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INTERNATIONAL 






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t POLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


ribunc 


Paris, Tuesday, July 26, 1994 


No. 34,650 


A 


Airdrops Suspended 
Though Rwandans 9 
Plight Grows Worse 


By Bany James 

fmamatond Herald Tribune 

The United States suspended its food 
airdrops over eastern Zaire on Monday 
after the United Nations refused to au- 
thorize such operations. 

-0.5. officials at a temporary base in 
Entebbe,- Uganda, said they halted 
the flights at the request of the UN 


. - She aaid the agency had to divert 
tracks to pick up the nearly 17 tons of 
airdropped supplies, part of which nar- 
rowly missed a parked French helicop- 
ter. Had it not been for the diversion, 
the trucks could actually have ferried 
more food to the starving refugees, 
CARE said. 

. Reuters quoted aid workers as saying 


for Refugees. A. 
UNHCR official in. Kenya said the air- 
drops, which started on Sunday after an 
announcement by President Bill Clin- 
ton that the United States was dramati- 
cally stepping up its involvement in the 
Rwanda refugee crisis, were being reas- 
sessed. 

UN officials have asked Washington 
io sort out the logistic mess on the 



Air Force C-141 cargo planes from 
bases in Germany rushed to Goma over 
the weekend only to buzz overhead, 
waiting for the runway to clear of other 
aid planes. Low on fuel, they flew to 
Kenya and Uganda to wait for permis- 
sion to try again. 

The Cunton administration has not 
taken an official lead in coordinating a 
multinational effort, however, and the 
30 air force soldiers, Marines and army 
Rangers in Goma so far have confined 
themselves to assessing the situation. 

Aid workers estimated on Monday 
that the death toQ in the festering refu- 
gee camps had risen to more than 
14,000, with about 3,000 more dying 
every day. About half the deaths were 
attributed to cholera and the rest to 
exhaustion and other diseases, includ- 
ing malaria and dysentery. 

Alison Campbell, a spokeswoman for 
the humanitarian group CARE, said the 
first U.S. airdrop on Sunday had been 
’a waste of time and resources of busy 
people in an emergency,” according to 
Reuters. 


attempt by the U.S. militaiy to be seen 
to be responding rapidly to Mr. Clin- 
ton’s directive to move large amounts of 
aid to the refugees. 

Regular U.S. flights to the airport at 
Goma, including a C-5 freighter carry- 
ing water-purification equipment from 
Germany, were continuing as part of 
the mounting international response to 
the refugee disaster. 

••• Peter Hansen, the UN undexsecre- 
. buy for humanitarian affairs, said the 
cholera epidemic was “out of control” 
and could get worse because of the lad: 
of dean water and sanitation, and the 
large numbers erf unbuned bodies in the 
refugee encampments. 

“It is extremely dangerous,” he said. 
“We don’t have the capacity on the 
ground to deal with this. 

French soldiers and aid workers were 
digging another six mass graves and 
picking up the dead. But refugees were 
dying faster than they could keep up. 

After Zairian troops cleared aban- 
doned weapons from the road and re- 
opened the frontier with Rwanda on 
Sunday, several thousand refugees de- 
cided they would sooner take their 
chances in their own country than re- 
main in the disease-ridden camps. 

The United Nations is encouraging 
refugees to follow their example. 

General Romeo DaUaire, the UN 
mflitary commander in Rwanda, said 
aid shipments should be landed in the 

See RWANDA, Page 4 


U.S. Effort Is Criticized 

Aid Agencies Decry ‘Publicity Stunt’ 


By Stev$ Vogel 

iVcnrongttM Past Serna 

GOMA, Zaire — A team of Ameri- 
can officers sent to assess living condi- 
tions in me Rwandan refugee camp 
near here was greeted idly Monday 
morning by the UN representative who. 
was to accompany them on the trip. 

The official scolded the Americans 
for the U.S. airdrop on Sunday, which 
has been widely criticized by relief 
agencies as a misguided exercise that 
diverted critical resources and person- 
nel. 

“It was just not appropriate,” field 
officer Jock Baker of the United Na- 
UuiiS High Comnussioner for Refugees 
toJd the Americans. “Food is not the 
issue; water and sanitation have been 
the issue from Day One.” 

Criticism that the airdrop was little 
more than a publicity stunt has left the 
American military team here on the 
defensive as it makes preparations for a 
dramatic increase in U.S. military aid. 


.mer - 

>v- •• 



But theharah feelings subsided as the 
team drove through the refugee camp 
and the Americans worked on plans to 
establish water purification units for 
which relief agencies have pleaded. 

As early as Tuesday, U.S. Army sol- 
diers are to begin setting up at least four 
units, each pumping 12,000 gallons 
(45,000 liters) of water a day to be 
trucked to the Kibumba camp, home to 
more than 150,000 people, where a com- 
plete lack of water has led to an out- 
break of cholera. A U.S. Air Force C-5 
carrying the water purification equip- 
ment landed Monday night at the 
Goma airport. 

The desperate need to gat water to the 
Kibumba camp was obvious every inch 
of the 15-mOe (25-kilometer) road from 
the camp to the nearest water source, a 
stream near the village of Rumangam. 
An endless line of men, women and 
children walked its entire length, those 

See AIRDROP, Page 4 

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Another Step for Mideast Peace 









‘“7 

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. MfteThciler.'RttilQ* 

Renumscent of a scene from September, King Hussein extended his hand to Yitzhak Rabin on the White House lawn 
Monday. Mr. Rabin moved quickly to shake it, avoiding the brief hesitation he showed when meeting Yasser Arafat 

Berlusconi Business Aide Admits Bribery 


Complied ty Our Staff Emm Dapmcha 

MILAN — The finance director of 
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s media 
empire admitted on Monday paying bribes 
to inspectors when making tax declara- 
tions. 

Salvatore Sciasda, who gave himself up 
to examining magistrates investigating Ita- 
ly's corruption scandals, told journalists 
that be made the admission to Judge Anto- 
nio Di Pietro during three hours of ques- 
tioning. 

"I made the decision to pay,” he said. 

Mr. Sciasda had been an executive with 
Fwinvest since 1982. 

Judge Di Pietro had issued arrest war- 
rants for Mr. Sciasda and his deputy, 
Gianmarco Rizzi, on suspicion of tax eva- 
sion and graft involving the finance police. 
Mr. Rizzi was later arrested and remanded 
in custody. 


Mr. Berlusconi came under fresh fire on 
Monday when the opposition demanded 
an explanation foil owing reports he held a 
meeting to chart Fininvest’s response to 
the Sdascia case. 

Luigi Berlbguer of the Democratic Par- 
ty of the Left asked the government to 
explain reports that Mr. Sciascia’s lawyer, 
the Fininvest chairman, Fedele Confalon- 
ieri, and two ministers, one of them a 
former Berlusconi employee, met at the 
media mogul's villa near Milan to discuss 
strategy. 

“If the reports are true, why were the 
prime minister's personal affairs discussed 
at a meeting at which two government 
ministers were present?” Mr. Berlin guer 
said. 

A Berlusconi spokesman, Antonio Ta- 
jani, dismissed the reports as “journalistic 
invention.” 


Giuliano FerarTa, a cabinet spokesman, 
called the demands for an explanation an 
unacceptable interference in Mr. Berlus- 
coni's private life. “The meeting had to 
have been an exclusively private affair, 
otherwise I would have resigned,” Mr. Fer- 
arra said. 

Mr. Berlinguer said the meeting was 
evidence of a “permanent conflict” be- 
tween Mr. Berlusconi’s public and private 
interests. 

Mr. Berlusconi had promised to set 
aside control of his business interests after 
he swept to victory at the head of a conser- 
vative coalition in general elections in 
March. Mr, Berlinguer accused Mr. Ber- 
lusconi of breaking “his first promise that 
he would not even phone to find out how 
business is going.” 

In Milan, prosecutors had said that Mr. 

See ITALY, Page 4 


Renewed Serbian Attacks Test UN Resolve 


A Rwandan boy sitting next to his dying mother Monday at Goma, Zaire. 

The UN has urged refugees to go home, but many cannot make file trip, j Serbian gunners fired a 40mm anti-air- 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Post Senior 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
Serbian forces around the besieged Mus- 
lim enclave of Gorazde have used heavy 
weapons tor two days in row in strict 
violation of a NATO ultimatum threaten- 
ing air strikes. UN officials said Monday. 

The United Nations’ response, however, 
was not to call on airpower of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization, but to send 
the Bosnian Serbs a letter, the officials 


craft heavy machine gun on 12 different 
occasions Sunday into the UN-designated 
“safe area,” said Eric Chaperon, a French 
Navy commander who is a spokesman for 
the UN protection force in Bosnia. On 
Monday, Serbian forces launched an 
82mm mortar into the enclave, another 
spokesman said. 

In an incident Sunday, Serbian gunmen 
killed a Muslim woman who was pan of a 
group harvesting food in the sale zone, the 
officials said. The shooting broke a local 
agreement under which Serbs and Mus- 
lims would share crops growing in the no- 


man's-] and. It also violated a United Na- 
tions Security Council resolution 
threatening force to stop Serbian attacks 
on the civilian population wi thin UN safe 
areas. 

The violations, which were witnessed by 
UN troops, appeared to be part of a Serbi- 
an campaign to test the United Nations 
and the mostly Muslim government in the 
approach to the July 30 meeting in Geneva 
of the foreign ministers of the five coun- 
tries, including the United States, that 

See BOSNIA, Page 4 


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North Korean No ‘Madman, ’ Say 2 Who Should Know 


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By K. Connie Kang 

Los Angeles Timet Strike 

LOS ANGELES — North Korea's new leader, Kim 
Jong II, is not quite the “madman” portrayed in some 
news reports in the West but rather a meticulous planner 
who executes his projects with iron determination, ac- 
cording to South Korea's leading actress and film direc- 
tor, who were kidnapped by him and held captive for 
eight years in Pyongyang. 

Had he been born to another life instead of being the 
eldest son of Kim n Sung, the world’s longest reigning 
dictator until his death earlier this month, Kim Jong II 


might have made a great movie producer, Choi Eun Hce 
andher husband, Shin Sang Okk, said in an interview. 

He loves movies, theater and the circus, they said, but 
at the same time was such a devotee of Stalin that he 
would use any means, including terrorism, to fulfill his 
goals. . . . 

As experts try to figure out wbai Mr. Kim is really like, 
negative images persist of him as a man who abuses 


alcohol and women and is possibly unpredictable enough 
to start a nuclear war. 

“He’s not that rash, even though he may appear that 
way to those who don’t know the inner workings of 
North Korea,” said Mr. Shin, who had many long talks 
with Mr. Kim. “North Korea’s nuclear program is the 
only bargaining tool he has. He’ll use it as a tool." The 
Kim Jong II he knew between 1978 and 1986 would not 
start a nuclear war, he said, because it would amount to 
suicide for his nation. 

Miss Choi. 63, and Mr. Shin, 67, who were kidnapped 
to North Korea from Hong Kong six months apart in 
1978 on orders of Mr. Kim, are among the few outsiders 
who came to know him. Hie ample escaped captors and 
now h've in Beverly Hills, California. They became U.S. 
citizens last year and are working on a film, “Genghis 
Khan,” which they began in North Korea. 

The kidnappings were examples of Mr. Kim's well- 

E tanned moves to achieve what he believed was good for 
is country, said Mr. Shin. As a movie buff who recog- 


nized the power of the medium, his dream was to create a 
first-class movie industry in his country. 

“If you measure him with Western standards of free- 
dom and human rights, Kim is irrational,” said Mr. Shin. 
“On the other hand, if you analyze him in the context of 
Stalinism, be is not crazy." 

“The means justify the end," said Miss Choi. “Wasn't 
it Lenin who said it was all right to steal for the sake of 
the revolution?" 

From their intimate encounters with him. Miss Choi 
and Mr. Shin are convinced that Mr. Kim has the ability 
to assume and retain power over North Korea. 

“The so-called North Korean specialists don’t know 
anything,” Mr. Shin said. “They’ve never met the man." 

Referring to “experts” who have speculated that Mr. 
Kim may not survive beyond the next two years because 
he does not have his father’s credentials and charisma, 
Mr. Shin said: 

“If Kim Jong 11 goes, so go all the people around him. 

See KIDNAP, Page 4 


Jordan Ends 
46 Years of 
State of War 
With Israel 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — With a beaming 
President Bill Clinton as their witness, 
King Hussein of Jordan and Prime Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Rabin of Israel agreed Mon- 
day to end the 46-year state of war between 
their countries and work together for peace 
in the Middle East. 

As a fierce sun beat down on the South 
Lawn of the White House, the iwo leaders 
stood with Mr. Clinton before hundreds of 
spectators and signed what they called the 
Washington Declaration. 

It is not a formal peace treaty, but it 
nonetheless signals the removal of Jordan 
from the ring of hostile Arab neighbors 
that has encircled Israel since the founding 
of the Jewish state in 1948. 

“The term used in international docu- 
ments as they affected us so far is ‘the state 
of belligerency’ and ‘the end of the state of 
belligerency,”' King Hussein said. “I 
think both in .Arabic and Hebrew our peo- 
ple do not have such a term. But we nave 
accomplished and we are committed to the 
end of the stale of war between Jordan and 
Israel.” 

Mr. Rabin replied: “We have today tak- 
en a major step on the road to peace.” He 
added: “From here, in the distance of 
thousands of miles from home, I would 
like to congratulate the inhabitants of Isra- 
el and Jordan, to remember the fallen in 
the wars on both sides and to tell children 
on both sides of the border we hope and 
pray that your life will be different than 
ours.” 

Both men praised Mr. Clinton and Sec- 
retary of Slate Warren M. Christopher for 
having given a high priority to the U.S.- 
sponsored Middle East peace process, 
which served as the framework in which 
Israeli and Jordanian negotiators worked 
out the declaration. 

“Just as we have supported you in com- 
ing this far, the United States will walk the 
final miles with you.” Mr. Clinton prom- 
ised. “We must all go on until we ensure 
that the peace you seek prevails in the Holy 
Land and extends to all of Israel's Arab 
neighbors. Our common objective of a 
comprehensive peace must be achieved." 

News agencies reported earlier: 

The meeting between the king and prime 
minister was a moment reminiscent of last 
September's dramatic handshake at the 
White House between Mr. Rabin and 
Yasser Arafat, chairman of the Palestine 
Liberation Organization, a diplomatic 
breakthrough that paved the way for this 
meeting. 

In Gaza, Mr. Arafat congratulated the 
two leaders on their agreement, which 
crowned the opening session of their 
Washington summit meeting. 

“It is a continuation of this peace pro- 
cess and the lone march to achieve a long 
and peaceful solution in the whole area, 
and we hope we will have the same on the 
Syrian and Lebanese tracks,” he said, re- 
ferring to Israel's peace negotiations with 
those two nations. 

Mr. Rabin echoed that sentiment as he 
and King Hussein signed the joint declara- 
tion. “Millions of eyes all over the world 
are watching us with great relief and great 
joy,’* he said. “Another nightmare of war 

See MIDEAST, Page 4 


Kiosk 



UNITED NATIONS. New York 
(WP)— The UN secretary-general. 
B litres Butros Ghaii bas warned that 
United Nations peacekeepers will 
have to withdraw from Bosnia wheth- 
er or not the Serbs accept an interna- 
tional peace plan. 

Mr. Butros Ghaii wrote in a letter to 
the Security Council that the United 
Nations would be overwhelmed by the 
task of raising and running a 60,000- 
troop operation to protect the peace if 
the Bosnian Serbs were to agree to it. 

And if the Serbs were to reject the 
plan and intensify the war. he said, the 
36,000 UN peacekeepers deployed in 
Bosnia would become vulnerable. 

Tapie Faces a 7th Inquiry 

PARIS 1 Reuters) — Bernard T apie. 
the embattled former cabinet minis- 
ter, has been placed under investiga- 
tion for the seventh time in a new case 
of suspected fraudulent business prac- 
tices. judicial sources said Monday. 

Magistrate Eva Joly put Mr. Tapie 
under investigation over a payment of 
10 million francs ($1.9 million) by 
Bernard Tapie Finances, an invest- 
ment firm in which he had minority 
interests, to Groupe Bernard Tapie. a 
holding company wholly owned by 
him. the sources said. 


Book Review 


Page 7. 






** 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1994 


Hard-Up Russian Scientists Turn to Tutoring U.S 

. . , ji„ MimX fm rvvinle- biological Drobli 



By Michael Specter 

New York Times Service 

PUSHCHINO, Russia — This picturesque 
city is a citadel of R ussian science. Its nine 
biological research institutes have long been con- 
sidered among the finest in the world. Its molec- 
ular biologists, protein physiologists and bio- 
chemists have published thousands of articles in 
prestigious journals. 

What better place, then, for an ambitious 
American high school student to prepare that all- 
important entry for the Westmghouse Science 
Talent Search? Who could be a more perfect 
coach for an eager teenager than a world-re- 
nowned specialist in the Held he wants to enter? 

M ln America, do you think you could find 
scientists of this caliber who would spend 12 
hours a day working with high school kids on 
their projects?" asked a wide-eyed Vinay Gupta, 
16, who attends Half Hollow Hills High School 
East in Dix Hills, New York. "Do you think 
they'd even learn our names?" 

There are a couple of similar programs in the 


United States, but none that rely on the type of 
scientific firepower assembled here. 

And unlike the top researchers in Russia, lead- 
ing scientists in the United States earn more than 
J150 a month. So do the technicians who dean 
their test tubes. 

Prominent American biologists do not need to 
learn how to fix old equipment when it breaks. 
They do not have to rely on municipal fields to 
grow vegetables to feed their families. They cer- 
tainly do not need to tutor high school students 
to supplement their incomes. 

But scientific research — once the pampered 
pride of Soviet life — has taken a particularly 
hard fall in the new Russia. Many of the scien- 
tists who could leave already have; others, work- 
ing in Pushchino and throughout the country’s 
basic research centers, consider themselves lucky 
to keep the dectridty on. 

So when teachers from Stuyvesant High 
School in New York suggested last year that 
some of the most gifted American students 
would Tra p at the chance to spend a summer 
month with the Russian scientific elite (and 


would gladly pay for h in dollars), few people 
here thought twice about it. 

“Is this what I thought my life would come 
to?" asked Viktor Popov, a biotogisi and for 23 
years a reigning expert here in the field of ceu 
biophysics. His salary of nearly $150 a month is 
three rimes the average in Pushchino. 

“Of course not," he said. “We live extremely 
difficult lives now. We have no money for equip- 
ment, for new journals, for computers. Every day 
it grams we are on the verge of the end. We don t 
have 5 percent of the funding we used to have, so 
yes, the students from America help keep us 

alive." . . i 

It is a bittersweet marriage: the raw, youthful 
talent of the United States and the experienced, 
beleaguered mentors of Russia. 

But despite their lade of supplies, the gam 
direction their careers have taken and their obvi- 
ous doubts about the future, Russian scientists 
somehow still manage to turn out important 
research. Their peers in the United States ac- 
knowledge that the Russians still understand as 
much about theory and the complexity of base 


biological problems as anybody. But it is a 
struggle. . V 

“Maybe these kids ought to know tha t a life in 
science isn’t necessarily one awards ceremony 
after the next," said Mr. Popov. “It won’t hi^t. 
them to see a little reality from this side of the 
ocean." . • • ; -V- - 

Sixteen American high school students are 

- - ■ ■ — 'led to 

iuca- 

were most 

promising. 

Each is assigned to a leading researcher and' 
works with that person all day, every day. The 
goal of the program, according to its leaders, is to 
help these gifted students develop a project for 
the Westmghouse Science contest 

Each of those who agreed to act as a tutor this 

armmrr will earn about $1,000 for the .work- 
None seem bitter or resentful but none pretend 


DeatbTofliu ArgentmeAlteckat^ * 



urgent UN Security Council 


LI Lliuc ui nu*nu, *- 

l year for similar work. 


New Hopes on Asian Security 

Pacific Nations Set Annual Ministers ? Talks 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

BANGKOK — Foreign min- 
isters from Asia-Pacific na- 
tions, meeting Monday for the 
first time to discuss security 
problems in the region, agreed 
to hold annual talks and devel- 
op measures to defuse potential 
conflicts. 

There was no agreement on 
detailed steps to build confi- 
dence and reduce tensions. 

But this was not expected 
from a large gathering of re- 
gional countries, some of them 
former Cold War adversaries 
more used to confrontation 
than security cooperation. 

However, officials said that 
the constructive tone erf 1 the dis- 
cussions had raised hopes of 
reaching agreement on some 
concrete steps by the time of the 
next moling in Brunei in znid- 
1995. 

They said such steps were 
likely to include exchanges of 
nonclassified military informa- 
tion, cooperation in regional 
peacekeeping, and registering 
purchases of conventional arms 
with the United Nations. 

There was “a definite willing- 
ness to get on with the job of 


sing 


ic 
Evans, 


defining and 

proposals," said 

the Australian foreign minister. 
“I didn’t discern any negative 
or excessively cautious inputs 
from anybody." 

Countries taking part in the 
Bangkok meeting, known as the 
ASEAN Regional Forum, in- 
cluded China, the United 
States, Russia, Japan, South 
Korea, Vietnam, Australia, 
New Zealand, Canada, Laos 
and Papua New Guinea. 

Indonesia, Malaysia, the 
Philippines, Singapore, Thai- 
land and Brunei — the mem- 
bers of the Association of South 
East Asian Nations — also par- 
ticipated along with senior rep- 
resentatives of the European 
Union. 

Prasong Soonsiri, Thailand's 
foreign minis ter and chairman 
of the meeting, said that as a 
result of the accord, the forum 
was now in a position to “make 
significant contributions to ef- 
forts toward confidence-build- 
ing and preventive diplomacy 
in the Asia-Pacific region.” 

Ah Alatas, the Indonesian 
foreign minis ter, said that the 
forum was attempting to “man- 
age strategic change in such a 


way that a new equilibrium 
among the major powers in the 
Asia-Pacific region could 


evolve gradually and peacefully 
over the next decade. 


ReadIHT 
Classmeds 
For All 
Your Service 
Needs, 


O fficials said that despite the 
sensitivities of China and some 
other participants about having 
disputes in which they were in- 
volved raised in the forum, ma- 
jor potential sources of conflict 
in the region — such as the 
Korean Peninsula, Cambodia, 

the Sooth China Sea and Burma 
— were raised during the three- 
hour formal meeting. 

Qian Qichen, China’s foreign 
minister, told a small group of 
reporters after the meeting that 
China, was prepared to engage 
in defense cooperation with its 
neighbors. 

T -nre a number of other Asian 
nations, Qrina adopts a secre- 
tive approach to security. Its 
unwillingness to disclose more 
information about defense ac- 
tivities has contributed to suspi- 
cions that it may become an 
assertive military power as its 
economy grows stronger. 

Mr. Qian did not spell out 
what he meant by defense coop- 
eration and a Chinese Foreign 
Ministry spokesman declined 
to say whether the Chinese mili- 
tary would accept proposals 
piadf! by a number of forum 
its for foreign observ- 
ers to be allowed to watch mili- 
tary exercises. 

Asked whether China would 
agree to publish an annual 
white paper on its military 
spending and capabilities as re- 
quested by Japan and a number 
of other countries, the Chinese 
spokesman would only say he 
believed that “with the passage 
of time, transparency wul be 
gradually enhanced.” 




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Hufdnson’sadwmtages in technology, priring and coverage. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Maeiq Mnaerzytuki/Rnacn 

MEMORIALS LARGE AND SMALL — Halim Strusinska, whose b™therdied50 
years ago during the Warsaw Uprising against Nazi ocagners, plaang flOT'e re at tte 
foot ofrtie monument to those who took part in the doomed revolt in the Polish capital. 


Thai Urges Burma to Release Dissident 

. 1 


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Reuters 

BANGKOK — Prime Minis- 
ter Chuan Leekpai of Thailand 
urged Burma on Monday to re- 
lease the detained Nobel Peace 
laureate Daw Aung San Suu 
Kyi as the key to solving many 
of the isolated country’s politi- 
cal and economic problems. 

Mr. Oman made the recom- 
mendation in talks with For- 
eign Minister Ohn Gyaw of 
Burma, who is in Bangkok as 
the guest of Thailand at a min- 
isterial meeting of the Associa- 


tion of South East Asian Na- 
tions. . . 

“Settle the question of Aung 
San Suu Kyi first, then Burma 

will have time to concentrate on 
developing the democratic pro; 
cess and the economy,” a Thai 
government spokesman, Abhi- 
sit Vejjjajiva, quoted Mr. Chuan 
as t etfing the foreign minister. 


“If the problem of Aung San 
Suu Kyi were resolved, it would 
make other problems easy to 
settle,” Mr. Chuan was quoted 


as saying during the 40-minute 
meeting. 

The Thai leader said Bang- 
kok had incurred sharp criti- 
cism for inviting a representa- 
tive of Burma's ruling military 
junta to attend the talks, though 
Thailand has made dear other 
ASEAN members backed the 
invitation. 

Developed nations led by the 
United States have said Bur- 
ma’s ruling State Law and Or- 
der Restoration Council must 


remain isolated by the. interna- 
tional community. 

ASEAN countries have con- 
tinued to deal with the lead er -: 
ship of Burma and invest in the 
country under a policy of “con- 
structive engagement.” 

The leadasoip has been criti- 
cized for human -rights viola- 
tions, the detention of opposi- 
tion politicians, notably Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi, and its re- 
fusal to accept toe results of a 
1990 general election decisively 
won by her National League. 


Air Traffic Improves m 

PARIS (AFP) — Air ‘travel was* almost bade to normal in 
southern Faatx after a toee-day sttflre by traffic contraltos, .tat 
the controllers followed up with a wotk^o-mle on Monday, 

strike, .hounds d ’wavelets 
remained stranded in airports in southern Fraiiceafler toecancd- 
latiou of more than, half of. flights. AMfrftovenee hamdte 
flights and from southeastern France, Itafy, Spain and Majorca. 

On Monday, Palm de Majorca airport said toe atuafion tos 
endnally returning to normal, with some flights still delayed by 
up to toree horns. Traffic in and but of the Balearic Islands was 
toe worst affected by toe strike. 

Thousands of Zimbabwean commensal brak workers, oodrike 
for higher pay since last Friday, stayed away from work on 
Monday in defiance of a management ultimatum to return to 
work or be fixed. (Reuters) 

Respoodutg to alarm by motorists, Itafian pofice vowed Mo.uk 
to prosecute severdy youths who huri. rocks at cars from bridges 
over roads. Eleven people were figured and 20 cars damaged by 
rocks *h™'ng the weekend on a highway near Pisa. (Reuters) 

Tourists have been ordered to pot on their dqtoes when they 
leave the beach to go shopping in the French Riviera resort of 
Samt-Rapha£L The local cornual said it would fine tourists wan- 
dering around hali-naked. ... (AFP) 

Austria's flamfeip carrier, Qantas Airways, said it was almost 
doubling its seating capacity on nonstop flights, to South Korea 
and adding first-class service. It will replace its 240-seat Boeing 
767-3008 with 400-seat Boeing 747s on toe route. (Bloomberg) 
Air Fiance plans to fly a Concorde to Kansai International 
Airport in early September to commemorate the opening of 
Japan’s firs t 24-hour airport, officials aud Monday. (AFP) 
Nearly 7,000 bos and rail workers in Los Angeles went oo strike 
Monday against the nation's, second-largest transit system. (AP) 
The wont heat wave Sooth Koreans can remember entered its 
fourth week Monday, sapping reservoirs, forcing key industries to 
start shutting down andfkOiing thousands of livestock. (AFP) 


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Simpson’s Lawyers Want Independent Tests on Blood Samples 


* 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — O. J. 
Simpson's lawyers sparred in 
court with prosecutors Monday 
over control of blood samples 
found at the scene of his ex- 
wife’s murder and at his home. 

With the defense demanding 
the right to conduct an indepen- 
dent analysis of the blood, the 
judge in toe murder trial of the 
former professional football 
star first proposed a compro- 
mise, then postponed a decision 
cm the matter. 

“This goes to Mr. Simpson's 


i’s lead 


ner,” said Mr. 
lawyer, Robert L. 

Tfae request was made at a 
hearing in Los Angeles Superior 
Court that marked Mr. Simp- 
son’s first appearance before 
Judge Lance Ito, who was as- 


signed last week to preside at 
MnSb ‘ “ 


right to (hie process, to equal 
protection, to have a fair look at 


toe evidence so wc can present 
our case to a jury in a fair ma,n - 


Simpson’s trial. 

The judge proposed giving 
the defense access to 10 percent 
of the samples, but delayed his 
decision after the deputy dis- 
trict attorney, Marcia dark, 
said, “You are taking evidence 
out of our hands forever.” 

Judge Ito said he needed tes- 
timony from expert witnesses 
on how much blood is required 
for prosecutors to conduct valid 


tests. Another hearing was set 
for Friday. . . 

“I sense that this is critical 
evidence in the case,” the judge 
said. "The record is not com- 
plete hoe. I do not have enough 
scientific evidence to make a 
ruling at this point." 

He did allow prosecutors to 
begin testing some blood 
Thursday at a laboratory in 
Maryland, two days later than 
planner!, to give a defense ex- 
pert time to get there topartici- 
paie in the procedure. 

He left until later a decision 
on how to handle leftover sam- 
ples. - 

Prosecutors hope tests - on 
blood and other physical evi- 



request, saying in some cases 
there was not enough blood to 
share without affecting toe out- 
come of the highly sensitive 
DNA tests for genetic makeup 


deuce ran de Mr. 
the June 12 killings 
wife Nicole Brown 
and her friend Ronald L. 
man. Defense lawyers hope in- 
dependent tests wffl cast doubt — ... „- c . .. . . 

Mr. Simpson, 47, has pleaded ing to do is compromise the testing the greatest forensic 
not guilty to two counts of first- evidence,” she said. _ breakthrough since fingerprint- 

degree murder. «. . . in& Otoets contend that it is 


‘What counsel is xeafiy try^ 


Mr. Shapiro specifically 
asked lor samples of Wood 
drops found at Mrs. Simpson’s 
condominium, blood on a glove 
ax the condo, Wood drops on 
the driveway and ini toe foyer of 
Mr. Simpson’s estate, blood on 
..a glove found behind, bis house 
and smudges on Mr. Simpson’s 
Ford Bronco. 

Miss Clark objected to the 


Mr. Shapiro called 
tats “hypocritical in their con- 
tention they wanted to preserve 
evidence because they them- 
selves had used up some of cine 
sample before toe preliminary 

h earing 

Miss Ckrk offered to let the 
defense’s own exp er t conduct 
some of toe tests, as long as a : 
prosecution expert witnessed 


the procedures. The defense did. 
not respond to that offer. 

"• DNA, or deoxyribonucleic 
acid, defines each individual’s 
unique genetic code. 

-■ Some scientists call DNA 
the greatest forensic 
cough since fi 

. Otheis contend' that it is 

jets to contamination and 

laboratory error and cannot be 
trusted.’ 


IV 


v 


Defense lawyers also planned 

Monday 


to ask prosecutors on u 

to turn over nearly all their re- 
ports and Investigative leads. 
They assert that prosecutors 
have overlooked information 
that could exonerate Mr. Simp- 




K 


son. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1994 


Page 3 







a Record of White House Pressure on Top Regulator 


By Stephen Labaton ■' 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Senior White 

House officials put heavy pxessure on the 
lojp savings and- loan regulator, a dose, 
friend of President Bill CKnlon/fo stay 
involved in sensitive Whitewater investiga- 
tions, according to a senior Treasury offi- 
cial's politically candid, diary, which has 
been turned over to Congress. 

In his diary, Joshua L. Sterner, tire Trea- 
sury secretary’s chief of staff, records that 
Mr. Clinton was livid when the regulator, 
Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger C. Alt- 
man, decided to remove hiTnwf from the 
Whitewater case in late February, " 

It also offers an account that contradicts 
the president’s statement m March that he 
had been unaware of any discussions be- 
tween Treasury and White House officials 
about the Whitewater investigation while 
those talks were occurring. 

The diary is significant because it offers 
the first indication that senior advisers, to 
Mr. Clinton wanted the agency investigat- 
ing Whitewater to remain under the con- 
trol of a political ally of the president. 


rather than under some bureaucrat whose 
handling of the affair would be outside the 
White House’s influence. 

- Mr. Steiner writes that for weeks last 
February, Mr. Altman wavered over 
whether to remove himself, only to be 
pressured by senior White House lawyers 
and political advisers to remain involved in 
the case. Mr. Altman ultimately disquali- 
fied himself on Feb. 25, a day after a 
' Senate hearing in which he acknowledged 
under Republican questioning that there 
had been discussions between Treasury 
and White House officials about the inves- 
tigations. 

David Dreyer, an assistant to the presi- 
dent, said the issues raised by Mr. Steiner’s 
diary would be discussed by fee White 
House counsel, Lloyd N. Cutler, when he 
appears before the House banking com- 
mittee Tuesday to talk about his internal 
review of the administration’s handling of 
the investigations. 

4< This is a mailer he will dear up on 
Tuesday,” Mr. Dreyer said. 

In a CBS television interview Sunday, 
Mr. Cutler said the review had found that 


no White House officials had violated any 
ethics roles. But he said that the discus- 
sions between the regulators and the White 
House over the Whitewater investigations 
had involved “regrettable errors in judg- 
ment.” . . . , 

Mr. Stoner’s diary is part of the docu- 
mentation accumulating as Congress pre- 
pares to begin Whitewater hearings this 
week. It has already been examined by the 
Whitewater independent counsel, Robert 
B. Fiske Jr„ and was made available to The 
New York Times by a person involved in 
the case who believed that its disclosure 
was inevitable. 

Hearings before the House and Senate 
hani-ing committees will examine the fed- 
eral government’s handling of an investi- 
gation into the failure of an Arkansas sav- 
ings association run by the Clintons’ 
former business partner and the govern- 
ment’s inquiry into one of the savings 
association's law firms, the Rose firm of 
little Rock. Arkansas, where Hillary Rod- 
ham Clin ton was a partner. 

The savings association. Madison Guar- 
anty, failed in 1989 at a cost to taxpayers 


of more than 560 million. Ma disop and the 
Rose firm have been under investigation 
by the Resolution Trust Corp., the federal 
agency managing the savings and loan bai- 
lout. 

Until four months ago, Mr. Altman was 
the acting head of the Resolution Trust 
Corp., and bis decision to discuss the 
Whitewater investigations with White 
House officials has come under scrutiny by 
congressional investigators. 

Mr. Altman has been a dose friend of 
Mr. Clinton since their days together as 
undergraduates at Georgetown Universi- 
ty- 

Mr. Steiner, 28, served as Mr. Altman’s 
chief of staff before being promoted last 
year to the same position for Treasury 
Secretary Lloyd Beatsen. 

According to Mr. Steiner’s diary, Mr. 
Al tman initially decided to remove himself 
from the case in Late January’ or early 
February to avoid the appearance of a 
conflict of interest, but then decided 
against it “under intense pressure from the 
White House.” 

His decision to stay on came after a 


meeting at the White House attended by 
Mr. Allman; Bernard W. Nussbaum, who 
was then fee White House counsel; Harold 
M. Ickes, fee deputy White House chief of 
staff, and Mrs. Ctimon's chief of staff. 
Margaret Williams. Mr. Steiner wrote feat 
fee White House staff had told Mr. Alt- 
aian that bis decision to remove himself 
was “unacceptable.” 

“They reacted very negatively to the 
recusal and RA backed down the next 
day” Mr. Stoner wrote, referring to Mr. 
Altman. “They were very concerned about 
him turning to RTC people they didn’t 
know so RA did not formally commit 
himself to stepping down.” 

Mr. Steiners diary is filled with candid 
observations that he will now have to ex- 
plain at the hearings, including one about 
how Mr. Altman “gracefully ducked” one 
congressional question in February about 
White House-Treasury discussions by be- 
ing less than fully candid. 

According to fee diary, Mr. Altman de- 
rided to remove himself on Feb. 25 when 
he heard from Howell Rabies, fee editor of 
fee editorial page of The New York Times. 


feat it was publishing an editorial criticiz- 
ing him for discussing fee Whitewater case 
wife fee White House. 

The diary says feat after the White. 
House heard of Mr. Allman’s derision, he 
received a joint telephone call from Mr. 
Ickes and George Stephanopoulos, a se-. 
nior White House adviser. 

“Harold and George called to say that. 
BC was furious.” Mr, Steiner wrote, refer-, 
ring to the president. A colleague of Mr. 
Ickes and Mr. Stephanopoulos said Sun- 
day feat Mr. Clinton was not furious at fee 
recusal itself but at Mr. Mr. Altman's de- 
ciding to do it during a phone call wife Mr. 
Raines. 

At a March 3 news conference, fee presi- 
dent said be had been unaware of any of 
fee discussions between Treasury and fee 
White House officials over Whitewater. 

The discussions were unusual because 
fee Resolution Trust Corp.’s investigations 
are supposed to be independent of politi- 
cal influence. Moreover, fee briefings were 
attended by senior advisers to fee Clin- 
tons, who were themselves included in fee 
agency’s investigations. 


APOLITICAL VOTES A 


Health Care Reform; Revving Up for Delay 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton administration and some 
Democratic congressional leaders have indicated a readiness 
to postpone all elements of health care reform — and their 
costs — until the end of the century. 

The House majority leader, Richard A. Gephardt, said 
during an NBC television interview that fee bill be plans to 
bring' to the floor next month would delay for “four to five 
years” the date by which businesses would be required to 
provide health insurance for their employees. 

The vice president, A1 Gore, appearing on fee same pro- 
gram, said that from the administration’s viewpoint, it “may 
be reasonable” to put off the so-called employer mandate. 
“ From the very beginning,” Mr. Gore said, the administra- 
tion proposal “had a phase-in period, and what the congres- 
sional leaders have said, along with the president, is that that 
phase-in period may be extended.” ... 

President Bill Clinton’s original bill sought to guarantee 
universal coverage by 1998; an extension would push back 
the target date to the end of the decade. Asked about an 8- to 
10-year delay, Mr. Gore said, “We don’t want to wait that 
long.” 

In interviews later, sources close to the House leadership 
said Mr. Gephardt was contemplating a delay not just on the 
employer mandate, but on all elements of health reform, 
including changes in insurance laws that would guarantee 
that policies could not be denied for reasons of health and 
that would make it easier for people to stay insured when 
they change or lose jobs. ( WP) 

Clinton Shin— at Reunion of Class of *64 

HOT SPRINGS, Arkansas — Thirty years after his high 
school graduation, the boy who sometimes thought of him- 
self as “the fat kid in the band” returned here as a man who 
has certainly succeeded. He not only has a job and most of his 
hair, but the girls who knew him way back when say he is 
probably sleeker and certainly better looking. 

