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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




Paris. Friday. Ju!}* 29» 1994 


No. 34.653 


U.S. Soldiers 
Sent to Train 
Aimed Forces 
In Cambodia 

Washington Stresses 
First Direct Military Aid 
Since Tife h ^onlethal^ 

By Fbilip Shenoa 

fte» York Times Seniee 

BEUING — Hie Defense De p a rt ment 
has sent doaens-of Amencan miUtftiy train' 
ers and hundreds of ^ dollars in 

equipment to Cambodia in recdit weefa to 
hdp the Cambodian Anay^ adddi has sitf- 
lered a string of bettlefi^ defeats this 
~ year at the h^nds of the tOim^ 

'' rd>ds. 

U.S. oRidais said it was the first time 
since the 1970s that the United States 
provided direct aid to the r^-emKvjien 
Army, althon^ th^ were qiiidc to note 
that the equipment did not i^nde weap- 
ons or ammimitj^ 

“This is ntmletbal aid,** an official said. 
**We're hdf^ thm to bnild roads and 
deal with mmes. 'Ihaf s all'* 

Senior State Department have 

said that die United States is also consider- 
ing sending arms and ammumfi on to the 
Cambodian Army but that a final deciaon 
would have to-await consultafions with 
Congress and with other that have 
been invdved in events to rebuild Caihbo- 
dia after years of civfl war. 

Under a $975,000 grant, the Defense 
D^artment has sent 44 t^cers and enlist- 
ed men to Camlxidia over tte last two 
weeks to serve as trainets, along with a 
varied of surplus road-building equip- 
ment, including road graders, water tanl^ 
and electrical genetHiors. 

A U.S. ttffidal in Hmom Penh said that 
the trainers would also assist the Cambodi- 
an Army in its program to remove the 
miOions of nimes that remain scattered 
across the counoyside as a lesuU of the 
dvU war. 

General Ke Kiniyan of Cambodia said 
Tuesday that the arrive of the American 
trainm and their equipnieat his- 

torical significanoe to our faces. .This as- 
astance is really inqxxtant to heighten die 
riuUs of our spedalists in the anued 
forces.” 

Cambodian militasy offidais said that 
while tte aid was use^ vdiat they really 
need are weapons, ammunidos and tai^ 
cal military advism triio can revive 

the demoralized army as a vaUd fitting 
force. 

Cambodia's head d state, King Noro- 
dom Sihanouk, has warned that vdthout 
aim shi pme nts from the United States and 
elsewhere, C^bodia mi^t again fafi to 
the Khmer Rou^ the Macast-inspored 
guerrillas who were respoorible for tlm 
of more than one nuBion Canibodt- 
ans after th^ ousted a U.S.-bacfced goy- 
emment in 1975. 

The Khmer Rcngc, ousted in 1979 in a 
Vietnamese invasion, ccmtizuie to octroi 
large stretches of western Cambodia and 
wi£ fresh shqnneDts o( weapons from 
across the border in Thailand, have sub- 
jected the anxQr to defeats on the battle 
field. 

The army has no rdiable suppb^ line fdr 
weapons anmmnitimi, although news 
reports from Phnom Penh suggest fiiat an 
Indonesian erenpany has sold 3 million 
rounds of amxmmition for M-16 rifles to 
the army. 

The Khmer Roi^ signed a 1991 Um^ 

1 Nations peace treaty meant to end the civil 
war but mter backed out of the agreement 
and refused to take part in general ^eo- 
tions last year, vriuen produc ed ^ 
freely elected Cambodian govermuent' m 
more than a generadoo. 

Other countries have suggest^ that t^ 

may supply wS&tasy aid to Cambod^ 
Australia sent a team of mSitaiy adv^ 
ers to Cambodia last week to assess the 

need for aid. . • i . .... 

“We are clearly wining m prmai« to go 
dittw"** down this track, ^.Foragn 
Minister Gareth Evans of Australia, 

ring to military aid, said this week mBangr 

Eok Airing ine«tin|5 oi the Assooauem of 
South East Asian Nations. 

Military donatidas from France Cto 
bodia’s former cotonial rtilcr, have already 
included a fleet of heavy transport trucks 
and three observation hdicop^ 

Diplomats say France would also con- 
sider sending weapons. 



LDi MkM Rnitm 


A Rwandan woman, her baby on her back, collapsing Thursday alongside the road that runs between Goma and the Kibumba refugee camp in 

Get Rwandans Back Home^ U.S. General Insists 


By Barry James 

InuramtOHol Uirdd Tribtme 

The cfaairaian of the U^. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gener- 
^ J<^ M. ShalikasbviU, said Thursday that the Rwan- 
dan r^ef effort must conoeatrate on getting refugees out 
of disease-iiddcn camps and back to their own countiy. 
althou|^ he added that there was no agreement on how 
to do * 


Also on Thursday, senior administration officials cor- 
rected vriiat they said were “premature" suiemenis by 
the U.S. miliiaiy that up to 2,000 American troops may 
be deployed in Rwanda as pan of a i^atriation opera- 
tion. white House officials said there had be^ confu- 
sion among U.S. military crfflcers ^oai plans to send 
troops to Rwanda. 

Nevertheless, General Shalika^vili said that “certain- 


ly there will be several thousand" troops involved if 
President BiD Ointon approves setting up a m^or sup- 
ply hub at the airport in Kigali. Rwanda's capital. 

He said the U.S. military was lookup at a number of 
plans. One was to set up a series of feedi^ stations along 
the route back to Rwanda frmn the refugee camps in 

See RWANDA, Page 8 



I Da>>d Akc'A(n(vFniK*-Pio« 

HEARING NO EVIL? — Jim Leadi, RepuUican of Iowa, Ksteoing to 
tok ri mnny Hmrsday by die fonner White House cooiisel, Bmuard Nuss- 
hftiwn^ dmded trying lo infhittce the Whitewater inquiry. Page 3. 


Kiosk 

Jackson Warns Nigeria of Sanctions 


LAGOS (AFF) — The Reverend Jes- 
se L. Jadcs^ the U.S. q>ecial envoy to 
Nigeria, smd here Thuzsd^ that Wash- 
ington was conadermg freezing Nig^ 
rws assets and jrnpndTig sanctions if 
the country’s militaxy regune remained 
in power. 

Tlie cml limits activist met the mili- 
tary ruler. General Sani Abadia, in the 
fa pi twl , Abiya, and told him that W^- 
iwgiftn wanted Nigeria returned to civfl- 
ian rule as soon as pomible, a member 
of Mr. Jackson's entour^ rqiorted. 
Mr. Jacksem also met thejailed oppori- 
tipn leader, Moshood K.O. Abiola, who 
went on trial for treasou Thursday. 


Witnesses outside the courthouse 
said three people were shot and killed in 
dashes with the police when hundreds 
of pro-democracy supporters gathered 
to call for Chief Abida's leiease and 
installatioa as pierideuL 

Luliura 

For racing aficionados, England's 
Goodwoex! rivals Ascot. Pi^ 6. 


Book Review 

Crossword 

Weather 


Page?. 

Page?. 

PagelR 


Angola Tragedy: An Abyss 
Of Mistrust and KUUngs 


By Paul Taylor 

ft 'iatimgian Fen Semet 

DONDO, An^Ia — Antonio dos An- 
jos. a I5-monUi-oId war victim, has sunken 
eyes, twiglike limbs and a case of cholera 
that will not Idil him, thanky {q the kind- 
ness of strangers. 

His doctor is a Nigerian, his nurse a 
Minnesotan. An Australian is the supply 
officer at the therapeutic feeding center at 
Antemio’s displaced pex^ns camp; a Nor- 
wegian is tile water engineer. 

They are part of an interaational relief 
effort that has knt Angola from becoming 
another of this aide's humanitarian ca- 
tastrophes, on the order of Somalia. Rwan- 
da or Bosxiia. 

Unfortunately, the kindness of strangers 
has not rescued Angola from itself. A min- 
erai-riefa southwestern African nation of 
1 1.2 million, Angola is home to one of 
Africa’s most intractable post-colonial civ- 
il wars, now approaching its 20ih year and 
well past the half-minion mark in deaths. 

Nor have strangers always come in kind- 
ness. Over the ^»n of just two decades. 


this country has been a Portuguese colony, 
a Soviet diem state, a smmpower battle- 
ground. 8 failed otgeci of New World Or- 
der democTscy initiatives, and a starving 
redpient of First World food aid. 

It hardly seems to matter anymore if the 
outsiders come for mischievous purposes 
or noble ones. Either way, Angohms ke^ 
suffering and dying, “if you want to m^e 
a case that the industiulized world still 
doesn’t understand bow to deal with Afri- 
ca. Angola is a prttty good example." a 
Western diplomat said. 

In a sense, Angola is the whole post- 
colonia] African tragedy writ sm^. While 
most of the rest of the planet moves toward 
democrat and free markets, t^ nation is 
stuck is its own hdiisb orbit, with a dys- 
functional commend economy and a avil 
war fueled by greed and power. 

It seems b^de the poont to argue who is 
most to blame. There is more than enough 
blame to spread around, from the Portu- 
guese colonizers vbo never prepared An- 
gola for mdq>endaice, to the superpowers 
See ANGOLA, Page 8 


Baseball Strike Set for Aug. 12 
If Player-Owner Talks Stumble 


The^aodand Frea 

NEW YORK — Baseball players said 
Thursday that they would strike on Aug. 
12 if th^ had not reached a new labor 
oomraci with owners by then. 

The decision puts b^ball on track for 
its eighth work stoppage in 22 years. 

"Webdieve that this date will maximize 
(he chance of successfully negotiating an 
a^eement without any work stoppage." 
said the union leader, Donald Fehr. 

The players' represenutives ray they 
fear the owners will impose a salary cap 
after the season unless there is an agree- 
ment to replace the four-year deal that 
csipired 31. The union hopes a strike 


would force owners to reach a deal in order 
to preserve the postseason television reve- 
nue. estimate at $140 million, an average 
of $5 minion per club. 

Richard Ravitch, a management negoti- 
ator. said the union's prc^xwal to raise the 
minimum salary from $109,000 to 
Sl75,000-$200,000 and to restore salary 
arbitratioi to players with two years of 
majcff league service would cost clubs $660 
million to $700 milticm over four years and 
$137 billion to S1.6S billion over seven 
seasons. 

Players voted nearly unanimously to 
give their executive bo^ the authority to 
set a strike date and call a walkout. 


Blaming Iran, 
Israel Signals 
Quick Riposte 
To Bombings 

Lebanon Is Put on Alert; 
Peres Sees ^No Doubf 
Of Tehran Involvement 

By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

Neur VevA Tims Sernee 

JERUSALEM ~ Indications of a possi- 
ble Israeli military operation against pro- 
Iranian militias in southern Lebanon over 
the next few days are increasing both in 
Israel and Lebanon, coupled with uncon- 
firmed speoiiation here chat Israri may 
launch a military action against Iran itself. 

In Lebanon on Thursday. Prime Minis- 
ter Rafik Hariri held an emergency sesrion 
of the cabinet in which he directed several 
ministers to “be on alert" for a possibie 
Israeli attack in southern Lebanon where 
forces cd Hezbollah, the Iranian-funded 
militia, attacked Israeli soldiers last week. 
One soldier was killed and 13 wounded. 

Since that attack Israel has also blamed 
Iran and elements of Hezbollah operating 
overseas for the bombing of a Jewish com- 

A Jaifib leader says Argeotbs iianed Brittin 
of ImiwnfiDg bombia^ a U.S. TOWS to pmdsb 
those responsible. Page B. 

muniQ^ center in Buenos Aires that killed 
nearly 100 people. Two other bomb at- 
tacks in London, against the Israeli Em- 
ba^ and a Jewish organization, are also 
being blamed here on “extremist Muslim 
militant" terrorist groups. 

FoieigD Minister Shimon Peres stressed 
the Israeli su^idons Thursday when be 
told Israeli envoys during a m^ ing that 
“there is no longer the slimiest doubt that 
Iran stands behmd the b^bings," of the 
Jewish and Israeli centers in Buenos Aires 
and London. 

A few days ago, Uri Lubrani. the Israeli 
coordinator for policy on Lebanon, vowed 
that Israel would mount “a harsh action of 
icvmge" for the border- region attack 
against the Israeli Army, which was 
planned and carried out by Hezbollah. 

Id Beirut on Thursday, Hussein Kbalif, 
the head oi the potiucal bureau of Hezbol- 
lah. said in au mierview mtb the Arabic- 
lanmage French radio station Radio Mon- 
te Carlo, that his organization was not 
r^onsible for the bombings in Buenos 
Aires and London. He asserted that allega- 
tions of Hezbollah involvement were "an 
invention of the Mossad." the Israeli secret 
service, to "mount a camp aig n against 
Muslim resistance movements." 

Meanwhile, another pro-^rian Shiite 
militia in south Lebanon. Aiiw, look re- 
rooQsibiliiy for an attack on Isra^ sol- 
(uers in the border region between Israel 
and Lebanon. That attack has not been 
confirmed by Israel. 

The saber-rattling comes as Israel has 
reiteraled its detennination to track down 
those responsible for altac^g Israeli and 
Jewish targets on its borders and around 
the world. 

The Israeli government also issued in- 
structions on Thursday to its diplomatic 
missions to observe extreme vigtiance in 
antidpatiott of further attacks in the next 
few days, rriule in the United States the 
FBI warned Israeli diplomatic missions to 
take special precautions against further 
attacks 1^ terrorist groups. 

Speaking of Iran's res^nsibiliQr for the 
attacks, Pnme Minister Yitzhak Rabin in- 
sist^ in Washington on Tuesday and 
again in Jerusalem on Wedne^ay that 
Tehran was directing an international Ira- 
nian-q)onsored terrorist network that is 
now taruting Israeli and Jewish interests 
around the worid. 

The cabinet meeting in Lebanon was 
brid following reports Sat the govenunent 
had fleeted a request by At-gpn tina to 
extradite a senior Muslim fundamentali-st 
and pro-Iranian l^er, Sheikh Sobhi To- 
faili, who lives in Lebanon. 

The Ad Diyar newspaper reported that 
he was want^ for questioning in the car- 
bomb attadc in Buenos Aires. Lebanon 
reacted sharply< saying it would not take 
any action against any of its citizens vrith- 
outproof. 

Tnere also was ^leculauon in Jerusalem 
on Thuisday that the Israeli Air Force bad 
been intensively training to mount a mili- 
tary operation against Iran. 

While Israeli officials would not com- 
ment publicly on any of tbe speculation, a 
senior official who spdte on condition of 
anonymity said that 'it is no secret that 
Israel will not sit and watch as terrorists 
attack it or attack Jewish targets around 
the world." 



Pound 


1.5263 


Tnb Index 


Down M 
0.34% m 
113.0 8 Jg 

pm^wsdoM 
1^744 
13321 


Yen 


100.05 


98.42S 


FF 


S.433 


5.382 


Wftwsstond Prices. 


ndorro 9.00 FF Luxembourg 60 LFr 

ntiiles n.20FF 

imeroon..l.-«CFA 

gyor E.P.SOOO Reunion -..ll^FF 

Snee 9.00 FF Sowil An*ia^,00 ^ 

0^ 960CFA Senegal 

raace 300 Dr. SPOXI BOO PTM 

jJ^,.”Zi«OLire Tu^iO .^..LOOO^ 

aryCoosi.l.iaCFA Turkey ..T.L 35^ 

1JD U.AE OJODirii 

}SrIon".'‘uM 1.50 U.S. Mil. lEur.l 51.10 


Endless Run for the Sun Keeps German Tourists on the Go 


By Rick Atkinson 

Waskii^m Pau Senke 

BERLIN — Even in the midst of the wannest July 
in memory, winter newer seems far away. Sunny days 
and balmy nights arc brief intcriudes m Germany s 
true meteorologtcal state — dreaiy cold and rain. 
Ttartin after ^ occufto the same latitude as Hudson 
Bay. 

Tbe Oennaa antidote is simple: Flee the cotoot. 
And flee they do, by plane, by train, by auUMJwbile, by 
the of Germans are world wtampioD 

travd^ peacefully colonizing tl« Mediterranean, 
the Carib^TFlorida, the Maldives — any place 

they can awead a beach towd and soak uj) enough sun 

to carry t£^ through another endless wmter. 

A nation of 80 million people last yw 10 (* 43.5 
million holiday trips, more than two-ihirds of them 


outside Germany. The deepest economic recession 
since World War 11 notwiemtaDdieg. that amounted 
to an 8 percent increase over 1992. According to a 
study by the Dresdner Bank, Germans devote nearly- 4 
percent of "private consumption" spending to forei^ 
travd, compared with 1 percent ftv Amencans. Last 
year, German tourists speoi $39 billion indulging their 
passion for faraway places. 

When schools recessed for auamer vacation eariier 
this month, 'Jte exodus became a stampede. Long 
stretches of beach in Spain and Italy are now known as 
Costa Germanica and the Teutonic Grill. A London 
tabloid last month featured a comely mode! wrapped 
in a to^ inscribed, “I ^t to the pool before tbe 
Germans!" 

German newroapers routinely cany features from 
M^orca or the t^ary Islands on the squabbling over 


lounge dtairs and beach umbrellas between lobster- 
red Ger^o tourists and tbdr outnumbered, if equally 
broil^ Nmlh European brethren. Dcr Spiegel, in an 
article entitled “Islrod of Lunacy." noted that a few 
yean ago Majorca's Playa del Palma “belonged to 
vacationers from all European countries." Now the 
beach is known as “Germany’s 17th slate" in ti^uie 
to the 2.2 million Gennan visitors who will visit the 
Mediloianean island this year. 

Where else do th^ go, these Marco Polos of the 
Rhine? Well where don't they go? Italy's Adriatic 
coast expects 700,000 Germans mis summer, up by 
100,000 over 1993. German visitors spent 65 muliqn 
oi^ts in Austria last year, two-thirds of the total in 
that tourist-infested country. 

Not quite 2 miiunw aisn made it to the United States 
in 1993, a number expected to increase by 8 percent to 


lOperoent this y^. A tiurd go to Florida, although 
visits to the Miami aroa have tmjpped tins season since 
well-publicized crimina] attacks on Gennan tourists. 
Another third make it to California reflecting 
German fascination with wide-open spaces and the 
Wild W^ one in every 10 visits the Grand Canyon. 

Statistically, accordng to the Gennan Travel 
Agents’ and Tour Operators' Association, the m(»( 
pqjnlar foreign destinations are Spain, Italy, Austria. 
France and Greece, But Germans also took 2.5 million 
holiday trips to ^tem Europe and 5.6 millioo so- 
called “long haul" voyagra outside Europe in 1993. 

“There must be something in the German mentality 
— 1 would call it a sense of exploration." said Eva 
Kiebach, spdteswoman for the U.S. Commerce De- 
partment’s Trav^ and Tourism Administradon office 

See SUN, Page 8 



Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 29, 1994 


**■ 


Pope Offends Jews by Granting Waldheim a Knighthood 


By Bany James 

Iiitenuaon^ HenM Tnbune 

Just as relations between the Vatican and 
Israel were improving. Pope John Paul II has 
offmded many Jews arou^ the worid by con- 
ferring a high honor on the fonner Austrian 
presidrat and allied Nazi war crimuial, Kurt 
Waldheim. 


heim's “rifols for peat^** and humanitarian 
activities as United Nations secretaiy-general 
from 1972 to 1980. 


Neither the Vatican nor Mr. Waldheim have 
commented on the award. 


hem served were re^nsible for massacring 
dvUians, executing prisoners, shipping prison- 
ers to slave labor camps a^ idmtifying Jews 
for deportation. It said Mr. Waldhmm's denial 
of the wv crimes charges was unamvindog. 


Only three weeks after the Vadcan finalized 
its recognition of Israel and exchan^g ambas- 
sadors, the Pope conferred a papal kmghthood 
on Mr. Wal^eim, the Order of Pius IX. 

Vatican sources said the P(^ approved the 
honor eariier this year. The order was conferred 
at a private ceremony in the Papal Nunciature, 
or embassy, in Vienna on July 6 by the nuncio. 
Archbishop Donato Squicctarini. 

The honor ofndally recognized Mr. Wald- 


Less ih«n five months ago, the U.S. Justice 
Dq^artment issued a damning report on Mr. 
Waldheim's war record, accusing him of expe- 
diting and probably ordering a series of atroc- 
ities. He Has been barred from the United 
States sinoe 1987 as a suspected war crimioaL 
The r^ort said that Mr. Waldhom '^oocu- 
pied positions of increasing responsibility and 
sensitivity, for which be was decorated, m re- 
gions where notoriously brutal actions were 
undertaken by the Nazi forces in which he 
served." 

The report said the units in which Mr. Wald- 


An intematioDal commission of historians 
set up 1^ the Au^an govemmffilt also cod- 
eluded that Mr. Wald£^ fa^tated Nazi 
atrocities by his activities as an ioteUigence 
officer in die Balkans. Tbt commissioQ found 
that Mr. Waldheizn had volunteered tojoin the 
Nazi Brown Shirts, an aim^ militia responsi- 
ble for many atrocities against Jews. 


Jewish sources said that because of the poeti- 


cal importance oi the dmlomatic reco^tioa 
id&rad, ' ' 


between the Vatican and Isra^ that agreement 
probably wSl not be affected by the P^’s 
action. Nevenbeless, they described it as a slap 


in the face at.a time when the Pope appeared to 
be working for an «nd to tradiUonm Rmnaia 
Catbril^ewish mistnist and hostility. 

Robert Goldnmnn, the Euzopean lepresen- 
tative the Anti-Defamation League, said the 
lea^ condeomed the award *1n the strongest 
terms. 

‘*One must wonder and be at die 

judgment of those who made this award," 1^. 
Cjoldmann said. *Tt U the view of this o^aasar 
tioQ that the Vatican owes the world an 
nation foe an aw^ that is at least incongruous 
and at worst a devaluation of the work of those 
who genuine^ labcv for, and are committed to» 
saf^uardmg h»TrniTi r^ts." 

The Order of Pius ZX is <»e of five orden! of 
knighthood amferred directly by die 
who officially received Mr. Waldheizn in 15 
amid wide^read intematimial protest 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Aixdier, Best-SeDing Bntisli "Waiter, ^ 

Geared of IndderXiadingObargBs 


• hSlSst among indhaduals 

null* of TmSmd JaAastryfor alted inader tr ading involving a 

He^enied any 

“T am dSSdV die vindicatkm and 
friends and colleagues.and wdl-wisto ^ ^ 

portive duri^tteM ve^ Mr. Arto milliori^ 

Tlic invS^tion centesred on a 


Tdevision Oronp, by Ixmdon-^ascd con^omcrate MAL. w&. 

AiiAiets^e,1>&y,monii»Aa^hoat± 


U,IL Lords Decry 
^Massive^ EU Fraud 


Return 

LONDON — European 
Union taxpayers are being de- 
frauded on a massive scale and 
neither the Euremean Commis- 
sion nor nationm govermneots 
are willing to crack down on the 
cheats, a committee of the 
House of Lords said in a r^X)ri 
prepared for release on Friday. 

Members of Britain’s un- 
elected upper house of Paiiiah 
meot painted a picture of ram- 


pant fraud in the EU spawned 
by a 


by a spending culture in Brus- 
s^ and perpetuated by a lack 
of political will to do anything 
about it 

"The fraud is massive and 
gromng," Lord Hunt a former 
cabinet secretary, said at a news 
conference. "It is an absolute 
y-andi*t and a gross abuse of the 
taxpayers* mmey.” 

Lora Hunt chairman of the 
Lords Sdect Committee on the 
European Communities, said it 
■was imposrible to estimate the 
fraud since the cheating that 
was detected was just the tip of 
an iceberg. 

But be said one expert. Pro- 
fessor Klaus Tiedmann of Ger- 
many’s Freiburg University, 
had put the fraud at 7 percent to 
10 percent of the ELTs budget, 
or about £4 bQUon to £5 billion 
(S6 billion to S73 billion). 

The Lords report recaps 
some of the abuses listed ^ the 
European Commission in its 
1993 report on fraud: 

• More than 90 percent of ol- 
ive oil bou^t by the EU in ftaty 
was subsl^^d. costing tax- 


payers 33.6 mmin n Eur<^)ean 
Currency Units (S41 million). 

• Also in It^y, 22 million 
Ecus was paid for training 
courses for airline staff tbat 
never took place. 

• In Italy, Greece and France, 
the EU paid 91.5 imllioo Ecus 
for vriieat that either did not 
exist or had deteriorated. 

The European Commission 
put forward a new strat^ in 
March to combat the cheating, 
but the Lords committee said it 
«ras totally inadequate. 

The peers called for mote em- 
phasis oa fraud prevention as 
distinct from detectioi^ a stron- 
ger EU court of audiuKS and 
the appt^tment of a task force 
to review Miere the HU’S finan- 
cial controls are failing. 

A big problem is that EU 
member states have little incen- 
tive or political will to tackle the 
<dieating, the panel said. 


White House Rejects Deal With Haiti ■ 

wAanNCTON j-Jte “ 



ft® Bflhaiv rate 


concede the resignatiat « uBuwuaui 

order to WoA the retiicB of the ooonti/s (toocatwally dech^ 

presideaL the Reverend JeanrBcrtrand Anstide. .. 

Haitiaa proposal induded etecrions for a new meddem 10 

replace the de &to president. Entile Je ma^n L The Washmgpn 

^traiorted. Mr. Jonassaintwasinstdledby themSiWm May 

to reiSS Father Aristide. The Post -said the <^er ^ General 
r>HM ?^ ^gnflrio n was part <rf a stiat«y by Haiti s ^te to fflm 
mtamatfAnar recogmtfon and bring' an esaiog Of the Uaitea 
Natkms trade embargo. 


19 Budieawald Attackers Arrested 


ERFURT, Gennaiw ffieutew) — Ptosecutocs on Thursday 
said 19 df 22 neo-Nazi dnoheads ^lo were released after noting 
at the World War H death caatp at Bucheowald in Thmlngia on 
Saturday had now been niider anesjL 


The came dfterhe^ criticism wakw^at Tbim^^. 


iMa^jsTaa* 

I tte atiiK^ bol thm rdeased all but one (» 1 
' r hnidwig them for identification. 


Parly rhiftfs RaAMuriyaimmArny 

TOKYO (AFP) — J^MUt’s top SoeiaBsts gave appeoval on 
Thursday to'ftime ih&iister Tomiicfai Muiayamas prt ywd to 


COOUNG-OFF PERIOD —President Lech Walesa of Poland 
government <» Thnrsd^ by takii^ a rtfreshuig ^ in a lake at the 


UidlQ UallM Cncandtt/SCRM r > Mat > ea e 

Ae most of a from die biBiDess of 
itial residenoe in Otirod^ near Warsmr. 


re ver se y iiyng - gtatwiing party stand , deelanng the militar y as 

gncoostitutionaL . ^ , 

The Social I>eoiocratic Party’s central executive board also 
approved draft pttii^raide&nes aoo^ting the nation |d flag Mg 
oationkl andiem, as w<fi as the US.-Ji^)an^ recurity ttwty- The 
pl^tfnwrt also States that the pai^ would henceforth, 
ondear pow er as a "proper energy source.” „ . 

Mr. Mun^aiitt hi^ aheady dedaied that the SoGuhsts . would 
give im rKwr tcaditiQoal peieffisc as part of efforra-to 

mawitawi .Thift ptiddincs wiB besobnattcd 

for final approval at a parQr congress on Sq>t. 3. 


Berlusconi to Offer a Plan on Walling Off His Business Empire Frendt Fishing Boat Rons Blocks^ 


CaifMbyOi^Si^fnm Di^auha 

ROME — Prime Minister 


Silvio Berlusconi of Italy will 
propose on Friday a plan to 
keep his business empire sepa- 
rate from his politic ofnee. 
political sources here said 
Thursday. 

Mr. Berlusconi has come un- 
der intense political fire over an 
alleged conflict between the in- 
terests of his S7 biUion-a-year 


Fminvest empire and his posi- 
tion as head of governmenL 
The sources said Mr. Berlus- 
coni would disdose his plan at a 
ntidday news o^erence. 

Under the propos^ die exec- 
utives of Berlusconi’s compa- 
nies would rqxnt drecUy to a 
mmwiittfe that would have the 
right to veto any business move 
it disagreed with. 

"It is a real separation of 
powers," said one source who 


demanded anonymity. "It will 
cut aO link* tetween Berlusconi 
and his company." 

Mr. Bolusconi held a contro- 
veraal meeting ai the weekend 
of cabinet colleagues and escec- 
utives of Finiovest. The guests 
said it was a private gathering, 
but critics argued that those 
present nmst have discussed a 
g^t inquiry invoWing F imn - 
vest executives and Mr. Berlus- 
coni's brother, Paolo. 


The prime minister's brother 
refused to meet Thursday with 
magistrates mvestigating posst- 
Ue bribery on bSialf of the 
prime ministet’s media-based 
tmunvest, his lawyer said. 

The brother was still at large 
deqiite a warrant for his arrest 

on COmiptioD dtar^ ex 

The lawyer, Vittorio Vurga, 
said Mr. B^usconi was wiili^ 
to meet the investigating magjs- 


trate bat die conditions under 
which be would be questioned 
had not yet been negotiated. 

The political tunnoal k^ 
p ressure on the lira,. whtA 
reached a record low a&tinst the 
Deutsche mark, aithoo^ the 
currency mana^d a sm^ gain 
in late European trading. 

The mark traded as itigh as 
1,010.50 hre. although it dosed 
at 1,005J7 in London, down 
from 1,00<L5. (Roa^ AF) 


Moscow Exerts Pressure^ but Bosnian Serbs Are Holding Out 


BAYONNE, France (Reuters) — A Fieodi trawler brake 
thm mgfr a of its home port, Hendaye, and 

moved out to sea Thursday in a hafl of bolts and stones thrown hsi 

firfiefTnen angry ewer FrenA tuna fititinx methods. 

The txnwkr SandimoCcniane bi^ thxoi^ with the hete of a 
Fieikhpofice lamutii from nearby Bayonne that h^ been allowed 
by the laniards to mter dm port, maritime authorities said. A 
few whidows on the Shodane-Gorinae were riattered. they 

to hnld talfcw^ 

die ^paitisb Tnininiwr of' agticulhire, firiieries and Food. Lids 
Atienza, a ntimstiy .spokesman said, ^lanirii firiKcniea assert- 
rtiat tlw- F iwwA Aiftaett diat are longer Qian allowed by 

European Umctt r^iilatioo& 

-’sSluriiitwie 


PARIS (AFP) — i French anthorities seraed (tirnifute early 
[ram me! 


By Steven Erlanger 

Sew York Tima Sentee 

MOSCOW — Witii a weekend deadline ap- 
proaching on Bosnia, Russia still expects the 
Bosnian Serbs to accqn the peaixplan drawn 
by the major powers, Fordgp Mimster Andrei V. 
Kozyrev said Thursday. 

'^here’s still time," Mr. Kozyrev said in an 
interview before to Geneva for a wedi- 

end meeting of forrigo ministers. "There's still 
two days bdore we meet in Geneva. 

“And 1 fa<^ in these days the message we 
communicated through General Cradiev be 
properly understood by the Serbs. We eiqiea 
them, hke the other sidm, to say yes." 

[The Bosnia Serbs said Thursday tb^ were 
stiddng to their previous position, which was 
widely viewed as tantamount to a rejection. 
A^ce France-Presse reported From Belgrade. 
Thi^ self-prodaimed paniament. ending a spe- 
cial sesaon Thursday on the international peace 
plan, said the Bosnuu Serb side was willmg to 


take p^ in negotiations but had “derided to 
maintain its positions” stated last week.] 

The Russian defense nunisier. General Pavel 
S. Gradiev. returned Thursday from a crip to 
Serbia as part of a Russian effort to get the 
Bosnian S«bs to change their minds and accept 
the “take it or leave ir peace plan. 

Mr. Kozyrev said the Russians bad decided 
that General Grachev, better than any diploma^ 
would be able to speak to Bosnian SOTian nrili- 
tary commanders in terms they would 
underatand. 

“We're trying to provide them as persmuive an 
argument as possible: that's what the inieraa- 
tional Gommuni^ wants and eiqiects us to da as 
traditional friends of the Serbs,''^Mr. 'Kosyiev 
said. 

But he acknovried^ frustration with the Bos- 
nian Serbs, saying, *^0 one controls them." 

The ^or powers — the United States, Rus- 
aa, Britain, France and Germany — have 
warned the Serbs that they faced tighter econom- 
ic sanctions, increased rotary pressure and a 


removal of the intematkmal arms embargo on 
the MusUm-kd Bosnian govenunent if tb^ did 
not back the peace plaxL 

But Western diplomats say there is reluctance 
on the part of the Russians, as wdl as the British 
and Ftendi, to start punishing the Sertis immedi- 
atdy if the plan is rejected. Tbat is a topic Mr. 
Koryrey refused to discuss. 

Tte diplomats say that the Bosnian Serbs must 
acoqrt the patchwork rnan for the partition of 
Bosnia-Herzegovina, which c^ers the Serbs 49 
percent of Bosnia and the Muslims and their 
Croat allies 51 perceoL Constituticmal arrange- 
ments wnd Other win remain 

the ^{domats say. 

Mr. Kozyrev said the Russians were ofieiing 
the Bosnian Serbs another inducement to agree: 


United Nations, not the North Atlantic TreaDr 
OrganizBtioiL 


a larger contingent of Russias peac ek eroe ra , not 
only around S^jevo but is otnri' areas ^ Serbs 


may ^pedfy. 

he stressed the Russian position, also 
stated by General Gradiev, chat any Russian 
pea c dceqpera must be under the oommand of the 


■ Serb Attack Condeinned 
Furious over an ambush tbat killed a British 
solffier, the co nun a ndnr of peacdoeepqs in Bos- 
nia accused Serbian faces Tfanrsday of ddiber- 
atdy attacking a United Nations fuel convoy and 
rgected their excuse as “worthlesa,” The Associ- 
Press reported from Sarajevo. 

The commander, lieotenant General Micihad 
Rosa traveled to the Bosnian Serbs’ stronghold 
of Pale to protest the ambush Wednesday: the 
canvoy and a subsequeor attack cm French 
peacekeepers who came to the rescue. 

Tbe Serbs asserted that their soldiers had fired 
on the trucks because tfa^ mintAfA them for a 
Bosnian government convoy. 

*nus assertion subsequentfy proved wholly 
wordiless, pvea the fact that me later was 
opened cm a Rench mifitaiy unit rb*r was at- 
: to recover the vefaicies,’’ General Rose 


Thoisday friim die Paris home of Berhaxd Tb{:m^ die dd>t-ridded 
tycocm and Idfixsc nrendu- of Paifiament, it was disclosed, 

. The seiznre at the home of the politician, who faces fraud and 
tax evasioo charges, was earned out ax the order of one of his 
oreefitota, the bank CiMit Lyoomais. Eariier. there were reports 
the seizure had beencardered by tax aatbaatka. Mr. Tapie is said 
to owe tim bank 1.2 Mlkm fiaiics (S221 infilibii); 


Lagln U.S. AIDS Researdh Assailed 


WASHZNGTC^ (NYT) — A pasd of die National Acaddny 
of Scaenoes said Wednes^ thm a lack of stupes on sexual 
behavior and dn% use bad blocked raosr^ in fitting AIDS. 

The committee ctf the Xnstitate of ftfedidhe, vriudi is part of the 
academy, said in a report dtat more research across disdpliaes 
was needbd to attack AIDS and called for a con^ndiaiave 
national sorvisy of semial behavior and dn^ use, wbSdi are the 
mi^orccmtribatotsto’tlie^ffead of AIDS. ' 


Sababwe FoKoe Halt Bank Protest 



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U.S. Army Plan Gives Women Some Combat Spots 


By Eric Schmitt 

Sew YerA Tima Serrice 


WASHINGTON — The 
army is planoiog to to 
women more than 32,000 com- 
bat poatioos now closed to 
them, but strong protests from 
senior ^erals forced the dvQ- 
ian army secretary to retreat 


from a mudi more ambitious 
plan. 

The new plan would allow 
women into some units that are 
currently oCf-Umits, but would 
keep tb^ m rear headquarters 
in many units and restricc their 
ability to compete for assi^- 
mmits that are neoessaiy to rise 
to the amor’s top ranks. 


The army secretary, Tc^ D. 
West Jr., and Genom Gordon 
R. SuQh^ the army riiief of 
staff, dashed last month over 


how widriy to expand oppoitu- 
he battie- 


nities for women on the 
fiefd. Mr. West wanted to opa 
virtually an ptsitlons not Uray 
to involve direct combat 


defease axtilleiry battalions, he- 
licopters that fly cover for 
tanks, and battalim headquar- 
ters pi combat en^neers and 
spedaF opocatioos forces, arnty 
officials said. 



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Under Mr. WesPs ort; 
plan, pOTtions would have 
opened in units such as the hdi- 
o^ter groups that 1^ special 
operations troops into combat 
wt many generals signed that 
women were not ptayscally St 
for such amts and w^d cause 
morale problems. 


Undo' the compromise plan, 
women would be assigned to air 


But women would still be 
baned fiom more than a quar- 
ter of the anny’s jobs, ineZuding 
operating an advanced field ar- 
tmenr weapon caUed the Multi- 
ple Laimrii Rodeet System, or 
uying hdiooptera canying spe- 
cw operations tnx^ 

If aCTm wed Defense Sec- 
letaiy william J. Peny. theplan 
would ellectivefy Mow women 
from advancing along tiic three 
nwin rot^ to the army’s senior 
leaderriiq^: armor, infantry and 
field 


I^Ush Depose 
AihebiVicar 


Remea 

LONDON — The 

fTMitrfi aS Fnglanrf lips fKfc 

missed a vicar who does not 
bdieve in Cod, qpaikbg 
angry protests Thursday 
ficra ti5 (tf his ftilow cler- 
gymen. 

The Reverend Anthcnrir 
Freeman. 48, was dismissed . 
by his local bishop after 
writing in a book, "There is* 
nothing out tiKie — or if 
there is, we can have no 
knovriedge of it." 

SixQrHfive (denes said the 
order, “reverses a Toii^ 
flniTph £/[ Pn g^and tndl-- 

tioD that tcdecates and-vat; 
ues a range (tf views." 


HARAKE, Zimbabwe ^tenters) — Riot pcffice disperse moxe 
than %009 striking bank woriceis after duey rampaged tiirmi^ tibil 
c^tal Thoesday, as unton chiefs h^ talks vrith govemn^t 
ogjcials on a stoppage over pay mcieases has ccppled the 
fmandal sector. 

The strikers, coocemed tiiat some of their members , was 
iritirning to wak undera maiiagiemeril'ithfeat bf fmoed 

(dosing re the few banks to remain (^len. Thm was no viotmed 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


IIk BbI& Sea haa been inTaded by. Mhe-grcca. toodc algajfe 
Swedirii srientists 'nuy urged people and pets to stay our 
df any tainted water. Tbe al^e has pforndmed becaaseof uminiid-’ 
W vrann, cairn weather. Sdentists beEeve a tm gp swatii; ctf the 
Baltic^ .stretchiim from soatheastem Sweden across to ^dand 
and sooth to Poland, Lithuania and Latvia, has been' hit V /AF} 

^??* ****^ ** Boast on Ihiiisday, floofiss 
inindra re houses and roads and diauptine rail traffic, fire 
brigade reficials said. . /FetOasJ 

to Seatilb. win bi^n Nov. 
oog ” — 


'Nonstop fligfafa frim 


Nrethwest Andines said in Hong Kong. *' fAFj 

htieoiatioMl Airport bto iwra dosed in a strike by^ 
N^nan airport wrekers nmon- demandii^ an end to miUtaxy 




(jRaUeaJ 

^ ^ bngataAnhatit 

^ ihirdto^ tou^ attraction. A sptAesman for Sun Itttema- 
tte nsort, m kilometers (lOQmfles) west ofi 
J^nneriang, described the strike aS an “unlavrful mdi^al' 

/AFP/, 


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Imprime per Offprint. JSntedcrEvanalc, 73078 Paris, 






INTERNAnONAL HERAU> TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JULY 29. 1994 


Pages 



fw M)' .fjJ-if". r»* <•- re 



By Aim Devr^ . .„ 
and Daniel' WiHiams ■ 

H'ashH^ PmS&viee ' . 

