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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Friday, July 22,1994 


No. 34,647 


4 


■ V S, 




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ees, Death in a Foreign City’s Streets 


By Bany James 


-- -naiw Mrwun 

^*-Jiolera raged oat of control among Rwandan 
“ ™‘ e on Thursday, prompting President 
2 “f ^^™ ton to step up the l£s. response to the 
numan catastrophe” of thousands dying .from the 
disease and other reu ses. 

With more than a million refugees crowded into the 
■Zairean town erf Goma, lacking food, water and 
Miutatjon. overwhelmed aid agencies said they could 
do J^ e 10 stcm the cholera epidemic. 

«pect between 10,000 to 50,000 cases,” 
saiaa doctor for the French medical aid organization 

poctore Without Borders. Half of those afflicted can 

be expected to die, he added. 

Criticized for doing too Ettle to stem the crisis, Mr. 
Clinton said he would announce cm Friday “a practi¬ 
cal plan of action.” • - 


“We are going to participate, indeed, in trying to 
lead die United Nations in responding to the cholera 
problem and dealing with the other aspects of this 
human catastrophe,” Mr. Clinton said. The world 
body, seeking $300 miltion in additional aid as well as 
aircraft, trucks and water carriers, has scheduled a 
fund-raising conference for Friday. 

■J J. Brian Atwood, Mr. Ointon’s special representa¬ 
tive to Rwanda, said that steps being taken included 
improving the airport at Goma to handle more sup¬ 
plies and opening up a new track route. 

The filthy camps around Goma were in such tur¬ 
moil that aid agencies were unable to assess the scale 
of the disaster. 

- Reuters reported that up to ljOQO aide were lying on 
the blade volcanic rode around medical tents at one 
Doctors Without Borders used up 4,600 liters 
' gallons) of intravenous fluid, the only treat¬ 


ment, and said they desperately needed new supplies. 
People were dying in the streets of Goma, and hastily 
dug mass graves were filling with hundreds erf bodies. 

*On the way here this morning we counted the 
dead on the road, and there were 800,” a Dutch nurse 
at one teeming camp said in an interview with Reu¬ 
ters. 

Cholera is a fulminating disease spread by water 
and food infected with feral matter. Most people in 
Goma are having to take water from Lake Kivu, 
which is contaminated. Vic tims lose liquid and ran 
die within hours unless the liquid is replaced. 

Governments and relief organizations around the 
world stepped up efforts to ship in supplies, but they 
were overwhelmed by the scale of the exodus, and 
there was a limi t to how much they could send in 
through the airport at Goma, which Has a cratered 
runway and limi ted facilities. 


Mr. Atwood said 1200 tons of food a day was 
needed, on top of 3.8 million liters of dean water. 
That is more than twice the food that was needed in 
Somalia at the height of last year's famine. But the aid 
agencies are able to deliver only a fraction of the food 
needs. 

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refu¬ 
gees railed on governments to intervene directly in 
the crisis with military-style operations. The humani¬ 
tarian agencies on their own “cannot cope” said 
Sadako Ogata. She said that a political solution was 
desperately needed so that the refugees could return 
to Rwanda, where food has been left to rot. 

The victorious Tutsi-led Rwandan Patriotic Front 
has given assurances that it will not carry out reprisals 
among innocent members of the Hutu majority. de- 

See RWANDA, Page 8 


sirs, - 



§ U.S. : Asks UN 

^To Gear Way 
> For Action 
5: Against Haiti 


CaafUed by Otr Staff From Dispatcher 

UNITED NATIONS, New York—The 
United States is se eking approval from the 
UN Security ■Council for a. mnltirmtmnal 
force to use “all necessary means” to re¬ 
store democracy in Haiti, the chief U.S. 
delegate to the United Nations, Madeleine 
1C Albright, said Thursday. ' 

Mrs. Albright did not use the word “in¬ 
vasion,” but ‘‘all necessary means” is un¬ 
derstood to mean militaiy intervention. 
The term was used when the UN Security 
Council authorized action to expel the 
Iraqi forces that invaded Kawait in 1 991. 

The announcement of the consultations 
with Security Council members was the 
first explicit acknowledgment that the ad¬ 
ministration was seeking a green light from 

- the United Nations to use force in Haiti. If 

If the UjS. anodes Haiti, it pirns to Ana 
Haitians to aroid a repeat of Somalia. Page 3l 

.jjz multinational force is fanned, U.S. 

'V'^troops are expected to make tq> a large 
majority. 

“There hasbeen no decision cat an inva- • 
son, and no deadline has been, set,” Mrs. 

■ Albright said. “Bnt we want to provide the 
diplomatic groundwork for whatever op¬ 
tion we take.” 

She said the United States wanted the 
Security Council to approve a resolution 
by the end of next week. However, it was 
not certain whether Washington could 
muster the required support from the 15- 
member council for its position. 

Undersecretary of Stale Peter Tamoff 
has joined Mrs. Albright in making sound¬ 
ings on the issue among Security Council 
members, a Stale Departmentspokesman 
said in Washington. ... 

The White House press secretary. Dee 
Dee Myers, said the resolution “wall allow, 
if necessary, a force to go into a hostile 
environment to create a permissive envi¬ 
ronment,” 

Mrs. Albright said the resolution would 
also authorize another force to go in “once 
the mili tary leaders have left” 

Under the current proposal, UN peace¬ 
keepers would be deployed to Haiti m the 
aftermath of an invasion. 

Haitian military leaders are the focus of 
U.S. and international pressure to step 
down »nri allow the return of the demo¬ 
cratically elected president, the Reverend 
Jean-Bertrand Anstide^ who was deposed 
by a military coup in September 1991. 

The State Department spokesman, Da¬ 
vid Johnson, stressed that the administra¬ 
tion's preferred solution was for Haiti’s 
toflitaiy leadership to depart voluntarily. 

Meanwhile, more than 100 members of 
Congress have signed a letter to President 

■ Bill Clinton asking him to seek congressio¬ 

nal approval before committing U.S. 
troops to Haiti. . (Reuters, AP) 



4n» Krdnnfhjai. Afxncc t-'ancc-PrrM 

Five French and Ukrainian soldiers in the UN peace force docking Thursday in Sarajevo under machine-gun fire from Serbs in the surrounding mountains. 

:e and Further Talks 



an 


By David B. Ottaway... 

' Waddnytan Past Service . 

BELGRADE — The Bosnian Serbian 
leadership has told international media¬ 
tors that it will insist on negotiate] 
overall peace package for ending the 
man conflict and that it will not 
their proposed plan for partitioning 
country along ethnic lines unless unspeci¬ 
fied changes are made in the borders. 

Making known their stand cm the parti¬ 
tion plan, tbe Bosnian Serbs declared 
Thursday that they would decide only af¬ 
ter an agreement was reached on six addi¬ 
tional issues and “further work” was done 
on the map detailing how Bosnia is to be 
divided between the Mushm-Croat federa¬ 
tion and the Bosnian Serbs* own sdf-de- 
clarcd republic. 

The position of the Bosnian Serbs 
sparked a sharp reaction Thursday from 
President Alija lzetbegovic of Bosnia, who 
said in Sarajevo fiat the Muslims* own 
“unconditional yes” had ceased to be val¬ 
id, and that they, too, would add condi- 
; tions - to their acceptance. 

The five-nation Contact Group —con¬ 
sisting of the United States, Russia, 
France, Britain and Germany — had in¬ 
sisted an a “yes” or “no” answer to their 


Monday, the Muslim-Croat federa¬ 
tion’s assembly voted in Sarajevo to accept 
without any conditions the map that 
would give them 51 percent of Bosnia and 
the Bosnian Serbs the rest. 

But the Bosnian Se r b i an Parliament said 
in a “decla r a t ion" adopted Thesday that 
they were “not in- a position to decide” 
about the partition plan, which would re- 

See BOSNIA, Page 8 



The Bosnian Serbian leader, Radovan Karadzic, leaving Geneva on Thursday after talks with international mediators. 


South African Blacks Press 
For Workplace Equality 

By Paul Taylor 

Washington Post Service 

JOHANNESBURG — With apartheid 
finally dead, a black South African mme 
worker, Nicosia gthi Mscsizwc. fteured 
there was no longer any reason why he 
could not climb aboard a mine shaft eleva¬ 
tor filled with whites. He figured wrong. 

and now he sports a nasty gash ova-his left 
GVCL 

“They told him. This hoist is for whites; 

it's not for you, 1 - said 
union organizer at an 11,000-employee 
gold mine west of Johannesburg, where 
white miners have always jumped the ime 
ahead of blacks onto electors that cany 
them to the surface at the end of then 
to. 


Newsstand Prices 

Andorra .....9.00 FF Luxembourg « L. Fr 

Antilles.11-20 FF MorocCO.-..-.12 Oh 

rv.rw.raon 1400 CFA Qatar ......&.00 Rials 

Egypt??---"*E»P- 5000 Munion- v 11JDFF 
cmBrp 9 oo FF seudiArabia..9.00 R. 

SS?-'.':»bcPA Senegal...-950 CFA 

S££e'*' ...300 Dr. Spain—-200PTAS 
Italy Li™ Tunisia ....1 *000 Dijj 

LeSr5n"'.USSlJ0 U.S. Mi1. CEur.lSU0 


This was not an isolated confront ati on. 
In the two months since South Africa com¬ 
pleted its journey from white-minority to 
black-majority rule, racial incidents have 
flared in many erf the country's mines,with 
blades pressing to purge all vestiges of 
apartheid from the workplaceand whites 
efingmg to old ways. 

Meanwhile, a broader wave of labor 
unrest, sparked by both economic and ra¬ 
cial grievances, has hit several above¬ 
ground industries, leading to a singe in 
st rik e s and picket-line militancy around 
the country... 

With the new post-apartheid govern¬ 
ment straggling to cany out social and 
economic agendas geared toward moder¬ 
ate redistribution ctf wealth and opportu¬ 
nity, the watkplaoe has become the first 
test of how South Africa’s political revolu¬ 
tion will change people’s everyday lives. 

The eariyyerdici, m a society still polar¬ 
ized by race, is; with great difficulty. 

‘Black workers are felling their union 
leadezs and management that now that the 
politics of the country has been democra¬ 
tized; there axe certain things they won’t 
it up witii any longer at wnk,” said 
Allen, a. labor consultant whose 

See RACE,Page* 


Kiosk 


Solzhenitsyn Arrives Back in Moscow 



Trib Index 


Down 

0 . 88 % 


Sfe^ 3 - 



Washmgton Pott Service 
MOSCOW — Alexander L Solzheni¬ 
tsyn,. the Nobel prize winning author, 
said Thursday that his eight-week jour¬ 
ney across Russia had shown him a land 
in a “pit,” in danger of strangulation by 
crime, but with enough spiritual health 
left to give hope for revival. 


Tbe former dissident arrived in Mos¬ 
cow for the first time in 20 years, ending 
a return from exile that began in May on 
Russia's Pacific Coast. Mr. Solzhenitsyn 
was met at a city rail station by Mos¬ 
cow’s mayor and more than 1,000 well- 
wishers and passers-by. 


NmYorfc. 

TlWdose 

previous cloae 

DM 

1.5925 

1.5839 

Pound 

1.524 

1.5465 

Yen 

99.15 


FF 

5-4435 

5.363 



Book Review 


Page 7. 


Dollar Soars 
As Clinton’s 
Aides Renew 
Commitment 


Treasury Official Fears 
Weak Currency Could 
Hurt Global Recovery 

Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — U.S. government offi¬ 
cials tried to talk the dollar higher for a 
second straight day Thursday, and this 
time it worked. 

Just a day after dropping despite pros¬ 
pects for higher interest rates, the dollar 
surged on investors’ assessment that U.S. 
officials were finally prepared to act to 
strengthen their currency. 

The rally was fueled by comments from 
Lawrence Summers, tbe undersecretary of 
tbe U.S. Treasury, who told the Senate 
Banking Committee that “a renewed de¬ 
cline of the dollar would be counterpro¬ 
ductive to global recovery.” 

Mr. Summers’s remarks came on the 
heels of a similar tack taken by Alan 
Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Board 
chairman, who also suggested that the cen¬ 
tral bank was inclined to raise interest 
rates sooner rather than later. 

The dollar got another boost from Laura 
D’Andrea Tyson, the head of President 
Bill Clinton's council of economic advi¬ 
sors, who said a 25-basis-point increase in 
interest rates would not choke off the eco¬ 
nomic recovery. 

The 11002/5 leap came on the day the 
Bundesbank held its last meeting before 
the summer recess and derided not to cut 
offirial rates and to leave its money supply 
target unchanged. 

The dollar closed in New York at 1.5925 
Deutsche marks, up from 1.5639 Wednes¬ 
day, at 5.4435 French francs, up from 
5.3630, and at 1.3477 Swiss francs, up from 
13190. The British pound rambled to 
SI 3240 from $13465. 

The dollar’s rally was less pronounced 
against the yen; it traded at 99.150 yen, up 
from 98.685 Wednesday. 

“This could be a watershed day for the 
dollar,” said Keith Cheveralls, director of 
foreign-exchange trading at Bank of Bos¬ 
ton. “The Fed has always opposed a lower 
dollar. Now, for the first time in a long 
while, the Fed and the administration are 
talking in the same voice about the curren¬ 
cy" 

Mr. Summers not only poured water on 
the idea that Mr. Clinton endorsed a weak 
currency to trim the country’s trade deficit, 
but actually said the government would 
work to strengthen the dollar. 

“The administration believes that a 
strengthening of the dollar against the yen 
and mark would have important economic 
benefits for the United States,” Mr. Sum¬ 
mers said. “It would restore the confidence 
in financial markets that is important to 
sustaining recovery. It would boost the 
attractiveness of U.S. assets and the incen¬ 
tive for longer-term investment in the 
economy and help to keep inflation low.” 

His remarks were tbe strongest call yet 
from the Clinton administration in sup¬ 
port of reversing the dollar's slide. 

Mr. Summers denied that tbe United 
States was manipulating the dollar’s ex¬ 
change rate with the yen and said Japan 
needed to open its markets and stimulate 
domestic demand to correct its current 
account imbalance. 

However, he also said that officials from 
the Group of Seven industrialized coun¬ 
tries had agreed that currency rates should 
not be left wholly to market forces. 

The dollar got some help from Hans 
Tietmeyer, the president of the Bundes¬ 
bank, who said the German central bank 
also favored a strong dollar. 

But the dollar's rally did not convince 
some analysts that the currency’s long slide 
had ended. 

“The fundamentals are unchanged,” 
said Nick Stamenkovic, with DKB Inter¬ 
national. “Treasuries are still weak and 
will r emain unsettled until the next Fed 
li ghtening and overseas investors will be 
reluctant to buy U.S. assets until Treasur¬ 
ies settle." 

The price of the bench of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond edged up 1/32 
point Thursday, to 84 28/32, with the yield 
steady at 7.S4 percent 

Mark Geddes, with Midland Global 
Markets in London, said: “I'm not con¬ 
vinced the dollar is out of the woods yet 
Fm still very negative. Today’s correction 
does not take away from the near-term 
downward trend.” 

(Reuters, AP, Bloomberg, Knighi-Ridder) 


Spin of Smithsonian’s Hiroshima Script Under Fire 


put 11] 
Brian 


By Eugene L. Meyer 

Washington Pvt Service 

WASHINGTON — As a strategic act that hastened 
the aid of a cosily global war, America's use erf the 
atomic bomb against Hiroshima and Nagasaki stirred 
enty relief back home. 

But almost ever since, it has been cause for recrimina¬ 
tion- little surprise, then, that passions are aroused by 
the Smithsonian Institution’s plans for an exhibit mark- 
matbe 50th anniversary. 

Thomas Crouch, chairman of the museum's Aeronau¬ 
tics Department, has said the museum inlands to “toll the 
whole stray.” Critics, however, accuse the Smithsonian 
of choosing political correctness over historical accuracy. 
They charge that the exhibit as planned will portray the 
Japanese lazgriy as suffering, even noble victims ana the 
Americans as racist and ruthless, hell-bent on revenge for 
Feaii Harbor. 


The debate has raged even within the Smithsonian. 
One memo last summer to the museum director, Martin 
Harwh, pointedly: “Do you want to do an exhibit 
intended to make veterans feel good, or do you want an 
exhibition that will lead our visitors to think about the 
erf our atomic bombing of Japan? Frankly, 
1 do not think we can do both.” 

Not only veterans of World War II are upset. Richard 
P. Haitian, the chief air force historian and a former 
science and technology curator at the Smithsonian’s Air 
and Space museum, said the problem was one of “pre¬ 
ponderance.” 

Reviewing the text to accompany pictures and objects 
in the exhibit, he raid he found, for example, “a plethora 
of pages and references to the brutal nature of American 
strategic bombing, and to Japanese casualties and suffer¬ 
ing,” while relatively few pages address Japanese aggres¬ 
sion and atrocities. 


John T. Condi, editor-in-chief of Air Force magazine, 
publication of the 180,000-member Air Force Associa¬ 
tion, offered a more precise analysis. 

He found that photos of Japanese casualties had beat 
reduced from 49 to 32 in tbe revised script, while those of 
Americans increased from three to seven, “still a long 
way from balance.” 

To which Mr. Harwit replied: “There are people who’d 
like to see a different kind of exhibit entirely/ 

“If wc present a variety of points of view,” he added, 
and critics “find some unacceptable, Fm sorry.” 

The planned exhibit has also drawn criticism from 
retired Brigadier General Paul W. Tibbets, who piloted 
the B-29 Superfortress Enoia Gay over Hiroshima. In a 
speech to a military group last month, be branded the 

See BOMB, Page 8 





















■art 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 22,1994 


i 


Page 2 _ 

Amid Shouts, Berlusconi Decree Is Canceled 

. . —• « Auum kilt rinse tb 200 CC 


- th A\ -ihsientions — Mr. Maroni is a member of the sepa- 
77 ,*' A.wn'iatai rms — 4118 1 io wi t houTth£ vote raiist Northern League, an uneasy coali- 

ROME — After a shouting and shov- |^ e ffKt tion partner, and the tension between 

ing match between government allies. them^re^Mha;? , aler j n ^ the League and Mr. Berlusconi's Forza 
thS Chamber of Deputies overwhelm, until ihewbItalia pSrty turned physical Thursday, 
ingly rejected Thursday a cabinet decree week. ®. of iai j After a Fora Italia deputy, Pietro Di 

that let scores of political corruption er SSSSZSSm ^proved by Muccio, told the Chamber that “better 
suspects out of jail. ... n C , abin iSr^SorS 1,000delinquents free than one innocent 

The decree, approved by Prime Mm- Parliament within three ^ „ Northern League deputies be- 

ister Silvio Berlusconi and cabinet allies expire. . M ft^incrnni's about- gan shouting in protest. Then a shoving 

™tch JR-Jn— *»c rt 

aA quit 

ahng rece 3 *. he announced thai to said he had 

“S^&^epuhesvo^ been fooled in approving the decree. 


iiv ainnim tvu V ““T-~ ' g , . 

nonviolent crime; such as fraud, from 
the preventive detention category. 

With nww.than 3.000 politicians and 

from bothsides. Dusmessmcn 

By Wednesda; 
out of about 4,0i 


Aid Halted 

AS BullctS Nigeria *^^12 - 

Hit Planes b * “ of - 

of suspects who can be jailed before * 

arrest while an investigation eonsm At 32 UKl|©V© 

It eliminated corruption, graft and other J 

MMiNAlant mmP «ir.h as fraud, from 


era or thieves, but dose tb 200 corrup¬ 
tion suspects were released, including a 
former health minister. Many of those 
released were put under house arrest. 

The decree sharply limited the kinds 
of suspects who can be jailed before 

... • m _ mnnmiM. 


GENEVA — The United 



ILK. Labor Party Leader Pledges ‘New Agenda’ 


lets, one while landing and the 
others while talcing off. 

An American aboard do* of po^u, 
the planes was wounded and • y^ n g 

i.tM tei a hnsnital in Cro- ' Tkic 


the United States ^^jSvenient” and that it could not 
President Bill ^ Thursday, 

meet him, “rights had", has pm off tas 

The envoy. Jgse.J^ L* Clinton to Nigeria s 

nip to defiver a perso^ embassy offiod said. 

—' reAav 



By Richard Stevenson 

JVm- V°rk Tones Service 
LONDON — As a law stu¬ 
dent at Oxford University in 
the early 1970s, Tony Blair 
wore shoulder-length hair and 
bell-bottoms and did a kind of 
Mick Jagger imitation as he 
performed in a rock band 
known as the Ugly Rumors. 

“Tony was our love ma¬ 
chine," one of his fellow band 
members once said. 

On Thursday, Mr. Blair was 
elected leader of Britain’s op¬ 
position Labor Party. It is a 
job that, given the dismal 
standing in public opinion 


new ground, that does not pul 
one set of dogmas in place of 
another, that offers the genu¬ 
ine hope of a new politics to 
take us into a new millenni¬ 
um." 

Mr. Blair has his cnucs, 
even within his own party. He 
is distrusted by some on the 
left wing of the party organi¬ 
zation, who question whether 
in trying to make Labor a pal¬ 
atable alternative to middle 
class Conservative voters he is 
giving short shrift to Labor's 
traditional union constituen¬ 
cy- 

His youth and relauve mex- 


■was taken tb a hospital in Cro¬ 
atia. 

AUfLAir Force C-141 cargo 
plane, a British plane on an aid 
flight and a small UN plans 
carrying peacekeepers were hit, 
armrriing to Ron Redmond, a 


to avoid a “‘*^£“ eve of regional mimsterial 
jes, one of six claimant* was set to 
actives -■u-sS* z £ 



This conciliatory 

talks came as the I 
rnm nlam to Vietn am ai 

jessyei?, massassp 


as 


B.i«dfln Disavows Praise of Pinochet 

* — Russia’s military leadership does n 


■*? 


Mr, Redmond said the ma- y w _ 

dents occurred soon after the ’ H Russia’s military leadership does not 

r esum ption of the airlift to the MOSCOW (Rollers) mmn «nricr who recently praised the 
Bosnian capital. The airlift had share the Knochet of ^^Tatop 

“3&.OA-- “5=Stt 


to journalists 


X< 


standing in pubUc opinion h5» 


position to become prime min¬ 
ister at the next general elec¬ 
tion, which must be held by 
mid-1997. 

And if his hair is better 
coiffed, his fashion sense more 
finely honed and his public 
performance more restrained 
than in his university days, 
Mr. Blair, at 41, still repre¬ 
sents a change — not just of 
the generational guard within 
his party, but of political style 
and substance as welL 

In electing Mr. Blair to suc¬ 
ceed J oh n Smith, who died of 
a heart attack in May at age 
55, Labor has chosen a tele¬ 
genic moderate; a lawyer who 
was educated at some of Brit¬ 
ain's most elite schools and 
has few ties to the leftist poli¬ 
cies, fiery class rhetoric and 
union domination of the par¬ 
ty’s past. 

Mr. Blair won 57 percent of 
a vote of party members, 
union representatives and 
members of Parliament, beat¬ 
ing two left-wing rivals, John 
Prescott, who was elected dep¬ 
uty leader, and Margaret 
Beckett, who has served as act¬ 
ing leader since Mr. Smith’s 
dea t h - 

The process of national re¬ 
newal requires “neither the 
politics of the old left nor new 
right,” Mr. Blair said in his 
acceptance speech here, “but a 
new left-of-center agenda for 
the future, one that breaks 


what derisively, as “Bambi," a 
nickname that detractors on 
both sides of the political able 
use to portray him as out of his 
depth. 

Perhaps of more concern to 
Mr. Blair in the long ran is 
another nickname — “Tony 
Blur" — that refers to hb un¬ 
willingness, so far at least, to 
lay out detailed policy pre¬ 
scriptions. 

“Tony Blair has been 
anointed Labor leader for his 
looks, not hb policies," said 
Jeremy Hanley, the Conserva¬ 
tive Party chairman. “He b all 
style and no substance.” 

Fust elected to Parliament 
in 1983, Mr. Blair rose with 
breathtaking speed through 
Labor’s rams. He cemented 
hb reputation for political 
skill in the last several years by 
effectively stealing from the 
Conservatives one of their 
most dependable issues: law 
and order. 

In an apparent effort to 
neutralize the party’s tax-and- 
spend legacy, Mr. Blair has 
attacked the Conservatives for 
raising taxes despite promises 
not to do so. More generally, 
he has sought to position him¬ 
self as a reasonable main¬ 
stream politician and a viable 
candidate to lead a country 
that has had a Conservative 
government since 1979. 

Although there b no indica- 

rinn ■’—- InKn 

□on 


Colonel General Nikolai aan ^ u *\^ d erLd>edapp^^ 

order and discs phne. 




jtT 






A 

A*,- 


‘.w‘ 




CliU Afcn/U* Awodaied ft™ 

Tony Blair with his wife, Cherie, after Ms ejection vras announced on Thursd»y. 


Major will call a general dec- 
turn before 1997, Labor under 
Mr. Blair b effectively begin¬ 
ning its campaign now, and b 
starting with a big lead. 

_ __ A poll late last month by 

[though there is no indica- MOW, a P^ c 

that Prime Minister John search firm, found that 40 per¬ 


cent of those surveyed be¬ 
lieved that of Britain s 
political leaders, Mr. Blair 
would be best at understand¬ 
ing the nation’s problems, 
compared to 16 percent for 
Mr. Major. 

The same poll found that 5 j 


percent of those surveyed 
would vote Labor in a general 
dection if Mr. Blair were its 
leader, with the Conservatives 
under Mr. Major polling 23 

PC ‘Tfcscares thelife.outof the 
Tories,” Mr. Prescott said. 


on. 

-IPs bad enough that tins has 
happened two days in a row," 

Mr. Redmond said- “But now, 
obviously, someone down there 
is directly targeting these 
planes, and that is a major con¬ 
cern to us.” 

’ The American who was 
wounded, whose name was not 

A 154 Journalist Is Slainin Algeria 

£e%sss%s."2 ■■jsassiBsis iss asas^t 

foie the US. defense secretay, ms the lfth joumjist shin g^/.Mnsl'm fimdsmen 
tout's mne(lJ Wrt 

pinned down for 30 minutes . . 

Egypt Aide Calls for Ties With Iran 

and Serbian forces, witnesses. gjR 0 (AFP) — Foreign Minister Amr Moussa said |«pt 
^vepescert-F^ 

and Ukrainian — threw them- jjjuxsdav. ■ . ^ 

selves on the ground in die mid- w.. Wq^. quoted as having told a meeting ^of lpOO 
die of an intersection on the here.that he and Foreign Mimster Ah Akbw 

Vdavati of han agreed “that we couM dose the page of me past 

Irmout its-ties with Egypt in I 979 ,after Hg^t »gned a ^ace 
treaty with Israel and gave refuge to the deposed shah of Iran. 

TRAVEL UPDATE 



Arafat Says He, Not Israel, Is the Host in Jerusalem 

_ ^ , ^ n „ avRii “the red line of starvation year conflict between Israel and «h e 1%7 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Pan Serhex 

GAZA STRIP — Secretary 
of State'Warren M. Christopher 
visited thb fled g l in g Palestinian 
autonomous zone Thursday 
and heard the Palestine Libera¬ 
tion Organization's chairman, 
Yasser Arafat, make a near-des¬ 
perate appeal for Western fi¬ 
nancial aid and dispute Israel s 
right to invite King Hussein of 
Jordan to visit Jerusalem. 



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The Israelis “haven't alright 
to offer any invitations,” Mr. 
Arafat said as he and Mr. Chris¬ 
topher spoke to reporters. “It b 
my duty and my responsibility 
to offer invitations to all my 
Muslim friends and brothers to 
visit the holy city. But I appreci¬ 
ate very much that King Hus¬ 
sein might come to visit, and 
this is an invitation from me to 
his majesty to come to the holy 
city with me." 

His statement immediately 
overshadowed the economic is¬ 
sues that he and Mr. Christo¬ 
pher had hoped to make the 
focus of thb first visit by an 
American secretary of state to 
the rundown, dusty streets of 
thb poverty-stricken strip of 
land along the Mediterranean. 

In their meeting and in a 
brief appearance afterward be¬ 
fore reporters, Mr. Arafat ini¬ 
tially sought to stress the urgent 
need for massive financial help 
that he said was necessary to 


$kvt. 

“the ariginar 

Just tell the taxi driver, 
"Sank too doe noo“<s 
5, rue Daunou Paris (Opera) 
Tel-(1)42.61.71.14 


avert “the red line of starvation 
and the humiliation and frus¬ 
tration” of the more than 
800,000 Palestinians in the 
Gaza Strip. 

Mr. Arafat's defiant remarks 
about Jerusalem came as he and 
Mr. Christopher were ending 
their news conference. Up to 
that point, the two had steered 
carefully around questions 
about whether Mr. Christopher 
had asked Mr. Arafat to stop 
making statements that enable 
Israeli hard-liners to say the 
PLO leader cannot be trusted to 
respect the terms of the agree¬ 
ment granting limited self-rule 
to the Gaza Strip and the West 
Bank city of Jencho. 

“I think the chairman will 
live up to hb responsibilities,” 
Mr. Christopher said, after ad¬ 
mitting that he had not raised 
the issue. Themjust as Mr. Ara¬ 
fat and Mr. Christopher were 
leaving, a reporter caused the 
session to end on a contentious 
note by asking how Mr. Arafat 
felt about the possibility of Is¬ 
rael inviting King Hussein to 
Jerusalem. 

The idea has prompted con¬ 
siderable discussion among Is¬ 
raelis because King Hussein 
and the Israeli prime minister, 
Yitzhak Rabin, are to appear 
with President Bill Clinton at 


^oijcoiiflict between Israel and 33K?£jMl 

SE SSsSSus* ss«=*bb= 

seasSSteawsfe.tB 


Mr. Redmond said that the 
American plane, which b based 
at Rhein-Main Air Base in Gcr- 
many, was hit five times in two “ 
volleys as it approached Saraje¬ 
vo with relief supplies. 

: The plane landed and, with¬ 
out unloading its cargo, turned 
around and took ofL 
• “The airlift is well and truly 
down,” Mr. Redmond said, 
adding that refief agencies had 
been able to stock up on sup- 

E lies during the last two arid a 
alt “relatively peaceful’ 
months, ■ 

He said experts had so far. 
been unable to determine the 
origin of the shots. 

Airlift shutdowns were fre¬ 
quent until tise North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization forced the 
warring factions to pull bade 


Strike to Curb Soulh France Flints 

PARIS (AFP) — A three-day strike by air traffic cont roller s 
will disrupt international flights over southern France starting 
Friday, reducing traffic by half, aiipoitauthanues said Thursday. 

All airlines that serve southeastern..France, Spam sMMlera- 
nean boast and the Balearic Islands, as wefi as any that fly over 
those areas, wifi be affected, Airqpprts de Pans said. 

•France’s domestic airfare,.Arc Inter, saicL it wc^»acd.40 
.percent of its scheduled flights Mara«lle and all flights to 
Bordeaux, Lille, Lyon and Nantes during the strike. 

km*** iHaht attendants fa the SULTA union called off a strike 
that had bben set for Thursday and Friday. A 
threatened on Saturday by air traffic controllers at Milan sLmate 
airport was also canceled. ■ ' (Rwtm) 

• Japan Atifines has unified to tire Japanese TranspOTt_lvfimOTy 

uuuaw lairauuiou jwuuuu w j - -■—- . . , ^ to cut its stir fares on European routes byan average 4 j j pcrcsai 

tivity within the city. On Saux thm Jwnjtjwji h»«. compan y 0 ffiaab saidThoraday-Thc average fare for a * 0 “?^ 

0 L *? 1 ^ ^ the officials said. Tbe new ra «s^c rt «£ 

The U5. transport hit Thurs¬ 
day was the 7th of. 15 relief 
flights scheduled during the 
day, Mr. Redmond said. 

(AP, Reuters) 


■ ■ n.i ■ ■ m. ■ ■ —- — — ■ J - 

“responsibility” seemed certain 
to provide fresh ammunition 
for foes of the autonomy agree¬ 
ment. Mr. Rabin's political op¬ 
position charges that the PLO 
leader's real »»ni is to use auton¬ 
omy for the Gaza Strip and the 
West Bank as a stepping stone 
toward control of Jerusalem. Is¬ 
rael asserts that an undivided 
Jerusalem must remain the per¬ 
manent capital of the Jewish 
state. 

Israeli officials said that Mr. 
Rabin expressed considerable 
anger about Mr. Arafat’s re¬ 
mark during a cabinet meeting 
Thursday night, although he 
made no public comment. For¬ 
eign Minister Shimon Peres, 
who heard about Mr. Arafat’s 
statement while attending a 
diplomatic reception, said, “I 
didn’t know that Arafat had a 
mandate for Jerusalem.” 

Israel has been increasingly 
sensitive about Palestinian po¬ 
litical activities in Jerusalem, 


tending a gathering of investors 
in Jerusalem. The Israelis said 
that holding the conference in 
Jerusalem instead of Gaza or 
Jericho was a PLO attempt to 
assert its claim to the city. 


furt, would DC lowereu uy 

earlier, the officials said. The new rates .are expected to-W 
introduced in October. .. >■. r .. 

A cholera outbreak in Houg Kong has been 
control, with no' new cases reported in nearly rwer week* me 
neat said Thursday. Twenty pcoptecame down withlfae 
in June and July. . 


with President mu v-union ai - ^ 

the White House on Monday to viewing ever yj^ e “ “ * 1 ' 
cipnal a de facto end to the 46- tempt to weaken its hold on the 


Cruise Ship Evacuated Afte\ 

ship.-The company has canceled the Ho¬ 
rizon cruise scheduled to leave thb week- 


By Ronald Smothers 

New York Tuna Service 

HAMILTON, Bermuda —The cruise 
ship Horizon has been taken out of ser¬ 
vice, upending the vacation plans of 
more than 1,000 passengers, after tests 


eliminate any bacteria that migh t have • 
caused four confirmed cases of Legion¬ 
naires’ disease and ? 18 posrible cases 
among passengers who had traveled on < 
recent cruises. 

The developments caused ah uproar 

_ .1 _ 5 ____ 


more than 1,000 passengers, after tests 1UC 

found the possiblepresence of Legion- among^ 

nairas’ disraSbactma in the ship's wa- when ^ 

New York on Saturday announcing that 
ier_ system. ^ ^ there was a small ride of their contracting 



for the passengers. 

They were evacuated from the ship 

2S&t-BaaRS. h 5S 2&J»™ss -=gS=a5=r==s.- 

were bring disinfected. The aim was to era who have booked other tnps on the 15 percent. 


__..j —^— said that federal 

health officials had not recommended 
last weekend that the cruise be canceled. 

They are promising full refunds to pas- 


rn.’wai^cia will have to wait out the 
incubation period of the disease, of from 
2 to TO days, to see if they fall 3L Even 
then it wffl take a blood test to determine 
whether the passengers have Legion¬ 
naires’ disease or some other form of 
pneumonia. 

The disease, which produces a head¬ 
ache, fever, coughs, chest pains, diarrhea 
and some ddinum, is readily treatable 
with the antibiotic erythromycin. But 
death rates in cases where patients are 

Mfili- MiM.nl, Mnnlurl 



Antigua 

(Available from public ardphones only.) 


Universal 

Translator 


Argentina'* 

Austria'CC* 
Bahamas'CO 
Bahrain 
BdgiofflUlOS 

Bermudas 

Bollviat 

Brazil 

Canada 

Cayman Islands 

ChileiCCj 

Colombta'CQ* 
Costa Rica* 


001-800-333-1 111 
022-903-012 
1-600-624-1000 
800-002 
0800-10012 
1-600-623-0484 
0-800-2222 
000-8012 
1-800-888-8000 
1-800-624*1000 
OOT-0316 
980-16-0001 
162 


080-90000 
00-42-000112 
8001-0022 
1-800-751-6624 

170 


Cyprus* 

Cacdi Republic! CO 
DenmaiUCQt 
Uomiaican Republic 
Ecuador^ 

EgypnCO* 

(Outside of Cam, dul 02 first .) 

El Salvador* 

RnhndlCa* 

FmwetCO* 

Gambia* 

German yiC*U 
tUmued avubbiluy ui eastern Germany ) 
GreecetCCl* 

Grenada*!* 1^624-8721 


355-5770 

195 

9800-102-80 

19T-00-19 

00-1-99 

0130*0012 


Guatemala* 

Haiti ICCM* 

Honduras *4* 

HtmgnyiCC* 

Iceland* 
bdandtco 

Israeli CO 

Ind^CO* 

Jamaica 
Kenya 

(Available from mast nujor «*s.) 

LitcbtenstebiiCO* 

Luxembourg 
Mcdcoi 

Mooawico* 


• 189 
001-800-444-1234 
001-800-674-7000 
(XT*-800-01411 
9994502 
1-800-55-1001 
177-150-2727 
172-1022 
800-674-7000 


080011 
155-0222 
0800-0112 
954KXW74-7000 
19T-00-19 


NetberiandslCO*.. 

ImflWlCCU* 

Nkaffagpmtao' 

(OuiSKk of Managua, dial 02 brat-5 

NorwaytCO 
Panama - 
Miliary Bases; ... 

Paraguay* 

Pent Outside of Lima, did 190 Bnt J 

PolandtCO 
PamgallCO- 
PnenoRkniCO 
San MaraiatCO* 

SbwakRepubto.ee 
SomkAfitorfCO 


;. 06:022.-91-22 
001*800050-1022 


166 
800-19912 
. 108 
2810-108 
008-11-800 
001*190 
0T-0I-M-800-222 
05-017:1234 
1-800-888-8000 
172-1022 
00 ^ 2-000112 
0800-99-0011 


WOOMOttS 
191-997AVI 
020-795-922 
155-0222 


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Sl Lucia 
Sweden 

SwltzerlandvCC'* 

Trinidad fix Tobago' 
iSPEOAL PHONES ONLY) 

United KingdomtCC 

16 call the US using BT • rew«rv—- 

To call the l m & udBg MERCLTtY 0500-890*222 
Tb call anywhere other thin the fS.0500-800-80C T ‘ 

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U^. Virgin IstandstCC - 1400-8BBWW 

Vatican CtyiCO - - 172*1022 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 22,1994 


Page 3 


h 


THE AMERICAS/ 


r 




& r>>^ 





■ >:*■* 


Ftoke Sgto FHton Rwtaf.s. 

WASHINGTON. — The independent, 
prosecutor looking into the Whitewater affair 
ms obtained a subpoena requiring the White 
House to turn over all its f fo y relating to, how • 
presidential aides handled the aftermath of 
ge death of Vincent Foster Jr, toe White 
House sad. 

_ sought by too prosecutor, 

Room B. Hske Jr., include any that reflect 
bow documents belonging to Mr. Fostq^ dep- 
u Jy White House counsel, were distributed 
‘"ter his 1993 death and how presidential 
aides deali with a Park Police inquiry into 
that death, the White House said. 

Mr. Fiske’s demand for. more documents ■ 
comes as he tries lo complete that part of las 
investigation dealing with whether White 
House aides tried to obstruct the police inves- 
ligation of what was .later determined to have 

been suicide by Mr. Foster. 

The subpoena was announced as the Jus¬ 
tice Dqjartment released parts of a 1993 Park 
Police report on Mr. Foster's death di«t it had 
withheld until now. The report finds no evi- • 
deuce of foul play and indices little inf orms 
tion that has not since been published. (NTT)' 

Social Security Sjrin-OffBHI - 

WASHINGTON — A biD to make the 
Social Security A dnanis trarion an iadepeib-. 
dent agency headed , by a preadep tiafly ap¬ 
pointed commissioner has been approvedby 
a House-Senate conference committee. 
Breaking the agency away from the Depart¬ 
ment of Health and Human Services - has 
strong backing, from major groups of older 
Americans. 

Chairman Daniel Patrick Moynihan of the 
Senate Finance Committee and acting Chair¬ 
man Sam M. Gibbons of the House Ways and 
Means Committee hailed the agreement. 

“We hope to increase public confidence in 
Social Security by improving administrative 
efficiency and by rncnTating the program from 
politics,'’ Mr. Moynihan said. 

The bQl, which the New York Democrat 
has pushed since 1984, aims to give the giant 


. /'M/ ... . 



Social Security Administration more public 
prominence, insulate it from politics and free 
1 it front being buried in hierarchy. 

Thenew independent agency would have a 
commissioner and deputy commissioner, ap¬ 
pointed by the president for six-year terms 
subject to Senate confirmation. It also would 
have a bipartisan advisory board of seven 
. members, four chosen by Congress and three 
-by the president. (WP) 

jUnnady’s Wife Quite Job 

WASHINGTON—Vickie Reggie Kenne¬ 
dy, wife of Senator Edward M. Kennedy, has 
resigned from her partnership here over its 
. d eci sio n to represou Libya in a case related 
to the country’s alleged role in the terrorist 
bombing of Pam Am Flight 103. 

..The senator’s office, after inquiries from 
The Washington Post, issued a statement con- 
~tirmmg that the Massachusetts Democrat’s 
wife left her banking practice at Keck, Mahin 
and Cate on luly 14 “as an act of conscience 
when she learned of toe firm’s intention” 

Dan Grove, managing partner of Keck, 
Mahin, confirmed that his linn would repre- 
■ sent Libya in a wrongful death suit filed by 
the family of a victim killed in the 1988 
bombing. 

■The United Nations has imposed sanctions 
against Libya in an attempt to farce the 
.country to extradite two Ubyan intelligence 
agents the United States accuses of causing 
the bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, that 
killed 259 people. (WP) 

Quote/Unquote _ 

A statement from toe family of President 
BUI Clinton's late legal adviser, Vincent Fos¬ 
ter Jr^ whoee death last year was recently 
determined to have been a suicide: “There is 
now no justification for painful repetitious 
examination of these issues. The principal 
advocates for this appear chiefly motivated 
by mean-spirited partisanship; they certainly 
care not at all for the feedings of Vince’s 
family, particularly those of his children, who 
have suffered greatly.” (NTT) 




rW 


Gniy Cameron/Hanoi 


FIRST MAN ON MOON LOOKING ON—President B31 Cfintan, left, greeting 
the ApoBo llcxew—Ne3 Armstrong, Bim AMrip aad Micheet Cotow — at.the 
White Hone to marie the 25th anniversary of the first lunar lanmng, on Jniy 20,19c9. 


If U.S. Invades Haiti, It Plans to Seize Weapons 


By Daniel Williams 

f VaUngte* Pcu Service 

WASHINGTON — If US. troops land in Haiti. 
They will act to disarm the Haitian Army and paramili- 
taiy groups like toe Teutons Macoates to pacify the 
country, according to current plans. 

The removal of weapons would take place whether 
Haiti’s mfliiary nders stepped down voluntarily or 
were forced to Dee by tbe invaders. 

The program would be designed to avoid the prob¬ 
lems that erupted in Somalia, where rival militia forces 
werepernatted to keep their weapons even after US. 
troops arrived to guard food and other relief supplies. 

The guns were eventually turned on the Americans 
by followers of a nrilraa leader whose quest Tor power 
was threatened by US. plans to rebuild the Somali 
government. 

The disarmament plan was raised during talks earli¬ 
er this week between Undersecretary of State Peter 


Taraoff; Madeleine K. .Albright, the chief delegate to 
the United Nations, and the UN secretary-general, 
Buiros Buiros Ghali. 

Tbe US. officials were undertaking an effon to win 
UN Security Council blessing for U.S. forces to take 
“all necessary measures'’ to restore Haiti’s exiled presi¬ 
dent, the Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 

No deadline has been set for Haiti’s military rulers, 
led by Lieutenant General Raoul Cedras, to step 
down. 

A published interview with the U.S. special envoy, 
William H. Gray 3d, in which he said he expected the 
dictatorship to be out by October, was not meant as an 
ultimatum, Mr. Gray and other officials insisted. 

“We think it is time for the military leaders to leave 
now,” said toe White House press secretary. Dee Dee 
Myers. “Not six months from now. not three months 
from now. We’d like to see them leave now.” 

