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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Tuesday, January 1 1 , 1994 




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No. 34.482 


I 


By Alan Friedman. 

. . . hatmaOfsntd ^tTfdd Tribune- - 
US. prosecutors investigating' the BCa af- 
fair said Monday thattbey should be able to 
bring fresh indkimeiits o(Wh American and 
■ facagnfigurcs as a result of agroitixjd-hrealdng' 
agreement wthAbu Dhabi. Underthe dea l, tbe ’ 
Gulf ^ emirate .win extrwfite theformcr BCQ 
chief operating officer and nialre available hxtn- . 
dreds of thousands of pagesof hitherto secreT 
bank documents. - 

The accord was readied Saturday after more 
' than four days of intense negotiations mGdae- 


mo\M\ 

MHlD i 


Dm, Sultan. an Nahayan^the Amt Dhabinder, . 
“ii* woo owned 77 percent of the collapsed Bank of 

Credit & Commerce InicmatiouaL 
° ;i : ■ ’Gs. • -U-.S. investigators say that the accord came 

- ■ -- 'i'.' : after law enforcement official* mad* dear that 

~ i --3s i-^ji they were dohleoqtiating charges against die 5 
- c\r. iLi • emirate in relation to the bank scandal, which. 

■ ‘•■5 has been called tbe workfsbaggest 

' The23-p^'agreementbetw^ 

r States and Aba I»abi says that “no rqiresmta- 
tions either orally or in writing" were made “to 
-- - X- - induce any of the parties” to sign. But a .US... 

Senate investigator said in an mterview that 

— V l .^ ■ officials of the emirate "knew they ran signifi- 

: v cant risks of criminal jm»ecnrion of members 

oftheir royal famOy if they fidn’t cot a deal.” 
Abu Dhabi has promised to hand over Swa- 
. leh Naqvi, the former BCCT chief; operating 

•- - . J.:. officer, to the United States within.. 120 days. 

. . . : - He faces multiple fraud and larceny charg e* 

* • -Mr. Naqw, who was induced shortly after . 

- •“ intemaiional bank regulators shut down BCO 

** ■■■; in July 1991, is beiicrcd to be the former bank 

HlO.YUi executive bestable to help investigators nnravd * 

lp r n I the bank fraud, in whim more man $12.4 bfl- 
IJ j... litra Iws vanished. Wasfamgton, for its part, has 
• ■ promised as pait of the accord not to profcecnte * 

~ J anyone in Abu Dhabi. 

Other main jxanis of. the accord indudec 
; % US. agreement to remove Sheikh Zayed 
and AbuDnals&cimaSljbflfionciySadss- 

leering lawsuit filed by the. trustee of First 

. American Bankshares, a Washington bsaklhat ■ 

’ . was BkgaBy owned by BCGL 

*■' • Abu DhabP? dropping of daims to $400 

T xmffion,conasiii^ofmaenBOCXfiBi(fi,toaM. 

' toFim Amaicafland AbuDhabi’s 28jjercent 

e ^^Ro&eit Mcag^iih^^el^v York district ' - 

Naqvj in bo. 

Geneva accord as a hr 

V an intffview Mr. Afo^Efflbruisaid he and the 
, • , Justiig Depa rt me nt worid gam acraaa tocrifr- 

"“ cal files that orijpnaiiy came-fram the London. 

and Cayman Islands offices cfBCCt . 

“This will hdp oar investigation of BCC3?s • 

— destodrogtraffidingandakxi^ 

pursue aew indictments,” Mr- MfargEoJhan 
- said. He said that anril wkv Ms-team had- been 
cc^ucting m BCQ investigation “with one 

hand ikd behind pur bade.*' 

. . Among the items Ui&. pKisectttomw.hop--^ - 
— — ing to pursue based onlheBCO documents axe . 

. these: d«^ of thcaDeaedbriWn^of regd*- • 

- lory officials «"d . central bankers m 10 cosin’ ■. 

tries; the laundering of funds for heads of . 

gpvamnents such as Manuel Antonio Noriega, 
the former Panamanian . strongman, and nt- ■ 

■: mors ttf paymems to selected American pohti- 

.. • titmi 

*“ • ••’ The Geneva deal cooM also pave the way for, 

u :r . See BCQ, Page 15 


)■* Sv&mtAgaxr h»As 

President Bffl CSnton, left, and Chanceflor Hehnut Kohl, right, prior to the opening of the NATO summit session Monday. 

A Sigh of Relief From European Leaders 

f American Contribution Continues to Be Vital,’ Major Asserts 


. r . By TomBueikle . . 

( _ . International Heruid Tribmc 

; . BRUSSELS— It took Presideaix Bill Qinton 
Hearfya year come to Europe to reaffirm that 
the Umtai States would r ema in *n ww<t in the 
defease of Europe, but Europeari^Sers were 
mrtcomplaiiaijg abaut the wahcmMcaKlay. . 

- A{ a summit meeting to define a post-Cokl 
Warrens for the NwthAilantic Treaty Oigarri- 
zarion, Mr- CSston won prase from the alSea 
ijfts- caused by tan tr 
Adantifef^ctesora- trffi^e Hjaipoficy toward 
the-fonaer¥i^Mhtria, aadtodi%el /ears that 


Warrington was forsaking Europe to build 
doser ties with Aria. 

Ahhougb doubts persist about America's 
long-term staying power here, European lead- 
ers were reassured by Mr.^ CSnton, amo said he 
made lus first trip to Europe because “the 
security of the North Atlantic region is vital to 
die security of the United States. 9 * 

“I warmly welcome die renewed commit-- 
meal by the United States,” Prime Minister 
John M^or of Britain takl feSow leaders. In 
particidar^e^edW.'GSnum -pledge, made 
in a speech htae Sunday mght and repeated to 


heads of state Monday, to maintain about 
100,000 U.S. troops in Europe. 

“NATO has been vital to the trans-Atlantic 
relationship,” Mr. Major said, “and the Ameri- 
can contribution continues to be vital to 
NATO." 

*Tl was a very dear and unambiguous state- 
ment," Foreign Minister Niels Helveg Petersen 
of Denmark said of Mr. Clinton's stance. ‘The 
Ame ri ca n co ruinitui eat to Europe is totally un- 
weakened and wiS continue.” 

Even France, for long the w3d card in the 36- 

CUSTOM 4 


TmT 


Qinton Unveils 
Nuclear Accord 


By R. W. Apple Jr. 

,V» York Tunes Sernce 

BRUSSELS — President Bill Qinton an- 
nounced Monday night that the United States, 
Russia and Ukraine had reached an agreement 
for the destruction of Ukraine's I7S long-range 
missiles and more than 1,800 nudear warheads 
— a deal he described as “a hopeful and historic 
breakthrough" that would not only benefit the 
three signatories but also enhance world securi- 
ty- 

If it takes effect, and questions lingered after 
tbe announcement about some details of ratifi- 
cation and timing, the agreement would 
aD three of the non-Russian states left with 
nudear weapons after the breakup of tbe Soviet 
Union would have undertaken to surrender 
them. Kazakhstan and Belarus, the other two 
countries, agreed last year to give up their 
warheads. 

US officials said that over two decades, 
sales of reprocessed nudear fad from former 
Soviet states would produce about $12 billion 
for those states inchidmg more than $1 billion 
for Ukraine. Only modest American seed mon- 
ey would be involved in the program, they 
asserted. 

Ukraine was the most difficult case, and the 
negotiations on the deal continued by tele- 
phone through Friday mor ning. Thor success, 
flimon a dmi n ist r a tion officials hope. Will help 
to reduce tensions between Russia and 
Ukraine, shore up the tottering Ukrainian 
economy and bdp to stabilize a shaky region. 

Most important, however, tbe agreement 
would get the weapons out of the hands of a 
country ill-equipped to handle them. The Clin- 
ton adminis tration had feared they might be 
poorly maintained, leading to disastrous acci- 
dents, or might be transferred to some other 
nation or fall into tbe bands of extremists 
within Ukraine itself. 

Mr. Clinton has added a brief stop in the 
Ukrainian capital, Kiev, to his European itiner- 
ary. In a symbolic gesture, he will meet at the 

See UKRAINE^ Page 5 


0 


1 


Sarajevo May Soon Get a Taste of Luxury: Tap Water 


. -By Chuck Sudetic 

New York Tunes Service 

SARAJEVO, . Bosnia-Hcrzegovina — For more than a year, 
the riri^e act oTdnwing a glassful of precious water here has 

rec k ing life itself. 

But now, after months of secret design, construction and 
transpact of bascar-rize purification ana pumping systems, a 
U& aid agescy is ready to turn cat tbe tapsin tbe homes of 
thousands who have been patched since the summer OS 1992, 
what Serbs began cutting power to pumps that deliver water 
from a spring behind the Seffiian lines. 

- “L^. winter I came hero and saw thousands of people 
canytpg water canisters down to the river ihro«h the snow, 
and 1 said to myself, Hris is stumd,'” said Fred Cuny, a 
disaster-refief worker from Texas who heads the water project 


directed by die New York-based International Rescue Com- 
mittee. “Ninety percent of the people IdDed in Sarajevo get 
kflledinfiiezanerightalmig the river which is most exposed to 
sheOmg and sniper fire." 

Bombardments by Serbian forces entrenched in the moun- 
tains are .timed at crowds waiting to fill plastic containers at 
pabtic water distribution points that are sometimes miles from 
their homes. Thousands of civilians have been wounded and 
hundreds killed. 

Sometimes, trapped by fighting in areas far from distribu- 
tion points, people have resorted to drawing water directly 
from thejnmky M^adca River, which also serves as a sewer 
for people upstream. Other people have had to hand-pump 
water or dubious quality from shallow wells sunk near the river 


Pope Defends Old Order 


By Alan Cowell . 

Hew York Dma^tntee 

ROME — At - the start of a decisive week, 


ly mto Italy's muddied 
day. ureing Italian* to deawe to Qmsuan yat- 
nes,esd»w» separatism and see somegoodm. a 
political elite disgraced by Europe^ worst cor- 
ruption scandtil. , . ' . - : 

;* J pti£ papal nttermree, -nt a letter 10 Italian 

to b^^Scmn- 
pajgti to dectionstoat will fcace^ ne w pon tjcal 
Sneups on « country' whose tad gwm to 
dssmX^ral^'.yM- •wrfaosw 1 mcwcotm** «e stffi 
casting abootfor affies. , 4 - ■ 

, ;Ih. the-inoBt neat dwwm of dc^oral 
strengtb.groiqrinra^^tod^' the fam» gC^ - 

sc^f heav^ -ra 1]Qfl ?^ 
against strot^ i^bst , 

The focus of attentumnow a «w«f np 1 ’ 

fets —most notably ^eoiudsti tbp.Nwwn 

■ th* -mafia maanate Sh4o Berios- 


com can forge iome united and credible 
chufleng e to the^ fixmer Communists as -they 
.seek tocastthemsdves as the political main- 
stream. . ' 

'Inalandilmtis97pei»aitROTianCaihofic, 
Si© church has long cxarctsed a strong puD on 
politics, openly counseling is fdfowm for dc- 
cadestostq^jort the onoe-dmninaat Christian 
Democrats as* bulwark aganmoemnaansm. * 

The Christum Democrats, along with them 
Seda&t afiiesibaye, howevear, beeaai the «n- 
tef U ahaost two yaa.fi lrickback investiga- 
tions that have revealed an mstinxtionafized. 
system Of bribes pmd to p^tfcaans and their 
parties in retoni for contracts and favors. 

Thetab^ tiie Christian Pcnmouts has left 
rite Vaticao to ponder how It should adviM’ 


Mari* or April, ai whk* rinmy tainted le&da- 
tms are ocpaaed to be thrown from office. 

spec^part^ns Ictefoltriwn 
roIeofPriBafoafIta^9“tBedw ^ *recajrai 
Ibe former Camiigmgts rod the federaEst 
NOTti^League,wMeuipngltHliaiiswfavOT 

those few QffSfiun Democrats who have es- 





1 poSoe said tbe man, 32, apparently tod had 


bank. Water-borne ailments, including hepatitis, have been a. 
constant problem. 

But the MUjacka will be the source of the new $2J> nriHion 
treatment system. If the water proves to be safe in quality tests, 
tbe dry water authorities said they would allow tbe valves to 
open, sending water into Sarajevo pipes. 

Because of fears of sabota^. the water project has been 
shrouded in secrecy since the five hnge modules containing 
pumps and purification machinery were ready for delivery 
from Houston over the summer. 

“We've been sheDed and fired on at one of the sites,* 1 Mr. 
Gmy said, speaking inside a toned where three at the modules 
have been set up. “One policeman was killed nearby.” 

“The modules had to be specially designed to fit into a C- 

See WATER, Page 4 


Kiosk 

Bosnia and Croatia 
Back New Trace 

BONN (AFP) — President Franjo Tudj- 
man of Croatia and President Alga Izetbego- 
vic of Bosnia agreed hoe Monday on a cease- 
fire in central Bosma-Herzgpvina, spokesmen 
for their delegations said. 

Under the verbal agreement, their two 
commanders in the fiekt General Rasim De- 
bc for tbe mainly Muslim Bosnian govern- 
ment fames and General Ante Rosso, a Bos- 
nian Croat, were to meet immediately with 
the commander of the United Nations forces 
in Bosnia, Lieutenant General Francis Bri- 
quexnont, to establish the cease-fire on the 
ground, a Bosnian source said. 

The two tides also agreed to meet on 
Wednesday to discuss the status of the dis- 
puted chy of Mostar before they end their 
two days of talks. 

Earlier article. Page 4 

Books Page A 

Chess Paged. 

Crossword Page 

Weaker Page 1& 



Was Eaa-jWIbt Aasaocd tau 


By Douglas Jehl 

Art font Tima Sen-tee 

BRUSSELS — As leaders of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization opened their sum- 
mit meeting here, their failure :o find common 
ground about bow to stop the fighting in Bos- 
nia- Herzegovina intruded quickly upon an 
agenda the United States had hoped would 
focus 00 tbe future. 

In what they intended as the centerpiece of 
their meeting, the NATO leaders on Monday 
also issued a formal invitation to their onetime 
Warsaw Pact adversaries 10 join in a Partner- 
ship for Peace, an arrange mem intended to 
forge closer military ties between Western and 
Eastern Europe. 

But with France and some other allies press- 
ing NATO to assume a more active peacekeep- 
ing role, the most forceful words of the gatber- 

Czech Republic backs U-S.-led Partnership 

for Pfeace pbn with NATO. *On Bosnia, 

France secures a diplomatic victory- Page 5. 

ing came as President Bill Clinton warned the 
other leaders that the alliance risks losing its 
credibility if cannot make good on its threats. 

Under that pressure, tbe 16 leaders reached a 
tentative agreement Monday to issue a formal 
communique reiterating their months-old 
warning to launch air strikes against Serbia if 
its forces persisted in their siege of the Sarajevo, 
tbe Bosnian capital But Mr. Qinton, who has 
found roles reversed since Paris helped to block 
such Western intervention this summer, re- 
sponded to a French appeal for a new hard line 
in terms that bordered on pique. 

“If we are going to reassert this warning it 
cannot be seen as mere rhetoric." the president 
told iu's colleagues in a closed-door session 
Monday morning as the summit meeting began. 
Speaking immediately after President Franqois 
Mitterrand of France, Mr. CHnton said: “Those 
who attack Sarajevo must understand that we 
are serious." 

There was no tign of any decision that could 
lead to imm ediate military action by NATO 
against Serbian forces, and British officials said 
that United Nations ground commanders had 
not requested such support But with Sarajevo 
staggering under heavy Serbian shellings and 
the allies still divided over a suitable Western 
response, the NATO leaders were to discuss the 
issue at length Monday night during a private 
dinner at a Belgian government chateau. 

At a series of news conferences Monday 
evening, President Clinton and his advisers 
tried to shift attention from NATO's disagree- 
ments over Bosnia 10 its formation of the Part- 
nership for Peace — a step that Secretary of 
Slate Warren M. Christopher said meant that 
the alliance “almost instantaneously became 
relevant in the post-Crfd War era." 

Thai arrangement falls well short of tbe full 
membership and security guarantees that Po- 
land and other East European countries had 
sought But Mr. Qinton and the other leaders, 
who had opposed immediate expansion of the 
alliance on grounds that it would contribute to 
uneasiness in Russia, were adamant in defend- 
ing tbe initiative. Partnership for Peace offers 
military cooperation and the ultimate possibili- 
ty of NATO membership to all of the fonner 
Soviet bloc and all four of Europe's neutral 
countries. 

Manfred Women NATO’s secretary-general, 
said Monday morning: “Our message to the 
new democracies of Centra] and Eastern Eu- 
rope has been equally consistent: We shall not 
leave you alone. We care about your security, 
which is of direct and materia] concern to us.” 

On Bosnia. Western officials said Monday 
night that the language agreed to by the leaders 
for a communique to be issued on Tuesday 
would state: “We reaffirm our readiness to 
cany out air strikes if necessary to prevent the 
strangulation of Sarajevo, the safe areas and 
other threatened areas in Bosnia and Herzego- 
vina." 

That threat is virtually identical to the one 
issued by tbe alliance on Aug. 9. But in the 
months since then, it has led to neither military 
action by the alliance nor a cessation erf Serbian 
sb effing and other aitacks against the Bosnian 
capital and other targets. 

Any decision to go ahead with air strikes 
would require tbe approval of the North Atlan- 
tic Council and then the United Nations Securi- 
ty Council. American officials described 
mounting sentiment among some of the allies. 
inrinrfing France and the Netherlands, in favor 
of immediate air strikes. 

But they noted that others, like Britain, 
whose troops are among the UN peacekeeping 
forces on the ground in the Balkans, continued 
10 bold deep reservations about any action that 
oould put them in danger. 

At a news conference Monday evening. Mr. 
Clinton would not say what position he intend- 
ed to adopt in the later discussion on Bosnia. 
But other administration officials have ex- 
pressed wariness about military action, in part 
by suggesting that the fact that tbe Bosnian 
government had begun a major military opera- 
tion a gains t Croatia should make the United 
States more cautious about coining to its aid. 


Why $500 Million Mars Probe May Have Fizzled at the Finish 


- : _ V. • K . By K2tliy"Saw>«r 


WASH^KjTON — Seven months before the launching 
rN ASIA** Max Observer, mananrs made achanse in fee 



fligh t plan tint might lave caused tbe 350Onn2KHi^«ce- 
: craft royamsh-Arig. 21 on teaching the red pUpe^ according 
to sources Familiar with theprogrem. - ;- - • 
fostetd of msuemg the craft's propeflant tanks five 
days afttf the Washing, as origuutBy planned, managers al. 
the National A«xmrotics and Space Adtoimscouion decid- 
ed -to delay -the procedure for .11 ritambs. — imtfl she 
Observer reached Mare. They did so, irrakafly, to avert a 


Batthe v*b*s Kadnot^ been designed to operate under the 
hlfised condition^ the sources said, and- the result was, 
pfobabfy sa ewb wtase leal^ that-caused a atastn^rie- 


rqptore in a fuel line and spud the craft out of control. 

- The change in. plan- dia not come up during a press 
briefing last Wednesday at NASA headquarters, where an 
Todepcsdcm investigating panel reported its conclusions 
’ about what happened to the spacecraft and why. 

Sources familiar with the program, expressed surprise that 
•mmHn q pf thfo manag ement derigop was omitted from the 
briefing and from the report’s executive summary and 

overview that were released to tho press. ■ 

The change is described, however, deep inside the report’s 
. ffinr-v ntnrnr which is eight indteS (20 Centi- 

meters) thick. It was not released to the press but was 
available f or review at NASA headquarten. 

T imothy Crtitmy rhftTrmnn nf the investigating board. VftS 
traveling and not available lor comment, his office said. 

1 Others on the panel arid they were not sure why tbe 


management decision to delay pressurizing the tanks was 
not mentioned. 

The disappearance of the Observer is one of several 
embarrassments for NASA in recent years. In 1989, it 
launche d the Hubble Space Telescope with what was later 
found to bea faulty nrinor; corrective optics were installed 
in a spectacular spacewalk mission last month. And about 
the same time that the Obseror disappeared, the antenna on 
the Gableo probe to Jupiter malfunctioned. NASA also has 
been plagued by cost overruns on its space station project. 

The decis ion to chary the pressurization plan for the 
Mars probe was made in February 1992 because someone 
reminded the team that a similar propulsion system used on 
the Viking missi ons to Mars in the late 1970s bad ran into 
takage problems ^ when the fod tanks were pressurized early 
in the flights. Glenn E Cmmmghtnn, Mara Observer project 


manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, 
confirmed last week. 

As to why this concern developed so late in the program 
— after it was too late to make what would have been a 
simple mechanical fix and still meet the launch dale — Mr. 
Cunningham said, “Thai’s the $64 question" 

The derision to delay pressurization was not questioned 
by anyone at the contractor firm, the Jet Propulsion Labora- 
tory or NASA headquarters. “With benefit of 20-20 hind- 
sight," Mr. Cunningham said, “it appears that probably all 
of us did not do as much analysis on this new condition as 
probably should have been done.” 

Controllers lost contact with tbe Observer late on Aug. 2 1 
tritile trying to perform the procedure they had decided to 
delay: pressurizing the propdlaot tanks. Tbe tanks have to 

See NASA, Page 4 











m 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY II, 1994 


:v‘‘ 



Into Lawlessness 


International Aid Efforts 


WORL D BRIEFS * 

Israd Says Gara and Jericho Pullout j 

MiditNotBeReadybyAprilTaiget 


Are Called Into Question 


J Mi 
\ m 




Deputies of the new Russian paiBaneut which opera Tuesday, checking attach* cases with which they were presented Monday. 


By Donatella Lorch 

Nmf York Times Sente e 
NAIROBI — Less than three 
months before the American troop 
withdrawal from So malia Is sched- 
uled to be completed, ever-growing 
banditry, attacks on relief workers 
and the rearming of dan-based fac- 
tions are putting into question the 
future role of the United Nations 
and relief agencies, American and 
UN officials say. 

A senior UN official said last 
week that the organization planned 
to reduce its troop strength from 
28,000 to about 15,000 after the 
US. pullout, which is to be com- 
plete by March 31. By that time, all 
the other Western contingents as 
wrii as the large Turkish force will 
have withdrawn, leaving the Paki- 
stani and Indian contingents as the 
main guarantors of security for UN 
and rriicf-agency operations. 

UN officials have expressed 


Russia Breaks Off Talks "With Latvia on Troops 


<jpmcf Frdfke-Prvse 

MOSC OW — Russia broke off negotia- 
tions on the withdrawal of its troops from 
Ijaivia following the arrest of two Russian 
generals in the Baltic republic, the Baltic 
News Service reported. 

Generals Nikolai Tailakov and Anatoli 


Vodopianov were arrested after an argument 
with the mayor of a town near Riga over the 
future of a nearby Russian military bare. 

The two officers are expected to be ex- 
pelled from Latvia, the agency said, but a 


Russian defense ministry spokesman said 
they were still in Riga. 

Russia’s Itar-Tass news agency reported 
earlier Monday that the talks were expected 
to be given a boost by this week's meeting in 
Moscow between Presidents Boris N. Yeltsin* 
and KB Clinton. 

Moscow and Riga have agreed that the 
20,000 Russian troops stationed on Latvian 
soil must pull out by Aug- 31. but discussions 
have stalled on the fate of the Skrunde radar 
station. 


Russia wants the facility, a key dement in 
its anti-air defense system, to be retained for 
six years after the pullouL Latvia originally 
demanded that it be dismantled at the same 
time as the troop withdrawal, bat Itar-Tass 
said Riga had drawn up a compromise pro- 
posal, of which it had released no details. 

Apart from Latvia. Russia stiB has 3,750 
troops in Estonia. It pulled all its forces out of 
Lithuania last year following the indepen- 
dence of the three Baltic states from the 
former Soviet Union. 


Weather Shifts, Slowing Australia Fires 


Conpt/ed by f Staff From Dispatches 

SYDNEY — Lower tempera- 
tures and lighter winds finally gave 
10,000 fire fighters a chance Man- 
day to go on the offensive against 
136 forest fires blazing across 
southeast Australia. 

The fires had been so fierce for 
several days that fire fighters had 
no chance of putting them out and 
could only try 1 to save lives and 
property. With better weather con- 
ditions on Monday, many of the 
fires were contained or skrsved. 

As more than 1 00 fires continued 
to burn in the state erf New South 
Wales, fire crews undertook wide- 
spread tactical bunring operations 
to deprive the fires of fuel before 
the weather turned. 

“Ncrw we are fighting back,” a 
fire services spokesman said. 

For fhe firs* time since Friday, 


“We've been waiting for this op- temperatures and gusty winds 
poitnnity for days," said a spokes- cou ^ return by the end of the 
woman' for the Department of . , 


Bushfire Services, Laurie Power. 
“But it’s not over yeL" 

Meteorologists warned that high 


Insurance companies estimated 


the damnm- to homes at S68 mD- with arson. If convicted they could rwati government ended in a stale- 

l ■ . _ _ l if<i/ ._?«■!* I « I Wa imnrie/wuul f<%r mnvf . _ 1 ll'.l. - J 


lion, plus S34 million lost in infra- 
structure and forests. 


be imprisoned for 25 years. 


Sydrey was not blanketed in thick, 
haze. But authorities stopped short 
of declaring victory. 

' Every thine is under control but 
the fires arr not out,” said Phil 
Rape* berg, director af the New 


South Wales Department of Brush- 
fire Services. “The difference could 


fire Services. “The difference could 
depend on a quick change of tem- 
perature and wind.” 

F'.»‘r pcnpV have died in the 
lirer, a K oui 1.5 million acres 
hectares) of forest and 
grassland ha'*? been scorched, and 
at least IS5 Ht*mcs and 30 other 
buildings des 1 roved. 

Thousands of people have been 
treated for smoke inhalation and 
burns, and hundreds have been 
bospilali/ed 

Ligh< rain Fell on Monday, but it 
wasn't enough to put out the 
flames Fire fighters also cut fire- 
breaks ard used he! i copiers to drop 
water on the fires. 




A woman contorting her daughter Monday as they viewed the remains of a primary school that burned on the outskirts of Sydney. 


r Visiting ^ 
New York City? 


^ POPE: Wading Into the Muddle , Pontiff Makes a Plea for the Old Order 


Gramercy 
Park Hotel 

l'«»!rE*ikh‘rd 509 room hotel 
~flr-,..tjne Gra mercy Park. 
Excellent Restaurant, 

( ■. Irini! Lounge, Piano Bar 
and P.rKTfn Service. 

Multi lingual staff. Minutes do 
B usiness Cover, Sightseeing. 
Barque (/Meeting facilities. 


Continued from Page 1 

caped the corruption inquiries. 

“The presence of lay Christians 
in social and political life was im- 


portant not only to oppose various 
forms >rf totalitarianism, beginning 


Singles $125-135 
Doubles $130-140 
Suites $160 & up 
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Member of Utril lnremadooai 


forms *»f totalitarianism, beginning 
with communism.” the Pope said in 
a reference to the Christian Demo- 
crats. 

He also took issue with the way 
Italy's agenda over the last two 
years has largely been set by inves- 
tigating magistrates in Milan who 
have called the one-time elite to 
task for what now seems to have 
been a runaway system of under- 
hand dealings whose billion-dollar 
scale has stunned all but the most 
cynical. 

“It is clear that the decision af- 
fecting the future of a well-ordered 
society cannot be placed solely in 
the bands of the judicial authori- 
ties.” the pontiff said. 

In urging Italians to make wbat 


he called “an honest and true as- 
sessment” of the postwar era. when 
Italy propelled itself into run- te- 
nches growth, the Pope seemed to 
be making a passionate appeal for 
Italians not to be swayed by those 
now denouncing the old order. 


the spiritual legjtimator of a cor- 
rupt order. 


“One cannot "forget all those sig- 
nificant achievements that have 
made Italy one >rf the world's seven 
most developed conn tries.” he said. 

In essence, the Pope's message 
seemed to reflect some alarm in the 
Vatican, and its liming and content 
immediately drew criticism that he 
was meddling — charges the Vati- 
can denied. 


"The Pope is a citizen or another 
state and should not concern him- 
self with Italian politics," said a 
spokesman for the Northern 
League, which has wide support in 
the wealthy north of the country 
and has frequently locked horns 
with the Catholic Church, calling it 


On Wednesday. Parliament is 
scheduled to debate a vote of no- 
confidence in the government of 
Prime Minister Carlo Azeglio 
Ciampi. Thereafter, according to 
Italian political commentators. 
President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro may 
dissolve the legislature to make way 
for new elections in late March or 
early ApriL 

The prospect has galvanized Ita- 
ly's ever-fractious politicians. 

Umberto Bossi. the head of the 
Northern League, said at the week- 
end that it might be necessary to 
“cut a deaT with other rightist 


northerners pressing for greater fis- 
cal autonomy. 

Mr. Berlusconi one of the few 
Italian tycoons to have avoided 
known implication in the corrup- 
tion inquiry, is putting him se lf for- 
ward as a standard-bearer of a new 
right. “Everything is now moving 
in (he direction of a posable alter- 
native" to the former Communists, 
he said. 

Underlying the maneuvering is 
another investigative time bomb. 
Former members of Italy’s secret 
services have accused several for- 
mer interior ministers and politi- 
cians, including Mr. Scalfaro him- 
self, of either participating in or 


groups to oppose the former Com- 
munists and soften its stand on 


coveri ng up clandestine payments 
from intelligmce agencies to gov- 
eminent ministers- 
A further twist to the ncnxmfi- 
dence vote is that parliament is stfll 
largely made up of politicians from 
parties heavily implicated in the 
bribery scandal. 


federalism to do so. 


“We can’t dig in our beds on 
federalism,” Mr. Bossi said in a 
major departure from the line (hat 
has made tern the champion of 



American officials are concerned 
that a sharp decrease in UN mili- 
tary power will only open the way 
to greater violence. 

“There are distressing signs of a 
deterioration in security through- 
out southern Somalia," a senior 
UN official in Mogadishu warned. 
“Any indication of an early UN 
withdrawal will almost certainly 
trigger a feeding frenzy as looters 
seek to grab UN and relief agency 
resources before they’re gone.” 

Rival Somali factions nave been 
jockeying, both militarily and po- 
litically, for the upper hand in ne- 
gotiations intended to produce a 
transitional national council that 


fiance and a rivalgroup of 12 other 
factions were unable to agree on an 
agenda for political nsconstruction. 

Although the Aidjki faction and 
its opponents are maintaining 
some form of contact at senior lev- 
els, they are rapidly rearming, 
American officials say. These offi- 
tials are particplsdy worried about 
die repeated visits to Sudan .by 
General AufkTs chief ally, Colonel - 
Omar Jess. Hie fundamentalist Is- 
lamic government in Sudan 
been accused by Western diplo- 
mats of supplying General Aidid 
with weapons. ■ . . 

The United Nations announced 
Thursday that it planned to decen- 
tralize its Somali operations, by- 
passing the capital as much as pos- 
sible. 

Since (he American-led interna- 
tional intervention began just over 
a year ago, Mogadishu, with its 
port and airport, has been die cen- 
tff Of the muitaiy and rdief opera- 
tion. Bui the United Nations has 
been trying to shift its efforts to- . 
ward resioas that are relative^ se- 
cure and stahle. In Mogadishu, UN 
and relief vehicles are regularly 
shot at and hijacked. 

In the last month, however, at- 


reamwnfld in d» Egypto *"* 

brought onby ^ 

SKStodW 0. *d J3 ; 




-.Peres, in 


make the withdraw* Wore the sannM.BW herwrf tha 

on tim P^estiman portions in (he negotiations as wwl 


-if 4P* 




LONDON CReuters) — The Interiatitaml Maritime B ureau said 
MorrfgMto .JPgo f 

to* 

M p WiM hff PbiS p pmes, Taiwan and Vietnam. - ^ 

The Chinese say they are ttyingto stop jjr ■ 

actually interfering with the legal Tights icf shims on ^-mghsoas. Ml- 
EBeri said. IfcMMrafonned roenjcrentifymg themselves as Chmese had 


77 \t>u : 





Walesa Won’t Keep Zhirinovsky Out 

" _ . , . f nr.l 0.1 A ITmut 




WARSAW (AFP) — President 1 ^ Wal^rrf Mmd swdj fenda* 
that he would not stop the Russian nltranatianahst leader,, vtadnmry. 


wouldmeetbum 


S^d&otEi- Vietnam Agrees to U.S. Rights Parley 

mili tias are testing . ®A<mrrrmN rRmtenil Vietnam has axreed to a -begin i 


wmg mi f fpfi could be selected by the end of 

January, becoming the first Somali 
government since the civil war be- 
Pblice suspect more than half the gan in 1991. 
blazes were set by arsonists. But the Somali factions remain 

_ , . . . . deeply divided. In November, a 

Two people have been charged conference sponsored by the Ethio- 


mate as General Mohammed 


IAP, Reuters ) Farah AidhTs Somali National Al- 


Uniled Nations have grown, even 
in the once-staUe towns of Baidoa 
and Bardera. It is unclear whether 
these attacks are random banditry 
or in some cases dan-based or 
backed by a growing Islamic fun- 
damentalist movement, American 
officials in Mogadishu ay. 

In the southern port dty of Kis- 
mayu, the dan mmtias are testing 
the resolve of the Indian forces by 
wandering armed around the town 
at night There is inte rdan fighting 
around the town of Brava, south- 
west of tbe capital 

Rdief nffidals say they are in- 
creasingly threatened in their work. 
To <Kqniss a Somali employee, or 
even to argue over a rent increase 
or the price of fuel is to invite a 
death threat, relief officials say. 


had been' 


who is also the founder erf the National Sdf-Ddense Front, a small 

that Poland wars *ttee country” and that hehad no 
intention of preventing visits of this kbuL Bathe said any costs —for 
fnrnmpl#} , extrapohee to prevent public disturbances —would have to be 
bonne by the person who mvitednir. Zhirinovsky, iwi by ti» taxpayer! 


. ■<!. it . 

.nfc* .c 
- rirfrf. 


.. -lut. 

m 


*• 


WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Vietaam has agreed to a^begtn a 
/tiwl ngn e with the United States tins month over auwatioos of hmnan- 
rights abuses in the Communist country, VS. and Vtanamesc official^ 
said Monday. ' 

In the 1 ai g n of a thaw, the two countries, which do not nave 
diploma tic relations, have agreed to meet in New York for the dialogue, 
the officials said. ■ . „ 

U.S. concerns over humah drills in Vietnam have been overaiadowed 
by Watitington’s pudi for thelufiest pbsrible ac qou nti ng for the 2^9 
U^. servicemen still tistad as missing m SoutheasLAaa. ' 




} atom* 


South African Pulice Raid Hostel 


-l ‘ i 
-.-•v ii' 


Aid Worker 


Is Seized in 


Mogadishu 


JOHANNESBURG (AF) — Tdioedh Monday raided a worker hostd 
in ip»amihfrf tty.gpTmien v4io1rin^»joiirnaKrtiXiveringahigh4evdANC 
tour, but Nelson Mandela demanded tmoadier measures from President 
F.W. de Klerk to quell township violence. One man was arrested. 

Abdnl Sheriff, 31, a South African fieeJanee photographer on assign* 
meat for TTie Associated Prtss, was tiiot and ^ItiDed Sunday m Kattehong, 
one of South' Afmafs most victeot townti a ps. Two other journalists were 
wounded in a battle, that b«xan after shots were fired from a workers' 
hostel and police tint andnued a.township rerident . . 




Compiled hr Our Staff Fnm Dbpatcka 

MOGADISHU, Somalia 
United Nations troops began .a 
search tar a British aid worker kid- 
napped by gunmen in Mogadishu 
on Monday, in the latest attack on 
relief organizations. , 

Gal um Gardner, finance officer 
far the United Nations World 
Food Program, was seized in nrid- 
morning by three men who stopped 
him at gunpoint, bundled him into 
a car and drove him away. 

Mr. Gardner, who is in his mid- 
30s, has been a refief worker in 
Somalia since October 1992. Me 
joined the UN agency in Novan- 


i3tM«MJ“WUKd.lU VJIJU i»aiiw|ipinn uiViUUMUli SiWW Wni 

and Joe Skwo, toe Canmunist Party leader, who had led a peace 
delegation mto Katkhonft wtre qmckly moved to safety after the 
shooting broke out' They later epatinned their tour. The hostel was 
beticwM tolwmre more people. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


***** 


MARSEILLE (AFP) —Hundreds of fire fighters and soldiers strug- 
gled Monday to phig a breached dflee in the Rhone River DeUa near here 
as flood waters poured onto we fields in die Gamar™ n*ioa 
Meanwhile, toe death toll in fhe floods sihoe Deconber rose mi 
Monday to 9 after the body of a 10-year-<o!d boy was found. Hehad been 
swept out of his mothers car on Friday by the watcnMrf the Nesque river 
near Venasque, in the VaudaredqiartmenL 
' In western France, the levels of tire Gbuente and Bon tonne rivers 
dropped sGghtly. bdt the town of Saintre remained flooded. 


Meanwhile, the Somali National 
Alliance of General Mohammed 
Farah Aidid complained Monday 
that U.S. troops had committed 
“deliberate kill mgs,” and said the 
alliance was trying to set up a meet- 
ing to discuss the incidents. 

“All these days they have been 
killing the Somalis,” said Issa Mo- 
hammed Si ad, who handles foreign 
relations for the alliance. “Within 






four days, they have killed three 
and injured five. What do they 
want — to start a new war in Moga- 
dishu?" 

The latest incident concerned the 
death Sunday of an eight-month 
pregnant tea peddler on the Afgoi 
road, one of the capital's busiest 

Toe US. Army spokesman. Col- 
onel Steve Rausch, said American 
troops on the roof of a bunding 
held by Pakistani forces erf the UN 
Operation in Somalia fired twice 
on a Somali manning a machine 
gm at the back erf a pickup truck. 
The dead woman supposedly had 
been an occupant of the track. Col- 
onel Rausch said the UN rules of 
engagement in Somalia p ermit ted 
shooting on tight at “crew-served 


British Airways is to begin daily nonstop service between London’s 
GaJtwick Airport and Charlotte, North Carolina, on Jan. 20. (Reuters) 
Unfed Abbes aad Laftiuasa German Abfties announced Monday 
that be ginning tins m onth, members of each airline’s mileage programs 
can accrne credit an anyffight operated by the two airlines anywhere in 
the world. ■ (AFX) 

A new rfr service between ToodanV Chy Ahpart and Dublin was - 
started Monday by the Yirgm gronp and the Irish carrier GlyJel in a 
move to cot travel time between die two cities. ; ' . . (Reuters) 

Aftafia Ab&ies pBots cafled a ooe-day strike for Tuesday to protest A 
pay freere and outbacks due to restructnrmg. Die idots said most flights: 

wwild be canceled. (Reuters) 


- ■. ^ i;-m 


Hong Kong Shaves Cbst 


^Politic* 

-■ ... 


The gunner in the pickup truck 
was hit, and the truck turned bade. 
Then an ambulance arrived at the 
building with the body of a woman, 
a 3fryear-old mother of six. 

“The Pakistanis reported that 
toe vehicle contained the body of a 
woman who had been killed in toe 
exchange,” Colonel Ransch said. 

'(Reuters, AFP) 


.Reuters, ■ ■ ... - 1; 

HONG KONG —Hraig Koogshaved the cost of the coioafs . - ; 

trage new airport prefect on M<md«y bnt wamed China^toat tbe ■* 

fmee could chmb agam tmless a kmg-nnming deadlock on fnndina - - " 

plans can be broken soon. - j : J ' - - 

•- The governmeatis caopected to seek approval fmm fa* r lydgri w. . -js ’ ' : -- 

GnmcO to push on with the prqject despite Benina's oppfficm. ' !"■ ^ _ 

A wvemmeot ^mkemnan raid the total cost of the new airport. ^ c. , * 

^udingbonowM costs, had been cat by 5 5 bflfion HbngKong ) * ^ 
dollars (J712 milfion) to I5K2 billion doflais. The sayings were - L i 
rntamy due to wort on bridges, roads and-Jand redamatiemamnna At. 
m under cost, be said. v 

“The bad_ news is the longer we take to readi .aareement, the ; 

^eater the r^o frosts going up,” said the^okesman, referring to - - 

the dilute with China over the arport. ' 


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- ByPeter Applebome 

htt „ Service 

. Mississippi — Anyone who doubts tlreastaa- 

*™"g economic egenof toe heading d»b toward Wi- 
ned gambling in ibe Unhed StetesshoaM am* tottb 
bodg^odge of naoss-drraed &re oaks and white-, 
canned mansions, ragged beam and chrapbamthathas . 

cnsinos over th^last two..yeai&- 
But if the Mississippi Gulf .Coast from BOojd to Bay St' 
Louis is a revealing window onto the economic power at 
j^lizfid gambling, ytoichha* tripled in a decade to a $30 
Dunon uusmess nationwide, its experience is also raising 
two questions with equally nationwide in qijfofion jc hew 
prany communities can expcct to i^akr. marie* on zam- 
hling— and at what cost? • ... .. — 

To proponents oTgambTing. the boom aloog this 3$-" 
mue (55-kikimeter) stretch of Gulf Coast, once defined by 
modest tourist attractions Eke pasle^calnrert i m»nmr 
S °°P S ’ garish imm a tur e golf courses and mom-and-pop 
seafood joratv>? proof of what a powerful ec nnnmr. 
engine gambling has become. ; 

“Right now, wejfeellikewe'rai, 
in the United States for growth," said 


Fling With Casinos, Big Risk Is Gaming 9 s Ultimate Social Cost 


prie adept of . People’s Bank in Biloxi, “and when was the 
last tune you heard Mississippi being No- 1 in anything?*’ 
/ . At - outpoint recently in Buoxi, 28 construction cranes 
towered over the Gulf shorn. Bui with plans to triple the 
number of gaming estab&hmerits here and to build the 
tvarfefiL&iggest casino and nine riyerboat casinos 60 miles 
down the coast in New Orleans, and similar proposals 
spixxmngfran neighboring Mobile, Alabama, all the way 
northi© Oricago, many economists are asking how many 
aim can realistically expect to cash in on gamb ling as 
many as/90 riverboat and dockside casinos could be 
. operating mound the country within two years. 

