nor 


governments n eff rr v f d .able to bdp • .iebd in mouldy boots and then be 
■ • inhered With a sort of whoosh info 


meet that a^xrairan: 


After a journey to viskjpoor is- a carpeted dnsdess -digital studio 
lanHww of R*r>jriaHe«h vmni have Uinkmg with mixers, dnbbezs and 


just surwved a hurricane, he^PStes^ stadcsof amplifiers. Young Afghan 
‘The West fedspityfra ^eseppo-x mea wfrJougbeards. Mamicctefi, 
pie: If It values coaragc arid deter- and duty-free watches sat at me 
wmmtib n~ What ■ i f vmght in fed is cootrols exuding thc confidcnt air 
respecL” .... , . ... of^MO^t^oammanders.” - -, k 

. Coll spends a. 'considerable Bat this, is not just a book of 
amnmit nf rfTrirt Mnd.iiiynnity'trf- trat^ aW tiie stOrieS of CoITs aS- 

- trying to <Esoovectbrjxnsous°wlty aguments for The Washington 
tbcrfeiiii carrying GtacraJ^ , cte . Post Tt is also a dtiQed wont of 
Pakistani leader andtifetii^U: ^ ' reportage Woven through witirhis- 
ainhawador, .AmrdtfeTx. Jtiph cfc. . ioricaj and political analysis. Cofl 

: l^i9ln 4S^%stis>|^om- s^sthebrai^meamtotcacci^ 
sraracy and goes ori aorinten^&m- ' fiw^ kliosyncrafic, entertamihg 
d duwe after a man . who nnghlOr aBdinR^thos^ldn^iKiatb 
nngjit not toebo a turned out 

■■■ 

- Cofl ha« fnh o^f mg^ ^^<^nara^gof^ , ' •Jwijsst the {ndhcr '&f 

Western ^S?&shcmer7jCltiD^o> Nixon md 

beliefs -r in the sm^iiqKpFithe,- <Se Destruction of Cambodia ” and 

■ Mig ahk^^yraTw^tilif feSp iip Ride," wrote tfSp 

barren sttirwe&s M ,fa?^Washbi&oiiPesL 

r '• v " r - - ' - •• * 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Every Book 


TheNew Ywk Tfae* 

Tte Gu a based oa icporti ham nun Ibu 
iOOO bootswrea tfnocglww ibc United Saa*. 
Weds on Esi are not Deceoarib eonmitnc. 


1 DISCLOSURE, by WOdud 

C d cfa tc n 

2 ACCIDENT, by Domdk 

Sued L- 

3 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 

SON COUNTY, by Robert 
James Waller 

4 SLOW WALTZ IN CEDAR 
BEND, by Robert James Wal- 

5 FATAL CURE, by Robin 

Cook : 

6 FAMILY BLESSINGS, by U 
Vvric Spe ncer 

7 LIKE WATER FOR CHOC- 
OLATE, by Lain Esqnbd _ 

8 BAD LOVE, by Jonathan Kd- 

9 HONOR BOUND, by W. E. 

B. Griffin 

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Aflfl rrmt T ^ 13 •• i 

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HA, by Roddy Dqyie ------- . y 1 

JvopffTCnqN y : 

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LIGH T, by Betty J.EatSe— I 41 

2 THE BOOK OF VIRTUES, 

- Wffliam r. Beunett 2 9 

3 SOUL MATES, by TbooMS 

Moon ;.-: — w r _ . , ■ ■ 2— 4- 

4 THE HIDDEN. LIFE OF ‘ 
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5 WOULDN'T TAKE NOTH- 
ING FOR MY JOURNEY^ 

NOW. by Maya Angdon 5 20 

« HAYING OtlR S®Tby Sa- 
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13 PRIVATE PARTS, by flow- 

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BRIDGE, by Naomi Judd 10. 

UA HISTORY OF GOD, by 
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ADVICK, HOW-TO 
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Fan i iu i— •- — ■— 1 1 . JT 

2 MEN ARE FROM MARS, 
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3 STOP THE INSANITY! by > 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1994- 


Page 5 


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i Hong Kong Chief 

! Steps Up Pressure 

: Electoral Plans Nearing Vote 


, By Kevin Murphy. 

, International Herald Tribune 

• HONG KONG — Confident 
■ that IeglsTatoBwQlpass ius Tess- 
i comroveraal proposals for demo- 
« craiac change, Chris . Patterii the 
, HongKoog goverara, roUfcaanaly 
< announce a second hQl on Friday 
; containing the measures that have 
J most deeply angered Chma. 

• The British Sony’s kgiskture 
! win vote Wednesday on the less- 
i controversial - r efe uai bHt, which 

J also is opposed hy Chiia. Govern^ 

i meat radio repealed Tuesday Hint 
i the colony's highest advisory body, 
j (he Executive Council, had ap- 
i proved Mr. Patten's derision to 
i farce lawmakers to begin consider- 
| ing the second bilL 
i That bin contains steps that wDl 
^significantly- broaden the voting 
base for future elections, and which 
China finds even more unaccept- 
able than the first ML ' 

The legislative activity — and 
with Britain widely expected to 
'"’make public on Thursday its ver- 
sion of fruitless negotiations with 
^Beijing — promises to bring to a 
- eftmaj a bitter dispute that has 
'dragged on for 16 months. 

•• “What we will be debating 
Wednesday is chicken feed in trams 
: of real democracy,” said Christine 
-Lob, an independent member of 
"the Legislative CoundL “But it is a 
- historic moment for Hong Kong.” 
China first ignored, then at- 
tacked electoral proposals- first 


rode by Mr. Patten in October 
*992 that it says contravene earlier 
agreements with Britain over the 
transfer oT sovereignty and Hong 
Kong's future political system. 

Asserting that Britain is seeking 
to -contmue its influence in the col- 
cay after 1997, Bepog has threat- 
ened to disband the legislative 
Conned and .any other change 
with which it does not agree. 

In .17 rounds of negotiations, 

. Britammid China had crane dose 
to agreement on lowering Hong 
Kong’s voting age to 18, abolishing 

. . appointive membership . to lo cal 
mumdpal government bodies and 
instituting a one-seat, one- vote for- 
mat for the seats in', the 60-seat 
Legislative Council that will be 
chosen by direct election. These 
provisions are in the first bOL 
The two sides remained far apart 
on iberizs of nine new functional 
, constituencies, electorates orga- 
nized along professional and trade 
group lines that cover most -work- 
ers, and the composition <rf an elec- 
toral committee that will select 10 
legislators in 1995 ejections, the 
last under British rule. These are in 
the second bOL 

Mr. Patten's decision to legislate 
on the so-called simple points, a 
bid io hasten discussion of more 
controversial proposals, prompted 
a collapse in the talks. - 
■ EmAia to Camilla Furling 
The expdusof Hong Kong peo- 
ple to Canada has peaked and is 


France and U.K, Retain 
Reprocessing Program 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Japan's reported ded- 
-sion to slow down its nuclear fuel 
■ cycle leaves France and Britain as 
the only two countries strongly 
-commitled to re processing reactor 
fad, rather than storing thespent 
•fad rods aboveground. . . 

' But Britain’s bid to start opera- 
tions at its Thermal Oxide Repro- 
; Plant at Seflafidd has been 
in doubt by a legal challenge 
i a local government and by me 

- Greenpeace environmentalist mga- 
‘mzation. 

;• France operates two^uchiqjio- 
!ccssmg units at a huge fariBty just 
.outside of Cherboorg, The plants 
separate highly fissile waste prod- 
,ucts from spent uraninm foef rods 
•and seal them inter glass blocks far 
eventual buriaLAbqqt 3 percent of 
the rods areL unusable waste. The 
-rest is convened back into reactar- 
•jrade uranium and a small quanti- 
rty of plmamam, which can be 
mixed together in a fud known as. 
Mox and reused in connnerdal re- 
actors. 

- France handles the wartefrom 
its more than 50 commercial reac- 
tors as well as spent fod rods from 
-foreign utilities, notably Japanese. 

ites a pilotreprocess- 
, _ i with French help is 

„ a plant modeled on the. 

French reprocessing facilities near 


Cherbourg. The Japanese derision 
to slow down tbe fud cycle appears 
to-pat this cooperation under 
threat, although to what extent was 
not dear on Tuesday night. 

Under the original agreement, 
Japan would have taken one-quar- 
ter of the 3,300-tcn processing 
market by the year 2000 , leaving 
half in French hands and the rest to 
Britain. 

In the United States,' former 
President Jimmy Carter turned 
down an appBcatiao to build a 
c ommer cial reprocessing plant on 
flic pounds that it woukf be uneco- 
nomic without massive subsidies. 
As a xesulvthc reactor rods from 
U.S. reactors are stored in huge 
tanks of water and allowed to cod 
for & generation or two. With the 
exception of Japan, Germany and 
some other countries -in Europe, 
virtually all the worid’s nndcai- 

qperating countries do the same as 
the United States. 

Japan’s derision also places a 
question marie over the future of 
the breeder-reactor, industry, ac- 
cording to nuclear experts. Breeder 
reactors produce more Aid, in the 
form of plutommn. than they bum. 
But France’s SuperphCnix fast- 
breeder reactor, once seen as a 
m odd- for the industry, has been 
plagued by questions about its 
safety, and concerns about prodfer- 
atinn . 


NUCLEAR: Delay by Japanese 


. j 




Continued from Page 1 

2050,” a senior government official 
involved in tbe debate said last 
week. “PofiticaBy, it is clear, that 
tins is not the time to be producing 
plutonium, shipping it around the 
world or storing itr 
The Clinton administration, 
fearful of adding to its tensions 
with Washington^ biggest ally in 
the Pacific, has never publicly op- 
posed Japan’s plans to build a sc- 
ries of hrodcr reactors, which both 
produce and consume pin ionium, 
gir the repnxxssdng'ceriters needed 
i(o convert nuclear waste. In fact, 
jfre nonproliferation policies issued 
by lhe White House last year gave a 
specific exemption to Japan’s pro- 
ject, and p reprocessing centers in 
England and France that depend 
heavily to Japan’s business. ' 
a But the Umted States halted its 
bwn breeder reactca program .15 

jreareagb,laigelytoslc^the^>read 
of bomb-grade materials. Ameri- 
can officials have made little secret 
oi their concern that Japan’s pro- 
would add tranoidonsW to 
of phrtonhim created by . 

silling of nuclear weapons 

in the former Soviet repubfics.. 
r While Japan’s plutonium is *Ye- 
>Sctor grade," meaning it is made 
Sot energy production instead of 
weapons, the National Academy of 
Sciences in the United States r»-._ 
rantly concluded that such material 

could be used to make a bomb, 
heightening the concerns that the 
[supplies could fall into the hands of 
■lerrorists or aspiring nudearstaies, 
including Iran, Iraq and Norm Ko- 
rea. 

- “The overall program is now 
seen as more trouble than, it -is 
worth, in terms of tbe money and 
the potitKS,” said Paul Leventhal, 
the president of tbe Nuclear Con- 
trol Institute, a group in Wastongr 
ton t hat has ted the lobbying. ™ort 
against Japan's plutonium plans. It 
E^pested instead^ that 

mmrium, which is far more difficult 
to him intonudear weapons. 

7 “The increasing .intonations!^ 
pressure because of the- program . 
Has created a perception abr<»d. 
that Japan is interested, i? P I ^ erv j 
ing the midear wrapons. opti«L 
Mr. Leventhal said. The Japanese 
government, he added* “is finding 
it more difficult 1 to blunt that per- 
ception.** 


While the wisdom of Jean’s en- 
eagy strategy has been widely de- 
bated abroad, tbe government -in 
Tokyohasdoneeverytirii®itcanto 
suppress open arguments that 
could stir a Japanese public when 
there is {sowing anti-nuclear senti- 
ment in Japan. But some J 
scientists are beginning to 
‘There are almost no 
marts an the issue,” 
xuo Furukawa of Tokai University 
wrote recently. With the govern- 
ment and same government-con- 
trolled nuclear institutes com- 
manding the research, money, he 
added, “there is no democratic di- 
mate, and the debate has created 
factions and aufboiftariaa tenden- 
cies.” 

- Nonetheless, as a study, conanis- 
sianhasworked in secret on Ja- 
pan's long-term energy plan, de- 
tails have gradually been l«wlrmg 
out Every week now Japanese 
news (Bganirathms are reporting 
that one element or another of the 


_ text month, fra instance, Japan 
wifl finally -activate a $5-b3noo 
. breeder reactor called Monju, 
named fa the Buddbist divinity of 
wisdom, several years behind 
schedule. The huge oomplex, on a 
remote pemnsala an tbe Sea of Jar 
pan, was digitally supposed to be 
■ the first of a serira otbreedm that 
would fundamentally change the 
nudempqwihdiBtryli^ * 
But Mcxgu win iw^ 
to run that the cansttnetian of a 

second reactor^ oiigaMlly planned 

to begin iniDMdiatriy, wfll now ap- 
parent^ not start until the. year. 
2000. ai the eariiesL * 

The program that' Japan is being 
fmwd to dday is already neariy 30 
years old. In 1966, encouraged by' 
the Unitod Stales, Japan adopted a 
plan to buOd a series of Tweedef 
reactors around the ommtiy sad 
become a leader is the tedmmogy. 
It seotmdro make tremendous ect^ 

qronau mi^icrmritim woultFbe 
scaroe and^ cxperLave, making the 
high cost of recoveaing pluhmium 
from ^tent nuclear fad a relative 

baigain. ; 

■ Unfortunatdy for Japan’s indus- 

trial planners, tbe projections went 

wildly. asny.'Uramum; prices have 
phmfied, making the breeder reac- 
tras5 to 15 times more expensive to 
run . than conventional nuclear 
power, plants.-: 



■M 

R.W. Tim/ABCDOr FriaosPtcoe 

NOT SO GREAT WALL OF CHINA — A worker dubbing 
onto a fence Tuesday bu3t by tbe Ztmhsd provincial anthoii- 
ties dong CIrina's border with tbe Portuguese territory of 
Macao. 'Hie fence is supposed to discourage iBegal emigriion 
of fanndreds of nDaqdoyed Odntwe into die foreign mare. 


UN Agency Sees No Progress 
On North Korea Inspections 


now set to dedrne as indicated by a tions for Canadian visas fell 10 per- 
reduction in tbe rate of new visa cent last year, a drop Canadian 
applications, Reuters reported officials attributed to concerns 
Tuesday from Hong Kong. about Canada's high imemploy- 

The rate of Hong Kong applica- meat, which stands at 1 1 percent 


Compiled fa Qur Sicrf Fmr, DispiZiix 

VIENNA — The United Nations nuclear safe- 
guards agency’ said Tuesday that it had no indication 
from North Korea that visas were on their way for its 
inspectors to visit suspect nuclear sites there. 

“There’s no confirmation of that." said a spokes- 
man for the In tenia tionai Atomic Energy Agency, 
following a statement to that effect by Secretary of 
State Warren M. Christopher. 

Earlier in Washington, Mr. Christopher said that 
“the inspectors either have or wil] soon have their visas 

logo to Norib Korea." 

“There seems to be a resolution of the immediate 
problem, that is the inspection of the seven sites will 
commence,” Mr. Christopher added. 

“I don’t have any reason to believe the North 
Koreans will not go ahead with the commitment they 
made,” 

But the inspection agency spokesman. David Kvd. 
said, “There is no such indication here in Mama by 
any side." 

He added it was “unlikely that anything will have 
moved by the time the board discusses the issue 
tomorrow, although of course we cannot exclude it" 

American and North Korean officials were to meet 
in New York late Tuesday to discuss the situation, the 
State Department said. The department spokesman. 
Mike McCrary, said Tuesday: “There’s a meeting at 
the usual level in New York today between the United 
Slates and North Korea. The purpose is toheip ensure 
that North Korea schedules these inspections at the 
earliest possible dare." 

The 3 5- member board of governors of the UN 
agency, meeting at its Vienna headquarters, is consid- 
ering bow to approach the issue after an apparent bid 
by Pyongyang to use the proposed inspections to 
extract diplomatic concessions from Washington. 

The United States and South Korea are trying to get 
•North Korea to open its nuclear rites to inspection 


ihrough a combination of carrot -and-siick measures, 
holding out the prospect of better relations or econom- 
ic sanctions. , ...... 

Bv offering diplomatic ties and economic help to the 
isolated and impoverished country, they hope to per- 
suade Pyongyang to abandon any ambitions it may 
harbor to become a nuclear power. 

After months of wrangling and attempts to limit the 
scope of the agency's inspections. North Korea said 
last week, it would open seven declared nuclear sites to 
inspection. But it has so far failed to issue visas for the 
inspection team and the agency board will soon face 
calls for action. 

Bui Pyongyang added a new hurdle over tbe week- 
end when it implied in a telex to the agency that the 
visits would go ahead only if the United States first 
resumed high-level talks and promised action on un- 
specified issues. 

This was promptly rejected by Washington, which 
said inspections must come first and talks later. 

“With no U5. formula to break the deadlock our 
board will have to address the issue,” Mr. Kyd said 
earlier on Tuesday. 

Tbe board was scheduled to discuss the situation on 
Wednesday, the last day of its meeting, after members 
had a chance to consult with their governments. 

The inspections would allow experts to make tests, 
change film in monitoring cameras and check seals at 
the sites, mostly at Yongbyon. 95 kilometers (60 miles) 
north of Pyongyang. 

North Korea's agreement with the inspection agen- 
cy and the United States does not include two other, 
sites that experts say are crucial to full knowledge 
about North Korea's nuclear capabilities. 

Gaining access to those sites is supposed to be a 
focus of the so-called third round of senior-level talks 
between the United States and North Korea. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


On f Hot’ Drink, 
Tokyo Stance 
1 $ Hands Off 

Agencc France-Prase 

TOKYO — The director of 
the Science and Technology 
Agency said Tuesday that a 
video containing a cartoon 
character drinking water con- 
taminated by plutonium was 
not suitable as a public health 
warning. 

But the director, Satsuki 
Eda. also indicated that he did 
not plan to ask the state-run 
company that issued tbe video 
to withdraw tL 

Mr. Eda said, *T don't think 
the situation requires me to 

give concrete instruction’* to 
the corporation. 

He was commenting on a 
request by the U-S. secretary 
or energy'. Hazel R. O'Leary, 
that Power Reactor & Nuclear 
Development Corp. withdraw 
the video because it understat- 
ed the danger of plutonium. 

She made the request in a 
letter dated Feb. 7 and sent to 
the company’s president, Ta- 
kao lshiwaiari, a company 
spokesman said. 

A spokesman for the com- 
pany said that it did not intend 
to withdraw the video, al- 
though it regretted that it had 
caused misunderstanding. 

“We did not mean to say 
plutonium is safe to drink,” 
the spokesman said. 



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INTERNATIONAL 



Sributt^ Yes, Help the Japanese to Design a Normal Country 

' ■* -*• & _ r, Mr Ozawa havi 


n i Bi I Ls>ii:o wrrn tiik nkw york toww ano tiik waniiiw.-ton nw 


New Russia in Trouble 


Russia’s economic transformation seems to 
be moving into a new and troubling phase. 
Both inflation and unemployment are rising, 
creating new burdens for a government that 
gives little sign of having any clear sense of 
direction. Now, in the third year of the post- 
Soviet era. many Russians are clearly weary of 
economic reform — while the Western de- 
mocracies have equally clearly lost much of 
their original enthusiasm for aiding it. 

The record of progress so Tar is mixed and 
chaotic. There have been solid achievements. 
Most prices have been freed, and markets are 
expanding. Privatization of state enterprises is 
moving along steadily, and some of them are 
doing well under their new owners. There is 
enough food; the starvation feared two years 
ago has not happened. But thane is a darker side 
as well. The transition away from communism 
has meant a severe drop in living standards for 
a great many — perhaps most — of Russia’s 
people. One out of every four now lives in 
poverty in a country that has no reliable system 
of public help for the aged and unemployed. 

Ominously, political paralysis is interfering 
with the remedies. An ideologically fragment- 
ed legislature seems incapable of enacting the 
basic laws of ownership and commerce neces- 
sary for health investment and growth. The 
government keeps stoking money desperate- 


ly into hopelessly unproductive factories, 
wasting the resources out of which a social 
safety net might be built 

Russians can properly complain that the 
West never told them about the two para- 
doxes contained in social democracy as prac- 
ticed in Europe and North America. The 
first is that it takes a lot of regulation to 
make a free market work. Where freedom 
merely means the absence of government 
intervention, the market is infested first by 
racketeers — the stage visible at present in 
Russia — and then by cartels. The second 
paradox is that a broad system of social 
protection and benefits is essential to make 
free enterprise work effectively. Otherwise 
the prospect of rapid economic change, de- 
stroying jobs for some people while creating 
them for others, is too terrifying to endure, 
and people will vote to hobble the whole 
threatening mechanism of economic growth. 

Many Russians now think dial they are 
seeing the emergence of a kind of free econo- 
my that means impoverishment for most of 
the population, while crime and the rackets 
flourish unimpeded by any public authority. 
That nightmare vision is probably becoming 
the greatest danger to the rise of genuine 
democracy in Russia. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Greece Is Out of Order 


There is something wrong with the Greek 
government’s sense of logic. 1 1 says it is afraid 
of chaos in the Balkans. It then slaps a trade 
embargo on its small northern neighbor, Mac- 
edonia, thereby threatening to widen the Bal- 
kan chaos. Since they broke away from ex- 
Yugoslavia, the Macedonians have struggled 
to build a new economy and keep the peace 
between their Slav majority and their Muslim 
minority. They have had some success, but the 
closing down Iasi week of their main link with 
the outside world, through the Greek port of 
Salonika, could knock them spinning. 

There is also something wrong with the 
Greek government's grasp of history. Its 
problem is not, as it claims, a fear that little 
Macedonia — a fifth of Greece's size in popu- 
lation, even less in economic power — might 
try a grab at the Greek province also called 
Macedonia. That could be dealt with by a 
border-respecting guarantee, which the Mac- 
edonians say they are ready to give. What the 
Greeks are really after is to stop Macedonia 
from calling itself Macedonia, because they 
say that is a “Greek" name. 

In fact, the Macedonians are entitled to 
share the name. The land they live in was part 
erf the ancient Macedonia of King Philip's 
time, which was at most fringe-Greek. (Phil- 
ip's army invaded and conquered classical 
Greece in 338 B-C.) Today’s Greeks are using 
bad history to pursue a pointless feud. 

The irony is that today's Greece bolds, until 
the middle of this year, the rota dug presiden- 
cy of the Enropean Union. Its EU partners are 
perturbed by wbal it is doing. 


They probably cannot order it to stop, 
unless it turns out that the barriers that 
Greece has imposed on trade with Macedo- 
nia violate EU trade law, as the European 
Commission warned in a statement issued in 
Brussels on Monday. Nor can they throw 
Greece out of the Union, even though they 
provide dose to a tenth of its national in- 
come. Once in that dub, you cannot be 
ejected, under present rules. Bat anger with 
Greece could show itself in other ways. 

One is economic. Greece runs a dangerous- 
ly large public-sector deficit, which seems set 
to expand sdll further even though the Grades 
have promised the EU to cut it. Starting this 
year, the Union has the power to announce 
publicly that a member country is fading to 
keep its economy in order — in effect, to 
declare the country un creditworthy. That 
would be a drastic tiring to do, but Greece's 
foreign policy may be making its partners less 
reluctant to be drastic in what they say about 
its economic policy. 

The other way is for Europe to address 
Greece's philorimo, its sense of dignity. The 
Greeks have a splendid history. They long to 
be respected by modem Europe. Their six- 
month presidency of the Union wOl come to 
its climax in a summit meeting on the island of 
Corfu, where the leaders of the rest of the 
Union are to be greeted by the elderly, ailing 
Andreas Pap apdre ou. If Greece is not behaving 
better by then, Mr. Papandieou should be told 
that his country is falling short of the standards 
of its own past and of Europe's future: 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Vietnamese to Go Home 


They first floated into the world’s con- 
sciousness in 1977, fishing boats crammed 
with desperate men, women and children flee- 
ing the hardships and persecutions of a newly 
united Communist Vietnam. They encoun- 
tered pirate attacks at sea and hostile recep- 
tions on nearby Asian shores. StQL nearly a 
milli on of these “boat people” eventually set 
sail, most in the late 1970s and early 1980s. 

That chapter of history has now been offi- 
cially closed by the office of the UN High 
Commissioner on Refugees. The United Na- 
tions’ refugee arm declared last week that 
fleeing Vietnamese would no longer be auto- 
matically eligible for consideration as politi- 
cal refugees; they will be judged on an indi- 
vidual bass like other applicants. Most of the 
60,000 boat people remaining in Asian refu- 
gee camps can now be legally sent back home. 

That is unwelcome news to the affected 
Vietnamese. But sending them home is no 
more cruel than leaving them to rot in refugee 
camps — if they can be assured of freedom 
from reprisals on their return. Asian coun- 
tries, fearing unemployment and ethnic con- 
flict, will not admit them as residents. And 
Western countries other than the United 
Stales have been almost equally unwelcoming. 

Although the world likes to pretend other- 
wise, the treatment that refugees receive al- 


ways has a lot to do with international politics 
and the current standing of their homeland. 
The Vietnamese exodus of the late 1970s 
shocked a world that bad been lulled by 
Hanot’s rosy — and false — postwar picture 
of liberation, peace and national recupera- 
tion. Vietnam is still a poor country and 
remains arbitrary in its treatment of those 
suspected of political nonconformity. Yet it 
offers more hopeful economic prospects and 
less systematic repression. 

It is also being officially welcomed back 
into the community of nations that isolated it 
during the long Indochina wars. Only this 
month, the United States finally dropped its 
19-year economic embargo. The Association 
of South East Asian Nations, once virtually 
an anti- Vietnamese alliance, now weighs ac- 
cepting Hanoi as an associate member. 

International taw defines a refugee fairly 
strictly. Most people trying to escape poverty 
and dictatorship do not qualify, only those 
who can demonstrate a “well-founded fear of 
persecution." International agencies like the 
office of the UN High Commissioner on Refu- 
gees have a dual mandate: to protea legitimate 
refugees and to organize their return home after 
it becomes safe to go back. For Vietnam, that 
moment now seems to have arrived. 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Beyond Nonproliferation 

The international regime, and U-S. policy 
in particular, must move beyond the strategy 
of manag ing proliferation to one of active 
denuclearization — capping arsenals and 
moving toward their elimination, and revers- 
ing the incentives to obtain nuclear weapons, 
in addition to discouraging commerce in criti- 
cal materials and technologies. 

The World Bank and the International Mon- 
etary Fund have already derided to condition 
credit upon the willingness of many developing 
nations to curb military spending; if aid agen- 


cies and private lenders in the developed world 
applied a amilar standard, regional security 
anxieties, and therefore incentives to acquire 
nudear weapons, could be reduced. Prompt, 
consistent intervention against aggressors by 
international military action could counter and 
deter wars. International punitive measures 
might be adopted against any nation that used 
nudear arms against a non-nuclear weapons 
state. A multinational nuclear deterrent force 
might eventually provide a '‘last resort’* guar- 
antee against nudear attack. 

— Peter Gray, in a ", Briefing Book on 
the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons." 



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T OKYO — Bill Clinton is being censured 
for masting that numbers be attached to 
a trade agreement with Japan. Why should an 
administration ostensibly devoted to liberal- 

3 the Japanese economy put so much 
asis on specific import targets that play 
into the hands of bureaucrats? 

The simple answer is that it is not playing 
into the hands of Japan's bureaucrats — quite 
the contrary. And the history of trade friction 
with Japan has shown that only concrete objec- 
tives will make trade agreements meaningful 
President Clinton’s derision noi to sign a 
window-dressing deal with Prime Minister 
Morihiro Hosokawa has in fact ended a quar- 
ter-century or mutual deception and sell -de- 
ception. removing a source or bitterness that 
eats away at U ^.-Japanese relations. 

And, contrary to predictions, it has not 
undermined the “fragile reformist" Hoso- 
kawa coalition government. 

Foreigners need to keep reminding them- 
selves that Japan's elected politicians do not 
run the country. Bureaucrats from the Ministry 
of International Trade and Industry and the 
Ministry of Finance have always been the key 
players in trade negotiations. The Hosokawa 
government is more dependent on the bureau- 
crats than any since World War IL 
When it was formed, a senior official in the 
Finance Ministry felt free to remark publicly 
that whatever the new government had in 
□rind, he and his colleagues would continue to 
do what they thought was best for Japan. It 
was the bureaucrats who stopped Mr. Ho- 
sokawa from going along with specified trade 
targets this time, because their sole experience 
with them was extrem ely un pleasant. 

In the early 1980s, MTTL working hand in 
glove with the industrial associations, encour- 
aged Japan’s leading electronics firms to over- 
build horrendously in order to wrest control 
of the semiconductor industry from the Ameri- 
cans. But after the setraconductor agreement of 
1986, reserving 20 percent of the Japanese 
market for American manufacturers, they had 
to “betray" their constituents with instructions 
to buy from these same Americans. 

Recent developments have placed the bu- 
reaucrats in the novel position of being stron- 
ger yet more vulnerable. The longest econom- 
ic slowdown since the war. and tens of billions 
of dollars in uncoil ectable debts, have left 
many financial institutions bankrupt by Amer- 
ican standards, effectively rendering them 
wards of the Finance Ministry — winch thus 
has greater control over allocating credit than 
at any time since the early postwar re c ove r y. 

At the same time, the bureaucrats have to 
contend with genuine if sporadic, scrutiny by 
the establishment press. And they can no long- 
er hide behind cozy arrangements with heayy- 
wrights of the liberal Democratic Party, which 
had to make way for Mr. Hosakawa’s coalition 
in July after 38 years as an official facade. 

And the economic bureaucrats are no long- 
er succeeding with the remedies that pulled 
Japan out of other postwar recessions. 

The two most important bureaucratic tools 
for miming the economy are the systematic 
transfer of wealth from Japanese households 
to Japanese industry and the use of exports to 
pull the economy out of cyclical troughs. 

For decades, Japanese f amili es put up with 
substandard wages and rigged, eye-popping 
prices for essentia] goods from food to bcus- 


By Karel van Wolferen and R. Taggart Murphy 


ing — partly because they had no nhmVe . and . . He put it this way: '^Without bureaucratic 

partly because the Japanese system provided reform, theJapanesc people will never be able 

predictable increases m income while gnaran- to enrich their lives, and Japan’* trading part- 

teeing relative job security. Bat there have hers will be forced into 2 protectionist stance 
been no real gains; in puntitasing power in- , m order to compete: It is rime for the Japa- 
years, and many Japanese worry that so- .' wsse bureaucracy to abandon protectionism, 
called lifetime employment is doomed. and in Older 10 accomplish this goal, a tough. 

Meanwhile, the days of economic growth ' : intcomprcamsing .negotiating, position [from 
fueled by exports appear lo be over. Japan’s President Cfinton] is welcome.* _ . ' 
Share of the global economy is now so large . - Hsewhere in-the world, rapid technological 
that the rest of the world is less and less alrfe change and - economic, globalization nave , 


to pay for exports — particularly so when 
most other countries want to send their own 

n^^admi^^rators find itffiajJ? to acctptf" 

Today, by standard economic criteria, Ja- 
pan is in the midst of a deflation. Sot tire 
standard remedy — putting money in peo- 
ple’s pockets — would imperil the bureaucra- 
cy’s control over the economy, so it is doing 
precisely the reverse. It is extracting every yea. 
it can from already hard-hit households. It is 
raising every price over which it has direct 

It Um the interest of both 
countries for Americans to 
send unambiguous signals 
that Japan’s traditional ways 
of directing its economy 
are no longer acceptable. 

control: expressway tolls, postal rates, taxi 
and subway fares, utility fees. It is bolding the 
coalition government’s feet to the fire until 
the deeply unpopular consumption tax is 
raised from 3 to 7 percent. 

While bureaucrats are busy raising prices 
to prop up the stock market and strengthen 
bank balance sheas, they cannot be expected 
to accede to American demands that threaten 
their control over the econo my . 

From inside and outside Japan, one bears a 
growing chorus of voices imploring them to 
surrender such control, to free prices and to 
let the market work. But the free market 
champions underestimate the likely costs of 
getting from here to there: bank failures, 


forced national governments to letm^or com- 
panks fad, to restructure their financial sys- 
tems and to endure the heavy social and pofm- 
cal costs of redeploying people and capital. The 
central message from Americans to d» Japa- 
nese should be that tiirir country can no Icmger 
remain the only industrial power that expects 
to avoid these costs or shift them abroad: • . 

And the . Americans treed to emphasize, 
sympathetically but forcefully, that only 
elected politicians with the unambiguous 
right to role have the. legitimacy to impose 
and deal with stich costs. " 

Japan’s ad min ist ra tors are’ generally capa- 
ble and responsible people. But in fulfilling 
what they sec as then- msant — defending 
the interests, of their own. bureaucracies 

againtf jury changes that might harm those 

institutions — - none of them looks after Ja- 
pan's overall long-term national interest. . 

The Mmistiy of Financeis more concerned 
about taring its tight control over the budget 
than about Japan's perilously long recession. 
Mm is more woriied about the headache of 

carrying out modest Amoican trade requests 
than about the dangers of Japanese mdntfry 
losing its major markets. 

. A policy-making apparatus that serves the 
nation’s interest, rather than the’ bureaucra- 
cies’,. could gradually emerge if tbe Hosokawa 
coalition aim its main s up po rter s succeed in 
restr u ct uri ng the political system. The coali- 
tion government has earned die label ‘‘re- 
formist” mainly through its program of re- . 
vam ping the electoral system to riimwiidi 


co r»r Mr Hosokawa and Mr. Ozaw have - 

seriously challenging H* P oaboo,L ;_.: . 

If there is a threat, it comes r 

bureancracy — which, white often 
^^Sosed ranks to bnng tom • 

dans who try to interfere. -. . . __ - ■» 

Anoflw misconception ts tbW-pressne rat 
lfce bureaucrats endangers the . 

alhion-Infact, it does the reverse. ndtoriGure; . 
adrannstrattHShave drifted l couisejfflly Uj-- 
face of overwhelming evidence J^.th e ad.5 
jrtM52K> longer 


fragments. Furthermore, no bureaucrat any- 
where surrenders power voluntarily, and Ja- 
pan’s are not about to be tbe first 

But this is no reason for Washington to give 
up.it is in the interest of both countries for 
Americans to send unambiguous signals, by 
deeds rather than empty admonitions, that 
Japan’s traditional ways of directing its eco- 
nomy are no kroner acceptable. 

Such actions should not be construed as 
Japan-bashing. Very senior members of tbe 
Japanese political elite have often told us 
privately that Japan must make vast rhangwi 
m its pohticaJ economy if it is to havea secure 
future To say so in public would be very bad 
form, but one Welfare Ministry bureaucrat, 
Masao Miyamoto, does speak his mind in 
newspaper articles and best-selling books. 


are brown to espouse, is political oversght 
over the ruling bureaucracy. 

In the words erf the arcnitect of tte coali- 
tion, Ichiro Ozawa, Japan must become “a 
normal country." This is a Herculean task, 
riven the monopoly over vital information 
that the Japanese bureaucracy enjoys. 1 .‘ 

. The Clinton administration has what may 
be America's last opp or t unit y to bdp Ova-, 
haul Japan's economic structure, by identify- 
ing and supporting the forces that want to . 
torn Japan into a "normaT country. Ulti- 
mately, this is of far greater importance than ■ 
the ups and downs of Japan's trade surplus. 

Economists point out that the overall trade 
numbers area fuhetibu of Afferent levels of 

question of "why Japan’s savingsare sbhi&h.' 
They are a direct product <rf bureancratic 
management of the economy. 

Other misconceptions could hamper U.S. 
efforts to help Japan reform. A prevalent one 
is the image of a -Hosokawa government . 
‘hanging on by its teeth.” Japanese party . 
politics has been in great flux forTO months, 
resulting in spectacular drifts and splits, but 


. pmauAAouj m J fjul Japan. ■ 

. -Tbe howls from MTIT bureaicrats m recent .• 
trades indicate that WasfajngiO ft has be en ay • 
the right track. History’s most successful pracr * 
tiddlers of managed, trade are accuang. the 
• Americans of rmmn S l ' n g trade, because they : 
know that this is the only way of xnovmg Japan . 

toward “normal ootffltij status. v 1. „ 

What would it mean for Ja pan to be a 
normal country? Among other thmgSy-everyy 
fourth or fifth car an the road, would be non- • 
Japanese. Most medicines in Japan wem be, \ 

. American or European imports. because. at - 1 - 
most afl Western j&annaoenticals are better 
and cheaper. Sony television sets and Nissan : 

. cars would be full of America^ ^Geraaan'and 

Korean parts. Owners of a nomber. of compa- 
nies in "strategic" Japanese industries, to use 
a woitf Moved by Mm, would live. re places 
like Hong Kong, B San Jose and Amsterdam- 
■ Japan's administrators are accustomed U> ■ • 
American bluster with no f oQow^up. The worst , 
thing that could happen now would be for the - 
Cfiwnn administration to give the impressxm..’:.. 
that it speaks loudly and carries a twig, - 
At the same time, the administration , 
should resist the temptation to punish' Japan, 
by driving up thc valne of the yen, thereby ' 
making. Japanese exports unprofitable. Tms - 
substitute zor a Japan policy may temporarily - 
mask underiymg problems, but in the end ion - . 
makes those problems worse. 

A large segment of tbe Japanese bureaucra-'~. 
cy, while not exactly welcoming a stronger / 
yen, prefers it to any other means of reducing 
Japan's intractable surpluses. The suffering . . 
that it causes in corporate Japan can be pro- - 
sen ted as something for which America ^must 
be blamed, rather thanasa consequence of . 
bureaucratic control over the economy. 

If the United States fails to help Japan 
become a “normal country,” the bureaucrats 
aid thar coiporateoousins will be driven ty 
die Inevitable soaring yen to extend their ' 
eeoBonric apparatus ana-methods to much of 
. Asia. This would at minimum widen Amen- . 
ca’s trade deficit with Japan to one with the/ 
whofe region, ft would endanger America's 
remainin g influence in Asia!. And it might . 1 
provoke great unrest when Asian countries- 
resist economic- control by Tokyo — when , 
they resist wfcatMCn refers to as flying; in a . 
farmtfioD of geese led by Japan. 


.. Karel van fyatferen, author of “The Enigma - 
' ef Japanese Power,” is president of die Insti- 
lute for Independent Japanese Studies. R. 


Idjapan. Is writing d book on die 015;* 
Japanese fhuntciaLnkitiojuhip. They contrib- 
uted this comment to The New York Times. 


Make Russia’s Long-Term Assets Serve Short-Term Progress 


N EW ORLEANS — American 
policy toward Russia has col- 
lapsed. Russia 15 becoming a capitalist 
country, but it is becoming an under- 
developed capitalist country. Russia is 
moving down into the Third World. 

As inflation destroys the security 
and savings of the middle dass, na- 
tionalists develop “stab-in-the-back" 
theories (The bankers! The liberals! 
The Jews!). Russia has undergone a 
revolution, but the substance of the 
dd regime remains entrenched. 

Like Weimar Germany, Russia is 
in effect bang faced to accept the 
loss of enormous stretches of territo- 
ry inhabited by millions of Russian 
citizens to weak and poorly organized 
states on its frontiers. 

But in reality Weimar Germany 
was much better situated than Wei- 
mar Russia. With the conspicuous 
exception of a handful of technologi- 
cally superb industrial processes. 
Russia’s manufacturing plaint is years 
— decades — behind world levels. Its 
bankers and managers have only the 


By Waller Russell Mead 


most rudimentary ideas about how to 
operate in the global economy. 

Russia remains, in short, a back- 
ward country (bat faces cruel choices 
in a world that has little use for it • 

Since Russia will remain for the 
foreseeable future distinctly less at- 
tractive to foreign investment than its 
Asian neighbors, it seems doomed to 
lag ever further behind the dynamic 
societies of the Pacific Rim. 

Given Russia’s demographic weak- 
ness in Asia — about 30 million Rus- 
sians living in Siberia and the Rus- 
sian Far East compared with more 
than a billion Chinese — it faces a 
long-term Pacific crisis that is infi- 
nitely more serious, and touches U.S. 
interests mud) more directly, than its 
troubles on its western frontiers. 

The West’s response to this situa- 
tion has been worse than di smal Tbe 
program or aid, reconstruction and 
support for democracy that remains 
the official position of the West was 


funded at derisory levels, and most of 
tbe funding has never materialized. 
Yet the West seeks to bind Russia by 
threats to deny or dday this pittance; 
tries to impose an unworkable territo- 
rial settlement on Russia and exalts 
itself for the generosity of its impulses. 

This is not policy; it is foOy on the 
grand scale — lure the fc% that 
bought Hitler to power in Weimar 
Germany and then sought to appease 
him. It is also foDy that is eerily retrac- 
ing the miserable steps by which the 
West egged Croatia and Bosnia on to 
defy tbe Serbs and then abandoned 
those oountries to partition and worse. 

Ukraine’s boundaries with Russia 
are plainly arbitrary; without an ef- 
fective Western security guarantee 
backed by bases and troops, they are 
unsustainable. The West wfll not pro- 
vide those guarantees, but it lacks the 
moral courage to draw the conse- 
quences from this undeniable fact. It 
temporizes, whispers sweet words in 


Ukraine's ear, encourages its leaders 
in their policy- of idiotic. and futile 
defiance; and never tells Ukraine the 
things it needs to hear: tharTts inde- 
-pendcnce depends on Russian accep- 
tance of its independence, that the 
outside world wflf not tift rfingfer (0 
save it, and that if temtarial cooces- 
rions in Crimea mid in the east will 
reconcileHussia to Ukrainian hide- ' 
penitence, then tbe sooner those con- 
cessions are made the better. . 

Yesterday the West could not be 
this honest with itself or with the 
Bosnians. Today it is fading the same 
elementary test in Ukraine. 

The West has created a situation in 
Russia that rewards enemies and 
weakens friends, like the fatuous 
British .and French diplomats of the 
*20s and *30s who humiliated Wei- 
mar’s democrats and then fa wned be- 
fore HBter, it is harsh and stern .to 
p^Wcsterapolitisiass in places like 
Russia and Serbia, and it criages be- 
fore the nltranatirmalisCE. 

If Vladimir Zhirinovsky became 


president <rf Russia tomorrow, tbe 
. Wesi would treat him better than it 
treats Boris Yeltsin. It might cut off 
tbe teken aid that Mr. Ydlstn receives, 

• but ir. wcmld listen to Russia more 
carcfdBy and respect itsnational inter- . 
estsmore scmpidonsfythannow.lt is, 
m other wards. wiHing to appease ene- 
. mies and unwiUmg to assist friends. 

Persistent illusions and self-deceit 
have alrrady cost America incalcula- 
ble prestige and goodwill in Russia. 
Increasing numbers of Russians, peo- 
ple who initially looted to it in a 
.spirit of trust, have lost faith in its 
ability to Mp them, and many are 
beginning to doubt its intenti ons. 

Helping Russia mil cost money — 


Ingestion for Hong Kong, Indigestion for Beijing 


H ONG KONG — That the sound 
and fury of the “disagreement" 
between Britain and China signify 
nothing was first divined by the Hong 
Kong stock market about six months 
ago. when there ceased to be any 
relationship between tbe political 
temperature and movements in the 
market. The Hong Kong masses had 
long before lost interest in the repeti- 
tive polemics of the two sides. 

The supposed climax to this squal- 
id story begins this Wednesday when 
the legislature of the British colony 
votes on a limited democratic reform 
Ml proposed by Chris Patten, the 
governor. It is his stake in history to 
the moral high ground. Beijing has 
again warned Hong Kong that come 
1997 it will disband tbe territory's 

three tiers of government if the legis- 
lature approves tile reform package. 

Tbe brutal suppression of the pro- 
democracy movement in China in 
1989 brought a million people onto 
the streets of Hong Kong to protest 
on several occasions. While public 
opinion polls show- that a majority 
supports the Patten proposals, it is a 
safe bet that virtually no one in the 
territory win be clamoring either for 
or against more democracy. Most 
people in Hong Kong want to do 
nothing to provoke China and pre- 
cipitate the premature arrival of the 
dreaded People’s Liberation Army. 

The masses of Hong Kong under- 
stand that the real drama lies not in 
electoral fiddles but in the coming 
collision between an authoritarian 
China and a semi-Wesiernized 
Hong Kong. Almost no one in the 
colony believes in the "one counify, 
two systems" principle enshrined in 
the Chinese- British Joint Declara- 
tion on Hong Kong. 

It is simply a convenient fig leaf 
behind which both Britain ana Chi- 
na hide. Its embrace enables Britain 
to avoid charges of a sellout, while 
China can assert that Hong Kong 
people have nothing to fear as their 


By George Hicks 


life-stvle will not be threatened by 
the Chinese takeover. 

In China, however, ideological 
“honesty" still shines through. Qin 
Wenjin. a deputy director of the New 
China News Aggncy, said recently 
that Hong Kong, after 1997, would 
become “purely an internal matter of 
China." To Beijing, tbe post- 1997 
status of Hong K ong will be no dif- 
ferent from that of Tibet or any other 


territory under Chinese sovereignty. 

Tbe success of Hong Kong and of 
economic reforms in China in tbe last 
15 years is rooted in an odd political 
and economic relationship. Although 
they are physically dose and eco- 
nomically complementary, there is a 
political legal and cultural divide 
(hat can never be bridged. 

U i$ this combination of closeness 
and apartness that gives the Hong 
Kong-China relationship its unique 
creative tension. Tbe colony has 
provided the capital entrepreneur- 
ship. technology, marketing and in- 
frastructure essential for the success 
of China’s reforms, while Hong 
Kong, without Oiina. would not be 
a major international city. Once this 
crucial dement of apartness is de- 
stroyed, as it will be in 1997, Hong 
Kong and China are likdy to be mill- 
stones around each other's necks. 

The first problem to be overcome 
is the colony’s difficult transition to 
Communist rule. Forty months from 
now, a free society will be banded 
over against the will of the great ma- 
jority to a country with one of the 
world's worst human rights records. 
This transition has to be worked by 
sleight of hand, using the hollow slo- 
gan of “one country, two systems" 

China's economy works, after a 
fashion, without the rule of law. an 
independent judiciary or a free press. 
Bui a is an illusion to think that the 
finely tuned, modern service econo- 
my of Hong Kong will do the same. 


With subsistence wages, manufac- 
turing and agriculture can boras in a 
corrupt environment. Financial ser- 
vices and most other sectors of Hong 
Kong’s economy cannot. If they are 
lost, the alternative win be to bring 
bade tbe man of scarring industry that 
has moved from Hoag. Kong to Chi- 
na. The territory would then be sees 
as a drag on the mainland's economy. - 
The most important con s equence 
of tbe absorption of Hong Kong by 
China will be political It will grve a 
tremendous push to tbe centrifugal 
forces that already threaten to tear 
China apart. By rar tbe most power- 
ful of these independent regions is 
Guangdong, tbe southern Chinese 


been Hoi® Kang’s role as a safety 
valve. Florida performed a similar 
function for CommnmttCubaby pro- 
viding Ctiban dissidents witii bom orit. 
and voice, indirectly enahfing the re- 
gime of Eidd Castro to survive. 

