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INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Friday, January 28, 1994 


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Yeltsin Speaks Up 
To Defend Cabinet 


•• -,»•», » ■■ 


Nonbinding 62-38 Vote 

Gives Political Support 
To Reluctant Presidmt 

By Thomas W. Lippman :- 

Washington PaaServtce - 

WASHINGTON — The: Saaate voted, W a 
^de margin on Thursday to urge President Bfll 
Clinton to lift the United States wn Karon on 
trade with Vietnam. I,.. 

War veterans, conservative Republicans and 
members of the Aimed Services Camniitiee 
joined some liberal .Democrats to approvtvbyB 
vote of 62 to 38, a resolution. sponsored by 
Senator John S. McCain 3d, Republican of 
Arizona, who span nearly six years , as a a: 

m prisoner of war id Vietnam, and John F. Keny, 

“ Democrat of Massachusetts,-* decoratcdViet- 

oam veteran who later turned against the war.' 

The lineup could provide substantial politi- 
cal cover for Mr. Cfinibn as he.evahuies a- 
recommendation from his f oragn-po&y advis- 
ers to lift the embargo. 

, According to sources, Mr. CHnton has hesi- 
tated to take the step, wind) would symboGod- 
ty put a final end. to, the 30year conflict 
beetwen the United ’States and the Vie tnam ese 
Communists, becanse of hisi own hiskay of 
avoiding the draft rather thahseiveip Vietnatn. ‘ 
Mr. Clinton has said .her win not lift the 
embargo until be is satisfied thil Vietnam is 
doing all it can to assist in the quest for infor- 
mation about thefate of more than 2^00 Amer- 
icans still listed jas missing from the war. : 

The Senate vote was tbesecoodlag pchfiad 
lift this week for those who favor ending the 1 
embargo and aHowing U.S. corapanie tofeave 
the bitterness of the Vietnam \mbefcmd and . 
participate in that country's fast-growingccoa- •, 
omy. ‘ ’ :: ' ' 

the Senatevote fotkwpd hoore af sometimes , 
passionate debate. Thc baac jBgameai wss * 
lias: Would lifting The aide eudwjaauoBF. ; 
age Vietnam N* mnfaiin nwHug pni i i w , ilmv 
uments aid artifacts avaflahfc to US. teams 
searching for the missing, or would H remove riff 
leverage and reward VirtnamewmasitaHttm- 
ues to avoid idling the troth?. . ■ • • - s ; , 

But in a larger stha^ ije debate was about - 
whether the war is. finally owr or not. Mr.,; 
Kerry argued that more than b*# of Vietnam’s 

T others are doingbudness therc *is anembargo 
against oursdves>” he salt' - 
“"l thmk it is dme-to' set Amedcsas into : 
Vietnam," said Larry Prefer, Republican of 
South Dakota; a Yletaam vetesa^ltisfiBtofor 
us to lift the trade embargo. Itistimefarano 
send an ambassador to Vietnam.” • . 

The resolution, attached to the State Depart 
meat authorization biD, docs not call for estab- 
lishing diplomatic refajaas with Vietnam dr 
sending an ambassador; That stqjappeara to be 
vears away, even if the trade embargo ratified : 






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Hester fcbb/ Apace Fraocc-PrsK . 


A Russian sokBer fbnkmga flag bearing Lensn’s portrait daring a ceremony Thursday at the St. Petersburg Cemetery to mark the end 
of fite World Wffl’D siege of the city, then known as Leningrad. At least a ndffion people (Sed daring fee 900^y Genaan Ana)' assaxdt. 



eet Stock Trading Data 


The Democrats 
As Centrists: 

A Hit in Polls 

By Thomas B. Edsall •* ; ‘ 

FVasWfigtOB/^^ixwer -. 

-WASHINGTON — One of the central^ 
themes of BfllCimton’S T992presuknfed cam-, 
r^igh was Oat be would, Selected, bdpAapc a ; 
“new" Democratic Party. Tl» underlying dann 
u?as that his electicm wwldpiuh the parqr away 

from some of fee liberal pofides of fite previous . 

SC AyS*af ter President Clinton took office,- 
the public believes the Desnocratfc Pwty is 
more centrist, and these is some evidence A am 
fact moving in tbatdHdaioml iiyortantljgDigs 

, TCEWS ANALYSIS 
Party is martTnoflcrate, S' own , 

and how iro* 

involve leades of 

al wing, the Rsevdread le^w l- Jartoon and ; 

es&zssitfsssi: 

BBSSSBESlSSSffit 


NEW YORK— The staff of the Securities 
andfadttnjpi Commissi on cm Thurslay rec- 
oomended mertaang the »nrnmt of rafexma- 
tkm invoBims can obtain about their trades and 
harrowing Slock qnotes so brokers have- less 
chance tmaake. money. 

The SBC said the proposed change s were 
"mcreroental" implymg a siep-by-stcp proce- 
dorjt s^amst consdoabte resistance by fee in- 
dnstry, allhoogh same of the measures to m- 
xreaso the transp a rency erf trading are under 

^The proposals do Jittict however, to solve the 
'inf vrars betiwea ^the dassacauctioo maduasin 
die New York, American and regional stock 
exchanges and the almost ealloprng increase in 


trading by compulcrover what are caDed screen 
maAets nmby broken themselves. . . 

JBut U ^d question New York Stock Ex- 
change rates ™rfdhg it Hiffirnft for a c o mp ahy 
,lonwve toanotlKr cxchaoK. • •• 

. The ajemnissionerg issued a statement point- 


iqg out that ihereport also did cot address the 
growing interaafionahzmron of securities mar- ‘ 
lcets, the riang number and importance of un- 
registered traders and the complex question of 
derivaiives. They wiD “continue to be examined 
separately." the SEC said. 

- One of the most disputed proposals in the 
report would halve the increments in which 
stock prices are quoted from one-eighth of a 
doBar (12 cents) to one^ sixteenth (6 amts) and 
eventually to quote them in decimals. Brokers 
make money on the spread in eighths of a dollar 
between the prices they ask and the prices feat 
customers bid. If that spread is reduced, they 
will make less. 

Brokers would also be required to tell retail 
customers if they have dealt through a stock 
specialist, wind) adds a middleman's charge. 
Investment advisers would be required to tell 
cheats if they have “soft dollar'’ arrangements 
with brokers that gives them free research or 
other services. If investors knew both of these 
things, presumably they could negotiate lower 
fees. 


■ The SEC chairman. Arthur Leviu. a former 
chairman of fee American Stock Exchange, 
said in his letter of transmittal that the report 
offered “no ‘right' or ‘wrong’ answers." 

Distancing himself from a report commis- 
sioned by his predecessor, he did not attend the 
news conference presenting it Washington. 

The commission also did not make any 
copies of the report. Market 2000, available in 
New York. The report was commissioned two 
years ago by Richard Breeden, a former SEC 
chair man, under a Republican a dmin istration. 
Comments were based on summaries of the 
500-pagc document distributed by fax and wire 
services. 

Marc E. Ladritz, president of fee Securities 
Industry Association, said he was pleased that 
that fee markets were “functioning smoothly 
and not in need of radical change." 

He added that be would study the report in 
detail when he received it. 

On Wall Street, it was unclear how much 
influence the report would have. “No one reaDy 

See MARKETS, Page 5 


Populist Line 
Of Old Guard 
Stymies U.S. 

By Thomas L. Friedman 

Nett' York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton ad- 
ministration's policy toward fee former 
Soviet Union is being undermined, slowly 
but surely, by fee takeover in Russia. Be- 
larus and Ukraine by politicians advocat- 
ing populist economics that American of- 
ficials believe will lead to financial ruin 
and political turmoil. 

Only two weeks, ago President Bill Clin- 
ton traveled to Moscow and Minsk to 
deliver his message: more economic re- 
form wiU lead to more Western aid. The 
leaders there nodded in agreement, and 
the White House pronounced fee Clin ion 
visit a rousing success. 

But no sooner did Mr. Clinton depart 
than one piece of bad news after another 
came rolling in from Moscow and Minsk 
— from fee ouster of Russia's key eco- 

NEWS ANALYSIS ~ 

Domic reformers to the toppling of fee 
liberal president of Belarus. 

Dee Dee Myers, fee White House 
spokeswoman, has tried to put fee best 
face on these sharp reversals, responding 
wife the mantra feat “we're more interest- 
ed in the policies than in the personalities" 
and that “President Yeltsin, as you know, 
reassured fee president feat he remains 
committed to reform." 

Yet virtually all the cabinet members 
left standing in Russia, Belarus and fee 
Ukraine are dedicated to policies feat run 
completely counter to fee economic advice 
Mr. Clinton gave those countries iwo 
weeks ago. It is hard to support reform 
without reformers. 

“I think fee news since fee president's 
Air Force One plane took off from Russia 
has been unremittingly bad." said Repre- 
sentative Lee Hamilton. Democrat of In- 
diana. the chairman of fee House Foreign 
Affairs Committee. 

“The reformers have been leaving." he 
said, “and fee sovemcwjt Ij bsinfc domi- 
nated by feose people who are skeptical 
about free markets and want to go on 
supporting the big state industries. 1. for 
one, will find it very difficult to support 
aid for Russia if fee central bank there 
continues to pour money and credit into 
supporting these inefficient state-run in- 
dustries." 

Behind its public facade of supporting 
policies not personalities, fee administra- 
tion is also scrambling to figure out what 
to do. and bracing itself for what is already 
being whispered about in policy circles 
and political journals: a debate on who 
lost Russia. 

What makes influencing events in Rus- 
sia so difficult now. say administration 
officials, is that the main problem there is 
not economics. It's politics. 

That is. President Boris N. Yeltsin un- 
derstands fee economic advice the West is 

See POLICY, Page 5 



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Details of Assault 

Tonya Harding said Thursday that she 
kncwdetails of theftttadcon Nancy Kerri- 
gan after it had happened, but denied 
plMWHflg to injure her skating rival. Miss 
Harding, fee U.S. figure dralmgdianm- 
pn, add she wanted to remain on the U£- 
Otympfc team. (Sage Ylf: 


Page 9. 


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Wasfungwn-Post Soviet 

WASHINGTON — Who should replace 
John Lennon? 

For Beatles fans everywhere — thrilled feat 
the »nmp’s three surviving members wih make 
music together next month for fee first time in 
24 years — the vay question smacks of sacri- 
lege. 

No one, of course, can replace Mr. Lennon, 
wbo was murdered in 1980. But we can always 
imagine. 

How about Paul McCartney, George Harri- 
son, Ringo Starr and ... Eric Clapton? The Fab 
Three and . . . Bob Dylan? Or Mr. Lennon’s 
widow. Yoke Ono? 

The hypothetical question of fee Fourth Bea- 
tle reveals how crucial the gronp remains to pop 
culture. Everyone has an opinion. 

“The first who comes to. mind is Eric CIaj>- 
ton, based on Iris sound ~and perhaps there is 
a bond there because he knew the Beatles," says 
Carroll James, 57, who also knew them and was 
fee first <fiskjod»y in America to play them on 
radio, in Washington in 1963. 

“It seems like ever since fee Beatles broke up, 
Paul's been searching for someone to sing 


wife," says Marie Benson, 40, of Akron, Ohio, 
wbo plays Mr. Lennon in a touring show about 
the Beatles. “Paul and Michael Jackson, Paul 
and Stevie Wonder, Paul and Elvis Costello.” 

For a reunion, he nominates Jeff Lynne, 
former, vocalist for Electric Light Orchestra, 
who, he says, sounds uncannily like Mr. Len- 
non . 

There’s actually no word on whether the 
three former Beatles will bring anyone dse into 
fee studio, where they are to record music for a 
video documentary. 

As they certainly don’t need any help musi- 
cally, the question becomes, who would add to 
fee group, and not just mimic John? 

Mr. Costello, an acerbic vocalist and cutting 
songwriter, led the Est in an informal poiL 
mainly because he would probably offset Mr. 
McCartney’s sappy lyrics and melodies. 

Some fans favored fee punk stylings of John 

Lydon (who fronted fee Sex Pistols) or Joe 
Strummer [a founder of the Gash) to recapture 
fee Beatles' raw early sound. 

Others cited Tom Petty’s suitability because 


of his relationship wife Mr. Harrison in fee 
Traveling Wilburn, an all-star ensemble that 
also featured Mr. Lynne and Mr. Dylan. 

Lenny Kravitz, who engages in neopsycbedc- 
Ua. is on the list, as are various stars wbo would 
present interesting, though incongruous, addi- 
tions: Bruce Springsteen, NeO Young, Billy 
Joel, Sting, Van Morrison. 

Some Fourth Beatle nominations are based 


columnist for fee trade magazine Hits. 

Mr. Best was fee drummer replaced by Mr. 
Starr just before the Beatles made it big. 

But in fairness, Mr. Trakin says, “it should be 
a family member, because those are the people 
closest to John." He suggests Mr. Lennon's 
sons Julian or Sean. 

Another camp rightly asserts that fee magic 
of fee group can never be re-created. 

At one owe, at least, Mr. Harrison held this 
view himself, noting in 1989 that there could be 
no true Beatles reunion “as long as John Len- 
non remains dead.” 


He Rules (hit 
Policy Retreat 

By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — President Boris N. Yeltsin of 
Russia, in his first public comments after fee 
departure of leading reformers from his cabi- 
net, defended his new government on Thursday 
and insisted feat he had noi abandoned plans 
to remake his country. 

In a statement issued by his press office. Mr. 
Yeltsin said he intended to use his considerable 
powers under fee Russian Constitution to 
“firmly defend reforms and ensure stability arid 
fee continuation of fee democratic course." 

The president dismissed criticism feat fee 
new government would gut his reformist pro- 
gram as “excessive dramatization." 

Mr. Yeltsin's spokesman. Vyacheslav Kosti- 

After overthrow of reformer, Belarus hastens 
to reassure fee West Page 2. 

kov, said feat if there was even a partial return 
of old-style command economics, “fee presi- 
dent will' nip this tendency in fee bud." 

Mr. Yeltsin's remarks appeared to constitute 
a response to mounting fears, inside Russia and 
in fee West, feat fee new government will carry 
out policies that will roll back fee free- market 
advances of the last two years. 

Yet what remained unclear was whether Mr. 
Yeltsin was losing control over bis own govern- 
ment, or whether he has made a calculated 
strategic retreat in the wake of parliamentary 
elections last month in which pro-reform par- 
ties fared poorly. 

As usual, there were few clues about Mr. 
Yeltsin’s thinking. He has appeared in public 
seldom in the last several months and has 
issued only occasional and laconic communi- 
ques. 

Rumors of his drinking, his health, despon- 
dency and detachment are part of Moscow's 
daily" diet. Some of his advisers, like the state 
television chief, .Alexander Yakovlev, haw told 
him in fee strongest terms that be must explain 
himself and his intentions to the nation often. 
Mr. Yeltsin has not heeded their advice. 

Ella A. Panfilova, former minister of social 
protection, who quit Jan. 16 in protest against 
the shift in government, said she had met 
Wednesday wife Mr. Yeltsin to tender her 
resignation formally. 

“Th.* preside*.? -.pf eared «o me to he suffer- 
ing and lonely," she said Thursday on Russian 
television. “Mv God! How few people there are 
on whom he can lean. The bitterest thing of all 
is that all fee suffering we’ve been through in 
fee Iasi two years has been in vain." 

Her remarks are pan of a growing chorus 
from doom-sayers. Critics as varied as fee U-S. 
director of central intelligence. Mr. Yeltsin s 
dismissed chiefs of finance and economics. 
Western economic advisers and leaders of for- 
mer Soviet republics on Russia's periphery have 
all warned of dire consequences should the new 
Russian government change course 

Mr. Yeltsin’s comments came a day after 
Finance Minister Boris G. Fyodorov resigned 
in anger, accusing fee government of earning 
out an “economic coup" led by “red manag- 
ers.” He said fee economic management was 
now in fee hands of “a cabinet of lifeless and 
incompetent state planning ideology.” 

Mr. Fyodorov was replaced by Sergei Du- 
binin. his deputy. Mr. Dubinin is well rega r ded 

See RUSSIA, Page 5 


Kohl Stresses 
Risks of Bosnia 
Intervention 


By Alan Friedman 
and Jonathan Gage 

International Herald Tribune 

DAVOS. Switzerland — Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl issued his strongest warning to dare on 
Thursday against any Western military inter- 
vention in the Bosnia conflict, saying it would 
require “hundreds of thousands of soldiers 
without necessarily establishing peace." 

He said that there was “no easy solution" 10 
the war and stressed feat sending troops 
“would involve great sacrifices among the civil- 
ian population." 

The German leader's comments, in the open- 
ing address at an international gathering of 
economic and business leaders in this resort 
town, came just 24 hours after fee French 
government demanded that the United Nations 
call NATO troops into action in fee former 
Yugoslavia. 

Mr. Kohl did not specifically mention the 
French initiative but rather addressed Iris re- 
marks to “those who say more intervention is 
needed." 

He said feat “feose wbo give advice" should 
listen instead to the military experts. 

Although acknowledging that the conflict in 
Bosnia- Herzegovina proved it was “an illusion 
that war has been banished from Europe” he 
nonetheless offered no remedy beyond suggest- 
ing feat humanitarian supplies be provided for 
those suffering in the region. 

In separate remarks concerning the political 
situation in Moscow. Mr. Kohl dismissed 
“those who say Yeltsin has no hope." 

The West, be said, “must maintain economic 
assistance and promote reform in Russia.*' 

If reforms were to fail in Russia and other 
nations in East Europe, he said, “that would be 
fatal to Western Europe and to the Western 
world," 

He reseated the view that it would be intoler- 
able if Germanv’s border wife Poland remained 
fee European Onion’s eastern frontier. 

“Such a frontier would have catastrophic 
consequences.'' he said, adding that West Euro- 
pean members of the European Union should 

See KOHL, Page 5 







n 




s&- 


** 


Page 2 

Belarus Reassures 
yfest on Reform 

It Minimizes Effect of Ouster 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 19 94 


By Steven fcrlanger 

A'w »* Tuna Semes 

MOSCOW — The Belarus For- 
eign NGnisuv called diplomats in 
Minsk on Thursday to reassure 
them that the country's commit- 
ments to denuclearization and the 
market were unchanged by the 
ovmhrow of Stanislav S. Shushke- 
vrch, a liberal, as chairman of par- 
hament and ceremonial brad of 
state. 

. But the removal of Mr. Shushke- 
vich on Wednesday by parliament, 
on spurious charges of corruption 
after two years of battling for earfy 
elections and economic reforms, 
leaves Belarus in the hands of the 
same Communist officials who ran 
it before the collapse of the Soviet 
Union in December 1991. 

Mr. Shushkevich, 59, was an out- 
spoken advocate of Belarussian in- 
dependence and separation from 
Moscow, which had ruled Belarus 
since 1772. His opponents, includ- 
ing the longtime prime minister, 
Vyacheslav F. Kebich, favor ties to 
Russia that are almost akin to a 
reunion of the two states. 

Mr. Kebich survived a similar 
test of parliamentary support 
Wednesday, with 175 deputies vot- 
ing to retain him and 101 voting to 
dismiss him- Mr. Kebich may see 
the relatively close vole as a warn- 
ing and try to hold elections early. 

President Bill Clinton met with 
both men two weeks ago to thank 
Belarus for agreeing to scrap nucle- 
ar missiles and to offer American 
support for faster economic reform 
and early parliamentary elections. 
The visit was seen as an effort to 
prop up Mr. Shushkevich. 

[ Washington reacted immediate- 
ly after the Wednesday parliamen- 
tary vote of no-confidence in Mr. 
Shushkevich, Agence France- 
Presse reported. “We regret the re- 
moval of Mr. Shushkevich, who 
was a firm supporter of economic 
and democratic reforms," a U.S. 
official said, adding that it was 
hoped the the Belarussian commit- 
ment to e liminating its nuclear ar- 
senal would not be affected.] 

Senior Western diplomats in 
Minsk expressed concern before 
the Clinton visit that a reunion of 
Russia with Belarus could start an 
“imperial reconstruction" that 
Washington and the West did not 
want to see. 

Their concents have taken on 
weight after an American intelli- 
gence finding that Ukraine's unrav- 
eling, hyperinflationary economy 
could create conflict between 
Ukr ainians and ethnic Russians in 
eastern Ukraine, who might break 
the country apart to seek reunifica- 
tion with Moscow. 


In Minsk on Thursday, the head 
of the opposition in parliament, 
^yanoo Paznyak, ««d the removal 
°* Mr. S hushkevich represented “a 
creating Communist coup aimed at 
ri hntnafmg Belarussian statehood 
and imposing a dictatorship under 
Kebich.” 

Yuri V. Khadipa, the deputy 
chairman of the opposition Belarus 
National Front, said: “Now the 
last stage of the reconstitution of 
the Russian Empire will begin with 
the induction of Belarus into the 
ruble zone. This move will prop up 
factories of the former Soviet mili- 
tary-industrial complex, winch no 
one needs." 

Having already forced through a 

militar y alliance that Calls OD RUS- 

to defend Belarus, Mb. Kebich 


sia 


is a primary proponent of a Be- 
larus- Russian economic union that 
would subordinate Minsk’s finan- 
dal policies to Moscow in return 
for cheap energy and the use of the 
ruble. He recently agreed on such a 
union with his counterpart, Viktor 
S. Chernomyrdin, who is due to 
come to Minsk next week to iron 
out details. 

This monetary union, which w HI 
cost Russians many millions of dol- 
lars if the ruble is exchanged one- 
for-one for the weaker Belarussian 
currency and inter-enterprise debts 
are canceled, was one of the prime 
factors cited by Russian economic 
reformers when they quit tbeir cab- 
inet posts. 

Minsk-based diplomats said 
events in Moscow and the return to 
dominance of Soviet-era managers 
had an obvious impact in Belarus, 
although they stressed that the 
Communist-dominated Supreme 
Soviet, first elected in March 1990. 
had been trying to overthrow Mr. 
Shushkevich for many months. 
They almost succeeded in July, but 
he was saved then by Mr. Paznyak 
and the opposition. 

But this time, after more months 
of trying to balance between Mr. 
Kebich and Mr. Paznyak, Mr. 
Shushkevich ran out of supporters, 
many of whom were angered at his 
failure to protect two cabinet allies 
who were removed from office 
Tuesday. The interior minister and 
security chief were dismissed by 
parliament Oa charges of endanger- 
ing national security. The offi cials 
had extradited two Communists to 
Lithuania, where they were accused 
of suppressing anti-Soviet protests 
in 1991 amid great violence. 

"Sbushkevich’s failure to sup- 
port those two created anger all 
around." a senior diplomat said, 
with many deputies accusing Mr. 
Shushkevich, during the closed ses- 
sion, of “betrayal.” 


Jewish settlers dicing in a boose they occupied in Hebron, in die West Bank. The 

Rabin Praises King ’s Readiness to Meet Openly 

There was less enthusiasm Thursday about 


Hen York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin said Thursday that “important pro- 
gress” had been made by King Hussein of 
Jordan when he said in Washington that he 
hoped to meet openly with him soon. 

King Hussein is believed to have met se- 
cretly with Israeli leaders many times. But his 
expressed willingness on Wednesday to go 
public was viewed by Israeli officials as a sign 
that he was ready for bolder steps in toe 
Middle East peace negotiations. 

No plans cost for an imminent meeting, 
they said. And they cautioned that it was 


unclear how bold the king was prepared to 
be. He has long been reluctant to move much 
faster than Syria in talks with Israel, a point 
underlined by his signal in Washington that 
he wanted a comprehensive agreement in- 
volving all Arab parties in the negotia ti o ns — 
Jordan. Syria, Lebanon and the Palestinians. 
— * ions about the chances 



“The readiness far a public meeting is 
imp ortant progress,” he said on army radio. 
“If indeed he has shown willingness for a 
n w .ting . I would only be happy about that.” 


There was less enthusiasm Thursday about 
the prospects for an immediate breakthrough 
in the stalemate that has kept Israel and the 
Palestine Liberation Organization from put- 
ting into effect their September accord cm 
introducing Palestinian self-rule in the occu- 
pied Gaza Strip and the West Bank town of 
Jericho. 

Yasser Arafat, the PLO chairman, and 
Foragn Minister Shimon Feres are to meet in 
Swi tzerlan d over the weekend in what both 
sides say they hope will prodnee a final iron- 
ing out of security arrangements. 


WORLDBRIE^. 



At Least 22 Killed in 

■ t i: officials Slid- . ..Un mimna fifed 


. tfarlH 1 


A Drfcnse Ministry - {Cupwara . Army uwto, 

SS SSiES- ***» ~ 

China Adapts Arms for 

■ LONPW CAFP) 1^ P* 

its medium-range ballistic missiles wun 

fense Weekly said Thursday. ^ - h n^ted military sources, 

According to the can be more 

China, is adapting spine of its imssies “““ 
effectively employed in local wars. . p eng 21 (DF-2I) 

08 01 VKraam 

other large areas of Southeast Asia, Jane s said. 


other large areas of Southeast Asia, Jane s saiu- 

IRA Firebombs Hit London Stores 

T/yvmnxT/iD, r Ai,*™ nlantfid by the Irish Repot 


iia — 

deuces planted fty the.In^SjJ^^ 
iy in three Wgswies in Oxford Street, 

Jty for the 
tbings were 


dearly the worir of die protest group- . .. Hoced Oxford 

' No one was injured in the firebotnbmgs, but pourc 
Street fra about two hours and evacuated six people iron 
above one store. 


Oil cc uvwi 

• from an apartment 


U.S. Seals Plan to Sell F-l5Es to Israel 

i __ I 1 m 



Lithuania Signs On as Partner for Peace 


Con^Ued by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BRUSSELS — Lithuania signed iq> for NA- 


TO’s new limited partnership plan Thursday, 
tner Soviet n 


republic to 


becoming the first framer 
embrace thedeaL 

Speaking to the ambassadors of the 16 mem- 
ber nations before si g nin g the partnership doc- 
ument at the NATO headquarters. President 
A tedai Brazauskas stressed Lithuania's “dear 
goal” of eventually joining (he North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization. 

That aim could bring complications with 
Russia. Moscow opposes eastward expansion 
of the Western alliance and reacted with alarm 
earlier when Lithuania applied formally for 
NATO membership. 

A spokesman for President Boris N. Ydisin 
warned then that Lithuania's move could pro- 
voke “a negative reaction in Russian public 
opinion” and play into the hands of the coun- 
try's extreme nationalists. 


Mr. Brazauskas sought to allay Russian 
fears. 

“Lith uani a’s position regarding NATO 
membership is not directed against any neigh- 


Bui they will be able to join, the alliance in 
military exercises, peacekeeping and other ac- 
tivities, and have delegations at NATO bead- 
quarters. 


boring or other European states,” be said, 
don of E ai 


ategration of East European nations 
into NATO and other Western structures 
would “significantly support the strengthening 


The program was designed to balance Rus- 
NATO enlargement with 


and continuity of democratic processes in Rus- 


sia,” he adc 

Lithuania became the second farmer Warsaw 
Pact state to accept the Partnership fra Peace 
offer made earlier in the month at a summit 
meeting of alliance leaders. Romania signed up 
on Wednesday. 

The partnership program will draw the East 
European nations closer but without granting 
them full membership in the alliance or the 
main security guarantee that goes with it — that 
an attack against one member is considered an 
attack against alL 


sin’s worries about 

the desires of the new democracies in Central 
Eastern Europe fra closer ties. 

Poland and Estonia are expected to sign next 
week, and other East European nations are 
likely to follow soon. 

Under the partnership proposal, the East 
Europeans must share information about de- 
fense budgets and defease forces, promise civil- 
ian control over the military and standardize 
weapons systems. 

Each nation is expected to agree an a specific 
work plan with the allies, tailored to its needs 
and capabilities. 

Meanwhile, Russia accused the Baltic states 
of seeking confrontation. (AP, Reuters) 


Spain Slowed by General Strike as Workers Press Gonzalez 


Corrpikd by Ota Staff From Dispatches 

MADRID — Nearly 8 million 
Spaniards stayed away from work 
on Thursday in a 24-boor general 
strike called to seek changes in the 
Socialist government's economic 
policy and labor reforms, trade 
unions said. 

Business leaders disputed the 
number, putting support for the 
strike at just 30 percent of those 
called out, compared with the 90 
percent that the union Figure repre- 
sen ted. 

Riot policemen clashed with 
pickets across the country and in 


some places fired blank rounds to 
disperse crowds of Strikers gath- 
ered outside businesses that re- 
mained open. Dozens of people 
were injured, and more than 50 
arrested. 

At a joint news conference, rep- 
resentatives of the giant General 
Workers' Union and Workers’ 
Commissions insisted that Prime 
Minister Felipe Gonzdkzcould not 
ignore the demands of the people 
any longer and would have to refor- 
mulate labor market reforms. 

The strike is the fourth faced by 
Mr. Gonzalez's administration 


since it came to power in 1982. It 
was called after five months of 
talks between government, busi- 
ness and unions on a “social pact” 
to combat economic recession and 
soaring unemployment broke 
down in November. 

The government’s labor reforms, 
introduced after the talks failed, 
made it easier for employers to hire 
and fire and encouraged recruit- 
ment of apprentices. 

Unions angrily branded the mea- 
sures a direct attack on workers’ 
rights and said they undermined 
job security. 


Mr. Gouz&lez has repeated that 
he is ready to meet the unions at 
any time but says the government 
will not back down on its labor 
reform measures. 

The unions said support fra the 
strike was highest in the northerly 
Asturias region, with 100 percent 
of workers participating, while in 
the poor western region of Extre- 
madura only 75 percent of workers 
backed the stoppage. 

Unions said 80 percent of work- 
ers at the telecommunications giant 
Telefonica stayed at home, but 
Banco Popular said only 12 percent 


of its 12,000 staff backed the stop- 
page. 

In Madrid, buses and subway 
trains operated much reduced ser- 
vices but, although car traffic was 
20 percent below normal, traffic 
wardens were spotted in the near- 
deserted streets. 

In the northern city of Burgos, 
one picket was crushed and seri- 
ously injured early Thursday, ap- 
parently when a dmnk driver drove 
his car into a picket line. 

In the southern resort of MAIaga, 
policemen fired blanks over the 
beads of thousands of strikers gath- 


ered outside a branch of the presti- 
gious Corte Ingles chain store, 
which remained open. 


May YouUvelOO Years (Eat Antsfz 

Tirtmi/,' # t rrm - . - .. u — . m !«• f nr tflTl unre. 


BELTING (AFP) — Eat ants if you want to live for 100 year£ 
advises a Chinese professor who has devised dozens of reopen 
containing the insects. 

The professor, Wu Zhicheng, has invented about 40 types of cakes 
and a dozen ant-based alcohohc and tea drinks, all of which aze rar 
sale in the eastern flirnwe city of Naqing the Xinhua press agenc^ 
said Thursday. Mr. Wu described azus as a “miniature nutritional 
treasure," packed with proteins (hat-can ward off illness and ag i ng 
and speed growth in drildrea. Chinese biologists dosdy monitor the 
food value of insects, which are rich in pTOtem and low in fats. Soxne- 
claim that maggots could ****>"»» a basic food in the 2990s. ” 


.And Have Same Wine on the SuUz 


LONDON. 
D anish 


> a tittle alcohol helps people 

, ; reported- '• 

report, written by experts at the University of Copenhagen 
and Copenhagen Municipal Hospital, confirmed earlier findings 
that a moderate intake of alcohol can be beneficial. The researchers 
studied 13,000 men and women aged. 30 to 79, who reported lheir 
intake of all forms of alcohol. 

"The lowest risk was observed atone to six alcoholic beverages a 
week,” the experts wrote in the Friday issue of British Medical 
JournaL “Abstainers had a relative risk of 137, Which ntaSns tffcy 
were nearly one and a half times more Kkriy to (Sc. Those drinking- 
more than 70 beverages a wed: had a relative risk of 223, or were two' 
and a half more times hkdy to die.” 

In Jime* doctomat a conference in France were told that people 
who drink wine in moderation suffer less heart disease than teetotal- 
lers or heavy drinkers and tend to live longer, in part because two 
glasses of wine a day tend to help lower qphealthy cholesterol levels. 


Firemen Clear Market Rubble in Nice 


Ertzaintza police in the Basque dty 
of San Sebastian, flinging steel 
bolts and straws at officers and 
attacking care after a pro-strike 
demonstration attended b y several 
hundred people. 

In Zaragoza. 13 strikers and two 
police officers were injured in 
clashes outside a another Corte In- 
gles shop. (Reuters, AP) 


Still No Answers in the Fire That Destroyed Airbus in Paris 


NICE (AFP) • — Rescue services struggled Thursday to dear huge 
Nodes of rubble from a supermarket whose roof collapsed here, Idfling at 
least 2 people and injuring 97. Prosecutors have opened an investigation 
into the disaster. 

Firefighters using cranes began removing die concrete blocks after 
officials decided that there was no hope of finding more survivors, 
OvermriiL-cnergcncy services using dogs crawled under the smashed 
roof, whichweighal sranc 1,500 tons, but the dogsfoond no more signs of 
life in the Casino supermarket, off die Promenade des Anglais near the 
Nkeaixpart. ■ .*• 

The .'supermarket was undergoing extension work, and it was also 
theorized that the weight of a roof garden, sopping wet after heavy rain, 
caused the collapse. Six of die 97 survivors were severely injured. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — A week after it oc- 
curred, the fire aboard one of the 
world's most modem aircraft — an 
almost new Airbus A-340 — re- 
mains a mystery. 

It also illustrates a little-known 
fact about the aviation business: 
more aircraft catch fire while sta- 
tionary on the ground than while 
moving along runways or in the air. 

The police still are investigating 
the fire that gutted the fuselage of 
the $ 1 20 mQhoa Air France Airbus 


at the Charles de Gaulk Interna- 
tional Airport in Paris. The plane 
had just undergone engine tests in a 
maintenan ce area and was being 
prepare! for service. There were no 
casualties. 

It was me of the newest, and the 
most expensive, among a couple of 
dozen large passenger aircraft that 
have burned on the ground in the 
last 20 years, some of them involv- 
ing hangar fires as weR Oue reason 
for this, according to industry 
sources, is that aircraft are at thar 
most vulnerable when parked be- 



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cause their alarms and fire-fighting 
systems are switched off. 

There is no pattern to ground 
fires aboard aircraft. They include 
older models, like Boeing 707s, 
727s and 737s and Douglas DC-8s 
operated by small airlines out of 
lliird World airports, but also 
modem aircraft flown by well-run 
airlines in the developed countries. 

The destroyed A-340 was the 
10th of the long-range aircraft to be 
delivered and had docked up only 
about 2^500 hours of flight in a half 
year erf service — enough to over- 
come teething pains or to reveal 
any serious faults. A spokesman for 
Airbus said the plane, die first of 
the company's aircraft to bum in a 
stationary accident, made use of 
the latest fire-prevention and sup- 
pression technology. 

Because more people are killed 
by smoke inhalation than flames in 
plane crashes, Airbus has been 
careful to eliminate ma totals that 
Flare op or give off toxic smoke, the 
spokesman said. This means, he 


said, that the fire could have smol- 
dered for some lime without reveal- 
ing itself by flames or smoke. 

Once fire fighters arrived, it took 
them 30 minutes to control the 
blaze, but nobody knows how long 
the plane had been on fire before 
they arrived. 

Even Airbus engineers have not 
had a chance to examine the wreck 
dosdy, because the police investi- 
gation is being carried out in strict 
secrecy. This is because immediate- 
ly after the blaze, Air France filed a 
charge of criminal rianragu against 
a person or persons unknown, a 
routine legal procedure in acci- 
dents, fires or deaths where the 
cause is not immediatdy apparent 

Sources at Lloyd’s of London 
said Air France would have been 
remiss in not taking such action in 
view of the recent industrial unrest 
at the company, even though thee 
was no immediate evidence of sab- 
otage. 

■ The move means, however, that 
the police report must go to an 


examining magistrate before it can 
be made public. 

It was the first major ground fire 
in Paris since 1985 when a Boeing 
747 belonging to the airline UTA 
burned in a parking bay at De 
Gaulle airport 

Sources dose to the investigation 
said experts bad been looking at 
the possibility that the fire started 
in or near one of the wheel wells. 
One theory, according to the 
sources, is that it began not on the 
aircraft but in an auxiliary power 
unit parked on the ground close to 
the wheels. 


European authorities and by die 
Federal Aviation Administration 
in the United States. 

Rodney Wallis, an aviation secu- 
rity consultant, said the fad that 
even such a modern airplancceuld 
bora so thoroughly bigbfigfcted the 
need for airlines to flunk cartfoDy 

blazing cabins. Unfortunately, he, 
said, many airlines are squeezmgin 
more rows of seats to increase reve- 
nue, making it potentially .harder 
for people to get out — partkxdttiy 
if there is smoke, panic and bag- 
gage everywhere. . ^ 


Scary* Cali® omia TeUs Japan Toprists 


SACRAMENTO, California Qtentera) — Governor Pete Wilson of 
"1 Japanese e 


CaEfanaabas apologized to22 Japanese executives who woe robbed at 



also released mi 
California's safety. 


The A-340 contains miles of elec- 
tric cables but as on all modem 
aircraft that rdy heavily on com- 
puters, these are more heavily insu- 
lated and shielded than cm older 
aircraft to prevent interference 
from electromagnetic sources. The 
cargo area is starved of oxygen to 
prevent fires in flight The en gines 
have automatic fire extinguishers. 
The systems are certified both by 


Royal Navy V&B CapeTwn 

Reuters, ‘ . 

CAPETOWN (Reuters) -Brit- 


two men who took over tbezr bus after a factory cutlet visit. 

' flections of- lead into tha Leaning Tower of Pisa have succeeded in 
Muring thescracqne, believed to.be in danger of collapse, almost a full 
centimeter closer io the vertical, restoration experts said Wednesday. 
However, '.die 5+meter tower remains dosed to the public. . ” ; (AFP) 
British Airways say s tts partner USAir, is to move its domestic U3. 
services at Kennedy airport to BA's terminal there to improve conaec- 
tidnswiih BA’s d^it.daifztfaiis^Atianiic flights. : (Reuters) 

Hie case of a Houstonian trim fafaBysbot a Scot mistaken, for a burglar 


goes to airarid jury this we&. It will hear testimony, in the case of 
'AridiiewDe^ Vries, war 


tin's Royal Navy returned to Cape 
Town on Thursday after an ab- 
IbefiigaieNor- 


seoce of 27 years. r _ 

folk and its auxiliary escort vessel 
docked in Victoria Batin after be- 
ing welcomed with a 21 -gun salute. 


i was killed Jan. 7 after he banged on the back door 

of (he boost owned by Jeffrey Agee. Mir. Agee sanThe thought Mr.. De 
Vries, whQ.Afaoxang his Jiront doorbell, was a borglar. (AP) 

" SnoA Korea’s two alifiiies wg cover 10 new ronton thw ywtr, inrfndtng 
d ties in America, Omia and Russia, the Transportation Minis try said in 
SeouL New destinations for Korean Air lines and Asians Aixtines axje 
Washington, Seattle, Beging, Sh a n g hai , Shenyang, Guangzhou, Taipei, 
Khab arovsk. Mexico Qty and Brussels. * (Reuteri) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1994 


Page 3 




IP i® SHE & L? 


B 4& i JWt fe£ g* 


•«:r%ra 


: Patients, Not Doctors, Now Make the Hard Choices 


^Cs'* 

% i 


By Elisabeth Rosenthal 

New Yw * Tww Srrricr 

— "When Bonnie G. 


ro^:ror J ’ “ c wokmgfoiwaid 
[Owhal^dern-iedmciogytould offer 

4 ]** a J*** fetus and faeebance 

• ^ be reasawrf thal her drild-- a bav 

. * .she discovered, t- would be fine.. 
Instead, the grainy television im*p f 

* toe sonogram produced brongfather 
- -.fflsmrama infonnation and forced her 

to make W-wraichina diaces that 

■ past generations never faced. 


formation and treatment possibilities. 
.BoL it has "i«rt increasingly requifed 
patieots to mak e da-irirms that learat 
thdr souls. 

. Should a middle-aged w oman with 
widespread lama cancer ^choose a 
bone-marrow transplant, which b ring s 

■ Qnfh ft W f WHr ffl rtf', a lunniif — — «ini ni 


Mrs. G.’s test slxmed.that her baby 
“ m April, had a blockage of Ms 

inanr i * ° « ... 


" " *■ .*- 


urinary system that had probably 

CSUKMl nuraUTMxt ... / 


caused per m a n en t damage, to his kid- 
vxys. while he could be born normal 


octs. While he could be born no rmal 
the d octors said, he would- most Hkdy 
need dialysis or an organ transplanting 
childhood, and might be so side that he 
would die shortly after birth. 

