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INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Monday January 3, 1994 


No. 34.475 




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By Michael R.~ Gordon 

- ■ “ New York 7 Wt Scrvkr - ~ .. : -t 

2 -. WASHINGTON — ^The UmiedStates plans 
a .8°^p* approach on expanding 


j ™ eiD ^ rs ^P .*9 East Emupean coun- 

- diyisioas among. American 
HBciaJs and protests Iran East Enrojpeim Jeafr ; 

: r -fs, adimmstraDon officials ssy. ■ . - .■:. 

^ little more than , a week beforti a NATO " 
^summit meeting in Brussels, all ados acfcjowt- 
'* e^ethat the decision whethw to lr* Poland ty . 

Czedi Republic, Hungary and other nations 
into the North Atlantic' Treaty Organization is 
one of the most important in thcinstoiYnithe.. . 

- alliance. 

V The issue has became even more preamg fee 
East European governments ha recwitweeks as/ 
their fears of resurgent Russian nationalism 
have been brightened by Vladnmr V. Zfairin- 
;. avsk/s aggressive statements and Ks party’s ; 
success in the Russian elections on Dec. 12. 

The prevailmg view: in -Washington, leaf- 
firmed ance the Rnssan^votei is thattheWest 
should move slowly to avoid aggravating Mos- 
cow’s^ traditional fears of endrdancDt and ’’ 

On the Other gdeare aSti ni ^ H t i riri nffirink 
who believe that -dmiocautic gains- in Eastern 
Europe must. be' oonsqlidatedanid that those 
countries roust be jmtectexf from past preda- 
tors by inclusion in die affiance. 

: Providing new details about the debate that 
embroiled the Clinton administration, officials 
said that Secxctaiyxrf State WarrenW. Christo- 
pher had initially favored eapanding NATCXs 
membership to the East 

But he was persuaded to reverse course after 
the intervention of Strobe Talbott, ibejoumal- 
ist-tarned-poheymaker who was -liAmwt Mt 



..... ... Meosbon K-ibuu Afprar France Pm/ 

bn^Uodtad^ roads or Sunday to protest againg plans to isolate their settlement within the Palestinian-controlled Jericho area as the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks continue. 


Christopher's deputy hut week. 

• On the weekend before a -critical cabinet- -- 
level meeting in October, Mr. T albott, who has - 
"been ambassador-at-large to the framer Soviet ' 
republics, typed a meiiiotmhishomeomnpnte? 

argfirng against NATO Hipmaw i iiwt <emf it <r> 

Mr. Christopher.; . ' v . .. ' A;: v '■"! 

Wi thin days, Mr. Christopher and Defense 
Secretary Les Aspin were flying to Eorqpe to • 
explain the change of plan. ~~^r.r : - 

Under the gtHdow^pproa^ 
formally preseoied at tr® smmmt meeting on - 
lan. 10 and ll.lhe United States md fealties: : 
will endorse th^princMe ihat.bJA'TO'sio^n^ . 
bwsbdp shduld evtajttndly be enlmgodL ■ r . ; : 

aBiancetyogt H u»a ga ^ g r.Kt ^ tf^^ 
admitting n«w i»embers. lQslead, EastE&ope- 
an cOTDtries and fOTmer Scwiet «pidfias : 
being invited: to mire pah Jn a pawgiam pf 



ils China’s Progress on Rights 


jitridc E Tyler : " : I ' 

- r.'j' yW* 7* m e* Senke ■ 

. • BEUlNG — .Despite what hc eaDs con- 
ti l ing abosts hf hnman rights ni China, die 
UiLambassador hereargues that Beging has 
made ‘'dramatic” progress -in improving the 

- tiaesdffeotizens and tfeklfais recardshbuld 

, taka: into acconnt whm-o^cy toward . 

a d 1 iriTp -heiryefe. : . 

in human rights reptescni- 
edb^tbe lianamnea Square -crackdown in 
1989.end.the ware of repression that followed 
are being steaddy reycised, and the Commu- 


nist Party has loosened its control over many 
wpects of Chinese life. 

His co m menu in an interview came in 
advance of a congressional review this month 
of China's record on Truman rights.' Before 
July, Prerident Bill Clinton must decide 
whether China has made “overall, significant 
progress” in human rights and thus deserves 
%) .feyje.febqifig 94 ^ra^ status renewed. 

Mr. Roy.~58, a career rfipkanat who is 
scheduledto complete his tour in Beijing next 
summer, said he could not predict whether 
Qrina would satisfy the standard of “overall, 
significant progress.*’ 



“I can't answer those questions, because 
the administration is going to have to define 
what it views as significant progress,” be said. 

He acknowledged that there had been im- 
portant human rights "setbacks" in 1993, 
including arrests and harsh treatment of po- 
litical and religious dissidents. But he said the 
economic and technological revolution pro- 
moted by Deng Xiaoping since 1978 had 
stripped away much of the ideological prison 
in which the Chinese had lived for three 
decades. 

In an executive order in May, Mr. Clinton 
said there were seven key areas in which 


China bad to make “overall, significant pro- 
gress" before he could renew its trade privi- 
leges in July 1994. Among the areas are “re- 
leasing and providing an acceptable 
accounting for Chinese citizens imprisoned 
or detained for the nonviolent expression of 
their political and religious beliefs.” 

Mr. Roy said human-rights abuses were 
likely to persist for the foreseeable future 
under the Communist Party ana ice security 
apparatus that keeps it in power. 

But in nearly two hours of discussion, he 
argued that the overall economic and social 

See CHINA, Page 3 


5 Southern Mexico Towns 
Seized by Armed Peasants 


Aimed jcnsanls in 


Compiled by Ovr Staff From Dapadua 

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexi- 
co — Thousands of armed Indian peasants, 
calling themselves the Zapatista Army erf Na- 
tional Liberation, seized five towns in southern 
Mexico an Saturday and Sunday, fighting gov- 
ernment troops to protest what they said was 
genocide. As many as a dozen soldiers and 
policemen and more than 20 Indians were 
killed. 

Late Sunday, the rebels had withdrawn from 
this city of 80j000 after holding it for 24 hours. 
The group was still occupying Ocoango. Alta- 
nrirano, Las Margaritas mid Chanal, and the 
rebels were threatening to march on Tuxila 
Gutiirrez, the capital of Chiapas State, near the 
border with Guatemala. 

In a communique, the peasants said they had 
declared war on the government: “The war we 
are dedaring is a last, but just measure. The 
dictators have been applying a nondedared 
gen oca dal war against oar people for many 
years." 

A large group of peasants occupying San 
Cristobal Idt the city in tracks early Sunday 
morning. Before leaving, the peasants painted 
slogans on walls saying the military base at 
Rancho Nuevo was one of tbeir destinations. 
Fighting was later reported near the base. 


Witnesses said the peasants held a meeting in 
the central plaza Saturday night attended by 
hundreds of cheering people. The rebels report- 
edly told the crowd that they were fighting for 
the poor and indigenous peoples of Mexico. 

The peasants sacked the town hall here and 
looted a government store. The streets around 
the tree-shaded central plaza were littered with 
paper and other items thrown out of the town 
nail where a fire could be seen smoldering. 

San Cristobal’s municipal secretary. Sergio 
Alberto Pastrana, said the rebels bad also taken 
over the police headquarters, where about 45 
men on duty offered no resistance. 

“They believe they are the strongest, and they 
came to demonstrate that," be said. "They 
showed the force they have." ^ 

In Ocosingo. a town of 30.000, El Tiempo 
newspaper said the rebels had set fire to the 
town hall and taken about 30 policemen hos- 
tage after four policemen were killed 
The insurgents destroyed three bridges lead- 
ing into the town, according to witnesses. The 
rebels claimed to have 5,000 followers in Oco- 
singo. 

A man reached by telephone in Ocosingo 
said thai there were still 2.000 to 3,000 rebels 

See MEXICO, Page 5 


Kiosk 


Weather Deaths 

At 10 in France 

LAON, fiance (APf- Amn taKng 
ho 

■- The dixwning-m <jtMd 175 kitonwters 

north of Paris, brought tbe nmnbajrf 
weather-related deaths torn flooding ana 
fro® avalanches id:3hp:Afc» m *®. 6st 
week to at leas. 10. • « 

The. body of Jean-Oaude Debra^S*. 
was Toontf m a 

helicopter crew seat out afier.&s.wo Lab-, 
nulor retrievers returned home; ■ 

: rig*s. 


Bridge 

Boob 


Sk^Goior, a Hot Option for Today’s Designing Parents 


. By .Eugene Robinson 

Wtahmgtan Foot Servlet 

LONDON— 1 A British fertility dime’s plans to implant an 
egg from a white donor. «ub * Haci woman hare created a~ 
controversy over so-caBed deagncr babies and the ethical. 
teats that modem medical technology presents. 

nr^ ^ Peter Biinsden. director the Boron Hall Ctimc near 
• CauibSd^ and- doeira were Hkdy ta go akmg with the 
request from .an mdanified boupfc — the man is of nnred 
: raoTdw wonfim black to implant the woman with a donor 
- - - f^rtifagd whhher partner's spam. Since there is 

^ bhi& donors,- he said, the egg win 


, to be of mixed race, whatever we do," Dr. 
it is more blade or more wime is 





The child is| 

Broaden said. 
indevanL" 

HSs comments r^tne ami d repens that a clinic in Italy had 
enabled a Hack woman to give mrth to a white baby about six 
months ago. According to the press reports, the woma n , who 
was infertile because of a tumor, and was married to a white 
man, asked for an egg from a white donor so her child could 
escape racial discrinunatiort 

In the last week, questions have been raised about the a^s at 
r which some women are undergoing fertilized egg i mplan ta- 
tions. A 59-year-old British woman, after treatment by Ita li a n 
doctors, gave birth to twins over Christmas. In Italy, acoarding 


to press reports, a 62-year-old woman is now pregnant after 
implantation of a fertilized egg. 

This string of disclosures has prompted soul-searching 
among British medical authorities and responses from politi- 
cians ranging from anger to bafflement 
Dame Jill Knight who heads a health committee in Parlia- 
ment said that to allow a couple to choose the ethnic identity 
of their chud was “plain and unvarnished genetic engineering, 
and as such most be unacceptable.” 

But David Blunkett, health spokesman for the opposition 
Labor Party, was more measured in his response, saying that 

See ETHICS, Page 5 


Let the PLO 

? Sweat’ Over 
Peace Talks, 
Rabin Says 

Further Delays Are Seen 
As the Israelis Question 
Reliability of Arafat 

By Clyde Haberman 

.Vf» >cvA Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Israel dug in its beets 
against the Palestine Liberation Organization 
on Sunday as Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
said he was in no burry and would let the 
Palestinians "sweat" before resuming talks on a 
troop withdrawal and transfer of civil authority 
in the occupied territories. 

Mr. Rabin was also quoted as having ques- 
tioned the reliability of the PLO and its chair- 
man, Yasser ArafaL He reportedly told cabinet 
ministers at their weekly meeting that Israel 
could no longer rely on oral agreements with 
the Palestinian leadership and would insist that 
everything be put on paper from now on. 

As a result of ha remarks, it seemed increas- 
ingly doubtful that the Israelis and the Palestin- 
ians' would resume their negotiations in the next 
few days, as had been expected. A senior PLO 
negotiator. Nabil Shaath, said in Cairo that 
although both sides were ready to talk, “the 
conditions for going back" were unclear. 

Aides to Mr. Rabin insisted that there was no 
crisis and predicted that the two sides would 
ultimately clear away the obstacles that caused 
them to miss a Dec. J3 target date for the start 
of an Israeli withdrawal from the Gaza Strip 
and the West Bank town of Jericho. 

“This is like a Middle East bazaar, and we’re 
playing by Middle East rules," said Gad Ben- 
A ri, a Rabin spokesman. "You have to play ii 
cool and with lot of patience." 

But while the impasse may largely reflect 
brinkmanship on both sides, it underlines how 
flimsy mutual trust is despite the heralded Sep- 
tember agreement at the White House that 
supposedly turned Israel and the PLO into 
partners for peace. It also casts doubt on the 
entire timetable for an assumption of Palestin- 
ian self-rule in the territories. 

Israeli leaders, for example, had said repeat- 
edly that the scheduled Dec. 13 start of the 
pullback from Gaza and Jericho was far less 



np. 

turn, throws a shadow over plans for Palestin- 
ian elections and 3 companion spread of self- 
rule throughout the West Bank by mid-July. 

In interviews over the last few days, Mr. 
Rabin had sounded relaxed about deadlines, 
saying that time was on Israel’s side and that be 
would take as long as needed to reach a satisfac- 
tory agreement. The state-owned radio quoted 
him as having delivered the same message to his 
cabinet on Sunday. 

“We are not in a rush." he reportedly said. 
“Let them sweat” 

The immediate dispute is whether Israel and 
the PLO, during talks in Cairo last week, bad 
come to toms on border-crossing checks, the 
size of the autonomous Jericho district and 

See MIDEAST, Page 5 


Low Oil Prices 
Force a 20% Cut 
In Saudi Budget 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MANAMA, Bahrain — Saudi Arabia, 
pressed by falling oQ prices and international 
criticism (hat its finances relied too much on 
debt has unveiled a balanced 1994 budget that 
cuts spending by 20 percenL 

Economists struggled Sunday to figure out 
whether weak oil prices and continued pressure 
to spend would enable the government to meet 
its ambitious target 

“It’s going to be hard to meet this budget 
with high subsidies, high population growth 
and low oil prices." an analyst said. 

In a speech broadcast nationwide. King 
Fabd projected spending for 1994 at $42.6 
billion. Spending in 1993 bad been projected at 
$52.5 bOnoo, but final figures are not available. 

The king did not specify where the cuts 
would be made. Nor did he give any estimate 
for government income in 1994, and it was not 
clear whether he expected a deficit. 

“The world economic conditions and surplus 
oil supplies have affected prices and imports 
from our country," he said, “so the prices 
dropped. ’’ 

In a report released over the weekend, the 
Ministry of Finance and National Economy 
said that oil revenues represented 75 percent of 
the national income and that the projected 
expenditure in 1994 would offset the drop in 
earnings. 

Oil prices have in recent weeks hovered 

See BUDGET, Page 9 


For Americans, It’s Good-Bye to Bran Muffins and Hello to Chips 


"Andorra ^-9-00 

AirilUea^.-n^ FFW^CCO^~.12C^ 

Ccmeroffi. 7 ®) CFA 

;saudf Arabia JfMR. ... 
Franc*-.— -9-OOFF Senega ]-..i8£>CFA 
. GC*OP— ^8&CFA Spoin ,__2HJPTAS 

Greece-L...500Pr*‘Tonisiri — 

- Ivonir Goast*3fiOCFA Turkey -T.t^lWBO- 
Jordan.-^..— 21 JD 

i <Qvmon .-U5S 1.50 U.SjmU&' r J «-l° 


• By Matty O’Neill 

. V ■ Jitm York Tima Serdet .. 

T4EW YOR& — Rather than pledging to 
be perfect and subjectHig^ ^Aorodves to an 
' abstentions,' ; healthful, aerobidzed life in 
I994w more pcqpleiecm tote ind ulg in g in the 

* ^----^themass^etaHeoverthe 


“htasure revenge” as .one ttend- 
waf&or calls it, B 35 .!* 01 a 

'Steady- gatti in the last several months, as 
'noted by evezyoirefromponsteHairf madeetr 


to mnritam expens and health-dub exec- 
utives. 

Moreover, this gain is most evident among 
the affluent, we3teducated pranlation that 
has been at the axe of the fitness craze. 

There is bomtifol evidence. 

. A n ati on al survey of 2,073 aduhs has found 
that in the last two yeare people chose higb- 
fat macks more often than lean ones. Cup 
consumption rose by 6 pdeem, and popcorn 
dropped by 3 percent 

Is 2 99i, respondents in a amflar 
reported an average weight loss of 10 j 


(43 kilograms); in 1993, they reported an 
average gain of 2,1 pounds. 

For the first time in IS years, John C. 
Naroross, a professor of psychology at the 
University of Scranton who smdics New 
Year's resolutions, found that neither losing 
weight nor stopping smoking was the No. T 
New Year’nesoiutkm tiusyear. Instead, 
pie are most concerned with managing 
personal finances better. 

“I am hearing a lot of people give them- 
selves penmssbn not to be perfect," Profes- 
sor Norcross said. 


Buanesses that stand to profit from a less 
ascetic society tend to read these signs as a 
backlash against the last decade's relentless 
beating of the good-health drum. 

Representatives erf the dairy, beef. pork, 
sugar, snack-food, fast-food and tobacco in- 
dustries, for instance, view the recent surveys, 
as veD as tbdr own increasing sales, with 
enthusiasm. “People are starting to loosen 
up,** said Max Great, executive secretary of 
the Wine and Spirits Guild of America, a 
trade group in Minneapolis. “The public is no 
longer overwhelmed by health concerns." 


Others, particularly those with a vested 
interest in health-conscious living, lend to 
interpret the surveys less as a backlash ihan 
as blips in an ever-improving picture of pub- 
lic health. 

"There's been a dramatic change toward 
healthier habits ova the last decade," said 
Mark Briddin, the executive editor or Pre- 
vention magazine. “Major health changes 
don’t happen in a straight line.” Manufactur- 
ers of tow-fat food products and fitness 

See PLEASURE, Page 5 





21l 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 1994 


Q&A: Contrarian’s View ofU.S , Economic Recovery 


A. Gary Shilling, who runs an eco- 
nomic consultancy and investment 
Springfield, New Jersey, is one 
of America’s more celebrated bears 
With signals set fair for the US. earn- 
onjy* he discussed his contrarian views 
with Lawrence Malkin of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 

Q. What is different about this recov- 
ery from aQ other postwar recoveries? 

A It is taking place in the midst of a 
decade-long correction Grom the 1980s 
when tremendous debts piled op in every 
sector and indeed throughout the world, 
there was excess hiring here and abroad, 
and a massive real estate boom which left 
tremendous amounts of excess capacity. 
Unwinding those excesses is a drag on 
the whole business cycle, and on top of 
that we have the unwinding of defense 
spending and exports pouring out of the 
newly industrialized countries. 

All of tins is giving us a world of slack 


demand and excess supply — a deflation- 
ary world which is very different from the 
upswing of this SO- or 60-year cycle back 

in the 1960s. 

Q. What cycle? 

A After World Wax n, you had a 
strong upward phase with 'new technol- 
ogy and the huge rash to the suburbs with 
a lot of housing and road- building, con- 
sumer electronics and appliances. 

In the 70s things started to get over- 
done. and we had an inventory cycle 
where everybody thought we’d nave 
shortages forever and stocked up on com- 
modities and goods to buy before prices 
went higher. Everybody ended up with 
far too much, which led to a sharp reces- 
sion of the type you hadn’t seen since the 
end of World War L 

In Phase 3, which was the 1980s, the 
economy really was starting to slip hut 
nobody noticed it because everybody was 
out enjoying the greed and glitz and bor- 
rowing and spending and just having a 
wild party like the 1920s. 


What inevitably follows is tlw collec- 
tion, the unwinding phase, and you can 
variously dale that from the 1987 stock 
market crash, or in the spring of 1989 
when the U.S. economy essentially 
ceased to grow. That started a little later 
in Europe and Japan, and the whole 
world now is basically in the same boat. 
The precedent for this is not in anybody’s 
database. There are no figures going back 
to the 70s and ’30s —so tbjyjust don’t 
exist as far as most economists are con- 
cerned. 


Q. Let’s go forward to the shortest of 
the short term. We've had a good Christ- 
mas. What’s your outlook for the New 
Year? 

A We’re still in a stop-go economy. 
The strength in the last three qnarters has 
ben fueled by the consumer, who has 
accounted for more than 100 per cent of 
the growth in gross domestic product. 
TTiars fine if the consumer has the where- 


withal to do it, but spending is growing ‘ 
more rapidly than income. 

Furthermore, there's been this mad 
rush to go out and buy bouses because 
people think mortgage rates are going to 
go up. That borrows from the future — 
it’s in effect pre-spending, and it includes 
all the Mow-on effects m terms of home 
appliances and f rani rare, In the upper 
income brackets, people have had their 
beads in the sand about tax increases, 
which axe retroactive to the start of 1993 
for incomes over 5150,000. If those peo- 
ple take only half their tax payments out 
of spending and the rest out of savings, 
that will still cut back the overall growth 
of spending by 25 percent in 1994. 

Q. But the new taxes are designed to 
have the rich keep their money in their 
business and invest it for the future. 

A What people are dong is investing 
to get rid of Domes, not to expand capaci- 
ty. You may pot in a computer, but mat's 
to cut costs; it yields p ro fits , not jobs. 
That’s a very different form of productiv- 


ity growth from the postwarpaiod when., 
we put in new machinery and a lot of 
people’s jobs were ‘ upgraded. . 


Q. What are the implications for the 
rest of the world? 

A We are not providing an engine to 
help the wodd out of the morass, .but 
they’re not helping us either,' because the 
rest of the industrialized worid is pretty 
modi in the same boat. Some have been , 
gaining because of the tremendous burst' 
df growth m China. But China is an 
enigma. It has astop-^o economic policy, 
it’s hard to see who is in charge and it has 
inflation problems. We’re bullish on Chi- 
na in the long ran. but it certainly is 
stretching it to say they're going to con- 
tinue this kind of growth and therefore 
will continue to hdp their neighboring 
countries boom. Ana as they gain marker 
share in the industrialized countries and 
unemployment lingers, we're gong to see 
protectionist pressures to limit imports. 


WORLD BRIEFS 



Smooth Sailing for Balladur 

He Leads France’s Presidential Polls as Rivals Dissolve 


BRUSSELS CLASH — Bd^an poficenieiistnigrimgfrithaTurkidj denwnstrator, partof a crowd 
protesting a meeting of members of the Kurdish Workers’ Party who had marched from Cotogpe. 

Bonn Gets Fewer Ethnic Germans 

At 218,888, Influx From East in *93 Appears to Stabilize 


Compiled bp Our Staff From Dispatches 

BONN — Germany accepted 
218,888 ethnic Germans from the 
former Soviet Union and Easton 
Europe in 1993, a slight drop from 
the 1992 figure of 230,565, the Inte- 
rior Ministry said Sunday. 

As in previous years, most immi- 
granis came from the former Soviet 
Union, the ministry said. 

Bonn's 1949 constitution grants 
citizenship to any ethnic Goman 
in Eastern Europe who can prove 
that he suffered directly or indirect- 
ly from World War U because of 
his German roots. 

In 1990. tbe year or German uni- 
fication, 400.000 ethnic Germans, 
mostly from the Soviet Union. Po- 
land and Romania, swamped hasti- 
ly established camps. 

Bonn stemmed the flow by seek- 
ing to improve conditions for eth- 


nic Germans in the East and by 
screening potential immigrants 
more closely. The numbers have 
since stabilized at less than 
300.000. 

In another development, about 
10 German youths went on a de- 
structive rampage in a home for 
foreign asylum-seekers in Bavaria 
on Saturday. And near Hamburg, 
some 15 neo-Nazis dashed with 
twice as many Turks after provok- 
ing them with anti-foreign slogans 
outside a big discotheque. Police 
said two police officers, four right- 
ists and a Turk were hurt. 

The refugee home attackers, 
aged 18 to 23. forced their way into 
the building in Straubing about 
2:30 AM, damaging doors and 
furniture and pulling a telephone 
from a wall, the police said. Three 
were arrested and none of the 
home’s 100 residents was injured. 


A Straubing police officer said 
the German youths bad earlier got- 
ten into an argument at a bar with 
some residents of tbe borne. He 
offered no further details but said 
the attackers were not considered 
neo-Nazis. 

A second refugee borne, in Ep- 
pertshausen, near Darmstadt, was 
also vandalized during the night. 
Police said youths threw a bottle 
through a window and broke the 
window of a car parked in the yard. 
None were caughL 

Despite appeals from Germany’s 
leaders, attacks on foreigners con- 
tinue to occur almost daily. 

In a speech broadcast Saturday 
to Germans abroad on the govern- 
ment’s Deutsche Welle shortwave 
network. Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
urged a rejection of “all forms of 
national arrogance.'’ ( Reuters, AP) 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Serricr 

PARIS — With heavy rains 
flooding northern France, a car- 
toon in L’Express last week showed 
Jacques Chirac, the GauQist leader, 
trapped on a roof waiting to be 
rescued as Prime Minister Edouard. 
Balladur nonchalantly walked 
away across the water. 

Implicit in the cartoon, of 
course, was that Mr. Balladur is 
heading for Etysie Palace, while 
Mr. Chirac, who has failed in two 
bids for the presidency, is about to 
be frustrated again m 1995, this 
time by tbe man he nominated to 
be prime minister just nine months 
ago. 

But tbe cartoon also captures the 
strange phenomenon of tbe aloof, 
soft-spoken 64-year-old prime min- 
ister. Although France is in a glum 
mood, with its economy in deep 
recession and unemployment con- 
tinuing to rise, Mr. ftaOadur seems 
□□able to do anything wrong in the 
eyes of many French. 

Even as the franc was savaged by 
speculators and Air France ground 
crews paralyzed the nation's air- 
ports this year, public-opinion 
pods consistently favored Mr. Bal- 
ladur as tbe successor to President 
Francois Mitterrand, showing him 
to be running far ahead of aspi- 
rants not only from the Socialist 
opposition but also from his own 
conservative coalition. 

Then, just two weeks ago, Mr. 
Balladur scored a major victory of 
his own when he won important 
concessions Tor France on agricul- 
tural exports and on audiovisual 
products in global trade liberaliza- 
tion talks. Suddenly, be was seen Co 
be tough as well as reassuring. 

His success has largely silenced 
the Socialists, who have still to re- 
cover from their drubbing in the 
March parliamentary elections. 
Yet the real loser seems to have 
been Mr. Chirac, the mayor of Par- 
is, who only nine months ago 
looked set to reach the presidency, 
and Valfcry Giscard d Estaing, a 
former conservative president who 
lost to Mr. Mitterrand in 1981 and 


dreams of retaming to Elyste Pal- 
ace. 

Until mid-December, though, 
Mr. Balladur bad always brushed 
aside questions about the 1995 
presidential elections, arguing that 
the topic should be debated only at 
the end of 1994. He even innaed 
that be would need five years, the 
life of the c urren t conservative- 
dominated par liam ent, to fix the 
economy. 

Then, after Ms victory in the 
trade talks, he seemed to change Ms 
tune. Asked by Le Figaro if he 
planned a five-year tenure in tbe 
Hold Matignon, the p r i nw- minis- 

The French 
evidently still have a 
good opinion of 
me, and yet 
apparently they 
believe they are 
badly governed.’ 

Edouard Balladur 

let’s office, he replied: “There's no 
question of that, rive years in Ma- 
tignon, never! Two years, yes, and 
after that, well see.” 

It was not exactly a declaration 
of his candidacy, but Mr. Bahadur 
is a man who picks his words care- 
fully. Two years in Matignon 
would take him from March 30, 
1993, when Mr. Mitterrand named 
him prime minister on Mr. Chirac’s 
recommendation, to the eve of the 
May 1995 presidential elections. 

Speculation about Ms intentions 
was further increased on Dec. 19 
when Simone Ved, the social affairs 
minister, and Francois Ltotard, the 
defense minister, endorsed a Baha- 
dur presidential candidacy. 

Supporters of Mr. Chirac were 
quick to respond. Jean-Louis 
-Debre, a leader of the Gaullist Ral- 
ly for the Republic party, said Mrs. 
Veil and Mr. Leotard had missed 
**a good occasion to keep quiet” 

- Mr. Balladur then chose to back- 
pedal- In an interview with The 


Financial Times, which him 
Man of the Year far 1993. he was 
asked about Ms presidential ambi- 
tions. i 

*Tm not talking about that” he 
said. “I have never talked about it, 
and I won't talk about it for the. 
whole of 1994L And I. hope that 
others will not speak about it ei- 
ther.” 

Yet, with many French newspa- 
pers also declaring 1993 to be the 
Year of Balladur, 1994 seems cer- 
tain to be the yeas in which Ms 
presidential candidacy will be con- 
solidated or wQl fall apart. 

The focus of the debate will be 
the Union for France coalition, 
which has Mr. Chirac and Mr. Gis- 
card as its two leaders and which is 
committed to naming a single can- 
didate in 1995. The srn pmp that 
erupted inside the coalitionm De- 
cember suggested that more serious 
infi ghting »hw>H 

In the end, though, what may 
count most for rank-and-file mem- 
bers of both tbe Chirac party and 
the Giscard-kd Union for French 
Democra cy is whirJi namtiriiite MT1 
best insure a conservative victory. 
And for now, with Mr. Chirac bur- 
dened by the ima ge. of a loser and 
Mr. Giscard often labeled a “has- 
been,” that candidate is dearly Mr.' 
Balladur. 

Mr. Balladur has something of 
an ally in Mr. Mitterrand. Al- 
though Mr. Mitterrand is a Social- 
ist, Ms cohabitation with the con- 
servative prime minis ter has gone 
smoothly so far, even helping his 
own popularity. Further, Mr. Mit- 
terrand nas never dis guised his dis- 
like for Michel Rocard, the Social- 
ists’ likely presidential candidate: 

In theory, a key variable must' 
still be whether Mr. Balladur can 
revive the economy and reduce un- 
employment Yet that ignores Ms 
mysterious sway over the French. 
Indeed, in Ms interview with The 
Financial Times, even Mr. Balladur 
sounded puzzled. 

“It is paradoxical,” he said, “that 
the French evidently still have a 
good opinion of me, and yet appar- 
ently they believe they are badly 
governed.” 


Scores Dead in Fi ghting in Kabul 

KABUL (Renters) — Fierce factional battles raged for the second day 
in the Afghan capitaF on Sunday, killing more than 70 people and 
wounded around 7Q0, officials said. 

President Burftanuddm Rabbanf s spokesmen, said the figures were a 
conservative estimate, of the casualnes in. the ‘fighting that. erupted 
between Mr. Rabbanfs forces and fighters led by General Abdul Rashid 
Doestum at -daw on New Year’s Day. The loll was likely to be modi 
higher because the uneasily of rocket and artillery fire was making it 
difficult for families 'to take their dead and seriously wounded to 
ritalsu The fighting was dx heaviest for six months. 


itial jets carried out bombing raids on the ancient Bala Hissar 
fort to the south erf the ory, one of the mam bases of General Doestum’s 
fighters. Mr. Rabbani issued an appeal toother parties in the fractious 
coalition Islamic government to join forces with Mm. 

Kohl Cites Bleak Security Situation 

BONN (Renters) — Chancellor Helmut Kohl said in an interview 
broadcast on Sunday that the Balkan conflicts and the rise of extreme 
nationalism in Russia showed the need for Germany to maintain a 
capable defense. 

“Anyone who takes a good look around in the worid knows that the 
security situation has not improved,” Mr. Kohl told a Berlin radio 
station. 

He acknowledged that the armed farces would have to curb spending 
as part of efforts to curb a state budget deficit But be dismissed 
opposition calls for deep cuts in defense spending as stupid, according to 
a s umm ary of the interview. “The armed farces will get what they need,” 
he said. - 

UN Convoys Unimpeded in Bosnia 

ZAGREB, Croatia (AP) — Fourteen United Nations relief convoys 
had surprisingly smooth runs Sunday as tbeyde&vered cargoes to hungry 
and cold residents of Bosnia, UN officials said. The missions ended a 
two-day New Year’s break for UN relief personnel Earlier aid deliveries 
have been Mocked or delayed by bureaucracy .and harassment, and sock 
have crane under gunfire. 

Five convoys readied Sob-held towns in eastern Bosnia, while two 
other lines of (rucks reached the eastern Muslim and the western Croatian 
parts of tbe southwestern city of Mostar, said.. Ken Harvey, warehouse 
manager in Metkovic, southern Croatia, for the UN High Commissioner 
far Refugees. 

Two other conveys for Sarajevo and the central Bosnian town of 
Zenica were beading to Tomidavgrad, west of Mostar, where they were to _ 
spend the night. Five convoys that left Belgrade earlier in the day were 
heading toward Muslim enclaves in eastern Bosnia: 

7 More Killed in Algerian Violence 

. ALGIERS (AFF> — Gunmen killed seven civilians in separate inci- 
dents in an upsurge of violence Friday and Saturday, security service 
offidalssajdSunday.Althesame time, several schools and colleges Mt by 
arson attacks, the sourcesaaid. 

Armed groups hit educational establishments across the country, 
mduding three ooDeges and two schools in Blida, a college and a 
grammar school in Oum ELBouaghi, a grammar school in Chief and a 
college in Ain Detfla. The police said about 60 trucks, bases and govern- 
ment vehicles were also tbe subject of arson attacks. 

An Algiers newspaper, A1 MoudjaMd, reported Sunday that 780 
Muslim fundamentalists were sttQ being detained in two desert detention 
colters. - 

Pakistan and India Discuss Kashmir 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Renters) —Pakistan said talks with India on 
the issue of disputed Kashmir began Sunday on a serious note as 
Islamabad called on New DdM to end what it calls repression in the 
Indian-ruled part of the state. 

Western diplomats said they expected scant progress in the talks on 
Sunday and Monday that end an 18-month hiatus in negotiations 
between the two old enemies, and which for the first time tackle head on 
the dispute over divided Kashmir. 

‘The talks have started on a note of seriousness,” a Foreign Ministry 
statement said after the first of four sessions on Sunday morning between 
the top diplomats of the two countries. 

Cambodians Battle Khmer Rouge 

ARANYAPRATHET, Thailand (AFP) — Cambodian government 
and Khmer Rouge forces battled throughout the day Sunday, south of tbe 
border town of Poipet, exchanging arttflsy and mortar fire, Thai army r . 
officials said. / 

Tim fighting appeared to be increasing in intensity, and both sides were 
bringing up fresh forces, tbe officials said, adding that they believed there 
were casualties on both rides. It was the third consecutive day of dashes 
in the area sonth of the Cambodian border crossroads of Poipet as Phnom 
Penh reportedly prepared a major offensive against the Khmer Rouge for 
the coming week. 


<U 


Paris Tries to Quell Critics 
Of Its Release of Iranians 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — A French minister 
said Sunday that Switzerland “un- 
derstands” France's repatriation of 
two Iranians wanted in the assassi- 
nation of an Iranian opposition fig- 
ure near Geneva. 

Alain Lamossoure. France's 
minister for European affairs, re- 
peated rat the Sunday television 
news program “Hour or Truth” 
government assertions that the ex- 
pulsions were “in the national in- 
terest-" 

“We have other Iranians in 
French prisons who are going to be 
submitted to French justice," Mr. 
Lamossoure said. “We don't have 


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any lessons to leant from anyone" 
about fighting terrorism. 

Mohsen Sharif Esfahani, 37, and 
Ahmed Taheri. 32. had been held in 
French custody since November 
1992 awaiting rating on a request 
for their extradition to Switzerland 
for the kilting of Kazan RajavL 

Mr. Rajavi, a brother of Mas- 
soud Rajavi. leader of tbe Bagh- 
dad-based Mujahidin Khalq. the 
main group opposed to Tehran’s 
Islamic revolutionary government, 
was slain near Geneva in Novem- 
ber 1990. 

Prime Minister Edouard Balla- 
dur's office said last week that tbe 
expulsions were made in France's 
national interest and that there 
would be no further explanation 
given. 

The expulsions drew a formal 
protest from Swiss authorities, who 
said that France had violated Euro- 
pean extradition treaties and agree- 
ments to combat terrorism. 

The Swiss “made statements of 
regret, we've given them explana- 
tions. and they've indicated 
through on official communication 
that they understand," Mr. lamas- 
soure said- 


U.S. Warns of Lapses in Air Control 


By Martin Tolchin 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — An increasing number 
of aircraft are flying too dose to other planes 
because of errors made by air traffic control- 
lers, the Federal Aviation Administration has 
reported. 

The required aircraft separation distances 
were breached 757 times in the 12-month 
period that ended last October, the agency 
found, a 5 percent increase in such incidents, 
called “operational errors,” compared with 
720 in the preceding 12 months. 

“Operational errors" is the FAA’s term for 
mistakes made by air traffic controllers who 
fail to keep aircraft separated by tbe required 
distance, which is, on average, three miles 
laterally or 1,000 Teel vertically; sometimes 
both buffers are required and sometimes tbe 
separation distances are larger. 

Some operational errors have been “rela- 
tively dose." said Bill Jeffers, the FAA’s 
deputy associate administrator for air traffic 
control Dangerously close encounters are 
called near-coQirions. 

The controllers attribute tbe increase in 
such errors to increased air traffic, overbur- 
dened airports and overworked controllers. 
But federal officials say air traffic increased 
by only 1 percent this year, to about 7 million 
departures, and they contend that busy air- 
ports are adequately staffed by controllers. 

Mr. Jeffers attributes the increase to “hu- 


man error and communications error” on the 
pan of controllers. 

Whatever the reason, FAA officials say 
there is no cause for alarm. “Just because 
operational errors may be going up, you can’t 
say that the quality of safety in the system is 
going down,” said Robert . Buckhorn, a 

Must because operational 
errors may be going up, 
you can’t say that the 
quality of safety in tbe 
system is going down. 9 

An aviation agency spokesman 

spokesman for the agamy. The number of 
collisions and near-collisions, he pointed out, 
has steadily declined. 

Fatalities have been attributed to opera- 
tional errors in the past. Air traffic control- 
lers were held responsible for a February 
1991 runway collision between a USAir jet- 
liner at Los Angeles International Airport 
and a Skywest commuter plane; 46 people 
woe killed. 

TWo months later, Senator John Heinz of 
Pennsylvania and rix others were killed in a 
m idair coQirion when the senator’s chartered 
plane collided with a helicopter over a Phila- 
delphia suburb. Air traffic controllers had 


given permission for tbe helicopter to fly near 
the senator’s plane to inspect it 

Despite the increase in operational err o r s; 
the FAA reports a reduction in tbe number of 
near-coDisions in the air, to 292 in die 12 
months that ended last October. That isdown. 
7 percent from the 315 reported for the year 
ending October 1992; 363 were reported for 
the year ending October 1991. 

Federal officials note that the last fatal 
accident involving a major airline occurred in 
March 1992, at LaGuardia Airport, but there 
have been several fatal accidents involving 
commuter planes and private aircraft. 

More controllers are needed, said James G 
Morin, general counsel for tbe National Air 
Traffic Controller Association of the AFL- 
CIO. “The FAA says they’re fully staffed, bat 
we take issue with that," he said. “We believe 
they can use a lot more people in a number of 
busy facilities, including New Yotk, Los An- 
geles and Chicago.” 

Last August, the Clinton administration 
lifted tbe ban on retiring the controllers who 
were dismissed by President Ronald Reagan 
when they weal on strike in 1981. 

Tbe FAA contends that there is no short- 
age of controllers, and it plans to hire 200 to 
onset attrition. Bat the controllers associa- 
tion estimates that 2,000 to 3,000 new bins 
are needed. 

The FAA^ says it has nearly 18.000 air 
traffic controllers, of whom 12,000 are ax the 
full-performance level, which means that 
they can handle any job assigned. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 
Channel Tunnel Fare Reportedly Set 

LONDON (AP) — Tbe round-trip fare for taking a car through tbe 
English Channel tunnel will range from £160 to £260, The Sunday Times 
said. 

From May to June and October to December a standard round-trip 
ticket between the tunnel tenmnals in Calais, France, and Folkestone, 
England, will sell for about £1 60 (S240), rising to £260 during high season, 
tbe newspaper said. The price mil not vary according to tbe number of 
passengers m the car. The Sunday Times did not cite the source of its 
information. 

The fares would make the price of using the Channel tunnel only 
shghtly more expensive than crossing by ferries. The tunnel is due to open 
to passenger service on May 8. 

Britain’s crown Jewels are to be moved from their midear-proof bunker 
in the Tower of London to a new home above ground. The jewels are 
being transferred because the bunker is too small to cope with the number 
of viators, a Tower of London spokesman said. The new home will be a 
glass air-conditioned display in the Towel’s Waurioo Barracks complete 
with a moving walkway to prevent logjams. (Reuters) 

Switzerland's internal boundaries have been changed, with the district 
of Laufon being transferred out of the Bern canton and into the German- 
speaking half-canton of Basel, officials said. The change means that the 
Bern canton now has no border with France. (AFP) 

A strike by employees of the Athens private bus system entered its 19th 
day Sunday with only 650 buses out of 1 ,700 on city streets, backed up by 
400 military buses. Strikers said they would continue their industrial 
action as long as the government refused to pay compensation for 
renationalizing Athens transports. (AFP) 

This Week’s Holidays 

Banking and government offices win be dosed or services curtailed in 
the following countries and their dependencies this wedc because of 
national and rdigjous holidays: 

MONDAY; Australia, Botswana. Britain, Burkina Faso, Gibraltar, 

Guatemala, Ireland, Japan, Korea, Malawi, New Zealand. Russia, 'Serbia. Sierra 
Leone. Taiwan, Thailand. 

TUESDAY: Burma. New Zealand. Taiwan, Zaire. 

THURSDAY: Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Croatia, Cyprus, Dominican Re- 
public, Finland, Greece, Iraq, Italy, Liechtenstein, Puerto Rico, Spain, Sweden, 
Uruguay, Vatican City. 

FRIDAY: Belarus, Ethiopia. Ukraine. Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 


o 

V 

E 

R 

H 

E 

A 

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D 



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:’r*fXw£ 

, >-.., By Isabel Wflkawm : ^ 

_, • ,-■_ __ - ' Eew York Tima Service - .. - -.-— -.. 

Dr - -% c ^yn Hteli»-'teai 

“onbcra of the OEnton a dmirust i uri on,' 

niS l ^A mliK - *5? S? Jc S afizin 8 drugs cooM reduce 
m^ni^ftirtba-^uay, an -idea foai.was nor 
P art ^ cu ^ ar b' BEW,bat -words that took nrijm-a w womfi- 

^"Sa ^ T * tfa ^T“ cnL rr^“ 

"“Jw* A-;«;-*flhnaoB & Johnson subadtary in Littfc 
Kock, A rkansas , was arrested and chargedwito adEDg~ 



General Is Fighting Off the Political Knives 


' snqi.in July. Kevin and Ms supported have called the 
casea saup to embarrass Ms mother, noting dot (he 
. ppfjgc issued The warrant for his arrest a week after her 
. comments about legalizing drugs. 

Takaerriews, Dr.fldessaMtotttsteknew nothing of 
het sec’s posable involvement with drugs but that foe 
stohdFbdimdlainas any mother would. She said hex son 
ha^sot fiwad with her for two years and was. after all a 
grown man.' ■ ■ • ■•'• 

. . “Tm -very saddened that this has happened, that he 
- Wey® associamd With this, 1 " Dr- Elders said. u lf he 
sins involved, I'm very saddened he was involved.” 

Dr. Elders emphatically said that her sot’s arrest had 
sot infhienced her poabon on drug legalization or her 
. comments about studying the issue. “1 have to base what 
-’T arty on the best scientific knowledge I have available," 


she said. “1 can't let my emotions or personal opinions 
get in the way. if I were to do that. 1 should not be 
surgeon general. 

“I can't base national policy and national thinking on 
the basis of my son." 

Kevin Elders, the younger of her two sons, has been 
released on 52^500 bond. A prefiminary hearing, which 
Dr. Elders said she and her husband. Oliver, might 
attend, is scheduled far Feb. 22 in Little Rock. 

The news, family and friends said, was devastating to 
Dr. Elders, a woman who had done virtually everything 
right’, she helped raise seven younger siblings: she was 
the first in her family to go ’to college; she became a 
pediatrician even though she had never seen one when 
she was growing up. and now she is the nation's fust 
black surgeon general. 

A workabofic like the president. Dr. Elders, at her 


desk in ter gold-braided uniform early each morning, 
was one cf ifee few- cop administration officials in town 
Iasi week, when offices not closed for the holidays were 
shut for the snow. 

She made no excuses for her son and said she and her 
husband, a retiree high school basketball coach, had 
raised their children the best way they knew how. 

“I taught rav son to be the best human being 1 could,* 1 
Dr. Elders said. "If my son was totally away from all of 
This, he couldn’t have been set up. Anytime you have an 
informant selling undercover — if my son had not been 
anywhere around, that would not have happened.” 

Dr. Elders showed no bitterness or anger. She did not 
by blame. But her mother. Haller Jones, did. 

“I'm tired of those dang reporters." Mrs. Jones said. 


as temporary home to Tabernacle Methodist Church. 
“They kick my baby around so much. She’s a good kid. f 
just hope she stands up to it." 

Mrs. Jones recalled that her daughter told her a few 
days ago. “1 look like I’m in the middle of the ocean.” 

She said she told her daughter: “I don’t care how deep 
foai water gets, stand up to them. Don't let them kick 
you dowr..*' 

Friends and family members say they fear that conser- 
vatives wilf use Dr. Eiders' comment on drugs to detract 
from her crusade to fight violence and ieen-age pregnan- 


cv. 


standing outside her daughter’s former grade school 
cthw 


h» Hiding in Telia te in southwest Arkansas, now serving 


“We have to be able to understand the difference 
between family values and family problems.” said her 
brother, the Reverend Chester Jones, a Methodist minis- 
ter in Pine Bluff. “When you have a big family, there is 
always one person in crisis." 


iE V? 

:«vas i-n / 


U.S. Reported Set 



On Vietnam Trade 


i . 


By Thomas ’ Wj Lippman . 

Washington IPaft Service . 

WASHINGTON ■ — : President 
Bin Clinton's senior forei g n p oli cy 
ad visers are ckfee to agreement tin a 
recommendation rbat be end the 
UJ3. embargo. cm trade wjth.Vi^- 
flam, -accohShg- to senior officials 
and other sources^*- . ^ 
Particmanisjm ah$h-Jevd meet- 
ing just before-Christinas, held to 
assess the result* of Assistant Sec- 
retary of State Winston Lord's 
mid-December lost, to Vietnam, 
agreed that “there were some good . 
■ arguments for doing it," a senior 
administration affinal cw«f- 

. ButTjecaaxaf.lbe potiScaL^ai- ' 
sitivity of-tteissue^they deddod to . 
wait at least uriffl after the holidays 
and . “do a temperature-taking of 
people oa the president's team" te- . 
fore makin g aproposal to thepren- 
dent, ihe'afcaal srid: ' : “ * 

“It’s gmiig to happat," saridRep- 
resentative Gary %- Ackerman, 
New York Democrat and chairman 
of the House Ebreign Affiiis snbr ’ 
ccammttee on Asia and the Padfic: - 
“It’s just aquestiofn^tnmig.” '- - 

. He said the lade of public outcry 
against pievions-CSintQnudnaas- 
tration gestures toward Hanoi T 
showed to^L it was pojiticaty ac- 


ceptable to senm toe- em har g p , - 
probably earty tins yea 1 ; - - 
_ Mr. Iird returned frcmVktaam 
witii a favorable renon on Hanot’s 
increased cooperation in the effort 
to detemnnetoe fates cf more than 
2J200 OA servicemen stiBofljdaJ- 
ly nnacoonnted for from toe Viet- 
oam War. Thai is the only issne. 
prewauiiug afnll « Hwififa<i oii 

■ Preasnre Urged otfKIAs ; 
.. ; A aBg'«iry ^ Americans -vradd 
put off normal trade wiih. Vionam 
to jparcoopfcEKtfan in resrihing the 
cases df servicemen, ao- 

cordfcag to apolfpublisfapd by The 
Assocrated nets. 

The idet'of estabfbhns'oozzpaJ' 
(fipkanariC-Tdations wifo^fietnam 
appeals to many Americans. The 
ptJl foond .58- jpercent in- favor, 
pezasnt opposed and. Jf)- percent 
not sure. 

satisBod^^^toa^^d^dwto. 
ehongh loaaxmnt dm Ameri- 
can servi^emen stiH fete&«as miss- . 
mgjoararaiinSouti^mt Aaa. 

or ‘mcae 

cooperation before ^ablishing 
nmuialtiade-withVietoam,and40. 
pescettt : agree^wnb cs^jlirfring. 


. r-r 




NATO: ' 

East hton Hold 

V Cppriiaimf " 


normal -^ade now in the hope 

wftha randkaasarnpleof 
on Dec.8-12%y ICR 

pfos or 

.miiXtts Apwiwitage ppinjs^ , . 



POLITICAL NOTES 




Even His Friends Are Piling On 


HILTON’ HEAD ISLAND. South Carolina — 
That body down there at the bottom of the pile, 
covered by a randomly assorted mass of arms, legs 
and torsos, turned out to belong to the commander 
in chief. 

The Renaissance Weekend, where President Bill 
Clinton is spending his New Year's holiday, has 
been described as a rather “touchy-feely” affair. 
The most literal example — at least of the 
“touchy** pan — came during a football game oa 
the beach when some 30 players on both teams 
abandoned traditional strategies of offense and 
defense and instead joined in a giant pile-on atop 
the leader of the Free World. 

Mr. Clinton, hair tousled and clothes covered 
with sand, came up a minute later roaring with 
laughter. 

By reputation, these New Year's gatherings of 
semie of the nation's highest achievers and their 
families are about heavy policy and sober personal 
reflection. When it comes to Mr. Clinton, anyway, 
the image is a bit of a fraud. 

The president this weekend has come across far 
less as a dap thinker than as a guy goofing off — 
and thoroughly enjoying il 

There hare been three golf games, two runs on 
the beach and a New- Year’s Eve party that lasted 
until the early hours with siog-alongs of “Auld 
f-ang Syne” and Broadway show tunes. 

All presidents eventually become linked in the 
public mind with a distinctive style of vacationing. 
There were Richard Nixon's solitary walks on the 
tyarh and Ronald Reagan’s w-ood-ohopping at a 
Calif ornia ranch. 

Mr. Clinton's preference — as revealed here and 
on his trip to Martha's Vineyard last summer — is 
to surround himself with friends,- in the style of a 
college reunion. (WP) 


mem by President Clinton wjib a failed Arkansas 
savings and loan and a rea -estate venture in the 
state. 

Federal authorities are looking into possible 
wrongdoing involving Madison Guaranty Savings 
& Loan, owned by a Clinton friend. James 


McDougaL and Whitewater Development Corp„ 
owned Jointly by Mr. McDougaJ. his 


then-wife, 

Susan, and Mr. Clinton and bis wife. Hillary Rod- 
ham Clinton, while he was governor of Arkansas. 

Questions include whether funds from the now- 
defunct thrift were diverted to Whitewater or to 
Mr. Clinton’s 1984 gubernatorial campaign. 

Appearing on the NBC News program “Meet 
the Press.” Senator Dole accused Ms. Reno of 
“dragging her feet” on the appointment of an 
independent counsel and said. “It’s high time that 
she did what she knows she should do.” 

He said he thought Madison Guaranty and 
Whitewater could be a “pretty serious issue” for 
Mr. Clinton, but added that he believed the presi- 
dent would be cleared or any wrongdoing. 

Senator Dole, angry at a lengthy inquiry into the 
Iran-contra affair during the Reagan administra- 
tion, has led a Republican effort on Capitol Hill to 
block reinstatement of the post-Watergate law 
providing for court appointment of independent 
counsel to investigate wrongdoing by high-level 
government officials. 

Without the law, Senator Dole said Sunday, Ms. 
Reno could use her own authority as attorney 
general to appoint an outside counsel to handle the 
case, which is currently being investigated by ca- 
reer government employees. f WP) 


Quote/ Unquote 


Republicans Seek Action on S&L 


Ids Km/llcsai 


Mr. Omfnn imvqiig a pa« in a big way during a football game on tbc beach in Sooth Carofina. 


WASHINGTON — Senator Bob Dole of Kan- 
sas. the Republican leader, and the House Repub- 
lican whip. Newt Gingrich of Georgia, urged At- 
torney Genera] Janet Reno on Sunday to appoint 
an independent counsel to investigate any involve^ 


President Clinton in his weekly radio address: ”1 
am grateful that our economy is coming batik to 
life; that optimism and direction are back; the 
deficit is down; interest rates and inflation are 
down; investments and consumer confidence are 
up. We have more trade opportunities with 
NAFTA and with the GATT world trade agree- 
ment. But our nation is about more than econom- 
ics. It's also about our sense of community, the 
obligations we have to each other. For too long 
we Ye been coming apart instead of coming togeth- 
er. In 1993 we began to reverse that, and I’m 
grateful.” (AP) 




- -r~ . .. 

.-i 



wBI tdloW’totinrtb - - - — 

selves woih. 

feririg formal membership ,'ar 

jkfvv rCAj i ■>> A/e£y&i; T&kr'&ma! J : 

^Reflecting- tte -ddipmant ^ - who led IBM 

within the admutistratiOT, a sfimor ^nd America mtdihe triffiofry agejirompl- 
offidaLdescribed the approach as a n^V^fnnn r* p Mmftc great- 

"prudent and ev olutionary” . way to ever#5e3," tfied Friday at 

update NATO 1 wjthput- a la rm in g Connecticut He 

the Russians and inviting atfivisive Tmd’sqHered a stroke Tn hmh. . 

debate over a^ipg tiiHnbers. . , A I&kmg Danocral^ who was unusmally 


plat 

■NA : 


it .as a eawrii 

ilati tiiafputs dff toe! question of ' 

TO expansion. . .. . cpain- 

“Tt is tl^foborftidatiicm of our 
hqjtis for Ce^raL;Bpogieaa de- 
moaw,^toH«demoaacy bfeasi- 
bleanatikdy, 


for a bariness 
/atscm'embaiked^ma brief 
serripe -after he. retired as 
i of toe-Intemi^iml Busness Ma- 
;inT97L-7 > 


He baarmean tedeuf advocate for nudear 

arins^redteiiaB and Served'as toe US. am- 
bdjnadOrao Moscow in toe Carter adnanis- ■ 



;bast- 
lambassa- 

_Jn hisi)acHio,;MriTaI&ptt arQted ± ddic to«toeSowet Ifofon dtoing a^very diffi- 
- that if NATO was' opened, . same-^ jundS,' fed a marveums ipmf 5»d 
East European -natikm^ fike-Pe- . CyfosTL Vaoce, score tatf'of state during the 
t .fond, tfae<hiah«i¥a%i^.Hni^ : rG^»4i»pistrat»ou.and 1 a former board 

gaiy^ would- beyad^tod . apooj.'memi^of'ffi* 4 ■ 

aince tl«y , haw gaoe-4he furthest of, 


, toward wrn y in g ofitdomDCTaUC ro- 
fenns. But Sussiai and ttorame, 
whose - efforts are Jes*: advanced, 

. would be left outside far years. .. 

wbtild CTOcmr- 


This.Tiei 


. , adtoois and 

wealth, ' Mr. Watson was -an indiffereot stu- 
da«, wto onoe amtesod that he spent bis 
years ar.Jtoiwii, Unxyotiiy mosdy Tlying 
mrplkcues -and foqBng nfound,” though he 
was gradnated in J937. it was in bo»- 
aft», esxxaaBv -after afro-year stintxo the 


age Russian feam toat NATO -was. . Army^ArTlpips in Worid War H. that Mr. 


tabolaring machinejy. His father died- in 
1956: 

Under toe younger Watson, IBM became 
one of the world's biggest corporations and 
business legends. When Mr. Watson retired 
in 1971, and for nearly two decades after- 
ward, IBM was regarded woridwide as & 
symbol of management excellence and tech- 
nological prowess. IBM’s recent troubles — 
financial losses and huge layoffs, uansed by 
thfi danKn/ * oLtofi big mainfr ame computers 
that were toe company’s traditional strength 
—were a source of deep regret to Mr. Wat- 
soo,. tooqglrhe.no longer sat on the IBM 
boanfi 

“They hired my father to makeago of this 
company in 1914, the year I was bun.? Mr. 
Watson said in 1992. “To some degree I’ve 
been a part cf CBM eversmefc Whoa you see 
somethmg.you love have great diffi culties, 
you are very sad about iL”‘ 

Mr. Watson’sxeal business inright wasto 
recognize toe profound diange that electron- 
ics would mean for calculating everything 
from census data Jo corporate balance sheets 
to market research. Eectropks — first as 
vacuum tubes, then as transistors, and later 
as integrated circuits — replaced the electro- 
mechanical business machmag that relied on 
electric motors, levers and punch cards. 

: Mr. Watson was a drives manager, rou- 
ting working 12 to 14 hours a day, traveling 


It worked well during IBM’s fast-growth 
days from toe 1950s to 1970s. But it became 
ossified after Mr. Watson left, and in-recent 


years the contention system has been blamed 
for bo 


bogging down decision-making in layers 
of corporate bureaucracy. 


Irving Paid (Swifty) Lazar, 86, 
‘Wheeler-Dealer’ Hollywood Agent 

New York Tima Service 

Irving Paul (Swifty) Lazar, 86, (he agent 
for spores ofloiaaiy and entertainment lumi- 
naries. who was variously described as a 
brilliant wbeder-dealex, a lone-wolf dynamo 
and a manic egotist, died Thursday at his 
home in Beveriy Hills, California, of kidney 
failure. 


Mr. Lazar dubbed himself toe “Prince of 
Pitch.” but his more familiar nickname was 
Swifty. It was given (o him by the actor 
Humphrey Bogart in the early 1950s after 
Mr. Lazar bet that he could clinch five sepa- 
rate deals for the film star before supper one 
day, and did. 


Cesar Romero, a Star of ‘Batman,’ 
At 86 After 60-Year Acting Career 

SANTA MONICA California (AP) — 
Cesar Romero, 86, whose acting career cm 
stage, in movies and television spanned near- 
ly six decades, died here Sunday. The cause 
of death was a blood dot after severe bron- 
chitis and pneumonia. 

The tall suave actor was often cast as a 
gigolo or toe “other man,” but be claimed to 
nave escaped the title of Latin Lover. “When 
I started in motion pictures in 1934, they said 
I was going to be the next Valentino,” he 
recalled in 1 984. “I was never a leading man, 
and very seldom did 1 do a picture where I 
got the grrL But I was saddled with toe label 
because I had a Latin name. My background 
is Cuban, but Tm from New York City. I’m a 

1 -arin f mm Manhattan. ” 

Mr. Romero made his biggest impact as 
toe evil pon-cratilring Joker m toe faddish 
“Batman” series of the 1960s. 


Mr. Lazar was known to have coaxed, 
blustered, coddled and even made threats in 
the coarse of winning record fees for his 
cheats' books, plays, movie and television 
scripts and performances. Seemingly tireless, 
he was known for his elegant, custom-made 
wardrobe, his oversize eyeglasses and toe 
fact that be repeatedly punctuated interviews 


Rita KEmont, 62, a former dissident who 
served as Czechoslovakia's first ambassador 
to toe United States after the ouster of the 
Communist government, died Thursday in a 
Prague hospital. She had recently undergone 
treatment for leukemia. 



Dtsan Safari CagbyangjL 85. a former for- 
eign minister of Turkey in the 1960s and *70s, 
toed in Ankara on Thursday, the Anatolian 
News Agency said. 


- ukramefogranpitenuciearmms. 


“The argument was that y the 
worst thing to do wcbld beto draw 
a new fine dapss Europe which 
would exclude Rnssta frcsn toe^se- 
curity ccatiimmitjr,”-'said;a sarior 
State Department official " 


‘.joined 
Thomas- J, Watson 


Tabulating Recoding Co. Under hurfatoer, 
■wbo renamed it company became a' 

- xriediumtozed concent making ptmdt-card- 


flmong IBM managers, known as the conten- 
tion system. Under h, almost anyone was 
allowed to challenge toe decisions of other 
maia^ra and force them to explain their 
reasoning. ' 


Noel Coward, Ira 
Gershwin. Moss Hart Lillian Heflman, Er- 
nest Hemingway, John Huston, Alan Jay 
Loner, Frederick Loewe, Richard Nixon, 
Cole Porter, Richard Rodgers and Herman 
WouL 


Ptare-Paul Schweitzer, 81, director of the 
International Monetary Fund from 1963 to 
1973, died Sunday. Mr. Schweitzer was ap- 
pointed France's Finance Inspector in 1936. 
then held senior posts in toe Finance Minis- 
try &nd Bank of France before joining the 
IMF. He lived in Paris and Switzerland. 


