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,, W S„ED VHTH TH E NEW VOEK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

■" ~ ~ . Anilnfi- Thursday^ January » 3 - 1994 


No. 34.484 




Experts Sec Tame 2.5% Growth Rate 
Even m America ('Good as It Gets ) 


the iwJoJttW yetia tocta mv&m*, f “ • ^ .^^ ,^^l a dJMa 2 . 5 pTOnt 
Continent and for Japan, the grimne^ will ; 

.endure a cooaderablcJphfle longe r, wi th no . ~ „ „r business people, economists and 

recovery drarty underway ^ ^wwf d* were osterf wten 

of eariy.1995, ec ^ aa ^^ i * Srilw^i industrial economies could expect 

.-■ “Pd describe the outlook fee WestraL Eu- ™ mum w competitiveness and real growth 
• rOpein iustlhree letters, am/ what must be done to get there. In a 

wfftnriipchief strategist for MorganSian- nno • *f„rrinlrt hrrtnmne’ with two 


nesc economy, winch is widdy.itferred toas v . 

“temble^Therc, the suddea mrotoaoii c«t • - — 

the financial bubble and the futepng re - 
ttxascai the ^goveniinimttotheaisiscon- ever smee then 

Suesto rattle the corporate sector. ’ therormg of 19 
‘nitM'nt'H^boafaiiiY^owgEmdootof' lf %“, as r< 8 
the fftohal reoBskMC «“d lan.Amstad, an $ajd Nigd Ga 
*** &a ?T. Tmrt m T-nndon. nttT/McGiaw 


wexklong senes oj arm** w""* ~~y,T 
in today’s editions, (he correspondents erf the 
International Herald Tribune report and am- 


ever since the recovery began in America in 
as it gets in the UA,” 



Clinton Hints 
NATO Would 
Defend East 
From Attack 

Remarks Appear to Go 
Beyond r Partnership 

On Security Guarantees 

ConipM ry Ow Staff Front Dispatches 

PRAGUE — Presidem Bill Clinton signaled 
Wednesday that NATO would come 10 the 
defense of new democracies id Eastern Europe 
if they were attacked- . . ___ 

Mr. Clinton was speaking at a jowl news 
conference with the leaders of the Czech Re- 
public, Slovakia, Poland and Hungary ate 
trying to dispel doubts over his Partnership tor 

^ Thespian, endorsed bv a summit meeting of 
the North Adamic Trea ty Organization, pro- 

The UN wiB study whether NATO’s idea foe 
air strikes right work in Bosnia. Page 
Mr. Onion's appearance in Prague tod the 
trappings of a Hollywood production. Page 3. 


Greg CSbwivTb* Awoowi P* 1 ® 


the alobal reoessioiC itaid lanAmstan, an sad Nigel uauo, ^ -v- 

^SShB^TnrimXondon. DM/Mi^rawf 11 

■jgsss ssssiS i. ^S“?“S£s: 
S^assaa ^»SS9l a « 

SS^- the rising tidettoL 

rrea«SB5^«* 

SP 2S^i*«*ratrf f&cal «ce» andb!y ' mSSitaiKmmiBaema^S*^ 

; -^losrarfS«Sal butaloww acong 

that remain are not much," 

ss , g* ^as£^£ 

•' strata rid dioegulatiri tkD « s yke 
^ nroUem with those soluti^isS 


Mr. Cfinton speakmg Wedn^^tbeU 
Som left: Mffidiwak of Storaba,Led 


White House Calls for a Special Counsel 

Reversal Comes After Chud Grows (her Omtons’ Finances 

. -i . TO Deoartment officials who are now condu 


^SCTSSfuW )'. 1 11 "^'JlISISSS rf the 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — An embarrassed and 
loan in Arkansas. 

As Presidem Bill Clinton «ni ' to Kjw. 
Ukraine’s capital, and then on to his summi 
meeting in < kSoscow. senior aidra wot prepay 
inn an official statement on the issue to be 
SSied later in the day, a White House official 

Sa Ai the same time. Senator Bob Dole of Ran- 
saC tto minority leader .called for a ^ 
bipartisan congressional investigation « “* 
^S^and Iom and the Clmtoos ties to u. 

The select committee be envisions is 
tvpc that recently studied the Bank of Credit & 


Commerce International and that 20 
held bearings leading to the i^gMgnoTn^ 
idem Richard Nixon after a White wusewy 
er-up of a political burglary at the Watergate 

“StesodaKd ftw and R»“* 

envemmem sources as saymg that theJWnw 
House statement would call for the apP°^' 
ment of an independent counsel a step Mr. 

Clinton has long resisted. . . 

K ASSSlSASSS the presi. 

dC JnroOTtdays. leading members of 
ton” Democratic Party said they bcbeved ttol 
£ should turn over all his personal files related 
w a disputed real estate venture in Arfomaa 
and seek an inquiry independent of Justice 


Department officials who are now conducting 
thar own review. 

This decision by important nenabenofdie 
president’s own party appeared 10 be the fm^ 
straw and once again displaced the tenuous 
qSty of Mr- Son’s political Mature in 

°Fm weeks. Republicans had called for an 

L« {SSpaigns governor of AAan« 

S who brought the Cbnions n» ™ «JJ 
estate venture, a development tailed 

Whitewater. 

No evidence has emerged that the CTjntons 
did anything illegal or improper. But like man. 

See PROBE, Page 3 


Reconcile 


- • By Roger Cohen 

PAWS-A^.^^W^» 0 2|^fe < SS 

fighters toTriwan, Taam 

would restme f n aidly inrnX ofprime Kfinister 

ment from the consenritve ^yg to Taiwan. 

Edcmard BaHadur to *2£22ritet Fraich c«npa- 

v Kiosk 

Caampils Poised 

ToQoitmRaly 

bri Wednes^nj^^^g Afer^n 

i^wasready . SSed! 

■ ment. . .' ... ,' ' — _ ’. . ■ •• ' Africa 


■SSSbussbSS 3 &SBS£eSS§£ 

^ es rr^r. z. 


asteoce, of France s poucy Foflowing the sale 01 ure - 

»- 8 ^ 


aej *ssEi s 

SSSpSined of being placed at a disadvantage. 

With Europe still in recession and the Oanese «^ony 

See CHINA, Page 2 


gets Off Shopping Frenzy 

■:aS^SSS£tX 

African dties took stares il^ aoxmWe^mg forced on reluctant African leaders on 

as imces began to Turaday at a meeting of nation^ leaderam the 

the CFA-baac. a move ^ J”*SL Seneaafcse capital Dakar, by Ftoe and the 

impli c ations for most of the international Monetary Fund. The IMF 


Ivory Coast, whfflupnc* 
had sometimes doubled and. buyers expected 

^T^SS^camtid ofifiger, pf'.*e 14 


Senegalese capiiau lyaa-u, 

International Monetary Fund. The IMF 00 
Sercd the currency grea^.ovorvdimd a^ 
said the devaluation was vital to help puB the 
Africans out of a vkaous recesaonary spiral. 

Tte African frari has l^peggri at » to 

the French franc since 1948 and tosbeen ffiar- 
ameed by Paris. In cuttmjg the CFA francs 
value in half, to 100 to the French franc. France 

-I.^LaaIt k^FnrA nnHft 


Wcdt ^^TSe sa^ KS 

: dBrittobrg. ... • 


^ i rSS3TtoSraC^»^ value in half, to 100 to the men irancna^ 

^BS^Camd^is, ma ^ s 


Cress^or^ 


Page 17. 


“^te 5™ «S^ r “P 

tocalwoducts ^H^prices shouldn’t go tsp 

raaamd d«ed. oamdHy to 
“ 1* to iKrea * 


But Micnei i^amaesfltt, uiEtuo^s ^ - 
the International Monetary Funded, 

courageous step ... wiDrestore compentiveness 
Wednesday smdlhai up 

to 10 billion French fmus 

loans would be provided by the IMF to facih- 

See CFA, Page 11 



Shoppers jamming an 


Si&sgo' Ajpw Fnmr Pte* 

African franc was devalued. 


Down 

- 1J68 

9348-83 


Down 

a42% 

11130 




nu - 1^®L 

-ts; 

^ 

I g - sST 


1.7419 
. . I^B - 
11Z4^ 
5321 


By Frauds X. Clines 

. . Re*. York Tima Satire 

i ■ miNTSNTil^ Texas— The death row garinrit fwwO' « 
‘luS^i^^v^Smden^ murderers weld scisrora 
humming n ^ ^ ^ 

anri razoMl^tav^th^ al ttoroffee urn 


i — 

I Bohroio 

SSaWi p£ ; S 52^'»i- 
2sl Bnl 2?SS S*& &S** 9 '°° r ? 

jorton „..330D.rt» 

USM^<EurJ»l-W 

Kuwoit- — -- — ,,r — 




teSSBESEbssa * s 


There 


capital punishment in T«as wdi in i time 
allow it. The factory is bmg »ro become increasingly 

smjs s^arss&i-- . 
■KSa&fflsssassi 

ment to freedom and me busg ' victs seize the work 

«S'“iSS»SS T " w 

are dead anyway^i^ 5 n^^^^^ e imM ^ ^ ^ \ X&1 
self,*' said James B<*iha^a- JgJ ^ procedures for the 
manning his 

full sev^i ye® of 1 ^^ l s ^ lb em Tm not really the 

“We do HU satisfaction the f aaory 

threat they think I am, besaw m ™ k worker . 

w»cn >-ou hi. Friday's shUL and 


E^iSfflSSJiwUi and n.alin^ am 

nuys turn down the factor’ job. saying. ^ should 
uilting us hard and fast now 

^ 2S5SKSS f““ is vol “ w ■ nd ^ fc 

See CONDEMNED, Page 3 


vides for closer militarv cooperation between n 
NATO and East European countries without __ 
giving them conaete security guaranwK. j- 

V But Mr. Clinton appeared to go further than is 
the text of the Partnership when be was askrf > 
whether it was conceivable, given the lessons of s 
World War II that NATO would fafl . “? J 

io the aid an East European country if it were « 
invaded or subject to military aggression. 

Mr. Clinton replied ihathe though iitwas at 
“doubtful" that there would be no help. I i 
think your reading of our reading of history is is 
right," he said. d 

But the president added that he did not s 
believe anv of the former Warsaw Pact mem- ^ 
bers faced the threat of imminent auack- m 

“Of course, there are always con^^atm 
the future the darker past might be recreated, 
he raid, adding that there could be “expansion- * 

IS, \lrCTnion told the leaders of Poland, Hun- a a 
gary. the Czech Republic and Slovakia — ihe , Q 
so-cilled Visegrad Group —that Jjf ry 
major stake in the well-being of their nations. 

'Let me be absolutely clear.” he smd. jThe y . 
security of your state is important to the secun- er 
tv of ihe United States." le 

He souahi to minimize the faci utat NaTU x 
siopp<5 short of offering the lour oauoru fuU ie 
nxrSbSship. and he dismissed a f ; r - 

whether the Partnership made the East hurt pe- 1C 

an countries second-class cousins. WATn a 

“The question is no longer whether NATO io 
will take on new members, but when and how, ie 
the president said. '* 

On fears among the former Soriet Woc stams s- 
toward Russia. Mr. Clinton said. « 

Russian position, the position of the prseni 
administration there, is itot they 'JjJ. Wf l ^ 
f the territorial boundaries of their neighbors. 

, Though die four Visewad counmre i lad^J 
l reluctantly accepted the Partnership plan, Mr. f _ 
a Clinton came to ease lingering concenuLBut ^ 
a cxd after be “sold” the idea to the kadm ; in ^ 
separate one-on-one talks, ttoy ^ 

y their long-term aim remained full NATO mem ^ 

^ President Vaclav Havel of the Czech Repub- 
y lie said that the Partnership was not asutoU- ld 

a tute for full NATO membership but rather a ^ 

“first step.” He said his colleagues from Poland. ^ 
Slovakia and Hungary had vers- similar ato- lf . 

ludes on the issue. si 

v ' Th e White House also issued a statement on j a 
-n Wednesday announcing a major expansion ot 1C 
Overseas Private Investment Corporation pro- ^ 
grams in Central and Eastern Europe. in 

, The organization will accept proposals for 
privately managed investment rund*“ ‘ 
gion. and increase its per-project Imdmg limit h e 
from $50 million to S200 milhon. { Reuters. AP) to 

fa- 
il- 

Ukraine to Sign s 
PacttoGetRid ; 

Of Its Arsenal i 

By Ann Devroy and Dan Williams J 

J H ashmpon Pint Semite „ . ol 

KIEV' — President Bill Oinion and Jrr«i- ], 
... denl Leonid M. Kravchuk of Ukrain e on 
MneSv Poised the benefits of «n nptfr 
mmltorhJ this republic of its nuclrar warheads = 
as ibev began a delicate pohtical dance meant 
S bolsteV^e pact against assaults by its cnucs 

he Their joint appearance at conference 

following talks at the Kiev airport reemai to 
- f*« DUt , 0 rest doubts about whether Mr. Kravchuk 
^u Sn ™e accord I on Friday m M«»w 
^ with Mr. Clinton and Presidem Boris N. YeH 

BI Mr. cSSn stressed the economic benefitsm 
Ukraine as it gives up its arsenal of T.SOO 
1 warheads. He cited compensation for themaru- 
" um in the warheadL international loans, in 
creased trade and new foreign aid. 
ioe “We are prepared to increase our support 
S substantially as Ukraine move toward eco- 
nomic reform." Mr. CUnton said- 
"This day and the days to follow wiU opeo 
iere the road to disaraumient for the world. Mr. 

: ‘ ra '' ^StttmeS? Tuesday by a Ukrainian Foreipi 

Usi Ministry spokesman that the agreement might 
£ not be rrady for siaun gj F 
are Clinton, Mr. Kravchuk and Mr. Ydtsm meet in 

Moscow, were wTong, U.S. officials said. 

Mild Administration officials would not be drawn 

tT " into a debate in Ukraine over whether it was a 
who treaty that needed parliamentary approval or 
now whether it was a stand-alone agreement tnai 
dere could be fufly put into effect without approval 
by the legislative branch. 

si is A U.S. official described Ukraine as divided 

See UKRAINE. Page 4 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 





Swiss Put 
More Heat 
On France 
To Explain 

Roam 

ZURICH — Switzerland 
stepped up diplomatic pressure on 
France on Wednesday to explain 
why it sent home two Iranians last 
month who were wanted in Swit- 
zerland for the murder of an Irani- 
an dissident. 

The government said in a state- 
ment that it had “charged the For- 
eign Ministry to request from die 
French government an explanation 
for its decision not to proceed with 
(heplanned extradition.” 

The two Ir anian s are wanted for 
the 1990 murder in Geneva of an 
Iranian dissident, Kazem Rajavi, 
brother oT Massoud Rajavi. head of 
fran's Iraqi-based Mujahidin 
Khalq guerrilla movement 

Hours before the Swiss state- 
ment, the French interior minister. 
Charles Pasqua. bluntly rejected a 
U.S. request for clarification. 

“I have no explanation to give 
the Americans." Mr. Pasqua said in 
a radio interview. He added, refer- 
ring to President Bill Clin ton. “I 
am not an employee of Mr. Gin- 
ton.” 

Countering U.S. criticism, Mr. 
Pasqua said Washington had re- 
jected a French protest over the 
presence in the United States of an 
unidentified leader of Algeria's 
banned fundamentalist Islamic 
Salvation Front. 

Mr. Pasqua repeated that France 
had acted out or national interest 
“Some things cann ot be said,” he 
added. “In a few months, we shall 
see." 

He again refused to elaborate, 
despite an opposition demand in 
parliament for an explanation. 

The Swiss had sent France a 
sharp protest note at the end of 
December when it released the two 
Iranians, Moshen Sharif- Esfanhi 
and Ahmed Taheri, from prison 
and sent them back to Iran. 

Switzerland says the decision 
broke the European extradition ac- 
cord. 

Battadur CUmbs 
In French Survey 

Reuters 

PARIS — The popularity of 
Prime Minister Edouard Balladiir 
has risen to 60 percent, although an 
even Larger share of French voters 
are unhappy with his conservative 
government, according to a pofl re- 
leased on Wednesday. 

The survey, to be published 
Thursday in the weekly picture 
magazine Paris- Match, said Mr. 
Bahadur's popularity had risen 
four points, from 56 percent last 
month. But 62 percent of French 
voters were dissatisfied with Balla- 
dur's conservative government, 
down from 65 percent in Decem- 
ber. The survey did not explain the 
contradiction' between the sour 
feelings toward the government 
and the continued support for Mr. 
Balladur. 

The popularity of the Socialist 
president, Francois Mitterrand, 
climbed Eve points, to 49 percent 


Radio Pretoria’s Outlaw Voice Challenges Change 


By Bill Keller 

New York Times Service 

DONKERHOEK, South Africa— Sur- 
rounded by two trenches, a fence topped 
with loops of razor wire, a four-foot wall 
of sand bags and a few men with guns, 
Johannes van der Walt cued an Olivia 
Newton-John record and prepared to read 
the news. 

As usual here at Radio Pretoria, it was 
news from a parallel South Africa. 

in this news, whites still stand tall, the 
voices of authority are the Afrikaner Peo- 
ple’s From and the neo-Nazi Afrikaner 
Resistance Movement an independent 
white homeland is almost reality. Nelson 
Mandela is a Communist stooge and elec- 
tions scheduled for April may or may not 
take place. 

On Monday, after four months of waf- 
fling, the government refused to renew 
Radio Pretoria's temporary license, mak- 
ing its broadcasters outlaws and setting 
the stage for a showdown almost everyone 
prefers to avoid. 

Operators of the station vowed to con- 
tinue broadcasting illegally, gambling that 


the government of President Frederik W. 
de Merit would not dare send the police to 
storm a station that has become a symbol 
to many whites of their beleaguered cul- 
ture and diminishing power. 

“It would be a disaster politically,” said 
Pieter La Roux, who supervises security at 
the radio compound, on a fortified prairie 
hilltop east of Pretoria. 

Radio Pretoria has defied the govern- 
ment and remained on the air. 

Although some of the station's more 
trigger-happy supporters speak with relish 
of an apocalyptic confrontation, the gov- 
ernment seemed inclined to pass the issue 
to a new. independent broadcasting au- 
thority where the station's status could 
languish for months. 

Broadcasting, which used to be a gov- 
ernment monopoly, is in a state of flux. 
There are several hundred applications for 
licenses pending before the independent 
authority. 

Since it went on the air Sept 18, Radio 
Pretoria has extended its broadcasting day 
from 4 hours to 14, and has become a 
rallying point for those whites who are 


unreconciled to the coming of majority 
rule. 

From its high mast topped with the 
four-color flag of the 19th-oeotnry Afrika- 
ner Republic of Transvaal, the station's 
FM signal reaches south to the white sub- 
urbs of Johannesburg and north into 
sparsely populated Afrikaner farm coun- 
try. 

On Radio Pretoria, the mnsic is middle- 
of-the-road and the political outlook is 
righL-of-the-pavemenL 
“rve heard “While Christinas’ on Radio 
Pretoria a number of tunes," said Chris 
Canradie, the station tnanagw and one of 
a dozen founders. Tve never heard Mi- 
chael Jackson. And never will. Not be- 
cause of his color, because of his music.” 
Most of the broadcasters are former 
employees of South African Broadcasting 
Corp-. which is regarded here as being part 
of the national stampede into decadence 
and c ommumm. 

Mr. Conradie says his listeners pine for 
the days when South Africa dosed its 
doors cm Sunday, gambling was forbid- 
den, a nd censorship kept out such tempta- 



tions as the oew, heavily air-brushed South 
African edition of Playboy magazine. 

“Everybody now is falling to pieces." he 
said. “We are trying to can people bade to 

•God, and then to make them proud to be 
Afrikaners again.” 

The station declares itself nonpartisan, 
but it has dose ties to the Afrikaner Peo- 
ple’s Front, an alliance of rightist groups. 
The ouilook broadcast here is ardently 
Protestant, fiercely amt-communist, and 
ultranarionalist 

No one knows bow many whites listen 
to the station, but those who do seem to be 
avid. ' 

A month ago. when word reached the 
hilltop ihaf the state aright be planing a 
raid, Mr. la Roux want on the air to 
summon support. Within a few hours, he 
said, a few thousand defeadesy annod 
men with their families, had converged an 
the compound, planning to throw them- 
selves before an assault that never came. 

“This is by no means a fort, and we are 
not preparing for war ” he said. “We real- 
ize that in a conventional attack they could 
blast the lower to ribbons." 


UN to Study 
NATO Plan 
■A For Bosnia 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Calls a Cease-fire in Mexico 

combat against insurgents in southern Mexico, ^ 

with fc-fcn' <*' «*>* 

^Thepreskknl 

gating thousands of troops and hay wopooa to 
allowing military aircraft to rocket nrihan 

woe circulating. The Zapatistas, who consist mamly of Mayan Indian 
pi-qcantg be gan their offensive cm Jan. I by seizing several towns and 
villages in southeastern Chiapas. 

Ex-British Aide Faults Iraq Inquiry 

LONDON (Reuters) —The former foragn«attMy. 
a ftaAeri Britain's ams-for-Iraq inquiry on Wednesday for zmstreaong 
a-nwri the ingrriry^s Leader of bring detective, mqiusaor, 

figure in the scandal, wanted Lord Jnsj«* Sf*® *■* 
Ms interrogation methods migit invalidate tte ugpniy. 
goring whether British nrimsters knowingly broke guidelines governing 
arms sales to Iraq before the Persian Gulf Wax. . • 


4 


Belgrade residents forming a Jong Hue for a streetcar, as shortages ot fuel and spare parts have forced cutbacks in priBc transportation. 

UN Chief and General Feud on Air Strikes 


By Julia Preston 

H’lBhintfon Post Service 
UNITED' NATIONS. New 
York — Severe tensions have aris- 
en between Secretary-General Bu- 
tros Bulros Gbali and the com- 
mander of UN forces in the 


Butros Ghali's reluctance to autho- 
rize the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization powers to launch air 
strikes in Bosnia, the diplomats' 
said. 

On Tuesday in Brussels, NATO 
leaders issued a new threat to use 


Balkans. General Jean Col of power to support UN forces ddiv- 
France, who has repeatedly ig- enng humanitarian aid in Bosnia. 


In the background is the struggle 
between General Cot. -who has 
been commander of the 27,000 UN 
troops in the Balkans since July, 
and Mr. Butros Ghali. 

The United Nations has repeat- 
edly faced difficulties in imposing 
its authority over commanders 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches More than 271 peO] 

GENEVA — The United Na- violence that began in 
dons secretary-general, Butros Bu- tourists and of fiaals. 
tros Ghali, ordered a preb u rinar y 
study on Wednesday of NATO's PrPfiiHpnt H 
threat of air strikes against Bosnian TreSlUCIIlll 
Serbs to reopen the Tnzla airport BERLIN (Reuters) 
and relieve trapped UN troops, a force the pace of the g 
spokeswoman said. nations to the capita 

Mr. Butros Ghali has asked his reception, 
special representative in the former The Bonn-based 

Yugoslavia, Yasnsbi Akashi. to ex- a German Air Force je 
a irane the feasibility of such air hdd an annual New 
strikes and report to a high-level gathering in Beilin. : 
meeting of UN officials in Geneva government to Berlin, 
on Monday, the spokeswoman move, have since tried 
added. Mr. Weizsacker, wj 

Leaders of the North Atlantic Borin to Berlin, tdd 
Treaty Organization asked the Germany together sh 
United Nations on Tuesday to expected “But do one 
:«] draw up urgent plans to ensure that bade an the wodd,” h 
300 Canadian peacekeepers could ■ __ . 

leave the eastern enclave of Sre- 1 .ln ya .S till 1 
brenica, besieged by Bosnian 
Serbs. They also asked for UN ad- LONDON (AP) 7- 
vice on opening the Tuzla airport UbrjgwMmvdvedm 
for humanitarian relief purposes. m l988, but the tnqu 
itetaoMfe. president Bffl Omum said the John Mqor said Wed 
itbacks Id pd)hc transports tiojL Western military alliance was con- Mr. Major was as 

skfcring using air power in both 
places. winch lolled all 259 pi 

I * “The secretary-general has asked peqple on the pound 

I fT to undertake a preparatory study in 

LW ^ Wl ^° response to the declaration of the the bombing, and tfa 

heads of states and governments Li bya because it has i 
scribed by diplomats as by far the who participated in the NATO 
strongest reprimand ever sent to a summit," the UN ^sokeswoman, (JoiTCCflOH 




or the right of cross-examination. Low! Scott • 

plaints a“bolt from the blue," and said he had fully safeguarded the . 
interests of witnesses while ensuring fee inquiry’s e ffic ienc y. : ^ 

Egypt Arrests 120 in Crackdown ! rf 

CAIRO (Reuters) — Egyptian security forces arrested 120 men on : 
Wednesday as part of a crackdown on those suspected of vwfenoe against , / 
public figures and tourists. . . I P 

De termine d to crush a rising tide of Muslim nnhtai u vi olence, the , • 
police have detained a total of 420 suspects in the last two week s and 
<&irr*\ large cach es of arm*, security forces said. Of those arrested, 35 
were wanted militants or escapees. > ■' 

More than 271 people have been killed and 668 wounded m political , 
violence that traan in 1992. Egypt has hanged 29 militants for attacks oh « 
tourists and officials. ’ 

President Rebuilding Berlin’s Status 

BERLIN (Reuters) — President Richard voo WefesSdrer, trying to 
forc^th« p^fiw «^fiT#gn w^irim t*x move to Berlin, invited envoys of 138 
nnrinrn to the capital on Wednesday for his traditional New Year's 
reception. «... 

The Bonn-based diplomats flew 600 kilometers (375 utiles) to Berfan in 
a German Air Fence jet. It was the first time a German presadeut, who has 
hdd an annual New Year's reception in Borin since 1950. hdd the 
gathering in. Bolin. Pufiament voted in 1991 to move the seat of 
government to Berlin, but many politicians, citing the high costs of the 
move, have since tried to delay or overturn the dousion- 
Mr. WeizsScker, who this month moved his official residence from ; ' 
Bruin to Berlin, told the ambassadors dial bringing the two halves of 
Germany together since unification was proving more difficult than ( * 
expected “But no one should believe that as a result we are turning our 
back an the wodd,” he sakL 

Libya Still Only Snspect in Bombing 

LONDON (AP) —There is no evidence that any country other than 
Libya was involved in fee bombing of a Pan Am jumbo jet over Scotland 
in 1988, bu the inquiry into fee matter reraams open. Prime Minister J 
John Mqor said Wednesday. ■ ■ 

Mr. Major was £a fee House of Commons about reports 

suggesting that Syria and Inm might have been involved in the bombing. 

wmmkmed all 259 people on board the New Yodc-bomd flight and 1 1 
people on the ground in Lockerbie, Scotland. j 

Britain and the United States have named two Libyans as suspects in : 
fee bombing, and fee United Nations has impose d sanctions against I 
Libya because it has refused to extradite fee suspects. j 


UN commander. 

The cable was prompted by Gen- 


Therese Gastant, said nr Geneva, 
where Mr. Butros Ghali arrived on 


eral Cot's saying in a newspaper W^ncsday. 


Because of an editmgenoiv an article from Brussels m Wednesday’s 
editions cm President KQ Clinton's campaign for higher environmental w , 
and labor standards in developing countries miadentified Sr Leon 
Britlan. He is fee European Union's trade commiss ion er. 


interview last week that be had re- 
peatedly asked Mr. Butros Ghali to 
delegate to him the authority to call 


She said Mr. Butros Ghali would 
meet on Monday wife Mr. Akashi 
and the UN mediator. Thorvakl 


nored or challenged the authority 
of his civilian superiors at UN 


According to Security Council 
resolutions, the final approval for 


from large and sophisticated ar- in air strikes. General Cot said fee Stoltenberg, as well as Marrack 

mtAc in ife w<*nt MaM&vamr w» i w_ m wi n ral nafn cwrl GOOlCuHg, UN PUflClSCCf 


headquarters, according 10 diplo- ^ stl ^5? ^ given by Mr. 


mats here. 


Butros GhalL He has said lie will 


General Cot’s defiance has left decision on the advkre of 

senior UN officials uncertain feat Si!??!? “ Bosma ' mcludui Z 
t v —l l„... r. if UCTerai LOL 


they have full control of him, and it 
has significantly contributed to Mr. 


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“I have received no request for 
the use of air power” from UN 
officials in Bosnia, Mr. Butros 
Ghali said in Paris. “The day I 


ones tn its recent peacekeeping op- 
erations. In Somalia, it secured (he 
withdrawal of Brigadier General 
Bruno Loi of Italy after he followed 
instructions from Rome to avoid 
fighting wife Somali militiamen in- 
stead of obeying combat orders 
from fee UN force commander. 

Last winter, Lieutenant General 
Philippe Morillon of France, then 


secretary-general refused. 


r^ve^har™ K t^fta»; commamtaof Wj Irnxros in 
UK support TGn officials Who fes a'Sdl 

<° th. enclave of SrebS 
Up.o oo^'o^ .teSro- “fialnsi the advice of UN oSuals. 
tary-general has been hesitant to Last week, Mr. Butros Ghali dis- 
recommend strikes out of concern patched a cable to General Cot. 
feat lightly armed UN peacekeep- saying his actions were “inappro- 
ers would face retaliation by more Pfiate” and “incompatible" with 
powerful Serbian forces. his position. The message was de- 


fee support of UN officials who 
believe it is urgent to use air power, 
I will be the first to back its use." 

Up to now, however, the secre- 
tary-general has been hesitant to 
recommend strikes out of concern 
that lightly armed UN peacekeep- 
ers would face retaliation by more 
powerful Serbian forces. 


General Cot also told Yasoshi 

Akashi, fee top civilian UN official ffhts m- 

iopraMc ^ButrosGStitochange f<m ^ 

toS^egcnerffeedto^ 
a channel of communications di- , 
redly to fee Security Council, dr- 

cu inventing the secretary-general, spokesman for the UN High Cim- 
toprS^fcase,%S^^ mtssioner for Refugees. The 
J, „ . .. spokesman, KnsJanowski, warned 

Mr. Butros Ghah did not consul- feat aaeacy warehouses in Sanrievo 
a yielding his decision-making were empty 
power, UN officials have said, be- Untoihiing the de^xiate sup- 
rause gpveranmnts wife troops on pjy situation, Sarajevo radio re- 
fee ground, aid agencies and other ported that Dour had ran oat at the 
UN dvihans have to be consulted dty bakery. The UN refugee agen- 
before the soretaiy-gmeral can cysaidtbat70wnscfDourwerc 
make a move feat could fenist UN scheduled for arrival by air during 
forces into a shooting war. fee day on Wednesday. 


U.S. Backs Larger UN Council 


By Paul Lewis 

Neiv York Times Service 

BONN — Opening consulta- 
tions on its decision to support 
Germany and Japan as permanent 
members of the United Nations Se- 
curity Council, fee Clinton a dmin - 
istration saiC Wednesday that it 
believed a larger council would 
have greater moral authority in the 
world and make fee Unicoi Na- 
tions more effective. 

The chief U.S. representative at 
the United Nations, Madeleine K. 
Albright, told Foreign Minister 
Klaus Kinkel and other offitials 
here that although the United 
States wanted permanent seats for 
Germany and Japan, it believed 
this would be difficult to achieve 
without giving some form of per- 
manent membership to fee most 
populous developing countries as 
welL 

Mrs. Albright broke off a tour of 


Eastern Europe to participate in 
the consultations. 

Enlarging fee Security Council 
was one of the most hotiy debated 
issues at last year’s UN General 
Assembly session, which set up a 
working group to report on fee is- 
sue later this year. 


feority, meanwhile, has been dam- 
aged by its inability to end the 
fighting in Bosnia- H erzegovina, 
the Cunton administration's 
abrupt decision to puD its forces 
out of Somalia and fee United Na- 
tions' growing difficulty in finding 
money and troops for new peace- 


Devdoping countries and many keeping operations. 

..li *rv. • - - .1 inm 


smaller industrial nations com- During the 1992 election cam- 
plained that fee counaTs present paign that brarnfat him to power, 
composition was anachronistic, nil] Clinton said Germany and Ja- 
The five World War II victors — pan should be given permanent Se- 
Britain. France, the United States, curity Council seats in recognition 
Russia and China — have perma- of their economic strength- 


fee day on Wednesday. 

The airport remained free of at- 
tack by afternoon. Bat fighting was 
reported in some other dty sec- 
tions, where no more than several 
hundred meters separate Bosnian 
Serbs and Muslim-led government 
troops. 

Bosnian radio reported sh riling 
and small-arms fire m several west- 
ern suburbs and said Serbian gun- 
ners ringing fee dty had concen- 
trated an parts of the Old Town. 
There were no immediate reports 
of casualties. 

Serbs and government troops 
also dashed on several eastern Bos- 
nian fronts and fierce fighting was 
reported at Olovo, northeast of Sa- 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

High-Tech Elevators for Eiffel Tower 

PARIS (AP) — The Effel Tower is gefemgalift into the21si century 3s 
workers install a pair of new high-tech elevators to cany visitors between 
fee tower’s top two Levels. ’ 1 

Hie new cabins, costing a total of 7 ndiion francs (Slinillion), weigh 
four tons. They lave beat de&gned to withstand year-round wear and 
tear on fee dry’s most popular tourist attraction- A second pair wiQ be 
installed next year to complete the replacement. 

Last year, 5J5 nriffion people paid to visit fee 320-meter (1,050-foot) 
tower and ride its four elevators for one of fee best news in Paris. The 
elevators make 250 trips per day. 

More flan 300 coaan«mj raf i*e erenm are scheduled in Nonnandy this 
year to edebrate the 50th anniveiwy of the D-Day landings and the 
battle of Nonnandy, oiganizers said Wednesday. Grandstands will be 
erected to seat 45,000 people for the main events, including an houxlong 
ceremony at Omaha Beadt and an evening spectacle at Caen. (AP) 

South Korea nd Cham are expected to agree soon cm direct flights 
between their capitals, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency said. (AP) 
Roof^ seas were hankering workers’ efforts to empty a barge spilling 
oil onto beaches in San Juan, Puoio Rico. The crippled barge, which ran 
into a coral reef after a towline snapped, has already spilled 750,000 
gallons of heating oil onto fee once-pmtine beaches. (AP) 

CHINA: Good Terms With France 


nenl membership on the Council 
and a veto over its decisions. 

But there was little agreement on 
how to alter Council membership, 
wife some countries wanting to 
abolish permanent seats and vetoes 
altogether, while others wanted to 
increase fee number of permanent 
members. 

The Council’s prestige and au- 


Subsequentiy, Secretary of State 
Warren M. Christopher and Mrs. 
Albright have said that the admin- 
istration stands by that view. 

A senior Clinton administration 
official said the United States as- 
sumed that some way must be 
found to bring aboard the biggest 
developing countries by adding 
Third World seats. 


New fighting also was reported 
Wednesday in central Bosnia be- 
tween Bosnian Croats and govern- 
ment troops, after fruitless n^gntia^ 
tions between the presidents of 
Bosnia and Croatia on ending fee 
warfare there. 

Much of the government push in 

central Bosnia has been on Vitez, 
SO kilometers (30 miles) northwest 
of Sanuevo. 

(Reuters, AR) 


Gootiaoedfroffl Page 1 
in November. Last year Germany 
vetoed fee sale of warships to Tai- 
wan, and Mr. Kohl reaped a large 
reward in China, 

The rapprochement “means the 
end of Chinese economic sanctions 
against us,” said the French foreign 
minister, Alain Jupph “Relations 
have been completely normalized. ” 
The contract wife Taiwan had 
been approved by Fiance’s.fotmer 
Socialist government. 

Mr. Jiipph said that the driiveiy 
of the Mirage jets, a vital sale for 
the troubled Dassault aerospace 
group, would take place, hut there 
would be no further arms ' sales. 
None of fee planes has yet been 

delivered. 


“The Chinese side reaffirms tfait 
arms sales of any type to Tahrap 
wiD bring harm to China's sover- 
eignty, security and remrificationy’ 
the statement said. > 

. The United States announced m 
1992 feat it would sell F-16 fighters 
to Taiwan. Although there has beefc 
no sig n i fic a n t Chinese reaction, the 
government has said it reserves tl£ 
right to retaliate. i 

Mr. B allartur has made the resto- 
re tionaf good relations wife Chi* 
a priority since- lairing office Jajt 
March. 

The agreement came ooe day a (- 
ter it was disclosed in Washington 
feat a dr&Tt report by theU.S.$tatj: 
Department has found little pro- 
gress on human rights in Chin& 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 





InP&nu^a CaseTkat Won’t Stay Buried Provides Test of Civilian Power 


‘ ' By Janffi^BrOOke tLccomTS^GcHi^^dc^^Pres^ 

J . 1 • - (feat Aibcrfo Fujimori in April‘l99L . . 

; 14MA ^Hurrying fcrfore the lighi of . The United States has warned that 
’dawn exgcsetf^wrw^i at^a Peruvian,. 5 *® traffifloln economic aid :«ffl nca.be 
. Anay .lnag saoge; a group of hooded ^hwsed unless 1 those who carried: oat 
judpeq lini& Wjurie. students and a tfa 'Caritnt* kfflings and other major 
THBfes^ ldc^pped Tkwrs eaiM f read : ahuses.af hnmau .rights are punished 
dcgnahyiffi^ta teachers’ coD»*eicee. Zn - _ “La Cantutrr is shaping up to be toe 
memaiTniflhtes of diatnighti8micmfl» .test case tfiu WDlmake or break aid to 
*«m *& 10 were shot in tot bead. ■•• . Pera”-saidJuaaEjMea>^ 

• two days ladtez^|Q>tiKW .. director of Americas Watch, the New 

.fllem daylight, the gnma^foogd a^foof York-based lomjaaH^hls organization. 

from, the desdrt tend and - • t).S. concent' about human-rights 
****** » Wfc to be conveyed later 
• ^^gtoparocip^^potcd mpress ■ tfetnoBtb, when AJctaaderE. Watson, 
1 «' K . •■.-•’ assistant secretaty of state for imnr- 
Aroaican aff aire. and severe American 
i Ql Inc IQ jpeqple. from La Caittofa' Uni 1 congressmen are due to come here in the 

offi- highest levdUS. visit since Mr. Fiiji- 
TOsand soknexs have bomchat^xl with nuirisdzed expanded powers. 

Sf^“ g w k S^^ pit> ^ ssor *** - . Most V& jhA was. fraun after Mr. 
studraa be&Ttoat tocy we ^ Fn^nori’s action, but Pern has recently 

to'win the money hade, ar- 

py me onmmg ram gn emna movement,. vinM that toe homan-rigbtsshuanon is 
- . Last year, tor example, the 

number of forced disappearances 
. court, and there ft doubt dytimyTborirF^ dropped toaboet' 75. down from an 
^tulty Would be pumshed banMy, . ,?.r - Viaroagnof 30ffa year over the previous 
'Today, 

of new crviHaQ institutions that replaced - . Dispate the im pr o vement s, a satisfac- 


tory resolution of the Cantu ta ease is 
; regartiedra Washington as an essential 
preconditic© for aid. / 

- The army here thirties differently. Last 
April, the army commander in chief. 
General - Nicolas de Bari Hermoza. 
though l he could silence an investigation 
by the Peruvian Congress by sending 
tanks rambling through streets of Lima. 

Bui in fits and starts, investigations 
-lurched on, fed by crusading magazine 
journalists, relatives of the students, op- 
position members of Congress, pressure 
from the United States and a dissident 
faction within the army. 

" In a major civilian challenge to anriy 
privilege, two generals and six officers 
are under barracks arrest and are fating 
trials for the Can Lula killings- Two oth- 
ers who have been charged have not been 
detained. 

In the last 12 years of army warfare 
against the Shining Path. 3,033 guerrilla 
suspects were, detained and secretly 
killed by security forces, human-rights 
groups assert. In the same period, the 
army conducted two courts-martials for 
unjustified killings. 

Although the suspects in the Cannita 
case reportedly believed that they were 


kidnapping members of a Shining Path 
bomb squad, guerrilla activities by those 
killed has never ban proved. 

“The soldiers think they are the mas- 
ters of the wold, that they can do what- 
ever they want with poor people,*" said 


The soldiers think 
they are the masters of 
the world. 9 

Rayda Condor Saes, whose 
oldest son was one of nine 
students killed in July 1992. 


Rayda Condor Saes. whose oldest son. 
Armando Amaro Condor, was one of the 
students killed. “When I went to live 
barracks, they laughed in my face and 
said that my son bad probably run off 
with some woman. Until his keys were 
found. I always thought that f would 
find hint alive.” 

A turning point came last summer 
when investigators sifting through hu- 
man remains at a common grave found a 


set of keys. The keys opened locks at 
Armando Amaro's school locker and at 
his mothers house in Lima. That grave, 
and another at the army firing range, 
were discovered after members of a dis- 
sident anny faction called Sleeping Lion 
sent band-drawn maps pinpointing two 
burial sites to Ricardo Uceda Perez, edi- 
tor of the lima newsweekly Si. 

The government never responded to 
U.S. offers of free forensic analysis. In- 
stead, officials shipped remains to Brit- 
ain for identification through genetic 
mapping. Now the government contends 
it does not have the money to pay for the 
necessary tests. 

“From the moment these 10 people 
vanished, the government has done its 
best to keep the truth from public view.” 
Americas Watch wrote in a report in 
September. 

According to the report, witnesses, in- 
cluding the third-ranking general in the 
Peruvian Army, have been harassed, 
threatened and forced into exile. Several 
have been arrested. General Hermoza 
has refusal to allow any of his subordi- 
nates to testify in civilian court or before 
congressional investigators. The attor- 
ney general's office dragged its feet, leav- 


ing most investigative work to journal- 
ists. Police officials have branded 
investigative journalists as terrorist 
dupes. 

But with the keys, the maps and cloth- 
ing identifications by relatives, a civilian 
prosecutor, Victor Cubas Villanueva, de- 
rided that he had enough evidence, and 
on Dec. 16 be charged 10 officers and 
soldiers with kidnapping and murder. 

The tenacity of some Peruvians in 
pursuing the case is explained in part bv 
the easing of a war psychosis that only "a 
few months ago gripped the capital 

“Under the stress of the bombs, the 
population demanded that terrorism be 
wiped out at any price." Fernando Ro- 
spjgJiosi wrote recently in Caretas maga- 
zine. recalling the panic atmosphere 
caused by a Shining Path bombing cam- 
paign in the summer of 1991 “To kidnap 
and murder 10 university people from a 
study center where it was known that 
there was Shining Path activity onlv 
made a handful of people nervous.” 

But with much of the leadership of 
Shining Path in jail and with tension 
easing, Peruvians seem increasingly to 
favor curbing the army's “dirty war” 
tactics. 


With newsmagazines publishing pho- 
tographs of the ringleaders of Afl army 
death squad suspected of earning out 
the Cantata killings, the government has 
been forced lo dismantle tile 30-man 
unit, which was formed three years ago 
to combat Shining Path activity in Lima. 

Named the Cdioa Group after an 
array war hero, the group is suspected of 
having carried out a string of other kill- 
ings around lima in the last two years, 
including the kilting of >5 people attend- 
ing a barbecue in central Lima and the 
disappearance of a left-wing radio jour- 
nalist. Pedro Yauri Sustain erne. The IS 
were suspected of attending a Shining 
Path fund-raiser, bur apparently were all 
innocent. 