Hot Springs High School is closed now, fee red brick 
building abandoned. But over cold roast beef and corn chips, 
as a disk jockey played dance music in the hotel ballroom 
where they had attended two proms. President Clinton and 
more than 200 former classmates had a chance to look back 
on the days before they became middle-aged baby boomers. 

At the reunion was Carolyn Staley, a close friend of Mr. 
Clinton's who was his next-door neighbor and who beat him 
in an election for senior class secretary. There were David 
Leopoulos and Joe Newman, his other two best pals, with 
whom he bowled and played jazz saxophone; they have 
remained close for years. 

There was even Mary Jo Rodgers, his senior prom date, 
who manages the gift shop at the Arlington Hotel, where the 
reunion was held. She says she was so confident then about 
Mr. Clinton’s future that she wrote “See you in the White 
House” in his high school yearbook. 

Mr. Clinton boasted that he had been back every five years 
since graduation for his reunions, arid he stayed at the party 
until 2:30 Sunday morning to laugh and talk with every last 
one of his classmates. . (NYT) 


Quote/UnqMote 


David Leopoulos on his classmate President Clinton, who 
was enjoying his 30-year high school reunion: “He’s having a 
ball. He's daodng with friends, visiting with everyone. He’s 
taking part in everything just as if there’s nothing else going 
on in the world.” ( A?) 


In Crisis 
Over Haiti, 
U.S. Finds 
It Is Alone 


By Roberto Suro 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
United States finds itself virtu- 
ally alone struggling with the 
Haitian crisis. 

A handful of tiny Caribbean 
nations have agreed to shelter a 
few thousand refugees. But not 
one major political ally or trad- 
ing partner in fee Western 
Hemisphere has stepped up to 


h t 


_ a joint statement, three of 
six Central American countries 
have now said they might take 
in Haitians. The other three 
said they would not 

Slippery promises are all that 
President Bill Clinton gets 
when he seeks recruits for a 
peacekeemng force. No country 
seems willing to join an inva- 
sion to remove military leaders 
who seized power in 1991. 

Panama’s president-elect, Er- 
nesto P6rez BaUadares, ex- 
plained the lade of support in a 
recent interview; “It is for the 
very ample reason that in Latin 
America Haiti is not recognized 
as a Latin American country. 
Haitians speak a different lan- 
guage. They have different eth- 
nic roots, a different culture. 
They are very different alto- 
gether” 



being voodoo, 
a ted slaves long locked in deep 
poverty, Haiti has a history of 
isolation within fee hemisphere. 
It does not fit with the hie coun- 
tries of South America. It is not 
part of Central America. 
“Haitians are strangers even 


Away From Politics 


a A fish-processing strip, fee AH Abakan, caught fire off the 
Aleutian islands and was trailing an 8-mile ( 1 3- kilometer) oil 
sli ck and a plume of toxic smoke; One crew member was 
missing, but the other 132 were rescued. 

• iJghftWng struck cad kffied a sea kayaker who had sought 
shelter in a World War IT-era banker in a park in Kittery, 
Maine. His three companions were injured. The kayakers 
beached their craft when a storm came up and took shelter in 
fee bunker, which is made of steel-reinforced concrete. 

e Thirty-cae army paratroopers were injured in hard la n di n gs 
after i unoping from a low-flying airplane at fee International 
Air Show iaDayton, Ohio, 
hospital 

• About 5500,000 worth of musical instruments belonging to 

the U.S. Army Band were stolen when a rental truck was 
laVfln from a hotel parking lot in Houston. The truck was later 
recovered. ^ ■ Seviers 


among the other black nations 
of the Caribbean,** said Jocelyn 
McCalla, executive director of 
the National Coalition for Hai- 
tian Refugees, a New York- 
based advocacy group. 

When Suriname agreed to 
cake in 2,000 Haitian boat peo- 
ple, neighboring French Guia- 
na announced il would tighten 
border security in case any Hai- 
tians escaped. 

In recent years, the Organiza- 
tion of American States and the 
United Nations have worked to 
compel elections in Haiti, to pat 
sanctions on its military regime 
and to monitor human rights 
abuses. 

Now Mr. Clinton is asking 
for much more as he tries to 
create a network of refugee 
camps around the region and to 
assemble multinational backing 
for the forcible removal of Hai- 
ti’s military regime. 

Finding partners for either 
sheltering refugees or invading 
would be a challenge no matter 
what country was involved. Pe- 
titioning in behalf of Haiti 
makes it much harder. 


For Perez de Cuellar at 74, ‘Duty’ Calls in Homeland 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — After a long ca- 
reer as a Peruvian diplomat 
crowned by 10 years as secre- 
tary-general of the United Na- 
tions, Javier Perez de Cu£Uar 
might be forgiven for declar- 
ing feat iris public life was 
over, that he was proud of his 
achievements, feat he was ask- 
ing for no more. 

Instead, in the unlikely sur- 
roundings of an elegant Left 
Bank apartment, he has been 
Styling himself to take on a 
challenge unlike any he has 
known, one feat emails risking 
his reputation and perhaps 
even bis life, one feat he feels 
he is unable to refuse. 

When he returns to Lima in 
early August, he is expected to 
announce that he will run for 
fee presidency of Peru, an- 
swering a call from growing 
numbers of supporters who 
believe that only he can pre- 
vent President Alberto Fuji- 
mod from winning a second 
five-year term in fee elections 
next April 

“Why do I get involved in 
this?** tie asked. “I am 74 years 
old, 1 have an easy life, I can 
stay in Paris. But an anguish 
has awakened inside me, an 
anguish over the situation in 
Peru. Peru is lost if nothing is 
dime. Forgjvc me if I "say 
something personal, but 1 be- 
lieve I have a duty.” 

One duty, he said, is to re- 
store full democracy. Mr. Fu- 
jimori closed the National 
Congress and fee courts on 
April 5, 1992, and he subse- 
quently rewrote the constitu- 
tion to permit his re-election. 
But no less urgent, Mr. Pfcrez 
de Cu&Uar went on, is fee need 
to attack chronic poverty in 
his troubled native land. 

White-haired, soft-spoken, 
switching easily between 
Spanish and French, occasion- 



Ajtmc Knu-hiM 

Javier P6rez de Cuellar, the former UN official, plans to run for president of Peru. 


ally using words in English. 
Mr. P6rct de Cudllar still 
seems more like a quintessen- 
tial diplomat than a stumping 
politician, a man more at 
home in fee capital of a devel- 


oped country than in the 
Third World. 

Indeed, when he retired 
from fee United Nations in 
late 1991, he made his home in 
Paris and not Lima. And hav- 


ing spent all but 9 of the last 
50 years abroad, he has al- 
ready heard Mr. Fujimori’s 
jibes feat he cannot know 

“I worked for Peru for 40 


years as a diplomat,” he shot 
back, “and this gentleman has 
only done so for 4 years.” 

Yet if he has any hope of 
winning, it is because he has 
not been muddied by a life- 
time of politics in Peru, be- 
cause he is a rare Peruvian 
who has gained international 
stature. 

“They've put a halo around 
my head ana turned me into a 
son of secular stunt,'’ he said 
with a slightly embarrassed 
laugh. 

He will be facing a tough 
political street fighter. In 
1990, emerging late m the day 
as a serious contender, Mr. 
Fujimori posed a strong chal- 
lenge to the writer Mano Var- 
gas Llosa in the first round of 
balloting. Then, after a cam- 
paign marked by dirty tricks 
and racial undertones, he easi- 
ly won fee runoff. 

“1 won't allow him to drag 
me down to his level," Mr. 
Perez de CufcUar said. “It is 
not in my character to insult 
people.” And he demonstrat- 
ed this by acknowledging that 
Mr. Fujimori was not all bad 
— feat he had tamed wild in- 
flation. begun modernizing 
fee economy and struck im- 
portant blows against the 
Shining Path terrorist move- 
ment. 

But in each case, he added, 
there are blemishes. The econ- 
omy is growing again, but it is 
not creating jobs or easing 
poverty. 

And while fee Shining Path 
was weakened by the capture 
of its leader, Abimacl Guzm&n 
Reynoso, “One needs serenity 
to see what has to be preserved 
and what has to be changed,” 
he said. 

“If there is a revolution ev- 
ery time there is a change of 
government, fee country will 
never recover. Peru needs 
long-term stability.” 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

At Top of Ivory Tower, 

Watchword Is Silence 
A generation ago, James B. 
Con ant of Harvard, Clark 
Kerr of fee University of Cali- 
fornia, Robert M. Hutchins of 
the University of Chicago and 
a great many other college and 
university presidents cut strik- 
ing figures an the public stage, 
speaking out cm public affairs 
at the tip of a mortarboard. 

Today, notes William H. 
Honan in The New York 
Times, almost no college pres- 
ident has said much about 
Bosnia, Haiti, North Korea, 
health care or other issues 
high on the U.S. agenda. 

When the legal scholar Ger- 
hard Casper became president 


of Stanford in 1992, fee trust- 
ees made no secret of their 
wish feat he keep himself out 
of the headlines. 

The exceptions to presiden- 
tial timidity are not likely to 
encourage outspokenness. In 
1970, when Kingman Brew- 
ster was president of Yale, he 
expressed support for fee mil- 
itant Black Panthers. His crit- 
ics — many of them disgrun- 
tled alumni whose children 
had not been admitted to Yale 
under his stringent entrance 
requirements — set up a howl 
feat nearly drove turn from 
office. 

Short Takes 

Six American high school 
students astonished judges at a 
world mathematics competi- 
tion in Hong Kong last week, 
achieving perfect scores for 
the first time in fee 35-year 
history of fee tournament on a 
nine-hour examination. Their 
performance in algebra, ge- 


ometry and numbers theory 
pul them ahead of 360 youths 
from 68 other countries. It 
was fee first U.S. victory in 
fee International Mathemat- 
ics Olympiad since an Ameri- 
can team tied the Russians in 
1986. China and Russia have 
dominated fee competition in 
recent years. The six Ameri- 
cans qualified for the olympi- 
ad by scoring higher than 
350,000 other teenagers on the 
American High School Math 
[ Exam in February, as well as 
on a series of follow-up tests. 

Personal service is one of 
tile fastest-growing industries 
In Washington, The Washing- 
ton Post reports. For a fee, 
people are available to do 
your shopping, cook your 
meals, clean house, iron 
clothes, feed fee children, call 
the plumber and wait for him 
to appear, buy new tires for 
your car and have them put 
on, and wait is line to get your 


theater tickets. Such help has 
always been available to the 
rich, but now the middle class 
is the main support of a cot- 
tage industry of personal-ser- 
vice providers. Pete Dwyer, 
who owns a personal service 
company called Order in fee 
House, says, “When I explain 
to lawyers wife billing rates of 
$150 to $200 an hour how 
much it’s costing them to han- 
dle these little tasks them- 
selves, their eyes just pop." 

In Wefiborn, Alabama. Phil- 
lip Bryant, 6 feet 4 inches (J.94 
meters) tall and 120 pounds 
(54 kilograms), beat out sever- 
al thousand of other skinny 
people for fee title “Mr. Puny- 
verse” in a contest sponsored 
by fee supermarket tabloid 
Weekly World News. “People 
made fun of me all my life.” 
he said. “Now being skinny 
actually might be an advan- 
tage.” 

International Herald Tribune. 


Hugh Scott, Ex-Senate Leader, Dies at 93 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Hugh 
Scott, 93, a Pennsylvania Re- 
publican who served 34 years in 

Congress, to be minority 
leade* in the Senate, died of 
cardiac arrest Thursday in Falls 
Church, Virginia. He bad Par- 
kinson’s disease and had suf- 
fered a stroke. 

Mr. Scott’s career on Capitol 

Hil! began in World War Hand 

encompassed the begmmngof 
fee Cold War. fee avil nghts 
t .. r-jwii*: the Vietnam war 
-t«c w (litigate scandal aim the 
i catenation of President Rich- 
ard Nixon- . . 

A representative of the mod- 
erate wing of his party, he an- 
eered conservatives wife ms un- 
failing support of eml rights 
measures and antagonized hb- 
c;als wife his strong tendency 
u; back fee policies of Repubii- 
ijtu presidents- ... 

Thus he supported Mr. N«j 
on’s opening to China in 1972 


— he was himself a student and 
collector of Chinese art — and 
he supported fee president os 
Vietnam and on other military 
issues. 

During the Watergate crisis, 
he the importance of 

fee revelations of the White 
House role in the cover-up of a 
break-in at Democratic Nation- 
al Committee headquarters al- 
most to 7 fee moment when the 
president was forced to leave 
office. , 

On Aug. 8. 1974, fee day be- 
fore Mr. Nixon turned over fee 
presidency to Gerald R. Ford, 
Mr. Scott and the House Re- 
publican leader, John J. Rhodes 
of Arizona, accompanied Sena- 
tor Barry M. Goldwater of Ari- 
zona to the White House on 
behalf of Congress’s Republi- 
cans to tell’ Mr. Nixon feat be 
did not have the votes to survive 
impeachment. 

Donald Raft Turner, 73, a 


scholar and. economist 
who was the UJ3. government's 
chief antitrust lawyer in fee ad- 
ministration of President Lyn- 
don B. Johnson, died July 19 in 
a nursing home in suburban 
Washington of complications 
of Akbenneris disease, his fam- 
ily said. 

May Lasswett, 89, an author 
whose humorous novels about 
life is Southern California and 
Texas were popular in fee 1940s 
and ’50s, died July 19 of Alz- 
heimer's disease in fee nursing 
unit of fee Solvang Lutheran 
Home in Solvang, California, 
where she resided. 

Dorothy Coffins, 67, a 
who was fee star of the 19! 
television show “Yotir Hit Pa- 
rade** and a longtime volunteer 
leader at the Muscular Dystro- 
phy Association, died Thursday 
m Watervhet, New York, an 
association spokesman said. 


Kong Yin, 123, believed to be 
China’s oldest woman, died 
July 16 of emphysema in 
Guangdong, fee official news- 
paper China Daily reported. 

Patrick J. Htifings, 71, a for- 
mer California congressman 
an d confidant of President 
Richard Nixon and other Re- 
publican leaders, died Wednes- 
day of cancer in Rancho Mi- 
rage, California. 

Michele (fee Madman) Zaza, 
50, a ldngpin of Naples’s Mafia, 
fee Camorra, died July 18 of a 
heart attack suffered in (he Re- 
bibbia Prison in Rome, prison 
officials said. 

Lane Bennett, 88, a 
champion rodeo star in 
the 1930s who helped organize 
fee old Cowboy Turtles Associ- 
ation, a union for contestants, 
died Friday in Colorado 
Springs, Colorado. 


International 

Classified 

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• Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

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• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 463794 74- Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

Itrralb^^Snlmnc 


Interested in 

The International Real Estate Market? 
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Marketplace 

Every Friday in the IHT for.- 
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Hearings Planned 
On Bias Charges 
At Spy Agencies 

Washington Past Service 

Washington — The 

House intelligence committee 
will hold hearings in September 
to air charges of discrimination 
against women in fee CIA and 
other intelligence agencies, ac- 
cording to Representative Ron- 
ald D. Coleman, a member of 
the panel. 

In a statement, the Texas 
Democrat said the committee 
also would look into “new alle- 
gations of retaliation against 
employees who have com- 
plained of discrimination.” He 
did not give any examples. 

“There is a building acrimo- 
ny among minority and women 
employees throughout the intel- 
ligence community who believe 
they hare been discriminated 
against,'' Mr. Coleman said. 








I 


JPage4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1994 


** 


Israel Favors Jordan Over Arafat in Holy- Site Dispute 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

ffew York Tuner Service 

JERUSALEM — It is a safe bet the palpably ' 
warm reception given King Hussein of Jordan on 
Monday at the White House, and the particular 
stress in the Washington declaration on Jordan's 
“special role” in administering the Dome of the 
, Rock, one of Islam's holiest shrines in Jerusalem, 
'will inflame a decades-long personal rivalry be- 
i tween the Jordanian monarch and Yasser Arafat 

The gilded, 1,300-year-old octagonal Dome 
- and the adjacent A1 Aqsa Mosque where King 
..Hussein's grandfather and mentor. King Abdul- 
. lab, was assassinated by a Palestinian militant on 
July 20. 1931, have been the subject of a jurisdic- 
.-tional dispute between Jordanians and Palestin- 
ians for years. 


Last year, King Hussein spent $8 milli on of his 
personal funds to restore the golden dome. The 


move, and the enormous publicity that surround- 


The future monarch, then 16, was standing by 
; King Abdullah's side when his grandfather was 
' slain. 


ed it, left tittle doubt the Jordanian monarch was 
reasserting the 50-year-long role his Hashemite 
family has fulfilled as custodians of the shrine 
and other holy Muslim sites in East Jerusalem, 
the city's predominantly Arab sector. 

Mr. Arafat, on the other hand, has repeatedly 
asserted that the holy shrine falls within the 
realm of the new Palestinian National Authority, 
of which be is the chairman by virtue of the 
Israeli-PLO agreement signed in Cairo on May 4. 
In the last few yearn, the PLO chairman bad 
adorned his offices with pictures of the golden 
dome, to make the point 

Only last week, a highly agitated Mr. Arafat, 
speakzng in the presence of the U.S. secretary of 
state, Warren M. Christopher, denounced in the 
strongest terms Israel's invitation to King Hus- 
sein to come here and pray at A1 Aqsa. 


“They have no right to issue any invitations," 
Mr. Arafat said “It is my duty and my responsi- 
bility to invite my brothers and friends to come 
visit the holy Christian and Muslim sites, which 
are under Palestinian jurisdiction.” 

The invitation to King Hussein was extended 
by the Israeli foreign minister, Shimon Peres, on 
his historic visit to Jordan that launched the 
effort crowned Monday with the Washington 
agreement. 

Since his arrival in Gaza earlier this month, 
Mr. Arafat has repeatedly vowed that he will 
pray at Al Aqsa mosque, a wish that Israel has 
said it would not oppose but has also delayed 
discussing with Mr. Arafat. 

The Israeli position on Muslim holy rites in 
Jerusalem has been 1 hat while the rity will “for* 
ever” remain the capital of Israel the right of all 
Muslim and Christum denominations to pray in 
their shrines will also be guaranteed by Israel 


Israel has said it would not prevent Mr. Ara- 
fat, a Muslim, from praying at Al Aqsa, but has 
mad e every effort to strip such an event of any. 
political significance. Mr. Arafat’s quest is to add 
legitimacy to his elalm of East Jerusalem as the 
future capital'of a Palestinian state by organizing 
bis prayer in Jerusalem as a political event. 

So, by stating specifically in the Washington 
declaration that Israel “will respect Jordan’s spe- 
cial role” in a dminis tering Jerusalem’s Muslim 
sites and em phasmng the Hashemite family's 
“historical” hegemony there, Israel left little 
doubt where it stood in the dispute over reli- 
gious, and to some extent political jurisdiction. 

A few days ago, the Israeli housing minister, 
Benjamin Ben ruszor, denounced Mr. Arafat's 
claims to the Islamic shrines, saying that M can- 
traiy to King Hussein, Arafat has no rights over 
the holy sites of Jerusalem, which have always 
been under the sole responsibility of the 
Jordanians.” 


Rwandan Orphans 
Stare Death in Face 

Dimqse and Hunger Ravage 

*re Keep Coming 



MIDEAST; A Step Toward Peace 


Coatinned from Page I 


may be over.” The White House 
* signing ceremony marked the 
third historic settlement of an- 
cient enmities that have 
? plagued the Middle East In 
September, Israel and the PLO 


signed an accord that promised 
the Pales- 


self-goveramcn t for 
tmians, a promise that is being 
' realized only now after months 
of difficult negotiations over 
the details. And it was 13 years 
ago that Egyptian and Israeli 
leaders came to Washington to 
sign a peace treaty. 

. In addition to ending the 
state of war between them, the 
declaration paved the way for 
. cooperation on several fronts, 
including telephone service and 


electricity, and the opening of 
borde 


two border crossings. Air ser- 
vice will also be established. 

King Hussein and Mr. Rabin 
agreed to make it possible for 
tourists to travel between their 
-two countries. The proposal en- 
visions the eventual establish- 
ment of a cultural park span- 
ning their border as well as 
'several joint development proj- 
ects. 


As an incentive for Jordan, 
the adminis tration has asked 
Congress to make it eligible for 
receipt of small-arms parts and 
ammuni tion, according to U.S. 
officials who spoke on condi- 
tion of anonymity. 

But they said any larger 
weapons requests from Jordan 
would be head off until a peace 
agreement was actually signed. 

Jordan has made no formal 
weapons requests, pending 
completion of a domestic re- 
view of its military situation, 
but King Hussein identified 
modernized arms assistance as 
a high priority in his talks with 
the administration, the officials 
said. 

In the declaration, Jordan 
agreed to reek an end to eco- 
nomic boycotts against IsraeL 
For its part, Israel agreed to 
respect Jordan's role in the 
Muslim holy shrines in Jerusa- 
lem. 

Just last week, Mr. Arafat as- 
serted that only Palestinians 
had authority over the holy 
places. 

(. AP , Reuters) 



Rearm 

GOMA, Zaire — An eman- 
ated little boy shakily got to 
feet among the cluster of sick 
child ran and tottered away 
alone into the plain black volca- 
nic rocks. 

Other naked little bodies 
were afready crouched in the 
unrelenting landscape, vomit- 
ing, defecating or just lying 
down to wait for death. 

“You can see how terrible it 
is here,” said Oswald Sebazin- 
dutsi Mazimpaka, who helps 
run a camp for 4,000 Rwandan 
refugee children on the out- 
skirts of the eastern Za irian 
town of Goma. • • 

“Who is there to save chil- 
dren like these?” he said. 

Hundreds of abandoned chil- 
dren are being discovere d daily 
in the teeming refugee camps 
around Goma and Mr. Maztm- 
palca’s orphanage at Ndosfao 
cannot take any more. 

The chOdrea, from infants to 
teenagers, have been separated 
from their parmts in the stam- 
pede of a million refugees 
across the frontier from Rwan- 
da. Most of them are from 
Rwanda’s majority Hutu tribe. 

The parents of others have 
either been killed during the 
three-month Rwanda blood- 
bath, in which 500,000 mainly 
Tutsi were massacred, or were 
struck down by a cholera epi- 
demic raging around the camps. 


follow visitors to Ac ‘ 

Sound the lines of white tents 
5?5> by the United Nations 
Chfldren’s Fund. 

Zairian workers pack ^ 
chfldien into the tents and then 
let them out, one-by*onc,^^M I S 
them each th 5 ee u ^ cd b 


Many are too young to say 
they are or where they 


who 

came from. 

“Give me a biscuit” say the 
healthier, older children who 


Zti a cup of purified water 
brought to the orphanage by 
French soldiers. 

The children eagerly grab at 
the biscuits and wander off 
among the rocks to eat- But 
thereis little joy in the camp 
and no noises of children play- 
ing. Instead, the children are 
crying, moaning or fighting. 

“We don’t count how many 
side there are,” said Mr. Ma- 
zhnpaka. “We’ve got diofcra, 
dysentery and malaria here 
now." He said 55 children had 
dial Sunday and Monday. 

The sick stay the night m a 
line of wooden cabins, and Mr. 
Mazimpaka was pulling them 
out by the arms to lay them on 
green plastic sheeting outside. 

Some were spattered with di- 
arrhea and urine. A man given 
the job of washing them said: 
“Fra a builder, for God’s sake. I 
have to do this because there's 
nobody else to do it” 

UmceFs Osei Kofi said more 
parentless children are turning 
op and that a new orphanage 
had been opened nearby, re- 
ceiving about 300 children in 
the first two days. 

"Children are bearing the 
brunt of this,” Mr. Kofi said. 

The cholera epidemic has 
IriQed 11.000 people of all ages 
around Goma since last week. 


SUMMER SHOOTING PRACTICE — A hooded Israeli teenager reedri 
organized by the outlawed anti- Arab Kadi organization. The camp was held in the 



RWANDA: U S. Halts Airdrops 


Contimed from Page 1 


BOSNIA: Repeated Serbian Attacks on 6 Safe Area 9 Test the UN’s Resolve ITALY: Aide Admits to Bribery 


Continued from Page 1 
drew up the new peace plan for Bosnia. On 
‘ Friday, Serbian forces sprayed a UN plane 


1 with small arms fire. 

- Earlier last week, Ratko Mladic, the 
military commander of the Bosnian Serbs, 
warned UN officers that he would ban UN 
'movement across Serbian lines if his de- 
mands were not met. 

• The Geneva meeting will focus on the 
Bosnian Serbs' rejection of the peace plan 
and will consider implementing a series of 
punishments against the Serbs, such as 
tightening enforcement around the Gor- 
azde zone. Under the plan, 51 percent of 
Bosnia would be controlled by Muslims 
and Groats, the remainder by rebel Serbs. 

Sir Michael Rose, the British lieutenant 
general in charge of the UN peacekeeping 
forces, has said combat-ready troops, such 
as NATO’s Allied Rapid Reaction Force, 
should replace the UN operation if a deci- 


sion is made to increase pressure on Lhe 
Serbs. If not, he has warned that his 18,000 
lightly-armed troops would be “sitting 
ducks” if Serbian forces decided to retali- 
ate. 


The chances of any such reorganization 
are not high. The United States has said it 
would contribute troops to Bosnia only in 
the case that all factions — Croats, Mus- 
lims and Serbs — welcomed a U.S. mili- 
tary presence. Britain and France, two 
other NATO mainstays, have stated they 
would rather withdraw their troops from 
Bosnia than get more deeply involved. As 
such, the threats inherent in the new peace 
plan appeared increasingly like another 
Western bluff in Bosnia. 


The Gorazde ultimatum, NATO’s sec- 
ond in Bosnia, was issued on April 22 and 
threatened Serbian forces attacking the 
isolated Muslim enclave with air strikes 


unless they withdrew all weapons bigger 
than 12.7 caliber to 20 kilometers (12 
miles) from Gorazde and pulled bade their 
infantry three kilometers from the town. 
The first NATO ul timat um in Bosnia came 
in February after the massacre of 68 peo- 
ple in Sarajevo’s open-air marketplace. 
That ul timatum demanded that the Serbs 
move their heavy weapons 20 kilometers 
from Sarajevo. 

Before the Gorazde ultimatum was is- 
sued, NATO warplanes bombed Serbian 
forces twice around the town — once on 
April 10 to protect UN troops ‘under Serbi- 
an attack, and again on April 1 1 when a 
Serbian tank was firing directly into the 
town, in violation of the Security Council 
resolution prohibiting direct attacks on a 
UN -designated safe area. Gorazde is one 
of six such zones in Bosnia. A third air 
strike ended in failure when Serbian forces 
shot down a British Harrier jet 


KIDNAP; 2 Ex-Victims Predict Kim Will Act Ruthlessly but Not Rashly 


Coofumed from Page 1 
Do you think they will let that 
happen? Kim II Sung didn’t 
groom him to be his Heir just 
because he was his son. Kim II 
Sung chose him because he 
knew he was capable.” 

Kim Jong II has been running 
lay-to-day operations of the 
Pyongyang government for 20 
/ears, said Mr. Shin, an assess- 
nent shared by numerous 
'forth Korea watchers in the 
South. 


During the movie couple's 
eight years in Pyongyang, they 
dined with Mr. Kim, watched 
movies with him and visited his 
home — considered a rare privi- 
lege. They spent many hours 
discussing movie projects, 
which Mr. Kim considered a 
key to mobilizing his people's 
support. 

Their bizarre odyssey began 
when Miss Choi Smith Korea's 
most popular actress since 


World War H was kidnapped 
in Hong Kong in January 1978. 
Out of nowhere, several men 
appeared, picked her up and 
put her on a freighter — sob- 
bing, screaming and then faint- 
ing — to the North Korean port 
of Nampo, near Pyongyang, she 
wrote in their joint 863-page 
memoir, which was published 
in Korean and Japanese. 

Several days later, Miss Choi 
was met at the dock by Mr. 


Kim, whose welcoming remarks 
were: “You have suffered a 
great deal trying to come here. I 
am Kim Jong D ” 

Mr. Shin was abducted six 
months later, after mounting a 
fruitless search for Miss Choi 
■ Stature Enhancement 
Mr. Kim is so sensitive about 
being short that he wears eleva- 
tor shoes, a Japanese magazine, 
Shukan Bunshun, reported 
Monday. 


Couthmed from Page 1 

Sciascia would also be 
tioned concerning an 
bribe to auditors reviewing lhe 
real estate company of the 
prime minister’s brother, Paolo 
Berlusconi, who has been 
charged with fraud in connec- 
tion with a land deal outside 
Mian. 

The charges against Mr. 
Sciascia were part of a probe 
into alleged collusion between 
leading companies and finance 
police. 

Sources close to the investi- 
gation in Rome said Sunday 
that Paolo Berlusconi was also 
being investigated for tax eva- 
sion. 

As for the finance police, 
General Giuseppe Cerciello 
and two colonels, Vincenzo Tri- 
poli and Paolo Zuin, were im- 
prisoned Saturday in the mili- 
tary jail in the northern town of 
Peschiera del Garda. 

Separately, police here said 
Saturday that a noncommis- 
sioned officer in the finance bri- 
le, Cataldo San taro, shot 
to death Friday. 

Mr. Santaro, against whom 
no charges were outstanding, 
was the third member of the 
brigade to commit suicide since 
it became the focus of magis- 
trates’ scrutiny at the beginning 
of the month. 

The investigation does not 
directly target Silvio Berlus- 


coni who has 
meat 


wen up 
at 


m- 


invest SpA publishing, 
. and retail empire. 


television 
A total of 22 other executives 
for some of Italy’s top commer- 
cial and financing firms have 
been implicated in the scandal 
(AFP, Reuters, AP) 


Craxi Criticizes 
Case Against Him 
As 'Persecution’ 


capital Kigali ami sent to 
Goma by road. . The trucks 
could bring back refugees on 
their return journeys, he said. 

But the mostly Hutu refu- 
gees, their panic fanned by ra- 
dio broadcasts, were afraid they 
would be massacred if they re- 
turn. The Tutsi minority now 
rutmg^Rwanda lost an estimat- 
ed 500,000 people in massacres 
at the hands of Hum soldiers 
and militiamen. Many erf 1 those 
mili tiaman s till are marauding 
in Zaire and the French security 
zone in southwestern Rwanda, 


where they have skirmished 
with Foreign Legion troops 
three nights in a row. 

. The Atari-dominated Rwan- 
da Patriotic Front has repeated- 
ly urged the refugees to return, 
saying they have nothing to fear 
if they were not involved in the 
mass a cres. - 

. The new president, Pasteur 
Bizhnungu, left for Mauritius 
chi Monday to meet with Presi- 
dent Mobutn Sese Seko of Zaire 
and ask him to facilitate the 
‘return of the refugees. Mr. Bizi- 
mnngn. also urged the United 
States to base its aid operation 
in the capital K* galj 


Agave Francc-Prcae 

ROME — Former Prime 
Minister Bettino Craxi, threat- 
ened with 11 years in jail over 
corruption charges, complained 
Monday that he was a victim of 
“willful persecution.” 

In a fax sent from Ms Tuni- 
sian hideaway to his Rome of-, 
flee, Mr. Craxi former leader of 
the Socialist P&rty, described 
the accusations connected to 
the 1982 collapse of the Banco 
Ambrosiano as “totally fantas- 
tic, absurd and unfounded in 
Italian or any European law ” 

Former Justice Minister 
Claudio Martindfi, also a So- 
cialist, who faces a 10-year sen- 
tence in the same case, said the 
high sentences being demanded 
by a state prosecutor Monday 
were “not only an injustice bat 
a monstrosity.” 


AIRDROP; U.S. Effort Criticized 

Continued from Page! 


heading north carrying empty 
cans and buckets, those return- 
ing south bearing full contain- 
ers on their heads. Many 
stretches of the route were lined 
with bodies, some covered with 
straw mats. 

The- 15- to IB-hour 'round 
trip, arduous under, any circum- 
stances, is fatal for many retfu- 
who are debilitated by de- 
Ltian and malnutrition. . .. 
To help alleviate the dreadful - 
living conditions in the camp, 
the American assessment team 


is Kkdy to recommend that the 
United Sti 


States send “variotis 
types of engineer support for 
removal of bodies, to. construct , 
roads and, most importantly, to 
build sanitary facilities Dire la- 
trines,” said Major. Frederick. 
Swiderdri, a medical officer. 


. . But given the time it will take 
to implement such measures, 
One officer acknowledged, 
“More people are going to die 
— it’s a fact of life” 

; Conditions at the Goma air- 
port continued to slow thestart- 
up.of the U.S. operation. 
; ' A.UJSb Air Force C-I41, the 
s&ond of the day, landed Mon- 
day. afternoon bearing 49,000 
pounds (22,000 kOograms) of 
oral hydration tablets needed to 
battle the cholera death rate, 

! bat no trucks were immediately 
available to pick them up. 

"Things aren’t moving. Peo- 
ple are stiH dying. It doesn’t 
make a Jot. of sense,” said a 
frustrated officer. 

There were no UJS. Air Force 
cargo handlers at the Goma air- 
port,- and loading material was 
a chaotic ami makeshift affair. 


{ h 


* 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1994 


Page5 


.. 

: 1 


European Authorities Seek a Rumored Plutonium Cache Britain and Ireland 

By R, Jeffrey Smith: \-rJ: first linked io nuclear smuggling when the Ger- there could be other material moving about.” That conclusion is based on speculation that 1 ' ififlCfi 1,Th IJlStfH* 

and Steve V^el v. said Leopold Shuster, head of the German feder- any additional malenal is similar to what was W KM W X W</ 

• . that -contained six grams of weapons-grade al crime office’s organized crime section, at a found m Mr. JaekJes garage — highly pure ww-fc * -*-* w /V* 

WASHINGTON- European law enforce- plutonium. conference in Wiesbaden. pluiomam-229 mixed with far more abundant, f|> ^ P/ihiiff 

ment agencies are searching for^iaiBe quantity Six grains of plutonium is roughly one-thou- Mikhail Yegorov, head of the Russian Interior m»ily worthless maienals. . f jfzSTii,Tjf; 1 I Lrl llfyl/ll'/ I 

of weapons-grade^tS^ram “that -a- Oerinan- sandth of what is needed to provide adequate Ministry’s organized crime section, said in Wies- The presence of worthless , materials -m ithe i/t/ 


By R. Jeffrey Smith;: -t; -; 
and Steve Yogely 

‘ Wart/ngliB AetfS'irtfc*- ‘ 

WASHINGTON. — European law enforce- 
ment agencies are searching for a toge quantity 
of weapons-grade plutomum 'that'a- Gerinan 
businessman has claimed is, circulating on the 
black market, according to high German and 
U.S. authorities. ; ' 

Although. Goman and U.S. intelligence offi- 
cials say they have reason to believe the man’s 
assertion may not be true, German, Swiss and 
Russian police have been ordered to conduct the 
search because the missing material may be suffi- 
cient to build at least one nuclear weapon, Ger- 
man and diplomatic officials sai d. 

The businessman, Adolf Jackie, was arrested 
at the Stuttgart airport on May 10 during a probe 
of suspected counterfeiting operations. He was 


“W. 1 




first linked to nuclear smuggling when the Ger- 
man police came across a leaded jar in his garage 
that -contained six grams of weapons-grade 
plutonium. 

Six grams of phitonium is roughly one-thou- 
sandth of what is needed to provide adequate 
fission for a single nuclear weapon, but the 

. discovery sparked immediate alarm because no 

weapons-grade plutonium had ever been found 
on the blade market. 

German authorities have said the material 
most likely came from Russia. 

Mr. Jaekle told the German authorities that 
the seized material was but a small portion of a 
much larger cache of weapons-grade plutonium 
in Europe, according to German and U.S. offi- 
cials. Documents seized at his house appeared to 
back up the assertion. 

“We realize it might not only be six grains, that 


there could be other material moving about.” 
said Leopold Shuster, head of the German feder- 
al crime office’s organized crime section, at a 
conference in Wiesbaden. 

Mikhail Yegorov, head of the Russian Interior 
Ministry's organized crime section, said in Wies- 
baden that Russian law enforcement agencies 
were cooperating in the investigation, but be 
stressed that there was no proof that the seized 
plutonium was from Russia. 

Both German and U.S. officials said the seized 
documents raised questions about the quantity 
and nature of the nuclear material that Mr. 
Jackie claimed was in circulation. 

They assume, but are not certain, that only a 
tenth of what Mr. Jaekle described as a total 
cache of 100 to 150 kilograms (220 to 330 
pounds) of such material might actually consist 
of weapons-grade plutonium. 


That conclusion is based on speculation that 
any additional material is similar to what was 
found in Mr. JaekJe’s garage — highly pure 
plutonium-239 mixed with far more abundant, 
mostly worthless materials. 

The presence of worthless materials in the 
garage sample “and the sloppy handling of it” by 
Mr. Jaekle has led U.S. intelligence aides to 
conclude that he was trying to swindle buyers. 

Another reason for skepticism, several U.S. 
officials said, is that the plutonium-239 in the 
seized sample had an unusual purity of 99.7 
percent. Most plutonium used in Russian nucle- 
ar weapons is only 94 percent to 96 percent pure, 
making it unlikely that Mr. Jaekle obtained the 
material from a nuclear plant or a stockpile. 

Instead, the officials said, it probably was 
produced for use by Russ an nuclear weapons 
scientists as a laboratory measurement standard. 



Bonn Assails Skinhead Attack 

It Calls for Heavy Penalties After Rampage 


Agence France- Prase 

BONN — The German government strongly 
attacked on Monday the “sickening acts” of 
cVinheadc who went on a rampage at the former 
Bucbenwald concentration camp, calling on the 
courts to hand down stiff sentences. 

On Sunday, a group of 22 skinheads gave Nazi 
salutes, threw rocks and damaged parts of the 
ate, and threatened to burn a member of the 
staff who was working at the memorial to the 
former camp, where about 56,000 prisoners died 
during World War D. 

More than 260,000 Jews and opponents of the 
Nazis passed through the gates of the camp, in 
Eastern Germany, between 1937 and 1945. 

A Bonn spokesman said the “government re- 


grets these sickening acts and demands that the 
courts hand down what can only be heavy sen- 
tences on those responsible.” 

The Israeli ambassador, Avi Primor, con- 
demned the gang’s actions, saying in a state- 
man: “The desecration of the Bucbenwald me- 
morial will be greeted with indignation in Israel.” 

“This event is, unfortunately, only one link in 
a chain of recent violent acts,” be added. 

The police detained the gang members — 
including a 23-year-old woman — as they were 
getting bade on the bus in which they had 
arrived. 

The woman, who is wanted in connection with 
another offense, was still being held Monday, the 
police said. 



Yeltsin Names Envoy to U.S. 


Peter Modkrs Realm 


STANDOFF ENDS — Police in Kassel, Germany, arresting one of 43 rioters who 
had heM a prison warden hostage for 22 imra The prisoners, roost of them Algerians 
who had been rafased political asylum, seized the warden Sunday. He was freed 
unharmed, as were three other hostages who were taken by the prisoners on Monday. 


