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INTERNATIONAL 



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BLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK 


TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris Seeks Military Steps Against Serbs 
And Witt Raise Issue at NATO Summit 

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By Alan Riding 

' ■T'. v ‘ .T^'ffai-'Tirt 7&iaS«r»I« 

. /.PARIS'-^ Determined tbal the war in the 
[oimer Yugoslavia should not be overlooked at 
- ■ tfr^-~N ATU.summit meeting in Brussels ami 
M o^foy , France is pressing the United States 
toTflin Western Europe in a more direct inffi- 
W^tervenuon in Bosnia- Herzegovina. - 

ymnr French officials taye specially 
urged tbe United Slates to hdp relieve Serbian 
THtaBurc on the Muslim endaves of Train and 
Scbietfca. But they have also warned Wash- 
mEton that tta credibiBty of the United Na- 
trota amHta North Atlantic Treaty Organnar 
fion is increasingly at stake in Bosnia. 


at nato Summit . . 

; Biir while Britain amdCanada taw recrauy ■ .- ... L ; i : . • ^ 

warned that they may soon withdraw troops W.: .-.-x - :>V 

ihev have assigned to tta peacekeeping force, i- ' •' ^ ^ 


mccuuft,- mo . 

officials sma,_rrcsuKm 
and Prime Minister Edouard Balladur intend to 
raise the issue wbetr they me« with President 
Bill . Clin too, and other NATO leaders next 

•week. - . 

•'• r -VewiD ask the United Stales to intervene 
: r aniheh>«s so that lids war does not attend to 
- the south of Europe and throixgjiout Ae. Bal- 
r tans," DrfenstfMinister Franks i-^oterdsajd 
Monday, echoing new French alarm about the 
-.deterwraiion of the situaiiph m Bosnia. . 

Forrish Minister Aim Juppe said ii ; was 
esscaitmfor the United Nations role to he 
- enforced and better defined. He also 

die view Oneral Jean CoU the French offi- 
l.'^cerwho 


warned that they may soon 
They have assigned to tta peacekeeping force, 
France is now playing down repots that it 
might poll oiit its 6.000 soldiers. 

' *No F one would understand rf we were to 

-leave Sarajevo nowjn win tet, '’Mr. Juppesaia. 

Nonethdess, for the fhsi hmc ^ many 
months. France seems cag» 

United States again in a oon ftat .ihat t he Clin- 

Washington** UN 1 wwoy, 

Ottilia that tt could lace sanedons. r^e 2. 
too administration was tappy to treat « a 

ington wfll take ona fergerrtde 

Th_ nntch foretell manster, wler frocy 

,BC that he and die Dutch 


Ss^^SSS 

problem that affected the enure Atlantic alb- 

Ukdy toaccepi ag»* 
if assured jtown^forces 
wmld oartidpate in a peacefcttpmg , fon» 

symbota^^^ 1 *. 

"for the United Natrons role to be ^ajaro pressure tx* detorrenr “f” « 
d and better defined. He also, tadorsed aggressors," he said. “Ttaiwus ita messag 
of General Jean Cot, «he French effi- gj^ta President Clmion. M 
who cammands United Nations troops m Mr. Kooytnans said ttai Mr. Ornton 

former Yugoslavia, that the force, was ffl-' See BOSNIA* Page 2 . 

equipped to act effectivdy. 





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TOKYO —The entertainment * 

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MCA Inc. will build a 

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Ptaeuic Industrial Co ^ which is based m-Usaxa. 
KdSa, tta world's largest cowamer _e'j£ 
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foreign corporation. 


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Russia Warns 
Of Dangers if 
NATO Grows 
Eastward 

LUhuania’s Bid to Join 
Sets Off Moscow’s Fears 
Of Regional Instability 

Bv Celestine Bohlen 

Y.iH. Tirt*.-. SiTl.tr 

MOSCOW — Russia 100 k sharp excepnon 
1 w-dnesda' to an unexpected request h. 
Lilh^a^join NATO. »arnin| ibalM^ 

P" t -“nimble 

oiihiao and eirrlian 

‘Tlto.^airdaa Brazanakas of Lidmania 
ao^reed a fdhnal request r “ 

MATO durias a televised address iucsuu 
nighu making the Baltic nauon the *“«d 
former Communis. Male after Atoua ,o seek 
place in the Western military alliance. 

P The reaction from Moscow was swift and 
negative. President Boris N. 

S. Vvacheslav Kostikov . warn^W^n^v 

that anv moves to expand the North Allan 11 
Trlw Organization could “tngger pUtaiy- 
nolitiral destabilization in the region. 

~The president of Russia is concerned over 
the te ndency of expanding the bloc. Mr. Kus- 

Cfintoo points out a lack of agreemem m 

Europe on N ATO expansion. Page 2- 

.jtov said “Promotion of such a tendency 
would contradict the proclaimed intentions to 
build relations on principle of trust, partner- 
shin and balance of forces. 

^Lithuania's bid and Russia's wPJSrfS 
^.KmTf^ci European countries stepped up 

ajs^sysadi^^ d 

SlS'm S£| Ul '» 

SJta'tft SSr Sulmaiionai- 
" ZWrinovsk, scored ms (mpres- 

diplomats in turn have contended 

jMrr-p- 3“ 

ordy s&rengtben the tand of 
by giving them proof of the West s enoas 

isolate Russia. _ . 

Two U.S. senators. Sam Nunn.Demo^t of 

*fflSS£*5i 

B, TtaUniied States, looking for ways to tal- 
75E& former Warsaw Pact wunuies. wtth- 

a ^SSS£.'SS?>SSS i. (he pres- 

bv Moscow, but dismissed by some East bur 
n’ean leaders as unsatisfactory. 
v 1 iihuania's formal bid to join NATO came 
^5S«» i(s (WO Bailie neghhors. 

d^e 

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a more cooperative relauonship «* Moscow 

See NATO, Page 2 


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Car Gadgets Crowd Out an Old Standby 

even use this thing.' " s£ 


By James Bennet 

York Tima Service 

car since the days at jHl^She an additional cup holder, 

heads over 'the Huk^mpar^L mosi people don’t 

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there are plenty, oi nuiuL, - — 

gum. Sorry, still no trash . d compactors. 

* taS5 and 

See ASHES, Page 11 


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be unable 10 adimnister the uudienn. 

U worked. HalT the students in the coarse did 
attend class the taxi d w, and 
' . sS have hoi found out who sent the message- 
: Dartmouth' bias one of the Toost i rim 
computer networks in Ammrar igj 
tiou-AD freshmen are required to buy a Mann 


tosh computer, and all enpm ■ ^ 

clwhng donmtories. are wired ^ 

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See COMPUTE, Page 3 


Georgian Rebel 
Shun, His Wife 
CattsItSukide 

By Lee Hocks tader 

UVtiJiiagrnft Pnrf Stn-n r 

MOSCOW — Zviad K. Gamsakhurdia, ita 
rw GMto> nalionalisl wko tore* 

SSSSSgsSS 

surrounded by Georgian troops, his «ue «uu 

W M?' G^«ikhuKiia'swife. Mta^na sp^ 

in the southern R ^^ f nl >2 S^’ weftS 
husband killed himself D«- 31 m we^em 

Georgia after being trapped by his enemies. 
TSS"» Ministry. quolin B in- 

sSaSasjtfSftSs 

rdiT^s ^ 

reame in Georgia. 

The press service did not say how Mr. Gam- 
sakhurdia had killed himself. 

Mr. Gamsakhurdia, 54. tad a career 

that flourished, fizzled and finally 
span of barely three years. The “ n °[ 
Greta’s best-known writers, he gained re- 
Sas a dissident in the late Soviet as. ime 
Shis country’s first elected president after 
independence in 1991 and notoneiy asa de- 
p^Ueader who sought 10 P° wer b - 
violence last year. 

His biueresL enemy was the current Georgian 
president. Eduard A- Shevardnadze wtasuc- 
oeeded him as leader of Georgia. Mr.Gjn»ak- 
hurdia accused Mr. Shevardnadze of bong a 


WVU^a. — 

See GEORGIA, Page 2 








Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1994 


Bonn Warns Iran of Isolation if It Executes Convicted Spy world briefs 



Compiled by Our Shift From Dapaidta 

BONN — The German government on Wednesday 
warned Iran of Further isolation From the West if 
Tehran earned out a death sentence against a German 
engineer convicted of spying for Iraq. 

Iran’s prosecutor-generaL AboifazI Musavi Tabrizi, 
said Wednesday in Tehran that “the case of German 
engineer Helmut Szimkus has been finalized by the 
highest court or Iran, and he was sentenced to death 
on charges of spying." 

The Gentian government said it had requested a 
pardon from Iran and was mating it dear to Tehran 
that it would not be happy if the sentence were carried 

OUL 

“Germany is the only Western industrialized nation 
that hasn’t isolated Iran, and they are perfectly aware, 
that it would not be in their interests to carry out this 
sentence,” said Martin Erdmann, a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman. 

1 Asked whether Germany took a position on wheth- 
er Mr. Szimkus was guilty of espionage, Mr. Erdmann 
said, “We have no proof one way or die other.” 

Iran has been accused of using charges against 


foreigners to exert pressure on foreign countries hold- 
ing its agents or officials. 

The case is the second within a week in which a 
government in Western Europe had to face legal 
complications in dealing with the I slamic fundamen- 
talist government in Tehran. 

Last week, France decided to send back to Tehran 
two Iranians wanted in Switzerland on suspicion of 
murder, instead of banding them over to the Swiss 
authorities. 

In his first public comment. Prime Minister 
Edouard Bahadur said on Tuesday only that he had 
served France's interests. J 

“This is a derision I believe suited the nation's 
interests," be said. “I ask to be trusted on this point." 

The death sentence against Mr. Szirakus comes 
amid strained relations between Germany and Iran 
over Tehran's alleged involvement in the assassination 
of Iranian Kurdish disadents in Germany. 

Mr. Szimkus was arrested in 1988. According to the 
radical Tehran newspaper Salam. Mr. SrimkiK is a 
mechanical engineer who first went to Iran in 1980. 


Salam asserted that the German used a secret radio 
to tr ansmit intelligence to the Iraqi military in the 
southern non of Basra and helped locale targets for 
Iraqi missies during the 1980-88 war. 

It said he later left Iran, then returned to live in 
icfnhan in the central part of the country. He was 
arrested when be tried to leave in 1988. 

Mr. Tabrizi said that Ayatollah Sayed Ali Kha- 
menei, Iran's spiritual leader, had the authority to 
pardon Mr. Szimkus- Mr. Tabrizi did not announce a 
date for carrying out the death sentence. 

In another case affecting Inm-Gennany relations, 
five men — an Iranian and roar pro-Iranian Lebanese 
Shiite Muslims — went on trial last month in Berlin, 
charged with the 1992 assassination of the Kurdish 
leader Sadiq Sarafkindi and three colleagues in a 
Berlin restaurant. 

The Iranian defendant. Kazan Darabi. has been 
identified by German authorities as an intelligence 
agent for the Tehran regime. 

Iran's intelligence minister. Ali Fallahian, widely 
believed bv Western security agencies to have been 


behind many of the killings, made an. lxnpublicized 
visit to Bonn in October, apparently seeking to pre- 
vent Mr. Darabi's trial 

German federal prosera tors sought to arrest Mr. 
Fallahian when his presence in Bonn became known 
but were blocked by the German government. 

Before the Berlin trial opened, a German business- 
man held in Iran on spying charges was released but 
not allowed to leave Iran. 

Gerhard Bachmann. 56, was given permission to 
resume work for his employer, a heavy equipment 
company, but had to stay in Iran because of the 
possibility of further charges being brought against 

him 

In the French case, the two ba n ia n s were suspected 
of involvement in the assassination of an I ran i an 
dissiden t leader, Kazan Rajavi, near Geneva in 1990. 

The authorities in Switzerland had demanded the 
men's extradition. But French officials decided 
against extradition. The move was widely seen by 
Fur n pean observers to be a response to fears of re- . 
Hewed terrorist actions. 

. (AP, Reuters, AFP) 


Refomist Opens Bid to Lead Italy ' ; ^ 

ROME (Reuters) — The ftafian refonmsf Mario Segnr latgzcfed hit [ 
bid for power on Wednesday as Prime Minister Cario Az«gto Gam : 
foiYri conflicting calls from political leaders over tee tuning os ’ general ; 

Mr ^i^ flmmpgrofApijLiieferaidinnttot : 

the country's electoral system, said supporting nun for prime minista [ 
along with his new Tact for Italy alliance was the rally wajrtodefesi tlx ( 
left in efactibusaqwctodifl thenefl few months. He . 

nnvefltlKaflianjapiri^amonFdJ.5.AVotoon.aiKH»Bno«oenK>toi 1 

is setfor Wednesday. " ' . 


New Israel-PLO Talks Reported Set 


JERUS ALEM (AP) — Israel and the PalesliM liberation Organza- : 
don agreed Wednesday to resume talks next week in the effort to resolve - 
diffe rences th^t are hm Hfno up the Palestinian autonfliny accord, actotfl- b 
ing to land Radio and aForrign Ministry offidaL ' 

Tlie two sides accepted agreements readied last wedc m Cairo on bordei 
security as the Wy for negotiations, die reports said. Israel's 

Foreign Ministiy officially demed ,any knowledge of resuming the talks. ; 


No NATO Consensus 
To Grow, U.S. Notes 


Cold War Out, 
Hot Line In - 
Just in Case 


NATO Wifl Offer 
A 'Signal’ to East, 
Germany Says 


The Associated Pros 

BERLIN — The NATO allies 
will give Eastern Europe's nervous 
new democracies a clear signal at a 
summit meeting next week that the 
allian ce wflj eventually be opened 
to them, German leaders said 
Wednesday. 

The tone from Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl’s government contrasted 
somewhat with the U.S. pro- 
nouncement Wednesday that the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion was not ready for new mem- 
bers, chiefly because it is believed 


By Ann Devroy 
and Daniel W illiams 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON— The United 
States is fending off demands for 
the rapid expansion of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization by 
contending that such a move would 


create more security problems than 
now exist and that there is no con- 


sensus in Europe Tor a bigger 
NATO. 


that expanding the alliance could 
further destabilize Russia. 


“We believe the summit will send 
a political signal to the democracies 
or Centra] and Eastern Europe that 
NATO is open in principle to new 
members," sard Dieter Vogel, a 
German government spokesman. 

But while sounding a note of 
encouragement to Eastern neigh- 
bors. Germany basically endorsed 
the U.S. position. 


Allies May Seek 
Russian Pledge to 
Respect Borders 


Reuters 

BONN — Ge rman y and the 
United States may ask Moscow to 
calm its neighbors' growing fear of 
possible Russian expansionism by 
clearly stating that it respects their 
borders. Bonn officials said 
Wednesday. 

This would be pan of a package 
of measures Western states are con- 
sidering to support President Boris 
N. Yeltsin following the success or 
an ultranaiionahst, Vl adimir v. 
Zhirinovsky, in Russia's parlia- 
mentary ejection last month, they 
said. 

“There is a growing concern 
among Russia's neighbors about 
their territorial integrity,” an offi- 
cial said. “We are discussing ideas 
about a clear statement on this 
from the Russians." 

The officials also were studying 
ways to reassure Russia's neighbors 
through the Conference on Securi- 
ty and Cooperation in Europe and 
a European security pact proposed 
by France to protect minorities and 
consolidate existing borders. 


“We do not want to give the 
impression that we're creating an- 
other dividing line in Europe after 
we worked for decades to get rid of 
the one that existed before." Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton said. 

He added that the initiative “win 
work if the Eastern European na- 
tions will make the most of it. and I 
hope that they will” 

The president suggested that a 
lack of agreement m Europe was 
the reason Washington was unwill- 
( ing to expand NATO rapidly. 

“If you look at die consensus of 
the NATO members at this time, 
there's not a consensus to expand 
NATO at this time.” be said at the 
start of a meeting with Prime Min- 
ister Ruud Lubbers of the Nether- 
lands. 

All the same, U.S. officials are 
seeking to ease East European fears 
of abandonment by saying that the 
Partnership for Peace program, the 
proposed alternative to immediate 
NATO membership, could lead 
eventually to inclusion of the for- 
mer Warsaw Pact members in the 
Atlantic alliance. 

The Partnership, which is ex- 
pected to win formal endorsement 
at the NATO summit meeting in 
Brussels next week, is intended to 
strengthen lies between the Atlan- 
tic alliance and former Warsaw 
Pact members without extending 
NATO security guarantees. 

General John M. Shaliknshvili. 
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, is being sent to Eastern Eu- 
rope this week with Madeleine K. 


Return 

WASHINGTON — De- 
fense Secretary Les Asp in and 
Defense Minister Pavel S. 
Grachev of Russia inaugurat- 
ed a top-level military tele- 
phone hot line Wednesday. 

The two wished each other a 
happy New Year in front of 
the press, then charted private- 
ly about the NATO summit 
meeting in Brussels next week 
and the proposed alliance 
Partnership for Peace pro- 
gram, which is intended to 
draw Russia and other former 
Soviet bloc states closer to the 
WesL 

The new link between the 
offices of the defense leaders is 
an ndditioa to current hot-line 
links between die presidents of 
the two nations and a teletype 
connection between the mili- 
tary “war rooms” of the Penta- 
gon and the Russian Defense 
Ministry. 






German Refugee Count Falls 35% 

BONN (Reuters) — Tough new limits on prfjtical asyhmi inqjos 


h new limits on political asyimn imposed last ■ 
refugees entering Gennany by more than 35 ! 


i*- 




year reduced the nnmber of refugees entering Gennany by more than 35 . 
percent, Bonn’s Interior Ministry said Wednesday. . 

The ministry said the 1993 total was 323,000, down by more than , 
1 15.000 from theprev»iisyear,becanseof resmctkms imposed in July on 
what had been Europe's most liberal asylum law.’ 


U.S. Admiral to Visit Hanoi on MIAs 






Sip 


WASHINGTON (NYT) —In another sign of improving tief between > 
Hanoi and Washington, Admiral Charles R. Larson, the oonnnander of ! 
United St ate s forces in the Pacific, lata: this month wifi became the • 
hi ghfly T- rnnlring American milit ary officer -On active duty U> visit Vietnam j 
since the war in Southeast Asia aided in 1975. 4 

Admiral Larson, a four-star officer based in Hawaii, will go to Vietnam , 
on Jan. 16 for a three-day trip to review the work of American and < 
V wmuHnasf? aperiaKats investi gating the fate of missing Americans He w ; 
also expected to m e e t with several high-ranking officials in the Vietnam- [ 
ese Foreign Ministiy. ■ 

The Cunt an adnwnv a mrinn has ccsKfitiooed a relaxation ctf the U5L I 
trade embargo against Hanoi on resolving what happened to the more than : 
2,000 American servicemen who did not return from the Vietnam War. 


Pasqua Lashes Out on Immigration 


WBTrcdo Liz/Tkc Awodxcd Prm 

Mr. Aspin at the Pentagon talking to Mr. Grachev od We&esday as he inaugurated the direct fink. 


PAR1S (Reuters) —Interior Minister Charles Pasqua said Wednesday 
thar be planned to said p lanel oads of illegal immigrants bade to therr 
home countries nntQ the world “gets the message.” 

In a television interview, Mr. Pasqua said that “the problems of 
immigration are ahead of us and not behind us” and warned of possible 
waves Of millions of people from the former Soviet Union and Africa. He 
said France would tighten border controls and increase the policing of 
foreigners, and added: “When we’ve sent several planeloads Dome, even 
trainloads and boatloads, die world will get the message." 




Albright- in Croatia, Warns on Sanctions For the Record 

O Ti» Yen, a ju nior environ 


By David B. Ottaway 

Washington Post Service 

ZAGREB. Croatia — The U5. 

[tor^MSele?ne Lb K U AlbriahL Ues was now a “ rie V e ° r su ^ ocl Croatia has been steadily ex- 
a-^rrfrfvr v fh* 1 ; discussion in the administra- ponding its military assistance to 

S£SXmS£ don's dipknnaric contacts wilh the 

6 * Croatian government- officers and soldiers, as Bosnia s 

in the Bosnia conflict was of “ma- She said she planned to raise the Muslim-led army presses its offen- 
jor concern" to the United States issue directly with President Franjo sive with ever greater success 
and could lead to the imposition of Tudjman of Croatia, whom she is agains t Croatian forces in south- 
sanctions. scheduled to meet Thursday. western and central Bosnia. 


Arriving here on the first leg of a 
tour of East European capitals. 
Mrs. Albright said Croatia's mili- 


tary aid to its Bosnian-Croatian al- behavior.” 


Croatia's involvement, she said, 
“might in fact lead to sanctions if 
there is not some change in that 


Croatia has been steadily ex- 
panding its militar y asri stan ce to 
the Bosnian Croats, offering arms, 
officers and soldiers, as Bosnia's 


Nonetheless, the situation for the 
Bosnian Croatian Defense Council, 
as its political and military organi- 
zation is known, has become so 
critical that President Tudjman 
and his defense minister, Gqjko Su- 
sak, have repeatedly threatened di- 
rect Croatian military intervention 
over the last two weeks. 

It is this potential expansion of 


Tub Yeo, a ju nior en v ironment adapter, resigned from the British 
government Wednesday after a strong public reaction to the revelation 
m m be had fa ther ed 9 rfiflri in an Ext ramarital affair with a Conservative 


councillor, government sources said. Mr. Yeo, 48, lost the soj 
colleagues after acknowledging the affair. , 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


western and central Bosnia. 


ii B t confiict p S hrtTutiied Channel Ferry Line Will Cut Fares 

States worried, as it would most T , 


BOSNIA: France Presses U.S. to Intervene Militarily 


Albright, the U.S. ambassador to 
the United Nations, to warm the 


the United Nations, to warm the 
Poles, Czechs, Slovaks and Hun- 


garians to the plan. 
The general said 


NATO: 

Lithuania Bid 

Continued from Page 1 


— knew full well that the chances 
of acceptance were slim. 

The debate over the future shape 
of the NATO alliance, and of Rus- 
sia's relationship to its neighbors, is 
expected to dominate visits next 
week by Mr. Clinton to Brussels, 
Prague, Moscow and Minsk, the 
capital of Belarus. 

Mr. Nunn, the chairman of the 
Senate Armed Services Committee 
and a frequent visitor to the Rus- 
sian capital, said Wednesday that 
be was “cautiously optimistic'' that 
Mr. Clinton’s visit next week could 


produce on agreement between 
R ussia and Ukraine over the dis- 
mantling or nuclear weapons on 
i Uk rainian territory. But Mr. Nunn 
said he was still dubious about the 
Ukrainian parliament's willingness 
to abide by any new agreement. 


The general said Tuesday that 
extending NATO’s security guar- 
antees too rapidly to Eastern Eu- 
rope could prompt a nationalistic 
backlash in an excluded Russia. 
The Partnership program, which is 
as open to Russian participation as 
it is to Polish or Albanian partici- 
pation, would create no such reac- 
tion, he argued. 

“What this is all about is bring- 
ing stability and security to all of 
Europe,” General SbalikashviU 
said. “The reason that partnership 
is defined as it is is to avoid at all 
costs the establishment of a new 
line, a new division that, in turn 
then, would create new tensions 
and fuel new conflicts.” 

The genera] responded in pan to 
comments made by President Lech 
Walesa of Poland in an interview 
Monday with The Washington 
Post. Mr. Walesa had said his coun- 
try preferred immediate member- 
ship as a bulwark against renewed 
Russian expansionism and as a 
guarantee for European democra- 
cies. 

*Txn not sure that President Wa- 
lesa would be making those same 
arguments if the question were of 
including some countries, but not 
Poland — whether he would not 
see that as very divisive:” 

Mr. Clinton’s national security 
adviser. W. Anthony Lake, argued 
in a separate briefing Tuesday that 
admitting new nations to NATO 
too quickly could “become a self- 
fulfilling prophecy of pessimism” 


Goatmned from Page 1 

had stood by Washington's previ- 
ous conditions for involvement of 
American ground forces in Bosnia. 
These include congressional ap- 
proval a “right to terminate” the 
operation and a clearly stated time 
for review of the politer. 

A senior French official dose to 
Defense Minister Lfcotard said 
Wednesday that France hoped the 


objectives were to free the airport 
at Tuzla so it could be used as a 
base for humanitarian aid deliver- 
ies and to enable a Canadian con- 
tingent stationed in Srebrenica to 
be replaced by Danish troops 
backed by armored vehicles. 

He added that it was “shocking 
and unacceptable” that Serbian 
forces had been able to block the 
arrival of the Danish troops in Sre- 
brenica. In Tuzla, he went on, “we 


likely curtatithe srtady kmnw£- 
meat, in VS.-Croadan relations the Enrotinmd s 
and lead to international pressure operators ptymg 
for the imposition of economic and *' r §" ce - _ r . 
f inan cial sanctions on Croatia. atom oeainuc. 


Lieutenant General Francis Bri- 

3 uemom of Belgium announced ■ Serbs Shell Sarajevo 
lai be was stepping down as the Hundreds of shells again 
UN commander in Bosnia. Gener- tZZrT* 


mat nc was sreppmg aowm as tne Hundreds of shells again rained 
UN commander in Bosna. Gener- ^ (m fSaSeMm 

w 1 ,3 Wednesday, news agencies re- 


ported from Sarajevo. 


ktU^aSerbian sniper in Sarajevo 'for the first time in the war. the 

°n Cnnst^ Day. police were under orders to mm 

Prune Minister Jean Chretien of h— ir ,™i 


Canada said Tuesday that his gov- 


United Stares wouldjoin efforts to w ^j, t l0 ihe Serbs that we 
relieve Tuzla and Srebrenica with want to protect the inhabitants and 


eminent was also reconsidering the ra^domreof 

phH by^ Canada's 2,000 

Mit- ^ 

i e most severe in months. 


“air power, or logistics or, if Wash- 
ington wanted or accepted to do so, 
the participation of its ground 
forces." 

The official said the immediate 


exercise our right to deliver hu- 
manitarian aid.” 

On Tuesday, apparently dis- 
mayed by the weakness of the inter- 
national presence on the ground. 


ten and echoed a similar frustra- 
tion. “Should we pull out and allow 


UUU. tMA/lUV WV 1 /HU WUl UiM _ . . . . “ ] .V-fr 

the people there to km each other United Nanons mmmmced that 


urv lAwyu. uawiw sv nm mwu vuiw _ , . « r , « v> 

until the last manT’ he asked. Lieutenant-General Michael Rose 


“Should we stay oo and be a target of Bri tain wodd become tire new 
for those who love death? Both commander of UN forces mBosma 


GEORGIA: Ex-Leader 9 s Suicide 


would be completely untenable. 
We must take care that develop- 


ments born of the current deadlock ant-General Francis Bnquemont. a 
do not lead to an even greater trag- Belgian, who has asked to be re- 


Continued from Page 1 poned reforms, his popularity 
_ plummeted. In January 1991 he 

Russian agent bent on subordinat- was overthrown in a bloody upris- 


f^Sdd^ti^ncSS 8 ^ S**”* Sealmk,own^by Sweden’s StmaUnc All is introducing 

seasonal fares and abandoning^ its system of different charges according. 
■ Qp<4ia Skpll Wnmrn to sailing times. A standard round-trip for a car aid five passengers wifi 

start at £126 (SI 87), rising to£220 in the summer peak period, with extra: 
Hundre ds of sbeO t ^g m rain ed for *iilk previous peal price 

™ ^ ajCVO ‘ rom Euiotmmd wifi officially announce its fares on Tuesday, bot an official 

esday . news agencies re- Monday that round-trip prices would range from £160 to £260, 

P0 J?° 1 ,u - depending on the season. The tunnel is due to open for automobiles in: 

For the first tune in the war, the May 

police were under orders to mm ** . . . . . . • . ' ' - . . .. 

avflians hack to their homes and Water tms ** Amstwdam are aroidug some routes because of high 
dSX SSti water and low bridges, officials say. The water level in the city's 150 

ported. Shelling closure of pomelos (90 mles) of ranals hasrisai np to 15 centimeters (625 inch®) 
the airponutheaipply lifdine. Res- above normal because of weeks of ram. (AP) 

idents called the bombardment the Some tourists were angered by an £8 ($12) fee pul into effect at 

most severe in months. Windsor Castle to help pay far repairs following afire mNovauber 1992. 

In another development, the A group of German students refused to pay, a Russian woman balked; 
United Nations announced that mid an Englishwoman decided instead to take her children for a ham-. 
Lieutenant-General Michael Rose burger. Entrance to the castle grounds used to be fret (Reuters) 
of Britain would become the new Gtizensof Yngodnia,BoBnia-Henegovbia and the four fanner Soviet 

commander of UN forces in Bosnia rep u blics of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia and Tajikistan wifi need visas 
later this month. to enter the Czech Republic after Jan. 15, Gech officials sard. (AP) 

Six Michael will succeed Ueulea- Die Madrid-based Wodd TetniSB) Organization said that international 

am -General Francis Briquemont. a tourism in 1993 increased 3.8 percent over 1992. with an estimated 500 
B elgian, who has asked to be re- million tourist arrivals worldwide. The group put 1993 tourism receipts at 
lieved of his post (AP. Reuters) just ova $324 billion, up 9 percent- (Reuters) 


ps* Politic* 

•■r’n .l- ■ 


ri’rs • -i.- ; /#->•». 


. - i— 

<_ - 


■=*-* * i./.t’JK, & 


In another development, the 


S-- t . " ; ‘ - - -J* ; iff- 

' ' • ’• • ••• . wjmm 


later this month. 

Six Michael will succeed LieTileai- 






' • V 


> n g G eorgia s interests to the =/id fled into exile in southern 
Krentim. Russia. 

Mr. Gamsakhurdia was wor- . . „ . , . 


lutmiing prophecy or pessimism 
about Russia by strengthening (he 
hands of ultranationalists there 
and destabilizing Eastern Europe. 


shiped almost as a messiah by his 
partisans, mostly in his native west- 
ern Georgia, who saw him as an 
anti-Soviet hero. 

But in the course of his short and 
turbulent presidency in 1991. he 
became a divisive figure, despised 
by many Geor gians who regarded 
him as a nasty despot who was 
intolerant of dissent. He had a hab- 
it of accusing his opponents, and 
even those who simply questioned 
him. as being under the influence 
and in the pay of his enemies. 

A beloved figure in the Soviet era 
because of his insistence on self- 
determination for Georgia. Mr. 
Gamsakhurdia was overwhelming- 
ly elected president of the nation of 
5.4 million people in May 1991. 

Bui once in power be cracked 
down on opposition leaders and 
the press, accusing them of being 
“spies.” As he repeatedly post- 


in late September of 1993. taking 
advantage of a separate uprising in 
the Black Sea Georgian province of 
Abkhazia, Mr. Gamsakhurdia re- 


Mexico Bombs Indian Rebel Strongholds 


v, : - - .... ,. : 




Compiled b} Our Suff Freer. Dispatches 

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS 


turned :o Georgia from exile and CASAS. Mexico — Thousands ol 
led an insurrection against Mr. troops swept through southern 


The fighting has so far killed 95 zalez, said the rebels must also turn 
people, the army said Wednesday, over 1,550 kilograms (3,410 


Shevardnadze's government. 


From a stronghold in western 
Georgia, he organized hundreds, 
perhaps even a few thousand 


Mexico on Wednesday, supported 
by planes dropping bombs and fir- 
ing rockets in an attempt to crush a 
rebellion by Indian peasants. 

Bodies still lav in tbe streets in 


A Mexico City newspaper. La Jor- pounds) of explosives and detosa- 
nada, said the death toll was nearer tots theytook from the national ofl 


400 and attributed tbe figure to company, Pemex. 


mih . m October. occupied in the uprising that began 


But tbe offensive stalled in late Saturday, as the troops fanned out 
October after Mr. Shevardnadze through Chiapas state m search of 
made a deal with Moscow. In re- members of the Zapatista National 


made a deal with Moscow. In re- 
turn for Georgia's joining the Rus- 
siac -dominated Commonwealth of 
Independent States. Russian 
troops were deployed in Georgia. 

Within a week. Mr. Shevard- 
nadze’s forces were rdavigoraicd 
and Mr. Gamsakhuruia’s gains 
were quickly roiied back. 


members of the Zapatista National 
Liberation Army. 

The group, which has called for a 
return of territory and for econom- 
ic justice, has vowed to fight to the 
death. 

An estimated 12.000 men. one- 
fifth of Mexico's armed forces, at- 
tacked bv air and land. 


Roman Catholic Church sources. 

The air force dropped bombs 
and fired rockets on sospected re- 
bel strongholds in the hills ringing 
San Cristobal, and tanks and ar- 
mored personnel carriers moved 
into the area as army helicopters 
flew overhead. 

Tbe action followed a govern- 
ment offer earlier Wednesday to 


Mr. Cantu warned that the gov- 
ernment “would have to take into 
consideration what is legally al- 


from Mayans, one of the most so-t 
phisticated peoples in the Western 1, 
Hemisphere until the Spanish coor 
quest in the early 16th century. 

The area that had been taken by 
the goemQas is popukted jnpstly 
by poor indigenous people who 
earn a living selling firewood and 


- ---- 

V. - i . 


. «K- 



lowed when meeting with those cbaitoaL 

who accept this invita&m to talks On Tuesday, army troops took 


and turn in their arms.” 

He Mamed the uprising on ex- 
tremists, including some Salvador- 
ans and Guatemalans, who he said 
were manipulating toe peasant In- 


m^otiaie an end to the uprising by dians in the region. 


back the town of Ocosmgo m 
house-to-house fighting; - - 
Among the dozens of corpses 
strewn about tbe town were the 
bodies of five peasants found in a 


^M/hh 


disaffected Indians. Bat the gov- There was no indication that the 


eminent insisted that the insur- Indians were interested ia negotiat- 
gpnts first disarm, free hostages ing a settlement. They did not re- 


group. All had been toot once in 
tbe hw*d and showed signs of hav- 
ing been freed from numftries be- 
fore their deaths, witnesses said. 
Military authorities said they had 
ordered 1 .'an- investigation -into the 
killings. (Reuters, AP, AFP) 


J ri ame>U»i 

KrK.,: 


and identify their leaders. 


Hoy Cantu Segovia, an aide to 
Interior Minister Patrotinio Gon- 


^xmd to an earlier offer by Carbo- 
lic bishops to act as mediators. 
Most of the rebels are descended 




* y. — - . 

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^POLITICAL \OTiy* 


Cflnton Otrecgy»on Al ration Draw TbA 

. WASHINGTON ~ Medicaid- officials in many suieshsvE'ob- 
to a Dcw ^ectivB- from the.Qinton administration that 
requires statesto beifjay for abortions tor low-income women iff 
cases trf tapeor incest •;■ ..... 

in a letter written on bdialf ~oS the Stale Medkadd Directed 
Assoaatran, Ray Hanl^Medxsid Arcelor of Aritmoteand darir-- 
nan of the group, voiced -strong objection to the ad xmnmra tion . 
position. 


bffl 

. w . ifoa ceq Oct 21. 

Bui Mr. Hanley saw! the^dmmstratioa had omnueraneted the 
law and imposed a fine requireraentwbere Congress mim/teJ in 

give states ftenTsMiy_ ■• 

. The complaint by state Me dic ai d directors reopens the volatile 
issue of abortion m^asCoi^c^ and the adntinisbreti^ju^wrefor 
a fight over wfietbcr'to reqmremsaranoe ooveraufortheinocediirc 
as part of Mr. Qinton’s healtfapian. '.• 

Mr. Hanlcy was apparently not speaking fbra& 50 stale Medicaid 
director^. The organization did not vote on the question. He mote 
the krter after consulting with a number of state Medicaid directors 
and the organization's executive committee.' - ■- • • - { 071 } 

Bffawy Join* Gubd>rn«tortoillao»ln M.Y, 

NEW YORK ■ — ■ Amid a growing field of Republican gubemaio- 
rial hopefuls in NewYoric, a former ambassador to France, Evan G. 


.... . behind him. 

Axa news conference, Mr. Kissii^a - , Reformer secretary of 
and Mr. Buddey, the ccuiserKifr/e writer, said they would be 
spokesmen for a group pf 25 men, most of them Wan Street 
executives, who hoped to muscat least $2 nriffionf or Mr. Galbreith, a 
Manhattan bnsktessiiEKL They described him as a dedkated cooser- 
vative. 

* l llusisDotexchitiv^aconservativeeffort,akbo<i^itiiecan£' 
date’s credentials are secure in that area,” Mr. Bockky said. 

_■ .Mr; Galbraith. 65, said he would promise to cut taxes in haff for . 
both individuals aid bnsmesses. sharply cat sp ending onwdfareand 
support the death penalty. 

Althot^ih he has. never. hdd an elective public office, Mr. Ga^ 
laaith has long beeb active in^ ^the RqwMcan Party and for months 
has been expected to ran for governor. 

He served as ambassador to France from 1981 to IMS under 
Presidem Ronald Reagan. fNTT) 

Grand 4ury H»ti From Btowh^Accumt 

' RflAMI— Agfand jury investigaiion into changes that Oannacrcc 
Secretary Ronald H. Brown received 5700,000 to lift the UK. trade 
embargo against Vietnam has heard testimoay from Ms chief accus- 
er. 



immigrant 

before the panel, testifying for two homa. 

“I fed gpod^ tfcit I bad a chance to tell my shay to the grand jwy" 
Binh Ly said as he emerged. “But Idon’l wam to cwnment ."ah 
anything until we see what the gbmdimy does." 

Last year, Mr. Ly accused Nguyen van Hao. a f miner Vietnamese 
government rffidal vhp was bocejtis buanesspartner, ofananmg 
a S700.000 payment to Mx.. Brown in late 1992, after Preadent 
Clinton's dectmn. • . l 

Brown has acknowledged meeting with Miv ^Hao thrtt.thhes —in 
November and pcoember of 1992- ami In Fdbrnaiy 1993, after hie 
became txwmneroe secretary — but he denied making any dwtisor 
accepting auy payments.. -. . .. 

Quote/Vnqwote : r -i ' ' 

Former PretidenlGeoargeltos^tiescribmgbferetirra^^ 
ton: “Baibara makes ihe^Imafcethcrco^AndAGKedoesthe 
..'dishes,''; 



yf • 


,- p ,. 


-S*r- *. ■ , 


>iv 


i y 


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President Delaying 
On Welfare Reform 


iL“.: 



*Vi* ,?r 







Kfszr F-aact-Pra* 


By Jason DeParle 

.Vrt Yuri Time Service 

WASHINGTON —The Clinton 
idmjnisu^iion is I lying to devise j 
sirjtirgv lhal would allow it to ap- 
pear to be pushing for welfare re- 
form, even while delaying action on 
a bill until ihe president's health 
caic plan dears Congress. 

The effon to delay welfare legis- 
lation so that it does not interfere 
with the administration’s primary 
goal of health care, while not ac- 
knowledged publicly, has been evi- 
dent in recent administration ac- 
tions and was discussed at a 
cabinet meeting Monday, officials 
said. They said such a strategy 
would moke it unlikely that a major 
welfare bill would pass Congress 
this year. 

Mr. Clinton's pledge to impose 
strict work requirements on welfare 
recipients was one of his most pop- 
ular campaign promises. Bui after 
almost a year in office, be has still 
not spelled out the details of a plan. 

The president has scarcely men- 
tioned welfare in recent remarks on 
domestic priorities. Neu year's 
budget, now in preparation, con- 
tains no cost projections for a wel- 
fare plan. And congressional lead- 
ers. warning that welfare is divisive. 


have urged him to work on health 
carefirsL 

Ai this week's cabinet meeting. 
Mr. Clinton spoke of the dilemma. ■ 
people who were present said. 

The president argued that health 
care was so complex that it re- 
quired the administration's com- 
plete political and legislative atten- 
tion. He also said the country 
would not succeed in moving peo- 
ple off of welfare until it passed 
universal health care, since many 
people stay on welfare simply for 
Lhe health insurance. 

At the same time. Mr. Clinton 
acknow ledged that he was taking a 
political ride in appearing to delay 
on a central campaign pledge. He 
worried lhai Republicans, who 
have introduced their own tough- 
sounding welfare bill, would accuse 
him of backpedaling. 

**f think the president is con- 
cerned that the Republicans will 
portray him as a classic liberal, tax- 
ing and spending" on health care, 
while abandoning welfare, said an 
official who attended the meeting. 

Among the strategies discussed 
at the meeting, the official said, was 
to introduce a biQ but encourage 
Congress not to proceed until the 
health care debate is finished. 


STORM’S TOLL— Drivers writing at a toll plaza near Pittsburg as a major SDOKStonn forced die patted closing of the Pennsyh ai»a 
Turnpike. The storm, fee second in a week on the East Coast left 13 people dead, knocked out power to hundreds of thousands of 
jui ffis , e tofg d schools ami businesses from North Carolina to Maine. Air and rail travel in the region also was severely disrupted. 

Clintons ? Own Roles in Probe of Failed S&L Run Deep 


By Susan Schmidt 
and Michael Isikoff 

Washington Past Scrnt* 

WASHINGTON — Last September, as officials of 
Resolution Trust Carp- were preparing to ask the 
Justice Department to open a criminal investigation 
into a failed Arkansas savings and loan, they faced an 
on usually sensitive problem: Should they mention 
lhai the case involved President BiD Clinton and his 
wife? 

'. There was do evidence that the Clintons had done 
anything ffleRal But Resolution Trust Carp- investiga- 


White House said it was for Ms. Reno to decide, 
Reuters reported. “It's up to the attorney general” 
said Dee Dee Mym, the While House spokeswoman. 
“It's a derision she would have to make.”] 

The history of the Madison investigation, pieoed 
together Bom interviews with Justice Department and 
Resolution Trust Corp. officials along with documents 
from the case, suggests that the invoivemem of the 
Clintons has repeatedly affected its progress. 

The transformation of a relatively routine Resolu- 
tion Trust Corp. inquiry into a political hot potato 

^ ^ ^ began in March 1992 when news accounts detailed 

tore bad'Wiied up evidence that depositor funds from. Mr. Clinton's longtime relationship with Mr. McDou- 

-1 «a.~~~r A. r —1 — J jVJ. I— HfL:* 


Away From Politics 


• WadM^gtou pcfet hBTO began 
anned.Anewiimt_^^eiittyainoDgtbe: 

is not waiting to see nmtTbefore acting, 
the officers were toakmg for signs, such as physical appearance and 
. movements, timt would give them a reason tosCBpeCt samecmc. He 
said the officers must be abletoarticolate their sospfcKKK before the 
scan*, or their <aseswB! riot stand up in court. \. , . 

- * Colin Fergnsai, ^Ao ls nocosed of kffiug Ox people on a Long 
Island Rod Road train last .month, is competent to aahd -trial a 
court-appdmed psydurfogist and [psydnfttnsl haveermriuded. But 
al^CTtlv^ fTw^g svre^Bnnomic^ at a Long beari ng. Judjg 

Ira B. Warsliawsky jxis^w«d ndmgxmlbe matter at the request of . 
Mr. Feqpwon’5 lawyer,.^ who" said be wanted. di s cussion time with : a 
psycholo&st he had retiemed. ' 

• Nude photopanhs of MaJ»d Jadisoo are bring sought m apta 
Monica, Cfrlifrania, cbiat by (be attorney rejaranttinp a l^yaur-cld 

boy who^a^Mn^ SfotecStiSmS 
1 that the faa thai my diem can 

cstaUisb w*at Mr. Jackson looks" Hse naked i» very. substantial. 
evidence of Mr. J»kson*s gnflt," add the attorney, L**xy Fddman. 

• The loss of 4be SI bffioa Mas Obaerrer last Angust might have 
Ixo. caused by a fud line rupture, according to tm.mdiqpdent 

1 «! C-.Ll.-i tlv> N«4i<w*l A m wgM liwt mm! 