' • On Oct 38, tteMk^y^s^ , CorOinuing Abus^ U.S. Ambassador Reports Progress on Human Rights 

~ topsides foreview, botoarfes^the :T Vf " " - .’ hadtoBilmefeits approach to Ott-- and' many argue that a amfronta- practice of Unking of China’s trad- rejected in awfllingness^M^e 


— ' li aiaftor n m onjn^ 'S^Chma 

ja^oments, and to JTOJW should not be Ignored. ’ 

.bow Cosgre^ v»«f SATO - Qana jKwtra&Swto the Umt- 

expanaon, .Mr. Chpstpphff aided ^ a* 

with Mn Talbott’s appKW^^l^ Mjjipgt f avore d riaSoo? statns, 
their view 1 foeans-toai toejqpor® face 

level meeting thai day. lowest' trade barritts m force 

■ On OCIT CJfflsfophw and whoi they' enterithe Umted States. 


ria between tbosewho call for pum-- tional ap pr o ach does not work. mg status to hs human rights re- 

tive. action : over righfs vintari ons ~ in his remarks, Mr. Roy look cord, calling toe linkage abnormal 
and' those who argue that China care to reserve for the White House “At toe core of our approach,” 
nnurf be accommodated because of - a full range of policy options 

“ ' ‘ " io make 


Mr. Asian "Dew ro Europe to exv 
plain foe new pdfoyj:_^' 

Tosoofoerl 


Thr <3to«ot; atamBStt^K^.has 


its inqiCDrtocpe as arrowing market 
In a dditio n , the administration 
has tried to engage China in trying 
fo persnaSe Noth Kmea to' aban- 
torn its nudtear weapons program,. 


further 


should Oiina fail to 
pr o gr ess in famwiii rights. 

. But be was far more coplidl than 
iris superiors have been in showing 
, a' preference for abandoning the 


t 

• » 
i 


icgs an 
with ' 

military . _ _ 

exercises; Prosident 


'CHnlon 


OS of Pttod,; Hungary, ihc QeJ 


RQwWfo and Spyaha 




gang to Moscow,: ••■■■■-«•• 

But some East Etm^effli na- ■ 
larly Poland, are 
lyfimsW 

kiof] 



^i^fo'KATO^Berdup 
!£ss St more dearly mapped 


N 

..i-.-j 


.jaggai sss- 

(^ediosrafa said.- 1, 


Away FromPolltics 


• FederaTrfficidsareyo|K>sing to place the coito-. 
- - stations -on -foe Pacific 


thepreose 
known! 
West 


; Ocean fWor toconvey 

- ntowmient of wsnnc sea waves, 
aslidafr wayeithal pfinoffiqaI5' 

. rp (Kft. FgPT^thg rihmrm l nanmis womu oc 

- ^mainland i&ca' bf’ the: Alratian Kands and 
tlnee off the npitowe^ aadmeatal Unhed States. 


^Ab-yefroWb^wwAotaodeafoby a 

dd friend i?Weph?pngff DranxaidBar, 


■barbaric Nan figures of the HdocausL But it 
ponethdess accused !um of befog a loser war 
■ criminal and of lyinz dn his immig ration papers, 
and it has moved tonave tern stripped of his U.S. 
dtizenshfo and deported from the United Slates. 
•Airrigtter carrying saw of 36 has been lost in 
a storm m the Norm Atlantic, 930 miles (1^00 
kflomefes) east of NewfoondUnd. Rescue offi- 
cials said thqrweresofar unable to find a trace <d 

the Ship. 


bovsweretikryingin the •Ten monfoff; after the I nSaa Point 3 endear 


^ ^er a^nffirass and'ford it, ^ttmg foe 6- 

Ytar^mtofihea^.toepdfcestid.'Kcy «id foe 

tod not reafize foai the-. Jo- 
weapon. 

• TTitJiij^LLtVpnijiiM uUTn ihimdnBrt its am- 
lention wg&oocof toemoa 


,35 zmles'(57 Ititomaeisj'nOTth of New Yoik 
V, was Shot down because Of wiwnaTTaggment 
['.safety problems, federal regulators have told 

plant man^ws they are amcemed that personnd 
there cansoLhantoe foe plantsafdj even^ when it is 
shut down. -The-Tegnlaiors said the state-owned 
plant posed.a risk, to its own personnel and ip the 
environment around it. ' ’ ap.nyt.lat 


Mr. Roy said, “is not the idea that 
we can somehow get beyond the 
human rights factor in our relation- 
ship with China.” 

“Rather, it is a question of what 
is the most effective way" to press 
human rights concerns, he said, 
while conducting n ormal diploma- 
cy cm crucial Asian security issues. 

“If you look at the 150 years of 
modem China's histoiy since toe 
Opium Wars, then you can't avoid 
the conclusion that the last 15 years 
are the best 15 years in China’s 
modem history, Mr. Roy said. 


"And of those 15 years, toe last two 
years are toe test in terms of pros- 
perity, individual choice, access to 
outside sources of information, 
freedom of movement within toe 
country and stable domestic condi- 
tions,” 

Mr. Roy was referring to social 
and economic forces that have ef- 


express 

individual views, an information 
revolution wrought by satellite tele- 
vision and fax machines and a new 
government “tolerance” for many 
forms of criticism. He also cited foe 
beginnings of a legal foundation 
that miipiL bdp citizens seek re- 
dress and compensation for abuses. 

Mr. Roy made dear that in his 
view, the most effective way w to- 
solve disputes with China was 
through toe stepped-up diplomatic 
dia log** that began last fall after a 
review of China ptoicy at foe White 
House and toe State Department 

If Secretary of State Warren M. 
Otristopher “were to recommend 
next May that we should extend” 
China’s trading privileges “without 
ren ditio ns, foal would not remove 
human rights Fran our foreign pol- 
icy agenda with China,” Mr. Roy 
said. 

“We would expect to still contin- 
ue an active human rights dialogue 
with toe atinese.” be said, “and we 
would continue to expect to see 
significant progress on buman- 
“ L ~ issues/* 


fectivdy curtailed party control _ 
ow where people live, work and go rights 

to school and whether they can be He said China's top leaders had 
admitted to universities or get mar- ^fcen Mr. Clinton seriously when 
Tied. he had warned that China’s favor- 

He argued that a new “diversity" able trade access to America would 
had root in Chinese society, be oo the line in 1994. 


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1 


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I|inwn».» **»*■ 


Page 4 


MONDAY. JANUARY 3, 1994 .. 

© P I N I © N 


Hrralb 


{INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Europe’s Job in 1994 


For the European Community, 1994 
should be the year when it starts to get its 
economic house in order.' That 
araoog other things, two bard decisions 
about the way most of the member coun- 
tries treat people at work and people with- 
out work. Since those decisions seem to 
point in different directions, Europe needs 
to understand why they are in fact both 
parts of the same thing. 

The first aim is to begin getting Europe 
back into shape to compete with the econo- 
mies of Japan and America — and tomor- 
row. maybe, with China’s. It is necessary to 
cut the practices that help to make Europe’s 
products more expensive than theirs. 

Too much of the European economy is 
still inefficiently run by the stale. Too many 
cosy social welfare cushions prop up Eu- 
rope's workers, whoever employs them. The 
cushioned economy, perfected in Germany, 
has been copied by too many of Germany’s 
neighbors. These things are comfortable, 
but comfort tends to bring a paunch, and 
paunchy Europe is trailing behind its com- 
petitors in the economic race. If Europe’s 
politicians have the honesty to explain this, 
Europe’s people will see why they need to 
cut their waistline. 

The practices of Social Europe, which 
ease today’s working life, are inexorably 
bringing pain tomorrow. Higher costs mean 
mare expensive products, and more expen- 
sive products mean fewer sales. Fewer sales 
will mean fewer jobs, and longer lines of 
unemployed, at every stage of the economic 
cycle. When the workers of 1994 realize that 
they are buying present comfort at the price 
of future discomfort — and condemning 
their children, perhaps, to be laborers In a 


third-grade economy — they will start to 
make Europe more efficient 

The second task facing Europe in 1994 is 
to be more urgent about the needs of those 
who are already unemployed — but to be 
urgent in the right non-self-destructive way. 

The Community’s jobless rate has reached 
1 1 percent nearly twice America's -figure 
and four times Japan's. A shockingly higher 
proportion of Europe’s total consists of peo- 
ple who have been out of work for a long 
time. It is necessary to do something about 
this, not just in the name of compassion — 
although that is where it starts — but also for 
the sake of a peaceful Europe. Long-term 
unemployment is one cause of the growing 
social disorder of the 1990s. 

The problem must be tackled, however, in 
ways that do not make the Community even 
more of an economic laggard. Caring for the 
unemployed means spending money — mon- 
ey to give ihejobless a living, to train some of 
them for new sorts of work, perhaps to create 
temporary jobs like those that helped Frank- 
lin Roosevelt’s America through the early 
1930s. But this expenditure most not grow 
too large, or it will block the economic recov- 
ery that will in the end be the best provider of 
jobs. The unemployed must be helped, so 
long as they are genuinely looking for work. 
If they are not, they cannot be supported at a 
cost which hurts all Europe. 

Both parts of this 1994 agenda rest on the 
same proposition. The European welfare state 
has grown too indiscriminate. Those who 
need care, for whatever reason, should get it; 
those who can look after themselves should 
noL Europe can go on bong generous if it 
aims its generosity with more precision. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Forget the Great Game 


Vla dimir Zhirinovsky may prove to be an 
evanescent blowhard, but the shudder pro- 
voked by his unexpectedly strong showing in 
Russia's parliamentary vote is justified. He 
wants to restore the vast empire built by the 
czars, a Great Russia stretching from Finland 
to Alaska, and even talks of going to the 
Dardanelles and the Indian Ocean, the pre- 
destined borders of a Fourth Rome. Recent 
history amply warns against dismissing such 
talk as the ravings of a buffoon. Mr. Zhiri- 
novsky’s rhetorical vodka may be raw, and 
home-brewed, but it fills a very old bottle. He 
is restating the expansionist goals that drove 
czarist foreign policy, and in doing so he 
touches deep chords of nostalgia. 

From the time of Peter the Great until 1914, 
Russia’s inexorable expansion was a source of 
anxious wonder to the rest of the world. In 
those years the czar’s empire spread at a rate 
of 140 square kilometers a day, or about 
50,000 square kilometers a year. In the 19th 
century alone it expanded by a third; czarist 
conquests in Aria brought the Russian e mpir e 
from a few thousand to a few hundred kilo- 
meters from British India. 

What had begun as a military measure to 
contain Central Asia’s Mongol warriors 
evolved into a sacred mandate to elevate sup- 
posedly primitive peoples, provide land for 
Russian peasants and paint the map with 
imperial colors, just as rival Europeans were 
doing. But energies and rubles that might 
have been invested in Russia vanished into 
desolate terrain inhabited by hostile peoples. 
And as czarist armies raced toward India, the 
alarms sounded in Victorian E n gland. 

The result was a protracted secret struggle 
for mastery of Central Asia known as the 
“Great Game," amply chronicled in a recent 
book by Peter Hopkirk. The phrase was made 
famous by Rudyard Kipling in his novel 
“Kim.” but was devised far earlier by Captain 
Arthur Conolly, a British operative who was 
beheaded as a spy in IS42 by the emir of 
Bokhara. The Game acquired a romantic 


aura, especially in the fluent nrarings of Lord 
Cmzon, who at 38 became viceroy of India in 
1898. Its incidents, be wrote, “and what I 
might describe as its incomparable drama are 
ibe possession of a few silent men who may be 
found in the dubs of London, or Paris, or 
Bolin, when they are not engaged in tracing 
Hues upon the unkn own corners of the earth.” 

Cmzon seized on every Russian word or 
deed that stoned to confirm Ms belief that 
Russia had designs on buffer states like Af- 
ghanistan, where Britain fought two wars, or 
Tibet, which British forces penetrated in 1904 
at the viceroy’s impetus. 

The Game was & prologue to the Cold 
War. enacted on a huge canvas and propelled 
by many of Lhe same fears of duplicity and 
encirclement. On both sides, hawks in- 
veighed against doves and pressed for a “for- 
ward strategy" involving armed forays into 
disputed terrain. Yel in the end, expansion 
did not save czarism, and Russianizing colo- 
nialism, which Stalin continued in the guise 
of a new ideology, inspired a counter-nation- 
alism among captive peoples that helped 
dissolve the Soviet Union. 

All the old empires have vanished, as have 
the silent men who drew lines on maps. One 
bitter legacy has been the obsessive suspicion 
among peoples viewed as pawns in the Great 
Game. To this day, Iranians look bade angrily 
at the 1907 partition of their country into 
British and Russian spheres of influence, a 
diplomatic feat in which Iran had no say. For 
the Russians, the Game had its tragic epilogue 
in the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. 

Today’s Russian nationalists may dwell 
on the glamour of conquest and splashes of 
color on the map. By any sober accounting, 
however, the average Russian benefited little 
from imperial vainglory, or the czar might 
still be on his throne. Nonetheless, it would 
be foolish lo underestimate the political al- 
lure of fantasy if Russia's democrats also 
succumb to its temptations. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Vatican and Israel 


Approval of an accord that is to lead to full 
diplomatic relations between Israel and the 
Vatican is a notable step forward for the two 
entities and for the different sorts of religious 
communities for which they speak. Vatican 
recognition of Israel — Israel's readiness to 
recognize the Vatican was never in doubt — 
should have taken place years if not decades 
ago. That Pope John Paul II is making the 
move now will comfort Israelis and many 
non- Israeli Jews, among others. It will also 
broaden the Pope’s capacity to care for church 
interests in Jerusalem and to contribute to 
making peace in the Middle East. 

As early as 1904, Theodor Herd, founder of 
modem Zionism, explained his interest in a 
Jewish slate in Rome. But Pius X opposed 
Jews' return, as Zionists put it, to the Holy 
Land on grounds that “Jews have not recog- 
nized our Lord." Subsequently the condition- 
ing of recognition on conversion yielded to 
the more presentable position — but one that 
the Vatican applied lo no other suife-tom 
place — that recognition should hinge on 
achievement of peace. A “humanitarian'' con- 
cern for Jewish welfare, yes. Political recogni- 
tion, no. Meanwhile the Vatican was moving 


closer to the PLO, a development that at that 
time revived many Israelis' fears that the 
church had not yet fully recovered from its 
historical anti-Semitism. 

The Vatican ice began to break only after 
the American-sponsored Middle East peace 
negotiations got under way in Madrid in the 
fall of 1991. Israelis were able to argue that 
the world was moving on and that it was time 
for the Vatican to end its formal ostracism of 
Israel — a posture that had lent a certain 
unfortunate color of acceptability to others 
with a directly hostile intent At first Pope 
John Paul kept his counsel, but now. follow- 
ing in the steps of Yasser Arafat, he is bring- 
ing the Vatican around. 

The Vatican can now reasonably expect a 
more sympathetic Israeli hearing for its con- 
cerns in Jerusalem. The church will also now 
be able to participate in the working groups of 
the peace talks dealing with refugees, econom- 
ic cooperation and the like. Further, recogni- 
tion will remove the principal roadblock to 
progress in dialogue between American Cath- 
olics and Jews. John Paul is to be commended 
for ihis major policy turn. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



International Herald Tribune 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. .ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chaimm 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher it Chief Eiecumr 
JOHN VINOCUR. Exmant Eibr &. VkePmtdeni 

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•RENEBONDY./Ayttift PuHnE-i • JU,\NITA I. G\SPARL Iraejwtkm! Ad\rnaing Director 
• ROBERT FARRE. Gmrbinn Directi O', £unyr 
DinxiruTd ;■ lj PubBaiav: : Ridxi ni D. Simmm 


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• . • 


Survives 
In Bosnia 

: By. Anthony Lewis 

B OSTON —The year 1993 left at 
least one mark on modern histo- 
ry, tht principle of the edmo-reli- 
grousstatewas established in Europe. 
That is what Bosnia means. The inhu- 
manity plucks at us — the daily toll 
of sfaeDs and cold and hunger. But 
what really matteris is the principle. 

Ihe Setts set out to “cleanse’’ ter- 
ritory thattbey claimed in Bosnia by 
the murder and expulsion of non- 
Serbs. They succeeded. And Western 
leaders have acquiesced in the result. 
Indeed, ihey want the government of 
Bosnia to accept the division of the 
'country along ethno-religious hues. 

It is really religion that identifies 
the Serbs; Croats and Muslims of 
former Yugoslavia: Eastern Ortho- 
dox, Roman Catholic and Muslim. 
They are all of die same South Slav 
stock and speak the same language, 
Serbo-Croatian. But to religion have 
been added nationalist emotions. 


Time for Clinton to Tell Europe Where It Stands 


W ASHINGTON — A year into his adminis- 
tration Bill Clinton visits Europe this month 
for the first time. He has made Europe wait, and he 


clues to this mystery: Has he thrown the Europe- 
ans off balance on purpose, to advance a still 
undisclosed H«rign of American leadership — in 
which case he is to be commended — or has be 
created a damaging deficit of confidence across the 
Atlantic through aeddem and inattention? 

A gentleman never insults anyone unintention- 
ally, Oscar Wilde said. And a POTUS (White 
House acronym for President of the United States) 
should not make allies nervous and create doubts 

abOOt f undamen tal T rintjonahipK wwtew anmahVng 

important is to be gained by (long so. 

The president and his secretary of state, Warren 


By Jim HoagUnd 

pose, this trip is the time to mah* that dear, in (me 
sense that would reassure officials and diplomats in 
London, Paris, Bonn and Brussels who have misgiv- 
ines about the lack of dear priorities and definition 


d uring the past year, cm phaOTing their ' sense of 
European decline and weakness. Mr. Ghrian pher 
especially has made dear his lack of confidence, and 
perhaps even his lack of interest in Europe, while 
constantly stressing the growing importance of Aria. 

Those comments may have been useful while 
America was negotiating with the European Com- 
munity on the trade rales covered by GATT and 
while America was trying (unsuccessfully) to get 
Europe to intervene militarily on the side of the 
Bosnian Muslims in ex-Yugoslavia. But with the 
trade negotiations concluded and Bosnia not now 
a subject of division, the journey Mr. Clinton 
embarks on next week marks a turning point. 

If there is a coherent Asia-first Clinton strategy 
that includes belittling the Europeans for good pur- 


deutly realistic about their dace in the wodd. to 
take a dear new American direction in stride and 
adjust to it -s-iUhey can see what it is. 

Mr. Clinton's predecessors used NATO as tire 

p rimar y InKtT wmant nf American Irtidundhip m Rn- 

ropcan political and economic affairs, when he 
attends the NATO summit in Brassds on Jan. 10, 
he should demonstrate how he intends to continue 
that tradition of Leadership beyond the Cold War 
— or sketch his al ternativ e of leaacned American 
responsibilities and authority in Europe. 

Remaining silent or vague on this essential point 
at the summit would set European doubts about 
Mr. Oin ton’s decisiveness and vision in concrete. 

He travels an to Prague, Moscow and Minsk 
from Brassds. So the American president at the 
summit wfli have to bring the European members 
of NATO more fully into his plans for handling the 
.multiple crises of the former Soviet Union. It 
remains unclear how, or even if, be sees America 
'and Europe working together to help entrench 
democracy and capitalism in Russia and Ukraine. 

Mr. Clinton, who hosted a Pacific summit in 
November and visited Japan in July for the Grasp 
of Seven summit, disclaims any mischievous intent 
or ulterior motive in waiting this long to visit 
Europe and hi ghligh t the trans-Atlantic relation- 


ship. He and Mr Christopher deny that they are 
lessening US. attention to Europe while thicken- 
mgAinmca’s relations with Aria. 

: They rituafisticaBy point out that the president 
wiD be visiting Europe on four occasions this year: 
for the NATO summit, the 50th anniversary of the 
landings in France in June, the Group of Sevan 
summ i t jn Italy In July «n A a ce remonial summit 
meeting of the Conference an Security and Coop- 


eration in Europe in Hm 
But that response is in 
timf pingnp a rotations! 
wnmmgthe Cold War. 1 
fixed by ceremonial visits 


ty in the *mmwri 
alive of die problems 
that 'was central to 
y are not likdy to be 
i memorable speeches 


ma. was a model of a multinational 
state. Sarajevo; the capital was a oos- 

tie’of^dr^igibus differences and 
many families were inuamamed. 

Sarajevo showed ; that different 
people could five together in peace, 
and that very fact no doubt made it a 
particular Sesbian target. Slobodan 
Milosevic and the other fascists who 
lead the Serbs today were, and are; 
determined to destroy that symbol 

UN mflitary commandos often 
say that Serbian shewing of Sarajevo 
has no nrihtaiy usefulness. But that 
ignores tire symbolic point. 

And so the shelling has continued 
over what was to Se a Christmas 
trace; in fact it has been at its most 
intense in two months. The Serbs hit 


A world that now 


tynieoBy disregards duir 

missing is the day-to-day sense of trust and clear fate wiUhonOT them, 
private odmmumcatioosThftt gindgd the Atlantic _ 

T riafimmhtp through far pwre diffionl t ritneg. 7 " 

' One tdring.exanq>le amang btbeni: When Mr. B dectric pylon on Dec. 20, 
Clinton decided to pull American troops out of rrf pntwip Sarajevo’s power supply. 
So mal ia by March 31, key Gennau -officials, who Urey switched off another lin«» 1 one 
had expended large amounts of political capital to t yy mntm l Ap Ch ristmas nay 
get Gentian troops to Somalia, learned of the Sertrian leaders have tried to justify 

decision from radio broadcasts. . their mflitaiy in Bosnia and 

Mr. Clinton’s trip is not a time for fine-timing Croatia as designed merely to protect 

such communication problems. They will sort Serbs there from hostile governments. 
. themsdwes out if he unveils his vision of America's But in the recent Serbian electioceer- 

idfc in Europe and Europe's destiny in the Clinton ing Mr. NScsevic and his colleagues 
era. lf there is not a vision to be nnvoled, that will sad openly that the pmpree was what 

became apparent on this European journey. It evoyone else has said all along: to 
would then be important for Mr. Clinton to make incorporate conquered territories in a 

the trip afencemiaufiiig effort to dearm why he Greater Serbia. “We are coming to 
and Mr. Christopher have been insulting the Euro- the end of our triumphant march.” 
peans in the worst possible way: unintentionally. the foreign minister, Vladislav Jovan- 
The Washington Post. ovic. said at a campaign rally. 

; 4jAmT . 1 In a Europefuledwith volatile 
1 ’ •' mixtures of peoples, the precedent of 


Engagement in Europe, Partne 


P ARIS — With the popular vote 
far a new constitution, Rnsaa has 
become a democracy for the first time 
in histtxy. This is very good news. Yet 
the relative success of new fascists and 
old Communists was disturbing. 

It is eariy to draw final condusans 
from the Dec. 12 results. What coali- 
tion will emerge? How will tire presi- 
dent use his new constitutional pow- 
ers? What is behind the fascist vote? 

But lire key question is: What can 
the West do to strengthen the demo- 
cratic camp in Russia and encourage 
those who, all over the country, have 
embarked an building a civil society? 

Some in the West will fed con- 
firmed in a deep belief Lbai Russia 
can never become a consolidated de- 
mocracy, and that it was vain from 
the outset to try to support Russian 
democrats. But others. Eke us, are 
convinced that this is tire time to 
support Russian democrats. 


By Timothy Garton Ash, Michael Mertes 
and Dominique Mo&i 


theories much like those which con- 
taminated the political atmosphere in 
defeated Germany after World War 
I. But Russia has not been defeated. 
The end of the Soviet Union was a 
triumph for tire universal values of 
human and civil rights, democracy 
and the rule of law. 


The election results have inientified 
die debate over induskxn in NATO of 
the East-Central European democra- 
cies. It has been argued that tire West 
should kero dear of such plans lest 
they provoke a bitter reaction in Rus- 
sia and weaken its democratic, pro- 
Western camp. Yet the uncertainties 
with regard to Russia’s future make 
the nervousness of its neighbors en- 
tirely understandable. In fact, it is 
Russian democrats themselves who 
warn us of those uncertainties. 

Could the inclusion of East-Central 
E urop e a n democracies be unsunder- 
stood as an exdnaon or even isolation 
of Russia? No, provided that such an 
inclusion were combined with a con- 
vincing effort toward a spedd security 
partnership with Russia. It is Russian 
democrats who say this most dearly. 

On Dec. 10, the 45th anniversary of 
the United Nations’ Univeraal Decla- 
ration of Human Rights, Foreign 
Minister Andrei Kozyrev -sffl that 
Russia aspired to partnership with 
NATO, not to NATO membershqj. 
He also said that it was the East- 
Central Europeans’ sovereign derision 


winch commun i ty, or alliance to join. 
Westem leaden should drop the old 
bad habit of novously wondering 
about how the “hawks" in Moscow 
might react, and tty to show more of 
tire darity and courage of those who 
represent democratic Rusaa. 

‘ Legitimate Russian interests do 
not extend to a right of veto over the 
security arrangements of former sat- 
ellites, nor indeed of the Baltic states 
or Ukraine. A democratic Russia will 
distinguish itself from the Commu- 
nist Soviet Union precisely try the 
recognition at tins truth. 

In addition, inclusion of East-Cen- 
tral Europe in NATO is in Russia’s 
enlightened self-interest A rein- 
forced affiance for stahffitv and de- 
mocracy in Europe would help tire 
democratic aid' peaceful forces in 
Russia. Russia needs stability on its 
western border just as the West needs 
it on its eastern borders. 

Before the Russian elections, it 
seemed dear that at NATO’s summit 
next week no former member of the 
Warsaw Pact, however democratic, 
however dose to the West, however 


reformed its military, however coop- 
erative its political leaden, would, for 
the tune being, get anything more 
than a “partnership for peace* There 
are encoaragm g signs llret NATO has 
begun to reconsider the issue. 

A partnership for peace should be 
proposed to Russia’s democrats, as 


Tricky Float 9 Forward and Backward 


H ONG KONG — China’s sur- 
prise decision to unify its ex- 
change rate and operate a con- 
trolled float of the yuan effective 
Jan. 1 is bang widely seen as a 
major step on the market reform 
road. That is true up to a point. But 
at least as important is Beging’s 
need to regain some central control 
over foreign currency earnings at a 
time when imports are rising fast 
and capital is leaving the country at 
least as fast as it is coming in. 

The new unified exchange rate, 
initially set at 8.7 yoan to tire dollar, 
replaces the old official rate of S.7 
and is in line with the swap center 


By Philip Bo wring 

allowed to keep all or part of their 
foreign exchange carmngs will be 
aide to carry on doing so. But dear- 
ly, other enterprises which want 
foreign exchange w£Q have to gp to 
the state banks and justify their 
requirements, rather than wring to 
one of the swap centers and simply 
buying at the going rate. 

To some extent therefore, the 
move is a retreat from liberalism, or 
at least from the decentralization 
that enabled those enterprises 
(mostly in tire southern and coastal 


rate that prevailed in the past few provinces which earn most of Qri- 
mooths. The swap centers were na’s foreign currency) to do vary 


where part (in practice, about tiuee- 
qwirters) of foretgnesrchangeearn- 
ings of Chinese enterprises could be 
exchanged at a freely floating rate 
and the proceeds use! as desired 
A single rale will help move Chi- 
na’s trade regime closer to what is 
needed if it is to be allowed to join 
GATT. And the new rate wifi force 
state enterprises and consumes of 
certain imported commodities that 
had been effectively subsidized by 
tire old official rate to adjust tbeir 
prices. Further, it win provide an 
additional export incentive for 
those whose earning s were artifi- 
cially held down by it 
However, the equally important 
ride of the story is that the swap 
centers wifi become redundant as 
the rate everywhere is determined 
daily on a central basis. 

It is not yet dear to what extent 
those enterprises which have been 


na’s foreign currency) to do very 
much what they liked with their 
earnings. In many cases, this has 
meant imports of luxury cars or 
purchase of apartments and offices 
m Hong Kong, as well as invest- 
ment in new enterprises. 

In other words, the new system is 
more like what prevailed before 
swap centers and retention of for- 


te do to kero tire float from becom- 
ing a rout if confidence cradcs. 

However, if the state banks can 
regain a grip on export earnings, 
drey shotudbe able to slow capital 
outflow, which is mainly a function 
of provindal-Ievd enterprises and 
the private companies that now 
flourish in parafld with them. 

. The banka will be able to stem tire 
import flow by Ibe simple adminis- 
trative expedient of bolding up for- 
eign exchange allocation. As with 
trade poCcy, Kberafeatioa in (me 

ly offset by new controls haoirera!' 

The currency moves can be seen 
as part of a necessary effort of tire 
central government, to get much bet- 
ter control over the monetary and - 
banking system, and eventually, too, 
over taxation. Itmakesalotof sense./ 
But it will, despite some short-term 
benefits for .some foreign investors, 
rein in the autonomy of the fast 
growing coastal provinces. 

The measures underline the con- 
flicting forces at wude on economic 


them. As for the East-Central Euro- 
pean states, substantially more 
should be offered to them, in the 
form of a contract with NATO — an 
explicit ‘’engagement’’ meaning that 
a proper marriage lies ahead. 

This engagement could proceed 
through three steps. In the first one, 
East-Central European countries 
would participate in the political con- 
sitltatiaa mechanisms as well as in the 
parliamentary assembly of NATO. In 
a second step, their forces would par- 
ticipate in- NATO peacekeeping and 
peacemaking operations, under the 
aegis of the United Nations and the 
Conference an Security and Cooper- 
ation in Europe. In a third and final 
step, they would enter the full mutual 
seaxrity guarantee contained in Arti- 
cle 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty. 

Many Russian democrats under- 

and democracy m*East-Gentral E^ 
rope is in their interest This wifi be 
atf the better mxkratood if acoonq»- 
nied by a dearer commitment from 
the West to support Russian demo- 
crats. Nothing would be more dan- 
gerous tor the West than a combina- 
tion of pessimism and passivity. 

Timothy Garten Ash is author mast 
recertify of M In Europe's Name: Ger- 
many and die. Divided Continent. 1 ' Mi- 
chael Mertes is a senior policy adviser 
to Chancellor Helmut Kohl writing 
here in apersarud capacity. Dominique 
MoXsi is deputy director of the Insdtut 
Francois aes Relations Internation- 
ales. The? contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


what has been done in Bosnia is ex- 
tremely dangerous, (hie might have 
expected the leading European coun- 
tries and the United States to resist 
theproporition that a stale can define 
itself in religious, ethnic or racial 
terms, seize territory and dear it by 
force of inhabitants who do not meet 
the definition. But appeasement has 
been in the saddle. 

At the beginning it would have 
been easy for the West to slop the 
Serbian aggressors. Even now, a cred- 
ible threat of Western military action 
would almost certainly lead the Serbs 
to stop their bombardment of Saraje- 
vo and their blocking of relief sup- 
plies. Hu Financial Times sad re- 
cently in London; The West has 
ample nriEtary power to defeat the 
aggressors ... Yet NATO, which 
back in August threatened air strikes 
on Serbian positions if the ‘strangula- 
tion’ of Sarajevo coo tu rn ed, seems fur- 
ther than ever from taking any action. 
Instead, the British and French gov- 
ernments have been adding to the 
pressure on the Musffins by hinting 
that they may withdraw their troops in 
the spring if no agreement is reached.” 

Britain and France want the Mus- 
lim-led government of Bosnia to ac- 
cept a peace plan that would give it 
about a third of Bosnia's territory. 


about a third of Bosnia's territory, 
broken into fragmoots and dependent 
on the goodwill of Sabs ana Croats 
for survival The Serbs are demanding 
that Sarajevo itself be divided, too, 
thus finally destroying the symbol 

The U.S. government, like Pontius 
Pilate, is doing its best to wash its 
hands of the Bosnian tragedy. Presi- 
dent Bifi Clinton's policy is evidently 
to do and say nothing on the subject, 
Jn the hope that Americans wifi for- 
get about h. But the consequences of 
Bosnia will not go away. 

The people of Sarajevo and the oth- 
er Bosnian enclaves arc holding out 
somehow, trying to keep alive their 
dream of a country without hate. 
Someday a world that now cynically 
disregards their fate will honor them. 

The New York Tunes. 


US OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


agn exchange warning s were per- policy. On the one hand is die push 
anted, ft remains tote seen how for coherent policies, based on the 


well the authorities can make it 
work without a resurgence of the 
black market. 

It will not be easy for the authori- 
ties to maintain a reasonably steady 
floating rate. Inflation and low real 
load interest rates have created ns- 
certainty about the yuan’s future. 
The official devaluation will add to 
inflationary pressures. Foreign ex- 
change reserves are substantial but 
have^ been eroding so there are hosts 
to what the authorities will be able 


market bat subject to central disci- 
pline. On the other is the “growth is 
good" doganeeringwbidi is popular 
in the proclaims south but ignores 
inflation and could tan reform into 
anarchy. Ufa has already spawned a 
panicky selective reimposilioa of. 
commodity price controls. 

All this is intimately bound up 
with the politics of saccesskm. The 
outcome is as unpredictable as 
where the float will take the yuan. 

International Herald Tribune. 


1894: Attempt on Czar 

VIENNA — The Cracow newspa- 
pers, published in Polish, comain ac- 
■ counts of an abortive attempt to poi- 
son the Czar, ofl die occasion of a 
dinner in honor of the Knights of Sl 
G eorge a week ago. .Among the 
courses was one of fish, and os only 
half was consumed, the Czar ordered 
.the remainder to be taken, to 160 
orphans of the Sl Nicholas Asylum. 
The children, as well as the Emperor 
and some of the guests, were taken ill 
soon after partaking the dish. 

1919: Sinn Fein Revolt 

LONDON — More. titan 100 Sinn 
Fcmers arc besieged in Belfast pris- 
on. The prisoners complained, or the 
treatment of one (rf their number in 
<moth« part ot the prison and man- 
aged, to get the man into the wing 
wmdnfiey occupied. They then iso- 
lated themselves, destroying the 
means of access and barricading 
doors and windows. According to the 


Daily News, the prisoners claim that 
they have sufficient food for several 
days. They have improvised a band 
and play seditious airs, while detach- 
ments of soldiers, wearing trench hel- 
mets, surround the prison. Measures 
to pul an end to the revolt are likdy 
to be taken to-day [Dec. 31J. 

1944: Pesshnistic Hitler 

LONDON. — {From our New York 
edition;] Adolf Hitler, in a grim New 
Year’s message to the German peo- 
ple, today [Dec. 31] offered them only 
hope of dogged resistance for then 
vw y lives and, anticipating invasion 
from the west boasted that “wberev- 
erthey land the Allies will recave an 
appropriate welcome.” Hitler again 
sounded lit German propaganda 
note that “in this war there wjflbeno 
victors and losers, but merely survi- 
vors and annihilated " A separate 
Year’s tinder of the day to the 
army called 1943 “a second year <rf 
great crisis” initiated by the Russian 
winter offeaavo 1941.*43 p ' 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 1994 


Page 5 



in Plans 'Slalemmt’ WidilJ.S. 


' By Dawd E Sanger 

• • - New yerk Times Senicr - 

TOKYO - - — NorthKorea’s paramomt-iwiner, Kim 

U Sung, said tot hijrccwntiy had agreedtoY'fant 
Sj3I£mP71T M nniv, * -~- ■ - -* 


4fehawt^ 

“ ~ yt ‘jHiittf fm 


’wwfcerc snsB.'to wo 
of- Mnaggrtasiop in 



uui ue wunco mai any earon lo press ms country 
to .make broader concessions “may.- invito 

catastrophe.” , 

Mr. Kim's declaration was conta i ned in a lengthy 
New Year's address that also laHl oot a radical new 


economy, 
the United 


UK UBU a&TVOU 

meet in Geneva i6<fiscuss a "package dear of eco- 
nonac incentives in return for -broader inspection 

■ 1 T*l. .1 T T -- ■ £t_«„ iL- MU M rf imtlMl VfMlWb 


two nudear waste 

hbwmadi gutouinm North Korea has produced. 

; Bma “spfqal ma p ectim" of.ftMCnttS, 

'atwmii energy agency has been detpaadina smoecariy 
is not Covered m the current talks. North Korea 

.< . .t- *• imfwiHgq IQ 


seven declared aaefcar sites, awf only for onetiitie 
inspections; Accoirdinfrfo'flib-aime mte Den t i North" 
Korea refuses to afiowtbe kind of regular viritsbythe 
Inter nation al Atrnnir . Piw py A 'gi nvy that a w» mnmffld - 
under tbe NudcarNotipnmferatkHi Treaty. ? v.-at 
^B o^ flteJJ nitod States and Sooih lCmea have said 

win besmtiKtCnt ft tJKNm&wsn^ to proccedwitfi 
talks about nomtalnm^ relations and 

opening die door to foragh in vestmentand trade. 

Inhis specch, delivered to to caiiralcQmmittoe of 
the Korean Workers’ Tarty, Mr. Kim node no direct 
connection between resolving the nuclear dispute and- 
attaining North Korea’s major objective: trading Bids 
roccdaomic powers 5fc once scorned. Bmhesnggtateri 
that North Korea would have to ebangs dr amati ca Tly 
in enter to develop fore^n markets. 

Tbe State Dqwrtmcnt said Tboisdky, withoot re- 
vealing details, that t& two^ sides had "inibvba dosa^ 1 
to some kind <rf prdhninaiy agreement da die unclear 
inspection issna. Bin offices say NdrA Korea mint ' 
first COTne op with ah tn^jccttra plan that^ satisfies fte 
atomic ene^y^ency. -V- f- - > - 

Officials say the. joint statement** itsfened tb by 
Mr. Kim wnnd pome after a team^ ^of^ atomic energy 
agency inspectors arrived atUbrfh KareaVnndeffl 
rnoraTfarinns in YocgbyOT. The United 'Stales would 
then officially annbnnbe'lhe Kmcdlatibn bf Team 
S^arit,” an atintml mStaty exerdsewidi SoothKmea. 
Privately, American.and South Korean offiaabt say 
they have little desite to hold the aerdses this year. ' 

The statement would most Hedy ahomdode some 
agreement about the <rtchange of, envoys between 
North and South Kt^ea* a prattle to restarting talks' 


its nsdearprogram, ana unu anccu mcijr 

etF hs deration test March to puB out of the 
wratim treaty, it is not bound by’any treaty-;-- 
tiems. Bi essence, ‘the North agues thal it is hanm 
^treaty and haff om of it, and will permit infections 
qply as h sees fii ... 

Discra& urns about orodnedng a “special mqiec- 
baaF Aw^ricam officials hare said, wrmld be part of 
talks mGcwva- 

Any evidmee that Washington was-baddng &wn 
fr nr p m tmrial starrfihat the North must agree to fuu 
iwrolar inspocdons as wdl as the special inspections 
fate could open die United States to charges that it is 
riving in mmori^*****™^- ^-dtiia of the adrmnis- 
fratVm arc already arguing that President Bill Cnnton 
jar dnetant tobackupfedccforation of amon thago 
llattlfortfcKTO would never be aBowtd to possess 


1UU«U . . . 

The Amakaninteffigence comrmmjty, m a concm- 
saa .&meA by the State Depanmeut, boated 
jecesjriy flat Mr. Kim’s govnumeait pn*abty has 
riready fabricated at least one bomb. By insisting on 
regular inspections, Washington is trying to assu re 
tStMr. Knn does not acquire enoagh pfiitpninm to 
bmld mostibut officials'ooMede flat they arc nbHkely 
- to find^ completed weapons. • 

■ At times m his Saturday, Mr.Kim sounded a 

nrifitam note. While callmg for an overhaul oT the 
Norfli Korean economy, he also said his country 
. needed » strengthen its “defense power to counter the 
‘ enemy’s moves to provoke tm,* apparently rrierring 
mbothtiteUmteoStatesand S««th Korea. “Wenrost 
bc fxdly prepared, pbfitfcaHy and ideologically, mSS- 
tarite am inateraBy; to deal with any contingency on 
' "ctnr'aiMive,” he srid. • 


- .■-•‘.• •.r- - 1 ■. • , w«J » - 

ETHICS: Race as the Latest T . Designer Baby ’ Option 


Unclear, 

Hosokawa 

StirsWorry 

By T. R. Reid 

WtstaigftM Pan Senior 

TOKYO — When Prime Minis- 
ter Morihiro Hosokawa arrives at 

the While House in five weeks for a 

meeting with President B31 Clin- 
inn, he could be one of the most 
powerful leaders in postwar Japa- 
nese history. Or he could be a 
“dead bod/* — Japan’s brutal 
term for a lame duck. 

The uncertainty over tbe politi- 
cal fate of Mr. Hosokawa during 
the ne xt several weeks has rattled 
pobcymakeis on both sides of the 
Pacific as they uy to plan the Feb. 
11 meeting of the leaders of tbe 
world’s two richest countries. 

In the five months since his co- 
alition go ver nm ent took office — 
ending four of one-party 

conservative nde — Mr. Hosokawa 
has scored sane major successes 
and demonstrated striking political 
Bui if be does not succeed cm 
tbe nod Wg test, his government 
could fall 

By Jan. 29, when the current ses- 
sion of parliament ends, Mr. Ho- 
sokawa must achieve final passage 
of bis ambi tious plan to revamp the 
electoral system and the political 
contribution laws. If the pa ckag e 
does not pass, Mr. Hosokawa his 
said, he vnQ “take the responsthfl- 
icy” — a meaning that he may re- 
sign and dissolve his cabinet. 

The question continued lo 
hound Mr. Hosokawa as Japan 
welcomed 1994, the Year of the 
Dog in the Oriental zodiac calen- 
dar. In bis New Year’s address, be 

S ' "ged agon to pass the “reform 
this mouth. But opposition 
ImAws said he was spending too 
much time an the issue and should 
focus on the economy 


Zhirinovsky Puts a Price on Quotes 


Wcahmpm Posf Senut 

MOSCOW — Want a word with Vladimir V. 
Zhirinovsky? That’ll be S300, please, for the first 
five rranines. - 

The Russian ultranathmalist, who made a sur- 
prisingly strong showing in last month's partia- 
memory elections, is danonstraiing tha: he has the 
am?, nimb le touch at public rtladcns as he does at 
public diplomacy. 

Just back from a European tour, where he was 
expelled from Bulgaria, banned by Bean anc de- 
nounced in Romania, he has informed foreign 
reporters that the days of free interviews are over. 


Interviews with prim reporters win be S30G for 
lhe first five minutes. After that, the fee is negotia- 
ble. Televised interviews are a lot more. Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky himself asked at least ouc American televi- 
sion network lor S60.000 for an on-air interview. 
The network refused. 

Most .American and European news organiza- 
tions, including Tbe Washington Post, do not pay 
for interviews as a matter of policy. Yiacfaeslav 
Shisheim. an aide to Mr. Zhirinovsky, wid a num- 
ber of media outlets had paid for interview's, but he 
did noi mention which ones. 


Major Stands by His IRA Bid 

Bui , He Warns, Offer on Talks Must Be Accepted As Is 


By William E. Schmidt 

S’n J'nrt Tunes Service 

LONDON — Facing increased 
doubt about tbe future of a Briiish- 
Irish peace initiative, fueled by a 
recent wave of fuebombings and 
violence in Northern Ireland, 
Prime Minister John Major said 
Sunday that an offer to Republican 
Karri-liners to join peace talks was 
sriD on the table. 

But he said the group must agree 
to accept the current proposal, as it 
stands, without negotiation. 

“I have no more to tell them, and 
] don’t think Albert Reynolds will, 
either, ” Mr. Major said, referring 

to the Irish prime minister, during a 

BBC radio interview. He refused to 
set a deadline for IRA acceptance 
of the proposal saying only that he 
was prepared to be ‘‘patient for a 
Hole while" longer. 

In a peace initiative launched by 
the two governments on Dec. 15, 
Mr. Major and Mr. Reynolds told 
Sinn Fan, the political wing of the 
Irish Republican Army, that its 
representatives could at down at 
pey * milts over the future of the 
province, if tbe ERA agreed to put 
down its arms after 25 years and 
aband on its campaign of violence 


ainwiri at driving the British from 
Northern Ireland. 

‘There is no doubt that if Sinn 
Fein lei the opportunity slip that 
now lies in front of them, they 
wodd find themselves increasingly 
isolated,” Mr. Major said. 

As the prime minister spoke Sun- 
dav, Martin McGirinncss, a high- 
ranking Sein Fein oflhaal was 
quoted in Dublin as describing the 
British -Irish proposal as unaccept- 
able, unless the British would de- 
clare their willingness to withdraw 
from Northern Ireland. 

In an interview with the Sunday 
Business Post of Dublin, Mr. 
McGtrinness said Sinn Fein had 
not marig a final derision on the 
proposal 2 nd would not issue a 
formal reply for at least three more 
weeks, white it continues to discuss 
the plan among its supporters. 

Until now. the IRA and Shm 
Fein have offered no direct re- 
sponse to the initiative, although 
the IRA signaled last week in a 
New Year’s message that it wanted 
pe yy but had so far seen nothing 
persuasive enough to give up its 
armed campaign. 


As if to punctuate that assertion, 
the group launched a series of at- 
tacks in tbe waning days of 1993, 
after its 72-hour holiday cease-fire 
expired the day after Christmas. 

On Thursday, it took responsi- 
bility for a sniper attack near the 
Irish border in which a British sol- 
dier on foot patrol was killed. On 
the two previous nights, there had 
torn attacks on police and British 
Army units in Northern Ireland, 
including a mortar fired at an army 
patrol in Belfast. 

On Friday night, an IRA fire- 
bomb blitz in Belfast caused mil- 
lions of dollars in damage to stores. 

In the past, tbe IRA has rarely 
tipped its hand or discussed its 
guerrilla strategy. But Reuters 
quoted an unidentified Republican 
source on Sunday as saying that the 
group would step up attacks to in- 
flame British public opinion, with a 
view to provoking withdrawal from 
Northern Ireland. 

“We’re going to see more of 
these attacks," the somce was 
quoted as saying. “The idea is to 
gel the British to throw up their 
bands and say, ‘Let's get out of 
Northern Ireland for good.' ” 


' v_-i ■«■*.; 


Goothned trail Pagel 

he believed that “it’s very diffiatil : 
to say that a couple cannot. have a, 
say in where the ,cggs should come 
from." . • j.. 

At issue is a technique, uo . l ong qL 
at the frontier of medical tedmop- 
ogy, in which an infertile woman is 
enabled tobearXcfiQd by having 
fertilized donor egg implanted into ^ 
her uterus. The egg is fertilized in a 
laboratory, geaeraHy with $penn, 
from the woman’s partner.-;.* 

The technique of in vitro. fertSk 
T7Jtficm is more often used with. a r . 
woman’s own eggs, and the result- 
ing child i$ genetically related to 
both the man and womna, JmI as it 
would be if conoeiyed without arti- 
ficial help. V T.'vf,;-.''''--*: *■' 

• Butin cases in. 

^ecanscM^ agpora 
lion, cannot 
own, anegg ^M — 
used. In sad) xases, tbe jwo man 

gowticalty; idattd. ' 

woman can jgjve-Mrth.to a ji®* . 
djfld,andvice versa. 

Dr. Fleur. Ffeher. bead of-fte 


iMhirt J sdeoceand inf onnatiraidi- 
viskn of the British Medical Asso* 
cufion, fold lodil news agencies. 
that the cases pijljkized tea wedc 
demanstriued “how far reprodno- 
tivetedmologyisdevdo^ig.’*- 
■ “I dctoTrbmk4hrt eithernitioifc 
aBy r* mteynatio nfllly we have do- , 
vdoped anadapjateframeworic of ^ 
cthteal jnmcqjtes to soppmt.docH 
toes who are ndping patieats with 
feti^'proHoih^"feHAersa^ 

: " Tl^« k^cM^vnreomertothgfote 

matefreqmtfly.^ .. 

*Tt js.hotmari?^ of 
rsex? die pointed oat, adding, 
TSoe are _other dtaractoistics 
peopte.wffl beabkuo sdect lot” 


Tlie British cerate sedting treat- 
ment at Boom Hai CBmc are re- 
portedhr eager to have their child 
jcsemme the fattier in skin color. 

Dr. Brinsdeh said he saw no rear 
<am not to gp ahead with implant- 
ing a white donor’s fatffized egg 

inm the bladt woman’s uterus. The 

inqor issut^ he said^ is a shortage of 
eggs from Hade donors. 

Ttfcigh WhittaB of ttie Homan 
Fcrtibzation and Enttaydogy . Ab- 
(hority, uduch Bcenses dimes that 
jyrfonti' impfaTitatioin and similar 
procedures, agreed, saying dona- 
tions of eggs and sperm from 
. and other ethnic rmnonties 
woe not sufficient to meet de- 
mand. 


MEXICO: PLEASURE: Good-Bye Bran Muffins, Hello Chips 

Is the low-fat society on a bend- 


1 1 1 T 1 




1 1 dflc^New York Unity 


>■!. .... 

, > - ' ?The era of fear has bad a long 

'^NEW' YORK r-^htojor .'Ro- ' aw^ rriga,” he said, 
^dSph'Gra&uri calledi fbr unity in arguments that the nation s largest 
•sacia^polaTmgj New Yfltifc Chy aQ» bad become ungcveniable. 

aldress aft Sanday,;. • Mr.GinhardprtHmscdtoranalK; 

“Nw YoricGty will again 

„ <*■** ■ 


Peasant Uprising 

. Conmraed from Page 1 

there on Sunday and that they were 
unif ormed ana aimed. Another 
resident said army beficoptere- were 
flying over the town. A third said 
the rebels, dressed as soldiers bat 
with red bandanas, were looting 
stores, b urning official records and 
demanding the keys to residents' 
cars. 

fkittp as has been the site of nu- 
merous i ncidents involving indige- 
nous aroaps in recent years. Pover- 
ty and religious and ethnic conflicts 
are prevalent in the region. 

The j ywwnmgnt in Mexico City 

said ft was “watching the srtaarion” 

and stressed that it was acting 
“prudently." 

A spokesman said that Chiapas 
was “a stale that ready has social 


Continued Cram Plage 1 

equipment, as wefl as representa- 
tives of (Set programs, health spas 
and addiction-treatment centers, 
agree. 

Has the Fit for life set hit die 
outer Emits of self-denial? Consid- 
er this: 

• A national telephone poll of 
1,000 adults conducted last sum- 
mer by the American Dietetic As- 
sociation found that only 39 per- 
cent of the respondents said they 
were doing everything they could 
to eat a healthy diet, as opposed to 
44 percent tbe previous year. 


_> in 1993. HarpoCoUins printed 

450,000 copies of “Eat More, 
Weigh Less" by Dr. Dean Ornish, 
theneart specialist whose low-fat 
regimen has been shown to reverse 
heart diq»a«». Simon & Schuster, 
on the other hand, printed 85(1000 
copies of “Stop the Insanity!” Su- 
san Powter*s book about getting off 
the diet merry-go-round. 

• Almost three years ago, Mc- 
Donald’s introduced the McLean 
Deluxe, a reduced-fat beef patty: 
last summer, the company began 
test-marketing the Mega Mac, a 
half-pound hamburger served with 
cheese and sauce. 


er? 

The attitude adjustment — 
which Faith Popcorn, a trend- 
watcher, has labeled “pleasure re- 
venge*’ — may have more to do 
with ennui than esthetics. 

“People ate their bran muffins 
for five years, and nothing 
changed.” said Wendy Kaminer, a 
public-policy fellow at Raddifle 
College and the author of “I’m 
Dysfunctional You're Dysfunc- 
tionaT 

“They didn’t lose weight, she 
said, “They still got fired, and 
they’re still unhappy." 


MIDEAST: 

Digging In Heels 

Conthmed from Page 1 

other security arrangements that 
are the mam issues. 

Israel insists there was a “meet- 
ing of minds," a point repeated 
Sunday bv Foreign Minister Shi- 
mon Peres, who bad led the Israeli 
negotiators in Cairo. He said that 
he and his PLO counterpart, Mah- 
moud Abbas, had reached under- 
standings. with President Hosiu 
Mubarak of Egypt on hand as a 
witness. 

Just as insistently, PLO leaders 
say that the so-called agreement 
was nothing but a draft of tbe Is- 
raeli position, and one subsequent- 
ly rejected bv Mr. Arafat who of- 
fered his latest thoughts on bordo- 
controls and Jericho's size in a fax 
sent to Mr. Rabin several days ago. 

It is an important dispute, for 
Mr. Rabin asserts that the baas for 
future is the accord he says 
was reached in Cairo. Mr. Arafat is 
now back-pedaling, the prime min- 
ister say's. And if that is the case, be 
says, everything can be renegotiat- 
ed as though from the beginning. 

The PLO leader has taken a simi- 
larly tough stand, warning that Pal- 
estinians will not accept what be 
rail*; Israeli attempts to “humili- 
ate” them. Israel's insistence on 
control over border passages for 
security reasons, Mr. Arafat says, 
would turn Gaza and Jericho into 
bantustans, the equivalents of the 
black homelands of South Africa. 

“We will not live in bantustans,” 
he told a Palestinian gathering in 
Jericho Sunday by telephone from 
his headquarters in Tunis. 

As this tug-of-war continues, 
there are signs that Israel may re- 
channel its energies into long- 
stalled talks with Syria. 

In two weeks. President Bill 
Chn loo is supposed to meet with 
President Hafez Assad in Geneva, 
and some officials here say the Syr- 
ian leader is unlikely to go empty- 
handed. 

A foreshadowing of possible new 
directions came this weekend with 
disclosures that Israeli and Syrian 
academi cs had secretly met in Nor- 
way in October, agreeing on a doc- 
ument in which the Syrians spelled 
out a detailed vision of “full peace” 
in return for a full Israeli withdraw- 
al from the Golan Heights, cap- 
tured from Syria in 1967. 

Although neither side represent- 
ed an official position, an Israeli 
participant, Yossi Olmert. said that 
Israel was kept informed and that 
the Syrians were there with their 
government's blessing. 

“The positions they express may 
be a little ahead of the official gov- 
ernment position, but it will be- 
come the official government posi- 
tion in due course," stud Mr. 
Olmert, who was a negotiator with 
Syria under the previous Israeli 
government led by the Likud Party. 


problems, poverty and mar ginah - 
Turirai that dale back 500 years^ to 
the bcghmmg rtf Spanish coloniza- 
tion!. • . 

(Reuters, AFP, AP) 



MARK ROTBKOsv ; ' \ 

A Biography , 

By Jams SL B. BresBiu - JOO, 
pages. S&95. VniyersBy ^ Ckh 
cagp Press 

Reviewed ^Paid^ichacd. 

T hey found Mad: Rottikri'a 
body — J Base nft «g* «*■ 
stretched —in a pond of Wood on. 
Feb. 25, 1970, in bs dmqily fin-, 
nisbed, dimly BArefl st&bom Man- 
hattan. Tbe jScr. ff7 r had been 
living Owe ^one. IfS sttange bow- 
artists* sodden de aths in filtrate then ■ 
-an: Sbeflrt’S and van Gcghcs am, 
Roihko’s md as weEL Some-anra « ’ 
his stridden some shwotof 

ihe -razor-slashed arms, the red- . 

to-Wack of drying Wood, t faemtf- 
tyrt posture or thecoirpse^ topft 

bewanted ffitb treridate m *4 . 
presence of his art. 

' He said, 

• before my petoes are.liavrog to 

same iWOT’SSS-iMd- 

when I paired Hot-: 

speak of tmgBdy.atid-i^yW:®* 1 . 

cSShW.H* ^-UESS- 

priOTjed 4e mqst^er *£**“*“ 

Shy inch of ttwr surface. Efemmt 
. dm last artists m 


B&tfftfaxc*3 Rothkowitz in 
J9BF faftMpL Russia; ' he had 
g n nq ipJ ip irt limd, Oitgpa, then to 
Yate(wherchc hdpcdtoTauiKh to 
■YaJcfSatiirday Evtaring ^st^ ton 
deeoC mtb jfcw Yodc whae, by 
for^dFrW® jmd ^ seriousness, he 
niadC*1xomsdf'ir pamtec¥ia <1927, 
•y hilfi trpng.to survive. oa S5 a 
watt, he git an illustraioris job 
-making pictures far a Bible, sued 
the maa who'd lured him; Went to* 
court arid tem 5800. A mCsaank 

mtM^s^he-waspric3d3r,rabbini- 

cad, bittei, vriwUy mban- In 1949, 
- bynowjhmedttipq\«W,.te 
. to pwnt the aquared-off fogs we 
recognize as Rothkos, ft was afor- 
nmt headhered.to for to 
daof his life. - 


sofas in the studio where -he tod 
' , came from to Salvation Army- He 

. kft 798 unsoM paintings, <m which 
. hft cbBdrea ra a vato of $32 miil- 
-Hml; - • 

Breriin’s book, no ti ti l latin g read, 

, tock seven years to write. Its schd- 
arty apparatos nms to 1^00 fooi- 
. notes. One wanders wtar he .both- 
ered. ESs book couldn't be drearier. 
- Jt’s gray with iriztevanries. Wtb un- 

■ -_j; ^ — DMiKnlrMcm 



rrmw llgraiHY* J — a**** * 11 * 

Tmssmg to finest for to twigs. And 

BresSn; it'is dear, knows next to 
nothing about art. 

‘ The best bfcgraphies cf painun 
bdp us see the pictures. Tms ozre 
doesn’t Wn-rfm, who teaches Eng- 
lish at to Univecuty of CaEforma, 
Berkdey, knew that Ms pniagonist 
' to leart dianstic or 
dofpamtas,”yethe 


"So why, then, did I choose 
Rothko?” he asks. “Biographas- 
want to ride into eternity on the 
coattails of to great; and many of 
them, while enjoying to ride, take 
an ungrateful look under to coat 
to check for tom ox sweat-stained 
amts, middle-age paunch, navel 
HnL . . . I don’t deny any of these 
motives . . . and TO admit to to 
fantasy t hat writing this book will 
pwifw me sufficiently, well-known 
so that, in NewXcsk Gty, someone 
will ask the journalist Jimmy Bres- 
hn if he’s related to met” He I 
shouldn't hold Ms breath. 

Neither Rothko nor his pan: _ 
are honored or* enhanced by this 
book, ft would have made Mm 
fringe “Silence is so accurate,” be 


Pad Richard is on the staff of The\ 
Washington Post. 


New Yosflt to - - 


-- - - GdDfiCtorr Duncaa PhSfips and 
p^MeilohkaiBwhe.TOsama^ . 
asdidaBtoldds matt scftqm, but 
Rothko, ttmi«h he wished ft so. 
.gasift gaDy sure. -He d e man d eg. 
icassEuanoc, winch, vton he re- 
ceived it, he rejected as uftfeft. 

■’ Roozc -botored hfflL 
Ib oogh he drank aTcflf, .witoVa 
; baj^ttrinir ffis bedth tmtuied 

didn’ t inwt 

cooldift handle money. . ... 

Hr Hked to appear poor, cwm 



THIS COULD 

BE YOUR 

TICKET TO 
WORLDCUP 


US 


didn’t fiL The beat-up durire and 


' • BBlon McCcnnico, an Anreri- 
can deugtier in Paris, is 

-Tfiked ft firefly because I was 
ahietb fimshft,wfidx is rarely to 
: case aa3 stiff er Erom dyrioda. What 
I et«qyed most was that to star 
‘pUcity of wlfflt l to author says a 

twAmeA as coanpficatcd meta- 

I ^° ISr - -f/oftn Brmton, 1ST ) ; 



and awe. 

Beholders .loved^P^ 1 ^- 
T>o(tety didn’t trust tom- V**?. 
nridn mad Ms canvases as 


Rothko was no art-saiitt, tx> New 

sssess-SSS': 

sssaa^SF 

ant guy. , 

hated 

5 rs 3 £CB'^»* 4 *j 

■: ^fsSSKSB 

^ feed and 
■ plained 
“strictly maKaous. 