After 1997, the Hong Kong safety . 
valve will no longer exist. Thousands 
of pxtHtebocracy critics in - Hong . 
Kang— people like Martin Lee; Szeto 
Wah, EmBy Lao, Christine Loh and 
Anna- Wn - — wfll -be-inade- fl^tnn/ 

Even injaa they would prove a&tiun-. • 
blesonae for tbe Chinese axnboritits as ’ 
Aung San Sun Kyi is for the Burmese. 


now on tbe table. The “Marshall 
Plan" concept is dead. We either 
seek alternatives or harvest the frtxits 
of the politics of paranoia in a coun- 
try with thousands of nuclear war- 
heads. Why not try lend-iease? 

Why not give Russia the money it 
needs in exchange for some tangible 
quid pro quo — like F ranklin Roo- 
sevelt when he loaned Britain 50 
destroyers in exchange for long- 
term leases on military bases? 

Mr. Yeltsin once proposed West- 
ern leases on Russian oil lands to pay 
the fo reign debt. On a recent trip 
across Siberia. I found surprising lev- 
ds. of interest among Russian offi- 
cials and analysts In proposals in-' 
chiding a “Hong Kong sdution" for 9 
the region around Vladivostok. 

It should not be a task surpassing 
human ingamity to. find ways 
wbnfi Russia’s long-term assets— it* 


natural resources, ns earmhg':pow9 
-—.can be brought to bear 00 4 


• '■ >7- '. 

771^ writer i'.d. senior adviser . bf rtf 
World Policy Institute* is completing 


wildly out of controL 
A powerful new alliance against 
Beijing between Hong Kong and 
Guangdong, tinted by common eco- 
nomic interests and tbe Cantonese 
dialect, is sure to develop. The foun- 
dations are already in place. A Bei- 
jing that can bardy control tbe pe- 
riphery now would regard inclusion 
of Hong Kong in the Guangdong 
camp as the final straw. 

It is ironic that Hong Kong, under 
British rule; has always given Beijing 
the best of all possible worlds: vast 
economic gain, political neulraBfy 
and no responsibility. But once Hong 
Kong is Beijing's responsibility, Chi- 
na will find itself with the worst of aO 
worlds: an economic burden, a politi- 
cal thorn, a cultural contaminant and 
a threat to the very nnily of China. 

in gaining physical control of the 
temioiy. China will necessarily de- 
stroy crucial functions that Hoag 
Kong has performed. These include a 
bridge to the outside world, a conduit 
for capital and ideas, and a training 
ground for mainbnders. More ab- 
stract but also of vital importance has 


ofto^’S ^enaeth.CehtJ^PnS^ 

^ ^ ■ ■ . .]• ■ 

m OUR PAGES: 100, 75 A3VD 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: ADifficahDebnt 

PARIS — It is a long time rince any 
Paris theatre has bran the scene of- 
soch scandalous incidents as took - 
place yesterday evening [Feb. 22] in 
the Opfcra-Comiqne. The cause of the 
scandal was the debut of MUe. Jane 
Harding in M. Saim-Sains’ opera 
“Fhymk” Mile. Harding has up to 
the present been better known as a 
leader oT the demi-monde than as an. 

operatic star. Tbe moment xhc actress 

made her appearance on. the stage, 
whistling, hisses and . catcalls were 
beard on all sides, followed by. a 
shower Of dead rabbits, fish, cab- 
bages^ eggs and vegetables. At the 
end of tbe first act, one lady dedared: 
“She took my husband from me and 
spent ray fortune. Nobody dull pre- 
rat ptehtssing"Ker pff me stage.” 


1919: B^6cvist 5 B Arrest 

LONDON ^Tbc “DaflyExpressT . 

.ondoriands tiat^cotland Yard d* \ windows 

..tectives of tte Branch Iasi ,. shaKifyS 


?*ght made another sensational arrest 
in connection with the activities of 
the Bolshevist agents in Great Brit- 
£to_ The arrested man is an .alien 
whose name is stated to be Marx. In 
w cd-flte ffiscoveries made by the 
Paris police following the attempt to 
?»assmate M. Clemencean. tbeBrit- 
isn authorities, are taking drastic ac- 
tion with afl suspicious “undeara- 
bles'~ in -this country. 

1944: Sweden Bombed 

STOCKHOLM — [From our New 
York edition: j Bombs from “foreign 
Ptones". fell in Stockholm tonight 
[Fd>. 22] for the first lime in the war. 
and the official Sweetish news agency 
raid citizens of the’ neutral capital 
wrcin a “panic mood" The bombs 
landed m an open-air theater in 
^fcrnStockh^m and iit rhe town 
or 5i™nas; just west of Stock- 
.jperaems were reported 
MJcd or injured, but thousands of 
widows were said to have beeo 
shattered by the explosions. 








IN TERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WE DNESDAY. FEBRUARY 23, 1994 

OPINION 


Page 7 



Contain the War in Bosnia 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


N EW YORK. —How did ii 
that the West finds itself 




if poUu- ... 

• cally, militarily and economically at > 

■ war against one side hi a three-sided " 

war in the Balkans? ■ ■ - 

• In the breathing space that tame 

• with the NATO tdtiraalum and the 
} decision of the Serbs to pull artillery 
: back from Tange of Sarajevo, that is 
1 the most importast question that- die 
; United Stales and its allies can ask 
; themselves- With luck, the answers 
: could help prevent . the war. from 

; wicer and keep the United 


secretly in 1970 but i 
1990, the document said dud 
“could be nesther peace norcootiSttBce 
between die 1 Islamic religion and-noiij 
Wwiiip wmI and political inatitiltWIlS. 

The West did not deign to pay atten- 
tion to Serbian fears, or Serbian rage at 
1 in a new Bosnia, mfln- 


The 


3 by tmnkers Gke its president, 
Serbs chose war. 


1 States out of the civil, religious and 


j ethnic wars now breeding. 

• Obviously the president should ask 
; that question of Jus top foreign policy 
■ advisers and then — on, dreamer — let 


Andihoquestiondqplomats 
detest: Was it possible 
tomkridihewarthat 
brought about so many 
atrocities: — to avoid it .. 
honorably and sensibly? . 


So these are some lessons for Amen- 
ca, its nflii* and the United Nations: 

1. Wait before encouraging seces- 
sion Unless you are prepare d^ to p ro-' 
ttet the seceders — not only from the 
mother country but- from their own 
minorities. This does hot apply to col- 
lapsing empires, like the Soviet or co- 
lonial models. But it does to individ- 
ual countries facing secessionist 

forces —say, India or Mexico, 

2. Before recognizing a new coun- 
try, find otft if it has enough control 


of its territory to provide- a decent 
t independence is not a syn- 


chance that i 
■ onym for civil war. 

3 . 1 f not, decide in advance among 



JJUehammer to Sydney — 
A Friendly Spirit tit Strike 


By John Williams 


XT rW YORK —Nearly four decades 
N ago, as a young Australian torch- 
hiking around Europe, I 

stop It a small inn near 

The food was simple and the bet* cora- 

l^hZSB* fall .and the town’s 
wooden homes 

bronze leaves that shimmered on the trees 
and fluttered across the hard g round. 

1 met a Norwegian girl ray age and 
ended up staying a few weeks. In the 


MEANWHILE 


three options: withhold recognition — — 

pending negotiation with large minor- * „ T „i_ with an endrding snake in diamonds From the Chinese Camps 

ides, jump m militarily if war comes. Properly Tough on lOfeyO whicb ^ Reppel gave to 

or just li&bt the match and sit around * . ... . — - v. *nH u*ieh Oueen Alex- Regarding the review of oi 

looking dolefully at the fire. 

Thelessons for religious or ethnic 

us know. Even if he does not, the group^pla^g md^dence: 


answers can be found plain in govern- 
ment actions, and failures to act, of 


-'-c 


the past three or four years. 

Most Americans give .the same an- 
swer about what brought -the United 
States in — the atrocities of Serbs 
[gainst M uslims, particularly that last , 
sHriling of the Sarajevo market The 
Serbsdcny responsibility and the Unit- 
ed Nations says it cannot fix blame. 
But Serbs committed so many horrors 
that they cannot expect the world to 
believe them when they deny another. 

Now this is the question, diplomats., 
detest: Was it possible to avoid the 
war that brought about the atrocities 
— avoid it honorably and sensibly? 
The answer is “yes" times four. . 

At least four times the alarm of ctvu- 
war to come was sounded, three times 
by representatives of the United Na- 
tions, once by the current president of 
Bosnia, Alija Izetbcgovic. 

The warning was mat if Europe too 
quickly recognized Croatia’s break- 
away from Yugoslavia, Bosnian Mus- 
lims would feel impelled to dedare. in- 
dependence, over the objections of 
Bosnian Serbs. Civil war — the Bosnian 
president's phrase —would explode^ 
l Rncmxn Muslims' say t» 


1. Decide whether . or not you are 
strong enough to survive — atone. 

2 . If not, forget the fantasy that 


Ii. ii BOl, j — 

the countries that recognized yon wiU 
also fight for Y otL 
3. Make concessions that will con- 
vince important groups of hostile 
rftim trifmgn to live under vour roof — 


Regar&ng “ IPs Risky Gating Too 
Tough on Tokyo " (Business/ Finance, 
Feb. II) by Reginald Dale: 

I wonder who has led whom up the 
gfr pl g p path in the U.S.-Japanese rela- 
tionship. The United States should face 
reality. We Americansare wasting/nme 


be- 


urymen to live under y 
or let them secede themselves. 


The West not only, encouraged the 
conditions of war in Bosnia but then 
failed to get behind an agreed political 
solution to end it. 

. Now, President BiD Clinton is again 

iuged On to air attack by some of my 
ioamaKstic colleagues. They seem let 
down, made bombless by the Serbian 
withdrawal and Russian entry. 

I believe that in Bosnia the road to 
-peace' is not down a bomb bay but 
through U.S.-led negotiations for par- 
tition. It is. the only solution left 
. gtasdingby Western and Balkan poh- 
ticiam ana diplomats. 

. -_On Bosnia I am a minority among 
more fearsome colleagues, and now 
their target, but here I sland, without 
any intention of secession. 

The New York Times. 


in believing that the J 
come more like os; until they — ■- 

thor mercantihstjc practices, we should 
try to act more like them. 

president Bill Clinton should contm- 
ne his pressure tactics until America’s 
trading partners learn that warm and 
fuzzy promises will no longer work. 
Only action will persuade the rest of the 
wood that the Japanese are sincere 
about opening their markets. 

THEODOR V. HEYERMANN. 

Bangkok. 


King Euwaru ouu - — — 

andra gave back to her as a souyemr. 

I say noteworthy, because ii is a 
fine example of that for which Faberge 
was famous, a large surface of enamel 
on a gnilloche background of gold or 
silver. It is remarkable, too, as an 
example of the happy and sane way of 
thin gs: for in 1936 Mrs. Kep pcl 
gave it to Queen Mary to return to 
Sandrin gham and thus keep the collec- 
tion complete." 

The details of this enchanting and 
characteristic series of exchanges are 
recorded in Queen Mary's hand and are 
to be found, 19 this day, on a piece of 
paper kept inside the case. 

A. KENNETH SNOWMAN. 

Chairman, Wartski Jewelers. 

London. 


Regarding the review of “Bitter 
Winds: A Memoir of My Years in Chi- 
na's Gukig" (Books. Feb. I0i: 


Andrew J. Nathan, in ins- interesting 
review, states that “there have been 
many memoirs about the suffering of the 
Chinese under Mao. but none about life 
in camp." Please allow me to draw your 
attention to the classic description of the 
Chinese system of labor camps in the 
autobiography of Bao Ruo Wong ( as the 
Frenchman Jean Pasqualini was known 
in China), “1 Was a Prisoner of Mao" 
which was published in the 1970s. 

HELLE LYKKE JACOBSEN. 

Danish Embassy. 

Moscow. 


Enchanting Exchanges Lfflehammer Gets the Gold 

. ? „ , - 1 -rme offer earlv thanks to the Nor 


Prenatal Testing 


mornings we hiked in the drill blue 
mountain air. or explored rustic shops 
for those thick sweaters diat wouldkem 
you warm at the North Pole. ln_ tb 
drowsy afternoons she played the piano 
in the inn's empty salon. In the evoungs 
we toasted ourselves before a roanng .log 
fire. We had eves mostly for each other, 
but there really were not many other 

Pe ^lthammer, which normally has a 
population of 23,000. is now hosting 
some 100.000 spectators a day at the 
Winter Olympics. In the runup 10 these 
Games, the town saw its face changed by 
the construction of roads, an Olympic 
village, a media center tor 6 , 000 journal- 
ists, indoor and outdoor sporting facili- 
ties. a hospital, an art museum, a train 
station, restaurants, shops, toilet blocks, 
food stalls and more. 

Friends in Norway tdl me that long 
before the Olympics started, many LiUe- 
hammer inhabitants were anxious, fear- 
ing that their romantic uwn would end 
up as a wmall city with big city problems 
— unemployment, empty hotels and so- 
cial dislocation. The new infrastructure, 
they thought, could destroy the place. 

Today people are much less worried 
about the buildings, which have been 
carefully located and blend into the sur- 
roundings. “Most people think it still 
looks pretty much the same,” a friend m 
1 illchamme r said. But he addal that the 
Question “is whether it will be the same 


Olympics will draw one of the biggest 
gatherings in history. 

People in Sydney are talking of real 
estate speculation- But what troubles 
me, as it does some people in Ltlleham- 
mer. is intangible. precious Mid poten- 
tially fragile —a city’s spirit. Sydney s is 
unique, as a few examples from my most 
recent viat show. 

The weekend after New Year's Day 
1 walked into a fnui-and-vcgeiablc 
shop in Mosman, an affluent seaside 
suburb. The owner and two assistants 
sat near the counter sipping gla^oj 
chilled Australian chardonnay. Please 
join us,” said the owner, who had never 
& me before, pouring A 

delayed New Year edebrabon?, I 
asked. “No," he replied. It * J 041 
we're on a long shift today, and need a 

little cheering up." 

We arrived late at a suburban cinema. 

suednet summary that placed us per- 
fectly in the ploL 

Mv wife asked if them was a water 
fountain nearby. “Not up here, th 
woman smiled. “Bui no womes, m just 
tuck downstairs and bring you up a 
glass. Do you like ice?” 

^ Finishing a meal in a small restaurant, 
... 6 - 1 _„..M n<n> hu rredit 


yima j iiim * 1 — r_ 

I asked the waiter if 1 could pay by credit 
- — • ft got that machine in 


card. “We haven't got — . 

yet," be said. “No womes, mate. Pay the 
next time vou come in, if you like. 

1 paid by cash. Next day, still full of 
wonder, 1 recounted the story to our 
eldest son, who lives in Sydney. Dad 
thanks for reminding me," he said 1 did 
the same thing there a month ago. 1 must 


remember lopop in and pay them." 
r '- J -ichge 


CDiuiJLvi iw ” r - - - 

You may still find such generosity in 

. _ re n.if hmv mRITV 



surveys will bring it back. 


lihropological 


In your article on Faberge (“The Op- 
ulent, and Intimate, Fabergt, ” Style, Feb. 
8L a spiteful and untrue comment is 

^ . S 1 HlltA nKlC 


GL a. spnciui ttuu UIXUMW — 

repeated about Queen Mary, who was 

. -l jmwmA 

a c 

both Ho 1 Majesty r and Se late Henry 


^enthusiastic and scholarfy collector 
vrith a real appreciation of beautiful 
objects. I had the privilege of knowing 


i 

A' 


QlUOll 9 ^ - - 

Most Bosman Moshms say they 
» want a democratic nonrrihnons state. 

• Bui Serbian Christians had suffered 
! under the role of their Serbian Muslim 
j countrymen, first centuries ago and 
1 their during World War IL They re- 
! called both times, in detaiL 

» And most Serbs had read an essay by 

'• Mr. Izetbegovk. Written and circulated 


Letters intended for publication 
shndd be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor* and contain the writer's sig- 
nature, name and fuB address Lot- 

len should be britf and a* subject to 
editing. Weamnm be responri ble for 
the return of unsolicited maraaenpts. 


Doin na xvuxjcaijr 

Bainbridge, who wrote the following 
relevant and faithful comment in his 
book on Fabergt, whom he represented 
in London: 

“It was then 1 heard that after the 
death of the King, Queen Alexandra 
gave back to each of his friends some- 
rfrng which they at some time had 
given to him- The most noteworthy of 
afi these souvenirs must be the cigarette 
case in royal bine translucent enamel 


Let me offer early thanks to the Nor- 
wegians for putting on the best Own- 
pics in recent memory. This has been a 
simple country village celebration, with 
no unnecessary glitz or glamour, no false 
patriotism or chauvinism; just mendh- 
ness, hospitality, honesty and superb 
sportsmanship by athletes and specta- 
tors alike. As an American, I have ap- 
preciated this all the more as a contrast 
to the embarrassingly overdone specta- 
cle of the Los Angdes Olympics. 

Thanks also to the speed skaier Dan 
Jansen, whose Olympic triumph, after 
many difficulties, helped remove some of 
the smeD that has been hovering over ice 
Ruling in the United States. 

alrossum. 

Paris. 


Regarding “ Dilemma of Knowing: Pa- 
tients, Not Doctors. .Von 1 Make the Hard 
Choices” (Jan. 28t: 


asss 

’ - • ' *' : — to the International Herald Tribune. 


Yes. perhaps prenatal diagnosis does 
lead to “the most tortured medical de- 
cisions today.” UltrascHuid tests are 
nearlv routine, vet notoriously unreli- 
able, "and amniocentesis, the usual fol- 
low-up. is risky. 

But more wrenching than the predic- 
ament of parents who are pressured 
into discovering that something may be 
wrong with thnr baby is the mentality 
that would screen babies at all, weeding 
out the sub-optimal ones before bulb 
and awarding a parent's love and ac- 
ceptance to those who can pass the 
■prenatal test. 

DEVRA TORRES. 

Barcelona. 


JW, IIUU1 UM» uui*-- 

In the usual thorough Norwegian 
way. researchers will uy to asass toe 

A Wrong-Footed Opening 

women’s forum is reviewing the possible 


infiltration of prostitutes. 

LiDeharamer now Lies in my pasL But 
I do worry about my hometown, Syd- 
ney. one of the world’s truly great dues. 
How fragile is toe magic of a city? Could 
hosting toe 2000 Summer Olympics pro- 
duce a less wonderful Sydney? 

Sydney is a big, sdf -confident place, a 
much tougher nut than Lfllehammer. 
Yet the Summer Olympics, which dwarf 
toe Winter Olympics in every way, be- 
come a bigger ana bigger deal each tone. 

With a population nearing 4 million, 
Sydney is already one of toe great tounsi 
centers of toe Pacific Rim, 
million foreign viators a year. The JJOO 


UESTION: How much time 
li would elapse in CBS-TV coverage 
oTthe Winter Olympics before mention 
i. TVmva HarriinE and Nan- 


wasmadeof fonva r Hardmg and Nan- 
... Barely one sec- 


cy Kerrigan? Answer: — - v ---- 
ond. CBS in effect delayed its broad- 
cast of toe opening ceremonies for toe 
bulletin that Harding would be allowed 
to skate after all. Perhaps it was feared 
viewers would tune out m droves if toey 
didn’t hear Harding’s name unmediate- 
ly. For some of us, though, opening 
with yet more tales of “trampy Tonya 
and “nice Nancy” got toe coverage off 
on exactly toe wrong foot. 

— Tom Shales, The Washington Post. 





Degussa on Water Treatment 


Pure logic defines 


our tomorrows. 


substitutes that help pre- 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23. 1994 


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The International Herald Tribune and the State 
Commission for Restructuring the Economic Systems of China 
are inviting the world’s business leaders to an unprecedented 
three-day Summit meeting on China’s economic reform. 

Its aim is to foster a dialogue as well as business 
development opportunities at the highest levels amongst the 
leaders of the Chinese government and the global business 
community. 

The Summit, “The Socialist Market Economy of the 
People’s Republic of China, 1994 - 2000: Implications for 
Global Business” will be held in Bejjing on May 11th, 12th and 
13th of this year. 

Participating will be the major figures of the 
Government of China as well as key provincial government 
and state industry leaders. It will be a rare opportunity to hear 
and personally meet the people who are driving China’s 
economic direction into the next millennium. 

As you would expect with an event of this stature, it 


will be a closed-door conference and will not be open to the 
general public. 

The International Herald THbune is inviting a limited 
number of the largest multinational corporations with a stake 
in the future of the Chinese economy to participate as Summit 
Sponsors. There will be 3 levels of sponsorship: Summit, 
Corporate and Supporting. Each will offer a comprehensive 
communications package consisting of conference-related 
benefits and advertising in the International Herald THbune 
and a leading Chinese-language daily newspaper. The deadline 
for registration is March 15th. 

For a complete information package, please fax 
Mr. Richard McClean, Publisher, at +33 (1) 46372133 Or caB 
+33 (1) 46379301. ' , _ *' 

The International Herald Ttibune Chira Summit. It will 
prove to be the major business' event of 1994 for China, for 
Asia and for the TEt • t 

companies participating. 


.'3F&4T *' ; 


THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE CHI N A #U M M I T 




rjjjrt! 













1994 


Page 9 



teace Is Seen 

oin AUies in Bosnia Talks 


In die Sarajevo Hills, Flexibility Toward the Serbs 


By Craig R. Whitney 

Afew York Tima Serria 

BONN — Russian, American 
and] European diplomats agreed 
Tuesday that the withdrawal of 
xrtn&n heavy weapons from Sara- 
jevo after a NATO bombing ulti- 
matum and Russian miesrveouon 
bad created the best chance in two 
years to achieve a negotiated end to 
the warm Bosnia-Herzegnv rna 

Jurgen Chrobog, a German For- 
eign Ministry official who presided 
oyer the meeting, said that the offi- 
cials had recommended concrete 
steps to their governments bnt 
these did not mcl»«fa any new 
bombing threats to stop the fight- 
ing m other areas. 

[The United States on Tuesday 
played down calls for an extension 
of the NATO ultimatum, Reuters 

rC f“'W^are not in a position where 
we want to overreach," said Mike 
McCtury, a State Department 
spokesman. “We’re in a position 
xtow where we are trying to consoli- 
date those gains that have occurred 
around Sarajevo and then figure 
out bow you branch but from that 
effectively."] 

Mr. Chrobog made dear that the 
European view was to*f the best 
chance of negotiating success 
would come if both the United 


said that aB those 
it, including Vital! L Chor- 
, the Russian negotiator, agreed 
that the Bosnian Muslims tad to be 
.offered some i 


■ areas of Srebrenica and TuzJa, and 
around the town of Maglaj. 

How these goats would be 
achieved was not dear from the 

„ ^ statement. Some of them, such as 

better than the one-third of the the opening of the civilian airfield 
country's territory, -in sDces, drat at Tuzla for civilian relief deliver - 
was in the latest plan prepared by te. have been called for by the 
UN and European Union negotia- North' Atlantic Treaty Orgamza- 

, » ...... - tionandtheUN for months. 

“We have a joint position." Mr. 
Chrobog said. “Now we will go to 
our ministers. They must draw 
theor own conclusions." 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl has 
said that be would welcome “a 
high-level international confer- 
ence** on the Balkans. 

“1 welcome the fact that, with 
Boris YdCfln and the Russian gov- 
ernment, now another important 
power has taken on responsibility." 
Mr. Kohl said 


involved. Russia objected to the 
NATO ultimatum bat used its in- 
fluence with the Serbs to persuade 
them to withdraw or turn over their 
heavy weapons by the I AJM Mon- 
day deadline. 

[The commanders of warring 
Bosnian Muslims and Croats win 
meet in Croatia on Wednesday to . 
try to sign a general cease-fire, Reu- 
ters reported .from Zagreb. 

[The meeting, due to take place 
under UN auspices in Zagreb, was 
delayed for two days because of 
objections by the Bosnian 'presi- 
dent, Alga lzetbegovic, that are 
now resolved, a senior official in 
the UN Protection Force said, 
“lzetbegovic seems to have caused 
the delay by initial reluctance to 
enter into a cease-fire but that 
seems to be out of the way now as a 
result of UNPROFOR and other 
diplomatic contacts,” be said.] 


tors and ngected at the Geneva 
conference earlier this month. 

“In the list of specific things we 
are trying to do now, there is noth- 
ing that m my view would require 
strong words of strong actions.” 
Mr- Churkm said after the «alW 
Md in the Bonn suburb of Bad 

^T^oSiaais al the meeting, who 
also included the US. special en- 
voy, Charles E, Redman, agreed 
that while the Bosnian Muslims, 
Croats and Serbs had -agreed in 
principle to dividing up the country 
equally, “the quality and surviv- 
ability of the territory For the Bos- 
nian government,” representing the 
Muslims, “must be improved.” 

Mr. Redman later told reporters: 
“Onr engagement, along with the 
European union and toe Russian 
Federation, has certainly stimulat- 
ed the parties to think in new ways. 
And now we’re going to see if we 
can turn this into something that 
brings ns a negotiated- sedation." .• - 

Mr. Churkm told Ge rman televi- 
sion that he was very skeptical that 
the Sarajevo model could be used 
is other places because the sfrua- 
ticn in the capilalwas unjqne. 

Bnt the statement said the offi- 
cials had agreed to use their influ- 
ence on all the w aning parties to 
grasp what they called “the new 
chance for peace" and to agree toa 
cease-fire and a removal of heavy 
weapons from around the city of 
Mostar as wdL 

The officials said they would 
work for a gradual widening of the 
protected zone around Sarajevo, in 

over” to otoer^w^^ES ofthe 
weapons pulled out or placed un- 
der UN supervision by the Sabs 
over the weekend. 

And they called, yei a g»fn for 
access fra humanitarian aid sup- 
plies to the beleaguered civilian 
populations around die. embattled 


By Roger Cohen 

\'e» Vnrt limes Serncr 

PALE, Bosma-Hetz^oyina — 
On Tilava Hill, in the Serbian-held 
mountains ringing Sarajevo, eight 
120-nun mortars stood in open de- 
fiance of NATO threats, flanked by 
multiple- rocket launchers, anti-air- 
craft gun* and other Serbian weap- 
ons used in the 22-month siege of 
the Bosnian capital. 

About a kilometer away. Ser- 
geant Robert Monneret, a French 
member of the UN force, stood in a 
snow-covered field and peered 
grimly at the weapons through bin- 
oculars. 

“My mission." he said, “is to 
survey the Serbian weapons and 
prevent any use of them. For us. it 
would have been much easier to 
regroup these artillery pieces and 
mortars in a UN collection site 
lower down, but the Serbs say they 
have orders not to budge from this 
position.” 


Lowering his binoculars, and 
glancing up with a hint of concern 
at two N ATO F- 14 Tomcat fighters 
sweeping overhead. Sergeant Mcn- 
neret added: “We are sull negotiat- 
ing with Serbs to try to ensure the 
regrouping of the weapons, which 
are spread over quite a wide area 
right now" 

The messy situation at Tilava, a 
few miles from the Serbian bar- 
racks in the Sarajevo suburb of 
Lukavica. illustrates the wav in 

which the United Nations ar.o 
NATO have shown fieri biiirv to- 
ward the Serbs. 

Technically, it seems that the 
Serbian Tilava battery should be 
liable for NATO air attack. The 
alliance's ultimatum calls for the 
withdrawal of any heavy weapons 
or “regrouping and placing" under 
UN control within a 20-lSomeier 
(124-mile) radius of the city center. 

Bui these Serbian weapons in the 
Hills to the south of Sarajevo are 



,iihin the designated moru id had over ££-£ 

oi*e ei°hi ** “"gE. 1 Sic. the political 

thev stood, and um scatterriover 5tucJi j„ 

an area ol about 15 square Ulome- - bul ^ 

“ra* ecus are operational" said pieces are ante W control ^ 
the sergeant, who heads a platoon as soon as cond^ permit, we 

, . . -r. i- - _i mi wiB put them in UN sites. 

He added that “more than 50 
percent” of Serbian heavy weapons 
had been withdrawn beyond the 
zone, rather than placed under UN 
control. But the weather does not 
explain the situation at Tilava. 

Referring to the weapons there, 
he said, “u they'd agree to move 
them. I'd escort them to Lukavica 
barracks anytime” 

As Sergeant Monneret talked, 
the F- 14s swooped ever lower over 
the Serbian guns with a d eafe n i n g 
and intimidating roar. “If they 
dropped a bomb it would amaze 
me." he said. "But in any case, if 
they do. we’re pretty badly placed.” 
If NATO has refrained from 
dropping bombs, it is dearly in 
part because UN officials are con- 
vinced that the current cease-fire 


of about 50 French soldiers that set 
up camp this week on the Tilava 
hillside. “But we try to keep them 
under our visual control. What is 
not yet clear is if the Serb com- 
manders axe really willing to move 
them, or if this is a small reserve in 
ms* of a Bosnian Muslim attack.” 
Both Yasushi AkashL the top 
UN official in the former Yugosla- 
via. and Sir Michael Rose, the Brit- 
ish lieutenant general commanding 
UN forces in Bosnia, have been 
prepared to give the Serbs the bene- 
fit of the doubt because, they said, 
heavy weapons not already witb- 


can be built into a wider settlement » 
for the war. * 

But Mr. Karadzic rejected the! 
terms of current peace talks, which • 
call for a union of three republics', 
— Muslim. Serbian and Croatian! 
— in Bosnia-Herzegovina. 1 

“I think it is loo late to talk) 
about a union of three republics". 
Mr. Karadzic said. “We are sepa-; 
rate ethnic groups and we are sepa- , 
rate states. Why should we make' 
some hybrid creation that would, 1 
not work? It is not a good solu-, 
lion.” 

While the Bosnian government ! 
has rcpeaiedly adjusted its negoti- . 
a ting stance, it appears dear that it ' 
will not accept toe carving-up of,* 
Bosnia-Herzegovina — at least not « 
without gaining substantially more J 
or better territory. • 

The Serbs have offered to cup 
their current share of the territory [ 
to about 50 percent, bnt Mr. Kar- . 
adzic appeared to retreat from that ] 
position, saying: “We control 72 ‘ 
parent of the land, and we own 64< 
percent. We are ready to go below J 
72 percent, even bdow 64 percent, , 
but cann ot give away traditional ■ 
Serbian territories." ! 


SPIES: Senior CIA Agent Arrested ! 


tacsl ijnn'AfOn Fqi»Fpbk 

A man pdSng a cUU on a sled thfoagb the snowy streets of Sarajevo on Tuesday was an imficatioa of the cafm that continued to reign. 


As Privatization Nears, a Belarus Storekeeper Goes Western 


By Steven Erianger 

New York Times Serncr 

. MINSK, Belarus — This fragile, 
senridependent county can seem . 
Eke the Soviet Union in aspic. Bat 
the only place you would be able to 
buy aspic is at Vladimir S. Nero- 
zya’s Universal JubQee Stop, an 
island of capitalist practice in a 
hypeiinflaticfflaiy sea. 

Mr. Nerozya, 41, is the boss of 
this extraordinary emporium, 
which stodcs normally unimagin- 
able goods ranging from frozen 
sole (by special contract from Mur- 
mansk) to German sparicting wine, 
Bordeaux and Kiwi shoe pdnsh. 

Mr. Nerozya, who has made the 
strae as Western as be dares, with a 
special department fra hardreur- 
rency sales and a trained and polite 
staff making $70 a month, or three 
times the average salary, is eageriy 
awaiting the start of privatization, . 
which hie thinks may beginin April 

When the store is finally allowed 
to go private, he says. will be 
ewer to change old habits.” Wh3e 
a “work collective” of all the em- 
ployees will buy title to the strae, a . 
group, of seven will put up most of 
the money and ran the show. 

“Then we can do areal renova- 


tion and se& off afi the junk,” Mr. 
.Nerazya said. “We don’t want to 
fix it up now, it will just increase 
the value."'. 

As an example of old habits, he 
said, the store by law is supposed to 
shot at 6:00 P-M. Bnt it now stays 
open to 9:00 P.M, “and we sell a 
itot in those hours, when people gel 
ootofwrak.” 

The hmeb-time break persists, 
however, as it does all over the 
former Soviet Union. Just Mien 
office workers break for Jnnch, all 
the shops dose fra hutch, too, leav- 
ing most cf the business to toe 
kiosks. But the range of goods there 
is small and there are many fewer 
kiosks here than in Russia, so the 
inevitable result is a lot of hooky 
during working hoars as -people 
disappea r from thdr desks to do 
their shopping. 

Added to the usual breaks for 
tea, chat and the watching of soap 
operas, it is a wonder anything gets 
done al alL Mr. Nerozya, at least, 
has ensured that the hutch break is 
strict -arid that when toe sign 
the store win reopen, it 
docs. • 

Another old habit he would like 


to change is toe time-honored, tor- 
tuous procedure for baying any- 
thing. Goods are displayed with 
prices. To see them, consumers 
throng the counters, jamming thdr 
fellow shoppers out of the way with 
a quick elbow to toe kidney. Con- 
sumers then line up at the cashier 
and pay for what they want, getting 
a receipt. They then hue again at 
every counter to exchange the re- 
ceipt fra the goods. 

Mr. Nerazya wants to institute a 
self-service system, as in the West, 
with piles of goods and cashiers at 
toe end. He has done dm with 
cheaper hems, especially state-sub- 
sidized, price-controlled products 
like bread that cost him more to sell 
than he gets in profit. 

But his customers are not ready 
fra self-service on most hems. 

He says: “People steal that’s the 
problem. People get very low sala- 
ries and our prices are ahead}’ 
reaching Weston levels. So they 
come in to steal what they can’t 
afford.” . 

Reform is too slow in every field, 
he said, since Belarus, which had 
freedom thrust upon it two years 
ago. is still run by the same Com- 


munist government that ran it in 
1990. 

“We want to avoid too many 
rapid shocks and changes,” Mr. 
Nerozya said. “But most people 
would prefer to work just as Ettie 
and as badly as they did before, 
and have it toe same way in the 
shops." 

Government absurdities add to 
his problems. There is no profit 
Emit on imported goods sold for 
do Ears. But for Belarus ruble-de- 
nominated goods, there are profit 
Emits. And for basics Eke milk, 
meat and bread, which are subsi- 
dized. there are fixed prices if sup- 
plied by state companies or farms. 

Because of shortages, there are 
ration coupons to get such subsi- 
dized products. Bur when Mr. Ner- 
ozya makes his own contract with a 
collective farm, there is no fixed 
price or coupon required. “So there 
are two different prices for the 
same items," be said, “It’s ridicu- 
lous." 

The Belarus government also has 
instituted new import and value- 
added taxes, as Russia has, a step 
that increased prices. 

For example, before Jan. l.acan 
of imported beer cost a customer SO 


US. cents, providing the shop a 10- 
cem profit. The store still buys the 
beer for 40 cents and gets a 10-cem 
profit, but now, with taxes, toe cost 
to the customer is SL 40. When it is 
pointed out to him that a 10-cents- 
a-can profit would be considered 
very handy by a Western grocery 


store. Mr. Nerozya shrugs, as if to 
say. "You're not in Kansas any- 
more.’’ 

The taxes make toe beer nearly 
unaffordable, he said. Sales plum- 
met and his customers blame him 
— not toe state — for a tripled 
price. 


Continued from Page 1 
reiary. said the national security 
adviser, W. Anthony Lake, and toe 
director of central intelligence, R. 
James Woolsey, had been ordered 
to lead a "coordinated examination 
of the national security implica- 
tions of this case." 

“We lake this very seriously.” 
Ms. Myers said. “We don’t Eke it 
onebiL" 

The charge d’affaires of the Rus- 
sian Embassy was summoned to 
toe State Department to receive toe 
forma] U.S. protest from Secretary 
of State Warren M. Christopher. 

Mr. Ames. 52. a CIA employee 
for more than 31 years, was arrest- 
ed Monday along with his wife. 
Maria del Rosario Casas Ames, 41, 
a Colombian-born, naturalized 
U.S. citizen who was a paid source 
for toe CIA in Mexico Dry. 

An intelligence expert said Mr. 
Ames's post at toe CIA dealt with 
handling double agents, among 
other sensitive tasks. 

"He must have been paid by toe 
successor to toe KGB and for them 
he would be a gold mine," said the 
expert, a former CIA official. “ He 
would have had access to all the 
information that has been craning 
our way since toe Soviet Union 
broke up.” 

The spying continued until toe 
couple’s arrest by FBI agents, offi- 
cials said. Mr. Ames was taken into 
custody in iris car on his way to 
work, while his wife, a pan-time 
student at Georgetown University, 
was arrested at their home. 

If convicted of conspiracy to 


commit espionage, each would face • 
a maximum sentence of life in pris- * 
on. 

The arrests capped an invest! ga- * 
iron that had run fra more than two ‘ 
years, officials said. It was appar- 1 
emly triggered by a tip from a KGB ; 
defector. \ 

In June, agents found top-secret i 
documents unrelated to his work in ; 
Mr. Ames's CIA office, according ■' 
to court papers. The couple's home ; 
was placed under electronic and k 
physical surveillance, and tbeir i 
trash was searched. Their home; 
was secretly searched by the FBI j 
last fall under procedures approved i 
by toe attorney general, the court ; 
papers said. .) 

One trash search turned up a > 
typewriter or computer printer rib- ! 
bon from which agents extracted i 
damaging information, court pa- ; 
pers said. j 

The complaint charged that the • 
couple deposited toe payoff money ; 
in banks in toe United States ana . 
abroad using at least two Swiss ' 
bank accounts to store and transfer | 
toe funds. > 

Mr. Ames, whose salary is ' 
$69,800 a year, is currently as- , 
signed to toe countentarcotics cen- ■ 
ter in toe CIA's intelligence dime- ; 
torate, the Justice Department . 
said. 

The couple allegedly paid cash j 
Tor a $540,000 house in Arlington, i 
Virginia, made credii-card pur- * 
chases averaging more than ) 
$50,000 a year, and bought a Jag- . 
uar and more than $165,000 in ; 
stodcs. (Reuters, API \ 


HDTV? Japan to Retreat in Face of Advanced American Digital System 


Continued from P«ge 1 
longevity of the Muse system 
chu already sluggish sales of 
t-de&nition sets and make com- 
ies reluctant to invest in new 
tpmeot and programming fra 
existing system. 

Mow, it's chaos,” said Hiroshi 
wara, senior vice president of 
phics Communications jLab- 
ories, a small company devel- 
ig digital video technology, 
[pan’s startled electronics in- 
iy association angrily called 
Mr. Egawa to retract Ms re- 
ks, saying they could render 
e decades of development and 
ons of dollars of investment ob- 
ie. 

mis is Eke pouring water hr a 
ring person s ear, Toshikatsu 
lawakL a managing director of 
susbita Electric 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COUID AFFECT 
YOUR UFE: 


The global unemployment erisis 
Hong Kong - Beijing negotiations 


1 


■t 



Potitieai reform in Japan 


2 -K -J-'wZr* 


« vJSW.% 


FOLLOW THE WORLD EVERY DAY IN THE IHT 


Japan’s hugest consumer electron- 
ics ccaocenu said Tuesday, using a 
Japanese expression to indicate 
shock. “If tlrisistoeimiiistiy , 5po&- 

cy, it is extremely regrettable. 

High-defimtian images arc twice 
as sharp as those of conventional 
television. The higher resolution al- 
lows screens to be larger without 
the picture bwxmung grainy, mak- 
ing TV viewing mote Eke being at 
the movies. 

Japan’s puhhc broadcasting cor- 
poration, NEK, began research' on 
high definition, tideviatm 30 years 
ago. Broadcasts from a satellite be- 
gan, here in th&late 1980s, making 
Japanthe only nation in which peo- 
ple can actually watch 2ngh-dd5ni- 
tkm television over the atr- 

So far.- only about 20,000 sets 
have been sold, far bdow, expecta- 
tions. OnereasOT K.thaEtbe sets 
cost the -equivalent of . aL : least 


$6,000, although that is down con- 
siderably from as much as $30,000 
a few years ago. Another reason is 
that there is only one channel of 
available, fra nine 

; a day. 

1 technology, in which the 
I and image are transmitted in 
the rates and zeros of computer 
code, should allow fra cleaner pic- 
tures, free of static and doable im- 
ages, just as digital compact disks 
offer sound free of the hisses and 
prats on analog records. Digital 
technology also will make it easier 
to mferge televisions and computers 
to provide interactive multimedia 
services. 

At the time Japan began devel- 
oping the Muse system, and up 
until afew years ago, it was thought 
toaz digital technology would not 
be feasible. Then American compa- 
nies like General Instrument and 


Zenith Electronics demonstrated 
such systems. 

Some analysts, and even some 
executives in Japan’s computer in- 
dustry, say that the television mak- 
ers sooufd have known a switch to 
digital was coming and should wel- 
come iL A single worldwide stan- 
dard would mean higher produc- 
tion volumes, lowering costs and 
allowing the market to grow, which 
would benefit toe televirion mak- 
ers. 

These analysts say it is better to 
make toe switch to digital soon, 
before too much more is invested in 
toe analog system. 

“It’s about time they face reali- 
ty,” said Peter G. Wolff, technol- 
ogy analyst with CS First Boston in 
Tokyo. “If technology is going toe 
other way. why continue to back 
the wrong horse?” 


TRADE: Clinton Team Learned About Japanese Practice the Hard Way 


GmtiBned from Page I '• 
y E. Garten was at She a rs an 
zn Brothers Ina. an Ameri- 
xpress subsidiary, thebroker- 
m waged a long tattle for a 

n toe Toky° Stock Exchange, 
ampaign succeeded only after 
res threatened to put sanc- 
CB Japanese axmritks com- 
s operating to the United 

. Cutter knows all about toe 
me ensnariing Japans tete- 
nirricao oos sector. As a fpr- 
onsuhant for toe accounting 
Coopers & LybrandJje adr 
U.S, comnanies stynneo oy 


rich Japanese finns in tte 1980s. 

But -those Itwting^ . if -any thing , 
seem only to have strengthened 
their be&ef (hat the Uriitea States, 
needs tougher trade poEdes for Ja- 
pan. : 

Mr. Altman's investment bank- 
ing firm, toe Blacksxone Group, 
helped Japanese firms execute 
some of the largest foreign take- 



luiktuu^ ‘-rr- r - 

fephone, Japan s quasi-g©*- 
ital tdeeommufficanons gi- 
lts domestic market, 
r most companies, the view 

We're better than toe Japa- 
jms, but we just tan t get 

: said. , T 

ao Mr. Clinton s Japan 


Sony C^’s .acqtrisitioiis of 
Records and Cbfomiria Picrures. 
BJacksicme Ins also done weak for 
Kirin Breweries and companies in 

the Mitsubishi industrial group. 

Mr. Altman chtkrided- wheat he 
recalled that senators expressed 
concern during Ms .confirmation 
hearing that he would be "soft on 
Japan 7 ' as a result cFMs'past busi- 
ness ties. “My answer was. that 
knowledge is poway not weak- 
ness,” hesaid... 

Mr. Rubin was co-chairman of 
Goldman Sachs Go; an investment 
bank that has done bbsmess with 
many of Japan’s largest firms and 


is partly owned by Sumitomo 
B ank . Goldman Sachs's Tokyo of- 
fice has been one of several foreign 
securities companies that reaped 
huge profits from its sophisticated 
computerized trading operations in 
toe Japanese stock market. 

Mr. Rubin last week declined to 
discuss his dealings with Japanese 
firms while at Goldman Sadis. 

Some cf the most important 
membeiS'Of the team shaping ad- 
ministration pofa cy . toward Japan, 
including the UJ5. trade represen- 
tative, Mickey Kan tor, and Trea- 
sury Secretary Lloyd Bernsen, have 
not deal: with Japan in toe business 
world. . . 

It is nevertheless clear that it is 
toe appointees Mr. Oin ton has 
drawn from the business communi- 
ty who are driving his policy to- 
ward Japan By contrast, top offi- 
cials at the State Department have 
had remarkably little input. 

■ Japan Sees Talks in March 

Japan will try to thrash rail a 


trade pact with the United States 
next month but will not accept de- 
mands for concrete market-open- 
ing targets, a senior figure in the 
ruling coalition said Tuesday, Reu- 
ters reported from Tokyo. 

Ichiro Ozawa, Mr. Hosokawa's 
adviser and one of the most power- 
ful politicians in toe eight-group 
governing coalmen, said it would 
lake most of next month to work 
out apian. 


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STAGE '/ENTERTAINMENT 


^agelJ 


oxreamixning 

Brecht’s. Epic 
Of Betrayal 


By Sheridan Morley 


L ondon — Brecht's ik uu of 

GaBJeo" £$ the ode that be never quite 
m a n aged to get right, or even fmicht^ 
to bis own satisfaction. He first wrote 
it as a film script in 1938, rewoiked it extensive- 
ly with Charles Laugiton toward the end of the 
war, and was writing yet another version when 
he died in 1956. 

Thus we can hardly blame David Hare at the 
Almeida for giving ns a new version, one tha t 

THE LONDON STAGE 

trims 40 cm more minutes off the original, re- 
places the carnival with a poppet snow and 
makes, this vast, sprawling epic of scientific 
betrayal accessible for the first time to studio 
theater*- 

\ The roll call of those who have been invofvKi 
’in cutting and shaping “Gatiteo” ova: almost 
half a century is as hugety impressive as its 
•central figure, played now in -a gargantuan 
^performance by Richard Griffiths. Originally it 
.was tq have been Oskar Homoika, then T ^ m gh- 
ton; difectors who came on board for a while 
! included Eti* Kazan and Harold Gnnnan be-” 
.fore Joseph Losey finally got it into rehearsal 
for LosAngefcs in 1947. 

CriticSwere less than thrilled. The man from 
Variety wrote of. a moment in the play when 
Galileo ^investigating the laws of motion rolls a 
ball down an incline and measures its ability to 
roC uptbe other side: It doesn’t make the grade, 
■and nehber, unfortunately, does the play.” 

• Abeady it bad come along way from the first 
(version Brecht had written m Denmark seven 
years earner, Hiroshima (“very bad publicity 
for us," Laughton had noted) had made the end 
pf tfiepfcy into a debate about the ethics of 
science andits function, if any. in politics, while 
the dominance of Langston, not only as star 
But aisO aS co-writer, was bound to ufect the 
balance of the leadfag role. 

! Neither the Los Angefes nor the Broadway 
premieres of the Jale 1940s were anything like 
triumphant, and those first stages of the project 
-petered out in a haze of in will, with Brecht, 
l^KQglitoo ami Losey alt accusing cadi other of 
feSing out, cither to'commumsm ca- to fears of 
the McCarthy tribunals. 

, It was not perhaps the best of times to be 
ideating with a criris-of-torisricDce epie whieb 
ftas at its Jiapet jMfabatcfo<yer. the rights -aad-^ 
jdnties of tBs mdft&uaT when faced wtSircfi-^ 
goons bigotry or state control. 

! This isthe rally majorBrechtwoik that takes 
a historical ^character as ha focus, and perhaps 
the only onein which ihe major event, GaBeo’s 
forced recantation of his own and other sden- 
^ discoveries, takes place offstage. • , 

•„ As a polemic; if lurks in the shadows of 
history and politics, of science and religion, and 
<it is hugdy to David Hare's credit that he has 
cut a path through the maze. To some orient he 
has also refocused the piece, so that Griffiths is 
now able to play a cuddly great bear of a man. 
who is from the very outset* charlatan, eager to 
import telescopes from Amsterdam and then 
pass.them .off as his own invention. 