By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Past Service 

MOSCOW — President Bo- 
ris N. Yeltsin has named Yuli 
M. Vorontsov to be the next 
ambassador to the United 
States. 

Mr. Vorontsov, 64, is one of 
the few leading figures from the 
Soviet era to get a high position 

under Mr. Yeltsin. 

A professional diplomat who 
has lived for much of his career 
in the United States, most re- 
cently as chief delegate to the 
United Nations, Mr. Vorontsov 
has survived political changes 
in Moscow thanks to his reputa- 
tion as an intelligent observer, a 
practiced diplomatic trouble- 
shooter and a credible negotia- 
tor. 

Mr. Vorontsov has for the 
most part stayed out of Mos- 


cow’s often-vidous political 
battles. 

“He’s a very able man,” said 
Marshall D. Shulman. who as 
adviser on Soviet affairs to Sec- 
retary of State Cyrus R. Vance 
dealt with Mr. Vorontsov in 
Washington in the 1970s. “If he 
could not answer something, in- 
stead of giving an agitprop re- 
sponse, he would just stay si- 
lent” 

As a Soviet diplomat Mr. 
Vorontsov served two tours at 
the United Nations, from 1954 
to 1958 and from 1963 to 1965, 
before becoming chief delegate 
there in 1991. He served in the 
Soviet Embassy in Washington 
from 1966 to 1977, ending as 
deputy chief of mission. 

Since then, he has been am- 
bassador to India, France and 
Afghanistan, serving in Kabul 
during the late 1980s when 


Moscow was disen g a gin g from 
its losing war there. 

Mr. Vorontsov is fluent in 
Fetish and French and is at 
with diplomats and jour- 
nalists. 

He served as deputy foreign 
minister under President Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev and was the 
first diplomat the Foreign Min- 
istry brought out for a wide- 
ranging briefing of foreign jour- 
nalists when Mr. Gorbachev 
was embarking on his policy of 
glasnost, or openness. 

3 Die in Sooth Africa Storms 

The Associated Press 

CAPE TOWN —Three peo- 
ple died in freak storms in 
southern Cape Province that 
also swept a train carrying 80 
vacationers off the tracks, po- 
lice said Monday. 


Mitcbel McLaughlin caning 
for new talks with Britain. 


Ukraine Elections 
Suffer From Low 
Voter Turnout 

The Associated Press 

KIEV — Only 19 legislators 
were elected in the latest round 
of voting to fill 112 vacant seats 
in Ukraine’s Parliament, and 
low turnout spoiled elections in 
many districts, officials report- 
ed Monday. 

Elections were declared valid 
in 64 districts where the turnout 
reached the required 50 or more 
percent But in 45 of those con- 
stituencies, neither candidate 
received the necessary 50 or 
more percent of the vote in Sun- 
day's balloting. 

The Central Election Com- 
mission said runoffs in these 
districts would be held in two 
weeks, and in those where elec- 
tions were declared invalid, a 
new round is to be held in No- 
vember. 

The results were a disap- 
pointment for the revived Com- 
munist Party and its conserva- 
tive allies, who hoped to 
increase their already signifi- 
cant share of Parliament seats, 
145 out of 450. 

Of those actually elected, 14 
people were not affiliated with 
any party and the rest belonged 
to small centrist groups. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Britain and 
Ireland pledged Monday to 
keep searching for an end to the 
conflict in Northern Ireland de- 
spite the refusal of the Irish Re- 
publican Array’s political wing, 
Sum Fan, to accept their peace 
plan. 

At a special conference on 
Sunday, 800 Sinn Fein dele- 
gates said the blueprint was a 
step toward peace but was un- 
acceptable in its present form 
because it contained “negative 
and contradictory elements.” 

Although Pi nn Fein denied it 
bad rejected the December 
“Downing Street Declaration,” 
its response fell far short of the 
unambiguous “yes" sought by 
the authors of the plan. Prime 
Ministers John Major and Al- 
bert Reynolds. 

“Sinn Fein do not have a veto 
over there,” said a spokesman 
for Mr. Major. “We are deter- 
mined to press ahead with the 
political process." 

“It’s a tremendous disap- 
pointment and a very great 
shame and disgrace that they 
are not prepared to give up vio- 
lence," said Sir Patrick May- 
fa ew. Britain’s secretary for 
Northern Ireland. 

London and Dublin have of- 
fered Sinn Fein a partin negoti- 
ations over Northern Ireland’s 
future if IRA guerrillas end 
their 25-year campaign to oust 
Britain and reunite the province 
with Ireland. 

Foreign Minister Dick 
Spring of Ireland, also express- 
ing disappointment with the 
outcome of the conference, said 
Sinn Fein was isolating itself by 
refusing to accept the peace 
plan. 

“Their leadership and the 
rest of us must be living in dif- 
ferent worlds if they see what 
happened yesterday as a posi- 
tive development,” he saia. 

“The peace process isn’t 
dead,” said the president of 
Sinn Fein, Gerry Adams. “-It’s 
very much alive.” He was 
speaking at a news briefing in 
the Irish town of Lettcrkenny, 
where the conference was held. 

In London, Sinn Fein's chair- 
man in Northern Ireland, Mit- 
chel McLaughlin, called on 
Britain to resume direct talks 
with Sinn Fein without precon- 
ditions on the disputed parts of 
the peace plan. 


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O P 



PI'BIJNIIEl) wmi TUK NKW tORk TlUHi AND T1IK W.VSIlINt.TON PONT 


Posthumous Moral Victory 


It is 50 years since a group or German 
officers tried to rid the world of Adolf 
Hitler. By chance, someone happened to 
move thar bomb-laden briefcase, and the 
Fflhrer was only wounded as walls shook 
in his underground co mman d post in 
East Prussia. Colonel Claus von Stauf- 
fenberg, the chief conspirator, had al- 
ready left the room. On bearing the blast, 
he mistakenly assumed that Hitler was 
dead and sped to Berlin to spur the revolt, 
only to be arrested and summarily exe- 
cuted. later that day. 

The July 20 plot was a noble failure, an 
honorable treason. Yet in a profound but 
poignant sense the failure triumphed. 
Nothing better became the conspirators 
than their demeanor when they were ar- 
rested, tortured, tried before a ranting 
Nazi judge and then strangled slowly with 
piano wire — much of this filmed for 
Hitler’s gratification. Of the nearly 200 
principals who were thus executed, none 
recanted; several thousand other suspects 
were later convicted in civ ilian courts. 

Their heroism contrasted sharply with 
Hitler’s final hours in Berlin. Having 
brought run on his adopted country, the 
Fflhrer cursed the Germans as unworthy 
of his genius and shot himself as the Red 
Army advanced through the nibble. The 
German armed forces had been under 
Hitler’s absolute co mman d, and Germa- 
ny’s national honor had been indelibly 
stained by the mass murder of Jews and 
other supposedly inferior non-Aryans. 

Nevertheless, in the immediate wake of 
this catastrophe, diehard nationalists as- 
sailed the July 20 plotters as traitors who 
stabbed their fatherland in the back. In- 
deed, in West Germany’s first years, 
while widows of SS killers received mili- 
tary pensions, the widows of July 20 
conspirators did not. This anomaly end- 
ed, thanks partly to a speech by the first 
president of the Federal Republic, Theo- 


dor Heuss, who found nothing treason- 
able in opposing a criminal regime, and 
to a judicial ruling to the same effect. 

Then, as archives opened and survivors 
testified, it became posable for the first 
time to write a serious history of the 
resistance, which spanned the political 
spectrum. After Hitler’s advent m 1933, 
the Gestapo jailed hundreds of thousands 
of Communists and Social Democrats, 
who were undeniably the first serious 
opponents of the Nazi regime. But sig- 
nificant dissent also grew within the 
conservative military caste. In 1938, se- 
nior generals secretly sought British 
support for a bold plan to oust the 
upstart Fflhrer, the plot collapsed when 
Britain bowed at Munich to Hitler's de- 
mand to dismember Czechoslovakia. 

Over the decades, the recovery of this 
history in both West and East Germany 
has doubtless been colored by ideok 
But even before unification, propa 
began giving way to honest schols 
curiosity to real pride. Speaking last ’ 
in the very courtyard where Stauffent 
was executed. Chancellor Helmut 
rightly remarked that the men and wom- 
en of July 20 crucially helped Germany 
recover its self-respect Mr. Kohl’s Social 
Democratic opponents were excluded 
from the ceremony, prompting their com- 
plaint that a solemn, moment was exploit- 
ed for political gain. 

It speaks well for Germany that politi- 
cal leaders vie to honor the memory of 
those who tried to loll Hitler. Nobody 
can say what might have happened had 
the July 20 conspiracy succeeded, but 
were that soil is sadly probable that these 
brave soldiers would have been blamed 
for all Germany's woes by truly resurgent 
nationalists. Their victory was moral, and 
posthumous, and its importance is now 
fully evident a half-century later. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Legislating for the World 


With the gigantic trade bill that went 
through the House Ways and Means 
Committee last week, the U.S. Congress 
is legislating not only for the United 
States but Tor the world. So far. 123 
governments have signed the broad ex- 
pansion of the international trade rules 
produced last December by tire Uruguay 
Round of negotiations. Technically, Con- 
gress is only writing the American im- 
plementing legislation. But the United 
States is the leader in the push for more 
open markets, as well as the biggest ex- 
porter. The standards that it sets in its 
own laws will, for better or for worse, be 
quickly replicated abroad. That is why it 
is unusually important to resist the temp- 
tations of protectionism. 

In that respect, the Ways and Means 
Committee has done in general a good 
job — not perfect, but very respectable. 
The committee, and for that matter the 
Gin ton administration, seem to have de- 
cided to deflea some of the political 
pressure with concessions to the biggest 
industries threatened by imports, espe- 
cially steel and textiles. The bill now 
contains an obscure change in a defini- 
tion that will make it easier for steel 
companies to win dumping cases against 
their foreign rivals. There is also a signifi- 
cant change in the rules of origin for the 
textile quotas, but in any case the quotas 
will be phased out over the next 10 years. 
So far, so fairly good. This week the Sen- 


ate Finance Committee takes up the bilL 

The congressional process tends inev- 
itably to focus on the grievances of com- 
panies that have trouble coping with im- 
ports. It is essential not to lose sight of the 
benefits that this bill can bring to the 
highly competitive American producers 
who are exporters. Over the next decade, 
the administration expects the fastest 
growth for American export markets to 
lie in Latin America and, except for Ja- 
pan. in Asia. In the past, most of those 
countries stayed outside the international 
trade rules, which were generally written 
by and followed by the rich industrial 
countries. The Uruguay agreement will 
now apply them to nearly everybody. 

The rules on subsidies until now were 
recognized by a little more than two doz- 
en countries. Now they will be adopted 
by 123. The same will be true of the 
dumping codes. The rules on import li- 
censing. a perennial sore pant for Ameri- 
can companies abroad, were recognized 
by only 30 countries but now will be 
similarly enforced by all 123 parties to 
the agreement. The United States is 
counting on future exports for economic 
growth, and that growth requires more 
widely opened markets. American law 
will set the standard for opening them. 
That is the baric reality by which Con- 
gress needs to weigh this trade law as it 
moves toward passage. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


What Blair Conld Offer Britain Advice for Clinton on Haiti 


equality 
The j 


[Does Tony Blair, new leader of the 
Labor Party,! wish to challenge the fasci- 
nation that the free market has held for 
politicians and economists for nearly 20 
years? These have not been notably ’suc- 
cessful years. True, the rival ideology, 
communism, has collapsed; and. for many 
people, material prosperity has increased 
beyond their dreams. But in many West- 
ern societies these years have also been 
marked by rising unemployment, rising 
crime and violence, greater poverty, in- 
and family breakdown, 
greatest of Christian Socialists, 
FL H. Tawney, wrote nearly 70 years ago 
that our modern obsession with econom- 
ic issues would eventually appear as piti- 
able as the 17th century obsession with 
religious issues appears today. “Society.” 
he wrote, “must regard economic inter- 
ests as one element in life, not as the 
whole of life.” It must so organize its 
production “that the instrumental char- 
acter of economic activity is emphasized 
by its subordination to the social purpose 
for which it is carried on.” A leader who 
can turn that philosophy into practical 
politics is long overdue. Only if he can do 
so will Tony Blair offer something truly 
different to the British people. 

— Independent on Sunday i London). 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED /.W 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
i'ti-Clkiinnrn 

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1 » « J 


The New 


N EW YORK — Rwanda is many 
things; a human catastrophe, a tes- 
tament to the danger of ethnic hatred, a 
devastating symbol of man’s inhumanity 
toman. But beyond all that it is a sign of 
the New World Disorder a world in 
which no great powe - lakes responsibility 
for preventing a descent into chaos. - 
When an organized group of militant 
Hutu began slaughtering Rwanda's Tutsi 
minority in Apm, no outride power was 
prepared to intervene. Pleas by the Unit- 
ed Nations secretary-general, Butros Bu- 
tros Ghali, got no response. 

In the end, the human tragedy was so 
great that the U.S. government has fell 
compelled to mount an enormous relief 
effort. It will cost many times what earli- 
er intervention might have, not to men- 
tion the cost in Rwandan lives. 

There were reasons for the Clinton 
administration's disinclination to inter- 
vene in April or May. Rwanda is remote 
from American military bases and out- 
side traditional areas of American inter- 
est Separating the parties in so savage a 
civil conflict would have been difficult 
But there was plainly another element 
in the U.S. derision to stay ouL That was 



By Anthony Lewis . 

the now ingrained reluctance to use the 
aimed forces of America in any situation 
where they may suffer casualties. 

Edward N. Luttwak, a conservative, 
analyst at the Center for Strategic and 
International Studies in Washington, dis- 
cusses the new nrilitaiy shyness in the' 
current issue of Foreign Affairs. His arti- 
cle, brief and pungent, is essential read- 
ing for both liberals and conservatives. 

In Somalia, Mr. Luttwak notes, the' 
Hnwth of 18 professional soldiers, who 
presumably went into the military know- 
ing that they might have to risk their 
lives, forced a total change mU-S. policy. 
In Haiti, a handful of thugs on the dories 
frightened off an American vessel; the 
impression of U.S. weakness bedevils the 
Haitian problem to this day. 

What we are seeing, Mr. Luttwak ar- 
gues, is a “refusal to tolerate combat casu- 
alties. 71 The phenomenon is not confined 
to (he United States or other democracies 



ed with extrao rdin ary timidity — for J r 
of public reaction against casualties. ^ 
- -The two recent cases where significant 
powers risked sizable casualties were die 
Falkland* war and the Gulf War. In the 
first, Margaret Thatcher’s leadership 
took Britain into a romanticized echo of 
empire. Lathe Gulf, there were real inter- 
ests, and President George Bush effeo- 
tivriy mobilized opinion behind the war. 
: But the Gdf War story suggests that 
Americans are now willing to nsk casual- 
ties only for a large and dramatized 
cause. And that,. Mr. Luttwak says, 
“rules oat the most efficient use of force 
— early and on a small stale .to prevent 
escalation.” He ncught have boat writing, 
prcsdently, about Rwanda. 

What is the reason for the new sensitiv- 
ity about casualties? Mr. Luttwak’s theory 
is that it reflects the smaller size of families 
in the devdoged world. People used to 
have many children, some of whom were 
expected to die young anyway, so death in 
battle was more acceptable. - 

Tbat may be a psychological explana- 
tion, but there is a more immediate polit- 
ical one in America: Vietnam. The Unit- 
ed States fought a war that, marc and 


We’re in Danger of Getting Used to It 


N EW YORK — Goma has 
more refugees than there 
are people living in Detroit. This 
sort of comparison is supposed 
to make the other side of the 
world seem closer to Americans. 
But it is an an empty device in 
the harsh light of the disaster 
that has brought more than a 

mill inn Rw andans to a border 

city in Zaire that once had a 
population of 150,000. 

And the disaster itself reveals 
the ihnHs of individual ability to 
perceive the members of the hu- 
man community as neighbors, 
friends, fellow sufferers. It re- 
veals an empathy overload that 
has blunted the edge of Ameri- 
can public opinion, perhaps for 
years to come. 

When JoSle Tanguy, execu- 
tive director of the medical relief 
organization Doctors Without 
Baders, talks about where its 
volunteers are now deployed, it 
sounds like a roll call of claims 
on our concern: Bosnia, Haiti, 
so many places where the U.S. 
government has considered in- 
tervention in recent months. 

From trying to puzzle out the 
Serbs, Muslims and Croats, 
compassionate Americans now 
turn their attention toward the 
Hutu and the Tutsi and the trib- 
al warfare that led a monumen- 
tal wave of people to pick up and 
move to encampments without 


By Anna Quindlen 


latrines and dean water where 
thousands are dying of cholera. 

Even Ms. Tanguy, who has 
given endless interviews on the 
chance that they will somehow 
help, finally says “But how 
many times ...” her voice dy- 
ing in her throat What she 
means is that the volunteer doc- 
tors have been ricocheting from 
crisis to crisis. And the public 
heart if there is such a thing, has 
lost some of its daslicit 


“People say, ‘Well, what good 
has it done? Ethiopia, Somalia 
— it just .keeps coming back,*” 
says Senator Nancy Kassebaum, ■ 
who sits on the subcommittee on 
African affairs. 

We Americans can be com- 
passionate and generous people, 
who hold pancake breakfasts to 
pay for kidney transplants, and 
help bufld new houses for vic- 
tims of fire and flood, if it were 
possible, as our mothers once 
suggested when we balked at 
brusseis sprouts, to take our 
plenty personally to Goma, the 
people there would be fulL 

But compassion likes proximi- 
ty and specificity, the embodi- 
ment of an issue in a person that 
attached when Betty Ford had 
breast cancer. Rock Hudson 
AIDS. Would understanding of 


the Holocaust be mute the same 
if Anne Frank ban qoC falren a 
small plaid diary into hiding? 

Tragedy on a roonrimentfll 
scale, as in Rwanda, lends itself 
instead to depersonalization. So 
does the televirion coverage, 
which is at once so' immediate 
and so distant Who ever imag- 
ined that we would be able to 
watch as the light of fife passed 
from the eyes of a stranger thou- 
sands of miles away? 

Who ever imagined that we 
would be as dose to a newly 
minted orphan, tears a swath of 
patent leather on his dusty face, 
as to our own children? Who 
knew we would become so ac- 
customed to the image of 
corpses in a mass grave that it 
would lose not only the power to 
shod:, but the power to move? 

It is the individual that moves 
us. In Goma, Raymond Bonner 
described me small boy carry- 
ing the doth-wrapped bundle 
that contained the body of his 
little sister. Orphaned toddlers 
wander the camps. Babies wail 
over their dying mothers. 

Ms. Tanguy says her doctors 
report seeing patients who die as 
they are being e xamin ed. 

“If these people do not return 
to their homes, the crops will 
rot in the field,” she added. 
“And we will see another cycle 
of starvation. That is pretty 


liedMuscle 


more Americans came to regard , as a 
, besting thousands of Jives even 
■ it decided to get oat. 

i Vietnam, the Pentagon has been 
hStfesenritive about public opinion. Un- 

- der&neral Cohn PcweU as chairman of 
the Joart Chicfs, it adopted a doctrine 
that afiowsAhe use of American forces in 
only extremely narrow circumstances. 
Military leadezs have become the biggest 
resisters to the use of force. 

Those of ns who came to oppose die 
Vietnam War naturally applaud the cau- 
tiousness of military leaders. But, like any 
doctrine, fins one can be overdone. Right 
now, Zairean officers are demanding pay- 
ments to let relief planes- Dor Rwandan 
refi^ees.land. The United States should 
use its muscle without hesitation to stop 
such a practice by the corrupt fences of 
President Mobutu Sese Seko. 

- America is the one. remaining super- 
power. If it cannot use force to prevent 
disasters, the world is truly condemned 
to chaos. And Americans. Mr. Luttwak 
writes, will have to learn how to be blind 

- “to passively ignore avoidable trage- 
dies and horrific atrocities.” 

The New York 7bffes. 

^760**-. 



much what we saw in Somalia.” 

“They are diverting food from 
Sudan, 4 said Senator Kasse- 
baum. “But we know there are 
children starving” in Sudan. 

The United States will send 
33,000 tons of grain and 20 mil- 
lion packets of rchydration kits 
to treat cholera. Diplomats will 
work with the new Rwandan gov- 
ernment; refugees who feared 
death because of factional fight- 


ing will be urged to return home. 

By the time they do, there will 
be mass graves that hold perhaps 
thousands of bodies. And then, 
somewhere else, another great 
disaster, writ large on our televi- 
sion screens. Does each succeed- 
ing struggle enlarge our under- 
standing of the essential tie of 
humanity? Or does it merely 
mak e us numb? 

The New York Tones. 


In Ukraine and Belarus, Politicians Have Been Learning Fast 


For a compulsively indecisive Presi- 
dent Bill Gin ton, Haiti is pure anguish. 
For months, he has been torturing him- 
self over whether to invade this sorry land 
and put its desperate people out of their 
misery by removing its military tyrants. 

The case in favor: Nasty rulers would 
get their comeuppance; Mr. Clinton 
would be seen by the victims as their 
savior; a democratically elected govern- 
ment would be restored to power, Flori- 
da would stop bring besieged by frantic 
Haitian refugees; and the United States 
would be seen to be exercising some mor- 
al leadership in a world of chaos. 

The case against: support for an inva- 
sion is limited on Capitol H31, at Foggy 
Bottom and in the opinion polls; Ameri- 
can military missions sometimes go 
wrong; the commitment to Haiti would 
need to last years to do any good; body 
bags never play in Peoria; and being the 
world's policeman is a thankless task. 

Mr. Clinton is in the position of having 
rattled his sabres at Haiti so often that he 
must do something soon or lose face. He 
would be well advised to work the tele- 
phone. He needs not just stronger domes- 
tic backing, but the ability to carry Latin 
America with him in any invasion fleet. 

— The Age ( Melbourne ). 


W ASHINGTON —Better the 
devil you don’t know than 
the one you do. So say the voters in 
Ukraine and Belarus, where color- 
ful risk-takers have replaced tired 
apparatchiks as leados. Despite 
the predictable gloom of Western 
experts over this turn of events, 
there is a good chance that the 
people have made the rigb* choice. 

This month's elections in the 
two ex-Soviet republics bordering 
on Russia do introduce a new 
element of unpredictability into 
the still dangerous sorting out of 
frontiers and assets in the former 
Soviet empire. Unpredictability 
always frightens experts. 

But there is also reason to take 
heart from the election returns in . 
Ukraine and Belarus. The elec- 


By Jim Hoagland 


lions went smoothly, without 
charges of intimidation or fraud. 
And the vanning politicians dem- 
onstrate how thoroughly recently 
oppressed Eastern Europe has 
absorbed the fundamentals of 
Western politics: 

The victors. Ukraine's Leonid 
Kuchma and Alexander Luka- 
shenko of Belarus, ran as wild- 
eyed populists, promising to 
«mash the establishment that has 
been crashing the little people. In 
office, the new guys are getting 
down to business-as-usual, mak- 
ing deals with the central bankers 
and emphasizing continuity. 

Could all politics be universal? 
Or are these guys from Arkansas? 


The experts in the finance min- 
istries and foreign ministries of 
the West had become accustomed 
to the stolid, party-boss ways of 
Ukraine’s President Leonid Krav- 
chuk. who issued a steady stream 
of unfulfilled promises to reform 
the old Marxist economy while 
Ukraine sagged deeper into ruin. 

On July 10, as voters went to 
the polls. Western nations an- 
nounced that they would give 
Ukraine up to $4 biltioa in eco- 
nomic aid. Whatever the inten- 
tions of the Group of Seven in- 
dustrial democracies, the an- 
nouncement was widely seen as 
support for the brain-dead sys- 
tem run by Mr. Kravchuk. 


Instead Ukrainians elected Mr. 
Kuchma, a 55-year-old former 
manager in the Soviet military- 


Looking for Bides in the Ethnic Jungle 


By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


W ASHINGTON — A head- 
line declares, “Cyprus pro- 
blem remains unsolved after 20 
years; UN’s “green fine* divides 
Greek and Turkish islanders." 
This tale of continuing crisis and 
presumed danger is certainly the 
way many people look at it. 

But wait- Wny is a divided but 
policed and peaceful status quo, 
a situation that separates but 
comforts formerly belligerent 
communities, considered a pro- 
blem? Would not many people 
in, say, Bosnia regard a Cyprus- 
type result as a solution, and a 
merciful one at that? 

What do we want for places 
tom by ethnic passions, aityway? 

To admit to confusion m dis- 
tinguishing problem and solu- 
tion is to confirm that most of 
us are still coming to grips with 
the post-Cold War proliferation 
of conflicts. None of the old 
rules seem to fit 
Certainly we can agree first of 
all that whatever the result it 
it to be readied peacefully 
not by terror or conquest 
But look at Bosnia, where vio- 
lence has produced a new if un- 
stable status quo. There it be- 
comes much harder to tefl the 
victims, who find their life un- 
just to the point of unbearable, 
that they would dispense with 
force to repair the wrong. 

Do not Bosnians who have 
lost the right to stay in their 
homes and their homeland have 
a right to return, or to be com- 
pensated in some way for their 
loss — or to fight on if they 
judge that they ml] gain from it? 
Otherwise, the initial employer 
of force, or the stronger party, 
has an ineradicable advantage. 


But how to fight on? That is 
the defining tactical question. 
There were years when almost 
everybody told the Palestinians 
that they had lost and should 
stop fighting, and almost every- 
one acceded except the boys with 
the stones. Circumstances were 
special — a softhearted occupier, 
good access to media — but cir- 
cumstances are always speciaL 

Those who at a given moment 
are defined as losers always 
have an option to open up a new 
front, as long as they have not 
defined themselves as losers. 

We. keep learning that ethnic- 
ity carries a call on a human 
being’s deepest sources of per- 
sonal identity and, politically 
speaking, amounts to something 
of a perpetual struggle machine. 

But what to do whoa, in an 
ethnic conflict, both sides claim 
to be victims of affront and in- 
justice? This is mostly bow it is 
in the real world. 

In those circumstance^ to 
condone the use of force is to 
ensure continuance of a state erf 1 
war and to put off a solution 
until the two sides have come to 
some matching balance of far 
ligue and opportunity, cost and 
bonefiL Wc may hate the “eth- 
nic cleansing" and other terrible 
excesses to which fighting can 
lead. But many of us hesitate to 
rule out the option of fighting as 
a way to serve an ethnic group’s 
legitimate and otherwise unob- 
tainable goals — with the condi- 
tion that the fighting be fair. 

Cyprus was relatively easy. 
The island's Greek-Turlush ter- 
ritorial split, when it came, be- 
came an accomplished fact in 
hours. That Turaey was much 


nearer and more powerful let 
Turkey intervene and Greece 
stay removed. The world per- 
ceived a rough balance: Turks 
violated the sovereignty of Cy- 
prus and “ethnically cleansed" 
its northern area, but for an 
understandable cause — to pro- 
tect a Turkish minority from 
Greek depredation. 

The United Nations moved 
quickly into the no-casoalty, 
hne-polictng role that it contin- 
ues to this day. Turks and 
Greeks now play to asmall gal- 
lay. Most people seem at ease 
with the prevailing inertia. 

I regret this outcome. First, 
although a territorial sorting out 
may woii in Cyprus, it will 
work less well where the differ- 
ent communities are maxed more 
on the ground and involved more 
with other international players. 
Cyprus is an island, and smaiL In 
other torn countries the very pro- 
cess of sorting our creates im- 
mense pressures to restore the 
torn pieces. Difficult as it is, as a 
practical matter a real solution 
requires a much higher level of 
coexistence. 

Finally, the Cyprus model of 
forcibly dividing ethnic commu- 
nities is not the way many of us 
want the world to go. 

To take account of an the 
different circumstances of hu- 
man life generates a prodigious 
demand on statecraft and wiL 
But to succumb early to formu- 
las of exclusivity and racism is 
to build in a morally and politi- 
cally objectionable imbalance 
between group rights and indi- 
vidual rights. 

Countries are allowed to take 
care of their own. They are not 
allowed to abuse the losers. 

The Washington Post 


closer economic ties with Russia. 

But in his first (toys in office he 
Hm emphasized his commitment 
to Ukrainian independence — to 
the point of sounding more am- 
biguous about giving up the 
country’s remaining 1,600 nucle- 
ar warheads than Mr. Kravchuk 
did in his final months. “I have 
never proposed that Ukraine re- 
turn to tire Russian empire,” Mir. 
Kudrina now says defensively. 

The pro-Russian sympathies he 
voiced in the camjtaign bother 
those in the West who fear that 
Moscow aims to reabsorb Ukraine 
and rebuild the Soviet e mp ire . 
They do not believe that he can 
cooperate without becoming total- 
ly subservient to Moscow and sac- 
rificing Ukraine’s independence. 

The election results can be read 
another way: The entirely rational 
ooncem of Ukrainian electors with 
improving their economic lot has 
been the driving force of their 
brief, fateful democratic history. 

In December 1991, these voters 
brought about the disintegration 
of the Soviet Union by voting 
overwh elmingl y for Uk rainian in- 
dependence. They had every rea- 
son then to believe that they 
would be better off economically 
by escaping from the collapsing 
Soviet economic and political su- 
perstructure 

Instead Mr. Kravchuk’s cata- 
tonic leadership led to economic 
>k>sion. Today the voters see 
from Moscow, particularly 
on gas and oil supplies, as their 
economic fix. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894c An Angry Sultan 

PARIS — The whole or the inter- 
est of European politics is just 
now concentrated in Corea and 
Morocco. In the case of Morocco 
a greater uncertainty exists. We 
have to do here with a young 
Sultan, who, either on his own 
initiative or on the counsel of his 
Ministers, has all the wishes to 
put in prison and suppress all 
those who stand in his way. If 
some day he should take die idea 
to maltreat Europeans or the pro- 
teges of Eoropeahs, affairs could 
very quickly get complicated. 

1919: Injoiioiis Alcohol 

NEW YORK — Prohibition is 
forcing many habitual drinkers to 
use injurious substances, and re- 
ts fr 


ports from many of the 
Yo " 


i' hos- 
pitals in New York, show that the 
numbers, reporting for psycho- 
pathic treatment have greatly in- 


creased. Even in the best public- 
houses the liquor sold surrep- 
titiously is of a quality which 
would have been scorned in the 
lowest bar before prohibition, 
with the result that patients suf- 
fering from ddirium-tremens and 
other alcoholic nervous disorders 
become more frequent daily. 

1944: Canine Detectors 

WASHINGTON — [From our 
New York edition:] American ca- 
sualties caused by anti-personnel 
mines and booty traps may be 
substantially reduced by Army 
dogs; whose training and ship, 
ment abroad as special canine de- 
tectors was disclosed today [July 
23] by the War Department. Con- 
sidered the elite of the K-9 Corps, 
the M dogs locate mine fiddsi 
lead the way around them, or 
pmnt a safe path through them. 
They are now being used in the 
European Theater of Operations 



f-' •' 


1 1 ■ 

;; t 




That may give Russian revanch- 
ists new opportunities to meddle. 
But Ukraine’s attachment to inde- 
pendence should be strong enough 
to thwart such attempts, if its 
economy can be made viable. “We 
can only be truly independent if 
we are powerful economically,” 
Mr. Kuchma says. 

France and Germany, in found- 
ing (be European Community, 
have shown how conflicting na- 
tional ambitions can be recon- 
ciled through economic coopera- 
tion. The best hope for stability 
and the entrenchment erf democra- 
cy in tie fo rm e r Soviet Union lies 
in Russia establishing comm uni ty- 
like economic ties with its neigh- 
bras, who must pursue free market 
reform more vigorously. 

The chances fra this scenario 
may have been ixxmroved by the 
abrupt U-turn performed by Mr. 
Lukashenko in Belarus. Inaugu- 
rated on July 20, the new presi- 
dent immediately appointed Mik- 
hail Cfajgir, a pro-reform banker, 
as his prime minister and an- 
nounced the reappointment of 
Stanislav Bogdankevich as the 
head of the central bank. 

In his rabble-rousing cam- 
paign, Mr. Lukashenko had 
promised to fire Mr. Bogdanke- 
vich, who had strongly opposed 
a merger of the Belarus and Rus- 
sian currencies. 

Like Western politicians, ex- 
Communists Lukashenko and 
Kuchma find reasons to tolerate 
on the inside what they de- 
nounced from the outside, and to 
move their populist rhetoric to- 
ward the center. 

These fellows learn fasL 
The Washington Pan. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1994 


Page 7 1 


OPINION 


Two Russians, Two Models 


P ARIS “—Alexander Solzhe- 
A wteyn has arrived in Mos- 
cow after his journey across the 
expanse of Russia. It was a 
strange voyage, by private rail- 
road car, stopping wherever the 
novelist wished, allowing him 
to meet and talk with people 
whose lives otherwise have 
been spent in anonymity. 

He listened more than he 
talked. However, he delivered a 
BKssage, . uncompromising in 
one respect, evasive in another. 

He said that he is not a politi- 
cian and would accept no office 
or nomination. He nonetheless 
condemns those now running 
the country — “an. oligarchy 
. - - composed of ex-members 
of the nomenklatura and ad- 
venturers emerged from the un- 
derground economy” — as well 
as the reformers or pretended 
reformers, and the Federal As- 
sembly itself. 

He told ordinary people that 
they must lake responsibility 
for what has happened in Rus- 
sia, and must become responsi- 
ble for giving the country, a 
different future. 

He is, one woman said, “a 
healer of souls.” She went on: “I 
had never imagined that he 
would be so simple. He hides 
nothing about the errors of the 
past, but at the same tune he has 
confidence in us.” 

A man said: “He destroys 
indifference. He disarmed me 


By William Pfaff 

... He speaks like a friend, 
someone dose. This was the 
first time in my life that I had 
the impression of someone who 
really wanted goodness ...” 

There are others who say that 
he is out of touch with Russia 
today, irrelevant “Am I really 
responsible for everything that 
went on in the past? What does 
be want? Does be think we 
xhould fall on our knees in Red 
Square and confess our sins?” 
It is a fair question. What 
would Mir. Solzhenitsyn have 
the Russians actually do? 

Nonetheless, he touches a 
very deep chord. A Russian so- 
ciologist, Valentina Fedotova, 
has recently written of charac- 
teristics of the Russian people 
that in the past have blocked 
Russia's attempts to reform it- 
self on Western models. 

One is a lack of material 
ambition. Foils in Estonia, for 
example, before communism’s 
collapse, showed that 90 per- 
cent of tile Russian portion of 
the Estonian population was 
completely satisfied with the 
country’s economic situation, 
while 90 percent of the ethnic 
Estonians thought the econo- 
my in deplorable condition. 

. The second obstacle to 
change is ignorance. Well over 
90 percent of the papulation 


has never been out of the coun- 
try, so has no standard by 
which to make comparisons. 
There is virtually no historical 
experience of capitalism or of 
the functioning of the market. 
In the countryside, the mass of 
people still live in preindus tri- 
al conditions. 

The economic change that al- 
ready has taken place has not 
inspired new efforts to improve 
the level of life but rather seems 
to justify the old popular no- 
tion in Russia that riches are 
theft. The Russian church has 
always said this, and the experi- 
ence of Russians in recent times 
has tended to bear it out. Eco- 
nomic change has brought profi- 
teers and crime, with worsened 
conditions for the majority. 

The much deplored success 
of Vladimir Zhirinovsky in na- 
tional elections last year fol- 
lowed his promise not only to 
make Russia a. superpower 
again but to restore its internal 
health. His solution to the Rus- 
sians’ troubles was an dd no- 
tion, that Of redemptive national 
expansion. Russia would heal it- 
seif by giving peace and happi- 
ness to others, incorporating 
them within an enlarged Russia 
whose frontiers might be those 
died by a poet a century and a 
half ago: the Nile, the Elbe, the 
Euphrates, the Danube ... 

This was dangerous non- 
sense, but a quarter of the ac- 



tive electorate voted for Mr. 
Zhirinovsky. Whatever those 
voters thought they were doing, 
they signaled uneasiness with 
what Russia has now become. 

Mr. Solzhenitsyn demands 
inner change, a form of spiri- 
tual conversion, as the neces- 
sary step toward real social 
and political reform. Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky offers aggression and 
national messianism. And bard 
as the latter may be, it is easier 
than the former. 

An extreme demand is being 


made on the Russian people 
today, that they transform their 
society on a foreign. Western 
model. That model contradicts 
certain profound characteris- 
tics of the Russian past: its 
communalism and popular egal- 
itarianism, its sense of a special 
destiny and redemptive mission 
to others, its endurance and be- 
lief in the value of sacrifice, as 
weQ as its traditional morality, 
outraged by the racketeering 
and corruption in the country. 

In radically different ways. 


Mr. Solzhenitsyn and the man 
he rightly describes as “a carica- 
ture of the Russian patriot,” Mr. 
Zhirinovsky, are proposing Rus- 
sia’s transformation on Russian 
models. For that reason they 
both have found an important 
response. They are speaking to 
a profound and ancient Russia, 
in its language. The one is ask- 
ing good of it, the other evil. 
The spiritual identity of the na- 
tion is being tested. 

International Herald Tribune 
© Las Angeles Times Spuhcate. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


If They’d Killed Hitler J™** 


Thomas Fleming’s article 
“The Fate of These Registers 
Proved a Tragedy for All” 
(Opinion, July 21) argues that a 
successful coup agamst Hitler 
in July 1944 would have led to a 
negotiated peace with an anti- 
Nazi Germany, which probably 
would have saved the lives of 
millions and possibly spared 
most of Eastern Europe SO 
years of Soviet Communist in- 
carceration. Maybe; and this 
surely would have been a good 
thing. But at what price? Proba- 
bly Weimar Redux, combined 
with a hot war with a massive 
and victorious Red Army. 

Mr. Fleming blames Presi- 
dent Franklin Roosevelt — ex- 
cessively influenced by his 
cousin Theodore — for wrongly 
applying the lessons of history 
in insisting on unconditional 
surrender by the Nazis. He ar- 
gues that after the catastrophic 
defeat at Stalingrad and the 
successful Allied landings in 
Normandy, it was apparent 
that Hitler had lost the war. 
Thus, the argument used by the 
Nazis and other conservative 
forces in Germany during the 
1930s that their army had not 
been defeated but “stabbed in 
the back” would not have held. 

Fm sorry, but this argument 
does not hold water. John To- 
land’s excellent “No Man’s 
Land” lays out dearly what hap- 
pened. On Sept. 2, 1918, in a 
state of near-hysteria, the kaiser 
— not a ma n known for his 
prescience — arid his guests at 
bis headquarters in Spa: “Our 
army is at the end of its tether. 

Our senior officers have aD gone. 

It means nothing more or less 
than that we have lost thewari” 
He then had a nervous collapse. 