' " there’s probably not a major dty in the United States 
thafsnot cmsdcrfcggambh^,” said Tun Ryan, dean of 
the college of business administration at die University of 
•New Orleans, “it’s an incredible explosion .of gambling. 
This market is going to be saturated. It may already be 
saturated.” 1 

And If ihe Gulf Coast shows the economic potential of 
g arn b fatg to produce jobs and tax revenue, it also shows 
the risks, bout in businesses displaced and lives ruined. 
Already, social sendee agencies and courts axe w ing 
mtmnages destztnedcorTeadeaats sinking into debt because 
o£ problem gambSng. 


“It’s my observation that there’s a tot of wreckage 
coming-out of this gambling business here." said Judge 
William L, Siewan of Chancery Coun in nearby Gulfport, 
who said he has already seen at least 20 divorces and 
numerous failures to pay child support as a result of 
gambling losses. 

When a casino boat called the Europa Star began trips 
into ihe Gulf a few years back to offer d ocksi de gambling, 
it strode more than "a few people as a rather forlorn effort 
to be a poor man’s Las Vegas. No one is lau ghing now. 

In Harrison County, home of Biloxi and seven of the 
eight casinos, the value of building permits for the first 
eight months of 1993 surged by 825 percent over the same 
period in 1992, growing from SI 1 million to S 102 million. 
Unemplovraent fell from 7.1 percent in 1 992 to 4.2 percent 
in 1993. ' 

The gaming establishments in Biloxi, all dockside casi- 
nos in elaborate buildings, have already created more than 
11,000 jobs. The 13 casinos operating in November in 
Mississippi produced 580 million in revenues. Tberc are 
now 17 casinos open, producing a tax bonanza for the 
stale and local governments. 

In neighboring Hancock County, one project. Casino 
Magic in Bay Sl Louis, bills itself as the hugest dockside 


casinodevetopajer:t ia the world. Owners say the 530-acre 
»215-beelarerproject will eventually include a 1.500-room 
hotel, 5.000- seat auditorium, convention center, a park for 
house trailers and a golf cource. The casino itself features 
68 gambling tables for games like blackjack, roulette, and 
poker and more than 1.100 slot machines, 

Despite success that has exceeded all expectations here, 
residents may be more uneasy about gambling now than 
when it began. 

The shrimping business, once the dominant industry on 
the coast, is being forced out by casinos taking over* the 
docks, leaving no room for shrimp boats and closing 
shrimp-processing plants and ice plants. And despite the 
influx of visitors, some other tourism-related businesses 
say the casinos have sipboned off their business. 

Louis Skrmena’s Ship Island Excursions is a 66-year- 
old family-owned business that hauls tourists to an off- 
shore barrier island. After years of steady growth, buaness 
fdJ 10 percent last year, Mr. Sknnetu said. 

“Now that the casinos are here." he said. “1 think a lot 
of people would like to vote them out.” 

.And, if gambling is an affordable recreation for most 
customers, with slot machines as cheap as S cents, gam- 
bling problems are soaring here. The number of Gamblers 


Anonymous Chapters has grown from none to five, and 
counselors at Recovery Resources, a private center that 
hdps compulsive gamblers, say they are seeing an increas- 
ing number of middle-income people who have piled up 
debts in the S25.M0-lo-S35.000 range, taken second mon- 
gages on homes and emptied savings or retirement ae- 
eounts. 

Qne 31 -year-old waitress and mother of two said she 
has been a casual bingo player before (he gaming halls 
arrived, but with big-time casinos so convenient had 
found hersdf gambling her whole paycheck and savings 
before she sought help. 

“It got to the point I was going almost every day." she 
said. “Ii’s like those machines hypnotize you. I used to 
dream about them at night, ching, ching, ching, the sound 
of the slots.” 

Still, few doubt the overall economic impact thus far has 
been positive. 

Dianne Harenski, a member of the Biloxi City Council, 
said the dty bad expected a half million dollars a month in 
revenues from its casino (ax The figure for the most recent 
month was S1.2 million. Thai has allowed the dty to buy 
seven police cars and two Tire trucks, and plan major 
capital projects that had been needed for years. 


APOLITICAL VO TPS A 


Wklf Inquiry i»Urgedln Bunn Exprfamtrtg 

WASHINGTON — The CEnton admiBistratMHi is being pressed 
to delve deeper into the record of U.S. government research 
human subjects, perhaps~opeajng a comprehensive review of the 
nation’s research ethics during the past half century. • " " 

What began as a discussion of radiation r rititwi t<> 

midear weapons program; during the Gold War, and promoted by 
Energy Seamry Hazd R. OXeary as part of ah. ini dative ro reveal 
her agmcy’s'dtomic secrets, has-expartflad in mrhnfc . 


of subjects. 

The ad min istration has pr o mi sed a thorough search cf -records by 
the Enetgy Department, the Defense Department, the National 
Aeronautics and Space Arhnhristr ^m^ . t hf and h rf tlth 
agencies an researdi involving human subjects who.were exposed to 
radiation, often "without their knowledge. Many of the experiments 
were done for medical reasons, not in the name of national security. 

Although much , about the research has been known in acadennc 
and scientific aides fbrdecades, its troubling history is only now 
getting widespread public recognition, in part because the adminis- 
tration has pledged an investigation. Now. politicians and public 
interest groups are begnmmg'to soggiest (bat fulfy underatanding 
that research may call for an examinatkm that focuses not just on 
radiation, but cm broader ethical questions. 

Senator John Glenn. Democrat cf Ohto and diairnian of the 
Governmental Affairs Committee, said he. would schedule hearings 
into the testin g, and tie called for a full -i n ves tigatio n of aH l mm « n 
eroerimaits'iqi-tothepresentd^r.' ! 

“Let me malci* myseif dear that -I am (anting about 1 mure than 
radiation testing,” Mr. Gleam said “I am calling for a government- 
wide review of at testing programs, *<fef drag tests at the Food and 
Drag Admimstration to nwRtary tekm t!w Defense Department, to 
determine if any imp r o pe r experiments -on humans persist to this 
day." ; ; . • ’ ■ \ ; . ' - ' ,-fN37) 

CBnton JFlifflom (h>rDlr»cthri Hm Nwriwr 

WASHINGTON —The xdmimstimaxm’s plan to icqmre Mcdic- 
aid coverage at abcations incases of rape ormcestwas disdosed 
before anyone had toM Preadail Bill Canton of the order, and be 
was furionsm its immature disdosnre, according roadnmnsuation 
officials. ■ 

On Dec. 28, three days after dtfdonnf of the plan! theDgait- 
meat of Health and Homan Sarvieesxcnt Jettere to officials m aH 
stales saying then- Mati»idprQgraias nmn fiiancfr abonipnx Jca ■. 
Jow-mccmc -woiaat m cas«'ttf nroc OT incest; : h(fedicaid is die 
federaL-stamprogj^jlMlprPvkteWl^/^jfl^^ J 

*nme ma^zinereported tins week .that Mr. Cfizflon said-M was 
sbodted to learn cf ibe directive. It qooredl^..GSnumassaying in 
an interview: “Thcre.was no dedtion tymn.it never came to the : 


Clinton Nominee 
Retracts Name for 
Peacekeeping Post 


and then weHl see." .... 

Officials at the Department of Health mid Human Services said 
they had sent a draft « the directive tothe' White Hoosebeforeitwas . 
diadosed. Bm WhfteHboreof&aalserident^^iKKtatonoticeof: 

J • ■' - sW 

In iany event, Medicaid officials said had riothsodioa fn the 
matter. Under an appropriatibris WD ^^oyediry Caress and , 
agued by Mr, Qhuon m October, ihqy raid, federat rands axe 
available for aborttons in cases of rape or incest, and Mies must 
contribute to the cost df *e procedure hr such cases. 

- U ^. government he^th officials said the uccsutsnt was not angry 
about the oontenf of Mffiirective, bnt waxmstpesswiovrsrthcwayit 
had been (fisdosed. •. 4 * 

The secretary of health and human services, Donna -E. Smlala, 
said: “I was as aimy aathe preridem.^ We dlhate l6dcs. TheproUem 
was the'lealc" ' t - . »■ - ■ POg) 

QUOf/UlHpiOte ■ " : 

- President Ctinton as he told the NATO affies of bis pten* for a 
imTttery P&rtna 2 *zp for Venice with ionner Warsaw Pad: ustionf . 
“Let me say here to the people in Europe's East,^ we dure^ith toq a 
fnmwm destiny and we are committed to your success. Th e ^gpO - 

rrptir! o ommum tyhasgrown and nowitistime tob^nwdcognmg 

flKMiiew«»neratoom^ • 


By Eric Schmitt 

New York Tones Service 

WASHINGTON — Morton H. 
Halperin, President BQ1 Clinton’s 
amlMfried choice to fill a new Pen- 
tagon porititm to directpeacekeep- 
h^pohey, has withdrawn his name 
. for the job, according to adminis- 
tration officials. 

The nomination of Mr. Hal- 
perin, 55, a former director of the 
Washington office of the American 
CSril liberties Union, stirred a lev- 
el of passion unusual for a midlevd 
post, as conservatives attacked the 
liberal positions he had staked out 
through three decades. Mr. Hal- 
perin reversed his initial support of 
the Vietnam War, fought whh the 
Nixon administration during the 
Watergate scandals and criticized 
many U.S. spying operations 
_abroad. .. 

•-But his chances to be assistant 
secretary cf defense for democracy 
and peacekeeping fell victim not 
early to resistance on the Senate 
Aimed Services Committee in No- 
vember but also to the reshaping of 
the president’* much-criticized for- 
eign policy team. The nomination 
also promised to complicate die 
Senate confirmation hearings of 
Bobby Ray Inman. Mr. Clinton’s 
choice to succeed Defense Secre- 
tary Les Aspin, who is resigning. 

Mir. Halperin’s nomination for- 
mally e xpir e d in November, when 
Hhe S foatedid not. act on it' before 
amounting. At the time, the While 
Hbuae expressed confidence in his 
qualifications and said it would re- 
sobmit his nomination when Con- 
gress reconvened later tins mouth. 
Administration officials said they 
had anticipated a tough fight but 
believed they would prevail. 

Then in December, Mr: Aspin, 
Mr. Halperin’s patron and. biggest 
supporter in the administration, 
announced that be would resign 
effective Jan. 20. Mr. Asian bad 
hoped to use unconventional new 
posts Hke the peacekeeping one to 
reshape UJ>. international rela- 
tions m the pasr^CtiJd War worid. 

Mr. Aspdn’s designated succes- 
sor, Mr. Inman, has fnaised hfc 
Halperin but also raised doubts 
about whether the job he was to 


bold was necessary. It now appeals 
likely that the pest wiQ be dropped 
with Mr. Halperin’s bowing oul 
“M ori wanted to serve with Sec- 
reiaiy Aspin.” a senior Defense 
Department official said, “but with 
the other changes ra nting , he has 
derided to not move forward." 

Associates said Mr. Halperin. 
who has been working as a Penta- 
gon consultant pending his Senate 
hearings, had discussed his deri- 
sion with Frank G. Wisner. the 
undersecretary of defense for poli- 
cy, and with White House officials 
over the last several days. 

Administration officials said 
Sunday that they were still consid- 
ering another job for Mr. Halperin. 
but probably one that would not 
require Senate confirmation. One 
post that has been mentioned is 
that of head of the State Depart- 
ment’s policy-planning bureau. In 
the meantime, Mr. Halperin will 
continue acting as a Pentagon con- 
sultant, they said. 

Mr. Halpain's decision cleared a 
potentially troublesome bardie for 
Mr. Inman's confirmation hearing, 
which is scheduled for Jan. 25 or 
Jan. 26. Republicans on the Aimed 
Services Committee had told Pen- 
tagon aides that they would griD 
Mr. Inman about Mr. Halperin, 
possibly jeopardizing the defense 
nominee's chances for approval 
A dministr ation offiririshave ex- 
pressed concern that such a .strate- 
gy could undermine their plans to 
nave Mr. Inman quickly help im- 
prove relations berween the white 
House and die armed forces and to 
: a boost to the administration’s 
, national security team. 



Maw Keon/Acc&s Rucc-Ptcse 

Members of the press, which has been denied access to the fighting by the government, at an army roadblock near San CristibaL 

Salinas Aide From Embattled State Quits 


OnrpHed by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

MEXICO CITY — President 
Carlos Salinas de Gortari an- 
nounced on Monday the resigna- 
tion of his interior minister and 
named a special envoy to seek a 
settlement in the uprising in the 
southeastern state of Chiapas. 

Mr. Salinas, in a speech to the 
nation, said Patrodnio Goaztda 
Blanco Garrido, a former governor 
of Chiapas who has been cited in 
reports "of human rights abases, 
would be replaced as interior min- 
ister by Attorney General Jorge 
Carpizo. 

Foreign Minister Manuel Cama- 
cho Solis was appointed bead of a 
commission for peace and recoocil- 


ln Mr. Halperin’s first hearing ktion “ Chiapas. 


It was not immediately dear 
whether the government had de- 
manded the resignation of Mr. 
Goozidez, who had been in the post 
for a year. The government rardy 
comments publicly on the reasons 

for cabinet changes, and no official 

ready has and will in the future put explanation was given for Mr. 
American lives and interests in Gonzilcz’s decision to step down. 


before the Armed Sendees Com- 
mittee, on Nov.' 19, conservative 
senators said his published articles 
criticizing the use of US. troops 
abroadimdehime^eciallyunsnit- 
able for the new job. 

“Since we are; convinced be al- 


we have a constitutional 
moral obligation to oppose 
him," Senator Strom Thurmond of 
South Carolina, the panel’s ranking 
Republican, said at the hearing. 


Rebel descendants of Maya In- 
dians, calling themselves the Zapa- 
tista National Liberation Army, 
launched the New Year's Day up- 
rising, which the government says 


has claimed 100 lives in the impov- 
erished southern state. 

The estimated 2.000 peasants, 
called Zapatistas, say they are 
fighting to regain their ancestral 
homelands in Chiapas and have 
vowed to topple the government 

Shortly after taking over at least 
six Chiapas cities, they said would 
advance to Mexico City. 

While bombs went off in Mexico 
Gty, sporadic fighting was still tak- 
ing place in Chiapas, where the 
Mexican military has continued to 
bombard the peasants’ mountain 
hideouts. 

Television reports said para- 
troopers had been brought into San 
Cristdbal de las Casas to be 
dropped into remote combat zones. 

Leftist groups sympathizing with 
the Zapatistas exploded bombs 
over the weekend in Mexico City 
and Acapulco. 

A track loaded with explosives 
blew up outside a military com- 
pound in Naucalpan late Saturday, 
and three bombs went off below a 
nearby electrical tower, the police 
said. No one was injured in the 
modems. 

The attacks came after a power- 
ful car bomb rocked an under- 
ground parking garage in Mexico 
City before dawn Saturday, injur- 


ing one person and causing exten- 
sive damage. No one claimed re- 
sponsibility for the blast but the 
message “We’ve arrived” was 
scrawled on nearby walls. 


Samuel Ruiz, the bishop of toe 
embattled San Cristobal diocese, 
said he had agreed to rebel requests 
to take part in talks to end the 
uprising. (AFP, Reuters) 


In War on Drugs, the Rotary Connection 


Away From Polities 


• Lorens BobWtt went on trial for severing hcc^JWuTs p^s in an. 

assault her 2a«yees said was prompted by ah Trireastibre impulse 
after repeated beating and -nme'OT her h us b a n d.. Her lawyer said 
John Wayi» Bobfatfs penis had become a symbol of a. “reign of 
terror forced on toejgefitCi o« 

ismore valuable than a perns ” Mr. Boobfe 
an ex-Marine, was found not guilty in November of raping his wue. 

• A nU earthquake sfawt parts of Ix» Ai«fe settmg offpar 
alarms, raafinggbusmand stalling rtmdenratoransmg no seoous 

. 1 1 An- til* TJirVitrt 


damage- The qnrflw. reared . 3.7 tin; the Rkfctor 
centered off the coast; : -— 


was 



m iheuantaBiw mm T r :r . 

an oil spill that stained tbebeaches m ^ 

aSSSSce a batge hit a ;300yarfs 

SfSi££& I00,5of the 750,0# pllons rftfldisgorgedmlo 
the Atlantic had bemTeoomed. ' ; . 

Bakos.AP.UT: 


’■ By Douglas Martin 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK— At Eighth Ave- 
info'-and West 45fh Street are three 

pay telephones. A man looks at toe 
fast, shakes his head and goes to 
the second He rolls ins eyes and 
moves- to toe third. Finally, be 
shrugs, shoves in 25 cents and dials 
— methodically putting his index 
fmger in toe tittle hole over each 
number and turning the dial seven 


“I don’t Eke it," said the man, 
Jimmie Tomlin. *Tt takes too tong 
to dial and I've got places to go." 

: Three decades after buttons be- 
gan to replace rotary drals on 
American phones, time has re- 
versed itself at about 250 outdoor 
pay phones in New York City. Re- 
sponfing to appeals from commu- 


nity groups frying to sup drag 
dealers from using public phones to 
do business, the plume company, 
Nynex, has brought back old-fash- 
ioned dialing 

“The rotary dial is a step hack- 
ward technologically, but H pre- 
vents a drag dealer from paging a 
customer or runner," said Steven 
Marcos, a Nynex spokesman, who 
said toe change was made as “an 
absolute last resort,” since the 
phones cannot take . advantage of 
many new services. Eke voice mail, 
(hat rely on push-button phones. 

The return to rotary dialing is the 
most drastic measure m a cam- 
that began with improving 
moving phones away from 
problem areas, then disabling them 
so they cannot receive incoming 
calls. Now Nynex is taking rotary 


pay phones, which are no longer 
made in toe United States, out of 
storage. 

Astonishment seems the most 
prevalent response. “It wakes you 
up a hide," said Willie Campbell, a 
cab driver who pulled over to the 
Eighth Avenue phone to call his 
sister. “It’s an eye-opener.” 

Phone company officials ac- 
knowledge that callers can use a 
device called a tone dialer, winch is 
sold for about $15 at decutmics 
stores, to said tone signals over a 
phone with a rotary dial, but add 
that the devices do not appear to 
have caught on. 

Phone companies in other areas 
have also brought bade rotary pay 
phones on drug-infested comers, 
though not on a widespread basis. 

“We really do it as one of the last 


resorts as a response to community 
concerns,” said Beverly Levy, 
spokeswoman for Southern New 
England Telephone. 

Phillip Jones, a spokesman for 
Ameriiech, which serves Illinois, 
Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and 
Ohio, said “We have used it upon 
occasion, but not widely ” 



Emjironmenial Challenge to NAFTA Dies 


: • ■ The Assoaaed Press 

1 WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court on Monday let stand 
a ruling char showed toe North 
. Americas Free Trade Agreement 
to: win congressional approval 
without a formal statement cm its 
Hkdy environmental effects. 

. ihe ante justices, without com- 
ment, rejected arguments by two 
dozens’, groups that even though 
their challenge became moot whet 


the treaty was approved in Novem- 
betvthe issue remains alive because 
President Bill Ciinum plans to sub- 
mit a sew global trade agreement 
to Congress this year. 

In their 1991 lawsuit the Sierra 
Chib and Ralph Nader's PubBc 
Citizen said toe North American 
agreement would harm air quality 
in American rides along the Mexi- 
can border and jeopardize VS. 
laws on recycling, ante emissions 
and the transportation of hazard- 


ous materials. The groups sued un- 
der a federal law that allows court 
review of “final agency action.” 

A federal judge ruled for the 
groups in June, but toe U.SL Circuit 
Court of Appeals for the District of 
Columbia reversed that in Septem- 
ber. The president was toe central 
figure in the treaty, the appeals 
court said, adding that his actions 
are not “agency action” and thus 
cannot be reviewed under the fed- 
eral law. 


Great 

anti healthful 
for children too. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1994 


Shells Hit 
Sarajevo as 
Rivals Meet 
In Bonn 


SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovi- 
□a — Shells crashed into the center 
of Sarajevo on Monday, wounding 
12 people, while in Brussels, leaders 
Of the North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization reaffirmed their readiness 
to launch air strikes to break the 
Serbian stranglehold on the city. 

in Sarajevo, a wire-guided mis- 
sile fired from the direction of a 
Serb position hit a residential area 
near the city center, where in the 
last week 46 people have been 
lulled. 

In central Bosnia, Moslems and 
Croats continued to struggle for 
territory, as peace talks by their 
representatives in Bonn went Into a 
second day. 

Talks on ending Bosnia's dvQ 
war have oFlcu been accompanied 
by an increase in fighting, as war- 
ring sides Uy to gain greater lever- 
age at the negotiating table. 

At least 6 people were killed and 
more than 30 were wounded in 
fighting Sunday and Monday near 
VUez that began with a Moslem 
offensive on the Croat enclave they 
have surrounded. The righting con- 
tinued Monday at a lower intensi- 
ty- 

in Bonn, Bosnia's Muslim presi- 
dent. Alija Izetbcgovic, and Cro- 
atia’s president, Franjo Tudjman, 
held face-to-face talks. Sarajevo ra- 
dio said these included new initia- 
tives oo Muslim access to the sea 
via Croatia. 

Diplomats said a new map had 
been circulated at the Bonn talks, 
giving the Muslims just over a third 
of Bosnian territory. In Geneva, 
where full-scale peace negotiations 
are due to resume Jan. 18, diplo- 
mats said the map met the target, 
set by European Union ministers, 
of awarding a third of the repub- 
lic's territory to Muslims under an 
eventual peace plan. 




7... ’ J- J 

....... f.'y. m .j4 ...„ 


V*- 




Walesa Sees 'Step to Ri^it Direction’ 


T i 

i 7 » • i i 




R'U'K but in the right dired®;” .Ptesi- nacto w^e ^^tt mMe 

WARSAW — Poland on Mon- dent Lech Mot said eta cabinet 

day gave tentative approval s a meeting. dared ask such a question so far." 

NATO plan to increase military Hungary and Slovakia have al- l “w_ Walcsa a . 

links with countries in Easton Eu- ready accepted the plan, winch was Russian nnclear weapons 

r °P«- . 4 . ... MATn offered to Russia and otter Eastern ^ mttoTkd if it joined 

But the cabinet said the NATO European states. NATO. Bui be said offering mem- 

inmau v e, rarmership for Feaoe, j^ r> Walesa suggested earlier tn Russia as wcO as other 

Monday that NATOagrce to a set former Warsaw ■ Pact members 


But tte cabinet said the NATO European states, 
initiative. Partnership for Peace, Walesa 

was lea far-reaching than it bad ^ m 


Monday 
of mem 


conditions for Rus- would 


. .. v : : 

..^S. l-'.'iV' i. 




would be given only aftjfuUd^ 
tails were made available at the 
North Atlantic Tnaty Qrgamza- totUnadar noau. 


tion s ummit to 
“It is a step 


toil* noctartnanL 

in Brussels. “I do not know why (lie worid 
, is too short, has not asked Rossis to put their 


would keep Moscow from being 
isolated, which is one of the con- 
cerns dtedby Russian officials op- 
posed to an eastward expansion of 
NATO. 


CLINTON: A Sigh of Relief From European Leaden 




IV*w 




Mb Batia/Tbe AssoaaKd Am 


A woman washing dothes as another Sarajevo resident waited to fiD containers at one of the city’s water (fistribmion points on Monday. 

WATER: U.S. Purification Project May Soon FiU the Pipes in Sarajevo 


OMtmnedfremftge 1 g* ** ^t^^- 

xntmbw NATXJmick <md a a teip ^Sdeby eight previous VS. presi - county a further USLdiscagjw^ 
entic of Mr. Omtons abortive Sratbe past half century, ment from Europe’s defense, dns 

official added. 

^t^tbfeMr^OiS ** by a CSsnan departure: to. dear -Nobody knows wbat it will look 
warm warns ior Mr. umtoa. ^ snpport for European efforts to iOy^"thfeofficialsaidof 

President Frangors Mitterrand forae its own defense capability. NATO “but for now we don’t fear 
found a convergence of views on Chancellor Helmut Kohl said Al ^ er } ca w qi us alone.” 
policy toward the former Yugosla- Germany was “very grateful” that 

via in a head-to-bead talk with Mr. Mr. Clinton supported the summit For their pan, U.S. officials sad 
Clinton between official summit meeting’s call for the creation of grey were cheered by the early Eu- 
meetings, said his spokesman, Jean NATO task forces that could be xwean reviews of Mr. Chnion’s 
Musitelli. Mr. Mitterrand wd- detached to the Western European performance, 
corned Mr. Clinton's renewed com- Union, the 10-nation defense arm ' . 

mitment to supply up to 25,000 of the European Union. . “It hopefully wfl] jput to rest once 

UJS. troops to help police a Bosni- One senior German official said ami for all thefecting that we are 
an peace agreement, if one can be Mr. Clinton's endorsement of mili- either turning away fxamEmopef’ 


official added. 

“Nobody knows what it will look 
like in 10 years," this official said of 
NATO, “but for now we don’t fear 
that America will leave us alone.” 


For their 
they were c 


U.S. officials sad 
1 by the early Eu- 


mitment to simply up to 25,000 
UJS. troops to help police a Bosni- 
an peace agreement, if one can be 


reached, as wdl as his declared sup- tar cooperation among European 
port for NATO air strikes in Bosnia nations stood in sharp contrast to 
if the United Nations calls for the administration of former Ptesi- 


ihem, Mr. Musitdli said. 


dent George Bush, which viewed 


In addition to the relief in Eu- such efforts with suspicion. 


performance. 

“It hopefully will put to rest race 
and for all the feehng that we are 
cither turning away from Europe,” 
said Stuart fuzenstat, the U.S. dele- 
gate to the European Union, “or 
mat the United States feds it is 
better off with a weak European 
Union than a st ronger one.” 


Continued from Page 1 
130," he added, referring lo the 
U-S.-buih Hercules caigo aircraft 
that flew the equipment to Croatia. 
“We ended up with three indies to 
spare on either side.” 

The frequent shelling and sniper 
fire at Sarajevo’s airport also re- 
quired that the modules be unload- 
ed quickly from the fjtnmtiaTi Air 
Force planes that flew them into 
Sarajevo from Zagreb, Croatia. 

The modules then had to be driv- 
en along a frontline road and 
through a Serbian checkpoint. 

“The Serbs blocked the stuff at 
the airport,” Mr. Cuny said, “be- 
cause we weren't doing anything on 
their side.” 

“We got (he modules in last Au- 


gust when the Western nations 
were talking about bombing,” he 


aHons) of water the system pro- 
uces each hour is shunted from 


said. “The Serbs let everything one neighborhood to another, he 
through then .' 1 said. 

Financing came from a S50 mil- Because the module system runs 


lion grant from the Soros Founda- off jfj own generator, it is not sub- 
lion, a philanthropic group in "New to the vagaries of Sarajevo's 


York that has funnelled millions of power grid. Bee 

dollars into Eastern Europe. An may betranspot 

additional $27 million from the areas of Bosnia. 

group has enabled 20,000 Sanyo- ti.. 

vans to connect to a natural-gas 

line so they can heat their homes 

and cooL 


power grid. Because it is morale, it 
may be transported to other needy 


The biggest hitch so far has come 
from local water-safety inspectors, 
who have demanded additional 


Mr. Cuny said the second of the 
DvcM^riodutewouldb.™^ 


to come on line Tuesday. When ail 
five are booked up, the system will 
be able to provide a third of the city 
with 24- hour water service, and 
more if the 450,000 liters (118,500 


the water was potable. 

“This is surface water exposed to 
pollutants and intentional tamper- 
ing," said Mohammed Zlatar, dep- 
uty head of Sarajevo's Institute for 


Water, referring to the water from 
the Mfljacka, which has been the 
subject of jokes among Sarajevans. 

“The consequences of letting in 
polluted water could be catastroph- 
ic.” Mr. Zlatar said. “They could be 
worse than the shelling. We could 
have 30,000 people come down 
with stomach diseases, and some of 
them could die." 

“We ask that at least 20 different 
tests be made before we let the 
water in.” he added. 


HANNAH'S HEIRS: The 
Quest for the Genetic Ori- 
gins of Alzheimer's Disease 


Catharina Dales, in Dutch Cabinet, Dies 


Reuters fe£t coalition cabinet m November 

AMSTERDAM — Catharina 1989. 

(Ien) Dales, 62 the Dutch minister Miss Dales was responsible for 
of the interior, died overnight of negotiating wage deals with the 
heart failure at her home in powerful civil service unions and 


Utrecht, ter ministry said Monday. 

She was appointed to Prime 
Minister Ruud Lubbers’s ceater- 


ijrfl coalitip" cabinet in November had a long-standing rela tionsh ip 
1989 . (with a female partner but had re- 

Miss Dales was responsible for fused to discuss ter private life, 
negotiating wage deals with the Pboari YoBgvkfcfr, 85, former 
powerful civil service unions and president of Laos, died Friday m 
acquired a reputation for driving a Vientiane after suffering chronic 
hard bargain. heart disease; the Laos news agency 

Miss Dales was unmarried and said Monday. 


-Sj HP' 


BOOKS 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


NASA: Why $500 Million Mars Probe May Have Fizzled at the Finish Line 


Continued from Page I 

be pressurized to Tire the braking rockets, which 
would put ihe Observer into orbit around Mara. 

When controllers tried to pressurize the 
tanks, minute amounts of condensed oxidizer 
may have been earned prematurely into contact 
with the hydrazine fueL The combination 
would have ignited inade the plumbing and 
ruptured it. spewing jets of propellant into 
space and putting the spacecraft into a rapid, 
uncontrolled spin that rendered it useless. 

“There was no problem with the check 


valves,” said a planetary engineer who asked 
not lo be identified. “The valves were never 
intended to be operated that way.” He was 
referring to the assumption that the valves 
would have to operate only for five days, not for 
1 1 months, and not in such cold temperat ur es. 

The valves, made by two different subcon- 
tractors. were regarded as assembly line items 
that had been proven in other spacecraft. But 
they had operated only in the relative warmth 
of near- Earth orbit, investigators said, never in 
the deep cold of an interplanetary voyage. 


In 1992 the Observer team debated the 
change in procedures extensively before it was 
approved, a member of the investigating panel, 

Peter G. Wilhelm, director of the Naval Center 
for Space Technology, said Thursday. He fo- 


$25. Oxford University Press. 

Reviewed by 
David Armstrong 

T HOUGH the cause of Alz- 
heimer’s disease remains un- 


cused during the investigation on the propul- known, researchers have made a 
son system. number of important discoveries 

“Was the decision prudent? That’s what the helped us to understand 

debate was all about," he said, that die molecular and genetic basis of 

changes so late in the game are acceptable, diis disease. “Hannah’s Heirs 
“assuming you make the right change.” chronicles the search to discover an 


• Martha Fosfh, member of the 
board of directors at Volkswagen 
in Wolfsburg, Germany, is reading 
Plato's ", Republic ' " in the original- 
Greek. 

“This book is truly an original. 
Plato’s lessons taken from Creek 
antiquity are just as applicable to- 
day as they were then. The preci- 
sian of the Greek language and its 
expressions strengthen tins.” 

(Michael KaOenbach, fffT) 



PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 
READ THISsONE FIRST. 


logical holocaust.” 

Alzheimer's is a slowly progres- 


and r epresents approximately 10 to 
15 percent of Akteimer’s cases. But 


this disease. “Hannah's Heirs” 

chronicles the search to discover an ed States, carrying this dreaded <fis- meant that he had the familial fcam 
abnormal gene for familia l Alz- ease and enduring a “personal bio- of die disease, which is inheritable 
tenner's disease. Throughout this logical holocaust.” and represents approximately 10 to 

scientific saga, Daniel A. Pollen, a Alzheimer's is a slowly progres- 15 pcrcent of Alzheimer's cases. But 
neurologist of the University of dve degenerative brain disease that what was sigmficaniaboutJefFs vis- 
Massachusetts Medical Center, impairs memory, attention and it was that he carried with him a 
blends suffering and courage with a judgment. In the United States an detailed pedigree documenting the 
dear account of the advances of estimated 4 min ion people suffer occurrence of Alzheimer's disease m 
contemporary science as he follows from it, resulting in expenditures Of his famfly te four generations, 
researchers and their race to solve $90 billion for medical bills, nursing Pollen immediately realized the 


sive degenerative brain disease that whatwas significant about JefFsvis- 
impairs memory, attention and it was dial he carried with him a 


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n LYTERTiATlONAI. M + f 

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dear account of the advances of 
contemporary science as he follows 
researchers and their race to solve 
the mysteries of this disease. 

Hannah was born in Russia in 
the mid- 1800s. In middle life she 
developed difficulty with recent 
memory and eventually with her 
personal care. Of her nine chDdreai, 
four were affected with the same 
disease. Hannah's children and 
grandchildren traveled throughout 
Russia and eventually to the Unit- 


By Robert Byrne 

I N Game 5 of the women's title 
match Jun Xie of China, the 23- 
year-old women’s worid champion, 
won the match against Nana Iose- 
liani of Georgia. 

Ioseliani used the superaharp 
Classical Variation against Jun’s 
King’s Indian Defense throughout 
the series. This game followed 
Game 3. Jun pressing Ioseliani with 
7._Ncfi to dose the center with 8 
d5, which gave White control of a 
preponderance of queenside space. 
In rerum. Black would work for a 
kingside attack with 15_.f5, but not 
before trying to slow the enemy 
aggrandizement with 9_.a5. 

Jun played 50...Nd7 11 Rbl f5 
j and drew in Game 3. but now she 
| shifted to 10._Bd7. 

I Jun did not at once follow 
through on her kingside attack, but 
I put another obstacle in Ioseliani’s 
way with l”...c5. On 18 dc Bc 6 , 
( Black's pressure against the e4 and 
| a4 pawns would have made it diffi- 
cult for White to gain the initiative. 

! After 21 Nb5 Bb5 22cb, there 
was no time for dday because 23 
| a5. 24 ab. 25 Na5 and 26 Nc 6 
I would be positionally powerful. 

I Jun shot 22. _g4 23 a5 g3! to break 
I open the king position. Or. 24 hg 
I Nh5! 25 gf d 26 Qel. Jun would 
; have activated her attack with 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

i anacH BCOitr *sPicv 
OBXT CABDS ACCBTO 

071 589 5237 

LONDON 

EXOTIC 

CAIlfSTlW^IS 


$90 billion for medical bills, nursing Poflen immediately realized the 

and home care costs, and lost pro- importance of Jeff and his family 
ductivity. By the middle of the next tree for studies cm the genetics of 


century the numbs is expected to Alzheimer’s. Although excited 
rise to 14 million. about the “momentous opportnai- 

“ Hannah’ s Heirs” opens with ties for research,” Pollen knew that 
Hannah 's great-grandson. Jeff, in be also had to focus on Jeff, whose 


Pollen's office. At 51 Jeff was al- Hfdong fears had just born con- 
ready developing signs of Alz- firmed. To a large extent, this, book 
termer's disease. Pollen correctly isabout Jeff and tte members cf bis 
surmised that Jeff’s relative youth extended family, whose courage, 


CHESS 



en prise bishop, but marshaled 


ipaie in studies made it posable to 
search for the abnormal gene. 

As he left Pollen’s office, Jeff 
said: “Doctor, we wfl] help in any 
way we can. We only want to help 
our children.” 

In an effect to acquire a complete 
record of Jeffs ancestry, FoDen con- 
tacted Jeffs ref earing physician, 
Charles, a pathologist rad Hannah’s 
grandson. Grades had meticulously 
charted tire family’s medical histor- 
ies over several generations and 
across continents. With these price- 
less records, mrifanibir geneticists 
could begin their search fra: the gene 
that had affected Hannah' s heirs. 

Grades also gave PoQen data 
from studies his family had partici- 
pated m since tte mid-1950s, includ- 
ing investigations attempting to fait 
Arihdmer’s disease to specific blood 
groups and to identify a viral cause 
for the disease. As Poflen describes 
these earlier studies, he prorides a 
rich historical perspective of Alz- 
heimer’s research. He also provides 
an interesting account of how sci- 
ence,, government and individuals 
worked together to increase public 
awareness of Alzheimer's disease 
As a result the National Institute of 
Aging was formed, as were organi- 
zations offering support to patients 
and care givers. 

“Hannah's Heirs” reveals that 
the search to understand the genet- 
ics of Alzheimer's disease has been 
long and arduous, involving many 
scientists over several decades. 
With Alois Alzheimer's exploration 
of the brains of patients with pro- 
senile dementia providing an ap- 


■ 

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TSSZR pr^rrate backdrop, ftjflen gives a 
27~Ng0!28 Jto4Qh4 bdtere an- 
spring 29 RaJ with 29^f 30 Qf2 


gene for familial Abhamer’s dis- 
ease. Throu^iout this account Pol- 
len details high technology and im- 


Afler 31 Qel, however, Jun care- 

lessly threw in a check with h &^ oJosy ^ D 

31 — Qh17 Ioseliani meekly retreat- SJJJSL ™l^ far0lIghs 
ed wnh 33 Ksl and Jnn nm» innir nrolccdar genetics. 


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ed with 33 Kgl and Jun now took 
the correct course with the straight- 
forward, overwhelming 33._Nf4! 


For Hannah’s family the race cul- 
minated in the fall of 1992 when 




lOSBJAWWWTt 

Posltlaa altar SS Ra 8 


26_Js’g6, 27^BeS and 28._Ng3. 
Moreover, winning a pawn with 25 
g4 Ng3 26 Bg3 fg 27 Qel Bh 6 28 
Qg3 would have proven to be a 
disaster after 28_Be3 29 Khl Rf 6 
30 Qgg 31 Qg4 Bg5 32 g3 Rg 6 33 
Qd7 Bf4! 34g4Rh635Kg2Rh236 
Kgl Qg5 37 Rf2 Be3! 38 Kh2 Qh4 
39 KgZ Q£2 40 Kh3 Bf4, which 
forces mate. 

So Ioseliani threw evaything 
into ter queenside attack with 25 
ab Ra2 26 Qa2 fg 27 b7. In any 
case, 27 Be3? Nd5! 28 ed Qb4 29 
Rel Bh 6 ! 30 Bc4 Be3 31 Re3 Nf4! 
is annihilating. 

Jun was in no hurry to seize the 


36 Kf2Nh3! 37 Kg3 (or 37 
38 Kgl Qhlmate) Bf4 38 ] 
(38._Nf2 39 Qf2 h5mate 


mosome 14. Although dreiM studies 
have not yet identified a specific 
gene responsible for famSud Aiz- 




: -5T»r 


(38._Nf2 39 Qf 2 h5mate wold for fi 

have saved a move). Ioseliani saw 
no need to go through with 39 Kh5 
Nf2 40 Kg 6 Qb 6 mate and gave Dp. 


IQWPS INDIAN DEFEME 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 14) 


FERRARI 

LONDON ESCORT AGENOT 
MAJOR QSSIT CMOS AGGEPIH) 

071 823 4456 


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Exort Serna 
MI177/5729g 


PARIS A LONDON* 

SMANT & EDUCATED • EXCLUSIVE 
teort Sena tondon(71 3H 5US 



discover it within sevtatd years. 

Pollen has written a compelling 
medical detective stnty that, for ail 
its scientific complexity, never fails 
to remind us of the human toll of 
AbJirimer’s disease. Oiari«Bi did 
not inherit the abnormal gpv, but 
four of his siblings did, and we are 
deeply moved by his nn gnfoh over 
them. “This is a story that had to be 
told,” said Ben, anptter of Han- 
nah’s great-grandson^- “Our aspi- 
rations were transcendent, but be- 
cause it involved people it could 
not be told without tears.” 

David Armstrong , ' an associate 
professor at Georgetown Unisentity 
Medical College, wrote this for The 
Washington Post 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY II. 1994 


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Bosnia Plea: Diplomatic Victory for Paris 


By Alan Riding 

Nai' York Tuna Senior '. ' 

PARIS — Never shy aboutplay. 
ing the maverick in thcNratn AU 
Jantic Treaty . Organization,. 
France’s insistence thai-a rehraant 
alliance address the -Bosnian war 
on Monday rcflected both a desire 

to show political kadenhipiin Eo- 

rope and a need to convince public 
opinion az home that it-ls working - 

to end the confHn - - 4 -.'-. 

Britain, Germany and -the Unit-' 
ed Slates bad been- eager to . keep- 
the focus of MATO’S summit tneet- 
mg in Brussels on the affiance's raw 

Partnership for Peace with Easters 
Europe's emerging ^ tkmocrades. 
They apparently fearedtfiat disais- 
siern of the B»nr|m crisis could cat- 
pose embarrassing rifts amnoa the 
16 allies. ‘ : 

. &U France, which has 6,000 sob 
there stationed in the former Yugo- 
slavia, said the issue should riol-be 
ignored: On . Monday,. President 


Francois Mitterrand urged ids col- 
leagues to ridtesnte‘ NATO’s th- 
ingness 10 launch air strike tpjw 
tect imemancfflal peacekeepers. 

On Monday night, it appeared 
that France had won U5. taking 
far its poatksh Nottsg jMt NA- 

,3 , 

T0!5.aedibifity'yvBS at stake, how- 
ever, President Ball Quuoh tddthe; 
leaierethatifanewwari^’i^ 
jsstak'^tbose who attackSa^cvo ' 
must understand that we are seri- 
ous.” 

According to ihe draft of a state-, 
ment to be issued Tuesday, the affi- 
ance will describe the present situa- 
tion as intolerable and. again 
threaten air strikes “to prevent The 
strahguIatian bf Sarajevo, the safe 
areas and other threatened areas of 
Bosnia and Herzegovina.” / • 

The United Nations secreiary- 
generaj. Bntros Bujros Gh air, 


vdeed skepticism Monday night 
that mflitny nuervmtion was any 
ckaer. He noted that negotiation 
offered the only solution “as long 
as states are uowiffing to use force 
and, up to now, they have been 
unwilling to do sa” 

„ During a' visit to Paris, Mr. Bu- 
tros GhSi also reminded NATO 
that it was up to the UN Security 
Council to order the use of force. 

*Ti is the council that gives a 
mandate to NATO, just as it may 
not give ooe,” he said, adding that 

“a declaration by President Clinton 
does not suffice." 

. While France can Hawn 3 -email 
diplomatic victory at NATO, its 
more tnunerfiatc problem at home 
is to justify maintaining the largest 
foreign continent in a UN peace- 
keeping force that is racreasagly 
caught m the cross fire between ihe 
waning factions. So far, 18 French 
sokhers have been killed and 26S 
wounded in the Balkans 


Clinton Weighs In With Kohl 


ComttUedbfO^S^FtomDbfetdia 
BRUSSELS —President Bill 
Clinton greeted Chancellor Hel- 
mut Koul^ jcnitiQy noting the 
German leader’s si ze able girth. 