Twenty-one weeks into a trouble-free 
pregnancy, Mrs. G. and her husband, 
Bryan, listened in disbelief as doctors 
explained that they could choose aban- 
don or could go' forward with no guar- 
antee of the' prospects Tor tbeircfiikL 

“We went home that Friday night, 
numb and stayed at home all weekend, 
trying to understand, trying' to figure 
out what to do,” said Mrs. G, who 
declined to beidentified because of the 
sensitive nature of her decision. 

New technology offers patients Eke 
Botmie G. a fantastic explosion of in- . 


than standard therapy but also a5 per- 
cent chance of dying darin g treatment? 
Should a baby with-a severe heart defect 
be aQowed to die at birth, at undergo 
corrective surgery — even though the 
operation’s long-term success is not 
mown? . 

These almost impossible choices are 
now frequently faffing into the laps erf 
patients, since doctors, who once rou- 
tinely called the shots, are now taught to 
include patients in medical decision- 


tests and exams in search of tidbits of 
information that might help them. 

They had just three weeks, because 
abortions axe generally illegal after the 
24th week of pregnancy. During that 
time they vacillated, with each positive 
test result propelling them forward, 
fetch negative going them pause, and 
vocal relatives who opposed abortion 
adding confusion. 

-Although later tests provided them 
with some valuable data, the best of 
modem medicine could not firmly pre- 
dict their child’s fate. 


“truth-damping' 1 — leaves patients not 
better informed but just confused. 

Banie Alien inched over eight yuan 
toward the agonizing decision to have a 
heart transplant, a decision she at first 
avoided with determination and then, 
just as energetically, faced by reading 
hundreds of articles and interviewing 
4 (whtk of patients. 

When, at the age of 34. doctors first 
said she would need a transplant to 


“Technology takes you a certain 
amount of the way, but then you have to 
make the decision without all the infor- 
mation you want to have,” said Dr. 
Richard L. Berko witz, chairman of the 
Obstetrics and Gynecology Depart- 
mental Mount Sinai Medical Center in 
New York, who helped the couple make 
up their minds. 

Patients deal with these difficult 
choices m different ways. Some become 
bookworms, while others rely on gut 
instinct- Some solicit dozens of medial 
opinions, while others follow the direc- 
tion of a doctor they trust. 

Doctors see their role as helping pa- 
tients make choices — providing data 
and lending an informed ear — but 
many medical ethidsts wbo believe in 
patient choice say the trend can be 
taken too far. 

They say that flooding patients with 
articles and statistics — what they call 


to be smart customers. 

“We have created, a which 

says that the goodpatient is the most 
consumer-oriented, who gets the most 
'information -and makes the nxxt in- 
formed decision,” said Dr. Jimmie Hol- 
land, chief of psychiatry at Memorial 
Stoau-Kettetmg Cancer Center in New 
York. 

“Patients feel a tremendous obliga- 
tion to make judgment oneself, 7 ’ she 

In the days after their initial sono- 
gram, Bonnie G. *nd her husban d rico- ' 
cbeted between their home, jobs and 
doctors’ offices for consultations, more 


Technology takes 
yon a certain amount 
of the way, hut then 
you have to make the 
decision without all 
the information yon 
want to have/ 


By December 1990, when shortness 
of breath and fatigue bad made it im- 
possible for her to join her husband on 
trips or even walk up stairs, her cardiol- 
ogist said it was time for a transplant, 
and Mrs. Allen began 10 study in ear- 
nest. 

fmmediatdy, she recalls, she went to 
the local library and copied every 
source that had anything to do with 
transplants. 

Although most transplant patients 
can resume a relatively norma] life six 
months after surgery, 5 percent win die 
iu the first 30 days. 

It was only her rapid deterioration in 
late 1991 that sealed the decision that 
all her research had recommended. 

“When they found a donor, 1 was in 


Dr. Richard L Berkowrtz, 
Obstetrician 


correct an inherited weakening of the 
heart, she said, “No way: I don’t want 
to think about that,” and put it out of 
her mma 


“I was still feeling pretty well at the 
beginning,” she added, “but as you get 
sicker and sicker, you begin to take it 
more seriously.” 


said. “I had already had a sister and a 
mother die of this disease, so it was dear 
where I was beaded without the opera- 
tion.” 

In contrast, Donald P. Scanlon Jr. 
placed his faith in his doctor at Sloan- 
Kettering and in God and decided in a 
mere two days to undergo a bone-mar- 
row transplant, a go-for-broke radical 
cancer treatment whose aim is to cure, 
but can sometimes kill. 

Choosing the most aggressive form of 
treatment suited his temperament, said 
Mr. Scanlon, a former boxer and now a 
managing director for equities at Bear. 
Stearns ft Co. in New York. 


At 36. he had spent a year tackling a 
tumor or the lymph nodes with conven- 
tional therapy — four open-chest sur- 
geries and many rounds of chemothera- 
py — only to have the tumor return 
each time. 

So when doctors suggested the trans- 
plant and described the sometimes har- 
rowing ordeal, he was inclined to say 
yes without reading or research. He said 
he still did not fully understand the 
procedure that saved his life. 

“I really didn’t want to know too 
much about it,” be said. “I thought it 
would confuse me more. 1 told my doc- 
tors. ‘Let’s get going; it’s in your 
hands.’ “ 

Perhaps the most tortured medical 
decisions today involve prenatal diag- 
nosis. where technology can often pro- 
vide only glimpses of problems and 
where the only sure solution to many of 
the anomalies discovered is abortion, a 
procedure often laced with guOt and 
moral doubL 

When Mrs. G.'s routine ultrasound 
showed that her baby bad a blockage of 
his penis, ha* doctors referred her to 
specialists. 

With only three weeks before it was 
too late to abort, doctors jumped in 
with a grueling afternoon of tests: an- 
other sonogram to look for kidney dam- 
age; an amniocentesis to see if her son's 
problem could be related to a genetic 
abnormality: another needle passed 
through her abdomen and uterus, into 


the bladder of the fetus to see if the fluid 
there would yield dues to the degree of 
damage. 

“It was the most devastating day,” 
she recalled. w Ai that point we had very 
little information, and we were hearing 
the worst-case scenario." 

The roller-coaster ride continued 
over the next week as each test result 

returned. The amniocentesis revealed 

that the fetus had a minor chromosomal 
abnormality, whose effect on their chOd 
no one could predict. 

But a later blood test showed that 
Mrs. G. carried the same anomaly and 
since she was normal, doctors said it 
probably did not cause the fetal prob- 
lem. 

Once again the pregnancy went for- 
ward. Then the fetal urine showed that 
the kidneys were functioning but that 
some degree of injury bad already oc- 
curred. Again they hesitated. 

The tests were repeated every few 
weeks, and just days before the deadline 
for abortion the couple got some good 


news; The blockage bad partly opened, 
and a new sample of the fetal urine 


and a new sample of the fetal urine 
showed that kidnev function was im- 


proving. 

St ill, the I lth-hour improvement was 
enough to make up the couple's minds. 

“At that point we breathed a little 
easier and decided to continue, " Mrs. 
G. said. “Technology has been nothing 
but a help, so far. Now we just have to 
wait and see.” 




"■ ■ •"£ 

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After the Quake , Crime Took a Breather 


Mtdnri Nehon/Ajewe Fima-Prear 

A nrident of Omega P«k,Cafiforaia, and one of her Jop on Ihe lookout for the other one, which has been missing since the quake. 


By B. Drummond Ayres Jr. 

New York Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Now the 
good news from the Great Quake. 

On any given normal day in Los 
Angeles, the police make roughly 
500 arrests, about a third of them 
for major crimes like murder, rape 
and robbery. 

But these are not normal days in 
Los Angeles. In the first 10 days 
after the quake hit, the total num- 
ber of arrests made in the city hard- 
ly equaled one day’s work in the 
prequake days, about 500 in all — 
or roughly 50 arrests a day. 

Why? 

“We’ve tripled the number of of- 
ficers patrolling the streets,” ex- 
plained John Dunlrin, chief spokes- 
man for the Los Angdes Police 
Department. 

Normally, there are about 700 
officers out on patrol during each 
shift But since the quake, about 
2,000 have been working every 
shift 

And at times they have been aug- 
mented by several hundred Nation- 
al Guard troops, though most of 
them are now gone since looting 
has not been a serious problem. 

“It’s proof of what we’ve always 
argued, Mr. Dtinkin said. “You 
pul enough officers on the street 


and you'll get results in cutting the 
crime rate. We put a lot of officers 
in areas that were hard hit but we 
also put extra officers most other 
places because there was a bit of 
damage just about everywhere." 

Did the quake have any special 
impact on the c riminal mind? 

“Nope,” Mr. Dunkin replied. 
“There was no significant increase 
or decrease in any particular kind 
of lawbreaking, only the decrease 
in crime overaLL" 

Now the bad news. 

Starting Thursday night, the 
number of officers patrolling re- 
lumed to prequake levels except in 
the hardest-hit neighborhoods, 
mostly in the San Fernando Valley. 
□ 

The city of Santa Monica, 


Like many parts of greater Los 
Angeles. Santa Monica took a pret- 
ty good hit. And when the disaster 
aid centers opened, among the first 
in line were the homeless. 

They were turned away, told that 
since they had possessed nothing to 
begin with, they had lost no thin g, 
and therefore would gel nothin g. 

“We have to get people back to 


their pre-existing state,” explained 
Kathleen Maher, a Red Cross 


Kathleen Maher, a Red Cross 
worker. 

To which one homeless person. 
Ken Nelson, replied: “The politi- 
cos must realize that it is almost 
impossible to distinguish between 
the national disaster homeless and 
the natural disaster homeless.” 


The city of banta Monica, 

K :hed in liberal wealth and sunny 
u ty on the Pacific bluffs west of 


beauty on the Pacific bluffs west of 
downtown Los Angeles, has long 
been a place of refuge for the home- 
less. 

Sometimes referred to as “the 
People's Republic of Sama Moni- 
ca," it has a policy, hammered out 
in heated argument, of not running 
off the down-and-out. 

A noble approach. But not so 
noble that good fortune smiled on 
Santa Monica when the Jan. 17 
quake occurred. 


The Great Quake was only the 
latest disaster to strike Los Ange- 
les. 

First came recession, followed 
by riot, followed by fire, followed 
by rain and mud. For many, the 
California dream has become a 


to move here. True, moving compa- 
nies report an increase in demand 
for vans for out-of-state moves or 
moves to pans of the state less 
prone to earthquakes. 

But these are the exceptions, a. 
poll by the Los Angeles Times says. 
It found that only about 1 of every 
30 Angelenos planned to flee. 

Robin Rees will not be among 
them. 

“I’m California bom and raised, 
and I'm not going anywhere — 
except to a new apartment,” she 
said, standing in front of her 
quake-demolished apartment in 
Northridge. the San Fernando Val- 
ley community atop the epicenter 
of the quake. 

She was clutching a bouquet of 
paper roses, brought to her by a 
grimy fireman who had recovered it 
in what was left of her mangled 


apartment. Everything else that the 
fireman had been able to recover 


fireman had been able to recover 
rested at her feet, in two black 


nightmare. 

Still, even in the aftermath of the 
hardest blow of all. most Los .Ange- 
les residents say they plan to pick 
themselves up and rebuild, not pick 
up and leave. 

True, job recruiters report some 
problems persuading new workers 


garbage bags. 
“Life in Cali 


“LiTe in California is good, what- 
ever else happens." she said, “i can 
pick up and start again. 1 will pick 
up and star, again."' 

“Anyway.” she added, looking 
up and flashing a grin, “I'm a Val- 
ley drl. Like. Val eais are different. 
Right?" 




J Bwio't Deputy Md ABoMwr Toplldt Rt»lan 

WASHINGTON —- Dcpuff Anorney Gened E faDij ? B.Hey- 
> nwrnn antiffmvW Me icagattiga on Thursday, oring differences in 
“operating and maaagoien t,stjtes" between him arid Attorney 
j ■ General Janet Rjeawi. • . . , ; ' ! ' 

- Mr. Heymami disclosed his decisan while sitting beside Ms. Reno 
. -at her nonnalweddy news conference at the Justice Department. 

Me R ww dsn confirmed in response to questions dm one of her 

- senior aides, Lula Rodriguez, under Justrne Department InvestigBr 
rion in connection with a vote fraud case in Miami, hadjeagned to. 

„ pureue “other opportunities,” wfiich Ms. Rauo^dndt specay. 

5 Ms. Reno and Mr. Heymamt both denied that there was any 
policy difference between thorn and that ha smgje incident had led 
to his decision to resign now. They said tteyhad been discussmg 
• thdr “chemistry” for w eeks. M&.Reao called the decision “very 

mutual.” 'v : ‘.‘ . 

Mr Heymann offered to stay until a successor was chosen, but 
said at the news conference that he would riotEoger a ‘Tame duck” 
•and oroected to be back teaching ax HarvswLVniTOSty byaummer. 


Senator Urges End of Threats to China 


New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — A leading Democratic 
voice on trade in the Senate says the policy of 
. annually threatening' China with trade sanc- 
tions is outdated, ineffective, harmful to the 
reform process in China and should be perma- 
nently scrapped this June if China meets mini- 
mum United States demands. 

The senator. Max Baucus of Montana, who is 
chairman of the subcommittee on international 
trade, said Thursday that if die CEnton admin- 
istration actually carried out its threat to with- 
draw China’s trade benefits it would be “the 
equivalent of a nudear bomb" in terms of 
itv m omir. and political fallout. 

Mr. Baums has long opposed using tariffs as 
a tool to influence China’s behavior. His state, 
Montana, is a mayor exporter of wheat to Chi- 
na. 

But tiffuanadcs echoed a view emerging from 
the administration itself in recent weeks, and 
suggested that a new consensus could he form- 
ing among Democrats on China policy. Most 
Republicans m already opposed to linking 
trade status to human rights. 


Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bemsen. also sug- 
gested during his visit to Beijing last week that . 
u the Chinese could just meet the Clinton 
administration's human-rights conditions, set 
out in toe president's executive order last June, 
the White House would then be prepared to 
scrap, once and for aD, the annual threat to 
withdraw preferred trading status on the basis 
of China’s human-rights record. 

The so-called most-favored-nation sums al- 


lows China to export its products to the United 
Stabs at the lowest posable tariffs. 


Supporters of a policy change argue that 
trade with China is now so economically impor- 
tant to the United States, and so important for 
encouraging political reform in China, that if 
the sanctions threat were actually applied the 
effects would be disastrous for both U.S. busi- 
ness and Chinese reform. 

One reason both Senator Baucns and Mr. 
Beotsen are speaking out now is in the hope of 
influencing China's actions by bolding oul the 
carrot of permanent unlinking of trade sanc- 
tions and hitman rights. 

—THOMAS U FRIEDMAN 


■ Dissidents Issue Petitions 

In an unusual show of defiance, dissidents 
issued petitions Thursday demanding justice 
for two men wbo were said to have wsen mis- 
treated by Chinese authorities. The Associated 
Press reported from Beijing. 

One petition was particularly noteworthy be- 
cause about 350 people signed, including intel- 
lectuals, professors, poets, artists, journalists 
and even officials. 

It demanded a fair hearing for an artist’s 
lawsuit against the police, asserting that he was 
illegally detained and beaten. 

Signature campaigns of that scope have been 
almost unheard of since 1989. when authorities 
cracked down on all dissent after using the 
army to crush the democracy movement in 
Beijing. 

The second petition, signed by 1 1 dissidents, 
called for the release of Qm Yongmin, who was 
detained late lasL year for launching a “peace 
charter." 

Earlier this week, Mr. Qin was reported sen- 
tenced to two years at a labor camp. 


Solarz 9 s Appointment 
To India Still in Doubt 


By Todd S. Purdum 

New York Tima Senice 

WASHINGTON — A Justice 
Department investigation of for- 
mer Representative Stephen J. So- 
lan: lhai had delayed his nomina- 
tion as ambassador to India ended 
without the filing of charges this 
week, but the White House indicat- 
ed that it was not yet prepared to 
nominate Mr. Solarz: 

A New York Democrat and an 
Asian affairs expert. Mr. Solarz 
had hoped the appointment would 
asstipgf; his 1992 electoral defeat. 
He has been the subject of months 
of mysterious and conflicting re- 
ports in New York and Washing- 
ton. 


congressman, and bier as a private 
consultant — to help a Hong Kong 
entrepreneur with a criminal record 
obtain a VS. visa. Administration 
officials said they could not pro- 
ceed with the nomination while an 
FBI inquiry remained open. 

On Wednesday. Mr. Solarz's at- 
torney, Nathan Levin, said Justice 
Department officials had infonned 
him late Tuesday that their inquiry 
had been concluded with no recom- 
mendations for further action. 


“It’s as dose as you get to vindi- 
cation from the criminal division,” 
Mr. Lewin said of the finding. 


Senior congressional Democrats 
said the White House had told 


1 Cm Patriot Missiles Stop Korean Scuds? 

' Tennessee. r*»»miari of toe House subcommittee that win handle 

juiiiuMM) * - T a riml n fSmi '“ rui rr Vo tnflf 


WADrilPtulv/n' — ” — ZT 

Tennessee, Airman of the House subcommittee that win handle 
President ffiB Clinton's welfare-reform J^gfcdation, "say* he that 
' expects to receive the a dmin istration’s bill m April and that enact- 

• ment by Congress impossible before the November mid- term deo- 

• tutnc . . ‘ ; . 


Ford’s human 'resources subcommittee should be able, to 

* ct^^^bemings and send iis recOTnnentoicms to the fuB Ways 

Committee 

benefitfas totHiaSr sad coasei vatives, who regard 

• MAoramt n* too exoenszvE. 


JEWi-rare and wdta: *!“ “ 

Ford said, “Last nigid, for the^Kt mac, wemt 

iJKE^tand toady lonx^-Mr.CtalmaarihnTOnldMd. 
wdf are bin to Congress tins spong. l J 


The Associated Prat 

WASHINGTON — Patriot air- 
defense missiles that the White 
House wants to put in South Korea 
are a little more advanced than 
those used in the Golf War against 
Iraq, but they still may be of limit- 
ed value against North Korea's- 
best "lidfa accor ding to militar y 
specialists. 

The Patriot is the United Stales’ 
rally means of shooting down bal- 
listic missies in flight, mid none are 
currently stationed in South Korea 
or anywhere nearby. 

Frank G. Wsner. tmdemecretaiy 


of defense fra- policy, said Wednes- 
day that the deployment was part 
of “sensible, rational defense prep- 
arations” on the Korean Peninsula. 

In its only use in combat, a ver- 
sion of the Patriot known as the 
Pao-2 went up against Iraqi Scud 
rockets in in 1991 . The U.S. Army 
contends that they were successful, 
but many U.S. and Israeli special- 
ists have said the Patriots destroyed 
few, if any, of the Scud warheads. 

Since the war, the Pao-2 has un- 
dergone improvements to its radar 
ana software that enables it to 
track incoming missiles. A more 


sophisticated Patriot, the Pac-3, is 
undtt development, but the Pac-2 
win be sent to South Korea, said 
Bruce Spring, senior policy analyst 
at the Heritage Foundation. 

By deploying Patriots, be said, 
“you’re not going to get every 
square inch of South Korea de- 
fended against missile attacks from 
the North.” But even in limited 
numbers, he added, the Patriots 
win provide “real defense.” 

Others, however, said the Patriot 
might not work weO against North 
Korea’s newest deployed model of 
the Scud, the Scud-C. 


David C. Wright, senior staff sci- 
entist at the Union of Concerned 
Scientists in Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, wrote recently that North 
Korea bad probably followed 
Iraq's example and achieved extra 


range in the Scud by lengthening it 
so mat it can carry more fueL The 
modified Iraqi Scuds re-entered the 
atmosphere at such speed that the 
fuse on the Patriot warhead could 
not be detonated in time to hit the 
Scud head-on. 

He said there was no reason to 
believe the Patriot would do any 
better against the North's Scud-Cs. 


WASHINGTON — That raspy State cf the Union it 

only after practice, p raco^ practice, and by the 
JSf iSSdfflt Clin wo woteupen Wednesday monung, he could 

***** this wilt be the price: two days of 

tt^sssz-. assassssass- 

— i ~ ~ • 


China Demands That U.S. 


Away From Politics 


them the Domination would not be 
made, but White House officials 
said no derision had been reached. 

Starling last summer. Mr. Solarz 
said the administration bad in- 
formed him that he would be the 
next envoy to New Delhi. The Slate 
Department lent him a desk in the 
South Asian affairs bureau and be 
went through official seminars and 
orientations for ambassadors-to- 
be. Then, with no public explana- 
tion, the appointment was put on 
hold. 

Mr. Solarz said he bad had no 
recent discussions with the White 
House about his nomination, de- 
spite repeated recent reports (hat it 
would not come through. 

Acknowledging that the ap- 
pointment could be dead, be add- 
ed: “It may well be. 1 suppose it 
would not ’be the first time some- 
thing like this happened, but I'd be 
quite honestly surprised.” 

The Domination was said to have 
been stalled by a criminal investi- 
gation into his efforts — first as a 


Ski weeks 

Sir 2407- iall inclusive) 
from March 6 to 27. 


PALACE HOTEL 
GSTAAD 
SWITZERLAND 


Please call. 
Phone 030 83131 
Triei,«03U 433 4-} 


^IhtfJeddin^Haids of thefforidj 


Drop Its Asia Radio Plan 


from hoarseness before, wihdoctos. ; 
whXimc throat aflment. But a- 
SSSSta SSed the president ctxidmledtliathesuffered from : 

talk t hpT 1 the average vocal cards can bear. 
smdDee Dee Whfe 

Hou^eSSnan, her role. 

more important . 


Quota/ Unqaot* 




Oiivtr L. Nath, ihe to* Whitt Hcrec 

“ evolved in the irBStcooa^wha.js ho Jockea off hB 
Soa* fa . ViigiBi. i iUpfafitw: Thw 

SsSSJrfm.miaHlo.” . 


■ BELTING — China demanded 
Thursday that the United States 
drop plans to set up a new radio 
station. Radio Free Asia, calling h 
willful interference in China’s in- 
ternal affaire. 

“Hie real objective of establish- 
ing this station is to use the news 
media to interfere in the internal 
affaire of China and other Asian 
countries and to create confusion," 
pad a Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man, WuJianmm. 

He sad the United Steles had' 
“trampled on the universally ac- 
knowledged norms governing in- 


ternational relations,” and “violat- 


ed the principles” of previous 
Chinesc-U.S. agreements. 

“The Ui side should withdraw 
its plan,” Mr. Wu added. 

The Senate on Tuesday ap- 
proved the Radio Free Asia plan 
contained in a pending Stale De- 
partment bflL The radio station is 
envisioned as a conduit of news, 
information and commentary for 
the people of Burma, Cambodia, 
Quia, Laos, North Korea and 
Vietnam. It would be administered 
by the US. Information Agency 
and would be modeled on Radio 
Liberty and Radio Free Europe. 


t The fust slHttieflgte with a Russian astronaut aboard is scheduled 
to lift off from Cap Canaveral next Thursday. The astronaut, Seigd 
Krikalev, and five Americans will fly on the 60th shuttle fnisaon. 
During the eight-day flight ou the shuttle Discovery, the crew is to 
release a research satellite and then retrieve it for the trip home. 

• A baby art whose parents cany the gene Fra Tay-Sads disease was 
bom free of the fatal defect She was tested when she was just an 
eight-cell embryo in a laboratory container at Eastern Virginia 
Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia. The birth raised hopes that 
doctors will be able to select and implant fertilized e^ free of other 
inherited diseases. The baby, Brittany Nicole Abshire. was bom 
Wednesday in Orange, Texas. 

• Resrae workers had to knock down an apartment waB to reach a 
sick 700-pound (about 320-k2ogram) woman wbo could not fit 
through her front door in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The effort 
required 10 paramedics. 

• A London comparer programmer woe a ng bet in Las Vegas. Chns 

Boyd saved for throe years to plunk $220,000 on one spin of the 
roulette wheel at Binions Horseshoe casino- When the number came 
up ted, he had doubled his money. ap. keam 


llrralfcSSnkune 

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— 


I V. 


Page 4 


INTERN AnONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JANUARY 28 , 1994 ^ 


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Page 5 



By David B. Ottawav 

ad found nc 
-calc comipi 
Jtrading, drug 
<8^ of people otU of ! 

feast 

‘ .^® scat ™g die condnsohs to a 

45-day mvenigatioi, focused pri- 
ority on die activities of the UN 
•Protection Force in-Sarajcvd last 
jrar, the UN qjedal representative 
pwe, Yasushi Akashi, did say that 
evidence had been found of some 
Jradmg in cigarettes, alcohol and 
poffee in late 1992 and earty 1993. 

’ He said it was alsoprobable that 
tud had been rmsappri^siaietf T>y 
some individuals who had taken 
advantage of “deficiencies 1 ™ in the' 
t accoaniSjg system. 

■ Some c« the condnsions hr the 
report are likely to surprise report- 
ers who have worked in.Sarrievo 
and had dther direct or indirect 
knowledge of UN personnel 
goods and fuel at exorbitant prices 
and of city residents asked to pay 
as much as 5,000 Deutsche murks 
IS300) to obtain passage on -a UN 
plane out qf Sarajevo. 

" The report, however, said 'there' 
no evidence of any “organized, 
targe-scale traffic king ^ - r • ‘ 


Mr. -Akashi added that media 
ac cusadons that UN. eoroloyees 
smuggled" people out of Sarajevo 
-for money were “baseless.” 

‘TTie investigation found' that 
whfle same’of the allegations were 
with merit, there was no evidence 
to confirm the' claim that wide- 
spread or systematic illega] activity 
had been carried out by UN per- 
sonnel,” he said. “While there were 
cases', of impropriety, . ihrae were 
only a Hmited mimber of casts in' 
which illegality was firmly estab- 
lished-'’ . . . ■ ... 

Mr. Akashi and the Austrian 
Army officerwholed theravtstiga-. 
fion,_Majior General 'Gunther 
Greandl, said 23 UN ^soldiers had 

been sent home . and seven . local- 
Mre cmlians dismissed from their, 
jobs for involvement injllegal -ac- 
tivities. Nineteen of theUTrsok 
diers were. from Ukraine aqd four 
from Kenya.- ' 

It was the Ukraine sta- 

tion edin Sarajevo .early last year 
that was repoted to be activdyin- 
vdved intheiHegal safe offudthat 

: Mr; Aka^f^osaid tbe^five- 
member investigative commission 
had discovered only. one case of 
illegal drug activity while it had 
found: “absolutely no basis”, for 
press allegations that UN staff had 
been involved. Nor was . there any. 
evklenceits personnel had been im- 
plicated in “fflegal prostitution ac- 
tivities." 



: U.S, Approves transfer 



! Washington Pari Sender 

» WASHINGTON —The Enemy 
^Department has approved a Swiss 
government request to ship about 
65 tons of used mid ear fuel to Brit- 
ain, where its plutaninm content 
will be recovered at a new chemical' 
treatment plant. 

, Switzerland's application was 
widely viewed among nuderi hon- 
Woliferabon watchdogs had mem- 

hen of Congress as the first test of 

ihe Clinton administration’s de- 
clared policy of discouraging the 
reprocess in g' of unclear fucf aad 
Additions to the wodd's plutonium 
Stockpile. 

r Plutonium, . a; by-prodtoct of -the 
{Radiation of Qnami| fridin nn* 
clear reactors, is the prfia? 'y bcrikt " 


^ a letter to leeH. Hamilton of; 
Indiana, who heads die Horae Bor- 
agn AIErire Gmqnottdc; - Enow 
J&xretary . Hazel. R. ; O’Leary.: said 
die had “reached the judgiomt that 
it will not residt . fat a significant 
fncrease.in thcriskof ppmausioa . 
teftmd lhatiwJddt-Csoned at fte - 
|uOnhe rctfiSSKrtm^estcdr. 
«.;.Ia a sepanrirkuie^ thedfeecior 
ef die Arms Control and Disarma- 
jncmAgency,IohxrD-^Amr,3a>d 

Wnrirt^g .i bfi nhipnhcnt, • after 

years in which such requests woe 
routinely approved."woaldkadto 


denmnetbe cooperation needed to 
pmsofe the admimstralKHi’s broad 


As a nation that does not have 
nuclear weapons and signed the 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, 
Switzerland obtains enriched ura- 
nium fuel for its nuclear power 
{Anns from the United States. The 
arrangement ogives the United 
States l^ri contzid bver 'di^ioa- 
tkmof the used fired. 

\ With tiiewoddaheady confront- 

weapons, President KD Gmtonhas 
called for a baa an the porodhetion 
of piuioniwn from commercial 
fuel. But .the administration has 
been reluctant, to chalfenge fad- 
dispeiatirffl plans of friendly na- 
tios^ thm for extracting the 
plutomum for possible future use . 
as ft source of energy. 

” A notice on the approval in the 
FedcralR^stcr aaysdiHl Switzer-, 
laml ht to sfefel 1 ^ ased Aid assem- 
—Britan's new ThauraJOx- . 
_ Thun. Chttxneal- 

r c proo cs sin &wiD lesatt in timpro- 
dnetioarof 421 kilograms ' (926 
pramds) of pharanom.. About 15 
poimds is s ufficient tn prodBCC a 
oniifc midem bomb, according to 
weapons eaperta, : 

v— tBWHAS W-UPPMAN 


In Lesotho 


. , 4 : By Paul Taylor 

Washington Past Servicr 

: JOHANNESBURG — Leaders 
of South Africa, Zimbabwe and 
Botswana have agreed to consider 
. Joint; action to resolve a military 

and political crisis in Lesotho, a 
mow that symbolizes the changes 
in (fiptanaq/ in southern Africa 
after apartheid.' 

The agreement occurred at a 
meeting Wednesday in Botswana, 
which was the first time President 
Frederik W. de Kferk of South Af- 
rica and Nelson Mandela, the Afri- 
can National Congress leader and 
the man expected to succeed him 
after elections in April, traveled 
abroad on .a regional issue. It was 
also the first encounter between 
Mu de Klerk and President Robert 
Mugabe Zimbabwe. 

■ The issue that brought the kad- 
. ecs together, is the conflict in Leso- 
tho, a mountainous nation encir- 
cled by. South Africa where 
sltimdsbes between rival army fac- 
tions have left at least 5 dead and 
11 wounded. The immediaie cause 
was complaints about military pay, 
but b ehin d this are growing ten- 
sions between the ruling Basotho- 
land Congress Party, which came 
to power m March, and other op- 
position parties. 

Mr. Mugabe said his country, 
Botswana and South Africa would 
establish a task force to investigate 
what steps they should take to allay 
the crisis. Sources in both the Zim- 
babwean and South African gov- 
ernments said Mr. Mugabe had 
proposed that a “symbolic'’ peace- 
keeping force — perhaps including 
trams from South Africa, Botswa- 
na, Zimbabwe and Tanzania — be 
sent to Lesotho to promote stabO- 
ity. 

A South African government 
spokesman said in Gaborone, Bo- 
tswana’s capital, dial South Africa 
would prefer “lending logistical 
support to such a force” rather 
tfim actually sending troops. 

“We are very cautious of getting 
too involved in Lesotho," he said. 

Mr. Mugabe, who fed Zimbabwe 
to independence in 1980 after a 
armed struggle against the white- 
minority government of what was 
then Rhodesia, spent about 20 min- 
utes drinking coffee and chatting 
informally with Mr. de Klerk. 

“Unfortunately, it has taken so 
long for people supporting apart- 
heid m South Africa to change their 
minds," Mr. Mugabe said after- 
ward. He praised Mr. de Klerk for 
his wiffingness to make sweeping 
.political changes in his country and 
said that “the rest of the world” 
was now prepared to open itself up 
to South Africa. 

It is unknown whether the spirit 
of axmeratkm will be much help in 
Lesotho. Just hours after the lead- 
ers announced the task force, a co- 
alition of six opposition parties in 
Lesotho urging all woula-be inter- 
ventionists to stay out. ' 



Apace Fruoe- Proac 

THE WAR GOES ON — An Angolan wo man and her child in rebel-held Hnambo are among 
the victims of rivO war that has raged since UNTTA rebels rejected the result of a 1992 election. 


Hosokawa, Facing 
Defeat, Takes His 
Case to the People 


By T.R. Reid 

H'as/Higiai Pi xi Scm<e 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Mor- 
ihiro Hosokawa put his personal 
popularity on the Line Thursday in 
a national appeal io the Japanese 
people to push for final passage of 
his far-reaching package of anti- 
corruption legislation. 

“If 1 can't fulfill my promise to 
the voters to pass a political reform 
plan, it doesn’t matter to me at all 
whether 1 remain as prime minis- 
ter.” an emotional Mr. Hosokawa 
declared at a rally to drum up sup- 
port for the bills. The legislation 
will die if it does not pass the Diet, 
or parliament, by Saiurday night. 

Mr. Hosokawa declined to clari- 
fy whether that statement meant 
that he would resign, dissolve his 
government, call a new election, all 
three or none of the above if his 
plan did not pass. Any of those 
alternatives seems possible right 
now. 

But people here may not have to 
wait long to find out what he wfi] 
do if the anti-corruption package 
fails. Negotiations over a compro- 
mise broke down again Thursday 
night, leaving just two days Tor fur- 
ther legislative action. 

The Hosokawa plan is dearly 
stalled right now, and even the big 
national outpouring of support Mr. 
Hosokawa pleaded for Thursday 


Prince’s Attacker Seen as Unbalanced 


The AtsotiaiedPress 

SYDNEY — A college student who fired 
blanks from a starter’s pistol within feet of 
Prince Charles at a ceremony celebrating Aus- 
tralia's national day had been “prepared to die” 
for his cause, a prosecutor said Thursday. 

Duripg a court bearing, both defense and 
irosecution lawyers said the defendant, David 
23, had psychiatric problems and had 
to draw attention to the plight of Cam- 
detained as suspected illegal immi- 
grants by the Australian government. 

The prosecutor, Susan Adams, said Mr. 
Kang had sent more than 500 letters to the 
pimce, news organizations and Australian offi- 
cials, complaining about the treatment of Cam- 
bodians. 

Ms. Adams said there was evidence that he 
had been “prepared to die” for his cause and 
(hat he was carrying out a “very deliberate and 
vay well-planned attack." 


On Wednesday. Mr. Kang Fired two blank 
shots at Prince Charles, who was about to 
n an award before 10,000 people in a 
aey park. The prince was unharmed. 

As he continued nis 12-day official visit amid 
tightened security, he attracted large crowds 
Thursday in the towns of Forbes and Parkes. in 
New South Wales. 

“He enjoys meeting people,” said his secre- 
tary, Richard Aylard. “It’s pan of the job. and 
if you're going to meet people the way he likes 
to do it, which is as informally as possible, then 
there's always going to be an element of risk” 

Mr. Kang faces six charges and could be 
imprisoned for a maximum of 1 7 years. He said 
nothing during the 30-minute hearing Thursday 
and made no plea. 

He was refused bail after the magistrate was 
told that he had been seeking psychiatric treat- 
ment for depression. Mr. Kang will remain in 
custody until another hearing on Feb. 4. 


A defense lawyer, Bill Dickens, said Mr. 
Kang had been frustrated by the media's preoc- 
cupation with Britain's royal family while the 
Cambodians’ suffering was ignored. Mr. Kang 
is an ethnic Korean but was born in Australia. 
Thepolicehad originally said he was of Chinese 
origin. 

Mr. Dickens said Mr. Kang was “a young 
man of gentle disposition” who had orchestrat- 
ed a “media stunt” 

Mr. Kang's sister Carolyn denied that her 
brother had intended to harm the prince. 

“He's not really violent no. that’s not his 
nature,” she said in a television interview. 

Referring to the Cambodians, she added: 
“He felt compelled to do something for the 
people. He felt morally obliged to help them.” 

Prime Minister Paul Keating, who will meet 
Prince Charles on Friday, said Australia had 
been embarrassed by the attack. 


RUSSIA: POLICY: Russian Populism Is Undermining Clinton 


■ <-• y» 


DEMOCRATS: The Public iJkes a Centrist Party 


* , CoBtmnedfroBiPag^ 1.; - 

bid. for a fourth term -wi^aa«i- 
dress featuring 'flnee tfesnfesjtlp.-’ 
gigiied to appeal to RjepnhhcaBs 
and independents: corporate tip; 
arts; t ough crime -legislation, ia-' " 
eluding life without parde fot a 


Welfar e -reform, mduding^-fli^-'i 
printing oT applicants- for . assis- 
tance. 

* Mr. Ointon’s positive and nega- 
tive poll ratings over ids fim year 
in office have offered a lesson to 
inemhos of Ins party. ' . : ’ 

Stanley Greenberg, Mr. pint 
ton’s pollster, said his negative rat-, 
togs reached a high during spring 
and early summer last, yeas'. This", 
coincided with tl«s one period, Mr. 
Greenbesg said, when a phmiBiy ctf 
voters saw him as a “KbcraT' Dem- 
ocrat, as opposed to moderate or 
“new" Democrat. This was at the 
■mrrvr tune that Mr. Gmtoa .was 


DEATH NOTICE 


M«S- -- 

was American and £■ 

She was a member Bar m 

the state of New York- She loved 
to skL sail, play tennis, swan and 
a tot more. 5he was very heMut 
everywhere^ 



Lricna raws, 

tived in America Jot 31 yff« 
before 

She. lived until . Wednes^Y, die 
£*h of January. Kathy ted I too 
Children, Patrick and 
which she was very raotid and a 

PatridtMaratsse: 


_ the ban cm 

homoaexuflls m the 
^ Mr. GSmca^s ratings have im- 
proved as he has been able tofocus 
the pubfic ag&ada da health care 
aodwdfare reform* \ . 

BoBi conducted by. the Demo- 
cratic firm MeHman, Lazarus, 
Lake, togAhor with the Taxxaace 
.Group,, a Republican concern, 
found mot when Mr. Clinton took 
offiefe the public gave him an edge 
of Spcrraai^pcinits^ aver Rqwb- 
ficans on the question of who 
wodd be better able to “hold the 
line* * cin taxes. ■ 

ByMay, after Mr. Clinton flban- 
daBaHnspromisenoi to raise taxes 
on the -middle the Republi- 
cans enjoyed a'32rpoint advantage 
over Mxi GEnton. The December 
poll showed,, however, that die 
margin has how fallen to.jnst 10 
paint* 44 percent to 34 percent. 

Orieof the most striking findings 
of the December poll was that Mr. 
CBnton and the Democratic Party 
cantmoe to hold slight advantages 
over the Repubfiam Party on three 

issues thm dating -much of. the 
1980s had bom arcog rfuses ftfe 
Republicans: reducing the deficit, 
cuuittg gpvcmioeaj waste and 
.-fightitig crime and : ditigs^' 

These advantages do not guaran- 
tee that the part^ cagfidates wifi 
win etections, eroecraDy ax a time 
when the stragmof pvtisan 'ndBO- 
tificanom is declimog. These find- 
ings do mean, however, (hat the 


i an edge in i 

inG»H 


as they 


lifting the 
jwb&discanse.to thodt£ciu gov- 
ernment waste or crime. ■ 

' Antton^ ^increasingly saiieat 




issue of welfare reform, Mr. Qin- 
tos and the Democratic Party en- 
joyed advantages of more than 10 
_ ! points over the Rcpub- 
i Party, 

Fred Sleeper, the Republican 
pollster yri» conducted miwjrs for 
the JBusb campaign, said: “To the 
extent that being a ’new’ Democrat 
is avoiding looking like a big 
spender. 1 dunk he has avoided it, 
so far. He’s avoided proposing any 
giveaway programs. I don’t think 
he’s become a ‘giveaway Democrat 
yet.” ' 

The fortunes and public image of 
the Democratic Party are highly 
dependent on the success or failure 
of Mr. CBnton, just as Republican 
stature was heavily determined by 
- -that , of Presidents Reagan and. 
Bush. The Democratic advantages 
could be seriously damaged if the 
inquiry into the Clintons’ invest- 
ment in the Whitewater firm in 
Arkansas in the 1980s produces al- 
legations of wrongdoing. 

Souk political strategists warn 
that Mr, Clinton may over time 
face increasing difficulty as he tries 
to balance the interests and claims 
of the more liberal base of his party 
; with his drive to become a more 
moderate “new” Democrat. 


Mexico Accord on Reforms 

Radas 

MEXICO CITY —The Mexican 
government and the leaders of nine 
political parties signed an agree- 
ment Thursday calling for sweep- 
ing electoral rdf onus in an attempt 
to end a peasant uprising in the 
southern state of Chiapas. 