BRIDGE 


; . • By-AhmTrmcott^ ^SSS^&tSS 

E^wasfbWBdtoiaketodub 
- ptetttofkSf and-conid doaothingeffeo- 

opgnn&ka drrfto d amondi^ gg Aflera tomcmd return, Iok> 
yTteteti occwreffat inBthedoimnyioniSi SotrthoooM 
-loinnament m • &st abcK the heart ace and the made 

New J asey*_ffl ao, then return to hand with a 

; Dan and & ruff to draw trttmpiknwe 

i.PteflM aud ^ui^^id ^^atAibmthectosaihandtO; 
Hewitt ot Manreitt a n u pattg eoOT^ readr dummy’s vrinneo. - • ‘ 

H V* :T^ tot Sooth^w^i have 

*'™' r T> * Mft artosccorer tock and 
ctmtinued-with to queen. East 

. . He- would win ai^ return a diamond, 

s^MultfW -againforemga ruff into dmnny. 


.lowed by the play of to kta 8 ®d i 
queen w hearts, but that b a modi j 
worse play. 


. WEST 
'4i 10987 
t? 2.4 
OKQH6 
*984 


NORTH (D) 
4AQ43 
9A3 
0 A 

*AQ JJ073 

EAST 
4KJ65 
«?«72 
OJ983 
*K6 
. SOUTH 
♦ 2 
KQ1 
0 7542 
*52 


Both sides were vulnerable. The 
mooing. 

"North East South West 

’!* . . Pass 19 Pass 

-2*- Pass - 2^ Pass 

s4.* Puss *V Pass 

,6W. . Pass Pass Pass 

• Wen.fed to dtauwad Mag. 


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Page 6 

WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 1994 


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FtfcB Cpv 


Provided by Credit Suisse First 
I Boston Limited, London. Tel: 
'322 40 00- Prices may vary 
■according to market conditions 
■end other factors. Dec. 31 


Cpi Md fni" TO Tnjr 


Cm no Price 


5pd 

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iswr Cpn 


5pd 

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Dollar Straights 


Cm Mai Prk*vtdTro 


Governments/ 

Supranationals 


MbApf 9* 
Act EX 5 
AdbDc TVS 

AdbJul 7V4 

A*Jm 

AkttAsr 79k 
AHbAur 7* 
AMcJun M 
AMrnProc 5 

AtMrfB Pr Feo J 
Alberta Pr No* M 
Alberta Pr Nov 7* 


B*WI DK F« 4* n 
Extant* Fab W 01 
EximwJm BVs 5 
ExttnbfcJun » 
Exltn bt latt fi« 07 
Extol Wt Jun >o*« 
ExImbkMav I 53 
ExlmbhMw it U 
Extant* Mar n* t9 
exfmbkWr 9ft 99 
Extant* Sea m rf 
Form Cdo Jun 7* *6 
FiftFib 5* « 
FflfcMav 10b 14 
FtfcMay 7* « 
Fat Nov 6 95 

I FefcOCT « « 

' FMHfldAer 7Vi «7 
! FWJondJan Tft 71 
FlrimdMar * « 

FimmdNov Tib 9* 
Finland Sea iV i 94 
FlntavtSw TO 96 
Gel Mr TO 97 


Alberta Pr Oct TO 
Aj«fX2sft» TO 
AasCwftiMov 11 
AusCwtnMaY lib 
Auicwihoa lift 
AusCwmod nb 
AialrtaFeb TO 
Austria Fab TO 

Austria Jwi M 

Austria Jm b*i 

Austria Jul TO 

Austria Jan lib 

Austria Jun TO 


Austria Jut 
AustrlalW to 

Austria Mr I» 
Austria May 6* 
Austria May TO 
Austria Mr TO 

Mohan Apr «b 

BetpVim Feb a 
Beiotom Jixi TO 
MOhanJuf ft* 
BsKrtum now TO 
tMHtivnOct TO 
B lea Aug TO 
BIS* Mr TO 

a tar Mr 7b 

Star Nov TO 

ate* Sec 79k 

BrCalmbJun TO 

■ CceuOC ITO 

era Mr TO 

CraOd TO 
Cce*5sa 1TO 
CdaFflb 9 
CdoNm ffl 
CM Aar TO 

Ow Feb lib 

COS TO 

Coe Aug TO 

Cmaub B 
CottFsD TO 
Co* Jun Svt 

Co* Oct TO 

ComO MadrJulTO 

Cr Fancier Feb TO 
Cr Panel *r Jot TO 
Cr Fonder Oct to 
& Natl Aar 7b 
Cs* Eaulo Sen TO 
Ormnaric Aug 4b 
OarawrkAug aUl 
DwvnarkFeb TO 
Denmark Feb Sb 
Denmark Feb TO 
Denmark Mr TO 

Denmark No* Sb 
Denmark Oct TO 
Denmark Seo n 
DnrtExDNOV I TO 
ECSCDC Bta 
E esc Jon TO 
EcscJan 9 
EacMr TO 
EcscOa Sb 
Ectcoa to 
E dcApr Sb 
EdcApr TO 
FdcAus TO 
E* Aug TO 
EdeJui 4b 
EdcJut TO 

EdcMr m 

EOcOet 4b 
EOcOct 7 
EdtDc TO 

EdtJUl TO 

EdfMr TO 

EdtMr t 

Ear May TO 
Ed! Sep TO 

Ere Dc 1TO 

EecFt* TO 
Esc Jan lift 

Esc Jim Sb 

Ere Mr 10b 

e lb Aar 7 

EUtAor IS 
E lb Apr TO 
ElbAUB TO 
E ib Apr 72ft 

Bib Aar n 

E ib Aug TO 

Lib Dc S 

ElbDr B 
ElbDc TV, 

ElbDc 5b 


loan Fab 4b 

i Mb Sea n* 

mod Sep vm 

I tod Auo 9 

I bat Aug UK 

lord Feb TO 

i&rtl Feb 10 

I bed Feb W 

lord jut Stk 

I bra Jan TO 

lontjun k 

i bra Jot 7b 

lord Jul Wth 

I bra Jan 11* 

IbTOJcm 9b 

lord jun TO 

IbrflMny 9b 

lord Mr 4b 

lord Mr Bft 

Ibrd Mr fU 

ibrdMr 7b 

Ibrd Mr TO 

ibtdNav TO 

IbrifNOr 72* 

Ibrd Oct TO 

Ibrd Oct TO 

Ibrd Oct m 

ibrd Oct 10b 

ibrd Sot 5W 

lord Sot 17b 

Ibrd Reg Auo ISft 


I ft DC 7* 

iteFeb 5* 

Itc Jul TO 

Ik Jan SV. 

IfCJun TO 

Ik Mr 8b 

Itc Mr TO 

IIMFlnDc Sb 

IrttoMApr TO 
Ireland Mr TO 

Ireland AAr TO 
Italy Apr TO 

Italy Feb TO 

Italy Jun SH 

ilaivJun TO 
Italy Mr TO 

Italy AAr TO 

Italy Nov 9Vk 

Italy OCT TO 

Italy Sep a 

Italy Sec TO 

JalCoAua lib 
JaiCoAor 10ft 
Jai co Dc Bft 

Jot Co Jul K 

Jai Co Jun 8 

Jai Co May I TO 

Jai Co Mr 61k 

JmHatwJOT TO 
JopHgTtwJun TO 
Jot Holm Jun 7b 
Jot Harm Jun TO 
JaaHolmMr Sb 
JwHgtmNnv 8b 
JapH&nrtMv TO 

Jt® Aug TO 

JdDDc TO 

JdbFeb Sb 
Jon Feb 6ft 

Mb Jun 9 ft 

JdbMav ID 
JOT Mar t 

JOT Mr 8ft 

JOT Nov lb 


ElbDc 7ft 

ElbDc 5b 

S ib Fed 5 

lb Feb 4* 

ElbFtb 11b 

EDI Jul TO 

S Jan 7* 

Jul 7b 

ElbMr TO 

ElbAAr 7* 

ElbMr II 

K M r f 

Nov 9b 

EH) Nov I Ob 

ElbNav 8b 

Elb Sot TO 

ElbDruan Jun Sb 
Eksoortl DC TO 
Eksoortf Jan 10 


KamaiAta- jut TO 
Kansal Alroct 4U 
KansalAIrsapTO 
Kcnml EWOct 9 
Kobe Cltv Aug 7b 
KobsCHvAug 8% 
Kobe Otv Aug TO 
Kobe Cltv Jul TO 
LordHm Dc TO 
MonitabaAAay TO 
AAanllatwOct ITO 
N Brunsw Apr I 

N ZealfM Apr 8 
NZacbidAug 9 
NZealndJW ITO 
NtaundldAtr lib 
Nib riov Sb 
N to Oct TO 

Narg KamDc 8 
Norg KomMavTO 
Norway A Dr TO 
Norway Dc 7 
NITDC TO 


EdfSCP 
NlbSeo 
SoASot 
E tfflWHOd 
Safa Nov 
DOFtnJao 
Own NY Feb 
CeccMr 
BP Cop Jot 
AWA Carp Jut 
Austria Jul 
□MtnNvPib 
tali Jun 
GeecJiri 
tanoe 
Own tty Feb 
l sac Mr 
Ami mil Usd 
Or Nail Sv 
SBC Cm Hay 
has Jot 
S ot? 0/5 Jul 

Denmark Aug 
Pro Roof tv Jan 
Holy Mr 

vie Putt Sen 
AmaxBkDc 
Cob MOV 
IdUiJhi 
S lews j ot 
O wn Ny Feb 
Ibrd OCT 
ladBDc 
Own Nr Feb 
IMbJun 
Amir inti Aim 

a n unit Aug 
bAug 


SO 99JBB 
96 19TO 

96 1DTO 

97 inn* 

97 1111b 

95 »H* 

97 1W. 

02 197b 

M IMA 
ai 9m 

96 i m 
H 11« 
94 vn 


Irstand FsbBO 

irohMJuilB 
ltd Fin Nv NOT 95 
Homes' Bs MOT 9S 


Gcaoi Ban FabSO 
EunttmaJut99 


BBSr* 

Eta Jen 04 


MPJUIW 

itoiy Julw 

liiW*Hn 

indoniezAww 

CrLvannAlOf 

saw 1 

BflpJuin 
Sul Ann 


» IS* 

l«5 MM 


03 97 

4ft 95 Wt 
4ft 96 98* 

TO « 99b 

10 96 STM 
Rk 96 109* 
96 96ft 

IB 506’-* 

95 UKSH 
«fl 180 

96 U6ft 

97 111b 
>1 113ft 


EtafclM 
ElbAugM 
ECB-AU^ 
Ecx Jv*l97 
Oresa Ftn Jon 00 


BtceAugW 

■djubw 
Austria Aug P 
UntakfutaAdOO 

SonanPecae^ 

agnwburoJtam 

SiBOTkenJunM 

RbcJLdfiJ 

St r ”APT« 

« MiVfp 

KblftmoMri] 

in ltd Bk Jun 94 

HUIS«nwlJu>U M 

Dan Domu ft JunM 
PotObWwTi'JWiOO 

Dot Den Pu Dec W 
CrLyumJinH 


Dre*lfinAwW 
Dread Fin Jul 9B 
Dg Bank Jai Jen 96 
Dcfi Nonu Jan 96 
CrwtapAiaYta 
Or Fondw Jul 9* 
CemnHreiik Od Oct SI 

□KNOW 95 

BundMBObnMBrM 



96 107ft 
» lWb 


MSov 

Fat Fed Fib 
loan dc 
lodbPDc 

CecaP 
Certrust Fib 
Mlddlttawnjut 
Gen Milts Aug 
Br Gos Pie Nov 
RtaMtn 


97 lWVi 

98 107ft 

?s r 


00 1T7 

97 117ft 
95 105b 

01 112ft 
94 im 
«a ns* 
97 712ft 
99 IIS 


99 ns 
9ft 95 W4b 
Nt B IM 
TO 97 105* 

TO 96 HJ6J3SC 

8 97 IM 
98 115ft 

OTTO 98 HUM 
ebib 97 lUft 


Global Corporates 


COM 99 103 
V TO 77 10TO 

mm «a iDTb 


Banks Finance 


I 8ft 96 108 
9ft 98 117ft 

9ft Ul 118ft 
ctlb 01 lljft 
>0 8b 95 1 05ft 

nb 99 ior* 
ul 7b 97 105ft 

96 108ft 

TO 97 m 
TO 00 KM 


g n km 
O il . 84ft 

KS 15S 

a s uss 

4 98 «k» 

Bft 94 W7ft 
7ft 99 105ft 

9ft 97 111ft 
7ft 94 1 05ft 

8ft 94 ioe 
95 106ft 

O 9Bft 
96 111 

02 110ft 

97 HJoto 
96 106* 

94 Ml* 
7ft 97 106ft 

8ft 96 HJTJt 
5ft 93 77050 
TO 99 90 

8ft 96 109V. 

■ft n n2b 

si* m 99 
7V» 99 KHft 
97 107* 


■Ml 
+77 
+65 
+7 
+65 
SkSa m 
603 -HQ 
411 -HI 
M2 +77 
455 +74 
tSI +31 
4J1 +31 
5J9 «6 
531 +41 
M3 Ml 

541 +35 
543 +72 

542 +97 
Ol +99 
4J9 +im 
4.97 +0 

&at +at 

itf ±*5 
575 +51 
434 442 
421 +29 
5J9 +46 
413 +41 

an +m 

545 +ea 
547 +46 
525 +44 

Wit +73 

530 +64 
■L46 -475 
513 +72 
542 +70 
423 +64 
US +62 
457 +53 
502 +112 
160 +66 
+71 
♦71 
+45 


96V) 123 

99b UB 
99b . 

99b 056 


BkGreaoJnlJulfS 
fik Green JunJun 15 
Befgtam AAer So 
Bernini Auo 99 
B dglumMan 
Bttetam May 95 
Austria Radee Fob 91 - 
Austria Feb 85 
AsnnosAAqrn • 


8S8Sgg 

mssfi 


Bran M Aub 97 

Bco N« in Au9 J7 
BcaDINen>I3ec96 

BOJOT98 _ 
BcaDIRomJ»« 
&u mn junoi 
BM Inn Apt 99 _ 

KSSSS6 

AnxBVaGPDaeff 

UbtJulOD , ^ 
Skaobonfc o P* Jut* 


9Sft Of 
tfft CO 
99b IU? 


Amro Mgr E 
At® Jot 97 


Af®jOT97 

AdtJOCTtf 

BMAntMarO 

SanAuCTAnrn 

2W>AwtP4bm 

Zk3C Ault Auo 82 

WesttbCurMOvCB 


WaMb Cur Morn 
UtoFln»av(B 
Toyota «ec Mar 03 
TerdamOctB 

Sudwtt LbOCMM 


Of. 

Pnce 

%£ o 
m 

w s 

3s | 
£ s 
\ B 

r g 

5 2*9 
UH 177 

« g 
•fc g 

^ s 

96 H 

m gg 

6 I 


=c 


gjSffiSS *T 


assstf 1 

Ed Feb 99 

ggSSSl •* 


SBS&r- 


S£eSaM*8vC 

BnpaitadAprfi 

aScauedAd*- 


SSattlWAprH 

mssssss 

B8SSSS. 


9TO ft» 

9TO S3 
"A 


OksbanA 2100 Oct 90 
Nofwat AW06 


BOlgllB 1 r?5c_C« 


SeCBWTvAwOZ 

SnCTDKB 

51)00 Pfc JOT 03 
5 b*NdvD 2 
SbabOCTB 
RaBankMedOCTB 
Ou*beeHvdOCT9S 
Quebec AarU 
Norway DecB 
Nora Giro Dee to 
Nib F*bB 
Nat invBkSenB 


No«K«AwaB 
Natwasoctn __ 

Natwi Sal Sec 49 

Nat West FcfsPerp- 
IbOT Turin JolBO 


cr ttariaAueiM 

BfcSOBltaMtVPWP 
Bl I reland Sepg 
Bcasmansopg 
sd Jinn 

BM Baa Jai Jantt 


99* S?f 

r i 

» g 

8a g 

Mb Ul 

r 


AOcMarw>A»y 

vfwdiideJttW 

WooctaBIftDn 

Wtetaa&Oa* 

urban MtoOCT« 

IMOlMnNtavW 

Dpgictogev**. 


BanetfuRetcTOro 
Anz BkaGpOctB 

iP*tpPtrp_ 


Mta Bk Den JtmCS 
Mel vine Mov 03 


MelylncMavO 
UbPebin 
LWOOK 
LkbAuaB 
jam um Aar OS 


627 +49 
563 460 
579 +54 
429 +50 
4J4 +57 
1U +92 
622 +132 
520 +15 
572 +71 
57+ +40 
473 +60 
525 +44 
435 +37 
99ft 454 +21 
99ft 615 +43 
MTft 116 +44 
96ft 60 +55 
9TO 649 +71 
189* 583 +73 
547 +74 
515 *90 
110 +78 


Ins Bk Sec #2 
I no MOT 03 
I too Non Nov OS 
ItsiNmleeQ 
1 too Nan Julia 
Ibrd Nov 02 _ 
htetaba JanC3 
Getdmon Lp ttav 05 
Goldman Lp Oct 05 
Gofcknan LpA« 03 
Gatamn Lp May S 
GeccFeb03 
GeccJOTB 
BeccDecia 
Feta OCT 02 
Euroflma Jan 03 
Eksportfln AugOJ 
EJaooriflnSepB 
eiOJcnO 
EtoOctB 
EdtNovB 
EdtrFebO 
Ebro OCT oc 
orwd Aa Aimes 
Droid Aa Apr B3 
Drew As Sep 02 
Da Bonk Sep 32 
DDFlnNvOaB 
CjfeOrpOCTK 
CAB* Aug 03 


Stand QIJD6C49 
Stand Ow Not 4S 

Stand Oil AN 49 
Stand Qi 4 Jan « 
St Bk Vh: Oct 47 

n£isr&« 

RtaGn>Nov49 
RbcJun+9 
Rob Flam Now 49 
QueotCKydSepey 
NbcFeb49 . 

Natwe*tcNov49 

NatwxtbMayB 
NatwesJ a Ad 49 
Natwea BvDcc+t 
Nob Oct 49 
MMtarUS3Dec4f 
Midlands? So) 49 
Midland St JOT 49 
Mon Grenfell Peru 
UoyOS s3 Aaa 49 
Uaydss2Nav0 


y*s 

79* 1-0 

SS* 2S 

79 144 

68* U4 
92* UB 
87* «» 


6Bfc UO 

r 


unarniwTOi" 

9Mdta*£?2 

9WMhnttN»» 

aStw£ir 

3t BkNSwFefiO 
SI BA NCR Feb 99 
Sotntob AbOCT 98 
SPtataOAbSOTW 
Socaen Tc Septa 
■SlwSonlt Auo96 

ssas'iScft* 

R3MMor« 


84ft US 
90 0X0 


LtaWssl JISI49 

Kt>LensdotJuB49 
ibrd Pena 

HkbcsDtcfl 
Hjbcs AO04ta 
H*bC*J*»l49 
HH Samuel Pam 
One PerpNew Pup 
DncPorp Old Pare 
Den Darcfce Nave? 
cxtaavMarer 

arte Rnteeme Apr<9 
dbcAnofl 
CtacJW4t - 
Cbrtxt Dg No* 49 
Ba POTlba»S*p49 
Bap Sep 49 
Bk Scot Nov 49 
Bk Nova Sc Aaa 49 
Bk Ireland Dec 49 
Barclay SI Jut 49 
Barclay a FolH* 
Barclay Old NOT 49 • 
AM Bkg up OCT 49 
AS) PIC Nov 49 
AD Pk Jul 49 
Zlraot Jut 01 
VotefiO LUDecVi 
Turk ECTm Dec* 

Total Bk Sen BU 


EBl MOT M 

EibTrtaMava 

St-gsbatnaPara 


Public Pwr SOT 97 
Italy OCT 05 
lxv*tmarNov95 


itopTm Jun Jun97 . 
taro Apr «2 


Floating Rarta Notes 


lOTOApre 
EQ)PoMar96 
EtoFOT02 
EH) Aug 01 
Cr Italia Jul 97 
Cr Fonder Apr ft 
Cra Feb 06 
CgJan9S 
BflpAua96 
Bol Apr 00 
Bk Greece Apt 97 
BetdUm Apr® 
Belgiuiri May 99 
Bco 01 Ram Apr 97 


9f* OJS 
96* -an 

9TVj 851 
98* 060 

96* 041 

98ft LU 
91ft 057 
ff -044 

in aa7 

98* -838 

HJTO *553 
ttb Ul 
99* 080 

taft 0.15 
99ft 841 
99ft 0J7 
99* 834 

98ft 137 
98* 033 

99 821 

99* aa 


SSKK”. 


■CreeOTiFtaMayn 

CretttmtAbpBS 

CrgdttomtAprnTO 


DMItKkSfnO 
Cr Natl Oct K 
CrLyomSwes 
CrLyomMorn 
cr Local Auras 
Cr Local Feb 03 


S Local Dec B2 
Local Aug a 
Cr Italia Jun B3 
Cr Fonder OdO 
catmbfca/afiwOd 
Canabka/tAuaK 

sx« 

Combanc IMS 
CIUctp No SotOS 
anapNOJunas 
a flap No Audio 
C hemcorp Anrin 
Chaw Man SgpID 
CM Feb 03 
CCTAUO0S 
CCT May 03 
Bl Nr Cw Apr Q5 
BINy CarpSepK 
Br Cosumto Feb 03 

BO Paribas Nave 
Baa Carp June 
BreiFOTU 
Bop Dei O 
Bru Kk Nov 93 
Em Hk Oct C 


Deutsche Marks 


Pounds 


waflJtaroaNwTS 
W+FebOD 
UWJonH 
Spain Jun 81 
SecPacDecDaefS 
Se Banker Mar 95 
SbabSOTM 
SaUcatCTft Oct 97 
Rente. Sep 96 
ROC Nov Mot 95 
QutbKHyd Apr® 
DAobOTk Jun® 

□kb Mar 95 

New Trdnd Junf7 

NewZesMMnrfS 

tf+slr Ov Feb 96 

Nc*!anwta4BiAug9S 

Mitsubishi Fl Jot* 

mw fw junta 
Luttbama Feb 01 
Lufthansa Feb» 

Luff Fin Aar OB 
Lkb not 99 
LJtbJolte 
Lkb Not 95 
LavaroO/sMOTfS 
Laveroa/tPeb+S 
Nap Apr OJ 
>.fw OCT 99 
Jpm LftO NOT 95 

IsvebnerSOTM 


Dollar Zeros 


7ft 
9* 

ipr 7* 

Aug TO 

Aug TO 

Feb 6ft 

Feb 
Jun TO 

Jun 4ft 

Mar 8ft 


Eksoortf Mr 8* 
Euratom Jan TO 
Euroflma Jan eft 


Euroflma Mr 9* 
Euroflma Mr 7* 


Oni Hydro Feb lift <4 
OnlHvdroftav 8ft Dl 


CaterpNar Feb 
Own Nv Feb 
Penney G to Feb 
GdfMr 
PepsiCo Mr 
GeccMr 
SekMr 
Cra Mur 
Wldlrnn Fin May 
Scot O/S Mov 

PtHImoCr JOT 

lodbJun 

ExxOTCovAua 


M 99 923 +«5 
94 91ft 927+419 


94 99ft 590 +283 
«4 99* 695 +183 


94 99* 518 +207 
94 9TO 501 +188 


94 99* 02 +169 


« 9|* 4.17 +m 
94 9Bft 431 +95 



99ft 061 
9934 512 

9+* 070 

96* an 

«ft 031 
99* 037 

99* 836 

98ft 870 
99ft BX 
99ft 034 
97* 857 

99* 81* 


auk 1-os 

22 Kg 

74* IIS 


womw"" 
Rente, not fa _ 
Quebec Hvd Jul IB 
Quebec OCT Dl 

New Z e ob ta Junta 
Hqtl owwWe JCTT7 


Tld LW Jul 96 
Sunil Fla Au»M 
Stockholm Jun 99 
SnCTMar96 
Scot um Jopta 

SaHmnaSep® 

^teN ^94 
Poocft Con Dec 97 
OmrevAuoM 
DsoroeAuo9« 
Oknbank JCT9S 
Nik Feb 99 

Haw Zeclnd Ml OCT 97 
New Zeo to Mir Oct 95 
Noll Power OCT® ' 
Nall Cencalta Jenin 
Not Bk Conodo Jul 96 
Mutrftm da Junta 
Mulrflel a Sen 18 


90 cun 

88 CM 

H 0-95 

84ft LS3 

78* cun 

7TO MO 

JF* MO 

91 838 

79ft 1-98 

04 M0 

STM 1-27 

as* im 

79* U 

■0* 1-32 

44ft 895 

*34 LOS 

B0* 1J0 

83ft 121 

87ft 081 

46ft OJS 

Bft UP 

84ft 184 

BM IM 

B5* U9 

97* L4S 

99ft 020 

99* U6 

n 844 

90 647 

98* 858 

98ft 029 

1® 026 

99 898 

97* 0316 

in be 

no a® 


Lkb Fin 19V NOT 91 

ISSEYS. 

ISSgS 


Italy jmw 

esssf 

itv ebne r A nrW 
I Mbnar Feb 95 
nuebnarNOTta 
IwebnerJMta 


KWcbnarNOTta 
toMbner JMta 
Ireland Sot 9f 
Ireland Junta 
ted inti Dec IB 
lml Inti JOTta 
ImltnHSsor? 
tosn TUrtni Feb 9B 
Ibrd AIM 82 

^SSOTKI 
GatobonktnDicPB 
Finland Jul 97 

Rn Real An 95 
Flo Oc Septa 
Fin Qc May 96 


RndcSOTta 
Fin Oc May 96 
FerrovteMoy97 
Ferrovle Feb 94 
Fek-AuD97 

Fek-peeta M 

Denmark Sep 97 
DpnmaritAoota 
CredapOsSepta 
CredtanOsFOTta 
CrLypntJul 9B 
CrLvnrw Marta 
Cr Italia Feb® 

Cr Italia Jun 77 
Q- Fonder OCT ta 
Carol BfcAueta 
Conabk a/» Navta 
QmJoI49 


Bcj Nap HkSep &3 
Boyer vroeAua 05 
Beyer Vare Jen 03 
Bayer Vera Aug® 
Bayer Land Aug ta 
Bayer Land May® 
Bayer hypo Aug 03 
Atull Cff Feb in 
Audi Cil SOT 92 
Austria Jan® 

Austria OCTU 
Abn Amro Aar 85 
Abn Amro Aug 02 

^Jiutsg 

ZSSt&F” 

TMcugtaOCTOct 97 
nMvo Kao Auo Aug 97. 


99ft 816 
99ft 830 
97ft LOB 
99* 029 

99ft 039 
97ft 061 
96ft 069 
96* 0J» 

96* 0J4 

m, BJK 
99ft 80S 
99ft 8U 
98ft aw 
99* 870 

99ft 0.T4 
99ft -887 
HO 836 
97ft 137 


BOSS? 

TMffJl, 


Motmeiascpia 
MUsubtsm Bk Sep 00 
MTOontaAorU 
MTOovsIoDkO? 
Malaysia OCT 05 
Korea ExchMor 97 

sssftsir 

KOP2LMOTM 
Kap 15/ May 91 
KwMavta 
KamiraOvMarK 
KdbJid 97 
Ireland Navta 
IlMtangNa Feb 07 
indtan on Navta- 
IndBfe Fin Mot 94 

Iceland MOT 94 
torrl Feb 94 Feb 9< 


99ft BSD 
99* 854 

300* 843 

97* B6B 
9ft 829 
99* 829 

99ft 826 
99* 880 

Wft 854 
- H 122 

ta 162 

77ft 063 
300 -803 

1804k 813 

300* 0JX 
99* 845 

loo* (LW 
IBM 871 


ComzfikOd 

Cba-taM? “ 
QMFOT49 
, So Jul 96 
Carinio Juf 99 
CarlPtaFebTI 


Cartolo Juf 99 
CarlPtaFcbW 
Corlp to Acr 97 
Boa Carp May98 
Bnp Feb 95 
Bk Greece Mar 03 
Bk Greece Marta 
Bk Greece 3M Dec 96 
BkCMna Jutta 


>y ■ r 


zz ss 


ibrd Ala rn 
"Hjnl FrOCTta 

RSSSSS' 


« S 

5* 




ESSsr 

Bacobort Navta 
AsHoOBfiOTM 

BBSS” 

KSSiSM 


xsz is 

R 830 

sss » 

WiS 

W 870 


r *t *RI5 iNDS 




NASDAQ NATIONAL 


Salts In not 

into High Law Close Ch'ge 


Sams In Net | 

100s High LOW Close Ch'ge 


OTC Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, Dec. 31. 


Soles In NOT 

100s Hleh Low Close Ch'ge 


Sales In NOT 

lOlto High Low Close Ch'ge 


A Pea Pod 
A Plus 

AADN S 7452 7* 

ABC Rail 452615 

ABSs 20 1J 475 111k 
ABT BM 42425 

ACC COS .120 6 2503)19* 


: Cos 12a 6 250349* 


AEP .10 2 49418ft 

AEREn 62BKTO 

AESCo 1.00a 2.9 3505 35 
AFCCbl 461 9* 

AGCO JM .1 10445 3+ft 

AGCOPT 163 33 2344 44ft 

ANB5 M 2.9 127 2® 


APSHW 
ARI NOT 
ASF. 

AST 

ATS Med 
AW Ah 


Annies s JO 19 10+010* 
AarnRI B 08 .7 93 lift 


AarnRlB OB 
AaronRl 0a 
ado r Is 
AttwvM 
AOInaSB 
AWamd 
Abrams .12 
ACronw 
AtrelErit 
Accel 
ACTSHII 
ACTOlms 
AcrCsh 
A arto 33 
ACMT A 
Acmethef 
Actel 
ACT Pert 
ACTPrwi 
ACTVcMc 

Aczlom 


OB .7 93 lift 

08 J aS*??. 

4+36 28* 
61 15'+ 
1093 8Vs 
.12 IS 63 7ft 
2397 lD’b’ 
2661 4 
372 4Ai 
444 ID 
23967 21 'k 
314 J I 
32 26 28101+ 

33 9 
323 76 
132912 
877 3*» 
310 ft 
136870 
37522% 


AdOCLOS 68 3 5 378343ft 


Aoaoe 
Adaptec 
AUlngln 
AdelDtih 
AdlaSv 
AdabeS S 20 
AdvCre 
AdvHIl 
AdvRos 
Aduar 
Advlnt 
AdvLog 

AdAAkStf 

AOvPaiy 
AdvPro 
AdvSem 
AduTLb 
AdvTCTl 
AdvTlss . 
Aflvanias 20 
Aouantos 2* 
AdvSCP 
Aeautm 
Aerovk 
Aelrtum 
AtinBla 
Atvma-r 

AgSuCs 
AgnctP 


402 Jft 
1 4789 391k 
984 20 
7064 19 
.7 121 74 

9 3CWA73 
3825 2 « 
173215ft 
498 37ft 
245215ft 

7905 |* 
2599 3* 
0407 6 
5321 5'+ 
2830 9ft 
265 lft 
1051 17 
419 6'4 
3940 B* 
6 4899 34ft 


8 14715 30’b 
53824ft 


Aantcag IDe Jt 734413* 
Aoourn 
AsrlDrn 
AlrVOTtl 
AlrSet! wt 1388 2ft 

AlrSen s 
AlrSv* 

Alnrau 

Ak&m 
Ak» 


523317 
550 4ft 
207211 

f 1388 2ft 

1588 13 
48910ft 
.17 1J 69! 9* 
797 3ft 
l.TTe W 5557 49* 


AlaanKn 112+ Bft 

AtamuGn 2te 1 J 10415* 
Alaten 120 59 OTZOft 


Albany 
Aicioes 
AldllQ 
Aldus 
AigrRia 

AiexRne 

AIIoCps 
A lias R 
Alice 
Aikerm 
AllASem 
AllFDlr 
AllCItv 
JU89W 
AlrvOrg 
Allot Pti 
AlnSemi 
AlBACap 
ana 3+ 3 


20 59 4920ft 

292719ft 
42511* 
335728* 
770327’: 
M 13 323626ft 
1177 S* 

39 23 651 lift 

3131 14* 

TS .1 52 20 Vi 

3426 ri 
13320 2 
2417 2 
35 9H 

317 4* 

48a 16 43 30ft 

7410 8ft 
2291 10ft 
221ft 

40 LB »5 15*1 


Alia sir s 40 2 jB 9515* 
AldCaeC ISO to 242*16*6 
AJIOCOO 1358 93 348245* 
.978 48 56764+ vj 
31215ft 

AIK3CI 7063 14ft 

A1WGP5 -£2 2J> 446326ft 
AIOMIPB 34 1.9 37242* 


5* 5*- * 
13 13 

7ft 7* + ft 
17* 14* +2ft 

10 11 — ft 

2+ ft 24ft— ft 
17ft ip* + * 
33* +0 +5ft 
33ft 35* +2* 
17ft 18* +1 

7* 8 — ft 

17 18ft - V, 
9ft 10ft— * 

34 35 + * 

9ft 9* + * 

29* 34* +4ft 
41* 46* ++* 
26* 28 +1* 
IB* 20 +1* 

3* 3* - ft 
12 * 11 *— * 
22 * 22 ft —I* 
5* 5* 

3 3*_ 

9* 10* + * 

11 1 »* + * 

lift 12* + ft 
5ft 7 +1 

25* 27ft +2 
11* 11*— ft 
7* 7*— ft 
7* 7* + ft 

9* 1 0ft — ft 
3ft 3> + * 
3* 3* 

9* 10 + * 

20* 21ft — ft 
10ft 10*— * 

13 13* + * 

9 V 

16ft 18 + * 

II 11* + * 

35 3* + -i 

1+ * + l* 

18 * 1 9* + * 
:i* 2i*— * 
12ft 13* + * 

5* 5* + * 
37* 39* +1 
Iff'? 19 — ft 

18 18* + ft 

21* 7* +2ft 
71 22ft + ’k 
1ft 1ft— ft 

14 15* +1 

33* 37ft +4* 
14* 15* + ft 

Ift 1 + 

3 3* + * 

4* 4ft— I 
4ft Sft + ft 
8ft 9* — ft 
1* 1* + ft 

16* 16* + ft 
5ft 5ft — ft 
8ft 8ft — ft 
31ft 33ft +2ft 
27 J9 +1* 
74* 26'<> +f 
2* 2* + ft 
7* 7ft + ft 
9 10* + * 

3ft 3ft — ft 
73* 74*— * i 
14 16* 

17* 13ft + * | 
12* 13 
9 1|* +2ft 

4 4* + * 
10* 11 

2* :* + * I 

II* 17* + * I 
10ft ID* + ft 
9 9* 

3ft 3'- + ft 
48ft 48*— ft 
7* 8 + ft 

14* IS* +1 
20 20 ft + ft 
19ft 19* + ft 
10ft 10ft— I 
25ft 28* +2* 
25* 27ft +1* 
25* 24* +1 
4* 4* 

10* lift 
12* 14H +1* 
i9* a* + * 
6* 7 

2* 2*i + * 

7* I* 

9 9* + * 

<r-J 6* + * 
30 30ft —I* 
7* B - * 
8* 10ft +1* 
21ft 21ft 
J4ft 14*— * 
15* 76* +lft 


4538 9* 

'2i3?3* 

156 4 
2467 5ft 

1 7124* 


AiraGW 

Alta! 

Alteon 
Altera 
Allrnr s 
Am bar 

AmbrSlr — 

Amcnr Me 12 77 26* 

AmecrF v AS zs 2aS 19* 

Amrlon go JJ 4521* 

Amertoc 2809 i 

ArFF IaO 6J 15?*+. 

AtnFPr 106 112 237*0 

AFTkE 54 IL2 121346* 

AF7\»F7 .75 94 
Ameron Ole O 4547 $9 
AmSvce 4&J 3ft 

AUlBCO 1.00 2.9 14 34* 


1* ift_ \ 
2 * 2 *- * 
7* 8* + * 

JO* 32* +l^k 
1? 74 +3* 

3* 4 + '+ 

4* 5* + '« 


39ft +2* +2* 

16* 17 + ft 


-3* 34* +2 
24* 28* +1* 
24ft ta* +1* 
13* 15* +lft 
27ft 27*— * 
10 10* + * 

5 2 -* 

II 71 

14* 17* +3* 
7* 8ft — * 

6 6 * + * 
Bft 8ft — ft 
IS 1 . 15* + ft 
1 * 1 * 

6 6ft + ft 
•* 8 ft 

9 18ft +j* 
33* 34ft + * 
II* 14'. +2* 
Bft 34* +1* 
5* S*— * 
II 11 * + * 

22 22* + ft 

7* 7 — 

8 ft 9 ft + > s 

4* 4* 

22ft 24* +lft , 
Bft Bft 
43* 45 
lift 12ft + * 

7 7* + ft 

28 29* + * , 

19 * 22 +J* 

J3ft 33* 

17 71* +3* 

ty, 7* + * 
4* 5 — ft 


25* 26* +lft 
19’. 19* +■ V, 
2D* 21* +1 
1 l*y + 
23* 24ft + * 
9* 9* — ft 
6 * 6 * + * 
8 8 — ft 

51ft 58* +4 
2 * 2 + 

34 34 

H* 26ft + * 
4* 4* 

M 14* — * 
28 28 
2* 2ft + ft 
2 lft 22 >- * 


ABnkr 
AmBiovn 
I Am Busin 
AmCItv 

ACIOITTI 


1.00 7.9 14 34* 

68 16 170? 26'. 
2327 5 
1358 15ft 


ACoio+ds .30 

AConsu 


! AConsu 

AmDntt 

Am E col 

AmEouc 
AmFB 
ulAFilm 
AFIITrn 
AmFrgi s 


47 28* 
834 2ft 

.20 .9 1649 24 

■an 3* 

3252 ?* 
11 TN 9 
534 4* 
JO 19 880 10* 
4769 

.94 3.7 ’25* 

1644 19* 


AGrcels 50 1 5 803834* 
AHIIhcPS 498722ft 


AmHDld 

AlndF 

AminPls 
AmLTeof 2.16 BJ 
AmLck 
AMS 
A.VWE 
AmMbSor 
A Mobile 


ANUCIC 
AmOlllDv 
Am Pec 
APhrG 
APwrCy s 


120 4J E83S3 


4ta ft 
792 9* 
434914 
7060 2ft 
J0682B* 


ARecr .22 17 175 6'c 

AmRecr 1247 13 

AmP.Mtd 9* 17'-: 

Am Sal Ri 26411* 

ASvFLs 59919* 

A Soil M 5JI8M 6* 

ASTudla s J» IJ 6081 6* 

AmSuor '**■ ’*• 

Amtele 
ATravei 1565 12'+ 

AUldGIb 0+4 5^J 

AVang 1315* 

A Wood I 471 3ft 

AroAII 25e SB 3310 4 ft 

Arrerted 80 15 465 B3'. 


2* 

2 * fm + ) 
7* Bft- ft 
4* 4's 

10* 10 ft — ft 

‘+ s 

25’7 IS* — * 
17* 19* +2 
31ft 34 +2* 

18 2 1' : +3 ft 

1* 1'j — 

lift 13 
I* ? + V, 

36ft 24’: 

S* P+— ft 
)9ft 79* — * 
13’. 13ft 
nv, ar: 

13' ’« IS +1* 
SO* 51'. -1 
V. + 

I* ?ft + ft 

13 13 — ft 

lft 2 

21* 23* -I ft 
5* 6 + ft 

12 12* - ft 

16ft 16* 

lift II* 

18ft 19' o— * 


r 

Autoint 
Autcom .991 

AutOCTtf 34 2.9 

AUlodk M l.l 

AutaGD 
AUtOUnu 
AulDInd 
Aulotal s 
Avatar 
AvIdTCT* 

Avndie 

AltCM .10 20 


BioLoglc 

BlaMWSl 

BlaMWwtB 

b'SISct S 


«?V 3* 3* 

10^2 3 4 3 * 
S! !* f* 


Bwoen 

Bloanwt 

BioleCT 

Blomag 

Biamatr 

Bio met 

Btomlra 

»BST 

BJoTtet 


7(09040* 39 
74721 19ft 


3* 3* + * 
3* ft 
* *— * 
5* 6* * * 

3 3* + ft 
9* 10* + * 

4 4ft + ft 

19 39* + * 

19ft 20 - * 
4* 5 + * 

3 3*- * 

7ft Bft + * 


Sates In Net 

100s High Law Close Ch'ge 

+6*6 lift 12* 16* +TO 
3432 29ft 30* +1* 
6608 32 29 * 31* +1 


Salas In Net 

100s Htoh Low Cloee CtVea 


i In Not 

i Hish Low Cteie Ch'ge 


Sates In NOT 

inis HU Law Close Ch'ge 


4666 17ft 12* 16* +4H 
3632 19ft 30* +1* 
6608 32 29 * 31* +1 

1586 3* 3* 3* 

19 1* 1ft 1ft 
2279 3 2 2* 

17121+ 12* 13ft +• * 

1310V) 10* 10*— 1 


BtoTGw196 
BlrdCp : 
BirdMd 
Blrtchr 
BlkHwk 


3860 5 4ft 5 + * Cononle 

3939 3* 3 3ft— * Cans tor 

930 8* 7ft Bft + * Cantab . 
2197111* ID* 10ft— * Ccntbrv 
3787 7ft 4ta- 7Vk + * 

394 3* 2* 3 + ft Conr 

186 8ft 7ft 7* CCBT 

1653 6* 5* 5*— ft CnoAic 

5Si lft 1 l — CotoBruc 

95+7 5ft «% 3ft + * CnoBn pt 

*65 lft * ta - ft CapSvgy 

I 82 1% 1* I’ft + * C y Sw 

20 2A 2140 8* 4* B* +1* CaollBc 


56t 3 1 90 69* 46* 68* +1* 


8SS - !* *8 

CrzBnch 

Si?,^ 7 ‘ ” 

SSKSS 1 ^ ” 


.10e A 70024* 23* 24* + » 


790 + 3 3* + ft 

23510 9*8 9*— ft 

47 7 6 6ft ♦ ft 

885 4 3ft 4 

1663 4ft 3ft 4* + * 

261 1* 1ft 1ft + ly 

33324 22 24 +1* 
444 1?ii lft lft 
719 I? 1? — * 


AS 16 719 I? 1? — * 

1.9S 9.2 421* 21* 21ft—* 

186513* 12* 13 


lft 3' i 3ft 3'k - ft 


S lkHwtA 
IfcHwtB 

BtacD? 


lft + ft CapSrr -AOe 15 77 39* a* 38* + * 

Bft +lft CaotIBC ^le ZJ 93 9* 9 9 

J-U-V, CopTrs 2So 13 24017 la 17 +1 

3ft— ft Caroustr 3b 11 290216* 15* 16* +1 

10ft— ft CardBnc 332* 32* 32* + * 


CUnlcm s 

QlntGs 

Olnlrfah 

Cloth 

QubCar 


LOB 40 Iff ft* 
3» 3D iroS 24 25 +7 

M 23 72 10* 10ft IS* + ft 

140 9* 9 9* + * 

M 15 2433 22ft 33 + ft 

277 5* 5ft 5ft— ft 
98614 12ft 12* -1 
, 844 7ft lft 7ft + ft 
12608 5 4ft 4* 

.16 5A 702 3* 2* 2ft— ft 
_ . 660 12* 72 12* + ft 

Pt 231 IA 2028 27 27 + ft 

T* 1321 6 3* 4 +2» 

256722. 17ft 21ft +3* 



3ft 6 +2* 

256722 17ft 21ft +3* 
392 3ft 2ft 3ft + ft 
7037 72ft 10* 12ft +1* 


4439 Bft 7ft 7ft— ft 
229+15* 15 15ft 


CoObBK JBe J 768 15ft 14ft 15ft + ft 


33 lft lft lft + ft gtodPl 
30 7ft 2* 2ft- ft CVIS 
072 2"« 1* 2 4 * CareEnl 


BlocDv 6072 r 1 * 1* 2 + * CareEnt 73S9 9* 

BIchD lD+t) 2J 54537* 33* 37ft 43* CareCp 7790 3* 

airtti 30S713 11 12*— ft Caroline 3107 10 

BaaiBns 1 24 A2 714030'+ 2"* 29ta 4 ft Cnenwk 1570 3* 

BoOEvn 7T 1.2 236022* 21ft 21ta 4 ft CorICnl IJIfe 19 22329* 

BocaRs 2795 7”k 6ft 7 + * CaroFsl JOg 15 7+1 13 

Body Dr 961 3ft 2ft 3ft 4 ft CnrsPIr 2571 14ft 

Bollinger S2+ 12’. 10ft 11* +|* Carver SIS 3* 

Ban Ton 1+60 5'. 7* 8*4* Cffiscde AOa +1 19919* 

Boo+MIII 179022* 19* 21* 41* CoseYS ..IS A Z7+024H 

BooteB 53225 23ft 25 + * CosnCrd 794 8* 


Amrtiasi 

AmerCos 

Amerwds 

armed 

Amgen 

Amlstar 
Amne. 
Ampler 
Amrlan s 
Amserv 


534 6'. 
785 12'. 
M5 1+' : 
> 64826* 
75698 51 


6 4’ » * ■» 

31* 34 *2 

1! 18 
12 12 — • : 
5'. 5 1 .*’. 
1+ 15* + ft 

3* 3* .. 
«'» +v. + -i 
32 32 -1 

Sft 3ft + ft 
lift lift + ft 
16 16 + ft 

25’ : 26ft + ft 
47'. 49.: +3 


lft 2 + 

18* 20ft +1* 
7ft Tft— ft 


SB&r 1JM 

BE Aero 
BEI El 08 

BEI .15* 

BF EOT 
BFSNY 
BOS AOo 

BHA .17* 

BHCFns BO 
Bl inc 
BISYS 
BKC5ett) 

BMC 5U 
BMC WSI 
BMJ 
BNH 
BPI Pkg 
BPI wt?4 
BPi wr«6 
BS0BCS 76 
BT Fin UJ8b 
BTSTIP 
BTU Ini 
BWIP JS 
Batcge 
BaCTiint 
BaCT.Ba. 
Bodgrri J0| 
Belle* 

BkHg wt 
BtterJ M 
Balchem JB3 


3-7 687734 
70'oe >o*» 
12 587 7va 
II 313+7* 
IIS 4 
7318ft 
23 77627* 

A 1+5 13* 
J 115427* 
2558 5 

7100 |7* 


BldL/BS 40 
BaklPIO 
BaivGm 
Baltek 

BOTPone 1.00 
BcOne otOJO 
BncFsTOK J4 
BnctetOM 1.7? 
Bancirs 

BncGalle 32r 

EccSju 1380 
BCPNJ A0 
Banctc s 

Ban oa M .96 
Banco pt J9e 
B) South 33 
SkGrans .44 
BnkNH Me 
B*5Ped 
Bank All ,05r 
BnkuiO -10b 
BkUlFpt 
BkWorc M 
Boners 5 
BnkFst .IQe 
Bknfh JOe 
Bento s Si 
Bonv.'AJ 
BanvSL2 

BanvPT AO 

BtmvnS. 

BarCTi 

Barra 

BareiBus 

BOretRs 

BsTnB rt 

BsTnA 

BdtPtr 

BasE+pt 

Baseffs A) 

Ba+Vw A0 

BarBis UM 

Bayprts 

BeauCti 30 

BeoBthi 

Bcebta JOe 

Bel Fuse 

BOTdBlk 

Be 1 tre .I5e 

BCTIBcd 

Bdwic 

BeiiSot 

Benjer? 

BFrwikR 

Betman 

Ben JOG 

Berkley AO 

BarkGs UM 

Bertuei 

Best Pwr 

Bes too 


AmleCos 08 J 88+924* 


Am f rnrt 

amtroi _ 

Arrives! 5 
Amviln 
Anlaglc 
MOlr 7c .22 13 


=550 10* 
ISe A 100520* 
111*11 


.48 27 514 18 


Anangel IDO- 6J) 703 16* 


AncBriOs -I0e J 14+0 24 
AnflrGr 74« y? 

AndvBc .15e 1.0 1307 76* 
AndvTog I 52 ?* 
Andrews 30ai n* 


12* 14* +2 
12* 14* +1* 
M* 15* 4 * 
12* 14* +1*, 
24* 26* +1* 
12* 12* + ft 
19ft 21* +2* 
12 ft 12 * ♦ * 
5 5ft + ft 
4* 7* ■+ » 
15* 17 +1* 

4 5 

1* IV, + * 

14ft 14*— 1 
5. 5*-- * 

»ft 32ft +1* 
1* 1 + 

* * 

4* 4ft 
J 5 — ft 


AMdHldg 
AidLite 
AidWsSe 
AJlstFn 
Alllrteta 
AloeHe 
AlPMic 
AtoTOl 
Aieiwwt 
AtsnoBto 
Aloha ri 
Alahr wt 
A la Lee 


AiateeM .B7g 7.4 1*2 6 


AndvTog 
Andrew s 
Andros 
Anergen 
Anlec 
Apertus 
APnEn M 
ApoV-C A0 
ADISou s 
Aolebee s M 

APlReCf 

APdE+fr 

ABiascts 

apI Caron 

Apdirnu 

APdinov 

AplOMt S 

apomict 

ABdSCi 

APdSCT wl 

oCTasto 

ArabSn 

Aramed 

Arttar 20 

AroorHI 

ArbrNtl 

ArChCm 

ArchPt 

Aixncos .21 

Arden 

Arertiuxi 

ArptiTBs AS 


867 16* 
1405 5ft 
1176225 
3430 J* 
30 1.9 1229 77* 
A0 1.68056330ft 
294721ft 


M 1 +IJ97 33* 

257 14 
108? +ft 
6OT5 S’- 
839 1', 
2+51 10 
27446’: 
29|9|39’+ 
2+1 Sft 
344 9'-: 
406 I 1 ': 
485 7 
030 Tft 
343 25* 
20 12 119420* 
35+618 
335 18’ : 
1583 14ft 
546 6ft 
.21 .9 297B24' 4 

.1851 

34210* 
.48 3 1 122* 


n* 2+ * * 

9* + ft 
19 19* —1 

70ft 11 ■- * 

ID* 13 +2* 

75* 15ft— ft 
17* 77ta— ft 
17 18 + * 

16* 16* + * 
1 2 

11* »Zft + ft 
23*. 24 * 

4* 5 : +1* 
IS* 15ft— * 
2ft 2ft 
34 ": 38' ■: *1* 
15 16 + ft 

5 5 - V? 

23 25 + * 

3ft 3ta + ft 

74* 16 + * 

T7ft 29ft +2 

20ft 21 + ft 

30'. 33* +3W 
73 lift + ft 
3* +ft + ft 
4* Sft * * 
ft ft- ft 
+ 10 - * 
a 44 + -,, 
J4* 38* +3ta 
sv, s* 

Sft 8ft— ft 
IV. lft- ft 


ArroGo IJ» 33 53131ft 


Argosy 567419ft 

ArgusPh VO rt 

Arivot 287? 

Ari-Eesl 04 J 2431 15* 
Armor 6+ 33 l*W20* 
Arnolds .48 1.4 115121 
AITIsPh 7392 oft 

AronFn J+b 1.4 138 >3 
Arawinr .10 0 756 23* 

Arrow 777r 17 7ft 

ArtSH 9080 16 

ArtfeJG .10 IJ 1181 6 
ArfWav 1211 

Aswtre 9108 ITO 

a sees 1281 TO 


2ft Z'« 

25ft 25ft— ft 
T9* 20* 

15ft 17 +1* 

18 18 — 
73* 13*— ft 
4ft 4ft - ft 
20V; 24 -TO 
47 51 ++ 

9* 10* +;vk 

Mft »; 

17* 18ft- ft 

5. 5 - * 


U* 15ft + * 
19 ' s I?*- Vb 
18". 21 +2 
S* 4* + ft 
12". ITO - l* 
20* 23* +3 
7 7ft + ft 
14ft 14ft— ft 
5ft Sft- ft 
II II ♦ * 

10 12ft +2* 

4ft 4ft— ft 


BOTWBC 32 
Big B 3 .12 

Bfgorrs 
BlgRck 
BlntSv SB 


7103 ITO 

2144049ft 
148430'S 
1308 Oft 
1383 1ft 
3353 d’k 
528 r + 
74| I* 
12 16125ft 
IS 2931ft 
1017 3ft 
7232 ?ft 
lJ 4079 25ft 

40S614’'i 
2590 TO 
417 irg 
3SI2ta 
3826 13'h 
4071 ft 
J 20524 18* 
S 412 5* 

15 ft 16ft 

415ft 
615017* 
54 TO 

12 125131ft 
SI 2=249 
1.7 22945’K 

16 I J 48 
103 6ft 

A 335+ 41ft 
33 18+33 

2.4 48 70* 
249? 24ft 

5-4 5946ft 

15 3224 

2.1 2*22 15ft 

1.4 J9 30* 
5 1639 17ft 

.4 85343* 
IJ 100 Bft 
2010* 
A J+033 
352 lift 
3 441 18’ : 

15 =6420 
1.4 7814 37. 
472 t;+ 

10+6 is 

9 3 477 4ft 

1488515 
131134ft 
40+ 7 
21614ft 
244510ft 
203 4ft 
1304 9* 
5742 

1671 11* 
2J 300 Mft 
U 867 21* 

3.0 4529 SO* 
1411 5 

2D 1182 14*. 

13699 34* 
4 2 559 7* 
794 9 
610 10ft 
10 1914* 

546 47’!. 
625 B l i 
10800 32ft 
2167 16* 
1766 Sft 
. 130 3ft 
177*7 $ 

1.1 8940 35ft 

«j4 1347* 

123374+: 
260314ft 
7771 2* 

13 124 
1JJ 2547 ITO 

24614ft 
205 < 

.7 368 IT* 


32* 33* + ft 

9 I Oft +1 

4* 6’-k + ft 

7ft 7* 

3* J* 

18 18 

25* 26* -I* 

17 13 + ft 

25’ » 27- +Jft 
Sft 5* — ft 
16* ITO ♦ ft 


Body Dr 

8a lllnaer 

Han Tan 

Book Mill 

BooteB 

800m town 

vIBoanEI 

Borol S .98e 4J 

Borind 

BOS7AC .40 23 

BOS BC Jt If 

Bosicnek 
BasiTc 

Blvd&C 20 A 

BaxEn A 
Ba+En B 

BradWV AS 16 


685516* 14ft 14ft— lft I CasnC wl 

13a '« ft ft— S CnsAmjj 


•98e 03 1243'+ 21* 2Zta + ft CaslnaDS 

199+gii 14* 14ft— 1 CasJYHMS .... .. 

BOSTAC .40 2J 32016ft 16 16 —1 Cas»wt 560 1 » 1ft it* + ft 

Bos Be Jt 11 82536 35 36 +1 CajnRsc 862 4ft 3ft 4ft — ft 

Basenck 4851 30’i 3Sft 34 —2 CASriEs SI92T3* 11 12* + ft 

BasiTc 5673 9’+ S’- Bft— ft CatolSem 7418 Tta 6* 7* + * 

Blvd&C 30 A 490 24 3* 23* + ft Caralvt 3WJ 7* 6ft 7* + ft 

BaxEll A 19626 20 76 +4* CattiBep 40 02 1414ft 13* 14ft— ft 

Ba+En B 7489 ) 2* lift 12ft +1'+ ComStr 76517ft 16* 17ft— * 

BradWV AS 14 9143 41ft 43 +lft CatoCPS 10 J ^?0V) 17ft ?0^ + ft 

arantre J»9e A 192 12 ? lift 1: +1 CMScl 4HI I 1 l", 

BrrtdSv 556 * % ft COTSewt 1045 N 

§r?£S. ?2 ? 714 J . 7 — ft Celeb Inc 2701 Sft 4* 4ft —I 

Brkwtg 332+ + Csiatlcl 15*3S* 24* 34* W 

Brenco 30 IA 150512'+ 10"1 12'+ +1* CMex 38526ft 2+ft 26ft 

vlSrendl _ __ 198 1* 1> lft-* Cetaeme 2m 7. rt 7 


.12 J 316048* 46U. 47ft +1 
7777 2 lft 2 + ft 

919 7ft 4* Tft + * 
7389 9ft 8ft 9ft + * 
7790 3* 3ft 3ft + * 
310710 9 . lft— ft 

1570 3ft 3ft Jft 
JJ9e 19 223 29ft 27ft 28ft — ft 
30b 1 J 241 13 12* 13 + ft 

2571 Mft 13* 1 4ft + ft 
SIS 3ft 2ft 2*6— h ‘ 
AOa 11 19919V; 18 19Vj + ft 

.15 A 2740 14ft 23ft I4V* + ft 
794 Bft Sft Sft— I 
469 2ft 2 J13 + ft 

3200 MU 23ft 24 —I 
394 27* 21 26* — ft 

1733?T4Jk 13 13J3— * 


CstBnC 98513* 12* 13ft + ft 

QrtBnpf 225 9.1 20725 34ft 24*—* 

CsIHim 31I6« 37* 39* +1ft 

CobOTKP A* 22 2729* 29 29ft— 3ft 

CobroEl JJ82 3 2ft 2* 

Cobra _ 423927ft 25* 27ft + « 

CocaBII 38 2 A 92937 3 6ft 36ft + ft 

Cocrasvs 997 4 3ft 4 

CodaEn 3998 5ft 4ft Sft + ft 

CodeAl 34912 lift 12 + ft 

ColTexip 2441 16ft 16ft 16ft—* 

Coctkko 483614*72 M*+2ft 

CoanosB 275711ft ftall +ft 

Cohasel .I4e 18 47 Mft 13ft T4V.-+ * 

CCTtamt 256513* 12ft 12*—* 

CohoEn 3W« 3ft 4* + * 

CatoDR 2414 4ft J* J* + ft 

Co town Z30B28V: 26ft 27* +lft 

CoiBcps A8 22 275022 20ft 21* +2 

Collins. JW .. 1052 2* 2ft 2ft + ft 

CBCPPA 72 38 1034 T9ft lift 18* 
OXnlGm 120 15 25922* 22 22ft— * 

CctnGo A0 2.1 S629 2E 2B — 1 

ColBr* 57710ft 9ft T0V: 

CalFst 17934ft 32ft 33 — 1 

Corn airs 24 1A 11136 25 22* 22ft— 1* 


560 1 * lft It, + * 
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5192 13V. II 12* + ft 
7418 7ta 6* 7* + * 


48 — * 
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554 * '« ft 

7379 7ft 7 7 — ft 

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IC05 11 KJft 10ft- ft Cel I Pro 
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7CC2 32 29* 31* 4-1* Cetistor 

,913,f}'’ ,J* 4 + ft CelCmA 

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155610+ 9* 10 — * Ceirin 
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14020ft 19ft 30ft +-lft I Cencall 


Si? . Canted s .151 .9 
103915* Mft IS* +-1 CerlIBcp Ja 1.7 
*. Cent I BC 137112.9 

160514ft 13* 14* +• * Cent Cel 
669516* 16 16* + ft ClrBnk 

5041 lift 11 11*- .1 Centrt* 

24 l? 19194 Vs Oft 8ta + ft Cent*TI 
40 17 .7732* 31* 37ft +■ "1 Centerm 
93516* 14* 16 +■ ft CeniScor 

6415 26 + 2** 25* +■ ft Center vrt 
<^16* 15ft !»• +■ ’■« OrCOo 
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2587 22ft 21ft 22ft + ft 
1701 ITO 17 ITO +■ ft 
173311 9* 17 *■ ft 

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41ft 42ft— 1* 
27 27ft.— 1 

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2 2 ft + ft 
8 10ft -rtft 
29* 31* -Hft 
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18 IB*— ft 
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Comcoa 5615* 14* 14*—* 

CmdtHdS 2736 8 7* 8 + * 

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gratavr 38 73 312 10* 12 +2 

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32 33 188 6* 7ft 8* + * 

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488326 a 26 + * 


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CotlrikJ* 292011* 10 10* + ft oimPIri 

CobotM UIIS.I 3554 .5T. 5»g 5ta + ft 


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555 Tft tfta 7 + ta 

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CooprD 120 3Vr 3ft 2ft 

COOPOTL 93 Bft 7* Bft + * 

COoOBAS S221ft Mft 21ft— « 

CoaroB JDb 3.1 402917 15* Mta + ft 

COOMVS 338040 32 39ft +5* 

COPYTCT 4889 t3ta lift IJ -flta 

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CorGabF 351717 M 14* + * 

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Page 1 


lfrJ_ 

^rE 1 


«>i I I > ill Ml IIWII S „ .. . _ 

jjjnrniai ri|s jnT rs 

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China 9 s Shifting Wall of Trade 

Bequag Lowers Some Import Barriers, Adds Others 


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:.: CtirSUby Our S&Fnm Dhpeufta 
" BEIJING — Chin* lowered same impart 
lwrriffl ^hfc B Wrir itmT to XQCCt Washmg tftn's 
New Yea deftdfine for better market access, 
but ftmq?ed*t the swntfime to set up others, 
Ihc officid press reported over tfae weekend. 