In a final attempt at damage control 
the military is reportedly pressing the 
Supreme Court to rale later this month 
that the Camura case should be tried in a 
military court instead of a civilian one. 
Id Peru, military court proceedings are 
dosed to civilian observers. 

“It’s a test of how autonomous civilian 
power really is in Peru," said Enrique 

Bern ales Ballesteros, a former congress- 
man who nuts a political research insti- 
tute in Lima. 



*POLLTLCAL VOTES* 


• WASHINGTON - — President 821 Qmloa continues to draw high 
ipproyalxalmgs far^phe of aB^ gatiri ns private fife y»d hi* 

tnanoal afiarrs^nccording to a net? Washington Post-ABC News 
Poll-...-,.-. ' 

But- the poll showed that three in five Americans say^ a. special 
prosecutor should be named to investigate Mr. Clinton’s financial 
deaUngswbeu lie was governor of Ax»iisa& 

The poll shewed that 59 pfctomt of those -surveyed said :tbey 
approved .of the job Mr. CHatotue .doings president,, compared 
with 36 percent who disapproved. The poll is based mi a national 
random sample of 1,038 aduteiaferviewed by telephone fan. 5-9. 
Margin of sampling error is plus or m«ntf 3.$ . percentage points. 

A mid-Decembet Post-ABC poll put to favOTabte-unfitvorable 
rating at 58 to 40 percent TheDecemberpoliwascoamlcied shortly 
before ttBffiatnms by two Arkansas state troopers that they had 
helped farifitaie extramarital attain for Mr. Clinton 'and before the 
White House came under mcreasmg pressure to release more infor- 
matioa about the^ ^invotyenieKl^^ Qiittm and his wife, Hillary 
Rodham Grown, in an Arkansas real estaie deaL 
- Asked v^dietha the JnWceDepartm^ shouId cany onltsmvesti- 
gatitiu of Mr. CBmon’s Arkansas deafags. or whdh^r Anotney 
General Janet Renoshould anpomt ajpepal prosecutor to look mto 
the matter, 61 percent said they favored a sjimd prosecutor 
Sixty percent of respondents said they believed Mr. Clinton has 
the honesty and integrity to serve effectively as proudest. The last 
time that question was asked-m a Post-ABC poll shortly before his ' 
mauguratiorv7*.pocent saM^tedid- t (WPj 


Back tban OldAppro a^ilta tttHfar o«sPrt»g« 

die Boq of narqotidi into flte 
largt^rbesaappcd ih. favor ci a 
jfafcS toshttt off tteflow 
syndicaies, according to 
official involved with 


have to be rea^K? dboerf ihe fact' 
and faercan on fhe streets of the. 
ttatradier than focuson ■* 
rate on eradrcatmg drag- 
andrfiscoqragmg A m erica ns 


ry from the use of 
he administratioa's 
>ast programs that 
raps is ingrained in 
' become a -major 

:wl'. ' {WP) 




JUpf n taUnwH Wnwi torCombat Poflcy 

, WASHINGTOH — Aflovearfiar tqecting a proposal that he 
found t too restrictive. Defense Secretary Les Aspin has approved a 
new general policy that wBI aBow womea to save ia some ground 
unitsdtmngaHnbttAFextiagcm^okeswoinamKatideeendeLaski, 

said the new polky would be announced later tins week,commg just 
before ML /SpiAfs schedrfed toreagn fem his post this month. 

Me if rfjt^ -rfecfiiwd-to discuss specifics of the new policy, but 
caationsd that wtswa would not bepenidtted. to'sdtve in all areas of 
combat action, such as .hand-to-hand fighting. “Womai are still 
aorngtobeax^wled ffixndatxx ground combaC shes«d.“Sovtoi 
ymi need is a tWBntion of what is direct ground combat. . * (LAT) 


raie rf nine Democratic senators . 

ties with 
ernorof 
flieir interests or the interests of 

or questions abom whether an 

beted." ; (WP) 


•A new arime nwaber has been dacofered by reaearctes uang a 
sancaconmutef; but with 258,716 digits it might be hard.for die 
average math »tez to rdH off the tongue. A prime number can be 
dhndS rally by itsiff or one to produce a wholemnabov Espies 
Sdude 2 , 3;5,7and II. Thejouraal Science sad theprroous record 
was 227^832 


W A Swiss tourist said be had jumped into Biscay** W to escape 
mhbers armed with a taiife cm acauMway near MSauu. The tounsti 
- - - * ■ ’ the knife s blunt side, and suffered 

as Ffmeisco, illegal ^ operating 
ti^dy effective ui reducing risky 

im loes not promote drag abuse, said 

HSdy iub^dm’fte Jounial of the Amato McdicalAss«ia- 
’ fibn. ' : * V 

• FoBowosof DaritI Koee* men ^“annfag »a^,^toaprpse«K 
toria as opening siatanealforfte final m SanAmpmo, T««as,of ; .i l 
SSts cS^wiOj Dinrdaiiig four federal agents m a gun tettk. 

“Dawd Kcrerii told ttese people his name-was death, said the 

prosecutor. Ray Jahn. . : >• xnt Rmn ap. iat 



The Business Lunch 
Goes on a Crash Diet 

Firms Tighten Their Belts 
As Tax Reduction Is Reduced 


Z brack Father/ Boom 


Pr esident C ftdo u s tmuBng in with gjm combo at a dob in Prague. His saxophone was a gift from the Czech president, Vaclav Hard. 

Clinton in Prague: A Major Production 


By Douglas Jehl 

tVw York Tones Sewer 

PRAGUE — The cast included Vaclav Ha- 
vd, the playwright, and Bill Clinton, the bom 
pofitical ham, and their stroll across the I4tb- 
century Charles Bridge was more than just 
another moment of diplomatic theater. 

; Under orders From Mort Engdberg. the Hol- 
lywood producer m charge of planning Mr. 
CHnton's most important public moments, the 
-Gothic span had been transformed into a stage, 
with artists and souvenir sellers banished to 
make room for the actors. 

Until Mr. Clinton’s arrival no vehicle had 
crossed the bridge since it was turned into a 
pedestrian walkway in 1958, local officials said, 
and neither German tanks in World War II nor 
Soviet tanks that came to suppress the liberal- 
ization movement of 1968 had dared to cross 
the much-loved medieval structure. 

But the White House sacrificed that tradition 
to the twin gods of publicity and security. While 
the two leaders stayed on foot, they were pre- 
ceded over the rough cobblestones by a truck- 
load of photographers and trailed by Mr. Gin- 
Urn's limousine with its District of Columbia 
plates. 

The promenade, on Tuesday night was in- 
tended as a symbol of renewed partnership 
between West and East and as Mr. Gin ton and 
Mr. Havel paused to admire some of the 30 
statues on toe bridge, mid gazed at the Ylatva 


River and the capital's medieval spires, theirs 
seemed a powerful personal drama. 

But that was not for any lack of planning, not 
least by Mr. Eogelberg. who made a reputation 
fust by producing “Smokey and the Bandit” 
and then Mr. Clinton’s campaign buscapades. 

Across the full length of the 300-\nrd-long 
bridge, each statue had been illuminated with 
two special spotlights. Duct tape was stuck on 
the paving blocks where the two leaders were to 
pose for photographs. 

Before coming to Europe, Mr. Clinton told 
his aides that he was determined that his trip 
have an emotional cast, and that he was eager 
for human contact Away from the bridge. Mr. 
Havd made sure that he 'got a good dose of that 
on Tuesday night, as the two drank beer and ate 
breaded veal in a historic pub. 

They even wandered on for a taste of 
Prague's night life at the smoky Reduta jazz 
dub, where the Czech president had invited 
several dozen of bis artistically inclined friends, 
and where Mr. Clinton borrowed a saxophone 
to play two of his favorites, “Summertime” and 
“My Funny Valentine.” 

when a loud popping sound rang out is the 
street as Mr. Clinton was leaving the dub. the 
president seemed only a little tense even when 
his Seem Service detail backed his limousine 
onto the sidewalk and pulled out a bulletproof 
vest in case he should need il The White House 
said later that agents believed the noise had 
been a firecracker. 


Reporters who did their best to trail Mr. 
Clinton through the evening said be seemed 
determined to make sure that everyone had a 
good time. “Get some food for these people 
be encouraged one Czech waiter after a reunion 
with an elderly couple he had met in a visit to 
the capital 24 years ago 

“When I was coming here, 1 wanted to walk 
across the bridge and I wanted to see you.” Mr. 
Clinton said as be kissed the woman. Jirina 
Kopokl on both cheeks. 

Among the Czechs who flocked to the nar- 
row Old Town streets to catch a glimpse of the 
American leader, there were shrieks and cheers 
and calls for “Bed CUN -ton” to “come here." 
The president often obliged, sometimes to find 
himself nearly mobbed by young men and 
women who pressed relentlessly 3gainst police 
harriers. 

But there has always more than a him of 
calculation in Mr. Clinton's personal style. 
Aboard Air Force One on Tuesday, aides car- 
ried a videotape of a Monday night ABC News 
program so that they could plan his perfor- 
mance on the first of a series of programs 
presenting a kind of nightly cinema verite of 
traveling diplomacy. 

In a bus from the airport ro the bridge, news 
photographers were shown photos depicting 
the walk across the bridge as it would look from 
Mr. Clinton's eyes as well as tbeir own, so that 
they could better plan their shots. 


CONDEMNED: For Texas Death Rmc Inmates, There’s Life on the Job 


Continued from Page 1 

fas tense for prison guards, too. 

' '“ft's been heading uphill from 
DayJ " said the factory manager, 
Charles Duff, a prison worker. “We 
produce iop-or-tbe-Hne goods.” 

Of the 373 men on droth row at 
HcntsviQe, the turnover rate is in- 
creasing as more arrive and more 
• are dispatched. 'Hie factory has a 
double shift of up to 120 workers. 
Fotiftecs-uunaxes are scheduled for 
execution tins month, including 
several whose jobs in the factory 
. have already ban snapped up by 
men on a long waiting fist.' 

The inmates make dozens of. 
items rr- sheets, diapers, lote bags 
and prison guard uniforms — aB 
sporting a TCI label for Texas Cor- 


rectional Industries and sold to 
other state agencies. 

• And though the inmates get none 
of the profits, they are accorded 
highly valued privileges, including 
larger cells, freedom lo visit with 
nearby friends on death row after 
work, and, most important, free- 
dom from bang manacled in the 
sight of their famili es in grim re- 
striction cages on visiting days. 

The rest of the death row is con- 
fined in “lockdown" In their cells 
except for three hours a day. 

To Lester Bower, a 46-year-old 
condemned prisoner and the fac- 
toiy bookkeeper. “It's kind of a 
paradox" how some of society’s 
roost dreaded people find special 
camaraderie in the death row fac- 


tory: “If a condemned man shows 
he can exist quite wdl without pos- 
ing a danger to his peers, what’s the 
roil reason for executing him?” 

Mr. Bower's friend and fellow 
factory worker, James Vanderbilt, 
a former police officer convicted of 
murder in the course of a kidnap- 
ping. is the state's longest surviving 
death row inmate: 18 years and 
counting in an involved legal pro- 
cess. He is respected for legal ex- 
pertise and endurance by newer in- 
mates who, sentenced under recent 
laws toughened to speed appeals 
rime call themselves "drive-ups" 
since they anticipate less lire. 

“After you’ve been here a certain 
amount of time, actually getting 
executed is a kind of pa role.” Mr. 


Vanderbilt said. “It becomes hard- 
er in your mind for a friend to die 
than it is for you to die. I know 1 
can be ready, but 1 can't know 
about my friend even though we 
talk about it.” 

A garroem worker typically 
checks out of the factory rosier a 
month before his execution date for 
final processing, if a court stay 
arises, be can came back on line. 

“Tbere’ve been guys coming 
back with tbeir arms 'all bruised 
from the execution catheters, get- 
ting a stay two hours before it’s 
over T Mr. Willingham said, refer- 
ring to the lethal injection process. 
“It's scary, wondering whether it's 
going to be me they lay there like a 
lamb on that table next time” 


By Clifford J. Levy 

AW Vurit Tunes Semce 

NEW YORK — The American 
business lunch once seemed so 
blithely ample. Shepherd some ch- 
eats to a nice restaurant, order a 
steak and a few highballs, make a 
couple of deals, gossip over the 
cheesecake. Hand a charge card to 
the waiter after barely glancing at 
the check. 

But first came warnings about 
cholesterol and alcohol and sagging 
productivity, and now — as if the 
conspiracy to destroy this venera- 
ble perk were not complete — the 
government has taken another step 
in its long campaign to reduce (he 
tax deduction for business meals 
and entertainment. 

The change, which took effect on 
Jan. 1. is rippling through the coun- 
try. ushering in a new era of auster- 
ity for some companies in advertis- 
ing, publishing and other industries 
that like lo do their brainstorming 
over white tablecloths. It is also 
worrying many restaurateurs who 
had hoped that they were turning 
the corner after a long slump. 

“This will finish off fine dining 
in America." said Stephen E El- 
mont, the owner of Mirabelle, a 
restaurant in Boston, and president 
of the National Restaurant Associ- 
ation. “We are under siege.” 

Congress lowered the deduction 
for business meals and entertain- 
ment from 80 percent to 50 percent 
last year as part of President Bill 
Clinton's deficit-reduction pack- 
age. It estimated that the move 
would raise S50.3 billion from 1994 
to 199S. 

Will the new rules wipe out a 
corporate culture that has flour- 
ished for decades? Probably not, 
but they seem to be chipping away 
at a practice that some executives 
always considered a kind of in- 
alienable right 

So it is no surprise that some 
companies are complaining that 
the public does not grasp the value 
of these meals, particularly in an 
age when offices are so cbocka- 
block with phones, computers, 
faxes, and other gadgetry that face- 
to-face contact with co-workers 
and clients is increasingly rare. 

In big dties, many companies 
are issuing policies after talking 
with consultants like American Ex- 
press Travel Related Services, 
which in recent months has held 
several wdl-attended seminars on 
the tax changes. A survey of 25 
travel managers by Corporate 
Travel magazine found that 60 per- 
cent would likely write new guide- 
lines for their companies, possibly 
requiring itemized receipts on busi- 
ness meals to cut waste. 

Grey Advertising, one of the 
largest agencies in die country, is 
sending a memo to its workers 
strongly urging them to cut back on 
business meals, eat at cheaper res- 
taurants and invite more clients to 
its corporate dining rooms. Grey 


has more than 2,000 employees in 
New York. 

“These meals do provide signifi- 
cant benefits, because often there is 
much more of an intimate environ- 
ment.” said Edward Meyer. Grey's 
chairman and chief executive. “But 
this is a business that spends too 
much of its life in restaurants.” 

Although he acknowledged that 
his more than three detrades in ad- 
vertising had been very land to his 
palate, Mr. Meyer promised to set 
an example by staying in more and 
closely monitoring expense reports. 

“There is a reformist zeal that 
takes place after new legislation 
comes in.” be said. “For six 
months, many people will pursue a 
policy of trying to curb excess din- 
ing in excessively priced restau- 
rants. But thereafter, the effect 
tends to wane a little. People go 
back to their bad ways. It's very 
much like dieting.” 

Jack Avrett. the chairman of Av- 
retl. Free & Ginsberg, another 
large advertising agency, said he 
was also asking employees to be 
more frugal just as he did when the 
deduction dropped from 100 per- 
cent to 80 percent in 1986. “Jn the 
old days, 20 years ago. it was just a 
rule of thumb that you went out lo 
lunch with clients every day." he 
said. “But that doesn’t happen any- 
more because the business pres- 
sures have been changing,. There 
has been evolution. It’s better this 
way. We get more work done:" 

But such views were not echoed 
on Wall Street, which has posted 
record profits in recent months. 
Executives at several major broker- 
age houses seemed almost taken 
aback when asked about expense 
policies, as if making cuts would be 
sacrilegious. And the new rules will 
certainly have little impact on the 
wealthy. 

“I just left the Four Seasons, and 
having lunch (here were Barry 
Dfller. Ron Perlman. Henry Kis- 
singer. Sandy Weill from Primer- 
ica. Joni Evans, and that was just 
today’s group,” said Jerry Delia 
Feminfl, the longtime adman who 
is president of the Jerry Inc. agency 
and has opened two restaurants in 
recent years. 

“It’s not going to affect them." 
be said. “It's going to affect the 
insurance salesperson. It's going to 
affect the poor Hispanic dishwash- 
er who works for a major restau- 
rant.” 

But even Paul Kovi, a pari owner 
of ihe Four Seasons, said he feared 
the new rules would depress reve- 
nues. About 70 to 80 percent of the 
lunches at the Four Seasons are on 
expense accounts, Mr. Kovi said. 

The National Restaurant Associ- 
ation said many of its 25.000 mem- 
bers were also responding by run- 
ning promotions and reducing 
prices. The group estimated that 
the change would lead io a cut of 
more than 165,000 jobs nationally 
in the restaurant industry. 


PROBE. White House A^ts for Independent Inquiry on CUnton finances 


sumlar m 

ihe White House 

t-jxoaai files on Wtawwzar s« g>ed to era- 

to the Justice Deparawo* aader a “*5*^ 
that keeps them dosed to the press and die 

?H S i sedar» *e select committee, w&^for- 

“ 5 : 


'«&>i Attorney General: 

fcmS Reno, who fas the authority to apprapt 
was aqtactag 
•‘‘SeoSi r^ iy** tfa White Ho to as sfaeoB- 
; SSadhtf options and tox Mr. C&tan was 
" fifing tbe^rots" Titan Etitope; - 


' **If die president and first* lady have. done 
notlnng wrong, as they haw said, they have 
..nothing to hide; 1 * Mr- Dole said. ' . 

At me heart of : the Clinton maner. is toe 
Morgan- Guaranty Sayings & Loan in Arkan- 
sas, which faBcd in toe late 1980s rand whose 
depositors required 550 million in federal de- 
posit insurance payments. Questions have been 
rated about .the possibility' that bank funds 
W&T& improperly diverted, through Mr. 
McDon ga1 T tn the ffinion campaign is order to 
. 'erase campaign debts. Other questions focus on 
whethe; Arkansas .state offfaais. appointed by 
Mr.’ CJmton, sought to - keep die institution 
open as its loans went sow. 

Mr.McDongal. hiswife, Susan, and toe Cli»- 
toas were partners in -Whitewater, a^iKw-d&- 
functreal cstate^ venture thai sought to develop 


resort homes in rural Arkansas. The Clintons 
have maintained toat they lost neatly 569.000 
an the deal, and Mr. McDougal concurs. 

Mr. McDougal has joined toe White House 
in denying that tire uimons either benefited 
financially from them association with him or 
that tben-Crovtraor Oraton or his wife used 
their positions to improperly benefit the bank. 

The financial relationships are highly com-, 
ptex, but- a complicating factor is that Mrs. 
Clinton and her prominent little Rock law firm 
represented both the bank, as it sought to stay 
afloat, and later the federal government, as il 
sought damag es against toe bank's accounting 
firm. A Former colleague of Mrs. Clinton's at 
-toe Rose law firm is now associate attorney 
general. " 



ftr— i'H- *-*■-** ■*« 


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Delivery in key cities 

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Information 

Technology 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Information superhighway in the U.S. 

■ IBM - under new management. 

■ Multibillion dollar mergers and strategic 
alliances. 

■ The hand-held Personal Digital Assistant 

■ The “virtual office” - fhe office of the 
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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 


Dose of Caution From Clinton U.S. Details 


With Eye on Home, He Goes Slow on Europe 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

Vfn' York Timet Senuv 

ICI E V — Behind all foreign poti- 

- cy there lurks, or ought to lurk, 
careful political calculation. What 
the folks at home will not supporL 
the traveling potentate cannot af- 
ford to promise. 

So it has been with President Bill 
Clinton this week, on his maiden 
1 voyage to Europe as the leader of 
the Atlantic alliance. Having seen 
how quickly American opinion 
turned sour when the body of a 

* U.S. serviceman was dragged 
through the streets of Mogadishu. 

- Somalia, to be duly photographed 

- and filmed, he is reluctant to make 
. small commitments — witness the 
. ruining hack of an American troop 

ship bound for Haiti — let alone 
big. dangerous ones. 

Mr. Clinton therefore made no 
bold move on Bosnia. He issued no 
ultimatum to the combatants — do 
this or we will do that. Instead, he 
and the allies temporized. 

They threatened yet again, as 
they did to no great effect last Au- 
gust. to use air strikes at Sarajevo. 
. but only under certain conditions 
and not very soon at that. They 

- added Tuzla and Srebrenica to the 
possible target list, but only pend- 
ing yet another study of feasibility 
and' suitability. 

Mr. Clinton resisted, likewise. 

• pressures from the East Europeans 
; for full membership in the North 

Atlantic Treaty Organization, 
obliging them to accept the Part- 
nership for Peace, a httle-brother 
status that they did not much like. 

One reason is the sensitivity of 
the Russians. For the moment, at 
. least, Mr. Clinton has given a much 
| higher priority to avoiding offense 
to the frail forces of reform in Mos- 
cow than to strengthening ties to 
; the once-oppressed peoples of the 
former satellite states who once oc- 


cupied such a special place in 
Washington’s bean. That reflects 
the influence of Strobe Talbott, the 
Russian expen and State Depart- 
ment official who has come to 
dominate the administration’s stra- 
tegic thinking on Europe. 

Bul another reason is what mem- 
bership in NATO means. It is. at 
bottom, a military alliance, and its 
members agree to come to the aid 
of each other if attacked. Expan- 
sion would mean the United Stales 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

was fully committed to use it? 
troops to defend Poland or the 
Czech Republic if they were at- 
tacked. 

Mr. Clinton was elected by a 
country eager to focus on its own 
problems, not those of the rest or 
the world, and he has done little to 
urge it to look abroad, except in 
terras of economic self-interest. 

Even if the will were there, the 
means are noL The 100.000 Ameri- 
can troops Mr. Clinton promised 
this week to leave in Europe, no 
matter what, would certainly not 
suffice to halt any serious manifes- 
tation of Russian expansionism. 

“The most effective thing for 
us." an American official said, “is 
to try to protect Eastern Europe by 
encouraging anti-imperialist, dem- 
ocratic tendencies in Russia. The 
problem is that the United States, 
or any other outside power, has 
only very limited influence over 
events in Russia." 

But this is a president who likes 
to have things both ways. So having 
denied them what they sought, he 
met in Prague with four East Euro- 
pean leaders. led by Vaclav Have) 
of the Czech Republic and Lech 
Walesa of Poland, and came close 
— much closer than some of his 
West European partners would like 


Boncheron Jewelers 
has designed for the 
American Hospital of Paris 
its ivell-knoivn pierced medal 
using the monogram of 
the hospital. 



— to telling them. “Just be patient, 
and you'll get what you want." 

On Tuesday. Jiri Dienstbier. the 
former Czech foreign minister, said 
in a newspaper interview, “We 
must not permit the Partnership to 
remain a sedative ora wailing room 
in which to await how things turn 
out in Russia." 

As if in direct reply. Mr. Clinton 
said after his round of meetings 
Wednesday: “While the Partner- 
ship is not NATO membership, 
neither is it a permanent bolding 
room. The question is no longer 
whether NATO will take on new 
members but when and how." 

But when will the right moment 
come? 

If the American people are not 
ready to defend Eastern Europe 
now. when will they be? Surely not 
until Mr. Clinton or some other 
president makes a much stronger 
case that the vital interests of 
America are at stake. 

If Russia is at all costs not to be 
provoked, then membership for the 
Czechs and the others will have to 
be delayed until Russia has become 
so stable that even if angered, it 
would pose no threat to its neigh- 
bors. Russian history does not en- 
courage the hope that thaL will hap- 
pen any day soon. 

As Mr. Clinton conceded, “there 
are always concerns that- in the fu- 
ture the darker past might be re- 
created." 

In a way, it already has been, in 
Bosnia. The failure of the alliance 
to halt the genccidal war there, in 
another East European country to 
which NATO guarantees do not 
apply, cannot be encouraging to 
Poland arid Hungary and the 
Czech Republic as they contem- 
plate what would happen if they 
found themselves trapped between 
East and West. 

UKRAINE: 

Nuclear Accord 

Continued from Page 1 
over the issue of whether they are to 
be a nuclear power or not" That 
division is reflected in parliamenta- 
ry statements that have emerged in 
opposition since the agreement was 
announced. 

The Clinton administration is 
bolding linn to its contention that 
it will not reveal some parts of the 
agreement, particularly the exact 
sequence of how the warheads will 
be removed and how long the pro- 
cess will lake. Nor will it say what 
incentives the Ukrainians have 
been promised by the United States 

“It is our position that some ele- 
ments of the agreement will remain 
confidential " a senior official said. 
He said the agreement fixes no 
timetable to the confidential de- 
ments and they could he never pub- 
licly released. 

Mr. Clinton cited security lan- 
guage built into the agreement that 
is meant to protect against any po- 
tential Russian expansionism and 
invited Ukraine to join the new 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion plan for military cooperation 
with former East Bloc countries. 

Mr. Kravchuk, who once called 
the weapons part of Ukraine's 
“material wealth." has agreed to 
give it up in return for financial 
compensation and guarantees from 
Russia and the United States that 
its borders are pennane m. 

The trip to Kiev came after Mr. 
Clinton won qualified endorsement 
from four East European leaders 
for his proposal, approved by 
NATO, to extend military contacts 
eastward without granting former 
Soviet-occupied countries the secu- 
rity guarantees that full NATO 
partnership includes. 


To order this medal in vermeil, 
you may send a check 
for 1500 Francs ($260) 
made out the order of the 
American Hospital of Paris to: 

Madame Christiane Guerlain 


American Hospital of Paris 

63, boulevard Victor-Hugo 
92202 Neuilty FRANCE 

Please expect 2 weeks for deliiery. 
For more information, call: 

(1) 46 41 25 90. 


Conditions 
For Aid to 
Russians 

By Thomas L. Friedman 

Nete York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Treasury Secre- 
tary Lloyd Bentsen told Russian 
leaders Wednesday that the United 
Slates was prepared to help speed 
delivery of Western aid, but rally 
after it saw credible signs that Rus- 
sia was restructuring us budget to 
phase out money-losing industries, 
lower inflation and better assist the 
unemployed. 

The mantra for President Bill 
Clinton’s visit. Treasury officials 
say. was: “More Russian reform in 
return for more Western money 
more quickly." 

That approach is in marked con- 
trast to the initial adnunistratioa 
reaction to the recent Russian elec- 
tions. when both Vice President A1 
Gore and the Russian affairs coor- 
dinator, Strobe Talbott, suggested 
easing Western conditions for re- 
form to defuse opposition to Presi- 
dent Boris N. Yeltsin’s govern- 
ment. That view was strongly 
opposed by the Treasury Depart- 
ment and seems to have been firm- 
ly quashed. 

Mr. Bentsen, who arrived in 
Moscow in advance of President 
Clinton, told reporters after his 
talks that the Russians had been 
making progress in taming infla- 
tion and spawning new private 
business. 

The next few days and weeks. 
Mr. Bentsen said, would be “criti- 
cal" in determining if Mr. Yeltsin's 
newly elected government and par- 
liament are able and willing to car- 
ry out the son of structural reforms 
that the United States and its allies 
want to see before they really turn 
on the aid spigot. 

Mr. Yeltsin is still putting to- 
gether his new government, and the 
newly elected Russian parliament 
is just getting under way. It is not 
clear whether the advocates of eco- 
nomic reform favored by Washing- 
ton will be assigned leading roles in 
the new cabinet and, even more 
importantly, whether the Russian 
parliament will be ready to autho- 
rize the sort of major budget re- 
structuring that the United States 
and its allies advocate. Treasury 
officials said. 

“It is at a very formative stage." 
Mr. Bentsen said after discussions 
with Deputy Prime Minister Ana- 
toli & Chuvias. “I would not try to 
predict who is going to be in what 
slot" 

But he added. “I want to see 
some strong reformers left in that 
government." 

The basic American position ar- 
ticulated by Mr. Bentsen to his 
Russian counterparts is this: The 
United States is ready to press its 
Western allies and the internation- 
al lending institutions to come for- 
ward with money they have already 
promised Russia and not yet deliv- 
ered if it sees “viable plans, and 
dear and credible statements of in- 
tent” thaL Russia is ready to re- 
structure its budget, a senior Trea- 
sury official said. 

What is new in this approach is 
that the United Slates will not in- 
sist on a waiting period to test im- 
plementation before money is de- 
livered. but it does want to see 
commitments of intent. 

That means. Mr. Bentsen said, 
that the Russian government must 
act to bring down its inflation rate 
further. The only way to do that is 
to stop printing money to cover the 
budget defidL And the only way to 
do that is by halting the broad 
subsidies to huge state industries, 
such as the coal miners or lank 
factories or state farms that ac- 
count for much of that deficit. 



' .if > 

I*".: 


Vitr. £|c- T r»W*»r*r.-: 


EARLY BIRDS GET LE SHUTTLE —Prospective passenger for the Eurotunnel service SfiS 

in France fining up Wednesday at a travel agency in London. The service is scheduled to start early 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 

For France’s Graffiti Artists, 
Days of Indulgence Are Over 

France’s graffiti artists will soon fed nos- 
talgic for the 15 minutes of fame and indul- 
gence — well, a bit more than that — that 
they enjoyed under the previous Socialist 
government 

The Socialist culture minister. Jack Lang, 
not only proclaimed the graffiti of French 
taggeurs to be an, bul also sponsored two 
major exhibitions of their work 
But the new rightist government sees no 
redeeming qualities in the paintings that cost 
the city of Paris alone 140 million francs (S24 
million) each year in cleaning costs. A law set 
to lake effect March 1 will increase penalties 
for graffiti art from the current maximum of 
a 30,000 franc fine and two years in prison to 
500,000 francs and five years. * 

The city Metro system, where some of the 
worst damage was once done (including an 
attack on the Louvre Museum station that 


many subwav stations have been treated with i career 

Yet in one of the exhibitions during the j Bundestag. 

Lang years, the focus of the show was a Germans «mdt in (be 

! environments) field bv the end of this decade. 


tL in the front of the car was a television that 
broadcast tips on “how to do graffiti without 
getting caught.” 

Around Europe 

Until 1990, young men in West Botin were 
exempt from military service because of the 
city’s special status. But with German reunifi- 
cation, ami the departure of the four Allied 
powers from Braun, the exemption was 


according to a fed end study. That will repre- 
sent an increase of over 5C- percent in less 
than 10 years. 

The newest soccer coennenxaror for the 
Italian retention channel Rai Tre has the 
fervor and devotion of many a sports fan, but 
with a difference: She is a Franciscan nun. A 
Rai sports reporter had discovered Sister 
Paola in the stands of a Lazio Rome soccer 


"Tu? Defense Minisuv EnnUy - j 


noiutced last year the induction of a first 
group of 12.000 Berlin men, those bora in 
1969. 

But there has been strong resistance from 
raanv inductees to the 12-month stint, reports 


meeting, reports Die evewv cu raw 

invitation to do commentary, with results like 
these: “People, you just wouldn’t believe how 
much I prayed to Our Mother Mary over this 
match ...” or “Ah. it is halftime now . i must 
withdraw for a spiritual pause." But the sis- 


raanv inductees to the 12-month stint, reports T n 

the weekly Der SptegeL and the police have ! fffS 

meraan^ly had to be w round up | ^ 


unwilling young men. 

Some have challenged the state’s legal right 
to rescind what had been a blanket protection 
through age 28, and one roan, Frank Dene, 
24. has taken the matter tc court. He con- 


cost 500.000 francs to clean), has made pro- I tends that only 18-year-olds should be in- 
gress in the fight against graffiti. Walla in ducted, for cUder men have long since made 


team as a force for good and its opponents as 
vectors of evil Fans erf another team. .AS 
Rome, hare petitioned Rai to hare Sister 
Paola confine her commentary to less world!) 
topics. 

Brian Knowhon 


Co mmand er in the West Bank Deal Nearer 
Is Killed in Helicopter Crash WtihPW, 


By Joel Greenberg 

Sett York Tuna Semce 

JERUSALEM — The chief Is- 
raeli army commander in the occu- 
pied West Bank was killed with 
three other officers early Wedded 
day when his helicopter crashed in 
heavy fog near his headquarters on 
the northern outskirts of Jerusa- 
lem. 

The death of Major General Ne- 
chemia Tamari. 47. the highest 
ranking army officer killed in more 
than a decade, stunned military 
and government officials and 
prompted the air force commander 
to appoint a commission of inqui- 

ry- 

An army spokesman ruled out 
sabotage “There's no doubt that 
this was an accident.” he said. 

The spokesman said General Ta- 
man’s helicopter went down about 
2 A.M. as it approached a fog- 
shrouded landing pad near his 
command headquarters. “There 
was very poor visibility and bad 
weather conditions," an army 
statement said. 

General Tamari was returning 


from the Bet Shean area in the 
Jordan Valley, where troops were 
chasing, an infiltrator who had 
crossed into Israel from Jordan, the 
spokesman said, adding that the 
infiltrator was later caught. 

Killed with the general were his 
personal assistant. Major Ofir 
Kaufman, and the two helicopter 
pilots. 

General Taman began his 28- 
year career as a para troop officer 
and had held several senior com- 
mand posts, serving for the past 10 
months as bead of the army's Cen- 
tral Command, winch includes the 
West Bank. 

He had been increasingly preoc- 
cupied with stemming a rising tide 
erf Jewish- Arab violence and head- 
ing off confrontations between sol- 
diers and Jewish settlers in the af- 
termath of the signing of the 
PaJestinian-Isradi accord in Sep- 
tember. 

While planning an expected Is- 
raeli pullout from the town of Jeri- 
cho, General Tamari also spent 
hours calming tempers of settlers 
alarmed by the accord who have 


retaliated violently for a spate of 
fatal .Arab attacks. 

Some .government ministers and 
Palestinian leaders said the army, 
and by implication General Ta- 
man, had been too lenient with 
settlers who have slain Palestinians, 
damaged Arab-owned property 
and blockaded highways in re- 
sponse to killings by Palestinian 
militants. 

But in remarks Wednesday to 
the parliament. Deputy Defense 
Minister Mordecahi Gur praised 
General Taman’s handling of the 
settlers and said he had prevented a 
looming confrontation between Is- 
raeli soldiers and civilians. The 
general had been “open to the sen- 
sitive and delicate situations in 
which we are now fifing," Mr. Gur 
said. 

“In recent months Nechemia 
was a symbol of this openness, of 
tiie readiness to preserve the unity 
of Israel and to avoid confronta- 
tions as much as humanly possi- 
ble,’’ Mr. Gar added.' “Strong as he 
was, he tried with all his ought to 
avoid using force.” 


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Germans Widen Search 
For Neo-Nazi Attackers 


BERLIN — The police raided 
neo-Nazi haunts as they broadened 
their search across Germany oa 
Wednesday for three skinheads 
who carved a swastika on the face 
of a 17-year-old girl in a whed- 

riiair. 

The attack Monday in the east- 
ern town of Halle was the latest in a 
series of neo-Nazi assaults on dis- 
abled people and brought wide- 
spread condemnation. 

“This was an unacceptable infa- 
my,” said President Richard von 
WeizsScker. 

The three skinheads, aged from 
15 to 20. cut the swastika on the 
girl’s left cheek with a knife after 
she refused to shout Nazi slogans. 

The hunt for the suspects was 
expanded to a nationwide level. 
Off-duty police officers have been 
called in to help, and more than 
4,000 composite sketches of two of 


the three attackers had been sent 

OUL 

A police spokesman in Halle said 
that the authorities had received 
scores of telephone tips about the 
possible whereabouts or identity of 
the skinheads, but that there had 
been no promising leads. 

The spokesman added that the 
police had rounded up rightist radi- 
cals in the region surrounding Hal- 
le. They also raided more than 25 
gathering places for neo-Nazis and 
set up checkpoints at rail stations. 

The girl was attacked as she was 
returning to Halle’s Adolf-Reich- 
wein school after lunch. The three 
skinheads waited for her to come 
out of a public toilet for the dis- 
abled near the school. 

The Berlin daily BZ quoted the 
gH identified as only as Elke J_ as 
saying she had refused to shout the 
slogans and tried to raff her wheel- 
chair away. 


ft!*'' 


*»* 4 


« O 

i: - ^ " 


braelSays 

• i Tie Aisuauted P ubs 
. TABA. Egypt — Isad and the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
are closer to agreement on autono- 
my. but there is still much work to 
be done on security issues, a top 
Israeli negotiator said at die end of 
talks Wednesday. 

The head of the Israeli delega- 
tion. Major Genera] Amnon Sha- 
hak. said the two sides were near a 
consensus on such topics as elec- 
tricity and tourism. 

He added that he hoped the talks 
would resume Monday and that 
negotiators would then be able >o 

solve some of the more difficult 
security issues. 

“On’the security issues there is a 
lot to be done and hopefully next 
week we will continue, and we 
might sum up some of the sub- 
jects.” General Shahak said. 

The talks resumed Monday in 
the Red Sea resort of Taba after a 
two-week, break. 

But Israeli officials said little 
progress had been made on the 
issues that have delayed the start of 
an Israeli troop withdrawal from 
the occupied Gaza Strip and West 
Bank town of Jericho. 

These include defining the size of 
the Jericho area, control ofintema- 
tionai border crossings connected 
to the autonomous zones, and de- 
fense of Jewish settlers living in or 
traveling ihrough-P&lestinian a reas. 

NabD Shaath, the chief delegate 
for the PLO, said after Tuesday's 
session that such issues should not 
be allowed to become “agreement- 
breakers.” 

The accord call s for an equal 
Israeli and Palestinian presence at 
border crossings. Last week, the 
. ales unions reportedly demanded 
^ srae ^ presence be invisi- 
ble. The Israelis said this went be- 
yond understandings reached two 
weeks ago in Cairo. 

At the same time, the Palestin- 
ians reportedly are not contesting 
the offer of a 57-square-kilometer 
l^.-square-mile) Jericho area, one- 
5*“ ” w kd they had demanded. 
*>ui they are said to be seeking 
corndots from the area to two holy 
sues and a Dead Sea beach. 


A WEEK IN THE 


Monday 

MONDAY SPORTS 

H 

Tuesday 

STYLE 

Wednesday 

STAGE 


Thursday 

HEAUH/SCIENCE 

m 

Friday 

LEISURE 

w 

Saturday-Sunday 

ART/ 


POtmCS AND ECONOMICS 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


ENTERTAINMENT THE MONEY REPORT 


IE LIFE OF THE TRTF 

Plus daily 

NOMJCS THE ARTS AND SCIENCE BOOKS AND TRAVEL A UVELY ARRAY 

NANCE FOOD AND FASHION BRIDGE AND CHESS OF COMICS 

OPINION AND COMMENTARY FILM AND THEATER ^ G^SSoRd'^ 

Don’t miss out. Make sure you get your copy of the IHT every dav 

• ■ • • ■ ■ ■ ' - ICetalb3SSribune. - * 





iTi 


1 Hi llfS 


o i v 

i* 1 


KS3 


• Rmm\ r ’ " l; - ■ : 

'.SYDNEY. — Governor Chris ; 
Fallen of .Hons Kong on Wednes- 
day" defauirid .ins' hMufliog: ofthc 
Bntish colony’s l^retarnto Chi- 
na against cririasn'try a former . 
Australian Jeadermaletxer pob^ 
listed in; TtejAttStraUan nfwspa-. 
per. >’-• L 

“It is yritolfy inaocuraie to su&:- 
gesl .that I aim. trying to Kilt China _ 
Bov to * 

article ill 5 

in which, former Prim£ hfiafcter 

Malcolm Fraset-ofAustrafia said 
Mr. Patten's conduct reflected St- 
ain's. ^ traditoaal: incapacity* *o 
understand Asia, .. -'■■■ . . 

Mr. Ffaser sald-Mr.yattcn wai 
trying to establish dcments of de- 
mocracy in . Hong: Kong dtat werq 
unacceptable to . Chin a and would 
not survive ttelran^ir. 

“Helteknoidcdges that be does 
not believb 1 am doing tins out of 
misdd evqhsahd^ffisTipdwfhitBntt" ~ 
Mr: Paucn wrote, ‘‘but even sol 


r^OHTect-a rather: serious mis-. 
nndasUndipg of what is happen- 
ingberc." 

soviemdr said -at issue be- 
tween Britain and China, was the 

mH-Karwsnf HfWIgRong dficUoPS. 
not the establishment oT democra- 
cy in the British colony. 

He said both coahtriesagreed m 
.thdr 1984 Joint Declaration on 
Hong Kong that the Legislature of 

Hie futra^Hong Kong Sp<»aL Ad- 
ministrative Region of China 
-would be Heeled--: 

1 He -added that China’s .Baste 
Law for Hong Kong, which takes 
'effect in 2007, supulaicd that one- 
third of [ the first LegBlitore would 
be elected, foDowca by 40 -pcrcait 
;.of the second and SO percent of the 
third; r •’v. 

“So ills already acoepled by Cm- 
"• na that Hong Kong, will become 
: progressively.- more democratic," 


China has attacked ■'the Hong 


Kong government for unilaterally 
seeking funds to finance a new air- 
port; Reuters reported 
• ■ ‘The Hong Kong government 
has unUaicraDy sought quick funds 

from the Legislative Council with- 
out digraipang it frith the Chinese 
side," said Lu Ping, director of the 
Hong Kong and Macao Affairs Of- 
fice. “The Chinese side does not 
agree to such a piecemeal method" 

■ VOn Monday,, the government 
: gave legislators two optronslor the 
. 5203 billion project The first op- 
tion was to approve enough funds 
lo push ahead with the project step 
by step and the second was to sus- 
pend all new work until a deal has 
been struck with China. 

The government estimated that 
under the second option there 
would be a $510 million surge to 
tte. project's cost for every six 

■ months of delay. • 

The government win make a de- 
finitive funding request to the legis- 
> latnre next week. 





LUIUU^l uipiviiH— ^ 

possibility of Kira's visit r onhap 
quoted an unidentified source as 
saving in Beijing. 

“Beijing is showing agreement in 
principle for ihe North Korean 
leader's visit to China after the nu- 
clear question is resolved, the 
source was quoted as saying. 

North Korea has been locked in 
a dispute with the United States 
and its allies over Pyongyang's sus- 
pected development of nuclear 
weapons. . 

The North Koreans agreed in 
negotiations last week with the 
United States to open their seven 
declared nuclear sues to interna- 
tional inspectors. But they have re- 


nuclear dispute to the satisfaction 
oF the United States, its allies and 
the UN nuclear agency. 

“If Kim's visit lakes place. Kim 
and Chinese leaders will discuss 
such issues as reform and open- 
door policy in North Korea, im- 
provements in North Korea s rela- 
tions with Japan and the L ruled 
States, an inter-Korean summit 
and South-North relations.” the 
source was quoted as saying. 

Yonhap's report said Hwang 
Jang Yop. chairman of the Foreign 
Affairs Committee of the Norths 
Supreme People’s Assembly, would 
visit Beijing later this month to 
discuss President Kim's trip. 


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; Jr. '.I 7 - •• ' 


Page 6 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 


OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONA 



Sribune 



n BUSHED WITH THE i\K« UIKK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


An Incomplete Summit 


At the NATO summit, tbe United Slates 
responded to complain is Lhat it was offering 
East Europeans too little an alliance role too 
Itue. and broadened some of the possibilities. 
Much remains to be done — not least by new 
applicants — to move from the symbols of 
partnership to the concrete mutual obligations 
of membership. But as President BiU Clinton's 
current European grand tour takes him to 
Moscow, he can fairly argue that be has acted 
in principled support of democracy. The mes- 
sage may be misread by the Zhirinovsky de- 
ment in Russian politics, but it should reassure 
the reformers Americans are betting ort. Mean- 
while. it should reassure Russians of all stripes, 
and not only Russians, that the United States is 
bent on diverting Ukraine's nuclear pursuit. 