YeUsin’s Defense 

Continued from Page 1 

as a technocrat, bin is thought un- 
likely to be able to play as dynamic 
a role in the government as Mr. 
Fyodorov. He will not have the 
rank of deputy prime minister that 
Mr. Fyodorov enjoyed. 

Along with the former econom- 
ics chief, Yegor T. Gaidar, who quit 
Jan. 16, Mr. Fyodorov was regard- 
ed as the most prominent champi- 
on erf the free market in the cabinet 
While a number of reformers re- 
main in the upper echelons of the 
government, none is regarded as so 
high-profile, wen-connected or en- 
ergetically willful as Mr. Gaidar 
and Mr. Fyodorov have been. 

There are already signs that the 
new government, led by Prime 
Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, 
wifi abandon f nee-marker practices 
and renew massive subsidies to 
bloated and ineffirient state fac- 
tories and farms. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin, buffeted by 
predictions that his stewardship 
will lead to disaster, has insisted 
that he will not give an inch in the 
fight against inflation. In what ap- 
pears to be a concerted response by 
his government «> its critics, several 
top officials have echoed his line 
that reforms wifi continue. 

In Rome cm Thursday, where he 
is on a two-day visit, Mr. Cherno- 
myrdin told the Italian prune min- 
ister, Carlo Azegtio Gampi, that 
Moscow would stay the course on 
reforms. He also lobbied for Rus- 
sia's a dmi ttance this year to the 
Gronp of Seven industrialized 
countries. 

He said he hoped that the G-7 
would be expanded and renamed 
the G-8, with Russia's membership, 
wben the organization meets in Na- 
ples in July. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin further lob- 
bied for Russia’s eventual member- 
ship in the European Union- “We 
' want these relations to move for- 
ward more quickly so that the Rus- 
sian. Federation can become a 
member oa an equal footing,” he 
said. “We want cooperation on all- 
fronts, but above all the economic 
one.” 


Continued from Page 1 
giving him, which goes like this: 
The only way for Russia to develop 
a market economy is if .it has a 
currency that is convertible and 
stable — so that banks will be pre- 
pared to make loans at reasonable 
interest rates, so that Russian ex- 
porters mil be willing to bring their 
profits back into (he country with- 
out worrying that they will be erod- 
ed by inflation, and so foreigners 
wifi be ready to invest there. 

The only way to get to that stage 
is for Russia's central bank to stop 
printing so many rubles. The only 
way to get to that point is if the 
Russian government can close its 
budget deficit, now running about 
9 percent of its gross domestic 
product. 

And the only way to accomplish 
that is if the government stops sub- 
sidizing unprofitable state indus- 
tries and farms, many of which 
produce products that sell for less 
on the world market than the cost 
of the raw materials that go into 
than. 

This is where economics ends 
and politics begins. Because to 
dose down such factories and 


farms would require hying off and 
relocating thousands of Russians, 
at least until new profitable busi- 
nesses sprout . up to re-employ 
them. 

The new government, dominated 
by conservatives like Prime Minis- 
ter Viktor S. Chernomyrdin. , the 
central bank chairman, Viktor V. 
Gerashchenko, and Agriculture 
Minister Alexander K. Zaver- 
yukha, is not ready to risk the polit- 
ical reaction that such draconian 
policies would involve — especially 
in light of the last election. 

That was why the key reformers. 
Boris G. Fyodorov and Yegor T. 
Gaidar, quit as finance minister 
and first deputy prime minister. 

Senior administration officials 
say they are trying to deal with this 
situation by bolding to a two-track 
policy. 

One track is to keep shining a 
light on the path of real economic 
rdorm that Mr. Clinton laid oat in 
Moscow. American officials say 
they hope that after this new Rus- 
sian government dabbles in some 
populist economics, which will not 
produce anything but hyperinfla- 
tion, it will come to its senses and 
bring back the ousted reformers. 


KOHL: Strong Warning on Intervention in Bosnia 


i 

open their markets to East Europe- 
an goods to help them pay for 
tr ansf ormation of their societies. 

■ Another Swipe at France 

News agencies reported from 
Washington and Paris: 

Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher, taking another swipe 
at France, on Thursday ruled out 

S American forces on the 
in Bosnia as part of an 
effort to press the Bosnian govern- 
ment into accepting terms for a 
settlement. 

American officials say that the 

Clinton administration believes 
that there are more important is- 
sues than the war in Bofflia-Herze- 
go vina. like stabilizing Russia. 
They also say that Mr. Christopher 
reseated being pressed by France 
over the conflict at a NATO sum- 
mit meeting in Brussels this month 
and again in Paris this week. 


Mr. Christopher urged France to 
close ranks with the United States 
and to support NATO resolutions 
threatening the Bosnian Serbs with 
an allied attack if they do not ease 
their assault on Srebrenica and 
TUzla. 

“The United States is not stand- 
ing by,” he said in response to re- 
pealed assertions from Paris that 
the Clinton administration was not 
exerting its energies to end the war 
that has taken some 200,000 lives. 

In an unusually undiplomatic re- 
buke, the State Department said 
Wednesday that the French foreign 
minister, Alain Juppi, had engaged 
in “strange moral calculus and 
questionable logic in his prescrip- 
tions for peace in Bosnia. 

On Thursday. Mr. Christopher 
said fresh reports that Yugoslav 
.Army units were now engaged in 
trying to counter recent Muslim 
advances underscored the need for 
a settlement. 


But he said that the United 
States did not believe it should put 
forces on the ground in Bosnia in 
order to require the parties to enter 
into a settlement. 

“We ihink it would be inappro- 
priate to insist that the victim, the 
Bosnian government, conform to 
some pre-existing plan,” he said. 

France had struck back earlier in 
the day, depicting the State De- 
partment as “misinformed'’ and 
swiping at American reluctance to 
commit ground troops. 

Mr. Juppi's chief spokesman. 
Richard Doque, said that "the 
choice today is between settling for 
watching the combat and trying 
everything to step it.” 

Mr. Du q Lie said France had nev- 
er proposed imposing a settlement 
by force, nor a huge military inter- 
vention, bui only bringing more 
diplomatic pressure to bear on all 
sides to accept a negotiated peace, 
(AP, AFP, Reuters} 


The United States will keep its 
offer on the table: Adopt real eco- 
nomic reform and the United 
States will galvanize the Group of 
Seven industrialized democracies 
to come up with real money to 
support iL 

The other track is to continue 
pressing ahead with the $4. l billion 
in direct American assistance al- 
ready approved by Congress. That 
money is not going to the Russian 
government but to support various 
projects on the ground, from small 
businesses, to bousing for soldiers, 
to energy development, to technical 
advice. 

These are the “ground-up” pro- 
jects that the administration hopes 
wifi plant the seeds of capitalism, 
.no matter what the government in 
Moscow does. 

But this two-track approach may 
not be sustainable for long. 

“I think that is a phony distinc- 
tion,” Mr. Hamilton said. “If you 
have hyperinflation again in Rus- 
sia, all bets are off. If you have 
hyperinflation, it doesn'L matter if 
you supply them S10 billion or SI 
billion. You have to have the fun- 
damentals in line.” 


— “a phone call or a fax would do 
fine,” he said —may not be enough 
to win votes from incumbent politi- 
cians who do not particularly warn 
to change the political rules under 
which they have thrived. 

A political moderate, Mr. Ho- 
sokawa ended four decades of con- 
servative one-parry rule when his 
seven-party coalition government 
won a historic election in July. He 
has since become one of the most 
popular leaders in postwar Japa- 
nese history, so his veiled threat to 
quit may generate more public sup- 
port Tor his legislative package. 

Press reports here Thursday of- 
fered more evidence of the wide- 
spread corruption that has left Jap- 
anese voters disgusted. 

Newspapers said prosecutors 
were about to arrest several more 
members of parliament for having 
taken large illegal payoffs. All the 
reported targets are members of the 
Libera] Democratic Party, the chief 
opponent of or Mr. Hosokawa's 
anti-corruption plan. 

According to reports in Tokyo, 
prosecutors were ready to arrest 
Seiroku Kajiyama, a top Liberal 
Democratic strategist. Mr. Ka- 
jiyama made headlines three years 
ago when he compared American 
blacks to prostitutes. He has denied 
taking illicit money, and in fact 
said he would commit hara-kiri, or 
ritual suicide, if he were charged 
with a crime. 

Elected on a wave of popular 
revulsion against corrupt politics, 
Mr. Hosokawa pledged to make 
political reform his first priority. 
He won passage of his legislative 
package in the Diet's lower bouse. 
But on Jan. 21 , the bills were voted 
down in the upper bouse, creating 
the current political crisis. 

Mr. Hosokawa could still pass 
the bills if he gets two-thirds of the 
vote in the lower house. He is ex- 
pected to try that Friday or Satur- 
day, but the outlook is uncertain. 

Even so, opposition parties are 
frightened by the prospect of a new 
vote in the lower house. Just hold- 
ing the vote would probably split 
the Liberal Democrats. Some of 
them would support Mr. Ho-' 
sokawa's plan, and then quit the 
party to join Mr. Hosokawa's. 

If that happened. Mr. Ho- 
sokawa's coalition could effectively 
win while losing, growing stronger 
against the opposition for future 
battles. 

But Mr. Hosokawa may not be 
around to take advantage of the 
gains. He has indicated before that 
he will resign if he cannot pass his 
political package in this Diet ses- 
sion. 

His speech Thursday was an in- 
dication that he means to do so. 

MARKETS: 

Change Proposed 

Continued from Page 1 

wants to stand behind it,” said Mi- 
chael Upper of Lipper Analytical 
Services. 

Perrin Long, an industry analyst 
at First Michigan Corp., said the 
traditional auction exchanges were 
"a dying breed, but they don't want 
to admit iL” 

The staff recommendations are 
highly technical and will go to the 
full commission and the stock ex- 
changes, which withheld all but the 
most general comment. Some of 
the changes can be put into effect 
by the exchanges themselves. 

More than 50 letters of comment 
from brokerage firms and others in 
the industry have been received by 
the SEC. and Mr. Levitt said last 
week that there would be some- 
thing in the report to upset nearly 
everyone involved with the securi- 
ties industry. 

Several proposals were made to 
expand information about the time 
and location or trading, which is 
increasingly being conducted by 
computer, after hours, and on for- 
eign stock exchanges. They would 
force the reporting of trades in U.S. 
stocks overseas so that price 
quotes, often different from Wall 
Street’s, reflect those trades. 

The SEC staff also wants to gath- 
er information on more than a doz- 
en new automated trading systems, 
like Reuters’ Instmet. which it now 
regards as too sketchily monitored. 

The staff also proposed tighten- 
ing rules on limi t orders, in which a 
customer instructs his broker to 
buy or sell a stock within the limits 
of a specific price. The report pro- 
poses prohibiting brokers from 
trading ahead of a customer’s limit 
order for their own account on the 
National Association of Securities 
Dealers (NASDAQ) market 


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Page 6 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1 994 


OPINION 


licralb 


INTERNATIONA 



i* 1 , 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Sribune From Clinton at Last , a Vision Poster in Bold Colors / 

i tvtv WECHiNr.mN nKT J 


All in All, a Strong Speech 


It was a strong speech the president gave 
Taesday night. Bill Clinton was right both 
that he and Congress accomplished a great 
deal last year — it may not be pretty, but it 
sure isn't gridlock — and that a great deal 
remains to be done. 

The speech revolved around the topic of 
health care reform; so will the session of 
Congress. Serious criticism that needs to be 
addressed has been made of the extensive 
proposal the president sent to Congress last 
year that it is extremely complicated, expen- 
sive and chancy. Mr. Clinton asserted in its 
defense that there is a health care crisis 
and that his proposal would neither disrupt 
nor destroy what is good about the current 
health care system. 

But then he took the unusual step so early 
in the game of saying that there is a lot about 
his proposal that he might be willing to give 
up. He will veto a health care bill that Con- 
gress sends him only if it fails to provide 
universal coverage, he said — if it “does not 
guarantee every American private health in- 
surance that can never be taken away." 

You could call it a threat; it sounded more 
concessional than that to us. The administra- 
tion thinks that if Congress adopts universal 
coverage, it will end up having to adopt 
many other corollary features of the presi- 
dent's plan as well, or something like them. 
That is far from certain. 

An issue leading up to the speech was 
presumed tension between health care re- 
form and welfare reform. Which would take 
precedence? The president, having respond- 
ed in this case to critics who denounced 
earlier hints that be would shelve welfare 
reform for now, said that he wanted both 
and that they are intertwined. One of the 
reasons people stay on welfare, he said, is 
that “it's the only way they can get health 
care coverage for their children.” 

Meanwhile, “those who choose to leave 
welfare for jobs without health benefits 
. . . find themselves in the incredible posi- 
tion of paying taxes that help to pay for 
health coverage for those who made the oth- 
er choice, to stay on welfare.” Health care 
reform is one of the predicates of welfare 


In Washington not so long ago. Demo- 
crats vied with Republicans in supporting a 
“good” war waged in Afghanistan by free- 
dom fighters against the Evil Empire, hi 
April 1992 its Communist rulers were finally 
evicted, and an interim government assumed 
power. Refugees began returning from 
camps in Pakistan and Iran; the State De- 
partment proclaimed a triumph for justice 
and self-determination. 

Fast forward to 1994: On New Year s Day 
a fresh rebellion erupted in Afghanistan; 
hundreds have been killed. Yesterday’s liber- 
ators are at each other's throats. An Islamic 
fundamentalist who is nominally prime min- 
ister opposes a rival fundamentalist who is 
putatively president, and a well-armed for- 
mer Communist commander jumps from 
side to side. International aid agencies have 
pulled out of the capital, embassies have 
closed and refugees again flee to Pakistan, 
which threatens to deport them. 

To the extent that Washington even no- 
tices, the mood is one of resignation. As a 
practical matter, there may be little that 
Americans can do. But they can condemn 
savagery, and ask how it caine about. Mos- 
cow and Washington share responsibility 
for fueling this war. which the Soviet 
Union instigated in 1979 by intervening 
in Afghanistan to prop up an imperiled pup- 
pet regime in Kabul. 


Given this trespass, the West bad the right 
to help a coalition of resistance fighters dar- 
ing a decade of Soviet occupation. After 
years of dirty fighting, the Soviet Union 
withdrew. Still unexplained is why the Unit- 
ed States, in silent partnership with Paki- 
stan, gave the biggest share of aid to the most 
violently anti-American rebel leader, Gul- 
buddin Hekmatyar, the current prime minis- 
ter. This is hard to understand, since there 
were more acceptable resistance leaders. Mr. 
Hekmatyar made no secret of his contempt 
for Americans. He refused to meet with Pres- 
ident Ronald Reagan, he allied himself with 
Arab radicals and he supported Saddam 
Hussein during the Gulf War. Yet he was 
the darling of William Casey's Central 
Intelligence Agency. 

The blunder has been variously explained: 
ignorance of local complexities, deference to 
Pakistan, Soviet disinformation, or Wash- 
ington's belief that the fundamentalists were 
the most reliable anti -Communist fighters. 
There is no clear answer. What can be said 
with hindsight is that the lack of public 
debate over strategy in Afghanistan left cru- 
cial decisions to a secret bureaucracy with 
minimal accountability. Too much slogan- 
eering and too little genuine discussion 
played their part in the tragedy still unfold- 
ing in forgotten Afghanistan. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Plutonium Challenge 


Plutonium is an artificial element pro- 
duced only by human beings in their nuclear 
reactors, and they have made loo much of it. 
The stuff is horribly dangerous, chiefly be- 
cause even small amounts of it can be made 
into very effective nuclear weapons. Several 
kilograms of plutonium — a piece the size of 
a grapefruit — is sufficient for a bomb. The 
American and Russian missiles to be dis- 
mantled over the next decade will produce a 
surplus of 100 tons of it 
More of it is produced daily, although it is 
somewhat less hazardous, because it is mixed 
in the highly radioactive wastes of civilian 
nuclear reactors and therefore less inviting 
to terrorists and other thieves. 

The growing stocks of plutonium now are 
arguably the leading threat to national security. 
Keeping this material in the ri gh t hands and 
out of the wrong ones will not be that easy, even 
in the United States. Amid the turmoil of 
Russia and the other former Soviet states, the 
possibilities are far more troubling. 

Two years ago the Bush administration 
asked the National Academy of Sciences to 
study the handling of the plutonium surplus. 
Its report, written by a deeply knowledgeable 
panel, is authoritative, clear and urgent 
It calls, first for dose cooperation between 
the United Slates and Russia in a rigorous 
inventory shared by both rides. Next the two 
governments need to devise reliable proce- 


dures to maintain control over stockpiles. 
Then they need to fashion plans to dispose of 
them or turn the plutonium into forms less 
easily diverted to weapons. They cannot af- 
ford the kind of long, inconclusive quarrel 
that in the United States, has held off deci- 
sions on reactor waste disposal year after year. 

All governments need to avoid making mat- 
ters worse. Russia is still producing plutonium, 
because it needs the heat and power that the 
military reactors generate. The National Acad- 
emy committee denounces the idea of buflding 
new reactors to' consume plutonium. That 
ought to end the debate in America about (he 
Integral Fast Reactor, the development of 
which the Clinton administration has been 
inexplicably supporting. 

The same logic applies to the British gov- 
ernment, which has unwisely decided to begin 
operating its plutonium plant at Sellafield 
with the weak explanation that its product 
will not be of weapons grade. The National 
Academy's committee points out that there is 
no real distinction between weapons-grade 
and reactor-grade plutonium. Both make very 
satisfactory bombs. 

Everyone has known for years that plutoni- 
um is a menace. This valuable report makes it 
dear that the menace is closer than laymen 
may have thought and is going to be more 
difficult to contain. 


— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


International Herald Tribune 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
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N EW YORK — Theodore Roosevelt once 
said that a good political speech is “a 
poster, not an etching.” More important than 


By Alan Brinkley 


Mr. Gin ton came into office with ah eoxp- 
tionaify frail mand a t e in an exceptionally ad- 
versarial political dimate. He was despised by 
the right, only tentatively embraced by the kft 
and harried Bran all directions by Rees Perot. 

He stumbled through his first few months 
watching weak public support crumble in the 
face of missteps and misfortunes. Even now, 
with considerable successes H chinri him anri hfc 


f oster, not an etching More important than 
Lne details are broad, bold themes that stand 


reform as he and his people now state it. 

Mr. Clinton took steps in the speech to 
preempt some of the likely fiscal fights still 
ahead, including the one over the so-called 
balanced budget amendment to the constitu- 
tion. which the Senate is scheduled to take 
up next month. The budget he will submit in 
February will be “one of the toughest 
... ever presented to Congress,” and the 
government is now looking at three consecu- 
tive years of declining deficits for the first 
time since the 1940s. He is right, it will be a 
light budget; it is not clear that be will even 
be able to finance all his own initiatives. He 
nonetheless warned bis party not to make 
further defense cuts. In that he was right 
The defense budget is already being sharply 
cut; it would be a grave error to take it down 
further than currently planned. 

The president's speech had a curious end- 
ing. He stands accused of reformulating 
and stealing Republican issues and themes; 
here was another. An activist Democratic 
president committed to governmental solu- 
tions to problems warned that there is a 
limit beyond which government cannot be 
expected to go. 

He had been talking about crime, another 
lift from the Republicans, although we have 
never understood why liberal Democratic 
politicians in the past were so skittish about 
addressing issues of crime. It is some of the 
dangerous and wrongheaded measures poli- 
ticians dream up to fight crime that should 
be opposed, not acknowledgment of the exis- 
tence of the frightening conditions under 
which so many Americans of every kind are 
forced these days to live, or the effort to find 
effective ways to control crime. 

From crime Mr. Clinton made his way to 
children, the need to provide them with a 
good reason for living and living by decent 
values, the all too evident fact that govern- 
ments can go only so far in doing so and that 
communities must help themselves. Not a 
bad theme. But the legislative program 
comes first There is a lot of arguing and 
explaining and negotiating yet to be done, 
and all that now begins. 

-- THE WASHINGTON POST. 


out from a distance. 

But through most of American history, 
State of the Union Messages have almost 
always been more like etchings than posters, 
often dreary, seldom memorable. In recent 
years, only Ronald Reagan — who, like Theo- 
dore Roosevelt, always claimed to prefer 
“banners of bold colors" to “pale pastels” — 
manag ed to transcend the genre. 

With “American heroes" seated prominently 
in the visitors’ gallery, Leary references to acts 
of courage and sacrifice, evocations of families 
and neighborhoods and communities and 
buoyant descriptions of America a$ “once 
a gain alive with hope and opportunity,” “a 
soaring eagle, proud and free,” Mr. Reagan 
transformed his State of the Union addresses 
from lists of policy achievements and goals into 
evocations of national values and myths. They 
were an essential part of bis effort to attach 
moral weight to his conservative agenda. 


BHJ Clinton, a man as enchanted with the 
details of policy as Mr. Reagan was boro! 
with th«wn, nevertheless delivered a State of 
the Union address Tuesday night more evoca- 
tive of Mr. Reagan’s bursts of symbolic ora- 
tory than of the legislative report cards of 
other predecessors. 

To be sure, he boasted of economic and 
fiscal successes. He promoted his flagging 
health care proposals. He spoke at length 
about wdf are reform, an issue that many had 
assumed would remain on the back burner 
until after the health care debate. He made 
modest and only partly convincing claims of 
diplomatic achievements. 

But most striking was his effort to make 
those goals seem part of a coherent whole: to 
persuade the American public that he does 
not just have ideas, but also an idea —that in 
admtion to specific policy proposals he has a 
vision of how the future can and should look. 

There is good reason for him to do so. 


good citizens” in helping to sobre soda! 
Wots. He insisted that individual acts « 
heroism are stfll possible in 
emly overwhelming social forces. He spoke 
above all about farmfy — hihL pan apparent- 
ly spontaneous moment, of his own motner, 
who died earlier this month- 

_ _ « niMieaivafniM - 


popularity much wnhanneri be faces consider- 
able public skepticism. Unlike at least four of 


who diea earner uus awm- 
' ML Reagan, and many other -eanMnnitMl - 
used such symbols as a rebuke to liberals. 
They cited the strength of communities, fam- 
* nr . a Akmviwc evidence of Ole ssrew- 


the last five presidents, he believes ui the capac- 
ity of gowanmeut to do good. But- he has 
inherited a political cliim&te in winch relatively 
few Americans seem to agree with him. 

The belief in progress — in tire DossflnKtv. 


listen to the Sound of a Voice That Gives Vs Voice 


T HE TELEPROMPTER had hardly 
stopped rolling, the president had barely 


A stopped rolling, the president had barely 
glad-handed his way out of the House cham- 
ber. when the analysts and politicians all 
began deconstructing his text. Health care, 
crime, welfare — they waded through the 
words looking for portents about policy and 
clues about compromise. But from my listen- 
ing post, far from Washington, I was most 
conscious of the voice Bill Clinton used, and 
the underlying sound of values: 

“In our' toughest neighborhoods, on our 
meanest streets in our poorest rural areas, we 
have seen a stunning and simultaneous break- 
down of community, family and work, the 
heart and soul of civilized society. ” 

“We can’t renew our country when children 
are having children and the fathers walk away 


as if the kids don't amount to anything.” 

“I am telling you we have got to stop 
pointing our fingers at these kids who have no 
future and reach our hands out to them.” 

Not that long ago, the language or values 
was spoken almost exclusively by conserva- 
tives. Not anymore. One of the sinking things 
Mr. Clinton has done is to give progressives 
and moderates permission to use the most 
potent words in our moral vocabulary. 

What a change. When Ronald Reagan spoke 
of welfare, he was talking of “welfare cheats.” 
Law and order were code wads for radsm. 

Gradually we are now finding a way to the 
center. Not drifting right to some presumed 
political center. Reaching down to a psycho- 
logical center — and finding n voice. 

— Ellen Goodman, in The Boston Globe. 


even aestranutty or social improvement —is - 
probably as frail today as it has been at any 
moment in America’s history. -On what, rfam, ’ 
can an activist president base his hopes for a 
reinvigorated government? 

In a speech in Chapd HOI last fall, the 
president experimented with a framework for 
ids programs reminiscent of the New Deal 
and the Great Society, the idea of security. 
The American people face a future of insecu- 
rity and instability, he said,- and it is up to 
government to make- them feel that they can 
weather the inevitable change^ that await 
them with some minimal 

His trade policies would contribute to ecu- . 
nomic security, his health care proposals to 
medical security, Us anti-crime mi natives to 
personal security. Government would n g um 
be the protector of its citizens. 

It was an bteDigaU speech, and in another 
time it might have generated real excitement. 
But amid the disenchantinent and cynicism of 
the 1990s, the theme sounded hollow. And the 
president, perhaps realizing that, made only 
oblique reference to it Tuesday night 
* He turned instead, with what seemed genu- 
ine emotion, to things that were staples of Mr. 
Reagan’s speeches. He spoke about social 
problems rooted in “tile loss of values, in the 
disappearance of work and the breakdown of 
ran- famili es and nur C ommunities." . 

Tie cited the role of “churches and other 


i nqy ciusu ujg .. , , ; . 

ilies and churches as evidence of the *nwe» 
• vance of government and the importance of 
-unleashing individuals from ns shackles, r 

■MnGmton has been trying, dowhf and 
tentati vely, to erifistthe same symbols oennw 
his own activist agenda. Amen cans, he said, 
have revealed the “better angels of our na- 
ture” in their responses to flood, earthquake, 
fire and storm. And they can do so as wed in 

. . — — not nv 


■ relying soteiy on iduzvuubu v* 

mid courage but by joining in an eff ort to ma ke 
government an ally of change and progress. 

The president was; in other words, nymgto 
do more Tuesday night, than boast of ms 

■ afyompikb mqfi ts and jump-start his health 
r*m p lan He did those things effectively, but 
be was oiw hying to reclaim from -the right a 
moral langnage that liberals have — in recent 
years, ai least — largely abdicated. 

He was continuing the effort he began with 
his speech an crime in Memphis last Novem- 

1 1. Fran ih* cmllviliM T! V 


barren, socially fragmented, world it has in- 
habited for a generation, and to link it to a 
'pop ular yearning for values and community. 

No recent president has been better at 
explaining policies. Mr. Clinton can talk in- 
temgentiy for hours about the details of legis- 
lation and programs. But on Tuesday night he 
seemed to recognize that a firm grasp of 


policy is not enough. Without a poster, as 
Theodore Roosevelt understood, there will be 
little interest in bis etchings. 


The writer is professor of 'American history a 


Columbia University. He contributed this com- -- 
merit to The New fork Tunes. 


Expect a Different World 
After Kim D Sung’s Bomb 


By Brian Beedham 



raT * 

-mis us 


ONDON — If North Korea is 


going to get the bomb, the rest of 
us had better start thinkin g about 
what this will do io our hopes for the 
21st century. 

This does not mean only what the 
consequences will be for South Ko- 
rea, and for America's military links 
with that country; or for Japan’s de- 
cision about nuclear weapons; or for 
a China that will suddenly find itself 
with a nudear cuckoo ih the next- 
door nest. The implications reach far 
beyond East Asia. They make it nec- 
essary to ask whether we are heading 
for an unmanageably mullinuclear 
world, a new form of chaos. 

It is not certain that North Korea is 
going to win its game of dare with the 
Clinton administration, but it is in- 
creasingly hard to be bopefuL Three 
weeks ago the State Department's 
Lynn Daws seemed to be saying that 
the North Koreans had at last agreed 


dragging The Clinton administration, 
half-admitting this, has decided to 
send Patriot missiles to South Korea. 

To an this the whistlers in the dark 
offer two would-be cheerful answers. 
Even if North Korea does get away 






-.*«! ■ vww 

NUCUH* 

gowgs? 


with it, they say, this will not necessar- 
ily mean that other countries will go 




ily mean that other countries wiD go 
nudear. Or, if that proves false, a 
worid of 15 or 20 or 30 nudear powers 
need not be all that more dangerous 
than out famili ar worid of half a dozen 
nuclear powers has been. 

Both arguments are almost certain- 
ly wishful thinking. 

A North Korean nuclear break- 
through will pretty dearly be the 
death of nonproliferation hopes, bo- 





cause we are only a year away from 
the Lime when the present Nudear 
Nonproliferation Treaty runs out 

Next year 150-odd countries have 
to decide whether to make a new 
promise not to go nudear. and to 
open their doors to international in- 
spectors who come to check that 
promise. If North Korea — asignato- 
ty of the present treaty and its check- 
ing arrangements — has just demon- 
strated that such promises can be 
safdy ignored, it is difficult to see 
anything serious happening next 
year. There will either be no new 
global treaty at all or a palpably 
valueless one. The anti-proliferation 
campaign will have collapsed. 

Tne countries that assembled in 
Geneva this Tuesday to talk about 
banning nudear tests will then have 
talked in vain. If the match is on for 
nuclear arms, the marchers will tram- 


to allow the resumption of regular 
inspections at their seven admitted nu- 
dear sites, and that it might now be 
possible to gel them to open up the 
two nudear waste dumps they had not 
confessed ta whose discovery started 
the whole crisis a couple of years ago. 

Alas, North Korea has nu« raided 
further difficulties about two of the 
seven “agreed” sites. No inspections 
have been arranged anywhere. The 
period of time during which the In- 
ternational Atomic Energy Agency 
has been blindfolded grows even 
longer. Yet another lot of inconclu- 
sive talks — is it the 15th, or the 50th? 
— has been going on this week It 
looks uncommonly as if North Korea 
is engaged in a classic piece of foot- 


their foreign policy purposes (the 
next generation of Saddam Husseins) 
will set about getting them. Their 
frightened neighbors (the next gener- 
ation of Kuwaits) will do the same. 

This is Hkdy to produce a vastly 
different nudear pattern from tire 


may then cease. We shall at that point 
be well into nudear double figures. 

Note two things about this posable 
list One is that it contains a. high 


proportion of rather wild govern- 
ments. The saving grace of the past 
half-century’s nudear stalemate was 
that those involved were on the whole 
fairly cautious people. The Soviet 
Union and the West both had a keen 
sense of self-preservation. China and 
the Soviet Union had their own leave- 
me-akne nudear standoff. The fingers 


one tire world has managed to cope 
with for the past 49 years. Nobody 
can foretell tire full list of new nudear 
powers, but some fairly confident 
guesses can be made. 

Iran wiH certainly want to follow 
North Korea. If Iran heads for a 
nuclear armory, somebody on the 
Arab side of the Gulf — perhaps 
Saudi Arabia, maybe a no longer con- 
trollable Iraq —win wish to balance 
the Arab-Iraman stales. The Arabs 
being so competitively fragmented a 
people, other Arab countries farther 
west (a fundamentalist Algeria? 
Egypt? Libya?) may well follow suit. 
The current holding bade in India 
and Pakistan, and in l-atin America, 


pie over pious details tike test bans. 
Men who want nudear weapons for 


; Can you say that of Kim II Sung's 
North Korea; of the mullahs’ Iran; of 
the angry warden of Idam who may 
before long be running Algeria and 
perhaps some other Arab countries; 
even, for that matter, of tomorrow’s 
India and Pakistan? - 
The other reason for feefing a shiv- 
er run down thc spinc ts that the new 
pattern of nudear power will not be 
tire relatively safe orre-against-mre 


The United States Has Not Caved In to North Korea 


W ASHINGTON — In his col- 
umn “North Korea Gets a U.S. 


Surrender” (IHT Opinion, Jan. 7), 
Charles Krauthammer distorted 
American policy so badly that the 
record must be set straight. President 
Bill Clinton has been steady and firm 
in his objectives: a nonnuclear Kore- 
an Peninsula and a strong interna- 
tional nonproliferation regime. 

The stakes in Korea are high. Nu- 
dear weapons there could destabilize 
aD of Northeast Asia and undermine 
the global nonproliferation regime. If 
the North launched military opera- 
tions, it would be defeated, but tire 
United States would be engaged 
alongside its South Korean allies in a 
major war that could leave destruc- 
tion through much of the pe nins ula. 
So there is good reason to give diplo- 
macy a responsible chance before 
turning to other alternatives. 

Let me first correct four miscon- 
ceptions contained in the article. 

• The writer’s views are based on 
the erroneous premise that the Unit- 
ed States has agreed to “one-time” 
inspection by the International Atom- 
ic Energy A^ncy to maintain conti- 
nuity of safeguards. The number and 
scope of inspections required is a mat- 
ter for the IAEA, not the United 
States, to decide. And Noth Korea 
knows that it most permit continuing, 
periodic inspections for the IAEA to 
be able to ratify that the continuity of 
safeguards has been maintained. 

• The writer mistakes an interim 
step for Final resolution of this prob- 
lem. The immediate task has been to 
ensure that no more fissile material is 
diverted. Maintaining IAEA safe- 
guards does that The United Stales 
will then press North Korea for in- 
spection of suspect sites and disman- 
tling of nuclear facilities. 

• The writer unjustifiably attacks 
the intqpty of the LAEA Its director, 
Hans Blix, has been beyond reproach 
in his handling of tins issue. The Unit- 
ed States had insisted that North Ko- 
rea deal directly with the agency so 
that the inspectors would be able to 
obtain the kind of access they need to 
maintain tire continuity of safeguards. 


By Lynn Davis 

The writer is U.S. undersecretary of stale 
for international security affairs. 


The IAEA’s integrity remains intact. 

• The writer tailed the suspension 
of the U.S.-Scuth Korean Team Spirit 
exercise for this year a “huge payoff” 
•few North Korea. He is wrong again. 
The United Stales and South Korea 
agreed that Team Spirit *94 should be 
suspended only if progress on the nu- 
clear issue reduces the threat to the 
allies. Even if Team Spirit ^ is not 
held, the United States plans to con- 
tinue its other mmor joint exercises in 
South Korea. As the president told the 


National Assembly in Seoul in July, 
the U.S. defense commitment to the 


the U.S. defense commitment to the 
Republic of Korea is unshakable. 

How wifi tbe United States seek to 
achieve its goals? 

The immediate task has been to 
ensure no farther diversion of pluto- 
nium. In June, UJS. officials told the 
Noth Koreans that there would be 
no more bilateral meetings unless 
they met certain conditions; no refu- 
eling or their nuclear reactor without 
IAEA inspectors present, and no 
breaks in the continuity of IAEA 
safeguards. Talks between the IAEA 
and North Korea in Vienna are gang 
on. and we urged rapid agreement on 
the LAEA inspections required to 


maintain continuity of safeguards at 
the seven sites in Yongbyon. 

It is essential that North Koreans 


It is essential that North Koreans 
comply fully with the Nuclear Non- 
proliferation Treaty, including the 
safeguards agreement thev signed. 
This indudes inspection of the two 
suspect nuclear waste sites that trig- 
gered Noth Korea’s withdrawal from 
the treaty in tire first place. 

During our first negotiating round, 
the North Koreans agreed to “sus- 
pend" their withdrawal from the non- 
proliferation treaty, but they are not 
now living up to all of the treaty’s 
provisions. After tire second round, 
the North agreed to begin consulta- 
tions with the IAEA rat “outstanding 
safeguards issues.” but agreement was 
not reached on the agency's request 


for a special inspection at tire suspect 
waste sites. The United States will 
continue to press the North to comply 
with all the treaty’s provisions, indud- 
ing access to tire waste sites. 

Further, North and South Korea 
must fully implement their Denucle- 
arization Declaration, which includes 
a ban on uranium enri chmen t and 
plutonium reprocessing on the penin- 
sula. The North has agreed to resume 
North-South talks that would include 
discussion of this agreement, but pro- 
gress has been slow. We will proceed 
with further U-S.-North Korean ne- 
gotiations only after North-South ex- 
changes and IAEA inspections. 

We also seek the decommissioning 
and dismantling of North Korea’s 
graphite-moderated nudear reactors 
and its reprocessing facility. The 
North would then be unable to use 
these facilities to produce the pluto- 
nium needed Tor weapons. The repro- 
cessing plant is prohibited by the 
North-South agreement, and North 
Korea has indicated its willingness to 
convert from graph! te-moderaied re- . 
actors to a less dangerous type of 
light reactors for its energy needs. 

North Korea must also address 
U.S. concerns about other matters, 
including its support for terrorism, 
violation of human rights, export of 
ballistic missies and hostile foreign 
policy. If it does, it should under- 
stand that h can change from being a 
rogue state to an accepted member of 
the international community. 

Mr. Krauthammer is right to say 
there is still far to go, but he is wrong 
in dairmng that the United States 
lacks resolve and a clear strategy, ftis 
pursuing a course that gives North 
Korea .a dear choice and tests its true 
intentions. America is prepared to 


international community has its. Km- 
its. America w31 not tolerate contin- 
ued stalling or repeated instances of 
bad faith.. If North Korea fails to 
comply with its international obliga- 
tions, the United States wQl have to 
take other steps, including seeking a 
range of international sanctions. Tne 
firm tfintomatic strategy that, tire 
United States has been trcrsningwili , 
hdp ensure that the international 
community wiH endorse such sanc- 
tions if they are needed. 

The United Stales has led the inter- 
national community to- a consensus • 
that gives North Kon» a dear choice 
between opening doors and increased 
international isolation. North Korea 
has no illusions about wfest it mast do 
to remove concerns about its nudear 
inten tions- There should be so .{Do-. 
sons that there is an easy fix to a 
comp lex and dangerous dispute. 

\7TteWashinponPosL 


The difference from the 19th cen- 
tury win be thatthesepowers are now 
nodear-anned That wiD make then- 
eerie dance enormously riskier than it 
was a century ago. In those days, if a 
country miscalculated, the penalty 
might be defeat in a amveutional 
wan It could now be a nudear knock- 
out The chances of miscalculation 
multiply as . the number of countries 
involved in the balanoe-of-power ma- 
neuvering grows. This is a far ay 
from the relatively ample two-sided 
nudear standoff of the Gold War. 

If would be wrong to say that a 
multinodear worki is bound to blow 
itsdf np. Man whets his ingenuity on 
Msmstmrtforsunriv^hemaymda 
way of bringing order even to such a 
mess. Bnt tbe odds against are daunt- 
ing. A multinodear worid win be a 
horribly dangerous place. U we can 
prevent it from happening, oar chil- 
dren will be very gratefuL 

International Herald Tribune. . 


TS OUB PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


189& Disorder in Japan 


SHANGHAI — The strange doings 
of the Japanese Parliament fairiy ri- 
val anything lately seen in Westmin- 
ster. The latest achievement of the 
Oriental imitators of oar own Jegisb- 
tors has been to expd the Presidait of 
the Tokyo Assembly, Mr. Hosfai 
Trail, amid a scene of unrestrained 
disorder. The reason for his sudden 
fafl into disfavor was that be was - 
suspected of befog in .secret confer- 
ence with die Government, and was 
too friendly with certain, large con- 
tractors to the army and navy. . 


face. We stand for mobiE 
Mr. Barnes also declared 


oflaboc." 

aithepri- 


Gmfereace? s ratification should be 
that unfair labor conditions in one 
country hnrihiie'tbe whole worid, and 
he invoked tire .WBscarian theory .of 
equality in economic treatment 


1944 : Mardi of Death 


1919: A Labor Dispute 


take steps to help bring North Korea 
into the family of nation* hut only as 
It meets VS. conditions. 

North Korea also knows that the 
patience of the United States and tire 


LONDON — The threatened immi- 
gration ban of the United States is 
not agreeable to English labor lead- 
ers. Mr. Gerage Barnes, MJP., de- 
clared yesterday (Jan. 27] that Great 
Britain would oppose such legisla- 
tion- “We-are pretty crowded On tins 
side of tire ocean," be said, ?wlnle you 
have only scratched the industrial snr- 


WASHINGTON — TFromoar New 
York edition:] The War and Navy 
Depar tmen ts made public last night 
Dan. 271 a hatrowing'cffidal^toiy.trf 
now the Japanese tortured, starved to 
death and sometimes beheaded or 
dot more than 6,000 American arid 
Fffipino.srfdiers who’ had beentaken 
prisoner on Bataan and Carregidorin 
.April .1942, and 'who were ten topris- 
an camps by “march of death” under 
a broffing sun without food or water. 
The first documaitcd accxxmlcf Japa- 
■ nese atrocities in the Ptafipriincs also 
revealed that" “American flags ' woe 
habhnaDyanddmgnedlyuscdasrag^ 
in the Japanese kitchens.” 


dca*' T 

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land we have had up to now. Ameri- 
ca, -Britain and France each had the 
bomb in order to hold off the Soviet 
Union. So did China. The Soviet 
Union's - nudear calculations were 
built- upon its confrontation with 
NATO. Itwasmotvery comphcated- 
It was therefore, for all the fears of 
tire West’s would-be nudear disarm- 
ers, not all that dangerous . — as 
events duly proved. 