“I 'was thinking of you last 
night, Helmut, because 1 
watched the sumo wrestling,’’ 
Mr. OmtOT quipped, .grasping 
Mr. KohTs arms teasin^y. 

It may n« have beat the roost 
diplomatic thing to say, but Mr. 
Clinton quickly covered his 
tracks to indnde-fcimself in the 
ition. , 

erring to his own continual 
battle against extra weight, Mr. 
Clinton explained, “You and I 
are the biggest people here and 
weYestifl lOO pounds too lights 
The two appeared to be on 
familiar bantering lento as. the 
president met with members of 
the German delegation. As offi- 
cials were identifying themselves 
to Mr. Qintoo, Mr„ Kohl mter- 
jected with, a smile, "And Fm the 

G erman dwmcdinf. w .' ■ 

'■ • 

Some bleary-joyed Belgian 
commuters did. a doable take 
during rash hour early Monday, 
spottingtoe. president of the 
United Slates jogging in tbe in- 
stde lanfe '- ■ - ' • '* 

Some even slammed “on ihe 
brakes when they recognized the 
figure in the all-wlnteoutfit, ctt- 

\--ior 


an hour, cirding the park’s lake 
twice:' 

• Q ' 

It wouldn’t do fm a pres- 

dent to travd akme. \ 

At Zaventem Airpcot cm Sun- 
day morning, it was not just Air 

• \NATQNOTOBOOK~' 

Force One but its identical twin, . 
another specially outfitted 747, 
that touched ’down to disgorge 
the American entourage. , 

The passengers, well over 300 
of them along with scores of Se- 
cret Service agents, brought such 
a redundancy of expertise that if 
Mr. nfnfon tires of Ms national 

statue need only mnrto^tbe 
dqnzties of each. 

Even ihe official delegation, 
which includes 79 staff members 
from the White House alone, was’ 
preceded to Brusds by three 
separate advance grasps, includ- 
ing one that arrived two weeks 
’ ago, and never left 
.'. Its daily efforts to orchestrate 
every detail of Mr.^ Omton’s visit 
have been a source of not a little 
strain ina capital that is home to 
the European Union and the. 
Nprth Atlantic Treaty Organize 
tion, hnd in which the United. 
States maintains three ambassa- 
dors. . 



At daybreak;': Mril Clintpn 
weatinra 
smerto.a 
Cambre, 



BoB.d^Ja^ 
ejpg»afoff half 


. tfefcrtntoCartff ad: 
ntinistration jdffisdil' who is now 
.the UJ5. amtossador tq the.Eu- 
ropcanUirion, “and diere’s nev- 


er been a more complicated step 
from a logistical pomt of view. 

One aspect of the trip that no 
one at the White House will dis- 
cos is exactly what it w31 cost 
US. taxpayers, although they ac- 
knowledgp that the best guess for 
the cost of keeping Air Force 
One in the air is S26.000 an hour. 

The roughest of guides can be 
found in me trip's cost to news 
organizations, who will pay 
$830,000 just to Qy aboard a 
chartered Northwest Airlines 
747 to each of the five stops. 

Even that figure is so sensitive 
that the White House Corre- 
spondents Association began the 
trip by trying the VttmI of damage 
xbntral more often practiced by 
the groups its members cover. 

As part of the airline's first- 
class service, reporters were told 
when they boarded the craft Sat- 
monting, four masseuses 
fly oil the crip’s last leg to 
help ease nine days’ worth of 
neck and shoulder strains. 

- - Nothing doing, said George 
Condon, the Copley Newspapers 
correspondent who is president 
of the organization. He said he 
would rather spam the free back 
mbs than risk the embarrass- 
ment of their disclosure. Mr. 
Condon said an informal poO 
found that a majority of his col- 
leagues on board agreed. 

"There wfll be no massages," 
he raid Sunday,' adding that lie 
had been assured that White 
House travrf planners had noth- 
ing to do with the offer. . 

: V- (AP.NYT) 


UKRAINE: ClintonPkweih Accord on Nuclear Arms 


GmriDiied from Ffegel 

, there late on Wt 

•Mail with President Leonid . — 
Kravchuk ofUkraine, whowffllat- 
er travel, .to Moscow for a ageing 
ceremony on Friday whlLMr. Clin- 
ton and Presdent Boris N. Yeltsin 
of Russia. . ...... • 

Ihe agreement could' still fall, 
apart; Mr. Kravchuk Has' failed in 
the past t . to bring die Uktm num 
parliament along with him- Tins 
time, Mr. Glinton said, “we have no 
reason to doubt. toe abffityxjf the 
president ip keep the cdtmmtmeni' 
that be is prepared to make.".- > . . 

-A Clinton admimstration 
Ukraihb specialist said that aff toe 
warheads would have to be out of 
Ukraine within" seven years after 
the signing of the agreement.' ■ ■. 

- After a new parliament is chosen 


in March, tbe spediEsi said; Mr. 
Kravchuk hta'pfcdgied to. resubmit 
for rarificatjmi the sirat^jc.arms 

don in 

titiri Trraty.V; 7 1' 

As a result of the agreement, Mr.. 
Clinton toid, toe United States 
plans' to expand its oorrparetimi 
vrilh Ukraine, “eqjecdally in toe 
economic area.” ' . 

Mr. Chilton said that ihe agree- 
inent co\tored:'176 missiles and 
1^00^ warhetris-Biit Ins orndts lat- 
0-amepded tbosefignres. There 
in Iacrl75 missies. tb«y said, in- 
cludittg oWerSS-19s, whichinay be 
Starring to ftll apart after pom- 
nanmenance; and newer SS-24s. - •' 
Accordmg io,the amended ffgr 
nrcs. thetotal ntunber of waiheads 
involved is for k»g-range 


Tro-tsilits, plus about 600 more for 
air-lamnied cruise imssles. 

The missiles would be disman- 
tled in Ukraine: 

Thc warfaeads would be 
intaet to Russia, where toe 
. enriched nudear fud would be re- 
moved. There or in the United 
^States or both, it would be blended 
. with other materials to create less 
highly enriched iud of toe type 

• used in nuclear power plants. 

It would then be sold by the 
United States Enrichment Coip^ 

’ Which maintains a market through- 

• out the world. . 

Proceeds from such sales, which 
. would lake place overs period of 
' about 20 years, would go to Rusaa, 
which would then share them un- 

• der a complicated formula that has 
stQl not been entirely worked out. 


“Should we pull out and allow 
the people there to kill each other 
until toe last man?” Mr. Mitter- 
rand asked last week. “Should we 
stay 00 and he a target for those 
who leave death? Both are com- 
pletely untenable.” 

General Jeon Cot. toe French 
Army' officer who commands toe 
30, 000- strong UN force in former 
Yugoslavia, has repeatedly drawn 
French attention to toe inadequacy 
of the peacekeeping effort in fre- 
quent interviews on French televi- 
sion and radio. 

At toe same time, French offi- 
cials often complain that the Unit- 
ed States and other European gov- 
ernments are not sharing the 
peacekeep in g burden. The united 
States has refused 10 send ground 
troops to Bosnia until a peace 
ag reement is in place. Only Britain 
has seat a contingent comparable 
to that of France. 

During toe latest wave of shell- 
ing of Sarajevo, however, the gov- 
ernment has been under pressure 
by French public opinion to acL 
According to one recent poll the 
French public now favors direct 
military intervention. On New 
Year’s Eve, many people in France 
lit candles outride their windows to 
remember the victims of Sarajevo. 

Political experts said that, with 
France now closer to NATO than 
at any time since de Gaulle with- 
drew French forces from toe alli- 
ance's integrated military com- 
mand in 1966, the government 
would have been sharply criticized 
if toe Brussels summit meeting had 
brushed aside the Bosnian war. 

By taking the lead in pressing for 
tougher international action, 
France also has been able to show 
political leadership within a Euro- 
pean Union that claims to be ready 
to adopt a common foreign policy 
but that in practice has been both 
divided and paralyzed by toe Bal- 
kan conflict 


Mitterrand 
Rules Out 
NATO Role 


Coojikd by Our Staff From Dispaufia 

PARIS — President Francois 
Mitterrand has ruled oat any possi- 
bility that France might rejoin the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion’s integrated military com- 
mand. 

In an interview on toe eye of the 
NATO summit meeting in Brus- 
sels, Mr. Mitterrand made Ins first 
press statement on defense since 
1988. 

He said NATO’s main priority 
was to develop a common West 
European defense strategy. 

NATO's “first priority is to take 
into account Europe's identity” in 
terms of defense, he said. 

“For the first time the European 
Community, now toe European 
Union, has set itself the goal of 
drawing up a truly European iden- 
tity on defense, followed by a joint 
defense and security policy capable 
of leading to a real joint defense 
strategy," Mr. Mitterrand said. 

He added that during NATO’s 
Rome summit meeting in 1991, 
members set out principles of 
“transparency and complimentar- 
ity," especially between NATO and 
the Western European Union. 

“These principles have not 
changed” he said. “The WEU is, 
moreover, deariy designed to be a 
component for toe defense of toe 
European Union." 

De Gaulle took France out of 
NATO’s integrated military com- 
. maud in I96oT 

“There is no reason to change 
our particular military situation 
within NATO," Mr. Mitterrand 
said Sunday. (AFP, Reuters) 


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Sin hn.-Apna Fnau-tna* 

Mrs. Albright and President Havel of the Czech Republic, (fiscussing toe pros and cons erf Partnership for Peace on Monday in Prague. 

Prague Is 3d to Back Partnership Plan 


regjona 


By David B. Ottaway 

WosJiuigiou Puu Service 

PRAGUE — The Ciinton administration's 
high-powered campaign to persuade four East 
European countries to accept its go-slow ap- 
proach toward their integration into toe North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization appears to have 
largdy accomplished its mission. 

Bui in toe process, it has shattered a fledgling 
dona! security alliance. 

Czech Republic cm Monday became the 
third nation to express its unequivocal support 
for toe U^.-ini Dated Partnership for Peace 
plan for progressively doscr raflitaiy coopera- 
tion with NATO, without guarantees for its 
security and full membership that it had initial- 
ly sought 

After a meeting with the U.S- administra- 
tion’s two special envoys. Made! due K. Al- 
bright and General John M. Shalikashvili. For- 
eign Minister Josef Zirieniec of toe Czech 
Republic said, “We are fully convinced this 
prtyect opens for us toe possibility to become a 
member of toe alliance.'' 

“We hope that this is a step which could add 
something new to toe security architecture in 
Europe," he said. 

At a press conference Monday, Mrs. Al- 
bright, ambassador to the United Nations and 
a member of Mr. Clinton's cabinet said she was 
pleased with the “enthusiastic reception" that 
toe U.S. proposal received in Prague and in two 


of three other East European capitals she has 
visited with General Shalikashvili He is chair- 
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 

U.S. officials said that Czech leaders, includ- 
ing (hose in parliament had said they would 
change this year’s projected balanced budget to 
accept a I percent deficit in order to finance toe 
local cost involved for their participation in 
joint militarv exercises and planning with 
NATO. 

This was toe most concrete offer made by 
any of toe four East European nations so far. It 
highlighted how, after initial doubts and criti- 
cisms, they are openly competing to see which 
one will become toe first partner in toe new 
military cooperation program. 

In fact, the Czech Republic’s leaders say they 
are striving to become toe first to join toe 
Partnership for Peace program and have reject- 
ed efforts by Poland to formulate a common 
stand by the Visegrad Group, which includes 
Hungary- and Slovakia. 

The group was formed in early 1991 at toe 
initiative of Hungary and was meant to serve 
both as an instrument for lobbying for entrance 
into toe European Union and as a basis for 
building a regional political, economic and mil- 
itary grouping. 

After toe Slovak part of Czechoslovakia split 
off to form a separate nation a year ago, it 
became the fourth member of toe Visegrad 


Group, which is named after a town north of 
Budapest. 

Hungary, the Czech Republic and Poland are 
widely regarded as toe most advanced political- 
ly and economically of all toe former Commu- 
nist-dominated East European nations and 
those most likely to be accepted as toe first 
members in toe Partnership Tot Peace program. 

The plan requires each country to sign inde- 
pendently a "framework document" involving 
various political and military commitments, 
and to proceed with a program of military 
cooperation at a pace and scope of its own 
choosing. 

This makes it difficult, if not impossible, for 
all four nations to proceed together, thus under- 
mining any common security arrangements toe 
Visegrad group might have attempted. 

In Budapest on Saturday. Foreign Minister 
Geza Jeszenszky became the fust to welcome 
toe Partnership for Peace initiative, calling it 
"an important way station on toe road to our 
full integration into toe Euro-Atlantic security 
system." 

Then, on Sunday, Slovakia’s leaders also en- 
dorsed toe plan, saying that their fears of Hun- 
garian expansionism were toe prime reason for 
toeir decision, according to U.S. officials. 

Poland campaigned toe hardest for initial 
NATO security guarantees and membership 
and has been toe last of toe Visegrad countries 
to openly support the partnership plan. 


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TOESPAY, JANUARY 11, 1994 

OPINION 


Hera lb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Srxbune. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Familiar and Useless 


You can talk about change all you want 
and keep repeating the changers' mantra 
(“This is the ’90s"), bat the news of the 
moment strongly suggests that some things 
are forever. The gems we have in mind are 
not diamonds, however, they are sentiments 
reportedly held in high places on both sides 
of the Atlantic and, as always, expressed by 
their proprietors as if they were original 
thoughts and apt ones at that. There are two 
of these we have in mind. Well start with the 
one concerning foreign affairs. 

As it is said that there is a “chattering class" 
and a “political class,” so there seems also to 
be a “source class" in the world, and this has 
long been evident whenever the “whither 
NATO" subject of American relations with 
Europe has come into the news. Thus by 
Sunday the reigning gripe was back in the 
papers and on the networks: America's Euro- 
pean allies were experiencing (yet another) 
spell of nerves, owing, as usual, to their fears 
that the United States was abandoning its 
“leadership" of the West. 

This one is at least as old as the Western 
alliance itself. But, interestingly, in all its 
permutations over the years it has rarely been 
accompanied by some corollary concept of 
European “followership," mainly because in 
reality none exists, and, anyway, when the 
complaint is not about lack of American lead- 
ership it tends to be about American strong* 
arm tactics. What does exist in reality is a 
pretty consistently practical and. naturally, 
often quarrelsome working relationship be- 
tween the United States and its Europun 
allies. Its rituals by dow include not just 
regularly scheduled meetings erf the ministers 
and leaders of these countries, but also great, 
patronizing sighs of despair expressed by the 
European source class whenever one of these 
meetings nears. In their vocabulary, all Amer- 
ican presidents (off the record, bien sir) are 
either fools or maniacs — until such time as 


they are superseded in office by another fool 
or maniac and are retroactively cited as a 
model of good alliance leadership. 

We mention all this by way of suggesting 
that it would really be dumb for Clinton 
adminis tration leaden to make decisions 
about European affairs on the basis of this 
ritualistic complain L But if you want to talk 
about dumb, you have to consider the foolish- 
ness of following the implied direction erf the 
other old chestnut in the news at the moment, 
the domestic one. It has arisen in the context 
of the Whitewater saga, is as old as scandal 
itself in the age of multimedia and deserves a 
place in one of those anthologies of famous 
last words, next to something like “I only 
regret that I have but one life to lose for my 
country." It is: “This will be a two-day story." 

Evidently, this prescription for disaster has 
been heard rolling around the inner councils 
of the administration in recent days, even 
though, as a political Rx, it is probably re- 
sponsible for more death and destruction in 
government than anything since the Seven 
Deadly Sins. As now, the tempting, insidious 
observation has generally been accompanied 
by the thought that a masterful showing (any- 
where) in foreign or national security policy 
would blow the trouble away. It is not just 
that this has never happened. (Hie Awful 
Thing, whatever it is, always comes b ack. ) It is 
that believing the two-day-story nostrum to 
be true, administrations regularly take actions 
10 suppress curiosity and the flow of informa- 
tion that, inevitably, make the two-month or 
two-year problem they have incurred greatly, 
sometimes terminally worse. 

So much for change. These two tired old 
sa}rings have been around forever, and, so far 
as we can tell have never done anyone any 
good. Real change would be a White House 
that had the wit to see what shaky guides 
both are to policy. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Get On With the Deal 


The lengthening delays in the Middle East 
peace talks are disheartening to Israelis, Pal- 
estinians and others around the world whose 
hopes soared with the announcement of the 
historic September framework peace agree- 
ment Israel and the Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization resumed talks on Monday on the 
transition to Palestinian rule in Gaza and 
Jericho. Quick agreement is unEkely, though 
the first Israeli troop withdrawals are now 
□early a month overdue. 

Many who thrilled to the prospect of peace 
knew that the details would be particularly 
devilish because the framework left so many 
points intentionally vague. Still both sides 
accepted the care principle of expanding Pal- 
estinian self-rule under a PLO flag. How then 
did the atmosphere become so acrimonious, 
with Israel now openly challeng ing PLO 
Chairman Yasser Arafaft reliability and le- 
gitimacy as a negotiating partner? 

One reason is that both sides have been 
using the discussion of supposedly technical 
details to reargue basic questions like Pales- 
tinian statehood and sovereignty. The frame- 
work agreement excludes statehood for the 
present interim autonomy period. Bui it 
points in the direction of eventual statehood 
by recognizing Palestinian nationality and 
PLO political authority. 

But the main problem is that both Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Mr. Arafat have 
tried to shore up domestic political support 
by exploiting supposed political vulnerabili- 
ties in the other’s camp. Mr, Arafat calcu- 
lates that Mr. Rabin needs an agreement 
even more desperately than he does. Mr. 
Rabin calculates that Mr. Arafat has been 
seriously weakened by internal challenges to 
his autocratic rule of the PLO. 

Mr. Arafat is trying to refute charges by 
militant nationahsis that he has sold out state- 
hood in exchange for Jericho and Gaza, which 


have many people but few resources. So he 
has been pressing to draw boundaries for 
Jericho that include some of the Dead Sea’s 
mineral wealth, to limit the visibility of Israeli 
soldiers and to give Palestinian border guards 
the main responsibility for policing borders. 

Mr. Rabin is eager to reassure Israeli con- 
servatives and centrists that he has not yet 
conceded a Palestinian state. He resists Mr. 
Arafat’s ever changing demands, in part on 
legitimate security grounds bat also because 
he thinks that be can now afford to let Mr. 
Arafat “sweat." 

Mr. Rabin showed in September that the 
most effective way to rally Israeli opinion is 
to move ahead boldly on the peace front. Mr. 
Arafat, instead of trying to quiet his people 
with symbolic victories that the Israelis are 
not prepared to concede, needs to listen 
more carefully to the Palestinians who want 
a more democratic PLO. 

Broadening and democratizing the PLO is 
important, not just for idealistic reasons but 
to provide political outlets for Palestinian 
opponents of Mr. Arafat and the peace agree- 
ment who might otherwise turn to terrorism. 
But it is up to Palestinians, not Israelis, to 
achieve that democratization. 

In reality, the two leaders have bound 
their political fates together and they both 
know iL As Mr. Rabin acknowledged to 
reporters last week: “We cooked this food 
together, and we will have to find a way 
together to solve differences.” 

Israel's leaders learned long ago that the 
PLO was an undemocratic organization led 
by a mercurial and unaccountable autocrat. 
Mr. Rabin bargained with it nonetheless be- 
cause he understood that the PLO. flawed as it 
is. is Israel's best available Palestinian part- 
ner. Israel's responsibility now is to see 
through the deal it made with Mr. Arafat 
— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Closer to a Korean Solution 

A rare opportunity now exists for North 
Korea to trade its misguided nuclear ambi- 
tions. without too much loss of face, for 
some Western aid in rebuilding its economy. 
This might be wishful thinkin g, but there are 
many in Asia who hope that North Korean 
leaders will see reason, none more so than 
South Korea. But Pyongyang must first ac- 
knowledge — as the former Soviet Union did 
— that its system, after decades of wasteful 
mi saJ location of resources into a needless 
nuclear arsenal is fast becoming a relic 
of a bygone era. 

All that the Pyongyang regime has to do is 
show some sincerity in winding down its 
belligerent military posture to receive the 
sort of benefits that another former LIS. 
enemy and hard-line state. Vietnam, is now 
getting. North Korea should take a leaf from 
the canny Hanoi leadership, which has bur- 
ied past hatreds in favor of reconstructing its 
economy, with help from its Asian neighbors 
and the United States, while retaining the 
dominance of the ruling party. Whatever 
dreams Pyongyang might have of its place 
in the emerging world order, the reality 


is that there is no place for a Stalinist 
gulag in North Asia. 

— Business Times (Singapore). 

After months of delicate negotiations. North 
Korea has agreed to permit International 
Atomic Energy Agency inspectors to resume 
surveillance of its seven declared nuclear facili- 
ties. It has also expressed a willingness to 
resume negotiations with South Korea on ef- 
forts to denuclearize the peninsula. What 
North Korea still spurns, and this remains 
unacceptable, is IAEA inspection erf two unac- 
knowledged nuclear waste dumps whose tail- 
ings should reveal if Pyongyang has diverted 
sufficient atomic fuel to make nuclear bombs. 

Yet seven-ninths erf an agreement is better 
than none, it is a signal for more diplomacy. 
The United States can offer economic ties ami 
diplomatic relations as a reward for good be- 
havior. Down the road the mtemalional com- 
munity can settle for nothing less than com- 
plete on-demand IAEA inspections, and if it 
takes the cancellation of U^. -South Korean 
military exercises to bring Pyongyang to this 
point, that is a carrot ready and waiting. The 
Clinton administration has kept its hod in 
handling this issue. But the danger is not over. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 



International Herald Tribune 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chatmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher & Chief Es/cume 
JOHN VINOCUR- ExraaeEj&or i VexPresHaa 
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• ROBERT J. DONAHUE. EcBtor of the EUmnat Pages - JONATHAN CAGE, Busmr.v and finameEdaor 

m RENE BOND Y. Deputy Publisher • JAMES McLEOD. A/nrtone Dinxtnr 

• JUANITA! C^kSPARL Irsemaand Deu&pnrt Durvor • ROBERT FARRE ftrnjtison Dimsor. Eunpe 

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' VWVt, 

Sace&tttt- 1 


Who Really Believes the Bosnians Don’t Matter? 


N EW YORK — Madeleine Albright, the 
U.S. delegate to the United Nations, went 
last Thursday to a garbage dump outside Vuko- 
var in Serbian-occupied Croatia. At that site 
Serbian forces are believed to have buried the 
bodies of 200 Croatian hospital patients they 
killed after capturing Vukovar. 

The mass grave was “a symbol of the Yugosla- 
vian war's inhumanity," Mis. Albright said. But 
Vukovar is a symbol of something else, too; the 
American and European weakness that has en- 
couraged the Serbs in their campaign of tenor. 

When Serbian forces attacked Vukovar in 
1991, reducing the city to rubble, intervention by 
a small NATO force would have stopped the 
aggression that went on lo genoddal killing in 
Bosnia. That is not just my belief. It is the 
judgment of General John Galvin, the former 
NATO supreme allied commander in Europe. 

General Galvin told the House Armed Ser- 
vices Committee last May that there were two 

E ints when the United States and NATO could 
ve persuaded the Serbs to call off their aggres- 
sion. The first was when they bombarded Du- 
brovnik, Croatia's port on the Adriatic, in 1991. 
The second was the onslaught on Vukovar. 

“In the destruction of Dubrovnik," he testified, 
“I believe we could have sent the US. 6th Fleet, or 
we could have soil the standing Naval Force 
Mediterranean into the Adriatic, and with very 
little military action we could have shown the 
det ermina tion of Western nations, ami indeed the 


By Anthony Levis 

United Nations, that tins did not get out of hand." 

At Vukovar, he said, “if we had put a relatively 
small amount of forces on the ground at that 
time, we could again probably have stopped 
what has grown into an enormous crisis.” 

But thee was none cf the “deter mina tion" that 
General Galvin said could have been shown. The 
American president, George Bush, showed only 
weakness. European leaders were equally feeble. 

The predictable result was to encourage the 
demagogue who leads Serbia Slobodan Milose- 
vic, in his appeal to extreme Serbian nationalism. 
If history has any lesson, it is that racist dictators 
feed on the outside world’s weakness. 

The American and European failures in 1991 
were as grave policy migudgnents as any in the 40 
years of (he North Atlantic Alliance. Yet none of 
the principals has had the courage or decency to 
admit responsibility for actions that allowed geno- 
cide to flourish: not P rim e Minister John Major, 
not Mr. Bush, his secretary of state, James Baker, 
or his national security adviser, Brent SoowcrofL 
Mr. Scowcroft had a piece in The New York 
Times last week (IHT, Jan. 6), written with Rich- 
ard Haass, laving out what American foreign 
policy should be. In it he dismissed Bosnia as a 
place where US. interests are "less than vital" 
Does Brent Scowcroft see the pictures of civil- 
ians slaughtered in Sarajevo? Dos he know that 


Serbian 
to 


have intensified their shelling as if 
noses at tins week's NATO summit 


that NATO promised to bomb the Serbs 
went an stran g lin g Sarajevo but has done nc 

“At present the greatest threat to stability ami 
order in Europe is in Bosnia," Senator Bob Dale- 
said on Friday. He added that the Serbian attacks 
on Sarajevo were “a direct challenge to NATO to 
back its rhetoric with action." Can anyone really 
fail to perceive the truth of those statement*? 

One Stale Dep artm ent official who had a part 
in the Bush policy on Yugoslavia has had the 
courage to recognize the disaster. That is Warren 
Zj irnner mamij a Foreign Service officer for 33 
years, who was the U.S. minister in Moscow and 
»mh»sc»rinr to Yugoslavia. like hk chiefs in the 


saw that the policy had 
Mr. Milosevic and was bankrupt. 

Last week Warren Zlmmennann resigned, in 
part in disgust at die failure of the United States 
to act against the slaughter in Bosnia. He was the 
fifth and by far the highest-ranking Foreign 
Service officer to quit on that issue. 


To repeat it is worse. How kog win 
; Bin Clinton, Bke Brent Scowcroft, gp on 
that the destruction of American and 
IATO credibility in Bosnia does not matte? 

The Neve York Timex. 


Give NATO Realistic Tasks and Don’t Enlarge It 


B RUSSELS — The present summit 
is probably NAT 


h e p resent 
VTO’s most impor- 
tant meeting since the alliance was 
founded in March 1949. On h hang s 
not oily NATO’s furore existence but 
the ability of the international com- 
munity to shape a civilized world. 

In November 1991. NATO leaders 
announced a new security architecture 
based on the start of an era of general 
prosperity in democracy and the rule 
of law. But one bloody unchecked 
conflict after another has demonstrat- 
ed the unwillingness of its members to 
involve themselves in actions that do 
not affect their vital interests. The 
Brussels summit needs to face up to 
realities of the world as it has devel- 
oped. It should state future require- 
ments in relation to real aims that 
NATO has the capacity to achieve. 

The first major test of the alliance 
after the end of the Cold War, the 
intervention in the Gull was techni- 
cally a resounding success but pro- 
duced a misleading impression. Al- 
though carried out in the name of the 
United Nations by ‘interested coun- 
tries" under American leadership, it 


By Frederick Bonnart 


was, in all but name, a NATO opera- 
tion, in cooperation with local forces. 
It appeared to show that no power on 
earth could resist the •»nianm» in the 
execution erf Security Council resolu- 
tions to maintain the principles of the 
United Nations Charter. 

In reality, the “interested countries" 
applied full force only to the degree 
that their immediate interests were 
concerned; they could not afford to let 
Saddam Hussein get his hands on Ku- 
wait’s oil H irmanitari.nl challenges 
such as the massacre of Kuwaiti civil- 
ians or the brutal repression of Kurd- 
ish and Shiite minorities — which 
should have provided the true justifi- 
cation — received a lukewarm re- 
sponse and have yet to be settled. 

The successful action led to the di- 
sastrous errors of the war in Yugosla- 
via. The gap between the intention to 
preserve the achievements of the Cold 
War victory and the will to cany that 
intention out became a chasm. 

Having failed to agree to intervene 
in the cany stages when action could 


have stopped the disaster, the allies 
tried to salve their consciences by 

providing hnnumitarian supplies and 
sponsoring one peace negotiation after 
another. It can be argued that these 
actions serve mainly to prokng the 
agony of the innocent czvmans canght 
is the cross fire of the traces of local 
politicians, some of whom fantasize 
about Western wffl to intervene. 

This Lessee should be fnDy absorbed 
by the summit when it makes its decla- 
ration. The urgent need is fra a credi- 
ble mtanational system to maintain 
peace and lay tbe baas for a just 
existence fra tbe papulations of tbe 
whole of Europe. It can be achieved 
only if NATO makes die necessary 
arrangements with the Central and 
East European countries to satisfy 
their security concerns and at the 
same time comes to an understanding 
with Russia about common limits 
and mutual objectives. 

Above all NATO must remain in- 
tact as a strong cohesive organization 
with clearly domed aims 


A Many-Splendored 'Greater China 9 


J AKARTA — East Asians are 
known for their economic prag- 
matism and lack of concern with 
ideology. Yet it seems to be East 
Asians who take most seriously talk 
of a possible clash between' East 
and West or between uuuor reli- 
gious and ethnic groups along the 
world’s cultural fault lines. 

Even more worrying is tbe tenden- 
cy erf East Asians to talk about Con- 
furian civilization and the role of 
“overseas Chinese” — the 55 million 
Chinese living outside China, mainly 
in Taiwan, Hong Kong and South- 
east Asia. This debate over Greater 
China has brought to the surface 
barely submerged tensions about 
ethnicity and national identity. 

Current worries in East Asia 
about the notion of Greater China 
has several reasons. The end of the 
Cold War shattered old ideologies 
and resurrected long-standing con- 
cerns among Chinese and non-Chi- 
nese about weir roots and basic val- 
ues. For many, these are questions 
about the very definitions of the na- 
tion-states in which they live. 

Die rise of the mainland Chinese 
economy, along with the continuing 
success of Hong Kong. Taiwan and 
Singapore, has prompted discus- 
sion about the so-called Confucian 
roots of success. Also, as countries 
in the region become more devel- 
oped and interdependent they are 
starting to consider whether there is 
a cultural basis for cooperation. 

Tbe Greater China debate can af- 
fect relations between Chinese suite 
and territories and non-Chinese na- 
tions, such as Japan and the Koreas. 
It is also conducted within ethnically 
diverse states sudi as Indonesia, Ma- 
laysia and Thailand which have in- 
fluential Chinese minorities. 

Yel the concept of overseas Chi- 
nese, much like that of a Jewish 
diaspora, is complex. Wang Gung- 
wu, vice chanceflra of the University 
of Hong Kong, has argued in the 
case of (he Chinese as Martin Kace, 
an American specialist on Jewish 
affairs, has done in the case of the 
Jews, that as cultural characteristics 


By Gerald Segal 


are mixed into strong host societies, 
it becomes harder to identify these 
communities as foreign. 

To what extent is it meaningful to 
see Paul Keating. Australia’s prime 
minister, as “overseas Irish." or Pres- 
ident Bill CHn too as “overseas Eng- 
lish"? Nonetheless, in many East 
Asian societies overseas Chinese are 
still perceived (or ntisperceived) as a 
group whose wealth and economic 
power is disproportionately large 
and whose loyalty is suspect 

Overseas Chinese certainly com- 
mand major economic powier, ac- 
counting for 80 percent of foreign 
investment in China. In Indonesia, 
tbe world’s fourth most populous 
state, Chinese reportedly control op 
to 30 percent of the economy. The 
influence of overseas Chinese is pri- 
marily economic. They hope to 
avoid a political backlash of the 
kind that occurred in the past in 
Indonesia and Malaysia w here non- 
Chinese and predominantly Mus- 
lim majorities resent the commer- 
cial clout of the Chinese. 

In Indonesia and Malaysia, local 
Chinese are content to get on with 
making money. But they are ever 
vigilant fra signs of a flare-up of 
anti-Chinese sentiment. 

Amid debate about the increas- 
ing power of Greater China, Indo- 
nesian and Malaysian Chinese are 
on edge. Hence the nervousness, 
especially in Indonesia, about the 
l eaden of Singapore, where Chi- 
nese make up some three-quartera 
of the population, playing an active 
role is meetings of overseas Chi- 
nese such as the recent one in Hong 
Kong which brought together en- 
trepreneurs from around the world. 

A speech at that meeting by Lee 
Kuan Yew, Singapore's senior min- 
ister. was a model of self-efface- 
ment on behalf of overseas Chinese. 
But the very act of attending and 
speaking upset leading members of 
Indonesia’s Chinese community. 

Singapore's high profile in' the 


mined Eosl Germany 
there, being rich and engaging wit 


overseas Chinese world is both nat- 
ural and risky. Given its s mall size, 
it relishes its special role in trade 
with China and trumpets its leach- 
ing of Mandarin, Kit by making 
much of its success, it can easily 
upset partners in the Association of 
South East Asian Nations and 
make regional cooperation more dif- 
ficult Consequently, Singapore mil 
remain circumspect and nervous 
about tbe notion of Greater China 

By far the biggest uncertainty 
concerns tbe attitude of Beijing to 
overseas Chinese. The mainland 
government seems to believe that it 
has some vague authority over what 
it sometimes calls “Chinese compa- 
triots.” In truth, whatever influence 
there is flows increasingly in the 
opposite direction. 

Mudi as West Germany under- 
tnyjust bj 

30 Pflgflgif 

fellow Germans, so overseas Chi- 
nese exert a pull on China. In cul- 
ture. lifestyle, economics and even 
politics, Chinese on the mainland 
are learning habits (hat undermine 
the authoritarian rule of the Chi- 
nese Communist Party. 

Tbe process is reinforced by the 
presence of overseas Chinese inves- 
tors. businessmen and viators, and 
by mainland students who return 
from study in the West 

Tbe Chinese are learning that 
they can be rich, free and still Chi- 
nese. North American or Austra- 
lian Chinese demonstrate that there 
is no necessary Chinese cultural 
disposition to authoritarianism. 

As the overseas Chinese exat (his 
pull on the fabric erf China, h is 
becoming dear to mainland Chinese 
that there is already more than one 
Chinese state. If C hina proves to be 
more a culture than a state, that 
Greater Chinese “unity" may prove 
to be built on greater aivi 


l vasty. 


The writer is a senior feBow at the 
International Institute for Strategic 
Studies in London and editor of The 
Pacific Review. He contributed this 
comment to the Herald Tribune. 


Europeans 
Have Lost 
Their Voice 

By flora Lewis 

P ARIS — lie Europe enthusiasts ! 

seem to have gone lbc way of the 
Cold Warriors, as though thar cause 
were out of date. The Treaty of Maas- . 
tridtt has rak™ effect, but in an at- 
mosphere of end of an era, net the 
start of a new one. 

The conventional explanations for 
this apparent resignation axe (1) that 
theraid of Soviet menace reduced the i. 
incentive fra “btuKting Europe," (2) 
tbe recession, and (3) the fafline to 
5 tnp war in ex- Yugoslavia. 

But it was not Moscow flat in- 
spired the idea of Europe; it was the ‘ 
need to end old rivalries and meet 
new in a changed world. 

The recession lowers rights and 
narrows the focus of ambitious, but 
nobody imagines that any European 
state can reverse it effectively an its 
own. And the failure in Yugoslavia is 
doe to too little, not too much, will to 
make Europe count. 

No doubt the ba dly pre pared, jwfit- 
jeafly mishandled approach to Euro- 
pean Union played a role in creating 
the impres s i on of hangover once the 
ceremony was celebrated. That does 
not explain why the leadas who woe 
so eager to achieve it seem to have 
renounced the effort to give it vibrant 
life. They have run out of steam. 

After the breathless conclusion of 
tbe Uruguay GATT round, whirfi has 


. , 1 , 1 s 

•v ^ ■ 

I- . «* 

r.-vMA 


The iw g pnt demands front Central 
European and Baltic countries for ad- 
"W”* *n NTATYt 

However, they are not under threat, 
and there is no w«e in catmmttmg 
- NATO to security guarantees against 
currently nonexistenl dangers. 

Agre em ents an Rutnership for 
Peace will enable those ottering into 
them to participate in NATO activi- 
ties including training and exercises, 
help them restructure their forces, 
and introduce common procedures 
and, eventually, harmonization of 
equipment. Their borders are guaran- 
teed not raily by international and 
national agreements but above all by 
the imminent danger that any aggres- 
sion or even undue p re s sure would 
present to NATO’s present members. 

Enlargement of die organization 
wraild mean dilution and, consequent- 
ly, loss of strength. It would eventually 
transform K MOmto a , src uri ^o^ - 

ty and Cooperation in Enropc, with- 
out co h esi o n or leadership, common 
resources or edacity for unifi ed deri- 
sion-making and subsequent action. 

It is far more important for the 
security of aspiring as well as actual 
members to mamtafa and reinforce 
the dements bran which tbe alliance 
derives its strength: its unity and its 
integrated mOitaiy structure. 

An understanding with Russia is 
an essential complement to these ar- 
rangements. Russia’s interest in what 
it calls its “near abroad” is natural 
and should be recognized. In return, 
an equivalent recognition would be 
required regarding NATO's “near 
abroad." While Russia’s influence 
and interests could be accepted be- 
yond its eastern and southeastern 
borders, this cannot apply to its west- 
ern and southwestern neighbors. 

Realistic aims fra NATO are limit- 
ed and may fall short erf previous agri- 
rations for an immediate^ better 
werid. But they are within the capacity 
of the alliance as it exists today. They 
win provide the secure basis bran 
which farther advances can be maA> 

The writer is editor of NATO’s Six- 
teen Nations, an independent military 
journal published in Brussels. He con- 
tributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


ulation was about having been abk? to 
achieve it without provoking a grave 
European crisis. It was enough flat 
the worst didn’t happen. 

Last year’s currency upheavals 
have been contained, and the Euro- 
pean Monetary System is functioning 
almost as if the roles had not beat 
relaxed. But there is scarcely any talk 
now about moving an toward eco- 
nomic convergence and preparing for 
the still ostensibly valid goal of a 
single European currency. 

The aim of a “common foreign and 
defense policy” is still on tbe bodes, 
and it is coming near to achievement 
in a common policy of do-nothing,' 
look the other way, in the flagrant', 
case of Bosnia and the looming cases ’ 
further east. The European discus-', 
rion on Bosnia is no longer about’, 
what can be doue but how toget out. 

French Defense Minister Francois 
Ltotaid points out lhat m the two and 
a half years that the Yugoslav wars 
have been going on, 200,000 people; 
have been killed, more than m the' 
whole of Eastern Europe during the 
whole of the Cdd War. He is 
aware of the tremendous 
moral and even : 
that abject adimlmnn of failure would; 
have far Europe, tbe Western allianc e 
and tbe United Nations. 

Threats by France, Belgium, Cana- 
da and others to jmfl out. thdr contri- . 
buttons to die UN force if there isn’L 
a settlement by spring are obviously 
meant to cow tbe Bosnian Muslims 
into accepting what tittle they can 
now get through negotiations. The 
threats have to be taken seriously in 
view of the refusal to act against the 
intense increase of the gratuitous bom- 
bardment of Sarajevo after the cynical 
promise of a Christmas truce, and the 
provocative blockages or confiscation 
of aid defiveries to dvihans. 

The frustration and disgust of nnh- 
tary men on (he spot is understand- 
able. They are not only being made to 
lode impotent and witless; it has to be 
asked ii their mission erf “protecting 
humanitarian relief and oartain tivu- 
ian zones” is nm simply adding to the 
agony and duration of war. 

Hie two Balkan wars of 1912 and 
1913, although just as cruel and bar- 
baric, ended in a matter of weeks, 
wjtitom benefit of peacekeeping forties 
and foreign aid. Mr. Ltotard asks the 
stinging question of what must be the 
reaction of public optrrion in die Unit- 
ed States and Europe as television 
screens show the parade erf wdl- 
dressed, seemingly sen -confident lead- 
ers at the NATO summit in hamisnmff 
Brussels, and immediately af terward 
the h a gg a r d refugees, the wounded 
and dying, the day’s ravages of Bosnia. . 

Whatever the reaction, there is still 
no action. The French mrnitfgr tnlVc 
about enabling the Western European 
Union to take on European security 
tasks that NATO doesn't want, in- • 
d uctin g in Eastern Europe. But he 
does not say why the result would be 
any different from the Bosnia tragedy. 
Asians ask whether Europe can non 
be discounted as a prime world force. 

But Europe is still here, stiD rich, 
stiH with great reserves of brains and 
power. All the reasons the European 
movement began in the 1950s remain 
valid, if anything more urgent than 
ever. Much has been accomplished, 
but it can wither away without contin- 
ued moment um. The builders of Eu- 
rope must rediscover their voice. 

© Flora Lewis. 


EV OUTt PAGES: 100, 75 AMD 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Very (Md Subject 

LONDON — William Hampson, 
formerly of Salford, who u> 

be the Queen’s oldest subject, died cm 
Tuesday [Jan. 9J. His age could never 
be ascertained with certainty. There 
was no documentary proof, but the 
old man maintained mat Ire saw his 
1 15th New Year’s Day last Monday 
week. Hampson used to say that 
when a boy he beard John Wesley 
preach. His two scats were killed in 
the Crimean war and four of his un- 
cles were in the battle of Waterloo. 


Both issues call for immediate atten- 
tion, and until an agreement is 
rea c hed upon them, sum matters as 
the formation of a League erf Na- 
tions, the amount of indemnity 
which Germany must pay, the use of 
the high seas and kindred questions 
will be of secondary importance. 