Too bad these achievements at the summit 
were not the sum of it. Unfortunately, the 
desired image of an alliance taking on new 
posi-Cold War purpose was badly tarnished 
by the treatment of Bosnia. Yugoslavia repre- 
sents NATO's dismal failure to cope with 
immense violence and atrocity on its very 
doorstep. The Brussels meeting showed no 
improvement. The members were called upon 
anew to deliver on their August pledge, so 
many times ignored, to reliev e sieges and open 


up supply routes in Bosnia by air strikes. 
President Clinton, declaring that “the credi- 
bility of the alliance itself" was at stake, 
warned members against making “empty 
threats." But who will not be bowled over if 
NATO. A g ain unanimous in voice but still 
divided and uncertain in wiU. comes through 
even with the limited tactical responses that 
the strike planners have in mind? Serbia con- 
tinues to shell Sarajevo. 

Empty threats are repugnant. They should 
not be made, especially when it is too late in 
the day to think of restoring NATO’s credibil- 
ity in Bosnia. Military support to bring in 
relief is valuable — a European effort that still 
could use .American help. Military support to 
keep a future peace is valuable, although 
heavy conditions still vitiate the American 
peacekeeping pledge. But military 1 action to 
sway the course or the war? 

By irreversible default, the alliance has 
committed itself to the settlement talks now 
bring conducted by the European Union and 
the United Nations. The result of these talks, 
at best, will not be pretty, but they alone can 
help stop the war. Long ago NATO forfeited 
the chance to expect more. 

— THE WASHINGTON" POST. 


A Good Deal for Ukraine 


In a victory for ib nuclear diplomacy. Lhe 
Clinton administration has persuaded 
Ukraine's leader to get rid of the nuclear 
arsenal he inherited from the Soviet Union. In 
agreeing to the deal. President Leonid Krav- 
chuk recognized that Ukraine’s nuclear legacy 
may be worth more convened into fuel than 
as arms. The chief concern now is that nation- 
alists in the Ukrainian parliament might find 
a way to block the pact. 

If instituted, the agreement would remove a 
threat from Ukrainian missiles still pro- 
grammed to hit .American targets, reduce the 
risk that the warheads will fall into reckless 
hands and keep tensions in the former Soviet 
Union from escalating to nuclear war. 

The UniLed States pul together an offer that 
Ukrainians should not refuse. In return for 
disarming Ukraine will receive U.S. help in 
dismantling the arms, making its Chernobyl- 
type reactors safer and cleaning up its environ- 
ment. The nuclear material extracted from war- 
heads will be turned into fuel for power plants. 

In an effort to satisfy the demands of 
Ukrainian nationalists. Russia will cancel a 
portion of Ukraine's debt as reimbursement 
for warheads already handed over for disman- 
tling It will refrain from economic coercion. 
And Russia, along with the United States and 
Britain, will guarantee Ukraine's bonders. 

The deal requires Ukraine to dismantle its 
entire nuclear arsenal — 1J40 nuclear war- 
heads mounted on its SS-I9 and SS-24 mis- 
siles and 564 more on cruise missiles carried 
on long-range bombers. The warheads are a 
wasting asset. Even though they sit on Ukrai- 
nian soil, they remain under Russian opera- 
tional control For Ukrainians to pick their 
electronic locks and gain control over them 
would lake time. To retarget them by repro- 


gramming their on-board computers would 
lake still more time. Meanwhile, the warheads 
are decaying and the missile fuel is becoming 
dangerously unstable, making the arms a men- 
ace to their possessors, not just to their foes. 

Nevertheless, some nationalists see 
Ukraine's nuclear arms as a symbol of its 
newborn nationhood. Others want to wave 
the warheads at Russians who are not yet 
reconciled to an independent Ukraine. 

But the arms are a distraction from tbe real 
threat to Ukraine's independence: lhe gross 
mismanagement of its economy and the social 
unresL it is kindling 

Instead of instituting economic reforms. 
Kiev is financing factories lhat produce noth- 
ing worthwhile. Ukraine's currency, which 
once traded on a par with Russia's ruble, now 
has no buying power abroad, and hyperinfla- 
tion has begun to rip Ukraine apart. Ethnic 
Russians in western Ukraine who voted for 
independence, believing that life would be 
better than in Russia, now have doubts. Politi- 
cal disarray could pave the way for national- 
ists to win parliamentary elections in March. 

In these circumstances, the Clinton admin- 
istration was wise not to wait for Kiev to live 
up to its pledge to join the Nuclear Nonprolif- 
eration Treaty, which the parliament would 
have to raiify.’lnstead. Washington persuaded 
Kiev to deactivate the warheads on missiles 
aimed at tbe United States, the sooner the 
better. And the United States will pay Russia 
to ship nuclear fuel to Ukraine in advance of 
extracting more from Ukraine's warheads. 

The Clinton administration deserves cred- 
it for brokering this deal. And Ukraine's 
leaders are right to reject nuclear symbolism 
for economic substance. 

— THE .V £»■ YORK TIMES. 


To Help This Small Planet 


Ask many Americans about their ancestors 
and you will be told that their great-grandfa- 
ther was one of seven children and ibetr great- 
grandmother the fifth of nine. They themselves, 
however, will most likely be parents or two or 
three at most. Why? Because, like the residents 
of other industrialized countries, they know 
that smaller families mean bigger futures — 
and are able to act on that knowledge. 

Fortunately for them, and for an increas- 
ingly impoverished planet, much of the Third 
World has arrived at the same conclusion. As 
the demand for contraceptives rises, so the 
birth rate in countries like Thailand. Morocco 
and Bangladesh is dropping 
1 Government commitment to population 
coniroi is one reason; foreign aid in the form 
of family planning programs is another, and 
the gradual realization of Marshall McLu- 
han's ‘'global village" a third. The last is 
almost certainly what accounts for a much 
sharper drop in fertility rates in developing 
countries than the decline in Europe several 
generations back, when a newly educated 
populace saw that too many children added 
up to too many economic Liabilities. 

Conventional wisdom says that lower birth 
rates come oniv after living standards have 


Other Comment 


Hie Battles of Kabul 

Afghanistan is u landlocked country, but its 
strategic and geographical positions make its 
Tate of interest to outsiders. 

Some in the West appear to be afraid that 
a strong and stable Islamic regime in Kabul 
would generate a greater influx of guerrillas 
to help Muslims in Bosnia. In the East. 

| Beijing is afraid that Kabul's triumph could 
■inspire its own Muslims [in western China] to 
increase efforts to free themselves from Beij- 
ing Russia, which has Islamic neighbors, has 
a similar concern that (he mujahidin could 



International Herald Tribune 

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Mandate 


W ASHINGTON — Bill Clinton's effort 
to coax the leaders of Ukraine and 
North Korea into taking their fingers off the 
nuclear trigger offers little to admire or like. 
But. in ways that his critics do not acknow- 
ledge, President Clinton is doing the job be 
was elected to do by haggling with Kiev and 
Pyongyang over international stability. 

To be blunt, he is trying to buy off the 
Ukrainians and North Koreans. He dangles 
ensnaring deals instead of issuing bold ulti- 
matums and organizing international coali- 
tions. He is more Donald Trump than John 
Wayne when it comes to slopping the spread 
of nuclear weapons. 

Traditionally this is not bow American 
presidents are supposed to act in protecting 
America's vital interests. Real presidents 
don’t coax. Real presidents lead, squeeze, 
intimidate or persuade. If none or those tac- 
tics works, real presidents zap their enemies 
with Lhe CIA or the 82d Airborne. That con- 
stantly implied threat made American diplo- 
macy far more brilliant and productive 
throughout the Cold War than would have 
otherwise been the case. 

But that threat is not credible under this 
president, who has made clear his deep aver- 
sion to using force abroad. 


By Jim Hoagiand 

The message out of Somalia. Bosnia and 
Haiti is uniform and undeniable: Tbe threat- 
ening shadow of UJS. military might os a tool 
to produce change or enforce the status quo 
has been withdrawn in President Clin ton's 
First year — as long as America is not directly 
and provocatively c hallen g ed. The exception, 
fortunately, is the inherited case of Iraq, 
where Saddam Hussein’s survival is a continu- 
• • ' a. 

; the 

— -o . r Republican criri- 

tism of Mr. Clinton for his clumsy c limb -down 
on North Korea’s nuclear weapons program. 
The critics have a point about the way be has 
played his hand. He has a g ain taken away a 
usdful ambiguity about America’s intentions 
and capabilities in diplomatic confrontation. 

After ini dally declaring the North Korean 
bomb- building program to be unacceptable (a 
la Wayne). Mr. Clinton appears ready to. leave 
it in place if Pyongyang makes a deal (& la 
Trump). U.S. recognition of North Korea and 
cancellation of a joint U.S.-South Korean mili- 
tary exercise are chips Lhat he is prepared to 
play if the North Korean leader Kim D Sung 


adopts uncharacteristic restraint and allows a 
modicum of international inspection. 

Mr. Clinton’s still unfolding deal with 
Ukraine's Leonid Kravchuk, to be signed in 
Moscow on Friday, is somewhat better than 
his North Korean exercise, but raises some ot 
the problems. Announced in Brussels on 

Monday just in time to top or elbow aside the 
day’s stories about NATO inaction on Bos- 
nia, the allows Mr. Kravchuk to sell for a 
much higher price 1,800 nuclear warheads 
that he has already twice agreed to ^surrender. 

At first glance, the price in U* pohocal 
and economic benefits, as outlined in Brus- 
sels, seems right — if President Kravchuk 
finall y lays down the law to the Ukrainian 
par liam ent and demands approval and imple- 
mentation of this denuclearization deaL 

Strategically and emotionally, watching tbe 
likes of Mr. Kravchuk and Kim 0 Sung bar- 
gain with the world’s only superpower over 
keeping weapons of ma« destruction is unset- 
tling. I share the critics* outrage over , this 
development. Who would not? 

But the critics overstate their case in blam- 
ing Mr. Clinton entirely for America’s resort 
to coaxing instead of demanding. They fail to 
acknowledge the nature of the band an Amer- 
ican president bolds in the Iasi decade of the 


ton was told by thedAondthe 

they could do nothing short cf an jimw£ 

war to stop the North Korean 

Herarit Kmgdom was d 

too hard to penetrate, foridnh* resets. 

Mr Clinton grasps for dea*s in part be- 
cause Conaress and the American electorate 
pXnotro accept the and 

ity of enforcing global uhimatmiB 
the Soviet threat has ^ 

gress refused last year to etvKt 
energy tax as part of defiat reduction, rrenra 
President Francois Mitterrand told fnends 
that a debtor nation that refuse* to raise the 
price of gasoline by four cents a gaiwn could 
hardly be serious about pursuing an agenda 
of world leadership. , , 

Mr. Clinton has contributed to w atmo- 
sphere in which Mr. Krawata* and Kin U 
&ng deal instead of yield. Bui to blame the 
president atone, as some of his cities do, is to 
compound the problem. Amoicsu ntJ ", ^ 
reflea on the costs of the retreat from gk*ai 
leadership that many now advocate, and not 
Micff themselves off the hewk by blaming ev- 
erything on Bill Ctin ton’s character. 

The W’a&uitgmit Post. 


Appeasement in the ’90s 
Like a Rerun of the ’30s 


By William Pfaff 


P ARIS — After Britain and France 
tried to appease Hiller by signing 
the Munich Pact in 1938. ceding the 


risen. In this case, as Bangladesh illustrates, 
lhat thinking is now passe. 

Bangladesh is among the least likely coun- 
tries to experience a spontaneous drop in 
fertility rates. Living standards and the litera- 
cy rate are low. and so is the status of females. 
But fertility rates in Bangladesh declined by 
21 percent from 1970 to 1991. and contracep- 
tive use among married women of reproduc- 
tive age rose from 3 percent to 40 percenL 

Bangladesh has one of the world’s largest 
and most successful marketing programs for 
contraceptives. Working closely with the 
Dhaka government, the United States provid- 
ed most of the contraceptive supply and, 
through the Agency for international Devel- 
opment. the expertise to produce a delivery 
system thai is virtually door-to-door. 

What has happens! in Bangladesh, and 
could happen in all developing countries, is of 
advantage not only to the world's poorest 
people buL to everyone living on a planet that 
may have to support double our current num- 
ber by 2150. By lhat measure, what America 
and other industrialized countries give to fam- 
ily- planning programs should not really be 
called “foreign aid." It is world aid. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Sudeten regions of Czechoslovakia to 
Germany. General Jan Svrovy suc- 
ceeded Eduard Benes as Czechoslo- 
vakia's chief of state. A few days 
later, a French- British delegation 
called on General Syrovy. seeking 
help in rescuing some anti-Nazi Ger- 
man refugees 'the German govern- 
ment was demanding be handed over. 

The general refused. He said the 
refugees would go lo Germany. Al- 
luding to Czechoslovakia's betrayal 
bv the British and French, he added: 
“In this affair, messieurs, we have 
been willing to fight on the side of 
the angels, now we shall hunt with 
the wolves." 

We are today living through 
months like those that produced that 
statement. Once again people in Cen- 
tral and Eastern Europe and the Bal- 
kans discover only incomprehension 
and irresolute good intentions among 
those in the West whose values they 
share, and whose support they need. 

Neville Chamberlain and Sdouard 
Daladier meant well in 1938. as do 
the leaders of the Western govern- 
ments today. They believed that Ger- 
many had a case for its claims on 
Czechoslovakia. They believed lhat if 
Hitler were given what he wanted, 
moderation in Germany would be 
strengthened. They wanted to believe 
the best of Hitler and knew that Brit- 
ish and French voters were hostile to 
any involvement in the quarrel be- 
tween Germans and Czechs. 

Hiller understood them well. After 
the pact was signed, he said of Cham- 
berlain and Daladier: “It b terrible. 1 
always have U> deal with nonentities." 

Bill Clinton. John Major. Francois 
Mitterrand and lhe other NATO 
leaders are making the same mistakes 
Chamberlain and Daladier made. 
They equivocate and compromise, 
and refuse lo assume risks. 

They now have allowed Russia to 
block Poland. Lithuania, the Czech 
Republic, Slovakia and other coun- 
tries formerly under Soviet domina- 
tion from entering into a formal secu- 
rity relationship with the Western 
countries. The ex-Communisl coun- 
tries again find themselves assigned a 
place between East and West. 

After painful debate, the NATO 
summit once again threatened air in- 
tervention in Bosnia — if UN Secre- 
tary-General Butros Butros Ghali 
asks for iL He will not do so unless 
the Security Council so instructs him. 
The Security Council is dominated 


by the NATO powers. Once again tbe 
threat is not a threat. 

This has been the pattern since tbe 
beginning and has allowed the Yugo- 
slav war to slip entirely beyond any 
real influence of the major powers. 
The Security Council has proclaimed 
protected zones, authorized the use of 
force, sent additional troops to this 
end. authorized NATO air strikes 
and demanded an end to the siege of 
Sarajevo, free passage for humanitar- 
ian convoys, a halt to “ethnic cleans- 
ing" and more. Nothing has been 
done. The result has been subversion 
of the norms of international conduct 
built up and defended by the Western 
countries since World War II. 

There is only one possible course 
now that could break the stalemate in 
Bosnia and re-establish some mea- 
sure of international order and law. It 
is for the international community — 
meaning NATO — actually to en- 
force the Security Council’s resolu- 
tions on Yugoslavia. This requires no 
peace plan, no vision of the future, no 
new decisions: only the decision to 
do what already has been decided. 

If the resolutions were enforced, 
the situation would immediately and 
dramatically change. The war might 
well get w orse. There certainly would 
be resistance — chiefly, but probably 
not only, from the Serbs —and repri- 
sals directed against UN forces. But 
for the first time a settlement might 
become possible, since external inter- 
vention would have set new limits. 



with new posabilities of loss as well as 
grin. Peace would have been un- 
blocked —whether it prevailed or not. 

One thing would certainly be estab- 
lished, of immense importance. The 
Western powers would demonstrate 
that they must be taken seriously. 
They would prove that the will of the 
international community, as it finds 
expression at the United' Nations, can 
be enforced. The opposite has been 
demonstrated until now. 

These are just the points on which 
Britain and France defaulted in the 
1930s. They acquiesced in aggressive 
national expansion by Italy as well 
as by Germany, and they displayed 


weakness. Their failures invited 
Hiller's miscalculation of what 
would follow, and brought cm the 
war. The allies had to go to w-ar 
for Poland, which they were unable 
to defend, because they had be- 
trayed Czechoslovakia, which they 
could have defended. 

It is essential today and for the 
future that the Western powers be 
taken seriously. In Brussels. NATO 
leaders were dangerously equivocal 
cm the issue of East European securi- 
ty. They must, on the contrary, make 
it dear in Moscow, to all of the politi- 
cal forces at work in that country 
during this time of turbulence; that 


the NATO governments are commit- 
ted to the integrity of frontiers in all 
the countries of the former Commu- 
nist Woe. Only freely negotiated politi- 
cal or territorial change is acceptable. 

If that followed a NATO demon- 
stration of seriousness and compe- 
tence. however belated, in Bosnia, it 
would become posable to reverse 
some of tire damage done in the last 
two years to the prospects for future 
order in Europe. Those forces who 
want to fight with the angels, rather 
than ran with the wolves, might then 
have been dedsivdy strengthened. 

International Herald Tribune. 

S Los Angeles Tunes Syndicate. 


Clinton, Too, Is Groping About in the Western Fog 


P ARIS — For all the frantic White 
House effort to assure an approv- 
ing chorus. Bill Gimori’s first presi- 
dential trip to Europe highlighted 
above all the confusion, lack of direc- 
tion and general incapacity of Europe 
and tbe United States to sort out the 
issues of a new era. 

Compare the tentative and at times 
even contradictory results with the 
brave illusion of a couple of years ago 
that foundations were being laid for a 
’’new world order." 

“Disarray" is almost as old as 
NATO itself as a description of the 
state of the alliance. But tbe term 
seems more serious now just because 
it does not reflect clear-cut disagree- 
ments. which can be resolved by com- 
promise. but a common lack of guid- 
ing principles beyond the will to 
maintain the institution. 

The French particularly were 


By Flora Lewis 


pleased at America’s endorsement 
of a future European “defense iden- 
tity" which could use NATO re- 
sources without U.S. participation 
in the operation. This is a sensible 

wti? primarily mean^ action outride 
the borders of NATO's 16 members. 
NATO still could not act against U.S. 
wishes, but it would not be stymied if 
America withheld troops. 

But it is abstract theory, with no 
practical meaning, so long as Europe- 
ans don’t want to act unless Washing- 
ton leads the way, as they made evi- 
dent in Brussels. 

" Partnership for Peace" is also a 
reasonable move in transition, offer- 
ing an unspecified number of stales 
to the east an assortment of technical 
links lo NATO and the possibility. 


push them to set up radical Islamic regimes. 

India, which used lo side with the Commu- 
nist Kabul regime, is not happy with the 
mujahidin’s training of Kashmir guerrillas. 
Iran would like to see a stronger Shiite Mus- 
lim position in Afghanistan, while Pakistan 
and Saudi Arabia would prefer a stronger 
Sunni Muslim position. 

It is difficult to predict when today's battles 
for Kabul will end. But it is clear that the first 
and foremost casualties are the Afghan peo- 
ple. They have no recourse in the race of the 
political storms raging around them. 

— The Jakarta Post. 


So Far So Good for Wealthy Brunei 


B ANDAR SERI BEGAWAN, 
Brunei — How does a small 
state that has grown immensely rich 
by exporting oil and natural gas 
cope with a vulnerable indepen- 
dence? The question is pertinent as 
Brunei enters iLs II th year of inde- 
pendence this month. 

Brunei comprises two enclaves of 
less than 6.000 square kilometers 
(2,300 square miles) on the north- 
ern coast of Borneo. It is divided by 
the Malaysian state of Sarawak. The 
sultanate has just over a quarter of a 
million people. Because of threats to 
its separate identity flora Indonesia 
and Malaysia in the 1960s and *70s. 
it was a reluctant candidate Tor inde- 
pendence after nearly a century os a 
British protectorate. 

It has relied greatly on diplomacy 
to protect a historical identity that 
dates to the 14th century. Yet de- 
fense through diplomacy is hardly a 
guarantee of survival at the end of 
the 20th century. The government 
has been very conscious of the ex- 
perience of Kuwait. It has thus be- 
gun building up its armed forces 
and is expected to purchase its first 
squadron ot fixed-wing combat air- 
crafL probably British-made Hawk 
jet fighters, os well as a new genera- 
tion of off-shore patrol vessels. 

Brunei has pursued the diplomacy 
option with skill, joining as many 
international clubs as possible. It has 
established ties with more than 30 
states, many of which have an inter- 
est in supporting the suit onus’s con- 
tinued independence. Japan, for ex- 
ample. buys substantial amounts of 
oil and gas from Brunei. 

After independence. Brunei 
joined the United Nations, the 
Commonwealth and the Organiza- 
tion of the Islamic Conference. In 
September 1992 it joined the Non- 
aligned MovemenL Its most im- 


Rv Michael Leifer 

J 

portant affiliation, however, has 
been with the Association of South 
East Asian Nations. ASEAN mem- 
bership has provided a form of col- 
lective security. 

The theory of collective security 
assumes that all states in an inter- 
national organization share an in-- 
teres t in safeguarding each others’ 
independence from challenge. In 
ASEAN, collective security among 
member states has been achieved 
without military commitments. In- 
stead there is a working respect for 
national sovereignly. Such respect 
has become the operating premise 
of the group, which was set up in 
1967 to provide an institutional 
structure for managing paten liai 
conflicts between members. 

Brunei joined ASEAN at an op- 
portune lime. Tbe group was then 
challenging Vietnam’s invasion and 
occupation of Cambodia as a viola- 
tion of national sovereignty. Since 
then. Indonesia and Malaysia, 
which were instrumental in forming 
.ASEAN, have built a strong stake in 
its continued cohesion and viability. 
Any renewal of the former threat to 
Brunei would do irreparable damag e 
to ASEAN, which a probably the 
most successful regional organiza- 
tion in the postcolonial world. 

The end of the Cold War has 
served Brunei's security interests. 
ASEAN recently launched a major 
initiative to promote a multiisterai 
security dialogue between virtually 
all East Asian powers, including 
China. Japan. Vietnam and South 
Korea. The United States, Canada 
and Russia are also involved. This 
initiative; known as the ASEAN Re- 
gional Forum, is intended to cope 
with new strategic uncertainties in 


Jhe Asia-Pacific region. It will work 
only if h caters to the interests of 
the smaller states. 

Brand has external defense links 
with Britain, which maintains a bat- 
talion of Gurkhas in the sultanate. 
The future of that unit is in doubt 
The agreement expires in 1998, but 
tbe year before Britain will have 
relinquished its hold on .Houg 
Kong, rite of the Gurkha brigade 
headquarters. Brunei would like the 
arrangement to continue, but Brit- 
ain's position is equivocal 

Brunei has not opted to join the 
Five-Power Defense Arrangements 
concluded in 1971 between Britain. 
Malaysia, Singapore, Australia and 
New Zealand. Although a consulta- 
tive pact and not a binding mutual 
defense treaty, that accord is used 
by its members to promote securty 
cooperation, including regular mili- 
tary exercises. So Far Brunei has 
deferred to Indonesian objections 
to its membership. Jakarta argues 
that defense arrangements set up to 
deal with a once assertive Indonesia 
have become an anachronism. 

A more promising avenue being 
explored by Brunei is an agree- 
ment with the United Slates that 
would allow American forces oc- 
casional access to Brand's port 
and airfield, in line with similar 
agreements between Washington 
and other ASEAN countries. 

ASEAN membership is no guar- 
antee of independence for Brunei 
But it does provide a measure of 
assurance to one of (he few postco- 
lonial slates that regarded indepen- 
dence as a threat, not a blessing. 

The writer, professor of inter- 
national relations at the London 
School of Economics and Political 
Science, contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


but no assurance, of joining in an 
unspecified year. 

As Mr. Clinton said, it gives time 
to watch how various countries devel- 
op, and some incentive. Most impor- 
tant in his view, it does not preclude 
his “ideal" of Europe-wide coopera- 
tion for peace without any new “us" 
and “than" division. 

There was not modi more to be 
done at this stage. NATO is not orga- 
nizationally able to absorb new mem- 
bers now, and tbe eager applicants are 
not up to the necessary contributions 
and snow of internal stability. Haste 
would not give more substance 

But the underlying issue is Russia, 
its relations with neighbors as well as 
with the West, and that simply is not 
addressed. So long as it is left a taboo 
question, the rest is spinning wheels. 

It should not be supposed that 
there are hidden motives, bad wiU, 
indifference or even inferior intelli- 
gence behind all this. This is truly a 
difficult lime, another historical 
crossroads with contradictory sign- 
posts, no compelling answers. 

Bosnia is more, not less, of a quan- 
dary than it was last spring when the 
United States proposed to take out 
Serbian artillery around Sarajevo by 
air, and Europeans demurred be- 
cause of the risk to their United Na- 
tions troops. There is no prospect of a 
peace lo maintain. There is no reason 
lor the belligerents to take new threats 
more seriously than old bluffs. 

Ukraine's President Leonid Krav- 
chuk is expected to sign an accord 
; to dismantle the nuclear or- 


on his soil in return for sub- 
stantia] concessions, but the word is 
far from the deed. His country is in 
disaster. It has fared much worse 


than Russia in faring transformation, 
and his parliament will not ratify the 
“executive agreement” on the nuclear 
issue; Can he implement it? 

After a new constitution and elec- 
tions, Russia's internal affairs are 
more distressing than ever. The open- 
ing of tbe new parliament was a terri- 
ble omen. President Boris Yeltsin 
manages to vacillate with a heavy fisL 
Washington's policy erf priority for 
conciliating Russia has intellectual 
justification, but there is mounting 
evidence that old imperial urges are 

S ing the upper band, even among 
ocrals. Russia's neighbors can- 
not be faulted for their fears. 

Ukraine's ambassador in Paris, 
Yuri Kochubey, challenges tartly the 
idea that strong rapport for the rant- 
ing Vladimir Zhiroiiovsky was just a 
protest vote. “The protest was the 
abstentions." he said. “His voters 
liked what he says. It is a mistake to 
think of Russia in literary terms, as 
Strobe Talbott does, the people of 
Tolstoy and Turgenev. Tbese are the 
people of 72 years of- Soviet rule." 

Tne Western debate has offered 
sharp options: spheres of influence, 
leaving Moscow its old turf; a wispy 
CSCE pan-Europeanism with no 
teeth; a renewed, enlarged defensive 
front against Russia. All are quite 
unsatisfactory. So we are getting tem- 
porizing, do nothing to embarrass 
Yeltsin, rideout the storm. It isn't the 
worst, but it's far from a plan. 

Mr. Clinton’s trip will have been 
most useful if he takes it as an eye- 
opener, a display of the urgent pro- 
blems, not as an acfaievemenL AD the 
West is groping about in a fog, not 
knowing what to do now. Just recog- 
nizing lhat would be an improve- 
ment, a goad to move on. 

G Flora Lewis. 


EM OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS A< 


1894: Monks or Soldiers? 

LONDON — A correspondent who 
signs “One Who Knows writes in an 
evening paper lhat the reports as to 
Russia s seeking a Mediterranean 
station in Corsica, at Milo, or at Nn- 
varino, are merely blinds. The real 
objective, he says, is Mount Athos. 
The peninsula, which whs formerly 
occupied entirely by Greek Orthodox 
monks living in lofty monasteries, 
has been converted into a Russian 
mock-clerical possession. The Rus- 
sians have bought nearly every avail- 
able property. Muscovite monaster- 
ies have been built, and under cover 
of monastic garments and robes are 
to be found Russian soldiers, per- 
forating at Mount Athos a three years 
special and specific military service. 

1919: For Durable Peace 

PARIS — The leading statesmen of 
Great Britain, the United States, 
France and Italy gathered yesterday 
afternoon [Jan. 12]at the French For- 


eign Office on the Quai d’Orsay for 
the inaugural meeting of the world's 
Peace Conference. The New York 
Herald comments: “On the decisions 
to be taken at the Peace Conference 
in the coining weeks or months hang 
the destinies of all mankind, which is 
yearning for a durable pease and 
praying that the choice of justice and 
wisdom may be heard and heeded." 

1944: A French f Pnrge’ 

ALGIERS — [From our. New York 
edition:] Immediate punishment of 
all traitors to France and collabora- 
tionists with Germany, regardless of 
^ny pressure from abroad or from the 
mad e, was asked by the French Con- 
raltative Assembly toni g ht [Jan. 12[ 
at the end of a two-day debate on a 
purge” erf the administration. Mem- 
oers of the French Committee of Na- 
-bonal Liberation p ro mis e d the assent' 
bfy that justice would be done by tbe 
special nrilitaiy tribunal, winch would, 
ijcmaid free from, any su gg estions by 
the French or Allied governments. 





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INTERNATIONAL A, » TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13. 1994 

OPINION 


SSJSSSiSSSS^3S^S^S^... 


Page 


-THOSE — — 
Cnxrt&t Sfite 


W ASHINGTON — When. Danny •. Charles Peters 

Ferguson denied m an affidavit'- 

IClinion had attend - . Woo ^ cases leftrodoabt about 

.ihelaw. Eyen Commerce Secretary Ron 
’ Brown had pad up by then. 

But w? should note dial Mr. Brown s 

t rriri tinned presence in the cabinet con-- 
‘ statutes another reason to question the 
adqunistiaticfl's. probity. After aB. he 
could not recall any 'meetings with a 
Vidrtaihese' businessman said to have 
offered him a $7004)00 bribe to open up 
. : irade -with Vietnam — until dear evi- 
. dence of three such meetings emerged. 

■ Bib and Hillary Gin ton were cheap- 
1 skating on ethical thin ice when titey 
• used Vincent Foster to do lh<ar personal 
• • legal work -on their Whitewater real »- 
tale investment and other matters while 
the public was payinahim to work on 
the wesktent’s official business. 
r One cannot help fearing that the ice 
broke -with Whitewater. The stage may 
have beat set Tor a Whitewater scandal 
when the Clintons decided 10 have Mrs. 
Ginton practice: with a major LtUfe 
Rock law firm while her husband was 
gwenidf. Thatwposed ihe Chmons to 
potential co&flkfe of interest. ... 

iSiis. when James McDonga l their 
Whitewater partner, Said he-anthraraed 
a $ 2 J 30 O^mooth retainer to Mrs. Chil- 
ton for representing iiis Madison Guar- 

would primh lhetn to cash in on their . #vmg a 
amnectionsin a way. that the adminia- didn^S®™ 


that President Duivimiw i|ju w«ww. 
him and oiherArkat^ troopers feder- 
al jobs for cpvensg up trysts that oc- 
curred when'he was ; gpvemor, most of 
its wercirelieved. : T^ bam tite 
most Iroublinaelexpentin the-stedesst 
sexual scandal in The American Spec- 
tator and. the Los Angles Times; • -• 

Since .mosi.peoj^ imysdl f indyd«l| 
did not believe that the renaming aDe- 
garions about sexual rinscpn^cu evmil' 
proved true, were enough to bring down 
the premising presideiiC « wcrewiIBn| 
to forgive him. 1 hope BflH3injpn jtonnd . 
not be so wiling to toij^ himself. ■ 

Bul l am veiy much afraid that he • 
will see thisepisodeasTurtbcr evidence ’• 
that however deep a hole he is in, be 
■ will loxhirib ouL : . 

A respected journalist, once told me 
that be thought Mr. Clinton's deepest 
convictibhwas his belief that he could 
always '“get away with it." lam not, 
that cynical. 1)ut I do worry -that the 
White House’s ihsenatWity to ethical 
issues, is threatening the moraJauthor; 
ity of the presidency. That can have 
tire gravest jrt.»nsetmences. : . 

December, began with the announce^ 
ment'that two“seniar members of the 
White House staff, Roy Ned and How- 
ard faster,, were leaving for lucrative 
-• i • TVkf inhs 


WUUIU pUIIUi.UH»Ul iW ■ ** * ".■ — — — 7:, 

connections in a way. that the adminis- 
. ^ration had once promised would not 
be tolerated: Yet they departed with 
.the oresktenl’s praise. .. - 

1 ram the appointment of Boboy 

— - * V.nrrtl Brtf rtf .HptnKft 


UKJ JKXMXIIJ wumuuuuu uui *• — -- 

happened to be the governor, who could 
sSdd Mr. Mcpougalfrom undue state 


UOIUIJ x^livaiaT* 

bBch embarrassments endanger 
presidential authority i° sew™ 1 ways. 
One of the most important has beep 
shown by the administration’s difficul- 
ty in finding good people for govern- 
ment jobs. America heeds a president 
X Xmnioji rince heiaiied to pav up with the stature to summon the ablest 

Amntam u> at least part of 


Ray Tnmim -'ag Secretary of 'defease, 
.which made him the 27th ..Clinton ap- 
pointee not to have paid Serial Security 
for domes&hap. In his.ccntempt 
for the jaw, Mr, Inman was doubtless 


• • 


their lives to public service; the more 
morally dubious the White House, the 
less attractive government seems. 

There has long been a shortage of 
qualified people in government, a de- 
privation that is now especially severe 
among Democrats, who have been out 
of the White House for nil but five of 
the last 25 years. It is a grave problem 
in a society that has too long underval- 
ued public service. 

Only during the New Deal and the 
New Frontier was there a major effort 
to bring the most talented citizens to 
Washington. The result is that far 100 
many of lhc people experienced in gov- 
ernment are mediocre. The most glar- 
ing deficiency of A1 Gore's “Rctnyent- 
; mg Government" report was its failure 
. 10 recognize this quality problem. 
According to the Volcker Commis- 
sion on the Public Service. 90 percent 
of college honor students do not even 
consider a career in government- 
The president also needs respect if be 
is to perform another essential but too 
often neglected function of his office: 
educating the people cm mrportnnt^s- 


iiwm about 11 aim me iukiuou.«. 

Developing the plan in secret was a 
disastrous mistake, that can be reme- 
died only by open discussion that em- 
phasizes careful explanation oT 
the choices rather than propaganda for 
the administration's proposal. 

The value-added tax on consump- 
tion is an example of why such expla- 
nation is needed. Last spring the lax 
was rejected as a means of financing 
health reform because a poll showed 
that the public opposed it, according to 
Stanley Greenberg, the White House 



In Rural Java, Death Comes ! 
To a Fighter and a Dreamer 


By Goenavan Mohamad 

* 






■3 XSr 


protect jobs better than the payroll tax 
disguised as a “premium" that the ad- 
ministration advocates. Because it adds 
to the cost of employment, it is almost 
certain to discourage hiring. 

Instead of recognizing this obliga- 
tion to educate, often the Clintons 
seem not to want the public to learn 
about successful alternative health 
care plans like Canada’s. 

As for foreign policy, it would have 
been much belter if Mr. Clinton had 
carefully explained the options and 
hazards in Bosnia. Somalia and Haiti 
and had given the public a chance to be 
beard before derisions were made. 


should know about. As a result, they 
may slam on the brakes. But when 
trouble arises, they may be more sup- 
portive and resolute if they feel thai 
they hare been consulted in advance. 

Bill CUmon will not succeed in these 
important presidential roles unless he 
has the trust and esteem of the nation. 
And he will not maintain that respect if 
he continues to appear to be a man w ho 
thinks he can get away with it. 

I hope he will confront his ethical 
weaknesses and learn to govern him- 
self. Then we Americans will have Taith 
in his ability to govern all of us. 


Kv?po°s: : 

“*<1“"“ U, “ ,he pc0ple ne^ iorkr,n,e S . 


UM 1 UUUWV . , . 

Virtually every foreign policy deci- 
sion in today’s world will have poten- 


J AKA RT A — The story or M arsinah 
shows the ugly side of economic 
arowih in Indonesia. She was brutally 
murdered, apparently for having dared 
to press for improvement m workers 
rights. Her mutilated body was found 
in May near Jegong. a village on Java, 
the main island of Indonesia. 

Marsinah is a shining symbol of me 
fj&ht Tor human rights- She demon- 
strated thai such rights are not a luxu- 
ry. nor are they something that those 
with power willingly confer. ... 

Marsinah was only 23 when she died. 
Although she lived in poverty, she was 

meanwhile 

determined to belter her own life and 
the lives of those around her. She was 
an adopted child of a poor farming 
family. Even as a child, she worked 
hard to make ends meet, selling snacks. 
When it rained, she used banana leaves 
as an umbrella. Her family lacked the 
money for her to continue her educa- 
tion bevond high school. . 

But she had dreams. She believed 
that there would always be opportunity 
for any Indonesian to find a daent 
place. She attended computer and Eng- 
lish classes. To learn more, she read 
newspapers and watched television at 
a neighbor's place. She once told an 
acquaintance. “Knowledge will change 
one's destiny." 

Marsinah was determined to change 
her lot and escape from poverty. She 
worked at a shoe factory for a year. 
Then she got a job with a watch-mak- 
ing companv. Her daily wage was 
1.700 rupiah’s (about 80 centsl. plus 
a meal allowance of 550 rupiahs. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



The use of’ the “gate" suffix m die 
« - — -•*— *-!—»— ,« affair is -gn- at- . 

41 Clintoa with 

differences .bfr- 

tween thetwo are enonabos. -< • 

Watergate involved tbe abuse of pow- 
er by a string president, indudntg-suco 
impeachable offenses as wading "fi- 
nesses in penury and authorizing uiuaw- 
ful break-ins. The -evidence teams*. 
Richard Nixon was averwbdmna, - 
“Whitewaiergate"; questions the rote 
of die thenHgovernof of Arkansas ™, t. 
land development p rqea with # man 
who beaded jl faffing as recmbOP; 
There has been; no charge of cranmai 
activity on' the part of Mr.. Clintoa, nor 
is there any evirieoce of 
Mpreover," those 

piibB^ans who *** W* • 

. _• . * i, ?: r ‘ 




.papers involving the transaction .be 
-Side public are the same people who 

• Tjbposed 'all investigations into the ille- 
SKofanns to Iran, the fflegal ddiv- 
Sy of arms to the Nicaraguan wntras. 

' - 'and 'die Bank of Lavoro scam that en- 

• a Wed Iraq -to finance its invasion m 
: Kuwait with U-S. taxpayers dollars. 

AARON STERN FIELD. 
Mprges, Switzerland. 


effort is being made in some official 
Western circles to equate the raped 
with their aggressors. . 

But most urgently, and espeaally as 
a Muslim, I would like to express my 
deepest gratitude to the many Jewish 
1 and individuals that nave spo- 
' on this issue, ana the 


‘Madinas and Bosnia 

Rezar&ng "Bomb's Holocaust Puts 
the Churches to Shame" (Opin ion, Jan. 5) 
by Hmy Sieffnail. 

; . As a practicing Muslim J would nke 
-l tot thank Mr. Siegnap for clearly point- 
rtig ont the emptmess ritualistic com- 
passion expressed by Weston religious 
-Buticms in .the dcstrucuOT ^ Bos- 
tm« ypkp. jings out just as. every 


i 


ten iotcciuuy uu 

many among them who have exjwsed 
themselves to danger by going to Sara- 
jevo Perhaps, as the end comes nearer 
tor many Bosnians, this will all “mean 
little." Nevertheless; this “little is far 
superior to what official Islamic tnsu- 
tutioos, governments and rulers have 
been willing to do. How many promi- 
nent Muslim personalities. let alone 
rulers, have gone to Sarajevo? A few? 

^Whytfiould Muslim ruler and elites 
try to defend faraway Muslims? A Enro- 
pcan Islam is intuitively perceived by 


many of them, and correctly so. as a 
potential ideological threat to their mis- 
erable tyrannies. It is no secret that in 
most Islamic countries the tragedy of 
pntnia is a political embarrassment. 

If we do not have the courage to 
defend the Bosnians, then the least we 
can do is to give them the means to 
defend themselves. Anything less, as 
Hemy Stegman poignantly pomte out, 
is hypocrisy. 

TAWF1Q IBRAHIM. 

Madrid. 

Cultural Leadership 

Recording “ Violence on Screen: Desir- 
ing What Disgusts Vs" (Opinion, Dec. / - > 
by Mario Cuomo: 

' Governor Cuomo equates pubhc me- 
dia supervision with “faceless ac it I un- 
countable bureaucrats. But the Ger- 


man Voluntary Film Self Control 
Board, a generally admirable arbiter of 
tastes, has been well-guided for years, 
not by bureaucrats but by the aristocra- 
cy of 'the country's arts, professions and 
clercy. If Americans cannot accept cul- 
tural leadership. then they will conunue 
with anti-cultural leadership. 

ROBERT WUL1GER. 

Bangkok. 

No Right of Racial Slander 

Regarding the report “4 Black .4c/ir- 
ist's Inflammatory Speech Letn’es a Cam- 
pus Sorely Divided' I Dec. 30 j. 

I was horrified by the blatant display 
of racism on the campus of Kean Col- 
lege in New Jersey. Il seems to me that 
lire United States should make racial 
vilification a criminal offense, as u is in 
Australia. This will not remow racism s 


underlying causes, but it will at least 

hammed of the Nation of Islam. 

SIMON HAYES. 
Adelaide. Australia. 


Grand at Whose Expense? 

Regarding ” Unappreciated Turkey 
( Letters. Jan. 3 1 from Mehmet Ogutcu: 
Mr. Ogutcu speaks of the dreams by 
some or a “Grand Armenia, which he 
savs would be created at Turkey s ex- 
pense. Mav 1 remind him that it was « 
Sre Armenians' expense ““ 

Greeks'. Syrians and Kurds — that 
“Grand Turkey" was created? 

HAIK ARSLAN IAN. 

Antwerp. 


which was payable only if an employ- 
ee showed up for work. 

This, of course, was not enough to 
live on. Marsinah and some of her rel- 
low workers joined to demand that tne 

daily meal allowance be built into 

the regular wage. 

Making such a demand took courage 
— the workers had created a distur- 
bance. They bad disrupted the “peace, 
•'harmony, “order” and unity that 
are the watchwords of Indonesian in- 
dustrialization and development. 

In Indonesia, owners of capual accu- 
mulate wealth by all possible means. 
Managers and executives can multiply 
iheir incomes. But workers should nev- 
er ask for more. Indonesia’s economic 
progress, investment in manufacturing 
and rising export earnings have hinged 
on meager labor wages. 

So at Marsinah s company not only 
the bosses and foremen but the security 
apparatus, acting on behalf of the state 
authorities, immediately took action to 
silence the rebellious workers Some 
were fired. Marsinah was murdered. 

We do not know just who was re- 
sponsible for her death, but 11 seems 
clear why she was killed. The homble 
wounds to her abdomen showed that 
she had been sexually assaulted and 
stabbed. Her pelvic bones were shat- 
tered. Marsinah was victimized both 
because she was an activist and because 
she was a woman. , , 

^s part of an overflowing labor force 
in the world's fourth most populous 
nation, women in Indonesia find them- 
selves in a weak position. 

They are also vulnerable in today ^s 
cultural environment. This is a world 
that has onlv winners and losers, n is a 
world obsessed with violent verbs 
such as ganvang (crush!, bunuh (kill) 
and gebuk (clobber). These are the 
metaphor? of fighting and male virili- 
ty. but also of despotism. 

Whoever murdered Marsinah must 
have thought that the death of a village 
woman worker would not stir much 
attention. They must have though • toat 
the body dumped on the roadside 
would instill fear among others who 
challenged local order. 