On Samnlay.Qnmi abashed quotas sad 
imnnit H ransfiS on Ml nrodocts. indufiie 
axf^anddvil aircraft, die People's Daily 
iqiart^ ft ratacedtaifife fra 234 products, 
mdnrifng fntatzcrs, feed and zinc, whose 
prioa would have risen because of the float of 
as ameocy, the pmr sakL 

In an. Qctdber 1992 market access agree- 
ment betwtaa the United States and unm, 
Bqjing agreed to remove toreMparters of its 
non-tanff trade barriers witom two years, 
Saturday was the fiat major deadline under 
this ag e em ent ■ 

But mcontmt to these market-opening 
moves, Bramg alsopubbshod a list of elec- 
tronics and machinery products it will con- 
twiM to pr ot w .i t » f ni g quotas compul- 


sory bidding the China Daily reported. Tbe 
government is also set to curb duty-free car 
imports, it said on Sunday. 

Officials told die pqxr the government 
would strengthen control over imports of IS 
product* on the quota list, including cars, 
motorcycles, video recor de rs, computers and 
air conditioners. All these products were al- 
ready subject to quotas, officials say. 

Coma also published a list of 171 products 
— including machinery used for textiles pro- 
duction, communications, and shipbuilding 
— that it will protect by insisting purchases 
be made using “international procedures’* 
such as quotas and tariffs, according u> a 
joint statement by the State Economic and 
Tirade Commission and the foreign trade 
nmisuy. 

Excessive imports of some consumer prod- 
ucts would hurt the development of the rele- 
vant mdnjtfries in Am* and hurt the coun- 
try's widnsiriat adjustment, the ffrin* Daily 
quoted a trade official as saying, 


Chinese consumers, flush with cash from 
the nation's economic boom, have rushed to 
buy imported goods in recent months. Im- 
ports grew 27JS percent in the first 3 1 months 
of 1993 from the same period last year, to 
reach SS5.95 billion, while exports rose only 
62 percent, to S7fL25 billion. 

Among the tariff cuts announced over the 
weekend were a reduction fra small cars, 
fnm 150 percent to 110 percent, and for large 
cars, from 220 percent to 180 percent 

Dispite this, imports of cars are expected 
to fall because of die effect of the yuan’s float 
a dampdown on smuggling and a possible 
end to doty-free car import privileges fra 
foreign -funded firm*, the f'hma Daily quoted 
officials as saying. 

Tbe cuts in car tariffs will be on top of 
reductions effective Dec. 31 for products 
ranging from computers to gasoline, an- 
nounced in November. That move reduced 
China's average tariff rate from 39.9 percent 
to 36.4 percent. ( Bloomberg; ATP) 


Bundesbank 
Sees Inflation 
Falling in 1994 


companies, the 

and with ft the agency's bantnnx^ department ■ ■’“v* > : "t 
■ Mr. Bresson, who is in char - " * - ■ 

Italian arid* Spanish markets. 


Unified Yuan Bale Gets Baptized in Fire of Market 


CmpOttty&v Staff Rom Vupateba 
BED1NG — The success or 
fatoue of China’s abolition of of- 
ficial ndjany controls will be 

by the Hwtwiiy irinrlrm 

on Monday, foreign vesture 


fused financial system. Unto the Certificate, should continue to be 
measure, a dual system of ex- exchanged in banks at the official 


change rates was scrapped and 
replaced by a unified exchange 


rate of 5.8 yuan to the dollar eva 
though it is gradually to be with- 


it is not only .the spread^ we want geota -e placement,? Me. 


camesdreefeeapest pace. 


If a drank 


the hp'rilc 
indicated 


remember,” Mr. Bresson sad. 




China scrapped its system of 
thud currency rates an Saturday 
to let the yuan, be traded in hne 
with ranker forces at 8.7 to the 
AjiiiTj i-pjaTKiig ^ devaluation of 
50pgcent c ompar ed with the old 
official exchange rate of 5-8 yuan. 

He move, announced by the 
official Xinh ua news agency, 
marked toe end of fora decades 
of-ratMetting by central plan- 
ners. 

- -The new level was set accord- 
ing .to. toe average dollar price 
Fnday at foreran exchange swap 
markets around the country, X5n- 
hua quoted acentral bank release 
as saying. 

" The caitral bank had an- 
nounced toe move on Wednes- 
day, in a$tep seen as preparing 
the way to make the yuan fully 
and ftedy .convertible, a goal still 

viewed as some yens away, and 
to bring order into China's cob- 


rate set in line with a managed drawn, according to a decree 

Hie move Is seen as a step toward 
preparing the way to make the yuan a 
folly and freely convertible currency, a 
goal viewed as years away, and to bring 
order into a confused finanmal system. 


float against a basket at curren- 
cies. 

.. While banks were dosed fra 
toe New Year holiday, joint ven- 
ture hotels and shr^s offered eas- 
tomers vastly di ff ere nt rates, in- 
dnding 8 j 05 yuan to the dollar in 
the state-run Friendship Store; 
Others ignored a central bank de- 
cree banning price rises and lev- 
ied SO percent surcharges fra im- 
parted products. 

China’s cogen cy reserved for 
foreigners, toe Foreign Exchange 



published in toe People's Daily. 

This was a great relief for for- 
eign business executives, who 
hold thousands of certificates. 

“I drink toe most important 
day is Monday because toe gov- 
ernment said it would give ns a 
rate rf 8.7, but in reaHiy it could 
be a kit more volatile,’* said Udo 
HriruSk manager of the Palace Ho- 
tel- 

Traders at Pima's largest cur- 
rency market in Shanghai expect- 
ed Evdy trading an Monday. 


They said they hoped the central 
bank wonki intervene to keep toe 
yuan stable, as it has over the last 
three months. 

In one positive sign. Beijing's 
black markets have quoted toe 
yuan at a level of 8.6, a fraction 
stronger than toe floating rate 
and the same price that has been 
quoted since toe float was an- 
nounced on Wednesday. 

Most brokers had not expected 
the float to occur before toe Na- 
tional Foreign Exchange Center 
opened later this month. This 
center is connected to currency 
markets throughout China. 

It is also not dear which banks 
wiQ be allowed to trade on the 
marker and what wffl happen to 
toe nation's 100-odd swap mar- 
kets, in winch banks and bad- 
nesses previously swapped hard 
currency for yuan, they said. 
Companies are supposed to 
change money at banks under the 
new system. ' 

Wild swings could aggravate 
China’s gaping trade deficit and 
inflation, which hh 14 5 percent 
this year. Western diplomats say. 

(Bloomberg AFP) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatha 

FRANKFURT — President 
Hans Tieuneyer of toe Bundesbank 
said in a newspaper interview pub- 
lished Sunday that West Germa- 
ny’s inflation rate might fall bdow 
3 percent in 1994, from 3.6 percent 
in 1993, and that such progress 
might allow toe “possibility of fur- 
ther interest rate cuts." 

Separately, Gerd Haller, toe sec- 
ond-ranking nffirial jn Germany’s 
Finance Ministry, warned Sunday 
that Germany will not allow toe 
new European Monetary Institute 
to exceed its responsibilities and 
try to influence daman monetary 
policy. 

"From tbe German point of 
view, there can naturally be no 
question that the European Mone- 
tary Institute will have any influ- 
ence whatsoever over the monetary 
policy of toe Bundesbank," he said 
m a radio interview. 

Mr. Tieuneyer voiced optimism 
on inflation and hinted at further 
rate cuts. 

“We expect to achieve a better 
result in 1994.” Mr. Tietmeyer said 
in reference to toe 1993 inflation 
rate at 3.6 percent “We do not rule 
out that in toe course of the year we 
will also have a two in front of the 
decimal point." 

“Our policy also includes toe 
possibility of further interest rate 
cots in toe event that the expansion 
of money supply weakens," he said. 

The Bundesbank narrowed its 
target range for M-3 money supply 
growth in 1994 to a range of 4 to 6 
percent in spite of toe fact that 
growth could not be kepi within 
this range for toe past two years. 
Money supply growth is a leading 
indicator that measures future in- 
flationary trends. 

Under pressure to show progress 
an tbe economy ahead of this year’s 
19 local, stale, national and Euro- 
pean Parliament elections, German 
politicians have renewed efforts to 
persuade toe central bank to move 
faster to Iowa rales. 

Friedhdm Ost, economic expert 
from Chancellor Helmut Kohl's 


Christian Democratic Union, said 
that in the face of soaring unem- 
ployment the Bundesbank should 
underpin budding economic 
growth by lowering key rates. 

“The inflation rate will fall," he 
said The Bundesbank's room for 
maneuver in monetary policy is in- 
creasing so that the leading interest 
rates could be significantly lowered 
again." 

Regarding the institute, the Eu- 
ropean Community member states 
agreed in October to establish the 
body in Frankfurt, where the Ger- 
man central bank also has its bead- 
quarters. Tbe institute is meant to 
be a forerunner to a European cen- 
tral bank. 

Mr. Haller stressed that tbe new 
institute would have two tasks. 

The first was to coordinate poli- 
cies of tbe European Community 
member stales “witoont in any way 
affecting the autonomy of member 
states, and concretely in the case of 
Germany, tbe Bundesbank.” He 
said that toe German central bank 
remains “wholly free” in tbe sec- 
raid stage of European Monetary 
Union. 

The second task of toe new insti- 
tute would be the preparation of 
the third stage of monetary union, 
Mr. Haller said stressing that the 
tasks and responsibilities of the in- 
stitute were laid down by the Maas- 
tricht treaty on European union. 

“We will of course not allow the 
institute to exceed those responsi- 
bilities that are dearly laid down 
there, and I don't think the Bundes- 
bank will either he said 

Mr. Haber said Germany could 
not accept a proposal from Spain, 
Portugal and Greece to exclude 
countries applying for membership 
in the Community — Austria, Fin- 
land, Norway and Sweden — from 
toe process, which is meant to lead 
toward monetary union. 

Regarding toe language to be 
used within the institute, Mr. Hal- 
ler made it dear that he expected it 
to be German. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


AFarint-Pincher Thrives 

East’s Copy King Duplicates U.S. Success 




RlUiNCY AND CAPITA]. MARKET SERVICES 


CUWNCT MAK&GBIKENT COIPGRAHDN P*£ . 
VtadKSier House, 77Loodoa«Il - London EC2M JND 
— ..." ttt! 071-3829745 ft* 074382 9*7 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE & GOLD 


sagBsy; 

Help! Which markets should I invest in 7 ' 










By Henry Copeland 

SpcriaJ to the Herald Tribune 

BUDAPEST — Asked about his black Converse 
All Stars, Paul Panitz, a 46-year-dd millionaire, 
volunteers that they cost S19 five years ago. Later, 
he recalls buying an office chair for S50 at a 1981 
auction. And on a given afternoon, he may be 
found in a copy shop not far from the Danube 
River, reminding employees that a copy machine 
uses six times less toner when operated with its lid 
closed 

“Sometimes Raul is too 


SMALL) 

business! 


we wouldn’t be gating ready 
to open our fourth store in 
Budapest," says Erno Duda, 

Mr. Pamtfs 25-year-old pro- 
ttgfc and co-owner of Copy 
General Hungary. 

In a business where margins are paper thin, Paul 
Pamirs frugality has made him toe king of copy- 
ing of Eastern Europe. Since his first strae opened 
in Budapest in June of 1991, Mr. Panitz. has 
apenedtnreemoireCopyGaieralshopsinHungft- 
xy, two shops in Prague and rate in Warsaw. In the 
process, he has surpassed in size the six-store 


Copy General's name and initial expertise. Soon, 
new Copy General shops will open in Budapest, 
Prague and Plzen. 

Copy machines — (race kep t under lock and key 
to prevent them from spawning saiwdat, or un- 
doground publishing — are humming in Eastern 
Europe. Demand has been so gnat that all but one 
of the Copy Generals hoe nave broken even in 
operating results afta four months, compared with 
an industry average of nine months in the United 
Stales, acarrtong to Mr. Panitz. 

Copy General's Budapest flagship now spins 
through eight kflometas (five miles) of paper 
every month, and one of tbe Prague shops recently 
completed an rada of 2 mfllkm pages fra a corpo- 
rate training 

But oddly, wink Copy General has multitudes 
of small competitors — almost every stationery 


BusinessWeek 


This week’s topics: 

0 1994 Industry Outlook 
O Japan*. Suppliers Reel As Giants Buy Abroad 
O Bill And Boris' Stfcty Summit 
O The Best Of 1993 

O In Moscow, The Attack Of^ The Killer Brands 

Now available at your newsstand! 

. BusinessWeek international 
14, a* d 1 Duchy, CH-1B06 Lusanne Tel. 41-21-617-4411 
For subscriptions can UK 44-628-23431 Hong Kong 852-523-2939 


store here sports a desktop copier — hs enterprises 
constitute the only chain of full-servke copy shops 
in Eastern Europe. Copy General's uncontested 
position m hs category is a measure not only of Mr. 
Panitz’s business acumen, but his willingness to 
persevere through tribulations that have thwarted 
others. 

Sieve Haas, 32. who helped launch Copy Gena- 
al in Poland and the Czech Republic, notes that in 
the United Slates “you can pick up a telephone, 
call an attorney and get incorporated in 24 hours, 
then have office space leased and furniture 
brought in another 24 hours.” In contrast, says Mr. 
Haas, “these things we spent months trying to 
achieve here.” Still unable to secure a telephone 
line fra one Budapest store. Copy General will 
soon install CB radios. 

Mr. Panitz came to Budapest in September 
1990, looking for something exciting to do with 
himself and some of the $1.7 million he had earned 
from selling Unicom Graphics, a printing business 
he started m Washington D.C. in 1971. 

Afta an unsuccessful two-month search for a 
site for toe oopy shop he hoped to open, Mr. Partitz 
tried to negotiate a joint venture with a Hungarian 
copy firm. This too failed. In another attempt to 

• _ • m 1 5 t .-J . 11 - 


ing the streets and putting notes on the windows of 
vacant stores. 

Nearly seven months after his arrival, Mr. Panitz 
finally found a basement on the southern fringe of 
the business district. The location was not great 
and the landlord wanted five years rent, up front, 
but Mr. Panitz had little choice. 

In addition to the advance rent, Mr. Panitz had 
to pay cash for his first copy machines, bringing his 
total outlay for the first store to $380,000. 

Revenues were $121,000 fra that store’s first six 
months of operations. Now, monthly revenues for 
all operations have swelled to S340.000 as custom- 
ers have lined up to lake advantage of the compa- 
ny’s long hours and attention to detai l . Copy 
General shops have been so profitable that, with 
the exception of one $100,000 loan, each successive 

store has been financed by established stores. 


Federated 
Acquires 
Macy Stake 

Reuters 

CINCINNATI — Federated 
Department Stores Inc., owners of 
Bloomingdale's and Abraham & 
Strauss, said Sunday that it had 
acquired a stake in R. H. Macy & 
Co. for S449.3 million, with the 
eventual goal of combining the 
stores into a single chain. 

The stake is 50 percent of the 
claim held by tbe Prudential Insur- 
ance Co. of America in the Chapter 
1 1 reorganization (rf Macy. 

Federated paid $1093 million in 
cash, and the balance is due in 
three years and bean interest at a 
floating rate. The transaction also 
gives Federated an option to ac- 
quire toe remaining 50 percent of 
Prudential's secured claim within 
three years. 

Federated said it bad acquired 
half of the Prudential claim with 
toe ultimate objective of working 
toward a combination of Federated 
and Macy into a “single nationwide 
multi -billion -dollar department 
store operation, with toe potential 
for great enhanced operating effi- 
ciencies.” Macy could not be 
reached for comment. 

The principal amount of Pruden- 
tial's secured loan to Many’s was 
S 832.5 mini on Tbe loan bears in- 
terest at a rale of 12 percent a year, 
none of which has been paid since 
toe Many’s Chapter 11 filing in 
1992. 

Taking into account the accrued 
interest on the loan since the filing, 
the actual amount of the Prudential 
claim against Macy was more than 
SI billion, Federated said. 


ASIAN CAPITAL HOLDINGS FUND 

20, Boulevard Emmanuel Servais, 

L-2535 Luxembourg 

RGB. 43160 

NOTICE TO TBE SHAREHOLDERS 

The shareholder* arc hereby convened to the Extraordinary 
Central Meeting to be held in Luxembourg on January 21a, 1994 
at KMM) turn, with the following agenda: 

1. Increase of the authorised capital from USD 70.000,000 - to 
USD 90,000,000.-. 

Article 5 fil of the Articles of Incorporation will be amended 
accordingly and will have to be read as follows 
“The Corporation Hu an autlroriacd capital of ninety million 
United States Dollars (USD 90,000,000,-) to consist of eighteen 
million (18x000,000.-) authorized shares of a par value of five 

United Slates Dollars (USD 5>~) per share." 

7T»e shareholders are advised that a quorum of 50 % is required 
for toe item of toe agenda of the Extraordinary General Meeting 
and that a decision will be token at the majority of the two think 
of the shares present or represented at the meeting, each share » 
entitled to one vote. A shareholder may act at any meeting by 
proxy. 

For toe company. 

Bmqwe de Geatfon Edmond de Rotos eMM Luxembourg 
SO, Boulevard EnumuradL Smrds, 

L - 2S3S Luxembourg 


























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 1994 


CJojc of trading Friday, DfiC. 31. 


I Cm Name WWy 

Fdiwnte Lwane 


GroNeme WMr 

FtfNams Last Otg* 


AALMotoafc 

Bond p« 103J— 23 
CaGfp 15.13 -25 
MunBd pell 24 
SmCcStk 1X86 -M 
ARi&tnvtt 
CaDGrnx 3434 —228 
GMtMn 157? — 03 
GrwtncnxXU'i —24 
HQBdne 1651 -58 
TxFBd tw 18.54 —37 

ABT Funds; 

Emetyp ito -JV 

FLhle 10.71 
FLTF 1109 *03 
GwthJnp 10,93 tM 
UfilfncB 1148 —JR 
AFLgCapnM.12 -43 
AHA Funds: 

Satan nx t229 *JB 
Full 1X20 —AS 
Lftn 1036 —41 
AIM Finds 
AcSGvp 904 


CreN am* Wldv 

FdNoma Lost Qw 


AO TOO 
BtfAp 
Cher) p 
Corwin 

GoScp 

GiitiD 

HYktAp 
meop 
mtiE p 

UmMp 

MuBp 
Summit x 170 
TeCTp II 29 
TFmt 

Ulttp 

Uttffir 

vnuei 

Vofcjp 

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2455 + 41 
16.10 

90S +m 
17.50 *34 
1045—03 
1132 *.H 
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145 — JDfl 
IMS +.1S 
10.12 —.05 

141 


1132 -32 
140? —AS 
14.08 -45 
20sa *33 
2032 *J3 
17.15 *01 
AMF Funds 
AriAAW 939 —01 
milgn 9.92 —03 
InttUq n 1004 —02 
MtgSecn 1109 —02 
ASX Finds: 

CopGrn 1004 -.15 
Grtncon 1001 *08 
(name 1003 —07 
ASMFdnx 9.91 —31 
AacessorFunds: 
lntFxinnxl2J4 —32 
AccMortplll? —30 
SWhi1Fxxl2J9 —I« 
Aomin 1S.94 *37 
AcmFd 1195 *33 
AdsnCap 2103 *.14 
AdvCBalP 1058 -04 
AdvCRetP 1054 — .13 
Advesi Advent 
Govt no* 1030 —31 
Cwthnpe 1733 —50 
HYBdPX 931 —57 
Inca no* 12.94 —52 
Mu6dNa1el022 *01 
SpcJnpe 2079 *34 
Aetna Fuads: 

Aetna nx 1002 —.15 
Bond nx 1037 —06 
Gmrinco 1143 — -04 
tnttGrnx 11.17 —47 
Alger Finds: 

Growth I 20.79 + 52 
fncGrr 13.14 *.!f 
MMCpGr 11254 *42 
SmCapt 2353*106 
ASoaca Gam 
ASoncePX 751 *37 
Baton p 14.13 *07 
BakxiBt 1534 *33 
BondAp 1485—36 
Canada P 507 *.11 
CaBdBp 1405 —06 
Co BdCP 1405 —06 
CotnTP 1704 
GtoSAp 1103 *33 
Govt A P 854 —04 
GovtBp 854 —04 
GovfCp 83 1 —A 1 
Gratae p 240 *01 
GwthFp 2474 *50 
GwttiB t 2104 *02 


CrfncSP 

ICATA 

IriMAB 

toSMuB 

m*wvcp 

IntlAP 

MrtgAp 

MrtgBp 

MrtgCp 


239 *01 
1191 *10 
1042 *01 
1042 *01 
1042 *01 
17.12 —09 
939 —02 
939 —03 
939 -02 


TXMSApfllOJU 
Americas Funds: 
AmBdo 1257 
Amcpp 1283 *.13 
AmMult b 7177 —09 
BqndFdp 1455 SB 
CdPinBl P83*30 — .14 
CapWUp 1633 —12 
CopWGr 1807 +.10 
EurOcp 22.11 *.14 
Fanvo 18.15 -04 
GovTp 1437 -05 
GwfMFdp2475 *40 
HlTrstpel534 -35 
liwoFdpei439 — 36 
JMBdpe 1428—11 
EftvCaAP 1872 *03 
LttfTEfld 1466 *04 
NwEaxipSUB +44 
NswArplitf -JOS 

SmCpWp2X50 *40 
TaxE»tp»37 —08 
T*ExCAPto35 —05 
T*E*MDPTS45 +0? 
T xEx VA P1638 * 02 
WshMUtPl7JI —07 
AmGwth* 936 —39 
AHeritanx 153—02 
Ainer Nall Funds: 
Growth x 415 —89 
income x 2186—2.17 
Trifle* x 1535— M3 
API Gr tpn 1332 *33 
AmMonte 
Bands ?.« —05 
Equity 1174 *.1S 
IntBd a 1000 -02 
AntUttFd nx2354 —44 
AmwyMutt 771 +.13 
AnatytScn 1258 *.03 
AnchCopt 2047-2.16 
AnaOa Funds: 

AZTFe 10.95 — 07 
COTFe 1077 —.15 
HITFe 1104-01 
ICY TF e 1053—02 
NnmstTFKDl -01 
ORTF 10.92 *01 
Arch Funds: 

Bal 1007 +OI 
EmGnti 1131 *46 
GavCarp 1057 —06 
Gralnc 12.96 *06 
MO TF 1183 *3) 
US Gov ltOO —06 
Armartfln 849 * 01 
AKcntoGrnll33 *31 
ANuFmJs: 

CaMwie 1156 
GvtSec 1040 —03 
Gratae x 1401 —34 

NaMurie 11.61 —.01 
■BATAndK 
GrolncT rail 79 —.12 
rniGovTnxlO.19— 06 
SIGovT nxlQ.17 —03 
BEA Funds: 

EMkEf 2544 *03 
irtttEuPx 2023 —23 
StgFxlntol743 —83 
BFMShOu n 9.95 —02 
BJB&Ap 1235 —.17 
BNYHomrian: 
Eqlncnx 1130 —02 
IrttGovfe 10.12 —07 
NYTEn 1037 *01 
BabsonGrauik 
Band Ln 143 
Bond Sn 1033 — Oi 
Eniera2nl740 *30 
Gwtnn 1308 +.04 
I rdf 1630 +.10 
Shadow n 1232 *36 
TaxFrSn 1105 *01 
TaxFrLn 938 +02 
UMBBn 1144 —03 
UMBHrln 949 +.11 
LIMB St n 1634 +.13 


MtgTrApe9.93 — Ot 
MlpTBn 9.94 
MtgTrCpe 9.94 
MltlG 1038 
Mittal 108 
MMSAp 833 — 0] 
MMSBf 8.93—03 
MCAAP 1081 
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MUFLCP 1037 
MJNBp 1033 +.07 
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MuNJCp 1031 +.07 
MNYA 1030 + 09 
MuNYBp7O20 -09 
MuNYCplOJO *09 
NMuAo 70.93 +08 
NHMUCP 10.93 *07 
NEurAp 1238 —.13 
NAGvA 1031 —01 
MAGvflp 1031 —01 
NAGvC 1031 
PtGfltiA P1201 *05 
PrGrttlBpllJ4 -104 
QgsrAp 2303 +00 
STMtap 932 —02 
STArttof 932 -02 
Tech R« 26.12 — 752 
Wldtncp 1.90 
AmSMA Foods 
Balance x 1176 +oi 
Bend x ]|,)7 —05 
Equity x 1476 + 08 
Gvttn 9.90 
UdMalx 1043 —04 
JfeoEax 77.74 +30 
Ammalnc 13.19 —.18 
A m l wiia durFdsi 
Bdntf 1040 +.10 
Bones' 10.11 —04 
CrtJrtn 1709 + 32 
CoreGrF 1709 * 32 
GrawttiF 14.17 +40 
Grawthl 14.12 -40 
WxSIfcF 1208 —02 
WHSlkF 1193 +30 
IntSdF 7045 —02 
tntBdl n 1045 —02 
UltBtkl 1193 -30 
SmCoCF 1455 +88 
TsFBdl n 7172 + 202 
Anxnre Vlntooe: 

Equity 70.47 +.03 
Fxlnco 1037 —03 
IntdfTF 1046 +01 
AmerAAdmtf: 

Baton nx 1236—30 
EquBv nx 1338 —.91 
lrnlEtoyr»1233 — 55 
UdTrmnxHUM— .12 
AmerCaptafc 
Oral Ac 1639 + 05 
CamBdApx 7.14—0? 
EGAn 2505 +.91 ! 
EmGrBp 2i44 +09 
EntA p 1123 -39 
EntBo 1219 -39 
EqtylncA p555 + 03 
EntncBI 555 + 03 
ExchFd 11131 -141 
FdMoA p 1242 —01 
F.MgBp 1243 —01 
GIEOAP 115* -05; 


□Iversan 1118 +.18 
irttl&jn 652 +.17 
IntiFInx 7045—48 
BaintFandE 
AdDnce 9.93 
BJCJtrC PX 1859 —23 
OtoOev PK2343 +32 
BdaGvn 
Bankers Trust: 
IratAMgt xl002 — 07 
IrtstEanx 1038 —.13 
InvImTF el054 —01 
InvtntEa xlllB — .19 
Invunm 1003 —07 
BaronAstnx71.il 
Bartlett Ponds 
BascVl nxlSJB *08 
FOcedi ne 1039 —16 
VI Ml 1233 +21 
BascomBd 2237 — 138 
BavFinds: 

Band ne 10.14 —is 
Equity nx 10 l 98 +.12 
STYldn 9.91 —.02 
BeocHHI 3150 +06 
BSEmgDbt 10-93 +08 
Benchmark Fuads 
Bakpiad X1040 +07 
BondA nx 20.4+ —40 
DivGrAnxiD.97 +.17 
EqldxA nx 1008 — 04 
FacGrA x 1076 *30 
ShtOure 7S02 — OI 
SlBdAnx 2031 -.10 
SraCoJA 1140 +05 
USGvAx 2005 —10 
U$T3dxAr«34 —57 
Beahnn Gmuc 
AtSGovn 904—01 
CaTFIn 1138 +01 
CoTFtn n 1043 
CQTFSn 1035 + 02 
QdTFHn 930 
Cc8TFLnU33 
EqGron 12.12 
EurBdn 1002 —32 
GNAAAn 1076 
GcAflnn 7167 +36 
IncGran 1500 —01 
LTreasn 1032 —.12 
NTTHn 11.11 -OI 
WTFLn 1270 +01 
STTreasn 10.00 —01 
TarlTMn 9457 —03 
Tar2000 n 7153 —48 
Tort005 n 5057 — 34 
Tur2010n 3739 —37 
Tcr201Sn 2806 —72 
TartOWn 1976 -33 
TNoten 1051 —03 
Utfllncon 1034 —06 
Berger Group: 
lOOpn 7601 +44 
101 pnx 11.92 +33 
erusleinFds: 
Gv5hDunl236 —02 
SrfDurrt 7236 —02 
WOurn 1349 —07 
CaMun 1378 -oi 
DivMunnlUO +01 
NYMunn 1X71 +01 
Inttvalnx 1559 —14 
B*rwynFdnl737 +.19 
Berwvnlnc nl 1 33 + .07 
BhiruOM Oj 11,1 4 +J1 
satmare FUnds: 
Balanced 1033 +JS1 
Equity 1035 -06 
Ea Index 1051 —.0? 
Rwdlnc 9.92 —.05 
STFudnC 9.90 
SCMun! 1737 *07 
Bk in dBnrd Funds: 
AmerEan 907 +.15 
Flexlncn 5.15 
GtGrnp 1048 +07 
FrcM np 934 + 09 
ST Gin 107 
ST Band n 300 


BruRtsSI n8i0-76 —05 
BUflABewCfx 
FNCl no* 1SJ6— 1.03 
Gtotac raxx 9.94 +03 
GGldlRvntt32 -S3 

GovtSecnpISAO— . to 

Maine p <733 —41 
Quamtl plA47 +03 
SpEqp Z3.I3-457 
USOvs npeBJt —68 
Burnham b 31 Ai +09 
C&SWtynx 31-92 -147 
CFBMaricefWetdr 
EquBy 1076 +04 
Flxtnc I0O1 —01 
IntFxln 1009 —04 
VAMuBd 1047 - 01 
CGM Funds: 
CapOevn£fJ\—7Jf> 
Fxdlnc nxiU7 — 36 
Mutinx 2B08-2JH 
Calmas p 1180 ♦ .16 
CnStomia Tras: 
OAncnx 1118 —.02 
CadJCnx 7739 — .w 
S8J*S00rtxlU5 —08 
S&PMid 12-27 +.17 

CahdTt Groap: 

Ariel* 3039 -39 
ArielApx 2209 +59 
GtoUeqx 1747 +.12 
Incox 1775 — JO 
MBCAi 1U6 —09 
IMunkrtx 1042 —06 
Social PX 3042 —16 
SocBdx 1704—12 
SocEox 2135 +.17 
TxFUtj nx 1072 —03 
TxFLno K 17.15 —03 
TxFVTx 1636 —05 
USGavx 1104—10 

Can bridge Fds 

CapGrA 1530 + 02 
GvfttA 7303—02 
GwthA 1630 + 31 
MuIncA 15.96 *05 
COPGrBt 1539 +02 
Gvln6 f 1305 —02 
GwthBt 16.16 *30 
IncGrBl 15.15 -08 
MuincBt 1557 + 05 
OtoMkldxrt4.13 -09 
CapOUEan 9.71 *07 
CtVrtXFI n 1048 —04 
OxwielEG r!652 +36 
CoppietUtl 1047 —IS 
Onatone Grawc 
FunaSW ISLai -33 
Gvttrxx 400 —10 
MedRs 1950 -33 
N Japan 6.14 —.06 
US Trend 1301 +35 
OmSrxrl ftmOy; 
AgoGtt! 1032 + 09 
Balanced 10.10 
Fund 1205 +.10 
GavtObtff 854 
Cars CD 13.08 +.10 
QxnegOHTao2 +01 

CntCBIA 1509 +.10 
ChKBlB 1507 +.10 
CttitumGpxOOO —36 
CntrvSlvrw 24.04 —04 
OtCapBC U10 +.12 
OiesGrth 1111 +47 
CHestm 14279—106 
QiicMII*rnM451 — 2l 
QtubbGrrtn i«30 —33 
ChubbTR 1501 — 43 
atpuernx 8CL05— 632 
OataflM Finds 
MEatP 7874 —36 
CdTEA 732 + 01 
ConTEA 706 + 01 
FedSeco 1)35 —02 
FLTEA 749 -42 
FundAp 830 +05 
GnHhAp 1303 +.17 
HtYWAp 6.95 +01 
mcameAp672 —05 
MATxA 807 +01 
MI TEA 739 +01 
MNTE A 734 
NatResA 1240 +.17 
NY TEA 746 _ 

OhTEA 732 + 01 
SmStkp 1738 +32 
StrhncA 731 —01 
TxExAP 14.10 +01 
TxIrtsA P 854 + 01 
USGrA 72.77 + 04 
USGvAp 677 —01 
UNAp 1377 —04 
CATE B 732 + 01 
706 + 07 
1135—02 
709 +02 
831 +06 
1255 +.13 
1378 +.16 
1034 —03 
4*5 *07 
L07 +01 
NaffieSB 1239 +.17 
NYTxB 746 

767 +01 
739 — 01 
14.10 +01 
85* +01 
1205 + 05 
677 —.01 
1377 —04 


GrpNrnm 
Fa Nome Last Chge 


CTTEB 

FedScB 

FLTxB 

FundB 

GfEaB 

GwttiB 

HYMuB 

MYSecB 

MATxfi 


LtdMurX 1037 + 01 
MuCAte 1106 —14 
MUFLI 11.11 
MUNJfe 11.84 
Muttf*A tel 1.11 —06 
NYTXF to 1250 —.17 
NIRSI 1155 +32 
Pocfirl 21334102 
PrcMI 1103 -34 

Premier ptrlW -12 

SeUUup 1203 *00 

Moused 11006—03 
STUSpe 1037 -.02 
Strati 1488—02 
Tax Ex c 1241 —01 
USGvtt 931 —JO 
Ufllnf 1434 —03 
VdAdt 1908 *.U 
WWlnc 933 —07 
WkMMt 1871 '34 
TCBalp 9.96 +05 
TCCort 1242 *.14 
TClncp 1035 + 08 
TCLutl 1450 +43 
TOtorfp 1003 *OJ 
TCSCpt 10.17 * 43 
DelGrpImM: 

Detwrl x 1836— 1.17 
Dfcpfe 2S.9B —39 
DUtil 709 + 01 
TsvPsl 934 — OI 
Detowan Group: 
Trend ae 13-95 —30 
Value px 2073 *39 
DetafflP 2509 —39 
Detorix 1653—1.90 
Dectrii p*1207— 172 
Detow p 1806—1.14 
IntlEqpx 1134— 36 
DeKTlA 7.09 +01 
USGovtp 804—512 
Treas p 9.84 —01 
TxUSp 1239 -02 
Trtnspe 1158—70 
TxFtFop 877 —01 
Dtotemtonal Fds 

USLro 11,4 
USSrrX 805 +.15 
US 6-10 n 1137 +38 
UKn 2240 +02 
Cantn 1340 —18 
Rxdn 10 ITS +03 

GIBd 10538 +JD1 
Gavin 10535 —32 
IntGv 114.12 —46 
IntlHBM 1070 —.05 
LCaptnt UTS —13 
PacR an 1934 + ST 
USLpVo) 1001 — JO 
USSmVd 1133 +32 
DodflUOn: 

Bdann 4640 —01 
I name n 1749 —OS 
Stock ii 5333 +.12 
DomSodal xlZ43 — >12 
D reman Funds 
Contra 7332 +.10 
WWn 1553 +.16 
artCpVdnll.19 +.11 
Dreyfus: 

A8ondnxl&l8 — .17 
Apreenp 14.92 
AsseiAnnl23B — OS 
BtPncd 1336 +Ot 
CaTTx n 
Cotlmn 
CTlntn 
Dreyfus 
EcQInd 
Fl- Inin 


EmpBia 1857 +04 
Endow 1740 +.12 
btopHtOm 
cddApp 31.70 +50 
GvSecpe 1244 -34 
GtoltlltoX B36 — 45 
Grtncpx 1775—100 
KYBds 1170 .. 
inflGrpjc 1744 -33 
TE Inc pc 1431 

EqlySIrt 35.97 +4TU 


Evtbrir 1430 +35 
Found nx 13-12 —30 
GtaRene 1475 +.16 
UdMfctn 2170 *38 
MunCAne 10.41 +01 
Mun^ne 1058 —02 
Martins neioja— 16 
Retire nx HAo — 37 
TotRtn 1932 + 04 
VaiTmnxlS41 —60 
ExceMldasu4.l3— 37 
Exlnvlfip 709 +01 
FAMVotrt 3022 +.19 
FBL Series 
BiOiipt 18.75—04 
Grawtht 1339—2.10 
HIGrSet 1048— .17 
Mo nad t 12.14 —39 
PFBLedaR 
CopAppx 1134 
FXdinx 1058 -09 
IntGv x 1043 —06 
SetvcriueaHTO +03 
FFBEqx 7062— 1.99 
FFBNje 11.25 +01 
FFTYI Fuads: 
intptdge 1039 - 
US Short x 9.77 —03 
WWHed0«0O9 —07 
WWFxdM002 —.18 
FMB Foods 
DivECpx 1159 +31 
DtvE I x 1139 + 01 
inlGCp 1046—02 
IMG I 1046—02 
MTTFae 1073 —.01 
MTTFle 1073- 
FPA Finds 
Cmil 2006 +45 
Newtnc 1133 
Pcrmrtf 1493 +.13 
Reran 2376 +31 
Fairanfn 2243 + 32 
Fasdcnonel/TB —50 


FtgttSn 

FSTKsn 

FGROn 

FHYTn 

Fms n 

FITSSP 


OH TxB 

StrttnB 

TxExB 

TEmsS 

USGrB 

USGvB 

UfllB 


Cotoratta Finds 
Balance nx 17.91 —69 
Com5ttc nxi5J9 — 38 
Rxedne 1344 —44 
Gov te 836 —.16 
Grthnx 2638—236 
btttsikn 12.96 —.14 
Murine 1271 -02 
Sped nx 19TI-248 
Conunaa Souse 
Govte 11.12 -59 
GrtHncx 15.95—1.19 
Grawtlix 1536—1.05 
MunB 1407 +01 
Compass OnKak 
Eqtylnco XI24B +38 
FwSnx 1033—10 
Growth* 11.13 +.10 
IntIRx 10J0— 50 

AAunBdX 1138 —05 
NJMm 4 1154 -32 
Shrtttfl x 1057 —35 
Gamposde Groups 
SdSflCC 11.99 +.84 
Growth p 1230 +.11 
toeoFdp 973 —06 
NW50P 1439 *.18 
TaxExp BJU 
USGavp 1079 —04 
CoiMrtoga Funds 
Equity 14J5 *09 
Rxedtnc 1059 —42 
LtdMat 1078 —01 
CannMutuak 
Gqvtx 1091 —68 
Grwtttx 15.14— U8 
income * 906 —07 
TotRet * 1454— 99 
Coaler a 7135— 03 
CoreFunds? 

BotonAn 1053 —34 
Ealdx 2151 —33 
GrEon 1031 +.17 
IntBdn 1006 —32 
InttGr nx 1346 + 36 
ValEqR 0 1359 -36 
CowenIGr 1153 
CDwenOP 1276 * 44 


GiEqBpn 1143 - 04 BdEndow 18.18 — II 
OGvA px 9.08 — 76 Baeton Co Inst 
GIGvB mx 9.12 —05 AstMorB nil 37 —35 
GvScAe 1000 -05! CaApBp 2700 -35 
GvScBp 1030 — 05 Ita^BnP 1114—05 
GvScCP 1079 —05 MgcABnoma — 35 
GvTg97p 1359 —32 Boston Co Rend 
CvTlAoe 9.00—121 AtocAp 15.17 
GvTIB Be 930 —.11 I CcpAAp 2700 +35 


GvTIC Pe 930 —.11 
Grlnc P U00 *.10 
HorAAp 15.13 -.16 
HorbB P TS37 -.16 
HiYldlnvA ISM —06 
HiYUfflp 6.65 —M 

MuBA p TOLSI —33 
PoceAp 1156 *09 
PoceBP 1152 *09 
TEHiYApll J1 -02 
TEWYHottOI -32 
TocExlA P1159 +31 
TxEIB P 11.68 


ltOSA p 1114 —.05 
IntA 1258 —03 
M^lAP >103 —35 
ScGrAP 17.97 +40 
TfBdA 1201 
■euMvBid Funds 
BIChiox 9 .44—09 
Monglnc x 975 —06 
StrolBrtx 907— JM 
BrtnsGIBt mil —39 
BrinsitGif 10L77 —06 
Bmctywn r»2497 *05 
Bruce n 11202—155 


AstAUpX 1207 +03 
Equity P« 1504—1 .81 
QRMunU1252 -01 
Special n IZ40 +05 
OesrFuntfs Trust 
Bond n 10.17 —35 
SIBdn 10.74—34 
SpEonx 1109—135 
Value nx 1132 —36 
VAMun 1049 - 31 
CuFd Ad n mo2 
CuFdST n 9T6 —31 
DGtnvamr. 

Eauily 1035 —.01 
Gavtinco 1037 —C4 
LTGovt 9.95 —31 
MunillK 1180 -32 
DMnWthr 


1556 + 01 
1197 +32 
1177 +02 
Hid +35 
1378 —45 
1185 *05 
GNMARPXU15— 09 
GnCA 1419 *32 
GMBdP 1534 *43 
GNY P 21.14 —31 
Grtncn 1734 +02 
GwthOp rw 1074 —82 
lnsMunn>190B +02 
intormn 1451 +01 
InterEaP 1540 +05 
Invent n 1509 —03 
MAIntn 1132 +02 
MA Tax n 17.13 
MunBdn 1306 +01 
NJ Inf n 13T3 +31 
NJMunn 1403 + 01 
NwLdr 3413+137 
NYITxnp 1104 
NY Ted n 16.15—10 
NYTEp 1859 +33 
PeoolndWST3— UB 
neoMidmto.iP —41 
ShlnGvnell 07 —38 
ST Inc pa 1242 — OI 
ShlnTP 1131 +02 
ThdCntrn 126 +.10 
USTInt 1350 — JM 
USTLnu 1558—16 
USTShn 1575 —JO 
Dreyfus Comstock: 
CodVMA 1103 —JOS 
CooVaffl 111.71 +35 
PSfgAp 9.92 +.11 
PlStHyOrx9.92 +.11 
Dreyfus Pramien 
CAMunA 1353 * 41 
CTMUA 1145 
CnpGOi 1608 + 30 
FLMunA 1506 + 01 
GtolnvAnlMN +03 
GBUnvei 1190 +01 
GnmoA 1484 —43 
GnmaBt 1484—04 
MAMunA)2J9 +41 
MDMutiAlUl 
Ml MunA 1676 +42 
MNMunA1574 +42 
MuBdBf 1543 +44 
MunlBdA 1533 +44 
NCMuA 1193 +41 
NCMuB 11192 +41 
NY MunA 1510 +41 
NY MuB 11510 
OHMuA 1356 
PA MunA 17. 12 +41 
PA MuB 1 17.11 +41 
TXMUA 2147 +42 
VAMUA 1748 +.02 
DraytosShateak: 
Growth P 3830 +57 
income p 1470 —48 
InvA 2141 +54 
JnvBf 2156 +53 
Wldlnvp 3558 +76 
Dupree Mutuat 
tatGovn 1072 — JJ3 
KYTFn 731 + 42 
KYSMfn 530 +31 
EBIFtonds 
Equity nx 5941 — 8L97 
Flexpx 5416—103 
locame PX4850 — 70 
Eaton Vance: 

China p 1756 + 47 
EVSIk 1249 + 36 
Growth P 834 +45 
incBosp 8.40 -31 
MunBd 1063 +03 
STGUt 907 -44 
STTSYP 5558 +JD1 
SPcEalP 843 +.13 
TradGvr H.48— 32 
Tradlnv fp 702 + 01 
TrodTottp 7.U —34 

Eaton V Lid Miy: 
CaTxFf 1056 
FLTxFt 1055 + 31 
MATxFt 1050 +31 
NatTxFr 1 7056 
NJTxFl 1056 
NYTxFf 1050 
PATxFt 1056 + 31 
Eaton VManittn: 

China r 1474 +59 
ALTxFt 1109 +31 
AZTFI 1106 +31 
ARTKFt 10.9 7 
Catttot 1003 + 01 
COTxFt 10.94 +31 
CTTxFt 10.96 -01 


ArmSSpn 9S1 
Ann (n 9.71 
ExchPdnxTIOO— 70 
FBFne 1056 —30 
1073 —02 
9.06 -OI 
2407 *33 
943 *43 
1057 —01 
1047 —31 
FstotlSn 1052 —01 
FSiOtltSS Pi 052 —01 
FSBFn 1659 
FSTn 2545 +.10 
FST1SSP 936 — 31 
GorntXSn 1158 —33 
CrwnaSp 1)58 —03 
FtotSSp 1073 —43 
1MTIS 1132 +.01 
MaxCap 1145—03 
Minicap nil 45 +08 
ShrtTerm 1005 
Fidetoy Advisor 
EaPGR 2932 +09 
EaPInc 1533 +34 
GDIResc 16.94 +46 
Gov fat P 9 JO —37 
GrwOppp2S.12 +31 
HIMup 1270 +33 
HJYJd pnx 1143 — 33 
IncGtp 1S47 +.11 
LMTERP105B +01 
LMTBR 11.13 —34 
LkJTEJ 1059 +31 
OvscoP 13.17 +32 
STRp J0.11 —41 
StratOpP 2000 —06 


EqPGI n 29.18 +40 
EaPlln 1500 +04 
tShlGv 948—01 
LtBln 11.14— JM 


An-TFm 1204 + 32 
AMgn 1540 +.12 
AMnGrnl425 +.17 
AMgrtnn 1136 +32 
Brtanc 1139 +39 
BtueOr 3417 +00 
CAlnsn 1137 +33 
CATFn 1242 +.02 
Cmadan 18.19 +48 
ClApn 1692 +.18 
Canlnco nrx9.B6— JM 
CanarSrnl5048 *74 
Contra 3044 *44 
CRvSecn 1645 + 39 
Destnyl 1641 +.15 
Destfnyll 27.1 S +00 
DbEn 18.11 *39 
Diverlntl nl!50 —02 
DivGttin 111! +01 
EmgGrorl703 +43 
EmrMkt 1970 + 70 
EquMnc 3184 +.U 
EQUn 1341 -.11 
Ealdx 1737 —02 
Europe 19.12 —IB 
ExtolFd 1110230 *39 
FWHFdn 1937 * 3( 
Rttv 1058 +.10 
GNMrt 1046—02 
GtoBd 1251 — JM 
GtoBaln 13.16 +.17 
GvtSec n 1004 —37 
GroCo 2936 +45 
GrWnc 2229 +.1* 
HTYTd 1Z9S —38 
InsMunn 1207 *43 
IntBdn 1071 —04 
(ntofGvrn 946 —01 
IrfflGrt n 1757 —01 
tnvGBn 749—04 
Japan n 1141 —36 
LattiAmn 16.10 +43 
LMMun 9.99 +31 
Utorpyr 1700 +06 
Ml TF n 1204 +32 
MNTFn 1152 +31 
Magellan 7085 +78 
Mkflndnr3l40 —34 
MA TF n 1213 +31 
MigeSecnmU +32 
Muncain 849 + 31 
NYHYn 1297 +32 
NYlnsn 1234 + 32 
NewM»raan7 +37 
NewMfll 1200 + 36 
OTC 3414 +51 
OhTFn 1202 +JJ1 
Owsea 2743 +33 
PacBas 1880 +51 
Puritan 1575 +36 
RertEsJn 1X57 +02 
RefGrn 18.14 *30 
ShtTBd n 955 —31 
STWWmrjft!? —05 
SmrtlCap 1082 +02 
SE Aston 1641 +37 
SlkSIc 1875 + 35 
SfrOppt 20.95 —36 
Trend n 5938 + 136 
USB) n 1130 —34 
Ulttlncn 15.18 +31 
Value n 4033 +46 
Wrldw 1333 -32 


AflfMunnICOi *42 
CAHYra 1133 +3! 
CTHYnr 1170 +32 
FLMum 1133 +JS 
GNMAn 10.10—03 

Gavin n 1058 — 36 
Hto»*trmrlll7— .14 
MMint 1045 *Jfl 
invGrBdnlOJS -37 
LtdGv 10X0-32 
LTGn 1240 —IB 
MDMumTOOO +JU 
Murtnr 1293 +.02 
NJHYr 1142 +33 
NY MY ra 1 101 *42 
PAHYra 11.13 +31 
Seine n 9.97 —31 ! 
SintGvn 9.91 —01 
SfiffitMuniari *31 
FWuC0piwl943 +.19 
$9 Wd Street: 

EteuEa 3156 *30 
PacBsn 4610 + 256 
5m Co 1250 +05 
TxFSte 1004 +31 
FW-forGv fellXO — 16 
RnHarMuellOD — 24 
Fbst Amer Funds 
AstAOpx 1051 —42 
Bdana 1073 *42 
Eauily px 1570 +.19 
Ealdx px 1075 —JO 
FxOfncp ?U2 —43 

GovBdc 942 —01 
Inline p 1032 —01 
Udine 1033 +31 
MfgSecp 1079 + 32 
MwBdP 1086 +32 
ReaEqpxl223 +40 
StOCk px 1611 +37 
FstBosJG X 973 


MOTF 

NJTF 

NYlns 

NY Tax 

NCTF 

OntolTF 

ORTF 


Mad TF 11 T9 
MiehTxF 1250 +31 
MNtrs 1257 +31 
1220 +39 
1237 +31 
1158 +31 
1236 +32 
1216 +3t 
1267 

11T2 +31 

PtxGrwfhUlB +51 
PATF 1075 +31 
premtax 632 —32 
PuerTF 1204 
SI Gov 1061 —.04 
SmCaiGf 1294 +50 
TACov 10.91 -31 
TxAtWY 697 +32 
TXTF 11.91 
USGOvSc 7.11 
UHIKes 10.19 —37 
VA TP 1204 T.fft 
Fmddbi Mgd Tn 
CaraQud P 2428 —41 
tovGradepSJS — JO 
RisOivp 1534 -.11 
Fremoot FuwB: 
Gtedainx 1352 +JO 
Growth nx 11.18— dn 
CA tote 1139 —31 
FondTrust: 

AOflresfP 17.17 +37 
Gretntp 1478 + 39 ( 
Gwfhfp 7S.10 +.18 


Govt pnx 1033—39 
IntFd nnx 1351 —10 
MMCdpnel3T3 +36 
Reeton na*l4&- J.lfl 
Resrv pnxlOJM —05 
Stock pnx 1451 —8* 
Vrtienx 1211-i.u 
IBM Mutual tort 
LtopeCartfiJn — .12 
MoniBd 1051 
SmattConlMfi *37 
US Treas i»043 —io 
Utsavx 10.96— 22 
BEX Grew: 

Hex 1851 *42 
SGtObAO 1554 + 30 
2GrawApl745 
2TaxEx 1154 +31 
JlncPlAP 1075 — JM 
idex3 1239 +JK 
JFlxInAP 955—32 
IDSGrtW 
BluCPPX 53/ —42 
Bendpx 236 — JJ8 
CATEp 254 
DEI Pe 7.74 —19 
Docaw se 1206 —04 
EauRPI px!140 —94 
Srtrtnp 454 +.02 
FedncPO 606—16 
GiooBdpe 6.18 —10 
GiaGrpr 675 *41 
Graatoi PXI7A3— \S6 
MTYdTEoxATB —JO 


Inoofp 1057 — loi i insrtEpx 5JD —JR 


ModTRIpUIO *43 
niedatnertai Funds 
CAMunnp9.49 +.11 
NYMunnpl.lB +31 
USGoune 23 1 —42 
GAM Funds 
Gktoql 17932 +5TB 
Ml 23933 * 554 

PoeScs 191.94 +84S 


InBPx 

MgdRe 

Mass p 

Mldipx 
MNTEP 
Mutt px 
NYTEp 


1045 —15 
1183—7? 
253 

275 - 

251 

1246 —BO 

252 


Fs£aatnr 1SJM +JQ j OE hrest Btun SAi 
RstFdEx 1057 -.12 OtversfdnMJS —57 


RHwMu 1148 +31 
First tmestore: 
BtOXppx 1558 -79 
Gtobtpx 637 + 38 
Govfp 1155—35 
Gretncpx 653 + 32 
HrtlYdP 540 
income p <17 
InvGrdpelAXl —13 
UtoBCP 1431 —01 
UfeHYn 11.16 +JB 
USAnpx 1231 +.10 
MATFpe 1Z2E —13 
Ml TF pe 1249 —05 
NJTFpe 1351 
NYTxFrpelS.18 — .12 
PATFpe 1116 —.13 
SpecBd 1219 +3) 
SpSttpe 1830 —.19 
TaxExptPtOJto —14 
TatRrt 0x1148— 131 
Utfltnepax 557 — 37 
VATFpe 1336 
HrstMul 1033 +.13 
First Omaha: 

Eaifttynx 1058 —.15 
FxdncrocltUi —14 
SlFWnnxlOOS —OS 
FPDvAst PV13.11 — 34 
FPTE InID 1133 +31 
FirPrEqT nx!054 —13 
FirFrFIT net046 —36 
First Union: 

BaTTn 1237 + 31 


BatCtn 

BcXfip 

FxtnBP 

FxtnTn 


1238 + 32 
1237 +31 

1042 —03 

1043 —JR 
IrtslFCt 1M6 +32 
InsTFBp 11.16 +32 
MnSdTn 1046 — JM 
NCMunC 11061 +31 
USGvtBp 1035 —33 
USGvtCr 1035 —03 
VatoeBp 1753 +.10 
VrfueCtn 1753 +.11 
Valuer n 1743 +.1) 

FrstFdFn 1003—05 


Airr 1739 *39 
AmGotor ZL55 +56 
Autor 24T1 +J8 
BiatKtir 2851 *136 
Bnfcsfr 2384 -32 
Broker r 18JO -73 
Cherar 2942 -.16 

... Compr 2445 -Si 

Eatnf 1133 -J19l ConPrdr 1551 *46 
RaTxFt 1143 *321 CslHour 1949 +48 


GATxFf 1069 -32 
Hilnc T 755 - 1 

KYTxFI 1074 -31 | 
MDTxFt 11.06 -.01 
MATxFt 11.15 -31 
MIT iF 1 11.38 -.Oil 
MNTxF1 1049 +32 
MO TxFt 11.18 -31 I 


DtAeror 1837 +JR 
DevCamrWja +57 
EleUtar 1115 +.10 
Elector 1178 +.19 
Energy r 1643 +42 
EngSvcr 1151 +46 


ArnVrtt 23.10 -42) NJTFt 1179 -31 
CoTTxFrtelSJl —37 ! NYTxF I 1170 -32 
CopGrat 1233 -.10! NLMunt 1051 


Ccnvtt 1043 +.12 ! 
DvGBil 1853 -57 
DivGffif 3087 —33 
Divlnt 1012 -31 
859 

1209 —15 

P.M —as 

1043 —47 
941 — U 
1137 +43 
759 +.33 
MuAZte 1089 
Intmdt 1038 — 37 j 


Eotlncl 

Euro I 

Gbit 

GtoOivt 

FedSect 

Htmsct 

MJYWf 


NCTxFI 

OfiTrFi 


1047 - 32 
1132 
ORTxFt 1733 
PATFt 1136 -02 
3CTXFI 1048 + 32 
TNTxF » 10.90 
VATxFf 11.05 +3r 
WVTxFt 1031 +.01 
EdlpEq nx 1345—174 
Emcrtod Funds 
Em&jt 1142 —39 
ErretOUS 01057—16 
FLTEe 1144 —-J7 


Softvwr 2755 -47 
Teehr 3873 -54 
Tetocomr3754 +40 


EmGtti o 12.17 +31 
(fifth px 1057—37 
IrtfTrp 1354 +.13 
MMura'pk1099 —04 
QuUGrp 12.98 + 09 
TtffncShpKITO — JM 
TotRTsypNLia —12 
Votyep 1153 +32 
FtoBsMpGroiflx 
AATEflP 1132 
AATEC p 1141 
AZTE p 11.17 
CTTEAP 10.90—41 
COTEP 1032 
FLTEp 11.14 
GATEP 10T4 
GtaRbPX 1432 —16 
tfltTED 1059 + 31 
KYTEAP 11 j* 
KSTEp 1072 
LATER 1133 
LtdTEp 1096 +32 
MITE A P 1238 
MOTEP 1135 —31 
NCTEAol079 —31 
NMTEp 1041 -31 
NYTEp 11.17 
OH7EAP11.90 —01 
PATEp 1067—01 
TnTEAp 1153 
UHAp 1084 +31 
VATEAptUR 
Flex Funds 
Bond np 2011 
GOMncn 941 —47 
Growth nplOAS +44 
AAuIrfdfpn 5.99 +41 
Fontaine n 1075 —31 
Fdrts Funds 
AstAHp 1454 + 30 
COpApp 2456 +77 
Copiflp 1746 +41 
Fktuerp 2856 +.40 
GtoGrthp 1470 -37 
GcvTRd BT3 —02 
Grwttip 2848 +47 
HiYIdP 878 + 42 
TF MN 10J3 
TF Note 1137—04 
TFNYe 1146-17 
USGvte 947 —06 
Fortress tavst 
AtSRIt 940 —01 
flondr HUM —43 
GISI mx 9.12 — 46 
Munlnct 1136 *43 
OtFortp 1174 +41 
Ulilr 1140 +JD 
44 WcP Ea e 641 —1 59 
Forum Funds 
IrwBnd 1083 —04 
InvSIk 748+595 
MEBnd I0TS _ 
TqxSvr 1070 *41 
FaimtarsGraiipc 
BrtnP* 8.93 -49 
Bh*OiP 1*649 —143 
Discvpe 2155 +45 
Fmtonpe 27.94 —34 
GovSecx 1002 —77 
Gtwttir*el248 — 69 
Seed Poe 757—132 
WEaeGr nel7.94— 33 
Fountain Square Fds 
Bet on ced 9.97 
GovtSec 1012 —JR 
MidCoc 1025 +.17 
QurtBd 1019 —.04 
QuaXST 9.86 +43 
FmdiIsGm*c 
AGE Fund 3.91 *41 
ArSUS 952 —01 
ars lOJH 
AL TF 1232 -31 
AZ7F 1142 +31 
BallRv 2145 +31 
Can re 1252 + .01 
CA(nterm1Q43 +31 
CcfTFr 746 +.01 
CO TF 12.18 *31 
CT TF 114? 
CvTSec Ue4 
DHTC 959 
Equity 643 -37 
Eolnc 1446 +JJ6 


GtotKdnx 1648 —33 
Income ne 1 144 —42 
S&SLnoncl 154—58 
5*S PM 03741—4.1? 
TaxExe 1239 —09 
Trusts nx 3376— 3JM 
GE knot GE Fds 
GtabdCx 1B76— JM 
StrtsC X 15.94 —32 
USE«d3nxT636 — 36 
GEUSE 1636 — 35 
OtTlovst 

EaSpcnX 7147 —49 
HiYld n 1072 + 32 
TxFrVAOllja +31 
GTGtofaafe 
Amerp 17. (g +58 
EmMkt 1751 +70 
EmMJdB 1748 + 70 
Europe p 1044 —06 
EteuB 1079 —06 
GvtncA 1040 
GvIncB 1050 —01 
GrtncAP 453 +41 
GrtncB 654 +JS 
HttCrfi 1092 +35 
HClncB 1552 +.11 
MJncA 1555 +.12 
HtThCrp 1098 +36 
lr«P 1132 +36 
IndB 1098 +36 
Jamno Il5) —42 
LOAmG 23.14 +47i 
LdtAinGB23.il +46 
Paoi fp 1546 + 48 
PocffB 1579 +48 
StratAp 1374 +.11 
Strata 1374 +.11 
TeieS 17.10 +51 
Telecom 17.17 +52 
Wktwp 1757 + 34 
WktwB 1749 + 33 


NewOBK 1444 —52 
Ohio px 355 —42 
precMtgx 081 +32 
Pragre5Px641 — 57 
Seteopx 951 -30 
Stock px 1971—1.95 
Sir Asg tr 1531 —143 
SttEntx 957 —51 
Mrtocte 657 —.10 
StrSTle 142 
StoWGI 557 +36 
TE Bnd PX A18 —48 
UtOIncpe 6T0 + 

Bi Funds 
Murt pnx 1099 —04 
NoAm px 1019 —09 
Tat ox 1018 —13 
indOneGT 1032 —0+ 


ExEolns 1250 *37 
Fxdtolns 1118 —36 
IdxErin 1144— U 
tofEqins 1244 —27 
UMrtlns 9T1 — SB 
MedTEIft 1045—41 
MlMutns 1036 —02 
VstEato 1031 — 48 
Kerttor* 

CusBltx 1649— .15 
CusB2tx 1659—45 
Q0B4I S3S +36 


CusKIt 

CusK2t 

OaSlf 

CusSSt 

CU5S6I 

IntM 

KPMt 

TxETrl 

TcxFrt 


9.91 
1ST +.14 
2345 —39 
957 +.13 
842 +42 
745 +.11 
7**5 +45 
1135 . 