; The rasn is now essentially Faktaff instead cf 
the rather more complex and enigmatic figure of 
jhefiril test His slow destination, by church and 
State, and. Ids own realization. of what he has 
dime to destroy the progress of scientific discov- 
oy, are none the ksshauntmg for that 

A ROUND Griffith* thedixectOT Jon- 
athan Kent has gathered one of the 
best supporting casts in the business 
(Michael Gorigp, Alfied Butte, Pat- 
rick Godfrey, Jerome Willis, and Edward de 
Souza as a pope becoming more authoritarian 
even as be is dressed for office), bat they are • 
really only there to prop up Griffiths, some- 
times Iherafly, as the great inventor becomes a 
giant martyr caught in the crossfire of church - 
and state, eventually losing the very sight that 
hag enabled ham to see the stars. - 
i This a mag nificent, npt-to-be-missed perfor- 



A Hollywood Boom 
For Foreign Actors 


By Richard Natale 

os ANGELES —The United States 


Ora.TCr' Ptrero 


The Hollywood welcome mat is out for foreign actors , here Sweden’s Lena Olin in " Romeo Is Bleeding. " 

Joan of Arc, an Enduring Film Star 


u Itma easier to bunt her than to tear her from 
■ the soul of France." 

Audit Mafraux. 1964 


By Joan Dupont 

P ARIS — Is it her woman-warrior look, 
that haircut? The fact that sbe came 
oat of nowhere and changed the map 
of medieval France? Her brilliant de- 
fense plea or her spectacular end? Perhaps for 
afl these reasons, Joan of Arc is the most 
aMding saint in film history. From Paris to 
Hollywood and Rome, even to Moscow, in 
some 40 films, directors have vied to have the 
last word on the historic Maid of Oribans. 

"J.wifl last a year, not much more,” Joan 
predicted. She survives five centuries later, less 


film role In his “Proofes de Jeanne d'Arc” 
(1962) Robert Bresson, another great director, 
also concentrated on the questions and answers 
of the trial, as noted in court minutes. 

Rivet te the dntohile has avoided treading on 
conquered ground, replacing the dose-op with 
the long view, making living theater out of 
tragedy — the trial whizzes by. Joan is neither 
saint, martyr nor witch, but a healthy young girl 
with a mission. Although this is the director's 
most expensive film, the amount was «man in 
proportion to its scope: This action movie has 
fewer extras than an illuminated manuscript. 

The Joan Americans know best is Ingrid 
Bergman, who starred in two movies. Victor 
Fl eming , of “Gone With the Wind,” adapted 
“Joan of Arc” (1948) from the Maxwell Ander- 
son play; Roberto Rossellini made her the 
heroine of “Giovanna d'Arco al rogp” (Joan of 
Are at the Stake) (1954), his filming of the Paul 


TbrtierrcfigiaBS trappings than for her.pnginal- . 


The story of Joan gpes back to the start of 
cinema history. George Metres, the pioneer, 
directed [he First “long" “Jeanne d'Arc" (1900) 
— 15 minutes. 12 scenes, hundreds of extras. 
Ceca B. De Mffle’s “Joan the Woman" ( 1917). 
was his first superproduction. Made in the 
shadow of World War Lit went easy on Ameri- 
ca’s En glish allies. 

It may seem curious that with so few films 
made on historical women, so many have been 
made on Joan of Arc. And directors have proba- 
bly not finished with her. Joan exerts fascination 
because she is a subject for our time, too: an 
androgynous, stubborn, single-minded woman 
who heeded her own counsel and refused to be 
bullied. Yet in our age of heightened awareness, 
no woman director has investigated this original 
character or the mystery of what made her differ- 
ent — her voices, her virginity. The lady — for 
filming, for burning — has been left to men. 


ent, save mainly for those born where English is 
the mother longue. Victoria Abril's fate may be 
different. 

If Barn Levinson's forthcoming film, ‘‘Jim- 
mv Hollywood," in which ibe Spanish star 
(Pedro Almodovar’s “High Heels") portrays a 
Latin hairdresser, captures the public s fancy, 
she might wind up with an active American Run 
career, it happened for the Italian actress Va- 
leria Golino. after Levinson cast her as the love 
interest in “Rain Man." 

Golino is an exception. Few foreign actors 
w ho come to Hollywood in search of riches and 
renown work here steadily or achieve the 
heights of international stardom of an Ingrid 
Bergman or a Marlene Dietrich. 

In recent years, however. Hollywood has be- 
gun to tender a warmer welcome to foreigners. 
Foreign actors can attract foreign financing to 
make films. .And once a film is released, foreign 
actors can attract audiences in overseas markets. 

“Foreign revenue on a film has increased 100 
percent over the past three years." said the 
producer -Albert Ruddy, whose credits include 
“The Godfather." “If’ you got 25 percent of 
your money from foreign eight years ago. you 
were doing very well. Now ifs at least 50 
percent So if you can pick an actor like Gerard 
Depardieu or Lena Olin who means something 
in the foreign market their involvement can 
cover half the budget in some cases." 

And as more films rely on international fi- 
nancing, the decadelong trend toward using for- 
eign-boro actors in American films accelerates: 
the rosier of names lengthens: Arnold Schwar- 
zenegger (Austria), Depardieu (France). Rutger 
Hauer (The Netherlands). Jean-Claude Van 
Damme (Belgium), Golino (Italy), Antonio Ban- 
deras (Spain). Juliette Binoche (France), Anne 
Parillaud (France), Julie Ddpy (France). 

Some are not yet household names. Others, 
like Golino (“Rain Man." the “Hot Shots" 
movies and the forthcoming “Clean Slate") and 
the Spanish actor Antonio Banderas (“The 
Mam bo Kings," “Philadelphia") work regular- 
ly in Hollywood. They may soon join the ranks 
o f foreign-bom performers who have become 
international stars, like Olin of Sweden, Hauer. 
Isabella Rossefiim of Italy, and especially 
Schwarzenegger and Van Damme. 

The current openness is not Hollywood's 
first display of xenophUia. During the late 
1950s and the 1 970s. the industry briefly spiced 
films with international talent. And all along, 
there have been independent-minded directors, 
like Levinson and Sydney Pollack, who used 
cultural and language differences to enhance 
dramatic conflicis. 

PoQack said be derided to cast Olin opposite 
Robert Bedford in “Havana,” “because I liked 
the combination of someone as American as 
Redfod against a European sensibility. It brings 
a texture and a richness you can’t get any other 
way. And it helps with the sense of conflict.” 


The rede played by Golino opposite Tom 
Cruise in "Rain Man" was originally written (or 
an American, she says. But after several meet- 
ings, the director “was starting to think if he had 
a foreigner in the role it would add something to 
the lack of communication between the charac- 
ter and her boyfriend," says Golino. 

What makes Hollywood's current openness 
to foreign actors different, and probably more 
enduring, is more than economics, says David 
Stuff, an agent with United Talent. “In some 
ways the world has shrunk, and cultural barri- 
ers have diminis hed. So audiences are better 
equipped to accept a more foreign flavor in 
American films.” 

In contrast to the past, when the studios cast 
Anthony Quinn in tne title role of “Zorba the 
Greek" or Meryl Streep as the Danish writer 
Isak Dinesen in “Out of Africa.” Depardieu 
was given the lead, Columbus, in the interna- 
tional co-production “1492.” Not even the fail- 
ure of that film has deterred producers from 
tossing out an international casting net. 

Among current films, for example, Olin is 
starring in “Romeo Is Bleating,” Depardieu is 
starring in “My Father the Hero” and Deipy is 
starring in the forthcoming “Kflting Zac" and 
"Younger and Younger.” 


F LUENCY in English helps. English 
helped Abril win her first Hollywood 
assignment, she says. Levinson hired 
her after watching her performance 
in Almodovar's "Kika," the director's first film 
in English. 

The Dutch-born Maruschka Detmers, whose 
credits include “The Mambo Kings,” speaks 
seven languages, which makes her an asset not 
only in American films, but also in the increas- 
ing number of European productions shot in 
English, said her agent. 

But accents are no hindrance, as proved by 
Schwarzenegger. Similarly, Hauer, who starred 
in “Blade Runner,” among other films, is rarely 
referred to as a Dutch actor. Olin’s national 
origins were never even explored in “Mr. 
Jones," in which she portrays a West Coast- 
based psychiatrist. Nor were Rossellini's as Jeff 
Bridges’ wife in “Fearless.” 

Golino of the “Hot Shots" films has had her 
greatest success in that most American of Hol- 
lywood genres, the comedy. “In comedies it’s 
easier to get away with bong a foreigner, be- 
cause you don’t often have to explain why the 
character speaks with an accent,” she says. “In 
dramas the characters have more of a past or a 
history” 

Not all foreign-bom actors are looking for a 
Hollywood career, but a h igb profile in Ameri- 
can movies can enhance an actor’s value around 
the world. It’s a snowball effect: the more work 
acton gel in American films, the more recog- 
nizable abroad their names become, and the 
belter their access to strong rotes in foreign 
productions, 

Richard Natale, who writes a nationaUysyndi- 
caied column on entertainment for LA. Weekly, 
wrote this for The New York Times. 


ties in her powers erf persuasion. Not only did 
she move armies, route the English invaders 
from Ctateans, and crown a king at Reims, she 
has since won over skeptics like Voltaire, Mark 
TVain and George Bernard Shaw. 

- . In France, Joan has been treated as a Maid 
for all seasons, seized upon by politicians at 
crucial times, perceived both as the champion 
of individual spirit against enemy occupation 
and as a standard-bearer for the extreme right. 
Both the right and left claimed her during 
World War U, and afterward she was held up as 
an example pf resistance and Eberatton; recent- 
ly, Jean-Marie Le Pen has adopted ha for his 
National Front party. Now a new two-part film 
treats her as a modem mirade woman. 

Jaoqoes Rivette's “Jeanne la Pucefle: Les 
Baumes” and '‘Jeanne la PuceOe: Les Prisons” 
arc a day-to-day chronicle of Joan’s campaigns 
and travails, adapted from texts by historian 
Rjfigine Pemoud. Played by Sandrine Bonnaire, 
Joan is shown on bonseback, moving men to get 
her “gen til Dauphin” crowned at Reims, bat- 
tling at their side. Bonnaire, an earthy actress 
who made her mark as a working-class heroine, 
speaks in her own contemporary accents. Her 
Joan spends Ettle time cm prayer; she marches, 
shouts, laughs and cries 

- Rivctte, working with longtime associates 
Christine Lament and Pascal Bomtzer, has an 

, actually ^iphfe^ted F^never st^^^ooting 
with a ccnyeted script, which is written when 
the film is under way. Tbc dialogues have immo- 
tfiacy mid freshness. They discovered that 15th- 


tberc was Jean Sebcrg, a thoroughly American 
jtiri. brought to the screen by Otto Preminger in 
“Saint Joan" (1957) after a publicized taleal 
hunt A man of the theater and lover erf court- 
room drama, Preminger adapted George Ber- 
nard Shaw's long-nmning hit; Graham Greene 
wrote the script None of these marketable 
features saved the film from disaster. 

As a matter of fact Joan erf Arc, the movie, 
has always been a challenge. Directors from 
different countries and backgrounds — Jewish, 
Lutheran, Janscnist —have made the flops of 
their careers with tins angular story. The hero- 
ine who defied all odds seems to have particular 
appeal to cineasls of the extreme, lmsungby the 
public, like Dreyer and Bresson. Nor is Rivet te 
consider ed an easy, popular filmmaker. Prior to 
bis 1990 “Belle Noisense," his claim to fame 
was “La Retigieuse” (1966), which was banned 
and became a cause edebre. 


D REYER’S “Passion” was made in a 
climate of adversity, problems with 
his producers and attacks from the 
press. A few years after Joan was 
canonized in 1920, the director was brought to 
France by producers who wanted him to make 
a popular movie, with a star like Lillian Gish or 
Madeleine Renan d. But the idea of a Danish 
director and American actress tampering with 
their historic monument was too much for the 
French. He ended up with Falconetri, an ac- 
tress who had performed only on stage. Dreyer 
saw her in a comedy and chose her, be said, 
because he could tefl she knew about suffering. 

More suffering was to come. FalconettTs 
contract contained a clause saying she must 
have her head shaved (or the final scene. The 
actress cried to see her glorious hair cut off . As 
the tears fell, Dreyer pin deed one from the 
conus' of her eye and placed it on her lips, 
where it was filmed for the stake scene. Antonin 
Artand plays a mraak who gives Joan a cross to 
hold as the flames mount Dreyer’ s “Passion” 
was considered expensive and unfavorably 
compared to Abel Gance’s “Napolton,” with 
its battle scenes and crowds of extras. Reviews 
were mixed; the public preferred “Napolton.” 


- “- s * * ;i 


- Tins a m^nmeent. century. French was good for today, with certain 

roan ce m a handy theatrical digest of a sprawl- modifications that give the l«m gn»gi» an op-to- 
iM a»c. It is ajae^re^te dare ring. Laurent also designed the hand-dyed 

Brecht always dM b“L costumes, fitted tunics and pants. Rivctte, who 

human cost of the activities erf the state m . long films, has made -the' longest Joan to 


religions or political turmoiL 
• The author himself knew more than most 
jrtxxtt the cost of seDoat and personal betrayal, 
and it is impossible -not to see in the "final 
moments" of Griffiths’ Gafiteo something <rf 
Brecht at tbc end erf his life coming to terms, 
albeit blindly, with the conflicting m&sages be 
had sent out into a confused weald. 


date — the' two films total hearty ax hours. 
French unites have praised Ins human view. 

En France, the great classic has always been 
-Cari Theodor JDrcyei^s sSem fitoa, “La Passion 
de Jeanne d’Artf (1928). Dreyer focused <m the 
-trial mid on the ttagic face of Marie FaJconetti, 
ah. actress who won immortatitywitb a single 


International 
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the first woman signed to Madonna 6 Mav- 
erick record iabcL The band may be nnder 
her name but Me-ShdllooksaM^ts Eke 
one of the boys (she’s 34). PresfflbM her . 
persona, sbe can 

happeningbere is obvtousty “orethanngrc 
promoae’s not programmed yet She 
looks for two-way communication even?*? 
interviews. ... : /■ 

She saidsbe has 

lately and the only ^ ' 


you look the better she looks. Having signed 
Mo'S^jmakes you like Madonna. • 

Her music is a polished, babbiting blend of 
the el eme nt s of contemporary Aftiran-Ameri- 
caft popular music — with Stedy Dan-tike 
keyboard cbords topping Ibe funk of it all. The 
ghost of Miles Davis bovecs. Such elegant 
textpral never be commercial 

“Pfantation^ ^LuDahies,” lttr debut album, 


create a more positive (meT She started to read 
books, and she wrote “poetry, states, lyrics, 
whatever” in a series of diaries. She attended 
the Duke Ettinglon School cf the Arts, and 
then Howard University. 

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"Yeah, Tin Hke-thal too. . . - j - . 


nevertheless attractive because of wttodie a 
ffie.^ Ahd^ the more 


America pnthe verge of the nflfaimtnn. It’s 
more mdodte than rap but there's plenty of 
rapper “flow." Sbe compares her stotyicffing 
style to that of thegrwts, African oral histori- 
ans. Me’Sbefl wrote and arranged h all “It’s 
. not too. had considering Fm s&taught,’' she 
says, **but Tve beat learning a lot from the 
guys m my band. They’re all from Bailee, 
(hey're monsters." 

She grew up in a “war zone" in Washington. 
She knew dK bad to change her fife when her 
JnstiiK^ reacstcw to the splattering of Wood 
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about ber stained sweater. 

She was . “always alone, turning into a voy 
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tic® and most erf all because she teamed fast. 
Meanwhile, her demo tape making the rounds 
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threeyears and so she scrubbed floors and and 
went to barber college before the tape reached 
Madonna. 

The Maverick people came to bear her on a 
Thursday. The following Monday she was^ 

Now^^^S in L A. with her 4-year-^dson 
in a Imie bouse with a lemon tree in the yard 
. Sooner or later the question had to be asked: 
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A group of ItaEan journalists were waiting 
their turn in the lobby, humming with guests. 
A record-company minion edged her way 
through the crowd to deliver a hot salmon 
platter fit for a rising star about to do a 
showcase. Me’ShelTs face tit up. “Ob.” she 
replied. "We don’t answer Madonna questions 

around here." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 231 1994 




The Start of a Global Linkup 


he availability of 
labor and the 
overall skill base 
are as important 
a part of infrastructure as 
good communications and 
logistics. Many of the com- 
panies setting up in Wales 
with the assistance of the 
Welsh Development 
Agency were surprised to 
find an unusually high 
degree of quality within the 
skill base and excellent 
road, air and rail links with 
the rest of Britain and 
Europe. 

South Wales is connected 
to London and the southeast 
by the M4 highway corri- 
dor. The A55 expressway in 
North Wales joins highway 
networks leading to 
Liverpool, Manchester and 
the Midlands. Central 
London is about a three- 
and-a-half-hour drive from 
Cardiff, and Heathrow is 
about two-and-a-half hours 
away. The rail link takes 
under two hours, and there 
is easy access to the channel 
ports on the east and south 
coasts. There is also easy 
access to Manchester and 
Birmingham airports and to 
Gatwick in the south via the 
M4 and M2S London 
orbital highway. 

CardifFs own airport 
offers services to other 
British cides as well as to 
many European destinations 
direct or via Heathrow. 
Flight times to Brussels. 
Amsterdam and Paris are all 
under two hours. 

Road-freight times from 
Neath or South Wales meet 
most manufacturers’ needs. 
Stuttgart, for example, can 
be reached in two days. 


Barcelona in three-and-a- 
half days and Rome in five 
days. 

The German company 
Robert Bosch built its 
Cardiff plant adjacent to the 
M4 highway. Infrastructure 
and logistical availability 
were two of the deciding 
factors for Robert Bosch. 
“Connections with Europe 
are excellent from here,” 
says Gerhard Turner, com- 
mercial director. “Basically, 
in two days we can send 
everything to wherever it 
should be in Europe.” 

Infrastructure also influ- 
enced substantial invest- 
ment decisions by British 

Aterri&c 

in frastructu re and a 
large greenfield site ... 

Airways, which is complet- 
ing two brand-new mainte- 
nance and repair divisions 
in South Wales. 

British Airways has 
invested more than SI 00 
million in a new dedicated 
maintenance plant for one 
of the world's most success- 
ful jet liners, the Boeing 
747. The plant is in the final 
stages of completion on a 
site close to Cardiff's air- 
port, just off the M4 high- 
way. It contains three bays 
for servicing 747s, of which 
there are about 1,000 in 
operation around die world. 
The plant is managed and 
run by British Airways 
Maintenance Cardiff 
(BAMC), a wholly owned 
subsidiary of British 
Airways. It opened for busi- 
ness last year, and the third 


and last servicing bay is 
almost ready for operation. 
The whole 72-acre (29- 
hectare) complex will be 
fully operational by next 
September and will employ 
about 1,000 persons. 

Giving the principle rea- 
sons for choosing the 
Cardiff area, Alan 
McDonald, director and 
general manager of BAMC 
says unequivocally: “It was 
the terrific infrastructure 
and a large greenfield site 
which gave us the opportu- 
nity to introduce modem 
working methods.” 

Other important factors 
were the recruitment poten- 
tial, local training facilities, 
logistics and a certain 
amount of regional financial 
assistance. 

“There is also a large pool 
of qualified people in the 
area, including ex-miners 
and ex-steelworkers, with a 
host of industrial engineer- 
ing experience,” says Mr. 
McDonald, adding that the 
nearby Barry Coilejge 
played a key role in provid- 
ing training facilities. 
BAMC is now working in 
partnership with the college 
to enhance its aviation train- 
ing center. 

“I think one of the biggest 
bonuses was the ‘greenfield 
opportunity’ to introduce 
new management philoso- 
phies," says Mr. McDonald. 
Many companies moving 
into wales brought new 
management practices with 
them, and these had already 
been accepted locally. 

“This has given us an 
opportunity to experiment 
in a technical sense - to 
bring in a production-line 



akoaftayear, with respon- 
sibilities ranging from regu- 
Jar service checks to more 
semhisticated services that 
. ‘. Involve almost rebuilding ■ 
the complete aircraft 
:-A few miles along theM4 
j isBA’s new avipmc plant, 

; part of which is still trader 
..■construction;. British. 
.-Airways Avionic Engiheer- 
;‘‘ing’ Ltd. (BAAE) at 
- Pontyclun wilLbe the air- 
line's service center for 
electronic equipment fitted 
to its aircraft. All BA’s 
. existing avionic fa cili t ie s , at 
' Heathrow are "currently 
. being relocated to the new 
sites; and the fall move will 


The secret at Wafas: position, coamadeaBan, hgbBn and a skBled labor tana. 


philosophy for maintenance, 
which implies total quality 
control/* says Mr. 
McDonald, who runs a 
“minimum-status” work 
team. Every employee, 
whether manager or line 
technician, wears the same 
white overalls. Teamwork is 


a must, as is total flexibility. 
Every three months, every 
support employee in BAMC 
works in the hangar and 
actually carries out tasks an 
an aircraft under supervi- 
sion. “This includes every- 
one,” says Mr. McDonald. 
“It ensures that all company 


"be completed by October 

1994 

Paul Kelly, dir«Mr 
general manager of BAAC, 

. says that room to expand 
and a location less than 
three hours from Heathrow 
were important factors in 
the decision to. come to 
Wales.. BAAE services all 
electrical and. electronic 

equipment that a modem jet 

carries, from coffeemakers 
to the latest navigation sys- 
tems: The plant not only 
services BA’s fleet, but is 
also seeking more business 
front other airlines looking 
for quality service — from 
Wales. - 


members remain, fully 
aware of what tins business 
is focused on." 

BA has run out of space 
.for aircraft maintenance at 
Heathrow. As its fleet 
expands, more 747s will be 
coming to Cardiff, which 
will be able to handle 75 


W elsh-based 

industry, has a 
good record of 
collaboration 
wife academic and special 
research institutions. 

Both the University of 
Wales and the University of 
CHamorgan provide taflor- - 
made training and support 
A network of specialized 
centers of excellence is also 
available to bdpnew com- 
panies. These mclude^the , 
Electronics Materials 
Center, the . Poly met arid 
Composites dorter andjhe 
Institute: for Industrial 
Information Tecbnologyat 
University:^ r *Col£egef 
Sw an sea; ibe juapaalese* 
Studies . Cente^ and the; 


S emi conductor and Micro- 
electronics Center at the 
University College, Cardiff; 
the Biocbmpbsites Center 
and die Co mmuni cation and 
Information-Systems 
Eng ineering .Center at 
University College Bangor 
North Wales; and' the 
Advanced Manufacturing 
and Business Industrial 
Technology Center at Ebbw 
Vale College, Gwent. 

Under Welsh Office 
direction, there is also a net- 
work of seven. Training and 
Enterprise Councils (TECs), 
which collaborate with the 
Welsh Development 
Agency to help ensure a 
•''tong-term supply of key 
skills for inward investors. - 


This adveitisingsecfioirwasprodUced inits entirety by the 
supplements diyisi^^^^fate^itionalHfflald Tribune's 
advertising. dopaibnei^'It 1 written by Michael 
Fnmdraiitt^ writer. The next 

issue on WilM^ffl bepnbfiriied<mMagch 2, 1994.. 


A. ■ ■ • ■ : 







‘ : These days the^felsh pragoriis a 
real 


chose wales. • - . 

. British Airways has its new 
engineering base at Cardiff Airport 
and recently C^eral Electric (USA) 
has moved to nearby Nantgarw, 
where they service aircraft engines for 
famous names like-CB/fl, Rolls Royce 
and Pratt & Whitney 
• With, mote than a little help from 
the %lsh Development Agency, both 
companies were hot merely able to 
find the right site, but also the right 
people from Wes’ skffled and flexible 
workforce. 

The WDA has also assisted in the 
development of a local supplier infia- 
structure to ensure vital: components 
ra ^waysathandL... „ 

■ To. -get your business off the. 
ground, put the Welsh Advantage to 
your advantage... Call the team at 
TOlsh Development Internadorial on 
+44 .222 666862, or write to. Welsh 
Development International, Welsh 
Development Agency, Pearl House, 
Greyfriais .Road, Cardiff. CFt 3XX. 


ONE 



♦ THE -WELSH ADVANTAGE 



















THE TRIB INDEX: 1 1 5.37® 

by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 

120 " • • 



100 


World Index 



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Compiled by Osr Safi From Dispatches 

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MMa to T* MX, 1 81 Atari* Ctmriaa da QauBe, 82521 Notify Codox. Franca. 


O IMmadanalilMU Trfcuna 


indudes cutting 7,500 jobs from its 
work faroe of 294,000. 

“TV charge is fundamentally a 
good move, but it is aedd show," 
said Beak Stotboom, an analyst 
with Amtgdd NV, adding that he 
would tower his rating on Unilever 
to aTtold" for the Aon to medium 
term but leave Ms long-term rec- 
ommendation as a “buy.” 

The British-Dutch consumer* 
goods conglomerate said 1993 pre- 
tax profit was £1.94 biffion after the 

charge, down 4 percent from 1992. 
Earnings would have risen 11 per- 
cent if die company hadn't raym 

hi gamers, net profit including 
the charge fell 9.8 percent, to 381 
MKm ($2 bQfion). Profit would 
have been up 2.8 percent without 
tV restructuring. 

UaQever said the cost-cutting 
should result in annual savings of 
665 million guilders. About 40 per- 
cent of the job reductions will re- 
late to management and adminis- 
trative posts, it said. 

Unilever PLCs American de- 
pository receipts fell $2375 to 
$69,125 on the New Yodt Stock 
Exchange; tritile shares of Unilever 
NV lost $1,125 to $11535. 

David Atkinson, an analyst with 
NatWest Securities, said the fall 
reflected '‘shock at the size of the 
restructuring charge and disap- 
pointment at the results." 

Sir Michael Perry, chairman of 
Unilever, said the job cuts would be 
spread across Europe and North 
America. 

He said the company would fo- 
cus on markets outside North 
America and Europe for growth 
potential in 1994. 

(AFX. Bloomberg, Reuters} 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE— As rapid economic growth and 
industrialization in the Asia-Pacific region spur 
dwnflnri for jetliners, the ambitions of Asian coun- 
tries for a greater stake in the aerospace industry 
are rising. 

As a result, Western firms find that they must 
increasingly share work and technology or risk 
losing sales. 

The Asia-Pacific area has become “the fastest- 
growing market for aircraft, aerospace equipment 
and services,” said Lee Haen Loang, Singapore’s 
deputy prime minister. “Major aerospace compa- 
nies have turned to this region to pararipaic in the 
growth and to service their cheats.” 

Mr. Lee spake Tuesday at the opening of the 
Asian Aerospace show, at which 930 firms are 
vying for business. The show, which is held every 
two wars, ends Sunday. 

When Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, a 
unit of Boeing Co. of the United Stales, rolls out its 
new-generation 777 jet in April, it will contain 
more Asia-Pacific components than any previous 
widebody coma-rcra! aircraft. 

About one-quarter of the 777*9 airframe, mea- 
sured by value, is being manufactured by compa- 
nies in Japan, Australia, Singapore or South Korea 
under a program that already has been worth $2 
billion to $3 taffion to these suppliers. 

That figure will increase if, as expected, addi- 
tional firm orders are placed for the twin-engine jet 
when it starts service m 1995. 

To promote sales of their aircraft and head off 
the possibility of a rival pan-Asian airframe manu- 


facturer, analysts said Western companies would 
have to offer even mere generous work-sharing 
and technology- transfer deals to Asian aerospace 
companies in the future. 

Japan. China, India. Indonesia, South Korea, 
Taiwan and Malaysia either have the capability to 
manufacture passenger jets or plan to do so in the 
near future. 

Smith Korea’s Daewoo Heavy Industries recent- 
ly outlined plans to team with Aviation Industries 
of China, India’s Hindustan Aeronautics and Ko- 
rean Air Lines to form a consortium to raise SI 
bfiHon and start buQding midsize passenger jets 
within five years. 

Sixteen airlines on four continents have an- 
nounced 147 firm orders and 108 options for the 


Metallgesellschaft 

Still 'Defining’ 
Core Businesses 


Boeing 777 family of jets. Asia-Pacific airlines 
make up close to 50 percent of that customer base. 
Asia has replaced Europe as the largest market 


tor jetliners outside the United States. Boring 
forecasts that between 1993 and 2010, Asian carri- 
ers will need some 3,000 aircraft, valued ai about 
$245 biffion. That is more than 30 p e r c en t of the 
total world market for the period. 

Richard R. Albrecht, Boring’s executive vice 
president, said that Western aircraft makers were 
extending their international manufacturing ar- 
rangements “because they make good business 
sense.” He said that having partners in Asia and 
elsewhere helped cut costs, shared the heavy finan- 
cial risk involved and improved the final product 
and its sales prospects. 

For the foreign suppliers, such arrangements 

See JETS, Page 19 


EU Warns U.S. Film Distributor 

! of the tob reductions wiB re- 



Dim Future for GIs’ Journal 


See Tort Titna Sorter ■ • . 

WASHINGTON — World 
War II veterans erf the nrifimry 
newspaper Stars and Stirpes 
reminisce about filing stories as 
shells exploded overhead, Al- 
though today’s staff menbers do 
not have towony as natch about 
life and timb, Stars and Stripes 


By the time of the Gulf War in 
199L more than half of the news- 
paper's correspondents wore a- 
vOums, and. many American sol- 
diers so longer saw the- daily 
Stars and Snipes as their prima- 
ry source of news. 

Today, as the newspaper tiles 
to maintain a journalistic spirit, 
its financial picture is cloudy. 
Military cutbacks have pulled 
thousands of U.S. troops and- 
tfaeir families from Europe; ef- 
fectively rizmniariqg ahugepocl 
of readers. 

Meanwhile, many troops can 
find other sources of American 

news, from USA Today and the 

In ternational Herald Tribune to 
newsmagazines and CNN- ... 
“We’re snuggling,” says Bern 

Zovistodri, an editor of the Euro- 
pean oStitm of Stars and Stripes. 

^Two-titirds of our customer 

bare has withdrawn from Europe 

in the past few years.” . 

Tire newspaper was founded 
during World War I to prowde a 
daily, hometown-style newspa- 


per to American troops serving 
m Europe. . 

It was shut down after the war 
but reborn during World War E, 
when its staff included young 
sddkts with a pasrion for jour- 
naUsm, sudias Bffl Mauldin, the 
cartoonist, and Andy Rooney, 
now a television commentator. 

The circulation of the newspa- 


f WeYe . 

struggling. Two- 
thirds of our 
customer base has 
withdrawn from 
Europe in the past 
few years/ 

per was about 500,000 during 
world War EC, when it had 25 
editions. Today, there are two 
editions: the European, with a 
a rculaiiop of 59,000, and the Pa- 
cific, with about 32,000. 

Stars and Stripes, which is 
owned by the Department of De- 
fense, has always been financial- 
ly seif-sufficient, but 85 percent 
of its revenue comes from book- 
store operations at mffluoy post 


requiring the newspaper to turn 
over the bookstore business by 
next fall to the Amy and Air 
Force Exchange Service, which 
runs the post exchanges. 

Without the bookstores, the pa- 
per's two editions expect to lore 
more than $8 motion, on com- 
bined revenues at $223 mB&on, 
in the year beginning Aug. 1. 

What is the future of a news- 
paper whose circulation and 
ftmds are withering? 

“That's die question of the 
day,” said Lieutenant Com- 
mander Ken Patterson, deputy 
commander for operations of the 
Pacific edition. 

At the European operation, 
the number of newsroom work- 
ers has been -halved since the 
Gulf War. There are now 61 re- 
porters, editors arid photogra- 
phers. “WeTl go over the edgeif 
we have to cal more,” Mr. Zovis- 
tosHsaad. 

While many factors are con- 
tributing to a sense of drift at 
Stars and Stripes, an overriding 
concern is that the news pa pe r 
may no longer be unique. 

BSD Hogan, a Stars and Stripes 
r ep orter during World War H 
and Ister cultural editor of the 
San Frandsco Chronicle, said, 
“Why, W ire got Time, News- 
week and other daily newspapers 

serving the same purposes.” 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Timet Service 

LONDON — The United States 
and Europe appeared headed to- 
ward a new confrontation over the 
film industry after a dispute broke 
out Tuesday between the European 
Union and United International 
Pictures, the film-distribution com- 
pany owned by three large Holly- 
wood studios. 

Jo&o de Deus Pinheiro, the Euro- 
pean Union commissioner for au- 
diovisual issues, said in Brussels 
that United International should 
be denied fm extension of as anti- 
trust waiver that allows the three 
studios — Paramount, Universal 
and MGM — to distribute their 
Sms to theaters in Europe through 
a single organization. MGM is con- 


Moscow 




On Budget 

Hewers 

VIENNA —Russia faces “huge, 
enormous, looming problems” in 
drafting its 1994 budget and w£D 
have to resort to measures such as 
gold sales to meet its co mn ritments, 
the head of the central bank, Vflctor 
V. Gerashchenko, said Tuesday. 

Mr. Gerashchenko said at a 
briefing in Vienna that Russia 
would not be able to keep its 1994 
deSrit below a range of $40 billion 
to $45 billion. 

“The drafting of the budget is in 


a very bad situation,” Mr. Gerash- 
chenko said He said the govern- 
ment would be compelled to sell 
gold to finance hs deficit. 

He also said it was time to pro- 
mote a market for Treasury bills as 
an instrument tor debt financing. 

Mr. Gerashchenko was reluctant 
re make a forecast on inflation with 
the budget issue stiD unsettled, 
Prices rose 22 percent in January 
from December. 

Mr. Gerashchenko has been in- 
vited by the Group of Seven lead- 
ing tnAnariri riBhflm, along with 
the acting finance minister, Sergei 
Dubinin, and the economics minis- 
ter, Alexander N. Shokhin, to a 
meeting in Germany on Saturday. 

The seven nations will seek as- 
surances that Russia is acting to 
avoid hyperinflation and to contin- 
ue economic reform. 


CURRENCY A INTEREST RATES 


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trolled by Credit Lyonnais, the 
French state-owned bank. 

[Also on Tuesday, Mr. Deus Pin- 
heiro warned Britain that if it con- 
tinued to allow Turner Network 
Television broadcasts, it may find 
itself facing hs European Union 
partners in court. The Associated 


should not be allowed to broadcast 
in the EU because it did not com- 
ply with EU rules that more than 
naif of a broadcaster’s program 
content must be produced in the 
European Union. Sports and news 
broadcasts are exempt.] 

Mr. Deus Pinheiro said United 
International Had acted in a way 
that impeded competition, for ex- 
ample by forcing theaters to take a 
package of less popular movies to 


be able to show a hit such as Uni- 
versaTs “Jurassic Park.” United In- 
ternational denied the allegation. 

Mr. Deus Pinheiro said he was 
not trying to Until distribution of 
American-made movies but said 
United, one of the two largest US. 
film distributors in Europe, might 
be impeding the growth of the Eu- 
ropean film industry. 

He said he would recommend to 
the European Commission, the 
bloc’s policy-making body, that the 
antitrust waiver, which was granted 
in 1989 and technically expired last 
year, be revoked when it takes up 
the issue this summer. 

If the waiver is revoked, that 
could jeopardize United Interna- 
tional and greatly increase the cost 
to the three stumos of distributing 
their movies in Europe. 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The new 
leadership of Metallgesellschaft 
AG acknowledged Tuesday that it 
had no idea whit the huge, diversi- 
fied conglomerate would be like 
Mien the restructuring ordered by 
its creditors is complete! in several 
years. 

“There is no specific strategy for 
the MctaflgcscUsdbaft group,” said 
Kajo Neukirchen, the turnaround 
expert brought in as chairman after 
his predecessor, Heinz Sdhimmd- 
busch, and most of the board mem- 
ber were fired over enormous unex- 
pected losses at a UJ3. trading 
subsidiary in November. 

“We are in the proass of defin- 
ing what our core businesses are,” 
Mr. Neukirchen said as he asked 
reporters and fm^ndal analysts to 
“show mercy” as the company, 
German/s 14th largest industrial 
group, is stripped down. 

Analysts who used to praise Me- 
taHgesdUchaft’s efforts to diversify 
from its original focus on metals 
and mining have recently warned 
that the restr u ct u ring could leave 
the company strategically amputat- 
ed. 

Such is the web of activities that 
Metallgesellschaft comprises — 
more than 250 individual units with 
interests in mining trading, engi- 
neering and financial services — 
that the process Of Hictinguidiing 
core from periphery could take 
months, Mr. Neukirchen said. 

raying its creditors ZO^milJxoQ 
Deutsche marts (S12 million) a 
month in interest on emergent? 
credits and bracing its 43,000 em- 
ployees for layoffs, the first of an 
array of actions aimed at restoring 
profitability and paying off debt. 

Metallgesellschaft has sum- 
moned shareholders to an extraor- 
dinary meeting Thursday to seek 
approval for the restructuring and 
debt rescheduling program worked 
out by the company and its major 
international creditors in January. 

One rhang e that shareholders 
and analysts alike are likely to ap- 
plaud is the company’s decision to 


abandon the oil futures trading 
that cost it 23 billion DM — activi- 
ties that Mr. Neukircben derided as 
“pure speculation." 

The problem was discovered 
when MeiaDgesdlschaft Coip„ a 
VS. subsidiary, ran short of cash to 
meet margin oils at the New York 
Mercantile Exchange and asked 
hanks, for an emergency loan. 

Even before the oil futures fias- 
co, however, MeiaDgesdlschaft had 
amassed pretax losses of 1.1 billion 
DM, and Mr. Neukirchen said the 
new board would act quickly and 
decisively to identify and isolate 
the sources. 

Sales of stakes in subsidiaries in- 
cluding Me tall Mining Corp. in 
Panada and Kolbensdunidt AG in 
Germany are expected to raise 
about 1 billion DM in the short 
term, he said. 

The company previously named 
several large subsidiaries that it 
said would not be sold, including 
Lurei AG, Budenis AG and Dyna- 
mii Nobel AG. 

Gereon Mertens, MetaflgeseU- 
sebaft’s chief financial officer, also 
said the company would not rule 
out selling its 35 percent stake in its 
prominent Frankfurt headquarters, 
the rest of which is owned by Ger- 
man banks. 

The main strategic change in the 
new Metallgesellschaft, Mr. Neu- 
kirchen said, would be the “medi- 
um-term” creation of a holding 
structure in which the company's 
remaining operational units were 
spun off as wholly owned subsid- 
iaries. 

■ Swatch Finds Car Partner 

Mercedes-Benz AG, the German 
luxury carmaker, plans to develop 
a small, environmentally friendly 
car nicknamed the Swatchmobfle 
along with the Swiss watchmaker 
SMH AG. Reuters reported from 
Bonn. 

The announcement ended more 
than a year of speculation about 
whai partner SMH would choose, 
after Volkswagen AG withdrew 
from the project eariy last year. 

SMH has said that the car would 
be ready in 1996 and cost around 
$10,000. 


Banking Clients Have Always Expected 
Outstanding Personal Service. 
Today They Find It With Us. 



D uring the Renaissance, 
trusted advisors helped 
administer the finances 
and. protect the interests of private 
individuals. The role demanded 
judgment, commitment and skill. 

Today, clients find that same 
personal service at Republic 
National Bank. We believe that 
hanking is more about people 
than numbers. It’s about the 
shared values and common goals 
that forge strong bonds between 


Sift » 

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preemeM Mantapto Credit Lyonnais. 

Qold 

AM. PM. OV* 
Z&rtdi S79JB 3 nJB — ftTS 

London 378.10 37W0 — &tt 

York mSO 37930 ~UB 

US. aouan ecr ounce. Leodm official Os- 
Inst; Zurich and Km York apeatoe**e» 
mporie on Mem York Cana (April) 
Scarce: Rente*. 


banker and client. It’s also about 
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assets secure for the generations 
to come. 

This client focus has contrib- 
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lion in capital and US$50 billion 
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have been and always will be. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


ASAFRABANK 

TIMELESS VALUES. TRADITIONAL STRENGTH. 

HMD OFFICE GENEVA 125* • 2. PLACE DU LAC - TE1_ lOKi 705 5S 53 • FOREX, (022.705 SS SO AND GENEVA I2QI • 2, RUE DR. ALFRED- VINCENT (CORNER 
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JAKARTA ' SINGAPORE * TAIPEI - TOKYO 








;e 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1994 


MARKET DIARY 


Greenspan Speaks, 
Stocks End Higher 

Compiled fy Our Staff Fran Dispatches uninvited sp UTt5 and for inflation 


NEW YORK - WaD Street was 
cheered Tuesday by remarks from 
the Federal Reserve Board chair- 
man, _ Alan Greenspan, who said 
inflation was not likely to beat up 
as the economy expanded. 

In one of his semiannual appear- 
ances before Congress, Mr. Green- 

M.Y. Stocks 

span said the outlook for the econ- 
omy was “the best we have seen in 
decades," with inflation subdued 
and long-term interest rates low. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age rose 2420 points to close at 
3,91 1.66. Gainers edged losers by a 
9-io-8 ratio on the New York Stock 
Exchange, with trading relatively 
light at 220 milli on shares. 

The rally was tempered by lin- 
gering concern that interest' rates 
are bound to move higher this year, 
given the pace of economic growth. 

“People are optimistic the Fed's 
doing the right thing, but they're 
not jumping m with both feet,” said 
Dale Tills, manager of institutional 
equities trading at Charles Schwab 
& Co. in San Francisco. “It's fairly 
dear that rates will, at best, stay 
where they are now. Most likely, 
they’ll inch their way up.” 

But prospects for rale increases 
to he, low and steady rather than in 


to remain subdued helped Treasury 
bond prices recover from a week- 
long slide. 

The price of the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond rose 24/32, to 
95 16/32, with the yield slipping to 
■6.60 percent from 6.62 percent Fri- 
day. U.S. markets were closed on 
Monday for Presidents’ Day. 

Beverly Enterprises rase ft to 14ft 
in active trading. The nursing-home 
operator is in talks that may lead to 
its purchase by Columbia HCA 
Healthcare Corp. Columbia rose 1% 
to 42%. also boosted by a buy rec- 
ommendation from Merrill Lynch. 

British Petroleum's American 
depositary receipts topped the New 
York Stock Exchange's active list, 
jumping y* to 64% after news that a 
well in Papua New Guinea bad 
shown evidence of oil and gas de- 
posits. 

Telefonos de Mexico SA’s Amer- 
ican depositary receipts were the 
second most actively traded issue 
on the Big Board, falling 1% to 69 % 
in step with a slide in the Mexican 
stock mark et Monday. 

Merck lost 'A to 32% in active 
trading. The drug maker recently 
told analysts its acquisition of 
Medco Containment Services 
would shrink profit margins. 

(Bloomberg, Knighl-Ridder. AP) 


Dollar Heads Lower 
Despite Rate Warning 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK —The dollar set- 
tled lower against the Deutsche 
mark on Tuesday even though the 
Federal Reserve Board chairman, 
Alan Greenspan, warned that U.S. 
short-term interest rates were 
“more likely to rise than fall." 

Hie dollar closed at 1.7236 Deut- 

Forajgn Exchange 

sche marks in New York, off from 
1 .7304 DM on Monday in London, 
when U.S. markets were closed for 
a holiday. The U.S. currency also 
finished at 105-545 yen, off from 
106270 yen. 

The market had been closely 
watching for signs from Mr. Green- 
span’s testimony about the possi- 
bility of another immin ent rise in 
U.S. Interest rates. But dealers said 
his remarks had been too vague to 
move the currency market. 

Dealers said Mr. Greenspan’s re- 
marks hinted the Fed was not set to 
dramatically boost rates now and 
that short-term rales would rise 
only modestly. The Fed raised 
short-term rates Feb. 4, sparking a 
rally in the dollar. 

The dollar was also pressed by 
news released Tuesday that the 
Conference Board’s consumer con- 


fidence index had fallen to 80.8 in 
February from a revised 82.6 in 
January. 

In Bonn. Finance Minister Tbeo 
Waigel said Tuesday that the rela- 
tionship between the dollar and the 
yen was not on the agenda of the 
Group of Seven meeting scheduled 
for Saturday, but he would not rule 
out that Washington and Tokyo 
would discuss iL 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar rose to 1.4495 Swiss francs 
from 1.4449 francs Monday but 
slipped to 5.8583 French francs 
from 5.8825. The pound was 
quoted at SI. 4790. * 

(Knighl-Ridder, Reuters, AP) 


VtaAaedaMJ Pres* 


fob. 22 


The Dow 



A SON 


D J F 
' J 'ISM 


NYSE Most Actives 


BrftPI 

TBlMcx 

Bevtiy 

Men* 

USWST 

GTE 

WMMrtl 

ZentthE 

TonOMTi 

NtSomi 

cooo a 

ABa-Ot 

HmsDpi 

EHAOoO 

Hanson 


VoL KKA 
139000 MW 
■58801 71*. 
33m 15V* 
30150 33V* 
24111 SOW 
23635 BW 
23535 3S5& 
21577 lift 
20660 MM 
15503 J1W 
15445 43 V, 
vms 25M 
1 8581 40ft 
18456 3SW 
18025 20W 


Lem La* 

64ft MM 


31 W 3155 
27W 28ft 

low uw 

13V* 14Vi 
199i 21U 

41 W 42W 
23ft 3»Vk 
38ft 40 


CW. 
■VI 
— lto 
+ W 
—’A 
fW 

- w 
+w 

+ M 

+ lft 
♦ ft 
+ 1 
— M 
*1 
— M 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


Novels 

Intel » 

TetCmA 

MClt 

Cine sos 

Ventrilx 

Lotus 

OeUCptr 

MlCSflS 

SPtcTdt 

TetatMiw 

MedVsn 

AotfeC 

NnUMcs 

PrssRvs 


VoL HU 

LOW 

Lent 

74015 2S\v 

24 

2416 

52863 *896 

66 

68*6 

43129 25'A 

2416 

14*6 

35418 7696 

26 V, 

2696 

Bml JO 1 * 

1916 

30ta 

s 

37 

6646 

28+6 

MV- 


23 

22V- 

19753 8056 

7816 

7916 

19682 3Vh 

rv» 

3 

19195 3H 
19125 36 

s% 

316 

314, 

ror» jti 

35W 

3756 

18093 »U 

569) 

57 

17364 17'A 

ISV- 

I6M, 


aig. 

+ w 
*2 
— ft 
— W 
+ W 
+2ft 
—to. 
+ lft 
—Vi 
+ ft 
—to 
— 3W 
* I 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

DecBned 


Tata) issues 
NewHWts 
New Lows 


Close 

Prev. 


706 

1013 

1411 

623 

635 

2768 

27X7 

59 

45 

86 

96 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

To! at issues 
New HUB 
New Laws 


270 235 

334 365 

K1 222 

831 830 

12 12 

7 14 


NASDAQ Diary 



Close 

Prev. 

Advanced 

ruL 

1K21 

Declined 

no. 

1898 

Unchanged 

na. 

1876 

Total issues 

na 

4795 


Dow Jones Averages 


tan . Mali Low LKtf Ota. 

Indus 315056 351156 386457 351156 +2670 
Tram 175652 180135 1752.77 1804 A3 '851 
Ut8 30857 21X35 30854 311.77 +£23 
Camp 13555S 140853 139750 107.57 *755 


Standard & Poors Indexes 



mm 

Low 

Last 

CDS. 