Space Admmstration. Ground oantroQers lost contact with the 
probe three days before it was to have entered whitmwmd Mamin 
die first ddser-rangeD^ misakm to study Man once the Vikmg 
missions 18 years ago. ■' ■ fa ^. XTr 


-the thrift, Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan, may 
have been diverted impropeny to Mr. Qin ton’s 1984 
gubernatorial campaign account and to Whitewater 
Devdopmem Ox, a real estate venture owned by the 
.Omtoos and James McDougal Madison's owner. 

' Some nfftriais at Restdutkm Trust Corp. bdieved 
questions about the Clintons and tbrir dratings with 
Madison bad .to be laid oot in the agency's written 
request for farther federal investigation. But others 
.thought .that would be a. strategic error: A detailed 
d^ciq>lioa of activities involving the Clintons had 
been presented to the Justice Department in Sqitesn- 
ber 1 992 and had been languishing for a year, prompt- 
ing.f ears, among Resolution Trust Carp, staff that die 
department was intent on scuttling the poetically 
sensitive case. . 

Last fail. Resolution Trust Corp. finally d id ask 
fodorfprateriztars in little Rode, Arieansss. to inves- 
mnff miiwrfaf criminal matters anting out of 
MsiSsot's 1989 failure, nanmig the Clintons, along 
wiflt other AriuutsftSpoSficians who had dealings with 
Mr.McDoogaL Among other thmgs prosecutors were 
asked to examine was whether Hiuary Rodham CSn- 
ton^t representation of the savings and loan before a 
slate regulator appointed by hex husband resulted Id 
lenient treatment that allowed Madison to stay open 
laris after it was on a dear path to insolvency. 

. While the Clintons have repeatedly said they were 
aware of no wrongdoing at Madison, the White 
.House, under heavy congressional and media criticism 
and possibly facing a subpoena, agreed late last month 
to turn over documents about Whitewater that were 
found m the office of lhe deputy White House counsel 
Vincent Foster, following his suicide on July 20. 

At the same time, the handling of the Madison and 
Whitewater issues by Resolution Trust Carp, and the 
Justice Department has underscored the politically 
charged nature of the probe. Although Resolution 
Trust Corp. has succeeded in sparking a federal inqni- 
jy,-the matter of Madison S&L has frustrated some 
agency rrffirinU who have said they worried about 
“packaging" the case and “selling" Justice on opening 
an investigation that should have began much eariier. 


and their investment together in Whitewater, 
accounts suggested that Mr. McDougal had 


Die history of the 
investigation suggests that the 
involvement of the Clintons 
has affected its progress. 


made the Clintons partners in a sweetheart real estate 
deal in return for lenient state treatment of Madison. 

Resolution Trust Corp. quickly sent a new team of 
investigators to Arkansas to help in the Madison 
probe, looking at, among other things, the business 
relationships among Mr. McDougal and local 
politicians. 

At the same time, investigators began to explore the 
role of Mrs. Gimon and her law firm in representing 
the thrift during a 1985 encounter with federal bank- 
ing authorities. The Rose law firm had represented 
Madison before the Arkansas securities commission 
when the thrift, judged critically short of capital by 
federal examiners, sought approval for a new stock 
plan to stay afloat 

Mis. Clinton was one of two Rose lawyers in that 
effort earning a combined 52,000 monthly retainer for 
the firm. The plan was approved by Beverly Bassett 
Schaffer, Mr. Clinton's state securities commissioner, 
whose law firm also had represented Madison. The 
plan was never implemented. 

Another Rose parmer and a Clinton confidant 
Webster L, Hubbdl now associate attorney general 
under Ms. Reuo. had his own ties to Madison through 
his father-in-law, Seth Ward. Mr. Ward was an execu- 
tive with Madison's real estate subsidiary. 

But despite these potential conflicts, the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corp. hired the Rose firm in 1989 
to represent the government in a lawsuit against Madi- 
son's accounting firm. The suit handled by Mr. Hub- 
bdl contended that the accounting firm had failed to 



How much the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp, 
knew when it fared Rose about the relationships 
among Madison and the firm and its partners is 
unclear. Mr. Hubbell has contended that his dealings 
with Madison were fully disclosed A series of internal 
FDiC memos at the time warned against fairing Mr. 
Hufrbelf dee to conflicts involving his father-in-law. 
Lawyers for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and 
Resolution Trust Corp. have been conducting an in- 
quiry into whether the potential conflicts were proper- 
ly reported 

By the fail of 1992. Resolution Trust Corp. bad 
prepared a 21-page document targeting Mr. McDou- 
gal and his former wife, Susan McDougal for criminal 
investigation by the federal prosecutor in Little Rock. 

The referral named Mr. Climon, then a presidential 
nominee, and his wife, as well as the current Arkansas 
governor, Jim Guy Tucker, as principals in “shell 
corporations" created by Mr. McDougal. 1< said that 
while there was insufficient evidence at that point to 
prove that the Clintons and Mr. Tucker knew about 
suspected check kiting and account overdrafts autho- 
rized by Mr. McDougal they had stood to benefit 
from such activities. 

Ihe referral was sent to Charles Banks, the Republi- 
can lf.S. attorney in Little Rock, during the waning 
days of the Bush administration in (he fall of 1992. Mr. 
Banks already had been stung once in his dealings 
with Mr. McDougal, having failed lo win a conviction 
of him in a 1990 bank fraud case and prompting critics 
to accuse Mr. Banks of mounting a politically motivat- 
ed prosecution. Hoping to wash his hands of Madison 
and Mr. McDougal Mr. Banks asked that be be 
recused from the case and that the referral go directly 
to the Justice Department in Washington, current and 
former federal officials said. 

In an “urgent report” memo to top Justice lawyers 
on Ocl 7, 1992. Mr. Banks's chief assistant, Mac 
Dotson, noted that the Clintons were named as poten- 
tial witnesses in the referral. Mr. Dotson wrote that he 
believed, based on the facts outlined by the Resolution 
Trust Corp., that further investigation was 
“warranted.” 

With less than a month to go before the presidential 
election, aides to the attorney general at the time, 
William P. Barr, were concerned that any special 
interest shown in the case could backfire politically, 
sources said. An investigation involving Mr. Gimon 
was sure to look as though President George Bush 
were using the Justice Department for partisan pur- 
poses. 

In light of Mr. Banks’s recusaL the case was as- 
signed to career lawyers in the fraud section in the 
criminal division of the Justice Department, but senior 
Bush administration Justice officials ordered that it 
get no special treatment. 

A March 19, 1993, memo by criminal division 


attorneys working on the case concluded that the 
referral did not “appear to warrant initiation of a 
criminal investigation” of Madison. But the memo, 
signed by John C. Keeney, then acting chieT of the 
division, left the final decision to federal prosecutors 
in Little Rock. 

Bui the results of the Justice review were not com- 
municated to the Resolution Trust Corp. for months, 
sources said. In the meantime, the agency renewed its 
own inquiry into Madison, sending a team of agency 
investigators back to Arkansas in January 1993. 

By September, having gathered much more infor- 
mation and still having received no official decision on 
the first referral the agency drafted a new request for 
the Justice Department. This expanded referral rec- 

Also under exploration was 
the role of Mrs. Clinton and her 
law firm in representing the 
failed thrift in 1985. 

ommended investigation of nine separate matters of 
possible criminal behavior, sources said. 

Those who believed that naming the Clintons in tire 
first referral led to official inaction argued the presi- 
dent and his wife should not be opted in Ibe new, 
expanded request. Additional questions about wheth- 
er bringing more bank fraud charges against Mr. 
McDougal would constitute double jeopardy helped 
spark a debate among investigators ana professional- 
liability attorneys working for Resolution T rust Corp., 
agency sources said. 

Resolution Trust Corp. Add officials took the un- 
usual step of appealing to the agency’s top brass in 
Washington to make the final decision on whether to 
include the Clintons in the new referrals. But the 
Washington headquarters refused to intervene. 

The new referrals were sent in October to the new 
U.S. attorney in Little Rock, Paula Casey, a Clinton 
appointee and former campaign volunteer. On Oct 
27, with the stack of new criminal referrals sitting on 
her desk, Mrs. Casey responded to six months of 
Resolution Trust inquiries about the fate of the first 
referral then a year old. She told the agency that she 
"concurred” with the Justice Department's decision to 
forgo an investigation due to “insufficient ■ 
information.'' 

Days later, in the wake of news reports about the 
new Resolution Trust Corp. referrals and questions 
about Mrs. Casey’s ties to Mr. Clinton awl other 
senior Democrats in the case, the attorney recused 
herself from further involvement. 

The Justice Department announced it was sending 
three career prosecutors to Utile Rock to conduct the 
investigation. 


U.S. Insists It Hasn’t Conceded on Korean Nuclear Monitoring 


Red Adair Sefls Company, 

But the Flame Still Burns 

’ . V ;/ . neAssodomtPr^ '■ 

■ ‘ HOUSTON —Red Adair, who has iattted-jnore fltffl ^OOail 
»he sale of his company to Gtobd Indostnra 

.. ^^^S^iainsuliant and would not rokomaretnm to 
; in-to room, I 

i taiy of slate for security affairs. 

; If the fateraatirataLAtomc^ 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

", Intemaduna! Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — In a broad 
defense of U& negotiations with 
Neath Korea, a senior Slate Dc*. 
pertinent official said Wednesday 
that Pyongyang had agreed to per- 
mit international inspectors the ac- 
cess that they need to ensure the 
continuous^ monitoring of North 
.Korea’s primary, nuclear develop- 
meat sites. 

fa return, the official said, Ibe 
United States has said it wfll “look 
seriously" at North Korea's secun- 
■ ty concerns, which include regular 
■jamt mtilary exercises between 
U.& and South Korean forces. 

No firm dedaoQ has been made 
to suspend those exercises, said the 
Lynn Davis, imdersccro- 


AtomicEn- 
_ _ in direct talks with 

tboNorth Koreans, is satisfied that 
monitoring. triH proceed unimped- 
ed, Washington and Pyongyang 
will enter anew set of negotiations 


aimed at opening to inspection two 
midcar waste dumps operated by 
North Korea, Ms. Davis said. 

The comments by Ms. Davis, the 
dearest yet made by US officials 
on its talks with North Korea, were 
designed in part to erase a growing 
perception that Washington is 
making concessions merely to 
bring North Korea back in line 
with an inspection policy to which 
other nations have long agreed. The 
United States asserts that North 
Korea's nudear facilities are in- 
tended for building bombs; Pyong- 
yang denies this. 

Ms. Davis said that il was still 
the policy of the United States to 
bring North Korea into full com- 
pJSance with the Nuclear Nonpro- 
liferation Treaty, and if discussions 
between North Korea and the 
atomic energy agency, known as 
IAEA, g» w5L a derisive round of 
negotiations between Washington 
and Pyongyang will get under way, 
she said. 

• “We have not backed down,” 
Ms. Davis insisted, saying that 



North Korea must “cany out all 
the obligations required under the 
Nonproliferation Treaty — inspec- 
tions of their declared ales and the 
two special inspections that the 
IAEA seeks” of the dump sites. 

In addition, she said, the United 
States (dans in those new calks to 
“find ways to resolve once and for 
all our outstanding issues with re- 
to the nuclear policies of 
Korea." 

In Vienna on Wednesday. North 
Korean representatives met with 
officials of the atomic energy agen- 
cy, but made no new proposals. 
The Associated Press reported. 

David Kyd, spokesman for the 
agency, said that the inspectors 
“imagined they might have some- 
thing to offer'’ in the session in 

Vienna, but that the North Kore- 
ans only listened to the agency’s 
idem and promised to report 
’ later. 

Mr. Kyd said agency officials 
told the North Koreans that they 
wanted to have talks on the “mo 


dalities and timing” of an agency 
inspection of Korean nuclear facili- 
ties. 

Ms. Davis said that for the final 
round of talks with the United 
Slates to continue, “the continuity 
of safeguards has to continue to be 
in place,” as defined by UN inspec- 
tors. 

Continuity did oot mean a single 
walk-through inspection, she said, 
but rather “an ongoing process.” 

The North Koreans. Ms. Davis 
said, have sated that "they are pre- 
pared to take the steps necessary to 
assure conun uiiy of safeguard*,, 
and I interpret that to be their will- 
ingness to do what it is that the 
IAEA will require to make that 
determination. 

She added, however, that the 
North maintained that it did not 
have to submit to inspections of the 
two dump sites. 

“It's correct to say that we have 
not convinced diem to undertake 
those inspections,” she said. 


“What we have convinced them 
to do." she added, “is to remain 
within the Nonproliferation Trea- 
ty. to suspend their withdrawal to 
keep the continuity of safeguards 
in place, and now — most impor- 
tantly — to provide the IAEA with 
the kinds of inspections necessary 


to continue to have that confi- 
dence.” 

North Korea abruptly withdrew 
from the Nonproliferation Treaty 
in March, but international negoti- 
ations produced an agreement by 
Pyongyang to suspend its with- 
drawal. 


COMPUTE 0» the U.S. Campus, the E-Mail Js Becoming the 

can be spiead quiddy. Late in Au- 


rjrxsit. 


sender, hackers cait change or bide 
their identities 

Dartmouth- h». a;.compnija|-. 

SdedS Sara the 

E-mail hut a reegot xc vision d eals 
1 "Die code pas 


uses 


^S^buttrfastodeal 


w^pjoNansjasihey arise, priyar 
-cy remains a big concent. 7 • / 

- “It is clear to me. that cjectrcaw 
mril deserves tie same proteeticii 
that U.Sl man has today, hot 

My open to'mterpretatiott, said 

Rjduxti E3rewa» a ooos^er^-. 
r whp led the team that ‘wrote 
jgram for BHtzndl - ^ • 

midterm cgncrilationisfar 

from the only questionable use of 
fllH* deettomc tgafl l iy5tepL BHtz- 
'nsril. has turned : the <ampos corns; 
pater network into an efectronte 
dfaice tanyfttg evtaytiting tom 

love letters to tMlBUSicenaixL - 
fa’^Ote'cas^ 


of a woman being raped while jog- 


® tended as a .wanting, but there 
bad been oo rape. . 

“Some of my staff were 
swamped with trails about the, 
rape," raid Kurt Sdumke, chief of 
the Hanover police. 

Mr, Brown said people must 
change how they think about dec- 
tnatic information and leant not to 
OTrt'wriythmg on s computer 
screen, ... 

“We already know bow to do this 

oh paper," be ‘saitl “If someone 
Lanote under yon- door that 


said tbentidtenn was canceled, you 
wold besuspkaous." 

For students, electronic mail has 
spawned a new social dynamic and 
provided an ettrawdunuy medium 
available day and night to ask a 
professor's advice or to ask some- 
one oul 

The service is free, and also pro- 
rides students with free access to 
Internet, the global computer net- 
work, riirmnBtmg the expense of 
long-distance telq&ooe calls. 

“I use it to keep in touch with 
friends at other schools, at Stan* 
lord in particular, because they 
have a SHnflar system,” said Jeffrey 
P. Sieinwacbs, a senior. 


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Page 4 


INTERNATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JAN UARY 6, 1994 

OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Expanding the Alliance 


The new dement in a yearlong “Whither 
NATO?" debate is the sharpened sense of 
potential peril emanating from Russia’s turn 
toward an aggressive. extreme natio nalism. The 
turn is evident in the travails of President Boris 
Ydtsin and his reforms, in the greater weight of 
the militaiy and in the rise of the chauvinistic 
Vladimir Zhirinovsky. These developments 
have had a special impact in the formerly 

Soviet-controlled and now independent market 

democracies of Poland, Hungary and the Czech 
and Slovak republics. Their fear is not so much 
of invasion or direct intimidation in the old 
style as of pressure, political and atmospheric, 
in the new. Ima g inin g that they might again 
come under a sphere of influence directed from 
Moscow, they have redoubled their reach for 
the institutional company and patronage of the 
West They want to enter NATO. 

Until now Washington has discouraged any 
thought or extending alliance membership and 
security guarantees to the east Instead it has 
offered a gamier Partnership for Peace that 
would deepen consultation and fashion links of 
training, logistics and so on. Pan of the hesita- 
tion arises from a reluctance to take on new 
security dudes at a lime of shrinking budgets 
and public support A larger pan springs from 
a judgment that expanding NATO would pro- 
voke Russia's natio nalis ts and dispirit its re- 


formers. Friends call this a “Russta-firsT poh- 
cy that recognizes the U.S. stake in assisting a 
country of permanent strategic heft Critics see 
it as a “Russia-only" policy that aggravates the 
very tensions it was meant to ease. 

It is in fact essential to serve the American 
interest in bringing along Russia. But it is no 
less necessary lo advance the American interest 
m consolidating democracy in a slice of Europe 

that is not burdened by Russia’s 1,000 years of 
difficult history and toil b eager and demon- 
strably ready to join the West. Of course, care 
— continued care — must be taken to broaden 
economic, political and even defense coopera- 
tion with Moscow to match Russia’s centrality 
in American strategy. But at the NATO sum- 
mit (BQl Clinton’s fust) opening cm Monday in 
Brussels, the president needs to flesh out his 
partnership offer with assurances that states 
meeting agreed standards of democratic com- 
petence and military fitness can expect NATO 
membership in a specified time. 

People are likely to look back on this mo- 
ment as one in which the United Stales had tlx 
opportunity to break through to a legitimate 
new post- Cold War mission in Europe. It 
would be a huge mistake to subordinate the 
extension of democracy to an overly solicitous 
reading of the Moscow scene; 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Nuclear Guinea Pigs 


There is no good excuse for some of the 
callous and cavalier radiation experiments 
performed on unsuspecting human patients in 
U.S. government-sponsored studies from the 
1940s lo the 1970s. Energy Secretary Hazel 
O’Leary had good reason to declare herself 
"appalled, shocked and deeply saddened" af- 
ter reviewing one such experiment 

The information now emerging makes it 
dear that many scientists lacked the common- 
sensica} fairness, honesty and compassion that 
is supposedly a hallmark of civilized humans; 
they had no qualms about endangering their 
patients and lying lo them about it, with the 
blessings of the government Many studies 
dearly crossed the line into unethical behavior. 

The best evidence of that comes from the 
, queasiness expressed by some of the scientists 
.involved. In 1963. a nuclear research manager 
warned that radiation experiments on prison- 
ers in Washington might have violated state 
and federal laws. And in I960, a radiation 
biologist warned that experiments on humans 
"would have a little of the Buchenwald 
touch," referring to Nazi experiments on con- 
centration camp victims. 

The most questionable studies used vulner- 
able populations of dying, imprisoned or ig- 
norant Americans as guinea pigs in experi- 
ments designed to determine the harmful 
effects of radiation or to trace the path of 
radiation through the body. Worse yet, re- 
searchers did so without telling the subjects of 
the danger and without following them for 


long periods afterward to determine if there 
were any adverse health effects. 

In the example that shocked Mrs. O'Leary, 
scientists with the Manhattan Project, which 
developed the atom bomb, injected plutonium 
into 18 patients at several medical centers 
from 1945 to 1947 to determine how rapidly it 

would be excreted. The rationale seemed to be 
that the patients had illnesses that were ex- 
pected to kill them within 10 years anyway, so 
why not gain useful knowledge from them that 
might help protect phnomum workers? Most of 
the patients seem not to have granted informed 
consent to the procedure. In some cases, the 
scientists went to great lengths to hide the true 
nature of the tests from the subjects and their 
relatives. And when questions about the ethics 
of such studies were raised by a congressional 
subcommittee in 1986. the Reagan adminis- 
tration turned a deaf ear. 

The very least the government can do at this 
late stage is to track down and examine any 
participants still alive to determine if they need 
medical care or financial compensation for 
harm suffered Mrs. O'Leaiy deserves credit for 
moving promptly to find and release as much 
information as possible- Her example has now 
led the Clinton administration to establish a 
government-wide task force to investigate the 
extent and nature at such experimentation 
and whether any harm resulted Redemption 
from this unprincipled research requires a 
thorough and honest accounting. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Credible Investigator 


Hie Clinton administration has taken the 
position that there is no need to name an 
independent counsel in the Madison Guaran- 
ty Savings & Loan case. It argues that the 
investigation is safely in the hands of career 
Justice Department attorneys, that the presi- 
dent and Mrs. Clinton are cooperating fully 
even though not directly involved and that 
the attorney general has no current power to 
appoint a fully independent counsel anyway. 

We think that is wrong. Murky though most 
aspects of this case still are, it represents pre- 
cisely the kind of case in wind) an independent 
counsel ought to be appointed We say that 
even though — and this should be stressed — 
there has been no credible charge in this case 
that either the president or Mrs. Clinton did 
anything wrong. Nevertheless, it is in the public 
interest — and in the president's as well — to 
put the inquiry in independent bands. 

Madison is the Arkansas S&L whose failure 
oast the federal government an estimated 547 
million and whose owner, James McDougal, 
was a longtime political and business associate 
of then Governor and Mrs. Clinton. Mr. 
McDougal his wife at the tune and the Clin- 
tons were partners in a vacation real estate 
venture called Whitewater Development Cor- 
poration. Critics suggest in retrospect that 
Madison was loosely regulated by state officials 
while Bill Clinton was governor. At the same 
time, federal S&L investigators have suggested 
that Madison funds may have been improperly 
diverted to Whitewater and that the Clintons 
could have been among the beneficiaries of the 
diversions, although there is no indication that 
they were aware of any such transactions. Mr. 
McDougal also helped Mr. Clinton retire a 
S 50.000 campaign debt in the mid-1980s. 

The Clintons say they did nothing wrong in 
connection with either Madison or Whitewater. 
They describe themselves in the Whitewater 
instances as passive investors who ended up 
losing some 569,000. although they have never 
claimed such a loss on their tax returns. They 
daim as well to have been entirely forthcoming 
in the affair — bn then it turns out that While 
House spokesmen were not entirely forthcom- 
ing about a Whitewater EDe in the office of the 
late White House deputy counsel, Vincent Fos- 


ter. The file and other papers are now going to 
be made available to the Justice Department 
investigators — but still not made public. 

There are other loose ends wi th regard to the 
Madison affair. It is a complicated business 
that neither can nor ought to be dismissed. It is 
tree, as the White House says, that the Republi- 
cans now banging their spoons and calling Tor 
an independent investigation spent the 12 pre- 
ceding years, when they controlled the execu- 
tive branch, denouncing such investigations as 
encroachments on executive prerogative. It’s 
true and it doesn't matter. 

Nor is it protection enough to say that the 
investigation is in the hands of career attorneys. 
To whom do they report? Who dears and 
vouches for their work? There is noway even in 
the best of circumstances, which don't exist 
here, that a Justice Department can conduct a 
credible investigation involving a president to 
whom it is ultimately responsible. That is what 
is al issue in this matter, and why an indepen- 
dent figure should be named. 

— the Washington post. 

Other Comment 
The Philippines 9 New Health 

Long dubbed “the sick man of Asia," the 
Philippines is now recording some economic 
numbers to cheer abouL For a resource-rich 
country — and one blessed with a highly 
educated work force — the Philippines has for 
too long performed far below its potential 

The country has made significant political 
and economic gains since Fidel Ramos as- 
sumed office in June [992. Most important has 
been the mum of political stability. The armed 
conflict that bedeviled the Philippines for two 
decades inflicted a severe tofl on the economy. 

Another factor has been the easing of the 
power crisis — the result of Mr. Ramos’s fast- 
track construction of new gas-fired plants. 
There is a real chance that the Philippines can 
now close the economic gap with its neighbors 
and join the ranks of Asia's newly industrializ- 
ing economies. It must not blow this chance. 

— Business Times (Singapore). 



International Herald Tribune 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Cii-Chaimtn 

RICHARD McCLEAN. PuHiOrrr A Clnef Exnutnr 
JOHN VINOCUR, Euxutov Efar Jt VfrPiradat 

• WALTER WELLS. A'mt Editor • SAMUEL ABT. KA7HERIVE KNORR and 
CHARLES M1TCHELMORE Depurv EJeun • G\RLGEVkTRTZ,Wwir£iir 

• ROBERT J. IXWAHUt£diev«fjfe£^ww? Ai.ors “JONATHAN GAGRftumtssiM/Fincttr EcBiinr 

• RENE BOhTOY. JAMES 

•JUANITA L CASPAR!, fimrulMSSil ZVtrAfwm Dtnx*r» ROBERT FARRlt Cirrukncr, Du***. Eu/r^v 
Dirrrseur Jt &j AiMinzaiw /ArWIl Siwww 


bftmtfimaJ HonUTriNme, IS! Avenue ChsfcvdiNGauile. 92SZ 1 NcuiIly-«r-Scinc, PraXs. 

TeL : i It 4637.93.00. Pax : C5railaburL4637.0&5l: Advtmsuig. 463731 II 
sor for Asia. Mkhnd Riehanlsun. 5 Cnnifrivry fct. Smstijw? 051 1. Tel Fur i&’l . j4-23J4 

i;. Dir. Asia, RolfD. KnmepuM. 5U Ghmeesier RcL Hem g Kane. TeL Shi J J6/6. Fax : Shl-fO/3 
It Dir. U.K. Carr. Thom. id Acn. Umdon WCT. Tii 1(17/ Fax: ZHLZ2S4 

il Mgr- Cemwnv: W Laaeiheh Friedrkkar. IS. NH2J Frankfon/M TeL ilfPt 72 ft/ 5S. hxc lOWt 72 73 IQ 
a.L± Mxhri Cam v. .*»> Third 4m. Afew Ymk NY. /«C2 Tet 1212) TS-SM fur i2I2i TSSJpiS 
\. an capital Je F RCS Naraern fl 7321121 1 2d. Comma sum Panlaire No. 6 I3J7 

pNS baemaumiHenM TrVw. M nsfp wmii JB.Y. (dW-tftfZ 



Five Issues for a Serious American Forei { 


shapl 


W ashington - Tbe fc 

debate during the Clinton 
lion’s first year focused almost totally on 
secondary issues. The United States can ill 
afford such a luxury this year. 

The only first- magnitude issue to get large- 
scale pubis; attention and sustained presiden- 
tial focus (al tbe eleventh hour) was the North 
American Free Trade Agreement Other such 

issues — Russia, the Middle East, Noth 

Korea, China. Japan, the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade — drew episodic high- 
level attention from an administration pre- 
occupied with domestic concerns. 

Three of the four most debated policies 
were Bosnia. Somalia and Haiti — all areas erf 
actual or potential military intervention 
where Aroencan interests were less than vital 
Despite progress on trade and in the Mid- 
dle East the lack of focus on the big issues has 
led to weakened relationships with America’s 

The big issues require special 

attention in the Oval Office. 

allies and a loss or support at home for 
continued U.S. leadership in the world. The 
outlook is approaching a point of peril fen- 
cing a coherent foreign policy, 
fo reverse this trend. President Bill Gin-' 
ton needs to choose a few priority issues for 
1994 and act on them. Here are five candi- 
dates — all matters where important U.S. 
interests are at stake and where U.S. actions 
can make a difference. 

Dealing with Russia, Ukraine and the rest of 
thejormer Soviet Union: 

The administration has established Ameri- 
can support for Boris Yeltsin as a leading 
force for political and economic reform. With 
the parliamentary elections over and the new 
constitution approved, America has to broad- 
en U.S.- Russian relations. 

Besides expanding contacts with all respon- 
sible dements of the political spectrum and 
emphasizing support not for individuals but 
for democratic institutions and market re- 
forms, Washington should spend more time cm 
such enraging features of Russia's foreign poli- 
cy as iu more menacing positions on midear 
weapons and the former Soviet empire. 

If Russia can object to the expansion of 
NATO, the West should be able to make the 
expansion of Russian influence no less an 
issue. It has to make dear that its long-term 
support is not unconditional and will depend 
on Russia's adherence to political and econom- 
ic reforms and restraint toward its neighbors. 

Relations with Russia cannot be tbe sole 
avenue through which U.S. relations with 
Ukraine are conducted. .American policy to- 
ward Ukraine has been confrontational and 
one-dimensional, linking willingness to pro- 
vide assistance and normalize relations to 
Ukraine's willingness to give up its nuclear 
weapons. But the more Washington pushes 
this approach, tbe more the Ukrainians con- 
clude that tbe weapons are valuable. 

Given Ukraine's collapsing economy and 
Russia's uncertain intentions toward an inde- 
pendent Ukraine, we could end up with the 
wont of all worlds; an unstable and isolated 
Ukraine with nuclear weapons. 

Tbe West should seek to promote Ukraini- 
an stability, with support tied only to needed 
economic and political reforms; with this ap- 
proach. the nuclear question can be addressed 
more productively. 

Consolidating European security : 

Too much of the UJL-European dialogue 
has been consumed by squabbles over trade, 
finger-pointing over Bosnia and counterpro- 
ductive suggestions that Aria is more impor- 


By Brent Scowcroft and Richard Haass 


taut to America than Europe, as if the two 
regions were mutually exclusive. Serious dia- 
logue should be resumed oa possible external 
threats to European stability. 

The issue of expanding NATO will lop the 
agenda at the NATO summit meeting next 
week. But it does not need formal expansion 
to deal with former Warsaw Pact countries. 
The goal in Eastern Europe should be to 
provide security and to coosolidaie political 
and economic progress (on which American 
help has been stingy), not to encourage gov- 
ernments to devote scarce resources to de- 
fense in order to earn admission to NATO. 

Nor should the goal be to make NATO so 
big that it becomes unwieldy. America can 
promote European stability by developing less 
formal mili tary ties to Eastern Europe and 
making dear that h will extend security guar- 
antees if Moscow threatens neighbors’ security. 
This approach should reassure Eastern Europe, 
avoid unduly provoking Moscow and provide 
leverage over Russia's external behavior. 

Pacifying North Korea: 

America has a dear interest in avoiding 
conflict on the Korean Peninsula. It has an 
equally clear interest in making sure that 
North Korea does not provoke an Asian arms 
race and does not add a nuclear dimension to 
the threat that it poses to regional stability. 

Tbe administration said on Tuesday that it 
was dose to a compromise wiLh Pyongyang. It 
is making a crucial error. Any arrangements 
for inspections must provide not for onetizne 
but for regular and full access to all sites — 
not merely tbe seven apparently agreed upon 
— that are known or suspected of having 
nuclear weapons activities. 


: to reduce 


tbe threat to the 

Washington dwuld open! v— - 

and economic relations. But whatever happens* 
the United States and South Korea should 
continue joint military exercises and strengtb- 



ty tc 
thei 


Fostering strategic dialogue with the Asia- 
Pacific powers: 

The North Korean issue demonstrates how 
important political- militaiy relations remain 
in the Pacific. China’ s negative attitude on 
sanctions against North Korea, its aggressive 
pnri dangerous policy on arms exports, Ja- 
pan’s hints about rethinking its non-nuclear- 
weapons policy, the conventional military 
buildup among members of the Association 
of South East Asian Nations — all this sug- 
gests strongly that Washington cannot allow 
ns diplomacy with the world's most vibrant 
economics to be dominated by trade disputes. 
Instead, it needs broader consultations on 
national priorities and changing national re- 
lationships in a dynamic Asia. , 

phening the sinews of foreign policy: 
among tbe requisites far successful 
_ [policy is a credible militaiy able to give 
it and support to policy. 

» administration has cut the already much 
reduced defense budget that h inherited from 
George Bush. The cuts are even larger than 
often realized, considering ihgt the defense 
budget indudes a range of nxiematkmal activi- 
ties that do not co n tribut e directly to U.S. 
forces. The UJ5. military most not become a 
hollow instrument in which the sizes and com- 
position of forces and their readiness are not 


The defease i. ... 

I nman, faces a tough job. He must convince 
Mr Clip ton to finance the Pentagon's posable 
it request of $255 bflliaa for tbe 1995 

year ami fight for it ra Capitol H3L, 

Preridcnt Clin ton, wl» has his abih- 

to exploit the power of his office to shape 
nation’s political agenda — oo-thebudgrt, 
health care, crime — must do no less on issues 

of Eonaga and defense policy. 

There are, of earns , .other national security 
matters deserving high-level attention... A', 
short list includes consolidating and vine 
possible expanding gains in .trade liberaliza- 
tion, continuing Iraq's isolation, maintaining 
vigilance toward Iran, promoting democratic 
r*a ngp in Cuba, normalizing ties with Viet- 
nam, copmg with continuing instability in the 
former Yugoslavia and rethinking the US. 
relationship to peacekeeping, peacemaking 
and the United Nations. ■ 

- These or other issues may turn out to require 
high-level involvement —say, if die 
Past peace process fallen of if the war 
in Bosnia spreads, tint what is certain is that 
the trig issues require special attention in the 
Oval Office. They offer tire areas of greatest 
opportunity if the United States takes tire lead 
— and the greatest ride if it does not 

Mr. Scowcroft, president of die Forum for 
International Policy, a foreign affahsfaunda- 
tion, was national security adviser under George 
Bush and Gerald Ford. Mr. Haass, a National 
Security Cotoidl staff member in dte.Btnh ad- 
ministration, is a senior as so c i ate at the Carnegie 
Endowment for International Peace. Vmjaon- 
tribmeddus comment to The New York Tin 



XT EW YORK — Vladimir 
IN Zhirinovsky’s strong show- 
ing in the Russian parliamentary 
elections last month constitutes a 
serious security threat lo tbe world. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky has modeled 
himself on Hitler. Tire conditions 
that drove voters to support him 
are similar to those that prevailed 
in Weimar Germany, only worse: 
economic disintegration, inflation, 
inequality, a breakdown of order 
and morality, and a profound 
sense of national- injury. 

The administration of President 
Boris Ydtsin is more inept and 
hppotent than the Weimar Repub- 
lic was. Tbe army voted over- 
whelmingly for Mr. Zhirinovsky. 

Admittedly, special factors fa- 
vored him Reformers were divid- 
ed and moderate nationalists were 
excluded from the ballot, leaving 
him as the only nationalist choice. 
Nonetheless, the elections turned 
him from a marginal figure into a 
credible contender for power. 

Barring an unexpected improve- 
ment in tire performance of the 
Ydtsin administration, Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky stands a good chance of 
becoming the not president. He 
has cast himself as an unpredict- 
able maHman who could blackmail 
the world with nudear weapons. 
He will be as insatiable as Hitter, 
with no means of staying in power 
but oppression and conquest. 

If the analogy with Hitler is 
uncomfortable, it should shock 


By George Soros 


tbe civilized world into action. 
There is a simple way to prevent 
Mr. Zhirinovsky from coating to 
power improve the performance 
of the present government. 

This would require a profound 
change in Western artitudes. We 
must reoqgnize that the collapse 
of the Soviet Systran has phmged 
the region into a crisis that endan- 
gers peace and stability far be- 
yond its borders. We cannot pro- 
tect our security by strengthening 
our defenses; we can do so only 
by exerting a constructive influ- 
ence within the region. 

We must bdp Russia and tire 
other former Soviet republics 
make the transition to democrat- 
ic, market-oriented, open societ- 
ies, because they cannot do it on 
their own; and we must hdp them 
build legal and security stru c tures 


tojjreserve peace. 


, next week’s NATO summit, 

the fTintnn adminis tration jg to 

propose what it calb a Partnership 
for Peace, extending a hand, to 
some East European states. The 
steps proposed — joint exercises 
for peactxeepmg, crisis manage- 
ment. search and rescue missions, 
disaster refief — are totally inade- 
quate, bm the baric idea is good. It 
needs to be expanded into a genu- 
ine partnership with a strong com- 
ponent of economic assistance. 
The militaiy and security as- 


pects could.be entrusted to NATO, 
out tire economic, legal and politi- 
cal aspects would require tire cre- 
ation erf a task farce under the 
aegis of the Group of Seven or the 
Group of 24 countries, which are 
airrentlyproviding aid to Eastern 
Europe. The task force would need 
m unified raiwmwn ri. 

It should be recognized that eco- 
nomic assistance to the former So- 
viet Union has, so far, been an 
immitigatflH failure. It need not be 
so. My foundations have devel- 
oped a fo rmula that works: Itcob- 
sisis of finding a trustworthy part- 
ner, retaining the purse strings but 
working for the benefit of recipi- 
ents. not of die donors, 

It has worked in tire Internation- 
al Science Foundation, which is 
distributing $100 nuQiou to natu- 
ral science and has benefited 
30,000 scientists in tbe former So- 
viet Union; in the Privatization 
Institute, established in 
with the Ministry of 
i; and in tire Transfor- 
mation of the Humanities . — a 
joint project with the Education 
Ministry to replace Marxism-Le- 
ninism in schools. 

After the Russian elections, 
many voices urged a slowdown in 
economic reform. The opposite is 
tire right policy. A social safety 
net is an integral part of an ad- 
vanced market economy, but 


Russia cannot afford one on its 
own. That is why mtemauonal 
assistance is indispensable. Bal- 
ance-of- payment support from 
the Inte rnational Monetary Fund 
could be delivered in the form of 
sbdal security payments. 

Similarly, NATO exercises 
could provide hard-currency em- 
ployment to Russian offi cos . In 
this way, large and important seg- 
ments of the population would 
have something to lose if Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky came to power. 

I have been predicting the enrer- 

gena of natkwahstre dictatorships 

since 1990, but I did not anticipate 
Mr. Zhirinovsky’s electoral suc- 
cess. It happened sooner than I 
expected, and it fulfills my worst 
fears. I considered tire threat so 
serious that I have spent or com- 
mitted $1 billion of my personal 
fortune for tire promotion of what 
I call open society. 

' Do the open societies of tbe 
world care about their way of life? 
Are they willing to make any ef- 
fort to promote itt There is not 
intidr time kft far action. Presi- 
dent "Bill Clinton’s forthcoming 
trip to the NATO summit, to 
Prague and to Moscow is proba- 

imtiate radically 

Ujwmd the former Soviet empire. 

The writer, an international fi- 
nancier, contributed tMs comment to 
die International Herald Tribune. 


India Has a Centrist Void That Pro-Hindu Moderates Might Fill 


N EW DELHI — Political corruption is per- 
haps as widespread in India as in Japan or 
Italy. Yet for all its flaws. Indian democracy has 
shown repeatedly that it will not reward extrem- 
ism. This is a lesson that tbe pro-Hindu Bhara- 
tiya Janata Part)- must learn after serious set- 
backs in recent elections across northern India, 
including Uttar Pradesh. If it wishes to gain 
power in New Delhi, it must shed extremism. 

The BJP’s leadership has always been divid- 
ed between moderates, who generally want reli- 
gion kept out of politics, and hard-liners, who 
want religion to be tbe basis of politics. 

Tbe moderates, until now (he weaker faction, 
would like the BJP to be a center-right conserva- 
tive party appealing broadly to tbe ethos of 
Hindu civilization but without dogmatism. Their 
model is the Christian Democratic Party of Ger- 
many. The hard-liners, with their furtive links to 
extremist Hindu religious organizations, want 


By Bharat Wariavwalla 

the BJP to champion the cause of Hmdmsm. 

The elections showed that centuries-old caste 
divisions, reinforced in recent years by class 
differences, cannot be overcome by an appeal to 
religion. Rama, hero of the epic Ramayana and 
tbe symbol around which the BJP sought to unite 


deprived and dispossessed Hindus. They see him 
as tbe god of the privileged. 

Just over a year ago. it appeared that Rama 
would be a potent symbol of Hindu national- 
ism for the BJP. When a crowd of Hindu zealots 
demolished the I6ih century Babri mosque in 
Ayodhya, tbe alleged birthplace of Rama, in 
December 1992, it seemed that Hindus, long 
divided into inaumraable castes and subcastes, 
might have found a focus for political unity. 


Thu has not happened. Instead, those who 
dreaded the aggresave variety of Hindu nation- 
alism preached by some in the BJP joined’ 
hands to defeat what they saw as an mtoupiit, 
upper-caste eb'te. Tbe key groups in this de 
facto alliance were the Muslims and Untouch- 
able and backward-caste Hindus. 

For example, those outride or at the margins 
of the hierarchical and oppressive Hindu caste 
order joined hands to ddeax the BJP in Uttar 
Pradesh. Tbe Bahujan Samaj Party, represent- 
ing Untouchables, and the Samaj wadi Janata 
Party, the party of the backward castes and 
dasres, emerged victorious. For the first time, 
those outside the pale of Hindu social order are 
ruling the largest state in India. 

Nationalist ideologues in the RIP argued that 
Muslim orthodoxy, with its einotional and pdrti- 
caliinks to Pakistan and the Ialamfcworid, stood 
in the way of a strong nation built an science. 


Arafat Is a Clever Loser but He Can’t Afford to Lose This Time 


W ASHINGTON — Yasser .Ara- 
fat has spent his political life 
playing and winning weak bands that 
other men would have thrown away. 
Bui that will not be the case in his 
brinkmanship contest with Israeli 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. 

Weakness can be an asset in Arab 
politics w’hen it is manipulated clev- 
erly — a game that the PLO chairman 
has mastered. He created his Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization out of a 
military defeat. He has sustained it 
for three decades in similar fashion, 
rising like a phoenix from the ashes of 
disaster after disaster. 

He can choose no other strategy. 
Weakness is the Palestinian condi- 


The Ghost of die PLO 

O N THE White House lawn last 
September, Israel in effect 
signed a peace agreement with a 
phantom organization, because the 
Palestine Liberation Organization, in 
every sense, no longer easts. 

Its military forces were expelled 
from Beirut in 1982 and later dis- 
persed. The social and political insti- 
tutions the PLO operated for many 
years also have collapsed. 

Finally, there is the erosion of sup- 
port for' the PLO among the main- 
stream, tied to (be sneaking suspicion 
Chat the leadership has lost touch with 
the realities of Palestinian life. 

Palestinian denuxrais fee! enraged 
at seeing their ideas thrown out the 
window by a few posiunr.g officials. 
A new generation of Palestinians, cut 
from the same quarry of shared strug- 
gle and kinship of vision, will surely 
come forward and tell these “sole, 
official representatives” ;o move on. 

— Fowaz Turh, author of “Exile's 
Return : The Making of a Pakstbacn- 
Amenam. The Washington Past 


By Jim Hoagland 


don, bred by centuries of Turkish. 
British, Arab and Israeli occupation. 
It should come as no surprise that 
Mr. Arafat is willing to risk tbe col- 
lapse of the Israeli - Pales Uni an nego- 
tiations by backtracking on what the 
Israelis say was a done deal. The 
razor’s edge is home territory for him. 

He has thrown the negotiations 
into bitter deadlock by rejecting Is- 
raeli control over border crossings 
into tbe West Bank and Gaza Strip — 
even though Mr. Rabin has always 
insisted that this was a sine qua non 
for Israeli military withdrawals from 
those occupied territories. The Is- 
raelis say the Palestinians in fact 
accepted* such an arrangement in 
talks in Cairo last week. 

This dispute hinges as much on 
cultural and political differences as 
on haggling ror tactical advantage. 
Mr. Arafat could bring down the en- 
tire Palestinian- Israeli peace accord 
if he fails to recognize now different 
tbe dynamics of this situation are 
from previous cliff-hangers he has 
created and then exploited. 

Mr, Rabin will respond to weak- 
ness and unpredictability not with 
sympathy and concession but by dig- 
ging in more firmly. Tbe shame fac- 
tor, deliberately used in Arab politics 
to undermine the legitimacy and au- 
thority of a stronger opponent, plays 
almost no role in Israeli political cul- 
ture, which abhors the self-doubt that 
Mr. Arafat's tactics have inspired in 

other opponents. 

Mr. Arafat has repeatedly salvaged 
political victory out of military defeat 
sines PLO guerrillas ambushed Israe- 
li troops in Jordan in 1968. His men 
lost that battle but their willingness 
and ability to fight the Israeli army at 
all established the PLO as an inde- 
pendent force in Arab pofitics- 


The PLO gained international sym- 
pathy two yearn later by being crushed 
in Jordan's civil war. The guerrilla 
organization also benefited from tbe 
1973 /yab-Israed war, in Whkh the 
Arabs initially surprised and humiHai- 
ed brad before suffering devastating 
battlefield losses that were halted by 

U.S. diplomatic intervention. 