, W^HINCyTON.r— The best the JRepublicaa ■ 
party has to offer ia the fora^ policy ndd^'has 
moved from scattered attadts to a fiill-4ca|fr 
psaull (m FresideDt BQl Qiatoo's han/^nig of. 
fMidgn policy, accusiag tbcDeinoimicadmmifr: '■ 
Jtrauon of mcoinpetence. 

practitiooeis. at a fgnim'. bdd 
W^^ay. former Secretary of State James A 
. vSker 3d and former D^ense Seca^etaiy Rldiird • 
B. Ch«iey, ^ poteodal rivals for the. 1996 
Republican Par^ presidential nrtmmatinii. - 
^ Th^ Jost their jobs in. an dection- in ' vdadS 
Preadeart Gecnse Bash allowed Mr. Ctinton- tVi 
make domestic poKcy — and Mr. Budi’s ladc (rf . 
It — the groond on which the battle Jbr the White . 
'House would be waged. Watching fordgncnses. 
Mevil Mr.^ Clinton almc«t daily, ttelRqniUi-' 
get back the political teacritffly ■ 

Mr. Baker, Mr. Cben^« Heniy A. Kis^uer,- 

wiio was secretary of state in the Nixoii and ' 


flds^strations, and the former chief delegate to 
tte'United Nations, Jeahe J.'Kjiimatrick, made 
dear in addresses to the Rraublican National 
Omizmitee Foreign Ptdicy JFonun thai comp^ 
tisioe dot 'sim^ Preadent Qmton.*s policies 
rrhas become a central Rqmblican Party theme. 
^ Mr. Baker said that to most Americans, for- 
ei^ jpdicy is litre tite pIumM^ little attention 
u^hd “until something goes wrong, anri thm all 

-By that measure, he and olheis put Mr. Clin- 
ton's snccessful handling of the hGd^e Pjigt and 
rdations with Rusda and former Soviet states 
mto ^ worfcing-phimbmg cat^oiy: Tiidt atten- 
bonis paid. Bni the problems of Haiti, Bosnia, 
.Smnalia anda handful of other Usues are eateii^ 

' plesttf things going suftidendy wrong as to make 
the nation take note, they.saio. 

. Mr. Ointon, Mr. Baker «»id i “has squandered 
'American credibitiw and undermined our pr^ 
. gmiy aiM ! around the world.” He accused the 
preskient ot larfrm^ ’*Sin ovmall plan and strate- 
gy direction’* forhis foreigD policy and of failing 
to assess ai^ act cm isriies in proportion lo the- 
-American national interests involved. 


Mr. Baker, Mr. Cheney md Mrs. Kirkpatrick 
an said Haiti,' where'Mr. Clinton has threatened 
an invasion, is not a vit^ U.$. interest. They said 
.it was not worth American, bloodshed, and that 
South Kot^ instead, should be the priority 
InteresL 

Mr. Baker and Mr. Cheney suggested that the 
Clinton administration has lacked^resolve in fac- 
ing up to North Koteaii Mr. Chet^- mock^ 
former President Jimn^ Carter's visit to Pyong- 
yang. in particular his suggestion that North 
Korea was not an outlaw state. 

Neither of the diTcials who served in the Bush 
administration was asked — or has offered — to 
explain tbeai administratio&’s lack of action 
w^ I^ngy^ look the first steps to divert 
nuclear material to buSd a bomb during 1 989. 

Mr. Baker said the president’s resolve does not 
match bis riietoria ’’A United States preadent 
should never, never, never, never threaten the use 
of force unless he j^rqiared to follow i^** be 
to Cunton stat 


said, a reference i 
and lUti. 


I statements on Bosnia 


on Clinton 


Cheney was even tougher. He said the 
Clinton admmistration was one of “the least 
competent in the 20th century.” He called the 
Clinton handling of Haiti an “abject national 
embarrassment’' and accused the Danocrals of 

allowing the miliiaiy to become dan^rousJy 
underfunded. 

'With less-pointed language. Mr. Kissinger 
made a similar case. He said Uie Clinton foreign 
policy team bad been unable to grasp the realities 
ctf power or the lessons of history'. 

The partisan attack comes at a time when Mr. 
Clinton is walking a tightrope over a canyon of 
potential crises. 

He is pledged to restore Presideoi Jean Ber- 
trand Ansude to power in Haiti, by use of arms if 
necessary. 

He is cmninitied to punishing the Bosnian 
Serbs for rqection of an intemationally brokered 
Balkan peace pact, through use of American air 
power. 

U.S. troops are being sent to the margins of 
ravaged Rwanda withont much of a dear idea 
how the brutal dvil war there ^ be resolved. 


Simpson Hot line: 250,000 ^Clues' 


By Jim Newton 

tas jiagals 71 mr Stnm 

LOS ANGELES — Encotira^d tiie 
promise trf a huge reward, or the chai^ to. 
. contribute to the mvestigation, 250,000 caUeis 
I have flooded a newly created hotline with 
'about the OJ. Simpson .murder. cas^ whjje 
rimilarfy besiegedpcuce have designated a full- 
time “due chaser” to nm down the cqd> 

ring to tfamn. 

“If s beyond belicT," Mr. Shape’s lead at- . 
.. tomey, Robert L. Shai»Tb, said ’Wednesday of 
' the hotfine dduge. He said.caOs have .become 
so overvriielming that the operators have had to. 

> install a spedaf back-tm recording system to 
keep op with the crush. 

- T^>stera Imre included private investi^tocs 
with dues based laxgdy cm news repc^ ama- 
teur detectives with ih^es hhiduating other 
>- wcmld-be suspects and people dannmg to have 
witnessed the events sunounding the murdera 

> of Nicole Brown Snqrson, 35, and Ronald L 
C^dman, 25, on June 12 outride ho* condo- 
minium in the Brentwood section of 1.0$ Ange: 
les. 

Althoogh some of the tips are seemizigty 
credible, many qrpMKU to be the products os 
overactive hnagmation s. One Maryland wemn' 
. an has called repeatedly to of dreams in 


.'wdiicb she sees ann ^her killer. To her frurira- 
tiem, Mr. SSmpsem’s camp ^as not gotten back 
to her. 



woiiong with the Sbwpsftn 
•“But if 1 get one call in a hundred thaf s a good 
lead, ifs worth iL** ' 

' Rismg to that thin promise, investigators on 
both ridtt .of the probe are painstakingly dt^ 
ingdown Mch ci thdr leads, rdnetant to pass 
iq) any infonnatiem that could later prove iir>- 
portanL . . 

. The pace of tq)s has persuaded some Los 
'Angeles FoGce D^artment facials that Mr. 
Simpson's camp may be fueling the fires in part 
.to occupy datives otherwise be 

buQdmg a case againri Mr. Sinpsan, 47. 

. Any tip that is not dibcked out amid be used 
against the proseentiem at triaL Mr. .Sirqtson’s 
camp already bas marip clear its intention to 
attadc the thoroughness arid competence of the 
investi^tion into their chent 
“Ihm’s. people that are mving ns tlteories, 
there’s p^chics, that kind <» tiring,” said De- 
tective Domis P^e of the police dq>art- 
menfs Robbety-Homkide DivisiorL “And 
then there’s people wriio have, information. 
WeTre dieddng it dl out.” 



Fred PlniDcirRnner, 

L. Shqiiroi, lead attmney for OJ. SimpscHi, at flie Los Angeles conrtihonse. 


tlx~Counsd Denies He Tried to Influence Whitewater Inquiry 


J^oa^SalbyOurSt^F^Dtfaidies 

WASHINGTON — The for- 
mer White House couns^ Ber- 
nard W. Nussbaum, dori^ ^ 
Tbuisday that be or anypiredse 
at the White House had' fried to 
influence the govemment.mves- 
ti^tion of. the WhitewaW af- 
He said meetn^ that he 
Upd bdd frith baoldng rf^nla- - 
JOTS “were proper.” ■ • . - 
. “I did not, nor as fm as I am 
anvare, did anyone dse at the 
White House ever seek^b ^rect 
the outcome cf w inteif ere with 
that investiffitibn,” Mr. Nuss- 
baum told &e House Banldng 
Committee cm the seccnid day 
of its hearing into Whitewater. 

The ccmtacts by Wlrite House 


officials oaocemed a decirion 
by Resolution Trust Cenrp., 
whkli investigated foiled sav- 
ings and loan tnstitiitioDS, to 
refer mi mvestigation of the col- 
■h^ed'Ma^soo’ Gnarin^ Sav- 
ings ^ Loan to the Justice De- 
partment for a possible 
criminal investigation. Ftesi- 
-deai KB Clintcm was named by 
Rescrintioo Trust as a po^le 
witness. 

Theowner oi tiie savmgs and 
.loan, James B..McDqug^ and 
Iris wife^ Susan, were partners of 
Mxi-C&ijaa and bis wife^ Hilla- 
7 Roi&iam CfintoDf more than 
a decade ago in a vacatiem de- 
Vetopmeat w^ect in Arkansas 
kno^ as Whitewater. . 


Questions have been raised 
ab(^ whether federally insured 
funds from the bank were fun- 
neled into the failed investment 
arid into retniQg a Qintcni cam- 
' paign debt 

Lo(ridi% back at the mood in 
the White House in late 1993, 
Mr; Nussbaum said Wlutewater 
was “not a major crisis.** 

Mr. Nussbaum said he had 
been tcrid the Treasury De- 
partment’s general counsel, 
Jean Hanson, that there was a 
referral for a posrible criminal 
investigatkm ra Madisem. 

“The. rKntons were not ob- 
jects or targets of the investiga- 
tion,” Mr. Nnssbaom said. 
“They were potential witness- 


es,” he said, as investors in the 
Whitewater land deal with the 
owner of the savings and loan. 
Rmublicans countered that 
le Qin 


been given 
recaving 


the Clintons had 
qmdal treatment 
mfomiatian about, the Madisem 
investigatioo. 

DesOTbing a series of meet- 
ings that he had held with gov- 
emmeot ctfficials, Mr. Nuss- 
baum said: “We recognize that 
as a general proposition, they 
should not occur. However, 
there was no flat prcriribltion.” 

But be said the discusrions 
were justified because the 
White House needed to be in- 
femned to re^ond to |»ess 
leaks about the mvestigation. 


He ^>ait considerable time 
e^lainmg the one contact that 
his successOT, Uoyd N. Cutler, 
has called uiq)r<qx3^. Mr. Nuss- 
baum acknowledged that he 


had qiuestioned whether it was 
proper for Rc^ C. Altman, 
the acting head of Resolution 
Thisc, to recuse himself from 
the investigation. (AP. Reuters) 


POLITICAL NOTESiC 


Republican Bight Wprries the Bllddie 

WASHINGTON — Many middle-of-the road Republi- 
cans. including some senior' members of tbe Senate, have 
concluded with a mixture of alarrn and amazement that the 
Religious Right — already a potent force at tbe grass roots 
level — is poised to take control of the national party and 
predpiiaie a political confrontation unparalleled since the 
rise of Barry M. Goldwater 30 years ago. 

And, they say. these moderate Republicans have only 
ihemsdves lo blame. While Christian conservatites have 
worked tirelessly to lake over party organizations at all levels 
from coast to coast, party mc^erates have remained passive 
on the sidelines, unwilling lo fight viith members of their own 
party over abortion and oUier explosive sodal poli^' issues 
that dominate the conservatives' agenda. 

Unless ibdr own wing becomes more agg-ressive, the main- 
stream R^bUcans warn, tbe Religious Right will reach the 
staled goal of the Christian Coalition founder, Pat Robertson, 
of wi nning “a working majority of the Republican Party” by 
1996. And that could alienate millions of ihd^endent voters'. 

“If we let this thing continue to percolate withoui attacking 
it head-on,” declares Senator Arlen Specter. Republican of 
Pomsylvania. a leading moderate, “we will assure Prudent 
Clinton's re-election. 

Senator Nancy Landon Kassebaum. Republican of Kan- 
sas, shares Mr. Specter’s assessment. The Reli^ous Right 
“has taken over a lot in Kansas." she says, “including my ow’n 
coim^ organization.” 

**P^ of the problem.” she says, “is that moderates aren't 
willing to work in the trenches, while the Christian conserva- 
tives have gone door to door and worked hard and won 
control fair and square. My hat's off to them for that” (LAT) 

House Acts to Save California Desert 

WASHINGTON — The House approved legislation ex- 
tending wilderness protection to almost a third of the 25 
million acres of California desert. 

The House adopted the bill on a 298 to 128 vote Wednes- 
day, concluding a fractious debate that began in May and 
marking an important milestone in a quarter-century' long 
effort % conser\'ationists to preserve a huge area of the 
Mojave. Sonoran and Great Basin desen areas. 

Those lands have been under development pressure from a 
urban populations. The bill now go^ to a conference commit- 
tee with me Senate, which passed its own measure in Ap^. 

If approved in final form and signed into law, the CaMor- 
nia De^ Protection Act vrill create more wilderness at one 
stroke in the lower 48 states than any legislation in history. 
Only the 1980 Alaska Lands Act protected more federal land 
from development. 

The California desert, extending over much of the south- 
eastern part of the state, is rich in biological, geological and 
aicfaaeoioacal resources. 

It has 760 species of wildlife, including endangered species 
such as the desert tortoise, and it has scores of mountain 
ranges, extinct volcanoes, huge sand dunes and uncounted 
pictographs and peiroglyphs left by early American Indian 
cultures. (WP) 

Quote/Unquote 

Formex Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d on Presideni 
Bill Clinton’s haodimg of foreign policy: “We have a silualion 
where prtnxrises are unkept; we have a situation where policy 
fl^flcm debase the currency of United States credimlity. 
With Haiti alone, tbe United Stales seems to change policies 
more often than most of us seem to change shirts. And it is 
July here in Washington.” 


Hou^ Hearings Roil Waters at Treasury 


By Stq^heai LabaUm 

Rm yorfe Tlnis Swite 

WASHINGTON — The 
\nritewater hearing have cre- 
ated ft bittei rift betweea the 
Treasury secretazy, the dqniw 
secretary and tbe dqwizneD^s 
top lawyer that offidwls s^ 
would lead almost inet^bhr to 
a'shake-up at the dqrartoieat. 

llie thm officials have pro- 
vided investigaton with con- 
flicting accounts of their xoles 
conceniiim contacts with the 
White fiouse about the 
3Mritewater«» « 

As word of tbe discrepancaes 
bave filtered ont in recent days, 
litpeirtns within ibis Tkeasniy. 
^gpartment have increased to 
the point where the lawyer and 
hf r clients dee^ distznst one 

Another, officials said. 

' 'The conflicts invrave Secie- 
tluy Dovd Bentsen, a fonner 
senator trom Texas who has 
^usht lo put hinwelf above the 
WbJt^ater fray; Dqmw T» 
siuy Secretary Rogg C^Al^ 
vwflti a ooD^ fnoid “ 
dent Bill diston who was seen 


as a hk^ successor to Mr. 
. Benibdi until Whitewater buS 
bled up, and the geneial coun- 
sel, Jean E. Hanson,.a Minneso- 
ta native and Washington 
newcomer iriio friends say is 

fw»Kttg iiMv earingly as 

the two'others deny her veraiori 
tfeveintsl.' 

Officials Bud that Mr. Bent- 
sen was alro digrleased with 
Kfr. Alfiman’s handKng of the 
case, but ^fhac for now, he. is 
litm at leMt a nv^tcum 

- of pul&'siipport . 

Next weeli;. the three oCfidals 
win qipear before the House 
and &mate Banking commit- 
tees. One perm invSved in the 

thapigpara- 

tiem forfhe hearings to getting 
ready for a civil lawmt. 

. Until Whitewater threw it off 
haUnee, Tfeasuty.had been the 
itodEde-free of the'admin- 
istiatidn’s niqor -cabinet de- 
partments 

Mn Bentsen and Mr. Altman 
bctiLiriayed rigtriSoant roles in 
preasing a nm&er of tc^ C3m- 


ton pricnities, tike the budgM 
and the Norm American Free 
Trade AgreemenL 

At issue is. a series of events 
involv^ M& Kmson and Mr, 
Altm^m his role at the Reso- 
lution Trust Coep., theindepeo- 
dent agency oveneemg the sav^ 
intt aro loan bailout. 

addition to his Treasury 
job, Mr. Altman was acting as 
the trust corporation’s head. 
Mr. Bentsen by law is the head 
of the periky-making arai<rf the 
trust oorpMation. 

Last 29, Ms. Han.son 
briefed the White House coun- 
sel at .tiie time; Bernard W. 

M inaehanm, ahnat a trust cmyv 
ration investi^tion into an Ar^ 
Vanaag saviugS' association, 
Madista Guaranty, owned 1^ 
the Clintons’ partner in the 
Whitewater real-estate venture; 
and into a law firm wboe Ifilla- 
zy Rodham Clinton had been a 
partner. 

The meeting was fdlbwed 
a series of disenssioos between 
White Bouse and Treasu^ fa- 
cials about the mvestigation 


whirii led to Mr.- Nussbaum’s 
ition vtiien they were re- 
this spring. 

The accounts of the three 
Treasury officials bave been 
mvided to The New York 
Times by investiptors and ccAr 
leag^ of the omdals who are 
sfifinng to either defend or em- 
barrass 

Mr. Bentsen has said he was 
never invedved in the White 
Hobse-Treasmy contacts and 
' knew zrothing oi tbe talks that 
occnired in September and 
February untfl were re- 
vealed m news accounts in 
March. 

Mr. Altman ha* said that he 
knew nothhm oi Ms. Hanson’s 
briefing of Mr. Nussbaum in 
Septentber. 

Ms. Hanson has said that she 
went to the White House in 
Sq>tember at Mr. Altman’s in- 
stnictioii. 

She wrote in a memorandum 
to Mr. Altman that she had 
briefed Mr. Bentsen in ^tem- 
ber about her taltB with the 
Hi^te House. 


Away From PolKies 


m 


■ W tiat WOUmiBlTO MWiM ^ 

s^ct Ang. 1, is being chalUnged^ businesses; ixadeassoaft- 
ioas and tobacco compames 


rani uuw 
Cingdom 

^Scrt^andSn^fttooHiter. _ . .. 

» Maw Crayob cnyoas tiwt otaatesmeBs of chbcolat^ bubble 

-Mfl Slit when iiscdjnay tempt chadren to bat them and 

be removed frean stores, the New York stele consiOTer 
Stef Ws- “Magic Scent" crayons, introduced last week, have 


tiny, a mma- fnied capsulcs mbted into the wax. The capsules 
burst as the crayon rube pqier. 

• A hman-MTOf” by a fingerprint examing in Albaiy, 

New Y ork , allowed a man sou^t on murder charges to sl^ 
threnqb the hands of New York uly law enforcement offid^, 
apparently allowing him to kill again, state officiate said. 
Andre Fcreman was irieased after a fingerprint check showed 
no prior arrests. Then on July 9, tiie ponce say, he stabbed his 
pregnant rirlfriend, Cheiyl Newbn^ 31, m Central Park, 
where bothhad been Ib^ in a tent 

• WhBe a sihgle attrinpt to make a test tnbe baby costs about 

^,000,'tbe ptooohire fails so oftoi that the average price of a 
succesrfhlpr^nan^qpioarites lOtiniesihat aKoraisgto a 
.study. The study was oondueted by Dr. Peter J. Neumann of 
l^'ectHt^ in Bethesda,' Maryland. AP.frrT 


ira bi 

osier to subicnite 
lor' new toll free 

rice. 

ly ot 05 - 437-437 


psaskihebuller... 


WSm Unw* II •njthnf ftB <* 


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S.-l^ N • C • ^.p-q-R-E 




LASSERRE 

doting July 30 
ofiar dinner 
Reopening Auguti 30 



The most 
valuable sight 
in London 

Offices in The Royal Exchange 
look out onto the Bank of England 


Quabty office space 

from S10 aq ft - 11.230 eq ft. 

Letting coneuhanis 

Hfliler Parker **a 7 ^ 606 6600 


M Guardian 

hcpmitt 


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P!Eige4 


FRIDAY, JULY 29, 199^ 

o p I w I o nr 


Reralh, 


“''“SrSSri httttt ^ Bleak Future (See Rwanda) Is Here Ahead of ^ . 

* T-r7-n«wTNrt'mM_c.«,wv R,r ed States fccIs &om SS^th^tufc JwWs a 


PUBLCOfeo WITH THF. W.tt lURK TflHK *S(0 THf WASHINGTON «»T 


G>iigress Looks at Chiiia 


Last year, PlcsideDt Bill CliDtoa found 
a constructive way to heal the rift be- 
tween Congress and \^te House on 
China, linfing Bering’s privileges 
to modest improvements in its human 
rights p^onnance. But this year, after 
an aggresave business lobbying cam- 
pa^u he junked his own solunon and 
extended trade privilttes unconditional- 
ly. Now it is up to Congress to tr^' to 
repair the It can be^ by pass- 

ing Illation that would relink tariff 
rates for certain Chinese goods to mini- 
tmuD human rights standards. 

The annnii? stTU^es ovcT China’s tar- 
iffs stem from the outrage that many 
Americans fdt when Deng Xiaoping or- 
dered am^ tanks to mow down students 
demonstrating for democracy in Beijing's 
Tiananm en Square five y^TS ago. But the 
issue is no longer just Tiananmen. That 
one barbaric act unma^ed the true dC' 
lure of a r^^me that was known abroad 
mainly for its eccmomic lefcwms. 

Now people are more aware that China 
tortures prisoners, persecutes religious 
believers, and is wagi^ a sustain^ as- 
sault gainst the inoi^ous culture of 
Tibet It also profits from selling Ameri- 
cans the products of prison labor and 
violates human r^is pledges to Wash- 
ington. China will continue to flout inter- 
nadonal norms as long as it believes it is 
immune from serious retaliation. 

On Tbttisday, a House subcommittee 
holds hMTing^ on a bill introduced by 
Nancy Pdosi, Richard Gephardt and Da- 
vid Bonior that would impose high tariffs 


on products made or export^ by the 
Clunese army or associated militapr com- 
panies or certain state industries pre- 
viously named by (be U.S. trade repre- 
sentative as possible targets for re- 
i^atioD in trade (hsputes. Exports from 
private burincsses and j<wt venturK 
would be exempt. About a sixth of Chi- 
nese exports would be affected. 

llie bin also asks the administration 
to encourage U.S. businesses in China to 
follow a volunt^ code of conduct, a 
step which Mr. CUnton said he favored 
at the time he abandoned his own hu- 
man rights sancrions but in which be 
seems to have lost interest since. 

The point is not to punish China, but 
to marimiTe the positivc influence that 
America could exercise as its biggest cus- 
tomer. Being's sales to the United 
States, from whi<di it earns almost four 
times as much as it pays out for purchases 
in America, are indispensable to China's 
developmenL China’s leaders understand 
I his very w^, even if America's do not 
The Pdosi-G^ihardt-Bonior bill en- 
joys wide ^port and could wdn a major- 
ity when it comes to the House floor, 
probably next wedt A companion Senate 
bill has been introduced by George 
Mitchell. Given the likelihood of a pres- 
idential veto, it is doubtful that these 
bills wQl ever become law. Still, they 
may help teach both the Chinese leaders 
and Pre^dent Clinton the h uman 
rights issue will not go away until China 
starts treating its people decently. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Republican House? 


Political predictions qjuickly become 
hopes, or fears, and political people start 
acting as if they m^t become true. So it 
is wim the prospect that the Republicans 
just might take over ^ House of Repre- 
sentatives this falL For outright Republi- 
can control, the party would need to pick 
up 40 seats; such a shift has not occurred 
since the post-Watergate election of 
1974. But Ftesident Bill Clinton's popu- 
larity is low, and many Democratic in- 
cumbents from basically Republican 
districts are retiring. So while the Re- 
puWcan whip. Newt Gingrich, is a man 
whose bold pr^ctions often border on 
the rash, his claims about Republican 
chances cannot be dismiss ed. 

The prospect (rf a big shift in the House 
— even one short of a change in party 
control — is already having a large im- 
pact on legislation. House Republicans 
have been imowing an excqptioiud d^ee 
of party discdpUiw that translates into 
uniiorm oppostion to virtually all of the 
Clinton program. What is rignificant is 
that the two dozen or so moderate-to- 
liberal Rraublicans in the House have 
not been throwing many votes the White 
House's way on crucial issues, the nota- 
ble exception being the North American 
Free Trade Agxe^ent, which be^ as 
a Republican initiative. But on issues 


Damagmg the Uniyersities 


For decades now, the huge Pentagon 
budget has been used as a backdoor way 
to &ance academic research and the 
training of graduate students in fields 
relevant to defense purposes — and valu- 
able to the civihan ecooomy as wdL But 


$2.8 billion TO alMut $900 milUoii, and 
the House went along with iL 
The rationale was that, with defease 
budg^ shrinking, defense research h^ 
to shrink, too. But SOme ClitiCS think the 
real reason was pique — that the Defense 
Appropriations Subcommittee, angered 
by attacks on its eaimarking of funds for 
projects in its members' home districts. 


chose these cuts to show the mainstreaio 
universities and their congressional 
champions who's boss. 

Either way, tte cuts would stagger aca- 
demic sdenoe and engineering. The Pen- 
tagon provides more than 80 percent ctf 
the federal research funds for electrical 
en^neering, more than 70 percent for 
materials and metallurgy, and more than 
55 percent for conqniter sciences. 

There may well be an argument for 
shifting these programs out of the Pen- 
ta^n to dvilian agencies, and even for 
t rimming them back. But it is foolishly 
d^tructive to cut valued research so 
precipitously with no thought for the 
cons^uences. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Cloeer to Mideast Peace 

The worid witnessed King Hussein, 
President Bill Qinton and Pimie Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Rabin signing the Washing- 
Urn declaration in a tdevised ceremony. 
To the people of the Middle East, the 
event was an affirmation of the {be^- 
fling] of a new era in the region, an era 
of prace and prosperity. 

The choice of Washington as the venue 
for the signing of both the PLO-lsrael 
accord and [this] agreement indicates a 
genoal accqitanoe by the parties of the 
Arab-lsrad conflict that the United 
States is a trustworthy peace broker for 
the r^on. It is to be hoped t^t Wash- 
insTOD will continue to play the role of a 
and honest broker, and wDl make 
further attempts to br^ the deadlock 
on the ^an and Lebanese trades. 


Peace in the r^jon, after 46 years of 
hostility, will come onty through t^ de- 
idopment of mutual trust and good wiO. 
The Washii^ton dedaration commits 
Jordan and Israel to vigorous nida- 
tions aimed at agredng to a peace treaty, 
but the declaration is a step on the 
road to peace, not a treaty in it^. 

— The Gulf Times (Doha, Qatar). 

Jordan and Israd are in many re^pe^ 
complementary countries, economies 
and societies. Each was made smaller by 
being forbidden the other. Eadi is en- 
large by the project of trade, tourism, 
cultural exdiaiige and commercial coop- 
eration between them. &ich a relation- 
ship is the only context in winch the 
autonomous state of PalestineL, now bdng 
created between them, can prosper. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 



Inceraadonal Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED lESI 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Cc^Chaiimen 

RICHARD McCLEAN. PMisher & OuefExeaUivt 
JOHN VINOCUR. fuKWfwfider & WxPraidBe 

• WALTER WELLS. « SAMUEL ART. KATHERINE KNORRaod 
CHARLES NS^XElMXB^DepmEi£b.<n* CAlU.aEWIRlZAsetiaif£<fl»- 

• ROBERT J. DONAHUE • JONATHAN GAC$, «wd fmww fifior 

• RENE fiONDY, DqpiA' /WisAer * JAMES Md.E0D,AiKOfis^ Oucdur 

VDB^?ASfRA.Ckade^lXnfX)r,Eiatre 

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W ashington ^sup back 

a bit hrom the day-to-day 
unfolding of tbe worid's crises, 
and a surprising picture emerges. 
Except for Bosnia and North Ko- 
rea, &e ma^or conflicts that have 
owned tte front pages for the past 
two years — Son^a, Rwanda, 


By Jessica Mathews 


cal manifestatirais is a chrooide 
of three eerily similar sodoectv 
somk-enviFomneatal (we need a 
word for this) breakdowns. 

In an three countries a sugority 
(tf the population lives in absolute 


^ 

ews fid States feds &om JwWs 

people The linkage to povem, J^jjj^suatessaconiprebwjw 

ti^cctoiy. Rwanda’s population environmental aHows .®?2^Scs!S' 

^SdSible by 201 l!&malia’s growth hS a^ni of 

growth is only dighdv slower. 28 cotmtnes SS^nieai of 

Haiti’s 7 million poOTfc will be mass forced migrations ^ ^ jKw tools tq qc w wy 

■I^.p,^«nd«pi5y^- 


(d^iricb 


shortages and acute poverty. —food, basic health, shelter, en^ to hold topsg. 

Security threats of this new ployment, education — don t has been almost comple^y de- TneMesmnanpro 

kind-cap^lcofdi^^ long that 


nations as thcwoughly as any n- 
ternal attadt, and of metastarizr 
ing CO nd^boring states thtou^ 
ethnic tendons and floods of rd- 
ugpes — were supposed to be a 
feature of nexl centiiry. 

Today the Pentagon is pillar- 
ing for action on four fnmts: Hai- 
ti, Bosnia, North Korea and 
Rwanda. Some of die tnx^ in- 
volved are just home from Soma- 
lia. It seems the future has arrived 
sooner than expected. 

In political terms, the catastro- 
phes 2 D Africa and Haiti seem un- 
related. Waning clans hearily 
aimed with weapons oourtety <x 
the Cold War in Somalia, eOinic 
hatred in Rwanda and a centuries- 
old s^-devoDringpChticaloiltuie 
in Haiti are, inde^ vety differeoL 
Yet behind th^ distinct politi- 


60 percent live in aMute pove^ 
ty, as do 76 percent in Haiti and. 
u percent to Rwanda. 

Life expectancy is 46 years in 
the two A&icaiL countries and 10 
years more in Haiti. In all three, 
the aver^ person receives only 80 
percent of the calories necessary 
For normal activity. Tbe meu 
number of years of sdioding' in 
Somalia is 03, in Rwanda 1.1 and 
in Haiti still a riiock^ 1.7. 

Rapid population growth 
drives them conditions. R.wan- 
da's pt^nilatioa denaty has been 
the nicest in Africa — second 
only to Bangladesh among aon- 
islanddevdoptng countries — yet 
its growth has soaring at 33 
percent aimuaUy, dose to the 
world's high^ ^te. The avera^B 
woman has 83 d^dreiL On this 


est is disappearing faster than 
anywhere in the world save tbe 
Ivray Oiast NqiaL The rate 
has accelerated as ciU shortages 
caused by the sanctions force 
greater use chaicoaL 

In Somalia, the environmental 
bottleneck is lack of water. 

All three countries have sof- 


it is easy to foi^ that it b^an as 

a small re6©ec problem. 

Americans tend to ^ th e con- 
flid in pui^ p^tical terms- 
Those in the re^ca worry as 
perhaps wosQ, about w^en 

Both Syria and Israd have used 

force to stop threatening water 


rUi UUVe W711U111S® WIM. M. WW}. W j_ 

ferad a ruinous drop in per capita divetsionsby the other, iratlf^ 
food productkxL, losng 16 to 22 stroyed Kuwait's desaluratiOT 
percent in the laA decade. Per plants in the Gidf War, wh& the 
capita GNP has phnxuneted. Hair Umted States targeted Iraq sw^ 
ti (presanctions} and Rwanda ter systems. The Gdm'sstzat^c 

, 1—. n A t« ttfi <Vtnil1ISIIfl 


KWaiUA, aim iw; — r~f .. , •; • 

camaoBC and envucnmeniti jm- 
^aweg Qjiial ioio nrevemme or 

neariy ttieversWe dttfitti .. 

The United Stttes 
er^TOSt, more mprapriate lo^h; 
cal aim «hg» nmtaiy forces. The 

cost in dc^ and tivei demestie: 

discord and leadership time and. 
attention ai recent crises that' 
pose no threat to immediate. 
American security and yet for' 


have lost 2.4 percent per year 
for a decade. 

Rwanda’s calamitous . esrodus 
a quarter <rf its popnlatioD in a 

few weds, witii me oonsecpient 
threat to ^iie and perhaps to tbe 
stability of other neighb^ odd- 
ly paxaflds the *Thieatr the Umt- 


valro lies In part in its ernmnand 
of tbe Jmdan River’s headwaters. 

Bfmaaih the West Bank and 
Gaza is as mudi as 40 percent d 
Israd's water sir)^ — a resrazree 
dial vrill be vasuy harder to rdiri- 
quish than tile land above it. . ' 
With populaticms growing by 


mvdvemeat suMests, finalty, (he; 
need to icthinknow tite United' 
States duties its ^tal interests, . 

The writer ia a semcrfdtaia of . 
the Coundt art Ton^ ' Rumens. 
She cenpibuteti Aa ammmt jo 
The Washinffon Post, . ' ^ 


If the United Nations Gives Up^ Urgent Work Won’t Be Done 


such as the budget and heath care, loud 
and unified Rqiublican "no” votes 
make l^islating hard. 

The Democrats are toriL Many who 
are ruzmiag for re-election, especially 
from conservative districts, want to stay 
far away from Mr. CTinton and from 
anything looking remotely like liberal 
l^sIaUon. That means more "no” votes. 
Other Democrats want to pass as much as 
they can as fast as thty can for fear that 
their opportunity for action wQl slip away 
in a Republican sweep this fall Between 
these two impulses, there is little room for 
accommodation. No wonder Tom Foley 
and Didt C^hardt look tired. 

Party discipline b not in itsdf a bad 
thing; it creates some real accountability 
as party labeb come to take on meaning. 
Still, tte intense partisanship of the mo- 
ment b encour^ng the very sort of 
bloody-minded, mean-spirited ttebate that 
tbe voters k^ telling tbe pollsters they 
don't Iflce. It b also making sentible action 
much harder 00 . issues such as health care, 
welfare, the defidt and ctime. As they 
contemplate ^Khether to vote for Demo- 
cratic or Republican House memb^ vot- 
ers would do well to adi candidates if there 
b a road toward a healthier panisansfaip 
—or must dungs go 00 like uus? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


S TOCKHOLM — And now it's Secre- 
taty-General Bntros Bntros Gfaali 
himseu thromng up hb hands cm the 
United Nations, apparently over- 
whelmed. Take the UN forces out of 
Ymodavia, he says, because if tbe war 
bnT stopped tiiey axe hdpless targets, 
and if it 15 stopped they aren’t strong 
enou^ to police a peace. 

After neazity half a century of political 
paraiysb which reduced tbe Umted Na- 
tions piimaiily to a talk st^, the posa- 
bility d concerted intematirniti acnon b 
too much to conteinplate. 

It isn't so suiptiri^ There was a mo- 
ment of unfoetbed optimism, and then 
the crises and the demmids that the Unit- 
ed Nations "do something b^an piling 
up beyond anyone’s reading to re- 
spond. There b "intervention fatigue” as 
as "coi^assirai fatigue,” 

The world in its turbulence — which 
is precisely what the United Nations 
was organized to coofront — suddenly 
looks hopeless, and the temptation b to 
give up. Meanwhile, ihetoncal shibbo- 
leths aboni sovereignty and equaHty of 
every independent state have hardened 
into mindless reflex to take the place of 
facing reality. 

The patience that steadied nerves and 
made small advances enthusiasiically 
welcomed during. the long Cdd.War; the 


By Flora Lewis 

Arab-Israeli conflict, the strug^e against 
^larthdd seems to have evtqiorated. The 
attitude b becoming an insisteince that if 
the worid can’t sort itsdf out, why go on 
trying? Or, at any rate, why not look 
away from the messy, aching present to 
a dreamy future? 

It b so much less demanding and so 
fflotaUy satisfying to argue for tiw dinti- 
natioQ of pove^, to trade definitimis of 
“human seemity,” to be intdlecmally 
rigorous aboat need to lecocnize that 
all problems are inextricably Bnked — 
peace, material wdl-bdogi environment, 
the population explosioiL, health, “em- 
poirermeQt.’' If evoything must be done 
at once, nothing b urgent 

A cc^erence the United Nations 
Devdreunent Study Program here enti- 
tled “Change: Social Ccmflict or Haimo-^ 
n^* mantled a warm, thoughtful litany 
(n all the good to be deme and ideas to hie 
carefully munch^ There were some 
complamts that hi^ emergency r^ef 
qi>eratiaQS and attempts at peacdkeqpiog 
were draining UK resources and distract- 
ing iT from toe task of assuring econ o mic 
and sodal progr^ in poor conntiies. 

The only real dbrupbon of the amiable 
atmosphere was from an intedoper rep- 


r es ennn 

Lyndon 


the American right-winger 
Roadie, whose new crusade b 


d)le in the imden^ ago, 'Not can it be 


against efforts to tamp the pcmulation 
eqplosiotL “If s fascism widi a lemimst 
face,” he shouted before he was oqidled. 
Eveiyoixe was embarrassed. • 

Tl^ b a strange new ddMie between 
attending to the conflicts before our e)«s' 
or those dearly coating and the more 
nottie issues, now mdded under die rio- 
gan of “putting people fiisf.” It b. ma^ 
to soundas tiiou^ war; eraaomics, dimev 
bad governance, were not about people. 
Hus approach notices that people can be 
peivase, but it plana to cure. tlnL 

Everybo^ agrees that the United Nar 
tionsy bowew flawed, cannot be re-' 
|tiaced. But betwem the pretension tbm' 
It dtould be able to look after every&ing 
and the dtatam for its iinpQteace, it b 
losing, the chance of stcen^heoiag its 
actual cqxadty. 

Among global strai^bts, the divtaon 
b between those vriicx race Henry Kisitin- 
get, bdleve that the tradition baUmce- 
oi powers is the onty way to kec^ some 
order in the world, and those wbo think 
that we can move <m toward oriOective 
security and cooperaticoL ' 

The times are on the coq). It cannot be 
denied that rdianoe <m balancing m^or 
powmsalwrtysbzeaks.do'^ witomoemt- 
ing levds cti catadto^ dim areontitink- 


point of being sure Chat omMctiveseemity- 
and coopeiatioa w31 wmt wdl eaou^ 

But me aCtesqiC 4s -worth pttsiiug. 
Tins b no time to 9 ve ug). 

Peoitie are xKri aping to sto^ being 
pervase^ dxy are am famnan. St2L sten^ 
oaids do No .oee continnes to 

defend sbtvety.'Warb aokmgerburited 
as tbe emblem of valoc and 
tfaou^ coEfficts toeak out. Ractsst-es- 
bts, but b is not admired and i^bdd as 
naturaL After loag,- hard campaigns suf- 
ficient intemaikaial coweeation was 
achieved .to w^ out smanpdx and oon- 
taih some itiapies, inclndmg Ibcnsts. 