OP 100 

439.13 


438.94 

+Z07 

5P500 

47155 

46758 

47156 

+377 

Induslrtoa 

35256 

548.14 

55254 

+197 


435to 

*31.64 



Uiilfttes 

16758 

159.98 

161 JV 

+ 153 

FI nonce 

44M 

43.94 

4444 

*050 

NYSE Indexes 


Hto 

Law 

Last 

Chg. 


Composite 

Industrials 

Tramp, 

UIIBv 

Finance 


36157 25977 261.48 
32256 320.49 32279 
27556 27428 27559 
21850 215.97 21757 
S1XW 91471 7)476 


+ 141 
+ 1.94 
+ 024 
+159 
+ 153 


NASDAQ Indexes 


HWB Law Last Owl 


CempwsBe 75057 

InctoJlrtali 83251 

BOTkS 49458 

Insurance 935.01 

Finance msaa 

Trtmsp. RUM 

Telecom 17659 


785.94 

826.76 

69055 

73157 

796.11 

175,01 


J90J9 +154 
83X31 +276 
69055 —351 
734.50 + 287 
885JB -050 
797.47 —254 
17541 —057 


AMEX Stock Index 


Hall Low Lost atfl. 
47X41 47044 47258 *143 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


as Bonds 
IB Utilities 
10 Industrials 


Close 

rux 


arpe 


Market Sales 


NYSE 4 p.m. volume 27045056 0 

nyse prev. cons, dose 2SMW400 

Aimx 4 pjn. volume I747D4W 

Amex prev. cons, dose 174802*0 

NASDAQ 4 pjn. volume 25Mt£Wt® 

NASDAQ prev. 4 pjtl volume 727450406 


M.Y.S.E. Odd-Lot Trading 


Buy Soles Short* 
Foh.18 15*6476 1J29.HH £5 77 

Feb. 17 1470.183 1599.979 20772 

Feb. 16 I55MU4 M«M5 MTO 

Feb. 15 1.1T7J91 159087 2X716 

Fee. 14 14174475 1451,987 27574 

- included Hi ttie sales figures. 


SAP 100 Index Options 


strut C 8 MU PoWLod 

Price Fes MMlp for M nor Mr 


Ml 

__ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 


to 

_ 

385 











to 

1 



m 



4716 








Ito 



379 











* 

Uk 

Wk. 

400 

— 

— 

— 

3M 

— 

«k 

15k 

3 

4B 


—m 





lh 

lto 


418 



nt 

a* 

w. 


11k 

7to 

*to 

415 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Ilk 

3to 

— 

an 

1716 

m 





to 

Ik 

4to 

5to 

475 

1» 

We 

— 



to 

75k 

51. 


430 

i 

W7 

m 

— 

to 

Mh 

65- 

8W 

435 

% 

6* 

9to 

— 

to 

SVi 

ito 

— 

440 

& 

4 

6Vj 

8to 

4 

7to 

95h 

U 

445 


15k 

4lt> 

— 

91* 

HHk 

13 

— 

CO 

St. 

« 

76 

4to 

U 

15V 

WA 

171k 

455 


«k 

18, 




1916 


4M 

— 

to 


Ilk 

— 

zto 

»to 

Sto 

465 

— 

to 

k. 

— 

— 

— 

— 


Cott: toM VOL 1)5411 

total OPta M.5MB9 



Puts: total vuL 305)6; Mat con bt. 70446 

Price Dec 71 DecH oecM Dec 14 Decs DecM 
27* — — — w - — 

a - - - i it ib - 

cm - m - I to 2to — 

« — - - 2to * 

coin; total «i. W; total eon W. NJD 
Mk total VBLU13; Ratal epm M.UVU 
Source: CBOE. 


World Gold Demand Stays Near Record 


Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — World gold demand in 1993 was dose 
to 1992’s record level even though prices rose about 20 
percent the World Gold Council said Tuesday. 

Demand in the 22 countries monitored by the coun- 
cil, representing some 75 percent of world demand, 
was 2,431 .8 metric ions Iasi year, about 1 percent less 
than I992's revised level of 2.459.0 tons. 

Demand in developed countries rose 30 percent 
amid a surge in demand for gold as an investment, the 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Ouse 


High Low Prev. Owe 


Mar 

901 

902 

Vl« 

900 

917 

May 

920 

921 

934 

912 

932 

JM 

m3 

931 

943 

929 

940 

Sen 

944 

9S4 

943 

9S2 


Food 

COCOA (LCE) 

Sterling m metric ton-toll of WMM 

‘ 918 
933 
Ml 
•S3 

EsL volume: no. 

COFFEE (LCE) 

Dottm per metric too-Mi at S mm 
MOT I2B 1530 1561 1537 1561 1562 

**— 1535 1536 1551 1,225 1568 1JW 
1538 1538 1544 1530 1561 1542 

1532 1536 1564 1531 T5fl 1561 
1534 I53G I5U 1533 1541 1546 

1533 1535 1533 1533 150 1544 


JUl 

SCO 


Job 
4 

Eat. votume: no. 

Hfijtl LOW CMM CSV* 
WHITE SUGAR (Mattf) 

DoDara per mefric tea-tats at S8la» 

Mev 311.10 5)950 30750 31050 - 150 

Asp 305*1 307-50 30820 M — ZOO 

Oct SOD 29250 39M M - 100 

doc n.t. n.t. gaso zma-ijo 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2B8J8 29180 — ZOO 

MOV 294.50 N.T. 29048) 2MJ8) — 340 

Est, volume: 111. open Inf.: 12527. 


Metals 


Dow Previous 

BU A St Bid ftift 

ALUMINUM (HIgb Grade) 

Dolton per metric tin 
Spot 1271 A 129150 12B0J0 158150 

Forward 131X00 131350 130348) 130350 

COPPER CATHODES SSKgh Grade) 

Dollars per metric too 
Spot 188448) 188450 1865410 1B66JH 

Forward 1706 1907481 1887481 188840 

LEAD 

Dalian per metric ton 
Soot 47650 477 JD 47450 47S5D 

Forward 49050 491481 408481 48750 

NICKEL 

Donors par metric ten 

Soot 5865.03 5B6848) 583048) 584050 

Forward 972S50 572650 587048) S9SBJH 

Dalian oer metric ton 

Soot 55B04B 559048) 554550 SS55J* 

Forward S990J0 55954)0 5550481 556050 

ZINC (Saecicd High Grade) 

Dalton per metric tan 

Spat 961JS 96248) 95X50 95750 

Forward 99090 78148) 97648) 97650 


Financial 

High Low One Cbanga 
3-MONTH STERLING (LI FFE) 
aWMOO-PtaoTMpct 


Mar 

■U86 

94J9 

94JB 

am 

Jan 

94.98 

9483 

9488 

— S3 

Sep 

94J95 

9437 

9488 

— 013 

Dec 

94J7 

96J6 

94J7 

— 018 

Mar 

96 JB 

9443 

9*43 

— 023 

Jun 

94 M 

9417 

M)B 

—023 

Sap 

94.18 

9192 

9332 

—031 

Dec 

ran 

9161 

9061 

— BJ6 

Mor 

92,70 

9344 

9144 

— 023 

Jim 

9349 

9331 

9331 

— 026 


Est. volume: 126.900. Open bit: 43Z22X 
3MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

51 BHHten - pfsot 108 PCt 


Mar 

9633 

9631 

9630 

— OjOT 

Jan 

95.96 

9S.95 

9534 

—doi 

Sop 

9X64 

9X63 

1561 

Unde 

Dec 

9535 

9533 

9532 

+ O0I 

Mar 

95L04 

9X02 

9X03 

+ 001 

Jun 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9439 

+081 

sen 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9458 

+ OJ01 


Est. volume: 1,204. Open Ini.: 14JB6 
3MOHTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 


DM1 raRBoa 

-PtSOfHOpCt 



Putran GtbGvInai EL 

M 

873 

7-22 

Mm- 

9434 

9432 

9433 

Urn*. 

Puftwn Mnadlnca B. 

a 

.14 

2-22 

Jan 

94.73 

94J7 

9431 

+ 004 

Rottwnans Inca 

181 

3-3 

3-17 

Sep 

9439 

94.94 

9437 

+ 004 

Salmon Enemy 

a 

25 

7-28 

Dec 

9X15 

9X09 

9X13 

+ 003 

Scotsman tnd 

a 

825 

3-31 

ssam- 

9534 

95.18 

9X31 

+ 081 

Spelling Enterpr 

0 

JB 

2-28 

Jm 

9X31 

9X14 

9X18 

+ 001 

IB. 1 1 fit i* J 1 l 1 .' 1 

M 

.16 

7-78 


9X14 

958S 

9588 

— 087 


u 

37 

34 

Dec 

9496 

94.90 

9434 

+ O01 

Untted FlnCp SC 

Q 

88 

3-11 

Mor 

9481 

9478 

9438 

—on 

WLR Foods 

O 

88 

+15 

Jin 

94J7 

94.64 

94J4 

-on 

SPECIAL 



Est. volume: 108820 Open Int.: 97*938. 




LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

158500 — Pis a 22ndl of 188 pet 
Mar 114—27 113-21 114-14 +043 

Jn 114-00 11241 113-21 +0-03 

Eat. volume: 185.161. Open Int: 157414. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LI FFE) 
DM 2SBM0-pts 0(188 pet 
Mar 97JS 9736 9733 +145 

Jm 97.71 97.17 9731 +037 

Sep 97.40 97.40 9732 +0.12 

ESI. volume: 276656 Open InL: 25X310. 


industrials 


High 
GASOIL (1FE) 


Low Lad Settle erte 


U^dothm ear metric tofMeteei M0 Iom 
M ar 14035 13X25 13935 13930 +135 
OVJS 1384)0 1387 S 13873 + 1JS 


APT 

MOV 

Jga 

Jut 

An 

ns 

No* 


139.00 13730 13830 13830 +130 

13975 I337S 13735 13948) +13S 

14133 14035 14133 14073 +150 

t*00 14X00 14350 .14X00 +175 

ItT. NX 14533 +1 


Sj. . ' HJ. N.T. 14333 + 075 
14730 14738 14730 ES3 +030 
N.T. K.T.- N.T. 15035 +DJD 

1SZ30 15230 15230 15X33 + 133 

JW ' NX N.T. N.T. IM 

Feb N.T. N.T. N.T. 13335 +135 

Est, volume: 12320 . Open tnl. 116357 

BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE) ' 

U3. dollarj per bamt-leti of LSM taatrelt 
Apr 1X47 1X17 TX2S 1X26 +0M 

May 1162 1335 H41 1141 +0.10 

Jm 1336 1337 1165- U65 +0.18 

Jot 1192 1X74 1175 TX7S +117 

Aog 144)7 1192 144)5 I3J1 +0J6 

Sep 1434 1430 1434 14.1B +835 

Eit votume: 3X166* ' Open InL )22i£75 


Stock Indexes 

188 (LIFFE) 

as per (ate pom 

Mar 33553 33025 33233 —93 

Jm 33574 ) 33195 33363 —95 

SOP 33593 33593 33573 -93 

Est. vatame: 20488. Open tot.: 73020. 

Sources.- Reuters. Mattt Associated Press , 
London lari Fhtandai Futures Exchange, 
mn Petroleum ~ ' 


Spot Commodities 


Cemmodttv 

Aluminum, lb 
Coffoe, Brtu, 8> 
Capper electrotvttc. lb 
Iran FOB. ten 
Lead.8> 

Silver, troy az 
Stool I scrap). tun 
Tin, to 
Zinc, to 


Today 

Prev. 

0886 

- 089 

068 . 

. 068 

0982 

090 

21388 

71100 

034 

034 

531 

1175 

13383 

-13133 

n*L 

17269 

04604 

04532 


DhrMtoncto 


Per Amt Pay Rec 


INCREASED 


Compass Bncstm 
Crilml Mae . 
Electronic Tt+Com 
Genuine Parts 
Marvhind Feffl 
Maroon Stontev 
Rap Baicarp )oc 


O 32 

% % 
Q 5075 
O .105 
Q 3D 
Q 3B 


3-15 +1 

3-24 Ml 
3-13 3-31 
38 +1 

34 311 
34 324 
311 +8 


IRREGULAR 

Am InsurMhiinvtS - .11 

Am insurMtainvM . 39 

Am insurMtalm/ea . 38 

Hampton Ufll . J2S3 

Mesa Royalty . jtsa 

LIQUIDATING 

CR( LtouM REIT . TJ5 3W 331 


2-28 3-2 

328 32 

328 5-3 

31 33 

39 447 


Phoenix R e so ur ce 


Gears* Mason 
GaodrictuBF, 
KJdawart BenAus 

Lawson Prdcts 

Mmlon Cap HoMps 
Mesa Offshore 
Morvon Keegan 
MyenvLE. 

New England Elec 
Noise Com 


X 35 315 331 


321 311 
34 331 

33 315 
4-5 4-19 

34 315 
328 +27 
318- +15 

31 315 
318 +1 

323 +1 


§ £ 

M 36 

e .12 

_ .125 
M 5162 

Q 4B5 
56 
35 


Hailwood Enemy . 170 318 34 

Hathaway Carp - .10 328 314 

STOCK SPLIT 
Hometown Buffet 2 for 1 split. 

Hospitality F ranch 2 for 1 sdlt. 

Patrick lnduBr2tnr 1 spilt. 

US Healthcare 3for 2&OIH. 

Varlan Assoc ltor 1 spilt. 

eawdi wpev eB iB I* Cdsndw (gads/ n+ 
montfety; cj-qnarlerty; » semi aneual 


statement said. "la the developed markets, demand 
was resilient,” Roger Murphy, regional manager of the 
coudcO in London, said. 

In contrast to explosive growth in the previous two 
years, China's gold consumption in 1993 fell 1 i per- 
cent from 1992. 

During the second half of the year, demand in 
C hina eased in response to a government austerity 
program aimed at cooling ihe overheating economy, 
the council said. 


Italian Firm Eyes Douglas Stake 

Bloomberg Businas New* 

LONG BEACH, California — McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s com- 
mercial aircraft division may sell a stake as large as 20 percent to 
Finmeccanica SpA. a spokesman for the Italian company’s parent 
said Tuesday. 

istitutoper la Ricostncsone Industrial SpA said it had given the 
go-ahead for negotiations to purchase a stake of 10 percent to 20 
percent in Douglas Aircraft Ox, based in Long Beach. IRL Italy's 
state holding company, owns 90 percent of Finmeccanica. 

McDonnell Douglas, based in SL Louis, would not immediately 
comment. 


** 


U.S. /AT THE CLOSE; 


Stores Post Higher Profits 


Cooptled by Our Sniff From Dapittcka 


NEW. YORK'— Increased retail sales in step with recovering 
US. economy boosted 1993 earnings for three major chains: Wal- 
Mart Stores fnc^ May Department Stores Co. and Home Depot Inc. 
Wal-Mart, ttelargest re tailer in the United Stans, said . net 

percent, to 567345 bOBom 

David Glass, chairman of the Bentonville, Arkansas, retailer, said 
the strong results reflected expansion into Mexico and Canada. At 


Sam’s Chibs, ns wholesale imiL 

May Department Stores earned 5711 million in 1993, up 18 
percent from 1992, the SL Lours-based retailer said. Sales rose 73 
.percent; to SU bilUdo. - 

- The cpmp any said it was fQnddmng buying individual stores or 
groups of stores to further boost sales growth. 

May said it opened 13 new department stores and 216 Payless 
ShoeSource stores last year under a five-year plan to add 100 
department stores and 1,200 Payless ShoeSource stores. 

May abo ope rates Lord ft Taylor, Kaufmarm’s, Robinsons- May. 
Foleys and Hechfs. 

Home Depot Iikl, an Atlanta-based home improvement store 
chain, said its earnings jumped 30 percent in 1993, but bad weather 
and a sharp increase in expenses to open new stores hampered 
stronger gams. 

Home Depot earned $457.4 million in 1993, while sales rose 29 
percent to $934 biffioo. Some of the impact of inclement home- 
tmprovenxajt weather was offset by a construction boom in southern 
Florida. 

(Bloomberg AFX, Reuters) 


Consumer Confidence Slips Slightly ; 

NEW YORK (AFP) — Consumes- confidence in the United States fell ; 
a little in February, the first drop in three months, the Conference Board; 
said Tuesday. 

The board's index of consumer confidence, based on a survey of 5,000 : 
households nationwide, fell to 80.8 from 82.6 in January. In December, 
tbeindra was 79.8, m November 71.9 and m October 60.5. ■ 

Morgan Stanley’s Earnings Up 28% ' 

NEW YORK (AP) — Morgan Stanley Group Inc. on Tuesday report- 
ed a 28 percent jump in fourth-quarter earnings, thanks to strong revenue ; 
from trading and increased investment-banking business. 

Motgan Stanley said its profit for the quarter ended Jan. 31 was $181.2 
milli on, nr y? IS a share, up from $141.8 million, or 51.68 a share, in the 
same quarter of 1992. 

Tomer Broadcasting Earnings Drop • 

ATLANTA (AP) —Turner Broadcasting System Inc. said Tuesday its- 
fourth-quarter earnings dropped sharply because of the absence of one- 
time gams that fattened results a year ago. 

For the year, the owner of Cable News Network and other cable- 
channels lost $244 milli on, mainl y because of a required change in 
accounting. For the quarter ended Dec. 31 , Turner earned $10 million, or 
4 cents a mare, compared with S30 milli on or 1 1 cenis a year earlier. 

For the Record 

Deere ft Co. reported a better-than-expected first-quarter profit of $87' 
million, irflecting increased production and sales. (Bloomberg)] 

UNR Industries Inc, the diversified steel company, said it had ended- 
discussions conceroing the sale of the company after proposals failed to; 
meet the company's expectations. (Knight-Ridder)l 


W— kud Box Offten : 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — - "On Deadly Ground” topped the weekend box- 
office, earning an estimated 514 mini on- Fallowing are the Top 10; 
moneymakers based on Friday ticket sales and estimated sales for. 
Saturday and Sunday. ; 

L ron Deadly Ground" IWamer Brottiersi *14 million * 

1 -J-"Aa» Vwrtura. Pr+DelectTve" - SWcmar Brothers! - - . IHXSmIHIon ; 

3. "Blue ados' I Paramount) JHUmHItaii J ; 

4. "Reality {.Universal) UlS million , 

5. "Blank Check" ( Wall Disney) *6.1 million , 

. 6- "ScWntflert List" l Universal) ® million , 

7. "Mrs. Doutdflre" (Tvientirtt: Century- Fox) S49mUllan , 

Z'MvGIrir (Columft*i PleftraJ *48 million , 

9. "My Father me Hero" ( Touchstone Ptchueei *44mlHton , 

ia "Philadelphia- {TrlStari S4J rrdlUan 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agenci Frame Pine Fob. ZZ 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amro Hid 69 6970 
ACF Mowing S770 58 

Aeoon ioijd K&5Q 

AhoM 51 5070 

A km 215 715-90 

AMEV K30 8140 

BdS-Wooonen 4X60 44 

CSM 7X50 74^0 

DSM 109 109 JO 

Elsevier 181.90 ibj 

Fokker 71 jM 20.90 

GW Brecana sxso sj*o 
HBG 29050 

Halnoken H7J0 231.90 
Hoogovena 6X20 6Z88 
Hunter Dmiolos 89 91 

IHC Cakwtd 4140 4X40 
Inter Mueller 88 88.78 
Inn Hederiara 8630 8640 
KLM 49X0 5350 

KNP BT 4643 4650 

Nedllovd 7ZJ0 7AJO 

OceGrlnten 73JO 78.10 
Paknoed 5550 55 

Phllln 4660 4680 

Polygram 7A.7D 78 

PoDCCO 127.10 127 

Rodomco 6X10 63 .31 

Rollnco 129JO 1 29 JO 

Rorenta 9820 7930 

Royal Dutch 20780 30870 
Stork 4X50 4X30 

Unilever 221-50 227.BQ 

VonOmtwrn atm 5ixo 
VNU 183.20 1 65. tD 

watten/'Kiuwer )»*Q im.70 
EOE taihamn 
Prev too* : 42M3 


Brussels 


Acec -UM 
AG Fin 
Art*d 
Barca 

Bokoert 
Cockerlll 
Cobeaa 
Del hate 
Fl+cirabel 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevaot 
krealettank 
Pefrofina 
Roynrtln 
7oval BekM 
Sac Gen Banaue 


7*05 26)0 
2910 2925 
41B0 4120 
2375 2180 
24575 74650 
178 178 

SffiO 5730 
1440 1442 
6500 6500 
1530 1530 
4330 *340 
9SM 9550 
7510 7aG0 
10225 10375 
3360 3395 
5710 MSI 
3510 8560 


SocGen Betakwe 2800 
5otlna 1*500 14850 

ScJvay 1*700 I4»W 

Traclebel 10«o 11025 

UCB 24200 2*350 

Correal Stock Index : 764864 
Pravwn : with 


Frankfurt 


680 656 
44144X50 
839 845 


31820 (20 

482.50 4 77 

24924920 


AEG 161 SO 161 JO 

AlltoaUHold 2600 2629 

Altana 636 6*0 

AskO 1039 1086 

BASF 290.70294.40 

Bayer 3W.733596D 

Bov. Hvno bank 455 462 
Bov verrtwbk 511 516 
BBC 

BHF Bant 

BMW .. _ 

Common boa* » 15035150 
Conllnenlol 17X50 266 

Daimler Benz 
Deguno 

D1 Bssbcacfc _ _ 

Deutsche Bank 820.50 823 

Douglas _ 560 562 

Orndner Bank 41758 *22 

Fekunuecue 333 334 

P KniPP Hoesch 187 18*50 
Haraener 32232250 

Henkel 60658 «08 

Hochllef 1150 1170 

Hoechkl 297 10 300 

Hdrmgnn 990 9BS 

Horten 233 233 

IWKA 38250 384 

Kail SOI! 155 154 

Kontadt 54020 540 

Kawfhal 47*50 4 J9J8 

KHD 116X13650 

KlaecknerWerke 137 128 
Unde 07750 BS2 

Lufthansa 17718150 

MAH 

Monnesmann 
Meiangeseii 
Mueneh Pueck 
Porsche 
Prewuag 
PWA 
RWE 

Rhemmemn 
Sctierhm 
SEL 
Siemens 
Thyssen 
uorto 
Veto 
VEW 
Vlag 

Vatkswaoen 
WeWa 

RWBji. 


43J43550 
431X42750 
1B2175X 
3220 3330 
B658A7X 
47847850 
227 228 

456 *61 
177 329 

mi jom 
385 no 
689689 10 
257 258 

JH 356 
49UM92X 
3+915050 
4B95D48BX 
448 446 

815 807 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtvitio 

Enso-Gutzelt 

Huhtamakl 

M3J». 

Kymmene 

Metre 

Nokia 

Pah lota 


Stockmann 


151 151 

4X90 43.10 
El 219 
1450 1450 
128 125 

230 235 

318 320 

95 « 

115 11* 

310 305 


HEX. Index ' 190X60 
Prey loci : ihu) 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia J7-50 37 JS 

Camay Pacuic 1160 1260 

Cheang Kang *425 4X2S 

China LigM Pm 4175 42 

Dairy Farm mi l 13 1310 
Hang Lima Dev 1640 io*a 
Hang Seno Bank r i vox 
Horuersnn Lund 4750 *550 
HK Air Ena. 4550 

HK China Gas 19J0 
HK Electric 

HKucnd 

HK Realty Trust 24.10 24.10 
HSBC HoUlnes 117 116 

HK snera Hits 

MK Telecomm 
HK F erry 
Hutch Whampoa 
Him Dev 
J Grain* Main 
J amine 5tr Mia 

Kowloon Motor 

Mandarin Or lent 11.70 1150 
Miramar Hotel 24X0 2450 
New world Dev 
SHK Praas 
Sletar 

Swire Poc A 

Tot Chctino Prps 1340 1330 
TVE 353 153 

Wwrt Hold 3X25 30.75 
wing on tan na — 
Wlnsor I no. 1X60 13 

.... .Mtim 

: 10456.46 


a> 

2JL70 2640 
26 310 


1240 1X30 
1490 1*50 
12 1180 
36 3475 
26.10 26.10 
7X50 72 

33 3X50 
1640 15.70 


32.75 3? 

6150 57JH) 
5.10 5 

56 5450 


Johannesburg 


AECI 



Altor+i 



Anglo Amer 

193 


Bor tows 

2050 

288(1 

Blrvoor 

7.75 


Butfets 



De Brers 

105 


DHeloniein 

4945 

49JB 

Gencor 

843 

140 

GFSA 

M 

97 

Harmony 

2X.-3 


HlgtiveW Stan 

17.75 


KlWJl 

4Z.’i 

42 JO 

IMObank Grp 

2735 


Rond lantern 



RUMlal 

78 

78 




SI Helena 



Sawl 



Meltoim 



Western Deep 

H7 

176 

Composite Index 
Previous : 481742 

480183 


London 


Atttev Not) 
Allied Lron* 
Ariu Wgglns 
Aravii Group 
Ass Bril Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Ban* Scotland 

Bar clan 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Baals 
Bawdier 
BP 

Bfll Alrwovs 
Brit Gas 
Bril Sleel 
Bril Telecom 
BTR 

CabJe Wire 
Cadhury Sch 
Caraton 
Coats VireOa 
Comm Union 
CourtauMs 
ECC Group 
EmerarNe Oil 
Earatumter 
FiSOIH 
Pone 
GEC 

Gem acc 

Gtoxa 
Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 
GU5 
Hon son 
HHHdOwn 
HSBC Hides 
ICI 


S.KI 

esn 

197 

252 

143 

9.78 

SJ9 

5.73 
116 
4J3 

142 
160 
6-94 
5J* 
4.90 
307 

4.73 
338 

143 
4J6 
172 
4J4 
5 '5 
*. *5 
XA7 
6^7 
4 50 
*05 
*J9 
35B 
128 
753 
131 

6.48 

0.75 
4 47 
XI9 
516 
412 
ITS 
1.77 
10.07 
746 


5.13 

Loa 

Z96 

Z5i 

550 

9J8 

528 

224 
576 
54)7 
4.78 
1.C 
160 
6.98 
538 
484 
164 
*57 
X38 

1.42 

4.43 
167 
4.n 
515 
420 
:« 
635 
4.03 
492 
*28 
545 
128 
157 
323 

677 

678 
449 

225 
5-13 
SJO 
IX 
1.74 

10.01 

758 



Ctaee Prev. 

1 netscape 

X65 

574 

Kingfisher 


6.12 

Ladbroke 

1.97 

2 

Land Sec 

7.14 

721 

Laporte 

883 

U2 

Lasmo 

127 

128 

Lean] Gen Grp 

485 

487 

LJavds Bonk 

584 

£.*2 

Marks So 



ME PC 

4.97 


Non Power 



ftatwesf 

5-33 

X33 

NltiWxt water 

X61 

X6C 

Pearson 

7 


P 8. D 

7 

6-94 

Pllhtnjiwi 

1.98 

1.97 

PawerGen 

X65 

571 

PrudenUai 

128 

323 

Rank Ora 

HUB 


Reck iff Col 

688 


Red land 

X77 

583 

Pond mil 

*85 


Reuters 

20X5 

206* 

RMC Group 

945 

9M 


T.75 


Rolhmn lunlH 

485 

AM 



4.71 

Rt; 

013 

B.1B 

5a ins bury 

348 

338 

Seal Newcas 

X28 

X17 

Scat Poviet 

432 

432 

Sears 

1.18 

1.17 

Severn Trent 

582 

587 

Shell 

7.1* 

720 

Siebe 

588 

587 

5 mi Ri Nephew 

149 

148 

Smith Kline B 



Smith (WHI 

584 

4.VS 


159 

373 

Tata & Lyle 

481 

436 

Tosco 

Z24 

Z28 




Tomkins 


281 


242 

245 

Unilever 

11JB 

12JD 

Uld Btscvlts 

344 

344 


6.03 

6)5 

War Loan 3‘1 

49 J6 

5056 

Wellcome 

647 

641 




Wlluams Hans 

197 

195 

mills CofToon 

ZU 

111 

F.T. 39 Index : S7XN 

KSEWi!&«u. 

Prevhxn : Jssoua 



Madrid 

BBV 3360 3325 

Bco Central HIM. 2915 2925 
Banco Santander 7050 7030 


CEPSA 
□rooodos 
Endesa 
Ercros 
Iberdrola I 
Rensai 
Tatocalera 
Telefonica 


JW5 3055 
2415 2380 
7350 7350 
162 154 

1065 1080 
6540 6560 
4100 4090 
7005 2000 


te&s rir :3D " 


Milan 

Banco Comm 5940 6221 

Baih»l 85 .50 SB 

Benetton arouo 36400 27190 

CIR J, SL S !3 

Credllol 2630 2670 

Enichem 2*35 2465 

Feritn 1921 1968 

Ferlin Riw 810 838 

Flat SPA 6851 «65 

Flnmccconka 1800 1JS 

Generali •ssza 41«td 

IFI 19000 19150 

I talent* »2M) 1J780 

Halgos _S38I 5S-T0 

italmoWllarc 38600 39800 

Meatoconco 15500 160S 

Montedison 1U2 I1M 

OUveW 2296 2362 

Pirelli 44J0 4S50 

PAS 266X 27750 

Rtooscente 9965 10060 

Salaein 3295 3360 

San Paott Torino ID9S0 11110 
SIP 4790 4351 

SME 3800 3801 

Snta 1980 1945 

Slanda 326OS32550 

Stel 005 4768 

Tore Atji Ptaa 29360 29850 

Ml 8 index : H89 
Prsrkjui : 1891 


Montreal 


63™! 44 

I91« 1915 

194* »ly 

t«6 n» 


2 lorn Aluminum NO. — 
Bank Montreal 29 iSv* 
Bell Canada 
Bomtiamier a 
Camel or 

Cascades . _ . _ 

Dominion Terr A TV, 7*9 
Donohue A 26>>3 MMi 
MoeMllkta Bl 22to 22S 
Noll Bk Conooo IDS, n-,3 
Power Cora. TffVfi 20 1 * 
Oue&ac Tel 214* 215* 
OhetosorA rr.k in 
Ouebecor B ISIS 19 
TekgkXte 20% 28H 

Untvu 7 6>y 

Videotron 29to 29to 

Previiiiis: 


Owe Prev. 


Paris 

Accor 
Air Ltoulde 
Alcmaf Alslhom 
Axa 

Boncolre fCJol 

BiC 

BNP 

Carre tour 


714 709 
815 830 
718 714 
1458 1658 
636 631 
1329 1330 
278 771 
734 712 
914 908 
4055 403 


CC.F- 278 277 JO 

c ®ru3 148.40 14040 

Oiarpeuri 1390 1392 

gnw Ms F ranc 37tso 279 

CluBMed 35X50 346 

Ell-Aqullatne 414J» 415 


EH-Sanofl 
Eura Dune 
Gen. Eaux 
Havas 
Imctal 


1080 T067 
3475 3645 
2712 2685 
451 44970 
642 666 


L ataroe Coopee 45970 458JD 
Umrand 5740 5660 

Lvun. Eaux 572 569 

Orcal (L'l 1272 1256 

i-VAAX. 3934 3890 

Matra+tochette 164 16640 
MIctollnB 244.9025080 
Moulinex 1Z7 121 

PorUxn 522 510 

Pechlnevintl 2IQ 30X30 
Pernod- Rlcard 407 JO job 

Peugeot 839 833 

Prtnremps (Au) 996 996 

Radiorecittitaue — — ‘ 


Rh-Pouleftc A 
Raff. SI. Louts 
Redoute (La) 
Sainl Gatxdn 

S.E.B. 

SleGenerale 
Suez 


530 524 

141 MOJO 
1658 1634 
097 89a 

662 674 

S84 500 

725 777 

34650J45.N) 


Thamson-CSF 19X50 190 


Total 

UAP. 

Valeo 


331 32979 
20650 20470 
1460 1460 




Saopauio 

Bones do Brasil 16.10 1ZW 


Banesoa 

Bradesco 

Brahma 


FetroSras 
T deems 
vote Ria Does 
varig 


8 7.70 
1150 1050 
160146JW 
1460 1480 
115 TOO 
29 JO 3S7U 
72 61 .DO 
100 IDO 


Singapore 

CerebM BJO 755 

Citv Dev. sjss 1 75 

DBS 1Z20 13 

Frwr Neow 19.10 1850 
Denting 1780 1750 

Golden Hone Pi ztj ZBS 
HdwPor 343 3J8 

Hume Industries *j* am 
inchcon: 558 sjsb 

K8PMI 
KLKeoong 
Lum Chang 
Matovan Banka 
JCBC 


OUB 
OUE 

Semtowana 
Stongrtki 
SUmDarinr 
SIA 

Store Land 
Store Pres 

SlngStoomiMp .... 

Store Teteanun 164 367 
5trall» Trading 352 182 

UOB 1080 1060 

UOL 279 Z20 


1140 11.10 
124 358 
151 187 
885 180 
1150 1170 
190 175 
7.10 780 
1460 1198 
US 175 
383 177 
7.95 785 
7.15 685 
14.90 IS 
480 380 


Stockholm 

AGA 461 660 

**« A MO 563 

Astro a n» nr 

Allas Copco 4*6 645 

Electrolux B 395 396 

Ericsson 36 6 366 

Euelle-A 122 122 

Handel SOonhon 128 NA 

investor B 20) 307 

Norsk Hydro. 23450 255 


PraegrdiaAF 
Sandvtk B 
SCA-A 
S-E Banken 
Skandla F 
Skansko 
SKF 
Stora 

Tnritotorg BF 
Volvo 


145 I6S 
130 133 
14S 146 

6650 NA 
170 182 
716 718 
148 149 
458 459 
86 8680 
651 NA 


j Close Prev. j 

1 Sydney 



1086 

9.96 

ANZ 

£50 

531 

BHP 

1820 

1784 


449 

441 

Bougcinvllle 

1.16 

1.16 

Coles Myer 

584 

5 


5 

579 

CRA 

17.92 

1770 

CSR 

588 

472 

Dunloa 

XU 

520 


UU 

1-28 




ICI Australia 

1X34 

1X26 

Maoeffon 

285 

Z10 


280 

Z73 

NatAusI Bank 

1Z16 

1174 

NewsCcrp 

10.16 

1088 


588 

£84 

N Broken HUI 

388 

336 

Pioneer Inti 

281 

ZB4 

Nmrvry Poseidon 

ZI5 

275 


138 

135 


4.1* 

4.10 

TNT 

235 

2JS 

Western Mlnlno 

723 

7.18 


5.10 

4.92 

Woodside 

43 

485 

AH anflnariM Index : 2202L50 
Prariawi : 217158 

I Tokyo 


Akol Etactr 



Aaahl Chemical 

684 


AsaW Glees 

1130 

1110 

Bank of Tokyo 

ISM 


Bridgestone 

1420 

1430 

Canon 

1620 

1600 

Cask) 



Dal Nippon Print 

1820 


Dahya House 

1630 

1630 

Doiwa Sedirlliee 

1450 

1«559 

Fan lie 

4290 

4340 

Full Bank 

2110 

2159 

Full Photo 

2570 

2560 

Fulltsu 

ina 

1010 

HHOCM 

980 


HltoOll COOta 

796 


Honda 

1680 

1S60 

IIP Vokodo 

5570 

5500 


663 



618 

622 

Kollma 

909 

915 


2830 

2810 

Kawasaki Steel 

340 

339 

Kirin Brewery 

lies 

1188 



822 

Kubota 

623 

623 

Kyocera 

6690 

6700 

Matsu EMC Inds 

IA90 

1720 

Matsu Elec Wks 

1140 

1W) 

AUhublsMBk 

2ETO 

7B2D 




MltsubWiI Elec 

at 

XA 

Mitsubishi Hev 

663 

670 

MHsubhlh Cora 

1060 

1080 




Mltsuhcssti 

845 

■42 

HilMwml 

1910 

1840 

NEC 

1070 

108S 

NGK insulators 

1050 

1050 

Nlkko Securities 

1250 

1240 

Nippon KogcAu 

936 

930 

Nipaanrai 

m 

721 

Nippon Sled 

337 

340 


4*1 

Ml 

Nissan 

807 

ICO 

Wcmura5ec 

22411 

KKl 

NTT 

1340a 9l4tto 


HDD 

HUD 

Pioneer 

7580 

2570 

maxi 

749 

750 

Sanyo EMC 

448 

454 

Sharp 

1610 

1580 

5m menu 

67D 

665 

Shfnatsu Chem 

1990 

1998 

Sony 

61 HI 

6110 

Sumitomo Bk 

2130 

2140 

Sumitomo Chem 

420 

425 

Sumi Marine 

868 

876 

Smninmo Metal 

270 

778 

Tftiael Core 

670 

678 

Taisna Marine 



TatetaGhem 

1270 

1230 


4009 

4050 

Tellln 



T«yo Marine 

1300 

1290 

Tokyo Elec Pw 



Toppan Prinfim 

1320 

1330 

Tortr* ina. 



Toshiba 

726 


Toyota 

1900 

1930 

YatnalcW Sec 
a:* IM 

N8du)22s: 19343 

825 

814 

Previous : »394 

TsMX lDOev : 1577 
Prevtou* ; 1379 



Toronto 


AMtibi Price 

ir* 


AOMcoEovIe 

IP* 

IS* 




Alberta Energy 

NV, 

19ft 

Am Barrie* Res 

Sta 

Uk- 

BCE 

48ft 

47ft 


3IW» 

KPS 

DC Gas 

15ft 

151b 


25 k. 

25L. 

BF Realty Hds 

083 

883 


045 

046 


9Vi 

9V» 

CAE 

Sto 

Sto 


490 

5 


33*- 

33+i 

Canadian Pacific 

221b 

23 


Con Packers 

13 

131k 

Can Tire A 

13ft 

12ft 

Confer 

47ft 

46ft 

Caro 

445 

4ft 

CCL Ind B 

9Sfc 

9ft 

CbMPlex 

485 

410 

Comlnco 

19toi 

lift 

CanwestExpl 

23 

22ft 

Denison MinB 

ms 

ms 

Dickenson Min A 

Vu 

6ft 

Dotasco 

24ft 

24 

DviexA 

0.76 

080 

Echo Bay Mines 

16ft 

16ft 

Eaully Silver A 

182 

1 

FCAinll 

140 

3ft 

Fed Ind A 

8ft 

8ft 

Ftafeher ChallA 

20ft 

wto 

FPI 

*30 

480 

Gentra 

0.53 

049 

GoWCorp 

Sft 

6ft 

GuitCddRes 

4.40 

4JS 

Hreslntl 

15ft 

15to 

Memto GW Mines 

I2U 

12' i 

H oil taper 

14ft 

14ft 

Horsham 

18' « 

18ft 

Hudsons Bov 

31 

3CFb 

Imasco 

39 

38ft 

Inca 

34ft 

33ft 

Interprav pipe 

31ft 

31ft 

Jotmock 

21ft 

21ft 

Lacatt 

Ztft 

22ft 

LabtawCo 

23 

2» 

Mackenzie 

Iffto 

lO 1 - 

Magna Inti A 

66ft 

66 ft 

Mar dime 

21ft 

23ft 

Mark Rm 

8ft 

Sft 

MacLean Hunter 

Mto 

loft 

Matson A 

26ft 

26’. 

Noma Ind A 

7 

7 

Noroiidp Inc 

24*4 

24ft 

Noranda Forest 

13ft 

12ft 

Nereen Energy 

15 

15 

Ntiwn Telocom 

40*. 

41ft 

Nava Corp 

9iy 

9 Vi 

Oshawa 

21 to. 

21ft 

PogurinA 

US 

335 

Placer Dome 

31ft 

JS). 

Poco Petrotaam 

9ft 

*"J 

pwa Corp 

1.19 

1.16 

Rayradi 

17ft 

!7ta 

Renatasancr 

28ft 

27ft 

Wooers B 

21ft 

21ft 

RoiDmans 

187 

IBS 

Rayol Bank Can 

29ft 

2?'a 

Sceatre Res 

13ft 

Uft 

Scott's How 

Sft 

J 4 * 

Seagram 

39 

38ft 

Sears Can 

7ft 

7ft 

Shell Can 

38ft 

17ft 

Sherrill Gordon 

lift 

lift 

shl Svstemnsc 

9ft 

9‘. 

Southern 

17ft 

16ft 

Sear Aerospace 

19ft 

19ft 

Staled A 

8ft 

Sft 

Talisman Energ 

29ft 

29ft 

Tack B 

24ft 

24ft 

ThamonNevri 

16ft 

Uft 

Toronto Damn 

21ft 

28ft 

Torslar B 

2P: 

Sft 

Transalta Util 

16 

15ft 

TransGdtoPIpe 

ifto 

19ft 

Trltan Fim A 

4j3) 

431) 

TrifflOC 

17 

16ft 

TrlzecA 

889 

0.92 

Unkora Energy 

D73 

075 

USBKWm 




Zurich 


AdiaiMIB 

214 

245 

Alusutsse Brew 

602 

602 

BBC Brans 0ov 3 

11)65 

10M 

ObaGetav S 

899 

*83 

CS Holdings B 

IWI 

69) 

Elektrsj^B 


3825 

Fischer B 

1235 

1258 


2360 

2390 

JelmollB 

870 

900 

Landis Grr R 

*67 

967 

Leu HUB 

600 

(30 


426 

■WS 

Nestle R 

1330 

1338 

OtrULBuehrieR 

U4 

153 

ParocsaHkJB 

1598 

1600 

RocnoHdoPC 

7D1D 

HA 

Sofra Republic 

145 

145 

Sanaa: B 

3975 

«70 

Schlndtar 8 

7300 

7300 

SulrerPC 

910 

910 

Surveillance B 

1950 

na 

swKsBnkCatPB 

«a 

489 

Swiss Retnsur R 

640 

647 

SwtswIrR 

828 

815 

UBSB 

1447 

1451 

Wlnterftw 3 

775 


Zurich ass B 

1490 

ism 

ismar* 


To our reatbra hi Austria 


hnmhmnkB' 

to tubnibe out hvil 

AidaJidMee: 
OdflOBISS 
mime 06069- 1 756 1 3 


U.S. FUTURES 


Season Season 






High 

Low Oocn 

High 

Low 

Cose 

dig 

OpJnt 


Grains 




WHEAT 

X94ft 

(CBOT) MPOhumrtnwn-d 
380 Mu 94 345ft £65to 

linir 

JuSfl 

r j3ft -8.06ft 


177 

100 Mo»94 3Jlto 

35414 

JJ0 

£57ft— mnft 



2-94 M 94 141 to 

347 

£38 

X40 





£44 

X4U 








-081ft 


£56 '-'f 




357ft— 883ft 









Esl. vales ID-MO Frit sate 

6925 





Fn's open tat 44411 an I2M 






(KBOT) sa»bun«m«iv4D*i:»riiiBlB 



3.92 

798 fltor«4 159 

159*. 

£5616 

157 

-884 

’S® 

im.i 





3.55 


£»V. 

£16 

136ft— 085 

HLI* 

3J5ft 


139 

137ft 

X38 

—084ft 

2JIB 

£40 




£46 



153". 




UBft— 887ft 

40 


46M 





Ffl'soo+n vil 34414 an sn 












111ft 


TMV, 

284V, 

189 

+ 080ft 


£14'6 




25Sft 



llfT 


2.98ft 

193ft 

Z9Bft 

+ 881 


£92"- 


253ft 

279J+ 

2JQ 

* 080ft 


273 ft 

234' /Dec 94 247ft 

258to 

255ft 

168ft *080 ft 



753 , YMl> l 95 Z73 

Z74 

171 

174 

+6BH* 


1B3 

2_»3 Mir, 95 277 

Z7Bft 

276ft 

27814 

+ 880ft 


783ft 

Z74'«iul95 17B>6 

2J9to 

zn 

179ft— 0885* 



251 Dec 95 751 

252 

251 

151ft 

+«80ft 


Ey. safes sxon Fit's, nm 

48,711 





Fn soaenmi 3*0508 8B9 





SOYBEANS (CBOT) LSOOBu 


wb-M 



S8?WMor94 to73 



679 



751 

X97toMnv9d 4J9ft 



6116ft 

,089 


7JD 






755 


684 ’6 


683ft +605VS 


tStft 

61) ScJJW 444 

668 

668ft 

667ft 

‘084 ft 


rsr-. 

iSStoNOwM 651 

656ft 

648 

656ft 

+085 


470 













£73 

4.47to AH 95 



666ft + 003ft 


6Sr.r 

Ul to Nov VS 625 




+OJD3V, 


Esl sales S280B Fit's, soles 

31714 










SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) lnns-c 




Z3750 

IflSJOMorM 19150 

TOJO 

19130 

19X10 

+1.10 



IBX5DMOV94 19440 

I960B 

19628 

19699 







197.10 



22180 

19150 Aw *4 19450 

19620 

19630 

HX80 

+ 130 



I89JDSCP94 17250 

19X08 

192*1 

19690 



3)680 

Ur.lOOCtH 19280 

19X50 

19280 

19X50 

+ 170 


7O9JD0 

458 Dec 94 19149 

19350 

191.40 

19X70 

• 180 


moo 







Est. safes 17800 Fit's, ma- 

13,71 ( 





Ri’iopcnmt toj m art to 








30.75 

2M3MOT94 28.16 

2X59 

27.95 

2884 

+838 


3045 



27.96 





7155JUI9* 2613 


2784 




ax 

2155 Aufl M 2755 

2825 

2753 

BJO 



288) 

22. 48 Sep 94 2788 

2780 

7735 

2177 

+0J2 






M89 

*6» 


7680 

aVODccVJ 2682 

3675 

2X65 

2624 

1 022 













26B5 

+615 


2XB 

2SJ0M<r'75 



2X60 

+615 


Esl. sow 21800 FrrXH*3 

1 MM 





Fn’socenlw 18)874 up USD 






Livestock 




CATTLE 

(CMS)) eLDOom.- 


ta 




O.JS 

7120Aw94 75JB 

74J7 

7588 

7582 

* 630 37.1*9 


7155 Jun 94 7630 





7387 

KL28Aug94 7138 

71S7 

7307 

7X15 


7192 

71.87 OCt 94 7177 

73.92 

7385 

7X57 



7438 

7135 Dec *4 7608 

74JQ 

7385 

7195 

+088 

l.ww 

7425 

7380 FA 95 7362 

7167 

7147 

7X57 


720 

.’£» 

7328 Apr 9J 7X80 

7X80 

76M 

«J0 



Esl. Mies 11665 Rfs. sales 

78*4 





Frr&apenknl ALTld off 1503 





FSDER CATTLE (CMEH) 

anon-tm 



4.200 

BS-3S 

7V52NUX94 81.95 

82« 

Bl 

8777 

+0*5 

8X00 

7*38 ATT 94 8UD 

8185 

8085 

8187 

• 838 

2805 

*440 

7U0MOV93 BUB 

8155 

■18/ 

81.0/ 

+059 

1477 

sun 

795S7kwe4 8155 

8280 

81* 

8187 

+ 647 

IXM 

8150 


8158 

8180 

81 JO 

+880 

JB 

81.10 

79JOOdH 8055 

SUB 

SO.Vi 

8095 

+ 048 

*3 

na 

7t.4SNCV 94 HI 56 

8185 

6185 


,0.40 

155 

dost 

79 00Jaii9a 8057 

Ml/? 