1944: Nearing Cassmo 

ALGIERS — [From our New York 
edition:] In a two-mile advance 
through the mountainous terrain of 
south-central Italy, the 6th Army has 
driven to within view of Cassmo, die 


1919: Immediate Issues M 


PARIS — On the eve of the prelum- 
nary peace conferences, the Allies 
are at issue on two vital questions on 
which discussions will be held at the 
first sessions next week. One is the 
measures u> be taken with the Bol- 
shevists of Russia, the other the lift- 
ing of the Goman blockade, suffi- 
ciently to allow the feeding of the 
people of the eastern provinces. 


on the road to Rome. 

fierce Goman resistance northeast! 
the town, American infantrymen, 
hare reached a point from winch they 
can look down mto the streets of the 
communications center. Now no 
more than four miles fro m the goal 
toward whkA they have bem strug- 
gling for six days, the Americans 
passed to the offensive again and 
captured the peak of Catena Vecdria- 


i’- 





i 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 199-1 

OPINION 


'Fn ; 

^ i 


This Benign View of Russia 
Is a Dangerous Delusion 


ITT ASHINGTQN — "Nothing is 
f V nwre contemptible," Joseph Al- 
sop told me when i took up this fine 
of work, “than a cbhnnnist witiKwi 
a Weltansdiau agB ” 

A coherent worldview Is loagh to 
come by ihee days because the tnarn 
threat to freedom Jias. shifted irom mili- 
tant communism to what John has 
named “ethnomama,” more tribalism 
than nationalism. It is exploding around 
Bosnia, the test that NATO is faffing, 
and is advancing in what used to be 
the Co mmtrnk f tyv- 
Does Bill GimoQ have a worldview? 
He may be taking one Emm the former 
Time magazine columnist Strobe Tat- 

‘ 

Unlike Clinton, I expect 
Russia — rich in resources 
and with an educated work 
force — to return to 
superpowerkoodandto 
dominate its neighbors. 

boil, translator of Nikita Khrushchev's 
memoirs, a longtime Friend of Bill gam- 
ing preeminence in foreign affairs. 

Judging from the president's inter- 
views (with little help from a muddy 
speech in Milwaukee read for him last 
week by Vice President A1 Gore), the 
Clin ton-T albott Weltanschauung in- 
cludes a view of a new Russia whose 
foreign poEcy can be shaped benignly 
by evidence of Weston trust 
If we reassure Moscow, goes this view, 
that it has nothing to fear from the 
nearness of NATO, then Russia, as it 
regains its strength, win bekssHkdy to 
fed the need to reassert control of its 
former empire. Contrariwise, if we were 
to fHic mnmmi of Russian weak- 
ness to incorporate the newly freed East 
European uations into die NATO de- 
fense, we would only encourage toe old 
paranoia and play into' the hands of 
resentful Russian revanchists. 

This is the diplomat tal sel that pro- 
duced tbs Partnership for Peace scheme. 
To Warsaw, Prague and Budapest, ea- 
ger to join toe West’s mutual protection 
alliance, it says: Maybe; someday. 
Your security “affects” America’s 
security, but it is not as vital an interest 
as Germany’s or Turkey’s. To Russian 
military leaders, Mr. Clinton's NATO 
waffle says: Don't get nervous, we only 
said “maybe" to toe' buffer states, 
and made no promise - about when 
someday would come:. - 
1 think this seeming compromise is 
self-deception: Tbit a because; I-aee 
Russia — resource-rich, unto an edih 
cated population, no longer hamstrung 1 
by collectivist ideology —returning to 
superpoweehood aaft.cven if demo- 
cratic, d ominating its a eighbors. • - • - 


By William Safire 


That is why I. asked the president, 
in a recent Sanhedrin of savants, 
whether anybody m his administra- 
tion was presenting the opposing 
view. Was anyone saying that if you 
do not bring Eastern Europe into 
. NATO now, wien Russia ts weak, you 
will never be able to bring it in whim 
Russia is strong and refuses to let it 
come in? Did anyone near him present 
the.case that, he might be making a 
' great historic blunder? 

“No one in the administration has,” 
he admitted, which is dismaying; even 
Lyndon Johnson had a high-level dis- 
senter. But Mir. CHnton said he has 
tried to understand the contrary posi- 
tion, “and 1 think my response would 
be, Bflh that Urn t development would 
not occur overnight ... we will have 
a couple of years to make the judg- 
ment you just outlined. And it won’t 
be where we*H wake up one morning 
and it will be too late. I think, there will 
bo several mornings when well have 
the chance to take a different course.” 
That easy out was challenged by the 
columnist Richard Cohen: TJut isn’t 
it likely that, at that, time, toe same 
arguments wfll be raised, that you will 
only encourage Russian paranoia, 
that you will push them ova* the edge, 
and you will be in toe same box?" 

“Whenever you make a new start,” 
Mr. Clinton responded, “ . .. . you al- 
ways have these judgment calls, and in 
the end only history can render a ver- 
dict Is it a risk? 

“Of courseit is, in tfaesense that any 
change you make like this is a risk. 
I believe the risk is smaller with 
the course we are taking than it would 
be if we tried to push to immediate 
membership ...” 

That is a false choice; a less risky 
alternative would be earned member- 
ship with published criteria and a rea- 
sonable timetable. 

The. president, who sees himself as 
“a force for optimism," later sketched 
his virion of tomorrow's Russia: 

“I believe if they continue as a dem- 
ocratic. market-oriented, reformist, 
noninterventionist nation, they will 
become in a more traditional sense, 
then, a very great nation, not an 
empire . . . Their whole history 
ana character and texture of Russia 
argues for that” 

- 1 think Russia's whole history 
and character and texture argue for 
toe opposite. Thai is what makes 
Wdtanschammgs. 

. . . The New York Tima. 


Letters, intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
-Edina* and contain die writer's stg- 
. nature, name and JM address. letter s 
should be brief : and are subject to 
editing- We cannot be re^antibh for 
the return of unsolicited manuscripts. 


yr Look ... Sinceiceve^. 
known each other for so long, 
Ftt leave ex-Yugoslavia to you* 
\But only because U’syou*y 









m 

457 




3, &ELES7K£ a L~Eat Re? i%on. Fnoc*» 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Let Europe See to Bosnia 

Regarding the report “ France Presses 
the U.S. to intervene in Bosnia" (Jan. 6): 

Is it not incredible that France and 
other West European countries should 
press toe United States to intervene mil- 
itarily in Bosnia? If a Europe of 350 
milli on people, which manufactures 
some of the most sophisticated nriiitaiy 
equipment in the world, has neither the 
vnU nor toe guts to end this local war, 
why should toe United States (and Can- 
ada) do toe job? As a Canadian, 1 say, let 
the Europeans solve their problems, and 
let North Americans attend to toeir own 
numerous problems at home. 

GERALD R_ HASTINGS. 

Monaco. 

An In-Between Affiance 

Russia, for historical reasons, feds 
uncomfortable having a large Western 
military bloc too dose to its frontiers. 
But for the small states, old and new, 
that have just been (reed from Russia's 
unwelcome embrace, toe possible resur- 
gence of Russian ultranadonaiism is 
nerve-wracking, too. What can be done? 

Perhaps a solution might be found in 
toe forming of a third bloc between 
Russia ana NATO. This would com- 
prise Estonia, Latvia. Lithuania. Be- 
larus, Ukraine, Poland, toe Czech Re- 
public, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania 
and Bulgaria. They would form a defen- 
sive affiance, and enter into nonaggres- 
sion pacts with toeir neighbors, east and 
west With more than 135 million inhab- 
itants and a broad economic base, this 
would be a bloc that Russia would be 
loath to consider invading. This new 
bloc could form a free trade area with 


toe idea of moving toward a common 
market, providing fledgling economies 
with a decent- sized market. 

The nouaggressioc pact with NATO 
would engage in mutual defense if 
Russia attacked. The pact with Russia 
would commit each to react to an attack 
by any NATO member court try. Securi- 
ty w ould thus be improved without .an- 
tagonizing either of toe powerful neigh- 
bors, Nervous Russian geopoliticians 
and military planners should, indeed, 
be pleased to have this grouping as a 
buffer and an ally. 

FREDERICK STARR WILDMAN. 

Col eb rook, Connecticut 

Hypocrisy All Around 

Regarding the Other Comment item 
“ More Hypocrisy on Bosnia?" { Opinion . 
Jan. 4) from New Straits Times: 

Everything that the New Straits 
Times of Kuala Lumpur says about 
Western hypocrisy’ in Bosnia is true. The 
Western performance in ex-Yugoslavia 
ha* been disgraceful But this commen- 
tary faDs to mention toe promises of toe 
Islamic countries to come to toe assis- 
tance of toeir fellow Muslims in Bosnia. 
There were mighty pronouncements of 
aid, which encouraged some of us in the 
Western world, but they never material- 
ized. What happened? 

K.W. EMERSON. 

Brussels. 

Everyman's Culture 

Regarding “Global Culture: The Para- 
dox of U.S. Dominance" (Opinion, Jan. 5 
and 6) by David Rieff: 

Mr. Rieff wonders at the paradox of 
the persistence of American cultural 


Put Care and Compassion 
Before the Mythical Cures 


By David Spiegel 


predominance ir. toe face of relative 
American economic decline. But just as 
an outdated conception of national 
economy masks toe reality of toe global 
economy, a narrow fascination with toe 
made-in-. America label cn cultural 
products masks toe reality of the univer- 
sal popular values and aspirations upon 
which toe modem w end is builL 

Just as Everyman buys Japanese care 
because they best express universal value 
attached to superior workmanship at a 
reasonable price, be admires American 
popular culture because it best embodies 
the univereal popular values of liberty 
and equality . Everyman puts up with the 
provincialism of toe made-in- America 
image for toe same reason that the world 
puts up with the outmoded language and 
mores of Shakes peare: because the sub- 
stance is so much more than the image. 

No matter what inani ty it is packaged 
in. a Clint Eastwood Aim is always 
about Everyman's earnest dignity in the 
face of life's absurdity, elite dishonesty 
and plain human meanness- Whether 
Everyman actually likes hamburgers or 
not. at McDonald's it is neat and clean 
and rich-looking; everything works; Ev- 
eryman's snot-nosed squalling brats are 
welcome, and he doesn't have to dress in 
clothes he can't afford or doesn't like; 
everybody is equal. All this is not only a 
welcome escape from daily life, bat a 
welcome expression of Everyman's per- 
sonal values and aspirations in an elite- 
dominated. dass-ridden, often deliber- 
ately impoverished society. 

While it is not surprising that incurable 
snobs, religious fanatics, aged Chin es e 
Communists, sour ultranationalists and 
self-interested cultural elites should take 
up arms against sooDed Ame ri ca n pop- 
ular culture, it is surprising that French 


S TANFORD, California — The Unit- 
ed States does not have a health care 
system: it has a disease cure system. 

* The public believes and many doctors 
behave as if most illnesses were curable. 
Americans think of toe body as if it were 
a machine with replaceable pans: De- 
fects can be identified, removed and 
replaced through treatments such as, or- 

MEANWHILE 

gan transplants, drugs and gene therapy. 
This is rarely the case. 

The expectation of cure has led to an 
explosion of invasive, expensive and of- 
ten risky interventions that have at best 
marginal effects on survival. 

There has been too much focus on 
diseases and too little on toe people who 
have the diseases. Most Americans die 
of chronic and progressive illnesses: 
bean disease, stroke and cancer. Cure is 
the exception, not toe rule. Compassion- 
ate care should help people bve with 


intellectuals seem to be leading toe 
charge. Those who have so nghiJy 
plumed themselves as toe inheritors of 
both toe Enlightenment and the Great 
Revolution should be working for popu- 
lar universal culture, trying to give it 
depth and breadth. But then, modem 
France is built on toe bloody suppression 
of a popular uprising in 1871. Everyman 
is not necessarily what Rousseau said he 
is, but history only explains toe paradox, 
it doesn't excuse dishonesty. 

PAUL SON ID AN. 

Paris. 

Wronging the Real Right 

Such words as “conservative.” “right- 
ist,” “neo-Nazi" and “skinhead” are of- 
ten used interchangeably in your pages, 
as if each of those groups was a variation 


as if each of those groups was a vanauan 
of toe same philosophy. I noticed two 
examples of this in your Dec. 6 edition. 
A Page 1 article, “Ex-Communisis Tri- 


umph in Italy,” refers to “neofasrists 
and other conservatives,” indicating an 
identity between the groups. A Page 2 
item, m the World Briefs section, is 
titled “Rightist Youths Riot in Germa- 
ny." The information in the article indi- 
cates that these youths might more accu- 
rately have been described as a 
marauding gang of thugs. 

Such careless usage results in the taint- 
ing of words that once had a positive 
meaning . Groups that bold reprehensible 
views and commit heinous acts are equat- 
ed with people of completely different 
political views. Ultimately. Margaret 
Thatcher, Ronald Reagan, racist street 
gan gs and Adolf Hiller become propo- 
nents of toe same ideology. 

KENNETH E BERGMAN. 

Warsaw. 


illness by relieving suffering, managing 
symptoms and coping with the uncertain- 
tv and fear. Several recent studies — of 
metastatic breast cancer patients, lym- 
phoma and mdijpam melanoma pa- 
tients. and patients recovering from heart 
attacks — nave shown that participating 
in support group? not only improves peo- 
ple's mood and coping skills but may help 
them live longer. Unfortunately, many 
inexpensive group interventions are not 
part of standard treatment They are of- 
fered as adjuncts to medical care. They 
are not reimbursed by insurance plans, 
although they cost a small fraction of 

fully covered invasive procedures. 

Moreover, man y of these procedures 
produce only marginally greater bene- 
fits than toe risks they incur. 

Insurance companies pay huge bills 
for in-patient and surgical procedures 
regardless of efficacy, whereas little or 
nothing is paid for time spent helping 
patients to cope with illness. 

Mental health benefits have been sin- 
gled out for benefit caps in toe Gin toe 
health plan. This ignores toe complex 
interaction of mind and body (hat we are 
be ginnin g now to understand. 

Humane care costs less than high-tech 
care and is what patients want and need: 
Americans spent S12 billion last year out 
of pocket on alternative medical care. 

Depression is three times as common 
among medical in-patients and twice as 
common among medical out-patients as 
in the genera] population. 

Depression and anxiety, in turn, make 
medically U1 people heavier users of 
medical services. A study in Canada 
demonstrated that toe least well-adjust- 
ed medically ill patients cost toe health 
care system 75 percent more than do the 
best adjusted ones. largely through un- 
necessary primary care visits, hospital 
days and laboratory services. 

Stress-related symptoms account for 
about 60 percent of all primary care vis- 
its. If comprehensive supportive health 
services can be provided, costs will fall 
and care will improve dramatically. 

Surgical and other medical proce- 
dures have made an enormous differ- 
ence in people's lives. But toe American 
health care system overvalues proce- 
dures at toe expense of old-fashioned 
medical compassion and concern. 

Medicine's oldest adage is "to cure 
rarely, to relieve suffering often and to 
comfort always.” In this century, we 
have twisted that job description. We 
need more compassion and counseling 
and less cutting and testing. The myth of 
cure is costly in human and financial 
lenns; toe price of dashed hopes is high. 
With a focus on care, many individuals 
wito serious diseases can lead longer, 
happier and more productive lives. 

The writer, a professor of psychiatry at 
Stanford University School of Methane, is 
author of “Living Beyond limits,'' about 
coping with serious illness . He contributed 
this comment to The New York Tones. 



Four hundred of the 
world’s most prominent families 
call Fisher Island home. 


There are a few places in the 
world where people can truly 
relax and enjoy a remarkable 
lifestyle. 

One of them is Fisher 
Island. 

It is a 216-acre sanctuary 
of lovely homes, beaches 
and recreational pleasures, 
providing the finest ame ni- 
nes in a serene, pampered 
environment. 

Its seaside residences are 
luxurious and as large as 
9.000 square feet, with ter- 
races of an addirional 5,000 
square feet overlooking the 
Gulf Stream. Biscay ne Bay 
and the skylines of Miami 
and Miami Beach. 

Created by William K. 
Vanderbilt If, great grandson 
of-American industrialist 
Commodore Vanderbilt, 
Fisher Island has been a 
favorite of the world’s impor- 
tant people for 70 years. 

The family's spectacular 
winter estate included a 
dramatic home by the ocean 
filled with antiques from one 
of Napoleon's palaces. On 


Countess Donatella Peca- Blunt of 
Fisher Island and Rome. A beu-seOing 
author. tie Countess hods Mdoe- 
basot Ponatdla Peeri-Bhuu Inc, 
dir cosmetics company she founded. 





. •• ' “ r : ’ 1 1 ' . ; ;r £ ! 


the grounds, Vanderbilt 
erected charming cottages 
and guest villas amid 
resplendent gardens and 
fountains. The mansion and 
surrounding structures have 
been restored to their former 
grandeur as The Fisher 
Island Club. 

In recent years, impressive 
social and recreational facili- 
ties have been added. There 
is a P.B. Dye championship 
golf course; an international 
spa lauded by Town & 
Country as one of the finest 
of the 1990s; a racquerclub 
with clay, grass and hard 
courts; two deepwater mari- 
nas which host the largest 
yachts in the world; a mile of 
Atlantic beach; and a variety 
of excellent restaurants. 

There are manicured parks 
for afternoon srrolls; an island 


shopping plaza with its own 
bank, pose office, trattoria and 
dockmastcr’s office; and, per- 
haps most important of all, an 
atmosphere of security chat 
allows residents to lead a life 
of privacy and pleasure. 

Little wonder, then, chat 
400 of the world’s most distin- 
guished families, hailing from 
39 countries, now call Fisher 
Island home. 

We invite vour inquiry. 

Residences $800,000 - 

$6,000,000 


FISHER ISLAND 


CnlUeany inmtntiuiej 
in dir w arid 

Fisher island. Florida 33109 
(305) 535-6071 / (M0) 624-3251 
Fax (305) 535-6008 

Rescoicd Vanderbilt Guest Cottage 
and Seaside Villa acconiTnudutions 
available from $425 tn $1,000 per nitfht. 


IIik pn*jen a KKr.tri.il whJ. the \c» ]cno heal Estate l ^hbbmi NJR RC 1 in 71K RcRMraunn Ones nm cmtwituic an endorsement of ihc merits m 
value nf Uic pmjcci. Obtain and read the Nn Jcisry Public tMTcnnc stuicmcm hcfptr venire anythin^. This K nm on nfferini; r» any pen, IT in anv sure •‘•hue 
v«ft an I'ffccmj; mjv nn Lufnlh he nuje. Ki|tul l Imn'inj; Oppotojnrtv. 






International Herald Tribune 
luesday, January 11, 1994 




Menswear: Americans in Milan 


By Suzy Menkes 

IntemotiOealHeraU Tribute 




M ILAN— Picture the scene on the 

Via deila Spiga. A dashing young 
man cats a befla figura m his 
American designer suit Ameri- 
can? American! 

This is the season that trig names from the 
United States are riding into Armani coontzy. 
Oscar de la Renta debuts his men’s designer 
coflection in Milan on Wednesday. Donna 
Karan stage a fashion specmcular Thursday at 
Florence’s Pitti Itmnagim Uomo show that fol- 
lows the Milan coflecuona. 

In the 1980s, no sdLrespecting yuppie would 
be seen is iris suspended without an Italian- 
labd jacket draped ova- Ms chair. Now, for the 
new autumn-winter season, American design- 
ers are Ditching for WaD Street clients, while 
Milan designers are in fli gh t from city sKck. 
Gianni Versace left sharp suits behind a nd 
showed wrinkled fabrics and sweet-as-candy 
colors in his show Monday. 

It isn't quins T-bone steaks taking over from 
spaghetti. Most of Kanm’s and de la Renta's 
dotbes are made in Italy — part of a strategy to 
bring their Labels to Europe at acceptable 
prices. 

“We have an army of wonderful people in 
Italy,’’ says de la Renta, whojs making a firing 
visit to Milan before ret urning to Pans to pre- 
sent his couture Show for Raima in 
Oscar de la Renta Pour Homme will be 
launched with a boutique at Saks Fifth Avenue 
in September. 

Donna Kanm’s aim is to “Ming a little piece 
of New York” to Florence. What itwHuw on 
roller blades wheel down the runway against a 
backdrop erf the Brooklyn Bridge ending in 
Milan’s Duomo, the audience should get die 
messa g e that this is menswear — American 
style. 

It is the first time that Karan has shown 
outside the United States, and the menswear 
director, linda Beauchamp , in Milan prep aring 
the event, says that it is meant to show “what 
Donna is all about.” 

“We've made comfortable dotbes that look 
ray tr aditional, " she Says, meaning that the 

clothes have an easy, spotty American style but 
are often crafted in Italy, the show will indude 
the DENY (Drama Karan New York) lower- 
iced line of rough wear and sports dotbes. 
menswear line, inaugurated in 1991, is now 


in its third full season after being introduced 
exdusvdy at Barneys in New Yak. 

What do the macstios of Milano think about 
the American invasion? ‘ 

“I think if* n ormal — I don't believe in 
fashion wearing a flag, there is just good arid 
bad fashion," said Versace as he onvcaled three 
different imam a 
, in the courtyard of ha 
" it the irony is that while the American 
designers are gang for broke with aB-ItaBan 
luxury, Versace himself is destroying the myth. 
He smni^tBistructuredsmtsmthfl finest cash- 
mere, with matching sweatas made from the 
same yam — but aH detiberaldy aged and 
wrinkled. The dothes, and especially the pants, 
were on the baggy side. 

“My new mood is to wash out everything,” 
he said. “We are at the end of the century, it’s 


US. designers are 
pitching for Wall Street 
clients, while Italians are 
in Sight from city slick 


farewell to classics, everything is easy, I want a 
sense erf future and space.” 

Nestling among the ddnxe rains of the sharp 
suit were dotbes with a country twist: outfitsin 
loden or tweed fabrics. Versus, an erommental 
young line, was a wild bunch of animal prints 
with swishing long coats and a sense of louche 
defiance.- 

Krizia’s show had a decadent fed — not in 
the rased textured knits, which were the finest 
part of the collection, but in die rich-hippie 
velvets and long dandy jackets worn with 
cuffed pants. Knzia’s tailoring references were 
to the 196CK and 70s — a fashion era that has 
already bear warmed ora. Much fresher were 
the long coats with a gamekeeper feeling and 
die knits in patchworks and patterns, for vast 
sweatas or chunky vests. Here as elsewhere, 
corduroy is making a strong comeback. 

“In Italy times are ray tough, it will take 
time and I don’t see much hope in the short- 
term,” says Krizia’s Aldo Pinto. 

Milan’s once sleek and prosperous men’s 
fashion industry seems to be reflecting Italy’s 
political and social npheavaL Franco Moschino 


has ftiiwd to ecology, matting his manifesto 
starts of unbleached cotton or no-chemical 
dyes, and knits from strips of jersey so that 
they look like a woven rag. Pattons are of flora 
and fauna — seaweed fronds, stamens and 
drops of water pm under a microscope and 
pbotoprinted. 

“Nature is the only fashion trend to believe 
in,” says Moschino to explain Ms eco-friendly 
collection. 

Anthony Tarassi expresses well the new 
tougteng-rt-out Italian look. His collection of 
sportswear pieces, including soft leather with a 
rough finish and knitwear inspired by medieval 
armor, is luxury with a rugged face. The base is 
in an easy fit with shirts and jackets both 
hanging loose, unstructured at the shoulders, 
and in subtle bird’s-eye tweeds and textured 
velvet or plaid. The colon ate Milan’s favorite 
warm bnwnu coded with watery green. 

Fahio In ghinmri Stnrii tnnlr a basic sniL with 
slightly baggy pants and square vest, then 
showed it in winter-weight cotton alongside 
■ traditional tweed. And there was a pinch of 
spice from around the world — a shawl from 
Ukraine, a hat from Hasidic Jews, a knit from 
Mongolia. Everything was shaken up by layer- 
ing jackets, vests and big shirts. 

Lndano Soprani had left behind the urban 
gray stone of Milan and gone to the country for 
inspiration: knits as bumpy as furrowed fields, 
nobby oatmeal tweeds and luxurious plaid 
trapper dtirts. The flannel shirt as soft and big 
as a shepherd's smock was part of a peasant 
lode that ran wild when fringed scarves woe 
tied round the hips. 

Iceberg’s collection had a merry fed to its 
Batman and Snoopy motif sweaters shown in a 
setting Hire a downtown galley awning. British 
designer Paul Mochrie imposed neat themes: 
“gamekeeper” for hairy tweeds; “The Sting” 
fra square vests with easy pants and a 1930s 
.flavor; “Batman” for mimnght-bhxe velvets. It 
added up to sportswear with a sense or humor 
and fabnc research from the oiled Black: Watch 
tartan waterproofs to printed corduroy. 

The first message from the Milan season, 
•which Giorgio Armani doses Wednesday, is of 
designers in fli ght from urban classicism- The 
ray long jacket and the ray short coat f 


is also the long military or gamekeeper coat and 
a surge of rugged kni t w e a r . And if you buy one 
next winter, it will have to be a pair of 
[pants. 


Day for Night for a New Generation 


t: t— : . . r- • — . . — v.... 


Cbmpfaa- Mem (ooept DKNYI 


Top. de la Renta's cashmere coat with bird ' s-eye tweed pants; above ; DKNTs silver climbingjacket and biking 

jacket ; inset , Versace's tweed pea jacket with leather pants, and Krizia's elongated dandy jacket and vest. 


Inttnuaional Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — From a basic Mao jacket to 
swanky Avenue Montaigne is a 
mighty fashion leap. But Michel 
Klein has made it. The ready-to- 
wear designer famous for making a Chinese- 
inspired jacket the hot seller in a mail-order 
catalogue takes ova this season at Guy Lar- 
oche haute couture. He will show his first 
coflection on Jan. IS. 

Klein, 36, aims-to work in the. granrf tradi- 
tion but to attract a new generation. 

“I am sure there are cheats for couture, bat 
we need to de-drama tize it,” he says. “All the 
ceremonial can be fri ghtening It should be 
more human, less aggressive. Clients mustn’t 
be intimidated. 

“It has to be luxurious — but not too rich. 
You have to respect the spirit of haute cou- 
ture and the way of making the dotbes. Bnt it 
is d£mod6 to do things that are not made to 
be worn." 

That is the reason, says Klein, that be is 
cancm trating on day rather than evening 
dotbes. He has avoided heavy fabrics, trying to 
give a feeling of tightness and modernity by 
day. For evening there are draped crepes, flat 
fabrics and any effects with satin n ipm. 

“When you have rigor by day, you need 
poetry at night," be says. 

He designed the day wear without choosing 
fabrics; for evening, the materials were Ms 
inspiration. Fra both, he started by writing a 
story abort what be wanted to see, creating an 
imagined lifestyle and series of events. The 
idea is to give a strong image with the day 
dothes and magic at night to ore braise, whose 
founder, Guy Laroche, died in 1989. 

The labd is exceptionally strong in Asia, 
including China, but Laroche needs to define 
its fashion image for the 1990s. As with other 
couture houses that have brought in new 
talent, Klein wtO continue to design fra Ms 
own labd, set up in 1981. 

Klein has worked with modem, stretch, 
easy-fit fabrics. In couture he can indnlgc his 
longtime wish to cut dresses on tire bias & la 
Viormet. 

“There is such a rapport between the cou- 
turier and the fabric that just does not exist in 
ready-to-wear.” be says. “The fabric comes 
alive. In pr&t-h-porter it is the fabric which 
dominates. Couture is like sculpture. And 
pan of the myth is uang an iron as a sculptor 
uses a palette knife.” 

The Paris couture season, which opens Sat- 
urday, inaugurates the purpose-built fashion 
complex at the Louvre. But Laroche will show 
more traditionally at the Ritz Hotd — because 
“the dotbes must be seen dose-up,” Kkdn 
says, and you “cannot do a change of style and 
place that does not correspond to the intimacy 
of couture, which should beKke a rendezvous. 

The conundrum of couture in these poLiri- 
cafly correct times is that it has to be exciting 
enough to create an imap- for the bouse — 



fe»(UnplcMaBiD 

Michel Klein, taking over at Laroche, wants to “de-dramatize couture. ” 


yet as discreet as the wealthy now desire. 

Klein, says that today’s customers are also 
demanding of their time: “People are busy, 
they are not ready to wait a month or sot 
weds. Fm not even sure that they want three 
fittings — even tf his better made. They get up 
in the nwmmg and say “I want a navy suit.’ 

In Ms ready-to-wear collections Klein is 
known for his use of basic color — not, he 
says, because he avoids color, but because he 
bcKeves that h most be done in One materials. 

“I love color!” he explains, citing his vivid- 
ly decorated vacation home in Provence. 


“The problem is using color in dothes. So 
often it wipes out the personality.” 

Far the couture be has chosen navy, white 
and red, but also “Oriental colors,” mixes of 
brown, sand and gold, and blue-mauve chif- 
fon. 

“People keep saying that couture is dead 
and that it is no longer the point of departure 
for fashion,” he says. “But it is there to make 
people dream.” 

Suzy Menkes 



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Of a Double Dip 


Shot Across Ferry’s Bow 

Qnnnpil Ticket Sales Test the Waters 



Compdrd by Our Staff From IXspacrha 

WIESBADEN, Germany — 

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North America 


Approx, weighting: 26% 
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ter growing by 1.6 percent in l992, 
the Federal Statistics Office said 
Monday- 

Eastern Germany’s fledgling 
capitalist economy grew by 63 per- 
cent while the German economy as 
a whole saw its gross domestic 
product fall by 1.3 percent, 
Economists said the preliminary 
figures for 1993 confirmed fears of 
a “donbkKlip" recession in West- 
tan Germany that may extend 
through the first quarter of this 
year. 

The figure for Western Germany 
“corresponds pretty precisely to 
our expectations,” said Holger 
WmAMfine - an economist at Mer- 
rill LyndiBank AG. “We see our 
fears of a double-dip recession coor 
firmed." , 

West German figures for tne 
fourth quarter were not rel e ased cm 
Monday but are scheduled for pub- 
lication on Tuesday. Economists 
widely think that they will show a 
slight decline, of 03 percent to 03 
percent, in the wake of gains m the 
se con d and third quarter. . 

The G erman Institute far Eco- 
nomic Research, an independent 
think last wee k rhaltan ff d the 
view that two quartos of growth 
had matted a turning point. 

The statistics office bad been 
planning to release the figures for 
1993 an Tuesday but issued than 
after the data were leaked to a Ger- 
man fi"»no"l news agency. The 
data are provisional, and more de- 
tails will be given on Tuesday. 

Separately, the country’s urnon 
for civil servants, the Deutschex 
Beamtenbund, has asked for 4 per- 
cent more pay in 1994 for West 
Germany's 134 mflBan avQ ser- 
vants. The union said it also want- 
ad the salaries of Eastern Germa- 
ny’s 80,000 civil servants brought 

more into line with pay in Western 

_ Germany. 

no (Reuter, Bloomberg) 


By Erik Ipsen 1 

Iniemastoatd Herald Tribune ‘ 

LONDON - In the last three years EngM 

Channel ferry operators have spent nearly ilbu- 

onwhetber jt has aD been for naught 
Thai is when tickets go on sale for the first land 
crossing of the F"gfeh Channel since the Ice Ages 
^Eorotunnd Fl^sLe Shutde service. The setwe, 

sdSfcfanb sort m «a “5 1 , “ 

SaasasEBBBss* 

Ofthe freight, with trains having every 15 mrnuies 
from other side at peak times. 

The service will likely be overseen by G-eorges- 
CbSiSaLot, the 54-year-dd pwjtoio^e 
Frendi employment agency Adia, who 
id news reports Monday, has been sdectoi to 
replace Sir Alastair Morton as chief 
^romnneL Eurotunnel execuuves would not con- 
firm the reports. 

Round-trip Eurotunnel tickets are ejected to 
mst between £160 and £260, for a car and however 
many passengers can be squeezed mtoit Pnces are 
to be announced Tuesday. 

The through-rail. Eurostar service, which wiU 
take passengers without can dm?* from 
to PariTta three hours, and to 
hours 15 minutes, does not yet have a start-up date 
less vame than “sometime this summer- tne 
pasymg w trains, each holding nearly 800 people, 
will compete with airlines. 

For now, the battle between 
remains all words. A spokesman for P&O Feme, 
which along with Siena Sealmk does the bulk of 
the business on the Dover to Calais route, decried 
Le Shuttle as being like a long subway nde. He said 


that the only amenitieson offer are “a lavatory and 

S ^ifr^LLe Shuttle will have only one toilet in 
* Sdlaflcarriage and will offer paswaw? a 
choice between remaining in then ear .or 

Ssasft&ttBBL: 

A ferry executive decried 
Le Shuttle as being like a long 
subway ride, with ?, a 
lavatory and a light bulb” as 
the only amenities on offer. 

malls, restaurants and kiddie pfc l^** 5 *™*™ 
mention space for 630 cam and hSOO p^mgers. 
“We used the same intenor designer who designed 
the Windows on the World restaurant m New 

Y BothStST^ P&O have special restaurants 
for truckers, catering to hm apP«*“ fca_ 
turing menus long on rned foods and coffee- 
Nonetheless, the advantages in the batue oe- 
tween trains and boats belong mostly to Eurotun- 
nel. Le Shuttle promises to get you off the read on 
one side of the channel and back on it at the far 
side in 60 minutes. That is a ^<mn^ ±21 onjy 
* H overspeed’s aging fleet of four hovercraft boats 
S^STbSovercraf t have a capacity of only 

s 55 cars 

■; The best the conventional femes can promise is 
f a total higfaway-to-highway trip of just ava 1U0 

5 See CHUNNEL, Page 15 


Rexrodt Supports 
Plan to Rescue 

Metallgesellschaft 


Confided by 0 \* Staff Fnm Dtspaid.s l] 

FR.ANKFl.fRT — Economics c 
Minisier Gunter Rexrodt on Mon- u 
dav threw his weight behind a res- 
cue plan for Meiallgesellschafi AG. s 
urging shareholders and creditors t 
to help bail out the meials concern. 

Mr. Rexrodt said a rapid reoiga- s 
nization of the company — whicn 
faces bankruptcy if 3 rescue is not 

approved by Wednesday — would I 

help protect jobs and reduce tension ; 
on international metals markets. < 
It was the first time a German 
minister bad spoken in rapport of 
the company since it disclosed the 
extent of its’ financial problems last 
week and announced the 32 billion 
Deutsche mark (SI. 84 bUlion* res- 
cue deal to ensure its existence, 

Mr. Rexrodt said it would help to 
restore confidence in Metallgesdls- 
chaft. one of Germany’s largest 
companies, if banks agreed ro ap- 
prove the rescue package- ‘With 
this, the confidence in the future of 
MG can be restored," he said. 

Metallgesdlschaft last week an- 
nounced a loss of 18 billion DM for 
from oil trading in the United States 
and said there could be additional 
losses of as much as 13 billion DM- 
It is seeking loans and a capital 
injection valued at 32 billion DM 
from creditors and shareholders. 

Two former executives — Heinz 
Schimmelbusch, who was removed 
last month as management board 
c hairman, and Mesnhard Forster, 


the company’s former chief finan- 
cial officer, are under investigation 
in the case. Metallgesellschaft re- 
fused Monday to comment on the 
status of the former executives or of 
the investigation. 

Another major creditor voiced 
support for the rescue package. 
Eberhard 7-inn, a board member at 
Baveriscbe Landesbank, said: “I 
believe this is a practicable par- 
age. It would certainly lie in the 
company’s interests for^ creditor 
banks lo accept the deaL" 

He said Bayerische Landesbank 
had not formally decided whether 
it would agree to the terms yet, but 
he added: “We hope we wiU be able 
to get it through " 

Mr. 7.inn refused to comment on 
how many of the company’s creditor 
hanks would have to approve the 
package for MeiaDgesellschaft s 
capital requirements to be reached, 
but he said the bulk of creditors 


would probably have to vote for il 

Banking sources say Bayerische 
Landesbank is owed 380 million 
DM by the company, making it Me- 
tallgesellschaft's second-largest 
creditor bank after Deutsche Bank 
AG, which is owed 539 milli on DM. 

Manin Kohlhaussen, Commere- 
bank’s chairman, said he thought 
Metallgesellschaft restructuring 
plan is acceptable but his bank 
would wait for other creditor banks 
consent to the plan before giving its 
own agreement. (Reuters, AFX) 


Gillette to Cut 2,000 Jobs in Bid to Restructure 

_ rjn.it. u** ities abroad in past years, was re- ny could* 


Compiled by Oar Staff From OapatdKS 

BOSTON — Gillette Gx, a ma- 
jor U3. maker of consumer goods, 
said Monday it would e timin aie 
2,000 jobs, or 6 percent of its work 
force, over the next two years in a 
restructuring which will mostly m- 
volve its operations outside the 
United States. 

But it said it would also add 
other jobs and that the work force 
at the end of this year would be 
unchanged at about 34,000 people. 

The company said it would take 
a charge of $164 million, or 74 


Thinking Ahood 


France Can’t Kick Protectionist Habit 


P 


BvRegMdMe 

Intavatioad Herald Tribune 


ARIS —The French are stiD 

ingova their “defeaT^itaU^ 

iS. v.. rj <t«w Ym g Game 


r S^by 

brinkmanship ar the end of the 

wflrid trade t alks last month. . . \ 

while Fnmrfs nesodating^yi^^ 

mav serve the pofitfcal 
5 »- . cjamh^ RnttAchm for France's real 


era, who do not, and' to prop up meffidfint 
sectore raiher than .restructure them. 

; In fact, of course, the amcessi«B France 
won on agriculture are notg^tostoptoe 
now incveraiWe momentum of {a™ 

. reform in the European Uman. Ana fee sei- 
back to Washington's attemp^ to.hme ite 
way with the Frendi nxme ma^wfflnmbe 
enough m riridd France from the new. 500- 


Muuster toomou - -T^, , _j . 
long-term interestsitis a 

il 5ERSS-- 

.^jasaggSaS;- 

readiness to meri the eoonomte 

. 

SLSSSBmS£gS 

SsfifigagiSs: - 

case France got only, a fractma of.wtot 

S*S>tem is that Mr. 

-nectacul^r t for two groups tiat g 


Fiance’s dee|>-rooted 

(j^grawdwibt<®^ ,e 

counii^^ 


the pamful policies needed to brmg the coun- 
try Wo the next century- 
Unfortunately, it is not jug Frimce thm is 
affected. By insisting that the Eur ?P ea ^V*^ 
strengthen its defenses against cheap 
rapartoT the price of its agreement to the^ul 
deuunder the General Agreanmt on Ms 
and Trade, France has poriied ^ 

Union further in the protecuomst dirajKm. 

The most tikely rauneduie ^ctm a ^East’ 
cm Europe, whose competitive export poten- 
tial gives France the shivers. 

The result is that as NATO leaders this 
week discuss bow to incorporate the CELTS' 
mg East European derroCT^mlo^ 
Astern security system, France has 
that their economic imegratum mto the 
Unkm will probably be mote difficult. 

. . Kir hkvtoNUlini! hL> EU 


channel tedmologies that are about to over- 
whelm European Kfcvtoco. 

Most senior French 'oOktalj (kmawdl tos 
fttil welL They also know ^ 

everyone else, must chan^ C01 5??L^ 

. SaWiet. BulMrt Ban^r«yf 
nbagn that he is ready to share that knowl- 
edge with-the Frendi de m b ra te 

Rather than prepare the gr oa ^ f ?^ 
chan^ he is leaifcg the country 
, „ mm anna so far as to 




the opposite direction.™ 

sug^^a recent ~ 

Shntet — tiwt cnrihzation means 
struggling against market forces.. 

t^Sder it willultimatdybe to unplemeat 


partners mto accepting 
Knadur has set a rotten precedent! for d^- 
soon-making in the new, supposedly more 
unified, post-Maastricht Europe. 

Naturally, France's partners are relieved 
iiiar a serious confrontation has been aveneo. 
Bui their edebrations of a n ew dawn or 

■mxasetw- . 

MpAhrmil by one of its monbas. trance 
created the disunity in the first place, and 
kept on until il had bent Germany to its will 
bv threatemng a European crisis. 

Of omuse. it is better for the GATT round 
ID have succeeded with mnmsiom i to Frana 
than for it to have failed vnrhom thexoTbat 
was v*at gave the Fkad >wd‘ 

But it wordd be much, much belter, ten 

France and everyone dse, ri Mr. BaJkdmlrad 

.used the UnWay R*"™ 4 10 start . diS Pf^f 

his country’s lcmg-standing protecuomst illu- 
sions, rather ***»" reinforce them. 


emts a share, against fourth-quar- 
ter earnings to pay for the restruc- 
turing. which would consolidate 
business units and factories. 

The company also announced 
that operating profit before the 
charge, as well as sales, had set 
records for the fourth quarter and 
for the entire year. The company 
said it would report the figures for 
the quarter and the year on Jan- 27. 

The company’s stock rose SI. lip 
in New York Stock Exchange trad- 
ing, to $59,625. 

Alfred M. Zden, chairman and 

Italy to Sell 
j 33% of EVfl 
On Market 

CompdrdbYOvrSiaff From Dapacha 

ROME — About 33 percent 
of the shares in the state- 
owned banking company are 
to be sold to investors in Italy. 
Europe and the United States, 
Treasury Minister Hero Bar- 
ucci said an Monday. 

The sale, which begins at the 
end of the month, could raise 
up to 22 trillion lire ($129 bQ- 
hon) to pay off Italy’s huge 
debts and make 1ML Isutuio 
Mobfliare lialiano, the first 
Italian bank stock quoted on 
the New York Stock Exchange. 

Under the comptex privaii- 

_1 aha Tr«ain/ IS 


chief executive, said Gillette was 
not cutting back or rerhiemg over- 
all operations, but “adjusting how 
it is organized and how it operates 
to compete more effectively in a 
global arena." He did not say what 
divisions would be affected. 

“The onlv thing I can say from a 
geographical standpoint is that the 
United Slates will be impacted 
much less than any other country, 
he said. “I can also state there are 
no plans to sell any product lines. 

Mr. Zeien said Gillette, which 
has established multi-product facil- 


ities abroad in past years, was re- 
sponding to increasing dobaliza- 
tion of the economy with a move 
toward facilities that could serve 

broader geographic markets. 

Mr. Zeien said that in 1993 the 
company’s ventures in China, Po- 
land and Russia had exceeded their 
start-up period targe ts. 

He also said that the company 
would increase spending on capiim 
resources, advertising, and research 
and development. 

He said that the board approved 
the realignment so that the compa- 


ny could “take advantage of oppor- 
tunities created by the oontmumg 
trend to more open world trad*. 