- The new prospect is very different 
A worid of 15 or .20 or more nudear 
powers wiD be, on a vastly bigger 
scale, abalance-of-pcrwCT world Like 
that of 19th century Europe. 

Groups of four or five countries 
will maneuver for advantage against 
each other as France^ Germany, Brit- 
ain, Austria- Hungary and Russia ma- 
neuvensd a century or so ago. with 
eventually fatal consequences. Pow- 
ers A and B will try to eaHst Power C 
against Power D; Power D, fearing 
for its fife, will try to lore Power A 
away from this threatening coalition; 
and so on. There may still be a few 
otre-versus-one confrattations — In- 
cite and Pakistan perhaps — but they 
will be exceptions. 


Classified 


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INTERNATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JA NUARY 28, 1994 

OPINION 


Page 7 


And U.S. 



By William S afin * 


aboor tlw delcriofatksi ctf JRas-' 
san-Amcrican r datro n s. s - 
One is Strobe. Talbott, longtime 
tnena ana Oxford roocmnate of Bffl 
Clinton’s.- He stepped down from the' 
power and prestige of Time mnpa-wn» 
columnist to handle. President Oin- 


The sellout of Kremlin 
r^rmnenaicakmedStrobe 
Talbott cmdhis boss, BUI 

Clinton. But in Jfoscoic, a ■■ 
former CertifiedJGopd Guy, 


on a harder edge. 


ton's dealings with the nations of the 
former Soviet Union, and-' was recently 
named deputy secretary of 

Although he was widely blamed for 
being the impetus behind Mr. Clinton’s 
unfortunate choice for defense secretary 
in November, his friends charge ihatthe 
current finger-pointing is the fiandiwark. 
of David Gcrgen, who Talhottitcs nisim 
was himsdf melcadmc advocate of the 
withdrawn nominee. The Qinton inner 
aide is not a happy band of brothers. 

But the serious, urbane Talbott (to use 
Time's old, two-adjective style) has 
teamed mote than the art or white 
House infighting. To his credit, he has 
-exhibited a refreshing wflBnmcss to re* 
vroe a position. when hteshown to be 
mistaken, which we cm-hope may lead 
to a re-examination of his wtote accom- 
modations Weltanschauung. 

Little more than a month ago, Mr. 
Talbott reacted to Russian voter dissat- 
isf action with reformers’, “shock ihcra- 
py" by talking up less abode, more 
therapy." That was a terrible blunder; 
it encouraged Boris Ydtrifr to foBqw 
his go-slow instincts, undermining re- 


. . turn; In tough testimony to Congr ess^ he 

- warned that rid to Russia depended cin- 
. irform, and that Tefonn had to . cease 

first. It was aii epiphany. 

, Mcanfttete^ hall a world away, an- 
.. other high-level diplomat was undergo- 
ing his. own profound change. Short, 
boyish Andrei Kozyrev used to he a 
■ Certified Good Gnyi His April Fool’s 

- Day speech last year! alerted the work! 

‘ to the danger of militant Russian na* 

tipnalism. Unafraid to ad-fib in firig- 
. fish, he wowed -those who interviewed 
him then, with his good Sense and good 

* humor and support of a new Russian 
. re spec t for its neighbors. 

But in Moscow test month, a harder 
edge was evident: He had just wan Ins 

- election in Murmansk, a military 

by talking tough about the “near 

- abroad.” When I asked aboat the with- 
< drawal of .13j00Q Russian troop s remant- 
_ ing in Latvia, he switebed the subject to 

what he* caBeri duc ringnattai against 1 
-- 11,00 0 ittjred Russian soldiers and their 
. families hving there (many in confiscate 
' ed homes, infuriating native Latvians). 

, ,-That was the new, disturbing Ko- 
zyrev. Two weeks ago, he seemed to 

* carry that hard line to an extreme, in a 
spera telling Russian ^ pkwnais that, 
nire should not withdraw from those 



The Etiquette of Stepping Down 


T raditional form for letter 

of resignation from a public official 
to the president of the United States: 
Dear Mr. President, 

It is with great sadness and deep regret 
that I must inform you that for personal 
reasons I no longer find raysdf able to 
serve my country in the position that you 
did me the honor of conferring upon "me. 
Health and family matters forisd my 


By Jndith Martin 


MEANWHILE 


Only her torch ghneed in the darkness 
prior to the radiation experiments. 


carrying out these duties, but I will al- 
ways be proud and grateful that you saw 
fit to entrust me with the privilege of 
serving the nation and assisting with the 
noble efforts of your administration. 

Respectfully yours, etc. 

Revised Form: 

Dear Mr. Down-in-the-Polls, 

Let me tdl you what you can do with 
your stupid job, which I never wanted in 
the fiist place. You don’t deserve me. I 
look forward to getting rich in the private 
sector while you ruin the public one. 

Rejoicing that I'm ornta here, etc. 

Traditional form of acknowledgment 
of a letter of resignation from a public 
official by the U.S. president: 

Dear Mr. Appointee, 

Your departure from government is 
an incomparable loss for the country, as 


iiegidas that have been the sphere of 
- Russian interests for centuries. 4 ’ 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


As nervous Bahs went ballistic, the 
Talbott State .Dep ar tment spokesman 
promptly raid “we don’t accept” that 
old-style hegemony. 

That rebuke caused a Kozyrev flun- 
ky to bluster, about “mass media 
deliberate distortion cf the minis- 
ter's pronouncements,” and Mr. Ko- 
zyrev to lash out at Latvia for “massive 
aid crude violations of bnrnim rights ” 
of the weBrOff cdlanms — bat also to 
call in the U.S. ambassador to assure.' 
hxm-that troop withdrawal would take 
place this year. _ . 

Both Russians and ’ -Latvia ns . are 
waiting for Mf Taibbtt to suggest a 
com p romise of letting a few hundred 
Jtnssten troops rent tbe Strands early- 
wanriim .radar faepity for four years. 
When he does, I hope Latvia grabs the 
deal to get occupying troops out. Nor 
vnmld it hurt for Latvians to assure 
king-resident Rnssten-speakers of ulti- 
mate first-class cit 


White Man’s Burden 


Regarding A Judge Finds He Cant 
Shake the Burdat of Blackness ” (Jan. 8) 
by David Margolick: 

I was shocked at the inherent racism in 
the notion that “blackness,” rather than 
white racism, is a burden. People of cdcr 
have long had to snffar file p s trn n iring 
pity oFwhite people who do not realize 
that tiny are saying, however inadver- 
tently, how wonderful it would be if only 
evoyone were white. 

If the article, instead of dealing with 
white racism, (old of a woman’s treat- 
ment at the hands of men, would you 
have dared to usethe headline; “A Jimge 
Finds She Can’t Shake the Burden of 
Fe mininity ”? If it wae about anri-Sam- 
tisni, would we expect it to be headed, 
“A Judge Finds He Can’t Shake the 
Burden of Jewishness”? 


wage system for developing countries 
that is “undistorted” bv free trade 
unions and government-set minimum 
wages. What about the effect of corrupt 
officials and mil if ar y in timidati on? 

The wage Marcinah was struggling 
for, by the way, is 30 percent below the 
“mmhnum physical needs” for a single 
person in that region of Java, according 
to the In donesian man power ministry. 

INDERA NABABAN. 

Jakarta. 


words alone, and without being in pow- 
er, be single-handedly forced NATO to 
reverse its thinking on accepting new 
members. He is in a better position than 
ever to win the next elections. 

JIM PRICE. 

Trieste, Italv. 


Farmers, Not Peasants 


Protection for Israel 


That American poatienwas modified 
Moscow if ■ 

pnamre“toororefaim^mareai5peeL 


TERRY CARTER. 
Copenhagen. 

Death of an Activist 


Mr. Talbott- app arent ly 


bon^ & ratsm conuritnient to boiitin- 
ue reform^ He was- misled; refannexs 
were ^doable-crossed and ffce 'power 
shifted to dieted apparatchiks: - 
1 Just as. tbe mvaaon of Afghanistan 
awakened thftacconnnod^omst Jimmy 
Cuter to KremHrireaBln, f bi e j e Ho otof 
the refonuen awakened Afe Gfadoa 
and ^Mr. Talbott Latt week. 
seefotaiy-daagnate. made a 


Tha-NewYork Times. 


' Letters intended for jubBcation 
Jdmddbe addrased " Letters to the 
\ Editor" andcontan the writer's sxg- 
nastae^name and fuB address. Let- 
^'trt'sbaddSebri&tnidtniidjaato 
erSdng. We carnal benspansStde, for 
jkeretmef l oa o B d pd jnaaacrpts. 


■Regarding “In Rural Java, Death 
Comes to a Tighter and a Dreamer* 
(Opinion, Jan. J 3): 

. Goenawan Mohamad describes the 
brutal murder of Marszoah. a young 
Indonesian labor activist She and 15 
others were interrogated by military au- 
thorities and fired man their jobs mere- 
ly for demanding what was promised 
to them under Indonesian law: J1.G5 
per day in wages. 

Many business writers advocate a 


Now that we know that ibe Oslo 
peace agreement wdl not stop terror, the 
people of Israel fed a greater lack of 
security than ever. If the minimum con- 
ditions for protection against tenor can- 
not be guaranteed by Yasser Arafat and 
his Palestine Liberation Organization 
because they lack the strength and 
the commitment of their people, then we 
have thrown away our own security and 
land for nothing. Israel is in a worse 
position than ever. 

TOBY WELLJG. 

Jerusalem. 

With Words Alone 


It was distressing to read the word 
“peasants” in several of your recent arti- 
cles about the revolt In Mexico. In to- 
day’s weald, “farmers” is a far more fair 
and precise definition of those who work 
the sod, even if they are illiterate and 
pom and Mexican. 

RICHARD FREMANTLE 
New York. 


Very Good, Sir 


The North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion is deluding itself if it thinks that by 
refusing membership to Central Europe- 
an states it decreases Vladimir Zhirin- 
ovsky's chances in the next Russian elec- 
tions. NATO is playing straight into Mr. 
Zhirinovsky’s hands. Now Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky can truthfully claim that with 


Regarding “The Eternal Butler” [Fea- 
tures, Jan. 25) by William E Schmidt: 

Surety P.G. Wodehouse’s immortal 
Jeeves was a “gentleman's gentleman," a 
valet rather than a butler, although as 
his employer, Bertie Wooster, informs 
us, he could, when the occasion demand- 
ed, “buttle with the best of them.” 

Incidentally, the observation that 
“only the English as a race are capable 
of the necessary emotional restraint to 
be good servants” is an interesting one. 
It is difficult to know whether to see il 
as a thinly wiled insult or a somewhat 
left-handed compliment! 

JULIAN deNORMANVHJLE. 

Tring. England. 


wdl as a personal one for me. Your 
dis tinguished record of public service 
has earned you the gratitude of your 
fellow citizens, and the esteem of those 
of us who are most familiar with your 
great talents and dedication. Please ac- 
cept my wannest wishes for your good 
health, and give my kind regards to your 
lovely family. 

Sincerely yours, etc. 

Revised Form: 

Dear Mr. Thrak-Yau’re-IndispensaHe, 

Getting out of government is the first 
real public service you’ve ever per- 
formed. My only regret is that sending 
you home is a duty trick on your long- 
suffering wife. 

Wishing good riddance, etc 

In a society that professes to value 
candor, disdain euphemisms and despise 
hypocrisy, even tbe most formal conven- 
tions woe bound to change. In the last 
traditional exchange the nation may ever 
witness, President BiD Qinton and Secre- 
tary Les Asp in traded verbal “letters” 
thru followed the old form: the fired one 
professing his desire to resign and tbe 
finer professing his incalculable regret at 
this derision to which he mil nonetheless 
yield. But the new age dawned when 
retired A dmira l Bobby Ray Inman acted 
at the prompting of his comfort level 
{which is the rough equivalent of what 
used to be called a conscience) and inject- 
ed ins true feelings into his letter of with- 
drawal as a nominee for the position of 
secretary of defense. 

No one should have been surprised. 
This is, after all, an administration that 
opened with a retreat, where the presi- 
dent provided facilitators to encourage 
members of his cabinet to express then- 
innermost feelings. 

Mr. Inman ’s innermost feelings were 
that he was being picked on by bullies, 
that he had done quite enough for his 
country, that he was not all that desperate 
to embellish his resunub. (He expressed 
“ . . great appreciation ... for your 
understanding of what has not gone 
wdl in the national security arena in the 
first year of your presidency . . 

But can the people who are now declar- 
ing him paranoid honestly say that they 
have never harbored such sentiments? 
Why didn't everyone congratulate Mr. 
Inman for his frankness? And after he 
gotaO that out of his system, why did be 
still look so pinched? 

Is it posable that we really do value 
decorum above unrestrained self-expres- 
sion? And that not even tbe president 
would urge his staff to express all (heir 
feelings unreservedly if he did not assume 
that they would suD be bound by eti- 
quette's demands for respect and tact? 

The tradition of leaving high govern- 
ment service requires that face t* saved 
all around, and this cannot be achieved 
with complete openness. It is under- 
stood that tbe president will not be made 
to look as if be either hired a nitwit or 
created a scapegoat, and the departing 
official will be allowed to depan with his 


reputation and enough praise and pho- 
tographs to furnish a fine private office. 

For that reason, almost no one is ever 
fired. People go voluntarily (no matter 
how surprised they are to find ihetnsdves 
suddenly volunteering) and for reasons 
that have nothing to do with inconve- 
nience or incompetence. Appreciation 
and regret are expressed on both sides, 
and a respectable, if not necessarily plan- 
able, explanation is made public. 

John Mitchell reamed as director of 
President Richard Nixon's re-election 
committee, right after the Watergate 
burglars were caught to devote more 
attention to “the obligation which must 
come first: the happiness and welfare of 
my wife and daughter" — attention that 
Martha Mitchell was later to claim was 
not benign. President Lyndon Johnson’s 
press secretary, George Reedy, left to 
devote more attention to his hammertoe. 

Tbe convention allows room for cre- 
ativity. The truly creative can even get 
away with inserting into die formula 
small digs at the president, which the 
president is supposed to be above return- 
ing in land (because be is presidential; 
and besides, he got what be wanted). 

When President Jimmy Carter upend- 
ed his cabinet in 1979, all the exit letters 
contained the required politenesses. 

But two people made sly references to 
tbe president’s eagerness for their depar- 
ture — Treasury Secretary W. Michael 
Bhunenthal, slating appreciation for the 
president's “agreeing” that “the time has 
come for me to return to private life,” 
and Energy Secretary James Schlesing- 
er, acknowledging that “il would be far 
better for you to have in place one who is 
less scarred by earlier battles.” 

Their return letters all contained the 
president’s appreciation for their ser- 
vices. But to Transportation Secretary 
Brock Adams, who added a wish gener- 
ally associated with sarcasm, “I hope 
you find happiness in your job,” Presi- 
dent Jimmy Garter altered the phrase 
about appreciation for him to “appreci- 
ation for tbe accomplishments of our 
nation during your service as secretary 
of transportation.” 

Within tbe convention, the greatest 
insult permitted is curtness. When Don- 
ald Regan left as President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s chief of staff, he conveyed bitter- 
ness bv writing merely, “I hereby resign 
as Chief of Staff to the President of the 
United States.” 

But when the chairman of the Nation- 
al Endowment for the Arts. John Frohn- 
mayer, tried to do something similar in 
his requested letter of resignation to 
President George Bush, he was talked 
out of it by the secretary to the cabinet 

But he did conclude with the line: 
“You and your administration have ac- 
complished a great deal and I’m sure the 
best is yet to come.” 

President Bush sent him a curt reply, 
omitting the formula expression of re- 
gret at his departure. 

All that was missing was manners. 


Judith Martin writes the syndicated col- 
umn “Miss Manners.” She contributed 
this comment to The Washington Post. 


■ r ' _• -V. „’v 


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International Herald Tribune 
Friday , January 28, 1994 
Page 8 




HtMoeTsfefcy 


Modern snowshoes are made of light plastic and are far less cumbersome than the old wood-and-wicker variety. 


Return of the (Improved) Snowshoe 


By Robert L. Kroon 

International Herald Tribune 




S AINT-CERGUE, Switzerland — 
The long-scorned snowshoe is stag- 
ing a stunning comeback as the latest 
fad in winter sports, unlocking un- 
trodden slopes and virgin forests for those 
longing to escape from congested ski lifts 
and crowded pistes. 

Modem snowshoes are made of light plas- 
tic and are far less cumbersome than the old 
wood-and-wicker variety that have been in 
use for 4.000 years as man’s oldest tool for 
walking on, instead of through, deep snow. 

Some historians say that America's first 
immigrants shuffled their way from Asia 
across the Bering Strait to the New World on 
snowshoes. In more recent times the un- 
wieldy accoutrements were still used by res- 
cue teams and snowbound alpine farmers, 
but the occasional cross-country walkers 
were invariably derided as “penguins" by 
fast-track skiers and snowboarders. 

No longer. In this Jura resort near Gene- 
va, an enterprising Frenchman, Jean-Pi erre 
Braude, has opened Europe's first snowshoe 
club and the response has been overwhelm- 
ing. Modem shoes, which look like oversized 


Ping-Pong paddles, are fitted with small 
hooks that enable the walker to climb snow- 


hooks that enable the walker to climb snow- 
covered hills “like a fly on a window pane," 
as Braude puts it. 

A 46-year-old, wiry Frenchman from the 
Cdte d’Azur who describes himself as an 
erstwhile “alpinist and reasonably good ski- 
er," Braude is not surprised by the instant 
popularity of this new form of cross-country 
locomotion. 

“It’s self-explanatory,” he said, pointing 



' 4* 1'f ' 

k? • V 'M 


WC; : ' m 

. M- 


HdUn Tabkj 


Jean-Pierre Beaude (right) has opened Europe’s first snowshoe club. 


at the white expanse of the Jura range, a 
Dine-covered, medium-high (up to about 


pine-covered, medium-high (up to about 
1,500 meters, or 5,000 feet) mountain chain 
that runs the length of the French-Swiss 
border. “Snowshoe- walking is a healthy ex- 
ercise for all ages, easy to learn and cheap. 
With the new, lightweight raquettes de neige 
you can roam through territory where even 
cross-country skiers cannot go. No crowds, 
no noise, no' backups at expensive ski lifts. 


The only risk is getting lost and that’s why 
we usually go in groups.” 


Beaude contends that anyone who is able 
to walk can master snowshoe walking as 
welL “In ranaHa and the Scandinavian 
countries they have been doing it for ages, 
but it’s the new equipment that makes it so 
much easier.” 

Well, up to a point. Good physical condi- 
tion is mandatory for longer treks, and begin- 
ners trying their first steps an. the big plastic 
soles tend to waddle about fike bowlegged 
babies. Standard ski poles are recommended 
as stabilizers, especially for newcomers. 

Beaude says ne was surprised by the re- 
sponse from people of all age groups, includ- 
ing adolescent “ski bombers" and school 
classes of 1 1 -year-olds. Some groups go on 


three-day treks, with dogsleds supplying 
night bivouacs. Armed with binoculars, they 
follow the tracks of foxes and an occasional 
lynx and discover the pristine beauty of the 
original Jurassic part 


A second snowshoe cento 1 has opened 
centlv at Nendaz, in the canton of Valais 


recently at Nendaz, in the canton rtf Valais 
and Beaude predicts the new winter sport 
will soon match cross-country skiing in pop- 
ularity. 

The recession-ridden ski industry has been 
quick rat the uptake and snowshoes have 
already found their niche among skis and 
other winter sports gear in Geneva supermar- 
kets, selling for $65 for basic models to $140 
for the deluxe variety with snap-on bindings. 


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In Hanoi, Shades of a French Past 


By Sherry Buchanan 


H ANOI — As I was browsing 
through tbs paperbacks of the 
main bookstall in the cento of 
Hanoi, opposite one of the dtys 
tranmtji lakes, I asked the stand owner 
whether she had any books by Duong Thu 
Huong or Pham Thi Hoai, two Vietnamese 
writers who have a following in the West 
thanks to tr ansla tions of their books mtO 
En glish and French. After a good 20 min- 
utes, she came back with a dusty secondhand 
paperback, held together by brown cello- 
phane tape: a novel by Duong Thu Huong. 

She wasted the equivalent of $4. a small 
fortune in Vietnamese dong, because it was 
out of prim and the author was not being 
published anymore. And what about P ham 
Thi Hoai? I asked. Never beard of her. I 
spelled her name out. She shook her head. 
At that moment, Kim, a young schoolteach- 
er, tapped me on the shoulder. In & soft 
voice, she said that I wouldn't find any of 
P ham Thi Horn’s bodes in Vietnam as the 
government didn’t allow them to be pub- 
lished there, that Pham Thi Hoai had been in 
jail and that now there were a lot of police- 


deal than as testimony to the strength of 
French culture in the former colony. But the 
coffee is Vietnamese with a sweetish v anilla 
taste; imported blends are- still mnrh too 
expensive. 

TEveryone tdls me it’s fike Paris,” says 
Nguyen Kim Ngpn, who runs the Ait Caftin 
the rad quarter, with wooden and glass doors 
opening onto the pavement fike so- many 
French bistros.. *Tm resisting die karaoke 
wave. I don’t like it." She has never been to 
P aris and she studied English at university,, 
today’s language of preference, but she does, 
have three dogs. The caffe boasts: “Id on serf 


The dreamy and time- 
worn elegance of this old 
colonial town is beguiling. 


men around her house. She said anybody 
who published her books would go to jau 


who published her books would go to jau 
too. 

The incident suddenly reminded me of the 


harsh reality of politii 
dreamy and time-worn elegance of this old 
French colonial town had until then be- 
guiled me, as it does most visitors, with its 
shaded paries, its wide, tree-lined avenues, its 
magnificent ocher and white colonial man- 
sions, its old quarto, its n um erous art shops 
with would-be Matisses, Mir6s and Duffys 
witness to the influence of the Ecok des 
Beaux Arts d’lndochine (College of Fine 
Arts of Indochina), which the French estab- 
lished in Hanoi in 1925. The old speak the 
polished French they learned in school in the 
’30s. S mall boys looking for a dong or a 
bonbon accost you with a line straight out of 
a Victor Hugo novel: “Je sids sons formtUT 
— I have no family. 

French-style coffee shops have recently 
opened up, more to cater to the French 
businessmen rushing to Hanoi to make a 


It meWeur cafe de la region” — We serve the 
best coffee in the region. A short menu 
offers: pain, beurre. fromage, jambon. 

In another street <rf the old quarter, Hoang 
Nam serves escargots, cutises de grawuiUes 
(frog legs) and gives a literal rendition of 
canard d Fomnge, aduckstewm ascooped- 
out orange ped. 

At St. Joseph’s Cathedral, a Severn neo- 
Gothic structure, gray-haired Vietnamese' 
women in almost identical white long- 
sleeved shirts, blade pants and black velvet 
headbands are singing vespers in a. peculiar, 
mix of Gregorian and Buddhist chants; the 
women are on one side, the men on. the other. 
At the entrance, the time far sendees are 
posted in French: Sunday Mass at 4:30 and 
6:30 A. M.; en semtdne at 5:30 A. M,. . . . 

The National library at 31 Traniieng 
Street from which the young Pham TH Boat 
used to get her books, stands, soene behind a 
wall in a shaded park. It is one of the many 
imposing Frrach colonial biriMihgs in Hanoi 
th«t t surprisingly, were largely muranWl \yy 
American bombs. In the dark wooden li- 
brary drawers, Andrfe Mainras and Francois 
Mauri ac share reference drawer 62 with 
Karl Marx. 

Pham TM Hoai writes in “Lamessagfcrede 
cristal” (Editions des Femmes, J^ris,. 1991) 


discovery. Sie was lucky. Her fathercodect- 
ed books. 

' - But, as she. points out, rahera destroyed 
than as the dangerous symbol of decactent 1 
ca pitalism. Today, beneath its Eastern Galr , 
be rWm, die apparent banning of Pham i tu 
Hoax’* novels is a reminder that Hama _is also 
the city of Lenin Square, of theHo On NEnh : 
Memorial and of the pte^perestrraka departr 
meat store with dusty wooden planks ami 
wooden cabinets displaying a gas mask, 
nest to the green army jpith helmets once 

worn by NcErth Vietnam’s army now woru by 

cydo drivers. 

- Thepety cadres stin haunt the aty. Al- 
most everyone has a stray to tefl about de- 
nrmriHtinTvi and harassment. 

A university student, who preferred not to. 
be named, said: “Vietnam us ed to be a very 
bad place. Because I was studying En g l i sh , 
thepoliceused to come andlook through my 
books and papers and say, ‘Why are you 
studying EnghshT’ But that's Vietnam; first 
the French, then the Americans in the South, 
th«i the R i?py{*ns- Now maybe it’s better.” 


Sherry Buchanan is a journalist based in 
Asia. 


■ A London art gallery is selling 2,700 
iro3s of toilet paper, an untitled weak by 


£10,000 ^bout $15,000). Agence Franc 
Presse tdls us that the artwrak, which 
rises 43 meters or about 15 feet, was 

sponsored by a maker of paper 
tissues, which generously supplied the 
roils. Gallery owns Bernard Jacobson 
said that David Bowie, among others, ' 
may be interested Ground Control to 
Major Bowk, can you read us? ' 


/// MOFIf UIH 


Trota Couieurs: Btanc 

Directed by Krzysztof Kies- 
lowski. France. 

The second port of Krzysztof 
Kieslowski’s trilogy, built 
around the theme of equality, 
begins in a Paris law court and 
ends in front of a Warsaw pris- 
on. Dominique (Julie Ddpy) is 
divorcing Karol (Zbigniew Za- 
machowski), charg in g that he 
did not consummate the mar- 
riage. Karol’s French is so inad- 
equate, be needs an interpreter, 
he is not equal to anything. Fu- 
rious at his inadequacies. Dom- 
inique sets fire to ha hair-dress- 
ing salon, denouncing him as 
the culprit. On the run, penni- 
less Karol resorts to sending 
himself back home in a valise. 
He scrambles out and to the top 
of Warsaw’s black market sod- 
eiy; once prosperous andpow- 
eiful, he takes revenge. Zama- 
chowslri is appealing as Karol 
the loser who takes all and 
Delpy looks cold and conten- 
tious enough as Dominique, but 
the movie veers between the 
sordid and the burlesque, strik- 
ing a note of grim north. It’s 
loaded with references — in- 
ducting flashes from previous 
Kieslowski films — like a joke 
that entertains family members, 
but sits heavy with the compa- 
ny. (Joan Dupont, IHT). 


against Gere’s receptive — and 
somewhat pudgy — loins. More 
flashbacks reveal that he’s be- 
came involved with the saucy 
nwpwnA writer after the spark 
went out cf his maniage to Sally 


(Stone), the mother of their per- 
fect 13-year-old, Median (Jenni- 


Irrtorsectlon 

Directed by Mark RydelL 
U.S. 

Richard Gere devotes his vast 
in teUect to a pressing issue of the 
day in his new film ‘'Intersec- 
tion": Should he as an incredibly 
wealthy' architect go bad; to his 
wife, Sharon Stone, a stay with 


feet 13-year-old, Meghan (Jenni- 
fer Morrison). With help Grom 
ha wealthy and supportive fam- 
ily, they had founded a fabulous- 
ly successful design firm. East- 
man A Eastman. It’s tough an 
him, working with Sally one 
miniifi* Mwi nibbing against Oli- 
via the next- Martin Landau," 
who plays a dose family friend 
and coOeague, advises him to get 
his act together. He gets all mis- 
ty-eyed. thinking about bow he 
and the missus kept putting off 
that big trip to Europe. And, 
wefl, yon know. While it’s obvi- 
ous that Sally ought to be the 
winner in terms of tact, beauty, 
taste and business acumen, she’s 
not a fighter (ike Olivia. Then 
again maybe Ae is just ack of 
Vincent, a tiresome shflly-&hal- 
tier. Olivia, a tad desperate for a 
noted Northwestern feminist, 
acts drunk and confronts the 
Eastmans at the gala opening of 
a mmenm designed by their 
firm. Sally is kind to ha rival 
because women are invariably 
noble in this situation, as we au 
know. But Vincent is funoas 
with Olivia. After dropping ha 
off, be drives off into the ran ry 
night for his meeting with desti- 
ny. Whom wiD he choose? Wdl, 
Lord knows, we don't want to 
moil it far you if far some inex- 
plicable reason you care to see 
this completely mane and incon- 
sequential tale 

(Rita Kempley, WP) 


smd 


mm 



his mistress, Lolita Davidbvidi? 
It’s a question that ranks up 
there on the suspensc-o-meter 
with “Paper or plastic?” It all 
begins pleasantly enough as Vin- 
cent Eastman (Gere) appears to 
drive his sports car ova a diff 
and his inan e life flashes back 
before his eyes. It seems that he 
was already at a crossroads in his 
life when he swerved to miss that 
vanload of hippies, which dis- 
solves into the bedroom of his 
lover, Olivia (Davidovich). The 
nubile redhead arches greedily 


Sakura 

Directed by Seijiro Yoyama. 
Japan. 

Already — even before it opens 
— given gtowing testimonials 
from educational groups across 
the archipelago, this fiWn is t>n» 

aneselmxsS- 6 the rato^nem 
that inculcates rivic virtues. In 
this one the sensitive bus con- 
ductor neglects health, wife ami 
family in order to realize his 
dream of planting a. row of eba- 


Sharon Stone and Richard Gere in - “Intersection”; 
Zbigniew Zamachowsfa in “Trois Couleurs: Blanc.” 


ry trees, sakura, across Japan. 
During (he interminable' course 
of tins picture, we watch him 
pot, plant and pant as cancer 
tabs to tbH This degree of dan- 
gerous dedication we are invited 
to find, as nothing less than 
admirable and are likewise re- 
quired to view all the sobbing 


and carrying on as somehow sa- 
Intory. Though the Whn Hats a 
director, h was actually nude by 
a committee (every last member 
listed in the credits) and the film 

ctosemenfly suffers the fate of 
an such projects: By satisfying 
everyone one satisfies nobo dy. 

(Donald Richie, IHT} 


(min mu § 


ACROSS 


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puzzle's theme) 

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14 'Whippersnap- 
par‘ ol tarns 
u Asian princess 
is Have too ime 
it Landing sue 
ia Poet's 
inspiration 
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W.W. II 


H Clinch 
*1 Jimmy Carter's 
birthday: Abhr. 

Mlncenae 
23 Scuttled 
2S Second -row 
occupant 

27 Warm-up 
2a Slips 

29 Compass point 

30 ‘Enough !" 

32 Arrange, as the 

hair 


34 Nuzzled 
39 Bird groups 
as Conical candy 
42 Circus prop 
44 Asian honorific 
47 Dig out 
49 Kind of doctor 
so Lampoon 
32 Part of 25-Down 
S3 Stadium section 
94 15th-century 
date 


* Flacks for 
washed dishes. 

♦ Glance 

b Decided fy not 
marshy 
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■C New York Times FtSted by WUlShoriz. 


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96 Sport with traps 


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2 ‘Unforgettable’ 
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12 Grants, perhaps 
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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, January 28, 1994 
Page 9 


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Vienna Intrigue: Who Has Real Sacher Torte? 




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* By Mark Kurlansky. 

V IENNA — Now that Vienna has 
lost its role as the neutral dty be- 
tween the West and the Soviet 
bkc, there may not be many spy 
thrillers set in this formal old-fashioned 
Stone-paved dry. One of the few secrets left 
that anybody sail wants to fight About is the 
Sacher torte. 

In this capital of a great cake tradition 
the undisputed grande dame of Vienna cof- 
fee and pastry houses remains Demel’s in 
the center o i the old city. In its wood- 
paneled, mirrored, chanddiered rooms, 
some of the world’s best desserts are served. 
Dane! traces its origin to 1786 and claim s 
to have 250 cookie recipes and 35 cake and 
pastry recipes secured m a vault 
Whether anyone is really trying to steal 
these recipes or not, keeping them secret is 
part of the legend. The staff consists of 103 
employees, many highly specialized in such 
fields as pastry with yeast, chocolate work 
or meringues. Owned for two decades by a 
Swiss company, the house was recently sold 
to a Goman one. 

While the company literature claims that 
the waitresses st3] speak a special Demd V 
created 19th-century grammatical form of 
German, it is sometimes difficult to get them 
to spetik. German at all since they are serving 
American and Japanese tourists modi of the 


time. When they do speak German it is 
usually a rather stark contemporary usage. 
They are busy. 

But ibeir pastry remains uu equaled, 
marked by the willingn ess to a clear 
statement with each dessert, sometimes go- 
ing sweet, sometimes dry, sometimes a harsh 
belt of alcohol, sometimes mild and delicate, 
sometimes heavy, sometimes light. 

Comparisons with other houses are get- 
ting easier because the repertoire has gotten 
standardized. AH ihe Konditereien in Vien- 
na offer apple strudel, the rum-soaked, fruit- 
filled Punischiorte, the caramel-glazed, cboc- 
Olaie-cream Dobostorte, the chocolate-and- 
meringue Stefanietorte. Each tried for its 
specialties, and by now, everything that has 
been deemed worthy has been copied by 
everyone else. 

Most of this pilfering of ideas has been 
accepted in silence. 

1 But the Sacher torte being not only Vien- 
na’s most famous cake, but one of its sim- 
plest, is a more serious issue: It originated a: 
the Hold Sacher. Eduard Sacher started the 
hold in 1876 and served supposedly the 
same chocolate cake his father, Franz, had 
invented as a 16-year-old apprentice half a 
century earlier. 

But after the collapse of the empire, when 
aristocrats had lost their fortunes, the hold 
went bankrupt and the Sacbers’ son sold the 
Sacher torte or — more importantly — the 
rights, to his friend DemeL 


Bui new management saved the Hotel 
Sacher and soon there were two different 
versions, both called “original Sacher torte." 
A Sacher tone is a plain, fairly light choco- 
late cake with apricot jam and chocolate 
glaze on top. At some point after World War 
I the Sacbers decided the cake was too dry 
and began splitting it in the center and filling 
with additional apricot jam. 

The fact that roth versions claimed to be 
the “original Sacher torte" led to years of 
litigation interrupted only by the Nazis. In 
1938 an Austrian court ruled that even 
though DerusTs single-slab torte may be the 
original recipe, only Sacher has the legal 
right to use tiie word “original.* 

S O Sacher serves a two-layer cake 
with a chocolate circle in the icing 
asserting it is “the original” and De- 
md serves a single-layer cake with a 
chocolate triangle in the icing that grudging- 
ly says, “Eduard Sacher torte eizeugnis 
[product] Ch- Demel’s Sdhne." Both package 
their Sacber torten for worldwide sales. 

Meanwhile all of Vienna and half the 
Western world is making Sacher torten with 
varying degrees of success. Some do not even 
lode lie a Sacher tone: No one wants to 
fight about most of these imitations. After 
all any good baker should be able to make a 
good chocolate-covered chocolate cake. 

“The recipe for the Sacher torte is not a 
secret," said Robert Palfrader, Sadler's res- 


taurant director. “We won’t give a recipe but 
it’s not a secret But it’s a secret that it’s not a 
secret Don’t tell anyone I said it’s not a 
secret." 

The only thing Sacher wants to fight about 
is tiie term “original.” 

“If you have it somewhere else and it’s 
better, it’s not original.” cautioned Pal- 
frader. 

They are very serious about this. Someone 
on the Bahnhofstrasse in Zurich started call- 
ing their Sacher tone “original" and it took 
one week for word to gel to Vienna. Tourists 
went to Sacher’s and said, “But I just had an 
original Sacher torte in Zurich.” Sacher al- 
ways tracks down these rumors, They took 
the Swiss to court and won. They caught a 
baker in Japan saying “original” but the 
Japanese settled out of court. 

Palfrader said if there is a secret to the 
1,000 to 3,000 Sacher torten they crank out 
each day, it is fresh eggs from 'farmers, no 
chemicals, a top-quality chocolate made ex- 
clusively for the hotel by the Viennese firm 
Manner (famous for little chocolate pastry 
slices served all over Vienna under the name 
Manne rschni tzen) . 

At last the secret is out. Cakes and pastiy, 
like all other cooking are as good as what you 
put into them. 

Mark Kurlansky is a journalist based in 
Paris. 



AUSTRALIA 

Sydney 

Opera House, tel: (2) 250-7777. 
Mascagni's vCavaUeria Rustfcana,” 
with Claire Prfmroae/Marta Pbtffc/na, 
Heather Begg, Kerry Elizabeth 
Brown, and Leoncavallo’s “Pag- 
fiacca." with Amanda Thane/Otaa 
Savina, Kenneth Coffins, Undsay 
Gaffney. Feb. 7, 10, 14, 19 and 22. 

AUSTRIA ~ 

Vienna 

Jddhsches Museum, tel: 535-04-31. ' 
dosed Saturdays. TWs new museum 
focuses on the relationship over the 
centuries between Jews and their , 
surroundings in Austria and Europe. 
To Feb. 13: "The Frautfans.*' Photo- 
graphs of the International Confer- - 
ence of Psychoanalysis held in Lu- 
cerne in 1934. 

Kunstforum der Bank Austria, tel: 
(2221 531-24, open daily. To Feb. 
20: Barack hi NeapoL" Paintings 
and sketches of the Neapolitan 
school of Baroque in the 17th and. 
18th centuries, tncludingthe period 
between 1707 and 1734 during 
which the Austrian Habstmrgs 
reigned as viceroys in Naples. : 

BELGIUM ••T.-:-;- 
Brussels 

La Moorata^lBl; .^2} .2&42-H. 
Jonathan Harvey's 'Inquest of 
Love.’’ A 1992 opera, directed by 
Dariq fiMjSftiay, conducted by Lionel $ 
Friend worBaity Banka.’Peter Cote-?' 
mw>^VdQWaodUixteMcljBod.jE^ ^ 
28, 30. ftb. 1,3 md 5. - 
Muste dTArt Ancten. tot. (2) 506-,.: 
32-11, ddeed MwSiys. Conttnu- 
ing/To Feb. Z7.‘ "Las XXet LaUbre-, 
Esthetiqu* Cent Ans Apres." Fee- 
tures the works exhWted under the 
aegis of Ihe two audacious Belgian 

associations between .1884 and 
191*. metodes works by Seurat,.. 
Bonnard, Ensor, van de VWde and 
Khnopff. wrong others. 

Muetea Royaux d’Artetd’Histoim 
tef: (2) 741-7211. dosed Mondays. 
To April 17 : “Minlaniros Modules de . 
/ , lnda’ , AfldamrosfromtheNewDel- 
m museum, depicting Me at the court 
of the Mogul emperors, harem 
scenes, andsdahasfromeplcpoerns ; 
such as “Ramayasna.^'. " ' • /. 

BfUTAIM 

Ca mbridge 

The Rtzwfiflam Museum, tat (223) 
332-900, doeed Mondays. To April 
10: "Drawings by Sculptor*” Focus- 
es on the roted drawing In the sar- 
tor's ait from the Ifih to 
centuries. Indudes drawings and 
scufptures by Rubens. Matisse and 
Hepvwrth. among others. - 


LIVE FROM THE BAT- 
TIJEfTELDs FromVietnam 
to Baghdad* 35 Years in die 
World’s Wm Zones . : 

By Peter Arnett IUustratttL 463 
pages. $23. Simon & Schuster. 

Reviewed by 
Herbert Mitgang 

T HIS is fame: .White Peter Ar- 
nett was broadcasting from 


London 

Barbican Centre, tek (71> 638-- 
4141, open dally- To March 6: "An- 
thony Whtahaw on Memory and.Re- 
llection: Paintings Since 1986." 80 
palrrtfrjgs explore experiences in na- 
ture and references to the work of 
Velasquez, Brueghel and Picasso. 
British Museum, tel: (71) 323-6525, 
open daily. To April 17: "Umalayan 
and Japanese Art from the Sctmitt- 
Meade Collection." The. Tibetan end 
Nepalese material contains a wide 
range of fine religious images, includ- 
ing the Budctra and bodhteattvas, mi- 
nor deities, lamas and hetexfcal rell- 

gtous figures. The - tee . ceremony 
pottery dates Irani the I5tfi to the 
20th centuries. 

National GaBery, tefl: (71) 839- 
3526, open- daiw. To April 10: 
"Claiide: the Poetic Landscape." 25 
pain&Tgs and 50 drawings by Claude 
Lorrain, :tha 17th-century French, 
pafciter.' whose lanttecapes pnawds" 


,.-.V 

f'-i- -4 

>• "StF: ■ ? 