In 1982. Mr. Arafat survived Isra- 
el's siege of Beirut and emerged as a 
hero in Arab eyes, even though the 
PLO was disposed from its opera- 
tional base in Lebanon. Similarly, he 
lost the war of international ter rorism 
— the Palestinian cause was tar- 
nished and its terror agents were 
tracked down and eliminated by tbe 
Israelis — but be remained undral- 
: in his leadership position. 
Jntil, that is, the summer of 1990. 
By backing Saddam Hussein’s inva- 
sion of Kuwait, be infuriated the 
Gulf rulers who had been his princi- 
pal financial backers. Saddam's de- 
feat brought Mr. Arafat nothing ex- 
cept ostracism and bankruptcy. He 
agreed to Israel's terms for peace 
talks in order to brake the PLO’s 
swift slide toward disintegration. 

The Palestinian is discovering that 
he cannot rely on external factors for 
much help m his diplomatic arm 
wrestling with Mr. Rabin. The Clin- 
ton administration has wisely de- 
clined to come galloping to Mr. Ara- 
fat's aid by pressuring Mr. Rabin. 
And Mr. Arafat's Arab brothers are 
either too angry at him far support- 
ing Saddam or too absorbed with 
their own problems to weigh in with 
the Americans or the Israelis on Mr. 
Arafat’s behalf. 

Egypt has been his most consistent 
base of support among major Arab 
countries ana would like tohdp him 
now. Bm Cairo's ability to influence 


the Israelis has been seriously weak- 
ened by the Cold Peace that has pre- 
vailed since the two former enemies 
. a peace treaty in 1979. 

Arab player Mr. Arafat must 
watch most dbsdy now is Syria’s 
Hafez Assad, who was humiliated by 
the secret Palestmian-Isradi contacts 
leading to the peace accord and who 
has other reasons to take revenge on 
Mr. Arafat. If Mr. Arafat miscalcu- 
lates and goes over the brink in his 
own separate negotiations with Isra- 
el, Mr. Assad would have a clear 
track to pursue a deal with Mr. Rabin 
on the Golan Heights. He could not 
now be accused of s elling out the 


Palestinians by negotiating separate- 
ly with the Israelis. ‘ 


Syria in fact may have been the 
real target all along for Mr: Rabin, 
who is skeptical of Mr. Arafat’s abil- 


ity to deliver. Listening to Mr. Ra- 
bin strongly insist a [ew weeks ago in 
Washington that there were ho pro- 
spects for a deal with Syria, ntnr. 
1 thought I heard a prime minister 
who doth protest too modi. ' 
Failure on toe Palestinian track 
might suit Mr. Rabin fine. For one 

ty*fatad for wliocouM 

finally wind up losing by losing. 1 

77re Washington Post. . 


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technology and a q g t a ha n. Hinduism, they as- 
serted, must settle its historic score with Islam if 
it b to advance into the modem era. 

Yet only if thc semi-reBgious BJP becomes 
moderate and softens its hostility toward Mus- 
lims will it stand a chance of emerging as a 
serious contender for national power. 

Such reform could pay handsome political 
dividends. There is now a centrist void to be 
filled in Indian politics. The Congress Party, 
whiefa occupied this space for toe past 35 years, 
is in great disarray. P. V. Narasimha Rao, the 
prime minister, survives in power by deft mar 
neuveringandanunoaiaBylmgerfiareofgood 
hick- If tbe BJP opted for pragmatism, these 
could prove to be weak assets. 

The writer, senior fidow at die Center for dm 
Study cf Developing Societies, in New Delhi, con- 
tributed this comment to the H erafd Tribune. 


’ ' 

*•- ' ' 
tjO' - 


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IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: A Curious Custom 

LONDON —As today [Jan. 6] is the 
feast of toe Epiphany, the Royal of- 
fering of gold, frankincense and 

myrrh will be presented at the altar (rf 

the Chapd Royal, Sl James’s Palace. 
Tbe offering usually consists of twm- 
ty sovereigns, with small packets of 
spices. In framer days roe offering 
was fin anced with a cheque for £ 50 , 
which was furnished by lire Lord 
Stewart, and on one occasion when 
Pnncc Albert happened to attend the 
service he had the curiosity to exam- 
ine the contents of the box in which 
tbe offerings were made. He discov- 
ered that the gold was represented 
merely by a single sovereign, h 

turned out that the balance of the £50 

was always distributed in fees and 
perquisites to various persons who 
tot* part] in the function and to some ■ 
of the officials of thechapeL 


Helsingfors [Helsinki] says that 17 
Bolshevists have hem yrmoedstlhc 
Finnishfrootier.Tbeygiveatfistress- 
ing account of the presentalnatioo in 
Petrograd. The city, they say «“■ 
ply an immense cemetery.. -People 
iaml daily from hanger, they feD a™ 
die in tire streets. Oats-are about the 
only food that is left to cat. A'btfrisg 
costs 20 roubles, a bunch of BggO** 
300 roubles. The working dasswsre 
exhibiting a profound discontent 
with the Bolshevist regimfeX 

1944; One Donblefe^ ' 


LONDON — [From our 




customers! 

ble”avisit( 

a .50 percent cut was . 

Britain's- liquor supply. De *®® \ 
the whisky titnatfon as 
distiller said oroorfe-to ***&■??? 
South America also would I 




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STDTKHnnu ^ „ ' tified and existrag straks-ara 

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HEBALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANliAgY 

“ © P I w * ° N 


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Of Nihilism and the Genius 


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This is die second , of two artida. 


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N EW YORK — Almost invariably^ 
what the poor of the world know 
—which is tosay.whatthe overwhelm- 
ing majority of the people of the world 
know — if they are familiar with any- 
thing foreign, is American popular 
culture. With the exception of the Is- 
lamic world. where resistance is still 
fierce,- that culture cootmues to sweep- 
all befort iL 

India and China, which between them 
now have two-fifths trftiwwodtPs popa-. 
lation, woe the other great holdouts, 
fearing the enormous changes that al- 
lowing in American culture woold bring. 

But thorn harriers have either ta&en or 
arem the briidc^ faffing^' . 

The essential -poznl is that most peo- 
pie. want this consumer culture, horwev- 
■ er innefa they may resent its effect-on,- 
i say,- the status -of women. Yet such 
; changes, coine as part, of the package, 

1 pww -American consumer culture is 
■ corrosive of all traditions and es- 
i tablished truths. V \ --? 

Yet we are stuck with the jjlob al cra - 
• ture,aswearesnjckimthwpridcapitaP 
i iom. Those who would. oat rf.ievnigqa' 

; ;to American ralinre in partienkr, hns- 
i hand die belief thatotor par adigms are 

’ l available are in for a kmg wait 

American mass culture has not be- 
* "come the glribal benchmark by - acri- . 
i dent. U is predseiy the hisanytes, 

tore, its^onricrioa that and 

realities are, or at least should be, indfc- 
tjnmrishab le. that mate; it superior to 
anything that can be prodheedby sod-’ 
cries where people nave lived longer 
and believed their cultures to be less, 
perennially up for grabs. _ 

^lt is the organic sperifiotyof French 
m Japanese or Egyptian history that 
makes it so difficult for snch cultures to 
concoct the dreamaeape ite has been 
ft rpwr^’ ggrettcontriogtionioxhe^y 

caitiny. Now, even more ton m the 
oast, it is the inorganic qnahty of the 
American cultoral mix that/has made 
h infinitely exportable.' ' - 
The main reason American popular. 

, culture arose with sadi swiftness and 

, achieved such success was that there 

* T^ alwwless<rf afirdneak.crf rraair 

; turns ana institutions of high culture tp 
. hold it back. A country mottvated by 
• assumptions on thepan of us ntog 
‘ daramat “history is bnnt ortot^he 
' bnaness of America is Imsites" is up- 
* Bkdy to worry very much wont qaas- 
' rions of quality so long as tne custom- 
' ere keep puying. .... _ 

, Tbc American busness dite.«ioiiK^, 
* probably erect heroic statues toth e stu- 
• doit radieds of to 1960 s., The_samc. 

' dhos ihai declared th^ peop‘ ft Simula 
i boy anything toy feltlike tavmftho^- 
• ever little they might Med it, mandated 
■ that one should learn aaythmg^one 
I warded to leam, and bttto. of nothing 


else, so long as aK* Teaming cotdd 
dtte be shlMdizfid or at least end m a 
decent-payingj ob. • 

Identity pradcs. with itsTapad sdf- 
: absorption, « cut from the smb c cb th. 

Jnst as one buys things to adorn mesea 

and oo^s smronndiiigs, so sfiatatB be- 
gan to-be encouraged to snidy thaa - 
srives, vnth the promiseof maintainin g 
ortrognnfing their self-esteem- 
. ibe presumption was thailmcwwdgP 

had been wibhdd tjy an oppresses »■ 
^gr yactl^.^meniswae happy, 

pleased to be able to study themselves, a 
4 hrrwpaitic rather ton an edu cation al 
experience, and the university admmis- 

nation was hapOT because, as an edoca- 
tumal commodity, such cmn cmag Hfla 
be expandod 10 satisfy to tonaods of 
- « Z : mm! niKvt Tvsseat- 


wnatcva-Bcw oppraw* 

ed iisrif , 50 kn?g as i»' mentors couM 
afftad the tniticri. ' . _ 

Wth high coltuns in Fctnsat, tbc field 
was ton dear for mass culture. This 
-has been the red sigmiicance of. to 
academic culture ware. While radi c a l s 
arid ncoconfiCTvatives squabble, to 

'adHnggoesim. 

Ewm before to latest campus tu- 
mult. to American vaaon tf camtal- 
1 ism hadproved itself infinitely iCTlicnt 
and absorptive; But now . the tim e it 
fnr some ggmindv dretaroing or 
seemingly sedirions movement • — rap 
music Is to obvious ex gyple — to 
be succe ss fully merehamfised grows 
■ ever shorter, h is only a decade smoe 
hip-luk) dubs were a phenomenon m 
nrii&ii ghettos. Now, sanitized vecaons 
rf to nmsk that originated there 
aie. used as background mnzak for 
Pej^ ammierriab. - :* . . 

^Europe or East Asa, where 
criTi taken mote saiouriy, rap, with 
hs violent, bate-fifled lyncs, would 
have made to estahfidiment, at the 

po ^ ra i 

one itsidespreds^ in to irf 
its entiwimeuis and, Snidfc a to 
society ntonce toy spring. There is a 
‘ stannch refiisal to admit that anythmg 
to be taken so seriously as to «t 
intowayofiteiiaricettoandacwq- 
faiM that anything can be market” it 
it is fflven to right advertising sp®i_ 

■ Becam e it excludes- nothing, from 
Bambi to Rambo, where almost any 
'other ctrfthre would leave at ka stson a 
thihgs off the dimmest, 
know- how to make cverythmg serai 
pot only attractive but somehow necea- 
.sarv, the new global admre has to at 

least passthrough to American dream 
facteny, even if> does mrt otonate 
there, before bqng sent out to RD to 
dicamsof tite woricLri. . ; . . .. . . ; 

The writer is author most recently of 
•The Exile : Cuba at the Heat cf Mir 
This article was adapud by 
Washington Post from, u .m&r 
that appears in the current issue of the 
WoHdfo^ Journal. 



When the Artists Acquiesce 

To Their Oum Corruption 

• 


By Ken Ringle 


Regarding the repen “Stroms Data 
P^ftoaGood *7> U.S Economy 
(Dec 30) by Lawrence Sfalkm: 

President Bin dinion’s tax increase 
may . have helped keep interest rates 
down, but not for to virtuous reason 
Mr. Malkin states. By raising taxes, Mr. 

Gmton took money away from private 
investment and discouraged work in- 
vestment and work being to two de- 
ments needed for growth. GrowUi in- 
creases to demand for money, winch in 
mm tends to increase interest rates. It is 

■ISSflittM: Be Clear About NATO 

reduction. When you ox to reduce gov- 
ernment borrowing you reduce ^savings 
and amsumptioQ by roughly to same 
amount you reduce borrowing. Tne two 
offset gyh other; to effect on interest 

rates is neutral ■ „ . 

President George Bushs recession 
(brought on partly by increased taxes 
and new regulation) brought down in- 
terest rates, short and long. Mr- 
inherited these low nut, he did not 
create them. This is verified by hucteg 
the Treasury-bill rate and Lehman Bond 
Index over the last two 
pn«h administration and to nrsi year 
under Mr. Clinton. 


west - u - - . '„,u 

mania or to Baltic sates - 
for France or Gerxar.y. ^ b> tocuP * 
useless ireaw with a country ttes. b 
cot willing to defend^ 

FER>aND»5 BaRCIA. 

Paris. 


about to growth in the same 
Ste^of *91 but under this heavier 
Surden of axes i: is udtoly to be 
sustained through *94. The BusihClin- 
lon taxes make it 

to growth we nad in 1983-S8. ■ More 

srrAssss" 

Left Standing at the Door 

from the recession of 19? 1-82. no: from 
the Rcaean tax cuts which took er.e^ 1 
after the deficits had disappeared, i 
evan G. Galbraith. 

New York. 


W ASHINGTON — In to original 
screenpbv for to new movie 

■■Gerommo: An" American Legend." the 
great Indian fighter hung little girls on 
meal hooks — a vignette substantiated 
bv even sympathetic contemporary por- 
traits, which paim him as not only a 
brave and formidable Apache leader, 
but one of to most ruthless and cnicL 
No meat hooks are evident in to final 
film, which makes to great wamor not 
much meaner than Tome. 

In Toronto, fist-shaking protesters 
turn out at the premiere of a Broadway- 
bound revival of the Jerome Kcm-Oscar 

meamthile 

Hammerstein musical “Show Boat," de- 
nouncing to show’s melodious pmtny- 
al of blacks and whites in to 1880s as 
“racist hate propaganda.” 

As visitors enter to Biennial exhibit 
at" New York's Whitney Museum ol 
American .Art, they are told to don a 
button that says, “1 can't imagine ever 

wanting to be white." 

Welcome to to arts world of to ws. 
where aesthetics and creativity too often 
tale a back seat to political posturmg. 
and the onlv people we are not afraid of 
offendina are straight white guy s. 

Once upon a lime we coukin i even 
mention homosexuality on to stags. 
Sow vre are lucky to find a play about 



Taxing is not the way to redu« to 
deCrit/Because taxing nw an adverse 
effect on growth. Growth provides a 
government with more revenues and re- 
mices its expenditures. Interest rates are 
influenced by several things, ccommuc 
activity and inflation tang the most 
important. There is an old saying. Tbe 
bond market loves a recession. 

Fourth-quarter growth m 93 was 


Re^ardm^, “Encasement in Europe, 
Partnership R f :rh Russia” (Opinitm. Jan. 
3) bv Timothy Gorton Ash, Micnoel 
Meries and Dominique Moist: 

Would the West risk a nuclear war to 
oroiect Poland or to Czech Rraubhc 
frSTa Russia led by Vladimir thorn- 
ovskv or some other Russian nauonalisl. 
Remember Munich 1938 — or for tot 
matter. Bosnia 1992! To change NATO s 
role of protecting Western Europe mtoa 
kss defined role of global European pro- 
tection (against Russia, who else?) creates 
confusion as to what is and what is not a 

vital interest for NATO. . 

NATO's role should be kept simple 
and dear, to protect Western Europe 
from aggression. Let to fronuers of 
NATO be to frontiers of nuclear retali- 
ation. Stop this idealistic nonsense of a 
global European defense system whra 
the alliance is unable even to solve what 
h^n as a minor crisis in Yugoslavia. 

Lei’s be down to earth: Russia is a 
nuclear power with a very powerful armv. 


Rezardir.” “Eos: JSuRjvw « £e 
Door . Betrayed" £ 

** Lucie H as Xa R <-f ■"» L f M CTIIS 
by Alan Levy (Op.c jw. Dec J&K 
’ Bravo fo: printing ±=c two opinion 
pieces about to deplorable trciimeni or 
young Czechs by .Amerlxr: cc.r^'offi- 
ccra As an American viator to Central 
Europe in 1993, i wimsssed such dis- 
araroful behavior rcst-hanc while 3sast- 
£0 two sours Czech friends who witod 
M t .An-.raca for to firs: time. Thg 
had saved up their crowns, and 1 eninusi- 
asncallv offered to be totr ^.wtoy 
could experience some of to freedom 
thev had so bravely freight for. 

The American consul m Prague put us 
all through a demeaning and arrogantly 
conducted interview, similar to xhoae 
described in thearucles. Fonutntdy, we 
were successful and my friends had a 
tremendous experience “abroad, re- 
turning to Prague with a more positive 
impressioa of Americans than what was 
oresented bv the consular corps. 

I had hoped that my friends experi- 
ence in Prague was an aberration. l am 
disheartened to sec that to situation 
appears to be official policy and seems 
to be gelling worse. 

JIM KULSTaD. 

Rome. 


W DC diux* vuwi . t — --- 

light of to Golds'"), lovably. 

irtios") or noble victims (“As Is I- Het- 
erosexuals can be portrayed as violent, 
but not homosexuals, although emergen- 
cy rooms are regularly peopled with gay 
men and lesbians who courted rough 
trade" once loo often. 

It is true, of course, lhai for too long 
the arts community ignored o; stereo- 
typed ethnic or cultural minonues. Bui 
todav the forces of PC try to remedy that 
not by avoiding stereotypes altogether 

Southern sheriffs, fundamentalist 

ministers and Catholic nuns, for exam- 
ple. are acceptable grist for one-dimen- 
aonal ridicule — but by treating the arts 
like a Marin County group therapy ses- 
sion, where all problems will be solved if 
we iust shout at to “oppressive estab- 
lishment" and give everyone else a hug. 

Granted, any artist's view of reality is 
selective, and times and tastes change- 
But what distinguishes to particular 
force presently tainting to arts from 
those before is its intellectual cowardice. 

There have always been pressures tor 
conformity and restriction in to arts, but 
in to past these have come almost entire- 
ly from to outside, and have been resist- 
ed. Todav to former freedom fighters are 
all ux> often the very voices of represson. 
Rarely. if ever, has to arts community 
been so earnestly acquiescent in its own 
censorship and corruption. 

What a so maddening about toPC 
groupthink is ns implication that there is 


some son of conflict between nurturing 
genuine cultural diversity'— who ooesn.l 
favor that? —and maintaining to cksac 
aesthetic criteria that have produced and 
recognized great art through to ages. No 
such conflict exists. 

If motion pictures in to past, tor ex- 
ample, misrepresented Indian* ana 
blacks, it was because, blinded bv naivete 
or prejudice, fihnmakere resisted treating 
them as individuals. Political correctness, 
in iu> insolence on defining and promot- 
ing an according u> the raroorgendff or 
etSnicity or circumstance of to arost or 

performer, extends to same dehumaniz- 
ing. mentality in a different context. 
^Nothing underlined the fallacy of that 
approach more than to "Cirral492 
exhibit last year at to National Gallery 
Q f An — perhaps to most culturally 
divers* anti inclusive show ever mount- 
ed. “Circa 1492" made stunningly irrele- 
vant anv argument about cultural impe- 
rialism or bias by measuring every major 
culture in to world at the time of Co- 
lumbus’s voyage by to greatest an from 
each that has survived. 

Shining forth from to nches of that 
exhibit — the heartbreaking T aino mask 
with its wars of rain, to exquisitely 
ornamented drinking cups and stiver 
ship from Nuronburg. the fabulous 
caned heads from Benin — was to 
reaffirmation of the once revered con- 
cept called universality. 

Does the great and significant art oi 
everv culture meet some test beyond to 
age. sex. race, ethnicity or pohu« of its 
creator? Does it transcend to barriers 
of time and language to speak name 
universal concept of truth and beauts 
mysteriously Unking afl humankind? 
The obvious answer is yes. . 

Bui there was another message in to 
show. The dawn of the 16th century was a 
lime of war and prejudice and suspicion 
and terror, as wdl as of .lemung. The 
Spanish Inquisition was in full bloom, 
and tribal and religious wars embroiled 
most of Europe, Africa and to Amra^. 
Yet one looked in vain in Circa i*wz 
for great art inspired by anger or fe2r. 

While tore was plenty prompted by 
fearful visions of the supernatural great 
an about almost everything else springs 
not from hatred, fear and groupthink 
but from wonder, hope and to compi- 
ling vision of an individual artist, tne 
Renaissance was about discovery, and 

so is all great an- . , , 

Anger and fear, on to other hand, are 
what political correctness is all about: 
anger at to inequities of life and soa- 
etv fear of images and language and 
differences — and of one's own artistic 

inadequacy as well 
Anger and fear only rarely produce 

great art- What they do produa - and 

the 16th century, again, is bigWy 
five — is to destruction of great art, from 
to Spanish sacking of Aztec temples to 
to English looting of New Spain. 

The Washington PosL 


• . ft - .-st.'':.-. J, i i- -r 


GENERAL NEWS 




Kevin Murp^ 

International fiertM Tribune . . . 

hong KONG —Attracting to prod^r 
Tia pmxma nponturtions over democrano 


: rs-*- 




•v* 


na into reopening pe p * 

T^onns ^Tfoog Kong, a sesuor kwil govern-, 

;•■ «ho asked not to be idennfied. . . 

- • “We'dprefer tobe talking to tom 
bm Chin a has to 

. rimrtfifctetomeeC’ said ujc offl raai w* ' 1 v 

the gove nrTnrat -iwPPu 
-Kong radfo service that 

-^^?^ h \^ gKoos,ft “ i,S 


cm the transfer of soverdraty. ir-wn 

* Aftraievra momhs.of 
more of apparently firurtless talks, Mr. Pattra 
decided to begin the kg&atrro pto^s on 
roughly. half of the packhge, while 
'door open to talks onto renaming proposals. 

’ '.t Accoidmg to OiimC such a straiegy hasnb- 

■ssSsMKsysgg 

to Britain’s unilateral actions by dismantling 

- Hong Krag’s three-tiered system of govon- 

: meat after. 1997. , R 

- “ A bflt tot would toweeto voting age to 18, 

- abofish appotocd mratixashq? to muni^al 

■ -^Thp’ yti- oontamingj steps deemed to least 

xotoSal WWJSJ*? 

; would allow 28 Hong KonRieadente who are 




and give 


Give the IHT as agUt 
trive yourself a as well. 


0f ^s^d bill would define f 0 

’SJrtSd The l«s- 

profesMonal-grcBp 

Dunne Ihe now-moribund negotiations, 
BriSSSitSSi Sie numbos of voters . I sough 
B SSJStatfK functional consont^lt 
dso made some concessions on the compost 
tion of the Election Committee. 

A nnal decision on whidt 

^ MdtT^ teSnnet during a tnstt «> 

Sto to official satd. 



Choose between these two magnificent 
Oxford Illustrated Encyclopedias. 


ill= 


iTi* 


.rt> 





in China 



1 . By Steven Mufson ■ - 

'. - - .■ Washington Past Seryto*. . 

RFIUNG — Senator 3. Bennett Jota^wo, 

: leS^P “iSSS 

1. B Remurc a Ccggittee . 

■ day it 

i itan compames A .pa»-« ^ ■: . - 

f - market ““ 



. . “At. cadi meeting-we ; said we hoped more 
American dollars and American business 

^l£c£oing to CW- be «id. add^ 
SwsCiunese countaparts irahed that. The 
nencaa^madft. 

'aaiesDin-.aiid ertreprencurs 

■‘sss^vessts 

imports from Ctoa are sub}^ 

S>le US, tariffs, ^ » 

oiles ol midear power plant 

' Ouna-Tf they dott’tfftitfrraius, toy wffl s ' 51 


svkania. sounded the only skeptical note from 
Aeddraatira. “Progress on human nghts is 
not suffickot in my view." Mr. SpeciCT said- H 
said he wanted “to put them on notice totto 
renewal of most-favored- nation status “is not 3 
foregone condusioii." 

■ Beiinig fTaims a Round 
China claimed victory Wednesday in a tor 
pute with to United Stares over ate&nons 
Sat it exported goods node by prisoners, Rra 

te ri?^^n^£SSed Born to Dec. 13 
issue of a U^S. government priUcam 
Federal Re^sier, saying that the No. 1 Qms“ 
Prison in Beijing had not exported its hoaery 

Register said U.S. cuaraisoffi- 
dak had found that raerehandise mde i m i ^ 
Zm -is no longer bang or is Hkdy to be 
Giported into to l).S.** 


A subnotion u. to- IHT in an ide^ar-long 

-ih for j friend or ^up lo 44^ .iff 

rSjM.-.-iaUv ut our sjHt-ial 2lh rutt u! up to ^ 

"* 'TweChdvmr twcl^ntumh gift 

Speaai bonus _ , . 

for current sub&csrmers - 

Vc wiU extend vour ow n 

bv one w eek for each month h gift 


Tofec advantage of our 
gpeeudgift rate: 

44 °/° 

off the . 
caver price! 

y ° Ur ^ Subscribe yourself 

in IK. 


7 r . ■; 

- Si*' g-J-'.T 

- ’ ‘lb* r 

■'Vi- ■■■-- 


, - — >■" >s r . ■ 
' L : 

• j • ,jJ - eh 

..o- 3 V, 

t=-' ■ 

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1: 

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•\W' ■ '''.'.J:' 

•_i IJA- 

: -i:: 


* neuters - • . “ . 
™least ot» 

• i_- .CRDtUJ™ 



•|Snte^^'*y ofMaoM 

a^if- - 

to launch three bombing; 

• tbeBagram air 

^se ju« htalh «pi^ ^ 




-a- ‘ 

i 

. .n.' - 


and wounded more 


Dustam's forces smoe he 
kJJ^his aH^attempt at dawn 

foatHew Year'sDW.. . 

. v ; TVolx«ibs tendedintbe aftyb:- 

of Wa^AkbaryW. 

Sc botoc erf to rahusto- ^ 


as troops Retake Airport 

with Mr. Hckmatyar, whose base is 
south of Kabul. 

In Geneva, the tateroaitonai 
Cammilteeof to Red Cross called 
for a truce and for Kabul airport lo 
so to wganiMiion 
fly in urgent food and medical stq>- 
pties. 

, . While ho^ritals woe awwlfid 
wid, more than 1500 casques, W 

of tom had been resupplied o> 

Red Ctoss, officials said. 

It was the worst series of battles j 

in the city since fierce 
August 1992 left more than 3.000 | 
people ted, - * 


^alion and wunsm, whowas not 

^andkillmgapas^W. 

Sx people were « wnd ®f/25 e 
other boSb landed near a bakey. 
^Nearby, another person was 
killed and three were wounded in a 
rocket attack. 

Iranian diplomats were ttying to 

:-s ±as:a‘ssaEs 


tint and uraenu 

mijwjch have been baked m two 
ten of infantry banks by ate 
Sbani foe. Prime Minuter Gul- 
bnddiri Hekmatyar, Iranian 



CaR ns tollrfree m 

i ■ .vcunni n«: 





^ indite wl.l,h ^ uiue^lm unn you 

D "”^i3SE^ 

Recipient"- Namr. 

Address. 

“J ijiy/OuL'/CoHntiy 

AAlrv* — ’ 

Gw/Cmle/Counny 

11 s 

□St^E3wX- df— Dl,i ™- Dwi 

Crmlil - F«* ^ 

Card -Yu- 


me®"**- 

BuLiJ was unclear whether me 
diplomats had managed to consult 


fag A rea ' 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1994 


‘Museum, Holy Ground, Cemetery’: How, and Whether, to Save Auschwitz 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Tima Service 

OSWIECIM. Poland — An in- 
ternational debate fraught with his- 


the surrounding ponds and fields, 
were blown up by die Nazis. Tbe 
remains have been largely left as 
broken slabs of lichen -encrusted 


pond near one of tbe crematories. Jonathan Webber, a fellow in Jew- too oblique, even though some ren- 
Now the deterioration of the Bir- ish social studies at Oxford Univcr- ovation has been done to the 
kenau section of the camp is begin- sity and a founding member of the watchtowers. guardposts, some 
ning to force decisions from Poland Auschwitz international commit- fences and the wooden barracks 
on whether it should be restored tee, asked as he walked over tbe where the prisoners were held in 
fully or partly, or be allowed to floor of gas chamber No. 5, the last, appalling conditions, 
fade into oblivion. hastily constructed gas dumber. Accenting to this aigumcut, one 


tori cal and moral questions is un- concrete and brick. 


der way about how Poland is to 
preserve the decaying remains of 
the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz. 

The four main gas chambers and 
crematories here at Auschwitz, 
where approximately 1.6 millio n 
people, most of them Jews, were 
gassed and their ashes dumped m 


Concrete pillars that were used 
to bold up barbed-wire fences are 
disintegrating, weathered by the 
harsh winters in this isolated south- 
western part of rural Poland. 

There is only a small agn indi- 


tbe new government quickly ap- 
pointed an international committee 

of historians, conservation experts, 
Jewish representatives and Polish 


government quickly ap- Rrcssme from Jewish lessor Webber 

a m tern auonal committee tions. asked the alter ^ the wSor 

nearly a decade there. 13«rthev wereshorT 


Whatever is done at the Birkenau 


fade into oblivion. hastily constructed gas chamber. 

The debate is over which fate is “Or can you say Auschwitz lies in 
appropriate for the site of Ibelarg- its meaning and not its physical 
est mass lulling of Jews in history- site?” 

“Is this something so unique that Taking different positions in the 


According to this argument, one 
of the best ways of ensuring that 
the Nazi atrocities are not forgot- 
ten is to reconstruct the gas cham- 
bers so that visitors can walk in 


eating that the ashes of about no effort should be spared in show- debate over Auschwitz are histori- and, perhaps, imagine better what 
100,000 people lie in the small future generations?” Professor ans, conservation experts, Jewish the horror was like. 


jcwuu ibuiw^uinuiw wum * wuju ■» . hv ■wrtet 

Catholics to reshape the way the section of the camp, it wtfl 01051 
Auschwitz complex is presented. Kkeiy be done slowly. . 

The debate over Auschwitz has' To assist the museum in its pres- 

also been driven by renewed inter- ervation efforts, the German gov- 
est in tbe Holocaust in the last few eminent announced 8 P® 1 01 
years, prompted in part by the ag- about $20 million in 1992 for ttfi 
ing of the generation of survivora next five years. And a television 


nanOTber they were shotT 
“Auschwitz, as the world’s lam- 
est cemetery, is WygrcwnC said 
Bohdan Rymaszewsfa, secretary of 
the International Cammitiecof the 
Auschwitz Museum. . 

“What is perfectly acceptable 


Arthur Dreifuss of Film and Stage Dies 


The Axociaied Press 

LOS ANGELES — Arthur Drei- 
fuss. a prolific German-bom direc- 
tor, producer and writer of movies, 
television shows and Broadway 
musicals, has died. He was 85. 

Mr. Dreifuss died at his home in 
suburban Studio City on New 
Year's Eve after a brief bout with 
tbe flu, his daughter, Nancy Hess, 
said Tuesday. 

Mr. Dreifuss played piano in 
Germany with George Gershwin 
before arriving in New York in 


1928. said bis friend George Mi- 
chaud. He became a Broadway 
producer, and at one point bad six 
musicals running ai once. 

Mr. Dreifuss was lured to Holiy- 


nature series "Wildlife in Crisis,” 

which be produced in Africa. 

Frank Bdknap Long, 90, author 
of “The Hounds of Tindalos,” 


representatives and Poles laying 
plans for its future. 

For many, the drilling emptiness 
of the 175 hectares (430 acres) at 

Bir kenau- the second camp at tbe 
Auschwitz complex, is the most el- 
oquent testimony to what occurred 
there. 

From the spring of 1942 to the 
end of 1944, the vast majority of 


'The Horror From the Hills'* and the Auschwitz victims were gassed 


Tbe debate has come to the fore 
now for several reasons. Until 
1989, the Communist government 
of Poland, without consultation 
from the outside world, decided 
what happened at Auschwitz. 

Immediately after World War II, 
the first Auschwitz death camp, 
which is actually the smaller ofthe 
two, was turned into a museum' 
with artifacts of human hair, suit- 


f Can yon say that 
Auschwitz lies in its. 
meaning and not - 
in its physical she? 9 

Jonathan Webber, 

Oxford professor 


fund-raising event in Germany gar- m # 

oered SI million from the pubic rn 


1992. The museum is to use the 


approved W a middiegomid . 
by [fae international committee, , “Our overriding pnonty h the 
said FoDarar Stoecfcer. cultural at- museum s authennaw and %ri- 
tache at the German Embassy in ty” said Franaszefc won-. 


uuvwl wihA icmf other works of fantasy, the super- at Birkenau, in what was then occu- cases and clothes of the victims on and by a changed attitude of many 

ccmtnict director He shifted to natural and science fiction, died pied Poland. display. Tbe one gas chamber and younger Jews, who want to reman- 


nalural “d fiction, died pied Poland. 

SJSJ*. i t>5k onHuLr Sunday in Manhattan. His science Under blankets of snow recently, 
SfE? “ > , JK* fiction wwks indude the story col- it was easy for visitors to scratch 

and became a talent ageat in the “John Cars lairs, Space Dc- away the earth near the pits, in the 

iy,us - tective," the serial novella The fields and at the pond where the 


His credits include “The Quare 
Fellow,” the idevision movie “Riot 
on Sunset Strip,” and tbe television 


Horror From the Hills," and the ashes were buried, and find flints of 

novels “Mars Is My Destination” human bone. 

and “It Was the Day of the Robot.” For some visi tors, the ruins are 


its ovens were rebuilt. 

In contrast, the Birkenau section 
was left virtually untouched, except 
for a memorial whose inscription 
failed to mention that most of the 
victims were Jews. 

When communism collapsed. 


ber rather than forget. 

Auschwitz gained added atten- 
tion from the controversy over a 


Warsaw. 

So fat, some of the money is 
being spent an a new acclimatiza- 
tion system for the exhibits at the 
first Auschwitz camp, for reinforc- 
ing some crumbling chimneys of 
wooden barracks and for a conser- 
vation workshop at the museum to 
explore the latest preservation, 
techniques, Mr. Stoeker said. 

But, he added, the emotional 


Roman Catholic convent building -question of what to do about tbe 
occupied by Carmelite nuns next to gas chambers has remained unre* 


the camp. That issue was resolved 
in 1993 when the Vatican, under 


“If you have a brick wall against compromise. 


unicei 



INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


International telecommunications 
company recruits a 


United Nations Children's Fund 

The United Nations Children's Fund, with headquarters in New 
York and offices throughout the world, seeks qualified candidates 
for the following position: 

REGIONAL EXTERNAL 
RELATIONS OFFICER (P-5) 

Nairobi, KENYA 

Under the direction of the Regional Director, responsible for 
developing, implementing and managing external relations strate- 
gies and programme support plans related to the Grand Alliance 
tor Children. This indudes advocacy, social mobilization, network- 
ing, global events and fundraising strategies, and encompasses a 
wide range of associations - Governments, donors. UN agencies, 
National Committees, NGO's, churches, institutions, universities, 
foundations, etc 

Minimum qualifications: Advanced university degree in interna- 
tional relationships, sodai sdences or communications. Ten years 
. progressive experience in information and communications relat- 
ed to social development, especially in Africa, dealing with high- 
level Government offidals, NGO's and community-level groups in 
an advocacy and programme capacity; good knowledge of child 
development and women's issues. Acquaintance with UNICEF 
perspective desirable. Skills In information and communication, 
networking, strategic thinking advocacy, negotiation, and ability 
to relate this to mass media, community and government offidals. 
Ability to organize and implement training. Fluency in English and 
French or Portuguese. 

UNICEF, as part of the United Nations common system, offers 
competitive international salaries, benefits and allowances. 

Please send detailed resume, in English, quoting reference VN-93- 
232 to: Recruitment & Placement Section, UNICEF, 3 United 
Nations Plaza, (H-5F), New York. NY 10017, USA. 

Qualified women are encouraged to apply. Applications hr this posi- 
tion must be received by January 20, 1994. Acknowledgement will 
only be sent to shortlisted candidates under serious consideration. 

UNICEF Is a smoke-free environment. 


Resident 

Property Managers 

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corporate guesthouse and a similar resident fadlity, both situated 
adiaceni to our business site. 

Responsibilities indude: ensuring that guests receive quality care 
and service comparable to an elegant country bed and breakfast 
facility; scheduling and coordinating all guest house reservations 
and identified special events conducted with cither guest house; 
and greeting arriving and departing guests. Will also be respon- 
sible for; maintaining appropriate administrative recoids/reports; 
managing daily housekeeping and special events staffing; estab- 
lishing work schedules; setting priorities and instructing all house- 
keeping personnel and wait stiff. Some occasional light cooking 
may be required. 

Three or more years experience with a bed & breakfast operation, 
corporate guest ho usc/reueat or equivalent experience necessary. 
A degree in Hotel Management preferred and fluency in a foreign 
language a plus. Salary range $50K_ For prompt, confidential con- 
sideration, please forward your resume, with salary history, to: 
5AA Confidential Reply Service, P.O. Box 899, Dept. Q-7820, 
East Brunswick, NJ 08816. Equal Opportunity Employer 


NETWORK 



Nice 
South of 
France 


Within our Research and 
Development Department, 
you will ensure high level 
expertise and define solutions 
for the evolution of Network and Services 
Management within our Group. 

YOUR TASKS: 

I Evaluate state-of-the-art tools and solutions 
from the market and their suitability to the 
needs of external and internal customers, 
i Study international and industry standards, 
i Define and experiment with different solutions. 

YOUR ASSETS: 

* 2 to 4 year’s experience in telecommunica- 
tions, good understanding of Network 
Administration and Operations, degree level, 
strong interpersonal skills, fluent spoken and 
written English. 

To apply, please send your CV. indicating 
your salary requirements to COMMUNIQUE 
50/54 rue de Silly - 92513 BOULOGNE 
BILLANCOURT Cedex (thanks for quoting 
ref. 404 on the envelop). 


2 Project engineers 

MULTILINGUAL 

Duties to include : refrigeration load calculations, cost 
estimates, project scheduling, project management and on-site 
tr aining of the customer’s personnel. 

The position requires 2/3 years project experience in a related 
engineering field. Le. mechanical refrigeration and/or 
construction. Experience with electrical systems is a definite 
asset and the candidates must be familiar with the use of 
spreadsheet, cad, and project scheduling software. 

Candidates mast be fluent In English and be conversant in two 
other languages. They must be also free to travel approximately 
50# ofthe time. The position is based in the south of France. 
Hesse send your letter (English or French), resume and salary 
requirements to : Daniel DOUXConseH 34 rue BreteuO. 13006 
Marseille (France). 


rVinic 1 ! IVi'.x 


unicef 



United Nations Children's Fund 

The United Nations Children's Fund, with headquarters in New 
York and offices throughout the world, seeks qualified candidates 
for the following position: 

RESEARCH AND 

DOCUMENTATION OFFICER (P-3) 

Geneva, SWITZERLAND 

Under the guidance and supervision of the Chief, IRM, responsi- 
ble for planning and supervising activities of the Research and 
Documentation Unit (RDC) with a view to providing information 
services which meet the requirements of National Committees, 
staff in UNICEF Geneva office, NGO's, agencies, institutions and 
interested individuals. 

Minimum qualifications Advanced university degree or its equiv- 
alent in training in library or information science. Five years profes- 
sional working experience in information management. Good 
knowledge of UNICEF policy, UNICEF documentation, and docu- 
mentation of the UN and international community desirable. 
Literacy in working with computers. Fluency in English and French. 
UNICEF, as part of the United Nations common system, offers 
competitive international salaries, benefits and allowances. 

Please send derailed resume, in English, quoting reference VN-93- 
3 56 to: Recruitment & Placement Section, UNICEF, 3 United 
Nations Plaza. (H- 5F), New York, NY 10017, USA. 

Qualified women are encouraged to apply. Applications for 
this position must be received by January 20, 1994. 
Acknowledgement will only be sent to short-listed candidates 
under serious consideration. 

UNICEF is a smoke-tree environment 


REPORTER/PRODUCERS 

Financial Television News Service 


Mira BWMK* Trans World Airlines is currently resfcruc- 
m wHmMM hiring its international marketing organi- 
sation and needs highly motivated and 
creative executives to fill key positions. 

TWA is establishing aggressive new marketing strategies and 
sales programs for both the recently introduced "comfort 
class" and the product changes and improvements that will 
come on stream in 1994. The mission of the people we hire will 
be to provide the strong leadership. Direction and innovation 
necessary to achieve greater market share and profitability. 

If you already hold a senior international marketing or sales 
position, have a proven track record of achievement and are 
fully mobile within Europe. We want to hear from you. 

Please setid a full CV including salary history and details of 
the contribution you can make, to box N° 56, 1.H.T., 63 Long 
Acre, London WC2E 9JH- Closing date: January 13th 1994. 


Frankfurt and Paris 


Our client an international news 
organisation is seeking’ experienced 
financial and television journalists for a 
European TV service. 

They will report news events and 
produce analytical coverage in English 
for a specialised financial audience. 
Your application must demonstrate an 
ability' to thrive in tills environment 

Applicants must have an extensive 
television background or years of 
experience covering financial 
markets for news services aimed at 
market professionals. Having both 
would be ideal. 


Fluency in the local language as 
well as English is essential. 

Please send a CV. covering letter and 
non-returnable VHS video tape of 
recem work, if applicable, to the 
following address by Wednesday. 
January 19th. 1994. 


Response Handling Service. Ref 777. 
Associates in Advertising, a St John's 
Lane, London EC1M 4BH England. 
Please state any companies to which 
your application should not be sent. 


Associates in Advertising 


Plant Manager 

Ireland Location ; 

Major international pharmaceutical company 
has an immediate opening for a Plant Manager. 
This senior level position will be responsible for 
all phases of production in this recently estab- 
lished facility. While an ongoing operation, 
plant size is expected to reach 450 employees 


plant size is ex 
by the end of 1 


14 . Plant location is near Dublin: 


A degree in engineering or relevant sdences with 
a mi nimum of 5 years at the senior management . 
level In pharmaceutical production, specifically 
tablet manufacturing and packaging, is required. 
Demonstrated ability to motivate and manage . 
people Is mandatory. Ideal opportunity for an * 
Irish national to return to Ireland. 

This position carries an attractive starting 
salary and a competitive benefits package. 

Resumes and salary history in confidence to: 

Box D415, DTT, 850 Third Ave^ 

8th FI., N.Y., N.Y. 10022 USA 

We are an EOE. M/F/D/V - resumes encouraged. . 


International Engineering-Group, active in Oil & Gas 
Exploration and Refining Industry, is seeking for its Italian 
Based Subsidiary, employing 100 Engineers and 300 
Technicians, a 

GENERAL MANAGER 

Will be based in Milan. Age 35-45. Dynamic, Creative, Self 
Motivating Personality with good Leadership and 
Communicating Skflfs. Italian Mother Tongue and Fluent in 
English. Mechanical and/or Electrical Engineering Degree. 
MBA and/or experience in Modem Management Methods. 
A challenging position is offered with good remuneration 
and a Stock Option Plan. 

Please send your application with CV and recent 
photograph to: 

IHT Box 824 Via CASSOLO 6, 20 1 22 MILAN, ITALY 


EDUCATIONAL POSITIONS 


jrAccelerated Learning Centre ^ 

| is a specialist study, business language and teacher preparation 1 
I centre for children and adults currently being developed in 
Singapore by Master Projects Pw Ltd. ' 

■ Wc arc looking for highly qualified and effective language teachers 
of English, Bahaso, French, Japanese, Mandarin, and Spanish as a 
Second or Other Language who are also trained and experienced in 
< the Accelerated Learning approach. 

I Other qualified teachers who are willing to be prepared for I 
1 teaching with Accelerated Learning methods are also encouraged / 
| to apply as soon as possible with cover letter and resume to: / 

I Dr. John Driscoll - Master Projects Pte Ltd. II 

l PSA PO Box 422. Singapore 91 1 1 Fax: 65-735-8825 J j 


Sales Directors 


The International Herald Tribune, 
jointly owned by The New York Times and 
The Washington Post, and currently priming in 
eleven countries worldwide, is continuing its 
expansion and will open additional advertising 
and circulation sales offices in Europe. 

We are presently seeking Sales Directors 
to be responsible for achieving substantial 
revenue growth for these offices. 