He said Gillette expected sig- 
nificant ongoing operatmgeffiaen- 
acs" which will begin lobe felt in 
1995 

Tony Vento, an analyst at Ed- 
ward D. Jones & Co„ approved the 
moves by Gillette, noting that mak- 
ers of consumer products find it 
difficult to raise prices in an era of 
low inflation. “Any cost-oil ting m 
this environment is good, he sauL 
(AFP. Bloomberg, AT. At A) 


California ’s World Wines 

Value of Slate’s Exports is Growing 

. . ■ i. nllhrmph th( 


ration plan, the Treasury is 
selling 200 million shares to 
individuals but also large insti- 
tutional investors. 

I talians will be offered 75 
mill i nn shares. Foreign and do- 
mestic institutional investors 
will be soki around 90 nallion, 
5 million wiU be reserved for 
employees and about 35 mil- 
lion for U3 investors. 

Separately, the stale-con- 
trolled industrial company 
Finmeccanica SpA said it took 
in a net 232 billion lire (SI 35 
mfllion) from the sale of stakes 
in subsidiaries Ansaldo Tran- 
sport! SpA, Union Switch & 
Signal Inc. and Elsag Bailey 
Process Automation Inc. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


By Lawrence Malkin 

Imemarhntal Herald Tribune 
As American agricultural negoMu^ hustled in 
and out of the climactic trade talks ™ a 

persuasive man stood there ronmding itiiem i that 

«tafSffB2SaT! the last 

Institute, did better than Hollywood’s ^movremak- 
ere and came away from last month s “^^ons 
3!h ■ urriff reductions in most counro« where 
American wine is now big business. D^ite th 
"recessions in Europe and Japa^ ^h rainun^ 
Spmcnis, the institute proj eaed the y^ofU 5^ 
wSe exports to 90 countries to have ““^ted by 
about S10 raflKon in 1993, to S ] 85 mUton. 

The gain in revenue even as volume falls i is *m 
mdiratiou of the progress of CaMoruia wn^ m 
moving upmarket, and that is the result of a strong 
SSoSj rampaign. The state steadily mc«a“d mt- 
St voSeby about 5 million gjknu i 
btcrsi a vear up to 1992, when 37 mOhm gallons 
were sold abroad; thm is pe^ami^ongto 
more than are bebeved to have been stapp^ w 

year. Bulk wines, mainly dMtmed fOTJa^and 

government wine stores 
make up only 28 pereoit of the lat^t wrai 
The great noses of Europe may be 
forge ttmg that the United States ^theworids 
fourth-lJgest producer and sevem h-largesi^x- 
wme, and that 90 percent conus , from 

*TI53^ ftK . s SbfJ5: 

nerawifiahuge inventory during the recent reas- 
sian, so they turned abroad. A weakdotoandaSl 
mflKoa promotion program paid for by theU> 


nartiv because the states steady dimate 
makes to^Uctable annual quality 
fruitier than most European ms 
American law sugar must c^ from tbejrape and 
cannot be added to boost the ^coholtevd._ 

Tough quality standards are enforwd by 
emment tospeciora. Last month, an dderly wd 
SSpt^wer began serving ^ 
on sentence for labeling plonk as: 
forma’s native grape. (Who «^« J .^ F . tuIlc ^ 
simflar scandals m Bordeaux and Italy? 

“People are tired of spending S 50 a bottte for 
wine as they did in the ’80s. and wondering »*eib- 
^1981 vS a Rood year." said Steve Burns, inter- 
for the 

Wine institute. “We offo - dependable qiwbw « 
Sd pricS: You know what you get, and thats 

what people want now. . 

As v.iih so manv other products. Japan is Cmi- 
fornia wine’s toughest market betaose of adi^ot 
cal tariff structure. The Japanese do no * 
compete with top-quality 

French grand cru attracts a 21 percent tanfl, wmen 
^essentially a luxury tax. But Cdifanu i teble 
wine in the bottle gets socked with an 
of 67 percent. California vmtners shrp 40 percrai 
of their wine in bulk to Japan to pay lower tariffs. 

iST" ouctlv whatJapanese M«wn 
want, because the law allows them to label the 
California product as Japanese rf , J 

with only 5 percent of their iocal brew^The Japa 
S thiu cS in on the marketing prog* 
Somia gets reduced to the status of a raw 


See WINE, Page 15 


7.1PPEMCY & INTEREST RATES 


Dinunisting 


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Jan. 10 


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By Geraldine Fabnkant 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The man who 
first agreed to the sale oT Para- 
mount Communications Inc. may 
soon find himself out of a job. 

Tbc chairman of Paramount. 
Martin S. Davis, who forged an 
allianc e with Viacom Inc. in part to 
insure bis Future role at me merged 
company, might not remain at Par- 
amount even if his former auy; 
Sumner Redstone, the cfaaumac i of 
Viacom, wins its battle with Qvt, 
Network Inc. to acquire Para- 
mount 

Initially, Mr. Redstone agreed 
that Mr. Davis, 66, wmld remam 
as chief executive of the tnogea 
company. But after. Viacom and 
Blockbuster Eniertainmott J- or P- 
on Friday announced thor gm to 
merge and to make a new bid for 
pSStount. Mr. Redraw had no 
roledeagnated for Mr. Davis m the 
new company. 

Under the new plan, Mr. sw- 

■ store was io become dtainn^ tf » 
’ mergpd Paramoum-Vlact^Block- 
and Blockbusters chair- 


Q VC Extends Bid to Jan. 21 

The Associated Pres 

JStS ^ ssstssssSsas 

malting its new erfferthat it also ' 541 . 875 , on the 

On Monday, Viacom OassA stodi • ^ 9^5 jn over-the- 

American Stock Exdmnge, QVC t^bW Sl^, jn J75. on 

counter trading, and Paramormtdechned a snare, 

the New York Stock Exchange. 


man, H. Wayne Hmzeoga, would 
become vice chairman. 

But during a stormy conference 
call with Wall Street analysts. Mr. 
Redstone said his chief executive, 
Frank Bioodi Jr„ would be the new 
chief executive. 

-We haven't really discussed the 
possibility of any rote," one analyst 
leaned Mr. Redstone saying of 
Ml. Davis. “There aright be one for 
him in the new company. 


Mr. Biondi would he chief execu- 
tive of Viacom's merged company, 
whether il succeeds in buying Para- 
mount or not. 

The analyst said Mr. Redstone 
reported having had a pleasant 
chat with Mr. Davis and saying the 
Paramount chairman had been 
happy with the new bid. But a per- 
son dose to Mr. Davis said he had 
been upset . 

A spokesman for Mr. Davis said 


later, however, thai Mr. Davis was 
not concerned about his contmuing 
role. The spokesman added that no 
matter who wins the takeover bat- 
tle, Mr. Davis’s objectives win be to 
act the best value Tor Paramount 
shareholders and to ensure that ihe 
winner can operate the company 

competently. 

Viacom now is offering S105 in 
cash for 50.1 percent of Para- 
mount, and QvC has bid $92 a 
share for 51 percent. Each is otter- 
ing the balance in stock. 

David Londoner, who follows 
Paramount for Wertheim Schroe- 
der & Co. said in comparing the 
bids: “If Viacom merges with 
Blockbuster. you are getting alot of 
Viacom stodc, which reflects assets 
that, long term, work less wdl in 
the- new media environment. 

“If you believe that media mag- 
era today are based on preparing 
■ for the information super hi gb- 
1 way," he added, “Viacom's pur- 
chase of Blockbuster drags Viacom 
l off the main road, making the loug- 

Lenn value of QVCs stock more 

1 attractive." 



: •- • _ _• ; ... ^ liiudMXrtA* - 


Page 10 


ENTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1994 




MARKET diary 


Dow Soars 45 Points 
As Optimism Grows 


Compiled by Opt Staff Fnm ttupauha 

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
surged Monday, with shares of 
aulo, telephone and software com- 
panies setting the pace, amid broad 
optimism about the economy and 
corporate earnings. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age set a sixth consecutive record, 
rising 44.74 points, to dose at 
3,865.51. It has risen a total of 
111.42 points in the last six ses- 
sions. 

Gainers outnumbered losers by 3 

M.Y. Stocfca " 

4-lo-3 ratio on ihe New York Slock 
Exchange, where volume totaled 
317.6 million shares, down from 
323J8 million on Friday. 

The stock market was under- 
pinned by stability in bonds. Inves- 
tors apparently were confident that 
interest rates are not soon beaded 
higher. The yield on the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond inched up 
to 6.24 percent from 6-23 percent 
on Friday. 

"Inflation just doesn't seem to be 
a problem, and that means we can 
see some fairly decent economic 
growth and earnings growth with- 
out overheating the economy." said 
Gene Grandone, an investment 
counselor at Nonhem Investment 
Counselors in Chicago. 

“People continue to recognize 
that the economic outlook is good." 
said Peter Caneio, chief investment 
strategist at NatWest Securities. 

Dealers said the market had been 
underpinned in particular by a se- 
ries of indicators last week on job 


V5u Anocicnd Pie» 


ion. tO 


The Dow 


Daily dosings of the • 

Dow Jones industrial average 


3400 


growth, car sales and factory or- 
ders, which encouraged investors to 
buy stocks of companies that are 
sensitive to economic cycles. 

Blockbuster Entertainment was 
the most-active New York Stock Ex- 
change issue, falling 4? to 28. Para- 
mount was down 1 'b to 775*. Via- 
com was off 4Vi to 41%, and QVC 
dropped l Vi to 39'<<. The fails among 
the players in the Paramount take- 
over battle came after Viacom raised 
the cash portion of its offer to S 105 a 
share for 50.1 percent of Paramount 
in an attempt to outbid QVC. It also 
agreed to merge with Blockbuster, 
which is helping finance its bid. 

Telefonos de Mexico was No. 2 
among the actives, down I'y at 65'i. 

Its shores fefl on reports the Mexi- 
can government plans to sell in com- ! 0ioci(E 

ing weeks its remaining 4.6 percent , t35m 
stake in Tdmex. Dealers warned ‘ 
that weekend violence in Mexico, 
including three car bombs in Mexi- 
co City, may affect the American 
depositary receipts of Mexican com- 
panies. The violence follows a peas- 
ant uprising begun Jan. 1 . 

Chrysler rose 14 to 58-%, Ford 
climbed 2% to 6714. and General 
Motors rose 1% to 59%. Meetings 
with company executives at the De- j 
troit Auto Show led some analysts 
to raise earnings estimates - 

Phone companies, including Bell j tSS -c 
A tlantic, U S West, Southwestern 
Bdl and Pacific Telesis were stron- 
ger. The sector was boasted after U 
S West said it would invest $750 
million to connect 750,000 homes 
with new video services. 



J A S O N D J 
1993 1994 


Dow Jonw Avtre^n 


OPM Hi low Lost CO*. 

, InOu* 3826X2 3U5 lS 1 DUU 3843-51 -44.74 
| TVwtt I7W70 1*J&44 179520 ibioj® -70J7 

1 urn 2n*s nun 2a1.ro 22x23 -its 
C omp 139*26 1 41X37 139*73 141X37 - 1104 



Sttriliro Per n+vtrlc t 

vt-lots 

or rat 

am 

BB7 

90S 

Standard & Poor 1 * Indexes 

Mar 8*9 901 

mo* 915 917 

902 

920 

881 

rei 

High low awe arae 

Jui 925 931 

Sea wx MS 

*44 

931 

m 


industrials SS3X( 544J8 55X49 +147 

Tronw. 44X40 4J6JS 44121 + 5*9 

uttimn 16972 147.9? 10942 +1J0 

Flnone* 4449 44J4 44 M + UX8 

SPS03 4377 467XS <7127 +137 

SP ICO 4»J5 43139 43975 +124 


NYSE Indues 


HR* 


IHT 


Comoosite 
Industrials 
Trump, 
u mines 
Flnone* 


Low doso CO’oe 

— 23276 +2X2 

— 371.94 ■+ U1 

— 279je +3411 

— 22571 +17* 

— 7TE54 + 1J3 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Cm* 


HWI Low Pm.CtaM 


Food 


NASDAQ Indexes 


NYSE Most Actives 


Composite 
ineHjsirlaK 
Fincnce 
insurance 
Telecomm 
I Banks 
1 Tramp. 


HU Low aw ewp* 
787X1 7827a J866C +375 
91770 sizes Knsa +4.1* 
S9C.98 £2267 891 .55 + 2X6 

0C1XJ £9273 91334-91278 - 

183X1 18146 182X1 +064 [ 
47077 U5Si 4BTJ4 + 0.W 1 


906 

no 

934 

E5t.SottB.Ull 

Mnorf pettonrtrle too-tots of S ton* 
jos 1.187 1,190 1.1*5 1.190 1.178 l,W 

Afar 12M 1208 1712 1703 1.19* 1.193 

EEC 33 70S 1702 1700 1.192 1,193 

Jrt 17*8 1701 IjS 1702 1,187 1.MS 

too 1.199 iSl 1701 1.199 1.183 LIU 

S 1.199 1JCH NT. N.T. 1.104 1,189 

Jon LICT 1U N.T. N.T. 1.TU UB? 

Esi. Solos 1.191 

Mwi low qom ant 

WHITE SUGAR CMOtH) . __ . 

Ooitars oor metric d 58 •>» 

Mar 20UB 2B4X0 284.40 785.10 — 138) 

Star 2*7ja N.T. 2SU0 2WJ0 — 170 

1 ABO N.T. N.T. 29170 29270 — [L70 

! N.T. NT. 20170 25350 - 050 

| DM N T. NT. WW 2B070 - 270 

Mar N.T. NT. 3050 28270 — I JO 

Est sales 721 Pr*v. solos MW. OP*n In- 
terest 12519. 


Metals 


CUM 

DM 


AmExd 

GnMotr 

FordM 

Dtsney 

drOv i 

Merc* 

pneAid 

AT&T 

GTE 

wawi s 

US Sura 

OwvSr 

Cllrt OTP 


VOL NOR 

LOW 

Lad 

CM. 

90858 M 

2+ 1 ’* 

28 

— «k 

8230 45") 

+3V, 

651k 

— 1U 

40121 77 Vi 

29 

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37771 59*k 

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59<4 

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31570 67<A 

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47 V. 

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21490 4Dk 

46’4 

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30537 184k 

I7*k 

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*kk 

7*316 37*k 

36+a 

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+ Vi 

27343 19V, 

18*k 

row 

>k 

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54 Vk 

55 

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34 Vk 

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241k 

74V, 

+ Ik 

23976 26 Va 

TJtk 

2S*k 

-2 

22936 SOW 

S7>u 

58W 

- IV, 

23862 38*6 

3714 

ssy. 

-Ik 


75*77 7074 76679 +879 | 


Previous 
■M ASk 


AMEX Stock Index 


•0*4 Low Oom COIN 
477.98 477.7* 47878 — 0J1 


AMEX Most Acl*V«S 



VnL 

wot. 

taw 

Last 

CM. 

EcnaBav 

11943 

14 

139S 

14 


FtNSCO 

119*7 

3V„ 

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Atari 

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74k 

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>*k 

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867* 

7Vk 

644 

71k 

+ 14 

Hov-qO a 

■33* 

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7374 

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seoatnwu 

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3766 

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3404 

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11 Vi 

114k 

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71h 

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7433 

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- ’A 


(Reuters. UPI. Bloomberg) 


Strong U.S. Outlook 
Gives Dollar a Boost 


Kmgkl-RiJJer 

NEW YORK — The dollar ral- 
lied on Monday. lifted by a global 
outlook that underscores the rela- 
tive strength of the U.S. recovery 
versus the depressed economies of 
other major industrial nations. 

The dollar got an initial lift from 
news that the West German gross 

Foreign Exchange 

domestic product contracted by 1.9 
percent in 199?. This strengthens 
speculation of another cut in Ger- 
man interest rates, probably no lat- 
er than early February, if the coun- 
try's inflation remains on a 
downward trend. 

The dollar dosed Monday at 
1.7338 Deutsche marks, up from 
1.7275 DM late Friday, and at 
1 1225 yen. up from II 1.85 yen. 

Tbc U.S. currency rose to 1.47 15 
Swiss francs from 1.4660 francs 
and to 5.9060 French francs from 
5.8828. The pound was unchanged 
at S 1.4930. 

The dollar briefly broke through 


NYSE Diary 


Toll* issues 
NewHietn 
mew lows 


Oase 

Prev. 

1326 

I2B0 

BM 

855 

5e9 

593 

2741 

2727 

137 

84 

to 

30 


A max Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Undwnoad 
Total issues 
New h irg ns 
New Lows 


Close 

300 

x» 

zw 

850 

24 

7 


Pow donee Pond A w ragwi 


2D Bonos 
ID Utilities 
10 Induslriols 


ra&ji 

ram 

10771 


am 

+0L1S 
+ 0 L 1 B 
+ 0-12 


Marfcat Safes 


NYSE 4 pjtl volume 317500000 

nyse orev. cam. ci«e 3Ti.i84.ra 

Am** 4 pjtl ralunw 19X72X85 

Amen ptwv. cons, dose sy+nnan 

NASDAQ 4 PJTL Volume 311352X00 

NASDAOere*. « urn. volume 330X98X00 
NYSE volume UP 207J57X60 

NYSE volume down 84.104X20 

Am*x volume up LR9AU 

Arne* volume clown 5799710 

NASDAQ volume UP 140909.500 

NASDAQ volume down 110734X00 


.Y.S.E. Odd-Lot Tracflng 


Jan. 7 
Jan. 6 
Jon. 5 
Jan 4 
Jon 3 


Buy 
94*786 
96IJ77 
*61909 
899 AM 
859733 


Soles 

IJ91.157 

1X82593 

UM796 

1X46X58 

1X32X05 


‘Incfuded to the sates Unarm. 


07507 

116,770 

109X53 

24X78 

73764 


SAP lOO Index Options 


SWOf CBHs-Lod 
Prtai Joe F*6 Mnr JW Jos Fe6 Bar tar 
3m---->h'A!hl + 
X----VVV- 

M* — — — — Ik h A 1 > 

II* - 


IK - - - - _ 

* - *K+ ( 


I* Th 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unctvtnped 
Tolal Issues 


CXne 

1X7* 

1X21 

1X46 

4X46 


7 

2+ - 


resistance at 1.7350 DM but re- 
treated under limited profit- taking. 

The dollar outlook versus the 
yen is fundamentally bullish as 
well since the Japanese economy 
remains mired in a recession, deal- 
ers said. This was acknowledged 
Monday by the central bankets of 
the Group of 10 industrial nations 
at a regular meeting in Basel. Swit- 
zerland. 

In Tokyo, Gaishi Hiraiwo. head 

of the Federation of Economic Or- ■■ — - •• — ■ — 

ganizations, called for income tax 

cuts of 5 trillion yen to help spur g-^ TT 1AT1 1 

^STw a i 0 ”r“d^ l cd u t kennan to Head G-10 Banks 

stimulate consumers* demand in 
Japan and help the country puQ out 
of its recession. 

Mr. Hiraiwa also called for a 


1X32 

T.749 

4749 


CaftL ftSd wl WdCT; Wd0O4"iW 474431 
PWi: Md nt CU4L tow man nt 4*UBt 


DMN Dee 95 McM Dk» 
35 — - - 7. 

« - - - I 

4T-1 3 - - Pa 

45 - - - 1 

Cdh: malvd.2 l -WQIflotfiirtLrx2l 
Plh. (OtotMLIO, Md BOWilli CUB 
Sort*: CBCE. 


AFP- Ex Id Sews 

BASEL — The committee of the Group of 10 central bankers said 
Monday that Hans TTetmeyer, president of the Bundesbank, would take 
i over as chairman of the committee, replacing John Crow, whose term of 

SS! om« a. Bank of Canada governor expires al ihe end of Jannar,. 

Central bank governors of the G-10 nations held their regular monthly 
meeting Monday, with the committee led by Mr. Crow, who was 
appointed to the post in November, for the last time. 

In December, Finance Minister Paul Martin of Canada said he would 


would not be welcome in the Unit- 
ed States due to the big bilateral 
trade deficit with Japan. 

Separately, the yen was support- 
ed by demand from investors eager 


to buy a 300 billion yen global not reappoint Mr. Crow as Bank of Canada governor. He awarded the job 


bond offering by Italy. 


to Gordon Thiessen, currently senior deputy governor at the bank. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Ajoik* Franca Plana Jon. It 
Clo** Pr*v. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amrs HhJ 

7050 

7170 

ACF Holding 

61X0 


Aegon 

IIOJC 101*0 ! 

Annie 

-■*.*0 

49 JO 

Afcro 


AMEV 

25X3 


Amst Rubuer 

2JT 

2.75 

Bol vWescnfi 



CSV 

77 

77.10 

D3M 

107X3 106.70 

Elwne- 

le* 

1E5 , 

Frtker 

20X0 

2110 

G>a Br jcafiei 

55 iC 

55X0 

MBG 

. 283 

20 

Heirekei 

2itL»: 

2=7X3 

Hscoover^ 

54.10 

56.i9 

Hgr.ter Caw m 


37 

i++CC:!=to 

«t.M 

fi-yj 

Inter .v.u-tier 

85 


tnt 1 : Neseri-M 

51J0 

*9.10 

KLM. 

«M 

44 50 

y.f+= B’ 

50 


t*Sitovg 



Gic Sr.r.rcr. 

7--J3 


Rritnced 

SC 

an 

PHI.S5 

CJ3 

4123 

Pa'/gro-—. 


T9 

»zxzc 

!2J«I 11533 

Rjssr-ss 

45 73 

is rt 

Rn.rica 

128X3 122JK 

Pire-ti 

7*xc 

vtJC 

=s.-g. 

23*.TO 




Ur.i?)*' 

2 i*M 2 HJ3 


*5 40 


.•HD 

ICL23 IE22E 

T.iitors.+'.Iiniver 

124 13 

12153 


OOMPrav. 

VloO 4V* 4W 

VoU+WOOMl 452X0443X0 

Wei la 837045X0 

DAX IndU J2ZXL77 

Previous : B3771 


Helsinki 


Amer-mtYinQ 

Enso-Gutzell 

HuntamcKJ 


Krmmenr 
M*lra 
Hot to 
Poliiofa 
R too la 
STcckmann 
HEX Index : 17M7S 
Prevtous : 169U6 


117 120 

4070 3920 
1*2 1*2 
13X0 1170 
119 117 

211 2C5 

2*8 m 

V5 91X0 
101 WXO 

304 2*0 


Hong Kong 


Coihov Pacific 
Cneuno Kon* 


Mcrro Lvn* Dev 


AO 55 
53X0 I3'0 
47 45X0 
S3 50 


Close Prev. 


1980 isxa 
73 71 

Hendcrwn Land 55 51 ,,... 

hr Air Ena 48.75 4650 I b+V 
HP. Cfimo <Z<n 27.40 21 <0 I Safkourv 
HK Electric 70 3 I SeflSmi 


urartdMel 

oSe 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hllbdown 

HSBC Hldss 

ICI 

IrKKoooe 

■CinofKher 

Ladorafce 

Land Sec 

Laoorte 

Lasmo 

LwolGenGra 
Uo/ds Bank 
MarKs So 
FAEPC 
Non Pcvrer 
NatWest 
Ninwsr water 
P canon 
P JO 
PUkinsian 
PowerGen 
PrmJcnliol 
Pant- Ora 
Rectil! Csl 
Peaiand 
Peed mu 
Reufen 
PMC Gravs 
Pails Ro>cc 
Pernmn mniri 
P-irat Scot 


27 26X0 


ICC! Power 


HSBC Hoiemas 1B3 levcm Trem 
Hk Oh era Hfts 1160 11X7 shell 
HP. Telecomm 15X0 1120 Ij,,*, 

—12 SmlltiNeahew 


Ac K-'JV. 
AG F.l 


i M* 1 . P*"? U \ amim monri 

! H-J1CS1 Whamocia B3 35.23 SmimKItnrB 
i M non Dev 77 70 26.70 Smith IWH1 

i Jardlrw Moflt. ?7 JD S* J sun Alliance 


Barca 

Betaer* 

Cocker,:: 


Brussels 

25S 2J74 • Jardine Str MM 3325 72X0 i Tcir & Cv^ 

W? ■ Kowloon Motor 24.40 24 XC T«SO 

ira So I wandarln Orient ll^ iom \ Thorn e-ai 
2231 2m I Miramar Hotel 70.70 20JD i Torn, ins 
rnKrrcs I N*W"orWDev „ 36 j< TS8 Grew* 

175 :?■ . 5 HR p,wl r L ^9 , K Unilever 

STtfc 5730 i 5 w . lujc _ . 5xS 143 ( uw ancuiii 

14+1 1471 i 5*lr* Pae A 61 Pffl 'votfotwe 

«i7» eTTC .' Tci etteuno Pros 14.10 '«X0 j war Loan:'? 

■ | T'JE 3xfl *10 I Vfolleom# 

4185 4101 , 'Hhart Hold 35 32J5 I'Whltoreed 

*150 *t 13 i r.lno On Inn 14.7D ]J-*2 I Willems hoo-, 

BtD jnjo I Wlnsor Inft 1473 14x0 j wlli,t C*4T«n 

1GGIS 9*13 Hera sera Index.: I13M.7S 


Deiraue 
Siectrctoe: 

GIB 
GEL 

Gevaei 
Krrt.ettanv 
Pelrcfira 
Pcwertm 
Oovni Ee>ae 
ise Gen Eorcue 


4*2 

2J1 

4J» 

623 

2JS 

Ufl 

9X1 

7.93 

5X5 

7J6 

1.98 

7X8 

M5 

636 

4X0 

5.13 

ACT 

4C8 

5X7 

62* 

623 

1XC 

557 

1035 

636 
625 
8*7 

ie.es 

10 

lx£ 

4-71 

4X3 

U5 

4X4 

543 

4.6* 

1-2S 

5*6 

7X7 

5X2 
1X8 
4 35 
534 
41* 
433 
224 
"1X0 
IXfl 
2X7 
11 ®5 
3X3 

637 
52X1 

12a 

5.72 

471 

233 


4X4 

a 

634 

777 

1J77 

924 

7.W 

5X3 

a 

7J2 

7 $ 

526 

631 

451 

514 

4X0 

613 

5X5 

»30 

631 

1.77 

5XJ 

3X2 

1028 

69S 

6.13 

9£7 

i.rj 

4.75 

4X3 

244 

4X2 

*46 

4X8 

133 

579 

7x2 

5X4 


Power Cora. 
Quebec Tel 
Quebecor A 
Quebecor B 
TeieoloOe 
Unlva 
Video Iron 
IMMtrW 
Proviou* : 


Oom Prev. 

2m 2iw 
2i« ?m 
19 IB 3 *. 
19V. IB36 

201a 30W 
m 74* 

244* J4Vt 


Paris 


Accor 
Air Lnulde 
Alcatel Alstttom 
A«o 

Bcncaire ICieJ 
B1C 
BNP 

Bou raws 
BSN-GD 
Cor retour 
Cl=. 

Csrus 

Ch qra euri 
Clmentj Franc 
Chit) Med 
Eif-Aaiitiome 
Eit-Scnoti 
Euro Disne* 
Gen Ew< 

He, CO 
tmeipl 

Lotarae Capoee 
Lrarand 
L'/ofi Eau* 
Great (L'l 
LVXAH. 

■V arro-Macnerte 
M«he»n B 
■“routine* 

I Paribas 

1X6 I Pecftiftev Irri 
296 I Pernod- Klrord 
625 I Peugeot 
4.1? | Prlntemos lAul 
4J) ; Rsaic'echnknie 
222 I Rn-F'ou.encA 
I3.5C 1 Pall. St. Louis 
2x1 I Hedoute ILal 
152 ' Soinr Gobam 
111? • S.E.B. 

327 I Ste Generate 
613 1 Sun 
52.15 j TncrnsorvCSF 
6*5 J Totol 


661 «40 

077 869 

092 876 

1582 1600 
612 5*6 

1355 132S 
286.10 288.10 
740 730 

975 956 

421J 4228 
295X0 294X0 
13S.M 137X0 
1280 1363 
350 146 

372 36690 
41843123 
ICS6 1045 
33 S3 3165 
2*48 2*45 
452.70 447 

614 62C 

473 4H> 

5760 56*3 
5*S S74 

1350 IE7 

401* 3*40 

16T Hftli 
229.10 26 10 
123 1 '5 

■cr so: 
no nc 

430 434 

E3 817 
473 970 

465 447 

143X3 147X0 
16*0 1*40 
1 an ur? 

622 617 

530 526 

775 77J 

347 10 34a*0 
190.73 1*220 
325 325 

661 6K 
147? 1416 


5J3 U4P, 

3*fr '.also 

2AS I CAC 40 lade* 1 23I7JS 
I prevK 


nnn : 2307X5 


58W 5 ECO • 

8373 SM\ 

Sse Gen Beioicue .2*45 2745 
; 52» !53W 
Se/cr “4*75 14ZK 

’W AIMI 


Johannesburg 


| F.TX E. ittmdR : 1440X0 
Previous : WM0 


Anglo Amer 


JCB 22755 »1JG I 

Current SttAirctex : 7662X7 ; 

Previous : 1*47X0 , Blrvoor 

j Buffets 
>Ce Beers 
: Drletenlem 
1 Gencor 

— jG FSA 

Frankfurt iHtsinSujsieei 


AEG 178X0180X0 ] Klool . 

All. era Hotel 23*4 M3 N«J»+Gro -. . 

Altar- **>7 51 tS> [PondWiteln 40 S3 

JJ5D 1370 ! Busotal |5M 34 JO ! 

X! 10331X0 IS* Brows ,5 -S I 

16170357X3 SI Hetera X 4*X0 

51D503X0 1 Secol 19 19 

555 55? 

657 650 : Westora Deea 2C0 2C6 

““ i SSBSg!S3Sffi WM ' 


Madrid 


BBV 

3015 

ynt) 

Bco Central Hiia 

3i4e 

S71 

Bares. Santander 

6450 

6550 

CBF5A 

7735 

2S3S 

Otavncr, 

2465 

2425 

Endesa 

4980 

t9W 

Ernras 

150 

If* 

Iberdrolg ; 

T315 

:rrs 

Renvoi 

467C 

4580 

Tabeesi+ra 

4423 

4M 

Telctorioc 

:*x 

1*3! 


18 17.7S 
73X0 91X0 
220 270 

26 55.75 
12 MX5 
N.A. 54 

706 105 

56X0 56 

7X5 740 
112 *13 
24 2SJQ 
12X3 7C 
£5X0 56X0 

53 27 : 5.E. Generali tide* : 328.16 

1 p u 1 Provton : 32U2 


1 Sao Paulo 

! Bonsa «!o Brirrll 60K 5750 
aonesac 3453 2«i 

Brodesco 74H3 10£W 

ISrcnma I Wa *30o 

:Porcnooenema SOSO stm 
Petr:*ros S73C0 565C0 

T»t«ras 1340a 12*50 

1 Vale Rit Doce jnw 
'vwtb 7102P 4190J 


Close Prev 

IB4 171 
235 200 

141 137 

437 429 

85X0 87X0 
573 560 


Skoncfla F 
5konska 
SKF 
Staro 

TrMlebora BF 
Votvo 


Amcor 

ANZ 

BHP 

Boral 

Boggalnvllif 

ColesMrer 

Corral I co 
CRA 
C5P 
Dunloc 
Festers Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 
Moon ton 
MINI 

No! Ami Bara. 
News Cora 
Mine Network 
N Broken Mill 
Pjormer mil 
Nmndr PoseiScn 


Sydney 

7X2 9£3 
4.78 4,73 
1SJ2 18J6 
4J6 428 
0X0 0-75 
5.38 L*7 
*77 4X1 
1 3 Jo 1840 
5-02 4«6 
5X2 £46 
U7 1X3 
1-70 1J1 
1C 44 11X0 
120 US 
7Jfi 2.75 
I2J6 1ZJC 
7J5 9.43 
in 573 
3M 12: 
2X3 2X3 
163 


Close Prev. 
sa 5V) 

ir-i. if* 

3 89? 3B3u 
46 451% 
31' i 3095 
17 I6H1 
344k 2475 
N.C. 0X4 
0+7 0X5 
* f- 
er"l in 
5-k 516 

2 r-* in 
2T-. 23 

13 17> 
26=i. Id** 
43 42 

5* 5 

lO 1 * 10*» 
4.15 415 
;■:* 2148 
22V. 23 

0X4 024 
5^1 t'l 

?r- 234. 

1X5 
186* 
1 SC 1.15 
1*3 M3 
r ( 9 


Srat^ 1 153X0 115409 1132X0 1133X0 

Farware room nnjn tmojes 1150X0 

COPPER CATHODES (Hloh Grade) 

PCr T7 mQOo”l74I.OO 1731X0 1732X0 
Reward 1761X0 1761X0 174SX0 1748X0 

LEAD 

75X0 460X0 461X0 

Forward 487X0 488X0 47X00 474X0 

NICKEL 

^S OrePerO M5M0 D, 5420X0 5323X0 5235X0 
Forward 9473x5 5480X0 9385X0 5370X0 

TIN 

Dalian nt m eJ h r l c ta n 

Spot 4775JHI 4785.00 4710X0 4715X0 

Forward 4870 XB 483000 4753X0 4360X0 

ZINC I Spec ial hW > Grade) 

Mhmm- mnilctoa f7&Q0 ^jja <tTXBB 
Forward 987X0 980X0 *91X0 *74X0 


Industrials 

tflfft Low Las) Settle OTM 
CA9QIL (I PE) 

u.5. Milan pw metric niHono? H» ton 
Jn 146X0 M1J3 141X0 14125 — <75 
14675 14150 142JD U173 —3X0 

USS S33 SSS £35 =S 

14A50 M4X0 144X0 144X0 —175 

144.50 144X0 14475 I44J5 — Z75 

14A« 14625 14623 14625 — 3X0 

150X0 150X0 150X0 UU5 -3X0 

15X00 tn« i*7 an i so .11 —3X0 

15523 154X0-154X0 154X0 —2X0 
157X0 156X0 156X0 156X0 —1X5 
15950 157X0 158X0- 15M0 — 3X0 ■ 
EsL Soles ZI.945 . Prev. sola 16J19 . 

Open Interest 113X04 


Apr 

May 

Jon 

JHI 

An 

Sop 

oa 

NO* 


U^./ATTHiC|QSM 


BRENT CSUDE OIL tIPBJ 

UX. ddDon par BdrroMois of 1X00 Bomk 

U74 —649 
1271 — 05T 
13.91 —0X0 
14.11 — 649 
14X4 — W47 
14X0 —WO 
K7Z —035 
14X7 —034 
15X0 — 0X7 
Es*. Sates 50X58 .Prev. joHn+4888 . 

Open Interest 157X15 


Fata 

14J8 

1373 

1373 

Mar 

1*77 

1378 

1170 

Apr 

14X4 

I3.9D 

1191 

Mar 

14J3 

14.19 

1A19 

Jan 

14J0 

1435 

K3S 

JoJ 

vm 

MJO 

USD 

Aag 

N.T. 

N.T. 

NT. 

Sap 

N.T. 

N.T. 

NT. 

Od 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T, 


Stock Indexes 

HM Low aosc OWBfd 
FTSE 108 (LIFHFG1 
OS per M«e point 

Star *^f*n u.ia min —TUB 

Jon 34740 3457X 3475X — 25 

Saw N.T. N.T. S4U3JI —20 

Est. volume: 12X11. Open Interest: 73X99. 
Sources: Reuters. MattL Associated Press. 
London inrt Financial Futures EMtamNt 
Wf7 wtweorn ExcftonpA 


Rnancfa] 


High Low Close Change 
3HMONTH STERLING CLIPPE7 
aoMoo-ptsot too pet 


Mar 

(473 

94X9 

9470 

—005 

M 

(4.92 

MJ8 

9*89 

— 086 

Sop 

M.TB 

MJM 

9*96 

— 0JM 

Oec 

M97 

9*94 

(4.96 

—CUM 

Mar 

*4X7 

(4X4 

9*87 

niw 

Jon 

94X8 

94X4 

Mil 

■ — nn. 

s«p 

94X8 

94X7 

(4X8 

iuq 

DOC 

MJ1 

9*30 

9*30 

— 0.M 

Mar 

*4.14 

(4.13 

9*13 

— OLDS 

Jon 

9314 

9193 

93.94 

—him 


Est. volume: 66566. Open Interest: 394346 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (UFFE) 

II mUtloa - pts otlBO pet 


Mar 

*659 

MJB 

9659 

+ 081 

Jan 

MJ2 

9839 

9672 

+ 0JH 

Saa 

9*03 

Milt 

96JJ2 

+0JQ 

Dec 

*5X2 

*sxa 

*5X2 

+ 082 

Mar 

N.T. 

NT. 

*5X0 

+005 

Jan 

9535 

*935 

*538 

+00* 

Scp 

N.T. 

N.T. 

95JT7 

+ 083 


Est. volume: 1X61. Open Interest: 8X77. 
3MOWTH EUROMARKS CLIFFEl 
DMtianaoa-ettotmoct 


425 

_ 

_ 

_ 


V 

X 

11. 

_ 

Mar 

*4X1 

94X6 

9*46 

— 0X4 

419 

an 

— 


— 

>, 

tk. 

n 

n 

Jon 

9*99 

**91 

**93 

—006 

ns 


19H 

— 

— 

V 

in 

Pk 

— 

Sep 

*578 

*530 

*531 

— 0X7 

ca 

11*1 

IT. 

V- 

Of 

1) 

2<k 

n. 


Dec 

95X3 

7556 

9558 

—am 

as 

row 

17 

VO 

— 

Vk 

n 

A 

mrn 

Mar 

*5X3 

99L75 

*575 

— 0JB 

a 

9* 

8 

13L 

!Ui 

1\ 

t 

Cl 

B 

Jan 

95.91 

95X5 

95X4 

-DUOS 

42 

7* 

«s 

Pm 

— 

3u 

* 

n 

— 

Sop 

95X3 

9579 

957* 

+ 0X1 

*n 

9k 

n 

a* 

a 

n 

F4 

11 

c 

Dec 

95X9 

95X4 

*5X5 

+0X2 

44S 

■4 

1* 

Tn 

— 

— 

73 

19*4 

— 

Mar 

*557 

*554 

9554 

+ 0X4 

49 

9 


i >k 

Th 


— 

II 

—m 

Jim 

*SJ9 

*536 

9537 

+ 0X5 

4S5 

«■ 

tk 

•a 

— 

— 

“ 

— 

— 

Est. volume: *4733. Open interest: 

7883*5 


LORD GILT (UFFE) 

CS&M8 - Pts & 32Mk at Mi pa 
Mar 119-20 119X8 119-17 —04)7 

Jtw N.T. N.T. 118-27 -tMF 

Est. volume: S0299.OPM Interest: 104133. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
DM 298X00 ■ Pti #neo pet 
Alar 101X6 101X3 101X9 —608 

Jen W1X1 101.02 101X4 —008 

Est volume: 84358. Open Interest: 144X0. 


Spot ComUKMflflM 


CommecBty 
Aluminum, lb 
Coffee. Brai, Ri 
Cooper eteerrolyne, B> 
Iran FOB. Ion 
Lead, lb 
Silver, trovaz 
SteeM scrap). Ion 
Tin, lb 

Zinc, n> 


Toaav 

Pie*. 

■ at 

0514 

»4W 

0815 

BXM 

07155 

213X0 

213X0 

0X4 

032 

*96 

9X0 

12*50 

129 JO 

3X467 

33645 

0X659 

0X154 


Dhridands 


company Per Amt Pay Rec 

IRREGULAR 

BP Prwaioe _ AXS V18 1-28 

STOCK SPLIT 
Aotlwrifc Fitness 2 fcr 1 Will. 

Cellular Tech 2 for 1 eolIL 


CRB Group 
TCWCVSCCUT 


SPECIAL 

9 JB 1-24 2-3 

> X7 T2X1 Ml 

REGULAR 

O .14 V31 M4 

W 72b 1-15 2-1 

Q _28 2-4 31 

O XB 3-15 3-1 


Eaton Vance Carp 
equity Inca AT&T. 

Phillips Pete 
SM Motor Prod 
o an nual ; 9-raraMe In Crao dtao tw idsJ »■ 
imrotwy; n-aearlcrl*; s-eemhmnmrt 


Hospital Takeover Worth $1 Billion 

transaction valued at about SI billion. . frtrH 

Terms call for EPIC holdec to receive 57 for ^ 
total of $277 miffion, and for Healtirtnist to 
EPIC which was spun off from American Mcd ^/ i ,^^^ OT j^ rs , 

1 ^8, had revenue ofjl-02 billion in its latest year. With lp.6TOww^ 

EPIC is the second largest anptoyewwn^ 

States, after Columbia Healthcare Cop. HeahhTrosl isaid i tag w « 
acquiation, ii tviH bctbecroerator of 115 acute-care hospitals 

and win have 37,000 empfoyees. 

National Steel Braces for Chafes 

MISHAWAKA, Indiana (Woombotf 
Monday it would take fourth-quarter charges of beywra Sl^jnmjOT 
and S135 million related to the temporary closing of i» National Seri 
PcDct Co. unit, eliminatioa of some inventory and Ae^dption of a new 
accounting method for employee post-retirement benefits. 

Tropieana Bays German Juice line 

BR^ENTON, Florida (AP) — Tropicanx Products ^ 
the German juke market in a big way Monday by acquiring HitchcoJc, 
ll« country’s leading brand of fresh-fruit jukes. T «« 

Tropieana purchased the product line from Dei nh a r d & Ca Terms 
were not disetosed. 

Cari. Karcher to Franchise Qucken 

ANAHEIM, Caflfomia (UPI) — Cari Karcher Enterprises Inc. said 
Monday it has agreed with Boston C h it A e n Inc to become ^ area 
developer and franchisee to develop and operate up to 300 Boston 

Qucken stores in California. ... . 

Terms were not disdosed. Carl Karcher Enterpnscs, ^boperares the 
Carl's Jr. fast-food chain, said it expects to open at least 60 £©s ton d ucke n 
stores by the end of 1995 and at least 200 stores over the next five years. 

For tiie Record 

Boeing Co. and the four companies in the Airbus consortium have 
extended until at least March a study on the feasibility of budding a 
jumbo jet that could cany 800 passengers. (Setters) 

Atlantic Richfield Co. said it would take an after-tax charge of about 
$450 mi%n agains t fourth-quarter gwtningRj reflecting its previously 
announced reorganization of certain U.S. ofl andgas operations. The 
charge also reflected severance costs for about 1300 employees. (UPI) 
US West Inc. identified four new sites for its proposed multimedia 
network, ad<lmg Denver, Minneapolis, Portland, Oregon, and Boise, 
Idaho, to the project to bring movies, shopping, games and pay-per-view 
videa.into customers' homes. (AP ) . 