Albers’s “Owl,” Dublin. 


ankSBBttzed setting for Incidents from 
myth, history and the Bible. 
Serpentine GaBery, teb (71) 402- 
6075, open daSy. To Feb. 27: "Wafl 
to Wafl.” From cave painting to graW- 
tl. by way of frescos, the practice of 
wan drawing has along history. The 
artists on 'show include Lxrthar Baun- 
garten, Michael CraJg-Martin, Jessi- 
ca Diamond. Barbara Kruger and 
Lawrence Weiner. 

CAMAPA 

Toronto 

Musbe des Beaux-Arts de l’On- 
taria teb (416) 977-0414. doeed 
Mondays and Tuesdays. To Mardi 6: 
"Seven Florentine Heads: 15th-Cen- 


tury Drawings from the Collection of 
Her Majesty the Queer." Sitverpoint 
drawings by leading draftsmen oi the 
Renaissance inducting Fra Angelico, 
Leonardo da Vinci. Domenico Qhkr- 
tandaio and Rflppo IJppi- 

CgRCHREPUPUC " 

Prague 

Castle Riding School, tel: (2) 33- 
37-32-32. To March 27: "Recent and 
Contemporary Czech Painting From 
the Stele Galleries' Collections." Fo- 
cuses on Czech painting from the 
1 960s to the present day. 

DENMARK " 

HunrWmefc 

Louisiana Museum of Modem Art 
tel: (42) 19-07-19, open dally. Con- 
tinuing /To March 6: "Claude Monet 
Wbrks from 1880 to 1926." Features 
late figurative paintings of the garden 
aid Japanese bridge cd Gfvemy. as 
wen as Japanese woodcuts which 
were an. important source of inspira- 
tion, lor Monet.. • 

FRANCE 

Na n tes 

Mu96e des Beaux-Arts de Nantes, 
tel: 40-41-65-65, dosed Tuesdays. 
To April 25: "Tony Cram: Desains." 
Receni drawings by lhaBritish sculp- 
tor. The exhibition will travel to Saar- 
bracken, Germany and a. Gan, Swit- 
zerland 

Pwter 

Jeu de Paume, tel:' 42-6069-69, 
closed Mondays. To March 13: 
■ ‘James Bishop." A retrdspeefive of 
the works of the American-bom ab- 
stract painter. Inducting 30 paintings 
on canvas and 62 otis on paper, 
spanning the years 1957 to 1987. 
The exhibition wffl travel id Monster, 
Germany. 

Muste d*ArtModeme data Vine de 
Paris, tef: 47-23-61-27, closed Mon- 
days. To March 6: "Autour d’un 
Chef-d’oeuvre de Matisse." Three 
verstora of Matisse's painting "La 
Danse" are exhibited together Tor the 
first time. Also on cSsplay are 40 
sketches and studies. 

Muste des Arts Dteoratifs, tel: 42- 
60-32-14, closed Tuesdays. To April 
30: "La Faience de Dam." 200 tin- 
glazed earthenware pieces manufac- 
tured In the Dutch city of Delft hi the 
18th century, includes plates and 
(fishes, vases and decorative otyects. 
Muste du Louvre, tel: 40-20-50-50, 



Helen Levitt photograph at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. 


source of inspiration. Features 250 
pieces, Including paintings, furniture, 
sculpture and architectural projects 
showing the fascination of ancient 


SUSS 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


War, delivering tl* new sjam the 
enemy capital that was beard and 
seen iomd the^Ofhi, fe-krag 
from a Vatican imtejh# the 
Pose wanted to meet mm. . 

And tins is fame oft (Hftreni 
son" "I tuned m. to iho BBC st 
daybreak, and wm!' WKtelfaw 
spokesman Martin Ftamset call 

" bk powrafapese of a o«» « 
war reoartage, Amett pwrides me. 
unspoken details beMad Ms .oontro- 
vtssial broadcasB. 
veys what -a tiongpewal 




• Ricfrard Reeres, author and 
syndicated cohnnmst, is reading 
.Tfc.IWjt Guide to the Oregon 
Trail? pubEsbcdby the U. S. gw- 
1 ermnent* s Works Progress Admnr 
istradon during - the Defnessum, 
“I’m dcaMafiatonretradngthe 
0^tmTrafl,soJ^ncatdringupm 
.the weak they (fid in the 1930s. It s 
giving me a pknire ' of what it 
locked fike thaj." 

. (Kenneth N. Colder, IHT) 


rlt among andeven. modest individr - 
ml, who was determined to be 
where the was and to bring 
OTLonly the truth of what he saw. 

After Viettain, Hying to report 
(he thah became a esatrity of war; 
-in later U.S. military actions — ■ 
-Grenada, Panam dK Golf —^evtejr 
effort was made to kBep.thcU.S. 
prssaway from the battlefid d . In- 
evit^-Arpeifsproteig ewerage 
gpt Uni into trouble with.lhe 
riteriries and certain other jouriiat 
Blsi from: American generals, in 
Ytauain, to haMdrii oohmmists, to 
KGB stmogfodt in Moscow, to 



itUUWU 

emotions of a great 
- The ride ot^it toj ^ 

1 ( 0 fn BMWMfl . tn 


teteviskm screens ’ “JS 


■ There «as new any c^^: 
meat from to* 

Ameriis tun aliyc to; 

And what a ang<dfrswffy n ^ 
What emerges ' is a portrait of a 


3t’s a dose. caH bw Arnett 
. doesn’t consider bumdf a war lov- 
er. Here’s how he explains himself 
in. thefeSt sentence of his book: ,"1 
have a ride never to dp anydang 
dangaws for fuaT* 

2t would be a mistake for die 
restder-to tmn inmiefiatdy to the 
exciting war .strafes from Vietnam, 
which Arnett covered for The As- 
sociated Piess, and then to his fant 

the BattlJfefd? 
tnnisom to be a fasdnating autobi- 
ography as well, the stray of a 
young man growing up . in New 
7 ^iiimd, a descendant of English 
pjoaeai who- mfenaiaraied- .with 
Marais. He says that because of Hs 


Theyoung Peter Arnett, strongly 
a^ported by his Anglican parmts, 


’ ■ By Alan Truscott 

■ r T 1 HE fiagranied deal is from the 
J. Reisinger Board-a-match 
Team Chaxcqxonshq) at the Fall 
Natkamls in Seattle in November. 
The normal contract was three ao- 
trmnp, and a chib was led to the 
ace. Whan die suit was returned. 
South finessed the tea, lost to the 
queen, and won the third round 
with the king. 

There was & chance that Bast 
Ixid the heart qoeen, so otie declar- 
er crossed to the spade king and led 
a small heart. East put up me queen 
and led the diamond four, putting 
'South' to the. test Finessing would 
Jove been a wild gamble, so he put 
up ihe ace and hoped to score four, 
heart tricks for a total of nine, the 
play of the Mart jack revealed' the 
sad truth in that suit, and South 
continued by cashing the made 
queen,, the spade ace and the heart 
ace to reach Uris ending: 


Egypt lor Western artists. Tho exn na- 
tion will travel to Ottawa and Vienna. 

GERMANY ~~ 

Berlin 

Staateoper Unter den Linden, tel: 
(30) 203-544-94. Gluck's "Al- 
ceste." Directed by Achim Freyer, 
conducted bv Thomas Hengelbrock, 
with Vinson Cole, Anna Catarina An- 
tonacd. Philippe RouiUon. Jan. 28. 
31, Feb. 9 and 19. 

Hamm 

Gustav-Lobcke-Museum, tel: 
(2381 ) 17-29-39, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing /To Feb. 27: "Agypfen: 
Geheimnis derGrabkammem." 

Stu ttg art 

Staatsth eater, tel: (711) 22-17-95. 
VenS's "RgoWto." Directed by Jo- 
hannes Schaaf, conducted by Ingo 
Metzmacher. with Gabriel Sade. 
Wolfgang Schone and Catriona 
Strath. Jan. 28, 31 , Feb. 10 and 24. 

Wuppertal 

Von der Hsydt-Museum, tel: (202) 
563-6231, closed Mondays. To 
March 20: "Von Cranach bte Monet." 
BO European masterwori© from the 
National Art Museum In Bucharest. 


became a scholar, won prizes in 
Bible study, discovered he was a 
loner and began to dream. IBs 
wanderlust was usually inspired by 
the pursuit, of his latest girlfriend. 
He started to write for small news- 
papers in New Zealand, then 
moved on to The Bangkok World 
in Thailand, where he covered ev- 
ery kind of story, from boxing to a 
nostalgic Somerset Maugham. 

For a while, Arnett lived! a rather 
ffctinml life himself, sharing the 
mistress of a high-ranking govern- 
ment official. That was rate way of 
getting pohtica] news. 

In I960, Arnett’s glamorous 
newspaper career seated a peak in 
Laos, where he discovered the free- 
dom of being a stringer for the 
news agencies. He became a full- 
time correspondent fra AP in Indo- 


gg USE 


NORTH 

4- 

9K9 

99 

4- 


WEST 

4- 

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EAST 
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SOUTH 
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IRELAND 

Dublin 

Irish Museum of Modem Art, tel: 
671-8665. closed Mondays. To 
March 24: "Josef Albers." includes 
early Expressionist drawings, col- 
lages and abstract paintings by the 
German-bom artist who settled in 
America after being a student and a 
teacher at the Bauhaus. 

ISRAEL ~ — 

Jerusalem 

The Israel Museum, tel: (2) 708- 
S1 1. open dally. To Feb. 15: "Ar- 
mando Testa." Posters and television 
commercials by the Italian graphic 
designer. 

Tel Aviv 

Td Aviv Museum of Art tel: 972-3- 
695-7361 , closed Mondays. To April 
9: "Robert Mapplethorpe.” More 
than 200 photographs by me contro- 
versial American photographer. 

ITALY 

Venice 

Museo Correr, lei: (41 ) 52-06-288. 


nesaa, honed his political skills and 
in 1962 moved on to the half-hid- 
den war in Vietnam, escalated by 
the Kennedy administration. 

For a few years. Arnett covered 
stories in the United States as a 
special correspondenL But he was 
back in Saigon when it feD in 1975; 
he refused 10 leave, and gives a 
wonderful account of how the AP 
office was protected when the 
North Vietnamese soldiers arrived. 

He quickly discovered that one 
of his part-time photographers had 
been a Yietcong agent for 10 years. 
Arnett continued to file from occu* 
pied Saigon, foreshadowing bis feat 
m Baghdad fra CNN. 

Herbert Mitgang is on the staff oj 
The New York Times. 


down one by cashing the heart 
king. He expected to win the board, 
but found that the rival declarer 
had made the identical play. 

NORTH 
4AK4 
9AK975 
092 
4 J 83 


Continuing/To April 4: "Pietro 
Longhi." 50 paintings, 35 drawings 
and 14 prints by me 18th-century 
Venetian painter famous for his ironi- 
cal description of Venetian life and 
manners. 


JAPAN 

HbncJI City 

Hyogo Prefecture! Museum of His- 
tory, tel: (7921-88-9011, closed 
Mondays. To Feb. 13: "Maruyama 
Okyo/‘ 60 paintings by OKyo. who 
was influenced by Western-derived 
techniques and by Chinese painting. 
The national treasure “Yuklmat- 
suzu," a depiction of pine trees In 
snow on a pair of folding screens, is 
on display. 

Kagawa 

Reoma Ha», tel: (0877) 86-5533. 
To Feb. 28. closed Tuesdays and 
Wednesdays. "The Kingdom of Bhu- 
tan." Bhutan folk clothes, festival 
masks, musical instruments used at 
Buddhist services and a Kannon stat- 
ue bearing 1 1 different faces. 

Tokyo 

National Museum of Western Art, 
tel: (3) 3828-5131. dosed Mondays. 


To April 3: “Great French Paintings 
from the Barnes Collection." Pictures 
selected from the collection of Or. 
Albert C. Barnes of Philadelphia, who 
acquired an exceptional selection of 
19th- and 20th-century paintings. 
Features works by Renoir. Manet, 
Seurat, Picasso and Modigliani, 
among others. 

SINGAPORE 

Empress Place Museum, tel: 336- 
73-33, open daily. Continuing/To 
July 1994: "War and Ritual: Trea- 
sures of the Warring States." An ex- 
hibition o( Chinese bronze culture 
from the Warring States period (475- 
221 B.C.). 

National Museum Art Gallery, tel: 
3323656, dosed Mondays. To Feb. 
20: "From Ritual to Romance: Paint- 
ings Inspired by Bali." This exhibi- 
tion. jointly organized by the Singa- 
pore Art Museum and the Neka 
Museum in Ubud, Bali, brings togeth- 
er more than 70 paintings of Ball seen 
through the eyes of Indonesian and 
foreign artists. 

SPAIN 

Madrid 

Museo del Prado, tei: 420-05-45, 
closed Mondays. To Feb. 15: “Goya: 
B Capncho y la Irwencton." A look at 
the personal, little-known miniatures, 
cabinet pictures and sketches exe- 
cuted by the master painter and 
graphic artist. "Truth and Fantasy" 
best describes the exhibit, since the 
works displayed grapple with such 
subject manor. 

SWITZERLAND 

I 

Collection de I'Art Brut, tei: (21) 
647-54-35, dosed Mondays. To May 
22: "Detournements d'lmages." 
Wbrks by the patients oi a psychiatric 
hospital whose imaginations were 
triggered by well-known drawings, 
paintings and photographs. 

SWEDEN 

Stockholm 

Royal Opera, tei: 06 24 82 40. Wag- 
ner’s "Lohengrin." Conducted by 
Siegfried Kohler, with Gosta Win- 
bet gh, Anita Sold and Sfen Wahlund. 
Feb. 1.6. 12. 18 and 22. 

SWITZERLAND ~ 

Zurich 

Kunsthaus tef: 251-67-65, closed 
Mondays. Continuing/To Feb. 20: 
'■Joseph Beuys.” The installations, 
windows, murals, sculptures and 
drawings are exemplary of the multi- 
faceted German artist's work. He 
lived between 1921 and 1986. 


UNITED STATES 

Atlanta 

High Museum of Art, tel: (404) 577- 
6940, dosed Sundays. To March 19; 
"Ansel Adams: The tarty Years." 77 
photographs, including some ot his 
earliest work at Yosemrte and lesser- 
known still Mes, portraits and city- 
scapes. 

Fort Worth 

Kimbeil Art Museum, tel: (61 7j 
332-8451 , closed Mondays. To April 
1 0: "Ludovico Carrad, 1 555- 1 61 9: A 
Retrospective." An exhibit ot the 
work of a master of Italian Baroque. 
His paintings show rhythmic patterns 
heightened by dramatic contrasts of 
light and shade. To March 13: "The 
Golden Age of Florentine Drawing." 
A survey ol Florentine draftsmanship 
including compositional sketches, 
studies of individual figures and fin- 
ished drawings by Leonardo da Vina, 
Fra Bartolommeo. Vasari and 
Francesco Salviati. 

Los Angeles 

Los Angeles County Museum of 
Art, tel: (213) 857-6000. To March 
27: "Helen Levitt." A retrospective ot 
85 photographs from the lata 1950s 
to the present, most of them devoted 
to New York City where the artist was 
bom and stin lives. Also includes pho- 
tographs from the artist’s visit to Mex- 
ico in 1941. 

New York 

Museum of Modem Art. tel: (212) 
708-9400. closed Wednesdays. To 
May 17: "Three Masters of the Bau- 
haus: Lyonei Feininger, vasrly Kan- 
dinsky and Paul Klee.” Printed work 
by masters who taught at the Bau- 
haus during the 1 920s. Includes Kan- 
dinsky's print portfolio "Small 
Wbrid." some of Klee's color litho- 
graphs and Feininger's woodcuts. 
The Pterpont Morgan Library, tei: 
(212) 685-0008, dosed Mondays. 
To April 17: "Gutenberg and the 
Genesis of Printing." Features three 
Gutenberg Bibles and a reconstruc- 
tion of Guienberg’s press. Also docu- 
ments the geographical spread of 
movable type and the change from 
manuscript to printed -book format. 
Pasadena 

Norton Simon Museum, tei: (.814) 
449-6840. open Thursday through 
Sunday. To SepL 11: "Kandinsky." 
More than 30 paintings, water colors , 
prints and letters covering the artist's 
career from 1912 to 1932. 
Washington 

The Corcoran Gallery of Art, tel: 
(202) 638-1439. closed Tuesdays. 
To April 3: "Picturing History: Ameri- 
can Painting, 1770-1930." 90 
soenes of American history by Ameri- 
can artists, including works by Benja- 
min West, John Trumbull, Winslow 
Homer and Thomas Hart Benton. 


WEST 

4752 

94 

4X107 2 
4Q9765 


EAST 
4 10963 
9 Q 10 8 6 2 
0 Ji 
4 A 4 
SOUTH (D) 

+ Q J 8 
9 J3 


South had a chance to make his 
contract. If East held the diamond 
lane, Ik would be endplaytd by the 
lead of dummy’s nine. 

But this was board-a-match, and 
the endplay attempt would mean a 
two- trick defeat if West held the 
diamond king. The odds that he did 
were 2-u>-l, so South settled for 


OAQ 8 SS 

4K»2 


Betti yfafec ware vulnerable. The 

s52*‘ West Nor* 

1 o pus 19 W® 

1 N.T- Pass 3N.T. PaM 

Pan Pan 

Wealed the drib six. 


FRANKFURT . HONG KONG JEDDAH : KATHMANDU 


Welcome 


WITH A SMILE! 


to destinations ^ ^ countries *5 continents 

m / in -far J and J 


Genuine care for your safely and comfort. 
Delicious dishes , delectable cuisine to touch the heart of 
the most discerning passenger. 

• 

Welcome to a whole new world f 
A world of smiles and friendliness. 


z 

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A ***** 

vBinunauKMoewMufeS 


KARACHI 


KUAIA LUMPUR 


KUWAIT 


LONDON 


MUSCAT 













































































































THE TRIB INDEX 115 . 58 ® 

Intemafional Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©, composed of 
280 Internationally investaWe stocks from 25 oountrteSi compUed 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 

120 ' ; ' ■ ' ' _ 1 ' r 





J M 

V/orld Ind^x 

* ’ 5 

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flsia/Pacific 


Approx. mlgKfng: 32% 

Close: 125,56 Piw: 12SL07 


Approtwi0te^3rfc.. 
Close: 117.34 Prwi 11639 



A S O N D J A S - P N ; D J 
1993 1994 1#93 «M 


North America 


Approx. «tigNhg:2B% 
Close: 90 JO Piw: 96 J3 


Latin America 


ApprotTWig Hug: 5% 
CkMK 13BJB1 Piwj 13R90 



“ A S O N D J " A ‘S O N D J 

IMS • W4 - 11* * :• 19M 

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Industrial Sectors 


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Energy miB 114J2 -1*0 C^Gbo df - '113J6 11252 *1.10 

UOMra 12&16 -lifeijg *QJ8i .' HwrE^tMe" ' ■lgT30“T2Qjg1 4057 

Rnanca 11SL5B. 11B.2P 4&aT CW»«”f Sobai .. 10|jS2. 10043, ♦IJfl 

Swvlcet 12422 <12229 4158 ~ Mrt*Wiont f* 13K18 138.42 -0.17 
For mat bfamafan obo* the Mot, a 

WiteloTribMBX , ^ 









International Herald Tribune, Friday, January 28, 1994 


Page 11 


Here Come the New ' China Plays’ 


Compiled by Out Staff From Dispatches 
BEIJING — China has identified 22 state- 

owned companies, primarily energy and 
transportation concerns, as Hedy candidates 
to fist shares. bn the Hong Kong and New 
York stock exchanges this year. 

Lin Bongru, director of the China Securi- 
ties Rrgulatoiy Commisson, said the compa- 
nies haS been recommended by his watchdog 
body, provincial governments, as well two 
government agencies, according to a report m 
the official China Securities newspaper. 

Ibe 22 companies, if they are given final 
approval by -China's State Council, would 
represent the second group of companies to 


companies, which were announced in late 
1992, six are now trading on the Hong Kong 
stock market 

White the thnmg , scale and location of 
«nVh listing has yet to be dedded, the paper 
said MrTlIu urged companies to list quickly. 

“You should grasp the opportunity while 
conditions on the Hong Kong stock market 
are relatively good, and strive to enter the 
international capital market early,” Mr. Lin 
was quoted as telling executives from the 22 
companies at a conference in the central 
Chinese city of Wuhan. 

Charles Lee, chairman of the Stock Ex- 
change of Hong Kong, said Thursday after 
the meetings with officials in China, that the 
majority of companies would apply to list in 
Hang Kong. A small number may also ar- 
range global offerings and seek listings on 
. r rther markets, mdnding the New York Stock 
Exchange. 

He said Mr. Liu told him that each of the 
short-listed companies would restructure 
their finances and accounting practices to 
comply with international standards. 

' Mr. Lee said he hoped that after six months 


the first few companies would be able to list in 
Hong Kong. He gave no specific date. 

Power utilities dominate the list. Huaneng 
International, Shandong Huaneng Electricity, 
Ffri pn g Joint Stock Power and Shandong In- 
ternational Power arc on track to sell shares 
abroad, the China Securities newspaper said. 

Power equipment firms selected include 
the China Harbin Power Plant and the 
Northeast Electric Transmission company, it 
said. Also included are transport-related 
(■pp i paniflE, such as China Southern Airlines, 
China Eastern Airlines, Guan gzhou- Shenz- 
hen Railway, Shanghai Hui Xmg Shipping 
and the aircraft manufacturer Xian Aircraft 
International. . 

Two Of China ’s nuyor automakers, Dong- 
feng Motor and Qipgling Automobile, are 
also eligible for listing. 

Mr. Liu s«iri the companies were chosen to 
fit China' s industrial policy, which has made 

power, transport ana raw materials priority 
sectors. Good economic efficiency and ability 
to earn foreign currency by exporting were 
also taken into account, the newspaper said. 

U.S. fund managers who have traveled to 
Beijing in the last six months have all pointed 
to power and transport sectors as attractive 
candidates for listing abroad. They offer in- 
vestors a low-risk stake in China’s vibrant 
economy, which grew at a rate of 13 percent 
last year. 

They said that on the negative side, they 
are also sectors that have suffered heavy 
losses due to decades of state m anagem ent 

Most of the infrastructure projects are 
Vvayv! in coastal areas, boosting their pros- 
pects for hard currency profits, while manu- 
facturers are fairly evenly spread. Telecom- 
munications plays are notably absent 
however. (Bloomberg , Knight-Ridder ) 


Listing Abroad 

* ’• ». v- ■'s'*' .; ... ‘ ’ • ... 


Budget Outlook 
Gives a Boost 
To U.S. Markets 


; Cgfote Fterit. : ;; ; 

Eastern fltnways v - 


to ^Pcw^rf-TX"’ , 










ttteflBfffeS. 






™ \] 




• . • 


Source: Knrght-Ridder 


Ailing Alitalia Brings In New Manag 


• . •• • .. ,J :!r . ur+r-.y. 


, j".' *■■■ 




Compiled by Our Stttf Front DiipaKha 

ROME — The troubled state- 
controlled airime Alitalia S^>A fired 
its prendent and managing director 
rai Thursday and picked two for- 
mer TTurnflprn of U.S. computer 
companies’ European subsidiaries 
as their replacements. 

The rtuwrman, Micbde Ftincqie, 
will be replaced by Renato Riveno, 
who recently retired as head of In- 
ternational Business Machines' 
Corp.’s European ogecations. The 
. TmnMgjng (firectm; Giovanni Kag- 
nani, wffl be replaced by Roberto 
ScMsanq president of Teas his&u- 
ypen is Inc.’s European operations. 


Mr. Bingnani will become presi- 
dent of Tixrenia di Naviganone 
SpA, anIRI con^pany that operates 
pas sen ger and cargo ships between 
Italy’s mainland and its islands. 

The reshuffling, announced by 
the state holding company Istimto 
per la Rkostruzione Indnstriale, 
which owns 86 percent of Alitalia, 
had been widely expected. 

Alitalia is tire latest in a string erf 
unprofitable European airlines that 
have replaced their management. 
Air France, Spain’s Iberia and Ire- 
land’s Aer Lingns have all changed 
management recently, 
fit shows the whole industry is 


Thinking 


suffering,” said Karl Heinz Neo- 
meister, secretary-general erf the As- 
sociation of European Airlines. 

Mr. Principe was been largely a 
figurehead president, but Mr. Ri- 
verso is expected to take an active 
role. The 60-year-old executive left 
his post as president of IBM’s Eu- 
ropean operations because he had 
readied mandatory retirement age. 

Newspapers and analysts have 
long said that IRI was casting 
around to replace Mr. Bisgnam, 
even though be has cut the airline's 
losses three years in a row since 
taking over in 1989. 

However, losses resumed grow- 
ing in 1993, and the company Is still 
bogged down with 2 trillion lire 
(SI .25 billion) of debt. 

Mr. Biagnani has also been enn- 
cized in the Italian press for not 


moving fast enough to establish al- 
liances with other airlines, as most 
European airlines are rushing to 
do. Alitalia's main alliance is with 
Hungary’s Malev. (Bloomberg AP) 

U Olympic in Dispute 
A Paris-based international 
company said Thursday it will seek 
5100 milli on in compensation from 
Olympic Airways, the Greek state- 
owned airline, for breach of con- 
tract in the sale of its catering sub- 
sidiary, The Associated Press 
reported from Athens. 

The Albert Abda group of compa- 
nies, which bought a 49 percent stake 
in Olympic Catering in 1991 for 514 
miTKfin , also said it would seek to 
Uodk an appeal by Olympic Airways 
to the European Union to write off 
SI b£Hkm of the airline's debt , 


Compiled hr Our Staff From Dispatches 
WASHINGTON — The Con- I 
gressional Budget Office on Thurs- 1 
day confirmed President Bill Clin- i 
ton’s estimate that the federal ] 
budget deficit in the coming fiscal 
year will drop below S 1 80 billion, j 
giving a lift to bond prices and i 
helping to push stocks to new ] 
heights. 

The office projected a $171 bil- '• 
lion pool of red ink for fiscal 1995, < 
which begins Ocl 1, down from the I 
$933 billion defid l estimated for 
the current fiscal year. The agen- 
cy’s annual report to Congress 
forecast a further decline, to 5166 
billion, in fiscal 1996. 

The good news for the nation's 
budget deficit came amid two posi- 
tive economic reports, about dura- 
ble goods and unemployment 
claims. 

The Commerce Department said 
orders for durable goods rose 22 
percent in December for the fifth 
straight monthly gain — the long- 
est string of advances in more than 
six years. For ail of 1993, the ad- 
vance totaled 8.6 percent, the 
strongest showing since 1988. 

The durable-goods report con- 
firms “what we’ve known for a 
while,” stud Thomas Carpenter, 
chief economist at ASB Capital 
Management. “Consumers are 
buying cars, they're buying com- 
puters, they're buying machine 
tools.'' 

Meanwhile, the Labor Depart- 
ment said new daims for jobless 
benefits plunged by 56,000, to 
309,000 in the latest week. But that 
news was mitigated by the earth- 
quake on the West Cotua and bitter 
cold in the Midwest and the East, 
which emptied unemployment of- 
fices. The government said the 
drop may be temporary because 
people often take several weeks to 
file for benefits after natural disas- 
ters. 

Following the news, stock prices 
surged 18 points to a record high. 

And in an unusual reaction to 
good economic news, the price of 
• the benchmark 30-year U.S. Twa- 
s sury bond jumped 20/32s to 99 
l 27/32. The issue's yield feu 0.04 
i point, to 626 percent. Analysts 
5 said the strong price showing indi- 
F caied markets weren’t overly wor- 
ried about inflation. 


The Congressional Bndgel Of- 
fice estimates on the deficit were 
based on an expectation of contin- 
ued economic growth that would 
provide increasing tax revenues. 
The agency sees economic growth 
after inflation totaling 2.9 percent 
in 1994, about the same as the 18 
percent estimate for last year. 

The CBO’s growth forecast was 
seconded Thursday by the Ameri- 
can Bankers Association, which 
predicted ih»» the U.S. economy 

See ECONOMY, Page 12 

Strong Profits 
For Consumer 
Goods Makers 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

Several U.S. multinational con- 
sumer-products companies report- 
ed strong quarterly earnings Thurs- 
day, as a recovering American 
economy and growth in emerging 
markets overcame the negative ef- 
fects of a strengthening dollar and 
recession in Western Europe. 

Coca-Cola Co. reported a 19 per- 
cent increase in net profit for the 
quarter, to 5466 milli on, and record 
results for all of 1993. The soft 
drink maker had net income of $2-2 
bilb on or 51.67 a share last year, a 
31 percent increase over 51.7 bil- 
lion or 51^6 a share in 1992. 

Revenue for the year was 513.9 
billion, up 7 percent from $13.1 
billion in 1992. Fourth-quarter rev- 
enue was up 4 percent at $3.4 bil- 
lion. 

Operating income from interna- 
tional soft drink sales increased 9 
percent during the year, led by a 41 
percent increase for the company’s 
Northeast Europe- Middle East op- 
' erations. 

In the European Union, howev- 
’ er, Coca-Cola's operating income 
‘ decreased 2 percent in 1993, partly 
' because of a strong dollar. 

’ Procter & Gamble Co. said earn- 
♦ ings for the quarter increased 13 
s pCTcent from a year ago. to 5653 
' million, due to strong volume 

See EARN, Page 12 


: By Reginald Dafc‘ 4 : 

InuntaOamljlfmsU TrBM* ~ ■ 

W ashington “A^uwnK 

ptoyment has nymnted ia the, 
mfhKtrial countries, i; funda- 
mental tradition of labor refer 
tions has been stood aa its. head.. Tbe juk 
used to be “last in, first oat" T hat often 
meant (hat when a company sbcd ^woricett, 
the youngest went Just. . . . ; - \ . 

Now the mk is morelike “first in, find out," . 
and the axe falls on dder workers wfcfcti* 
young keep their jobs. AsconipaiMS' .^ntt jbr 
downsize, they have come to rdy hemmy on 
eariy retirement to adnew fteir . goals, r ■ 
That poficy no longer makes economic or 
social sense, as governments, which fregnoti- 
ly have to foot the HO, am bfsmtimjr 1b 
realize. Many of them are now .trying to 
reveree eariy retirement hiccaitiw»4^mlio- 
duoed in the 1970s and 1980SJ - • 


than younger ones — except in jobs requiring 
« good ideai'-of physical strength. 

Numerous studies of different profession s , 
be says, have failed to find a direct rdation- 


duoed in the 1970s and 1980s: - 
But most emptoyera are shortaghled^f^ 
nine on regardless — and storms up P«»- 
tewm for themseives farther down the rare, r 
Many ynmrapemarts imstafamlv bdievc old- 
er wrakeis arc kssi»q<taaiwL Andtoey <xtei 

finditdie^xfftogttndofotowQttfl^yn^ ; 

tend to cam more, than to make severance 
payments to their younger cd wwgnes . 

In many casra the cost to a cranpanvef 

'saaasMsgKg' 


tbe oStizhtion forEa^ampCooperahOT 


five-year-olds today are mrah healthier than 
they were even a generation ago. 

Physical strength is anyway becoming less 
relevant m the industrial countries as manual 
work moves to developuig nations. In high 

.■■■- By shedding older 

workers, companies are 
ensniingproblems 

- farther down the line. 

tedmotogy industries, skill aiid caperience 
dtodd be at a premium. 

: And it’s likely to getmorc expensive to 
out oWct wockera as gg v r rnm e nt s cut bade 
eariy retirement .incentives. " 

Britain and the Netherlands, for instance, 
iue examming bow to reduce the state disabil- 
ity payments that companies often t reat a s 
substitute pension schemes; France is hying 
to persnafe employers to cut back on eariy 
retirement; rad lire United Stales plans to 
-save money by gradually raising tire official 
n - ti t pm mi age from 65 to 67 after 2000. 

.. Other, governments are trying to col ba at 
the generous pension rates they introduced as 
inducements to eariy retirement; they’rera- 
oaormsat companies to retram Older wodc- 


Ira^tcriri career planning. 


The fifficulty is that tiiexe is n ow a bro ad 
yv-iai consensus in favor of eariy retirement, 
which the govozimeats themsdves have 
helped to create over the past 20 years. 

Labor unions, went along with the idea to 
protect younger workers, who, if dismissed, 
were Hedy to receive less generous income 
support t ha n their older colleagues, Mr. Okba 
writes in the OECD Observer magazine. 

It also suited governments to keep the 
young at work for political reasons. While 
younger workers eater the unemployment 
statistics immediately cm d i smissal , those tak- 
ing eariy retirement normally do not Unem- 
ployed youths are more likdy than their ri- 
ders to mm to crime or dot in the streets. 

But governments have changed their minds 
as tire cost of eariy retirement has escalated far 
beyond their expectati o ns — at a time when 
national budgets are already severely straired. 

And while most industrial countries today 
are worried about unemployment, there are 
feats of a labor shortage m 10 to 20 years, as 
the baby boom generation moves toward re- 
tirement. A much smaller work force will 
have to finance the retirement of many more 
people — and if all the baby boomers wanted 
to retire eariy, the cost would be prohibitive. 

Most companies fed they don't need to 
worry about that now — and governments 
can’t force them to. But governments will stiH 
ny io nwla eariy retirement less attractive. 

The chances are that many c ompani es in 
the industrial countries will in the future want 

to keep their employees working for more 
yegra rather than fewer. Those emptoyeesare 
now, at mid-career. If s time to start reversing 
tbe attitudes and practices that have become 
ingrained over the last 20 years. 


emaEMCY k INTEREST RATES 


> * lum ^ fi* w. 3* ' w 

jUHMnWB UB law S7.MS M* 

Si ' was S3M " 2 S-SS 1* . !»• ..«*■ 

ESS* JS aS »» 22 “3 “ 

LandMfo} '■ “fz ww i m » WHS OK* -UW1 »■ • • 

££* 'S3 UW6 SI wS wo 

SS.' s S.S'g*--:- 3S.=-S. 

S.' 

mraOdbk. — > 


Jan. 27 . Euroeunmcir Ompftt* 
Mi Sw»* 


potior tHMorfc PW Slerthw rS? v-m ecu 
iiuontn . »» 

Smooth* -tnw* SMWI. ^ 

» ?sr a: — «« 


Kty NOMf RrtW 


tffcHi^r Poflar Va hK* • . nrrtrr - -Per* ovnwr 

C*rr«ocy ret* crmkOrac. Tr ■ *«■■-. ***> 

fiE S '■ tSs 7MS 

Ota-W* ™ Irt*c • MW JSST-im UAeaw— 103 

**«■-** S SST ^ 


mmod stales ciom i 

' o iicow f rate ■ U® 

Pilurls bXD 

rim mi toads " ’ ‘ iS 

MlMdhCDS, 

Comm, paw m days • J® 

lamltTMiurvMI U1 

■’Woor Tr om«nt , iOr 3J4 

3-yMf Traanrv note 4W 

HWTROHnMtt s« 

7 -yoorTr*osonroote SJ 7 

IftawTroasoryoolc • w 
jUparTnapirrband UJ 

jwnWLyKiiao-eBy aimdrosmt Z73 


iwwrout 


5Vi 5V> 
5* M 
Sh Stt 
sr» Sh 
SH i » 
U1 434 


no,morito 


>o»ri»h tatertKMk 
Monlh Inter tank 
UHnwr GowcnUMnl bond 


mn r S23Sidow uiw' 'uns' ia«i. 

Sm~ *m»* V2Z IS VST ' ■ 

a: uMtam* atWvu mhm): M ofCtmaOu 

M? w*UDm-aner**‘*T - 


UMobordroto 

(MbpW 

ViaMtminMwak- 

S^MAttkMrtaife 

MieantoataaK 

»w»raw*. 


144 1» 

av. 114 
2W. S«. 
W 2W 
2h m 
3K 

ffU ffl* 
644 6M 
110 4.10 
SSO SM 
5Ji SJO 
SJS S3S 


Morwnwmte «D 

CaBmon oy 4h 

VmMtH BdWlKllll o7D w* 

THfltffH m r > 1 6h 

umm hmindt l* 4M 

lJwTwr SJ4 172 

Sbwck: Rnrtmrx. Btoombera. Merrill 

Lynch. Book of Tokyo. Commertoomc. 
SrMtnMfl Montayu. Cnftttt LYamU. 

Odd 

. AM. PM. Cll’ve 
Zsrfcb 38U0 3827S -tLM 

Londoa 38*50 38U0 

N«w York 3S120 - 7JD 

us. thumper ounce. London o ffldcl fly 
km Zurich and New YorkeperMt amt cm- 
too prices; Mew York Ca max ffioW 
Source: Reuters. 




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In asset management, like many other fields, it is innovation which gives tradition in vital force. 
At UNION BANCAIRE PRIVfiE. our innovative spirit is reflected in our methodical use of 
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GENEVE - ZORICH - LUGANO - LONDON - NASSAU - NEW YORK - TOKYO - HONG KQNG - ISTANBUL - AMERICA LATINA 



WT *d t 




Page 12 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1994 


Dollar Tumbles 
Against Yen, Mark 


ContptM by Our Staff Front Dupaldta 

NEW YORK —The dollar tum- 
bled Thursday against major curren- 
cies. hitting a seven-week low 
against the yen after Treasury Secre- 
tary Uoyd Benisen repeated com- 
plaints about Japanese trade policy. 

His comments prompted many 
traders to buy yen on speculation 
the Clinton administration will re- 

Forelgn Exchange 

sume calls for a stronger yen if it 
does not win trade concessions 
from Japan. 

The dollar closed at 108.60 yen, 
its lowest since Dec. 8, down from 
110.095 yen at Wednesday’s New 
York close. The dollar also feB to 
1.7290 Deutsche marks, from 
1.7451 DM, as Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl, in a speech in Switzerland, 
emphasized historical reasons For 
maintaining a strong mark. 

The dollar fell to 5.8848 French 
francs from 5.9270 francs and to 
1.4612 Swiss francs from 1.4710 
francs. The pound rose to SI. 5085 
from SI. 4945. 

Mr. Benisen. in a speech to the 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce, said, 
“Japan needs to get in step with the 
world economy. Market penetra- 
tion by foreign products in Japan is 
too low.” 

The dollar slumped against the 
yen on Wednesday after U.S. trade 
officials said they had made no 
progress in the latest round of trade 


ECONOMY: Boost for Stocks 


Continued from Page 11 

would grow by a solid 18 percent 
this year. 

On Friday, the government is to 
repon on the rate of economic 
growth in the fourth quarter of last 
year. Analysts expect a 5.4 percent 
rate. 

The CBO also assumed that the 
government would hold to the $500 

H.Y. Stocks 

billion, five-year deficit reduction 
budget approved by Congress last 
year. 

In his Stale of the Union ad- 
dress, Mr. Gin ton said he would 
send Congress, on Feb. 7. “one of 
the toughest budgets ever.” 

“It will cut spending in more 
than 300 programs, eliminate 100 
domestic programs, and reform the 
way government buys its goods and 
services," he said. 

Despite the expectation of lower 
deficits, which would tend to re- 
duce inflation, both the CBO and 
the bankers' association called for 
the Federal Reserve Board to in- 
crease interest rates soon in order 
to keep inflation in check. 

The Congressional Budget Of- 
fice said Thursday it expects the 
Federal Reserve to allow short- 



uegotiations. which ended in 
Washington on Tuesday. The Unit- 
ed States wants Japan to accept 
numerical targets for increasing 
imports of autos, medical equip- 
ment and other products. 

“It’s pretty obvious that the U.S. 
isn't satisfied with Japan's efforts” 
to open its markets to imports, said 
Chris Widness, international econ- 
omist at Chemical Bank. “We 
wouldn't be surprised to see the 
dollar fall to 105 ven.” 

Mr. Kohl, at an international 
economic conference in Davos, re- 
called the collapses of the German 
currency earlier this century, 
“which caused broad sections of 
the population to lose everything." 

As Europe moves toward mone- 
tary union, he said, “A stable cur- 
rency is and will remain the indis- 
pensible prerequisite for economic 
success.” 

A dealer at Union Bank of Swit- 
zerland said the Kohl comments 
triggered significant do Oar selling by 
Continental European investors, 
which triggered stop-loss orders 
around 1.7420 DM ana only attract- 
ed support around 1.7390 DM. 