Hindoo bore fine a month later. 
General Erich Ludendorff 
wrote: “The war is now lost. 
Nothing coaid alter that” He 
added, “Our situation could 
only get worse, never better.” In 
a meeting with the kaiser. Field 
Marshal Paul von Hindenbuig 
revealed that the army needed 
an immediate armistice and that 
the kaiser should appeal for 
to President Woodrow 
at once. General Luden- 
dorff demand ed that an anni- 
stice be arranged within 24 
hours. Thus spoke the “unbeat- 
en” Gentian army. 

By October 1919, everyone in 
Germany knew that the war was 
lost. The “big he” that the Ger- 
man Army had not been beaten 
but rather stabbed in the back 
was just that, a big, fie. Any Ger- 
man who chose to knew, knew. 
Later, many chose to foigeL 

In view of tins history, who 
can doubt that any peace treaty 
negotiated by German officers 
who had betrayed their person- 
al loyalty oath to the Fuhrer 
would be denounced later as a 
“stab in the back”? The “big 
Be” would have lived again. 

What we do know is what we 
have now. Germany is a re- 
spected member of the commu- 
nity of nations and a stalwart 
bastion of democracy. It has 
contributed fully to the unprec- 
edented peace and prosperity 
that Europe has enjoyed for the 
past half century. I argue chat 
this is because Roosevelt was 
stubborn and wouldn't listen to 
his generals and to his allies, 
who wanted a negotiated peace. 

JOHN E. RAY. 

Fontenay-Trtsigny, France. 

Thomas Rearing’ s account 
of the 1944 bomb plot ag ai n st 


Hitler presents a different Nazi 
Germany from the one known 
to history. “The generals in 
command of the Goman ar- 
mies in France,” he writes, 
“would have agreed to a unilat- 
eral surrender, in ante of Hit- 
ler’s survival” if only the terms 
had not been unconditional. 
Several of the communiques is- 
sued by these generals 
(Blaskowitz, Krftger, Lam- 
merding and others) have sur- 
vived, and their response is out- 
rage and implacable riefi»nf»- 
At die same time in Beilin, the 
Gestapo carried out an investi- 

r " m into public opinion in 
workers’ districts (the re- 
cords survive); the reaction was 
(me of overwhelming opposi- 
tion to the plotters, who were 
branded as Prussian aristocrats 
and reactionaries. A totalitar- 
ian state of the character of 
Nazi Germany does not come 
apart until it is truly shattered. 
DAVID WINGEATE PIKE 
Paris. 

Loolmg to die West 

The ongoing straggles for 
democratic rule throughout the 
world are a clear indicator that 
the developing world abounds 
in democracy-loving people. 
When the Soviet Union col- 
lapsed, the go-ahead signal 
from the West gave dormant 
democrats the extra courage 
they needed to embark on liber- 
ation struggles, in hopes that 
the great powers would come to 
their rescue if necessary. 

But what do we see? Silence 
and betrayal on the pan of 
‘Western leaders. Haiti, Togo, 
Zaire and Nigeria are classic 
examples. Flagrant violations 
of democratic principles and 
human rights occur m those 


countries while the West cal- 
lously looks on. 

The latest in this series of 
violations is that in Nigeria, 
where a military leader who 
seized power by force has arrest- 
ed the democratically elected 
leader and accused him of pro- 
claiming himself president- Is 
this not absurd? Shouldn't it 
have been the other way around? 

If the West wants to com- 
mand continued respect and 
admiration from the developing 
world, it should muster its cour- 
age, eschew the idea of “nonin- 
terference is internal affairs” 
and assume its responsibilities. 
Otherwise, dictators in “hi- 
bernation” wiR emerge to take 
advantage of this weakness. 

BEN POKOU. 

Abidjan, Ivory Coast. 

Carrots for Electric Cars 

The title of your editorial 
“Electric Cars Aren’t Ready” 
(Opinion, June 27) was not quite 
right, but the content was on 
the mark. Electric vehicles do 
have a valuable role to play in 
our short-range transportation 
mix- And, believe it or not, the 
technology exists to make very 
useful (and economical) vehi- 
cles. But mandating the major 
automobile companies to make 
and sell such vehicles, as Cali- 
fornia is trying to do, won't 
work. The real problem here is 
that the major automobile com- 
panies are trying to develop 
electric vehicles on the same 
model as conventional, com- 
bustion-powered cars. That is 
difficult (perhaps impossible) 
and it is unnecessary. When and 
if they are sold in quantity, elec- 
tric vehicles are likely to be sub- 
stantially different, in appear- 
ance, size and performance. 


from today's cars. What is re- 
quired is a way of letting a mar- 
ket develop to allow consumers 
to determine just what sorts of 
vehicles they want. 

There are a few things that 
can and should be done to allow 
electric vehicles to penetrate 
into the mix of personal cars. 
First, relatively low perfor- 
mance electric vehicles (say 
with a maximum speed of 80 
kph or SO mph) should be ex- 
empted from requirements such 
as “S mph bumpers,” crash cer- 
tification, etc. This would per- 
mit the creation of small vehi- 
cles suitable for short-range 
commuting Second, preferred 
parking zones with (initially 
free) charging facilities should 
be established in those down- 
town areas where combustion- 
powered vehicles are least 
wanted. The ability to get a 
parking place can be a powerful 
incentive, and is the sort of 
“carrot” that is required for this 
market to develop. 

JAMES KJRTLEY Jr. 

Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Way Out of Bounds 

I quote from three articles 
on the World Cup in your July 
12 issue: 

George Vecsey (* Soccer's Sol- 
diers of Fortune ”) writes: “Ior- 
dan Letchkov, who had scored 
the winning goal with a header 
off the worn and weathered 
baldness of his dome . . and, 
“Then there is Borislav Mikhail- 
vov, the goalkeeper who was 
rather baldish only last season 
and now sports a marvelous 
head of dark hair. Doesn't he 
worry about going askew when 
he dives into the turf?” 

Christopher Clarey (“Sweden 
and Ravelli Slop Romania in 


BOOKS 


he catcher was a 

PY: The Mysterious life 
f Moe Berg 

v Nicholas Dawidoff. 453 
tges. S24. Pantheon. 

eviewed by Christopher 
ehmann-Haupt 
■j Y now many readers know 
J the most prominent mythic 
atures of the famous athlete- 
:holar-spy Moe Berg (1902- 
172). How he lasted 17 years m 
lajor-league baseball despite 
ang the player who first m- 
lired the phrase “good field, 
? hit.” How he was said to 
jve spoken at least a dozen 
nguages. including Sanskrit, 
•spite its being a dead lan- 

*How during a 1934 all-star 
aseball tour of Japan, he car- 
ed out what he said were gov- 
-nmeoi orders to photograph 

■sasssfats- 


a lecture in Zurich delivered by 
Werner Heisenberg with in- 
structions to shoot the German 
physicist if he revealed that 
Germany was dose to develop- 
ing an atomic bomb. 

Now, in this enthralling, in- 
telligent biography, Nicholas 
Dawidoff has cut through the 
myth and revealed a coherent 
verson of Moe Berg. 

He points out that although 
Berg (fid have talent as a catch- 
er, he extended his career with 
the Boston Red Sox by bring a 
useful handler of pitchers while 
pitying as little as possible. 

While Berg had an unusual 
fed for languages as well as an 
encyclopedic knowledge of 
word origins, he not only 
couldn’t hit in any language (as 
some wag once observed), be 
also didn't speak any foreign 
tongue expertly, and certainly . 
not Sanskrit 

Dawidoff writes that Berg 
was never ordered to photo- 
graph Tokyo; the notion 
was purely Bog’s invention. 
Nor were his pictures ever con- 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Natasha CbHsagne, a pic- 
ture editor in Paris for 30 years, 
is reading William Boyd’s “ Blue 
Afternoon .” 

“I spend most of my day 
looking at photographs, and 
people always accuse me of nev- 
er reading. But Fm a great fan 
of Boyd and his latest is one of 
those bodes where you never 
really know the end — even 
after the last page.” 

(John Brunson, JUT) 



suited for Doolittle’s raid. 

And while Berg may have 
been assigned to assassinate 
Heisenberg, Dawidoff writes 
that “the whole situation was 
charged with improbability.” 
As he concludes: “Only a large 
dose of OSS wishful thinking 
finds Heisenberg, bomb nearly 
buflt, telling a lecture hall full of 
foreigners about it” 

Despite such revelations, 
dealing with Bertfs famous ehi- 
stveness is where Dawidoff s bi- 


ography shines the brightest 
This is not an easy subject to 
write about, since Berg grew in- 
creasingly evasive as be got old- 
er and during the final 25 years 
of his life be had no employ- 
ment or ordered routine. 

What the last section of this 
book reveals is not exactly the 
charming mystery man that 
Berg is so often said to have 
been. True, many acquaint- 
ances report that his presence 
was a gift. 


As a Trenton newspaper 
writer puts it: “He was wann 
and made people feel good 
about themselves. You were 
flattered that he spent time with 
you.” 

But as Berg's life wears on, be 
strikes the reader increasingly 
as a freeloader and a bean. As 
one uncharmed acquaintance 
said, “He regarded most people 
as living in a kind of vacuum 
until he enlightened them.” 

More disturbingly, incidents 
crop up of what Dawidoff de- 
scribes as Berg’s prurient inter- 
est in human crises and his at- 
traction to women whose 
husbands were about to divorce 
them. Toward the end of the 
biography the words psychotic 
and schizoid appear. 

In his final chapter, “The Se- 
cret Life of Moe Berg.” Dawi- 
doff undertakes a psychobiog- 
raphy of his subject and plumbs 
what he has earlier hinted at 
Berg was always blind to his 
real feelings, the author sug- 

e and nearly lost control of 
if toward the end. 


What he could never resolve 
was his own love of baseball 
and his immigrant father’s stern 
disapproval of the game. Nor 
could he reconcile his father’s 
rejection of religion with soci- 
ety’s insistence on viewing Berg 
as a Jew. 

These confusions produced a 
sense of self -distrust. The way 
to avoid the pain of confronta- 
tion was to stay cat the run and 
let no one pin him down. 

While the foregoing analysis 
may sound presumptuous in 
summary, in DawidofFs sensi- 
tive treatment it seems both 
tasteful and plausible. 

After he died, his sister took 
his ashes to Israel, but to this 
day no one can figure out where 
his grave is, so once again, as in 
life; Moe Brig has disappeared. 

But you can find him in 
DawidofFs pages, a highly orig- 
inal, complex version of the 
man who wasn’t there. 


Christopher Lehnuwn-Haupt 
is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 


The World , According: 
To OV Chairman Rush 


By Richard Reeves 


Shootout to Reach Semifinals’') 
writes, “Ravelli scratched h is 
increasingly prominent fore- 
head" and, “with deep wrinkles 
around his eyes and ois reced- 
ing blond hairline, Ravelli looks 
more like the salesman he stud- 
ied to be than the world-class 
goalkeeper he is.” 

And Rob Hughes (“A World 
Cup Running Cheer With Spicy 
Surprises n ) writes: “Anyway, 
the release turned one bald, qui- 
et onlooker on his head” 

Most prematurely balding 
men feet e x t re me social discom- 
fort. Imagine if you were Letch- 
kov, who scored one of the most 
dramatic goals of recent memo- 
ry. What gets talked about? His 
hair. There is no excuse for such 
poor taste. 

Lighten up? When will we 
prematurely balding men stop 
getting reminded everywhere 
we go that there is something 
different about us? 

JAY GILBERT. 

Budapest 

In the Temple of Doom 

Regarding “The Reporters 1 
Know Don’t Wear High Heels ” 
(Meanwhile, July 19): 

Anna Quindlen may feel de- 
meaned by the way the movie “1 
Love Trouble” overglamorizes 
journalism and misrepresents 
the real work she does. 

As what is loosely termed a 
“college professor," however, 1 
Find it mildly exciting to fanta- 
size that anybody might con- 
ceivably think that there was 
something in common between, 
say, myself and Indiana 
Jones ... 

PHILIP G. CERNY. 

University of York. 

York, England. 


W ASHINGTON — For 
more than a year I have 
tried to set aside a few hours 
and listen to exactly what it is 
that Rush Limbaugh does to 
make such a handsome Living. 
But. entertaining as he can 
sometimes be. he lost me after 
five minutes each time. I just 
can't pay attention to him for 
longer than that. 

He sounds like a whiner to 
me, a kind of encyclopedia- 
wi thou t-an -index guy who cor- 
ners you at a bar or in a gas 
station while you're waiting for 

MEANWHILE 

a battery charge. A guy filled 
with unconnected information 
that can be held together only 
by foaming ideological fits or 
conspiracy theories. 

“Folks,! don’t make this 
stuff up!” be would say. But 1 
knew be did. One of my favor- 
ites was his pronouncement: 
“The poorest people in Ameri- 
ca are better off than the main- 
stream families of Europe.” 

How could he believe that? 
(In fact, average per capita in- 
come in major European coun- 
tries is four times the income of 
the poorest 20 percent of Amer- 
icans.) 1 can think of four rea- 
sons: He has never been to Eu- 
rope; he has never been to the 
United States: he’s stupid (1 
don’t think he is — ignorant, 
yes, but not stupid); he’s a liar. 

That said, I was happy to 
learn that there are people' out 
there with the concentration 
and presence of mind to write 
down what the man says and 
check it against facts and reali- 
ty. I am grateful to FAIR (Fair- 
ness and Accuracy in Media), a 
very liberal organization that 
puis out a newsletter pointing 
out such things as the tact that 
Little of Rush gets to rage 
against liberal control of the 
media on more than 900 radio 
and television stations across 
America every day of the week. 
Poor guy — loo bad the libs are 
keeping him off the air. 

This month. FAIR’S news- 
letter published eight pages of 
quotations from Chairman 
Rush, followed by the truth, 
all in an article entitled “Rush 
Limbaugh Debates Reality.” 
Here are a few samples: 

Limbaugh: “Banks lake the 
risks in issuing student loans 


and they are entitled to the 
profits.”'Fact: There is no risk; 
the loans are insured by the, 
federal government. 

Limbaugh: “Don’t let the' 
liberals deceive you into be- I 
lieving that [the 1980s] resulted • 
in a bigger gap between the' 
haves and the have-nots. Fig- 1 
ures compiled by the Congres-' 
sional Budget Office dispel •" 
that myth.” Fact: The CBO 
figures indicate that in 1980 - 
the richest fifth of Americans - 
made five times as much as the 
poorest fifth. Now the richest • 
fifth make more than 20 times ‘ 
as much as the poorest Fifth. 

Limbaugh: “Most Canadian < 
physicians who are themselves ' 
in need of surgery, for example, ■ 
scurry across the border to get it ' 
done right — the American ■ 
way.” Fact: Most of the Canadi- * 
ans who have received medical ■ 
care in the United Stales are • 
folks who got sick at their winter 
homes in Florida and Arizona. 

Limbaugh: “There are more 
American Indians alive today 
than there were when Colum- 
bus arrived. Does this sound 
like a record of genocide?" 
Fact; The Indian population in 
1492 is estimated as having ' 
been at least 5 million people 
and perhaps as many as 15 mil- 
lion. That dropped to about 
250,000 in the late 19th century • 
and has now climbed to just 
over 2 milli on. 

Limbaugh: “For the first time * 
in military history, US. military 
personnel fin Bosnia] are not un- ■ 
der the command of United 
Stales generals." Fact: American . 
troops have fought under dozens ■ 
of foreign commanders, begin- 
ning with Lafayette during the 
Revolution, and under Marshal 
Foch in World War I and Mont- 
gomery and Mountbaiten in 
World War U. 

limbaugh: “Those gas lines.' 
were a direct result of the for- ' 
eign oil powers playing tough': 
with us because they didn't 
fear Jimmy Carter.” Fact: The : 
worst gas lines in 1973 and -1 
1974 were more than three-! 
years before Mr. Carter took" 
office. Richard Nixon was the*.' 
president, and he scared a > 
lot of people. 

There’s more and a lot of it is - 
pretty funny. I’m sorry I don’t 
have the patience to listen to it •’ 
every day- 

Unhrersal Press Syndicate. 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 

I N the world championship 
quarterfinals of the Profes- 
sional Chess Association Sergei 
Tiviakov beat Michael Adams 
in Game 3. 

The Nimzovich Variation of 
the Caro-Indian Defense, sig- 
naled by 4.„Nd7, is highly val- 
ued for its soundness. 

Popular against it is S Bc4 
Ngf6 6 Ng5, but this attempt to 
work with sacrifices at F7 or e6 
was repelled by Adams last year 
in a game with Kiril Georgiev. 
After 6...e6 7 Qe2 Nb6 8 Bd3 h6 
9N5f3c5 IOdcBcS IIBd20-0 
12 00-0 Na4!, Black's attack 
on the while king beat White’s 
on the black king to the punch. 
Tiviakov returned to the calmer 
6 Nf6 Nf6 7 Nf3. This reduction 
of material acquiesces to 
Black’s strategy of compensat- 
ing for his diminished control 
of space and it also lets him 
develop his queen bishop after 
10 O-O-O, White nevertheless 
gets attacking chances. 

Against 10...Bg4, Tiviakov 
took up an old suggestion of 
Bobby Fischer; 11 Kbl, a cen- 
tral point being that 1 l._NdS 12 
Bel! Bf3 13 Qf3 Bg5 yields 
White superiority in develop- 
ment and mobility after 14 Qg3! 

After 11. ..0-0 12 h3 Bf3 13 
Qf3 b5 14 Bd3 Qd5 15 Qe3, 
Tiviakov had the bishop-pair 
and a promising position. Ad- 
ams could not exchange more 
material with 15— Ng4? because 
16 hg BgS 17 Bh7 Kb8 18 BgS 
forces mate. 

While Tiviakov readied a 
(ringside attack with 16 g4. Ad- 
ams had trouble organizing a 
counterattack. 

Maybe Adams thought that 
his 17...K/8 would gain a tempo 
by reviving the attack on the d4 
pawn and simultaneously 
guarding the bishop. But Tma- 


TTVMkOViBLACK 



AD*M S/WHITE 

Position after 27 . . . Re5 

kov proved him wrong at once' 
with 18 f5! 

In playing IS..J16. Adams 
perhaps overlooked that after. 
19 Bn6! Qd4, Tiviakov could 
play 20 Bg7! On 20..JCg7 21' 
QgS Kf8 22 Qh6 Ke8 23 fe, the 
Russian had a decisive mating' 
attack. 

On 27 Rhel, Adams could 
not rely on 27...Kd6 because of. 
28 R/l. So he tried 27..JRn5. but 
was then hit by 28 Qf5!, which 
threatened the queen and e5 
rook at the same time. Since 
28...Qf5 29 Bf5 Rel 30 Rel Kd8 
31 Bc8 Kc8 is ruined by 32 Reg, 
Adams gave up. 

CUKMCANN DEFENSE 


Whit* 

Black 

WMie 

Black 

TTvUkov 

Adam* 

Tiviakov 

Adams 

1 e* 

C6 

IS Qe3 

RacS 

2 dt 

d5 

sir; 

RIM 

3 Nd2 

de 

m 

4 N*4 

NOT 

is rs 

M 

S BC4 

X 

19 BbG 

Od4 

6 NIB 

20 Bg7 

jul 

7 m 

BIS 

21 Qg5 

22 066 

23 fe 

KH 

8 Qc2 

9 BBS 

cfl 

BcT 

KeB 

BIB 

10 OOO 

Bg« 

24 ef 

Ke7 

11 Kbl 

OO 

S3 56 

RdS 

12 (i3 

S 13 

& 

13 03 

14 Bd3 

h5 

27 Rhel 

Qd5 

28 QfS 

Resigns 


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International Herald Tribune 
Tuesday, July 26, 1994 
Page S' ' 


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TT* * ‘Ml 


With Fabrics and Flourishes, Couture Revives Its F uture 

” 1W _ m d Kyotow!re Cootu»> aewer_r«rat s 


'bus Ah* 


By Suzy Menkes 

IniematnyiwJ Herald Tnbwie 


P ARIS — Haute couture 
has pul its house in or- 
der — by calling on the 
architects and decora- 
tors. A return to structured 
clothes and a focus on imagina- 
tive fabrics and flourishes dom- 
inated last week’s shows for fall. 
The image was polished, glam- 
orous and upscale. Without set- 
ting an agenda for the future, 
the couture shows will help to 
rehabilitate fashion design m 
the post-grunge era. 

There was no startling new 
silhouette. The news was the 
fact that there was a structure 
and an outline, with the jacket 


cut much closer to the body and 
skirts mostly shortish and 
swingy. The most dramatic 
statements were made by Karl 
Lagerfeld at Chanel, where a 
corset underpinned w asp- w aisl- 
ed jackets. A curvy lace-back 


PARIS FASHION 


corset molded the bodice above 
Christian Lacroix’s ball gowns. 
Both styles were symbolic of 
couture's return to the tradi- 
tional concept that clothes 
should be Fitted to flatter — 
rather than fashion designers 
requiring clients to supply the 
perfect bodv for the clothes. 

‘ Like the' most vertiginous 
high-wire act, the art of couture 


is to make it all look so easy. 
Chanel’s apparently simple 
scarlet coatdress, slinking sinu- 
ously around the curves, was in 
fact created with welted seams 
where once there were corset 
stays. Yves Saint Laurent is the 
expert at the wisp of chiffon or 
the velvet wrap-dress, both so 
artfully cut that it was hard to 
spot the seams. His absolute 
mastery of technique, using 
fabrics as butter-soft as satin or 
as rigid as brocade, helped to 
create the aura of magic at ms 
show. 

The skills surrounding the 
couture — with fabrics, feath- 


claiming to invent anything m 
fashion. In fad. couture has be- 
come not so much a laboratory 
of ideas, as an exercise in cre- 
ativity with materials. 

The feathers that fluttered 
through the collections — Cha- 
nel's fluffy muffs and cocktail 
hats, Jean-Louis Schemas 
multicolored marabou coat mid 
Lacroix's dandelion-puff of a 
sweater — were examples of 
things that could be executed 


eni fashion moods included a 
snow-dusting of tiny pearis on a 
white Elvis-style jumpsuit for 
Chanel. Embroidery, like most 
of the workmanship at the cou- 
ture shows, should be seen in 
close-up. Emanuel Ungaro s 
encrustations of lace, appliques 
of birds, embossed silk with us 
pattern re-embroidered, or ruf- 
fles of tulle, all underlined pie 
exceptional work of his atelier. 
At Valentino, too, the couture 


to the silk dty of Kyoto were 
; of art. So, in a different 


onl^ in haute couture Yes they 


[ have a significance beyond 
fied world because 


workmanship was dazzling, 
from the belt 


ers, fur, embroidery or appliqut 
• • ‘ *-arp fo- 


— were also put into sharp 
cus in a season that was not 


that rarefieu wui™ — 
fluffy surfaces created with mo- 
hair or angora will be more real- 
istic versions in ready-to-wear. 
Francois Lesage's ability to 
’ >ider 


reinvent embroidery for differ- 


— that looked as 

though it was fashioned from 
autumn leaves to the petaled 
chiffon collar, or the siren dress 
in a slither of silver lace. 

Hanae Mori’s kimono-in- 
spired embroideries in homage 


works v»» aii~ w, — . - - — — - 
way, were the bows in stiff satin 
or soft velvet that studded the 
midriff or whooshed up at the 
hip in Hubert de Givenchy’s 
elegant collection. 

Where would couture be 
without the specialist fabric 
suppliers? Oliver Lapidus made 
his collection a showcase for the 
Lyon sflk weavers. But the 
Swiss textile industry is the 
backbone of haute couiure; the 
symbiotic personal relationship 
between couturier and supplier 
is shown by the pride displayed 
by representatives of Abraham 
of Zurich or Forster Willi of SL- 
Gall when their fabrics hit the 
runways. 



EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


INTERNATfONAL 



Associate, Bachelor’s 
and Master’s degrees 


at our campuses in 

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Heidelberg • Berlin • Madrid • Engeiberg 

and at the 

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SWITZERLAND 


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Couture's newer recruits 
were backed up by the imagina- 
tive fabrics, like Jakob 
Schlaepfer’s lattice of velvet 
ribbons for Oscar de la Renta at 

Raimain, or the velvet and spi- 
der’s web of lace that helped 
designer Michel Klein at Guy 
Laroche move from daywear to 
night 

The master class also relies 
on upscale tools of the trade. At 
Saint Laurent, the deagners 
chinoiserie theme was enhanced 
by Abraham’s vivid satins in 
the van Gogb-snnset shades of 
ranks and purples and by bro- 
cades in sweet-and-sour colors. 
Forster Wfllfs embroideries for 
Lacroix included romantic ap- 
pliqufcd flowers and sophisticat- 
ed effects with geometric bor- 
ders and cutouts. Lacroix is the 
designer who displays fireworks 
of i m a g ination in ms use of em- 
bellishment from fur and feath- 
ers through hand-pai n ti n g to 
sequins articulated so they 
seemed like reptile scales. 

The creative developments in 
the material world and the 
forceful return to technique will 
be the saving of haute couture 
— provided those skills them- 
selves survive. Everyone is 
through with the idea that cou- 
ture should pretend to be what 
it is not — streetwise clothes for 


the hip crowd rather than the . 
height erf elegance and luxury 

for a fortunate few. But it is also 

important that the crafts, 
unique to France, are re- 
searched and developed, rather 
tha n just dusted down like a 
museum piece each season. 

This time last year, Karl La- 
gerfeld caused a flutter among 
his fans by biking Chanel hem- • 
lines thigh-high. The fact that 
no one this season was even 
talking about skirt length 
(mostly just above the knee) is 
indicative of the fact that cou- 
ture has gotten bade on track. 
With the fitted- to- the body sil- 
houette and the fme workman- 
ship, haute couture showed that 
it had something to offer that is 
individual, original and occa- 
sionally exceptional 


: r.'" 7 ": ! 1:4 : 


•■•r.i.U J u 


Renovations 
For Museum’s 
250th Year 


Business Administration 
and other business majors 
International Hotel / Tourism Management 
International Relations / Diplomacy 
Computer Systems Management - Economics 
psychology ■ Public Administration 
Engineering Management 
Pre-Medicine • Commercial Art ■ Liberal Arts 
French, German 
For Catsiog, Vfewfaoofr or Infomstionai 


SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 

Hunt HT/TH • 51 Watetloo Rbad » London SE1 9TX • England 
° P Tri- (071) 928 8484 * Fax' (071} 620 1226 • 


DCT international Hotel Management Career Centre 
Admission Office, P-O. Box 1086 
CH-8401 Winterthur, Switzerland 
Telephone: 441 52 222 3 222. Telefax: +41 52 222 4091 


GERMANY 


UNITED KINGDOM 


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<j> Sels College London 

D£.:Cw«SK Mil* "OJr <ii 1Rn ji 


. Fop rorrizfl rted«rtf & pr«Fn»4onai proplf 
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|(*352 Schonwalde ibei Berlin) 
Germany 

Phone: 1491 33056-52470 
Fax-. (4<5) 33056-82501 


Send for a free 
copy 
of the 


MRMliONAL 
EDUCATION 
GUIDE 


^t’ hW "T ' r 


If' rite tor 

Fred Ron»n, 


International 
Herald Tribune, 

181 Avenue Charlw-de-CauUe. 
9252 1 Neuilly Cedex. 
France 








'.-j- 


. T' *0, 


*55®. 


REP O R T/.v 



The Associated Pros 

L ondon — The 
British Museum 
has announced a 
development 
strategy to take it into the 
21st century with new gal- 
leries and public facilities 
planned by architect Sir 
Norman Foster. 

. Foster’s design, whose 
current commissions in- 
clude restoring the Reich- 
stag building in Berlin and 
bufldmg a new Hong Kong 
airport, was chosen from 
submissions by 132 archi- 
tects worldwide. 

Sir Claus Moser, chair- 
man of the museum’s devei- 



WWIMIIW <U muuvti iw 

£110 mSlion pounds ($150 
'to 165 million) and comple- 
tion by 2003 for the muse- 
um's 250th anniversary. 


NEW FALL 
COLLECTION 


ESCADA 


In Paris 

Also, Sales 
on Summer Collection 

Marie-Maitine 


8, rue de Sevres, 

Parts 6th 


V 

.; % . 
. A s 


W. 


I u 'PJH VM i£u 


1 ■•v'.V Jl*. 




1 



I 


i> liSo 






‘V. ».?=>*•, 








** 


International Herald Tribune, Tuesday, July 26, 1994 



THE THIS INDEX 1 13 . 47 ft 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©, composed of 
280 interrattonaBy Investabte stocks from 25 ccurflrtes, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business NeWs. Jan. t, 1992 = 100. - 
120 -- '' 



Asia/Pacific 


Apprax. weighting: 32% 
CteK 13035 Pm; 13079 


Europe 


. Approx, weighflog: 37% 

CfcSE nS210PW- 1K53 




F M' A ' M 



ENEI 

1983 

1M4 . 

1893 • 

- 1994 

fl North America 


Latin America 


Appns. waging: 26% .. 
Ctosa 9155 Pravj 3128 
150 , — - — — ^ 


Appror. wigMng: 5% 
CfcBK 116 l7E PBY- 1 1634 

H9I 




F M 
19B3 

?Jj Worid Index 

The index in Kte U.& dater values of stocks kc Tokyo, New Trek, London, and 
Anjontjno, Australia, Austria, Botgban, Bred, Canada, Ctila, Downuk. FMand, 
Franca, Gennany, Hong Kong, TWy.lkwicQ, NMwriands, Nn Zealand, Norway, 
S l ngapma, Spain, Sweden, Swftrerland and Vonazuola. For Tokyo. Nam York ant 
London, m Index h canvosod of km 20 top tosuosln urns at mihtt c a pHaB Bti oa. 
Otherwise the ten top sacks vntnoked. 


| industrial Sectors J 



IIOL Pm*. % 


dost dM dwgs 

dUC doH drey 

Energy 

112jB7 11Z30 +031 .QqjU.eoo* 

.115.69 11542 4023 

UflBiet 

11952 119.79 4ft11 RwlWBfWs 

. 127J7 127S7 40.31 

Finance 

116.91 116J54 +032 CosoxnamCootte 

99.13 9&80 40^3 

Services 

J18.85 11183 -02A .WaceBmeow 

128^3 128 40.12 

For more tnfonnaSon about Ihe Index, b booklet b> avaXabte frne of charge. 

Write loTribhidex. iBi Amne Chutes da Gauba, 92521 Notify Catex. Franco. 


C International Herald Tribune 


Oil Firms 
Report 
Profit Dip 

Exxon and Mobil 
Indrided in Fall 

Compiled by Om Sioff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Exxon 
Coup, and Mobil Coq>., the lap 
two U-S. oil companies, along 
with Texaco Inc. and Amoco 
Carp, all reported diminished 
profit margins Monday, blam- 
ing low prices and poor inienm- 
■ tional refining aatpati 

Exxon, tiw nation’s largest oil 
company, said its second-quar- 
ter profit fdl 14 percent. 

“Both upstream and down- 
stream petroleum earnings ex- 
perienced declines relative to 
last year because of lower aver- 
age, but rising, crude o3 prices 
during the quarter," said Chair- 
man Lee Raymond. 

Upstream, or exploration 
and production, earnings were 
lower because the depressed 
world crude oil market kept av- 
erage profits on ofl sold below 
last year’s level, be said. Down- 
stream, or refining and market- 
ing, earnings werehurt because, 
once crude oil prices began to 
rise, the higher cost was not 
matched by increases in prices 
for refined products. 

Net income fell to $885 mil- 
lion, or 70 cents a share, from a 
profit from operations of $1.03 
bOlkffl, or 81 cents. Includin g a 
$210 millio n gain on tax credits 
and asset sales, net income for 
the 1993 quarter was $] .24 bil- 
lion, or 98 cents a share. 

Mobil, the Nol 2 U-S. on 
company, said second-quarter 
profit from operations declined 
1.1 percent. Profit from opera- 
tions, fell to $513 nrill i on, or 
$1.25 a share, from $519 mil- 
lion. 

The results exceeded Wall 
Street’s expectation of $1.19 a 
share before special items. 

Texaco, the fourth-largest 
U.S. oil company, said its profit 
from continuing operations fell 
to $115 miDioa. or 35 cents a 
share, 

f TKiught-Ridder, ; Bloomberg) 


Hong Kong’s Broker War 

Jardine Fleming Chief Assails Rebate Ban 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Bendd Tribune 

HONG KONG The chairman of Jar- 
dine Fleming Holdings Ltd-, Alan Smith, on 
Monday attacked proposed new regulations 
for the fund- management industry, saying 
they would hurt loou brokers and damage the 
British colony’s status as an offshore financial 
center. 

Mr. Smith’s comments on regulators' pro- 
posals to bar stockbrokers from paying cash 
rebates to [and managers are expected to 
intensify a debate that pits local and foreign 
securities firms’ interests against one another. 

“We don’t have a problem with disclo- 
sure,’' said Mr. Smith. - But we object to the 
outright banning of rebates.” 

Jardine Fleming, is (me of Hong Kong's 
pre-eminent stockbrokmg and fund-manage- 
ment houses. 

“The regulators should also realize that 
Hong Kong is not competing against New 
York, London and Sydney, but against other 
offshore centers and Asian markets where 
rebates are common,” Mr. Smith said. “1 
doubt the SFC has closely studied the likeli- 
hood that other centers win gain at Hong 
Kong’s expense,” he added, referring to Hong 
Kong’s Securities and Futures Commission. 

Tarred by numerous corporate scandals 
and the closure of its stock and futures ex- 
changes during the October 1 987 market col- 
lapse, Hong Kong has moved to bolster its 
overall regulatory framework. 

A consultation papa published this month 
the Securities and Futures Commission 
seeks to ban rebates but to allow “soft 
commissions” with greater disclosure goes 


by t 
that 


along with its efforts to lift Hong Kong's 
securities market to higher standards. 

Soft commissions, which are common prac- 
tice in most major markets, are informal 
transactions in which brokers provide goods 
or services to fund managers in return for 
their stock-trading business. 

“Fot those managers who retain cash com- 
missi on rebates, the SFC found that, although 
commission rebate revenues were negligible 
for some funds, for other managers rebates 
ranged from 25 percent to well over 100 
percent of management fee revenues." the 
consultation paper said. 

Critics charge that the cash rebate system 
can boost the profitability of fund managers 
with related brokerages without investors de- 
tecting a dear increase in their management 
fees. 

The practice, if abused, can encourage 
churnin g , or excessive trading, by fund man- 
agers eager to do their part to add to the 
office’s year-end bonus pool. Currently, no 
fund can book any more than 50 percent of its 
transactions with a related broker. 

Foreign fund managers and brokers who 
are prevented from accepting and offering 
cash rebates in their home markets have wel- 
comed the SFC proposals. 

Cash rebates are generally prohibited in the 
United States, Britain and Australia, and soft 
commissions are tightly regulated, with the 
result that some foreign fund managers oper- 
ating in Hong Kong say local companies that 
accept cash commissions have an advantage. 

But local companies with both operations 
under one roof are unwilling to surrender 
their admitted competitive edge. 


Page 9 


Germany Starts 
Massive Inquiry 
On Stock Fraud 


By Brandon Mitchener 

Iraemmanot Herald Tribune 
FRANKFURT — German 
authorities announced Monday 
an investigation into slock 
fraud, revealing a major scandal 
just as a law that baas insider 
trading is to go into effect 
According to news reports, a 
ring of two dozen dealers was 
engaged in what is called front- 
running, the taking of positions 
in securities with the knowledge 
that large orders from investors 
were about to be executed and 
were likely to affect prices. 

The case came to public at- 
tention last week when German 
tax authorities searched the 
Frankfurt and Munich offices 
of the German private bank 
Merck, Finck & Co. for evi- 
dence related to tax evasion by 
a Swiss company, Geneva- 
based Confide, an asset-man- 
agement consultancy. 

While details were sketchy, 
officials said the in-’estigation 
was a perfect example of why 
tighter rules were needed. The 
alleged offenses, which began 
as long as seven years ago, 
would be punishable by up to 
five years m jaO under the law 


that enters into force on Aug. I, 
but were not illegal at the time. 

“It shows how badly we need 
the new law.” said August 
Schafer, who will head the new 
federal watchdog agency’s 
Frankfurt office, "we won’t be 
able to get a hold on everything, 
but at least it will be more than 
in the past” 

A spokeswoman for the 
Frankfurt prosecutor's office, 
Hil degarde Beck er-Touss aim, 
said German authorities were 
investigating five individuals 
and two Geneva-based compa- 
nies in connection with allega- 
tions of tax evasion in a case 
that dates back as far as 1987. 

The chief suspect whom she 
declined to name, is a Swiss 
citizen and has been in Switzer- 
land for more than a year, put- 
ting him beyond the reach of 
German authorities, she said. 
The other four suspected tax 
evaders are Germans. 

The German stock exchange, 
meanwhile, has asked its own 
insider trading commission to 
investigate whether any internal 
trading rules of the exchange 
had been broken, according to 

See FRAUD, Page 11 


Japan Straddles Fence on Issue of East Asia Caucus 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

BANGKOK — Trying not to 
offend either the Umted States, 
its main trading partner, or 
Southeast Asian countries that 
provide a major market for its 
exporters and investors, Japan 
said on Monday that it was still 
considering an invitation to join 
a proposed new regional trade 
group that is opposed by Wash- 
ington. 

China and South Korea also 
made it clear in a meeting with 
the Association of South East 


Asian Nations that they were 
unwilling to form the group, to 
be called the East Asia Eco- 
nomic Caucus, at least for the 
time bong. 

South Korea, which needs 
American support in negotia- 
tions with the new leaders of 
North Korea, also wants to 
avoid alienating the Clinton ad- 
ministration. 

China is seeking assurances 
that Taiwan and Hong Kong 
w01 not be admitted to the cau- 
cus, at least for the time being, 
before it agrees to join. 


Nonetheless, analysts said 
that East Asian economies, 
which account for a growing 
proportion of world output and 
trade, appeared to be edging 
slowing toward formation of 
the caucus. 

The informal lunch meeting 
in Bangkok on Monday of for- 
eign ministers from nine of the 
eleven prospective caucus mem- 
bers was the first time they had 
met collectively to discuss the 
plan, first put forward by Ma- 
laysia in 1990 and endorsed by 
ASEAN in 1993. ASEAN links 


Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philip- 

g ines, Singapore. Thailand and 
runeL 

Ajit Singh, ASEAN's secre- 
tary-general said nobody at the 
meeting had disagreed with the 
idea of having a caucus. 

He also said that there was 
agreement to continue develop- 
ing the concept and for the nine 
foreign ministers to meet infor- 
mally for discussions whenever 
the opportunity arose, Agence 
France- Presse reported. 

Washington has expressed 
concern that the caucus could 


split the Asia-Pacific region and 
undermine APEC, the Asia-Pa- 
cific Economic Cooperation 
Forum, whose 17 members in- 
clude the United States, Cana- 
da, Australia and New Zealand 
as well as East Asian countries. 