The ideal candidates would preferably have 
newspaper advertising and circulation sales 
experience, along with fluency In English and a 
second European language. Self-motivation and 
self-discipline are essential requirements for this 
challenging position, as is an EC work permit. 
Applications will be kept in strict confidence 
and .should be addressed to: 

The Publisher, 

International Herald Tribune, 

181, Avenue Charles de Gaolle, 

9Z521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 


INTERNATIONAL 


rlbunc 


CommonicationsWeek International 

The Newspaper of Global Networking 

Cammwda/InfMi MrmSnal. the premier business pcbBcnkm (or Ihe Industry boB- 
dag loarantM^ multimedia toforendan highways. Is expanding. We needambUtoas. | 
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offer attractive salaries, a highly mounted team, eccpcrttmce wi th Ihe blest pS** ' 
I™lQkl^f-aMfl miaanMia[rin> pmp*r*fth at ni|i «lUl*ef "TlfflnBoiilirhT^ i 
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MJyita: Para to 250JM0FF plus benefits 
Tbe paper Is la tbe process of nwvtnf to Qua* 


COPY Editor Para to MO.OOOFF plus benefits 

. ^ here l ied Jot bng«ec-» rie dtaul on toQc«hy»ti 

” , 10 supplements and shmr daffies. Yoo wB 

Please write with resume or CV to: Malcolm Laws, Editor 
ComimrokadlofisWedk International 
CMP Publications International Corp. 

14 rae de Basaaao. 75116 Paris, Fiance. 


ban equal (wrnnmAfessnplarercomnilued to^ principles 


Turn to page 15 for more 

INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 

Almo ^halfaniilMimknseeililssectm my Thursday: 


* k • 

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J v Vi:i 

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tor of museums at the Polish Cah 
tureMinistiy. “Thns.wevrill seek to'; 
limit the intrusion of modem sub- [ 
stances. One of our greaiea ccffl- 
straints as. curators is that. Ansch- : 
witz is at the same tune a xm^cum, 
holy ground, cemetery and monu- 
ment How do we drew visitors that 
under a particular patch aT grass lie 
the ashes of thousands? Opeamg a 
cross section would .tmdeoitand- 
ably offend rehgkm sensfixtitics. 

“Because of its umqne character, 
Auschwitz is largely an exercise in 


■ £ 

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Philip Oma 

TeL (33-1) 46 37 93 36 Fax: (33-1) 46 37 93 70 


j 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1994 


Page 7t 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


1 



dam VOl/Tke Ner Ymt Tam 


Bronze Age Tin Mystery Solved 


By John Noble Wilford 

AW York runts Sen «»¥ 




xchoeologis 

discovered tin in Turkey. No one is 
predicting a rush by miners to stoke 
claims or any quick riches to be made 
on the world's metal markets, for the amount 
discovered is trifling. But scholars ore hailing 
the discover*' os a solution to one of the most 
enduring mysteries about ancient technology: 
Where did the metal smiths of the Middle East 
gel the tin io produce the prized alloy that gave 
, the Bronze Age its name? 

The new findings could change established 
thinking about the role of trade and metallurgy’ 
in the economic and cultural expansion of the 
Middle East in the Bronze Age. which ran From 
about 3000 B.C. to 1100 B.C. 

After thousands of years in which copper was 
the only metal in regular use, the rising civiliza- 
tions of Mesopotamia set off a revolution in 
metallurgy when they learned to combine tin 
with copper — about 5 to 10 percent tin and 
the rest copper — to produce bronze. 

Bronze was easier to cast in molds than 
copper and much harder, with the strength of 
some steel. Though expensive, bronze was even- 
tually used in a wide variety of things, from 
axes and awls to hammers, sickles and weap- 
ons, like daggers and swords. The wealthy were 
entombed with figurines, bracelets and pen- 
dants of bronze. 

Digging through ruins and deciphering an- 
cient texts, scholars have shaped an image of the 
Bronze Age as a lime of vibrant economic expan- 
sion. the earliest Sumerian dues and the fust 
great Mesopotamian empires. They found many 
sources of copper ore and evidence of furnaces 
for copper smelting. But despite their searching, 
they could never find any sign of anrient tin 
mining or smelting closer than Afghanistan. 

It seemed incredible that such an important 
industry could have been founded and sus- 
tained with long-distance trade alone. But 
where was there any tin closer to home? 

After systematic explorations in the central 
Taurus Mountains of Turkey, an archaeologist 
at the Oriental Institute of the University of 
Chicago has found a tin mine and ancient 
mining tillage north of the Mediterranean 
coastal city of Tarsus. This is the first clear 
evidence of a local tin industry in the Middle 
East, archaeologists said, and it dates from the 
early years or the Bronze Age. Some of the 
metal might have been imported from faraway 
Afghanistan or elsewhere, but not all. 

Dr. Aslihan Yener of the Oriental Institute 
reported that the mine and village demonstrat- 
ed that tin mining was a well-developed indus- 
try in the region as long ago as 2870 B. C. She 
analyzed artifacts to re-create the process used 
to separate tin from ore at relatively low tem- 



peratures and in substantia] quantities. Dr. 
Vincent C. PigoU, a specialist in the archaeolo- 
gy or metallurgy at the University Museum of 
the University of Pennsylvania, "said: “By all 
indications, she's got a tin mine. It's excellent 
archaeology and a major step forward in under- 
standing ancient metal technology." 

To Dr. Guillermo Algaze. an anthropologist at 
the University of California at San Diego and a 
scholar of Mesopotamian civilizations, the dis- 
covery is significant because it shows that bronze 
metallurgy, like agriculture and many other 
transforming human technologies, apparently 
developed independently in several places. Mud] 
of the innovation, moreover, seemed to come not 
from the urban centers of southern Mesopota- 
mia. in today's Iraq, but from northern hinter- 
lands. like Anatolia, in what is now Turkey. 

Speaking of the ancient tin workers of the 
Taurus Mountains. Dr. Algaze said: “It's very 
dear that these are not just rustic provincials 
silling on resources. They had a high level of 
metallurgy technology, and they were exploit- 
ing tin for trade all around the Middle East" 

The mine, at a site called Kesiei, has narrow 
passages running more than a mile into the 
mountainside, with others still blocked and 
unexplored. The archaeologists found only low- 
grade tin ore, presumably the remains of richer 


Darker Theory on Childhood Asthma 


By Lawrence K. Altman 

Art > •*rZ Timet Senior 




EW YORK — A new >tudy on asth- 
ma adds to the evidence debunking j 
myth that children usually outgrow 
the common and sometimes fatal 
lung disease which is an increasing public 
health problem in the United Stales and many 
other countries The incidence of asthma and 
deaths from it have risen sharply in recent 
v ears, but the reasons are not known. 

For decades, doctors have told anxious par- 
ents that their children's symptoms of wheez- 
ing. coughing, chest tightness and difficulty in 
breathing were likely to disappear as the chil- 
dren grew older. 

Indeed, many children with the mildest 
symptoms do outgrow asthma. But it is becom- 
ing clearer that those with moderate or severe 
asthma usually do not. 

“Outgrowing asthma is ihe exception to the 
rule.” said Dr. Ruurd Van Rnorda. an asthma 
expert at De Weezenlanden Hospital in Zwolle, 
the Netherlands, and the senior author of the 
new study hv Dutch and American researchers. 

Dr. Van RoonJaV study found that breathing 
diffiaiities in about 75 percent of children with 
moderate to severe asthma persisted or recurred 
by the time they reached their mid-20s. 

It also found that asthma persisted in K6 
percent of women and 72 percent of men. 
affirming a sex difference noted in earlier stud- 
ies. file reason for this difference is not known, 
although experts speculate that it results from 
anatomical differences — that women tend to 
have smaller airways than men. 


Reflecting the new thinking. Dr. Van Roorda 
said in an interview: “When you have asthma, 
you always have asthma. Asthma can act differ- 
ently in different people. There can be a long 
symptom-free period. Some very mild asthma- 
tics will not hare any symptoms for decades. 
But even then you are never sure that it will not 
recur because" many asthmatics relapse when 
they are much older." 

A major puzzle is why deaths from asthma 
have increased in many countries during a peri- 
od when experts say treatment has improved 

Even as treatment 
improves . deaths are 
increasing. 

significantly. In the United States, the number 
of deaths nearly doubled io -4,650 in 1992 from 
2,598 in 1979.' The increase has been chiefly 
among blacks. 

Dr. Van Roorda said his team was astonished 
to learn that many patients who were not being 
monitored continued to use drugs many years 
after the initial prescriptions had been written. 
Some patients used drugs prescribed for other 
family members. And some doctors renewed 
aMhma prescriptions without first checking pa- 
tients' lung condition. 

The study also found that one-third oT the 
group smoked cigarettes, despite the added risk 
that it may Lrigger asthma a Hacks. 

“It is a very stupid situation." Dr. Van 
Roorda said. 


Taking the Measure of the Soul 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

Sett York Times Service 




EW YORK — Breathes there the 
man, with soul so dead, that it 
lacks mass, velocity and something 
physicists call “spin?” Spoofing an 
endless debate as to whether religion and 
science can be reconciled, an English physi- 
cist proposes applying advanced laboratory 
techniques to measuring the soul and putting 
some theological ideas to a quantitative test 
The proposal comes from Dr. David E. H. 
Jones of the University of Newcastle-upon- 
Tyne, better known by his pen name Daeda- 
lus. As Daedalus, he has delighted readers 
since 1964 with a magazine column in which 
he blends perfectly sound scientific ideas 
with proposed applications that verge on the 
outrageous. Dr. Jones's wit lightens the imas- 
sailably serious pages of the British scientific 
journal Nature each week. 

No stranger to complex technology, Dr. 
Jones once built an ordinary-looking but sub- 
tly unbalanced bicycle that he bad designed 
to be impossible to ride. Another of his feats 
was the construction of a fraudulent perpetu- 
al motion machine that defied explanation by 
many of his fellow scientists. Dr. Jones also 
conducts serious but often offbeat research; 


one of his investigations concluded that ar- 
senic in the wallpaper of the Sl Helena house 
where Napolfeon ended his days may haw 
hastened the- exiled French emperor’s death: 

TT>e weighing of souls is a notion rooted in 
antiquity. The an dent Egyptian gods Anubts 
and Thoth balanced the hearts of the dead 
against feathers, and if the hearts were too 
heavy they were devoured by a waiting mon- 
ster. But Dr. Jones's tongue-in-cheek ap- 
proach involves more sophisticated appara- 
tus than a simple balance. 

Dr. Jones suggests that by attaching piezo- 
electric transducers, inertial-navigation ac- 
celerometers and other instruments to a dy- 
ing peraon, it should be posable to measure 
the direction, vdodty ana spin of the soul as 
it leaves the body, causing the body to recoil 
slightly. The change in body weight would 
reveal the soul's mass. (“SpuT is a quantum 
property of subnuclear particles: the lepton 
ana quant particles that make up matter have 
spins designated as one-half, while force- 
carrier particles like those of light have spins 
of zero, one, two or other integer numbers.) 

“Traditional theology is«ilenl on the spin 
of the soul,” Daedalus writes, “though it may 
predict that the soul of a sinner would depart 
downward, and might weigh less than that of 
a righteous believer." 

The Daedalus proposal for measuring the 


physical properties of the soul follows a long 
.and lively exchange of letters to Nature on 
religion and related subjects. Prominent sci- 
entists and other thinkers have joined in the 
correspondence, and sparks often fly. 

I N October, for instance. Dr. Hermann 
Bondi, formerly the chief scientist of the 
British Defense Ministry, wrote to Na- 
ture that since the world's major reli- 
gions contradict each other, “a huge number 
of believers must be wrong." 

He added: “The variety of religions is a 
calamitously divisive force in human affairs. 
The less this factor is brought in. the better 
for alL This is especially incumbent on those 
working in a universal and global enterprise 
as science is." 

Son! measurements could also settle argu- 
ments about abortion, Daedalus suggests. By 
applying a soul detector to pregnant women, 
he writes, investigators could check theolo- 
gians who argue that the soul enters the 
embryo a week or so after conception. 

“Ilis dearly worthwhile," Dr. Jones writes, 
“to establish this moment accurately, if the 
soul turns out to enter the fetus quite late in 
pregnancy, the religious arguments against 
contraception and early abortion will be 
neatly disproved.” 


Heart Risks of the 2d Generation 


By Jane E. Brody 

Near York Tima Service 




Thr Near Yak T» 


deposits that had been mined out. For this 
reason. Dr. James D. Muhly, a professor of 
ancient Middle Eastern history at the Universi- 
ty of Pennsylvania, said be was skeptical of 
interpretations that Kesld was a tin mine. 

“They have identified the geological presence 
of tin,” he contended. “Almost every piece of 
granite has at least minute concentrations of tin 
in iL Bui was there enough there for mining? I 
don't think they have found a tin mine.” 

In her defense. Dr. Yener said: “His argu- 
ments are still based on an analysis of the mine 
and not the industry. He has to address the 
analysis of the crucibles." 

Slag left over from the smelting, collected last 
summer from inside the crucibles and in sur- 
rounding debris, contained not low-grade tin 
ore but material with 30 percent tin content, 
good enough for the metal trade. This analysis, 
including various tests with electron micro- 
scopes and X-rays, was conducted with the 
assistance of technicians from Cornwall. 

The tin-rich slag. Dr. Yener concluded, es- 
tablished beyond doubt that tin metal was 
being mined and smelled at Kestd and Gol- 
lepe. They could not have met all of the Middle 
East's tin needs in the Bronze Age. she said, but 
neither was ail the tin imported, as had long 
been thought. 


EW YORK — No anatomical or sur- 
gical study has revealed tome about 
the health erf the American heart than 
the Tour-decade project involving the 
people of Framingham, Massachusetts. 

Be ginning in 1949, more than 5,200 Framing- 
ham residents have participated in a unique 
study that has shown how living habits tike 
smoking and inactivity and health factors tike 
obesity and high blood pressure, influence a 
person’s chances of developing and dying of 
cardiovascular diseases, the leading killers in 
the United States. 

For the last two decades, 5,100 of the chil- 
dren of the original participants have also been 
studied, carrying the Framingham work into an 
era when deaths from heart attacks and strokes 
' have fallen sharply while the costs of cardiovas- 
cular care continue to soar. 

The F raming ham offspring, now middle- 
aged. are in many respects significantly healthi- 
er than their parents were when they entered 
the federally financed study 44 years ago. 


Blood pressure and. cholesterol levels are 
considerably lower, and far fewer participants 
smoke cigarettes. But the men are heavier and 
less active, and both the men and the women 
have much higher rates of diabetes than their 
parents did at comparable ages. 

In most ways, toe children of Framingham 
mirror the trends in the United States as a whole, 
which suggests that falling cardiovascular death 
rales have sparked a false sense of optimism. 

“Since the early 1970s, when the offspring 
study began, there has been nearly a 40 percent 
'drop in the death rate from heart attacks and a 
58 percent decline in the death rate from 
strokes in the United States,” observed Dr. 
William Casielli, the director of the Fr 


ham Heart Study. “But the rate al which people 
suffer heart at lacks and strokes has not fallen to 
a comparable degree." 

He continued: “Most people who get heart 
attacks and strokes don't die. They live. This is 
how our country is going broke, paying for the 
bypass operations, angioplasties ana truck- 
loads of medicines needed to keep people with 
cardiovascular diseases alive. Hospitalizations 
for coronary disease may have actually in- 
creased, not declined.” 


Dr. William B. Kannd, who has been moni- 
toring changes among the Framingham off- 
spring, said, “So far, there is no evidence that 
the underlying prevalence of hypertension has; 
changed in the Framingham population.” 

- The main difference between the offspring 
and their parents is the rale of detection and drug 
treatment of high blood pressure, a major risk 
factor for both heart attacks and strokes, be said. , 

“Currently." Dr. Kanne) noted, “20 percent 
of the 50-year-olds, 40 percent of the 60-year- 
olds and 50 percent of the 70-year-olds in' 
Framin gham are taking drugs to lower their 
blood pressure." 

Nor are the Framingham oilspring doing 
very well in controlling their weight, which 
increases their risk of hypertension and diabe- 
tes, another leading risk factor for heart disease. 
Dr. Kanne! attributes this deleterious weight 
trend to inadequate exercise and increasing 
opportunities to dine on fattening foods. 

But perhaps most distressing to the Framing- 
ham researchers is their fin ding that rates of 
adult-onset diabetes are soaring. Dr. Kannel 
noted that the prevalence or diabetes in Fra- 
mingham had nsen nearly threefold over the 
last three decades and was continuing to climb. 


BOOKS 


The myth that most children outgrow asthma 
emerged in part from articles published in med- 
ical journals. Some studies reported that the 
prognosis for childhood asthma improved with 
puberty. Others suggested that two-thirds of 
children outgrow the disease. Yet a few studies 
said that up to 70 percent continue to have 
respiratory symptoms as young adults. 

Experts now believe that the optimistic re- 
ports gave a false impression of asthma because 
they were incomplete, biased in the way pa- 
tients were chosen for the studies and did not 
follow- patients long enough to detea recur- 
rences in the decades after adolescence. 

“The second decade of life, between 10 and 
20 years or age, is a relatively good period for 
most asthma patients,” Dr. Van Roorda said. 

As children mature, their airways grow larger, 
possibly eating the symptoms of asthma and 
creating the impression that the condition has 
disappeared, although the inflammatory prob- 
lem remains. In many cases, the children have 
moved away from home and from the agents, 
such os cats or dogs, that triggered the asthma. 

“Even when you have asthma symptoms, you 
can manage normal daily activities.” he Roorda 
said. “So people may not realize that they have 
symptoms or become used to them. They find a 
way to cope with their disease and thus may 
think they have outgrown it. although they 
haven't. When you ask. "How are you doing?* 
many sav. ’Fine.' But when you specifically ask. 
‘Do you suffer from breathlessness or wheezing 
or whatever?’ then they say. *Yts, I do.' But they 
do not realize lhaL until ihe moment that you 
specifically ask them.” 


BERTOLT BRECHT: 
JoanuJfi, 1934-1955 

Translated from German by 
Hugh Ramson. Edited bv John 
Willett. 556 pages. 39.95. Rout- 
ledge. 

Reviewed by Richard Eder 

B ERTOLT BRECHT was os- 
tensibly a Marxist playwright, 
but that is a bit like saying that 
George Bernard Shaw was a vege- 
tarian playwright. Brecht like 
Shaw, in fact juggled ideas like 
flaming torches while trying, less 
successfully than Shaw, to keep his 
distance from the beat. In his the- 
ater the ideas are primarily charac- 
ter; their role is Tar more dramatic 
than inteUectuaL 
This profoundly contradictory 
man (thank goodness for the 
switchbacks because his straight- 
aways could be repellent) was a 
believer in dialectic, the pulsing of 
opposites, and more than a believ- 
er. It gave him energy, as love tradi- 
tionally gave poets energy. No ge- 
nius, though, can inhabit another 
genius's scheme without breaking 
it, and Brecht quite thoroughly dis- 
arranged the Hegelian- Marxist the- 
ory of progress through contradic- 
tions. Thesis and antithesis were his 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Bernd Fischer, Berlin's chief of 
protocol, is reading "Aits einem di- 
plomatischen Wanderleben" by 
Friedrich Rosen. 

“It is an old Habit of mine to 
browse around searching for diplo- 
matic memoirs. Through this book 
I have acquired quite a knowledge 
about the way the diplomatic life 
osed to be in Berlin until the end of 
World War IL” 

(Michael Kalknbach, IHT) 



heartbeat, but he couldn't stomach 
synthesis. 

This pul him at cautiously sim- 
mering odds with his fellow Com- 
munists, at least from the mid- 
1930s, when Statin decided it was 
synthesis time and began to shoot 
intellectuals by the thousands. 
"Cautiously” is the key. Brecht 
stayed out of Moscow and when he 
returned from exile to East Germa- 
ny after the war. it was in a compli- 
cated balance of convenience, ac- 
quiescence and disagreement. 
Allergic to synthesis, he could no 
more abide the anti-Stalmist than 
the Stalinist variety. 

There are those who regarded 
him as an opportunist, with an all- 


loo-convenient ability to tempo- 
rize. This may be partly true, but if 
so Ft is part of the contradictions. 

After Hitler came to power in 
1933 Brecht left Germany and set- 
tled in Denmark with his wife; the 
actress Helen Weigel, and their two 
children. Stefan and Barbara. In 
1939, after the fall of Chechoslova- 
kia, they moved io Sweden; in 1940, 
after the invasion of Norway, to 
Finland; and in 1941, to California. 

After the Allied victory they 
moved to Switzerland and then to 
East Germany, where be remained 
until bis death in 1956. 

Translated by Hugh Rorrison. the 
journals Brecht kept irregularly be- 
tween 1934 and 1955 are a new 


By Alan Truscott 

I T IS generally unwise to lead a 
singleton trump, since this may 
damage a partner who holds one or 


two trump honors. Exceptions oc- 
cur when dummy is likely to take 
several niffs, and West might have 


risen to the occasion on the dia- 
gramed deaL 

It occurred in the final of the 
Reisingo - Board-a- Match Teams in 
Seattle in December. 

North's third-round jump to 
three hearts was a splinter, showing 
a strong hand with diamond sup- 
port and heart shortage. This led to 
a six-diamond slam, which would 
have been defeated if West had led 
his singleton trump to cut down 
ruffs. West chose a dub, and South 
won with dummy's ace and cashed 
the heart ace. He led to the spade 
king, returned to dummy with a 


heart raff, and threw his dub loser 
on the spade ace. There fallowed a 
spade niff, a heart ruff, a dub ruff 
and a third heart ruff with the dia- 
mond ace. 

South was left with Q-I0-9-4 of 
trumps, and he ruffed a club low 
and made his slam. Note that raff- 
ing high would have led to defeat. 
The low raff was not such an obvi- 
ous play as one might think ofier 1 
West had played the two and nine 
of dubs, since East had been asked 
about partnership leads against a 
slam and had explained that any- 
thing was possible, including low 
from a doubleion. 

As it turned out, a trump lead, 
defeating the slam, would not have 
helped East-West or hart North- 
South. In the replay North-South 
reached three no-trump and were 
devastated by a spade lead. The 
contract failed by three tricks, so 


South’s team was due to win the 
board however his slam fared. 

NORTH 

* A852 
■? A 

9 A J 7 

* A8743 

west (D) east 

*.1 97 4 2 * Q 10 8 

C 1 9 6 4 3 VKJ87 

05 9 KB 8 

*Q9Z * K J 6 

• SOUTH 

* K 

V Q 10 S 2 


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West 

North 

East 

South 

Pass 

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Pass 

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Pass 

1 * 

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2 0 

Pass 

39 

Pass 

3* 

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4 

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6 -5 

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Pus 


West led the club two. 



volume in the mammoth collection 
of his writing, edited and annotated 
by John Willett and, until his death, 
by Ralph Manhem They are a re- 
cord of both human and artistic 
contradiction, a frozen surface 
punctuated by a volcanic rumbling 
that doesn't quite break through. 

As the exponent of distanced or 
non-Aristotelian drama — no pity, 
no tenor and. above all no purga- 
tion. or you fail into sentimentafity, 
— be stood against what he regard- 
ed as the empaihetic squashiness of 
the Stanislavskians. 

From Scandinavia he followed 
the course of the war, pasting pho- 
tographs and news accounts into 
the journals. Hitler, be remarks, is 
simply a late-capitalist free-trader,; 
“The borders that goods cannot 
cross will he crossed by tanks 
which, in turn, are goods.” There 
are glimpses of emotion, though; 
Following accounts of the massive 
Allied bombings he writes that- 
“one can see no end to the war. just; 
the end of Germany.” 

Assisted by the German exiles; 
who were already there, Brecht set- 
tled with his family in the Hoflyf 
wood area. He struggled to write 
film scripts, with not much success: 

Fritz Lang gave him a job helping 
to write “Hangmen Also Die,” but- 
be hated the work. “The diem takes, 
the brush and smears the picture so 
that nobody will ever know what it 
really looked like" he writes, adding 
that it was ruining his handwriting; 
He socialized with his fellow exiles 
but complained that their intellectu- 
al horizons had shrunk. 

Deeper than all this was his sense 
that he and the other German art- 
ist-refugees who had played such a 
role in the political and aesthetic 
battles or the *20s and '30s had 
taken refuge from history in air 
urban Tahiti. “1 fell an exile from 
my era," he writes, and when Pearl 
Harbor is bombed he notes. "We 
are in ihe world again." 

Entries from the last years in 
East Germany diminish and grow 
more distanced than ever. 

He invents an officially correct 
slogan: “No drunken OTgjes on 
mountaineering lours," a reference 
to the need to mobilize to buOd 
communism. Then he reverses it: 
“But mountaineering tours cause 
tiwar own type of intoxication." ' 

Richard Eder is on the staff of ike 
Los Angeles Times 


CALLING ONE FOREIGN COUNTRY 
F R <> M A N O T H E R I S N O 

SECRET 

WITH THESE SIMPLE ACCESS 

CODES 


Whether you're trying to reach another county overseas, or call hack to the UJL Sprint Express ' can help. Just dial the access code of the country you're in to reach an En^islvspeaking Sprint uperatoc \au don't even have tu be a Sprint 
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o Trinidad &Tcfaeo 23 
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Chile 

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Oil 

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0012-087-187 

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1724877 

Nw Zealand 

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140047741)00 

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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1994 
















































































THE TRIB INDEX: 1 1 1 .45 $§ 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©. composed of 
280 internationally investabte slocks Irom 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1. 1992 = 100. 

120 





Appmx. wqnnng 32’> 
Cose. 11882 P»er 118.-13 


Apprax. nBghtmg- 37% 
Ctese- 114.75 Prev.: 115.48 




Approx, wetyrtng- 
Close 97 09 Pin 9680 


J 

A S O N 0 

J 

1994 

1993 

1994 


: taHn 'America ■ * 

HH 


Apprct. weuhong. S'™ 
Close: 128 97 Pw. 125.00 

si 



ASONOJ ASONDJ 
1933 1994 1993 1994 

Yfa W Wkdbt 

17w> etdax backs US dWtir values of stocks *r Tokyo. New York, London, and 
Argnnti na. Australia. Austria. Belgium. Brazil. Canada. Chile. Denmark. Finland, 
Franco. Germany. Hong Kong, Italy. Mexico. Netherlands. New Zealand. Norway. 
Singapore. Spain. Sweden. Switzerland and Venezuela, fix Tokyo. M*t York and i 
London dv iticWr n compa-jed o» mo M top issues m rams of market npaatorlian. 
.litre rwsrf me ion ;;#> stocks jio nocked 




Wad. 

mat 

pro*. 

dOGfl 

SHS 

X 

ctaaot 

Energy 

110.48 

110.13 

♦0.32 

Capital Goods 

111.65 

111.32 

+0.30 

Utifibes 

11904 

118.69 

♦0.29 

Raw Materials 

11638 

114.97 

♦123 

Finance 

11338 

113.93 

-0.48 

Consumer Goods 

99.12 

99.10 

+0.02 

Services 

11938 

113.99 

♦033 

Miscellaneous 

137 84 

13674 

♦066 


Far more intormatun about me index a booklet is available free ol charge 
Wide to Trib index. I8t Avenue Charles de Gaulle. 93531 Newby Cede*. France 

"3 imemalional Herald Tribime 


Stocks 
Fall in 
Europe 

Inflation Fears 
Behind Plunge 

Compiled by Oar Siufj From Dirpurdtcs 

LONDON — European stock 
markets ended lower on Wednes- 
day after being dragged down by 
declining futures, profit-taking ana 
a weaker opening on Wall Street 
caused by fears of a resurgence ia 
inflation. 

The European component of tbe 
International Herald Tribune 
World Stock lodes fell 0.63 percent 
percent, to 114.75. 

In London, shares plunged amid 
a selling spree on tbe futures market 
and dimming outlook for interest- 
rate cuts. At the dose, the Financial 
Tunes Stock Exchange 100 index 
was down 29 3 points, at 3.379.2. 

Upbeat reports about consumer 
spending during the Christmas peri- 
od are convincing many investors 
that tbe British economy is on ihe 
way to recovery. That is also limiting 
optimism about a rate cut, which 
would be beneficial for the stock 
market 

French share prices dosed lower 
on a technical correction after tbe 
market hit a record high on Mon- 
day. The CAC-4Q blue-chip share 
index sank 24.79 points, to Z249J5, 
on active Bourse volume of about 
5.4 billion francs ($915 million). 

Dealers said the downward move 
also came amid speculation that 
French interest rates were unlikely 
to be cut soon. Even if the Bundes- 
bank cuts rales at its council meet- 
ing on Thursday, Paris dealers said 
tbe newly independent Bank of 
France is likdy to delay cutting its 
own rates to build up some credi- 
bility in finandal markets. 

German share prices also weak- 
ened as investors took profits in 
disappointment that tbe strong ral- 
ly just before and just after tbe new 
year appeared to have run out of 
steam. By the session end, the DAX 
index was down 20.17 points at 
2733.41. 

German shares continued to de- 
cline in after-bourse trading. Deal- 
ers said that a vague rumor that 
President Boris N. Yeltsin of Rus- 

See STOCKS, Page 10 


Borden Sees Loss 
And Solicits Bids 
For Snack Unit 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Baden Inc 
said Wednesday it would seD its 
North American snack foods 
business as part of a corporate 
restructuring that wfll contribute 
10 a $650 million charge against 
fourth-quarter earnings. 

Borden said the divestment 
program would permit the com- 
pany to focus on core business- 
es such as pasta, niche foods 
and domestic dairy products as 
well as its nonfood businesses. 

The company said it expect- 
ed a loss of $590 million to $600 
million for 1993 but maintain ed 
earnings would improve steadi- 
ly in 1994 after a marginally 
profitable first quarter. In 1992. 
it posted a net loss of S439.6 
million and in 1991 it recorded 
a profit of $294.9 million. 

The company also said it 
plans cost reductions over the 
next two years that will save up 
to $125 million annually by the 
end of 1995. It plans to cut its 
annual dividend in half for 1994 
to 30 cents a share. 

The company’s share tum- 
bled to close down $2,375, at 
$15,875, on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 


Anthony D'Amalo resigned 
under pressure os its chief exec- 
utive last month. 

Frank Tasoo, who became 
chairman on Dec. 9, said 
Wednesday the board had “eval- 
uated the full range of alterna- 
tives for Borden, including sale 
or merger of the company.” 

The goal of this program is 
to build shareholder value by 
focusing on and revitalizing our 
best businesses.” he said. 

The businesses being put up 
for sale include its North Amer- 
ican salty snacks, seafood, jams 
and jdlies. They accounted to- 
gether for about $1.25 billion in 
revenue last year, or nearly 20 
percent of projected corporate 
sales of $6.75 billion. 

The divestments are expected 
to be completed by the end of 
the year. The snack foods units 
may be sold together, individ- 
ually or in combinations. 

Cither businesses for sale, inc- 
luding Doxsee seafood and Ba- 
ma jams and jetties, accounted 
for $500 million in sales last 
year. Among units to be re- 
tained, Borden said its pasta and 
niche products such as Cracker 
Jack and ReaLemon were fun- 
damentally strong. 


3.2 Billion DM Bailout 


Complied trr Ov Staff From Drenches 

FRANKFURT — Metallgesefl- 
schaft AG, whose finances were 
reported Wednesday to be in even 
worse shape than previously 
thought, said it was seeking to raise 
32 billion Deutsche marks (SI. 84 
billion) in fresh equity and credits 
as part of a restructuring plan. 

The troubled German metals 
company said after a meeting with 
its creditor banks that the capital- 
raising plan was m& with a “posi- 
tive” response. But the company 
would not say whether the banks 
would accept tbe plan. 

“No agreement nas been reached 
yet,” said one banker who attended 
the meeting Other bankers said 
they had until next Wednesday to 
declare their position on tbe pro- 
posed restructuring. 

The new chairman of Metatige- 
sellschafu Karl-Josef Neukirchen, 
also said Wednesday that the com- 
pany would have to review its re- 
sults for last year following the dis- 
missal last month of six of its board 
members, including tbe former 
chainnan.Hetnz Schunmelbusch. 

Industry sources said that for the 
year ended SepL 30. the company 
had a loss of 1.784 billion DM — 
more than five times the previously 
reported loss of 347 million DM. 

The sources also said debts at the 
group currently total 9.095 billion 
DM, greater than the 8 billion DM 
it announced last week. Tbe 


sources added tfie loss at the coni-, 
party's U.S. unit. MG Cotp„ was 
770 milliaa DM for the year. 

A MetaDgeseflschaft spokesman 
refused to comment on the reports. 

.The company said its proposed 
restructuring package included: 

• A stock offering to raise 1.4 
trillion DM through the sale of 5.6 
million new. shares at par value of 
50 DM. {viced at 250 DM each. 
The company would not say if the 
shares would be offered on a rights 
bass, although this is standard 
practice in Germany. 

• The transformation of 1 3 bil- 
lion DM of bank credits into “sub- 
ordinated convertible participation 
capital," which would have tbe 
character of equity. 

• The granting by banks of 500 
million DM in new credits to the 
parent company. 

“With this package of measures, 
the foreseeable liquidity require- 
ments mil be fully covered and 
there would be an adequate equity 
base,” the company said. 

Metal Igesdkchaft said the capi- 
tal measures, combined with previ- 
ously announced plans to sell off 
some of the conglomerate's subsid- 
iaries, would bear fruit quickly. 

“Tbe management board cruL«d ti- 
ers today as a new beginning for the 
Metallgesellschaft group,” a state- 
ment said. It said the package of 
measures should cover the group's 


liquidity needs and provide it with 

an adequate capital base. 

Deutsche Bank AG lias credit 
exposure to Metallgesellschaft or 
539 million DM, Bayerische 
Landes bank bos 380 million DM. 
Dresdner Bank AG has 198 million 
DM, Commerzbank AG has 201 
million DM. Crtdit Lyonnais of 

240 million DM and Chose Man- 
hattan of 149 million DM. tbe in- 
dustry sources added. 

Tbe sources said 60-2 percent of 
the company’s new share issue will 
be taken up propentianarely by 
Dresdner Bank, Deutsche Bank. 
Allianz AG. Daimler-Benz AG and 
tbe state of Knwait The rest will be 
taken up by tbe remainder of Me- 
tailgesellschaffs creditors, the 
sources said. 

Metallgesellschaft has been in 
crisis since it disclosed on Dec, 7 
that it needed an emergency loan 
from its main creditor banks. 
Dresdner Bank AG and Deutsche 
Bank AG. to meet cash calls on oil- 
futures contracls- 

On Dec. 17. Metal IgeseDsch aft's 
supervisory board fired Mr. Schim- 
metbusch. accusing him of con- 
ducting the oil-futures trades with- 
out properly informing tbe board. 
Four other management-board 
members were asked to step down. 

Even without the oQ trades. Me- 
taUgesellschaft was running up 
losses on its activities. 

(AFX. Bloomberg, Reuters I 


Amid Gloom, Germany Spots a Possible Glimmer 


By Brandon Mitchener 

Iiaemanonal Herald Tribune 
FRANKFURT — Conflicting 
data on employment and orders to 
German industry, released 
Wednesday, cast doubt cm the gov- 
ernment's claim that an economic 
recovery had arrived but left intact 
the hope that it was on its way. 

Record unemployment in De- 
cember. a decline in orders to Ger- 
man manufacturing industry in 
November and downward revi- 
sions of two earlier reports suggest 
the German economy might Iiave 
shrunk in the fourth quarter of 
1993, after expanding at a OJ per- 
cent rate in the second and third 
quarters, economists said. 


“The recession isn’t over.” said 
Hans Jacket, an economist for 
DRI/ McGraw-Hill in Frankfurt. 
With the exception of exports, 
which are rising,, “the underlying 
trends in major demand compo- 
nents stOJ point downward,” be said. 

Amid the gloom, however, many 
economists professed to have seer 
a bright spot. 

The number of West Germans 
without jobs rose by-383,079 in De- 
cember to a postwar record of 15 
million, for an unemployment rate 
of 9.1 percent. East German unem- 
ployment rale rose to 16.2 percent 
from 15.8 percent in November. 

In seasonally adjusted terms, 
however. West German unemploy- 


ment rose by just 5.000 in Decem- 
ber, the smallest increase in 
months, after increases of 35.000 in 
November, 58,000 in October and 
50,000 in September. 

Separately, the Economics Min- 
istry reported a 0.8 percent decline 

Denmark extended Its string of 
interest-rate arts. Page 1L 

in orders to German manufacturers 
in November, adjusted for inflation 
and seasonal factors, and revised 
October's figure to a 0.6 percent 
decline from a drop of 0.3 percent. 

On Tuesday, (he Economics 
Ministry said industrial production 


had fallen 2.1 percent in November 
and revised the previous month's 
data to show a deeper decline. 

But tins contradictory combina- 
tion of a smaOer-than-expected rise 
in unemployment and raiger-i ban- 
expected decline in industrial or- 
ders and production amounts to a 
sure sign the economy is slowly 
turning around, some analysts said. 

“The first signs of a recovery are 
always wishy-washy," Stefan 
Schneider, an economist at Nomu- 
ra Research Institute, said. “The 
(rend is changing, but it takes some 
time before it shows up. I wouldn’t 
write off the recovery completely.'' 

Although he said the seasonally 
adjusted West German unemploy- 


ment figure for December was an 
"amazingly good number." he 
pointed out that a single month's 
figures can seldom be trusted in 
charting a trend. 

The Bundesbank, which bolds its 
first board meeting of the new year 
Thursday, is also taking a cautious 
line on tire recovery. Hans-Jurgen 
Koebnick, a member of the board 
and president of tbe slate central 
bank in Rhineland-Palatinaie, said 
on German radio Wednesday that 
die economy would “come slowly 
into gear” in 1994. 

He also said the Bundesbank 
would “certainly come down sig- 
nificantly" in its discount and 
Lombard rates this year. 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

Job-Seekers Now Get On-Line 


By Kathleen Murray 

Vm York Timer Sen in' 

N EW YORK — In a year. Tim Bruce 
will lo%e hi> job as a Navy pilot, a 
casualty of a shrinking U.S. military 
force, ind his father. Joseph, is already 
trying to find him a new job. 

Wnhin an hour of hearing the news, in fact, the 
eider Mr Bruce went to his computer, dialed up 
CompuServe — an on-line service he uses to com- 
municate with other professionals — scanned his 
screen for job listings for j viators, then posted a 
notice asking for leads. 

Within three days, he had nearly 40 responses, 
including some job possibilities and advice on how 
his son could log enough flying time to seek a job 
with the commercial airlines. 

"There were ideas we wouldn't even have 
thought of.” Mr. Bruce, a software engineer in 
Santa Ana. California, said. 

He said he did not feel particularly adventurous 
in taking the job search to cyherspjee. But career 
counselors and recruiters say he is at the edge of 
what is likely in he the next employment frontier. 

“PC power." ;hc power of personal computer, 
is now enabling people to find job opportunities 
they might otherwise miss. 

Some point out that, even in the United Slates, 
fewer than one-third of homes have personal com- 
puters and fewer still have modems, so most 
people remain computer-deprived. 

But regardless of its ultimate merits, electronic 
job-hunting already has created j nice position for 
a number of people, such as James Gonyea 46. 
who set up Help Wanted U.S. A. in March 1*593. 

Seven years jg,i. when others were dismissing 
computer networks as an esoteric enclave. Mr. 
Gonyea. a ps>chuK*gist and career counselor from 
Manchester. New Hampshire, decided to take ca- 
reer services to ihe next level. 

Todav. work in e under the electronic identitv 


“CareerDoc." he heads the Career Center on 
America On-Line, whose 400.000 subscribers not 
only can look at sample resumes but also can post 
their own and seek comments on them. 

In addition, they can peruse help-wanted ads. 
leave a question on a bulletin board for Mr. Gon- 
yea or sign up for a private counseling session with 
him or one of his associates. 

Mr. Gonyea said that computers had advantages 
over face- to- face counseling. “People are more 
comfortable because it’s anonymous." he said. 

He once counseled a teacher who had been fired 
by a high school in Massachusetts after having 
been accused of having sexual relations with a 
student, "it was easier for him to talk frankly 
about it,” Mr. Gonyea said, “because I didn't see 
him. and he didn't see me.” 

After six private half-hour on-line sessions, the 
former teacher found a job as a librarian. 

Others, though, have not been as fortunate. 
Brian QuashncdL a sales representative with Dow 
Jones & Co., said he knew of several people who 
had searched for jobs on-line but only one who had 
actually been lured. 

Employers also disagreed about the value of 
using computer listings. 

When ihe state Human Resources Department 
in Kansas was looking for a workers’ compensa- 
tion judge. an ad in Help Wanted U.S.A. generated 
six responses. “For us. that’s a lot," Janet Palmer, 
the personnel manager, said. "I'd do it again.” 

But when Richard Lewis, a recruiter in Atlanta, 
went looking for a data-processor. he got no re- 
sponses at all. 

Some career consultants say that informal 
networking may continue to be preferable to the 
more structured electronic job-searching services. 

Martin Yaw, a career consultant, says that no 
matter how widespread electronic job-hunting be- 
comes. it will always be only part of a successful 
search. 


STAR TV Said to Replace Its Chairman, Again 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — STAR TV. 
the Hong Kong-based satellite 


according a report to be published 
Thursday in the Far Eastern Eco- 
nomic Review. 

The magazine named Gary Da- 


how to expand in difficult markets for five years and was its president 


like China and India. 


for pay television and international 


broadcaster controlled by Rupert w. airrattly the No. 2 executive at 
Murdoch's News Corp. his report- ® nu ** 1 Sky Broad c a s ti ng Ltd. m 
edly replaced its chief executive for London, as Mr. Griffith s replace- 
the second time in six months. n* 311 a ^ ter months in the job. 

Amid in-house delays building a The switch has been attributed 
subscription television service and by sources dose to BSkyB to a 
intensifying competition in the personality clash and differences of 
fast-growing Asian television mar- opinion between its chief executive, 
ket, STAR TVs managing director. Sam Chisholm, who supervises 


Mr. Chisholm, a New Zealander Jf*™ 5 vjde <> before his transfer to 
who has been described as a "mir- “ on 8 Kong 
ade worker” by Mr. Murdoch. Die change comes at a time 
helped turn around unprofitable when critics say STAR TV, in 
BSkyB’s fortunes through cost-cut- which Mr. Murdoch bought a 65.4 
ting and tough negotiations with percent stake for $525 million in 
U.S. program suppliers. He is July, has lost some of its early mo- 
known to bold Hollywood in low mentum. 
esteem. Still Lbe international broadens i- 


tbeless encountered difficulties 
since its start-up by the Hong Kong 
conglomerate Hutchison Wham- 
poa Ltd. and the family of its chair- 
man. Li Ka-shing. 

There has been a debate in Asia 
about the need to protect native 
customs and values from invasion 
via satellite. The controversy pro- 


Mr. Griffith, an American, er with the widest reach in Asia, 
worked with News Corp.’s 20th beaming five 24-hour channels into 


James Griffiths, is to be replaced. STAR TV, and Mr. Griffiths over Century Fox entertainment group 38 countries, STAR TV has none- 


Still the international broadcast- rided some defensive local broad- 
with the widest reach in Asia, casters a rationale for protecting 
anting five 24-hour channels into their commerical interests in tbe 
countries, STAR TV has none- name of culture. 


Cold Snap in U.S. 
Lifts Oil Prices 

Complied bt Our Staff Fianr Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Crude oil 
soared above SI5 a barrel on 
Wednesday for the first time in 
almosL a month as a cold snap in 
the United States and a series of 
refinery shutdowns sent beating oil 
up almost 2 cents a gallon. 

The market was further boosted 
by expectations that OPEC may 
bring forward a ministerial confer- 
ence scheduled for the end of 
March to the beginning of Febru- 
ary and leave its six-month oil out- 
put ceiling unchanged, according 
to OPEC delegation sources. 