Nevertheless, officials said pressure for a quick 


invasion had eased as a result of a drop since early July 
in the number of refugees leaving Haiti by boat. 

Mr. Buiros Ghali is already convinced that an initial 
American force ought to pacify Haiti before a UN 
peacekeeping force was sent to keep order, protect 
Father Aristide and revamp the military and police 
force. 

Also, tbe seemajy general warns to avoid a debacle 
like toe one in Somalia. He urged the Bush administra¬ 
tion to disarm the Somalis when troops first went in 
but was ignored. 

Officials regard the drop in the numbers of refugees 
as no fluke. Rather, they said, the decision to keep 
Haitians at Guantanamo until they can be sent to 
temporary safe havens in other countries — in effect 
keeping them until they can be returned to Haiti when 
Father Aristide is restored—has deterred people from 
taking lo toe boats. They can no longer hope for 
eventual emigration to toe United States. 



Simpson 
Opens Own 
Inquiry on 
Slayings 

The Assodmed Press 

LOS ANGELES — O. J. 
Simpson is organizing an inde¬ 
pendent investigation into toe 
murders of his ex-wife and her 
friend, employing a team of de¬ 
tectives and providing a toll- 
free number for information. 

He has also offered a 
$500,000 reward for leads. 

“O. J. wants to confirm to the 
public that he is innocent of all 
charges in this matter and that 
he is most eager to get to trial to 

E : his innocence.” said his 
ess attorney, LeRoy Taft. 
Mr. Taft said the former 
football star ‘Teels he is com¬ 
pelled to undertake his own in¬ 
vestigation at his own expense 
to pursue all information lead¬ 
ing to the arrest and conviction 
of the real loner or killers in this 
case.” 

The lead defense lawyer, 
Robert L. Shapiro, contended 
in court papers that the authori¬ 
ties have ignored evidence 
pointing to Mr. Simpson’s in¬ 
nocence. Tbe papers rite a se¬ 
ries of obscene, threatening 
phone calls to Nicole Brown 
Simpson in 1992 that the police 
determined had not been made 
by Mr. Simpson. 

They also rite a report that 
police officers heard Mr. Simp¬ 
son's 8-year-old daughter — 
who was asleep in iter mother's 
cond ominium when tbe bodies : 
were found outride'— say the 
morning after toe Iriffings, “I 
heard Mommy’s best friend’s 
voice and beard Mommy cry¬ 
ing." 

Mr. Simpson has pleaded in¬ 
nocent in toe June 12 stabbing 
deaths of Ms. Simpson, 35, and 
a friend, Ronald L. Goldman, 
25. He is being held without 
bail and is to be arraigned Fri¬ 
day. 

Mr. Simpson plans to hire 
John McNally to head a team of 
private detectives, Mr. Taft 
said. Mr. McNally, a retired 
New York police detective, 
worked with toe attorney F. Lee 
Bailey on toe Patty Hearst kid¬ 
napping case in the 1970s. He is 
on Mr. Simpson's defense team. 

J, Albert Johnson, a Boston 
attorney who has used Mr.' 
McNally on several cases, 
called him “toe best investiga¬ 
tor I’ve ever met.”-. 

Mr. Shapiro is asking toe au¬ 
thorities to turn over a number 
cf items, including police inter¬ 
nal affairs reports on officers 
assigned to toe case, records of 
visits to emergency rooms near 
Mr. Simpson's estate for cuts or 


of unsolved murders similar to 
toe slayings of Ms. Simpson 
and Mr. Goldman. 


XJ.S. Fears New Rise in Use of Illicit Drugs 


• By Joseph B. Treaster 

; New TerkTUna Service 

- NEW YORK ~A 13-war 

decline to use of illiciulnigs has 

halted as Americans become 
• less worried about toe hazards 


of drugs, federal researchers 
say. This finding suggested to 
some experts that the drug 
problem, might be on the brink 
of worsening. 

In an annual survey of house- 


Away From Politics 

• A man portrayed as a minor conspirator in the terrorist plot 

to blow up New York Q'ty landmarks was sentenced to toe 
three and half months he had already served ;on charges of 
conspiring to supply eoroloarves. The defendant, Earl Grot, 
STccdd! haveiSaM'op to five yearem pnson * hus 
sentencing in US. District Comt m Jtohattwu The Feb. 26, 
i9937bombing of the Worid Trade Center killed ax people 
and injured hundreds, .• 

• fa a maior triumph foraoti^nK^wiTO*^ 

orwBrnorPete Wilson, announced that he would sign mto law 
fon imokingm Tte 

law would Sake CaHornia one of lie most ^hospitable 
places in the nation for smokas. The law. which woiUdgo 
mtoeffecUan-1. would ban smoking m resianrant^o/fiMS, 

I S^fectorio. hospitals and other large, enclosed.,work- 

• Ttesoo of RraKsanW™ Kwasi Mfnme otMajjtod hffi 
teen charged■wKhraping a woman aftera date. Michael 
SrTMwbose father is chairman of tbe .Congressional 

^““dialled 

until when he was freed on 535,000 baiL 

Tiwitd over a series of 14 susfl fires at synagogues, 

been set by toe same person. . J 


holds across the country, re¬ 
searchers from toe Department 
of Health and Human Services 
said there were indications of 
increased drug use among teen¬ 
agers and people over 35. 

The survey, by the Substance 
Abuse and Mental Health Ser¬ 
vices Administration, consisted 
of more than 26,000 face-to- 
face interviews. It found that 
the total number of Americans 
who used drugs in 1993 had 
leveled off at 24.4 million, 
about the same as in 1992, from 
a high of 35.7 mSHon in 1985. 

But it also reported that there 
had been basically no change 
since 1985 in the number of 
hard-core or heavy drug users, 
who are toe people consuming 
the bulk of the 300 tons of co¬ 
caine sold each year and are 
responsible for most of the 
drug-related crime and vio- 
-lence. 

The survey bad a margin of 


ask the butler... 


error of less than one percent¬ 
age point, plus or minus. 

The survey estimates that 
there axe at least half a million 
heavy cocaine users, but gov¬ 
ernment officials say the num¬ 
ber may be four times as high 
because the survey does not 
reach many of toe heaviest 
drag-using groups. 

The survey indicated that 7.5 
mffli em Americans above toe 
age of 35 used drugs during 
1993, compared with about 6 
million in 1992 and 7.4 million 
in 1991. In 1993, 2.1 million 
teenagers reported tiring mari¬ 
juana, compared with 1.7 mil¬ 
lion the previous year. 

In assessing toe dangers of 
taking drugs, 32 6 percent of the 
teenagers interviewed in 1993 
said they thought smoking mar¬ 
ijuana once or twice posed a 
great risk, down from 35,9 per¬ 
cent who said so in 1992. 




Foreigners on a Spending Spree in N. Y. 


By Tom Redbum 

i\Vv York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Alain Tobier had 
waited in fine two hours to climb the 
Statue of liberty. He had marveled at 
toe view from toe World Trade Center 
and had had his picture taken with a 
dinosaur at tbe American Museum of 
Natural History. But now be was 
con centra ting on what really drew him to 
New York: shopping. 

Standing at toe counter at 47th Street 
Photo, Mr. Tobier, an aerospace engi¬ 
neer from Toulouse, France, looked 
through the viewfinder of toe Pemax 
am of oats 35mm camera recommended 
by a salesman. He had already bought an 
Epson portable oomputer upstairs. One 
of his companions was carrying a new 
Wilson tennis racket in his bag. The 
other had a box or Timberland shoes. 

“Everything is so much more expen¬ 
sive at home,” Mr. Tobier said. “We have 
a list of all toe things we're supposed to 
buy for our friends. This is so much fun.” 

Join toe club. Tourists from abroad, 
spurred on by toe fall in the dollar, are 
spending their francs, pesos and yen 
more freely than ever this summer. With 
visitors from elsewhere in toe United 
States increasing. New York City ap¬ 
pears lo be experiencing its best tourist 
season in years. 

“New York is the shopping mecca of 
toe world,” Mitchell Moss, director of 
toe Urban Research Center at New York 
University, said. “Tbe decline of the dol¬ 
lar is doing more to boost tourism here 
than all toe promotional nampaigns put 
together” 

To Bren Spencer, a London journalist. 
New York is everything he expected — 
and more. “It’s too hot, too crowded and 
too noisy, and we can’t get enough of it,” 


said Mr. Spencer, 25. who was visiting 
the Empire State Building with his fa¬ 
ther. 

Visitors accounted for more than $14 
billion in economic activity in 1992 toe 
most recent year for which figures are 
available, the U.S. Travel and Tourism 
Administration reported. 

Travel and tourism support 154.000 
jobs in New York alone, according to toe 
City Economic Policy and Marketing 
Group. 

Foreign tourism, which is up all over 
toe country, is particularly important. 
While visitors from abroad made up only 

Tourists from abroad, 
spurred on by the fall in the 
dollar, are spending their 
francs, pesos and yen more 
freely than ever. 


about 20 percent of toe 25 million people 
who stayed overnight In New York City 
in 1992 toe city^s Convention and Visi¬ 
tors Bureau estimated that they spent 
more than 40 percent of toe dollars tour¬ 
ists left bdnnd. 

Europeans account for toe bulk of toe 
visitors from abroad, but tourism offi¬ 
cials also noted that visitors from Latin 
America are on toe rise. 

This year, signs abound of increased 
visits by Americans and foreigners alike. 
After slumping from 1987 through last 
summer, hotel occupancy rates began to 
cre e p higher late in 1993. Now they are 
climbing steadily. In May. 77 percent of 
the roughly 65,000 hotel rooms in toe 
city were occupied, according to the Pan¬ 


el ell Kerr Foster consulting firm. That 
was up from 71 percent in May 1993 and 
from 68 percent toe year before. 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
noting an unusual number of European 
visitors, reported attendance up by 82. 
percent in toe first quarter. Visits to the 
Statue of Liberty, which was closed fre¬ 
quently this winter because of harsh 
weather, nonetheless are running even 
with last year and were up by 4 percent in 
June, compared with the same month 
last year. 

Meanwhile, attendance at the Empire 
State Building, which reopened May 20 
after repair work, has risen by 17 percent 
over toe same period last year. 

To most Americans, New York stands 
out as perhaps toe most expensive city in 
toe country. The average hotel room rate 
today is §144. The cost of restaurant 
meals, from McDonald’s to toe Rainbow 
Room, is higher than elsewhere. 

To visitors from Europe and Japan, 
however. New York is a bargain. “Most 
things here seem pretty inexpensive.” 
H enning Groenbaek, a Danish visitor, 
said. 

Products like cameras and electronics 
equipment are heavily taxed in Europe 
and Asia, making them substantially 
more expensive there than in toe United 
States. 

In addition, the exchange rate of most 
European currencies against toe dollar is 
up about 10 percent since the beginning 
of the year. 

Indeed, foreign tourists appear to be 
on a spree. The amount of foreign cur¬ 
rency exchanged last month at American 
Express offices in New York Gty was up 
by 25 percent from June 1993, Nancy 
Muller, a spokeswoman for American 
Express, said. 





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INTERNATIONAL 



Pt'Bl.lSHF.n wmi THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Italy’s ’Knight’ Retreats 


eribunc A Rwanda Rescue Now on the Scale of Desert Storm 


Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi rose 
to power casting himself as Mr. Clean— 
“The Knight,’' Italians called him — 
who would clean up a corrupt political 
system. But after a huge public contro¬ 
versy over a Berlusconi decree that anti¬ 
corruption prosecutors interpreted as an 
attack on their whole enterprise, his ar¬ 
mor is badly dented. 

On the face of it, it is hard for anyone 
concerned about civil liberties to take 
issue with the Berlusconi demee. Italian 
law permits large-scale pretrial deten¬ 
tion of suspects, a practice that prosecu¬ 
tors can use to sweat oui confessions. In 
most circumstances, pretrial detention 
is a terrible idea. Mr. Berlusconi's de¬ 
cree abolished detention for those under 
investigation for nonviolent crimes, in¬ 
cluding corruption; more than 1,000 
people were set free. 

The problem is that the prime minis - 
ter fed public suspicion that be acted not 
to protect civil liberties but to shield the 
corrupt. He used his decree powers to 
circumvent normal parliamentary de¬ 
bate on wbat would be a sweeping 
change in Italian practice. 

He issued the decree while Italy was 
in a frenzy over its national soccer team, 
encouraging the idea that he was sneak¬ 
ing something through. The decree was 
carefully tailored to white-collar crimi¬ 
nals, which suggested that those without 
connections were not about to see their 
own civil liberties served. It did nothing 
to answer the legitimate concerns of 


prosecutors over whether the quick re¬ 
lease of the accused would simply give 
them time to tamper with evidence. On 
top of all this, the decree was issued 
after several senior officials of Mr. Ber¬ 
lusconi's Fininvest holding company 
had come under investigation. 

The prosecutors were outraged, and 
many in iheix ranks quit the anti-corrup¬ 
tion investigations that have led to thou¬ 
sands of arrests and the collapse of the 
parties that ruled Italy for 40 years. 
Public reaction was mostly on the side 
of the much admired prosecutors. 

Prime Minister Berlusconi's coalition 
partners threatened to quit. On Tues¬ 
day, he backed off and said he would 
pursue the normal parliamentary order 
for his proposal. He said his only goal 
was protecting "the principles of indi¬ 
vidual liberty. ’ 

Civil liberties are subject to abuse in 
Italy, and even honest prosecutors can 
use their powers dangerously. The Ital¬ 
ian criminal justice system needs re¬ 
forms to protect civil liberties and also 
changes to speed trials and protect evi¬ 
dence. But Mr. Berlusconi has hardly 
acquitted himself well in this affair. 
Many Italians doubted that a man with 
such close and profitable ties to Italy's 
old order could really be Mr. Clean. 

Predictions of instability within Mr. 
Berlusconi's strange governing coalition 
of separatists and neofascists have now 
been confirmed. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Suspense for Mexicans 


As Mexico approaches its presidential 
election next month, the central issue is 
democracy itself. For the first time in 
the life of any Mexican voter, the out¬ 
come is genuinely in question. The long 
tradition of prearranged elections is fad¬ 
ing fast. Mexico is now approaching the 
critical moment in its transition from 
one-party rule to voters* choice. 

The r uling Institutional Revolution¬ 
ary Party (PRI) has won every federal 
election since 1929, often stuffing ballot 
boxes and unashamedly manipulating 
returns in the name of stability. Because 
of that history, the government now 
faces the great challenge of convincing 
its citizens that the count in this elec¬ 
tion, on Aug. 21, will be accurate. 

Six years ago, Carlos Salinas de Gor- 
tari of the PRI won with, according to 
the official tally, 50.5 percent of the vote 
versus 31 percent for his closest rival, 
Cuauhtemoc Cdrdenas. Mr. C&rdenas's 
supporters vehemently charged that the 
election was stolen from them, and he is 
now running again. 

But one great surprise this year is that 
the most vigorous challenge to the PRI 
is coming not from Mr. Chrdenas and 
the center-left but from the right — 
Diego Feraindez de Cevallos and his 
National Action Party (PAN). Polls 
show Mr. Femindez running abreast of 
the PRl’s candidate, Ernesto Zedillo. 
Regardless of the accuracy of the polls, 
they have created an atmosphere in 
which Mexicans expect the results to be 


very dose, and any other result is likely 
to be received with deep suspidon. 

President Salinas and the top leader¬ 
ship of the PRI have gone to consider¬ 
able lengths to reform and strengthen 
the electoral process. They pushed 
through one round of changes four years 
ago, drastically modernizing proce¬ 
dures. After the New Year’s uprising in 
Chiapas and the assassination in March 
of the PRl’s original candidate for the 
presidency, all the parties signed a pact 
setting out further reforms that Con¬ 
gress has enacted. Among other innova¬ 
tions, at each precinct there are to be 
nonpartisan officials selected by ran¬ 
dom lottery as well as observers from 
the parties and from foreign countries. 

But the sentiment for reform is not 
unanimous. While the top of the PRI 
may be for it, the party is huge and 
contains a lot of middle-level people 
unwilling to letgo of all that patronage 
and influence. There may be efforts here 
and there to revert to bad old habits. 

It will also be in the interests of some 
of the losers to cry fraud. A custom has 
arisen in Mexico of winners negotiating 
after the election with losers, and the 
losers’ position is strengthened by accu¬ 
sations of tampering. 

Whom to believe? It is too early to 
say. But you can believe one thing: This 
election will be more open, and more 
closely watched by independent observ¬ 
ers, than any in Mexico's history. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Health Coverage Numbers 


President Bill Clinton says he thought 
Ins remarks sounded innocent enough. 
Speaking to the nation's governors on 
Tuesday, he said he would be satisfied if 
health care reform managed to insure 
“somewhere in the ballpark of 95 per¬ 
cent** of Americans and that he would 
not insist that Congress impose as em¬ 
ployer mandate. 

Neither remark deviated one iota 
from administration policy. But that did 
not stop a torrent of speculation that he 
was retreating on universal coverage 
and was backtracking from mandates. 

On Wednesday a rattled White House 
disclaimed any such signals. And the first 
lady, Hillary Rodham Clinton, visited 
Capitol Hill to reassure Democratic lead¬ 
ers that the president was not wavering. 
By the end of the day, the Hill was 
supposed to believe that Mr. Clinton was 
rin gin g the same old tunes — for now. 

Judging from reactions, it would seem 
a grave matter of statecraft whether Mr. 
Clinton sets sail for 95 percent coverage 
or 93 or 98. Bat to fixate on the numbers 
is to miss the important structural ques¬ 
tions in the debate. 

Universal coverage is, foremost, a 
statement about public values; the rich¬ 
est country ought not to terrorize par¬ 
ents with the fear of bankruptcy because 
their child becomes chronically ill. But 
for those who need a harder-edged rea¬ 
son, universal coverage is also necessary 
to make health care markets work. 

If the rules aOow healthy individuals to 
opt out of insurance, many will do so — 
at least until they become sick. Then 


insurance companies will find that they 
are mostly catering to the chronically 21, 
whom they will have to charge prohibitive¬ 
ly high praniums. The answer is to require 
healthy individuals to enroll when they 
are well and pay premiums to help cover 
the cost of care when they become ilL In a 
phrase, universal coverage. 

Does that mean that every living 
American must be covered to the point 
of statistical perfection? Not really. In¬ 
deed, the president's bill would not 
achieve 100 percent coverage; nor do the 
Europeans or Hawaii — which has a 
mandate on employers to buy their 
workers coverage. 

What is needed is a bill that, as a 
practical matter, brings coverage to the 
rich and poor, rick ami healthy, young 
and old, employed and unemployed, in 
the same way that Social Security, as a 
practical matter, provides retirement 
benefits for all Americans and requires 
contributions from every worker. If the 
medical insurance rules, like those of 
Social Security, allow odd exceptions — 
whether they add up to 2, 3 or even 5 
percent of the population — this amounts 
to no moral or medical catastrophe. 

President Clinton's loose lips did not 
help negotiations. His words encourage 
recalcitrants on Capitol Hill to spend 
time figuring out how to get the presi¬ 
dent, and his Democratic supporters, to 
retreat — rather than accepting the goal 
of universal coverage and figuring out 
what else the bill can have to win bipar¬ 
tisan support. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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W ASHINGTON — Rwanda has be¬ 
come the worst humanitarian di¬ 
saster in the world. In the days ahead, 
refugees and internally displaced Rwan¬ 
dans will die by the thousands. Unless 
the international community responds 
quickly, there could be 100,000 dead. 

For months we have watched genocide 
in Rwanda. With the war over and refu¬ 
gees surging out to Zaire, the internation¬ 
al community has a chance to help. 

The humanitarian emergency in 
Goma, Zaire, is deepening by the hour. 
United Nations and other humanitarian 
agencies are overwhelmed by the scale of 
the refugee exodus and have issued an 
appeal for massive outride help. 

There are a million Rwandan refugees 
in Goma. They choke every street 
One thing is working. Refugees are 
heeding the plea of relief officials to 
walk north about 50 kilometers to a 
designated camp site. Some of these 
people cannot survive the walk and have 
began to die en route, from dehydration 
and exhaustion. 

And unless the international commu- 


By Lionel Rosenblatt 

nity responds, there will be tittle on 
hand to sustain those who do make it to 
the camp. Goma will go down in history 
as a death march. 

Refugees are also streaming in to other 
areas of Zaire. There is a risk of endan¬ 
gering the local citizens and further in¬ 
flaming the countries of the region. To 
avoid attracting more refugees, we need 
to address both the needs of the refugees 
and those inside Rwanda. 

The immediate needs in Goma are for 
water and food, followed by public 
health and sanitation measures. 

The scale of need is such that only the 
logistic capabilities of the American and 
other major military organizations can 
bridge the gap. 

If measures including the following 
are taken, hundreds of thousands of 
lives can still be saved: 

• Immediate airlift of pumps and 
tanker trucks for distribution of water. 

• Imm ediate airlift of food and deliv¬ 


ery trucks, as wdl as transport of food 
overland from Ug anda. 

* Military civil affaire specialists to 
handle distribution to the desperate refu¬ 
gees. Valiant relief personnel no w on t he 
ground are overwhelmed by the growing 
scale of the job. 

• Medical and public .sanitation per¬ 
sonnel To provide adequate numbers of 
personnel, military medics may be re¬ 
quired in addition to the staff of nongov¬ 
ernmental organizations. 

It is becoming dear thousands of' 

refugees are doomed to die in Goma and 
vicinity, but hundreds of thousands of 
lives are still in the balance and can be 
saved by immediate action. 

Aid must also start flowing inside 
Rwanda, where as much as half the pop¬ 
ulation may be displaced. And political 
and relief efforts nave to be organized 
for early repatriation of refugees, with¬ 
out permitting the defeated. Rwandan 
army to reconstitute. 

If Rwanda and its refugees get top 
priority now, most can stnl be saved. 
Western beads of state and government 


have other interna^ 


life-threatening- 


toSSaS™ «te KuKfc No* 


thousands of lives. .. _ 

Leadership is the vital mgredienL A 
first step would be for Fresident BO! 
Clinton to appoint a figure of interna¬ 
tional repute to pull together the urinary 
lo gistic capacities of the Unite d Sta tes 
and other countries in a joint lifesaving 
enterprise — the humanitarian equiva¬ 
lent of the Desert Storm war coalman. 

Planes should begin flying around the. 
dockimmaEaldy. Every hour of ddayis 
costing the lives of many Rwandans. 

77fe writer, president of Refugees Inter-, 
national back from an emergency assess¬ 
ment visit to Goma, Zaire, was to testify at 
a hearing of the US. House of Rqrresenta -. 
tries on Thursday. He contributed this com¬ 
ment to the International Herald Tribune. 


Time for the Powers Jointly to Impose Peace at Last in Bosnia 


P ARIS — There are only two 
ways to end the war in Bosnia. 
One is to let it rage until it has 
burned out all hope, until, as the 
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan. 
Karadzic said earlier this week, 
“there is a victor and a van¬ 
quished.” The other is for out¬ 
side powers to impose peace, or¬ 
chestrating sanctions and, pro¬ 
bably, using force. 

Neither way offers the "peace 
with justice** that people of good¬ 
will have been demanding as the 
essential precedent to preserve 
some credibility and moral satis¬ 
faction for the United Nations 
and the major countries involved. 
This requires assurance of Bos¬ 
nia-Herzegovina’s integrity as a 
stale, right of return of all refu¬ 
gees (reversing ethnic deansing 
so far as posable), and trial and 
punishment of war criminals. 

Either way risks spreading the 
conflict which has surprisingly 
been contained so far. But there 
is a better chance of preventing 
wider war if the powers show 
that they can sustain agreement 
among themselves and a will to 
act which has taken them more 
than two years to achieve. 

They have been caught until 
now in a combination of vain 
hope (that the belligerents could 
be induced to accept mutual com¬ 
promise) and idle bluff (as if 
threats would be enough to make 
risky action unnecessary). 

The powers are paying for this 
equivocation now, because each_ 
hesitation, each bluff called has 
increased the price of effective 
decision. For ati the destruction 
and exhaustion, the belligerents 
dearly are not prepared to bade 
off from that war aims. They 
have learned to play the powers at 
thdr own waffling game. 

Although he has accepted the 
latest plan of the "contact group” 
(United States, Russia, France, 
Britain, United Nations and Eu¬ 
ropean Union), Bosnian Presi¬ 
dent Atija Izetbcgovic made dear 
that he did not like it and was 
betting on rejection by the Serbs 
so as to improve his military posi¬ 
tion. E(e hopes to force the pow¬ 
ers to remove the arms embargo, 
and perhaps bomb the Serbs. 

The Bosnian Serbs are maneu¬ 
vering, as they have done all 
along, to provoke division and 
uncertainty so that they can keep 


By flora Lewis 


what they have and press for 
more, stopping just short of what¬ 
ever seems to be the international 
breaking point The role of Serbi¬ 
an President Slobodan Milosevic 
is tricky, as usual, and it would be 
simpleminded not to take his ca¬ 
pacity for cynicism into account 
No doubt Mr. Milosevic does 
want relief from economic sanc¬ 
tions, which, are hurting Serbia, 
and would like to earn interna¬ 
tional brownie points for weigh¬ 
ing on Mr. Karadzic, who has 
been troublesome to him, too, at 
times. But he is capable of claim¬ 
ing that he has done his best all 
the while quietly bolstering the 
Bosnian Sobs* confidence that 
they can count on Serbia’s huge 
reserves of arms if Mr. Izetbcgo¬ 


vic gete access to heavy weapons. 

At every turn of the screw, the 
problem gets harder for the diplo¬ 
mats. There aren’t any more gim¬ 
micks available by shifting squig- 
gjes on the map, promising reoono- 
struction aid ana economic be¬ 
nefits. There wifi be intense re¬ 
luctance to cany out the latest. 
round of threats, and intense op¬ 
probrium at being seen to be im¬ 
potent before such defiance. There 
isn’t any good, honorable solution. 
This at Inst has to be admitted.: 


from the start, only escalated to 
an ever higher degree of tragedy. 
It is to impose a settlement that 
will satisfy no one, except to the 
not inconsiderable extent that 
each side wfll be pleased to see the 
other forded to some concessions. 
Or, to.stand back for the Shake¬ 
spearean finale of mutual massa¬ 
cre, with no. chance of the classi¬ 
cal rariiwrntB that brings humility 
and understanding after the folly 


and p unishing aggression only 
makes sure that the agony will be 
prolonged. And it must be admit- 
ted that humanitarian concern will. 
not clouse this political conflict. 

The choice is the same as h was 


The powers have to decide, 
pronounce and act, painful as it 
wifi be, and accept that they must 
do it together. Amy defection wifi 
undermine alL For support from 
the belligerents, they must look 
to the longer term and the pro¬ 
mise of a different kind of Bal¬ 
kans'released from historic back¬ 
wardness, insecurity, fragmenta¬ 


tion through a regional plan with 
major-power guarantees. 

There were many who foresaw' 
what was coming if Yugoslavia 
was kft, or encouraged, to break • : 
op era the argument that self-de- w j 
termination means everyone for 
himself and to hell with the neigh- • 
bore. Perhaps it is time to suggest 1 

a new Yugoslavia instead of more 
bits and pieces, a looser, more 
confederate and certainly more 
democratic one, something worth' 
<*rwting the war to achieve. 

It would have room for Serbs 
and Croats and Muslims, and for 
e thnic Albanians and perhaps 
Macedonians, too. 

That should be the incentive. 
Meanwhile, there is no avoiding 
tine stick—^ a cease-fire relying on 
force when ills floated. - - - 

B Flora Lewis. 


ireaamg the ■ • - 

n^BuTthere Act for the Protection of Human 

preventing J «F 


N EW YORK — The Bosnian Serbs are 
waiting for the international community 
to readjust its blinders and offer than more 
—territory, autonomy and a free hand locally 
to continue ethnic cleansing and arbitrary 
rule. But there is good reason to doubt that 
new adjustments in the partition package 
would stop die fi ghting and ethnic cleansing. 

As the powers ponder punishment. United 
Nations otGaals should focus on ways to 
protect against atrocities to come. 

ft is nearly two years since the Security 
Cawdi first expressed shock at the torture ana 
other abuse in prison camps in northern Bos¬ 
nia. The United Nations has sent teams of 
human rights monitors and formed a war 
crimes tribunal to investigate violations and 
bring those responsible to justice. Yet there 
are reports of new rounds of ethnic cleansing 
in Banja Luka and other Serb-held areas due 
to be turned over to the Bosnian government. 

Even if the parties say “yes," there is great 
risk of stOl more abuses, including scorched- 
earth destruction directed against people and 
remaining infrastructure as troops are re¬ 
quired to withdraw from territories they now 
hold. There may be further assassinations of 
local political leaders and murders of detain¬ 
ees, new forced displacements and violence 
against local minorities. Retaliation for such 
incidents wifi grow as returning refugees dis¬ 
cover mass graves and other destruction. 

In December, the UN General Assembly 
established the long-awaited post of UN High 
Commissioner for Human Rights. IBs role is 

and haltrigtts violations. If ever there was a 


By Felice Gaer 


place where his guiding hand was needed, itis 

m former Yugoslavia. 

The high commissioner. Josh Ayala. Lasso; 
should press now to assure that hitman rights 
protections wfll be applied whether or not 
peace comes. Peacekeeping troops wifi need 
to be deployed promptly, particularly in areas 
vulnerable to violence. If they are committed 
to enforcing UN principles, they can provide 
a preventive presence, limiting - the worst 
abuses. Offers to send troops cany if a cease¬ 
fire holds will be too late: 

Regardless of tile outcome of the peace • 
plan, the high commissioner should immedi¬ 
ately send a trigh-fevd special envoy to be 
stationed in Zagreb to bring human-rights- 
related expertise and.perspective to tile operar 
tions supervised by Yasoshi Akariri, the UN 
special representative. The 38,000-member 
UN Protection Force lacks a single human 
rights officer. It has never worked out stanr 
dard operating procedures far addressing 
rights violations inrts fkJd operations. 

The qierial envoy can begin to put in place 
tiie personnel and training needed -to assure 
that a future human rights monitoring system 
Operates in accord with the principles arid 
practices developed by the UN Center for 
Human Rights. Be or she can begin to devel¬ 
op a procedure, as in El Salvador, to disquah- ' 
fy known perpetrators off abuses from serving 
in post-settlement local polkx forces, 

A special envoy could make a dramatic. 
difference in deterring future violations. Low¬ 


er-level human rights officers reporting 
through the protection force would lack the 
independence and clout to achieve as much.. 

The high ct vzr mr ssum er shoold call on the 

parties to sign a special annex assuring that 
each will surrender individuals sought by the 
war crimes tribunal. He can remind govern- 
rnems with infanBatiraiabqur abases, (B* about 
thepaton of commaitdand control, to submit. 

. the data promptly to the tribunal rather than 
continue-to suppress it. In so doing, he can $•. 
make c’^r that the United Nations wifi not 
equate victors and perpetrators. - 

Ethnic deanring has been the purpose, not 
the result, of the war in Bosnia. It has un¬ 
leashed mid legitimated forces m Europe, 
East and West, that were previously ais- 
missed as marginal and politically irrelevant. 
These forces of hate and racist extremism 
seem to feed on one another. 

7 If the high commissioner for human rights 
speaks forthrightly, prevents further abuses, 
dispatches a special envoy and advances the 
tribunaFs capacity to obtain custody of those 


one that the UN community can look bade to 
in future years —-finding perhaps a glimmer 
of satisfaction in the-knowledge that these 
conlributionawcrelatebijt, this timei lasting. 

The writer is director of the Jacob Biavstem 
Institute for the Advancement of Human Rights 
of the American Jewish Committee; she has 
conducted three fact-finding missions in former 
Yugobpdafor the International League far Hu¬ 
man Rights. She contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


Japan Got Itself Into the Yen Problem and Has to Get Itself Out 


W ASHINGTON — Someone 
will someday write the de¬ 
finitive history of the swindle of 
the century. For now, we must 
content ourselves with the bare 
facts. During the 1980s, Japanese 
insurance companies, banks and 
corporations bought hundreds of 
billions of dollars of foreign 
stocks, bonds and real estate (of¬ 
fice buddings, hotels, resorts). 
On these investments, the Japa¬ 
nese have suffered catastrophic 
losses, often 50 percent or more. 

What is astonishing, though, is 
that the swindle was mostly self- 
inflicted. It was mainly eager 
Japanese buyers—and not fast- 
talking foreign salesmen — who 
fed the buying frenzy. 

All this is now relevant be¬ 
cause it explains the yen’s dra¬ 
matic rise to a postwar high of 97 
to the dollar. Thai is, it took only 
97 yen to buy a dollar, compared 
with 145 in 1990. 

For most countries, a rising 

dence.?or Japan, fTisthe oppo¬ 
site, It represents a harsh judg¬ 
ment by global money managers 
that the Japanese cannot cornea 
their big trade imbalance them¬ 
selves and that only laqge ex¬ 
change rate changes—raising the 
price of Japanese exports and 
lowering the price of imports — 
will do the job. 

Japan's massive overseas in¬ 
vestments merely postponed the 
inevitable day of reckoning. 

When Japan nms big trade sur¬ 
pluses, it coDects huge amounts of 
foreign currency (mostly dollars) 
that it doesn't need to buy im¬ 
ports. Normally, this would lead 
to a rapid rise of the yen, as sur¬ 
plus dollars were sold on foreign 
exchange markets to buy yen. 
With more sellers of dollars than 
buyers, the dollar drops and the 
yen rises. In Japan's case, the ef¬ 
fect was delayed because so many 
dollars were “recycled” to buy 


By Robert J. Samuelson 


[ordga bonds and office buddings. 

Having now suffered immense 
losses on these investments, the 
Japanese have lost their appetite 
for more. So the dollar drops and 
theyea rises. 

There is nothing mysterious 
about this. Yet many Japanese 
deny it. They “think that the 
strong yen has been intentionally 
created by Washington,” writes 
Richard Koo, an economist with 
Nomura Securities, "but in fact 
the reason lies in Japan’s massive 
5130 billion trade surplus/* The 
delusion pervades Japanese soci¬ 
ety. Only last week. Prime Minis¬ 
ter Tonmchi Murayama blamed 
thc-United States for the high yen, 
reports the Daily Japan Digest 

The Japanese are right to fear 
the rising yen; they are wrong to 
blame others. Since 1992, Japan's 
economy has stagnated. There are 
now faint signs of a revival that 
a higher yen could snuff oat 

A higher yen means that Japan's 
export gaming s (in dollars) buy 
fewer yen. To cover their costs, 
exporters have to raise their over¬ 
seas prices. Last week, for exam¬ 
ple, Komatsu Limited, a maker of 
construction equipment, increased 
export prices tty nearly 5 percent 
Higher prices reduce exports; and 
this then damp ens business invest- 
meat Economic growth suffers. 

In theory, tins process should 
correct itself. A higher yen makes 
imports cheaper and pushes 
down prices. Tins should spur 
consumer spending and increase 
imports. As the trade surplus 
drops, theyen’s exchange rate 
stabilizes. The trouble is that Ja¬ 
pan’s markets frustrate imports, 
and lower prices are not always 
passed through to consumers. 

The needed adjustment may not 
occur. A stagnant economy could 
discourage imp ort s . If toe trade 
surplus persists —even with lower 


export volumes—it could lead to 
a vicious circle of a rising yen and 
worsening economy. 

Whatever happens, Japan's 
predicament punctures another 
myth: Japanese farsightedness. 
Throughout the 1980s, Ameri¬ 
cans told themselves that the 
Japanese took "the long view.” 
They planned for the future. Ex¬ 
actly the opposite has been true. 
Many policies, of both business 
and government, have been 
amazingly shortsighted. The 
Japanese have ignored obvious 
dangers and not dealt with pre¬ 
dictable problems. 

Start with those huge overseas 
investments themselves. Even in 
the 1980s, the prices that Japa¬ 
nese companies were paying for 
U.S, office bufldmes, hotds and 
resorts were considered inflated. 
Since then the aSlapse of commer¬ 
cial real estate markets has made 
matters much worse. ■ 

A survey tty the consulting firm 
Kenneth Leveothal ScCo. reckons 
that Japanese companies have suf¬ 
fered losses anatleast 40percent 
of their UJS. real estate One Los 
Angeles hotel is valued at about 
hah its S110 million purchase 
price, reports the Los Angeles 
Times. A major Los Angdes office 
building may have dropped two-, 
thirds in value. 

Foreign stocks and bonds were 
also hazardous. Tree, US. bauds 
paid higher interest rates than 
Japanese bonds. But any excess 
profits could easily be wiped out 
tty exchange rate changes. That is 
what happened. 

Consider a $10,000 UjS. bond 
thatcost2nnlUonyenmtiiemk['- 
1980s when the yen was200 to the 
dollar. (A Japanese investor 
needing 510,000 had to buy the 
dollars chi foreign exchange mar¬ 
kets for 2 milli on' yen.) Now the 
same bond, if soldnnd converted 


back to yen, would fetch only 
about 1 million yen. Somehow, 
the Japanese had convinced 
themselves that such exchange 
rate shifts could not happen. 

Government pohditthflve been 
equally shortsighted. For years it 
has been obvious that Japan 
should racoorage imports byub- 
eratizmg its markets. The reason 
is not to satisfy UR trade com¬ 
plaints; it is to prevent a con¬ 
stantly rising yen from devastat¬ 
ing Japan's export industries. 
Only by reducing the trade sur¬ 
plus can Japan halt the yen’s rise. 

At times, Japanese officials 
have parroted tins logic. But they 
have not practiced u. Countless 
^market opening” and “liberal¬ 
ization’’ programs have only tin¬ 
kered at the edges. The real ob¬ 
stacle is a state of mind The 


Japanese hare not yet concluded 
that their import-resistant and 
ovexregulated economy, is not in 
their own best interest 
Until the Japanese grasp tins, 
economic and political paralyses 
could feed ftarfi other. Japan has a 
had four prime inmxsters in the 
past year. The postwar system of 
political parties is breaking 
down while the economy face 
unprecedented pressures. Politi¬ 
cal turmoil makes it hard, for 
Japan to undertake needed eco¬ 
nomic reforms. But economic 
uncertainty frustrates political 
stability. Foreign exchange mar¬ 
kets reflect these tensions. - - 
: When people say that the dd- . 
lar is falling, they hare it back¬ 
ward. The problem is not the' 
dollar; Ifs the yen. 

•: The Washington Poo. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


ly sent his secretary SzamudByia 
a special train withm hangmen to 
.Western Hungary to carry out the 
trial and execution of 7S counter'- 
revolutionists. The (rids woe die 
usual farce of justice under the 
botahevist rfegiiDc, the dictator’s 
object bti j; to strike terror in the 


PARIS — The preliminary trials 
for the horseless-carriage compe¬ 
tition were concluded -yesterday 
[July 21}, and are expected to 
open up a new era in roudloco- 
moticn.That the tnadbines are far 
from perfect is acknowledged by 
alt yet in:this age of inventions 
improvements will follow fast. 
These petroleum carriages, the 
cost of which is from £200 up¬ 
wards, wffl one day play animpor- 
. taut part. Petroleum spirit is pre¬ 
ferable for pleasure conveyances 
amleqxxialtyforlougjoun^a 

it is dean, is easily carried, and can 

be obtained almost anywhere A 
match wifi set the machine going 
and - a puff of breath will extin¬ 
guish the jet of .flame.. 


1919; Terror in Hungary 

GENEVA — An Innsbruck tde- 
gram states that Bela Kun recent- 


1944c mderm&Bwk 

LONDON — [From our N® 
York edition:] German army bU 
co mm and conspirators who tow 
to kill Adolf Fuller attempted ! 
nmltaucousiy to seize the gover 
ment offices in Berlin, the GfflDM 
radio declared amid indfcatia 
that a purge of anti-Nazi leads 
was continuing. Dispatches r 
Ported ihat.5]500 German office 

had been arrested as conroirato 
against Hitler, and a group ofge 
jrals had gone underground j 

Germany atut occupied countri 

to get support fortheir revolt 




















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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 22,1994 


Page 5 


o P i N i o IV 


America Needs Intelligence 
But Doesn’t Need die CIA 


By WiHfawi iPfaff 

ARJCS—A recent contributor to dose to becoming chief of British 

but even if he had, the 


■IT the New York Times Mazarine , 
Rob Rosenbaum, has reopened the 
old question of whether the British 
spy Kim Ptrilby was actually a triple 
agent whose defection to Moscow 
was cover for continued .spying for. 
Britain. Mr. Rosenbaum thinks this 
possible, but the chance is sK ght 
■ It is an. amu<ar} g spe culation, but 
it does —together with the Aldridge 
Ames case— again raise the ques¬ 
tion erf what spies are for. They re-, 
bruit one another to . betray their 
respective services, but what posi¬ 
tive things do they acc omplish ? 

The CIA acknowledged recently 
that it has little current information 
bn Africa because the actual mission 
of its agents in Africa had always 
been merely to recruit double agents 

in Soviet and East bloc embassies. 

; During its nearly five decades of 
existence, the CIA has been respon¬ 
sible for certain operations that did . 
the reputation of the "United States 
no good, such as the Bay- of Pigs - 
landing and the Phoenix program in 
Vietnam. On the other land, its U-2‘ 
and satellite photo-intelligence op¬ 
erations were unquestionably im¬ 
portant in tracking Soviet military 
developments. 

The CIA ran the Soviet'general 
staff spy, Olig Penkovsky, but be 
had offered himself to British intelli¬ 
gence, andtbey made a gift of him to 
the CIA. The Khrushchev “secret 
speech” was also a gift, from Israeli 
intelligence. The CLA was good at 
political warfare in the 1950s (creat¬ 
ing the Congress for Cultural Free¬ 
dom, its magazines, and Radio Free 
Europe), but this later declined to ' 



activity 

was always the effort to penetrate 
Soviet intelligence, while Soviet inr 
tefligeacewasspaidingits time pen¬ 
etrating Western intelligence. 

In a draft lecture to KGB recruits 
that turned up recently among Kim 
Philby’s possessions put up for sale 
at Sotheby's in London, Mr. Pbflby 
says: “I have a dream. It is that one 
day we, perhaps one of yon, will 
recruit, say, a young Norwegian of¬ 
ficer — perhaps even an officer ca¬ 
det. Over the years, you will nurse 
him into Norwe gian militar y mldB- 

gence, and hen finally into NATO 
headquarters 

But, one must *sk, if they did, so 
what? Mr. Philby himself came 


mt 

Odd Warwonld have ended just as 
it did: in Soviet economic and po¬ 
litical collapse. . 

.Tins, of-comse, is the argument 
Aldrich Ames makes in his own de¬ 
fense. In April be said in his confes¬ 
sion of spying for the Soviet Union 
that infrmgfflnc. work is’“a sdf-setv- 
ing sham” conducted “at consider¬ 
able human and ethical costs,” and 
that he had done no fundamental 
harm to the United Stales. He might 
have been expected to say that, but 
it is sof necessarily untrue. 

Wartime intelligence deals with 
tangible matters and confronts he 
test of the battlefield. There are 
ilans to steal, orders of battle to 
and weapons rites to 
strategic and tactical 
to discover. In peacetime, 
the major directions of scientific and 
technological evolution are known 
to everyone working in a given field. 
There are-few secrets: 

Peacetime intelligence deals with 
political intentions and political re¬ 
ality. Any government's policy op¬ 
tions are limited, and its 
usually are soon known. What can 
spying tell us about the policies 
tut will be followed by Kim Jong 
II in North Korea? 

Governments, in any case, listen 
to what they want to hear. Warn¬ 
ings about Iraq’s intentions before 
h. invaded Kuwait were ignored be¬ 
came of the Bush administration’s 
investment in good relations with 
Saddam Hussein. 