There b no more reason to tfaii^ it b 
inposaiMe to do.btettr. than to ihs^ it 
mB te eaty. It does take some moc^ 
pecastenoe in die face oC. fiusaatidia, 
soaieenal^ willingness to deal vrith the 
ioBXiemate as as to pto ahead r--- as 

\d)B 0 se exuwff dia aty mecBcal vcAumeos ' 
aredemgiaRwaada. 

faesiL Mn fiutjos GhalL the UK 
game isift Idn -^-and it can’t oe tamed ' 
-over. There b oo <»te id tom it over to. 
and you haven't Ae xi^ to ooinpede to 
tite forces rti' c&^ Hk sheer 
crises is but jpec^tie can be 

dogged as we& K dmaqoenL 


There’s No Need for a Comprehensive Peace Syria Can Wait 


TT^ASHINGTON — The Riv- 
W er Jordan no longer runs 
chilly and cold, and so American 
dipl^ats turn their eyes to Syria, 
t^ should torn diem tack. 
President Hafez Assad, the 
foiling de^t in Ihunascus, has 
almost nothing, ex<^ the srudg- 
mg and late recognitron of Isra^ 
to offer. Hb gamesmanship b no 
longer fasdnating. Hb indiffer- 
ence to the moral, historical and 
sentimeDtal motives of political 
actiOD b tiresome. 

King Hussein of Jordan and 
Aime hfinister Yitzhak Rahin of 
Israel accomplished maity things 
in WasiuEgtoL, and one o£ them 
was to expose Mr. Assad as a 
rank flnadi nvntsm 
The breakthrOQgb between Is- 


By Leon Wieseltier 


rad and Jordan b exhUaratmg, 
after aH because it b not alto- 
getiwr a taeaktiirocgh. Tfab rec- 
onciliation b a Httie redundant, 
and that b tbe beauty of it. 

Between Israel and Jordan, the 
reality of peace preceded the 
proonse of peace by more than a 
quarter oi a century. 

Between brad and Syria, too, 
die border has been stiB few de- 
cades: But not aQ stillness b tbe 
same. Mr. Assad fita the stillness 
w;*h hostility, anxiety, intrigue — 
and, oafab ol the border, vrith 
the peace of an efEkient polke 
state. Ite dbnqititni, at tiie city 
of Hama in 1982, was met wim 
amassacre. 


The vutience that be will not 
tolerate in hb own country he 
promotes in other countries. 

There b a new allianoe.for re- 
gjcmal peare and r^ional pros- 
perity that indudes Israd, ^ypt, 
Joid^ the Pakstiitians, Mor^ 
cc^ Tunisia, Saudi Arattia mid 
die United States. 

Before tins aOiaoce, Syria b 
powedess. Its president b one of 
the great losQs of onr time. Why, 
then, court him? 

The common answer b “a com- 
prehenave peace.” 

This- b the oldest dogma of die 
Middle Eastern peace process. It . 
was adduced again by Preddenl 
Bill Gintoh on the south lawn of 


Watching America ’s Military Show 


N ew YORK — U.S. troops 
finally turned up in Goma, 
Zaire, last week, wS after the 
wrenching images and stories of 
Rwandan refugees had s^urat- 
ed the American consdence. 
But t^ were hardly the most 
con^icuous r^resentatives of 
the armed forces to make the- 
news over the weekend. 

In Saturday’s paper alone, 
you could read about Sergeant 
First Class Ervin M Graves of 
Port Bragg, North Cantiina, 
who had just received a life sen- 
tence for the murder and at- 
tenqited rape of Lba Biyaot, a 
21-year-old second lieutenant 
whose prn mi.«ang rfouQte in- 
cluded an honors d^iec from 
PrincetoiL 

Or about the Gtadd, the 
state-mpported militeiy acade- 
my in Charieston, South C^h- 
na, which had just been ordered 
in another (tourtioom 10 admit a 
wo man, ShannoD Faulkner, 


public in its doonwid de- 
fense of sexual di yyrmmarinn 

Or about John R Dalton, 
secretary of the navy. As report- 
ed by Jeff Gerth of The New 
York Times, Mr. Dalton had 
onty recently and tanflly settled 
abad debt on adefaulted ctmdo 
loan. He also turned out to have 
been an executive at two fail^ 
Texas savings and loans that 
were bailed out by taxpayers; 
the Federal Dreosit Tnairan^- 
Cmporatira had accused him of 
“gross n^hgence” in tab man- 
element ^ one of them. 

Why tad Mr. Dalton’s dieck- 
ered ^nnancial past gone un- 
mentioQed during hb rubber- 
stamp confirmation hearings 


By Frank Ridi 


last year? Perhaps because be b 
a mmor Democratic fund-rais- 
er. Certainly because Senator 
Ram Nunn, chajrmayt of the 
Armed Services Committee, 
vriio bullies President Bill Gin- 
ton aboot aB matters militaiy, 
aired the awkward facts only in 
a cl(Med-door session, lest they 
“bog down the proceU.” 

And these were only last 
weekend’s headlines. Recent 
wedEs have brought the latest 
twists is the cases ot Sergeant 
Zenaida Martinez, who accuses 
Che airfotoe of puniriung her for 
pursung a sesnial harassment 
case, and navy Lienteoant Ju- 
nior Grade Tasy ThoriiA 
faces escpiflsioa for reveating 1^ 
hoinosebiali ty OB tdeviaon and 
may soon challenge the prqios- 
ferous Kunn-Clmum “Don’t 
ask, don’t teST pdity in court 

like many Americans raised 
CO ^HetDam, I am unclear on the 
rede of a U.S. nrilitaty in the 
post-Cold War worid. unfmto- 
oatdy, so b Bill Oiaton, who, 
unlike me, was dected com- 
mander in dnef. 

But even if he plans to pro- 
crastinate indefinitdy rather 
than arrive at cc^ident polices 
on Haiti and Bosnia, surely the 
military can serve as nuMc than 
a fount of bad news for women, 
homosexuals and taspayers of 
all jeoders. 

That was wl^ I harbored 
hopes tl)^ the preadent, al- 
tfanighhan^kqitacfaaracte'- 
istic distance bom tbe genoddal 
Rwandan ciril war, might 
least have d^ityed Uil. forces 
widi prompt emcieiicy in re- 


sponse to the ennriiig himwnii- 
tarian tragedy. 

But he acted only after he saw 
tbe same pictures of the dead 
and dying that the rest of us ^ 
~ foBowmg. rather tiian lead- 
ing — and even then die tmHai 
result of Ms mflitaiys.eamige- 
ment was of dubious benefitr 

Ignoring the requests of Uie 
United Nations and others al- 
ready involved in on-tho-sceae 
relief for logistical help, man- 
power and trucks, the Azneri- 
nans iticii i p tw,! oq air-diopping 
food, and somewhat riiaoncal- 
ly at that (Fewer than half the 
24 car-sizta paiceb reached 
the ground, rarriy intact) 

A U3. military aircraft flew 
in from Stuttgare brin^g not 
only one fonclift but alM 18 
joiunalists on a lound-tc^ ride 
to hype the American laigesse. 

“TMs b a totri puldto rtiations 
operation,” said A&on Can^ 
bol of CARE, wta accused the 
Americans of wasting tiie pre- 
dous time and desperrayarah- 
ened resources of the idieF ^ort 
as trades were divertod (0 re- 
trieve the scattered ahdrqps. 

The pubOc relaticms opera- 
tion proved as disastroos as the 
rest ra the militaiy’s recent PR 
— but it was menafiiDy sfarat- 
lived . ^ Tbraday, American 
tdevisirai viewers could finally 
spot a grovring number of Hun 
soktiera hard at humanitarian 
w(>ikinGooi8,birildingawata' 
purification sykem to battle tlK 
ngiog chedera qpidemfc. .. . 

If you can fo^te the horrific • 
images of the wo^ before^ tMs 
rare ^ ^ good news about the 
Ointoa-era mititaiy may not 
seem too fittlev too laift. 

The New. York Tanea. 


the White House on 
vdten he de^bi^ tbe otshxtive 
tbe Watiimgtrai Dedaration as 
- “a just, lasting and conqirdieii- 
sive peace” Thb dogma should 
have been retired in 1979, with 
tile rigumg of a rieaty^ be twee n 
^pt and IsraeL 
Fra the progress betweda Isiad 
and ^gypt, Xnad. and Jordan, fo- 
rad and tta intestine Liberation 

ideal i^craqire- 
hensiveaes^ but deqate it. 

Each ,of Israd's adveisaries, 
inqiressed at last witii the uiqief-' 
ishabifity of the Jewish state, 

. made its peace in its time and m 
its way, and none of them suc- 
ceeded in .blocking any oi their 
journeys to leasoo. 

B^-tfae standiffd of a cfwnpm . 
hoiave peace; the new di^teusa- 
tirai between Israd and its r^mn 
disappoiats. But (here is srane- 
thmg wm^ surety, wiih sudi a 
standard. R makes -work for ^plo- 
mats, but it also insults , tiie woric- 
that they have dready oonmlraed. 

The orthodox conoe^ra of 
oompreheiuiveniess, mraeovei; is- 
mideadip^ If a ceaztofeheasKve 
peace means a peacemat'is not 
Skdy to be ^adtraed by gttnfc>; 
in tta.ni^t, a peace tw turns . 
the energies of states and peoples 
toward vriiat Kh^ Husstih — 
raandty repcoduGing the finest 
draari classical TSnniam ^ 
caUed “vidiat .is zionn^”- then 
tiiere is .a oocqmdunsive peace 
and it has been shown not to have 
needofSyria. .' 

. S^ria, of oouis^ will eyentnally 
haves^ofit 
R-is tiieprofesdraial peacepre- 


cesaras, led by the UA secretary 
of state, Warren Christot^. 
i^now p^ thdr bags and race 
to tbe “Syrian trad;.” 3 

In fact, th^ aiie propoaag to 
restore to ^yiia the invariance of 
wfikh they have recendy, and 


Ti^^,iGA]bediL 
mnere is another reason to let 
the “Syrian trad^ be: the ner- 
^voasness of Israd. 

There mnotin^' ^ Syria caq 
give Israd tiitt would be worth 
rattling the Israelis fra. The ac- 
commodation with tiie PLO, a 
good aocramnodation will 
have a tioul^ history; is cattlmg 
the Israelis quite enqe^ - - 
From the standpoint second 
ty, and from the stan^pomt of: 
mesafity, the Palestinian questo 
is the urgent question. It requires' 
aOi^Israd’^atteatiraL 
Aslting the Isra^ to sucrender 
allrapaitoftheGiJanHa'ghtem 
this peat' and' 'diszyihg season- 
be asking- too nnidL. 

The smart- mail of Sym 1^- 
bett ODttmart^ FBs enriiy; 
which will not be forgotten, 
ha^pr^ted him noihif^ 

teqpecting ti]e^^^[ to get 

he penmtted ^ynaii tefevi^ 
sioa to mow the .Syrian perale a. 
few nimnies of cover^e nran .. 
Washingion,' a' few ininiites'^'Qf - 
truth about the resti^ the worid; 

EBs'raity d&s.nre the munahj 
in- -Tehran arid ' tiie. 'dmlranats 
m WadniigtoD. Who Wwie - 
Anyway, he?D can. * 

_7he writer is Sterary editor of 
The iVov Apuhfic ffe ^rntrUrated 
mis to The New York Tatiei 


IW OUR PAGES; lOQ, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894s Virti^ofGocauie 
PARIS rrCocahM; the allodold of . 

^ Cora jdan^ enibles to render 


day brings m some' foot- 
soire stoaggfer fiCT Kkff or softie 
CQisniittee of citizdis; evamoNc* 
pen, disguised, in b^gais* rags, 






hi^'i A ^*1 f ^ 







f ^ 1 



:.«j 1^ t n 1 i -1 1 1 ^*1 







* - 1 rP3 





MuTTiTr^iB 




P&ge5 






IMTEKNAnONAL HEKALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 29 , 1994 


% 


O P I N I O 



/DOCHESTER, Vexmont — Democratic 
•LX leaden on Cajutol Hill ^ingeriy dipped 
Amr toes in to Whitewater this week wbra ibe 
Houm Banking Committee opened hearings on 
-President Bill Clinton's invtdvement in a 
decades-old real estate ctdl^se in Arkansas 
' and its ties, if any, to the savings loan 
Scandal. The press has been pounding on'Qie 
story for months. ' 

' Republican politicians and the fimdameuT 
ti^st ri^t wing have been tirelessly accnring 
the pmident, usually without evidence, of ev- 
erything from infidelity to shenani- 

gans and murder. Some of these charges have 
f^^d th^ way into print and broadcast news. • 
So it is on the press. that many Ointon. 
defenders have focused theii ire. Give the pres- 

DoAmericanspr^erlheJdndof press 
A^ojuxas$umedpre8id0nt8iobetoo 
powerful too virtuous to be 


What Do People Want? 


- P ! 
‘ * -0*- . 


opsUrweniesujhmiihoynM^leody - 

peHurpsatasevea^coettoprivaey? 

ident a chance, they cry. Get off his. ba^. 
Stop crippling his adnunistration. There is 
no evidence of wrcmgdoihg in Whitewater; 
so why the fuss? 

These plaintive cries echo the complaints.c^ 
Republicans 20 years ago, when Ricnvd Nix-' 
on was taking press, poblic and congressional 
beat for the watmate break-ins. 

; Watergate and Inerident Nixon's dwartore 
deeply influenced the .press and proroundly 
affected the public's once adulatory view of 
presidents. Another such event was &e war in 
Vietnam, causing Presidents Lyndon Johnson 
vd Nixon to be widdy seen as devibus. Mr. 
Nixon's cover-up of Water^te ill^ilities, Mr. 
Johnson's so-called credibfli^ gap and the 

f >ersistence of both in waging an unpopular, 
osLng war formed the genesis of today’s dis- 
trust of politicians. If fewer Americans believe 
that preddents should have inunnnity from 
criticism of any- but their official conduct, 
more are likdy to believe stories questioning 
the personal probi^ of the most closely 
watched person in the land. ' 

The lowering of the presidency was not the 
only devdt^ment that changed press and pub- 
lic attitudes. A few weeks before John F. Ken- 
nedy was murdered in 1963, the networks be- 
gan the 30-mmute nightiy newscasts that are 
now the "front page" l^m which most Ameri- 
cans get their news. 

Newspapers and newanagadnes,_too, have 
contributed to the transformation of the 
American press since the 1960s. It was newq>a- 


By Tom "WUSker 

per coverage that exposed Gary Han's sexual 
^ventures and ended his presidential hopes 
in 198$. This began a long step into private 
r^ons that the press, until then, had left 
mostly unexplored 

But the astoaishing growth of television into 
something like a national nervous system was 
far more significant. Television, after all, has 
the unmatched ability to tran^ix the entire 
xmtipn, whether for the Kennedy assassina- 
tion, the moon landing or O. J. Simpson's pre- 
liminary hearing on imixder charges. 

Television news in 1963 and for many years 
after was a sort “loss leader," primary a 
pubUc service e]q}ected to earn the networks 
rather than ju'ofits. That has chang^ 
significantly. Af^ more conventional busi- 
ness interests todc cantird -—.General Electric 
at NBC, the real estate magnate Laurence 
Tisch at CBS, Capital Qties at ABC — news 
: programs were also expected to make money, 
which demanded higher viewer ratings. 

The end of highw^nality, low-rated docu- 
mentaries followed, as weU as the rise of news 
. broadcasts focused on crime; su, scandal and 
celebrities willing to bare their private lives. 
The values of priva^ — even a i^ident's — 
.qmckly fell victim to public appetites and tele- 
vision's wiUingness to satisfy mem. 

The same years brought the astonishing de- 
velopment cf communicatioas technology — 
tele^on satellites that broi^t to viewers the 
Gulf War, a coup attempt in Moscow and a 
revolt in Tiananmen Squa^ as thqr happened. 

Cable television, the videocassette recorder 
and the satellite dish gave Americans almost 
limixless viewing <mtioiis, putting even greater 
pressures on broadcasters to present entertain- 
ing programs, even if tiiviid or saladous, that 
would attract viewers away fiom other choices. 

Meanwhile, politicians became adept at us- 
ing the vast audience and impact of television 
to promote themselves and their TOlicies. 

. Almost any public event, significant or not 
: — a hearing on a Supreme Court nominee, a 

S resident throwing iq> at a dinner table in 
apaiu Yasser Arafat uid Yitzhak Rabin shak- 
ing hands, Bill and Hillaw Rodham Clinton 
reontting charg^ that he philandered — could 
be seen by mimons. 

Predictably, viewers now demand to see ev- 
erything. Netwodrs, syndicates and cable ea- 
galy respond, competing to put on programs 
that viewers are thought to want — particular- 
ly those dealing with sex, scandal and crime. 
Amy Fisher, Joey Buttafuoco and the Menen- 
dez brothers bec^e housetold names. 

. Otherwise '^na fide news programs all too 
often have been forced by ratings pressures 
down the same slippery slope. Every tudst 
-and tun tjf the formcoming O. J. Simpson 
trial will be broadcast on every medium, by 


popular demand. And newspapers, even if they 
wanted to, could hardly ignore stories on 
which television lavishes so much time and 
teebne^ogy. But newspapers and magazines, 
having for many years fought a mostly losing 
battle for suprema^ in the news field, are 
as eager for readers as television is for viewers. 
To sustain readersb^ and appeal to advertis- 
ers, many publications have followed tele- 
vision into more explicit concentration on 
sex and sensation. 

Watdgate not only made Bob Woodward 
and Cul Bernstein famons, it taught less well- 
known reporters that a president can be a 
wrongdoer and that no such possibility is too 
swiati to investi^te. It also lat a bad taste in 
the mouths of journalists who believed that the 
press gene^y had not dug into Watergate 
with sufficient vigor. 

Later, reporters and editors became ruefully 
aware of tl^ faOnres to push investigation of 
the Iran-contra scandal. Many are convinced 
that Ihesidents Ronald Reagan and George 
Bush escaped retribution omy by mounting 
a "stonew^" defense that the press failed 
to pCTetrate. 

Widespread looting of savings and loans 
went mostly unnoticed in the years when 
press exposue might have prevent^ some of 
the worst outrages. 

Many joumalists are therefore determined 
not to forget that they have a constitutional 
respooribility to inform the public about the 
kmd of corruption and deceit that might be 
involved in the Whitewater case. 

Paradoxically, even such worthy determina- 
tion can lead n^orters into what would have 
been considered excess before private behavior 
became a target of inquiry accepted by many 
journalists and much of the public. The new 
aggressiveness of the press is not a problem 
for ]^esident Clinton alone. Overwrought 
press coverage oonceivablv could lead to such 
extremes as the dismissal of charges against 
O. J. Simpson. 

Worthy people shrink or withdraw from 
public life, for Tear of losing their privacy. 

Significant news may be buried among sen- 
sational stories, to the detriment of public 
policy and democratic choice. Deplorably, 
some of that has happened already, arousing 
familiar cries for censorship or other re- 
straints on the press. 

The pertinent questions are too seldom 
asked. Do Americans prefer the kind of press 
that used to assume presidents to be too pow- 
erful or too virtuous to be investigated and 
held responsible? Or do they want a press 
that pursues \^tewaier and other controver- 
sies where they may lead, perhaps at a severe 
cost to priva^ 

The writer, a firmer eohtmnist, has ampleted a 
book on race rdations in America. He contrilnMd 
this comment to The New York Times. 


Run the Highway Through the Library 

TirASHINGTON - Imagine a By Hardy R. Franklin 
TV library where ^ ^ 


you can tiew 
an art exhibit thousands of miles 
away, books from the papal ar- 
chives, documents from ^ li- 
brary of Congress. A library where 
users can study weather images 
from satellites, read the president’s 

MEAiYffHELE 

latest speech or decipher the lyrics 
of the latest pop hit. 

All of this and much more is 
possible soon at a public library. 

Whether it will happen in Amer- 
ica dq>ends largely on dedaons 
that Congress wQ] make in the 
near future — decisions that will 
determine the course of the infor- 
maxioQ superiu^way and who will 
be among the elite who can avail 
tbemsdves of its riches, and who 
will be left in the dusL 
How the U.S. government con- 
fronts the dtaHenge of developing 
this national information network 
will test one (tf the most basic values 
in a democratic society: public ac- 
cess to infonnatioo. What telecom- 
munications services should be uni- 
veisal in the "information age"? 


How will we determine what those 
services are? How will we pay? 

The answers will be dead^ by 
ofiicials who base much of what 
they know on those who stand (o 
the most financially — the 
communication that 

are v^ng for contn^ Ihifoitunate- 
ly, we cannot assume that public 
g(^ will Irhimpb over profit. 

Despite the Clinton administra- 
tion's eagoness to promote private 
investment in this new technology, 
even Vice President Al Gore has 
c^ed for ie^sladon that would 
protect open access and safeguard 
against the type of monopoly con- 
trol t^t some cable company 
owners now exercise. 

A truly remarkable system will 
make this infonnatioD technology 
siffordable and accessible to all. As- 
suming that the government cannot 
afford to provide a computer and 
linVag p for cvety housdxdd, as the 
French government does, there is 
one sure way: every public 
library must be connected to the 
infonnatioo superiiighway. 


For the majority of people who 
don't have computers — or even 
encyclopedias — in thdr homes, 
libraries are a logical on-ramp to 
the information highway. 

A woman diagoos^ with breast 
cancer wants to know the most 
recent advances in treatment A 
student and his parents wonder 
what sdiolarships are available to 
pursue a career in engmeering. A 
resiarcher wants to know the boil- 
ing point of a compound as he 
prepares an experiment 
librarians are already expert in 
using electronic information to an- 
swer questions like these and thou- 
sands more. They have a critical 
role to play as navigators of the 
inforfflation hi^way and guard- 
ians of the public's right to know. 

All people, not just those who 
are rich enough or smart enough, 
should be able to ride the informa- 
tion highway. 

The writer, director of the Public 
Library of the District of Cohrmbia, 
is immemaie past president of the 
American Library Association. He 
contributed this commatt to The 
Washinffon Post. 


LETTERS TO TEE EDITOR 


Hie Record on Rivanda 

J. Brian Atwood, administrator of 
the UE. AgeiKy for International 
Development and President Bill 
Qintoo's special envoy to Rwanda, 
ri^tly describes the plight of the 
rehig^ who have fled to Zaire in 
harrowing terms Immedi- 

ately, Then Crisis Prevention Quidc- 
fy,*' pinion, July 25). He is abso- 
lutely ocMTect, too. to stress that the 
humanitarian role of the United 
States is critical, because it has a 
unique c^^ty to deploy vast re- 
sources swtly. The president’s de- 
dsioa of last week wiO trigger action 
by others and will save many lives. 

But the governments (tf mdustrial 
countries mould be humble when 
th^ consider thdr record in Rwan- 
da. Mr. Atwood $/xs too far vriien be 
condudes that his government is tak- 
ing the lead in igirvaiating the Unit- 
ed Nations and devdoping machin- 
ery for dfective crisis prevention. 


As a member of the Security Coun- 
cil, the United States shares respoosi- 
bihty for the UN’s failure to act when 
many dvilians were murdered after 
the dected government of neighbor- 
ing Burunrh was overthrown last 
year. The Security Council again 
failed to resptmd s^tfy or effective- 
ly when the killings b^im in Rwanda 
on April 6. UN troops were seen to 
take no action and then to retreat as 
civitians were butdiered. Even now, 
it should shame the international 
community that the UN peacekeep- 
ing force; mandated by a May 16 
dedsioa ctf the Security CouncQ, vriU 
not be in place for two months. 

The humanitarian response has 
itself been desperately slow. As Mr. 
Atwood says. President Ginion act- 
ed as soon as he understood the 
dimensioiis of the crisis. Why did 
understanding take so long? 

ROBERT ARCHER. 

Christian Aid. London. 


Spending and Growth 

Regardittg “The Welfare Steae 
Will Stm, but It Will Have to Be 
Sueamlir^” ((pinion, July 13): 

Robert J. Samuelson defines the 
problem as follows: "As gro*^ fal- 
ters, the cost of government welfare 
rises. This increases tax rates or bud- 
get defidts, which further impedes 
growth." While this is solid textbook 
economics, it is not true. 

The U.S. gross national product 
increased 13.9pei^tm 1936, while 
the national debt jumped from $27.7 
billion to S33.8 billiotL The GNP 
increased 13.2 percent in 1943, but 
the national debt almost doubled, 
from S72.4 billion to $136.7 billiotL 
Many simOar examples could be 
died. The idea that government 
spending slows growth is absurd. 

Mr. S^uelson would do weU to 
abandon foolish my^ 

FREDERICK C. THAYER. 
Kaiserslautern, Germany. 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


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toil donma house wilh ‘80 som 
gordag mognScert view on 6fa 
Tower. For ■ yew tem Seal 15. 
niDOO/tim -1- dooB. 1-46^^! 

MARAB, ImoMoao 110 tot", on 
afartad oaittyanL daufale tecepbog 2 
Fl&ooa Ownar: |» 48 OtF 54 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGBffM PARIS 

Td: (1) 47.20.30.05 

TVi, MUSS D'OBSAY, etoim dl 
amtom ecrtviwnces slraa* aed- 
laotg fayw-sndy, double awi^ stor- 
age. pwang fa FFISJXIOi Augiw - 
fa. U nT455IS847 fa 455 i3S 

CROISSy 4 yktoft]^ idnct bus^beou- 
nfd houses F22.Sn to FSSjw/mo 
SAINTOGUD 3 roang terroa. view 
Paris. FOiOO/iaa. Teb 1-46 03 13 XI 

PARS XV. Small I betteom suoobto 
te ceude. Mae dilricl, corMnam. 
$9S0/ma 3128760157 USA Fo, 313. 
8766395 TeL 331 43 24 16 13 Ptans. 

I4tt, 75 SQM. 2 B9R00M5 + 
terrace, just renowned, simw. qmal. 
F800G. Owner lonfa7i43SJ»4i^ 

SPAIN 

164i nov HBW MARTM 6 lowm. 
250 sgei. Mgh dm fiMstone bditeg. 
lawne 70 san, 4 badrowm. 3 baths. 
DOrtan. FZl&n Tab ni 42522425 

RBOWG Rmws APARnWBirS 
in ITtfi euiuwy bufaia, new 8ER Le 
Vainet or Smaurifc. rrom 4 days lo 
5 merthL Slwfa 2 roans, 3 reams 
Ttor 1-30 56 23 00. For 1-30 86 23 30 

PIAZA RASIUOL APAJITMBItS 27, 
ComondaVe Zom MoM kxwud vi 
the finenad & bunness wea A win 
& mdwdud dyle. Daly - Weedy - 
Monthly rates. RservWaMs - TeL (3*- 
11 SKM2. fa- (34.1) S3S1497. 

PARIS I7tt. AH comferis. hily 
eranpad, 2 rooms, 50 sqm. 4 people. 

AwuiL Fnoooa Id; 111 42 2e 


7 PLAZA DE E5PANA APARTMBIT5 
In Ihe heart a( Madrid. 1^ dern 
studos 10 lei Doily weedy, onnihl) 
rotes. ■■ ■ . - 

hons. - . - 
34.1.5484380 


•* sw ^^*>**7 tot 

FA equafa. Dveo resents 
Teh jmo 85 85 fa 


LOS JERONIMOS APARTMENTS 
Motoig 9 Mattod. Benmen fato 
MuKun & tekro Put. Rnest i 
of traJdnn al lutntfwe. Daly - 
Monthly rote, faervoitom - Trt I 
l|420(mi fa 04-11 4294458 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


NHir YORK CRY AREA HOUSE swop 
wah tois Inne/Bamned or Bed 1 
yr from Aug. IS. Bfadd 7 bedoan 
3h both vetonm, needy ramded, 
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So did nearly half 
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ShoulJn ‘t you advertise 
your property in the 

INTERNATIONAL 
HERALD TRIBUNE? 


USA 



Gothic Irish Castle 

Owner WILL TRADE FOR HOME 
IN SoiTTHERN California OR Santa Barbara 

Only a few renain, die imdie- 
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Investmesit Prep«i*ty 
PRIME PARK AVE ^NO SL) 
APARTUENT HOUSE FOR SALE 
24 unite 22 apartments plus 
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CONTACT EXCLUSIVE BflOKERS 
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Many propcnics availahb in a wide 
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Pite SPr. 485.000HNae) 
Coifanir Mary Uelenoy 
CRI6SA 

9M2aaWA»< nsiMaiB 
ia{4itgl«982»oa. Facet iiiiaBaew 



UNIQUE IN PRAGUE - 
IN THE HEART OF EUROPE 


Upper-eiasi penthou&e ■patinieDis, 
downtown, top residential area near 
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Future-oriented residential 
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Building owner Fa. Posiav s.r.o., 
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Tel: 0049-69-64 68X092. 

Fas- 0049-69-64 688416 


FRANa 


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EXCEPTIONAL 

Small lesidcmx of 15 aparnnaiis 
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View on sea & porL 
Fran F35,000 the sq-m. 

17 Avenue Denis SEMERIA 





I 


Ijpemcaional Herald Tribune 
Friday, Jufy 29, 1994 
Paged 






Elegant Racing in England 






Glorious Goodwood 
Is a Glamour Event 

Best Horses and 1 1 Champagnes 


By WHUiam Grimes 

NwTeikTUmStnIet 


. •> "c- — 


G HICHESTER, Esriand — In 
1801^ the third Duke of Ricb> 
mood and OoEdon had a vety 
good idea. He laid out a race- 
ooinse (m his vast estate in what todiqr is 
West Sopex, allowing the Sussex hfilitia 
to ikM its ftfintMi zac^ g tzaditioo that 
wu endangered when the fidde Eaxi ol 
j^roiKSDt, previcns host, unexpected'- 

ly wididrew his support 
They camcL They ' raced. The duke was 
Hie next year he added a small 
wooden stand for his friends, who 
wa^ed as tbs duk^s hocp, Cedar, went 
down Co drfeat in a nee with Hunqwtor, 
owned by the Prince of Wales. A ton^ 

. loss, but perhaps a shrewd move. . 

The raem^ wwitwines- Today. Goodwood 
Racecoorse <0eis 19 days of bi^hcaiiber 

turf radngev^ year. The high point of the 
season emnes in the last wedc of July, when 

the best horses in Europe converge <nx the 

track for a wedc of important slakes races. 
The Festival Meeting as it is known, ranks 
with £jpsom and Ascot as one of tiie glain- 
oor events of flat racing in Engtend. This 
year, Americans can cheer te one of tbdr 
own, tiw gutsy Lun; who has been entered 
fw the li&sst race of the meeting, the 

Sussex Stakes, a rmiAm^ Grade 1 affair 
with a purse of about SaafiOO. 

Goodwood may lack the name reoogni- 
tion ctf Ascot, but ithas no rival for diarm. 
In fact, so admired is the setting tiiat the 
tra^ is known coHoqnially as Glorious 
Goodwood. The course, an hrpguhu' tig- 
ure-eight attached to a six-furlong 
straightaway, ats atop tiie South Downs, 
humptilce phaiic tiiTtg fliat recede in soft 
tiers an the way to Ondrester, about tiiree 
mOes soDtbwest of the tradL On a dear 
day. racqoers can see the spadde of 
Ctuchester Harbor beyond the . rifling 
bands emcaald green, ydlow-green arid, 
here and th^ the tm^t yeltow of Bdds 
vdiere oilseed rqte grows. - 
For both jodceys artd horses, Goodwood 
presents a tactic challenge. Con^ped 
wi& ^ somdard fiat oval of Ameiicah 
tracks, it is a crazy -roller coaster. %»int 
lacBs takejdace on awide stnu^naw^ that 
Tims downbffl betoie fiatteaii^ oat m fixBit 
as the viemng stands. Horses have to be 
hustied out of tile gate and estaldish stride 
very qmdify or get left behind. 

races start at the top of the ^ 
uxe-ei^ loop, with the hot^ dimtang 
upfaiB against a spectacnlar background of 
hiQs.aad hedged lidd& After making tiie 
&sn; '^harse^ race downhill then sfi^rtiy 
udoll islo the stod^taw^, fonowing one 
(X two turns, dqiei^ig on the dutai^ If 
die two-tam choice into the straightaway 
sCTnidsaBnfecOTiip1icaled,itis.ln the 19^ 
Festival Stdoes, the horses in a lO-fbrkmg 
in(x were diiccted onto tiiewroag tuiiL, and 
the race had to be dcdaied void. 

As the track gt^ puts it: ‘‘‘Goodwood’s 
pronounced gradients and sharp berids fa- 
VOT the active^ haiufy type of bmse, tiie 
ftnent mover radiei timtiie b^ kx^-stri<t 
iag nzzmer. Tins api^Bes etpeciany in riibct 
races and vriiea the gtring IS fast.** 

The gcang was fas^ the weather dear 
and mua, when my vrife and 1 headed out 
to Goodwood lecentiy, when the radng 
b^rns at 6:30 in tiie ewairni and ends as 
darkness bqhis to descend Shortly after 9^ 
A narrow rmul off the A28S, malted by a 
brown sign, todk us into tiie Goodwood 
estate and wound f<n about two and a half • 
miles beneath a canopy of beedi treesy 
taking us past the turn to Goodwood 
House, cazreatiy occitoied by the son of 
tiie lOth Duke (rfRkhmaod. The dtitepazr 
acoountant by twiHwng , is rfiairmaii of the ' 
raoeooursi^s parent co mp any, the Good- 
wood Group. A haiub-on type^ be greets 
all viritocs to the tradt on an mtroductoiy . 
videotqreplaj^d over TV inoitdtars. 

In the mood to ^uige^ we bought 
badges for the ternkst of the trades tinee 
section^ the Richmond Endosiire. The 
adzobsion price was $22.50, ooiiq>aTed 
with$13J0 for the Gordon Endosure and 


- " r II r " I rh *^ii iinnii ■ ■■ — ■ -■ ■■> i. .. ... ... 





.i" W'*-* ^ '-‘.v S' ' r*' '*'» f ’V'sl'v' -ji ..‘ll.-- I 

: 




LEFT Horses after a 


race at the track in 


West Sussex. 


ABOVE Racegoers 


dashing to the tote 


If f I f c I a f s 


Mixing Comedy and Dancing in Barcelona 


B arcelona — it might be go- 
ing overboard to call the night- 
dub La Tlerra (Barth) out of this 
world, Ixit the managers already 
have emploj^ed other planetary puns in 
their promoticmal campaigns. 

During the Ouistmas holidays, they 
lured dients with the slogan **Paz en la 
Tlerra*' (Peace on Earth). Tbey do not 
have a cauhphrase for the club’s quieter 
annex. La Luna (Moon), but mayte 
there’s no need, because after a year in 


By Al Goodman 


operation, the Tlerra-Luna tandem seems 
crowded. 

The morie actor Johnny Oepp, Princess 
Cristina of the Spanish royal family and 
members of Bar^ooa’s powerful soccer 
team have dropped by. The Barcelona 
architect Oriol Bcdiigas, who hdped re- 
shape the dry’s design for the 1992 Sum- 
mer Olympics, turned up the night of my 
visit. Many clients are professionals in 
thdr 305 and 40s. 

LaTierra offers variety: cabaret shows, 
late-i^t dancing or relatively tranquil 
rhaning The club opens at 1 1 P. M, and 
shows start around midnight. They 


change nightly from comedy (in Spanish 
or Catalan) to soul to pop muric. Tte 
smger Bryan Adams performed 
there late last year, as <tid Andz^ Stroi^ 
who sang in the film, **Tbe Commit- 
ments.'* Most of the tdent, however, is 
homegrown. 

Dancing is the next ^ from 2 A. M. 
until the 4:30 A. M. dosing, accompanied 
by a fine cdlection d recorded pop and 
golden oldies. The spacious main room is 
low-ht with dozens of pale yellow tiny 
lightbulbs like yon find on Christmas 
trees. Along the bade wall are a dozen 
globes behi^ glass. 


Down the hall is La Luna. The room is 
calmer, with one long coudi and an old 
wooden bar, where you can have a simple 
coffee tor about $2. For certain nights on 
tte town, ^t can be like heaven. 

La TterrOt Aribau, 230, Barcelona. Tek 
414-3595 {dub) or 200-3553 (chib cffice). 
Closed Sundry. Dinner and shew padcage 
on Mondoy is about $23. Most mows on 
other ni^us cost $11, iitdiuiing first drink. 
Additio^ thinks, $7. 


Al Goodman reports from Spain for 

cm. 


r E s Mini f f I i E 


Directed by Rob Reiner. U. S. 
Rob Reiner seems to have 
lost his SQise of direction in 
'Tforth,** an embarrassing 
comedy about a perfect pre- 
teen (M|ah Wo^ who di- 
voFoes 1)^ noxious parents 
only to ]eaTa after 88 of the 
most painful minutes in 
movie history that there’s no 
pl^ like home. North is 
the dream of all the other 
parents in his neigbboihood. 
But his own parents (Julia 
Louis-Drqrfus, Jason Alex- 
ander) aie too bi^ talking 
about their own Iiv« to ap- 
preciate him. Then it comes 
to hte: he'll divorce his par- 
ents and become a free 
agent With hdp from his 
ambulance-chasing attorney 
(Jon Lovitz), North sifts 
throng parenting proposals 
from all over the ^obe. The 
id^ parents — surprise, 
smprise — turn out to be a 
pair of vriiite New Yoric sub- 
urbanites called Nelson. His 
guardian angel (smirky 


Bruce Willis) explains: 'The 
Nelsons were good folks. 
They’re just not your folks." 
Having grasped this great 
truth. North deddes to re- 
turn to his true parents. 
'T<lortb'’ is awkwardly struc- 
tured not to mention mean- 
spirited and incredibly stu- 
ind. This movie is aimed at 
neither kids nor adults; it 
siinply isn't aimed. 

(Rita Ken^ley, WP) 


ThwCUoirt 

Directed by Joel Sdtumacher. 
U.S. 

In the opening of The Cli- 
ent” an 1 l-year-old boy 
sneaks off to smoke a ciga- 
rette, then witnesses the sui- 
dde of a mob lawyer, ri^t 
after the lawyer has told him 
where an important body is 
buried. John Gritiiani, mas- 
ter of the instant grabber, 
has yet to concoct a sawier 
Ivyrrifiwig thaTi ttris. **The 

/-ir -j 


diell, tells what happens 
when young Mark Sway 
(Brad Renfto) finds himself 
enmeshed in a web of legal 
trouble. Mobsters in New 
Orleans want to make sure 
Mark keqis qmeu Mean- 
u^e, R(^ Foitrigg (Tommy 
Lee Jones), a ^andrianding, 
scijpnire-quocing TJS. axsor- 
osy with political ambitions, 
would veiy much like to use 
Mark for his own purposes. 
The tilm makes all three of 
its prindpab more appeal- 
ing than they were on paper. 

(Janet Maslin, HYT) 


CUent,” niedy compressed 
in a screenplay by Akiva 


in a screenplay by Akiva 
Goldman and Rot)^ Get- 


TtiMUes 

Directed by James Camavn. 
U.S. 

Nudear terrorists take on 
the nudear family and live 
just long enough to rue the 
^y in True fjes,** a slick, 
rick espion^ thriller fea- 
turing Arnold Schwarzen^- 
ger as the James Bond of the 
*9^ In addition, the lovable 
lummox speate six lan- 
guages fluently (English 


doesn't seem to be one of 
them) and scopes fabulous 
femmes fatales, while re- 
maining faithful to his 
mou^ missis (Jande Lee 
Curtis), Decqiti^y labded 
a domestic qiic, the $100 
millicm movie is, in fact, a 
weird hybrid of action jug- 
gernaut, buddy-cop caper 
and reactionary soft-core 
pomoaaphy. "Have you 
ever lollra anyone?” adrs 
Hden Taricer (Qmis) 1900 
learning tiiat her husband, 
Harry, is not a plodding 
salesman as riie tho^t, but 
a dashing spooL Tah, but 
dey ver all baahd," es^lains 
Harry, who has mana^ to 
keqi up the ruse for tiie past 
IS years. Heloi is furious 
about the dec^tion. so Har- 
ry must save not only the 
world but his marriage. 
True CJes,” far too teefano- 
logjcaSy bloated for its car- 
toony plot, overestimates 
the human tolerance for 
hi^-teefa mayhem. 