The East Asian members 
form a majority in APEC and 
their proposed new trade group 
is intended to function as a cau- 
cus within APEC. 

Senior U.S. officials, in Bang- 
kok for annual talks with 

See CAUCUS, Page 11 


v * v 

t N 


j 

i- 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Learning the Lessons of Privatization 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 

W ASHINGTON — While 
President Bill Clinton seeks 
to increase the role of gov- 
ernment in areas ranging 
from health care to high technology, 
much of the rest of the world is stfll 
following Ronald Reagan’s precept arid 
trying to get government “off its back." 

The formerly communist countries 
have, mostly, learned the costs of state 
control and arc struggling to introduce 
market principles. France and other in- 
dustrial countries have l au nc h ed big pri- 
vatization programs, and even Japan 
wants to deregulate its economy. 

Now even the Wodd Bank is calling on 
developing countries to open the floor 
much wider to private entmprise in laying 
foundations for their future prosperity. . 

The Bank’s latest World Development 
Report amounts to a devastatingmdict- 
ment of public investment in infrastruc- 
ture projects — such as power, water, 
transport and telecommunications — 
which governments have usually treated 
as their monopoly preserve. 

The report cites dramatic examples of 
waste and inefficiency. One third of the 
roads built in developing cotmtries over 

ihe past 20 years (at a cost of $ 1 3 Mbonj 
have eroded for lack of maintenance. 

Third-World ports on average move 
cargo from ship to shore at orty 40 
percent of the speed of the most efficient 
ports elsewhere. African and Latjn 
American railroads employ double the 


labor they need, and the average devel- 
oping country power system has only 60 
percent of its generating capacity avail- 
able at a given time. 

Developing countries invest $200 bil- 
lion a year in new infrastructure — one 
fifth of their total investemnt. The Bank 
calculates they could get nearly two thirds 
of that back, or about $123 billion, if they 
priced services to reflect true costs in just 


GoYemmenlB should apply 
commercial principles to die 


the sectors of power, water and railroads. 

They could save an additional $55 
bflfion a year by reducing inefficiency — 
for example by repairing water leaks, 

a fire) and locomotives more effi- 
y on the railroads, and reducing 
power generation losses. 

One mg mistake, the Bank says, is that 
governments (and, one might add, the 
Bank itself) have concentrated on in- 
creasing tire quantity of infrastructure 
without paying enough attention to its 
quality. Shoddy maintenance, misalloca- 
tion of resources and lack of reponave- 
ness to users are virtually universal in 
developing countries. 

The Bank finds three main reasons for 
this sad state of affairs: lack of competi- 
tion, failure to allow managers to do 
their jobs property and users* inability to 
malt**- their demands known. 


The answer, it says, is to apply com- 
mercial principles to the provision of 
services, allow competition where posa- 
ble and involve users in designing and 
operating projects. 

In fact there is already a growing 
worldwide consensus that the private 
sector must play a much bigger role — 
partly because nearly everyone can now 
see the failings of planned economies, 
partly became of growing frustration 
over power blackouts, traffic congestion 
and long waits for telephones. 

Privatization, particularly of telecom- 
munications but also of power projects 
— not to mention airlines — is spreading 
through the Third World. Ports are being 
leased to private operators and road 
maintenance contracted out Increased 
use is bring made of private finance. 

But the lessons do not only apply to 
developing countries. In another new re- 
port, Um'ce, the European Employers’ 
Federation, makes very much the same 
point about Western Europe. It calls for 


CURKENCT ft INTEREST RATES 


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Page 10 


MARKET DIARY 


Wall Street Awaits 
Fed’s Rate Moves 



Compiled hr Chr Staff Fnm Dupalcha 

NEW YORK — The stock 
market finished little changed 


30-year Treasury bond rose 
11/32 point, to 85 even, taking 
the yield down to 7.53 percent 


Monday as investors kepi to the from 7.56 [percent Friday. 


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sideline amid concern about 
when the Federal Reserve 
Board would next raise interest 
rates and by how much. 

Renewed pessimism that the 
weak dollar may deter pur- 
chases of U.S. assets and antici- 
pation oT this week’s congres- 
sional hearings into the so- 


il. S. Stocks 


called Whitewater controversy 
also tempered demand for 
slocks, traders said. 

Whitewater concerns possi- 
bly questionable investments 
made by President Bill Clinton 
and his wife. Hillary Rodham 
Clinton. The matter under- 
mined confidence in the stock 
market because of concerns the 

f iresident may be distracted 
( 


rora governing. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 


erage finished up 6.80 points at 
3,741.84, while declining stocks 
slightly edged advancing issues 
on the New York Stock Ex- 


change. 

The price of the benchmark 


Expectations of an impending 
rate increase grew last week, 
when Alan Greenspan, the 
chairman of the Federal Reserve 
Board, told Congress the central 
bank may have to raise interest 
rates for a fifth lime this year to 
keep inflation in check. 

Oil companies were weak af- 
ter reporting second-quarter 
earnings below Wall Street s ex- 
pectations. Mobil, down to 
§4%, was among the losers. 

General Nutrition gained 1 n 
to I8fc after saying its planned 
acquisition of Nature Food 
Centers would lift earnings. Na- 
ture Food rose 1% to 1 1%. 

American Brands rose to 
34% after the company’s quar- 
terly figures impressed Wall 
Street. . 

Black & Decker gained 1 'A to 
18% after reporting a 15 percent 
rise in second-quarter earnings, 
above analysts' expectations. 

Kirby fell % to 16% after re- 
porting lower earnings for the 
second quarter. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


The Dow 


Da2y dosings of tbs 
Dow Jones industrial average 



3600 . 


m 


J F 
1994 


M A 


J J 


Standard* Poor’s 


Industrie Is 
Tram 

ultimo 
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SP 500 
SPlOO 


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53XJS SMS 330.1b + 1X7 
387X2 385-51 386X1 + 061 
1SS56 15*96 TSUI — am 
4*77 4*53 4*64 
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<01.73 420.40 01.49 + 084 


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LAC a 

RJRpfP 

Merck 

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IBM 

GenEls 

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25035 

30934 

25068 

30861 

25X72 

30969 

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■0.48 

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20X60 

21135 

205.79 

21X75 

20664 

111.36 

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NASDAQ Index®* 


HWl 

Law 

Last 

dm. 

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industrials 

Banks 

Insurance 

Finance 

Transp. 

71668 

725.98 

76767 

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93153 

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93X98 
715. 10 

71X05 —063 
73468 —1-59 
76X23 —261 
88769 —363 
932-ffi -1.15 
71BJ5 -4.15 

AMEX Stock Index 


High 

Low 

Last 

Chg. 


43*09 

43348 

43*05 

*060 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


S igns of U.S. Slowdown 
Undermine the Dollar 


Bloomberg Businas News 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
fell against other major curren- 
cies Monday amid signs that 
the U.S. economic expansion 
was slowing and the belief that 
this would diminish the need 
for higher interest rates. 

Many traders sold dollars af- 
ter the National Association of 
Realtors said sales of previously 
owned homes dropped a large r- 


Forelgn Exchange 


in 


lhan -expected 3.6 percent 
June to the lowest level in four 
months. That report came less 
than a week after the govern- 
ment said new housing starts 
had dropped 9.8 percent in 
June, also more than expected. 

The dollar dosed at 1.5895 
Deutsche marks Monday, down 
from 1.5980 DM in New York 
on Friday, and dipped to 98.55 
yen from 98.95 yen. 

“We’re seeing evidence that 
the economy is slowing,” said 
Alfonso Algo, a trader at Sakura 
Bank Ltd. "The dollar is going lo 
pull back a little further. 

Though the dollar was weak- 
er, traders said it was unlflcdy to 

resume die five-month slide that 


drove it down almost 14 percent 
against the yen and 13 percent 
against the mark. 

“We’ve probably seen the dol- 
lar's lows for the year, at least 
against the mark,” said Steve 
Geovanis, manag in g director of 
foreign exchange at Merrill 
Lynch & Co. ‘The economic 
slowdown is nothing to worry 
about.” 

Concern about this week s 
hearings on the Whitewater af- 
fair also weighed on the dollar, 
traders and analysts said. 

The House Banking Commit- 
tee begins hearings Tuesday on 
President Bill Clinton’s involve- 
ment with an Arkansas real-es- 
tate company and its ties to a 
faded savings-and-Ioan. 

Analysts said the dollar was 
likely to trade in a narrow range 
this week as traders awaited Fri- 
day’s report on U.S. gross do- 
mestic product to see whether 
the economy was growing quick- 
ly rfnraigh to warrant a rate in- 
crease by the Fed. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar slipped to 13480 Swiss 
francs from 13552 francs and to 
5.4275 French francs from 
5.4625 francs. The pound rose to 
$13304 from $13275. 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


AopleC 

Mlcsfts 

TetcmA 
Sybase s 
US Hlbs 
modes 

NwsiAlrl 

RoriCOG 

Gscoi 

MO 

Cirrus 

Seagate 

Quantum 

DSCS 

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37312 313b 
32W1 51ft 
30099 23 
28396 3V 
28079 37Vi 
22347 34ft 
31269 18 
30861 4ft 
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19009 24ft 
1441 S 26* 
14294 25* 
13775 15ft 
12684 34* 
11701 3 


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Today 

Noon 

20 Bonds 

10 Utilities 

W industrials 

9741 

9364 

10169 

9754 

9360 

18169 

NYSE Diary 


doe 

MV. 

Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total issues 

NewHians 

New Laws 

1082 

1052 

703 

2836 

35 

47 

1103 

912 

TSB 

2843 

34 

36 

AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


X CL Lid 

AnxM 

Chevsn* 

VtacB 

Viocmrt 

RoyriOg 

SucfSrg 

Prr.Com 

Nabors 

VtocwtE 


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7106 6* 
5873 8ft 
4576 34 
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3594 4*i 
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3070 5* 
2721 6* 
2653 446 


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Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total issues 

New Mrs 
New Laws 


248 375 

295 274 

949 964 

792 813 

10 B 

13 9 


NASDAQ Diary 


Market Sales 


NYSE 
Anwx 
Nosdoa 
In millions 


21340 

1117 

19446 


211X37 

31910 

29X724 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Told issues 
Now Highs 
New Lows 


1447 

1591 

2029 

5067 

51 

98 


1557 

1592 

1923 

5073 

65 

88 


Previous 
Bid Art 


600-00 


57150 

57100 


576-50 

59100 


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Mar 16425 164118 Mil '6425 —015 
Est. whim*: 1M46 . OpCnirt. 12.178 


BRENT CRUDE OlL tlPE) 

US. Gotten eer Ban *1 tetBOl 1X88 barms 


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Dec 

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17 J7 
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17A0 —0.15 
1735 —0.74 

1730 —M2 
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1733 —an 
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Est. vo bum: 35333. Own bit. 734X85 


Stock Indexes 


Financial 


HM LOW 0058 CtWWK 
MftONTN STERUNG (L1FPE) 

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9170 TUB 
9X29 9333 

9233 na 
9239 M 
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9136 9132 

91 w 

9085 9055 

I4T^ N.T. 


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Mar 

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Sv 


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Jua 

Sep 

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£3 

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91A7 -U4 
91J2B -OJB 
9107 —Ora 
9ULB8 — 0X3 
9073 — OdM 


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Ok 3134J 


Low Chao QniM 


+ 03 


volume" 27X6*. Own Int.: 519524 
HAONTH EURODOLLARS CUFFS! 


SI mUHaa ■ PbaT lit pet 

Sap N.T. N.T. 

9407 WJ7 
9X82 9182 

jgn N.T. N.T. 

N.T. N.T- 


laa N.T. N.T. 

Est. vo lu me: 200 Opan lnt.:U68- 
>M«TH EUROMAIUtS (UFFEI 
DM1 mWop-rtsofioope* 

OK Sfl 

55T KS K3 

M 9431 9423 

D K >*« SM 

Mar 9352 9173 

jST 9351 

SW 

Doc 9333 tub 

S£ 4336 9336 

jS 9294 9193 


9478 —051 
9409 —032 

euw —032 
9354 —033 

fiw — 003 


95.10 

9551 

9451 

9456 

9431 

9402 

9102 

9333 

9KS 

9125 

9110 

9257 


Est. volume: 89377. Oo«l Int.: 813332. 


— 851 
Unch. 
—051 

— 051 
+051 
+ 051 
uadi. 

titn 

UndL 
Unch. 
+ 051 
+ 051 


^n^r-BWiKIs 1 


FF5 mlHkn- 


DM 

Mar 


Sep 


jua 


9436 

9423 

9456 

9352 

9159 

9130 

9111 

9198 


9433 

9416 

9197 

93J3 

9353 

9335 

9106 

92J0 


9436 

9421 

9403 

9352 

9159 

933* 

9115 

9352 


+ 051 

-«i" 

—051 

—002 

am 

+052 

+054 

+057 


Spot CommodUM 


CamamOty 
Aluminum, lb _ 
Copper etedrolytlc lb 
Iran FOB. nn 
Lead, lb 
Silver, trtnrn* 

Steel (scrap), tan 
Tin. lb 
Zinc lb 


Today 

0672 

1.19 

21350 

038 

5315 

11957 

15931 

8A7BZ 


(573 

1.19 

21100 


526 

11957 

35572 

0A836 


Est. volume: 23JS2. Open KiL: >84431, 

LOKQGILT,C UFFE 1 .J 

(Sun > pis B 32ndi of WO Pd 
Si 103-14 102-08 10-10 +H3 

SS N.T. NT. 1&16 +0-12 

volume: 4lA5a Oven int:il44ll 

GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 258500 -PIS Of 180 PCt . 

^ 9XK S Sjo+iui 

Est. volume: 109369. Open ML: 17IA2S. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
mm +856 

S +8« 

jS NT- NT. N.T. unch. 

Est. vu luma: 137,261 Own tail: W644 


_ 31275. IU72 

Est volume: 7A90 Open Int: 5UW- 

sS ama 

6 ■». a ® 

Est. volume: 20624 OBM WJ 69)911 
Sourcws: MoNf, AosKlotm d Proa, 
LcXdon Ml Financial Fohm Enchant. 
Inn Pwtruicvm Enchtmam. 


+750 

+730 

+750 

+758 

+750 


Dividends 


Per Amt .Pay 
IRREGULAR 

CWMMtaHoM - -S K £5 

Health Care Prop - s8 H 

HeaUhCara REIT - K 

Nartti SWeSyos Bk - Va tis 

Prime RetaU - » 

St Helena GaU * JW 

x-anprox amount per ADR. 

STOCK SPLIT 


H 1H 


Parwch Hold! tar 3 tywwe 
Wasblrston Tr Bncp 3 tar 2 spilt. 


INCREASED 

Bruno* Inc g 565 

Piedmont B kGra g 

Pr wW mt Bkshrs Q ■>' 

SPECIAL 

. 30 


84 8-19 
9-15 9-30 
H M2 


F&C Banczhares 


8-1 8-15 


INITIAL 


Magna Ba ncorp n 
Wraerhouse 


. 20 


AiOonwCgMnemir 


industrials 


Low Lxrsl Settle am 


KlgH 

GASOIL (IPH1 

U3. do«an per metric h»4ats ol 1(8 tons 
«■» 1B7S 1B2S 15230 15230 -US 

156J5 15475 -1» 

oS 161 JO moo 16850 16850 — 150 

Mnv 16175 16175 

Dec 16650 16450 


14225 —138 

>6450 16430 —150 


Allied 

Armor All . 

Cotton Consol 
Centra! LMdstana 
chnopMke Uttl 
amu Inc 
Cor estates Fin 
Comdisco Inc 
CrestarFln 
DMaMInc 
FlnoertwtCra 
FstFedSvgs Skw* 
F=st Fin Bancorp 
Firstar Com 
Fnmemaster Corn 
FuHtrHB 
O&B Bancorp 
Giddlngs Lewis 
GUteteCa 
Halliburton Co _ 
Horae Beneftdol B 
KMnwarth BenAas 
LaUtaw Inc A&Bs 
Lee Enterprise 

KESMST 

NBB Bancorp 
Nashua Coro 
OppenhelinerCop 
Peoples BkCT 


Imrn 

REGULAR 

Q 51 
Q .10 

3 .16 

a 5625 


S-1 

8-16 


*3 


10-3 


Ml 

8-15 



Coup for Martin Marietta? * 

multibillion-doUar u - S ’-SL^ rK - a person familiar sdth the 
awarded a year ago to TKW uhl, ; » 

bid^g said Mon^- b iddinK ai^ secret pro. 

The federal SSTandLoSheedCorp. prolan 

»m this vear after mwed. 




, . A to be worth more thanSS . - 

Xhe contract, whidi is estuna «... — ^ — <+ *r 


U 1 Ws new generanra of 

billion, covers spvals-ovw 


OUUOn, rovos «,wesdr00 00 dCCTlomu Mgmus-ovw 

comment, as did a 


Metall Plans to Cnt links '^* 





rionships were no t m aid il was sedring a sttfle 


KorWian Buys 5% Stake in Viacom 


■jl4' 


investment ^ ^ a value of about 5338 




8-1 

8-m 

3 S3 To* 

1 1 pi 

§ 5 aS -J 

Q 34 8-4 8« 

Q .17 8-1 8-12 

. .125 M 8-15 
O 50 - 8-1 8-15 

S H w w 

Q .145 8-1 841 • 

8 .18 7-26 7 - 3 S 
53 W 1WO 
O 35 8-1 M 

Q 35 9-1 9-22 

Q JO 8-W M 
M 56 M 8-15 

^ 7 % -3 «0 

a m iSn ms 
5 jo j-m m 2 
a .18 9-ra TM 

S ’* 30 7-29 831 
J 2 . . 8 - 1 . 84 S. 


nriHiOT- Viacom maJring any change in 

-fai^t^55B5SHBSS^ 

U S West and AirTouch Merge 

NEW YORK, 

tions, creating one of the bigpest r 
The mew entity plans to jomti 
CCThnm mcalions services. The nutt 
lar jeant venture is 70 percent AirTi 


pursue licenses for. 

‘tyownership of mecdlu- 
U SWcsl 


(AP, Rearers; 


sonwU 9 PPYObln la Conodtam touts: 
nwntMr; Hwrbrlr: i * 


m- 


Fortte Record 


tinning operations rose l 9 percent, — (Bloomberg) 


American Barrick Makes Takeover Bid for Lae Minerals 


millicHL or 70 cents adore.. ^.*..8 5-- 

American Brands Inc. saM scoon<KuaiWp^tr^83j«r- 
cent because of strong resists 

■Casitduiies/AK.j^.ss^ earnings jumMd 

25 permit as ail the conqxiny’s ^drroaoos reported 
theperiod. - 


(Bloomberg) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TORONTO — American Barrick Re- 
sources Corp- the world’s largest gold min- 
er in terms of market capitalization, Mon- 
day launched a 2.08 billion Canadian dollar 
($13 billion) takeover bid for Lac Minerals 
LtcL, another Canadian mining concern. 
Hie purdiase would make Toronto- 


based American Barrick the largest gold 

rnd help it to 


producer in North America and 
further expand its international opera- 


tions. American Barrick’s offer is the sec- 
raid in less than a month for Toronto- 
based Lac. 


American Barrick said it would offer 4 
dollars a share and 031 shares of Ameri- 
can Barrick for each of Lac's 148.7 million 
shares outstanding, valuing the bid at 
14.04 dollars a share. 

Lac Minerals chairman and interim 
chief executive James Pitblado said he be- 
lieved, however, that the offer was insuffi- 
cient. “It is nice and gratifying that other - • 
people realize there are some very valuable 
assets within the Lac organization,” he 
said. “But my personal view is it is still 
inadequate." 


company's interest in Lac was primarily 
teredo: 


WMkMdlnOffiM 


centered on Lac’s South American proper- 
ties. “That’s where we would focus a good 
portion of our attention,” be said. 

In afternoon trading on the Toronto 
Stock Exchange, American Barrick shares 
were down 1 dollar, at 31375, while Lac 
shares were up .625 cents at 14 dollars. 

• On July 7, Vancouver-based RoyalOak -- 
Mines Ltd. offered to pay 3-75 dollars in 
cash and 1.75 shares of Royal Oak for each 
Lac share, valuing the bid at 1339 dollars a 
share. 

(Bloomberg, Knigfit-Ridder, Reuters) 


Tkc Associated Press ' 

LOS ANGELES —“Fonert Gump w ctenmated the U. & to . 
office again, with a grass of $22 million over ibe weekend, ; * 
Followingare the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Fnday ticket* ; 
sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


L"Rx+t«JGurm>“ 

i-Tra«U«tf* 

x-n-cifcpr...; — 

4"TT»UooKloa" 

S. -AnavG M tha DuNMtf* 
i.-S a wd" 

7.-UH8W 

a-North- 

9.-1 Love Trauma" 
n."nwSiMttMr ■ 


(Panmoutti . _j 

rrwmritaeiOMurrrwO 
jmmarpndtuBti^ 
OWDtt iwi • r 
{ Wutt O isneyf : , , 
rrwtnfleta Century FMI 
(Poroataaatl 
(Columbia} 
muehataMI 
lUnlmudl 


(22 million 
UL4 rnmton 

jnUmWbm 
TOJ munon 
£tf mifUoa 
$4JmFBor 
SX4 mlfflon 

(3.1 miakH 
S17 mllllan 
SUmUlkm 





WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


AgncBonNw bdfIS 


Amsterdam 


ABN AmroHKJ 
ACF HoWhW 
Aegon 
Ahold _ 

Akzo Nobol 
AMEV 

Bob-wesBonen 

CSM 

DSM 

Etewler 

Fokkor 

Glst-Brocodas 

HBG 

Hamokon 

Hoogo w a 

Humor Down* 

IKCCoJond 

Inter Mueltar 

IM1 Nedortaod 

KLM 

KNP BT 

KPN 

NadUoirt 

OceGrtnten 

Pokhoed 

Philips 

Polygram 

Robeco 

RodamcD 

RolincD 

Roranta . 

Royal Dutch 

Static 

Unilever 

van Ommerati 

VNU 

WoHgrarKHraer 

EOE. 

Prey loas : 


58.90 5830 
4530 4550 
9630 9750 


21150 209 

7330 7X70 
3850 39 

6830 6830 
141 jo vojo 
16260 163.90 
1630 1640 
48 48.10 
291 294 

27340 221 

7530 7430 
76J0 7750 
39 W 
78 7670 
7750 7750 
5230 5250 
48.10 g 
49 JO 4950 
67 6670 
7130 7JM 
5050 4950 

5X10 5X10 

7470 7750 
11650 11730 
5550 5450 
119 119J0 
86.90 8650 
19850 19850 
4750 48 

18870 18870 
5050 5050 
WMO 18450 
US 11550 


AG Fin 

Almanll 

ArtwJ 

Barao 

BBL 

Befcaert 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cocker UJ 


Brussels 

NA 2530 
7550 7510 
4710 4700 
2310 2300 
NA. 4160 
77100 26650 
12175 12100 
NJL 2400 


Colruvf 

DelnoUe 

Elcttrnbcl 

EieOraflna 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Cfavwtwl 


Krvdtaltxink 

JMcnane 

Petraflna 


Red tael 
Rayaht Beige 
SoeGen Bkawue 


2000 2000 
180 189 

5960 9M0 
7310 7300 
NA TS44 
5830 5BT0 
3330 3400 
1354 1362 
4170 4 ISO 
9600 9520 
mo 4840 
2965 2970 
6850 6660 
1480 1470 
10350 1 0275 
3120 3200 
506 m 
5600 5410 
8110 8100 


CleeePrev. 


Clou Prev. 



F Isons 
Forte 
GEC 
Genl Ace 
Glaxo 
Grand Mel 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hlllsctown 
HSBC HKkS 
ICI 


Helsinki 


Amer-YWyma 

Enso-Gubell 

Hghhunakl 

KQP. 

Kvmmene 

Metro 

Nokia 
PoWola 
Repola 
Stockmann 
EX Index.: 3«l 


122 

m 

4330 4360 

IU 

ITS 

1160 

1138 

122 

125 

in 

170 

497 

500 

69 

78 

9530 

M 

215 

211 


Hong Kong 

3150 3150 
12.W 12.10 
3S50 3570 


Bk East Asia 
Cattiav Padfta 

KBIS g ss 

Haw Seng Bonk 5375 54 

Henderson Lend OT-S J850 
HK Air EtW. 45.W 4550 

HK CMna Gas TAB WU5 

HK Elertrlc 21 SO 2X« 

HK Land 1970 19.95 

HK Realty Trust SOW 70.90 

HSBC tWdtaOS 8975 89^ 
HK 5hanO Htfa 1175 1170 
HK Telecomm Jim 15 
HK Ferry 1470 1430 
Hutch Whonwoo 34J0 34.40 
HVSCX1 Dev 2L40 21 50 

jarameMaitL gw 
Jardine St rHM 29J0 2850 

Kmitoan Motor 15J0 M 

•brnbartn Orient liM 10.10 
Mlrama Hotel 2U0 2030 
Hew World Dev 2X25 2305 
SHK Props 4750 4750 

5tatux 255 256 

Swire POC A 6025 5975 
Td Cheung Pens 1J.90 11.J0 
TVE Xffll 350 

Wharf HoM „ 31 3D 31 
VVIno On Co Idtl 11.10 IJJO 
Wlnsor ind. 11.95 11.90 

: 917452 


IJ9 

277 

252 

653 

559 

419 

1.90 


Kingfisher 
Lodbratoe 
Laid Sec 
Loporte 
Losmo 

Legal Gen Grn 
Lloyds Bank 
Marks SP 
MEPC 
Natl Power 
NatWsst 
Nth WW Water 
Pearson 
P&O 
PHUngtan 
PawerGen 
Prudential 
Rank Ora 
Red load 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rayce 
Rotamn (ixiltl 

Royal Scat 

RTZ 

Satnsbury 
Scot Newaos 
Sad Power 


197 

260 

152 

759 

BJ9 

455 

554 

173 

670 

752 

151 

457 

S51 

433 

452 

443 


U? 
225 
254 , 

6.10 'i 

575 

421 

156 

442 

593 

253 

155 

752 

855 


Donohue a 
MOCMU tai Bl 
Natl Bk Ccnada 
Power Corn. 
Quebec Td 
Qoebecor A 
QucbeoorB 
Teleglobe 
Uni vo 
VMeatran 


559 

173 

674 

752 

152 

459 

551 

430 

477 


5.18 

655 

671 

158 

5.13 

X19 


526 

777 


465 

553 

656 

652 

159 

5.15 

371 

409 

557 


953 

1J0 

X62 

370 

853 


Severn Trent 

Shell 

Slebo 

Smith Nephew 
SmlthKIIne B 
Smith tWM) 
Sun Alliance 
Tata 8 Lyle 
Teseo 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
Utd Bl sort IS 


War Loans* 

Wellcome 

Whlroreod 

yMlHOmsfMge 
VWIDs Corroon 


i30 

199 

1.18 

5TT 

751 

656 

158 
415 
474 
354 
412 

237 
1037 

238 
206 
H57 
331 

159 
4289 
652 
558 
358 
151 


459 

950 

170 

352 

191 

850 

403 

SL30 

358 

1 . 1 * 

537 

751 

657 

156 

4.14 

474 

327 

414 

250 


isasMsa 5 


12* W* 
W* 19V, 
B* 0* 
19* 19* 

me 19* 
18 18 
17* 17* 
IB* IB* 
NjQ. — 
12 * 12 * 
18*429 


Faxis^^m 

H “I 

810 
6261 
363 
515 

■■■1295 

^SSmf 


Accor OS 

Air Lluuld. *1* 

Alcatel AMhom 628 

AM TOT-MS 

Bonoolreiae) ,515 

BIC 1.280 

BNP 

Bouvoues 


Carre tour 
CCF. 

Cents 
Chorgeura 
Omenis Franc 
Club MOd 
Danone ex-BSN 
Elf- Aquitaine 
Eit-Smfl 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 
Havas 
Imelai 


2030 1995 
234 tm tn 
1 1470 112 

1400 1376 
299 __ 

403 60S 

821 NA. 
41X90 41X50 
968 *75 

TO 1170 
540 533 

4525045150 
699 595 


Lafarge Coepee 441J0 


440 

6220 

Lyon. Eaux .532 525 

Oreo I IL’l 1239 1Z» 

LVMK. . W 831 

Matro-Hochette 11410 11? 

Michel In B 25* 2Sj 

Moulinex 1155011650 

Palbas 390 

Pechtaevlntt 1647016570 
Pernod- Rtaird 34060 SO 


Peugeot 

Pinocff Print 
Radtatertmlaue 


1074 

131 


70S 

law 


117 

173 


4251 

637 


SacGenBefcXaue 23 is 2305 


Sollna 
SatVOY 
Tessenderta 
Tractcbel 
UCB 

Union Mbilere 
Wagons Llts 


13900 16200 
14679 16200 
9950 9810 
10200 9980 
24875 23775 
2580 2570 

7638 7600 


Current 


, S MS£?S“ : 


: 75294* 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

AleatetSGL 

AlltatnhkM 

Mtana 


1017018370 

3*47035370 

3672 2515 

586 591 

M0S 1000 
BA&F 308.70 310 

Barer 359J036170 

Boy. Hvoo bank 63570 630 
Bov VerekHbk 46767170 
BBC NJL NJL 

SHF Bank 
B66W 

Commerzbank 
Continental 

Dataller Bert* 

Deaden 
Dt Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 

Dwotas 

Dresdner Bank 


Johannesburg 


402 


406 
863 872 
3377034170 
26S 26470 
786 773 

691 500 

2477026770 

7287073270 

487 484 
387 309 


Fetamuehte 305 

F KruppHgtsdl 31450 
Horaener 336 

Henkel 5*5 

Hochtief *50 

Hoecnst 334 

Hofrmonn 873 

Horten 223 

IWKA 379 

Kgll Sail mo 

Kardodi 56450 


Koulbol 69J49670 

KHD 1 32 149 JB 

Ktoeckner werfce 15170 15150 
Unde 915 9H 

Lufthansa 1*620170 

MAN 430 430 

Momesmonn , 640 w 

Muencn Roeck 7980 30 10 

Porsche 766 787 

Prausi* 64744950 

PWA 2348023150 . 

RWE 459 i 


AEG 
Altrcn 
Anglo Amer 
Bo rt ow e 
Blyvoor 
Buffab 
De Beera 
Drietoniem 
Gcncar 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Hlghveld Steel 
Kloof 

tMAankGrp 
Ran a antetn 
Rinplal 
SA Brew* 

Si Helena 
Sasoi 

Western Deea 


2370 2370 
fLA. 118 
236 235 

32 32 

9 NJL 
65 4575 
108.75 10175 
6370 M 
1U0 11 JO 
12012870 
74 2425 
27.75 20 

5675 5670 
3150 3125 
4* 4570 
100 189 

WTO W 

42 44 

Z770 2775 
192 198 

: 555674 


London 


Abbey Nttfl 

*08 

4JW 

Allied Lvnra 

563 

SJ1 


231 

7.R 


2 M 

167 

Art Brit Food! 

«U 

5X5 

BAA 

9X3 

X74 

BAe 

502 

5.16 

Briik Scot tend 

1X7 

1X7 

Barclays 

563 

566 


569 

5X5 

BAT 

4J3 

*23 

BET 

1.72 

1.1A 


117 

121 


737 

763 

Boats 

536 

525 


*38 

*39 

BP 

*13 

*13 

Bril Airways 

4X3 

4X6 

Brit gas 

239 

239 

Srlt Steel 

IX* 

160 

Hit Telecam 

3Xf 

190 

1TR 

177 

178 

Tabu wire 

*33 

4X3 


* 24 

*35 


107 

3JH 

Coats Vlyella 

230 

718 


5.44 

M3 


534 

5X8 


333 

175 

|rilerartuOII 

*30 

4X7 

Fundunnel 

293 

Z8S 


Market Closed 


The stock market 
in Madrid was 
closed Monday for a 
holiday. 


Milan 


Boko Comm 
Bostaoi 

Benetton group 

cR? 

Cred Itof 
E niche m 
Fortin 
Ferfln Rise 
Flat SPA 
FtameccDnlCD 
Generali 
IFI 

itatcem 

I to tote 

Italmablliare 

MedUwnca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

PlrelH 

HAS 

Rlnasoente 
Satoem 


4835 4905 
14616870 
24250 25000 
1096 1110 
2750 3740 
2200 2259 
2990 2900 
1289 2100 
NJL 
7010 7030 
1910 1965 
43300 43659 
29ESO 39600 
13600 13880 
5500 5400 
45500 44300 
15570 15830 
1512 1530 
2548 2578 
5280 5460 
27150 NA 
WOO wso 
4235 4225 


Son Paolo Torino 9870 10000 


SIP 
5ME 
SfUO 
Stando 
SKI 

Tara AMI PI 
MIE Index . .. 
Prevloas; 1188 


6530 6573 
| 3830 3900 
2535 25401 
37000 36500 
5685 5400 
39500 30650 


1173 


Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 
Book Montreal 
Bed Canada 
Bombardier b 
C amMor 

r /i j f n rff i 

Dominion Text A 


33* 23* 
73b 23 L, 
66* 46* 
20* 20* 
179k Irtb 
7* JL. 
7* 7*. 


RivPoulenC A 
RaH. 51. Louts 
Solid Gabobi 
XE£. . 
ste Generate 

Thomson-CSF 
Total 
UJLP. 

Valeo 

«aw 


830 
918 
442 441 

132.M 13520 
1655 1646 
684 686 

512 ““ 

593 590 

28470 28860 
163 15820 
3U9J0 30870 
15X70 15670 
28770 


Sao Paulo 

Banco do Brasil _20 
Ba«5pa 



Pttrabras 
SwnaCnn 
Tetehros 
Tetasp 
usimtnfB 
vale Rio Dace 
Vorts 




- s 

870 870 
690 671 
250 2SO 
77 78A9 
221 216 
209.96 210 
245 265 
1-103 16.99 
llTllO;* 
5725 5400 
62.70 42J0 
364 365 

0.99 L0I 
108 107 

92 NA 
J9J99 


Singapore 

7JS 

City Dev. 

DBS 

Frew Nme 
Genfino 
Golden Hope PI 
HgwPor 
Hume Industries 
inchoope 
Keppel 
KL Kesono 
Lum Chong 
Malayan Banks 
ocec foreign 
DUB 
OUE 

Seinbavranp 
ShanprUa 
SimeDartnr 
5IA foreign 
Stwt Land 
S’pfire Press 
SingSteamrtlP 
SMra Tetecnnin 
Strafta Trading 
I/OS taretgn 
UOL 


dose Prev. 


EsselNhA 
Handel sban ken 
Investor B 
Norsk Hydra 
Procardia AF 
SandvHc B 
SCA-A 
5-E Banken 
SkanddQF 
Skanska 

«F 

Stnra 

TralietoorgBF 
Volvo 
At 


107 

112 

180 

251 

118 

119 

120 
49 JO 

121 

162 

145 

413 

105 




Sydney 

9.12 9 JO 
4.11 4.12 
1X52 18M 

M0 SS 

435 479 

18 JO 10JO 
4J2 4J8 
1.10 1-10 
141 140 
11 JO 11 JO 
MS MS 


Amcor 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bora) 

Bougainville 
Cotas Myer 
Coma ico 
CRA 

CSR _ 

Fosters Braw 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bonk 
News Carp 
Nine Network 
N Broken HH1 
Pac Dunlop 
Pioneer inn 
Nmndv Poseidon 
OCT Resour ce s 
Santas 
TNT 

Western Minina 
westgac Banking 
Woodslde 


2.98 X98 
11 10.98 
873 8J7 
4J0 4.18 
X5B X62 
457 478 
UM 105 
232 ill 
145 147 

178 3J6 
248 273 
745 7J5 
473 475 
432 449 


Tokyo 


Akal Eiecfr n 
Asahl Chamlaal 
Asahl Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 


Toronto 

17* 17* 
16* 17 

6* 6* 


U.S. FUTURES 

Via ABooated Ptam 

My 25 

Season Season 
«Sh Low 

Open HWi Low One 

cue opJnt 


AbltHjl Prtae 
AsntcoEgale 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Am Barrtcfc Res 

BCF 

Bk Nava Scotia 
BCGOS 
BC Telecom 
Bramaloa 
Brunswick 
CAE 


21* 21* 
31* 32* 
46* 46* 
24* 26* 
16* UP* 
23* ZJ* 
0J25 0J1 
10* 10* 
7Vj 7* 




29* 29* 


Canadian Paidflc 20» 20* 


Can Tire A 
Cantor 
Cara _ 
CCLUtdB 
anenlex 
Cum Inca 
ConwestExM 
CSAMBtA 

Dofasco 

%£?£,*** 
Equity STtver A 
FCAlntl 
Fed tad A 
Fletcher ChaO A 
FPI 

Centra _ 

Gulf Cda Res 
Haeslntf 


n igf* 

20* 19* 
MO 3* 
9 8* 
5VS 5* 
22 21 * 
25* 25* 
9* 9* 

21* Zl* 
879 071 
IS* 15* 
0J0 078 
4J05 4JB 
7* 7 

17* 17* 
5* 5* 

046 045 
5* 5* 

12* 13 


HemloGM Mines 12* 12* 


Holtlnger 
Horshom 
Hudson's Bay 
imasco 
■nee 

IPL Energy 
Jorauack 
Labatt 
UWawCo 
Mackenzie 
Magna Inti A 
Marie Leaf 
Marti hue 
Mark Res 
Motion A 
Noam Ind A 
Narondalnc _ 
Norando Forest 
Nor ten Energy 

Nttwi Telecom 

Nava Cora 


COnan 

Cjflj 

Dal Nlpoon Prtnl 
DoJwa House 
Daiwa Securities 
Fanac 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fujitsu 

Hitachi 
HUadif CBMe 


770 
645 455 
11.18 11.10 
T6J0 1470 
1970 19 JO 

2J1 £52 

322 120 
2% r5j Ntason 


HaYokade 

Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kriima 
Kansal Power 
Kowwakl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Wks 

Mitsubishi Bk 

Mitsubishi KOSH 
Mitsubishi Elcc 
Mitsubishi H«v 
Mitsubishi Carp 
MtaMl end OB 
Mltaukashl 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK iRWkdors 
Nikfeo Securities 
Ntopan Kogafcu 
Nippon OH 
Nippon Sleet 
Nippon Yasen 



1730 1770 j SftsUC 
5210 5290 I sherrltt Garrioa 
STtLSrstcmhse 
5oriham 


72S 725 

723 717 

963 963 
2570 2990 
382 398 
1190 OT 
933 939 

729 735 
7148 7250 
1660 1710 
1120 1140 
2580 2580 
511 512 

477 09 
768 784 

3 SlHWMW" 

- ~ 1650 


SletasA 
Talrtman Energ 
TaekB ■ • 
Thomson 
Toronto Domn 
Torstor B 
TronsaBnOfll 
TransCdaPtae 
Triton FW A 
Trifflac 
I Trine A 
Unksca Eiwov 


w* 13 

19 19* 
26 26* 

34* 34 

38* 37* 
29* 29* 
17 17 

20* 20* 
21 21 
B* Mil 
57* 57* 
11* 11* 

21* 21* 
5* 5* 
24* 24* 
12 12 * 
15* 15* 
42* 42* 
11 * 11 * 

20 20 * 
XUO UBS 
28* 28* 

9* 9fb 
UB 050 
IS* 16* 
29* 29* 
20* It* 
77 77 

27* 27* 
13 13* 
■* 8 * 
62* 42* 

7 7* 

41 41 

12 * 12 * 
8* •* 
16* 17* 
14* 14* . 
8 * 8 * 
29* 29 

22* 22* 
15* 15* 
20V* 20* 

23* 2414 
14* 74V. 