Oracle Carp. wiH supply multimedia software and storage devices to Bed 
Atlantic Cotp. for delivering movies on danand and other services over 
conventional telephone lines to custamera as early as this spring. (AP) 


Weekend Box Offlc* 


Certain offering! of leeoiuies. Randal 
■cnlctl or murefls i> rat csuk pnbHdKd in 
Us newspaper are M Mharucd in ccnih 
Jnrivfictioin in wMeh Or h KeiuatittU l Heold 
Tribune is dtaribvted. rnclixliBg ike United 
Sum of Anterici. awl do not coosiuu 
nderiags of sectnilio. services or interest in 
One jurisdictions. The hienBtioaal Herald 
Tabnne usance no nvanibibv wiuaoever 
fiirany a dvo u s om feroBgitsofiy bad. 


The Associated Prat 

LOS ANGELES — “Mrs. Dbubtfirc” topped the weekend box office 
a gain, earnin g an estimated Si 1-4 mfHinn. Following are the Top 10' 
moneymakers based mi Friday ticket sales and estimated sales for 
Saturday and Sunday. 


1. ~Mrs. DoublflrB" - 

2. The Pei last Brief" 

3. Tamtatone' 

4 ’Grumpy OW Men” 

5. The Air UP ThetV 

6. -Shadow IdKb" 

7. -Sister Aar r 

8 - Beethoven ■» 2nd” 

9. "StJiinaiert Llsr 
16 Tiw Plano” 


138th Century Fax) . 
(Mbmar Brothers} 

(HoUrwOOd Pictures) 
ll/Vamer Brdtiers} 
(Hollywood Pictures) 
(Shadowfands ) 
{T ouch s to ne Pidunsi 
( Universal) 
Wnhforwaii - 
(Miramax) 


STL4 minion 
SMinnUan 
SU million 
S62 mltttsa 
S5X mlilloa 
S3X million 
nJmHHan 
S3X mlBlon 
S2X million 

FIX minion 


U.S. FUTURES 


Ma Anoctoed Fran 

Season Scasai 
Hah Low 


Jan. 10 


Open Higri Low Oaie Cho OoXni 


Grains 

tmtEAT lawn 

4000 WinMnum- aXcrs porbuM 

1*16. 300 Ma-*i U0 17IH 3X7’* 3.70*6— DjOHi 31 JUS 

368 380 MOV 74 367 3X9ta 365 lerx—OM'U 9JM1 

34* 3X6 XXM 3X5V. 3X7W XU 3X616 0005 

351 XOJ ScpM 346>6 X48 X46 14714 IJD3 

19716 109 Dec 74 1 S4V, 155V) ZS46 155\4— ADCA 1X0 

177 111 Jut 79 S27W 4 

EsLatos MA. Fl+VSOWS *J67 
Fri-loocnM 96X30 on MS 
WHEAT (KBOT) 

SXM OuraMmum. doAan nerbuOMl 


1W 

Z*8 

Mar« 3X8'/i 

3X9 

3X4 

196V— 0X2% 22J92 

1X9W 

298 

May *4 3XSV) 

3X7 

1X4% 

346% 

7X82 

JX* 

157 

Jut 94 

U4W 

34S 1 * 

141% 

144% — 0X0% 

9J99 

149 

1039. Sec m 

144V, 

3X4 

344% 

3X4% 

1738 

155 

3.12V, Oec 7* 

3X9% 

19Pk 

348 

150% -000% 

877 

152 V, 

3J2 

Mar 99 




151V -0X181 



1M1 

115 

Z9J54 

zm 

177V. 

18IP6 

181 

ISfn 


2J6 -00216 


75* 

751 

rat 

735 

6X2 

757V, 

ujv. 

667 

666 

4ST0 


6J TV, -0.12 16 5X07 
6X8to-0.1Ib OJ7I 
6X2 -ai3>4 3S^a 
6J2V, — 0.DVS 34577 
485W-0J3V. 1157 
444V.— ato'i 2.725 


G o-lZcra 


l *l IS- Gulic 3= 
lw t ^e« y*t 


TNT 2.'2 2 *2 1 4'erw'tjGid V>- 

WVtlira Minino .58 ■*, ne.i-ser 
Wratpoc Banking 4iS 457 1 HoriiS 
Wooestoe 4x5 4xc , i 3-rv 

srarass B,:n, “ 


Tokyo 

Aval E>ec*r 44C 

xsom enemies' *57 

A SOM Glass 

Bcr* ol To* -o 


f two 

— .-emoe* 

. Lsscr? 
LofawCo 
435 . 'Aewons e 

— 60 , yes ec :w x 

MIC HJ5 ! Mar.l.m* 
'S56 tSS . Vcv* =es 


tJSC i isc 1 MocLean y-xite' ir-s ir>a ! 
’S£t 153C ; "taiocr A 
mk ic*r ' tsfae :to a 


Ertdowlone 
Canon 

Casio .. . - , - 

Ooi Hloocc Prinr 16*0 ItiTS ; iwcrtfc tc 

Dalwc House i«0 "rJcrzaf irer 

Cclwa 5*airt1i*s 1370 ]ZX i l* <?7rr E r ers, 
Fcnue 37*C T7*a I Te'ra— 

- - ' 7013 7V0 ( News Cara 

2 Mg m . CsTcwq 
831 87* ; PSBur'n A 

W C“ 3 te*r Zcr-v 
— 


Esl .sate 3 609 Ft+VKUM 1877 

Fri'sepenuif 42X08 UP 71 

corn (awn 

, 5X00bumMnHxn-daHc**o«reusM 

107*4 2Jfv.M«« xnrti vm. am an»-4UKMM)xi4 

U8WMoyMll» 112*4 axnv 3JM4-009 84105 

2X1 JutM 112V, UJ'4 la 307*6 -OLWM AU*7 
2X9V,5KI94 170*6 llOVi 187 2X716-40 12.137 

136 V, Dec 74 2J0 170*6 IfPf, IMVi-OOTA 34806 

253'a«tar95 77V* 12»W 173V, 234 -4UB 2.173 
176 V, May 75 179 2.79V, 177% 77Vh-0JXth 1M 

US** A6 95 2J9V, 179W 2X7 377H-402Vi 334 

257 D*C*9 258 258 2X6 

ESLtoto I4A FH's.nSes 73.703 
Fr.’saoent* 3Sa9w no 622 
SOYBEANS FCBOn 
SXSOtxj mWmom- Attn per MiM 
756 SXi'+Joi** 4J7 40*6 AH 

5X9*4 Mgr *4 6X8 498 468 

SX2’*,MavM 701 7X1 6X1 

S.MVTJMM 7X1 7X1*4 4*2 

428 Aug W 492V, 4«*W 6X1 
417 StpM 470 470 V, 464 „ . 

55JV, Nov (4 650 4J0V, 442V, 4X3 VS —009 'A 17,118 

611V, Jan W 655**1 65S*’, 650 450 -OXBVi J7< 

4X2 Mar 95 459 -0XM4 229 

4CVrXiV5 459V, 46016 456 65* — OJJTVj IU 

55 fa Nov 75 428 428 426 421 -4101 SI 

EN.RXM MA- Fr,’vK*H 64679 
Fei'scpanint 177537 uo 163 
SOYBEAN 66EAL (0071 
im tons- dBBor i pylon 

ZPS3 18460 Jen 74 17921 17*50 I97.7Q 17820 -1 JO 42J3 
23750 1 8929 Mar *6 197X0 20120 17800 19820 -170 37.1*8 

IBSXtMov 74 2069 XI. 13 19810 1*9X0 — 2J0 14395 
1 <031 Jut 74 XI 60 30170 1*760 !**J0 -320 72X83 

17150 Aug 94 30050 20080 >**XQ 177.70 —110 4412 

... • • ■ jmu 1734050,74 17750 17750 1*7.00 17730 —3X0 2X83 

20430 I MOO Oct W 1*750 17800 17420 17423 -1X0 1X16 

i2~ lSs! ! WOO 4600X74 177X0 IWX) t*S3Q I7SX -150 2561 

■j' ,7 1 233X0 19400 Jon *9 1 9130 — 2J0 89 

•S- —I, I EP.COM MA. Fn-tiato 14618 
<3 tf . i Fei's aoentnl 84. 7M uo III 

A'i J WVBBUI O*- 

Si 7 ? 3 

W7 19— 


ii=» ns* 
Ha Ca 

U Na 

F| 


Air Canada 
Alberto Energy 
Am Bcrrtck Res 
BCE 

B* Nora Scotia 
BCGcs 
EC Talecarn 
3F Raattv His 
Bramcica 
a^w,ct 

CarrcJrv 
CISC 

C«w*cn Pacific 
Car, Peckers 
Can Tire a 
C onfer 
Cara 

CCL InC 8 
CinecKe* 

Ccrnirito 
Canacest Exci 
Denison Wr 3 
Dlckenscn Mr. a 
D etosca 
S,loi A 

E^tc Bov vines 
ccutf* Silver a 
fCa inr 

Fee ins a 

c?ci. a r. rt»s | e-mo 

C P* 4 Z) 413 : Sjo 


Shbob Snsan 
HWI Low 


Open Mob Low Otae cno OpXY 


1IXS 7X2 OCT 74 1058 10X0 1076 1077 -4X114351 

1091 9.17 Mar 95 BUS 107* 1079 107* +002 2J94 

mu* 1057 May 95 1075 1075 1075 IAX0 +0X3 

10X9 KL57JU79 10X0 MX0 10X0 10X1 +0X8 15 

10X9 1057 Oct *S 10X0 HUM 10X0 1042 +0X8 

Ext. saws M7H Errs. KPes 1X736 
FrYsOPWlM 104*27 oO 1130 
COCOA OKIE) 


H metric burs- Scar ton 
M95 

1368 

1369 
1377 
1387 
1382 
1400 
1407 
1390 


tSlMrM 109 1153 1126 1143 +5 33XU 

778 May 76 11*8 1188 1162 HOD 14398 

977 jut 7* i2H 1217 . am an +o .vh 

row Sob 74 ms 1238 1225 1116 +8 4313 

HKIDacM IM 1362 1245 1361 +6 4730 

KJ77 Mar M 1276 +6 8XM 

111 I Mar 95 1285 +6 4333 

1325JUI95 088 +6 3X06 

1320 Sap 95 HI* +6 382 

Est. sales 4377 Fri's. salts 13X27 
FiTSopwW 88X92 OH 781 
ORANGEJUCE fNCTN ) 

15X06 Bis.- cants port). 

133X0 8315 Jot 94 11088 114D0 11050 11395 +2X9 *87 

13625 8450 Mir 94 11250 11565 1050 10X0 +220 0466 

135X0 86X0 MoyM 11550 117X5 1I5J8 11*uAS +340 2X81 

135X0 1 0133 Jut 74 11425 11060 11125 1 1435 +330 1.10 

0450 10550 Sap M 11750 00X0 11950 119J0 +1X5 02 

mot 188X0 NOV 76 171 60 +1X0 

132X0 HH50JBI75 mat 172.01 iw m 0381 «iao 

119X5 IO4X0Mar95 12340 +1X0 

May 98 0340 +1X0 

Est. solas NA. Frrs.«tts 1,109 
FmapwW 18X91 ed 95 


Metals 


MGRADECOPPOt (NONX) 

25X00 Ba.- ewes per D. 

TZSJanat 97X0 80X0 77X0 1050 

7XQ0 Mir *4 77X1 SUD IMS- 


18750 

8940 

10220 

0950 

102X5 

rouo 

101X0 

8(50 

99X0 

8850 


8140 

745BAPTM 7740 77X0 77X0 81X5 

7360 May 76 7760 8158 7960 8150 

7AWJMIN 0X0 81X0 01X0 81X8 

7420 Jut 74 10X0 BOB 00X0 WJO 

76X0SOI 76 81X0 8330 81.4 82X0 

7575 DacM H5D HX0 SL50 8340 


76.90 Jen 75 


83X5 


73 00 Fab »5 HUB 8U0 801X0 *OXJ 


9 a at • ^13X0 


Singapore 


BASF 

Bcrer 

B«v. Hvoa bank 
Be. Here insb* 

SBC 

BHF Bam- 
BMW TMXOniJO 

Ccmme+rtwr.k. 3?!JB 38353 

Canlinertoi 36XDM3.H: 

DaimierBenr ^858 8*7 

Sewssa 6E0 

si BebsocJi gzaaaxc 

Deutsctw Senk 807 M3 

Dojgtas 576 5TO 

Drndner Bank 0553*5170 
Feiemuebic 
F Kruse Hoes4*t 
Homnwi 


Milan 


I 

I QiretXB 
ICitv Dev 
DBS 

I Frcser Nerve 


Her.* el . 

Hoenrief 
HoaeMt 
Hs umcw n 

Herien 
IAKA 
Kali Sal; 

KarzfsS i 
Kcuihat 
KHD 

Kwecfener werne 
Line* 

L/Htian*o 

7/AN 

Muiuwi4»unn 

MetcManri) 

MuVXh Ro*e* 

Parse** 

Preussca 

PWA 

9WE 

Pneuunefall 

lettering 

SEL 

Siemens 

Tlryssen 

Vcrto 

'.aba 

VE/7 


337 335 

157)53 JO 


6(4 630 

!7>* 1253 

*ftR iS 

ZP J45 
3755037CJQ 
19 t S3 
941J0 565 

S3 5» 
:?7 I18J0 
1J6T1T.’2 
74J 744 

17817330 
412453*9 
*26X3427® 
SB 210 
zua 3660 
80S 770 
444JD «1 

250 227 
51* m 
3a 33* 
1121 1IC7 
491 3W 
7371B2X0 
277WSJ0 
30 312 
522.13 514 JO 

jj* a* 


London 


AK»e» Non 
Ail>M Lyons 
Arlo VJIOBlns 
Are /II Grave 
Ass Brti Foods 

BAA 

379 327 [|*« 


Bonk Scariond 

BcrCkTvs 

Boss 

HAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 

BOCGnwo 

Boots 

Bcmntar 

BP 

Bn* Airways 
Bril Gas 
Brit Steel 
Bm Telecom 
BTR 

Cable wire 
C odburr Sett 

Ga radon 

Coats Vlyelia 
Comm Union 
Courtouats 
ECC Groue . 

ErrlerprlgB 0,1 

Euratunnel 

Pisans 

Forte 

GEC 

Ganl AU 
GttUO 


4X7 
6X0 
252 
179 
173 
1057 
4X7 
2X4 
408 
S.T3 
5l53 
1.48 
3 JB 
447 
S.7f 
460 
347 
4X6 
151 
157 
4X7 
3X6 
SC7 
5X7 
443 
247 
6J? 
543 
WO 
4 75 
640 
1X2 
260 
3X4 
7X5 
6X1 


2X5 

1C4 

5J2 

1073 

4X7 

242 ! 
613 | 
SXO 
941 


645 



I9K 

l+B 


:«3D 


w 

00 

GsMenHooePi 


Seretrsn grevo 

7000 26250 

lfe» PT" 

xra 


tu: 

16» 

Hume Indirtlnes 

5.10 

Crwtltoi 

2240 

230 

ineftcene 

6X0 

En.wem 

Z1X 

212* Keuoel 

ll.iu 

Fe+tm 

ISU 

1431 

K.LHW0"S 

4X8 

Ferlln Rtt 

5:5 

an 

LamOtong 

Z17 

Fid SPA 

417* 

<1*5 

ftaicivgn Bonk 2 

10 

Fiimwt'ariito 

1419 


CCBC 


Generali 

17*09 

OUB 

BXfl 

IFl 

'5820 I554S 

OUE 

855 


104+5 

TCS4( 

OemDcwara 

18X0 


4*CI 

4799 


6X0 


JSSaO 37*0 

Siirw Darbv 

*34 

Mediobanca 

13BIC uaso 

SIA 

8 


*04 

877 

S-pore Lcrc 

7.1ft 

Oiiven i 

1977 

svas 

SpOTO Pr*iS 

1550 

Pirelli 

NA. 


Sira Steomsrup 


PAS 

2MMZT50 

3'eor+ TMecomm 

3.74 


*100 

*i» 

Straits Trading 

4IK 

Ccoem 

HA 

— 

l+OB 



7d ua 
?4S 7.*0 
1IJ0 11X0 
17.10 I960 


M I Pcow Tsrira 1fi*M 1«« 

*60 i HI? Wi 

3.73 
4Xt 
197 
12 ** 

A7S 


! SME 

Sn*o 

| Stcnda 
I Star 

i Tara All- B,» 

1 55 | MIB to*,* JH* 

5X4 i Pra* lavs : *S7 
S42|— = 

^ j Montreal 

*75 (Alcan Aluminum 7T - 7 ) 
937 i Both Montreal TTe 27J8 

l Bell Canada <7+ CH 

4 *7 1 Bombardier B SIJ ?! + 

64C | Cams lor 22 

ixt I CCXOtiM 8 PI 

365 I Dominion Ten A *»s ?*a 

347 [DanonoeA g> 

7X8 MacMillan Bl TT-e 7T* 
6AS i Natl B» Canoao M's 13% 


2X7 1*0 
Times lad. : 3424X4 


UOL 

HO. I Smuts Tiatetlai: 

fig 

7UX7HU 
413C 4I7J 
nCO 2767+ 


Stockholm 


AGA 

*73 

Ca 

A 

on 

610 

Aslro A 

1*0 

1*1 

Altos Coco 

430 

430 

Eieciralu* B 

xc 

3U0 


151 

347 

Essuile-A 

119 

116 


123 

113 


172 

172 


234 5iimV0 

“rscoraia ac 

133 

!33 


125 

f?r 

SCA-4 

152 

tSi 

3-E tcr.ker: 

40 JO 

58 


Full 3ank 
Fut' PholB 
F'JlltSU 
HIlBCtll 
Hitac'ii Cable 
Hcnea 
no Yo+cdo 
iroatu 

Japan Airline-, 
Koiima 
K on sal Power 
Kawasaki steel 
Kirin Brewery 
komonu 
Kubefe 
e.yBcert 
Matui Elec Ira 
Matsu Elec ms 

Mirsuotsril BA 

Minuwau Kcsc: 
Mitsueisit Elec 
MilSUQiSIti Hew 
MltsuBism Cora 
Mitsui aid Co 
MitwVosro 

M.tvani 

NEC 

MG', irautetars 
Ml * ka scew-'lws 
rnsDon koocku 
NlBBOP Ol. 
Nipean Steel 
Niwon Ymcn 
Ninon 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 

Otvmous Cc-icat 

Pioneer 

Rlexh 
San no Etec 
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INTERNAHONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY II, 1994 


ose 


3 - 


Return . 

BRU SSELS. — - The • Europegs 
Commissi cat's rnttger-iaquiiy lK * m 
has proposed vetoing the creation 
of a joint steel venture by Germa- 
ny's Mannesmann AG, VaUoorcc 
SA of France and BvaSpA of Italy, 

commission and industry sources 

said on Monday. 

Karel Van Mien, the competi- 
tion commissioner, was expected to 
ask his fellow commissioner to 
back the veto propsal at a meeting 

EU Car firms to Suggest 
Post-Protection Policies 

Reuters .. 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Automobile Manufacturers Asso-' 
nation will make recommenda- 
tions on Tuesday to the European ' 
Union and other policy-makers to 
ensure Europe’s car industry. re- 
mains competitive as barriers to 
Japanese imports are removed A. 
spokesman refused to give details 
mil said changes should create a 
healthy economic eKmate for the 
industry. • ; 

Meanwhile. Italian car sales 
slumped 20 percent last year and the 
market is unlikely to sees pick-up in 
1994, according toAnsia, Ital/sna- . 
dooal auto association 


ob Jan. 26, the d«irfKry» fa a ver- 
tfict after a four-month inquiry into 
the venture, tine sources said. 

- If Mr. Van- Men convinces his 
colleagues to bade- htm, the jani 
venture would be only the second 
company alliance vetoed by the 
commission under European 
-Union mercer control rules m ef- 
l«ance]990. . 

71^ vtature, called DMV, would 
be created by the UvammDahnme 
Sp A,Manncsmann ROhren-Werke 
AG and the Vallourec unit Val- 
tubes SA. lt would employ 1,000 
people and make seamless, stain- 
. less steel tubes used in power sta- 
tions and fat the chemical industry. 

A spokesman for Mr. Van Ktirn 
smd the issue was under ifewa'w 
and refused to ooatnKnt farther. But 
the sources said the cansmsaon in- 
vestigators beSewd the oaa hftsH - 
naent of DMV would restrict com- 
petition in Europe. « ' . 

There were**severe di ff erences of 
opinion and fact-finding” between 
the commission staff and the com- 
panies involved in DMV, oae 
dustiy source smd. 

In Latel981,tbe commission in- 
voked its veto, powers under the 
merger rules to prevent Aerospa- 
tiale of France and Alenia SpA of 
Jtaiy taking over the De HavSand 
commuter aircraft division of 
Boeing Co. 


Firm Rebuilding Beirut 
Raises $850 Million 


Bill for Banesto Goes Up and Up 

Bank Reportedly Needs as Much as $4.8 Billion 


Caiqdkd by Ow Saff From Dap&chet 

MADRID — The amount of money need- 
ed to restore Banco Espaiiol de Credito SA to 
health could be between 600 billion, and 700 
billion pesetas ($4.1 bCDioo and $4.8 billion 1, 
according to analysts and media reports. 

The Bask of Spain's initial estimate was 
that Banesto needed 503 billion pesetas to 
rebuild a balance sheet that was stuffed with 
assets that now appear to be much less valu- 
able than dailMd by m^apryTK-n i 

But as the investigation into Banesto's fi- 
nances goes deeper the volume of doabtful 
loans ana levels of risks has been indicated by 
media reports to be wuph higher than 
thought. Additional problems could arise as 
the foreign subsidiaries of the bank are 
into account, the reports said. 

El Pais newspaper said, however, that the 
Deposit Guarantee Fund would be in a poa- 
tka to hdp by buying about 120 billion pese- 
tas worth of doubtful loans from the bant All 
Spanish banks contribute to the fund. 

Analysis said they are nil] undear about 
what the bank’s future wiO be. But they said 
comments by the new chairman, Alfredo 
Saenz, that be will maintain the “essence and 


not be takes over by another Spanish bonk. 

They sakl chances are high that the restruc- 
turing plan wfflinchide a cut in the par value of 
the link’s shares, winch have been suspended 
an the Madrid mw the Rant: of 

Spain took control of Banesto cm Dec. 28. 

Spain's Association for the Defense of 
Shareholders, representing the Banesto 
stockholders, said Monday that it had filed a 
civil suit over the weekend against the bank’s 
auditors, Price Waterhouse, tor alleged negli- 
gence in reviewing the bank’s accounts. 


Still analysts said, the amount of the cm in 
(he shares' value will likely be limited, given 
the negative effect mi the bank’s 270,000 
shareholders, who include foreign investors 
and the bank’s own clients and employees. 

Press reports say almost 60 percent of all 
the share issues in the fust portion of the 
capital increase carried out by Banesto in 
early 1993 were bought by the bank's own 
clients with loans from the bank itself. 

After meetings Monday with Mr. Saenz, 
union leaden said the new ehairrriafl had 

The restructuring plan 
is expected by mid- 
February. 


agreed to Hmit layoffs. Tbey said be expeas to 
have finished scrutinizing the Kti.inr* sheet bv 
tfae end of January and io have drafted the 
restructuring plan by mid-February. 

A different view of the Banes to ’interven- 
tion story may be given on Tuesday when the 
former chairman, Mario Conde. holds a 
meeting with reporters. 

Mr. Conde is expected to be against any 
lowering in the value of Banesto's shares; he 
owns between 4 and 5 percent of than. 

JosC Maria Amusategui. chairman of 
Banco Central Hispanoamericano SA, said in 
an interview published over the weekend in 
£1 Pais, that he, too. was against any lowering 
of the value of Banesto 'shares. ’ 

BCH loaned Mr. Conde 7 bQhon pesetas in 
mid- 1993 to invest in the Banesto capital 
increase, using the shares and Mr. Conde's 
personal wealth as collateral. 


Details of the Bank of Spain report on why 
it look control of Banesto, published in El 
Pals, show the extent to which the Banesto 
balance sheet deteriorated from the end of 
1992 (o the end of 1993. 

Figures for 1 992 show chat non performing 
loans stood at an estimated 120 billion pese- 
tas. but by the latest inspection in 1993 the 
figure has' risen to close to 340 billion. This 
lifted the need for previsions on bad debts to 
145 billion pesetas against S3 billion in 1991 

The figures are the result of an investiga- 
tion into all outstanding loans above 250 
million pesetas, and the bad debt total is 
expected to rise considerably once an investi- 
gation into the loans below 250 million is 
completed. El Pais said. 

It also said the bank’s pension fund has 
deepening problems. About 66 billion pesetas 
are needed to bring its pension coverage up to 
regulated standards, the report said. 

An expected revaluation of Banesto's as- 
sets will reduce Lhe value of the bank's indus- 
trial assets by about 120 billion pesetas, 
which would lead to a book loss of 8 1 billion 
pesetas, the report said. 

One of Banesto's associate companies, the 
insurer La Uoion & El Fenix SA. resumed 
trading Monday in Madrid after an 1 1-day 
suspension. 

Regulators decided to allow trading again 
af ler Union & Faux's caretaker management 
agreed last week to revise its 400 million 
peseta 1992 profit to a 12 billion-peseta loss. 

But investors' skepticism about the compa- 
ny's future dragged Union & Fenix's shares 
down 15 percent to 1.790 pesetas, the maxi- 
mum change allowed is one day. 

(AFX. Reuters, API 


Reuters 

BEIRUT — The company 
that will rebuild war-shattered 
central Beirut said on Monday 
it had raised more than $850 
million in Lebanon’s first cor- . 
porate flotation since civil war 
ended in 1990. 

Speaking after the closure of 
Lebanon's biggest share offer, 
the head of the SI .8 billiooLeb- 
anese Company for the Devel- 
opment & Reconstruction of 
Beirut Central District, known 
as Sohdere, said it had easily 
exceeded its $650 nnUkm target 

“We are still counting and we 
are over $850 ntinkm.” said 
Nasser Chamaa, head of Sob- 
dere’s board of founderc. How- 


ever, he said he did not expect 
the total to reach $1 bflfion. 

Mr. Chamaa said the offer, 
which was open to Ldwiese 
,and non-Lebanese Arab inves- 
tors, attracted more than 15,000 
investors, .and the majority of 
shares were purchased by Leba- 
nese. . ... 

“We think ft's a ieaDy excel- 
lent result It’s better' Qian we 
expected, especially in terms of 
the number of people that have 
subscribed,** Mr. ftmiM said. 

The issue Was one of the big- 
gest corporate, flotations ever 
made in the Middle East. 

Trading m Sofidexe shares is' 
expectedto start next month. 


Lufthansa Board Plans Talks on Pension Fund 


Cnttpded by Dm Staff From Dispatches 

FRANKFURT — Lufthansa 
AG's supervisory board wiB meet 
Jan. 31 to discuss the restructuring 
of the government-controlled air- 
line and ways to resolve a stalemate 
over Lufthansa’s pension fund, its 
chief spokesman, Josef Gren dell, 
said Monday. 

He said Lnfth«n«« would proba- 
bly .have lop ay 1 bOlian Deutsche 
sutks ($574.8 xrrilKon) or more to 
the government employee pension 
fundVBL after the proposed estab- 
lishment of imift operating units as 
independent profit centers and the 
privatization of tbe government’s 
Lufthansa stake. 

Mr. Grenddl said the board's 
discus si o n would focus on a re- 
structuring plan to transform 
Lufthansa into a holding company 
with five central divisions and 


m anag e ment board members, rath- 
er than six at present. 

Subs diaries such as Tjifihan^ 
Service Gesdlscfaaft or Condor 
would each be led by a general 
marmgpr and would create a sub- 


structure of nine independent units 
within the holding group, he said. 

But Mr. Grenddl said that im- 
plementation of the restructuring 
plan as wdl as Lufthansa's privati- 
zation efforts would he blocked if 


Air France to Keep CSA Stake 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Air France said Monday that it wanted to remain a 
shareholder in the Czech national airline CSA, in which it holds a 38 2 
percent stake through a consortium with the European Bank for Recon- 
struction and Development 

“Last December, Air France said it intended to remain a shareholder in 
CSA.” an Air France spokesman said. “We stiD have tbe same position.” 

Transport Minister Jan Strasky said over the weekend that CSA 
planned to withdraw from its investment contract with the state-owned 
French airline. 

Tbe Chech government trying to resolve a financial crisis at its 
national carrier, had offered to find a buyer for Air France's stake, an 
official close to the negotiations said Monday. The official declined to 
name potential buyers. (Reuiers. Bloomberg) 


the company, unions and federal 
government" did not reach agree- 
ment on Luf thansa 's payments to 
the pension fund. 

Mr. Grata el) said the nine oper- 
ating units would have to set up 
their own pension plans, which 
would require Lufthansa to reim- 
burse the VBL fund. Substantial 
payments to VBL would also have 
to be made to privatize I-ufth-wsa, 
Mr. Gren dell said. He declined to 
specify the amount but said 1 bil- 
lion DM was “perhaps" the mini- 
mum. (AFX Reuters) 

■ Growth in Traffic Eases 

Tbe Internationa) Air Transport 
Association reported Monday that 
growth in passenger traffic had 
slowed in November, while freight 
volume continued to rise, Reuters 
reported from Geneva. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 



A S O H 
■ 1993 ■ 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Brussels." 

. Frankfurt 
Frankfurt - 
Helsinki 
London 
London 
Madrid 
Milan 
Paris 

Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Sources: Reuters, 


AEX 

Stock index 


DAX 


FAZ 

HEX 


London 
FTSE 100 Index 

m- - 

y® 

33®- 4— 

3200 t-f — 

%?$= 

®ASONDJ 
1993 1994 . 

Monday 

Close 

424.48 

rttiex 7,662.47 


2,233.79 


84&51 

1,724.25 


Paris 

CAC40 


Financial Times 30 Z ,515.10 

FTSE1Q0 3,441160 

General Index 328.16 

MB 944.00 

CAC 40 2,317.25 

Affaerevaerlde n 1,72522 

Slock index 

SSS 1.B3&97 


"7,667.00 ■ -0.06 


2^11.64 +1. 


337.01 
1,69026 +133 

2 * 617.69 - 0.10 

3.446.00 -0.16 
323.32 ■ +1.50 

957.00 -1.36 

2,307.55 +0.42 

1,706.98 +1.07 


1,045.80 -0.65 

IrimjTOf.*) Beak) Trihjor 


Very briefly: 


• Air Afrique is to get a capital injection of 18 billion CFA francs ($59 
million), after leaders of the 1 1 .African countries that own stakes in the 
troubled carrier approved a rescue plan. 

• IG Farfctsundnstrie in Abmcfching, a shell company handling the 
liquidation of the notorious World War II chemicals cartel, has no legal 
claim to assets in Eastern Germany that were expropriated by the Soviet 
Union after the war, the federal administrative court in Berlin ruled. 

• Roche Holding AG, the Swiss pharmaceuticals company, said consoli- 
dated sales rose 10 percent to 14 3 billion francs IS9.8 billion i in 1993. 

• Crhfit Lyonnais is to offer one-third of the capital in its Union des 
Assurances Federates subsidiary at a price of 520 francs ($88.40) a share. 

• French consumer prices fell by 0.1 percent in December, making the 
inflation rate 2.1 percent for all of 1993. 

• Ladbroke Group PLC said it would participate in a consortium with 
MAI PLC to bid for the license to run Britain's national lottery. 

• Britain's merchandise trade deficit shrank to £580 million (S867 million I 
in October from 51.09 billion in September. 

• Tomkins PLC almost doubled its pretax profit in the six months to Oct. 
3), to £93.8 million. 

A FP. Bloomberg, Reuters. Knight- Rubier, A FX 

Barclays to Cut 3,000 Jobs 

Bloomberg Business Sens planned to sbed 500 workers from 
LONDON — Barclays PLC, its retail branches in London and 
Britain's largest retail h ank said it southeast England. It is not known 
plans to shed 3,000 staff from its how much money the banking 
British branch network by the end company will have" to set aside to 
of next year. cover the costs for the added job 

Tbe move comes just over a week cuts. The increase in the number of 
after the bank's new chief executive, jobs Barclays expects to cut means 
Martin Taylor, began working. Bar- that by the end of 1995 it will have 
days stressed that the job cuts were lost a total of 21,000 jobs since 
not tinted with his arrival. 1991. 

Barclays said in September it The bank's work force is 68 J00. 


NASDAQ 

Monday’s Prices 

' , NASDAQ prices ns of Apinc Now York time. . 
TWs list compiled by the AP, consists tit the 1.000 
moat traded securities in terms of dofiar value. Ute 
updated twice a year. 


1 2 Month 5b 

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Page 12 


— 


NYSE 

_ Monday’s dosing 

,>^J ndude *» nationwide prices up to 
Sheet end donot reflSt 
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the dosing on Wall Street and do ncrt reflect . . 
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advertisement 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 





Nigeria Fixes Naira, Abandons Refor 

. . . .. . _ * „■ nr&cribed bv ihe CE 


Reuters 

ABUJA. Nigeria — Nigeria 
fixed the exchange rate of its cur- 
rency, the naira, at 22 to thc U-S. 
dollar on Monday, effectively 
abandoning market reforms of the 
last seven years. 

The country’s military ruler. 
General Sani A bach a. announced 
the move in his 1994 budget speech 
broadcast from the capital, Abuja. 
He also announced rules that effec- 
tively stop the free flow of imports. 


■‘Government will actively moni- 
tor this decision.” General Abac ha 
said of the currency move. He said 
it was taken “to create a favorable 
atmosphere for economic revival" 

Nigeria, under the previous mili- 
tary regime of General Ibrahim Ba- 
barigjda. introduced a structural 
adjustment program in Sep tan bet 
19S6, with backing from the Worid 
Bank and the International Mone- 
tary Fund. The reform sent the val- 


ue of the naira tumbling from pari- 
ty at the lime with the dollar. 

' General Abacha’s announce- 
ment Monday fixes the naira at its 
current official rate of 22 to the 
dollar. It has been trading at 
around 48. however, at free- market 
rates. 

General Abacha said all foreign- 
exchange offices would become 
agents of the Central Bank of Nige- 
ria. “As such they are to henceforth 
sell foreign exchange at the rate 


prescribed by ihe CBN," he said. 

The foreign-exchange offices, he 
added, “must therefore not sell 
forex to finance imports nor should 
they sell more than 52.500 or equiv- 
alent to any one customer." 

General Abacha, who seized pew- 
it Nov. 17. when the civilian in- 
stalled by General Babangida to 
complete a return to civil rule pro- 
gram resigned, also announced sev- 
eral tough measures reverang the 
key policies of the previous regimes. 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY.! 7 .., 1994 



The IHT Pocket Diary 
Fits In The Palm 
Of Your Hand. 



• Ml'jmiti'o S \ 13 cut i >!■'-! \ ? in.i. 

• Ridded hiaxrk leather oner. 

with *jjIi irwt.il comers 

• It'nruL printed m 
" French blue paper with 

gilded puce edge* 
• |904 notable date* and national 
h ■!? Ju> - in over W o nintrhs: world 
inn j-/| our lablc: iithmmnn.il telephone 
dialing code* and munirv prefixes: 
conversion table* of weights, 
measures and distance*. 
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• Include* removable address 
N*4.. that Ills *nu"K ini.* Us i«n silk 
pivkcl. No need M re-wuie vour hum 

important ph'iie number* — the addrc" 
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• Cadi diar> packed in a blue gttl bus 

• Corporaw disci units and 
pcrstindli/arion arc available. 
Rif detail.*. i«i* Karen Dipt at 

i.WI 1 4o37iV*5J- 




Year after year -even at a period when 
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Please send me 1994 IHT Pocket Diaries. 1 1-1-94 

Price includes initials, packing ami postage in Europe: 

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ED Additional postage outside Europe 40 F.F. <U. 5.5*6.90) 

HD Check here For delivery outside Europe by registered or 
certified mail: 50 F.F. (U.S.S8.G0) per package plus postage. 
P&vment is by credit curd only. AH major cards accepted, 
t Please »nte iful French resident!, may pay by check in Ficnch 
francs. We regret that checks in other currencies cannot be 
accepted.) 

Ptease charge to m> credit card: 

□ □ Am: 1 □tUncr* Q Kumtnrd CD M-wc-iCwd □ Vri 


Today’s 

EDUCATION 


TllUh I I 1 


Appears 
on Page 5 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


BUSINESS 




IBCIM MACNM3Y 
Tampon hodudwn Machinery 
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simple pul) remove* top sheet 
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I ) 8 1 A vc. Ch. -de-Gaulle, ‘>252 1 Ncuilly Cedex, France, 
f Rlv 133-1 14637 0651 















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JANUARY 11. 1994 


Page 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


h 









- AW'. 



In Japan Market 


TOKYO — Car sales in Japan 
by Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler 
Corp, singed in 1993, but Genera? 
Motors Corp.'s sales fdL according 
to data released Monday. - 

Despite die gams by Ford aid 
Chrysler, -the American Big Three 
still accounted for only Oilpercenl 
of car sales in Japan, or fewer than 
20,000 vehicles in a market of move 
than 3.4 million. 

Germany continued to be the 
most popular source of imported 
vehicles, with sales totaling^, 177. 
though that number was down 63 
percent from 1992. 

Chrysler’s safes in Japan more 
than tripled, to 5,699 cars, in 1993; 
Fad’s grew 50 percent, to 5.111. 

“Foreign carmakers posted gains 
in 1993 due to the introduction of 
mw models and right-hand drive 
vehicles, as well as price cats,” said 
KnnQdko Ono of the Japan Auto- 
mobile Importers Association. 

Chrysier also benefited from, a 
boom in sales of recreational vehi- 
cles, he said. 

But primarily, be said, Ghrystert 
sales increase “resulted from heed- 
ing advice from Honda to reduce its 
retail prices and introduce right- 
hand-drive cars.” American and 
other foreign hove been diffi- 
cult to sell in Japan in part because 
Japanese motorists drive on die left. 

General Motors sold &2 percent 
fewer cars in Japan, a total of 8425, 
in 1993, although its safes have 
posted gains since August after 
GM cut prices. 

The increase in car sales for all 
foreign makers was 73 percent 
from a year earlier, to 195,090 in 
1993. Inciudmg trucks arid buses, 
safes, in Japan of foreign vehicles 
rose 9.1 percent, to 201,481. 


.. Japanese automakers, hit . by 
poor consumer demand, saw do- 
mestic car sales slump- 6.9 percent, 
to 3,430,000, io 1993, the fluid con- 
secutive year-on-year decline. 

Saks of Gern^made cars' fdQ 
6.7 percent from a year earlier, to 
*7.684 in 1993. . ' 

Chrysler introduced a right- 
hand-drive Cherokee in ‘ January 
1993, becoming the first of the 
American Big Three to. offer a 
right-hand-drive car in Japan. 

Guysler also began selling hs 
Gusrikee Sports 1 model in De- 

making fore^recr^ 

atronaf vehicle to be sola for less 
than 3' nriTB on yen. 

Chrysler also plans to introduce 
its LH model in Japan, with a safes 
target of I0JXH cars in 7994. 

The Japanese automakers 
Honda Motor Co. and Tr^ota Mo- 
tor. Co-, meanwhile, reported in- 
creased sales in Japan of cats im- 
ported from their American 
subsidiaries. 

Honda 'sold 2££80 U.Sr-made 
cars m 1993, up 35-5 percent, and 
Toyota sold 7,955 cars, more than 
tripe its year-earifer total Most of 
the- American-made cars were sta- 
tion wagons. (Reuters, AP) 

■ Trade Talks to Resume 
' Japan and the United States will 
resnme -talks Tuesday ""**4 at in- 
creasing. Japan’s purchases of 
American-made auto parts to try to 
rat Japan's trade surplus, Agence 
France-Presse reported, quoting 
Japanese government ofEdils. 

it would be the fourth time the 
two rides- had met to discuss the 
issue under a framework accord 
reached in July by President BDl 
CHnton and former Prime Minister 
Khctd Miyazawa. 


Steelmakers 
In Japan Face 
Rising Losses 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Japanese fled- 
makers will post record losses 
for then current financial year, 
but the wrest is still to comeas 
demand from the automotive 
and electronics industries 
slides, analysts arid Monday. 

Nomura Research Institute 
prcdietcd the five biggest steel- 
makers would post parent- 
company current losses of-216- 
triffianyen (S1.92 Mljon) for 
the yeareafing March 31 anti, 
losses totaling 295 bflbon yen 
in the following year. 

“Ibdr results in 1993-94' trill 
be the worst in history, and 
next year will be worse ■tin,"' 
Hiroyuki Suzuki, a sted-indua- 
try analyst forNanmra. said. - 

Crude sted outpatwfll Ml to 
91 u tiTTkm metric tons in tiie 
year March 1993 from 
97 mvffio n this year, aaxxding 
to Daiwa Institute ofRefosirdL 


Panting at Taiwan 9 s Door 

Foreigners Eager for a New Asia Play 


... By Kevin Murphy 

ImamUtomd Htratd Tnhme 

TAIPEI — With other Asian 
stock markets apparently taking 
a breather. Taiwan is attracting 
attention from international in- 
vestors eager to enter a Cray 

largely off-limits to t he m 

. A few months ago it was one 
Of the worst-performing markets 
in the world over a. three-year 
period, but Taipei's volatile 
Stock exchange has gained 
roughly 35 percent is the past 
mouth whOe neighboring mar- 
kets have coded. Still, the bench- 
mark Weighted Price Index, 
which closed down 3132 pants 
at 6343.83 Monday, remains 
about 50 percent off the all-time 
hi gh hu in February 1990. 

- No one seriously predicts a 
quick return to the heights at- 
tained four years ago when stock 
frenzy led workers to quit their 
fobs to play the market full time 


and underground securities mar- 
kets went spinning our of ccratroL 

Indeed, Taiwan's Central Bank 
of China on Monday 
down on liquidity in 
system, sending shot-term inter- 
est rates soaring, in an effort to 
cool the latest bout of stock spec- 
ulation, Reuters repeated. 