In addition. Oman's oil minister 
predicted Wednesday that inde- 
pendent oil producers would coop- 
erate with Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries 
members to stabilize and boost oil 
prices, f Bloomberg. Knight -Ridder) 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 

s 

Amucrdam ■ 
Bnmds iTi 
FronKhJH i “J" 
London lol ' *Hi 


'all! :■!»> E!»' MJU 

'*««• 2J71. f S *“I4 330' 


DM. F.F. Lire D.CI B.F. S.F. Yw Cl Peseta 

Hi?» CJJ*S LIU3* JJST* I3U *T6* <015 I3U» 

31 &:ie ? IJ13 * lur; iota LOT F.4l 3075* 

— :.v iia> osni uw U7s i Sts- i jwj 

- -■» m ii'iis irs: siM mo wajj i«s nsa 


Mm Tort lb) • C'iO .’i 5*54 !iC2> 

Port* !F? I'JI JSj jJjSj 

Ttotvo i : :^r Id.-.” sj!i Sit' 

Toronto I JIM !■«! i"(> LTi Oil 

Zorich i! - ' :•*» '-i^i ea-! 


vr- 

.1 r^i ?~-i 


m irs: hm mo wau i«a uia 

:!JU 1S»* -03 w Tra# ir^n* ia»si — - 

330 ' *«D- 4 TJM 1 .UTJ& ISDlA l JR II IMS 

sails myi it* tjw ii>& i.ra iuji 

— j-USd* jm: ax* j*m sjo* ser *«■ 

r 3 .” Cm' * ^ i us> ;»js — — [j-» a w 

ira ure- ism list- opo? nit*- — mi* 

stm ra'J* ;-a? <r«p* — iai 7 - irai un«* 
'.au» l'jh ares urn up wn 


Eurocurrency Deposit* 

Swiss 


French 


Jan. 5 

Dollar 

D-Mark 

Franc 

Sterling 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

1 monffi Mj 

0#,M 

fl’'44W 

S 


3»>2 * 

eve*. 

3 montns 

1 

3 '-~i 

540-51 1 

(>♦**« 



4 mm IB 3 *s-3Vj 


3W.1 

Sfu- 9+ 

5*44 

t*-2 

6-evn 

1 rear 3 -.va ^ 

Sotrcos: Reuters Uords Bonk. 

J VJ "« 

5Pk-5U 

546-54* 

1%-1ft 



«o *»9 awKcabto to mterto* deuatUs at a mUHon mtnlnwm tor mutvotans). 


I SDR M"' • ,r 3> ..-i i'j>- Mif.D ;tys M«Sj UHft IUCm l«T IWIS5 

Ciiisi'ia. >ii J.Ti - v-iJjit*. cotton. Men vert and Zurich, fUtnn In other centers: Toronto 
iatesotjpm 

a Tu eo» cne novna o To out one da «r? \ units of IX: N. li. not nuoMd. NJS.. not 
oi aiiot i3r. 


Other Dollar Values 


Cummer 
Aram), mm 
fliMraL t 
poor rail. 
BroiU cmr. 


Danish krone 
EertXMwM 
Fln.roartim 


Per* 

Cimtmcv 

Her S 

Currency 

PUTS 

Ctimncr 1 

pars 

0<W 

OrwFWOC 


Men. peso 

3109 

5. Air. rand 

13W3 

>.4533 

Hong Knag ( 

7.-7I 

N Zealand S 

1+787 

S. Ker.wan 

81270 

trjo 

Humklorbd 

row 

N Ore. Untie 

7.4K 

5wM.krann 

UDM 

321 » 

lira ion nme 

3!J+ 

PNI.poso 

rs® 

Taiwan S 

2450 

STSS 

Imu. rwtod 

r»»l 

PeHsbxIotr 

30519 

ihalMM 

2551 

J»+l 

Irish 1 

&X»1 

Porl.etaiUe 

17636 

Turkish lira 

1*687 

6155 

Israeli seek. 

1*236 

RgiLruMe 

125500 

UAE dirham 

3575 

IMS 

Kuwaiti dinar 

OLIW 

Saudi riyol 

375 

veiwz. boHv. 

H5*S 

s.:rr 

Motor, rum. 

TffT 

Sing.* 

1J41B 




Forward Rates 


Currency Smmv (Mo* 90-dor Cormier Hn tMvr M4«r 

PuupdSwrfM IJSK ir« U 770 Canadian dollar 1JW I JIM WITS 

DHtidRiMKt 1»°S U**0 JoMMMTCn 112* 11105 11U0 

3wt»m>dc «*»• ««» 

Souren. IW«S Sen* IndoSeO: Bank , Brussels*: Banco CwiMweMe itallana 

txtilani- flue no* Prana* Pntsse IPonal. Bonk of tokve i fforoi 9onk of Canada 

/ 7 v ~ 'll’ l UP iSP& ’ 1 -W AriJ Centers and ad 


Mi sO Jar wear 

UW Ijm 1.3179 
m* 11105 11130 


Key Money Rates 

United Stctei Close 

Dlmwnt rate 3J» 

Prim* rate L00 

Federal fend* 3 ’■« 

Miami CM ISM 

comm, paper I redan 3J5 

t-mantti Tmnunr Din 107 

1- rtw T recto nr Mil 140 

2- rtar Tmwr note AX! 

5mr Trctaurr note 525 

7-rear Treasure note 5^2 

It- rear TrcasurrMN 5X7 

B-rtor TruMrr MM LdS 

Merrill Lynch VdMReadr team 2.74 
Jonoo 

Dltcwntrate IW 

CWI MMr 7 >» 

1-nuWh toferDank 

3- momti Mcrhaak 2 

*-moem toiemanh its 

10 dtoar Ourgrn m ei w Dead 3J6 

Cofwany 

Lombard rate 6^ 

Coll money 6.15 

1-faaRHi lolartaflk 6.10 

3-menni InHrbMK 5JB 

t-moaHi lefertaik 5.60 

10 -veer Bmo 5*7 


Close Prev. 
3 M 100 


Pi, Pi. 

2«b 2*. 

3 3'« 
2 1 » 200 
17s 1 *• 

3J6 NjQ. 


Bank bam ran 

too 

m 

Call DSSflAY 

9b 

54* 


iVl 

SVi 

3-montk hstorbvik 

S'. 

5- 

6+nanlh Interbank 

SS 

sv. 

18-rear GW 
France 

«6 

6J0 

InterveniiM rate 

6JD 

630 

Call money 

6'k 

6 ». 

lununlk HmraouK 



3-Rwnrbtoferhaafe 

4.15 

44 

6+naam toJerhon* 

S*i 

5*y 

IB- tear OAT 

5M 

S72 

Sources: Reuters, Bloomberg. Merrill 

Lynch. Bunk of Tok re. CotntnrrebOflM, 
OttenrreH Monfodu. Credit Lvetmois 


!*■ Crtdrtn 
2*. 

zm Gold 


Zurich 
London 
New York 


aiS donors oer ouoca London otncJof B x- 

<H lops: Zurich Odd Nnr York opodns Bid &*■ 

S40 too prices: Non York Comex (Fed) 
ica Source Heelers. 


BID No. 

BID SUBMISSION DATE 


PROCUREMENT NOTICE 
£UKUROVA ELEKTRIK A.§. 

: PTM-PR 94.01 
ATE : JANUARY 27, 1 994 


QUKUROVA ELEKTRIK A.§., (QEA§) intends to procure below Protection Relays for the construction and 
extension works of its substations: 


SCH 1: UNE MONITORING EQUIPMENT SCH3: MISC PROTECTION RELAYS 

34 EA. FAULT LOCATOR 6 EA. TRANS. DIF. RELAYS 

30 EA. FAULT RECORDER 358 EA. OVERCURRENT RELAYS 

SCH 2: MAIN PROTECTION RELAYS 207 EA. AUTO-RECLOSING RELAYS 

3 EA. BUS-BAR DIF. RELAYS 566 EA. OTHER RELAYS 

18 EA. DIST. PROTEC RELAYS 

This procurement shall be financed by the company resources and the Bidding shall be made according to the 
company’s Bidding Procedures. 

This Bidding is open to all Bidders who comply with below Prerequisite for Eligibility; 

For all schedules: 

• Bidders who have been regularly engaged for a continuous period of 10 years, prior to the date of Bid 
Submission, in the design and manufacture of above specified static type protection equipment. 

For Schedule 1: UNE MONITORING EQUIPMENT 

• Bidders who have designed and manufactured at least 1 ,000 pieces of above specified Static type, Line 
Monitoring Equipment, out of which 500 pieces still in operation since 5 years. 

For Schedule 2: MAIN PROTECTION RELAYS 

• Bidders who have designed and manufactured at least 2.000 pieces of underimpedance starting, switch 
type, static Distance Protection Relays, out of which 1 .000 pieces still in operation since 5 years, and 200 pieces of 
Static type Bus-bar differential Relays out of which 100 pieces still in operation since 5 years. 

For Schedule 3: MISC. PROTECTION RELAYS 

• Bidders who have designed and manufactured at least 500 pieces of static type Transformer Differential 
Relays, out of which 250 pieces stiH in operation since 5 years, and 20.000 pieces of static type Overcurrent Relays 
out of which 10.000 pieces still in operation since 5 years. 

A complete set of Bidding Documents may be obtained upon remittance of a non-refundable document fee of 
U.S.S500 or equivalent convertible currency, to below Bank Accounts and upon a written application to below 
address With evidence of payment: 

BANK/BRANCH ACCOUNT No.: ADDRESS: 

ADABANK/ADANA 20000013 QUKUROVA ELEKTRIK A.§. PHONE: 322-2350681 

I M AR/BANKASI/ADANA 20002548 GENERAL MANAGEMENT TELEFAX: 322-2350257 

SEYHAN BARAJ1 TELEX: 62735 TR 

P.O.B: 239 01322 ADANA-TURKIYE 

All Bids must be delivered to the above offices on or before 14:00 hours Local Time, on JANUARY 27, 1994 
and shall be opened at above offices of General Management. 

It is essential that the Bidders shall be in conformity with the Prerequisite for Eligibility and the Bids shall be 
submitted in full conformity with the Bidding Documents. Other Bids shall be rejected. 

QEA§ reserves the right to accept or to reject any Bid and annul the Bidding process and reject all Bids, at any 
time prior to award Contract, without thereby incurring any liability to the affected Bidders or any obligation to inform 
the affected Bidders of the grounds for QEA§’s action. 


SCH 3: 


SCH 2: 


MISC PROTECTION RELAYS 
6 EA. TRANS. DIF. RELAYS 
358 EA. OVERCURRENT RELAYS 
207 EA. AUTO-RECLOSING RELAYS 
566 EA. OTHER RELAYS 


BANK/BRANCH 
ADABANK/ADANA 
I M AR/BANKASI/ADANA 


ACCOUNT No.: 

20000013 

20002548 






I 




Page 10 

market diary 

STOCKS: European Weakness 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1994 


Continued from Page 9 
sia would resign — later denied by 
an adviser to Mr. Yeltsin — bad 
added to the cautious mood. 

Italian stocks also closed lower. 
Political battles over the dale of the 
next elections and fears interest 
rate cuts are not coming soon 
spurred investors to take some 
profits ahead of the long holiday 
weekend, traders said. 

“People are beginning to worry 
about the domestic political situa- 
tion again,” said a trader at BNL 

N.Y. Stocks 

Eurosecurities. With the market 
dosed for a holiday Thursday, 
many investors with profits to book 
from last week's strong rises cashed 
in. traders said. 

The M1B all-share index fell 14 
points, to 994. after falling 6 points 
Tuesday. 

Among the biggest losers across 
Europe wen: several major phar- 
maceutical companies, whose share 
prices dropped after an Italian gov- 
ernment decision to stop reimburs- 
ing consumers for their purchases 
of several major medical products. 

Britain's SmiihKline Beech am 
PLC, Switzerland's Sandoz AG and 
Italy’s largest quoted drug company. 
Recordaii SpA. were among the 
companies whose shares fell after 
the government enacted the plan. 

SmiihKline shares fell 13 pence 
to 355 because the Italian govern- 
ment said it would no longer reim- 
burse patients for three of its top- 
selling drugs: the antibiotic 
Augmcnlin. the anti-arthritis drug 
Relafex. and Seroxau an antide- 
pressant. 

Sandoz. whose SI 35-million a 


BENTS EN: Dollar Bounces Back 


under the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade. 

With those trade battles won. the 
administration can now focus on 
expanding trade with Japan and 
the rest of Asia, he said. 

“The Asian- Pacific region is the 
fastest-growing economic region in 

Foreign Exchange 

the world and we must be a pan of 
it," Mr. Ben [sen said. 

In October, the government's 
latest reading, the U.S. trade deficit 
with Japan was $6.1 billion. 

Analysts said the reason the dol- 
lar bounced back after Mr. Bent- 
sen's talk was that currency traders 
had decided lo focus on the depth 
of the Japanese recession as a rea- 
son for selling die yen once it had 
strengthened slightly. 

Last year, the administration en- 
courage! a stronger yen as a means 
of curbing Japan’s trade surplus, 
resulting in a rise of about 20 per- 
cent in the yen’s value. The curren- 
cy has since given up a little more 
than half of that gain. 

"The Japanese economy is in a 
real mess, and they need a weaker 
currency to get the economy out of 
a rut again " said Mark Geddes. 


treasury economist at Midland 
Globa! Markets in London. "Deep 
down, the U.S. knows that .’ 1 

As long as the Japanese govern- 
ment fails to lake more Gscal mea- 
sure to stimulate the economy, 
"they'll have to accept a weaker 
currency,” said Neil MacKinnon, 
chief economist at Citibank in Lon- 
don. 

In addition to depressed eco- 
nomic conditions in Japan, the yen 
is suffering from expectations mat 
interest rates on Japanese invest- 
ments will go even lower. Japan's 
discount rate, the central bank's 
rate on loans to commercial banks, 
is already at a historic low of 1.75 
percent. 

The dollar, on the other hand, is 
benefiting from optimism about 
the economic recovery and a belief 
that the Federal Reserve will raise 
official U.S. interest rales this year. 

In the short term, the key report 
of the week for the dollar will be the 
December U.S. employment report 
on Friday. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar was lower at 1.4797 Swiss 
francs, from 1.4825 francs, but rose 
to 5.9055 French francs from 
5.8975. The pound strengthened to 
51.4875 from $1.4860. 

I Bloomberg, UP/, AFX) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agma Front* Jan. S 

Close Prev. 

Amsterdam 

ABN Amro Htd 7300 72M 

ACF Holding 5X70 SB. 00 

Aegon 109.40 110 

AhoJd 49.211 

Akw aw i*i 

AMEV 0X80 87 

Amsl Rubber 2_70 2-60 

Bois-wessanen am «n70 

CSM 75.10 7440 

DSM 106J0 J07J0 

Elsevier 185 18X20 

Fokker ‘ ~ 

Gist- Brocades 
HBG 
Hel nek en 
Hoosovens 
Hwiter Douglas 
IHC Co land 
inter Mueller 
Infl Nederland 
KLM 
KNP BT 
Nadllovd 
OceGrlnten 
Pawned 
PMIIpb 
P o lygra m 
Robeco 
Rodamco 
R ailnep 

RorunJO 
Rovol Dutch 

SWlt __ 

Unilever T25-90 22430 

VonOmmeren 4410 *7 JO 
VNU 17470 175.60 

wautn/Kniwier 12430 125 

CBS trend index : MA. 
Previous : MM0 


I Vlas 4*7507-50 

Volkswagen 441 444 

Wrlta 850 840 

□AX Index : 2233-41 

Previous : 85467 


Helsinki 

Amar-Yluvma 1 


Enso-Gutzeit 

Huhromafci 

K.O.P. 

Kvmmcne 

Mrlra 

Nokia 

Pohlala 


115 116 
39 JO 3880 
1*3 194 

1130 14 

118 1 2D 

200 798 

298 2*7 

90 8930 
97 9450 
286 270 


469 4.73 

126 2J0 

473 474 

437 442 

237 270 

145 132 

9X3 
700 706 

?5? 

1.76 1.76 

708 7J tl 

7J7 7J3 

1.16 1.IS 

5JM 


Brussels 


AOK-UM 

AG Fin 

Arced 

Barca 

Bekoerl 

Cncfceriii 

Coobd a 

DoinaUe 

Electrabvr 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevoert 

K rediet Dan* 

Peirailno 

Powerful 

Royal Beige 


25« 2465 
2935 2900 
4100 «I0» 
2290 2205 
21000 20600 
160 155 

5830 5833 
1370 1350 
6750 6750 
1515 1550 
4060 4035 
W0G 8930 
6000 8090 
9890 W 20 
3AC0 3593 
5830 5820 


. Sac Gen Banaue 8*60 W20 
. Sac Gen Belokwe .SAM .34 '5 
Satina I MOO ISOOO 

Salvay 14900 1«25 

Trodetwl 11W0 10450 

UCB 25900 25850 

Current siqck^rate » : 758708 


Frankfurt 

AEG 174 JO 176 

AIJicnr Hold 2355 2890 
Altana 435 644 

AskO 1085 nil 

BASF 30280307-40 

Bayer 36360 367 

BOV. Hysa bank 516.50 S24 

Bov Verclnsbfc 565 579 

BBC 65© 662 

SHF Bank 51 7 SO 524 
BMW 721.50 724 

Commerzbank 385397 JO 

Continental 38260 763 

Daimler Benz 84384*60 

Deotresa 475,50 at 

Di Babcock 258 25950 

Deutsche Bank E4960 882 
Douglas 557 555 

Deesdner Ben* 462-80 *64 

FeMmuetiie 330 330 
F Kruoo Hooch 15815450 

Horoww 
Henkel 
Hotfitiet 
Hoecftst 3088031430 

Holznrarei 
Horten 
IWKA 
Kali Sab 
Kars root 57X50584 jo 

Kouthot W2 5*0 

KHD 12D 701223* 


Stockmann 
HEX Index : 1671.31 
Previous : 166488 


Hong Kong 

Bk Easi Asia 61 JO 59 
Cathay Pacific 1530 1540 
Cheung Kong 49 JO 4925 
China Light Pwr 5X50 55-50 
Dairy Farm infl 15.70 15.90 
Hang Lung Dev 3121) T0£O 
Hang Seng Bar* 77 JO 75 50 
Henderson Land 55 58-31 
HK Air Eng. 53 S258 

HK Chino GOS 25-7D 76.20 
HK Electric 32 3* 

HK Land 3)25 30.25 

HK Realty Trust 59*0 30 

HSBC Holdings 114 115 

HK Shang Htls 14® 1SJ0 
HK Telecomm 1680 1720 
HK Ferry 14.30 1X90 

Hutch Whom ooa 39.75 7975 
Hyson Dev 3125 *0 5 

jardlneMcrth. 60 JO 81 
Jardine Str Hid 3675 3775 
Kowloon Molor 2X80 2X50 
Mandarin Often 1 11.10 1108 
Miramar Halel 71 JO 2080 
New World Dev *0 *125 
5HK Proas 74 74 

Slelu* 410 5.90 

Swire Poc A 67J0 69 

Tal Cneuna Pros 1580 1630 
TVE X75 X73 

Wharf Hold 37 JO 37J0 
wing On irtrl 16 15.40 

Winsor ind. 1660 I6J0 


Johannesburg 


AECI 

I7JP 

17 JO 

Allecti 

n jo 

9X50 




Barhmre 

5560 

5X75 


IX2S 

13 

Buffels 

55 

S3 

De Beers 

108 

108 





960 


GFSA 

116 

118 

l-tormony 

25 

23 

Hlghveld Sieel 

70 

17 

Kiaa> 

5X25 

se 

NedBank Grp 

2960 

2« 

Raaritanleln 

S7J0 

5X50 





9460 9660 

51 Milena 

49 




19 


5265 

5160 

totslsm De«j 

215 

217 

Conwrol^ing^JOMJ* 


330 333 

634 638 

..... 1252 1233 

HMCftSl 30880314 JS 

1080 1075 
23) J35 

375 390 

Kgll Sab 153 151 

Korsraot 57X50584 jo 

Kauthat W2 5*0 

KHD 120 70 122 JO 

Kioeckrw «eme112J0 107.90 
Linde 948 *48 

Luttnansa 1745017450 

MAN 410-W9J0 

Monnesmann 430 *Z> 

Maialioesail 770JO267J0 

MuenciiHwedk 3-*s 38« 

Porsche ,.J70 _ 750 


Preustog 

PWA 

EWE 

Rhein meioli 

ScMring 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thvssdn 

Varta 

Ueba 

VEW 


459J04S1JO 
218 213 

511 W 519 JO 
340 320 
1094 1IA3 
392 199 

78740794 70 
279 278 

311 3C8 

52X5952460 
337 338 


London 


AOBeV Nal l 4.92 

Allied LvWH 459 

AND Wiggins Uet 

Argyll Grout) 285 

Ass Bril Foods 567 

BAA 1X55 

BAe On 

Bonk Scotland 2.15 

Barcian 5 n 

Bass SAb 

BAT 540 

BET IJ7 

Blue Circle tM) 

BOC Grove 4*8 

soots 585 

Bowler 4JS 

BP 3J4 

Brit Airwra 4J6 

Bril Gas 341 

Bril 51 rrl 1J5 

Bfit Telecom 402 

BTB 151 

Coble wire MO 

Cadbury Sch 5 la 

Carodan AW 

Coots vtveita 2-59 

Ccmm Union 6.45 

CfiurlBuKJs *2! 

ECC Groufl 473 

EnlenwiieOtT 447 

Eurotunnel 447 

F Isons MO 

Fort* 140 

gec 

Gen'l Ace 7.18 

Gta>o 4*2 



Vg Auodated Pm 


year soles of its osteoporosis prod- 
uct Miacalci in Italy could be 
threatened, saw its “B” shares drop 
30 Swiss francs to 4,290, but they 
rebounded later in the day. 

(Knigiu-Ridder, Reuters. Bloomberg) 

■ Dow Hits a Record 

Stock prices shrugged off a slide 
in U.S. bond prices Wednesday, 
surging to a record high led by oil 
and technology stocks, news agen- 
cies reported from New York. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age, which surged 27.30 points 
Tuesday, was up 14.92 points, to 
3,798.82. breaking the record of 
3794.33 set last Wednesday. Trad- 
ing on the New York Stock Ex- 
change amounted to 376 million 
shares, the nintb-heaviest volume 
ever. 

The 30-year Treasury bond was 
down 19/32 late in the session, bid 
at 98 2/32, and its yield rose to 6.40 
percent from 6.35 percent. 

Nevertheless, the Dow surged 
ahead, helped by hefty gains in 
such components as International 
Paper. Merck, United Technol- 
ogies and Alcoa. 

Oil slocks rose as the price of 
crude for February delivery ad- 
vanced to S 15.37 a barrel. Royal 
Dutch Petroleum Co. shares added 
2 Vs to 106H, Chevron Corp. was up 
I to SO 1 .*!, British Petroleum PLC 
gained 1 to 6414 and Mobil Corp. 
was up H lo SOW. 

Among drug stocks, Merck & 
Co. shares added to 36ft. The 
drug company made changes that 
may position Martin Wygod to be- 
come chairman. Mr. Wygod was 
the founder of Medco Contain- 
ment Services Inc. 

(Knight-Ridtier, Bloomberg) 


D^diqsi^-Oftha 

average 



Dow Jones Averages 


IIHUS 17*0.53 3871.33 3750.41 379749 + 1179 
Tram 175X43 1788.70 IMS? 177843 + IJM ! 
Util BS41 72827 ZZ2-M 22443- lg.| 
Como 138130 T398L47 137X78 1389-43 + 6.79 . 

Standard ft Poor's Indexes 

Bigs low Close Cbt* 

VSfi!* S3 S3 S3 
SS ’Sira 

h asnse^R 


EUHOPEAW FUTURES 

crow HWi CO* Pigy.aw* 

Food 

sSrtrtM PormeTrtc hHWab ot M tons 
Mar 88S 886 917 885 90 90 


BBS 

888 

*17 

885 

r 90* 

910 

937 

908 

HI 

923 

WO 

920 

*35 

938 

905 

938 

*48 

94* 

*73 

945 

MS 

*86 

978 

964 

f *75 

978 

979 

975 

980 

*18 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9*3 

*98 

N.T. 

N.T. 

LOOO 

uns 

MJU 

1,015 

Est. sates 8,137 




NYSE Indexes 


Com posit* 

Industrials 

Trarae. 

UtlllTV 

FkioncB 


High Low Ck»» Ciroe 

_ — 259 JT + 044 

— — 317J3 + 1*5 

_ — 27105 +1® 

_ —22449 — 178 

- - 213.17 -U* 


NASDAQ Indexes 


. J A S O N . D. J 

- 1993 1994 

tin 

NYSE Most Actives 


Composite 

indu-strtoli 

F Inane* 

insurance 

Tolecomm 

Banks 

T romp. 


High LOW one 
77BJ9 77X60 778JH 
81360 80442 81361 
885.15 881.22 BK23 
91173 9«L74 906-56 ■ 
18269 180.42 18879 ■ 
68862 66577 68778 ■ 
74193 735.98 74104 


Merck 
TelMex 
AT&T 
RJRNaa 
Barden 
CML Go 5 
GTE 
r. mart 
wawvrts 
EMC 5 
AW Lad 
BloCAE 

StoritC 

IBM 

BrMy5a 


High Lon 

Last 

CHg. 

J0 


toft 

+ ft 

88V 

88ft 

88ft 

+ift 




+ ft 

4ft 

Aft 

6ft 

■+ ft 

16ft 

15ft 

15ft 

—2ft 

18ft 

18ft 

17ft 


34ft 

33ft 

34ft 


21ft 

20ft 

21 

— *2 


AMEX Stock Index 


High LOW CiOM arg* 
<7862 477’! 47879 -*■ 1.4J 


Dew Jones Bond Averages 


18ft 

17 

10 ft 

+1 



30ft 


30 



Close 

30ft 



— ft 





+ ’A 



59ft 

58ft 

59ft 

+ ft 

io ummes 

10131 

9*ft 

58ft 

59ft 

+ ft 

10 Industrials 



AMEX Most Actives 

VOL High Low LOS1 09- 

BT cv7% H1B273 Z4V7 24 244h — Ja 

RovolOg 14654 Sh fli 4®t — N 

Echo Bay 13025 14% 134. 14 —Vs 

OieySh 5 117747 771* 2648 +118 

AmdhI 7387 1'1 W 7 + Mi 

5PDR n 7077 46 46 469V f 

ENSCO 6972 3«, 314 3“» +7, 

ChDevA 6898 5Li j'« jig + 

TauS nee 662* SVb 4S 4«, -y 

Hasbro 4734 36 Mi 35Ms 359a + A. 

HanvDIr 3925 ILL 6Mi 646+15 

Jan Bel I 3182 9 8V| 84k — Vb 

limxCo 3035 ate 2714 28 t 4 

BeloWls 2700 14'«. 1344 14 + "4 

NY Tim 2766 2 TW, 264 27V* -H>4 


Market Sales 

NYSE 4 pm volume 
N YSE prev. cora. close 
Amex 4 pm volume 
A me* prev. cons. cIok 
NASDAQ 4 pm volume 


375.130600 

393787792 

21606.940 

2X167600 

349680600 


COFFEE (LCE) 

Dalian per metric hm-lola of 5 lens 
Jaa 1.176 1,184 1.196 1,176 1.178 LIU 

MW 1,195 LI 96 1609 1,193 1.199 » 

Mar 1.199 1600 1613 1600 1JB4 1606 

jul 1.196 1.197 1610 1.1M 1.199 16|| 

Sep 1.195 1.196 1.203 1602 1.198 1^ 

HOY 1.1*5 1.197 1 60S 1,1*9 16<» W 

Jaa 1,195 l.m N.T. N.T. 1,198 1603 

Esl. 5oIes2J*3 

High low Owe CVW 
WHITE SUQARJMOW1 
Dollars per metric ton-iota of 58 tens 
Mar 28X70 28460 28680 2SS60 — OJO 

Mn 287 JO ms® 2£JD Un«J- 

Atn 291.51! 29U8 29168 * OU 

Ocf Ml JO MIJO 3B1J» 3060 + 1 SO 

Dec N.T. N.T. 279.00 28260 + 0JD 

Mar N.T. N.T. 28060 28X00 + 060 

Eri. sates S26. Prev. sales 750. Ob«i Inter- 
est 1X489. 


Metals 

Close Prev 

Bid As> Bid 

ALUMINUM tHIgh Grade) 

Dollars per metric ton 
Spot 113050 1131 JO 111660 

Forward 1149.00 1I50JH 113560 

COPPER CATHODES (High Crude] 
DoUan per metric tan 
spot 1749.00 175060 T 73260 

Forward 176760 1767 JO 175260 

LEAD 

Dollars per metrician 
SOOT 46360 46460 46050 

Forward 47760 477 JO 44260 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric ton 
Soot 529360 538560 521560 

Forward 535560 536060 529560 

TIN 

Dollars aer metric ton 
Sent 4770.00 478060 400360 

Forward 4820.00 483060 485560 

ZINC (Special High Grade) 

Dollars per metric Ion 

Soot 98060 *8960 99660 

Forward 1 007 JO 100860 101560 


hwi low Ctett awe 

GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LlFFtl 
DM 25*490 -Pi* OHM PCt 

Mar VH.1I TOOK 10084 -an 

jm un 6 i loan iooj 9 — aii 

Eat. volume: 11&B2XO<>efl interest: 148,144. 


Industrials 

Ktah Low Last Settle Ortw 
GASOIL (IPE1 

UJL damn per metric ton-lets «* in mbs 
JM 14765 14568 14625 14665 +125. 

Feb 14725 143L5D 14050 M6J0 + 350- 

Mar 14760 14525 H660 M6J» + 3JX 

Aar 14825 14425 14550 145JD +225 

■MOT 14425 14560 14825 14825 +ZJ0. 

JOB 14723 14uSo 14625 M623 +225 

JM 14960 1482S 14960 MOM +223 

AM 151 JO 150.75 15025 1S160 +250 
Sep N.T. N.T. N.T. 1S3J0 +325 

Dot N.T. N.T. N.T. 1S665 +X2S 

NOV 15725 157 JO 157 JO 15895 +125' 

DK 18025 15960 UOJD MO50 +225 

ESL S0M1UL661. prev. SOUS TMBS. 

Open Inter esM0V489 
BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE) 

(15. do Bars per UarreWots of W89 harms 
Fed 14J6 1324 1427 1426 +065 

Mar MAS an 1436 1430 +0J5 

Apr 1459 14.11 1453 1453 +841 

May 1423 1433 1470 1471 +0-46 

JM 146* 1452 .1465 1465 + 865 

Jul 1562 1465 1562 1563 + 026 

Amp 1531 1490 1X15 EL15 +034 

Sen 1547 15.19 1547 1547 +0 l4* 

Oct l&C 1520 1535 1565 +841 

Ed. Sales 7Q210 . Prev. sales 40349 . 

Open Interast 141407 

Stock Indexes 

. , HWi Low dose Cbaeae 
FTSE no (LIPFE1 
05 per tmtev pokit 

Mar 34426 33816 33876 —326 

Jaa 3006 34126 33*85 — 32J 

EsL volume: 15800. Open Interest: 6760*. 
Sources: Rndnn, MaHt Atsocksftd Pna. 
London tan Ftnandat mum EecAansa 

tort Potrolaum Excttanoo. 

Spot CtonanodWea 

Co tnmo dH y Today Pm. 

Aluminum, lb 0513 0507 

Cotiee. Braz* lb 0415 0415 

Capper alednUyllc. Q> 0LS495 091* 

Iron FOB. tan 7IX0D 211® 

Lead, lb «w »«i • 

! SITvor. troy az 522 520 

Steel Iscraal.ton 129 JO i»J0 

Tin. Ih 33457 12*74 

Zinc tt) 0472 046* 


U.S./AT THi CLOSE 

VW’s New 'Conceit Car’: A Beetle? 

car ..as 

called, at the North American International Auw Show coincides with 

4^c^y^T&vei» '«4and ±at axacanwl,™.*, 
Simaslv be oaid based on 1993 results. . 


N.Y.S.E. Odd-Lot Trading 


+ >«8 


Buy 

Sales 

Short" 




1,448058 

24078 




103202S 


+ ft | 

Dec 31 


169X863 


+ ft 

Dac.30 

754609 

1043081 


♦ Ift 

Dec. 29 

732681 




•included in me sates ttmas x 



Financial 


DhrMenda 


High Low CKna Change , 


NYSE Diary 


SAP 100 Index Options 


Advanced 
Declined 
UPOianaed 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


Close 

pre*. 1 










907 


rnfh.1 nd 



Ms-Lari 

1003 

1318 


Dec 

Jin 

Frt 

Nn 

Dec 

Jaa 

559 

514 

JM 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 

•u 



2752 

2734 

385 

— 

— 

— 


ft 

i. 


108 

50 

re 

_ 

M. 

_ 

— 

111 

-g 





_ 

_ 

_ 

— 


•v. 

— 




_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

'j 



____ 


«5 

28 1 * 

— 

— 

— 

L 

is. 

7\ 




Company 

Per Anri 

Per* 

■S8M08 

Pts at 108 act 


—004 


INCREASED 







1-31 






SIC Corp 

Q JO 

Sea 

*504 

94.98 

9X97 

AAA 


INITIAL 


Dec 

9504 

9406 

9407 

— 005 



Mor 

94.90 

9X84 

*465 

—064 


24 

Jua 

94 .n 

9466 

9X88 



Q .10 

1-31 

s«p 

9451 

9X45 

9X48 

— 063 

CSB Ftril Cara 

- 67ft 

1-01 

Dec 

Mar 

Jan 

94J0 

94.18 

9401 

9X24 

*4J» 

*194 

9X28 

9X12 

*194 

— 063 

—on 

— 065 

STOCK SPLIT 
Research Frontiers— 5-80P-4 



Esl. volume: 73J9X Open interest : 381,918. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LJFFE) 

SI million -ptsol UN pet 


Amex Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New LOWS 


NASDAQ Diary 

Close 

Advanced 1498 

Declined 1JBS 

Unchanged 1460 

Total issues 4744 


4U---- ; S»ri- 
429 im ir^ - i8*4i ■» 7*> *\ *>« 

425 C K, ll>- — 1*4 S > — 

a l h n ih a n n it 

IE Hi n A - 9l I II - 

440 • I I 3HS rs» I r* — ~ 

40 ^ ? - ID, - - - 

4» h I . 2 - — - S 

« S 1 ^ - - - - - 

CNh: total HBLiani; tgioi oecn ml 43B6D 
Pots; Mat JCL HJi;. Mol cpralm 4J1.r» 

Dec n DecH Dec 91 DtcN OecH Deers 
Bh - 

B — — — 5e — — 

jr/1 - - - N Ue - - 

41 4: - - 1‘»:h- 

dl - - - ft 1 

CNh: UPK vbLIS. Bid tsen mt.XBl 
Puts: Mai latir; lotaiooen M. IUE9 
Source CBOL 


Mar 

9X47 

9X47 

9607 

+861 

Jan 

9X12 

9X11 

9X11 

4-061 

Sap 

9501 

95J1 

9500 

+66) 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9J.+0 

+ 061 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9554 

+ 061 

JM 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9561 

+ X01 

Sea 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9461 

Unctv 


Bay View CopIM 
Cntrl Vermont PS 
Home Svgs Book FI 
Johnson 8, Johnson 
NokmdCo 
Pacific Enlerp 
UfiHarca TemaPers 


1- 28 T-M 

2- 15 1-31 
2-4 1-28 
9-8 2-15 

7-2J 1-M 
2-15 1-20 
1-28 1-14 


Erf. volume: 348. Open I merest: 82*8. 


2-MONTH eUROMARKS 1 LI FFE) 


DM1 mHHw 

• pfsefiaopct 



Mar 

94J5 



+ 061 

Jun 

9568 

9560 

9502 


S«P 

9X48 

*558 

*500 



♦509 

9568 

9082 

— X04 

Mar 

VSJG 

955* 

*569 

— 002 

Jua 

9183 

9S7B 

9560 

+ X01 

Sep 

*553 

9507 

9568 

Unctv 

DOC 

*564 

*560 

*562 

+ 061 

Mar 

9141 

94J8 

9500 

Unch. 

Jun 


9554 

9X25 



Taiwan Stocks Soar 5.7% 

Return 

TAIPEI — Taiwan's leading stock market index rose 5.7 percent 
Wednesday in its biggest bull run for yean, but the central bank has 
begun restricting foreign investment to curb the strength of the 
Taiwan dollar. 

Fund managers said the bank has slowed approvals for investment 
by foreign institutions since late last mouth. The inflow of cash has 
been pushing up Taiwan currency against the U.S. dollar. 

This has left an overhang of funds waiting to enter and disappoint- 
ed managers who fear they may not be able to take full advantage of 
the bull run. 


Esl. volume: 123634. open interest: 750491. 
LONG GILT [LI FFE) 
fSOMM ■ Pts a Itads at 1M pa 
Uar 119-18 119-23 118-24 -0-20 

Jua 118-30 lira 1 1B-M — 0-14 

Esi. volume: 70.194. open Interest: W2J92. 


U.S. FUTURES 

Vm AnoaoMd Proa 
Season Season 

Man Low Open High Law Ck*o Cha QpJw 


il; ro-TOo nlM r? g-mrorterty; 


Ceruln offerings or secniiies. fionciel 
servicB or taeacas ia Nil cmk pafalbfacd in 
this m u s pa pef are not imboti x rd in ceraia 
jurddietioRS is w hi c h Itae tMoMtianl HcnU 
Tribanc if diltribtned. iecbAog the tinned 
States or America, ud do sot constitute 
afferiagi of scorifies, saniccs or imereo* in 
iboue inrisdlctions. The tateronioaal Uanld 
Tribune Homes no itspaaribUky whatsoever 
hr mj nd«ataemaes Sx oSaiagi of any UoL 


Grains 


Season Season 
Hah Low 


Open Mnh Low dean a« Opjm 


Season Season 
HMh Low 


open Hah Low Oase Cng OpJnt 


Grand Mel 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hiltedown 
HSBC Hldos 
ICI 

Inchcaoe 
Kingfisher 
Lad brake 
Land Sec 
Loporte 
Lasmo 

Legal Gen Grp 
Uovds Bank 
Marks Sp 
MEPC 
Non Power 
Natwesi 
NthWst Wo I Of 
Pearjon 
P&O 
Pllklngran 
PowrGen 
Prudenhol 
Ponk Org 
RecJuit Coi 
Red land 
Peed tail 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Polls Pavce 
Rammn ■ unit) 

Rovol SCOT 

RTZ 

Salnsburv 
S<o* Newcas 
Scot Power 
Sears Hatas 
Severn Trent 
Shell 
Siebe 

Smiin Nephew 
SmiihK line B 
Smith IWHi 
Sun Alliance 
Tole & Lrle 
Thco 
T hom EMI 
Tomkbu 
T SB Groua 
Unilever 
Uld Biscuits 
vadotone 
War Loan Tt 
W ellcome 
Whimreoa 
williams Hdgs 
Willis Corroon 
FT. 30 Index: 254&J0 
Previous : 23523* 


Madrid 

BBV 3140 3155 

Bco Central Hiw. X6SS 3200 

Banco Sanlmier W50 4600 

Banes to NA l*9S 

CEPSA 2425 2430 

Dragoons 23« 2405 

Endesa 6090 6880 

Ercros ISO 149 

Ibertlrola I 1025 1015 

Peosol 4445 4485 

Tabacaiera 4105 3995 

Teletanico 1915 lots 


r Claw Prev. Clow Prev. 

Non Bk Canada Idle IDVs SkontlloF 174 m 

Power Coro. Z1*g 2l» Skcunska IBj 182 

Quebec Tel 21 W 214, SKF IM 134 

OuntMCor A 18V, 18 3*or° _ 418 414 

Ouebecor B 1BU. 18th Trolleborg BF Blau 8XJ0 

Teleglobe 201% ja<% Vohro 542 537 

Unhio 7s* 7V» AHaersvaarlden : 147724 

Video Iron 24W 25 Previous : 146831 


\menmak inmM 


Accor 
AJr Ltauian 
Alcatel Ahuham 
Axo 

- Bancnlre icie) 
BIC 
BNP 

Bauvgues 

BSN-GD 

Carrctaur 

CCF. 

Cerus 
Charaeurs 
Cimenls Franc 
ClUDAMd 
Ell-Aaullalne 
Ell-Sanoll 
Euro Dhnev 
Gen. Eou> 

Havas 

1 metal 

Laiorge Caooee 
Legrand 
Lvon. Eouv 
Omni IL'1 
LVJA.H. 

Mai ro-H acne rte 
JUUchelln 8 
MauUnrx 

Paribas 

Pecnipev mil 
Pernod- Rlcard 
Peugeot 
Prirrtemps lAui 
HarUorccrwUiiue 
Rh-Pouienc a 
BOH. St. Louis 
Redouie I La) 
Sain* Goooln 
S.EJB 

Sts Generate 
Suez 

Thotmtw-CSF 

Total 

UA.P. 

Valeo 


Air Canada 
Altwrtc Energy 
Am Barrlck Ro» 
BCE 

Bk NOVO SCO lie 
BCGOS 
BC Telecom 
BF Realty hds 
Bramalea 
Brunswick 


OcsePrav. 

5 S*e' 
1 B'« IP® 

4019 di 

45V* 451i 
SF-j 30k. 
16V 16»* 
2S l s 7b 
a 04 N.Q. 
0.43 0-« 

9i-j 9*. 


Sydney 


CAE 

Camdrv 

r* 

S'* 

371* 

7ft 

5 

33ft 

Amcor 

1X04 





ANZ 

4.90 






I70H 

1/86 




BotdI 

4J2 

463 



40 

Bougalnrllle 

X72 

X7S 



5 

dries Mver 

565 

567 


10ft 

KH* 

Qxnalca 

X40 

X25 


190 

185 

CRA 

1902 

IS6K 


2r* 

3H. 

C5R 

S63 

4*7 


21 

20-ft 

Dunk® 

5J2 

XJ6 


X25 

025 

Fosters Brew 

103 

1+4 



T4 

Goodman FieM 

167 

164 



23 J- 

ICI Auslrallo 

1X34 

1X16 


165 

105 

MageHan 

118 

118 

EC<o Bar Mines 

IF* 

1* 

MIM 

261 

277 


1.15 

1.18 

wot Aust Bank 

1260 

1138 

FCA Inn 

170 

170 

News Corp 

960 



Oft 

Bft 

Mine Network 

5.73 

564 


21 "a 


ri Broken Hill 

in 

365 


c 


Pioneer infl 

204 

263 


047 

005 

-jmndv Poseidon 

IM 




9ft 

3CT Rescurces 




■uo 

X3S 

Santos 

1*S 

let 


18' 4 

I8ft 

TNT 




IS 1 - 

IS'- 

m-ttem Mining 

7J3 




13ft 

IVestpaC Banking 

469 





Woods (de 

405 

403 

Hudson's Btrir 

39ft 

3 , »* 


All erdloaries Men : 219*60 
Previous : 21 7* Jo 

Tokyo 


Banco Com.n 
Basloal 

Be nelian groua 

CIB 

Cred Hal 
Enicnem 
Ferlln 
Feriln Rise 
Rol SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Generali 
IFI 

lialcom 
1 fa bos 
itaimo&iiiarc 
Mediobanca 
Montedison 
Cl 1 vein 
Pirelli 
RAS 

Pinascenta 
Salaem NA 12*5 1 

San Paolo Taring 1Q150 10450 

SIP 3490 3561 

SME 3560 3730 

Snw 1420 1451 

Standa 79460 79500 

ye* 4250 4Kfl 


Sao Paulo 



4850 



3050 


Brndrxo 

10200 


Broruna 



4500 


Palrubras 

43500 40001 

Tetooras 

12000 11571 

Vale Rio Dace 

37200 30001 

varta 

59000 

HJI 

Bovespa index : 42W 

previous : «0W4 


Singapore 



760 

e 

CirvOev 

405 






17 *3 



2260 79 n 

Golden hooel'l 

174 

361 

How Par 

1*0 

JK7 

Hume induslrle* 

5M 

505 

incncop# 


Alb 




KL Kroana 

460 

4JC 

Lum Oang 


ZI4 

Mala ran Bank? 