17 17 

4.15 4 

76* 16* 
(LIS 0.17 
1* N.Q. 


Grains 


123 


334 

JM 


•ojm 

-0J1* 


. -0J3VV 15JH 
X4S -lunto 7X941 

X4B* -0J414 4,100 

3J9* U9J4-OM W 
X22* -WB 306 


X6S X09 DecM 3X8-4 XOV5 UL Ml fa - AM* 31.1B 

XM* X27 Mar 95 3J2 3X7*. X61* X47 -O^Vi 6JJJ 

X56* 116*Mov«SX36 142'/i 136 3J7 -MS 347 

S* 111 Jlll*S X22 X* 

Dec 95 

Ed. axes 1X000 Rl*i.si8u 15.136 
FWsooenlni 57.536 up 93 

ss* srrais 

146* X2 IV, May 95 US 140 

X33* X16hJul95 
Est. sales NJL Fri-i. sates 
Fit's open in! 36.501 dl W 

CORN (CBOT) WOO Exj mWmum- di*n«r ..... 

99j 5. -W-.SepM 11516 2.17* IIS* 177 -0J1* 69J77 

3J7 117 S« ills 230 117* X19*-iun*mjw 

2 124 «to9S l&h X29 X26J* 22(* -Ml* HJW 

IBS UtVjMny 95 XUW 2J5Vi 233’4 235 -Ml* X173 
isu i hi, oo TJPi. 239*4 237V. 239 -EL01* 7,963 

2^ 239 5 urn urn tri* 23»* 2x1* -am* w 

163 XMV.^95 141* 2M 2J1* 243H. -0J1* 6JH8 

JulW 038 

Est. HAS MJ«J Pit's. *oto 29.933 

Fit's open Int 213Jj l W> 9» . 

SOYBEANS (CBOTI Du rrtrtfraiv cweni ptrumd 

-1-1— - «— .« 


7J8* 

7J7’-': 

7J4 

7J5 

7J5* 

7J049S 

5JS 

179 

X59V5 


SJ2 

5J4 

604 


-001 17 

-am* is* 


IL73*Aub'94 5JJVj SO* 19W. *■«* »» 

SA? s eoM 5 j0'i i7^ 5J0 174^ *DiH 

sS fSw SJ9 565 554V. 5^4 -034% 

541 Jan 95 536* 5L771, SAPV 170* *2^^ 

669* Mar 95 i74M SjO* M4* S79 ’B** 
5J5ViMay9S 5.83* 5J4 5JI 5M "S^ HK 
sjbviJui w mum 5J7V>-am* xdtv 
179 Aug 95 5J5'-l 589 5JB 5JB -003 60 

SJ8 Ski 95 

SJHWNOvM 5.B3 5J6 582 

JulW _ 

Est. sales «wno Fit's, tries 4X367 
Fri-sapenlm IN^l Oh 115* 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOTI igow-MeiPeM „ 
m00 17430AugM 175J0 177^ 175.10 17600 

17X90 Sep 94 175.10 17690 17480 17600 
MMW 17XW 175.50 17280 174J8 
72MOeC94 17340 17580 17X70 17440 
InJoSoS 17430 17630 17X50 17SJ0 
174J0 MertS 173JG J 78.00 174M IMJ0 
I753DMav95 17*80 7688 17650 177^ 

17670Jl495 170 JH 18080 17600 17S^J 
WM9S 10080 IDO 00 1 7993 179 50 
EsLUtoS 1X«® FrT6«ieS 1X254 
RTsaSlW 86.716 Off 361 
SOYBEAN {ML (CBOTJ M0eH«*n w W Bi 


21000 

20759 

20980 

20730 

10730 

70780 

20600 


*130 19371 
-1.10 16749 
-130 10443 
-L40 2B4B5 
-130 3309 
•MO 6138 
-1.10 2JJ9 
-040 1333 


X45 

3034 

79J4 


12 


348 
I M 


340 
US 
US 830 
1340 1340 
6J0 6J0 
845 Ui 
KLS9 NU0 
S 5.10 
178 3M 

a mo 

7JB 745 
1590 1590 
4J6 MV 
346 140 
152 336 
1370 7X10 
116 Zll 


Straffs Tta«s|eg : 227X2* 


Pr e r to es : 


Stockholm 


AGA 
AseaA 
AsJra A 

Allas Cages 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 


70 

614 

Ml 

90 

374 

401 


Nomura See 
NTT 

Olympus Oatlail 

Pioneer 

Rican 

Sanya Elec 

Share 

SMflMH! 

SMnefsuCneni 

Sony 

Sww jtomo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum! Marine 
Sum! tamo Metal 
TeljelCora 
Tatsho Marine 
TaftadaChem 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Hannan Printtis 
Toroy Ind. 
TasMba 
Toyota 

YomricMSK 
a: x MXL 


882 . 

HMD 
7260 1270 

1040 :: ■ 
333 

6« 64S 

791 

2340 2220 
NJL NJL 

K 

940 953 
562 574 
1770 .... 
740 750 

212 212 
5790 5JS0 

Bl 

924 915 
292 292 


Zurich 


inti B 
Alusutase B i new 
BBC Bran BevB 
OboGetoY B 


'“a* 


ElektruW 
FBcher B 
intenOscaant B 
jetmoU Q 

feS^S5c R B 

o^nLewtataR 

5efra Republic 
SendozB 
SMaOMB 
Sutler PC 
Surveillance s 
Swiss BnkCOraB 
SwtoaRetaaurR 
Swissair R 
UBS B 

WhiferllwrB 
Zurich Art B 


BID 80i 
1210 1220 
4278 6430 
560 573 

7250 1278 
2970 3000 

s jslsiassiiHr 


246 345 

6*2 673 
1226 1219 
803 7S8 
568 573 
344 362 

1515 167S 
2H0. 2300 
879 KS 
BOB 8® 
620 620 
1M5 7179 
136 137 

1510 1510 
SSS0 5500 
116 116 
70S 0*5 

0050 ms 

926 920 
2100 2135 
406 600 
$65 565 
765 765 
1197 1190 
739 764 

1345 NA 


71.45 Aug 94 MB 
2X405SP94 3430 
2X100094 ZU5 
2X00 Dec 96 2XJ5 
2X65JanH 2X45 

27.95MO r9S 2MS 

2293 May 95 7144 
23A0JU95 M 

2X30 Aug 95 ZXS5 

ajosrata ass 

Est soles IM00 Ftis-taks 
FrrtDpenW 9&B1 i» P77 


, 7255 
I 2B3B 
! 7S-0S 
27JI 
27JQ 
74.75 


3495 

2465 

2X90 

3X54 

2X55 

ZX55 

2X4S 

2X55 

ZUS 

3155 

1X071 


2425 

2433 

ZL7Q 

2 333 

2332 

7333 

nn 

2X35 

2335 

2UB 


2442 

7431 

7337 

ZU9 

2X39 

3139 

7339 

2339 

3XJI 

ZU7 


-035 T5J51 
-030 2X602 
-031 IX 952 
-216 37 JW 
-216 3J57 
*209 4JH2 
-OJM 1077 
•UM IJ20 
•201 
-201 


Samar Season 
Hiatt LOW 


Law One 09 Onto! 


71-56 . llJ6MQy_96 . 

Est. sales 12493 Ftps saes . 4joo 
Fit's acan ini 106322 


1LXJ -HUB 


COCOA (N^^wmewejw— Wim 


1541 

1580 

1600 

1672 

1193 

1463 

1431 

1664 


7*45 

4(9 

.1517 


, 04 7434 

1041 Dec 94 1M5 
107 Marts W 
107BMay95 
1333JHM , 

12*5 Sep 95 
1290 Doc 95 1565 
rjjOMar96 

_ uww FrrvirtM 5344 

Pit’s open ini 77J04 ub *5 
ORANCSJUKE (NCTTO II 
13450 idJSSenW 9240 


1611 

1657 

1400 


1565 1540 


36D 

1463 

'1693- 

istr 

.1537 

1557 

1582 

1407 


—57 ®JJ» 
-41 MJ93 
^68. 7332 
—a X9S4 
-a 2346 
— « 1392 
-a 4344 

-68 MM 


B5L40 9X60' 9240 
ri.ioNBvw »*5 .M 9*2 *»»: 

mojgits 99 JO 10135 99.90 101.30 

££*£•95 UU5 105J0O BBJO 

VT.nDMay 95 . - 107-55 

iSlJOJriH 107^ WJL60 UMO 1RJB 

TOXOOSepVS 11260 11248 IJD3I 1R* 

II 100 11X00 Nov 95 11260 11X60 1BL40 .11X50 

ESL Ides "too Fs-Ts-Mto *88 
RTs open hit 13371 off 52 - - 


73*410 

moo 

12435 

11435 

11930 

111-50 


-JM UD0 

-235 2387 
.“230 . 
-235 
-235 
-1JB- 


Metals 


HtGtUmECQP fTN Q4CM3C] sjosih.- cams oer ■>. 
HMI 74203616 11425 11115 116^ IWto . 
7490 SeP 94 11460 i 76-00 11460 t1£H 
7 535 DK 94 11X50 11460 11X50 1IX« 
7630 Jan H 

7100 Feb 91 11110 

7X00 Mar 95 ... 

Sff • BB 

^ss\as'^s u» iomo 

7X20 Oct 93 11470 116J0 11470 11475 
77J3NBV95 11435 

(8J0DK9S 10860 10250 10210 10215 
BBJJJonW . -]WJ5 

6X70MorW ’ - 137-33 

71.l0Aer96 . 11X05 

mot 96 - Sift-™ 

Jon 96 111J5 


116901 

11530 

11130 

11130 

11178 

11160 

11X50 

11600 

mas 

115JS 

T72JD 

10900 


9V JO 
11231 


7300 FWiSriM 3J13 
tat 513X5 Off 571 


-275 888 

-030 32348 
-270 10614 
.-060 341 

-RS5 245 
-250 2617 
—250 1307 
-M0 796 

-075 73* 

-250 585 

-an m 
“038 245 

-OJD 603 
-258 59 

-250 

•250 77 

-250 

-250 U 


UB 


-33 
-471J ' 

-10 78/044 
-10 24612 
-10 33 

-X0 6639 
-X0 X6SB 
-X0 UK 
-10 
-20 Z09S 
• -XU 1 
-ID - 70 

-20 17 


Livestock 


CATTLE .(CMERl JAUOEK-eMNBer* 


71(7 
7410 
74J0 
7435 
7J. w 
6930 
»8J» 


61 W Aug 94 6U9 
6270039* 71 6C 

6730 Dec 94 >MB 
67.90 Fen 95 M60 
«» 40 Apr 95 TIM 

M60Jun9S 
MJUAugtt 4750 


69 JB 
71 JS 
7277 
7210 
71-50 
4130 
67 JO 


6205 
7280 
7030 
69 JJ 
7030 
6775 

a jo 


6B3S 
7217 
.150 
6966 
7037 
67.55 
67 JD 


Esl.s^s iwn FrfL sries 9313 
Fri'scuJWW 7225 1 -UP 398 
TCEO CT CATTLE ICMER) VUWJ*».- coW B« h 


— IJ2 22J33 
HUO 84573 
-260 IUO 
-Ota 9642 
-065 2134 
—067 1.30! 
-045 U 


BUD 

8IJ0 

BUS 

8200 

8195 

7630 

BUS 

76.90 


TV JO 
7205 
7760 
7237 
7760 


TI.IOAUPN 79 JO 

71 JM SeP 94 
70.95 Od w 
7i60ltw« 

7795 tents 7287 
7X253*0995 
77JSMarta JUO 

77.45 Aw *• 7440 

Esr.sriet 1 i"?,£ il < 2, afc r jS 
Fji'SDoenlrt 1X081 » -69 
HOGS tCMEW 40Wlri-tt«s.ewB 


I860 
76.97 
7452 
77 J8 
76 J7 


75 J8 
74 VS 
1.598 


7460 

743) 


IMS 

7760 

76.90 

7200 

7735 

74.18 

75J0 

7487 


—217 4362 
-1J7 2.0* 
-1.13 1544 
-4.10 1671 
->JB 415 
—490 23 

— IJM 74 
— <U3 10? 


5X40 
49.75 
SO JO 
5010 


42.45AM 94 45J0 
39600894 41 JO 

39ATDecV4 l\S2 
18*0 Feb 95 41.1S 
3185 Apr 95 421S 
CL7S Jrii9S 6C.V0 


4630 

42J0 

4L4S 

4U5 

4230 

4440 


4250 AM 95 

; lllBRJI HUM 4jW0 


45.10 

4130 

4080 

4265 

4040 

4435 


46.10 

4X05 

4165 

4LU 

4210 

«J2 

4X00 


47 JO 
4635 

E^J srtn .1118 
Fn'Bflpenrt 22(20 to 5* 

PQOICSELUGS (CMERl Omni.- amert 

3L»AW« 31.90 31.90 3000 30JW 

4lSFrt9S 4*05 4500 4*30 4137 

6230 4267 Mar 95 4X40 4425 

riJD 4XQD May 97 44 M 4X10 

*231 *630A«9tS 

Est.sai» 

Fri'iapeniri I -Uh to 75* 


-030 9J13 
•OJB HL0S7 
-207 46M 
• 013 U93 
-230 B4 
—030 396 

17 


4US 4X75 


AM 


-130 XB23- 

-138 xaz 

-075 116 

■ 030 44 


Food 


THm* 62^W«^ JH jo TtJJOlBUa 209JB~12aZ1JW 
2,4X19 SjdSw 71X75 21635 WOO 31230 -1M 11^4 
78.90*Wf5 7J7JO 3193 J7JD 2I7X} -SOB 5JU 


754 763 
3150 2T70 
914 930 


It's easy to wbtcrft« 
mBefgtviT] 
ptst call: 0 800 17538 


24435 

34408 

74460 

245.10 

75200 

24XdO 

ai.io 

feMrirt 


£»Mav«7»^ niJJ 2JVJB -930 IJM 

SSjW-M 95 221.10 381. W OT » MJJ0 -5J0 » 

SmSboK' 2Z73S —453 39 

ilSSSw -MO 217 

Jjl tolww 211.10 27I.1D 221.™ 231.10 
rtLSM Frfi-K^ 7-W 

urjwjwMLOM 7 ' p^*<Fi iiirtto-neMvA 
S'S“‘^jtOd94 tiS nn 11-74 I1J8 -tottv 
«|74Ur95 IIJ9 IlJf UJ! 

10 57 Mav 95 . Jj'OJ »•» 

in S7 ku 95 IMS HR 

mwoB« }JJ» »{A 
lOJBMHta 1129 U39 


1X40 

13.10 

I3J6 

lira 

11.90 

MSB 


1161 

I1J6 

1139 


1U6 

IU8 

IUO 

1161 

H39 


30617 
- . MO 
ua 
1.113 
-am uf 


Ftrsorantat 

SO-VBl CHCMXJ unnwR-anbRVTwa. 

5863 371 J Jut 9. SU ms son 529.0 

mo ■ SHU Aug 94 ms 53*5 52*5 V9U 

JHL5 . 3763 Sep 94 5275 533.0 527 J 531. E 

597 JJ 3820 DecM 534J 5420 0*5 53X3 

56I.E *01 JJ Jan 95 5333 

68*0 *1*5 Mnr W 54*0 S47J 54*0 5466 

06J 4 1*0 May 95 HU 

611X0 4706 JU 95 557.7 

SXSffl efUSaiK 56X0 54X0 56X2 5632 

6220 5390 Dec 95 5710 5712 571J 57X1 

61X0 5752 Jan 96 52X1 

6112 . 5802 JIAIT 96 58X8 

5(72 SDOMar 96 509.1 

Entries. 9500 FiTvirie* 11J7* 

Rfsoeeninr 12M29 

PLATMUM (NMER3 »»ey o-dgknnrneB. 

43720 3S7JSUUIW *19.10 

435L00 34820 Oct M 41 UD 42X80 419J0 431.10 
<7950 37420 Jm 95 423JD 43460 42X50 43*50 
43120 39920 Aor 95 42820 42920 4Z720 438.00 

*3720 d7 JO Jtd 95 42X0Q 

43) JD 43t450W« 43620 

Ed: Sries 1 Fd'S-SaSa 1627 
FrTiawirt 3X195 ril 129 
GOLD IHCMX) UM Pay at- dtOarv nr wyoz. 

38620 maSJ-JW 38*80 -0.10 

38*70 385.5D 38*70 3B*?8 — 0.I0 5U35 

MMOC« BE.™ 36860 3*7 JXr mS ^C10 7.133 

MUOOeeM 3929a 39L70 390JO 371.10 -0.10 43642 

}*X»F»h« 3M60 39X10 39520 .39420 -0.10 10600 
36*50 Apr 95 3HU0 3*820 39730 39720 -0.10 5230 

36130 Jun 95 68160 —0.10 9211 

miflAwW 38X00 38520 3K20 40X00 -0.10 3607 

•mMOd95 60BJB — 0.W 1277 

*1151 -4.10 1857 

47X23 Feb » 47X40 — Q.1G 1,169 

mJOAPTta- 42060 -ara. ■ ?44 

45*20Jun96; 42*40 -030 22S2 


-220 64 

-23D2UHS 

-220 2213 

*230 

-730 

■230 


□pm HWI Low Oow 


!1IN 922BJWI96 92390 92^0^9X790 9X830 -2D7BL15* 


Escston: W426, FffiJrin 326JH 

FTPS OPenia - - 


-40 30269 
-48 813 

-40 IB 


gpetW 2MT94S up 0274 

®FSssys^T^-i«o ^ 

1J760 .76500D4CM JflM J^SO 1228Q 7^1 

canaSEwdO-laR iCMiBO %mr «f.iww«»gi m* - 
03740 OJMSepM 03217 0JM7 0.7211 0.7M2 —5 31^ 

un ua DecM 07WI 07219 03193 07213 —5 U4I 

07685 03050 Mar 95 OJ170 0JW0 03170 03180 —5 ** 

03522 OJMJunM OTOS 03140 03125 0 3140 -5 « 

07160 069655m« ■ 0.709t -5 61 

83070 fUU7BDec91 QJ0J6 -5 * 

esL sales 2386 FWxsatos *225 . 

G«aShMAIDC R3M9U iwrny - 1 wWwril g Wl 
06595 XSWSmM 0-6576 06375 06275 06M6 . -D 0211 

04406 OS590DCCM 06297 06379 06218 a6391 -B 36° 

06595 OSPOOJuntS 0.OT -B B 

SSI ^ SSS -m i*7 

JAPAMEEYEN ((MOD I wiw I ifceeewisxnowoi .. 
affHMcmoo894H*p« omm 500.010200021 01*302101 73 -22 tvw 

0.01049002Q9S25DacM 0210243021 0258X0111270021 074S 
0JH0W0M0977*Jun95 6210^3 

Q2io7manMiosnin Q2MHP 

02105400209680MUV96 O01IB31 

EsxsriH 18247 FiFs. tries 273)49 
Fri's open tat 7X3*0 up 8*1 
SWISS FRANC CCMBQ Hwlmio-1 DeMtwWWJM 
031)7 D.M0DSCPM 8341* 83453. 034U, 03415 

IL7W OUIKSDCCM 03*3* 03468 03421 03432 

0.7680 079BJun93 03495 03312 0.7480 034M 

07760 OJCOMcr96 ‘ 034* 

Ed.sries 79315 Fit's, totes 29601 
FffsaeeaM 30668 off 2939 


-22 430 
-22 2H 

3 uS 


“35 3720 
-35 12N 
-JJ U 
-35 D 


Industrials 


C0TT0N2 (NCTN1 SUNas-aodPtr* 
7BJ0 riAIAlBM 7220 7100 71 JO 

7060 59210094 7X110 7460 7100 

77.75 S9 61 D*C 9* 7X40 7*25 7X« 

78.15 . 6X50 MO- *S 7340 -7567 7X75 

7B.S5. 6*00 Mery 9S J4J0 7X22 7*50 

7035 7091 26 95 7MS 7720 J535 

7*30 69600095 72W 7X95 7X95 

7220 MUM Dec » 7130. 7X00 7130 


Efl-srirt NJL Frr&sdtas 5JB 
RTt open tat 53.913 UP 11 


7230 

7*15 

7180 

7520 

7535 

7660 

7235 

71.95 


•160 9 

-1-3 SJMf 
-1JS 3BJJ7 
-L53 7,160 
“L» «2 
-IJ5 2 . « 
-060 » 
-065 «B 


5120 

5765 

5X15 

5X10 

5*05 

5(60 

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Restructuriiig Costs 
Cut Net at Siemens 


Cowpil* by Out Staff From Dispatches 

MUNICH — S emens AG, 
the electronics company, said 
Monday that reorganization 
costs and lower earnings from 
its financial investments cut net 
profit by 6 percent, to 125 bfl- 
Uon Deutsche marks ($784 mil- 
lion), in the first nine months of 
us financial year. 

Sales increased by 3 percent, 
to 57.7 billion DM, in the first 
three quarters of the financial 
year, which ends Sept. 30. 
While an 1 1 percent rise in for- 
eign sales reflected a pickup in 
demand in Siemens’s mar- 
kets abroad, sales in Germany 
slipped by 6 percent. 


KHD Denies 
Danger of 
Insolvency 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

COLOGNE — The 
share price of Kl&ckner- 
Humboldt- Deutz AG, the 
German engineering com- 
pany, tumbled 17 Deutsche 
marks to 132 DM ($83) cm 
Monday in spite of the 
company’s denial of a re- 
port that it might file for 
protection from creditors. 

"The content and mean- 
ing of the report do not 
correspond with the facts,” 
said Hflmar Kopper, chair- 
man of KHD's supervisory 
board and chief executive 
of Deutsche Bank AG, re- 
ferring to the report that 
appeared in the German 
monthly Manager Maga- 
zine saying the company 
needed extra liquidity of 
500 to 600 million DM. 

The report said that 
KHD’s major shareholders, 
which include Deutsche 
Bank, were seekmgstrate- 
gic partners for KHD. 

weruer Kirchg&sser, 
board chairman of KHD, 
said, “we are sticking to our 
statement that we will 
achieve dear growth in 
sales and new orders and 
reach break-even in 1994 
on the basis of improved 
operating conditions.” 
(Reuters, Bloomberg. AFX) 


New orders rose 8 percent, to 
64.7 bfflion DM, as foreign or- 
ders rose 18 percent, while do- 
mestic orders fdB 4.9 percent 
Large orders for power plants 
in Taiwan and Britain contrib- 
uted to the rise, as did the con- 
soBdation of Osram Sylvania 
Inc. of the United States. 

The improvement in the 
economic situation on the main 
international markets, and also 
an iricreashagly firm recovery in 
Germany and very heavy or- 
ders, have resulted in a signifi- 
cant increase in activity, the 
company said. 

Siemens has said, however, 
that it expects profit for the 
financial year as a whole to be 
.10 to 15 percent below that of 
the previous year. 

While the interim results sug- 
gest that projection may have 
been pessimistic, analysts still 
were m broad agreement with 
the company’s view. 

“We’re all expec ti ng a down 
year,” said Dennis Extern, an 
analyst at Merrill Lynch Inter- 
national. Tt’s too early for a 
capital goods company to call 
the turn in their cycle.” 

The company, Germany’s 
second-largest after Daimler- 
Benz AG, is in the middle of a 
sweeping reorganization that 
focuses on its telecommunica- 
tions and computer divisions. 

Norbert Backer, a company 
spokesman, estimated that full- 
year expenses for the revamp 
would be “somewhat lower” 
than the 1.8 billion DM that 
was needed in the previous fi- 
nancial year. 

Mr. Bddcer did not disclose 


Lyonnais Ratings Are Cut 

$13 Billion Downgrade by Moody’s 


GmpUeiby Otr Staff Frm&vauhB 

PARIS — About $13 billion of short-term 
and long-term Credit Lyonnais debt was 
downgraded Monday by Moody’s Investors 
Service Inc. The credit-rating company said it 
had been reviewing the debt since Feb. 4. 

- The rating action reflects Moody’s belief 
that die significant burden of Credit Lyon- 
nais’ problem assets should continue to nega- 
tively impact its already weakened financial 
fundamentals — especially profitability and 
capitalization — and its global franchise,” 
Moody’s said. 

“Such a trend is likely to persist for some 
time in spite of the recent rescue package 
provided to Crfedit Lyonnais by its majority 
shareholder, the French state.” 

Moody’s downgraded the bank’s long-term 
certificates of deposit to A3 from Al, short- 
term, certificates of deposit to Prime-2 from 
Prime-1, long-term letters of credit to A3 from 
AI, short-term letters of credit to Priroe-2 from 
Prime-1, senior debt to A3 from Al and senior 
subordinated debt to Baal from A2. 

The downgrading also affects the credit 
ratings of the French bank’s international 
arms. 

- The French government controls 75.7 per- 
cent of the bank’s voting rights and 552 
percent of the shares, while Thomson-CSF 
owns 192 percent of the shares and 20.4 
percent of the voting rights. 

The bank had posted a loss of 6.9 billion 
French francs ($1 bOfion) in 1993, the largest 


in French banking history, after posting a 1.8 
billion franc loss m 1992. 

The government plugged the boles in the 
bank’s balance sheet with a 4.9 billion franc 
cash injection and an 18.4 billion franc backing 
of doubtful real-estate loans. The government 
also lifted 40 billion francs in bad real-estate 
loans from Credit Lyonnais’s balance sheets. 

‘ Credit Lyonnais also is planning to sell its 
stake of about 3 percent in the oil company 
Total, according to published reports. 

Under a shareholder accord reached last 
year, the government. Credit Lyonnais, As- 
surances G6nera] es de France and Socifeife 
Central du Groups des Assurances Nation- 
ales SA agreed to hold their Total stakes for 
lOyears or, if any party wished to sell to offer 
their holdings to another member of the pact. 

■ EU Sets Conditions for Air France Plan 

The European Commission will ask Air 
France to repay a 12 billion franc injection 
provided by Gaisse des Depots & Consigna- 
tions as one of the conditions for approving 
the airline’s 20 billion franc refinancing pack- 
age, EU sources told AFP-Extd News in 
Brussels. 

Other conditions include provisions that 
Air France should be barred from seeking any 
further state aid, should be privatized, should 
sell its stake in the Men dim hotel chain and 
should pledge not to increase its traffic by 
more than 27 percent a year, the sources said. 


New Pechiney Chief 
Will Focus on Profit 


uauuiii year- CompOed by Oar Sufi Fhm Dapadta 

Mr. Bddcer did not disclose PARIS — Jean- Pierre Rodier will combine his current job as 

specific figures for earnings rhirf executive of Union Minifere in Belgium and his new job as 
from financial investments, rh airman of Pechiney SA, Union Mini fere’s parent company 
whit* accounted for about half Sodfetfe Gfenfcralc de Belgique said Monday, 
the company's net profit of 1.98 Mr. Rodier, who was named to the board of the French metals 
billion DM last year. and company Saturday, has said his two priorities 


the company’s net profit of 1.98 
billion DM last year. 

The companys high depen- 
dence on fmannal as opposed 
to core operations has prompt- 
ed some analysts to drib Se- 
mens “a bank with an electron- 
ics department” 

Reiterating comments made 
at a press conference this 
month, Mr. Bddcer said de- 
clines in global slock and bond 
prices tins year had cut into 
earnings. 

Semens said that profit was 


STET Chief Opposes 
AIcatel-AIsthom in ERI 

AFP-Exret New 

VENICE — The managing 
director of Sodeii Finanziaria 
Telefonica, Michele Tedeschi, 
said Monday that he opposed 
Alcatel-Alsthom and Pirelli 
SpA taking a stake in Istituto 
per la Ricostruzione Indus- 
trial, known as IRI, when it is 
sold into private hands. 

Mr. Tedeschi said he agreed 


would be returning Pechiney to profit and seeing through its sale 1 c ? escm ®S reca 

to the public, which is likely to take place in 1996. The government "f 1 * “ c “J™? “r chiU fJ nai1 


> is expected to confirm his appointment Wednesday. 

> “My No. 1 aim is returning the company to profit, but we also 


Romano Prodi, who said in 
April that Alcatel should not be 


Operations 
Earn More 
At Norsk 


Compiled Ir: Otr Staff From Oapadta 

OSLO — Norsk Hydro AS 
said Monday its second-quarter 
profit from operations was lift- 
ed by strong sales, especially in 
its agriculture division. 

The energy and chemical 
company said it earned 1 .05 bil- 
lion kroner ($ 1 50 million) in the 
quarter, compared with 2.13 
bQlion kroner in the 1993 quar- 
ter. But the 1993 profit would 
have been only 307 million kro- 
ner if not for a one-time gain 
from the sale of its slake in the 
Norwegian rood conglomerate 
Freia Marabou AS. 

Sales in the second quarter 
jumped 14 percent, to 17.93 bil- 
lion kroner, and operating in- 
come more than doubled, to 
1.93 billion kroner from 936 
million kroner. 

“Our results are developing 
positively in ail core areas,” 
said Egxl Myklebust, president 
of Norsk Hydro. “We are espe- 
cially pleased that improve- 
ments in productivity and mar- 
ket conditions have had a 
positive effect on our fer tilize r 
activities.” 

Operating income at Norsk 
Hydro’s agricultural division 
rose to 544 million kroner from 
99 million kroner as profit mar- 
gins and sales rose in Europe. 

Rising oil and natural gas pro- 
duction as several new fields 
came on line offset a decline in 
oil prices. 03 and gas profit rose 
to 900 million kroner from 732 
million as Norsk Hydro’s pro- 
duction rose to about 235,000 
barrels a day from 178,000. 

Re fining and fuel marketing 
results were lower than a year 
earlier because of weak profit 
margins, the company said. 

Metals earnings rose to 305 
million kroner from 85 milli on 
because of higher al uminum 
prices. 

Results for all the company’s 


Frankfurt -- London 
DAX ‘ . FTSE 100 Index 

.•aKk~ SMfr 


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. 1893 

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Farts 

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F m’a J > 

1893 

Monday- 
Close 

AEX 40X52 

Stock Index 7,529-48 

OAX 2.13522 

FA2 . 809.39 

HEX 1,821.55 

Financial Times 30. 2,412.10 


Pans 

CAC 40 . ' . 
2400- - 

2000 '~ 

ISM;;--. —■ 


Fm-aTMT?.- 

1093 


Zurich 


FTSE1Q0 
General Index 
MIB 

• CAC 40 
ARaetsvaerfden 

• Slock Index ' 
BBS 


3,106.10 

Closed 

1,173.00 

2.05&64 

1,890.68 

454.12 

324.0 8 


Prev. 

Close Change 

403.02 40.12 

7/96.10 +0.45 
2.150.28 - *0.65 
808.23 +0.14 

1.884.02 -0.68 
~2.425.20. . -K354 

3,11470 ■ -4U*' 
307;05 ,- - ■ 

1,18000. -6.59 

£,041.4f . ' +0JJQ 
1,901.57 ,-0.57 
453.94 ■ +0.04 
924.44 • - -• A>.04 

Inienunoful Herald Tritium: 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


Apnl that Alcatel should not be Kesuits tor au the company s 
allowed into the Italian market operations benefited from cur- 
“while the French system re- rency gains of 9 million kroner. 


French newspaper La Tribune Desfosses. 

Pechiney had a net loss last year of 980 million French francs 
($180 min i nn) despite laying off 4,000 employees, which reduced 
the work force to 59,000. 

The company hopes to break even this year and is more 
optimistic for next year. Jean Gandois. who is stepping down as 
cfratHTian, told shareholders in June that he believed profit would 


fuses it entry.” 


(Bloomberg, AFX ) 


Very briefly; 

• Porsche AG began operating profitably again in May. its 
rfigfrrnan, Wendefin Wiedekiag. said. Unit sales were up 62 
percent, at 7,033 vehicles. 

• Gfldemeister AG, the German toolmaker, will take over Deckel 
Mabo AG, which filed recently for bankruptcy protection. 

■ BM Group PLC will sell its American Mitchell Distributing Co. 
uni t to Marubeni Corp. for $25.5 million to reduce debt. 

• Renault SA and Iveco, the truck division of Flat SpA, said they 
would jointly build 120,000 cabs For commercial vehicles. 

• The European Commission is investigating plans by Sanofi, a 
subsidiary of Etf Aquitaine, to buy the whole of Sterling Winlhrop, 
which it controls jointly with Eastman Kodak Co. 

• PoIyGram NV expanded into Poland with a rock-music record 
unit, Warsaw-based Izabeiin Studio. 

• Charter PLC said its £93 million ($146 million) rights issue had 
been 93.5 percent taken up by stockholders. 

• Hie Netherlands first-quarter trade surplus widened to 5.3 
billion guilders ($3 billion) from 3.7 billion guilders a year earlier. 

• Italy’s industrial producer prices in May were up 0.4 percent 
from the previous month and 3-2 percent from a year earlier. 

• Fromageries Bel group said it acquired a 75 percent stake in the 
Italian speciality cheese producer Cademartori Introbio. 

• IMI PLC sold its unprofitable computer software unit Redwood 
International to CP Software Group in the United States, but it 

will retain a Stake. Pinters. AP. Bloomberg. AFX 


366 nriDion DM in the third stabilize by the end of the year and increase in 1995. 


FRAUD: Prosecutors in Frankfurt Track Massive Case of Insider Trading 

Continued from ftge 9 The new laws bring German investors among the German blown the whistle on the Swiss 


quarter ended June 30, down 
17.4 percent from a year earlier. 
( Bloomberg Reuters, AFP) 


Coutimed from ftge 9 
Stefan Lutz, spokesman for the 
exchange. 

In the past, Frankfurt prose- 


NYSE 

Holiday's closing 

TaWsa indude the n a tion w ide prices up id 

the closing an WaH Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Vie 7he Associated Press 


raw yw pe iota MX* Lorn 


In Mr. Rodief’s three years as managing director of Union exchange. 

Mini fere, he cut 10 percent of the work force to offset declining In the past, Frankfurt prose- 
zinc and lead prices. (Bloomberg Reuters, Knigfit-Ridder) cutors have said that several in- 

vestigations into suspected tax 

— . — — -- ■ — evasion by traders as a sort of 

legal proxy for probes of insider 

nMonoi * trading, which was legal. 

flftjgaa raw YMPEIOKW _m»LgEs»QVjjr “Starting next week, we will 

Tit be watching all transactions on 
the German exchanges for any 
evidence of irregularities,” he 
said. In addition, each of the 
country’s eight exchanges, 
which are grouped under the 
umbrella unit known as Deut- 
sche Bdrse AG, will add anoth- 
er layer of oversight as local 
agents of the federal watchdog 
agency, he added. 


stock market supervision up to public, which has historically 
international standards, pro- felt its money was safer invested 


riding the legal weapons to deal 
with both primary inside trad- 
ers, meaning those with direct 
access to privileged informa- 
tion. as well as secondary insid- 
ers, who are indirectly involved. 

A paper trail created by man- 
datory disclosures of all securi- 
ties transactions is the kind of 
evidence investigators have 
lacked until now. 

The reform is expected to si- , 
lence most critics erf the Ger- 
man financial markets for the | 
former lack of laws against in- 
sider dealings. ! 

German banks hope the new | 
laws will also help attract new i 



in bonds. 

German media have reported 
that the latest case of suspected 
insider trading involved a ring 
of as many as 24 traders who 
had skimmed hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars in profits 
through front-running 

A former senior trader for 
Dresdner Bank AG, Gunter 
Wflle, was reported to have 


blown the whistle on the Swiss 
companies and colleagues when 
he was investigated for tax eva- 
sion himself. German media re- 
ported. 

Mr. Wille could not be 
reached for comment- Dresdner 
Bank also had no comment, and 
Merck Flncfc, which is owned 
by Barclays Bank PLC of Brit- 
ain. said that last week’s investi- 
gation involved one of the 
bank's clients rather than the 
bank itself. 


CAUCUS: Japan Straddles Fence 


EdL 

71 







Continued from Page 9 
ASEAN and other Asia-Padfic 
states, have expressed the fear 
that if the caucus operates as a 
voting bloc, it will cause unnec- 
essary tensions and divisions 
within APEC, seen by Wash- 
ington as the nucleus of a future 
Pacific economic community. 

Australia shares tins concern. 
Gareth Evans, the Australian 
foreign minister, said Monday 
that the caucus “runs the risk, 
at best, of being a distraction 
from APEC at worst, of creat- 
ing division down the Pacific 
that will be unhelpful in achiev- 
ing APECs larger goals.” 

A Japanese Foreign Ministry 
official said Japan’s view was 


that if the caucus were estab- 
lished. “it must not lead to divi- 
sions in APEC.” 

A senior U.S. official said 
Sunday that the plan for (he 
caucus, as outlined by ASEAN, 
was “a bit more elaborate and 
ambitious than we had been 
orianaUy Jed to understand." 

He said that the United 
States wanted to be sure that 
the caucus did not become a 
new entity that would diride 
the Pacific and exclude Ameri- 
ca. 

However, the official said 
that the United States had an 
open mind on the caucus and 
wanted to discuss it further with 
other Asia-Pacific countries. 



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ASIA/PACIFIC 


Radica Gambles on Casino Toys 


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flEywii 


ars fall 


year of 80140 won on Monday, 
down from its previous low of 
80170 won Friday. The dollar 
has moved in a range of 805 to 
813 won for most of this year. 

“The central bank seems Co 
consider it more argent to quell 
inflation than to promote ex- 
ports,” said one dealer. A lower 
won would make South Korea’s 
exports more competitive by 
m aki n g its products cheaper in 
overseas markets. 

Analysts said f aster- than-ex- 
pected growth bad raised the 
specter of inflation in South 
Korea, where gross national 
product grew at 8.8 percent in 
the first quarter of tins year, 
compared with 3.9 percent in 
R993’s first quarter. More re- 
cently, rising juices on import- 
ed raw materials, especially od, 
have put additional pressure on 
inflation, they said. 