Another reason for the dollar’s 
fall against the mark was specula- 
tion that Friday’s report on the U.S. 
gross domestic product will not be 
strong enough to keep the dollar at 
its current lofty levels. The dollar 
rose to a 29-month high of 1.7565 
DM on Jan. 18. (Bloomberg. AFX) 



Indus 3909.49 3WX53 3901 ja 392630 - lO 

Trans 121x2+ 1 82361 nos.n isn.oa -7ji 
im 23LS3 &SH 221-30 22X41 + 615 
Comp 141864 1477.65 14171* 147X83 -8j* 


Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


Industrial, 
Irma. 
Utilities 
FI nones 
SPOT 
SP too 


High Lour Close Cb’se 
53X89 S49.9B 33X44 + X08 
4417* 44043 44117 +1.78 
17141 19848 17100 + X3Q 
4X83 4112 4X79 +047 
477-53 47120 477.05 +183 
441.92 43X07 441X4 +149 


COCOA CLCC) _ . _ . _ „ 
Starting per radrtc ton-lot, oM» ton* 
Mar 910 911 915 «5 913 

MOT 910 911 915 907 910 

SuT 917 91B 924 91 7 921 

sen 9» 930 «6 930 *» 


MS 913 913 

907 918 911 

917 921 922 

930 933 934 


NYSE Indexes 


Composite 254.59 24X29 JA4J8 + 2.1J 

Industries* 32117 320.94 32X93 + 168 

Transp. 27X93 777.15 27X35 *049 

UVItry 72932 224. SB X2B.92 -191 

Finance 221.79 219X2 221.75 + 261 


NASDAQ Indexes 


d!c »s w ?s « NX na 

Mor W W 9t5 9W — 

im 969 978 970 970 — — 

5r « * tji - - 

s tig 187 990 Wc 9W — - — 

COT 99S 1-010 N.T. N.T. - - 

Est. volume: 1748 

Snarl wmfrfc ton-lots <* 5 tons 

iz ys ys hr ws ws ys 

M m u" l:R3 MW 1.187 1.1B 1.19* 

Jal 1.182 1,183 1,187 1,177 1.175 1,177 

SOT 1.1 84 1,185 M89 1.180 1.178 1,181 

NOv 1.183 1,185 MW 1.180 N.T. 1,181 

Jan 1.182 1.1B3 MB9 1,183 MIX 1,181 

Eft. voftme: 2641 

hot low aose are* 


WHITE SUGAR (MntHl .... . 

Dolton per metric too+ats of 5« too, 

M at >91 SO 28X50 291.10 291 JO + 1 JO 

iSSt Zrtlc 29X50 271-20 + 1J0 

A« 29X00 29+20 79440 29XS1 + 1-20 

oa 'm "<i ”7 7 c 28X00 2>4jo + 740 

OK “ N.T- »J« SUO ± J*j 

Mar 281J0 281 JO 281-50 JHXW + 0.40 

Est volume: 1J4X Open tot: 14,095. 


Composite 

Industries 

Banks 


NYSE Most Actives 


Pkavbi n 

OSutvn 

TeiMex 

PtiiiAAr 

GTE 

WOTMrik 

ACE LI n 

OcQRp* 

SaraLee 

FordM 

GnMOtr 

ArahDn 

Cficwp 

IBM 

YPFScn 


VOL Men 
74538 ISIS 
5B930 25H 
42410 71+k 
48444 40 V, 
J44I1 M's 
31473 24 
31454 aw 
31372 50'A 
31154 »W 
27195 *6% 
25715 80 
2403* 27V, 
22971 <2 
21328 57V, 
20B74 37N, 


low lost 
12H 12V. 

23N 24 

sms 7i i* 

5945 591k 

XM MV> 
25W a 
27W 28 V, 

50 50% 

23 23V, 

441b 444k 

SB*. 99V. 

264, 26 Ik 

41 411k 

56 V, 57 
264* 274k 


Htob Low LOST ON. 

79X99 78X71 79X99 *4.19 
B29-34 825.71 B39J4 * XS5 
699.02 696.10 69X59 -2-22 
93X91 929+4 93X64 *102 
89X80 88664 8*7.82 *11.35 
78038 774.95 7B0J8 -600 
18X54 1B2J2 18X98 + 067 


48X14 Ml JB 481.77 


Dow Jones Bond Aver 


a Bond* 

10 utilities 
10 industaMs 


AMEX Most Actives 


cnevsn. 

Echo Bov 

ChrtMed 

RtfroOo 

JonBefi 

SnettOMd 

Ho*ro 

TopSrae 

TuOMex 

HeUanet 

AirxJI 

spur 

Atari 

Nabors 

PresdA 


Vat Hhh 
10*98 374k 
nS2 134* 
5997 ZT+ 
5604 44k 
5189 7*k 
5118 6Vi 
4903 341k 
4070 6*< 
3826 4'k 
3755 54k 
3602 7*k 
3445 47W* 
3148 7V, 
3097 7% 
3*26 2H 


Sales 


Oho. NYSE 4 tun. volume 
,<u NYSE orev. cons, close 
Amex 4 pjil volume 
Amex pro. cans. cloM 


371 .89X520 
19.119608 


term rates to rise this year by al- 
most one percentage point, to near- 
ly 4 percent. 

But investor confidence that in- 
terest rates wouldn't rise signifi- 
cantly any time sooa helped boost 
stock prices on the New York Stock 
Exchange Thursday. The Dow 
Jones industrial average jumped 
18.30 points to 3.926 JO. 

Strong corporate earnings re- 
ports also boosted stocks, analysts 
said 

“The bottom line is it looks like 
rates wfll remain low," said Thom 
Brown, managing director at Ruth- 
erford Brown & Catberwood Inc. 
Low interest rates induce investors 
to buy stocks instead of lower- 
yielding fixed-income securities. 

Auto stocks rallied amid reports 
Ford Motor Co. is expected to an- 
nounce a used-car leasing program 
next week. Ford rose Pi to 66*4 
and Chrysler Corp. added ^ to 
60*. 

AT&T rose 34 to 5634, and Du- 
pont Co. rose 1 to 55*. after both 
posted stronger earnings. 

Coca-Cola gained * to 415b. The 
soft drink maker said fourth-quar- 
ter profit grew 19 percent amid 
surging sales in several emerging 
markets and the United States. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, 
Knight-Ridder, AP) 


NYSE Diary 


Advtnced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


NASDAQ 4 pm. wotume 314J9O80Q 

NASDAQ pro. 4MIL volume 316. <9 4600 


| aza3Z3BEZZial 


+ Vfc 

—’A Buy Salat Short- 

Jem. to 1 .221 .532 1676TO4 22,966 

Jon. 25 1645649 1662671 44483 

Jew 24 97X028 1,52X329 29,803 

Jem. 21 160X357 1,597.518 6X7U 

** Jan. 20 1XBOZ7 1X3X523 27-540 

•Included In the sates fliwn 


SAP 100 Index Options 


1323 1172 

785 888 

641 S91 

2748 2751 

101 *1 

17 29 



Metals 

date Prevfoas 

Bid Art Bid Ash 

ALUMINUM (Htotl Grade) 

niMQ ijwjo 

^worfl 124600 134650 12B£0 1235J0 

COPPER C ATHOD ES {Htob Grade) 

jWlan PPT "fasaSfl 00 iuijh 184 9jt0 185 QM 
Forward 188X00 188440 187240 187348 
LEAD 

£- r per"N*iCto B J0LSO 50750 

Smnl 52940 53040 51940 52040 

NICKEL 

S 0 ” "ot 040°574040 570540 571040 
Forward 579X00 580040 576940 577000 
TIN 

I 507540 508540 
Forward 522X00 523X40 513040 513540 
ZINC (SMdal Htoh Grade) 

1004 40 100550 

Forward 102140 102240 W2440 102100 


Financial 

High Low Cto* Choogg 

3-MONTH STERLING (UFFEt 
000880 -PH Of IN PCt 

MOT 9L69 9U6 94A7 +841 

j£T 9690 9446 9447 Unch. 

Sen 9453 9448 9449 —041 

rw 9451 9L8S 9486 —043 

IS 9440 9173 9453 —045 

9AM) 9434 9434 —046 

Sw 9441 94X7 9448 —044 

Dec 9426 7424 9423 —044 

KSr 9412 7400 940B —044 

JOT 9359 9356 9156 — 044 

Est. volume: 30*63. Open hit.: 43084X 
3+MH8TH EURODOLLARS OJPPE) 

H mutton - pi* of in pet 

Mar 9665 9X64 9664 —041 

Jon 9646 9X36 9615 Uljdfc 

500 N.T. N.T. 9644 +041 

Doc N.T. N.T. 9X66 —041 

Mar N.T. N.T. 95JC Untft 

Jan N.T. N.T. 9X26 Unch. 

SOT N.T. N.T. 9X46 Unch. 

Est. volume: *51. Open fait: 1X9*1. 
XMOftTH EUROMARKS ILIFFE1 
DM1 mllUaa-Ptoof IN pet 
Mar 9461 9X3* *4X7 —842 

JT 9448 9441 9442 -0« 

Sep 95.18 9X13 9X14 —042 

Dec 95.30 9S-32 9X32 — B44 

Mar 9X54 9567 9X47 —DUOS 

Jd« 9X62 9X55 9555 -045 

Sen 9560 9X56 9X54 — 044 

DOC 9X51 9564 9X64 -045 

Mar 9X42 9XJ* *534 -045 

Jus 9X25 9X20 9X21 —042 

EN. volume: B736XOpan bit: 873436 
LONG GILT (UFFE) 

(SOON ■ pt> 4 Start aM 08 pet 
Mar 11*419 118-00 118-05 —829 

JOB N.T. N.T. 117-17 — M9 

EW. volume: 10540*. Open tot: IQXflX 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND {LIFFE1 
DM 23X400 -Pt, of 100 pd 
Mw 10031 *951 **53 — 021 

Jan 108-24 *(50 99.90 -020 

Est. volume: 123573. Open tot: T746T2. 


Industrials 


High Lew Lost Sotlte ClCge 

GASOIL <(PE) -| , M . 

U.S. Mias per metric ton-ton ef IN toes 
FOT 14750 14X25 147-40 14725 +223 

MOT 14750 1432S 14750 14750 +225 

tSf lliS 144-25 14325 14X25 +125 

Htav utS 14325 14425 14425 +125- 

JOT U67S 14175 1*425 14425 +1* 

jhI tITjo 14X00 14525 14X25 +258. 

AM ILT. N.T. fCT. 14750 +OS0 

VZT lie 75 14925 14925 U92S +XS8 1 

0§ NT. N.T. N.T. 15250 +050 

^ NT. N.T. N.T. 154-50 +ftg 

Me 15673 156-00 15675 15*25 +025 

j2 NX NX N.T. 15725 +125 

Est. volume: 16*9*. Open tat. 1K77B 

BRENT CRUDE OIL CIPD . , . 

ux donors per h ur roi i ota of IBM Bottom 
M ar 14UQ 14.17 1421 1420 — X08 

>OT 1+33 14.1) 14.14 14.13 — X08 

2Sv 1424 14.16 14.16 14.16 —025 

52? 1645 1420 1637 1630 —022 

1456 1467 1652 1645 Unch. 
liL 7463 1460 14-63 U55 +021 

£5 1426 1468 1674 1*20 +023 

Oct U0 142 U70 1490 +029 

tro 1X01 1694 1521 1X20 +028 

est. volume: 41219 . Open tot. 1432*1 


Stock Indexes 

Htoh Low Close Change 

FTXE 100 tLlPFE ) 

ST^VSS 3 «l 34372 -160 

S ^ 

Est. volume: 13,155. Open tot.: 7S287. 
Sources: Rooters. Mattt AssodafoO Frees. 
London inn F in an cial Futures Excttonae. 
tna petroleum Exchange. 


' U.S./AT 

AT&T’s Profit Increases, MCTs Dips & 

NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) - fourth 

Telegr^jh Co. said Huusday that its operating products 

quarter as demand far its telecommunications and comp 

and -sendees strengthened with the global economy-. tj c long- 

MQ CommSSns Cmp. s^nd to AT&T ^ 

distance phone companies, said hs sales rose I3A MCI 


posted a charge of S92 mfllion for costs assoaaicu 

and consolidation, costs related, to its acquisition of unu* 

North American, a unit of British Telecom PLC ^ ^ a 

Ax AT&T, fourtb-qbarter profit rose to S1.15 WUiod. or Himbed to 
stare, from SI bafitm, oir:75 cents a share, m 1992. Members) 

SI 8.46 biffion £rom_S17J0 bfflioo. (Ream. Bloomberg} 

Intel Gives Timetable for New Chip 


1 ~ 




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Coffee, btol, rb 

Capper oiectmirtic lb 
•ran roatBi 

L9CKL lb 
Silver. Tray az 
Stool (ocrapl. tan 
Tin,® 

Zinc, lb 


MuttGv M 2SZ 
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2-4 2-11 
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24 2-18 
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a & 
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2 7 2-1 
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2- 1 3-U 

3- 1 Ml 
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Ml 24 
2-18 2-28 


EARN: Consumer-Products Companies Gain, Helped by U.S. Recovery 


Continued from Page 11 
growth in domestic and foreign 
sales, and cost cats. 

Measured by value, revenue was 
down marginally in the quarter to 
S7.79 billion. But unit volume of 
safes was up 6 percent, excluding 
discontinued pulp and juice opera- 
tions. 

Gillette Co. reported record 
fourth-quarter sales and earnings 


before subtracting a one-time 
charge against earnings to reflect a 
previously announced restructur- 
ing of the toiletry maker' s overseas 
business. 

Earnings for the quarter totaled 
$169 million, or 76 cents per stare, 
up 25 percent from S135 million or 
61 cents per share for the year- 
earlier quarter. Sales were $1. 62 bil- 
lion, an increase of 7 percent. 


The company took a one-time 
charge of $263 millio n after a re- 
alignment, mainly in foreign opera- 
tions. 

Sara Lee Corp. reported its net 
income for the quarter to Jan. 1, the 
second of its financial year, was 
$236 million, or 48 cents a share, up 
from $220 million, or 44 cents, a 
year ago. Sales rose 5 percent, to $4 
billion. 


NEW YORK (AP) — Intel CoipJwiD demonstrate its 
computer drip within a year ana begin selling it lawf ® v 
Executive Andrew Grove said Thursday. ‘ „ M 

In a spixdi to financial analysts, Mr. Grove said the company worn 
have the new chin, code-named P6, running personal computers t>y 
time next year. Since its dnps supply the computing power in more' man 
80 percent of personal computers, bud’s <kvdopment pronouncements 
cause computer makers and software writera to adjust their plannmfi: 

Apple Computer Incx, meanwhile, said that it would license its Macin- 
tosh operating software to competitors that use the PowerPC nucro- 
processor thc company is developing with International Business Ma- 
chines Crap, and Motorola Inc. Tne first Macintosh computers with tne 
new chip ace expected to.be on. the market in March. 


Today Pro. 

0558 0553 

dSS ££ 

« & 



But the company predicted gen- 
erally flat third-quarter earnings as 
its personal products business con- 
tinues to suffer from weak sales. 

John Bryan, chairman and c2ud 
executive, pointed to “ongoing 
softness” in European hosiery and 
knit products and weaker-than-ex- 
pected trends in that sector of the 
U-S- business. fA? Bbombprg) 




NEW YORK (AP) — Salomon Inn, parent of the Wall Street invest- 
ment bouse Salomon Brothers, reported Thursday that fourth -quar ter 
profit more than tripled due to strong performances in investment 
tanking and trading. _ “ 

The company smd net income for the. quarter was 5476 million, or 
$4.3 3 a share, npfrom 5143 miltiran, ntSl .1 n a share, in the same period a 
year earlier. Total revenue was SL8 billion, a 29 percent increase over 52. 1 
biffion in the fourth quarter of .1992; ; - 

tax 




For U.S. Carriers, a Mixed Quarter 

CHICAGO (Combined Dispatches) — UAL Carp., the parent of 
United Airlines, reported Thursday that its fourth-quarter loss was S64 
nriH5n, or S3.02 a share, down film fourth-quarter I992’s loss of S224 
million, or $9.27. But the loss was wider thaa angsts' had expected and 
the compass dtairman called the results unacceptable. 

Delta Airlines lha posted a slightly narrower loss for the quarter, of 
$141 million, or $3 J6 per share, co mpare d with S 1 44.4 mflHon, or $3.46, a 
year earlier. Results in the latest quarter include a charge of SU2J 
million to reflect early retirement ra abort 1,300 employees. 

America West Air&jes Inc. posted a fourth-quanerprofit and. be c a me 
the first UX earriw to end 1993 in the black. America West reported 
fouifbquarter net income of $10.4 nnlHob, or 39 oents a share, compared 
with a year-ago loss of $17.6 mDian, or 75 cents. For the full war. 
America West reported net income of $37.2 irnlKon, or SI. 47 a mare, 
compared with a net loss of $13L8' nnOion, or 55^8, for 1992. 

(Knight-Ridder, Bloomberg) 

Im plant Claims Lead to Loss at Dow 

MIDLAND, Michigan (Bloomberg)— Dow Chemical Co. said Thurs- 
day a previously announced $192 million charge for the cost of settling 


after taking a S433 suDian charge for the costs of an extensive restructur- 
ing. 

The fourth-quarter charge was for a pending settlement of litigation, 
filed by breast-implant recipients against Dow Craning Crap., a joint 
venture of Dow Cheoaical and Craning Inc. Dow. Corning was the larges 
maker of silicone breast implants-untu. they .were .banned in 1992. 

For the Record 

PMBps PetroJeum Gou- announced tiiat fourth-quarter net ea nwn gs 
were $39 mSflion. or 15 certs a riiare. cbuqnedrrim $124 redlion. or 48 
calls a share, for the year earlier. -The company said :an. extended 
shutdown fra scheduled maintenance at the company's Sweeny refinery, 
as well as lower crude ail and gas prices; were responsible fra the 
depressed earnings. •. . (BZnitftt-Ridder) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 



Acec-UM 

AG Pin 

ArMd 

Bore® 

Bckoert 

Cockortll 

Cotwoo 

Dolhali* 

EUKtrabel 

GIB 

GBL 

Govern-! 

Kredleioank 

Pelrallna 

Pawerfln 

Royal Bo lor 


Z 780 2780 
3045 2990 
4170 4200 
7425 2370 
>1100 21275 
183 IB 4 
5790 5790 
1515 1500 
M8P +U0 
1530 1520 
4155 4130 
9280 9230 
7850 7670 
10825 10700 
3520 3540 
5930 5930 


Sac Gen Banaue 9090 9 QS 0 
‘ Soc Gen Beta laue 2690 

Strilaa 1OT0 1OT0 

Solvcy 15075 15125 

Troctabei 

UCB 24775 24*75 

CWTMrtS^rtjgP : 773X38 


Johannesburg 

AECI ISK tag 

Attach 9 X 50 9150 

Anglo Amer 197 193 . 

Barlow* NA ® 

Blwoor *2 7^ 

BuHels 5 Q 50 48 

De Been 106107 A 

Drtetonteln 54 51 

Gencor X 20 Xa 

GFSA 9950 93 

Harmony 3 * 2 * 

Htohveld Start 17 1750 

Kloof 50 _ 4 B 

NeObank Gra 2750 27 jg 

R OT CHcntrtn 4250 4150 

Rusplat 7650 75 

SABron U B 2 J 5 

St Helena etSO NA 

Soio] 19 1 X 75 

Wrtksm 43 42 J 0 

Weswrnpaep 1 * 51*150 



Taro Aul Rw 


Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 
Bank Monlreal 
Bell Canada _ 
BomOartJnr B 
CamtnW 
Cascadex 
Dominion Tort A 

Donahue A 


fACcMIlton Bl . 
Nall BK Canada 
Power Cora. 
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Sao Paulo 

Banco do Brasil 9800 9500 


Sydney 


Amcor 10-10 939 

AN 7. X36 £33 

BHP 1B58 1X22 

Bard 625 422 

Bougainville 1.10 1.16 

CotosMvOT £34 £35 

Conwm 5-30 LS5 

CHA 17-72 1766 

CSR £25 £25 

Dunlap £73 £6* 

Fastarx Brew 134 134 

Goodman Field 1J6 1J6 

ICl AuslTOllO 10-90 11 

Magellan 2.10 2.10 

MIM 278 278 

Nat Ausl Bank 1262 1236 

News Carp 9J3 9J0 

.Ntoa Network 6io £» 

N Broken Hill 365 155 

Pioneer Inti 265 264 

Nmndv Paaeidon 265 24* 

OCT Rewurcei 163 163 

Santos 3.92 336 

TNT 262 230 

Western Mining 730 73* 

Westaoc Banking 5.M 56 1 

Wondslde 625 620 

^Ma nBij OTfato l^dei : 325X70 


Banesta 

Bradesco 

Brahma 

Parompongma 

Petrabros 

Telrtiroo 


6700 6400 
7700 7800 
1230a 1265a 
8500 8600 
72000 77500 
19200 20780 


Vale Rio Oace 54990 56990 
Varto 90000 82000 

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573 573 

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Schindler B 7B50 

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Swiss Retnsur R 695 
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82 JS 7120 Apr 94 7600 7617 7675 

7465 7125 Jun+4 7420 7437 7195 

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Financial 

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Cammodfiy Indexes 

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Thyssen Plunges Into Loss 

liixt Company Sees Improvement This Year 

D * 1?aKha " ■ Yhyssen's 1993 loss was the parative figures. Mr. Kriwd said 
rKANNrURT — - Thyssen AG worst for the company in 40 years the group expects earnings in the 
on Thursday posted the worst an- and was “characterized by the high current level to be above year-earli- 
nual results in its postwar history, loss at the sled division/ the chief er levels. Sales for the three months 
but said U e xp ec t ed an improve- executive. Heinz Kriwet, said, ended Dec. 31 rose 12 percent to 
mrat m the current year. Thyssen Stahl AG, the stedmaking 8.1 billion DM. 

The diversified sari and machm . umt, reported a net loss of 1234 
cry concern reported a loss of 994 biffina DM for the financial year, 
million Deutsche marks ($568.6 iiiore than four times they ear-earli- 
million) in the 1993 financial year, cr levcL 
which ended Sept. 30, and said it 'Hie finance director, Heinz- 
was omitting its dividend. A year Gerd Stein, said that excluding its 
earlier it had made a profit of 350 5ted operations, Thyssen had an 
million DM andpaid a dividend of .-.operating profit for the year of 744 
6 DM a share. million DM. He did not give com- 


MetallgeseUschaft Keeps 
To Forecast on OU Losses 


FRANKFURT — Metaflgesdlschaft AG, the German metals and 
manufacturing conglomerate, said Thursday that- the unwinding of 
its oil-futures positions was going better than expected. The compa- 
ny said it would be able to keep to its estimate of a 1.5 Kmon 
Deutsche mark loss from the oil trades. 

The company has sand it faces aloss of to to 1.5 bflEon DM ($859 
minion) on top of a revised 1.8 bflhonDMJossfor the business year 
ended last SepL 30. 

The company said the liquidation of dl futures positions in New 

Vnrlt is rrmhntting fa rtflr than planned. **This doesn't refer to thfl rize 
of the loss, but to rapidity and smoothness” of unwinding the 
contracts, a company spokesman said. 

The new. management, under Kari-Josef Neuknchen, infonned 
the supervisory board about the terms of a 3.4 billion DM rescue 
partragp approved by more than 100 creditor banks earlier this 
month and the status of the ofl-futares contracts. 

MetaB geseflschaft . said Thursday that it had. scheduled a press 
conference fo^ Feb. 22, and analysts expect the company to describe its 
plans to sell various units in greater detail. (Bloomberg, Knitfit-Ridder) 


But the company still was in the 
red, he said, as heavy losses in the 
steel unit continued to dominate 
results. He declined to say whether 
the company would post a profit 
for the 1993-94 year. 

~~ — — However, Mr. Kriwet said, “We 
year of 744 have reasons for bang optimistic in 
* oivp- com- the medium lean, not m the con- 
text of general economic expecta- 
tions, but because of measures 
winch we have taken and most of 
which are taking effect" Those 
measures include job cuts. 

On SepL 30, the company em- 
ployed 136^75 people worldwide, 
down 7 percent from a year earlier. 
On Dec. 31, that figure had sunk to 
133,862 people, down a further 23 
percent (Bloomberg, AjFP) 

■ Usmor Lose Widens 
The French steelmaker Usmor- 
Sacflor said its 1993 net loss grew to 
a record 5.8 billion francs (S977 
million) from 2.4 billion in 1992, 
wider than the company’s Novem- 
ber forecast of 5.0 bilfon francs, 
wire services reported from Paris. 

Sales fell to 75.4 billion francs 
from 87 HilKnn. 

The company also said that it 
was maintaining its forecast of a 
ipy t this year of 2 biHiOEQ francs, 
based on unchanged demand. 

Financial Director Robert 
Hudry said recovery was mainly 
expected to be achieved through 
hi gher steel prices and further cost- 
cutting. (AFX, Reuters) 


More Woes 
For German 
Automakers 

The Juvaated Pres 

BERLIN — German auto- 
makers reported more bad 
news Thursday, with Audi 
saying it must slash work as’ 
pay by 10 percent BMW an- 
nouncing a 73 percent sales 
drop last year, and the indus- 
try as a whole predicting stag- 
nation in 1994. 

Battered by Germany’s re- 
cession and weak export mar- 
kets, the industry shed 

70.000 workers to a total or 

650.000 as production 
slumped 23 percent last year, 
said Achim Diekmann, head 
of the German Automobile In- 
dustry Association. 

Safes in the sector fell 20 
percent to 189 billion Deut- 
sche marks (SI08 billion} in 
1993, Mr. Diekmann said. 

Bayerische Motaren Werke 
AG said Thursday that it made 
a profit last year, although it 
did not say bow much. It raid 
sales in 1993 were 283 billion 
DM. down 75 percent from 
1992, and production was 
down 92 percent 

Audi AG’s unprofitable 
parent Volkswagen AG, won 
agreement from staff last year 
to go to a four-day week. Audi 
may now be cm a similar road. 

Production at Audi dropped 
30 percent lasL year, and the 
company needs to cut its wage 
costs by 10 percent said a 
spokesman, Karl-Heinz 
Rumpf. He said talks had be- 
gun with a workers’ group on 
cost-cutting. 


Turkish Devaluation 
Unsettles Markets 


Realm 

ISTANBUL — Turkish slocks 
tumbled and money markets were 
unsettled mi Thursday after Prime 
Minister Tansu Ciller tffectively de- 
valued the lira by almost 12 percent 
The central bank knocked 11.97 
percent off the dollar value of the 
lira on Wednesday night after Ms. 
Ciller met for eight hours wiih her 
lop economic officials to discuss the 
money crisis. The bank set its daily 
dollar rate at 17,250 lira, compared 
with 15,186 lira on Wednesday. 

The lira ended on Thursday at 
about 17,650 to the dollar. 

The Turkish currency hit trouble 
10 days ago when excess liquidity 
flowed into foreign currencies. Ef- 
forts by the central bank and trea- 
sury to staunch the flow by hoisting 
interest rates failed to calm markets 
alarmed by the downgrading of 
Turkey's credit rating by two U5. 
agencies. 

Ms. oner's decision to devalue 
reversed assurances she made last 
week that people dashing for for- 
eign currency would lose and inves- 
tors in the lira would win. 

Istanbul’s 69-share index 
plunged 8.6 percent in the first 90 
minutes on Thursday. It ended 7.64 
percent lower at 19,513.60, down 
1,615.04 points from Wednesday 
and down about a third from its 
record high of 28,883.61, reached 
Jan. 13. 

The centra] bank also said it 
would impose liquidity require- 
ments on the nondeposit liabilities 
of banks, including foreign curren- 
cy debts and asset-backed securi- 
ties. It raised its rediscount rate to 
56 percent from 48 and abolished 
reserve requirements on deposits. 


The central bank also scrapped a 
rule under which banks had to in- 
form it two days in advance before 
changing deposit rates. 

Big state banks responded swift- 
ly by increasing their one-year lira 
deposit rates on Thursday to 88 
percent from about 74. 

Brokers said they expected the 
market to stabilize after it had di- 
gested the central bank measures to 
defend the lira. 

"The market was ready for a de- 
valuation. There may be some psy- 
chological falls but it will recover 
quickly," said Metin Dizdar. assis- 
tant general manager of Birikim 
brokers. 

Exporters, whose goods will be- 
come more competitive abroad, 
were nonetheless concerned about 
the devaluation. “Although we ac- 
cept that devaluation win constitute 
a driving factor for exports, we are 
concerned that cost inflation will 
create negative impacts in the short 
term,” Okan Oguz, chairman of 
Turkey's exporters assembly, said. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 

•' FTSE 100 Index 


Parte 

CAC40 





%'sowr 

• ■ «S3- v 1994 

exchange / . Index ' 

Amsterdam . . AE X' 



29(30, 


A S O N. 0:.J 
1933 1994 


A S' O.N D-J 
.1993 1994. 


Thursday Prev- 
Close .•.••.close 

425.71 425.82 


Bmssete"-'..'.': Stock Index 


7,73858 7,71022 


%' . 
Change 

' + 0.02 

: +0.37 


Frankfurt.-- 'OAX 


Frankfurt' 
Helsinki . 


FAZ 


2,125.14 
817,48 •■ 


• 2,119.17 +0.28' 


609.41 +-1.0Q 


HEX 


1,870.20 1 <873.52 • rO.19 


London ■ ■ ’ : .Financial 2,627.28 
London •' FTSE 100 T" ' 3 - 427 - 30 
Madrid *■ General index 


2,641.10 -0.53 


3,436.10 ' -0-26 


351.56 346.59 ' 


Milan 


M1B 


1,018.00 1,005.00 


+1.43 

+1.29. 


CAC40 


' Paris 

Stockholm • Affasnsvaeriden 


.Vienna 


Stock Index 


2^8098 

1,77446 

5Q1.35 


2.282.35 -0.06 


1,746.50 +1-60 


5Q1J33 •+0.00 


Zurich/.',. . ses 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


1,068.67 ... 1,066.01 +0-3S 

LmcfDiTj. ual Herald TriHmc 



Bank of France Sets a Long-Term Target for Money Growth 

¥>.. /-_-i r- ggjg ^ not going to be a con- cash into longer term securities, ■ Eli Bank Inert 


stnrint on poScy.” 

joher Potts at 


t-ach into longer term securities, 
will also “carefully monitor” 
rhangre in total domestic debt 
This measure, which includes 


By Carl Gewirtz 

huanatiomol Herald Tribute 

PARIS — Market expectations 
of an imminent cut in French inter- 
est rates "were dashed Thursday 
when the newly independent Bank 
of France announced no change in 
its monetary policy. 

The bank for some time has been 
in a situation where managing in- 
terest rates vra the supply of money fid not want to box iiseu in, sain ^.-j^-Clande Trichet, gover- figure 

confiicted wxthstabniz^tnevamc g^jarilGodemeDt at Nomura So- -r »he central bank, spelled oat uoninflationaiy real our growin 

of the franc against the Deutsche .’ cmiriest “It would have risked be- Intl , n lfl i factors responsible for the potential of 2J-to-3 percent and 
mark- ... . . .. , ihg damned if it had set no target JvvtfalL sudi as the government's prioe inflation of no more than 2 

•^Trying tojnani^e.b^^raal ^ ^sied Poking ally if it was privatization program and the huge percent . 

and external targets can be soantta- seatlobemisangtitotiUBiiL ^BaHadnr” bond. “The resulting nominal GDP 

dioory," aParisbankef observed, that the council wants He said the bank “wffl continue growth potential wffl be usrf to mcm- 

“and the bank is : in formulating to analyze the factors affecting M-3 jtor total demesne debt, win ch wiD be 

short-term priority remains fo- ktad growth mdosdy" but, given the singled out as an extremdy valuable 

afc-ifciw— i 


TV— .-Jlnr'hntifr l oe DaniC SprOCUCUJ 13 LUB1. JU ***- imviui, uit 

ilv u. 4 . 3 measure of money si^plv last “Themediinn-termtrradmM-3 

• ^S'dear that the bankas nevdy vear badly missed the 4-to-6 J per- growth should be in the order of 5 
fcamed Monetary PoEty CouncO w shrinking 1.6 per- percent,'* be said, adding that “this 

(fid not want to box itself in,” smd Jeah-Clande Tridiet gover- figure is arrived at bg combinmg 


EU Bank Increases Loans 
The European Investment Bank, 
the financing arm of the European 
ooent loans 


on Thursday, Agence France- 
Presse reported. 

It lifted lending to 19.6 billion 
Ecu ($21.56 billion), up from 17 
billion Ecu in 1992. In 1993, it lent 
17.7 billion Ecu for projects within 
the EU, and 1 .9 billion Ecu outside. 


Germans Cite 
Optimism on 
Russian Debt 

Reuters 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Ranh AG said Thursday that 
Russia wanted a speedy resolu- 
tion to its debt problems. 

Deutsche Bank chairs a 
committee of banks owed 
money by Russia. The com- 
mittee's chair man. Christian 
Vontz, held talks in Moscow 
on Wednesday with Russian 
officials, including Prime Min- 
ister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin. 

Deutsche Bank said there was 
a dear will on the Russian side 
to push debt negotiations for- 
ward Talks will be resumed as 
soon as possible, the bank said. 

The t»lk<, aimed at resched- 
uling $26 billion of bank debt 
owed by the former Soviet 
Union, have been held up be- 
cause of legal problems. The 
Hanks want Russia to waive its 
sovereign immunity. 


Very briefly: 


■ Montedison SpA said its offer aimed at doubling its capital to 5.834 
trillion lire ($3.4 billion) was 99369 percent subscribed. 

• PolSat a Polish company, beat a host of foreign media giants to win a 
license to create Poland's first private nationwide television channel. 

■ The European Independent Steelworks Association asked the European 
Union to safeguard supplies of scrap metal against unfair compettuon. 
citing Central "and East European nations and Turkey. 

• The Dutch economy expanded by a revised 0.8 percent in the third 
quarter from a year earlier, more than the initial estimate of 0-5 percenL 

• Rank Organization PUC appointed Sir Denys Henderson a 

live director, adding that it expects him to become chairman m 1 995 when 
he retires as chief of Imperial Chemical Industries PLC. 

• Burton Group PLCs stock plunged 13 percent to 58.75 pence (87.8 U.S. 
cents) a share, after Sir John Hoskyns. its chairman, said there had been 
no increase in Christmas and New Year sales over the previous year. 

■ ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd. said it had formed a joint venture with the 
Russian turbine manufacturer Nevsky Zavod. 

■ The Czech Republic's second wave of asset sales will be delayed by a 
month due to administrative problems, the local press reported. 

• The Ukrainian parfiament adopted a privatization program for 1994 to 
sell 20,000 small enterprises and 8.000 medium and big companies. 

• Forges de Clabecq SA's shareholders agreed that the Belgian steelmaker 
would continue its activities. 

• lveco SpA, Fiat SpA’s industrial vehicles umt, reached an agreement 
with unions under which some working hours will be reduced to savejobs. 

■ German companies that lost money in the Gulf War trade embargo 
against Iraq have no claim to compensation from the government the 

country's highest civil court ruled, 

J ^ AFX. AP. Bloomberg. AFP. Reuter, 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1994 


Page 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


"Deadline 

* b 1997 ’ 

For the 
Hard Yuan 

„ Return 

HONG KONG - China j^y 
have little choice bui to make its 
yuan currency freely convertible by 
w,Une itraams Hrag Kong 
the coton/s de facto central 
gowraor said Thursday. 

With Hoag Kong set to keep its 
exchange control-tree regime after - 
we handover, Beijing would be at- 
post powerless to stop a free mar- 
ket m yuan springmg up in the' 
territory, said Joseph Yam, chief 
executive of the Hong Kong Mone- 
tary Authority. - • • r 

Bering abolished its n ffhj nl ex- 
change rate od Jan. I in favor of a 
managed float" based on rates at 
quasj-frce market iwapeenters. 

Economists said fim convextibQ- 
ity was still far off and only select- 
ed enterprises have access' to the 
swap centers, which are carefully 


Singapore Stocks Leave Forecasters at Odds 


Hong Kong 

Han^Sefig. 


■ Singapore- 
-Starts Times,; 


Tokyo.. 


By Michael Richardson 

latemattonai Herald Tritent 

Singapore — After t&mhin ^ 75 

percent from an all-time high on Jan. 4, 
Singapore stocks are advancing R gwn. 
However, fund managers and brokets of- 
fer sharply differing views on how the . 
nHrk'rt wQl‘ perform in coming wee ks. 

Jaidine Fleming Research Ltd is tiffing 
potential investors in its latest survey of 
- Singapore that the recent sefl-uff provides 
. an excellent buying omortuaityi or seket- 
ed bank, property, snip-repair and con- 
sumer stocks. 

“WebeSeye themaricef's correctionwiir 
--be shortlived and that jane benefit will be- 
a reduction in speculative activity as punt- 
* os tide their wounds,” said iim three 
Hna, research maimgef in the company’s ■ 
S^pore office. 

She said that foreign tn*rifnrinn s were 
expected 'to be net buyers, of Singapore 
equities in 2994 because of the marke fs 
solid, fundamentals, tow downside ride, a 
-strong Singapore currency and political 


gion is gradually becoming less attractive. 

The Straits Times Industrial Index 
closed Thursday at 2,286.28, up 30.81 
points or 137 percent for the day. its peak 
on Jan. 4 was just under 2,472. 

Jardine Fleming predicts dial the index 
will be testing- new highs by the second 
(pater and that Singapore wifi be one of 
me top performing Asian markets in 1994. 

The index gained 59 percent in 1993, 


weQ behind the Philippines. Hong Kong, 
Malaysia. Thailand and Taiwan. 

The plunge in the overheated Malaysian 
stock maritet this month dragged Singa- 
pore down as well because over half of 
Singapore's daily trading activity is in Ma- 
laysian shares. 

A recent increase in prime lending rates 
of up to one-half of a percentage point by 
three of Singapore’s four major local 


Kuala Lumpur Leads Asia Higher 


be forced to allow a free market 
within the next three yean wiiepy it 
imposed internal exchange control 
barriers between Hong Kong and 
the rest of the nation. 

“They don’t really have much 
time,’’ he said. ‘There is nothing to 
stop : a market in ranmribi being 
established in Hong Kang after 

stnets the^flow of rexunbln to 
Hong Kong.’’ - 

Hong Kong wffl keep the Hong 
Kang dollar as ilsicurreacy after it 
becomes a Special Adzmmstrative 
Region of China on July. 1, 1997. 
But under Beijing's “one country, 
two system” famnda, it will also 
keep its bee port character that 
allows free conversion and flow of 
foreign currencies. . 

“In a way this is the deadline for 
convertibility of the re nmin bi," 
Mr. Yam said. 

Mr. Yam said he had mentioned 
tins to Deputy Prime Minister Zhn 
Rongji last year- Mr. Zhn, who is 
also governor of People's Bank of 
Onto, the central baakjbad seemed 
surprised bw the idea but had nioair 
ised to study it, M£ Yam said. 


However, Crosbry Securities is tiling hs 
clients to strongly underweight Singapore. 

The company says thai whik ji ranks 
Singapore “wol ahead of other regional 
economies overall on a long-term basis, we 
do not fed that the undoubtedly good 
macro-fundamenlals justify current valoa- 

Crosby asserts that both economic and 
earnings growth in Singapore are stowing, 

- interest rates are rising and Singapore^ 
stock, market, relative to others in the re- 


CompUed bp Qw Staff From bapauka 

KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysia’s 
benchmark stock index soared 4 J7 per- 
cent on Thursday as investors bid up 
shares after a fall triggered by central bank 
measures to quell speculation. 

Other major Asian markets wore higher, 
as well, except for the Tokyo Stock Ex- 
change. Tokyo’s 225-share Nikkei index 
lost 1J29 patent tp dose at 18,891.79 
points as domestic investors showed un- 
willingness to buy until Japan’s political 
uncertainties were dispelled. 

In Hong Koqg, Thailan d, Taiwan and 
South Korea share prices all finished 
sharply higher after recent losses. 

Toe weighted price index of the Taiwan 
Stock: Exchange scared 3 percent, to 
6,02239 pants, on hopes that the govern- 
ment would soon lift its S3 billion ceiling 
on stock investments by foreign financial 
institutions, analysts said. 

The composite index of the Seoul ex- 


change, recently reined bade by govern- 
ment market-cooling measures, galloped 
ahead 1.46 percent, to a four-year high of 
907.44. Analysts said investors were bull- 
ish on blue chips because they stood to 
gain most in the economic expansion fore- 
cast for the coming year. 

In Kuala Lumpur, the stock exchange’s 
Composite Index gained 44.93 points, to 
1,07434. . 