Fortunately. Marsinah's case has at- 
tracted wide’ attention. In their aiTo- 
gance. the killers failed to realize that 
tS moment she and her collegia 
went on strike u> demand better wages, 
workers could no longer be ignored in 
Indonesia. And because M arsing 
dared to be pan of a liberating , udal 
force for stronger rights lba, ^^f e ' 
mg strength in Indonesia, women have 
ceased to be marginal. 




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MILAN FASHION 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TH URSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 

HEALTH /SCIENCE 


Armani’s Cuddly Security Blanket 


By Suzy Menkes 

tnienununal Herald Tribune 


M ILAN — Giorgio 
Armani threw a big. 
soft, cuddly security 
blanket to the lost 
waif of Italian measwenr [&hion. 
In his show Wednesday, the supple 
tweeds, slrokable velvets and dusty 
colors were new — vet normal. He 
ended the Milan shows on a clear 
note as the fashion crowd moves on 
to Florence. 

Elsewhere there has been a clash 
of the classic and the gimmicky, 
with punk hair, weirdo models and 
styling tricks. 

' The themes of the week have been 
tfn easing of shapes, a resurgence of 
knitwear, a brown color wave and 
unusual effects with fabrics and tex- 
ture. The style is anti-macho, even 
feminine, with models slight- pale 
and looking faintly decadent. 

From the moment that Armani 
opened with malleable jackets over 
baggy corduroy velvet pants, you 
got his message: “1 didn't want to 
do real classic three-buttoned jack- 
ets, so i played with the collar — 
just opening (he shirt at the neck 
made such a difference — but I 
hope at the end everyone felt that 
these were new classics.” 

2 Classic? Yes. if you mean a sim- 
ple roglan -sleeved coat or jacket, its 
collar sliced off. flipped down with 
a button on one side. Or a new vest 
scooped at the front and made, like 
so much else, in velvet, cord or 
woven fabrics that gave the same 
deep-pile effect. 

r> But this was also a collection with 
a point of view: that if you don't like 
soft pants, too bad: and that, since 
the jackets hang loose from a slop- 
ing shoulder, no structure comes be- 
tween your well-honed body and the 
wide world except a light-as-a-knit 
fabric. They are clothes for a mod- 
ern-minded man. and that is Ar- 
mani's strength. 

Cut. comfort and color dominat- 
ed the show. Tender shades of mis- 
ty sky blue or even nectarine were 
introduced against a basic pallette 
of beige and grays. Ethnic patterns 
Were also woven through the Em- 
porio collection that the designer 
deliberately ran right on from the 
main line. 

* “It's all Armani." he said. 


BOOKS 

THE GREAT SAFARL- 
The Lives of George and 
Jov Adamson, Famous (or 
"Born Free” 

By Adrian House. 465 pages. 
525. Morrow. 

Reviewed by Carolyn See 

M others, don't give this 

book to your impressionable 
young daughters! Not for the rea- 
sons that we. as young mothers, 
dame groaning away from those 
saccharine movies about the won- 
derful Adamson couple living in 
perfect harmony in sunny, peaceful 
Africa raising that damn lion called 
Elsa and being so good-natured 
4bout it that our daughters came 
dm of matinees, asking. "Why can't 
■|e adopt a wild lion. Mommy, huh. 
huh. huh. huh? And why can't we 
qdopi a hvrax? Then he can drink 
Up all Daddy's gin. and think how 
nice it would be around the house!" 

No. not for those reasons, but for 
another far more dangerous subtext 
• Adrian House, a scholarly, large- 
hearted English gentleman, had the 
thankless task, as a young editor, or 
dealing with Joy Adamson when 
die was writing those Elsa books — 
"Bom Free.'* “Living Free." “For- 
ever Free" and the others. 

. The author became a friend to 
Joy Adamson and a real friend to 
her long-suffering husband. 
George. House began to go regular- 

BRIDGE 

Bv Alan Truscott 

J EFF'MECKSTROTH or Tam- 
pa. Florida. Eric Rodwell of 
Naperville. Illinois. Bob Goldman 
of DalldS and Paul Soloway or Mill 
Creek. Washington, faced Leandro 
Burgay and Soldano De Falco of 
Jtaly, and Herve Mouicl and Alain 
Levy of France, in a 550.000 chal- 
lenge match in December. Every 
dealer received a band suitable for 
a strong no-trump opening and had 
to make that bid. Burgay was trying 
to prove the superiority of his bio- 
Bing methods in that situation. 

- In the diagram, the chance that a 
“ player will pick up 9-4-0-Q distri- 
bution is one in 100.000. and the 
odds become longer when, as here, 
another player is known to have a 
balanced distribution. 

’. At both tables West hid the com- 
pulsory no-trump and East bid two 
hearts, showing spades. In one case 











Cbrnhiphn Moore 

Armani's so/r suit with buttoned lapel and open-neck shin. 


Valentino also showed two lines 
on the runway — the more classic 
couture range' with long coats. jack- 
ets and knits in cappuccino colors, 
and the sportier Oliver collection. 
Both worked well. 

The show opened dramatically 
with bathrobes lined with print 
over velvet jeans and bare torsos. 
The two important trends were vel- 
vet and the four-pocket jacket — a 
hybrid of Norfolk and safari. Oli- 
ver's smock-shaped jackets and 
loose shirts gave just the right mea- 
sure of sloppiness and romance. 

Romeo Gigli is a romantic and 
his show had a lot of charm — 
especially the ending when latter- - 


day flower children came out in 
lightly layered ethnic clothes in rich 
dark colors. 

Gigli's handling of ethnic themes 
looks convincing and wearable — 
usually just a subtly patterned vest 
under' the high-buttoned square-cut 
jacket and narrow cuffed pants that 
are the designer's signature. Those 
suits might even come in plaid — 
part of Gigli's worldwide inspiration 
that makes his fashion seem part of 
an artistic global village. 

Dolce & Gabbana had clothes in 
all the right modern proportions 
and showed imaginative knits. But 
m an urge to be hip. they hid their 
own strengths. The looks were 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• David ApplefiekL head of the 
Frank Books publishing company 
in Paris, is reading " The English’ 
Patient" by Michael Ondaatje. 

“it's one of the most poetic 
pieces of prose that 1 have ever 
read, which has sensual under- 
standing of history and a height- 
ened sense of perception." 

(I Use Gersten. IHTl 




ly to Kenya, it was suggested to 
him that he write a biography of 
this quite extraordinary couple 
who had befriended any number of 
wild animals, raised them as their 
own “children" and then released 
them to the wild. 

To keep selling the Elsa books 
and movies the Adamsons had 
been presented as a cross between 
Mr. and Mrs. Geaver and Tarzao 
and Jane. The truth was a zillion 
times more interesting, and House 
has the perfect tools to tell this 
story. His work has been prodi- 
gious; he keeps his judgments to a 
minimum, and he has obviously 
fallen in love with East Africa, the 
wild life and the daily life that the 
Adamsons made their own. 

Here’s why you might not want to 
give this book to your impression- 
able daughter. Joy Adamson was 


this showed 3i least a five-card 
spade suiL and West ventured five 
spades, a contract that was due to 
succeed, over South's five dia- 
monds. This pushed Levy, the Eu- 
ropean South, to six diamonds, 
which was duly doubled and de- 
feated by two tricks. 

In the replay, Burgas as West 
could not be sure of a 9-card spade 
fit, for in his methods two hearts’ 
could have been bid with a 4-card 
spade suit. He chose to double five 
diamonds, and collected just 200. 

Since it was obvious from the 
bidding that West held a doubleton 
diamond long. Goldman as declar- 
er laid a little trap by leading the 
diamond queen at the second trick. 
But Burgay took his king without 
hesitation. 

The American team gained 7 
imps, and this seems to represent a 
slight weakness in the Burgay 


raised in Vienna. Her parents di- 
vorced in 1922 and she took it hard, 
growing up to be a vintage trouble- 
maker. She ran off with a boyfriend 
who broke her heart. Then she mar- 
ried her first husband, whose moth- 
er was a Jew. This was in the middle 
’30s and Joy was sent house-hunting 
to Kenya, where they might safely 
escape Hitler’s menace: On the ship 
Joy found a second guy. declared 
herself madly in love with him. 
dumped husband No. 1. married her 
second husband, settled in Kenya, 
met George Adamson — a game 
warden who minded his own busi- 
ness — declared herself madly in 
love with him. said her second hus- 
band was impotent, married 
George, opined that he drank, 
smoked, snored, was a boor and not 
up to her intellectually, concluded 
she was really in love with husband 


methods. But in building a system 
one cannot worry about an oppo- 
nent's holding an astronomically 
improbable hand. 

NORTH 

* J 542 
10 3 7 

4 52 

* J 8 53 


WEST(D) EAST 

* A K Q 10 *98783 

9 K 3 2 Q 9 5 

OKS o — 

*K642 +AQ1097 

SOUTH 
* - 

9 A J64 

O AQ J 10 98743 

Both sides were vulnerable. The 
bidding; 

West North East South 

1 NT. Pass 2 9 SO 

5 * Pass Pass 6 O 

Obi- Pass Pass Pass 

West led the spade king. 


there; the big hobo coat, the no- 
mad's patchwork shearling, recy- 
cled sweaters, mixed in with track 
pants and worn with sophisticated 
sloppiness. But spray-on colored 
spiky hair, a safety pin stabbing a 
fine jacket and models looking like 
Sid Vicious, seemed a desperate 
punk revival that isn't even new in 
fashion. 

It all looked fresher Wednesday 
in the designers' new D&G range, 
with its mixes of plaid, speckly 
Irish tweed, a rugged sense of out- 
doors and a whiff or the London 
street scene 

Bvblos got lost on a long and 
well-trodden ethnic trail, producing 
pieces layered in a way that they are 
never worn outside Peruvian vil- 
lages and magazine fashion spreads. 
Extracted from the mass of nomad 
knits and blanket fringe in natural 
colors, there were bowl-of-rnuesh 
tweed suits with square-cut jackets, 
dotted-cream corduroy pants and 
rugged brown leather jackets. 

In the showrooms, Italian luxury 
sets an inimitable standard. Gucci 
nurtured its country roots, with 
jackets Norfolk-style or with knit- 
ted sleeves and rugged leather jack- 
ets and hiking boots. The superfine 
cashmere for marled knits oozed 
quality. Off-io-the country ele- 
gance was the theme of Fendi's 
collection of velvet-soft alpaca 
coals, boiled wool knits, tactile 
leather jackets and sheadings, all in 
earth colors from ginger through 
compost brown. 

Inspired by her newly opened 
golf club. Laura Biagjotti made her 
signature cashmeres as long cabled 
sweaters and cardigans, worn with 
knickers, in the elegant style of the 
Duke of Windsor on the green. 

Missoni look gentlemanly sym- 
bols — watches, umbrellas and 
fountain pens — and wove them in 
subtle patterns and colors for car- 
digans (hat looked like old tweed 
jackets. 

Antonio Fusco's research into 
super-light fabrics and construc- 
tions refreshed classic Italian style. 
A cashmere jacket Uhl looks busi- 
nesslike but feels as soft as a week- 
end cardigan seems a more genuine 
symbol of Milan men's fashion 
than the downtown, punky looks of 
an enforced hip parade. 


No. 2, and threw tantrums and tizzy 
fits and threatened suicide until all 
three men were ready for a rest 
home. 

Even though Joy wouldn't sleep 
with George, she was fearless on 
safari It was as though she felt a 
cobra or a puff adder wouldn't have 
the nerve to take a bite out of her. 
The Adamsons as a couple might 
have been no more unhappy than 
many, jaunting about in what seems 
like the most beautiful country in 
the world, dodging demented ele- 
phants, putting man-eating lions out 
of commission, going on a carefree 
vacation that involved driving 
across the Sahara. They must have 
thought themselves invincible: Even 
the Mau Mau appear here as no 
more of a threat than a herd of 
cranky buffalo. 

Then, something fateful hap- 
pened. George shot a lioness who 
left three cubs. Joy ended up with 
one of them, whom she named Elsa, 
after one of her mothers-in-law. She 
fefl for Elsa, loving her more than 
any of those husbands (or. by now, 
numerous lovers) she had on the 
suing. She raised Elsa and released 
her. wrote her book, got it picked up 
by' HarvilL a division of CoUios. 
struck up a stormy relationship with 
Mr. Collins, committed every' kind 
of screaming mayhem, then pub- 
lished “Born Free." which sold 5 
million copies. (Not a just world, but 
an interesting one.) 

The material here on wildlife is 
amazing, but the human lifestyle is 
more amazing sliH Those Adam- 
sons! .Always digging trendies and 
pulling up fences and shooting ze- 
bras to supplement the lions’ diet 
and traveling the world and slugging 
each other and not giving it much of 
a second thought when one of their 
servants gets killed by one of those 
lions. (Except they worried about 
the lion, i What a life! It almost 
makes you want to go to Kenya. 

After Joy was snot by an irate 
servant George lived ait the last 
decade of his life in idyllic surround- 
ings. visited by admirers, hanging 
out with his own pride of lions, 
working on what be sweetly referred 
to as his “Rehabilitation Project Tor 
Wayward Girls.” Everybody loved 
George Adamson because he was 
kind, patient, fearless and fun. As 
for Joy. she became one of the fore- 
mothers of this century’s ecological 
movement and made’ everybody’s 
life a living hell. There’s a moral 
here. I’d best not belabor iL 

Caroiyn See regularly reviews 
books for The H i ishingron Post. 


A Gene That Signals 
Direction and Location 


Scientists have discovered 
a class of genes, called 
hedgehog genes, that lend 
shape and pattern to the 
early embryo. Once turned 
on. these genes make 
proteins that give 
neighboring cells signals Early 
telling them their position ear 
and roles m forming a leg. 

wing or fin. At other sites, / 
the hedgehog proteins // 

direct development of the A . 
the central nervous / 
system. / ; q 


At this point, the hedgehog 

The Bghi gray stippled areas of the drawing snow in* 

that are expressing this gene. 


Midbram 


Hindbrain 




Forewarn 


eye 



SpmaJ 
\ cord 
- r and 
\ notocord 
i V 


i Within the eariy 
u\ nervous system, the 
v signals arising from the 
^ ■ top and from the 
■ bottom are involved m 
** formation of specihc 
neurons at specific 
u sites. Neurons at the 
^ top are associated with 
_ sensory functions. 

Sg ’while neurons at the . 
!’ bottom control 
movement- 




A fertilized mouse egg 

grows to be a duster of 1 6 V '- ^ 

ceHs within three days, in V' ^ . 

the blastula stage, shown V; v . 

here, there are many more >/■ 

cells, and the inner cells \ 

have begun to take on Mouse embryo, 
specific roles. 8Vi to 9% days old 


Limb A 

bud 3] 


Developing 

digits 



enrol In tne limb bud. the positional information from me 
' For ® luT,l> hedgehog protein makes the write start defining 

the arrangement of digits of a future paw. 

Vac, StefflgAlThr N*» Ink Tn» 


'Hedgehog’ Genes Shape Embryos 


By Natalie Angjer 

iVew Varfc Times Service 

EW YORK — The discovery of a 
class of genes, given the cheeky name 
“hedgehog," has aroused the pas- 
sions of developmental biologists so 
vigorously that their normal reserve and skepti- 
cism have dissolved. 

Three teams of scientists report in the current 
issue of the journal Cell that they have un- 
earthed what developmental scientists have 
been seeking for the last 25 years, as they 
studied the complex sequence of events that 
allow a angle cm, the fertilized egg, to efflo- 
resce into a complete animal. 

They have identified the genes that act on the 
early embryo to lend it shape and pattern, 
transforming a nondescript comma of tissue 
into a vertebrate animal, with limbs and digits, 
brain and spinal cord. 

These genes produce so-called morphogens. 
molecules that researchers have known must 
exist but have had tremendous difficulty isolat- 
ing. The word morphogen means “maker of 
structure," and the hedgehog proteins are just 
thaL 

Once switched on inside the embryo, the 
molecules sweep slowly across the primordial 
buds of tissue and begin generating identifiable 
form, sculpturing aims, hands and fingers on 
the sides of the embryo, vertebrae and ribs 
along its midline, a brain within the skull 

First detected in fruit flies, the hedgehog 
genes earned their name for their ability, when 
mutated, to give a fly the bristly appearance of 
a hedgehog. Their normal function in the fruit 
fly is to dictate growth, and the latest trio of 
reports establish that the same genes also dic- 
tate structural design in vertebrates. 

The papers describe the isolation of hedge- 
hog genes from mice, zebra fish and chickens, 
three staple organisms of laboratory research, 
widely separated in evolutionary time. “This 
new class of signaling molecules will probably 
end up being the most important molecules in 


vertebrate development," said Dr. Gifford J. 
Tabin, a developmental biologist at Harvard 
Medical School and the principle author of one 
of the three reports. 

Scientists have yet to look for the genes in 
humans, but they are certain that hedgehog is 
performing the same role in human embryos as 
it is in fish. If this turns out not to be the case, 
said Dr. Philip W. Ingham, a senior scientist at 
the Molecular Embryology Laboratory’ at the 
Imperial Cancer Research Fund in Oxford, 
England, and the head investigator on another 
of the new papers. “Til resign from science." 


W ITH such a big segment of the 
puzzle of development now 
snapped into place, researchers 
said they can begin tilling in the 
rest of the confounding picture of embiyogene- 
sis. They can start to decipher how the hedge- 
hog molecules interact with other essential 
players known to participate slightly later in 
development, including the Hox genes, also 
assiduous builders of bodies, which themselves 
are found across the evolutionary scale. 

“This is extraordinary work, it's fantastic, 
and T wish Td done it," said Dr. Jim Smith, 
head of the developmental biology laboratory 
at the National Institute for Medical Research 
in London. “When I started working on limb 
development in 1976, we all knew there bad to 
be something like this, but we didn’t necessarily 
think we’d live to see iL" 

Scientists said the findings may prove useful 
in the quest for better ways to treat head and 
spinal cord injuries, as well as degenerative 
diseases of the brain. 

“People these days are very interested in 
molecules that mediate important derisions in 
the eariy development of the central nervous 
system,” said Dr. Andrew P. McMahon, a de- 
velopmental biologist at Harvard University 
and the principal researcher on the third of the 
latest papers. 

The hedgehog morphogens also offer relief to 
development biologists who lately had grown 


dissatisfied with another proffered candidate 
for the role of omnipotent morphogen:- retinoic 
arid, or vitamin A. In widely publicized reports 
a few years ago, scientists suggested that retin- 
oic acid could be the long-sought morphogen 
that sets up a body plan. However, there were 
sizable gups in the data and doubts in the minds 
of many biologists that retinoic acid worked at 
such a fundamental level in the embryo. 

In the new work, the hedgehog genes pass all 
the litmus tests that vitamin A had failed, 
displaying with extraordinary precision the 
properties Lhat scientific theories about mor- 
phogens had predicted. 

And when scientists manipulate embryos 
and subtly alter the ways in which hedgehog 
genes are expressed, they get the sort of maca- 
bre developmental mutations they are expect- 
ing, For example, they can prompt a growing 
chick to sprout mirror-image sets of wings sim- 
ply by inserting active hedgehog genes in the 
tissue abutting that where the genes are normal- 
ly expressed. 




AMING the varieties of hedgehog 
genes, which play a key role in em- 
bryo development, has been a source 
of friction among research teams. 

L wanted to give the varieties num- 
x letters. 


One group wanted to give the varieties num- 
bers, another letters. 

Dr. Tabin suggested that they n*m& each 
newly detected -gene after a species of real 
hedgehog- This scheme stuck for the first three 
genes, which were de s i g n a te d Indian hedgehog, 
moonrat .hedgehog and desert hedgehog. .• 

But when Dr. Robert Riddle, a postdoctoral 
fellow working in Dr. TaMn’s lab, detected 
what proved to be the most fascinating hedge- 
hog gene of all be rebded against the system 
and derided to call the gene Sonic hedgehog, 
after a character in a Sega computer game 

Many other scientists detest the new name, 
saying it trivializes a noble molecule. “It’s the 
kind of idea (hat you talk abou t in a pub and say. 
‘Wouldn’t it be funny if we named it SonicT " 
said Dr. Smith. “But then you don't do iL” 


Teachers Fight Science "Gender Gap’ 


By Peter Marks 

Sen- York Times Service 


S TONY BROOK, New 
York — A gasp rose from 
the audience of 300 Long 
Island schoolgirls when 
Cynthia Burrows, a chemistry pro- 
fessor. projected the slide onto the 
screen. 

What startled tbe students 
wasn't a chart of the periodic table 
or a model of the architecture of a 
carbon molecule or the text of a 
complex theory. It was a photo- 
graph of her IB-month-old triplets. 

The lesson lhat Dr. Burrows was 
trying to impart had more to do 
with a formula for life and work 
than tbe properties of organic com- 
pounds. Her message: A scientific 
career and motherhood can be 
made to mix. but only after the 
science training has occurred and 
the career has been established. 

“These years between 15 and 30, 
this is a lime when you have a lot of 
energy, a lot of intellectual ability." 
she told the junior and senior high 
school girls gathered in on audito- 
rium at the Stale University of New 
York at Stony Brook. “There is no 
reason at all to encumber yourself 
with a husband and family. Post- 
pone as long as you can." 

That view might seem extreme, 
but she said later that women in tbe 
world of science must often make 
difficult choices. “To excel in sci- 


ence, which is still a conservative 
field, you must follow a narrow 
pathway of education, sometimes 
at persona] cost,” she said. 

The girls, eighth, ninth and 10th 
graders from 31 Long Island 
schools, had been invited to Stony 
Brook for a day of encouragement 
and exploration of academic disci- 
plines that remain largely mole bas- 
tions: the worlds of math and sci- 
ence. Two dozen female professors 
at Stony Brook, which has a nation- 
al reputation as a center for science 
education, agreed to act as guides 
into those worlds, escorting the 
teenagers into their laboratories 
and detailing the opportunities that 
science offers. 

“The goal is awareness," Linda 
Padwa said. “It's letting the girls be 
aware thai they can lead productive 
careen in science and still be femi- 
nine." Ms. Padwa a science teacher 
from Pon Jefferson, helped create 
the Symposium Tor Girts Exploring 
Mathematics and Science. “This 
country doesn't have enough math- 
ematicians and scientists to write 
off half the population." she said. 

Although women have made 
gains in some scientific fields, par- 
ticularly in the biological sciences, 
they remain underrepresented in 
physics, applied mathematics and 
engineering. Of 1,750 members of 
the National Academy of Sciences, 
for instance, only 70 are women. 

Hanna Nek vasil. an associate 
professor of earth and space sci- 


ences at Stony Brook, says that in 
general it is harder to keep women 
in science programs, that women 
are more likely to suffer from a lack 
of confidence in their abilities and 
abandon the science trade. 

“What we have found is that tbe 
freshman year of college was a very 
critical year for women interested 
in science, and that more freshmen 
women drop out of science pro- 
grams than men," she said. 

Dr. Nekvasil shepherded nine 

where sfae^n^ra the^ryst^ 
lized structures of rocks. “How 
many of you think rocks are bor- 
ing?" she asked, as a few of hear 
charges put their hands in the air. 
“You won’t by the end of the dass.” 
The professor gave the giris 
pieces of granite and hardened lava 
to hold, snowed them how to exam- 
ine a sliver of rock under an elec- 
tron microscope, and offered them 
a soft sell on the glories of geology. 

S OME students said that 
they were interested in sci- 
ence but had not formed 
any specific plan. “I’m not 
really sure yeC said Roopal Sam- 
paL 15. “I was interested in medi- 
cine, but now fm thinking either 
something in math or science, or 
maybe computer programming." 

Jeyce Capizzano, 15, said she 
was thinking about becoming a 
doctor, and that being among fe- 
male scientists for a day gave her a 


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stronger sense of the possibilities 
open to her. “It helps me to see 
these women, to see tow hard they 
work to succeed." she said. 

In her half-hour talk. Dr. Burrows 
shied away from some of the drier 
aspects of bo- discipline, instead 
presenting a slide stow of her life in 
science. 9te showed pictures from 
the summer she spent as an intern 
on Ascension Island in the South 
Atlantic, helping to launch weather 
balloons for the National Oceano- 
graphic and Atmospheric Adminis- 
tration; of the view from her lab 
window- in Strasbourg. France, 
where she (fid postdoctoral work, 
and of a white-water rafting trip she 
took while attending an organic 
chemistry symposium in M ontana. 

There was even a magnified slide 
showing die chromosomes of her 
daughter. Laurel, one of the 'trip- 
lets, given her after she had amnio- 
centesis. Dr. Burrows told the stu- 
dents that she had her children at 
the age of 39. a little older than 
most of them migh t want to try. but 
assisted by modern science: The 
triplets, she said, came about as a 
result of in vitro fertilization. 

As her audience aohed and 
ahhed, the professor talked of other 
scientific advances, like the map- 
ping of the human genome, and of 
the part that the girls might some- 
day play. “This is all going to hap- 
pen in the next generation," she 
said. “And yon are going to be tbe 
scientists of the next generation.” 


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Page 9 


THE TRIBINDEX: 1 1 1 - 

International Herald Tribune World Stock .tadex 

280 intemafionaHy Investable 5tockslroni25 rountrias, compflea 

by BtoonibergEWSrate&Ne^ 1992 - top. .. 

120 : — — — '! .... ... .. • ,.'-" T - — 


That May Bind 

Gore Hite a Blow for Communications 

T 



Credit Tightened 
By Central Bank 

' Compiled b? Our Stuff From DtipOzcha 

KUALA LUMPUR — Malay- 
sia’s stock and money markets were 
pjxmgcd into confusion Wednesday 
after the central bank took tot# 
measures to drain liquidity from 
the banking system. 

The ringgit plunged to a two- 
year low against the dollar, and 
K f/yire went into a free fall as over- 

Tokyo gains, hot ate.- 
stock markets phage. P agel5> 

5 ^ j« foods' pulled out profits they 
had made in a dizzying bull market 
that had begun to worry the gov- 
ernment” The Kuala Lumpur 
stock market’s composite index 
soared 90 percent in 1993. 

The central bank. Bank Negara, 
said late Tuesday it was taking «w 
measures that would effectively 
drain bflbons of dollars from the 


North America 


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It foSowed that up with changes 
Wednesday in the way it calculates 
banks’ so-called eligible tiabahues, 
measures that would require banks 
to put stSD more money aside as 

re ^?oompo«to index, which fell 
557 percent Tuesday after a gov- 
ernment official warned that share 
prices were too high, plunged more 
than 6 percent, or a record 7333 

currency market, the dol- 
lar was quoted as high *» 2-74 
gh at om pita It M to W 


ed conunamcauons newer*. «* 
the country, out on this matter the administration 
has decided it is wiser to coax than to dictate. 

In a speech in Los Angeles, Mr. Gore outlined a 
series of legislative initiatives aimed at promoting 
the construction of an advanced nancawide net- 
work that can link classrooms, electronic libraries, 
rural doctors and people at home. . , 

■ But in terms of federal t^n^og/ njjj“ 
this is a far cry from the crah program inttewn 
to ran a man on the moon. The federal government 
is too pressed to finance any of the oew Mtw^ 
constriction, which could total as much hNH 
billion over the next 20 years, and few experts 
think the goveromem should even try. 

The cable television and telephone industries are 
already raring to lay thousands of miles of optical 
fiber and buying new computers ^Jtoreai^^- 
tribute everything from movies to electronic docks. 

The last thjng the administration wants to do is 
spook investors with regulatory browbeating. In- 
et~^T the administration is hoping to influence 
events by reducing the regulatory bam®* *»t 
have prevented competition between telephone 
and cable television companies. 

The administration also wants to promote stan- 
dards that allow different networks to commmu- 
cate with each other and gaily prod tbe mdu^y s 
olayere to think about the broader public mterest 
HSk, in his speech Tuesday, Mi. Gore chal- 
lenged" telephone and cable companies to link all 
SScxims, Wanes and health clmics to an inter- 


Utw 

^TdrtSswould have to be worked oot by the 
Federal Communications Commission. 

Still, Ins effort is important fra several 
More than at any time in the last 20 y^rs, ibae ^ a 
consensus in private industry and in Congress that 
the lime is ripe for a major revision of commumca- 
tions laws, some of which date back to the Com- 
munications Act of 1934. 

The essence of that consensus is to relax barriers 

and permit much greater competition between the 
local telephone, cable and long-distance compa- 
nies — while protecting consumers as old regula- 
tions are abandoned in favor of marketplace com- 
petition. 

The goals enunciated by the vice president dove- 
tail with legislation drafted by top lawmakram 
the House and the Senate. Indeed, the White 
House has taken scrupulous care to avoid upset- 
ting delicate compromises that lawmakers on the 
House Energy and Commerce Committee nave 
already worked out among different factions of the 
communications industry. 

Bv putting its muscle behind this emerging con- 
sensus, specialists say, the White House greatly 
increases the chances that Congress will pass far- 
reaching changes that could unlock billions of 
dollars in investment and lay down rules of the 
road in an era of expanded communications- 


German Banks 
Face Off Over 

Metallgesellschaft 

... , fiihrr tame institutional Share 


and other large institutional share- 
holders. effectively punishing them 
for any part they might have played- 
in the confusion. 

Deutsche Bank and Dresdner 
AG piaved brinkmanship over me BarJu which already heavily 
foundering German metals group oposeil lo Metallgesellschaft r. 
Wednesdav, missing a deadline to have extended their credit 

agree on a’ bailout and pushing the j. b „ another 750 million DM 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT— Creditors and 
shareholders of Meiallgesdlschafi 
AG piaved brinkmanship over the 

- r , . n — OTAlin 


Wli a vnwfcFi -1 — — r’ , 

company one step closer to bank 
rupicy. 

Deutsche Bank AG. the largest 
shareholder in MetaDgesellschaft 
as well as coordinator of the rescue 
program, said: “If no agreement is 
Shed soon, Metallgesellschaft 
will have to hand over its affairs w 
the courts." The company asked us 
120 creditors to accept the rescue 
plan swiftly and “as a whole. 

But Norddeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale in Hannover, a largp 
German bank that is one of Meiall- 
eesellschafi's top five creditors, re- 
lated on Wednesday that it would 
not support the rescue plan unless 
“Deutsche Bank budges first. 


mica uy — 

each, but NordLB has argued that, 
they should shoulder an even big- 
ger burden because or them in- 
volvement in the company’s affairs. 

Metallgesellschaft shares tell 10. 
Deutsche marks, to 226 DM. on the 
Frankfurt Stock Exchange on 
Wednesday. 

“I think we need more time to 
coordinate the 100 -plus creditors, , 
Deutsche Bank Chairman Htimar 
Kopper said to Reuters in Benin. . 

[Barclays PLC said Wednesday 
that it was “supportive in princi- 
ple" of the restructuring plan pro- 
posed bv Metallgeseflschafi AG. 
AFP-Exte! News reported from 
London. “We have made a con- 
structive response to Deutsche 
Bank in this connection," a Barr 


itel Expected to Control Fra 


In rejecting the plan. NordLB 

proposed an equity writedown. c i ays spokesman said . 

AG Holding Daimler-BenzAG 

and the Kuwait Investment Office 
have indicated that their agreement 
to the plan was dependent on ac- 
ceptance by the banks. 


nw. 


Bmn nwiwl ** '<*“* mi» iwB'-ijL 

Aun'M -rn'srzm H»| Mrt* im.Ti w.ia -m 

Sac. im msx~^ ima wse 4023 

»»« H9X3 ■*” WJS 18UB - 


By Jacques Neher 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Framatome SA, the French state- 
controlled builder of nudear power plants . wM 
git at one pomu it J" * fc ™ enter the private sector, the Bifasay Nfim^y 
rin gg it later bnt was still well above jnesday, and Alcatel Alsthom SA ap- 

Tnesday’s dose of 25615. peared likely to become its new owner. 

A 1 “™ PT “* Girard Longuet, the industry minister, raid 

Framatome would be sold in an 
transaction, rather than m a public stockoffer- 
ing, because the company was not well known 
enough to spa* wide investor tot®*®** . 

^^tesaid mat be had asked the Prtvatazanon 
Commission to work up a valuation for the 
company’s shares. _ 

Analysts, bowerver, said tlK decision to make 
Framarome an off-market pnyaMabon v«^i 
facilitate transferring the state s shares toAtea- 
td Alsthom, which already owns 44.1 pwont 
_ __ Lni* Inmr wnntPn to fC£3IQ 


‘S^towever.stillsaidtte 
Malayaan currency and the stock 
market were fundamentally strong 
of the buoyant economy. 

“Short term, it is bad news for 
the stock market," Choong jGm 81 
Hock, managing director of m r- 
days de Zoete Wedd (Malaysia), 
said of the central bank’s moves 

this week. « ... 

“But in. the medium term, brmg- 
ing liquidity down will ensure that 
the bull run is more sostamabte, 
because it was really getongomof 
' hand.” ■ (Ratters. Bloomberg) 


___ IU1 OllVttMJ ■ 

of Framatome and has long wanted to re^in 
’ it had obtmied, and then lost. 


mqority control] 


in 1990 in a showdown with the then -Socialist 
goveromenL 

“When the government says it wants to put 
Framatome into private hands, it means Alcatel 
Als thorn's hands,” said Kevin Brau. analyst at 
Credit Suisse First Boston in London. 

In an interview published in Les Echos on 
Wednesday. Pierre Suard, chairman of Alcatel 
Alsthom, said that the government was well 
aware of his interest in obtaining majority con- 
trol and he thought that efforts were under way 
to carry out the privatization. 

Aside from the stake held by Alcatel 
Alsthom, the state has indirect interests in 
Framatome through a 36 percent holding by 
CEA, the French Atomic Energy Agency, a tu 
percent stake held by Hectnrite deFrance, the 
national electric utility, and 5 peromthrid by 
Crtdit Lyonnais. An additional 5 percent is 
spread among Framatome employees. 


Company sources suggested that 5 percent of 
the 7 percent required to give Alcmel A!sl ^f 
majoritv control would most likely be surren- 
dered by Credit Lyonnais, which is trying w 
focus on core banking activities and return to 
profitability. Analysts suggest that the 7 per- 
cent stake could be valued at \ 5 _biUion frano. 

Framatome had sales in 1993 of 16 billion 
francs and net profits of 900 nulhon francs. 
Sales are expected to boom ml Was hi&hasjJ 
billion francs, as two reactors buih at Daya i Bay 
in China, and now operational, are to be bflled. 

However, the future for Framatome is 
clouded bv a frigid international market for 
nuclear power plants. Thr cpmjrany jsjn awrat 
venture with Kraftwerk Union AG. the nuclear 
plant unit of Siemens AG, to design an ad- 
vanced nuclear reactor for export marke^ bm 
there is not likely to be any demand rnj .esu^ 
Europe Tor such plants tn the foreseeable fu- 
ture. analysts ray. 


Wrighing each institution’s an- 
swer would probably dday an an- 
nouncement until late Thursday or 
Friday, sources said. Some «pea- 

ed NradLB to back down and agree 

to the accord. 

The metals giant has said it 
would begin bankruptcy proceed- 
ings immediately if its creditors- 
turned down the rescue proposals. 

Deutsche Bank warned Wednes- 
day that the cost of leiung MetaD-. 
pesdlschaft fail would undoubtttl- 
fv exceed the cost of a resale fot- 
shareholders and creditors alike. 

“Self-interest dictates the need 
for an agreement," it said. Crecu- 

in loans to the company if it ae- 
clared insolvency. 


lNTtRHATiOiiAL MANAGER 


Is It lSeally ifi Next Paramount? 

- •“ . ' 1 * : nian< to devdon soohisti 


Swiss Set 


ByPaBMJa Kruger 

Hew York "nines Serried . 

I n a small office «Mge 
-asd MkxSnow » ***** 

tunongh btwks Bke “Science. 

WorftBdieve" and ‘TsaacAsunaV’sBoc* 

^SSipIqyee cl 

voune mffimedia software company 

■gSf SE-Mt MUxfinow b 

tn indude m an educational 



Bubble Bursts for the Bust Business 

, , vnMimlitv Al- their living from bankruptcy-n 


it’s a very small base wtfre bwWmg 

?e^stfflalot of hiring 


morning vwtu, 

‘ ‘ • break into the fidd.hoping that then stock opticais 

-^E found that 45 

• nwsrfS than$100,000. Neariy 90 percent had 

hot Httfc 

winnmg "t^eSSP mSSSoH,- 37 
“It’s really ewanng, saw — 


ayenm the mrenmuvc 
fidd, ^ bigwigs as 

.gsSSfffe.? - : 

• evaynuyor 


1 $100,000. Nearly 90 po 

__ market,” 
“Than isn’t 

WE 

zsszagg&sK'ss. 
‘^sssarssik ™ 

•pmer whizSte&lifoOTa before the ^pwate 
S discovered the market, ham been 
tripling and even tniadniplmg thfitf staffsas 
pntx of multimedia . personal computers hw 
Sroped: and the publics appeu te has grown for 
• mSoMTtbe aampact msks for computm, 

, See MULTIMEDIA, Page 13 


Bloomberg Business Hews 

BERN — Switzerland proposed 
measures Wednesday to toughen 
money-laundering laws, a step 
President Otto Such called neces- 
sary to preserve the country’s rcpu^ 
ration as a “solid finan cial cot ter. 

The proposals, if adopted, would 
shift the onus for signaling suspect- 
ed illegal activity to banks and otn- 
a financial institutioDS. 

Under Switzerland’s current 
bank-secrecy law, banks are not 
required to disclose information on 
clients and transactions if they ais- 
pect illegal activity, unless asked to 
do so by authorities. 

“The bank-secrecy law shouw 
not protect criminals,”, said Mr. 

‘ Stich, who until reoendy was fi- 
nance minister, at a press confer- 
ence. “Switzerland’s reputation is 
after all based on the fact that we 
are a solid financial center where 
you can’t just do anything.” 

He said the proposal was a 
marked improvement over the cur- 
rent law because it made not only 
banks but every member of tne 
financial sector responsible for re- 
porting suspect activity. . 

Tbe law would affect invest- 
ment-management firms, insur- 
ance companies, the Swiss postal 
service and individuals such as ff- 
dndary trustees, lawyers and om- 
ens who undertake cash or credit 
transactions. 


By Alison Leigh Cowan 

Hew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The legions of lawyers, 
accountants and investment barrens who 
have made good Imngsm the las few years 
working out the bad^ebt cases or the 1980s 
are about to face their worst fears, the bank- 
ruptcy business is going bust. 

last year, for the first tune since 1989, 
fewer companies entered bank^tcy ^ 
left, helping slow the volume of billion-doUar 
ra«*: to a trickle. . , , 

Thai helps explain why America s roughly 
20,000 bantoiqjtcy speaatosare cbngmg 
fast to the clients they have left — and are 
Snring the last megadollar cases Iflre R.H. 
Macy & Co. 

-fi you take a look around. there r^Uy 
aren't too many other major busied 1»J 
dSs sitting there in 
ert L Mil let, a lawyer at 
Liberman who represents Miry’s bondhold- 

erc **This seems to be the last one. 

Hie bankruptcy fees in the Macy case 
while not the largest ever, are a stunning 


illustration of the meal-ticket mentality. .Al- 
ready 11 professional Euros- presenting 
Macv, the creditors and bondholders, have 
wrung more than $37.9 million in fees from 
the two-year-old case, which is expected to 
take another year c*r two to resown- 
Weil GotshaL alone, has billed Macy i 1 3 J 
million, more than a third of the total fees. Aj 
the firm, 1 26 peopje call Mac y chent . 31 

partners, 50 associates and 45 other employ- 
ees. And at least 24 of those lawyers each bill 
more than $ 10,000 a calendar quarter. 

For five years now. one big company ana 

another sought * f" SZfZSS 

cfwrts, clogging the courts and making a banX- 
nipicy fiSas routine as a Hollywood hang- 
over. Consumers learned not to care when a 
beloved airline or retaikr took the 
although competitors often r c 9 ra P’ l aine f al ^ 
bankrupt rivals had an unfair edge, *3^8 
advantage of the temporary moratoriums on 
Ihdr debt to lower prices ruthlessly. 

As the mega bankruptcies swelled, so did 
i unniii ferttinc off their car- 


their Uving from bankruptcy-related work, 
according to Joel W. Lustig. thepubhsher^ 
the National Directory of Corporate Distress 
Specialists. 

That head count includes 12300 lawyers, 
2,000 turnaround managers, 700 aocoun - 
lants, and 650 finance specialists, anddoes 
not begin to cover the thousands or peop e 
ranging from auctioneers to collection agenw 

who operate on the fringes or spend. °nly P®^t 
of their time tending troubled businesses or 
their creditors. 

But as the economy improve and 

nie renegotiate thdr debts. 

banquet is coming to a close. Indeed, .last yew. 
93 companies left bankruptcy wbfle onN 83 
companies entered, according to Edvrardl. 
Altman, a New York University finance pro- 
fessor who studies distressed companies. 

What is more, fewer of those filing are of 
spectacular size. Large companies with lots Ot 
layers of debt and equity are generally where 
the biggest killings are made since each fac- 
tion wants its own representatives. 


^ 

Ailing Rocket Industry Has U.S. in Orbit 


s®Ssw5£. 
E 558 ** 6 - grasses 


By John Mintz 

Washington Fast Sendee 

WASHINGTON -- The UJS. . roCKCls uiu put WJ — r ~ - , 

“Sdcal *01 pa, AM dJ. “while d. -- « 

er in space discovery for decades, is analysts said, °nly dtiie g^on ^ for fg.QOO per pound, builds rockets like trucks —sunplfe 

with the goings ment helps finance development or able to oo ^ _ ^gged and economical. *; 

on in a remote town in tte jtmgle of. - Federal agencies— including the 

French Guiana, and it is beggmg k | - ^ pnt objects into orbit for «-=*—' 1 

ibe town of Kourou is the locar tti 2,000 per pound oi payload, and tne 
■_ 1 “2!?4 SS Ib- =«?A ^ will be able to do it 


but they are also highly capable — 
ioo capable, some say. 

“The U.S. has been building: 
rockets like Fenaris. which are 
highly tuned, complicated and, 
fragile.” said a congressional offi- 
cial. “while the rest of the worto 


Iggoj ouu ww***-* x 

Federal agencies— including tbs 
National Aeronautics and Spat* 
Administration, the Pentagon and 


tU MENCY fc INTEREST RA TES 


tioa of . ^higb-usch launching site r “ - r* ' , . 

bufli by a team of European na- upcoining Anane 5 will be able 

for $8,000 per pound. 

Deans’ Ariane rockets — like — — 


numuuau uuv»*t — *- 

the Central Intelligence Agency — 
have been bitterly divided on how 
to solve the problem. 

But in recent weeks the White 

* — — t r » House’s Office of Science and 

. . . Technology Policy, concerned that 

rocket technology to compete with The Chinese and Russians can do ti ^uan will guartmteq 

foreian-subsidized rockets, and for S4.000. ^ foreign dominatimi. has begun a 

ine federal agencies must laancn 

- . , ..lie u.. 3 i 


.1m. 12- 


gyrocurniwyDeposfts 


-ju, *J=. Ufa oft ** V S. UK ■ U a* 

* .L Si an**’ ZZ, “ uEa . uw m iw* 

**« "5 £2 i w- ■* ua- m ^ 


uhkhi 


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.re-c » V- ^ 

.lamia..- ™ 

l wart* 3VM«. MA WW twl 'iSu. W** ^ 

1ST ^ ^ ^ ™ ^ 


oeans* Ariane rockets — like 
Ws Proton rcx^ launched 
J ®"- 12 from Kazakhstan, and China s 
Long Marches, lofted from the 
Gobi Desert — are so cheap that 
U A firms fear bankruptcy because 
they can't compete. 