UUI) 

UA7 

+0» 

i 

Ett.Mtas 1.538 Fh*s.646M 
Frrsooenint 11J92 up n 

857 





HOGS (CMBl! A0NM.-cMparb. 





51 71 

3957AWM *950 

MM 

*80 

58-15 

taxi 1X8B5 

S627 

4£77 Jun94 5X00 

5580 

1480 

stuv 

* US 

78* 

5X37 

4X30 ISM 5630 

5197 

5635 

54.95 

+OIB 

1963 

SLA) 

*655 Aid 96 5145 

5197 

5185 

5187 

+075 

Z55B 

49.7S 

4MOOd94 4&25 

4X75 

«2S 

470 

+043 

l,*7 

5058 

JUODecM *82 

*.* 

49 JC 

a* 

+BJ8 

1.188 

5080 

*160 Feb 95 *65 

49« 

*85 

*.92 

*0.77 

227 

4KO) 

Al 98 Apr 95 



48.15 

+6* 

65 

Esl. sixes £147 Fn’rate 

X4*9 





Ft, soom Int 30J59 off 1173 





POfDCBaXXB (CMEK) iDJODk-es^Mi) 



Si. IS 

37.10 Feb 94 SUS 

5650 

MAS 

BJO 

+193 

1 

6890 


»97 

5780 

5887 

1 1.90 

1371 

4189 


5957 

57 JO 

59 JZ 

+280 

4311 

47.00 

37J0/MM 5755 

5947 

KJ3 

5935 

+ 1 78 

issj 

5950 

4100 Aua 96 5X30 

5725 

w_TH 

5677 

+ 1.42 

a 

Esl. tales 3801 Fn'vstXm 
FrlLOPDIkg 9.2S4 Off 315 

Mn 






1 Season Season 






Hoh 

Law Open 

Htah 

Law 

Close 

on 

aunt 

1131 

1837 May 93 11.13 

11.16 

11.10 

li.i) 

—0.1* 

620 

UJ1 

1ft* Jut 95 11.15 



n.ii 

-114 

338 

H30 

1X57 Od 95 11.14 






Est.scses 35380 FWs.stf« 

1733) 





FrrSOWn IrV T2A7BS off 2009 






INCSEJ ltiwfcion»-!p«r«>n 




1495 

953 Mw 9* 1146 

1150 

1130 

1UJ 

—3 

1,09 

1268 

978 May 94 1156 
999 JUl 94 11 SO 



n* 

+3 34883 

1365 





1377 

188) SOT 96 1285 

1712 

1191 


+5 

1422 

13V 

1041 Dec 91 1223 

1344 

1227 



6465 

1382 

1077 Mar 95 1260 

1262 

UW) 

1271 

+6 

7.916 

1*0 

linMavH 1278 

1290 

1271 

1389 

+4 


1407 

1225 8493 1303 

1310 


□Of 

+5 

1350 






481 





IIS) 

+5 


Esl. soles 5394 FWLldes 

200801 



1 Frfs 0PW1 W _KJ.W2__on 1243 





13625 

8650 Mar 94 W7J5 

187.75 

10680 


—180 

*867 

135.00 

8980 May 94 MUD 
10X50 Jul 96 11330 

116711 

10980 

109.15 

-6AS 

£791 






3496 

13658 

UXSOSepH 11X78 

11X70 


11620 

-1.15 


13680 

leBOOMtaM 11735 






mm 

10X50 JOn 95 11980 

11900 

lift* 



932 

12625 

10680 Mor 95 11930 

119J0 


11678 

—LIS 


Esr.sdes 1700 F>rs.saka 
FtfsonenM 18333 UP 28 

IJI29 






Food 

COFFEE C (NCSE) F.toln-m«rw6. 
«U5 61 JO Mar 94 77 JO 71J0 7525 

90.50 CL2JMov«4 79J0 T9J0 7675 

OSS 6490649* MUD 8058 7KJ0 

JLSB 6880 Sep 94 8165 BUS 7938 

9100 77 IQDec94 BUS 8175 8160 

17 JO 76.90 Mar 95 1175 BITS BZ50 

S5JS 0-50 Mnv9S 8X75 8375 8X75 

lUt ftHAIK 

Ed.Wto 18867 Frtvsatos 7830 
Fri'+oennh) 41.136 off 482 
SUOM-WORL0 II (NCSE) uuab-em 
1189 lHMar94 19.97 1180 KUO 

n Q UOMOV94 11.25 I US 11.17. 

11.73 9.I5JUU4 HAS 1144 lUS 

11 « ICOdM 11.17 1UI 1188 

1137 9l7*6ar«5 11.12 11.14 IU9 


7630 
78.10 
79 JD 
8875 
8L90 
BZ95 
8X70 
600 


1089 
M4M 
I US 
11.16 
1 UJ 


— 0J0 ZTO 
-AJ5 3047S 
-445 6 . 966 
—885 4882 
-8H 1882 
—455 966 

-IAS 27 
-185 I 


—422 17867 
-025 99893 
—420 26868 
-415 19,918 
-414.3858 


Metals 

(NCMX) BMU-atawa. 
H7J0 7X00 Mar 94 B6JO 8720 B5J5 8U0 

9418 74JDAprM 8LM 87.N BUS BcLSD 

HX20 7X60 May 94 86.90 8780 B6J0 BA75 

89 JO 74.HJUnW 8780 (780 0780 BAM 

10295 7480 JUl 94 S7XO 8T.55 868) MSB 

1SU0 7480SEP96 17 JO 07JS 87 JO B7JB 

1OL90 7X75 Dec W 88.10 88.10 8720 B7J5 

8770 7690 Jon 9S S8JD SSU8 M3B DAS 

99 A0 73J»Feti95 8X90 86.90 8623 8SJ0 

8970 6279 Mix' 79 1870 8(70 UJ0 B78S 

8+80 7685 MOV 95 8785 

87.90 TZOBJUTS 6885 

88.70 7570 AW vs 8780 67 JO 87J0 8780 

9030 79.10 S4P 75 K25 

88J0 75200095 87.95 DK 87.95 87.15 

BUQ 7775 Nov VS 8419 8418 8410 8725 

W.W IBJ) Dec 95 8885 

Est.nAB 204)00 Ml safe* 10,191 
Frt'SOpenM 6*261 up 163 
SILVER (NCMX} UOOireyeL-anWiMreevca. 


5360 

55L5 

536J 

5555 

56X0 

5612 

57X0 

5664) 

57X0 

5844) 

5954) 

tain 


4654) Fed 94 5213 

3664) Mar 94 SUA 52X0 5MA 52L5 

530-0 Ape 74 52X7 

3712MOV94 5178 S65 5178 5XSA 

3712 JUl W 5212 5302 3212 5X87 

37645 Sep 96 5312 571 J 5305 53X4 

3902 Dec 94 5318 BV2 5302 5172 

401 2 Jan « 5X0 5378 5JV2 5388 


+430 22871 
+040 

+450 3Z0B7 
+420 868 

♦055 7289 
+450 3288 
+4AS 1662 
+045 

+030 369 

+045 1J87 
+045 
+045 
+LB 

+ 045 160 

+040 


+ 32 1 

+3JS6J40 

+18 1 

+38 31217 
+19 19J0O 
+ 19 3J38 
+19 1493 
♦ 19 


4162 May 95 
42024(495 
4902 Sep 95 

5392 Dec 95 

Esc Hies 21808 Fl+Lldto 3 
FTsagenU Ilim up 119 


2684)000 M 

41480 37420 Jan H 40120 40120 3K4H 
40120 39050 APT 95 49120 40120 «14» 

Est. sales 2,«2 Fri's.satas 3,737 
Mi's ooen Inf 22778 t*> 331 
GOLD (NCMX) ■OH, b .,M*<Mrinvw 

41570 33U0FtoW 37BJB 3J9ib 37728 

29(30 3765DMOT94 379.50 3J9J0 379.M 27880 -140 t 

41X59 33X20 As* 94 380AD 361.10 377 JO 379JO -Z« 69,171 

4T780 33040 Jw 94 38220 383.19 37980 30120 -240 3*4*4 

41X80 9*1 JO AIM 94 3844) 38X60 30X58 3834) -240 5866 

4T7JB 36480 Od 94 38640 3(640 38621 38588 -Z40 4889 

426J0 KUKDaen 389JO 38980 387.10 36830 -340 13817 

41180 36U0FW9S 39L5D 391 JO 371 21 39080 -240 

4T7J09 36450APT9S 39480 SHOO SHOO 39349 -340 3406 

361J0Jun95 3M.10 -130 Z9Z7 

30LS0AUB95 39180 -2J0 . 

4102000 95 401J8 -130 

4220 DecK 404JD 40UB 4D4J0 4D6JB —XX 3806 

J 201)80 FfTS-Sdes 4X472 

FmeOMW 139495 up $99 





5*78 

+X9 


5523 

+38 





5617 

+3J 

747 


397.10 

—380 18,137 

39X50 

-+3JB 

1437 

397.10 

— X58 

489 




19X98 

-ISO 

216 

H 

— 130 

B7 


Financial 

UST.BIXS KMQO slnStaDn-tosriloapct. 

9627 94.11 Mor 94 98J4 9466 9662 9X65 11430 

9676 96.15 JunM 9632 9634 9629 9632 —021 XUU 

9648 HBSspH N83 94M .9001 9683 -081 Wri 

94.10 oxactacw 9X68 9X68 9X0 9541 18N 

Est ton 4497 FihiHts 0238 
nrscpeia* 42A» up raw 

JYR. TREASURY {QBOT) ^ iUUD0taWM4ttkan» 

113- OSB9-265 Mar*(W4S 110-06 107-27 118-045* 055 

117- OSW445 JunWWMB 109+15 WWWW9.13S 055 

118,195109-37 SOP 94 _ 108-30+ 055 

Est-Mdes 61800 PCvtoH 50848 

FrTsopenH 241.l Bp_.ic_ 18718 

16 TR. TREASURY JC0OH wn4towto-vt>4.«Mk0i«iK> 

116-00 HB-00 MOf *6111-00 111-33 111-08 111-31 , 08 

115-31 180-19 Jon 94 110-14 H0-H 110-13 110-36 + 07 

115- 01 NO-31' S6P94 118-00 DO-OS 109-39 189-31 + 06 

114- 21 1O0-» DOC 94 lOt- 13 109-13 109-13 MJ9-13 ♦ D6 

111- 07 WhV M«r« 108-24 ♦ 86 

Ett.telai 80801 Frftsdes 116.VS3 ' 

Fri’sapenM 2H845 u p 1199 1 

US TREASURY BONDS (COOT) PhAjatoiet WBwil 

125-31 9*00 MB 94113-10 1U-07 112-00 11343 + 14 

119-29 91-04 Jun 94 111-18 117-05 111-07 11341 » O 

118- 26 90-12. SCPH I1IKB 111-07 119-13 1114B *14 

1M-08 91-19 Dec94 110-13 11846 1H81 11843 + W 

116- 38 WMO MarV5U0-H WO-JT 189-31 100-31 + U 

115- 19 18-15 Jim 93 WM1 + 13 

112- 15 10980 5(095180-14 H84S TOt-OB 108-35 + 13 

111-14 H6-25 DBMS . „ MO-08 + 11 

ESL SOW 338800 Fyrs.wtor 487.135 - 
FrTsaaenM 460705 ts 3HM 

MUtSOFALBOMU (COOT) fWtoW*v-<eiAtonhernapet 
105-13 9943 MarMMO-33 HI-08 W-n MO-37 + » 

104-07 9W6 Jun 94 9*-!7 WM1 99-U 99-3T ♦ 03 

Est SOW 4800 RYS-SaW 150B 
Fi+iouento 34719 off - 475 
EURODOLLARS 1CKDO Pljajf+hPWIktt 
9X69 9X31 Me 94 9X39 9633 9639 9632 

9A40JU1M SX#6 «* 9SX 9U6 
9086 See 9* 9X0 *U7 9X40 9X44 

90JlDecM 

9X34 Mar 95 


9671 

968* 

9641 

9SJ0 

9X60 

9X0 


9X37 «X30 9X35 <081353,143 

9XM 9XB0 9X0 +xoam!R 

RL71JUn« H8T H86 «JB KU +88317X412 

91 81540*5 9660 9443 9657 9643 -003140,194 

/ 

1 


Season Season 
Htah Low 


Open Htoh Law Close Chg OoJnr, 
9631 9636 + BJO 10X71 4. 


9X81 91.18 Dec 95. 9634 9638 

Est sales NA. Fr+xistos 371J8J 
FWsOPe nW 7JSM2V UP 31664 
BRITISH POUND (CMBU IMTHU+Ittolmtol 
L53M LAROMarf* 147M 1.4796 14732 14771 

1J150 1.4474JUI96 14m 14740 14m 14730 

1.4930 14440 Sep 94 14690 14700 14650 14m 

14V30 14300 Dec 94 14664 

Esl sales *8M FrTxsrtes 1UD7 
Frf'SOpanW 4Z730 UP 434 
rn*mninv ir| n | * A|> ioheri 
88712 0i737IMarM 87^2 17478 07437 0J470 

07805 0J365Jun94 07438 07473 07415 07464 

07740 0J3*3SepV* 67430 07464 07*79 07461 

07670 0731 5 Dec 94 07432 07460 07410 07458 

07605 07375McrV5 07455 

07522 07374 Jun 95 07451 

Est saw 66X2 Fit’s sdes 6186 
FM’sopeiWai.971 all 422 
GERMAN MARK (CMBR1 SMrmk- 1 hHnuHI 
0J2O5 0J647MO-M 0J780 0995 05755 0J788 

DA133 05407 Jim 94 05736 05763 05735 05738 

06065 05608 Sep 94 05715 05737 85715 05738 

0J730 assnoecH asm 

Est tatas 46834 FrTs.Joles 40850 
FtfsapenM 137839 Off 313 

J APANESE YPJ (CMCT1 i wwlpmw WIU 
XOQ9V3OXOQ08OflMor94IUIO9iiaLQO9S22OJ)Oro77tLO0V475 
08899481800871 Jun 94 08BV6«OXa09I I1 0Xli n M4 IH JOn«13 
080998aU08943Sep94 0809548080*59508095530809559 
Dm 94 0809613 

ESI. total 328B7 FtfLBtB 22,104 
FtTSCPOlH 100441 Off 474 
SWISS FRANC (CM43R) i oer hucl ixM MUM sun 
07195 05500 Star 94 06877 08105 08864 08894 
07870 08590 JunM 0804 D8B99 08863 888M 
07000 08+00 Sec W 0600 08895 08870 08*93 
Est soles 0895 RTS. sales 1X118 
Fit's open W 41747 up M61 


-48 

1336. 

—42 

436 

—46 

«• 


1 


1 

+ 15 3XZI0" 

+ 15 

X12S- 



♦ 14 

DS' 



+• 

«• 


. 

—» 136423* 

— « 10.999. 

— m 


— ® 

67" 


— 120 91,203 
—Ilf 8801- 
—117 838, 

—115 1 . 


— K 41 J18 
— 51 2JB9! 
—41 48 ■ 


Industriats 

COmiHl 04CTT4) SUSthw-OknHBWta 
7880 5X6ZMO-94 7850 7*85 7858 

7849 5747 May 94 7135 7V7S 7X35 

nuo 54J0JU94 JV5S 8X10 7980 

7459 9510(594 7450 7589 7*70 

7150 5980 Dec 94 TUB 7250 72X0 

7185 6350 Mm 95 7280 73.15 7280 

7125 64X0 MOV 95 

S&M.Wlu. 0739 
6050 4175 Mar 94 £U0 47J0 45J3 

35 £S SS 

54-00 4ZA0Jim9* 4140 4150 4120 

9X0 O20JI4V4 4AO0 44.15 4150 

5580 44A5AUB94 4485 45X0 4480 

na ssss 2 % sa ss 

5880 4785 94 4888 4X20 4885 

»X0 JM0OBC94 4330 4U0 4850 

4185 4125 Jm 95 4970 4970 4970 

58J5 4950 Feb 95 4975 4975 4975 

II IHxsiisSi 

51X0 4880 Jun 95 


7985 

7980 

7985 

7X18 

7185 

7X00 

7485 


4193 

4*87 

4X72 


4X97 

4887 

47.97 

4782 

4687 

4657 

087 


+Z22 3,146* 
+150 3X538' 
♦ 1J0 II J48i 
+181 Z381, 
+X75 9,915- 
+BJB M 
+u ti- 
tans n + 


+1X6 21+46 « 
+074 41203; 
*071 39810 j 
+086 34857* 
+871 1X317 « 
+416 X644, 
+414 7565 i 
+XM Z*84 | 
+416 382 * 1 
+ 016 6586. 
+436 USB. 
+086 680 . 
+086 368 " 

+426 

+086 , 

+426 

+086 * 


£3 


23 




14»Jan95 
1678 Feb 95 


1681 Apr 95 


W8I 

1973 

2430 U8&JWI95 

1773 1090 JUl 95 

1X90 17.16 Aua *5 

1984 17X8 See 95 

2080 1775 Doc 95 

Ed. safes 10,992 Fit's. toes HJIO 
FtrsaponH 434013 Off 5235 
1BUEAOBD GA90UME CNMER) «UMw4- 
5788 4880 Mm 94 4380 4175 4575 

<250 <385 Aar 94 4480 4X45 4480 

6180 41711 May 94 4X80 4X98 4580 

6180 4X35 Jun 96 6X30 4680 46.15 

HUB 4X75 JulM 8X58 46JB 467} 

*000 4X75 Aug 94 4X30 4620 4600 

5480 4585 Sep 94 4180 4650 4X90 

6680 46800094 4UB 44J0 4480 

4X80 43.10 NOV 94 I4.e 4480 4180 

toes 287*2 Ws-toes 2179s 
FWsopenW 124/481 off m 


1U1 

1644 

14,12 

1424 

+083 31.1*7 ; 

1484 

1484 

1620 

1430 

+0.15 98,939- 

U* 

IMS 

14-40 


KUiTtoTin 

148* 

1691 

1466 

1479 

+0.17 38.165 

1484 

ixa 

1692 

1X01 

+117 22875, 

1X13 

1X30 

1X15 

15J3 


IX* 

15J0 

1X35 

1X43 

+ 0H8 19J31 i 

1X85 

1X65 

1X65 

1X63 

+ ftl9 11*5. 

1587 

1587 

1X87 

1581 


1X53 

HUB 

lira 

1X98 

1617 

1683 

+120 ZIJ06 " 
+020 8402 e 

1480 

KM 

1640 

16* 

1661 

+020 7J91, 
+121 137*1 

1478 

1670 

1678 

1683 

+023 3898 + 

1482 

1682 

1688 

1693 

1782 

+0^ 17.941 : 
+ 13) 


17.11 

1780 

1753 


4380 

4586 

4570 

4613 

4672 

4&JB3 

4685 

4185 

4375 


+083 

+0J3 

+023 


+0L37 zuns- 
*021 363813 
+008 39828 

=88 

-9-15 S97 


Sock Indexes 


SAP COMP. MDEX (C3NBU SDOvkkM 
453-10 43480 MOT 94 41885 4724B 44750 

48480 44000 JunM 470.18 47380 409.10 

*57* *60895*1 M 47250 47X30 <7180 

«7J0 439 JB Dec 94 47X80 477 JS <7105 
BLtoa* NA Rrxsde* 78,9*3 
WitataW 196796 to IM 
NYSECOMP.ffOex (KYFO mM« 

SffiG»3HSS&3 

gS 


472AS 

47150 

47250 

47688 


26100 

TOM 

WSM 


+470179817 
♦60S 11,401 
+ 180 1563 
+ 380 ins 


+Z1D AID 
♦ US 458 
+Z30 
+Z» 


Commodity Indexes 

dm 

“22 22 1,18128 

WKltOn 1796® 

.OJ. Futures -NA 

Com. Research 2DZ4 


Prtjtays 

1.T755D 

tmja 

14631 
227 JQ 

V 


c 


•t Mfurkct* 9 ill"'* 1 



























































Page 16 


NASDAQ 

Tuoml iiy'i Pficji 

•NASDAQ prices as of A p.m. New York time. 
This list compiled by the AP. consists of the 1.000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value, it is 
updated twice a year. 














































































* 


*) 


JCNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1994 


Page 17 



Mannesmaun 
Posts 'Clear’ 
Loss for ’93 


BONN — Manpes manp AG ro- 
PWted flat sates for 1993 on Tn»- 
ihai it had suffered a 

«a»pany had nef profit of 63 m3- 
Deutsche nuAs ($37 nriffioq), 

off76 percent from hs 1991 resuk 
The conmany said its sales held 
steady at 28 bffliem DM while or- 
dm rotated 27.9 biffion DM in 
!993, t^> 1 percent &xto 1992. 

Tte company said its weak ro- 
so lts m 1 993 were due to the costs 
of n^iKturing. a dedine in wodd- 
wide demand for in vestment equip- 
ment and the effects of exetemae- 
rate fluctuations. ’ . 

It said sales had bees maintained 
by demand for portable telephones 
and a strong dedomaacc by for- 
eign subsidiaries. 

The company add the restruc- 
turing “had considerably burdened 
earnings” but “sinndtaixeondy cre- 
ated the conditions to significantly 
lower the break-even point. and 
boost productivity.” 
ft said the restr u c tu r in g would 
help to increase the company’s 
competitive position in 1994, but 
Manne sman^ gave no indication of 
whether expected to return to 
profit this year. 

Mannesmann said its 



wits 

More of Independent 

■ The Associated Prat 

J^OT®ON — An Irish newspaper group said Tuesday it had 
agreed to raise to 29.99 percent its slake in The Independent 


the Irish 
($5.6 


, . Independent Newspapeis'PLC, run 

Tony OTldlfy, said it would pay £3.7 uuuwu 
mboa) for an additional 5 percent of Newspaper Publishing PLC, 
. Parent of the independent. 

The deal requires that regnlaim give the O’Reilly group permis- 
swo to exceed a 25percem stake in Newspaper Publishing. 

R^yaj^eered the purchase of 2A99 percent of Newspa- 
per ru wishing on Fro. 4 Tor £3.50 a share, the same price be had 
.agreed u> pay for the additional 

^ newspaper group formerly owned by the late 
put the same value on Newspaper 
rubusbrng s stock, although those bids have been a combination of 
cash and stock. 

Ttefcmno- Maxwell company. Minor Group Newspapers PLC, 
turned up wth two European newspapers that are already Newspa- 
per _PuWishing shareholders — H Pais of Spain and La Repubblica 
a Italy — and executives including The Independent’s founding 
editor, Andreas Whi ttam Smith. 

“With these further purchases we have increased our stake in NP 
~ 3 vs y si gni fi ca nt lewd," said Liam Healy, chief executive of the 
I nah gro up. *We believe that tins demonstrates our continued 
commitment to the conmany and is fully consistent with our dexer- 
the future success of its newspap 


nunanon to ensure : 


its newspaper tides.” 


Steady Growth Seen for U.K. 

Panel Doubts the Need for Further Rate Cuts 


LONDON — Prospects for 
steady economic growth. despite 
tax increases scheduled for April, 
offer little reason for further inter- 
est-rate cuts, the Treasury’s hide- 
pendem panel of advisers said 
Tuesday. 

In their first report this year to 
the chancellor of the Exchequer, 
Kenneth Clarke, members of the 
panel known as the “six wise men" 
said that in the absence of a rally in 
Staling, which would make exports 
more expensive, “most of us see 
tittle reason for further cuts is in- 
terest rates." 

The Bank of England signaled a 
quarter-point cut in Britain's base 
lending rate, to 5.25 percent, on 
Feb. 8, saying subdued inflationary 
pressures gave it room for the 
move. Many analysis said they ex- 
pected a further cut to offset tax 
increases scheduled for April 

But the paud said consumers 
would probably sacrifice savings 


Arbed Seen Aiding Klockner Unit 


Reuters 


with sales of 123 bOHon DM, was 
profitable in 1993 but suffered a 
dear. dwJm>» in wymtngc largely 
because of weak profit in plant 
construction. 

Mannesmamfs tdecoannnnrca- 
tions unit, which includes mobile 
phones, posted a sharp gam, as 
sates rase to 900 miffion DM from 
140 million DM 

The automotive technology dro- 
skm’s loss widened in 1993 became 
of reduced orders from the car in- 
dustry and pressure oh prices. 

The company said mat exports 
produced in Germany feQ 5 per- 
cent, to 92 billion DM in 1993, but 
sales from its foreign plants rose U 
percent, (Reuters, AFX) 


BREMEN — A Belgian subsidiary of Arbed SA 
signed an accord to bnya 25 paean stake of Kl&koer 
Stahl GmbH, officials of Bremen said Tuesday, a pact 
meant to ease European Union concerns about gov- 
ol of the steeLmflL 


eminent control ... __ 

- The officials of Bremen, a German state and city, 

'also said that ArbetTs SSdmar SA was interested in 
raising its stake in the Klbckner-Werke AG unit to 
more than 50 percent within two years. ... 

• Klflctatt-WerkeagEted to.sdI most of the sted mill capadty in the glutted alu 
to a group of investors, backed by Branca, in Novem- Rwder reported from Paris, 
ber, but the European Commissi on began an investi- 
gation into the takeover because of the high level of 
state involvement 

Klaus Jaeger, the Br emen economics minister, said' 
the Arbed involvement probably would pave the way 
. far the European Comnasaon to approve the takeover 
by the investor group: "With the companies Skbnar, 

KBckrw, Bremer VuBcan and Hegemaxm, a private- 
sector majority is established without any doubt,” 

The Luxembourg government, however, owns about 
a third of Aibed's capital. 

\ The Bremen officials said Aibed’s supervisoiy board 
would deride qu the investment next month. 


Vladimir Kaldunko, first deputy general director 
of Alunnniy, the Russian producers' group, said he 
was dissatisfied with the level of cutbacks by Western 
producers, and he singled out Peeftiney as an example. 
Mr. Kalchcnloo said farther Russian cutbacks would 
depend on those made in the West 
GiHes Tourvidlle, a Pechmey spokesman, said the 
company would not comment on possible capacity 
cuts before Friday. The company has said it would 
"take its responsibilities” regarding cutbacks. 

Under a deal reached in January, major aluminum- 
producing countries agreed to a program of capacity 
cutbacks to help prop up prices. 


2 Groups Join in Italian Bid 


Bloomberg Business News 

MILAN — Omnitd SpA and 
Pronto Italia wtH join forces to bid 
for a license to run Itaf^s second 
cellular phone service, it was an- 
nounced Tuesday. 

Tbe combined company vrill be 
owned 70 prorent by unuritel and 
30 percent bjy Pronto ItaHa. 

Ing. C Olivetti SpA controls 51 
percent of QmnatdL The rest is split 
amongBeS Atlantic? writ J 6*>T»er-- 
cent; Cehnlar C^mroanicaticEQS In- 
ternational Inc, with 14.7 percent; 


. Pronto Italia is led by Pacific 
Triesis Corp. of the United Slates 
and indndes several Italian 

The merger narrows the field of 
bidders to two. 

The other group is Umtd SpA, 
put together try Hal SpA, the mo- 
dia group Bninvest SpA, the Brit- 
ish ceQular operator Vodafone 
PLC and Italy’s stare energy hold-. 
jag compSnyEntc Naadnateldro- 


Lehman Brothers, with 8 percent, 
and Sweden’s Tcha, with 9.7 per- 
cent. 


■ Both groups are bidding to pro- 
vide competition to tbe existing 
service, ran by the stale telephone 
group SIP SpA, winch reports haw- 
mg more than a griffi rm customers. 


Protests Mar Fiat Pact With IJnion 

Reuters ' 

ROME — Wildcat strikes and proteas oh Tuesday greeted an agree- 
ment between union* and Hal%) A to cut some 16,500 jobs, doodiog the 
chances of a final deal bring afflied by a weekend deadHne, 

About 300 workers from Flat’s Arese car plant blocked Milan’s central 
train station, and employees from its Sevelroinigliaiwwoiis denounced 
the plan to cut 7, 0w permanent and 9,500 temporary jobs.as a seD-ow. 

Under the plan, the govenunent will help pay for “social cushions," 
such as early ndirezbeat packages and en h anced layoff compensation, to 
heJp soften the Wow. Fiat, Italy’s biggest private company, h 
SnaDion last year. 


NOTICE TO THE SBARHBOUJERS 
OF 

DAIWA CAPflAL-L-GF. EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD 
BVIERNATItmLEQljnYITIlW 

20, Boulevard Emmanuel Servaxs 
L-2535 LUXEMBOURG 
R.C. B 28616 

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the 
shareholders of DAIWA CAPITAL - L.C.F. EDMOND DE 
ROTHSCHILO DYTERNATfONAL EQUITY FUND will be held si (he 
registered office of the company on March 15th, 1994 at 12.00 noon. 

_ AGENDA , 

1. Approval of the report of the Boon! of Directors and the report of the 
Auditor; 

2. Apprtwd of the financial salements for the year ending on Droember 
31st, 1993; 

3. Allocation of the net rcouH; 

4. DiBchargeoT the outgoing Directors and the Auditor from their dutk? 
for the year ending on December 31st, 1993; 

5. Appointment of the Agcnte of the company; 

- Rc-decfion of the Directors; 

- Re-election of the Aoi&or; 

& Any other business 

Tlcsolutiorw on the above-roentioaed agenda wiB require no quorum and 
the reaolutiom w® be passed by a simple majority of Lbe shares present 
or jeprcsetitod at (be meeting. 

A shareholder may act atony meeting by proxy. 

On behalf of (he Company, 

BANQCE PBIVEE EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD SA. 

' S acewsatle <fe Inxembowg 
BO, Boalmrd Emwaa ad Semis 
L -2B3B LUXEMBOURG 


rather than cul spending and thai 
disposable income would grow af- 
ter accounting for inflation, mak- 
ing a farther rate cut for economic 
stimulus purposes unnecessary. 

But “toe weakness of inflation- 
ary pressure” still gives the govern- 
ment scope to reduce interest rates 
if the recovery fallens, the panel 
said. 

It forecast that Britain’s core in- 


flation rate would stand near 2.9 
percent in the fourth quarter of this 
year and rise to 3.1 percent bv the 
fourth quarter of] 995. 

The advisers predicted that the 
country's gross domestic product 
would rise by between 14 percent 
and 3.0 percent this year and 1.7 
percent io 3.5 percent in 1995. 

f Reusers. Knight -Ridder) 


Last year, the Klockner unit dosed one of its two 
blast furnaces in Bremen. KlOdcner-Stahl GmbH was 
one of three of Klockner subsidiaries to file to protec- 
tion faun creditors in December 1992. 


• Pecbiney Silent on Russia Statement 
Peehiney SA, tire French state-con trolled aluminum 
and packaging conglomerate, refused to comment on 
statements this wedT by a Russian official, who angled 
it out for faffing to do its part in reducing global 
aluminum market, Knight- 


SmithKUne Earnings Rise 
On Sales of Newer Drugs 

Compiled hr Our Staff Frox D^ptzdia 

LONDON — SmithKime Beecham PLC said Tuesday pretax 
ofit rose 12 percent last year to £1 J2 billion (S 1.8 biffion helped 
j an 18 percent increase in sales. 

The British drag company said the results, which were within 
expectations, allowed it to raise its full-year dividend by 24 percent, 
to 10.9 pence a share. 

“Our solid performance was fueled bv tbe success of new products 
in all our businesses," said Robert P. Bauman, the company's chief 
executive. 

Sates in 1993 were £6.4 billion, helped by weakness in sterling and 
strong demand for the four new drags SnhthKiine has introduced 
since 1990. Sates of those drugs more than doubled last year to £463 
million, the company said. 

Sales of Relafen, an arthritis drug, increased 44 percent, the 
company said. Paxil the No. I antidepressant in Britain, was 
introduced in tbe U.S. market, where sales reached 5135 million in 
the first 10 months of tbe year. 

Sales of Kytril a nausea drug Tor cancer patients, and Havrix. a 
hepatitis vaccine, also advanced. 

But sales of (he anti-ulcer drug Tagamet, the company’s best- 
selling prescription drug, dropped 6 percent The patent for the drug 
will expire in May, freeing U.S. generic-drug producers to market 
then own versions. 

Also mi Tuesday, Thorn EMI PLC, a music publisher and electri- 
cal rental company, said its pretax profit climbed 2-5 percent to 
£251. 1 million in tbe first nine months of its financial year. 

Profit got a lift from increased sales in its music division, the 
company said The results include a one-time charge of £20 3 million 
for the sale of some operations. 

Thom also said that a government investigation had cleared its 
U.S. Rem-a-Centcr unit of allegations of overcharging customers 
renting furniture and appliances- t Bloomberg, Reuters ) 



Frankfurt 

DAX- 

. London ■- Parts 

FTSE 100 index GAC40 




hiy 

mgr m . 1 .. 
— - 


BW“ ' 

. ‘WW 

yrr 


JOT 

jr » 



HT 7 ' ) 

259 " 



4; p * . .. 

s, ®T r ^•TTF , 

1S93 

■ Prev. % 

Ctasa Change 

425.53 ' -0.78 




%'oir 

189ft - . 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

cTT£ ^'s'o'n' 
1984 ..«S3. ■: 

tndsx 

AEX 

i) J F 

1B84 . 

Tuesday 

Close 

.42 &2& ' 

Brussels 

Stod< Index 

7, 64044 

7,71639 

-039 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,107£2 

2,11933 

- -0.56 

Frankfurt 

..FAZ 

806.71 

B13.B6 

-0B8 

Helsinki 

HEX . 

lioidd 

1394-63 

+0.44 

London 

RnanciaJ Times 30 

2,57*00 

2.585.30 

-0.36 ‘ 

London 

FriSE 100 

3^33.70 

3.35030 

..•0^0 

Madrid . ■ 

General index. 

337:07 

340.17 

-041 

Milan 

M© 

1,089370 


-0.T8 

Fade 

CAC4Q 

2^2CL57 

2^31,31 

-0J21 

Stockholm 

Affirarsvaariden 

1^09^7 

1(825.18 

-0.66 

Vienna 

.Stack index 

468J2 

. 488.54 

+0.04. 

Zorich. ■ 

S8S- 


1,048,24 

-1.05 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


tsKnoaonal HenldTribMc 


Very briefly: 


■ Svenska Handefaftankea AB reported an operating profit of 1.92 billion 
kronor ($241 million ) for 1993. after a loss of 840 million kronor for 1992. 

■ Volkswagen AG workers at an assembly plant in Belgium have gone on 
strike to protest firings of two colleagues. 

a Philips Komnranikations Industrie AG, a German unit of Philips NV, 
said it planned to shed 800 jobs in addition to a previously announced 900 
job cuts, bringing the work force down to 3,100 by 19 95. 

■ Germany's trade balance showed a surplus of 8-5 billion Deutsche 
marks ($4.9 billion) in December, up from 8_2 billion DM in November. 

■ France tripled its trade surplus to a record 87.26 billion francs ($14.9 
biffion) in 1993. The 1992 surplus was 30.9 billion francs. 

• Belgium set the price for the sale of Sod&e Rationale dlmestissementi 
which holds 50 percent of Distrigaz SA. to Ackermans & Van Haaren NV 
at 19.04 billion Belgian francs ($334 million). 

• The European Union's combined industrial output feD 3 J percent in 

1993, the sharpest slide in nearly two decades. Industrial production 
plunged 4.1 percent in Japan in the same year, but US. production rose 
42 percent. Reuters. A FP, AFX, AP, Knight- Ridder 



?nv wa ‘ 


c 


* 


S i 1 


REPUBLIC OF LEBANON 

COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION 

Tender for tbe Execution of the Infrastructure Works in the Beirut Central District 

The Government of Lebanon, represented by tire. Council for Development and Reconstruction (CXUL), invites suitably qualified 
L tbimcivr irifiastrocnxre and civff engineering Contractors to tender for the Reconstruction of the Infrastructure Works in Beirut 
Central District (BCD). 

- Wofks will include tbe following main dements: 

-A Ring Road around the BCD area with an aiqatnimBie length of 3.6 km and of various widths, including interchanges, bridges, 
underpasses and tunnels. 

- Primary roads in tbe BCD arca witb an approximate length of 8:4 km and width varying between 15 m and 40 m. 

-. Secondary roads in the BCD area with ah apprordraate length of 10.5 km and width varying between 7 m and 27 m. 

-Tertiary roads in the BCD area with tin appraxhnate length of 63 tan and width varying between 8 m and 10 m. 

- Road furniture such as radewalks, kerbs, traffic lights, etc. ■ 

- General public lighting for streets, interchanges, bridges, underpasses and tunnels. 

- Sewerage network, including around 28 tan sower pipes with service connections, manholes, and a sewage pumping station. 

- Stormwater drainage network including around 26 km of stormwater pipes, add culverts with gullies, manholes and outfalls. 

- Landscaping and irrigation network for roads including around 38 km of irrigation mains manifolds and laterals, wells, a ground 

reservoir and a pumping station, , . , . ... 

- Water supply netwotk including around 30 km of water mams with fittings, valves, fire hydrants and control devices. 

I Electric power distribution works including cable support system within’ culverts, as well as duct banks and manholes for the 

20^y gi))|gs, 

_ Tunncl lighting system complete including fighting fixtures, transformer sub-stations, stand-by generators, CCTV, etc. 

I Ovil works including primary and secondary ducts, manholes and handholes for Telecommunications Network (Outside Plant). 

m tender Lebanese Contractors working i'n Lebanon or outside Lebanon who have executed in the last twenty years 
Are f PovernmeBt agencies or public or private organizations for & total amount of one hundred and fifty ( 150) Mflbon 

Us’D^Ssa^ doUar^^raS at tbe times oFauscxtdoa, of which at teasl one similar project has amounted to fifty (50) Million 

UJS. Dollars ^ mee2 jj,e remnrenrenb stipulated above and who wish to participate in this lender mud establish 

• Contractor who must meet the conditions Mated above provided that foe Lebanese Contracts 

last 20. years amounting to 30 Million U.S. Dollars, one project of which amounted to 10 

Million U-S. Dollars. . ; ■ 

T»<ufm must be submitted inside two separate sewed envelopes. 

(enacts _ r;rin iw. comoiaed qualification documents contained in the Tender Documents for this putpose and 

proving iSSSS financial aMity and experience of foe Contractor. The second envelope 
any other supponms ■ 

sMlcon*^ foe c^tne die first envelope and establish the ability and experience of tteConlractors. The 

Cpomclpis who qualify fo execute tfre Ptoiect and shall return foe Tender Documents to those 

C T^T Ulcn second envefope of ody those Contractors who have qualified publicly at a dale and 

time jo be Eimwnc^m . . ^ invited to coftect foe relevant Tender ■ Document Mffiu* * sum or U.S. 

iSlOjboS^ Othc ofilccs ofeD^/as of Monday ftbnaiy 28, 1994 at foe following address: 

Dollars len nuu^> ^ CtjUwSl for Development and Reconstruction 

Taflet AI4tarty, Brfrnt Liriiaapn' 

. n.fcmhted at foe above address not l«cr than 12;00 hours noon Beirut local time at foe ofilccs of c.d.k. on 

Tenders are to he suDmuww 

Friday May 13, 1994. 


REPUBLIC OF LEBANON 

COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION 

Prequalification of Consortia 
for the Finance, Design, Build, Operate and Transfer 
of a Conference Center and Luxury Hotel Complex in Beirut 

The Lebanese Government wishes to build a center for conventions, exhibitions as well as Arab and International 
conferences, as part of its plan to reinforce the role of Beirut as a center for culture, finance, tourism and trade. 

The Government of Lebanon, represented by the Council for Development and Reconstruction (C.D.R) invites 
applications from suitably qualified Lebanese, Arab or International institutions wishing to undertake this vital project to 
prequalify to participate in a competition to design, execute, finance and operate a conference center with a luxury five 
star 500 to 1 ,000 room hotel including luxury and ordinary suites, a commercial center in addition to a marina with all its 
facilities on plot No. 705 in ATn A1 Mraissi. Beirut. 

Those wishing to prequalify should form consortia which will include a financier, an international hotel operator, an 
international qualified consulting firm with a wide experience in designing first class luxury hotels provided he 
collaborates with a Lebanese consulting office. 

The project will be erected on land owned by the Lebanese Government with a total area of 66,OOOm-\ The main 
functions of the project will occupy a built up area of 260,000 m* approximately, distributed as follows: 


- Conference halls, lecture halls and theatres 

43,000 m 1 

- Hotel 

167.000 m 5 

- Commercial centers 

35,000 nr 

-Cultural and entertainment centers 
- Car parks as needed 

15,000 nr 

Total built up area excluding car parks 

260,000 m 5 


The project is to be designed and executed in accordance with a time schedule within a period not exceeding 36 months. 

The successful consortium will have to operate foe project for a period of time then hand it over in excellent condition 
to the State of Lebanon. 

Prequalification must be in accordance with the prequalification document available at CJ3.R. against the sum of U.S.$ 
5,000 (five thousand American dollars) in the form of a banker’s certified cheque in the name of the Council for 
Development and Reconstruction. 

Those wishing to participate in foe competition are invited to receive foe prequalification document starting Monday 
February 28. 1994 and return them with all supporting material before twelve o'clock noon, Beirur local time on 
Thursday April 28, 1994 at the following address: 

Council for Development and Reconstruction 
Tallet At-Saray 
Beirut Lebanon 























































































liSP 


international herald tribune. 


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1994 


Page 19 


asia/pacific 



Finance Unit Weighs on Matsushita 

... .... iw.'KM.inn «wwc*nnui economic climate ifl J*I 


J ^S*aaMa , qt 

,ta >SSs , i^“sr5SSrs 

dS^&ama. wio^said 


TOKYO — !. Matsushita Electric Industrial 
Co. said Tuesday that its quarteriy profit had 
fatten, that its annua? profit would be below 
expectations and that it would, spend ISO bil- 
lion yen ($1.6 billion} to respite a finance sub- 
sidiaiy hardened with bad loans. 

The de&romcs and ente rtainm ent giant’s 
stock fell 36 yen iriTokyo to dose at 1 ,690. 

The one bit of light in Matsushita's report for 
its third quarter, which ended Dec. 31, was dial . 
its entertainment revenue edged up 1 perceot, 
largely on ibe box-office success of the movie 
“Jurassic Park.” Matsushita owns MCA Inc, 

- the American company whose Umvosat Pic- 
tures made the film. - 

Matsushita’s core consumer electronics busi- 
ness, however, was hit hard by weak demand 

and the strength o£ the yen, and group net *"i«*~* npr-m 

percent to 47.1 bfflkm yen. 1 

Girram revenue at the Osaka-based company 


: nnmte tviamiambia aw »*v 

neer’s^improved in consumer electronics; Sony 
washtmbyaweakperfonnancefrocnit5 movie 
.division. 



180 bflfion yen through a grant ana a ^ 
interest loan to its subsidiary NL Finance Ca 
“Despite its strenuous efforts to date, due to 


I bilHon yen by setting stock, 
is also seconding staff to m> 
p,u»o - capability in adrmmsrerms and 

“N^JSS^Sed in March 1992 wad- 
nrinisier and collect loans receive trans- 
ferred from another Matsushita subsidiary, Na- 

tK y fy ri^l ta 6 Sd the 80 billion yen graw 
would be treated as a nonrecumng loss for the 
parent company in the current financial year. It 
S^lbalancetSs by recording a nonreouraig 
nrofit of a Kke amount from the sale of portfo- 
lio stocks and the sale to subsidiaries- of ont»n 
fixed assets that are now leased to these subsid- 
(AP, Bloomberg, AFX) 


Tokyo Executive 
In Cellular Phone 
Rift Cries Foul 


Strong Yen Eats Into Honda’s Net 

. Cempikdby Out Staff From Dispatch^ ... — and particularly in China — were another 

TOKYO-HoDdE^C^^T^iu down 18 percent, 

drirf-quarternet profit fdl .9 P*^*"™*^ Stor the nine months were 

earlier and fell 49 .5 percenimthe first mne months * J4? Wtonjai, 
of .its financial yem; as the strong yen ate mto down 9.5 percent, at 2X& muion ycn. 

operating margins. 

- TheJapanese automak er earoeu 6.76 billion yen 
($65 million) in the October-December quarter, 
compared with 6.89 bUlion yen in the 1992 quarter. 

Honda’s profit for the nine months was 16.1 billion 
yen, down from 3L9 billion yen. 

■ The company predated that its foil-year profit 
would be down 55-percent firam 1992. * 

• Honda, the only Japanese automaker to sell 
more cars in the United States than in Japan, said a 
ieoovmng U.S. market cushioned its earnings m 
die third quarter. Strong motarcyde sales m Asa 


down 9 JS percent, at 2*23 trillion yen. 

- Analysts have taken a pessimistic view of Hon- 
da’s stock for the next six to 12 months. Continued 
volatility and escalating trade tensions 


operating margins. 

- The Japanese automaker earoeu a /o uunuu jrcu aas stoat iar u» uwn- " */• r““ — 

(565 mffl£n)hi the October-December quarter, currency volatility ami escalating 

1 ." J «m. (s «Q xm;™ wn m the 1992 auarter. with (he United States could hunt strength m 

Honda’s U.S. sales, they said. 

Also on Tuesday, Moody’s Invotore Sem* 
Inc. lowered its ratings on rawcured IsemOT dett 
and commercial paper issued 
automaker, NissanMotor Corp, to A-3 from A-2, 
rating continued pressure on earnings. 

' (AP. Bloomberg, AFP) 


Data Show 
Limp Japan 
Economy 


By Andrew Pollack 

Sr* York Tuna Serene 

TOKYO — Depending on 
one's point of view. Takeo Tsu- 
kada is either the culprit re- 
sponsible for an escalating 
trade crisis between the United 
States and Japan or a bystander 
caught in the crossfire. 

Mr. Tsukada, who prefers the 
latter description, is president 
of Nippon Jdou Tsushin Corp- 
known as IDO, a provider of 
mobile telephone service that 
the U.S. government accuses of 
f ailin g to provide adequate ac- 
cess to Japan's cellular tele- 
phone market for equipment 
made by Motorola Inc. 

Last week, the U.S. govern- 
ment said it would impose sanc- 
tions on Japan for violating a 
1989 trade agreement intended 
to open Japan’s market to 
American celhilar technology. 

Mr. Tsukada assailed Motor- 
ola for making what be called 


As Mr. Tsukada tells it. there 
is no plot to keep Motorola out 
of ibe Japanese market. In 
1987. Japan's government de- 
cided to allow one company in 
each market to compete in cel- 
lular telephone service with 
Nippon Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Corp.. Japan's mam 
phone company. 

IDO won the franchise for 
die heavift populated corridor 
from Tokvo to Nagoya. It de- 
cided to build its system using 
technology developed by 
NT&T. Mr. Tsukada said, not 
io block Motorola but simply 
the NT&T technology 
already had a proven track re- 
cord in Japan. DDI Corp, 
which won the franchise for the 
rest of Japan, chose Motorola s 
technology. 

Si ill, the United States com- 
plained that it was unfair that 
the Motorola system was not 

■ > i .u. k'uthhi nnrnl- 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 



Singapore 
Straits Times 
2500 

m 


Tokyo 

Nfltkei-225 


’To'n d7?’ 