Moras in the last couple of weeks by 
Bank Negara, the central bank, to discour- 
age speculation in the ringgit by foreign 
investors have contributed to the Kuala 
Lumpur market’s sharp CaU. 

The rebound Thursday was assisted try 
comments from Prime Minister Mahathir 
Mohamad, who told the state news agency 
Bernama: Tf you look at Malaysian com- 
panies you win find that day are doing very 
wdL In fact, some of them are doing better 
than some d the giant companies in the rest 
of the world.” (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


banks ended a two-year downward trend 
in interest rates, unnerving some investors. 

“While such increases had been antid- 
paled, they will nevertheless dampen mar- 
ket sentiment short term," said Sim Chey 
Hoon, a senior analyst at Peregrine Securi- 
ties Singapore Pte. 

Their is also nervousness about plans 
by the government to increase compulsory 
retirement savings for all residents. 

The release of the annual budget next 
month and the introduction of a 3 percent 
tax on goods and services in April is also 
causing some unease. The tax is expected 
to result in a one-time increase in the 
inflation rate of between 1 and 2 percent. 

John Engle, research director at Smith 
Barney Shearson HG Asia (Singapore) 
Pte^ said that while the fan in stock prices 
over the past few weeks had caused a 
heavy shakeout of retail investors, most 
institutional investors were “sitting tight-” 

He said that earnings of pubhdy traded 
companies in Singapore were likely to in-, 
crease by just over IS percent in 1994 and 
by 16 percent in 1995. That compares with 
12.5 percent last year. 

“Although the current phase of consoli- 
dation could last for a few months, we are 
quite bullish on the outlook for the Singa- 
pore market in the the latter part of the 
year,” Mr. Engle said. 

The U.S. Embassy, in a report on the 
Singapore economy, said that the gross 
domestic product was likely to expand by 
between 7 and 8 percent in 1994 after 
adjustment for inflation of just under 4 
percent 




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= ' •■>;fl7<24y =;n'jB293VV- : +437' 


CoiTtoo&aeStodk W44 - . :■ 854 ^ .+V 46 - 


Foreign Investors Salivate at Samsung Heavy Listing 


Annoy 

SEOUL — Samsung Heaiy In- 
dustries Ca will list on the Seoul 
stock market on Friday, hdpiug 
meet same of dm growing foreign 
demand for hard-to-got Sooth Ko- 
rean blue dims, analysts said. 

Samsung Heavy, tie shipbofldmg 
and heavy machiner y affiliate nf die 
Samsung Groop, launched.® offer 
of 15 million new tones an Dec! 17- 
18, taking the company’s total out- 
standing shares to 49 irnTHon and 
enlarging the paid-in capital to. 245 
baffian won (S3Q2 trS&od). " 

“SHI will be listed (to toe market 
on Jan. 28 and foreign investors 
can buy op to 20 percent of total 


outstanding shares,’* a Korea Stock 
Exchange official said. . 

Analysts said the Samsung 
Heavy listing will prompt a fresh 
influx of money from overseas in- 
vestors who have been watching the 
market's bull run from the sidelines 
and are frustrated by a 10 percent 
limit on foreign investment in any 
one stock on the Seoul exchange: 

*T expect strong interest, espe- 
cially from foreign investors as they 
are keen on acquiring shares in the 
Seoul bourse,” said John Wadle of 
Barclays deZoete Wedd Securities. 
The subscription price for toe initial 
public offer was 10,000 won per 
share, muting a prospective 1994 



. Compiled bp Om- Staff FnmDbpateba 

TOKYO — Armco Steel Co, toe unprofitable, 
joint venture bctwctn Annco Inc. and KawasaJri 
Steel Corp, is sedang U3. Sccorities arid Be- . 
‘ dtonge -Ckmumsaqa approval to make a public 
^oflqmg^rfjigj>ercenf AMs c^toal , z Kawasaki 
official -sand Tfioryday. , .’ !;■ - ‘ . 

iaj^anntorto Owe$3B ma&onby 
selling .15.75 miffioa shares at 520 a share, the 
<^dal said. ; 5 

Officials bfArmcofnd said toe cffetingwotild 
result intheU3L couqjaBy’sodtfrom the ventare. 

Aaxadmg to news rgtortSi Kwasild^Sted ^ $aa 
to buy Azmco Inc.V 50 percent stake m mc joint 
venture and sufeeqaendyrei taoei g own stake to 23 


percent once the pultoc offering is finaEzed. Armco 
SlceTs emptoyee shareholding group would contin- 
ue to iota a 10 percent Stake in the company. 

Armco Steel will also launch a S275 million 
bondssue in the Upmarket to raise funds needed 
io sepay bank borrowings and outstanding pen- 
aou contributions, toe Kawasaki official said. 

: Armco Sled, which produces flat-rolled carbon 
sted at plants in hfiddleiowii, Ohio, and Ashland, 
Kentucky, had an operating loss of $419.9 million 
-in 1992. ...... 

In 1992, Armco Inc. reported an equity loss of 
S234J rntOten from the venture. A year earlier, its 
equity loss was $119 million. . 

(AFX, Bloomberg) 



price-earnings multiple of five times. 

Many believe Samsung Heavy 
will start trading at around 30,000 
won, given toe frantic demand 
from domestic and foreign inves- 
tors for fundamentally attractive 
companies. 

“The company is toe only play 
on the booming shipbuilding in- 
dustry av ailabl e to foreign inves- 
tors at the moment. There is also a 
name value attached to being a 
Samsung Group affiliate,” said Da- 
vid Kim of Schrodas Securities. 

Hie only pubhdy traded ship- 
builder is Hanjin Heavy Industiy 
Ox, under Korea Stock Exchange 
supervision after years of tosses. 


Philippine Executive 
Still Seeking Phikeco 

Return 

MANILA — A Philippine busi- 
nessman, John Gokongwri. asked 
the Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission Thursday to block share 
sales by two units of Singapore's 
Keppel Corp. The companies, which 
are planning to ruse 800 nuflioo 
pesos (.S29 millioo), along will Ka- 
wasaki Heavy Industries Ltd, are 
seeking a stake in Fhtoppine Ship- 
yard & Engineering Coro. 

Mr. Gokongwd's JG Summit was 
part of a consortium bidding for 
rhDseoo last year, but tost toe deal 
when Kawasaki exercised its option 
to top his 2.03 biHian peso bid. 


Keith Nam. representative of 
H.G. Asia, said he expected few 
subscribers to Samsung Heavy 
shares would be wflling to part with 
them until the price readied the 
40,000-won level He added that 
valuations justify a short-term 
price appreciation to 50,000 won. 

“They are listing at the best time 
with investors longing for expen- 
sive blue chips,” said Chey Jong 
Hyon. genera! manager of Lucky 
Securities. 

Upon Samsung Heavy’s listing, 
the stake held by five other Sam- 
sung units will drop to 48.9 percent 
from 70.9 percent, of which 225 
percent is held by South Korea’s 


largest electronics maker, Samsung 
Electronics Co. 

Shares available in the market 
will therefore amount to about only 
50 percent of toe total as the old 
shareholders are not expected to 
liq niriatft their holdings. 

Sanunmg Heavy forecasts calen- 
dar 1994 net profit rising to 1025 
bDlion won from an estimated 86.8 
bflhcm won in 1993. That would 
imply a forecast of earnings per 
share of 2,092 won. 

Mr. Kim, predicting slower mar- 
gins this year because of lower- 
priced ship orders obtained in 1992 
and 1993. estimated earnings per 
share of 1,985 won. 


’ Manila \ " ■ 'ComriosK®" ■' ■' ’ &060*3S-\ -2*985.61 -■’.+0.45 j 
SfiSSr Stock Index /■' ;;--S$p8- \>*kS7 j 

•KZS&'M : : ’/• -;2>30 642 •: R28*.n ?+1.08 j 
Bombay :V • .Netipnaj Index > ■ , 1 ^LiQ | 

Sources: Reuters. AFP Uuaiuuual Herald Tritwr-. 


Very briefly; 

• Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association said vehicle exports in 
1993 fell by 115 percent — the largest decline in 41 years — as the yen s 
rise boosted prices and major export markets shrank. 

• The Ministry of tateraatiouol Trade and Industry said sales at major 
Japanese department stores and supermarkets fell 45 percent in Decem- 
ber from a year earlier to 2.64 trillion yen ($24 billion). 

• Mitsui Muring & Smelting Ga win cut 500 jobs at its metal division anu 
close a lead smelier by June as part of a much larger restructuring 
program; toe division work force now totals 4560. 

• Mitsubishi Corp. is opening a division to prepare for entry into toe 
multimedia business. 

• yhpawih«»n ( one cf China’s economic experimentation zones, enjoyed 3U 
percent economic growth in 1993, more than twice the nationwide rate; 
its gross domestic product was 41.35 billion yuan ($4.75 billion). 

• China light & Power Co. reported a 75 percent drop in first-quarter 
revenue, to 3.2 billion Hong Kong dollars ($4135 mimon), reflecting a 
drop in electricity sales by toe utility to southern China. 

• Vietnam is raising import taxes on gasoline and motorcycles to 50 
percent from 40 percent starting Feb. 15. 

a Hand’s iwnlw extended $1.4 billion in new loans last year, a nine- fold 
increase over loans made in 1992. 

AP. Return. AFX. AFP 


BARING MUI1IAL FUND MANAGEMENT SJl. 

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13, rue Goethe 

R.C.LnnrabovglttO(69 


DIVIDEND NOTICE 


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13. rue Goethe 
L-1637 Luxembourg 

Board of Director* 



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'Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1994 


SPORTS 


Speed Makes the Difference in the Cowboys 9 Miserly Defensive Unit 


By Richard Justice 

Washington Post Service 

ATLANTA — As reporters smothered quar- 
terback Troy Aikrnan and running back Em- 
mitt Smith, as they swarmed around wide re- 
ceiver Michael Irvin and quizzed the offensive 
coordinator, Norv Turner, it was easy to think 
--of the Dallas Cowboys as a team built solely 
around a great scoring machine. 

Actually . . . 

1 “Our offense sells tickets,” Smith said with a 
" smite “Our defense wins championships." 

He may be exaggerating a bit, but his point is 

■ accurate. The Cowboys have one of the best 
quarterbacks in the National Football League 
" and perhaps the best running back. No wide 
receiver, except maybe Jerry Rice, makes more 
' big plays than Irvin. 

Vet when you ask the Buffalo Bills, and the 
teams that have been flattened by the defending 
! Super Bowl champions this season, it's a quick, 
deep and talented defensive unit they keep 
, talking about. It's a defensive line that rotates 


seven players and wears offensive lines down by 
the thud and fourth quarters. It’s smallish line- 
backers that are fast enough to cover mim i n g 
backs and tough enough to take on tight ends. 
It’s two outstanding coverage corner backs. 

When the Cowboys ripped the Bills, 52-17, in 


last January, Aikman and Irvin had big days. 
And the defense forced nine turnovers. That 


And the defense forced nine turnovers. That 
defense was the No. 1 -ranked unit in the NFL 
in 1992. and this season it is one of the reasons 
the Cowboys are 10- point favorites to become 
the sixth team to win consecutive Super Bowls. 

But it is easy to argue that defense isn’t what 
it used to be. 

“It’s been a lot harder this year,” defensive 
tackle Russel] Maryland said. "People have 
been real critical of us. They say we're not the 
same, we don’t have the same desire, that kind 
of thing, I know we have the same character and 
talent and that’s what counts. That’s what got 
us here. Say what you want about Emmitt 
Smith. Troy Ailunan. Michael Irvin — they’re 
great players — but when it comes down to it, 
defense is just as important” 


In a season in which they found out why it is 
so difficult to win back-to-back championships, 
die Cowboys fell from first to 10th in total 
defense. Defensive end Qiarles Haley, perhaps 
their single most unstoppable player, has been 
slowed by muscle spasms ail season and will 
probably play only in spot situations, mainly on 
passing downs, on Sunday. Maryland, iheir 
best lineman against the run, is playing on a 
severely sprained ankle. 

Still, if teams believe it is easier to score on 
the Cowboys this season, it is actually harder. 
Despite the injuries and the slip in rankings, the 
Cowboys still allowed six fewer touchdowns. 
The 21 touchdowns were the fewest ever al- 
lowed by a Dallas i«m. and only one other 
NFL team — the New York Giants, with 20 — 
was harder to score against. 

The defense allowed one touchdown or none 
in 12 of 16 games, and after a season-opening 
loss to the Washington Redskins, it gave up 16 
in the Goal 15 regular season games. After that 
opening loss, the Dallas defense allowed 11.9 
points per game. 


Smith and the Dallas offense deserve some of 
the credit for that success, since the Cowboys 
hog the ball for 31 minutes a game and keep 
thar defensive players fresh. And since they 
score so often, opponents often find themselves 
playing catch-up, which allows the Dallas de- 
fense to gamble more. 

“The best thing we have going for us is a 
bunch of defensive linemen who do different 
things," Maryland said. “An offense can t get 
into any kina of rhythm with the t hing s theyre 
trying to do. If I'm in there a while, then Leon 
Lett comes in. it’s a completely differentstyle. 
An offensive lineman has to wonder “who s 
coming at me next? 


losophy into his coaching career during college 
stops at Pittsburgh, Iowa Stale, Oklahoma and, 
as a bead coach, at OHahoma Stale. Speed was 
the signature skin <ft&his University cf Miami 
te am s, and when he came to the NFL* be saw 
no reason to change. ‘ 

“I’ve always believed .in speed,”- Johnson 
said. “Our philosophy has always been to at- 
tack rite line of scrimmage. This worked well 
with the dominant players we bad at Oklahoma 
and at Pittsburgh- Then at (Mdahnna 
when we didn’t have as talented a group,- we 
found we had to play a more aggressive style.” 


SeChicagp Bears a few day? after last year’s 

Soper BowL . _ 

sun. the defense IS 


StllL tne L/aiuis 

—allowed virtually nothing to 

wide receivers, including Great Bajfs Sterling 

Sharpe and San Frandsco’s Rice. 

“One thing we tty to do is take the wide 
receivers out of the game,” Kerin Smith said. 

. ?If you do that, your front seven can be more 
a g gres s ive. The linebackers can be so much 
■more aggressive against the miming game and 
the qurnkpasang game.” 

“We don’t get the recognition of some other 

deftises,” he said, “bot we’re in the StqterBow 

for a second straight year. That speaks for 
itsrif.” 


“Do I like coming out at times? Well, put it 
iis wav- I like eaine to the SuDer Bowl, and 


The Cowboys’ outride Jinebadcas, Dixon 
Edwazds and Darrin Smith, are small by NFL 
standards, and Haley and Maryland are both 
undersized at their position. So is defensive end 
Tony Tolbert,, who nadTfe sacks. Defensive end 
Jim Jeffcoat, one of the leftover from the Tom 


this way: I like going to the Super BowL and 
I’ve been to two m a row.” 

It is not a classically designed strategy. As a. 
195-pound defensive end at the University of 
Arkansas, the Cowboy coach, Jimmy Johnson, 
learned that speed can be as effective as 
strength in some cases. He took the same phi- 


Jim Jeffcoat, rate of the leftovera from fixe Tom 
Landry era, had rixl 


“It’s the wave of tbefntoxej^ Mar yland 
“A Jot of teams have been trying to do it since 
we had some success.” . 


Can Thomas Run Past Dallas? 
Only Behind the Bills’ Front 5 








THE SUPER BOWL ON TV 


cafiiK-t. : 


By Timothy W. Smith 

New York Times Service 

ATLANTA — It took about 
three seconds for Thurman Tboro- 
, as to surmise just what, against the 
‘ Dallas Cowboys this Sunday, it 
would take for him to duplicate last 
week’s 186-yard, three- touchdown 


game against the Kansas City 
Chiefs. 


“It's not up to me." he said, 'it's 
up to my offensive line.” 

And with that Thomas, a multi- 
ple threat as a quick, shifty runner 
and sure-handed receiver out of the 
backfield, deftly sidestepped a 
thorny question and loaded a boul- 
der the size of Mount Rushmore on 
the shoulders of his front five 
blockers for the Super BowL 
But the way that they have 
played through the playoffs, they 
might be able to carry the burden 


and help Thomas do something 
that be hasn not done since the 


that he hasn not done since the 
Bffls' first Super Bowl: rush for 
more than 100 yards. 

Thomas had 135 yards on 15 
carries against the New York Gi- 
ants in Super Bowl XXV. The next 


year, he got 13 yards on 10 carries 
against the Redskins. And last 
year, in the 52-17 loss to the Cow- 
boys, Thomas got 19 yards on 1 1 
carries. But the Bills fell behind so 
quickly and turned over the ball so 
often (hat Thomas was rendered 
virtually useless. 

The Bills do not want that to 
happen again. This is not the same 
group that played in last year’s So- 
per BowL The biggest difference is 
that Will Wolford, the Pro Bowl 
left tackle, sgned with the India- 
napolis Colts as an unrestricted 
free agent. So. now they go John 
Fina at left tackle, Glenn Parker at 
left guard, Kent Hull at center, 
John Davis at right guard and 
Howard Ballard at right tackle. 
Parker has replaced Jim Rite her, 
who started last year’s Super Bowl 
at left guard. 

Parker was asked to characterize 
the offensive line. 

“WeQ, if yon had to pick a word, 
‘big eaters,' ’’ he said. 

Maybe that is why, in lieu of the 
Rolex watches that r unning back 
Emmitt Smith gave his Cowboy of- 


Comparing the 2 Teams 


Raeular Smsm 


POSS. TIME (avg) 

30:56 

27:30 

OPFENSE 



TOUCHDOWNS 

41 

37 

DaL 

But 

Ruining 

20 

12 

GAMES (Won-Last) 

1M 

tw 

Panina 

10 

20 

a 

FIRST DOWNS 

Rutfiing 

Passtna 

Penalty 

323 

120 

314 

117 

Returns 

EXTRA POINTS 

3 

40 

9 

34 

1»S 

X 

175 

23 

FIELD GOALS/FGA 
POINTS SCORED 

30/37 

376 

23m 

327 

YDS GAINED (tot) 

MIS 

5260 

DEFENSE 



A vo o«r Game 

ssu 

3388 


DaL 

Bar. 

RUSHING (net) 

2141 

1M3 

POINTS ALLOWED 

229 

242 

A vo per Gome 

I3S.1 

123-4 

OPP FIRST DOWNS 

297 

331 

Rutfwe 

*0 

550 

Rushing 

*4 

114 

Yards nor Rusii 

4 A 

U 

Passing 

176 

11* 

PASSING (net) 

3«54 

3317 

Penalty 

27 

10 

Avo par Game 

ZltV 

207J 

OPP YARDS GAINED 

4747 

5554 

Passes AH. 

475 

497 

Avg per Game 

2975 

347.1 

Completed 

117 

304 

OPP RUSHING(net) 

1451 

1921 

Pci Compteted 

44.7 

41J 

Avg per Game 

1012 

120.1 

Yards Gained 

3517 

3535 

HUtfWS 

423 

500 

Socked 

2* 

31 

Yards per Rush 

If 

U 

Yards Lost 

143 

218 

OPP PASSINGInet) 

3116 

3433 

Had Intercepted 

1 

18 

Avg per Gome 

IMS 

227.1 

Yards Opp Ret 

47 

174 

Posses AH. 

555 

5B2 

Opp TDs an Ini 

0 

0 

Com Meted 

334 

323 

PUNTS 

54 

74 

Pet Convicted 

402 

55J 

Avo Yards 

41.8 

404 

Sacked 

34 

37 

PUNT RETURNS 

37 

33 

Yards Lost 

231 

256 

Avo Return 

IDJ 

U 

INTERCEPTED BY 

14 

23 

Returned tor TO 

2 

1 

Yards Returned 

171 

304 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

34 

45 

Returned far TD 

1 

3 

Avg Return 

21.1 

164 

OPP PUNT RETURNS 

32 

2f 

Returned far TD 

0 

0 

Avg return 

S3 

AS 

PENALTIES 

W 

M 

OPP KICKOFF RET 

44 

43 

Yards Penalized 

744 

43a 

Avg return 

184 

19JB 

FUMBLES BY 

33 

2* 

OPP TOUCHDOWNS 

23 

25 

Fumbles Last 

14 

17 

Rushing 

7 

7 

Opp Fumbles 

22 

35 

Passing 

14 

18 

Opp Fum Lost 

M 

li 

Returns 

2 

0 


Tensive lineman, Thomas derided 
to go in a different direction to 
reward his blockers. 

“He gave us a roast,” said right 
tackle Howard Ballard. 

Like a Yankee pot roast? 

“No, a roast,” Ballard said. 
“Like with people that get together 
to tell jokes about you.” 

Earher this season, the offensive 
line did not have the Buffalo offen- 
sive line coaches rolling in the 
aisles. First, they had to replace 
Wolford. They chose Fina. a first- 
round draft pidt in 1992. 

“I was a little skeptical about 
losing Wolford,” Hull said. “In our 
offense, the left tackle is probably 
the toughest job. We throw a lot 
You’re blocking the best pass rush- 
er, week in and week out. My hat’s 
off to John Una. He’s done a heck 
of a job. He was a center last year. 
That's a big step going from cento' 
to left tackle. 

“He faced some of the best pass 
rushers in training camp. He 
passed every test Derrick Thomas, 
Pat Swilling, Chris Doleman. 
Those are Pro Bowl players. He 
passed the test on all those. I wasn’t 
worried one bit when the season 
started.” 

But then the Bills had some inju- 
ries and Parker played both tackle 
and guard. He was not comfortable 
because of all the shuffling, and in 
the last five games of the season the 
team put him at left guard. Hull 
said the group has got better since 
it had become more stable. 

The five are definitely coming 
off their finest performance of the 
season. The Chiefs used a defense 
designed to take away the KBs’ 
pasting attack. So the Bills’ coaches 
changed the blocking scheme to 
take advantage of the fact that 
Kansas City had just one lineback- 
er on the field, (fee result was 186 
yards rushing for Thomas. 

“Last week we ran a lot on the 
comers,” Hull said. “We got chi our 
primaries pretty good. I don’t know 
if you can be successful doing that 
against the Cowboys. Their team 




The Super Bbwl on Jan. 30 fJan.31 in 
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aecanSng to the National FootbaB 
Le ague,- wS be te J e c ast m the following 
countries: 


In the fallowing countries, the gat ne 
will only be carried Bve, on the ESPN 
I nt ernational sateSte sports network 


EUROPE 











' 4 SS 


'v/-’ 




Aatfhriot Premiere, Eurosport. 

Belgium:' Canal Plus, TVCF, Euro sp ort. 
Bulgarin: Bulgarian National TV. ' 
Cyprus: Luawera. 

Cnch JUpafaSc/Slavalda: Czech Tete- 
vriarvEmuport. 

Denmar k. Scamat TV3*, Eurosport. 

Channel 4* Eorasparf 
Finland: Eurosport, Channel 3. 

F rance : Canal Pfus*. Eu ro sport . 
Cemnaiy: Pr emiere*, E ur os p ort. 
Crncs: Euro sp ort. 

Husigmyi Eurosport. 

Maid: OkbwwI 4*, Eurosport. 

Bohr TetepiO % Eurosport 
UadrtansMK Canal Hus. 
Luxembourg Eurosport 
Monaco; Caned Ptut 
Nrideriande CTl 4*. Eurosport. ’ 
Norway . Searaot TV3*. 

Mara t Trievwzjo PoWtq, Eurosport. 
Port u gal: SIC, Eurosport. 

Korminki. Teksvnaunea Romano, 
fcaria: Ch. 6 (Moscow*. 
SlownlVCwdla Eurosport. 

Spate Canal Pius*, Eurosport. 
S w ed e n: Soansat TV3*, Eurosport. 
Switzerland: Premiere, Eurosport. - 
Turkey: Eurosport 


ASIA-PACIFIC 

Bang la de sh , Brunei, Burma, Cambo- 
dia,' French Polynesia, Futuna, Guam, 
Inda, Laos, Macau, Micronesia, Mongo- 
Bo, New Caledonia, Palau, Pddstan, Pa- 
pua New Guinea, Rota, Sri Lanka, US. 
Samoa, Vietnam and pals of the former 
Soviet Union. 


AMERICAS 


AnguBa, Antigua, Arubcc Schemas, 
B a rb ad o s , Belize,- Bermuda, Bolivia, Barv 
aim, Cayrntn blonds. Ode, Colombia, 
Goto Rico, Cuba, Domi n ion Ecuador, 
French Guiana, Grenada, Guadeloupe, 
Guat emal a, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, 
Martnque, M o nt s errat, Navis, Nicara- 
gua, Paraguay, Peru, Saba, St Boris, St. 
Christopher, St Kitts, St. Luda, St Mer- 
lin, St. Vincent, Surinam, Tortola, Uru- 
guay, Venezuela, Wafts. 



Y-:: : 


AHA/PACIFIC 


■■•4A -HR) 

!*• -Vi 

ff; jo* 


i-t- -• i y-rT -" - • •; . j i 








Aaslratc E5PN International, ABC*. 

- China: ESPN Inti, OrienfcrfTV*. 

Hong Kong; HK1VB, BH9 MemafonaL 
Ind on esia: ESPN International, RCTL 
Japan: NTV*, hWK* Sumitomo. : 
Malaysia: E5PN I n te r national , . Ro- 
cfio/TV Malaysia. 

New Zealand: ESPN Infl, Sky Mmda. 
PH KppW BPN tnf'l. World 21. 

Si n g ap or e. ESPN foternotionot, SBC 
IbaUcmdb ESPN International TVl 
Tatwceb BPN Trrtematioht i , VkJcotand. 


MIDDLE EAST/AFRICA 

Algeria.' Bahrain, Chad, Dfibauti, 
Egypt, Inm, Iraq, Jordan, labanoa Li>- 

yu, M o u tft a a ia , Morocco, Oman, Qatar, 
Somrfa, Sudan, Syria, Tanzamq, Tuni- 
sia, United Arab Ei i uu te s, Yemen and 
the broe8 Occupied Territories. - 

The Armed Percse Netwarii tetevi- 
sian dtamei, bond in Frankfurt, wt9 
.broadcast the gone Eve. AR4 can be 
seen in hotels In some major aties that 
m within the rtmge of AFN Iransmis- 
nan towers. In Belg ium, AFN television 
can be received bvthe-BnnHb area but 
anlyon NTSC mritayUem tdovision sets. 
In Hedy, AFN a avakdiie in the Pisa 
area, on muttsyriem sets. The AFNs 
tulecaiti in Britain era carried only an 
dosed droit. ‘ ' 


•- 

Mat SdnuAfiec Fawe-hnK 

Thuramn Thomas was strained to get 19 yards on 11 carries agamst the Cowboys last January 


MIDDLE EAST/AFRICA 
broefc ESPN bitemotionol, Cable ICP. 
Kuwait: ESPN Intematianal, Kuwait tV. 
Saw! Andrfro ESPN Inti Cable OES. 
South Africa: E5PN Int i, Cable MNET. 


The For Eart Network will braadca* 
the game live in Japorv.bpL Only on 
dosed arouit on Ui md&cntbates. jQw 
F nrE n it In K o rea NWwerttiieB'brop&- 
ant the Super Borri Bve rndls awflable 
at most hateh m Seoul 


speed is incredible. They run well. 
That makes it awfully hard to do 


That makes it awfully 
those types of things.” 


“Dallas has a great front like 
Kansas City," Thomas said. “I 
think Dallas's from four is a little 
bit more active and aggressive than 
the Kansas City front four. The 
yards might be a little tougher, but 
hopefully the offensive linemen 
and center Kent Hull can make all 
the right calls and have some lanes 
opened up for me. 


there to keep them off balance with 
the run and the pass." 


■ Georgia Sticks by Flag 
Despite plans for a protest by 
church ana civil-rights leaders at 
the Soper Bowl, Governor ZeD 
Miller said the state flag of Georgia 


would fly over the Georgia Dome 
on Sunday, The Washington Post 
reported. 

The state flag has been a source 
of contention for years in Georgia. 


Thomas agrees with Hull, but 
hopes the offensive line has another 
good game in the storehouse. 


“1 don't think we’ll be able to 
accomplish what we accomplished 
last week. But hopefully we can get 


CrvQ-rights leaders wrote to the 
NFL’s commissioner. Paul Tagfia- 
bue, in December requesting that it 
not be flown during the Super 
BowL The NFL has declined to get 
involved, claiming it is a local mat- 
ter. 

Black legislators in the state 
House of Representatives and Sen- 
ate have introduced legislation this 
year to chang e the flag because & 
portion of it contains what they 
consider to be a racist symbol, the 
Confederate battle emblem. 


AMEMCAS 

Argentina: ESPN.infl, T el ipo rt. .. 
Brazil: TV B u ndw an tes*, ESPNJnt'L 
Canada: Gtobd (Engfeh], RDS [French}. 
Carucoo: ESPN W e mafand, IDS' 
Do m i n ica n tepufaOc BPN Jntl, Ch. 6*. 
B Safva d ew ESPN-Jnfl, Canal Doe. 
Jc emrirui ESPN bi tem ationd, CVM. 
M ex ic o . Televisa*. 

Ptaanu: ESPN lnt1,.TeievBora 
TrMdwMbbQBa: BPN Inti AVM-TV. 


AIN radb in Europe wtfl broadcast 
the game ct the frequency of 987 an the 
EM band and the'frequenan of 873, 
1707, 1143, ond 1485 on the AM band. 
The network no longer 'broadocaii an 
shortwave, but can be received on the Lr 
band at 1537 megahertz on the internet- 
bond maritime sateCte system. 


The US. metary's Far Eart Network 
w3 broadcast Bie game Eve on radb at 
the-AM-.freqoency of 810. It, too; no 
longer bro adonets on shortwave, but can 
be received on the L-bond at 1537 
megahertz on the intemahond montime 
satdEte system. 


■ These networks are 
Inte r national w9 pruvic 


ovidng Sve com m e n tary from the Super BowL £5PTV 
commentary in English, Mandom and Spanish, as 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 





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* ..THE CURIOUS INCiDEMT OF 
THE DOS IN THE NIGHTTIME/ 


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Admits Knowing, Afterward, of Attack on Kerrigan 


the Associated ftrat 

MELBOURNE, Australia — It 
took just 126 inisuies. 

Strffi Graf and Arantxa Sanchez 
Vicano turned in predictable semi- 
™ vxcwnes Thursday at the Aus* 
tralian Open to set op a final ho- 
tween the _ world's top-ranked 
women tennis players. 

. ^top-seeded Graf took a frac- 
non over _an hour to rout Kinriko 
Date, . 6-3, 6-3, and gain her fifth 
AmtraBan Open singles final 
. ■ Sdnchez Vicario, the No. 2 seed, 
then took 65 minutes to crush 
fourth-seeded Gabrida Sabafini, 6- 
1, 6*2. 

. Three-time champion Graf won 
the first mnepoints against a dear- 
ly nervous Date and never relin- 
quished her grip on the match. 

She used her crushing tppspin 
forehand to move the lOth-soeded 
Date around the court and the 23- 

year-old Japanese never was aide to 
establish a rhythm in her firet 
Grand Slam semifinal. 

Gxaf, 24, advanced to her 22d ’ 
Grand Slam final, having lost an 
average of only three garry* per 
nat c h here.- The German won the 
French Open, Wimbledon and the 
U.S. Open last year, but hasn't won 
the Australian Open sines 1990. 

Monica Seles, still recovering af- 
ter being stabbed in the shoulder 
by a spectator in Hamburg last 
April, took the women's title the 
past three years. . 

“Steffi attacked and played with 
great pace," Date said, n did not 


glcs semifinal, made 23errors and 
was unable to establish control of 
points with her moderate .service. 

Her forehand was particularly 
eiratic and she never, approached 


Irate, the first Japanese in 21 
years to contest a Grand Slam sm- 

WOMEN'5 SIMSLE5 SEMIFINALS 

Staffl Graf 0), Germany, deCKImlko Dot* 
HO). JOOCIO.M. M; Arantxa SondmVlGarla 
tZ>. SpabUtoL CdrMo SIMM (41. Arawtft- 
nG.A-l.A4. 

, MBITS DOUBLES -SEMIFINALS.. 

Jooco EltbiMt and Foul Haartota, Itottwr- 
kntfiaj^kUlartlaDoiwiiQMl Kail Ntva- 
ertt. Craft RuxAHc. 4-L64. M; Byron Hodt, 
ZtmbatMvw and Jonathan Starts US- CZI.dsL. 
■toi April and JonmBtor ta novS wecte n .l-IA- 

MIXED DOUBLES ' 
Qaartcrflnate *. 

Andrei ORiovadv, Russia, and Lartoo IW- 
tand. Latvia (6). detcyrn Sate, CtkIi RwhA- . 
He. and GW Fernandez, ujB, CO. M. >* 04 

SgmWmIs 

Todd WaadbrldBW AwtrDDa, add Helena 
Sokova, Craft Republic OX. deL EmHJo Son- 
ctat and AraMnSancho^tciirta, spate (M, 
M.M. -V 


nez, in the quarterfinals. • 

But Graf, now 3-0 against Date, 
was not happy with her game. 

■ “With short prajHs,Tiot very long 
rallies, Irtevergotinto the rhythm I 
wanted," she said. “The points 
were a lot shorter than when we 
played the other two times." 

Graf hnrt her right thumb in the 
final game. She said she jammed it 
against ha knee while playing a 
shot, but was not experiencing any 
pmff after the match. 

S&ndtez Yicario was equally as 
dominant against Sabatiin, who 
rarely advanced to the net and 
made 30 unforced. earns.. . . 

“It is a great feeling," said the 
Spaniard. “After loang three times 
in .the semifinals here. I. finally 
madelL” 

S&nchez Vicario said her willing- 
ness to take the initiative gave her 
the edge over a strangely reluctant 
Sabatnn, who said she still fdt 
weak because of a virus earher in 
the tou rnament. 

“I knew I had to be regressive,” 
SAnchez Vicario said. “She hits the 
ball short and I tookmy chances. I 
always had control and feh very 
comfortable.” 

The final indignity for Sabathii 
came late in the match, when she 
turned her back to the net after 
hitting a ball long. 

S&ndiez. Vicano, not sure the 
ball was going to be out, reached 
'far it and lifted a sky-high lob that 
floated softly down onto the back 
of the frustrated- SahatinL . 

. “I have to say it was not good, 
tennis at ah,” Sfinchez Vicario takL 
“I drink it was disappointing." 

She has lost to Graf in 21 of (heir 
26 pterions meetings, but said, 
Tmriot afrakL Fm going to jriay 
rny own gomes and she’s die one 
under pressure. ’ 

“She’s beatable. She’s human, 
not a machine. If 1 play 100 percent 
and take my chances I can beat her. 
I have nothing to lose.” 

The men’s semifinals are sched- 
uled for Friday. 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings . ~ 
eastern conference 

Affcnrilc DMUm 

— W L PC* 
New York 2T II 


Florida m. Gaorgia 79 
.GWM Mason SX Wiliam A Mary 74 
-Jamas Matgson T9. East Carolina E 
Kentucky TV, Sooth Carolina 47 
Maryland XLCkmoa S3 
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N. Qmltna AST 88, N.CrGfMnstMn) SO 
NL CaraRna SI. 84, Gaarata torti 71 


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HOCKEY 


NHL Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE ■ 
ANontlc DMston 

W L T PH OF 6 A 

lESST S S i S5S 

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Taranto 
.DotroH 
Dallas 
St Loot* 


WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 


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But U.S. Skating Champion 
Denies Helping Plan Assault 


Wm Bmsest/Kmfcn 


Sinr HNUnO/Tbe Aaooaud hth 


GUESS WHO LOST — Kinriko Date, left, lasted just 60 minutes against Steffi Graf; Gabriela Sabarini managed five mhnites more. 

No. 2 Duke Just Eludes an Irish Upset 


The Assodated Press 

Marty Dark made the most out 
of a miss for No. 2 Duke. 

He tipped in Grant Hill's shot 
with three seconds left to play 

Dame, 

*T just decided to crash the 
boards from the wing and get to a 
spot where I thought it might 
come," Clark said. “It came right to 
me.” 

The Bine Devils (14-1) wan for 
the 87th straight time at home 
against a non- Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference opponent Notre Dame (5- 
12), which led by 12 points late in 
the first halt threw away the ball 
with 14 seconds left, leading to 
Cladds tiebreaking basket. 

"It seems like it’s all for naught 
when you lose by two points,” Mid 
Monty Wiffiams, who got 34 points 
for the Irish. “It says something 
about Duke, but it also says a lot 
about 41 k character on our team.” 

Joe Ross tipped in a miss by 
WQHams with 2*26 left, giving No- 
tre Dame a 72-69 lead. But Okto- 
kee Parks made two foul shots and 


Oiri$ Coffins sank one, tying it at 
72 with 37 seconds to go. 

Notre Dame tried to set up for 
the final shot, but Lamarr Justice's 
pass glanced off Ryan Hoover’s 
Lands. 

The Irish got the ball twice after 
Clark’s go-ahead basket Hrst, they 
threw away an inbounds pass. 

COLLEGE BASKETBALL 

Then, after Antonio Lang missed 
two foul shots for Duke with two 
seconds left, WIIHams took a long 
shot just after the buzzer. 

No. 3 Kansu 62, Oklahoma 
Slate 61; Steve Woodbeny sank a 
3-point shot with 1.5 seconds left in 
overtime and tite Jayfaawks 18-2, 3- 
1 Big Eight) beat the Cowboys (13- 
6, 2-2) for the 30th time in 32 games 
in Lawrence. 

Greg Ostertag tied a Kansas re- 
cord with eight blocked shots and 
got 1 1 rebounds mid nine points. 
Brooks Thompson scored 23 for 
the Cowboys. 

No. 4 North Carofma 96, Florida 
State 77: Denick Phelps had 22 


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FIFA Still Irked by French Inaction 

ZURICH (Reuters) — FIFA’s general secretary, Sepp Blatter, said 
Thursday he would meet the French Football Federation’s interim 
president, Jacques Georges, in Colmar, France, on Friday and tdl him a 
timetable-had to be set for the Marseille bribery matter to be resolved. 

• The new manager of England’s team is to be announced Friday — it 

is expected to be Terry Venables — because senior officials were 
attending the funeral of Manchester United's farmer manager. Sir Matt 
Busby, on Thursday. (AP) 

• Wolfgang Niersbach, spokesman far the German federation, said it 

was prepared to switch the friendly against England from April 20 to 
April 19 “if the security experts say we should dio it." (Reuters) 

Yacht Jury Drops Winston to 3d 

SOUTHAMPTON, England (Reuters) —The U.S. yacht Winston was 
dropped Thursday from second place to third in both the second leg and 
■ overall standings of the Whitbread race by the International Jury. 

It cm four hours off the compensation time granted Winston for taking 
part in the rescue of the Italian yacht Brooksfidd during leg two. 
Whitbread 60 rival Galicia 93. Intnnn Justitia, and Yamaha daimed the 
Jury a significant error in its original decision in Fre mantle . 

Jordan Improves Baseball Chances 

CHICAGO (AF) — Michael Jordan took batting practice with the 
Chicago White Sac general manager, Ron Schuder, and seemed to 
improve Iris chances of earning an invitation to spring tr ainin g. 

“I think he’d have to fall on his face not to do it, but I'm not ready to 
say for sure just yet,” Schuder told the Chicago Tribune. “I would say 
wehl have a decision within 10 days — by next week.” 

• Ri ght- hander Andy Benes avoided arbitration by agreeingto a on&- 
year contract with San Diego for S3, 005,000, a raise of 5955,000. 

For die Record 

EnseEb of South Africa tied the European Tomrecord with 12 birdies 
and broke the course record by three strokes by shoot 61 in the Dubai 
Desert Classic. He had a five-shot lead ova Jon Lomas and Mark Roe of 
Britain. (Reuters) 

rh wrtl j race track was spared closure when the conned that oversees \ 
French horse racing voted to keep the 160-year^old facility open while i 
dosing the track atMnsans-Lamte, west of Paris. (AP) 

■ .PkneTkgma.ffie All-Star center of theNewYodc Islanders had his 
rig ht cheekbone broken by a puck during pregame warmups: he probably 
will require surgery. (AP) I 


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Non*. Stefs on pool: w (on Hsbort) 3+8—20. 
A (on EsteOta) 13-7-5-25. 


CRJCKET 


SECOND TEST, SECOND DAY 
India v Sri Lata 
Tlmdavla B un adara. India 
ladle m Mk 541-4 
Sri Lonkg lrt lantnus: 5*2 


SOCCER 


ENGLISH LEAGUE CUP 
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ITALIAN CUP 
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SPANISH CUP 

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FOOTBALL 


ATLANT A - H omed June ■* —«_ 
cooch. end Jim Bata defand« art™* 
CINCINNATI— Named LanY Peecatieno 
detenstee coordin at or- 
CLEVELAND— stoned Tony -tones, onen- 
tfra tacKUL to 3-raar eontract. 