Dealers forecast that the dol- 
lar would fall below 800 won this 

week, when high won demand is 
expected because of tax pay- 


Taiwan Stocks 
At4-YearHigh 

Compiled by Our Sitrff From Dhpatdta 

TAIPEI — Taiwan’s 
stock index soared to a 
four-year closing high 

Monday on reports that the 

government would double 
the current ceiling cm for- 
eign stock investment to 
$20 billion and ease other 
restrictions on overseas 
money. 

The index gained 131.77, 
or 2 percent, to 6,688 on 
volume of $4 bfltioo. 

Local newspapers said 
the government would 
eliminate a 10 percent cap 
on foreign stock invest- 
ment ( Bloomberg , AFX) 


inevitable.” 

Some dealers are forecasting 
a won-dollar exchange rate in 
the 780 to 7 90 range by the end 
of this year. ' 

South Korea’s central bank, 
winch was maintaining the dol- 
lar’s value at an artificially high 
level to boost exports, has be- 
gun allo wing the dollar to fall to 
cap inflation, analysts said. 

“A fall in - import prices 
means a reduction in produc- 
tion costs,” said Kim Joan 
Kyung of the Korea Develop- 
ment Institute. . 

Officials at the Bank of Ko- 
rea said the won’s rise was not 
motivated by the central bank’s 
policy to fi&it inflation. “We 
have done oar best to let market 

§ riii cdples work,” -said Kim 
ung Min, director of the 
bank’s foreign exchange divi- 
sion. ’The won’s rise was 
prompted largely by expecta- 
tions of dollar supplies m the 
near future.” • 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Rapid Tribute 

HONG KONG — Selling gaming ma- 
chines that never pay out cash won't 
impress lard-wagoring gamblers, but 
Hong Kong-based Radica Games Ltd/s 
rapid growth jnst might, despite a recent 
losing streak. 

With roots in Reno, Nevada — a long- 
time American gambling center — and 
massive new factory space in southern 
China, Radica has been riding high on 
America’s expanding appetite for gam- 
bling, taking a rush of orders for its 
sophisticated toys for adults that mimic 
real casino action without the jackpots. 

“Hong Kong doesn’t understand that 
g a mi ng is not always serious, that in the 
-United States it is done for fun, for 
entertainment,” said Radica’s executive 
vice president, Jim Sutter, explaining the 
company’s move in May to list shares on 
the over-thocotmter market in the Unit- 
ed States. “Besides, the UJS. is our most 
important market” 

Radica’s American executives came to 
Hong Kong to have their machines built 
by others in 198S, deciding to build their 
own factory a few years later. Hong 
Kong’s low corporate tax rate and a tax 
holiday on operations in China, where 
tire company has several thousand em- 
ployees, provided the incentive to stay 
offshore once the profits started to roil 
in. 

Radica’s sales more than tripled in 
1993 and quadrupled in the first half of 
1994. Profit in 1993 hit $9.5 million, with 
marg ins on each, machine- produced edg- 
ing past SO percent. 

A range of 40 games based on black- 
jack, poker, keno and one-armed ban- 
dits, with retail prices of S9.99 to $99.99 
at TJ.S. chain stores such as Target, Wal- 
Mart and Radio Shack, has delivered a 


90 percent market share of the world’s 
n ongflro hHng casino-game market 

That the growth has come in the Unit- 
ed States — where national casino reve- 
nue rose by 45 percent between 1991 and 
1993 and the number of households visit- 
ing a casino rose by 60 percent between 
1990 and 1992 — surprises few punters. 
But Radica’s ability to continue to grow 
at such a efip is no sure bet. 

“It’s the biggest challenge we face right 
now,” said the president and chief execu- 
tive, Robert Davids, once general manag- 
er of a Reno casino and before that, an 


Can the company 
survive if the U.S. 
gambling boom fades? 


executive with the ltt>T fflmTYttng - Tnarhmi» 
maker International Game Technology. 

On Monday, Radica said that third- 
quarter sales mould reach $14 million, a 
45 percent increase from a year earlier 
but much lower than the $21.3 million 
forecast by analysts. 

Tire company’s shares tumbled on the 
announcement and were off $3375 a 
share Monday afternoon at $5,625, com- 
pared with their initial offering price of 
$11. Merrill Lynch cut its rating on the 
stock from “above average” to “neutraL” 

In a research report, Merrill analyst 
Harold Vogel lowered his earnings esti- 
mates to 90 cents a share from a range of 
$1.08 to $1.13 for 1994, and to $1.10 a 
share from a range of $137 to $1.45 in 
1995, according to Bloomberg Business 
News. 

Acknowledging production problems 
at its new factory, Radica said it expect- 


ed fourth-quarter results to match its 
“previous expectations.” 

A key question is whether Radica can 
survive if the US. gambling boom fades. 

“They have demonstrated extraordi- 
nary merchandising and distribution 
abilities,” said Charles Rnnson, publish- 
er of the IPO Value Monitor in New 
York. “They’re selling nongambling 
gambling games now, but they could be 
something else if they had to. I like the 
company, but right now Fm not recom- 
mending it,” added Mr. Ronson, who 
judged its $11 opening price too ambi- 
tions. Ti has inherent risks.” 

Mr. Davids said. The key for us is to 
diversify without taking a step too far.” 
He acknowledged analysts’ concerns 
about Radica' s ability to manage differ- 
ent imes of business. 

To that end, the company is develop- 
ing a range of other games and doubling 
its manufacturing capacity in Chin a. 

Most hand-held games aimed at chil- 
dren feature a challeng e to the player's 
hand-eye coordination. Radica intends 
to specialize on card and other games 
that adults have traditionally played, not 
on small computerized machines. Radica 
also expects to start building machines 
for International Game Technology, 
which designs and manufacturers video 
games, slot machines and gaming moni- 
toring systems and has taken a 9 percent 
stake in the company. 

“They are great at designing and sell- 
ing their machines,” Mr. Davids said of 
his former employe and current share- 
holder. “But manufacturing is a head- 
ache for them. We offer them lower costs 
and a foothold in Asia.” 

At the same time, Radica is preparing 
for a market test of “Pub Poker/Free 
Poker,” a computerized poker tourna- 
ment game. 


Singapore Telecom Opposes U.S. Call-Back Firms 


Raders 

SINGAPORE — Singapore Telecom- 
munications Ltd. said Monday that US. 
carriers operating international call- 
back and cattisg^ard sendees in the 
country were breaking mutual business 
agreements. 

Singapore Telecom saidit had written 
the UlsC carriers to try to resolve the 
dispute rather than resort to legal pro- 

The dispute covers mainly call-back 
services, which allow overseas calls at 
significantly lower rates than Singapore 
Telecom charges. - 

In a callback service, the customer 
dials a number in the United States, lets . 
it ring for an agreed number of times 
and hangs up. The cafl-back company 
uses speaai equipment to call back ana 
provide a US. dial tone, with winch the 


customer can then make calls to the 
United States or elsewhere at reduced 
rates. 

Call-back companies can offer such a 
service economically because they rent 
long-distance capacity from major US. 
carriers such as AT&T Carp, and MCI 
Co mmuni c ati ons Corp. at favorable 
rates. 

According to the Business Times 
newspaper, a company based in Iowa 
called USA Global link is offering calls 
from Singapore to the United States at 
70 percent less than Singapore Telecom 
charge and calls to Japan at about half- 
price. 

“The reason why refilers can offer 
such competitive rales is because they 
do not have to invest in costly telecom- 
munications infrastructure,” Singapore 
Telecom said. “Neither do they have the 


obligation to provide a universal service. 
Over the last decade, we have spared no 
effort in molding and building Singa- 
pore into a regional tdecormnumcations 
hub.” 

Calling cards, also known as “call 
home direct” services, allow customers 
to dial the United States from anywhere 
and deal directly with a US. operator. 

This service is less of a threat to Singa- 
pore Telecom, as the rates are generally 
higher than its own direct-dial charges, 
and the company offers its own calling- 
card service for citizens going abroad. 

The Business Times said U.S. carriers 
had a total of around 1,000 subscribers 
in Singapore for their calling cards. 

■ Vietnam Upgrade 

Vietnam plans to. spend at least $1 
bQHon by the end of the century to 



upgrade telecommunications in Ho Chi 
Mmh City, The Associated Press said 
Monday from Hanoi, quoting an official 
report 

An influx of foreign investors and 
rising incomes among the city’s resi- 
dents have increased the demand for 
regular and mobile telephones and fac- 
simile service. 

Ho Chi Minh City now has about 
150,000 telephones for its population of 
more than d million. The government 
plans next year to increase the number 
of regular telephones to 240,000, mobile 
phones to 14,000 and electronic pagers 
to 200,000, according to the report 

An increasing number of foreign tele- 
communications companies, such as 
Telstra Crap, of Australia and Motorola 
Inc. of the United States, have estab- 
lished themselves in Vietnam. 


Sou r ces: Reuters, AFP liueniuwial Herald Tribe* 


Very briefly 


• STAR-TV, the Asian satellite television broadcaster, said it. 
acquired pay-television rights to 98 movies from New York-based 
Orion Pictures Corp. 

• Japan and the United States are expected to resume trade talks 
on Japanese government procurement Thursday in Washington. 

• Nissan Motor Co. a Japanese auto maker, said it would start 
buying airbag components from TRW Inc. for use on the Sentra 
model It makes in the United States. 

• Japan's agency for small and medium-sized businesses said 60 
percent of the small exporters it surveyed reported they could not 
make a profit when the dollar was below 1 10 yen. 

• Larsen & Tonbro LtiL, one of India’s largest companies, whose 
interests range from engineering to cement, plans to raise $150 
million through an issue of global depository receipts. 

• Kobe Steel Ltd. of Japan said it would set up a venture to make 
construction machinery in southwestern China in October. 

■Japanese car production in the first half of 1994 was down 10.8 
percent from the like period in 1993, an industry association said. 

• Sea-Land Orient LttL, a container shipping tine, said it formed a 

joint venture with Shanghai Port Comprehensive Development 
Corp. to operate a container depot and trucking operations in 
Shanghai. Bhombetfr Kmgfu-Ridder, AFP, AFX, Reuters 


Hong Kong Plans 5-Year Note 

Bloomberg Business New 

HONG KONG — The Hong Kong government may sell its 
first five-year security before the end of the year, following on the 
success of its three-year note Monday. 

The Hong Kong equivalent of a central banker, Joseph Yam, 
made the prediction after investors responded enthusiastically to 
a 500 million Hong Kong dollar ($64 million) sale of three-year 
notes, the first debt issue with a maturity date beyond July 1, 1997. 

The average price tendered for the notes was 100.43 dollars. The 
notes pay 6.95 percent 


They’d have a 
better chance 


if they 

were 


en 





World outrage has brought some 
of the rarest endangered species 
back from the brink of extinction. 

An even greater world outcry is 
needed if cbe Yanomami Indians of 
northern Brazil are not to disappear 
altogether from the face of the Earth. 

Over 2,000 of their people have 
died in cbe last four years as a direct 
result of encroachment upon their 
land by illegal miners. 

Their rainforest home has turned 
into a living hell since large deposits 
of gold, tin and other minerals 
were discovered on their land in 1987. 

Although a park was created 
in 1992 covering all Yanomami 
lands in Brazil, it has not stopped 
the continuing invasion of gold 
prospectors. 

If all this has not been legal, 
neither has it been peaceful. 

Recently, at least 16 Yanomami 
were hacked to death in a brutal 
massacre. The miners cat off their 
heads with machetes. Some of those 
killed included children. 

Thousands of others have died 
of malaria, tuberculosis, venereal 
disease and other diseases brought 
by the invaders and to which they 
have no immunity. 

Mercury effluents from cbe mining 
have poisoned the rivers, killing the 
fish and destroying their water supply. 

The Yanomami have become 
completely disoriented, their whole 
world has been turned upside down. 

Pushed to the brink of despair, 
the tribe recently recorded the first 
case of suicide in their history. 

If you read on, the mother and 
child on the left may still escape the 
free of the dodo. 

Survival International is firmly 
committed to seeing that they do. 

It was founded in 1969 out of 
concern at the worsening plight of 
the Yanomami and South America’s 
other rainforest Indians. 

It is today z worldwide movement 
which helps tribal peoples protect 
their lands, environment and way 
of life from destructive outside 
interference. 

It stands for their rights to the 
lands they live on and use, and their 
right to decide their own future. 

We have prevented dam building 
projects in India and Guyana that 
would have submerged the lands of 
10,000 and 4,500 people respectively. 

WeVe persuaded Scott Paper to 
pull out of a project in West Papua, 


NOW TO ACT 


POLITICIAN* Of! £N 


BELIEVE THAT EVERY 


LETTER THEY RECEIVE 


RE PRES ENT 6 THE VIEWS 


OF SEVERAL HUNDRED 


OTHER PEOPLE WHO ro 


NOT TAKE THE TROUBLE 


TO WRITE r- BY 5PENDMG 


A FEW MINUTES WRITING 


TO THE PRESIDENT OF 


BRAZIL AND TO THE 


GOVERNOR OF RORAJMA 


EXPRESSING YOUR 


BRAZIL 


CUIPUMEE WRITE 


IN ENGLISH OR 


N YOUR OWN 


LANGUAGE BE 


BRIEF |T IS VERY 


IMPORTANT TO BE 



CONCERN. YOU WILL BE 


TAKING VERY EFFECTIVE 


ACTION TO HELP THE 


YANOMAMI INDIANS :> 


THEIR SITUATION IS 


CRITICAL YOUR VOICE 


18 ESSENTIAL TO SHOW 


THAT THERE IS 


INTERNATIONAL 


CONCERN FOR THE 


INVASION OF THEIR LAND 


:> THE ADDRESS IS 


EXMO SR ITAIIAR 


FRANCO. PRESIDENTS 


DA REPUBliCA. 


PALASIO DO 


PLANALTO. TO ISO 


BRASILIA OF. BRAZIL. 


AND E Jf M O SR 


OTTOMAR PINTO. 


A L A C I Q BO 


GOVERNADOR. BOA 


vista, q o n-A i m a . 


POLITE. NO MATTER 


HOW STRONGLY 


YOU FEEL A BOUT 


THE ISSUE 


MAKE THESE POINTS 


:• THE BRAZILIAN 


GOVERNMENT 


MUST UPHOLD AND 



thus preserving the ancient rainforest 
homes of 15,000 people. 

Survival International is 
independent of all governments and 
political parties and is not funded 
by any. 

Right now. the most pressing 
item on our agenda is the campaign 
to save the Yanomami Indians. 

Firstly, we have to get the 
Brazilian Government to guarantee 
their right to their lands. 

Then we have to ensure that 
no mining or other development 
takes place on it without the 
Indians' agreement. 

But there is just so much chat we 
can do on out own, and our resources 
are severely limited. 

That is why we need every man. 
woman and child in the world 
to lend us their voice so that we 
can pressure the powers responsible 
for the oppression to bring about 
positive changes. 

You can help by becoming a 
member of Survival International. 
The more members we have, the 
louder our voice and the more likely 
ir will be heard. 

You can also help by sending ns 
a donation. Your contribution, 
however small, will ensure that the 
pressure is sustained and the work 
can go on. It will fund emergency 
medical aid and other urgenr projects. 

Another effective means of 
lobbying for change is ro have as 
many people in the world as possible 
write letters to press for action. 
(Details on how to go about doing 
this are on the sidebar to the right 
of this ad.) 

All the Yanomami want is for 
their land rights to be respected. And 
to give their children a chance to live 
and grow up on their land in peace. 

Not in a manner chosen for 
rhem. But in their own way. 

I 

| Name: 


1 I entire a cheque/pewl order for £15 1 ' £5 i ! (concessionary) ! 

| Pkasf charge my Access/Vaa/Muterard ttx I I 1 1 1 I I ) ) J I I I 1- 1 1~^3 l~ 1 ~ 1 j 

I I 

| Signature: _ Expiry datf — ... , ... — ] 

I SunrivaURh j 

| Send to; Survival, 310 Edgwan Road, London W2IDY.U.K. ] 


GUARANTEE THE 


YANOMAMI INDIANS 


LAND RIGHTS ALL THE 


ILLEGAL MINERS ON 


THEIR LAND SHOULD BE 


REMOVED IMMEDIATELY 


THEY SHOULD ENSURE 


THAT NO MINING 


OR ANY OTHER 


DEVELOPMENT TAMES 


PLACE WITHOUT THE 


AGREEMENT OF THE 


YANOMAMI INDIANS. 


MANY SURVIVAL LETTER 


CAMPAIGNS HAVE 
SUCCEEDED IN THE 


PACT PLEASE HELP 


FanBdnl WW. FNadrat Rnhilt LWntry.Tmiwti O.R.E. IhrKur tidKnt Mtf*LU Cum KcjrhctcV iViih 
CA mjuuy koBABrion 1 1 15 * 3 1 7 TVt H?| 7 >l PuC 1171 7 Z.I AW. 


-J 









































































Ly I±SjD 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY^ JULY 26, 1994 


Page 15 







































































rage 16 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. JULY 26. 1994, 


SPORTS 



OnaTrip Out West, 
Yankees Outpace 
Foes in the East 


The /issocio&d Pres* 

An amazing trip out Westhas 
widened the gap between the 
New York Yankees and the rest 
of the East. 

New York completed its 
most successful West Coast 
road trip in dub history Sunday 
when Don Mattingly hit a 
three-run. pinch-hit homer in 


Hoiles, and Henderson scored 
on a head-first slide just ahead 
toEichhc 


jom. 


AL ROUNDUP 


the ninth, giving the Yankees a 
6-4 victoty over the California 
Angels. 

When New York embarked 
on its West Coast swing on July 
14, the Yankees led Baltimore 
by one-half game. They now 
lead the Orioles by 516 games 
following a hard-to-believe 10- 1 
road trip. 

‘This is what makes it all 
worthwhile,” said Jim Abbott, 
who pitched eight inning s and 
figured to be the loser before 
Mattingly’s homer. “To go 10-1 
on a trip is difficult to do. At a 
time like this, you push atten- 
tion away from yourself. It's a 
team thing.” 

Among the highlights: 

• A seven-run ninth inning 
rally to beat Seattle in the first 
game of the trip. 

• The next night the Yan- 
kees rallied for two runs with 
two outs in the ninth before 
winning in 11 innings. 

• Mattingly collected his 
2,000th career hit on Saturday 
and made No. 2,00] unique 
among them. 

Mattingly, who was making 
his first pinch-hitting appear- 
ance this season, had six previ- 
ous pinch hits in his career, but 
never a home run. 

Mark Langston held the Yan- 
kees to six hits in eight innings. 
With one out in the ninth, Mike 
Stanley singled off Langston, 
who walked Jim Leyritz and was 
replaced by Joe Grahe. 

Grahe’s wild pitch moved up 
Stanley and pinch-runner Luis 
Polonia. Mattingly, called on to 
pinch-hit for the first time this 
season, lined a 2-2 fastball into 
the right-field seats far his sixth 
homer. Mattingly is 7-for-27 as 
a pinch-hitter during his career. 

Athletics 7, Orioles 6: Rickey 
Henderson scored on Mark 
Eichhom’s wild pitch with two 
outs in the ninth as Oakland 
rallied from six runs down to 
overcome visiting Baltimore. 

The Orioles led 6-0 after six 
innings before the A's began 
their comeback on Mark 
McGwire’s two-run homer in 
the seventh. Oakland tied it in 
the eighth on a three-run homer 
by Scott Hemond, who re- 
placed Terry Steinbach when he 
was ejected for arguing. 

The A's loaded the bases in 
the ninth against Tom Bolton, 
who was replaced by Eichhom. 
After getting a forccoui at the 
plate and with Ruben Sierra up, 
Eichbora bounced a pitch that 
rolled behind catcher Chris 


of Hoiles’s throw 

Twins 10, Brewers 6: Kirby 
Puckett’s two-run homer high- 
lighted Minnesota’s five-run, 
seventh-inning rally in Milwau- 
kee. 

Puckett drove in four runs, 
Kent Hrbek hit a three-run 
homer and Chuck Knoblauch 
scored four runs for the Twins. 

In earlier games, reported 
Monday in some editions of the 
Herald Tribune: 

White Sox 4, Indians 2: In 
Cleveland, Julio Franco ho- 
mered and drove in three runs 
and Alex Fernandez cooled off 
the Indians as Chicago won the 
final meeting this season be- 
tween the AL Central leaders. 

Blue Jays 4, Rangers h To- 
ronto won its eighth straight 
despite getting just four hits to 
complete a four-game sweep of 
visiting Texas. 

Brad Cornett got his first ma- 
jor-league victory for the two- 
time defending World Series 
champions, now 7-0 at home 
since the All-Star break. 

Red Sox 8, Mariners 2: Mike 
Green well went 4-for-5 with a 
homer and John Valentin drove 
in three runs to lead Roger 
Clemens and the Red Sox past 
Sea trie in Boston. 

Boston and the Mariners split 
the four-game series, which was 
moved to Boston because of fall- 
ing ceiling tiles in the Kingdome 


Boston collected 16 hits to bade 
Clemens, who allowed five hits 
in seven innings. 

Royals 6, Tigers 4: In De- 
troit, Kansas City’s Jose Deje- 
sus pitched five innings to gain 
his first major-league victory in 
nearly three years. 

Dejesus, called up from Tri- 
ple-A Omaha on July 16, won 
for the first time since Aug. 31, 
1991. when he pitched in the 
Philadelphia Phillies’ KM vic- 
tory over Atlanta. 


Story of the Indians 


Fast 


By Murray Chass 

New York Tima Sendee 

CLEVELAND — Ozzie 
Guillen, the loquacious short- 
stop of the Chicago White Sox, 
perhaps put the weekend series 


in the proper perfective. 


“If we go on 5 trike,” Guillen 
said midway through the four- 
game series between the White 
Sox and the Cleveland Indi- 
ans, “they’re going to f< 
about this series. If we 
you think anybody is going to 
say, You remember that series 
in Cleveland?’ ” 

The series, however, had its 
significance for the moment. 
After the second 2-2 split be- 


tween the teams the past two 

: Sox know 


weekends, the White ! 


these new-fangled Indians will 
ear Iron 


not disappear from the Ameri- 
can League Central race. 

If, on the other hand, the 
Indians are in first place and 
the players strike and the play- 
offs are wiped out, the Indians 
and their championship- 
starved fans will be devastat- 
ed. The Indians have never 
won a division championship 
in 25 years of division play; 
the Indians haven’t won a pen- 
nant since 1954. 

“You could write a book 
about this team's history, and 
that would be a pan of it,” 
Sandy Alomar Jr., their ami- 
able catcher, said of a possible 
strike. “The way this team’s 
history has gone, that’ll proba- 
bly happen?’ 

Dennis Martinez, new to the 
Indium this season, Iris 18th in 
the major leagues, said he nev- 
er has given any credence to 
the idea of fate ruling some- 
one's destiny. But . . . 

“I don’t believe in those 
kind of things,” he said, sitting 
on one side of the spacious 
home clubhouse in orand- 
spankutg-new Jacobs Field in 
downtown Cleveland. “But 
they lost those two guys and 
then lost another one after the 
season. I never thought about 
fh <r£g thing s when I signed 
with them.1 thought they had 
a good ball dub and needed 
some pitching to help them 


win it Now there could be a 
strike. There’s something go- 
ing on there. I don’t know 
what it is.” 

Whatever is going on, it also 
indudes a Sudani siege of crit- 
ical injuries and a bit of cork. 

Carlos Baerga, their good- 
hitting second baseman, was 
on a torrid hitting streak when 
he severely sprained his right 
ankle last Tuesday night He 
missed the entire White Sox 
series. The next night, Marie 
Clark, the team’s biggest win- 
ner with 1 1 victoriesToroke his 
right wrist He won’t pitch 
again, at the earliest until Sep- 
tember — if there are games m 
September. 

Unless be can present a con- 
vincing case at a bearing Fri- 
day, Albert Belle will xmss 10 
days in August the result of 
bang caught aflegedlyusing a 
bat filled with cork. The cork 
incident controversial from 
the White Sox angle as well as 
Belle’s, developed in the Chi- 
cago part of the home-and- 
bome series and served as a 
subplot when the teams played 
here the past four days. 

The series ended Sunday 
with the White Sox winning, 4- 
2, as Julio Franco drove in three 
runs and Alex Fernandez de- 
fused the offense that scored 25 
runs in the first three games. 

This series followed the 
same pattern as last weekend’s 
series.* The White Sox won the 
first and fourth games, the In- 
dians the middle two. The only 
difference is that a week ago 
the Indians held a two-per- 
centage-pcrint lead and now 





Tony DqakTOK Asmasud Pr. . 

Mike LaVaffiere was late with the tag, and Tony Pena scored for Oevdand, but the White Sox came out on top, 4*2. 


standpoint, it keeps die team 
going.” 

The series created such ex- 


,i,_, ' "j _____ v-i,:— j iik acura uouim tuut.w 

unnersn sesmkms 

consecutive sellout, exceeded 
the new stadium’s opening day 


game 

the series probably was Friday 
night’s 9-8 decision in favor of 
the Indians, 

“ People don’ t realize the im- 
portance of ibis game in this 
series,” Mike Hargrove, the 
Indians’ manager, said after 
his hitters slugged six homers, 
three by third baseman Jim 
Thome. “This was a very im- 
portant game. It’s the differ- 
ence between four out and two 
out. From the confidence 


young 

Lof- 


crowd of 41,459. 

With a 

players in Belle, Kenny 
ton, Baerga, Omar VizqueL, 
Manny Ramir ez, Alomar and 
Thome, the Indians are ex- 
ceeding the plans of John 
Hart/the general manager and 
architect of these Indians. 
“We looked at thb year as a 


breakthrough year,” said Hart, 
standing behind the batting 
cage during batting practice, 
“meaning we’re going to break 
through .500 and hopefully be 
ready to compete. It you can 
get to the point where we can 
compete, dun you have- a 
chance to contend at a certain 
punt To me, it’s notnll about 
*94. But now we sit in July in 
die heat of a pennant race with 
a damn good ball dub and 
recognizing we’re going to try 
to win it this year, bin at the 
same time believing we’re go- 
ing to have a chance to com- . 
pete is *95, ’96, *97 and so on.” 


The fans, whose presence is 
testimony to the lnmans’ status 
as contenders, did not treat the 
White Sox kindly this weekend. 
By booms Manager Gene La- 
ment ana the pitching coach, 
Jackie Brown, they expressed 
their displeasure at Lamonfs 
action in asking the umpires to 
check BeDe’s bit inCtocaga. 


for the allegedly corked bat . 

Perhaps knowing how their 
dub operated in Chicago, the. 
White Sox brought tiuoo sum 
rity guards and posted theft m 
their clubhouse in Cleveland 


proved, is that White Stax per- 
sonnel made an after-hours 
visit to the Indians’ clubhouse 
at Contiskey Park die night 
Belle hit a home run and 
checked his bats. It was the 
next night that Lament called 


-Hargrove did not find the 
episode amusing. 

“While I don’t condone the 
idea of doing that, Tm not af- 
proving ^disapproving it“ — . 
mrimig a bat — “but the 
game’s bigger than what’s sur- 
rounding this,” he said, “lx's 
time to move .an. Let Albert 
have his appeal and go from 
there. Tm real tired of it alL'" 


The Races Are On: In 3 Key Series, 6 Teams Are Looking Out for No. 1 


■fi 


The Associated Pros 

All at once, the National League 
races are getting interesting. 

This week, San Frandsoo’s Darryl 
Strawberry will face his forma team 
when the Los Angeles Dodgers come 
to Candlestick Park. The Atlanta 


NL ROUNDUP 


we’re not sure if we’re going to get a 
full season in. This is a perfect script, 
a positive situation.” 

San Francisco improved to 12-2 
with Strawberry by defeating the 
New York Mets, 8-6, on Sunday in 
New York. The Giants closed to 
within 116 games of NL West-leading 
Los Angeles, which lost its fifth in a 
row with a 7-3 lass in Montreal 


The players union, is to set a strike 
date on Thursday. 


McGriff. singled, O’Brien homered 


Barry Bonds was the star for the 
Giants on Sunday at Shea Stadium 
on his 30th birthday. He drove in 
three runs, including a two-out, two- 
run single m the eighth inning that 
rallied the 


off the left-field foul pole. 

1: Jeff Bagwdl 


Giants to a 7-6 lead. 

8, Cardinals 5: Charlie 


Braves will be trying to catch die 
visiting Montreal Expos. The Cincin- 
nati Reds will be trying to hold off 
Houston at home. 

All three sets start Monday, all 
with first place at stake. 

“Fm looking forward to the series 
after this long road trip, and Fm no 
more concerned that it’s the Dodgers 
than if it were any other team,” 
Strawberry said. “It’s important to be 
playing a team in first place since 


The Expos, meanwhile, won their 
sixth straight and have surged IK 
games ahead of Atlanta in the NL 
East. The Braves beat St Louis, 8-5. 


Cincinnati’s lead over Houston in 
the NL Central is down to one game. 
The Reds lost 
the Astros routed 


Braves 

O’Brien and Jose Oliva hit three-run 
homers to lead Atlanta in St Louis. 

Tom Glavine won for the fourth 
time in his last five starts despite 
allowing 12 hits in 7tt innings. 

O'Brien’s homer, his seventh. 


Astras 13, Pirates 
hit two homers and drove in five runs 
and Craig Biggio had a grand slam as 
the Astros romped past Pittsburgh in 
Houston. 

The Astros won three times in the 
four-game series, outscoring Pitts- 
burgh 38-11. Bagwdl leads the ma- 
jors with 98 RBu. He has 32 home 
runs, with 20 of them at the Astro- 
dome; breaking the tingle-season re- 
cord of 18 set by Lee May in 1974. 


mistakenly hdd the. ball in censer 
field earlier in the game, drew a walk, 
in the ninth from WiIHe Blair. Shef- 
field followed with his 22d home run: 


Ctalw 


In earlier game s, reported Mondtp 
etieral ‘ 


in some editions of the Herald Tribune : 

Partes 3: Danny Jack- 


son stopped San Diego for seven in- . 
rings, and Philadelphia wan at home. 

Jackson gave up two runs and five 
hits; striking out seven and wanting 
none. But he hit Craig Shipley in the 
leg with a pitch in me first inning, 
ami later admitted he was anpy that 


3t Beds flb Jim Builinger 
niching in place of ailing Steve 
Trachacl, shut out Cincinnati for 
eight imtingsin Chicago. 

BaQinger gave up five hits in nis 
seventh start of the season. He has 
made 23 rcKrf appearances. Traensei 
was sidelined by a blister. 


defl 


Expos 7, Dodgers 4: Rookie Ron- 
sH White drove in seven runs end 


Mariks 6, Rockies 4: Gary Shef- Shipley toed to steal a base, in the 



The pennant races have taken on 
extra urgency because no one knows 
bow much longer the season will last- 


inning began with St Loms leading 
in David 


1-0, but Ryan Klesko drove in D&\ 
Justice with a single. After Fred 


field was 5-Jor-5 with a two-run 
homer in the ninth that lifted Florida 
in Denver. 

Sheffield had tirefirst five-hit game 
of his career and tied the team record 
set by Quick Carr last season. 

Carr, who had been 0-for-4 and 


ninth inning Saturday with the Pa- 
dres ahead 7-1. 

Lenny Dykstra, playing for the 
second time since nussmg 30 games . 
because of an appendectomy, went 1- 
for-3 with a walk, a stolen base and a 
run scored for the Frillies. 


Montreal completed a three-game 
sweep of visiting Los Angeles. 

White went 4-for-5 with a three-, 
run homer, a two-run double anti Jt 
pair of RBI tingles. He also strut*, 
oat with the bases loaded. 

White, 22, bad started only 10 
times this season as a backup out- 
fielder to Marquis Grissom, Moises 
Alou and Larry Walker. He was bav. ! 
**"• .255 with no homers and four 
in 51 at-hats. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


r/:^ 



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DEPENDABLE AND RELIABLE 

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LAST NIGHT MY SUPPER. 
UJA5 ELEVEN SECONDS LATE ‘ 


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Hallowed Ground in Scotland \ a Bit of Golf Heaven on Earth 


‘ The Associated Press 

.FIFE, Scotland — Playing the golf courses of 
M£ten] Scotland is a bit Eke sampling single malt - 
Scotch whiskies: Each has its own heavenly' flav or, 
essence and quality. And each can dehaht the senses 
or make one’s head spin. 

• Here, in the very region where the gany * originat- 
ed. golfers of even* stripe can be in toxica tedlwthe 


precision of Naim, the character of Cruden Bay, the 
. prutish strength of Carnoustie, the charm of GuIIane 
North Berwick, and the ancient splendor of The 
Old Course at St Andrews. 

. Intoxicating indeed. 

• And all these courses — accessible to the public—- 
- have the added spice of features that can turn 

*= P sS;t a nS^“ ' y ^ yed * 

Consider these characteristics encountered on a 
^ recent trip: 

‘ • Breathtaking vistas where the sea laps against 
land, and course layouts cut through high dunes that 

. j^tSfidds ^ qufll-Bke P atcbes of buttercups and 

' • Dangers that devour wayward shots, such as 
sharp-faced bunkers, thigh-deep Heather and gnarly 


gprse thick enough to house rabbits, pheasants and 
other wild critters. 

• Undulating greens that are so huge (one double 
great at Si. Andrews is an acre and a half, or about 
.6 hectares) that putts of 150 feet (45 meters) or more 
are not unheanfof. 

. . • Local Tides that permit a drop without penalty 
from a rabbit burrow or a horse’s hoof print, but 
require a shot to be played from pebbly roads. 

• And, of course, the fiddeScottish weather, with 
misty rains, winds that gust and reverse directions 
sometimes between shots, and meteorological mys- 
teries that can turn shirtsleeve calm into heavy- 
sweater chill in midround. It's posable to experience 
all four seasons in a four-hour round. 

Start with SL Andrews, the holiest of holies, the 
world's oldest golf course, the sacred ground where 
die game has been played since before Columbus 
encountered a world unknown to Europeans. 

. In the. 24 British. Open Championships played 
here (1995 with be the 25th), the best golfers in the 
world have hit into the wind on the 370-yard (340- 
meter) opening hole and failed to reach the green 
with then two biggest shots. 

'Yet, bn a mOd day, a rank amateur can reach it- 
with a three-wood over Grannie. .Clark's Wynd (a 
pedestrian walkway to the beach that cots across Lbe 


opening and dosing holes) and a sand wedge to the 
green over the SwQcan Burn (the Scottish name for 


The Old Course’s most charming feature is its age. 
lbe same terrain has been negotiated by ancient 
shepherds using balls and dubs made entirely of 

The same terrain has been 
negotiated by ancient shepherds 
using balls and dubs made 
entirely of wood and modern-day 
players striking balata balls with 
space-age graphite shafts. 

wood and modem-day players striking batata balls 
with space-age graphite shafts. 

like most links courses, the layout chose itself. 
It's the one finger of earth between beach and plow 
land on which the game could be played. Grazing 
sheep dipped the fairways short and found shelter in 
depressions that evolved into the first bunkos. 

A walk over this terrain puts you in the footprints 


of the game’s immortals. Old and Young Tom Mor- 
ris. Harry Vartion, Bobby Jones, Palmer, Nicklaus 
and countless others have trod the fairways. 

Heaven, though, also has its Hell. Literally. Hell 
the name of a bunker on the par-5 14tb hole; once 
had a 15-step ladder so its victims could descend 
into the abyss. 

It is no longer as deep. But if you get pressed up 
against the front face, and you have no room to play 
right or left, your caddie is likely to say something 
like, “You'll never get out.” Is that not the definition 
of eternal damnation? (One solution: take a penalty 
stroke for an unplayable lie, drop in the back of the 
bunker, blast out and pray for a double bogey.) 

So topLay Si. Andrews — which also has bunkers 
called Coffins and Graves and a swale at the 18th 
green called the Valley of Sin — or anywhere in 
Scotland, the first lesson you learn is to hit the 
fairways. 

Scores get as fat as a Scottish hog if an errant shot 
finds the heather, gorse or bunkers. 

Take Carnoustie, for example, a 7.000-yard brute 
given added bite in the cold, wind and rain. 

One lost soul in the thick, wet rough bludgeoned 
away at a ball and looking like a chap digging up a 
sewer pipe. The ball just sunk deeper and deeper and 
deeper after three whiffs. 


Still, the same humbled duffer birdied the 524- 
yard, par 5 No. 6, rated the hardest hole at Carnous- 
tie, on which Ben Hogan could only make par in 
four rounds in his only British Open appearance and 
victory in 1953. Go Figure. 

Golf in Scotland requires shots not normally 
needed elsewhere — low knockdowns, bump-and- 
nms, putting onto the green from 50 yards away and 
learning to heed the advice of the caddy. 

Ah, the caddie. 

Motorized carts are almost unheard of in Scot- 
land, so the caddie is the traditional method of 
lugging around the bag, finding errant shots and 
reading the greens. 

Caddies are also an endless source of amusement 

When told that a golfer vowed to drown himself in 
the burn if he didn't start playing better, a ruddy- 
faced caddie deadpanned: “I dunna think ya km 
keep your head down long enough to accomplish the 

Another golfer hit every club in his bag in a vain 
attempt to escape a bunker. When asked what he 
should take now, his caddie replied: “Take the 4: 15 
train home.” 

But don’t neglect to take borne a slice of heaven, 
too. 


SIDELINES ■ . . 

' Barcelona Signs Hagi to 2- Year Deal 

* BARCELONA (AF) — The Ro manian World Cup star 
Gheorghe Hagi agreed Monday to a two-year contract with FC 
Barcelona, joining a roster that includes Romano of Brazil Hristo 

. Stoitchkov of Bulgaria and Ronald Koeman of the Netherlands. 

- Hagi who has played for Brescia in the Italian league since the 
. fall of 1992, will join the dub on Aug. 1. A misunderstanding 

about tax payments in Hagi’s contract, reported to be worth about 
$ 1 million a year, forced the collapse of negotiations when Hagi 
. arrived in Barcelona on Friday for an exam by team doctors, said 
a team spokesman. The spokesman said Hagi had believed his 
payment would be tax free. 

- Hagi, 29, scored three goals and led Romania to the World Cup 
quarterfinals, where it lost to Sweden in a penalty shootout He 
replaces the Danish forward Michael Laudrup, who left Barcelona 
at the end of the season. 

Boxer Dies After Bout in Las Vegas 

; LAS VEGAS (AP) — Wangila Napunyi a 1988 Olympic 
* boxing gold medalist from Kenya, died Sunday from a head injury 
sustained during a fight two days earlier. He was 26. 

Napunyi was on life support with injuries from a blood clot on 

— the right side of his head when he died at a Las Vegas hospital 
Napunyi was fighting David Gonzales of Houston in a scheduled 
10-round. welterweight bout Friday night at the Aladdin Hotel 

— when the referee stopped the bout, won by Gonzales. Napunyi 
collapsed 30 minutes later in his dressing room. 