(Rita JCenqdey, WP) 





One attiactiOT trf the KchiHOTd M 

sore, in addition to its bring to 
finish fine. The restaurant offered a ^ 

fixed mice menu that w^y 
baacsl^th a gustatory flourish here and 
there. Most important, the MU offered 

1 1 chanqtagnes, soaie » 

placed m the restaurant, 
and some diners riect to stay there the 
entire evening, moving on 

menu has six brands), vlhai 
tiie boims enter the gate, diners can ns^ 
st ep thxoti^ the slimng riass doom aim 
natdt tiie race from tiie balcony. That s 

one way to do it. But we wanted to get the 

feri of the course. After the tocood race, 

we headed to the waTfcmg ring to check out 
the hoisefterii for the third race and began 
to soak IQ) the scene. ^ 

In tiie Gordon Endosore, the feeling 

was more pepulist and pubtike, with many 

a pmt bei^ hoisted, but veay whriesome 

and cheery, with a male-femaJe ratio mudi 

to 50-50 than at American tracks. 
The Goidtm ErKlosare also offers a fix- 
ture at Khirii trar^ the hog roasL This is 
a stand at vdudL carvers^ to woik on a 
whole roast pig, slicing oCOiricy pieces and 
serving them on rolls. 

For the ht^es, Goodwood must seem 
hai^vay betwen an athletic 
cCTites* and a driiutanms* balL After eadi 
rac^ a p r iz e of $75 goes to the groom of 
tiie best-tumed-out horse in the parade 
ring. Bisio>trask etiqputte calls for pohte 
rpplanse fbr the winnu^ horse as it js led 
from the track back to its stall 
Above dl, the BritiA are quieter. An 
Ameocan seeks in vam that fevered atna^ 
^ifaere of 0Bed that prevails at 

hoBEie^ and tiiattODW-damaging vocal style - 
witii vtiiidi bettors epoouiare meir horse. 

In Race ^ lay wife and I watched in 
<£riiduf as our two jades fva'dual lo^ 
cast bet, vtiridi reepraes tiie bettor to pick 
the first two horses in ritber order, raUied 
from wril back in the pack and b^an a 
thrining acorieration. As they pulled 
jihigMi in the BwmT fariong, an luunistmc- 
American voice at my side rose abore 
tiie scA mnimur rti' tire crowd, screainmg 
- lAio^ nnixdm as the hmses tiiunder^ 
tire wine. Arilver-haired ^tktman turned 
tonrywil^axciredaneyrinowandsaid,*'! ' 
takeit you had the winner, then?” 


H ANDICAmNGisnot ea^ for 
newoGBreis. The two daily rac- 
ing. rarets, The Racing Times 
and Tte S^artifl^ lift; present 

tmjiiitM itifnnniitino U dpiisdy enciypt- 
ed, in tii9 type. The form 5tatistic& for 
boire' go to tire b^inmng rif the 

. yca^ and may dtow onl^ three or four 
zaceal^previomraoes^ztisnecessaiy to ^ 
a ihidk ‘Team bcKk;” available at larger 
bbolaumm for alxNit 
The track program, for SI JO, provides 
»hmnhn»n azia|yses of each horse, and 
some <tf tire dmiy Dcwspspets have good 
racing oaa»Kmoeats who handicap the 
day’s races. Ine best stogie source I found 
was tire Tubribiih Race Cud sdid at the 
trade for $7 JO. By the fourth race both 


nr^ wife and I hM swung round to the 
British pomt of view. Goodwood wasn't a 


British pomt of view. Goodwood wasn't a 
gambling eagrerrence, it wu a county fair, 
a t hr ee- G oors e meal, a stroU through the 
^uden and an after-wnk drink rriled into 
one. ’Via, Ipse, does it really matter? 

By Race 6, we h^an to care vtiii^ horse 
woo the paddock beauty prizn 


IJJE fl/S 


[ Gone are the blond wig, the 


$6 for the public eodosuxe. Prices ^ up 
during tire My meeting, during vtiudi tire 
Rkkinoad Eodomre is open to members 
ooly. Faxkiiig on a fidd across the road 
bom tire racecours e cotranoe costs S3. 


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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, July 29, 1994 
Page 7 


-'Vf, 


From San Sebastian 
New Basque Cuisine 




By Patricia We!is 

TuemaHoHol HmUTHbuig 


S AN SEBASTIAN} Spain tt* Classy 
and deganuSan&bastUnjsIikea 
small-scale seaside resort fnssen in 
time. It’s also a mqor gastFonomic 
^center, for Basques are oon^dm^ Spain’s 
' best cooks and most enthusiastic eaters 
^and drinkers. The i^on daims some of 
,the country’s finest raw ingredients, m- 
dudii^ and sfadlfish^ meat, 
i^cep’s milk cheese^ wild mushroomsy the. 
oat red Ricga Alta wines, the emmeotly 
'drinkable white Tbcalcoli wine, a pleasant 
fizqr local cider, as well as an intense, 
•almost lemcKiy apple brimdy, or 
Tthat could cmnpete any day with Frances 
Calvados. 

The city rates an astonishing number (tf ' 
^ restaurants, the newot of.wducb is nm 
'^y 34-year-old Martin Berasatqv* H^s 
the youngest oi San Sebastian’s ^ebrated 
-chefs, yet he’s probabty been at the stove 
.as long as most. From the age of 13 he. 
worked in the Idtidiens of 1^ parent^ old- 
'town restaurant, Bodegdh Alejandro, 
where his mother picked up cooldng 
;fr(xn local tisbemvai who prqrared thrir 
^own meals in her Utdien for a smaD fee. 

A year ago BCTasat^ui moved his res- 
taurant to £e outddits of town, where he 
cjmanded the family’s modCT houM into 
•a huge, and airy contenmorary restaurant 
decorated in a sea-foam Dine, with a mar- 
.kling view of rdling lulls and loa^anmg 
Basque farms. He t^ his staiS and'hls 
. merited hfidwlin star with him, and set 
an eimanrive garden, Ml erf herbs, vi^eta- 
. bias, fruit trees and berries. 

. Like many of his passionate Basque 
'COok-coUeagues, he is a pioptment of 
gain’s rmeva cocina vasca, or lighter. 


fresher, wie seasonal modan 

that^gzadously maintflifnt the int^rity of 
traditional Basque muanA His food is 


subtle and pure. As he likes to say, 
%tier and cream are f<ff desserts only," 
so you won't find batter on the table or 
cream hidden in the sot^. Olive ml is the 
fat of choice. 

Starters here mi^t include a platter of 
upas, . sudi 9S bites of nue tuna bdly 
gniled over wboddi diarcoal that is made 
on -the pnqrerty; marinated fresh ancho- 
and a delicate eseo&ecAe of tuna, 
spvked with a gentle acidity of tomatoes, 
Guonsand dder vin^ar. 

- Most diners begin their meal with a 
glass or two of thelo^ Txakoili,the fresh, 
Imnony 'Mate wine from ste^ seaside 
vixuByards. A fine local to recommend 
is a light Rioja, Vina Izadi 1988. 

Main Gouises range from soch modem 
fare as a refreshing gay paAn cS langou^ 
tines served in a martim glass to a boWy 

and a tu^^^^^terl^A fine traifitional 
suggestion includes an exfiaordinaiy ren- 
£tion of local grilled hdee or mmuza. 
Elsewfaere in the world hake is a trash fish 
itbered in nets, the Basques catch the 

by msinrsining frcshneSS anri 

texture. Berasatqgui grills the tender, 
white-fleshed Qa^ fim over charcoal, 
manying h with a hriniant green fresh 
fava bean puree. 

^ two recent visit^ chQdren of all ^es 
werenresent in the dming romn, natoM 
for Sebastian. Famiu^ ^^ues reign 
supreme in Bas^ conntty, and efafldren 
acoopqiany tbdr parents everywhere, in- 
duding ta^ bats and ^ restaurants. On 
Sund^ the restanraht offeis a q>ecial 
duldren’s ioiemi that indudes internation- 
al faytmtes, sndi as pasta, steak and fries. 



The Heart of the Zulu Kingdom 


ByBiUKeUer 

Sc*' York Time Semoe 


Rataunmt Martin Berasategui, Lt^ 
Ktdea 4, Lasarte; 366472. Closed Svndcy 
meftA Mondc^ and two weeks ai Christmas. 
Memoat2,800(S2]J0X 4,800. 6.800pese- 
tas. A la ante, 3,900 to 7^00 pesetas, 
iaduddng strict bia not yrine. 


J OHANNESBURG — The battle- 
field of Isandlwana has not changed 
much since the day in 1879 when the 
British redcoats sufered one of the 

most humiliating defeats of ihetT imperial 

histoiy. Seated on the cr^ the Zulus 
named Isandlwana — meaning ‘‘like a 
tittle bouse,” althmigh most visitors agree 
it looks more like a sphinx — you look 
down upcxi a wide, golden plain that rdls 
away into the heart of the Zulu IdngdonL 
Exc^t for a narrow road and a telq>bone 
line, there are few modem distractions 
from the tale of battle David Rattray is 
narrating for a spdlbound audience. 

There seems to be nothing Rattray does 
not know about the edestial swath of land 
that the Europeans called Natal, the Zulus 
called KwaZulu, mid the aU-aooommodat- 
ing new Government KwaZulu/Na- 
taL He knows the bu^ and bushes, the 
geology and the weather patterns, the lan- 
niam and the lore, but b^ of all he knows 
the history erf battles. Many of (he major 
battles of frontier South Africa, battles that 
still echo in cootenmoraiy pities, tran- 
^nred within a few nouis’ drive of Fugi- 
tives’ Drift Lodge, the comfortable guest 
house Rattr^ binlt on his father’s farm. 

Of all, Isandlwana is his passiotL, 
an irresistible story of colliding empires, 
human valor and colonial comeuppance. 
By the time Rattray directs your pze to 
the plateau on your left, from which 
20,000 Zulu warriors cascaded down upon 
the astonished British, you have been lis- 
tening entranced, fm- almost two hours, 
lon^ than the battle of Isandlwana itself, 
and they are among the most rewar^ng 
two hours you have spent in South Africa. 

Now itet South Africa is not only polit- 
ically acc^iaWe but — given the univer- 
ml mfection for President Ndson Man- 
dela — a potential pil g rima g e destination. 


it is inevitable that visitors will begin 
pushing off the well-trod tourist routes in 
seardi of something different Most trav- 
elers will see Cape Town, of course, for its 
hrsiory and scenery and wine, and game 
reserves, led by the great, wild sprawl of 
Kr^er National Pa^ But then what? 

first answer would be KwaZulu/Na- 
taL It is beartbrealdngly beautiful, easily 
accesribl^ filled with comfmtable lodgings 
and rich in Itistory (hat still matters today. 

Three distinctive cultures cohabited, of- 
ten brutally, in the rolling hills between 
ihe rugged coast of the Indian Ocean and 
the spectacular jut of the Drakensberg 
Mountains. The Zulus, the largest of 
South Africa’s ethnic groui^ are uso one 
of tte most fascinating political and mili- 
tary forces to have arisen on the continent, 
and Zulu natio nalism r emains a potent 
force today. The British, who inoneered 
the racist laws for which the Afrikaners 
would ultimately bear most of the respon- 
sibili^, left their ctrfonial stamp on evoy- 
thing . The Indians arrived as mdenturra 
workers on the British sugar cane farms 
bnt went mi to make Durban the largest 
Indian city outside (rf India itself. 

I anticipme the anxious question: ’’Na- 
tal .. . Zulus . . . isn't that where, 
uh . . .?” Yes, it is the province where 
10,000 blacks have died ance 1984 in fratri- 
cidal conflict between Mandela's African 
National Congress and partisans of the 
Tnkatha Freedom Par^. And no, that is not 
a reason for avoiding tiw area. The violence 
has subsidfid, and is cmufined to areas 
where outriders are imlilrrfy to venture 

It is posrible to sa^le the best of the 
province comfortably in as little as a week. 
You could do it in a few days if you restrict 
yoDiself to Durban and the Zulu heartland, 
or you could extend your stay to linger in 
some of the province's game parks. 

What follows is a rough and adjustable 
itinerary, with Rattray’s lo4ge as the cen- 
terpiece. 

Fly to Durban, a frequent one-hour 


flight from Johaimesbuig, and pick up a 
rental car. South Africa has g^ roads 
with modem 24-hour service stations. . 

Durban lounges around a huge natural 
harbor. Zn the l§20s the British landed and 
by the middle (rf that century settlers had 
begun dearing the area for sugar and fruit 
farms, textiles and papv miTU. and later 
shipb^ding and oil rmning. 

Downtown Durban is a cosmopolitan 
city office hlocks and department stores 
surrounding an extravagutiy Victorian 
complex of old civic buildings. 

You can sample Indian Durban with a 
Idsurely walk through the quarter that 
^rawls around the Grey Street Mosque, a 
huge confection of ramparts and gold 
drmies at the western end of downtown. 

From Durban there are two routes in- 
land, equally pleasant but quite different. 
One alternative is to take the N3 highway 
to Pietermaritzburg, a graceful Victorian 
dty that has preserved many landmarks of 
Amkaner and British histoty. Outside- 
Durban take the hi^way's Hillcresi turn- 
off and meander to netermaritzburg 
along the Old Main Road. Continue north 
through the Natal Midlands. 

A nother option from Durban 
is to go up the coast on the M4 
m^way to Stanger and then 
take Highway 74 inland. This 
route offers some fun side trips, such as 
the CrooDdile Creek croc farm m Tongaat 
or Shakaland, a touristy but educational 
rillage in Eshowe. 

The usual tour for first-timers consists 
of Isandlwana in the morning, and then a 
more leisurely af temcxm visi t to Fugitive's 
Drift, where the straggling survivors of 
Isandlwana were pursued to the Buffalo 
River, and Roike's Drift, a few miles 
away, where later on the same eveutful 
day 100 British held off 4,500 attacking 
Zulus in 10 hours of hand-to-hand com- 
bat, from behind an Alamo constructed of 
bis(^t tins and commeal bags. 


Its I i T S 6 1 1 ! E 


AUSTRIA 


Vienna 

Museum Modemer Kunst, tri: 78- 
'25-50, closed Mondays. To 18: 
"Maffi^ren." Presents six different 
.forms o( paintHiig with worksby flgu- 
rative-narratlve artists Francesco 
Clefr,ente, Jorge immendorlt and 
Mricdm Mortty, and Intormel palnt- 
"ers such as Fw KIrketiy, Hermann 
Nitsch and Cy Tworrtbly. me exhibi- 
.tion IS sutx)lemer^ by sculptural 
pieces by each artisL 
Fatais Liechtenslein. teL 317-G900. 
dosed Mondays. To Sept. 18: "Mar- 
kus Lopertz.” 50 large works span- 
_ Ring the Austrian cutist's career from 
the erxJ of the 1950s when Uviertz 
began to paint in a mamer between 
'the representational and the abstract, 
to the 1970s when he created still 
Kfes consisting of symbolic rhotifs.' 
such as helmets, spades,' ears at 
com and fish. 


belonui 


BniQCT 

Kunstcentnim Oud SintJan..tri: 
(50) 33-56-66. open OUy. To Oct 
'2: "Modigliani: Oe (Dpenbarlng." 
More than 400 drawings and water- 
colors created in Paris by Italian artist 
•Arriedeo Modgliarti from 1906 to 
-1914. The wote were collected by 
Paul Alexandre. 


BMTAIN 


'LmmSoci 



Matisse*s **Le Jeune Marin JJ” at the Fondation Pierre 
Gianadda in MartigrQf, Switzerland. 


Ferdinand Hodier: A Romantic Tradi- 
tion.'* 1 00 paintings arxf 40 dTBvdngs 
*trom a pd^e cotlection of German, 
Swiss and Austrian art. 

Royri Academy of Arts, tel: (71 ) 
-.494-56-15, open daily. Continu- 
ing/To Ocl. 2: "Impreseioftism to 
Symbolism: The Belgian Avant- 
Garde 1660-1900." K) paintinge. 
sculptures arxi reliels fllurirate the 
artistic revolution which took place in 
B^um between 1880 and the turn 
of me century. The exhibition 1^ 
tures worte by Ensor,- van de Velde 
and van Rysseiberghe. 

The Ashmoieen Museum, tek 8^ 
278010. Closed mondays. To Aig. 
14: "Eastern Birds." Birds hi the ads 
from China, Japan, Inda and the Is- 
lamic world depicted In painting^ 
pnnts, textiles, wood, ceramte and 
metal figures. 


PRANCE 


CAMAPA 

Uoitfreol 

yhisde dee Beaux-Afts. ( 5 i 4 j 

Hides and still lifes. 


Areenai, teh 44-78-25-00. open dai- 
ly, ConOnuIng/To Ocl 2: "L’Or dee 
Dieux, 1‘Or des Andes.” From the 
cbllMtion of Peruvian banker Gttik 
iermo Wiese, 140 pieces of pre-(^ 
lumbian jeweliy from Peru, Ecuador 
aidOolumbia 

MontoaDler ' 

Mustie Fabra, .tel: 67-86-06-34, 
riogori Mondays. To C3cL 3: “Vieira 
da Silva." Drawings and paintings by 
thepostwarpahiterthatwsrsacespt- 
ed ^ the French government as pqr^ 
msnt of estate taxes. 

Nice 

Muses d'Art Modems st d’Art Con- 
femporain, tek 93-82-61-62. eloeed 
Tuesdays. To SepL 25: “Jim Dine.' 
More than 60 works from the artisfs 
personal coHeeflon. Includes sculp- 
tures using small statues, tools, 
masks. paAited bird, ari d tmAlmeda 
dravdn^ and printings.. . 

Psis * * 

Muses d’Art Modeme de ia Vine de 

Psrts. tel: 47-23-61 -27. cioeed Mon- 
days. To .Oct 16: .“Robert Inivin." 


Paintli^ from the 'SOs and ’60s 
showing tiie influence of Abstract Bc- 
preariortism bn the artiri; includes 
hstaBaSons and photographs ae well 
as drawtngs and bhieprints of rite- 
' projects cr eate d in the 


Musee Camavalet. teb 42-72-21-13, 
dosed Mondays. To Aug. 7: "Paris 
de I’AntiqiAe a nos Jours.” Recent 
acquiriflons by the museum Include 
vchaeotogicri finds, printings, post- 
era, aeriri photographs and post- 
cards. 

MusSe du Louvre, tel: 40-20-51-51. 

"SfiSSmsdesTroffbar- 
raefc Le Desrin a Botogne, 1580- 
1620." 


Muses MarmotlarvOaude MonaL 
tel: 42-24-07-02. ContinuIng/To 
Ocl 2: "La NouveOe Vague: L'E^ 
tarhpe Japonaise de 1666 a 1939 
dans la ejection Robert 0. MuHer." 
More than 150 Japanese prints, dat- 
ing from the opening of Japan to the 
West in 1868. 

Musee d'Orsay. tel: 40-49-48-14, 
closed Tuesdays. Continuing/To 
SepL 1 1 : "Kadar." SO portraits mthe 
French pioneer in photography from 
185410 1660. 

Toulouee 

Musee das Ai^usttns, lef: 61-22- 
21-82. open drily. To Sept. 30; 
"Clauds vignon." A retrospective of 
the works of the French printer arxf 
richer who worked for rang Louis 
rail. Indudes such prirtiings as "Le 
Trkxnphe d’Hercule,'' painted for 
Cardlnri de Richelieu, as weN as 
drawings and etchings. 

QBmAWY 

Berlin 

Altee Muaeum. tel: (30) 21-50-23- 
78, closed Mondays To Aug. 28: 
"Cte Letzien Tage der Menschheii, 
Slider des EratenWeltkrlegs.'' Brings 
together propaganda posters, photo- 
graphs and films from countries on 
both rides of the confioL as well as 
printirm documriitifto various art- 
iste' visbris of war. Incjudes vvorks by 
Dbc, Beckmann, Dufy, ChagaH and 
Malevich. 

Iluideh 

Lenbachhausv fek (69) 233-320- 
00, cioeed Monds^ To SepL 11: 
"Chuck Close.'' The American paint- 
er regards his portraits, based on 
photomaphs, as grids d chronetic 
uTHis. The lar^ormai printings look 
like sDrpenees of abstrriX color, but 
from a dlslance, assume the appear- 
ance ol the photographs from which 
the images are originally taken. 
Speyer 

HIsiDrtsches Museum der Pfalz, tel: 
(62321 «wn. w 
Contfnufng/To Aug. 14:''Der 
enschatz der Rorr^ov: Melster- 
werke aus der Eremtage SL Peters- 
burg." 240 ob^ dw from the 
Treasure of tito Romanovs In the Her- 
mitags in SL Petarsburg bring to life 
300 years of Russian ratory. 

IRELAND ~ 

Oublht 
Dougl 

111C dosed Sundeys.To Aug. 27; 
“Lost Property: Christian Bottanski.” 


jto Hyde Gallery, tel: 702- 
■ /s. Tc 


1 1 1 s ! a s s 1 1 f 


On July 31; “Petrus Chri^^ Re- 
nris8anoeMasterofBnjges.''.Metro- 
pofltan Museum of Art, New York. 
On July 31: “African 2ton: The Sa- 
cred Ariel Ethiopia." The Manil Col- 
lection, Houston. 

On 4uty 31: “Kyoto-Pari^Kyoto: 


1200 Ans dTnfluences.” Jardins de 


On July 31: “L'Idea Ferrari.'' Neue 
Nationelgalerle, Berlin. 

On July 31: "Friiee Beato ri I'Ecole 
de Yokoftoma, 1883-1877.'' Centre 
National de le Photogr^ie, Paris. 


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An attempt at evoking separation and 
death, and consisting of unclaimed 
propeny collecied from bus and rail- 
way depots. 

ISRAEL 

Jerusalem 

The Israel Museum, tel: (2) 708- 
811, open daily. To Se^ 26: “Fniiis 
of the Brush.” Four centuries of Ital- 
ian stiU-life painting from the collec- 
tfon of Sihrano Lodi, induefing works 
by Annibale (^rraci. by members of 
the school ri Caray^XQio and by corv 
temporary artist Giorgio Morandl. 

ITALY 

Venice 

Palazzo Grasri, tri; (41 ) 522-1375. 
"Rinasetmento - Oa Brunefieschi a 
Kfichelangelo: La Rappresentazione 
deH’ Architettura." The exhibition i$ 
closed temporarily. It will be open to 
the pubfic again from Aug. 1 8 to Nov. 
6 . 

Zitelle Cultural Center, tel: (41) 
528-6310, open daily. Continu- 
ing/To Seri- 1 1^ "China 220 B. C.; 
The Xian Wamors." Life-sus terra- 
cotta warriors from the army of 7,000 
oardlng the torrto ri the Emperor 
un Shihuangdi. 


JAPAN 


SINGAPORE 


Toityo 

htara Museum, tel: (279) 24-6585, 
open daily. To Aug. 31 ; "Art Is Fun 5: 
Uncensoring the Senses." The fifth 
hnstalmerti of this series brings to- 
geSier seven Japanese artists who 
exriore the visual aspects of art as 
w^ as the physical sensations ri 
touch and sound In their work, thus 
chrilenging the notion that art is a 
passive exercise of viewing. 


National Museum, tel: 332-3656, 
closed Mondays. To Sept. 19: 
"Strides ri White: PorcelalnfromDe- 
hua” The pieces on display from the 
Dehua kilns ri China's Fujian prov- 
ince date from the Song dynas^ and 
include outstanding colleciion of 
blano-de-chine. 


SPAIN 


PORTUGAL 


Lisbon 

Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, tel: 
397-6001. closed Mond^. To Aug. 
IS: “As Tenta^oes de Bosch ou o 
Etemo Retomo." Focustng on Hier- 
onymus Bosch's triptych ' 'The Temp- 
tation ri SL Anthony," toe exhibition 
features works by Arcimboldo. Dorer, 
Moreeu and DaH. in which the artists 
explore the thematic variations and 
the symbols ri their time. 

Museu Nacional de Etnologia, tel: 
301-6264, Closed Monc^. To Seri- 
30: "Escultura Angolana." Masks, 
cult and sacrificial ot^ects from vari- 
ous ethnic groups in the former over- 
seas Portuguese province of Angola. 


Madrid 

Botero In Madrid. Oxitinuing/To 
Aug. 12: (TntoePaseodeRecoietos 
and F^aza de C^bc^. an installation 
ri 21 Iffiper-ttrin-life rotund bronze 
sculptures by Cotombian artist Fer- 
nand Bolero. 


SWITZERLAND 


Lugano 

villa Favorite, tel: (91) 51-61-52, 
open Fridays, Satur^'re and Sun- 
days. ContinuIng/To Oct. 30: "Eu- 
rapa and America: 19th evxj 20th 
Century Paintings and Wlaiercolors.'' 
works from the Hudson River School 
of painting and from the Amencan 
impreseionisis as well as Cubist and 
German Expressionist works, Rus- 


sian avant-garde and American Pto- 
straci ExpTMSionist palntlngB. 

Mo^ny 

Fondation Pierre Giannada, tel: 
(26) 22-39-78. open daily. To Nov. 
1 : "De Matisse a Picasso.'* 80 painl- 
inos, drawings and sculptures by 30 
20th-oerTtury artiste induding works 
by Bonnard, Matisse. Braque, Rcas- 
80 , Balthus and Chagall. 

UMTEPSTATES 

Chicago 

Art institute, tel; (312) 443-3600. 
open dally. To SepL 18; “OdHon 
Redon: F^nce of Dreams." Brings 
together 160 works by toe visionery 
vtisL Inducting his early "noirB," i.e. 
charcoal drawings, and his color 
paintings, pastels and waterextiors. 
Mthough a contemporary of the Res- 
ists Etod the Im^H-esslonists. Redon 
cxeried dreamlike pastels arid paint- 
er^ which often drew on the nascent 
disdriine ri psyctooanalysis wKh Its 
emphasis on dreams. 

New York 

Museum of Modem Ail, tel: (212) 
708-9400, closed Wednesdays. 
Continuing/To SepL 6: "Master- 
pieces from the David and Peggy 
Rockefeller Collection: Manet to Pi- 
casso." 


naaiiBvikDLCnNr 


e New York Tones Edited hy Will 5llioryz. 


CONDITION CRmCALs 
Hie Story of a Norse Con- 
tmues 

By Edut Heron. 414 pages. $22. 
Fawcett 
Reviewed by 
Suzanne Gordon 

O VER the last several de- 
cades the nam^ of phyri- 
dans, like Lewis Thomas, Peni 
Klass or Sberwin Nuland, who 
write about their exigences, 
have become increasingly fs* 
miliar That ccHipIed With the 
mediB’s tendency to report al- 
most exdusivdy on the acthi- 
lies oS doctors and biomedical 
lesearcheis — give the public 
the impression that mratome 
equals all of health care. It’s no 
wondo* that most people ignore 
the other important players <» 
this stage, notably muses. 

This is not due only to the 
media’s focus on doctors. 
Nurses’ traditional sodaliza- 
tioD has encouraged them to be 
far too humble about their ac- 
complishments. When society 
teaches that virtue is its own 
reward, silence is often the re- 
sulL One who has broken that 
sQence is Edw Heron, a critical 
care and emergency room 
nurse; vdio, in 1987, introduced 
herself wiUi *’lntenrive Care: 
The Story of a Nurse.” 

Heron described her experi- 
ences as a nursing studenu di- 
vorced and raising a son. In Uiis 
bmlL vriiidi covers the period 
between 1987 and 1992. she is 
an experienced nurse, her son is 
in his late teens, and she falls in 
love with a much younger man 
— ihus providing a love interest 
for readers whose tolerance for 
illness and death may falter. 

Although Heron provides 
enou^ personal detaO to make 
the book a very go^ read, its 
importance lies in hv dqnctioD 
of now ack pec^le really func- 
tKHi, v^t nnrses do to hdp 
them, and how little {rfiysicians, 
hospitals and our soaety under- 
stand or value that work. In 
anecdote after anec^te. Heron 
punctnates the prevalent niyth 
that wt can soindiow turn hu- 
man bongs into *^(-seasitive 
health care consumers.” ^y- 
one who bdieves that idea 
should meet Ae 23-yearoId oo- 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Hdena Ktmtov^ editor of 
Flash Alt magazine in Milan, is 
reading “Generation .X“ by 
Douglas Criipland. 

’’It is even more the novel for 
the new generation than Bret 
Easton Qlis's ’American Psy- 
cho,’ a few years ago. It is more 
conscious, more like everyday 
life with a more acceptable level 
of violence, which however be- 
comes more psycholo^cally ab- 
sorlrfng.” (Erik Ipsen, IHT2 



ffiTparinnal tber^ist who shows 
up in the inienrive care unit on 
the day of her wedding after 
chnicmg on an hors-d’oeuvre. 
Bemuse ^ didn’t want to 
bother the guests, she went into 
a coma in the la^es room and 
died three liam later. 

Human foibles are one of the 
tfiwmi-e of this bodt. So Is the 
insensitivity of some phyricians 
>lOTIMcking 


and the role nurses pL 
up the pieces when tE^ doc- 
tors fail to attend to thdr pa- 
tients’ ne^. In one incadent 
Heron is caring for a terminally 
m patient suffering from excru- 
datix^ cancer pain. The physi- 
caan m charge of the case re- 
fuses to prescribe narcotics. 
Instead of dutifully following 
orders. Heron challenges them, 
and finally prods another phy- 


sician to get the patient the pain 
medication. As m her first book 
this intimate view of medical 
pditics is far from leassuring. 

As this hook demonstrates, a 
nurse’s job is not only to moni- 
tor and administer treatments 
pbyscians prescribe. There are 
times iriien patients need affir- 
mation, confidence building 
and reassurance more than 
drugs, tests and procedures. 

Heron constantly refers to 
her ability to judge v4ien a par 
tient nee& this kind of care as a 
” 81 x 01 sens^ or *intuition.” 
One wishes that she had chosen 
a less traditional and easy-to- 
dijwniss phrase. Terms us^ in 
nursing scholarship, like 
“ri^ed intuition” or “expert 
clinical judgmeoL” would bdp 
the public understand that it 


takes more than ’Roman’s intu- 
ition” to interpret the emotion- 
al and social subtexts of pa- 
tients’ behavior. Otoe reason our 
culture so easily dismisses nurs- 
ing is because many b^eve Uiai 
anyone — certainly any woman 
— can be a nurse. 

That certainly seems to be 
the theory to wmch the bo^tal 

edministrainrs is HCTOn’S DOOk 
subscribe. The administrators 
she portrays are cmstantly try- 
ing to cut costs by laying off 
experienced nurses, hiring less 
eiqierienced personnel as re- 
placements, and imposing in- 
tolerable workloads on uose 
who remain, ^en nurses bis 
administrators to increase staff- 
ing levels, the latter simply tell 
them to it or leave it. the 

end of the book. Heron actually 
does leave iL 

Echo Heron now works only 
part-time. This book makes us 
understand why she and other 
nurses often quit tiie profession 
or truncate their commitment 
to iL Our culture, the authOT 
shows us quite vivify, demands 
quality caregiving but refuses to 
reward the car^vers. 

Suzanne Gordon, the author rf 
“Prisoners of Men's Dreams: 
Striking Dut fwa New Feminine 
Future,” is currently writing a 
book on nursing, ^e wrote this 
for The Washinffon Post. 


By Alan Tniscott 

T he most talked about deal 
of the second Generali 
Masters Individual contest is 
shown in the diagram. Some de- 
daffers made six nt^biimp by 
devdoping dubs and eventual- 
ly scpieezing East in spades and 
diaiDOQds. Others reached six 
diamonds which someiimes 
succeeded after South short- 
fffied his diam onds and trapped 
East’s jack at the fimsh. 

At one table the opening lead 
agflinsi six diamtnds was a 
heart, won in dummy inth the 
king. South discarded a club 
and cached dummy’s (op dia- 
monds, revealing the bad split 
He led the sp^e jack for a 
winning finesse and threw an- 


WEST 

«- 

9 10987 
0 

«KQ52 


Other club on the heart ace. The 
position was: 

NORTH 
* 10 
943 
0 — 

4AJ943 

EAST 
*Q987fi 
9 — 

0 J8 

«6 

SOUTH 

♦ AX3 
O — 

OQ1097 

* 10 

A heart was now led from Che 
dummy, and East had an un- 
pleasant choice. He diroosed of 
his club loser, and South ruffed 
South then played the (]u^. 
and another diamond, ^long 
East the jadt, and later played 
winners from his hand to 


squeeze West in beans and 
crabs. 

NORTH (D) 

♦ J 10 
C AK43 
OAK 
«A Jfi43 

WEST EAST 

AQB8 7 5 4 

9JI09B76h ”9® « 

(.5 0 J 8 6 2 

*KQ52 

^ SOUTH 

4AK32 
9 — 

OQ 109 7 4 3 
410 7 6 

North and South weie \iih)eTabte. 
Tlw bidding: 

Nonti 

14 
34 

4N.T. 

60 

West led the heart Jack. 


«■ 

East 

South 

West 

24 

30 

3 C 

Pass 

3N.T. 

Pass 

Pass 

50 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 


images 


DSTERNAMONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 29, 1994 


*« 


Britain Was Warned on Bombings^ Jewish Leader Says 


Return 


Buenos AIRES — Argentina gave Britain 
advance warning that it was a likely target for 
bomb explosions similar to the one that killed 
^ost p^Ie at a Jewish center in Buenos 
Aires, accoi^ng Edgar M. BronfmaiL president 
of the World Jewish Congress. 

The British government denied Mr. Bronf- 
ntan*s assertion. ^We had no advance warning.'' 
a Foreign OfHce spokesman said in London. 
London police and the office of Rrime Minister 
John Major also said bad received no intelli- 

gence information from the Aigen tines. 

Mr. Bronfman said Argentina was considering 
breaking relations with Ir^ if it is shown that 
Tehran was bdtind the group that caused the 
Buenos Aires bombing. 

Mr. Bronfman said President Carlos Saul 
Menem of Argentina bad told him that an Irani- 
an dissident gave the warning about impending 
attacks in Lwdon when he was interviewed in 
Venezuela by Argentine investigators in connec- 
tion with the July 18 explosion in Buenos Aires. 

'‘That's pretty good prtxtf it was the same 
group” acting in London and Buenos Aires, Mr. 
Bromman added. 

Mr. Bronfman said President Menem told him 


he had warned London. “Menem even phoned 
London to warn them.'' he said. 

Police and security orgamzations in London 
were caught off gua^ by car bombs outside the 
Israeli Embassy and a Jewish fund-raising 
organization. 

The Board of Deputies of British Jews said it 
warned police a month ago that extremist attacks 
could be expected, but the British auihoritie did 
not appear to share their concern. 

At least 96 people were killed in the explosion 
at .Aigcnlina’s main Jewish community center. 
The two car bombs in London w'ounded 19. 

Argentina said late Wednesday that it had 
called back its ambassador in Iran for consulta- 
tions. amid rising diplomatic tension in the after- 
math of the Argenbne blasL 

“The president said that if what he suspected 
was true, then he would break relations with 
Iran,” said Mr. Bronfman, who was visiting Ar- 
gentina to give support to its Jewish community. 

The Argentine Fcrei^ Ministry summon^ 
Iran's ambassador, Hadi Soleimanpur, twice in 
two days this week to request his cooperation in 
the investigation of the bombing. 

But Ar^tina denied reports that it had re- 
quested the extradition of a former Hezbollah 
leader in connection with the bomb attack. Hezr 


boUah is a pro-Iranian Idamic fundamentalist 
party based m Lebanon. 

A Foreign hfinistty spokesman, Horado Fu- 
entcs Roda, told Reuters that no extradition 
papas had beat presnt^ to Lebanon for any 
member or forma* member of HeaboUah. 

Rep(^ carried by French radio and new^- 
pers said Argentina had requested the extrra- 
tion of a former Hezbollah member and threat- 
ened to oit dq)lomatic ties with Lebanon if it 
were denied 

Foreign Minister Gtddo Di Telia of Argentina 
is due to brief the UN Security on 

Ixwbing Friday, and Britain is to back Argenti- 
na in its call fiva UN condemnation of “interna- 
tional terrorism.” 

The judge handling the investigation into the 
Argeotme bombing said he had^tained useful 
clues on the attack from the Iranian disrident he 
interviewed in Caracas on Monday. 

The judge, Juan Jos6 Galeano, who read out a 
brief statement at the Bnenos A^ courtiiouse, 
^oke to a former Iranian d^lomat, Manudiiehr 
Motamer, who is seddng refugee status in Vene- 
zuela and protection fiom Tdran. 

Judge Galeano said Mr. MotaQief*s ‘‘testimo- 
ny was utmost inq>ortanoe to clarify what 
happened and brought us closer to our highest 


goal — to identif)^ the bomhcrs and bring 
them to justice.” 

The Iranian ambassador to the United Na- 
tions, Kamal Kharrazi, in a letter to the UN 
secretazy-gaeral, Butros Butros Ghah, aonised 
Isi^ of aoeuring Tdiran without a shred tif 
evidence. 

The Israeli en^ to the UN, Gao Yaaooln, 
said Tuesday that mvestigations into tte attack 
in Buenos Aires “pointed clearfy to B&oian 
invdvemenL” 

Mr. Kharrazi also said Mr. Motaina was not a 


U.S. Sees 

Behind Bombings? 


Vows Punishment 


Iranian diplomat or dvil servant, as news reports 
out 


claimed, but rather a smaU-business man who 
bad been arrested several times for fraud. ' 

Venezuela expcDed four Iraniaa diplomats af- 
ter th^ of trying to forobty rq)atriate 

Motamer, his wife and chSdren. 

Adding credibility to the aUegatioos were re- 
ports of an unusual increase in the amount fd 
traffic thioi^ diplomatic bags between Tehran 
and Buenos Aires in recoit months. 

Depuw Forei^i Mimster Fernando PdrtiQa 
accusM “Iran on Wednesday of “abuang the 
function of the diplomatic but ph^ 
down rq}orts that tte es^losives used m the 
bombing had been import in Iranian diplo- 
matic poudies. 


^ Tim Weiner 

Tprk Tbm Sffnee 
WASHINGTON — As U.S. 
. ititriiigwiff qffidals worked to 

asses a wave of terresist bomb- 
ings in Lon^n, Buenos Aires 
and Panama, Seoetaxy of State 
Waxxen M. Chrtetc^ff said 
Thoesday that the United 

States wo^ lead a “concerted 
intnmatiqi ljfl JCSpOOS^ tO thC 

aitadts; - 

‘ Semnr nfftnials and inteUl- 
gence (dicers said the attacks 
veteprobaMy an outgrowth of 
battles between Israd and Hez- 
bollah, the Iranian-backed 

guerrillas- in South Lebanon* 
rathe** «•>**»" an assault by Iran 
aiiJ its tO WTOCk 

the recent Arab-lsraeli peace 


Defector’s Claims 
Doubted in Seoul 


iVo Proof of North^s Bombs 


Reuen 

SEOUL — South Korean 
governmeai officials said 
Thursday that th^ had no evi- 
dence to support claims from a 
North Korean defector that 
I^rongyang has developed five 
nuclear warheads. 

The officials, including mem- 
bers of the national intelligence 
agen^ that staged the news 
c^erence on Wednesday at 
which the defector made his 
d^m, said South Korean poli^ 
toward North Korea r emains 
unchanged. 

“Tbe defector was not him- 
self involved in the nuclear pro- 
gram and was simply idling re- 
porters what he heard,^' a 
Defense Ministry spokesman 
said. 

He added, “His reliability 
will have to be investigated fur- 
ther but certainly his statement 
does not require a change in our 
defense po^ure.” 