112 +31 


jCerriaseAmericft 
AutoCfP 9-SO +31 


CAPff 

cpmi 

EnA 

RxA 

FOAA 

GX2A 

GvSAx 

HrEGA 

HrtGrA 

CrntiAx 

Omega 

PtXA 

StcAx 

TxFAx 


934 
947 

1257 -JM 
113d +32 
1072 +36 
1858 +JS 
1112 -38 
2430 *75 

23.10 +32 
952— Of 

17.11 +41 
11.92 +JJ3 

031 
1041 


CapApiw25.17 +38 
SpEanx 3090+138 
IncEqnx 2739 —05 
ShoriGv n 194S — 
HMtg 1*2054 —14 
Sieandx 2133- " 
BondfK 22.18 — 34 
lnt£q nx 3572 +31 


Fxdtoc 1113 —14 
NYTF 1170 — » 
STRdnc 971 —01 

TREfl 1247 —25 
MrfcTWEo 972 +43 
WYkTwFx 1058 —37 
Mmols Fonts 
GvtSecAx 972 —8* 
GthfnAx 976-JM 
VriEqApk?41 —33 
MrieWi Funds 
EaJnex 1001 —36 
Gvttocnx 930—37 
toBdnx ?.«■— 32 
STtncnx 946.-34 
Socfcnx 1025 +.12 
MathennxI5.lt —07 


Opport PX 1133 —54 
SInfGvtP 9.98— 42 
TRBdpe 1038 — 
TRGrpe 1277 - 
invftesh 456 *43 


1340 + 55 
1430 +JM 
1006 


CcsGrt 

OuXStk 

USGvt 


ABCpx 1003 —77 
Asset n» 2130 —71 
CarnrSc pxl 152—1 78 
Eqlncnx 1157 —75 
GfTelpx 1030 +JU 
Growth np0336 —33 
SmCopGel778 —38 
Value px 1239— 1.90 
Gctaxy Fundx 
Asset AO nil JM —01 
EaGftti 1187 +.04 

£qlVaf 1234 +32 
Eatnon n 1258 —JO 
HtQBd 1089—36 
IntBd 1054 —33 
IntEatn 1277 +.15 
NY Mon 11.10 +JQ 
ST Ban 10.17 —JR 
5mCoEanl237 *34 
TE Bond nil 47 +31 
Gutowui ruixL. 
GovtBdn 1036 —47 
ImtoPInx 1185 —52 
SWRWG 1451 —42 
CatoGnm 
Erqonpx29.il — 732 
GintlFdnXlil 1—133 


Dytenp 1243 —14 
EmarttipnI2.11 +34 
Energyn 1037 +32 
Enviran 733 +.17 
Europen 1243— JM 
FtdSvcn 1571—429 
Gridn 676 +.14 
Growthnp 554 +J15 
HRhScn 35.14 +T8 
WYtdrt* 753 +31 
latXnai nol 1T3 — 32 
tntGovn 1272 —37 
InttGr n 1631 *32 
LaBuren 2338— 130 
PocSasn 1537 +JS 
SeHnanno657 —30 
TxFreenol454 —34 
Tech n 2359— 256 
TotRtn 1036 —33 
USGavtnK779 — 21 
Ulfln 1058—139 
vriEo 1751 — BI 
tnvPflnp 1012 —JR 
InvPMYe 1154—31 
IRvTrGvtBte9J4 —36 
IStrtFdnpx 7484 — 48 
JP Growth 1735 +.18 
JP income 949 —0$ 
JPMIbsIB: 

Baide 938 —M 
DiversiM xl 008 —04 
ST Bond 9.96 — 591 


Equity nx 1331 
IntGovnx 1065 —48 
kit nx 1338 —39 
Munlnt nxl058 — JQ 
SmCcvnxlA13 +32 
OtrerintA la 13 —43 
Gridman Sachs Fmly: 
CapGr 1550 +36 
Gttttncx 1535—18 
Grtnc 1535 +.17 
mttEa 1739 +J»! 
Murulncxl451 —33 
SriEa 1535 *33 
SmaCito 2030 +53 
GcMmn Sachs Inst: 
AtSGv 9.97 
GovAe 1000 *37 
SWITFx 1018 -JM 
ST Gove 1005 —35 
Gawd! Funds 
EmoMic 1770 +54 
GtGvln 1016 +31 
InhEfl 1133 +31 
SmCos 1545 + 58 
Gvt&svn 2156 -39 
Gradisan McDonald: 
EsIVai Pfix2271 -46 
GChrtncpxU37 —.12 
OHTFpx 1352 —11 
Oppvdp 1838 + 38 
GHMNTE 1057 
GHNatTE 1067 *41 


Growth x 11.02 —25 
Incomes 1052 —17 
TaxExx 1000—33 
TotRtn x 1071 —78 
Janus Fond: 
Bdancedn 121 ?—06 
Enterpm 21.92 +32 
FedTxExnUT -31 
Fbdncn 974 —37 
Fundn 1939— 139 
Grthlnc 1459 —36 
inlGvt 513 +31 
Mercury 11.98 -36 
ShTmBdn 100 —02 
Twynn 2442—82 
Ventrn 4848—103 
WridW 2533—57 
JapanFdnxlQ33 —82 


WrtdBA x 958 —13 
FIxBt 1133 +32 
FOABf >071 *34 
GtOpBt 1838 + 3S 
GvSB lx 1012 —0? 
ImdBtx 9.43 —06 
PTXFB t II JO -43 
SKSt 034 +31 
TxFBtx 1042 —03 
1844 -35 
1042—03 
1135 +33 
1072 +34 
1013 —37 
943 —06 
1172 +33 
833 +31 
947 —01 


GtOpCt 

TxFCtx 

RxCt 

FOAC1 

GvSCfx 

ImdClx 

PTxFCt 

sica 

K1ARF 


ARM GvA MUM —02 
AStAQBx 1151 —.10 
GtoBtAe 1407 —05 
GtoFxA 12^8 —14 
GvtAl 1442 —05 
InfFIA 1235 —04 
K PEt 345) *30 
MuniBdA 11.92 +31 
SmCapA 1237 +43 
LMHroc 1846 —31 


1434 +32 
Equilvn 1400 +.12 
Intlnc 948 —04 
NYTF np 1144 +33 
USGvn 9T1 —02 


Eti/iryiPfIJSJI—lJl 
income l 1092 —28 
Prism fen 1045 +34 
MearGthe 1378—54 

Mentsrrn 1272 + 33 
MergerFd ptto98— 1 JR 
Meridann 2507 +59 


>.10 


Batncdn 1013 +31 
tntmtn n 1046 —03 
Stock n 1026 +.10 
LritenNY 8.14 

nxl073 - 


CATEf 12.14 —31 
DiscvBt 931 +37 
Growth P 1752 +33 
HAcsre (105 
LTGvAp 800 — JQ 
MATE! 1233—01 
MaTEB 1202 +31 
NYTEfP 1255 
STStralB 099—01 
ScdEAP 1543 +70 
SociEBp 1576 +59 
SPOosA 855 +.17 
SpCOpsB 854 +.16 
Shine tP 759 —32 
Tax£x fp 1131 *42 
J Hcnc n cfc F reeck w. 
AVTech 1132 +37 
EnvraAp 843 +31 
GUnet 955 —12 


AstABKxUTS —30 
G6G little 1119 —04 : 


GlQbAP 

GkttiBt 

GUnA 

GtobRx 

GITech 

GCIdA 

GatoBt 

PacBas 

R89kA 


1330 +35 
1055 +35 
945 —13 
1505 +59 
1755 +41 
1641 — 0? 
1649—49 
15.96 +51 
2039 +.10 


ROBkBt 2024 +.10 


Sondim 1234 — 70 j JHaacucKSaveron: 
PariiAv x 2843 — 43 , AOiA 1236 +.13 


Stock nx 39.00 
TaxExe 1030—22 
US Govte 1038 —44 
HTlnsEaP 1246 —02 
HTMBFl p 1034 —01 
HaktoCoto 9.12 - 

Hanover inv Fds , 


AcnBt 1230 +.13 
SOAP 1074 _ 

BriB P 1075 
BondA fp 1543 —07 
InvAP 1510 -JM 
USGvAp 1028 —08 
, USGvB t 1037 —08 
BJChGrx 1043 — 08 KSMun 1245 —JO 
STGve 947 — 10 KSIMunLt 1251 +31 
SmCoGr 1076 *55 1 Kaufman nr 355 *.U 
US Govte 1016 —.16 1 Kemper Funds 

I AtSGov 848 +31 
Blued* 1279 +.14 
Cfcfrf 757 
Divines x 855 — JD3 
ErrvSvc 1351 +39 
1057 +31 
939 -33 
1357 +.15 
1034 + 35 
877 —03 
1081 +.12 
1052 +32 
1138 +31 
1033 

1153 +JJ9 1 
1X38 ♦ J>5 ' 


Bondx 1131—581 
CqcAbo nx 1637— 89 1 
Growth nx 1348 -38 1 
intlnx 2432 — 39 

ShtOurnx 935— 321 
Value nx 1331— i.m! 
Heartland Fds 
USGvt pe 1050 —70. 
Vrtuepe 2332 —.42 j 
WtTVFe 1038 -33| 
Heittage Funds 
CcnAPP B1539 -.19 1 
OMlKP 1359 —41 < 
IncGcp 1154 - 37| 
LMGCvp 937 
SmCapSpl6.il) +35' 
tfishMorfc Funds 
Batonch ret 1 034 — 34 
Band nx 1076 —09 
- ; GovtBd rat 937 — 38 I 

.Uj Growth rod 055 -.16; 

J77 ] incGrrar 1003 —31 
incoEa* 1X16 -33 


FLTx 

Gtolnc 

Grth 

HiYteto 

income 

intlFund 

MoniBd 

NYTF 

ON7F 

Retirei 

Retire! 

Retires 

Retirei 

ST Glob 

SmCpea 

Teehnol 

TXTF 

TotRrira 

USGvt 


AmerLdpBUM +JM 
GbIGovt pei037— 17 
Gvttnd rare 1043— 45 
tnvGr npe 1058 
MdTFp 1645 -32 
PATFp 1474 
Spfnvnpe22.T4 +34 
TxFri repel 547 —01 
TatRri rmx 1400 +.13 
VaTTrnpxlOS? +05 
LexfngtoaGrp: 
CnvSecnelAIO — >9 
CLdr 1278 —46 
GNMAnx 032 —34 
Gtobaln 1151-36 
GofdMnx 6.90 +35 
Gitttnc nx 16,16 — 139 
5) Govt n 9.98—31 
SOB 406 +.13 
Stlrrv 241 +.16 
TE Bd nx 1095 —04 
WHEm 1X96 +56 
Liberty FomOy: 
AMLdr 1408 +35 
CmGrAplXBO +55 
EqthCP 1158 +.12 
EotncCt 1158 +.11 
FDrin 1019 +.13 
FTfitJ 1)41 —0J 
HnncBd 1154 +JQ 
MnSc 1145 +31 
USGvtCP 832 —05 
USGvSecASJZ -36 
UlflFd 1X64 +JC 
UtilFaCt 1254 + 32 
Ltoerty FkxaxSc* 
Gthlnc 1079 
InsMuni 11.11 *42 
TF Bond 1089 *02 
LIS Gov 930 
Utfl 1156 
UnfTrmp 10.13 —01 
LkidDv nx 2732 —96 
Undnrnx 2X32—33 
Loomis Sartos 
Bond nx 1137 
Growth pmojn 
frttfEqnx 1X90—45 
Smcnpne 1413-1 50 
Lord Abbrit: 

ANDldP 1070 
BontCebp975 +34 
□evrtGIh 04.12 
Ea 1990 pel 408 — 1.58 
FdVriupx)306 —10 
GEq PX 1X54 —50 
Giincp 932 —08 
GavtSecp X96 —01 
TaxFrp 1141—01 
TFCTp 1075 +JB 
TxHCdp1157 
TFR.P 017 +01 
TFMOP 558 *31 
TFHJP 554 +41 
TaxNYp 1142 +01 
TFTXp 1064 +41 
TFPAP 533 +01 
TFHIP 537 . 

TFMI 531 +31 
TFWAp 538 
VoluApp P1255 +31 
US Govt SJM —02 
LuBtotaaBra: 

BroHIYd 9.76 +36 
Fundx 1759— 132 
Muni 086 +32 
OPpGr 1053 +30 
MAS Funds 
BDtoncedhl15B +36 
EmerGrnl738 +56 
Equity n 714 7 +.11 
Fxdlnlln 1134—04 
Fxdlncn 1143 ++03 
GIFxin 1057 —11 
HYSecsn 954 + 02 
MEan 15.12 +33 
LWJurFl nlOJO— 31 
MlgBkFc 1054 —32 
MunFxl 11.12 +JI7 
SriEa n 1774 +.M 
SriH n 1062 —31 I 
SefVJttn 7177 +.72 
SmCpVl nl7J10 +45 
SoFln 1239 -32 ! 
Value n 1X27 +.10 i 
MFS 

MJTApx 1130-105 | 
MJGApe 1150—259 


AmertnAelOM 
AtSRAp 973 - 

AZMAc 1137 +31 
BoiA 1X33 +.17 
BasVIA 2237 +34 
CAMAe 1025—31 
CtttMnAelX13 —01 

CaoFOA 7747 +.76 

Consuttp 1103 —34 
Cp+flA 832 +31 
CpHQAe 1107 —10 
QXTAe 1132—07 
DevCop 1600 +39 
Dra»A 1876 +08 
EuraA 1657 —12 
FaaSecAp908 —02 
n_MAe 1067 
FdFTA 1505 +31 
GiAIA 13L22 *31 
GffidAe 11X03—10 
G1CVA 1058 -JR 
GIHdA 1X14 +.14 
GRAA 1267 +.14 
GriRA 1758 +54 
HerithA 291 +JM 
ficJkip 1031 
IntEqA 1131 *48 
AUMuAe 1052 —31 
MNMuAelO02 +31 
LatArnAr1652 +34 
MrtfnsAe 060 +31 
MnLMA 1001 
MuInTrA 1052 +31 
MNaflAe 1001 
MResA 15.19 +37 
NJMAe 1139 
NYMnA 81238 —02 
PDCA 21,18 +.19 
PAMAl 1155 
PhrncA 1355 + 34 
SOVIA 1556 +32 
SlrOvA 7274 +JB 
STGIAP 854 — JH 
TediA 430 +31 
TXMAe 11.1$ +31 
WUlncAe 930 —04 
Ad«B 973 
AmarlnBMJi +.10 
AZMBte 1137 +31 
Barit 1254 +.17 
BasVIBt 2X19 —12 
QttMnS to 1X13 —31 
CAMS e 1026 
CapFdBI 2751 +.15 
Q*0Bt 033 +32 
CPHQetaU07 —10 
CPfTBto 1102 —07 
DrogBp 1070 +47 
EUTOBt 14.17—12 
FedSacBt 9.98 — JB 
FUMB to 1067 
FtriTBt 1577 +31 
FdGrBt 1043 +.13 
GlAJBt 1X11 +31 
GtBdBte 1003 —10 
GtCvBt 1074 +32 
G0JIB1 1X63 +.14 
GrtRBt 1455 +51 
HacrihBt 339 + 34 
IntlEqBt 11.18 +38 
GVftri 1234 +.14 
LrdAmB 7 1647 +34 
MAMBte 1132 —01 
M [MuB tel 053 
MNMBtC 1002 +31 
NtntnsBIe 039 +31 
MnLhrit 1001 
MUrttB 1052 +31 
MNctt1BtolO0O —31 
fdResBt 1517 +37 
NJMfite 1139 
NYAAnBtelX09 —31 
NCMBte 1000 
OHMBte 1132 +31 
POESt 2039 +.19 
PA MB to 715$ _ 

PtnxBI 1124 *33 
STG4B I 853—02 
SpVIBt 1531 +31 
StoOvBt 1X74 +3$ 
Teririt 453 +37 
TX MB to 11.15 +31 
UltlnBt 940 —07 
\MdlncBto9JS — 03 
MenftrxsiFds 
AsJAflrf 1X35 +.13 
BTChx 1135 
CmAnpf 1156 +36 
Fteridih H.13 +32 
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CopapC 1030 +35 
CooApB 1023 +44 
CopApAf 1037 +45 
EqlncA 1155 +.16 
EqincC 1154 +.14 
EotnvstAfU.13 *37 
EakivC 1X15 +47 
GovSecA 754—03 
HBncA 630 -m 
HflncB 659 —01 
bittEopx 958 —45 
inflFjdnt 803 
MedAsta 9.19 *47 
MadAstA 931 +37 
MgdAitC 932 +38 
RschBalC 956 +31 
TaxExA 043 +.01 
TXExB 043 +32 
MIMuinc 11.15 +31 


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TXTTAri 1043—03 
VcttuelApUM — $1 
VtdueTA 1358 — 5T 
VAITAn 1103 — M 
VAllAo 1103 —08 
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NfSond 937—07 
NatnFdx 1631 —80 
NtGwfhx 105? — 25 
TXFrtto 1082—10 
USGvlnreia.ro — tz 
Ikiifwmrr nem 
AMTBalnl552 +.13 
Genesis x 136 — 30 
Guantnnxt850— 36 
LWMctt neia36 —08 
Mariatroll.il— 338 
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SoSrid roflX06— ^ 157 
UttraBdn 931 -31 
N ew Alter x 3038 —29 
NewCntfp 1249 +31 
NewUSAtt 12JS +37 
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Nctlllnx 2632-136 
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NchLd nx 1858— 1.18 


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STGV 1033 —31 
VDEh • 1255 *31 
VaJGr 1353 +37 
Ftortataae A Sbs 
BondFd 9.95—02 
EauffVAr 1651 *37 
H&lA 1A75 *.J7 
HGOVA 10-16 —JR 
MOiA 1127 *JB 
LMMCBA 1002 
AUMuA 1135 *42 
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CbreGrtv*M37 *31 
CoreGrtM9022 +44 
CoreGrth0834 —37 
EmaGrQittlXl) +47 
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tncGrBx 1476 —15 
WWGrB 14.19 +JM 

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Gwthp 1459 +31 
Grlncp 1X50 +JK 
USGvt p 1006 —03 
NefnvGrn 2S.1I +42 
NeinvTrn 1039 +37 


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ArSGovA 1005 —31 
COTFA 1033 +J71 
GvttncTr 94D —03 
GvttocA 930- 
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mcomeA 1036—04 
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TFtocT 1024 +JR 
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VduGfT 1742 + 37 


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LeshTsvA 956 —09 
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Monettoe 1554 +.14 
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ChTTl P 2X04 +41 
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MuiNUGB 1056 +.13 
MufSnft* 18.13—357 


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t«ncAp 550 +.01 
InOoAp 834— Cl 
LMMAP 737—42 
RschAPX 1X78—155 
SectApe 1117—357 
TotRAoe 1X34 —32 
UlOAP 754 -04 
VahiAPX 974-155 
WoGvAP 1230—1 35 
M i WoGrA 1607 -37 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON ESCORT AGENCY 
CXEQflr CABS ACCEPT® 

071 589 5237 


” GBffVA • MIB04AT1QNAL 

EKOif Service 

Trt 022 / 7S2 50 49 • 077/259200 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


LONDON 

EXOTIC 

ESCORT SBMCE 
CAU{071)W6S51S 


INI&NATIONAL ESCOKT5 

Serna Araiab/e WcrkKiide 
M 212-765-7896 New York. USA 
Major Cnedr Cbncr A Chads Accepted 


VBMAYZUKiQf* PRAGUE _ 
SJPREME wn 5CCTI save. 
CM Vxrn I +■ + 43 1 ) 537 > 7 37 


ULTIMATE 'lO* 

2 7 2-884- 1666 
?CW YORK BCORT SBVKZ 


BANNA 

lONCONBCORTSEMCE 
fawoen 8 BxbBw 
7 dcrio. Lcrx^rv'Hecttvt?- 
Tebchone 085C 623734 


GENEVA * MISS * PARIS 

Ewort agency 346 00 89 ere* teak 


ZURICH / BERN / BAS& 
Seen Sow* 
let 077,-57 29 67. 


’“** LONDON ESCORT SBVtCE *• 

Tel 071 370 2C95 « " » ■ 

* " * * " QqyVEvenngi * * * * * 


[FRANKFURT 8 AREA 
Mao'i New bel Escort 
PteeCdQg-597 56 66 .1 
J ZUBCH REGRC 
& Escort Sena 
Znncfc 01 / 383 08 55. 


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MuBdA 1757 - 02 
MuWA 938 +01 
MuLIA 733 +01 
MuALAP 1X92 +01 
MuARAPlQ50 —01 
MuCAAp 591 
MuR-AP 1054 *41 
MuGAABT13l *02 
MuMAApll56 +01 
MuM0Apll73 - 
MuMSAD 959 +04 
MuNCAp 1239 -02 
MUNYAB1137 *01 
MuSCAP 1X66 *01 
MuTNAalO04 +.01 
MuVAAplI.99 +01 
MuWVApU07 -01 
CQpGBtX 1179— 1.11 
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Gold p 1436 +A3 
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HNldB 1456 +03 
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IntoTEp 1536 +JD 
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MSi)CG»A2176 +31 
MfglncA 1405—32 
NYTaxA P1334 +02 
NYTxB n 1X35 +33 
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SpedApx2749 — 36 
SklncAp 532 —01 
StrtnCBt 531—01 
StoSTWpe4f3 —01 
StlnGrAp*525 —11 
SfrktvA pe 510 —03 
TxFrfl 11153 *31 
TxFrAp 1054 +32 
TaBBBn 856 —35 
USGvt p 933 —JO 
Overtasd Express 
StoalGr 1X20 +37 
AstAlAx 1100 —75 
CATFA 1757 —22 
MutocA 1737 „ 

ST Govt *02—7.18 
USGvIA 1047—12 
VRGA 909 _ 

PBHGGrn 1530 +54 
PFAMCeFds 
Bokxi x 1050—31 
Ct»ApnxlX5S +.10 
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EflfiEq rat 11.97 —08 
Eqlncnx 1158—04 
Mime 1139—47 
Mixed nelD-16—11 
MMCoe 1400 +37 
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SroCpVx 1277 +.12 
PIMCD Funds 
TatReJn 1054—06 
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LDII 1013 —31 
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HFYW 7044 —02 
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PNC Funds 
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Btttanc 1X63 +31 
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Grawthl 1132 +39 
Idxea 1107 —02 
WGvtS 1037 —02 
WTBd 972 —32 
mtGorv 1&37- n 
KtttEq 1235-33 
Manned 1080 —03 
ManaaedSlOBO— 03 
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STBd 904 —02 
SmCatrt/SlX43 +51 
SmCapVl 1353 +51 
Vttturi 1157 
VtttueS 1157 _ 

PRARttyn 934 +34 
PoancUSX 976—71 
PaanoGrtMOOO +09 


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BandCn 904—02 
Bx*yCnl602 +38 
GvflncC 70Q +07 
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LtdMIC 1001 —01 
MIMnC 1105 +31 
MuBdC 1077 +31 
SmCapC 2352+130 
pgmBoTnx 1746 - 
Porrfossus 8131 +01 


BajRtnx 21 
Groerth* 1AJD +JQ 
Nifty 50 17.12 —10 

PaXWtownVLK +02 
Fefiaanx 7 738 
PmCOBA 603 +33 
Pena R ayceFds 
PemMux 031 
EqtoCX SJ8 —37 
Premier rac65l —02 
Vcttitotnx 903 —61 
PAMUMP 1173 +J11 
Pariarm on eeMs 

BqCon ret 1132 — 03 
Eolns nx 1102 —03 
InFICp 1056 
InFlln 1056—36 

SYHCp 1001 —01 

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Perm Pnrt Funds 
ftrmptn 1747 +JN 
TBrin 6457 +31 
VBondn 5437 —02 
PerttCGne 1X48—25 
Phaa Fundx 701 


BttotFd 1603 —32 
ColTxEp 1X75 +07 
CopApp 1802 +.16 
CvFOSer 1832 +38 
EotyOpp 774 +06 
Growth 2134 
WYtoldX 931 —41 
toGTAp 948 +31 
InGrBI 948 +0) 
Ml 1233 +.14 
MulFlAp 1334 —02 
MulFIBp 1333 —01 
Stocked 1X55 +49 
TEBd 1175 +02 
TrtRdp 1558 +02 
USGvB x 973 + 
WUOpp 1032 +.13 


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tottEqnx 1001 —27 
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BqAeAnx1X32 +03 
EoGrArtx 11.10 +31 
EqlnAx 11.17—07 
FxdlnA 1068—37 
HmOvAnl053— 05 
NJAAtlAn 1045 +31 
STInvAD 1001 


Eqtnep 1601 
Amoricp 1105—04 
Brildp 942 —05 
ConGrp 1452 +02 
Goto 018 +.18 
Growth p 1252 +53 
Income p 1021 —03 
F%lMBdPlQ74 
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Ffomrllp 190< +02 

PtoTlreep2055 +54 
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InVerBitt 1207 
MUtB 1301 +03 
FocGfB 1634 +08 
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MunArzt 1X38 +3< 
MuFLA U04 
MuGot 1X00—31 
MuaHYf 11-39 
MuhBA 1133 
MUtlrit 1144 
MuMdt 1156 +39 
MunMA 1 1X11 —31 
MuMnl 1X32 +31 
MunMIt 1X52 +31 
MuittM0dtll34 +02 
MUNCI 1138 
MunNJf 1133 +30 
MuNYt 1260 +42 
MunOftt 1256 +31 
MuPQt 11.15 +32 
NtMunt 1633 
Struct p 1171 -JB 
StouctB 1178 -JB 
USGvt rtf 1005—37 
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Prudeaflal mat 
Acrid nx 1131 —21 
Balm 1106—4* 
GmsacnxlX27 +.18 
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IndSttcnx 1X08 — 
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PutBoai Funds 
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AstoAp MM +51 
BKWAp 452 
AZTE 941 
CATXAP# OM —31 
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CPAT 4304 ; 

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GiGrAp 
GrtnAp 
HBtlAp 


1172 —13 
7036—03 
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952 +49 
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MYdAP U0O +35 
HYAdP 1053 +JM 
InanAp 702 — JM 
InvAp 016 +.' 
Motto P 9.11 
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MITXItP 955 + 32 
MuniAO 907 
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NJDcAP 954 +3) 
NwOpAP 2456 +40 
NYTkAp 955 +32 
NYT00P 905 
0TC6P 1155 +53 
OhTxlIP 904 
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TFtoAp 1558 +J)1 
TFHYA 1577 
TFKYBt 1S.17 +31 
TFttfit 1559 + 42 
Texas p 956 +31 
USGvAp 1355—02 
UTOAp *40 —01 
VstOAP 742 +01 
VDVAP 1149 
AtfiBt 1058 —01 
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CATxBte 085—31 
DvrtnBt 1246 
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FLTXB t *41 +31 
GIGrBT 940 + 39 
Grttrit 1X51 +34 
HRhBt 2651 +05 
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MunSt 907 +31 
NJTxST 953 
NwOopB 13443 +40 
NYTxBt 954 +33 
OTCBt 1109 +53 
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USGvB T 1X52—01 
UffiBt 947—01 
VtStoBI 759 +01 
VOrBt 1131 +05 


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BoriGnwhttUr +36 
BosNumOlS09 +07 
BatftomOl&40 +08 
Quest For Value: 
CATE 1107 —01 


Fundx 

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AgGroe 2658—74 
CATFoe 1505—10 
CapmcD 1504—09 
USGve 1000—71 


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CATF 1105 +32 
EqVri 1X35 +76 
Govtnco KL59 —03 
ST CA n 1018 +31 


GvMoBf 635 -31! Eauitvlp 1373 * 


> 2UWCH • SUS5N 

Escort Service 
Tel: 01/381 99 48 


I RAWRriT K0U4 DDS^DORF 

j <4 area. Bead Service. 1 days 
i Off-47394 


MUNICH* WELCOME 
HCOCT & GUBJE AGBSOf. 
Fl£ASECAti 089 -91 23 10 


PARIS 8 LONDON 

BfOLVT 8 SKZATZJ • E70US7VE 
Escort Ser+ce Lc»djn |71 JU j!45 


V1BMA "ZURICH* PRAGUE 

3UP8EME INTI ESCOtr S3MCE. 
OJ Vienna | + + 43 11 532 11 32 


JET-SET 

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0043-1336 7* 86. 


FRANKFURT X AREA; 
Moras New inti Escort Agenc/. 
ItatU 059-59766 66 Daf/. j 


I V184NA*PAR1S*M1 LAN ’ZURICH 

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Smvcx. ax Vjema +43-1010 63 19. 
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tntmBt 9.02 — 03 
Sects te 1118— 164 
TetRBto 1306—23 
WoEqBtxlen —58 
WoGvfl 1209—104 
WoGrB 1636 +07 
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Mto6eaxl042 —19 
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AdKWAP 906 .! 

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CAM*Xtp*l(L60 — 05 


Beacon real 09 — 1 48 
Oiscovrv 1305 —33 
OuatoHW2730— 258 
Shares nx 00.96— 640 
NCC Foods 
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NWNLNd 1007 -m 
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MuttAx 1137—56 
STBdX 1003 —73 
ValEqx 1250—101 
1X71 —01 


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BafTAn 1103 —02 
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MqtoSTCA 1207 *34 
MatoStuy Ptatox 
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MoBTAti 1030 —21 
MDIIP 11.14—08 
MDJTA 11.14—08 

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CrpBdtx 7.99 —02 I MunLAD 1107 —05 


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CmTcA 959 +07 
DvGrAp 2036 +07 
EurGrAp 959 + 70 
GIEnAt 1104 +04 
GCnAp 1X97 
QtaAp 1104 +04 
GrthAp 2174 +56 
HBnApx 807 
IricAp 1051 —06 
InvGApx 1108 —04 
MHtoAuxl047 —18 
NTaxApxlX25 —37 
NYTXAntll06 — 02 
ReoFAP 1702 +02 
5TGvtApx258 
SmCanA 1X32 +01 
USGvA PX1O03 —05 
UrtAP 900 —07 
AssIBt 1242 +.78 
ATLBt 1709 +42 
BtoeBT 1547 +.16 

Carrs tx 1100—00 
QjpABt 7X59 +04 
OnTcB 938 +08 
2032 +07 
906 +.10 
2001 +55 
1101 +04 
1X96 

1134 +04 
807 + 01 
1X40 —04 
tovGBBC 1138—05 
MHtoBfX 1X97 —17 
NTdtBfc 1205—07! 
NYTXB 1X1105 —OS 
ResFSf 1/34 +02 
SmOxtoMOAt *00 
UH78P 900 —07 
CafTOuX 113* —29 
USGvB tk 1X04 —34 
AfS3P 17.18 +41 
CbpAO 1X05 +03 
OvGOP 2037 +37 
EuGrD 9.41 +.10 
NTxOPX 1305 -3/ 
GrtW 3X85 +55 
GRnDI 1047 
MDncDP* 809 +01 
InvGOx 11.08—06 
NYTxDnlUI-32 
MHCPX 1047—1? 

S7WDW258 
SmCanO 1031 *01 
USGDPK 1032 —05 
UttDp 900—06 


DvGrBt 

EuCrBt 

GrthBI 

CenBT 

GOnBI 

CKHBt 

HBnBtx 

tocBt 


BOHncp 1230-42 
BnerGr 2X02 +32 
Gavtn 909—05 
Grlnc 1009—32 
tastGv 7149—03 
toSGvAdlOOa +31 
MNTE 1101 +31 . 
NttttTE 1151 +314 
POtEurG1506 +0S 
Seejorp 17.15 +01 
VOtuep 1903 +07 
PkttJmiBx 1X71 +3B 
PortcoPdr 
BlttKnx 2301 +.18 
Bdktox 2732— 136 
Ettldcx 3201 —34 
Grtncm 2X18 +36 
MBdMe 1X29 —12 
NMGrt.nx7l47 +52 
STBondlMOiO— 14 
SpGrnx 3X37 +06 
TX&nBdr»O01 +02 
Preferred Gram 
AHatAAxllJQ — 07 
Fxdnne 1004—33 
Growth rocl332 +01 
Mime 1135—45 
ST Gw ne 1X06— 04 
Value roc 1146—15 
Price FtmdK 
AdUS 407 _ 

Bdance* 1X02 +35 
BIChG 1104 +43 
Comcn 1038 
CapAprn 1X66 +J36 
DtvGron 1158 +.11 
Equtnn 1635 +35 
EqMxn 1351—02 
Europe n 1136 —16 
FEFn ■ 1X84 +.14 
FUnsJntnicjS +04 
GNMn 902 —03 
GATFn 1030 - 

GtoGv 1008—09 
Growth n 2052 +74 
Gwthfnn 1647 +79 
HTYWn 902 +04 
Inaomen 904—03 
IntBdn 1X34—15 
1751 +0J 
1X16 +.12 
951 —17 
572 

McfTXFrnlX67 
MtdCepniXIB +51 
NewAmnrnOi +4B 
NAsta 2X19+106 
NewEron2Q05 +.16 
NwHrznnl616 +52 
NJTFr 1155 +37 
NYTxF n 1101 —01 
OTCFdn 1539 +50 
ScsTritn 1R9S +57 
STBdfl 535— 31 
ST Grin 
SmCVI 1438 +02 
SeacGrx 1137 —74 
Saectoe 11.11 
TrfYeen 930 
TvmfYni256 
TFtosIn 1X80 +32 
TxFrS n 508 +01 
US tot 508 —02 
US Lung 1X01 —10 
VA7F n 7104 _ 

FViqvyT nxl 105 +JR 


1202 +37 
1304 +31 
937 

1136 —10 
1106 +31 
_ 1144 +31 

Opport x 1114— » 
SmCcp 1171 +56 
USGov 1109—04 
RBBQvtp 1047 —04 
RCM Fund 02097— 06 
RSI Trust: 

AOBd 2 731 —13 
Core 3439 +34 
ErnGr 3537+141 
IntBd 2536 
ST«F 1735 +01 
Vdue 2600 +.18 
Rainbow n 541 
ReoGrapv 3X5X +35 


CXBBd 1227 
C&BEq 1X05 +33 
DSIDv IMP +07 
D6ILM 930 —04 
FMAspc 1050 
KMSC 1647 +09 
SAM/PMn*54 +34 
SrSnEq n 1437 +30 
5toran 1156 +37 
TSWBq 1132 +38 
TWRr 1040. 
TSWIntl 1X2*. 

RrilTss 1)18741— 101 


lidsxsn 

WStkn 
Japan n 
MdSMn 


DrvAch* 1350—03 
OovfPrf 938—06 
tosTExe 1X50 —42 
SF100RUS34 — 23 
TBtol 951 +31 


8K3VX 1139—06 
Bond X 1156 —13 
CVACCX2O06 —06 
EmnGr 2334 +03 
Gcwtx 1158 —07 
Growth x 2956 + 78 
Managed 0205 —14 
TEBdx 1255 —03 
UtTOGesx 1X78 —14 
Wwldx 708 +30 
PiFFxrflrjcntajI— 04 
tHFU*Mut»1102 +01 


EndvGtf 1107 +.15 
ItSfGrtfi 1708 +.76 
SmCopGr 1205 +04 
PradS*«cnw705 


WctlA 

M-fhTl 

ireulD 

Ad) A 


CAtnAp 

EddAp 

EatocA 

RCnA 

GkXsAp 

GlAstA 

GIUtA 

CvPUp 


046 +03 
1X18 +01 
934—02 
932 —01 
1038 

1X80 +30 
1176 +.15 
1142 +06 
1404 +.17 
137 

1400 +01 
909— oa 


BaTFrnx 1X04 +04 
GFxlrfltrt843 
GwthTr nxi 001 +39 
lnOEaTrnl2Sr ■ “ 
SKSvFTT 1008 —05 
SlhGtoT 1004 +05 
TE FTTriDOXB— 02 
Tax FnY i»603 —05 
VtttueTrnxlO0O+03 
Refke tovTrxt 
Balanced 1746 +06 
EQGro 1831 +.15 
Eqtocam 1842 +31 
Income 1631 - 
mmKhxujf — pi 
RMA ne Group: 
BlueCh 00(3244 —36 
RTFdnfMS01— 147 
GovSocp 7349—10 
Growth P 2500—12 
MWCbPP«B07-Xl6 
SocAwpe2&54— 134 
RimcaBdeHUR- 
RYncoStkxilT? +JB 
RhertnEx 1X43—109 
RhrertlGV7x93l - 
RhrertfctoCre* 

Equity 1X78 +04 
Fxdln 1007 +JR 
TNMuOb KU7 +03 


CDntron 1151 +00 
EmGrp 1738 +02 
VaffYue 1305 +04 
Rochester Fds 
BdGrowpiX15 +07 
RtMUP 1940 
LWYp 303 —01 


Otolnpe 1309 - 
Growth peI609-l.lt 
ImtEqpa 1X94 +01 

RuttmareOrou* 

AmGasnxl 136—03 
SMPtdx IWI807— 18 
OTC ldXRxl639+ 
USGLgnelOJl —93 
UStntne 904- 
MDTFn 1107 
YATFn 1141 
RyttxNova 1001 — w 
SBCWkBn 7004 +02 
SSFOOX1201 —33 
SBSFFdnxlS01— 008 


SfGvTAn 406 — 03 iPanGTebn KLB6 +01 
SmnT An 100a— 02 Prim S* U3B +07 
+TWB* 1X00 — 02 PbrtlUOBPt 
snatci 1000— m I GcW 1642 +40 
SdTAn 1002 IntBd 6 1049—1* 


GrOaAp 1245 +03 
HTYWAP 800 + 01 
IttVerAp 1206 +08 
MuKAP 1X22 *31 
NWHiA 1109 „ 

PacGrA 17.11 +09 
STGIAP 908 +03 
UfflAp 932 + 04 
CatMut 1X10 +01 
AdB 947— « 
Eaurint mo +.10 
Eamcrtt 1304 +.14 
FSbfll 1205 +31 
PBtTA 1X11 +31 
FbcOint 1759 *06 
CNMAn) 1401 —04 
GtASS 130 +01 
GfcttttBf U08 +.17 
GIUrB 1470 +01 
GlbGAnt 1903 * 01 
ObRsrtt 1X26 +06 
CWPSnt 908 — 05 
GvtScnp 1X03 —03 
Grttrit 1433 +07 
GtOpBt 1X19 +01 
WWW* U9 +41 
WGO 851—04' 


1X16—02 
Baadnp 1109—09 
Bdlndxp 1043 —03 
CopGrn 1101 +38 
CarpOln Dnl J79 
GNMA P 1000 —03 
LttfVBd npiX6l — 02 
SttGvnp 1003 —01 
toiMnp 1006 +02 
httGvtW 1006 —04 
btttp 1044 —04 
Eatoenp 1427 +06 
Eqlndxi»IS03 —02 
KSTF 1033 +02 
MidCGp 1109 +09 
PA Mitt) 00103/ + 01 
toTtGappnl403 +41 
Value np 11.17 —02 
CapAnp 1536 +04 
SFETTusf X303 — 06 
SIT Funds: 

Growth n 1X66 +05 
W 1546 +04 
TtocFhjeniXOS _ 
USGov 1043 +02 

snasrie 
Capon wix3J +01 

CocGrT x 1X34 
toGBT 1048 —05 
toGTDbi p 10L48 —05 
toGBIvp 1 jjn *JJ2 
ST8dTYnltt07 —02 
ShTTrTrn 9.98 — ot 
VaHncT run 057 —in 
Vallndl»7a58 
Safeco Fuads: 
CaHTrn 1253 —m 

Bwifyratlll8-^ia 

*■" 

JpmtBc 1707 —11 
Wncn 1453—ni 
NWroc 1255 —19 
USGov n 908 —SO 

SpnnGrtaajo —j\ 


egssz Lm.3gi! c S^“ s,a,9,i 


u»*SS 



5crtWk0e 1408—49 
Sadder Funds 
Balanced rtt23 — f* 
CdfTx n 1005 +31 


PrograssriT-ir'-'- , ^nAmn* ri-J — r 
TaxExe il.lT 


USGWPe 


SarStaS^v * 79 i _ „ 

Svetoane334l— W Bittarn *™ZL.Gra •»»,*»“■« 

cSsAn iSm-» SaUs 

Gkrilnx 2400 —04 uitKlm ‘rT; j Redcst *2 

^0x1643 -46 ttof jn" 6 ; 

1X35 *08 *02 ' - 43 


Gaidrtx 
Grwlncrtxl704 —3/ 
jrtajflWfwllT?— « 
totemaflrstiLlQ —32 
toflBdne Tl»— 


CATFC 

capihtt P 




94T — *3 


-t 

GvttncA llg-a, TStnu F07 ' 


LaMinrr 2148 *& Aagnn" 

MedTFn 1U6 +JD «hCrt< JJj! Fundn 
MMB 909 +01 toamen^/7 

NY Then 11.17 +01 LffvGT ££ 


NY TJrr 11.17** sio —SB fTi ,i 

OHTYn 1359 *» 1 * j| i NYTEn C73 -j' 

PA Tax n 1X99 +J0 ffTWp ^ ] godyn 1A95 


RacOppsfM07 *31 
QwWrttxlSJK— 2B SKt&nanF*** 
STfland nxl 201 —12 Amtodn 1JS +3J 
STGUn 1103— 04 Assacn * 
TxFHYn W55 +01 tove^n . 

Vah* tK 1205 — >31 “ 

ZBT20W 11)8205—149 .« 

■aNttflA' CapOpprt3X39 +i» 


SfaMM' 
AssetAx- 1335 — 04 
BJOlx 1743 +02 
Bandx TL.T4 —86 
jaartynadk 
Band px 701 —07 
EquBy x 509-1J3 
EqGTA 1033 +3T 
OtlKx 746 —22 
TxExx 1X37—01 
Ultra x 700 —00 


Gvttocn 

HyMunn }136 +& 
HKBmen 1X74 —03 
lrdmBdn 8.98 — »] 
btlMunn 7142 +^| 
MwttAin 906 
PrfcneEqnl448 +.11 
Spedta 3400 +57 
Stock n 2409 +07 
TflflRflfn 2605 +13 


AmShsi»U60-Ua 
Sprite npe2Q51 -2.16 [ 
USGov pne 90S) - “ 


S«ttSmn2S42 +A0 
SbfttDn 29.1? — K 
stnttmemaojs +.t* 


FrorttierAlOJS +55 
CapFdA 1535 +05 
CotoTm 746 —01 
cm SHcA 1347 +.72 
ComunA 1343 +42 
FltfTak 80S 
GATxEx 809 +02 
GH&mMSI +00 
GrawlhA 506 +.13 
fneomeA 1448 +06 
incameD 1445 .+06 
InHA 1603 +02 
UXDc 849 
MassTx 808 
MdTx 
MkhTx 
MkttfTX 
MOTk 
NaflTX 
NJTEp 
NYTax 
NCT5CE 

OhtoTX 
OrTE 
PaTxExp 801 
OJTxHy 644 
047X0 749 - 

SCTE 808 
USGvtAp 7.18 —03 
KYBdAp £34 +01 


Advtgti 1X19 +01 
AmU« racial? —34 
QnSJkr»1734 — 3? 
DHajvne JBD5 — J* 
GavScne 7X61 —X 
Incan 1004 —02 
tosMune 1156 — 1? 
toffne TAM +^ 
Invstnx 1906—102 
Mu*BdnelQ05— 31 
Opptntv ne2B03— 54 
STBandn JO03 
STMunne1X36 —05 
Total nx 2400 +03 
■58 — 01 ISnaBaatoc 
835 -( EqGrnx 1103—21 

XI8 +01 1 GovSecracIQjn — j 05 
lrttRnx 1X32—21 
5uriUnertcaPds 
BOlAsetA P1434 +06 
BalA9eepl<32 +06 
DivIncS P 506 
EmGrA P 1732 +53 
EmOrS 17.19 +53 
FedScSpel052 — 04 
GrowmApl44B.+06 
HBncBp 801 —01 
HancAp 800 —01 
TEksApl271 
USGvA 849 
USGvB p 849. _ 

Virtues . 1547 +01 


XU 
A 15 
809 
840 

802 +01 
845 +07 
739 


AooGrttip SJ2 +00, 

BcrtoncedPlS02 — m TARGET: 

BondP 646 —03 toterBdn 1006 — 01 


COmSHcp 2949 — M 
GvSecsp 1004 — 04 
Growth P 1706 +06 
PATFp 1001 - - 
TFtocP 1X91 +03 
world p 1243—13 
SetttrvFdn U85 +.M 
Sequaksn 


Matrix n 1133 +06 
S&PMid nl 732 +04 
SP580n 1X43—01 
STGvtn 930 _ 

YWPln MUX) _ 

7784 Feuds: 

GcvMed 1000—04 
Grotocn 1049 +07 
MATBnnlOJ? +01 
7ExMedn)035 +01 


FxxCncTrnlO02— JM 
GrGqfTr 1043 +.12 
Grfnc£Trnia0r+4/ 
MGvtTrniaiA— m 
LTlnCTrn 936 —01 
SmCpET 1X86 +01 
MMlTMR 
CaUAupe 1152 
GPtoepe 1150—73 
EmrGYpeU37 
FUnspe 1052 +J71 
Grtncpx 1142—158 
Growth p 1148 +.74 
(nttSrpK 1X66 


WtEqn 1309, +08 
LBCnnGrntjl _ 
LuCcwV 1X71 +JJ1 
MtoBkdnKU7 —07 
SmCapG 1106 +07 
SmCnpV 1202 + 07 
TatRSBd 1009 —02 
5U4 +.18 (TNERndB 

AdUS AP 755 
BGfcmAp 1X13+04 
BdtocAP 1X18 —62 
CATFAP 744 +02 
GOPGTAP1507 +.19 
GlabGAplZ22 —05 
GrOpAp 1247—03 
GvScAP 1105—08 
GwthA P 1054 +04 
HBncA p 1006 +01 
toriOAP 1405 —10 
LktUSA 1259 —05 
MassT A P1707 +02 
TxExAP 747 +02 
VdtueAp 747 +45 


X38— 14 
904 —09 


trflTFxn 
totEqn 
toriFxn 856—57 
LpGrwn 908 +.13 
UJVfrtn 933 — .16 
MtgBkdn ail —04 
Muni n Xri —06 
SmGrwn 1X23 +00 
SmVdn 901 —64 
TTSOnn 840— U 


NatMupetlJA —08 TempWen Group: 
STGlPe 253 —02 1 AmerTrrl309 +.11 


USGov pe 1X42 — 03 


MQMullnOIJO - 
UStodhwlOJS —17 
USJncT nelOL59 —17 
ValEqlTnxl205— 06 
VriEdTrartUS— 06 
VAMuT nell.17— 
VaMurtt to) 7.17 — 


CcraAcc M34 +01 
DevMktpl£2fi +09 
parenp 2X30 +02 
GtabOpp U56 
Growth P 7742 +.15 
tottmp 948 —05 
REstP 1X76 +.15 
SmttCop 739 +09 
Woridp 1501 +.15 


Europe 11.11 —04 
MorrtMykilxOi +02 
SrBMfnri 743-208 
apequItllXlXTf +.15 
SanriiBBeneii : 
tone 1X71 +56. 
CltoApA 1440 +.13 
Q*APB 1409. +.13 

EquByAp7il9 +J6 

OGvtA 1292 +01 
toCGTOAplX31 +02 
MWA 949 +01 
toHA 1801 +55 
tofri 1848 +53 
MoGovtA 1245 —02 
MuOriA 1X09 +02 
MUFLA 1349 +43 
MittJdA 6X4 +01 
MwttOA 74X6 *43 
MtrtIJA 1525 +43 
mtCf A 1X73 +44 
SHTSY 514 _ 

USGvIA 1X66— JQ 
UBIAp 1309 +45 
Sm&SWrilOOP - 


ErnMSp 1302 +08 
ForEoS 1X32 +.11 
FEsa/S 1240 +.11 
Grwtttf 11X0 +48 
TlttrdAvV X1742 —84 


GwthA 

IncoA 

Htt 

OnorA 

PrcflMA 

STUGvA 


2102 +.13 
843—04 
>207 +.74 
3X50 + 
1303 + 51 

901 . _ 

TororiA 1247 +02 
TExA . 1X54 —17 

USGvA 943— IQ 
EqtaB 1X76 +06 
GrwthBt 2106 +.12 
toeomeBt 807 — JH 
taflBt 1258 +.15 
QparBt 2939 +06 
PTOdMriBlX96 +50 
ShlGvB 900—01 
TwBcBt 1X54 —17 
Tenets 1X4 7 *32 
USGovBt 959—03 
ThomburaHs: 

InJMu 1356 +41 
LtoOOl 1239 +41 
LMGvtp 1205—44 
LtdMunpiXJS +01 
NMtoT 1306 +01 
1323 +08 


STOBrShGf 1X01 
SmXHBrayShnaA: 

AriGvAp 930 — 01 
ArtvWAP 2737 +51 
AaGrAP 2600 +49 
ApprApx 7141 —47 
TtSGApO 1206 +.15 
TeRnx 10742— 90B I Tocquev 
AzMuA P01X58 — .17 
CoMuA pel6J9 — 50 OcbAppx 130B —07 
OtosSNnco851 —I* LA Manx 7757 
FdVaiApx L14 —23 T(mttRHXlX22 
GK7PAPX2908— 01 USGvx 1X59—09 
HlncAK 1X11 —95 Tradstnaric Ftoads: 
IntCAAe X62 » Equttyn 1004 

irtNYAe X6S _ GovttocaniO04 — jm 

LklMup 801 _ KY Alton nKL36 +02 

LtoHYpe 701 —36 SIGewtR 906 —02 

MgGvAP 1349 

MoAAnAPttl634 — 02 


MaMuA PB7354 — JD4 
A0MuAP*7X59 — 70 
NyAltoA Pb1748 — .18 
PrMtAp 2153 +00 
SpBjAp 2003 +52 
ftTRA 1507 +07 
UIBApe 1509—57 
WlncAp 640—07 
WWPAp 104 


AflSGvA 938—01 
CATFAp 1005 +02 
CopApp 1X46 _ 
EmGAp 2X13 +36 
Gvtncp .851 —46 
GrtnAp 1133 +08 
GvSecp 801 —06 
InflGvx 2503 —74 
tovQuotp 933— JOS 
TFBdA 70 36 +01 


*4lGrBt 2649 +48 BTOiipT 1106 +05 
AanBtx 1100— 09 CaTFB 1X85 +02 

to 7609 —40 EfnGBf 25Si +42 
Comribc 1502 +.11 Gvtnct 904 —OS 
DW»telXW— 104 GrtnBt 11.9* +07 
gWtoBte 851 —12 HYTFf 90S +01 
I^P 0 * W47 —78 HiYld t XI 8 — 01 
RJAuBtottLSl —01 IrittRst 1508 +43 
W7riBTX X14 —77 TFBdBt 1036 +01 
1641 —54 Trust Per OxdUtt 
WMte 2X85 —18 G5P 932 
GvS£» 1X01—17 MSPe 936—06 
Grtrritx 1X19 —01 TMP1996e903 —10 

in Sjn S 8 S'?? JmwGEniXW +.15 
^ 2W«»GV1104 +05 
lnvGdBtel341 — 00 THUCmturv: 

MoevBtnixoo— 06 BrtmvT^ 


Mg«uetei60<— 72 
Nj7W(fitei349 —10 
NyMuBte7748 —18 
PrMffll 2104 +40 
PrtnTRB 185X7 +01 
SecfrStX 1508 +03 
2008 +51 
7709—701 
TWGBte 1X77 +.15 
TxExB to 1858 —08 
UMBte 7509—57 
WJncBr 600—01 
s ^™®nnWt 


Grin 1743 +05 
Growth n 2250 +05 
Hertnvn 1001 +05 
JnjEgn 730 +00 
LTBortdn 908 —04 
Select n 3956 +.15 
T*ESTn 1046 +01 
TxEJntn io*A + jot 
Tlfi-Tn 1X80+01 
Urian 2109 +08 
J^Gvn 945-^jn 
Vrtuen XI 2 +05 
Vistan 1027 +29 
,10 


mill px X14— 104 USaa Ctord- 

—73 AosvGthn2022 +03 
SoGenpseal032 +05 BcttBncadnl27l— w 


Balance 1002 
& » +Jn 


tovOffld 
Ltd In 


JJri —02 1 

9.93 —031 
1050 


5#0S» 1400 +22 
113 +0| 
**GrStk 1006 +23 
SpIValSt 1029 +24 
SWm IO0I—OT 
JJSOvHnr 11.19 —ji 
VatSk laiO +03 


CABdn 1034 +01 
Corofn 2346 +09 
GNMA 1028 +01 
Gridn 959 +.16 
GrXIncn 1008 +03 
Grwton 7709 +.76 

Jnesikn 74.13— 17 

income ri 1X71 —os 
totln ixio +00 
NYBdn 1103 +01 
SttTBrtdnlOJD — Jfl 
5®Tri 1326 +02 
TkELT n 1X18 +02 
TfcESTin 1X70 +01 
VABd 1157 +02 
WMGrn 1170 +.16 


£»n 3004 +J8 

te!} «« +.16 

iSSR 

sowtoviojo * j3 

SGj0rinan2134 +47 
CANn mg 

CATFne 1121 -jfq 

GovSIc 7X35 —is 

1006 —il 
NttTFBnel042— o* 

Sa,gg-» 

xio.14 +27 


* 1X82—70) 
CATTIn HL36 +04 
CATF 7120—05 

Croat; me 3j0o _ — 

JJJ7 —70 
U75 '.10 

Jggw* *25-^13 

EtoiBvitt3O09 


-i-s;- 1132 +.13 

Erifti 2021 +20 
IncGrox 1X26 +07 
WMMD07.IX — It 
taflFdx 1047— IT 
InfTEe 9.14 
LTTEo 946 
Wgtftoe. 946 — 03 
NYTE* 801 —22 
SJnEuro 116—25 
STTaxExtf.12— 04 
IgfUriMlDVt 

Brtmp 1133 +05 
GrEqp 1478 +37 
bfffld 1X59 —02 
LMGovAn?36 —02 

«=»*«, SS-TTs +J0 

Staton* 2034—96 GcldGvt 


1135—07 
1137 +07 
1X14—05 
^USlGv 1X21 —04 

T»tea«tpe 

Coma 7.91 —87 


AocunumyXl* +09 
639— JQ 
21.17 +.14 
937 +36. 
Xri— D*4 
404 +01 
942 +04 
2*37 +.14 
904 +07 
.739 +02 

. 556— X7 

NWGCPT 17Jffv+J|. 

Refirt 7J0 +03 
screen 3443 +33. 


Gvtsec 

HBndl 

MoMnc 

Incom* 

MlGth 

AAWttCBl 

MurtX 


ToxExn 

ySGVtn 1 

VlW ^ .r«7 . ifl 

AstoAPe _ n 

GdWTfiSP AM ]- 
RttUnvx d 

STWDCP 
wrWircwtM* 

SiESSrS 

MunwApJili --CI 
/uhitnrfi I M LW ^ 
^TFAP«X» 
PATFB IMS ■— 
STGIAP *■« — J? 
STGffit W* -"-21 
TxFHBI 1541 

tSSSapim* '■AJ 

USGvBf 154 4 “ *5 
USGvAP 1544 —.04 
Ut0ihrA p »1fJ®-S 
Uririre 1459 — m 

BSestn 9735 -7. 6 

Dfwran JW» -3| 

HX»S 20X4' -.15 
5^1 251J-. -2& 

FOB* MM* 

1 7X26 -J >q 
V ua e u ordtwyy 
AdmrTnel058 —13 
AdmLT nelOJ} — 50 
AitoiST ne 1023 — c? 
SSSn IMS -46 
Convt n 1131 
Eqlncn 1X66 — W 
Exaiorarnis.il +UI 
Art°rocnnt20i -.13 
Prmepn 1852 -JJ 
Quart n 1655 -31 
STAR nx 1X41 — ^ 
Trtnttnx 37 JW — ^ 
TrtTSx 3X45—7.25 
STTsrynelOSa — 07 
STFedne 1X34 —.10 
STCorpaelD30 — 0< 
rTTsryne 1X71 —.46 
GNAAAn 1X37 —01 
rrCorpn 9.94— M 
LTT try no 1037 — W 
LTCWpne?22 —20 
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klxBndne 10.06 —.16 
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NYlns ne 71.15 +41 
OHtosno 1127 —01 
PAbsne 1154 —46 
SFEnrgr 1506 +49 
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SPHRttr 3507 +45 
SPSorvr 2321 +26 
SPTechr 1833 +40 
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NYVen 1137 +07 
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ESraRNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 1994 


Page 9 










.1 * ■* r Ma . 








■5**- 




•"'L^ : 

»^-j ' 





trm& Market’Lures Big Firms 


Bonds Cap Year With a Dive 

Robust U.S. Economy Gives Market a Chill 

j _ ... i. — 


SHORT COYER 


By JohiiWani Anderson 

WaktoQUn Post Service 
- NEW DELHI — McDon- 
ald’s, the resta u rant chain that 
has fedthfiWHicL95 bafijcnteBn? 
binders, is coming to TthTm , the 
country 'where cows affc sacffid. - ' 

It wooM noi appear, tojbe a 
match nadein htavett, boroffi- 
dais of the fastfooi giant say 
they are conurntzed to ^opening 
bcefless restanrarri ts teft within . 
the next- two years forthe same 
reason that huntire&i-tf other 

US. businesses are flocking to ' 

. India; Tliey simply can’t resist . - 
‘There Is an educated, urban 
middle class dial is largo' , than 
the population . of . the entire 
United States,” said Brad Trask, 
a -spokesman ‘/far McDonald’s 
Corn.. “That’s a very impressive 

Twanrrt " 

Some of the biggest :and- best- 
known companies in the United * 
States have reached the' same 
amclnskm m the wake of a revo- - 
lutianaiy ecjonoinicrefcinn drive 
launched two years ago by the 
goveiinii entot-Prmrehfaister-- 
P.V. Nararimha JRap. 

The prospects of gating an 
'early foothold in nowtyfiberai- 
ized India -r- vdth the. wodd’s 
fifth-largest economy and a mid- 
dle class mmiberihges many as 
250 xmOioa people — is so entic- 
ing that lli companies havcin- 
vested more here m the last year 
than in the entire previous 45 
years of Indians independence 
combined, j.'-.* 

International Business . Ma-. 
dimes Gorp^ Walt DtsnCT- Cth,- 
Raytheon ATKT, Morgan 
■Stanley & CO. and . Sara Lee - 
Crap, are examples of other US. 