The industry is “on its way W 
bang destroyed” if he US. gov- 
onroni docsiitbdp. NonnjnR. 


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eminent docsn t bdp, u^. launch capabilities to deteno- 

Augustin^chaii™ rara ro a poff where they an no 

Marietta Corp. longer compete with those of other 

year. “YouHsa people hud offby ^ ^ Uxta Thompson, 

Martin Marieu* di^or of ^ 


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, .c j^tacairmina London ita/cru » * 
OvKZuekSitmdHme Yo* apwlwontfcW 
ino prices.- Meet Y 01 * Cmrm (FMi 
Source: Reuters- 


ZBrtcn 


crAey- 


^ 1 THE FIRST INDEPENDENT 
1 RUSSIAN STATES 

rk-Nteate- LICENSED AIR 

CHARTER CO. 

CHARTER • SALES • MANAGEMENT 


ALG AEROLEASING 

Ge „ eva 41-22/73S4510 
Ziirich 41-01 /BU 37 00 


1 201 993 93 93 
65 481 95 22 
7 04421544 78 


European Multi Index Fund (EMI) 

SICAV 

Luxembourg. 11. me Aldringen 
R.C. Luxembourg N° B 3.i790 

The Board of Directors decided to launch two new sub- 
funds namely .... ni 

European Multi Index Fund (EMh-lialy Index P us nd 
European Multi Index Fund (EMI ^Switzerland Index Plus 

During the initial subscription period ending at the close 
nf business on Januarv 14th, 1994 shares are issued at a price 
or ITL 100.000 for the sub-fund EMl-ltaly Index Plus and of 
CHF 100 for the sub-fund EMl-Switzerland Index Plus plus a 
fee of 0,5ft in favour of the relevant sub-fund. No other com- 
missions are applicable for shares so subscribed. 

As from January 17th, 1994 on shares will MmU 
the conditions sated in the updated prospectus c< ^ ° f " hich 
may be obtained at the registered office of the company. 


sourpet. new r _ ami* 


-H*** 


Page 10 

market diary 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 


Profit-Takers Bite 
Into Dowfor 2d Day 


Campitr.l Aj- t>ui Stuff rnm DtipuuAa 

NEW YORK — Blue-chip stock 
prices were eroded by mild profit- 
laid ng Wednesday as the market 
appeared lo consolidate gains from 
the six-day huff run that ended ear- 
lier this week. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age, which retreated 15.H0 points 
Tuesday, closed off 1.68 points, on 
Wednesday at 3.848.63. ft had fatt- 
en by as much as 25 points in the 
course of the session. 

In spile of the Fall in the Dow. 
advances topped declines by a mar- 

H.Y, Stocks 

gin of 1 2 to 1 1 on the New York 
Stock Exchange, indicating 
Wednesday's pullback might have 
represented little more than a con- 
tinuation of Tuesday's shallow cor- 
rective action after the previous 
run. which included four consecu- 
tive record Dow closes. 

Trade Latimer, vice president 
and chief market strategist at 
Wayne Grayson Capital Corp- 
called the market's continued re- 
treat “a healthy consolidation." 

“We're getting a hit ahead of 
ourselves, and I'd be very happy if 
we pulled Hack some more." she 
<oid. “Otherwise, we'll become too 
vulnerable." 

Volume totaled 309.9 million 
shares on Wednesday, up from 
304.M million on Tuesday 

The market had been boosted ear- 


ly in the session Wednesday by a 
bond rally following the announce- 
ment that* producer prices had fallen 
bv 0.1 percent in December. As a 
result, the bellwether 30-year Trea- 
sury bond, which edged up 5/32 
Tuesday to yield 6.24 percent, 
surged 28/32. to 10! 1/32. The is- 
sue's vield Ml to 6.17 percent. 

Semiconductor makers posted 
gains as the industry’s book-to-bfll 
ratio, a measure of demand, rose to 
1.04 in December from 0.99 in No- 
vember. That means chip makers 
got 5104 of new orders for every 
$100 of product shipped last month. 
Intel rose IH to 63\ Motorola 
climbed 2 Hi lo 94J*. Texas Instru- 
ments rose 3<4 to 7014, Micron Tech- 
nology was up lit to 544 and Mi- 
crochip Technology rose 24 to 394. 

Alcatel Alsthom. the French tele- 
communica lions company, fell 24 
to 26'* after the company said it 
expected 1994 earnings to fall below 
1993 profits, prompting analysts at 
CS First Boston and S.G. Warburg 
to pull their buy recomnxmdations. 

Brad Ice's rallied to rise 14 to 13 
after a Merrill Lynch & Co. analyst 
repeated an “above average" rat- 
ing. citing the stock’s 52 percent 
dividend yield and prospects for an 
earnings recovery in 1994. 

ChemTrak Inc. rose 1 to 74 after 
Ortho Pharmaceutical Ccrp„ a unit 
of Johnson & Johnson, agreed to 
market CheraTrak's home choles- 
terol test. 

(Kmghi-Rulder. UP/, Bloomberg) 



Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 38S51P 3838.48 3BM 97 3 B 48 * 3 -1X8 
Tram 1SI422 1B331 I Jit 22 182237 *10® 

ura 2 a as som nu) zojb ♦a® 

CBmp 1400 bl 141 a 00 1401-34 U09® 

Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


d o» High LOW Pr>».oc« 


Industrials 

Tmnsn. 

Utilities 

Finance 

spsaa 

sp in 


NYSE Index* 


Law Cfese 
50X1 SS1J4- 
439.95 443.00 
168X5 1*9.12 
4465 44.M 
472.14 474.17 
43655 43852 


HU Law Lo** 0*9- 

262.73 241 J7 26 ? J -Dll 
32177 IS.06 331 31 -0M 
27D.6S 7?7 JS 37HJO -00 

235.74 124.77 71U* -0.11 
31934 218m 3*9.13 '0X9 



BSS 

B0 

B»7 

866 

Ml 

AS? 


9W 

*» 

905 

as 

897 

0 


918 

919 

919 

980 

911 

912 

Sea 

933 

734 

935 

914 

0 

927 


951 

9SS 

9S2 

934 

NA 

NA 


964 

76S 

964 

949 

■W 



973 

974 

974 

936 

— 

— 

Jul 

980 

982 

969 

969 

—e. 




*» 

994 

986 

978 




Doc 

1X00 

1X15 

N.T. 

N.T. 

— 

— 


Industrials 

Mod Law boat Settle ChU 
S^SoRgn’iw metric too-Jots of IN IH - 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 

Producer Price Index Rises 0.2% 

for 1 993 to a oflg ligbh 02 penal increase, the Labor Department 
said Wednesday. inflation measure since 


S “? v - 4 




Corncmfle 

Inoudriafs 

Transo 

y*«tv 

Finance 


JA S ON D, d 
1993 ' - - v -1994 


NYSE Most Actives 


TeiMo 

AmE,D 

WstsB 

GnMair 

MerrvGa 

CHCOPfP 

NtSem) 

EMC S 

Wawint 

US Sura 

FordM 

QllCDTO 

Merck 

AT8.T 

Unisys 


AMEX Most Actives 


HaintB 

Tapsru 

RayalOo 

SNSCO 

EcrtjSov 

CircaPti 

GrtnBrT 

Atari 

HanvOIr 

OKDCon 

Hasbro 


Vol 

HBah 

LOW 

Last 

aia. 

45306 47 •+ 

&SV, 

66V 


39129 31V. 

30V 

30V 


38226 

13 V 

131* 

13W 

—V. 

3605 

6OV 

S3V 

5»V 

—V 

33631 

2H 

IV 

J'A 

— H 

31888 30 

19V 

19V 

_. 

30931 

IM 

111* 

184* 

♦ V 

39396 

19V 

m 

17V 

♦ V 

7P43 UN 

25V 

25V 

— V 

2604 

27V 

25H 

3S 

♦ IV 

24215 

IIH 

a 

—V 

26216 

3*te 

38Vj 

38V 


23853 

37 V 

36'/i 

36V 

— Vj 

33578 

55 

53V 

MV 

— V 

23783 

UVi 

17V 

13V 

*Vj 


Low-Inflation Report 
Sends Dollar Down 


vat 

« 9*1 

Law 

Lass 

7463 


Vi. 

'Vo 


9V 

4 V 

SV 

5767 


4V 


4469 

3<Vu 

3V 

IV,, 





3223 

70V 

9'.i 

10V 


«/ M 

■< n 



7 V 


TV 

7904 

7V 

7V 

7V 

7893 

T'it 


IV 

7/92 

35V 

35'* 

35V 

2687 

19 

IS 

1BV 

2642 

84* 

8V 

8V 

2544 


BV 

V* 

3489 

6V 


6V 


NYSE Diary 


Ci "iipileJ b\ »./ur Sufi Fnm Duptucha 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
in active trading Wednesday after a 
report on producer prices’ in De- 
cember indicated inflationary pres- 
sures were still slight. 

Analysis said the news that 
wholesale prices fell 0.1 percent in 
the United States last month indi- 

Forolgn Exchange 

caied that the Federal Reserve 
Board would be disinclined to raise 
in'.eresi rales to defend against infla- 
uon. Lower interest rates lend to 
make a currency less attractive to 
international investors. 

Thedollarclosedat 1.73J9 Deut- 
sche marks on Wednesday, down 
from 1.7419 DM at Tuesday's 
close, and to 112.27 yen from 
1 12.405 yen. It also slipped to 
1.4635 Swiss francs from 1.4780 
francs and to 5.8%U French francs 
fmm 5X110. The pound rose 10 
SI. 5035 from $1.4401. 

'•This throws cold water on the 
notion that the Fed will raise rates 
in the first quarter." Angelo Evan- 
gelista. vice president at Bank of 
Boston, said. “That means the dol- 
lar will weaken." 

A scries 0 / strong economic re- 


ports in the fourth quarter had 
prompted speculation that the Fed 
would raise rates 10 prevent a rise in 
the inflation rale. Higher rates 
would make do! iar-tte nominated de- 
posits more attractive, boosting the 
currency. 

The bond market rallied on the 
news, with the 30-year Treasury 
bond gaining almost a point in 
price, bringing its yield down to 6. 1 7 
percent from 624 percent Tuesday. 

The dollar was primed to fall after 
Cun tram Palm, a Bundesbank 
council member, said he was "skep- 
tical" that growth in Germany's 
money supply would slow enough to 
warrant a cut in interest rates in the 
near future. 

The German government said 
Wednesday that consumer prices 
had risen 3.7 percent in 1993. up 
from an earlier estimate of 3.6 per- 
cent Officials of the central bank- 
have said thev would like to see an 
inflation rate of 2 percenL 

But Amy Smith, senior foreign 
exchange dialer at IDEA in New 
York, said ihe dollar’s fall against 
the mark should be limited by the 
fact that the German economy is 
slumping. She said there was string 
support for the dollar at 1 .7250 DM 
(AFX, Knight- RiJder, Bloomberg) 


Advanced 1143 1004 

Declined 9S8 1146 

Unchanged 64* 604 

Total Issues 2/« 27S3 

Now rtohs 101 l it 

New Lons 13 10 


NASDAQ Indexes 

Hum uw Las am. 

Carrmbe TB826 7*135 ”6X5 -1JO 

Industrials 823 73 817.51 823.9° - IAS 

Banns 492.12 690 37 49137 » 1.93 

Insurance *14.79 *11® 913.11 —048 

Rina 891.48 887.61 89CLW —0.05 

TrtraJ. 74X34 75632 7S7.77 -2.61 

UttUttes 181.98 190-77 18X98 -030 


AMEX Stock Index 

Mien low dove or?* 
479X7 47834 47937 +030 

Dow Jones Bond Averages 


2D Bonds 10558 Urtctv- 

IDutlllltss 10323 —0.13 

10 Indusirlols 107.73 +0-13 

Marfcet Sales 

NYSE 4 tun. volume 390JMJ000 

NYSE prev. com. dose 38X729X84 

Amex 4 tun. volume 160CAO5 

Amex prev. cons, dose 72,997 aw 

mas DAO 4 P.m. volume : 22535500 

NASDAQ orev. 4 tun. volume 321,929X88 


M.Y.S.E. Odd-Lot Trading 

Buy Sales Shart- 

Jan.ll IX5&440 1504532 6023/ 

Jan. 10 1,17X266 1577975 87524 

Jan. 7 746586 15*1,157 97.90) 

JW1. 6 961527 1582573 116570 

Jan. 5 963.906 1576574 109AS3 

•Included m me sales figures. 

SAP lOO Index Options 


Jan. II 

Wvind 

Nt) DK Joe M 


Est. Soles 7442 
! COFFEE (LCEI 

i DoOanpcr tnaiHctao-ioiiorstans 
Jon 1,178 1.U1 1.183 1,172 1.188 1,189 

Mar 1,194 1.195 1.196 1,186 IJK 1305 

MOV 1,197 1,198 1.198 1,188 1500 15531 

JdI 1.1*3 1.194 1.194 1,187 1,1*7 1.199 

Sen M»3 1.195 1,193 1,187 1.197 1,199 

Nov 1.193 1,199 1,194 1.188 1.196 1,199 

, Jaa 1.190 1.195 1.190 1,188 1.197 1,19* 

Est. Soles £824 

HM* Low Close ch'66 

WHITE SUGAR (Mettfl 
Dollars Per metrte tan-nls Of SB tons 
Mar 289X0 287X0 289X0 289X0 + 3 a0 

Mav 771X0 289,40 291X8 272X0 + JX0 

I Aaa 294.90 N.T. 296X0 297.10 + 3X0 

Del 28620 N.T. 286.00 2B7.00 + 3X0 

Dec N.T. N.T. 284X0 204X0 + 3X0 

I Mar N.T. N.T. 285X0 287X0 + 3J» 

Est. sales UOL Prev. sale* 1.106. Open 
i interest 11** 

Metals 

Close Previous 

ew Ask Bid Aak 
ALUMINUM tHWi Grade) 

□cm ion per metric am 
spot 1155X0 1156X0 115350 115450 

Forward 117050 1171.08 1170X0 1171.00 

COPPER CATHODES (Mlfb Grade) 


Exn. — 
14123 —055 
143X0 —075 
14223 — ITS 
1CX0 — 150 
14350 — IJS 
145-25 — IJS 
14750 —1X0 
149.75 —050 
152S0 —150 
13450 —1.73 
156-25 —175 


Jaa 14X75 14175 

FOB 14550 1*273 

Md U&2S M2® 

Apr 144X0 142X0 

May 165X0 14ZJ0 

Jun 14575 14175 

Jill 14750 14525 

Aog 14950 W750 

Sep 15150 1*975 

Oct 15450 I5275-. 

HO* 15650 ISSM 

DOC 158X8 156X0 

Est. Salas 27.167 . Prev. sain 2X491 . 

Open Interest I Id, lit 

BRUNT CRUDE OIL UPT) 

UX. dollars per borreMots of 1X08 barrels 
m 14X0 13X1 13X2 1353 —031 

Mar 14X2 1X46 1X46 TX46 —8X6 

APT 14.17 1X60 1X61 1X60 —839 

May 103 1377 1377 1377 —046 

Jim 1*31 14.19 14.19 14X3—040 

jm (45* 1457 14J7 14.13 —045 

AaB N.T. N.T. *LT. 14X7 —0*1 

StP N.T. N.T. N.T. 1453—839 

Oct N.T. N.T. N.T. 1470 — 849 

Est. Sales 31554 . Prev. soles 46>445 . 

Open Interest 162X20 


Stock Indexes 

HW Low dOM Ckanpe 
FTSE 108 (LIFFE) 

S2S per Index POIM 

Mar 3426X 3379X 338*4 —42 5 

Jon J4J0D 3377X 3377X —425 

Sep N.T. N.T. 3*1*0 — 425 

Est. volume: 21X0X Oaan Interest; 7X9S3. 


Spot 1776X0 1779X0 175850 175150 

Forward 180OX0 1801X0 177150 1773X0 

LEAD _ 

Donors ser metric Ion 

Son I 478X0 *79X8 47250 47350 

Reward 491X0 492X0 406X0 48650 

NICKEL 

SS artWr- ®fW 5-5X0 5490X0 
Forward 570SA0 571000 5345X0 5550X0 

TIN ^ 

Dollars par metric ton 
Spot 4845X0 4BSSX0 4760X0 4770X0 

Forward 4900X0 4905X0 41X2X0 4828X0 

21 NC (Speetol HM lOrade) 

Dollars pa metric ton 

spot 999 -SO 180050 981X0 982X0 

Forward 1019X0 101950 1000X0 1002X0 

Financial 

Hteft LOW Close ornate 
3-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 

CSMXM • Pis of MO pd 

Mar 9446 9462 9444 + 0X1 

JM *4X4 9475 «*77 — OUT 

Sep *4X7 9478 9479 — 0X5 

£?C *4X5 *4.74 *676 —0X6 

Mar *474 *4X5 94X5 — 0X8 

Jim 9*57 94X8 *4X7 —008 

se« *457 9450 9458 —0X7 

D*c 9451 9*12 **12 —0X6 

Mar 94X8 9358 9358 -0X5 

JUfl 92X7 9X22 9X82 —8X2 

EsL volume: 115.797. Open Interest : *17X47. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFEI 
Si milliaa - pts of Ml PCt 
Mar 9*X2 96X1 96X2 +0X3 

Jun *657 9654 *656 + 80S 

Stp 96X8 96X7 96X8 +0X5 

Dec 9X70 95X9 93.70 +0X5 

Alar N.T. N.T. 9557 +0X6 

Jog *433 *533 9334 +0X6 

See N.T. RT. 9415 +0X6 

Est. volume. 473. Open interest: 9570. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM) moiton - an of no pet 


5485X0 5490X0 
5345X0 5530X0 


4760X0 4770X0 
48 HUD 4820X0 


981X0 982X0 
IQOOJM 1002X0 


Amex Diary 


Advanced 304 296 

Declined 777 316 

Unumnaed M7 243 

Total Issues ko 855 

New Hiatts 27 » 

Now Lows S 3 


NASDAQ Diary 


SHke Cafls-Loa 
Price No* Dec Joe P«a 

S: 

39| — — — — >, W 4 i I ». 

3»S — 43 - — ■» S I — 

4a - - - s i«i i >. 

6S-S--VVI1- 
410 9 2F, »'• US'- N N Is n 

415 HI* 2T» 36U — IS l«s T- - 

42d I* 1» 1t*> 21“; 7. IV A A 

a U 15 I6 1 , - % 2 |V - 

on rt mV i?v u l o> *v, 

OS A HI « - Isftft- 

440 lli, <t| 7V, 3H 6*2 tn 1T- 

445 v, 2 •. - 7V. Va nit - 

4SC N I Iv ft II, tfi - U'l 

*55 A >. IV - - - 17%. - 

Cats: total vaL H2Xtt; laral open M. *79739 
OUl- woi VOL 1 121 IS. total seen PL 5NAJ7 

DecQ DecH Dec 93 Decfl DecN Dec 93 
tts - - - W - - 

B*s — — — *i iv. - 

T - - 

*5 _ _ _ is - _ 

Cek: Isiol vc* 40: total open Inl 77D 
Pets: Mid *« 17*1; total ooen ml. 128,153 
SbewCflOE 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unctoneed 
Total Issues 


1 —033 

1 —0X2 


Est. volume: 122.922. Oom Intered : 80*450. 


Sources: Reuters, Matft Assad 
London Inti Financial Futures 
inn Petmewn Excftanm. 


Spot CommocHtlaa 

Commodity Today Prev. 

Aluminum, lb 8X24 0534 

Coffee. Brat, lb 0X15 0X35 

Capper electrolytic, lb CL929S 0914 

iron FOB. ion 21330 21100 

Lead. B34 HJM 

silver, irav o s. 5X8 5X6 

Steel (scrap), ton 12950 72950 

Tin. lb 52552 52578 

Zinc, Si <24691 0.4659 


Dtvi do nd s 

Company Per Amt Pay Rec 

STOCK SPLIT 

Find instif me 2 for 1 split. 

INCREASED 

Find Instil Ins Q .13 1-20 2-34 

CORRECTION 

USTratHBort VZ7 1-Z7 

rwtsed eHtdlve dales on I Ibr J reverse jpfrf. 
SPECIAL 

Fst United Bn Grp XI 1-13 1>24 

subled to close oi menier with Nerwesi Corp. 


AUdSoum insn 
Sdnlfzer Steel 
State Bcncshrs 
Un (first Coro n 


Applied Power Q 33 2-6 2-28 

Birmingham Steel Q .10 1-24 20 

Helene Cunts 0 X6 2+ Mi 

Sthwostern Energy a 36 1-70 2-4 

Warner insar O Ji ih l-a 

Wheotter TXT. q XI 1-17 M 

o ot m uol; p e u yo Me lo Canodkm funds: m- 
moe my; tha u or tn tv; s -s em l- titint i u l 


- X7 1-21 J-24 

. 35 M0 2-25 

- .10 1-18 Mf 

_ 325 3-17 4-1 


Birmingham Steel 
Helene Curtis 


Mar 

94X0 

94.47 

*4® 

Jun 

96.95 

94X9 

94X1 

Sap 

95X3 

95X6 

9529 

Dec 

9558 

9SX0 

95X2 

Mur 

95.77 

*571 

9572 

Jot 

Sep 

9588 

95X6 

*SX* 

95X8 


DK 

95.77 

9571 

9573 

Mar 

95 M 

9562 

95® 

JOB 

95X0 

9544 

9544 


LONG GILT (UFFE) 

BUN - Pis B 32nOs at 188 pd I 

Alar 119-12 118-26 119X1 +044 . 

JM 118-16 118-15 118-13 + 006 1 

ESI. volume: 88X71 Open Interest: 104X65. 

GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFB) 
DM 258X80- Pts OMOlPct 
Alar 10132 101X7 1D1.16 +0.12 

Jun 10134 101.10 101.11 +112 

ESI. volume: 133X45. Open Inierast: 146X49. 


Brazil Index Qoses Up 7% 

Citnpi kii by Our Siaif From Dispatches 

SAO PAULO — Brazilian stocks soared Tuesday, wiib a key index 
rising 7 percent, bolstered by a shaip in/lax of foreign funds and raiewed 
confidence that the legislature wouldapprove the government’s anti- 
inflation program, brokers said. 

The Bovespa index of the 54 most active shares wras quoted at 53.643 
points, up 3J02 from Tuesday’s close. 

“Prospects of economic stabilization, an improved political scenario 
and cheap prices on some second-tier stocks have been underpinning the 
market.” a desk manager at a major brokerage house said. 

Investors were lured by “last year’s strong returns," said a trader at 
Banco lealu. (Return, Bloomberg t 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vie Auodowd Prew 
Season Seoun 

High Low Open Htoh Low O 


Certain offerings of KCerllies. Tienctal 
Krtkes nt lnrmb in real evwe pddutad u> 
rtrii nnt ipaper are not mdnriud in cenM 
Jwwficiinm in wtridi *e tatcmooeal Herald 
Trihonc It Julnhutrf. iacludrnfi ike Uailed 
Slater of AoimCa. awl do ew con si lime 
offrrii«* ot tcrantics. terricts or imeresp In 
ibete juritdiciiawr. The Inienutioaal Herald 
Tribune Buoraes no respoeaibibly ahaaoever 

ipr aey adratmemv fn oflertnp oT lej bad. 


Excluding the volatile tooa ana cumgj r” 

modestSercent in Decembff, asnpared with a 
advance. Fordie year, the core PM rose 0.4 pOTcnL down sharply from 
1992’s 10 percent increase, the department said. 

L.A. Times-PacTel Electronics Bid 

I AN GELES fBlownbeig) — Times Mirror Co.’s Los Angcks 

ping assistants who will help them tap mto a database ^ bt^« listings, 
classified and display advertising, promotional matenal and news stones, 
tberompanies satU The information will be read to them overthe phone. 
Taxed or maikd. Customers wfll also be able to buy some products ow 
the phone and will have limited computer access to the databases, the 

notreveal pricing for the sendees, although they said it would 
be low enough to encourage frequent usage by many customers. 

Tandy to Add 3,600 Jobs in ’94 

NEW YORK (Koighl-Ridder) —Tandy Corp. said Wednesday that it 
would add more than 3,600 jobs this year in an accelerated expansion of 
its retail outlets. 

John Roach, the chairman, said Tandy would add 24 SupeiCeaters and 
approximately 1.600 employees to its Computer City retail chain, build ax 
new stores and add 1,800 employees to its Incredible Universe electronics 
c hain , and hire 200 people to support the overall expansion plan. 

He added that Tandy would introduce sales programs to “capitalize on 
a nationwide distribution system” at the Radio Shade outlets. 

Mesa Settles Lawsuit With Unocal 

LOS ANGELES (UPH — Unocal Cap. said Wednesday that it had 
agreed to a $47.5 million settlement from T. Boone Pickens’s Mesa Inc. 
and other parties ste mming from the corporate raider's unsuccessful 1985 
hostile takeover attempt. _ . 

The case bad been scheduled to go to trial in U JS. District Court in Los 
Angeles on Feb. 22. Unocal and a shareholder had sued Mesa, of which 
Mr. Pickens is chairman, in ] 986 over 599 million in profits it said it was 
owed from purchases and sales of Unocal stock within a six-mon tb period 
in 1985. Unocal was also seeking prejudgment interest, which could have 
topped $50 nullion. 

Burlington Hh by Energy Slump 

SEATTLE (Bloomberg) — Depressed by falling energy prices. Bur- 
lington Resources Inc.*s fourth-quarter earnings fell 85 percent from a 
year earlier, excluding discontinued operations in the 1992 period. 

Although it boosted gas output by 1 1 percent and oil production by 1 
percent from the year-earlier period, Burlington’s net income fell io $52 
million from $963 million a year earlier. Including discouniinued opera- 
tions, the year-earlier result was SI 133 million. The company sold its 
interest in Rum Creek Timber Co. . 

Revenue sank. 8 percenL to $310.8 million in the latest quarter. 

For lite Record 

The Agriculture Department lowered Us forecast for 1993 cotton 
production Wednesday bat raised its estimates for the orange crop. The 
department estimated the cotton yield at 163 million bales, which would 
bring the estimated harvest 42,900 bales below 1992 levels. Orange 
production for the 1993-94 season is forecast at 103 million tons, . up 2 
percent from last month's estimate. ' (UP!) 


Low One CTB Op.W 


Season Season 
High Low 


◦pm Hah low One Qo OnH 


Season Season 
«gh Low 


Qaen Hah Low Qose Chg OaM 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 



Hong Kong 



Brussels 


incur/ 

2655 2*70 


-G F.n 

2«S 796S 


Arbed 

4540 4380 


Sarco 

2410 2365 


Beioert 

21000 21208 


Coceprill 

178 182 


Cooeoo 

stm stid 


□ulhalte 

1456 1446 


Eiectraoei 

6680 6750 


O'B 

1498 1500 


GHL 

4180 4200 


OevMti 

9H0 *170 


f.redteitonk 

7960 8010 


Jplroflna 

10200 10775 


Ao-.wertln 

J620 3645 


Psiai Beioe 

5B20 5360 


•tac Gen Bomuif 

87*0 BBD0 


Z ac Gen Belgtaue 

2760 7745 


Sotirta 

■5325 ISAM 


Solvar 

U975 14300 


Trccletwf 

io 7 w icaw 


■JCB 

24925 25500 


Current Start Index : 7702.97 
Previous : 7&814* 

— 




Bk East asm 5850 58 

Colhav Pacific 1230 1150 
Cheung Kona 4175 Jt5C 
Cnina Ligfil Pwr 4935 5050 
Dairy Form inn 13.70 1430 
Hang Lung Dev ia.70 rvjo 
Hong 5eng Bonk 7050 7250 
Henderson Land 5030 52 

HK Air Eng. 44.75 48 

HKCninaGaS 7050 2230 
HK Electric 27.70 79 JO 
HR Land 2550 2430 

HK Really Trusl 2L30 27 

HSBC Holdings 107 107 

HKShangHlG 1130 1230 
HK Telecomm 15.10 li*0 
HK Ferry 1230 12.90 

Hutch Whamnoa 33 3450 
H.san Dev 2SJ0 27.10 

joralne Moth. 6850 6*50 
Jardlne Sir Hla 31 33 

Kowfoon Motor 2170 2190 
Mandarin orieni idjo iojo 
M iramar Hotel 2030 7050 
New world Dev 3*35 36 

SHK Proas 4650 to 
S leluA 550 555 

Swire Pac A 5750 5950 
Tal Cheung Pro* 14.70 14 40 
rVE 170 170 

Whorl Hold 32.75 WJ0 
Wing On ln« 11»0 1*30 
Wineor Ind. 1430 1430 


Johannesburg 


15.10 n« 

1230 1190 
33 3450 
2SJV 27.10 
6850 6*50 
31 33 

2170 2190 


4650 70 

550 5 AS 
5750 5950 


AECI 
AJ retn 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blrvoor 
Bui lets 
De Beers 
Driefontein 
Gen cor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Hionveid Steel 
Klooi 

Mcdbonk Gro 
Randtonlcln 

Rusoial 

SA Brows 

Si Helena 
Sosa* 

WBlfcom 
Wesiern Deeo 


18 10 
9X50 9350 
207 217 

2450 27 

1135 NA 
54 52 

II0JS 111 
5575 56 

9.10 94} 
112 113 

j frjp 2!L50 
I* I* 
5X75 5175 
2875 2*.25 

40 49 

02 03 

*3 9450 
-14 47 

19 1L85 
i) 4850 
195 197 

;4M*32 


Madrid 


3BV J 1 10 3095 

Bco Central HIso. 3260 3245 
Banco Santander 6590 65*0 


CEPSA 2870 2B9S 

Orogaaos 2500 2515 

Endesa 7030 7040 

Ercros 146 148 

Iberdrola I 1010 1020 

RePSOl 4655 4775 

Tobocalero 4330 4340 

Telefonica 1920 1945 




Close Prev 

Handelsbankeri 

134 

122 

mvesior B 

WO 

172 

Norsk Hydro 

238 237 JO 

PracordWAF 

1J1 

129 

Sfmawik B 

120 

121 

SCA-A 

145 

150 

S-E Bankeri 

62 

61.S0 

Skandla F 

IBS 

186 

Skanska 

217 

20 * 

SKF 

1® 

1® 

Stora 

434 

437 

Treileoarg BF 

87X0 87X0 

Volvo 

585 

577 

AHoewyaertden : 

1711.17 

Previous : 1730J4 




Toronto 


Sydney 


Amcor 972 9.9S 

ANZ *£9 437 

3HP IS7J liM 

Boroi 439 439 

Ekmgalnvilie 08* 0.90 

Calc* M»er 536 5^3 

Coma I co 4J5 *77 

CRA 17.70 1832 

C3R 5X8 5.1 1 

Ounloa 5*7 559 

Fosters Brew 137 138 

Goodman Field 1.71 1 32 1 

I Cl AusJnSki 1050 10.46: 
Mogdlnn 230 230 

MIM 2X4 2.73 

Nat Awt Bern* 1239 1232 
News Cora 93» 9 « 

Nine Network 5.7c 5.7* 

N Broken HIM 372 340 

Pioneer mil 290 291 

Nmndy PoseWon 25* 2x0 

OCT Resources 15: 170 

Samos X91 *35 

TNT 231 113 

Western Mining 7X* 7.12 

Westeac Bonking 4*3 467 

Woodside 435 JJ8 


Banco da Brasil 7050 6350 
Banesoa *50 3500 

Brodesca 8300 69M 

Brahma 1000a W0a 

Pgr ana pa nemo 5500 5000 
Petrobros 59000 55500 

Telebras l*5M 13700 

Vale Rio Doce 34300 36300 
VarlD 69500 NA 

O. i 100- 


London 


Arioev Man 447 

Allied even* 65* 

ArlO Wiggins 26l 

Argyll Grauo 29* 

ass Brit Foods 170 


Bank Scotland H* 
BarrJav* 594 

BOSS 536 

BAT 525 

BET 1J0 

Blue Circle 3^19 

BOC Grauo *39 

Bools U3 

Bovwter J.7J 

BP 1*3 

Bril Airways *78 

Brit Gas 3.42 

Brit Steel 1 74 

Brit Telecom *62 

BTH 149 

C ante Wire 4*3 

Cadburr Sch S3B 

Caraiion 17* 

Coats Vi.elle 163 

Comm Union 467 

Caurtoulds 5X9 

ECC Group SX7 

Enterprise Oil 435 

Eurotunnel 6-15 

Flsons 138 

Forte 161 

GEC 379 

Gem Acc 778 

GtakO 6*7 

Grand ,'Aet 4X4 



Singapore 


Golden Haee pi 
H ow Par 
Hume Industries 
inchcooe 
Kespel 
<L Keeeng 
Lum ChonB 
AAoteyan Bonks 
OCBC 

ous 

out 

Sembawow 
Shonsrlla 
Si me Darnv 
SIA 

SDare Land 
Snare Press 
Sins 5 team snip 
Sooro TeHcwnm 
Siratts Trading 
(JOB 
UOL 

%S&2 r ?&£$i 


AW 7.70 
660 77S 
11.40 H.*0 
lAJKf 17.10 
16.90 17.90 
110 144 

142 3X4 

440 575 

635 670 
10.10 10X*1 
3J4 1C 
1.93 103 
9X0 9X0 
1190 14 JO 
9X5 B7S 
7JS 3X0 
14X0 15 « 
510 6J0 
3X6 *12 
7X5 7X0 
675 6X0 
14X0 1520 
3X0 4X8 
NA 172 
344 194 
10.70 11X0 
2.16 L42 
: 326031 



Montreal 


Alain Aluminum 
BankMmitreal 
Bell Canada 
3ambardier B 
Camhtor 
Cascades 
Dominion Text A 
Donohue A 
MacMillan Bf 
NON Bk Canada 


29 7* 

23 27*9 
<3te 422b 
2ltb 2lvj 
23% Z?Vi 
flVS n 
9% *1i 
2446 23*. 
21V. 2TA 
10*4 II 


Stockholm 


AGA 
ASOCA 
Astro 6 
Altos Copco 
• Electrolux B 
Ericsson 
Esseitv-A 


410 415 

Ml 610 
184 188 

423 428 

29S 297 

3S3 3d! 

i» Un- 


Grains 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

5X00 Uu minknum- dollars par busriel 
193*, 700 Mar 94 3X5 Vf 19) XB5Vi 

1X99: 3J30 May 94 142+ 3X6 lANk 

34* 7*1 JU*i 3.46V. 7S1W 746W 

3X1 3X2 Sep 94 148V. 352k. 

3X7W 3JF D*CM 348 180H 3X7 V. 

327 XII Jill 95 

Est. sales 15X00 Toe's sates 10749 
Tuesoaenim 54343 t# 146 
WHEAT (KBOT) 

5000 bu mkwrwm- omtos oer (xrsriN 
X92 2X0 Mv94 3X2 k. 386 3XZW 

349'-, Z98 May *4 3-64V9 3X8W 144K. 

349 797 Jut 94 344 V 142 144V. 

144 305V Sea 94 345V| 34TW J45 

3X5 117 “1 Dec »4 3X3 X5*Vi 3X1 

IXT-a 3X3 MOT9S 
Es* sales NA TUrtide 7X73 
Tue's MW M 3*419 off 3234 
CORN (CBOT) 

SjjOO thi mnmjm- deOm pw teitfiel 
30**i 732HM1T94 105*1 3X6 30* W 

liry 7389: MOV 94 XI0 XIOVi XOBW 

315 241 -M 94 310 310*. X0S* 

2S3'* 148 V Se» 94 2X7* 288* 2X6 

272V. 3 36 W Dec 94 1MM. 249 2X7 

2_77Vi iSS'y Marti 774l» 774V 2-73 

2M*. 2J*9iMay95 777V. 177V, 774 

2X1 274L AN 95 77S'4 771'* 177 

L9V 2XS9iDecf5 1X6 2X6 3-54 VS 

Est sales 65X00 Tin's, sates 0X38 
Tu*'s open ini 347,131 ah 1623 
SOYBEANS fCBOT) 

5X00 Du minimum- dollars per bushel 


11X5 

9®Od*4 

1095 

10X9 

18.91 

1096 

-00 14X62 

1094 

9.17 Altar 95 

1095 

II® 

1094 

1097 

—OX2 

2X35 

1O0 

1057 MOV 75 




10X7 

—O-02 

37 

1089 

18X7 Jul 95 




18.97 

—082 

25 

M0 

10X7 Od 95 




1097 

—002 

» 


387V. »0JD 30X03 
X64W tROl-VS 9.110 
3STii -004 1X132 

3X195 .OJDVS 1,905 
340VS -0.051* 1.909 
327Yi 4 


1B4>4 -OXlVy 21,136 
X60V. .0X2*4 7X74 

148V, -0X4 

MVS 40X3 1.766 

154V, -QJBtk 915 
3X4 v. .cm 


io*** -am 'a 117 jn 
1X9 ‘6— 4101 sun 
3X944-0X1 70X06 

786V.-0X2V, 12X39 
147 Vi —0X2 V. 37X89 
773 —043V, 2357 
776 — 4UnVl 311 
ITS —0.03 358 

2X4 v, -an* jo 


7X6 7769] Jon 94 6X6 6X7 6X346 4X4 1 '. *0X1 1917 

7X4 589V. MieW 694 IfSVS L9I46 6.93 V, -0.00(6 81X01 

7X1 592VSMay*4 697VI L*9 59595 597V. -OXO» 35X68 

7X0 S94SJUI94 597 599 59544 59784 -Hill 31X74 

7X5 528 Aug 94 590 592U 590 591 -CUB’- 5.136 

682 517 5*094 iM’/i 56784 6X6 5664* -<2X014 2.949 

7X7V: SXS>iNov 94 544 “l 547 54SV, 546V, 12078 

5611V 518ViJ6n9S 55HS 59 ‘m 551 552 709 

667 642 Mar 95 551 557 55SV> 6X7 >0809. M 

566 547WX495 6X7V, 557V, 556!, 556*5 166 

550V, 581V, Now 95 530 530 528 528 -003 495 

Est sates 47X00 Tue'ssdes SOTOj 
T ue's open W 17X70 on 862 
SOYBEAN 68EAL (CBOT) 

1 00 tans- dollars Per ion 

239X0 184*0 Jen *4 19580 19500 194X0 195X0 -020 5X0 

237X0 18520 MOr *J I45J0 1*7 40 1*600 T97J0 - [10 40X71 

232JB IX5J0MPV94 197 JO 198X0 197.10 19530 -ISO 14^147 

Jaa IB 191JDA484 19520 1*9X0 198JD 199X0 -120 13X14 

72X00 IOXOAUQ94 I47JD 198-70 1*7X0 19570 - 1 JO 5506 

31000 mtOStPM 19550 197X0 19550 197 JO *1J0 1X34 


SS. tales 18X00 Tue's. sales 2X942 
Tue'sapenrt B5IM6 UP 487 
SOYBEAN M. (CBOT) 

BUBO fcs- (Mars ow 100 tes 
39X0 70 90 Jon 94 2593 79H 

2974 21.I3MOT94 3X3 79X8 


X545 0.10 00*4 269* 3500 2590 

3590 OXODecM 25X0 25X5 2520 

75B 22X5 Jan 95 25.15 2517 2515 

Est sales 15X00 Turt sates 17J7I 
Tus'sooeftifB 96.915 UP IBM 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

40X00 bs.- .am cere. 

7552 ra«F«h*4 7427 74-50 74X5 

8X75 7X20 Apr 94 7580 7695 76X7 

>6BS n 25 Jun 94 74X0 7463 7435 

7787 70-20 Aug *4 7XJ7 73X5 7X17 

7XB2 71 JZ7 Oct*i 73-35 73X0 7320 

7430 72-3SD*C*4 74J0 7415 71*5 

ria Txoo Frays ;<xo 7110 7X*o 

Esi. sales. 15.116 Tite'5 sales IL130 
Tuo's open W 85722 ite 1277 
n M 1 m CATTLE (CMER) 

50X80 IBS -cents Per Bx 


^4 sales 9.9*6 Tub's- sote, 15X23 
tub's open Ite 109.130 IIP 1680 
COCOA (NCSE) • • 

HtmMtctora- 5P*r m 
1415 fSlMtrM 11)0 1153 

1366 978 MOV 94 USD 1113 

1365 999 Jul 94 lie 1314 

7377 1020 Sep 9« 1300 1305 

1309 1 041 Dee 94 1234 1261 

lie lariMorfs 

1400 I1HMOV93 

1407 1225 Ju> 9S 

1350 I32B5HP95 1325 1325 

En-sdes 10X01 Tue's taka 0X35 
Tue’s open M 88X17 up 22B 
ORANGE JUC8 (NCTN) 
isxoo Ira.- orals per e. 

13U0 8X15 Jan 94 11X95 >12X5 

11(25 0450 MarM 11430 11425 

13109 e.OOMOry** 1162S 117X0 

135X0 10X50 Jul *4 11725 117JD 

134-50 lRU03ep«4 119X0 119JJ0 i 

13400 108X0 NOV 94 120X0 170-50 I 

132X0 10150 Jon 95 
12125 106X0 Mar 95 

Mov 95 

EAMH NA. Tue'bBdes 1X7) 
Tub's aOCTiM 17X77 off 163 


Metals 

M GRADE OOPPER (NCMX) 

25X00 Is.- cents perti. 

10440 7X55 Jen 94 81.90 1120 8120 

107X0 73X0 Mar 94 0125 87.® 0125 

»X J4J8APT94 

MUB 7X68 May 94 01X0 02X5 01X0 

8920 7 410 Jun 94 0255 0125 8225 

10295 7420 Jul 94 8120 >195 82X0 

10320 7450SCP94 8X15 8X15 Site 

10120 7525 Dec W 8350 8480 8350 

8U0 7490Jgn9S 

9920 7320 Fed 95 0128 0120 0120 

SBJD 6220 Mar 9S 81X0 83X8 8180 

08X0 7 6X9 Mew 95 

85X0 7*20 Jul 9S 

86X0 7520 Aug 95 

8520 79.W56P9J 

8110 75200095 

020 7725 Nov 95 

EM. sales 10200 Tub's, sates R.922 

Tub's open Ha 4590 off 750 

SA.VER fMCMX) 

5X00 bav at- cems per tray a- 


*31 SUM 
431 14X30 
*38 9.994 
425 4291 
1-25 4541 
♦25 7^17 
♦25 4331 
♦as 13*9 
+25 3B3 


-415 5*3 

-410 ma 
— 4C 3295 
-445 1X96 
—4X0 7® 


*025 LI® 
*0J5 39.921 
♦0.15 730 

*115 1357 
♦005 834 

*0X5 1319 
♦025 3254 
—108 3X06 
-o.w • 

♦ no 1293 

—115 

—120 

-125 

+105 383 

-130 

111 

1® 


EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI m2Gan-otiaf MOpcl 

9663 9120 Mar 94 94X0 96X4 9499 WO 

9475 90X0 Jun *4 9623 9628 94X1 96X5 

9434 9136 Stl> M .9625-- -96,18 9405 «40* 

96X1 *071 Dec V 9167 9173 95X7 9570 

*5X0 «n24Mar95 9556 *1® MM *5-57 

95X1 ; *071 Junes 9523 *1X7 *433 +6X4 

*5X3 TUI Seats 9S.M *117 1112 «15 

*1X1 . n.WOeC*!- 948* 04JB- M3 98X5 
Ek. salts NJL Tub's. 1*5 331X01 . 