IIJB 

11.19 

OCBC 

15 

112C 


863 

8.7(1 




Semtwwang 

1X30 

1880 




5ime Dorm 

468 

XU 

SIA 

BJ0 

8J2 

S'oort Land 

860 

X» 

S’pcrc Press 

1560 

I5M 

Slna Steamsnip 

464 

4 JO 

5'por e Tffrcomm 

178 

3.71 

Straits Trading 

X08 

4.14 

UOB 

11.90 

11.*C 

UOL 

261 

‘iAt 

Straits Time* ind. 
Prev tons . 7471.70 

: 243169 


I — . . . 

Ton Assl RIM 78810 79200 Stockholm 


MJB Index : 980 

Previogj : 

Montreal 

Alcon Aluminum 286* 291? 
Bone Montreal 27s* m 
Bell Canada 43'n 42 , u 
Bombardier B 2GW 2tH. 
ConKUar 2?>-, 304* 

Cascades r.. 71% 

Domlmon TeH A *v, M* 
Donohue A 23'* 73 

MacMillan Hi Jl 3 Zl -» 


AGA 
Amo A 
Astra A 
Atlas Caoco 
eiectrom j B 
Ericsson 
Eneiie-A 
Handclsbanhen 
inveslsrB 
Norsk Hydro 
Prawrdio af 

Sandvlk B 
SCA-A 
S-E Ban* on 


Hi 4,1 

599 5*7 

189 193 
420 417 

303 297 

341 336 

110 112 
110 100 
168 169 

231 JO 224 
13$ 137 

124 122 
148 US 
56 56 



44* 

4C5 

Asam cnemlcoi 

828 

A1C 

Asnhb Glass 




1480 

1482 

Bridgestone 

1339 

129 S 


SS8C 

IS— 

Casio 

1100 

taw 

Dal N«mn Print 

1650 



1530 

1510 

Daiwa Securilles 

nta 

1250 

Famic 

33*0 


Full Bank 

1950 

!¥» 

Full Photo 

2540 

2520 


BAA 

854 


S28 

825 

Hitachi Conte 

782 

72T 

Honda 

1X0 

iro 

llo Yofcada 




553 

531 

Jason airlines 

»1* 


Kalima 




28JJ 






1170 

i:» 

Komatsu 

;-8C 

764 





AIEO 

5WB 


I55C 

:53a 


1SC0 

icon 


2823 

2833 


444 

441 


548 

544 


823 

815 


1M0 

1040 


*95 

6«3 

AMhHtfcesfri 

322 

820 


202U 

1990 


an 

374 

NGK insalortnrs 

10X 

Pffl 

Nlkko Securities 

1080 

raw 

Nippon Kogafcu 

90S 

ECS 


800 

853 

Nippon Steel 

314 

ja: 




Nissan 

758 

755 




NTT 

48Go 7506a 

OIvtnaM Oat leal 

1050 

1050 

pioneer 

7*10 

2540 

Rtaotl 

rv 

721 

Sanyo Elec 

447 

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1540 

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62G 

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5840 

5829 


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SumHwno Churn 

471 

433 

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899 

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244 

284 

TataetCoro 

837 

ACS 


79* 

788 

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11» 

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3980 

JS33 

Teiiln 

416 


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1220 

1270 

Tokyo Elec Pw 

3150 

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Tormr ind. 

599 

584 

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70S 

404 


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Paca Petroleum 
PWA Cera 
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BBC Brwr. He. S ITC7 

wha Ge.a, £ 953 

CS Maldirtrs a N.A 
CW.-54S 4170 

-.icrer 9 1150 

ir'era^ajm E 7300 
49lmal* E 9J7 

UMrtO.rB 937 

*_fj -t:s 2 753 

■Vgerr-.sic* 3 44 1 

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Sanaa; B 4330 

Seh-ncter 3 ’VQO 
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Su-veuenee e 2080 

Sw.sr.Snk CcroB 491 
»A.!5 Pe-^Ttir 0 NA 
Swiivti.- ? 750 

JBS 3 1366 

Ainierthg, B 2*0 
Z j-<ch An B 1550 


WHEAT (CBOT1 

UIOO ho nnnimum- doHs* per bushd 
383 360 Mar 94 387 386ft XU 

3A5 XU MovM X63 X67ft X58ft 

X49 X96 JUI94 X42'4 144ft X41ft 

X51 362 Sep 94 XGft XISM X41 

3J7V. X09 Dec 94 323ft 151ft XS1 

127 XII M9S 

EM. sales I66U Toe's, ides 30.179 
Tue’sapenli* SSJ82 uo JM 
WHEAT (KBOT1 

5.000 bu mWmm- <Uta ow bushel 
191ft IN Mar 94 183 185 167 

36* 2.90 MOV 94 X63 1 A X6Sft 162ft 

XW 2.*7 JlllW 361 36416 162ft 

149 XD2ftSn>94 364ft 365ft 164 

155 112ft Dec 94 X5D ISO 149ft 

Mar »5 157 157ft 158 

Eg ides NA Tue's.sdes I1J27 
! Tue's open irt 42J70 up I6S 
I CORN [CBOTJ 

■ SXUO bu mwwnom- auiors nwUrTd 
! lUft 1374* Mo- W 105ft 104 104ft 

1IJ X30ftMOv94 109 10»ft 107ft 

1114* 361 Jjl 94 10* ion in 

19TVi 260ftSep94 26^A XU 260ft 

172 UOftDecM 268ft Z71 769ft 

277’, XSrv,Mar9S 275 X74ft X75 

UX* X761>MDy*S 
280 27542 Jul 95 271 210 UI 

X57V> 1 0 Dec “S 

Esl ides 50000 Tun's. Idas 5VJ46 
Tue’iapcnid 3406*4 up 3277 
SOYBEANS (OW'D 
5.000 bu mintmum- dollars oar budwl 
7J4 S76'tJanM S. *0 197 66* 

7J4 56944 Mor 94 L99ft 766ft 69a 

7J1 5.92 , ‘ilWoy «4 763ft 7.10 7JB 

7J8 5MftJd94 765 7.11 TJU 

735 478 Awo 94 7 68 7.85 698 

LIFT 617 SopW A7I 675 

7J7*j 5J54>Nov94 454 656 453 

662W 6187] Jon *5 660 668 458ft 

667 647 Mar 95 6M 666 664 

666 bJT.iJuM 654 4A5V: 664 

I 4504 561 W Mov 95 43* 611 437ft 

Esl sates 55600 Turs.sdes 6U64 
T'.'e’S open kV 1D591 up 1876 
SOYBEAN MEAL (COOT) 

! 100 mns- daflm per tan 
■7XX IB140 Jan9f 20060 20160 I99.H 

23750 14530 Mar 94 70038 201 JO 19950 
'OX® 185J07Aov*4 20130 2030 20930 

zn.a 19X7014 94 agon mis nut 

! 22360 19X50 Auu 94 20 1 70 30X30 20160 

■ 7I0JC irua SeoM 19950 20050 19*50 

70400 19400 Od 94 1*960 19960 WL00 

789 00 4 60 Dec 94 1*7 JO 19X50 19*50 

70000 I'M JO Jan 95 

Esi softs 14000 Tws.sdes 18545 
Tuesapmev 84. ID dl 1549 
SOYBEANCHL CCBOT) 

44 COO Kb- dadars per 100 Us. 

»» 2a90Jin94 39 is 29JI 2X98 

^74 2l.l3Mar94 2*63 2*JI 70J5 

7933 7133140V 94 2X65 2X90 3X5B 

2860 7155 Jul 91 2618 3837 2800 

7X25 21 65 Aug 94 71 50 3755 7755 

2750 22. 40 Sep 94 2690 7*65 2685 

764S SLIOOaW 3605 3410 38*5 

25.90 a9CDec«4 JJJO *540 T M* 

2645 2255 Jen 96 

i Est uses 1 7 300 Tue’L sain 19-494 
1 Tin's opened 98557 off 1301 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMERJ 
40 300 wl - cents cer aj. 

7653 1U90Feo94 *356 7100 7X45 

0.1 7X20 Apr 94 75JJ 7550 7627 

7474 TtJiXnV 7347 7465 7167 

niS TOMAugTJ 7255 7X97 7X65 

7X26 713700 94 77.70 7100 72J0 

7190 7XASDK94 .135 160 nn 

1« 73 0OFCO95 7110 7335 7110 

Esl son 1X914 Tuo*S. «Sm 11488 
Tic's open-'d *0820 np TM 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 
tc. 000 fcs.- cents per to. 

04.«C 79.90 Jan 94 K.»S m.K 9X95 

6135 79 j; Mar 94 so 10 BI20 0070 

8500 7920 Apr M 78.95 1025 T9JS 

84.40 T35Uav94 7) 73 79.90 7950 

8100 79 J5 Aug 94 0070 8095 »W 

il SC ”9 JO iw 94 9025 8825 8825 

8833 77 45(4av <4 B8>0 8035 8810 

00.77 79 30 Ocf *6 7995 M65 79 JO 

EM 3«CS 1.75* Tic's, ides 1565 
TiC'sopenid 12JII Up 409 
HOGS (CMER) 

4LCD0 tOi. - arVs per to 
4125 4C30Feb94 MM3 JlH 4127 

etas 39 S’ Apr 94 47 40 4765 47.22 

6140 4S!7JunM 5195 SXI6 077 

5X15 4530 Ju< 94 5297 S3>5 5X70 

5195 4635 Aug 44 $140 51.45 H.ll 

4836 CLUDdM 4XMI 4820 

49 36 45 JO Dec »J 49 JO 4920 4895 

49 66 *6*Fcb«S 4960 4963 *960 

4»ID 61.90 Apr *6 

i Est 'Jin L7T9 Tue'i toes 5972 
I Tue 606811 ml 30 585 up 22M 
I PORK BELLES (GMEW 
I 43.D0C tos - cent; per to 
61.15 SIBFuhM 54 00 5670 5690 

101190 3ajflMar*4 $»40 5*30 

1*130 dJOMa, 94 S7.BS 5X65 S7J0 

•6200 JJJO X« 94 $(«) 5*17 582/ 

rSTJO 41 00 Aug 94 Je.a S645 560 

'Em ides 2.479 Tic'-, sales 2699 

.Tie-. oeen *n IP IM up 297 


I COFFEE C (NCSE1 
U.500 lbs- -ccnisoer to. 

I 9*L’5 fll.rOAVjr M 71 S5 7110 

IJtiO 1123 May 94 71.15 7465 

pj: 44.90 JU 94 7140 7610 

89 50 *0.5OjegW 7760 77 JO 

91.04 ft iDQecOi 79.15 7916 

' 8730 7X90 Mar 95 

1 MCVri 

ES-saNs Mm T1CS.S des 9.987 
Tic's acn id n.9/7 m mi 
SUGAR-WORLD II (NCSE) 

1 JJ Otfl Hrs.-nm *5 per*). 


1067 

l.n’MaM 

1X82 

1X15 1X80 

1X85 

+xn 

MU 

*864 

906800PM 

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*567 

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. 9X71 Dec 94 

*501 

9501 

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9568 

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9X23 

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9563 

9360 

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9501 

13X514 

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9667 Tte-ISOK* 

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VLSI SOP 95 

9X83 

9X83 

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9501 

*1.18 Dec 95 

9063 

9X53 

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*460 

87016 


3JS5ft *-X04ft 31^74 
lent ,am usi 
X47ft 13347 

X43 —062ft 1628 
3JZ —061ft 1608 
127 *061 4 


364ft * 061ft 2X32 2 
364ft ,060ft 7639 
14 3V . — 061 9336 

144 ft— OJHft 137* 
369 Vi— 063 80S 

152 ft 


365 ft — 060ft M*. 723 
3J»ft —060ft 77JS3 
Hwi* am 

202ft +0J»ft 1135* 

170ft +061 3X454 

X78 + 060ft 2613 
239ft -060ft 1*7 

2J9ft ,060ft 310 

157V. * 


+OOIV* MB 

•turn, 83616 

-063ft 36827 
-063 30641 

♦061ft 4347 
fftOOft 2314 
+067 1161* 

,062V, 742 

♦OJHft 221 
. UOOft M4 
•OJDft 387 


-040 *374 
-0.10 3*387 
+034 13387 
♦140 I8S74 
MLO 5314 
•040 XS42 
♦030 UN 
+040 2374 
*168 81 


2X90 Jan 94 

2*15 

2*61 

2X98 

2901 

—003 

X7*8 

21.I3MOT94 

2902 

7901 

7X94 

79.18 


0.9*2 

21 03 MOV 94 JXA5 

20.70 

2X9 

2X80 

—003 18024 

7165 Jul 9* 

2X18 

2867 

2X08 

7X79 

— X1T I2J83 

2> 85 Aug 91 

VM 

2765 

7705 

2760 

♦X07 

*051 

22 40 SepM 

U*0 

7765 

7X85 

77 SO 

+0.07 

3017 

a.iooa*x 

3805 

28)0 

7X95 

7865 

+005 

2033 

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25J0 

2540 

2500 

2567 

+X14 

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2505 

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147 


+030 36041 
+030 18385 
+040 U31* 
-833 7651 

♦ 043 17*5 

-12S 730 

♦ 0L7S 77 


*060 3344 

♦ 06S 6157 
*055 XI23 
♦030 1,112 

♦ US 1.154 

*oa iso 

-030 43 

♦US 114 


cocoa mesa) • - 

lOmdrictons- 1 par km 
1495 *S3MorM 1142 1148 1123 

UN 970 May 94 1173 1177 1158 

| U45 999 Jul 94 . 1190 1204 11*0 

1377 1020 Sap 94 122S 1232 1Z20 

1319 1841 DacM 1253 1155 1344 

13B3 1017 Md *5 1270 1270 UU 

MOO 11DMay*S 

MO* 1725 Jul VS 12*4 12*4 12*4 

1350 1370500*3 

Est. Idas 16059 Tue'i. safes 4344 
Tire's men htf 86*93 off 377 
OHANGEJUKE (NCTM 
15600 On.- cents per to. 

13X70 0X15 Jon 94 10X50 HUH 10X00 

13625 B4JDMWM HUB 11X25 1MJ8 
13500 09 60 May W 1I4J0 11460 11150 

13568 MOJOJ1494 114J5 11460 11535 

13X50 1RS50SCPV4 11X80 1M60 11860 

13(00 10X00 NOV *4 

13X80 1 8330 .ton 93 I23J0 12150 12150 
11X75 10400 Mor 95 

Moy *5 

Ed. ides 1300 Tu^vsdas VtS 
TUa'sopanM 18648 off 153 


Metals 

HI ONADE COPPER tNCMX) 

2S600 tos.- certs par to. 

10640 7X2 Jon 94 7*60 8060 TX55 

187 JO 7X00 Mar 94 7965 EUW 7*65 

BJD 7650 Anr W 80JB 80J5 0X55 

IttXJO 7X40 May 94 |D35 8160 RI30 

BJD TAKLIaiM 

10205 7630 Jd 94 8X70 0135 MJB 

10330 7400 Sap 94 B135 BUS BUS 

•01.90 75JSOec94 BUB 8265 8228 

8X50 7400 Jan *5 

*760 7160 Fab 95 

8X50 4X70 Mar *5 8760 8360 8260 

8X00 76.85 Mar 95 

1X50 7X00 Jd 95 

8460 7568 Aug 95 

8560 T9.H58PfS 

mo 7UDOa*s 

833 7723 Nov *5 

EsLsdat 8600 Tic's, sdes 7351 

TUKsapaaM BA 43 00 1779 

SLVR CNCMX1 

5600 kuy ox- eedi per boy az. 

5446 34X5 Jim 94 SU 206 5220 

5146 4456 Fab W 

51X5 3446 MorM 5215 Ml 5 49X0 

BU 3716 MOV 94 S27J QL0 5006 

5456 371664*4 SJ06 SJ46 50SJ 

541 J 37X5 5ap *4 B6S 5346 5U6 

57X0 3816 D8C 94 539J 541J 51X0 

5«0 4010 Jan 95 

5720 OILS MOT 95 5465 5453 5210 

5840 4186 May *5 

5956 4206 Jul 95 

5506 4*36540*5 

Dec *5 

Esl. sdes 2X000 Tueisdes 15661 
Tuo'sDpanrt 118JHI off 1*19 
PLATWUM (NMERI 
■DitBrdRmpv Iroyaz. 

43760 32660 JdiH 3*800 3*900 31X00 

0X50 33560 Apr 94 40160 4B26D 3*460 

43X00 35700 Jul 94 4060 40360 3*760 

48600 248600094 404J0 40568 0200 

4000 37460 Jan 95 40460 40768 40X6D 

Esi sains NLA. Tun's, ides 1J77 
i TdsdOmW 21611 Off 4*3 
GOLD (NCMX} 
i 100 Puv az.- daOori par tray m. 

39X9 34X50 Jon 94 

41X70 mao Fab *4 39X20 3*760 37060 
39430 37360 MOr 94 M30 3SU0 39560 

41X91 335J0AITM 31760 3*960 37X00 
417 JO 33960 Jun 94 39X70 NUS 373J0 
41X00 341 JO Aug 94 40 U0 401 TO 40160 
41760 WLDOOCI94 

*2X50 34100 DacM 40X20 40X00 40X00 

41100 34X50 Feb *5 

41700 36X50 Apr VS 

42X58 JSMOJuntS 

3KU0 3HJ0Au]*9 

41100 41 130 Od 95 

47060 41X30 DOC *5 

EH. sdes 55000 Tim's, ides 2X448 

Tun's eceninr 170697 up 7U9 


-J* 3X444 
—39 14613 
—25 9J77 
— 30 4J10 
-30 M04 
-30 8681 

—30 XJ28 
—38 3083 
—80 383 


-80S *70 

+DJD 1X3M0 
+0135 3602 
-0.15 1691 
— 860 

-061 148 

-4165 415 

— 065 
-065 


-065 1J*1 
+035 41,371 
+0L2S 

•035 8012 
+830 827 

+830 XU2 
♦030 1101 
+030 US 
♦USB 

+ais 1053 
+033 

+035 223 

+X3S 

+830 

+US 4) 
• 030 

+030 Ul 


— J4J 4 

—US 

— 14J73J49 
—146 H02I 
—1*7 KU40 
—148 SJT7 
—149 X90B 
—140 
—156 
—150 
—150 
—416 

-156 711 


EsLsdes I84J36 TuaVsdat 25X858 
Toe's open M XML» IW..XM7- 
BRITISH POUND (CMQU ... 

Sparpauid- 1 PdritenuahrSLOBgi - 
IJ3BI 16000MarM IJW-.lwNtt I67S2 16014 : 

1J158 U80OJun9T .16730 16780 1.44*0 I67S8 . 

16900 1680D54PV4 16480 16730 16440 167)2 

16*50 16S20Oec94 16484 

EsLsdes 11048 Tub's, sdes 11J53 
tile's open M 28634 oH 188 
CANADIAN DOLLAR CCMBO . 

Spot dto- 1 paw •audsflUOOl 
06712 87394 Star M 075*5 07422 07547 IU54B 

87*05 87365 Job 94 075*5 07800 075B 17551 

07748 07345 SepM 07188 07880 07B8 0797 

07470 X7215D0C94 07584 0794 07553 07553 

07580 0.7336 Mar 9S 07KB 

Est sates 7680 Tue's.sdes 5649 
Tun Open ml 2X295 Off 43* ' 

BSRMANMARK (CMER) 

. 5 per mart:- 1 pdat equals KL0IU1 
06305 0J4B8Mar94 0J7» BJ740 05713 0J719 

0619 05400 JUH 94 0J7D4 03705 05414 0J49Z 

86055 X5441SM>94 U474 

Dec 94 0J571 

EsL sates 32070 Tuffs. Edes 41040 
TUe^SOPBlM 13X138 up 294* 

JAPANBEYBI (CMER) 
t Pf ran - 1 powenuds BUMOOfll 
■LBOVfSaxnHBOOMv 9406008*40008*228608818061*878 
ll60f94aiLOOaBt2Jun 94 06089010688*5000088710608*17 
Q0DMUO0OB942SepM 8008747 

EsJ. sdes 25613 Tuffs, sdes 3X874 
Tuffs open Ini 101821 off 874 
SMS FRANC (CMER) 

I per hone- 1 PdW equate I8J0Q1 

87195 07500 Mor 9+ (L473S 06747 06725 06748 

07070 06590 jun 94 06753 06700 06740 06744 

07010 06480 SepM 06750 

EsL sates T7J91 Tuffs, sdes 210M 

Tuffs Open id 4X940 off 454 


Industrials 

C O T T ON 2 (NCTM 

50000 8a.- csnl s p er 8 l 

4X34 5542 Mar 94 87.10 6X55 47.M 

8X40 5767 May 94 4X45 4973 4X45 

4US 5X30JUI94 4850 70.40 49 JS 

4770 5*510094 4768 4750 4800 

4800 59.48 Dec94 4460 44J0 4585 

<760 6259440-95 47.10 67.10 67 M 

6X60 4400 May *5 

Eif. salts Hum Tuffs, sdes 1X23* 

Tuffs open id 51504 off 7X4 
HBATEWOO. (NMER) 

47000 Od- certs per gd 

4X25 4X25 Jan 94 3105 SITS 5165 

4260 KU0FSD94 4860 «M 4868 


+20 27604 
+18 *1* 
+ 14 8 

+10 5 


— M 2X988 
—14 1657 
—14 510 

—18 354 

—14 111 


—I1 12*673 
—11 8679 
—IT 114 
—11 


—18 9939B 
— 19 4J38 

— i* ns 


+ 1145608 
+ U 324 
+ 14 38 


+1JB 27504 
+160 1X185 
+ 135 4684 
+X27 m 
+0J3 XM3 
tOJt 




ihe^ror^andaMro* 

It expects lo make an even bigger profit in iw. 

Trump Set to Buy Aladdin Hotel 

G^Seari of™. Tnunp’s Taj Mahal caarno hold m Atlantic .O*. 
New' Jeraey, said Wednesday. ' ^ ' 

“We can expect some type of announcement mart 
ihu," Mr. Gomes said. "That's how close we ^ 

Tramp is believed to have an oral agreement with the hoteTs mortgage 
hoff to buy it for S65 million. Bell Atianuc-Tnara Leasing Cotp. the 
mortgage holder, refused to confirm the deal 

Kmart to Book f 1.3 Billion Charge 

TROY. Michigan (Combined Diroaicbes) — Kmart .Corp. s»d 
Wednesday thairamings for the fourth quarter and tdl of 3W3 wouJdbe 
less than expected and that it will take a pretax charge of SI J buboa to 

fi The e ££^d it had increased to 800 the mn*crof storaitnffl 
dose and relocate, up from a previous figure of 300. .Following the 
announceme nt. Standard & Poor's Corp. pot Kmart on i is Cretn t Watch 
list of issuera whose ratings may change, with negative unpheatraos. ^ie 
move concerns about S3 .7 billion of debL (AFPi UPI) 

U.S. Factory Orders Post Strong Gain 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of aircraft, autos, computers and 
metalworking machinery pushed U.S, factory orders up by l-4 percent in 
NovemboTtne fourth increase in a row and the biggest ance June, the 
government said Wednesday. _ 

The advance, to a record seasonaDy-adjusted annual total of S 2 o 2 bulion, 
followed g»'n 5 of 1 2 percent in October and 0.7 percent in September. 

Amdahl and Fujitsu to Cooperate 

SUNNYVALE, California (Bloomberg) — Amdahl Coqx'said its part- 
ner, Fujitsu r^ri , would bdp it devdop mainframe computers in a lad to 
trim costs. Amdahl said the accord wiln Fujitsu, which owns 44 percent of 
its equity, could spur sales to some Fujitsu customers. It did n ot say to w 
much the companies planned to invest in the next generation of cocjpatCTS. 

U.S- Orders Donnelley Divestiture 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) —The Federal Trade Commission ordered 
R.RL Donnelley & Sons Co. to divest a printing company it acquired 
because the transaction "substantially lessens” competition in a specialty 
printing market A new buyer of Meredith/ Burda Co. must be approved 
by the commissioiL Donnelley, which bought Meredith/ Burda in Sep^- 
tember for S536J million, said it would appeal. 

For the Record 

TLC Beatrice International HoWmgs Inc. said Loida Nicolas Lewis, the 
widow of the company’s founder, would become chairman on Feb. l.The. 
company has started a search for a new chief executive who will have 
responsibility for all of its units worldwide. f Reuters) 

Trans World Airlines Inc. replaced W illiam Howard, its chairman who 
was appointed only seven months ago, with. Donald F. Craib Jr., a TWA 
director and former chairman of Allstate Insurance Group. (NYT) 




4305 Jan 94 

5165 

5105 

9165 

5101. 

+U1 874 









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4700 

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♦ L3f 21059 

4360 May 94 4500 

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4305 Jun M 

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4X50 JlOM 

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4760 

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4125 Abb 94 

4760 

4705 

4895 

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4X71 Sep 98 

46iB 

4X50 

4X00 

4X38 

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470000*4 

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4969 Dec 94 

5160 

5160 

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+1.11 30N 

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5805 Mar 95 

5105 

5103 

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4*60 Apr 95 

5160 

5160 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1994 


Page lit 


T*TTv u A 


Court to Make 
GM-VW Ruling 

In February 


Liberty at Bank of France 

But Little Qiange in Policy Is Seen 


Hauers 

FRANKFURT — A Frankfurt 
judge said Wednesday he would rule 
next month on whetta* Volkswagen 
AG improperly poached managers 
from General Motors Corp. 

The Frankfurt state court ad- 
journed its hearing on GM*s bid to 
ban seven of its former managers 
from working at VW after just three 
hours and said it would reconvene 
on Feb. 2 to hand down its ruling. 

General Motors and its German 
subsidiary, Adam Opel AG, have 
claimed that VW systematically 
|ured away seven GM executive 
just after Jose Ignacio Lopez de 
Arrioriua, VW' s controversial pro- 
duction chief, left GM to join the 
German company last March. 

Opel is also separately pursuing 
criminal allegations of industrial es- 
pionage against Mr. L6pez and VW. 
The charges are being investigated 
by U.S. and German officials. 

Wednesday's hearing marked 
the sLan of full court proceedings 
on CM'S poaching claim. A tempo- 
rary injunction aimed at preventing 
the seven so-called “Lopez war- 
riors" from staying at VW was re- 
jected on a technicality last month. 

At the hearing held Wednesday. 
Heinz Wetterkamp. Opel’s attor- 
ney, argued that VWs move to hire 


the seven GM managers must be 
seen in the context of a “massive 
campaign" in which VW tried to 
lure away as many as 2$ GM man- 
agers, but ultimately succeeded in 
getting only seven. " 

But Jurgen Kicker, a lawyer for 
VW. described the seven as execu- 
tives who. having found themselves 
excluded from meetings and gener- 
ally isolated after Mr. Ldpez’s exit, 
followed their former boss to VW. 
“This may have been unusual, but 
not systematic." Mr. Kicker said. 

Mr. Wetterkamp said the aUeged 
theft of sensitive GM documents 
and hiring of the GM workers 
amounted to a campaign to steal 
corporate purchasing know-how 
from GM. He said Opel and GM 
were asking for a two-year employ- 
ment ban for the seven that would 
be effective as of their move to VW 
in March 1993. 

VW. suffering losses in Europe's 
depressed car market, had hoped 
Mr. Ldpez would be able to slash 
costs, particularly by squeezing low- 
er prices from component suppliers. 

Separately, without admitting 
guilL VW said it would not contest 
the portion of the Opd's suit that 
seeks confirmation of an earlier in- 
junction banning VW from trying to 
hire away other key GM workers. 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The Bank of France joined the ranks 
of independent central banks Wednesday, when 
the government, concluding a process begun nine 
months ago, appointed the six outsiders who com- 
plete the bank’s new monetary policy council. 

The view among analysts in Paris was that there 
were no surprises, Christopher Potts at Banque 
Indosuez said the appointees were uncon troversial 
and Charles Wyplosz at the Insead business school 
said “they are all middle-of-the road. It's unlikely 
to be a committee with teeth." 

The franc did rise on the foreign exchange mar- 
ket, but dealers attributed this to across-the-board 
weakness of the mark rather than a reaction to the 
official change in status of the central bank. 

“The dear message," said Mr. Potts, is the new 
independent status of the central bank “is unlikely 
to lead to a new direction in monetary policy." 

The creation of the monetary policy council was 
delayed by four days until President Francois 
Mitierand, a Socialist, ensured a key role for one of 
his followers, the former finance minister Michel 
Sapin, who had strongly backed France’s strong- 
franc policy, known as franc fort. In addition to 
Mr. Sapin and Jean-Claude Trichet, who was 
named governor of (he central bank late last year, 
and his two deputy governors. Denis Ferman and 
Herve Hannoun, the council comprises: 

Michd Albert, head of Assurances Gentrales de 
France; Jean BoissotmaU an economic journalist; 
Denise Flouzat, a university economics professor. 
Jean- Pierre Gferard, a businessman who currently 
heads the national standards testing laboratory; 
and Bruno de Maulde, chairman of a securities 
market supervisory body. 

The council's mandate is to define and imple- 
ment monetary policy independent of government 


interference. The panel is scheduled to hold its First 
meeting next week and publish 1994 monetary 
policy goals at the end of the month. 

But like the Bundesbank or the Federal Reserve 
Board. the Bank of France has no official say in 
establishing the exchange rate, which remains the 
preserve of the government. 

Economics Minister Edmond Alphandfery said 
the French central bank's independence was “at 
least equal to that of the Bundesbank.” 

Theoretically, the separation of responsibilities 
could lead toa clash were the council to decide that 
the slow growth of monetary aggregates required 
much lower interest rates — a move that could 
destabilize the franc. 

In the view of Mr. Potts, such a dash is unHkdy. 
He noted that German interest rates are declining 
and therefore permit a reduction in French rates 
without affecting the mark/franc exchange rate. In 
addition, the permitted IS percent fluctuation 
against the mark — widened from 225 percent after 
August's currency crisis — gives France plenty of 
room to cut interest rates without calling into ques- 
tion the central rate of the franc versus the mane. 

But even this room for maneuver is unlikely to be 
used, said Mr. Potts. “A cut in interest rates of a 
quarter or half a percentage point faster than Ger- 
many is not going to change the economic outlook 
in France," he said. 

Didier Maillard of Banque Paribas concurred 
with the view that the central bank and the govern- 
ment are not likely to get into a conflict soon. But 
this means “it's not a period where it wQ] be easy for 
the bank to prove its independence." 

“Independence is more easily proven when there 
are inflationary pressures that governments are re- 
luctant to fight," he said, adding that such a test is 
easily 12 to 18 mexuhs away. 


Denmark 
Extends 
Rate Cuts 


COPENHAGEN —The Danish 
central bank, encouraged by im- 
proving economic prospects, an- 
nounced on Wednesday its ninth 
discount rate cut m five months, 
bringing tbe key rate down 0.25 
percentage point, to 6 percent. 

“The background to the rate cut 
is the strength of tbe krone and the 
currency inflow,” said Kirsten 
Mordhorsi, a bank spokeswoman. 

Tbe krone has finned gradually 
once the virtual suspension of the 
European Monetary System's ex- 
change-rate mechanism in August. 
At toe time of tbe currency crisis, a 
Deutsche mark was worth more 
than 4.1S kroner, bat on Wednesday 
it fetched just 3.8835 kroner. . 

It has strengthened partly as a 
result of the rate cuts, which analysts 
said would help Denmark outper-. 
form most European countries in 
gross domestic product growth. 

Tbe Organization for Economic 
Coopera lion and Development has 
forecast Danish GDP growth of 25 
percent in 1994. Inflation is below 2 
percent and state finances are 
sound. 

The rate cot was expected and 
could be followed by another, ana- 
lysts said. Ivan Hansen, vice director 
of Jysfce Bank, said be believed the 
Bundesbank would cut rates on. 
Thursday, allowing Denmark to 
make a 0.25-poim cut next week. 



Sources: Reuters, AFP InwrotKkHlHraiiUTrihnnc 


ASHES: Chrysler Makes Those Dirty Little Trays an Option in 2 New Cars 


Continued from Page I 
equalizers and space for their com- 
pact disks, there simply was not 
enough real estate. 

Indeed, attempting to satisfy the 
uses and pleasures that Americans 
expea in their autos — from with 
coffee to music to romancing — is 
an intricate affair.Designera must 
make hundred of trade-offs. 

The needs of passengers have 
been met with everything from 
heaters that popped up in the form 
of hot-waier bottles at the turn of 
the century to radios in 1929; air- 
conditioning in 1938: ignition keys 
in 1949: record players in 1956; 
and trip computers and CB radios 
in ihe 1970s. A car called the Pan in 
1921 offered seats that converted 
into beds. 

For Chrysler s designers, aban- 
doning the ashtray was a pretty 
easy call. Only 16 percent to 17 
percent of car buyers now smoke, 
according to research. But it could 


turn out to be a pretty bitter 17 
percent. 

“What's the name of this model 
just so I don’t accidentally buy 
one?" asked Walker Menyman, 
vice president of The Tobacco In- 
stitute. 

Mr. Merryman said he was not 
comforted by the fact that smokos 
could have their dealers install ash- 
trays and lighters for free. “The 
whole idea would be a turnoff to 
the smoker, because what you're 
saying is. ‘You're not as welcome a 
customer.' " 

He also said he had given up 
using cup holders because (hey 
caused his drinks to spill. 

The sedans, which will go on sale 
this fall, represent Chrysler^ at- 
tempt to break into a market domi- 
nated by Japanese cars. Hoping to 
lure the young and affluent, the 
designers decided a smokeless car 
would appeal to them. 

Analysts said the key to breaking 


NASDAQ 

Wednesday’s Prices 

NASDAQ prices as of 4 pm. New Yoric a me. 
This list compiled by the A P, consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities in terms ot dollar value. It » 
updated twice a year. 


the hold of the Japanese was price. 
The sedans are to be 52,000 to 
$3,000 below comparable vehicles, 
which means they would probably 
cost less than $15,000. 

But having decided to let go of 
the ashtray, the design team had 
some difficulty convincing its supe- 
riors to gp along. “It’s a big compa- 
ny and there are standard ways of 
doing things," he said. “All cars 
have ash receivers." 

Indeed, some Chrysler execu- 
tives seemed a bit defensive about 
the deciaon, and the lack of an 
ashtray was not mentioned during 
the elaborate introduction of the 
cars at tbe North American Inter- 
national Auto Show in DetroiL 

Chrysler executives said they 
would wait to see how this was 
received before deciding whether to 
drop ashtrays from other car and 
truck lines. 

Others sought to put the best 
face on iL “It's our step to help the 


II Month 
HBotiLow SOX* 


health of Americans," said Arthur 
G Uebler, Chiysler’s wee presi- 
dent for marketing and communi- 
cations. As he Finished laughing, 
Mr. Liebler added: “Don't teu RJ. 
Reynolds I said that." 

Anti-smoking groups were de- 
lighted by Chrysler s decision. “We 
applaud iL” said Sharon Jayoox, 
the director of prevention and 
school health for the American 
Lung Association. 

■ Honda's New U.S. Model 

Honda announced Wednesday 
that it would design and manufac- 
ture a new Acura mode! in Ohio, 
the first Japanese luxury carlo be 
produced in the United States, Tbe 
Associated Press reported from 
DetroiL 

Honda has yet to name tbe car. 
which will be introduced for the 
1996 modd year and sell in tbe 
range of S23.00Q-S30.000. 


GM Unveils Small Cadillac 
Designed in Europe, U.S. 


The Associated Press 

DETROIT — General Motors 
Corp. is showing off its First major 
joint North American-European car 
project, a sporty, small Cadillac to 
be built in Germany that is to com- 
pete with German and Japanese eo- 
try-levd luxury cars. 

Chief Executive Officer John F. 
Smith Jr. said cash-strapped GM 
saved investment costs in develop- 
ing tbe Luxury Solan Euro-style 
Cadillac by tapping the talent pool 
of GNfs global operations. 

“Our design, engineering and 
manufacturing bases are more di- 
verse and spread across more re- 
gions than most of our competi- 
tors." said Mr. Smith, who led tbe 
turnaround in CM'S European op- 
erations in the late 1980s. 

GM said it would make the new 
car initially in Germany and im- 


port it to the United States. Execu- 
tives said production might be 
moved to the United Stales later if 
currency exchanges become more 
favorable. 

The new Gadillae, which mil go 
on sale in 1996, expands the label’s 
lineup into a segment of affluent 
bot young buyers who favor 
BMW's 3-Series and Mercedes- 
Benz's new C-Gass sedans. 

The car's basic underbody was 
developed and engineered in Eu- 
rope for the Opel and Vaoxhall 
brands. Tbe engine was designed 
and engineered at the Opel Techni- 
cal Development Center for Opel 
Vauxhali and Sweden’s Saab AB, 
of which GM owns 50 percenL Its 
automatic transmission was de- 
signed in the United States but 
built in Europe. 


Very briefly; 

• TVeafaandaflstalt, the agency in charge of selling state assets in the 
forma East Germany, is expected to agree next week to sell the steel- 
maker Eko StaM AG to Rrra Prodotn Sdenngki SpA of Italy. 

■ Rolls-Royce FIX, the British maker of jet engines, and Hornnet Corp.. a 
U.S.~based unit of Pedriney SA of France, announced a joint venture to 
refurbish airplane-engine components. 

■ Elf Aquitaine and Union des Assurances de Paris will be privatized “in 
the next few weeks," Finance Minister Edmond Alphandfry said. 

• Germany’s cartel office said the steelmaker (Med Krupp AG Hoescb- 
Kntpp must sell its shodc-absorba unit, Krupp Brihnringhaus GatbH, as it 
agreed in i 992 to do by the end of 1993. 

■ Femxzzi Group bought the 49 percent of the Rone television station 
TetentonCecarlo that it did not already own. The price was not disclosed. 

• British Sled PLC said 330 workers would lose their jobs by April as it 
doses its Brentford Works, a plant near Birmingham that makes large 
steel tubes for power generators and processing plants. 

; Bloomberg. AFX. Reuter*, AP 

No *94 Profit for Aerospatiale 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 
PARIS —The chairman of Aer- 
ospatiale on Wednesday forecast 
“significant improvement" in the 
company’s 1993 results but indicat- 
ed it would not show a profit for 
lastyearor 1994. 

The state-owned company had a 
loss of 238 billion French francs 
($4027 million) in 1992. when sales 
were 21.8 billion francs. 

Louis GaJUois, chairman and 
chief executive of Aerospatiale, Eu- 
rope’s biggest aerospace and de- 
fense concern, said be believed 
1993 represented the low point in 


(be industry’s current cycle but did 
not forecast a profit for 1994. He 

S ”cled the company would 
even by 1995. 

He said the concern had “held 
and consolidated its market share 
everywhere" despite “one of the 
worst economic backdrops Aero- 
spatiale has ever known." 

He said new orders had fallen in 
1993 to 29 billion francs from 39 
billion francs, putting total orders 
at 130 billion francs, or about two 
and one-half years of activity. 

(Bloomberg. AFXi 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1994 


i2Manm as 

High Low So* Ov Vkt PE ion Wan Low Late* Of 0C 


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Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
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CALLANDER 

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wCoHanderF-Austrlan A5 131171 

w Callander F Spaiush Pm 7503.00 

nr Collonder F-US Health Cares 735J 

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tf Cl Canadian Growth Fd CS 4J7 


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tf CUInvesr GtoOM Band 5 

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d Cll invest Selector S 

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d Obllg Infl Dlversl Flees FF 1J246 

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d Obllg Anglglse* 1 .. I4J8 

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d Obllg Convert imenw FF 154^1 

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tf Kurt Terme FRF -f F 13887 

CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE 

tf E I vsees Monelaire FF 8778604 

tf 5am AcHcosh USD B. -8 I097J2 

CREDIT SUISSE 

tf CSF Bonds SF 

d Bond Valor Swf SF 

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d Bond Valor D ■ Mart. DM 

tf B«id Valor Yen i 

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d CSF internolionol SF 

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d CS Gold ualar S 

tf CS Tiger Fund S 

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rf CS Gulden Bona A FI 

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tf CSHispanaloenoFdA Pta 2987SJ00 

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rf CS Eurooa Bond 9 DM 

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rf CS Germany Fund « DM 

tf CS German Fund B — —DM 

tf CS Euro Blue CHIPS A DM 

tf CS Euro Blue Chips B DM 

tf C5 Short- T. Bands A 5 

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tf CS Shorl-T. Bend DM B D/A 

a CS Mcnev Market Fd S S 

tf cs Mo act Mortar Fa dm dm 

tf CS Mona* Market Fd £ ( 

a CS Money MOrtel Fd Ten-Y 

d CS Money Market Fd C3 CS 

tf CSMoner Aurui Fa Ecu_Ecu 
tf cs More-- Market Fd SF — SF 
tf CSManer Martel FdH FI _FJ 1181807 

tf CS Manrr /Aartet Fa Ut L« 1172257810 

tf CS //Ionov .YiafXel Fd ff — FF ftfei.433 
d CS Money Mcrtet Fd Pta — Pta 12US0.3M 
d CSMone/ Market FdBEF.BF 5584*. m 

rf CSOevn-ProtecA DM 74*44: 

d CS Oeko- Protec B DM 

S CL Narih-Amenean 4 S 

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a CS ur. Fund A I 

tf CS utc Fund B C - 

tf rj France F und A FF 

tf CS France Fund a FF 

tf CSEuror«H D7A 

tf CS Ihtl* Fund A Lll 335175400 

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a CS Nernertanth Fd A — _fl 

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0 CS Jaean vegotrend 5FR—SF 
tf CS Japan Megatrend y,h — .Y 

tf CS Parti IncSPR »'B SF 

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tf DH Motor Morten Fund SF 1870080 

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| tf lawrol Portfolio SF 38780 

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wDotvai Band i 1H484 

! wEurawal cjaaiv Era J JSL3e 

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DIT INVESTMENT FFM „ 


tf Concentre +■ DM 5783 

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SUB IN & SWIECA ASSET MANACEMENT 
Tel : <8071 94S 14C0 Fd r ’ 1 309(941 1488 
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ntOvencw PertoriTKiice ftf J 2H9 a6 

mPacitie RIMOp Fd-__-_ — S •'■*30 

EBC FUND MANAGERS Uaney) LTD 
1-3 Seale St. Si Heller .05MJC3I _ 

EBC TRADED CURRENCY FU«D LTD 
a Capital. — 3 71504 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Jan. 5, 1993 I * 


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tf income _ * 14.72* 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
tf Long Term— ■— ■ ! 342Z75 ■ 

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9 C1I TERMINVEST PLC (44 71 MS 1*1 01 

ECO FT5E IDO Gottorn 1 7780 

tf Ecu s Currency Options __S B4JM 

E GUI FLEX LIMITED 

w Clm C/ worth America _F1 1844 

ERMITAGE LUX (152^(73 W 

m ErmltogeSeb Fund 3 78J7 

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■ ErmiHge Euro Hedge Fd_ DM K47 

ir Ermllooe Crostnr Asia Fd_S 2X21 

wErmHaoe AmerHdg Fd S 10.14 

EUROFA FUNDS LIMITED 

tf American Eaultv Fund s 26781 

tf Amertcon Ootlon Fund- — S UJJ2 

w AsJtm Enuitv Fd J 13147 


EYBR85T CAPITAL (107) 3*2 2ZM 
m Everest Canttat inti uo_ - S 1378* 

F1DELTTT I NTT. INV. SERVICES (LtaO 

tf Dtsooxerv Fund S 2047 

tf Far East Fund 5 71JF 

tf Fid. Amer. Meets s 19782 

d Fid. Amer. VMuk IV S 1 1706780 

tf Frattw Find _ — - — — — 5 XL36 

rf Global Ind Fund S 2083 

rf Gloaal Selection Fund S 2XS 

d International Fund 5 1980 

tf New Europe Fund i 13.10 

tf Ortem Fund S 115.43 

a Podflc Funa. — — S *0822 

d Special Growth Fund 5 3783 

d World Fund— S 11773 

FINMAHAQEMENT 5 A-Luboto (4181 773*371) 

w Delta PromU/m Carp i 114580 

FOKUS BANK AA472 428 555 _ 


P a Box 2001. Hamilton, Bermudo 

fllFMG Global (30 NOV) S 

m FMG N. Amer. (30 Nov) J 

mFMC Euroae in Nml s 


5A)A CURRENCY FUNDS 

w Gaia Hedge 1 1 5 

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m Gala Swiss Franc Fn 8 F 

iv GAIA F« . . - 5 


TARTMORE INDOSUEZ FUNDS 04/01/94 
Tel: (3521 MS4 74 470 
-ax : (Ssii 44 54 23 
lOND PORTFOLIOS 

J DEM Band Dl3 581., —DM 487 

1 mvjrtay L D ts X91 . 5 F 32B 

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1 French Franc— DIs 1074— F F 1X7* 


1 Global Band Dts 223 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

1 ASEAN 

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1 Continental Europe 

1 Developing Markets 

7 F-wnrw - - - - — 

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RESERVE FUNDS 


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nr GAM Overseas . ! 188.9 

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a GAM Bond C C 1W.I 

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SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1-422 2626 
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iEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

135 Erot 57rd Sfreel.N Y IBEZ21 246B4310 „ _ 

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iv GAM Untvenal DM Acc — DM 20U4 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGE MB NT LTD 
Bermuda: 1007) 3754000 Fax : I8CTL 2954180 
JWM GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 

w (Cl FlixmcMl & Metals s UOM 

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iv GS Adi RateMort. Fd II — S 1080 

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30TTRX FUND MANAGE6AENT 

■vG. Swca Fund Era '39177 

3T ASSET MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 
rel: <44/77-710*1 67 „ „ 


tf GT Asia Fund B Sharmi 1 

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1 GT Australia Fd A Snares-S 
tf GT Amlraiia Fd B Snares^! 
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tf GT Berry Jason Fd B sn 8 

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tf GT Dollar Fund BSh- % 

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Gil* R K5 E YCA PITAL MAN AGEMENT LTO 

/ GCM Gtobal 5eL Eq 3 1ID77 

GUINNESS FLtGHTPD MNG44S (Grmry) Ud 
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0 Global Equity * 

3 Amvnixm Blue Chip —5 a74 

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mHennoluropecvi Fund —Ecu 333J1 

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m Hermes Asm Fund ! 3«S 

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m Hermes Strategies Fund — s 73*47 

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in Hermes Merida Fd r 11060 

In cSm? 1 PARTNERS (ASIA] VlMITED Wal 
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INTERNATI ONAL MGAC T IN JS*E FUNp” 
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INVESCO I NTT. LTD, POBTTLiereiV 
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JARDINE FLEMING i OPO Box 11448 1 

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Japan Car Firms 
Report 3d Year 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1994 


China State Firms to Sink or Swim 

New Corporate Law Will Jolt Pampered Industries 


Page 13 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


es 


Compiled by Our Staff From Diqxttdws 

TOKYO — Domestic sales try 
Japanese cannaken fell for the third 
year in a row in 1993 as the econom- 
ic dump deepened, an industry asso- 
ciation said Wednesday. 