■ companies that recently- have 
started operations here or -an-l 
nounced their mtenfikms'to do so . 
m tire-near future. r. -'-T 

: Hundreds of other companies, 
many of them snail , arm metfr 

nnrvow^^^testinfithewa- 

ters.. . ■ 

Tt- i^ without paraM,” said 
Amid Shanna, head of Motorola 
Inc. for Central and South Aria. 


and a doorway to in- 

markets.. Americans, 
Oil the other hand, get access to 

cheap, EagSriwpeanifcaail «- 

. Fora qmmhimaiti^cpnmfr , wa. wdl-educated Jahor. and 
nyhkeMotoida, “thaeate40io t&y get a partner that knows 

:sn _;n;— bow- India -IKrfkS.- ... 

' “Something has gotten die at- 
tention Of American business, 
and tfs ffieittoms," said ahigb- 
ranking U.S. dBpiomat, noting 
that U5 j exports, to toifa were 


“There have beta more ftstifea 
investment proposals this year - 
‘than in the previous 10' CQiB- 
ibised." ‘ " ‘ 


■50 - 

with tire buying power io 
* tdenhontor apager/and >»■•> 
-ioomga maria to ignore," Mr. 
Sbaima said. “This is one of tire 


‘ *.«yvpyv«o va . 

getting a foothold 
in the newly ' . 

. liberalized Indian 
jnaritetliaye 
attracted major . 
US. companies. . 


hugest un toped markets that 

oasts today? • 

- The' American invaaon'would. . 
hnwtawi wnthm^aMe jast a few . 
years ago, when India was wed- 
ded to sdf-snfficatoicy and a So- - 
viet-styfc economy. In fact, tire 
government of. IndraCfendta. 
then the prime innristeiv expelled 
IBM and Coca-Cola from India 
in the early 1970s; and tire conn- . 
’ try was identified as an enemy of 

mnl tinational buanesses - for 
years.;. ' 1 ’: - ' ; - 

., Thedmrent government is tiy-_ 
ing to erase those memories with 
ambitious eco nomic reforms de- 
signed to attract foreign capital 
■- and imdrin thepoteatal of tire 
country’s huge laW poci 

In two of tire.most important 
reforms UJS. buoness- 

es, India raised tire share that 

foreign firms can. hold in busi- 
nesses iwre to 51 percreni and 
now ixEnnits foreign companies 
to sefi .flreir. goodsuring their 
hwmd names. ' . 

Infim and U.S. companies 
are eagedy finking, in joint ven- 
•tmgs ibyt jve Inman co mp a ni es 
". a recognizable brandn anre, f or- 
. dgncapitaL access- to advanced 


umisu ohlvw» iw» *-*■ pere rnt , 
boogmg t«al trade between tire 
countries to about S7 hilBoo a 

year. , ■ 

However, :grren tire tremea- 
ddus diaBenges India faces, m- 
dnding its repealed, f adore to 

gve op lb its economic potential 
and the occasional policy flip- 
flops of its leaders, some analysis 
think tiredream of India becom- 
ing an Asian tigff is far-fetched. 
^IntEa has a nasty habit of 
getting to the brink of success, to 
toe tbredwld, and not making 
it," said Motorola’s Mr. Sharma. 

Dcsphe tire drawbacks, UJS. 
companies with a long-term per- 
spective are increasingly wiQing 
to take tire risk of opening op 

- shop in Im&L_ . . 

. For McDonald’s, the chat- 
lenges arc not jaa financiaL but 
cahnral and religious. Indians, 
taught from chik&tood that “tire 
cow is ydbr mother," » revere 
the "twimIk that there are 450 
miDioa, head of cattle roaming 
the 45treetsnnd counnyade here, 
accor d in g to Kamal Nath, In- 
dra’s environmenial minister. 

' McDonald’s is expected to 
serve <4»ckcn burgers. But this 
dots not impress some groups 
that are trying to keep oat the 
company’s golden arches. 

Mr. Trask, the company’s 
g yk e amm, said that while “cor 
statement »hnt we bad no inien- 
■ non of .sdlmg beef pn India} 
deaxed up * lot of questions, 
we’d be naive not to expect 

- something” in tire way of a pro- 
test 


. . Btombag Btemat S** 

NEW YORK — U.S- Treasury 
bonds phmgsd late last we& as 
investor* concluded that signs of a 
speeding recovery mean yields are 
up next year. 

Tvc kmd of got some concern 
about rates," said Robert David- 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

son. manag er of the Van Kampen 
Merrill U5L Govemnwn Fund. 
“This month and last nxmih we’ve 
had a preponderance of strong 
numbers for the economy” 

Among the key statistics released 
last week, the Onnmeree Depart- 
ment said new-home sales in No- 
vember surged to an annual rate w 
807,000, the highest since April 
1986- 

The hooting report followed tire 
Labor Department's announce- 
ment that unemployment claims 
last week dropped 39,000 to 
291 000. the lowest since February 
1989. . , . 


bond yields could make a run at 7 
percent in ax months. Mr. David- 
son said. 

The benchmark 30-year bond 
plunged on Fridav by 1 1/8 points, 
to dose at 98 7/8. The yield was 
6 J3 percent, up from 6.25 percent, 
and tire hi gh est doting yield since 
Nov. 21 Yields last rose this much 
in a day on Nov. 19. 

The record low yield is 5.77 per- 
cent, set on Oct 15. 

“I think employment growth is 
ating to be strong in tire first half 
of 1994,“ said Joseph Lira chief 
economist at S.G. Warburg & Co. 
That means bond yields will hit 
6.75 percent, and possibly 7 per- 
cent, by the end of June, Mr. Lire 
said. 

Mr. Lira is forecasting that the 
economy gained 285.000 jobs in 
December, and will gain more than 
200,000 in each of the first three 
months of 1994. The December 
jobs report is due Jan. 7. 

The bousing figures are especial- 
ly mod news for the economy, said 
Michael Strauss, chief economist at 


Hems resales and new-hPTne sales 
is November are nmninc at a com- 
bined annual rate of 5-017 million, 
the fastest rate on record. 

“We arc 5tfJ going to ge* a tre- 
mendous stimulus from :be hous- 
ing sector tins quarter and next 
quarter,” said Mr. Strauss. 

Home sales now 1 mean more 
spending on appliances and fur- 
nishings about six to sine months 
from now. he added. 

The Purchasing Management 
Assoriaticn cf Chicago said its De- 
cember ir.dsx of manufacturing 
conditions feu to 62.6 from 65.3 in 
November. The October reading 
was 57. The index is still weii above 
50, the threshold that divides ex- 
pansion from contraction in manu- 
facturing, 

“Tr.e manufacturing sector is 
one o: the s^ongest sectors of the 
economy." Mr. Strauss said. 

The three -vear cote fell 6/32. to 
99 18/52. to" post a yield of 4.55 
p-r~e”i The 10-vear note fell 
22:32 to close at 99 23/32. yielding 



A actwau* at WU iWBk s teonaDKana 
Srmncial evantt, oomprfad tot the imama- 
bom> HanM Tribuna by BtaomDorg Bus* 


Aata-Padflo 


inance 


- NEW DELHI —Thame bfirtitiff P-V.Nara- 

cfmhn Rtolrire retorted the reagiatroP Ml^^g 
Ik&tister Marunofan'S^ ow Indifi ”8^ 
financial and hrau m mdustxial feaoera 

^gave a cbfledfte s^hef lhat jh fc . S m glfwul 
xemain si : the Irelm of Iwfia’x za£cm wneram 

^eFadiiatiffla' 

^andlndus^^ 

, said thtifiraace nrinxstortB' com&mance^ra*ilB.™ 


Mr^SH«h,6I,had<rffered toqnriafter^^ 

mentary investigators mtoja 

scam, m whidr bankas and 

ijflliaa in tank fm^ls to p)«!f, tire stock market, 

strongly criticized his ministry. 

to n separate devdopment, ^ 
jSecnritim and Exdange Board of Imfia, & S£B1 > 
-vriB be rqtiaoed soon,^n official said. 

- r ^ Nadkanii,. dudunanof tire Naritmal &odc 

- m 'cudi&h. oftoonynrity. No tore for tire re- 
■ ^acanent was given. . . 

(AFP, Bloomberg) 


mJtmx.* Hong Kona October raull 

• jh. s Tokyo December floowrtc 
mMcIo sate. Forocase Dow* 7.7 percent 
on year. Dacanbor loreion^w™ 0 ^ 1 »■ 

tjilk ■ Hoag Kong Trading in 
shares in P la y m a les Toys HOKUngs. a 
spinoff from Playmates International 
Hokflngs. wpected to begin m hong 
Kong. 

Europe 

PMto Bonk of France saeun- 
Ma t e purot ia ae tender and treasury bJD 
auction. 

• Jan. a London December Purchoe- 
mg Menagere Indax. December MO mon- 
ey supply. Forecast Up Q.B percent in 
mordh. S3 percent m year. 

• jan. s Fmkfurt Bundesbank alo- 

calH eecurWee rapurtauea agreemanla. 

kora a he m grao AM. A total of 110.1 
boon Dautecba maria of repos aspife. 
London December official reserves. 

Forecast Up $50 mMon. 

Madrid December otncW reserves. 
Forecast: S5iO bifflon, after *5^2 WBon 
in November. 

• JM.S nraaiiuif Bundesbank coun- 

cB meettng- . . 

a Jan. 7 Parte December trade bal- 
ance. Forecast TJO wuon-franeaurplue. 


wianjiim MO Commumcabons me 
may announce Bus week plans to tu« ra 
own weal phone ayeram m maior U-S 
Cities. 

Tho*. Arizona December purchase.^ 
mHiagen Wdei. 

DafcoB me canal economaa of Genera. 
Motors, Ford and cnrysiw pwiM on out- 
look of me economy ana aura mdussy ai 
theSocwiy ol Automome AnaSyss 1 S^nr 
AnnuN Automotive Outlook Conference 
attheWeetm Hotel in Detroit 
8m Jtoa, CaMomla Retnai begins in 
me long-running dispute between Ad- 
vareed Micro Devices me and Intel Corp 
over respective ngnts w a man eoiwo- 
oesa or crap, heart of a pawn case be- 
tween the two aentieonaueior giants. 

SL PauL MhuznT Ciosmg arguments 
■re set w tne patent ba«e between 
SOMad UW Systems and P fcer o ver 
"rifUfl'n Express and Ratty catnesers. 



ThgAMriM 


tjn. 3 WS aWogW November oon- 
sbuetton spending. 

IMBra December inflation; Novem- 
borunemploymantiindlnduatrtal produo- 
pan. Outlook: tnfiaUon up 02 peroart 

ffrf«w A»M;DaoamberinBadon.BOina- 

tkno tjeWre Wetraesdiv- Oufloofc O pO -1 
: paromtin December. 7£ percent in 1003. 


Rochester, New York Xerox Corp. wai 
umea a marketing agreement to begin 
selling a battery-powered. hancHieid 
copier starling in April 
Earrdrva expected today: Woigraene. 

• Ja. «WesMngtoa Treasury Depart- 
mem announces details of J- and B- 
month bins auction to be held Monday. 
Jan-ia 

Careen weekly euetkai of W-day zero 
coupon bond*. OuSook: Viaids am ex- 
pecwHodrop. 


Mesfctngtoe A-wncan Petroieum Insti- 
li* ss-es.tsweeviVWortonUS petro- 
S-3CK p-?5uciw.. iTipons and ro- 
S-VKV iS,: 2 Jl-ar 

■ Jan.5 Washington Novemser lac- 
xryc-aent 

Mexico CSty Average interbank interest 
Rare. C--ca?k Ci>w-. ‘•om m 2 M7per«wnL 
Pmdo Dece^-ber nflzoon. OtrHook- 
j£ perpert *or :ne rourt*. snd IE lease 
2*CCpereer-.-='-,ear 
Odawa The S^enmemo: Canada wul 
5*i; 52 t :.y. Cf Spris Sue June 1 . 2M4. 
Owroft U.S £j:&-naners Kpon s^es ot 

dcrasbctCf -aie cars ans trucks tor :ne 

Dec. 2:-as penac. ofliMi>y ensmg 19S3 
S-jSsoiL- Anwysis e»p«i nai about ’3^ 
ru:i«i c an are agta :ni=xs were sold tor 
ar o! T3». 

San Frandaca Ap»a Compuier inc 
sponsors rtsfliw Macworid Expo of 19W 
Through Jar. e. 

• Jan. 8 Washington initial weekly 
so* urra-npioyrrrsni corr.pensaaon insur- 
ance Clferi* 

Vwfoua m^ot U S. nrauiem re- 

leese sales tv die month ol Decenber. 
Outlook. Retail sales up 6 percent to 9 
percent. 

Detroit General Motors' Automotive 
Components Group holds press contor- 
ence to outtirai progress and strategies in 
hmpmg the automaker become more 
competitive ir. the pans business. 

Las Vegas '.Wm '9« Consumer Elec- 
tronics Show. Emphasis win be on com- 
munications. starting with AT4Ts an- 
nouncement of Magic Mail, the first 
commercial uses ot long-awaited General 
Magic me. technology; muWmedia PCs. 
new consumer products from Sony. Pan- 
asonic. Microsoft Yamaha. Acclaim En- 
tenainriem Inc. Through Jan. 9. 
Houston Environmental Protection 
Agency holds public hearings on its new 
program to reduce nsk posed by chemi- 
cal spills. Through Jan. 7. 

graaNngtoa: December unemployment 
«id November wholesale trade. 

Ottawa December labor force survey. 

Hear Y ode Tender oilers by Viacom me 

and OVC Network Inc for Paramount 
Qxnrmjmcaflons me. expire at mxiolflht 


Investors Spike Rothmans Merger 

KUALA LUMPUR (Keavm) - A spokesaren for a miyor ' 
shareholder said Sunday ihai 

merger of Rotiunaoi International's Asan operations because «t «ouia 
lead to an outflow of investment from Malavsa. u.-u.c. 

The shareholder. Pcrmodalan Nasional BhcL, a stale uvestment faous^ 
and other mg or stockholders in Rothmans^ Malay-s^ jorni venture 
spiked the deal at an emergency shareholders meeting Fnd J,. 

^ln February. the London-based tobacccgroup. 

fuse its 50 percent-owned subsidiaries in Malaysia and Singapore. 

^ dieted,- said; Anthony Jones. Rothes Mah^^ 
ing director. “We ha'-e to consider other options. Bui, he added, “The 
d«l will be less attractive without Malays^-" 

MCI Plans to Take On Local Calls 

WASHINGTON (Combined Dispatches) — MCI 
Corn, is planning to enter the local phone business no» “MtooUzodl y 
rSnal carriersfa move that could substantially reduce fbeSataUron a 
y^r MCI pays to regkmal BeU opera ung companies to complete us 

Sa expects to invest as much as S, -J 
build locaSme connections that would permit businesAMdreadeti 
cSonSio bypass local phone company lines, sources close to the 

Tgy*j njch networks would enable callers to connect directiy to 
lon^-distance carriers such as MCI and AT&T without havmg to go 
through the local phone company. Eventually MCTs 
adapS to local smicc in direct compeuuon for regtonalBeU comp-ru 
and others that hold a monopoly os-er local phone serwc*^ Blo(mbergf 

America West Airlines Ousts Chief 

simmering personality conflict with the chairman that anparoitiy intensi- 
fied over the bankrupt airline's most recent plan to n^u iiseu. 

Mr Conway has been replaced as president by A. Maurice Myers, 
president and chief executive of Aloha Airlines, the enm>uo»|^- 
Mr. Mvers was also named chief operating officer. William A. Franks 
.\merica West’s chairman, took over the chief exenmve s pc«t 
The free- wheeling Mr. Conway, a founderol ^ ’ 

and the more reserved Mr. Franke have clashed often ^ceM r - F ^ 
arrived in 1992. Mr. Franke had no previous airhne experience, but ms 
shown himself to be a dedrive and swift-acting execuuve at companies in 
several industries. 

Mitsubishi to Build Saudi Tankers 

MAN AMA. Bahrain (Reuters! —Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries 
has clinched a S400 million deal to _b2ld l five 
the National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia, the Saudi company s 
Eeneral manager. Mohammad Suleiman Jarboa, announced 
8 Mitsubishi will start building the 300,000-ion tankers each this year. 
Mr Jarboa said, and will start delivery in 1996. 

He said the tankers would make the company the second 
Sandi Arabia after Vda International Marine, a wholly owned subsidiary 
of the giant state-owned oil company Saudi Aramco. 

Joint Effort for a Pushbutton Car 

saMisssssgpS 

ihel990s. the sSa Shimbun said. Toyota already has cooperative ties 

with GM and VW in production and sales. , 

With the development of the new automanccar, Toyota hopes to create 
a completely new market, the newspaper said. 



fj fnveUPUmUyCut Spending 20 % 


ContbuedfromPage 1 
around S13 a band, about J8 be- 
kw tire tor* ““ < '“ YVtTOm - 
zation of 
Countries. 


dropin both oil prices and prodno- 

tk*L.n — > 

Oman is contacting^ ^several mde- 
-j — rto rally 


Arab ; sums' to ■“balanced”;'cuta 
The ting, whose country jnmps mniang afl «1 P *®^** 5 Jp 
aboutS mMkm bands of cnla day, podi prices higher. (Pagn?) . . 

■ ■ m _ wwr«. ■ " i n ■ **#■ A i rf ■ it wa nfigi'tfV "* 20 pT»n ?ff lt 

in 1993. Xandda Febtonxitoms 
to tire wodd - bendmiaik Brant 
Blend of erode ml ended 1993 on 
Friday at alfoe-jear tow pf $13^0 


B IT ft pfHmHMumvw w 

said: “We expect tiuS situation to 
-dwng^iwt atavoyfjtr dai^God- 
mUwi o -tf all oitwoducn« st^es 
cooperate. We aqxre to this.” 



i 

\ 




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F ' r 3 .r 1 


Ontfrawi.fr?® 7 - 

' created wbat then^Europe- 
m Eccmoimc Xlommumty, suo6 e~ 

^ssjsssirssss- 

^oil The bat* is rated 
Moody’s Invcstors^Stavicc 
■ “AAA” by Standard & Potn s 

^usetireHB.isbtoow^^ 
of ite ctotiv®®® ^ J? 

. member coufltrres of thpB 
- UtiOB, & When a 

various roaiaritres.. ^ 

‘*“f 1 ^ 

■ fciii* .''die 10 

oon»re. C^»| “^ s ’j^ United 

woody ® bjwi 

* Stains and East AstaJ 

wider investor,^ ^ 

*■. - Mr. Bres««^^'Se.i s 

•' 7 SB. 

in l^»^^Si ; a s500 iinIlw n 

; . “Dr^»” ?»? 


investors. Mr.Rressonrcdcons the 
av^age cost Of-;. those ..jsstwr 1 * 
than he’dJhs»htal to .p^r 
to find bnyras ftoftdoBnritinnm- 
nated'tfobfll bond issne. 


E^rerta in Riyadh put the coun- 
try’s monthly ml revenue in De- 
cember at around 53 billi on , down 
from S3 J bflHon in August 
prating memtits of roec ulation 

.and nunor, the king said the local 
currency should “stay as it is with- 
out any amendment and tins is 
what I want to stress at this occa- 
sion.” 

Qne U-S. dtiUar buys about 3.75 
riyals. 

In the 1993 budget, tire .deficit 
- was put at $7.4 billion. Defense and 

'-'security costs were SI6.4 bnHon- 
Figmes provided by tire Sandi 
Press Agency did not disclose foro- 
casts on cdlrewarae or mfliiaiy and 
-seamty spending. 

Spentfng by. provinces and wato 

departments was pm at 5Z/mmoii 

rivals; wMe 22 state OTgtozapons 
wot expected to spend 2839 bti- 
fioa riyals in 1994. These did not 
include the military or internal se- 

Cnr ^ (Reuters, AP) 


Oman Resumes 
Campaign to Cut 
Oil Production 

Room 

DUBAI — Oman’s ad minister, 
Said tbn Ahmad ash Shanfari. 
pl ans m begin a trip to Brunei and 
Malaysia on Tuesday in a second 
lour of non-OPEC on producers as 
part erf the Omani campaign to cut 
production to push prices up, an 
Omani oil official said Sunday. 

“After tiret. Ire wffi comeback to 

Oman and then go to Mesdoo the 
non week," said Rashid al-Bar- 
wani, director of marketing m the 
Omani Pettdeum Ministry. 

Mr. Shwtif«ri risked Anti) and 
European od producers outride tire 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries last week to ay to 
persuade them to join an Oroam 
initiative for oil output cuts to 
boost weak worid oil prices. 

So far, Egypt, Syria and Yemen 
have said they would help; Russia 

• ii..»«Aaininiginilrin« 


TO OUR REA DERS IN BUDAPEST 

Hand deiiveryof the IHT isnow 
available on the day otpubheahon. 
iy; 161-J068 


Call today: 


i/uiiuu — - , 

^ J Bufheaddal, 0 ^tedcmrad 1 was satisfied without difficulty by the 
csublishment^and without having to resort to funds from the Spanish 

C- T?e Bankof Spain governor. Luis Angel Rojo, has bilboa 

pesetas are ut^tiy deeded for the reOTgamzanon 
Spain’s five largest banks. He ascribed Banesto s troubles to ^he sharp 
^ofiSEor between 1989 and 1991 just as the recession 

in the worid economy was begi nnin g. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


announcements 


X)oringtecoo».of ■ 

the EEB was able to trim the ywd d ^^^p^**!**^^****^ - ™™ - 

P 8 ^ L w ^fTiTWEntbondl Lost Week’s Markets, 


nas agreea io s*a. up aju»m irT' 
party on ml with Oman, while Biit 
ain and Norway have declined to 
flwtfft any commitments cm output 
cots. 


At a Glance 


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'3JOT2 — 0.W* Prime toW 
7293A +0j 03% Faclenil funds rate 
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5*50 +ILM% 

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ZSS7J0 +oa% cmi montv 


Dec 31 Dec 24 

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100 31/W 


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I 


IIVTL'DIU ati/vu 


Page 10 


Eisner Says Park Could Close 


New York Times Smite 

. LOS ANGELES - In ihe strongest indication yd 
Disney is in danger ofctoring, Michael 
asner, tlwdjaiiman of Walt Disney Co„ has told a 
news magazine in France that the stru gg lin g theme 
pare could shut down if be failed to reachan agree- 
with hs creditor banks on a financial rescue. 
An article published Friday in the French news 
^fia^ne Le roint quoted Mr. Eisner as saying tha t 
tmo Disney must reach an agreement with its banks 
. . 1 ° VB stots on a solution to the park’s financial 
cnsis by March 31. 

“If the engine of an airplane falls out in foil fli ght, 
wnat are the options?” Mr. ELqier said in the article. 
Anything is possible today, including closure." 


The magazine said Mr. Eisner made the comments 
two weeks ago. Still, the article Friday was the second 
published report in a week in which the Disney chief 
had publicly criticized the performance of the compa- 
ny’s unprofitable Euro Disney venture. 

Analysts have said Euro Disney would need a cash 
infusion Of Sl.S billion to give it a chance of paying 
down its debt of S3.7S billion. 

A possibility under review is that part of Euro 
Disney's debt could be converted into suck, of which 
Mr. Eisner would assume $750 milli on if the banks 
came up with the balance, the analysts said. But so far 
the banks are reluctant to accept sk± a plan until they 
have evidence that the performance of the theme park 
will improve. 



Virginia Braces for Its Disney 

Orlando Experience Suggests Vast Changes 


By Michelle Singletary 

Washington Past Service 

ORLANDO, Honda — The 
huge, ihxee-dimensiona] billboards 
lining the congested highways near 
Walt Disney World here oTTer a 
portrait of how ihe future may look 
for the serene, rolling countryside 
in northern Virginia. 

Like Haymaifcet, Virginia, where 
Walt Disney Co. plans to open a 
theme park in 1998, the Orlando 
area once had a rural character. 
Today many orange groves and 
grazing pastures nave been sup- 
planted by dozens of businesses 
that flowed into the Orlando region 
in Disney's wake. Crowding High- 
way 192 and International Drive 
are smaller theme parte, holds, 
restaurants, outlet stores, gift shops 
(one in the shape of a giant orange) 
and gasoline s taboos. 

In addition there are: Kart 
World <a go-cart park). Bargain 
World (discount T-shirts), Denim 
World (cheap jeans). Cartoon 
World (low-priced Disney souve- 
nirs), Flea World (world's biggest 
flea market), as well as Sea world, 
a major theme park. 

Much the same could be in store 
for northern Virginia, according to 
many people living and working in 
the Orlando area. They counsel 
that Prince William County, where 
Disney plans an American history 
theme park called Disney’s Ameri- 
ca. should brace itself for a ride 
that may be lucrative, but also 
bumpy and exasperating. 

In interviews public officials, 
residents, housing advocates and 
enviro nmentalis ts in central Flori- 
da agreed that Disney World had 
transformed the area into one of 
the world’s major vacation spots, 
creating thousands oF jobs. 

But the construction of Disney 
World also touched off a surge of 


commercial development that has 
overrun the area and created per- 
manent headaches for the commu- 
nity. One is overcrowded roads, ev- 
ident to any viator. Another is a 
shortage of moderately priced 
apartments and bouses For service 
workers employed at Disney World 
and surrounding businesses. 

“I think people will see their life- 
style change forever, but they 
should be glad it's Disney,” said 

Virginia should 
brace itself for a 
lucrative but 
bumpy ride. 

Orange County Commissioner 
Fran Pignone, referring to the view 
of many officials that Disney puts a 
lot of money and energy into mak- 
ing its projects run wed. 

Walt Disney World, on 32,000 
acres here, is much larger than the 
projected size of Disney^ America: 
a 1 00- acre park on a 3,000-acre site. 
But the same sons of debates that 
arose in Orlando — over the quali- 
ty of life and the cost of develop- 
ment — have already begun in 
Prince William County. 

Unlike Wait Disney World, the 
Prince William park is not being 
designed as a “destination resort.” 
Instead, the park is seen as a sec- 
ondary target for tourists, aimed at 
attracting one-day visits. 

But it has proved difficult in the 
past to forecast a Disney park's 
draw. Early projections for the 
Horida park were for 8 to 12 mil- 
lion visitors a year, whereas 26 mil- 
lion tourists now stream into Or- 
lando. 

As the employment base in- 
creased in central Florida so did 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


OTC Consolidated trading lor week 
ended Friday, Dec. 31. 

(Continued) 


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109 



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634 8ft 

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the need for schools. In Orange 
County, the school system is so 
overcrowded that temporary class- 
rooms have gone up at almost all 
the 1 14 schools. 

In Prince William County. Dis- 
ney officials have said, the compa- 
ny will not be seeking a special 
legal status from the legislature to 
govern its park as it did in Florida, 
where the company got legislation 
passed in 1967 creating the Reedy 
Creek Improvement District. 

This was the biggest perk Disney 
won from Horida. It is a special 
district in which the company does 
not face the normal zoning and 
budding review process that devel- 
opers usually endure. The special 
taxing district also allows the com- 
pany to pay Tor, and control, its 
own roads, utilities, fire and police. 

But the company pays property 
taxes just like any other landowner. 
Disney is by far the largest taxpay- 

$82 mllUoinifiaxes in 1993, Includ- 
ing $30 milli on it paid to its own 

S '-government in the Reedy 
c district. 

In Orlando, the economic bene- 
fits brought by Disney have been 
enormous. Gross sales in the region 
were $3.3 billion in 1970, the year 
before Disney opened. By 1992, 
gross sales readied $48.6 billion. 

Disney is the area's largest em- 
ployer — its attractions employ 
about 36,000 “cast members, as 
the company calls its workers. That 
compares with Disney's o riginal es- 
timate that it would employ 25.000. 

To Disney's credit, it warned 
public officials in Orlando that oth- 
er businesses would come after it 
As in Prince William. Walt Dis- 
ney purchased a large tract of land 
to provide a buffer between its 
world and the other businesses and 
tourist attractions. 


By Alex Kacherov 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW —Just a few months 
before the Soviet Union collapsed 
in 1991, Okg Yeremin, ml engineer 
bored with bis routine job at a 
state-owned enterprise, derided it 
was time to turn his entrepreneurial 
vision into reality. HiS dream was 
to open a lumber mill in Karelia, a 
vast land of trackless forests, snow- 
bound winters and reindeer in Rus- 
sia’s frozen far north. 

Mr. Yeremin found some part- 
ners and scraped together $20,000 
in start-up money in January 1992, 
but from the outset the enterprise 
seemed jinxed. Just as the plant 
began operation, the new reformist 
Russian government decontrolled 
prices, driving up Mr. Yeremin's 
expenses sharply. The plant's prod- 
ucts — plywood, cut logs, planks — 
became too expensive for local cus- 
tomers. Mr. Yeremin rushed to 
seek sales elsewhere, but he was 
blocked by local authorities in Ka- 
relia, who barred unauthorized ex- 
ports of wood and other raw mate- 
rials. 

Stymied at every turn, Mr. Yere- 
min’s plant survived barely nine 
months before dying quietly in Oc- 
tober 1991 His conclusion: The 
only way to make money in Russia 
was by buying and s elling — not by 
producing. 

“Why should 1 bead over back- 
ward, invest milli ons of rubles, 
build the facilities, train personnel 
and bear responsibility for all 
that?” Mr. Yeremin said recently. 
“The easiest and most reasonable 
thing to do right now is commerce, 
not production." 

Mr. Yeremin's problems illus- 
trate what has become a pattern 
across post-Soviet Russia. Frus- 
trated by limited access to long- 
term loans and credits, high taxes, 
political instability and racketeers 
who prey on busnessmen. many of 
Russia’s brightest entrepreneurs 
have turned to buying and selling 
rather than producing goods. 

Older, inefficient factories also 
have been plagued by a precipitous 
decline in orders, and the resulting 
drop in production — 18 percent in 
1992, 15 percent in 1993 — has 
become a battle cry of President 
Boris N. Yeltsin's harshest critics. 

Even within the government, 
some officials are now arguing for 
greater investment in production 
— especially after the strong show- 
ing of Mr. Yeltsin’s nati onalis t and 
Communist opponents in the Dec. 
12 parliamentary elections. 

‘The theme of next year’s poli- 
cies will be investment, stopping 
industrial decline and supporting 
agriculture,” the official newspaper 
of the Russian government, Ros- 
stidriye Vesti, said Saturday. 

That promise resonates with 


many Russians, who suU regard the 
buying and selling of goods with 
special distaste even as they envy 
those who are malripg a killing 
from it “Speculation," as the Com- 
munists called it, was illegal until 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev’s perestroika 
unshackled the old Soviet com- 
mand economy. . 

Moreover, the trading boom is 
contributing to a split in society 
between haves and have-nots. In a 
report released last week, the gov- 
ernment said the gap between Rus- 
sia's rich and poor had widened 
over tire past year, with incomes of 
the wealthiest 10 percent of the 
population rising to 10 times those 
of the poorest lu percent. 

Nonetheless, many econoamts 
argue that the shift from inefficient 
production of goods no one wants 
to buying and selling consumer 


items that people crave is exactly 
theright medicine for the economy. 

“The market economy worics m 
Russia,” said Yevgeni Vasin, a 
leading economist. “Capital flows 
to places where profits are highest. 
It u absolutely natural” . 

He added, “As long as the mar- 
ket for trading is not saturated, all 
efforts mil be aimed at buying and 
selling. Loud shouts that we must 
invest .in production rather than 
commerce are not justified." 

Mr. Yeremin’s experience is m-; 
sunctive. Today, about lOOpeople 
work Tor his trading firm, called 
Kor una. Having abandoned the 
lumber mill his main business now 
is baying and selling video and au- 
dio equipmentTTootwear and 
canned food. The company rents 
an expensive office in downtown 
Moscow, where it negotiates daily 


with merchandise deates and for- 
eign middlemen. 

“Prodnctioa is highly unpipfit- 
. able," Mr. Yeremin said. *Even if I 
land the cheapest credit. 6pm a 
bank at an interest rate of. say. 160 
percent, to bugd a workshop tike 
the one 1 bad. I need at least 
$300,000, and my debt wiH'rim to 
.$780,000. And I won't be .able to 
repay it even in three years because 
this sum does not take into account 
wages for workers and- other ex- 


Access to loans and credits from 
Russia’s new commercial banks is 
difficult indeed for aspiring busi- 
nessmen. Andrei Kopylov, an 
economist at Moscow's Keybank, 
acknowledged that his bank gave 
credit only “to people we bow 
personally and who have been our 
clients, for at least six months.” In 


addition, the bank requires hard- 
currency collateral and a high de- 
gree of liquidity. • 

He said the bank was flooded. 
with requests for loans and that 
lending criteria w a* strict The 
best a burinessman can hope for is 
a three-month loam longer-term 
credits are out of. the question, he 
Said, because “the situation is on- ' 
predictabterboth economically and' 
poGtkally.'' 

Mr. Yasin, the economist, said 
'scarce credit was choking off new 
small- and medium-sized business- 
es and poring a major obstacle lo 
economic growth in Russia. 

But despite the obstacles, a num- 
ber pf skinful managers who start- 
ed boHding their businesses in the 1 
early days of perestroika are now 
reaping the profits of that fore- 
sight. 


WORLD STOCK 


JCNMftamFMM Dac.3i,Ttn' 
CM»Fr*v. . 


Hong Kong 


Bk East Asia 
Cathay Pod He 
CneunnKang 
China Light Pwr 

Dainr Farm inn 

Hang Luna Dev 

Hang Seng Bode 

Henderson Land 
HK Air Ena. 

HK Chino Gae 
HK Electric 
HK Land 
HK Realty Trust 

HSBC HoWlngs 

HK Shorn Htls 
HK Tetacoaim 
HK Ferry 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hyson Dev 
Jard he Math. 
JanllneSIrHId 
Kowloon Malar 
Mandarin Orient 
Miramar Hotel 
New World Dev 
SHK Props 
SMux 
SwtaePnc A 
Toi Cheung Pros 
TVE 

Wharf Hold 
Wing On Inti 
Wlnsor Ind 


53 5330 
15 IS 
4735 4738 
56 56 

1530 

18.90 19 

76 76 

5838 5530 
48 4830 

2140 SIS 

3335 3030 
2730 2730 
27 2690 
115 115 

14.90 1540 

1630 16.60 
1130 1130 
38J5 39.25 
3075 3025 
8050 80 

36 36 
22.10 2220 

11 1020 
wm tc m 
4123 42 

70 7030 
535 555 
» »5B 
MJ1 14.70 
320 338 

37 3625 

HA 13.10 
1438 1430 




Johannesburg 


AECI 
Altectl 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Bhrvoor 
Bwtteis 
De Beers 
Drlefonfeln 
Gancor 
GFSA 


HSXivold 51 eel 
Kloat 

NedbiMtGro 
Randtontefn 
RusMat 
SA Brews 
5t Helena 

50581 

WHkom 
Western Deep 


1730 1730 
9330 9330 
2193031730 
5425 552S 
12 N3L 
53 53 

1033010330 
5630 57 

865 875 
107 104 

23 23 

1625 1630 
5325 5325 
2850 2725 
« 4825 
82 82 
95 9525 
44 44 

1825 1880 
48 48 

203 208 


.Composite lades : 
,PnF*ltMU : 4888rf 


London 


Abbev Non 

5.11 

5.14 

Allied Lyons 

677 

667 

Aria Wiggins 

2J7 

236 

Argyll Group 

275 

277 

Ass Bril Foods 

563 

563 

BAA 

1058 

1056 

BAe 

4.12 

4.10 

Bonk Scotland 

234 

228 

Barclays 

05 

655 

Bass 

337 

537 


BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 
Bowater 
BP 

BrB Airways 
Brit Gas 

Brit 5teeJ 

Bril Telecom 
BTR 

Cable Wine 

Cadbury Set! 

Coradon 

Coots viyella 

Communion 

Courtaulds 

ECCGram 

Enterprise OU 

Eurotunnel 

Ftsona 

Forte 

GEC 

Genl Acc 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GU5 

Hainan 

HHtedown 

HSBC Hides 

ICI 

Inchcane 

KmaiUtwr 

Ladbrofce 

Land Sec 

Laporte 

Lasma 

Legal Gen Grp 
Uavds Bank 

Marks Sp 
ME PC 
Nafl Power 
NatWest 
NitiWit water 


F80 
PUkington 
PowerGen 
Prudential 
RgnkOry 
Rack 111 Col 
Redtand 
Reed inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Royce 
Rottmn(anh) 
RujnScot 

Scdnstwry 
Scot Newcat 
Scot Power 
Sears Holds ' 
Severn Trent 
Shell 
Slate 

Smith Nephew 
SmtttiKBneB 
Smith (WH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tate 8 Lyle 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
utd Biscuits 


534 

134 

X35 

637 

537 

434 
161 
430 
343 

127 
422 
323 
521 
5JS. 

4.14 
238 
647 
Asa 

432 
448 
615 
125 
232 
342 

7.15 
724 

426 
221 

427 
649 
249 
139 
9.90 
739 
533 
724 
132 
738 
727 
1.14 
5JB 
658 

433 
545 
465 
620 

535 
60S 
645 

128 
545 
161 
935 
720 
525 
696 
1737 
922 
142 
429 

435 
612 
444 
523 
655 
128 
609 
726 
548 
149 
432 
sj»- 
336 

4 

113 

931 

225 

241 

12JD2 

141 


536 

126 

325 

639 

535 
437 
344 
431 
146 
126 
436 
325 
528 
114 
606 
2J» 
6*9 

433 
440 
453 

6 

123 

242 

24) 

7.15 

721 
671 
22B 

430 
647 
222 
138 
923 
601 
543 

722 
158 
731 
740 

1.15 

532 
662 

434 
545 

431 
622 

536 
6 

644 

128 

533 
161 
925 
722 
532 
695 

18 

923 

142 

692 

439 

613 

650 

520 

642 

128 

608 

726 

547 

149 

603 

535 

336 

631 

2.14 

937 

221 

246 

1236 

161 


BBV 3165 3115 

BcDCentraTHISR 3450 3400 
Banco Santander 6640 6560 
t Banwto ItA. N2L 

fCEPSA 2455 2460 

2305 2320 
«0 6710 
144 145 

1825 1010 
4490 4860 
4000 3950 
1865 1830 


. Close Fm. 

vaamone . sja 532 

War Loan 316 5625 5619 

WeUcnme 656 663 

Whitbread NA na 

yntaomiHtes 174-170 

WUli* Carraon 224 224 

■T.2P 

n:8)Ui 

I : snue 


Madrid 


■bfJndal 

Repeal 

Tafaaadara 

Telefanko 


Mari&etsQoeed 

The stock markets 
in Amsterdam, Brus- 
sels, Frankfurt, Hel- 
sinki, Sao Paulo, 
Stockholm, Tokyo, 
and Zuricb were dosed 
Friday for- a holiday. 


MUan 


Baton Comm 
Bostoal 

Benetton anw 
ClR 

Creditor 

Entchem 

Ferfln 

Fur-fin RbB 

FkrtSPA 

Finmeccanica 

GeneraU 

IF1 

italcem 
Itolpas 
I tatmoU Hare 
Mediobanca 
Mooted ban 
Olivet!! 

Pirelli 

RAS 

RMoscenle 
Satpem 


5190 5300 
05 90 

26730 26300 
1730 T72S 
2314 2300 
2085 2050 
1844 1854 
569 548 

4364 4371 
1551 1540 
39250 39345 
15960 1616* 
mm im« 
4950 4960 
36210 360*0 
14511 14522 
940 913 
71 A 2111 
NA. — 
27* ® 27700 
9070 9079 
NA — 


San Paolo Torino 10620 10615 
SIP 3596 3603 

SME 3750 3750 

ante 151B 1510 

Standa 29470 2W3® 

Slot 4403 4352 

ToroAssI Rlso 2940029450 


«nup 


One Prev. 


Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 2746 27% 
BankMonTreal Z7» mt 
Bell Oanada 
Bombardier B 
ComSskw 


4216 4616 
201k 2046 
28 38VS 
69k- 6* 
916 916 

23 2316 
2116 ZIH 
TOM .WTO 
2116 2116 
21 K, tm 
18 10 
TOW. . TO 
3» k 20 

7* N.Q. 

25H 25V: 


Dominion Tern a 
D onohue A 
Madwnian Bl 
Matt Bk Canada 
Power Core. 
OueftecTeT 
QuetocnrA 
QuBbecar B 
Telaglobe 
Unhm 


Parts 


Accor 


593 581 


AtrLKiuldn . 074 873 

Alcatel Aisthom . 842 8 47 

A*o isas 1601 

Bonoalra lOe) 585 as 

BIC 1320 1320 

BNP 2B7J0284J1Q 

Bouygues - 6S7 699. 

BSN-GD 935 959 

Cormtour 4304 4310 

CCJL • 303 30X80 

Caras T2530T2750 

Oxnaurs 1366 I3BD 

Ctments Franc 339.10 340. 

Chib Med 352 350 

EthAquttatne 41670 419 

EH-5amH WTO 1025 

Eurodhsney 3040 33 

Gen. Eaux 2923 2930 

Havas 4454S0Ja 

1 metal 552 552 

Lafarge Coppee 4666*46640 
Lagrcnd -5720 5550 

LVtHl Eaux 5*1 582 

OrbaftL*) 1305 1330 

L.VJVLH. ' 3735 3776 

Matron adwtle 157^015680 
Michel In B - 209^*21090 
Moulinex 102 102.10 

Paribas - SKS0 502 
Pechlneyintl 20520 207 

Pemod-Rieonl 431.90 WM 

Peageat - 7B8 709 

SSSttS 

Rh-PaufencA 1485014880 
RafLSLLaub 1560 ' 1577 
Raitout* | La) TOM 1050 

Saint Gobaln 508 995 

S£A 521 531 

SteGanerale 766 773 

Suez 3S6f0 25&MI 

Thomson-CSF 181 Jm 18190 

Total 322J03Zt» 

UAP. 667 671: 

Valeo 1291 1300 

CAC4*ledett ; TOUt 

mwtoas:22t)J2 


Cerebas 
City Dev. 


Singapore 


. 8 L20 

7JH 8 


DBS 

Fraser Heave 
Genttne 
Golden Hop* PI 
How Par 
Hume Industries 


KLKWPOnO 

Lum Chang 

Malayan Banka 

OCBC 

aim 

DUE 

aembaw an g 

ssesu 

SIA 

STwm Land 

Smg smamstup 
Spore Tetocomm 
Straits Tnxflna 

UOL 


CtasePrev. 

1240 1280 
1840 1*4* 
2250 2*50 
344 384 
IN 111 
550 5J9 
6 TL9S 
11J0 11-30 
186 188 
tm 202 
187* 1040 
1480 1480 
7.95 750 
840 885 
1580 1450 
545* 540 
484 480 
7-5D 74S 
685 660 
1580 1540 
4.18 484 
176 178 
AM 02 
1180 1180 
285 283 
: 34254* 


Sydney 


Amcor 
ANZ 
a hp 

Bfl l k j l 

BouootnvUle 

CM** Mver- 

Comoico 

CRA 

C5R 

Dunlop 

Fosters Brew 

Goodman Field 

ICI Australia 

Magellan 

MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Cora 
Nine Network 
N Broken HIM 
Pioneer Inn 
Nmndy Poseidon 
OCT Resources 
Santos 
TNT 

Western Mining 
Westpac Banking 




9JB 984 
454 5 

17J8 1742 
488 480 
174 046 
589 560 
426 425 
I860 1840 
486 482 
14Z 5M 
146 142 
185 148 
1880 1086 
2.15 2.18 
266 276 
1284 1126 
953 972 

385 560 
163 IS* 
Z77 17* 
263 283 
189 169 

386 287 
189 182 
783 7,13 
483 470 
471 ATO 

91 ; 717160 


Toronto 

Abitltri Price 

aPSS? 6 

Air dorado 

Alberta Energy 


18 H ism. 

171u 17V. 

5 5Vk 
184k TOM 


Am Barrtdc Res 376* 3M 


BCE 
Bk Nova Scotia 
BC Gal 
HC Telecom 
BF Realty IMS 
Braraaloa'- 
Brunswick 
CAE 


4616 461k 
304b 304k 
164k 1646 
25% 25 

OX© BJM 
041 841 
94b 9Vi 
7Vb 7Vk 


Clou Pr*». 

Comdev a a 

CISC 33 334k 

Canadian Podflc 214k 211b 
Can Packers 121k 13 

C0n Tire A 17to 171k 

cantor 41ft 41 

Cara 5 5 

CCLIndB idvi m% 

sses 2 SS H8 

Conwest Exp! 21 W 21 
Denison Min B 075 07S 
Dickenson Min A 6* 646 

Dotasco 23 VI 23Vta 

Dylex A 149 149 

Edw Bov Mines 17* 17V: 
Equity Silver A 1.15 Lie 
PCA Inti 340 360 

Fed ind A BV5 Bib 

Fletcher Chall A 204k 20ft 
FPI 3tk 380 

Gontra 043 044 

GoWCorp 9V» 9 

GutfCdo Res 480 420 
Hees Inti ISVi 15W 

Hemlo Gkt Mines 14V5 UVi 


Holtlnger 


Hudson's flay 

Imasoo 

Inco 

inferprov pipe 
Jonnock 

ffiyca 

Mackenzie 

Inti A 


13* 13B> 
191k 1916 
39M 3916 
«Vk 40 
35ft 35V. 
3216 32* 
TOW 19Yfc 
224k 22* 
22* 22* 
lllk 1116 
6516 641* 
24 Vi 3416 
Bfc 84b 


Maonoim 
MorUtme 

Mark Res . _ 

Mod-can Hunter 124* T2W 
MdtoonA 284k 28% 

Norm. Ind A 7 7 

Moran da Inc 251k 25* 
Horanda Forest 12 11* 
Horen, Enerov 15*k WV. 
NThem Telecom 42 

Nora Carp 71k 9% 

Oshava 2Hk 21* 

Pagurln A 38S 385 

Placer Dome 32ft 33ft 
Pocn Petrol ettm tm 6ft 
PWACorp lft Ilk 

nayriock 15ft 15ft 

Renaissance 2BV. 29ft 
Rogers B 71«k 21ft 

Rotturas wzft 101 Ik 
Royal Bank Can 28ft 29 
Sceptre Res . 1246 12ft 
SotfSfsHaap 9ft 916 

Seagram 3*ft 35ft 

Sears Con 9ft 9ft 

Shell Con 38ft 38ft 

SherTltt Gordon 10ft 10ft 
SHL System toe 9ft 9ft 
Soul ham 17ft 17ft 

Spar Aerospace TOft 18ft 
S telco A *ft 8ft 

Turnmanflneni 23ft 23ft 

Thomson News 16ft 16ft 
Toronto Damn 21ft 21ft 
Torstar B 24 34ft 

Tranotto Util 15ft lift 
TransCda Pipe 20ft 20ft 
Triton Flnl A 355 3VU 
Trtmoe 15ft 15ft 

TrtecA fPM 056 

Unlcorp Energy 085 050 


sse sm 


>58 



Sates In 


Net 


100 s 

High Low Close are* 

§ii C R? A 



901*% 

M% 

1*?* 

37 


4703 1ft 

«k 


GrtBav 

26 

417 12ft 

11% 


GCIrvB 



2198 3 

2 

GILk Be 1541 
GtLH wt 

8.1 

671*3% 
105 7% 


GILA Pi 

A 

J 

14440% 

9% 

44ft 

10% + ft 
44ft 

GrtWall 

14 

468 9% 

m 

9ft— % 

GIRYSv 



1633 7ft 

6% 

7% 


.74 

1.4 

54917% 

15% 

17% +1% 

Grenfid 

JHe 

2 

4*6 20% 

19% 

20% + % 

GmwAIr 



.M 

8% 

8ft 

GmwPh 



2% 

2% + % 


jn 

12 

1*625% 

1MB7 

24 

24% + ft 

Grrv Ad 325 

12 

78 187 +4% 

GrltTai 



12311 

9% 

11 +1 

GristMU 



6255 4% 

a 

4ft .. 




5952 3* 
213 7% 

3 -ft 

GrdRnd 



/% 

7ft + ft 




219814% 

uft 

13% 




123 Bft 

7 

7 —1 


M 

36 

30046ft 

1* 

16ft- ft 




78617% 

16ft 

17% + % 

Grvphon 



417614 

13% 

13ft + ft 

Guests 



1233 14 

12% 

14 +lft 

Glfmrk 



25213ft 

Bft 

TOft +1% 




113 4ft 

4% 

4ft — 




906719% 

lift 

19ft +lft 


60 

26 

2913% 

21% 

23% + % 

Gvmbree 



479245% 

<1% 

44ft +3% 

1 



H 


1 










w a sm 



HD Vst 



llrtl 

5ft 

5£ + % 



■ ■3 

5% 

HA-LO 



1« 6% 

5ft 

5ft— ft 

HBO 

JO 

J 

5527 4*% 

4Jft 

46 +3 

HCClra 



246830ft 

28% 

30ft + % 

HEIMn 



2688 4ft 



HF Fnc 

50 

22 

19123ft 

22ft 

22ft— % 

HPSC 



302 3% 

J% 

Jft + ft 

HSRSC 



410022 


21 

HU BCD 

Ata 21 

3630 23ft 

22 

22ft + ft 

Hach 

.16 

5 

96 21 



Hod ca 



405 8ft 

8ft 

8% + % 

Haogar 

20 

J 

3164 25ft 

73 

25ft +7ft 

HonnAut 



60512 




28 

26 

101 10% 

10*b 

TOft— % 

HailmkHi 



711717ft 

TOft 

17ft +4 

3ft + ft 


.72 235 

887*3% 

2ft 

HhmlE 



113 

13 

13 

HmhHm 



256 9 

6 

8ft + ft 

Hamhn Be 



1964 20% 

19% 

19ft + ft 




1549 5ft 

5 

5 

HamoGo 



653 «% 

5ft 

5% 

HmpBn 



2513% 

IJ 

13ft + ft 

HancHd 

*Ba 21 

94 33% 

31% 

33 

Monde, 



1502 7ft 

6ft 


HrdgAs 



702 9% 

8% 

» - ft 

Hortevs 

64 

21 

768 3D TO 

28 

30% +2% 

HrlrNt 

JMa 23 

3244ft 

42 

«ft +5 

Harmon 



100023ft 

21ft 

23 +1ft 


20 

1.1 

433018 

16 

11 +lft 




5106 Bft 

/% 

8% +1 

HnrvFar 



32225ft 

23 

25ft +lft 

Ftorvlnd 



3164 6% 

5ft 

6ft + ft 

Horn pi 



732Z3TO 

23ft 


Hathwv 

.lie 18 

273 3 

Zft 

2ft- % 




3214 Bft 

7ft 


HavenB 



561 TOft 

12% 

12ft + ft 

Ftovrftd 

560 14 

3316% 

16ft 

16ft— ft 


27 

16 

173717ft 


17ft 4- ft 

HovFuA S 25 

14 

617ft 

17ft 

17ft— ft 

KawfcB 

44 

23 

B59 19ft 

18% 

19ft + % 

HawtFfi 

501 


394 9ft 


Bft 

HlthCSv 



285011% 

lift 

11% + ft 




53220ft 

19% 

20 — ft 

HlIhRsk 



350 13 

12% 

13 + % 

HitMerr 



1427 7% 

7TO 

7% + % 

HltCrlm 



2044 4ft 

3% 

«’.b — ft 

HCim wt 



410 5TO 

5 

s — % 

HllCmp 


2533525% 

23 

24ft +lft 

Hlttwvn 



5434 7% 

oft 

6% + % 

HllhtJyTe 



7210ft 

9ft 

9ft— ft 

Hitnim 






| HlthWWlA 





HllhwwIB 





Hithwtc 





■f 

HllwAm 



77*2* 

24 

24% + % 




411823 

?lft 

22% + % 

HrtlndE 



78225 

23ft 

24% + ft 

HcngB 

JM 

6 

309 10 

Vft 

9ft— TO 

HthgA 


16 




HectCm 



43 BTO 


a 

Hekteml 



113 10% 

9% 

9ft 

MelenTr 






1 1 . re 



2396 4ft 

31b 

4ft + % 

HMI'TCS 

48 

14 

70214 

12% 

14 4- ft 

HnrvJk S 

24 

16 

1131 15% 

14ft 

15ft + ft 

Herblle 

48 

27 

43*017% 

17 

17% + % 

HrigFds 

.lie 

5 

721 

20 

21 +1 

HrtgFSs 

32 

10 

no i&% 

1* 

16 — ft 

Harley 



1016 6ft 

6 

6ft + ft 

HiTcPhr s 


176 10% 

9ft 

10ft + ft 

HlberSv 






HlPtaln 






Htohwdo 




ft 

%— ft 

HingmS 



178 9% 

9ft 

9% + % 

Himdie 



Kt'fl 

21 

21ft + ft 




914 5ft 

3ft 

4% — ft 

HaLoPak 





11% * > 
4ft + ft 

1 ■ ; _ rm 

.10 

21 




l7e 12 

4972 9% 

7% 

TJb + ft 

HtdyRV 

Halinger 

•TO 


864 2% 
3494 10ft 

1% 

TOft 

l*i 

10ft + % 

HlvunJCa 



722013ft 


17% — ft 

HoilvwdE 



40911 

16% 

18 +1% 

HlwdPk s 



297530 


30 +2ft 

HlwdPpt 

.70 

23 

1675 25% 

74ft 

25ft +lft 

Hatooic 



1956 4ft 

3ft 

4ft + ft 







HcHsnB 



259 4^ 

6% 

6fti + <5 

Ham Ben 

■7B 

34 

5423 

21ft 

23 

KmFdiNiJO 

14 

7122ft 

21% 

21ft— ft 

HFdMOs 

56 

20 

6428 

2S% 

28 +2% 

hfjbd 






HFdSvF 

640 33 

7049ft 

WTO 

19ft + ft 

HmcNtr 



1305 4ft 

4ft 

4ft + % 

HORL 

72 

1* 

473 19 

ffl% 

IBft— ft 

HtnPrl 

M 

5.1 

.8611% 

11% 

11% + ft 

HmSvFL 

.Ttt 21 

18632% 

31% 

39% +1 

HmcStat 



102514% 

13% 

14% +1 

HomcrM 



2419 14% 

12ft 

13ft +1 

Hmecras 



413ft 

12 

13ft + ft 




1990 30% 

29% 

30% 1-1% 

HmawG 

JO 

5.7 

304 3% 

3ft 

3ft 




4710% 

10 

10 — % 

HpmeTBi 



1490 29% 

27ft 

2STO + % 

Hon Ind 

40 

14 

2091 » 

26% 

28 +1 


2> 

J 

328 

28 

a -1 

Moral Bk 

320 25 

25846ft 

15% 

15% 

Her rtf* 



791515% 

U 

14ft +1% 

Horttd 

.lie u 

2933x3% 

2% 

3ft- ft 

Hown 



SI 6ft 

6% 

6% 

HufKao 



327 7% 

7 

TV, — % 




166*20% 

17% 

17% —2% 

HunMB 

JO 

.9 

499323% 

22 ft 

23% + ft 



.1 

185243% 

37ft 

42ft +4ft 


Jtt 34 

861424% 

22ft 

23ft +1 




1487 2ft 

2ft 

2ft 




247330% 

77% 

29% +1 ft 




430 5ft 

4% 

5ft + P* 

Hvear 



2091 4% 

4 

ift 4* % 


Sales In Net 

100s High Law Close Chfte 


Hycornt 

HvdeAts 

HydeAiB 

HvdrTch 


5*6 6ft. 
4136 SVi 
1788 3ft 


r 

2 


r r; 

2ft + Ik 



2461 13ft lift 


IMI 
IM 
IPL 

!rg .. 
isg mn 
isg Tech 
IVF Am 
IVFpt 
iviPun 
IWC 140 
I cot 
Ikos 

UilnlSuo 
ImoaeAm 
I mag Bus 
ImoaEn 
Imaoelnd 


■ITfc 


imdne 
Imucor 
I mu Log 
Imungn 
ImunRsp 
Imunexs 
Inwntwl 
Imurend 
I meets y 
ImprBc 
ImoCrd 
inFacu 
InHomc 
I nocotn 
Inbrand 
mcoHm 
indBcp l.le 
IndeoHld 82c 
irtdBkMA 
indBkMi 60 
lodinsr 74 
IndTHM 
irdlFdl s 80 
ind Utd 86 

inAcous 80 
tndusHid 
IndHwtA 
indHwIB 
indSd 
indTrn 
IntMocn 
infnBra 5 


1.141 



5ft 
13ft ■FJ 1 '* 
9ft + ft 
10*6 . 
16**. 4-1 ft 
16 + ft 

P.— ft 
lft — ft 
lift ft 
12L. 

’ 29 .- 

13"J + ft 
20 +1 
8 —ft 
371- + ft 
3ft + ft 
4ft + ft 
» + ft 

IS'— ft 
I — ft 
22 

24ft 4- A. 