Assessments of the weakness of 
the Soviet Union during the 1980s 
were rgected because Reagan ad¬ 
ministration policy presumed a 
powerful and dynamic Soviet threat. 
After. Mikhail Gorbachev had con¬ 
vinced Washington that he was an 
authentic reformer, the Bush admin¬ 
istration overestimated his strength 
because it wanted him to succeed. 
The Clinton administration may be 
mAlrfng the same mistake about Bo¬ 
ris Ydtrin, for the same reason. 

- Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan 
of New York has for same time 
argued that the CIA ought to be 
dosed down. Its “action” capacities 
can go under mili tary co mmand, he 
says, and its analysis duplicates that 
of the State Department- 

While there isa danger in central¬ 
izing analysis, I believe that the sen¬ 



I) OLIVER a Der Stented r-V—CM! 


Since a Good Man Is Hard 
To Find, Settle for a Dolt 


By Ellen 

B OSTON — Somewhere in the 
middle of the movie, Forrest 
Gump finally proposes to the wom¬ 
an he has loved since first grade. 
“Will you many me?” he asks. “I’d 
make a good husband. Jenny.” 

At that point, anyone worth the 
price of the popcorn wants to stand 
up in the theater and tell Jenny to 
grab him. Never mind that Fonrest 


Goodman 


MEANWHILE 


ator is correct when he says die CIA, 
as it has existed for the lak 47 years, 
is at the end of its useful life. Its 
personnel quality and talent level 
have fallen steadily since the 1960s. 
It is demoralized by intelligence fail¬ 
ures, the Ames case and the end of 
the Cold War, which was responsi¬ 
ble tot its creation. 

The problems in the world today 
cannot be treated by bribing police 
chiefs and local politicians, or by 
recruiting other people’s diplomats 
to tell Washington their secrets. 
The useful information today is 
that supplied by area specialists, 
historians and ethnologists, and 
through conventional diplomatic 
observation and journalism. The 
U.S. government needs intelligence, 
not spying. There is a difference. 

The United States needs to do 
something about the outdated or 
half-baked ideas of foreign coun¬ 
tries that circulate in Washington 
and New York. Instead of the CIA it 
needs a new, small, organizationally 
independent, high-talent analytical 
agency staffed by people who really 
know foreign countries and interna¬ 
tional relations. President Clinton 
should think about iL 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 


- International Herald Tribune. 
& Los Angela Tones Syndicate. 


Rule of Law in Bangladesh 

Taslima Nasrin is not subjected to 
political persecution. A judicial pro¬ 
secution has been initiated under 
provisions of the penal code which 
prohibit deliberate and malicious at¬ 
tack cm the religious feelings of the 
citizens of Bangladesh, whether Mus¬ 
lim, Hindu, Buddhist or Christian. 
By initiating the judicial procedure, 
the government is extending the pro¬ 
tection of law to Ms. Nasrin. 

As far as the threats against Ms. 
Nasrin are concerned, the govern¬ 
ment issued a stem warning against 
those who make such threats and 
who announce rewards for assas¬ 
sins. reminding them that such irre¬ 
sponsible utterances are punishable 
imder law. A judicial case has been 
initiated against those making 
threats to the life of Ms. Nasrin. All 
efforts are being made to ensure that 
the rale of law prevails. 

Bangladesh is uot the only country 
where judicial proceedings are al¬ 
lowed fix' statements injurious to in¬ 
dividuals, groups, communities or 
their faiths. Concern has been ex¬ 
pressed about Ms. Nasrin’s security. 


But how can a government ensure the 
security of a fugitive who has chosen 
to hide to escape justice? 

Bangladeshi society has tradition¬ 
ally been tolerant. Extremist trends 
have always been ephemeral, mar¬ 
ginal or locaL Bangladeshi society is 
in a better situation than many other 
societies, where “ethnic cleanring,” 
racist attacks and profanation of 
cemeteries are not rare. It is essential 
that such a society, where people of 
different religious faiths nave lived 
for centuries in harmony, should not 
be given over to communal strife in 
the nam e of liberty of expression. 

The overwhelming majority of the 
people of Bangladesh are religious 
out not fundamentalist, as shown by 
the poor showing of the fundamen¬ 
talists in recent elections. To prevent 

f iindampnrAtism from taking TOOL 

the democratic government should 
be allowed to ensure, within a legal 
framework, the rights erf all its citi¬ 
zens, individually and collectively. 


K. M. SHEBABUDDIN. 

Paris. 

The writer is ambassador of Ban¬ 
gladesh to France. 


has an 10 of 75. In the words of 
countless generations of mothers, 
“A good man is hard to find." 

Indeed the bottom line of the 
movie that has become the surprise 
hit of the summer in the United 
States is exactly how few and far 
between good men are. 

In “Forrest Gump,” Tom Hanks 
acts as a baby boomer's tour guide 
through three decades of male roles 
and man-made disasters. Through 
the wonders of computer-generated 
imagery, he is seen next to every 
flawed male icon from Elvis Presley 
to Richard Nixon. He is innocently 
drafted into everyman’s questionable 
cveryrole. from football star to sol¬ 
dier to entrepreneur. He is picked on 
by the good oT boys when he’s young 
and sent to war by the best and the 
brightest men when he’s grown up. 

The males in Jenny’s life are an 
even more dubious Iol They are dys¬ 
functional poster boys. The movie's 
catalogue of Mr. Wrongs includes a 
father who abused her. sleazy strip 
joint customers who heckle her. and 
an anti-war lefty who slugs her. 

Compared with them. Forrest 
looks pretty, urn, good. 

Does anybody remember when 
the great American hero was a Jim¬ 
my Stewart character from a small 
town? Today the last American hero 
is a Tom Hanks character with a 
small IQ. Is there a message here? If 
he is good, is it because he doesn’t 
have toe brains to be bad or bitter? 

Several years ago, Tom Hanks 
played another appealing New Sen¬ 
sitive Male of toe era. His character 
in “Big” was actually a 12-year-old 
boy magically transported into a 
grown-up man’s body. He was one 
guy in touch with his inner chDd. 

Not long after that, Mike Nichols 
directed a movie about toe male 
psyche that offered toe hope of male 
consciousness-raising through con¬ 
sciousness-shattering. In “Regarding 


Henry.” a mastcx-of-ifte-imiverse 
type became a model husband and 
father by getting shot in the head. 

Now Tom Hanks is back in “For¬ 
rest Gump” and Mike Nichols is 
back with “Wolf.” Will the main 
male of “Wolf.” is too benign, even 
passive. He is a middle-aged literary 
editor, being eaten alive by bad guys 
in the corporate jungle. When he is 
bitten on the hand. Will gets a shot 
of that old animal spirit The hero in 
this movie is a werewolf. What was 
in that saliva? Testosterone? 

So there we have iL Once a man 
had to choose between the lady and 
the tiger. Now a woman at the mov¬ 
ies can choose between the slow- 
witted and toe werewolf. 

Oh, but 1 almost forgot the lion. 
The third movie in this seasonal troi¬ 
ka of male images is “The Lion 
King.” Disney offers an animated 
paean to patriarchy. All is well in toe 
world only when toe princes like 
Simba are willing to take their right¬ 
ful place on the throne. 

Do you get toe idea that Holly¬ 
wood is having trouble with heroes? 
With changing scripts? 

If I read what is going on here, 
there is as much ambivalence about 
defining a good man as finding one. 

Men today are handed any num¬ 
ber of mixed cultural messages 
about who they should be. A good 
man is expected to be egalitarian 
and protective. He is supposed to 
turn away from violence and to be 
able to defend himself. 

We want to raise boys who are 
strong but not silcnL sensitive but 
survivors. We want our sons to be the 
men we would want our daughters to 
many. But we are afraid they will get 
clobbered by toe alpha males, in the 
playground. The real world, like Hol¬ 
lywood, is still full of bad guys. 

So we end up with a small, dispa¬ 
rate lot of good guys: 

Simba. toe king of nostalgic fan¬ 
tasies for toe old “natural order.” t 

Will the modem man who needs 
sharper fangs to survive. 

And Forrest, the only man al¬ 
lowed to utter the simple verities on 
toe screen — “A promise is a pro¬ 
mise,” and “I’m not a smart man 
but I know what love is” — because 
he is a simpleton. 

O.K_ OJC. a good man is hard to 
find. But it’s a whole lot harder to 
find him at toe movies. 

The Boston Globe. 


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369 vpn. oardm. Tet pj*i 71 87 82 

AVEFOCH-210SOM. 

Maids room 2 patone, private 
garden, son. Tet (T) 4745 22 60 

AVBUE MONTAKRB owner soft, 
fang tfeW fhaa. barypedomn. 
24-hour security, perfect roadMon. 

S&Sn!7SSaUSS 

RUB 16* toto IDOL Owner seto 
is M bidtfag, 75 sm*. 3rd floor. Sf», 

Kjrat muni, mu toora, - 

Csnacne. HI 49 53 99 94 

16*. AVENUE VICTOR HUGO. ,200 
sqm. n wry beootii twkiu 
rsiwkwert for rareptinciy 2 faehsoBS, 
top floor wt6i bdeary and m, 
Suw. Tek m 45 48 54 S8 

MBS 15 ft, UVD V1CTOI, ME 
•BMGW4 n Tftqusbrt da Pirn 
Pdvt". 1933 pras «n*w bJdng, 
21 HUH smefa bdrony. TF61SJXO. 
Tek fTI 45 32 32 00 

oe st ions note snow 

Sda. FF UoSSu TiflJ 59 87 99. 

NEAR ana lOWSL Du* hews 
boot 33 X 5m. ftrfocf nwwg «ncl- 
fcoa Escelsrt carfffh. 1-455?*3® 

PUCE VBDQME PARS, 38wrl- 
cor parking rides tor ids. Contact 
AXdteTrf W9!X)*5W fax 69GQS25I 

PORTUGAL 

9CUUSMN 

Abort l^OQOsqac. kvtd/roodence, 
MW new frseUw. to Ymdn da 
RdtrooLftoetarnUmtoa 

Priced to sdar DM TStLDOOeoA. 
Ptm K. Ntoben + 1 619 325 60 35. 

SPAIN 


DPT A MAIIORCA Cottage on 2500 
an. Prioe flaps nlbn. Owiifahh. 
S150K. OrfTftBUA p16J725-9231 


SWITZERLAND 




LAKE GENEVA! 
NOUNIABISESORIS 


SdbM 


197S 
t CHALETS 
GSTAAD, 


in 

IB __... . 

OANS-MQNTAMLMc. 1 to 
m, SFr. 200,000 to 33 wm 

Te<*l M-mVi 


ISA RESIDENTIAL 


C LAYMAN 
ITZKOWITZ 


Gaxnercy 3 Bwiuotn 

Want Loft Condo Terrace? 

S60i reoirteiww - STEALTH 
Kafaayshi - 2IM72R3B7. 


CaN 


East 60*1 


4 Bedroom Can* 


Pentiiawe 4T«rooes 

-■ fL , li.Liblini V/wiLUT? 

WOT* tn djnmMUQ WW 

OM Htyfc 2125726381 or 759485a 


lincobi Canto Condo 


effiw 

Bea Wont GrariS^eW 

on' l '<lw‘ f "oih«jy neb wed side. Sl.t 
MV.sSru, 


ntfai CJ V. Sots, 2)2^M38a 
QtesMich V>oQe loft SpmidBt 

LOVE LOFTS? 


I hone them ol idudng condo. FJ 
serviced bldgs. Oromercy » TiRKa 
tow with outdoor room loft 
Ci< Nooei, 212-57355(1 


*0Ti£ 


imArea 


Dream WhBe Glove Luxury? 

Steps ham 6* Urfted Notnre - open 
dry view from Triple Nit 2 bedroom/ 
dnr home. Gym ibrt %C5H Cd John. 
2125738393. 


GUTTB«aG. NEW JBSIY 

COME DRECTIY TO 


GALAXY CONDO 

BVBSDNT REALTY 
TOCO &*fcvard EaVlsnwr Ud 
Terns, to & On Poefc, Oub 
15 Min. to NYC, Open 7 [W5 
Entois 1-3 Bedroom 

S 0«POBATE IfASWG 


201-061 -6777 


wasoNPowr,a 

Gradate En^sfc Slone Manor Howl 
European detail indude i*«to 

’ _ erthed wetowijajfcQhi* 
atourn entry ccd mfled 
'vder wtoAjIrfeto 
SB99J0a 



Country Living 


6 Corbie Drrn 
to USA 


655-9761 


HK/OHSb 84 SLI Bedrow/2 Bathe 

PREWAR C0MX5MMUM1 

LondmaA nntoion oportmert. 

1000 Rt- ft. Whato floor! Near man 
& best sl Bppto n . Grand, to 
^eng raoeo, 2 wulimo 
Jo cc ai, Bam Pred^ou 

212769881B/8H. 2137237*53 

DOUGLAS HUMAN 


WASHMOrON D.C Looking for h* 

lowffl & DC 


or houws in Georgetown 4’OC tnoT 
Ow Mr. Sawyer ST be ie MUNCH 
GBtMANY 232 JULY to review year 

Ftro 23C09691 Or l£A Snmer Co. 
Tet202466.7788 Frc2C2-29Wi31 
V.Wah&C 20006 


1B35K5LNW. 


NKJttTi East STUDIO 

PM-A-Tmt* Brpwnstone 

P6cs pemded room. 2 efeett. Air 
mrrtocrieJ. both. jGfcfaneHe, may be 
wed as aSa arSWia. 

Coweiofi chrapsi 1450/per quarter, 
Iro MllVper qSvtor. NeggOdSe. 

MXANAWAldtZ 

2128917060 212-8795665 

DOUGLAS BUMAN 

BBKSHRES, MASACHUSHTS USA 
Fraaiy Crotocwd^ed & Braakfap.2 
wsMitoly restored how from 1770 
1B85 on 130+ onto. he^d. 
waterfdi pool, pend, watorffled 

poictole. Artkp** dvaarttort. Re¬ 
place berktxxnt 5 betkoam ouch 
home with private baths and ar- 
cxjntatroainfl. Near Tanglwrood, 
Jacob s PBow and ttong. Owner 
financed Tek 2127587428 

TRUSTEES SA16-UJXURT CtHlft 
ttoaihiteiS in NYCi magniffard Car- 
St Hotel, Atocfaon Avenue a 76th 9. 

to. arted-thr-art fahm. 2 
bedtnoiTiv 2 marble bdfa. Fliy ren¬ 
ovated an Krti floor. Dirty wad ser¬ 
vice rod dlhotel fperttea cMrtofate- 

Orty CDmOu; ftacOCra DAOTMncv, CJ- 

tonm, 488 Modem Ave., Tek 212- 
7SB3 wO. Fas: 7127520097 USA. 

BOCA RATON/PAIM MACH AREA 

SOUTH FLORIDA: NASSAU ROMT 
Sweeping ocean views, fafabas new 
Towroomes foctog beads. Lusvnom 3 
betixociT!, 3 1/Z beds. Pnwte pods 
rod elevators. Seainty. Carttonrtje 
ownership wdrorae. Prate S4730CO. 
Omts to J jrtenwtondmwn. 

OQrady Rmfty [407) 272-3*34 

OCMMnHHMM BEACH H. 
Ncrfaog hot bean spared to BflKH 
YOUTUreSTYtR. GRAND MANSION 
Ccpoaton af mm iteHem guart 
tom i bendriruel a4hm pod. 
Cel far dek*: tou^Tine Ddma, home 
4Q7-65M196 bustoess «y^5S6881 

NR* YORK. Mfcbown afficw^wfntert. 
good fairing, very cooveraert toexh 
toi doorman, 2 looms ffas kitehen & 
baiioccn. fined ou> as fanh office 
and Svmg oamnuodrtan, hstefiHy 
hraghaj, trortey sAwfan. Fro far 
details London: 4-4471-233 0185, tek 
-1-4471-222 3836 

NYC CHELSEA ACROSS FROM 8AH4- 
EYS depraimert store two bbefa north 
of Gresnwidi Vfage: 500 sg ft, 
sonny. 17ft fleer sjudo et prewra 
fairing, sepwoto riesang 'Oom, 
large dosets. IWien, S80L Morthly 
mroilencm S929. New York Hd*w 
212-2556018. Fro 212-627-1416 USA. 

ESTATE SA1£-REJWD Ambassador 
s*(ng frorty rondo. 2 faeckoon, 2 
bod) (lutivt 35 irntftt no^th ci 
Seetoc Airport in 6frnonds, Washing¬ 
ton. Wdsrfront location with spec- 
toculor name view. $379!. fayfaei 
AM. Jacobsen Tek 206771-60W, 
FAX 206775-294Q USA. 

A STEAlfl Huge retfachon. Owner mm 
sefl. Gorgeous Bnitenaormy 2 bed¬ 
room. 2 both condo. Undwructod 
OtM/teoanban views vrth al oaten* 
ses - pool, spa, wt#* _ , ooai 
Sd52jm Goehr, Ffcfat GT£fl 456 
5621 USA-Pritdtertfaof & teot. 

BB5ANT SAN fRANOSCO CONDO, 
Ptedatem «kd far ertertammg. 

1 bedrttoBi, 2 be«K Ebrary & satoron. 

2 as seen pama 5afxxa» mods 
non ft be*. 2 firwiocBL,,friv« 
terrace ft narttea raftOCO. S. cr T. 
Griffith T*415/342-9070 USA 

WON HEAD 5. CAUUNA Hetties, 
Vftx. Hatnestes, Ocean Frorf, nert 
aaan and golf courses CeR or Fro 
Ante Goufecra far d*a& 1-883^5- 
7588. Fro: 1-8DU4MM9. few 
Morioetina Group. Wn. Bakjvnn, 9C 

WBUN8T0H R- Begad home far 
ids nestled in L5 aaei of grew w 

race, la ns. trotn trap stw oom 
toteiTd: 407-791-34SS USA 

HEATHROW/OnAPTO FLORIDA 
Dnigner MxW ha ■ 3 Bsftwnu 

(401444-0471. Foe 407-539-174 

l«W YORK OIY 3 fadrwts, 2 bo*5 
gHMLteiy renomhd, C6*d tok 
«mL Comer cyntirart 23d Boor. 
SSSOOOa For 1*2-4637706 U5A 

USA FARMS ft RANCHES 

COLORADO ROODS 

Lbbry Marian horns ro ® o» 
fawft men of HfBJ fL p«*, dam 
to dong, hsnfirg. wafa 'P 0 '* ■ 
rearaban nrotei 5 America 
faw fat Lmd PtukawtoS 

Tet 3B/s350D ftro 308/626-5040 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SHARE 


BULGARIA 


CB0RAL 50RA, 85 gad 3- 


room oportnert with brfnoa rod 
rtrfwa Suittile far 


floe. S35D/mo. Far +31 30 6441322 


ton and/or o£ 


CYPRUS 


PATHOS, CYPRUS. New 2-bed Rot, 
he totted & eryipped, hSsde nece 
Toto vilage, 5 km to Faphat Ion. 
USSfiOOkKave. TeUfa*: |fc} 5B 2B4B 
or 17^28 3109 ftgkftkm. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


CB4TIALIOKX3N 



MAYS. Att/ 

to 5 bed__ 

from 050/wi. let 


1-376 19 


HOLLAND 


AMSTERDAM CB4TER, apartmert. 70 
sqjiv, grraoe, rfimdoded Ofl 1738. 
1/8 to 31/Itt Tek +31206260660 


NEPAL 


KATHMANDU, NBAL Lwety, pnrate 
eaoB. Funshed 



PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

HUBS 15flj. 2 nn BfW Tew, metro 
b Hekeim, RS Oanp de Mas. 47 
sqm. Arose! 1-21 Fn 4500 l Fifty 
Fumohed. let 40L59A22Z 

RE ST LOUS PRUNE STUDIO with 
deeping loft, in took Wcto good 
view, qurt, brritt 32 tqjn. h£yhr- 
nahed. AvaAtofe per v*ek 5750 or 
aer morah $2000. Tel: 40 59 87 99. 

FLATOTE 

BR&TOWHIOR 

EXPO PCWE DE VHtSARIB 
from starios to Bee reroi de km. 
Dcrty. Vteridy or monthly- 
Free slelllt service to 
Eworirey-Lcre! 

Cdfe 05 J4SJ45 Tal Free 
or (33-f) AS 75 62 20 

RBflINO RJRM9B APARTMB4IS 
ia 17ft century bedrina nero R3 fa 
Vesnef or SarVouvfc. From 4 days to 
6 mortfa. Sexfioi, 2 roam, 3 roam 
Tet 1-30 86 23 00. Fro 1 -» 86 23 30 

Embassy Service 
YOU8 SEAL STATE 
AOMIN PARIS 

Teh (1) 47.20.30.05 

7Bw MUSS ITORSAY. Aamwa al 
modem asutewisnros etegrat Bed¬ 
room. fayer-stody, double tog, stor¬ 
age. parfana. Fro. FT1XOOO. Aujtrt - 

VAUGflMRD - MONTPARNASSE 4 
roams, very sunny, 4th Root. Mt, very 

MBS 15fc CONVamon Large 45 
tejjn. stuck), dm fittings. Lous XV 
syfe hvnriure. (HftO 0 charges in- 
dufed. Tet fl) <5 32 32 00 

74 CHAMPS SYSEE5 

CUB1DGE 

FOR 1 WK OR MORE H***? 
rtuda? or 3room opotroena. RXLY 
EOUIPPH). IMMBXATE RESERVATIONS 
Tek (1)44 13 33 33 

15ft, IBDC HUBS, splenrid sturio, 
fuDv cauioDed. mdudra phone, color 

TV/v3bSdfaSuSlAS0i77. 

UE ST UXDS, 17ft cent, chan* 95 
sqm. tong + 2 bedrooms, hfli 
oeAias, beam, cable TV. 1-4271267u 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

SUSMfi, green hftop suhvb, 15 
tain, west faro, easy trrosport, 1*0 
34 m chortTrog^hraae wSh 180 ram, 
arden, ffngr®crrt view on txlBi 
Tower. Frai year from Seji 15. 
niDOO/rnorth + charge*. 46 97 73 
51 

14ft, 75 SOM. 2 BHJKXJMS+ w- 
race pat renovowd urnny gwet F8000 
Owner London 71-435-33-41 am. 

SPAJN 

PIAZA BASUCA APARTMDITS 27. 

Comcnclorte Zcrta Mariid tocated in 
fte finanod A bans area A warn 
& wtoduri Style. Doty - WeeWr ■ 
Morttftr rates Reservitaa - Tet pi¬ 
ll 5353642. fate 04-}} 5331497. 

CAIWAIE • MKlfBS 
Hcrdpcked 

cJ gm Pen ond smburb^ 

Tri 1-4614 91\ 1. Fax 1-4772 3096 




7 PIAZA DE E5PANA APWMBOS. 

In the heal of Madrid, rtgh dm* 
studies to let. Oofly weekly, monthly 

ESnsfre 

34.1548080 


LOS jaOtflMOS APAKTMENT5 
Mcreto, 9 Mid-id. Between f+ado 
Mweua & Retiro fbrk. fineB i 
d trodhonal fwnton. Difly - 
Monthly rrtes. Retorwanoni - Tet j 
J *200211: 


D- 


far P*l) 429445B 


USA 


MONIBSY FBDtSUIA, CeSonia 

aea. .-can rwtwfe con oa ei aase 
pine and cwms farea. New, buy, 
- tndwood floors. 


lerroee. Fiiy equjped. Mnawfi- 
wews af Carmel, ffit BeSi & 
Sc Oosrni. USSlJOa TeVfa*; |92J 


cert i 

Pacific L. _ 

58 2848 or |92| 58 3109 IPaktoro) 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


MCE SMALL APARTMBtT in PARIS 
eext to Janto del Planks to be b in 
enchonae af an a p atm en t in New 
VaA lor, n a to *y. thmfmref. If a* 
terested, fro Gwmmiy + 49601- 
638244. 


MTHtNATIONAL HOME / CAR 
mkhcngei. Inter chan g e, 286 fad S, 
Hamtea Ontario. Croada IBP 3G4. 


YOU SAW THIS AD. 


So did nearly half 
a million poiemial 
real estate buyers worldwide 
Shouldn't you advertise 
your property in the 

INTERNATIONAL 
HERALD TRIBUNE? 



UNIQUE IN PRAGUE - 
IN THE HEART OF EUROPE 


Upper-class pent bouse apartments, 
downtown, top residential area near 
WrncesLas Squire with a wonderful 
view ovef the rooftop* of Prague; 
Maisonette apartment* with 3 
storeys, from 30 to 135 sqm. top 
notch farnishiagi each as spiral 
staircase, open fireplaces, largo 
terraces add separate elevators. 
Futare-oriented residential 
architecture that meets inicmttional 
standards and feainres ibe latest 
environmental concepts for 
buildings, e.g. storage cistera for 
rainwster. solar collectors sod wind 


energy. 

Outstanding architectural design 
architect Ivan Pavaaan. 


by the 


Building owner Fa. Postav s.r.o.. 
Praha Muugeroeat by v. Pereaczy A 
s Lid.. ' 


Partners Lid.. Precaution ft Sale. 
Frani/tfrl/Mitin. Germany 
Tel: 00 *9-69-64 68 8092. 

Fax: 00*9 -69 -64688476 


GREECE 


IONIAN ISLANDS, 
Water Side VILLA FOR SALE, 
privileged position 
Write to: Mrs. Anita Burgy 
42 , Reds Chancy, CH -1213 PeB-Urey 
Phone: + 4122-741 1818 


USJL 


FOR SALE 

U.S.A. - HOUSTON/ DALLAS/ FT. WORTH 

30 - year oU company, owner ran m good heanh and past reliramem age W« u> sea ennpany 
WELL ESTABLISHED - EXCELLENT CREDIT - EXCELLENT REPUTATION 
Approxinuify 1000 high amity income producing aparrmems plus 5 million saute ted oi 
PfllUE Dcvetopmeni Lana, an with rogn oensiiy ulillies in puce 
PLUS; a Properly Management Ccouuny 
Win sell Ati ita ash or Hsiad stock i us S/S.OOO.OOO) 

BROKERS' AGENTS Pratecieq will a '0°4 commsswi 
SERIOUS COUFtOENHAL INOUIRIES ONLY FA.V 1713] 4S8-1M6 


Looking for 

property In 

SWISS REAL ESTATE) SwitZOriamf? 


LUXURY AFARTMEMTS. LUGANO 
SlimngaperlmailshamagyScatresj- 
dence In Caslagnoia. Marvetous vims an 
hie Luganci fhe to*w and he mountains. 
2-3 rooms. Swnmmg port. Pmaft par- 
kin. Hassling ranttiens of paymat 
Pries from Sir- 515.000.- 
CttnbcrSam KrahenbuM atCMG 
if Tti Mr. GtddD Bogo *41-ft»8206008 
CMG SA 

9M2 GimMb- tBOModrm 
TIL:41 ♦a*M2«0B. fas41 *21*3628019 


RENT 

SPAIN 


-COSTA DEL SOL- 

ON THE GOLDEN MILE 
MARBELLA, SPAIN 


. . Eiquislteljf_ 

equipped, wilh cmtrsl air rondilionine. 

Panoramic vkw of the Metfiknamn. BenM Wf 

landscaped, smmnfag pool. 21 Imitr strict 
secuiily cuaids. 2 km from the beads. Marbdla 
CUj lArcf B4W 731(1). Phroe-Fasoffrivul 
Can Mwtoib 34-52^0545.^ fttah. 


Attention 
Real Estate 
sellers! 


Real Estate 
Marketplace 


a ppears 
every Friday 


To place an advertisement, 
contact your nearest 
IHT office, 

representative or in Paris: 


FRED RON ANi 
(33-1)46 37 93 91 
or Fax (33-1) 46 37 93 70 



r 

r* 


id 

to 




3! 6 «l «l>« 






















































International Herald Tribune 
Friday, July 22, 1994 
Page 6 














JLS 




Living Aristocratic Life at Beaujolais’s ‘Newest’ 

. a .L- rivTfwino a mnm is far from sinrols. for I • - -. -•. . i* • -v '■'"i ^ 





By Marlise Simons 

New York Tima Service 


B AGNOLS, France—On a sunny 
morning, a smattering of guests 
sat down to a pastoral breakfast 
on the high lawns of Chfiteau de 
Bagno ls. The Victorian chairs were ample, 
the young waitresses puttered through the 
grass in long frilly frocks and earned 
strawberries and little glass pots of yogurt. 
Beyond the terrace, past the lavender beds, 
the cherry trees and the dovecotes, shim¬ 
mered a great valley, tressed with undulat¬ 
ing vineyards. It could have bscfl a su¬ 
preme Merchant Ivory moment. That is, as 
long as no one turned around. 

Behind the guests stood the true com¬ 
mander of to* valley in the Beaujolais 
region: a 13 th-century fortress of immense 
walls and five towers, its bold outline an¬ 
chored to an outcropping of rock. Behind a 
moat, a drawbridge and arrow slits for 
windows, its builders lived here for genera¬ 
tions. Successive noblemen came to hoist 
their banners and gradually expanded the 
place to represent their might Now that a 
meticulous and sumptuous restoration has 
been completed, affluent travelers can stay 
here, eat copiously and wander the 

^Last year Bagnols opened its 20 rooms, 
hails tower chambers and courtyards as a 
handsome luxury hotel . 

France, the home of chateau-hotels, is of 
course not easily impressed by a newcomer 

to the scene. But Bagnols has already made 

ripples and raised some elegant and public 
eyebrows: For one, its owners are English, 
not something that happens commonly to 
a chateau that is designated a monument 
historique. _ ., 

A visiting architect, a Frenc hm a n , said 
gleefully that the building’s sheer age and 
its sober, dean medieval architecture, 
more in tune with modem times, made 
more famous French chateaus look like 
overdone upstarts. . 

Bagnols’s greatest drawing power is that 
the castle, like a fine eclectic museum, 
embodies in one place almost eight centu¬ 
ries of styles and traditions. And it takes a 
visitor into the beautiful, little-traveled 
Beaujolais countryside. 


As my husband and I approached the 
chateau on the 40-minnte drive from Lyon, 
though, it was not love at first sight. From 
the valley of the Azergues River, the for¬ 
tress looked squat, a bit of a mongrel, 
showing stumps instead of soaring towers. 
The reason was the Revolution of 1789. 
The new government ordered the tops of 
all five towers chopped off to diminish the 
hated symbols of power. The revolutionar¬ 
ies also turned the main halls of Bagnols 
into council chambers, probably saving the 
place from further destruction. 

Work on the fortress was begun in 1217, 
when Guichard d’Oingt borrowed a large 
sum of money from the powerful archbish¬ 
op of Lyon to build it Its first three lowers 
and curtain walls were finished by 1221- 
The Beaujolais hills were the borderlands 
on the edge of the kingdom of France. 
Raids and pillaging by rivals called for 
strong defenses. Less is known about the 
fighting around its walls, but the clues are 
still there: machicolations were added, ar¬ 
row slits were widened into loopholes, a 
floor still opens into an oubliette, a trap 
dungeon where the enemy or troublemaker 
was dropped and confined to oblivion. 

Through limes of peace and prosperity, 
too, the fortress grew as its owners added 
new living quarters and called artists from 
Lyon to apply Renaissance friezes and 
waD paintings, only to have them covered 
again with the ornate wood paneling that 
the later French elite found so irresistible. 

From its entrance in the village of Bag¬ 
nols, the castle looks every bit the grand 
residence it turned out to be. The outbuild¬ 
ings are welcoming, flanked by a great 
ravage; the hall where the grapes were 
pressed before the winemaking. Beyond 
the fortress’s mighty gate lies its Spartan 
courtyard. , , „ 

No sooner had we climbed the equally 
sober staircase than a young woman ap¬ 
peared, offering to unpack our suitcases 
and iron any wrinkles. Meanwhile, we 

peered around our large room, with its wall 

ppinfing y And fin e furniture. She also 
placed a choice of mineral waters and 
silver tumblers on an antique desk. The 
queen-size four-poster bed, half hidden by 
velvet curtains, was spread with heavy, 
embroidered linens. 


Choosing a room is far from simple, for 
each is unique. From ours, the Seigneurs 
d’Albon, named after the owners from the 
13th to I5th centuries, we had a new of the 
valley worthy of a sentinel’s. 

Its most surprising feature, however, 
was a large circular bathroom, set in onc of 
the southern towers. Here stripping of 
wallpaper and plaster bad revealed salmon 
pink walls with a gallery of painted white 
arcades. Two wooden barber stands^ held . 
round mirrors and large brass soap dishes. 
My husband immediately drew a bath and 
settled into the marble Empire tub in the 
center of the room. The dolphin-headed 
spouts of the bath had been dutifully cop¬ 
ied from the village’s 17th-century spring. 
Naturally this all comes at a price: double 
rooms start at $357 a night. 

On a quiet day, you can ask for a tour of 

the unoccupied rooms, worth doing to see 
the hotel's magnifi cent French and It ali a n 
furniture from the 17th and 18th centuries. 
Rooms ma y have carved chimneys or, as in 
the Guichard d’Oingt room, remarkable 
tapestries. Some have original arabesques 
or landscape panels or trompe Toed wall 

painting . 

In one much celebrated suite, Madame 
de Sfcvignti went the night in 1673 on her 
way from Lyon to Paris, although she 
heisdf did not remember this fondly. Lat¬ 
er she wrote to her daughter about staying 

in Bagnols, “a miserable little village six 
leagues from Lyon.” 

The idea of pouring a fortune into the 
great wreck of Bagnols (it is whispered to 
have been close to $6 million) came from 
Paul Hamlyn, a London publisher, and his 
wife, Helen. Mrs. Hamlyn, a designer and 
decorator, came upon the place in 1987, 
with rainwater splashing through holes in 
the roof, seeping into Renaissance wall 
paintings, rotting the beams. It took four 
years, 200 workmen and uncounted con¬ 
frontations with French cultural bureau¬ 
crats to make it habitable. It meant peeling 

and^Mhose other layws^^Sd by 
shifting tastes. 

Tom Wilson, the architect, who was 
matting a stopover during our visit, said: 
“It’s been an extraordinary four years. The 
biggest challenge was installing the wiring 





Guests have breakfast served on the lawns of the Chateau de Bagnols in the Beaujolais region of France (inset). 


without opening walls because of the 
” He said he learned a lot, Eke 


rtO 


chimney flues and in the conduits of an¬ 
cient latrines. 


Mrs. Hamlyn’s passion for -detail is 
much evident in the Guards Room, the 
main dmfng hall, dominated by one of 
France’s largest and finest Gothic fire¬ 
places, sculptured in off-white stone. For 
this hall and the adjacent dining room, she 
ordered striped fabrics at Prelie of Lyon, 
copied from chateau wall designs. English 
cabinetmakers produced side tables, trays; 
and wine stands. The cup-footed wine 


glasses were handblown in Alsace and 
have the golden opacity of oW glass. She 
persuaded Raynaud of Limoges to use a n 
18 th-century formula to make the anna. 
Irish table linens were ordered from the 
company that supplies Buclringham Pal¬ 
ace. A shop in the viBagenow sells many of 
these items. 


ster flavored butter. At night our galantine 
of quail was layered with foie gras. The 
vineyardsOf Bagnols produced our wine, a 
light Beam'dais cru. After a spicy mousse a 
l’orange, the table was covered with artful 
petits fours. 


The old lrifrfwaHt, resurrected and easily 
inspected behind great glass walls, produce 
hearty Lyon-type dishes for lunch and din- 
. near, pfttfis ana river fish and plenty of 
herbs from the kitchen garden. For lunch 
we tried the foie gras wife crushed rank 
Sichuan pepper and pant shrimp s in-lob- 


Tbere is much to see in the environs of 
Bagnols: other chateaus, fortified villages 
amdoldfarmhouses, and the nearby Beau- 
jokris vineyards. But If you dont have 
much time, stay near the Chilean, m the 
southern Beaujolais, if only few the stone 
mails, with a natural cdor between deep 
honey and copper, aglow as though the sun 

is always setting cm them. 


The Rules of Battle for Getting Across Rome (Alive) on a Motorcycle 

^ .. ™ three rearixa re- the cars. AH Italian drivers, with noexcep- Somerukssarepqsiwe..1 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 


R OME — Rome reveals itself in 
many ways, and the way it most 
Ekes to be seen, at least by for¬ 
eign visitors, is through rose-tint¬ 
ed glasses that filter out all but the sweep 
of palazzos and piazzas, frescoes and 
friezes. Try seeing Rome through motorcy¬ 
cle goggles, though, and you’ll find another 
dty altogether: out there, beyond the Fo¬ 
rum and the CampidogUo, it’s a war zone 
— with no prisoners, no mercy and no 

truce. ... . . 

To the uninitiated it might appear that 
the traffic is just chaos, a.snarling, honking 
beast whose only aim is to prevent any 


lestrian from ever crossing the street 
411 at, of course, is one of its prime func¬ 
tions. But within this apparent mayhem, 
there are actually rules, or at least battle 
lines, that only the foolhardy ignore. And 
rule one is: Motorcyclists have no friends. 
Not even among other motorcyclists. 

This was a discovery I made after a 
friend (possibly destined to become a for¬ 
mer friend) first lent me, then sold me, his 
motorcycle. Not, it is important to note, a 
motorina, one of those high-pitched scoot¬ 
ers engineered to sound Eke amplified 
mosquitoes, but a four-cylinder, pitch- 
black, 12-year-old, oil-seeping monster 
with a far greater predilection for giddy 
acceleration in straight li n e s t han for turn¬ 
ing owners. 


Of course, Td had bikes before. The first 

was an old British Ariel 600: Make this 
work, my father said, and Fll get you one 
you rsm take cm the road. So he and 1 made 
it work and I acquired an old British BSA 
250. whose engine mercifully seized every 
time I nudged it beyond 35 miles (55 kilo¬ 
meters) an hour. 

Then, there was the DMW 197. Yes, 
DMW, not BMW, named for a back street 
operation in Manchester E n gla n d, where, 
they said, a man named Dawson set up the 
Dawson Motor Works, presumably to spin 
a Ettle trade off any confusion with the 
rather more prestigious Bayerischc Mo- 
toren Werke in Munich that produces 
BMW care and motorcycles. There wasn't 
much comparison, though; one 170-mile 


trip took nine hours, three gearbox re- 
b addings and one total engine seizure. 

By the time, much later, I got to Africa 
as a correspondent, another friend lured 
me back onto two wheels, persuading me 
to buy an off-road Japanese thumper with 
a red tank and knobbly tires. 

On it, I rode through Kenya’s Great Rift 
Valley, watching the giraffe feeding on the 
acacia trees, getting snarled in jams of 


the care. AflltaEan driven, with no e xcep¬ 
tion, drive as if they learned the craft from 
the video game called Tetris where the ob- 

jectis to fft as many objects as possible into 

a defined areawithout ieavihg a single space 
between thenL That mean? ^ 
sandwich unless you manage to- dart, bo- 
tween the dosing, jaws of the Lancias mid. 
Fiats before they dose on yoo. 


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men with spears, ’there were thrills, spills 
jind all manner of adventure. Punctured 
tires left me marooned by the firesides of 
thatched villages as night fell; my mishan¬ 
dling of the bike left me marooned in the 
thorn trees as my (ex) friends roared erff 
into the sunset. I rode it into Nairobi 
during an attempted coop to see what was 
happening. (“You, go away,” said the sot- 
dier at the first roadblock, pointing a rifle 
at the flame-red apparition, and I obeyed). 

The successor machine, in Johannes¬ 
burg. was a bigger, slicker version of the 
off-road bike rd had in Nairobi, with just 
as much of a penchant for adventure It 
took me across the dirt tracks to see white 
extremists Eke Eugene ToreTUanche reliv¬ 
ing their notions of a pioneering history in 
remote spots of the bush. It took me to 
segre ga ted black townships. 

But none of this was any preparation for 
Rome. . 

The first thing that happens when you 
ride a motorcycle in Rome is that you wish 
you hadn’t Forget any notion of two- 
whccled solidarity, Harley-hogger style. 
You teeter into the traffic. The motonm 
buzz you like swarms of irate bees, cutting 
across your path, appearing from nowhere, 
Har i n g from side roads with the insouci¬ 
ance that the city demands of its young. 
If you survive the motorini, you cope with 



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International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


S '. NDjfroa survive Che 
K deal mtfc yOTr feHow 
* - dists, who Eve with-a per manen t 
— . jL. sense of affront that you might 
think your moteweyde to be Caster, louder, 
more muscular or more macho than, theirs. 
In practical terms, this means that every 
i fight is a drag race, every shyer « 
road a challenge -to change down 
three howEng'gears, twist the 

_ 1 pd head for the moon — or the 

intensive care unit. 

It is only after tbia initiation that you 
begin to discern the roles. 

Some inks are negative: For instance, 
b framne many motorini have no ficense 
plates and therefore cannot be traced by the 
police, there are no red fights for motorini 
riders, just as there are no one-way streets^ 
no pedestrian precincts and no distinctions 
between the road and the sidewalk- 


through 
throttle 1 


Some rules are positive. If, for instance, 
you manage to get your motorcycle’s front 
tfre a hair's breadth ahead of a motorino, 
motorcycle or car, you ergoy right of way 

_bm only until that driver senses you will 

toseyriuriieniefiisL - 

- Souw rufcs fall between; the two. A red 
f^^ fnr’tTTStence. is onlyicd if there’s a 
p<*cenian watching. And. only foreign vis* 
mms. hcfieve that white markings cm the 
;ktnaei^cn<^ng a pedestrian crossing actu- 

j^cTmadn^ C that eddies and swirls 
round obstadcs fike toe Tiber in flood. 

(to'rule.is tmmntable: Buses always 
win. ' - • - - 

, So vtoy do it, friends adc. 

-1 ride this monstrous motorcycle be¬ 
cause, for one thing, l ean get across t own 

. with- minininm dday. paoc without hin¬ 
drance outride restaurants and thus give 
myridf more time for the really important 
.'aspects of fife in Rome, such as the pasta. 

But beyond those arguments, there’s a 
rase-tinting that goes on with motorcycles 
that has nothing to do^with goggles. Some¬ 
times, l ride motorcycles because it makes 

_/il. - *- mm Mik iJm ■* fr 


ill! Till 


, lit will sell a 1957 recordingof 
Jchn Lennon with his first band, 
made on the very day that he actually - 
met Paul McCartney. The bouse is 
also selling the real red-to-red 
recorder tfietapewas made on. 


am, again, 1 that 16-year-oli 
fluttering British BSA 250. 

PetoapstoereteaKridof contin ui ty that 
starts for all bikers with toe equivalent of 
the Arid 600 and runs through to the pro- 
seat The Via dd Corse may not be the Rift 
Valley, and the traffic cops may not be 
soldiers tefling you. to go away from the 
coup, bed the nrotracycte provides a linear 
succession between all those places and 
events. On two wheels, even the mundane 
can be adventurous; and on two wheels, we 
cad dream toe' Eaw Rider dreams of youth. 

For that, even the battle with the motor¬ 
ini is^worthwhile. - 


/// M $ fli fJIMi 


Forrast Gump 

Directed by Robert Ze¬ 
meckis. US. 

When a television news re¬ 
port overheard in “Forrest 
Gump” mentions American 
astronauts, the audience can 

be forgiven for wondering 

whether the title character 
will soon be seen walking on 
toe moon. The charmed life 
of Forrest Gump has led 
him practically everywhere 
else, from the White House 
(where Presidents Kennedy, 
Johnson and Nixon appear 
to be greeting him axmray) 
to an Alabama boarding 
house (where he gives pelvis¬ 
shaking lessons to a guest, 
the as-yet-unknown Elvis 
Presley). “Forrest Gump” is 
such an accomplished feat of 
cyber-cinema that it makes 
these tricks, not to mention 
subtler ones, look amazingly 
seamless. But Robert Ze¬ 
meckis remains much more 
successful at staging briT 
liant technical sleight-of- 
hand than at providing the 
dramatic basis for his visual 
inventions. Structured as 
Forrest’s autobiography, 
and centering on his lifdong 
love for an elusive beauty 
named Jenny (Robin 
Wright), "Forrest Gump” 
has the elements of an emo¬ 
tionally gripping story. Yet 
H feels less like a romance 
than fike a coffee-tablebook 

rest Gump” has Tom Hanks, 



feature and gotten away 
witofr.(Ga77ti/mneis, NY1) 


Angwls In the OutfMd 

Directed by -William Dear. 
U.S. 