Sales of registered vehicles tura- 
Hed 8.4 percent, to 4.887.179 units, 
the lowest level since 1987, the Ja- 
pan Automobile Dealers Associa- 
bon said Tbe association said it was 
the first time since World War II 
that saks of cant, trucks and buses in 
Japan had fallen for three years. 

Sales of imported vehicles grew 
9.1 percent, to 301,484 anils, the 
report said. 


Businesses Urge 
Tax Cut by Tokyo 

A genet: France- Prase 

TOKYO — Business leaders 
urged the government Wednesday 
to cut income taxes as soon as pos- 
sible to revive tbe economy. 

Gaishi Hiraiwa, c hairman of the 
Federation of Economic Organiza- 
tions, or Keidanrcn, called on 
Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa to act first and worry about 
the drop in revenue later. 

“Income tax cuts should come 
first,” he said. “The source can be 
secured through an increase in the 
consumption tax in the future.” 

Mr. Hiraiwa and Takeshi Na- 
gano, chairman of the Japan Feder- 
ation of Employers' Associations, 
or Nikkeircn, said (be government' 
should consider issuing bonds to 
cover the shortfall — a course op- 
posed by the Finance Ministry. 


The dismal numbers show “just 
how far tbe recession has spread,” 
said Yosirio Rondo, an association 
official 

In December alone, sales were 
down 11.1 percent, to 345,715 
units, ft was (he ninth consecutive 
month in which sales were lower mi 
a year-to-year baas. 

Sales will probably continue fall- 
ing in the fust quarter, said Jona- 
than Dobson, an auto-industry an- 
alyst at Jardine Reining Securities, 
although he forecast a small rise in 
sales for tbe full year. 

“The first half of (he year should 
be fairly severe,” Mr. Rondo of Ok 
industry association said. “Howev- 
er, if we see some positive influ- 
ences, sales could slowly pick up.” 

Analysts cited a possible in- 
come-tax cut, low loan rates and 
price-cutting by car dealers as in- 
centives to consumers. 

Mr. Rondo also said the govera- 
meni was considering eliminating a 
special consumption tax on new 
cars, whidi would bring tbe tax rate 
down to J percent From 4 J percent. 

Japan's top automakers all posted 
lower sales in 1993. At Toyota Mo- 
tor Corp., tbe largest, sales fell 7.7 
percent, to 2,038,000 vehicles, Nis- 
san Motor Co., tbe second-largest, 

saw an 8.4 percent drop, to 
1,098.000. (Bloomberg, AFX / 

■ Store Chain to Cut Staff 

Mitsukoshi Ltd., which runs Ja- 
pan’s most prestigious department- 
store chain, said it planned to cut 
its staff by 10 percent by 1997. The 
Associated Press reported. 

A company spokesman said tbe 
cuts would be made by attrition 
and reduced hiring. 


Bloomberg Businas News 

HONG KONG —Thousands of state en- 
terprises in China will have to run themselves 
like real companies or face ruin starting this 
year, the result of the first Chinese law on 
corporate governance and accounting. 

The broad set of initiatives, endorsed by 
Gtina's parliament Dec. 30 and effective July 
1 , will force the management of coddled slate 
enterprises to set up independent boards of 
directors and be more directly responsible for 
their companies’ performances. 

It wiH abo force Chinese companies to bring ‘ 
their accounting and corporate disclosure 
practices closer to international standards. 

“The law says get out there and survive on 
your own, baby,” William Overholt, manag- 
ing director at Banka's Trust in Hong Kong, 
stud. “This will be great for the well run 
enterprises and death for the bad ones.” 

Almost a third of China's factories are 
lasing money, while most are dependent on 
the government’s support. 

Another big step is that the Communist 
Party will be removed form (he boardroom. 
Each company’s directors, rather than bu- 
reaucrats, will appoint management. 

Since 1949. the government has been pull- 


ing the strings behind the scenes, often ad- 
vancing factory managers who had better 
party credentials than management dolls. 

Tbe law reverses that In the future, govern- 
ment officials will not be able to join a compa- 
ny’s directors or management without resign- 
ing their official posts. That takes some of the 
temptation for corruption out of the system. 

“Under this new law, the government won't 
be able to freely interfere in enterprises, it will 
only be entitled to a share of the company’s 
profits depending on tbe value of its invest- 
ment,” sard Li Yinbig, one of the law’s draft- 
ers. "This will help enterprises become cam- 


Beijing already announced that it would 
turn 100 large state enterprises into limited- 
liability companies, which m ea ns they would 
be Allowed to go bankrupt if they do not 
perform. Eventually, 11,000 state enterprises 
will be forced to sink or swim. 

The blueprint called for a limited sell-off of 
smaD state companies to the priva te sector and 
the creation of a single corporate income tax to 
ease state-sector burdens, effective Jan. 1. 

The law on corporate governance does not 
directly deal with issue of selling state assets 
to private investors, a big hurdle that lies 


ahead for Begingas h tries to fashion China 
into a more market-driven economy. 

However, by making management more 
independent and accountable, the law sets 
the stage for private investment in state com- 
panies on the stock markets or directly, West- 
ern diplomats said. 

“The corporate law doesn't stipulate that 
6e government should hold a controlling 
stake in stale rums, but in practice tbe state 
will mly control stocks in backbone otter- 
prises,” Mr. Li said. 

‘The law also stipulates that all shares can 
be transferred. Now die state holds a lot of 
shares, but if it thinks fit, it can transfer 
them," be added. 

Losses by state companies in the year to 
November swelled 20 percent over the year 
earlier, reaching 292 buhoa yuan ($5 billion). 
That is more than the budget deficit of 20 
billion yuan Beijing has projected for this 
year. 

To principle what this does is lay out tbe 
rales of the game,” said Mr. Overholt. “Even 
if the rules are bad, at least people will know 
where they stand when they invest in a Chi- 
nese company. That’s going to boost investor 
confidence.” 



mssmsmsmmsmmmmm 





inknadmi HnU TVibwe 


China’s Press Expresses Fear of Economic Instability 


Very briefly: 


Rouen 

BEIJING — China, through its 
Official press, has raised the pos- 
sibility that current bold econom- 
ic reforms may lead to social un- 
rest and warned tbe balance 
between change and stability 
must be maintained. 

An article in the Economic In- 
formation Daily even discussed 
tbe usually taboo subject of the 
ending of the era of the para- 
mount leader, Deng Xiaoping, 
89, during a period of such radi- 
cal change. 

U said that if any problems 
occurred in the transfer of power 
from Mr. Deng’s generation to 


younger leaders, the conse- 
quences would be disastrous. 

The article said China's re- 


in abandoning socialist econom- 
ics and moving toward tbe mar- 
ket, would lead to “a redistribu- 
tion of power and benefits.” 

Tf an enterprise can't pay Its 
salaries or if it has to borrow 
money to pay salaries, this is a 
problem of the distribution of 
benefits. If it is not handled well, 
there win be trouble," it said. 

Police officials from through- 
out the country, meeting in Beij- 
ing, vowed to use all their power 


to protect political stability and 
social order, the official Xinhua 
Daily Telegraph said. 

The meeting fell that with 
more reform measures coming 
out this year than in the last de- 
cade or so, it vrill be hard to avoid 
some problems that will affect 
social stability " it reported. 

China’s tightly controlled pro- 
paganda organs almost never 
make decisions on their own. 

Even Prime Minister Li Peng, 
in an interview printed Monday, 
spoke of the need to be carefuL 

The better our situation, the 
more cautious we should be in 


pushing forward the reform 
drive.” Mr. Li sakL 

Far more serious is the ques- 
tion of political stability after the 
death of Mr. Deng. 

An article by Lu Jianbua of the 
Acaderiiy of Social Sciences in 
the China Youth Daily dared to 
raise the question of whether the 
country rwuld be able to handle 
Mr. Dengs death well. 

“Of all the variables in the con- 
temporary Chinese political 
structure, the least certain is the 
question of unity during the peri- 
od of transfer of power” from Mr. 
Deng's generation to younger 
leaders, it said. 


• South Korean engineers on a government-sponsored project said they 
developed the first notebook computer capable of running software for 
Marimtosh and IBM-compatible computers. Tbe Dual O/S Notebook PC 
has an lmd 486 processing chip for IBM programs and a Motorola 68030 
for Macintosh software. Some analysts were skeptical about tbe innova- 
tion, saying a dual system would add to tbe weight and cost of tbe unit. 

• Sanyo Electric Co. said it planned to team up with 3DO Co. of the 
United States to enter the home multimedia market with a machine that 
runs software stored on compact disks using a code developed by 3 DO. 

• Chinese Petroleum Covp^ a company run by the government of Taiwan, 
plans to send an eight-member group to survey od resources and 
refineries in China. 

• Thailand’s Ministry of Finance will soon recommend that withholdings 
tax on interest earned from bank deposits be reduced to S percent from fS 
percent, an official sakL 

• Cambodia's state-owned railway weathered occasional attacks by 
Khmer Rouge guerrillas to post a profit of more than 14 billion rids (5 1 
million) in 1993. 

• Indonesia will launch a prototype of the N-250, its first aircraft, in 

November. Hotter. AP, AFP. Bloomberg 



Korean Firms to Raise R&D Spending 


Reuters 

SEOUL — South Korea's major 
electronics companies said 
Wednesday they planned signifi- 
cant increases in research and de- 
velopment spending this year. 

Figures supplied by the coun- 
try's lop four dectronics compa- 
nies — Samsung Electronics Co~ 


Goldstar Electric Machinery Co- 
Daewoo Electronics Co. and 
Hyundai Electronics Industries Co. 
— showed projected spending on 
research and development rising 
38.1 percent, to 1.56 trillion won 
($1.93 billion k in 1994 from I.I3 
trillion won last year. 

As a proportion of expected sales, 


(he planned spending ranges from 6 
percent at Samsung, the largest 
South Korean company in tbe in- 
dustry, to 152 percent at Hyundai. 

Spokesmen at the companies 
said most of the spending would be 
on sharpening computer-chip tech- 
nology and developing advanced 
goods. 


China Group Buys H.K. Firm 


Bloomberg Business News 

HONG KONG — A China-led 
consortium wflj boy a 70.9 percent 
stake in Hong Kong-listed invest- 
ment and real estate company Em- 
peror (China Concepts) Investment 
for 987.6 million Hong Kong dol- 
lars (S126.6 million), the companies 
said on Wednesday. 

The consortium, which is 55.5 
percent owned by a state-con- 
trolled entity and also includes the 
Hong Kong conglomerate Cheung 


Kong (Holdings) Ltd, the main 
vehicle for the businessman Li Ka- 








































Page 14 


SPORTS 


Giants Hoping Not to Face the Real McMahon 


By Frank Litsky 

Nrv York Times Service 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New Jersey — 
David Tale of the New York Giants was 
asked about Jim McMahon. 

“Which Tint McMahon?" he said, "The 
offbeat one who [ikes everyone to think he is 
old and beaten up and has ho arm? Or the one 

who is smart and tough and wins games?" 

The Giants will get the real Jim McMa- 
hon. the dangerous Jim McMahon, on Sun- 
day when they play the Minnesota Vikings in 
a National Football League wild-card play- 
off game at Giants Stadium. 

McMahon. 34. is the Vikings’ quarterback, 
a free spirit playing his 12th NFL season. 
Tate is the Giants' nickel back. In 1988. he 
and McMahon were both Chicago Bears. 

“He was such a great competitor, then and 
now,” Tale said. “He’s dangerous because 
he's so wild. He throws some posses you 
don't expect. If he's healthy, he will make 
things happen and do things to inspire his 
team.” 

And astound his team. The Bears' coach 
then was Mike DitJca. who was brusque and 
crusty and not exactly receptive to dissent. 


Tate remembered how McMahon dealt with 
that. 

“In one game” Tale said, “we were facing 
third down and short, and Ditka sent in a 
run. McMahon didn't like it. He audibled to 
a fade pass, and when Ditka saw that he tried 
furiously to call time out Ron Morris ran 
down the sideline and caught the ball for a 
touchdown. Ditka blew his lop. but McMa- 
hon didn’t care. He always called audiblcs. 

“McMahon helped us realize this was a 
players' game. Coaches can prepare you. bur 
players play the game. He felt he was the 
quarterback and had to win the game." 

And run the game. 

“We had a rookie tackle that year.” Tate 
recalled. “He missed his block and Jim got 
sacked They sent in the same play again and 
Jim got sacked again. So he turned to the 
rookie and told him to get out of the game. 

“Ditka didn't see him do that, but now 
Ditka sees the rookie tackle on the sideline. 
He said to the kid. ‘What are you doing 
here? 1 The kid said. 'McMahon kicked me 
ouu' By that time, we ran the next play with 
10 guys on offense and we did O.K. Ditka 
finally sent in another tackle. 

“When McMahon came off the field 


Ditka said. ‘Why did you do that?’ McMa- 
hon said: ‘The kid wasn't playing worth 
anything, anyway. You might as well keep 
him off the stage.* Ditka just shook his head 
He never talked about it publidy. McMahon 
wouldn't have backed down, anyway " 

McMahon has always been different- Tale 
remembered a Bears* minicamp where Mc- 
Mahon showed up wearing sunglasses and 
thongs. 

“He goes out on the field dressed like 
that." Tale said “and wings the balL” 

But McMahon’s ofT-ihe-wall image is de- 
ceiving. Behind the shades and thongs are 
football intelligence and fire. 

“He is a playoff quarterback.” Tate said 
“Under pressure, you know be is going to do 
iL We felt if we gave Jim the bad something 
would happen. That's why teams try to 
knock him out of the game. He'U limp out 
there and he'U throw the ball like his arm is 
falling off, but he'll wing it downfield He' s 
dangerous.’’ 

As a team, the Vikings can be dangerous 
on offense. For receiving, they have the two 
Carters — Anthony with his quiet, consistent 
excellence, and Cris with his acrobatic 
catches. For rushing, they have a talented 


heavy-duty back in Scottie Graham, a re- 
placement for a replacement. 

Greg Jackson, the Giants' free safety, said: 
“Minnesota is another team like Dallas. 
Three wide receivers, a good running back, a 
quarterback who can be just as good as Troy 
Aikman. If you give Jim McMahon enough 
time, he can pick you apart" 

So can the Vikings' defense, which ranks 
Erst in the league. It has superior pass rush- 
ers in Chris Doleman at end and John Ran- 
dle and Henry Thomas at tackle. 

“They’re very aggressive.” said Ban Oates, 
the Giants’ center. “Against a team like that, 
your pass routes have to be a little quicker. 
You have to get the tight ends involved more 
because they're big targets. You can’t sit 
back there.” 

The Giants would rather run than pass, 
anyway. 

“Sure.” Oates said. “But that may not be 
easy because they rank second against the 


He added: “If we can't run. we will have a 
very slim chance to win. Bui if we can run, 
well be all right. Thai well be able to throw 
the ball at our choosing and at distances we 
like." 


rust annum NFL Individual Leaders and Team Statistics 


FIRST ROUND 
Saftirtfoy. Jan. a 

Pittsburgh ai Kansas City. 1730 GMT 
Green Bay al Detroit. 2100 GMT 
Son dor. Jon. 9 

Minnesota at New York Gionfe. 1730 GMT 
Denver at Los Anmies Raiders. 2100 GMT 
DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS 
Saturday, Jan. 15 

AFC first-round winner at Buttola. 1730 GMT 
N FC 1 irsi- round winner at Son F ronclsco.2100 
GMT 

Sunday, Jan. It 

NFC first -round winner at Dallas. 1730 GMT 
a PC nrst-rauna winner at Houston, 2MB GMT 
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS 
Sunday, Jail. 23 
SUPER BOWL 
Sunday. Jot. 30 
Atlanta Georgia 


Team Statistics 


TOTAL YARDAGE 

AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE 


NCAA Bans 
Texas A&M 
For 5 Years 


The Associated Press 

COLLEGE STATION. 
Texas — Texas A&M’s athlet- 
ics program was placed on five 
years’ probation by the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic As- 
sociation on Wednesday and 
its football team was barred 
from television and bowl ap- 
pearances for one year. 

The NCAA found that play- 
ers were paid for work that 
was not actually performed, 
that prospective studeni-ath- 


Mlami 

Houston 

D e nv er 

Butt** 

Ptnvjwgh 
New York Jets 
New England 

LA. Ranters 

San Diego 

Kansas Glv 

Cteveumd 

inalananolis 

Seattle 

Ctocmrii 


Yards 
Mil 
5458 
SMI 
53*0 
5235 
5212 
SObS 
501 A 
*67 
4U5 
J7« 
<705 


Rust! 

14S* 

1792 

10*3 

too 

7003 

1300 

1710 

IJ2S 

1874 

1655 

1701 


Pass 


4052 


2015 

1611 


3844 

3743 

3317 

3232 

3332 

nm 

3589 

3143 

3180 

3037 

3417 

7454 

7541 


Pittsburgh 
NOW York Jets 
la Button 
Karoos Cfv 
OeveUrt 
Nn> Enmarw 
Houston 
CncnnHI 

Son [Moo 

Denver 

Miami 

Seattle 

Buffalo 

fnaonapofc 


4531 

4711 

4723 

4771 

4718 

47TO 

4874 

5018 

5046 

5147 

5150 

6313 

5554 

5638 


1368 
1473 
1865 
1620 
1454 
1*51 
1273 
2720 
1314 
1418 
1446 
1440 
1*71 
25 II 


3143 

32J» 

2158 

3161 

1124 

2045 

3401 

27*8 

3752 

3731 

3445 

3651 

3633 

JUT 


letes improperly were given fi- 
nancial aid, that athletes re- 


ceived improper extra benefits 
and that the school showed a 
“lack of institutional control" 
in its athletics program, which 
had been involved in an in- 
fractions case in 1988. 

“While the university ad- 
ministration is committed to 
compliance, it is apparent that 
some alumni and student-ath- 
letes still believe they can vio- 
late NCAA rules with impuni- 
ty." the NCAA Committee on 
Infractions said. 

“What is even more unfor- 
tunate is that the alumnus who 
was involved in these viola- 
tions was a prominent member 
of the university’s athletics 
support group," the panel 
added. 

A&M officials met with the 
NCAA on Nov. 14 and pro- 
claimed the school's innocence. 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL 
OFFENSE 

Yards 


San Frandsoo 
Da Kai 


New York Giants 

Atlanta 

Wrt a detohia 

Mtarwsato 

LA. Rams 

Gmn Bar 

New Orleans 

Detroit 

Tamnc Bay 

Waslangtor 

Chicago 


6435 
5615 
5213 
5145 
SI 10 
4722 


Rom 

7133 

7161 


4804 

4750 

4707 

4491 

4311 

4271 

3717 


2210 

ISM 

1761 

1622 

2014 

>617 

1766 

1744 

1290 

1724 

IS77 


4302 

3454 

3404 

2*35 

ISM 

3161 

Jl** 

7790 

3131 

2*41 

2714 

3021 

2545 

2040 



DEFENSE 



Brown. Ra<. 

80 

1180 

143 71 7 


Yard* 

Ruth 

Pass 

Blues. Sea. 

(0 

*4S 

113 81 3 

Attsourufi 

XU 

893 

MV 

auMr, HOU. 

77 

M4 

1JJ 81 5 

New Yor> jets 

274.5 

*21 

2028 

Krtjy. Mia 

75 

874 

11.7 87 3 

LA. Raiders 

2*53 

114 6 

|78a 

►termor. SD. 

73 

471 

92 37 2 

Kansas Ghr 

7*U 

1013 

194.* 

GMns. ttou 

68 

887 

133 80 8 

Cleveland 

J*k4 

1038 

>953 

Menetears. am 

48 

40* 

*3 ST 8 

New England 

mi 

1219 

1773 





Houston 

J04A 

7*3 

725.1 


Pi inters 



Cncmoii 

313A 

>383 

1749 


Na 

Yds 

LG AV« 

San Dteao 

316A 

821 

2143 

MorOgmrv. Hou. 

54 

2442 

77 458 

Danwet 

321 J 

888 

7333 

Rouen. Oen. 

47 

3017 

42 45.0 

Miami 

HI * 

104.1 

2178 

Tuten. Sea 

n 

4007 

44 443 

SeafK* 

J32.I 

(038 

270 

Hansen. Oc 

as 

2U2 

77 84J 

BuHeto 

347.1 

120.1 

227.1 

L Jeir&an, Gn. 

70 

3*54 

40 4X9 

IrAanwoSs 

352.4 

1573 

1*43 

Stork, tad. 

83 

3S9S 

65 4X1 





KKH. VCX 

57 

2431 

47 428 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE 

Baker. K.C 

76 

3240 

S9 428 


OFFENSE 



POVMS. Pit 

89 

2781 

61 4X5 


Yards 

Rush 

Pass 

Sami. HE. 

73 

30*6 

59 414 

San Franooco 

m 2 

1333 

2489 





OaBas 

3509 

1311 

215.9 

Purt Rataroers 


PNen> 

3Z&8 

1131 

2123 


No 

Yds 

A vs LG TD 

Now York Giants 

371 A 

138.1 

1833 

naati. Ot 

36 

<64 

T2J 91 2 

Atknta 

31*A 

*7.4 

rtnn 

Gordon, SO. 

31 

395 

\7J S* 0 

PNIadektfoa 

307 i 

1101 

1*7.6 

Brown, Rta. 

40 

445 

113 74 1 

Mnnettta 

301 A 

101.4 

1993 

McDuffie. Mte 

28 

317 

(U 72 2 

L Jt Rams 

-OO J 

125* 

17J4 

Mtexxn. Oen. 

40 

cs 

108 M 0 

Groan Bay 

2769 

1013 

1953 

Caner. KC 

27 

247 

9.1 X 0 

New Ciiawis 

2*43 

1108 

1833 

T frown. N.E. 

25 

214 

*0 19 0 

Detroit 

2*1.1 

1213 

1498 

f nnelervl. frrf. 

31 

274 

S3 47 1 

Tamos Bav 

24*A 

804 

1883 

Hams. HE. 

23 

201 

83 21 0 

Wesiw >ocoi 

266.9 

1079 

19M 

Mom. Saa. 

32 

270 

83 33 0 

Chicago 

7373 

104 a 

1273 









IGdaM Ratanwn 



DEFENSE 




No 

Yds 

Am LG TD 


raids 

Rush 

Pan 

■sma8. Rac 

25 

60S 

242 46 0 

Mimesoia 

2753 

*59 

17*3 

McDutfie. Mia. 

32 

75S 

216 4 0 

Green Bar 

780.1 

TO.* 

IBIJ 

Ban. Gn. 

Z3 

501 

213 45 0 

Chicago 

290 8 

1143 

174.1 

Venfin. ind 

50 

1050 

213 31 0 

New to ffc Gvsros 

2914 

«6.7 

1943 

Ollienden. HE. 

23 

478 

2U3 44 0 

DetnH 

7718 

mi 

1883 

Lewis. SO. 

33 

684 

20J 40 0 

New Orleans 

2*15 

1308 

142* 

Bates. Sea. 

30 

403 

20.1 44 0 

Da8as 

2*79 

1033 

1*41 

Rctmon. On 

30 

547 

189 e 0 

San Franoscu 

3123 

1123 

199 8 

Baldwin. Oe. 

M 

444 

185 31 0 

PIHddiHpnia 

3132 

1320 

183-7 

Cooeiana But 

24 

434 

182 28 0 

Phoenr 

322.9 

1143 

20a8 





Tamoa Bav 

327 9 

1248 

2033 


ScortM 



LA. Rams 

3382 

IIS» 

2223 


Touchdowns 


Atlanta 

3388 

1113 

2273 


TD Mb 

Rec Rta Pts 

Wasrmonn 

343 e 

131.7 

2113 

Alton. ICC 

IS 12 

3 0 *0 


Individual Leaders 


Minnesota 
Green Bay 

QkCJOO 

New York Giants 
Detroit 
New Orteans 
□alas 

San Francfcco 

Plhladetofna 

Pnoenlr 

Tamoa Bar 

LA- Rams 

Atlanta 

Washington 


4482 

445J 


1534 

1582 

IKK 


4663 1547 

4469 164* 


46*4 2070 

4747 1451 


4977 

9017 

M67 


1800 

7080 

1141 


5246 17*4 

5411 1851 


5421 

54*7 


1784 

2111 


2870 

2*00 

7818 

111* 

3020 

2406 

3116 

3197 

2*37 

3304 

3257 

3540 

3617 

3386 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFOtENCE 


AVERAGE FBI GAME 
AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE 
OFFENSE 



Yai* 

RUdl 

Pass 

Miami 

3432 

91 7 

272.1 

Houston 

353a 

1123 

2418 

Oanvar 

3412 

1058 

2352 

Buffalo 

3283 

1714 

H77J 

Pittsburgh 

327 2 

125.2 

2023 

New Ytok J*fs 

3 ZSJ 

H7J 

7082 

New England 

3148 

111 J 

7052 

LA Raiders 

3113 

8*1 

270 

San Diego 

1103 

1148 

1*64 

Kansas Gtv 

3022 

1033 

1983 

OavTHand 

2*6J 

1062 

1899 

IreSatePoEs 

794.1 

808 

7138 

Searlte 

2913 

125.9 

16V* 

Gncmnal. 

2513 

*48 

I5B2 



Alt 

Com 

Yds TD Ini 

Bwav. Den. 

551 

348 

4030 

25 

10 

Mnitana. K.C. 

7*8 

181 

2141 

13 

7 

Tesiaverds. Oe 

238 

IN 

1797 

14 

* 

Esiason. NY-J 

473 

3M 

3421 

14 

11 

MiUMfl. Mia. 

231 

133 

1773 

12 

8 

Histetler. Rai. 

41* 

236 

374? 

M 

10 

Kell*. But 

470 

788 

3382 

18 

18 

CTDorwieU, Pit. 

«6 

770 

2201 

14 

7 

George, ind. 

tea 

234 

2526 

8 

6 

DaBcrg. T B.-Mia. 

221 

Rodion 

IV 

1707 

7 

10 


AH 

Yds 

Am LG TD 

Thomas. Bu» 

355 

1315 

17 

27 

6 

Russoa. N£_ 

300 

1088 

14 

21 

7 

C warren. Sea. 

273 

1072 

1* 

45 

7 

G frown. Hou. 

1*5 

ICO? 

VI 

26 

6 

1 Jotnsoi. NY-J 

198 

871 

41 

57 

3 

Bemsme. Den. 

223 

BI6 

3 1 

24 

4 

Alters ICC 

706 

7*4 

37 

7> 

12 

Ttxtattson. Pit. 

305 

7*1 

17 

36 

3 

Burts. SD. 

185 

744 

40 

77 

4 

Foster. Pa 

177 

711 

JO 

38 

8 

Pons, ind 

179 .11 

Receivers 

40 

34 

0 


Na 

Yds 

AvgLG TD 

Lawwie. ind 

as 

1038 

122 

71 

3 

A. wuller. VD 

84 

IIS7 

118 

6* 

7 

Shame. Den 

81 

*»5 

123 

*3 

9 


Foster. PB. 
Sharce. Den. 

G. frown. Hou. 
Brown. Rai. 
Coom. N£. 
Oetatao. Den 
Jackson. Oe 
Means. SO. 


R* 

Dei Groat. Hou. 
Carney. SB. 
Elam. Den. 
Anderson Pit 
Stovnwch. Mia. 
Lowery. K.C 
Ortskc. Bui. 
Kasav. Sea. 
Biasucci. wa 


PAT 

FG 

LG 

FIS 

27-2* 

35-44 

S3 

IX 

39-40 

2M4 

SC 

124 

31-33 

31-40 

51 

134 

41-47 

26-15 

54 

11* 

32-32 

28-30 

46 

116 

B-31 

24-32 

52 

10* 

37-37 

23-2* 

52 

104 

26-37 

21-32 

» 

IDS 

3*-2* 

33-78 

SS 

98 

15-16 

24-31 

53 

*3 



A # 

Yd* 

Avg LG TD 

E. smart. OaL 

281 

1484 

SJ 

62 -1 

Bems. Rams 

294 

1427 

49 

71 7 

Peoram. Ad. 

2*2 

1185 

4J 

29 3 

Sanders. Det 

20 

1115 

44 

47 3 

Harmon. ny-G 

292 

1077 

3J 

X 5 

Brooks. Was. 

222 

1061 

4J 

85 3 

Moore. Pho. 

743 

MIS 

as 

» * 

Waiters. LF. 

204 

950 

44 

31 M 

Walker. PW. 

174 

745 

4J 

25 1 

Brown, NO. 

180 70S 

lltodrw 

1* 

40 2 


NO 

Ydr 

Arg LG TD 

Shame. GN. 

112 

1774 

114 

54 11 

Rice. IF. 

98 

1503 

113 

80 15 

itaita. Oak 

Hi 

1330 

111 

(1 7 

RdM, AH. 

84 

1242 

H4 

53 IS 

C Carter. Min. 

84 

1071 

114 

50 « 

wasrer, PM. 

75 

4ID 

8.1 

55 3 

pmctiam ail 

74 

734 

M 

34 7 

Haynes, ail 

72 

m 

104 

98 4 

Jonas. SF. 

48 

735 

104 

a l 

E. Marta Nil 

44 

*» 

144 

54 3 

coders. Pho. 

44 

PMt 

483 

*.l 

7* 3 


Na 

Ydi 

LG 

Avg 

Arnold, Del. 

II 

BB7 

40 

445 

Roby. was. 

78 

M 

40 

443 

Comanno. Pho. 

71 

318* 

61 

07 

Band ni, NjO. 

77 

3356 

a 

414 

Alexander, AIL 

77 

3114 

75 

433 

New seine. Min. 

90 

3844 

44 

42,9 

Wagner. iXB. 

74 

3174 

40 

0.1 

Lndto, NY-Ram* 

75 

3715 

44 

41* 

Howl NY-G 

44 

1887 

40 

418 

Jen. oak 54 2W 

M Returners 

9* 

415 


No 

Yds 

AvgLG TD 

Hutftev. TOO. 

X 

583 

tu 

83 3 

Oder. VF. 

34 

411 

12.1 

73 1 

K. WUamv DaL 

34 

3ta 

1A6 

*4 7 

Meeaew. NY-G 

32 

3D 

103 

75 1 

Gray. De». 

23 

1*7 

U 

35 O' 

Scahona, Phi. 

X 

275 

813 

25 0 

Ooee. Ox 

35 

289 

43 

a o 

Baaay. Pho. 

35 

282 

8.1 

a i 

T. SrtiiNi, AB. 

V 

255 

U 

51 0 

GdUonl Mta. 29 212 

Kickoff Miw 

73 

50 0 


No 

Yds 

AygLOTD 

Brooks, GJV 

21 

411 

264 

95 1 

Hmtaes. HXX 

X 

753 

2S.1 

9* 1 

T. Smltv. Ad 

■ 

*48 

245 

*7 1 

Grey. Del. 

78 

488 

244 

*5 1 

Bator. Pho. 

11 

4*9 

215 48 O 

K. wisams. Dak 

31 

48} 

223 

49 0 

Ismail. Min. 

42 

902 

214 47 0 

Carow. CM. 

21 

450 

214 

55 0 

McAfee. TOO. 

a 

580 

107 

55 8 

MtohtO. Was 

X 

678 

205 

*8 0 



• . . -’tom* 

E4 Raakc/Tfec AMcoacd fcee 

Roderick Rhodes slam-dunked two of his 20 points in Kentucky's 107-82 rout of Vanderbilt. 


Costly Victory for Kentucky 


The Associated Pros 
It’s hard to imagine a team 
routing a ranked opponent in its 
conference opener and then im- 
mediately searching for a reason 
to feel good about it. 

That's exactly the case with 
fourth-ranked Kentucky, which 
beat No. 22 Vanderbilt 107-82 
Tuesday night and then began to 
hope it can remain in the nation- 
al title chase ir center Rodney 
Dent is lost for the season with a 
knee injury. .. . 

“It was a great win, but it was a 
big blow for our basketball team," 
said Coach Rick Pi lino. “It’s big- 
ger than any of you could ever 
imagine. At least for now we have 


No. 8 Massachusetts 71, 
Rogers 59: Lou Roe scored 20 
points and Mike Williams 16 as 
the visiting Minutemen held off 
the Scarlet Knights for their sev- 
enth straight victory. 

Massachusetts (10-1. 2-0 At- 
lantic 10) led 41-26 at halftime 
and seemed on the way to an 
easy victory. But Rutgers (3-5. 0- 


COLLEGE BASKETBALL 


td teta Rac Rot Pti 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE 


R». S.F. 

Kean, Alt 
Share*. GJL 
Walter*. iF. 

E. Bereitft. 02. 
E Smtai. Dal 
Wrffams, Phi 
C Canei - . Mot 

Moore. Pho. 


got to lift the spirits up. 
The 6-foot- 11 (2. 


1 -meter) 
Dent injured his left knee in the 
Cm half. Dent, averaging II J 
points and 5.9 rebounds, will 
have tests to determine the ex- 
tent of the injury. 

The Wildcats ( 10-1). winning 


Young. SF 
AJrrrun. Oat 
term. NY-O 
Bnder. Pfk 

Hettett. All 

Betterton. Pho. 
McMahon. Mm. 
Favre. G8 
Hortwurfl o*. 
Wilson. TOO 


All 

Com 

Yds TD Od 


FAT 

FG 

LG 

FIs 

to 3 

314 

4073 

» 

16 

Hanson. DeL 

2B-a 

3»-43 

S3 

IX 

3*2 

771 

3180 

15 

4 

jacke. GJL 

JM5 

31-37 

54 

ia 

*» 

247 

3038 

■5 

• 

Murrey. DaL 

a-a 

28-31 

S3 

122 

209 

181 

1985 

14 

S 

Andersen. TOO. 

33-33 

26-35 

54 

117 

430 

263 

2*78 

24 

17 

JtftaMta. All 

34-34 

26-27 

54 

111 

4T8 

253 

31*4 

18 

17 

Oder. SJ=. 

Sf-AI 

16-24 

44 

107 

m 

209 

1*67 

* 

8 

RMil, Min. 

77-28 

26-35 

SI 

105 

522 

318 

3303 

1* 

74 

Treaaaefl. NY 

28-2* 

25-31 

44 

103 

£5 

200 

2002 

7 

11 

Butter. OU. 

21-22 

27-36 

54 

181 

388 

221 

3457 

12 

IS 

G. Davis. Pho 

17-37 

2ua 

45 

IV 


their eighth straight game, went 
1 52-42 halftime advantage 


from a: 

to 59-42 in the opening 1:16 on 
Rod Rhodes’ two layups and 
Tony Deik's 3-pointer. 

Vanderbilt (7-3) got no closer 
than 88-64 on Chns Lawson’s 
tip-in at 7:48. 


1 ) made several small runs in (he 
second half and twee got within 
five points. ■ ; •' 

No. 11 LousviBe 132, George 
Mason 87: Dwayne Morton 
scored 31 points and DeJuan 
Wheat 20 as the Cardinals 
proved to be a rude host. It was 
George Mason that came in av- 
eraging close to 100 points a 
game, but it was Louisville that 
set a school scoring record. 

George Mason (5-6) came out 
firing at the rate of a shot every 
10 seconds. Louisville (9-1) was 
down by right points midway J 
through the half, but picked up 


the pace in a 20-9 surge for its 
first lead, 44-43 with 5:30 left in 


the half. 

Louisville broke the school 
scoring record of 126 set in 1971 
against St. Peter’ s. 


' Marybnd 91, No. 12 Georgia 
Tech 88: Joe Smith and Keith 
Booth had baskets and Johnny 
Rhodes two free throws to short- 
circuit a rally by the Yellow 
Jackets (9-2). " 

Tech newer led in Che Atlantic 
Coast Conference opener for 
both teams. But the Jat&ets went 
on a 14-0 rim, keyed by two 3- 
poinl baskets by Travis Best and 
fire points by James Forrest, to 
cut the deficit to 73-69 and then 
got it to 8J-80. bur Smith. Booth 
and Rhodes pul visiting Mary- ' 
land baefein front by seven. 

No. 16 Connecticut 77, 
Georgetown 65: Douydl Mar- 
shall scored 29 points, and the 
Huskies 02-1, 2-0 Big East) held 
the visiting Hqyas (7-4. 1-2) 
scoreless for seven minutes in the 
first half. 

No. 20 Boston College 96,'VH- 
hnora84: The Eagles hit 12 of 17 
3-pointers and shot 63 percent 
overall, but it was their second- 
half defense that proved decisive 
against the visiting Wildcats. 

Trailing 38-35 at halftime, the 
Eagles (10-2. 2-0 Big East) hit 
four straight 3-pointers early in 
the second half k> key a 29-15 
surge. Vfflanova (4-5. 1-2) then 
got no closer than eight points. 


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3 Rio Soccer Teams 


Quit League Amid 
Corruption Inquiry 


CompiM h Our Staff From Dupatchti 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Three of 
Brazil’s top soccer dubs — Fla- 
tten go. Fluminense and Bolafogo 
— have withdrawn from Rio’s state 
soccer federation amid a state po- 
lice investigation into allegations of 
corruption in the sport. 

"The Rio Soccer Federation has 
lost its credibility.” Flamengo's 
president. Luis Antonio Velloso. 
said on Wednesday. 

The teams said they would form 
their own league with its own ad- 
ministration. Three second division 
Rio teams — Portuguese Bon- 
sucesso and Can to do Rio — previ- 
ously left the federation and also 
planned to join the new league. 

The Fluminense president. Ar- 
il aido Santiago, said: “We cannot 
and are not going to participate in a 
suspect championship. We are to- 
tally united and have 80 percent 
support in Rio." 

The rebel dubs lace a hurdle in 
getting official recognition from 
the Brazilian Football Confedera- 
tion. Gubs have never been direct 
federations members: instead, they 
^ ore affiliated with the regional fed- 
, orations, who are in turn affiliated 
with the national body. 

Meanwhile, Tele Santana, who 
managed Brazil's 1982 and 1986 
World C up teams, on Tuesday add- 
ed his name to a growing number 
who hare called for a national in- 
vestigation of corruption in Brazil- 
ian soccer. 


Santana, coach of the S$o Paulo 
dub. told TV Btuiddrantes that 
"corruption exists in soccer all over 
Brazil, not just in Rio.” 

Rio stale police began an investi- 
gation last week into allegations 
that soccer referees were told to rig 
tbe outcome of key games, indud- 
ing qualifying rounds for the na- 
tional championships. 

On Tuesday, a referee. Claudio 
Cerdeira. accused the Rio federa- 
tion’s director. Wagner Canazaro. 
of instructing him and other refer- 
ees to rig results. 

"He told us that there must not 
be any upsets — the results must 
always be the results that interest 
the federation.” Cerdeira told the 
federation's tribunal. 

Canazaro. who was the federa- 
tion’s refereeing director at the 
time but has since been dismissed, 
denied the allegations. 

Nilo Batista, the state police 
chief and vice governor, said the 
police would examine how public 
funds subsidizing soccer were used. 

Earlier this monlh, one referee 
said he was instructed to guarantee 
a draw in a game so both teams 
would gain promotion to the sec- 
ond division for the national cham- 
pionship tournament. 

Corruption claims were first 
made by three referees in an inter- 
view with the newspaper 0 Globo 
in December. (AP, AFP , Reuters) 


Compagnoni 
Wins Her 3 d 
Giant Slalom 

Ream 

MORZINE, France — ■ Ita- 
ly’s Deborah Compagnoni 
sounded a warning to her 
Olympic rivals on Wednesday, 
collecting her third successive 
World Cup giant slalom vic- 
tory a month before the Win- 
ter Games in Lillehammer. 

Compagnoni. who tasted 
Olympic gpkl when she won 
the super-G at the 1992 
Games, showed that she had 
lost none of her appetite in a 
dazzling performance that 
only Anita Wachter, the over- 
all World Cup leader, came 
close to matching. 

Fastest in each leg of the 
race, Compagnoni stormed to 
victory in two minutes. 14.47 
seconds, with the Austrian 
0.27 seconds behind. Heidi 
Voelker of the United States 
was third, 1.8 seconds back. 

“I'm in great shape physi- 
cally. I feel good in my head 
and I'm skiing well” said 
Compagnoni. 23. “What else 
could I ask Tor?" 

Her victory, following giant 
slalom triumphs in Tignes. 
France, and Veysonnaz. Swit- 
zerland. last month, showed 
her as the skier to beat in the 
discipline and Wachter as her 
only real threat for now. 

Pemilla Wiberg of Sweden, 
the Olympic champion, was 
fourth after the first leg but 
fell nea>' the bottom of the fi- 
nal run. France's Carole 
Merle, world champion in the 
discipline, finished 25th. 



Pascal Pmn.Tlgcacc Fmct-teftc 

Deborah Canpagooni stormed to victory on Wednesday, giving her rivals an Olympic warning. 