But in the long term, monetary 
poEcy is expected to remain rea- 
sonably loose. This, along with 
political stability, signs of cau- 


and the promise of a relaxation on 
foreign stock ownership limits, 
has rekindled food memories for 
local investors who dnmimte the 
market These factors have also 
created a tempting target for for- 


a Asa's next hot exchange. 

“lathis case a small group of 
foreign investors' optimism 
about the market has caused a 
domino effect.” said Patrick 


Chim, assistant manager of 
Kwang Hua Securities Invest- 
ment & Trust Co. 

Despite government pronoun- 
cements that Taiwan wants to lib- 
eralize financial markets. lie Tai- 
pei stock market remains largely 
dosed to fonrignexs and dominai- 


While foreign 
institutions are on 
the sidelines, 
the momentum 
they helped 
create carries on 
without them. 


ed by individual investors. The 
market's psychology tends to be 
insular, mercurial and occasional- 
ly a mystery to analysts struggling 
to firm explanations for sharp 
day-to-day price movements. 

Under government regulations, 
a total of S5 billion m foreign 
capital may be brought into Tai- 
wan for investment in local secu- 
rities. Permission to do so must be 
gained from the central bank, 
which has been ai odds with mar- 
ket regulator, the Securities and 
Exchange Commission, about the 
pace of the opening. 

Stability of the Taiwan dollar, 
with its great bearing on export 
prices, is paramount to the cen- 
tral bank. The Securities and Ex- 
change Commission's priorities 
are different: speeding Taiwan’s 
overall capital markets develop- 
ment and liberalization. 

Applications totaling more 
than 55 billion have been re- 
ceived from foreign investors. 


but many have yet to be pro- 
cessed- Brokers accuse the cen- 
tral bank Of stalling to relieve 
pressure on a slightly appreciat- 
ing Taiwan dollar and growing 
money supply. 

Although foreign investment 
accounts for at most 3 percent oT 
market capitalization, interna- 
tional interest lifted regional 
stock markets in 1993. explain- 
ing why expectations of foreign 
cash alone prodded Taipei mar- 
ket's early rises. 

Now, while many foreign in- 
stitutions remain stuck on the 
sidelines, the momentum they 
helped create has carried for- 
ward without them. 

Local investors are reportedly 
pouring their savings into the 
market. Others are borrowing 
from unofficial lenders to partic- 
ipate in the rally. 

H A month ago, the talk was all 
about 6,000 bong a real possibil- 
ity. The number people now have 
in their minds is 8,000," said Pe- 
ter Kurz, Baring Securities' chief 
represen La live in Taipei. “These 
markets do have more extended 
booms than other places: there 
are not many natural sellers in 
the market." 

How far then can Taiwan's 
market rise? 

Analysts say local institutional 
investors, most of whom were 
bearish on the market's pros- 
pects last year, are switching 
from cash to equities. At the 
same timet large numbers of 
fixed deposits are maturing aL a 
time of lower interest rates. 

“I’m sure the government 
doesn’t want to see it become as 
big a casino as it was in late 1989. 
early 1990,” said Timothy Moe. 
research head at Salomon Broth- 
ers Hong Kong Ltd. “But Taiwan 
may still have a tittle more to go.” 


H.K. Market 
Is Called 
Too Big to 
Manipulate 

dgoin 1 Frcnce-Prasc 

HONG KONG — The Hong 
Kong stock exchange is achieving 
record volume and has become too 
big to be easily manipulated, its 
chief executive said on Monday. 

The executive. Paul Chow, ac- 
knowledged having “beard talk" of 
attempts to influence the market 
That was an apparent reference to 
speculation that China has the fi- 
nancial strength io manipulate the 
Hang Seng index of leading Hong 
Kong shares behind the scenes 
ahead of 1997. when the colony is 
to come under Chinese sovereignty. 

But Mr. Chow asserted that it 
had became extremely difficult for 
any erne person or organization to 
dictate the market's course. 

“1 wonder if anyone can move 
this market" be said. 

Volume last Thursday touched a 
record 153 billion Hong Kong dol- 
lars (51.97 billion I, reflecting an 
influx of foreign funds. That is 
almost three times the daily aver- 
age last \eir. 

Volume on Monday was 10.8 bil- 
lion dollars. The Hang Seng rose 
365.46, ending at 1 1366.94. 

Mr. Chow' noting that Hong 
Kong's market capitalization stood 
at about 15 percent behind Paris 
and Frankfurt, forecast that it 
would within three to five yean 
overtake the Continental European 
markets to become the world's 
founh-biggesu 

He attributed the upsurge in for- 
eign interest to the arrival this past 
year of the first six Chinese state 
companies to list directly in Hong 
Koag. 

But ewer the same period, many 
brokers have suspected China, 
through its many business interests 
in Hong Kong, of placing big sell 
orders to force down the market and 
embarrass Governor Chris Patten. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

12535- 
*1X0“ 


Singapore 
Smarts Tiroes 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 




"A S ON D J 
1993 1994 


j r 

m -P* , 

mf 2. 

oTTd j ? 

1993 1994 



1993 


1994 


Exchange 

index ' 

Monday 

Close 

Prev. 

Dose 

% 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

1 1,366.50 

IfflOMO 

♦332 

Singapore . 

Straits Tima? 

2,424.36 

2,36640 

+2.45 

Sydney 

Ai! Ordinanes 

2,1 84 B0 

2.183.00 

+0.08 

Tokyo 

Nikkai 225 

18,443.44 

18.124.00 

+1.76 

| Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,206.75 

1,100.73 

+1.35 

Bangkok 

SET 

1,541828 

1.575.43 

-1.91 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

873.04 

ako.cn 

-1.61 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

6,343.83 

6,375.1 5 

-0.49 

Manila 

Composite 

3.089.39 

3,159.58 

-222 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

Closed 

607.69 

- 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2^51.52 

2.27B.S6 

-1.20 

Bombay 

National index 

1,823.03 

1,750.55 

+4.14 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


HeiJiITnhme 

Very briefly: 


• India said it had given Pizza Hut international, a unit of PepsiCo. Inc.. 
permission io set up pizza restaurants across the country. The chain is 
expected to invest about 540 million over a period of seven years to 
establish at least 30 restaurants, a government official said. 

■ Japan said it would inaugurate a program next week to open large 
public- works projects to foreign coo tractors. 

• The Philippines opened talks with the International Monetary Fond on a 
new economic program and President Fidel V. Ramos said the country 
was in a beuer position to negotiate a deal due to an improving economy. 

• China Southern Airways and China Eastern Airways are waiting for a 
government derision that would allow' them to list their shares on L.S. 
stock exchanges. 

• Djin Grotqx a South Korean synthetic diamond producer, vowed to 
fight until it overturned a U.S. court ruling ordering it to stop production 
for seven years. The court ordered the ban on grounds that the company 
had stolen its technology from General Electric Co. 

m Kazakhstan, whose oil and mineral wealth has lured a growing number 
erf international businesses, hopes to receive about SI billion in Western 
loans in 1994. Prime Minis ter Sergei A. Tereshchenko was quoted as 

saving. Knight- Rutter. AFP. Reuter. Bloomberg 


Sri Lankan Company Returns to Its Roots 


Reuters 

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka Established 12S 
years ago by two Scots as a trading house when 
SriLanka was a British colony, Aitken Spence 
& Co. has become one of the country’s top blue- 
chip conglomerates. 

^ The company, which was hard-hit by the 
TTnrihri^lTr ^rhnn ei swathes of its business in the 
early 1970s, is enjoying a retamto such sectors 
as plantations and insurance. 

%’s a hit of pleasure getting bade into old. 
businesses we began fife with," said Michael 
Made, the caapmfs fil-yesrHoW ch a irm a n , 
vto joined Ailken Speucein 1953 nits first Sri 
Lankan trainee. 

. '„ In tiwmtemning decades after the national- 
izations, Aitken Spemrc built im a major share 
of the island's tourist industry through its navel 
agency and hotel businesses. It is also a leader 
in cargo handKng. “We’re No. 1 or 2 in the 
■tourist sector, and we aim to maintain that 
position,” Mr. Mack said. 

Hie said investment funds based in Britain, 
the United States and Hoi® Kong had acquired 
between 35 and 40 percent of the company 
since it went public in 1983. 

Fareigners hire the orapany because it pro- 
vides good returns, is in growth businesses and 
"takes in a large put of its revenue in foreign 


currency, i 

depredation, Mr. Mack said. 

Aitken Spence earned net profit of 137 mil- 
lion rupees (£2.9 rrnOion) in the year ended 
March 31, 1993, and earnings per snare rose 22 
percent to 19.18 rupees. 

Revenue was more than 2 billion rupees, and 
15 bflKon rupees of that came in foreign cur- 
rency, an advance erf 29 percent from a year 
earlier. 

The company’s effective income tax rate is 
relatively low at 20 percent because of its poEcy 
of concentrating on sectors that attract tax 
incentives, said Asia Stock Brokers (Pvt.) Ltd. 
in a recent repot. Sri Lanka's basic corporate 
tax rale will be cot to 35 percent from 40 
percent in ApriL 

The company began business in 1868 in the 
southern port of GaUe. It imported rice and 
coal, and exported gems, hides, ebony, coffee 
and the local liouor, arrack. 

It set up a branch in Colombo with the 
.development of the Colombo harbor a few 
years later and acquired shipping and insurance 
agencies and plantations to become an agency 
house typical of the time. 

The Scottish families that founded the com- 
pany severed connections in 1971, when owner- 
ship was taken over by Sri Lankans. 


Today, Aitken Spence is a conglomerate with 
32 subsidiaries employing more than 7.000 peo- 
ple in five sectors — tourism, cargo handling, 
manufacturing, services and real estate devel- 
opment. 

Aitken Spence has a reputation for cautious 
growth, careful deliberation and a knack for 
picking the “right” business, the brokerage 
Smith New Court Sri Lanka said in a report 

It said the company's 10 percent market 
share and expansion plans make it well placed 
to exploit the boom in tourism. 

Mr. Mack said over half the company's profit 
came from its hotels and travel agency business. 
Aitken Spence owns three resorts and manages 
seven others. Its travel subsidiary represents top 
tour operators u) Europe and East Asa. 

“Hotels account for the lion’s share of recent 
investments," Mr. Mack said, referring to the 
company's two new hotels, the expansion of its 
Triton Hold — the island's sole five-star resort 
— and its recent acquisition of a reseat in the 
Maldives. 

“We suffered so much from nationalization 
we decided we would bold where there's no 
threat of government intervention,” the chair- 
man explained. “This has been a thread of 
continuity in (he firm’s development,” 


Hongkong Land’s Assets Gain 


Cauqnledby Our Staff From Dispatches 

HONG KONG — The value 
of office lowers and shopping 
centers owned by Hong Kong's 
largest landlord, Hongkong 
Land Holdings Ltd, rose 47 per- 
cent to S7.84 billion last year, 
according to a valuation done for 
the company. 

In a statement announcing that 
it was making a S300 million con- 
vertible bond issue, Hongkong 
Land a unit of Jardine Matbeson 
Holdings Ltd. said the annual 


valuation of its main investment 
properties had been carried out 
by the real estate broker Jones 
fjng Woo non Inc. on Dec. 31. 

The bonds will be convertible 
into shares or Hongkong Land 
the company said. 

In the last two years, prices 
and rents charged for Hong 
Kong's top-quality office build- 
ings rose steeply as China's rap- 
idly developing economy allra cri- 
ed more foreign companies into 
the British colony and those al- 


ready in Hong Kong, especially 
in the financial-services industry, 
expanded while the supply of of- 
fice space in Hong Kong’s cen- 
tral business district remained 
basically unchanged 
“The increase in Hongkong 
Land’s valuation may even be on 
the conservative side; this year 
really has been excellent for 
prime-grade office space,” Karl 
Leung, a real estate analyst at 
W.I. Carr (Far East j Ltd. said 
( Bloomberg, AFP) 


China and India Discuss Making Aircraft 


The Associated Press 

NEW DELHI — China is pro- 
posing to pool technology and 
money with India to jointly manu- 
facture commercial aircraft. 

The Chinese ambassador, 1 
Ruisheng, told the Press Trust 
India news agency Monday that 
the two countries, emerging from a 
strained relationship after their 


border war in 1962, want to make 
100-seat passenger planes. 

Mr. Cheng said India and China 
could use their expertise at making 
military planes to manufacture ci- 
vilian ainraft. 

“We should diversify to the civil- 
ian side,” he was quoted as saying. 
“The technology available with 
both sides could be used-” 


No immediate comment was 
available from India. 

China and India have been try- 
ing to improve relations, emphasiz- 
ing trade and commercial collabo- 
ration, as both countries open their 
insulated economies to outside in-' 
vestors. 

Their bilateral trade rose 26 per- 
cent in 1993. to $450 minion. 


BCG: Fresh Indictments in View? WINE; Califonua’s Exports Grow 


CflBthned from Page 1 
an improved offer from Abu Dhabi 
to BCCI depoatore and other cred- 
itors. fa October a oonrt in Luxem- 
bourg rejected a 51.7 hUbon settle- 
ment between Abu Dhabi and 
Touche Ross, the London-based 
liquidators of BCCL Now, thanks 
to the Geneva agreement, Abu 
DhaWwfllhavetojpjrefoeHquida- 
tois all original BCX3 records if a 
i>ew finan cial settlement is not 
reached by April 1. If that were to 
happen the hquRlatbrs might use 
the documents as part of a future 
lawsuit against Abu Dhabi. 

' Abu Dhabi, winch bas consis- 
tentiy described itself as a victim of 
the BCCI fraud, has found itself 
increasingly isolated ance the Lux- 
embourg court rqected its ofte to 
creditors. Ml Margenthau, accom- 
panied by John Moscow, the duff 
tea investigator, traveled to Lux- 
embourg in Nbvrinber and ob- 
tained new pledges of cooperation. 

In late December an out-of- 
court settlement was reached under 
which Sbeikfa Kfcated ibn Mahfouz, 
8 S fiprij financ ier, and an associate 
paid 5225 nriffion to avddprosecu- 
tion on BCCl-rdated fraud and 
racketeering charges that bad been 

fice in New York. Sheikh Kfotfed 
also agreed to cooperate wtm uA 
authorities wto trere-hnxstiffdmg 
nuanbere trf ihe royal family of Aba 
Dhabi. 


* On Monday the sheikh alleged in 
a lawsuit in the high court in Lon- 
don that senior Abu Dhabi officials 
wore aware of. the BCCI fraud. In 
the $10.5 bQHon suit against the 
Abu Dhabi Investment Authority 
and Gbanim Fans al Mazrm, ils 
head, Sbaldi Khaled contended 
they were “knowing parties" to the 
BCCJ fraud. Mr. Mazrni was a so- 
nin r member of the Abo Dhabi 
te a un that readied agreement with 
iJS. officials last Saturday. 

While Aim Dhabi stressed on 
Monday that h had reached its 
agreement with Washington in.Cff- 
der to help further BCCI investiga- 
tions, the emirate in recent weeks 
has found itself in an awkward situ- 
ation in Washington. This was the 
case because it had asked tire State 
De partm ent for head-of-stste im- 
munity for Sheikh Zayed, who was 
inmai in the SI .5 billion First 
Amer ican lawsuit. 

Two senior members of Con- 
gress who have been investigating 
BCG — Senator John F. Keny 
and Representative Henry B. Goo- 
zalez — protested to warren M. 
Christopher, ifce secretiny of stofo 
about the attempt to win immunity 
for the Abu Dhabi ruler. If immu- 
nity had not been -granted and 
Shakh Zayed had refused to tes- 
tify, the Aba Dhabi refer could 
have lost the $13 baHton suit by 
default 


Continued from Page 9 

material supplier in. cue of the 
world’s fastest-growing wine mar- 
kets. 

In the final, hectic horns of nego- 
tiations over the new tariff sched- 
ules at the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade, Mi. Clawson, 
the California lobbyist, managed to 
win a one- third reduction in Japa- 
nese duties on table wine and a cut 
from 25 to 20 percent at bulk ship- 
ments. 

“It’s only incremental,” raid Mr. 
Clawson. “Bnt this is a nadti- 
nnUian dollar business, and we're 
going to keep at it." 

Not only is California competing 
with. French wine in the.new mar- 
kets in Aria, it is erven breaking into 
die market in France itself, where 
five nuOfon liters of California 
wine were sold this year. 

“As far as the consumer is con- 
cerned, tins is an open market, and 
ihe-Firach Hite to try new wines. If 
we stay here and keep al it, weH be 

in good shape when the European 
economy cones back,” said David 
Winter, who began working in the 
bdty of the beast last March as the 
Paris-based European marketing 
director for Wcnte Brother of Cal- 
. if Praia, which exports 40 percent of 
hs output, and has just won an 
order of rate thousand cases for a 
promotion in 124 stores of France’s 
jrix retail chain, 
forma competes mostly with 


what the wine trade calls the "new 
world” wines of Chile, South Afri- 
ca, and Australia. Marketing ac- 
cents the laid-back California life- 
style, and it differs from country to- 
country. 

In Germany, California capital- 
izes on the lade of good German 
reds instead of hying to take on the 
good local whites. “Take a chance 
with California,” goes the slogan 
there, but the marketers were more 
camions than that. They started 
dowdy in upscale speciality wine 
and food shops and now are in 
department stores. At 8 million li- 
tem, sales were up 50 percent in 
1993, and tins year California wine 
moves into hypermarkets. 

Britain is probably Europe’s 
most competitive market; it takes 
about 30 million liters a year from 
almost 1% California wineries and 
is the state's best foreign market 
after Canada. It competes mainly 
in the tough market just below £4 

($6) a bottle, which is bard to do for 


costs, according to Andrew 

Montague, the California Wine In- 
stitute's chief promoter in Britain. 

Asked about the tannin that too 
often seems to characterize Califor- 
nia wine, he replied that meant the 
wine was drunk tooyoung. “People 
randy lay down California wine 
and they should,” he raid. “T am 
trying to turn that around with 
tastings and shows to get wine into 
glasses where people will drink it-" 


X OJUINNEL; Testing the Waters 

; which last year handled ‘ 


inmates, mduding the 75 mjnme: 
rafting . In bad weather and heavy 
y- g s , something Lc Shuttl e ha rdly 
needs to worry 

run far longer and far harder on the 
stomach, if the feny nms at afl. 

*Tanx)tunnel^ will become tbs pte- 
fared route over both fen** 
an d theririmes." 

Ryder, an analyst at Salomon 

Brothers Inc. ‘ • . 

Even the Dover Harbor Anto^- 
itv which nms by far the buaest 
cSss-Channel port m England 
forecasts a quick and massw cutm 
its business. . ' . 

"We expect JSurotonff to-take 
40 percent oS om re«W®J ** 
firstvear," S 0 ™?* a 

spokesman ’for the .Authority, . 


Exacerbating the plight of the 
feny operators is a surfeit of capac- 
ity. A total of ID super femes — 
five each from both P&Oand Stena 
— make a total of 50 crossings* 
day, often teaviogai the same time. 
"The competition is « fi®* “Hfl 
w rim hosts that don’t always 
make, sense,” Mr. Rees of Stena 

complained. 

wiB^te^lfover with even less 
commocaal logic. Although the fer- 
viy operators and Eurotunnel insist 
foe last flung they' want is for the 
war of woros ^to become a price’ 
war, same analyst predict blood-, 
letting! Even the feny com panies 
admit dial- there is probably room, 
for oniy one major feriy operator. 


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Join the experts as they debate the (rends 


MARCH 23-24. 1994 - DOLDER GRAND HOTEL. ZURICH 

Following the considerable success of their first event. International Fund 
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Page 16 


International 


SPORTS 


In a Game That Had Everything, 
The Raiders Had a Little More 


By Michael Wilbon 

Washutgton Post Service 

LOS ANGELES — This was a 
game straight out of A1 Davis's 
dreams. 

His quarterback threw deep, 
bombs away. His defense allowed 
only a field goal when it counted, 
thwarting one of the best playoff 
quarterbacks in National Football 
League history throughout the sec- 
ond half. And on mind to watch 
was a full bouse in the Los Angeles 
Memorial Coliseum, a colorful 
rowdy crowd that was reminiscent 
of an earlier era in the Raiders’ 
history. 

Los Angeles' 42-24 victory over 
the Denver Broncos in an Ameri- 
can Football Conference wild-card 


playoff game Sunday was. in virtu- 
ally every way, vintage Raiders. 

The Raiders got three touch- 
down passes from Jeff Hostetler, 
and three more touchdowns on the 
ground from Napoleon McCallum 
in his best performance as a pro. 
Thai more than offset John El way’s 
302 passing yards and three touch- 
down passes and tight end Shan- 
non Sharpe's 13 catches. 

Those are the details, but hardly 
the stoiy of the kind of game that 
once made the American Football 
League so irresistible. 

There were six touchdown drives 
of 65 yards or longer just in the first 
half, which ended with the score 
tied at 21. Hostetler's first six com- 
pletions went for 202 yards and 


three touchdowns. There were on 
NFL playoff-record 27 penalties 
for a record 227 yards, a record 17 
of the penalties called against the 
Raiders. 

There were nearly as tnany fights 
on the field as there were in the 
stands. In a first-half fight, comer- 
back James Trapp came off the 
sideline and started punching 
Broncos in the middle of the field. 
That in itself might not sound so 
bizarre, but Trapp is inactive and 
was standing an the sideline in 
street dothes. Remarkably, the 
Raiders were not hit with a penalty, 
but the Broncos were, a 1 5-yarder. 

“Ridiculous," said Denver’s 
coach. Wade Phillips. “A guy 
comes off their bench and attacks 
our player and we get a 13-yard 
penaStyr* 





Pw w r er 7 M 0 *— M 

LA. ROkhn M 7 M 7— 12 

Hrat Quarter 

LA H orton 9 PCM from WaUlttr Uontf 
hide). 5:34. 

Dan — Sharpe 23 pass from Ehw (Elam 
kick). 8:48. 

LA — Brown AS Pass from Hosteller (Jasper 
kick]. 12:35. 

Second Quarter 

Don— RJahnson » pom from E hoav f Eton 
kick), 4:54. 

LA— Jett 94 pan from Hostetler (Jaoasr 
kick), 7:32. 

Don — Russell 4 pass from Elwav (Elara 
kick), 14:28. 

Third Quarter 

LA— McCollum 26 run (Jooscr kick). 4:52. 

LA— McCollum 2 run (Jam* kick), 10:33. 

Foe mi Quarter 

Don— FG Elam 33, 2:24. 

LA — McCollum 1 run (Jaoaer kick). 8:17. 

on LA 

First downs M 19 

Rustws-yards 18-54 32-134 

Passim 331 291 

Punf returns 3-38 (HI 

Kickoff returns 4-85 MS 

Interceptions ret (HI 1-1 

Compatt-lnt 3Z-54-1 13-194 

Punts *<M 4*43 

Fumoto-lpp 241 M 

Penal ttes-vords 1897 17-130 

Time at possession 31:09 28:51 

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 

RUSHING— Denver. DetpMO M2. Elwav 5- 
23, Rivers l-Z Maddox VI. Mil bum H minus 
2). Las Ansaie&McCailuni 1341, Montaomory 
15-51 Hostetler 45. 

PASSING— Denver. Etway OT-47-1-302. 
Maddox 3-7-0-3*. LOS Aimlei. Hostetler 13-19- 
0-294 

RECEIVING— Denver, Sharpe 13-lSfcMor- 
shall559. Milbuni 55. Russefl Ml. Tillman 2 - 
25. RJotmsan 2-19. K.Tcrvtor 1-11 Rivers l-l 
Evans 1-7. Las Amies. Jett 3-1 1 1. Brwn 351 
Horton 345. Montgomery 3-29, WHgtit 1-21 

MISSED FIELD GOALS—Nane. 


A setting already wild enough 
almost got even wilder. The parag- 
lider who crashed into November’s 
Riddick Bowe-Evander Holyfield 
heavyweight championship fight in 
Las Vegas sailed in over one end of 
the Cohseum and circled above the 
rim or the stadium. But this time 
the paraglider. James Miller of 
Henderson, Nevada, motored on- 
ward, was tracked by police in their 
cars and arrested immediately after 
landing in a park in a northwestern 
part of the city. 

The police charged Miller, 30, 
with interfering with a spoiling 
event, a misdemeanor. 

In an afternoon chock full erf 
sidelights, there was also incredibly 
entertaining, even if flawed, play- 
off football The Raidas, with their 
bombs-away offense the first half 
and rejuvenated defense in the sec- 
ond half, advanced to Saturday’s 
divisional playoff game in Buffalo. 

Denver safety Dennis Smith, be- 
fore it began, had billed the game 
as the Raiders’ speed vs. the Bron- 
cos’ strength. “I said, “It’ll lx a 
game of trucks vs. Ferraris,’ ” 
Smith said afterward. “If it’s a race, 
they win. They’ve got too much 
speed. If h's a game of collisions, 
we win. 

“Well, h wound up with trades 
chasing Ferraris," be said. “There 
were not enough collisions and too 
many races." 

The raoe was officially on when 
Hostetler hit wide receiver James 
Jett with a 44-yard laser that set op 
a nine-yard touchdown pass to 
tight end Ethan Horton for a 7-0 
had six minutes into the gamp. 

Elwav countered with a 65-yard 
drive that ended with a 23-yard 
pass to Sharpe for a 7-7 be. 

Hostetler hit wide receiver Tim 
Brown on a crossing route, which 
covered 65 yards and pat the Raid- 
ers on top, 14-7. El way took the 
Broncos on a 12-play, 80-yard drive 
that ended in a 16-yard touchdown 
pass to tight end Reggie Johnson, 
and it was 14-14. 

On perhaps the game's most 
memorable play, Jett, the rookie 
from West Virginia, somehow got 
behind a three-deep Denver zone. 
Hostetler threw a rainbow that Jett 








- 'Vf ’ ' V.- 

• - -V •"-, 








3U$yitfr 

LkCMIoIbi 

TTie Broncos’ John Elroy threw for 302 yards, but in die last faatf took a (wanting from the Ratten. 


ran under, caught and took into the 
end zone to make it 21-14. At that 
point, with more than seven min- 
utes still left in the half, Hostetler 
had completed 6-of-9 passes for 
202 yards. 

But Bway would wind up with 
18 completions and 199 yards in 
the half. The next drive covered 77 
yards, included a fourth-and-inch- 
es conversion, and ended when he 
hit wide receiver Derek Russell 


with a six-yard pass to tie the game 
again, at 21. 

Then the Raiders' defense,. 
Coach Art Shell’s desire to keep 
Etway off the field by naming 
more, and three consecutive poor 
punts by Denver’s Tom Rouen 
changed the tone of the game early 
in the second half. 

McCall urn’s 26-yard run around 
the left end, the longest dash of his 
career, put the Raiders ahead for 


good, 28-21. McCalhnn’s second 
touchdown ran, a two-yard burst 
up the middle, made it 35-21 with 
four minutes to play in the third. 
The first ran was set np by a 33- 
yard punt, the second, by. a 30-yard 
punt 

McCallum got his third touch- 
down, a one-yard phage, with just 
under seven minutes Ictl The three 
rushing touchdowns tied an NFL 
playoff record shared by 20 others. 


FMmmdGcMMs 

~ V NFC . ■ 

• GREEN -BAY PAOCBS 28 , 

DET ROIT UONS 24., - • ~ 

• NEW YORK GIANTS 17, 

MINNESOTA VIKINGS TO. 


•KANSAS CITY. QJIIEES 27 , . 
PITTSBURGH STffiLBJS 24, 
OT. • - 

• LOS ANGHJ5S RATOR5 42, 

' DENVER BRONCOS 24. 

Second-Round Games 


Saturday, Jan. 15 

• NEW YORK GIANTS at 
SAN FRANCISCO 49BK. 

Sunday, Jan. 16 

• GREEN BAY PACKERS at 
DALLAS COWBOYS. 


Sat ur day; Jarii 15 '' 

• LOS ANGOES RADERS at 
BUFBU.O BILLS. 

Sunday, Jan. - 1 6 

• KANSAS CITY CWff5 at 
HOUSTON OSSIS. 

C on ference Tiftet ■ 


Sunday, Jan. 23 


a.AFCj^in^i6ial^> Gone. 
• NfCChdnywi n^ MpGqme. 

SuperBowt XXVfll 

- Allcmta • 


McMahon Takes His Knocks: r I Plan to Be Back 9 


LcrCdoao/RciOca 

James MUkx, who crashed November’s heavyweight tide bout, 
hove into sight again but fins time had hes wings dipped by police. 


By Frank Litsky 

New York Times Service 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New Jersey — 
At age 34, he is still wears a long gold 
earring on his left ear and blue sunglasses 
in the dark. The old defiance is still there. 

So is the resiliency that has allowed him 
to return, seemingly every few weeks, from 
a broken this or a dislocated that But Jim 
McMahon is no phony tough guy, and he 
was scared Sunday during his Minnesota 
Vikings’ 17-10 playoff loss to the Giants. 

On the second play of the second half, 
with the Vikings nursing a 10-3 lead, Mc- 
Mahon dropped back to pass. Ashe threw 
incomplete, me Giants' Mike Fox smashed 
into him from behind, and a split second 
later Keith Hamilton hit him from the 
from. McMahon's head was bent back. 

“My whole body was numb for maybe 
two minutes," he said. “Until I got feeling 
back in my legs, it was not a good feeling, 
considering what has happened the last 
couple of years." 

In the two preceding seasons, offensive 


guard Mike Utley of the Detroit Lions and 
defensive tackle Dennis Byrd of the New 
York Jets suffered serious neck injuries 
during games. Utley is paralyzed; Byrd has 
partly recovered. McMahon’s injury was 
diagnosed as a minor concussion. 

“I thought those two guys broke his 
neck,” said Tim Irwin, the Vikings’ offen- 
sive tackle. “I was worried for his safety." 

McMahon was helped off the field, and 
Sean Salisbury replaced him for (me play 
before the Vikings punted. The next time 
they had the ball, McMahon was bade. 

Nine minutes later, Fox hit McMahon 
as the quarterback completed a pass. Mc- 
Mahon took a blow to the bead and feD on 
his left shoulder, which was separated ear- 
lier in the season, forcing him to miss five 
games. This time, the shoulder was 
bruised. 

On that second hit, McMahon also suf- 
fered a pinched nerve in the neck or shoul- 
der, causing a loss of sensation elsewhere 
in the body. Football people call that inju- 
ry a burner or stinger. 

McMahon again returned, but the Vi- 


kings could not score or even threaten 
against the Giants’ tough defense. 

McMahon was sacked three times and 
belied often by the Giants’ front line. As 
Cris Carter, who caught McMahon’s 40- 
yard pass for the Vikings' touchdown, 
said: “We had second and long, third and 
long a lot. He got knocked arormd a lot" 

In a worid of hardnosed people, McMa- 
hon is almost an icon to teammates. 

“What he did today,” said Jack Dd Rio, 
the Vikings’ middle linebacker, “was a 
tribute to him.” 

His blockers are amazed by his resil- 
ience. 

“I don’t think there’s anything more you 
can say about his toughness," said Todd 
Kalis, an offensive guard. “He doesn’t let 
anything — pain, injury, whatever — af- 
fect what he’s trying to do." 

McMahon has been spent 12 seasons in 
the National Football League — seven 
with the Chicago Bears, ooe with the San 
Diego Chargers, three with the Philadel- 
phia Eagles and one from the Vikings. He 
has been beaten op so often that ms 12 


starts this season were his most except for 
13 for the 1983 Bern*. 

The Vikings, seeking an offensive spark, 
signed him this . season as an ura c s t u cted 
free agent fofS3.2 mfltfon over two years. 
He led them to a 9-7 regular-season record 
and a short trip to the playoffs. 

“He amazes me,” said Steve Jordan, the - 
Vikings’ tight end. “When he came to the 
team, a lot of people said he hadn't fin- 
ished a season m years. Can he take a hit? 
WdL he took some today and bounced 
bade.” 

Against the Giants, he just could not 
bounce back enough. He was disappointed 
because; he said, “We had it in contra! 
with a 7-point lead and the way oar de- 
fense was playing, and then, in the third 
quarter, we tost tire game.” 

So tire Vikings are out of the playoffs, 
but for McMahon It is only an mteernp- 
tiou, not an end. 

“I plan to be back next year,” he said. 
‘Tin having too much fnn, bat it’s not fan 
when we lose. HI be back if they want me 
back.” 


. (Who^’Sn^Wiiis 

SRTAvai^fer BUI 

. . The AstodatekPms 

NEW YORK — Rhnrnng back Emrmtt 
Smith, who missed two games and half of 
. another, all three pf which tf^ DaHasCnw- 
bdys lost, was selected Monday as the 
mosLvahiaHe player in the NEL. 

In voting by 81 national media mem- 
bers, Smith narrowly bad' out last yeafr 
winner, Steve Young of the San Francisco 
.49era. Smith, the league's leading rusher 


•Young, flretoppassermtheNFL^had?!. 

Smith is the &st^^xf®rihe Cowbqys 
to win the award, arid only The third run- 
ning back since 1980* : i- .. 

JmyRicfltrftite4^ 
balloting with IS'ifrus, He was followed 
by Denver quarterback John Elwav with 
10, and Dallas quarterback Troy Atkman 
with three votes. 

Abo receiving votes were naming back 
Marcos Allen of Kansas City and quarter- 
back Warren Moon of Hbnston, two eafcb, 
and quarterback Phil Simms of the New 
York Giants and wide recover Stating 
Shape of Green Bay, one each. 
















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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. JANUARY 1 i . .99+ 


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41 






Nw.Yorkiiinertcrvhx 

' -fe ^^ L B 9^f>^A3soaammab and 

league's most 

t D^jmttong.but smooth for the 

~ 5f"‘* $"< Ci^te Barkley. At training 
; ^ October/ tke bjoot, hinch-Janvard 

.:- ^ the corn. Tests rrreakd a bulging .' 

Jufc m fas ftocfc, wftiefi hosfuzmpered his style - 
w a tfegn* but not Us smile. TbmBarkky 
was iHvohftfm t^aUertatUmmaFhdemx- 
area bar. Su7idqjr hewdsphxed an fre injured; 
tot because tyasmaRtearmhisright auadri- 
ceps tendon, tom chaing a game Friday rntfk 
The team’s doctor, Richard ‘Emotion, jun/f it : 
appeared BarkJef wmdd not needsurpay, hut 
that he will re-endoate dw fn/wytiui weat“: 
i4mirf aQ that,- Barkley offered saw thoughts 
on hisfitture, ^eieogw arU society In genavl ^. 
in an interview with Samantha Stevenson. 

0 Looking ahead to am year? ’ ••••.;: 

A: Next year? Tmoot playing basketbaH 
next year. 

Q: Then tdl m, what is the stateof 
Diaries BariSey in ISM? . . : . - - : 

A: Fra just trying jo finish off this season. 

S efufly, eywything ^ be fiw and we 
win- the wood chamjaMrifihfr- This ig-ipy 
last season. - . .. 

Q; For sore? . V' 

A: Fca* sure. - 
.0 The fans. vrifl imss.you. 

A: There will always be great basketball" 
players, rm lrxriang forwani to playing in .' 
3994 boeaoa we Mve a chance to wb tbe ; 
world championship. We are one ofthrec 
best teams in the Jea^TTwre are only four 
iwfive flat can winit, and we’re one of them. ." 
Q: SobowYyour back? - 
A: T think it's been a struggle for me this 
year physically. My. back ingoing to bother 
me. There's nothing l ean do about h. Urn’s 
part of the game.. You have to play hard and 
play through itf ' ' J : - ; 

Q- Let's make a Hst of reasons, why you 
are retiring. . v 

A: The oarvly reason ispfcy sical pain. Thai’s 
it. For me, it is a physical sum My feet 

mnlr^ mu lane im< < *rL*«C • 


into lhei)ewyear T arid 

JackNkadatiSt 

right, was raisbgtania- 


Qa&fhtpwben PM .. 
Mi^ej^heatFYed 
Gntfles in a playoff 
to win ifceMercedes 


NW^m,53,<aaie 
framto^dwts hack to 
wm toe ‘fenior sec- . 
tionrfthetwo^ier . 
eventTbeabebe- ^ 


■ tiBe. Bittnotontbese- 

^ played a y ery ; ' 
good senior tourtonr- 
natttent/’ hesaid. • • 

_• “Bot thafsjBQt Hbaf' 
Pmtr^ngtodo. 
^oumaylighai 
; mfe,1kifif I thfaikinmy 
(wnraDdlcaibe 
cocapetitiye,flie«jibe- 
fie?e.LcanbedMn- 
p^itive. K inmyown 

n^rdonHtbbk 
thaLtbeanHetyoa 
know and m go do 


km C. FAnatboId/n* Amd» 
rfPfra v - 


s Attacker 


i.-!’ \{ *1 

1 


Q: What about gang hack to Auburn for 
your degree? 

A: It depends on my plans. Everybody 
does not need an education. I think if’s 


of niy back pain. When you have back prob- 
lems it makes ytxa- legs go numb. Your feet 
are taking akd of presaire. I'm taking seme 
an ti-mfliimnatCHy shots in my leg that make 
the piin go aww inmy baii. But 1 don’t , 
want to get in thi habit of taking shots 1 to 
t play. Thai's iu-. : 

i 0: You’re not: tired of the hassles you 
have recently bad to go through? 

A: I don’t move around Phoenix, rwgbi a 
cook at home. My wife -is * good -cook. 
'Petrie are goiqgtobiig the hcfiouic^ytNL If 
goes with the tOTtory. Thm T s iriry tbeypay 1 
you so much money. They pay you ® mub'oo 
to play and another .two million ip deal with . 
the nutk And ttore are no nuts for me ' 
because they will ^ punched in ihe head. ; 
But tbafs thewayjtis. . ~ . . v I, ■ - 
Q; Is anyone ot m jlhinggoing lo change 

nvr inluMf. • J . - ' 


want 

tbdali 

for me. One of the problems in the political 
System is you haw so many people who owe 
people something. But if I get in there I 
won't .he. lodcing out for any particular 
group. I’ve been' on both ends of the spec- 
tnafl. Fve been poor. Tve been rich. Hope- 
fully, I can dp a good job. 

' • Q: Republican, Democrat? 

" Aj Tin an independent. 

0: What will be your jriatform? 

Ar No. 1 tiring, I would pop more money 
into the pubHc. school system. What we’re 
doing is creating different sodoecoDomic 
_ ^pL^riuKlwehwdeceridraiedoiirpubfic 

doctor cmi^tvx'MlAtlam nofb«ng ' ‘^Cbortsysjan. We are creating two different 
in pain then b 'sstaaediing^ l consider. . econotmc,. gtoup®. Also, we have to get 

Thnseason i iTwt|^ back-U>^Mtigain^ tougher «i crime. People are not afraid to 
that 1 thinJL.ive .can wui T wiU take sunt ersronir crimes in. our society today and . 
games off. r ' • 'that's wrong. 


Q: the Phoenix organization talks as 
though you wiH be back in 1995. 

A: If 1 can get iny back together and they 
guarantee I won't be in pain, of course Fll be 

playing. Tm only, 30 years old. A good- important if you don’t have a special gift, 
locking 30 years old, I might add. Jerry Having an education today doesn't guaran- 
Colangdo wooldn’ t want me to play basket- tee you a job. 

ball in pain. He’s too good of apeison for Q; Do yon believe in stricter gun laws? 

A: Guns don’t kiD people. People with 
Q: People m Alabama say 31cm want to ran guns kill people. You put a gun on that floor 
for govemorwhea you retire? andmuseit 

A: Not for fan years. It's scunething Tve Q: Do you cany one? 

A: I prefer not to get into it. People know 
you have a gun or don't have a gun, it sways 
their opinion if they want to do something to 
you. 

Q: Do you fed secure in your home? 

A: Yeah. As long as I have that 9-millime- 
ter beside me. 

Q: Do you have a sense that since Michael 
Jordan has left that the pieces of the champi- 
onship puzzle are more divided? 

A: No, not really. 1 felt the teams in the 
West would have been favored anyway. Se- 
attle. Houston and us. Even Chicago. The 
Bulls are a great team. 

Q: Any surprises in the league this year? 
A: Just a lot of bad teams. And that's it. 
Q: Like? 

A: No, not like. There are a lot of bad 
teams. 

Q: Do you miss Jordan? 

A: 1 see him now more than when I was 


playing. 1 see him a lot We made some Nike 
commercials and we just made a McDon- 
ald's commercial. He's doing great. He's 
really happy. 

Q: Do you see you and Jordan ever barn- 
storming Europe? 

A: That Dream Team stuff is over. It 
might tarnish something if we retire at veung 
ages and go overseas to play. If we play, we 
should play in America. Maybe an exhibi- 
tion over there. Or something. Tm an Ameri- 
can. That's what Americans do. They take 
care of Americans. 

0. Have Pat Riley of the Knicks and Phil 
Jackson of the Chicago Bulls made n big 
impact on pro coaching? 

A. They are very good coaches. But coach- 
es aren’t going lo win unless the players are 
good. You got bad plavers. you can't win. 
This is a player's game. 

0 You laugh a lot on the court 



Kuicks Get a Return on Trade for Harper 


■.TJKjfaer^mdfrm .1 . “This is a great opportunity,” he added “1 

- Jididn’ilake long jor.Derek Harper to get think it’s important that I try to take advan- 
the bulk of the playing time af pmnt gumd - - ugc of it. - 

foT theNew York Kmcki-.- ' v ~. ,- q Neither Harper nor Greg Anthony had 
, acmhred ihree^d^ More frenn - ouisiandinB ofienMve numbers, but Harper 

the Dallas Mavmcks, pEayed'27 nmuttesr-did .it- ^better ^ ^defeoave iob than Anthony, 
Sunday mgjrt and was oath© ccw-during a ^*5 been starting for the Knicks since Doc 
17-7 fourth-quarter ran as New York defeat- ■ Rjversweni down with a season-ending knee 
ed the visiting ^PonJand Triul Mazers, 99-85; , inpuy. 

Patrick Ewmg sowed 36 points and John. “He’s doing a good job with the plavs he 
Starks added 30,>it « was the newly ac- - ^0^" Ewing said of Harper. “H^s an 


.^uired Harper who. got the most attention 
afterward for playing rjuafity minutes dating 
the most cnidtApm ri the g*j»e;\ 

. “It’s stiU eariy, but you.; can nil he's 'going 
.to be aWe to^ark t» mcenain situations,^ 
said Charles Oakley, who had 14 pcinis and 
12 rebounds for hs 16th doable-double of 
the season ^ more than he had. all last 
season. ‘ ; . 