Tom Hanks in a scene from “Forrest <xump. 


the only major American 
movie star who could have 
played Forrest without oan-_ 
descenrion. 

(Jana Masbn, NYT) 


Spanking the Monfcay 

Directed by David O. RusselL 
U.S. 

In this vary funny dark com¬ 
edy, toe phrase conveys a 

healthy, cross-generational' 
attitude. Ray ArbeCi. (Jer¬ 
emy Davies) the film's frus¬ 
trated college-age hero, be-" 


longs to a generation that 
seems to take a rational ap¬ 
proach, to sex. But he finds 
himself at the center of a 
twisted cormng-of-age story.: 
His- misguided experience 
. involves a brief fling at in¬ 
cest with his mother (Alber- 
’■ ta WalSOU). Yet “Sp anking 
the Monkey” remains good- 
. humored, sane and amusing. 
It’s as if David O. Rnssdl, 

- ,35, toe film’s writer and di¬ 
rector, had dared himself to 
do die impossible in Ms first 




“Angds in the Outfield,” 
this summer’s second base¬ 
ball movie intended for a 
family audience, is a big 
drimjmg scoop of marsh¬ 
mallow sentiment topped 
with whipped cream spiritu¬ 
ality. updated from the . 
1951 fifin' starring Paul 
Douglas as George Knox, a 
hard-hearted baseball 
coach, the new version, has 
Danny Glover as Knox, who 
is now the scowling manager 
of tbe California Angels, in 

last pbabe and so bad they' 
are buffoonish. But-with, 
spine unexpected heavenly 
intervention, they begin per¬ 
forming wondrous feats. 
What transforms them is a 
-bey’s,fervent prayer. When 
Roger (Joseph Gordon-Le- 
vittt, an 11-year-old foster 
child, hears his- father, ■ a 
drifter, sarcastically remark 
that the chanties of the fam¬ 
ily’s rcairUmg are as good as 
.tn<»c of; the. Angds-whining 

thepaniant, toebpytafasit 

as a promise. He-prays Joe 
the Angcis to win the pea- 
‘ nant, and gets his wish. This 
• Disney, movie aspires .to the. 
tone of one of the studio’s 
animated fantasies, but;it 
. lacks a story even a fraction 
as corupelfing or 

f Stephen Holden, NYT) 


K. 


',*s 


X 





X 

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JJ1 Ly> l\S£> 


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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, July 22,1994 
Page ? 


Upgrade’ Chase: The Stakes Get Higher 


By Roger Coflis 


F EW things arc more stressful to 
tbe frequent flier than waiting 
at flie departure gate'for the' 
crucial nod: Shall 1 have the. 
otqmate joy of an upgrade, from econo¬ 
my to business or business to first, or be 
sequestered in the class that’s printed on 
my ticket? Look around as the flight is 
called. Management styles are wi«iiW- 
egps are on the line. 

“People desperately want upgrades^* 
says Stephen Heckscher, a mariceting ex¬ 
ecutive with. Delta Air jjj London, 
"Corporations generally are sa ying em¬ 
ployees should ride in economy; so the' 
only benefit an employee can get now. is 
a personal upgrade. That’s why they’re 
all coming out of the woodwork. People 
don’t seem to have any sense of ahpiw!. 
They go off screaming and hollering 
about an upgrade and lose all sensea' 
proportion. I mean, if you go rntn a 
restaurant and thettfs'an empty ^N 1 *. do 
you expect a free meal?” 

Well, yes. But the airiines havc only 
themselves to blame by debasing the 
class system with a blizzard of promo¬ 
tions and deals, from free upgrades 
half-price “companion” fares to'“two-, 
for-one” offers. 


Wagonlit Travel in London. “As the 
'economy improves, certainly in the ■ 
UJL, people are moving up the aircraft 
again and business class is getting fuller, 
so there are fewer- seals to give away, and 
an increasing number of arrimem are get- 
rid of first class” 

Je said that sometimes the airline pro-, 
morions “blow a fuse.” “A lot of our 
(gents bought two tickets for an airline 
-that was giving upgrades ‘sutg'ect to 
avaMufity’ in economy and business, 
class. They’d present the economy ticket 
to see if they got upgraded; if not-they’d 
scrap it for a refund or to use next time 
and present the business dags ticket; 
which created absolute chaos with the 
: yield management of the airline.” 

“Deha has a policy basically against 
upgrades,” Heckscher says. ~ 


“Not only might 1 type in an upgrade 
request for you, but Td do a message ‘Do 
all possible to assist’ to special services to 
meet you at check-in and walk you 
through.” 

Tactically, it can pay to laiget flights 
that are likely to be overbooked in econ¬ 
omy and benefit from an “airline roll.” 
the process by which passengers are 
“rolled” up to tbe next class to avoid 
bumping people off the flight. Unless 
you have a confirmed upgrade, your pri¬ 
ori tywill be determined by your comput¬ 
er coding, and possibly by the way you 
id your denw 


Ti t frtfMtit Tnrihr 


_ A recent promotion by American Air¬ 
lines moved everyone up a class. Buy a 
a the.’ 


business class ticket on the Atlantic with 
British Airways and you can fly one way 
on Concorde. Social cthribears know how 
to move iq> a class by redeeming frequent 
flier miles or buying a consolidation tick¬ 
et and saving 50 percent on whatever it 
was they were supposed to have paid. 
Assuming anyone knows by this time. 

The stakes are high. With first class 
costing around twice the business class 
fare, which in turn can be three times as 
much as full economy, an upgrade is 
worth more than a 50 percent discount. 
The published one-way fares from Lon¬ 
don to New York are £1,935- ($2^00) in 
first dass, £1,061 in business, and £360 
for full economy. Getting bumped up 
from economy to business therefore 
“saves” you £700. 

“Upgrades are always possible; bntifr 
becoming a bit more difficult,** says 
Richard Lovell, managing director of 


have to be very specific. We used to send 
upgrade certificates to travel agents to 
help them develop their corporate ac¬ 
counts: but now we ’ve ev en stopped do¬ 
ing that Wc do give FFP upgrade certifi¬ 
cates phis the occasional operational 
apgrade,when we move people up a class 
if we’re overbooked.” 

There are two types of upgrade: those 
that are pre-ordained, as it were, in the 
computer, and those that arise for opera¬ 
tional reasons (overbooking) at check-in 
or the departure gate. Both require a 
strategic and tactical approach. Try to 
make sore that your PNR (Passenger 
Name Record) carries a “pre-authoriza¬ 
tion to upgrade.” Failing that, aim for 
the designation SFU (Suitable for Up¬ 
grade) and the magic “Do aD possible to 
assist,” and you’ll be top of the list for an 
upgrade at the gate. 

An almost sure- fire w ay to get an up- 
grade is to be an FFP member with a 
gold card traveling on a fuff-fare ticket. 
It also hdps to be a VIP or CTP (commer¬ 
cially important person). VIPs come in 
many guises, from an authentic celebrity 
with whom tbeairfmeis glad to be asso¬ 
ciated to simply someone with some kind 
of business relationship. 

“You could be a VIP for. me in PR, 
sales or marketing. VEP means an impor¬ 
tant contact with the airline,” says Iain 
Bums at American Airlines in London. 


are dressed and your demeanor at the 

gate. 

“We give priority 10 upgrading any 
full fare passenger along with any mem¬ 
ber of the JAL Mileage Bank,” says Rob¬ 
ert Rigby at Japan Airlines in London. 
“We nave no specific dress code: but 
smart casual is expected for upgrades to 
business dass and a jacket and tie are 
expected for first.” 

According to an SAS spokeswoman in 
Stockholm, the pecking order for up¬ 
grades is: passengers holding EuroBonus 
award tickets; EuroBonus gold card 
holders; VIRs and CIPs. 

A travel agent can help by putting 
through a message to an ainbe for a VIP 
classification, says Loved. “We can’t 
forge a code; but if we really ask an 
airline loped the stops out they do. You 
would cad the special services manager 
and say it's critically important, can you 
arrange an upgrade, have someone met, 
waft them to a lounge. But you don't cry 
wolf too often.” 

“Your best contact for an upgrade is 
the station manager,” said Clive Ray¬ 
mond, marketing director of Nice Air¬ 
port and former general manager of BA 
in France. 

He added, "The best thing that can 
happen to you is to have a problem with 
the airline. That gives you an excuse to 
meet the station manager and build a 
relationship with him. He’s much more 
important to you than the commercial 
manager. Cad him on some pretext a 
couple of days before you fly, have a 
coffee together, write a flattering letter to 
the president mentioning him; say that 
you're giving the airline another 
chance.” 

Whatever the computer says, a lot can 
stid depend on management style. 


Paris Finale: Jubilant Lacroix 


By Suzy Menkes 

Iruernanoacd HctvM Tribune 


P ARIS — With disco lights spin¬ 
ning, feathers fluttering and skirts 
flouncing, Christian Lacroix's 
show closed the fafl/winter cou¬ 
ture season. His jubilant display left an 
uplifting feeling that it is great to be young, 
very rich and rn love with fashion. The 
general impression of the week has been 
that couture has deferred its death warrant 
now that glamour, femininity and combing 
your hair are back b style. 

Lacroix’s preening of fine feathers was 
the essence of haute couture, but no more 
than that. Tbe designer said before the 
show that he was through with couture 
pretending to influence the street or as a 
locomotive for licensing. His “it-is-what- 
it-is” collection handled opulent fabrics 
and ornate cmbeBishment with grace, wit 
and few glitches. 

It also picked up on the current rage for 
glam rock, not just with the leopard-print 
runway and mirrored chandelier, but also 
with big bouffant hairdos last seen on 
ih Fa 


Farrah Fawcett. 


All things glam and glitzy included a 
metallic silver top. multi-colored sequined 
skirt and shimmering shoes — aQ worn 
with the tidy multi-colored tweed jackets 
and belted coats of daywear. The ultimate 
raincoat had splatters of gold on transpar¬ 
ent plastic. 

Tbe riisftn mania was a smart way of 
handling the fact that Lacroix’s clothes are 
for an interior pampered world. It is hard 
to imagin e them coming down the street, 
even though the tailoring was taut and 
stria and there were pants as well as the 
flirty parachute skirt that dominated the 
show. New was the silhouette cut close to 
the body, and the complex winged shoul¬ 
der line. That emphasized the return to 
structure after the fluidity that had infil¬ 
trated even haute couture. 

But for all Lacroix’s glancing references 
to the 1940s suit and its descendants b the 
1970s, the show was less about glam rock, 
ihan clothes for those with glamorous 
rocks of their own. They were clearly the 
target for the lacy little black and gold 
party dresses (a client passage that went on 
too long). 

But Lacroix makes romantic dresses for 
budding beauties who have the wasp waist 
to trap made tbe heart-shaped corset bod¬ 



It was the yin and yang of haute couture 
when Philippe Venet showed bis collection 
immediately before Lacroix. Venet showed 
pared-down, artfully constructed clothes 
with no embellishment — outfits that 
could take you anywhere. There were use¬ 
ful coats with kimono sleeves and sculpted 
suits, their architectural severity softened 
with fluffy mohair or by muting toning 
colors like coral and tangerine. Colors 
were bright for everting dresses, sliced at 
one shoulder, in a raspberry ripple of ruf¬ 
fles or in metallic gold and bronze. In its 
own distinguished way, it was also the 
essence of haute couture. 

The bouquet of roses that Nina Ricci's 
bride wore m a coquettish bustle was de¬ 
signer Gerard Pipart’s ode to the frankly 
feminine woman, his style for 30 years at 
the house. For day she wears a dress or a 
pleated skirt, flaring out to just over the 
knee. 

Among the avant-garde in ready-to- 
wear this is called the New Length. Here it 
was the more familiar New Look. But if 
the day clothes were irredeemably lady¬ 
like, the evening clothes had a glamour and 
refinement, as the pleats theme was devel¬ 
oped as ball gowns the color of metallic 
candy wrappers, and just as sweet-toothed. 


Lacroix's pinstripe jacket and skirt. 


ice of tbe wedding gown. A fine finale of 
ball dresses included a wicked black and 
red corset dress and a delicately embroi¬ 
dered eau-de-nil gjlet with a low-slung 
pine-green velvet skirt 

These evening clothes emphasize not 
just Lacroix's finesse with subtle color and 
elaborate decoration, but his self-appoint¬ 
ed role as personal trainer to the couture 
suppliers. 

He stretches the lace and beadmakers 
with complex designs. He exercises the 
imagination of hand-weavers in tweed. 
These efforts are sometimes heroic fail¬ 
ures. But this season they were mostly 
lighthanded, with feathered sweater and a 
fluffy plumed coat symbolizing French 
fashion at its most frolicsome. 


T HE psychological crisis of confi¬ 
dence in haute couture now seems 
to be over. It had been seen as 
politically incorrect as the 1990s 
rejected the excesses of the previous de¬ 
cade. Since waif-like, poor-girl clothes do 
not do anything for the bottom line of 
upscale stores, the buyers in town wel¬ 
comed the return to couture values. Joan 
Xaner of Neiman Marcus praised the re¬ 
turn to “romance, glamour and real cloth¬ 
ing” after “a lack of fashion." 

Kalman Ruticnsiein of Blooomingdales 
said that he was excited to see a “return to 
designing" after all the “limp and floppy 
clothes." 

Dawn Mello, president of Bergdorf 
Goodman, who has had to face across the 
runway Filin SaJtzxnan, the fashion editor 
she fired, was seeing her first couture 
shows in five years. 

“I am excited. With the return to struc¬ 
ture, couture seems very much alive,” she 
said. 

But there has been one death in the high 
fashion fashion family. W Europe, the 
glossy publication launched by Fairchild 
Publications in February 1992, was quietly 
folded this week. 


/// A i T s sins 


AUSTRIA 


Vienna 

Osterreichische Ca l o rie, let (222) 
79-60700, closed Mondays. Contin¬ 
uing/To SepL 4: " Der Master vein 
Gross lobmlrw: Bn Skfrtatfer derZelt ‘ 
um 1400." five works from the un¬ 
identified sculptor known as the Mas¬ 
ter of Gro6stobnmng and 40 15Bi- 
century church sculptures. 




Bnujee , 

Kunstoentrum Oud Smf-Jan, tef: 
(50) 33-56-66. open daily. To Oct 
2: "Modigliani: De Openbaring." 
More than 400 drawings and water- 
odors created in Parts by Italian artist 
Amedeo ModfgHani -from 1906 to 
1914. The works were purchased 
and collected toy Pad Alexandre, 
who became the painter’s closest 
triend and orty patron upon his arriv¬ 
al In Paris in 1907. 


MUTAIM 


Durham 

The Bowes Museum, tel: (833) 69- 
06 - 06 , open daily. To Sap*. 4: The 
Tempting TaDte. The evolution of 
the formal cBnner service In Europe 
between 1500 and 1870, from medi¬ 
eval and Renaissance style to the 
19th century. 

Edinburgh 

Scottish National Gallery, tel: (31) 
556-8921, open dafty. To SepL 25: 
“William Gillies: Watercolours of 
Scotland.” More than 70 waterectors 
by the 20 th-century artists. Includes 
views of Skye. Fife, the Bonders and 
the West coast 
G U f T TOffW 

Burred Collection, let (41)64£-71- 
41, open daily. To Sept 94: .New 
Perspectives: The Italian Renais¬ 
sance." Features paintings, deficate 
glassware, ceramics, arms and ar¬ 
mor. Illustrated books, textiles and 
musical instalments from the Italian 
Renaissance. 

London 

Whitechapel Art GaBery,W: (71) 
377-0107. closed Mondays. To Sept 
11: "Franz Wine: Art end the Struc¬ 
ture of Identity." 70 paintings tythe 
American Abstract 
spanning the years 1947 to 196Z- 
KKne is known tor 
bold black strokes on white, but the 

per, and a number oFrotoriufworSsj 
Rovaf Academy of Arts, tel: (71) 

by Ensor, van de Velde and van Rys- 



Hannover 

Sprengel Museum, tel: (511) 168 - 
3875, open daily. Continuing/To 
Sept 11: "Die One der Kunst: Der 
Kunsibetrieb tfs Kunstweric" Deals 
with the current situation of the art 
scene end the interaction between a 
work of art and the place where it Is 
presented. 

Kronecti 

Castle Rosenberg, tel: (9261) 
97236, open daily. To Aug. 21: “Cra¬ 
nach: Bn Mater-Urtemehmer aus 
Franker." 50 paintings, 50 drawings 
and 35 engravings by the 16th-cen¬ 
tury Gentian artist Lucas Cranach 
and the members of his studio. 
Munich 

Haus der Kunst, tel: (89) 211-27- 
127. To Aug. 14: "Elan Vital Oder das 
Augedes Eros: Kandnsky, Wee, Arp. 
Mlro and CaWer.” Documents how 
, these five masters of modem art were 
connected personally and by com¬ 
mon traits in their work; with 500 
paintings, drawings, sculptures, re- 
Belsand mobiles. 


closed Mondays. To Nov 13;:'Alam- 
kara: 5,000 Years ot India.'' This ex¬ 
hibition, which covers the period 
3000 B.C. to 1900 AD., includes 
stone, bronze and lerraootta images 
ot deities, paintings of court life, ev¬ 
eryday Ute and nature, Jewelry and 
other examples ot decorative art on 
ken from the National Museum, New 
Delhi, Singapore institutions and pri¬ 
vate ooDactors- 


"Lady with an Ermine," a number of 
multi-media kiosks enable the verier 
to delve into Renaissance thinking, 
the llte ot Leonardo and the versatility 
of the man. 


by Bonnard, Matisse, Braque, Picas¬ 
so. Batthus and Chagall. 


UNITED STATES 


SWITZERLAND 


SWEDEN 


Stockholm 

KutturhuseUel: (8) 24-23-22, open 
daily. Continulng/T o Aug. 28: “Leo¬ 
nardo da Vinci." in ackfton to mod¬ 
els, drawings, facsimiles, manu¬ 
scripts and paintings, including 


Geneva 

Mus6e Barbier-Mueller, tel: (22) 
312-02-70. open daily. To Aug. 30: 
"Arts Royaux du Cameroon." Stat¬ 
ues. doors, seats and vessels from 
weaem Cameroon. 

Martigny 

Fondabon Pierre Giannada, tel: 
(26) 22-38-78, open daily. To Nov. 
1: "De Matisse a Picasso. 80 paint¬ 
ings, drawings end sculptures by 30 
20 th-century artiste inducting works 


Chicago 

Art Institute, tel: (312) 443-3600. 
open daily. To Oct. 16: "Goya. Truth 
and Fantasy. The Cabinet Pictures, 
Sketches and Miniatures.” 100 
small-scale works, mduding surviv¬ 
ing oil paintings produced for the 
Royal Tapestry Factory, sketches for 
artarpieces and many portraits and 
self-portraits. 


terpiecesfrom the Barnes Collection: 
Cezanne to Matisse." B0 French im¬ 
pressionist, postimpressionist and 
early modem paintings from the col¬ 
lection of Dr. Albert C. Barnes M 872- 
1951). Includes paintings by Renoir, 
Cezanne, van Gogh, Seurat. Monel, 
and Picasso. 


Fort Worrit 

Klmbeti Art Museum, tel: ( 81 7) 
332-3451. open dally. Continu¬ 
ing/To Aug. 14 :"Impressionist Mas- 


MaUbu 

The J. Paul Getty Museum, tel: 
(310) 459-76-11. closed Mondays. 
To Sept. 4: "Andre Kertesz: A Cen¬ 
tennial Tribute." Celebrates the cen¬ 
tenary of the birth ot the phoiogra- 
pher and traces his 50-year career 
with 50 photographs covering ns 
years In his native Hungary, ris in¬ 
volvement with Paris artists and his 
life in New York after 1936. 


ITALY 


SAME-SEX UNIONS IN 
PREMODERN EUROPE 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


Venice 

Palazzo Grass!, tel: (41) 522-1375. 
Continuing/To Nov. 6: "Rtoasci- 
mento - Da Brunelleschi a Mchel- 
angeto: La Rappresentazione dell' 
Architenura." Features 30 architec¬ 
tural models built during the 15th and 
16th centuries. 


By John Boswell 412 pages. S25. 
ViHard 


JAPAN 


Chiba 

Nippon Convention Center, tel: 
(43) 269-00-01. Continuing/To 
Aug. 31: "The Smithsonian's Ameri¬ 
ca. Documents American history 
and culture from the influence of the 
frontier to American contributions in 
science and technology. 

Tokyo 

MHsukoshi Museum of Art, tel: (3) 
3364-1111, closed Mondays. To 
July 31: ‘VanfteK Fashion Photogra¬ 
phy In the 19th and 20th Centuries.” 
More than 250 photographs by 25 
renowned photographers. 


NETHERLANDS 


Photographs of a yiper (1926) and of Max Beckmann 
(1930% shown at the Louisiana Museum in Denmark. 


Amsterdam 

Van Gogh Museum, tel: 20-570-52- 
00, open (My. Conteiuing/To Oct 
9: “van Gogn's Sett-Portraits From 
Parts." 18 self-portraits painted to 
1886-1887. 


drawings, watercotors and photo¬ 
graphs. 




KsfeSSSS 

wink." Features designs toy Puflaao. 
Hrrtton and garden studies by Kept, 

SSS&ssr-r 

nnd Roman sculptures of toe 

tSfra"* 1 


DENMARK 


\3r wan rsnoh to Gerhard 



Shmm- MajorVWbrkS trom 

artiste- The pant' 

SSSSSSff-"*" - 


L’Wt-ew-to-Sorgue 

HOtol de Camprodon. tel: 90-38-17- 
41, closed Mondays. To Oct 30: 
“Dos Bords de I'Escauiaux Rfves de 
la Sorgue: Las Modemes du RflO- 
ilsme a I’Exprassionisme 1 B 8 O- 
1940." Works by Flemish painters, 
ranging from ReaBam to Symbolism. 
Fauvfam and Abstractionism, Includ¬ 
ing paintings by Louis Artan, James 
Ensor, TTteo van Rysselberghe, Con¬ 
stant Permeke arid victor Serv- 
ranckx. 

Pari* 

Centre Georges Pompidou, teh 44- 
78-12-33, dosed Tuesdays. Contin- 
ubw/To Oct 3: "Joseph Beuys." 
Drawings, objects, sculptures and 
more than 70 Installations 
Centre National de la Photogra- 
phie, tel; 53-76-12-82, dosed Tues¬ 
days. Continuing/To July 31; "Fe¬ 
nce Beato et FEcole de Yokohama, 
1863-1877." Photographs taken dur¬ 
ing the 15 yeare the Itaftan-bom pho¬ 
tographer spent in Japan in toe sec¬ 
ond half of'19tocertury. • 

Grand Palais, tel: 44-13-17-17, 
dosed Tuesdays' Continuing/To 
Aug. 26: “Impresaionnssme; Les Ori- 
glnes, 1859-1869." Focuses on toe 
Influences that led young painters 
such as Monet, Renoir. Pissarro. Ma¬ 
net and Degas to.lmpnesstonism. 
Musee du Louvre, DM: 40-20-51-51, 


dosed Tuesdays. Oontinuing/To 
Dec. 26 : "La Collection Puiforcai- 
M&fChos," Exhibited once every 10 
years, the Greek shipping tycoon's 
collection Includes gold goblets, sa¬ 
ver dishes, spice boxes and siKrer- 
waredating from toe I8to to the 20th 
centuries.. 

Toulon 

Muete da Toulon, tek 94-93-15-54, 
open dafly. To OcL 30: "L’Art Ameri¬ 
can dans les Coflections Pubfiques 
en France."-American art of the last 
two decades with works by Dan Fla¬ 
vin. Donald Judd and Sol LewitL 


PORTUGAL 


Lisbon 

Museu Nadonal de Arte Antiga. tel: 
397-6001. dosed Mondays. To Aug. 
15: “As Tentacoes de Bosch ou 0 

Etemo Retomo." Focusing on Hier- 
cffryrrus Bosch’s triptych'The Temp¬ 
tation of SL Anthony," the exhibition 
features works by ArdmboWo. Oarer, 
Moreeu and Dan, in which the artists 
explore the thematic variations and 
toe symbols oltoelnime. 


Reviewed by 
Camille Pagtia 

I N 1980, John Boswell came 
to attention with a tong schol¬ 
arly book, “Christianity. Social 
Tolerance, and Homosexuality: 
Gay People in Western Europe 
from the Beginning of tbe Chris¬ 
tian Eire to tbe Fourteenth Cen¬ 
tury,” which won the American 
Boole Award. Even those who 
did not read it may have been 
aware of the c ontrov er sy over 
the appearance of the contempo¬ 
rary word “gay’’ in a book about 
the Middle Ages, a usage criti¬ 
cized by some as anachronistic 
and tendentious. 

As the first openly gay pro¬ 
fessor to win tenure at an Iw 
League university, Boswell 
made history. Many substan¬ 
tive questions raised about his 
work have been, eclipsed by his 
general celebrity in a period 
when gay studies began to enter 
college curricula. Since his big 
book, Boswell has been award¬ 
ed the A. Whitney Griswold 
Professorship of History, as 
well as c hairmanship of the his¬ 
tory department ax Yale, 
in has new book, Boswell, 


• Karf-Heinz Zinuaermann, 
general manager of Munich’s 
Hotel Rafael, is reading “Gai- 
Jin” by James ClavdL 
“I lived and worked in Asia 
for many years, and I have a 
Japanese wife. The description 
of expatriate life in Yokohama 
in the 1830s gives a fascinating 
perspective on what it’s like to 
be an expat in Japan today.” 

(John Brumon, IHT) 



abandons his earlier reliance on 
the word “gay" This retreat has 
scarcely been noticed in the ex¬ 
traordinary notoriety the book 
has inspired even before publica¬ 
tion. Boswell's thesis — that ho¬ 
mosexual marriages were sanc¬ 
tioned and routinely conducted 
by the medieval Catholic Church 
— was aired 00 network televi¬ 
sion in the Uni ted States, and 
publicized in the Doonesbury 
comic strip and in a full page of a 


major magazine. 

Evaluation of serious academ¬ 


ic books does not normally oc¬ 
cur in such an atmosphere of 
highly politicized pressure. Bos¬ 
well states that “Same-Sex 
Unions” is directed toward 
“readers with no particular ex¬ 
pertise in any of the specialties” 
m which he claims “mastery.” 


But no one without special 
knowledge could be expected to 
absorb, or even comfortably 
read, a text so crammed with 
labyrinthine footnotes and os¬ 
tentatiously un transliterated ex¬ 
tracts from ancient Greek and 
Old Church Slavonia 

The credibility of Boswell’s 
book rests on three points. First 
is the authenticity of the medi¬ 
eval manuscripts containing the 
disputed liturgies, to whose ex¬ 
istence in European archives 
Boswell says he was alerted by 
"a correspondent who prefers 
not to be named.” Second is the 
accuracy of translation of those 
manuscripts. Third is the inter¬ 
pretation of the texts. 

1 have no reason to doubt is¬ 
sues one and two. 1 also accept 
his claim of fluency in many 




QERMANY 


Bern 

Kunst- und Ausstettungshalte, tel: 
(228) 9171-200. Continuing/To 
OcL 16:“&iropa,Europe;DasJahr- 
fcunetertder AvafliganJe in Mftttf- wxl 
Osteuropa." A multkllscipllnary ex- 
hUtion of 700works by 200 palnteis 
and sculptore from toe termer Iron 
Curtetto countries. 


Pushkin State Museum of Fine 
Arts, tel: 203-69-74. Continuing/To 
Sept 9: "Art Collections of toe Ar- 
changeiskoye Museum." Paintings, 
furniture, books and porcelain select¬ 
ed from the 40,000 Hems usually ex- 
hfbfted at toe Archangel Museum, 
formerly the estate of the Yussupov 
farriUy. 


By Alan Trascott 


SINGAPORE 


National Museum, tel: 332-3656. 


O N the diagramed deal 
South landed in four 
spades after West opened with 
four diamonds and North dou¬ 
bled. The opening lead of the 
diamond Vmg was won with the 
ace, and South was relieved to 
see Bast follow sdL She cashed 
the spade ace and led the seven- 


ners, discarded her remaining 
riianirmri, rea ching this ending: 


NORTH 
* — 

P — 

0 10 9 
♦ A 8 7 2 


diamond, scoring the spade ten 
as her tenth trick whatever East 
chose to do. 


WEST 

4- 

Ir 87 


10 


urs/jf s 11 s 


On July 24; “Gerard Mercator « b 
. Geographic ttera lee Pays-Bas Meri- 
cOonaux.” Muste Ptarran-Moretus, 
Antwerp. 

On July 24: “wuhslm LetbL Ge- 
dachtnlsausstattung zrn 150. Ge- 


burteteg." Neue pinakotoek, Mu¬ 
nich. 


She decided that East was 
unlikely to have five trumps, 
because with that bolding she 
might weB have doubled four 
spades or split her honors. So 


EAST 
*QJ9 
9 — 

0 — 
*K54 
SOUTH 
A 10 8 6 
9 — 

9 — 

*Q96 


NORTH 
4 A 7 
9 A KQ J 
v A 10 9 
* A 87 2 


WEST(D) 

AS 

9763 

CKQJ8765 
* J10 


EAST 

*QJ943 

99852 

02 

+ K54 


Oft July 24: “American Impression¬ 
ism and FtaaMsm: The Panting ot 
Modem Life, 1S85-1915." Metropol¬ 
itan Museum, New York. 


she put up tbe king, hoping to 
in honor on her left, and 


collect anl-- 

was discomforted when West 
discarded. 


She cashed four heart win- 


South had taken the first sev¬ 
en tricks, and needed three 
more. She led a diamond from 
dummy, and East could not af¬ 
ford to ruff. She discarded, and 
South ruffed. She then crossed 
to the club ace and led the last 


SOUTH 
* K10S6 2 
9 W4 
443 
*Q963 


la n guages. However, in my opin¬ 
ion, this book, like “Christianity, 
Social Tolerance, and Homosex¬ 
uality,” demonstrates that Bos¬ 
well lacks advanced skills in sev¬ 
eral major areas, notably 
intellectual history and textual 
analysis. The embattled com¬ 
plexities of medieval theology 
and the ambiguous nuances of 
language and metaphor familiar 
to us from great literature seem 
beyond his grasp. Speculative 
reasoning is not his strong suit 

Boswell argues that homo¬ 
sexual marriages of some kind 
were widely accepted in classi¬ 
cal antiquity and that tbe medi¬ 
eval church simply continued 
the pagan practice. But his 
weak, disorganized and anec¬ 
dotal material on Greek and 
Roman culture never proves 
such marriages existed outside 
die imperial Roman smart set, 
whose cynical “dolce vita” dec¬ 
adence he does not see. 

Insisting that heterosexual 
marriage Had no prestige and 
was “primarily a property ar¬ 
rangement” in antiquity, he re¬ 
peatedly portrays Achilles and 
Patroclus as lovers (a Hellenis¬ 
tic fantasy not in Homer), while 
shockingly never mentioning 
Odysseus and Penelope, one of 
the most famous marital bonds 
in literary history. 

The question of pagan surviv¬ 
als in Christianity is a fascinat¬ 
ing one, but Boswell neglects the 
most obvious facts critical fra- his 
larger argument. Gnosticism 
and Neoplatonism are never 
dealt with. Addressing the am¬ 
bivalent Judeo-Christian atti¬ 
tude toward sexuality, he shows 
no understanding of basic philo¬ 
sophic problems of body and 
soul, matter and spirit, 

Boswells treatment of the 
Middle Ages, ostensibly his spe¬ 
cialty, is strangely unpersuasive. 
The subftmmal sexual tension 
and process of sublimation in 
asceticism and monastidsm, 
also prominent in Asian reii- 
gions, are never honestly exam¬ 
ined. 


North and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

West North East South 

4 * DM. Pass 4* 

Pass Pass Pass 

West led the diamond king. 


Camille Pagtia. professor of 
Unive 1 


humanities at the University of 
the Arts in Philadelphia, and the 
author of "Sexual Personae," 
and the forthcoming “Vamps and 
Tramps," wrote this for The 
Washington Post 



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Walking to Goma, 
An Endless Line 


By Raymond Bonner 

New York Times Semite 

GOMA, Zaire—Death struck Thursday with a vengeance. 

More dan 800 dead, many wrapped in straw mats or pieces 
of doth, lay along a 5-kilometer (3-mile) stretch of road from 
the center of Goma to Munigi. 

At Munigi, a small boy walked barefoot across the volcanic 
rock carrying a bundle in his outstretched arms. Wrapped 
inside the dirty piece of doth was his little sister. 

As he lay her gently on the rock, a few tears ru nn i n g down 
his face, two men carried a woman in a blue and yellow 
striped shirt and pleated skirt by the arms and legs. They 
dropped her on the rocks — along with the other bodies. 

A nrmn sprayed the bodies with a disinfectant- Volunteers 
wearing gauze masks picked the bodies off the ground and 
heaved them onto pickups. There were not enough trucks. A 
dump truck arrived It was quickly filled. 

A little gjri in a pink dress with curly black hair, who was 
5 fyn Wednesday sitting alone beside her dead mother, was 
stED at the Thursday. But no longer alone. She sat with 
two other tiny girls. No one knew who they were or where 
their mothers were. ... 

“We can’t do anything, I am afraid. They just die and die 
piM die, and they keep coming and coining and coming,” said 
Dr. Florence Parent, of the international relief organization. 
Doctors Without Borders, as she tried to move among a thick 
congestion of people lying on the ground at Munigi. 

Laboratory tests have confirmed that cholera is the killer. 
The fortunate stricken had a relative or friend standing over 
them, holding a saline solution that dripped through a tube 
into their arms. “We can’t cope,” said Dr. Parent 

That is what relief workers were saying even before the 
outbreak of cholera. Now, they say that the world's armies 
must come. To fight another humanitarian war, as they did 
for the Kurds who fled Saddam Hussein in 1991. 

“It is an overwhelming task that cannot be responded to 
with traditional methods,” said Filippo Grand!, head of an 
emergency team that has been sent to Rwanda. “It will have 
to involve military contingents.” 

The arrival of nearly a million refugees in less than a week is 
the greatest refugee migration in such a short period that the 
relief community has ever faced. 

In addition, the refugees have arrived in an area where there 
are few suitable sites for camps and very little water. Logisti¬ 
cal obstacles increase the nightmares for the relief communi- 



_cargo jets . .. 

'It is discouraging that all we have been able to accomplish 
so far is move people to sites,” Mr. Grandi said. And that is 
far from a success at this point. 

After more than a week, the columns of walking refugees 
move unbroken for more than 30 kilometers along the road 
north, out of Goma. 


Deputies Back Santer as EU Chief 


BOSNIA: Serbs Seek More Talks 


Continued from Page 1 

quire them to give up 30 percent 
of the territory they now hold. 

The declaration remained a 
secret until Thursday when the 
Reuters news agency obtained a 
copy of it in Geneva, where the 
waning parties were meeting to 
deliver their responses to repre¬ 
sentatives of the Contact 
Group. 

The Bosnian Serbs’ stand 
provoked signs of an emerging 
rift within the Contact Group, 
with the United States, Germa¬ 
ny and France all indicating it 
was unacceptable while the 
Russian foreign minister, An¬ 
drei V. Kozyrev, called it “rath¬ 
er positive” and ”not devoid of 
logic.” Creating such a rift is 
thought to be one of the prima¬ 
ry objectives of the Bosnian 
Serbs at this stage. 

In Paris, a Foreign Ministry 
spokeswoman, Catherine Co- 
lonna, said the Bosnian Serb 
reply was “not acceptable,” and 
that there could be no further 
negotiations before the foreign 
ministers of the Contact Group 
meet July 30 to decide what 
action to take next. 

The five Contact Group gov¬ 
ernments have threatened to 
tighten sanctions os Serbia, the 
main military and political sup¬ 
porter of the Bosnian Serbs, 
and to lift Lhe arms embargo on 
the Muslim-Croat federation if 
the Bosnian Serbs refused to go 
along with the plan. 

In Bonn, German Foreign 
Minister Klaus Kinkel said the 
Bosnian Serb response was 
“disappointing” and would 
have to be judged as saying 
“no” unless there was a change 
before the meeting of the for¬ 
eign ministers. 

But in Moscow, the deputy 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, 
Mikhail Danurin, said Russia 
would insist on further negotia¬ 
tions with the Bosnian Serbs’ 
leadership before that meeting 
“to better understand what 
their preoccupations are and al¬ 
low them to better explain their 
point of view.” 

The Russians appear to be 


supporting the Bosnian Serbs' 
strategy of prolonging the nego¬ 
tiations in order to avoid addi¬ 
tional punitive measures either 
on the Bosnian Serbs or Serbia. 


Compiled by Our Sujf From Dispatches 

STRASBOURG. France — 
The European Parliament nar¬ 
rowly approved the nomination 
of Luxembourg's prime minis¬ 
ter as the European Union's 
new chief executive on Thurs¬ 
day, averting a crisis with the 
Union's national governments. 

The assembly voted 260 to 
238 to support Jacques Santer's 
nomination for the European 
Commission job, with 23 ab¬ 
stentions. 

“I think that the European 
Parliament has shown itself 
worthy of the powers that have 
been given to it,” Mr. Santer 
said with apparent relief just 
after the vote. 

But during the debate on his 
nomination, many deputies 
questioned Mr. Santer’s fitness 
to step into the job, now occu¬ 
pied by Jacques Delors of 
France. 

A Dutch Liberal Gijs de 
Vries, described the nominee as 
“a man of the past,” and a Bel¬ 
gian Socialist, Raymonde Duty, 
said Mr. Santer had been of¬ 
fered “a poisoned chalice” by 
the major powers that proposed 

him 

Parliament’s lukewarm en¬ 
dorsement c> Mr. Santer ended 
a chapter of uncertainty in 
Union politics that began with 
Britain's veto of Prime Minister 
Jean-Luc Dehaene of Belgium 
as Mr. Delors’s successor. 

Pauline Green of Britain, 
leader of the Socialist group, 
the biggest in the 567-member 
Parliament, said the German 
presidency should have consult¬ 
ed the assembly after Britain 
vetoed Mr. Dehaene. 

Accusing the Council of Min¬ 
isters of engaging in only stage- 
managed consultation with Par¬ 
liament, she said: “If there is a 
crisis of confidence, it belongs 
fairly and squarely at the door 
of the council ” 

That veto, imposed against 
the 11 other member-states at 
last month's Union summit on 
the Greek island of Corfu, led 
to a hectic round of political 
consultations to see who else 
could command a consensus. 

Mr. Santer was nominated by 
a special EU summit meeting in 
Brussels July IS, but many Eu¬ 
ropean members of Parliament 



Jacques Delors, left, talking with his successor as EU chief executive, Jacques Santer. 


were unhappy with the proce¬ 
dure, from the behind-the- 
scenes bargaining to the feeling 
that Mr. Santer’s nomination 
represented a lowest comm cm 
denominator. 

“Fm a common denomina¬ 
tor, of course, because I was 
chosen by the 12,” Mr. Santer, 
57, said at a news conference. 
“If I’m the lowest, I don’t 
know.” 

“You have to judge me on my 
actions,” he added. 

The vote Thursday was not 
binding. In December, the Par¬ 
liament will vote to accept or 
reject the entire 17-member Eu¬ 
ropean Commission, including 
the chief executive. 

Mr. Santer said he would try 
to win over those who were 
skeptical about him. 


d<^'ir B ^ a dccSan m ^ RACE: Blacks Press for Equality 

their view of a final peace settle- 

meat is substantially different Continued from Page 1 


from that of the Contact Group 
as well as of the Muslim-Croat 
federation. 

The declaration began by re¬ 
ferring to “the former Bosnia- 
Herzegovina” and stating that 
there are already “two states” in 
existence, the self-proclaimed 
Republic of Srpska and the 
Mudun-Goat federation. 


The Bosnian Serbs also said 
that until six additional issues 
were resolved as part of an 
overall peace package they 
would make no decision on the 
Contact Group’s proposal for 
the partition of Bosnia. 

Among the issues the Bosni¬ 
an Serbs want to resolve are 
their share of the capital city, 
Sarajevo, that is scheduled to 
remain under United Nations 
administration for two years; 
access to the sea fm- (heir repub¬ 
lic; details of the cessation of 
hostilities and how the whole 
plan would be implemented. 

They also said they wanted to 
negotiate first “constitutional 
arrangements," an apparent 
reference to the legal status of 
the Bosnian Serbian republic 
and whether it will be allowed 
to join in a confederation with 
Serbia, as the Muslim-Croat 
federation plans to do with Cro¬ 
atia. 

As for the partition maj 
seated by the Contact 
the Bosnian Serbian declara¬ 
tion said “further work is re¬ 
quired,” although the proposed 
borders could serve “In consid¬ 
erable measure as a basis for 
further negotiations.” 

After further talks on all 
these issues, it said, ” the Re¬ 
public of Srpska shall be decid¬ 
ing on the complete peace 
plan” 


company recorded a 70 percent 
increase in days lost to strikes in 
the second quarter of this year, 
compared with the same period 
a year ago. 

The most visible strike re¬ 
cently was a salary and work¬ 
ing-conditions dispute between 
$50-a-week black store clerks 
and Re ’n Pay, one of the na¬ 
tion’s largest supermarket 
chains. When stick-wielding 
strikers threatened shoppers 
and managers at several stores, 
the new government sent in the 
police, who used rubber bullets 
to disperse strikers and injured 
more than 200 of them. 

The white business establish¬ 
ment was relieved at the show 
of force; it was almost as if the 
new government had passed an 
initiation rite IQ maintaining 


public order. Conversely, the 
black labor union 


movement 
felt betrayed. Though President 
Nelson Mandda has mended 
fences with black unions, the 
relationship between old allies 
seems likely to remain a diffi¬ 
cult one. 

As telling as the action has 
been inside supermarkets, the 
more symbolic labor unrest of 
the post-apartheid era has been 
mines, which have been 


m 


the 


s weak 


r source of this coun- 
for the past centu- 


pre- 


ry- 


Race relations in South Afri¬ 
ca’s gold mines are both a mi¬ 
crocosm and a caricature of the 
larger society. More than 85 
percent of skilled miners are 
white, and they earn, on aver¬ 
age, roughly 10 times the salary 
of unskilled mine laborers, vir¬ 
tually all of whom are black. 

A 2911 statute that made it 
illegal for mining companies to 
award skilled blasters’ certifi¬ 
cates to blacks was taken off the 


CROSSWORD 


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Solution to Puzzle of July 21 


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MUtrMpMHMl 

© New York TmeS Edited by Will Shorty 


“Of course it’s not an easy 
task,” he said, “but I will do this 
with my customary obstinacy 
and determination.” He de¬ 
scribed his motto as: “Not too 
strong cm formality but tough 
when it comes to action.” 

The suspense about the out¬ 
come of the vote was pushed to 
the limit fry a last-minute check 
that voting machines were 
working. 

The Christian Democratic 
group, second largest in the as¬ 
sembly, mustered all but 5 of its 
157 deputies for an endorse¬ 
ment of Mr. Santer, a fellow 
party member. 

The Socialists, Parliament’s 
biggest group, were divided, 
with mainly British, German 
and French Socialists voting 
against Mr. Santer, but the 


Spanis 

Greeks' 


books in 1988. Since then about 
a quarter of all new blasting 
certificates have gone to non¬ 
whites —too many, say whites, 
who worry about declining 
standards and job competition, 
and too few, say blacks, who 
worry about tokenism. 

It has always been the custom 
in South African mines to allow 
the skilled miners—the whites 
—to go to the head of the line 
for elevators at the end of their 
shifts. 