Tub's oocnW . . ■ . ‘ - ■ - 

BRITISH POUND (CMBO 
S Pkr pound- 1 pdra eouatiOXBn 
15384 l®00Ma-H 1X848 1X990 1X8*6 1X988 

LSIS0 1X500 Jan 94 1X870 1X918 1X848 Ixno 

1X930 1X660 Sap 94 1X800 1XBSD 1JM» JM* 

1X958 IXSOOecM 1X770 1X800 1X729 1X816 

Ed. coles NA. HN'isOtei 92® 

TUt^openlnt 30X91 Off 963 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

I PBTdkvl POM equate S0JB01 
0X713 02394 Mar 9* 02565 02508 07350 07554 

02105 02365 Jun 94 02574 0J5» 07545 02547 

07MB 07345 SOP 94 02543 

02670 07315 Dec 94 82555 07515 02535 025V 

0JS80 0J37CMW93 02531 

Est.sotes NA TuftsWs 3X13 
TUe'sopenU 27X9* op 3 
GERMAN MAfHC (CMBU 
5 per ravtc- 1 point aquots SOOOOI . 

0X305 056X0 Mar 94 03715 05743 R57M 057® 

0X133 05407 Jun 94 05694 05712 0J6M OS7D9 

0X065 0546 ISsafc astro 

05700 O505Deefl OXMZ 

EsL cate* NA. TUB'S, sales 34201 
WiopbW 144X85 UP 833 
JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

SP*rv*n- 1 point equate SOJBoeoi 
axooyagDjmsaoMarMaiMWiBaxoaKuiuneaaiLSOBKti 

OOOWSOJKB871 Jun *4 0X08* 190X08*9300099 1 Wj008*50 

ACOMUOtB8M5epM OX089790JB899BlOOM7te-Cni993 
EsL sates NA Tue's.sales 15282 
tin's w he ios.ni aft va 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

t per hteK-ltxrint equals SOJMOl 

07M5 0X500 Mar 94 0X7® 0X835 0X757 0X835 

0JD70 8X590 JlPl 94 0X806 0XBB 0X131 

02080 1460) Sep 94 .. 0X825 

EaLcotes na UN's. gates .1X15,100 

Tlars raenW 47X33 up 77B 


Industrials 


9AA14KS14 

• 003313X92 
-♦00*347201 

♦004)98.174 

♦ 0041*9230 
—004137211 
♦0041)32® 
♦00*9230 


♦ 1® 29.993 

♦ 138 <84 

H3* « 

♦ 136 S 


-1 25.135 
— 1 123 
—I 502 
—1 38* 

-I 128 


• 25137X79 
*24 623 

• 24 ZU 
•34 II 


•231002V 

♦ 19 5.1® 

♦ 77 304 


*71 47,127 
*71 475 

*71 30 


195X0 

1*6X0 

-0.90 1801 

544X 

366XJcnM 




SD7X 

-24 

3 

19460 

19530 

•000 2.944 

5140 

*650 Fra 94 




5006 

— 3X 

6 

IfiM 

19500 

♦0® M 

D4X 

3460 MarM 

S13X 

5168 

SDOX 

5IBO 

-3X0854 




KSX 

37IXMOV94 

S17X 

517X 

5120 

SU3 

-3X12X18 




S6S0 

371J Jul 94 

5t9X 

5105 

S1S8 

51M 


8X28 




«1X 

3J4JSB0 94 




SWA 

— 3X 

263* 




sno 

3800 Dec 94 

ms 

sax 

S3L0 

5246 

—IS 


2091 

79® 


5400 

®lXJan9s 




52SA 

-15 


2883 

28.99 

♦0.11 «X09 

S72X 

41L5 Mar 95 

5343 

534J 

5320 

S3I10 

—36 

2,773 

28X6 

2B60 

• 009 19^18 

JMO 

4180 May 95 




5319 

—17 

200/ 

2015 

♦ OM TX8/9 

WS.0 

4208 Jul 95 




5388 

-38 


37® 

VSS 

5.12) 

ssoo 

4930 Sep 95 




542J2 



3685 

26.95 

♦ OI5 40*4 

5S38 

SNOOK 95 




5*07 

—40 

7M 


25.98 -O M ZSSI 

2536 rOO 4X7* 

25.17 . 007 231 


7AIS — 0.11 30,122 
7623 -HE 22.125 
74X0 -003 16.966 

7X20 —017 9.34 
TUa —007 52*3 
7400 —105 811 

73.98 -BOS 29 


«*.» 

n.*ajon*4 

KL77 

SIM 

8130 

81 tS 

-025 

24H 

8535 

79 XI Mar *4 

8115 

0.17 

81X7 

81® 

—023 

5286 

850 

79 J9 Apr N 

8) ID 

81.15 

8065 

nos 

-41)7 

2.1® 

8*80 

NXSJMdyH 60X5 

M 

80.45 

80® 

—0.27 

1,410 

8300 

VXJAuqM 

61.95 

008 

01® 

n® 

— «sn 

ijn 

Slid 

79X05eP94 

91.23 

91 JO 

81.17 

6130 

—018 

151 

08.00 

7785 Nov 94 

110 

81® 

6tJS 

11® 


5S 

81 18 

’9J0OO95 

11 10 

81. W 

8098 

81X0 

-OK) 

1S3 

Esi sales 

1X53 Toe's, laies 

1.938 





Tin’s open d« IL271 

Ite Ml 





HOGS (CMER) 







tajnas s 

• LTunperih 







51-25 

»jOFeb*4 

42 JO 

ost 

46X5 

47X7 

-o.ro 

9X0 

•9 0S 

39.57 Aar *4 

46J2 

an 

48J9 

«X? 

—aw 

7.90 

54 07 

65 77 Jun 94 

an 

a 97 

as 

S3® 

-8X3 

602 

54 00 

4530 Kite 

S3 47 

o 0 

ao/ 

5222 

-023 

lt» 

9® 

46JSAugM 

5185 

aio 

S1.70 

Si® 

—030 

1367 

PC 

a®On« 

0.10 

0.15 


4880 

— CJ7 

104 

D» 

45 K Dec 94 

005 

005 

0X5 

00 

-030 

6S 

Ulii 

48® Feb « 

X X? 

5CJ5 

XU} 

at a 

-0.1/ 

SJ 

Ot 

0.90 Apr 95 




00 


ID 

E8 s=*ts 

4W Tue v sales 

6802 





Tub's open M J1J3I 

UP 07 





PORK BELLIES (CMERl 






0.900 Ds. 

-eertsperb 







81.15 

niaFraf* 

57 75 

an 

5615 

5620 

—137 

8107 

M>99 

38.6Hk.Vr 74 

5835 

59.*5 

54.77 

56X5 

-1® 

1X6* 

i)JB 

JOJD.MoyM 00 

iO 10 

S7.W 

57.92 

—167 

7,* « 

8100 

3930 Jul*6 

59 99 

ton 

58* 

5850 

-130 

1327 

57 50 

■aooAuiW 

TJD 

57® 

56X5 

56X5 

—0X5 

249 

Ed. cotes 

X9lt Tue's. sates 

2.165 






Tue'seecnuit ID NJ off 23 


COFFEE C (NCSE) 

17.500 En -ConficerD 
Sfl.rs 61.20 Mgr *J THIS TUB 

9150 612S7.50V 9* *3*5 7475 

1’B 6490JUI9J 7509 74.10 

*J0 a8JflS«94 7A» 7*3» 

91 « *7 IOC+e94 te.» 

VJR *8.98 MU' 95 

Mov 95 

Est. sates *xi5 Tue’s.sales 7JM 
Tuo'swenint uo ion 
SUGAR'BORLO II (NCSE) 

112000 Ihfc- cem per h 
1184 LSOMfe-U 1020 1079 

11X8 SJDMatW 11X2 11X8 

1115 9.15 Jut 94 lfl.*7 1US 


72 95 - IJJ 35X43 

7420 ♦ I JO 11X6* 

76.15 1 120 3.757 

7723 -OB ZJ8* 

*9.10 . 1.W 12® 

80 15 >1 15 746 

41.90 • 1.15 2 


UTS -O01 49JBS 
1105 —OXI 28266 
111*7 -Ml 15.938 


Est.KPes 120 OP Tue's. sales 19 JS 
Tue’sapanM 106,9*4 all 981 
PLATSIUM (NMER1 
58 trar at- dodtrs per tray at. 

<27X0 336X0 Jon 94 386X0 

42k50 335X0 Apr 94 390.00 390X0 387X0 380X0 

428X0 357 JO Jul 9f 39U8 392X0 390X0 3*8.10 

405X0 348X000*4 393X0 WX00 393X0 391X0 

«7X0 374X0 Jan *3 39&J8 395X0 395X0 393.00 

Apr 95 397X0 397X0 397X0 StoM 

E«. sates ftA. Tue'vcates 1X29 
Tue's open ** 19X32 up 479 
SOLD {NCMJO 
IH mw aoL- aasars ecr tray az. 

392J0 363X0 Jan 91 

415.70 33M0FehM 38720 33BXO 38500 

3*20 383X0 AAar 94 389J0 389X0 38820 

4)8X8 J3U8AfrM 38920 38920 387X8 

41720 B9.40Jun94 3*160 3NX0 309X0 

415X9 341X0 At® 94 391X0 39X00 391X0 

417X0 340X0 Oa *4 

426X0 34X88 Dec *4 39720 397X0 396X0 

411X0 SOJOFebVS 

417X0 264X0 Apr 95 

428JB 36120 Jun *5 

4I2XO 3WJ0AUBSS 

411J0 4102000 »5 

<2a® «8J0Dec95 

Es».s«4*s 30080 Tue's. sates 46,937 
Tub's open W 157271 off 3682 


Financial 

VST, BILLS (CMER) 

*1 mMan-pisa* NO pci. 

*6*0 *6.11Marte 9688 96X2 *4» 

**J6 96 IS Jun 94 9664 96X8 96X6 

96*4 *6X6590*4 *6X1 9644 96X2 

Dec 94 *4.10 *4.10 96.10 

Est. soies na Tue's. sales 1X93 
Tub's own rf» 36271 n> I 
SYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

Sl08.no prw- pis B.33ndSOll» pet 
II3-055M8-I7 Mar 9) 1 17-00 112-07 112-80 
117-05 109-24 JUIMI1I-ID I1I-H5 I1UN I 
Esf.scPn 30.008 Tue’s.sales 16,926 
Tub’s gpraw 198273 up <82 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

5 U9XOO mb- pts A Snds at IDO pa 

116-49 108-90 Mar 9*114-84 114-20 114-84 ' 

115-21 108-19 Jute 94 113-14 113-25 113-13 ' 

115- 01 110-18 Seaw 

1)4-21 109-2* Doc 94112- 18 111-10 112-09 

111-07 109-0* MarK 

Es>. sale* teXSO Tub's, mms 46.375 

TursapenM 7&X644 lC ED 
US TREASURY BONDS KBOT} 

10 MS-tlODXOO-ptS 8. 3»dsel 188 PCD 
130-31 *0-00 Mar 9(1)6-13 117-14 116-U 

119-29 91-06 JUOM1IM3 116-11 115-13 

1)8-26 98-12 Sep 94 114-22 11M0 1U-1S 

1)8-08 91-19 Dec94114-0B 114-31 114X0 

116- 20 182-06 IWarTSlU-OI 114-0) 113-29 

115-19 98-15 jun*5 

1)1-16 109-00 5*95112-15 113-15 112-13 1 
113-14 106-25 DOC 95 111-10 lll-S 111-11 1 
Est.HBes 5«5X0e Tub’s, sales 798-27S 
TuTioNnia 363X17 w 4JM 
MUMCVALBONDS ICBOTI 
sioob Biuei-da&32nd»® loops 
ms-22 *9-22 Mar *4 103-29 10+12 183-25 ! 

103-00 100-® JIMM US-06 ICO- 17 JHJ-BO : 
Est sues 6X38 Tub's.km» 4 X94 
Tile’s open «nt 25X47 up <61 


—1.98 213 

—1X0 16X14 
— tJO 2X22 
— I JO 
— L7B 


— 1J0 I 

— 1X0 81X0 
—1X0 31 

— 1X0 uje 
—l JO 73.5*8 
-1X0 4J4I 
« X261 
— 1X0 11X92 
—1.90 1X» 
-«J0 2X03 
—1.99 007 
-lte 

—in n* 

-1X0 13B 


•0X2 27X87 
‘0.0 6X61 
*0X2 xats 
•0X4 B 


065 WIJB 1 
065 4472 


D 230006 

U TUB 

n 384 

13 71 

13 1 


27 312X7] 
27 16X9* 

27 20J39 

34 UJ26 
26 0 
20 56 

25 13 

34 6 


l* fexn 

M 44 


COTTONS (NCTN) 

50008 teA-aentePS-fc 

0X8 . 55X2 Mar M 0X5 69X5 

7058 57X7 Mot M 70X0 7TL7B 

71.10 5830 Jul 84 71.M 7IJB 

69 JO 58.51 OS*4 0X0 78X5 

67X9 29.® Dec 94 67X8 .68X5 

6850 62JBMS-W 

ALSO 44 DO May 95 ®X0 0X8 

EtL cates NA TiivasScs *X® 
ToB'saaenlnl 5L7S'UP 578 
KEATING 08. WMISR} 

41X90 gal- cents per aal 
62X0 43X0 Feb 9* 030 030 

60X0 ®J3Ma-94 47X5 47X5 

5835 4170 Apr 94 46X8 46X0 

57X0 4&SDMOV94 45X0 45X8 

58X0 065 Jun *4 45.10 45.10 

57X0 USOMU 45X0 45X0 

5540 4535 Aug 94 46X0 46X0 

57.17 '• 44 75 Sap 94 
57J0 47300094 4755 47X5 

5830 4880 Now 8* 030 48N 

59-00 49 JO Doc 94 5030 5030 

4235 4223 Jon 9S SOJO SOS 

5825 O A0 Frti 95 50X5 5045 

57X0 5035 Vice 93 

55X0 0JOABT95 

SI 40 0.25 May 93 

51X0 030 Jun 95 

Ett sates NA -TUB'S. 58.969 

Tub's an en tm 201X14 up 6772 

UOKTSMEET CRUDE CMMBRj 

1X00 HR- dDOaraaer bPL 

VL*S 1 3X4 Fra 94 )5 jQS 15X5 

21.10 2432 Mar 94 JSJO 1539 

200 1448 Apr 94 15X1 15X1 

2010 15X1 May 94 15.18 1555 

91X5 1530 Jun 94 1537 1SJ0 

2038 15J6JUIM 1L00 16X8 

lsJt ,S9S 
20JB 16X0 Sep 94 1595 1&04 

52 16320094 16.11 1617 

2X49 164SNDV94 1625 163) 

»« 1655 Dec *4 1675 1640 

1738 1632 Jan 95 1&J9 16X9 

19X0 16*1 Feb 95 1686 16X6 

£46 17X4 Mir 95 1690 1690 

2X30 !730Jun9S 1TJ0 17® 

EAscNte NA Tub’s. sales irnxc 
Tue’capBoH 4D,ISS off 2977 
UNLEADBJ GASOLINE (TIMER) 
48088 80+ amts per tej 

iBXOFebfl 42J0 42.90 

57.00 XL® Mar 94 GJ5 n n 

0-50 44X5 Aar 94 4545 46® 

6)30 4680 MOV 94 4630 4730 

»1A0 45jU Jun 94 48X0 48X0 

dUO 46XU494 <7X5 OS 

«M0 47.10 An M 

54X0 46SS094 

Est sales HA Tue's. sates 23®2 

Tn^epanm 10x75 up 252s 


68X5 

0® 

•0X9 24X30 

0.95 

70X6 

♦ 0X4 12X71 

7030 

71® 

♦ 0X7 

7X29 

0930 

70.03 

•033 

1309 

6730 

60® 

♦ 051 

6X11 


0® 

*0® 

63 

0.00 

0® 

*8® 

19 


— 035 0X15 
-0X4 42,126 
—1X1 27X85 
—1X1 27,161 
—0X6 19X34 
-0.46 11980 
— 1X1 7X53 
-1X1 3,959 


4133 —Q.91 37JB6 

42® —1® 22,716 
«® —495 25X50 
4633 -4® 27.746 
4681 —ate 9X98 
4739 —0X0 MSI 
4719 —0X0 3-53! 

4739 -OJO.1J0 


Stock Indexes 

“fCOMP.BBEJC (CMER) 

SB * mdex 

2 -S 0525 4717S 472J0 4 

OL1S 47679 471® I 

gtua_ 09 J0 Dec *4 4)9.00 47930 cue ‘ 
5*-s*s NA Tue's. vies 47X33 
Tcjrtopjnw >82378 off 6® 

oie coMp.Noex (nyfej 
P oMs and cents 

*2 « att» 20X5 261® : 

HS.10 26135 26230 

f«30 2SSJ0SB>«4 i 

KLOO 237.13 OK 94 . . i 

rat. N86s NA Tub’s, sales >■ 
TartCMiW 42® up 225 


-LISULSS 
-13S 3X16 
-130 791 

-1.2 1X59 


-WO 4.176 
— n sn CO 

-«® 92 

-0® 45 


Commodity indexes 

Moody's • twww ' Previous 

Rwters . W3 tm..-. 

O j. Futures i2o? 1X6930 


«® 

024 

—1X1 2399 


48® 

48.19 

— 1JJ1 2X92 


035 

0.14 

—1.01 3X03 


5035 

0® 

—KOI 1,132 


50X5 

0® 

— TX1 134 



4034 

— )J)1 

. 


V39 

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4774 

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4734 

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1431 

1431 

-0X4 8230 

; 

14X6 . 

. 14X6 

-0X5 84372 


14X2 

14X2 

-00 37330 


15® 

15® 

-0X1 29,11 B 


1525 

1525 

-4® 37,956 


15X5 

15X5 

-035 16385 


1577 

1539 

—4128 12X41 


15.96 

1557 

-02611992 


16.12 

1615 

—02* 9X27 


16 34 

16J9 

—034 9,109 


16X2 

16® 

—032 19X56 


16X6 

16X4 

— &2S 7X84 


1630 

1630 

—031 2X95 


14® 

1650 

-0.16 101 


17.15 

17.15 

— 023 U®2 





















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— HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JAmiAKY 13. 1994 


Page 11 

EUROK 


British Unemployment lidls Below 10% 


' Qxrqnkdbv Our Staff Fro* tHspmdta 

LONDON — British unemploy- 
ment - fell; a seasonally adjusted. 
46,800 in December to 2.766 mo- 
tion, the biggest monthly fall in 
more than five years and the fourth 
consecutive monthly decline, the 


avoid pushing down base lending 
rates, wfcidi currently aaud at 55 
percent. The Treasury's monthly re- 
wwt no iheeoonomv baWednesday 


The jobless rate.is now 9.8 per- . 
cent, faflingbdow K) percent of the 
work force for the first time ance . 
July 1992. In November, the job- 
less total bad fallen by 39,000, to a 
rate of W percent; - : ‘ 

The unexpectedly good news for 
thieTBritish economy gave aboost to. " 
■ the pound, .which ended London 
trading at 2.6070 Deutsche marks, 
up from- 25930 DM on Tuesday.. 
Stodra fell as the prospects of an. 
interest-rate cut receded with the 
neWs that the economy was im- 
proving, but the outlook for im- 
Srowdeconwmc growth faakd to - 
flint head gkes. which bad fallen 
s har ply on. Thursday. ' 

. TteWpp.qf 46,800 in the jobless 
total -far exceeded expectations. . 
Most analysts had forecast a fall of 

only 16,000 to 20,000. 

- Treasury Minister AnlhonyNel- 
soo- -jnd -Wednesday that British 
interest rates were on bold and a 
further cut was unlftdy. He sad 
the government “was content with 
the present monetary stance and 
the present level of interest rates is 
satisfactory in tends of con turning 
to bear down on inflation." 

Mr. Nelson’s comments con- 
finneria growing befirf in financial 
markets that the government would 


recovery remained on course 
and retail sales looked strong. 

Many economists say that Brit- 
ain iS on coarse to achieve the gov- 


ernment's forecast of a 15 
increase in gross domestic product 

this year, with growth gradually ac- 

ederating throughout the year. 

Employment Secretary David 
Hunt said unemployment wasopa 
firm downward trend. Hf 
ed the improvement m the Bnnsn 


Nattiest Cuts 4,000 Jobs 


economy with the slump in Conti- 
nental Europe. Britam.hesmd^ 
“the only country in the European 
Union" where unemployment was 

“on a firm downward trmd, add- 

ioe that Britain's more flcxibleiB- 

bor market bad made this possible 
The gowxnment maintain s that 
uaemptojment has faDen becaure 
Britain refused to acc^tsw^as- 

pccUofiteMa^tT^^ 


Citicorp 
Returns to 
Russia 


day that it would cut vwjow «*» 

■■:3sSssa5^w« sS ® 

gap is through automation. ■ m similar to 

.‘There is a kmg : t^raopnm»a _ .'"t”!* rivl^Os. ” said Rod 






fenropean Union and because 
abolished wages councils, which set 
minimum wages in low-pay sectors. 

But the Treasury alwca^R 01 ^ 
that jobs were still bang died m the 

manufacturing sector. It smdj.000 
manufacturing jobs had been Jog 
in November. The rise of 91.000 
ibbs in the third quarter had been 

Boosted by job creation in the ser- 
vice sector, it said. 

Ann awyd, employment spokes- 
woman for the opposition Labor 
Party was unim pressed. The gpv- 

tics to con the public tot ithas^ 
economy under control, die said. 
Other opposition politicians said 
there were still 177 mDboa unem- 
ntoved ami almost a million had 
been s taking work for over a year. 

The Labor Party ac- 

cent study wbichiaedG^^ 
the International Labor Organiza- 
tion and suggested that the ma™ 

saftsaasasA? 

fits, was much high 6 * in Britain 
than admitted by the government 
(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) 


Bioomberg, Business Sets 

MOSCOW — Nearly eight 
decades after Lenin national- 
ized its business in tl* Som 
Union, Citicorp on Friday wfll 
open ibe first f^y fomgn- 
owned commercial bank m 
Russia. . . 

Treasury Secretary Lloyd 

Bentsen of the United Statais 

scheduled to cut the ribbon 
and formally open the new 

bank. _ . , I 

MUjenko Horvat, Gucorp s 

chief representative in Russia. 

said Citibank’s unit will con- 1 
centra te on corporate banking 
and, later, capital markets, tar- 
geting local banks, Russian 
companies and foreign multi- 
national companies as clients. 

“We’re going to be a full- 
service commercial bank, said 
Mr. Horvat. “People still can i 
get their money in an flyout oi 
(his country efficiently. 

Citicorp, the largest U.S. 
bank, has no plans to open 
accounts for individual Rus- 
sians, said Mr. Horvat. R* 
Russian operation will have an 
initial capitalization of 50 
milli on and the bank expects 
to do most of its business in 
rabies. 


BP to Close 
Ethylene 
Plant to Cut 
Capacity 


Fmnkfuit 

DAX v 


WrW 

2HXJ— ^ 
20001 — 


^OOthdex ^C40 

.. ' 1 1 ■ - — — ' '2400 


- 2 ® 0 



It’s Lost Grow 

Field Grows in Italy’s 


id Jot Olivetti 

Cellular-Phone War 

. «n _ • -*■ nun 


CFA: Shopping Frowsy h Set Off 

. , . port prices but makes exports 

Continued from Page ‘ Seaper. 

.... _r .V.A . , _ r /->r: A ,nn> rfflin- 


SsS's 

'^ssss; 

- < 5 ^» announced that it was dropping ® 

|^^S3SS5 

Now the twogro^shavem^g^toCT^^ 
compe tit or f °T by OtivettLA 

bis 

Olivetti had been seen as 
tvB^fl^Um tdnow poses a a^stairti^ thieic. Yet 


another consortium of smaller companies namal 

Sb iSSmiottar IHtie-known^ At 
5“^ Sro thought likdy to P^ 1 ^ 88 for 

£? ^iTSiSa ». Paris - ta “ d ^ 

% S'n^oric must rcach «te Postm^ 
TdroaniimnicaiiaM 

riie winner to be identified m April or May. 

■ -: JM w sf3SS3 

bafion to the winning group. B nl1a said: 

• aTm who the winner may be. Mr. 
-jnSM^VUmtel lock to have an advantage asfar 
conremed, with state company EN1 

;JXO w on their side." (Reuters. Bloomberg) 


“'Sso pledging cash to tide the 14 J ^^ent swiftly reintroduced 

iSalist, and Prime Minister of Togo and Benin, 

FHouard Ballad ur, a conservative, yagers failed to open their stores. 

^jSntiy, “These mcasuna bear Those who did refua^sehm- 

France’s firm and con- goods. Many petyle spoke 

S51 \SSSSL to the Franc 


France wfll write off 25 bfflion b fonner colomai tyw. 

FiSehfrancs of the 80 billion and an unfair world eco- 

owed to it in the Franc Zone. oomic system. 

Countries like the United Stales, Trade union l “.g” 
which had made devaluation a con- countries warned ot sooai ^ 
dS of helping out, should now hcaval" 
be prepared to step in. prepare ™ ■ 


3SS&bs 

sound economic management mh- ^ most 

a»t ihTO the commitments to demoo- stands to benefit more 

S&gSES — 

currency devaluation increases im- (/1/ 


Bkembetg Business Sm | 

LONDON — British ^ 

PLC said Wednesday it would close . 
iis Bagjan Bay ethylene pUnt m An 

SouihwSes at a cost of £200 n*- 

boo (S2985 mfllion) bJ 

-S 

have to take conoerud 1 acoon to 
reduce capacity across Europe be- U 
fore it can return to P^ ri ^ ,. M 
Ethylene is an important m^ali -- 
eat in a variety of petrodtemioK « 
and it also has agncultural and p 

medical uses. "§ 

About 600 staff and 

■ _jii u» ebminated when or * 
closes the plant in March because of 
an oversupply of ethjjene to the ^ 
European petrodienucal market. BP 
SL^rompany said u would uy — 
iniually to diminate those jobs y 
tbxough voluntary departures. — 

“Individually, these closures 

look small bm flit gams roomen- W 

turn and other companies follow su 
BP*s lead, then overcapacity mthe .i 
industry will die away Pmhp {a 
Morrish, chemicals analyst wim p ( 

Smith New Court in London, said. m 

The industry estimates it has ex- # 
cess ethylene capacity of 15 mil- a 
lion metric tons a year, out of a c 
total capacity of 16 million tons. f . 
BFs move, which would remove # 
ts 335,000 tons of capacity com® m- g 
ter a failure last month to reach an 
in- industrywide agreement on con- ■ 
ice certed cutbacks. J 

he The company operates or has 

** stS ‘mSee ethylene planum • 

, Britain, one in Germany and one m . 
„ the south of France. 

The company will take the £200 

„ef, the major component. 

SCO- ■ Shett-Montedisoii Inquiry 

. The European Commission said 

it ^ op^ an inquiry mtoa 

^ Montedison SpA AFP-Extd re- 

Jr ported from Brussels. 

The joint venture would be di- 
rt ex- rectly controlled byShell 
rffee. Icurn^ NV and Montedison Nf^' 
Sw S NV, OTrtier of Ita D«A 

,fde- u “‘ 

aid. tecatim Nederiand BV, the com- 

JHT) mission said. 


o'nd'j 

1894 


t-XsTo 

-1993 


Exc riffle 


RattitHgt. ... & 

FrtmWurt' , Tl 
London . • 

MI \ IM ,, n — ■ 

. Lonriori .v ' 
Madrid \ - 
Mltpd . 
Paris •• • 

StocKftotmT” 
Vtenna "T! 
Zurich . . 
Sources: Reurera. 


AEX 

Stock index 

iQAX . ; ... 

FAZ 

HEX 

^Rramcial Timas gu 

/FTSEIQO 

Qqierat Indgx ~~ 

~lm . ■ ' -7" 

CAC40 . 
AfiaersvaOflden 

Stock index 
S8S 
s 7afp~ 


’gPoT v A S i 
• .1994 IMS 

Wednesday Rev. 

■ Close ■ •• " Ctose . 
416*35 424,01 

7,702^97 7,68 1 .66 

2^09.18 2^28.75_ 

--B43J1 B4B.P4'~~ 

. 1,760.19 . 1, 742.31 
I 2.574.40 ' 2,606-70 
3^72.00 3A13J0 

331-87 "'331-5B 1 ' 

*97OC0~ *9e5'^”Z 

~ ^281^0 2,331 ^3~ 

1,711-17 1, 73074“ 

501.18 499.77" 

1JB3SJ6 1JM^24 


1893 1994 


1994 

%" 

Ghenge 
-iai 
40.28 
. - 0.88 
-0.53 
+1.03 
-124 I 
- 1.22 
+0.09' 
+0.52 
- 2.12 
.1.13 
+0^8 
- 0.66 


InwnaBMWl HWiWini-i* 


Very briefly: 

Cmmy-s Wlanon «, « P««« W3 ' lhe ^ rM 

^ 1982. 'IK Meral " “.Tnl I 5 perccnl b 1994. riicr a 

• Frm’s gross <i™“ u 5£^^*p«^ObJ^or> for Bffliww. 

wi o' \2 Sid*c wid -01 bo eoougb » prorom 

Forecasting ssad. itraid “ e & aL from riang. 

unemployment, curreml 1 - per t aulomake r. i? studying 

. PSA Peugeot Chairman ' acque 

the possibility or ro«nunngt he . men unveiled their ne» 

. since 1988. in July, 

succeed Sir Andrew Hugh braitn. pretax 

.ProosseoEWdraAG marks .5511.3 

1 S 4 V- cartes. ,o 1 29 . 

million French francs (121.8 oultal^ mbuilding of central 

2 ■JSMa"iMi n « b > lebanesc abroai 

■S acquired Moten a®** BV N afx. AF 

disclored. 

Ford and Mazda Weigii - . ope Link 

“ CtvnpHeJ by Our Stuff From [uspuuh^ discuss i 0 ns 

* 

di_ a Ford of Europe plant. .. mld coincide with Ford > 

A Ford spokesman noted that the ta f 'J= reclorSt Mazda has said 

Advances developed. 


1 ilfcvmin 

Sis. . Minn lom snx* 


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s 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 


Page 13 


. W^ wi day’t Ctorina 

Tables include the. nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wan Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere, via The Associated Press 


MULTIMEDIA. ** "“-^^^', 0 , 00 . 


^ -joriil in way. 

% | give thTsponering « of U« — B^:ST» JStfiSl 

economic recover* which has late- w a twct an audience £ bSn focos- approaching 

ly seen American companies cut- . ‘^maybe 100” but instead W* P roj ^- alliances with HaipeiCollins Publisher Inc., for 

an estimated 2,600 jobs each ^o rtt L 1 . 000 , » the pro- 

business day. «. director. KobertBdL _ 


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Page 14 

GRIND: 

Slow Growth 

Continued from Page 1 

shorthand for more layoffs, more 
.plant dosings, lower wages and, in 
the near term anyway. Tor below- 
par economic growth. 

■ What makes those steps impera- 
tive, however, is the growing struc- 
tural unemployment problem coo* 
fronting the world’s richest 
: nations. A series of recessions in 

■ the last two decades has left an 
ever-higher number of people un- 
employed. It is what economists 

■ now refer to as the ratcheting effect 
that shows no sign of abating. 

“Europe faces the danger of an 
expansion that doesn't create 
jobs." said Samuel Britton, director 
of the National Institute for Eco- 
nomic and Social Research in Lon- 
don. Even in the United States. 

■ recent figures suggesting strong job 
growth understate the problem fac- 
ing the world's largest economy. 

“The reality behind the most re- 
cent falls in U.S. unemployment is 
that we lost a tremendous number 
of full-time jobs that were replaced 
by part-time positions, 1 * said Philip 
Braverman. chief economist at 
DIvB Securities in New York. Spe- 
cifically. he cites November data 
showing a loss of 376,000 full-time 
jobs being more than offset statisti- 
cally by a surge in pan-lime jobs of 
562,000. 

American employers are only 
doing what experts in Europe and 
Japan insist must be done in their 
countries as well, bringing costs 
down and the flexibility of produc- 
tion up in order to compete in in- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 


Sfpto Bubmans, chief executive, 
chemical company Coifftajlds PLC 
in London: 

We need major cute n costs and 
Trying standards before we can price 
ourselves back into growth and 
work. We in (he Northern Hemi- 
sphere must watch our backs. There-. 
Is an extremely rapid shift [in manu- 
facturing! to Asia from North Ameri- 
ca and Europe. The realization that 
we must work harder for less money 
is not there yet It will take years to 
carry on with the process of making 
Europe more competitive. We wfll 
not see an upturn unS well into the 
second half ol the decade. 


Htrohilu Okumura, chief economist, 
Nomura Research tosttiuta in Tokyo: 
The problem is a lack of demand. 
Japan should stimulate its economy, 
if not we could have a worldwide 
shrinkage in economic activity like 
we had in the 1930s. The govern- 
ment should borrow in order to txnfd 
large public infrastructure projects. 
In London. Vienna and Washington 
they have good parks, museums awl 
opera houses, i an talking about 
spending 600 trillion yen between 
1991 and 2000. 


creasingly open, and brutal, World 
markets. 

Ending recession is proving to be 
the easy part of the equation. The 
bard part is getting the right land of 
recovery, one that creates stable; 
long-term employment opportuni- 
ties at reasonable wages. It is that 
latter task that from Tokyo to Tu- 
rin may take the better pan of this 








P • 


.«! i'" 

■‘i .J' 


Phllqj Bfweroan, senior vice presr- 
dent and chiei economist DKB Se- 
curities in New York: 

The real story here is that we have a 
recovery superimposed on asoftde- 
presskm. We need fiscal and credit 
stimulus. We have to identify the reel 

enemy, h makes no sense to detent! 
the bafflements (against Inflation] 
when the real enemy is pouring in 
via toe rear. Unless we hantSe our- 
selves well, the risks begin to esca- 
late with toe situation turning nasty 
ki the second half of this decade. 


decade. What is more, it will suc- 
ceed only if politicians, employers 
and workers take some extraorxii- 
nary and all- loo-painful steps to 
drive down their labor costs. 

Nor since the oil shocks of the 
1970s have the rich nations faced 
more trying circumstances. “Some- 
thing dramatically different is un- 
der way," said Mr. Braverman. He 


Stefan Cofflgnon, director of re- 
search, Association for the Mone- 
tary Union of Europe in fete: 
Common sense would recommend 
that toe United States and Europe 
get together and form an affiance to 
settle the problem of undervalued 
currendesinAsm.There,lhe8-capi- 
tal controte make rt easier for them to 
control exchange rates, to set them 
at extremely low levels. Their costs 
ere one-tenth or one-twentieth of 
ours so it is not surprising that we 
are seeing a deindustrialization 
here. 


and others see two major shifts sap- 
ping the economic vigor of the 
world's richest nations: huge, 
wrenching reductions in military 
spending and the fall of commu- 
nism. 

“For the first time, the fall of 
Iron and Bamboo Curtains made a 
billion workers available to the 
West," Mr. Braverman said. 



We are pleased to announce the admission of 


Hampton S. Lynch, Jr. 

Resident in New York 


A. Heaton Robertson 

Resident in Boston 


as General Partners 


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New York Boston Philadelphia Chicago Los Angeles 
Dallas Houston Naples Palm Beach 


For 

investment 

information 

read 

THE MONEY 
REPORT 

every 
Saturday 
in the 
IHT 


London Luxembourg Paris Zurich 
Tokyo Hong Kong Grand Cayman 


Effective January 1. 1994 


D»U Roche, chief strategist, Mor- 
gan Stefey tote matkml in London: 
We have to deregutte, deregulate 
and deregulate. We must do tire sort 
of things tote cause Jacques Delors 
nightmares. What is needed Is; 
tough, tough leadership. We need 
leaders lo tefl the European elector- 
ate thal they have priced themselves 
out of a job. Yet trying to name most 
European leaders today Is trying 
to name the Swiss prime minister. 
Where are the Helmut Schmidts, he 
Thatchers and even toe Adenauers? 

Recipes for a 
Recovery 


What’s more, many of those work- 
ers in places like Eastern Europe 
and C hina ore highly skilled and 
educated. 

“Then, too, the discrediting of 
Marxism and of centrally planned- 
economies has had major repercus- 
sions from India to Latin Ameri- 
ca." be said. "There; a new market- 
led orientation has sent exports 
soaring and inward investment 
rocketing." 

Last year, China soaked up a 
staggering $15 billion in overseas 
investments. 

“No one could have predicted 
that," said Teizo Taya, chief Japa- 
nese economist at the Daiwa Insti- 
tute of Research in London. To- 
day’s investments in China and 
across the emerging nations are to- 
morrow’s televisions, , textiles and 
toys flooding world markets at 
hard-to-beat prices. 

In contrast to the buoyant pic- 
ture presented in many emerging 
economies, their older, richer rivals 
face years of remedial tinkering 
with everything from overly large 
public sectors to rigid labor mar- 
kets. With the exception of Japan, a 
major drag on the economies of 
virtually all the rich nations in the 
coining years will be (ax increases 
and spending cuts designed to slash 
immense government deficits. 

“Government budgets are just 
out of control everywhere," said 


Leveraged 2^— 

on 10.1.94 

US $ 67.60 

Lined on the 
Amsterdam 
Stock Exchange 

Information: 

MecsPienwn Capita] Management 
Rolan 55, 1012 KK Amsterdam. 
Tel.: + 1 1-20-521 HIO. 


Mar Ptebch, senior vtoe president 
Comentonkh Frankfort 
The most important thing moould 
do is to reduce ovefragriation in 
some markets, part'eutarfy in toe la- 
bor market We b»e to offer more 
jobs with towerkicome in Garmtefy.l 
am not too confident if you consider 
present regulations, toat that we can 
acteero much progress in the short 
and medium term. You have to mea-. 
sure B In terms of a decade or so, 

unfortunately. . 


Hont Sfebeit, president. Kiel insti- 
tute of florid Economics to Kiel, 
Germany. 

We need more timMe labor ar- 
rangements in Europe - larger cBf- 
ferenlfatein wages between regions, 
between job guaifficalions and be- 
tween industrial sectors. In toe past 
we have concentrated on mantato- 
. fogthefoGomesoftooeetoworkand 
at toe sametime have contofadad to 
unemployment by tkiving up costs 
aid pricing ourselves out of toe mar- 
ket. 


TeteTaya , chief Japana^B^ 
met Darn tostitufs of Research m 

J^jane* companies have .so far , 


deal with toe deefine. They wB ham 


think unemployment could reach A. 
or even S percent in the next two 


William Gasser, senior economist 
with Union Bank of Switzerland in 


Zurich. Even famously prudent 
Switzerland now has a public defi- 
cit larger in relation to the size of its 
economy than the United States, at 
4.5 percent — and that ranks as a. 
low figure by entreat European 
standards. Britain's deficit, for in- 
stance, is 8 percent of GDP. 

Having foreclosed for the time 
being the easy options of deficit 
spending or inflating their way out 
cu the mess, the rich countries now 
seem destined reluctantly to follow 
America’s aggressive lead of shut- 
tering businesses that are uncom- 
petitive and freeing the labor mar- 


JFor Europe’s heavily subsidized 
steel and coal industries, for in- 
stance; and for Japan’s agricultural 
and service sectois,.the future looks 
bleak but the imperatives now seem 
inescapable. 

The rich countries have many 
higher-end products that they and 
they alone have the skills and plant 
to make. The key is taking re- 
sources out of uncompetitive in- 
dustries and transferring them to 
those where the future lodes bright- 
est 

To spread ihar nets as widely as 
possible; to ensure that they do not 
lose industries and employers dial 
they do not have to lose, the devd- : 


like services and agriculture (hat are 
.70 percent of the Japanese econo- 
my. It is just one word; deregulate. , 
We dent have much room to adjust 
tisctepoticy. 


oped countries must make painful 
adjustments in wage rates, either by 
outright cuts or by future raises 
.that faff short of inflation and/or 
jproductivity gains. 

In thefamoosly flexible U.S. la- 
bor market, that process happens 
daily. The trick, the experts say. is 
to keep those necessary though 
p ainf ul ad justmen ts from r unning 
out of control and feeding a sort o? 
deflationary chain reaction. 

NEXT: German leaden sat Eu- 
rope's mightiest economy has pulled 
ora of recession. But independent 
economists and business people hate 
prepareda warning. 


er 



By Jacques Neber 

Imemarumal Herald Tribune 
PARIS — The head of Alcatd 
Alsthom, France’s premier indus- 
trial group, dumped cold water on 
hopes that Europe trill emerge 
from its economic crisis this year, 
predicting in an interview pub- 
lished Wednesday that sales and 
profit would decline in 1994. 

The comments by. Pierre Suard. 
published in the French newspaper 
Les Echos, jolted the Paris stock 
market, whore Alcatel Alsthom, a 
maker of telecommunications, 
transportation and power systems 
equipment, plummeted 12 2 per- 
cent, dosing at 792 French francs 
(5133.831 a share, down 110. - 
“I confirm,, unfortunately, that 
the crisis is serious," Mr. Suard said 
in the interview. “Personally, 1 1 
don’t think that it is' behind US, j 
especially in Europe." • 

Markets for the company’s prod- 
ucts in Europe, he said, declined 10 
percent in 1993, and be predicted 
another 10 percent shrinkage this 
year. He said thecoonomic situation 
in Germany, Italy and Spain, impor- 
tant markets for Alcatel Alsthom, | 
was “extremely difficult". i 


Mr. Suard said profit in 1994 
would deditie more sharply than 
sales. For 1993; be said; net profit 
would be on “the order of 7 InOion 
bancs," about even with the 1992 
level ' : 

As a result Merrill Lynch Inter- 
national Ltd. on Wednesday cut its 
1994 earning^ estimates for Alcatel 
Alsthom by 24 percent and 
change d its medium-term view an 
the company to “neotrsT from 
“above average.— 

In a research note, Nefl Barton, a 
Merrill Lynch analyst, reduced Ins 
estima tes of AlcateFs earnings - per 
share to 38.06 francs from 5036 
francs for 1994 and to 44.91 francs 
from 53.60 f rants for 1995. - • 

The train areas of revenue de- 


cline, Mr. Barton said, would ue 
Germany, Italy and Spain, as price 
competition cut profit margins on 
okfer /tdecomnuuKarion product 
lines. 

Mean while. Mr. Suanf s desire to 
regain control over Framalome, the 
state-owned builder of nuclear 
power plants, appeared' within the 
realm of posabtirty Wednesday af- 
ter Industry. Minister Gerard Lon- 
guet said the government would 
sell its stake in the company in an 
off-market transaction. . 

Alcatd Alsthom owns 44 percent 
of Framalome, and Me. Suard 
wants- to recapture the 7 percent 
stake he was required to surrender 
in 1990 during a share restructuring 
plan incased by the Ihen-Socialist 
government. 


TO OUR REAPERS IN GREAT BRITAIN 

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Up the Audio 


Scouring the Low 

By Andrew Pollack 

Mw York tuna Sen-ice 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

12000 ' 


: .-: cmmdedtnO» SuffFtomDttpeKtu* ■ prices M risen too .shaitiy and 
• HONG KONG — Slock mar- began u>ing to reduce ifiquiaiiy- 

2^S?S3S^SB*V' 

ItssaswKs®. 