1993 19W 

index 



ISO’S ’ O *M> J? ‘ 

. 1893 • 


1994 


Exchange 
Hongkong 


Hang Seng 


1983 

Phew. - — , 

Close -Change] 

10.674,00 10.456-40 -f 2.08 


Tuesday 

Close 




Sr? 1 “i—1225 19.MM3 WBiLW-^ 

lOKyO . _■ . ,• 1 . »a* 


an Ordinaries " 2^02*0 


--- — -ras Sm i.«** 


Bangkok -'SET 


KA. 1.446.91 


composite Stock a 4 6 ” 0 . 4 °- 76 

5.733^1 S.TO.oa f-86 


MM 

Stodc Index KA. 


Jakarta ^ — -r^ 

wear 

- ■ ■ : — . ■ ki a *4 OCniK • 


543.76 


Bombay ' " National Index N-A. 


charms- RsUlers. AFP 


1.99&05 

Incrratioral Herald Tnt, 





im . iwiwus — -J - — 

would post a net profit at about 
12.9 milW dollars in 1994onrev- 
eameof 39.1 milliaa dollars. Holy- 

a - A o Hn3. 


Canqrikdby Otu Staff Fnm DOpuUha 

SYDNEY —TNT Ltd^ a global 
transport company, said^ Tuesday it 
would sell most of its dripping as- 
sets through a 123 mffico mne nf 39 1 rTni||twi u uuim. »«*/■ 

lian dottar (US$88 pt*hc ^ ^ ^ g ^ 

share offcnng nett month. bus of kasng debL 

Holyman is expected to pw a 

sss ss# 

.wssjki; « 

d^.!»ioMiriote^in_200»a; 


^ m u i&uuu via “ “ 

of net debt to equity win drop to 

100 percent from 217 percent on 
June 30. 

TNT is scheduled to post results 
for the first half of 1993 on Thurs- 
day, and analysts are expecting a 
profit of about 20 million dollars, 
compared with a loss of 9 million 
dollars a year earlier. It would be 

the company’s first profit in more 

than three years. 

A key factor is its 50 percent 
interest in Ansett Airlines, a do- 
mestic carrier that returned to prof- 
itability last year. 

( Bloomberg, Reuters) 


TOKYO — Japan’s leading m- 
dex of economic indicators stood at 
36.4 percent in December, wdl be- 
low the key levd of 50 [« the 

eighth consecutive month, we 

oontic Planning Agency said Tues- 
day. 

An index above 50 indicates eco- 
nomic expansion, while a figpre be- 
low that represents economic con- 
traction. 

The leading index, which fore- 
shadows trends in the 

^arevised41.7mNov^er-I' 

had stood at 33 3 in October. 

The index of coincident econom- 
ic indicators, which was rdeassd 
simultaneously, stowl at ^ 0 “ 
December, compared with 20.0 m 
November, for its third consecutive 
month below 50. 

The country’s production of ve- 
hicles fett 133 percent in Jmu 


hicks iwi i'—-* Q c] 

from a year earlier, ^ 77Z.8U 
units, the Japan Automobile Man- 
ufacturers’ Association said Tues- 
day. it was the fifth consecutive 

annual decline. , . 

(AFP. Bloomberg) 


HU. IB M— 1 Utt 1HUWIVU. j " . . , 

ob for making what he calico j^g used in the hi^ly popu- 
demands that threatened laica corridor. In 1 989, the cd- 
to drive his company to bank- i „iar phone trade accord was 
ruptcy- . .. 

At the last minute, be said. 

Motorola said sanctions could 
be avoided if IDO placed an 
hY yrvviiatft order for 225,000 
Motorola portable telephones, 
which would have guaranteed 
Motorola a 50 percent share of 
IDO’S anticipated cellular cus- 
tomers. IDO, he said, rqected 
the request as being imposable 
to f ulfill and against free con- 
sumer choke. 

Mr. Tsukada afro expressed 
surprise that the American gov- 
ernment would bring all its 
weight to bear in the service of a 
single company. 

“It’s a dirty, collusive rela- 
tionship between the govern- 
ment and a private company. 

Mr. Tsukada said. “Japan «e 
people cannot understand it. _ 

Indeed. Motorola’s main 
bidding in Tokyo has. been 
splattered with graffiti in the 
last day or so, with such slogans 
as “Crush the hard-setting di- 
plomacy of U.S. imperialists 
painted on the walls. 



lUlil puuiu. — 

signed to open the Tokyo-Na- 
poya market to Motorola. IDO 
was persuaded by Japan s gov- 
ernment to build a second sys- 
tem using the Motorola tech- 
nology. 

IDO could not afford to 
build two systems, Mr. Tsukada 
said. So it' put more emphasis 
on the NT&T system, not to 
block Motorola but simply be- 
cause it had started on the 
NT&T system first and needed 
to build it up quickly so it could 
compete. The result is that to- 
day, IDO has about 310.000 
customers for its NT&T-com- 
patiNe system and only a few 
more than 10,000 for the Mo- 
torola system. 

Even Motorola executives 
say IDO was saddled somewhat 
against its will with the fran- 
chise for the Motorola technol- 
ogy. But that has not stopped 
Motorola, based in Schaum- 
burg. Illinois., from complain- 
ing that IDO has dragged its 
feet in building the system. 


difference in timing of the Chinese Lunar N 
. South Korea's -poos ^ Um£ 

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China to Launch 


• u _i.„. Uuna to Lauuoi 

TFTS* Asian Aerospace Companies Seek a Bigger Share of Soaring 2 UJ3. Satellites 

^ — . ih. htoheKt oualitv products the mojorityof tte tusdiettpmds ]“ £5 w-ft— 




- Rentas ■ ■ 

.ss— s^ta?fa5g 


long H would last 


Exchange Cbmrnisaon, said it bad not been in - 

formed of the suspenson. , . ^ 

Shenzhen “A" shares —stock rraerved for On- 
aese dtizcas — have tumbled 40 P«w®£S““* 
August because of ti^itfi credit ute Oma is 
JSSy drive and fears that new listings would 

0 °^^ n ^ e ^hares dosed only^^Uy 

after the statement But m 
1 9 percent on expectations among some investors 
thatauSwities tbrae would foflow suit 


ContiiHied from Page 13 
-provide access to advanced tech- 
nology, relatively 

and entry into a highly admired 
"'industry,’’ Mr. Albrecht said. 

The two other major Western 
makers of jetliners. McDonnell 


ensure the highest quality products 
at the lowest cosl" 

He said that while the total for- 
eign content of the airframe and 
engines of McDonnell Douglass 
MD-11 long-haul jetliner was just 
over 18 percent and < 


the minority of the fuselage panels 
and doors, the wing center section, 
the wing-to-body attachments and 
parts of (he wing ribs. 

The Japanese firms are partia- 
pating as program partners in the 
design and testing as wdl as manu- 
facture of these portions of the arr- 


of the medium- 

makers of j c 5Wiw?2st!S range* °MD-90 around 32pawnU 

I^jug^Cofp.of A^miedSiaw mJfuture models devdoped by the fn ^f- . . H l Ded 

and Europe’s Airbus Industrie, wcre hkdy to have more While Boeing has develops 

fflbcmtMing^ SmSOpcreenl ocra-UA conlrat. dose nes *lh 
rangpments with a The three largest Japanese aero- 

3HJSSS 

SS&sttw ***• 


cs WILU Jflptii, “ . — 

to need more than 600 jet- 
liners worth S60 bDlion over the 
next 15 years, McDonndl Douglas 
has concentrated on China, whicn 
is likely to emerge the second 
largest aviation market in Asia. 

Boeing forecasts that China will 


need 800 airplanes valued at about 
$40 billion over the next 15 yesus. 
The value is one-third less than for 
Japan because China mainly needs 
tfn.ill and medium-sized aircraft 
for its domestic services. Japan re- 
quires most of its new planes Tor 
international routes. 

McDonndl Douglas has devd- 
oped co-production aiTangpmoats 

with China since 1985 for its MD- 
80 and MD-90 aircraft. 

Mr. Wolf said these and other 
partnership arrangements with 
Chinese aerospace companies had 
resulted in more than $2 billion m 
sales of McDonnell Douglas planes 
and other products to China. 


BEUtNG — China Great Wall 
Industry Corp. signed a contract 
Tuesday to launch two broadcast 
satellites for EchoStar Satellite 
Corp. of the United States. 

Die satellites, made by Martin 
Marietta Corp.. will be earned mto 
orbit in late 1995 and nnd-1996 by 
Great Watt’s Long March 2E rock- 
et from the the Xichang launch site 
in Sichuan Province. A Long 
March 2E was used in the abort«l 
attempt to send the Australian Op- 
tus B-2 satellite into orbit in De- 
cember 1992. 


NYSE 

Tun ilny** Closing 

Tables 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1994 


SPORTS 


Florida 
Stops Rival 
Florida St. 


The Associated Press 

With March approaching. 
No. 16 Florida is starting to draw 
comparisons to the 1986-87 Florida 
team, the only squad in school his- 
tory to advance to the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association 
tournament’s final 16. 

But the Gators did something 
Monday in Gainesville, Florida, 
that no Florida team, not even that 


COLLEGE BASKETBALL 


’86-*87 team, had accomplished: It 
beat intrastate rival Florida State, 
72-61, and improved to 22-4. 

The 1986-87 team, which fea- 
tured the current National Basket- 
ball Association player Vernon 
Maxwell, managed 21 regular- sea- 
son victories, but was never ranked 
as high as the current squad. 

“This is the best Florida team 
I’ve seen since Maxwell and (An- 
drew) Mourn.” said the Florida 
State coach. Pat Kennedy. “They 
are a legitimate team that should be 
ranked higher than they are." 

For about one half, Florida State 
looked more like the nation's I6ih- 
ranked team than Florida did. The 
unranked Semino/es <12-11/ dictat- 
ed the tempo and had a 36-34 lead 
at the half. 

Just 19 seconds into the second 
half, Florida State's lead was gone, 
never to return. 

Craig Brown's 3-pointer put the 
Gators La from 37-36 and ignited 
an 1 1-2 run that put the Gaiois 
ahead 4S-38 with 16:48 leTL Flori- 
da State pulled within two points 
twice in the next three minutes, 
both times as a result of close-range 
shots by Bob Sura. 

But Florida guard Dan Cross, 
who scored just four points in the 
first 34 minutes, sparked Florida's 
final run by hitting 10-of-ll free 
throws in the final six minutes. 

No. 24 Oklahoma St. 73, Colora- 
do 56: Oklahoma State used a 20-6 
second-half run and cruised past 
the Buffaloes in Boulder, Colorado. 

Bryant Reeves scored 17 points 
and Brooks Thompson added 15 to 
lead Oklahoma State (19-7, 8-3 Big 
Eight). 



Herd Samo/Tbc AuocaKil Pios 

GRETSKY STRIKES AGAIN — Los Angeles's Wayne Gretsky flipping the pock post Toronto 
goalie Felix Potvin in a 6-4 NHL loss. Earlier, Gretsky signed a three-year, S2SJ5 tmffion contract 


Ted Williams 
Hospitalized 
After Stroke 


CtuepHedby Our Staff Fran Da/HUdlB 

GAINESVILLE, Florida — 
Ted Williams, the Hall of 
Fame outfielder, suffered a 
slight stroke at his home in 
Florida and was listed m fair 
condition Monday at a hasp*- 
ial whore he was being treated 
in ihe intensive care unit. 

“He’s conscious, clear- 
beaded and talking.” said 
Ralph Ives, a hospital spokes- 
man. Ives could am no de- 
tailed account of WHEams’s 
condition, but said the former 
Boston Red Sox star was expe- 
riencing “some weakness on 
ibe left side." Another spokes- 
man, Daniel Moore, said Wil- 
liams was also having some 
difficulty seeing as a result of 
the stroke, which occurred 
Saturday. 

“AH Ms indicators are fa- 
vorable for recovery,” said 
Moore. 

Williams, 75, also suffered a 
mild stroke two years ago and 
then underwent surgery on his 
neck to clear a blockage in a 
carotid artery. The procedure 
was designed to prevent future 
strokes. 

W illiams voted into the 
Hall of Fame in his first year 
of eligibility in 1966. was the 
last major league baseball 


player to hit .400. He batted 


in 1941. 

(NTT. Reuters. A?) 


TheyDreamoj 


Genie 


ImenKtitml Herald Tribute - 

L ONDON — What is the. mam. component to 
winning a World Cup? Yon and 1 rnffltbeheve 
that talent is preeminent - — and that organization, 
fitness, teamwork and money are secondary. :: 

Saudi Arabia appears to think differently. In hiring 
and firing first a 

Bncnlian. that a Hob ■ 9 ' 

Dutchman to HuohAa rfWJfcmr 

coach the national ^ — 

team d uring the 


past three months, Saudi Arabia's soccer laris (the 
royal family} seqn convinced there is agemc out there 
who can turn beginners into wodd beaters. 

Leo Beenhakker, the Dutchman faired on Nov. 22 
and fired on Fd>. 19, was described by the Saudi 
soccer federation as “not appropriate for Saudi play- 
ers; under him the team stood little chance erf winning 
the World Cup." 

Saudi Arabia winning the thing? Alladrn-might rub 
ihe lamp. The Saudis die marvelously well to reach the 
finals That achievement fulfills the dream, andpossi- 


T . “j - -----l vntffas. ■ 


OJ ^^n^ailbough some ct- flwse ‘ 
Td of bring am ,, It mi «*«« «££! 


bly exhausts the potential of soch a nation. 

Ambition is not to be mocked. Prince Saltan ibn 


Abdulaziz, vice president of the soccer federation, had 
every right to pledge in October, “Our team will not be 
guests of honor at the finals, like some past Asian 
countries.” . - - 

Yes, sr. Go there with pride in nationhood, go as 
competitively as each mans skin and spirit allow. Go 
as far as yon can, and rest assured that year American 
hosts are already grateful to Sancfi Arabia for dimmat- 


C OI UHW yv***~-> ----- 

It is 

tile forward Saeed Owairan — ba w y® 1 10 

_* h Tto*Uw , tte L nib. Saadi has 
bonuses of 5100,000 plus a Mercedes pa njW 

three timra the training hours that brought them this 
far. 


t when reality dawns, tho Sand is must know there 
isn't a coach who can make up deficiencies in talent 
and experience 

That is why the Netherlands, a first round opponent 
of Saudi Arabia at the World Cup, has just w 


S AUDI ARABIA b as chosen not toocportits stare 
to mature in oversea^ dLmes.lt cannot follow the 
practice of rich Arabian families who go put mto the 
world, boy up lhe best horses — often buying back 
Arab stallion bloodlines — and deposit them with the 
best trainers m Europe and America. 


back Ruud GuDiL Now there is a potential world 
beater, a performer who has honed fantastic skills and 
awareness in the mecca of aD leagues, die Italian first 
division. 

Gullit swore never to play again under CoariLDick 
AdvocaaL He felt humiliated by bong substituted 
against England a year ago when he strayed from. the 
restricted right-wing role that Advocaat asked of him. 


SIDELINES 


McDowell to Leave Chisox in 1995 Intrant Justitia Sets 24-Hour Record 


SARASOTA, Florida ( AP) — The day after losing his second arbitra- 
tion case in three years, Jack McDowell, the Cy Young Award winner. 


said he wouldn't play for the Chicago White Sox in 199S. 

“It’s a guarantee. I won't be back next year,” Me Dowd! said Monday, 
adding that he knew he would leave the White Sox “as soon as we sat 
down at that arbitration table for the third year in a row.” McDowell, 22- 
10 with a 337 earned run average for the American League West-winning 
White Sox last season, was awarded S5.3 million for 1994 instead of the 
$6.5 million he had requested. 

McDowdl, 28, has long believed that he deserved a long-term deaL He 
is 7 3-39 in the 1990s, making him the winningest pitcher in the majors 
during those four years. The right-hander has expressed a desire to be 
traded and said again Monday a trade would not bother him. 


SOUTHAMPTON, England (AP) — Intrum Justitia broke its own 24- 
hour world record Tuesday as it Increased its lead on the fourth leg of the 
Whitbread Round the World Race. 

Intrum Justitia, a Whitbread 60, covered 428.7 nautical mDes in a 24- 
hour period, beating the record of 425 mites it set during the second leg. 
On the third day of the 5,900-mile leg from Auckland, New Zealand, to 
Punta del Este, Uruguay, Intrum Justitia led Tokio by 18 miles. 


For the Record 


Tom Coqgfafin, the Boston College football coach, has become the 
coach of the National Football League's expansion Jacksonville Jaguars 
in a five-year deal reportedly worth nearly $4 million. (AP) 


B OTH MEN have changed. Advocaat has become. 

more relaxed and confident. Gullit has' departed 
AC Milan, where his bruised pride inhibited expres- 
sion. With another Italian dub, Sampdoria, be has 
recaptured a rapacious, free-running,- gpal-scoring 
game that Advocaat would be mad to impinge upon. 

Gullit, 31, is oat there showing that we were wrong 
to presume tha t his desire and Ins fitness were gone. 
Watt Beenhakker stayed with Saudi Arabia, it would 
have been intriguing to see how he might plot to stop; 
Gullit. Frank Rilqaard, Ron Koeman and maybe 
Marco Van Basten. 

In 1990, those 
Beenhakker. For 

drid to three consecutive Spanish Sties, 
was never in control of the bickering Dutch master s 
A coach nonetheless proud of his motivational and 
teaching qualities, Beenhakker refutes that he tried to 



impress cm the Samlh the complexities of Dutch “total 
footbalL" . 


Ihe closest tou nas-oecn w onus wy aw*- 
to train and work die local players. In Kuwait, Qatar, 
Bahrain and elsewhere the trend has been to go for the 
best, go BraaKan, and hope that former Brazilian 
players and coaches can imbue some ofthor rhythmic 
game into the players. 

There is an obvious acceptance in the Middle East, 
as in Africa. .There is an attraction among people who 
hvc under ihesoa to roll the ball around, m akin g that 
ball do the work, sharing (he movement. 

; Tbodrawback is that tbe langnid Brazilian style is 
deceptive. It requires addictive practice, from tty 
cradle on, to baud up the drill factor. And as even 
Brazil has found, soccer teams in the modern gam e 
have to work, to run, to fight to earn the right to 
tmxess skids. 

Saudi Arabia's last ttrazjfiim npw*, Josk Candida, 
was getting the jrass&ge across when hie was dismissed 
during the qualifying phase in October. The Sandis say 

to thathis employers 

were affronted because he behaved cordially to Ins Iraqi 
counterpart and went too far in idling his players to 
ignore utc history of warfare and play the game. 

■ The. word' now. is that the Saadi royal family is 
scouring Brazfi far a more politically coma coach. 
When they find on^ he has owe months to pull off a 
nrirade and securehh fortune far fife. 

abJh&abm*e*infft(V*TtMwi. - 



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SCOREBOARD 




NBA Standings 


EASTERN COMFHRENCE 
Altomtc DMstoa 


Phoenix 

34 

14 

AM 

2W 

Golden State 

30 

20 

AM 

Oft 

Portland 

» 

21 

AM 

7 

LA Loiters 

19 

31 

MO 

17ft 

LAOtePors 

17 

32 

Ml 

1* 

Sacramento 

17 

34 

xa 

20 



W L 

Pet 

New York 

36 15 

704 

Orlando 

30 30 

M0 

New Jersey 

2A 34 

J2D 

Miami 

2A 25 

510 

Batten 

20 31 

J92 

Philadelphia 

20 32 

-385 

Washington 

16 34 

-308 


Central Dhrlslm 


Atlanta 

35 14 

AM 

Chicago 

35 16 

ABA 

Cleveland 

27 24 

529 

Indiana 

25 24 

510 

Charlotte 

23 28 

451 

£ 

§ 

I 

15 37 

288 

Demur 

13 39 

255 

W a STERN CONFERENCE 


Midwest Dl vision 


W L 

PCJ 

Sal Antonia 

39 14 

J3A 

Houston 

36 13 

735 

Utah 

34 19 

Ml 

Denver 

25 26 

A 90 

Minnesota 

IS 35 

J0O 

Dallas 

7 45 

.135 


Pacific Division 


Startle 

36 13 

735 


08 


ws 
10 
16 
MV* 
20 VI 


0 

V 

II 

20VJ 

2JWr 


08 


1 

S 

13 

23 V J 

II Vi 


(MONDAY'S RESULTS 
San AnnnSa M 23 M 34— in 

Minnesota IS 20 21 23- 1* 

S: Ellis 7-13 3-221 RnWraon 13-013-1550. M: 
West 0-13 Mt&SmIWi 7-12 O-niRWsrWtOW 
25- Retaands— San Antonia 5 a (Rodman 201. 
Minnesota 43 (Frank, Rider , Brown 71. As- 
sists— San AntardaO (Anderson 10), Minneso- 
ta 71 (Smith 10). 

ChOrtOttB 14 27 » 23— n 

CWeoao m m 3 i u—ni 

C: Canton 7.10M 1 A. Hawkins 3-11 M l A. C; 
Plooan 14-22 1-3 30. Kerr A-V2-3 15. Rafcaaads— 
Chortatte 34 ICenlon Ol.CMcnao 51 IPIoaon, 
Grant 12). AlsMt-CharlaNt 22 I Baaues 11). 
Chicago 3A (Armstrong 10). 

Washington 23 27 25 24— n 

Mfaml 32 36 36 34—131 

W : MocLean MA04) H Price A-10 W 17. M: 
Riot 11-134-4 2». SeTkaly 7-9 10-1424. Smith 3-11) 
2-2 21. R Atwoods— Washington 37 IGwilona 
6>.Mlaml4B (Selkcly B). Assists— Washington 
1* (Ovarian 51, Miami 32 iSmlih 10). 
Dallas 24 25 II 31— W 

DairaB D » » 22— M 

D: Mashtium«-» 5-723. Com port 1 7-15 W 17. 
D: Ell loti 7-12 2-2 17. Mills 7-17 11-13 25. Re. 
Po u nd s Dallas 50 (Jonas 11). Oafrolt 44 
(Mills 13). Assists— Dallas n ( Jackson 51. D*. 


haft 22 (MUIs A Oumors A). 

FMtadatoMa l* 23 1» 2A— >2 

Utah 31 ® 30 2F-1W 

P: LodwarwOM 16. Graham s-13 1-31X U: 
K_ Malone 10-17 W 23. Stockton Ml (M 22. 
RaPoanda— FhlladelpMa 3* (Lsckner 3). 
Utah 43 (Soone r 15). Assists— PtiUodetohta 
20 (Dawkins 5). Utah 31 (K. Mctane 0). 
Sacramento 22 27 II 1*— M 

Phoenix 22 2» » 22-112 

S: TIsdolaMOMM, Richmond 6-IVff-l 11 
P: Barkley 9-14 *-5 21 Johnson A-13 M 20. 
A*alarleH2lHl21. Reha ands — 5 uu u i nanta 32 
(Simmons ICavsweJI 8). Phoenix IV IBarkfav 
11). Assists— Sacramento 24 (Slmntans i. 
Webb 6), Phoenix 3) (Johnson 6). 


Cent. Florida 79, Fla. International 75 
a label 80. VMI 57 
Coastal Carolina 04. Liberty Bl 
Davidson B2. E- Tennesme St. HI 
Dataware st. 92. Florida a&M 07 
E. Kentucky 97. TetOL-Marfln 75 
Florida 77, Florida St. 61 
Jackson st B4. GramDllna St. II 
Jacksonville 74 Louhknn Tech At 
Marshall 7a Georgia Southern 75 
Radford CL Chorfesfan Southern 71 
a Carolina St. 02. Howard U. 75 
SE Loutstana 79. Centenary 78 
South Alabama 75, Ark.- Utile Rock 67 
Teanemee St *4. Tennesme Todh U 


The AP Top 25 


I4DCKEY 


The teams la the coileae baskefball Mft 
with RtsFakice vales la omyntbues. records 
moogh Feb. BUatol points based ae 23 Mats 
tnro» TT Mace vote throogk one potot two 
Mtt-ntoce vote, ant previoa* ranking: 


NHL Standings 


22 27 11 55 -tM 1M 

23 34 4 30 170 Itt 
21 32 .4 40 217 235 
B.. 38 f 39 154 229 


■ASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DtvMoe 

W L T Pts OF GA 


Major College Scores 


EAST 

Buffalo BS. Chicago SI. 80 
Campbell B3. Md.-Baitlmare County 72 
Canbiiis 99. Sima 9a OT 
Cotgote 84. Lalavetta A3 
George WasMnglan 7U Rhaae Island A1 
Lovata. Md. 75. Fordham b 7 
Niagara 7A. 5L PWert 7*. OT 
Providence 71 St. Jonnt 47 
Rutgers ti, si. Banoventwre B3. or 
SI. Francis, Pa 77, Bueknell 77 
Towsan St. 75. N.C-GreensPoro 74 
SOUTH 

Alabama Sl S3, Miss. VMIev St. 49 
Beimme-Caakman 82. Md>E. Shore AA 
Butler Bl. Mercer 65 


MIDWEST 

Cleveland st Bl. N. Illinois 10, OT 
Evansvtlte 95, Ma-84. Louts 57 
Illinois SL 70. Imfiana SL 55 
SW Missouri SL 75. Bradley 45 
Valparaiso 7U. E. llllnob 55 
W. Illinois 49, Youngstown SL AS 
WlL-Grean Bov 80. IIL-Chkaga AA 
Wight 51. 89, WK -Milwaukee 87 


SOUTHWEST 

Prairie View 8b. Akam St. 83 
Texas Lamar 75 
Tends Southern IK. Southern U. 84 
Tera-POn American 100. Troy St. to 


FAR WRIT 

Long Beach st. H. Memphis SI. 58 
Ski c hom a st. 71 Coteraao 5A 



Record 

PIS 

PVS 

NY nanoers 

38 

16 

4 80 210 152 





New Jersey 

31 

19 

8 70 2D? 153 

1. Arkansas (80) 

20-2 

1*620 

1 

Washington 

28 

26 

6 62 W 181 

Z Duke 

19-3 

1JD1 

6 

Florida 

25 

23 

10 60 144 163 

Z Michigan (3) 

19-4 

1AM 

7 

PbDadetpMa 

. 2D 

29 

A M 338 238 

4. North Carolina (1) 

214 

1*365 

2 

NY islanders 

24 

2D 

5 54 193 191 

5. Connecticut (1) 

22-3 

1*341 

3 

Tampa Boy 

22 

n 

.8 52 Ml 182 

A. Missouri 

202 

1.321 

12 

Northeast Division 

7. Kentucky 

205 

1.194 

n 

BchSomi 

» 

■ W 

U 71 MB 146 

a Temnie 

19-1 

1<M2 

13 

Montreal 

31 

22 

8 70 MS 177 

9. AlUttM 

2W 

IMS 

15 

Pittsburgh 

29 

2D 

Tl 49 214 215 

Ml Kansas 

21-5 

9SB 

4 

Buf«ak> 

» 

a 

7 67 303 142 

li. Massachusetts 

2V5 

938 

18 

Quebec 

23 

31 

S 51 189 194 

1Z Indiana 

MS 

935 

16 

Hartford 

21 

33 

A 48 ITS 287 

13 Louisville 

204 

930 

5 

Ottawa 

9 

44 

S 26 149 275 

14. Purdue 

21-4 

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17 

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23. Georgia Tech 

U-9 

157 

25 

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24. Oklahoma SL 

107 

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31 

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Son Jam. 

'Anahe im ' 

Las Angelas 

Edmonton — , „ - 

. WWjlBiRTtS RESUL.TV'* 
WasUMAaa 8 1 B -0 

PLY. Islanders 3 1V-4 

Phst period: N.V.-Mc!nol» 17 (TurgeanJi 
tsUM-YeOalgania* (Green, MctnnM. Sec- 
ond Retied: PLYeTbrgeon 2L T8Wtt Fwltd: 
N.Y Malakav 5 (Datoaom MdanlsJ, Stefs 
on goal: W (anKaxtad) OH-atir. fan. 
Beaunre) A40-V. 

P WUm r ph . • 1 ■ S. 0-4 

PLY. Hnoon ..-183 J-4 

FVef Farted: PsJagr 73 (Muten, k. 5o- 
nwdCMBR); N.Ys Grams 40 (torrnor. Meek- 
er); (on). Third Period: P-stevens 38 (Jbgr, 

• Frwds): {nal. fNPtnoca 2* (Tecdief. <0,.. 
Brawn); N.Y.-Wetti 1. N.Y^Hudeon 3 CGUberL 
Beutabaam). OubtUmo: N-Y.~Aroont» u 
(Meesterl. Shalt An gem: F (an Rkhter) 8-tt- 
7-8-37. PLY. (W Barrasno) 0-17-14-1— «. 
Moatreat • - fvJ 3-7 

P hi lad elph ia • “3 4'. 1-0 

Flret Period: P^oceW 32 (GottoY.Roebie); 
CppL P-BiWAmour U (Galley. Recchl); 
(ppL M Dama h oun e 27 (LeCWrlj P-PedVk 
W ( Ractna. RecchO; (po).MDIPMra I (Haf- 
Jen tutsebott}. Secaod Parted: AVDwn- 
ptaaaMW 21 (LeCMriJ F-Coomy 2 (Botvin, 
Beranek» 6MMHM- M. P-BrTnd’Ampar l* 
(Renbero)/1P'-Lladroe33(Renbers.BrtmrA- 
rooon;iPoMP k PedykT9(«uclne);(ppMM- 
DtameU (MuDer^ehavLTIftd peried : ma- 


Brteeboft a IP-Undra 34. (Brlnd-Amour, 
Racine) ; iM-LeOoir n (BeJkrwj, Dkmne). 
Stele m peak m (an roosm)) u-n^4LP 
Ihv, TtewfWJ .W-ww-^a. 

oam '. "“r.. i. 1 i i-a 

San jam '83' 8—3 

Pint PArleiL- P-Gtkhrtst U D-Mo d tmo 37 
ftodvorCLOate); (nd.OHAdyardt (Churla, 
; McKeasle). Sdeoaa Parted: SJHk**r7(EA- 
W, Gaudrcau); SJ^Makarav W (Peder- 
- son) ^SJL-OndlRdtM (Larionov, Garpenlov). 
Third Period: 13 M odena 38 (Craig, Le- 
tfyord); (PPL D Modono 39 (Cavqlftil. 
Crate); &McPhm 14 (Courtnalt. Evason). 
Shots oo gear: DtoOWWte)W-i2-26.S-r. (an 
WakaMd 

T oee nt e '• ’ • - - , l i 5—4 
Lee Aeaetae - 7 2 1—4 

First Parted: LJWJWTrdk IP (Lang, Blake); 
(PPLT-Zearf 4 (BersuOsbome). Second Perf- 
ad: LJL-GnrtAv 29 (Kurrt); LJLrGraDfcy 30 
(Robboffle, BMce); (pg). Third Ported: T- 
Ftnn Il(Gaf7.r-Mnxmv7(GaDanw,ZC- 
ted; T-GUmour 22 (BOTSChevsfcy); T-OR- 
«bw< 23. (Andreychuk); UArRabltalHe 33 
tDracfc Btaketi TT-Berg A (Osbame, Mo- 
cmm>; (w). 5be4s ae ml: T ConHrudev) 13- 
W5— 40. LA. (on Potvin) 15A-7-W. 

1 # 0-1 
1 1 9—2 
Fi rst Period :»SoWc 19 (Skremj;B-Mon*r 
1 (Audette, Mar). Second Period; B-mmvtev 
18 (Hawerdnik, Dawn). Shots oa goat; Q (on 
HaMc) \W7-U. B (an Ffcet) 8^-13-24. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1994 


Page 21 


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Having a Plate and Elating It, Too? Only if Harding Wins the Gold 




! 

J 


By Harvey Araton 

New York Tima Service 

l^LEHAMMER — IfTonya Harding, wins 

lae gold, I pnomise to eat my plait right down 
to ibe very last trite. ^ 

rriJSf^ f li CoaW DOt hantDe losing their closest 
^ “y words long 

S ^ Vi& da9ca y 10 Pa***- No way! 
munch on a lap top, so a compromise would 
seem to be the local hntdj rfattet, hold the 

,TOUldn '' 

People here have taken to sampling the bio- - 
degradable plates, made primanly of potato 
and corn starch, being used throughout Olym- 
pic venues. The plates, and acco mpan ying cal- 
kr y,are p roduced by Lyctcby Biopac, aSmsd- 
isb company working m conjunction with an 


Austrian group to save the world from card- 
board and plastic. It’s a noble capitalist's envi- 
ronmental cause that’s been embraced by jour- 
nalists who can’t stomach herring, or cross- 
country ski races, but need the scoop on local 
flavor; 

Do I have an ethical responsibility to eat a 
'plate before I write about it? If this is a trend 
that catches on, we'll all be doing triple axels 
before the week is up. Or, worse, running gates, 
as they say on those frigid slaiom slopes. 

The local businessman trito obtained the 
Norwegian licensing and distribution rights to 
Biopac, Dag Sanner, is eating op ah rtnt free 
pubbdty, but even he refuses to consume a 
plate. Crews from CBS and CNN arrived at his 
office in Haxnar recently, hoping he'd chow 
down for the record-setting viewers in the 
Stales. 


“They’re not meant For eating, though noth- 
ing in that plate can be damaging to humans,” 
he said. “But what if someone sees me eating a 
plate on TV, and tries to eat 200 of them? Of 
course they’re going to get rick.” 

And he’d get sued. 

Other than composting the plates and letting 
ilifni naturally fertilize the earth. Sanner said 
they coold also be disposed of as food. Pigs ate 
the' target market Journalists, Sanner said, 
would find saner mass-produced Norwegian 
charm by sampling a McSaixnon sandwich at 
the local arches down by ljUchamraer’ s Strand- 
toiget MalL 

“But how can yoo write about the plate and 
not eat one?" one of my contemporaries asked, 
waving a white half-eaten starch special. 

I told him that, while 1 might be persuaded to 


try one with bacon and cheese, fried onions or 
□actios. there was no way I would eat one plain, 
unless — - unless — Tonya Harding wins the 
gold medal, if something happened as unfath- 
omable as that. 

“You’n: on,” he said. So there you arc. 

1 am sure that's not going to happen, despite 
what's been reported by the hungry wolf pack 
covering the Hardigan circus. With the ap- 
proach of the women’s figure-skating competi- 
tion that begins Wednesday and ends Friday, 
Harding was executing her trademark triple 
axels with stunning regularity, four is one prac- 
tice. Her ankle seemed to be sore no more. Her 
amazing resolve was holding up. 

Her American rival, Nancy Kerrigan, had 
been smiling too modi, a bad sign, and, by the 
start of the week, was stumbling all over the 


place. The French star, Surya Bonaly, was be- 
ing chastised by officials for doing illegal back 
flips. The world champion from Ukraine, Ok- 
sana Baud, just showed up this week, and what 
was that about? 

Could Handing, if she executes her jumps, 
actually win? That'll be the day. 

Despite a report of a Czech Olympic skating 
judge, who is not here but who claimed that 
Harding was tainted, most have said they 
would not penalize her, despite allegations of 
involvement in the attack on Kerrigan last 
month in Detroit. That's their job. to be fair. 
That's also a journalist's job. yet most in Ameri- 
ca have either convicted Harding by public jury 
or called for ber ouster on vague ethical charges 
to be brought by a glass-boused committee, 
upon which sits a' confessed if pardoned felon. 


Wednesday, Thursday 
TV Schedules, Events 


Wednesday’s Events 

AM times are GMT 

Alpine Sfcflng - Men’s gfam sintom 
first ran. 0830; second run, 123a 

BWNon - Women’s 7.5 kitometeis, 
0900; Men’s ID kHometers. 1200. 
Ftgum Skating - Women's technical 
program, 1800. 

Ice Hockey - Quarterfinals: Canada 
va Czech Republic, 1400; Finland vs. 
united States, 1530; Germany vs. Swe- 
den. 1B3Q; Slovakia v& Russia. 200a 
NortOe Combined - Team go-meter 
sM jumping, 103a 

SpeedekaSng - Women’s 1.000 roo- 
ters. 1500. 

. Wednesday's TV 

EUROPE . 

AH times are focal 

Austria - ORF: 0600-1800, 2015- 
2200,2245-2400. 

Britain - BBC2: 1415-1550. 2005 
2100, 2315-2355. 

Bulgaria - BNT/Channe! 1: 1025- 
1645, 1915-1945, 2200003a 
Channel 2. 1655-2000, 00300100. 
Croatia - HRT/TV2: 1400-1930. 
2306-0005. 

Cyprus - CYBC: 1715-1745, 2000- 
2100,22302300. 

Czech RepuMe - CTV: 0915-1730, 
1945-0005. 

Denmark - DR; 0945-1730, 1855- 

1926.2130- 2215 

Estonia - ETV: 1050-1945, 2145- 

003 a 

FWand - YLE/TV1: 1015-1600. 

TV2: 1600-1830. 1900-1930, 2015- 
0030. 

France - FR2: 0924-1253 
FR3: 1304-1500, 2005-2030 
TF1: 2050-2250. 

Germany - 2DF.-0903-1745. 1925- 
2300- 

Graece - ET1: 0830-0900. 2345- 
0215; ET2: 1430-1515 1915-1945 
Hungary - MTV/Channel i: 1317- 
1568; Channel 2: 20052010. 2250- 
0130. 

Iceland - RUV: 0825-1045, 1225- 
1445. r 1 825-1 855, 2330-2345 . 

Italy - RAEh 0925-1145. 00154200; 
RAJ 3: 1255-1400. 1950-2020. 

Latvia - LT: 1400-1800. 1915-1945. 

0030-01 oa 

Lithuania - LRT: 1055-1245. 1400- 

1600. 2130- 2150. 

Luxembaurg - CUT: Highlights on 
evening news, 1900-2000. 

Macedonia - MKRTV/Channal 1: 
0825-1030, 1225-1445. 1325-1800, 
1825-2100; Channel 2. 0855-1045. 
1155-1400, 1455-1630, 1755-1845, 
1955-2230; Channel 3: 1025-1210. 
1335-1630. 1755-2130. 2230-230a 
Monaco - TMC/IT: 0930-1300. 
1330-1925, 2005-2230. <7145-0315. 
Netherlands - NOS: 0900-1754, 
1 840-1 8Sa 2000-2345. 

Norway - NRK: 0900-1750, 2005 
0030; TV2: 19452030. 2130-223a 
Poland - TVP/PR1: 09151100, 
20152040, 2200-2300: PR2: 1105 
1500. 16051725, 1905*000. 0035 
0205. 

Portugal - TV2S 2300-2320; RTP1: 

noo-ii 2 a 

Romania - RTVR/Channel 1: 1425 
1515, 19151945, 0030-0100; Channel 
2z 15551830, 2025-2330 
Russia - m©: 1155-1345, 1825 
2100. 23050030; RTR: 13151945, 
22050125. 

Slovakia - STV/SK: 0600-1935. ' 

Slovenia - RTVSLO: 09051845, 
19552015. 20352325. ■ 

Spain - RTVE: 0930-2400; TVE2: 
14451500. 

Sewden - SVT/TV2: 1400-1605, 
17451915, 2000-2145: Channel 1: 
09151130, 12551400. 160S-174S. 
19152000.21452400. 

Switzerland - 75R/TSJ/DR&0930- 
1500; 8+: 1630-1900. 19352200. 
Turkey - TFT: 18052000, 2030- 
2300. ” 

Ukraine - DTRU/UTt: 10551245, 
13551600. 1015-2100, 21352245, 
00350100. 

Eunwport - 0605contlnuous cover- 

■‘age. 

ASIA/ PACIFIC 
Afl ttmoa ora tocsl 
AustnRa - Channel 9: 203501 oa 
Near 7 *° l ll * >lj — TV?: 0705080a 
21352400. . 

■hynn - NHK: 22052400 (general); 
12351500. 18050630 (satellite); 
13051500. 19052200 (Hl-Vtelon). 
Papua New Guinea - EMTV: 2105 
2300. 

China - CCTV: 1935203a 2305 
010 a 

Hong Kong - TVB: 24050100. .. 

Sou*. Korea - KB& J0°°- l300; 
MBC: 14351730. 24050135 
Malayla - TV3: 2315-0015. 
Steg^wre - $BC/Channel 12: 2*05 
0100. 

STAR TV/Prime Sports - D205corv 
tfnuouscovwage. 

NORTH AMEfflCA 
- ah times era EST __ 

r— rot* - CTV: 06351800, 2005 
2300. 

■United States - ^i!Z2K2& 
20052300, 0037-0137; TNT: 1305 

Itadeo - Televisa: 07051 100. 1705 
1900. 23352400. 


Thursday’s Events 

AH times are QMT 

Alpine suing - Women's giant sla- 
lom first run, 0630; second run, 1200. 
Cross Country siding - Women’s 
30-kilometer classical, 113a - 
Freestyle Skiing - Aerials finals, 
1105 

(oe Hockey - NSrrth place, Austrto- 
F ranee winner va. Norway-1 taly win- 
ner, 1400; llth place, Austria-France 
loser vs. Norway-naly loser, 1530; 
consolaiion, Canada-Czech RepubKc 
loser vsl Flnland-Urihed States loser, 
1830. Qermany-Sw ods n loser va.Sk»- 
vakia-Russia lossr, 2000. 

Nordic Combined - Team 3x1 0-kflo- 
metar cross country, 0900. 

Short Track Spcudikzllig - Wom- 
an's 500 meters, 1800; men's 505 
meter qualifying, 1800; men's 5.005 
mster relay quaBfyfcig, 1805 

Thursday’s TV 

EUROPE 

AH times era local 

Austria - ORF: 06051800, 2015- 
2105 2236-0030. 

Britain - BBC& 1415-1550, 2005 
2100. 2315-2355. 

Bulgaria - BNT/Charmei 1: 1035 
1145, 1255-1515, 1555-1 945; Channel 
2:22050105 

Croatia - HRT/TV2: 1626-1930. 
23 050000. 

Cyprus - CYBC: 17151745. 2035 
2100, 2235230a 

Czech Republic - CIV: 0915-1535 
1945-2015. 23250005; Channel 2: 
2135223a 

Denmark - DR: 1145-1700. 1856- 
1925.21352222.00050100. - 
Estonia - ETV: 10551615, 1915- 
1945, 21450030. 

Finland - YLE/TV1: 10451700; 
TV2: 19051930, 22050015 
France - FR2: 00251100. 1105- 
1145, 11551253; FR3: 1255-1405 
1405-1440, 20052030. 

Germany - ARD: 09051500, 1715 
1740, 2145-2230. 

Greece. JETT: 0830-0900; ET2: 
1400-1445, 1915-1045. . 

Hungary - MTV/Cbanoel 1: 1207- 
1400. 1625ri655. 2005^3710, 2305 
0015 

I c el an d - RUV: 0825-1005 1155- 
14051825-1855, 23350000. ’ 

Italy - RAH: 14051500; RA12: 0025- 
1145. 0030-0200; RAI3: 1225-1400, 
19552020/. 

Lnfarta -r .LT: 1915-1945,0030-0105 
LHhuanla - LRT: 1325-1540. 2135 
2155 • 

Luaamtooug - CLT: HO^tDghts on 
svpriing nei«,i90520oa 
Macedonia - MKHTTV/Channel is 
0825-1005 1155-1345. 1525-1800, 
1825-2100, 22352305 Channel 2 
1055-1243. 1355-1635 1735-1745. 
17552130; Channel 8: 08551045, 
1125-1340, 1755-1915, 19552235 
Monaco - TMC/IT: 09351345. 
1405-1505 1735 1925. 23052330, 
01050300. 

Nathariands - NOS: 09051725. 
18451855 20352325. 

Norway - NRK: 0951750. 2005 

2405 TV2: 1845-1905 

Poland - TVP/PR1? 09151100, 

18351855, 21002235 PR2: 1105- 

1505 1605-1725, 19052005.0005- 

0105. 

Portegal - TV2: 23052325 RTP1: 
11051120. 

Ronanla - RTVR/Channai 1: 1205 
1S00, 1915-1945, 00350100. 

Russia - RTO. 1425-1645 1635 
1900, 22350215; RTR- 11551405 
17151800. 21252166. 

Slovakia - STV/SK: 06051145, 
1225-1440, 18152200. . . . 

Slovenia - RTVSLO: 0905-1505. 

17051845, 19552205 

Spain - RTVE: 09302400; 7VE2: 

14451505 

Sweden - SVT/TV2: 09151015. 
11451500, 20052105' 

Swi tzer la nd - TSR/TSI/DRS: 0935 
1445; S+: 19052230. 

Turkey - TRT: 18051935 2035 
2305 

Ukraine - DTRU/UT1: 1 0251435 
19151945. 00350105 UT2: 1325. 
1600.18051845 

Eurosport — 0600-conflrHiouscovar- 

fl9 °‘ ASIA/PACIFIC . 

AH time*, are local ■ ■ - 

AuatraBa - Channel 9: 2030-0105 
New Zealand - TVJ: 0700-0800. 
21352400. 

Japan - NHK: 22052400 (general):' 
1230-1500. 18050635 (satafOte); 
13051500, 19052200 (W-Vision). 

Pallia New Gutaaa -- EMTV; 2105 
2335 

China - CCTV: 22052405 
Hong Kong - TVB: 2400-0100. 

South Korea - KBS: 10051300; 
MBC; 14351730, 24050130. 

Malaysia - TVS: 2315-0015. 
S i n ga po r e- — SBC/Channel 12:2405 
■ Oioa 

STAR- TV/Priraa. Spotter - 0205 
1300 , 1530 -ccxtfnuous coverage. .. 
NORTH AMERICA ' 

AH time* are EST 

Canada - .CTV: 06350900, 1335 
170520052200.. 

United States CB&07050900. 
2000^2 3Q0.: 0037-0187; TNT: .1305 
1805 

fgasdeo - TeStvisa: 0700-1 100, 1700- 
19052335240a 

information provided ty the iOC, tw, . 
and tneftridua 0roadcasief3;'comp&od 

by the International HaraST Tribune. 


IOC to Match Funds 
But Only for Sarajevo 

Roam 

L DLLEHA MMER — For the International Olympic 
i Conamilec; dbarity apparently stans with Sarajevo. And 
I stops there. 

Norway’s speed-skating star. Johann Olav Koss, who 
! set three world records in winning three odd medals, said 
last week that he was donatinga 530,000 Olympic bonus 
to the charity organization Olympic Aid. 

The IOC then said, or so it was understood by most, 
that it would match ail charitable donations by athletes. 

But IOC officials said Tuesday that only 56,000 of 
Koss’s donation would be matched, because Olympic Aid 
splits its funds among Sarajevo, Afghanistan, Eritrea, 
Guatemala and Beirut. 

“It’s the destination that counts,” said the IOCs public 
relations director, Andrew Napier. “We -will match what 
athletes give specifically to Sarajevo.” 

“Our understanding from die ivynr>mg was that the 
IOC would match the whole amount Koss and other 
athletes via us,” said Svein Tornaas, the campaign 
ramagpr for Olympic Aid. ‘Vow we don’t know.’' 

Sarajevo, the host city for the 1984 Winter Games, has 
been singled out by the IOC to show Olympic solidarity 
1 with the victims of the war in Bosnia. 

Napier said that Koss had been inspired by the plight of 
I Sarajevo and that, if Olympic Aid gave his entire donation 
to the Bosnian city, the IOC would also give S 30,000. 

But Andun Tjomsland, a spokesman for the Norwegian 
I Olympic team, sad Koss had not intended that his money 
go solely to Sarajevo. 