But the ritual is an inevitable 
source of friction at the end of 
long hours in stifling condi¬ 
tions. “You sometimes have to 
wait an hour or more,” said 
Kenneth Buda. a black mine 
Laborer. “And it makes you mad 
when the whites go in front.” 

Sporadic incidents have 
flared over the years, and some 
major mining houses have halt¬ 
ed the practice. 

Last month a group of black 
workers at one Gold Field mine 
prevented whites from board¬ 
ing elevators. Punches flew, and 
a standoff lasted several hours. 

The next day 183 white min¬ 
ers who belong to the all-white 
Mineworkers’ Union staged a 
brief walkout, claiming it was 
not safe for them to go under¬ 
ground. 

Several other stabbings and 
beatings have occurred, with 
blood spilled on both sides of 
the color fine. 

“The thing we fear most with 
the coming of South Africa’s 
big political change is a break¬ 
down of discipline,” said Flip 
Buys, organizing secretary of 
the white union, which repre¬ 
sents about 20,000 skilled min¬ 
ers. “You can’t run a mine in an 
atmosphere where a boss says 
one dung and a worker says, ’I 
have my rights. You can’t make 
me do that.’ ” 


The Comet Show on Jupiter 
May Last for Several Weeks 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

New York Tuna Semite 


NEW YORK —As the spectacular show caused by comet 
fragments striking Jupiters pockmarked face continued, 
some scientists now say that more fragments of the cornet 
Shoemaker-Levy 9 will be hitting Jupiter for several weeks. 

As many as five huge impact scan at a time have come into 
view an Jupiter’s face in recent days. 

Besides drilling great holes in Jupiter’s upper atmosphere, 
comet fragments hitting the planet sparked a stammering 
display of auroral light, as electrically charged particles creat¬ 
ed by the impacts interacted with the atmosphere Although 
there are frequent auroral discharges on Jupiter, die light 
from the current one can be seen by even small telescopes: 

Contrary to earlier predictions, the show may not com¬ 
pletely end Friday, whoa the lasting fragment of the comet is 
to slam into Jupiter. 

Three of the astrophysicists who have been calculating the 
Fate of the comet since it was discovered last year, Zdenek 
Sekauma, Paul W. Chodas and Donald K. Yeomans, all of the 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California predicted 
that a storm of cometaiy impacts would continue to hit 
Jupiter until the end of Septeml 

None of the comet fra 

were expected to be as large as those now churning op the 
planet’s atmosphere, they said. 

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory team also had good news 
for sky watchers, both professional and amateur: Any im¬ 
pacts between next Wednesday and Sept. 22 will be on the 
side of Jupiter faring the Earth, and- will be abfe to be 
observed directly. 


BOMB: Smidisonian ls Challenged 


Continued from Page 1 

exhibit “a package of insults” 
and then refused to be inter¬ 
viewed by exhibit curators. 

Assuming that the exhibit 
takes place as scheduled next 
May at the Air and Space muse¬ 
um, the most physically impos¬ 
ing artifact to be displayed is 
the restored forward fusdage of 
the Enola Gay itself. 

Veterans who see the Enola 
Gay as a symbol not of nuclear 
destruction but of a successful 
military mission to save lives 
have gathered 10,000 signatures 
on petitions demanding that the 
plane be displayed “proudly 
and pamoticafiy’’ or moved to 

Hfirttner miiwrm 


advisers to scrutinize the script. 
Some of their recommendations 
were accepted. Many were not/ 
Even the outgoing Smithsonian 
secretary, Robert McC Adams, 
raised concerns about balance. 

“The overall impression, 
even from tins revised script,” 
said Mr. Haitian, ~“is that .the 
Japanese, despite 15 years of 
aggression,-atrocities and brat- 
ratify, were the victims. The cu-. 
raters who wrote the script are 
s till pushing the tHwas that, the 
atomic bomb shouldn’t have' 
been dropped.” 

“We don't do things to raise 
controversy,” said the museum 




L .S. and Seoul Vow 
Again to Aid North 
jf.It Ends A-Plans 


Reurea 

SEOUL—The United States 
and Sooth Korea, salting a for¬ 
mula for deafiog with the new 
North Korean leadership, re¬ 
newed cm Thursday an offer of 

economic assistance and diplo¬ 
matic hdp if Pyongyang drops 
any unclear arms program,. 
Seoul officials said. 

The conciliatory remarks 
g. day after Seoul had de¬ 
nounced North Korea's latfi 
president, Kim II Sung, as a war 
c riminaL 

In response, Pyongyang 
called the South’s criticism a 
“dedaration of war.” But ana¬ 
lysts played down the vrar of 
words. 

The offer of help came at the 
end. of a meeting in Seoul be¬ 
tween Assistant Secretary of 
State Robert L. GaDmxd and 
' the Foreign Minister, Han Sung 
Joo, their first since Mr. Kim’s 
son, Kim Jang H, assumed pow¬ 
er. 

The two countries said they 
would “actively assist” Pyong¬ 
yang in upgrading its nuclear 
reactor for 


deli 


,te to the talks, came to 
w _to start a series of meet¬ 

ings. with officials in four na- 
^ aimed at charting strategy 
on dealing with the new leader¬ 
ship in North Korea. • _ 
^He is to visit Japan, China 
and Russia this month. 

While Mr. Gallueri was talk¬ 
ing in Seoul, North Korea de¬ 
nounced Prime Minister Lee 

Yung Dug’s assertion that Kim 
B.Susg had started the Korean 
War in 1950 and with that act of 
aggression prolonged the split 
MmeKorean Peninsula. 

“The reckless words are not 
merely a slanderous remark 
against us but an official decla¬ 
ration of war,” the North Kore¬ 
an statement said. 

South Korean analysts were 
not disturbed. 

“Such a response is well ex¬ 
pected and does not amount to 
a. change in Pyongyang's poli¬ 
cy,” said Yu Suk RyuL a cfirec- 
'* Foreii 


Min- 


lt 


gave up any nuclear arms amb*- 


and 

; voting in favor. 

Two-thirds of the liberals, 
opposed Mr. Santer, as did the 
Greens the Communists. 

The nominee earlier presmt- 
ed to the body a broad view of 
the priorities . the commission 
would follow under his leader¬ 
ship over the nest five years. 
His term begins in January. 

He said the EU most recon- 

citizens that^ropean^^^ 
tion is an unavoidable necessi¬ 
ty. And he said that the integra¬ 
tion process needed a' new 
stimulus. Another priority 
would be to generate economic 
growth, without which, he said, 
endemic unemployment will 
never be eradicated. 

(AP, Reuters) 


tkms, a Foreign Ministry offi- 

V They confirmed that to re¬ 
solve the nuclear issue com¬ 
pletely, “nuclear transparency 
present and. future should be 
guaranteed, and the truth be¬ 
hind past nuclear activities 
should be clarified,” said the 
South’s offi cial for nuclear af¬ 
fairs, KimSam Hoorn ’ 

, man said^Lhat MSvGfoSfucci and 
Mr. Han .had affirmed that 
. Pyongyang should freeze its nu¬ 
clear program if it wanted to 
carry forward its high-level 
talks with the United States in 
Geneva, which were suspended 
after the death of Kim 0 Sung. 

[U.S. and North Korean ne¬ 
gotiators agreed “in principle” 
Thursday on a date to resume 
talks on the North's nuclear 
program, the White House an¬ 
nounced, according to Tire As¬ 
sociated Press. The press secre¬ 
tary, Dee Dee Myers, said the 


tor-general at the 
istxys Institute of Foreign 
Affairs and National Security. 
“X don’t think it will have any 
impar t on U.S.-North Korean 
talks or even inter-Korean rela¬ 
tions in broad terms.” 

A Foreign Ministry spokes¬ 
man said that Mr. Gallucci and 
Mr. had reaffirmed the ne¬ 
cessity to coordinate policy to 
i»rfp end North. Korea’s isola¬ 
tion in the world community. 

Both nations are prepared to 
bear some "financial or other 
burden” to convert North Ko¬ 
rea’s'graphite atomic reactors 
to safer fight-water systems, he 
said, adding that their policy on 
North Korean nuclear issues re¬ 
mains unchanged despite Kim 
H Sung’s death. 

Deputy Prime Minister Lee 
Hong Koo of South Korea told 
Mr. Gallucci the North-South 
presidential summit meeting 
planned before Kim fl Sung’s 
death was stffl an in principle, 
even though it had been post¬ 
poned. 

• lit North Korea on Wednes¬ 
day,- the ruling elite publicly 
swore allegiance to Kim Jong ti, 
who is 52. 

At a huge rally in the heart of 


agreement was reachedbetween' Pyongyang, representatives of 
negotiators in New York. They the Communist Party, govem- 


will turn to their g overnm ents 
to confirm the date, winch will 
then be announced.] 

Mr. GaRucci, tile chief U-& 


ment. 


military arid social 
called Mm their new 
and pledged unity be¬ 
hind him 


Han Xu Is Dead at 70, 



on 


• -By, Seth Prison. 

New York Tima Semite - 

NEW YORK—Han Xu, 70, 
a senior Chinese diplomat 
whose lifelong association with 
the United States included a 
four-year tour as ambassador to 
Washington in the 1980s, died 
Tuesday in Beijing of cancer, 
tire official New China News 


r. Han’s career was king 
intertwined with Chinese- 
Aurerican-relations. He helped 
rescue downed' American fight¬ 
er pilots in World War H He 
played a key role in President 
Richard Nixon’s, groundbreak¬ 
ing 1972 trip to Beijing, and, 
finally, he was one of China’s 
main spokesmen to the United 
States after the Tiananmen 
Square crackdown in 1989. 

ious and fluent- in. 
he became, so popular 
m Washington that when he 
was recalled from a 1973-79 
tour as the deputy head of the 
Chinese Liaison Office, 30 
members of Congress gave, him 
a farewell party.' - 
“He was vivacious, charming 
and tough, 1 * said Michel G. Ok- 
senberg, who worked with, him 
during the negotiations that" 
preceded China’s normaliza¬ 
tionof relations with the Unit 
ed States in 1979. 

Like many othor suxxessful 
• members of 


dose of traditional Chinese 
painting, for which he retained 
a passion throughout his life. 

He attended Yanjjng Univer¬ 
sity in Beijing, joining a Com¬ 
munist movement that brought 
him into contact with Zhou En- 
lai, later "prime minister. 

' • He once told an interviewer 
that he had saved cunency 
notes signed by the American 
pilots he helped rescue. 

After the Communist victory, 
he rose through die ranks of the 
Foreign Ministry, serving as a 
counselor in the Chinese Em¬ 
bassy in.Moscow in 1964-65. 

He bccamehead of the minis¬ 
try’s Protocol Office, a position 
of importance in a country, 
where protocol was supreme, 
shortly before China’s reconcQ- 
iatkm with the United States. 

In 1974-75; Mr. Han’s job 
brought him in contact with an¬ 
other American be would work 
with over the years, George 
Bush, who headed the U.S. Li¬ 
aison Office in Beijing. 

“Han Xu was an outstanding 
representative of China,” Mr. 
Bosh said Wednesday. “Barba¬ 
ra aikl I knew him well when Xu 
was chief of protocoL He repre¬ 
sented his country with great 


China’s: Foreign 


Ministry, Mr. Han came from 
an elite background. His father 


was a judge in. the high court of 
the Nationalist government,. 


i go 

winch was defeated and driven 
to Taiwan in 1949. 

Bom in Beijing in 1924, Mr. 


director. “This has been a jay Han went to adnafe and 
painful sort of experience.” his education included aLeavy 

To most Americans then, the ■ ■' ■ - ■ ■ __ 

atomic bomb posed no great titota tutu-v a 

S'SSSSS RWANDA; Refugees Dying . ■ 

conditional surrender without 


s 


H 




& 


iSn 


^:e 


the cost in lives of an invasion, 
particularly after the bloody 
battle of Okinawa. In their 
minds, it was all quite simple: 
Japan was the aggressor, an is¬ 
land nation of unyielding fanat¬ 
ics and anything to end the war 
without having to invade Japan 
was worth it 

Military planners estimated 
upwards of 800,000 Americ an 
casualties woukl have resulted 
from an invasion of Japan. 

Last month the SnwhwniBn 
issued its second and latest ex¬ 
hibit script, dated May 31 and 
described as a finished product. 

As recently as April, Mr. 
Harwit noted in a memo, “We 
do have a lack ofbalance and 
much of the criticism leveled 
against us is understandable.” 
He appointed a new team of 


spite the fact that most of the 
estimated half-million Rwan¬ 
dans massacred since April 
were Tutsi The front warned 
cm Thursday that it would take 
hush measures against looters 
in *’ —* 


fioals said Thursday that hate- 
m on gf rin g broadcasts from a 
mobile radio appeared to have 
stopped. 

The United Nations man¬ 
aged to deliver some food to 


was really outstanding . 
in his appreciation of aB our . ■ 
problems, said John Holder- [ 
former assistant secretary •- 
of state for East .Aria and the .; 
Pacific, .who met Mr. Han in ~ 
Beijing, “And he was very adept _ 
at making his government’s po¬ 
sitions understandable to. us.” 

E. Frederic Morrow, 88, 

Blade Aitteto Elsenhower 
c NEW YORK (NYT)— E . 
Frederic Morrow, a retired' 
banker, author and executive 
assistant to President Dwight 
D. Eisenhower, died Tuesday of X. 
complications of a stroke,at- 
Mount Sinai Hospital in Man- 
h att aiL He was 88 and lived in 
Manhattan. 

Mr. Morrow was the "first 1- 
black lo reach an executivepo-. 
sitioQ at the White House and 
the first to serve as a vice preri- 




* 


two huge camps for the first _ „ 

& telhng «ty the camps were hampered 

Hutu to follow thor govern- ItydemandsltyRwandanAjnw 
ment into exile. But French of- troops ior a cut of the supplies. 


V 


than the world's largest private-' 

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TO OUR REAPERS IN lUXEMBQliPft 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
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rm and an authority'.*-" 1 * . » 
foyce, died July v 

of a heart attack; in.;. V 


Massachc- 


Egremont, 

setts. . . 

Efizabefli Yamsshite, 67, a 
former reporter, university pro-, 
frasor and head of two college 
journalism^ departments, (tiro 


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3 THE TRIB INDEX: 113 , 29 $ 

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!' ?X|2*2®*onNy insvestable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
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- jf| World Index 

*• " V The index tracks US. ttaker values erf stocks he Tokyo.' Mem York, London, and 
. , . ArganKna, Auatrab, Austria, BuJgKim, Brazil, Canada, ChRa, Danmark, Finland. 
’ franco, Gamany, Hong Kong, Italy. Madco. Nanwrtanils. Mem Zsatand, Norway, 
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Energy 111.90 itefiO -0-68 CapMGood«__ 

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■ 'dty <}.•*: » 


liberty Media Joins in QVC Bid 

Comcast, Gaining an Ally, Changes Offer to All Cash 


Compiled Ip Oar Stuff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — liberty Media Coip, 
said Thursday h would join Comcast 
Corp.’s effort to acquire QVC Inc, and 
the companies said the $22 billion offer 
would consist entirely of cash, dropping 
an earlier securities component of the bid. 

Traders said the offer was an improve^ 
meat over the previous Comcast bid but 
that it disappointed investors, who had 
been hoping for a higher bid for the 
home-shopping concern. QVCs stock 
fell $1.75 to S4425, just above the $44 
value of the revised offer. 

But Dennis McAJpine, research direc¬ 
tor with Josephthal Lyon & Ross, said 
the offer had failings, compared with 
Comcast's original stock-and-cash bid, 
because an all-cash offer requires QVC 
- shareholders to pay more in taxes. 

Comcast originally offered $37 a share 
in cash and $7 in preferred stock for the 
shares in QVC it does not already own. 

From its headquarters in West Ches¬ 
ter, Pennsylvania, QVC said it would 
review the new offer and continue to 
explore alternatives in order to maximize 
shareholder value. 


The two bidders already own stakes of 
nearly 20 percent each in QVC. a cable- 
tdevision home shopping network oper¬ 
ator run by Barry Diller. 

Mr. Diller built up QVC in recent 
years but has harbored ambitions to run 
more than a shopping service. He failed 
in a bid to acquire Paramount Commu¬ 
nications Inc, which was acmrired by 
Viacom Inc, then tried to purchase CBS 
Inc- only to have his plan foiled when 
Comcast bid for QVC. Mr. Diller previ¬ 
ously worked for News Corp.'s Fox net¬ 
work, which he expanded, and before 
that was 31 Paramount. 

Liberty, a cable-programming affiliate 
of TdeCommuntcanoos Inc., would 
own 43 percent of QVC if the takeover is 
completed. The companies agreed that 
Comcast, with its 57 percent stake, 
would manage QVC 
John Malone, the head of Tele-Com¬ 
munications, was said last week to be 
unhappy about Comcast’s bid for QVC 
because it would gain control of the com¬ 
pany at a bargain price. He was rumored 
to have been considering a rival bid. 

The Libcrty-Comcast joint acquisition 
will hoist antitrust red flags, analysts 


warn, because Tele-Communications 
owns a controlling stake in QVCs main 
rival Home Shopping Network Inc. Bui 
some analysis said the companies must 
have taken this into consideration, per¬ 
haps by planning a disposal of the Home 
Shopping stake by Telecommunications. 

Liberty and Comcast originally joined 
to make QVC into a cable powerhouse by 
persuading the high-profile Mr. Diller to 
join the company, Liberty and Comcast 
also supported Mr. Diller, who holds 125 
percent of QVCs shares, in his failed 
attempt to take over Paramount- 

Liberty’s Class A shares rose 813 
cents to S21.063, while Philadelphia- 
based Comcast, a cable-television opera¬ 
tor, was up 87.5 cents, at SI6.75. Com¬ 
cast also provides cellular telephone 
services and owns the Muzak back¬ 
ground music syssem. 

Comcast operates cable television sys¬ 
tems serving about three million sub¬ 
scribers. Liberty operates cable televi¬ 
sion systems serving about 3.2 milli on 
subscribers and has interests in several 
cable programming ventures. 

(Knight-Ridder. Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Bundesbank Happy With German Signs 


Far mote Information about the index, a booklet is avaiaUe tree of charge. 

Witte to Trib Index, 181 Avenue Charles de GauBg,'B25P1 NeuBy Codex, France. 

C tfitarnolional HarakJ Titwno 


WALL STREET WATCH 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Inflation, 
the Bundesbank's arch enemy, 
and money supply, its mam 
compass, arc both pointing in 
the right direction —lower. Bui 
they are not moving as decisive¬ 
ly as Europe's most powerful 
central bank would like, it said 
Thursday after taking its mid¬ 
year bearings. 

“To be happy, we'd have to be 
in the comdor,” Bundesbank 
President Hans Tietmeyer said, 
referring to the central bank’s 4 
percent-to-6 percent target range 
for full-year money supply 
growth, which signals a near- 
term level of inflation the 
Bundesbank considers tolerable. 

But the indicators point “in 
the right direction,” and the 
Bundesbank “hopes that win 
continue,” he said. 

Mr. Tietmeyer said M-3 


'Style’ Loses Its Substance 


By Leslie Eaton 

New York Tima Service 


X ^ Stan 


EW YORK — In the stock market, 
style is usually as important as sub¬ 
stance, But not this year. 


Style, as investment professionals use the 
word, does not refer to hemlines or lapel 
widths or the dtuffon-aiid-combat-booi look. 
On Wall Street, style means the way portfolio 
managers pick stocks and the kind of stocks 
they stay with. 

The appeal of investment styles is that 
when one is out, another is usually in. The 
nimble investor may be able to move from 
one style to another as they ebb and flow; 
conservative investors could cushion losses by 
owning funds with different approaches. 

But not this year. The two major style 
categories — growth and value -— are both 
losing, and by almost an identical amount, 
Wilshire Asset Management reports that its 
stock index funds that followed the value 
style of investing fell 5.06 percent in the first 
half while its growth funds fell 5.02 percent 

Value investing is sometimes described 
simply as buying cheap stocks. Its adherents 
look for stocks that are selling for relatively 
little, by comparison with their assets or eam- 

’"^ookmg at the 750largest stocks on Ameri¬ 
can markets, Wilshire categorizes as value 
stocks the 20 percent with the lowest pn- 
ce/earnings ratios, lowest price-to-book ra¬ 
tios and highest yields, amemg ot^ factors. 

But if value investors are ot the bird-m- 
the-hand” persuasion, growth investors go far 
the “two in the bush,” looking for companies 
that they expect to perform well in the future. 


Wilshirc’s growth index features companies 
with rapidly growing sales and earnings and 
high returns on equity. 

Over the long haul, these two Wilshire 
indexes have tnrned in quite sim i lar results. 
From 1978 through this year, the value in¬ 
dex's .average annual return has been 15.6 
percent, while the growth index’s return has 
been 143 percent ; 

But in the short rim, the two indexes tend 
to turn in very different results. Far example, 
in 1991, value rose 25.6 percent but growth 
zoomed 46.6 percent An extreme example 
occurred in 1981, when value gained 10.3 
percent while growth lost 10.7_percent 

These two styles will sometimes move to¬ 
gether for a ample erf months, often when the 
overall market is bad. For example, both 
phtnged during the quarter that included the 
market collapse erf 1987, though growth was 
tut harder thaw value. Both also ended that 
year with gains. 

But the last time these two indexes wen 
both down for two quarters in a row, as they 
are now, was more than a decade ago. in 1982. 
In the first half then, growth did far worse 
rb ? n value, bat it almost closed the gap in the 
fourth quarter and ended the year with a gain 
of 14.5 percent, compared with 15.8 percent 
for value. . 

Statistical junkies may take hope from that 
rebound and from the fact that not since 1978 
have both the big value and big growth index¬ 
es fallen for the year. 

This is not the case for the value and 
growth indexes that track smaller stocks, 
however. Both of those fell m 1987, and in 
1990, a terrible year for small stocks, both 
inHprfts plunged mare than 19 percenL 


money supply, the central 
bank’s most closely watched 
barometer of future inflation, 
had slowed to an annualized 
rate around 6 percent for the 
last three months, after bal¬ 
looning dangerously from Jan¬ 
uary to the end of March. 

In June alone, however, it 
still clocked in well above target 
at an armnaifywi n.3 percent 
over the fourth quarter of 1993. 

Germany’s chief central 
banker said It was “not very 
likely” that the Bundesbank 
will hit its target of 4 percent- 
to-6 percent growth for the 
year, but be said the Bundes¬ 
bank nevertheless would stick 
to its goal to avoid any impres¬ 
sion it had gone soft in its cam- 
paign against inflation. 

“well probably have to tol¬ 
erate a certain overshoot this 
year,” Mr. Tietmeyer said. 

The Bundesbank pat Ger¬ 
man interest rates, which dks- 


Sony to Close 
A Factory 
bijapan 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Sony Corp., 
which has been suffering from 
low sales and the high yen, said 
Thursday it will dose one of its 
factories in Japan early next 
year. 

The Atsuta plant in Nagoya, 
Sony’s first factory in Japan to 
close, has produced mainly 
printed circuit boards for video 
recorders and disk players. 

The work will be shifted to 
Sony’s Neagari plant, about 160 
kilometers (100 miles) to the 
north. 

Sony said it is asking the 210 
workers — less than 1 percent 
of the company’s total in Japan 
— whether they want to be 
transferred to Neagari or stay in 
Nagoya and work at other Sony 
affiliates. 

The Atsuta plant began oper¬ 
ating about 20 years ago. Its 
sales totaled roughly 10 billion 
yen ($100 million) last year. 

Both plants make parts for 
products aimed at die Japanese 
market 

In May, Sony Corp. reported 
that its consolidated profit 
plunged 57.8 percent, to 15.30 
billion yen, in the year ended 
March 31. Sales slipped 6 J per¬ 
cent, to 3.73 trillion yen. 

Japan has been in an eco¬ 
nomic recession for three years. 


rate rates throughout Europe, 
on hold at least until the end of 
August by leaving its key dis¬ 
count and Lombard rates, the 
floor and ceiling on German 
interest rates, unchanged at 45 
percent and 6.0 percent, respec¬ 
tively. 

It also announced it would 
allocate its benchmark securi¬ 
ties repurchase agreements, the 
instruments most relevant to 
markets, at a fixed 4.85 percent 
for the next four wedts. That is 
marginally lower than the last 
current rate of 4.88 p<pxnt. 

“We need tranquility” said 
Edgar Meiter, a Bundesbank 
governor, noting that any hint 
of its future interest-rate plans 
would have thrown already-vcrf- 
atfle markets into a tizzy. 

Mr. Tietmeyer sa'id the 
Bundesbank, like the U5. Fed¬ 
eral Reserve Board, was interest¬ 
ed in a “strong dollar,” as well as 
a strong Deutsche mark. Thurs- 


Page 9 


IBM Earnings 
Beat Estimates 
As Costs Drop 


day in London, the dollar closed 
at 15758 DM and 98.60 yea 

The Bundesbank's actions, 
which were echoed by stand-pat 
stances in Switzerland and Aus¬ 
tria, were welcomed by German 
government and business lead¬ 
ers. “Through this, the Bundes¬ 
bank underlines its duty to fol¬ 
low an anti-inflation policy and 
to limit the inflationary poten¬ 
tial contained in the current 
rapid expansion in money sup¬ 
ply,” the German Federation of 
Chambers of Commerce said. 

Mr. Tietmeyer said the cur¬ 
rent level of German interest 
rates was appropriate for the 
German economy, which re¬ 
cently began to pim itself out of 
its worst recession in decades. 

The Berlin-based DTW re¬ 
search institute; one of six inde¬ 
pendent economics think -t anks 

See SIGNS, Page 10 


Complied by Ov Staff From Disparities 

ARMONK, New York — In¬ 
ternational Business Machines 
Corp. reported second-quarter 
earnings of $689 million on 
Thursday, reversing a record 
loss a year earlier as expenses 
fdl. 

The company also said it was 
expanding its cost-cutting 
goals. 

Meanwhile, among the other 
UJS. companies reporting re¬ 
sults, CatepiUar Inc. had a re¬ 
cord quarter, reflecting demand 
for its tractors and construction 
equipment in the Americas and 
Asia. 

IBM earned 51.14 per share 
in the quarter ended June 30, 
far exceeding Wall Street’s ex¬ 
pectations of 73 cents per share. 
IBM stock climbed S525 to 
$61,125 in late trading on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

“Frankly, the earnings im¬ 
provements have come a bit 
faster than we thought they 
were even four or five months 
ago," Jerry York, chief finan¬ 
cial officer, said in a speech to 
analysts Thursday. 

In the second quarter a year 
ago, the company lost $40 mil¬ 
lion before a restructuring 
charge of $8.9 billion, the hug¬ 
est in its history. 

Revenue for the latest quar¬ 
ter were $15.4 biltion, down 
slightly from $155 billion a 
year ago- Since then, IBM sold 
a division that designed special¬ 
ized systems for government 
agencies. With that division ex¬ 
cluded from the year-ago fig¬ 
ures, revenues were up 3 per¬ 
cent in the latest period. 

IBM said sales were flat in ail 
regions except Asia, where it 
reported a 14 percent increase. 

Louis V. Gerstner Jr., chief 
executive, said he was pleased 
with the company’s progress. 
“We are still far from where we 
need to be, but we are showing 
steady improvement,” he said. 

The company also said it 
would aim to cut expenses by $8 


billion by 1996, raising its target 
from $7 billion announced ear¬ 
lier. At the end of June. IBM 
was more than half way to the 
larger target, having cut cumu¬ 
lative expenses by $4.8 billion. 

The company also plans to 
reach its goal of cutting 20,000 
jobs by the end of the year. 

IBM has been forced lo un¬ 
dergo radical changes to cope 

Coca-Cola picks its president and 
heir to chairman Page 10. 

with shifting demand from lu¬ 
crative mainframes and mini¬ 
computers to smaller and less- 
profitable personal computers. 

IBM also said its debt had 
declined S2.1 billion since Dec. 
31. to S25.2 billion as of June 
30. 

For the rest of the year. Je¬ 
rome B. York, chief financial 
officer, said he expected a 
stronger performance than in 
the second quarter. 

(AP. Bloomberg! 

■ Caterpillar Profit Soars 

Caterpillar's second-quarter 
net income more than tripled to 
$240 million from 567 million, 
Knight-Ridder reported from 
Chicago. Quarterly revenue 
rose 24 percent, to S3.61 billion, 
boosted! by a 21 percent in¬ 
crease in volume in the machin¬ 
ery and engines division. De¬ 
mand for construct] on products 
rose in North and South Ameri¬ 
ca and Asia, the company said. 

The results beat Wall Street’s 
expectations. 

United Auto Workers union 
members continue to strike ihe 
company, although Caterpillar 
said about 3,000 union mem¬ 
bers have crossed the picket line 
and are now working alongside 
management employees. Even 
if the strike continues, it will 
have “minimal impact on sales 

See EARNINGS, Page 11 








- 






CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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Janan 

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(mAMHiM 5M 5% 

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Sources: Reuters. BUxmben. Merrill 
lynch. Bank at Tokyo, Commerzbank. 
GreemtmH Montagu Cridtt Lyonnais. 

CoM 

am. pm. arse 

znrteft 30S35 3MJ0 —US 

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New York 3 IU 9 3 B 4 JD — IJ 0 

UXdoltars per ounce. LendanofRtdaillx- 
iimjTurkb and New York aeenk# and cka- 
Sag prices; New York Comas (August) 
Source: Reuters. 


LEADERSHIP EARNED 
0 NEJ 0 BATATIME. 



if «5 


At Fluor Daniel, we’re proud to be a world ur 
leader in engineering, construction and main- th 
tenance services. Yet we never forget how we o* 
got here. One job at a time. m 

Our mission is to give our clients a competi¬ 
tive advantage in their individual marketplaces, m 
We do this by being uncommonly responsive el 
to their specific needs. 

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delivery. That means whatever the scope or 


unique demands of your project, youll receive 
the benefits of our worldwide resources, technol¬ 
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making your job priority one. 

That’s why we provide more services to 
more industries in more places than anyone 
else. And why over 75% of our clients are com- 
■v panies we've previously served. 

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FLUOR DANIEL 

3333 Mlcheison Drive. Irvine, CA 92730 (714) 975-7100 ft 100 Fluor Daniel Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 (803) 281-8800 




Itv V 7 S 5 5. 








Earnings Reports 
Shake Up Equities 


NEW YORK — Wall Street 
turned in a mixed performance 
Thursday as positive second- 
quarter earnings reports were 
tempered by companies that 
/ailed to meet expectations and 
by some lingering inflation con¬ 
cerns. 

The Dow Jones industrial av¬ 
erage finished up 5.18 points, at 
3,73145, while declining stocks 


U.S. Stocks 


outnumbered gainers by an 11- 
to-9 ratio on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

In the bond market, trading 
was choppy as investors digest¬ 
ed prospects for the Federal Re¬ 
serve Board to raise interest 
rates soon to stop inflation 
from accelerating. 

The price of the 30-year Trea¬ 
sury bond was little changed, 
edging up 1/32 point to 84 
28/32. but prices of shorier-ma- 
turity notes and bills fell. The 
anti-inflation expectations were 
more important for the longer- 
maturity issues, while the short 
end of the market was affected 
by the immediate interest-rate 
picture. 

The yield on the long bond 
was steady at 7.54 percent, but 
the yield on 10-year notes rose 
to 7.25 percent from 7.23 per¬ 


cent Wednesday and the yield 
on three-year notes jumped to 
6.38 percent from 6.34 percent. 

IBM was the most actively 
traded Big Board stock, jump¬ 
ing 6 to 62% after reporting 
second-quarter earnings that 
doubled analysts' expectations. 

“The market today is one 
stock — IBM.” said Lawrence 
Rice, chief market strategist at 
Josephthal Lyon & Ross in 
New York. “That is the stoty of 
the day and the story of the 
week.” 

The Dow's gain would have 
been greater bad United Tech¬ 
nologies not reported worse- 
than-expected profits that sent 
the defense contractor’s stock 
down 3% to 62%. 

Johnson & Johnson rose 1% 
to 46% after a Merrill Lynch 
analyst raised his recommenda¬ 
tion on the maker of health-care 
products to above average from 
neutral in the intermediate term 
and to buy from neutral over 
the long term. The company re¬ 
ported strong earnings this 
week. 

In over-the-counter trading, 
Integrated Device Technology 
dropped 77/16 to 18% after the 
computer chipmaker’s cautious 
outlook for its financial second 
quarter eclipsed first-quarter 
results that increased three¬ 
fold. (AP, Bloomberg) 


SIGNS: Directions Are Correct 


Continued from Page 9 
in the country, on Thursday 
raised its forecast for 1994 
growth in the West German 
economy to 1_5 percent Previ¬ 
ously, the bearish institute had 
said the economy would proba¬ 
bly shrink. 

D1W now predicts that the 
pan-German economy will 
grow by 2.0 percent this year 
and by 2.0 percent in 1995. 

The Bundesbank's actions 
were in character for an institu¬ 
tion known for its indepen¬ 
dence and inertia. After years of 
telling markets that rapidly ex¬ 
panding M-3 was a strong 
warning of strong inflation to 
come, few observers expected 
the Bundesbank to turn around 
and say M-3 was irrelevant. 

Indeed, Mr. Tietmeyer and 
other Bundesbank governors 
said that M-3, which includes 


cash in circulation, 
its, time deposits under four 
years and most savings ac¬ 
counts, remains their guide of 
choice. 

“Our M-3 gpal contains an 
element of Goman stahQjiy- 
mindedness,” Mr. Tietmeyer 
said. 

When M3 becomes distorted 
by special factors that in them¬ 
selves do not forebode or fud 
inflation, however, the Bundes¬ 
bank takes lots of other indica¬ 
tors into consideration, he said. 

“As long as the other things 
tell us we're going in the right 
direction,” the Bundesbank is 
not as bothered by an M-3 over¬ 
shoot, he added. 

Hie M-3 target has been 
overshot for the last two years. 
The Bundesbank last cut its dis¬ 
count and Lombard rates on 
May 13. 


Vfct A«u 


Jut, 2\ 



iitWr-1:':.... 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Most Actives 


IBM 

ComPMS 

AutSec 

WMXTc 

EqiRsdn 

Humnno 

JonnJn 

UHncrs 

OoniC 

TeMMX 

refef 

Cadence 

Chase 

AT*T 


VO* Mob 

LOW 

Last 

CbO. 

86523 62% 

51 

63% 

-6ft 

5476* 32% 

31% 

31% 

T% 

41643 3% 

3ft 

3ft 

— ft 

3*732 29% 

2V 

29% 

‘ft 

34313 32% 

31% 

33% 

+ 1 

31479 17% 

lift 

17% 

+ % 

27665 *6ft 

44% 

%% 

+ 1% 

23933 44ft 

41% 

43% 

_ 

236*6 31% 

30% 

31 

— ft 

23438 30ft 

30 

311ft 

—•4 

73206 55V- 

54 

SSft 

+ % 

23030 «(* 

atT/i 

41% 

- « 

80097 14ft 

13% 

14 

♦ ft 

199)0 37ft 

36ft 

37 

+ ft 

19578 53% 

53% 

53% 

- ft 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


VOL Man 

LOW 

Last 

Chg. 


9*972 30% 

17% 

19% 

—7ft. 


53112 *8% 

©ft 

47% 

—% 


*7137 *2M 

36ft 

40% 





5Sr.-„ 



37388 15 1 4 

13% 

13% 

—ft 


37018 27ft 

24ft 

75% 



36970 22ft 

30ft 

23 



31576 36% 

33% 

36 



31165 38% 

37% 

33ft 

-9ft, 


39398 12ft 

11% 

12ft 

-ft. 


2918 lift 





35797 28ft 

26ft 

a 



33428 41ft 

40 

41% 


HchgA 

IDBCms 

23329 13% 
31455 10ft 

11 

10ft 

10% 

-y» 

AMEX Most Actives 


VOL Htoh 

LOW 

LOSt 

Chg. 


28277 1% 

1% 

1% 

-"w 

VSocmri 

10344 OV u 

4ft 

4% 



9672 11% 



+ v n 


81© 4ft 

% 

% 



5393 8% 





5190 6ft 

6 

6% 

+ % 


5108 31% 

37ft 

33ft 


VSocwtC 

4596 l>Vu 

1*1. 

1% 

*«l* 

NtPrtnt 

4413 Zft 

7W„ 

2ft 


Viacom 

4039 38 

36% 

38 

* 

Market Sales 


Today Prev. 

4:00 can. 

WYSE VSM 3OS09 

ABN* njj I5J93 

Nasdaq mil 30044 

In minions. 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Open 

tflgh Low Last 

an. 

tnrtui 3734JS 3744110 371*64 V22AS 

Troru IJMM I605J9 IS9L63 15978* 

Util 10X84 18X84 I81J3 182.18 

COmp 1293.10 1398.16 129085 129*44 

-5.18 

+2JO 

-4X44 

-102 

Standard & Poors Indexes 


Htoh Low Last 

Chg. 

SP100 

SP SOQ 

ncknlrioh 

Tramp. 

UMJtJes 

Rnanco 

421.12 41X38 43032 
65132 451.00 *5X61 
526.55 

386.70 38X58 38*45 
15534 
4*99 

•104 

-ran 
•0.12 
—0.13 
—014 
-029 

NYSE Indexes 


High LOW Lost 

Chg. 

Conrowe 

maustriais 

Tnancp 

unary 

Flnanoa 

25027 249J* 2500* 
30X93 307.71 30X52 
344J4 24U? 3 OM 
90*31 30539 706M 
711© 209J6 31032 

♦ ns* 

-Ma 

NASDAQ Indexes 


Mob Low Lost 

019. 

CermoWa 

(nausfrWs 

Banks 

Insurance 

Hrxnce 

Tronso. 

71X74 71X79 71X74 
72X36 77333 73*43 
76734 766.10 767.06 
08*07 ©602 88X02 
93232 93001 93X69 
71338 709JO 71200 

+ X97 
—l.II 
-083 
—1.© 
+001 
+060 

AMEX Stock Index 


Htoh Low Lost 

am. 



+03* 

Dow Jon 

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■nee 

20 Bonds 
WUtnittes 

10 moustriala 

dose 

97 JS 

9171 

1©J9 

Cbtoe 

— 006 
Unch. 
—032 

NYSE Diary 


dose Prev. 

AdvmKKd 

Declined 

Uncfioriood 

Tonal Issues 

NewHlgtiS 

New LOW* 

961 

1114 

768 

2843 

30 

63 

756 

M01 

470 

44 

AMEX Diary 


OoM Prev. 

Advanced 

Dedined 

Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New 

New LOW* 

288 

272 

237 

797 

4 

13 

225 

799 

6 

>1 

NASDAQ Diary 


dose Prev. 

Advanced 
Dad! netS 
Unchanged 
TOM Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 

1553 

1533 

1990 

5076 

66 

98 

1336 

17© 

1948 

5071 

in 


Metals 


dose . , 
BM Ask 
ALUMINUM IHWlCradrt 


Preview 

BM Ask 


Spof—" 750X00 MMJjO I5JW0 
mnwi-d 153240 U3MQ 154100 
COPPER CATHODES (MSB Qrodel 

g^ Wr, ’fflB"2S3a00 253100 253*40 
SSworf 2S39JJ0 2SA» 253840 253940 

I Ft ft 

K|^* PW " m sSl0 9 ’58440 STUB 59240 

r£wonl 4W40 MU" «*» 

NICKEL ^ ^ 

ST ** 6MLOO 0*540 

638540 639040 M3U0 M4040 

TIN 

541*40 542*40 

ZINC We tiM HM » SnMcl 

Sr mm WTn1ST 98X00 M 
Krwerd 108140 100X00 100UD MMD 


HhA Uw Lost Some Ortw 


Nay I&150 14040 1S1J5 U1J5 +0 l25 

OK 16335 14125 16175 1 0X +U0 

Jaa 14840 1*125 14*75 14*75 +125 

BN. votonto! 1UH4. Open M. 16312 - 


* 83 KS 

17.44.17.15 1706 1X48 +112 
T740 1745 1700 VM +0.14 

17.38 17.16 US* ' 1733- +114 

14.98 1638 1648 17J5 +H4 

17.18 17.10 17.10 17.21 +1M 

N.T. NX NX 17,17 +ftM 

AT. NX AT. H.T7 +0J4 

Est. volume: 29483. Omn bit 127,952 


Ocfl 

NOV 

Ok 

jcm 

FOB 


AM- 


Stock Indexes 


Spot CommodW— 


Caaunotftrv T4day Prav. 

Aluminum, lb 0883 14V 

Copper electrolytic, lb L20 l-M 

Iran FOB. ton 21740 21340 

Lead, ib ol 3B an 

Silver, rrov az 5.13 5X6 

Stem (scrap), ion 11947 11947 

Tin. lb 14V 188*7 

Zinc lb 14875 0485 


Financial 


9456 +041 

9341 —041 
9133 —043 

9178 —OW 
9133 —041 

7147 —101 

91X1 —041 

9131 -042 

91JI -042 
7T.W —10? 
nun uncti. 
90l79 +041 


wab Low cm* Change 

MftONTH STERUNO CUFFE1 
ISNM0 - Fts of 1M pet 
bg 9*60 9453 

M «.« «» 

Mar 9134 TJX? 

An nm nn 

sea 9234 9228 

DK S2JSB 91.92 

M«r 9132 9156 

Jap 9153 91.44 

Sap 91 3! 9126 

35 9146 VUM 

Mar 9047 TO© 

Jen N.T. N.T - 

Est. volume: 4*28* Open Ini.: 50381. 
S-MOMTH EURODOLLARS (UFfflJ 
SI inUBae-pb MW pci 
Sep 9*84 9*83 9444 —104 

DK 94.14 M.« *4.15 -049 

wr 90ji 73jn an — aor 

9141 9X40 9X41 —047 

s5 N.T. N.T. 9334 -047 

EOL vohline; SS6; 3501394. 

S4AQNTH EUROMARfOCUFFEI 
DMi ndMoa - Pti of M pci 

35 « 

JM £3 

35 SS 85 

Mar n» na 

AM 93J4 9305 

StP 9353 9350 

Dae 93J3 9333 

MM «.T7 93.T7 

inp fim fxm _ _ 

Ext. volume: 14*631.Open ML: B79&4HL 
MMMNTH PIBOR fMATIf) 

FP5 nmon - Pts or no pel 

In 907 9*27 

Dec 9*26 9*14 

ar %% 

S5 %% %% 

55 S 


95.15 —103 
9549 —043 

9*72 —042 
9*47 —0.0! 

M +842 
9*12 +04* 

9352 +102 

an +084 

9354 +10* 

9X33 +04* 

9XT7 +04* 
9344 +104 


MJ0 —044 
9*19 —047 

9443 —046 

9382 —047 

9X41 —046 

9334 —848 

9X14 —047 

9199 —IV 


Est. volume: 47*55. Open bit: 187282. 


LOMOOILT 


HMM-Plsa 




180 pel 


103-14 102-18 1024)2 (inch 

Dec loaoo 11" ‘ 


_ 558-29 10MB Unch. 

Em. vahmw: 673SA Open bit.: 115481 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND CLIFFE) 
DM 2S48M - Pti of 100 pd 
Um 9*22 9148 9392 +121 

Dec 91*8 9247 9X25 +026 

Est. volume: 14*34* Onen ML: 8 mm. 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIFI 


FFSOB0H 

pti’ernopct 
117J2 11*42 

117J0 

+012 

Dec 

17634 

11X02 

716X6 

+074 

Mar 

11044 

11X40 

11X64 


JM 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Unch. 


EsL volume: u&Zi* Open bit.: 14*397. 