At Che oetv^ conference, the 
defector, Kang Myong Do, said 
that North Kwea was concen- 
trating efforts on building mis- 
siles to cany five nudear war- 
heads it has already developed. 

He said the hei^ of Of^- 
tions at North Korea's nuclear 


coomlex in Yongbyon tojd him 
i Oct 


in October 1993 that Pyong- 
yang had secured the five 
bombs. 

Choi Won Son, an official at 


Russian Experts 

Tn Embalm Body 

OfKimRSung 


Reuten 


MOSCOW — Russian ex- 
perts are prqtaring to embalm 
the body of President Kim D 
S ting of North Korea for dis- 
play, the newspaper Moscow 
News reported Thursday. 

Tbe psqxr quoted sources at 
the Center for Biolo^cal Stnic- 
tures as having said that senior 
members of the center were al- 
ready in Pyongyang. 

The North Korean leader 
died July 8 at the ag^ of 82. 

The Moscow specblisis have 
embalmed the b^ies of other 
Communist chiefs, including 
Stalin. Ho Chi Minb of Viet- 
nam and Kiement Gottwald of 
Czechc^ovakia. Tb^ also tend 
to the body of Lenin, ihe 
founder of Bolshevik rule. Sta- 
lin and Gottwald were moved 
to graves in the early 1960s. 


Madrid Ardibishop Retires 

The Assodiaed Press 
VATICAN CITY — Pope 
lohn Paul U on Thursday ao- 
xpted tbe resigi^on of Cardi- 
am Angel Suquia Goicoechp, 
77, as archbi^op of Madrid, 
aibmitted for reasons of age. As 
niccessor, the pope appointed 
Monsigsor Antonio Maria 
[louco Varela, 


On August 29th, the IHT will publish a 
Special Report on 


The Brazilian 


Economy 


Among the topics to be covered are: 
■ Prospects for reform following 
the elections. 


TTie outlook for privatization. 
Brazil's volatile stock market. 


A look at the commodities driving 
the economy. 

Brazil’s relations with Argentina, Uruguay 
and Paraguay. 


For infcmtalk)natioutiKh&Usffigm this Spec^ 
Report, f^ease contact Bill MahOer in Perils 
at ( 33 - 1)46 37 93 78 , 


Itcralo^^i^enbune 




the South Korean Foreign Min- 
istry. said that Seoul did not 
have any evidence to believe the 
North had “even one nuclear 
bomb.” 

“Tbe government's policy to 
seek dialogue with North Korea 
remains intact,” he said. “South 
Korea is still prepared to coop- 
erate and help the North im- 
prove ties with the West once its 
nuclear transparency is se- 
cured.” 

The United States also cast 
doubt on Mr. Kang’s claim. 

U.S. Defease Seoeiary Wil- 
liam J. Peny said Wednesday 
that be stood behind a Central 
Intelligence Agency estimate 
that i^ongyang might bave one 
or two atomic booibs. 

The CIA based its assessment 
on estimates of how much plu- 
tonium North Korea could 
have extracted from its Yong- 
byon reactor during a tempo- 
rary shutdown of the plant in 
1989. 

But last month the CIA di- 
rector, R. James Woolsey, said 
f^ngyang could bave enough 
plutonium for five more bombs 
by later this year unless its nu- 
clear program was halted. 

Nonh Korea insisis it U not 
making nuclear weapons but rC' 
fuses free access by UN inspec- 
tors to its nuclear industiy. 

Officials at the Agen<^ for 
National Security Planiuog said 
it bad confirm^ during two 
months of investigation since 
Mr. Kwg sought asylum in late 
May that he was a son-in-law of 
the North Korean prime minis- 
ter, Kang Song San. 

The official North Korean 
Central News Agency has de- 
nied that Mr. Kang is tbe prime 
minister's son-in-law. And it 
called the Seoul news confer- 
ence a “despicable act of using 
human rubl^ in the North- 
South confrontation. 

“He has nothing to do trith 
tbe premier,” he said. “He is an 
ignoramus, a loafer without a 
r^ular occupation and a •.'Tuni- 
ng who misappropriated a 
large amount of state funds.” 

“By politically using a crimi- 
nal who escaped from the 
North in inciting North-South 
confrontation, they cast a shad- 
ow over the prospect of North- 
South dialogue and laid an ob- 
stacle in the way of national 
reunification without hesita- 
tion.” 

U.S. and South Korean offi- 
cials said Mr. Kang’s claim 
would not have any major im- 
pact on high-level U.S.-North 
Korean talks due to resume in 
Geneva on Aug. 5. 

TTie talks are to focus on 
Pyongyang's nuclear program. 
Washin^on has hintM that it 
could give diplomatic and eco- 
nomic concessions if the North 
abandons any nuclear aims tn- 
tentions. 

Another North Korean, the 
26th defector to South Korea 
this year, arrived Thursday, the 
South Korean intelligence 
agency smd. 







'ncAaniaMd his 

The pbotograpib of die dying Sudanese that mn Kerin Carter, a South African freelancer, a Pvffitzer Prize, 


Kevin Carter, Pulitzer Winner for a Famine Photo, Dies at 33 


The Asrodaitai Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Ke- 
vin Carter, 33. whose photo- 
gn 4 >h of a vulture waiting for 
a starving Sudanese child to 
die won a 1994 Pulitzer Prize; 
died in what appeared to have 
been a suicide, friends and the 
police said Thursday. 

Several letters were with the 
body, which the police found 
Wednesday night in Mr. Car- 
ter’s pickup truck parited in a 


northem subnrb of Johannes- 
burg. The police said he (tied 
^ carbon monoxide poison- 
ing, but they planned to inves- 
tigate tire death though they 
did not suspect foul play, a 
spokesman said. 

His prize-winning photo- 
graph was first publish by 
The New York Times and 
then distributed around the 
worid by news and photo 
agendes. 


“He was an ^traordinarily 
courageous photographer, 
dedicated to his work," said 
Anton Harber, editor tbe 
Weddy Mail and Guardian 
newspaper, where Mr. Orler 
once work^ 


came thmu^ in his plcturea." 

Mr. Carter wotked for al- 
most 10 years as a broadcaster 
and photographer for Sooth 
African newq>apers until de- 
ddingto become ahreorlancex.. 
in 1993. 


David Sandisoo, photo edi- 
tor of the Sunday Tunes news- 
pi^per. called Mr. Carter “one 
cd tte most emotional people 
1 bave ever known, and this 


He then worked for Reu- 
ters, Agence FranceH-Presse 
and. other news oiganizations, 
and sold several news photos 
to The Associated I^ess. 


i^e don*t bdieve tins is 
about Israd and Jordan,” said 
O ne nfRcial weD-veTsed 

in Mideiast affairs. If it weo^ 
Joedanians would have 
been attacked in Iran, Libya 
and dsendiere, be said. 

The was referring to 

tbe signfng cm Monday an 

ajgreement ending a stiUe of bdr- 

Ugerency between the two 

But these officials said tbe 
govenunent of Iran would suie- 
fy wdeome any disruption of 
o^tiations ^ween Isxad, 
Jdraan and tbe Palestine Liber- 
atim Organheatiem that might 
result from the bexoDhings. 

Mr. Qiristopfaor, testi^ing 
beforea Concessional commit- 
tee <» the hCdeast peace 
ce^ pimnised full Goopeiaiion 
betveea tbe inteUigence ser- 
vices of several nations to track 
down those re^xmable for tbe 
attacks and to prevent more 
suebacts. 

An intelligence officer, 
speaMng on condition of ano- 
nymity, said the bombingis were 
probu^ reprisals for tile Isra^ 
H raid on a Heriidllab base in 
Ldmnoit last mcmtiiu At least 30 
menibers of HeriioUah and,-by 
some accounts, a number of 
Iranians,' were killed in the idd. 

“Hezbollah hay an immedi- 
ate cause of amoem," another 
tnti^igenoe officer ssid. "If the 
Iranians are shown tohavehad 
a hand in tiiese 'and 

thittg y sore look that my, at 
least in Aicoos Aiiesi, I woidd 
they have a stiat^c mod'll 
The peace process isolate 

them further, and jeomordizes 
their stratum interests.^ 

While not ^rec^ tdaimag 
fteOi&hlh ahdtiie g&Tonimis^' 
of Iran foi: the bombmg^ Mr. 
Christopher strem^ implied 
they were inqihcat^ - 

'TltekilkrainvolvBdiD tiwse 
terrible inddents nmst not 
we wili not let them snodted,” 


Taken togetlwr. the ^o- 

w m l«ast m pe^ 

^u«reJriDed,hm«IW^ 

most intense attacks of their 
Wnd in recent years. 

Oh JuW 18, a bomb de- 

stioyed tli Jewish cammmity 

center in Buenos Aires- Ffine^ 

six people were IdDed and 10 
are still missing. Last wrak, a 
bomb on a P a naman ia n ymer 
killed 21 people, most of th^ 

Jews. Tlus week, two car bombs 

qtploded in Ltmdofl, one out" 
^^tbe Isradi Embassy, the 

other outsit a 
xairing group,’ Israd Joint Ap- 
peal, Bijori]^ 20 people. 

^^'be United States h» dis- 

our government's top 
experts to Latin Anp*- 
ica to asast in the mvestigation 
of the bombings in AieeDtina 
fttiH in Pttwama “ Mr. Onsto 

pher said at a bearing before tbe 

House Foreign Affairs Com- 
nattee. .. 

In adfitioD, he sai d , ”inc 
United States is working with 
its antes around tte world to 
Ttnpm ve coordination and to 
improve . intefligence-sharing. 
This win aid in the apprehen- 
daa those teroon^le for 
those crimes and hdp to pre- 
vent fntuie atrodties.” 

' ^Ifithont mentioning names, 
Mr. Christopher critic&d allies 
(ti me Umtei Stales for trading 
and diking with Iran. 

"Iran is an Tn*emattnnal out- 
law, yet senoe nations still erm- 
du gt pidezential oom m ercial 
zdatioos with Iran and some 
tmVft stm to rapease that out- 
law nanon,” be said. "T^ 
must understand that by doing 
so, th 9 make it easier for Iran 
to use its resources to ^onscff 
terrorism throughont the 
world.” 

Other officials died Geima- 
and to a lesser extent, 
nance and Japan, as nations 
dealing with Ir^ 

In Loodon. the laradi am- 
bassador to Britain, Mosbe Ra- 
viv, said a -large interaational 
ef^ was essential to erriing 
tile uran of btmihii^ which he 
smd were insfi^red by Iran and 
dements of HezboDah. 

"What hqipeoed here and 
wiuit hsqipened in Ai^tina is 


larrcr pdpetrated by extreme* 
Ldamic groi^ inspired by 
T(duah-aj^ the derics we can 
find in -the HezboQah move- 
ment in Ldianon," Mr. Rariv 
said, dting Isradi intdligencc 
repc^ 


ANGOLA: After Almost 20 Years of War, the Country k StiU KUUng Itself Syria Assails Jordan oh Peace Pact 


ContiDiied from 1 

that treated it like a plaything, to the 
Angolan combatants themselves, wbo 
have never found the cour^ or will to 
makepeace. 

The war could well get deadlier. Last 
month, just as UN-sponsored peace talks 
showed glimmers of progress, fighting in- 
tensified throughout the countiy. The for- 
merly Marxist government of President 
Jose Eduardo Santos bas launch^ a 
major offensive, bombing rebel-coniroUed 
areas in the central highlands and the 
north. 

The rebel movement, the National 
Union for the Total Indqiendence of An- 
gola, known as UTDTA and led by Jonas 
SarimlM, is using artillery to poimd 
ernment-hdd cities, including one; Cmto; 
that is hearily populated by its own sup- 
porters. 

Tbe flare-up forced the curtailment cf 
what for the previous six months had been 
the UN World Fo^ Pregram's largest 
airlift If the relief flights cannot resume 
soon, up to 2 niiliion Angolans dependent 
on food aid face the prospect of a war- 
induced famine. The state-run Angolan 
News Agency reported last weekend that 
petite in Cuito were eating mice and plant 
roots to stay alive. 

Because Angola's calamity has been 
spread over two decades, it bas rarriy 
found its way onto the world's front pages 
or tdevision screens. But the onnulative 
death toll of more than 500,000 here rivals 
that of any of today's higher-profile trage- 
dies. 

It is a disaster for which the United 
States, Russia and other outriders clearly 
brar responsibility. While they come now 
as relief workers and would-be peacemak- 
ers, in tbe I97Ds and 1980s they came with 
aims, armies and ambitions, making An- 
gola a pawn in the Cold War. 

Tbe United States aimed and supported 
UNITA, which was also helped us an 
invasion force from white-ruled South Af- 
rica. Moscow backed the Marxist govern- 
ment and enlisted Cuban trucks to prop it 


up 


Since the start of the 
1990s, the United States, 


-Cold War 
Portugal 


and tbe United Nations have all tried to 
coax the combatants here toward a politi- 
cal power-sharing arrangement similar to 
the one that broi^t South Africa through 
its tranritiOT from v^te-minority rule to 
democracy. Yet they have discovered that 
formulas impeded by outriders are ineffec- 
tive if tbe parties themselves do not trust 
one another. 

At various stages since 1975, the'war 
here has been w^ed under tbe banner of 
idedogy, ethnicity or class animority. 
Nowaday^ stripp^ of outside patrons, it 
seems mahily rixmt power, money and 
ego. 

Since fighting resumed in late 1992, the 
war has tricen an estimated 200,000 lives, 
on top d 350,000 Stom 1975 to 1990. Most 
of the casual ties have been dvilia&s. Azmo- 
la has about 100,000 amputees, possibly 
the highest numb^ per cainta in the world, 
and an estimated 10 million une]q>Ioded 

latiri mines- 

De^te a nine-month round oi UN- 
supervised peace talks in neighboring 
Zambia that, on paper, bas brought the 
parties close to an agreement os a cease- 
fire, demobOizatioa and politixal power- 
sharing, diplomats here say the conflict's 
rtynannes still tilt toward war, not peace. 

For one thing, the dos Santos govern- 
ment appe^ to have the advania^ mili- 
tarily, and its generals seem detenmned to 
crq)ple UNITA before agredng to any 
cease-fire. 

Also, the combatants already made 
peace once, with prodding from the United 
States, Portugal and the Soviet Union, 
onl;/ to have the war resume when Mr. 
Savimbi dafanerf that the UN-certified 
1992 elecUcn he lost had been stolen. 
Peace will Uledy prove more ehirive the 

second time around. 

But perh^ the most intractable prob- 
lem is that while most Angolans are im- 
poverished, Angola hdds coou^ mhiexal 
wealth to fud both parties^ war madiines 
inddlnitely, and there is a deadly equilibri- 
um in die way tbe spoSs are divided. 

The govenunrat draws revcaiue Frmn 
offshore ml we^ produce 550,000 
bands a day, according to official Ango- 
lan eatimates. UNriAwws at least SlOO 


million a year — perhaps much mote — 
from diamonds it extracts from mines in 
nortfaeastem Angda, aocmdiqg to a calcu- 
lation by trade sped^ts in Swth Afiica. 
UNITA np r esentatives smuggle tbe dia- 
monds to Zaire and sdl them throi^ 
nuddlemen to De Beers, the ghmt Smith 
African, diamond emnpany. 

“This war is betw^ Aimda’s two main 
tribes; oil and diamonds, said a dirillu- 
rioned xdief woricer. 

This aS raises a knotty rmestum about 
humanitarian assistance. By leedi^An^ 
la’s poor victims, is the wcRid also hkUrect- 
ty fueling its wedtity wairioiS? Aocading 
to the United Nations, the government 
spends 2 percent of its ba^fit on eduea- 


Xisgers 

DAMASCUS — For the first time, ^a leveled direa 
criticism ‘nunsday against Jordan for having signed an agree- 
ment ending a state of war witii Israel Syna stressed it was 
hot in a row to achieve vriiat it called "hmcmmlete" peace; 

The ^wemment da£ty A1 Baath described the Wawington 
declaratioo as a *^uiprise devdqnnent” and a “violation” 
the princqdes on wl&h the peace process was begun nearly 
three years ago. It said .the dechuations would negatively 
affect Arab'interests. 

“The surprise developtneats and wolBtions inciuding the 
Gaza^JoBcbo deal and the Washington dedaratkm could not 
overwhdm tbe fact that peace will fail and evaporate if it is 
not Just and conqnriieiasive;” A1 Baath said. 

^xia.ahd Istari are deadlocked over Isradi withdrawal 
from the Golan Heights and future ties. 


tion and 2 percent on health. Nea^ aH the 
tor bombs and land mines that 


rest goes 

create more business for relief workers. 

“In a sense, we are blackmailed,” mid 
Mike McDonagh, head of Omoon, an. 
Irish rdief agency. “If we weren't here, 
there would be a masrive f amixie. But by 
coming, we may be malting it easier f<v tbie 
war to go on.” 

Manuel Aranda da SHvai ihe UN coor- 
dinator for hiimaiiTtflrtaTi aid in Angola, 

said, “We have jpieveated a cat 

here.” He noted that about 1,000 j 


RWAJNDAj Smd m^iigees Home 




• .*« 






s 





- 4' 


iULSTUa 

ilgen 


1 , 


Gonthnedfreai 1 
Goina, Zaire. Another was to 
airdrop supplies to letnrhing 


that the securityritnation inside ! 
Rwanda was “uneven.” 



a day were dying of starvation anc 

ases before the UN r^ef ef- 


rdatdl diseases 
fort, aided by about 50 nongovenunental 
organizations, geared late last year. 

In theory, by providing mote tnan $150 
nuDion in food aid this year, the United 
Nations has acquired a lever to "n<tg |p the 
combatants toward peace. In practice, 
however, the combataots mote wleu use 
the aid as a du^ xefu^og ntifit^ dear- 
aoce for relief flij^is wbenevm: th^ want 
to or pressure the other side; 

father ade scans to give a rfamn 
about Angdaos,” a rdief woricer said. 
“You can get pretty cyoical here pretty 
fast" 

Unswede, 11 of the humanitariaa orgar- 
nizatimis weriting ia Angida appealed to 
Mr. ^ &ntos and Mr. Savimlri to st^ 
the respect the neund^ of the 
rdief effort, and “reflect on the ^^pallmg 
mord coDsequencesof the cunent course 
ofevoDis.** 


SXJNlEndlessRunFromDrearinessKeepsGernianTauristsontheCio 


CotiiiiKd from Page 1 

in FrankfuTL “They are born explorers. It 
always makes me smOe v^en 1 see Italians 
or FrenA; they just go where normal 
pie go. But Germans are always sneaking 
around the corner trying to see something 
the othrn? don't see;” 

That foreign travd would continue to 
e sgpiq fo Hiiring a period of record unem- 
ployment and finandal uncertainty 
gests a deep-rooted wanderlust, tourism 
experts suggest. Germans feeling pinched 
mi^t shorten tbdr holidays a bit, shop for 


better bargains or posqjone plans for a 
second or third annual vacatioiL 


“In a recession, the Frendi or Italians 
prefer to k^ their standard of living up 
— eating in restaurants, having a mce 
bottle of wine and that sort of things” Mrs. 
Kieboefa added. “But for Germans, travel 
is sommhing very derirabte that wQl not be 
sacrificed.'’ 


ranai^a Britain and Hungm are all rela- 
tive^ dteq» for someone vrith a wallet fuU 
of Deutsdie marks. 

Moreover, Germans have time to travd 


ftiw the average worker gets at least sax 
weeks of paid vacation a year. “My Ameri- 


can frieueb turn green with euvy whia they 
compare that to- thdr own modest two 
weeks,” Mrs. Kiebach said. 


The strong German currency now 
m^es many fordgn destinations a bar- 
gain. A study by & Federal Assodatum 
of German Banks showed that Turicey. 


for Invwliiient infomialion 


IteidTHEMONBriSORr 
s,«fy Sahudoy in riw IHT 


A U.S. militaiy team was in 
Kirali, assesang the rituation. 

Defense Secretary Wtliam J. 
Pei^, who planntirf to go to the 
regioo. tins wedtend, said no 
find dedriim. had msu^^ 
on whether to send troops to 
Rwanda, in addfrkm to the 
4,000' U.S. servicemen and 
woDMn ea^ected to take part in 
the humanitarian operation 
outside.Rwaoda. Mr. narry said 
tbe idea of seoiSqg tro^ to 
Rwanda was “egccdl^T but 
cqimkx because the operaticn 
would mvotve gettn^ the an- 
tiiority 'Of die new l^tdotic 
Front government and “would 
be inextricably mixed with 
peaedteeping Operatious that 
aregexhg on in toat area!” 

The y.S. government has 
stressed that its. mission is 

Strict bnmaTMtarian and hay 

nqti^ to do mtii a UN com- 
niitmait to send iqi.to i^OO 
sddiets into the country to re- 
{daito BieD(k troops they 
pidLout of their security ztme in 

lateAuguA 

The- oommander of the UN 
aanwancfe fflisaon to Rwanda, 
M^or General Romeo Dallaire 
of Canady wa^ that a refu- 
gee ci^ erirpshte even the Cur- 
rent trejsedy could develop un- 
less tiiBr6were.enou^tio^ to 
rqilace the FrendL He said he 
h^ied the United Stares would 
send ^Tots of troops.” But UN 
in New York said that, 
at best, ih^ would only have 
3,000 troops ready to replace 
tfacFrendL 

General Shalikashvili said' 
that altiwi^ .the refu^jees had 
to go bomiB; lie adcnowledged 


“We dem’t want to get into a ! 
situatton ^here we are forcing * 

them to go home,” he said. ; 
^ Despite die ^>paning oondi- | 
tions m the fnman famipe, ! 
where the first confinned ca s ffs ' 
of meningtis added Thursday ! 
to the catalo^ie of miseries, • 
ooty a small number of the | 
mote than 1.2 nwllirtfi refngecs 1 
have taken the liric of lecunS^ . 
The Hum refugees hare been ! 
mtumdated by their leadere • 
mto remainmg with th^ gov- 
tenment in exue. 

Tbw are that if they re-* 

mm they will be slaughtered by 
Rwa^’s new, ’DitsTruIcrs — " 
menrows of the ethnic minority « 

that lost hmidieds of thousands^ 
of people Otis r*“4—s - 


V 

Lt: 


v: 


> - 



fH massacres by Hutn’^extiem- 

ISIS. - 

Jto ethnic hatred, which has - 
spilled across the border into^ 
mmmdi, promptiiiE the eov-'^ 
to send troops on.'; 
TlWBday to qodl violate, re* u 
i^wse; Jlumaads of.- 
™ tefugcro at. a separate^' 
they^ 


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memsafep^sagehomi. 

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toDasanda Kir 


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r.t fie Ratfio That 
Pwps Lindig” an infw ‘ 


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reftig^^'^" advice to thew 






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t/(^iiiiU(ti:(>fwil^t*iC'9wt’fi’<ifii 






THE TRIB 




-I :113.08P 

Herald Tribme World Stock Index ^ composed of 
^0 interneConally Investable stocks from 25 ooitotrfss, cormBed 
oy Btoomberg BusirwssJ^ews. Jah. T, 1992«10Q. 

120 ^ : 







F • M 

1003 

A 

M J . 

J 

18M 

AsiarPacific 


Europe 


A|i|mLii(eioMb932% 

Close; 1292B Prevj 130X9 


An«IK.«nfBhfti|p37% 

CkBK 113X0 PlWJ 114X2 

^3 



'' F M A M 
1993 

J J 
19H 

F- M' A M J J 
1991 1904 

■ Worth America 


Latin America 

XppnKHdgMing;26% 
Ctoes: 9181 Picvj 93.19 
150 ^ 

B9 

An>iaLmiydn|FS% — 

1 ^2j^1^Piw.:121^ 



F M 
19BS 

irOnG RlOOt 


P M 


Vm Max urneka US. aekar iMbos cta$oeki te Toky^ Nw V«rl^ LamlBr^ and 
UgHkirm, AutUiSi, AinMii, nnuliiii. BraA Cm«^ CM*, DwoMlc, Fhiland, 
Rfane*^ G «fiH*n» , Hong KOng; My. Madeo. MawMrt*, N*w ZNMd, Nonray, 
S l ngip^ epiifcV S iwMi. O ntMrt w id ond V *n* n lfc ftr Tbkfa. Wwk Yotk and 
London, Bta Max k e e u ii Kmd of M SO top kauaa it tana* oTiaarM c^ pMMbn, 
d O u ndta IhafenlopstodaiarBlmciead 


1 tiidustriot Sectors 






HM. 

PlWL 

% 


no. 

Ahl 

% 


dMi 

dbH 

ttaPQS 


. dtaa 



Energy 

112.30 

112.12 

40.16 

CapUQoodo 

. 114.39 

11455 

-023' 

URHm 

120J3 

121.35 

-0X3 

RmRolBflk 

12757 

12839 

-064 

finance 

11&43 

117.14 

-an 

CoasmerGioodi 

9658 

9857 

-02S 

Senices 

119.09 

119.33 

-0^ 

Miecllatieow 

12B53 

12114 

-0.18 


for morelnbxmaaonatxxMOie ktdex.atooUBfisevatMe6eeofchage. 
mdB to TO) Index. 181 Avenue Charies da 6euBe.X521NeuSyCe(lex. Fiance. 

e IntBrnallanat HefoU Tribuno 


GM Gives 
A Boost to 
Stocks 

Profit Doubied 
bi2d Quarter 

8 y Lawrence MaUdn 

•InMMaial HaraUTribwia 

NEW YORK — ^ Ridiog the 
Dpswmg of the wodd economic 
cyde, a slimmer and more ef& 
dent Genenl Motors Coip. on 
’nmxsdsgr joined Detrcnf s other 
Big Tbt^ automakers in re- 
porting its most profitable 
quarter in history. 

Ihe conq>an3r$ share price 
dosed Thnrsdsy with an ad- 
vance of 37.3 cents at SS0.2S. It 
helped qnir a mild rally for the 
mancet as a wbde. 

But indnstty analysts said the 
wodd’s largest automaker still 
had a long way to go in trans- 
plantm^ the mdlmds of its 
prospeimg European opera- 
tions back home to Amimca. 
Sales oi GWs Co^ Europe’s 
best-sdhng model, incieased by 
7.2 percent, and producdoo is 
bdng expaiided. 

In the united States, howev^ 
er, said David HeaJy of &G. 
.Warburg .ft Co., “tb^re <mly 
half way throud a very impres- 
ave tuntaround.” 

"The good half is the dramat- 
ic shrinififig of ovediead,” he 
sad. "The tad news is that they 
stiD have a thin product Hst, and 
it nuQr take a cotq>le of-more 
yean for the new mani^ement 
to izxqnove that These things 
talma long time.” 

GM r^orted earnings of 
$1.9 billion dunng the second 
quarter, more than double last 
year’s $889 ndllioa fen* the same 
period. Quarterly automotive 
profits hxqncn^ ^>ectaimlai^ 
from $33 fflillicKi to md- 
lion in North Amedkn, and m- 
tematianal profit almost dou- 
bled firmn $306 million to $343 
ntiDion.. 

President Jack Smith, 
brraght home two years ago to 
Fescue CM’S faffing domestic 

See G 3 Vf, Pa^ 10 


iVow, Russia’s Pyramid 


By Lee Hockstader 

WaUnpim Pea Serdea 

MOSCOW — As thou- 
sands of axudous Muscovites 
thronged the headquarters of 
Russia’s largest mvestmeDt 
firm — which authorities 
consider a diam — the go^ 
emment said Thursday it 
would propose new laws to 
r^ulate the hdter-skdter se- 
curities xnarkeL . 

For a fifth day, people 
padeed the street in front of 
MMM, tile huge invesUDent 
company that autiKxities said 
last week could cdllapse de- 
^le promises of ridies for 
shareholders. 

The government plan to 
draft new rules for the securi- 
ties market was dearly in- 
tended to calm jitters but was 
accompanied no details. 
Offidals even 1^ a l^al ba- 
sis to dose MMM. 

So far, there are no laws in 
Russia that require invest- 
ment firms to iMsdose any- 
thing about investment activ- 
ities — assets, the companies 
it diooses to buy and sdl, to 
say nothing of a finandal 
proqiectus. 

has said it does 
have real holdings* iududing 
shares iu Avtovaz, a lai^ ail- 
ing Russian automobile 
plant; in GUM, the huge de- 

E nent store on Red 
e, and in defease plants, 
is no way for share- 
holders to ocmfiim this rnfor- 


matioa, lei akme pul a value 

on $udi investments. 

^ Through an aggressive tele- 
wimi advertising caitq>aigD 
that lured miiiinns of mves- 
tors, MMM baQt what offi- 
cials said was a classic pyra- 
mid scheme, in which 
yesierdt^s sluueholdeis are 
paid off with income from 
tomorrow’s buyers. 

“How MMM makes its 
money, the companies in 
which it owns shmes, is a 

HBowMMM 
makes its money 
is a mystery/ 

Wihhan Berger, 
financial journalist 

mystery,” said Mikhail 
Botger, a leading financi al 
journalist, writing in Izvestia 
^ursday. 

Share prices, set not by the 
market but by MMM, had 
soared to the ruble equivalent 
of $54 last week fiom $1 in 
FdMuaiy, even in the face of 
warnings. 

MMM is “a group of 
skilled swindlers who take ad- 
vantage oS imperfect legisla- 
ti<m to bambo^e people and 
fin their own pocket^” said 
Seigd Almazov of'the Rus- 
sian tax police. 

In a number of fuQ-pa^ 
newspaper advertisements 


this wedi, MMM*s presideni, 
Sergei Mavrodi. warned the 
government that his share- 
holders and ihor dependents, 
40 million to 30 million 
strong by a probably inflated 
count, wouul not stand for 
govenunait interference. 

Government warnings last 
week coupled with news that 
the firm owed 524 million in 
taxes set off a run as investors 
rushed to redeem their shares. 

With branch offices closed, 
thousands have stood in the 
glacially slow fine at MMM 
headquarters, in some cases 
around the clock, although 
few ha\'e been adndited to 
successfully redeem their 
shares. There have been simi- 
lar lines in Sl Petersbure. 

One young mao said he 
had someone $13,000 
so that his partner could get 
inside the MMM building, 
where he was to redeem some 
S80,Q00 worth of shares. But 
the accomplice had already 
been inside the building for 
20 hours, and rurrmrs b^an 
to swirl that the company 
could survive. 

“We are trying to figure 
out how to recall him.” he 
said, in a change of heart 
based on the rumors. 

For the lucky handful that 
could get to the front of tiie 
line, MMM was offering to 
redeem shares Thursday for 
123,000 rubles ($61). 


BT-MQ Given 
EU Approval 
And ^emption 


CengdedbfOirSuffFrml^^adie 

BRUSSELS — The ^rope- 
an Union on Thursday ap- 
proved plans by British Tele- 
communications PLC and MCI 
Cormnonications Corp. to form 
a trans-Atlantic alliance to pro- 
vide global communications 
services to multinaticmal com- 
panies. 

The European Commission, 
the Union’s executive branch, 
approved the British emnpany's 
iu percent holding in MCI. It 
also uve their joint venture, 
called Concert, a six-year ex- 
emption from competition 
rules. The alliance has been 
cleared by U.S. regulators. 

While mtish Telecom’s $4.3 
tnllion stake in MCI will make 
it the U.S. long-distance com- 
pany’s largest a^e sharehold- 
er, BT would not be able to seek 
control of MCI, said the com- 

misginn, w hich aign acknowl- 
edged ^t Concert would re- 
strict competitiOT. 

The beneficial effects of the 
venture in speeding global tele- 
commnnications services to 
miiltinarinnal companies quali- 
fied it fm* an exenq)tion, the 
comnrisaon said. 

The commisaon said it had 


obtained assurances from the 
compaiues that any user in the 
12 current EU countries or Aus- 
tria. Finland, Iceland, Norway 
or Sweden would be able to 
obtain Concert’s services 
through MCI, even though BT 
will be appointed excluave dis- 
tributor. 

The European competition 
commissioner, Karel Van 
Miert, said strat^c alliances in 
the tdecommunications sector 
would have to sti^e a bdance 
between cooperation and com- 
petition. 

”lt is clear that the telecom- 
munications sector in many 
cases requires cooperation 
agreements between telecom 
tmerators, such as the one con- 
cluded between BT and MCI. in 
order to ensure network and 
services interconnectivity, one- 
stop shopping and one-slop 
biUmg,” he said. 

The commission said Con- 
cert would be able to offer more 
advanced services than either 
BT or MCI alone and would 
substantially reduce the costs 
and risks associated with offer- 
mg services at the scale required 
by migor mtemationai users. 

(AP, Reuters, AFX}\ 


Mitsubishi Considers Raising Nippon Trust Stake 


CeagiUtfOieSiifiFrmDlspauAe 

TOKYO — Mitsubishi Bank Ltd. of 
J^xsn said Thursdror it was consideriiiig 
plans to bail out Nippon Trust Bank 
Ltd., mdudmg increasing its stake in the 
troubled affiliate to more than ^ per- 
cent firom 3 peroeaL 

Mitsubishi is also cnn?^ri<MH iTi g matring 
Nippon Trust a subridiary or extendi^ 
it low-interest or no-interest loans, 
Karaitaka Um^a^ public rdaiions 
manacCT at Mitsabi^ Bank. 

But Mr. Umegaid said: “There is no 
reason for us to move without a request 
The decisicHi is qp to I^pon Trust” 


A spokesman from Nippon Trust the 
smallest of Japan’s seven trust banks, 
denied the baiu was p lanning to merge 
with Mitsubi^ Bank or bec^e a sub- 
adiaty. 

“We have not asked Mitsubishi Bank 
for any assistance,” a Nippon Trust offi- 
cial said. 

Nijqxm Trust is buckling under the 
pres:^ of bad loans, mostly to the real- 
estate sector, udiidi swelled 80 percent 
from a year eaiiier to 130 biOion yen (51 
billion) in March. 

With ncmpeifoniing loans accounting 
for almost 10 percent of its assets, the 


bank's bad-loan ratio is the highest 
among Japan's 21 m^tx' tanks, 
are ail burdened with the afiennath of 
speculative lending in the late 1 980s that 
v^ch drove stock and. land prices to 
record hi|^ 

“We tfiuik some kind of support is 
needed, but we don’t have enou^ infor- 
mation al^t the trust bank’s financial 
position to decide anything concrete 
yet,” Tsuneo Wakai, president of Mitsu- 
oi^ was quoted as saying in the Jgi 
News Service. “We may or may not turn 
the bank into our subsidia^.” 

Press reports said Nippon Trust 


m^t issue new shares to Mitsubishi, 
uring the estimated 100 billion yen 
raised to write off most of its bad loans. 

The Asahi Shimbun newspaper said 
the Finance hfinistn w^d tave to 
waive its rules for the takeover to go 
thiou^ The rules prevent trust banking 
units of banks from carrying out suw 
opmtions as pension and loan trust 
business. 

Jean’s Finance Mini^ has already 
shown some flexibility in bending the 
rules to allow troubled finandal institu- 
tkms to be rescued. 

(ALFP. Bloornberg) 


WAU STREET WATCH 


Biogen Discovers a Rally 


By Milt Freudenhdm 

Neia York Tuna Santee 


N ew YORK — Biom Bic. sto^ 
has soared since fbe htotedmology 
company amaoimced promismg re- 
sults in slowing the devastating ef- 
fects df mnltiitie sciero&, a ^seesr of the 
nervous system. 

Shares ctf Biogea jnixqied $15.25; or' 52- 
percent, to $4473 in over-the-conater trading 
<xt Wednesday, and set back sli^tbr from 
that levd Hiiinday, ending at $43,623, down 

The Biogen news xnxUed the entire Stan- 
dard ft Ppo’s biotodinQl^ stock index, 
whidi had recent^ after Teseatcih 

failures rqxxted ta several omrqranies. 

Scientists said tiie oonditira of mnltyle 
sderosis parien« iriio were treated with &o- 
gen’s genetically en^neered beta^interferoo, 
aa immune system hnmone, deteiimated at a 
measurably slower rate than simnar patients 
who recei^ a placeba 
Dr. Lawrence Jacobs, a neurolo^t at the 
State Unxversrty of New York at Bufbto who 
the beta interferon study, said 301 
patients were tested at relative^ eaiiy stages 
^ multntie sdecosb. Of those m the control 

group MO teodved the placebo, be said, haff 

had a deterioration rate over two years of 1 J) 
on a standard lO-point scale in wbkb 10 
would be death. ~ .j. 

He said “significantly kss than 30 percenr 

of those takxngtata intediBron titowed as much 
lietaiormkBLlniey also had fewer flaxo-i^s of 
symptoms than those in the control gn^ 
Analysts described the results as a *^ome 


run” for BiogetL The cotnpany's stock has 
langoUhed reoenily as eaonngs from other 
tsodnets have deidined. Bu^ep, based in 
Camtaidge; Massachnsetts, said it would seek 
federal and European r^ukuxy approval for 
beta mterferon only next year. 

. Ihe Kogen down the stock 

a veicaon of betaint^eron for miiltole scle- 
rosis patients. Oibon lost 53.125, to S32.625, 
Wednesday and gained back only 12J cents 
Ihurstay. 

Scheni^ AC, the German drug conq>any, 
also saw its nham pnce eroddl Biogen's 
discovery. Schering plunged to 926 Denteche 
marks (SS8Q from 980 DM Wednesd^. 

Chirm’s product, called Betaseion, also 
reAices the nximber of flare-ii^ of mdtq)le 
sclerosis, vriuch ctftea b^jns with short-din- 
tion attadcs on the nennew system of people 
in th^ 30s, particnlaily women. 

But theOunmpiodnct has not been shown 
. to dow the deterioration of mul^de sdeioas 
patients* who; in mai^ cases* end up in wlied- 
rfMiTs, unable to control their musdes. 

- Teoia Lemer, a tnotedindogy analyst at 
T^riman Bioth^ said the Biogen results 
. were “^y a poairve wjuise.” 

But Ms. Lexner said CnirOD would contin- 
ue to domioate the mnl^e-sderoas fidd at 
least until 1996, even if Kogm gets approval 
for its product next year. 

£b. Jacobs said ms researcbos were wait- 
ing for additional results from m^etic reso- 
nance wwagiwfi scans,, neurological assess- 
ments, fluid analyas and tests of 

patients to feed thonsdves, write arid 
perfonn other taodimaiks of qnaU^ of life. 


JettbSaid 
ToIieBoss 
To Scandal 

Ike Aaoetaed Press 

NEW YORK (AP) — Joseph 
Jett, the star bond trader firm 
by Kidder, Peabody ft Co., tas 
told federal investigators his 
boss masterminded the trades 
that allegedly created $330 mil- 
fion in phony prefts, a souree 
close to Mr. Jett said 

If true, the assertions mean 
that Mr. Jett’s boss at Kidder 
Peabody, Edward Cerullo, had 
a far more active refle t>»an Mb. 

had contended He had said 
only that his supervisor was 
aware of the trades. Mr. Cerullo 
has denied any in the al- 
leged schmie. 

It also would be the first ac- 
knowledgment by Mr. Jett, the 
f(xmer &ef of Kidder’s gov^ 
enunent bonds section, that he 
engined in the trades at the cen- 
ter of the scandal. But Mr. Jett 
asserts he did not know he was 
dmng anything wxod& said the 
source, who is famifiar with 
what Mr. Jett investigators 
but sptae m condition of ano- 
nynuty. 

Mr. Jett’s statements to the 
U.S. Attorney’s Office contra- 
dict a ss ert io ns by Kidder and 
its parent. General Bectiic Co., 
wbdi have sought to blame Mr. 
Jett exdustvdy for the scandaL 


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«* 


mTERNAnONAL HERALD TRXBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 29, 19W 


market DIARY 


Trade Hopes Spur 
Dollar to 100 Yen 


OmpiU bf (hr Si^ Frm Dapa^tes 

NEW YORK— The doUar 
ralhed Thursday to more than 
100 yen for the first time in a 
month on qieculaiion that Ja- 
pan and the United States 
would reach a trade agreement 
and on expectations that U.S. 
second-quarter growth ngures 
would be strong. 