16ft + ft 

4ft 

ft 

S — ft 
*ft — ft 
3 — ft 

30-. +1 


Sales In Net 

100s High Lew Close Ofioe 


IrwnFns JO 


I SCO* 
Isis 

» 

imrokd 
Hr on 
Iwerks 




\3 


186e .7 


10825 23ft 2S t ft 
19311ft 11 lift 4 ii 
1837 7ft 6ft 6ft + ft 
176519ft 17 19 +116 

M ftft^TO 

47188ft 184ft 18416— 12*4 
204118 16 18 +1ft 

548726ft 22ft 36ft +3ft 


infodai 

547 ft 

ft 

ft- TO 

Into Am 

1493 4 



Intolntt 221 

111 10 

9ft 

9% * % 

InfRsc 

10911% 



into Rea 

1105338ft 

34ft 

38V, +1% 

Informlk 

3589021% 

19% 

21% 4-1% 

Inir&snc 

38*9 4% 

4ft 

4ft + % 


JO 


intuTrch 
InglMkl 
inmoc 
i ntgrp 
innudato 
I nod to wt 
Innovex 
Inotek 
1 rvut 
insoFn 
insllca 
insite Vis 
insIlE 
InsItMds .14 
insllTc 

insAut 
Intogracr 
infaCIrs 
intuDv 
ItgSvs 
intgWfl 
Intel 5 
inter wt s 
IntSr wlA 
IntSr wtB 
intisras 
Intel El 
imnei 
inMn 
Intern 
IntNtwk 
Inlrcraa 
IntctlBk 
Infrfein 
tntertc 
Infim 
intertim 
inlgph 
intOHII 
mtneat 

InlerUnq 

intrCm 

Ini metC 


328 4ft 
10 1*27 II 
IBM 7>, 
1*25 
1369 7ft 
2424 1ft 
16 8413 12 7 « 
452 l<ft 


-05 


JO 


InttAIr 
mtcabi 
IntCUe 
intern 
InDah-A 
inoaire 
InlHU 
Inllmao 
IntJeit 
InfPtr 

IMRsh 84 

IntSemTc 

IntTotl* 

Intrnu 

IntmwtB 

Intnhse 

inipm 

litfpore 

impPLu 2JH 

Inlerslv 

Innoec 

Intrtrris JO 
Ifitvtsa 
Intvotce 
Intuit 
invenre 


480024ft 21ft 
195924ft 20 
7121316 13ft 
8175 

11 1463 2ft 2*1 
18 32514 13 

445313ft 12ft 

104137ft 35ft 

71910 Bft 
437213ft T2ft 
5633417ft 13ft 
BO 96a 9 
. 2460 6ft 5ft 
J13843B4H 63 
14904 16ft 15ft 
231 1ft 1% 
110 1ft Ift 
420 5ft 5»*l 
11#e 7.9 2047828 2Sft 

1372 8ft 8 
28 1.9 31644ft 13% 
34 5ft 5V» 
199451116 9 
.10 18 105317- lift 
82 U 24720’a* 19 
84 18 344515ft 147k 
I 787 4ft 3ft 
1S3 4> 

751 6'6 
16083 11IA 
3589 SO 
10582 7ft 
1863 7 
... 396011ft 10'- 

.121 1917 9ft 9 

.16 U 2470 4ft 4ft 
1070 3Tk 
1 1874 3ft 3 
775523ft 2lft 
46 3 U 2ft 
109118ft 17ft 
2718ft 17 

18U 5D 553? ]lft 
117720ft 18% 
729 7ft ift 
I3M0 1^ % 

18 104 3ft 3ft 
10133s 13ft 
415515ft 14ft 
191310ft 9 
3TO 5ft S 
379 4ft 3ft 
,50910ft 9ft 
1708 7ft 7 
. 1625 24 

1451 13’* II 
11138 4 3 

18 1015 1JU 12ft 
I1Q 3ft 2ft 
662216ft 14ft 
863743V: 43ft 


4ft 

5ft 

9ft 

47 

6ft 

6ft 


invBnfc 

JO 

IJ 




JM 

3 

13 Bft 


Iomega 



5221 2ft 


IQWOMJ 

J4 

3.4 

54 25ft 

74ft 

lasca 

M 




iroquoi 

J* 

3.3 

is ir-s 

17ft 


4ft — ft 

11 + ft 

7ft * ft 
25 +5 

7 

ib 

17ft +lft 
I®, 4- 
74 +2ft 

73 +3 
13ft + ft 
10ft +23% 

7ft + ft 
14 + % 

12ft— % 
37% — ft 
9ft + ft 
13 — ft 
17ft +Jft 
9% 

6ft— ft 

U -ft 

'KZ* 

ift 

5ft 

27ft +ift 
8% + ft 
14ft +1 

5ft — 'a 
11 *i»h 
lift - ft 
» + '« 
15% 

4ft + ft 

5ft- ft 
10ft + ft 
48 + ft 
7ft + % 
6ft + ft 
W.- ft 

9ft 

416— ta 
J + ft 
3ft 

Oft +4 
3ft + ft 
18 

TOft +lft 
31ft— ft 

19Tb +Ift 

6ft 
(ft + 
3 1 -— ft 
ITS + ft 
13ft + ft 
10ft + ft 
5ft + ft 
4ft + ft 
9%— ft 
TV.— ft 

74 — ft 
12% +lft 

3ft - ft 
13ft + ft 
3 - ft 
T6 - ft 
47ft + ft 

ft - h 

24ft + ft 
TOft + ft 
i? 1 -:— % 


1 J » 

J&J 5n 



381520% 

18% 

20ft +1ft 

JBRst 



1296 6% 

6 

6 — % 




135 2 

1% 

1 ft 

JLG 

so, 

2 

17024% 

23% 

24% +1 

JMCGo 

.14 

IJ 

81*6 9ft 

m 

Bft— ft 

JPE 



34512% 

11% 

12% 

JSB Fn 

M 

22 

145823ft 

23 

23ft + ft 

John 



975 7ft 

7 

7% 




255 8% 

8% 

Bft — % 



3J 

1D40I4U- 

139: 

13ft 



139 7 

5% 

+ 




40614ft 

IJ% 

14ft— ft 




1640 6ft 

Bft 

4% + ft 




76613% 

12ft 

13% + ft 




411 3% 

2% 

2% 




1677 TOft 

lift 

12kb + ft 

JeffrtSp 

20 

J 

*3*35% 

33ft 

32ft— 1 


M 

U 

403*0 



JeffS vg 



71516% 

15% 

16 + ft 




56815ft 

15 





169110% 

8% 

9ft— % 




5990 2* 

1 

2ft + ft 




*8027 

24 

26 ft +2ft 




80825 

7J% 

24ft— % 

jotmsS* 

.15, 

J 

4718ft 

18 

18ft + ft 

Janlchl 



16617ft 

16% 

17% — ft 




1311 17% 

17 

17ft + ft 

JanesM 

.10 

.1 

145714 

lift 

13ft— ft 


1.16 

4j6 

**025% 

23ft 

25% +!ft 


24 

IJ 

521 20% 

WH 

20% +7V4 




3426 6% 

6 

6% — % 

Justins 

.16 

1.1 

882015% 

12% 

14% +1% 

[ _ K 1 

K Swiss 



1042 24 

22% 

23 




197 7 

*ft 


KLA 



671828% 

27 

27% — % 

KLLMS 



117715ft 

13% 

14% — ft 

KTron 



6710% 

9% 

10% + ft 


J21 

J 

25x7% 

6% 

*%— % 

KalsRsc 



134317ft 

ISft 

17ft +2 



4J 

2046)1 Oft 


lew + % 

Kantan aTOJS 

6J 

6351ft 

51 

51ft +1% 

KanbakB 



2217% 

Krt. 



.08 

e 

2*36)1 Oft 


10ft + ft 

Kaydans 

ah 

u 

326120% 

19 

20% +1% 

KeivtMl 



15651014, 

9ft 

9ft 

KdySAs 

M 

2J 

122527ft 

26% 

27% 

KeivSB s 

M 

21 

1131 

29 

31 +2 

Kernel 



1375 15ft 

11 

15ft +2 

Kenan 

24 

1.4 

2047ft 

!6ft 

17ft + ft 




298148% 

45% 

4* —2% 

KradSare 



8085 6% 

5*4 

6 — W 




180320% 


20ft 

KentU 



i~!in 

3ft 

3ft + ft 

Kdywifa 



1259 3ft 

2ft 

3ft + % 










32016% 

15% 

16% + TO 




331 7% 

6% 

6% + TO 

Keptet 



1012 13% 

12 

13V: — % 




b»ki 

1ft 

1% + *W 




HP 4ft 

4 

4% 




772 3ft 

2ft 

2ft — ft 




210 9 



KevTrn 



1000 8% 

7% 

8% 


.28 

4J0 

17232% 

31ft 

3Tft + ft 

KersHrt 

JM 

3.2 

1234 

31 

33ft + ft 

Kimtxn 

J* 

27 

293531ft 

30% 

30% — TO 




196 5 






150613ft 

12% 

13% + % 


.15 

36 

4685 4ft 

3% 

4ft + % 



150 5>b 

4ft 


Kirschn 



1027 7ft 

6ft 

6ft— 1 TO 

Kleinrl 

! 


9811% 



KnapeV 


36 

15720 

18ft 

19ft +lft 




515517% 

lift 

15ft -Ift 




1S51 Sft 

6 

7ft +lft 




27512% 

11 

12% + ft 

katiRE 



6382 Vb 

ft 

» + - 




5*97 VS 

ft 





011718% 

17 





230918% 

I4ft 

18 +3 




27514% 

13 

13% - % 




70317". 

lift 

17 + ft 


.I7t 

29 

64? 4ft 

4% 

4ft- ft 




81613% 

MV, 

13ft +lft 

Kuicke 



946414ft 

13ft 


KUT2MHI 



4870 14 

1213 

13ft + % 

KwshLh 



8147 l„ 


1 +S 

KuihLCwt 





| 



L 


1 







LCI in! pf 125 

4J 

139328% 

26 

28% +1% 

LCS _ 

.10 

!J 

157x7ft 

6ft 

ift- % 

LDDSi 


2290148% 

45 

48% +3% 

LDICP 

.16 

23 

576 7%. 

7 

7 

LGFBC 



17732% 31ft 32% +IK 

LSB NC 

J3 

26 

48*1 ft 

28 

20 +1 

LSI ind 

Hi 

S 

29710 

9*» 

9ft— ft 

LTX 


0253 3% 

3 

3 + 

LVMH 

L53e 28 

21131% 1Z7% 127%— 3 

LKE 



69710ft 

8ft 

10ft +1% 

LKiedeSi 



163 16ft 

15 

15% — % 

LeddFr 

.12 

IJ 

130310% 

9% 

10 — TO 

LotfvLucF 



739611% 

7% 

10% -1 

Latov as 



369 4% 

3ft 

3ft- ft 

LteShr s 

42 

l.i 

28527% 

28% 

28% 

LakidFt 

■60a U 

2919 

11 

18 -1 

Label nd 



883 2% 

2ft 

2% + ft 

LakcvwSv 



612211ft 

10% 

lift +5 

UtmRss 


1060033% 

29 

32ft +2% 

Lancurs 

JW 

IJ 

2901 46% 

45 

46 + % 

Lance 

.96 

4J 3388 23% 

19 

22% +3ft 

LonaoJr 



263021ft 

19% 

20ft +2 . 




10 6ft 

Oft 

6ft— ft 

LdmkGnh 



705018ft 

17ft 

18ft + ft 

Londm 



143524ft 

23% 

24 + ft 

LOndsir 



477322ft 

18% 

22ft +7ft 







.oraaatlc 



184 18% 

18ft 

18ft— ft 

LasPMd 



2*8 1 



UnerPr 



.855 Bft 

8 

Bft + ft 

LOsrmTe 



3357 8ft 

/% 

8ft +%. 




3885 5% 

5ft 

5ft 

Lattices 


1522116% 

15 

16% tlft 

-Burl Bcs 

240 SJ) 

1113ft 

12% 

12% 

LOarSB 



470 3ft 

3 

3% 

LBwSn 

48 

17 

3*«9% 

28% 

29 

LwvrTs 

.17 


163310% 

17% 

18ft + ft 

Lome 



1325 6ft 

5ft 

6V» + ft 

LeoarFn 



434817ft 

16ft 

17ft + %. 

LmgCa 



852015ft 

74ft 

ISft + ft 





9ft 

10 — % 

Lertcc 

J2t 

5JD 

269 IBft 

9% 

10ft + ft 

w i : — 1 1 ■■■ » - - 


Sates to Net 

100s High Low Ckne Ch’go 

Ltcnters 472212W 11 , 12ft +lft 

Lament 826723ft 21 22ft + ft 

LetsOt OTIOVl 9ft TOft + V* 

LcnGrp 399 ft ft— ft 

Lescos 117716 I4ft 16 +146 

102 8% 8ft 8% + ft 

123736% & 3616 +3 

47014% 14% TOft ♦ ft 
73425ft 244k 24% + ft 
242128 27 28 +% 

174 94b 9ft 9% + ft 

1 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

711427ft 27ft 29ft +1VH 
. a 10892ft 90% 92 -rl 
UWNBS 880 22 17633046 2946 30ft + U 
LlbriVTc 1979 9% 746 9ft +2J4 

Lido 1926 3 

LWok 13735 7ft 

3ft 


a 


LevelOne 
LextngS 

LbivBc __ 

U&BCOK JOe 3 
LWvHA 28 OjO 
LbtvH B 28 3.1 
LibMdAs 
LTOMdopBOO 68 





26 12 


5 . +1ft 
4% 5 ft +1V6 
16 ISft +2ft 
1646 18ft +116 
9ft 9ft + ft 
9ft 10ft + ft 
4ft 4% 
23111% lOft lift + ft 
86212 T1 1146 + ft 
9*92416 33ft 34 + ft 

74341216110 110ft— 2 


LteUSA 
□ecore 
LfeQst 
LMlneS 
LfHoons 
Ligand 
Lilly Ins 
UnBrd 
Linen re s 
UrtcFd 
UlicSB 
LincTI 
UndlH 

Undbrg _ 

Undsy 192635% 33ft 3S» +1% 

UneorTc J4 8112*73916 36 3*% +Ift 

Unasm „ 12954 6% 6 6H + ft 

Ltosmpf 184 10J 53649ft TOft 10% — ft 




352725ft 

22 

24ft +2ft 



45 8% 

8 

8 — ft 

uo 

3 S 

14242ft 

40ft 

40% —1% 

1 JM 

28 

50337ft 

36 

37 

J9t 

9.4 

175 6% 

5% 

6% +1 

JO 

4 A 

65 4ft 

4ft 

4ft + ft 


LTI 
LTOBoks 40 
LllchFns Jtt 
Llteiluse 
Llttsewt 
LtSwtl 
Ltuskl 
Loiack 
LoanA 
LOdgEnt 
L a ewe n g 86 
Laswnstn 
LoglcD 
Lame* 
LondOvr 
Londlnt 889 
LneSStk 
LoneStr 
LngSik 
Lottery E 
Lotus 
Lowrmc 
LoYota 24 
Lofkbi 40 
Umar 
Lundint 


TO1Z7 9ft 7% 9 —1 

1.1 TMBft 36 38 +2 

J 11413ft lift lift— % 
59526 24ft 25ft +1 
55818ft 17ft TOft +lft 
9S7 9ft 8ft 916 + ft 
72311ft 10% 11 — ft 
12650 7% 6% 6% + % 
2041016 9ft 9ft + ft 
2150144k 1216 14% +2ft 
79*2546 24ft 25% + ft 
624)2 11 12 +1 

478 6ft 5ft 6ft +1 
186* 74k 7ft 716 + 16 
3514 14 14 — ft 

88 68 urn m 10 + ft 
929538ft 24% 27ft +24k 
SOHO 7ft 6ft 7ft +1 
3154 846 74k 8ft + ft 
201217V: 15ft 16ft 
24186 56ft 54ft 55 —I 
78 9% Bft 9ft + ft 
18 411 154k 154k 154k— ft 
14 60 17% 17 174k 

50412ft 11% 11% 

43920 18% 28 +1 


M 


J4 

22 


M-Wove 
MG Prod 
MAF Be 9 
MARC 
MB Cam 
MCI S 
MOL info 
MDTCp 

MF5CIT1 

MGI PRr 

MK Gold 

MMI 

MNX 

MRIMol 

MRS Teh 

MSCarr 


MTCBJ 
MT5 
MDrmo 
MB a 
MaceSec 
AWChTC 
Mocromd 
Madge 
MadGE 
MaoPlir 
Mogul 
MuaSfl 
MnmP 
MognBl 
MooGp 

MOOCPS 
MaaTch 
Mall 8* 

MOtaSt 
MOtnSICB 
MokilS 
Malton 
Mrailm t 
MonhLfe J4 58 
MOTOOlSI 

Mart Fn 
Morcam 
Mortet 
MorOrl 
MarinerH 
MorCoo JO 
Mark CM 
MkTwns 84 
Morkd 
MktFcl 
MortW 
Mora El 
Moream 
MrdiSB 
MrshSu 
Marsh I s 

Me. left 

MortCol 
MdFdBc 
MHlQflO 
MnsonDixiJS 


87916 Uft 13ft— 2ft 
losia 8ft oft +1 

23922% rift 22 — % 
739 SW t 8 
152621ft 19 2TVk +2ft 

A 1465307 25 28% +244 
6129 9 7% 89k +lft 

2783 5lk 5ft 514— ft 
3832334% 31 32ft— ZV. 




397215% 

12% 

14% 1-2 



4606 «% 

3ft 

6 








1*912% 

11% 

n%—% 



331 4ft 


4ft— ft 



1026 14ft 

12% 

13 



522121% 

20 


JO* U 

34)18% 

rm 

17ft- ft 



9778 TO 

9TO 

9%— % 






M 

2J 

77 25% 

24% 

25% +1 

AO 


141 16ft 

16% 

16% — ft 



1677 6ft 
1755 Ift 

5% 

1 

fS + % 



263417% 

14 

16% +2% 



3523 15 

12ft 

IS -W 

186 

SJ 

27735 

33% 

33% — % 


MOSSDk 

Montsfi 

MotrxPh 

MatrxSv 

Mattiew 

MatErs 

Masco 

MnxcrMN 

MmtlmGc 

MOsiGwt 

Maxim 

Maxtor 

MOxwef 

MaytICo 

MayllGrp 

MavnOI 

Movu 

McAtee 

tssr\ 

McCar 


143713% 11 13% +2ft 

1221 8% 74* 8% + % 

591 15ft 13ft 14ft — % 
13093316 34ft 3516+1* 
18 79 37 33 34ft +1ft 

17 189 TOft IBM 1916 

1366 Bft 7% 8 + ft 

970 9ft 8 Bft 
326512 1046 lift +% 

3443 5ft 4Tk 5ft + ft 
1213712 lift 12 
■16e 3 2317% 17ft 17% + ft 

748 44* 3ft 4 
266 1ft 446 5ft + ft 
1 4ft 4ft 4ft — % 
2600 TOft 9ft 9% — ft 
414 9 8ft 9 + 16 

54*4 9% Oft 9% +Ift 
2282 Bft 7% 8ft— ft 
3234 5ft 5ft 5% + ft 
*25222 18ft 21ft +3 
II 516 TOft 15ft 16 

1168 9ft 8% Bft- ft 
14 854224% 23ft 24% +1 
IWWft 38ft 39ft + ft 
38 13 7ft Oft Oft- ft 

3729 3 1ft 1ft + ft 
89716 15 15 —ft 

171421ft 19% 21ft +lft 
<L4 837 TOft 9ft 10 + ft 

4J 88718ft 9ft 9%-lft 
24 412124 23ft 234b— ft 
193 9 8ft 9 
9318% 17% 18% 

£50 9ft Bft 9ft + ft 
U 31225 24ft. K +%. 

332121% IM 20% +1% 
28 1 45 45 45 +2 

n U 83336 35% 35% -ft 

2008 7% 6 
190210% 9ft 
49811ft 10ft 
498 4 3ft 
959 9ft S% 

61 '8ft 7ft 
104761$% 9ft 
673 9 8% 

3ft 




40 


681 4 

349749 46% 

23360 -6M 5ft 
491 4 J 21380ft 9 
12311ft 11 
24411ft 11 
20 Slu 4% 
39 *16 6% 
1750 Ift 7ft 
2883752’ 50 

1514% 13% 
48 1.9 13497*4% 23 


Oft + % 
10ft + ft 
lift +1. 
4 + r. 
9» + % 
Bft + ft 
9% 

8ft + 4* 
4 + ft 

47ft— % 
5ft— ft 
10ft +W 

5*1— ft 
Oft 

7ft— ft 
iSS-TO- 
244* +1% 


Sotos Jn Net 

lOBs High Low Oosa ChDo 


McFarl 

McGow 


2 S 1 K 

McGrUV~MT 28 19515 ‘ 
MdbrKRe ieea 2 

MechTc 54 Mb 

Medlmun 542411ft 

XSZS, 89715ft 

Medaoti itrran 

M^tarey 

Mudanc wt 2228 2ft 

MedVsn 1933646ft 

MedCmp 60714 

MedAd 2338 2ft 

MedDv 206 2ft 

MedDlog <m 4ft 

ModGr 7ZS 6% 

Modlmo 3045 ft 

MBdMkt 83726ft 

MedTwt 59 2ft 

MedTKtl 744 Ift 

IftEdSh J* 25 3403 22 
Mttfids 26425 ft 

Medic wtB 3147 _ 

Medic wTC 150 ft 

Medkws 166*19 

Medtsvs 3415 Ift 

Medrod 41213% 

Mmtsiat 257415ft 

Meacrd 714 2 

Megtood 257511 

Megonrtz 106M mi 

Meoal**l 279913 

fltetomi TOS5 4% 

MetomP JleltL* M7 «b 

MemxTd 15004 ft 

Mem tec iDe 2 aizft 
MentavJ 982 1ft 

MenWrs 481032% 

Mento r 561 1*41 13ft 

MentGr .181 6854 14ft 

MrcHkS M 16 154319ft 
MOW *551 TOft 

MrcBnc -4M 6513ft 

MrdtBa am A wn 
MertHcfiYUfl 29 1 55 

MercGns AO 20 122330% 
Merclnl 572 1816 

MrttoBC 1J8 4J 514328ft 
MerldDla 4HB> J* 52B 8% 

Merdlns 24b 12 *331 11% 


MerP1*3 
MerbL 
Merisel 
MertMd 
MerllCp me 
MosoArs 
MotCTOI 
Metatec 
Methanx 
MelhdBs 84 
McthdAs 85 
Afletrcm 
Metro Fn J)7r 
Metracatl 
Motroecn 
MlamSb 
MIChlF 20 
MfchSir 
MtchPn 88 
MlChNt 200 
MicrBi 
MCTInc 
NUcFocu 
Micron It 
Mcrwar 
AWCTflSs 
MicroPro 
MlcPra wt 
Mlcrchos 
Mlcre 
Mlcrdv 
Mtcrglx 
Mkrotg 
Mcmla 

MJcroa 
Micrprs 
Micros 
ivucSem 
AUcsfts 
Mlcrtet 
Mlcrtear 
Mictch5y 
MktOcn 
MldAmi 88 
MUAmpflXl 
MWAflS 


81.5 
3100 4 
756211ft 
1295 5ft 
3 2taW7ft 
. 10902 18% 
327 3 
50615 
lew @ 

J 1216ft 
3 338514% 
174124% 
-8 55 9ft 

190*18 
1565 13% 
13002 3ft 
25 3*97 8ft 
. 589236ft 

12 4227ft 

15 134159% 
98612ft 
157911% 
177415ft 
2677 6% 
2442 4216 

405039ft 
16*8 4% 
1025 1ft 
560539 
6424 5ft 
1639 4% 
4486 9ft 
52S 2ft 
4730 Oft 
8071 Ift 
4414 9% 
21522* 
544 5ft 
4675983ft 
1229 *ft 
522* 9ft 
37913% 
303529 
4J 31515 
*2 2730 

TO 152 27ft 


MdCorifl M U 20111% 
MIdSau s 54 IS 

MdsxWW lid 49 1921<6 

‘ Fn * 50321ft 

Cp 1340425ft 

Mldenc 200 7 

MOwGr JO U 86829% 
Mlkahd 1157 lOft 

MiieHtne ip 6% 

MlirBId JW 328 3% 

MjtlrHr 52 77 524730ft 


Mlkmln 
Miitooe 
Ml twins 

MlneSf .92 22 
Mlnrtlts .« 3 A 

Minnie 

\25 1.7 

MlfekSr 
MobIGS IjOO 4.0 
MUTel 


66723ft 

893 4ft 
427 9% 
1643ft 
227% 
272310% 
19214ft 

w 

2254325ft 


Mohlev 1812 2% 

MOCN 70a 27 778 9ft 
JMocflncs At 16 106630 


JDM 




Modtec 
Mohawks 
MoiecDy 
Mtdexs JM 
MdtaxA J» 
MoitenM 
MomenCa 
66o iroeoC 
MonocoF 
MonacWt 
ManAvl 
MonCasn 
Mondavi 
Utmost 24 
Mon RE JO 
MonraM 

ManfPgj. 
moo«p 
JW ioreHd 
MorgnQa J2* J 
MornGo .15 " 
Mascom jm 
M ettle M 13 
Moihrwk 
MolCte 
MtnPkFn 
MtnrBk 170 25 
MmastaE 
MCottee 

MuelTOr P2J» 57 
Muircir 


3130. ft 

1127534% 
412311% 
.1 16*9*6% 
.1 2412*4% 
967936% 
167 8% 
42313% 
909 8% 
2650 3ft 
. 51 ,2ft 
407 Oft 
163310 
240474% 
45 6ft 
48116ft 
23*6 lift 
8017 
1 4ft 
. 259 7% 

27 1190x7ft 
J 1230 8ft 
’ 30030% 
1*913% 
447 3 
277-13% 
2841 
150111% 
138210% 

££% 


4% 5ft + ft 
9% 10% 

14% l4Vr- - 
T % 1ft + ft 

iSSif+s: 

14% 15ft + ft 
29% 33, +J% 
10ft 11% +■ X? 
*ft 7% + % 
2ft 7ft + ft 
16 17% +• ft 

28 28ft 
41ft 4J% +2% 
13 TO +1 

2? . 
2ft 2ft— % 
4ft 4ft + ft 

% Hti* 

7% 7ft + ft 
19% 19ft— 2ft 
ft ft 

ft ft- 
16 18ft +2% 
3% 3 + 
12ft 12% 

13% TOft— % 
1% 1ft + ft 
9% m +'% 

13% 14% + ft 
lift 12ft + ft 
5% 6 — % 
5ft 5ft— % 
ft ft 

12ft 12*9 + ft 
1ft l%-> 
27 32ft +5% 
13 13% 

13ft 13% + ft 
IBft 19ft 
13ft 14ft + ft 
11 13ft +7VJ 
21% 21% +■ % 
SS S5 +lft 
»% 30 +-% 

17% 17% — % 
20ft 28ft— ft 
0% 0% +ft 
10% 11 — % 
4ft 5 

3 4 + ft 

17% IBft +Hk 
4% 5ft + ft 
25ft 27 +1% 

16% 17% + % 
2ft 3 + % 
14ft I4VS — % 
7ft B 

15ft 15ft _ 
13ft 14ft + ft 
22% 34 + % 

Bft 9ft + ft 
16% 17ft +■ ft 
12ft 1»— ft 

3 S + ft 

7% 8 + % 

32 +3ft 
26ft 27ft— ft 
57ft 57ft— 1% 
12ft 12ft 

TOft 11% + % 
13ft 14ft +■ ft 
4ft 5ft + ft 
37ft 41ft +2Vb 
J7ft 38% 

4ft 4ft 
Ift Ift 

U *** 

•Ift 2% • 

5% eft + ft 
6» 7 + % 

8% 9 + Vk 

23ft 25% +1 
4ft 4% — ft 
79% '80ft— % 
5% 5% —ft 
7% 9% +1 
13 13% + V* 

28% 28% 

T4ft 15 + W 

29% 27% —ft 
Mb 25ft— 1% 

11% 1I%— ft 
lift 12 + ft 
20ft 21% + % 
19ft 20V* — 1% 
23ft 25ft +1% 
Bft 6% + % 

r.r^ift 

.r 

•JSWi 3STO +1% 
20% 23ft , 

4 44b— lb 

9% 9% + % 

42% 42% 

26% 26% —ft 

8% 10% +lft 
U TOft „ 
21 21ft— Vi 

BK 25% — ft 

3ft 34% + ft 
Ilk 9% + % 
8% 91k— % 
Wt 28ft -1ft 
% + ft 

33 34% + % 
10% 11% + % 
35ft 3gS— ft 
33%'iW— ft 
21% 23% —2% 

8 % Bft + % 
12% 13ft + % 
7% 7%— ft 
2% 2% 

2ft 2W— % 

9% $%- % 
21ft 24ft +lft 
4ft 6ft— ft 
14% 16W+1% 

9 .11% +2% 
ISVj lift— ft 
4ft 4ft +1 , 
7% 7% +% 
6% .*»— ft 
7ft 8ft + ft 
29 29ft 
“ T2*k — ft 
... 2W-% 
12% 13% +■ % 
40% 41 + ft 

n% loro + % 
w% 10% + ft 
33ft .35 + ft 

10 10 




Sates In Net 

100* High Low Close aifte 

MuHcre 250418% 16 18% +2ft 

Muitmdh 617335 33ft 34%—% 

Mat LAsr 1JB214J 52501% 20ft-21% +ft 
NbitSvg s 94717ft 16ft 17ft + ft 

MvCOOn 3628 Ws 9ft 10% + % 

Mylex 983 7 6% 6ft— ft 


N 


N-VIrolnl 3386 4ft 5ft *% + ft 

NABAst 1J0930JI 637 S 1 * 4% 5 
NAC Re .16 J 1407729% 21 29% +1 

NAITCS 

NBSC J2 2J 
NBTBCO Jib 28 
NCI BUS 
NEC 
NFORsfl 
NFS 

1496 2ft 

“A* 

489 5% 

1W 4% 

2179 4% 

5528 
452 4% 


12 
M US 


J2 1.1 
1.BMU 


.72 4.1 


U4t 7j» 
Jtt 2.4 


NMR 
NPMHI 
NSBCP 
N5A int 
NSC 
NVIEW 
NYCL 
Naham 
NamTats 
Namlc 
Nanomr 
Napca 
NashF 
Nathans 
NBAJSk IJHa 1J 
NalBev 
NtCaptr 
NCtVH 

NCtvBn _ 
NtCmBcs JO 
NtCPtr M 
NlQlVWt 
rttiVCnv 
NlDentex 
NalGYPS 
NatGy Wt 
NafHme 
N1HHII 

Nttlnco 20r 1J 

Nttlra 31 U 

NLoan JOc 

NtMerc 

NlPenn .72 U 

NttPlel 

NtPMA 

NtPznB 

NdtlRV 

Nat Reed 

NlSanh M 1J 

NSecIn JU 33 

NTech JUe J 

Notvwis 
NIWnLt 
NtwCCJ 
NatWndr 
NaturFd 
NotrBls 
NtrSuns 20 

NautiCDS 
Novore 
NavgGp 
Netlcor 
NeisnT .16 

Neorxs 
Neaarotje 
Neoprwt 
Neozun 
Nettrame 
Net m ono 
Matrix 
NwkCmp 
NtwfcG 
Nwklmg 
Nwkimwt 
Nwfcimpf 
NtwkSol 
NtwkSv 
Netwonh 
Neurex 
Neuron 
fteutrg 27 
NBrunS 
NEBUS JO 
MHmoTh Ata 52 
MewHrz JMe A 


4113 7ft 4% 6ft— ft 
311 20% 20% 20% + ft 
34 18% 17ft 18% + % 
60017% 16 16% — ft 

15938ft 38 381b- % 

23719ft TOft IBft + ft 

93 16 15ft 15% + % 

2 2ft + ft 

8ft Bft + ft 

29ft 29ft 
5 5 — % 

3 3 — 

3ft 4 

% + 7 * 

4% 4ft + ft 

103511% 10% 10ft— % 
75210ft 8 10% +1% 

48 Ift ft ft— ft 

« 4ft 4% 4ft + ft 

50818 17 17ft— ft 

922 9 |ft 8ft— ft 

41 56ft 54% 56ft +1% 
8622% 21ft 22% + % 
TOft ft 

334 TOft U% TOft + % 
12537 35 37 +1% 

17 193*23% 22 22ft— % 

3J 50711ft 1#% 11 
S3 5% 5 5 

88516% 15% 16% + ft 
847 9 Bft 9 + % 

902034ft 30ft 31ft— 3ft 
15720ft 17 17 —3ft 

1287 14 12ft TO 4- ft 
243 3ft 2% 2% — ft 
13913% 12% 12% 

4413% 13 13 

255 Vk ft — 

2*4 4% 4% 4ft 

58440% 37ft 40% +3% 
976 TOft 10 10ft + ft 
630 7 Bft Bft 
578 Bft 6 6 

15012% lift lift + ft 
792 7% 6% 7% + % 

3413ft 12% 13ft +-1% 
325ft 24% 25ft 
466 3ft 3% 3ft + % 
8627 8 7 7V4 

21244 44ft 44ft— ft 
1585 14ft 13ft 13% — ft 
1613 8ft 7% 8% 
112310% 8% 10ft +lft 

3661 20% 19% 20% +1 
953 12% 11 12% + ft 

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rcteafie anffajuld still face criminal proceedings. •••'.-•.• •_• ftoem 

Tomba Checks Out the Movie Biz 


ROME (Reuters) — Ibeltafian skiing ^;2flbe^~-Tambft’lii ah .“JSJ3f3SiCESSL soe’s f ourth touchdown pass irame 
interview published Sm&ay, sumstShflUlris altering /Career was 414 game, with 4:44 gone m overtime, 

TT 6 . - for 47 yards. Hampton went oyer °” N _, F M,i«>iri the win over 

“Ihere’s hot a kmgfatnie for me in skiing^ Tomha, 27, told the jhel£0&-jard mark for the third ^ blocked the Dolphins’ 

The flamboyant Italian, who nLt month hhb tobeoomo fifrjfigt the ffl,h s^^t^sa and were con- 

^aSSS. wlsiSSSSs 

3^ a m+Ik* Jriiw AT^S^^thegBpq-g. /_ . ^axmg, Bledsoe, who was 27 of 43 for 


■ip - ;• iL« • -• ■••■ • '• •-. V Af-i -i-.-v-- •:• Aiaj. j '■■ Yotfs Marcus Buckley. . , 

I CHf UteltCOOFU: • ■■*•; ■■■.■.■' r .-• The Giants then drove 39yards 

pi llp^tnaJih od Bun ch uk- 

■HOif of ffiSJMtdnds M the Hong KoosWodd Cup met, mgitmfrem fee 1 to mtealW. 

: C 8 kfc,FMb» ms named. to Fnum> J»J IRawt Cojt.^n^lte .Titer; PM Smmsfomd 


first down, then punted. Dallas s into ^ AFC wild-card slot because Beueriein completed 27 or 33 

Kevin Williams trad to pick up tbe fwwm in^ng. passes for 278 yards and three 

bouncing, partially blocked kick Bledsoe, who was 27 of 43 for touchdowns, two to Randal HflL 
and hbpunced off Ins chest to New 329 yank, threw a 36-yard scoring C3riefs34,Seahawks24: InKan- 
Yori^s Marcus Buddey. . pass to Michael Irmpson for the ^ City. Missouri, the Chiefs’ first 

The Giimt? thm drow 39yards score as the Patriots (5-1 1) garre since 1972 as AFC 

in 11 plays, with Janod Buncn uuc- fo^th in a row. West champion went from laugher 

mg u m from the lto makert 13-/. teams combined for 27 tft nnil-hiter shortly after Joe Mon- 

Ltter, PM Simms found Hamp- 0^(5 in a wild fourth quarter. tana went in the sidelines. 

S££Z3ra$d l aZ Steetes 16, Browns 9; In Pitts- _,B.t Tun .M. P«d- 


Mari Wim/lte Aaooued Pm* 


But Tim Newton pounced on 


reedhf erf 47^3 seamds at thc Hong Kong'WbridGup meet., (flattens) ingitmfrom the 1 to make it 13-7. ^ ^ combined for 27 to nail-biter shortly after Joe Mon- a nthon? Carter (81) ran into a teammate, but the Vikings beat tbe Redskins to gain a playoff both. 

. CttkitLPWine was maned .to FmhceVJ^ J&W €ro«quafclhe . M Sn^ fot^IW ^ a wfld fourth quarter. una went to the sTdeHnes. Aranony to., ^ 

country's top' .male tenuis player had been Mt out this yearbtaHise Q* • tonfor a3+yard pa® thm set up ... n. i n pj»e_ But Tim Newton pounced on ,k» «Hn« and assure Minnesota (9-7) a ago, was 19-of-32 for 225 yards, 

what organizers called his excestaye ddnan ds.*-— tyjSS Da ? d T ^ weJFs M ^ ^ kept their play- Rick Mirer's fumble on the Sea- ■ 27?Mwiih 6-27 playoff spot for the second straight enabling the Vikings to dose the 

■ And^N^der of Ukmmo wwatpd a:^ go^ A ^ f . hawks’ 11 with 2:03 left, and the Srahawks made .1 27-24 wim 6.Z/ Gre ^ regular season with three straght 

Hooms^ CupT and imryimiss the AnSnilian<%>em (token) : Then, kammg fhebaDoo ±e oB chiefs tacked on an insurance left on Mira’s ^^ardpa* voFct- wins for the first time since 1974. 

mjjuiHi uqy _ . . , _• ..-r •. .. . ■ . . . • wound, the Gianty^irove 69 yards nell threw a tourm quancr . ^njg,.. rell Edmunds. The Chiefs scored 1 missed some open guys. Me p rtrr h ( .B«!«kinsi4-]'’\.iiwasa 

«si™ ss-ss 6 - 

fiwSSS SSrsH5 


•"Headline hi. The > 

ncwwdkeseasis 

cannow be spctenrftai isbadL.” 

•Bobby Bowden, 
players seine' nH»g.;lyc ^ od y 

evaTtXJdynnflcesm^cyrflffbovMs, 


(Katun) 


ayBadpacs 

a.'fentHi a 
/Sjewords 


the ball on the 
tS'tirove69 yards 


i5l Edimmd& The Chiefi scored “1 nrissrd some open guys,” Me- 

their final tcadhdowB i with :46 re- Mahon s^d- fdi hke dismal sea- 

maining on Todd McNan^s l-yard S three decades. For the third 

ohmae on fourth down. to. Of couise_ they had eight or nme _ mRC ,k w r„iwt m 


pI T 8 f°! f ^i^ OWQ ‘ moffsK 5 !pS!f" “ time m four games, they failed to 

S “ftr 3 ?,S^d , qffi CT b»ck. *ore .«>!«*&. UK Obly qua. 
in^Tm^ McMahon’s 11-yard who took Chicago to the playoffs 

touchdown pass to Anthony Carter three tunes m the 80s and went Richie Petitbon will keep tus j 
™ R“l- there with Philadelphia three yam «ondym. 




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I 




Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 1994 


A Y 


SPORTS 



SCOREBOARD 


fotr^ 

■ i 




NBA Standings 


EASTERN CPNFEREKCE 
Altsnttc Division 


New York 

18 7 

.728 

— 

Orlando 

ta 12 

571 

M 

Miami 

17 13 

A 80 

a 

Boston 

12 17 

414 

B 

New Jersey 

11 16 

.407 

B 

PhllndelBtila 

10 17 

J78 

9 

Washington 

8 X 

Central Dhrbloa 

286 

lift 

Atlanta 

1* 7 

.731 

— 

Chicago 

18 9 

567 

!V| 

Chorion* 

16 12 

571 

4 

Ctoveiana 

12 15 

444 

7Va 

Indiana 

10 16 

38S 

9 

Detroit 

8 19 

296 

IIHr 

Milwaukee 

8 X 

286 

12 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Mltf«ntfDlvb(on 

W L Pel 


Duke 87, W. Carolina <7 
Duouesne 67, Richmond 60, OT 
Ftortao si. W, N,C-GncfHboro 76 
Georaetown M, Memphis SI. 78 
Kansas St. U Southern Mbs. 78 
Kentucky K. Robert Morris 67 
Lamar 65, McNeese St. 62 
Marshall 7& Davidson 71 
NE Louisiana 72. Texas- 5an Antonio 0 
nw Louisiana 92, sw Texas St. B2 
Navy 85, Florida Atlantic 72 
Nkcholb 51. 71, Louisiana Toctt 72 
Radiant 71 LSU 72 
Virginia a. Ubertv 49 
VI rain ki Tech 87. Fla. Inwmailanai 69 
MIDWEST 

Akron 81 St. Fronds. Pa 72 
Miami. Ohio 79. Dayton 91 20T 
Missouri 71 Mercer 9 
N. Illinois 82. Chicago St. 77 
St. Louis IDO. S. Illinois 67 
W. Michigan 77, E. Illinois 74 
West Virginia 67. Otrio St. 12 
SOUTHWEST 

Baylor las. mhsl Valiev Si. oB 

DePoul 89. Houston 67 

Norm Texas 64. Sam Houston SL 62 


Seventh Piece 

UC Santa Barham 71. Army 68 

Satan HnB-Me ad owl oo d i Tournament 
CMRWlOBdliP 
Solon Hall 71 smmtard » 


NHL Standings 


Son Diego 64. Montwtfon 61 
SMTtao Classic 
Owmgleos M o 
Michigan St. 81 Comoll 67 
TWrd Place 

Bowline Green 0, Georgia Southern 66 
Son carnival Clonic 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AHontJc Division 


Texas-EI Paso 70. Vo. Commo n weaflh 9 
Third Place 

lawa 51 7], Peppardlna 64 

Great Northern Classic 


WK -Green Bay A East Carolina 43 
TMra Place 

E. Michigan 77. E. Washington 73 



w 

L 

T 

Pts GF 

GA 

NY Rangers 

X 

9 

3 

55 

140 

97 

New Jcrscv 

X 

12 

4 

48 

137 

186 

PMkxwipftia 

20 

17 

3 

43 

146 

146 

wcMiwnwen 

17 

17 

4 

38 

IX 

118 

Florida 

16 

15 

6 

X 

106 

T06 

NY Islanders 

15 

18 

3 

33 

130 

126 

Tanuxz Bov 

12 

23 

5 

29 

102 

127 

Northeast D! vision 




Pittsburgh 

18 

11 

8 

44 

140 

132 

Boston 

17 

12 

7 

41 

121 

10 

Buffalo 

» 

17 

3 

0 

127 

lay 

Montreal 

16 

15 

6 

38 

118 

iw 

Quebec 

16 

17 

5 

J7 

135 

m 

Hartford 

14 

21 

3 

31 

m 

IX 

Ottawa 

8 

29 

3 

19 

in 

191 




WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central Division 


Houston 

24 4 

257 

— 

FAR WEST 

Utah 

X 8 

214 

4 

Cal St.-Fullertan 85. Oklahoma Baptist 71 

San Antonio 

18 11 

jOI 

6 \n 

Colorado 75. Md.-E. Shore 0 

Denver 

14 11 

_S!» 

9V» 

Catoraaa St. 106. Fart Lewis 66 

Minnesota 

■ X 

286 

16 

Nevada as, C5 sramisiaus 90 

Dallas 

2 24 

877 

21 

Oregon 76, SI. ManTs. Cal. X 


Pacific Division 



Purdue life Weber SI. 73 

Seattle 

22 3 

J HD 

— 

S. Utah 70. Idaho 65 

Phoenix 

71 5 

808 

lte 

San Jose 31. 74. Montana SI. 0. OT 

PortlanO 

17 11 

207 

6te 

Texas ABM 81. Loyola Murymoun! 79 

Golden Slate 

14 13 

JI9 

9 

UNLV 01, Adel phi to 

LACIIoaers 

It 16 

407 

12 

Valparaiso B4, Air Farce 79 

LA Lakers 

9 19 

221 

1410 

FRIDAYS GAME5 

Suu-umento 

8 19 

296 

15 

EAST 


NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Washington *1 IB 25 2»— M 

New York 26 26 22 28-162 

W: Ellison 10-11 1-1 21-Choomsi 11-201-225. 
N.Y.: Ewlno 11-17 2-4 24, Starks 13-22 (HI 29. 
Robeonds— Washington 37 lGogltohn 13). 
New York 40 (Oaklev 101. AssWs-Woshlng. 
ton 26 (Adams 1 It. New York X ( Ewing. An- 
thony. Starks 6>. 

Oftando 24 22 26 3S-WB 

Miami 21 23 22 34— IM 

OlOTieat 12-1828 27, Shlles 6-108-8 Z1.M: Rice 
8-2S4-4 24 Sailev B-124-6 20. Reboumb-OTando 
56 (O'Neal »l. Miami 57 (Sallev 161. Assists— 
Orfanda 24 ISkiles MM, Miami 22 (SmHti III. 
CMCOQO 21 26 23 25- 95 

Charlotte 31 23 16 15-115 

C: Kokoc 6-14 1-1 13. Plonen B-16 7-11 2X 
Armstrong 5-14 3-3 13. C: Hawkins 9-17 8-0 24 
Curry 7-16 5-528. Rehoands-diicago 52 1 PIp- 
oen 131. Char tone 51 IHawhlm 121. Assists— 
Chicago 17 (Kukoc6!.Chortotto 25 (Boeuas7). 
Sacramento 27 14 23 23-^7 

Detroit 21 33 17 18—71 

S: Simmons 4-145-16 IS, Tisdale B-13S421. D: 
Elliott 6-20 2-2 18. Mills 9-22 4-5 22. Rchaends— 
Socromento54 (Simmons. Tisdale 12). Detroit 
51 (Poivnke 131. Assists— Sociamgnto 20 
(wen I). Detroit >5 (EMail, Dumars 5). 
San Antonio 20 ■ 29 38—107 

Indiana 19 21 14 28- 82 

5: Ellis 8-11 1-221, Robinson 8-20 5-5 21. Re Id 
6-136-622. 1: D. Davis 7-15 1-3 15. Workman 4-1 

2- 2 II. Rebounds— Son Antonio S7 (Rodman 
19). Iidlana 9 (DiTavts 221. Asdsts-San An- 
tonio 31 (Del Negro, Rodman 6). IniSana 15 
{Fleming 51. 

Cleveland 30 24 23 36-182 

Milwaukee 35 18 38 23-185 

C: Daugherty 6-H 14-14 26, Price 6-13 8-8 72 . 
M: Brickowskl7-15 84 22. Edwards 6-10 4-4 16. 
Rebounds— Cleveland 45 (Daugherty 91.MIL 
weaken 40 [Edwards 7). Assists— Oevehmd 
23 (Brandon 5). Milwaukee 28 (Barry 6). 
Houston 33 36 18 33-110 

Minnesota 19 26 27 12— 184 

H: Thorne 8-154-6 2&Otoluwon 14-256-1134. 
M: Rider 11-24 7-9 301 Person 7-17 3-2 19. Re- 
baoads— Houston 9 (Thorpe I7J. Mhmasoto 
64 (Longley 19). Assists— Houston 30 (Max- 
well 7), Minnesota 24 ( Williams 8). 

Golden State 18 32 22 36— 96 

Denver 31 17 n 23—101 

G: Webber 8-11 1-2 17, Sorewell 6-14 16-18 28. 
D: Ellis 7-13 44 18. Abdui-Rovf 9-16 3-3 22. 
Rebounds— Golden Slate 59 (Webber 12), 
Denver 58 (Ellis. Mutombo. B-Wllllams 81. 
Assists— Go WenSiate 22 (Sorewell 61. Denver 
19 (Abdul-Raui 6). 

Philadelphia 32 22 26 27-187 

Phoenix 34 23 29 33-119 

P ; Weal h er sn oon 10-15441 Z4. Burras 10-131- 
m P : Bark lev 8-14 4-1022. Miller 12-M 85 32. 
A Inge 8-17 2-3 22. Rebounds— Phllodrtphki « 
(Wealherspoon 10). Phoenix 54 (Barkley 14). 
Assists — Philadetoftld 3D ( Homocek 8), Phoe- 
nix 37 (Barkley 121. 

Boston 29 29 26 35—119 

LA Clippers 26 9 23 13-111 

B: Parlsh*toM1&Gombte7-lll-21B.Bn>wii 
6-139421. L-A. Mamina 13-26 36 29. Harnrrll-18 

3- 7 26. Re b o u nds— Boston 47 (Parish 8). Loe 
Anoetes 49 (Morning 11). Assists— Boston 18 
(Douglas 8). Las Angeles 33 (Jackson 15). 


FalrtleM 03. Wls-Mllwaukoe 45 
Providence 88. South Carolina 0 
SOUTH 

AhL-BIrmhiolwm 78, South Florida 41 
Cincinnati BS. Austin Peav 75 
MIDWEST 

Minnesota 7X James Madison 68 
Nebraska 70. N. Iowa 63 
Southern Cal 67, Mo.-Kansas a tv 66 
SOUTHWEST 

Steuben FAusiln 77. Cameron 74 
PAR WEST 

New Mexico SL 97. Maroon Si. 56 
Oregon St. 82. Portland a 

TOURNAMENTS 
AJbartsoot Holiday Ctenic 
Championship 

SW Louisiana 83. Boise 5t. 80. OT 
Third Place 

Slippery Rode 77, Alcorn St. 67 


Cbampiorabip 
OUahama 95, Tubo 76 

Third Place 

Texas Teen 93. E. Kentucky 83 
Big tslcmd 1 nv national 
Championstib 
Ohio u. IDO. La Salto B0 

Third Ptaae 

Connecticut 130. Tenrwu ee Tech 7B 
Seventh Ptaae 

Cre Milan 81, Texas-ArUngton 63 
Cable Car Classic 



W L 

T 

Pts PF PA 

x-Buftaia 

II 4 

8 

233 299 232 

Miami 

V e 

D 

00 322 311 

N.Y. Jets 

8 7 

0 

-SB 278 223 

IndtonaPolb 

4 II 

0 

267 179 348 

Non England 

4 11 

Casrral 

0 

1 

267 205 20 


W L 

T 

Pt» PP PA 

x -Houston 

11 4 

0 

233 344 238 

Pinsburan 

8 7 

0 

-533 292 272 

Ctevetand 

7 8 

0 

467 295 271 

Cincinnati 

3 12 

West 

0 

200 174 299 


W L 

T 

PIS PF PA 

x-Kansasaty 

10 5 

0 

Ml 294 267 

v- Denver 

9 6 

a 

400 343 251 

LA Raiders 

9 6 

0 

-600 273 296 

ScnDtean 

7 8 

0 

467 290273 

Seattle 

6 9 

0 

400 256 288 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

East 


W L 

T 

Pts PF PA 

y -Da) las 

11 4 

8 

233 368 216 

y-N.Y. Giants 

11 4 

0 

233 273 10 

Piuiacteiphia 

7 8 

0 

467 256X1 

Phoenix 

6 9 

0 

480 20 299 

Washington 

4 12 

Central 

0 

250 230 345 


W L 

T 

PIS PF PA 

y -Green Bay 

9 6 

0 

600 328 2S2 

y-Oetrolt 

9 6 

8 

J« 168 772 

v-Mbmasota 

9 7 

0 

263 277 298 

CMcoga 

7 8 

a 

467 228 710 

Tampa Bay 

5 10 

West 

0 

233 2X344 


W L 

T 

Pts PF PA 

x -Sen Francisco 

10 5 

0 

467 439 251 

Now Orleans 

7 8 

0 

467 297 330- 

Atlanta 

6 9 

a 

400 306 358 

LA Rams 

4 11 

a 

267 201 XI 



W 

L 

T 

Pts GF 

DA 

Toronto 

21 

13 

6 

48 

IX 

117 

Dallas 

X 

13 

7 

47 

138 

ns 

□etrait 

X 

13 

3 

43 

157 

134 

St. Louis 

19 

14 

5 

43 

121 

IX 

Chiaieo 

18 

14 

4 

40 

173 

IX 

Winnipeg 

IS X 5 
Pacific Dfvtslaa 

35 

132 

158 

Calgary 

70 

14 

6 

46 

152 

ir 

Vancouver 

19 

18 

0 

X 

134 

IX 

Los Anoetes 

15 

20 

3 

X 

144 

154 

San Jose 

12 

X 

7 

X 

M 

121 

Anaheim 

14 

24 

7 

30 

101 

123 

Edmonton 

n 

» 

5 

27 

119 

143 


THURSDAY’S RESULTS 
Tampa Bay 8 3 1—3 

Ottawa 8 8 8-8 

Seco nd Period: T-Zamuner 3 (Bureau. 
Cob); T -Savant 7 (Creighton). Third Period: 
T- Joseph 4 (Bradley). (ppl- S h o tsougool: T (on 
Mode lev) 154-TJ-I7. O (on Puppo) 36-3-11. 

Anah eim 8 8 8—8 

Washington 1 1 1—3 

First Period; W-RkJtoy 13 (Bunddge, Cote). 
Second Parted: W-Ciecone 1 (Poulin). Thirty 
Period: w-Khrfsticti 19 (Hunter). Shots on 
goal : a (an Tdborecel) 6-10-10—26. w (anTua- 
nutt) 13-13-9—35 

aamoatou 18 8—6 


Major College Scores 


THURSDAY'S GAMES 
EAST 

Boston College 85. Lana mono U. 54 
Brown 63. Boiton U. 60 
Ken! 71, Yale <S 
Maine 101. Cent. Florida 97 
Xavier, Ohio 93. MiL-Batilmora County 66 
SOUTH 

California 73. Wake Forest 72 
Canptn St. 94. Lovota. III. 71 


N.C. Char latte 60. Santa Clare 58 
Third Place 

Holy Crass TO Bui tor 47 

Cessna Classic 
Champlaasiito 
Wichita St. 80 Jackson St. 75 
Third Place 

Arkansas St. 61 Monmouth, n j. 49 
Dr. P epp er Classic 
Cham p i ons hip 

T h. -Chattanooga 85, South Alabama 69 
Third Place 

Alabama st 87, Amerlam U. a 
Fiesta Bowl Classic 
Championship 
Arizona 119, Michigan 95 

Third Place 
Auburn 81, FonSiom 60 

Golden Harvest Classic 
CMmniotnhlP 
Kansas 60 Southern Math. 66 
Third Place 

Rhode Island 86. £- Tennessee St. 73 
Great Northern Classic 
FJrst Round 

East Carolina TO E. Michigan 0 
Wlsj-Green Bay 50 E_ Washington 44 
Hatter Ctassic 
Champtoastdp 
Northwestern 74, Rider 68 
Third Ptace 
Stetson 81. Northeastern 72 

Lobe I nvl tattooed 
ChampioaNito 
New Mexico 90 Rice 75 

Third Place 

SL Banaventure 83. Middle Tena 0 
MVP Holiday Classic 
Chomptaeshlp 
Toledo 94. Murray St. 82 

Third Place 

Delaware 72, Cokimbki 52 

Marts! Classic 
Champtonshb 
Drexol 75. Martst 65 

Third Place 

Buffalo 60 St. Peter's 61 

Rainbow Classic 
anaudoasbb 
Louisville 85. Hawaii 79 

Third Place 

Florida 66. Evansville 63 
Fifth Place 

Clemsan 60 Ofctotiania SI. 65 


x -clinched division title 
y-cl Inched plcnroff berth 

Frtdov** Result 
Minnesota 14. Washington 9 


College Bowl Games 


HOLIDAY BOWL 
Son Dteeo 

Ohio State 28, Brigham Young 21 
FREEDOM BOWL 
Anaheim, Com 
Southern Cut 20 Utah 21 


IRDEPENDENCE BOWL 
Shreve p ort . Ul 
V irginia Tech 45, Indians 20 
PEACH BOWL 
Atlanta 

Clemsan 14, Kentucky 13 

GATOR BOWL 
Jddaenyniw Fla. 
Alabama 24, North Carolina 10 
ALAMO BOWL 
San Antonio 
California 37. Iowa 3 


HALL OF FAME BOWL 
Tsmsxv Fla 

Michigan 42, North Carolina State 7 
CITRUS BOWL 
Oftaoda, Fla. 

Penn State 31, Tennessee 13 
FIESTA BOWL 
Tempt, Artx. 

Arizona 29. Miami 0 

CAROUE5T BOWL 
Miami 

Boston College 31, Virginia 13 
COTTON BOWL 
Dallas 

Notre Done 24. Texas MM 21 
ROSE BOWL 
Pasadena CalH. 
Wisconsin 21. UCLA 16 

HERITAGE BOWL 
Atlanta 

Southern U. 11. South Carolina State 8 
ORANGE BOWL 
Miami 

Florida State 18 Nebraska 16 
SUGAR BOWL 
New Orleans 

Florida 41. West Virginia 7 


First Period: C-T1tuvi7 (KfetePetit); (pp>. 
E-RIcr 10 ( Wright Pearson). Second Period: 
C-Nietiwandvk 23 (Klsla. Esmi); C-MadraUs 
13 I McCarthy. Nleuwendykl; C-Retrtwl 12 
(Fleurv, Titov); (pp).C-Kblo4 (Ntetnmncryk. 
Mart mM. (ppl.Ttrtrd Period: C-Haas 1 (Mc- 
Carthy. Roberts); C -McCarthy 4. Shots on 
goal: E (on Vernon. Kidd) 7-8-18-25. C (on 
Rentard, Braftmalte) 1 0-12-9— 3L 
FRIDAY'S RESULTS 
SL Louis 8 I 8—1 

Winn Ipea 118-2 

First Period: w-Sefcmne 71 (Quintal. Shan- 
non). Second Period; SL-fiaron 7 (Shanahan. 
Bazon); W-Tkodwk M (Sehxme. Mironov). 
(PP). Shots on goal: Si. (an Essensa) 16-14- 
5-31 W (an Joseph) 12-10-16— 38 
Quebec 2 3 8-5 

Pim&urgh 2 2 8-4 

First Period: Q-Ruclnskv 7 (Wotonin, 
Young); (pg). P-Stevms 22 (SIraka, Jon- 
ninas); P-Shrako 14 (5levens,Taglkoietft);Q- 
Karpa 4 (Rudnsky, Lapointe I . Second Peri- 
od: P -St a pleton 4 {Daniels. Brown); O- 
Kamenskv 14 1 Undbero. FVn)J frLapatnteS 
(Rudnsky. Karaa); P-McSortey 2 (Brawn, 
Mutton) ; Q-Sundln 20 (Kamensky, Lindbera). 
Shots on goat: Q (an wregget) 11-11-6—28 P 
(on Fleet) 13-18-11—42. 

N.Y. Rangers 8 8 1—1 

Buffalo a i s— 4 

Secoad Period: B-Audetto 9 (May. Plante). 
(sp).Tliira Period: B-Mav 8 (Plante, Au- 
detfe); B-Howerchuk 16 (Bodgtr.Magllnv); 
N.Y.-Tlkkanen 17 ( Nemc h lnov. Zubov); B- 
Khmvlev. 11 (Jeemy). (on). 

Shots oa goal: N.Y. (an Hasek) 9-21-10-48 B 
(an Heafy) 8-7-11-98 

Los Angelos 4 8 8 8-4 

Detroit 3 0 18—4 

First Period: i_A.-Svdor 5. OPrlmrou 13 
( Yzerman. Cotfev) ; l_A.-Huddv 7 ( Shurtnifc > ; 
D-Fedorov 29. 1_A.-Kurrt 17 (Gretifcv. Rahi- 
taDH): (PP). LA.-McEorttern 7 (Dannefly); 
IshlD-LMstrom 5 (Coffey. Yzarman). 
(op). TWrd Period: D-Yzerman 4 (Coffey. 
Sheppard). 

Shots oa goal : la. (an Cneveldae) 844 2 1 8 
D (on Stouber) 71-15-163—55. 

Montreal 2 2 1—5 

Catotmr 8 2 8-d 

Ftrsf Period : M-OataneauH 2 (Cartxmneau. 
Honan); M-Odcleln 1 (Keane. Muller). 
(pp)3oamd Period: C-Nieuwendyk 24 ( Rob- 
erts Mad mils); (ou).M-Dampttous3el3(Le- 
beau. Bellows).- M-Proutac 1, C-Madnnli 14 
(Klsla, Roberts). Third Period: M-Petrov 8 
Shall oo goal: M (on KldcL Trefllo) 54-5— U. c 
(on Kunlarl >68-17. 

PtiUodehtofa 8 I J— l 

Boston 2 18-3 

First Period: B-Sma(lnskl 18 (Donato, Wts- 
bv)i (ONI. B-Nnely 23 (Oates. Wesley). 
(pp)-Second Period: B-Robertsl (SmaDnsklJ : 
P-Re nb ero 19 (ReccM. Lbndna). TTUrd peri- 
od: P-BrintTAmour 11 (Dtaean Bergnok); P- 
Recrtil 71 iRvnberg. Undras); P-Undras 17 
(ReccnL Renberg). Shots on goal: P (an Co- 
SOY) 5-5-9 — 19. B (on Roussel) 13-18-13—35. 
Dallas 2 1 2-5 

Chicago 1 ■ t— z 

First Period: D-P. Broten 5 (GUrtirtst. N. 
Breton l; D-N. Broten w (McPhce); C-Le- 



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ON ALEKT — Australia’s Aflan Bonier, Mark Taylor, Mark and ShaaeWame, from left, kept watch fnfte sSfisSmOmm 

South Africa’s first innmgi in Sydney. Warne’s bowfing proved key, as he took sevea wickets mdSocrfh Africa was ^i 4i#for Iwx 


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ml eux 6 (Graham, B. Sutter). Second Ported: 
D-McKenzie 2 (Evoson). Third Period; D- 
M odono 26 (Ludwfg. Cowfimi); D-Ktatt 6 
(Modonol; C-Riwttu 2 (Noonan. Gaulot). 
Shots on goal: D (on Hadcetl) 13-9-13—35. C 
(On Mooa) 9-13-16-32. 

SmJoH 2 8 1-9 

Vancouver 1 0 1—9 

First Period: v-wart 6 (Bure, Murzvn); 

5J.-Otevrrt 2 (El Ik I; SOrOlovrel 3 (Whitney, 

OxoUmh). (dp). Thted Period: V-Craven 6 
(Lumme); S-J.-Ellk 5 (Odgerv Pederson). 
(pp). Shots aa goal: SJ. (on Whitmore) 186- 

4 — tv. v (an Irtte) 9-10-1)— 30L 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
Anaheim • 8 2—2 

Florida 1 1 3-4 

Flrsi Period: FBames fjecoad Ported: 
F B ntannorB (Murphy. Howgood). (PP).Tbird 
Period: FLaus 2 (Skrudkmd, Hud); A-Yake 
14 A-Corkum 11 (Valk, Douris). FHirfl 7Xen- 
)ibat3 an goal: A (an Vanbtashrnudil 6-7- 
36—39. F (on Hebert) 888-19. 