Cincinnati— N amed Botar DePteii «*- 
tendw mutant coocn. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Homed Jim JrteBon 
Itoeoacken coach. 


pcants and Dante Calabria 20 as 
the Tar Heels (16-3, 4-2 ACC) 
scored the game’s first 12 points 
and won at Florida State (8-7, 1-6). 

Na 9 Kcntacky 79, Son Gan- 
na $7: Jeff Brassow scored 23 
paints and Jared Pride ett had 17 
rebounds as Kentucky (15-3, 3-2 
Southeastern Conference) woo its 
32d straight game at Rupp Arena. 
Jamie Watson scared 21 points for 
South Carolina (5-10. 2-4). 

Na 11 Irafiana 78, No. 17 Minne- 
sota 66: Daman Bailey set a school 
record lor c are er 3-pdmt shots and 
Indiana (12-3, 5-1), playing at 
home, took over the conference 
lead 

Bailey made four 3-pointers for a 
total of 149, one more than the 
mark set last year by Calbert 
Cheanery. Bailey finished with 19 
points and Alan Henderson had 20. 
Randy Carter scored 18 paints for 
Minnesota (13-5, 4-2). 

No. 18 Maryland 73, demson 
S3: Duane Simpkins scored 18 
points as Maryland (12-3, 5-1) 
matched its victory total for all of 


last season and tied Duke for the 
ACC lead Clemson is 10-8, 1-5. 

No. 19 West Virginia 87. Du- 
quesne 67: Marsalis Basey got 27 
points as West Virginia (13-2. 6-1 
Atlantic 10) beat Duquesne (9-6. 3- 
3) for the 15th straight time on the 
Mountaineers' home court 

No. 20 Alabama- ffinningfiHni 62, 
DePmd 59: Carter Long scored 21 
points and Al aha ma -Brmri rEh am 

(15-2, 3-1 Great Midwest) held off 
visiting DePaul (124, 2-3) when 
Tom KJemschmidt missed a 3- 
point shot at the buzzer. 

North Carolina State M, No. 21 
Georgia Tech 78: Guards Lakista 
McCuUer and Curtis Marshall each 
scored 19 points as the Wolfp&ck 
(6-10, 24 ACQ surprised the visit- 
ing Bulldogs (1 1 -6, 24), uriio got 28 
pomts and 13 rebounds from James 
ForresL 

No. 23 Sl Lous 76, No. 22 Mar- 
quette 66: Erwin Claggett scored 23 
points as St Louis (15-1, 3-1) 
avenged its only loss of the season. 
Marquette (] 1-5. 4-1) had won on 
Saturday. 


Carolled h Our Staff From Dispatch# 

PORTLAND. Oregon — U.S. 
figure skating champion Tonya 
Harding said Thursday that she 
knew details of the attaik on Nan- 
cy Kerrigan after it happened, but 
denied planning to injure her rival 
and said she wanted to remain on 
the U.S Olympic team. 

Wearing a jacket issued mem- 
bers of the U.S. team at the 1991 
World Championships, Harding 
said she was "embarrassed and 
ashamed that anyone close to me 
could be involved” but said she had 
u no prior knowledge of the attack. " 

“1 am responsible, however, for 
faiHng to report things 1 learned 
about the assault when I returned 
from natio nals- " she said, reading 
from a statement- 

It was at the U.S. National Fig- 
ure Skating Championship in De- 
troit that Kerrigan was hit above 
ho- right knee with a metal baton 
on Jan. 6. The injury forced her out 
of the competition, which was won 
by Harding. Kerrigan was later giv- 
en a spot on the team. 

“Many of you will be unable to 
forgive me for that.” Harding said 
of her failure to inform authorities 
of what she knew about the attack. 
“It will be difficult for me to for- 
give myself ” 

She gave no indication of what 
information she withheld. She said 
her first reaction upon returning 
hone was “disbelief, followed by 
shock and fear.” 

Harding's former husband. Jeff 
Gillooly; her onetime body guard, 
Shawn E Eckardz; Shane ML Stant, 
who authorities say struck Kerri- 
gan and Derrick B. Smith, who 
authorities say has confessed to 
driving Slant away after the attacks 
have been charged with conspiracy 
to commit assault, a felony in Ore- 
gon. Under sentencing guidelines, 
the crime carries a penalty of three 
years in jail if the judge determines, 
as Donald H. Lender of the circuit 
court for Multnomah County has 
in this case, that the crime reflects 
“aggravated circumstances." 

Even if Harding is charged, her 
attorney has indicated, she will 
fight any attempt to remove her 
from the U5. Olympic team com- 
peting at the Games in Lflieham- 
mer. Norway, next month. 

"1 still want to represent my 
country in Lillehamroer next 


month,” she said Thursday. “De- 
spite my mistakes and rough edges, 
1 have done nothing to violate the 
standards of excellence and spon- 
manship that are expected of an 
Olympic athlete." 

She said she had told authorities 
what she knows about the attack 
and “although my lawyers tdl me 
that my failure to immediately re- 
port tills information is not a crime. 
1 know 1 have let you down, but 1 
have also let myself down.” 

She made repeated references to 
Kerrigan and expressed saddness 
over her injury. 

“Nancy Kerrigan and I can show 
the world two different types of 
figure skating," Harding said. “1 
look forward to being on the team 
with her.” 

She continued her training with a 
brief, half-hour skate during which 
she took a fall that left her holding 
her back in pain. 

Gtifooly returned to the FBI of- 
fice for what his attorney. Ronald 
H. Hoevet, said would be another 
five or six hours of questioning. 

With Hoevet. Gillooly went into 
FBI headquarters through a back 
door at 2 P.M. Wednesday and 
emerged at 7:40 P.M. 

A source familiar with the case 
said Gtflooly was trying to “cut a 
deal.” while NBC News reported 
that Gillooly was trying to work 
out an arrangement in which he 
would plead guilty and get an 18- 
month sentence. 

Hoevet, who earlier had consis- 
tently denied he was negotiating a 
plea bargain with authorities, said 
only “no comment" Wednesday af- 
ternoon when asked whether a plea 
bargain was in the works. 

The Multnomah County prose- 
cutor, Norm Frink, would not com- 
ment Thursday on whether au- 
thorities were any closer to 
arresting Handing. 

Harding and Gillooly had main- 
tained they were innocent of any 
wrongdoings Though they were di- 
vorced last August, they had recon- 
ciled and were living together until 
lasL week, when Harding an- 
nounced she was leaving him. 

Harding was “shocked and very 
hun" when she saw news reports 
that Gillooly was willing to testify 
against her, said Stephanie Quinte- 
ro, a close friend who harbored 
Harding after she moved out on 
Gillooly. (AP. ATT) 


Under the patronage of 

HH General Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum. 
Minister of Defence. UAE 


DUB ^1 


JANUARY 31 - FEBRUARY 6, 




▼ E-N N 
OPE 
19 9 

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VUE A WORLD SERIES 
■ FI B ATP TOURNAMENT 

DUBAI 


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Season Tickets tan motebM/on 

Grand Stand: Dhs. 500 

Box Seat* Dhs. 3,670 (Including full hospitality) 

Tickets available between 12 noon and 8pm from: 
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The Forte Grand Dubai, Tel: (9714) 826242 
AGMC BMW Showroom, 

Dubai Tel: (9714) 664798 
Spinneys, Jumeira, Tel: (9714) 494565 

FDr f urther information, please cal (9714) 826700. 

Timings 

QuaHying: 

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stein Draw: 

QRfcfft 2pm & 7pm 
SSKoi onwards (Semi-Finals) 


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INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
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The Dubai Tennis Open - a world-series ATP tournament with 
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The Aviation Chib Tennis Centre hosts the action on court as well as 
all the fun off iL There's a Fast Serve Speed Test and Dubai Duty Free’s 
Tennis Surprise and Souvenir Shop. There are food and drink stalls and an Exhibition 
area. There's a Ball Count and the opportunity to test-drive BMW care and bikes. 

Dubai celebrates this grand sporting occasion with other events too. There's a 
Charity Fashion Show and a Shopping Mall Tournament Display. And competitions 
to enter, fike Guess The Player. Celebrity Boy & Girl and a School Essay Competition. 

The Dubai Tennis Open 1 994. Ifs a week full of fun and excitement. Don't miss it! 


Sergi Bruguera 
Thomas Muster 
Petr Korda 
Magnus Gustalsson 
Flictiard Kraflcek 
Karel Novacek 
Alexander Volkov 
/van Lendl 
Watty Masw 
Wayne Ferreira 
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Javier Sanchez 
Andrei Cherkasov 
Emfflo Sanchez 
Jason Stoltenberg 
Darren CahBl 
Marcos Ondruska 

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Christian Bergstrom 
Grant Connell 
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Todd Woodbridge 
Luke Jensen 
Murphy Jensen 
John Fitzgerald 
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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1994 


OBSERVER 

The PC Length Problem 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Steven Jobs. 

onetime boy computer genius, 
was telling a radio reporter the oth- 
er evening that when he started out 
he never reared his business might 
fail because the old crocks of the 
world would refuse to adapt to the 
personal computer. Experience 
showed that children loved the 
things, and history. Jobs said, 
taught that sooner or later old 
crocks always died. 

in short, he was in a business 
with a future. I sensed this too 
when personal computers fust be- 
gan burping and beeping ail over 
the landscape. Though 1 hadn’t yet 
beard of Steven Jobs, it was obvi- 
ous that these machines would have 
to be Taced unless I wanted to be- 
come an old crock and pass away. 

1 have decided not todo that. Pus 
away, that is. Naturally then, within 
days of fi/st seeing youngsters play- 
ing happily with personal computers 
1 acquired a personal computer. 

Learning to use it didn’t take 
nearly as much time and work as 
the average guy with a tin ear 
would need to learn the piano well 
enough to give a passable perfor- 
mance of Beethoven’s “Appassico- 
ata" at an American Legion hall. 

Once mastered, the personal 
computer turns out to be a very 
good invention. It is not only die 
best typewriter ever made, it is also 
a terrific dictationist, ringing up 
faraway telephones and reading 
them what I write, thus saving me a 
trip to the post office. 

□ 

People who make the things, 
however, still decline to eliminate 
their many unpleasant defects and 
nasty features. Mine, for example, 
seems to have an embarrassing case 
of dandruff. By picking up the key- 
board. turning it upside down and 
banging it lightly on the table a few 
times, 1 can always collect a little 
pile of fine, white flaky material. 

Whether this comes from the 
keyboard or from me is hard to say, 
and I prefer not to know. Much as I 
dislike the thought that minute 
fragments of me may be disappear- 
ing into the keyboard at a fairly 
steady rate, it's even more unpleas- 
ant to find yourself harboring a 
machine with dandruff. 

Typewriters in the old-crock era 
never presented this problem be- 
cause their keyboards didn’t have 


floors attached underneath. Falling 
scalp, flaking fingertips, hangnails, 
fingernail dirt, beach sand, sweater 
lint — whatever fdl into a typewrit- 
er keyboard Tell right on through 
and was never thought of again- 

Even worse than the nasty detri- 
tus in the computer keyboard is the 
furry mess inside the main box. 
whatever they call iL I once had a 
professional come because my ma- 
chine was in utter collapse. He 
opened the box and pulled out a lot 
of essential-looking hardware that 
was encased in tightly woven and 
revolting layers of hairy matter 
sucked out of the air over the years. 

“You have to clean it out once in 
a while," he scolded, producing a 
mining vacuum cleaner. Sure you 
da but when you get the screwdriver 
to open the thing up. what do you 
see? A warning that fooling around 
inside this box may be fatal 

o 

It’s bad enough dying because 
you've become an old crock. It 
would be humiliating to die of try- 
ing to avoid being an old crock. 

If computers were half as mirac- 
ulous as people like Jobs think they 
are. they’d come with interior self- 
cleaning systems that took that gar- 
bage out of Lbere with the push of a 
button. If something as primitive as 
a cookstove can clean itself, why 
does something as futuristic as a 
computer make you risk death to 
get the h'nt out? 

Now here's another terrible de- 
fect, and I don't mean the way they 
position the screen way up in the 
air miles from the keyboard so you 
have to keep bending your neck 
until you get a splitting headache. 

The graver flaw, however, is that 
it doesn't make writing painful 
enough. Using the typewriter, you 
also had to use scissors, paste, sta- 
ples and pencils whenever you 
changed your mind. It was hard 
work. People thought twice before 
writing 500-page books. 

The computer makes writing so 
easy that nobody has to think at all 
before knocking off a 500-pager. 
Result: The typical 500-pager nowa- 
days reads as though nobody had 
thought at alL My suggestion: a new 
system warning writers that they 
have reached the 300-page mark and 
that going over 330 will produce a 
death-dealing electronic assaulL 
Perfection still awaits. Mr. Jobs. 

New York Times Struct 



‘Philadelphia’: The Real Story Continues 


By Laura Blumenfeld 

Washington Past Seme e 

W ASHINGTON — By the time of the trial, his edges 
were so sharp he had to sit on a pillow. He was 6 - 
feet-4, 100 pounds (1.93 meters. 45 kilograms), skin 
draped on bone, his neck floating in a white collar. He was 
suing the law firm that had dumped him when his supervi- 
sor learned he had AIDS. “I actually begged him.” the 
dying attorney told the judge. But his supervisor “goi up, 
said he was sorry and left-” 

As the man testified, his eyes rested on bis mother. It 
was hard for her to look back, and when her son’s Ups 
began to shake, she had to leave the room. 

The case unfolded in Philadelphia in 2990 in a court- 
room. not a movie seL It was one of the lawsuits studied by 
the makers of “Philadelphia." Like the Elm’s Tom Hanks 
character. Clarence Cain, 37, was a funny, bright, success- 
ful lawyer who won a discrimination case against his 
employers before he lost to the disease. 

But the Cain plot has an extra twist. Cain had worked in 
Philadelphia for one of the multistate chain of Hyatt Legal 
Services offices. The head of that chain. Joel Hyatt, is now 
running for the Senate. He is the Democratic favorite for 
the Ohio seat being vacated by bis father-in-law, Howard 
Meizenbaum. The release of “Philadelphia" just as the 
Ohio primary races are building momentum has dropped 
sand into the Hyatt campaign machinery. Political rivals 
have been highlighting the parallels between the stories. 

“The movie is fiction," Joel Hyatt says. And this is true. 
In the Hollywood tale, the law fitm’s chief, played by 
Jason Ro bards, is anti-homosexual and muepentanL The 
real-life story is more nuanced and more intriguing. Yes, 
Hyau approved of Cain's dismissal. But Hyatt has since 
apologized and says he has grown from the experience. 

Cain spent his final months in poverty, back home in 
Newport News, Virginia, with his mother, a retired bus 
driver. Of 10 children, Cain was the only one to attend 
college. He had helped support them an. Suddenly his 
siblings were sending him beans and canned com. They afl 
pitched in to buy him a television. Because of Hyatt's role 
in this sad ending. Hyau. too, has become vulnerable. 

During the filming. Richard SQverberg passed the mov- 
ie vans parked outside City Hall every day and thought 
about his former client. Clarence Cain. He never spoke lo 
anyone. He never saw Denzel Washington, who portrayed 
the attorney representing the AIDS-stricken man. If Sti- 
verberg had, he would have offered Washington a tip 
based on his own experience: “Do everything you can to 
be sensitive. Your client’s life is over." 

He tells the story, how he befriended Cain when they 
were both working at Hyatt. Cain arrived in 1986, a 
University of Virginia law school graduate, recruited for 
the firm's fast-track program. He managed the Falls 
Church, Virginia, office and was quickly promoted to 
regional partner, in charge of the Philadelphia area — 10 
offices and 75 employees. Just before he got sick, they gave 
him a raise. With a $44,000 salary. Cain was one of Hyatt's 
highest-paid regional partners. 

Then one day in July 1987, Cain didn't show up for 
work. And then another day passed, and another. He was 
in the hospital with pneumonia. His first week there, he 
kept his briefcase at his bedside and took business calls 
with an arm gouged by an IV needle. Then he informed his 
supervisor of his long-term diagnosis. 

“Clarence's superiors just couldn't cope with the con- 
cept of his sexual orientation," says Bruce Biltin, a lawyer 
wbo once worked with Cain at Hvait’s firm in Phfladel- 


Garence Cain (right) with his lawyer, Richard Silverberg. Inset, Tom H a nks in the fBm, ‘Tlnbdeipfeia.* 


phia. “And AIDS — oh my God, they thought — bow is 
this going to reflect on Hyau?" 

Then, as U. S. District Judge Raymond Broderick wrote 
in his opinion, “within days of learning Cain had AIDS, 
the defendants switched this young lawyer onto another 
fast (rack — one calculated to remove him." 

Silverberg left the Hyatt firm protesting the treatment 
of Cain. During the two years he represented him while 
working at other firms. Silver berg exasperated his bosses, 
who caned Silverberg “obsessed." During one job inter- 
view, a partner peered over his desk and asked, “Just what 
kind of friends were you?" He lost three jobs. 

Silverberg ended op working at home on his sister's 
computer and sneaking into an old employer's office after 
hours to use the copier. He was 33 at the time, a year out of 
law school, had never handled an employment discrimina- 
tion case or any other major case, and was up against a 
team from a 2 43- lawyer firm. Even his father chided: 
“Don't be a martyr." 

Ohio reporters covering Hyatt’s Senate race have 
phoned him recently. SQverberg happily delivered the 41- 
page rebuke Judge Broderick wrote when Silverberg and 
Cam won. The court awarded $107.888 in damages and an 
arlftitinnnl $50,000 in punitive damages. 

Joel Hyatt's voice is even, not calm, but perfectly 
balanced, like a wheel cm a wire — the slightest push and 
it's off. “We made a big mistak e." he says. “People 
understand that I made a mistake" And again: “The 
manner in which we responded to Clarence's illness was 
inappropriate. 1 tried to make it right, but it was too late." 

In has deposition, Hyatt acknowledged that he supported 
the decision to remove Cain. The firm had at toe time 
offered Cain, instead, an entry-levd job in Virginia at half 
pay, and later, in an attempt to settle, an administrative post 


in Kansas Qty. Cam refused both. During the, trial Cain!s 
former employers painted him as inept and uncooperative. 
Today, Hyatt says of Cain: “He was an ambitious, 
person trying to succeed. We identified that and put him cm - 
a specially designed fast track:" 

Today, the voice of Hyatt is unqualified regret. Tbere's 
a plea in it Don’t threaten all I’ve built: At 27. Hyatt — 
together with his wife, a college fraternity brother and a 
gay ire met the first day of law school -— revolutionized the 
:tice of law with storefront offices and standardized' 


ees. They beamed television commercials nationwide, 
starring the eager-eyed Hyatt himself. They created the 
country’s largest private law firm, the McDonald's of legal 
practice with more than 2 million clients served. 

All this, while Hyatt waited for his Senate seat People 
say he’s been running ance be left diapers. For a decade 
he d been talking about making a bid wheat his father-in- 
law stepped down. And for two and a half years, he has 
been traveling around Ohio, raising money and his profile. 

And now “Philadelphia" is being used by toes to. 
embarrass him. “Not out of concern for Clarence Cain or 
the AIDS issue," Hyatl says.- The even voice teeters: “It’s 
an upfront desire — can we destroy Joel Hyatt?" 

John Nolan, a friend of Hyatt’s who runs the AIDS 
Commission of Greater Cleveland, is one of several AIDS 
activists sympathetic to HyatL “It’s easy and unfair to judge 
'87 activities by *93 knowledge and understanding," Ik says. 

As a U. S. senator, Hyatt says, be would work to increase 
AIDS research and education. In Cleveland, where he lives, 
he is active with ADOS charities. He meets regularly with 
HTV-positivr patients. When be walks into their homes. 
Hyatl says, be remembers a Kite them he didn’t care, 
enough about. “When I go there, I think of Clarence." 


PEOPLE 


No More Curfew Now* 
Helmsley’s Term Is Over 

Leona Hehnsley finally became a 
free woman after serving > s 
months in a federal prison, one 
month in a halfway house and two 
■ months in the relatively plush con- 
finement of her penthouse apart- 
ment on Central Park South m 
Manhattan, where she bad to re- 
turn every night by 9 o’clock. 
Hehnsley was convicted in 1989 of 
imwiv tax and mail, fraud. She 
saved the government $3,294 by 
living at home for the final two 
mouths of her sentence instead of 
at the S54-a-day Le Marquis Hotel, 
which is used as a halfway bouse 
for federal offenders. 


“Raining Stones," a British film 
directed by Ken Loach about a job- 
less "wn in northern England, was 
chosen by the French critics's asso- 
ciation as best foreign film of 1993. 
The association selected Alain Res- 
nais’s “Smoking-No Smoking" as 
best French film. - 
□ 

- Paul NemnanV salad dressing 
and spaghetti sauce are getting him 
a special Oscar at this year’s Acade- 
my Awards. The actor will receive 
the Jean Hosboft Humanitarian 
Award for donating to charity more 
than S80 million in profits from 
Newman’s Own food business. 

• . □ 

It wasn't that the audience didn't 
like Isaac Stem's music when they 
walked out in the middle of a Den- 
ver concert. They just didn’t realize 

he was taking a breather. “Remem- 
ber, it ain’t over ’til the fat man 
sings," the portly violinist quipped 
as ushers steered nearly half the 
audience back to their seats. 

Hie heirs of the French writer 
Cbfetle have objected that the prize 

in her name - — financed by the Ann- 
leder Foundation of Switzerland 
and worth 35,000 Swiss francs 
C$24,000) — was awarded to Salman 
Rushdie, author of “The Satanic 
Verses," and have banned the use of 
her name in the future. The heirs 
said Rushdie was “a foreign writer’’ 
and there was no “literary relation- 
i and Col 


ship" between him . 


rdette. 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appear a on Pages 8, 13 & 15 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 




Tomorrow 



Low 

W 

High 

Law W 


CIF 

C.T 


C/F 

OF 

Atgsna 

10*4 

9'48 

c 

18«4 

10/50 ■ 


4.-3Q 

•im 

si 

307 

-3*7 pe 

Antam 

4/39 

1/34 

sh 

6/43 

-5<34 1 


13«5 

7/44 

sh 

11/62 

205 r 

Barcv<arti 

U/V 

4/39 


13/55 

7/44 s 

B«Vr*ie 

4-39 

•:w 

9*1 

104 

-0/22 c 

BfliVn 

104 

■*I2* 

sl 

104 

-5/24 pc 

Brunata 

4/30 

-3/27 

c 

4.09 

0/32 pc 

Bufeprol 

2'35 

•2C9 


.101 

•7/20 c 

Ccp»*ager 

0/31 

■S/24 

sn 

104 

-405 s 

CJoaCWSV 

l9rfH 

9-48 

B 

17*3 

P*<z 1 

Orfr> 

6/43 

•i.m 

c 

12/53 

307 e 

E**wgt> 

SMI 

•101 


9/48 

5M 1 1 


10/50 



0 48 

307 9 

FrwUurf 

3.37 

-2<39 

sn 

2/35 

-4/25 pc 

Orma 

4/39 

-3/27 


2'* 

■6C2 s 

Hrtsrtj 

■3*7 

•7/20 

W 1 

-5/34 

-10/15 sn 


9/40 

5/41 


0/46 

305 r 

LnP 0 kn» 

22/71 

13/55 

s 

23/73 

14*7 i 

Lisbon 

I5/W 

8/46 

a 

16*1 

9/40 * 

London 

5/41 

-2/28 

c 

0/4B 

-1/31 C 


10/50 

2/35 


13*5 

3/37 9 

MOW 

4n9 

-J/37 


409 

002 a 


•2C9 

■0/32 

a 

■6/22 

-14/7 9 / 


1--34 

-I.W 


0/33 

6/22 pc 

Niea 

13/55 

ora 


1305 

6 '44 s 


■3/27 

■8/18 


-307 

-0/10 9 

palmn 

13/55 

4/39 


12*3 

a te s 


7 '44 

1/34 

sh 

4.09 

-2*29 a 


-1/31 

-4/35 

sh 

■2/39 

-7 CO c 

BevVJw* 

■ 1IJ1 

■3/27 


1/34 

■4/25 pc 


1050 

2.** 

c 

9/40 

104 9 

St Prt-rsfc«n 

-7/20 

■9/16 

•an 

-0/10 

■14/7 sn 

StortdicJm 

.3-27 

-7/M 

sl 

-4/35 

-10/15 pc 

Strmxxny 

2.3S 

3/27 

9h 

2/35 

-JOT s 

Toarm 

-»"?S 

-9/23 


■60 

-9/ie -m 


7/44 

•I/J1 


6/43 

1/34 s 

Vianra 

r /35 

■3C7 

ih 

■1/31 

-7/20 c 

Y’JV'JTjr 

-im 

-8/22 

sl 

-209 

■9/18 %J 

Zundi 

2.35 

-1/35 

sh 

1/34 

-405 5 

Oceania 

njtkbnd 

26/79 

15.53 

5 

34/75 

ie«t pc 


27/W 

19«6 

3 

20/EB 

19/OB pc 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 





North America 

Heavy snow wil spread from 
Cincinnati, Ohio, lo Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. Sun- 
day into Monday. Ram wW 
tall farther south, while a 
mixture at rain and sno* is 
expected from Philadelphia 
to New York City- Arctic cold 
Iron Canada wil spa south- 
ward Into the central Plains. 


Europe 

High wnds wil pound north- 
west Europe again Sunday 
Inio Monday London and 
Pads wfll have a break in the 
stormy weather Saturday. 
Sunday w* be w mdy "Wt a 
le* showers. Heavy rams 
wilt soak southwest Turkey 
this weekend while snow 
breaks out over the moun- 
tains c* western Turkey 


Asia 

Northern Japan will be cold 
with snow Saturday The 
cold weather will gradually 
moderate early next ween 
Rain and wet snow in the 
Tokyo area Saturday wfll be 
loBoived by dry. cold weather 
Sunday into Monday Heavy 
rains will soak the northern 
PMippkies and IndonesS- 


Mlddte East 

Today Tomorrow 

Mgh Urn W High Low W 



OF 

OF 


OF 

C/F 

BW14 

17/63 

13SS 

pc 

17/02 

1203 c 

Croij 

1B*64 

9/40 

pc 

10/64 

0/46 pe 

Damascus 

13/55 

0*43 

14 

13.-55 

6/43 pe 

Jarusskro 

14/57 

0/40 

F 

13/55 

8 -46 pe 

l/m 

25/77 

0/46 

» 

34/75 

5/41 s 

Ri»di 

22/71 

13*5 

pe 

38/79 

13/56 1 


Latin America 


Today To 

Kgb Low W Wgh Low W 

OF OF CJF OF 

BuBnotAhos 38/100 23/71 S 3**1 21/70 PC 
Corneas 2WH3 E/71 pc 29/M 23/73 pe 

Un» 25/77 19*6 PC 3S/77 20 68 pc 

UmocoCSy 23«71 7M4 s 21770 JM pc 

modsJanaho 38/B3 3«/75 t 29/M 23/73 pc 

»/8* 12/53 * 31/88 16*1 fx 


Legend: s-army. poeart* dowty.o-cloudy. O^shtrocrs. Hh mfe r s wmg. r* st-www Ikimes. 
sn-jnow. Hce, W-We«nw. All maps, forecasts md data provkJad by Aeeu-Waadw.kic. '3 199* 


Asia 


Tot Ur 


- 


High 

Law 

W 


Law W 


C/F 

at- 


at 

OF 

Bnr^ok 

33*1 

10*4 

1 

33*1 

19*6 9 


-1131 

-71 30 


307 

-4/25 pc 

Hong Kong 

10.-64 

13*5 

9 

IB/64 

14*7 s 

IMa 

JO/W 

.•060 

90 

3 01 m 

23/73 ih 

TtawDoW 

37/00 

13*5 

S 

24/75 

9*48 ( 

W 

■4/25 

9/10 

5*1 

1/34 

-9/16 9 

StuntfMl 

B/46 

-307 

s 

8/40 

-1/J1 s 


37/00 

34/75 

1 

28/B2 

34/75 sh 


30/60 

8/46 

$ 

31V00 

11*2 a 

7<*TO 

7*44 

409 

9h 

6/43 

002 pc 

Africa 


1**9 

9/40 

% 

16*1 

10*0 ( 

Cope Town 

24/75 

14*7 

3 

20*2 

18*4 S 

Coubtenca 

17»» 

6.-4J 

B 

19*60 

8/46 * 


23/73 

7/44 

s 

20/82 

B/46 * 


31/88 

36/79 


32*89 

34/75 pc 

Noweb! 

25/77 

9*48 

8 

37/80 

12/53 s 

Tm 

10*1 

5/41 

s 

14/57 

4/30 ■ 

North America 

enchmge 

•1/11 

■6/23 

c 

205 

-7/20 pe 

Atari* 

16*1 

5*43 

5*1 

13*5 

4/39 c 

Efcr*m 

6/4J 

409 

i 

6/43 

■4/25 pc 

CNrago 

•1/31 

-10/15 

4 

■307 

-I0/1S pc 


307 

-0A8 


IO< 

-If/TJ c 

CMro* 

3/37 

-700 

b*i 

•2 09 

-10/15 PC 

HonobJu 

27/00 

10*1 

s 

27.80 

19*6 pc 

MouPon 

12*3 

0/43 

c 

10*0 

305 1 

Los Asigofes 

17*2 

7-44 


30*68 

8/46 a 

Mu/rt 

27/00 

21/70 


29*0c 

21/70 pc 

UnmWKfe 

-7/20 

•10/4 

n 

-7/20 

-15* pc 

Vtort/rwl 

205 

■307 

1 

0/X! 

-10/15 pc 

Nassau 

27/80 

206B 

3 

27*0 

21/70 rc 

NewYo/fc 

7/44 

2 ns 

r 

5*41 

■4/25 pc 

Phoam 

17*2 

6/43 

c 

16*1 

J/37 pc 

Sun Fran 

13*55 

5/41 

pc 

14*7 

4*39 9 

Soon if 

9*40 

104 

1 

8/46 

o/32 a 

Toronro 

5/41 

•309 

r 

■209 

9/10 pc 

WasHnffao 

9/48 

*09 

r 

7/44 

3C7 pc 




Depth 

Mbu 

Rm. 

Snow 

Last 


RmqtI 

L U Plate* PtatM 

State 

Snow 

CaiinsitB 

Andorra 

Pas do la Casa 

105 160 

Good 

Open 

Var 

20-t 

flasarf tutv open, pood shkng 

Sotoeu 

90 175 

Good 

Open 

Pckd 

20/ 1 

fteaort tuBy open, beefy skitng 

Austria 

igis 

0 55 

Fak 

Ctsd 

Hvy 

26/1 

4r6Msapen. wet snow 

Kltztuhef 

30 115 

Good 

Open 

Var 27/1 

At stts an parenes krrosr dorm 

Saaibacrt 

45 115 

Good 

Open 

Var 

25/ 1 

Resort tuPy open 

Scht aiming 

35110 

Good 

Open 

Vaj 

a/i 

Good above 1500m 

St Anton 

40 240 

Good 

Open Good 27 71 

At tins open, new eno» at 1400m 

Franco 

Atpe d’Huez 

120 210 

Good 

Opan 

Var 

a/i 

72/06 arts open, low one heavy 

Les Arcs 

95 285 

Good 

Open 

Var 

a.-i 

53. 64 Hits open OdO icy patch 

Avonaz 

155 195 

Good 

Open cloud 

a/i 

28/41 Us open, good tree sktng 

Cauterets 

185 220 

Good 

Open 

Fak 

17/1 

If. 15 6/ts open, rery good sfuffig 

Chamonix 

50 340 

Good 

POM 

Var 

a/i 

72/76 «ts open, good sting 

Courchevel 

125 155 

Good 

Opan 

Var 

a/i 

Ail 64 Ms open, snow fumes 

Les Deux Aloes too 300 

Good 

Open 

Var 

a/i 

60/64 Bits open, goad steng 

Fiaine 

90 300 

Good 

Far 

. Var 

27/1 

16/26 Bits open, avalanche risk 

Isola 

155 250 

Good 

Open 

var 

18/1 

18/23 Us open, lovely sktng 

Men be! 

65 160 

Good 

Open 

Hvy 

16/1 

At 4B Us Open, lower runs sticky 

LaPtagne 

150 310 

GocxJ 

Open 

Va i 

a-i 

Wet soon lower slopes 

Serre Chevabw 

40 170 

Good 

Open 

Hvy 25/1 

70/ 77 bits open 

Tignes 

155 315 

Good 

Open Pwdr 26/1 

41 -51 tuts Open, great siding 

Val d'lsdre 

120 160 

Good 

Opan 

Var 

a/t 

50/51 IttiB open. exceBenr dang 

Vat Tborena 

150 360 

Good 

Open 

Var 

a/i 

At 29 Bits Open, pates axoBert 

Oarnny 

Garmisch 

5 220 

Good 

Ctsd 

Var 

a.-t 

New snow above t40Or 

Obaradorf 

0 150 

Gooa 

Some 

v* 

a<i 

12/27 Ms open, tpper runs good 

Italy 

Bornilo 

25 135 

CVmrt 

Open 

Pckd 

14/1 

Mbs Bits open, good at 600m 

Cervinte 

95 415 

Good 

Open 

Var 

14/1 

Resort luty open, wry good siting 


IWanat 


Depth Uta. Res. Snow Last 

l u r 


Cortina 30 120 Good Open Pckd S/1 AM am open, patches tower down 

Courmayeur 95 230 -Good- OSd Var 18/1 26/27 Us open - ■ 

Selva 50 100 .Good Open PcW 8/1 At Ms open fay km* damn 

Sestrtfrra 65 150 Good Open Vbr 15/t AB 19 ttsapwt, good eking 

Urmxay 

UBehammer BS120 Good Open Var 27/1 Heson My open. good Stomp 


Baqulera-Seret 150 250 Good Open Var 20/ 1 AS Us and polos open 

Sw U wri aal 

Arosa 95100 Good Open Var 28/1 At IB Sits open, some frssft sre** 

Crane Montana 40 US Good Open, var 24/1 abbs open, same icy patches 

Davos so 190 Good Open Var 27/1 At 36 BBs and 55 pistes open 

Grindehwatd 15 80 Fair Open Var 26/T AHBttsapen. goodebme IBOOn 

GStaan 30 60 Par' Skti Hvy 26/1 48/69 Sits epen. low stapes poor 

SL Moritz ■ 40 SO . Good Open Var 28/1 All 24 kits opan. good skrttg 
Verbier 30359 Good Open Parir 28/1 At 39 bits open, tresh snow 

Zermatt 60 330 Good Open Pwdt 28/1 S5/78 teg open, flood Stagy 

U.S. 

Aspen 95105 Good Open Var 28/1 At 8 His open 

Crested Butte 60145 Fa (r Opan Pwdr 28/1 n/l3Ueapm 

Keystone tfl5 i» Good Open Pckd 20/1 1 4/22 m open 

Mammoth .45130 Good Open Pwdr 25/1 24/30 Us open, toady powder 

Park City 55105 Good Opan Pckd 26/1 12 tins open . tresti snow to enjoy 

Steamboat 105 ISO Good Open Pckd 20 n 19/20 Btiscpen 

Tetlurtde 95110 -Far Open Pwdr 28/1 At to Sftsapen . 

Vail • tOOIIS Good Opji Pckd 19/1. At 25 B&apsn - . 


Key: LU Depth in cm on lower and upper stapes, Mh- Plilsi. Mountainside pistes. Ree. 
PMwftms leading to resort vUage, AxtArtMcM snow. 

Papers suppBad by me StaCHib at Qmat Brt&r 


i 

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or language barriers. 


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ARSET Access Numbers 
How to call around the workL 
t. rising the chart bukwv. find the country you are mlllng from. 

1 Ilia/ the nmts^xjrKlin^v<FOT.4c«>.sNumhCT. 

3. An AR£T Engll-h-speaking OpeTumr or voice prompt will ask for the phone number you wish to ailTor connect you to 3 ' 
OM<m>erNtTvkv repre-entnrtvtt ' . - 

I a reari>r your f ree ’.vaHel cant of AKTV Accu» Numbers, peufial Ibc access number of 
thccrxnito yrarieinandaskforQBWnxTServ-ice. " 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA/PACIFIC 

Hungary 1 ’ 

ooA-eoo-onn 

CfaOe 

OOa-0312 1 

Australia 

0014-881-011 

Uetond** 

999-001 

Colombia 

980-11-0010 

ChiuaJ»RC>»4> 

10811. 

Ireland 

1-800-5SP-000. 

Gosta Rica's 

114 

Guam 

018-872 

Italy- 

172-1011 

‘Ehiidffl* 

119 


Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Liechtenstein' 

1554»-li. 

India* 

000-117 

Lithuania* 

8*196 

Indonesia* 

00801-10 

Luxembourg 

0-30041-11 

JjpiUl* 

VOjFf - 1 1 1 

Maka* 

0800-890-110. 

Korea 

009-11 

Monaco* 

19*4011 

Korea** 

U* 

Netherlands* 

00422-9111 

Malaysia’ 

800-0011 

Norway* - 

- 800-190-11 

Near 7.«iland 

om-dti 

Poland** ** . 

0*010-4804111 

Philippines' 

105-11 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

Rissh~(Mosam) 

159-5042 

Romania 

01-800-4288 

Saipan’ 

235-2872 

Skvralda 

0042000101 

Siiveipin- 

NUMUiMIl 

Spain 

900-9940-11 

Sn Lankj 


W* 4 - 

jfVLuar 

020-795-611 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Sirterriimf 

155-0011 

Thailand* 

aoiQ-<MMin 

UK. 

0500490011 

EUROPE 

MIDDLE EAST . 

Armenia” 

8*14111 

Bahrain 

600001 

Austria”” 

022-903-011 

RgypT (Cairo) ’ 

5ZO4200 - 

HcHgiunr 

f’H- 11-0010 

land 

177-1002727 

Hulgurii 

iXHWAHJOlO 

Kuwait 

800-288 

Croatia'* 

99-38-0011 

Lebanon (Belrox) 

426-801 

Cyprus- 

0H0-W010 

Saudi Arabia 

■ 1-800-100 

Czech Jtep 

00-420-00101 

Turkey* 

0080012277 

Denmark" 

8001-0010 

AMERICAS 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

Aigendna* 

ooi-aoo- 200-1111 

France 

19*-0011 

Belize* " 

■ 555 

Germany 

0130-0010 

Bolivia* 

0800-1111 

Greece* 

00800-1311 

Brazil 

0008010 


H Salvador** 

290 

-Guatemala* ’ 

190 

Guyana*** ' . 

165 

Honduras's 

■- m 

Mexico*** 

^400462-4240 

Nicaragns (Managua) 174 

Panamas 

•109 

Pent*- 

. - - t m 

Suriname 

■ - - 156 

Uruguay 

004410 

Venezuela** 

“40411-120 

CARIBBEAN' 

Bakawm .... 

- 1-800872-2881 

-Bermuda* 

1-800472-2881 

-British V2. . 

1400472-2881 

Cayman Islands 

1-800472-2881 


Gren ad a* 


1-800-872-2881 


Haiti* 


Jamai ca** 


001-800-972-2883 


0-800-872-2881 


Neth. AxxdL 


001-800-872-2881 


' SLKacyNgvk - 1-800-872-2881 
'■ ' ■ AFRICA : 


Gabon* 


. 004 - 001 / 




00111 ' 


Kenya* 


0000-ltt 


Malawi** 


797-7971 , . 


OVT CiIliimCinlrx.il «JXT WorW Coooera " .V-TW i 
It-fnUKi.mflftin.iunri .lOwrlk.'mu-nroiaihJiOinavH* /B*r bpner 
tan'* Wn wrik^ilM» lr«<)«(Ut>nai«tr iwHjnpuqci-. 

rtBT vaM fmnirt ■.nunu^iUiiinnijiklkiih.-iivniK'iiiixUiui 
>.OfcT *oridCaaaccr-'wiMLV|itkv>jn4w 

■Okr USAMrect* jathc-.mirai^c-fcn^I J.»v 

Txd'ifc. ikduw 

IWn ptxx-iL.pui |4*cw.wiJk»ikjf IktllllEMMLlflll! 

/'T'ftfKty-ir Barov Ivtii. 


101-1992 


-»j* iK^/vorolbliiefinMcwiv phne 
"Crdut^liiyirtr 


,v* ya jtwWik.-6i.Bufl arcai . 
a 4w.u wnnl dut am