Optimism for a potential 
trade accord that would in- 

Forelgn Exchange 

crease Japanese government 
procurement of goods took 
hold on a Kyodo news service 
rq>ort that Japan would offer 
concessions to the United 
States. 

The dollar ended in New 
Yorit at 100.050 yen. up from 
98.4^ yen Wednesday. The 
dollar has been trading below 
100 yen since June 29. ft fell 
below 100 yen for the first lime 
since World War II on June 21. 

Speculation that second- 
quarter U.S. gross domestic 
product will show robust 
growth also helped the dollar 
gain, traders said. Faster 


growth would make it more 
likely the Federal Reserve 
Board would raise interest 
rates, which would be expected 
to uve the dollar a boost. 

Forecasts for preliminary 
U.S. second-quarter GDP aver- 
aged 4 percent ^owth, com- 
pared with 3.4 percent expan- 
sion in the Hrst quarter. 

“fteviously we’ve seen a 
strong GDP figure, which 
been accompanied by 
price pressure," said Cor^ 
Miller, economist at SGST ifl 
London. 

The high demand for dollars 
spilled over into U.S. Treasu^ 
bonds, where prices for the 3(^ 
year government issue rose to 
84 25/32, for a yield of 7J4 
percent, down from 7.61 per- 
cent on Wednesday. 

The dollar clos^ at 1.5916 
Deutsche marks in New York, 
up from 1.5744 DM on 
Wednesday, at 1.3500 Swiss 
francs, up from 1.3339, and at 
3.4330 French francs, up from 
5.3820. The pound was at 
SI.5263, down from S1.5321. 

{Blownber^, Reuters) 


GM: Automaker Buoys WbU Street 


CootinBed from Page 9 

operations, expressed his plea- 
sure at the latest returns but 
said ‘Sve can't gel complacent." 

Mr. Smith had earned his 
spurs by decentrali^g. cost- 
cutting and streamlining mar- 
keting as boss of GM ^rope. 
which Mr. Healy noted was "a 

U^,Stock« 

different company" from GM 
North America. Second-quarter 
market i^are in North America 
actu^y declined from 34.8 per- 
cent in 1993 to 33.1 per^nt 
because GM was not able to 
meet booming demand from its 
tight inventories. 

GM does not break out its 
international results, but by 
volume Europe represents 
three-quarters of its overseas 
business. Led in- the Corsa. 
t^ch has been a hit in Latin 
America as well as in Europe, 
CM’S international sales vol- 
ume rose 7.2 percent, to 1.12 
milUoa during the flrst half of 
the year, and by 4.6 percent in 
Europe, to 846.000. 

But the U.S. market may have 
peaked for this ^ele. Arvid 
Jouppi of Keane Securiues in 
Demat said U.S. auto sales had 
grown at a compound aiuiual 
nue of about 1.25 percent for the 
past 20 years, only about half the 


rate through die Depression, war 
and boom of the previous half- 
oentuiy, and said the real growth 
potenti^ now lay outside the 
mature markets of North Ameri- 
ca and Western Europe. 

■ Wall Street Rebonodfi 
U.S. stocks ended a two^y 
slide as CM’S earnings sparked 
a rally in auto shares that offset 
coaccrn about higher interest 
rates, Bloomberg Business 
News report^ 

“We're going to continue to 
see the market be tom b e tw een 
signs of a good economy and 
strong earnings and the impli- 
cations this good news has for 
interest rates," said James 
SoUoway, director of research 
at Argus Research Corp. 

TTie Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage closed 10.36 joints h^er 


ISIM 21.3 
s. Gains ii 


the last two sesaons. Gams m 
GM. Minnesota Mining & 
Manufacturing Co. and Procter 
& Gamble leiTthe way. 

Opdfflisra about CM'S eam- 
inj^ spilled over to Ford Motor, 
which rose 62J5 cents to S31, 
and Cluster Corp., whose 
stock gained 37 J cents S472S0. 

The Nasdaq Coi^posite in- 
dex rose 0J^4 to 7IZ67 after 
railing 3.52 on Wednesday. In- 
tel, P^crosofi and Nordstrom 
gtuned. 







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Oess Fnv. 

Advanced 

Decilnsd 

Jnenonoed 

Total Issues 

NewHIohs 

NauiLovwS 

I5P2 1417 

1561 169 

2013 2043 

SOM BUS 

9 a 

114 111 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


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Open Int. 14709 | 


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CfowtardCoA 
CnMrferdcpR 
PomllvBnM 
PaBUna scGa 
PlntPodCop 
PertWaraeNtl 
GtWoptomPIn 
HOdPorOorp 
Jotfinenanep 
LoMiwann Ind 
McrrlnMcInd 
MIdcilborfv ConuR 
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NthHdtUIH 
PSi Roeeuren 
FatrtetGIUDv 

asjSgjgpA 

Rod Lion Him LF 

BeiitaoTf 

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TobFroOuds 
Tiademr Md 
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WcplwoodCorp 
wioeemta Eimw 

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nioMARri n MPiint»> i n h i I wnt 


Pov Roc. 


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1-15 
S-IS V-l 
AO M 


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A7 AS 
A14 lAl 


AS AIS 


Staomterg Biaueas Nfna 

PURCHASE, New York — PepsiCo 
Inc. officials have announced tb^ are 
dropinng their program to repurcha^ the 
companys shares and are scaling back on 
mq'or investments. 

Elaborating on a r^ulatoiy rdiog this 
week, the executives said they were cuttii^ 
bade because of the unusual emphasis 
Pqjsi places on one measur* of the compa- 
ny's ^l load. The soft drink maker pri- 
marily “measures financial leverage on a 
market value ba^” it stud in a quarterly 


filing with the Securities and Exchange 
Comxnisrion. 

The company treasurer, Randy Baines, 
said Pe{» wanted total debt to be between 
^ p e n xnt and 25 p oxxot of its market 
value plus Its debt In December, Pepsi's 
'Market value rario" stood at 22 percent, 
within the target range. 

Since tfa«n, the company’s stock price 
has tumbled 26 percent, in pan due to 
lower-tfaan-espected profits riom its res- 
taurant chains. With the fall in market 


Mostly to get the nrio back in line, 
Pqpsi said it would defer further diare 
rqruichases. So far this year it has bon^t 
mexe than 10 million ^lares for more 
Than $378 miiliOQ. It also expects to ^pend 
less than half of last year's S1.4 billioo in 
stjat^cinvestmeots and'acqniniieiQS;' ' 

Several anali/sts criticized Pepsi's ratio 
because it means the comj^y is less lik^ 
to buy shares when the price is low. 


iraS.J.dp.iyloGrt 2 , 000 ^_^ 

.;cmpapyees,at SsWsonal Conapuiw^- 
were told of the move TTiiirsday, before a public anuoui 

U« mo«s a, part of d.e conipan.Vs att^p. lo 

iqgsM hKjnwitiM tmd sales grr^ . 17 pgreep, Of 

day it was off its credit card busiocsses. 

StroiijgSdesPoivwDiiraceB’^ 

BETHEL, Coniiccticut (Bloombeig) — *^'**®“r 
Iria said nnirsday that inaeased sal^ ii?^w*r^rd 

cost savings from restructuring in 
earnings for the fourth quarter of its finan^ 

The maker of alkaline batteries said net 5 SSn 

ended June 30 was $41.8 millioii, teveraug a toss ^ 515^ *^*^ 

m the 1993 fourth quarter. The year-eaiher toss included a pretax 

lestntomring diarae of $65 minkm. s Th** 

•Salcs^ 16 iSoent m the quarter, to 

fas(^ growth occurred is iatcmationai marieeis 

Kme, vteore sales rose 26 percent amid pnee mcFcascs ana expand 

es distnbutioo, tte company said. 

Flakes Bdip Dow Chemical Profit 

MIDI^AND, Michigan (Btoombcig)— Dow 
Hnxrsday its second-quarter net income climbed 69 perceqi on a 
gain jn reveouc of strong volume and price in- 
creases in its plastics division. ..... 

Met income rose to S250 rmOion from $148 miUion a year 
•rifAc . Pn^iWimr /tn^ifme Aa rca* in last year’s quaitcr, DoW'S 

:2percent. m 



W VfMgyiia 

Iirst-liine UaS. Jobless Claims Drop 

WA«uTMryTY^>T — ITS. uoemDlovmeat lint 


WASHINGTON ^ 

■shrank last wcdc as auto 



, U.S. unemployment lines 

textile wodems reiuiued from 
.. 9^ of nrst-dzne jobless claims u> 
A rinoe Mueb. ^ . 

it ion s for anemployment benefits dropped a laiger- 
59,000 — the Nffilest dr<q> since Fdmiaiy — to-a 
331,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. 

Padent A^lnme Lite Coliunbia/HCA 

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky (BlOamberg) -p- Columhi^HClV 
Hedthcare Corp, said Tluirad^ its secrad-quarter net income 
junqied 24 percent' as the country's largest bo^ital ch ai n treaty 

mrae patients and trimmed labor and siroly oost& 

The oraEpaiQr’s net income rose to £a)5 millioa from $166 
millioa, ^riiUe levenne rose 6 percent, to $2.69 billicm. llie results 
were stated as if Cohimbia’s merger mth HCA-Hospital Corp. ' 
were in ^ea last yettf. The merger was conqileted Feb. iO. 

aHiTB«anf>i^ incRascd 1.1 p ercent in the quarter, 
and 5aine4)oqiital outpatient litits rose 22 percent from expai^d 
home health and other asciDaiy services, the cot 


COTiqiany said. Tbe 
xrmpOTy's o] 

19.S pereat, Columbia said. 


fbeos on labor and siqiply cosri widened tte company's operating 
max^ to 20.2 percent Rom ~ 


PepsiCo Defers Stock Buybacks Because of Poor Debt Ratio 

valuer and a smaller increase in debt, Pep- 
si's ratio soared to 30 percent by June 11. 


Continental Airlines Reports Loss 

HOUSTON (Combined DiRratcfaesy — Cootineatal Airlines 

a shaie,^ii^^i^U it would^^^^ie' to scale bade its Denver 
(iterations in favor of its no-fcills, riiort^haul Continaital Lite 
service. ' 

In Atlanta, Delta Airlmes, tiie thinMaigest U.S. carrier, sa£d 
profit for tile tioee months ended m Jane rose 50 percent, to S 1 OiS 
million from $7-2 imDion a year eatiier. after a $413 million 
provisiOT for fenrucamngeosts and $14 miOioa fordi^es in its 
frequent-flyer program were tdbm into account, the airline hada 
loss of $249.8 mflhoo. (Blocmba^ AFJf) 


For die Record 


iSwrifhiniPFBeefliMn ly Crngfifit gjngjmoarestaiptiQn. version 
of hsulcte drug, Thgamet, for beutbumj^tieDts unless addition- 
al studies prove it is not l^aIndul^whB^j^aken with other drugs, a 
Food and unig AdmmiriratiOT advisory panel saxl Thursday. 

f Bloomberg) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


AflMWt Aonct My 28 


Am s terd a m 

ABN Amro HM MM SfXO 
ACF HoMlaa 44i0 4iSB 
Acoen •AJQ f7 

AhoU -«■> Ml 

Akn NaM 2IXS0 31UP 
AMEV 74«a 7*M 

BolAWtasonin Jt SMO 
eSM 66JQ 4770 

MU 141JB 141 

ENrrMr MI MIJP 

Fokker 14 14X1 

CMABrocadH 4* <7Jti 
HBG VXSD V3 

HttaNwi avzMJP 

HOQQOWtru 77SD 7SM 
Hunlar DoHOlai 7SJ0 7SJ0 
IHCCalvM A2g SAW 
iRtarMutafar PPSB ID 
Inl7 NMtrland 7V.«0 7? 

KUHl S4S0 SL40 

KNP BT 48J0 MM 

KPN 4«S0 4VSa 

NMiUOVd « 48 

OetGrintcn 77 JQ 77JD 
PakhOM SOSO 4?.7Q 

FNIlH 53.90 SIAO 

Pelvpram 7640 7670 
RoAMO 1156011660 

Redama s&40 s&40 
ttaHma 111 11650 

Roranto I7J0 8768 

ROVOI Dwidi 1865D 17420 
Stark «30 4BS0 

UiPtavar 11760 188 

Von Omimron 5160 5ISQ 
VNU 113 IIS 

Woltars/Kiiwwr lu IMSD 


Brussels 

2SA6 2S46 


AG Fin 
Almanil 
Arbad 


7m HM 




BBL 
Bckowl 
CBR 
CMB 
CNF 
Codcerlll 
Cobapa 
Cotniyt 
DoPkibP 
Btaelrobel 
ElKtroRna 
6IB 
GBL 
Govoarf 
OtovorM 

ImmeM HW 

KndtalfaBik 6900 

Mosm MOO 

pplronno 10375 

Fewerfln 3199 

RseueM SM 

ItoyaleBMse S9W 

SeeOtnBenque B300 
SoefieiiBpIglaiw 2M0 
SoRM inUM 

Solvay 
TassPndorio 
TruOobol 

UCB 

unien Mintara 
WMom UIs 



Frankfurt 


I8117MD 
SB 9a 
2425 2447 

snSBBJD 
M4 1800 
38050 310 
3SS»S0 
4314&S0 
4ff 479 
69S Mi 
395 400 
V 063 B70 

WW l’ M ank 33SJ0344JB 
Intaitol 
Her Benz 


oWSeL 

lOIBHOM 


'.Hypo 

LV 

PBonk 


a66J03»^ 


- 

49050 47S 

-ni 346 245 

twheBceA 7205073450 
plop 478 480 

Rtaar-BOMl 38639150 
limiVito 30050 Ml 

rvppHoeieh 21650 214 

gr ^ as 

kitof n6 9S5 

EMI S St 

mam Btf go 

!v S9 

A 375 |77 

Sou 138 U8 

ristft 96B S67 

r 

43^ Si 

2iaw3^ 
3990 sns 
70050 796 

239 33030 
447SD44U 
inwtall 330 320 


lesnam 

noeseW^ 

lehRiwdt 


Clow Plow. 

StfKTln* VM too 

Slerrmn gjiOOTSM 

Tnyuen 2975D397J0 

Vorla 305 309 

vmo SI6.10S7150 

V6W MS >40 

VlOB 470476SO 

Votkawoeon M749670 

WellQ lOM toil 

DAX looes : imst 

tan : 3Vg*|^ 


EMM : asjc 

»lwi: 87151 


Heldnid 


Anwr-Yhtvmo 

12* 

m 

Eneo-Gutxelt 

018 00 

Htetamokl 

173 

173 

tLO.P. 

II 

110 

Kvnuncnc 

la 

124 

Nieira 

173 

149 

Nok 0 

507 

02 

Pehlgla 

78 

72 

Repwlfl 

K 960 

Stotemonn 

218 

lU 

HEX lode* ; H90 


PievkMis : iAf37 




Hong Kong 


Bk East Alia 
CalNoy Pacific 
ONgna Kona 
China UshtPor 
Dolry Form Inti 
Hone Lim* Dev 
Hone Sms Bonk 
Hwionr i cn Land 
HK Air Eng. 

HK Chino Gas 
HK Etactnc 

HKLond 

HK Reollv Trust 

HSBC Heldinos 

HKShamHtta 

HK Tciecomm 

HKFerrv 

HuldiWhanwM 

Hf«en Orr 

Jonflmmolh. 

Jardine Sir HIS 

Kowteon Motor 

Mondorln Orient 

Mlromw Hotel 

NewVAirldDev 

SHKPrees 

Stalin 

Swire Poe A 

TotOieunoPm 

Tve 

Wharf Hold 
wing On Co intI 
WhBor ind. 


axo 3260 
1260 1ZSS 
37X0 37J0 
40 MJQ 
10.70 10JS 
13X0 13JS 
StJS MTS 
4050 4050 
4450 4460 
1L40 7460 

23.10 SM 

5nct 

fiS 3U0 

91.75 97T3 

1150 12 

IS.IS isa 

1650 1450 

owi 35J0 

aio 

63.75 46X5 
39X5 960 

16 1550 
1615 10 

21.10 20TO 
3655 3660 
4950 4MD 

255 254 
6155 6I5D 
1250 1250 
164 164 
32X0 3150 
1155 11J5 
13 13 

: 940X66 


Johannesburg 

AECI 3150 33 

Altoch 1» 118 

AnaioAiiier MS Ml 

Bonows saw s 

Blmor 9X5 9M 

4550 4M 
EtaBeerg 111.75 111 

DrtetanlHn 47X5 4550 

Geneor 12X5 13 

GPSA 19 136 

Hormonv 24X5 24,75 

HlehvoMSIeel 2625 2B5D 

Kloel SBXS S7 

NcdBonkGrp 3358 XLS8 

Rondfonleln 9 4850 

RumIoI 105 101 

SABrewi ILSO OSn 

51 HOleiiQ 4450 e 

CtwnI 2855 3055 

WeOterrtOeep 300 192 


London 


AOOeyNon 
Allied Lyons 
ArloWInIns 
Arovll Grew 
As Brit Poods 
BAA 
aA6 

BenkSCDtiond 

Berdm 

Boss 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 

SawBtar 

BP 

BlilAIrvnvS 
Bril Cos 
am sieei 
irllTetacafli 

Coble Wire 

Codburvsm 

Corodon 

Cotas VIvef la 

Cofflffl Union 

Courtaulds 

gCCGrew 

Enterprise Oil 

Eurtaunnef 

Fisns 

Forte 


607 

£78 

257 

269 

£7? 

9.75 

4.92 

154 
563 
£50 
461 
LU 
116 
765 
&XS 
4J7 
600 
4X3 
276 

155 
176 
3^ 
627 
459 
110 
£14 
£49 
£28 
178 
4X6 
IM 

156 
353 


606 

£B 

256 

2X3 

6J4 

9J3 

693 

153 

565 

569 

456 

r.)4 

113 

763 

5X4 

464 

All 

4X5 

3X6 

155 

3X6 

171 

623 

6X8 

112 

£16 

£44 

551 

168 

4X3 

112 

1X7 

2X1 


Prev. 



Trent 
Jtten 
State 

Sniih Nephew 
Si^KIlnc B 
Snith (WH) 
Altloice 
. iBLyte 
Tesee 
Ihemewi 
Tomklni 
TSBGrow 
Unlimr 
UMBI^ts 
Vodnlenc 

War Loon 3W 



w n tibre uj 
WliitarnsHdos 
Willis Cerroon 

prcwieus: 



Madrid 


BBV 3990 3810 

BeeCmtrelHIep. 3SIII » 
Bones SontoMer 4m SlOO 
Bonesto 1825 1818 

CEPSA 3M5 3130 


enoesQ am am 

Brens Ue U1 

Iberdrola SO 99 

RMSta 4S 419 

Toboetaere 3500 3580 

T eto loolco 7515 Jin 


Milan 

BoneaConiRi 4 

Bostool 

Benettonoroup 24 

am 1 

OR 2 

Credltal 3 

Enlcfiem 2 

Fernn l 

FerllnRIsp M 

FItaSPA 6 

F ln meecUco l 

Generoil ^ 

IPI 29 

llBlGOm 12 

ItOlPQS 5 

UolmoMllarr 43 

Wedlebeneo 15 

Montedison T 

ouvetn s 

piroiii 5 

RAS 25 

Rta oM onte • 

Sotaom 4 

Son Paolo Torino • 
SIP 4 

SME 3 

Snki 2 

Stando 38 

siet s 

ToraAsstRISP 38 


Montreal 

AleonAMtamin M 3m 

Bonk Montreal 23Vb 9 

BetlCoiieda 4I« 4isk 

imiOw^a im m 

corner IB It 

CiMCOdes TW 716 


Oomfnfen Teta A 
DenohueA 
MacMillan Bl 
Non Bk Canada 
Pu iior Cerp. 
QuitecTta^ 
Quete c or A 


Teta o lc te 
unlire 
VI d otal o n 

Rsssrisa' 


CleeePrav. 


CtoaeFrev. 

69 

7 

EieClfpA 

IV 

19 

llta 

llta 

iiuwieijbonfcaii 

MS 

109 

189 



177 

101 

89 

Ita 

Norak Hydro 

25101409 

Mta 



117 


llta 




116 

179 

It 

SCAA 



W 


S-EBonkm 

0X8 

49 



SkondoF 

117 


N0. 

— 


10 

161 



SKF 

10 

W 

i:MB0 

Store 

419 

4M 

1 


TrellebaraeF 

103 

in 



VaNo 

3970 

91 


Paris 

Accor m 993 

AlrUWMt 133 iU 
AtoMAtSthom 49 «B 
Am V75027t2g 

Btaicaire (Clot a SW 
aiC 1X9 129 

BNP 399 39 

BowVBiies a at 

Carrtaeur 3050 2045 

CCF. a 91 

Cerus 10581139 

Onreoura 7390 mbq 
anwriis Franc 30110 307 
OubMOd 49 49 

OonemexBSN 89 93 

eiFAotattano 411.104I1J0 
Small 963 9a 

Bun ofwiey 9JS (0 
Cm. Eow Jbs S6 
Havas 4SBS04Slie 

ImelW 999 99 

LafergoCaOBoe 436504369 
Lenrand oea ra 

LvaaGawk S34 99 

Orita (LT 139 190 

L.VJIAH. 860 

MtotroHoCtlono 116 1159 
tMtaWme 355X03589 
Mouliia 1159 1179 
39 3939 
Inti 16491679 
' 3189 Sta 
fta w o tta 539 SO 

Ptaoun pure 970 99 
Rndlotetawteio 470 46B 

n^OUteK A 13B9D 1399 
Ron.9t.Laul5 1659 1645 
StanlGobtan 

936 

sn 


^ta&wrata 


SM 
9ws 
TTmraon-eSF 
Total 
UAP. 

Vtaoo 
CAC9 


37637960 
166 164 

393059 
15^1549 
S7793H9 


Sao Paulo 
BonoodoBnaM 29 2 
Bonespa 861 < 

BradtecQ 69_M 

Brahma 336399 

CtaiWo 169 09 

Ettardbrm 243 211 

Itaubonco 301 210 

U9tt 385 291 

poranapanenn IS2S 16X8 
PelroBros 13491239 

SOueoCrU £002 £460 

Tetaore* 4680 429 

Tekm 415 385 

UsHntaos 19 19 

vole RIO Coco 1IUD1189 
vortv 71 9) 


Singapore 

Cerebn 79 79 

atveev. 49 69 

DB3 11.16 11 

ProserNeara MXO 769 
GmHnp 13X0 3£18 

GtadmHOMPI 257 29 
HowPor 39 39 

Hume industries S9 S55 
indwopt £60 £55 

icmpel 189 109 

KLKweno £76 ItJ 

umam i64 i63 

MakmnBankB • 595 
OCBCtarelfln 139 129 
OUB 69 6X5 

OUE 89 89 

se m boeoB laio VLN 

Stimrlta £ 9 

ItawOffby £52 3X4 
SIAMm 119 13X0 
SVUrOLtaM 7X5 7M 
StaerePress M 16 
stitaS titanehip 454 39 
Staoranuectanm M W 
stroHsTretano xa 39 
IMTSesratan 739 
UOL 228 £24 

strtais Times bull; 2211X4 
prev l e ii s 19019 


Stockholm 

A6A MM 

AeeoA m 6g 

j^oipcp 

isssr" a S 8 


^SBsssrmi 


Sydney 


Amcor 9.16 9.18 

ANZ 49 49 

BHP 1660 119 

Borol £50 146 

B owo l nvilie 09 t9 

CelesMm 6X4 6i7 

CemolCD £38 £34 

Ctu 1168 Its 

CSR 6X5 4X3 

PestaraBrow 1.70 7.11 

Cectamnn Field 163 163 

ICI Australia 1160 119 

Maooum 3 3 

MIW 29 19 

NtaAutaBank 119 119 

NewsCora 167 666 

Nine Network 616 69 

NBrakm HW 368 X4i 

^Omlm 69 657 

Pimeertnn ZN 197 

Nmnte Pnw ldon 29 29 

CCT Rasuraes 761 I67 

smtal 39 3B7 

TNT 39 £63 

Wtastam Minina 7.17 7X5 

jaSSSe*^** iS 


Tokyo 


Akol Eletar 466 465 

Asohi Chcrrrtail 79 79 

AMMGkm 190 119 

BenktaTokra 1970 isn 

Bridoestant i6io isn 

Canon 1700 179 

Casio llfi 119 

Doi Ntapon Plinl 190 1970 

Otawn HOww 149 190 

Otawn StGwrntaa 159 ISN 

99 4010 
229 3340 
am 2i«o 
1040 ion 
9B 939 

89 an 

1710 169 
SBB 900 
777 7B4 
7N 730 
•67 79 

3610 SHO 
3BS 383 
1710 119 
•49 933 
70 735 
7170 709 


Fmuc 
Ftaiemk 
Full Photo 
Pylitsu 
HfiseM 
Hiiotail Coble 


ItaYokode 

IlDdW 

JQpon AirlIfKS 

K Biimo . 

KonsQl Fewer 
Kunusukl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 


Matsu ijec.lnds 1630 169 


SM 518 
661 69 

770 766 

1280 ra 

844 SM 

loai ION 
179 1438 
ilS 119 



MotwEieeWks 1110 1130 
MlauMhlBk 349 3ta6 
MitsubWd Komi ~ ~~ 

MItwMshI Elec 
MllsuMsMHev 
AWsvWsMCera 
Mitsui and Co 
Mlbukeam 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK insutaiurs lOtt 1D9 
NlkkoSeoirittaS 1210 1210 
NIppm KoBoku wiO 
Nlpoen OH 
Nipnm Steel 
NlppmYucm 
Nluen 
Nomura Sec 
KTT 

OIvntausOtaICBI 1130 11M 
Pioneer 3770 2738 

Rkoh 
SmvoBlee 
Shotp 
Sdmw 
Shineisa cnem 

Smitanta Bk 
SumliemoOiem 
Suml Marine 
Sumllems Mtaw 
TtasetOorp 
Tnlsho Marine 
TtawdoCliem 
TDK 
Teiifn 

Tokyo Marine 

Tokyo Bloc Pw . _ . 

Tmpon Prtntlna 1470 miq 

Toravtnd. M8 737 

TtehlM ” “■ 

Tovotd 
VsinataMSoc 
a:xm 
asi 

'tSfl 


735 730 
551 S9 
1730 1730 
730 737 

3M 3070 
^ 569 
IfdO 1730 
$83 SZB 
917 717 
273 39 

iS MO 
833 810 
1330 na 
eso 4300 

S63 59 

1270 1370 
3010 37ta 


737 733 
3110 3170 
877 89 


CtaeePrtv. 


Toronto 


AMtlWPrtce 
AonicoCata* 
Air Canada 
AtaertaEnnrav 
AmSorrttai Rei 
BCE 

BkNavaSctalo 
BCGOS 
ac T e taco m 
Bi m wta u 
Brvrawim 
CAE 
Comdev 


imPotaflc am 



17M 17M 
17 1716 

m m 
rm 3ita 
S1«6 38 

4516 4646 
34W 946 
M 1446 
2946 3346 
59 8X6 
1046 10 

746 716 

69 69 
am — 


EmoBoylWneo 
' T silver A 


idW 1V4I 

xS ^ 

9 846 

St6 546 
3146 8146 
94 916 
746 fW 
2146 296 
070 056 
1616 >646 
OB 0X1 
4.15 6.15 
7 7 

1716 1746 
541 946 


\SSA 


Eotaty . 

FCA Irta 
Fed Ind A 
FteTmerOtallA 
FPI 

Centra .. . _ . 

Ctaf Crip Res 946 546 
lr«1 T746 1244 

GWAAinca U 1346 
1246 1946 

.. 77 77 

Huteona Bar 3446 aW 
immee 3516 3446 

men 3746 37V> 

IPLEnerpy 3fta 2516 
Jomack 1646 1446 

Lnbtat 1776 2046 

LoUtawCO 31 2146 

Mo ck e ti ae Til 8 

MeonoltalA 5646 5646 
MmtaLcta nw nil 
Morlllme 3ri6 a 

AtarfcItM 746 746 

MetamA 1016 21 

NenmtndA SH 546 
Noranaolnc 9 9 

NeramtoFonar 1146 1716 
NoresnEnerar 1546 I5ta 
HlhnTtaecem 916 
NovnCorp 1146 

Otannu 1746 . . 

PeourlnA IIS 1X5 

Ploeerovne 2716 2516 
Qeo Fetrateom 746 F6 
PWACOra 057 058 
Narrate 1946 1546 

Renotsemee 9716 87 

SegTTB 17M n 

Rummuus 75 tb 

Rnyta BnnfcCan 27ta 27>k 
Scetaro Res Ta in 

jeetfS Hom 816 no 

Sewrum Ct6 046 

SeoraCm 7Vi 716 

»en Cm _ 4116 4146 

aw ii J lGeraen TM 7144 
SHLSvsIomfiM 746 7>6 
SBUmi tal I64t IM 

saarAeraeFoce u 14* 
niC»A 066 fta 

TtatwimEnero 204k 2946 
TVteB 2116 

Thenom 
TorefttaDomn 
TwtaorB 
T ransuita Utu 
TrwwoOdPiPo 
TrNmFMA 
Trlnioc 
TrtatcA 
UnICDrp Enervy 



Zurich 

Adta Inti B 350 2SI 

BBC Bran BteB 1213 18^ 

mHtadifiBB on 5B7 
SektrowB S S 
FtaC^ B Ota 14n 

l .Htenft sgMO B 2120 UTo 
JfiRtali B Ml Otf 

LondtiGyrR & » 

MKWBwkkB 7^ 415 

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} II 


Losses on Bonds Quise lituUng Results to J^unge 68% 


Featm 

FRANKfTJRT — Cossmetzbank AG, hurt 
by fmaocial-martcet turmoil,, rqxuted an imeat- 
pect^y diaip decKoe ThuR&y in Rtsi-half 
eammgs. but analysts said the bank piobablY^ 
woj^d match its 1993 results for the fufl year. 

Operating profit after risk provisions fell 23 
pen^i, to 436 million D»tsdie-.siarks ($276 
i^on) m the first half, conmared with half of 
ue results recorded for 1993, and tradmg profit 
for Its own account plunged 68 pereoL 
Commerzbank, however, scdd-its ^p>eral5ng re* 
suits were up 1 1 percent from the period a 

>car earto. 

Tin diffenmce is explained Iqr a sharp rise in. 
earnings during the seocmd half of ia«« year, 
.when soaring financial maikets boosted prtmt at' 
most German banks. 

It s fine_ that the operatii^ pn^ts rose .1 1.- 
pere^t ag a ni s t the calendar comparison, but in 
me tanking world, one cmnpares with ax-, 
twelfths, said Annalies Kbbem, ana-; 

lyst at M.M. Warbuic in Hamburgi' 

Analysts had predicted that CQmzneizbank*s 
operating profit would fare better thaii tha drop 
_<rf 10 petcent to 15 percent, th^ were etpecting 


Srm Dratsche Bank AG, Germany’s largest 
conunercial bank. But Cteutsche B ank on Tues- 
day rafted a rise of 1 percent in its operating 
profit after pioviaons. 

Cmnineizbank’s profit hurt by the poorer 
FBSiill &om trading for its own aocount, whidi 
f^ to 87 million DM. The bank said it had losses 
in hs trading in sham and bcmds in June. 

Deutsche Bank, in its report,, said it had man- 
aged to overcome such losses reducing its risk 
provisions by 46 percent. fVi y w ^ g T^hiifig pared 
provisions by % percent, compa r ed with half of 
the previous year's total. 

But Commerzbank said it saw a good basis for 
eairaii& for the rest the yew, citing the pros- 
pect 01 better bond-market and satis- 

JBCtory business ccmdirions. 

Anmysts said Commeizbaiik results historical- 

tmtded to improve in the second half of the 
year £rom the fireL 

-. John Leonard, h anking analyst at Salomon 
Brothers in Londtxi, said the half-year results 
were “thin, but mainly because of the markete.” 

Bu t he said condhioos were expected to im- 
prove and that be did not expect to revise his 
eazmags forecasts. 


Investment Income 
Off at Banco Central 

Ccofrikd I/f Oar Si^ Fnm Ditpaiehe 

MADRID — Banco Central Hispanoamericano reported 
Thursday that first-half n^ profit fdl 19 percent, to 2932 
Ulhon pesetas ($225.6 nnOioi), as Rnanraai inrmni* dr(q^>ed 
more than two-thirds and loss provisumis rose 43 percent. 

Spain's second-largest commercial bank said income from 
its financial investments fdl from 1 1.81 btHion. pesetas in the 
first half of 1993 to 4.63 bilUon pesetas in the latest six 
months. ■ > 

The bank set aside proviaoos of 7(X) miffim pesetas against 
losses in the vdoe of government bondlKdifings. During the 
second quarter, the price of Spain's bmchmaik 10-year gov- 
ernment bond fdl 8.4 percent 

Executives said tlut the bank did not have a la^ position 
in Spanish bonds but noted that its provmoDS for insolvencies 
had risen 43 percent to 81.7 billion pesetas. 

Despite the drop in net profit the. bank said Its core 
businesses showed positive results. Net interest income edged 
up 0.1 percent to 153.1 bOlum pesetas, while operating 
income rose 3 percrat to 63.83 bnUon pesetas. . 

Bank officials said operating inoame in 1996 could read 
175 biliitm peseta^ wide proviaoas could fall to between ^ 
billion and 70 billi<» pesetas. 

Th^ also predicted the bank would end its losses and post 
flat earnings by the end of 1994 becdise'loan demand was 
likely to increase in Spain by as mudi as 6 percent as. the 
economy picked up from last year, when gross domestic 
product drank 1 percent 

The bank said it also brqied to post some .'capital gains in 
1994 from the continued sde of its extensive investments in 
industrial conmames. 

Argentaiia Corporaddn Bancaiia de Eqiana SA, anotbw 
may (M* S^panish bank repOTtmg results Thursday said net profit 
after minority intwests had risoi (9 pezeent, to 44.17 l^on 

(Bloomberg Reuters, AFX) 


NYSi 

Thu^udfly’s CloiAiSl 

Tables 'nducle Uie nationwide prices up to 
' the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades efcsewhare. Via The ABsodeted Press 


Gildemeister 
Sets Hans for 
Ri^ts Issue 

BlecaAerg Batinea Nevi 

BIELEFELD, Germa^ — 
GOdemoster AG said Thurs- 
day it i^anned to raise 69 mil- 
lion Dwtsebe rearkg ($44 mO- 
lion) sdfing new shares to 
cuirent holders to fund its take- 
over of the faQed manufacturer 
Deckd Maho AG. 

The tool-maldng company 
also said it oqiected hs continu- 
ing tolerations to break even 
next year as demand and prices 
pick up from 1993. In the first 
half a this year, new cmlers 
were 60 percent faigto thm a 
year earlier, at 123 miJlkm DM. 

The company also an- 
nounced a 1993 net loss of 59.1 
million DM, down from 76.7 
nulHon DM the year before, 
largely because tA 40.8 milUoa 
Dm in exbraordinary in- 
cluding writers of 32ffl^Qn 
DM of debt 

GSdemdster released detaib 
of tbe c^tal increase it plans 
to emndoe with its takeover of 
Dedcd Maho. It said it aimed 
to offer 6,780,000 shares to cur^ 
rent hdders at KXZ DM eac^ 
(XHnpared with the cuireat Gil- 
demeister share jurice of about 
224 DM. 

The share issue wfl] take 
place in six to eight weeks. 


Takeover Fight Hits 
Banking in Portugal 


LISBON —A fierce corporate battle loomed Thursday in 
Portugal’s banking sector as principal sharehdders in Banco 
POrtugues do Atlantico SA gave notice th^ planned to fight a 
bid from Banco Comercial Ponugues SA. 

New^ on Tuesday that BCP, Ponugars fourih-iaigest bank, 
would bid 132 billion escudos ($825 miliion) for a coniroUing 
40 percent stake in BPA, the second-biggest bank, stunned the 

finanrial co mmuni ty. 

If successful, it wtmid at a smdte create Kmugal’s second 
bankiiig group assets, challenging Caixa Genii de Deposi- 
tos for top and soring more tnan a 20 pe r cent maiket 
share. 

But late on Wednesday, core shareholders in BPA, who say 
that whb other minoii^ support hold about 27 percent 
of the capital, said ib^ aimed to increase thrir bio« to 40 
percent 

“We win make all necessary efforts to enlarge the core 
holding to around 40 percent of BPA by joining with other 
sharehohte of tbe bank,** a ^kesman for the group said. 

The pro^iect of a bitter fight for control or BPA is an 
unaccustooira devd<^>ment in PortugaL not only among 
banks but in the corporate sector as a whole. 

“Tins is die meet xopoitant develc^ment rince the 
were natkmalized 20 years ago,** said Eduardo Stock da 
Cunha, a director of Santander Investment PortugaL “We 
have never had a coporate battle on this potential scale." 

In Tbuisday trading BPA riiares opened 30percent higher, 
at 2,613 escudos, while BCP was down 82 at 2,125. 

On balany, bankmg analysts said BCP still stood a good 
diance of wnnn^ de^te BPA shareholder resistance. 

The BCP ehaiman, Joige Jardiffl Goncalves, while some- 
thing of a maverick in Pwtuguese banking, is seen as an 
efficient managgr who would be likely to revive recently 
flying BPA profits. 

The core sharriiolders, meanwhile, represent a diverse 
gtoiq) of industrial interests, already hi^y leveraged with 
BPA loans to finance their shareholdings. 

To line iq) the extra 13 permt in share support, the group 

at 3,(XX) escui^is^ fork out ^ billion escudos t^^y the 
sharm themsrives. 

A key to BCfs success wfll be the stance of the govern- 
ment, vriiidi holds 243 percent of BPA and had announced 
plans to fiutber privatize the bank. 


French Central Bank Cuts 
Ke|y Mon^-Market Rate 


JgftwBiteg Busiaess Newi 

PARIS — The Bank of 
France on Thursday trimmed a 
money-maiket rate to tiy to 
strengthen the country’s conva- 
lescing economy, economists 
said. 

The central bank cut its inter- 
vention rate to S percent fiom 
3.1 percent It was the I2lh such 
cot rince Jan. 1, whoi the rate 
stood at 62 percait 

Although France's recovery 
gained stren^ in the secemd 
quarter of this year, “there’s 


L—LWtWf 



Still need to sdmulate the econ- 
omy and ^ve financial markets 
a nUip," Mid Rrilijm Auverny. 
an economist with Credit Agri- 
ede, France’s largest bank. 

France's economy is only 
slowly pulling out of its worst 
recession in 50 years. But it may 
be something of a fiasb in the 
pan, some economists say. 

“Governmetit incentives to 
tbe car and bousmg sectots 
played a key role in boosting 
growth in the second quaner," 
Mr. Auvemy said, and with 
their impact fading, it b not 
clear what will take thdr place. 

Thus, many French econo- 
mists exi^i die intervention 
rate, which determines the 
country's money-market rates, 
to be cut by a further quarter or 
half percentage point tmore tbe 
end of tbe year. 

The extent of future cuts wtU 
d^^ on Germany's Bundes- 
bank, whose monetary policy 
France shadows. 


Sainsbury 
Bids High 
For Low 


Campded Oar Si^ Fnm Di^atehB 

LONijON — Britain's big- 
gest food retailer, J. Sainsbuiy 
PLC, launched a oounterbid 
Thursday for the struggling 
Scottish supermarket compmy 
William Low & Co., topping 
arch-rival Tesco PLCs dfer 
made two weeks ago. 