«*» bigher; al 18,7*»SK “Eto-‘ 

: kiSl^Lumpbr mestk institutions arc 

- ^^^ mareS0,I?eno ° 

: - cramoneQt of ihe .bucnxau.onaL Uw mageL ~ „,^*wSeng 

; lferaW Index fd?543.10 8 poinH. dosu^at 
■ was ai 117J0, down 0.95 percent. 2 n.i0 pomis 

, : js®«S!SWK- s^-sfiEa-ag?- 

teal qFhCoQ,” saM Edd,e a 

fond manager at Sanwa Interna- 
tional Ftnapce-, 


thev can'i be everything io eveiyboay. 

Gwo an analyst with S.G. Warburg in Tokyo. 

The result has been steadily rising revalue. The 
sales of the parent company are expected toreach 
HO billion yen. or SI .5 billion, in the year ending 
' in March, up from 162 billion yen last L" 1 

hill ion ven the year before. Thai contrasts with Rat 

■ dd5g£ “an? <*«* audi0 

r.Mtt** that pretax unconsoUdai- 


wtih the rifftt strategy anu a 7.°" 

proroer. T&at is thelesson jiiovriedby Anra 

SfeMESa— 

,-• has outpaced the pack., doubling in ed^rofhKe current fisra! year 
low of 950yra (S8-45 atiteaM ^SwaY ™ My the same as last >*ar. Huosto Kur 

ta Man*, 

. Aiwa 

f SimScnBtag to 

operated fairly independently 


ed profit for the current fiscal year w 

ven rousJhly the same as last jwr. Hiiostu Kur 

KIFaSralv- with CS F.rat Boston •"Tokyo. 

Sid he expected earrings al a j*““ SS«?1fls 
if Aiwa is ahead of the pack nou, he said, t _ 

because "the) - got in trouble before the 
S?S»n to W money in !W afier the 1985 
Plaza Accord led to a sharp rise tn the yen. 

P Tte company was also hurt because it had begun 

AiSpokesnwn saidAetwo companies otherwise 
operated fairly independently. 


mow to Ease _ : . 
Rule on B vying 
Foreign Slwres 

Roam . . 

: SEOUL — South Korea 
will allow its dikens to invest 
in foreign shares and win ease 
■restricrionson rtumufaenmns 
companies making rights is- 
sues, Finance Minister Hong 
lae Hyong said Wednesday. 

: At present, onty.Soum Ko- 
rean institutional investors 

- - • ■! r rhatvc 


Cm V it«J h «V Suit *™» 

TOKYO — The economic stim- 
ulus packaee that the government 
will announce this month may in- 
clude measures to help banks and 
nonbank financial institutions ^dis- 
pose of their huge volume of non-; 

performing loans, die Maimchi 

newspaper said Wednesday. 

The measures will include relax- 
insSt^te-offsof^Jtt 

loans, the paper said. . 

hanks musi apply to die Finance 
Ministry for clearance to wnie olT 
losses that might result from delin- 
quent loans, the paper said. 

The government plans to elimi- 
nate that requirement to help banks 

The government also will pro** » 
secondary market for banks delin- 
quent loans, the paper said. 

To help nonbank financial insti- 
tutions dispose of their delinquent 
loans, the government 
establishing an entity that will take 
on all the nonperforming loans 
held by nonbanks, the paper said. 

Japanese banks and other finan- 
cial institutions became encum- 



Singapore 
Straits Times 

m 

m 

2300 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 


Ts'onFj 
1993 1 ®* 



-A^ ON DJ 
1993 199* 


A r SON DU 
1993 I ® 34 


Exchange 

Hong Kong 


Hang Seng 


SST^SS o«h 

10,712.70 11,155.80 -3.97 



Kuala Lumpur Composite 


SET 
Composite Stock 
Weight edPrice 
Composite 



via Offers Reassurance on Taxes 

SSSSJ- 

erarng ThMaiooL I „J3?WeLesday to assure for- available for five years or until an plans lc abolish preferential in- 5 ^^^, prime Minister Kfa technology and training- 

be shielded “Uprise's contract expires Lme-lax rates to foreign .nv^ion ^^osokawa said Japan wo^d 

three months of haidjip. . SSJ^hJhl^diax changes recent- whichever comes first. Bui 00 such jn spec i a | economic rones, n do Its best 10 meel Amen van «pev 

TheSmgapore ^ as long as ^nS^ll be available lotoetgn- aJjbai's Pudong distnct and in uUon5orag ^ W sie^ro reduce 

‘ ' funded enterprises set up aft^Jan. olhcr signaled areas. ... — — -n-. 

taduw&l The general secretary of die state 1. he Ifnr rhanee 

[ex ended down 87.89 ** ^ aAmmk traiion. Jut 

,/n ,1 «t «mri the market to - - - — ■ — v.j 


tcan institutional investors ^t Woa dealing director at runup 
can invest in foreign shares. Sean j t ie$.*aid. "Overall, laal^fun- 
1 Bui individuals will he allowed damentals srts&L very wiodj . 

Wbuylhemdxreci^ fronifo^ The Y<™*» Lnmpur Stodt Ex- 
rion bourses sometime thas composite index dosoi at 


Uicr uoi6“a"-“ — 

Separately. Morning Star HoW- 

i . j : j :• ..nn^nl to PCOOrl 


The general secretary of lb* ^He intended the tax changes . ^SSSSd» report 

StiSSS bteyS?- ^fiits yeT 

sfesiS?S S£S«3» 1 

cmtiiiK oihI “Overafl, local tun , ■ ' 


lauunsui 

its current-account surplus. 

Sneaking to a business group, the 
primerrJnister said Japan would 
take deregulatory steps. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


croon industries about a 1.* . 

China in 

the sueas of technology and training- 

his resignation after uie exenange , . Rcuirr. Bhauherx 

«etrag informaupp aboui brotm. 


IU iTUjr — j — — lL; , 

agn bourses somelinje tto 
year, Mr. Hong said. He dad 

1 not spe^y the value of fonagn 

| shares that individual rnves- 
1 10 ns would be allowed to hold 
or provide other detaus. - 

. The government also. said, 
any manufacturing company 

raxrii% dxvidends^ and oper-. 
auS profit equal to attest 5 
pnttni of p*d-m espad a»H 
h»ie one right* issue a year 

trolled rights issws toWps^ : 
port its market sm« 1.™ 


dame ntals arex ffl ve ry •' p^' — 

Honda Sees 1994 Rebomd 

11 

b^pooplelgnored 1 C non away from Japan. • — ,p - 

pnh, research manageraHJj.lv. a “Overseas output will t 

pjBfiBfis^saMr ■ ■ ■ - * /> 'iV * , ingly autonomous,” said 
^Taiwan stocks Tell to the third y sales, indudingirc 

consecutive day on feara the coun- forecast to rise J* TsA t^Vehicitt; and Japanese sales. 

SsS^bat*wasn^»«^ expectedto surge j^ a0 oo. 

Se sa*m& market, antes said. 28J)00 imports, are expected tocumo ^ while 

tTwflS&n are expect^ to plunge ^TP<^nU AFP) 

l ^vwaffitedtoice 1 i overseas output rises 19.1 percent, to auu, 


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Paris January 13th. 1994 - •" an intenriew 
with Les Echos published on January 12th. 
1994, Pierre SUARD, chairman and CbU 
of Alcatel Alsthom. confirmed that the 


1994 outlook 


sales for the 1993 financial year will show 
a slight decline as compared to the 
previous year and that profit after taxes 
will be at a similar level to that of 199- 
in the order of FFr 7 billion. 

Mr SUARD also indicated that for the 
current year, 1994, he expects another 
decrease in sales and also in earnings. 
Alcatel Alsthom said that the reduebon m 
earnings would be between 10% and J* 
except if the economy revives during the 
year, which is not currently foreseen for 
the activities in which the group is involved. 

Mr SUARD explained that "the reduction 
of sales in 1994 is mainly caused by a 

reduction of our telecommunications 
activities in our European domestic market . 


"The expected results for 1994 , 

Mr SUARD added, "are also affected 
by the acceleration of investments m 
R&D made by the group to benefit 
from the rapid evolution of the market 
and technology, although we had 
originally intended to stabilize these 
expenses". 

m order to correct any impressions 
of pessimism that could be implied 
from the statements above. 

Mr SUARD emphasized two points: 

_ "It has been possible to compensate 
partially for the reduction in domestic 
European markets by the significant 
development of exports, particularly 
to Asia and especially China, 
in fact, Alcatel’s European companies 
have increased their exports by .0%. 
in 1993. and another rise of 20% 
is forecast for 1994". 

_ "Never sacrificing the long term for 
the short term, our efforts in R&D 
have already showed some significant 
results in the fields of broadband 
switching, synchronous transmission, 
and mobile communications". 






/ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 


SPORTS 


NCAA Scholarship Vote 
Brings Call lor a Boycott 




By Mark Asher 
and Steve Berko witz 

Washington Past Service 

. SAN ANTONIO. Texas — An- 
gered by the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association's lack of re- 
sponse to its concerns, the Black 
Coaches Association has called for 
disruptions during the rest of the 
college basketball season. 
.-Saturday is the likely starting 
date for boycotts and demonstra- 
tions, according to sources familiar 
with the strategy planned by the 
group's leadership. 

“In all likelihood there will be a 
boycott, but I am reluctant to give 
you a time and date.” said Rudy 
Washington, the group’s executive 
director and men's basketball 
coach at Drake. “Players and 
coaches are expected to participate. 
And they're talking about the rest 
of the season, like the baseball 
strike.” 

On Monday, delegates at the an- 
nual NCAA convention in San An- 
tonio soundly rejected a proposal 
that would have restored one schol- 
arship to the 13-scbolarship limit 
for men’s basketball teams. The 
new limit went into effect this sea- 
son but was criticized by the black 
coaches group, which said that re- 
storing the 14th scholarship was a 
itiatter of providing educational 
opportunity, particularly for black 
athletes who make up 60 percent to 
70 percent of the NCAA's Division 
I men’s basketball players. 

. The group had also asked dele- 
gates at the convention to reconsid- 
er instituting new academic stan- 
dards for athletes, saying the such 
changes would have a profound im- 
pact on poor students. 


Although Division I delegates 
overwhelming voted to approve a 
"thorough review” of tougher stan- 
dards for freshmen athletes, they 
“did nothing” about being sensitive 
to the coaches group's issues, said 
Mike Jarvis, men's basketball 
coach at George Washington. 

"I can’t tell you what's going to 
happen, but maybe it*s time for 
something,” he said. 

The prospect of a boycott 
prompted the commissioners or the 
nation's major basketball-playing 
conferences to schedule a confer- 
ence call for Thursday af terooon to 
decide how to read if a boycott 
occurs. 

Sources said the black coaches 
group expects some support from 
high-profile white coaches. Asked 
about whether he would support a 
boycott, Mike Krzyrewski of Duke, 
who is white, said, “I think it’s 
premature to make a definite state- 
ment about that.” 

“The basis here is about oppor- 
tunity for black athletes, and let’s 
not cover it up with other things 
that do not pertain to the issue at 
all.” he said. 

Sources said the black coaches 
group, which represents coaches in 
ail sports, has been planning for 
this possibility since September 
and said protests and demonstra- 
tions were planned to include play- 
ers, other black students and white 
coaches. 

Other possible actions being 
considered by the group include 
refusing to participate in the open- 
ing jump bill at the NCAA tourna- 
ment's championship game; dem- 
onstrating at the four NCAA 
regional championship games: de- 


laying traffic to NCAA tourna- 
ment games; delaying the start or 
the second half of games by 20 
minutes, or both; boycotting all 
news conferences; requesting local 
chapters of the NAACP, the Rain- 
bow Coalition and black student 
unions to picket NCAA tourna- 
ment games; conducting a court 
sit-in during a regular season game, 
and delaying a televised regular 
season game by 20 minutes. 

In a potentially significant vote 
dwarfed by the specter of a boy- 
cott, the NCAA schools approved 
legislation Tuesday that will allow 
underclassmen to be drafted by 
National Basketball Association 
teams once without forfeiting their 
eligibility, beginning immediately. 

Previously, underclassmen for- 
feited their eligibility when they 
informed the NBA they were mak- 
ing themselves available for the 


Now, underclassmen who otter 
the draft will retain their collegiate 
eligibility until 30 days after the 
draft. If they declare their intention 
to return to college during that pe- 
riod, they will be allowed to resume 
playing for their schools. 

This could give underclassmen a 
considerable degree of leverage in 
negotiations with NBA teams. It 
also could cause problems for 
NCAA coaches, whose recruiting 
could be affected by players chang- 
ing their minds about leaving. The 
deadline for underclassmen to 
make themselves eligible for the 
draft generally has been in* mid- 
May, and the draft generally has 
taken place in late June. 




By JoeLapomte 

yVcw York Tima Service 
NEW YORK —As the National 
Hockey League's regular season 
readies. the midway point, some 
trends are becoming dear. 

■ Scoring is down, fighting is up, 
suspensions are numerous, expan- 
sion is a success, labor-manage- 
ment relations are toochy, key inju- 
ries are plentiful. 


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Ross Halas stole the ball from Kenyon Murray as Indiana again proved to be too good for Iona. 


Jordan the Outfielder? ' You Never Know 9 


The Associated Press 

"TOKYO — If any man was ever the 
picture of contentment, Michael Jor- 
dan was it Wednesday as be sat back in 
a leather chair at his restaurant in 
Chicago and addressed a roomful of 
fapanese admirers via satellite. 

By his own reckoning. Jordan is a 
raging success: His restaurant busi- 
ness is booming, and be has a best- 
filing book and more than enough 
time for golf and taking care of has 


family. Everything a man at the tender 
age of 30 could want. 

Everything, he concedes, except 
maybe a job in major league baseball. 

“I don't know if my talents are good 
enough to play for anybody right 
now, he said when asked half -joking- 
ly if his future plans included trying 
his hand at professional baseball “But 
if 1 ever get good enough, you never 
know.” 

Speculation that Jordan, who re- 
tired from the National Basketball As- 


sociation in October, might be consid- 
ering a career on the diamond bad 
been fueled this month by his new- 
found propensity for turning up at 
Comiskey Park for batting practice 
with the Chicago White Sox. 

Jordan said he enjoys the competi- 
tion dement of the workouts, and has 
been putting in about three hours on 
the diamond each day. He also noted 
that many people forget he was re- 
cruited to play baseball after high 
school, but chose basketball instead. 


Robinson Gives Wolves Lot to Chew On 


“I was a pitcher,” he said with pride. 
“1 don’t think my arm is strong enough 
for the Majors, or even AAA. any- 
more. f think I’m more suited now to 
play outfield. I can still throw people 
out at third ” 

Jordan did not elaborate on his 
plans, but the owner of the White Sox, 
Jerry Reinsdorf, indicated last week 
that he did not expect the two-time 
Olympic gold medalist and seven-time 
NBA leading scorer to show up for 
spring training next month. 

The former NBA star was beamed 


The Associated Press 

r - David Robinson found four ways to 
beat the Minnesota Tiraberwolves. 
‘He had 27 points. 12 rebounds. 10 
assists and S blocks Tuesday night as 
the Spurs won, 108-98, in San Anto- 
nio. 

' He fell two blocks short of becom- 
ing the third player in NBA history to 
record a quadruple-double — posting 
double figures in four categories. Nate 
Thurmond did it in 1974 and Alvin 
Robertson in 1986. 

“David was David." said forward 
Willie Anderson of the Spurs. 

Robinson’s tripie-double was his 
12th in the NBA and second of the 
season against the Tunberwolves. 

“He’s a terrific player — one of the 
best in the league, no doubt.” Minne- 
sota center Luc Longley said. “His 


lateral speed out on the floor gives me 
problems.” 

San Antonio outscored Minnesota 
30-17 in the third period to take an 88- 
66 lead, and cruised to its eighth vic- 
tory in nine games. 

Trail Blazers 108, Souks 99: Rod 
Strickland bad 22 points. 10 assists, 8 

NBA HIGHLIGHTS 

rebounds and no turnovers as Port- 
land. playing at home, handed Seattle 
only its fourth loss in 30 games. The 
Sonics never seriously threatened after 
the Trail Blazers pulled away early in 
the second quarter. 

Knicks 98, dippers 77: Patrick Ew- 
ing scored 31 points and New York 
outscored Los Angeles, 29-15, in the 
third period to hand the visiting team 


its sixth straight loss. John Starks 
scored eight of his 19 points during the 
third-period surge that broke the game 
open. 

Nimgets 94, Pistons 86: Mahmoud 
AbduJ-Rauf scored 10 of his 17 points 
in the fourth quarter as Denver ex- 
tended host Detroit’s losing streak to 
10. It was the Nuggets’ first win at 
Detroit since 1988. 

Hornets 95, Suns 93: In Phoenix, 
Hersey Hawkins' 3-pointer with 2:46 
left gave Charlotte the lead for good 
over the cold-shooting Suns. The Hor- 
nets held Phoenix to 15 points in the 
fourth quarter and handed the Suns 
their third home Joss in 18 games. The 
Suns played without the injured 
Charles Barkley and Kevin Johnson; 
the Hornets were missing AJonzo 
Mourning and Larry Johnson. 


Knight, who is here to kick off 4he 
company's “Just Do It” advertising 
campaign in the Japanese market. 

Jordan said he did not miss bong 
out of professional sprats and was not 
considering a return to basketball 

“I don’t have any itches of getting 
back out there," lie said. “I’m over 
that." 

Before signing off, Jordan suggested 
a second career possibility for another 
NBA superstar claiming to be ready to 
move on: Charles Barkley, who has 
said he plans to retire after this season. 

“There comes a time in life when 
you need to try something new, and 
sumo wrestling may be that challenge 
for him, you never know," Jordan said 
with a wry smile. “He picks up about 
20 pounds every summer, so he's get- 
ting there. He could certainly be a 
sumo wrestler.” 


No. 4 Arkansas Wins 
As LSU Cries Foul 

The Associated Press 

The loss to No. 4 Arkansas hurt, said LSlTs coach. Dale 
Brown. The way it happened made h doubly hard to 
swallow. 

Clint McDaniel made a free throw with 39 seconds left 
to break the game's final tie and LSlTs Jamie Brandon 
miss ed two shots in the final seconds as the Razorbacks 
slipped by the visiting Tigezv84-83, Tuesday night. 

McDaniel swiped the ball from Andre Owens at mid- 
court, then was fouled by Owens. 

"It was so sad to end such a good game with such a 
terrible call,” Brown 

said. “Twenty-thousand COIXEGE ROUNDUP 

screaming Arkansas fans 1 ; - 

could see with their own eyes that (McDaniel) fouled him.” 

Brown beaded fra the officials' dressing room after the 
game, but security personnel blocked him. 

McDanid mis sed the second free throw. Brandon's 12- 
footer hit the rim, but LSU (7-4, 1-2 Southeastern Confer- 
ence) got the rebound and Brandon missed again from 
about the same distance. 

Corliss Williamson was Il-for-13 from the field and 
finished with 24 points for Arkansas (1 1-1, 2-1). ■ 

No. 11 Iwfiana 89, Iowa 75: Damon Bailey and Pal 
Graham each had 20 points and Brian Evans, playing with 
his separated right shoulder in a brace, scored a career* 
high 21 to lead the visiting Hoosiers (9-2, 24) Big Ten) to 
their fifth straight victory over Towa (6-6, 0-3). 

No. 13 Temple 76, Prim 65: The Owls’ big three — 
Aaron McKie, Eddie Jones and Rick Brunson — com- 
bined fra 62 points as Penn’s right-game winning streak 
was snapped. McKie had 24 points as Temple (8-2) took 
command with a 15-4 run in the final minutes for its 13th 
straight victory over its dty rival Brunson, the point 
guard, was 6-for-7 from the field and had 16 points and 
didn’t commit a turnover. Jerome Allen led me visiting 
Quakers (9-2) with 26 points. 


Expansion. ■ This season’s new 
teams may be hockey’s best pair of 
first-year franchises ever. Partly be- 
cause of a generous expansion 
draft, partly because of smart man- 
agement and partly because of 
ownership with deep pockets, the 
Florida Panthers and the Mighty 
Ducks of Anaheim are more than 
respectable. 

The Panthers are contending fra 
a playoff berth, and the Ducks are 
a success at the gate and the souve- 
nir stand. 

Esa Tikkaoen. whose career 
seemed in jeopardy- when he fin- 
ished poorly last season, has been 
one of the best players on the New 
York Rangers, one of the best 
teams. Can he keep it op? 

Cam Neely, in the third year of a 
comeback from a major leg injury, 
is once again a prototype power 
forward for the Boston Bruins. 

Brian Burke, hired as second in 
command behind Commissioner. 
Gary Bemoan, is cracking down on 
stick fouls; although his tolerance 
for fistfightwg has - encouraged 
more of it. 

German Titov, a 28-year-old 
rookie from Russia who played last 

season m Finland, has helped kero, 
Calgary in Gist place in the Pacific 
Division. . 

The Dallas. Stars, with Bob 
Gainey, their general m»n«gw mid 
coach, running a roster of mediocre 
talent, are challenging fra the lead 
of the Central Division and gaining 
a following in a prime market 

Dominik Hasek of the Buffalo 
Sabres is the leading candidate for 
the Vezina Trophy as the top goal- 
tender. although part of the reason 
for his success is the defensive style 
adopted by the Sabres after •tab- 
injury to Par LaFou tmne. - • 

Sergei Fedorov, the Detroit cen- 
ter, is the leading cendidatefar Atf 
Hart T rophy as most valuable play=- 
er. Everyone knew he was good in 
his first three seasons, hut his gcdl 
surge, total effortand spirited lead-, 
ership have exceeded the hopes qi 
even hxs strongest bOftSttriC-' 1 ' ■ * ' 


. • . .Tampa Bay has drawn crowds of • 
more than 20,000 in SL Petersburg 
for some home games m a toned 
baseball stadium. This is how the 
Detroit Pistons built a stable bas- 
ketball franchise* first at the Savier- 
dcane, thenat the Palaceof Auburn 
HUk, 

ESPNZ if you can get It The 
cable network adds some pizazz, 
with adventurous production val- 
ues and, most of all, exposure for 
an underexposed sport. 

Biggest Disappointments .. . 

A plague of injuries. Out for long 
stretches have been Mario Le- 
mieux, .Eric Lindros, Steve Yzer- 
man and Mike Modano. The rea- 
sons include too many games too 
much travel and too much ice tune., 
for stars brought about by the dbc 


bious “resT they get during televi- 
sion, timeouts. 

Teema SeUnne. After a rookie 
season of 76 goals the sophomore 
jinx was inevitable; 

The goal drought. Last season at 

this po&t, each game averaged 7 J0 

goals So far tins year, the average 
is 6.06- Referees allow too much 
clutching and grabbing. Fighting 
majors are up from 619 to 909. 
.^Tbe officials' strike. Please, nev- 
er again. 

Los Angeles Kings. They 
sneaked into the Stanley Cup finals 
last season but squandered their 
chance to upset Montreal when 
Marty McSoricy got wngitf using 
an illegal stick. The Krugs' prob- 
lems start at the top, where the 
owner is selling part of (he team, 
the general manager is squabbling 
irith the coach and the coach 
misses McSadey, who was traded 
to Pittsburgh. . 

Television ratings, down sfigbtly 
from last year on ESIN. 

Pavel Bure and his Vancouver 
Canucks. 

. What’s Ahead 

The room of Mario Lemicux. 
This league needs healthy, happy 
stars. 

The trade logjam will break. Pos- 
sible change of scenes for Ed Bel- 
four of Qncagp,Siayzie Corson of 
Edmonton. Mike Gartner from the 
Rangers, Peter Nedved erf Vancou- 
ver, Steve Duchesne and Mike 
JfchJ of Quebec, three or four Is- 
' landers, several Los Angetes Kings 
players and one of those Calgary 

goalies, . 

- Miore coach dismissals. So far. 
only Ted Green in Edmonton and 
Paul Holmgren in Hartford have 
left their bench positions, taking 
other roles with their organizations. 

An influx of players after the 
Winter Olympics. Canada's Paul 
Kariya might Mp Anaheim 
the Stanley Cup playoffs or Maine 
capture die NCAA chanqiioaship. 
Even Peter Stastoy might return, to 
someone, horn Slovakia. 

A big shake-up in Chicago: 

. Collective bargaining agreement 
hptween the playexs. and the own: 
ces; A“StrSC' Dflrore the playoffs is 
.toJoutr^he^uesri^ 

• Viktor Kozlov, the sixth sdec- 
'tion in the 1993 NHL entry toft. 

- has been ckared by Dynamo Mos- 
cow to negptiatea contract with the 
San Jose Sharks after the Russian 
_ hockey season. The Associated 
Press reported. , 

~^Tle^^ aa ^^O unoed'ap^ree- 
nugbt pbyfor Russia in next 

month’* J l j|e|np mw fll ymnini 

Kozlov; who turns 19. next 
month, will play for Dynamo Mos- 
cow in theRnssian League playoffs 
in mid-March. 


TO QUE REAPER 
IN H PUANg 

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’•1'W -IS-.:-;'! _ 





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N 


INTEBNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13. 1994 


Page IT 



3 

i 


V: ■ 





ss Is Mostly in the Stands 


- isr . 


jUity 

'•fc. 


By ^Kiia^-Wilbon , * .annoyance. Thai guy bad not been shot or 

i.: v. ; staged or beaten; bejust fell out of ibesunds. 

LOS..ANGELES — - The arjned secU^y ■ ,: ;^Whatever happened to those laid-back. 


. , surfers knowrv as. Califor- 

to -q^ p£rfc£if : . •' sports fans? They are not here' at National 

about 100 yaw from the pns&gas. f pomted}' - fdoiba}] League games, J promise you. 

I®.™ «Jt-aa4saia U Sunday afternoon at a Raidergame is un- 

: U wto thnreTiohrs after thc Les AfigefS- - -Me an "aftej^bbtf anywhere ebe. The- people 
Raiders-Denyer firoiMMipbjSflL ih^y’re tough In Yankee Stadium 

oh -S unday wight, >6uid horeven iet but of their care here. Thai 

though it '*" j * v ~~* - sr- * - — ■■ 


been a brisrehongh day for 
people hired Ip kdM-tbe*p®ce^OB koew.-aA. 
rests, breaking up.Jgbis^gec^ 
the Coliseum, rushing peoj& ifii 


fooi who buzrcd the stadium has 
fc& how htcky.be is that be didn't actually 
pa'lhe Colmnn during Sunday's game, 
iiesamg fie would have received. As the 



anotiier gdy»1jat1ieji6*J<tf^ _ ,iThti. paraglider would probably have fared 

x " (V. .. *" . ., • *• . • , n 


ers," the guard _»j^ ‘ > Ycm don't'wanttopoant even worse than the guy wearing the John El- 

that, <10700?" The foelf-oo hfefiWfcttii' fttenf. * skyjacker who stood u 




; .r; . *' _ . 


up and strutted after 


-Denver's first pass completion, only to be 
swashed senseless before the next play. 

Earlier, a, Buffalo fan walked through the 
rather infaiaibus Lot 6 wearing a Bills jersey. H 
was promptly ripped from his body, soaked in 
fighter fluid ana set afire. Officers from (he 
LA. Police- Department made the assembled 
toughs take up a collection to pay for the jer- 
sey. It has also become a pregame ritual of 
sorts, there in that same Lot 6, to rub the bullet 
lodged in the stomach of one Raider fan. 

RFK. Stadium in Washington has lawyers: 
the Coliseum has drug dealers. Giants Stadium . 
has Blue Bloods; the Coliseum has Crips and 
Bloods. One player for the Raiders said he 
-would like to see dub officials institute a guns- 
for-tickets exchange. 

The Raiders — with their colors of black and 
silver, thelogo of a pirate with a patch over one 
eye and swords behind him. a team whose very 


existence is wrapped in intimidation, challeng- 
ing authority and second chances — have al- 
ways attracted those who color outside the 
lines. In Lot 6, a safe haven of sorts for people 
from various warring factions to declare a truce 
for eight Sunday afternoons a year, men play 
pregame football. Tackle, not touch. No pads. 
Sometimes barefoot, with broken glass every- 
where. One Lot 6er told the Los AngefcsTimcs 
that one of his favorite plays of the season oc- 
curred outside the stadium, where ‘a guy 
caught a pass and ran full speed into the grill nl' 
a Chevy." The talk here isn't about stock lips 
and politics; it's about having served hard time. 

And, we should add. this isn't about race. It 
has to be the most racially and ethnically di- 
verse crowd to gather at any stadium in this 
country, maybe the world. Diversity still can be 
frightening when, simply from the conversa- 
tion going on in the stands, you can figure out 


that j significant portion of those in attendance 
have been in jail or should have been. Hooli- 
gans would need lessons to ieam how to look 
this tough. Some of the Raiders' players say 
their wives and children have never seen than 
in a game. Too dangerous, too much marijuana 
in the air, too many stretchers on stand-by. 

High rollers? No Jack Nicholson, no Dyan 
Cannon here. Magic Johnson came to a game a 
couple of weeks ago. Stood on the Raiders' 
sideline. High rollers nowadays sit in sky-box- 
es. and the Coliseum doesn't have any. In fact, 
what is missing at the Coliseum is a moat. 
There are no night games there. People said it is 
simply too dangerous. 

This isn’t Washington or Denver or Chicago 
or even Pittsburgh, where those of means wait 
impatiently for the right to spend hundreds or 
thousands of dollars to secure a seat. The folks 
here, in most cases, are men and women who 


don’t know unliJ Saturday if they will hav-e the 
$35 it costs lo attend Sunday’s game. And that 
parking is another SI 5 to $25. depending on 
how close you can get and whether you want 
vour car to be (here when you ect back. 

A( the end of Sunday's game, a small army 
of policemen and privately hired security peo- 
ple encircled the closed end or the Coliseum. 
People st reamed things at them you just cannot; 
believe. Here and there you could see a parent 
and his or her children, a few people whp- 
looked as if they just as easily could have been, 
louring a museum. But they were overwhelmed- 
by tattoos and bure chests, by faces painted, 
black and silver, by T-shirts that declared what 
fans of opposing teams might get done to therm* 

They poured happily into some of L.A.V 
mosi unsettled and violent streets, many if not 
most of them to lives a far sight tougher thaa 
any football game. 






. 

:i -{ rr*>' 


Xi 

- *i~ 


's c r 


By-Mike Freeman : “We've playwf each other so of- 

• . Ne*YoHc7lrmSmke ten tete wkv years, wtfre fe- 

' EAST RUTHERFORD, New ' 

Jersey — They, arts,' as -Lawrence Jcrt. -Usea&WLcm Smashas 
Taylor arid, old friends. been with AeGi&iMronc&I was m 

~ The Sato~Frandsco 49a’STnnftfje - -A«^Lss^oL’/ a ; - . — ; 

New York- Giants 'have 'gone ^ .The Giants and 49eraare adtfiaJ- 
against each other so many rimg? in ry aoser Chan yon nngnt ctosuc. 

' STpost-season fflaHftVir tf* ' 

-49ers are in the Giaa^-dhwka... thc^ets^was ra fef- 
Bnt they aren't the kind ctf friends same posiftttWer^^ 
who-mvite the other ova for dhmex ~ untfl 

to meet, rite famfly.' •' ~ : • :Rewes&^hnn.TTiejnanrespan- 

- . ZT'-tbe past is any inificaiicwL ***» Ibr comag^np wi* a plan to 
when the (Wsand^ters meet oh Msbe^ff^mloo^tbe 
Saturday «t Candlestick Bark in a . 9™*^ co P rd ^* tor ' 


National. Football Conference 
pUryoff game, it will not only be ah 
exciting game. Based on what the 
winner has done i q die past, .it ^ 
could mean a Super Bowl trip Tor 
the victor! . ' : >' - 

Dan Reeves the coach of die 
Giants, and George Seif erf, fis 
counterpart with the 49ei5t using 
coach-speak, have each piodaiined 
the other team the best in flte Milfcy 
Wat “ 


Mike Nc^^Wks on die Denver 
staff wbeauSherwhan was still 
there. The^ers have noticed that 
die GiaHtfe*fe=arii®-some -of- the 

play«-Reevesii«riin Denver. 

playA Jje .used in 
Denven aod sometimes a gimmick 

yT saftit said. IX&s * atrong- 


tohhk_ & 

— — _ _ ^ ieams'baw ban in- 

li.lSl 3fc* ««» " anbewaflite as 

“We know each 

stud. “It's cmlv fitting that we 

eadx other againT" • - .l^^auMu The Giantt won, 15- 

The Giants and 49ers have met : ^ w dc^TMag(^s%y^&tifehr, 
five times in the ptojwffis — 198f, ' from 42 

1984, l 986. and oul The 


• • - - * » 

• -u 



-V •• 

f- : • • v 


Siitua Wi&Tbc AmkuuV FVci 


A NEW ORIBST EXPRESS— - Pitcher Park Chan Ho was applauded in Los Angeles by the Dodgers’ manager, Tom Lasorda, 
left, and the team’s general manager, Fred Qaire, as be beemne the fint Korean to sign with a major league dub ia 15 years and die 
second in baseball fetory. The rig^d-hander from Kong Jh Gty, South Korea, wh(Ke fastbafl has beat docked at 99 mph, got a 
sgniag boons (rf ST .2 tnflBoo for a annor-leagoe contract, but wifl attend tbe Dodgers’ spring training camp. H Park, 20, makes it to 
the majors, be wfl be Ifie first Korean to so. Park Chid Sooa signed with die Milwaukee Brewers in 1979, but got only to double A. 


Arrests Are Said 
To Be Imminent in 
Attack on Kerrigan 




winner in fodr of those 
gone on to win ibe Soper 
one year that didaT v — 

1985, when the 
Fraodsco m a 

tj^ssaaNii* 






$MTu* 

. . •• r&- 


i* tiiXUn.4:Ai± m 

TO CSX. 

WIBCTWr 




You amnew 
. dwlKThaad 
•toywr'kwwdr 

Just callus ril&f BI30BA 85.85L ; 


is . that game 
lie coach was 

x-season, the Gi- 
i 49ers om of the 
t tana dot of 
IsorfatGntatt 

« . s«- 

<1982; As G- 
-aa*s* i coadi was Ray Pcrions, and a 
c 49tf&oflftriixste61to 
Mmed im'mte tyq T tion. fqraioue^ ' 
dotto to aaf ti* 49af 38-24 wo- 
toty iudfe semfingK . • . r -*';-. 
" 1 Tlris^thne‘*rii©'CoaelL is Reeves 
is far Cerent In 


past years the 49ers’ defense was 
usually pretty good, but this year 
it’s much weaker. Reeves, however, 
says he doesn’t see airy glaring 

w eaknesses, hut if that's the case 
then be may need new contact 

lenses. San Francisco is ranked last _ « , , n 

the National Football League ■ Tney d Done It Before 


tbe field. Instead of 3 points, we 
need to get 7. It's going to come 
down to our running ga me. We 
want to dictate the tempo." 

Bot win Steve Young and Jerry 
Rice let them? 


“What is it you want to move?" • Bill Polian, a two-time NFL 
Edna asked. executive of the year as the man 

“Some office equipment, some credited with converting the Buffa- 
weights. actually quite a bit of lo Bills from losers to NFL con- 


m 

against the rush, allowing 4J yards- 
n cany] The Giants' have the best 
running game in the NFL and one 
of the best running backs in Rod- 
ney Hampton. 

Tbere is little doubt, what the 
Giants wOl do? 

“They have an explosive of- 
fense," said guard WflHam Rob- 
erts. “Our key is to keep them off 


Mike Lamb of Los Angdes radio 
station KMPC was wondering bow 
much it would cost for the Los 
Angeles Rams to move to Balti- 
more, so as part of an on-air tut be 
called the Mayflower World-Wide 
Moving office in Baltimore and a 
woman named Edna came on the 
line. The Los Angeles Tunes re- 
ported. 


stuff,” Lamb said. “You ever 
moved a sports team before?" 

Edna: “Yeah, we moved tbe 
Colts. I mean our company did." 

Lamb, seeing he had a five one: 
“Well, now you can't idl anybody. 


but we’re looking into moving the job. 


tenders, was named general manag- 
er Wednesday of the Carolina 
Panthers expansion team. 

Polian, 51, will step down as the 
NFL's vice president of fooihafi 
development to lake the Charlotte 


Rams to Baltimore and need to 
know how much it would cost.” 
Edna: “Sure, just fax me an in- 
ventory. You can sign il with a 
phony name if you like. Sign it Joe 
Smith." 

Edna's guestimate was $25,000. 


He has been a widely sought 
commodity since his controversial 
firing by the Bills’ owner. Ralph 
Wilson, following Iasi season's 52- 
17 Super Bowl loss to the Dallas 
Cowboys. It was Buffalo's third 
consecutive Super Bowl defeat. 


The AssocrnieJ Pnrtt 

PORTLAND. Oregon — Law 
enforcement sources said Wednes- 
day that the FBI would announce 
arrests later in the day in relation to 
last week's attack on U.S. Olympic 
figure skater Nancy Kerrigan. 

Dewey Blanton, a spokesman for 
Kerrigan, said that the skater's 
family “was informed by the FBI of 
an impending development” 

That followed a report by the 
Portland Oregonian newspaper 
that the FBI was investigating alle- 
gations that the husband of figure 
dealer Tonya Harding and her 
bodyguard arranged Thursday's at- 
tack on Kerrigan. 

A Portland minister (old investi- 
gators be had listened to a tape 
recording of Harding's husband 
and bodyguard plotting with a 
third man, described as a “hit man" 
from Arizona, to injure Kerrigan. 

It was not dear if the announce- 
ments were related to The Orego- 
nian's report. 

Kerrigan was struck on the leg 
after a practice session last Thurs- 
dav. suffering severe bruises that 
forced her to withdraw from the 
U.S. national championships in 
Detroit The championships also 
serve as the US. Olympic trials. 

Tbe International Committee of 
the U.S. Figure Skating Associa- 
tion named Kerrigan to the Olym- 
pic team along with Harding, who 
won the LLS. championship. 

Harding's husband, Jeff Gilloo* 
ly. acknowledged he was being in- 
vestigated. but told the Oregonian 
that he was not involved in the 
Kerrigan attack. 

“I wouldn't do that" GiHcoly 




SIDELINES 


UVLTillM 

NBA Standings 


aatwwoi ueniiicE 

. Anodic bMrio* 




w u •- 

pro 

« 


MtaWYTOK 

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jn 

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sat 

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» i 


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- TO T9 

JOt 

. 


MoiMpMt 

, - - .13 W 

406 

m 


Bolton 

13 TO 

33 

Wj 


ul rtlJnnkir 
mmimpnaf . 

. : » » 

33 

12VS 


AMvrio 

Ottawa 


Mkm 


Mftqoufett 

DnvH 


CHMDMlM 

. . a 7 jw 

31 W - A77 
W 14 -SIS 
0.17 AW 
Y3 te AW 

f » art 
a a - x* 


• 2 - 

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10 
MKr 
Y$ 


western awraumci 

MMMrtDMOM 



Houston •• • 
Utah 

Ben Antonia 


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MW . 


Kama 


Portland 

GoidoDStan 

LA-CRpwrt 

S wJtt tituM 
La. Lofton . 


W L 

M 

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' . 37 . 5 

MU 

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M3 

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TO TO. 

.457 

S» 

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MBS 

im 

TO TO 

30 

17 - 

- 2 29 

M 

Mft 

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Mr 

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W 2*-TW 

a at-uo 

W: W Mcrgo i Y tS> j?n, Chd>»pon7-l32-2U. 
HA: CWommVSt-CA^MorrtsW.Ul-l M. 
nob oa m 53 lOugnatta w. 

HwrjpTtmrSl (CoNnron T3i. Aartwi Woin 
Wdop 3). Now 

Joanna updwson w. * 

Poore r --- • 7,--..'. ' m m v 7f~m 
pe w n r ana tt— u 

or: «d( aaMif/RwmtansT-M m jf. 
W: CtBott.M5>2 H. owners 6-MSH IL 
I MP— ie D oBWerSg.taeii t e nh oai.PWfuM' 
S3 (FatvnicR US, A«ob**— Oenv*r at (itMi- 
Iknn 1U> DatroR 32 CTTwnKa. Hwtr 61. 

a 3 H 

XT -SO 17 

liAJMtLM M.lUt,Mittor 1-14 Z-23DL M: 
Dw>» M m«UrtDd< HtWULIU- 
»— i u ea—tn tADawM lit: JHIh— 
X fgrlOmu wgltfc AP i li w ei ta tt i M 
IMCKW S). MHwnukH a tBrtCKOWSW 5). 

a m it a-> m 
*7 31 30 30 — MB 
m: lUdtor lKtr«2fc WSBoow C-M >« IS. S: 

sat e-n M *. AobfeBm ms ww zr. HO- 
bom Ws-~MPn«itiaa CWWIwm. Fo»* OtAou 
AoMoU <Wcd— itnataoio to - i Wwwin tl 
(WRUanv ttl, Sm^ntonio a (Robimon TO. 
CMrfoM » U K 14-OS 

m— bt . - * a a »-« 

. .Cl Cnmr10-191’123.Eltts7-4l'21£P: Breen ' 
WMIUMMTO»4ir. l— C 7CT - 
lon*5* tEWa«, Pt»oen»x6i tBraon Mj-Ao- 
itoto Chortoltiia (Curry. BneuMTt.mm- 
nfat 38 (P_WWSoo TO. 

Mhismm . wav o-ia 

union -s*aw sr—itr 

•_ G; J— wayngspr —ll tw rwg. 
;LAt von EW« S* TO SmHh tO-M WK 
■mhcwiar qoMrnSTOeWr— bf TO.ua 
AniolooStbteSKAnW^-Boidm States 


34 3T U TO- rr 
Xt 30 73 TO— in 
S: scnromnfs.il f-M w. Povion 7-nss if. 
P : CJteMraon o-ts U-14 a. Sir tekkmd M* M 
22. J-Robbanr 0-1* S-0 TO RU M uhUi S oc rtl te 
St (Payten a. Port lend 52 (CRoMnaon 1TA 
A*»W»— 5«o«te 17 (Payton 71. Porttoita TO 
(Strickland TO. , 

Major Coltege Score* 

BAST 

BroxM TO Rutoero M 
hno JX t tert t i M s tem 72 
Mateo TO HOWTO 40 . 

Mow HamptIHr* 97. Coot Gonnecttarf H.*3 
Proutdonco TO Rhoda bland 72 
Testate 76, Penn 4S 
Vaononi V, oortmouta B 
Vote TO Sworthoiaro S 
SOUTH 

Ra intomaMoaal 73. Ftartoa Atlantic 70 
Florida 0 . South HorWa 64 
Maryland TO Florida St 7* ' 

Scute Alabama TO Southern Mb*. St 
VHtafwva n. Kktmona go 
MIDWEST 
InCDana TO' Iowa 73 
- SL Senavcntur* TO N. lawa 70 
SLLOBte TO MunrWt StTO 
SOUTHWEST 
Aritaows TO LSU TO 
Rice 71. Southern Methr <1 
Sam Homfon St- TO Tms-A7IMton 79 
PAH WEST 

St MoryV. CaltX JX Marttjrldp* 64 
UMLV HR. UC Irvine 79- • 


Woinineten 

19 

19 

4 

47 

137 

129 

itasfcL Heimel. Seamd Period: B-Smaiinsk> T3 

FtartOa 

TO 

17 

7 

39 

111 

US 

(Soeanrvi: P-Stevcns 2S (Brawn. awwvI. 