Harper, who had seven points and four, 
assists, maiden 20-f<w junjper-to gjvc Ne» 
York a 91-73. lead in ttie fourth tpiarter. 
Portland got oo closer thmI4'after that; - 
. "1 was nemns." Harper said- “Tm just 
trying to find my; cr^ml zdlnc right now . " 


NBA HIGHUGHTS 


outstanding player and we know what he's 
capaWe of doing." - 

Anthony was not available for comment 
after the gam© He had four points, four 
-assists and five rebounds, but Rod Strick- 
land burned him for 14 first-half points. 
Strickland fed Portland with 19. 

■ The Blazon were without guards Terry 
Porter and Clyde Drexler and center Chris 
Dudley, all of wham «©• injured. 

New York outreboonded Portland 45-36, 


only the fifth time this season the Blazers 
were beaten on the boards. 

Suds 122, Warriors 107; Phoenix, playing 
at horn© was without Charles Barkley and 
Kevin Johnson, but Jls bench look up the 
slack. A.C. Green bad 29 points and 17 
rebounds and three other Phoenix players 
scored at least 21 points. 

Johnson missed his third straight game to 
rest a bruised right thigh and sprained ankle, 
but Frank Johnson filled in with a season- 
high 26 points and eight assists. Dan Majerle 
bad 23 points and Dairay Ainge 21. 

“We played a very proud team that forgot 
their adversities for two hours and kicked 
our bulls," said Golden State's coach. Dm 
Nelson. 

Spars 95, Lakers 89: San Antonio held 
host Los Angeles to 25 points in ihe first half, 
a franchise record-low. 

The Lakers were without coach Randy 
Pfund, who was suspended for one game and 
fined by the NBA for bumping a referee in 
Friday’s victory over the Clippers. He was 
replaced by assistant Bill Berika. 


a good team you are going to win a lot more- 
than you los© It's not the most important 
thing in the world. 

Q: What is the most important thing? 

A. God. Everything else is secondary. 

0. Looking back at 1993 and all of the 
deaths in spans . . . 

A: I don’t look back on it I keep it on my 
mind all the lime How precious life is. 1 
keep everything in perspective, no matter 
what happens cm the basketball court You 
lose a basketball 5am© it’s not that impor- 
tant. If it doesn’t nil you it won’t affect you, 

I don’t think. 

Q; Will you miss the game? 

A: You're going miss it. You're always 
going to miss it. Bu« you’re giving to mi.« it 
whether you retire tliis year or 10 years from 
now. 

0 What have you learned in the NBA? 

A: Nobody owes you anything. Y'ou have 
to work for ’what you get, My raom (aught 
me that, but chat’s stuff you learn along the 
way. I’ve gotten smarter: I'm a better, a 
better basketball player. 

Q: Unlike your commercial on role mod- 
els. do you really believe you are a role 
model? 

A: Yes. Athletes are role models. Second- 
ary role models. Your parents are first. 

0 Are you trying to leave a Barkley- 
legacy behind? 

A: No. Because in this life you are trying 
to do so much you aren’t thinking about 
what you are leaving. Y ou don't have time 10 
stop. Every day there is something new for 
me to do. 


VvfffUeJ M Oar Staff fr<vn [iitrati her 

DETROIT — T lie police said 
Monday they have a videotape of 
the man who attacked U.S. figure 
skarer Nancy Kerrigan and are 
hoping to get a belter look at him 
by sending the videotape 10 a lob- 
oratory for digital enhancement. 

"If we get a dear picture of the 
person, that would definitely be 3 
step in the right direction. ' Deputy 
Police Chief Benny Napoleon said. 

Kerrigan, limping slightly and 
holding onto her mother, reiurned 
home to Boston on Monday with 
hopes of skating again soon.' 

She was scheduled for tests lateT 
in the day on (he knee badly 
bruised when the man attacked her 
with a heavy rod Iasi Thursday af- 
ter practice in Detroit. 

The videotape was taken by a 
cameraman for Intersport. a Chica- 
go-basal production company, sec- 
onds before the attack and shows 
the man squatting near the curtain 
when Kemgan pulls it open as she 
walks off the skating rink. Napo- 
leon said. 

“You can see his fac©" Napo- 
leon said. "You can see his eyes. 
You can see his nose. You can" see 
his mouth." 

A private laboratory will attempt 
to clarify the shot through digital 
enhancement, Napoleon said. He 
said he was unsure how lone that 
will take. 

He said police would wait until 
then to distribute the videotape of 
the man. 

On Sunday, a videotape techni- 
cian from Olympia Arenas which 
operates Joe Louis Arena, deter- 
mined that the attacker was white. 
Napoleon said. On Saturday, po- 
lice released two composite "draw- 
ings of the man because Tour wit- 
nesses described him as white and 
two described him as black. 

Witnesses described the attacker 
as being 35 to 40 years old. 6 feet 
tall, and 190 to 210 pounds. Napo- 
leon said. 

Another Intersport videotape 
shows the attacker running down a 
hail alter he had hit Keirigan. Na- 
poleon said 

“You can see him running down 
a hall, he said. “You can see wbat 
looks like a black stick in his 
band ’’ 

Kerrigan was named to the 
Saturday. The at- 
ha 10 withdraw 
championships. 

“I can't let (his stop me." Kori- 
;an said ns she arrived at t.ngan 
nternation.il Airport in Boston. 


Kerrigan has been told by doc- 
tors that she can return 10 skating 
next week and begin jumping in 
two weeks. She said she hopes to 
<fcaie next Monday. 

• Speedskater Kristen Talbot, 
her spot on the U.S. Olympic team 
seal red in Milwaukee, flew home 
Monday to Baltimore to donate 
bone marrow to ha brother Jason, 
who is undergoing chemotherapy 
treatment for aplastic anemia. 

Talbot, a two-time Olympian, 
was the fourth and final 500-meter 
qualifier Saturday and was I Oth in 
the 1.000 meters Sunday. 

Her times in both events were 
better during the first -weekend of 
competition. Dec. 3 1- Jan. 2. Mar- 
row testing caused her to miss 12 
practice days before the trials and 
she said her concern for her brother 
had been a further drain. 

“[ think it was a little bit harder 
than it was last weekend,” Talbot 
said Sunday. “I think my mind is a 
little bit with Jason, rather than 
myself.” 

Jason Talbot. 19. was diagnosed 
in raid- December with the disease 
that slows the production of blood 
cells. Without a transplant, his 
chances of survival are IS percent 
at best. A successful transfusion 
pushes those odds as high as 80 
percent. 

Talbot. 23. of Schuylervill© New 


York, was among three siblingi 
who were matches for the trans 
plant She was considered a bene' 
candidate because of ha brother/ 
ages; Matthew is 7 and Andrew ?. 
Another brother. 9-year-o!d Rya-i. 
was not a match. 

Doctors at Johns Hopkins Medi- 
cal Center will take marrow froi - 
two places in Talbot’s hip in what 
expected 10 be a brief procedu;: 
Tuesday. 

“Tm pretty calm, but I'm ner- 
vous for Jason." Talbot said. 

"The recovery depends a lot or. 
individual variation.’' said R'chari 
Ambinder, Jason’s doctor at John* 
Hopkins. “There will be some sore 
ness, but blood loss is differ??:, 
from person lo person. 

“Any other normal kid. tha.- 
would "be no question that the re- 
covery rate would be 80 to 90 per- 
cent by the date of the Winter 
Olympics," said Ambinder. ‘7 
would say, though, tins surgery will 
have an effect on Kristen's train- 
ing. and with her being or? the cut- 
ting edge, it will definitely afftv: 
her, but 1 don’t know how "much." 

Talbot said she hoped (o rrsum; 
light training at Milwaukee's Petti 1 
National Ice Center later this week. 

Jason TaTbot will know in about 
a month if his body accepts the 
transplant. (A F, A ! i 1 


U.S. Luge Team 
Back in Oberhof 


' 1 m just going to go on." 

She said the swelling in ha leg 
had gone down and «he was follow- 
ing doctors’ orders to try walking 
normallv. 


ESPN Expands 
To Middle East 

. "••niY -fll Trjhlit' 

PARIS — ESFN Interna- 
tional has riani-d an agreement 
with Orbit Communications 
Co. to telecast the ESPN Inier- 
naiional Network programs 10 
the Middle East and North Af- 
rica. Lhe 24-hour US. satellite 
sports network announced 

ESPN International's pro- 
grams include NFL games. 
PGA golf tournaments. NHL 
match© 1 :. Latin American and 
European soccer matches. 
Indy car races and Paris Cup 
tennis. ESPN said that Or bn 
will provide addition pro- 
gramming from the Middle 
East. North Africa and Eu- 
rop© 

Telecasts will have English 
and Arabic commentary ' 


SCOR EBOARD 


SIDELINES 


NHL landings 


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PHOENIX— Pot Charm Bartley. forward, 
an tolurad list. AtStvafed Cedric CtAtol Ids, tor- 
ward. from infsirod fist. 

- FOOTBALL - 
Ndttoaai Poatoau Lsaaae 
HOCKEY 

- Natttnal Heater Leaww 
CHICAGO— Claimed Grea Smyth, dofense- 
. man. off «mtyers Iran Toronto. 

_ PITTSBURGH— ASS«Kd JnsHn Oufier- 
inan and Ed Patfenon, rfetif Hrinn and Mor- 
ion Nadimd, ton wtoa. to Ctovetani IHL. 
“VAHCOUVER-Trodw Dixon Went. le« 
wifSr sad future. oonsMeratfone to LA. I or 
' Jimmy Corson, ccnfer. 

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coach, to Svtar contract. 

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Whitbread Yachts Tighdy Grouped 

SOUTHAMPTON. England fAP) — Five boau were within three 
nautical miles of the lead Monday night as the leading fleet in die 
Whitbread 'Round the World Race rounded ihe southwestern lip of 
Australia and beaded for New Zealand. 

Japanese-New Zealand entry Tokio. overall leader after iwo legs in the 
Whitbread 60 class, held a tenuous advantage over another Japanese- 
New Zealand yacht. Yamaha, and two other 60s, the European enny 
Intrum Justitia and Spain’s Galicia 93 Pescanova. 

Also bunched in the lead group as the yachts rounded Cape leeuwin 
was New- Zealand Endeavor, which holds first place overall in the Maxi 
class. 

Hong Kong Likes Horses, and Bets 

PARIS l AFP) — Hong Kong's racetrack Tans leave the competition j 
standing when it comes 10 having a flinier on the horrts. a survey released ; 
here Monday showed. ; 

The 41-co’unuy survey by French racing’s promotional bodv UN 1C | 
found that, in 1992, people in Hong Kong spent an average of $1,200 per 
capita in bets on horse races, “ | 

The next biggest spenders were Australians. Bui they were a disiam i 
second at $320, followed by Japan | S27 1 ) and New Zealand fSl35>. Neck- j 
and-neck in sixth place were French and British punters, who each bei an j 
average of 5120. j 

Leading the field in terms of the total value of bets placed was Japan, j 
with $33 billion wagered during 1992. i 


The -isstKioted hers 

OBERHOF. Germany — Back 
at the scene of the crime with police 
protection, Duncan Kennedy and 
the U.S. luge team tried Monday to 
concentrate on training for this 
weekend's World Cup meet. 

But there was one big distrac- 
tion. 

Just two days after Kennedy 
competes, the two neo-Nazis who 
allegedly led the assault on him 
outside an Oberhof bar go on trial 
and the prosecutor has asked Ken- 
nedy to testify, 

•it’s possible he could testify 
that day," said Karsten ReubekeuL 
court director in nearby Suhl, 
where the trial opens on Jan. 17. 

Kennedy has said he would do 
all he could lo make sure his at- 
tackers axe punished. But he would 
not comment Mondas on whether 
that will happen. 

Reubekeul said the court must 
first determine whether it will call 
Kennedy. 

Prosecutor Erich Rachor. mean- 
v» hile. said he had filed charges late 
Iasi week against four more of the 

1 5 skinheads involved in the Oct. 
29 beating. 

The two due to go on trial, ages 

16 and 21. have been charged with 
causing grievous bodily harm for 
which they could receive up to five 
years in jail if convicted. 

Of the six tuapecls. only the 21- 
yeax-old. the alleged ringleader, is 
in tail. German justice officials 
have moved swiftly in the case, 
however. The attack was a big em- 
barrassment to a country unable to 
halt a wave of attacks on foreigners 
— mostly asylum- seekers from 
poor countries — by rightist ex- 
tremists. 

Kennedy was surrounded, 
kicked and punched outside the 
Kurparkklause bar as he turned to 
confront the skinheads >o his black 
teammate and roommate. Robert 
Pipkins, could get away. 

The skinheads had confronted 
Pipkins in the bar. making monkey 
noises and gestures and calling him 
“nigger.’’ 

Kennedy is ranked second in 
World Cup competition behind 
teammate Wendel Suckow and this 
weekend’s meet is lhe second-to- 
last for the Americans before next 
month’s Winter Olympics in Lille- 
hammer. Norway. 

The seven-man. three-woman 
U.S. luge team arrived quietly on 
Sunday, beating the hordes of press 
expected later in the week. They 
had abandoned training in Igls, 
Austria, a day early because of 
warm, rainy weather that had made 
the Lrack there soft. 

They planned to be “sliding" 
Monday afternoon in Oberhof. 27C’ 
kilometer? ( 150 miles) southwest of" 
Berlin, where the sun shone oo 
about a half-meter of melting snow 
and tourists were few because of a 
recent thaw. 


Kennedy, Pipkins and their 
teammates were not talking to re- 
porters. The team trainer. Jeff 
Scheuer, said they all want to con- 
centrate on training and plan a 
news conference on Thursday. 

• New protests have forced tbt- 
International Sid Federation t„ 
again reconsider the women' •: 
World Cup super giant slalom 5.n • 
urday that was slopped after .V» 
competitors, canceled and then It . 
stand, officials said Monday in 
Oberhofen. Switzerland. 

An FIS official said the executive 
body would decide during trie- 

5 hone consultations whether Heid': 
urbriggen’s victory in the Altcn- 
tnarkt race should count. An an - 
nouncement should be made Tues- 
day. the official said. (AFFi 

• Defenseman Kenneth Kenn- 
holL who sustained a groin injury 
during a league game, will not be 
able to play for the Swedish hocke- 
team in Lillehammer. the Swedish 
team's coach. Curt Lundmarit. said 
Monday. f.-?: 

• Security will be tightened a: 
next week's European figure skat- 
ing championships after an attack 
on U.S. figure skater Nancy Keni - 
gan, organizers said Monday in Co- 
penhagen. 

“We have reviewed our entire 
security setup to prevent anything 
like that happening here." sti J l el ; 
PeieTsen, head of die Danish Skr.'- 
ing Union and of (be organising 
committee. 

Petersen said additional security 
guards had been hired for the Jan. 
18-23 European championships in 
Copenhagen, but declined to elabo- 
rate on specific security measures. 

“It is incredible that something 
like this could happen and we arc 
deeply shocked,” he said. "We ar: 
taking the Kerrigan attack very se- 
riously." 


2 Months Early * 
First Fist Flies 

Compiled ty Our Staff From Paparehn 

LONDON — U.S champi- 
on Michael Burnt punched 
British challenger Herbie Hide 
in a London street Monday, 
two months before they meet 
in earnest for the WBO heavy- 
weight tide. 

Hid© shin buttons torn 
away and nursing a sore lip. 
said Bemi had struck him 
more than cmce. 

Witnesses said the flash- 
point came when Hide 
knocked a baseball cap from 
Bentt’s head as the champion 
posed for photographers. 

Sard Bentt: “He compro- 
mised my manhood.” 

Said Hide: “He’s a nut," 


Fos* investment information, 
read 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Portland OBIJS— B 

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For the Record 


THE 


REPORT 


Dr. Janrie Astaphan, who admitted providing steroids for sprinter Ben 
Johnson and other athletes, has been arrested at John F. Kennedy 
Airport on dreg warrants after his plane from Antigua to Toronto was 
diverted to New York because of lhe weather, a Drug Enforcement 
Administration spokesman said, (A Pi 

Peuwot’s sporting director, Jean*Pierre labourite, said Monday he 
wanted Alain Prcsi to return to Formula One motor racing with 
McLaren. Frost retired last season after winning the world championship 
with Williams. (Reuters) 


Quotable 


• Anna Bauscher. 91, on whv sbe didn't bother to pick up her medal 
after setting an age-group world record at a swim meet in Philadelphia: ■*! 
do this for survival, noi for the glory,” 


every Safurday 
in the IHT. 






Page 18 


International herald tribune, Tuesday, January n, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


How Americans Feel 


Amos Oz’s Belated Tribute to His Father 


m - ■ w 



lives. I figured dial it wasn't too 
early or too late in 1994 to do my 
own. 

Sixty percent of the people I 
talked to felt better about teem- 
selves than they did about North- 
ern Ireland. 

Seventy-four percent said that if 
they had to do it 
all over again 
they would sleep 
on the top floor 
and pat their 

children in the 
basement with 
the doors locked 
and the windows 
barred. 

A majority of 
Americans re- 
ported that what BocnwaW 
they feared the most was having 
cold popcorn in the movie theater. 

Gnkfaen said that they feared 
gening chewing gum on their new 
sneakers and having to sit next to 
smelly Josh Workman on the 
school bus. 

□ 

There was no agreement on 
whom people admired the most in 
sports, although 54 percent of those 


RSC, With Grant, 
Will Tour More 

Roam 

L ONDON — The Royal 
Shakespeare Company has ac- 
cepted one Of Britain’s biggest 
sponsorships, with the food and 
beverage group Allicd-Lyons PLG 
which will enable the company to 
spend more time touring abroad. 

The company's artistic director, 
Adrian Noble, said the £33 million 
($5 million), three-year sponsorship 
would bring finan cial stability after 
one of the bleakest years ever for the 
art in Britain, with many cutbacks in 
state and coiporate funding. 

The RSC said it would do more 
international touring and spend at 
least IS weeks in the United States 
and nine weeks in Continental Eu- 
rope in the three years beginning 
March 1. Its 1994 touring begins 
with a production of “The Winter's 
Tale,” which will visit New Zea- 
land, Japan and the United States. 


polled said, "Anyone whose name 
starts with Bubba.” 

When the question of guns came 
up, 87 percent said they would 
rather have a toy than a gun, but if 
anyone tried to take the toy away 
from them they would all want a 

gun. 

When asked “Do you believe 
that thoe is only one catorte in Diet' 
Coker 90 percent of those inter- 
viewed said that they did. Only 23 
percent claimed to have actually 
seen one. 

One of the questions asked was, 
"Do you believe God should be in 
the classroom?” The majority 
agreed that He should as long as He 
didn't raise real estate taxes. 

The next question was, “Do you 
believe in dinosaurs?” To which 67 
percent responded, “Only if they 
don't create traffic gridlock in the 
streets.” 

The survey asked people, “What 
do you like the most about Ameri- 
ca?” The overwhelming response 
by 80 percent was the Post Office. 

D 

I also posed the question, “Do 
you think that life is unfair?” Most 
of the participants said no. One 
typical respondent said, “Life is 
fair, cable television rates are un- 
fair” 

The question then came up, 
“Would you want your daughter to 
many Howard Stem, the radio | 
commentator?” The majority said i 
no, but one man said, “I thought 
she had.” 

My survey also tried to find out 
if people were fearful of NAFTA. ! 
Sixty-nine per cen t responded that 
they could nve with it as long as its 
warheads were not planted in the 
neighborhood. 

Television violence was also on 
the list of things that people were 
concerned about One of the main 
worries was that Oprah Winfrey 
was going to hit someone over the 
bead when she took her micro- 
phone into the audience. 

Did people believe that every- 
body should be politically correct? 
Most replied no, if it meant paying 
more for health insurance. One of 
those questioned said, “The only 
poson I want to see politically cor- 
rect is Senator Packwood.” 

When asked what they would do 
in the future that they hadn't done 
in the past, the majority said that 
they would pick different numbers 
for their lottery tickets. 


By David Streitfeld 

Washington Pm Sem pe 

W ASHINGTON — Amos Ox grew up 
in a cramped Jerusalem apartment 
that boasted many books but not modi else. 
His father, Yehuda, was a former professor 
of comparative literature — a ichitant im- 
migrant to a Palestine that, thanks to Euro- 
pean anti-Semitism, had more comp lit pro- 
fessors than students. Yehuda took solace 
in his books; they fed his spirit. They didn't 
feed his family. “Why don't you sdl some c£ 
your precious tomes, so we can buy some 
food? 1 ’ his wife; Fanis, would ask. 

Reluctantly, Yehuda would pluck out a 
few volumes and trudge off to the shops. 
Yet when he returned hours later he would 
be carrying not food, nor even the prom- 
ised moacy, but more books. He might 
have gotten rid of a couple, but he couldn't 
resist the lure of others. Who needs to eat? 

Oz smiles as he tells the story, maybe 
because childhood represents the high point 
of his relationship with Yehuda Ariefa 
Klansncr, who had to make Ins living as a 
librarian. “He was a right-winger, a city 
dweller and an ardent, uncritical Zionist,” 
says (be son, who left home at age 14 to join 
a kibbutz, changed his name (Oz means 
“strength" in Hebrew), and has been a 
longtime and prominent advocate ofrecon- 
dliation with (be Arabs. 

These differences, once so great, matter 
less now. Yehuda died in 1970, living long 
enough to see his son publish his first three 
books and become the leading Israeli writ- 
er of his generation. Oz’s new novel 
“Fima,” his iltb work of fiction to be 
published in the United States, is in part a 
belated tribute to the old man, but also 
testimony to the unhappy feelings fathers 
can provoke in the Eves of tear sons: 
Fima could “almost sniff hi* father’s 
special smell wafting up the stairs, teat 
smell he remembered from his infancy and 
could identify even in a roomful of strang- 
ers: tee seem of airless rooms, old furni- 
ture, steaming fish stew and boiled carrots, 
feather beds, and sticky liqueur. 

“As father and son exchanged a per- 
functory embrace, this Eastern European 
aroma aroused in Fima a revulsion mood 
with shame at the revulsion, together with 
the long-standing urge to pick a quarrel 
with his father, to trample on some sacro- 
sanct principle of his, to disclose the irri- 
tating contradictions in his views, to exas- 
perate him a little.” 

The novel is more discursive than plot- 
driven; as bdits Fima’s dreamy nature. 
(Efiaim Nisan, to give his formal name, is a 
receptionist in a Jerusalem gynecologist’s 
office, a 54-year-old onetime poet who has 
the ndwtf fantasy life (his of Walter 
Mkty.) The story recounts the five days 
before what is heralded on tee first page as 


“the sad event,” the death of his father, it 
will change Fima’s life, The son is forced to 
become a little more of an adult. 

“When my father was alive," says the 54- 
year-oki Oz, “although we were not always 
cn the best of relations, there was his body, 
his person — his broad hark so to speak — 
s t a nding between me and death. I knew it 
was there, of course. Always, I could see ii 

—tins is where being an Braeti helps a btde 

bit. But be stood between me and death. 
When he was gone, these was nothing," 
Think of it, he says, like standing in line. 
“Something changes about people's pos- 
ture — the way they stand, the way they 
wait — when they are first The death of a 
parent, whether this is a father to a boy or 
a mother to a gbi, makes you ready for the 
caR “Next, please.’ " . 

In Israd, inis notion has broads’ impli- 
cations . For a long time rfiw its estabush- 
ment a half-century a go the country was 
d ominat ed by the founding mothers and 
fathers. David Ben-Gurion, rh*im Weiz- 
raaan, Golda Metr — these were larger- 
than-life figures, pioneers, tee folks who 
initiated it alL 

“These people woe always parents, 
even when they were very young," says Oz. 
“They were parents of the country, the 
ones who started the business. So even in 
the broader sense of the Israeli experience, 
there is now this fedmg, “Next, please.’ " 
He has proposed for tee first Isradi- 
Pakstinian joint project “the creation of a 
monument to our mutual stupidity.” In his 
view, the Palestinians will get less Bum 
they could have had in 1948, five wars ago, 
whue the Israelis will keep le y* th*m drey 
could have had they been more generous, 
more imaginative in 1967. And the thou- 
sands of victims on bote sides? “The dead 
will get nothing except for some wreaths 
and a flood of high-flown rhetoric.” 

He’s sitting an tire porch of bis cousin’s 
home in Betbesda, Maryland. He’s drink- 
ing about his father a gain Yehuda, Oz 
recalls, was a member of the underground 
du rin g the struggle for independence, for 
which be wrote leaflets about tee perfidious 
British. One day be was asked to bide in his 
home a few Molotov cocktails — no small 
matter, considering thi« could result in a 
sentence of death. Yehuda put the canisters 
on shelves behind a row or books. “Where 
else?” asks Oz. "There was no bssaneat, no 
attic. The kitchen was no bigger than an 

airplane toflet." 

The next day, the neighborhood was put 
under curfew. A house-to-house search 
followed. A young British officer, flanked 
by two soldiers, came into the family’s 
apartment He saw all the books and im- 
mediately tfau such an educated 
man could not be a terrorist 
They began chatting about literature. 


PEOPLE 

Btffyandthe (hears 
Can This Be the Kid? 



V Billy Oystd, whose send-ups of 
production numbers and qmclc ad 
Ebs haVe brought great ratings — 
c«n Erimrys — to the past few 
Academy Awards ceremonies, is 
th reatening to tiaB il qnit*- Amin. 
Crystal was coaxed last year to host 
. die ceremonies one more time, but 


Author Oz has made his peace with iris father as Us country seeks its own. 


An enthusiastic Yehuda — he was, after 
all, a professor without a single student — 
began plucking books off shelves. “My 
mother and 1 stood these trembling for 
fear a cocktail might roll off tee shelves 
and explode,” Oz says, smiting again. 

Although Yehuda was a lib rarian , not a 
writes, Oz calls trim “mare literary 
I’ve ever been.” IPs a strange thing to say 
when you are tee writer who embodies 
conte mp or ar y Israeli literature in Europe 
and the United States. Oz"s second novel 
“My Michael,” the story of ayotmg Jewish 
woman’s fantasies about two Palestinian 
broteos, took Israel by storm in 1968; a 
success on a comparable scale in the much 
more populous United States would need 
to sell about 10 milli on copies. 

But even the most successful novelist in 
Israd fives ranch like everyone rise. Dur- 
ing the decades on the kibbutz, all of Oz’s 


royalties went into the com m on fund. He 
served in the army and the reserves. The 
house in die descat town of Arad where be 
fives with his wife, Nily — they have two 
daughters and a son — doesn't boast a 
swimming pool 

When he's writing, which is most of tfar 
time; Oz. fends off r epor t er s wanting to 
know the significance of evoy political 
hiccup. Art, for all intents and purposes, is 
kept separate from fife. He doesn’t write 
tracts. 

IBs most recent novels — “Black Bax,” 
“To Know a Woman" and now “Fima” — 
all revolve around characters who experi- - 
eace a major shift in prio ri Hey, and conse- 
q neatly _ have an overwhelming' urge for. 
raemotiafirtn “Making peace with, some- 
thing,” Oz calls it, qukfey adding rimt-riik 
isn’t Tiv-am politically. 1 


‘ may not be so lucky tins year. Oys- 
. tal says it’s barri to repeal the impact 
of such iinplanncd erents as Jack 
'■ patance's one-arm pestups, which 
save Crystal' fodder far the 1992 
show and tee idea for a splashy 
entrance in 1993. A spokesman for 
the Academy said only that there is 

“no news to report an who toe host 

will be" on March 21. 

■ a 

The Nobel prize winner and au- 
ihor ESe Wie» plans to co-tcach a 

. coarse titled “Facing Hate-Malting 
Peace” at Eckerd CoDegein Florida 
.this winter. - . .-Wayne State Uni- . 
vecrity in Detroit has fared Cofemn 
Young, whose 20 years a mayor of 
the city aided a week ago, as a half- 
time professor of urban affairs. 

• ••••' D . 

The anger and actress Media 
Moore, wta> hashit hard times ance 
her divorce fro m her hu sband-man- 
ager, may be rebouateng since tee 
talked of being on pohlic assistance 
■an the “The Marny Fovkh Show ” 
Two lawyers have offered free legal 
scrvicts and two producers have ex- 
pressed interest in putting together a 
concert or recording deaL 

□ . 

Saying tie is doing great w o rk and 
is stifl getting better. NBC rewarded 
Jay T«i> with a contract extension 
that will beep him .as. host of the 
“Tonight” show through 1 995. The 
fimmonl terms were not disclosed, 
but an executive said he would get a 
raise. He hm been earning S6 mS- 
JuntoSTariDioaayeBr. 

Sophia Lores says she is consid- 
ering r renmn ig her acting career. 
“Not bring a teenager anymore, I 
havb to select stoats that are my 
appropriate to my age and to ray 
character,” .said Loren, 59, as she 
accepted an award in Pakn Springs. 


CWERMnOlVAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appear* on Pages 5 & 14 


Europe 


Com Dal Sol 

DoMta 

EtMxagh 


Rfyfcin* 

Rom* 

Bl Rnmtug 


Today 
High Low 
OF OF 
13/55 B/46 

6/43 3CT 
6/41 -1/31 
1MB II*? 
11*2 7/44 

5/41 1/34 

4/39 0132 

B/43 30? 

3/37 104 

2/35 1/34 

T3/5G a m 

10*0 7/44 

DMB 8/40 
11/52 0/43 

7/44 OKB 
SMI 1/34 
-3/27 -12/11 
6/46 6/43 

23/73 14*7 
12*3 6/46 

10*0 7/44 

8/48 6/43 

7/44 2*6 

■5/34 -11/13 
4/39 -1/31 
14/87 7/44 

■3/34 -0/16 
9/46 7/44 

9/48 6/43 
3/37 -209 
307 2/35 
10*0 4/36 
-4/25 -12/It 

■0/77 -6/10 
S/41 1/34 

-3/27 -11/13 
B/a 5/41 
307 002 
1/34 -lOI 
307 -1/31 


i Low W 
OF 

i 12*3 a 
l 400 r 
I 0*2 pc 
r 7/44 rfl 
I 11*2 pc 
0/32 C 
1 104 pc 

I 406 * 
r 0*2 *h 
I 2*5 pc 
I 13*5 ■ 

I 2*5 ril 
I 4*6 *1 
I SMI pc 
I 1*4 po 
I 3*7 o 
-7/20 •> 

I (M *1 
i 17*2 ■ 

I 11*2 ■ 

I 6M1 r 
• 6/43 a 
I 3*7 pa 
! -13* .■ 

I 104 po 
I 9/48 pc 
I -5*4 of 
1203 pc 
I 4/30 *1 
' -1*1 pc 
’ -1*1 r 
! 3*7 po 
/ -8/10 ■ 
r -4/23 c 
I 3*5 pa 
-0*2 Bl 
I 4*6 pc 
' 0*2 pa 
i -3*0 a 
I 1*4 pc 


WEATHER 

Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. 


CROSSWORD 


.C7 New York Times Edited by Will Shorn. 


Today Tea 

fh Low W HM> 


■ ■ '■'^7 

atjr 

2F.zzvs$ ,, -?f 


ftatarti 33*1 23/73 pc 38*1 

Bo^g 2*6 -4*5 C 2*0 

HtajKonfl 16*6 16*6 po 16/68 


North America 

Rah and snow wB fall (ram 
Now Yoric Otf to Washing- 
ton. D.C., Thursday. BitW'V 
cold (dr w» knife southward 
through the Groat Lakes 
aSaas and Mdwesl Wo tWs 
week. Chicago through 
Atlanta wtB bo much colder 
than normal. Loa Angelas 
will haws sunny, warm 
weather. 


Europe 

The British Mas to western 
Norway w* have wMy. wet 
weather lete this week. 
Snow wfl pile up (ram Oslo 
to Helsinki. Paris through 
Beriki wfll be wMy and mKJ 
wtth a Ht of rain by Thurs- 
day. Diy weather wfl pravaB 
from Lisbon to Madrid Eater 
this week. 




Asia 

Rein wtl over sp read south- 
ern Japan Mat this week. 
Including the Tokyo area. 
Northern Japan wlil have 
snow. Seoul and Be$ng wB 
be mainly dry and chilly. 
Hong Kang and Taipei w« 
be rather cloudy and cool 
lale this week with a few 
stray showera. Manila wfll be 
mainly *y end warm. 


Ape™ 

CtaaTtal 


32/66 24/75 a 32 *B 
23*3 13*5 * 22 m 
1*4 - 5*4 pc 2*6 
10*0 2*6 S 7/44 
20*2 24/75 pa 2 MB 
21/70 14*7 pc 20*8 
7/44 2*6 r 6/*6 


13*6 10*0 pa 16*1 13*6 pc 
24/75 16*6 ■ 24*5 13*5 a 
17*2 am a 21*0 12*3 a 
21*0 11/62 C 24*6 1/40 pa 

30*6 26*7 pa 32 M 24*8 a 
24*5 10*0 S 26*9 12*3 pa 
12*3 7/44 dl 18*9 7/44 po 


ACROSS 

1 John Denver’s 
'Christmas in 

• 'Tuna-Fishing* 
painter 
Id Among 
14" — -Eyes* 
(1969 song) 

IB Actor Richard 
IB Bounty rival 
17 Refinement 
IB Witticisms 


IB Vigor 

20 1950 Sinatra hit 
23 West Bank org. 

m ‘Just a ’ 

28 Three strokes, 
perhaps 
la Actress 
Sommer 
31 Shares 
as Feared test 
Be Troubles 
40 Weaken 
41 1955 Sinatra hit 


Middle East 


Latin America 


W M*I Law W 


Today Tomorrow 

Mgh Low W HI* Low W 
GIF OF OF OF 


Oceania 

Auckland 23*3 15*0 pc 23*3 16*1 pa 

Sydrwy 29*4 22*1 ■ 26*4 21/70 pc 


Mil 

16*4 

12*3 pc 21*0 

14*7 a 

Bta»ita 

35*6 

21*0 a 

31*8 

17*2 pc 

ota 

20*8 

10*0 ■ 

23*3 

12*3 a 

Caracal 

26*4 

23*3 pc 

29*4 

34*5 pa 

DOTwacuc 

14*7 

OM3 • 

18*4 

am a 

Una 

24*8 

16*6 pc 

28/77 

10*8 pa 

Janatan 

14*7 

am a 

17*3 

11*2 ■ 

Mata CM 

wso 

7/M pc 

18*4 

am a 

Uta 

28*8 

5/41 a 

30*6 

11*2 a 

HedaMnta 06*3 

23*3 pa 

29*4 

23*3 pc 

m»wJi 

30*6 

11*0 a 

31*0 

10*0 pc 

Swriags 

28/TO 

11*2 1 

29*4 

14/57 pc 


Lagamfcfr«ray, noowSydoudy. o<3ou*y. dv ah ow a*. WMnd wtkau e, wot\at-waiw fcaW. 
an-onow, Mca, W-WBBt». M map* famcaMawid data prodded by teaHWeadwr. Inc. C18M 


North America 

Ancteng* -9/18 -1< 

Manta 10*0 ( 

Botan 2*5 -i 

CMrogo -1*1 -f 

Owmr 9/48 -t 

!>M 0*3 -i 

HnU> 27*0 II 

Houston ia»c 1< 

la/rgata 23*3 1! 

Kami 28*9 * 

Itaeito -11/13 -1/ 

ktaWad -3*4 -11 

Nuau 26*9 21 

Now York 2*6 -1 

Photo* 21*0 I 

Swi Fran. 13*6 I 

r Hu 9/48 4 

Taeraa 1*4 -7 

WtaNnpn 4*6 1 


SohitioD to Pcazie of Jan. 10 


□noDEtua nnaaaa 
□□□□ass aaaaaaa 
□□QQasBanaaacaaa 
□□anas aaa nsaa 

HEEDED EDHHS 

saoaaHaaEHa 

□□QQCJHE □□□BE 
□EDEDEO □aaBEBH 
QEHEH □EEEDEH 
□ □□□HHEOEESE 
□□DO DHHEQ 
□□QD DOH □□□□□□ 
□ □□QEEHQQQlEaaHE 
□□□□□□□ HEUBEQE 
EQEEEE EEQEEEE 


44 Improve 
48 Rig 
44Shutott 
4TBeechweer 
48 Relax 
51 Audit 

conductor, for 
short 

92 Guy's date 
94 Eternity 
98 1961 Sinatra hit 
84 ■Warm" 

■8 Minnow eater 
•s Driving hazard 
at Petructvo’s 
mate 

ss Shillelagh land 
7OT0th-day-crf- 
Ctvistmasgtft 

71 Swerve 

72 Henna and 
others 

73 Follow 


4 Blue-chip 
symbol 
* Lively dance 
9 Chihuahua 
change 

4 Bar, inlaw - - 
8 Compass part 


e Half begun? ' 

7 Excited 

8 Stucco becking 
• Foot part 

10 Swear 

11 Ryun’s nm 

12 Basil's ' 
successor 

isNlebBohr, e.g. 
*i The Man 
Without a ' 
Country 
22 More aloof 
asPropeisa 
gondola 
28 Bouquet 

27 Bhd ‘perched 
upon a bust of 
Pallas' 

28 Toddlers 

so Dramatist Rice 
32 Goddess of 
discord 

*3 Raccoon kin 
34 Lawn tool 
as Is apparent 

37 impart 

38 Ditto 

42 Saw 

43 Elevated 
48 Stood up 

90 Kind of switch 
S3 Distrustful 



•by OtoadU. Ktaua 


M Run site M Behind 

84 Prepares tha 98 Ale 

P re * tes . sa Pennsylvania 
87Phntberis port 


t They go Into . 
locks 

i Relative of 
Hindustani 
rVofte-facaVWW 


Jjnvcl in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


oaB ycro4 , j Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reac ^ 1 US- directly from over 125 countries- Converse with someone who doesn't speak >x>ur 

language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 am knowing they’ll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible wich AIST i 
' * ■ jiw a . <i To use these services, dial the ABET Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 

help you need. With these Access Numbers and your ABET Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ABET Calling Card or you’d like more information on AIST global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 


ATsT 


-. ABET Access Numbers. 

How to can around theworki 

L Using the dun bdaw. find the country you are collmg from. 

2 Dia l ihe conespoodiog.'gaa' Access Number. 

3 An AJ5STEnglish-^3ealcingOpcraior or voice prompt will ask for the pbonenunijer you widico call ot conned you to a 

customer service representative. 

Torecdve ywir free wafletcardof Acas Numbers, just dial theareess nanteeroif 

tee country youtetoandzskfor Customer Service -r;. 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMB ER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA/PACHTC Hnngary • 00*^8004 )1111 flit - ” 00*4912 

Ans *?H?. 0014-881-011 telamfe 99^001 jcSSSST 90O-ll-OOlff 

10811 teefaad 1-800-530-000 

I iTa-ion 5S5*? 

«w« 5 s 5*d^8 

: gggg 8^196 SUi, ■ ■ : 

Indopesia * °»«0M0 X-uxemb omg 080tMm ■ ~ - ' S — 7 — i” 

2^1“ Sgfal UXX>*90-™ j^oncWw ft 

B IModco444 95-800-462-4240 

B wr ao^ 

New Zealand 0 00-911 kB f*- 0*0104000111 ITT — - ' ' 109 _ 

Phllipptees* 105-11 Portagar 05017-1-288 ^ 

Rpgfarffltosowv) 155-5042 Scmamita - 0i-800-4»w Uruguay • QM410 - 

Saipan* 235-2872 Slovakia 0042000101 Vengzugte " 80011-120 

Singapcee 800-01I1-1II 5pdn ' 900^0041 CAWBHBAN . - : 

Snlanka 430-430 Sweden- 020-795412 1-80O87Z-2881, 

Taiwan* 0000-102800 9 wSSSp HMM1 ’Bennuda* l-«J0«r2-2881 

'TCodand* 0019^91-111 1 OK. ‘ * OSOOWOU t Bctohv - 1 1-80(^872-2681 

EURt»E MIDDLE EAST Cayman Islands 1-800-872-2881 

Armtula- 8 a 34111 Bahrain mum {Grenad** 


Belgium* 

Bulpana 

Croatia** 

C>-pni5* 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

Germa ny 

Greece * 


430-430 Sweden* 020-?95-6ll 

W8M028M 9eter ihnd* 155-00-11 

»1»39]-Iin VJL 050000^55 

MIDDLE EAST 

0*24111 Mnatn ~ '800QW 

0Z2^<&011 EgypCf Cairo j 5X0^0 

p~S-11-0010 larad 177-100-2727 

00-1800-0010 Kuwait- 800288 

9»^0011 TebMCnCBcfaTg) 42&9VL 

080-90010 Saudi Arabia 1-800-100 


00-42000101 Tnrfcey 
6001-0010 " - 
9600-100-10 Argendn 
19^-0011 Bdixe* 
0130-0010 Rolrvta* 
00-800-1311 SrazS 


004 - 8004)1111 (Me - ■ 0 a>rtgl 2 

! 9994 X 11 tC ofcwnb til . . • 980 - 11 - 0010 ! 

1 - 800 - 530-000 • r ; -a* 

gjgS Sandra* “ 

1?****- 11 iflSalvadoite " ~~~I 9 Q 

: tG nairm a h* .■•••■• ~ . • 190 

— » •tew*-..' — - — : ^ 

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95 - 800 - 462-4240 

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90 O 994 XM 1 " C ARf a M E A N 

020 - 795 - 6 U 1 - 800 ^ 72 - 2881 . 

15500-11 1 - 300 - 872-2881 

050 (K 8 » 4 XriI 1 - 80(^6722881 

EAST . Cayman Mauds 1 - 800 - 872-2881 

800001 ^toadsr l- 800 - 872 ^ 2 i 38 ir -/ 

3100200 jHteT • 001 - 800972 - 28 ^ ^ - 

177 - 100-2727 ’’Jannlar 0 -BQP 37 Z- 2883 - . 

800-288 ateQ».Ain«l 001 - 800 ^ 72-2881 

4a&«i i&KftayNeva 

1 - 600-100 | AHDCA • - 


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■ 980-114)010' 

■ ■ 114 

119 

190 

190 

165 

129 

95 - 800 - 462-4240 
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~~ 15500-11 1 ® 22 “*L_ 

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5100200 jHter ■ .• 
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