: “J ohann was in Eritrea and was shocked by conditions 

I ihwe," T^ rtmclanH said. “For him it’s logical to give to the 
whole charily” 

Olympic Aid’s Thoraass said the organization's statutes 
dictated that all donations be split equally. 

Olympic Aid was set up in 1992 with a target of raising 
94 nnffion kroner (S1Z5 nnQkm). of which it now has 
I about 52 milli on kroner. An estimated 10 million kroner 
has poured in since K ass's announcement. 


OLYMPIC NOTEBOOK 









Frank Lcpolairii/A^na Fmo-PiQK 


Stephane Barm bringing down an Austrian player in France's victory —it all came down to a penalty sboototiL 


- Anita Wachter.-the- Austrian 
who is the Jeatfing riant dalam ski- 
er oa the World Cup circuit this 
season, said Toesday that she ex- 
pected to race in that event Thurs- 
day after having been forced out of 
the combined competition by influ- 
enza. 

“I fed a lot better. In a ample of 
days I should be fine," Wacbter 
said. 


Hans Trygve Kristiansen, whose 
team has won three gold and two 
giver medals at these Gaines, an- 
nounced that Ik was res ignin g. 

‘Tve been coach for nine years," 
he said. ‘T fhinir that's enough, 
don’t you? I have no doubts. I 
achieved my main goaL I have suc- 
ceeded and decided it’s time to 
quit-” 

• Traffic jams prevented thou- 
sands of spectators from arriving in 
time for the start of the men's 4x10- 


kilomeler cross-conn try relay, 
which Norway was favored to van. 

Organizers estimated that as 
many as 100,000 people sought to 
cram themselves into the cross- 
country stadium — capacity 31,000 
— and around the tracks for the 
event 

Bnt, one official claimed: “It's 
not chaos, it’s just a problem of the 
numbers." 

• Viktor Petrenko, the 1992 
Olympic champion who finished 
fourth in men's figure skating, wifi 
not go to the World Figure Stating 
Championships in Japan next 
month because of an agreement 
with the Ukrainian federation. 

The country is allowed just one 
skater there, as it was in the Olym- 
pics, and that will be given to Via- 
cheslav ZagorodnruL He was sec- 
ood at the Biropen championships 
last month but did not compete at 
the Olympics because that spot was 
taken bv Petrenko, Ibe 1992 world 


champion who then fumed pro and 
was reinstated for this season. 

"I’m going home to Odessa to 
sec my wife." Petrenko said. 

• Riding iIk sweet swell of suc- 
cess, UUehamroer's mayor has pro- 
posed that the town apply to host 
the Winter Olympics again in the 
year 2010. 

“This would be the best after-use 
of the Olympic arenas." Mayor Au- 
dun Tron said as the deputy mayor. 
Odd Arve Lien, nodded approval 

Should the International Olym- 
pic Conmnnee decided to cm back 
on new bids, they offered T ilktham- 
zner as one of a select group of rites 
hosting future Games. 

Sl Moritz, Switzerland; Lake 
Placid, New York, and Innsbruck, 
Austria, have all hosted the Winter 
Games twice. 

• Tickets to the sports events are 
selling well but visitors to the 


Olympics do not appear to be in the 
mood for culture. The organizing 
committee said it would lose S mil- 
lion to 10 million kroner ($1 mil- 
lion to 5U million) on the art, 
theater and outdoor national 
events that nobody attended One 
group, Hedmarit Teater. is taking 
its performances into the streets erf 
central Lillebammer. But that 
poses another challenge: The 
school-age local actors, wearing 
masks and costumes, will have to 
try to differentiate themselves from 
liic wild, pin-wearing, flag-waving, 
sweater-shopping throngs. 

• A chilly start cm a hot topic: In 
Oslo, a man and a woman wearing 
only white cotton aprons launched 
an animal-rights campaign that 
hopes to deter people from wearing 
for coats. 

The activists said that soon post- 
ers will appear on buses throughout 
Scandinavia featuring five nude 


models under the slogan: “We’d 
rather go naked than wear fur." 

“We already have reports that 
posters have been stolen from Oslo 
buses." said Amanda Bates, a 
spokeswoman for the Washington- 
based People for the Ethical Treat- 
ment of Annuals. 

• The number of women seen 
wearing a skirt in the Olympic re- 
gion since the Opening Ceremony: 
three. The number of visitors who 
have fallen on the icy city sidewalks 
and fractured or broken a bone 
since arriving in Lillebammer: 1 12. 

• Correction: In a story in Mon- 
day’s IHT on the 10.000-meter 
speed-skating race, the name of the 
Dutch athlete killed in an auto ac- 
cident was incorrectly reported. 
Her teammates were wearing black 
arm bands in memory of Renske 
Veflinga, 19; Rintje Ritsma fin- 
ished seventh in the race. 

flfT, A?. Reuters) 


Courtroom jurists must be interviewed for 
prejudicial thoughts that might influence & 
case. In this subjective, often petty sport, Har- 
ding was the equivalent of a social outcast 
before anyone knew her husband planned the 
Kerrigan attack. She was penalized a half-point 
by the judges in Detroit for a costume that was 
considered skimpy, cheap. American officials 
here reportedly have been treating her like dirt. 

When the judges watch her perform, there 
will be no way for them to separate her from ail 
they have heard, or decided for themselves. 
Only the threat of litigation has gotten Harding 
this far. but she can't sue the judges for lopping 
a point off her score, or just not appreciating 
her athleticism at the expense of artistry. 

Fair or not, Harding can’f win. TheyU never 
let her. 


France Gets 
A Victory 
In Hockey 

The Arsodoicd Pros 

ULLEHAMMER — France de- 
feated Ausuia. 4-1, in a penalty 
shootout Tuesday, giving the 
French their first victory in the 
Olympic ice hockey tournament. 

It was only a consolation round 
game, however. France will now 
play Italy for ninth place, and the 
Austrians will play Norway for 
llth. 

The French, who outshot Italy in 
a game they lost 7-3, finally had a 
break go their way wben a video 
goal judge's ruling in the second 
period turned a 3-2 deficit into a 3-2 
lead. But the Austrians twice tied 
the game in the third, sending it into 
overtime with the score tied, 4-4. 

The video ruling came five min- 
utes into the second period with the 
score at 2-2. Arnaua Briand shot a 
loose puck from the slot over the 
sprawled Austrian goal tender, Bri- 
an Siankiewicz. It appeared to hit 
the right post and bounce ouL 

Briand and some teammates lift- 
ed their arms in celebration, but 
plav continued and 29 seconds lat- 
er. at 5:35. Richard Nasheim com- 
pleted a 2-on-l break with Kenneth 
Strong to score for Austria. 

The Italian referee, Ruggero Sa- 
varis. asked for the video replay, 
which is bang used in the Olym- 
pics for the first time. The camera 
showed the puck hitting the right 
post, deflecting into the goal in the 
upper corner — and oat 

Savaris look away Nasheun’s 
goal and awarded one to Briand. 

The Austrians tied it twice in the 
third, but the comebacks came to 
nothing when Petri Ylonen stopped 
Strong and Nasbom on their penal- 
ty attempts while Franck Pajon- 
kowski. Serge Poudrier. Pierre 
Pousse and Benoit LaPorte scored 
for Fiance. 

Italy 6, Norway 3: The game 
matched the worst offensive and 
defensive teams of the tournament 
Italy had allowed 31 goals in the 
five preliminary-round games, 
while Norway had scored only five. 
This was the first time the Norwe- 
gians had scored more than two 
goals in one game. 

Italy wasted no time taking the 
lead, scoring after 18 seconds when 
Gaetano Orlando knocked in a re- 
bound of his own shoL Norway 
leveled the score at 7:22 on a slap 
shot by Petter Salslen from just 
inside the blue line. Italy regained 
the lead just 44 seconds later when 
Timmy Camazolla deflected a shot 
by Orlando past Norwegian goalie 
Jim Marthinsen. 


OLYMPIC SCOREBOARD 


MEDALS 

4> 

COUHTRY 

a 

9 

• T 

Russia 

y 

7 

3 1 

Norway 

• 

7 

2 1 

Italy 


3 

a 

Swrmonv 

5 

2 

6 1 

United States 

4 

3 

1 

Canada 

2 

3 

3 

Austria 

1 

2 

3 

Netherlands 

a 

1 

3 

South Korea 

2 

1 

0 

Switzerland 

l 

2 

0 

Jaoan 


2 

t 

France 

a 

1 

2 

PJotand 

. 0 

0 

3 

Kazakhstan 


2 

0 

Sweden 

l 

0 

B 

flctarui 


1 

0 

Britain 

a 

B 

1 

Skwsnfa - 


0 

1 


For investment information 

Read THE MONEY REPORT 

every Saturday in the IHT 


- TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
OrwomtrrsUb* 

- — ; Mm «m kummmt iMmr 

G: ftoftr O* Maras Albonito. 

Gtoroto Vuuiflu SUvto Founv) 

S: Norway (SturcSvwftWvVfoanl Ulvanw 
Tlwmox Abeaonf. atom OOMiel 
B: mem (MHw Mytiyks Horrl KNvm- 
ittanv Jort Roman. Jon igameba) 
s» JamuHoa 

• Una MU lSWtatar Toon 

G: Germany tHaratara Joakfe Oalstof 
Otfffoar. defer Ttana jam We tof W W 
fc Jaoan Ulnyp NMilkota.TaftBaoeu OKflbe, 
Marta k I Kasai. MomUBui Haradol 
8: Austria {SMnt Kuitin. ortolan Meat, 
Slaton Hfl H wadwy Andreos Gouaenw) 

■ Morf TVedt Spmo Ww 
- AUrtUMWtr Refer 
O: KVKocn Kim. South Korea 
S: jLHoan Chae. South Karoo 
Br.Marc Oasnav Canaria 
■ Wwrt M W M e te r anw 
G: South Koran 
S: Canada 
B: United States 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 
1 AJpiae SUM 
miwi wflPfP*® 

o: ponrillo WRnrs. Swwton 
S: Vrani Sdmridrr, Switzerland 
B: Aienka Ooman, Slovenia 
Snad Skatlot 
mows MB Maters 
Gl Emtte Huovadv. Austria 
S: SveMaw FuMWna Rtssia 
6: Outdo Nlentonv Gummy 
Crase GHtat SWIM 
HtoMVtaKteHlwiten 
G: Russia (Elena Voeft*. Lortsso Lcauttna, 
Nha Govriiufc. Lyiitoav Ewovai 
S: Marww mulaOytaneaMr >Mar Hatana 
Nvtjraottav Bln Nllaen. Anita Moot) 

B: UWY t»ea Voraettn. Monuete di Centa 
OtKttaa FarazzS. stefatde Befeoerate) 

- n — re SHetiJH 
Ice DBOciM 

G; OftMdBGrfeehufc. Evaenl PMsv. Rossio 


S: Moto Usovo end AJawmder Zhuiln, Russia 
B: Jeryra TorviH ent Chrtdaaher Dean. Britain 
SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Meat H lo tti l ne 
as KHemeten 
G: Serata Tonuev, Russia 
S: Fnmk Luck. Germany 
B: Men Fischer. Germonv 
BDOsied 
Tuju Mu a 

G: Swtti 1 (Gustav wetter and Donat) 

S: Steffen (RtfoGoetsc/mmd Guido AeMW 
B: Italy I (Gunther Huher end Stefano Tied) 
Sid JURiptna 
Leave ton no Mrters 
G: Jens WMssttaa, Oermcny 
S: Espeo Bredesea Norway 
8: Andrea CekBuraer. Austria 
speed SkatfM 
IWi MAM Meters 
G: Johann OJov koss, Norway 
S: Ktefl Siaretld, Norway 
B: Ban VeMfconw. Nettwsiendi 
SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
*WM Skfina 
Wfeowtes oawnMH 
G: Kalla Sctdranr, Germany 
s: PteaDe Street. Untied states 
B: Isolde Kastner, Italy 

Crms-Country SUn 
MteTs Free Penalt IS KBenteters 
G: Biom DatMta. Norway 
S: Vtatftmlr Smtmov. KazaUaton 
B: SHeto Fou ner, Ita l y 

Ftoora Statins 
Mtm Free Prasrom 
G: Alaacei urmonav, Russia 
S: EM* Steffco. Canoda 
B: PMftsse Candeloro, France 
Heroic c e mMiwri 
mdM MW 

G: Fred Borre LunObero. Norway 
S: Ttetanarf Kona. Japan 
B: Blano Ensen Vlk. Norway 
speed Sta ttne 
Pnsnrt SM Nuns 
G: Bennie Btelr. United States 
S: Suian Aacfe Canada 
B: Frontma Schenk, Genhatry 
FRIDAYS RESULTS 
BMtHee 

women's BICtaraetera 
G: Akyrtom Bedard, Conada 
5: Aaw Brtond, Franc* 

B: Urauio Dhi. Germany 
Lmc 

MmH * 

G: Kurt Bnwer and wnti Ud tMufi Holy 
S: Hanslars RoW Ond Nortert ttuh ar, itqiy 

D-UrTfiFnermetr^ MiMwmtr»rmnmr 

speed Stattao 
mm's 1AM Mews 
G: Dan Jannn United States 
S: law ZheltzDVskVi Behuvi 
B: sera* lO*«he»nro. Rtasla 

THURSDAYS RESULTS 

Alpine SWIm 
M art saPerGtote Stolen 
G: Mortws woameler, Gernmnr 
S: Tammy MO*. Pointer, Alaska 
B: KleiH Andre Aomoca. Norway 
Crtd Caaotnr skkm 
M en* » KBoeoeten 
G: Biorn DaNte, Nareny 


S: Vladimir Smirnov, Kacaktnten 
B: Marco Albaretlo. Itatv 

women* WHOtaaeter Par** 
G: Lyubov egoruva, Russia 
S: Manueta 01 Centa Italy 
8: StofdnJa Belmondo. Italy 


Sated Stating 
Mea* MM Meters 
G: Johann Otav Koss. Norway 
S: Kiel 1 Stand kL Norway 
B: RfaUe Ritsma, Netheflands 


O: Svetlana Bazbanava fiumJo 
S: Ernes* Hunyodv, Austria 
B: CSaudfa P«3jste*n. Germany 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Freestyle Stem 
Men* Meeals 

G: JeereLue Brassardi Canada 
S: SergH Sheupietsav. Russia 
B: Edgar GrasPlFan, France 
Women* Moguls 
G: Stine Use Hal t e s te d. Norway 
5: Uz McIntyre. United States 
B: EHzavnta Keievnlkatta. Rmoia 


G: Gento WB D— ata teer, Italy 
S: Susi Erdmann. Germany 
B: Andrea Taower Her. Austria 
Speed skatfae 
Mea* URMMn 
G: Jpham Olav Koss, Norway 
5: Rlntle Rttsma. Nethertanas 
8: Fafta Zancstm. N et he rlan d s 
TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
tyi— sum 

Warns* SoperGtart SUom 
G: Dtaui Bottetaein r aHer. UA. 

S: Svetlana GttCBsdwva Russia 
B: IteUe Kasner, Italy 

Cress Caantry Siding 
Warned* S RUemelm 
G: Lyvoov Ee nn avn, Russia 
S: Manueta Di Cento. Mow 
B: MartaUtsa tarvesnieml 
Ffaore Stamm 
Pom, Freestyle Program 
G: E. Gordeeva and S. Grtakav. Russia 
S: »LM»shtoHendk Mid A. Dmitriev, Russia 
B: l. Bresseer and i- Eistor. Canada 
MONDAY'S RESULTS 
Cross Country SATetP 
Mea* SI KQeoMders 
G: Thomas Abgoard. Norway 
. S: Blem name. Noway 
B; M Bw MyDyta. Ptntand 


Men* Singles 
: Georg Hetkl, Germany 
Markus ProdL Auferto 
: Annin Zopetl er . Holy 

Speed Stating 
stars sae Meters 
: Atottandr Golubev. Russia 
Sergei Klevcnenva Russia 
: Manama Hartfc Japan 

SUNDAY* RESULTS 
AWm SKHm 
M en* Dewnoin 
: Tammy MO*, united Stefa* 
KletU Andre Aamedt Norway 
: Edward PeriMrahv. Canada 
Orose C e iiMn r SRUrb 
W o m en* tS KOeaetan 
: Manueta DI Cento. Italy 
Lyubov Egorova, Ru»te 
: NMQ GavrlkA. Russia 


CROSS 

COUNTRY 


MEICSesH KILOMETER RELAY— 1, Ita- 
ly (MourtltoDeZott.MareoAfcarvUo.GtarBK> 
VaniethfcSilvto Fanner). 1:41 :15A;2, Norway 
(Slur* Stvertaen. Vegan) Utvsta. Thomas 
Atsaaara Store DeMie), 1 :4I -ISA; X FlntaW 
(Mlko Mydyta, Horrl KirvesitemL Jarl Ro- 
iom Jori tsomeiso). 1 Mi 1 16; A Germany 
(Tarata Rein. Jeclien BeHe. Peter Sdillcktew 
rieder. Jtaann Muehtega). WfBJl S, Rus- 
sia (Andre) KJrHtov. Aiewt PnAounm, 
Geanacn Lazutin. Mikhail Botvfaov). 
1:* *XS2; A Sweden (Jrei Ottaamn. Chrtslar 
Motaoeek. Anders P m as t roem. HenrUt Fore- 
berg), t:4S:2Z7; 7. S wl t ia r tu nd I Jeremies 
Wtgger. Ham DMtheim. Juere Camt, Gto- 
ehten GtAJon). 1:40:122. 

B. Czech Republic (Lubomlr BiKMa,Vadav 
Karonka. Jlrl Teaty. Pave) Benc),t:47:t24; % 
Kazakhs ton IMHreM twonov, Hovel Korolev, 
Andrei Ne v zorov. Pavel RtaHnlne), 
1:<7:4U; 10. France (PNltope Sanchez. Pat- 
rick Remr. Hvrve Baltaid. Stephana 
Azambret. l :4;2Ll ; II, Estonia (jeak Mae. 
Jaanue TePPan. Elmo Kassta. Toivo Kuus), 
l:«:S74; 12. Beterus doer OQukhav. Vlcter 
KamotskL Sergei Dondawhsch. VMdialav 
Pkllawiav).l:4»3J; 11 United Stat o» (John 
AoSxta, Benjamin Husabv. Todd Boaratra 
LukaBodenatetnor),1:49:4U; M. Japan IHIr- 
oyuki imaL Kazuteshi Nopanama, Kazunarl 
SosaU. MasaoU Karo). 1:J»:42.1. 


HOCKEY 


POOL A 
W L 

* -Finland 5 0 

H -Germany 3 2 

s -Czech Rep. 3 2 

x- Russia 3 I 

Austria I 4 

Norway 0 S 

POOL B 
W L 

x -Slovakia 3 0 

x -Canoda 3 1 

■■Swed en 3 1 

x-Unlted States I 1 

italv l 4 

France 0 4 


T P» OF GA 
0 10 25 4 

0 6 It 14 

D « 16 11 
0 6 2 D 14 

0 2 13 28 

0 0 S 19 

T PtS GF GA 

2 B 25 14 

1 7 t? 11 

1 7 23 13 

3 S 21 17 

0 3 IS 31 

1 1 1127 


SKI JUMPING 


T2PMETER TEAM — 1, Germany [Hans- 
leero ja*Me.CwWof DuHner.DMW Tiwma 
j«ns wefcsfloo). ran aotatu l Jam umyn 
NEshftceM, Tafcanatw Oktae. Nortaki Karol 
MasoMkO natal). 9545; X Austria (Heinz 
Kuttlis Chrlsttm Maser, Stefan Hornoacher, 
Andreas GaWheroeri. 9iiS; 4. Norway (Ov- 
vtnd Berg, Lass* Oitesen, Rear Uoutroy. 
Espen Breduen). MJ; & Finland (Raima 
YiteuLU. Jarme Vbatafaen, Jaw Pettgrl 
AMran. Jam Merton Sotnhwn}, W9J; a. 
Franca rSfeew DefauR, Nicola* JaOA-PTOSl. 
Nicolas Dessum. DMer Moilant). 322.1. 

t.CwOt Republic (LodblovDtuhoa.2bynek 
Krempaic, Jirt Parma, Jarostav Sakata). 
KNU; 8, itatv [Ivo Perttfe Andrea Cecan.Ro- 
feprteCromvlvon LunanO).78X3: AStovemo 
(Malta Ktadnik, Matte Zuoan, Sama 
Cast Isa, Robert MegUe). 739. i; ID. Sweden 
(SJnflcn Tatlbera Mika) Atortlnssan, J»ftan 
Rasmussen. Predrtk Jabensan). fcSU; 11, 
united States (Ronoy Wdber, Greg Boeser. 
kor strtL John Langfatvl SOU: 12 RusJo 
(Alex I Sotadtanklih Dmitri TchoMMca 
Stanislav PeUHiko. Mikhail Gtelnel. 41U. 


Franca 0 4 11 1127 

■-advanced to teaoHertfaais 

aoarterffaaJs on w te ta w 
Canada vs. Czech Republic. D9tt> 

Finland vs. united stole. iD3fl 
Germonv vs. Sweden. U30 
Slovakia vs. Russia. 1500 

TUESDAY* RESULTS 
Caorotaften Gamas 
Austria A France 5 
itatv A Norway 3 

note J i o-t 

Norway 2 I 4-9 

Ftat Period— 1. uoiv, Gaetano Orlando: l 
Norway, Petter Sateten lOte Eskikl DaM- 
straml ; X Italy. Jimmy Camozzoto (Gaetano 
Orkndo): A itahr. Rolond Ro maser: s. not- 
wtry.GetrMolfl Jan-RoarFaocdi). Pmott le*- 
M a rte n Ftastod. Nor drlnplnet. 

Second perio d— A. Norway, Tommy Jakob- 
sen (Veoor Borlielj 7, Itatv. Bruno Zarrilto 
(Anthony araellll. Penalties— Arrlnony cir- 
CMd. I to (Interterence}: Norway benttv 
served by PaHer Thortsen itoo many meat. 

Th ir d p er iod- 0 , Italy. Lucto Tqpmlgn (Bac- 
tanoOriandol : f. lfaly. Gaviono OrlanOB (Lo- 
de Topatighi- Penalties—' Vedo SaendlnL Ifa 
(hold Inal. 

Shota an goal— Italy 9-4-5— IB. Norway 11-* 
> II DWH lidi nnimrnmrn-r illrfintl 
a saves). Norway. Jim ManMnsen tlft-12). 
Austria 2 0 2 S— 4 

France 3 l l *-s 

Hrst period— I, Austria Mortv Datunon 
(Rah Doyle) lap). 2. France. Pterrldc Mala: 
1 France. Serge poodrier (Deitii Feta): A 
Austria Martv Daiiman I G erhard Pusch- 
mk): Panottfas-ChrislopheVliie. Fra IhoU- 
tagl; Gerald Ressmcrm. Auf ( tafe rferenoai. 

Secead p art ed 5, France. Armte Briand. 
Panaitles— Plerrtefc Mala Fra (hook I no): 
Merrick Mata. Fra (frtpptng)- 
TMrt period— A Austria, Werner Kenti 
(James Burton); France. Franck palonkomte 
(Pterre Pousse); Austria Hmard W i n tw im 
(KemelhSirone). Penalttes— Dents Perez, Fra 
[■rlpoteo); Pfcrrlck Mala Fra (haldira)- 
Overttae— Non e . Penalties— Rob Darla 
Am (holding}. 

ShoBtoo*— Fiance, Franck PoInnonsM 
(goal): Austria Martv Oaibita Igaatti 
France, Serge Poudrier I goal); Austria Ken 


Snana tmtssi: France. Pierre Pousee (goal) : 
Austria Richard Nashelm (miss); France. 
Benoit Loporte (pool}. 

SHtsenanoI— Austria e-V-14-6— 37. Franc* I0> 
7-gd— 31 soofles— Austria Brian Stan- 
klewicz (33 she ts-29 saves). France, Petri 
Ytanen (37-33). 


SHORT-TRACK 
SPEED SKATING 


MEN LOM METER FINAL— I. Kim KF 
boon. South Korea 1:3447; X Owe JUioan, 
South Korea 1M.ni Nlchoka Gooch, Britain, 
a SO; Derrick camp ML Canada OSF. 

• Final— t. Marc Gaonaa Canada 1:3103; 
X Satani Teraa Japan. 1:3139; XLeeJimtak 
South Korea. 7:449»,- Frederic Blackburn. 
Canada DSO. 

sew finals Heat t— I. Kim Kt-hoon, South 
Korea 1:31.49; Z Nicholas Gooch, Britain. 
1 ; 31.77.-3, Lee Jun-ha Smith Korea, 1:31 .93; 4, 
Marc Gagnen, Canada 2:1A27. Heat 9— L 
Chae JMiocn. Smith Korea 1 :31J6: 2. Derrick 
Campbell. Canada 1:36.12; X Frederic Bkrcli- 
hum, Canoda t :«U1 ; A Satoru Teraa Japan. 
1:4158. 

OearteriFUMls Heat I— 1, Chae Jl-haan, 
South Korea 1:31-40; 2. Derrick CampbwL 
Canada 1:31 £2: 3. KJeran Hansen. Australia, 
1 :32J<; Orado Faoana Italy. DSO. Hoot 2—1. 
Lee J un-ha South Korea 1 :9SB.Oty male rg- 
cord laid recant: 1:31:0, KHioon Kim, AF 
bertvtlle. Feb, 2D, 1*921 : Z Satoru Teroa Ja- 
pan. 1:2944; x Eric Fialnx Untied States. 
1:2?JD; A Richard NizIelskL Australia 

1:WJ. 

Heat 3—1. Frederic Blackburn, Canada 
1 :3U3; 2. Kim KHwaa South Korea 1 :30»; 
X Btacnor E tee tun. Norway, 1:3836; A U 
UtmlLChtnal 132.16. Heat 4—1. Marc Gagnon, 
Canada 1 :3l S3; X Nlchoka Gooch, Britain. 

X Andrew Gabel, United States, 
1 : 3059 ; u Jiaiun, CMna DSO. 

WOMSITS VN RELAY FINAL— I, 

South Korea 4:2&A4.0lymolc record (old re> 
cord: 4:3643. Canada, Albenville, fa 20. 
19921 1 1 Canada 4:3284; X United States. 
4:32^4; China DSQ. 

Semifinals Heal 1—1. Canodo. 4:2694; i 
South Korea 4:27.15; l Russia 4:3147; A Ita- 
ly. 4:05.18. Heal 1—1, Chi no,4 J2.lt; z United 
Stoles, 4:3X52; X Netherionb, 4:4156; a 
F rance, 4:5U4. 


It’s never been easier 
tosubteAeondsowe. 
Jud cxJ loB-frce: 
06656155 
or foe 06069-175413 







nn n«b>»oii»-» n»n i i Ml spot* S8 p.o « 3 utro o o a a < Bccw era 0 OE-- a e (Tin aa a.e.a* »■ a oo 




M.V-- W ^-.' • 

rVaL-J,—-. 'M 


Page 22 


LYTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUIVE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23,. 1994 



OLY 


Figure skating 

The technical program, 
performed first, requires each 
skater to execute a total of 
eight specified steps such as 
Jumps. 

jump combinations and various 
spins for the judge to appraise. 
This short program (approx, 
two minutes and forty seconds) 
counts one-third of the skater 1 s 
overall score. 

The freestyle program, which 
counts for two-thirds of the 
skater's overall score, calls for 
an innovative performance 
that requires a balanced 
number of jumps and spins, but 
because it is "freestyle, 1 ' there 
is no stipulation as to 
which moves must be 
performed. 

Sources: AP. The New York Tunes 




Triple Ax*l 

Mamed after the Norwegian skater Axel Paulsen, the axel is the 
easiest Jump ro recognize because H is started facing forward- The 

skater gEdes forward cn one toot, lakes off from tne edge of the 
Made, rotates 3.5 times, and 
M lands <mitw opposite toot. 

A ■» skazng backward. 


dF" ■ » 11 / 

<•-? 5 “ 


m 


THREE ANOA 
HALF 

ROTATIONS 




Salchow 

A pjmp ori^nated by Ulrich Salchow at Sweden, the flrst'mwY 
champion m 1908 and b 10-time world champion, tiiis jwnp^ ia 
leg swing, which . 
starts rotation al ^ 

Bltoft. Moving 

backward. Ihe skater ^ m 

juries off one foot. m M 

makasona, two w ff * jW 

three fun turns In the \l V vl 

ak. end tends on ihe . f\ - , | . 

opposite foot facing *’•.», / | 1 

backward. 4 > “ 









RcrrAtXMS. 




*K \jc 

Named for Atoa Lutz, a ***»-, 4 x 


Named for Atoa Luts, a *-.-,*1 jfF • ~ 

yoimg. obscure skater in Vienna, the __ * R0TAnCN A 

lutz te a dttflcuH jianp witti 3 rotaitan on *„ ’> ^ V 

take-off that turns opposite the direction ot the ' *• -5? **„ 

preparatory curve Skating backward m a tong toe-assisted take-off ’ 

curve, the skater takes off with the assistance of 

the toe on the opposite foot, rotates in the opposite (Srection of the original curve and lands gliding backward. 




Toe Loop 

A simple jump often used between mote tflfffcuS 
moves, the tee loop begins and ends on dte 
same foa. The skater glides backward, then 
uses the toe of one skate Made to help push up ' 
ofl the Ice, revDfvee In the urone. twoar4hrae. 
times end lends skating backward. 


- 




flHMMtfT*' 



nOTATKWS 


f"V 




Watching the Watchers: 
All Eyes Are on the Judges 


s. 


Nr. . J 



New York Times Service 

.HAMAR — The nine judges will be under as 
much scrutiny as the skaters Wednesday night 
when the women's competition begins in Olym- 
pic figure skating. 

Every decision by the judges will be debated, 
examined in detail, pored over for evidence of 
national bias or individual prejudice. The one 
burning question is this: Can Tonya Handing 
get a fair shake, given the tawdry, compelling 
events of (he past five weeks following die 
attack on Nancy Kerrigan at the U.S. national 
championships? 

T think we have to judge what we see." stud 
Jan Ho ffman, the Gennan judge. 

The 27 skaters will be given two marks by 
each judge, one for technical merit and the 
other for artistic presentation. The short, or 
technicaJ program, on Wednesday night ac- 
counts for one-third of the total scoring. Friday 
night’s long program accounts for the rest and 
wlD determine the medals. 

Olympic judges are selected from countries 
with the tcro 10 finishes at the previous world 
championships. Those 10 names are put into a 
hat and nine are drawn to judge at the Olym- 
pics. whDe the 10th becomes an alternate. Gen- 
erally, bias has been reduced in international 
judging since the end of the Cold War. For 
instance, the U.S. women won all three medals 
at the 1991 world championships in Munich 
and two of the three medals at the 1992 Olym- 
pics without an American judge on either paneL 

The nine judges for this competition are 
Wendy Utley of Britain, Jan Olesinslri of Po- 
land, JaxmOa Porlova of Czechoslovakia, Al- 
fred Koiytek of Ukraine, Jiasheng Yang of 
China, Margaret Ann Wier of the United 
States. Noriko Shirota of Japan, Audrey Wil- 
liams of Canada and Hoffman of Germany. 


"Each judge has their own concerns,'* said 
Ben Wright, a former president of the U.S. 
Figure Skating Association and a prominent 
fixture on the international skating scene. 
"Problems of the United States are not of much 
importance to them. They haven't asked many 
questions. I'm glad, because I haven't bad to 
explain the intricacies of American life" 

Hoffman, an orthopedic surgeon, is the one 
championship skater on (he panel. He won a 
silver medal at the 1980 Olympics in Lake 
Placid, New York, and was twice a world cham- 
pion. 

Ol esinslri is a former Polish national champi- 
on. Jiasheng, a doctor, is the first international 
judge ever from China. Shirota won a Japanese 
ice-dancing title in the mid-1960s. Wier, a real- 
estate executive, skated with her brother, Hugh 
Graham, a former president of the USFSA, in 
the pairs competition at the 1955 world cham- 
pionships. 

The most curious choice on the panel is 
Koiytek of Ukraine. He is the father of the 
former coach of Oksana Baiui, the 1993 world 
champion and a gold medal favorite at the 
Olympics. 

"Our judges work with our skaters, too," said 
Claire Ferguson, president of the USFSA. 

Judging the judges are two referees and .a 
five-member technical committee of the Inter- 
national Skating Union. The placement of a 
skater only two spots from the majority of 
judges can result in a charge of bias. 

“It's really going to come down to whether 
they bit the dements,” Wright said of the skat- 
ers. “If they miss something, it's the kiss of 
death." 

That goes both for the skaters and the judges. 

— JERE LONGMAN 




To 6 Minutes onthe Ice 


By Jere Longman 

New York Tana Service 

HAMAR — After seven weeks 

a i ceaseless -speculation, of court- 
room drama Mil threatened law- 
suits, of possible suspensions and 
last-minute relenting, after claus- 
trophobic taming sessions under 
searing pressure, Nancy Kerrigan 
and Tonya Harding have nothing 
left to do at the Olympics bat skate. 

It seemed as if this day might 
nearer come, the two of mem to- 
gether, dealing for a gold medal, 
accountable for the moment to no 
one other titan nine judges scoring 
at rinkade. 

The past seven wedcs wifi be disr 
tilled into ax minutes at the Winter 
Games, two mmoles in Wednes- 
day’s short program and four min- 
utes more m Friday’s long pro- 
gram. Any one of at least seven of 
the 27 competitors could win the 
gold modaL the favorites being 


pede. Especially, Wednesday.. Ihe wfthihe short program, but yoa can 
largest tetadaoa auctience in Gtynt- definitely lose one. Brian Boitono 
put tnstaryis expected \ . c fdl on a triple Axel in the first SQ 

■ • • - " seconds of the men’s competition 

Kerrigan and Harmngh^Byed ^ immediately out of medal 
m the same doanitory, trained &t ooutaitioa. The' idea at the end of 
the same tone, apd.-apy, ti^seek the short program is to be among the 


the same outixm^ iq Ibdr find top five 'skaters. In Friday’s King 
performances as ^matcor skaters pMjmmv iW. five will skate in the 
— agoMnwdaL Kcxriganisdetarr group, far which the judges 
ruined to prove rK&^ihe has recov- nserire thar higher marks, 
a ped bo th .Bom th&lmeecappya.t- '-Karigaa my tie the most reli- 
Detroit and., a disastrous,?.. fifth- short-program skater among 


mined to prove 
dot both from 


inisdeter- 

hasrecov- 


throogh adean r<&sraalj 
bothered byasoreapkte^ 
omoaefinaladrenafinenii 
ry her toward htt -olti 


" 4 B A 

Aaf SueoaniK Aaudncd Aoi 

FVance’s Surya Bonaly, more au athletic than a classical skater, is a favorite. 


Key Contenders in a Closely Watched Competition 


Oksana BaluL 

Age: 16. 

Country; Ukraine. 

Career; 1993 world champion. 
Music; Short program - "Swan 
Lake"; long program - Broadway 
show tunes. 

Scouting Report: 

A beautiful, joyous skater who was tbe 
surprise winner of the 1993 world champi- 
onship in Prague. Has struggled this sea- 
son with her combination jumps. Could be 
the leader alter (he short program. 

Surya Bonaly. 

Age: 20. 

Country: France. 

Career: Four-time European cham- 
pion, 1992 Olympics 5th place. 
Music: Short - Riot City; long - 
'The Four Seasons," Vivaldi. 

Scouting Report 

Has smoothed the rough edges in her artis- 
tic performance but remains more gym- 
nastic than balletic. A superb jumper, the 
only woman to attempt a quadruple jump, 
which requires four revolutions. 


Josae Choulnard. 

Age: 24. 

Country:: Canada. 

Career: 1993 world 9th place, 1992 
world 5th place, 1992 Olympics 9th 
place. 

Music: Short - “La Rile Mai Gar- 
dee"; long — "An American in Par- 
is." 

Scouting report 

Bubbly, effervescent skater who has prob- 
lems with consistency. 


j Tonya Harding. 

j Age: 23. 

\ Country: United States. 

| Career: 1992 Olympics 4 th place, 
[ 1994 and 1991 U.S. champion. 

| Music: Short - “Much Ado About 
« Nothing"; long - theme from *’Ju- 
; rassic Park." 

| Scouting Report 
I Has a solid short program with improved 
i artistry, but can't afford a mistake skating 
; in the eighth position, with all the serious 
; contenders to follow. 


Nancy Kerrigan. 

Age: 24. 

Country: United States. 

Career: 1992 Olympics bronze j 
medal, 1993 U.S. champion. 

Music; Short - "Desperate Love,” 
original score by Mark Milltano; 
long - medley of Neil Diamond 
hits. 

Scouting Report: 

Has the most complete short pro g ra m , but 
has struggled with nerves and her triple 
lutz. Should be in gold-medal hunt after 
the short program. 

Chon Lu. 

Age: 17. 

Country: China. 

Career: 1992-93 wold bronze med- 
al; 1992 Olympics 6 tfi place. 

Music: Short - "Clair de Lune”; 
long - "The Mission." 

Scouting Report 

Excellent lines, soft and elegant, but her 
skating lacks personality. Doesn't make 
many mistakes, so cctLd be in medal hunL 1 


Yufca Sato. 

Age; 20 

Country:: Japan. 

Careen 1993 world 4th place, 1992 
Olympics 7th place. 

Music; Short — “The Railway Chil- 
dren"; long - Unavailable. 

Scouting Report 

As a skater, she is superior to many com- 
petitors as she glides almost silently across 
the ice. She is a Fast, tight spinner, but is 
not an expert jumper. 

Katarina WRL 

Age: 28. 

Country: Germany. 

Career 1984 and 1988 Olympics 
champion. 

Music: Short - “Robin Hood"; 
long - “Where Have All The Flow- 
ers Gone?" 

Scouting report 

Has an impressive short program. Return- 
ing ro amateur ranks after six years as a 
professional Has become a better jumper, 
but still lacks the jumping ability of the 
other contenders. Not a real medal hope- 
ful unless others collapse: 


Kerrigan, Holding, Oksana Band 
of Ukraine, Surya Bonaly . of 
France, Chen Lu of Grins, Jos&e 
Chouinard of Cana da and Yuka 
Sato of Japan. The field is wide 
open, whim means that even Ka- 
tarina Witt, the two-time gold med- 
alist returning to Olympic c^petir 
tion after years as a professional, 
cannot be discounted. 

Hie overwhelming focus, of 
coarse, will be on Kerrigan and 
Handing,, chief rivals: drawn, into 
uncomfortable proximity by a bra- 
zen tale of hoofigamsm. Kerrigan 
was dubbed above the right knee 
on Jan. fi at the U.S. national cham- 
pionships in Detroit, and four men 
nave been charged. Among them, 
was Harding’s forma: husband,' 
Jeff Giflooly, who has pleaded 
guilty to racketeering in connection 
with the plan to harm Kerrigan. 
Harding has not been charged. She 
has proclaimed her innocence: say- 
ing she learned only after the attack 
that several people dose to her 
were involved. 

The wedcs since the attack have 
been anxkms ones for both skaters. 
Kerrigan was an uncertain partici- 
pant until her bruised knee bad 
healed. Harding's presence hoc was 
not secured until the UJS. Olympic 
Committee, under threat cf a S25 
nriHion lawsuit and in danger of 
having the tidal wave cf mafia inter- 
est drown every other story at these 
Games, canceled a disciplinary 
hearing that could have resulted in 
her removal from the team. 

Stin, tbe Kerrigan- Harding saga 
has dominated every other event at 
these Olympics. The successes cf 
skiers like Tamary Moe and speed 
skaters Eke Bonnie Blair, Dan Jan- 
sen and Johann Olav Kcss have 
beamercdrvECBons. Hartfing-Ker- 
rigan has more legs than a cexvti- 


ptabe finish at tte - 1993- , world the women. However, die has not 
ebampiousbiptit* - • competed in nearly three mootifi, 

■ tJi* ~ v havmg withdrawn from the nation- 

aF cfiamptanshipS after, the did)-, 
' 'Bing jrtt*£Taadshe has had pnfrJ 
Kerngnn sooacn, tzvy acq^cqa... , Jjq- nerves in previous 

Harding, wtolittSSi . die won a bronze 

through adorn rdaSxd ’Tnedal the 1992 Olympics, die has 

bqt lr iwrfry* .«ar^ Seated a xdegn Jroig program-, 

an one final iwIrraalitK mSitidcS^ . ^Ihrshasmade her stronger and 
ry her ■ toward- htt' ycri? 'a&eamned,* said ScotvokL 

Olympic dream de^te -ju teore. . ‘TE stejuststays calm, she'll havie a 
tmdiemiBmsnncero^ . feuwoefc," . 

jury investigation: feat is ixmSfes- . -And ho^fides Sootvold plan td 
fegbyk 

pressme is as hjgh, as w ija^w jww to do thal/Td 

“I can’t hna^id£ T . '^nca^e i e^'moFe mcmey titan Nan : 
ice with thatTrindofliag^^^^^i said. _ 

gCTie»^gKl-hec gold medal will be 
yrorfe ap jD^nued S10 mfifian to 

ySSSZSSSSFPtt ** m tonrs, ^pemxnces,, 
hpwtot^i^iSr -^feaenaqals, and’A movie deaL. Ifv 

If arty, kind of ;pariex^j^he. fee doesn’t wind medal, be^ 

ifisccflied ftmn thc men’s ai^pairs S sl^fing martyr, apparently with , 
compctkioD^ thfr.iatefibatiomrf- v« 2 mranons csdorsancut posLsibJir - 1 
Ska&ng Ihiian prefers a more to- . tiasfiB axwlabfc.- 


Olympic dream de^te^flu 
that icniains unccftafe sndi 
jury investigation' fe^^^i 

. ing b^Ck pi j^rtlandftft^c 
pressure is as hj 0 L Bs the. sti 

ice with thatTrind ofib^gaw 
one of ihem;” «rid ^nL^ 
1992 'men’ll 's&yer' 

tibns. Ids a to feadwfeu 
both of them. If dfeer one p 
a great pfatfornirtee^we^rii: 


a,hwir- — ^ 'Jto^g^^conHoerdal potential f 

m. athtetic . style. a^cais fo Be fallow outside of ' 

to roft g.Sheis atrooWed sk at er bid ■ 

Hanfing ana Banaqr. ^ . , pn^gram with artistry' and she 

“The ISU has rentrined mEcfest- rhains a tefifiant spinner. 
c& infix wgflft Aderem anring • ^ eiglrlh Wednesday 


Hanfeg Kid BonUy: ' ^ „d1 

“The ISU hasrimtnnedm&est- rhains a brilliant spinner. 

^ ^ ,tes Wednesday' 
^^31 Saif 811 te; °* tor contenders 

KempnaNo.26. 


. becwBe.tex style wax 
eyfre looking for,” said 


figure* 


Erina RHfeeiLa Ggm^fctgcx- 

wnftomNewYoK^^ath- ^ 

t^ic, not ciegant and lySfec way ; 

thejm^esOreiL Everybody is look- ^ n&Mag-\ 

mgSqrdieaextS^SL- • 

Wednesday’s two^ninnte short ^ ant modi eba" • 

(aogratu consists of cighf reqmrod Harding has always said that ihe * 

ctew.the moEL critod bang a ■ dti^bt^tgtm de rpre ss onvTherc' " 
cazunzttuoa junq> and a donate couklhanfiy be more pressure m a ; 
AxeL There is an old $aym& in Skar- event than there will be* 

ing dial yon cai't win acan^etition Wednaday night. . * f 



In Norway, Dial 800-19-877. 


VX^ith this Sprint Access Number, it’s easy to call home from any phone in Norway. You. can bill the call to your Sprint WorlcTOfi 
FONCARDr u your U.S. local calling card, or call collect (to the US.). You'Ll enjoy Sprint's low international rates, without costly 
surcharges. And Sprint lots you call just about anywhere in the world from over 75 other countries just as easily. While winnin 
gold is difficult, calling home shouldn’t be. Klwwlwre in today's paper. youTl Oxid our full list of Sprint Access Codes. 

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Page 23 


WINTER 



ItaUamSiun 



Germans Leap Past Japan to Win the 120-Meter Gold 



By William Drozdiak 

t. Service 


UL^HAAOilER — In the biggest surprise 
of the Winter Games, Italy's cross-conn tiy -ski 
teMnd«hn»ed the gods of Norway’s most 
hahowed national sport on ’Hiesdayma spfit- 
seoond finish to win the gold medal in the men’s 
4xl0-kilometer relay race, 

. Wth 150,000 spectators cheering wldfcSfl- 
Wd off ft furious challenge 
by Notway’s five-time gold medalist; E^ora • 
Dahfie , beating tom by half a length. The onset 
dropped an eerie curtmn of silence over the 
crowd, which had crane to believe that their 
quartet of Iong-distazice skicxs was hmnriMeL 

The success of the Italians in a sport 7ora 
cooMerad a preserve of . Nordic culture was - 
attributed by many skiers to the benefits of 
sustained high-altitude training in the Dolomite 
mountamsJhtt MauriBo Deleft, 43, the leader 
of the team, who dried the fim leg, said the 
classic Mediterranean dirt may alsc have helped. 

“We train hard, but we also betieve in our ■ 
special foods Kke pasta, risotto and good red 
wine,” said De Zolt, who had finished behind 
the Norwegians to win two silver jn 
previous Olynqiics. “It’s difficult to say how 
many glasses I drink, anffif I tddyou I would 
probably get in trouble." 

Whatever the training secrets, the strong per- 
formances, by the cross-country skiers, ^ includ- 
ing tbe women’s stars Manuehi Di Cenla and 
Stefania Belmondo, has already carried Italy to 
its best Olympics ever. Italy now ranks third, 
with IS medals, b ehind Russia with 19 and • 
Norway with 17. 

Whde Faunor was hailed at the fin^h line as 
a conquering hero by a throng of well-wishers, 
including the Alpine skiing star Alberto 
Tomha, team members said the key to the 
victory was the remarkable ran by De Zdt, a 
veteran policeman old enough to be the father 
of Iris teammates. 

De Zolt said be would now fulfill ^promise 
made several years ago to retire after winning 
the gold medal that had eluded him since he 
started competing in cross-cram toy events at 
die age of 27. 

“1 thought it was getting too late, but now I 
can leave with peace of mmd,” he said. 

Said Farmer: “Maurilio really deserves the 
largest share of the credit He not rariy molded 
tins team together but ran a terrific leg that got 
us off to the great start we needed to win the 
gold medal’’ . 

In last year’s work! champion-drip relay in 
Falun, Sweden, J^eZahfimshed.aminute off 
the pace set by Store SSvertseh, who led Norway 
to victory. But this rime, DeZrit kept op with . 
Sivertsen so well that in the second W-Marco. 
AlbareDowaslrft with only a 10-second deficit 



Sario Fanfler of Italy lunging across the finish line a half length ahead of Bjorn DahBe to win the gold medal in the 4xl0-kfloroeter relay on Tuesday, dethroning the Norwegian team. 


I ran well the others would not have to worry 
about wiiriwwg up,” De Zolt said. 