Sainsbuiy is (Bering £210 
milliOD (5321 miliion) in cash 
for the 57-store chain, a wide 36 
percent premium to Tesco's 
£154 nrillinn bid. 

Analysts said they expected 
Tesco to try to clinch ilw deal 
by topping Sainsbi^s offer. 

Low's shares jumped 46 
pei^ to £3.26, as the market 
wailed for a response from 
Tesco and a possmle bidding 
war. Low's sham had lan- 
guished at £1.69 before Tesco’s 
strike. 

Sainsbuiy is offering £3.05 
cash for each Low ordinary 
share and £1.43 for its convert- 
ible preference shares. Tesco's 
offer was pitched at £225 and 
£1.089, reqxctively. 

Both groups are offering Low 
shareholders the ^rion to take 
their own shares instead of the 
cash. 

Low said it “intends to con- 
rider the Sainsbuiy offer in de- 
before making recommen- 
dations as to wfaai action 
shareholders should take." 

If Sainsbuiys bid is success- 
ful, it would push its British 
market share up by 0.6 percent- 
age pmnts, to 12.0 percent 

(Blomnberg, Rniiersj ' 

ICI Profits Surge 
By’40%inHalf 
As Demand Rises 

Feaun 

LONDON — l^erial 
Chemical Industries PLC re- 
ported a suige in half-y^ prof- 
its ou Thursday and said it was 
seeing si^ of improvement in 
worldwide markets. 

Profit before tax rose by 40 
pen^t, to £234 miUion ($357.7 
million) from £167 auilion, on 
sales of £4.46 btlhon, an 8 per- 
cent rise. 

The chairman. Sir Denys 
Henderson, said the results were 
aided for the first timB in recent 
years by ui:q>rovuig markeis in 
tbe second quarter. 

“This is the most tangible ev- 
idence yet that our customers 
are emerging from recession 
with some modest improvement 
now evident in Euix^. sus- 
tained demand in North Ameri- 
ca and continuing strong 
growth in most Arian econo- 
mies,'' he said. 


Investor’s Europe 


united nations education, 
scientific and cultural organization 

UNESCO 


Invitation to register for bidding 
The following works in one 
of its Heaclquaitci^ buildings, in Paris 
are to be subject to tender: 

Treatment or replaceme^it 
of asbestos and fire stop valines 
in tbe Sixth Building 
Ground floor+15 storeys 
floor area 30,000in2 


Biddins exercise 1 


Lot N” 1 - Construction of temporary 
prefabricated offices 
Lot N**2 - Transfer of contents of offices 
Lot N"3 - Treatment or elimination of 
asbestos 

Lot hP4 - Replacement of fire stop valves 
Lot N”5 - False-ceiling insulation 
These lots may be included in a general -works 
contract or treated separately. 

Biddins e?cercise /V” 3 


Supervision and co-ordination of all 

work 

DocumentaUon is available In French only 


Bid issuance: 15 Scptcmiwr 9-i 
Conmienccment of work: End of year 1994 
R<rtimatcd duration of work: Tlircc years 


Applications for tender dwimenis, 
togetlier with references covering similar 
operations, should l^c sent to; 

UNF5CO - BPS / GES 
IVavaux d'Amiante 
7, place de Fonienoy, 

75352 Paris 07 SF (FRANCE) 

to arrive not later than 31 August 1994, 
Reliable references required 


Frankfurt 
DAX : 

aoo— — 


London 
FTSE 100 index 






Paris ' 
(jAC40 

«ro— 

23flOW- 



M S~S 

1993 

.Exchange index 


F M A 
1993 


TTiTa- M j j' 
1993 


Amsterdam 

Brussels , ' 

Frankfurt 

Frankfort 

Helsinki ■ 

London 

London ' 

Madrid" 

Milan 

Paris 

Stockhoiro 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Sources: Reuters, 


ASX ^ 

Stock index 
D/U( 

FAZ 

HEX 

Financiel Times 30 

\FrSE100 

General Index 
MIB 

CAC4Q- 

Aftaersvaertdm 
' stodt index 
"SBS . 

AFP 


-Thursday 
Close - 
40522 
7365B7- 
2,122ai 
.805J)3 
1,83939 
2401.40 
3J»530 
307.92 
1,124JX> 
2,05343 
1,878^7 
45346 
912J12 


RBV. 

Close 

404.20 - 
7,5B1£5 
2,140.44 
811.22 
1.859.77 

2.396.20 


% . 
Change 
.+0.23 
-0^1 
•0.82 
-0.76 
■ 1.10 
•HX13 


3.08230 +0.44 

311.89 -1.27 

1,122.00 +0.18 

2,055.69 -0.11 

1,865Bt -aSO 

455.05 -0.81 

909.03 +0.33 

Imeraamul Ihtakl Tnbane 


Very briefly: 

• PSA Peugeot Citroeo SA’& first-half sales rose IS percent from 
the year-ago period, to 83.8 billion French francs ($16 billion), 
whOe its share of the European car market grew to 12.5 percent 
from 11.9 percenL 

• Hanson PLC %reed to buy George H. Scboles PLC for £96.1 
million (SISO mmion) in cash, which will transform Hanson into 
one of Britain's bigg^ electrical equipment makers. 

• Geiman diugmakers exported pharmaceuticals worth 3.8 billion 
Deutsche maite ($2.4 trillion) in the first three months of tbe year, 
up lOJ percent from a year ago. 

• fcirtfingtwm intgmflriftnai PLC agreed to scU the Sheraton 

Grand HoM in Houston to National Life Assurance Co., of the 
United States, for £1 1.7 milli nn AFP. Bloambag. AFX 


MARUSAN ASIA GROWTH FUND 

Fonds coRimun de placement 
Reostefed Office 
7, me duTltor ch e- oux-Herbes 

L-1728 Luxwnbeurg 
Dividend Notice 

Notice is hereby given in all investors in the Marusan Asia 
Grovtlh Fund. 

Ail unitholders noted in the fund rc^^ter as of the dose nf 
business on July 28tli 1994 will receive a dividend payrnenl. 

Details oflbe dividend 
Ex-dividend date i July 29th 1994 
Payrnenl dale : -iugust KHh 1994 

Amount per unit : USD 0.17 

Bettered unilhnidvn will be sent payment aatomatically. 

Holden nf bearer eeniheates are requested to present coupon 
n" S ini 

Banque Inlemalinnale k Loxembouif' 

2. boulevard Royal 
LrS!9Sli Ljixrmbourg 

By order of the board of (he Management Company, HSBC .Asia 
InvcAlnnenl Services Lisembnui^ §A. 


Cl'myCY .-V-ND C\PIT.\L .\L\BKET SERMCES 


CiiutENcr Management CoRi>ORA-noN Plc 

11 Old Jewry - London EC2R 8Dtl 
TeL: 071-865 0800 Fax: 071-972 09*^0 


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Pige 12 

NYSE 

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P^18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD IRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 29, 1994 


OBSERVER 


The Flexible Goodbye 

The PACs, of course, have 
been blessed in bavins Clinton 
as their opponent He is the 
most flexible of presidents, and 
when he diose to make health 
care the gTMt issue of the ^ he 
picked an issue that neem a 
president vidth Woodrow 
son’s stobbcon iron if there was 
to be any chance of prevailiog. 

Had he commitied himsdf to 
all-out combat from the ont^ 

like^ Canadian an^e^o^ 
plan. It is easy to con y rdiead 
and ^lendid for provok^ po* 
litical passions, which Qmton's 
side deqmtdy needs. His op- 
position has pas^on galore. 

□ 


By Russell Baker 

N ew YORK — A noble 
sense of public duty to di- 
late wisely cm the great health- 
care battle is at war within me 
against the shameful su^dOD 
that I haven’t the faintest no- 
don what it’s all about 
Stupidon is about all that’s 
left in me anynxne about the 
health-care matter. 1 suspea that 
many, jf not most members of 
Cong^ are eoually baffled. 

1 suspect thu doera’t nmdi 
matter, since whatever Congress 
does be the pnxluct a 
small circle of insiders, with the 
rest going along in befuddlemeni 
under pressure of the astound^ 
amount of money the lobbies 
have flung into the battle. 

There is too much “1” and 
“me** here, but bow dse to get 
to somed^ vital that rests so 
heavily on pure suspidon? My 
summon is that if 1 uven’t tlw 
f^ainrest oodoii what it’s all 
about, neither does most of the 
rest of the populace. 

A few pomts are obvious. 
One is that the Clintons have 
roused the (^position of one of 
the most formidable coalitions 
of moneyed power since PACs, 
the so-ealted political action 
committees, r^laced TOhtical 
parties as instnunents dect- 
mg and otmtroUing Congress. 

M we see the tawdiy specta- 
de ctf the PACs taking charge. 
At the same time we are aeaied 
to die awesome sight of the old 
par^ astern colluising under 
the money onslaught of the new 
PAC system. 

□ 

The co]li^>sed party is the 
Democrats. The Rroublican 
Party seems as tmified as ever, 
but It is an Dlusoty unity. In the 
health-care battle, the PACs are 
out to break a Democratic pres- 
ident, whidi gives them com- 
mon cause wim R»ubUcans. 

Since President Retten the 
Republicans ^irituaQy have be- 
come a party m opposition, even 
when t&ty cmtrol the presiden- 
cy. Health care simply doesn’t 
test their famous party muscle 
uainst the power of big PACs 
IDm the insurance and dnig in- 
dustries' and the medical hmby. 


Why the 

was out of band is a 

question for historians. Peihaps 
it was Qinionian flesdUlity. 

It must have been obvious 
fmn the start that the insurance 
industry would be a mighty op- 
ponent, yet the mimnal Chnton 

plan hatirfm^ the fnqnv 

ance industry the first aide. It 
was to operate thtot^ private 
insurance companies. Theceaf ter 
the ZQSUISDCe hatt 

only to e*»p away. 

Since tba flexibility has fol- 
lowed flexit^ty. No, universal 
coverage isn’t aU tbatinqiottaDt 
now so never mind that md veto 
threat 

A remarkable aspect of all this 
has been the White House fail- 
ure to create a public consensus 
for a p ro gr am that would be 
aco^itwle to the mesidait and 
possible to pass in Congress. It is 
rare to enact oontioveisial l^is- 
lation until a national consensus 
rai it is reached and it becomes, 
in the words the late Senator 
Everett Diiksen i^hed to cavil 
ri^tsl^slation, “anideavdiose 
time has come.” 

Whatever is bong pasted up 
cannot be an idea umose time 
has come. The public has no 
idea what a healthrcare bill 
should do. Yet politicians are 
desperate for anything they can 
calla *11681111-0810 bill” We are 
in danger of a confusion whose 
time income. 

New York Times Sa^iae 


King of Pimk Finds liispiratiw in PEiris 


By Mike Zwerin 

jHsmaSmal Hert^ TNbme 

P ARIS — More than IS years after 
the dratb of Sid Vicious, pii^ 
fashions lUte drug-overdosing, skin- 

E ienang, bdly-button rings, Mohawk 
aiicuts and black-on-black clothing 
r wBflin or have retunied. I don't re- 
member whicL 

Along with his partner V.'vjerme 
Westwood, Malcolm McLaren is 
known as ‘*ihe of punk fash- 

ion.” They opened “Let It Rock” in 
London, a dothing store named after 
a Chuck song. Later, it was 
called simply '‘Sex.'^featurim S&M 
gear. McLai^ managed the Sex Ks- 
tols and has been accused of 
ing punk” and of '‘manipulating sick 
youtbs.” One reason he created punk, 
be said, was to “upset people." He has 
the air ^ a fiiradly saboteur. 
F^ ijer this year, McLaren, now 48, 

P songs he wrote on an dbum he 
uced called "Paris” (Vogue), re- 
corded in Paris. A few weeks a^, 
more cadre than pimk, he was ritting 
in a frenetic studio drmdng room. 
<?a pifaifTitig on the capitaL he was 
being made up for a video clip from 
“Pans." His co-star, the beautinil l)i- 
niwan Amina, Sticiatatl OD 8 SlS- 
teriy kiss. People came and went It 
was hot, his makeup ran and was re- 
stored. ihere were photo ^s. McLar- 
en’s rap continued through it aU: 

“Paris is having a renaissance in 
Tokyo right now. The Japai^ have 
diora Paris as tte cunent dty to get 
bi^ on. 1 certainly have the w^ 
‘Paris’ enou^ on tins record. I’ve got 
to be in reasonably good shape." He 
laughed on his way to the bank. 

McLaren has b^ *inq>ired Ity 
French culture” since the of 13, 
when he discovered aH those Soho 
dives with Frendi names. They were 
dimly lit and the clients, callra Xs, 
stood around dieted in black-on- 
black speaking pigeon French and 
looking really boi^ After reading 
Albm Camus’s “The Stranger" he 
learned that these bored looking Xs 
wearing black were *|part of a scene 
known as existentiali^’’ 

The RoUiim Stones, Pretty Things, 
The Who, Jen Beck — all down the 
line — had in fact married rock as 
much to French existentialists as to 
iba blues. Tluty all wore black and 
looked bored. Enlightenment added 
up over the years. A “motor of angst" 
coupled British rock with the French 
“ *the only certitude is death,' don't 



Bid the tfl-pDipose prennse lacked a 

mdodic hoM imtil McLaren dis^- 
e^Biv'Satie. EEe wdl^ around-Par’ 

is listening to &tie throv^ earphones. 

'“C^Satie, jc Yaime^: Saties 


Malcolm McLaren calls Paris’s rock contribntion histOTy. 


care, bored, black-on-black existential 
attitude.” 

He tbou^t about these things last 
winter hanging itirout Paris looking 
for a raison d*fttre for maiong an album 
about Paris.” He constructed a make- 
shift record^ sm£o in “a umt” with 
a view of Sinl-Sil^nce. He'd been 
coming him for one reason or another 
for 20 years, but he could not ^ue out 
wMt he was dring in a Left Bank 
gVieL His ftiexids were telBitt him be 
would rnaiem a reccxd about nris and 
he was taking tbm seiknidy. 

In San Fiandsco, Jeny. Gaxcaa bad 
told him that if it hadn’t been for the 
Beat scene there he would never have 
come with the name Grateful Dead, 
which is, McLaren said, “about as exis- 
tential a name as you can titink up." 
The San Frandsoo Beat connection 
with Paris was strmu: “Jadt Keiouac 
and all those guys.^ He thought he 
might be “disrawiing a link nobody 
hadtbraigbt mudi ab^” Rock anisic 
with a had grown out of Beat, as in 

Bret^. 

Paris and rock have generally not 
been assodated. ‘'Ibis Pimsian oontri- 
tatioD to rodt was unwritten history," 
M^.aren said. The link came to 
with an image: The Vdvet Under- 


mund meets the velvet ge^*igm«m 
^Gles Davi^ on BOoIevaid saiat-Gen- 
maixL” For the Best PiAdls’ first cmcert 
in Paris, he had given Johnny Rotten a 
beret to wear in honor of w Ftdndi 
and Disy GiDeqtie. Roger Va&n, 
Erasgois Truffaut had recorded Art 
Kaksy, M(»k and Mte on their 
soundtra^ .The jazg-obanected exis- 
tential scene was aocameated Ity Boris 
VxazL 

An of the above, McLaren sitys, was 
“encapsulated by Juliette 'Greco's af- 
fair with NCles Da:i^ ^reco was the 
queen muse of this Uack-on-blad^ 
oadc, morose, 'grand ennui' politic <d 
boredom.” She told JeanfP^ Sartre 
tiiat ibt had discovered the most 
handsome man die had ever met: “He 
lodks like an Egyptim queen.” (Davis 
recorded an album called “Nefez^ 
titti.”) “Miles t^Mles of Afiles” is the 
name of a McLaren song. A line goes: 
*T wore black, you wore black, ir 
Paris and Paris isjaa.” There is die 
existential voice (*T love his Ickk Hfe 
in the butt* vib^*) tif Serge Gains- 
bouig (“love is a di^). A song called ' 
“Pbre-Lachaise” recdls the Doors. 
Eveiytl^ is recalled and recalling is 
everydniia. Django Reixdiardfs 03 ^ 
sy g^tar influence is rep re se n ted by 
ms son BabOc. 


tie ^mwned ly tflfi ndilde ChCt 
Bakety .inuiequited kwe thiQg you 

cm the jMQk of the Seine at uuee 

o’clock ffl' tiie mooiiiig.” 

AH die dbove warfirmned hy^ 
tntanMi nietmbeas) “Mikty' wa lU' 
iqdrd by Bk, Satie.” Satie also had “a 
toudtm- the.'Qriental North African. 

and so 

McLaren an ga^ giad miwi cia DS from 
.nordt aiid:hlack'Afi3Ga because **^t 
nde' rf Pari*, ia. vety.edtttic and 

He ^ok'ibe package to die Frendi 
.They bought it 
on adding “tbree. major 
Teanne Mmean 


n 

bm. 

. Rdidl fatiwfe faftna* 

{shfrdSD h^an afEair with Davis) said 

od A sons written fcff Cieoo hM her 
inlm whh MiWs vunqiet, a 
land of “gjjiost of MQes.” Greco said 
diere was no - way bn eaiib die would 
agree tt> do-diis. 

Maj^i dioidd have ruention^ the 
aarii^. jijgy aduzcalBiid/or SOCMdOgi- 
cat WI eigh ty this SOBI^ 

duagto-evetybody . coB^ is nuue 
bainnn, ted^ poppy faot-eir dian 
“hffleay ” .“SaOB^aqa^ or “eatisten- 
tiaL" ■ 

That bother to write abont it?” 
you adc? Good (pestirei. . 

Bor due' dung; it's late Jzdy and ibere 

ain't aE muf* h ajy mmg- Foe an^ 
o&er, it piowdes an imagbt into a 
son v^ a name to be reckoned with. 
Thndty, i t pre s ents Catherine Deoeuve 
•CNkiarea’s iidtial lyrics for her s(»g 
wen. “too vidgar” and she had diem 
rewrixteuX Aim^ C'she ieiDm<& iiie^of 
a pamtin^ and Franyise 

rail men HaA (rf 

existential ^^dianteuseT 
Hardy's voice “rises over ckxid- 
bursts ca Pnis tinsd diat oounteeprant 
seosual African drums at the comer of 
Sradwozg fthtt-Denia” These is n 
verse about “a boy iriio locks like a ^ 
loddng Hire a boy.” McLaren iws 
Satie to an Algerian xai efatb. Gitii on 
die'Mfetxo stiiw vdnte . truce. James 
Bond gels lost in PigaDe. And '“it^' 
getting late, dmost dawn and I must go . 
hOGOB. Botrd like to IP ^ 1^10 Para 
on the Seine 'caose raqs u a pngier 
friend td mine.” 


people 


g,,fjiiaaFeriBetuiJiiag 

InbtdbmaJenesW 

Six years after vowing thst^ 
rhe duiri Indiana Jones roovii^ 
would be his Imt Hanifloii Feni 
has agreed to iHay the thriO. 

geeking ^ 

tkne. ‘TVe're wiwtiiag; with a 
qgfpt right now ” Ford ukl 
‘Eatertaisssent Tooigbt'' ia ! 

. .1 Ua '( 

» Ml 


LosAn8te. He5a« i helgvai 
wmiring with stem - 

and Georga LW Old “the - 
character's very fun to ptay. the . ] j 

njovies are gr^ entertamnieBti 5 |i 
so f have no lesstasoa” . > 

□ - 

Bardot has sat a let^ \ 
ter to SigiMa Lokb amrestiog . 
caHneat and dismay that the 
Italian star has.flgieed to modri 
{hr coats for an Italian compa- 
ny. Bardot she found h- '' 
“degiadiDgi rqiumant, lameo- 
«iii^ and imw<HW Ip aocept'- 
mooey stained with the blood * 
anunals even if you need h.” 
Loren was on vacation and ozh 

areilable' fm commaL 

D 

Mayor Jacques CUrae of 
Paris has dropped a smtagaiatt ' 
a weeUy magmrine over a cover 
photogrqdi showing himle^ 
mg over a Mtao turnstile ia if 
to avoid paying his farie. Qdx^ > 
ac's office SfM he took die deei- : 
rion after Le Nouvel Observer V 
teur printed an apology-in iu : 
issue -on Thnisdity. Thephoto^. 
gi^h, vrith an artide caOedf '; 
“(Seaters in France,” was tak- 
en “as a joke” 18 years ago^ 
Qiirac's offloe said. 

■ ■ n 

WBbm Kanoedy Mtkhas 
setded out of -ooun with a bar 
bouncer hepondied in the faoe. - 
Smith said he slugged HemyC. ' 
Cddran after imswkfng him ' 
for the friend of a ma who. ;! 
taunted gt an Axliiteloar' ' 
^fl^nia, bar about his IWI 
Florida ewe triaL Cochran filed 
a half-mulion-doUar lawsnbL: 
MgiBst &aiih. whose . 

04& would not da- : 
ekoe the setdeownt amount 


iivroiiNi^oim 

VCLASSIHED 

Ai^iean on Ibges 5,6 IT 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


rodn 

Twoemw 


Mdh 

Um W 

MQh 

Lew 37 


OF 

C/F 

OF 

OF 

Mgwvc 

2 Bm 

19/58 ■ 

zrma 

19 / 0 * 1 

AmwwWni 

25/77 

IMS pc 

20/79 

ISAS PC 

/Msa 

S /81 

10/01 c 

3 Ml 

i 4 ior pc 


31/30 

£ 3/73 f 

33 Af 

83/73 pc 

BwedDOB 

2 »<M 

22/71 ■ 

28/02 

32/71 pc 

3c^»h 

SI /OS 

15/59 1 

32 /n 

21/70 pc 

Bm9n 

SMB 

21/70 pe 

32/0 

tO/OO pg 

Bhm/c 

a/K 

19/88 BO 

31/00 

19 /BS PC 

Bum* 

XH 1 

um • 

am 

am pe 


2wa* 

21/70 PC 

3 D /00 

ia«* PC 

CcWctMSd 21/38 

zam PC 29/84 

22/71 ■ 

Di«*> 

21/70 

12/53 PC 

21/70 

13 > 5 S 3 b 

EfMunyi 

IB/OB 

is«s PC 2D/ao 

t 4 A 7 dl 



22/71 PC 

33 A 1 

21/70 pe 

RccWul 

31 /SS 

21/70 1 

31/00 

18 A 6 pe 

OWMMi 

sD/as 

23/00 pe StAB 

iffAS pc 

HckkM 

24 / 7 S 

ia/s* ■ 

94 / 7 S 

17 A 3 ■ 

MwM 

33 W 

I 9<00 M S/OP 

19/00 pe 

UwFWcre 

3*^8 

19/00 ■ 

23/77 

19 A 6 • 


27 / 3 D 

tOA* • 

30n9 

I 7 A 3 pe 

Landcn 

28^9 

lOAl a 

20/02 

10/04 pe 

3laM 

S 8<«7 

2>/70 PC 

33 A 1 

10/64 pe 

Mien 

am 

23/73 pe 20/91 

21/70 pe 


24/75 

13 A 5 • 

2 im 

10 A 1 • 

MiKh 

29/54 

17/02 pe 

29/84 

10/04 pe 

Met 

2B« 

81/70 pe 

28 /B 4 

31/70 pe 

am 

26/79 

1742 pe 

28/04 

ISA* pe 

FiWiw 

37/30 

33/73 C 

27/90 

23 m pe 


91 ee 

21/70 ■ 

33 AI 

2 CIA 8 pe 


89 fH 

19/30 pe 

28 /S 4 

tO/O* pe 


14/57 

io<ie e 

14/57 

9/48 e 


31/59 

11/70 pe 

3981 

20Aa 9 

a McnOiaa 2 B/B 3 

1 SA 1 e 

27/00 

10 AI ■ 

SneMn 

27/09 

18/04 • 

20/79 

I 7 A 2 pe 

WiaMewg 

33/11 

21/70 pe 34/33 

20 A 8 pe 

T«nn 

34/79 

IB/ 0 * t 

2 */ 7 S 

17 A 2 ■ 

Vcriei 

31/00 

29/73 pe 

a 2 A 9 

23/73 pe 


23104 

19/03 po 

MA* 

13/08 PC 

WicMW 

31/83 

18/04 pe 

31/90 

10/84 pe 


31/33 

19 /OB pe 

32 flS 

I 9 A 6 pe 

Oceania 

AlridHKi 

13/05 

7/44 pe 

14/67 

B/ 4 S pe 

Sytfwy 

i«ei 

7/44 S 

14/97 

SAT pe 


Forecast for Saturday through Morxlay, as piovkSed by Accu-Weather. 



MMbman 

North America 

TTw im( wMuh«r pan«m inM 
tXffUnve hio sart^ naxt 
m much ol the East, includ- 
ing WmMnoion, D.C.. New 
YdA ^ end Beslofi. it wDi 
remain veiy hoi In the Rooky 
Mountain ataies with the 
j^ealBSt temparatura depa^ 
turea from nonnel In the 
northem eWes. 


Europe 

The unuauBlly hot weather 
pettem wK oonUmie across 
most ol Central and Eastern 
Europe from Ihia weekend 
Into early next week. Paris 
will remain quite warm 
deaplte a Ihundentonn poa- 
alblliiy. The Biliish Isles wW 
have seaaonable tempera- 
tures with showers. 


Hawy 

Snow 


Asia 

Hast will build back Into 
Japan and most ol Koras 
tram this weekend mie early 
next week with Utile or no 
rain. A possible typhoon 
eouM brii^ <aln and wind to 
Taiwan and assi-esnirai 
China early next week. Pe^ 
alstent showers and ihwidah 
storma wll drench the PhOp* 
pines through Monday. 


A^ 


Tedw 


Tbewfiow 


Hhpi 

Low 

w 

High 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

BeniADk 

32/99 

2 sm 

1 

32/09 

SE /77 pe 

Be^ 

HongKcng 

32/39 

sure 

am 

asm 

■ 

« 

31 /OB 
31/08 

22/71 pe 
Sana re 

Mania 

31 /re 

M-W 

Ih 

31 /n 

24 / 7 S re 

NswOiM 

3 S /96 

30 A 2 

t 

30 A 7 28 A 2 pc 

Seoi 3 

31/88 

34/79 

pe aiAO 

24/75 pc 

SliwigM 

34 /B 3 

20/79 

pe 

34/93 

27/80 po 

ST" 

33/91 

33 A 1 

am 

£ 5/77 

pe 

Ml 

32/89 

33 A 1 

23/73 po 
24/76 pc 

TeTyo 

34/93 

2 B/ 7 f 

RB 30/95 

sane pe 

Africa 

Aokn 

29 / 0 * 

am 

K am 

23 m 9 

C/^T<mn 

21/70 

1 IA 2 

t 

21/70 

12 S 3 pe 

CiiMtwwa 

asm 

19/04 

3 

27 AO 

10/04 pe 

Mnre 

21/70 

12/53 

1 

22/71 

i2Aa pc 

Ltpee 

gam 

24/75 

1 

29/84 

34/79 pe 

NeteN 

som 

9148 

M 

21/70 

11/02 pe 

TwA 

31 AS 

21/70 • 

33 ni 

21/70 ■ 

North Amerfca 


SATURDAY 





SUNDAY 


Al knoMK and (Uk priMlM 


Andmsa 

Mwm 

BoMoo 

Chkiip 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Bsliu 

cen 

OamMCUt 


TadM 
Wgh Low 
OF OP 

gus* tarn 
sam iee« 
27/aO ISfiS 
sang lew 

STM 2100 
4t/iosas/ra 


« Wgii 


TMnWTOT 

Law W 
OF OF 
SliSB 22/71 • 
SMI 21/ra ■ 
2B« 17« ■ 
zrm 1702 * 
sivas 21/70 • 

42/10725/77 a 


TWnr 

Law W High law W 
OF OP OF OF 

BwoMAlMr iSiVi io«o sk 17/ea aMS c 

CwaoM Sana isjee pe a/ss taw ■ 

Lkiw iaiS4 16«1 I ISA* 15/» pa 

HUeaCky 23/73 la.CS pc as/TS 13155 (h 

RbdaJwwM asie ir «2 • asiK isa* pe 

9w*pl a/«S 0133 WI 1l«52 4/29 Wi 


DM 

HanaWki 

Hsueun 

LMAngdM 

Mwn 


Lagand; S4unny. pc-petly daudy. oOoudy. Wi-dwesia. Htairig a k ai ns. rreln. rf-mew fcailea. 
sivsnw, Ma. w-Wauhv. Admai - ■- * 


Ad mapa. fbrMMS and drta precMadbyAccB-WaMher. kia e ISM 


29/73 1*JB7 
2802 taoe 
»na 20 /BB 
2a/B2 17JS 
2S«4 M<S7 
27«0 17/32 
31/M 34/75 
34/83 21/70 
sons ISiM 
33/31 24/75 
28/84 tea* 
s /77 i4.e7 
St/H 34175 
27/80 21/70 
43naa »•< 
Tim 13/S5 
2 *m 1S/S 
28/79 13/65 
2804 am 


• 23/79 14/57 pa 
pa 39/a* 19105 t 

I 27/93 18/04 pe 

• S/a* lOAl pe 
I 92S7 IMI • 
pe 3S/79 17/02 pa 
pe SI/09 24/70 pe 
■ 34«S 22/71 ■ 
a 27/eo 1S«1 pc 
t 99/01 24/75 pc 

• 20/04 18/04 • 

Wi 28/^ rsao pe 
pe 32/OS 24/78 9 
t sons 23/70 pe 
pe 42/10731/80 pe 
pe 21/70 14/57 pe 
pe 2S/73 14/57 pe 
di 2T/B0 1303 pe 
I 3008 33/72 a 


Europe and IfidcUa East 







BBope Wddk Ease 



m • 

. . . 



Location 

Waathre 

High 

Lew 

Waior 

WMe 

WkRt 

Loeattaii 

amam 

Mm 

Low' 


MAHe-' 

'' 'WM 



Ta^ 

OF 

Tamp. 

CVF 

Tsnqiu 

CSF 

HaIgMe 

(Malrea) 

Spaatf 



TMap. 

OF 

IIWAk. 

OF 

.TOanp; HdIgMa 
OF (HsfiW 

' Spaad 

Games 

partly sunny 

30186 

21/70 

26/79 

1-8 

8E 

1040 

' Carmea 

. ainiy' ' 

3V8» 

-Vim 

20/79 

M 

R 

1242 

Deauvile 

partly ounriy 

27J80 

1906 

16/84 

1-2 

uw 

1540 

DasuvOo 

partysunv 

2082 

)BM 

12SS 

. 3008 

14 

flW 

1540 

Rimtni 

Sonny 

3108 

2871 

2B7B 

»1 

m 

TO-20 

Rknim 

onmy 

32«9 

■aam-~ 

M 

-NW 

1040 

Malaga 

sunny 

3301 

24/75 

25/77 

O-l 

»w 

1245 

Malaga 

. amny 

32A8 

49/78 

asm 

4-1 

SW 

i£4S 

Ca(^ 

sunny 

32 m 

23m 

27/80 

0-1 

w 

1049 

CogBaif - 

gotetf' ' 

33 m 

B4/» 

27/80 

.0.1 

w 

12n22 

FaiD 

partljrgmny 

24/73 

1702 

ana 

7-e 

«IW 

1540 

Fate 

ckMOsandouT 

23^7 

i8e« 

ta/BS 

14 

SW 

15-30 

Ppeeus 

oimny 

81/86 

23/7S 

26/79 

0-1 

NW 

1245 

Pkaaua 

aurmy - 

-S2IB9 

22/71 

2908 

O-F 

NW 

1S4& 

CofhJ 

sunny 

30386 

22/71 

2e/7s 

0-1 

NW 

1S45 

Corfu. 

- ain^ 

9U88 

22/71 

46/79 

0-1 

NW 

15-30 

B/lghlDn 

pertb/surirv 

28/79 

1702 

1702 

0-1 . 

SW 

1545 

B/ktfnen 

CMlind 


24/75 

umz 

IMR 

■ .-•14 

SW 

2040 

Ostand 

partVourwiy 

25/77 

1904 

1906 

0-1 

8 

124S 

' douda mid sun 

27n0 

1054 

lOM 

14 

R 

2040 

Scbevsnlpgen 

sunny 

2S/77 

1604 

2008 

0-1 

$ 

1040 

Scheiranhgan-. 

■ doBasandoM 

anmg 

.UW4 

asm 

_ :14. . 

S 

1540 

Eytt 

awry 

28/79 

2008 

21/70 

0-1 

S 

1040 . 

Eyb 

ssrny 

2082 

1064 

aom 

0-1 

SE 

1245 

buiA- 

etoudi 4uid Sim 

32/89 

22/71 

26/79 

1-2 

N 

2CM0 

isnir' 

amny 

32M 

21/70 

asm 

14 

N 

2040 

Tel Am 

ourmy 

28/82 

22/ri. 

2em. 

1-2 . 

SW 

.2040 

TolAvly 

suvy - 

2SIV« 

2073 

28/79 

■*4. 

SW 

2040 . 

Caribbean and West Mlwilic 







Crelibean nd Wait /tttartfe 







BaitMdes 

pBidysumy 

9006 

23/73 

27/80 

14 

ENE 

2045 

Biititdoa ' ' 

«ntjr 

SIM 

S4/ra 

27M 

14 

ENE 

2045 

Khgston 

SLtnomas 

tfamdarsoDmia 

ouniv. 

sare 

9OT7 

24/7S 

25/77 

SBoe 

2202 

T-S. 

1-2 

b 

B 

25-90 

2545 

Kkurton' 

SL'meniss* 

parAraumy 

mny 

3501 

36/95 

ztm 

25/77 

ana 

2B/B2. 

14 

14 

-E 

E 

2550 

Hamltan 

pan^ sunny 

.32A9 

24/75 

zmo 

14 

SE 

2040 

Hamten. 

pait^surov 

S2M 

25/77 

27/80 

14 

SE 

2045 


T.-* 


Asie/PeNfle 
Penvig 

Phuket 
Ban 
Cebu 


Shnhama 

Honolulu 


, deuda and aim 

32/89 

2507 

3om 

0-1 

SW 

1040 

clouds and sun 

3S«1 

24/75 

asM 

0-1 

SW 

1545 

cfcNJdaandaun 

32/89 

22/71 

29/84 

0-1 

SW 

1245 

party sunny 

33/91 

25/77 

30/86 

0-1 ' 

88W 

1540 

party sunny 

IBM 

11M 

18«1 

14 

NW 

2540 

ihowato 

15/59 

10M 

15/61 

14 

SW 

-2540 

ciMidsandsm 

33ni 

26/7B 

26/78 

14 

.SE 

aoM' 

party sutny 

SOM 

2373 

asm . 

24 

ENE 

2540 


.AelWPKHIe 

Penng 

Phutwi 

Ball 

Oabu 

Palm Beach. Aua. 
BwS Wands, NZ 
aMMRn 

ifonoUiu.', . 


deudsandaun S1A8 
tiun ua do mi e 9809 
ctooitoandsun SMI 
panly«inny SMS 
iho wea IttBI 

cleiKty . . 1M1 

p^surmy 8 M 1 
etoudisndeun Si/88 


22f71 

aSTT 

2Sr73 

SSiTT 

M6 

fono 

S7JK 

2V7S 


.29/64 

2Sfl4 

3(VM 

15M 

1M1 

SWTS 

28/79 


0-1 

S! 

0-1 

2-3 

^•2 

1-2 

1-2 


SW IMO 
6W tfr2S 
SW 12-25 
BSW 1242 
WSW 3MQ 
SW 2(><t0 
SE 2CM0 
ENE 2M5 


H'avd in a \vQrid without borders^ time zones 

or language barriers. 



Iniagineaworidwhereyoucancallcounuy tocounuyaseasilyasyoucan&oinhonie.And , 
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Z Dial the (XTfpespondingABa'AocesaNunibef. 

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tiiecoDiitryycirreiaaiidadctbrCimomerService. 

couwnnr access number coownor .accesswumbkr coumtky AfyBccwTfcdiwp 


.1 ... 




ASIA 


Bely* 



AnstfaHa 

1-800M1-011 

TAeg|pe*.iwH^ 

15500-11 

Cliiiia.rac*** 

loeu 

LUhnairia* ' 

8*396 

Onam 

' 01A«72 

Lraesaboura . . . 

ooocMim 

HbaftKlQqg 

SOSOIU 

Maml/wtio, F.TJL of 9940047no 

India* 

000-U7 

Malm* 

0800090110 

Indormnla* 

OOl-Ml-20 

' idonaeo^ 

19WO0I1 

J^an* 

0039-111 

lOndwrUtair 

06O22-9U1 

Xofca 

009 -U 

Jtofwiar 

S00-190-U 

KOfcaa* 

11" 

Bofaar*.*: 

0*0104800111 

Maiireir 

aOiHMTU' 

AxtORiF 

090rM-208 

New Zealand 

•00G.9U 

Bmnatiia.' 

01-«O42m 

ThiBMiaes* 

. W-u 

-kUMSSOteOBOOwJ 

. 1S94D4Z 


tsymz 

•SIOAdlM 

0042000101 

^Oflapore 

tiCN^OllMIl 

Spafo* 

9009900-11 

Sdlaoka 

iiaM30 


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@1994 AOS' 




NASDAQ 

Thursday's 4 pjn. 

This Hst compiled by me AP. consisB ol ^ 1 .OM 

most traded securities In terms of dollar vdue. It is 
upd^ twice a year. 


■wShLaw Stock CH* W PE HWi LlwUrtSOTW 


nw VM PC into Wl LOwLcWBOrgg 





f y iL fe; 




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is M L3 


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_ }■ IP 
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_ IS 1154 
1.4 1« 

17 

_ 16 

f s 

_ 23 
_ 23 





AMEX 


Thursday’s dosing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not retlw 
date trades Usewhere. Via TtteAasoeialscl Press 



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37 nbAmlrea 
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I 1 14» 
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95< 1 16 CdnOc 0 

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.77 66 
79 66 
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1.24 L9 


41 3«k 

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II zavk 
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18 avi 
56 221k 

37 13 

33 22 

70 23Vk 

30 'Vb 

25 2 

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93 UH 

31 avk 

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17 II Vk 
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394 6Vk 
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60 181k 

1 lavk 
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7 lllk 
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9 13 
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49 4014 
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76 1114 
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119 234i 
239 B'k 
12 1441 
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44k 4lk ~ 
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74k 7Vk - 
861k B6’ft - 
611 61k — W 
14k 11k - 

31 21 

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1 IVh - 
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111k IIH -14 
lllk 114k .. 

114a 1214 'Vk 
13 13 

4414 444k —'A 
304ka'A*lH 
40 40 —4k 

I3Im 14 ■ Vk 

iiVk im ■ Vk 

33Vk 33% -% 
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144k 1441 —VI 
3'.k 3% • Vu 
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JBa66 36 11% 
75 66 — 6 1146 

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276 4H 4% 414 
23 914 9 

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tVk 1% —fi, 
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53% 56% • 31> 
34% 25 • 9k 

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13 13 -% 

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III-. 114k % 

19% 19% ■ % 
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4%iwi|lnanr 
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nvk 9%lneWM«t 

1% VuHOiS 

2S4k TVklnleloni 
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6% IVfclnPnVwt 

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7% 24kMMur 
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11% 6%KVPnA 
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6% mKorEno 
54k SkkKlnW 
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6 3 uweton 

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4% 3%Lnd5PC 
11% 4%LortB 
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7Vk 244LsiTeen 
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94k 4 LBBwrwl 


3 ZVu ^ 3 Vh— V u 

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_ _ 1160 3% PVh 2n7u — % 

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_ — 17 fk 4k 41 —4k 

„ 660 1% 111 IH "U 

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33! 
























































i> iiS£> 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 29, 1994 


Page 15 




















































































By Matthew Purdy 

Aew fork runs Service 

NEW VORX — The latest plan lo keep the New York 
Yankees in the Bronx would allow fans to come see the 
Bombed v^thout hardly seeing the Bronx. 