Industrials 


low Last Settle Cfftc 


HIM 
GASOIL (IPS] 

UJL dollars per metric ftm-Ms at too tom 

Aoe 15*00 15225 1X158 15X50 +02S 

Sep 15740 13540 15*75 15*75 +158 

oa uaoo 15&40 16040 14040 +oss 


HJM L4W awe Cbamn 

31214 306*4 STUB 
ae 912*4 309X0 312*1: +3*4 

Est. volume: 11389. Open IM.t Mf«l 
CAC4B WWTIF1 

Jai M&fM 203ZM 2045 M +1840 

iSo W' 2M3JJ0 207350 +H» 

S mib! SSm 208140 +HB6 

S 2n*M 211*00 211000 +io« 

Mar . N.Ti N.T. 2137JB +TWS 

EsI. vatoma: 23886. Open hit- 704*9- 
Sources: Motif, A mcletooj’rcss. 
London Into Ftnondol Futures EnAnM 
Inn Petrohum exchange. 


Dividends 


CMP 


per Amt 
IRREGULAR 


Pay Ret 


Am insurMtainv 85 - 43 

Augat I nc - 44 

Barden Cbern - M 

Gemini II lna» - M 

HcrrtsSvmBk - - -I ? 

iNAinvsecur - 58» 

Plum Creek - 

Sotamon Bros Fd. - 48 

Salomon Bras Imr - Jtf 

San Juan Bain - 4419 


7- 31 1V1 

8- 10 831 

7- 29 M 
8-1 M 
M 844 

8- 2* 9* 
8-M S-2* 
7-29 8-18 
7-22 8-10 
7-21 8-12 


SPECIAL 

Lakeland Fst Fin - AO 

INITIAL 


84 836 


EQTT Enemy __ 
PmwlecCapMlPSA 

REGULAR 


_ .1579 


7-29 8-12 
729 5-1 


AmFetPreoFd 2 M 

Am insurMtainv 84 M 

Am lnsu+Malnv K M 

Boro Warner 0 

CIM HlYld Secur M 

Claim Stares Q 

Fxi lid Bonaaro a 

FstTNNaH Q 

FrwiKiln ineTXFr M 

FraifcllnKY M 

Franklin LA M 

Franklin MA Ins M 

Franklin MD M 

Franklin Ml M 

Franklin MO M 

Franklin Nc M 

Franklin Nj M 

Frniiilln NYJns M 

Franklin NY Intrm M 

Franklin OH Ins M 

Franklin OR M 

Franklin pa M 

Franklin pr m 

FrankHn Shrt hdr M 

Franklin Tic M 

Franklin VA M 

Franklin WA M 

Hawlhm Elec a 

Kemaer Cora <3 

DatetaKl Fd Fbl O 

Oakwood Homes a 

Poe* Brawn Q 

RnanofeeElec a 

SetasGora Am O 

supadfle a 

Sttfei Find Q 

Storm Racsr Q 

Summit Bncp NJ Q 

TemptetaaGibGv M 

Treadco Inc Q 


5 


(Manned; e+aynMe m Caeaeoan m 
aealbhr; «HV uni i «r ty; i —l ogg ee t 


Coke Taps Goizueta Successor 


ATLANTA — officer, making him the heir 

lvester pisritett - whenever its 

apparent at the woria s laig® 51 s 0 * 1 ^***" 
chairman decides to svp 17 -monih contest between 

JSBSSS!SSSMffSjf*-"--.*- 

“Buithera*has f Sa“its^airman and chief 

b ^r in ite. no w wgort t o Mr. lvester. 

■ ■ • ■ • 


Amoco Plans to Slash 3,800 Jobs 

CHICAGO CAP)—Amoco Carp, said TTiutsdayit would 3,800 
jobs over the next year, the second significant staffing ^slash since 
1992 ft? one of die United Stales’ biggest ofl companies- 

Amoco said 700 more jobs would be dm^iated by the end of 
1996-in a move to “improve efficiencies m support staff. 

A number of large ofl companies have undertaken similar 
moves. Warning the depressed puce of petroleum and restrictions 
SSeSnrimB&NoMthdess. the cutbacks have served Ka 
reminder that job losses are continuing even as the overall Ameri¬ 
can economy gets healthier. 


Monsanto Reports Record Earnings 

— . . . —_- / a liorl q IQ npm 


Apples Aren’t Core Trade Issue, U.S. Tells China 


TO OUR READERS IN LUXEMBOURG 

never been easier to subscribe 
ar.d save. Jus! call toll-free: 

0800 2703 


By Steve Mufson 

Washington Post Service 

BEIJING—Do not confuse apples and 
oranges, a U.S. official told Chinese trade 
representatives Thursday. For that matter, 
do not confuse apples and compact disks, 
computer software, or insurance. 

A day after apples from Washington 
state were displayed at a news conference 
as evidence that China was opening up its 
market to UjS. goods, the deputy U.S. 
trade representative, Charlene Barshevsky, 
said China needed to do more to improve 


trade relations and to win admission to the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

“Apples are apples, citrus is something 
else,” Ms. Barshevsky said ax a news confer¬ 
ence after what she described as “frank" 
talks with China’s trade minister, Wu YL 

Ms. Barshevsky said that even though 
China this month had allowed in its first 
shipments of Washington apples. Beijing 
continued to prohibirimports of oranges' 
and all other agricultural products from 
California. 

Moreover, she said, China had failed to 


take action in other areas of trade, includ¬ 
ing putting an end to “rampant” pirating 
of compact disks and computer software 
that costs American companies an estimat¬ 
ed SI bilHon a year. 

[Bloomberg Business News reported 
that Ms. Barshevsky said China had react¬ 
ed coolly to a U.S. demand that it shut all 
26 of its compact-disk factories to stop 
pirated CDs frdSn flooding Asian markets. 

[“We have asked for the factories to be 
closed, and the response was quite cau¬ 
tious,” she said.] 


For the Recofd 


j . „%•-> 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agence From I¥hm JJf2l 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amro Hid 5850 5830 
ACF Hokflrtg *5 4* 

AeODfi 96 95.30 

AhOkl «*50 

Aka Nobel 20X20 20250 
AMEV 71-M 71 JO 

Bob-wessonoi 3850 38.10 
CSM 485» 69 

DSM Ml JO 134JB 

Elsevier 14X30 16350 

Fofcker 1*90 1*80 

Glsl-Brocodc-J 4*90 *590 
HBG 294 2M 

Hrlnekon 21*70 21940 


Hoooowra 7X40 73.70 
Himtor Dougfcs 78 7733 
IHC Cotend 3810 3750 


Inter Mueller 7550 75.1 u 

inin Nederland 7490 7490 

KLM 51 .§0 5190 

KNP BT 47 **70 

KPN 4941) *940 

Ntdllovd 6*70 67JO 

OceGflntcn 77JO 7750 

Pakhaed *9JO *9jo 

Philips 5250 5X70 

Polvwrom 7*70 74J1 

Robecn 11611450 

Rqdamco 5**0 54.10 

Rollnco 118 118 

Rorentn 8640 0*70 

Ravai Dutch 197.10 19150 

Stork *740 4790 

Unilever 18*40 18790 

Van Ommenen 50.20 3120 

VNU 179 JO 1701 

. T11X10 


Waiters/Kluwer 11440' 


Frankfurt 


AEG 18017940 

Alcatel SEL 36150 3S5 

AlUtmj Hold 2448 2SD2 

Altana 595 603 

Asko 1002 998 

BASF 3QX503E515D 

Barer 3S2£» 356 

Bov. Hypo bank 433 434 

Bay Verelnsw *48 *75 

BBC 737JO 730 

SHF Bank *06 *07 

BMW 8*2 Iff 

Commerzbank 337503*350 

Continental 2587025740 

Daimler Benz 753761.50 

Deaysso 48249250 

Dt Babcock 234 ZB 

Deutsche Bonk 7377*020 

Donates 480 488 

Dreirfner Bank 384 390 

Fehlmuetite 304 301 

F Kruno Hoesctl 212 213 

Harpener 3«>33750 

Henkel snsasjo 

Hocmtot 948 947 

HoecM! 33432890 

Hol zmonn 840 172 

Horten 220 220 

IWKA 379 381 

Kail SOU M0 M2 

KorjTotft 568 m 

KOUlhof 493 506 

KMD 14*501*950 

KloecknerWerke 151 153 

Linde 91V 937 

Lufthansa IWWIW.-E 

MAN *3042250 

Atamesmann 

Metalteesoii 1 99 20*40 

Muencn Rueck 3010 3030 

Porsche 775 788 

Freuuao **590 *50 

PWA 230 231 

KWE 4539045450 

RhHntnelali 327 325 

SChertng 943 94* 

Siemens 47X50 481 

Thvssen 297 2W 

varto mso 303 

vein 525 511 

VEW 34$ 340 

Vkw 471475J0 

vaftswaaen 4905049740 

wet la 993 952 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtyma 123 123 

Enso-Gutzelt 4398 *2*0 

HUitamakl 148 in 

K.OP. I1JK 11J0 

Kyrnmene 123 124 

Mrtra 170 173 

Nokia 493 __ 

Pan tela 49 7t 

Reoo*. 94 95 M 

Stockmann 205 214 




Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 3230 3390 
Camay PacHic 1220 13 

Cheung Kono 3450 3X40 
China UghtPw 40 >9.90 
Dairy Farm Inti 1055 1050 
Hang Luna Dev UM 13 
Hans Sera Bank 5*50^55 
Henderson Land 3850 39.10 
HK Air Era. 4*70 4420 
HK China Gas WJO 14J5 
Hit Electric 23 23J0 
HXLond 1955 1920 

HK Realty Trust 21.10 21 jo 
HSBC HOtdbigs 8925 9050 
HKSharaHttS 1190 11.90 
HKTdecDfnm 1*90 1*55 
HK Ferry 1195 1350 

Hutch Whampoa 300 3* 

HyscwiDev 21J5 2190 

Jardtna Math. 4125 41JO 
Jardlne Str Hid 2850 2020 
Kawteon Motor , 1X40 UH 
McnOartn Orient 1020 1025 
Miramar Hotel 2090 2190 
New World Dev 2290 23."' 
SHK Props 4790 48. _ 
5KHu* 294 „ 3 

SwtrePacA 409S 4095 
Toi Cheung Pros 12 1195 
TVE 140 140 

Wharf HokJ 3090 3090 
Whig On Co inti 1090 11 

wmsor I ML lljrs 115$ 




Johannesburg 

2325 2X35 
118 115 
238 

3250 J .„ 
1050 1050 
4*75 4*SD 
no 10*58 
6450 6450 

va 

2*50 2435 
ZB ZB 
5750 SB 
3335 3X35 
4535 4535 
104 104 

8450 8175 
O *3 
2750 2750 
205 204 


AECI 
AHeoi 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blywjor 
Hufteis 

DeBcera 

Drlefonteln 

Gencar 

GFSA 

Harmony 

wsAveftt Sleet 

IthXlf 

Hedbgnfc Grw 
RonBt un te li 'i 
Rush Pat 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
StBOt 

Western Deea 


□mi 


London 


lock market 
ssels was 
hursday for 



GU9 


Hlllsltown 
HSBC Hides 
ICI 


Kingfisher 

Lodbrahe 


59* 592 

259 257 

152 1.45 

756 752 

8.17 8J0 

456 *91 


198 195 

434 430 

754 IS 


Land Sec 

Laparto .„ .- 

Losmo 1.42 L3» 

Legal GenGrp 459 451 

ar ^ s 

ME PC *33 *32 

Man Power 498 

NalWeM 459 —- 

Nttiwst water ii7 50 s 

- *40 640 

•s ts 

SOT 495 
3.13 


P&O 
Pflklraton 
PowerGcn 
Prudential 
Rank Ora 
RgcklttCul 1652 

21941444 


_ 394 

493 498 


2094 
559 521 
7.98 751 
497 *7$ 
998 9iH 
152 152 


Rgdtomi 
Reed inti 
Reuters 

RMC Group 
Rons Ravce ■«. 

RMtvmn (unit) 390 X43 

Royal Scot 395 XJ7 

RTZ 

Sateshury 
Scat Nmrcas 
seal Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 
Shell 

Slebe __ 

Smith Nephew 195 

Smith la hie B — 


Smith (WH) 

Sun Alliance 
Tate A Lyle 
Teseo 
Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
UW Biscuits 


85* 857 

399 396 

533 53* 

390 394 

121 121 

5.14 598 

735 720 

559 591 

195 19* 

*07 *91 

» a 


291 


1096 1099 

230 233 


294 29V 

1X16 1X14 


322 3.W 

- 191 554 

War LdwiM 4X41 *172 


Wellcome > 
Whitbread 


WIIHamsHdgs X65 —- 
WlIRs Carroen 137 138 
!.T.38 


Madrid 


BBV 
Beo Central Hbp. 


CEPSA 

Orraados 

Eihm 

Ercras 

Iberdrola 

atmol 

Tafaocatera 

Teletaniea 





Milan 


Batiea Comm 4735 4745 

Baskwi 162 16* 

BenotlangrouP 2*5002*600 
Ofla 
C1R 

Cred I tel 

esst 

Perfln R(s> 

Flat SPA 
Finmeccanica 

Generali 

IFf 

llalesm 
1 ideas 
UaMMMikr# 

MMHatxmca 

sa ,w 

Pirelli 
RA5 

RftwKMte 
5dpm 

Scot Paoia Torino 9975 
SIP 4540 *485 

SME 3930 MTS 

5nla 2565 2520 

SIcnM 3773034500 

SMI 5545 3480 

Toro Assl Rhp 28930 28800 


maj new 
3705 2495 
2200 2 » 
K® ssg 

2050 *000 

NA. «A 

4870 <800 
1950 2010 
fiBOQ 42SSB 

2H00 277SD 

13505 132DO 
5400 2543 





Montreal 


Aieon Aluminum 33** 33M 
Bank Montreal 23U ZFtt 
Bell Canada gv* 47 
BombartffsrB 20% 2B% 
Cambtar 171k 171b 

Cascades tu 74b 

Domldan Text a 7% 7 

Donohue A 1JW 12kv 

MacMillan Bi 19 If 


dw Prev. 



BM 

Power Cara 

19% 

a 

Quebec Tel 

19% 

19V 


18 

18% 


17% 

II 

Tetegtabe 

18% 

11 

Unhra 

NA 

— 

Vldeotron 

12% 


K58MSS3 

186X48 


Parte 


Accor 

AlrLteulde 


684 688 

HOT 800 


Am 


BIC 

BNP 

gSSS 

Corns' 


Cbnents Franc 

Cbb Med 


EU-5anan 
Euro Disney 
Gen-Eouv 


1 metal 57* 

Lafarge Game* *4290 
Legrand 6*30 

Lvan. Ecu* 531 

Onwl fL-J !3Z7 

LVWLH. 845 


MklJOfin B 

Maunneic 

Paribas 


Peugeot 
p moult Prim 


509 511 


S«gtrt G obaln 

SteGenerale 
Sue z 28527990 

Thomson-CSF 16X1014250 
Told 313 3)3 

UAk 1569015450 

Valeo 287 29190 


1 Sydney 



930 

908 

AN? 

*09 

*25 

BHP 

1040 

1082 


X47 

150 


007 

095 


*29 

4X1 


5 

4.98 

CRA 

10/6 

1904 

CSR 

4-/4 

*88 


UO 

1.11 


104 

UO 


IU8 

1104 

MogelkJn 

l-W 

105 

MIM 

AW 

108 

Mol Aust Bank 

w 

11.12 


806 

NlneNetwcrk 

*m 

*20 

n Broken Hill 

160 

173 


*54 

*52 

ptanms" Inn 

J02 

1» 


206 

204 


raw 

1.58 


195 

*1X2 

TNT 

161 

243 

western NUnira 

7.14 

707 

westaac Banking 

*72 

*85 

woodshte 

*67 

*69 





Sao Paulo 


BansadgBraaU 21 2190 

855 890 
620 *98 
2*024X99 
Cards 78 7751 

EWn*rm 2249223891 
[touOOnCO JftS 204 

Udn .260 270 

P aran ramemc 85J2 14JH 

Ptlrdsts 11550 117 

SouzaCrai 52*9 &199 

Tatafanxt 4X40 4X51 

Tatosp 349 3*0 

UsimfaKS. __}J» U7 


Vote RlaOoca iota 111 
Vang 9&00) 19 




Singapore 

Cfrehra 7JS 6 

OjyDrv. *50 <J5 

DBS 11.10 11.10 

F raser Neave 1690 1690 

Genttra 1920 19,10 

Golden Hone Pi 252 252 

Haw Per 12 a XJQ 

Hume Indosfrles 5J5 5J5 

■ncncone 590 595 

MFPtl 1090 11-10 

KLKmona 390 392 

Lum Chons 198 193 

Mdpjmn Banks us 870 

OCBCteretgn 1390 14 

OUfi 625 635 

OUE US 8JS 

5efnbawong 1098 ll.vo 

aragrllo S25 £30 

5km Darby UB 384 

HAtarwen 1290 1290 

rporeLand 790 795 

ypere Press 1*90 1690 

Sing Steamship 396 398 


gpere Telecomm 390 3J4 

Strutts Tredhw 354 398 

UOB foreign 1X10 1X30 

UOL in 116 


Stodchofni 


AGA 64 6150 

ASM A 479 477 

Astra A 162 W 

AttesCapce 90 8950 

Electrahn B 375 373 

Ericsson *04 409 

E3HJ»+A 104 t0* 


Hondetsbankm 
Investor B 
Norsk Hydro 
Procardia AF 

Sandvlk 0 

SCA-A 

S-E Bankea 

SfcomMa F 

Skanska 

SKF 

Store 

TrelletSorg BF 
Volvo 




Close Prev. 
108 110 
175 174 

2S2 24950 
in 119 
118 118 
112 112 
4990 4990 

120 r» 

159 1*2 

141 145 

395 393 

3S? I 

188SJB9 


Tokyo 


495 498 

767 769 

1220 TZM 
1540 1560 


AkBl Electr 
Asohl OrnnkxH 
Arohl Glass 
Bonk of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 

Canon 

rmlfi _ 

Dal Nippon Print 78So IMS 
Otewe House i«n mm 
D atwa Securities 1688 1720 
4320 4310 


1400 1420 
1770 1780 


1240 1270 


Full Bank 

iHi- ■ 


Full Photo 
FulHsu 
Hitachi 
HuadUCowc 


2Z70 2280 
22*0 2270 

MW HW 
1010 1020 
9M 912 
1800 1830 


733 7*0 

711 734 

970 98S 
2390 2820 
■400 *02 

1210 MHO 

9*5 953 
738 74S 
7380 7500 


ito Yakocto 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kmima 
Kansd Power 

Kawasoki steel 

(Grin Brewery 

Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 1740 1790 
Matsu Elec Wks 1130 1120 
Mitsubishi Bk 2438 
Mitsubishi Jtasd 515 576 
M jtsuMsM giec «2 7w 

Mitsubishi Hrn 793 796 

AMtsubhW Cora 12» ms 
Mitsui ana Co 845 847 

MltsukastU .. 

MManU 
NEC 


10« 1070 
m J 1730 

1210 1210 


NGK ins t u ai ors losa nso 


U0D 

Kuo raso 
753 750 
3C 341 
645 435 

bib an 
2360 MM 
NJL NJL 


NIMw Securities 
Nippon Xogaku 
Nippon OH 
Nippon Steer 
Nippon Twen 

f48j3an 

Nomura Sac 
NTT 

Olymous Opt leal 1160 11BD 
Pioneer 2910 2N0 

Rican “ 

^mwEicc 

SMmazu 
SMnehuOiem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
S u mitomo Chcm 
Suml Msslne 
SumOorao MaM 
TotsMCOrp 
Tatsho Marine 
TokednChem 
TDK 
Ttellla 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Taman Print Ira 1*88 1*90 

Toray 10 a 770 7M 

Toshiba 775 780 

Toyota 2190 2200 

YamokM Sec MS 

a: xtOO. 

m 


962 957 
582 519 
1810 1820 
748 763 
2130 2130 
5950 6010 

1980 2018 

533 535 
926 928 
m si 
648 6SZ 
•19 828 
1200 1230 
4S00 4590 
S74 572 

1290 

3030 


Toronto 


AbHIM Price 
Arnica Eagle 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Am Barrick Res 
BCE 

Bk Nava Scotia 

BC Gay 

oromaieo 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Camdev 
CISC 


179k 17Vj 
17 16*t 
4% Ste 
21M 2Hi 
32% m 
*A OVt 
25 24% 
M% M to 

10% 10% 

7% 7% 

AW 5 

» X 


Ca n ad ia n PocHIc 20% 20% 


Can Tire A 
Cantor 
Cara 

CCLIndB 
ChMPiex 
Cam loco 
Conwest Ekpl 
CSAMgtA 
Dotasco 
Dykot A 

Echo Bay Mines 
Eauttv Silver A 
FCA inti 
Fed indA 
Fletcher Chart A 
FPI 
Centra 
Golf Cda Res 
Hees InM 
HemtoGW Mines 
Hoi linger 


HudsanBBay 


inco 

1PL Energy 


18% 10% 
19% 19% 
3% 3JSS 
8 % 
5ft 5% 
22 22% 
26 26 
9% 9% 
21W. 21% 
0J2 0J2 
15% 15*4 

aw aao 

4-05 *05 
7% 7% 
17% 17% 
5% 5% 

X4S 0*5 
5% 5% 

12 % 12 % 

19% 19 

24% 24 

33% 33% 


37% 37ft 
2nt 29ft 


LabatJ 

LoMawCa 
Mackenzie 
Magna mfl A 
Maple Leaf 

Maritime 

Mark Res 

Matson A 
Noma IndA 
Nnronda Inc 

N o ro n da Forest 
Norcen Energy 
NttmTetebnm 
novo Com 
Oshown 
Paw In A 
Ptacer Dame 
Paco Petroleum 
PWACcro 
Ravrncfc 
ttoimbaanoe 
Rogers B 
RDthmans 
Royal Bank Can 
Sceptre Res 
5cofrSHteP 


16% 14% 

m, 20 % 

71% 21% 

JSt* 

57% 58ft 
11 % 11 % 
22% 22% 
9% 9% 

21 % 22 % 
5% 5% 




5ewjCcm 

Shell Con 

fflwrrttt Gordon 

SHLSvstemhse 

5outtian 

Soar Awwpoot 
stelcoA 
TaHsrnan Enera 
TeckB 
Thomson 

Toronto Darrin 

Tarata-D 
TranooftaUtU 
TranCdg Pipe 
Triton Fim A 
Trttnoc 

TrtzecA 

UnJcare Energy 




Zurich 


AdalattB 

AkBUtM* B Itow 

BBCBrwnBpvB 
CJba Getgy ft 
CS HddteMB 
ElektrowB 
FbdwrB 

JabnaBB 
UmdbOy rR 
(MtoWdl B 
Nestis R 

Oerllk. Buebrie r 
P ergewHtdB 
Roche Hdg pc 
S afra Republic 
SandozB 
SchbkSsrB 
Sulzer PC 
Surveillance B 

Swiss BnkCoraB 
Swte Retasur R 
Swissair R 
UBS B 

WWerthurB 
Zurich Ass B 




240 245 
,488 650 

1ZD 1234 

g s no 

4 581 
340 337 
1*50 1470 
2T60 JW0 
865 040 
795 795 
.420 m 
1170 1144 
.133 135 

M2S M0 
119 115 
m 488 
7756 7800 

J 09 *■* 

2M0 3035 
£10 *09 

565 561 
.760 760 

lan 1202 

,730 733 
raw 1343 


U.S. FUTURES 


Via Aisedated fte» 


My 21 


Htoh Low 


Open High Low Ctose Cho OoJnt 


Grains 


rDupW 

3J4%-4UM% 19405 
138 -003% 30413 
1*3 —OW L533 
ueft-aofft si* 
122 

X22 —0111% 3 


WHEAT (QBOn MMUunenknum-goOmM 
157% 103 Sep 9* la 124 13* 

165 XD9 Dec 94 361 361 3J7Vi 

144% 137 MOTH 366 166 163% 

156ft XleftMovfS UIW X39ft 336ft 

1*2% 111 JUK 

Dec 95 

Est. (ales UA WetTS. tales 1X069 
Wed's open lid 5667* up 29 

WHEAT tKBOT) UOOtemfetewv'OoBontarMMI . 

335ft 103ftSep9* 336% 136ft 333ft 134%-OJOft 14,707 
360 112ftDec9* 362 1*3 U9ft 032% 14,134 

159H US MOT95 1*3 363ft 140ft 141 _0JB3ft SJBD 

364ft 121 ft MOV 95 334ft Uift US 336 -OIH 118 

133% 3.16ft A*95 331 121 119% 1»%-CLI»% 314 

EAMMS NA W«rj.a*» i/m, 

Wad'sgpenirt 376S4 OH 2 
CORN (CBOT) MM Bamlnlnni-dates per 


232ft 

177 

132ft 

135 

135ft 

2J9ft 

263 


2.18 Sep 94 2.17 117 ll*% 

220 Dec 94 218% 119% 217% 
229 Mcr95 223% 239 127 

23SftMay95 235% 235ft 133 
L39ftJul93 239 239% 237% 

2*2% SOP95 261ft 261ft 139% 
135ft Dec« 263V, 263ft 268% 


EsLsdes NA. Wtd’s.sNes 51©* 

Wed's open by 212317 up 1071 
SOYBEANS (HOT) SeaabunMngm- denar, c 


115 -033% 51387 
us —can ft 11 B642 
127%—(UH 21,974 
133 ft-002 7,192 

7j7ft—am 7,09 
239%—am 523 
14D%—0JJ3ft *376 


7J5 

738% 

7.57ft 

73* 

7JB 

735ft 

734% 


U6 Aug 9* $35 
520 Sen 9* $39 
iSSftNovM L58 
145 Jon 95 $64 
523 MOT9S $23 


640ft 


527% May 75 SJBft $81 
532ft All 75 181ft $34 
Aug 95 179 $29 

Sep 95 $29 179 

580ft Nov 95 $31 533 


$34 $73% 

$22 $83 

561ft $54 
561 561 

$24 $39% 


525ft 

528ft 

$79 

$28 

528% 


9 km-Man per kn 


71030 
2©J0 
30938 
3© JO 
7B760 
30730 
10430 


EsL sides NA wed's, srtka 44327 
weefs open bit 135659 on 13 a* 
SOYBEAHMEAL (CBOT) MOI 

- 17(30 Augn 17*30 17430 17430 

17$10SepM D4J0 17650 I73J90 
173.1000 *4 17330 17*30 17120 
17160 Dec 94 17330 17X50 17X00 
17X50 Jon95 17350 17*30 17220 
174.60Ma-95 175JO I75JD 17*30 
ITXKMavOS T74J0 17630 I75J0 
177,10 JU *5 17UU 17130 1T4J0 
EsL sites NA Wetfv sales 1X834 
Wed'sooen Ini B3J03 up 725 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) lOAHtot-asftrei 
3045 2163 Pug 9* 2150 ~ 

30J* 2260S«« 2193 

WJ* 22. lOOd W 2JJ7 

3837 1230Dec 9* 2332 

3X55 3X65 Jan 95 72.95 

3U0 J330MB-95 2X05 

3835 3330 May 95 2X30 

2735 2X306*95 2137 

27JO 2X75 Aug 95 

2*75 3X38SOP 95 

EsLsaieg NA Wed's.soles 121,243 
WM-sopenbe 94303 up 555 


$77 -OQ9%aWJ2 
$44 —034% 13695 
5Jfr%-Om% 4X2J1 
544 Vj— 030% 9J43 
522ft—030ft 3643 
5JBft—031% X5J6 
531%—031% *313 
$29 

529 -Otaft 7 
580% 2J09 


17*50 —L30 3X279 
17460 -038 17694 
17260 —150 9,9*5 
17230 27,191 

17130 7,905 

175-00 *130 3335 

17540 *830 U*2 

177 JO r060 1,105 


2*15 

Mfl 

2309 

2*KI 

2X50 

2Xto 

ZL30 

not 

21*2 

2122 

2202 

2X09 

2118 

2200 

2X15 


2205 

2X93 

2128 

2X20 

Eta 

run 

2X25 



nn 



2XE 


♦ 034 1X383 

♦ 0.05 19.719 
*139 11777 
*037 3X2*2 
♦034 1525 
4035 3625 




Livestock 



— 

CATTLE 

(CMOU «nin. 
410SAU9M 6840 

“SSI* 1 

■i, 

60.&P 

4907 


7*10 



7195 

7132 

7187 

♦ 087 23319 




7103 

7095 

7137 

+037 12076 

74ta 

«7.90Fab95 


7075 

7X48 

70J7 

♦ 112 

9008 

75.W 

4900 Aar 95 

7102 

rant 

7100 

7107 

—aw 


49 JO 

4480 a*) 95 

6BJ3 


6837 

6002 

-003 

t,i» 

6008 

n7.T1;t'A'4 

ri 

67AS 

4800 

HL50 

*i 

ES-SWte 

1X903 Wars, sates 10147 





qb a 





recoeR CATTLE KMeu 

1*666 kB.-akite 

perk 



buh 

71.HAU0W 

79.X 

ms 

79X 

79.97 

+n« 

*989 

©00 

71taS8B« 

7BX 

7881 

7880 

78JU 

+073 

2043 

8153 

70030094 

7M0 

rass 

77.9i 

7802 

■j 1 1 

IO 



7800 

7905 

7800 

7107 

Rxg 

1 


7X95 Jan 95 


7*70 


7X45 

601 






7500 

♦ 17$ 

» 



7*95 

7708 

7*70 

1691 

♦aid 

74 




ILK 

7585 

7*25 

♦Ota 

112 


2090 wars, setas, 

1.5V 





WafiapenH 12^93 

0H 63 





HOGS tCMSStl te0OO«a.-ate1B»ii 







4*80 

*640 

4S37 

4*55 

♦ax 

♦07Q 

MO 




*U0 

4*75 

4V40 

9076 

4905 

398000M 

4075 

4102 

4179 

4137 

♦303 

9,983 

5Q-SD 


«*5 

*1.10 

CMS 

41.HI 

♦IL40 

4043 

SLU 

aiis 

4088 

4X15 

4007 

+QJ7 

1.360 

4880 . 


3970 

39.97 

37-70 

3907 

♦032 

«9 



4*70 

*400 

4*90 

4*90 

+ 0J0 
4 010 

as 

4580 

tOJZMVS 

4400 

*4-90 

4* JO 

4*90 

■i,ai 

4695 

42JSBAUQ95 

4X01 

4X50 

4150 

4200 


HEfll 

Estates $326 Wetfx sales $360 
WwrsoamW 27,113 Off 645 





1 PCffKPELUB (04BR) 4UnjU..a+niNr«L 




31j6O041« 

32A7 

ff.-'.va 

31© 

3300 

♦OJO 

. 99 


3LSAuoto 

3X15 

X90 

3X00 

3277 

1065 

*689 


».1EP«B9S 

4307 

4*75 

4335 

4*12 

:SS 

XIX 

Ota 

3X60 Mn* 95 CM 

43J0 

*339 

«M2 

714 

Alta 

4UXUW9S 




4400 

+0JD 

49 


43J0JW« 

**» 

4330 

4470 

BUD 

2P 


4*30800 95 




4120 


■ 2 


1J*4 waffxsdes 

2033 






Up 229 




_ — 


Food 


COFFEE C (HC&3) 83tte-MlM>k 
27430 4830 SMB9* 2 2040 23330 71530 

3**2S 77.10Dec94 22230 23625 21930 

24*30 7X90 Mar93 22530 23X50 223.00 

MUO USOMOV 9$ 2Z7JB 2*100 22*30 

345,10 8L08Ju195 22730 2J2J0 22X711 

19680 i* DO SoP 95 

21330 8130OoC«3*a80MB0 2*100 

EsL sates MLW WMnLUta U475 


729JO 
2313$. 
23555 

23730 


74080 

34X50 


♦645ZZJS9 

♦ MB llll* 

♦ 535 $837 

♦150 161$ 

*530 32B 

♦ 680 39 

*430 313 


1239 

J.10 

081 

7232 

11.90 


*5oa«l 1131 


mstjuin 


IIIMH-OM 

IV+te 


9X180 

11JB 

1180 

1150 

♦ 002 6*390 

95880 

H38 

1103 

1173 

108* 29.910 

9*730 

IL48 

ItJff 

1103 

+084 6066 

9*550 

1108 

I1J0 

IIJ3 

♦M3 UU 

94380 

1109 

DJ* 

1109 

■ 083 US 

9*220 


Scami Season 
Htoh low 


Ooen High’ Low Close Chg OPM 


1138 W38M<*-94 

1M( 113* May 94 - 

&s. sales 9,293 wetfxstees 96© 
WbiTsopenSik 106454 off 49* 

COCOA 0*30 lemericteie-SBvtei 
15*3 iaas«i>9* w 1B9 hr 

1M 10HDec9* ISM 15» 1514 

1M0 1 ©7Mur95 US7 ISto 1548 

1612 lOTBMov.fS 

ISO 122SJW95 

1453 1265Sep 95 

1433 1290 Dec IS 

144* V3Eii'Adr9* 

B*l sales UK Wad'S, totes HU42 
Vtetrs open irt 77657 IIP 1108 
OffANGEJUKe (NCTN) ixttateu-akteMrl 
13*30 8635 Sep 94 9130 9330 ' 9030 

89.1QIW** 9*30 «J0 9*00 
V1D0JM195 9830 1930 ©JO 

9430Mkr 95 10X25 U2J5 10X00 
9730MOV95 10430 10*50 10650 
1 OLA) All 95 

10SJ»5ep95 . • 

Est. sites kA. warn** UM . 
Wed's ooen Irn 256*3 off 31 


1! J9 

T163 


*083 

—OJ0 


1478 

ISO 

TSil 

isn 

I39T 

uu 

MM 

1540 


—1139350 
• -817641 
—5 &J5* 
-4 2,955 
—6 UH 
-5 1392 
-5 *681 
-8 16M 


13430 

13780 

12C25 

11*23 

11930 

111.50 


9X78 

9*03 

9125 

18160 

10*55 

10685 

18X35. 

W9J5 


tan i464i 

+885 UM 
+030 6027 
tOJO 23* 
+0J0 . 718 


+880 

+080 


Metals 


114.48 
nui 
Ill JO 
iiijo 
11X70 
10961 
11X30 
11 too 
11083 
11X10 
11X88 
!©ta 
9235 
99 JO 
11060 


K1 GRADS COPPER Q4CMX) cMoetes-cra 
11620 763XMM 11660 11X15 TM80 
7480 Sep 9* 11*85 11*20 11*35 

7X73D0CJ4 11X45 11*75 11X30 
7680JOI95 18880 W880 10830 
7100 Feb 95 

FWO 95 11X30 11230 11231 
7685May 95 

7I30JUI9S . 11050 11030 11030 

75JOAU0 95 11430 11X38 11430 

79.10 Sep 95 

75200(795 11465 USAS 11*65 
7775 Nov 95 

OXD0DOC9S 18930 18930 10930 
OJO Jon 94 10830 10830 19830 
6UC.'.Ur9S 

9L10APT94 
Mar 96 
JiffiM 

EftKtes 7JB0 Waifs.sales 73 ** - 
Wed^openw 5X205 off 15X3 
SAVER OKMX) mob ear as-ante pw troy a 
5043 371.0 Jul 94 5273 5173 5173 

5583 3253 Aug 94 

XTUStpM 5083 S3BJ 52*5 
3303 Doc M 5853 54X5 59X0 
401 3 Jen 95 

*lX5Mcr« $533 S03 5*53 

4U3M0V95 5583 5593 5*3 

®8BJ©9S 5433 5433 5578 

*33 Sep 95 S703 933 5433 

5398Dec 95 903 983 5703 

5753 Jen 94 
3K3MorM 
5173 May 94 


n*4i 

115,10 

11X85 

nxa 

11X15 

11X55 

11170 

mu 

n*A$ 

as 

TO7JH 

10765 

11X15 

w/m 

111.15 


+035 ijn. 


241 

2*5 

MW 

16© 

BOO 


—8J0 
—835 


SMLS 

5973 

54*3 

eu» 

4065 

6180 

61X0 

42X0 

61X0 

41X0 

4173 


5211 

au 

52X5 

53*1 


-53 145 


wctn open be 122379 up W9f3 ! * 11 


Ed. sites 71800 W«rs.stes 12311 


5463 

EL9 

HB3 

5473 

3703 

5773 

5813 


-63 7869 
—40 946*8 
-63 25. 

—43 inn 

—63 549 

-63 UK 
—63 t 
—43 70 

-63 IX 


JO *ov ocr MBnaaregre 



2J33 

*1780 


y jcii 1 

Cm 




«uo 

i r l 


t t, i ■' 1 

t i r i ■ j| 



*29JB 

V ‘j* f* 171 

tn rj 

T 1 

t)T V.'j 


34 

43100 

39080 Apr 95 






E. ‘ ■ 

*27JDJl895 






«nta. 

431-SB Oct 95 





41X48 

41560 

419.10 


42660 —260 


-060 395 

-MO 216*2 
-260 2312 
—260 139* 


EsL sates NA. Wed'S, sates 197* 
WscTSOpenkn 2S6H up 706 
0X0 (NOMTO W WW w -teemnwn 
4UM MU Alia M 3*13*. 30.10 30*20 
38MB XUlSteN .- 
417# 34*880© 94 388J0 390.18 3B78B 

©t5o maoDecto anjo ©xs mai 

41T30 -msOFSbOS 39X90 89680 38*40 

©730 34*50 Apr 95 

©xse atUDJuntS 40100 40X00 40330 

*1X9 380JDAUO95 

*119 *U90d95 

©930 ’1J0DK9S 


Season Seaun 
HUi Law 


0700 

87405 

07522 

OJHO 


90m 92320 Junto 9X828 9X890 9X840 92MB 

EsL sates NA wed's, sates 719649 
Weds op en ini 2 as off 3422 
BRITISH POUND (QMBO tuwnu m O-1 tekseauail 
14364 I64BSep9N 1J436 1J4B6 1-51C 140M 
1J5740 l6500Dec«4 15*40 15490 151B0 15IW 
L5730 .16440Mar 94 . 15192 

Bd-totes NA WWxscie* 14675 
W+ftooenW 40661 OH 531 
GUteUNANOOUJUt COMBt] iNTtelsteMM 
07740 07068Stpto 0704 0729 07210 072*6 

07D3XDeCto 0J«S 07225 071(1 07217 
07020 Mar« 07150 07190 8719 07185 
86990Jun95 8719 OJUS 87115 8719 
_ AMItHff 87025 07110 07075 07111 

Estates NA wwrxsctes 6699 
VtotfsopenW 84,927 

GERMAN MARK ICMBU SHrimk-leaWeeuteitM 
06581- 05600Sep *4 06389 06419 83366 OtaM 

OSMCtecH M*10 03424 04370 03292 

05980 Jun 95 03319 04310 03323 

0-4S5 SCO 95 03340. 

_ OtaOMrN 03B0- 03210 03310 83306 

Estate* NA Wed 1 VKites 56374 

Vtotf»op«iW HH.0B UP VI 
JAPAMESEYEN KMD Iptrvsn.1 rateewieteMUM 
04J0480j808942Septo 011101710011126303)011403101© 
8ffl0490»ta9B3Pec94 03182908011040011)01840610218 
03106J«lD09776Jun9S 0310395 

ftw©730 jno5gS ep95a3io«4oxino«7to3iii4aninow 

8Bto640030»48IN ta to(IJllta50JW38a8fl)029003W3ffl 

EsL sates NA Wed's, stees . 31,164 

«B*nW 7+521 ON 475 
IWg FRANC (CMaO Sewmnc-ltalieequitelWMn 
07817 03400 Sep 94 07579 07611 07*15 07439 

0 7840 06885 Dec9* 074)0 0768 87*31 07456 

87880 87S98JH95 07509 

tmm O435M0TM ■ ... 07483 


0399S 

03393 


-130*0.08 
16G 
. □ 

9 


Industrials 


S 

39030 

5HS 

39X40 


—1J0 59695 


40*30 



FebW • 

Abt* . . 

62608 Jen 94 

—Mte* 3M00 Metre, sales 31630 
WeiTs open In U 26 M up 223 


41IJ0 

<15.70 

6J9JD 

«X90 


-1J0UU 

—L30 96B2 
—130 5630 
-Jr» *683 
3442 
-Jta 1477 
- JO 5656 
—1J0 1,141 
-170 744 

—140 2452 


Financial 


UST.0K16 (CMEIU 11 snMaa-MalMpcL 
9638 9*42 S»94 0$J0 9X3) 9577 9X27 -00$ 22604 

9*10 MTS Dec 9* 9*74 9473.1*70 1*31 -005 W© 

9X05 AM Mar 95 9t46 <437 9434 9*47 -0JU M 

. 9*J9 —004 I 


wemaPKibv 34677 an 94 

SYR.TREASURY HOOT) IKiMimuaSZM4ufl«>a 
in.113U2.12 SepMto+tta W*-06 U3-29 103-21 — .07 ■ mm 
104-11101-24' DK94M3-05S MS-10 103-05 103048- 045 fU 
Ett soles NA «URfS.$©B 69J3T 
WetTiOPenW 203JDJ uo 3*16 
18YfcT15£ASURY KBOp I1AM9wln-ptelItecteteHMaa 
1 IS—01 WV-14 SepUUMH 104-04 ism HD-31 — 07 7)4644 

11+71 11B-25 Dec 94 HELM 103-07 103-28 103-0H- 07 

11V47 100-05 Mar 95103-06 102-12 KO-46 182-©- © » 

Q5-22 9M0 Junes . 181-14- © . S 

to]-0* M0-T7 Sep95 100-%— 07 

Est.sues NA MrflUMl WJIt . 


US TREASURY gown f&OT) iKMHUtHkiymeft 
l!8-» RW* StaMUS-n MB-» Iffi-SS 103-33 Jffl = 
118-08 n-l» DK9*1©44 TO-0J MIMS 1BM0 + 83 

116-20 «t-28 Mar 95101-04 W-07 Ml-04 151-07 .♦ 03 

115-19 98-13 Jun 95 ISO-n UO-11 100-14 100-18 + 02 

JIMS JM8 Sea9S . 9901 f 03 

J13-T4 97-14 Dec 95 99-12 99-14 99-12 99-U + 03 

U64K «S-Zt 46v«5 99-00 + . 03 

J9-16 96-U JU194 ' 11-11 

EsL Sites NA W«TL ' 


89647 

4674 


: or 


1650 
466 
. 30 

40 

U 


■ini s n ptehti p i w thwiyuepa 
-17 9044 90-06 90-16 — 04 2X788 
• - 89-19 - 04 M 

fetes 6718 


Wed's wen ko 4*9,116 off „ 

MUNK2PM. BONDS (0013 SMOte 
95-17. 16-12 5ta94 90-17 to-2* ‘ 

Sp-27 D-21 J2«to'. 

Elt.tolto NA W5,- 

Wacriwenrt lull 
EURODOLLARS (05S&. iurtwan i-te WOpct. 
*$570 982(0Sep 94 94850 9*8*0 91800 9020 

TO 710 Dec 94 91180 941*0 94110 MJ30 
902*0Mar 93 93350 93«0 9U» OM 
907»Jun9S 9X630 91630 91360 9190 
9UBS»9S RUM 91340 9X300 R320 
91.100 Dk 95 93890 0090 tltaO 91050 

98750Marto 9JJDQ0 9X020 92*70 92.990 


—W32867) 
1 —40KS.1B 


g-SOrito 78* 7160 TOJO 

776$ 59.40 Dec 94 7831 7078 7065 

7XW ;; 4Mar95 7165 7163 7160 

78« .6*09 May 95 7X62 7X*J 7225 

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ST. LOUIS, Missouri (AP)—Monsanto Co. had a 29 
increase in second-quarter e arnin g s because of increased« 
for agricultural products and efforts to cut costs, the company 

said Thursday. . , , « _ , 

The St Louis-based dienikal-and-agncultural products maker 
earned $258 mfllian, or S2-19:per share, on sales of $2^7 bulion, 
compared with earnings of $200 million, or $1.66 per share, on 
sales of S2Jb billion in the 1993 second quarter. 