'-7 Dr. Robert Voy, a ringside physician for the Nevada Athletic 
Commission, attended to Napunyi after the fight He said the 
fighter had been “very alert” and had “responded normally” 

Tour Rider’s Earnings Go to Rwanda 

PARIS (AP) — Richard Yirenque of France, the fifth-place 
• firm her in the Tour de France cycling race, has pledged to turn 
over his 250.000 francs (545,800) in prize money to a French relief 
agency helping Rwandan refugees. . 

Virenque also announced Sunday that he would auction his. 
bicycle and polka-dotted jersey, awarded to the race’s best climb- 
er,and give the proceeds to relief for Rwanda. His earnings will go 
to the group Doctors Without Benders. 

For the Record 

Kenny Perry shot a bogey-free final round of 65 to win the New 
England Classic by one stroke over David Feherty in Sutton, - 
Massachusetts. Perry finished at 16-under-par 268 for his second 
career victory. Feherty closed with a 67. (Reuters) 

Quotable 

• Charles Bremner. writing in the Times of London on the 
three- week Tour de France: It “may be the only event that lasts 
longer than an English Test cricket match, but as far as the 
spectator is concerned it takes about 45 seconds, the time for a 
gang of hunched, sweatingmen in Lycra shorts to whiz past in a 
blur of corporate logos. Bend down to uncork your bottle of 
BrOuilly and you have missed them.” 




Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
EUDMdM 

W t Pet 

New York M 36 JOS 

Balilmore 54 41 -5M 

Boston 47 50 4® 

T pronto 47 50 4B5 

Oil-oil 43 55 A39 

Jy CdMTCd DtwMoa 

- uSto 59 38 .*58 

Cleveland 54 30 -®9 

Kansas City 51 <7 St Q 

Minnesota 46 51 ADA 

Milwaukee 45 S3 A99 

Was! Dhrtstoa 
7 eras 46 82 

Oakland « 54 449 

CnWomte 42 50 *30 

Seattle 40 56 .*17 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Dfvtstoa 

w l pa. 

Montreal 40 37 -*19 

Atlanta 59 39 MO 

PWiedefisWo 47 n AK 

New York 45 SZ M* 

Florida 45 53 -4S9 

Central Division 


Cincinnati 
Houston 
Pittsburgh 
51. LOUIS 
CWOMW 

Las Angeles 
San Francisco 
Colorado 
SoflDtoSC 


57 40 
57 43 
44 51 
44 51 
43 53 
westDtvtskM 
48 SB 
47 52 
47 53 
39 61 


Sunday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
The Associated Pr ess 

-Seicher. 7-H Sv— Montgomery 
; B _Ko B »CHY.Homelir.l^ 

.- W , ih ei» Bw—a r - 

511 Mt J* 8 
GHnatsis. T. Dovls in- 
?i. J. nelson 18) one 

toksas ID. K. Rvan <91 O'* Berr¥tun.w-» 
n^juS-t L _GilnoWs.frl. HRS-Oosw*. Jn- 
8, , Greeny tm. ^ # , 

1» W0 "*-4 4 1 
Pavlik. Oliver 18) ond 1 Sodrfcuy- 
.asiJHof7),Co» 

■2 L-Pooll*. I-i Sv— CO* 13) NR-Tonmta. 

883 OBI WO-? 9 J 
600 820 >00-3 6 • 

IS i^Va. F8HWMO. 

. Sv-R. Hernandez <K» nR-cmero 
-nnm H7>. „ w g 

AteBWOM “J ”L , » I 

miwiiitrr HO "0) “"T. 

X'SiMWSEK 

IBs— Mi I won* oe. T. «W# «>. ■)#. Vownwi 


(91. Minnesota. Pockeff <171. Hrfrefc <71, Wto- 
Held 118). 

New York ON 883 8N-4 W 2 

c a t H omio too ten w-t i i 

Abbott. Howe (V) and Leyrftz, Stanley <91; 
Langston. Grebe (9), NL Litter (9) and Turner. 

W— Abbott. 8-7. L— Grot*. 2-5. Sv— How* (12). 
HRS -new Yerfc MoiO/mt* W. CMitonia 
Hinder IB), Snow Ml. D o f c n dro til. 
BaUawre W fit 088-4 U « 

Oakfaml 8M BN 211-7 18 1 

Moyer, Milts <11, T. Botkin 19), EkMnm (9) 
and Holla; 8. WltlHorsnan (3), Brtacne (4), 
vorirng U}^ere(7),Leiper W.Eekeraky (9) 
andStefriboCh. Heraond fW.W— EttarsJey^M. 
L— T. Button, >-2.HR»-OokknL McGwire (9), 
Ketnand <21. BaBimwe. oevereaux <9). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Ste Meeo 8N 8N 2W-8 18 1 

PWMMMMO » 881 *fcP-S B 8 

Ashby, PA Martinez 17). Brecon (8) and 
AiSMt; On. Jaeksan. stecomb <8L O. Jems 
<81 and Pratt. W— On. Joefcsotv IX 
L— Asbby, 4-10. Sv— a Janes (26>. 
dodeoatt Me m a-i s i 

CUa«0 M IN 700-3 3 « 

Schourek. Service (7) and Ooraott; But- 
HmrJdven (7)and Parent w— Bui nm»*r,5- 
2. L — ScSiourek. 5-2. Sy— Myers (30). 
los Angela IN » <**-* « l 

Maatreai w* “ •»*-» « 1 

Ki. Gross. Seanez <57. DaU 16). MOTowell 
(6), Got! (7) ond Pfazzo; Rueter. Herecfia <61. 
wstteland U1 andDL PMtdwr. W— Ruster.6- 
Z L— K*- Gras*. 7-7. Stf-WWWand 418). 
HRs— Montreal. R- WWte til. Los AnsMes. 
Karras 19), M. Webster (4), C Gwyttn <21. 
5ae F n sncU co *18 ON GN-8 W 1 

Hn York om *n »-* 8 i 

Black. Burba <77, Mmrlsleonv <7), Gomez 
(U.BeckiUietdJS. Reed; Briones, J.Manzo- 
nlBa (8), Franco n),GundemA (91 andSttiv- 
nett. HuntflSY <6L W-MonleMono, >2. L-J. 
Mattonflta, 5-3. 9v— Bet* ftJ). HRs— New 
York. Hundley <151. Undcman (SL 
P BUbm U i 9M oa 1M— l 3 a 

Houston BN 153 Ex-13 11 0 

Utter. R. Mectzanlllo (6). Dewey (8) and ; 
Kile, Hudefc («. W— XUe. 7-A L-Ueber,M 
HRs— Houston. Btgain M). Bagwell 2 (32). 
Florida 8M « 803-6 14 2 

Cetorado » Ml BOO-4 » 0 

Gardner. Aquino (61, Y. P8T8Z (8). Non (8> 
and; Nled. Lakonlc M , &Rted (A), M. Mu-. 
Mi (6),Blair (B)and.W— 6tab4-4.L— BMr,D- 
i HRs— PlOrtdO. SieffleM (22), Conine IM). 
Attario MB 44* Me— 8 W 2 

SL Loots IH HI 898— S II 1 

GfevlMb Bcdnskn (8),Otson if) andO>Bri- 
go; Tewksbury, Habvan LSX. Oucnb ial-R. 
Rodrlfluez (2). JftffWw W <*** PomaL 

Vy— Gtovtne, HS 8 .L— TewklburY, 10-10. Sv—«- 
soa (II. HRs— Atlanta. OWva (ALO'SHen (7). 

The WBchael Jordan Watefa 

SUMUY5 GAME: Jordon went OtenG In 
B |rnilnUKim , s 74 ie»ie -Mkwawflle. Jontan 

HIM out tortglrt RekL Novtng me bases loodwt 

in Hw (l«t,- Hied out lo center M the twrlhand 
IbvM out *• 9m etaWfe. Hf flt» w l» Of o 

Pttch trere Ja daonytUe ^pni 

N*mo»(*«S*™ndedatlWLJar«inwonaa 
o SDOTHrWflh 5ix Wrtoute In rtoW fteM. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan b bitting 62- 
tor -333 (.185) wim » mm. 13^*1^ one 
trkrifc 34 RB)L V wnim 85 strikeout* and 
jjgje 33 bases fa 37 attempts. 


U.S. Gains 
After Loss 
To Russia 


The Associated Pros 

ST. PETERSBURG — 
The U.S. basketball team, 
rebounding from its loss to 
Russia, advanced to the 
medal round of the Good- 
will Games on Monday 
with a 99-80 victory over 
(Tima 

The UJS- collegians dom- 
inated throughout, with 
Lou Rowe of Massachu- 
setts scoring a team-high 17 
- points and Michad Fmlcy 
of Wisconsin adding 16. 

The Americans, who lost 
77-75 to Russia on Sunday, 
finished the preliminary 
round with a 2-1 record. - 
They will face Italy in (he 
semifinals Wednesday. 

Puerto Rico, 2rl, will 
face either Russia or Ar- 
gentina in the other semi. 

Without any NBA stars, 
the U.S team continued to 
struggle in international 
competition with the loss to 
Russia. 

Collegiate teams — ama- 
teurs —have won only iHe ‘ 
1993 World University 
Games since taking the 
go Id medal at the 1986 
Goodwill Games. U.S. 
teams have been beaten at 
the 1988 Olympics, Pan 
Am Games, World Cham- 
pionships and the 1990 
Goodwill Games. 

The Russians, playing a 
tough defense that prevent- 
ed the Americans from get- 
ting the ball made lo their 
big men, took die lead for 
good, 60-58, with less than 
seven minutes remaining 
on two foul shots by Andrei 
Fetisov. 


Japanese Leagues 





MKharf Roodm'Thc A*»ici*lrd Proj 


Damon Stondanrire of the U.S. driving past Sergei Bazarevfch in Russia's victory. 



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LEGG MASON CLASSIC 


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TENNIS 


PATHMARK CLASSIC 
sinam. final 

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CALIFORNIA— Oesionoted Scott Lewis, 
pttetef, for tmnIgnmanL 
OAKLAND— Recoded Mike MoMer. ptteft- 
er. from Tacoma PCL. Sent Eric Hettana 
c at c her, to Tacoma Optioned Mike MoMer. 
pitcher, to Tacoma PCL. Recalled Fausto 
Cruz. tnfMder. ttwn Tacoma. 

SEATTLE— Recalled Shewn Basfcle, pttch- 
er. from Calgary, PCL- Oaflened Brian T pr- 
ana outfielder, to Calgary. 

Nattooal Leaeae 

ATLANTA— Recoiled Brad Woodall, pitch- 
er, from Richmond, IL. Ops toned Mike Kelly, 
outfielder, to Rtoimand. 

CINCINNATI — Acttwcded Jerome watton. 
euMelder.frem ISdoy dbaMed Dst Designated 
Stow Pbdubs, aulfletdv, far as afanmeta 
FLORIDA — Recalled Darrell WWfmore, 


outfielder, from Edmonton, PCL Put Carl 
Everett, outfielder, on 15-dov dtooMed Its). 

N EW YO RK— Stoned Kevin McCorthy. out- 
fielder, and a mi pied Mm to Gull Coast 
Le ag ue. Pat Kevin McRevnoiasiOvtfleldw.pn 
15-doy disabled list, retro a ctive to July 21. 
ReooHed Jetamv Bumttz. outfielder, from 
Norfolk. IL. Stoned Thn Btituo, outfielder. 

PHILADELPHIA— OMIaned Andy Carter 
and Paul OuantrllL pWchers. to Scranton- 
Wllkes Barrs, il. Activated Letery Dvkstra 
and Dave Hollins, outfielders, from 1 5-day 
cSsobied list Oattaned Andy Carter and Paul 
QuontiHLpHchers.tpScrontoi»- W HkevB or re. 
IL. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Activated Bill Swtft 
Pilcher, tram lSdav disabled list. 

ST. LOUIS— Put Rick Sard Wfe. pitcher, an 
lSday disabled nst. Recalled Gary Budcetk 
pHcber. from LouJsvJIle, AA. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Aesoaatton 

PHOeNIX— Retoased Sceeter Henry and 
Lou DavAlns, guards Bid Mark Buford, for- 
ward. Signed Bruce Bowen. tarworcL and 
Corey Gaines, guard. 

SAN ANTONIO— Signed Avery Johnson, 
guard. 

FOOTBALL 

N ot io nal Football Leone 

BU F FALO— Removed Kenneth Davis, run- 

nine back, from physical Iwunable-tooer- 

form list 

CHICAGO— Released Tim Ryan.deien)ive 
tortile. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 4) 






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Fine, Ban and Trade 
Settle NHL Dispute 


By Richard Sandomir 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — The nine- 
day-long tug-of-war over Mike 
Keenan has ended, with a harsh 
settlement that left no party 
pleased or unpunished. 

The multipart decision by the 
National Hockey League com- 
missioner , Gary Bettman, lets 
Keenan go to the Sl Louis Blues 
as r-narhf smH general manager. 
In compensation for him leaving 
with four years left on his con- 
tract, Bettman approved the 
Blues’ trade of Petr Nedved to 
the New Yak Rangers for Esa 
Tikkanen and Doug Lids ter. 

Bettman also ordered late 
Sunday night that the Rangers 
pay Keenan a $608,000 bonus 
and that Keenan in turn repay 
the team $400,000 of it. He also 
suspended Keenan from being 
coach and general manager of 
the Blues for 60 days, and fined 
him $100,000 for “conduct det- 
rimental to the league.” He can 
start his dual jobs in Sl Louis 
on SepL 24. 

In essence, Bettman found the 
Blues and Detroit Red Wings 
guilty of tampering with the 
rights to Keenan while he was 


under contract to the Rangers, 
and fined the Blues $250,000 
and the Red Wings 525,000. 

The fines for Keenan and the 
Blues are the ma ximum allowed 
under league by-laws. 

Bettman also fined the Rang- 
ers 525.000 for filing a lawsuit 
last Monday against Keenan 
and his lawyer after asking the 
commissioner to investigate the 
matter earlier in the day. 

in a statement. Bettman said 
NHL teams and employees 
“may not engage in a kina of 
frontier justice, where every 
question of a contract’s validity 
becomes an invitation to self-help 
in the form of unilateral declara- 
tions of free agency and the im- 
mediate entering into of inconsis- 
tent contractual obligations." 

The Rangers and Blues had 
agreed on a trade Friday in New 
York to settle die dispute, but 
Bettman was not entirely satis- 
fied and called the parties to the 
NHL office for an eight-hour 
meeting Sunday that replaced 
the hearing that was to have 
been held on Monday. Accord- 
ing to a source familiar with the 
trade, it was Keenan's idea, act- 
ing as Blues' general manager. 


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CINCiMNATf— Waived Alec Milton, offen- 
sive Itneman. 

GRE EN BAY— Stoned Curtis Duncan, wide 
receiver. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Stoned Erie Mott torn 
and Garin Patrick, offensive linemen; Brad- 
lard Banta ttoM end; Stephen Grant, line- 
backer; Mac Cody, wide receiver; Dornen 
Co« np beil.riuin>nebocfc;ondJqsanMa)t ia w L 
offensive tackle. Released Tim Rottier.aefe^ 

LA. RAIDERS — Signed Robert jenkln&ot- 
fen&lve tortile. Resigned James Hill, running 
back. Waived R_l. Kora, safety. 

LA. RAMS— Stoned Darryl Astonore, offen- 
sive tackle. Put Todd Klncnen. wide receiver, 
on rttysleatty-u n a tol i to aertorm list. Re- 
leased Bob Brasher, tight end. Stoned Wayne 
Gandy, offensive tocsJe. to S-veor contract. 

NEW ORLEANS— Waived Tom Bodies, of- 
tensive lineman. Announoedthal Lance Lund- 
berg, offensive tackle, has left coma. 

N.Y. GIANTS— Stoned Corey Miller, line- 
backer; Alike Horen nutter.- Thomas Lewts 
wid e r ecelvT; rad TMaWcoieMl el— b tobartL 
Put Lewfs on non-to o ibaP Murvoettve list. 

N.Y. JETS — Agreed to terms with Orlando 
Parker, wfde receiver. 

PHILADELPHIA— Released Tim Harris, 
defensive end. Re-algned wiUtom Thomas, 
linebacker, and Mike Flares, defensive line- 
man, to I -Year contracts, and Mike Janes, 
Held end. R e lea s e d Cnrks Barry, ottenelve 
llnemcei; MkeAKKcnzIe, fight end; ana Erik 
Simian, linebacker. 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


By Jupiter! It’s 0,J. 



M ARTHA’S VINEYARD, 
Massachusetts — Every- 
one on Martha’s Vineyard is 
trying to forget O. J. 

The big talk has now turned 
to the Shoemaker-Levy comet 
bombardment of the planet Ju- 
piter. The whole island 
glued to the 


was 



Budnrald 


TV to see the 
fireballs strike, 
and many the- 
ories were ad- 
vanced as to 
why it hap- 
pened. 

The most 
popular one 
was that O. J.’s 
defense attor- 
neys arranged 
for it to take place at this partic- 
ular time to take the hear off the 
trial 

But some people at the beach 
were skeptical. 

“O. J. was in jail at the time 
so he couldn’t have strode Jupi- 
ter with a comet,” Pomfret said. 

“Then how do you explain 
the glove found near Jupiter’s 
red spot just before it was hit by 
the comet?” Tumstyle asked. 

□ 

Bergstrom said, “It could 
have been left there by any- 
body. I don’t think we should 
decide who is responsible for 
the explosions until we get the 
DNA tests back from the lab.” 

Wrightman said, “The Na- 
tional Enquirer has a story 
claiming that on the ni|ht of the 
explosions O. J. had slipped out 
of his cell and had disappeared 
for two hours. Does anyone be- 
lieve that?” 

Everyone shook their heads. 
Except for Caliastro. 

“what I don’t understand is 


why the Irish Republican Army 
is taking credit for something 
0. J. supposedly did." 

“They take credit for every- 
thing,” Plumbell told him. “I 
think that an explosion of this 
size is more likely the work of 
the L. A. District Attorney’s of- 
fice.” . , 

“No matter what, u isn t go- 
ing to help Clinton’s Health 
Care Bill" 

“Why not?" 

Plumbell said, “Clinton is in- 


sisting on health care for eveiy- 
'iude r . 


one and this has to indude 
Lee Bailey and Alan 
Dcrshowitz who are not cov- 
ered by blazing fireballs under 
their present policies.” 


“It’s 


□ 

tor the ju 


to 


advocate full coverage for Jujri- 


ter, but who is going to pay for 
it?” 

Feifer said, “According to 
The Star, O. J. purchased 250 
milli on tons of TNT at O'Hare 
Airport two days before the ex- 
plosion.” 

Template joined in the con- 
versation. “I was in the A & P 
and The Globe headline said 
that O. J. was planning to go to 
Mars after blowing up Jupiter ” 

To keep the conversation go- 
ing I said, “What if there was no 
explosion on Jupiter and the 
networks concocted it to ' 
their ratings up after die O. 
story petered out?" 

D 


'Story of O’ Author Revealed 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — A 40-\ 


Template yelled: “That’s im- 
possible! We saw the car chase 
on Jupiter with our own eyes.” 

“You saw what the newscast- 
ers wanted you to see. The 
whole thing could easily have 
been created by computer im- 
aging," I said. 

‘Nobody in the television in- 


dustry lies about the solar sys- 


NEW YORK — A 40-year 
mystery surrounding “The Story 
of CT has been solved, according 
to The New Yorker. Critics have 
argued for years over the author- 
ship of the erode best-seller. The 
magazine said she is Dominique 
Aury, a well-known French edi- 
tor and writer, who is now 86. 


tern. 

would lose their FCC 
What proof do you have that 
the explosions weren’t the real 
thing?” 

“None at the moment, but if 
it’s as big as they say it is, what 
happened to the knit cap that 
was hit by all those balls of 
fire.” 


By Ellen Pall 

N EW YORK — It was while watching an old 
interview with a deeply drugged Jim Morrison 
on television several years ago that a light bulb went 
on over Nicolas Cage's head. 

“Morrison was saying, ‘I don’t think we’ve done a 
song yet that conveys pure happiness,’ ’* Cage re- 
membered. “And 1 thought about myself. 1 thought, 
T should do that Something that’s not so angst- 
ridden.”’ 

And so was born what the actor refers to as his 
sunshine trilogy, a trio of mainstream, big-budget 
comedies: “Honeymoon in Vegas” in 1992, this 
year's “Guarding Tess” and “It Could Happen to 
You,” which opens on Friday in the United States. 

In all three. Cage turns his back on the intense 
outsiders, oddballs and criminals he made his spe- 
cialty in such movies as Alan Parker’s “Birdy,” Jod 
and Ethan Coen’s “Raising Arizona,” David 
Lynch’s “Wild at Heart” and John Dahl’s “Red 
Rock West,” only recently released in theaters. In- 
stead Cage joins the team of regular guys — decent, 
socially rooted fellows who, in ms words, set “a more 
positive example.” 

A more positive example? Nicolas Cage? Is this 
the man who, from the age of 17, deliberately culti- 
vated an image of brooding, desperate cool? The 
man who kept a pet shads and prided himself on the 
large lizard tattooed on his back? 

m 19S7, when that Nicolas Cage saw himself in 
“Moonstruck,” in which be played a Brooklyn baker 
smoldering with love for a repressed bookkeeper 
played by Cher, he was aghast. 

“I was in such a state of shock that I bad made a 
sweet, romantic movie I had to go and do ‘Vampire's 
Kiss’ right after,” he said. In “Moonstruck" he 
wooed Cher with a torrent of passionate words. In 
“Vampire’s Kiss” he scarfed down a live cockroach 
and ran through the streets of Manhattan, fangs 
gleaming, panting for blood. 

Well Cage is 30 now, and the father (by a former 
girlfriend) of a much-loved 3 -year-old son. Though 
it makes him a little nervous even to say so — and 
sounds odd, coming from a man who has grown a 
Mansonesque goatee for a film he is now shooting 
called “Kiss of Death” — he has calmed down. 



Myk* Arwwwta 

Problems of sudden wealth: Nicholas Cage with Bridget Fonda in “ft Could Happen to Yon.** 


way^to 


These days he is thoughtful slightly formal. His 
“He chooses his words judi- 


hair is thinning a bit. He chooses his words n 
doudy. “I don't regret anything,” he said or his 
haute-punk past durmg a conversation the other day 
at a bar in midtows Manhattan, “but I think people 
have to be allowed to grow and change.” 

Permission, evidently, granted. In “it Could Hap- 
pen to You." Cage plays Charlie Lang, a New York 
police officer who is kind to small children, re- 
sourceful in a crisis, long-suffering with his screechy 
wife (Rosie Perez) and at all times thrillingly sincere. 


promise,” Lang repeats three rimes, as he feels his 
to his next move. 

ie first two of Cage’s sunshine comedies were 
•i singly successful (He was already doing quite 
before that. At 26 he bought a SI .5 million 
castle in the Los Angeles hills; if he wished to, he 
could retire to it permanently today.)-' Writing in The 
New York Times, Vincent Canby praised both 
"Honeymoon in Vegas” ("benign delirium”) and 
Cage’s work in it; the film did weu at the box office. 

“Guarding Tess” opened with an impressive 59 
million its first week. Perhaps the less said the better 
about the poor cousin to Cage’s recent string of hits, 
last year’s unsuccessful “Amos and Andrew," in 
which he portrayed a kind-hearted car thief. 

Whether “It Could Happen to You” will follow 
“Honeymoon in Vegas” or “Amos and Andrew ” of 

rmiffgft, remains fn tv. <awn Rnt thft filmmakw s OQpld 

always sell the new picture for parts tojhe riryjaf 


p rem- 
and 


Lang’s refrain in the film (“A promise is ap t 

ise”) could have been written for James Stewart, 

in den t Cage greatly admires Stewart’s abilit y to be 
manifestly good, innocent and sincere era screen. 
Many of the actors Cage admires — Gene Kelly, for 
example, or the German silent film star Max 
Schreck belong to another generation. 

And thoug h it has been said that Cage shares the 
stylish sense of disillusion projected by other actors 
of his generation (Charlie Sheen, Kiefer Su t he rlan d. 
Sean Penn), there is a maverick quality to his work 
(not to mention his lodes) that has set him apart 
Drawn to small, edgy films and known among 
directors for his openness to artistic risks. Cage 
wants to be a character actor as much as a leading 
man. For his wfflmKitess to show passion on the 
sc reen, even if he looks foolish, lie has. in fact, been 
likened to the young Stewart. 


l-ang gtyes the term “honest cop” new meaning, 
funding nothing but a lottery ticket 


New York. Warmly photographed by Caleb Des- 
chanel the movie is a virtual Big Apple travelogue. 
Lang lives in Woodside, Queens, and walks a beat 


in his wallet 
when he wants to leave a tip' at a coffee shop, he 
promises the waitress (Bridget Fonda) that he will 
pve her half his lottery winnings, should he win. He 
tits the jackpot for $4 million. “A promise is a 


Lang lives in Woodside, Queens, and walks; 
in Manhattan. One sequence talcw; place at Yankee 
Stadium; Fonda and Cage Rolleiblade at Bethesda 
Fountain in Central Park, and the lottery winners 
celebrate on a party boat that cruises the waters off 
Manhattan. 


In *3t Could Happen to You," his voice —husky, 
manly, with a Irina of flat drawl — often sounds like 


Stewart’s, and not by chance. “ ‘More Jimmy,' ** tire 
director, Andrew Bergman, would often urge, ac- 
cording to Cage, “More Jimmy/” 


EUen Pall, the author of "Back East" and other 
navels, wrote this for The. New York Times. 


people 


WoodstodtRermted: 

9 Names to Remember 


Names from the pass 
star billing at one of two 
vab celebrating tire 25th ad- 
versary of the historic Wood- 
stock concert. The lineup for'. ' 
Bethel ’94 is upstate New Y«V 
oa Aug. 13 and M will feaita* f 
nine performers from the origb ; 1 
nal concert: R fcWe Hnra 

Joe McDonald, M*' 

Sebastian, Moo*. , 


fly, Sh* Nm N* *ad J 
Street and Tears. The other at ; 


street ana 4 iv. 1 

mversary show, in Saugerftct,v - ‘iji 
New York, win present the i 


pres 

timer. Bob Dylan 
15 me 


end suc$- 


sters as 


and 


; f itfP 


Princess Diana might make i- * 
rareiroyal court appearance^ 
ly next year to testify agauuV 
Bnrce Taylor, the part twnero£ ' 
a gymnasium who secretly toot 
photographs of her writing ota_ c 
m a leotard, her lawyers saidV : 
Monday. Last month she set/ " 
tied a case against the gyura*. 
sios, the LA Fitness Club. E&; 
ward VII was the last member d|' 
the royal family to appear as a * 
witness in courts before his acr - 4 
cession to the throne in 1901 
□ 


Duddte Mitterrand, wife ' ' 
President Francois Mitterrand, 
is making a quick recovery, freni. - 

a heart bypass operational Bp. - 
is and will leave rite hospati-' 
early next month, her surgeon ;.- - 
said Monday. Mrs. Mitterrand. * ■ - : 
69, was hospitalized a month-: . 
ago. . . . Gene Kety, 81, sat ■* 
in stable condition in a Los Aa-v ' . 
eeles hospital Monday, two"' - 
days after suffering a unfair'-' 
stroke. There was no word ca _ ‘ 
when he would be sent home. ' * ’ 


A London judge has given 
DnkeofMmmorowhtEepORw- 
to prevent bis son, the Marque*/ 
ofBlandford. jailed for mode- ; 
meanoss os a number of ooca 
sons, from inheriting hi* tju 
miffion (SIS ntiDian) estate 


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32*9 20*0 > 
31*6 18*4 pc 
14/57 12*3 sh 
31*6 2170 ■ 
24/75 13*6 s 
29/79 75*9 9 
33*1 3170 pc 
22/71 16*1 ■ 
31*9 2271 pc 
30*6 19*6 pc 
32*9 18*4 , 
29/W 19*6 e 


OF 

20*2 

27*0 

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32*9 

26*2 

30*6 

32*9 

29*4 

33*1 

30*8 

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19*1 

17*3 

33*1 

31*8 

31*8 

073 

30*8 

2679 

2679 

25/77 

34*3 

33*1 

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28*2 

29*4 

29*4 

27*0 

31*6 

30*6 

15*9 

33*1 

2373 

2679 

33*1 

2373 

31*8 

30*8 

31*8 

31*9 


LM W 
OF 

20*8 s 
18*4 | 
1 fl*f ■ 
22/71 , 
2271 3 
19*8 > 
19*8 • 
18*4 1 
2170 ■ 
19*9 ■ 
2271 a 
10*0 pc 
72*3 PC 
2170 S 
19*6 I 
19*6 1 
17*2 pc 
IB/64 3 

20168 a 

19*4 3 
15*9 pc 
19*8 a 
2271 % 
12*J pc 

18*4 pc 
2170 a 
19*6 pc 
24/7S a 
18*4 I 
18*4 a 
0«e pc 

20*8 3 
14/57 pc 
70 /W pc 
19*6 pc 
17*2 pc 
2373 3 
19*6 3 
18*4 3 
10*8 pc 



Today 
Mgh Low 
OF OF 


32169 24 m 
33*1 2373 
29/M 27/60 
30*6 2475 
32*9 9*4 
36*7 26*2 
34 ©3 2679 
32*9 2271 
33*1 2475 
32*9 Z6/7B 


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ah 33*91 
pc 32*9 
I 31*8 
ah 31*6 
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pc 36*7 
pc 33*1 
pc 32*9 
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pc 32*9 


LOW W 

OF 

2577 pc 
2373 pc 
2879 ah 
2475 Jb 
26*2 pc 
20*2 pc 
2879 po 
2373 pc 
2977 pc 
3679 pc 


North America 
The heoi wave wil cool hu/e 
across much at the western 


states throudi Vie end of the 
The 


week. The greatest 
depaflures from normal wS 
be fn the Northwest In 
Seattle and Portland. Thera 
wA be (lequeni showers and 
thunderstorms In (he East 
Inchirfing Washington. D.C. 


Europe 

Hot weather will continue 
through much ol northern 
Europe. Including Berlin, 
Prague and Warsaw. 
Thunderstorms ere likely 
along (he western edge of 
the heat In Brussels. 
.Amsterdam and Paris. 
BrttaH and Ireland wft have 
showers. Southern Europe 
will be seasonable and 


Asia 

Frequent rains wIB con linus 
much ol the week across 
southern China Including 
Hong Kong, aggrav at ing the 
flooding. Showers and 
thunderstorms will occur 
dally In the northwestern 
PMlpDlnes. The heat wave 
wflh togh hunkffiy **» pa rata 
across Korea and most of 
Japan 


Africa 


28*2 

21/70 a 

28*2 

2271 pc 

C*wTown 

14*7 

7/44 pc 

16*1 

8/46 pc 

Csydinu 

2679 

17*2 a 

25/77 

18*4 pc 

Harare 

21/70 

12*3 1 

23/73 

13*6 pc 


28*3 

T 4 . 7 S | 

29*4 

2*75 pc 

NrmM 

2170 

10*0 pc 

2271 

12153 pc 

Tin* 

32*9 

2271 po 

32*9 

20*1 a 

North America 

AnchoraB* 

20*6 

10/50 1 

21/70 

12*3 pc 

Aftrti 

31*8 

2170 1 

32*9 

20*8 ih 


29*4 

19*6 1 

29 / 5 M 

IB /84 pc 

Ongo 

24 75 

14*7 ] 

28/79 

12/53 l 

D«n*f 

64/75 

13*5 ah 29*4 

14*7 9 


; ACROSS 

1 Petite or jumbo 
sGobs 
9 Final Four 
rounds 

t4 Composer Satie 

13 avail 

13 Gather Into 
folds 

17 Fashionable 
• African land7 
1 * Chain ol lulls 
30 Till 

compartment 
21 Tartarus 
. captive, m myth 


22 Military 
encounter ■ 

23 projection 

(map system; 

27 Escargots 
22 Embarrassment 
so Accede, (to) 
si Places of refuge 

32 Neither’s 
partner • 

m “The Twilight of 
the ' 

33 Unites . 
si Deal (out) 

37 Lanka 

33 Birdie beater 


33 ‘Give My 
Regards to 
Broadway" 

• composer 
so Meeting musts 
42 ‘Canterbury 
Tales' inn 

43 Gabriel, eg. 

44 Curmudgeon- 
Ilka 


1 Composer 
Duparc 


Solution to Puale of July 25 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Dvtrat 

HonoUu 


BWut 

Caro 


Oceania 


Todpy 

OF OF 
st/as 2271 
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27*0 17*2 
41/1062373 
42/107 27*0 


Low W V6gh 


Low W 

of or 

Sim 2373 f 
34*3 20*8 t 
30*6 17*2 a 
28 *2 18*4 a 
41/108 2271 a 
43/109 27*0 I 


Today 

High Lww W High Low W 

OF OF C* OF 

BuaneaAfea* >3/55 7/44 ah 1 8»i 7M4 pc 

Caracal 31*6 2577 pc 31*8 2S77 pc 

Urn 18*4 18*1 a 19*4 15/89 pc 

MMksCSy 2373 12*3 pc 24/75 13*5 pc 

HkxMwwfa) 2879 18*4 a 2677 19*6 pc 

13*5 4*9 all 13*5 0/3? pc 


LotPrgaiaa 


14*7 

16/61 


6*6 sh 14*7 
6**3 C 16*1 


6*6 Ih 
9*48 pc 


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2879 14*7 pc 23/77 14*7 pc 
31*6 2S7a pc 31*8 2475 pc 
34*3 23.73 s 38*5 2173 PC 
32*9 19*8 a 2679 18*4 pc 
32*9 24/75 I 33/91 2577 pc 
2271 12*3 pc 2373 11*5 pc 
24/75 13*8 » Z?7l T4/57 pc 
31*8 2475 pc 32*9 26/77 pc 
30*8 3170 i 31*8 2170 pc 
43/109 31*8 a 44/111 31/BB a 
2373 13*5 a 2271 13*6 4 
2079 14/37 pc 2577 14*7 pc 
2373 10*0 ah 2871 14*7 rti 
32*9 ZStTl | 32*9 2271 pc 


OHOE3 00003 0030 

□ana □□□□□ aana 
naan naanaassaa 
aasaans □□□nag 
aos saan 
guana □□□ □□□□□ 
□□□□ taaanaa □□□ 
asgaaoBHaaaaBaa 
bsb □□&!□□□ aaaa 
□snog aaa aaoaa 
□□□□ Qgn 
QsaQsa nanaoas 
agguggaaga naaci 
□ggg aaggo aaoo 
□□□□ □□□□□ aaau 


47 Courts 

«*■ Cowboy" 

ee Fashionable 
state? 

••Enact 
sb Zone 

sa Arched recess 
S7*Ftowersfor 
Algemon" 
author Daniel 
se "... tore no. 

unstoned' 

st Haydn's 
“Nelson.* for 
one 


3 Address part 

.4 Ollt a living 

5 Some temps 
e Two Women' 
Oscar winner 
7 Remnants 

a Tale of 

•Naiads' homes 
toDonizettrsThe 
. - — o* Love' 

11 FasWooabie 
Canadian city? 

«B"OhtMo a vttWn 
13 Actress Anna 
is Curtain fabric 
si SHky-twlred cat 
» Fashionable 
Welsh body ol 
water? 

*4 Bonds 
is Scold 
at Rest on one's 


4tMun8to 


47 ■— off to sea " si Site oi 

«* Pahs or Hector J" ‘ ***** 

-Cringe . -King Cole - - - • 

4 s Com covering w Computer .■J»0odU*a*t_ ! 

*eRuswan-bo«n - ■ „- Y oa'o«^v 


DOWN 


f Wine 
description 


* George's lyrfdst 
brother. 


•7 Is weary -' 
••Summons 
•■Person with a 
seal 

31 fQnd offender 
33 Rip ' 
3*1977 
Wimbledon 
; -champ • 
as Crowds around 
aa Turbojet and 
. others 
•Movement 



PngW by WwitTMW* 

New York Times Edited by Will Shorn - 


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000-137 Matar 

.0800690-110 

Indonesia* 

001-601-10 Monaco* 

194-6011 

Japan- 

0039-131 Netberfauads* 

06-022-9I1X 

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. 00M1 Norway 

80M9t«t 

Korea** 

11* Potatad>. M - • . 

OaO 10-480-01 U 

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800-0011 ^ Foxtogal* . 

05017-1-288 

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000-911 Knmwria 

01-800-4288 

Philippines* 

• 103-11 . RnSShrtMoscowT 

155-5042 

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235-2872 Skmdda 

,0»4260Q101. 

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aowm-lll Spain* 

900-99-00-11 

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430-430 Sweden* 

020-79M11 

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.0060-102864) Switzcrtend- 

155-00-11 

Thailand* > . 

. 001M«-HU UK . . 

’.0560*9*011 

EUROPE x Ukraine* 

84100-11 

Armwtila** 

Baltin M n HIT F. FAST 

Aaeutar" 1 ' ■ 

022-903011 . jMorin 

•SOMOV 


0606-100-10 Cyprtis* ; 

■ : 080-90010 

Bulgaxia 

00-18000010 brad ,1 • . ■ 

. 177-100-2727 

Croatia** 

99664)011 Bwmr-- 

' ' 800-288 

Czech Rep ’ 

■ ■ 0M2&00I01 . XebanOotpekbO . 

. 426-801 

Denmark’ 

8001-6010 ■ Qatar , 

oeowwi-77 

HnJaotf 

9800-100-10 SaidAiaEto ^ 

: : i-soo-w 

France 

i9a-oen * : 

- 00-600-12277 

Germany .. 

O33(H)Oi0. -riO, 

■* -flown 

Greece* 

OOWtfU J AMERICAS - 

TIiiiijii ji* 

oo*6wwmn 1 ■» 

WH-B0B-20W1H 

Icefeuuf*! 

Irdand 

99W01 ' Betfee. ; r,,-;:. 
1-606550-000 BoUvU" - 

' • - -535- 

0600-1112 


COUN1HY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

4i 

Brazil 

- 000-8010 

-4 

ChSe 

00*-03L2 

-H 

Colombia 

960-11-0010 

•r 

Costa Rica*a 

114 


Ecuador* 

- ' ’ • " 119 

■ i 

HSaivadort , 

ito 

Guaoeroala* 

190 


Guyana** 

165 


^MondUtasTi 

123 


oMcxIcoaa* . 

95600-162-4240 ■ 


JQcaregna (Managua) i74 

Panama* 

109 

. f r . 

Peru* 

19J 

'"Jr 

ftxrinanre 

156 

: .V 1 

Uruguay 

(XHHiO 

4.- 

Venezuela** 

80-011-120. 

% 

iv 

CARIBBEAN 



1-800-872-2881 


British VI. 


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1 -800-872-2881 
1-800-872-2882 


001-800^72-288^ 


OuSB-872-2881 


0 ^ -800373-2881 

IjMnji: 


AFRICA 


510-0200 


Gambia' 


OCU-801 

00111 


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1