Hartford 2 11—4 

N.Y. islanders 2 1 8-a 

Flrsi Period: H-Caneta 5 (Zabntti, 
Prengorl ; (pp). N-Yrt-taoue 19 {Turgean,DaF 
oarno): (pp). H-Sandorson 25 (Pronger); 
(PP). N.TrKIna 18 (Thomas. Turaoon). 
(BpLSecand Period: H-Verbeek 19 (Storrrv 
Casseb); N.Y.-Flattey 4 (AArt tints, Green). 
Third Period: H-Sondersoa 26 (Comets. Pat- 
rick). (pp). Shots an goal: H (on HextaJI] 12- 
11-10—31 N.Y. (an Buriue) 

Tampa say « 1 • o— 5 

Wathlngtoa 3 2 8 0-8 

First Period: W-Rhflev M (Milter); (shlT- 
Kllina 15 (GraHon. Savor d); (ppLW-Boadre 
12 (Hunter, Kanlnskl); T-Bradiey 14 (Jo- 
seph); (pp). T-APderman 7 (Cnefghton:; T- 
Hamrtlk 1 (Bureau. Got taut): W-Mllter 4 
(Bunrkfge. Ridley). Second Period: T-Klima 
14 (Graitan, Berg land I ; w-Huntar 1 
(stone vi; (pp). iw-RMtoy 15 (Bunridge). 
snots an goal: T (on Tabaracd) 15882-38 
W Ion JatManskl) tO-1 5-1 4-0-39. 

New Jersey 2 2 3-7 

Ottawa 8 I 8-1 

First Period: NJ.-Mllton II izeleoukliv 
Fetisov I; N_j.-Nidtoils s (Richer, Ntoder- 
maverl. Secoad parted: O-Archlbawa (Bura- 
kovsky. Dolote); NJ.-Nlcboib 6 (Lomleux. 
Smith); NJ.-RIcher M (MocLeon, Emma). 
Hiifd Period: N-I.-Guertn 5 (Milton, Ste- 
vens); Hj.-NlchoUs 7 (MKLaan. Modry); 
Hj.-Chorske 8 (McKay, Modry). Shah an 
goal: NJ. (an BHlinatan) 16-108-34 0 (on 
Bradeurl 8-12-18-98 

Las Angeles 4 3 8-7 

Toronto 8 13-4 

Fbst Period: LA--Druce 4 UL-Sandstrom 
11 (Btoka. Gretzky); LA-DonnoMv 14. LA* 
□race 5 (Donnelly- Sydor). Secoad Period: 
LJL-Tavfor 4 (Dannefly); i_A.-3andstram 12 


(Kuddv. Gretzky): LJL-Gretxkv 17 (Huddv. 
Karri); (pp). T-GUmour 10 (Anamrdwk. 
Banchovsfcv). (no). Third Period: T -Ander- 
son 7 (KrushebiysU, Mironov I ; TT-Krushaf- 
nvskl 5 (Anderson, SmvBi); IT-Gantour 11 
(Maooun).(sh)JBMttoagool: LA. (an Potvin. 
Rhodes) M-133-ao. T (on Hrudey. Staober) 
12-12-16—48 


TENNIS 


COLONIAL CLASSIC 
. to Melbourne 
Mart* Final 

Thomas Muster, Austria, dot. Alexander 
Valkov, Russia. 63, 18,7-6 (7-1). 

PEPSI HOPMAM CUP 
ta Perth, AastraHa 
First Raaad 
Austria def. Ukraine (6) 34. 

Judith Wlosner. Austria def. Natalia Med- 
vedeva Ukraine. 78 (88), 6-3; Atox Anton- 
Itncb, Austria, deL Andrei 'Medvedev, 
Ukralne,4462.6-i;AiaxAittanltedhandJip 
dth Wlesner del Andrei Medvedev and Nata- 
lia Medvedeva, defauH. 

Australta (5). deL Sweden 2-1. 

Nicab Pravts. Australia, dsf. Catarina 
Undavtst. Sweden.78 (7-21,61; Mlkaol Pom- 
tonw Svreden, def. Walty Maxur, Australia. 64 
64; Wally Masur and Nicole Provfs def. Mi- 
kael Pemlors and Catarina Llndavist6-3. 7-5 
Germany deL South Africa (8). 2-1. 

' Ahke Huber, Germany, del Amanda 
Corner, South Africa M (741.3461; Barad 
K ort xicher.Genrainy.dei Marcos Dndrusko. 
South African 64 64; Marcos Ondnnka and 
Amanda Coetzer deL Berad Karb uch er and 
Anfce Huber 67 (1618) — ana pro set 
Switzerland (7), def. Natherkoids, 30 

Manurta MateevD-Fraantere, Swftzeriand. 
dot Miriam Oremans. Nefhertonds, 34646 
8; Jakob Hlasek. Swttzeriand, dot. Jan Sto- 
mertnk. Netherlands. 44 64 78; JokobHIa- 
sekandMtpiueto Maieevo-Fragntere deL Jan 
StemartnkM Miriam Oremans 88 — one pro 
sat. 


Standi aas: Manchester Untied. 57 points; 
BtaddMjnt4S; Areenal43; Leeds 42; Newcas- 
tle 39; Norwich 37; Liverpool 36; QueanH 
Parti Rangers 35; Sheffield Weftiesdar 34; 
Aston VlUa 34; West Ham 33; Tottenham 30; 
Coventrv 30; Ipswich 30; Wlrabtedon 29, 
Evertan 25; Otetsea 21; Sheffield United 21; 
Mmrtiesfar Oty X; Okfitam 19; S uutliau p - 
tan 18; Swindon IS. 

ITALIAN FIRST DIV8IOH 
Gael tort 2, Lecce 1 
Genoa 1. C u mone s e 0 
In tor narionote l. Alatanta 2 
Lazio 1, Sampdarta 1 
Piacenza' L Pa r ma 1 
RBBQlana 6 AC Mlhm 1 
Torino 1, AS Ram 1 
Udkieea L Juventua 3 
Shmd tog s: AC MBarv 2s paints; Juvontus 
ondSampdorta23;Parma22; LazlaTlj Intor- 
nazloaate X; Napoli and Torino U; Cramai>- 
ese and as Roma 17; Caaiiarl 16; Faoala and 
Piacenza 15; Genoa and Atatanta II; Reg- 
atana 12; udhiese 10; Lecce 4 

SPANISH FIRST DIVIStON !. 
Raya VOUeama a Deperttva de La Coruna 8 
Savina L mat Sodedod 0 
Roof Madrid % Aifaoceta 8 
Sporting de GUan z BorocfanaO 
Cetta l, Zaragoza a 
Valencia 8 Osaeuna 0 
Lagranes 8 vanodotM 8 
Ltefda 1, Oviedo 1 
Terwrife L ArteWaj de Madrid 1 
Athletic do altboo 1, Racing de Santander 2 ’ 
Staeffinac Daparttvo La Coruna 25 polnto; 
Brexetona 23; Sporttag da Gdon, 22; Athletic 
de Bilbao end Reel Madrid, 21; SevUta; 19; 
ABxwete, Real Soc to dod and Valencia, 18; 
AfiaHco da Madrid aid Racine da Sredmter, 
ITS Zdraeaza and OvtedOrlS; Royg Vcdtocana 
OMTnwflsB; LoeranescndOMtaM; Oso- 
suna and VaJlndoJld, 11; UehfeL 9. 


- ’ GREEN BAY— Asreed to taenia wWv Chris 
Jartm. kkanr, on 3-vaor caffiraci ex trasto n. 

- KANSAS— Stoned Erik McMfllOIV safStr. 
Waived Tam Ricketts, tortile. Stoned Pete 
Shofelt, linebacker, to Practice 'squad. Re- 
teased Fred Montgom er y, wide recetvw. 
from proeftar Mad. 

LA. RAIDERS— Agreed tatenra With Ed- 
die Anderson safety, and Jeff Jaeger, kicker, 
on 3-vear contnsd m .. Asried. fa ter ms eMi 
Terry McDaiteL arnerbaefc, and Dan TUrib 


4jp because ka 
-| duni 


LA. RAM S Ac ted to terms wBh Anthony 
N e wman safety, on 6yeqr cmRracL 
NEW ORLEANS— Stoned fsrttel Bunt cor- 
nsrtndL 

M.Y. JETS— Agreed ta tarms with Joh nn y 
Johnson, running back. en 2-veor conFeoctax- 
tanaioiL • 

PHOEN IX-Jtoreed totarmswRM Greg Da- 
vH kicker, an 3year contract. .* 
PITTSBURGH— Stoned Carlton Hasatrig: a6 
tensfv* Uneman, to 3vear centracf toOemton. 
- SAN FRANCISCO— Stoned John Taylor, r«- 
raiver, <md Brent Jonat fight end, ta 6yoar 
contract mden sl ons: Met luu I HiiAj oral Dg- 

— ailxMh' Ba^aais ■4L, ■ AnhrJt* TraMm, 

■iiuii Mirancti* uniotuien lasOuv K aipii i anno 

guard, bnd Nate EMMandiw, to 3-Voar 
cunt rad uluiSms mtltolNtoBNIsi 
live end, nd Derrick Dene, sutod, ta 6yoar 
contract extonston.- ' 


gjtioajl efurr,-' 

cccsanly - '■ 

jnm " Hiil^ ‘ ' " 

wedo il 

aBv — * *' " 

mfaiaiai. i- 

drfaied. 1 


pJjyoJlielv'Ji'- - 

wad uncifc!;.' ; - 


SOCCER 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Aston VUIa a Blackburn i 
Evertan a West Ham 1 
Ipswich 1. Liverpool 2 
Manchester United B, Leeds 0 
Newcastle Z Ma n chester aiv 0 
Queens Park Rangers 1. Sheffield Wckndov 7 
Sheffield United Z Oldham 1 
Scwthampton IV Norwich 1 
Swindon- 1, Chelsea 3 
Tottenham L Coventry 2 
Wimbledon 8 Arsenal 3 


BASKETBALL 

National B a skethaB Assoctattop 
CHARLOTTE — Slgnrd Lorenzo WllUams. 
faiwanL 

FOOTBALL 

NaReoal Feotbtol Learn 
CHICAGO— Released Fred Banks, racete- 


S«d JUMPING- ' *.*r 
Resofts Satoroar to the kne w ereirt in k 
Gann lira i rn riiiS r h th en, . Gtstnasy; . L 
Eumt -Brefe-isn, Norway, IK» nisterg-lIT 
meters) 2386 oofeits; Z. Jens Wetaflon.Gen 
many, U04-1T0 ) 23lJ);XTakanoboOVnbe,Ja- ■. 
Ptoi, (1061W] 2X7; 43oraskMrSidwta. CZadi 
Repubiki (1KL5-HJ65) 226Jt;L Andrcox GoHF - - 

berger, Austria; CHD-lX) 2244; 4 LOsMOite- 
sen. Norway. n874045V2Z)Jt (tte), Roberto - . 
C*corv Italy, (»25-IQ6^] 22L5r iJtefciz Kut- 
tia Austria; (ms-tau) 2182; 9,-Mawdidco •• - 
Harada, Japan. (M45-104 j 5)217JI; NV Iftcolas 
Dmemiv France, (975-ioi) 2164 > 

World cap standings (otters events): l, 
WStssflogJOT points BredasatoSSS; LGokF 
barger, 2244; 4 Otatau 245; & Srtiaia, 2S2; 4 
JbiraNiRdkata. Japan, 24SJ7,Ottesen,209;8 


jjj" — il 92> 

i^imiitcalL^r • 
TtaufM^M- •- • 
NFL ewn scr/r-r-. : 
19(9. die .tors---. r .. 
mba rec ::cr“ji r • 
lotadcasK!::-.:- 
dlaM* 

I.WtpJr.a;rj::s 
ptetdea LaM- 
piqedaiiLz.- 
KlcSo. / :2 -.r;. . 

flR*nthi?'j:un« i> - 

M'.-.r.. 

X Bohia.-vtibcy \ . , 

ts said: Wr t’ 

the totijL".;:: V*. 
bp you uers V 
how. bcad-u-b-; . 
®taker and -*c r . - 
■i'" 


Arizona Cl 


CINCINNATI— Stoned David Shula. coach, 
to 2-vear contract e x te ns io n Itiraauh 1996, 
DALLA S A gre e d to terms wttti Trav Alk- 
man. auarterbara. on Hew contract axJ 
Ertk w)(ltau»offaislvetaclde,on 3-vear con- 
tin cy extension. 

DETROIT— Oaknad Melvin JenUia, cor- 
narback. off wal»are. walvad vonipn Tunwr, 
w«t receiver. 


lfl, Roberta Omoii, Itafy, 02. 


ill 


11 1 

11 


CRICKET 




-U I 

U 

1 


. - SECOND TEST 

Australia vs. Sort* Africa, First Day 
sandair, ta Sydney 

South Africa lsl Jnnlnos:- 160-04) ware) 
Austrafia let Imbios: 2M 112 overs) 


74*4;:.^- ... 

J EMPE. Anau _ .. 
Swann drier, * . 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HCNBBES 


KL WSHt T LffiD. ) 
sue . uc / 





2 




. . JWTXHS. MEN SQUHN «KO 

' T ” a y l i xnjwer wtul BW* Saroel t> «v*4 4a»4 - 
mewuET 


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wswe* ' 
a er «m« 

5 DC nj*J 


toVictor y, but Florida state a 

*J11I:.^ jB Iams& Gasp 


- -te? Tff -?KZszZ2l^: : - ' 


': By Dave Scfl ; . ■: : 
- Washington TastSefliieer - " .- 


itiiC89. 


' lacked a 31-yard fidd,gpal ywtb ^'kirow I yras. wrong. wze ; 

’ *222 left in the' Totff&qBartaf to; Tflsofiia} right lethal's tojaco- 
.. - give Notre Dan &* 2A-2t victory , . nario^gairi}-!; woaidi tsqxct yeb-io 
■ over Texas'. A&M in ~to_ Comm bright again? ^ ^ ' . 

‘ Bowl, keeping the Tighting Irish's" - tTHw yww nrfy tbe secood re- 

• bittersweet dtcam^aSvc for a.few ... ^ in <yt the - 

' more hoars beforeixdied. heat thc 

- The crowd of 65^855 Saw fSe lasryeads game. 

I"®?* (1W) strMgle i &fnrday - - T&g year, the Airfraa cooSMsave 
. ssan^ t^^vcnA-rmd^^es W JBdla is i 

. but eventually ngu ffiateehw m 

* their -quest, for a.- ninth; national: 


The Associated 

MIAMI — Florida State and raw »p 0,3 
Coach Bobby Bowden won ihor luC lop £nj 

firei national championship Son- 

, _ ■ x,-__xj* 1 »n The Assod- it* teoms l« IM e*»w 1WJ AP conw * f00 ^ 
dav. finishing No. 1 in 1 ne ASSOO- flB u, w ni, om-tnocx »«n m M orenmwcs. 

ated Press college football poll at- uluuu ncorrii. total *>******"' » **** 
ter beating Nebraska. 18-16, in the 


■‘ZS/Zr 


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ednens, 
•uk!s«s ’ 

"■huenj 

s CroafiE, ' 
^smhotg \ ’ ~ ■ 
craisscutt !' 

a tawa i = 
tevuuea ’ • • 
*d«»w \# 

P- “ 


Lidie ca- 1 •. 

!>«*r j: .. 

^sbk j ■■ 

• ewant 
« am a 
blef anda 

shai 7» \ 

d?*vtm 1 
I 

mir fc:. 

cbizn [- 
3 SOS £ i ■ 

ixinfe [- ■: 

saiiffl p .. 
criattsss f ■. 
: jt\s 2 i on l '' 

; Miami? p". 
:: reran [•'• 


, t a jg n ii ]Hw » i » nn| >.~ — -'.• - ■ _• , ni 3] ^UnmtS whOI OOC 

' . The quest proved vam^howtSer,'':' <ub‘ ' 

■ ^ittfiniiuiioBdg^ld^- " 

: hSfeSi* -| 

, ninked four* -m The Assodaied Holes came out for tteseax^ | 
• -; Press ^polL On >tev. 13, however, L .Jay, J 

thnfrishhnddeftaiedPloKdaState sen wcnt*wn Iwas coH,liaigor ■ 


“.Srttt 

-v*^ - 


K ^-A 

vJA.. 


urnuu luuiui in .uk j im w wwm . . 

Press poH On Nov. 13, however, , .^f. wjtto bs jadc 
flic ftish had defeated Florida State sanweat.mwnlwasi 

-!-_- -«« •■■-- bjl j - 4v » t "u i Salft in tf " tint 


in. Booth 


X car 3 i/iij, uic ur«™™«u me A ffg a iw wuu «ua «*»»* 

tacy fammd the oeve- cC .N<sre ^ thr first ttod-quaitcr dQyp 
name’s altimatdy doomed drum the offense responded wits a 


■ mounted the campaign . stamp. :. ^ A me n had ahothw ihiwin 
* against Honda Stale m .bis post- airiThcmas went owr from 
game news cbnfaence. y . ■_ - .-■ ^ eoe4er kad w^h.6^0 

Holtz, pointed to 1989, when his ^ thW.mjatftt- Nofte pame 

' team was m tibe same atsatkii Fkr> Tnairhw fthe Aggfe Marc "Edwards 
. irU Stnt* m nnw Ncrtre .Dame IM ^AM>iiaMv«nfinnfikir;i21- 


-_jfla. state is nnww..i^Mt .uamy yyynrf fnpmtroa yam ontaw.g 
gmshed 12-1 and Miami 11-U hut 2 ] tie with 3:48 kfi in the dmd. 
yWmiW i AenatioBal champion- T^defenscS!stopp^th^B£^ 
^ becaurehbem : NatreDnn& wifi; 3J5 Wt in th^ga 

“T thmlr whai youTalk ^ajpom a - Notre Dans?* Michad iffller 

'‘-uiaaMl ‘hIimi hui uiilti i v . U»?W lint ■■ — * ■ - J- - mm t IQ utmlc tn.VTVC 


UMtum u*. ‘ “ 

scoredfiomtweymds oifw> Zl- 

21 tie with 3:48 kfl m the dnxd. 

The defenses stcro&l the' Kfteses 
until, widt 3J5 Itft in th^game, 
WnhB r>smV?S Michad MfflCX 1©> 



Orange BowL 

The Samnoks. who came dose to 

winning the title the last ax seasons, 
retained their top ranking when 
their kicker. Scon Bentley, bh a 22- 
yaid field goal with 21 seconds left 
Sanndav nigjit- Then Nebraska s 
Byron Bennai missed a 45-yard 3- 
point attempt on the final play. 
^Florida siaie (12-1) easUy beat 
Notre Dame Ul-U for the utle 
even though the Fighting Irish 
handed the Semin oles their only 
defeat. 31-24. on Nov. 13. 

The Semin oles received 46 or 62 
first-place votes in voting by a na- 
tionwide panel of writers and 
broadcasters. Notre Dame, wmch 
moved up to No. 2 from No. 4. got 
12 first-place votes. 

Honda Sate also won the USA 
Today-CNN coaches' champion- 
ship. The Seminoks received 36 
first-place votes in that poU 11 
more than Notre Dame. 

Bowden said Honda State de- 
served the national title despite its 
loss to Notre Dame. 

I “You need to take the champion 
on the basis of the season, not one 


»,”£=.= with Bcnricv'5 kick. The Seminoles. 
he said. ** And we didn’t lose who have lost two national champi 

5b*e No. 16 team at home." Bos- onsbips when field-goal attempts 

rioht were oenakzed 15 


IM& 


Cart Hmtara'lnwr. 

were Na 1 after Ids field goal with 21 

. . ._n. — wWi W n 


1 • wc do it — historically or hysteur . -s.> ■ \ ^ 4 

• w«f undefeated a comfc years .. 

■ ago" — it was 1984’ r-- _ano-Wtm^^a^wj^ 




ton CoDege, as the Imh did the 
week after beating Honda State. 

Ken DenlingprqfThe Washington 
Post reported from Miami: 

Bcmiey. a freshman who was re- 
cruited for just such a moment, 
kicked his fourth field goal of the 
night to give Horida State its vic- 
tory over previously unbeaten and 
Na 2 Nebraska before an Orange 
Bowl record crowd of 81.536. 


ir-T; 


T 1989»_tbe detCTtninihg-fac tor,’ the J 
> mnmbef .oneiiea6r^™.h^ , 
r- tohead camp^tip^ .^z 
- ak Tn 1989, Noto Damewait jg^. 
H We played nine boM-teamit-WV 

1 'know 

; ■.■■snip ”... 


rent*, airf pfctidh • TheGaio 


On Sunday, Horida moved up to fifth 

ace in the final AP poll and West Virgm- 


whk* also blew a chance for the 1988 hdH^Tthein ^ But 1 couldnW n^TlCevta Knox 

Mti^rftid^vrtlffl Noire Dame ruinedijs |i > 2^7 < ^y^l sec- ^tand was why they kept punchmg me ^ ^ ^ should „. 

undefeated season in the Hcsia BowL The b^ore Dean completed 22 m the stomach. , . Two plays later, Floyd divedmto 

rTr^ m tlv nm- OHU5 pauic . . . . nR.L .t.. ■ wl 7 mutwav tnrnush . j .munt 


— Fans and players streamed onto 

the field but wefe ordered off and a 
rh*> Trtn 2n second put back. A fairly strong 

Hie lOp^rO wind seemed to die a bit and then 

nick up as Bamcu stepped into the 

ball. Triers was tittle doubt ihe ball 
nmmneanlM. teW pohW6B*«Ii»»PCrt»» ft0U ] d be tOO fflT left whOl H gOI 
r o BrjJ-rtocf wo*e JTkwjbS ant oolnl tor S „ frhrirn _ 

BW *™rot fc u-p T ^^«: pv> 3ir £S (a3 second-guessed hmisclf 
i. non an st i«i i2->-« T -™ ’ and his team for gaffes near the 

IZSST'™ S:S IS > end. The first was for not Idling Jc 

4. Auburn u> n-o-3 1<37J 4 dock run to the final seconds be- 

s. FiorMo vi-m mb- « fore sending Bentley oul 

SJ 3 -It’s hard to believe we won to 

a! peno st. io-w i- 374 13 daggone game. Bowden said. Ev- 
il’ '« u ery time l looked up somebody else 

11. o^Tt in i n ii was winning il 

12. Ttmwsse* «■' \ Indeed, Nebraska look to lead 

SUS^"* % « on Bcnbcu’s 27-yard field goal with 

is. Miami im •" J® 69 seconds lefL 

^ S? t9 The Seminoles entered to. game 

ia ucla a-** M 14 as the highest-scoring team in the 

w. ttont i coroiino m ]t couniTV, averaging more than 43 

£;££»”■ « £ S pom^Bullhq^k^'"*™' 

a vir»ifi*o Tech 9 -m f 1 ? a touchdown m to first half, to 

21 aentswi 9-w £ ^ njsi lime this had happened ance 

SSrS a - to W^mi game of Oct 19. 1992. 

Nebraska took a 7-3 lead mid- 

. wav through the second quarter. 
Bentley said that Danny p razjer ^rw behind wideout 

to holder, had said: You beuer ^ j 0 | mson OTCr to middle 
jump in my arms cause you re go- ^ Seminoles strong safety Devin 
ing to make il Bush tipped iL Instead of falling to 

“I just gave him a smile, said ^ ^ ba]) bounded to 

Bentley. “1 was very confident. split end Reggie Baul 

However, the drama did not end yards upfidd and he scoot- 

2K s r» ““ fwa " sard 

^STitad and 1* Florida 
for wcessive edebra^. State offense were kept off balance 
^ Thai helped 17-point underdog most of the secoodi quarter by to 
Nebraska Jetbito jx«ilion for Ben- Gornhuskers. Bat Warddsotoew 

«u_ s 45-yard lick *M. « £ SKfjjKM’ J 

“■Fhe ^lebrations came after Ne- Kez McCorvey and helped set up 

br^'^Xck^nmieFra- to fidd goal that brou^t Honda 

^to<^T29-vard pass to tight State to within 7-6 at halftime, 
end Trumane Bell to to Horida On to first series of to second 
Slate 28. and the clock hit 0:00. half. Ward led a 67-yard drive that 

ended with William Floyd’s dive 
from to 1 toi gave the Seminoles 
a 12-7 lead. 

OH Two Ward passes gave Horida 

State a first down at to Nebraska 
, , 45. Ward ton showed his fastball 

tnow that. I knew that because I kept apai _ a 41-vard across-the- 


Bentley said that Danny Kandl. 
to holder, had said: “You beuer 
jump in my arms 'cause you're go- 
ing to make it." .. 


UHhUlpj •■Mwu ” * - 

sailed right were penalized 15 
yards for excessive celebration. 

That helped 17-point underdog 
Nebraska set into position for Ben- 
nett’s 45-yard kick with one second 

10 "fhe 1 cxlebraiions came after Ne- 
braska’s quarterback, Tommie Fra- 
zier, threw a 29-vard pass to tight 
end Trumane Bell to to Honda 
State 28. and the clock hit 0:00. 


Unbeaten Season Skra 

. , i. , 45. Ward ton showed 

MSKffiSMaeSS SKSS»S5s«S5; aMUStfi 


fcst^B offmsc :io oyer- 


\ (OT 3 - - n — 

Florida TheGaiontwooonNewYeaFsDayfor 

to. firs time ance the 1967 Orange 
ifingin -when Spurrier,' wedo after warning the 
Sort Hdsman Tropby. w thcm to 1 VKtory 

over- over Georgia. iKh. 


Wli&lffi&M i to 




V'/i.j* :■ 


ttWaSStivtoseuaui 

*toiypife«d^oody^ 

WSffiS' 

arfrfetoPMee, Wri^it 
imtal ;S2ryard itoix^j- 
Qators p^,who„won 
tofiKtPto- 7 ..: . 


. over Georgia. T«m MJn 

“AB of us are ready to watt down Boot- 
boriStreet or do something," Spurrier said. sbou j ( 
r ^wsything-aeoned to go our way. 

The Mountaineers did uothmg ri^xi af- w 
ter t aking a 7-0 lead on their first p c ®®*‘ ■, 

. goa S quartobadt ptatoon <4 Jate 

; Krittoer and ItomStu^Il could nm »wt. 

■ stdve to Gators’ defense, wlnle^niraer & 

1 Ca made it along night for Nehkn on his Jg2 
• 584 birthday. .. 

Tbcripss was a spr^ end for Wert Virgin- Wr 


undefeated season ends before halftime. Dean compieieo tz 

Mountaineers were unranked m ™ ^ 37 f or 255 yards. He played to whole 

season pdD, receiving fcwCTWt^ to J^J , h JJ BSe Wtufed, who shared 

Bowling Green, .and only vict ^ 1 “ ' ^ with Dean, had an injured knee. 
Mianriand Boston College to end to sea- tune lw 

sonputtbeminpositionforashotaiNal. Rben scored his second touchdown cm a 

P .. two-vard ran early in to third period, md 


in iaii* jnmr— -* 1- Two plays later, Hoyd dived into 

With to score tied at 7 midwav through ^ ^ Nebraska argued he 

the second quarter, Monty Gtow's hard hit ^rmhleA, but to officials ruled 

forced StudstUl into a wobbly throw that hc - d «pucn into the end zone first. 
Wright intercepted at midfield. Surprisingly, Horida State went for 

to to right and stopped just two points on the conversion, and 
idine, near the West Virginia Ward's pass was batted down. 

1 both teams seemed to think ybe Seminoles increased their 
oat of bounds and stopped, lead ^ 15.7 on a 39-yard Bentley 
dn’L Cdd goal into a strong wind with 


“ftssv. ^^ru o "“ ,dflopped ’ 

• • . , “It was a lot easier to run on them,* i nS iead. the freshman safety spun 3:06 left in the third 1 quarter. 

West Virginia remamed wmom asw^ ^ ^ fdt ^ ^ couldni stop aJOund m dcgrccSi ran back a few yards Frazier completed passes of 15 

me. I was surprised at bow small they took on toward to middle oflbe Odd. and 16 yards to Dixon and reserve 
owL Honda, ujich laAiheSW Bow r p. b]ocks te back ^ milback Lawrence Phillips ran 

royears ago to Notre Dame, sbOTMtmiB . ihc ri^il and ran untouched for a 52-yard twice for 29, including the final 13 

peed all season, setting a Southeastern « Thcy seined to get faugued as we kept ^ That made it 14-7 with for the touchdown that brought to 

Terence record with 472 pom ts. passing he adtoL “I don’t toK 4^ “»» toSoo? quarter- CmSmskers to within 15-1 1 

Wri &, spimiing Ktum put Florid, twin that good of shape, and Tm sure 


he was suing oat 01 oounus auu lead to 15-7 on a J^-yaru pcuuc? 

but Wright didn’L Cdd goal into a strong wind with 

Instead, the freshman safety spun 3:06 left in the third quarter, 
around 360 degrees, ran back a few yards Frazier completed passes of 15 
and took off toward to middle of to Odd. and 16 yards to Dixon ana reserve 
m.v 4 c hi* vmrftl hack to taiiwi l nwrence Phillips ran 








si*- • ••- -•'•csflw?- r - 


•• -rr- -i-crattod up to be.* ddto &c**± 

IS* AswimudTH?r p: ••: ,30^ Sabers sad. , ^ ^ 

1 _ A gz^ia- , _ - ■ -■ A n7rirp> ^ gairieA'ii nieartffe'cf re- 

tDescart ^a^t^fianB, xAitattoat 

ami .year, 8^7; when 

mal Tu *rT«ngMm m^6d__a 51- 

ywds — 

m Satmdagf aftcx A^m»hand«d sufteed/itt Bast three- 

Jtonats.fiist^nW ml -loss season ance 1984.. ^ . . 


au wiy r..’rzzr "£fs, e • t — ^ 

: •• < ^B*»»Tt^ f fryt <ffi pM itm.l5se asrag .. 
' "They dcimMtod'to^ of w™* 
• gg gft and toirdefenseproyod to* 
'./'i^rasc 

'T :Tla: 


• finnblf 




totoan, et^; r tbt5ii4_l 


dated bade 10 


iofa s toiicaflowir m 


a 13-10 lead. 



Wisconsin Conquers 
Pasadena and UCLA 


By Leonard Shapiro 

WaJringtoit Pcu Service 

PASADENA, California — it 
looked and sounded like a home 
game far Wisconsin’s football team. 
So to properly inspired Badgers 
rewarded all those thousands who 
followed thdr paths to glory in to 
Rose Bowl with a 21-16 victory over 
UCLA before a crowd of 101.237. 

The last time Wisconsin played 
in this game 31 years ago. time ran 
out on the Badgers in a frantic 
fourth-quarter rally, and they lost, 
42-37. to Southern Cal- As dark- 
ness descended Saturday nighu it 


five fumbles and an interoeption. 

Tf I had it to do over again, Td 
do it different, yeah,” Cook said in 
to UCLA locker room. “My natu- 
ral reaction should have be® to 
throw to ball out of bounds. 

Wisconsin finish ed the season at 
10-1-1, with to most victories in 
school history. 

The Badgers, ranked 9th, had 
nonetheless been 7-point under- 
dogs 10 UCLA, ranked 14th, and 
had not won a Rose Bowl in three 
previous appearances. But they 
were listed as to home team, wore 
their home uniforms and this ma- 


ness descended Saturday nighu it ■ ^ radium was awash in red 
was UCLA that had no pr®? 01 ^ J from thousands who had traveled 
seconds left when quarterback ^StoiMeanL 


, ia tbe Rose Bowl, 21-16. 


acvuuw -1- 

Wayne Cook made what he.de- 
scribed as “to wrong decision m 

' — .. MmmliU nn lh/> 


ball away from to Wisconsin 
He was hit and dropped from 
behind by Wisconsin defensive tack- 
le Mike Thompson, and time ex- 
pired. Thompson also recovered two 
fumbles on a day when UCLA lost 


and Swiss Advance in Mixed Tennis 


ttearopB 


yards lor Noi 23 


and kick renauor 


- Reuters ■ 

■gags san w!;'— 

gBfa«sy-ga|a& 

riie Swiss meet the top- 
cS’RepubHc; Czechostovafitwon to inaugural event m 




>Hcid- to *» 


Wve school 


first m tojoatwa seaaems. 


Haber had conafcrabk probto. wiihtos«^nito 
“^ W^dndes. Codzcr looked «mfidfi»t from to b£ 


lari uiriCoam-.wn m » rntd. °f 15 sow: 

? B,dl oppoI1 fto 


him a 4-6, H 7J victoty. • 



Gffi Wood/ A*** Funtt-Pns* 

to Fictou Swid«j «™r Son* AWm's Amarf* Coefter. 


west with their team. 

In this atmosphere, UCLA com- 
mitted those six turnovers —a sea- 


receiver J. J. Siokes, who broke 
Rose Bowl records with 14 recep- 
tions for 174 yards. 

Wisconsin used its brutish run- 
ning game to full advantage, paroc- 
ularly junior tailback Brent Moss, 
who gained 158 yards in 36 carries 

and scored two touchdowns. 

Trailing 21-10, to Bruins got the 
ball with 6:23 left and draw 90 
yards in 15 plays before Cook 
found Mike Nguyen in to end 
zone with a five-yard touchdown 
pass. The Bruins tried and faued 
for to two-pcint converse. 

The Badgers then put to game 
in Moss’s hands trying to kill to 
dock. In his first four cames, Moss 
gained 31 yards out to to Wisam- 
sin44. But on third and one, be was 
stopped short of a first down. 

With 1:51 left to play, Sam Vet s 
punt traveled 35 yards but was re- 
turned 17 yards by Paul Guidry to 
to UCLA 38. The Bnrins took over, 
and Wisconsin’s coach, Barry Alva- 
rez, admitted “my bean was in my 
throat” as Cot* moved his team 
methodically down field. 

On third and 10 alto Wisconsin 
36 with 25 seconds left, be passed 
for 18 yards to Stokes for a first 
down at to Badger 18. 

The dock was stopped with 15 
seconds remaining to move to 
fhains Tor a first down, and Code 
had several options, according to 
Co ach Terry Donahue. He was to 
look to to aid zone or, if his re- 
ceivers were covered, could have 
thrown to ball om of bounds or 
into to ground to kill to clock. 
Instead, Cook inexplicably took 

off whm to pocket caved in around 
_i him and was dragged down. 


















;e 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 1994' 








Hedging Their Bets Through the Stars 


Imemirional Herat] Tribune 

Tj ARJS — If even the news pundits are less inclined 
*■ jisbl now to plunge into predictions for 1994 than to 
nasb over what went so wrong in 1993 . no one can blame 
France's astrologers for hedging with equal sIrilL Only in 
good times do people want to read about future calamities 
and t rials. 

This year the 34,000 astrologers of France counsel 
patience and prudence not only for their clients but 
apparently for themselves. The famous Madame Soleti 


MARY BUIME 


writes in France- Dimanctie that she has "relentlessly 
studied the charts and palpated the planets to learn their 
positions and trajectories." And no doubt she has, but 
with what pawky results. She does say that those bom 
under the sign of Aries the ram will know nothing but love 
and joy in March and April, but presumably only with 
other rams since other signs have either vague promises 
(Taurus: “1994 will be full of surprises”; or other concerns 
(Gemini's March will be rough and the springtime too 
agitated to give a thought to amorous rams). 

Some magazines evade the issue with articles not strictly 
connected to the stars. “Holiday Test: Are You a Good 
Host?” asks the cover of Vous ei Voire Avenir, although 
by now most readers only want to face that question 
through an ice bag's veil. 

“Astrology and Depression: A Remedy” claims Horo 


Mag, but the article, after warning about Neptune's effect 
cm the i 


i ego, admits that astrology cannot cure depression 
but only warn of its approach. 

Approach? It's already here on a worldwide scale, with 
unemployment, warfare, death and destruction at unf ore- 
levels. No i 


seen 


one over the age of 8 can face 1994 with 
equanimity and no longer can French astrologers comfort- 
ably predict disasters in distant lands because CNN will 
bring them into every living room. 

Things are at such a pass that no astrologer in his or her 
right mind would hazard a prediction on Britain’s royal 
family, although Monaco's princely one continues to tick- 
le the planets ever so slightly (Princess Caroline and 
Vincent Lindon will discreetly join their destinies and 
Princess Stephanie will have another baby. No news of 
Prince Albert.) 

For ordinary people, here is what Astres magazine has 



ftehe Ajcfaj/CHT 


to say about today, Jan. 3. Aries should stop feeling guilty 

peer die crab 


at work, Taurus will have creative ideas, Cancer 
wants to come oul of its shell An unexpected sum of 
money will put Leo in a good mood, Virgo should ease the 
apron strings, Gemini's life needs a bit of spice and 
Scorpio should break loose briefly. Sagittarius might have 
work problems because of instability, while Libra will 
have them at home. Capricorn should leave the beaten 
path. Watch out Aquarius, you may catch cold, and be 
patient with your partner's views, Pisces, even if they don't 
agree with your own. 

Feeble sniff, but who wants to face reality on the first 
working day of the new year? It's not a year of very lovable 
planets either. Uranus, formerly called Herschd, is taking 
over from Neptune and Uranus is considered by some to 
be distinctly malefic. 

Neptune; another bad die, has been in cahoots with 
Uranus since 1993 and will re main so for about 172 years, 
says astrologer Dan Martin in Astres, so no wonder we all 
have headaches. One might hope. Mr. Marlin wistfully 


adds, that in 1994 people will take better care rtf each 
other, but Jupiter will put the kibosh on thaL 

What does all this mean to Francis Mitterrand? Well 
writes Bernadette Aubin, he will keep his job and do better 
in public opinion polls, but few of her colleagues agree. 
Chris de Bergue confides that Helmut Kohl faces prob- 
lems in the coming German election and adds that Ameri- 
cans will have difficulty in understanding President Clin- 
ton's foreign policy. Boris Yeltsin is in fora rough ride, the 
seers say, and Madame Benares in Astres hedges her bets 
by predicting unspecified natural catastrophes in uniden- 
tified places in late winter. No one sees peace in the former 
Yugoslavia. 

French real estate and the stock market will do better in 
1 994. says Jean Caro, seeing his country as headed toward 
the end of a metaphorical tunnel (none of the astrologers 
is so foolish as to hazard a guess on whether the real 
tunnel, under the Channel, wriD open in May as planned). 

European astrology has been traced to Mesopotamia. 
The Greeks only started believing in it when their civiliza- 
tions was in decline; the practical Romans fell for it 
utterly. 

The reason early Christians disapproved of astrology 
was because it was regarded as science and science was 
imm oral, the late Louis MacNeice wrote in a study of the 
subject- By the late 12th century astrology was again 
acceptable. Martin Luther wrote the preface to a book by 
a prominent stargazer. 


Kepler practiced astrology, so did Galileo i 


the 
Doug 

life for his patron who died shortly after receiving it). 

In the 18th century, Newton having made the universe 
in to a machine that worked, astrology was not needed but 
survived at the popular level In the 19th century, with the 
swing away from the rationalistic universe; h thrived 
again. 

In our own times, everyone knows astrology is nonsense 
and everyone knows his or her own birth sign. The Nazis 
banned astrologers, the British had an official government 
astrologer in World War IL Animals, plants, historical 
periods and cities have been given astrological signs. The 
U.S.A. is under G emini, Portugal is Pisces. Jerusalem and 
Paris are Virgo, Hamburg Aquarius, London Gemini. 

In Paris (Virgo is earthy, mutable, sharp-tongued and 
keen-eyed) there are more than 6,000 astrologers and they 
thrive m hard times. Although they need not fear unem- 
ployment, something in the orbs, cusps, aspects and trines 
has told them to cm their fees. Maria Gamine, for exam- 
ple. whose advertisement says she foretold trouble for 
Michael Jackson, floods in southern France and the 
deaths of Garbo and Ajdetty (age 84 and 94, respectively), 
is offering a 50 percent reduction to clients by correspon- 
dence. For 350 francs (about S60), credit cards accepted, 
the customer not only gets a personalized chart but a 
magnetized object to attract good luck throughout 1994. 


Mea Culpa: A Clean Slate for '94 


By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON — Experts who wallow in the 
admission of error erode the credibility of their 
mavenhood. But in a doubt-defying fea t of clay, let me 
rid my conscience of the most egregious of my last 
year’s language gaffes. In both my language commits 
and my polmcafessays, soas to start the year with a 
dean slate; (Thereby to would be better man so as to, 
but for some reason thereby has acquired an overly 
formal connotation, Eke albeit.) 


Em good at history, though. In compact^ Boris. 
Ydtsm’srekaitiess pressure on a (kfiant padjament to 
Oliver Cromweffs blast at legislators nnwfflmg to oam- 
mit regrade —“It is not fit tharyou should sit here any 


t.-'i 


When President Clinton spokcof- “people that are 
different than we are,” I popped him lightly on the use 
of different dum, which is not as strong a differentiation 
as different from, but then went on to suggest fixing the 
end with “people who are different from oursehex.” 


Lyle W. Sparks erf Chicago thought that was an 
overnice use of the reflexive ourselves. “Examples of 
the proper use of the emphatic or reflexive ourselves," 
be writes, “are ‘We ourselves have committed gram- 
matical error’ and *For the post of language guru, we 
nominate ourselves/ ” 


it and I should 

use “people who are different from us.' 

Whatever happened to Surma-Shave T I asked in 
<me of my nostalgic moods. “For that m att er, whatev- 
er happened to BurmaT George Meredith of Red 
Bank, New Jersey, wondered: “Wbatcvcx the differ- 
ence between whatever and what ever, what ever hap- 
pened to parole who knew the difference? All gone to 
Myanmaf?” That’s the new name of Banna, adopted 
in June 1989. 1 just checked with the spokesman for 
Myanmar, who says, “Burma was the name given to 
the country fay British colonialists in 1885. Toe Bur- 
mese make up 85 percent of the population, but there 
are 135 nationalities in our country, and the name 
Myanmar represents everyone, not just the Burmese." 

On whatever, both Memam-Webster and Webster’s 
New WraM Dictionaries report that one word fits aQ, 
but it seems to me that Meredith has a pome when used 
in a question, the interrogative pronoun and intensifier 
should be two words, what ever. The meaning is wholly 
different from the adjective whatever, as in “whatever 
name the dictator of Burma prefers”; -whatever the 
dictionaries say, use the single word in its additional 
sense of “no matter whaL” (Whatever happened to the 
gp qnCTfia) signs along the road that advertised Bnnna- 
Siave in doggerel? Ire shaving cream is gone, the signs 
are gone, and the roads have boat replaced by interstate 
highways, freeways, whatever.) 

Bark to mere obvious mistakes. “Only by buBdinga 
floating majority," I wrote with political prescience, 
could the president “build the momentum ... to 
overcrane his bite noir, gridlock.” To which Ihor 
Sevcenko, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine 


IcDgerT — - 1 noted, Tri the ensuing Tridcte Rag*’ a: 
Cromweffian cokxtd arrested 96 rdnetant legislators, 
leaving aTump Padtamenf to hang the Kmg.". 

Wron^y executed, “Wbai Charles I wdked out otc 
of the oversized windows,” crarectedTony^tmttroof 
Bay Shore, New YaA, “ratio a hastily erected walk- 
way and platform — which oyerioofeecf Whitehall — it 
was to lose Ins head rather than hang.” Royalty gets 
decapitated, not hanged. 

For a reason hanng orify to do with fhmh&JH 
fingers, I^redicied. a greWLfttiure for “PC-ROM* 

computer savvy” instructs Andy 
bureau chief and cohimnist for Ckamiwspapera, “note 
that PC-ROM is an. acronym for Tenoral Computer 
Read-Only Memory/ Meet often* tbereefams seated 
as the machine's BIOS, which stands fra ‘Baric Inpmt- 
Output System.’ The BIOS is the gizmo that sets things 
up wteri you hit tire ‘On.’ switch. 

“Since PC-ROM has been around formorethan a 
decade; eons in com pute r d om," Glass cantinnerin his 
snazzy Ultrashadow foot, *T am sure CD-ROM is 
what yon reaDy had in jrand whesn you rrfcxrcdtoThe 
new world of PC-ROM* in noting the. growing interest 
in multimedia systems. CD-ROM stands for “Com- 
pact Disk Read-Only Memray/’V 

Yeah, and “read only” means you can’t write to the 
disk, at least not this week. I am correcting this error 
lest ay wades be immortalized on CD-ROM and 
couf use some android reading it in theinture; 



ffussew -Y l ' 




V - 


’In apkatpafactoids, bits of conjecture or tmsmfor- 
mation masquerading as facts; I described Spocfc of the 
infinitive-spiriting television series “Star Trekf’ as an 
android, an automaton who was similar to a human but 
not the same; This was by way of giving the woid on, 
-aid. a combining form to denote spurious sameness. 

"The ‘StarTrer character you cit ed, as Spo ok's fans 
know,” wrote B race Goldman of Rj dnnoa t fr Tshalf 

hmtiati gud half Vulcan — -but natur al.’— i q frVin g 

him a humanoid, something like but hot. quite a hu- 
man* Commander Data, Trim ‘Star Trek: The Next 
Generation,’ is an android. So when you wrote; ‘An 
android is very Him a human being but is as automa- 
ton, ’ you published an a — ‘ — - J 
like but not quite a real 


- . j 

r.i» 

’■:i 


IS 


when 


army 


History and Literature Emeritus at Harvard, respond- 
ed, “Keep 


an eye on your proofreader." 

This had me scratching my head until an “Oh, no!" 
came in from Evangeline Bruce of Washington with 
“How could you make the bite masculine?" The black 
beast is la bite noire. (Proofreaders expecting arcane 
wordplay in my copy occasionally say to themselves, 
“This is so obviously wrong that it must be one of his 
verbal stunts, and rd better leave it as is so nobody 
can accuse me of not getting the joke.") 


feeding on demand. A proofreader was gutsy enough 
to boldly go where no proofreader had ever gone 
before, saving me on the honorific before the mistake 
could hit print; he assumed I knew this — no parent or 
couch potato could possibly confuse Dr. Spook with 
Spock — but was slyly testing him. '•'"- 

New York Timer Service ■' ' - 


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mTCRIV ATION AL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Fage -9 


A Newt* 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


PARIS— P - 
irialittd nj:t 

cousideribic r» ‘ * 
wnUeo’nor •'!: 
view of the * 1 - 
fashicn 


Europe 


Todre 


Tomorrow 


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Hlgtl 

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car 

CJF 

Algam 

16/91 

11/52 

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1366 

9/40 PC 

^ ’roli-irtom 

6/43 

4/39 

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6 '43 

205 all 

Lrfara 

307 

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Bh 

3/3? 


AOwra 

12/53 

•3/43 


14/57 

9/4B pc 

Btralnv 

16/61 

9/48 


1305 

409 pc 

Bovjradf 

307 

-lOI 

c 

8/43 

104 in 

Berfan 

5.41 

104 

c 

409 

209 c 

Btuwph 

9/43 

3/37 

r 

0/41 

104 ^ 

Budnpcnt 

205 

-1/31 

V\ 

307 

002 sb 


205 

•1/31 


307 

lOi an 

CkuMScI 

IB/64 

*102 


14/5? 

8/46 pc 

Dublin 

7/44 



7/44 


Edrtmh 

7/44 

6/43 

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7/4* 

409 » 

Rorence 

1152 

7/44 

nh 

11/52 

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FranUun 

205 

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403 

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6«43 

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5/41 

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■2/29 

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taaribul 

7/44 

3/37 

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9/48 

8/43 pc 


;4.75 

14/57 

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23/73 

1569 a 

Lobon 

13.65 

3/48 

6tl 

12*53 

0/<8 pc 

LordcKi 

11/52 

6'43 

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Madrrf 

13/55 

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Bh 

7/44 

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6 '43 

409 

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7/44 

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Moscow 

■2/29 

-8/10 

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Mundi 

409 

104 

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r*w 

14/57 

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11*55 

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Q-Jo 

-6.22 

-14/7 


■203 

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Palma 

14/57 

11/5* 


11/52 

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Poo 

14/57 

D/46 

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7/44 

002 r 


205 

■2/27 

in 

409 

■307 pc 


1/34 

■2.79 


205 

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14/6.7 

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14/57 

5/41 ob 

Si /■■imhij 

-7/20 

-11/13 

c 

-5/24 

11/13 c 

SexrtBftri 

■1/31 

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9/32 


Sirasbotoy 

5'4I 

307 

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5/41 

209 di 

T«5rtn 

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-7.70 


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Voracv 

8/46 

5/41 

fib 

9/48 

2/35 ih 

Vrarra 

7M4 

002 

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4/39 

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Warson 

104 

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Ijjncn 

4/39 

205 

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409 

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Oceania 

AucL/and 

25/77 

10/61 

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25/77 

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27/00 

1864 

s 

28/82 

10/54 pc 


Forecast lor Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 



m 

5(0 *%> 

B^jU/woreoiwblyr F773 UnsMierafaV kXVjHamr 

Mm Kldcow 



North America 
A Storm with wind-blown 
snows, coastal rains and 


gales will lash Virginia 


through Now England lues- 
day. then Atlantic Canada 
Wednesday Windswept rain 
win wei much ot the Pacific 
coast Tuesday, maybe Los 
Angeles Wednesday. The 
MiOwest will bo cold wllh 
some Great LaVe snows. 


Europe 

Bouis of strong wind and 
ram will sweep m trom the 
Atlantic hitting Portugal. 
Spain. France, Germany, 
Belgium, Netherlands and 
U.K. Thera wil be Smiled dry 
weather as wall. Italy will 
have a few showers, then 


maybe heavtj rains Thurs- 


day. Pans of Scandinavia 
will be snowy. 


Asia 

Beijing through Korea will be 
chlly with kttie ram or snow. 
Shanghai, Hong Kong and 
Taiwan wllf have cetffed. 
partly sunny weather. In 
much of Japan, II will bo 
cool, maybe with a few 
showers Thursday. The 
north «ffl be cold and snowy. 
In Jakarta and Smqaoore. a 
may downpour eo«m day 


Middle East 


Latin America 


BoM 

C are 


Today 

Wgh Low W M0i Low W 

OF CIF OF OF 

Bueno* tow 29W IBM l 3109 20*8 pc 

Caracas RW 24ns pc 29194 J4/75 pc 

Law 34/73 niBB pc 25*77 30 *8 pc 

MmrCI) 21*70 fl/43 c ?2m 6/43 pc 

RtadaJonare 30W 23/73 I 3098 23/73 pc 

Santago 28/79 9/48 a 26/79 1102 pc 

Logand: asunny. popart^ doudy. c-ciouCy. sh-shoi»gs. i-frunaeiaomi s . r-ram. al-snow lurrtes. 
sn-snow, l ice, W-Wealhef. All maps, toracants wid data provided by Accu-Weather, Inc. O 1994 


Jmcuian 
I lima 
Riyadh 


Today 

High LOW w High Low W 

OF GIF OF OF 

IT'S? 12-63 c 17162 12/63 c 

18*81 ID/50 PC 19.68 11/62 pc 

12S3 JW pc 13«f 5/41 c 

13/55 8/46 pc 13.-65 9-46 e 

23*73 3*37 * 74/75 9-46 1 

27180 13*55 a 27/80 11162 * 


Asia 


Train 


Tomorrow 



LOW 

W 

Hf®h 

Low W 


OF 

CJF 


OF 

OF 

BreghA 

3269 

23/73 


31/88 

22/71 c 


307 

-10.15 

* 

2T3S 

-7*20 a 

HoioKono 

19*69 

14/57 


3om 

1509 s 

Mmtta 

3263 

21/70 


32*69 

22/71 pc 


24*75 

11.52 


24/75 

io/50 a 


40? 

■BOB 


3/37 

-8/10 a 

Shancbal 

3*48 

174 


11/52 

705 8 


2962 

24/75 

* 28/82 

24/75 ah 

T>«pm 

33.73 

13*55 

c 

2303 

13/55 pc 

To^yo 

1162 

5/41 

■H 

11.52 

-lOi e 

Africa 

Mjm 

1762 

12/53 PC 

18*1 

10*0 d* 

CwTow 

25/77 

1661 

» 

29/84 

1864 9 

w«™ 

2068 

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p 

17*2 

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Hurar 

24/75 

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Tins 

57/62 

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a 

2068 

8/46 C 

North America 

tochorapi 

-a-22 

-136 

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-6/22 

-15* C 

Mania 

TtAA 

-1131 

f 

9/48 

-1/31 c 

Bowon 

•1-31 

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c 

2*35 

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Cbfcigo 

-* 25 

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-4/25 

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Dcmrer 

13*53 

-229 


13-» 


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-5.04 

-8/lB 

sn 

-3/77 

-11/13 e 

HrrxMc 

26-79 

1066 

ft 

27*0 

2066 pc 

Hciracn 

1762 

3/37 

A 

21/70 

7/M a 

LmAivr^a 

2609 

11.52 

A 

2068 

0/48 pc 

Mdm 

26.79 

14/57 

r 

22/71 

10*0 a 

MkTTwrorfi 

-e*19 

-14/7 

ft 

■7/20 

■12/11 pc 

Mwwl 

■14.7 

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c 

-H/1B 

■19/-? OT 

rLoaai 

27/80 

2068 

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1068 pc 

MrwVcrt 

tror 

•327 

c 

212 5 

-5 Of sn 

Runw 

S3 >73 

9/48 

» 

24/75 

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13/55 

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7/44 

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T wtn 

.7/29 

■9/15 

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6*32 

■299 

an 

205 

-4/25 m 


- ACROSS 

i Gore’s" in 

the Balance" 

• One who’s 
"agm'it 

io Train unit 
— Without 
Windows' ('64 
song) 

14 Supermarket 
meat label 

15 Territory 

16 Major Bowes 
updated? 


13 


iaFat 

19 Home on the 
range 

20 Kind of signal 

21 PartoISEATO 

22 Mail HO 

23 Breakfast order 

25 Lift up 

29 Woodworker's 
choice 

32 Belgian airline 

34 Bests 

3a Hemingway 
opus 


Solution to Pmzle of Dec. 30 



41 Dub again 

42 Took ten 

43 Ingenious 

45 Shows remorse 

46 Up 

50 Marinaro and 
others 

52 Slough 

53 Reckon 
56 Bosom 

companions 

60 "Remember the 
neediest,' e.g. 

61 Olympia 
Dukakis film 

63 Fast time 

64 Capri, tor one 

65 Misrepresent 

66 Pupil's place 

67 African lake 

68 Volvo worker 


DOWN 


□asms □□aaaa 
HDDiQnnnntiaiicia 
qqqqqq inaaBa 
man □aganiua 
□Baca Emm hq a aaa 

□H1BSH □□□□ 
□OIUHDaLJQClQaUHQQ 
□□HutiuaaniuBiiaLJ 
□ □[tiSQH U 13 E 3 UIJIJ 


1 Bridge seat 

2 Comic Johnson 

3 Imitation 
morocco 

4Cnnlw7ong 

5 Pinafore 

6 Cononwoods 

7 Grammy. 
winning pianist 


a Yacht heading 
o Person of .will 

10 1929 event 

11 High nest 

12 -M'A'S'H" 
character 

16 "Too bad!" 
irParaspsy- 
chofogy study 
22 Authentic 

24 Singing sisters 

25 D.C. zone 
20 Comic Ben 

27 Have — in 
one's bonnet 

28 Probe 
3oFlatsign7 
31 Vienna is its 

cap 

33 In opposition to 
one another 

35 River to the 
Seine 

36 Town near 
Padua 

37 Osmose 

39 Mel mack ion of 
TV 

40 60s org. 

44 Craved 

48 With room to 
spare 

47 "Little Orphan! 
Annie" poet 


6 New York Tones Edited by Will Shorn, 



5~ 

5 


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The rex-’- 
ts. Western 
deep couisi’. : ■ 
1995 Aisto f.; 


Chinas A: 


\ , 


KONG Ki -v., - 

frng of Chins ■ : • 
fiqing woulii . 
IW from i. : • 

outside %,ytic 
. Mr. Li indici.i.: 
umovatioas tr?.-: v. 

eipeoj;. ' 

carefully. 


4sGoodnighr girt a Southeast 
49 Pants part Kansas town 

si — Plaines «VVteh’s 

54 Deluxe or Golden, e.g. 


58 Tart 


so Ball .. - 

[arcade gaime) 

02 Kitchen mess. 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ABST Access Numbers 
How to call around the workL . 

L Using the chan below, find the counuy you are calling from. 

1 Dial the corresponding AIKT Access Number. 

5- An AECr EngUsh-spealdng Operaior or voice prompt will ask for the pihone number you wish to call or oonnoctyou to a 
cuscotner savice repsesentadve. 

To roedve your free^ waBet card of MS9b Access Number^ lost dfof theaccess numberof 
the coumryyoirte in and a* fra Qsnnicr Service. 



Imagine a world u-here you can call countn- to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the L'.S. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 
language, since it's translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they 1 !! get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AIST. : 

To use these services, dial the ASET Access Number of the country you're in and you'll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your AUS3" Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an AIXT Calling Card or you’d like more information on ATST gioba! sen-ices, just call us using the 


convenient Access Numbers on your right. 



COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA 


Hungary* 

ooa-sooomi 

Australia 

0014-882-011 

2cdand*u 

999*001 

China, PH t>o^ 

10811 

Ireland 

1-800-550-000 

Guam 

018-672 

Italy* 

172-1011 

HoogKoog 

800-1111 

T 1* uTiiiiM ..irfiale »T * 

15500-11 

lndia» 

000-117 

Urlm^nf— 

8al96 

Indonesia* 

00-801-10 

Lintmbourg 

0#»0111 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Monaco* 

19*0011 

Korea 

000-11 

Netbcria oda* 

06-022-9111 

Korea** 

IV 

Norway* 

800-190-11 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

Poland**** 

0*010-4800111 

Xmv Zealand 

0009U 

POrtugaf 

05017-1-288 

Philippines' 

105-11 

Romania 

01-8004288 

SmsIar^Moscow} 

155-5042 

Slovakia 

0042000101 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Spain 

900-9900-11 

Singapore 

8000111-111 

Sweden* 

020-795-611 

Sri tanka 

430-130 

Switzerland* 

15500-11 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

ux 

0500-890011 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1111 

MIDDLE EAST 

EUROPE 

Bahrain 

800-001 

Armenia*" 

8a14111 

Egypt* (Odro) 

5100200 

Austria—* 

022-903611 

1 newel 

177-100-2727 

Belgium* 

078-11-0010 

Kuwait 

900-288 

Bulgaria 

00-18000010 

Trbanon(Beirot) 

426-801 

Croatia** 

99680013 

Saudi Arabia 

1-800-100 

Cyprus* 

080-90010 

Itiiiey* 

00800-12277 

QcchBep 

00-42000101 

AMERICAS 

Denmark* 

80010010 

Argentina* 

001-800-200-1111 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

BriiW* 

555 

France 

19aOOU 

BoUvla* 

0-800-1111 

Germany 

01300010 

Brazil 

000-8010 

Greece* 

00-800-1311 

Chile 

OOa-0312 


980-11-0010 


114/ - 






190 ... . 


165 


Honduras’* ’ 


Mextooaa* 

958004624240.- . 7 

Nicaragua GManagoa) 174 .’. .. | 

Panama* 

109 

Pent* 

' ■ ■ ■ '• 

Uruguay 

(KW410 

Venezuela** 

804)11-120: 

CARIBBEAN , - ; f 

Uafcgmttf 

l-80O«72-288t. . - J 

Bermuda? 

1-80O872386L- | 


C=rr BririshVl 


1-800-872-2881 


Cayman isianrk 


i-800-872-2831': 


1-800-872-2881 


HahT 


001^00-972-28®^ 


: 0-80»872^88X ;v ^ 
001-e00«72-28« v 


AFRICA 


1-800- 872-2881^ ;'. 


OOtoOOUV 


Gstnbhe 


OOfft,-/ 


0800-10. '7 




101-1992^- 


0800-890-1 


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