The results exceeded Wall Street expectations, and investors 
bid Monsanto's stock higher- Monsanto shares closed tip 87 J 
cents at $76,625 on the New York Stock Exchange. 


frigate Profit fc Less Than Expected 

NOT! YORK (Bloomberg) — Cdgate>Paln»olive Co. said its 
second-quarter profit rose a liess-than-cxpected 4 percent as poor 
results in Narth America dragged down earnings. 

The cons umer -products company said profit from operations 
rose to $147.7 mfllicra, or 97 oats a share, compared with net 
income of $142.4 million, or 86 cents, is the year-ago quarter. 

The results were lower than Wall Street expectations of 98 cents 
a share, the mean estimate erf 14 analysts surveyed by Zacks 
Investment Research. Colgate closed down $1.75 at 550.50. 

Revenue Rise Bolsters Northwest. 

MINNEAPOLIS (Bloomberg) — Northwest Airlines Carp, 
reported record second-quarter profit due largely to an 8.5 percent 
rise in revenue, the company said Thursday.' 

Thcfoortb-largesi azr earner in the United Slates said it had net 
income of $7L3 motion, or 68 cents a share after preferred 
dividends, compared with a year-earlier loss of $136.2 million. 
Sales rose to $2J27 baHkm. • 

“The excellent results are consistent vrith our plan for the 
quarter and. for the first half,** said John Dasburg,~the Northwest 
prcsidenL The company had indicated last week that results 
would exceed analysts' estimates, which ranged from 20 cents to 
46 cents a share- • 




Mesa Aiifnes Inc, the largest U.S. r^ional air carrier, signed a 
letter of intent to buy some assets of UaAir Grotqi Inc.*s Alleghe¬ 
ny Commuter Airlmes.. (Bloomberg} 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 22,1994 


Page 11 


EUROPE 



Higher Profit, 



LONDON — Wellcome 
PLC on Thursday reported 
higher sales and profit for the 
10 months ended June 30, led 
by a strong performance by its 
herpes drug Zovirax, but its 
stock dropped as the results fell 
short Of expectatio ns. 

Analysts said the pharmaceu¬ 
tical company’s shares also were 


of 


British Air Says 
Air France’s Aid 
Breaks EU Pact 


Agcnu Frmce-Pnm 
PARIS — British Airways has 
■ complained to the European 
Commission that France’s plan 
to help its indebted national car¬ 
rier, Air France, breaks Europe¬ 
an Union subsidy guidelines, ac- 
cording to a memorandum seen 
. here 


y, the British carri¬ 
er charged that the plan to give 
20 billion French francs ($3.7 
billion) to Air France violates 
. the Treaty of Rome. 


Air France “could resolve its 
, problems without this aid,” by 
giving iq> its stake in 20 compa¬ 
nies, the British carrier said. Air 
France has interests in a range of 
companies including Meri dian, 
Servair, Air Charter, Jet Tour, 
Sabena and Air Afriqne. 


The commission is expected 
to approve the French plan 
Wednesday. 


hurt by the 

for a takeover bid. John Robb, 
chairman and duet executive, 
said recent speculation about a 
possible merger or takover was 
“vary wide of the marie.” 

In addition, the company 
said doctors .were still shunning 
its AIDS treatment Retrovir, or 
AZT, because of controversy 
about its use in treating patients 
at an eariy stage of infection. 

Wellcome said profit before 
tax ami exceptional hems rose 
12 percent frran a year earlier, to 
£546 million (5846 million), but 
the market had been looking for 
earnings of £S50 mflliou to £600 
million. The ccanpany also took 
a larger-than-expected excep¬ 
tional char y , of £58 rrriTlinn to 
cover reorganization costs. 

The company disclosed 10- 
xoonth results because it is 
changing its year-aid to Dec. 31 
from Feb. 28. It previously an¬ 
nounced results for the six 
months ended in February. 

Weflcome’s stock, however, 
ended 7 pence lower at 606, 
rallying late in the day after 
being down as much as 17. 

Mr. Robb said sales of Zo¬ 
virax were up 15 percent in 
March through June, excluding 
gams from currency transla¬ 
tions. In the United States, sales 
were up 27 percent 

But Retrovir safes fell 15 per¬ 
cent, hit by the findings of a 
British-French study that ques¬ 
tioned the drug’s use in patients 
diagnosed as having the virus 
that causes acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome who had 
not yet shown symptoms of 
AIDS. (Reuters, AFX) 


Could British Tradition Change? 

High-Priced Retail Banks Are Aghast at the Thought 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tnbanc 

LONDON — Do consumers care 
what their banks charge them for thar 
loans and. pay than for their deposits? 
Surprisingly, in Britain the answer has 
long been no. 

“It is traditionally a marketplace that 
has been all about loyalty and long-term 
relationships,” said Graham Wallace, a 
spokesman for TSB Bank PLC. “It has 
long been inertia among consumers that 
has dictated a certain lack of price com¬ 
petition." 

But suddenly, those old and highly 
profitable assumptions are looking fee¬ 
ble. While Britain’s largest banks arc 
widely expected to report spectacular 
gains in first-half earnings at the begin¬ 
ning of next week, a chill wind has 
churned up. There is growing fear that 
price-cutting and special-offer competi¬ 
tion may at last come to British retail 
barikiqg. 

“In the past, UJC. consumers have 
been willing to pay enormous costs,” 
said Chris Williams, an analyst at Fox- 
Pitt Kdton. For example, banks in Brit¬ 
ain charge up to 18.4 percent in interest 
on checking-account overdrafts, while 
ILS. banks charge half that, be said. 
Such hefty charges are “unsustainable” 
in a banking market presently awash in 
capacity and singularly lacking in loan 
growth. 

What started tongues wagging was a 
salvo fired this montht by Abbey Na¬ 
tional PLC, the building-sodety-turned- 
bank. It dashed its interest rate charge 
on overdrafts from 18 percent to just 
under 10 percent. It was a move quickly 
copied by a number of building societies, 
which are similar to American savings 
and loan associations. 

While such moves were dismissed by 
the major banks as loss leaders thrown up 
by marginal players in those types of 
accounts, Wednesday’s move by Midland 
Bank PLC was a horse of a different color. 
Midland, a unit of HSBC Holdings, said it 


was offering what amounted to a summer 
sale on loans of more than £5,000 
(57,750), shaving rates by half a percent¬ 
age pant until the end of September. 

“So far these are all marketing exer¬ 
cises rather than cut-throat competition, 
but the question is is this just the thin 
edge on the wedge," said Hugh Pye, an 
analyst with Barclays de Zcete Wedd. 

What makes bankers and investors in¬ 
creasingly nervous is that no one knows 


'Retail banking in the 
UJC is a big golden goose. 
'So why kill hr 

Hugh Pye, banking analyBt with 
Barclays de Zoete V«hL 


for sure. Midland, for instance, denies it 
has any intention of touching off a price 
war. It, like its main competitors, insists 
that the real battle rages on the far safer 
turf of quality of service rather than 
price. 

What the customers of British banks 
really want, insists Angela Fellows, a 
spokeswoman for Lloyds Bank PLC, is 
“wann-and-cuddly treatment” from 
their bank’s staff. To ensure that tellers 
smile and loan officers make eye contact, 
Lloyds employs “mystery shoppers” who 
report back to management. 

Others emphasize error-free banking. 
Midland Bank recently unveiled a pro¬ 
motion offering customers who transfer 
accounts there £10 for each mistake that 
is marie in the process. Midland says its 
research has shown that 83 milli on cus¬ 
tomers are dying to move their accounts 
and that itjust wants to make the process 

Vac AnmEmg. 

A competitor dismiss ed it as an inef¬ 
fective marketing ploy: “What, Tm sup¬ 
posed to move my account to Midland in 
the hope that they’ll make a mistake a 
pay me 10 pounds?” 


But for Britain's bankers, the tit-for-tat 
battle on the service front only underlines 
the baric problem: The banks are largely 
interchangeable, offering virtually iden¬ 
tical services with virtually identical ser¬ 
vice levels. That leaves only price as a 
possible means to differentiate them¬ 
selves. 

Building societies and other financial 
institutions are keen to exploit that op¬ 
portunity. Direct Line Insurance PLC, 
the Royal Bank of Scotland subsidiary 
that sells auto and home insurance over 
the telephone, this month fired its first 
round at the banks. It unveiled a pilot 
program offering mortgages one per¬ 
centage point below the average bank 
rate. What is more, it claims it will be 
able to arrange a mortgage over the 
phone in as liule as 20 minutes. “We 
wouldn't be doing rids if we did not think 
that we could take quite a big share of the 
market," said Miranda Pount, a spokes¬ 
woman for Direct Line. 

By selling its products over the phone 
and not through an extensive and costly 
branch network. Direct Line's costs are 
hugely below those of the traditional 
mortgage lenders. It was by pushing the 
same advantages of cost and speed that 
Direct Line made mincemeat of its com¬ 
petitors in the insurance market. In just 
nine years, it has become the largest car 
insurer in the la^iri- 

Also looming is the proposed acquisi¬ 
tion erf the Cheltenham & Gloucester 
Building Society by Lloyds Bank. C&G's 
cost base, measured by its cost income 
ratio, is roughly two-thirds that of the big 
banks. As the future mortgage lending 
arm of Lloyds, that will translate to ei¬ 
ther fat marg ins on a far bigger book of 
mortgage lending or to the potential to 
cut prices and gain market share. 

AH these threats remain some way off, 
however. In the nearer term, analysts and 
bankers alike predicted increased compe¬ 
tition in the form of more special offers. 
“Retail banking in the UJC is a big gold¬ 
en goose,” Mr. Pve said. “So why lull it?" 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

2300- 



London 

FTSE 100 Index 

SHU- 

m 
m 
2200 
TCS 

ssg 

253 




%UA 

1893 

U J J 320 f'm a 
1893 

M J J 

1893 

mH 

Exchange 

Index 

Thursday 

Close 

Prev. 

Close 

% 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

389.04 

367.60 

+0.31 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

Closed 

7,476.79 

- 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,113.30 

2,138.65 

•1.19 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

80(L56 

304.24 

•0.46 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1,616.57 

1.817.56 

-0.05 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2,404.70 

JL393.70 

*0A6 

London 

FTSE 100 

3,09530 

' 3X7720 

+0.59 

Madrid 

General index 

304.08 

305.40 

-0.43 

MBan 

MIB 

1,163lW 

' 1,157.00 

+0.52 

Paris 

CAC40 

2,053.78 

'2.043.72 

+0.49 

Stockholm 

AflasrsvaerUten 

1.885.09 

t.884.35 

+0.01 

Vienna 

Stock index 

454.22 

454.54 

-0.07 

Zurich 

SBS 

017 . 2 a 

912JB1 

+0.49 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


[nienuiHHuJ l Jerald Tribcnc 

Very briefly: 


• CeOtech Group PLC a British biotechnology company, said 
Merck & Co, of the United Slates would pay it “double-digit" 
royalties plus as much as £31.5 million (S49' million) over five 
years for marketing rights to a once-a-day anti-asthma drug now 
bring tested. 


• LM Ericsson AB of Sweden and Raycbem Corp. of the United 
States said they planned a joint venture to design, make and sell 
fiber-optic access networks to telecommunications companies 
around the world. 


■ France had a trade deficit of 7.57 billion francs (SI billion) in 
May, slightly narrowed from 7.81 billion francs in April, and the 
five-month deficit widened to 30.6 billion francs from 29.9 billion 
francs. In Britain, the trade gap shrank to £495 million in June 
from a revised £672 million in May. 


• Prudential Corp., the largest British life insurer, said revenue 
from new premiums fell in the first half of 1994, mainly because of 
a weak British market for insurance products, but it described its 
worldwide investment-product sales as “buoyant” 

Reuters. Bloomberg, AFP 


E. D. & F. Man to Seek London Stock I listing EARNINGS: IBM, Caterpillar Post Strong 2nd-Quarter Performances 


Compiled by Our Staff Fm Disputes 
LONDON —E. D. &F. Man Group, the 
British commodity-trading and fund-man- 
. agement company, said Thursday it would 
■ seek a listing on the London Stock Ex- 
. change in late September, valuing the con¬ 
cern at around £450 mEDion (S69t> mfiEoa). 

“The board of Man believes that a Est~ 
.ing of the group’s ordinary shares will 
provide it with additional flexibility in the 
.medium term to financ e its .'planned 
growth,” Harvey McGrath, managing di¬ 
rector, said. 


The equity issue is expected to raise £80 
million and put 30 percent of the company 
in public hands. 

Man’s common-stock equity is owned 
by about 100 of its senior managers.Tt is 
intended that at listing, the group’s man- 


r. McGrath said. 

Around 250 million shares are expected 
to be issued to the current shareholders. 

Mr. McGrath said that after the repay¬ 
ment of preference shares, £35 million to 
£40 million of “new money" out of the $80 


million would be left to invest in commodity 
processing expansion and possible acquisi¬ 
tions in the hind-managment industry. 

“We are seeing huge numbers of oppor¬ 
tunities in Easton Europe, in say cocoa 
processing, ” said Stanley Fink, group fi¬ 
nance director. 

Man is a leading international trader in 
sugar, cocoa and coffee and owns British 
Cocoa Mills, one of the largest specialist 
cocoa processors in Europe. 

(Kmghl-JUAder, Reuters) 


Continued from Page 9 
and profit" in 1994, Caterpillar 
said. 

The company “is firmly com¬ 
mitted to doing whatever is nec¬ 
essary to continue operating 
our plants,” Donald Fites, the 
chairman, said. 

U.S. sales jumped to S1.81 


billion from Si.44 billion, driv¬ 
en by rising demand and price 
increases. 

Despite a weak dollar, inter¬ 
national sales rose 23 percent, 
to SI.68 billion. Results were 
buoyed by rising demand in 
Latin America and the Com¬ 
monwealth of Independent 


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States, while sales in the Middle 
East region continued to drop. 
Sales outside the United States 
represented 48 percent of the 
total. 

After years of cost-cutting, 
Caterpillar is having to add em¬ 
ployees to keep up production. 
At the end erf the second quar¬ 
ter, the company’s headcount 
had risen 5.1 percent to 52,712 
from 50.109 a year ago, with 
most of the new employees in 
its hourly ranks. 


• AT&T Corp. said its second- 
quarter net income rose 12 per¬ 
cent, to $1.13 billion, from 
$1.0! billion a year ago, paced 


by revenue increases m its fi¬ 
nancial services and equipment 
operations as well as a return to 
profitability for its computer 
unit. Bloomberg Business News 
reported from New York. 

• McDonald’s Corp- second- 
quarter earnings fell just short 
of expectations, hampered by 
adverse currency fluctuations 
and weak economies in Japan 
and Europe, Knight-Ridder re¬ 
ported from Chicago. McDon¬ 
ald’s reported second-quarter 
earnings of S565.7 million, 
compared with I993’s 507.1 
trriflioii, on sales of $2,029 bil¬ 
lion, compared with $1,877 bil¬ 
lion. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 22,1994 


Plage 13 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


7 r, f 

ft 


KUALA LUMPUR—Unit¬ 
ed Malayan Banking Com, Ma¬ 
laysia s fourth-latest bank, is 
being investigated for allied 
lending irregularities, a Finance 
Ministry official said Thursday. 

Bank Negara, the centra] 
bank, had been monitoring Un¬ 
ited Malayan’s operations for 
some time, said the official, re¬ 
questing anonymity. Bank Ne¬ 
gara refused to com m ent. 

United Malayan, which last 
week announced p)pns to seek a 
listing on the local bourses, is 60 
percent controlled by Datuk 
Keramat Holdings Bhd. 

Datuk Keramat is believed to 
have used United Malayan to 
indirectly finance a 1073 minion 
nnggit acquisition last year of a 
controlling interest in George 
Town Holdings BbcL, a retaflmg 


Investigates 
an Lending 


group. Basking laws prohibit fi- 


tordated companies.. 

-Late on-Wednesday, Prime 
Minwtw Mahat hir bin Moha¬ 
mad ordered an investigation 
and called for punitive action 
against those found involved in 
questionable loans and other al¬ 
leged irregularities. ‘The matter 
should be probed by the central 
bank,”Mx. Mahathir said in the 
northern state of-Penang. 

. United Malayan and Datuk 
Keramat are iw^bt the chair¬ 
manship of Mohaned Moor 
Yusof, a former political secre¬ 
tary of Mr. Mahathir and a po¬ 
litical ally of the deputy prime 
minister, Anwar Ibrahim, who 
is also finance minister. 

Datuk Kcramal, a tm-smdt- 
mg company, acquired its stake 
in United Malayan for 600 mil- 
Uon ringgit ($240 rnffion). : 


According to banking 
sources, the probe into United 
Malayan centred on the role of 
a lawyer and businessman, Tay 
Chiow Kee — neither a share- 
holder nor an executive of the 
bank — in bank operations 
since it was acquired by Datuk 
Keramat a year ago. 

Analysts said the allegations 
have come at an unfortunate 
time-for the bank,-which ap¬ 
peared on the road to recovery 
after years of controversy and 
financial mishaps. 

Last week It announced a 146 
percent jump in soup pretax 
profit, to 190.7 million ringgit, 
for the year to January, and 
unveiled plans for a stock offer¬ 
ing within 18 months. The bank 
has 73 branches and has ob¬ 
tained approval for 24 more. 


Coles Myer to Buy 
10% of Its Shares 
As Kmart Divests 


Compiled by Oar Stqff From Dhpak&es 

BOMBAY —_ India’s largest business con- 
\\ glomerate, Tata, is in turmoil as its leader strag¬ 
gles to defuse reports of a takeover bid-on his 
. flagship company, Tata Iron & Steel Co. 

. . y Ratan Tata, 57, the chairman of Tata Iron, 
- India’s biggest private steelmaker, on Wednes* 
'• day night denied in a signed statement that he 

7 tnlri a magazin e that an fryp atriatw fi vKan' (wrpft- 

rate raider was stalking Tata Iron. 

■ . • ~ • Mr. Tata said he had “no specific knowledgeof 

any takeover plans” for Tata Iron* Sted, acting 
]that his remarks in an interview with' Business 
v Today magazine had been misinterpreted. - 
The interview quoted Mr. Tata assaying: “The 
-•> threat is from a nonresident Indian predator. We 
’ -i: do have specific information confirming our 


fears. But I cannot say more than that at this 
stage.” But on Wednesday, he said, “I have to 
state categorically that these statements attribut¬ 
ed to me are factually incorrect.” 

In his statement Wednesday, Mr. Tata said he 
had in response to a “casual query” from the 
interviewer indicated “hostile takeovers could 
not be ruled out” in India’s recently liberalized 
business environment. 

“In response to a further query,” he said, “as 
to who might possibly be interested in taking 
over a company like Tata Sted, I made a general 
statement mat it could be a multinational corpo¬ 
ration or a foreign sted company with strategic 
interests or a nonresident Indian who had me 
funds and the interest in owning Tata Sted." 

(Reuters, AFP) 


Complied by Ota Staff From Dispaicka 

SYDNEY — Coles Myer 
Ltd. said Thursday it would 
buy back about 10 percent 
of its shares from Kmart 
Ccrp., after the American 

retailer anno unced it was 

selling its entire 21.45 per¬ 
cent stake in Australia’s big¬ 
gest retailer. 

The country's biggest 
stock buyback in its mstoiy, 
with an indicated value of 
126 billion Australian dol¬ 
lars ($926 nrillicm), divides 
Kmart’s stake in Mel¬ 
bourne-based Coles into two 
parcels, ending a 26-year re¬ 
lationship between the com- 

ibcuTon its core/operations 
in the United States. 

Coles said it would buy 
the 10 percent stake from 
Kmart at 435 Australian 
dollars a share, for a total of 
587 millio n dollars. It will 
then caned those shares and 
arrange for the sale of the 
remaining 11.45 percent. 

The retailer said the bro¬ 
kerage concern Barclays de 
Zoete Wedd Australia Ltd. 
had expressed confidence it 
could find buyers. 

The news dominated trad¬ 
ing Thursday on the Austra¬ 
lian stock market, where 
Coles Myer ended at 429 
dollars, down 2 cents, shires 
after jumping 21 cents on 
rumors of the deal earlier in 
the day. 

The Coles Myer chair¬ 


man. Solomon Lew, said the 
transaction, by eliminating 
10 percent of the company's 
shares from the market, 
would “significantly bene¬ 
fit” Coles shareholders by 
lifting earnings per share 
and eliminating “uncertain¬ 
ty about Kmart’s commit¬ 
ment” to its holding. 

“Essentially, we are buy¬ 
ing back pan of the farm,” 
Mr. Lew said. “While we are 
sony to see Kmart go as a 
shardiolder, it is good news 
that the shares are returning 
to Australia." 

Schroders Australia, 
Kmart’s local financial advis¬ 
er, said the company had 
made its decision at a board 
meeting in Troy, Michigan, 
cm Tuesday and would invest 
the proceeds from the stock 
sale in its U.S. operations. 

Kmart, the second-largest 
U.S. retailer, has been under 
pressure to raise funds since 
Its plans to sell a stake of 20 
peirant to 30 percent in its 
specialty stores for between 
$600 million and 5900 mil¬ 
lion was rejected in a share¬ 
holder vote last month. 

After the defeat, Kmart 
said rumors that it would sell 
its Coles Myer stake were in¬ 
correct and unfounded. 

Coles will retain all rights 
to the Kmart trade name in 
Australia and New Zealand 
for 24 years. 

(Reuters, AFX) 


POSCO, Countering Hyundai, Plans to Add Capacity 


^ ^ ^ Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

*’ SEOUL — Pahang Iron <fe 
- Steel Co. has disclosed an ambi- 
tious plan to expand its produo- 
. .. tion capacity, puttingit in corn-. 
petition with the Hyundai 
J. group of com panies ’ plan to 
- ~ build an integrated iron and 
steel nnlL 

POSCO, the world’s second- 
.. .. largest steelmaker, said it would, 

invest $18.5 billion to expand 
its capacity by 5.8 unHiori met- 
■ ric tons, to 28 mini ma tons, by 
1999. 


:The announcement was 
made Wednesday, one day after 
Hyundai Pipe Co, which has 
been dependent an POSCO as a 
. supplier, notified South Korea’s 
Ministry of Trade, Industry and 
Energy of its plan to enter the 
sted business. - - 
The ministry quickly ex¬ 
pressed. its disapproval of die 
Hyundai plan, saying it feared 
an ova supp ly of sted would 
result Hyundai, in response, 
said the mi mstx / s predictions 
of demand for steel were too 


conservative, that demand 
would exceed supply by 20 mO- 
fion tons by the end of the de¬ 
cade and that any surplus sup¬ 
ply would be snapped by buyers 
m Chin*. 

Hyundai has long wanted to 
own a steel mill to free itself 
from dependence on POSCO, 
analysts m Seoul said. 

As POSCO and Hyundai 
were making their announce¬ 
ments, other South Korean 
sted companies also announced 
plans at an industry seminar 


Wednesday to expand produc¬ 
tion capacities. 

Han Bo Sted & General 
Construction Co. said it would 
build a sted plant to produce 2 
milli on tons of hot-rolled coils 
and 13 million tons of cold- 
rolled coils, Dongkuk Sted Mill 
Co. said it had started a project 
to increase capacity to 2.4 mil¬ 
lion tons by 1997, and Kang- 
won Industries Ltd. and Union 
Steel Manufacturing Co. said 
they, too, were drawing up ex¬ 
pansion plans. (AFP, AFX) 


■ Hyundai Strike Violence 
Striking workers at Hyundai 
Heavy Industries Co. cm Thurs¬ 
day forced their way through 
barricades into the company’s 
shipyard at Ulsan, defying a 
lockout by management, news 
agencies reported. 

The move by the strikers trig¬ 
gered a efosh with company ex¬ 
ecutives and security guards 
manning the barricades in 
which five people were injured. 

(AFP, Reuters) 


Bapindo 
Figure Is 
Sentenced 


Ccmpdet to Oar Sutf Fnm Dapaches 

JAKARTA — A court band¬ 
ed down the firet sentence in the 
Bapindo banking scandal Thurs¬ 
day. ordering a bank executive 
official to prison for nine years, 
while prosecutors demanded life 
imprisonment for the affair*s- 
leading figure. 

“You have been found guilty 
of corruption,” Chief Justice 
Soedjaiman said in sentencing 
Marxian Suparman, a junior ex¬ 
ecutive of PT Bank Pemban- 
eunan Indonesia, or Bapindo. 
Judge Pieter Pnrba. one of two 
assisting judges, said the defen¬ 
dant bad “helped cause losses 
to the state of $174.8 million.” 

He was convicted of unlaw¬ 
fully converting 12 irrevocable 
letters of credit for the business¬ 
man Eddy Tansil, the central 
figure in the case, between De¬ 
cember 1989 and May 1992. His 
lawyer said he would appeal the 
verdict. Mr. Tansil was subse¬ 
quently able to transfer the 
funds out of the country. 

In another Jakarta court¬ 
room, prosecutors said Mr. 
Tansfl should be sentenced to 
life imprisonment, be fined 
$370 million and lose his assets. 

Mr. Suparman and Mr. Tan¬ 
sil are two of six people facing 
trial over $450 million of losses 
incurred by Bapindo on letters 
of credit extended to Mr. Tan¬ 
sy's Golden Key group. 

Mr. Suparman, who was also 
found guilty of accepting 
5140,000 in bribes, was fined 15 
million rupiah ($7,000) and will 
have his house and land seized 
by the state. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


Bong Kong Panel 
Silent on Bad Bids 

Patten 

HONG KONG — A 
Hong Kong panel reviewing 
government rules for land 
a noti on* made only minor 
proposals in its initial find¬ 
ings and left a controversial 
issue — rigged bidding by 
consortiums — untouched. 

One panelists conceedod 
the initial report contained 
“nothing particularly new,” 
but said there “could be 
some quite significant 
changes" in a second report. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 


Singapore 
Straits Tunes 


Tokyo' 
Nikkei 225 


1S94 

Exchange.. 


rflij m F 



F M A 
1984 


Hong Kong Hang Seng 
. Singapore ■ StraftsTV nes 
Sydney • ■ A8 Ordinaries. 
Tokyo Nikkei 225 - 

Kuala iurnpur Composite ~ 
Bangkok • SET ~~ 1 

Seoul'—'.. Composite Stock 
Taipei : Weighted Price 
Mania PSE 

Jakarta ~ Stock Index 
New Zealand M2SE-4Q " 
Sombay NahooeUndex 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


'Thursday 

Close 

9,117.66 

24*920 

20,62230 


93525 

6^77.70 

2,64854 

461.14' \ 

2JB&20 

1*94237 


m F U A ** J ? • 
im . 

.■ Prev; V. : ; : : -!& '■ ... 

'Ck**.;--Change 

9.18&82 

.2,078.60 . , -1.41 
“2O,7E»io!..^70! 
1,000.72 -1-32. 

’ T^63J5® ' -138 
936.67 ' -6.14 

6,47*30 .' +1.60 
.2,663.46 -0.56 

462.54 ■ 

' 2.05494. -0.91 

■ 

IntenuUnBal HenU Tnhnc 


Very briefly: _ 

• France is to cancel or reschedule nearly $500 million in debt 
owed by Vietnam and. will almost double aid to its former colony 
for this year from $47 million. 

• Topgranp Holdings Ltd. of Malaysia signed an agreement to buy 
Dunham-Busfa Inc. and DB Holdings, two U.S. companies in the 
beating and refrigeration industry, for $4137 million. 

• DuraceO Inc. plans to manufacture rechargeable nickel hydride 
batteries in the United States in a joint venture with Toshiba 
Battery Co. of Japan and Varta Batterie AG of Germany. 

• Mazda Motor Coip. of Japan raised domestic motor-vehicle 
production by 12.4 percent from the figure a year earlier, to 88,413 
vehicles in June, the first increase in 21 months. 

• Sime Darby Bhd. of Malaysia, the diversified conglomerate, said 
it made a friendly cash bid of £21.7 milli on ($33.6 million) for Lee 
Refrigeration PLG. 

• Taiwan's export ratio to its gross national product fell to a 22- 

year low, 39.76 percent, in the first quarter because of its transfor¬ 
mation to a consumption-oriented economy, a government agen¬ 
cy said. AP, AFP. Bloomberg 


Al uminum Curbs to Remain 


CANBERRA — Major alu¬ 
minum-producing countries 
pledged on Thursday to contin¬ 
ue a round of voluntary produc¬ 
tion cuts agreed to in March, 
which has brought the industry 
back from the brink of collapse. 

After a two-day meeting 
here, 35 goverment representa¬ 
tives from Australia, the United 
Stales, the European Union, 
Norway, Canada and Russia 


said the agreement had helped 
build confidence in the alumi¬ 
num market, which was in crisis 
last year as a global oversupply 
sent prices plummeting. 

But the participants said in a 
communique that the market 
situation was still delicate. 

“While there are first indica¬ 
tions of a decline in inventories, 
inventories are still historically 
high* panting to a continuing 
imbalance between supply and 
demand,” the communique said. 


Ww 

JPCOMF 



DBOOK 




•SBF ■ PAR 

Published by the International 
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Launched in December 1993, the 
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Each profile includes: head office, 
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company background and major activities, 


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French Company Handbook is 
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ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 22,1994 


nMflMh 
HwnLow Mow 


Thursday’s 4 p-m. 

TWs (1st competed by the AP, consists of the 7,000 
most traded securities In terms at dollar value. It is 
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rtv5A’V'f—\* ,l SflP l . 



Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 22,1994 


SPORTS 


2 Undone Duties Spark Rangers’ Undoing of the Indians 


The Associated Press 

The Texas Rangers acquired 
Manuel Lee to play the infield, 
not to hit. The Gevciand Indi¬ 
ans got Jeff Russell to close out 
games, not to blow saves. 

Neither fulfilled their as¬ 
signed tasks Wednesday night, 
much to the delight of the 
Rangers. 

Lee, who had only 18 homers 
since 1985, hit a three-run shot 
off Russell in the ninth to tie the 

ALKOUNDUP 

game 1 J-l 1. Texas went on to 
beat Geve!and 13-11 in 14 in¬ 
nings on Juan Gonzalez's two- 
run homer in Cleveland. 

“I got lucky and hit the ball 
out of the park," Lee said. 

He also got lucky just by get¬ 
ting to the plate in die ninth. 

“We were talking about hit¬ 
ting Will Clark for Manny, and 
I said, ‘No I don’t want to,’" 
Manager Kevin Kennedy said. 
“I didn’t know Manny would 
hit a home run, but I knew he 
would have a good at bat. He's 
been hitting well with men in 
scoring position all year. It 
worked out” 

The homer was Lee's first in 
321 at bats since last Sept. 3. 


Gravity Check? Falling Dome Stops Seattle Games 


The AitodaloJ Press 

SEATTLE — From the city that 
brought you the raioed-out National Bas¬ 
ketball Association game, now comes the 
major-league baseball homestand cut short 
by gravity. 

Officials announced Wednesday that six 
American League games would not be 
played in the Kingdoms this week because 
of the threat that more ceiling Insulation 
tiles could fall on fans or players. 

Four tiles dropped Tuesday, prompting 
postponement of a Seattle Mariners game 
against the Baltimore Orioles. Unwilling 
to risk the possibility of more insulation 
crashing down, Wednesday’s Seattle-Balti¬ 


more doubleheader — which included a 
makeup of Tuesday’s game — also was 
postponed, and a four-game series Thurs¬ 
day through Sunday against the Red Sox 
was shifted to Fenway Park in Boston. 

Klngdome officials called in engineers 
Wednesday to try to determine why four 
tiles fell from the ceiling nearly 180 feet (55 
meters) up into the stands behind home 
plate on Tuesday. 

No one was hurt in the mishap, but it 
forced the first cancellation of a sporting 
event in the dome’s 18-year history. On 
Jan. 5,1986, an indoor NBA game between 
the SupexSonics and Phoenix Suns was 
called when rain leaked through the roof of 
the Seattle Coliseum. 


Wednesday, team officials announced 
that the Red Sox series would be played in 
Boston, with Seattle considered,the visitor. 

The Mariners said they would have pre¬ 
ferred to play in one of the nearby Tnplc- 
A Pacific Coast League stadiums. 

The teams will play Friday, a double- 
header on Saturday, and Sunday. The 
Mariners* next scheduled homestand be 1 
gins Aug. 2 against the California Angels. 

The two postponed Baltimore-Seattle 
games are expected to be made up at the 
end of the season if they play a part in the 
division races. The Orioles are in second 
place behind the New York Yankees in the 
AL East and the Mariners are 16 games 
under .500 in the AL West 


Russell, meanwhile, blew his 
fourth save of the year — his 
first for Cleveland. He was ac¬ 
quired from Boston last month. 

Larry Casian. the Indians' 
sixth pitcher, yielded a one-out 
single in the 14th by Jose Can¬ 
seco — his fourth hit — before 
Gonzalez drove the winning 
home run into the bleachers in 
left. Gonzalez also homered in 
the third. 


It overcame the Indians’ sec¬ 
ond five-homer performance in 
two nights. Albert Belle, Eddie 
Murray, Jim Thome, Paul Sor¬ 
rento and Wayne Kirby ho¬ 
mered for Oeveland. 

Yankees L Athletics (fc In 
Oakland. California, Melido 
Perez outdueled Steve Onti¬ 
veros and New York's Mike 
Stanley hit a solo homer for the 
game’s only run. 


The teams combined for only Steve Howe pitched the ninth 
five hits, twe by New York and for bis 11th save. 


career shutout as be won for the 
sixth time in seven decisions 

McDowell strode out nine in 
his second shutout this season 
and third complete game. Dar¬ 
rin Jackson hit a solohomer. las 
10th. as the . White Sox won 
their fourth straight to open a 
two-game lad over Oeveland 
in the AL Central 

Angels 8 , Red Sox .4: Bo 
Jackson and Guh Davis hit 
solo hornets and Spike Owen 
had three hiis and two RBIs to 
lead California past visiting 
Boston. 

The Angds won their fifth - 
straight against Boston, getting 
5ft strong bmings from Fhu 
Leftwkh before Russ Springer 
went the rest of the way forms 
first major-league save. 

Brewers II, Royals 1: hi M3-' 
waukee, Jose Valentin hit his 
first major league grand dam ■ 
and Matt Mieske drove in three 


What’s the Count? 

It’s Only a Beep At 


. By Baixtaby J* Feder 

Ne* York Times Service _ 

CHICAGO — The Toronto Blue Jays,.winners of, 
he struoling this season- But 


three by the A’s. The game 
started 3ft hours after the Tex¬ 
as-Oeveland game and was 
over before the Rangers and In¬ 
dians had finished. 


Ontiveros, who entered the ™ 
me undefeated as a starter 

is season, struck out two, 5 ?,^ * W 

_ 3 uu ^ outs m the sixth. 


walked one and hit two batters 


in pitching his first complete hS 

of the season 


game of the season. 

Perez pitched eight innin gs B 
and got his fifth straight vie- White Sox 3, Tigers 0: In 
tory. The right-hander struck Chicago, Jack McDowell 
out five and walked one before pitched a six-hitter for his 10 th 


Juan Guzman pitched eight 
strong innings, allowing Minne¬ 
sota only five tuts m Toronto. 


A Galaxy of Cup Stars in Italy 

An Array of Players WiULight Up Soccer’s Top League 


A galaxy of soccer stars 
who sparkled at the World 
Cup have joined Italian first- 
division dubs to test their 
skills in what is widely re¬ 
garded as the world's best 
soccer league. 

The league, won by AC Mi¬ 
lan for the past three seasons, 
had a face-lift during the 
World Cup as rosters were 
shuffled and foreign stars 
were signed in a busy transfer 
campaign that officially end¬ 
ed last week. 

Nearly a dozen newcomers 
have either signed with first- 
division clubs or are close to 
doing so. 

They include Jttrgeu Klins¬ 
mann of Germany, the only 
star to have already played in 
Italy, and Fredy Rincon of 
Colombia, whose country 
crashed out of the World Cup 
finals after the first round, 

Rincdm will guide a re¬ 
vamped attack at Napoli, 
which acquired the midfield¬ 
er from Brazil’s Falmeiras af¬ 
ter trading the Uruguayan 
forward Daniel Fonseca and 
Jonas Them, Sweden’s cap¬ 
tain, to AS Roma. 

Roma, which risked relega¬ 
tion last year, will field one of 
the league's most restructured 
squads, with Fonseca and 
Abel Balbo of Argentina up 
front and Them in midfield. 

Napoli, which signed Rin- 
c 6 n to a three-year deal, have 
also picked up the Brazilian 


defender Andre Cruz from 
Belgium's Standard Li&ge 
and the French midfielder 
Alain Bogbossian from 
Olympique Marseille. 

Klinsmann, who scored 
four goals in the United 
Stales and was a member of 
Germany’s triumphant 1990 
team, will return to Italy with 
Genoa if a deal to send the 
Czech striker Tomas Skuh- 
ravy to Leeds of England 
goes through, according to 
sources at Genoa. 

Klinsmann, who played for 
Monaco last season, left In- 
it*aazionale in 1992 after 
three seasons. 

Brescia is expected to 
transfer the Romanian star 
forward Gheorghe Hagi to 
Barcelona. A Brescia spokes¬ 
man said the club was reluc¬ 
tant to release Hagi but that 
officials were negotiating 
with Barcelona to satisfy the 
Romanian, who has received 
a lucrative three-year offer 
from the Spanish side. 

The spokesman said Bre¬ 
scia would sign another Ro¬ 
manian, probably Steaua Bu¬ 
charest’s Hie Dumitrescu, 
whose two goals against Ar¬ 
gentina powered Romania to 
the World Cup quarterfinals. 

African newcomers to the 
league include Sunday Oli- 
seh, a midfielder on the Nige¬ 
rian World Cap team, and 
Abedi Ayew, a Ghanaian for¬ 
ward. who should add some 
zip to Torino’s attack. Oliseh 


has joined Reggiaaa, which 
barely avoided relegation, 
from Standard Li£ge. 

Juventus, runner-up last 
season and home of the Ital¬ 
ian star Roberto Baggio, 
sig ned the Sporting Lisbon 
midfieder Paolo Sousa in 
ApriL The Turin team also 
acquired the French mid¬ 
fielder Didier Deschamps 
from Marseille. 

The Benfica midfielder Rui 
Costa has joined promoted 
Fiorentma, while a third Por¬ 
tuguese player, Fernando 
Couto, should shore up the 
back three at Parma, which 
picked up the defender from 
Porto. 

Italian news reports said 
Padova was trying to sign the 
UR. defender Alexi Lolas if it 
failed to sign Sweden’s Jo¬ 
achim Bjorklund. Padova has 
declined to comment 

But the U.S. team’s general 
manager. Bill Nuttall, said 
Coventry City of England’s 
Premier League was interest¬ 
ed in Lalas, whose contract 
with the U.S. team expires 
Oct 31. He said Coventry’s 
coach, Phil Neal, and chair¬ 
man, Bryan Richardson, had 
met last week in Los Angeles 
with Lalas, 24. 

Another American player, 
the forward Joe-Max Moore, 
has been sent to Saarbrucken 
of the German second divi¬ 
sion on a one-season loan. 

(Reuters, AP) 




«■; ■ 




•• v* 
■ - 


Gary C. Cukcgr'ibMcn 

Sammy Sosa connecting for one of his two home rum in Chicago’s 9-8 victory in Denver. 


The Associated Pros ■ 

Thanks to the San Diego Pa¬ 
dres and- Pittsburgh Pirates, 
there is a tight race in the Na¬ 
tional League East 

. The Montreal Expos and At¬ 
lanta Braves are virtually tied 
far the NL East lead thanks in 
huge part to their respective 

I^RobaHJP 

- play against one opponent: 
Montreal is-12-0 against San 
Diego while Atlanta is 3-9 
against Pittsburgh. 

Take away those two mat- 
chaps arid Atlanta is nine 
mines better than Montreal 
the bad news for the Expos 
into the last 70-odd 
games of the season is that bodt 
series are finishe d. ' 
Montreal completed its 
sweep of San Dies 0 and ran its 
two-season record against the 
Padres to 22-2 with a 5-2 victory 
Wednesday night in Montreal. 
Pittsburgh, a foil of the Braves 
only a couple yean ago, beat 
the Braves 5-4. • 

Moses Alou’s hases-loaded 
RBI single off Andy BerieS in 
thefifth broke a 2-2 tie, and WB. 
Cordero’s two-run homer, his. 
. 14th, made it 5-2 in the sixth. 

.Pirates 5, Breves 4: The bot¬ 
tom of the Pirates’ batting order 
produced all five tuns in Pitts¬ 
burgh. Tom Foley singled in the 
go-ahead rim after Don Slanght, 
who was 3-far-3, doubled; start- 
mg pitcher Darrny Neagje drove 
in three runs to set the stage for 
Panl Wagner to win it, 

Martins 8 , Reds 7: In Cincin¬ 


nati Gary Sheffield hit the first- 
pinch-homer in Florida history, 
a two-run shot in the eighth 
miring off Jeff Brantley, •. • 

Sheffield's franchise-record 
21 st homer bounced off the top 
of the wall in center field to put 
tbs Martins ahead 7-6. His run- 
scoring forceout in the ninth' 
scored the eventual deciding ■ 
run as Florida snapped a five - 1 
game loang streak. 

Gabs % Rockies & Mark. 
Grade had four bits and three 
doubles, the last ft two-run shot ■ 
in the eighth to give Chicago a a, 
three-game sweep in Denver. 

With the scare tied 7-7 in the 
eighth, pinch-hitter Tuffy 
Rhodes singled with one out off; 
Steve Reed and moved to sec-' 
end on a walk to Mike Maksu- 
diari. Grace followed with a ‘ 
double, giving to give the Cubs 
a 9-7 lead. . 

Mete 5. Dodgers 4: In New 
York, BoW^BoniDa hit a go- 
ahead two-rimhomo: in the 
thfad.inmng, Hs 16th of the sea¬ 
son, arid BretSaberhagen beat 
Los Angeles for the third rime 
this season. 

Astros 2, Cardinals <k Greg 
Swindell and John Hudek com-' 
bined on a five-hitter, and Chris 
Donnds broke a scoreless tie:= 
with anRBI double in the sixth 
in Houston. 

- Swindell give up all five St... 
Louis hits in eight innings and 
struck but six. Hudek got his 
16th save in 17 chances. . 

Ghmts S PtrnHks 2z In Phila¬ 
delphia, Mike. Benjamin drove 
in a career-high four runs as. 
San Francisco won for the 10th 
time in 11 games. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 22. 1994 


Page 17 



On a Grand Day for a Picnic, a Latvian Cyclist Triumphs Grandly 


!% 


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tonic* Kflwr*M*flKFc 

The Toot de FYance pack pnwmg a viDage near Ghises on Thursday daring the third of four daily stages in the Alps. 


By Samuel Abt 

Internal tonal Herald Tnkvx 

CLUSES, France — Pioir 
Urguraov learned his lesson 
and so did Miguel lndurain and 
Richard Virenque. 

They all proved that Thurs¬ 
day 35 the Tour de France com¬ 
pleted its third of four daily 
stages in the Alps, climbing 
three big mountains and pre¬ 
paring for the individual time 
trial Friday that should decide 
who will stand second and third 
below lndurain when the bicy¬ 
cle race ends Sunday afternoon 
in Paris, 

Ugrumov, a Latvian wbo 
rides for the Gewiss team, in¬ 
truded into the handful of con¬ 
tenders by racing away to an 
easy victory on the 18th stage, a 
174.5-kfiomeier (108.5-mile) 
jaunt from Moutiers to C3uses. 
A day after he was beaten for 
the stage victory in a two-man 
sprint, Ugrumov had the sense 
to ride alone to the finish. 