Czechs in Final 
Of Mixed Tennis 


The AnnaMcd Press 

PERTH. Australia — Petr 
Korda outslugged Wally Masur, 4- 
6, 6-1. 6-4, on Wednesday night. 
Ufting the top-seeded Czech Re- 
public into the final of the Hopman 
Cup team tennis championship. 

Jana Novotna .downed Nicole 
Provis, 6-2, '6-2, in the opening 
women's angles and Korda then 
d inched a winning 2-0 iead over 
No. S seed Australia by defeating 
Masur in just under two hours. 

■ The Australian pair then won the 
meaningless mixed doubles. 8-5, in 
one pro set. 

The Czech Republic, on target to 
become the first nation io win the 
event twice; will face either Germa- 
ny, the defending champion, or un- 
seeded Austria in Friday night's 
final. The Austri a-Germany semifi- 
nal will be played Thursday night. 

Korda, winner of last month's 
Grand Slam Cup. was too powerful 
and accurate for Masur. He moved 
well and used his running back- 
hand to devastating effect 

Korda, ranked 12th in the world 
to Masur's 21st scored the crucial 
service break in the seventh game of 
the final set and then kept his nerve. 

He said a change to a lighter 
racket after the first set was the key 
to his victory. 

"I couldn’t control the . heavy 
racket in the first set but after Ihe 
change I was able to play my 
shots.” he said. 

Masur said Korda’s intelligent 
shot placement proved decisive. 

“He came back a gear and made 


certain he made the big shots,” Ma- - 
sur said. “He played a much more ■ 
mature match than he has played 
against me in the past He won it 
rather than me Iosing it” 
it took Novotna, the Wimbledon ; 

runner-up, only 55 minutes to de- 
feat Provis. 

The Australian baseiiner, a for- 
mer French Open seraifinalist look 1 
a 2-1 lead in the first sei but then 
was helpless as the powerful and ’ 
persistent Novotna reeled off 10 
straight games. ” 

Novotna woo for the first time in 
four Hopman Cup singles appear- . 
ances and avenged a loss to Provis 
in the same event last year. 

Novotna served impressively — 
including four aces — and kept 
Provis under pressure. 

The Czech Republic's victory en- 
sured the event will be won by a • 
European team for tbe sixth 
straight year. 

For the second day running, the 
experimental Tennis Electronic 
Lines worked perfectly. 

The Hopman Cup is one or a 
series of events leading up to the 
Australian Open, which begins Jan. 

17 in Melbourne. 

■ Qualifier Routs Sampras 
Pete Sampras, the world's No. 1 
player, was upset by a qualifier. 
Karim Alanu of Morocco, ranked 
204th by the ATP Tour, 6-3. 2-6. 4- 
6 on Wednesday in the first round 
of the Qatar Open in Doha. The - 
Associated Press reported. • 


SCOREBOARD 


• v 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

New York 

19 8 

JIM 



Orlando 

16 U 

J52 

4 

Miami 

14 13 

J519 

5 

New Jersey 

13 17 

414 

a 

Barton 

13 18 

400 

6*3 

Pnilndetoftto 

11 18 

579 

9 

Washing ion 

1 30 

Central Division 

586 

ms 

Atlon ro 

20 7 

.741 

— 

Chicago 

19 9 

479 

1*3 

Chorlarte 

17 13 

567 

4*3 

Cleveland 

12 16 

439 

1*9 

Indiana 

11 16 

407 

9 

Milwaukee 

8 20 

586 

>2*3 

Detroll 

8 21 

.276 

U 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 



W L 

PC* 

OB 

Houston 

25 4 

M2 

— 

Utah 

22 8 

733 

JVi 

San Antonio 

20 U 

445 

6 

Denver 

14 IS 

At 

II 

Minnesota 

8 30 

-28» 

16*7 

Dot las 

2 26 

jot 

23*7 


Pacific Division 



Seattle 

33 3 

ASS 

— 

Phoenl* 

71 6 

jn 

2 

Portland 

17 TJ 

Ml 

8 

Golden Slate 

IS 13 

536 

9 

la dinners 

11 16 

407 

12*3 

LA Lakers 

10 30 

533 

IS 

Sacrum en la 

9 20 

J10 

15*3 


TUESDAY’S RESULTS 
Ortonde 30 19 U 30- W 

New York 3* if U Tf — iso 

O: w. Anderson 7 19 3-1 14, O'Neal I). 164-11 
76.N.Y.. Ewing 4 -ibb-IO 26, Slaru 13-9910-12 
39. Rebounds— Orlando 42 (N Anderson b>, 
NOW York 41 i Ewing 19). Assist*— Ortanao 17 
(Hardaway. Sklles SI. New York 24 (Anmonv 
101 . 

New Jersey 14 » II as- 83 

Miami 23 3* 17 34—100 

NJ.: Coleman 4-12 2-j in, wester 3-7 2-J 10. 
Gilliam S.04-5M.M: Riat8-t44vt22.MkaIV7.l2 
4-4 la Rebounds— New Jersey 54 (Coleman. 
Glunmf). Miami 60 (Seikolv ID). Assists— Nm. 
Jersey 17 (Anderson 0). Miami 25 (Shaw 0). 
Charlotte 24 39 14 23- 94 

Allanto 48 28 41 25—13] 

C. Burrell 7-14 2-2 16. GaTIhaO Wl 2-3 14. A: 
Wilkins 1 1 -172-2 25. Willis 9-14 2-320. Augmon 
11-14 2-3 24. Rebounds— Cnarlatle 47 1 Ellis 7|. 
Atlanta 40 (Willis >81. Assists— Charlotte ip 
(Bowies 51. Atlanta 34 I Blaylock 131. 

Cleveland 24 U 23 24- w 

Indiana 21 19 M JO— 1M 

C: Wilkins 8-15 3-4 20. Nana- 7-11 trfl 2a l: 
IWcKev 7-11 4-4 16. Miller 10-13 B-E 29. Re- 
bound*— Cleveland 50 IDavonertv 13). Indi- 
ana 43 (DAJvIS 131 Assists — Cleveland 20 
fPrlco 71. inalano 28 I Fleming in. 

Detroit 20 21 13 30-91 

Chicago 27 37 23 20-97 

D-Hunler 12-24 1-1 39. Dumar* 11-24 3-337 C: 
Plpaen 8-17 4-4 71. Grant 8-13 3-4 l». Re* 
bounds— Octroi i « i Etiiotl. Raiynice hi. Chi- 
cago 51 1 Pttwen ill Assists— Detroit 15 (Du- 
mors 8). Chicago 78 (Pimjen 9> 

Portland 23 28 30 24- 93 

Houston 29 24 38 23—104 

P; CPofclnson 5-174-414. Porter 10-162-334. 
J. RoOWvm 5-12 W 14 h Thoroe 8-14 2-4 IB. 
Oialutwan IS- 23 2-5 33. Rebounds— Portland 58 

1 williams, Strickland TO). Houston S4Unon>e 
13). Assi s ts P ortland 22 [Porter 01. Houston 
31 1 Maxwell 111 

pnflcuSalBfiia If 21 25 IS— 64 

San Aalaalo 21 3« 17 is-107 

P; WBOThersocon «-F4 1-2 19. Mornocek 5-14 

2 2IS.S: Robtoson 11-24 10-1232 Knlghl 9-1020 

jn imunrifl 43 iweotnrr- 

sooon 121. San Antonio 42 ( Rodman IBs. At- 
slits — Pnitodclanlo 20 iBarr n St. San Anto- 
nio 23 | Robinson 81 

LA Laker* 25 38 19 27— 119 

Denver 34 27 29 24—115 

l_A.. Threat! 10- 14 4-4 24. worthy 11-153*137. 
D Ellis 9-U 34 21. R. Williams 10-1* 55 27. 
Rebounds— Los Anaelrs ir iDivac I3v Denver 
57 (Ellis 161 Assists — Los Anodes 71 icnrtsiir. 
Tnreofi 41. Denver 27 IGiiik Pock ?). 

Seattle 24 29 29 31—112 

Phoenix 11 21 34 21—101 

5. Gill 7-17 >5 19. K raw 9-13 4-4 22. P: Bork- 

lev 9-18 3-023. K. Jonnson 4-15 HMJ 72. Mmerle 

T.tj 2-1 2i Rebounds— Seattle ** i McMillan 
9i. Phoenm 54 (Green iji. Assists- Seoul e> 
f Payton Bt. Pfwenis 10 IK. Johnson Ml 
Sacramento ]■ 31 3# 31—112 

Ootoen Stole 22 K 33 38—111 

5 Tlldoie 9-15 7-7 20. Richmond II 20 10-11 


34. G: Mull In 8-15 3-3 19. Webber 15-23 4-10 36. 
Rebounds— Sacramento 501 Tlsaaie il I, Gold- 
en 5taie4A < Webber 13). Assists— Socramenta 
32 r Richmond 1!). Golden Stale 30 IMullln, 
Johnson 71. 

Major College Scores 

EAST 

Boston College 96. V Ulanova 84 
Connecticut 77. Georgetown 45 
Dresel 81. Md-BalNmare County a7 
MorlSI 84, Mount St. MO TV'S. MO 83 
Massachusetts 71. Ruigers 59 
Monmouth. NJ. 73. St. Francis, Pa. 71 
Rider ad, Falrtelab Dickinson 54 
Robert Morris 73. Wagner 71 
51. Fronds, NY 78. Long island U. 47 
Tawaon St. 74. American U. 73 
SOUTH 

James Madison 78. Liberty 44 
Kentucky 107. Vanderbilt B2 
Louisville 132. George Mason g> 

Mars) Mil 95. Apcalocfiion 51. 64 
Maryland 41. Georgia Tech 88 
Miami 79. Florida Atlantic 42 
Murray St. 91 Arkansas Coll. 7* 

Tray St. 102. Mist. Valiev st. n 
MIDWEST 

Ma-Kann City 40. Wtchlio St. 48 
N. Iowa 64, Creighton 43 
Ohio St. 72. lowo 48 

SOUTHWEST 

Okianama Si. ill Prairie view si 
FAR WEST 

CS Narthrldge 91 Buffalo 72 
Powwrdlne 72. n.c. cnarlatle 41 
Santa Clara 74. Col Sl.-Havwanl 58 


• :v, w 

NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atloallc Division 



w 

L 

T Pt* GF GA 

NY Ranger* 

77 

9 

3 

57 

143 

99 

Now Jersey 

23 

12 

4 

so 

143 

109 

PWtaxtetahlo 

20 

17 

3 

43 

146 

l-U 

Washington 

17 

18 

4 

38 

T28 

126 

Florida 

16 

16 

* 

38 

108 

109 

NY Islanders 

IS 

IV 

3 

33 

133 

132 

Tomoa Bay 

13 

23 

S 

31 

104 

131 


Norttieast Division 


Pittsburgh 

19 

12 

8 

46 

146 

140 

Barton 

18 

13 

7 

43 

139 

111 

Monlreai 

17 

IS 

7 

41 

123 

113 

Buffalo 

18 

17 

4 

40 

130 

109 

Quebec 

17 

18 

5 

39 

142 

142 

Hart lard 

15 

21 

3 

33 

I1B 

135 

Otto no 

B 

30 

3 

19 

112 

195 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central Division 



w 

L 

T 

Pis 

OF 

OA 

Toronto 

71 

14 

7 

49 

138 

131 

Dallas 

30 

■5 

7 

47 

143 

133 

SI Louis 

20 

14 

6 

46 

129 

130 

Detroit 

20 

13 

4 

44 

161 

■ 28 

Chicago 

20 

14 

4 

44 

130 

10! 

Wtnnmeg 

IS 21 S 
Pacific Otvlston 

3S 

133 

163 

Calgary 

20 

15 

6 

46 

155 

136 

Vancouver 

19 

19 

0 

3a 

126 

126 

Los Angeles 

16 

3) 

3 

35 

149 

151 

San Jose 

12 

30 

9 

33 

102 

127 

Anaheim 

15 

24 

2 

32 

105 

124 

Edmonton 

II 

24 

a 

38 

123 

147 


dvord. McKenzie I. Overtime: C-Graham9(B. 
Sutter). Shots an goal: C Ion Mono) 13-7-6- 
3-30. D Ion BeHburj 8-9-5-1—21 
Montreal 10 16-3 

San Jose 118 8-4 

First Period: M-Bellows 14 (Schneider. 
Daawnousse); SJ.-Odgerse (Whitney. Ellk). 
(PDl-Sccoad period: SJ.-Odoers 5 (Errey. 
Baker). Third Period: M-Lebeau a (Dam- 
phausse. Bel lows ). Shots on goal: M (onirbe) 
9-4-16-3—34. SJ. Ian Roy) 7-8-7-3-24. 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
N.Y. Istaixfai 1 I 0 — 3 

New Jersey i 2 3-4 

First Period: Nj.-Rlcner IS (Emma. Mac- 
Lean j ; N Y-Turgran l7.lsn»N.Y..Melimto IB 
(Green, Daigamol Second Period: NJ.* 
Charske * (Emma): N J.-Zriewkln 17. N.Y.- 
Flallev 5 (McBean. Kurvers). I PCI Third Pe- 
riod. Nj.-Sievenj7 i Alpeito, NKdiails): ipgi. 
NJ. -Richer 1«. N J Nlcholls B I Mac Loon. 
R hater 1. iro). Shots on goal: N Y. ton Bra- 
aevr i II-4-&-22 nj. ton He nail >12-17-10—39. 
Tampa Bay < I 8—1 

Tar DO To I 0 0—9 

Second Period: T-El.nulhfl I K lima I . Shot] 
oa goal: T (on Rhodes) 9-8-11—29 T (an 
Puaeal 8-12-4— 2« 

Detroit 11*0-4 

SL Louis 13 10-4 

Flni Period: D-Yierman 5 iHowe. Siteo- 
card i . D-Kozlov IS fCiccorclu. ColFer). O- 
Sheooord 70 IQriasson, Yierman). Second 
Period: D-Occareili 14 (Kotlov. LKtstromi. 
5L-Ko*»tev 3 f Butcher 1. SL-Boran J Uon- 
nevi: SL-Snanahan 25 Uonnev. ZomBoi. 
Third Period: 5L-S1tanor«ni2AiJannev.Kw- 
amnoy).SboTSDn«oal:DlonJmn>n) 10-17-n- 

2-40. S.L. »on Osoaod) 1M0-1OO-40. 
Chicago 10 0 1—2 

Danas 0 1 ■ o— l 

First Period: C-Cheuos 7 iweinnen. Mur- 
pnyi iPPiSeeano Period: D-Kiatt 7 (lh- 


1 0 8— I 

Ln Aaoeiee 1 2 3—5 

First Period: LA-BIOke 9 (Gretzfcv. Gran- 
ato) : O-Faate 2 (Sakic Kovalenko), second Pe- 
riod: LA-Rabi tome 19 (KurrLGrelzky); (pp). 
UARobltollle 30 I Sydor. Gretzky). (BO). Third 
Period: l_A.-2tiim<k ■ ( Blake. Gretzky), (pp). 
LJL-Slwchuk Z Shots oa goal: Q Ian Hrudevl 6- 
44-21 la. (an Ftoeii iM-9— 3DrvM 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Liverpool 1 Manchester Untied 3 
Norwich 1. Neweaolie 3 

ITALIAN CUP 
Quarterfinals 
Parma 1 Faggia 0 


• v. -L-, 

SECOND TEST 

Antralla vs. South Africa. Fourth Out 
W ednesday, lit Sydney 
South Africa 2d Innings: 239-9 (1D9 overs) 
Australia 2d Innings: 634 (33 oven) 




BASBBALL 
Amertam League 

BALTIMORE— Named Pate Mackanln 
manager al Bowie at EL; Butch wvnegar 
manager and Jeff Morris pUchbig ooodh at 
Albany otSAL. end Mike O'Berry manager al 
Frederick of Carolina League. Announced 
tool Pete Howell. Albany liginer; Larry 
McCall. Frederic* pitching coach; Joe Dur- 
ham. Frederic* coach; and Rudy Higgins, 
Frederic* trainer, will return. Agreed to 
lermawtih Edgar Altonsa. intleider.on minor- 
league contract. Purchased rights to Dennis 
Hood, outfielder, and Ken Arnold, infteldar, 
(ram Thunder Bov of nl. Assigned Hood to 
Rochester al IL and Arnold lo Bowie. 

CLEVELAND— Promoted Mark StxroJro. 
manager at minor leaaue operations, to direc- 
tor ot minor league operations. 

TORONTO— Stoned MJke Timlin, Pitcher, 
lo 1-rear u ml i u c t. and Dennis Gray, pitcher, 
and Shawn Green and Brenl Bowers, outfield- 
ers. la ml nor -league can from. 

Nurtanat League 

COLORADO— Signed Darren Holmes, 
pitcher, to l-veor contract extension through 
1995. 

FLORIDA— Agreed to terms with Mark 
Gardner and wlille Fraser, pitchers- an mi- 
nor-league contracts. 

SAN DIEGO— Agreed to terms with Tony 
Gwvnn. outfielder, on 7-year contract exten- 
sion through 1997. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

CHICAGO— Activated will Perdue, center, 
from ki lured list. Pul BHI Cartwright, cantor, 
on Inlured ii*l. Waived Jo Jo English, guard. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 

GREEN BAY— Agreed to term; with Chris 
JacJce. kicker, on 1-tear contract e ".Tension. 
Signed Mike Merriweatoer. linebacker. 

KANSAS— Signed Erik McMillan, safety. 
Waived Tom Ricketts, lockte Stoned Pete 
Stalled, linebacker, lo practice sound. Re- 
leased Fred Morrtgoinerv. wkse receiver, 
from practice sauoa. 

LA. RAIDE R5— Agreed to terms with Ed- 
die Anderson, safety, ana Jell Jaeger, kic ker, 
on 3-vear contracts. Agreed to terms with 
Terrv McDaniel comerback. ana Den Turk, 
center 

LA RAJAS— Agreed to terms with Anthony 
Newman, sahriv. on 2-year con I rod. 

NEW ORLEANS— Signed Israel BvrtLcor- 
nemock. 

N.Y. JETS — Agreed lo terms with Johnny 
Jatawn, rwnfunaoack. on 7-vear contract ex- 
tension. 

PHOENIX — Agreed to terms with Greg Da- 
vis. kicker, on 3-vear contend. Fired Erik 
WVlmarX pro personnel director, and Carl 

Hairston. Seoul. 


PITTSBURGH— Stared Carlton Hascfr lo. ot- 
fenslve Itaetnan. to 3-year contract extension. 
Acttvaied Steve Avery, running bock, from 
practice squad. 

SAN DIEGO— George G'Learv.delerahtoilTie 
coach, resigned, to accept a position as defen- 
sive coordinator and defensive line coach at 
Georgia Tech Ifntversltv. Announced the resig- 
nation of Jack Relllv, auarierbocks coach <x>d 
posstoa name eoondnalor. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Stoned John Taylor, re- 
ceiver. and Bnsn Janes, hghi end. to 4-year 
contract extensions; Merlon Hanks and Do- 
omed Russell, defensive back* Ralph Tamm. 
Butr-cLond N«e Slnoleton. receiver. K 3-vear 
contract extensions, and Kort Wlisan. defensive 
end. end Derrick Deeset euant to 3-vear carv 
Irod extensions. 

SEATTLE— Signed Eugane Robinson, sofefv. 
and Tnocy Johnson, hiliback. to 2-rear contract 
extensions and Terry Wooden, Unebodrer, to 3- 
year contract extension 
TAMPA BA 1 Y— Sieve Shafer, defensive bocks 
coach, has resigned, effective at end season, to 
accept defensive eoonflnofor and seaxxttay 
coach pas H iuns at San Diego State University. 
JeH FI teoeraW. assistant coorii. resigned, effec- 
Nve at end seasoa to accept linabackers coadi 
caNHan al San Diego Stota. 

WASHINGTON — Agreed to terms with Jim 
Lachev, tackle, an Ssrear contract extension 
and Ricky Sanders, rvcetver.an 3-vear contract 
extension. Fired Richie Pettttxm, head aoadi 

HOCKEY 

NattoPot Hockey League 
BUFFALO— Sent Philippe Boucher, defense- 
man. md James Black, center, lo Roche ste r al 
AHi_ Reassigned Sergei Petrenko, center, to 
Rochester. Recalled Matthew Bornaby . for- 
word, from Roche ste r. 

CALGARY— -Cl aimed Guv Larnse. tarward, 
an waivers Iran Taranto. 

DALLAS— Seat Brad Berry.detonsenxnvand 
Neil Bradv. center, to Katomazao. IHL 
HARTFORD— Sent MHw Lenarduzzi, goal- 
lender. » SPringHeUL AML 
N.Y. ISLANDERS— Recalled Chris Luanga, 
I ram SON Lake City, of IHL 
OTTAWA— Recalled Andy Schneider, left 
wing, and Grog Paikcwlcz, right wing, from 
Prince Edward Island, AHL signed Brad 
Latter, heft whw. and Herb RXtalar), right wins. 

PITTSBURGH— Recalled Roberta Romano, 
ooalie, and Ed Patterson, right whig, from 
Cleveland of IHL Recalled Justin Duberman, 
right wing, tram Cleveland of IHL 
OUEBEC— Sem Paxton Schulte, fed wtna to 
Cornwall of AHL 

Susoraded amide Looolnte, center, lor refusing 
to offend practice Recalled Rene Corbet, left 
wtng, front Cornwall of AHL 
ST. LOU 1 5— Recalled Nathan LaFaveftc. 
tarward. from Peoria IHL 
WASHINGTON— Recalled Sieve Konowal 
chuk. center, from Portland o« AHL Assigned 
Shawn Anderson, defenseman, to Portland. 

COLLEGE 

BELMONT ABBEY— Michael Rrktv, ath- 
letics director, resigned, effective immedi- 
ately. Named Fred Da bens, vies prestowtl ter 
student life, interim attitollcs director. 

BETHUNB-COOKMAN— Sylvester Col* 

Itos. football coach, will no) return next sea- 
son. Marred Jack McC lalron football coach 
CAL POLY-5AN LUIS OBISPO— Named 
Phil Earlev and Erie Jackson assistant toot- 
ball coaches. 

CLARION— Named Maten Luke football 
coach. 

CREIGHTON — Named Ben GuUlano wom- 
en's volleyball coach. 

FRESNO STATE— Trent Oilier, ton lor 
Quarter Pock, will give up senior year to enter 
NFL draft. 

FLORIDA ST.— Marauefte Smith. Junior 
running back, is iramferrtng to Central Flori- 
da 

R3 ROH Ann— Named Nick Ouartaro tool- 
ball coach. 

FURMAN— Named Brian Lee women's 
soccer coach. 

IDAHO ST— Fired Kyle Willingham, defen- 
sive coordinator. Gary Anderson, defensive 
line coach, resigned. 

KENTUCKY WESLEYAN— Homed John 
Johnson too tool I coach. 

LIVINGSTONE— Delano Tucker, athletic 
director cmd football eooeh, resigned. 

MARYLAND— Fired Lorry Slade, defen- 
sive coordinator. Named Kevin Coyle defen- 
sive coordinator: Rob Spence Quarterbacks 
coach; and Dave lingerer running backs and 
special teams coach. 

M I SSOU Pi- Announced that Paul CLIiwv. 
Basketball guard. Is Inmslerrlng from Pensa- 
cola Junior College. 

Missouri— Named And» Moeller and Jon- 
athan Hoke assistant football coaches 
NORTH CAPOLIHA St.— named Carv Go- 
dette outside linebacker coach. 

NORTH TEXAS— Named Craig Heiwlg 
otnktic director. 


OHIO STATE— Extended contract ot Nan- 
cy Dorscn. women's basketball coach, 
through 1997-98 season. Released Travis 
McGuire, freshman running bade, from his 
toattnii letter al Ment. 

PRINCETON— Robert J. MvsHki athletic 
director, retired, effective end of 1993-94 aca- 
demic year. 

PURDUE— Named Bob Morris defensive 
coordinator. 

SAN DIEGO ST^-Nomed LeCharts 
McDaniel and Ken Delooao assistant football 
coaches. 


SOUTH CAROLINA— Named Wally Bum- 
horn defensive coord Viator i Chuck KHI v and 
Mark Satva offensive litre coaches; and 
Frank Hickson running backs coach. 

ST. FRANCIS. Pa— Announced tool Ter* 
renoe Martin, basketbal r forward. Is academi- 
cally ineligible tor rest of season. 

SYRACUSE— Named Norm Gerber defen- 
sive coordinator. 

UC SANTA BARBARA— Chris Ford, guard, 
left bask etooll praarcan far personal reasons. 

WASHBURN— Named Tony DeMaa toot- 
ball coach. 


WE5TERN NEW MEXICO— Harold 

Wheeler, football coach, has re si gned, effec- 
Ifeg Jan. I. to accept defensive coordtnotor's 
notation al Northw est Louisiana. 


£ . -.**, -tw crhMggMxOita* w -.4 

.! I-?-.;.? 


World Cup Skiing 


WOMEN'S GIANT SLALOM: 
Remits Wschniduy from Marziae, trout: 
1. Deborah Com o ag n onl. Italy, I mhnrte 07JI 


seconds; X Anita Wachter, Austria, 1:8758; 3. 
Leila Plccanf. Franc*. 1 :«7A5; A Pemilla Wl- 
bero. Sweden. T;08JDD; 5. Vrenl Schneider. 
SurttzartaiKL 1:88.18; 4. Eva Twardokens. 
United states. 1-.88.13i 7, Marianne KlaerstaO. 
Norway. 1:8830; EL Heidi Voelker. United 
States. 1 :08 M; 9. Christine Meier. Germany. 
1:08A3; m Ulrike Mater. Austria 1:09.02. 

World Cup standings: 1. Wachter. tO* 
points; Z Wiberg. 538; X Schneider . 518; A 
Compagnoni. 434; S. Mater, 421; 6. Seiztawr. 
319; 7. Ertt, 389; I. Renate GeetschL Austria, 
795;9,Marena Gall Izta. Italy. 293: 10. Bibtana 
Perez. Italy. » 


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I! , - 


ii 


































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Glock 17 on the Bus 



W ASHINGTON — Warning: 
This is not a funny column, i 
am on a crowded bus and I'm on my 
way to New York to visit ray friend 
Noodly, but J may pot get there. 

Everyone on thi 
me— they think 
they’re better 
than I am — but 
I am better than 
they are because 
underneath my 
coat I have a 
semiautomatic, 
and if they don’t 
stop staring at 
me they are go- 
ing to know who — . . . 

law. Bucbwald 

I bought the Glock 17 at a gun 
shop in Virginia. 

A nice guy sold it to me for $300 
instead or the ticket price, which 
was SSSO. I showed the dealer 
Noodl/s driving license, the one he 
stole out of a guy's car in Astoria, 
and there were no questions asked 
The dealer said “What are you 
going to shoot with the Glock?" I 
replied, “Clay pigeons." He had a 
fit laughing “That gun takes 17 
bullets in its magazine," he told me. 
“You're going to wipe out the en- 
tire shooting range with it.” 

I chuckled “Maybe 111 shoot 
some bats, too." 

□ 

Then the man showed me special 
bullets that exploded when they hit 
a body. He informed me that there 
was a run on this type of ammo, 
and he was selling only eight boxes 
per customer. I couldn't say no, so I 
asked him to gift-wrap them with 
the gun. 

What's good about the Glock is 
that you can hide it under your 
shirt or jacket. 

The TEC-9, which Noodly keeps 
under his pillow for self-defense, 
has a 20- round magazine and 9mm 
snout. What Noodly likes about it 

Song Royalties Go to Heirs 

The .isrecuired Press 

NEW YORK — A federal 
judge has ruled that more than 
$100,000 in royalties generated by 
the 1926 hit swig “When the Red, 
Red Robin Comes Bob-Bob-Bob- 
bin' Along” since 1982 belong to 
the heirs of the composer Harry 
Woods, who sold the melody and 
the lyrics to a music publishing 
company. 


is that it will take a silencer or a 
barrel extension. The only thing 1 
don’t like about it is when you 
carry one everybody can see it and 
then some spoilsport calls the cops 
and before you know it you’re try- 
ing to explain all about the TEC to 
people who don’t know diddly 
damn about weapons. 

□ 

111 tell you what else 1 don’t like. 
It's that guy sitting across from me 
who keeps looking at me as if Tm 
nuts or something. I have a good 
mind to show him my Glock and 
see him dive for the door. 

Don’t get me wrong, fm not the 
kind of person who wants to use bis 
gun on every Tom, Dick and Harry 
on the bus. At the same time, peo- 
ple who ride buses are always ask- 
ing for it. If I shoot it’s going to be 
because they looked at me fanny. If 
one of them bumps into me when 
the bus stops — he has no chance of 
getting off alive. 

Sometimes when I'm carrying my 
dock underneath ray shin the cold 
steel gives me goose humps. I'm 
tempted to take it out and get off a 
few rounds in the back of the bus. 
Other times, just rubbing my stom- 
ach with it nukes me fed warm. 

You didn't notice, but a passenger 
iust got cm the bus and he looked 


like somebody who doesn't have any 
use for people like me. My father 
was like that, and so was my mother. 
They never would give me the right 
time. 1 have my hand under my 
shirt, and if that guy so much as 
glances in my direction he'll be sorry 
be bought a bus ticket 
O 

You know what I think? Every- 
one should cany a Glock 17. That 
way no one will have to take any 
garbage from anybody who boards 
a bus. I haven’t made up my mind 
yet about whether or not I am going 
to fire my weapon, though I’m get- 
ting pretty tired of just sitting here. 

HI tell you something. It’s the 
people behind me that I dislike the 
most because they're looking at the 
back of my head. They think I can't 
see them, which is a damn lie and 
makes me so mad that I have to bite 
my tongue to stop screaming that 
they’ve looked at me long enough. 

When you read the papers to- 
morrow, say that what I did was in 
self-defense. If I didn't have ray 
Glock. I know that everybody on 
this bus would try to shoot me. 


The Power of Words: Who Defines Rape? 


By David Streitfeld 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — Words can be just 
as evil as deeds, the influential anti- 
pornography theorist Catharine MacKin- 
. non asserts in her new book, “Only 
Words.” 

“To say it is to do it, and to do h is to say 
it,” writes MacKinnon, who argues that 
pornography causes sexual violence and 
therefore should be banned. 

So what reviewer Carlin Romano, writ- 
ing in Hie Nation, provocatively raised the 
idea of raping MacKinnon to prove that 
thoughts and deeds do differ, her response 
followed quite naturally. 

“This was a public rape,” MacKinnon 
said. “What Romano did was place me in 
the position of a raped woman so that he 
had me where he wanted me. ... AO 
women are hurt by this. It changes the 
public boundaries for the treatment of 
women.” 

Romano responded: “She's gone from 
saying pornography is rape to saying book 
reviewing is rape. Catharine MacKinnon’s 
min d is one long slippery slope.” 

In the seven weeks since the review 
appeared, it has mushroomed into a vitu- 
perative cause cfcfebre that mirrors the 
larger debate in feminist, legal and jour- 
nans tic circles about pornography and the 
First Amendment Romano’s review has 
become fm some feminists a symbol of 
those who just don't get iL 
“What we’re seeing here is the increas- 
ing penetration into the mainstream media 
of what previously was only done by por- 
nographers,” charged MacKinnon. 

She s not exactly defenseless, however. 
A number of groups and individuals have 
taken up her cause, at least one of them at 
her invitation. The writer and First 
Amendmen t fan Nat Hentoff, whose sur- 
name was appropriated in Romano’s re- 
view as one of her fictional assailants, 
received a letter from MacKinnon. “Please 
disavow this rape of me in your name,” she 
asked. 

Hentoff complied with a Milage Voice 
column headlined “The Public Rape of 
Catharine MacKinnon.” He wrote: “The 
rape — hypothetical or fantasy or whatev- 
er — was a rape. . . . Romano deliber- 
ately, cruelly, set out to debase Catharine 
MacKinnon’s person, along with her 
ideas. It was not a rape that will land him 
in a qeD. but his name will be connected 
with it Tor a long time.” 

That's a promise made by Jeffrey Mas- 
son as well in a letter that was sent to 
Romano. Mason — a writer who has 
become best known for his libel case 
against the New Yorker writer Janet Mal- 
colm — rose to defend the woman he lives 
with. 







Catharine MacKinnon took exception to “verbal rape” in a review. 


“If there is ever anything I can do to 
hurt your career, I will do it,” Mason 
wrote, adding that he wanted to “grab” 
and “shake” and “hurt” Romano. 

MacKinnon echoed that position. “I do 
think Carlin Romano should be held ac- 
countable for what he did. There are a lot 
of people out there and a lot of ways that 
can be done.” 

Romano began his review of “Only 
Words" with this dramatic sentence: 
“Suppose I decide to rape Catharine 
MacKinnon before reviewing her book." 

This begins a complicated conceit in 
which be derides not to rape her (“People 
amply won’t understand”), and instead 
does “the next best thing: I imagine the 
acL” He then further supposes that he 
writes a “savage, pornographic” review, 
based on his fantasy. Meanwhile, another 
critic is also assigned MacKinnon's book 
for review. 

This fellow, given the suggestive name 
of Dworkin Hentoff after two prominent 
defenders of the First Amendment, “con- 
cludes that be loo needs to rape Catharine 
MacKinnon before properly evaluating 
her book.” Unlike Romano, he actually 
does il. 


Both Romano and Dworkin Hentoff are 
arrested for rape. Not fair, points out the 
jailed Romano: All I did was imagine it 
Dworkin Hentoff really did it. But in the 
world of Catharine MacKinnon, both are 
equally guilty. 

The “DwbrfcuT side of the rapist has. 
been variously attributed to MacKinnon 
colleague Andrea Dworkin or MacKinnon 
opponent Ronald Dworkin. Romano de- 
nied it was specifically meant to suggest 
either. 

The critic's review, after its unusual 
opening premise, accuses MacKinnon of 
having “a sensibility so soaked in gender 
hatred, and so convinced of foolish gener- 
alizations about male psychology, that she 
threatens to become the Lyndon La- 
Roucbe of sexual discrimination law.” For 
good measure, he talk hex reasoning “of- 
ten SperioUS,” her w n p ir iml Haims “often 
suspect,” her values “dogmatic” and “her 
view of sex and the good society . . . ra- 

v i shingl y insular .” 

Romano, a book critic for the Philadel- 
phia Inquirer who is currently a visiting 
fellow at Harvard, said he anticipated a 
strong reaction to the review. “I jnst hoped 
some of it would be more subtle. . . . 
Let's not forget my offensiveness was a 


S se to her offensiveness about men in 

Words.’ I at least treated her as a 
r in my review. She treatsjnen as 
spare parts attached to penises. ” ^ 

He also accused her of trtviaSzmg. 
“Real rape unimp ortant when the 
word gets watered down,” said Romano, 
who is almost as controvosial in the wood 
of bode reviewing as Mac K i n non is in her 
realm. 

MacKinnon answered: “He’sjnst using 


raped women to cover him s e n . inars ral- 
ly offensive,” 

The Nation has gotten at least 501etters 
about the review, had five subscriptions - 
canceled and received demands Ux an, 
apology from at least two men’s anti-poo- 

Polly Poskin of the 
Coalition Against Sexual Assault, 
summed up some of the Romano-as-rapist 

fervor 

“The only difference bet we en Romano 
and a rapist is that I can wad Romano up, 
spi t on h»m, and throw him in the trash; if 
I hit a rapist, he may kill me. But how fine 
is die tine between words and action? 
What about those who choose not to dose 
the ma gawnf^ the book, off the TV? 
They might decide it really would be just 
fine to do the same thing to me. And then 
will do it” 

Victor Navasky, editor of The Nation, 
said he remained proud of the review. 
“Once every couple of years, you publish 
something that deeply touches people,” be 1 
said. “Often, it has to do with the use Of 
satire or irony, and people taking it literal- 
ly.” • 

Romano was far from the only critic to 
attack “OnlyWords.” In fact, it was wide- 
ly vilified. Tins was no surprise - to the 
editor of the book, at Harvard University 
Press, Lindsay Waters. “Asking people in. 
the media to review MacKinnon is. a Bttie 
like asking the tobacco industry to review 
a report linking cancer and smoking,” he 
said. “It’s not likely to end up positive.” •• 

Nevertheless, the University of Michi- 
gan Law School professes- has an increas- 
ingly wide foOowmg. She has been credit- 
ed with influencing the Canadian Supreme 
Court to gready stragthen that cotmtiy*s 
obscenity laws m 1992. It was more impor- 
tant to ban speech that is dehumanizing to 
women, the court said, than to protect nee 
speech. 

MacKinnon and her supporters “have 
vowed to pursue nmibr r uling s in the 
United States,” Nadine Strossen, presi- 
dent of the American Civil Liberties 
Union, observed in the Chronicle of High- 
er Education in July. “Moreover, some 
leading constitutional scholars have pre- 
dicted that this strategy win ultimately 
succeed.” • i 


PEOPLE 

. Hollywood Who's Who, 
As Told by HeUBFlass 

Hdifi Fleiss, the HcHywpod mad- 
am, tdd Vanity Fair that tj* actor 

Hmifie Sheen wanted promote 
dressed as cheerleaders and piodas- 
er Job Peters “got gjds for every, 
cate.” Fleiss sai d Stom ai Doboty 
waned tohire prostitutes fora fian- 
ce’s bachelor party.-; — which 
is not clear — but would only pay 
$200 each, so Fleiss hung up other. 
(Her rales started at $1,500 a right) 
Doherty's pobficist said die actress 
did ask a Fleiss associate — not 
Fleiss henrif — about hiring worn® 

“to jump out of a cake or some- 
thing. rtessorartends that Doherty 
wanted girls who woe "pretty - 
bat not too pretty.” *5he said, T 
only want to pay $200 apiece:’ I said, 
‘Wfedcm’tyoodoRyorawUTAnd 
I bra® up on her.” 

Howard Stem has derided not to 
do. a late-night TV talk program, 
according to an associate of the 
raunchy radio performer. The con- 
tent of Stan’s New Year's Ei j spe- 
cial may have been partly responsi- 
ble for cocding discusskxts between 
Stem and the Fox network, but far 
more significant were recent fines by 
the Federal Ccwmumicatinas Com- 
rmsaon because of his radio show. 


Roger Grimm, the brother of 
Presdeot Bffl CBnton, has come 
forward witha book idea: “Growing 

Up Gmtoo: The Hist Brother's Sto- 
ry.” His agent said that, so far, the 
book had been tamed down by sev- 
en of the 17 publishers who had 
received the proposal- No word yet 
from the 10 others. 1 . . And Gea- 
nifer Flowers still hasn't found a 
pufa&ber for beraccount of her rela- 
tionship with Ctintoo. 

□ 

After “Jurassic Park” was criti- 
cized as anti-science and “Rising 
Sub” was slammed as Japan-bash- 
ing, Mkfcael Crichton is braced for 
the reaction to his latest work, aboct 
a male executive who is falsely ac- 
cused of sexual harassment by his 
female boss! “Disclosure,” due rat 
this week, rftriteng es “a kind of in- 
tellectual protectionism where 
things aren't debated,” he said. 


lI^RNAIIOim 

CLASSIFIED 

Appear* on Pages 6&15 - 


K> 


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>#*’' uli? 




Europe 

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WEATHER 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


CROSSWORD 



Hong Kong 




i UnsmaanaUr 
CofcJ 


North America 

A Significant anowJal Is pos- 
sible from oasiem Ten- 
nessee Dirough Pennsylva- 
nia this weekend. Same 
snow may reach Washing- 
ton. D.C.. Baltimore and 
Philadelphia. Cold air will 
divo horn the control Plains 
ro Texas Friday and Satur- 
day. LocaVy heavy nuns wis 
fal m tfio Souffteast 


Europe 

Heavy reins will Inundate 
Sicily and Holy Friday into 
Die weekend. A second ares 
ol heavy rain and strong 
winds will approach Ireland 
later in the weekend. London 
and Parts **8 here dry, sea- 
sonable weather thts week- 
end. Snow will continue to 
blanket much ol Scandi- 
navia. 


Asia 

Temperatures w9 moderate 
from Beijing through Seoul 
Friday boo Saturday. Colder 
weather wfl return to Be^hg 
late this weekend or early 
next week. Tokyo w« have 
diy. chffly weather this week- 
end Heavy rains wffl move 
away horn the Philippines 
Friday. Sunshtne wiD return 
over the weekend. 


N**S 

OprTow 


Today 

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OF CIF 
sm zsm c 
1/34 -9/ie t 
19/86 15/59 c 
77/80 22/71 r 
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21/70 13/55 C 
10/50 002 e 


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North America 


Middle East 


Today Tomorrow 

Mgh Low W H0h Low W 

OF OF OF C/F 

19*06 11/52 S 20/88 13/56 ■ 

1 9788 9748 a 22/71 13*5 a 
14/57 3/37 a 17/62 7/44 a 

M/57 7/44 a n/BS 8 Me a 

76771 6/43 1 30ree 11/52 a 

21.70 8M6 a 22/71 9M8 a 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

Mgh Low W >80i Low W 
OF OF OF OF 

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Caan 2BA4 23/73 pc 29/84 23/73 pc 

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SMSnow. Mce, W-Waather. AM mapa. Ittr wa i e and data provided by Accu Wart rer . he. C 


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I -7/20 d 


ACROSS 

i Not piquant 
s Israelis aline 
conquest o! 
Canaan 
10 Fortunes 
partner 
14 Hus! 1 C 

is More than fubsy 
is Pan of an eie 

17 About 17 million 
square miles 

18 Get even, in a 
way 


is Germany's 
Oscar 

20 Stan of an 
adage 

23 Infamous 
Ugandan 

24 "The Third Man' 
director 

25 Subservient 

28 Mash 

ao Computer code 

34 Son of Hera 

35 Type of window 

37 Mason's aid 

38 Cornishman 


Solution to Puzzle of Jan. 5 


□hho maaoa aana 
iHann annan mans 
[□□□□□□□nina anaa 
□□as aaaaa 
□□□ QHQC3 nraaaaa 
□□□□□□ □□□□□□ 
□□□□□ □□BBS □□□ 
□S12Q □□□□□ □□□□ 

□□□ aaaaa aauaa 
□Bamna aaaaaa 
□□□□□□ oaaa □□□ 
□aaaa □□□□ 
□uaa □□□□□□□□aal 
edhli □□□□a aiuna 
dhqs uaasa aaua 


38 Web-footed - 
animal 
ao Use a 
whetstone 

41 Four-time 
Japanese P.M. 

42 Mugs 

43 Tag words 

44 Ti thing 

46 ABC. for short 

47 Making a 
stand? 

48 1905 Secretary 
or State 
so Shoshone 
si End ol the 
adage 

98 Word with fire or 
no 

so Paris official 
•1 Pop smger 
Bund on 

82 Some charts 

63 Essence 

64 Laie-ntghi star 
BSFfy ash 

86 Some homes 
67 Crackpot 


1 Prankster 

2 Rummy 


3 Anne Nichols 
stage hero 

4 Exerting to the 
max 

. 5 Welsh dog 

8 Incite 

7 Wife ol Jacob 
•Steep slope - 

9 Actress Oavis 

10 Oslo and others 

11 Taurus or Aries, 
e.g. . 

is Paw 
13 Western 

Electric founder 

Barton 

ai Preternatural 
22 Binge 
2 s Wordless 

26 Alpine feature 

27 Item in a patch 
29 Make powerful 
29 Big-band name 
*t X’d 

32 Type of column 

33 Words of 
explanation 

35 V piece? 

86 Oral stumbles 
40 Wood hyacinth 
42 Type of gun . 
49 Like best 
friends 


© New York Times Edited by Will Shortz. 



hwWbyMlvW. Mow 


47 Theta pieceder 32 Actor Scot! 

49 Isle — - 53 Stick in the 

so Patrons fridge? 

51 Indiana Jones 54 Tiny 


i Actor Scon as "Dam it all!" . 

i Stick in the saNabisco 

fridge? - • product 

(Tiny . . *70 . 

imperfections ’ 58 Coll course 


few:. . 

^ . 
i*-s . V " 
ft*:: • • 


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01-8004288 .. 

00-42000101 ; 

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