Albardfowho won die bronze in the individ- 
ual l O-kilometer race, behind Dahhe and Alex- 
ander Snrimov of Kazakhstan, gradually made 
up the (BBaaicc agmst Norway’s dune-rime 
gold medaSsts, indutfing Vegard Ulvang. One 
of the coon try’s most revered athletes, Ulvang 
has suffered in these Games from a leg injury 
and the disappearance last year of his brother 
Ket3, who has not been seen since he went 

mining m a hlrryan t 

The first two legs of the event were held in the 
classic style, in which the driers pump and push 
themselves along tracks in the snow. The last 
two legs used the freestyle technique, in which 
the skxos-gBdehke skaters. 

In the third leg, Gioigjk) Vanzetta said his goal 
was to stay abreast of Thomas Alsgaard, 22, who 
emerged as Norway's latest hero by winning the 
gold m the 3(Hrilraneter race last week. 

■ “Hermawayveiyfartbml caught him an the 
MU," saM Vanzetta. “I just needed to keep even 
vridi him and set iro Suvio for the final kg.** 

. The showdown between Fanner and Dahhe 
tamed out to be one of the great races in recent 
Olympic history. . The duo broke away from 
Finland’s Jari Isometsa early to set up their 
head-to-head duel down the i 


“It was a very hard race focme. ball knew if J;. . “My strategy was to stick dose to Dahhe to 

Fax a Note to Oden: There % TroubhinValhalla 


Washington PonScrvice 

I.TT.LSHAMMER — Norway had won 16 
' tfwhkhitsmale 
had accounted for .13, its female 
i 3. And the Norwegian women don’t 
like the second-class treatment they drink they 
have received from the Norwegian press. ‘ 
“We wish to thank our srapotrtet* amongst 
the addetic commnnrtyand the jrabBc,” Anna. 
Moot and Trade Dybadahl saxl on behalf of 
their team after it can» in second to the Rus- 
sians in. the 4x5-kflomeler rday race. “We do 
not (hank the piress craps. Yon have tost touch 


with reality arid expect nothing but gold.” ' 
“We would hke to fed that the press has faith 
in us, too,” said DybendahL “It doesn’t make it 
any easier for us when you predict that we have 
no future.” • 

• When- the Vikings ruled Norway, women 
werera disposable commodity, tossed live into 
the flames of a leader’s ftaeral byre to give Eric 
or Chaf companyon Iris way to Valhalla. But 
Noway today is not a'country where woman 
mtodroligbtfy: The prime minister is a wom- 
an, as airtight of the other 18 top government 
officials. • ’ 


the end, then sprint hrane after the final turn,” 
Fanner said. “I knew it would be a dose race 
that could be decided in the flick of an eyelid.” 

Going into the final uphill run, the two racers 
exchanged glances as Dshlie slowed down, al- 
most inviting Farmer to take the lead. 

“I wanted to enter the sprim on his tail and 
overtake him in the stretch,” Dahhe said. “But 
it was not so easy as I thought.” 

Farmer* 

take the inside position and i 
(unity with one of Iris renowned finishing) 

“My strategy worked perfectly,'' he said. “I 
knew that if I could enter the last turn ahead I 
could pour it on and beat Bjorn in the last 100 
meters." 

Farmer crossed the finish line .4 seconds 
ahead of Dahlie for a winnin g time erf 1 hour, 41 
minutes, 15.0 seconds. Finland finished a min- 
ute later to take the bronze. 

“It was great to be able to win the gold medal 
on their hrane turf, the temple of cross-country 
ridin g." AlbareDo said. “For three years they 
have been the strongest in the world. The big- 
gest satisfaction was to come into the stadium 
and hear the crowd so sQoiL We were able u 
shut them up” 

The defeat prevented Dahlie from tying the 
Russian cross-country slder Lyubov Egorova 
and the Soviet speedskaier Lytha Skoblikova as 
the only six-Mw^ V^^O lym^^ain^kms. 

HkxneteT classical marathonf'Sf^ial men's 
cross-country event. 

Dahlie said he would have preferred to run 
the third kg and let Alsgaard do the anchor. 
But their coach believed that the younger skier 
would not be able to cope with the tension of 
the stretch run. 

“I think we disappointed four million Norwe- 
gians today,” Dahlie said. “Maybe same of them 
broke their tdeviskms. But we offered them good 
entertainment. I think it was a good promotion 
for the sport of cross-country skiing.” 



FbuhTb 


i/A|mFn»hne 

Masahiko Harada, having fallen short for Japan, could not bade iris dis ap pointment 


Just Living for the Relay: Or, Can 200,000 Norwegians Be Wrong? 


By Christopher Oarey ■ . 

New York Tin*et Sehiee 

LELLEHAMMER— Dawn was 15 minotes 
away, and Kjdl Odegaard was whispering in. 
the dark. 

“I heard cm the radio that the_ tracks are 
getting full,” he said to an American. “You 
probably think this is crazy” . •• . 

Norwegians have not hesitated ~to express 
their enthnciflg m since these Winter Olympics 
began 10 days ago. They have crowded onto the 
slopes at KviiQOT.'xaised a racket in the Viking 
Slip speed-skating arena and sold out the ski 
jumping stadram/But this was the day the host 
natianhad really been waiting for, the dayof 
the men’s 4xl0-kilometer cross-c otmto y rday. \ 

Last year, the liflehammcr Olympic Orga- 
nizing Committee maOed a ticket-order form fo 
every Norwegian household. LOOC finaDy 
stopped counting orders for the men’s relay . 
after they hit 200,000. Why bother counting 
higher when there are only 31,000 seats in the 
stadium? 

“This is the race for the N( 

Odegaard, who asked for rday 
caved rariy a form letter in re turn . 


re-. 


Tickets are only for those who require con- 
cession stands and a view of the finish hue. The 
bulk of a cross-country race takes place on the 
trades that extend raztsde the stadium, and »h«i 
is vdiere Od^aard and about 70,000 other 
Norwegians wereheaded on this cold and dear 
morning. 

Odegaard has lived is Lillehammer since 
1984, rat for the Olympics, he and Sm Moot 
rented thrirhome fo a company from Oslo and 
took thar three children south to Gjovik, where 

theyareslayingwifoMcra’sn»LlKrmacom- 
fortable boose with a spectacular view of Lake 

before the sun rose over the lake this 
morning, three generations of cross-country 
fans already west gathered in the during room; 
N orwegian breakfasts are nsaaDy copious, and 
this one was no exception: goat cheese, shrimp 
saladfhani-boiled eggsj dices of ham and rolls 
with fresh strawberry jam. ~ 

Food was not the primary topic, however. 

“Fra -Norwegians, these Olympics are like 
Christmas every day," said Odegaard; 37- 
year-crid Mio once played Dhrision I soccer in 
Oslo and now works as a social services coordi- 


nator in the I-ilvriuiinmer re gion “We have 

for fivt years. Now, we are ^^r^tring the 
chance to ei^ oy them.” 

Tuesday, it was time to enjoy the rday. 

“I am so nervous about this race,” said 
Moear, a 38-year-old who has passed her red 
hair onto her children. 

Only two members of the household would 
not be going to UHehammer: Hedda, their 2- 
year-oW daughter, for whom the weather has 
been judged too cold, and Moen’s mother, who 
would stay home to baby-sit. 

By 7:45 AJvL, the rest of the extended family 
had piled into two cars and headed north. By 9 
A3iC they had stopped on a narrow road about 
two and a half miles from the race site, unload- 
ed tbeir backpacks, Norwegian flags and heavy 
sweaters, and set off on cross-country skis, 
and Moen, Hk e many linehammer 
its, are serious recreational skiers, and 
their two eldest children, Ida, 9, and Ulnk, 6, 
looked well on their way to emulating their 
parents as they easily negotiated the trail lead- 
ing toward the course. 

“We started them both at about 3 ” Moen 


said. “Hedda will have skis of her own by next 
year. She probably will go about two meters 
and say, No more,’ bnt she will learn." 

The trail quickly fed into another, wider and 
more crowded than the first As sunlight 
streamed through the snow-coated evragreens, 
the heavy air rang with the sound of poles 
meeting hard-packed snow. A woman sided by 
with her cocker spaniel on a leash. Behind hen 
was a middle-aged man who had tied a rope 
around Iris waist so he could tow Us young son. 
Soon, there wore dogskds led by teams of 
huskies, a group of youngsters dressed fike 
treffls hundreds of e a B ef skiers pushing 
onto the same narrow trades. 

“I knew there would be a lot of people, but 
even I am a little bit surprised at how many," 
Odegaard said. “I have never seen anything luce 

Why do Norwegians live fra: the relay? 

“It is the most unpredictable race,” Moen 
said. “And became the teams start ax the same 
time and go against each other, h is also the 
mast exciting," 

Inside the stadium, thse are huge television 
screens and scoreboards to keep the paying 


public abreast of developments. Outside the 
stadnnn, there arc only portable radios and the 
word of mouth. Actual sightings of skiers are 
rare. After rising before dawn, driving for one 
hour and sknng for another, Odegaaro and his 
family would get exactly eight very fleering 
glimpses of their Norwegian heroes as they 
charged around the course. 

Bui the lack at contact did nothing to lessen 
the antidparion, and as Norway's Bjorn Dahhe 
and IutfyTs SOyio Fauner dueled for the gold on 
the relay’s final leg, the fans cm the outside 
framed right, nervous circles around their radi- 
os. 

“Horn has him by a second,” said Moot. 

“The Italian has the lead," came another 
voice. 

“Hah, heart attack,” said Moen, patting her- 
self on the chest and grinning. 

But suddenly the grin was gone and a soft 
groan went up across the course. The Italian 
had won by the smallest of margins. 

“Popped us like a balloon,” said Moen, shak- 
ing her head. “But onr skiers have done a lot for 
us, so we really can’t complain. We have to lose 
sometime, or else it is no fun to win." 



South Korea Wins Both Gold Medals 
In Short-Track Speed-Skating Races 


Kim Kj Hood 


•v 

Kaafnaia Iliym/Ronci* 

of South Korea puffing ahead of Britain's ^fichote Goodb to defend his tide in the ^000-meter race. 


..•IS"?: 


Compiled by Ota Snff From Dispatches 

HAMAR — South Korea swept 
the gold medals Tuesday in the first 
two short-track speed-skating races. 

Kim Ki Hood defended his title in 
the men's 1.000-meter race, then 
Sooth Korea skated to gold in the 
women's 3, 000-meter rday in Olym- 
pic record time. 

Kim, who won his country's first 
Winter Olympics gold medal in 1992, 
ux* advantage of a faff by Canadian 
Derrick Campbell in the finaL 

Campbell led from the start of the 
nine-lap race, but lost Iris balance 
fighting for the lead with Britain's 
Nicholas Gooch in a turn with three 
laps remaining. 

When Campbell slid into the pad- 
ded wall, Kim dipped past Gcoch, 
wfao finished second but was disquaT 
ified afteijudges reviewed his bump- 
ing with Camp bell. Campbell didn’t 
(nosh, and South Korea’s Chae Ji 
Hood was awarded the silver. 

With two of the four finalists out 
of contention, the bronze went to 
Canadian Marc Gagnon, even 
though be didn’t skate m the finaL 
Gagnon, the 1993 world champion in 


the event, fcD in the semifinals, then 
won his consolation hcaL 

Kim won in 1 minute, 34.57 sec- 
onds, well off the world record of 
1:28.47 set by New Zealand's Mi- 
chael McMUlen April 4, 1992. 
MchGflen was cH initiated m a quali- 
fying heat. 

Kim also was short of the Olympic 
mark of 1:29.58, set in Tuesday’s 
quarterfinals by his teammate; Lee 
Jim Ho. 

The South Korean women’s rday 
quartet won in 4 minutes, 26.64 sec- 
onds, breaking the Olympic mark of 
4:2fL94 set by Canada in Tuesday’s 
semifinals. 

China finished second, but was 
riiaqiMilifiari for reasons not immedi- 
ately specified. Five-time defending 
worid champion Canada won the sil- 
ver in 43L04. 

The United States, silver medalist 
in 1992, took the bronze despite fin- 
ishing fourth in the four-team finals 
in 4:39.34. The Americans were set 
back when Nicole Ziegelmeyer 
sprawled to the ice in a turn. 

The U5. women were given a spot 
in the Olympic rday just two weeks 
ago when North Korea. Japan and 


Australia decided not to send teams. 
The Americans had been disqualified 
when Karen Cashman, the lone new- 
comer from the 1992 silver medal 
team, fell in the world championships. 

Short- track speedskating was a 

demonstration sprat at the 1988 
Games, and awarded medals for the 
first rime in 1992. The men's 1,000 
and the women's 3,000-meter relay 
Tuesday were the first two of six 
events. 

Eric Flaim of the United States, 
the 1988 Olympic long-track silver 
medalist who switched to a short- 
track last year, was eliminated in the 
1,000 quarterfinals. He was passed in 
the final turn of the nine-lap race and 
finished third, just M seconds out of 
second place. 

All four skate? in the heat beat the 
old Olympic record of 1 :30.76. set by 
Kim, while Flaim broke the U.S. 
.mark. “You know you broke the 
American record,” someone said fo 
bon after the race. 

“Yeah,” be said, nodding his head. 

“How much did you break it by?" 

“By a tot," he said. 

“Thai’s a consolation, isn't itT 
“Not much.” 


Last Japanese 
Comes Up Short 

By Ian Thomsen 

Imrrnaiiortal Herald Tribune 

LILLEHAMMER — The German ap- 
proached the Japanese a few moments before 
they were to jump off their edge of the earth. 
“Congratulations on winning the gold me dal ," 
the German, Jens Weissflog. said Tuesday. 

Then Weissflog zipped down the track, his 
skis sounding to the Japanese like a sliding door 
being opened. The German disappeared over 
the bill and the noise from the people waiting 
for him at the bottom rose up and clobbered the 
Japanese. The longer a jumper stays airborne, 
the louder the noise. Weissflog had gone 13SJ5 
meters (444 feet, 6 inches), the longest jump of 
the day. 

But Masaluko Harada, as anchor of his largc- 
hiD jumping »«nn, was in position to give Japan 
its third Winter Olympic gold medal ever. Ja- 
pan held a 55. 1 -point lead going into the last 
jump, a practically unbeatable margin- Harada 
had won the world championship in 1993 on 
the normal hill, although lately he had been 
erratic, jumping just 40 meters in a training run 
here Sunday. When Weissflog offered his pre- 
mature congratulations. Harada tried to wave 
him away hke a bad spirit, but it was too late. 
He had already heard the words. 

Impulsively, it seemed, he pushed himself off 
of the bench and rode his skis in a crouch down 
the track and launched htmsgtf over the hfll- 
Now Espen Bredesen of Norway was the only 
jumper remaining on the mountain, and the 
noise carrying up from Harada's leap was sur- 
prisingly bhmL Then Bredesen threw himself 
off of the mountain in the most disciplined way 
be could, and the last bit of momentum from 
his landing carried him past the Japanese, who 
was crouching on his skis, knees against his 
chest, his gloved hands covering his goggles in 

chaww 

Harada had jumped only 97.5 meters. 
Among the top right teams, it was the worst 
jump of the day, and it allowed Germany to 
overcome that enormous deficit The result: 
Germany was first with 970.1 prints, Japan was 
second at 956.9, with Austria third at 918.9. 
Only Harada’s hands responded, moving from 
his goggles to his hdmeted ears. 

The noise was not what it might have been. It 
came mostly from the Germans, who were 
celebrating Wrissflog’s third Olympic gold 
medal, to go with individual large-hill victories 
in 1984 in Sarajevo and last Sunday here. The 
Japanese were mostly taking in the si|ht of 
Harada and the Norwegians had nothing. A 
few hours after having lost the cross-country 
4x1 0-kilometer relay by a fraction of a second, 
they were now settling fra fourth here, 20.1 
points behind Austria. 

“What went wrong with the Japanese is that 
on the last jump be was desperate to maintain 
his lead," Weissflog said. “He probably was 
under pressure because of the distance I bad 
jumped. On my jump, I was much more quiet 
than on my first jump, because the gold medal 
was gone and I knew that 60 points were not 
going to be made up. 1 was not expecting to win 

the gold medal” 

His incident with Harada had not yet been 
revealed when Weissflog, 29, gave tins inter- 
view. One mare victory Friday in (he small-hcD 
individual competition will allow him i© match 
the four ski-jumping golds that Marti Nykanen 
of Finland won in 1984 and ’88. 

“Perhaps I was thinking too much about the 
gold medal," Harada said. “Maybe I was too 
conservative. Maybe I wanted it too much.” 

The Japanese were favored as the day began, 
but the best jump thus far from wrissfiog 
pushed the four-man German team in front of 
Japan, 486.8 to 486X1, at the end of the first 
round. Impressive performances from Jrnya Ni- 
shikaia and Takanobu Okabe — 135 and 133 
meters —gave Japan a lead erf 66.5 prints over 
Germany with two jumps for each team re- 
maining. 

At that point Norway had moved past Aus- 
tria into third place. The lead vanished when 
Roar Ljokdsoy, a 17-year-rid Norwegian, re- 
sponded with a jump of 99.5 meters. Smiling 
snyly afterwards, he admitted that he had 
leaned too far forward on his takeoff. 

“I wanted it too much," he said. 

“For him it will not be a problem,” said the 
team manager. Trend Joran Pedersen. “Why 
should it be a problem? It’s only a jump.” 

It was a beautiful day, and Bredesen. who 
had been beaten by Weissflog on the same hill 
Sunday, said be was trying to enjoy h. The 
arena overlooks the frozen lake, and the snow 
was like a soft cloth over the tiny bondings. The 
bright stm was without color compared to the 
orange Olympic flame barring at the stadium 
edge. From the mountain top, the valley opens 
up and the bottom of the jump was surrounded 
like an aura by the tens or thousands of specta- 
tors waving hundreds of flags. Each time they 
applauded, with gloved hands, it sounded Hke a 
flock of doves taking off. 

These were Bredesen’s surroundings as beset 
off on his final attempt. There was a slight 
chance of Norway snatching the bronze medal 
but his jump of 131.6 meters was not good 
enough. At the bottom he grimaced, slapping at 
the snow. Then he saw Harada, and perhaps h 
reminded him erf his 17-year-old teammate, 
who had also wanted it too much. 

“I thought Harada would pull it off, but you 
before he’s jumped," 


;uy beto 
should 


not make com- 


can’t congratulate a guy 
Bredesen said. “Yon 
stents about that.” 

“Was it a psych job, or do you think Weiss- 
flog was really congratulating him?” he was 
asked. 

He did not answer the question exactly. He 
said: “No, 1 think you should wait until a guy 
finishes. That’s not the way to do iu” 

The Germans celebrated, and Harada’s Japa- 
nese teammates picked him up and convinced a 
smQe out of him, because a silver medal is not 
so bad. Their emotional surroundings dissipat- 
ed as the Norwegians marched away quietly, in 
the tens of thousands, but not sullenly. It was 
still only a ski jump. 


Later Start for Alpine 

The Associated Press 

HAFJELL — The start of the men’s giant 
slalom Alpine competition on Wednesday has 
been pushed back half an hour to give competi- 
tors more consistent li ghting conditions during 
the race, Olympics organizers said on Tuesday 
right. 

The first leg of the men’s giant slalom wiH 
start at 0900 GMT, with the second leg due to 
begin at 1400, the organizers said. 






I I Ml a » OT3 se e.o a n ct-r-o c a a a < csn cr c oor-k e a crv? d. a Q. c.o- y es 





page 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1994 


POSTCARD 


Moscow Music Market 


By Michael Specter 

lieu York Times Service 

M OSCOW — Moscow has 
rapidly become a city where 
almost anything is possible if you 
are rich or crafty enough. 

Feel like gambling till dawn? 
Easy, casinos are everywhere. 
Hungry? Fine, delis deliver. Need a 
videophone, a car alarm system or 
the latest fragrance from Est£e 
Lauder? It's all a phone call —or a 
credit card slip — away. 

But there is at least one thing 
that cannot be found so easily any- 
more in the capital of a country 
that has over the past 200 years 
nurtured many of the world's most 
accomplished musicians: classical 
music on the radio. 

“Isn’t democracy great?" Yev- 
geny C. Kibkalo, one of Moscow's 
most renowned vocal teachers, 
asked amid the faded grandeur of 
his ornate practice room ai the Mos- 
cow Conservatory, the one place 
where Eugene Onegin remains more 
popular than either of the Elvises 
(Presley and Costello). 

“Now we live in a marketplace," 
Kibkalo said wistfully. “So now we 
need to wonder, what if the market 
has no need for us?" 


Like others in the world of mu* 
sic, he said his biggest Tear was 
what might happen if a generation 
of children was raised without Bee- 
thoven, Tchaikovsky or LizsL 
"Serenity is something ordinary 


Russians need very badly,” he said, 
bat we offer.” 


It is a concern heard increasingly 
in Moscow among intellectuals 
who fear that arts, already in tur- 
moil. will shrivel and disappear if 
forced to make their way in tne new 
world of commerce wholly without 
subsidy. 

In some ways. KJbkalo's fear 
.seems extreme.' The conservatory 
has a waiting list, operas and or- 
chestral music are performed con- 
stantly in Moscow, and the man- 
agers of Radio (Wei the single 
remaining classical station in the 
city, say their listeners are fanat- 
ics. 

But driven by advertising and 
money, radio in Moscow is begin- 
ning to bear a resemblance to sta- 
tions in New York and Los Ange- 
les, where classical broadcasts are 
under siege. 

Radio Off el run and financed 
by the government, has tbe weakest 
signal on the FM band. Its employ- 
ees earn pennies an hour, and ad- 
vertising, says the station manager, 
Aleksei G. AvtangUov, does not 
exist. 

“Our purpose now is to soothe 
the soul” Avtangilov said. 


“and that is what 

While undoubtedly true, it is a 
service that may not be in great 
demand. 

□ 

It is not as if there ever was a 
glory era for class cal music on the 
radio in Moscow. The Soviet 
Union supplied three base nation- 
al channels, and political decrees 
from Pravda often competed with 
Ukrainian folk musk or the cele- 
bration of space flights for atten- 
tion. But virtually all stations 
played some classical music, de- 
pending on what was in favor. 

In the last decade, stations in 
Moscow and St Petersburg began 
to broadcast a steadily growing diet 
of opera and orchestral music. 

All that has changed now. 

These days, radio in Moscow is 
dominated by new rock-oriented 
stations sprouting along the FM 
dial. The droaing statistics about 
crop rotation and metal production 
favored in tbe Soviet era have been 
replaced by the musk of Queen, 
Urban Cookie Collective and Phil 
Collins. 

□ 


There are few more unusual ex- 
periences than coursing through 
the streets of Moscow listening to 
Cyndi Lauper. Annie Lennox or 
Aaron Neville. But would beer ads 
fit between Bach sonatas or guitar 
riffs by Megadeath? 

“We are hip,” said Alexander 
Kasparov, 32, the fast-talking pro- 
gram director of Radio Ma ximum , 
perhaps the most successful of the 
powerful new stations. The station 
employs almost 60 people and is 
supported by Russian and Ameri- 
can investors. 

“We reach for tbe young adult, 
the 18-to-34-year-old segment of 
the market,” Kasparov said. “We 
play what people want to hear, and 
believe me, that is not opera." 

It is also, for the most part, not 
even Russian rock music. “It 
wouldn't be fair to the native mu- 
sicians," Kasparov explained, “to 
cram them in between UB40 and 
Prince. They would sound so 
bad." 


Black and White World of ‘Colonial’ Movies 


By Joan Dupont 

P ARIS —The movies, bom at a rime of 
colonial conquest, pictured a Made 
and white world from the beginning. For 
years, myths from French popular imagi- 
nation were translated to tne screen with 
images of officers as heroic characters rul- 
ing over untutored hordes. Films like Jao- 



The male -equivalent is die European- 
ized Arab. He too is a louche character 
who doesn’t know bis place, , filmed in 
— — ‘"in Juhen 


Wit Moko (1936).” The 
“pure” Arab or Berber character conies off 


ques Feyder’s “L’Atlamkle" (1921), 


adapted from a popular novel, were so 
loaded with legendry, they already wore a 
premonitory look of paradise lost. 

A festival on “colonial cinema" at the 
Institut du Monde Arabe entitled “Ms- 
greb et Afrique Noire au regard du Qno- 
raa Colonial, 1895-1962" examines the im- 
agery and ideology of the exotic in a 
program of 40 films. Accompanied by an 
exhibit, the retrospectiw (through April 3) 
is a study of segregation on the screen; it 
suggests a new way of reading history and 
deciphering racially packed imagery. 

“In media age, we are consumers of 

ima ges without understanding their mean- 
ing," says Youssef B Ftouh, who orga- 
nized the festival. “Certain ways of inter- 
preting Africa are so buried inside us that 
we’re not even aware of them. F m interest- 
ed in what makes propaganda and how we 
read images." 

This is one retrospective that is not a 
nostalgic event. El Ftouh, a documentary 
filmmaker, put it together with a research 
group of historians (Association Cbnnais- 
sance de PHistoire de 1’ Afrique Contem- 
poraine) and the National Film Archives. 
“Historians are just beginning to pay at- 
tention to colonial cinema," he says. 


4 ^ 

i 




fAU, \ % 




-f : . 1 


better. He is rikrwn as the oW sage, at- 
tached to anrestral tradition, Kke.Hamou 

dies hugging idsofiz 
. ratter than .submit to . the conqueror. In 
these early. Sms even the credits were 
’displayed separately. The names of Euro- 
pean actori appear first, followed by their 
rale titles; the natives, however, arc identi- 
fied by the parts they play, as in “Hamou, 
chief warrior, Itto’s father,” followed fay,' 
Mbulay T brafai ro. ” ’ 

B Ftouh baa an eye out fcr-syjribds that 
gup in photos ana<m screens;' 
-tone of the aims aftins exhibit 
is to efamg p tbe way people look at trievi- 
sxxu. ^Once you become aware^ jour vtson 
. rhanffs; whaiyou saw in a btor becomes 
dear. When you see Nelson Mandela non 
.to Frederick <fe Klerk cn tdtevis^ Man- 
dela is invariably an tbe li ght ride of tbe 
frame, the side of lessor importance.*' pa . 

■ ion 


important 
has 


“i 




Maria Fefix in Yves CiampTs “Les Heros sent fatigues” (1955). 


Over three years. El Ftouh and his team 
reviewed 350 films, short and long, news- 
reels. trailers and commercials and zeroed 
in on repetitive themes. The earliest film 
screened is a 1905 comic fiction. “Le Rive 
deDranem" by Ferdinand Zecca; it lasts 1 
minute 25 seconds. 

“We were interested in certain themes," 
says B Ftouh. “in the way the characters 
are depicted, such as the position of the 
native in the frame, how he is always in 
profile, as if posing for a chart on the 
evolution of man. The character is shown 
on die right side of the frame — the 
negative side — and at the bottom of (he 
screen, naked or dressed in striped materi- 
al a symbol of their inferior condition and 
exclusion from society." 

The festival poster has been made bom a 


photo from the set of “L'Atlantide." The 
first fil 


1 film to be shot in natural sunoandmgs, 
partly in tbe Sahara, it was also tbe most 
expensive film produced in Fiance at that 
time. Tbe poster depicts the queen of Atlan- 
tis, the mythic colony, perched high in the 
background of a lavish Art Deco interior, 
next to a handsome officer in white: In the 


foreground, half-naked slaves in striped 
turbans and loindoths, bear trays. 

“These divisions persisted,” says El 
Ftonb. “In Jacques de Baroncelli's 
*L*Homme da Niger 1 [1939], you see the 
engineer on top of the frame. The top of 
the frame is always occupied by those 
characters who are supposed to be dose to 
heaven: tbecoionializers. Tbe black char- 
acter on the bottom is dose to earth, and 
tbe devil" 

To show the invisible line that separates 
two worlds, graphic artist Rik Bas Backer 
drew a dotted line horizontally across the 
poster “We didn't want a nostalgic past- 
er the idea was to point out the differ- 
ences that were marie be t ween white and 
black, dressed and naked, masters and 
servants," B Ftouh says. 

At the exhibit, these half-hidden codes 
are spelled out by “pictograms," designed 
from stills, focusing on the teflrng detail — 
noble heads of explorers superposed on a 
map of the African winrinwit The map 
itsdf is a kind of recurrent movie hero. 
The continent was always [portrayed as 
vijgin territory, like tbe Wild West, and 


described in sexual metaphors. In Ray- 
mond Rouleau’s “Le Messager” (1931); 
Africa is compared to a femme fatale: 
“You think you’re g/vng to change her, but 
she rhxngpt yon,” a c&rp*ri*r says. 

As for the natives, from Berber chief to 
black fanner, the roles were typecast with 
certain nuances, B Ftouh points out Tbe 
mulatto is a significant case: She is tbe 
sailed woman, the outlaw. The mulatto 
appears tn almo st all of the films. A tres- 
passer because she has crossed tbe color 
line, a t emp t r e ss of white men, she often 
ends badly: “She may be Arab or Spanish, 
she is usually naked or provocatively 
dressed, with big earrings and a cigarette. 
Just a hint of this legendary m&is turns up 
in ’Casablanca,’ a woman singing in Span- 
ish.” A flamboyant example was the role 
played by Josephine Baker in Marc AI16- 
gret’s “Prinoesse Tam-Tam" (1936). Yves 
Ciampfs “Les Hfcros sont fatigufcs” 
(1955), with Maria Felix and Yves Mon- 
tand, shows the movie verson of the mu- 
latto with all her accessories — cigarette 


into protocol) 

In 1990, Radio France Internationale, 
. ffmM dating the 1931 Exposition Coksi- 
e d e b ri aea with .sin ann iversary* bro- 
chure. ‘They said the montage jtn the cover 
was meant to depict the umversaHty of 
man,” saysB Ftouh. “The forehead is that 
of a blond white man, the eyes of aaAsfam» 
then, moving down, flu long nose looks 
senritic; the large seating month, all teeth 
chna/ing, h<lnrig tn a Madf man. — asuggea- 
tioD of camribansm. When I pointed it c« t 
to them, they were amazed, tody just want- 
ed to show a world view, they said.” 


The onema of the ’40s was infiltrated by 

And 


and blackface characters. 

when tfiese characters spoke- — even when 
they were speaking- their native Jangna ge 
— subtitles-tiansiated them into a stereo- 
typed dialect- Even today, American 
blades are often dubbed in French fi l m s 
speaking in a slurred, vaguely “island" 
accent 

These leftover attitndes crop up in many; 
places, says H Ftouh, “even in the way the 
Institut du Monde Arabe was conceived 
— tbe peristyle, the Stored light, as if you 
were in the shadowy, dangerous streets of 
a Casbah.” He is sure that Jean Nouvri 
would be surprised to hear-how his cre- 
ation, a mndri of cont emp or ar y architec- 
ture, bears, messages, from the past . 


denched to her hpsticked mouth, gaudy 


earrings, tattoos and a come-hither ! 
directed straight at the audience. 


Joan Dupont is a Pwis-based writer spe- 
cializing in ike arts. . _ 


PEOPLE 


AVideaWhodunt 
At Kennedy Compound 

■ Police are investigating aPen^ 
- sylvama man's dtin that Caroline 
Kamedy’s husband tried to nm 
him over with a vat John Whoo- 
. 39 , told police that he was 
standing in-a vacant lot across front 
the KomfiMy compound m Palm 
n**rh Florida, Monday making a 
videotape, when a van came 
through the gates of the estate and 
headed straight for him. Whooley 
told reporters that the driver 
“gunned it. I had no choice but, to 

put my left hand out and extend ny 

arm. Then I was pushed back be- 
tween two or three feel” In a state- 


ment, to police, Edward Sddoss- 

tiMhanil caul-.^As 


) was leaving, I noticed a person 
vrifii a .video' camera across the 
street” .But he denied striking 
Whooley, and said be didn’t make 
“any threatening actions whatso- 
ever Any suggestion -to the con- 
trary is untrue." . 

a 

Rome prosecutor. Her Filippo 
liras wants Spanish tenor Jmak 
■ Groans end 22 others to be tried 
on olWations that Carreras dver- 
chargeafor performances at tfie 
Rome opera m 1992,. according to 
Italian , television. A Rosie judge 
wifi ride on March 14 whether Car- 
reras, and Ms co-defendants, who ; 
include the director' of the opera, - 
dm Paolo Qeari, should be tried. 
Creso, at the center of an iuvestiga- 
tion info the qpera’s finances, 
stepped down tlns^ wed; after Rome 
mayor FkanccscoRoteffi demanded 
he resign. 

Ted Turner has bought the 500- 
square-miDe Amcndans ranch in 
southern Ndw Mexico, which was 
focmefiy owned by WDfiam Ran- 
dolph Horst and, before that, the. 
king of Spain. The cost more than 
510.5 mflnon- 


Jeamie Cahnenr, the world’s old- 
est .woman — according to the 
G oimiess . Book j of.. Rerards — ' 
tinned 119 . fins' week. *T have 
promised to Kve to be- 120 ," she 
says. “HI make an effort." Calment - 
fives in a ret irem ent home in Aries. 
France. ■ ■ ’ 


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12*3 B 

□ufafel 

Jld* 

3/35 r 

7/44 

1*34 c 

EJifajUli 

4/39 

1/3* on 

5*41 

1/34 pc 

Borancn 

tans 

4/39 ah 


8/43 ah 

Fnmktul 

1/3* 

-3/27 Hi 

1/34 

-2/29 HI 


11/53 

*130 ah 

8M8 

2/35 pc 


-1*31 

-8/10 ■ 

-4/35 

■12/11 an 


11« 

21 36 pc 

12/63 

3137 pc 


2A/75 

14/57 a 

24/75 

17*62 pc 


H«8 

1103 fl 

T77B2 

11C2 a 


4*39 

1*3* m 

5/41 

1/34 r 


136S 

a M3 c 

i7/a? 

7*44 pe 


10150 

3*37 oh 

e/49 

3/37 ih 

Moscow 

-**2S 

-9/iB e 

-2/29 

■7/30 af 


7/44 

1/34 ih 

4/39 

■1*31 r 


14/57 

5/41 ah 

16*1 

7M4 ih 


-2/29 

4*18 pc 

-1*31 

-9rt8 pc 


15*59 

10*50 pc 

1MI 

11*52 ah 


11*53 

4/39 ah 

9M8 

3/35 r 


■zia 

-S/24 c 

0*33 

■3*27 an 


*133 

-3*27 pc 

4*39 

0*29 c 

Bonw 

16*51 

T(44 pc 

14157 

6M3 ah 


| -3*77 

-11/13 1 

-6*22 

-13*3 an 


■ 1*31 

-6/22 a» 

■2*29 

■7*29 -* 

Stwiboura 

B'46 

2/38 t 

5/41 

1*34 r 


■mi 

■7120 » 

-4*25 



9*40 

3*37 ch 

10*50 

4*33 ah 


4*39 

■2120 * 

3*37 

-1*31 * 

Warm 

■5/3* 

4/19 an 

■2*29 

57* H 

Zunch 

7*44 

3*37 r 

4*39 

1/3* r 

Oceania 


29.71 

1WS1 e 

73*73 

18*1 e 


3579 

19/66 a 

27*60 

20*68 a 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Acco-Weather. 



North America 
A slorm will spread snow 
from Chicago di rough Pfns- 


bugh Friday night Into Sat- 
East Coast from 


urday. The 
Norfolk to Adamic Chy win 
have a mature of rah. sleet 
and snow Saturday CoW air 
will plunge southward 
through the central Plains 
Ihethisvwek. 


Europe 

A slow-moving storm In 
souths astern Europe will 
cause heavy rains from 
Athens. Greece, to Izmir. 
Turkey, later this week. 
Heavy snow wfl (aH fnan the 
Ukraine to the western Ural 
Mountains this weekend. 
Central and northern Europe 
writ be dry and cold Soam 
wi be mild w*h showers. 


Asia 

Beiimg through Seoul will 
have dry. milder weather 
Thursday Into Saturday 
along with plenty of sun- 


shine Tokyo w* have windy. 

TwA 


cow weather late this 
along with some sunshine. 
Northwestern Japan win 
have locally heavy snows. 
Manila and Bangkok will 
have sunny, warm weather 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today 

Mgh Low W Htfl low W 

C If CIV CO OF 

imi ti sz pc trez ins? c 
16-ri B'46 pc tsrab a/<6 a 

I0» 5 «l pc 1?<53 *H0 C 

Jwusahm B/*« pc m >57 7M4 * 

Lurpr 19*66 1« a W/75 s 

Hiy«9i KUO 9M« t TUT! ll/M a 


Today 


OF OF 


Bam 

Cm 


Legand: Murry. pc-sarOy doudy. c-chiuty. 
srvsncw. mcc. W-Wea^et. " 


OF OF 

Buanoa/Wm K.T7 C 15.77 176? pc 

Cancaa 3W 1IW pc Kt* 7475 pc 

Una 28*79 rtm PC rrvo 2**70 C 

MrooCty 23*73 BUC pc Z3.73 pc 

nodaJmm 3**93 28.79 pc 34*93 K‘7» pc 

Soraago 29/V 13*55 J 32V9 ?355 J 

t-Ouhenb^o. ’-rpn. af-wxjw Zcanes. 

Wid data pu r kMd by hcc u W e affiw. k^. 7 199 « 


Asia 


To am 


Tomorrow 



Law 

W 

K*t 

Law W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

CO* 

8aidak 

37/96 

22/71 

8 

36*7 

24*75 pc 


10*50 

-6*02 


0M6 

-3/Z7 pc 


21/70 

«/59 


20*6 

14*7 ah 

un • 

33/81 

23/73 

a 

33*91 

23/73 pc 

NowDaM 

23*73 

11*52 

• 

23/73 

11*52 • 

Seoal 

6/43 

■one 

i 

7«4 

-3*27 C 

Shon^m 

9/48 

6*43 

ah 

11/52 

4*3* C 


30/8B 

24/75 

pc 23*4 

24*15 1 

Ta«H 

22/71 

16*1 

c 

22/71 

te*i 1 

Tokyo 

67*3 

-3/27 

e 

6M 

1/34 C 

Africa 

M^tn 

21/70 

1152 


19*6 

13/56 pc 

Capr To*n 

27/00 

W/B1 


27*0 

17*2 pe 

CmtUBncj 

30*8 

8MB 


21/70 

11/52 pc 

Haiwv 

33173 

6/48 


29.-84 

8/48 pc 


32*9 

26/79 


33/91 

27*0 pc 

Na-ob 

20/70 

1152 


ZB/IO 

14*57 pc 

Tjm 

2i no 

«**■ 

c 

21.70 

11*52 pe 

North America 

Mara 

so* 

-13*9 

1 

■3/27 

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Ahru 

19*8 

1152 

t 

1355 

2/35 pc 

Bncan 

■3127 

-4 "25 

ws 

•ro 

-3/27 . 

Ctsspo 

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e/is 

•n 

-4/25 

12/11 c 


6/43 

•6/22 


1/34 

e/16 a/ 

Daoat 

1/34 

•IBB 


-2/2# 

-11/13 c 

rtnckJa 

77*0 

2170 

pc 26*82 

20*8 pc 


31*70 

7*44 


1559 

5/41 pc 

Loi/mWa 

2068 

646 


rare 

11/52 a 


n/e 

sun 


29*64 

16*4 pe 

UiranM 

■e/iB 

-13*9 


-8*18 

-17/2 c 

Mcrentd 

-10*15 

-16*4 

c 

-4-55 

-11/13 HI 

Npj you 

28 72 

20 no 


27*0 

20*6 pc 


1/34 

0*32 


3.-37 

■0*27 t 

Phcnns 

21/70 

9*40 

9 

23*73 

10*50 3 

Ser.Zrtr. 

16*1 

0/46 

VC 

16*1 

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•**rm 

846 

377 

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9<48 

3*37 th 

T -3SW3 

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tgATjgun 

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ACROSS 

1 Give tit tor tat 
sPiBow covers 


l« Bunco 
94 It debuted in 
Cairo. Dea 24. 
1871 


21 They make 
colorful 
displays 
a Transcending 

23 Have trouble on 
the ice 


is Video screen 
dot 

laSolong 
17 What's my line: 

#t 


*4 Gas, in 
Greenwich 


27 Wine casks 
m Cleopatra bitar 


20 Guard 


21 The A In "CAT 
scan* 


S o l utio n to Fnsiie of Feb- 22 

■ 


□□□□□ soman saa 
aasas saass asa 
□BanspanQns nan 
HEnaa aas oaoaaa 
□□□□□ran □annarara 
araa saraan 
□maos □□□ nanra 
□□□□□ ana □□□□□ 
□qdq □□□ raraciara 
asaratii □□□ 
□aaaaaa □□aaraara 
asaraas aara aaara 
□aa uarayazjaaaa^ 
□□□ aanara aasaa 
□□□ ciBDaa □□□□□ 


at Cartoonist Peter 
as Utah ski center 
m What's my Bne: 

#2 

27 Nautical 
direction 
aaDsrtzaaf 
“Who’s the 
BossT 
as Refine, 88 
53-Down 

40 Oto Ford model 

41 Dickey fastener 
«i Thinks out loud 

43 Level 

44 Amatory writing 
*5 Brutality 

«a Ghostly 

S3 What's my fine: 

#3 

•4 First name tn 
fashion 


sa Prefix with 
figure or tarm 
**G.PA. in slang 
*7 “Not my — — ” 

sslntefiigancs 
sa Mr. Culbertson 
and others 


DOWN 

1 Easy marks 


iTetegraph •; ■ 

sMideastguK 
4 Rural -themed 
opera ’ . .. 

sCtystsJBne 
gemstone 
■Stowaway 
7 Leaf angle 
■ One of AIcotTs 
- .- .LtttieWonran . . 

. f Boy Soxfttie _ 

10 Reserved 

11 MusicaJ wfth the 
' song ‘Memory* 

— smasher • 
13 Viking 

touchdown site . 
laVUtad'Este 
locale 

n Speaker at 
Cooparatown 
23 Cheerful 
asOMhcVeifcan 
3M Glorify' * ' 

as ■Dead* 

2? Vogue 
aa Green-card 
appBcant. 

2* Hackneyed *• 
aa Cords, eg. 

32 Love, ki - 
Le Havre 

33 Signature evert 
as Goes for 


^UwnrkJbneuEditedlvWmShertL 



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42 Danish city • , 4 aOtfScntt position eaAaior Julia 
is Co nfederate -aP:*Go, 1” 


4i.Btt of color 


41 Acapulco 


«7 f%BosopfcJcsl - et Ct waiH ig 
4aCorracn. 


44 Certain 

. .towwmerta^ .pc^MmfLm. ,, s^Eanttarousmck 





Someone back home would also love to 
hear the sound of your voice 


Dial direct from Norway with AT&T Just dial 800-190-11. 

After a day of cheering, shouting, oohine and ashing at the Olympic Winter 
Games, we know you'll want to share all the excitement w-;i- people hack home 
That's why we've made it so easy with AT&T. 

Anywhere :n Norway, simply dial 8»)0-190-li. In other countries, dial the access 
number from the list on the right. An English-speaking AT&T Operator or voice 
prompt wii[ help complete your call to the US. or more than "0 other countries. 
Use your AT&T Calling Card or call collect. You li ge: economical AT&T rates and 
keep hotel surcharges to a minimum. 

Of course, with AT&T you a iso know you'll get clear, 
crisp connections. So there’s no need ro raise vour voice. 


AB0T Access Numbers. 
How to call around tbe workt 


1. l?nig the duflbekm, find the oounby you are ottogfeoa. •. . '* *-• 

2. Dul the corresponding ATST Access >ttimber. 

3. An EngUsh-speakiny Op«aror or voire prou^ wfflaifbc the phone number yon wisb toafi or ccamea you id a 
Caiooer ServKe nepresentadve. 


% reedvr your free wsllct card of ADSn Access Nombczs, just dial the access raraibcr of 
the ctxmtry yorfre in and ask for Customer Service. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBERS COUNIKY ACCESS NUMBERS COCMHOT ACCESS NtAEBEBS 



ART 


ASIA. /PACIFIC Greece* 

00-800-1311 Bofiria* 

. . (woo-im 

AostraBa 

0014-881-011 Hungary- 

00®40d4IllU Braafl 

. -0004010 

rhfrna. P*Rf n 

10811 IcetaaTw 

999-001 CMie • ; 

- '-'00*4832 

Gram 

018-872 Ireland 

1-800-550-000 OoforeWa 

: 98O-U-0010 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 Italy" 

172-1011 Costa Bca*w- 

114 

Intfia* 

000-117 Liechtenstein* 

155-00*11 EcoaBorf* 

• ... • 119. 

lnriftnr. 1,1 

001-801-10 I-hhaanh* 

- 8*196 HSaWiiort 

190 

Japan* 


0-800-0111 Gwnwnahe - 

190 . 

Korea 

009-11 Malta* 

080p-890ril0 Goyanaat. 

..AU . tfs 

Korean 

11* Monaco* 

. 4)011 BodchiSstw 

‘ . is 

Macao 

0800-111 NrthrrfatndsT 

064122^111 j3exfl^’ r 

' ; L 95-800-^2-4240 

Maliy&bt* 

80WJ011 Norway* 

wc^iBr:*. 

:i 7‘: r -• T74 

Nev 7*3lani 

000-911 Pohndt*i 

0«O204aO4nil . ; 

-109- 

Philippines* 

105-11 Fbrt^dt 

050H-M88 Peu» , 

*. w 

awria-flfoseow) 

155-5042 Romania 

01-800428^ SterinaoK 

' *.156. 

Saipan' 

255-2872 Sfcvakfc - 

0042040101 ^ ’ &Ogpaf - '' r 

000410 

Singapore 

8000111-111 5oam - - 


'. smt-m ■ 

Sn Lanka 

-*30-430 Sweden* . 

. 020-795411 CftBSOEAir.. ... 

Tabrar* 

0080-1028841 SwtoeAnd* 

1550011 - ‘ Bahamas 

.? 1400^72-2881 

Tlsubod* 

0019-991-1111 - UkraineT 

. . mw* '^^-W^S72-288I ’ 

EUSQPE U£. 

v,, ..wornm-imam# 

tBQOOTwssi 

Anaes a*t 

8«14U1 . . MIDDLE EAST ^ .. * , . l-8QO«7Z-2881 

Austria*™ 

022-9034)11 Bahais 

-.mm , ; 

-1-800-872-2881 

Belgium* 

078-1145010 PsTpriCainfr 

■ V*. * : 

■ ■«)l-80(«I72-2883 

Bulgaria 

00-18004XJ10 bad : ' - 



Croatia** 

99-38-0011 Kowak . 


. ; 001-800^72-2881 

Ccpnis* 

08090010 Lebnoa^Bdin^ ^ 

• l-aOOm-2881 

Czech Rep 

0042000101 SutiAMa bht*.? 


Prnmarlr 

80014)010 Hartley*- -• !.-A 


&& S2W.V ««-001 

Rnfand* 

9800-100-10 AM 


00111 . 

France 

19*40U AigenrinaF' *T 


SSS=?.T .- 0800-10 

Germany 

0130-0010 .. Be&ze* 

»v • -• • • .797-797 - 


imftiiaiijr*Iirtir wwr* 

psaaaaMn^MweuroAptlvamBra^AM'tacnMteatha^Hito tio* 

— -JJ — *-■'* — Y 1 |p in irinti anil 

prrtwfi to Mr Mimairaa 
WT WJICfiWB 
MntiMGHarkiiierpMiyR^ 
mTc m w m - hin . 




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i r**i Oiiuswm fata nan *, 
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1 ftll “JT fits. (TOUT Dnp 



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