N.Y. (sunders 

14 

TO 

4 

3 i 

T42 

143 

Third Parted : S-Oonato4 (Juneau. Bouroucl; 

Tamna Bar 

TO 

23 

5 

35 

113 

135 

B-Reld7 (Baunjoe); (SMP-Frandt14<Stevm 

MorMteoM Division 




Jaerl. Overtime: P-Sicvens 26 lJaar> Fnncttl 

PmUtirsh 

TO 

TO 

9 

51 

157 

149 

(ml- soots oa aaal: B Ion Wresort) n-15-19- 

Wtmiiaol 

20 

IS 

7 

47 

134 

117 

1-44. p ion Blue; n -*-1-6-24. 

Boston 

T* 

M 

S 

46 

UO 

125 

Edmontaa T 0 1 — 2 

Balfato 

» 

11 

4 

44 

143 

110 

Dtates 1 4 1— S 

OtMiteC 

17 

21 

5 

J* 

146 

153 

Phot Period: E-CToer 16 (Corson. Amoftl. 

Hartford 

17 

TO 

3 

37 

129 

137 

Seated Ported: D-Cralo 9 ( Evasoa.Jonnsonl ; 

Ottateo 

B 

34 

4 

20 

123 

210 

O-Evtaon 5 IHataw. Churlal (pal; O-Oah- 


Winston Increases Whitbread Lead 


of 

es- 


WESTERN COMPERE MCE 
Centre! DMtten 


it n » toiiavtsn; OMcPnec a Ijannam 
barn. Thlrt Period; O-Dohlen 13 (Covomm, 



W 

L 

T PH OP 

GA 

Crntal lap): E-Ben net! 2 (Poanon. Wolgttf). 

Toronto 

25 

U 

7 

57 

154 

128 

Shots on mat: E (on moos) 7-5-n— u. D (on 

Dallas 

TO 

15 

7 

S3 

156 

136 

Rnntorti lS-TO U— SI. 

Dotroll 

23 

13 

4 

50 

103 

IJ> 

Bottom 2 1 3-5 

Si. Louis 

21 

16 

6 

40 

ns 

138 

Chi mo • 1 1—2 

CMcobo 

20 

TO 

4 

44 

127 

121 

First Period: e-Plante 15 (Auden*. Marl; 

Wfmlpeo 

16 

3i 

J 

37 

143 

178 

B-Mov TO (Planlel. Socond Ported: X BuMokc 


Pacific Mvbtetl 




Audette 11 (Planlel; C -Goulet in (RoejUck. 

Gafearv 

TO 

M 

7 

57 

164 

745 

Noonan). TWrO Period: B-5wemev 4 C- 

Vancouver 

20 

21 

0 

40 

139 

TOO 

Rouitu i (Peuiinl; B-Wood 9 toenauv sftoil. 

Anatwim 

T7 

25 

2 

36 

120 

135 

Shots oa aoo(: B (on HoeOeCll TO«-n-^2*. C 

Loo Aneelas 

TO 

21 

4 

36 

154 

1«3 

Ian Hauui) 4-15-7— 26. 

Sen jom 

TO . 

21 

TO 

34 

M7 

139 

Quebec • 0 6—0 

EOmonon 

T3 

25 

4 

33 

125 

150 

Cotearv • 1 8—1 

TUESDAY’S RESULTS 



First Period: None. Second Ported: C-Rel- 


HI 


TUXSMVS HESttl-TS . . 

utcnp~« . • I'- » * » 

Hew Vent . _ n b o to— a 

LA: Monntoe Mi'WW.5MKicW6-n VI U 

NY; e-tea T3-TO W TO 

m— B d i 1 1.1 Awte r n T1 llrnr— ^ .Row " ... . . - 

yof * *' 

Ijoeuon SI. Mew Ybrti 27 t5*ona to ■ 


CtaBneotrTOlTOAttaeM o TOfPMaa ManEii77. 

32 TO V TO— 99 
2S 2< U TO— HI 
M: IjopB ** 64 TO SAridth 10-19 XX TO S: 
Simmons $.17 M TO Tisdale SftHate 
723. Sacramento 59 


£ 333 . 

NHL Standing* 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AttaoHc OMiloa 

' W L T Pte OF 8A 

fLY. temarrs zr 12 3 57 US 111 

Mow WW '- 24 U * S2 1*7 «* 

PhHadetanla 21 If 3 *5 152 W 


1 • o—l 
PMadetaMo » i >-4 

Hat Period: O McO c dn i (vashiivMacwer) 
(pul. Second Period.* P-moi»(«m 1 (Yuteka- 
rich. Rwx«>. Third Ptrtod: 3. PNladedtBtrta 
Paust 1 (Dlneen, YueMcevlcii); P-Yushkevldi 
* CBrOsT Amour, Cotter) Ipo); P-Llndras 19 
ITtoaetl) (en).SBMsM0eai:O (an ReMset) *■ 
Dd-Sl P (an Bltdngtonl (M- 13—77. 
ToroTOo S l T — 2 

Wmhioeton iio—i 

FW Parted: None. Second Period: W-Jo- 
toinssan 3 (Plvonko. Khristtehl; T-Andrev- 
Otuk TO f Rouse, CHmocirt (Mi). TMrd Period: 
T'dlmour M I Berg. Mandervlitel. Shstt on 
•oaU T Can Beauoni) 8-7-6— 21. W (or PohrtflJ 

Boston I 1 2 9-4 

PHttmnti ' 3 17 1-6 

HOB Period: p-5tevens TO (Brown. Rom- 
mHj MonteM 3 ( Momma .- S-riuWraJ (Snv- 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS ■ 

1 Tiler'S ptBGB 
4 Rap’s opposite 
•jitereharitaH: 

saMoneynutKer ^ 

t«OdSSOrtb«RP 

wNuwtoh . 

I TO 


1 

17 Keg eowanoj 

s«“He<pi‘sw 
» i0S8BncIiie- ; 

vaJeosW 
20 Behave 

23 Muftico»»od 


. spam 
asdoanemAd, 

. may**--- 
acMoitgage- 
' Merest ... 
MPurpteHean;-"- 

. a : g. . - 

30'Lowtiridgef ' 
B/eiyon* 
.pownrcanaJ 

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© New York Times Edited by WiJJ Shorn. 



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S»VW ~ 

FOOTBALL 

NaftonM Pootaafl Leone 
DENVER— Erme Siautner. drienstwe line 
cooch. retired. 

INDIANAPOLIS COLTS-FIrod DwoWl 
Poduer. receivers caaeti: Rk* venturi, tte- 
fensive coon} motor; Gcoree Cawvwax sec- 
ondorv eoarti: Francis Peov. detenslve line 
coacfe; (tad jav Roftertsan, oetenstee ossts- 
lant coo c*^ 

U A. RAIDE RS— Put Cltesicr McGlockion, 
detenshte 11/wwn.en Jnlured reserve, Slynw 
Warren Powers, defensive lineman. 

ti. Y. JETS — Prompted Gres RoWnten. de- 
tsnsive line coach, to defensive cnenflnator. 


SOLTH.AMPTON, England (API — Dennis Conner's stra 
separating from the rest of the fleet continued to pay dividends Wi 
day as the American yacht Winston extended its lead in the third leg of 
the Whitbread Round the World Race. 

Winston, a Whitbread 60 entry, led ihe nearest rival in its class, tite 
Japanese-New Zealand yacht Tokio. by 83 nautical miles. The leading 
boat in tbe Maxi class. New Zealand Endeavor, was 77 miles off the lead 
as the fleet sailed off the southern coast of Australia. 

Winston is more than 1 20 miles south of the main pack, in the latitudes 
known as the Roaring Forties. Others boats, upon learning that Winston 
was in the lead, have copied Conner’s strategy and have sailed further 
south. 

• Richard Matthews, chairman of the Crusade Y acht Club, which was 

mounting Britain's challenge for the 1995 America's Cup. said Wednes- 
day that the syndicate had been unable to assemble the S250.000-dollar 
bond required by the organizers. ( AFPt 

Holyfield Cut, Botha Bout Canceled 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — Former champion Riddick Bowe has 
needed 10 stitches to dose a rn sustained in a sparring session, which has 
forced the cancellation of his fight next month against South African 
Francois Botha. 

Bowe’s manager. Rock Newman said "a freak accident” reopened an 
old cut over lus left eye. Newman said he was not sure when Bowe would 
return to the ring, or who would be the opponent. Bowe had been 
scheduled to fight Botha on Feb. 5 in Las Vegas. 

• Undefeated Yuichi Kasai of Japan wiU challenge WBA junior 
featherweight champion Wilf redo Vasquez of Puerto Rico on March 2 in 
Tokyo, organizers said Wednesday. 

For the Record 

Kevin Reimer of the Milwaukee Brewers and Brian Traxler of the Los 
Angeles Dodgers’ Triple- A farm club will play for the Fukuoka Daiei 
Hawks in the 1994 season, tbe Japanese team said Wednesday. (AP) 

Outfielder Orlando Merced more than quadrupled his salary, agreeing 
to a one-year contract worth Sl.485.000 that means the Pittsburgh Pirates 
won't go" to arbitration this year, having signed all their players, f APl 

Whhey Herzog resigned as genera! manager of the California Angels 
and was replaced by Bill Bavasi: Herzog will remain with the team as a 
consultant. ( APi 


said. “1 have more faith in ray wife 
than to bump off her competition." 

Harding's bodyguard. Shawm 
Eric Eckardt. called the allegations 
"absurd." 4 . 

There was no indication that 
Harding had any involvement is 
the attack or knew anything about 
it. the newspaper said. 

The minister. Eugene C; 
Saunters, told investigators an ae^ 
quarntance played the tape record' 
mg for him. the newspaper reported.. 

Saunders turned to Gary CTowfc 
a private investigator, and told him 
about the alleged plot. 

According to what Saunders told 
Crowe about tbe tape, a man with 
connections to Harding had ap* 
proached Saunders's acquaintance 
and asked him to arrange an "acci- 
dent" that would knock Kerrigan 
out of the competition. 

Crowe said Saunders' acquaint- 
ance became worried after receiv-. 
ing threats from tbe Arizona man 
because the man who allegedly hired 
the "hit" had failed to pay him. 

Efforts to find Saunders early 
Wednesday were unsuccessful There 
is no phone listing for a Eugene Cr. 
Saunders in the Portland area. 

Ban Gon. spokesman for th[e 
FBI in Oregon, told The Oregonian 
that “the events surrounding that 
attack possibly involved a federal 
violation. I don't want to go-be : 
vond that.” 

Gori said Wednesday morning 
he expected further information 
would be released later in the da>^ 
but did not expect any develop- 
ments that would prevent Harding 
from leaving Portland for a week- 
end competition in Virginia. 

Saunders retained a lawyer and 
went to the authorities Monday af : 
ternoon. The Oregonian said, addl- 
ing that, after questioning him. the, 
FBf talked to Crowe on Tuesday - 

Detroit police, and later Foi 
agents, questioned aJi skaters and 
coaches at the Olympic trials. 

Harding and Gillooly talked to 
FBf agents in Detroit and checked 
in again with them Tuesday. Hac, 
ding said. 

Gillooly said he understood why, 
the FBI had to investigate him. v 

“It's their job to follow up on 
this.” Gillooly said. “Nobody likes 
being investigated by the FBI. But J 
understand their need to invests 
gate." - 

• U.S. Olympic speedskater 
Kristen Talbot, who donated bond 
marrow in an effort to save hec, 
brother's life, could resume train-* 
ing as early as the end of the week; 
said the doctor who performed ihtf 
transplant in Baltimore. 

• Petr Nedved can play for Can* 
ada at the Lillehar.uner Wimet 
Olympics, the the International Ice. 
Hockey Federation mled. Nedved 
defected (o Canada as a teen-age? 
in I^SQ, but his international hock^ 
ey rights remained in Czechoslovak 
kja and were never transferred. * 

■ Skier Heinzer U Injured j 

Former world champion Fran* 
Heinzer suffered a concussion an*j 
facial cuts Wednesday in a training 
run on the daunting “SireiP World 
Cup downhill course. Reuters re^ 
ported from Kitzbuhel. Austria. ~” 

He lost control on the 40-meter 
Seidelhang jump on the upper part 
of the course while practicing for 
Saturday’s downhill race. He was 
flown to a hospital by helicopter. : 

• A lack of snow at Adelboden 
forced organizers Wednesday to 
move Tuesday's men’s World Cup 
gjam slalom to another Swiss veit 
ue. Crans-Montana. 


PH*ByHana«em 


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ESCORTS & GUIDES 

1 INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED II 

BELGRAVIA 

(Continued From Page 15) 



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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


All Hands Below Deck 



W ASHINGTON —The words 
that seem to be popping up 
all over Washington recently are 
"damage control." When discuss- 
ing the president's difficulties with 
his investment in Whitewater, it is' 
generally agreed that the problem 
is not the Issue itself. The damage 
control is what’s causing all the 
trouble. 

. Every president has highly 
trained damage- 
control teams 
that are expect- 
ed to minimize 
any situation 
that could em- 
barrass him. 

As on a ship, 
the damage-con- 
trol team is lo- 
cated below 
deck — in the _ , 
boiler room of Buchwald 
the White House. They are in touch 
with the top officers on deck who 
are steering the boat through the 
treacherous rocks of the scandaL 
When the alarm goes off, the dam- 
age-con trol team, wearing masks 
and oxygen tanks, do a survey to 
find out how bad things are. 

□ 

Harris Block, a senior damage- 
control officer, speaks up to the 
bridge. “There is a small leak in the 

Fouquet’s Owner 
Is Fined $6,800 

The ArUKtuied Pm* 

PARIS — A court Fined a co- 
owner Fouquet's 40,000 francs on 
Wednesday after inspectors found 
that the restaurant on the Champs- 
Sysees had stocked frozen “fresh" 
food and had roaches in the kitch- 
en. 

The co-owner, Maurice Msel- 
latti, 73, said his accusers were 
“Hying once again to attack one of 
the last bastions of French gastron- 
omy on the Champs-Elys&es." Al- 
though Fouquet's is seen as one of 
Paris's most prestigious restau- 
rants. the Micheiin guide gives it no 
stars. The fine amounted to $6,800. 

Fouquet's also was cited for buy- 
ing "farm fresh” cheese from a lo- 
cal outlet Because of illness, Mr. 
MseUatti’s wife, who as co-owner 
faces similar charges, will not ap- 
pear in court until March 23. 


boiler and there are Whitewater pa- 
pers floating all around." 

“Can you plug it?" die executive 
officer asks from topside. 

“It’s too late. The leak is spread- 
ing," Block tdls him. 

“What do you adviser 

“We could bring down some 
divers from the Justice Department 
(o gather what there is and get it off 
the ship." 

“Good idea. And then deep-six 
the files.” 

But the damage-control leader 
says, “Too many people know 
about the flies, and if they are 
dumped it might appear that we are 
covering up and that could lead to a 
court-martiaL" 

A White House official shouts. 
“Media ship off the port side. They 
request permission to board ana 
question the captain on why the 
ship of state is in such treacherous 
waters." 

Block says. “Don’t lei them 
come on board. Send over six dam- 
age-control officers to deny what 
happened." 

“Aye. aye. sir. Attention, media 
ship. All questions regarding dam- 
age to our vessel must be relayed to 
the Justice Department. They're 
the only ones who understand why 
we're taking on so much water." 

A radio man speaks to the execu- 
tive officer. “Sir, they want to ap- 
point a special officer to examine 
all the papers involved with the 
accident and to recommend court- 
martial charges against those who 
may be responsible for 
Whitewater." 


The officer responds, “That’s out 
of the question. Send back word 
that we can investigate our own 
accidents. Our damage-control 
people are the best in the business." 

“That may not fly, sir. We 
should come up with something 
else" 

“Tell them we’re willing to coop- 
erate in any way possible, but they 
can’t board the ship until next 
Tuesday." 

“Why next Tuesday?" 

“So that we can get the ship all 
cleaned up and not have any bilge 
hanging around.” 

“Steady as she goes." 

“Hard right rudder.” 

Executive officer to helmsman, 
“Remind me to send our damage- 
control team a well-done." 


Polish Fil 


By John Rockwell 

yew York Times Service 

W ARSAW — At a recent conference 
in Fiance on the future of European 
film, the Polish director Krzysztof Zasussi 
took a pessimistic line. Freedom, he said 
worriedly, had proven a very mixed Mess- 
ing for the Polish film industry: Protective 
barriers had bent lowered and Hollywood 
had conquered alL 

“Before, we were dominated by the Rus- 
sians.” be said. “Now. it’s the Americans." 

With an inflation rate of 35 percent and 
steady devaluation of the zloty, with a 
worldwide recession and uncertain experi- 
ence in developing private enterprises, the 
Polish Rim industry might indeed seem in 
trouble. Its best-known directors — Zan- 
ussi, Krzysztof Kieslowski, Agnieszka 
Holland and Andizej Wajda — either lie 
tow or work abroad. 

In 1993, the 10 most popular Rims in 
Poland were American. Yet movies keep 
getting made here, more each year, and 
people keep paying money to see them. 
The Communist victory at the Polish 

K ills this fall is unlikely to change that. 

ew Polish films may not all be the ear- 
nest moral explorations or stirring dissi- 
dent manifestoes of yesteryear. But they 
appeal on a visceral level to an audience 
grown cynical from the machinations of 
their politicians or prurient from their 
new-found freedoms. 

Two especially popular Polish films of 
the last two years, not classy enough for 
the major Western film festivals or accessi- 
ble enough fen* Western distribution, can 
speak for the stare of Polish film today. 
And their producers offer varying yet 
complementary strategies to confront the 
Hollywood behemoth. 

“Kgs" (the producers' equivalent of the 
original “Dogs." a Polish epithet for the 
pouce) is a story of corrupt, bnital. cynical 
former Communist secret policemen con- 
fronting the new realities of contemporary 
Poland. It won the Golden Duck (Poland's 
improbably named version of the Oscar) 
for best director (Wladysbw Pasikowsiti) 
and best actor (Boguslaw Linda) in 1992. 

“The Kidnapping of Agate." based on a 
true story, is a 1993 film about a Polish 
politician who accuses his daughter's boy- 
friend of kidnapping after the two young 
lovers run off together. The film offers 
delightful performances, modest but overt 
sexiness, a trenchant look at the abuse of 
power and a light touch that fails to pre- 
pare one for the brutal ending. At a recent 
Warsaw screening, a mostly teenage audi- 
ence loved iL 

“Pigs" was produced by Zebra Film 
Productions, founded in 1989 and still 
technically owned by the state, and hence’ 
technically a nonprofit holdover from the 
former Communist system. Two of its 


lllll 




Marek Koodrat and Boguslaw Linda in scene from the Polish fihn “Pigs.* 


three chief executives, Jacek Bromski and 
Jacek Moczydlowski (the third is on leave 
teaching in New York), speak with a resi- 
due of dissident id ealism of the need to 
foster young directors and to make serious 
films that resist the commercial ethos. 

“Agata" is a production of Heritage 
Films, an enthusiastically capitalist ven- 
ture of Lew Rywin, who attended a Brook- 
lyn high school before he was deported 
from die United States as an illegal alien 
and who served as Steven Spielberg's Pol- 
ish line producer Tor “Schindler's List” 

Rywin has set up his office as a sort of 
homage to cigar-chomping Hollywood 
studio bosses of yore. Yet he, too, has been 
involved in high-art projects, notably 
Kieslowski's 10-part series of hourioog 
films called “Decalogue," made for Polish 
television, and Wajda’s last three films. 

Perhaps because of his experience in the 
United Stales, his fluent English and, now. 
his Spielberg cachet. Rywin professes con- 
fidence that be can work with Hollywood. 


“I cannot complain,” he said. “My portfo- 
tio.is full. If a train is coming your way, - 
you can either be crashed by it or you can 
jump on iL" 

Tamissi was hardly so buoyant, and 
neither was Moczydibwski. Like so many 
former dissidents, be and his partner fed 
at sea with their new freedoms, lamenting 
the loss of the intensity and excitement of 
their dissident years. 

“Under communism, film was the freest 
way to express ideas," Moczydlowski said. 
“Of course there was censorship. We had 
to figure out a way to say what people 
wanted to hear without saying it specifi- 
cally. It was a game of wits. Now that 
anything can be said in the open, there's 
. nobody to fight against We don’t know 
what stories people want us to tell them.” 

Whether the production is public or pri- 
vate, neariy all movies in Poland are seeded 
with a grant of approximately $250,000 
from the Ministry of Culture and then 
require additional outside investment The 


trouble is. the Polish audience by ite^f “ 


audiences mist be sought outside Poland, 
which (Mutes the native film product. - 

‘There is.DO way I can hope to return my 
investment if I address myself solely to the 
Polish marker," Rywin said. Thai has led to 
most reproducers expanding to tekvia on 
or to serving as local coordinators for spec- 
tacles bankrolled from abroad. “Poland is 
taking advantage of the Yugoslav sittift- 
tionT Rywin said. “Bef ore, most American 
producers would go there to do penod 
piece. Now.- they go to Poland ocRussa. 

The number of films produced in Poland 

has actually risen sieadtiy x according to the. 

' Ministry of Culture's Stare Gnemaiogra- 
pby Committee, front 22 in 1990 to 25 in 
1991 tc>28inl.992(the 1993 figure is-not yet 

in). But Polish film attendance has plum- 
meted, meaning that a No. 1 box-office hit. 
even if it is an American film, sells fewer 
'tickets than before. From 38 million in 
1990, overall attendance dropped to 

IS million jo 1991 and 11 miffion in 1992. 
The ministry estimates that 1993 wQl show 
a rebound to 15 ' motion. 

The problem is partly the recession and 
inflation., with ticket prices leaping from 20 
cents m 1990 to $2 now. And partly, Rywin 
argnes.it has to do with the limited number 
and poor condition of Polish theaters. 

. Tbereis also more orless rampant piracy, 
although Rywin places less weight on that 
than do the Zebra executives. According to 
them, Poland has the highest per-capita 
number of video cassette players in Europe, 

. the majority of available cassettes are illicit 
and tbtnr use has severely depressed fihn 
attendance. On Jan. 7, the Polish parlia- 
ment finally passed a copyright law intend- 
ed to curb die pirating of films. 

For Rywin, who shares with the Zebra 
team a professed lack of concern about the 
resurgent Polish Communists, the only 
way to survive is to . adjust “We must . 
remain open to the products of the West" 
he said. T*m not afraid of American prod- 
ucts. There’s room for everybody. 

Like so many East European intellectu- 
als, be longs for a system of values in 
which profi tability vs not paramount. “For 
us, culture was a substitute for everything 
else," he said. 

. “When I was a teenager, we could go to 
the cinema and see everything by F ellini or 
Bergman. We didn’t have anything else to 
da We had no money, and cinema was 
cheap. A director oould go to a car factory 
and show his film and have a very interest- 
ing discussion. 

“Now, we are losing this. Go to Belgium 
and ask a doctor who is Bergman and be 
won’t know. It’s a consumption satiety in 
the West, and now here, toot Young peo- 
ple just go to the dnema to have fun." 


PEOPLE 


Tardy Morion Memoirs 
Sighted for Next Fall 

Harold M. Evans, the head of the 4 


can finally say for certain »W0 the 
company plans to publish Marion 
Brando’s tong overdue, mac* fret- 
ted about and very expensive — 
maybe $5 traffic*! worth — tnem- 
oiiy. in the falL Evans said that 
Brando had beat working for more 
than a year with Robert Lindsey, 
who ghostwrote former President 
Ronald Reagan’s manors, and that 
the manuscript is expected fry th e 
of January. Holding fais breath? 

O . 

The Gsi according to Mr. Black- 
wefl: Glenn CJose’sTook has her on 
“Nigbnnare Alley" and Rosie Perez ~ 
is “a fanny-flaunting fiasco" Close 
pi yfo up on the top of. the former 
designer’s 'annual worsl-dressed 
women list Next up was Jufia Rob- 
erts (“a barefoot bride"), followed 
by Diana Ross (“a Martian meter 
maid —starring m a cancan revue’’), 
Perez and Susan Sarandon (“peeka- 
boo She"). - - - Meanwhile, Mari- 
lyn Qosyle and Jane Fonda beaded 
up McCall’s list of “five women who 
kt us down”: Quayie for not prac- 
ticing what she preaches and Fonda 
for becoming one of the “least liber- 
ated" famous women. The five also 
included the actress Jennifer Grey, 
the model Anna fficofe Smith and 
Princess Masak© of Japan for giv- 
ing up a career in diplomacy to 
many Crown Prime Nandrita 
□ 

Georee Bums has two years to go 
100th birthday, and the 
is a sellout. The co- 
1 signed in November 10 play 
three shows at Caesars Palace in 
Las Vegas on Jan. 19 to 21, 1996. 
His birthday is Jan. 20. 

• O 

The director OfiverStoee chides 
Americans for being more worried 
about violence in movies than they 
are about real-life violence. In an 
interview in Entertainment Weekly. 
Sume noted reports that people bad 
walked out of his latest Vietnam . 
film, “Heaves and Earth." because 
they were put off fry a torture scene 
*Tm anMTed Americans would be 
so squeamish." be said. “What 
wimps! How can you deny life?" 


before 


INTCRIVAXIOIVAL 

CLASSIFIED 

■ Appears on Pdges 5 & 15 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 


A**»v~ 

Amamtom 

M» 

ABmE 

Bdictfcna 

Bvtn 

Bnrowh 

Budapest 

CawCMfr* 

Dump 

ton* 

ftanWuT 

Gama 


Today 

Htflh Low W 
OF OF 
19*56 11<5? 1 
B/« J*37 e 


714 * 

14/57 

16*61 

8/43 

4/» 

6143 

4*3J 

5*41 


Want** 

U* PaWna 

L rttoon 

Union 

UaW 

UUn 


Hunch 

■fccw 

Pm™ 

Phk. 

Piapw 

Rn*>w* 

Burr 

SI PHwfcmg 

StaiMm 

SajsboutT) 

Tadm 

viw 

Vn-mi 

Worsen 

Zirc* 


■2/39 pc 
■'48 ah 
9M pc 
KM pc 
-1/31 ih 
2*35 t 
1IX *■ 
1-34 c 
21 . ■ n 12 IS 3 a 
8/48 3/37 ri, 

6/43 3*35 oh 
12*53 7*44 pc 

3*48 4*39 ah 

r.« oor -li 
GOB -3*27 m 
10/50 8.-43 oh 
35/77 15150 % 
15/59 10/50 a 
B/48 4*39 pc 

13.55 5*41 pc 

7*44 4/39 c 

-4*25 -9/18 c 
C/41 2/35 ih 

r*i«r 3/48 c 
2/35 -J/B7 c 
15.59 11.52 pc 
B/4G 3 '77 th 
-1*31 ih 
-|/3I so 
7*44 ,C 
4H8 so 
■ 1/31 I 
205 d) 
■2/29 * 
6M3 c 
I *J4 ah 
-2-W) eh 
2.35 0 * 


3.-37 

2/JS 

14/57 

■SC/4 

3*J7 

6**3 

1/34 

9*« 

4.39 

2*35 

4139 


ngh 
OF 
19*8 
0*43 
8/48 
17.52 
17/62 
6/43 
3/37 
6*43 
409 
3/37 
21/70 
6/43 
5/41 
12/53 
6/43 
6/43 
0/32 
1253 
28/79 
14*57 
0*46 
12*53 
7*44 
■ 1/01 
5*41 
14/57 
0/32 
16*81 
B/48 
3*37 
2.35 
14 '57 
■1*31 
2/35 
8.’*3 
0*32 
9*48 
4*39 
1*34 
Sill 


LOW W 

C*F 

12*53 B 
205 pc 
002 ah 
10*50 a 
9*48 a 

002 pc 

307 C 
1*34 pc 
•1*31 pc 
•id m 
13/55 • 
■2*29 ah 
0*32 ah 
5*41 9 
1*34 c 

0*32 r 
«*Z2 an 

6*43 s 
17.® a 
10/50 pc 
3*37 1 
4*39 a 
104 a 
■7*20 a 
-3/27 e 
7/44 ■ 
<02 an 
1102 5 
305 pc 
■4*25 pc 
■3127 an 
8*48 pc 
-1WIS an 
107 an 

•101 pc 
- 6/22 Bn 

307 9 
■209 c 
-105 e 
■209 C 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



North America 
A taw mch«s of snow aro 
Ifcety from New Yoifr Ciy lo 
Boston Friday. Bitterly cofd 
air wffl overspread the entire 
eB5iem half of the nation 
over the weekend. Heavy 
snow 9quatts will pile up 
downwind of ifie Great 
Lakes. The West will have 
sunny, mitd weather th!9 
weekend 


Europe 

Heavy rams wS soak north- 
ern Spain and pads of Italy 
over the weekend. A storm 
will bring heavy rain to 
southwestern Turkey Friday. 
London and Parts through 
Frankfurt wfl tum colder Fri- 
day into the weekend with a 
lew snow flurries by Sunday. 
Southea stern Euro pe wB be 
nutdweh showers. 


Asia 

Dry. chilly weather over 
Japan Friday will be 
replaced by milder, wet 
weather over the weekend. 
Seoul will lum stormy this 
weekend wtlh rain or snow 
Snow may f3l ki Bafng lor a 
time Saturday. Shanghai to 
Hang Kong win tum cloudy 
with showers possible later 
■1 the weekend 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Oceania 


AlKjdVKt - 

Srtwy 


23*73 10*61 c 
28/82 19.W a 


23.73 14*57 
2MK? 70*0 


Ban* 

Cato 

Damaacua 

Jmoalwp 

liner 

Riyadh 


Today 

High Low W 
C IP OF 
20*88 14*57 5 
22/71 12/53 a 
17*2 9/48 > 

17*62 11/52 9 
20*82 12 S 3 a 
23/73 11/52 » 


Hlgb Low W 
Of OF 
18*84 12.-53 I 
17/62 8*43 a 
14157 5/41 I 
14*57 7*44 I 
23/73 .101 a 
24/75 11/52 a 


Torlay . 

Mgh baw W HV> InrV 

OF Of OF OF 

Buanoa/Urea 28/79 18/94 pc 32*9 20<ee 1 

Camera 29*64 23/73 pc 29«4 24*75 pc 

Lena 25/77 <90B 9 25/7? 20*68 pc 

UamCh 22/7i 409 pc 19*68 307 c 

RndaJanrao 27*60 23/73 pc 26*62 23/73 pc 

Saneaga 31*68 17*62 9 33/91 16*61 pc 


Legerufc 5-sunny. oc-qarOy cloudy. c-cJouty, stvshowers. hfuidBrsiomia. r-rati. fVxrtes. 
sn-snow. Hce. W VitoaDier. A9 mw>*. forecasta and data provided by Accu-Westher. tie. 1894 


Asia 


Tod m 




Utah 

Low 

W 

» 9 b 

In W 


car 

OF 


OF 

OF 

tangtek 

32 * 

S /71 


33/71 

S /71 C 


0*32 

•ana 


4*39 

■ 3*57 a 

htongKoig 

16*64 

M /57 

c 

1 B/S 4 

14^7 pc 

Uan*i 

30 * 

23*73 


32/89 

23*73 a 

Nn>Da» 

13 * 

13*55 


19*60 

13*56 pc 

SooU 

2*35 

•ene 


2.05 

- 7 W a 

Stwn^ial 

a*o 

- 3*27 


B- 4 B 

- 1/31 a 


29*82 

M /75 

*1 26*82 

24/75 i*i 

TripW 

18*64 

12*53 

4 h 

18*68 

11*52 pc 

Tokyo 

7/44 

2 * 

di 

7*44 

•101 ah 

Africa 

I*rm 

17*62 

15*3 

■ 

19*66 

13*55 a 

Cap* Tran 

21/70 

14*7 pc 27*71 

16*81 pc 

CasaMarea 

22*71 

11*52 


23/73 

12*53 a 

Harare 

20*60 

10*50 

pc 24/75 

6/46 pc 

Lagoo 

32 * 

33/73 


31/60 

24/75 a 

ftakoto 

34 /IS 


■ 

26*79 

12*53 a 

Tiraa 

16*1 

ewe 

a 

1 BI 64 

9*46 a 

North America 

Anctorage 

- 4 . a 

- 7*20 

an 

■*m 

- 11*13 pc 

Aaarna 

6*43 

10 / 

c 

8 * 4 Q 

4/25 pc 

BoSoo 

5*41 

■ 4*29 


10 * 

- 9*10 d 

Chicago 

■ 6 C 2 

• 13.9 

m 

- 0*9 

■ 73 X 9 c 

tXnrrcr 

10-50 

- 8-29 

a 

10 50 

■ 4*25 pc 

Oatni 

- 4 .TS 

- 10.15 

st 

■ 9.18 

■I 9.--2 < 

HmwUl, 

26*79 

< 6*4 


27*90 

19*66 pc 

Hoawcn 

13 * 

6*43 

* 

1702 

307 • 

IraAng a*ra 

26«2 

11*2 

6 

20/79 

10*50 ■ 

Ifam. 

26*79 

18*4 


73*73 

11/52 pc 

Mranepoia 

- 13*9 

- 74,'- 11 gt 

- 18*0 

■ 28 AIBC 

tXxxrat 

- 5/34 

■ 11/13 

*1 

■ 10/15 

■ 17*2 tt 

Norma u 

2608 

21/73 


26 /J 9 

191 GB pc 

li 7 »Yort. 

6*43 

<•09 


2*35 

■ 8*16 d 


23*73 

9 «a 

* 

24*75 

8*46 a 


1864 

0*43 


14*57 

5*41 pc 

S««p 

11*52 

7*44 

di 

11.52 

4*39 xh 

Ton**, 

■ 3*37 

- 9*16 

rt 

- 6 - 1 B 

• 14/7 a* 

VtaOwtfcn 

6.46 

•229 

1 * 

3*37 

■ 7.20 d 


Dge MbL Bee. Snow Leal 
L U Ptataa Piste* State Snow 



Andorra 


Pas de la Casa 
So«eu 

85 135 
100 145 

Good 

Good 

Open 

Open 

Pwdr 

Var 

11*1 

11*1 

Atm and p&BB open 
Good sktng after bosh anM> 

Aarttrlw 

Igis 

0 30 

■Worn 

Osd 

Var 

11/1 

Beet Pong at AxmorLtom 

KJtrtuhel 

25 90 

Good 

Open 

var 

6.1 

Hatvunkarrm race ms weekend 

Ssalbach 

55 95 

Good 

Open 

Pckd 

4/1 

ley patches some bwer pistes 

Schladmtng 

30120 

Fair 

Worn 

Hvy 

4/1 

Uppa Popes sW good 

SLAmon 

50 200 

Fair 

icy 

Var 

4/1 

Snow good ebewe tBOOn i 


Carvinia 120430 Good Open Pear 11/1 E ratten stone 

Cortina 40 130 Good Qpen Me 6/1 MxV cap racing ttm**&fnd 

Courmayeur BbOo Good dad PndT It /I Very good ahtr^ - - 

Selva . . 65 100 Good - Open Vfe 6/L /m «s and perns open 

Seatrtftre 80150 Good Open Pwdr 11/1 *Ufxa*y My fits open 


Rwnce 

AlpetVHuaz 140 220 Good Open Pws* iVl ExceSant s*ting 

Las Arcs 120 355 Good Open Pwdr ll/l ExceSent sktng 

Avon a? 140180 Good Open Pw* 11*1 ExoeBent sking. good Powder 

Csuterets 175 230 Good Open vat 11/1 Good snow, mfttar weather 

Chamonix 85 380 Good Open Pwdr ll/l Fwsti snow. Qn*X skiing 

Courchevel 145 180 Good Open Pwdr 11/1 Excetont skiing now snow 

LeaDouxAIpes 120300 Good £*>an Pm» 11/1 Lets qna to 3*0t>n gram snow 

FJarte S5 280 Good Open Pwdr 11/1 Most BBs open. wtcatentsMug 

I sola 230 300 Good Open Pwdr li/1 De«p snow, avalanche danger 

MOn be! 80 180 Good Open PwtJr li/l ABBS open great snow 

LaPtagne 165 330 Good Open Pwdr tin Ewofienf sto*ng sft»- frssn snow 

Sene Chevalier 85 270 Good Open Pwdr 1 1 *V ExceBert skting 

ngnes 145 325 Good Open Pwdr 11/1 Bcoeten pemoar skiing 

Val d'fsbre IIS 325 Good Open Pwdr 11/t ExceaenlaMng 

ValThoremt 160 360 Good Open Pwdr 11 n ExceSent stxng twehocmiar 


5 145 Good Osd Var 4/1 Good adng upper stapes 
2 130 Good Some Var 1/1 Soma rum to resort open 


Tiytal 105145 Good Open -Pwdr li/1 Ma» Ms wid*«j«iro open 

Spain _ • ... • ■ ^ 

Bagutora-Beret 120-230 Goad Open- v*r 11/1 AM Uts end pittas apm 


BO 65* Good Open Pwdr 11/1 AM&cpm vary good t*#rQ 
50 160 Good Open Pwdr 11/1 Excatonr sting 
55 130 Good Open Pwdr 11/1 At Ms qoam good shtog 
S 60 Good Clad Pwdr u/1 Better aking with new snow 
20 70 Good Open ' Var IT/1 Sprinkling at new snow 
110170 Good Open Pwdr 11/1 ExcoBen Bkxrrg wayrtme 
10 30 Good Open Pwdr- ll/l Avshcnow. tnpmadriutng 
100250 Good Open Pwqr'tiri Baxter* stong 


Anna - 

Crans Montana 
Daws ; 
Griridefwald '■ 
Gstaad 
SLMorttz 


Zermatt 


Gamrisch 

Obersktorf 


IU. 

Aspen 

Breckanridge 

KttingtOfi 

Mammoth 

Park City 

SlBamboet 

TeBuride 

Vail 


98108 
115 140 
-. 70180 
2& 90 
90 135 
120180 
88100 
100 133 


Good 

Good 

Good 

Fair 

Good 

Goad 

Good 

Good 


Open vs» an 
Qpfln Peru 8.1 
Open Pwar B-'i 
Open fldeef NA 
Open Pwtt- ll/l 
Open Pwdr 11/1 
Open Var 8*1 
Open Pw» ii/i 


AS Ms open, good sMng 
Good sang on packet! ponder 
Great sung, ptenry at new snow 
MasT&tsqewa troth soBak 
At tits apart, good skMng 
Most Bfto open, groat skiing 
At tits open, vary good sung 
At Mu end back tmrie open ■ 


Italy 

Bormlo 30145 Good Open Var 8*1 Most htts and at peaes open 


Key UU Depth in cm on lower and 
PWaa Rm leading » mson vsiage. 


upper Ranee, Mta. PMacMountalnalde pbms. Uaa. 
MAnsacSti snow 

■ Reports ajppted by tie Ski Club of Gnat Bn&n 


Txwel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ABET Access Numbers. 

How to cafl around the world 

I. Using the- chan htfrwv. find rtw cnuntiy >-ou are calling from, 
i Dial the corresponding •■’UST Acctsw. Number. 

5. An AJ&T Engl Wi^p« iking C^xxaior or voice prompt will ode for the phone number you wish to call or coanea ^-ou to a 
customer aerilce represenurive. " ' ' 

To receive yoorfnxvv^lki card of Access Numbers, wst dial the access number of 

the country- \taiVe in and ask for Qjstomcr Service 


Kg 

DC 


caabv art ■ Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. .And 

reach die US. directly from over 1 15 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 
• j a n g lia g e since it's tra nslated insta ntly. Call your cl ients at 5 a.m. knowing Lhey' li get the message in 


V Vt fuMAl 


2 's ' your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with ABEC 1 

To use t j iese services, dial tlte ADS' Access Xumber of the countn 1 you’re in and you'll get all the 


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If vou don’t have an MKT Calling Card or you’d like more information on AIKT global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 



COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA/PACIFIC 

Hungary* 

OO&- 6 OO-O 1111 

Australia 

0014-881-011 

U-dundu 

09*00] 

CStfnaJPRO** 

10811 

Ireland 

•1-600-5 50-000 

Guam . . 

018-872 

Hasty* 

172-1011 

Hoag Kong 

800,1111 

Liechtenstein* 

155-00-11 

India* 

000-117 

Lithuania* 

8*196 

lodoaesh* 

00001-10 

Luxerrhourp 

cMwo-oni 

Japan* 

0K9-1I l 

Ma tar 

0800-890-lia 

Korea 

009-11 

Monaco* 

19A-0011 

Sorcau . 

1 11* 

fte rim lands* 

06-022-9111 

Malaysia* 

8000011 

Ntwvrey* 

800-190-11 

Nt*n Zealand 


Potoud**- 

0*0104804)111 

Philippines" 

105-11 

Portugal* 

05037-1-288 

BussiarCMosouw) 

155-5042 

Bomauto 

01-800-4288 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Sloukta 

004204)0101 

Singapore 

axumt-111 

Spain 

900994)0-11 

Sri Lanka 

43IM30 

Swedenr 

020-795-611 

Taiwan* 

0080-102800 

flulfttiliaf 

155-00-11 

Thailand^ 

0019091-1 11 1 

OK. 

0500600011 

EUROPE 

MJLUL7LE EAST 

Armenia'*'. 

8*14111 

Sahraia 

800001 

Austria-** 

022 - 90 J -011 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

510-0200 

Belgium' 

078-11-0010 

brad 

377-1002727 

Bulgaria 

00-lfWwJ0I0 

Kuwait 

... 800-288 

Croatia** 

9MW10U 

Lebanon (Beirm) 

426-801 

Cyprus” 

Xfflri.90010 

Saudi Arabia . 

1-800-100 

Catch Rep 

00420-00101 

Turkey* 

0060012277 

Denmark* ' 

8001-0010 

' AMERICAS 

Hnignd* 

9800-100-10 

. Axgetaina* ' 

oor-aoo20o-im 

Fiance 

194-0011 

Belize* 

555 

Germany 

0130-0010 

BoUvtt*' 

o-aoo-ini 

Greece* 

00^00-1311 

Bad.;- 

V MOflOlO 


00*4312 


Colombia 


960-11-0010 


114 


119 ‘ 


‘H Salvador - * 

- ■ .190 

iGummla 1 . 

190 

lOiyana^* 

165 

^Honduras** 

123 

iMexioo*** " 

9S-80O-462-424O 

JBcwagmi (Managua) 17* 

Panama* 

109 

'Peru* 

191 

Uruguay 

000410 

Venezuda** 

- 80011-120 


CARIBBEAN 


Bahaa— 


Bennucbr 


■BrtdshVX 


1-800-672-2881, 

1-80^872-2881 

1-800472-2881 


Caymanistaud* 


1-800-872-2881 


Grenada* 


1-800-872-2881 


001-800-972-2883 ' 


0-800-872-2881 


001-6004372-2861 


ScKina/Wcvte 


1-800-872-2881 


AFRICA 


OOa-OOI 


iGntibte 


00111 


Uberia 


0800-10- 


797-797 


101-1992 


ATfiT 


WC*III^C»Jwwmt*MteJnwatalBiri>6<l Mwr»r te 
|w» .uurervmu'unnriBBqiticmtcniiKn'ituBri/uxnnlr.Atf Unmaiiic 


-Mat iriheiuilibclKiacimiAA* 
MCofcctdBmotfr 




lew ynaw eUa mcnh*>fh<w w c ipw rem nbmCT H»bt6WpB _ 

' ja 6ta^flaije9B“>aite|yfcq4prlr<. ♦**Nocya*^aai*6i*,nB»e» 


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-TublKiirinnoiB/tniL-iuirto/iumaipli'acijnifrviWna* 

linnrMwicWwnkwt. ■»9*qgreaHyC en i i Bc r Sewta te 




■1 


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© 1994 AST