By completing the stage 2 
minutes 39 seconds ahead of 
the second-placed lndurain, the 
Latvian jumped from sixth 
place overall to third. His time 
was 4 hours 52 minutes 19 sec¬ 
onds, an hourly average of 35.8 
kilometers. 

lndurain, a Spaniard who 
rides for Banesto, similarly 
profited from Wednesday's ex¬ 
perience of bang overtaken in 
the meaningless sprint for 
fourth place by the vainglorious 
Virenque. In the same mono a 


mono. Big Mig turned on the 
burners this lime and left Viren¬ 
que one second behind. 

Eating dust or not, Virenque 
was content with third place for 
the stage. A Frenchman who 
rides for Feslina, he tightened 
his bold on second place overall 
by finishing 45 seconds ahead 
of his main rival, Marco Pan- 
Umi, an Italian with Carrera. 

Pantani. who fell to fourth 
place from third, gamed 1:29 on 
Virenque on Wednesday by 
surprising him on the final 
climb. 

Although there was plenty of 
climbing Thursday, the last 20 
kilometers from ihe 1613-xne- 
ler-high (5,322-foot-high) peak 
of the Colombiere were all 
dow nhill. Virenque used that 
terrain to pull away from the 
Italian, who is too fight at 123 
pounds (about 55 kilograms) to 
be an overly speedy descender. 

So. with' the 473-kilometer 
uphill time trial facing the 
Tour’s remaining 119 riders 
Friday. lndurain is secure in the 
overall lead by 7:22 over Viren¬ 
que, who is 1:33 ahead of Urgu- 
mov. who is 2 seconds ahead of 
Pantani, who is 32 seconds 
ahead of Luc Leblanc. 

lndurain, Pantani and Viren¬ 
que, in that order, should be the 
favorites in the time trial to the 
resort of Momne-Avoriaz. 

Leblanc, a Frenchman wbo 
rides for Feslina and has the 
suicidal habit of attacking and 
wasting his energy the day be¬ 


fore a time trial, was at it again 
on this stage. Twice he bolted 
away and twice he was caught 
before he flatted on the final 
descent and lost enough time to 
fall from fourth place overall to 
fifth. 

Other casualties included the 
six riders who quit during the 
day and Annand De Las Cue¬ 
vas, a Frenchman with Casior- 
ama who ranked as high as 
third on Monday. Suffering 
with a heavy chest cold and 
demoted to 17th place overall 
on Wednesday, he did not start 
the proceedings. He missed 
something. 

A few puffy clouds in a pale 
blue sky, a healing sun, a cool¬ 
ing breeze: What a grand day it 
was for a picnic or a bicycle race 
and what a grander day for 
both together. 

Acting on that theory. Con¬ 
stant Pointet, a worker in a 
charcoal factory, and his ap¬ 
prentice fiancee, Denise Gnin- 
deu a cleaning woman, drove 
up toward the Saisies Peak, 
1633 meters high and (he first of 
the three first-category climbs 
in the stage. 

Parking their car below a cow- 
pasture full of mauve wild- 
flowers, choosing a spot with a 
view of the climbing riders 
through willow and fir trees and 
unpacking a table, two chairs 
and a hamper of food and wine, 
the couple settled down for a 
holiday. 

They were doing exactly 


what hundreds of thousands of 
people did Thursday in the Alps 
and what millions will have 
done around the country by 
Sunday during the three weeks 
of the Tour. 

The couple saw only a small 
pan of the stage, of course. As 
they passed the pale; the slices 
of bam. the crusty bread, the 
pickles and the red wine be¬ 
tween them, they saw the pack 
pursuing the first of many 
breakaways. 

Peter De Gercq, a Belgian 
with Lotto, and Davide Cas- 
sani, an Italian with GB-MG, 
were ibe fugitives on that first 
climb. After they were caught, 
dozens of other riders gave it a 
whirl. 

All through the afternoon, 
the pack was in such a frisky 
mood that even such dormant 
teams as Motorola and Nove- 
mail had riders in attacks. 
Ugrumov made his winning 
move on the second climb, the 
Croix-Fry Pass, 1467 meters 
high and populated bv lawless 
hooligans who hurled buckets 
of water at and into reporters' 
cars preceding the riders. 

On the final climb, the Latvi¬ 
an rode fast enough to make 
certain he had no companion to 
snatch away his victory. Anns 
aloft in solitary glory, he 
cruised in just about the time 
Pointet and GnindeL, that hap¬ 
py couple, would hare been tak¬ 
ing a glass of pastis as an aperi¬ 
tif for dinner. 


r 

f* 




•?s 


Spain Sweeps Ahead in Federation Cup 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispasdta 

FRANKFURT— Spam, the 
defending champ ion, swept into 
the quarterfinals of the Federa¬ 
tion Cup on Thursday with a 3-0 
victory over Argentina. 

The United States, Bulgaria 
and Austria also reached the 
quarterfinals. 

Conchita Martinez, the Wim¬ 
bledon champion, put the 
Spaniards ahead after fighting 
off a spirited counterattack by 
Patricia Tarabhri in the first 
singles. Tarabini won a second- 
set tiebreaker, 8-6, to level their 
rimph at one set each but Marti¬ 
nez stormed bade in the final set 

to win, 6-3,6-7,6-2. 

Arantxa SdnchezVkario eas¬ 


ily beat Florcnda Labat, 6-1,6- 
4, to ensure Spam’s place in the 
last eighL Marie Angeles Mon- 
tolio and Neus Avila then 
cruised past Florenda Labat 
and Bettma Fulco-VtUefla in 
the doubles, 6-1,64. ■ 

The second-seeded Ameri¬ 
cans now face No. 8 Austria, 
which put an end to Australia's 
title hopes. 

Mary-Joe Fernandez led the 
United States toward victory 
with an easy 6-1 4-1. triumph 
over Canada’s Helen Kdesi, 
who retired with a thigh injury. 

Lindsay Davenport followed 
up by crushing Patricia Hy, 6-2, 
-64. hr the doubles, the Ameri¬ 
cans -Gigi Fernandez and Zina 


Garrison Jackson stopped J31 
Hetherington and Rene Smp- 
son-Alter, 6-1, 7-6 (7-3). 

Bulgaria, seeded sixth, routed 
Indonesia. Magdalena Maleeva 
beat Yayuk Basuki, 6-3, 6-3, 
and her sister, Katerina, defeat¬ 
ed Romana Tedjaknsuma, 6-2, 
6-L The Bulgarians completed 
the rout in the doubles, as Lu- 
bo nrira Bacheva and Svetlana 
Krivencbeva easily stopped Ro¬ 
mans Tedjakusuma Yuyuk and 
Basuki, 6-1, 6-3. 

Australia, last year’s losing 
finalist, was ehmmated by Aus¬ 
tria, with Petra Ritter beating 
Rachel McQuillan, 64.6-1, and 
Judith Wiesner sweeping aside 
Kristine Radford. 64). 6-3. The 


Australian team of Elizabeth 
Smy lie and Retinae Stubbs won 
the meaningless doubles match, 
defeating §ylvia Plischke and 
Barbara Schett, 6-2, 6-3. 

(Reuters, AP) 

m Graf Disappoints 1TF 

International Tennis Federa¬ 
tion officials expressed disap¬ 
pointment on Thursday when 
they learned that Steffi Graf, the 
world's lop-ranked women's 
player, had decided to play an 
exhibition tournament in the 
United Slates this week after de¬ 
clining to play in the Federation 
Cup, Agence France-Presse re¬ 
ported from Frankfurt 


Sl Petersburg Gets Games Face-Lift 


The Associated Press 

ST. PETERSBURG — With just two 
days to go before the start of the 16-day 
Goodwill Games, frantic work was still 
going on Thursday to get the venues 
ready for the first major sports event in 
post-Soviet Russia. 

“At other big events some things bare 
always been done at the last minute, but 
the efifference here is that MOST things 
are being done that way,” said the presi¬ 
dent of the Games, Jack Kelly. 

Nowhere was the race to make the 
deadline more urgent than at the SKA 
indoor swimming pool, where the 50- 
meter freestyle dud between the Ameri¬ 
can Tom Jager and the Russian Alexan¬ 
der Popov kicks off the competition 
Saturday morning. 


Hundreds of soldiers were installing 
windows, painting walls and laying walk¬ 
ways. The pool was filled with brackish 
water and the building reeked of paint 
Workers were paving a parking lot and 
putting up billboards at the Petrovsky 
stadium, site of the track and field com¬ 
petition. which will feature stars such as 
the American sprinters Carl Lewis and 
Leroy Bund] and the Ukrainian pole- 
vaultcr Sergei Bubka. 

Critics hare predicted an organization¬ 
al disaster in a city reeling from economic 
problems since the collapse of the Soviet 
Union. But Kelly said the Russians would 
have everything ready on time. 

“Certainly the city will be ready when 
the Games start, but it’s going to be 
ready on its schedule.” he said. “We had 


a desirable schedule, but the schedule 
was to finish just in time for the Games, 
not a bit earlier.” 

More than 2,000 athletes from 55 
countries will be competing in 24 sports. 
The field includes at least 60 Olympic 
medalists, 30 world champions and 15 
world record-holders. 

These are the third Goodwill Games, 
which were created in the mid-1980s by 
the American entrepreneur Ted Turner. 
The first two, held in Moscow in 1986 
and in Seattle in 1990, saddled Turner 
Broadcast Systems with combined losses 
of more than $60 million. 

Officials had hoped to break even on 
the Sl Petersburg Games, but Kelly said 
there would be another financial loss. 


SIDELINES 


Simla Deal With Dolphins Reported 

DAVIE, Florida (AP) — Don Simla is expected to sign a 
contract extension that would give hhn the option to coach the 
National Football League's Miami Dolphins through the 1996 
season or take another job with the team. The Miami Herald 
reported Thursday. 

The contract is estimated to be worth up to S4 million, depend- 
ing on whether Simla derides to continue coaching, the newspaper 
reported. The Herald said that if aula decided to leave coaching 
before the contract expired, he would be guaranteed an executive 
position that might include minority ownership. A news confer¬ 
ence to announce the deal was tentatively set for later Thursday, 
the newspaper said. , . . 

Shnla, 64, declined to commentWednesday after a report by the 
Sun-Sentinel in Fort Lauderdale said the team’s owner, H. Wayne 
Hnizenga, would hold a news conference Dunsdsy. Last week, 
gbula said he hadn't decided whether to continue coachi n g be¬ 
yond this season. His contract expires after tins year. 

Cyclist’s Family Seeks Murder Probe 

PAU, France (AP) —The family of the late Spanish cyclist Luis 
Ocana on Thursday demanded a wider investigation into the 
champion’s death in May, rgectrng the official finding that the 

caus e was suidda , . „ . 

Ocana’s mother and her children noted that Ocana, who was 
right-handed, had received a gunshot wound to the left temple. 
The family filed a complaint de manding that an investigating 
magistrate widen Ms probe to focus on possible subjects. Ocana, 

49 . was found with a gunshot wound to the head m Ms home in the 

southern town of Caujpenne (TArmagnac on May 19 and died at a 
hosoitaL His body was cremated after an autopsy. 

* “We never believed in the official suicide theory, raid the 
'cycHsfs brother, Antoine Ocana. Referring to reports that sug¬ 
gested suicide motives, he added, “My brother never had cancer 
and he was never fin a nc ially ruined.” 


SCOREBOARD 

Major League Standings] 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

East WvtJtow 

W L FCL 
New York 54 34 409 

08 

Bo tb mure 

S 3 30 

JB 2 

2 W 

Boston 

45 48 

AO* 

llto 


43 SO 

MJ 

Wi 

Dtoratt 

42 Sl 

M 2 

1 SW 


Ctotrto DWbksr 
57 36 

jn 


Oevotornt 

54 37 

593 

2 

Kansas aty 

49 44 

-514 

9 

Mllwaakce 

44 50 

M 

13 W 

Mnaesata 

43 50 

A 42 

14 

Texas 

WestDTvblM 
44 40 

AS? 


CaWornlo 

43 54 

ASS 

5 

Oakkmd 

41 S 3 

ASt 

S 

Seattle 

3 B 54 

AO 

7 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EattDMNen 

W L Pet. 
-Atlanta 56 M jm 

GB 

Montreal 

S 7 37 

-406 

— 

PitUodMptiio 

45 50 

474 

ovs 

Now York 

44 5 B 

MO 

u 

Ftartda 

41 52 

ASS 

MV, 

Ctoctonatl 

Central DMston 
56 31 

J 96 

_ 

Houston 

54 41 

JOO 

3V, 

Pittsburgh 

45 40 

AO* 

nv. 

SL Louts 

49 48 

ATS 

llVi 

CMcaao 

41 52 

AK 

MH i 

LasAitootes 

West Dtvtstoa 

48 47 

SOS 


Coiofiato 

4 * Sl 

AT* 

3 

5 an Frenctaco *S Sl 

M 9 

aw 

SanOtego 

37 59 

JBS 

iih 

Wednesday’s Line Scores 


For die Record 


The condition of the Olympic freestyle siding aerials gold 
medalist Lina Cherjazova, 25, was iromcie^^We^nesday from 
to serious, and doctors expressed hope that the Uzlxkman 
skier, who was figured in practice last week m Lake Flaad, New 

Y R^O^S, 1 S^tional Football Iggotfs^-time leader 
^^LJ^U # bvariimiiiasback with 566, raid he would retire 


AMERICAN UEAQUE 

m m too—9 * o 

m too 100-9 7 7 
wan* ond Tetttoton; McDowell and Ting- 
tay.W—44cDowelW-S. L—WelbJ-4. HR-Cbl- 
oa* .ta cking (HI. 

ary m too on -1 f • 
tot IIS US —11 IS • 
Gordon, DnUn do ( 7 ) end Mactartane; 
Banes. Mercedes t» and Nilsson, Mathew 
<■). W—Bows, 9*. L-Cardon. * 4 . HR—Mll- 
woukae. vwaittn.ro. 

M MS MV-1 « X 


m 



U1 UU* • --“1--- „ s 

nextmanth after 11 seasons. 


(AP) 


u • 

Erickson, Slovens ( 5 ). AsuBora (to and 
Watoocfc, Ports <*>; Guzman. RBMfl ( 9 ) 
and Borders. W-Guzmon. 1 M. L—Briaaon. 
M. HRs—Minnesota Mock < 121 . Toronto 

m. 


an «i 2 us ooo u-n a l 

«1 UG MS OO-ll 17 0 

(M Ion! BBS) 

Dottraer, Bohcnon ( 2 ), Corpentor Ml, Hon- 
•vent! ( 6 ), Homes U). Oliver (■}. Hanke ( 111 . 
WMtaaMe fUj and RodHouezi MOork, Moot 
00. Piunk m. Russell W. LWtaebf fW, Co- 
slon ( 14 ) and Alomar. W H enke . >*. L-Co- 
Sian, V 4 . S, W hi tesi de ( 1 ). HR*—Texas. 
OmafcK) ( 16 ). J*. Lee ( 1 ). Cleveland. Thome 
( 151 . Ben* ( 28 ). Murray 041 . Sorrento ( 101 . 
Kirby (S>. 

NSW Yam M 0 M 0 too —i 3 a 

Oakland ttt 000 000-0 3 3 

PMZ.HWIS (91 and Stanley ;OnHvorcs o wd 
Hemond. W—Perez. W. L—Ontiveros, 5-1 
nil. HR—New York, Stanley nil. 

W Ml 0 * 0—4 9 ■ 

20 on kx— a u i 

Nobholz, Bankhead ro.Howwd ( 71 . Ryan 
m aid Borrynm; Leflwfc*.a»rinoer («} and 
Turner, w—LetiwicS\ SL L-Nabnott. 2-1 
Sv—Springer 111 . HR*— Boston. BemrhUl 
(Sl. CtfhMa Davis ( 3 BI, Jackson ( 10 ). 
MATIONAi. LEAGUE 

m mo m -9 9 i 

MS OH 099-3 M 3 

Portugal. Montefeane ( 9 ) cm Mo n wo rt ng; 
Wfesf, Borlond ( 4 ).Slocuina ( 51 . Anderson ( 71 . 
Carter (SI and UdborthaL W—Portugal, 9 d. 
L—West. 44 . H R s Son PranctSSO. Band* 
OH. Ma. WUnoms ( 35 ). 

S 0 
1 1 

Tewksbury, Morphy m. Rodriguez (II and 
McGrtffr SMndefi. Hudek < 9 | end Etoebta. 
W—Swindon, M. L-Towksborv. ih. 
(ML 

111 Ml 200—4 T 1 3 

New York on 3 N OQa —5 13 1 

Mgllao*.Seoooz ( 01 , Gall (Hand Heman- 
daz; SetertMoon, Manzanillo ( 7 ). Franco C 9 ) 
and SlimeIt W—SaOertxven. 3 J-L L— Mtr- 
Omt. S- 7 . Sv—Franca ( 20 . HR*—Los Ange¬ 
lo*. Butler (71 New York, BonTOo (U). 

as m 020-9 u t 

020 3 M 010—4 10 • 

Bonks, Veres ((). Crtm U), Bouttsto (I). 
Plesoc ( 9 ) and Panto; Mis, Gr. Hams ( 3 ), 
Holmes ( 5 ).M.Munoe MI.S. Rood ( 7 ), am* 
fln( 9 ) end Shcoffer. W—von*. IJLI^-S. Reed. 
3-1 Sv—Plesoc ( 1 ). HRs—Oiicoao. Soto 2 
( 331 . Coisrada Habbard ( 1 ). 

100 011 MO -3 7 I 
OH 212 MX —5 10 ■ 

Bone*. Brocotl ( 7 ) and Ausnus; Henry. Ro¬ 
les (SI, WeHeland (91 and DFletdier. Spetar 
Ol. 19 —Henry. M L—Benta«-n. 5 V—WWW- 
tond n«l. HRs—Montreal. Grtsrom ( 7 ), Cor¬ 
dero 04 ). 

000 200 TO*—* 7 1 

013 109 I I, 5 12 1 

GtevHto Bednnton <U ond Lonez; Neoeie. 
Wasner (71. Dyer <91 ad SlaugM. 
w —wognen ML l— Gkrotne, 11* Sv D yer 
( 3 )- HR—Altotla, RKOlly IB). 


Fhrtdq 300 020 BZI -4 » 0 

CTactnnaH 050 OM Ml —7 II 0 

Weather*. Aautno ( 2 ).MottiewsU),YPeraz 
(II Men (01 ond Natal; Riio. McElrar 17 ). 
J Bran! lev ( 7 k Carrasco (91 and Taubenseo. 
Dorsott ( 91 . W—taatMws. 3 - 1 . L—J. Bratolev. 
5 * Sv—Nen U 2 j. HRo-Florkto Sheffield 
( 31 ). Cincinnati, Boone 18 ). 

The Michael Jordan Watch 

WEDNESDAY'S GAME: Jordon woof 0 - 
lor -4 with o onuodouk DneouL sfrikoout and 
dvouL He nod one oufouL one assist and one 
error. Ho dropped a fly ball M me second, 
ai lowing one run to score. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan b batting .IBS 
Ifl-tor-a*) with 27 runs. UOouMes.one triple. 
34 RBIs. 37 wants. 82 sfrtleouts and T2. sfoien 
bam In 36 attempts. He basis Putouts. five 
assbfs md 10 errors ki rloM field. 


CFL Standings 


Eotfern Oivbtoo 
W L T 


Bolflmqre 

Toronto 

Winnipeg 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Shreveport 


PF PA Pis 
44 42 2 
55 62 3 
70 59 2 
79 10D 2 
33 51 0 
44 75 0 


Western Dhrbtan 
Brtt-Columbto 2 0 0 


Las Vegas 
Edmonton 
Calgary 
lauumenie 

Seakai chevron 


81 20 4 
0 M 48 4 

0 84 B2 4 

0 43 38 2 

D 51 54 2 

0 44 S3 2 


W e d n e s day's Gam# 

Edmonton 21 Ottawa 21 

~ '•O-'AI "avwRJtk MT".*! .'.Ii.-v 
; - 

- - w 

Tour de France _ 

Results Thursday of i 744 *HoeMter ( 198 - 
mite) Wtntarge treat Momenta Clem, tom 
cvdbt, c o u ntry , team OM wtaniae lime: 1 . 
plotr Ugrumov. Latvia Gewbs. 4 hours. 52 
minutes. 19 seconds: 1 Mieiioi lndurain. 
Spain. Elonesta. 2 minutes. 39 seconds behind,- 
1 RJrtmrd Vlrenoue, France. Fetltno. ?:«; *, 
Fernando Escnrtki. Spain. Mopel. 3 : 25 : & 
Marco Pantoto, Italy. Carrera 3 : 25 . 

I. Roberto Cona Italy. Lampre. 1 : 3 *; 7 , Pas¬ 
cal Lino. Franco. Feslina, 3 : 30 ; 0. Luc Leb¬ 
lanc. Franca Feslina 3 : 39 ; a Arturas Kotou- 


fb. LithuaniaFoHt 4 JS: IftOscar PoHKMI. 
Italy. PoWU 4 : 55 . 

Ovorall Sta n di n gs: I, iWlouel indurata 
Spam. Banasto 91 hours. 37 minutes 43 sec¬ 
onds; Z Richard Virenque. France. Feslina 
7 : 22 behind; 3 . Plotr Uan>nov, Latvia Gewiss, 
fcSS; 4 .MortoPantiPiUHitv.Camrju, 8 : 57 ,- 5 , 
Luc Lehkmc, Franc*. Feslina 9 : 29 . 

A Roberta Conti, noly. GB-MG, 10 : 51 : 7 . 
Alberta EIR, llalv. GB-MB. M: 30 ; & AIM 
Zulle. Switzerland. ONCE. 19 : 02 ; 9 . Udo Bolts. 
Germany. Teiokam, 21 : 13 ; la Pracal Una 
France. Feslina 21:21 

j/r-rw.v; .-smHur..;, —:— 

FIRST TEST 
Thursday, at Lord's 
South Africa vs. Le g beta first day 
South Africa 1 st Innings: 2*44 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 22,1994 


OBSERVER 


Here Comes Weather 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Louie Alien 
is dead now who used to do 
the TV weather on Channel 9, 
Washington, with nothing but a 
crayon and a big sheet of draw- 


at was back in the 1950s, 
or maybe ’60s, and it’s been 
downhill ever since for TV 
weather, as well as for men 
called Louie, which is to say 
they don't make 'em anymore. 

To push around fronts and 
air masses with his drop-dead 
indifference to the melodrama 
of the skies—using nothing but 
a crayon! — you bad to be a 
genuine Louie for that 

Progress hasn’t been good to 
TV weather watchers. All the 
new electronic gadgets, photos 
from deep space, radar-imaging 
machines, multicolored techni¬ 
cally enhanced simultaneously 
recalibrated dew-point readings 
from that worrisome low-pres¬ 
sure area off Samoa —come on, 
guys, just give it to us straight 
from the shoulder about tomor¬ 
row, the way Louie did. 

What's it mean for people 
who have to live with the stuff? 
Umbrellas? Air-conditioning? 
Earmuffs? 

□ 

With a few crayon strokes, 
Louie showed where the fronts 
were preparing their foul or 
blissful work. Then he gave a 
20-seoond meteorology lesson: 
“Air moves clockwise around a 


high-pressure area, counter¬ 
clockwise around a low.'* 


A few more crayon strokes 
produced a stick man in a straw 
boater, and Louie said, “A good 
day for outdoor activity. A 
stick child reading—yes, read¬ 
ing, not watching the tube — 
meant you’d better plan for “in¬ 
door activity.” 

Good day or bad, Louie 
brought cheery prospects for 
“activity.” There was no apolo¬ 
getic whining such as you get 
from the TV nowadays when 
rain promises a damp weekend. 

This is not a lament for an 
unrecoverable past, but a want¬ 
ing to today’s overequipped, 
state-of-the-art TV weather 
people. They are losing their 


way m jungles of technology. 
They are yielding to shabby the¬ 
atrical impulses to pervert 
good, upright, honest weather 
into corny daily mdodrama. 

D 

Die great philosophical troth 
about weather was enunciated 
some 40 years ago by a newspa¬ 
per reporter named John Can. 
For the fifth consecutive day, 
on reporting for work at the city 
desk Carr was assigned to write 
a weather story. 

Three minutes later he turned 
in a story which said, in its en¬ 
tirety, “every day we have some 
weather, and today was no ex¬ 
ception.” 

Nowadays we have hundreds 
of TV weather people who 
come to work every day appar¬ 
ently under the illusion that this 
is the first day there has ever 
been any weather anywhere. 

Why do they want to make us 
feel bad? Don’t they want us to 
be happy about having this 
wonderful wind and rain and 
heat and ice giving us an endless 
supply of days for outdoor ac¬ 
tivity interspersed with plenty 
of days for delightful indoor 
activity? 

Some are televised sitting in 
rooms packed with scientific in¬ 
struments, such rooms as Dr. 
Frankenstein used during 
heavy showers to make a botch 
of poor old Boris Karloff. How 
can it fail to alarm the viewer? 

What of tomorrow, TV 
weatherfolk? Fair and mild? 
Showers followed by clearing? 
Freezing and blustery with pos¬ 
sible snow? 

Few of them traffic much in 
such useful local information 
unless it's “Button down for 
hurricanes, tornadoes and ty- 

J ihoons,” events that Louie AL- 
en would have characterized as 
ideal for cellar activity. 

Cable's Weather Channel of 
course can be useful if you live 
in one of those Texas counties 
always watching for thunder¬ 
storms. Most people don’t, so 
they have to hold a wet finger in 
the wind when they want to 
know whether the next activity 
will be outdoor or indoor. 


New York Tima Service 


An Actor’s Long-Running Vietnam Role 


By Ralph Blumenthal 

New Yak Tima Service 

N EW YORK — Richard Hughes, fabled as the 
last Am erican to leave Saigon in the 1970s, is 
finding that Vietnam still refuses to let go of him. 
And vice versa. 

So he was hardly surprised when, rehearsing for 
an Off Off Broadway production of “The Seagull" 
in 1992, be stepped off the A train at Canal Street 
and came face to face with the big green sign of the 
Kinh Do Vietnamese Restaurant 
As an omen, not to mention an eating place, it was 
hard to pass up. So Hughes, a 52-year-old Kus- 
burgh-bom actor, surrendered to the lure of a bowl 
of pho in the same way he had given himself to 
Vietnam and the cause of the homeless urchins he 
sheltered in his Sboeshine Boys hostels in wartime 
Saigon a quarter of a century ago. 

That’s where I first met him, and as a correspon¬ 
dent for The New Yoik Times in Saigon. I wrote the 
first piece about the Shoeshine Boys. 

Since he first discovered Kinh Do (“Big City”), 
Hughes has come bade to the restaurant for pho. a 
heart/ rice-noodle soup with beef, and for the crispy 
pork and shrimp rolls called cha gio. In fact, he 
chose Ki nh Do as the place to have lunch recently 
and talk about how Vietnam derailed the acting 
career that he is now trying to get back on track. 

He also recounted his campaign to free two for¬ 
mer Vietnamese colleagues jailed in Ho Chi Minh 
City (the former Saigon) in 1990 for what the gov¬ 
ernment called “anti-socialist activities," a cause 
that has put him more than 535,000 in debt. 

*T made a couple of copies." be began, turning up 
at the table in a blue work shirt and sliding into a 
seat. His briefcase bulged with dog-eared correspon¬ 
dence with Tom Cruise, Paul Newman, Robert De 
Niro and others who have helped his cause, newspa¬ 
per clippings and fund-raising appeals, focused on 
the cases of Doan Than Liem, a lawyer who is 
repotted dose to release, cutting short his 12-year 
term, and Do Ngoc Long, an economist, freed last 
year and awaiting asylum in the United States. 

He remembered enough Vietnamese to banter 
with the restaurateur, Tu Van Nguyen, a former 
South Vietnamese army major who spent 10 years in 
Communist re-education camps and jails. 

Hughes would have been satisfied with a bowl of 
pho, but Tu would not hear of it Nothing but the 
house special would da Tu scurried off to see to it. 

After graduating in 1965 from Carnegie Tech and 
two years later from the Boston University Gradu¬ 
ate School of Drama, he started off at the Theater 
Company of Boston. 

In 1968, as a conscientious objector, he refused 
the Vietnam draft, then borrowed 51,500 to travel on 
his own to Saigon, where he helped found the 
Dispatch News Service — which distributed Sey¬ 
mour Hersh’s exclusive on the My Lai massacre — 
and opened a shelter for street children called the 
Shoeshine Boys Project, so named because the chil¬ 
dren commonly subsisted by shining shoes. 

The low-key charity was lionized in news articles. 
Richard Avedon took pictures, and Hughes was 



Did) Pra/Tbe New Ye* Tone* 


Richard Hughes today, left, and in 1968 in Saigon with one of the dutdreo his project helped. 


even flown bade to the States in 1974 for a surprise threesome, he said: “You can’t get any 
family reunion oh “This Is Your Life,” including a. taking care or a kid: who dies. 
tribute by the U.S. representative at the United 


closer than 


Nations, George Bush. 

By the mid-70s, Long and Liem were taking more 
responsibility for the charity, which expanded to 
eight group homes — six m Saigon and two in 
Danang—before they were phased out and Hughes 
was told to pick up his exit visa in 1976, three years 
after the last GIs left Vie tnam and more than a year 
after the Communist victory minified North and 
South Vie tnam. The chanty aided some. 1,500 
youngsters, mainly boys bat also some girls. 


The worst part of the story, Hughes continued, 
was having to be defensive for taking his loyalty to 
lids friends to such lengths. 

“1 had to explain who these people are and why 
Tm doing what Fm doing,” he said. “I fdt there was- 

almost something wrong-here because I cared. Itfs 
been an uphill battle. People are usually not that 
loyal for so long.” . . 

Butnow,heMud,“Ig0tto thepomtrmnolonger 

apologize^ for the natural thing to da” 


In 1976, when he got back from Vietnam, be tried 
to restart his acting career, landing some parts in 
regional theaters, then a prime supporting role as 
Bernardo in Kevin KHne’s “Hamlet” at the Public 
Theater in 1986, and going on to other film and 
theater roles. 



But Vietnam was claiming his life again. In 1990, 
Long and Liem were arrested, along with a former 
American colleague, Michael Morrow, a develop¬ 
ment consultant, over their meetings with a free¬ 
lance writer who bad angered the authorities. 

Morrow was released after three weeks, Hughes 
said, but the two-Vietnamese were more harshly 
treated, in large part he is convinced, because of 
their earlier alliance with him. They were a very close 


reading legal briefs. 

His companion. Sherry Hall, a public-school 
teacher, is the mainstay, suuoortinz the 

family in an apartment in.upper M 
have a daughter, Tara, almost 10. 

Having readied the point that he addresses De 
Niro and Newman as “Dear Bab” and “Dear Paul” 
in his lettera, Hngfcs is seeking their , help to wipe 
away the $35,000 debL . .. 

Hughes said he longed to revisit Vietnam. One of 
his brothers Teoea% traveled there and foasriithe. 
old Shoeshine Bays home on Pham.Ngu Laa Street 
was crowded by hippie bikers and novelty stalls. 


PEOPEE 


Oscar WUde Wins Place 


What would Oscar WBde 
say. Westminster Abbey pirn 
tty honor the Irish writer, who 
was imprisoned for homosex¬ 
uality and died fa disgrace ntaiw 

ly a century ago.The abbey will 
recall ins genius with a trafi. 
nonal plaque in a window in it* 
Poet’s Comer. The. memorial 
mil be unvoted in February m 
the centenary of 'tbe opeciqg 
night of his comic mas terpiece 
“The Importance Of Being Ear¬ 
nest.” 

'• •• -a. 

Women stripped’to their bras' 
and bartenders sprayed Seltzer 
to cod off the crown asToroa- 


I 

■r 


■e 

r 


tp marts jammed into the steamy 
RPM drib for a surprise show 


:? 


is town to warm up for flair 
upoomfag tour. (It opens Aag.1 
in Washington). Mkfc. Jaeger 
and company, minus the retired 
bass player Bffl Wyman, played 
new songs and old favorites far 
90 minutes. 

' □ 

Heidi Floss, 28, the HoBy- 
wood madam, ts selling T-shirts 
and flannd boxers with a pock- 
el for condoms at her new 
clothing store in Pasadena, Cal¬ 
ifornia. “Because of my trial 
coming up, it*5 good to keep 
busy ” Flews rays. She goes bo 
trial Aug. 27 on charges cf pan¬ 
dering and selling cocaine: 




A 24-hour concert mvolvinij * 
17 nations is being planned to 
marie: the 10th anniversary of 
the 1985 live Aid charity oon- 
cert GoBb Medockj 43, a mmac 
producer, has founded World 
Aid Relief! which will org ani ze 
the' concert He hopes to raise 
$500 imUfan.for charity. The 
concert will take place July 25, 
1995. 

D 

0rie*aDorciBa,42,theprma 
ballerina at- Milan's La £cala 
opera house, has quit after 33 
years with the dance corp s in a 
W irt) KMnagpiwn y 


MERNimOlUL 

CLASSIFIED 

'Appears on Pages 5,6 & 17 


7-.>, 




WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


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Forecast lor Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weaffier. 



North America 

ll wilt remain rattier hot 
across me western half of 
the United States thla week¬ 
end and early next weak. 
The canter of the heat will 
shift from At Pacific Nonh- 
west Into the Southw est . The 
northeastern pert of the 
notion wffl turn a bit cooler- 
witti some showers and 
thunderstorms. 


Europe 

Much of the European conti¬ 
nent wB remain qtito warm 
Ale week e nd into early next 
week. The warmth wIII 
spread northward and east¬ 
ward Into so wham Scandi¬ 
navia and western Russia hy 
early next weak. Showers 
wfl signal Ae antval of cool¬ 
er weather across most of 
the British Wee Monday. 


Asia 

Typhoon Walt will likely 
move across southwestern 
Japan later Saturday with 
destructive winds and flood- 
Ing reins. Walt wfl probably 
stay west of Tokyo. Walt 
may affect Korea or north¬ 
eastern China later this 
wee ha nd or early next week. 
It wd be hot across eastern 
China this wroekand. 


Middle 


Latin America 


Bata* 

Can 


teywr 


Today 

fffgfl Low W 
OF OF 
31/86 24/76 ■ 
as* laes • 
am it«2 ■ 

27/BO 1B»4 s 
S7/BS 22/71 a 
39/102 23/77 ■ 


Mflb 
OP OP 
32/89 23/73 9 
30/67 21/70 « 
32«9 18*4 « 
20*2 1B*» « 
41/10022/71 a 
42/107 20/79 a 


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Today 

Lon nr KW Low W 

OF OF Cff OF 

11/52 104 a 9MB 2/35 pc 

26/a two po sbm two » 

10*4 10*1 PC 11*4 15*0 pc 
24/75 12*3 Ml 23/73 12/53 *h 
24/76 18*4 a 24/76 17*2 C 
9/48 3/37 dl 17*2 SMS a 


Asia 


TadW 

Tomorrow 


»gh 

Low W 

rtub 

Low » 


OF 

OF 

OF 

OF 

Bmgia* 

33*1 

24/75 Ml 

33*1 

26/77 pe 


32*9 

23/73 pc 

32*9 

24/75 pc 

HOfigKcOfl 

30/88 

27*0 1 

31*8 

26/78 pc 

Idar^a 

31*8 

34/75 r 

31*8 

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NnDiM 

35*6 

291 84 1 

36*7 

28*2 pc 

Sad 

31*8 

22771 pc 

31/BB 

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SfXn^WI 

34*3 

26779 pc 

34*3 

26/79 Ml 


32*9 

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32*8 

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Tabs. 

33*1 

24.75 pc 

33*1 

24/75 pc 

Trtq* 

29®4 

21/TO pe 28*4 

22/71 m 

Africa 

Attan 

29*4 

21/70 • 

a*4 

23/73 pc 

Cap# Town 

18*4 

S/A* • 

18*8 

3*7 pc 

OoMttnea 

27/80 

18*4 C 

27*0 

1 MB pc 

►tare 

21*0 

12*3 1 

22/71 

13/55 pc 


28*2 

24/76 l 

aiw 

34775 pc 

Naked 

19/BH 

11/52 c 

a/7i 

11/52 pc 

Turti 

31*0 

19*8 ■ 

33*1 

21/70 ■ 

North America 

Ancnoraga 

18*1 

9/40 9b 

16*4 

10*0 pe 

Aftama 

32*9 

a/7o t 

32789 

22 m 8h 

Boom 

29*4 

21/70 1 

30*8 

19*8 pc 

Oarage 

28*2 

17 /e pc 

31*8 

17782 pc 

Dwww 

*2*9 

18*1 • 

32*9 

16781 1 

DM 

29*4 

18*4 7 

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Hcnxdu 

29*4 

23/73 Ml 31*8 

24775 pe 

Housfcn 

34*3 

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24/75 pc 

LOBAngrie* 

29*4 

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27/80 

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Uwn 

32*0 

2*/73 1 

32*9 

25/77 Mi 


SATURDAY 





■ ‘ .’•? ..'.I : -O'.-. 


SUNDAY 


Europe and MkMe East 


Mkxvnsts and dtta provided ’ - 'M 
by AccuWaAac Ace 1«H „ 


Location 

Wsathor 


Low 

Water 

Wav 

■ Wind 

Location 

"i/imraUr* *' HMi Lora 

Water' 

Ww» 

- Wind 



Tttnp. 

OF 

Tarep. 

OF 

Taop. 

OF 

Haigbta 

(1181*4 

-spaad 

(MO 

• V •• -.V 


IMj^ila 

irattMr 

Sp«ad. 

' W»J 

Cannes 

sunny 

29/84 

21/70 

28/79 

:nf p ’ 

s*r uu to-20 

. Camas 

•unity 29*4 21/70 

26/79 

.1-2 

SW 

.12-22 

DaaiMUe 

partly sunny 
partly sunny 

28/82 

1MB8 

18*4 

i-»- • 

SW 

15-30 

- Dneuvfe 

partly aumy 29184 18*4 

.18*4 

1-2 1 

SW 

15-30 

RimJni 

30/BB 

21/70 

26/79 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Rkrdtti 

Bunny • .31/88 . 22/71 

2B/7T 

0-1 ’ 

NW 

10-20 

Malaga 

Bunny 

31/88 

22/71 

28/79 

• 0-1 

SW 

12-25 

Malaga 

■ Ca^nrf- 

smy . 31/88 23/73 

26/7V 

0-T - 

SW 

12-25 

Cagtisri 

surety 

31/88 

24/75 

2879 

0*1 • 

w - 

1020 

- smew e. y-SUSa W5- 
Clbodtandaun 29*4' 19*6 

r 28/79 ; 

0-1 

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12-22 

Faro 

partly sunny 

29184 

18«4 

21/70 

1-2 

SW 

12-25 

. Faro 

2V70 

1-2 

SW 

12-25 

Piraeus 

partly sunny 

31/88 

24/75 

2079 

0-1 • 

HW 

12-25 

PtomlK - 

tunny ... ' M*8 ^2/tfTS _ 

28/79 

0-1 

NW 

IMS 

Corfu 

atony 

31788 

22/77 

2079 

1-2 

NW 

15-25 

Corfu 

tunny ’ 3T4W- 22/77 

' 26779 

7-2 

NW 

15-25 

Bnghan 

partly sunny 

27/80 

15IB9 

17*2 

0-1 

N 

10-20 

Sdtftol ■■ 

atam .nr.-.*. 273BOv.15l5R 
ckx»andaun 2879 17*2 

. 17*2 

.0-1: 

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1020 

OaranO 

partly surmy 

2078 

16/81 

18*4 

1-2 

N . 

ifrao 

Oxtand 

18*4 

1-2 

N 

15-30 

ScfWvwWigBO 

partly sunny 

2679 

77*2 

18*4 

V2 

N 

15-30 

SctMvonpqgtti 

,ckwdi andaun .2679 • 77*2 

18*4 

1-2 

N - 

15-30 

Syft 

clouds and aun 

25/77 

16*1 

18*4 

1-2 

N 

15*0 

SyR 

doodsaodaun'2S/77 18*1 

18*4 

1-2 

N 

15«) 

terns- 

clouds and sun 

32/86 

24/73 

2879 

0-1 • 

N — 

12-25 

ten* 

partly sunny 32 * 9 - 24/73 

2079 

0-1 

N 

12-25 

Tol Avtv 

auraly 

2084 

24/73 

2079 

1-2 

SW 

•2040 

TsiAv* 

aumy 29*4 24/75 

2079 


SW 

2040 


il 


CarBibeen and West Atlantic 

Barbados 
Kkwstcn 
St- Thoma s 
Ha/nBon 


partly sunny 
partly 


Mxxiy 


sunny 


Aria/Padfic 


Lagand: wumy. popwdy cfogdy, odour*, ahotaaers. HhuxMoims. rrwn. atwww fkorwa. 
w-anow. Mca, W- W Oa fta r. A9 awp M ora caato and date provided by *ccu-W«ather, Inc. 01984 


San Fran. 

Baasa 

Twonai 


20/79 17*2 
37*0 14*7 
30*8 34/15 
ZBA4 23/73 
41/100 20*2 
21/70 13*0 
30/BB 18*1 
30*2 16*1 pc 37*0 
33*9 24/76 «1 34*3 


pc 29*4 
t 2B/7B 

pc 3Z*9 
t 33*1 
I 43/KB 
pc 22/71 


16*1 ■ 
ta *1 pc 

35/77 PC 
24/75 PC 
31/89 4 
14/57 pc 


18*1 PC 
19*1 PC 
24/76 PC 


Ponang 

Phuket 

Bali 

Cebu 

Palm Beach. Aus 
Bay ot Wanda. NZ 

Shxaham a 

Honehiu 


clouds «nd sun 
clouds and sun 
ctouda and sun 
partly sumy- 
awiny 
clouds 


and sisi 
clouds and sui 
partly swmy 


31/88 

32*9 

34*3 

31/88 

25m 

25/77 

25/77 

25/77 

27*0 

28*2 

28*2 

27*0 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

32*9 

25/77 

30*6 

0-1- 

32/89 

25/77 

29*4 

0-1 

32*9 

24/75 

20*4 

0-1 

31/88 

24/75 

30*6 

0-1 

18*4 

10*0 

18*1 

1-2 

21/70 

1355 

16*1 

14. 

30*6 

24/75 

asm 

2-4 

31*8 

24/75 

2079 

2-4 


B4E 1 20-35 
E 25-50 

E 25-55 

SE 20-25 


CaribAeonand West Atlantic 

Barbados 


Stl_ 

HaraBoa 


part* sunny 


8S*8- WtT 27/BO 

33/91 2S/77 28/82 

S*S3~ 2577 28/82 

81/88 25/77 27/80 


1-2 EFC 20-36 

1-2 E 2S-50 

1-2 E Z5-& 

1-2 SE 20-36 


SW 10-20 
SW 15-25 
SW 12-25 
SSW 1X30 J 
SW 2035 
,S 25-40 
SE 25-50 
ENE 25-50 


Penang 

l~H - . J|*| - 
nWW 

Ba9 

Cebu • 

Palm Baatfc Aus. 
Bay of Wanda. NZ 
Swmhama 
Honolulu 


clouds and aun 3VB8 25/77 30/88 

thunderstorm# 33/91 25/77 2£VB4 

Clouds and urn 22/89 24/75 2M4 

clouds and wn 81/88 , 25/77 30/86 

9unny • '17»2 KW0;. i«bi- 
amw: . 22/71 12/53 18/81 

douda arid sun 31/88 24/75 25/77 

Otouds and sun- 31/88 24/75 2679 


0-1 : 
0-1 
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0-1. 
1-2 
1^ 
1-8 
2-3 


. 8W 1020 
SW 15-25 
SW 12-25 
SSW 12-22. 
WSW 20-33 
SW 20-30 
SE - IWU 
BC 20-40 


Si 




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190 ;;4 


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190 




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800 - 190-11 Hbndutas^k 


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0019991-1111 XXX. 


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800-288 Jamaica** 


001-300473-2803 


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9800-100-10. Sandl Arabia 


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