This overture in the long-running flirtation betnoen New 
York and the baseball team is a proposal to build a bridge 
from Manhattan to an IlJOO-sfUce parking gara^ in the 
Bronx, which, in turn, would be connected to the stadium by a 
two-block-long enclosed walkway lined with shops and res- 
taurants. 

The proposed bridge over the Harlem River, coupled mth 
plans for a Metro-North train station within the stadium 
grounds, would make it possible to reach the stadium without 
setting foot or tire on the streets of the borough. 

Yankees offidals coni^id that attendance at games has 
been stunted by fear of crime in the South Bronx and the 
difficulty of reaching the stadium other than by subway. 
Ai^ou^ Uiey now have the second-best record in baseball, 
attendance at Yankee games ranks 1 7tfa among major-league 
teams, team officials have said. 

Gty o^iciaJs have produced statistics they say show that 
the area around the stadium is relatively safe from criminals 
(except ticket scalpers) during games but acknowledge that 
any dfort to keep the Yankee in New York must address 
security concerns. 

The bridge prtmosal. made eariier this month to the Yan- 
kees by the state Department of Transportation as part of a 
$380 million plan to upgrade access to the stadium, is another 
effort by state and city officials to keep the team in the city 
after its lease expires m 2002. 

Fearing the Yankees might move to New Jei^, the state 
suggested last year that it might be wflling to build a stadium 
on the West Side of Nfanhattan; it is also looking at othersites 
thioii^out the city. 

W^esday, the Yankees were typically coy in response to 
rq>orts of the latest plan. 

Howard J. Rubenstein, a spokesman for Geoige Steinbren- 
ner, the team's prmdp^ owner, called a bridge proposal 
"ing^ous” but said Steinbrenner would witU«Md any sub- 
stantive conunents until he received a Hnal propo^ for 
renovating the stadium and the area around it from Governor 
Mario M. Otomo and Mayor Ru^lph GiulianL 

But Rubenstem said Steinbrenner ‘Is gratified by the 
attention and professionalism the two of them are shomng." 
He said the latest prt^xisal dononstrates that officials are 
“really seeking a serious solution” to the team’s concerns. 

Ci^ and state oCGdals said it would be six to nine months 
before the Yankees recei\'e a cong>rdieasive proposal. 

City officials have said it could cost as much as S2S0 million 
to renovate the 71-year-oId stadium, which was restored 20 
years ago. 

One state economic development official familiar with the 
situation said the transportation proposals, which were pre- 
sented to team offidals eariier this montii and first reported 
Wednesday is New York, would not nece^arily be part of the 
final plan for the area. 

Oldest Pl^er Bows Out 


The Assodaied Pros 

MIAMI — Otariie Hou^ 
■mfyor league baseball's oldest 

E layer, has thrown his last 
ouckli^U, 

The Florida Mariins have 
placed the 46-year-old on the 
disabled list, and be doesn't ex- 
pect to pitch again. He has been 
bothered by a hip ailment that 
evratuaUy wiU r^uire replace- 
ment suigeiy. At Head's re- 
quest, he'll remain with the 
team for the rest of the season. 

With a shrug, a smile and a 
dgarette. Hough accq)ted tlw 
eno of a major-league career 
that began in 1970. 

“When I came out of hi^ 
school I didn't picture mysdf 
throwing a baseball for 28 
years. It’s been fun,” he said. 

Hough started and won the 
first game in Marlins' history 


. .After threedaw of (fiv^onaj i- in 

showdowns, the National hit his 34th 

w. Sera leans „m inaHMi inaiitt 

;&K{dmwv^ckMlKtoi RBI of the season. 

In (he 12th. Stere Raley fed 
Hbiisft»43nciBiatisenesco^ 5“^ * 

^Taming a strike, the fianw. . _ „ . ~ 

three matehops woQ’t be re- Instead. BugweO hsed ap- 
pealed imtB the final wedoeod phdidiideitoleftioiseaktbeiie 
</ tbe8ea;t^Sq>L3Ot0OcL2, and launch a six-run rally. An- 


NLBOUNDUP ^ 

— ^ ^ Eus( 

when the will' be hdd at ' H 

Houston, -X<05 Angdes and J0Q2 
Montreal instead of die other tros 
way around. . . sino 

Housbrn won. its series with p. 


dqar 0?d « v> added a two-run 
double and pindi4iitter Tony 
T PiBBtJMo hit a three-run honer. 

Housumi tri^ Cincinnati 
i}Q2 peroeot^ pmnts. As- 
tros haven’t been in first place 
soice.Juae 18. 

Padres 9^ Boddes 2: In San 


PhaSad/RoKn 

It's a safe return to first base for the Brewers’ 'Hiroer Ward, as Tmtmto’s John Olemd tekes the piCcho^ throw. 

Royals, on a Streak, Tighten AL Central 


TJk Aot>daliid Press 

The two best teams in the American 
League Central may soon be joioed by a 
third. 

Ibe Kansas Qty Royals have quickly 
turned the AL Central mto a three-team 
race with a five-g^e winning streak, in- 
cluding their 4- 1 victory at Ik^ Wednes- 


day night over Chicago. 
Whue the White Sox s 


last year, and he was the team’s 
opening-day staner this season. 

He gave up five runs Tuesday 
against Philadelphia and lasted 
just ODO-third of an inning be- 
fore mak^ the quickest d^ar- 
ture in his 440 career starts. 

“If i can't pitch five or six 
inning?, I canH tidp the ball- 
club,*' said. “Fm upset 

with tnyseir that 1 can't throw 
any better, but vith my leg, I 
can't do it.” 

■ Good News for Krok 

After an exammation at a 
nuladelphia ho^tal doctors 
confirmed Wednesday that the 
luiq>s John Knik, the Hides' 
first baseman, had found on h?s 
bo(^ were “a minor medical 
problem iinreiated” to the testic- 
ular cancer th^ dia gn<>!^ in 
March, The AssodatedPress re- 
ported. 


While the White Sox and Qeveland In- 
dians swapped turns atop the diviaon and 
then took turns smacking each other in the 

ALROmOUP 

p^t two weeks, the Royab have used their 
winning streak — the l^tthm over Chica- 
go — to pull within 5^ games of the fii^- 
place White Sox. 

Kansas City, which has hovered around 
.500 for much of the season, has opened 
the second half 9-S. 

“The guys have dug in and they're ready 
lo fight,” said Hal McRae, the Royals' 
manager. “It is not a streak yet. but it is 
going to lake a lot to knock us off our 
feeL” 

Mark Gubicza pitched Jason Bere (o a 
standoff through seven innings, and the 
Royals capitalued oa an error by third 
baseman Robin Ventura in the eig^ 

Brian McRae scored the go-ahead run 
when Ventura hobbled Wally Joyner’s 


Bere, coining off tme of the worst starts 
of his life, helatbe Rwals to three hits for 
seven innings before he was replaced 1:w 
Kirk McCaricill after giving up a leaden 
double to Chico Lind. 

Lind, who went to third on a single by 
McRae, was thrown out at the plate by 
shortstc^) Ozzie Guillen while trying to 
score on Dave Hendersmi's groumler. 
McRae took third and Henderson went to 
second on the play. 

Dennis Cook relieved McCaskill and 
got Joyner to ground to Ventura, who 
failed to field the ball as McRae scored. 


Joyz^ stole secmid and Bob Hamdin 
w^ed to load the bases for Felix Jose, 
who grounded a two-run sin^ to center. 

Rusw Meacham pitched to one batter in 
the eighth for the vicuxy, and Jeff Mont- 
gomezy pitdied the ninth for his 22nd save. 

Chicago’s Frank Thomas went l-for-4 
and has only two hits in his last 15 at-iats. 

Afldetics 11, Abb^ 3: In Anabeini, Cal- 
ifornia, Mike Boraick had three hi^ in- 
duding an RBI single during a six-run 
outbuik in the first inning, as Oakland 
inched closer to the u^} in the AL WesL 

CenuiimoBeiToa hit a three-run homer 
in the third inning for die A's, who with 
their fourdi straight win moved within Hi 
games in the AL WesL 

the A's woe once 13 games out this 
season. 

Ron Darling won his sixth straight dea- 
sion, giving up three runs and eight hits in 
five innings. 

The A's ripped PhU Lcsftwidi for six runs 
and six hits in just one-third of an inning. 
The Angds have lost six straight. 

Tigers 3, Marinos 1: Mike Mooreral- 
low^ only two hits in eight innings and 
Travis Fryman hit a two-run homer off 
Rancfy Jtemson as Detroit defeated visit- 
ing S^tle. 

The victory enabled S^aiky Anderson, 
the tigers' manager, to OKOve mto a tie for 
fourth place on the career managerial win 
list with Joe McCarthy. Aaderson has 
2,126 career victories. 

Moore walked four and struck out four, 
outduding Johnson, who sfiruck out 13 but 
dropped to 0-5 in his career at Tiger Stadi- 
um. 

B r ewe r s ^Bhie Jays 0; Dave Nilsson hit 
his second thiee<run home run in as many 
games and drove m four runs in Toronto to 
Irad Milwaukee over the Bhie Jays. 

Bill W^man allowed four hits in seven- 
plus innings for NGlwaukee, vdio have won 
five of tl^ last six road games. Mike 


IgnAtiak- cQ^l^ed the five-hh shutout 
^th two ininugs of relief. 

Fat Heatg^ gave up five runs and seven 
hits ID seven ionings. 

Nilsson, vriio went 3-fo^ hh his 12th 
homer in the seventh iniung to put the 
Brewers up 5-0. 

Twins I, RangmO: In ArlingtOD,Texas, 
Pat Mahomes pitched sax soud isnings, 
and the Minnesota buBpen baQed him out 
of a jam in the seventh, maim^ a first-:, 
inning RBI groundont Toy Kirby Puckett 
hold qp. 

It was only the third tmre this season 
that Texas, which entered the game .witii 
the worst ERA in the majors at 5.79, has 
been blanked. 

The Rai^gers, v4x> have been alone in 
first place in the AL West since May 30, 
now lead sur^ng Oakland: by just VA 
games. 

Puckett's one-out grounder scored 
Chuck Knoblauch who opened the rame 
with a double off Texas fiU-is starter Jeto 
Dettmer. Knoblauch also doubled in the 
fifth, uppingJusjmq'of les^ue-^padn^ totel 
to 41. 

Mahomes allowed three hits in 6% in- 
nings. 

YWiees 3^ Red Sox 3: At New Yodc. 
the game between the Red Sox and Yan- 
kees was snspei^ed because of rain in'the. 
bottom of tlte ei£^th. 

Boston scored twice in the top of the 
dgbth to tie it 3-3. Kfike Stanley, v4io hit' 
two home^ singled with one out in the 
Yankees eighth, and Benue Wfiliams was 
batting wbra pU^r was halted. The suspen- 
sion was announ^ 1 bourand 7iniiiutes 
later. 

The game wQl be completed before 
Thursday's scheduled game. 

Stanley has hit seven homers in Us last 
10 games and has scored a run in .14 
straight games, nearing the modem nugor 
league record of 18 set^ Red Ri^e (tf die 
Yankees in 1939. 


win m 12 innings on Wearte^ -n^ig^ flue poijgBrs. It would have 
day.-San Raacisco won two the first rime this season 

thm from Los Angdes, takixs fiiat the Rodies sat atop the 
the fioak^ 4-1. - diviaoBL 

And Afianta, in the worst Instead, the Padres knocked 
shapeinthestanifiiigsafanyof Cofondo oot of second place, 
the second-plaoe teams, pee- EtMe Wffiams had a tb r ^r u n 
vented a Mcmtxeal swe^ .by hosoer and four RBls iot San 
beating 4-1. Di^aThebomerwasUsei^th 

Gants <boi^ I: In San being cUled ro 14 
Francisco, Los Angdes had a 1- 

0 lead ontil tfae^l^ ttmmg , Coast League. He had four RBls 
Rany y i rife d Saw for tiW. tilSd tiooe tiuS SCaSOlL 
Ftanedsito's comdnek nctoxy. Joey HaimUoa jg^-up one 

Tom Caudiotli gave is a OTapdtiireehitsip wimungs 
leadoffdD^toDmLSiris, andwdas^ Wth sev- 
who took second on John Pat- .. . , „ ; 

tenon's bunt Bond^s riiaxp « Rfals 7} 4: Bobby 


titeleftfiddwdteCoreDariyd 

Strawberry was-intentianauy d ghfr le admg^ v^tzu New., 
walked to load the. bases. Y« over the Cardmals. 

Qurfiotdthm,,,ikBdD«e 

Mi^onyraaqi^jpi.^ 

Mahwaring drotemtwomore Jason Jatsome ™ 

nmswithaBoaiid-ntiedoebfe. bs fourth sttmght st^ work- 
n^om. n. 1 ^^' li rtLii ingseveDiimiag5.aad allowing 

Dave Butte gm^vtom ^even Uts with five strikeoms. 

*r St Louis starter Tom Urbaai 

cuaed a thieb-hitter into the 

dgh&befOTC the Mecs tallied, 
ms 24th save, putting the Gi- ~ ~ .. 

mtsr a f^-aaae bdnnd Los *•, 


Angdes in the ' Wmre pitehed-ai two^utte for 

.. ^ . his.first career coomlete game. 

Breves J s- Kmtt asHUaddidiia defeated 

Menxfir latdied seven stremg ^ home. Munoz xetired the 
innings and Jeff Hansesr hit a 23 batteis after Bcmto 
two--run homer as .AUat^ Santiago hbmered vrifli ooe out 
daying at ho^ moved witlun ^ second mning. He did not 


2% games of McmtreaL. 

MontreaTs 'Win* 

nifi^ screak came to an end. 
Modeer, ate aUowed five fats 
and struck out six in seven in- 


Lttty WaDser in tiie 


umcreai. ism a walk. 

^t-gamc'Win-. Fas Rjmp todt ^ teas, d- 
Lme to an end. Kriririg hits imd three 
lUoWed five hits mwg «ti ^jlit itiwinpg 

six in seven in- . pirate s >9, Qibs 4; In ntt &- 
a.;Miir(tfba^ teigfa. Ride White wtm for the 
Jams ly retiring first time as . a nsgor league 
ntitearRODa starter, limiting Chicago to two 


Strikeout sad in the fifth <m a' hits in six imiwiy 


popiq> to tiwrtstop^ 


Tom Foley had four RBIs 


J®*® *!*'«*^ and tloee of Pittsburgh's 16 
agamst Ken HilLm the sixth on hiis, and Don Slaught was 3- 
Blauser's two-nm homer to foM- with two r]^: 
r^cmter.hMfi^'nieyidd- . The Pirates had six hits off 

WBke Morgan In the first three 
Roberto Kdhf^s RBI smgjleaad . 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


























intcsnahonal hkhatj) tribune, Friday, july 29, 1994 


Fage 17 











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MMn AoMoM/Ai^aM Rnet-taac 

FLYING HIGH — U.S. afUete Dan OBrien moved into ponticm to tveak fib wmM record in tltt decafldOD, at die 
GoodwODGamesmStP^iersbai^ After fire events, O’Brien ivas ahead (rf die pace he set bi 1992, en note to die 
record. Ri baskedniH, Pnote Riro took die gold, Arfuiatfng Itafy, 94-dO. Jerome MtaKy Ind 20 for Puerto Rioo; 
Paolo Moietd topped Ifdy widi 1& The Unm Stetes mui the bronze medal widi an 80-71 victoiy over Russia. 

A Life Outof Balance: U.S. Gymnast Dies 


By eSuistine Ifoennan 

IVaska^UmPastSvflce 

WASHINGTON — The final tdephooe 
call fran the fonner watinnai team gym> 
nast CRristy Henricb to Katl^ KeOy, a 
U.S. gymnastics offidal, came less th^ a 
montn ago* 

‘*How are you dmng?" Kdly asked Hen- 
lidi, idio had wither^ to 52 pounds (23 j 
Idlograins) last year from her normal 
wea^t of 95, due to the eat^ disorders of 
anorexia nervosa and bulimia. 

“Sometimes I have good, di^rs, scxne- 


times 1 have bad d^, but Tm ddng bet- 
ter,** Hduich said fEom her home in indo* 
pendence, bCssouiL 
**She sounded good,*' Kelly said 
Wednesday from her office in Indianax>‘ 
lis. **S3ie must have beau really smart, be- 
cause she was so good at fai^ng it . . . I 
bdieved her, becaro sbe was bo^ and 
not in the bospdtaL I thought she was on 
the road back, maybe because I wanted to 
believe it Tb^ 1 got a call t^ die was 
back in die ho^taL And I fiaM to mysdl, 
•How can this be?* ** 

* On Tuesday night. Heorich, 22, ^ed In 
the intensive care unit at Research Medical 
Centec Jn Kansas .CSty,Jtfissouri The 


cause of death was listed as moltiple organ 
system iafiuie. 

Headch was one of the best gymnasts in 
the United States in the late 1 980s, qualify- 
ing for the .U.S. natinnat team eveiy year 
between 19^-19^ Sbe nussed wiafarig 
the 1988 ^ynque team by 0.188 of a pomt 
but she did earn a place on the 19» U.S. 
team at the wwld rfiampi ondripa in Stutt- 
gart Germany, fitd^ing fourth on the 
oneran paridld bars. 

Even as she was competiag at the high- 
est leivds of her qiort diou^ Hearidi was 
brynning to be omsinDed by conqnilsive 
eating disordos. 

Sie said in a tdepbone interview «ith 
The Washington Post last Deoembo' that 
she often ate nothing more than an apple a 
dsy. 

“And then,” Henrich said, ^ gpt down 
to an ^^le shoe a day.** AH the while, she 
was traming tqp to nine hours a day in the 
gym. 

At the time she ^poke, Henrich said she 
wd^ied about 70 pounds and was recover- 
ing skhdy. She and her mother, Sandy, 
sa& ha proUenis b^an with a comment 
.from a gyxtmasdcsjad^ who told Heonefa 
on an mlematiooal ti^ that she. was fat 


Schumacher Appeals Ban by FIA 


CemptM frr Ov Staff Ftimt Di^xndta 
PARIS — Michael Schumaeba, the 
world Foramla One ebampioDship ieada. 
on Thursday appealed a two^ace ban im- 
posed on him by world racing authorities, 
allowing him to compete in the Goman 
Grand Pitt this weekoid. 

Lodging the appeal meant that the pen- 
alty is automatii^y suspended until afta 
the race at HockenheiBL 
Schumacha diivo said at a news con- 
ference that he was aware the appeal might 
land him an even tougher penalty, indud- 
ing possibly losing any points be ^ghl win 
in the German race. 

- “lamfuliy aware ctf the risk lam taldng. 
I hope for c^d appeals judges,** he said. 

Scfanmacha*5 wide lead in the Formula 
One werid standings could disappear if the 
Paris-based Intemadona! Automobile Fed- 
eration decades to toughen the sanctions. 

The FIA ordered ibe sanctions against 
(he German driva on Tuesday for tempo- 
rarify iaoring a blade flag at the Briti^ 
Grand Piix on July 10. He also lost the six 
points he earned from his secmid-place 


finish b^^hiTid Damon Hfll in the British 
race at Silverstone. 

His Benetton *«««> claimed it bad not 
been properly informed that the black flag, 
ordering a dnva to enta the pits, had been 
wav^ at Schumacha. but the Paris hear- 
ing board fined the team 5600,000. 

**8001 Michad Schumacha and die 
Benetton team f^ that the penalties in- 
flicted upon them were very severe and 
both parties have agreed to {qipeali** Ben- 
etum said in a statement 

**Thtc decision has been readied foDow- 
tng the concon from both Michad and die 
t#a>fw that MidiaeTs absence from his borne 
Grand would unfairly penalize and 
disappoisit aD the Goman fans who have 
long awaited this event** the statement said. 

Max Mosley, preadeat of the FIA, had 
teiti earlia that the orgaiiization*5 appeals 
panel would meet neict week if an ^peal 
were made. 

Schumadia ciurently leads Hill 33 
points in the ^tanHing t, a gap that vM>uld 
be reduced to just seven if the penalties 


were upheld and the Pnglkhman nans the 
two races Schumacher stands to miss. 

But FlA set a precedent of increasng 
penalties against drivers who qipeal when 
they increased a one-race ban on Eddie 
Inme of Northern Irdand to three, follow^ 
ing a cra^ at the Brazilian Grand Prix in 
ApriL 

Schumadier's decision to appeal rpeans 
that he could risk returning to the driver’s 
seat with his lead entiidy wiped out by HilL 

Schumacher’s team was fined 5500,000 
for “failing to on several ooc^ons” to 
Follow officials’ instructions at Silverstone. 

FIA also said the team had a computa 
system with a device “capable of breaching 
r^ulations** but there was no proof it was 
used. Sdll, the coun^ levied an additional 
5100,000 fine because the team “failed to 
maifK their computa source codes avail- 
able imm^ately.** 

Schumacher’s dedsion was greeted jqy^ 
ously by die German fans who attend^ 
Thursday’s first unc^ficial practice sesaon 
at Hockenheim. (AP, Reuters) 


And Now, An ^Affordable’ Yacht Race 


and wouldn't make the 1988 Olympic team 
if die didn’t lose weidL 

Sandy Henrkli ywH her dau^ta b^an 
teiifiwg about ha weight the m om ent «h«» 
off rtte plarte xt the of that txm. 

Henrich sud last year that she basUm^ 
stopped eating in 1988, and when she did 
eat, She forced herself to vomtL She cut 
bade on ha nAmnal, halancerl blCakfaStS 
to jott an apple slice, then often would eat 
nodxtng dse the rest of the day. This, sbe 
said, went on for three years. 

Cismg ibdr last plume call, Henrich 
toikl Xdfy die was writing some arfides on 
ha troubles, tdudi Kdly, women’s pro- 
gram director for U.S. gymnastics, 
plarmed to drcnlate to all young gymnasts. 
In the past few years, the group has dra- 
matical stqiped up its efforts to inform 
and athletes about anorexia and 
h nKmia, fnrTnHinp htring a. nnlri timiiaf anti 
sports psychologisL 

“Fm very sad, Fm angry, I have sense of 
l^kssness,” said A1 Fong, Henrieb’s long- 
trine ooadL “Fvb beoi waldiirK something 
happen for sevoal years, and even with 
everyone knowing about it and all sorts of 
medical and psydidogical 1^, yon knew 

thrk Aiy ,vas inCVitaUc^ an<i jt h j i p p^nwri ** . 


By Barbara Uoyd 

Ntv York Times Soviet 

NEWPORT, Rhode Island 
—It was like a reunion here this 
wedt of forma America’s Cup 
sdons. Frmn Poa de Savary (tf 
England to Gianfranco Alba- 
ini of Itabr, names evoking 
yuhting’s past came here to 
learn more about a plan for a 
new intemalitma! re^tta remi- 
niscent <A (he old America’s 
Cup days. 

Officos of the New York 
Yadit Qub. at a news confa- 
enoe, offer^ deuuls afta their 
announcement Sunday of the 
new Internadonal Qip. 

“This is sensible,” de Savaiy 
smdof theone of the idea's main 


SIDELINES 


feature^ Imuring the numba of 
professionals wbo can race. “It's 
a low-cost amateur event focus- 
ing on young people, which I 
find attractive. This is affordable 
and in a totally different league 
than the Amenca's Cup.** 

In fact, the new oompetitioa 
is not cheap. But the SlJs mD- 
liun price tag pa team b^g 
bandied about, compared with 
the 530 million costs of an 
America's Cup effort, has a nice 
ring to it It would include a 
challenga and defoida series 
in July and August and a final 
match race in ^temba 1996. 

“This is for people not inta- 
ested in the America’s Cup,” 
said de Savaiy, a dropout from 
cup racing afta it left Newport 


in 1983* “The America’s Cup is 
grand piix racing." 

Not so, said Dennis Conna. 
Preparing to take friends for a 
s^ on Stars ft Stripes *87, the 
boat that won the America's 
Cup from Australia. Conner 
said that he could see himself in 
the New Yak r^tta, although 
in an unlikely role. 

“We’ll come and participate 
and play by the rules,** said 
Conna, a four^time America’s 
Cup wimia. But that means 
Cowa might have to trim sails 
instead of steering the boat As 
for his rqilacemeot at the helm. 
Conna sees “hundreds” of po- 
tential candidates. “College 
sailor of the year.** he said. 


While willing to compronuse, 
Coima also is critical of any 
auempi to shut out professionsd 
sailors. “It could be that they’re 
just coeddng up something for 
themselves," he said of New 
York Yacht Chib organizers. “If 
that happens, it mi|fat be just 
interestu^ for a whfle and then 
turn into an old man’s tit^hy. 
But if th^ let the teal sailors in. 
it will be a ^od evaiL 
During Conner’s afternoon 
sail off Newport, the SO-foot 
mast on Stars & Stripes *87 
snapped in half. The smoky 
blue, dS-foot yacht is unlikely to 
ermtinue coimedng in the New 
York Yadit Qub S^uicenten- 
nial Ri^tta, wfaidi is scheduled 
to resume racing Thursday. 


Bin Fitdi Hired as Clippers Coadi? 

LOS ANGELES (LAT) -** BDl Rtch, the fifth-winnlDgesl 
coach in National B^eihall Association history, will be intro- 
duced as coach of the Los Angeles Clippers at a news conference 
Thursday, a source close to Fitch said Wednesday. 

Fitch, wbo guided the Boston Celtics to the 1981 NBA title 
and led the Houston Rockets to the 1986 NBA finals, signed a 
mnltiyear contract with the Clippers, according to the source. 

Lalas Signs, on Loan, Willi Padua 

CHICAGO (AP) — The U.S. Socca Fedoation confirmed 
Wednesday it will loan defenda Alexi Lalas to Padua of the 
Italian League for one year. 


Lalas, 24, wiD become the first American-boro playa in the 
league; the most competitive and hi^y paid socca cucuit in the 
world. He also had offers from Q>^try CiQ in Errand’s 
Premia League and VfL Bochum in Germ^y's Bundesliga. 


For the Record 


RiESia’s mtional soccer team coa<^ Pavel Sadyrin, resigned on 
Thursday afta his team’s poor showing in the World Cim. He was 
replaced Oleg RoiRantsev. formeriy the coach of Spartak 
Moscow. (Reuters) 

Lester Fisott, 58. was rushed to a horoital Thursday afta the 
veteran Briush jockey fell during a race Thursday at Goodwood, 
suffoing possible h^ and neck injuries. (AP) 


lii|orL»agifS ten ding> 


AMiaiCAH LEAOUa 
CmIDIwMm 



W L 

pa. 

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New Yak 

9 V 

419 

— 

Bailiiiae 

55 42 

457 

s 

•Berton 

48 a 

4 M 

12 W 

Tareiitp 

47 9 

475 

14 

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45 a 

CartraloMaMB 

48 

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Ode— 

a 41 

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— 

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57 a 

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12 

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a 47 

43S 

5 ie 

MH—Bcee 

47 9 

47 B 

12 

Mtonasote 

47 8 
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48 

12 

Ttocte 

a St 

475 

— 

Ooktand 

44 M 

48 

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cauemla 

9 a 

412 

6» 

Seattle 

a a 

48 

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NATIONAL LEAOUE 
— IDIvWaa 


Mantrea 

9 a 

48 

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Alteita 

a 41 

JM 

sn 

ran— intilQ 

a 9 . 

490 

13 

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a 9 

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4S S4 

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446 

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444 

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45 54 

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45 «t 

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10 


Wednesday's Line ScoM 


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w^^Dortlnflh OB^ 

lond. BWfoa (Ml. 

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aJToSSio nTairtieftl (91 aid Knar. 


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(U. M—hom m, a—lBanNry ( 9 ) ood 
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( 11 ). Jo— ( 13 ) aid SavoN; Roper. Ruffin 
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MalorLeegueLeiMlert 

AMERICAN LBA 6 UE 
UTTINE— Tbanias. CMu—JN; ONeMi. 
NSW York, JO; LonabClewaland, JIB; Bdle. 
gowelBAXM; Malta. TerentaSNiBeator 
Naw YeA. Jfli w. dork, tb— XM. 

BUI N Uto w w A Oile— 99 ; lAfton, 
aawBlBnd, 93 ; Ci—saL'INi^N;CrHN 9 Jr., 
SBatNB.K; EfNAaevolaAMi PhUllpB,Dt- 
trait, 79 ; Knabtaudb Mhe—tA 7 S; Mama. 
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i> /ISo 



Fage 13 


asia/pacihc 


Tokyo Says Output 
Improved in June 


<^"VHediyOvSuffFnmDi^atiia 

— Industrial pro- 
ducuon in Japan rose a season- 
^ adj usied 10 percent in Jone 
from May, but it is too early to 
conclude that output is recovo-- 
mg. the Ministry Intena- 
dond Trade and Industry sa id 
Thursday. 

June output was undtanged 
from June 1993, nuulung the 
first time in 33 mon ths that in- 
dustrial output did not show a 
year-oD-year decline. 

“The r^cnt ctmtains good 
and bad news,** said Harumi 
Takahashi, a MITI offidaL 

It*s still hard to maV« a clear 
judgmenL” 

The ministry forecast that 
output would faD 3.0 percent in 
July and rise only 03 peroeot in 
August 

Ms. Takahashi said the con- 
tinued strength the yen was a 
n^adve factor for manufactor- 
ers, who export a oonaderable 
amount of their products. A 
hi^ yen erodes ejqmrters’ earn- 
ings when th^ convert them 
into yen and makes th^ goods 
more e]q>ensive abroad. 

inventory levds also are 
holdmg back the economy, she 
^d. The inventoiy^to-sales ra- 
tio stood at 1 13 J m June. Un- 
less the index falls to 1 10, die 
ministry will not be able to say a 
period of inventory adjustment 
IS over, she said. 

On the poative side of the 
rqiort, indust^ ou^t ex- 
Cttded forecasts in A&y and 
June, and die production fore- 
cast for July was revised 
ward from a rnanth ^o, 
Takahashi said. 


, . . :m 

June from May, the first 
monthly ri» in thrM month s, 

Auto production jumped 
1 1.8 percent leading the 14 ma- 
jor cat^wies in the reporL 
• Only electnc macfaineiy and 
nonfeiTous metals registered 
small decKnes. 

In quarter-mi-^iuaiier terms, 
average produetiOT in April- 
June rose 0.8 percent from the 
previous poiod. In the January* 
Mardi period average produc- 
tion dimbed 1 J peroat There 
have not been two quarters of 
consecutive incaeases since the 
first half of 1991. 

Ihe rqiorts* mixed results 
eased fears that strong industri- 
d production numbers might 
lead the Bank of Japan to 
the country’s histmically low 
interest rates. 

(BbxmAerg, JOti^-Ridda’} 

■ Orina Raises Ftmeast 

Faced with contmiring shOTt- 
ages of farm goods, f^ina fau 
decided to settle on a less ambi- 
tious reduction in inflation this 
to 13 peri^t, Bloomberg 
Business News reported from 
Beijing, quoting the official 
China Secodties newspaper. 

Begin^ had skx its sights on 
hiingbigmflatioobelowlOper- 
cenL Bm retail prices in the first 
six months of this year rose 19.8 
percent frcan the year-earlier 
period. 

Hie government found that 
among 128 kinds of farm prod- 
ucts, 48 were in short siq^, 
including cotton, edible oU, 
sugar and pock, the paper said. 


Japan Tobacco Listing Set 

Issue Schednledfor JR East Annirersary 


BhemAe^ Biainess Seta 

TOKYO — First, small investors were dis- 
courage ftom buying Japanese stocks when 
shares oi bfippon Telegr^h & Telephone 
C^. plunged 72 percent from its listing 
price. 

Then, the Japanese government listed 
shares in East Japan Railway Co., Cutting 
down tra^ng on the Tokyo Stock Exchange 
last October and predpitating a 20 perc e nt 
slide in Japanese stocks. 

Tlie government is hoping the third time 
unD be the charm. 

On OcL 27, one year to the day after East 
Japan R8ilwty*s debut, shares of Japan To- 
bacco Inc. are to hit Ja^’s eight stock ex- 
ch^ges. Ibe Finance Minis^ wants to sell 
666,^ of its 2 million Japan Tobacco shares. 

as said Japan Tobacco m 

lems to NTT and East is 
because demand for stocks is stilf fii^e. 

“It feds kind of ominous, this listing of 
JT,** said John Doyle, a trader at Ch^mcal 
Securities. 

The mmiatiy will auction 230,000 diares 
from Aug. IS to Aug. 18, the Tol^ Stodc 
Excha^said. Based on these bids instim- 
tional investors, the first auction set the 
price of (be o^exing. 


The remaining 436,666 shares wiU be allot- 
ted to individual and institutional investors 
through brokerages from SepL 2 to Sept 8, 
the exchange said. 

The governinrat wQl retain about a 67 
perc e nt stake in the company, the fourtb- 
largest tobacco company in the world. Japan 
Tobacco cuirently commands an 80 perceni 
share of Jtqian’s cigarette maikeL 

In May, Jtqian Tobacco reported an 8 per- 
cent rise in current profit, to 109.16 billion yen 
bfllioii), for the year ended Maidi31.Itlias 
forecast its cunent profit will edge iro to 1 10 
billion yen in the year ending next March 31. 

Traders and analysts said that to ensure a 
smooth offex^ this time, officials will have 
to come up vritb ways to avoid the embarrass- 
ment, of last year’s listing JR East, the 
largest railway company in Japan. 

JR Fast shares made their debut in October 
at 60^000 yen each, a hef^ 58 percent above 
its price in auctions to individual and institu- 
tion^ investofs. 

The biggest problem with (he list^ was 
that it was too much of a good thing. Its 
success prompted investors to dump other 
stocks to raise cash to buy JR East, pushing 
overall share prices down. 


Hitachi to Absorb Sales Subsidiaiy 


Bktembag BntHeu Seta 

TOKYO — Ifitachi Ltd. will 
absorb its troubled home dec- 
tronics sales snbridiaiy, Hitachi 
Sales Cmp., on Apd 1, the 
company said Thnrsd^. 

The move is part oi Ifitadu’s 
altmmx to better i»q}are itself 
for tM danges sweating ^ 
electronics bu^ess, said Ibu- 


tomo Kanai, president of Ifita- 
dii. 

“We face a new worid of fall- 
ing prices, a strong yen and the 
rtee of multimedia,’’ Mr. Kanai 
said. “This merger will Ifi- 
taefai face these new challenges.** 

Hitachi is one of Japan’s 
leading electronics comp^es, 
with a range of products from 
nuclear power stations to light 


Wheelock Profit Jumps on Strong Whaif Results 


ConffHkd bf Om StafT Atm ZK^ordier 

HONG KONG — Whedock ft Co. said 
Huirsday that its net profit rose a better- 
than-ejroected SO percent in the year en^ 
March 31, supported by strong one-time 
gains in estate as wdl as prefit at its 
subsidiaiy Wharf (Holdings) Ltd. 

Whedock safdprofit rose to 2.20 billimi 
Hong Kong dollars ($284 millioa) firom 
1.47 biDion dollars in the previous year. 
The company said that, exduding one- 
time recurring pretax profit grew 28 

percent. 

Whedock said it posted an excmtimial 
gain of 271.6 irwTK nn dt^lars from me sale 
of real estate and other investments, com- 
pared with 30.7 million ddlars the previ- 
ous year. 


Sales rose to 2.23 bQlion dttilais from 
2.21 ItiUion dollars. 

But most of its profit came frmn Wharf, 
of winch it owns 44 percent, and which has 
real esta^ hot^, telecommumcations, ca- 
ble tdevirion and infrastrocture interests. 

In March, Wharf, whose finandal year 
(fiffeas from that Whedock, said net 
profit rose 33 peaxent in calmriar 1993 , to 
^73 ItiDion dollais. Most of Wharfs profit 
came from real-estate activities. 

The rest of Wbeelodc’s profit came from 
its subsidiaries — the department-stem 
groiq> Lane Crawfeud Internationa] and 
real-estate groups Real^ Devdopment 
Coip. and Hon^umg Red^ ft Trust 

Chair man Peter Woo said the property, 
retail and trading group’s assets were ex- 


pected to grew in value and that it had a 
plan f(Y a series of investments of tetweeo 
10 billion and 20 billion doUais. 

The full-year results are the first smee 
Whedock's cmitntiling shardioldeis, the 
family the late shying ma gnate YJC 
Pao, moved to revitann the company in 
November into an aggr^ve invesuneot 
proup tiu-oi^partaerships wiA Western 
mvestofs in tJima, Hong Kong and south- 
east Asia. 

Fotmeriy known as World International 
Holdings, Whedock has formed marketing 
alliances with Fosters' Brewing Group 
Ltd. and acquired a 25 percent st^e in the 
paper-products maker Climax Intema- 
ticmaL It also fenrned a joint venture with 
Britain’s ^^lgm Group to bring music me- 
gastores to Asia. 


bulbs, the cmi^aay’s home 
electronics division, which 
makes washing machines, air 
comtitioners, telerisions and 
video record^ ims been run- 
ning losses for several years. 

The sales ec^any for those 
appliances, Hitachi Sales, has 
repented cperatii]| losses total- 
ing^more than 5 l^on yen ($51 
mniion)iD the put two years as 
J^ian’s eccmoimc slump and a 
cod summer last year damp- 
ened demand for home appli- 
ances. The company is forecast- 
ing an c^rerating loss di 470 
mulimi yen in the year ending 
in Mardr 19^. 


Tata Seeks 
To Double 
Steel Stake 

BOMBAY — Against a 
bacl^ound of rumors that ex- 
patriate predators are stalking 
the corporai^ewds of the Tata 
empire, the Tata group Thurs- 
day reedved approval to double 
its 7.9 percent stake in Tata 
Iron ft Sled Co. 

Tata Iron’s annual meeting 
gave other companies in the 
^oup 30 ntiUimi warrants, each 
carrying the right to buy a share 
in Tata Iron for 242 rupees 
($7J0). The shares closed at 
287 in Bombay on Thursday. 

A sha^older petition filed 
in court here ch^en^g the 
proposaL sayii^ it would turn 
the cotapany into a fiefdom, 
was turned down. 

The bdding is to be raised 
through an issue of warrants 
that must be converted within 
18 months into shares priced at 
the avonge market price for the 
preceding six months. 

Ratan Tata, 57, the chairman 
of Tata Iron, has denied telling 
a magazine that an expatriate 
Indian coiporate raider was 
seddng Indua’s Nggest private 
steelmaker. The magazine. 
Business Today, said it stood by 
its accouDL 

Family-ooolroUed conglom- 
erates in India have historically 
had relatively -qmall stakes in 
their operating snbsidiaries, 
malrinp a takeo^’CT easier. 

Tata Sons Ltd. has 2.41 per- 
cent of Tata Iron, and a gronp 
of other Tata companies bolds 
5 JO percenL 

[Enatriate Indian bnsiness- 
man Swarq Paul b adding a 
n^or Pittsburgh steel plant to 
hb expanding corporate em- 
pire, /^ence Franoe-Presse re- 
ported frmn New Dellii. Mr. 
Paul’s name was died in specu- 
lation about a takeover bid for 
Tata Iron.] 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong Singapore 

Hang. Seng Straits Times 

13000 


Toicyo 

Nikkei 225 



F’b A‘ M J J 
19S4 


tSTTT 


^^TTrprsrTS! 

. f • . . . 


Bmhanga '■ 

index 

Thufsday 

Pf8W: • 


Close -- - 

Close." -'Change 

-Honglfong 

HangSoig 

■9M2JS& 

.9A02;1Q; • ^aOI 

Sfngap^. 

SlfatbTtfrtes 

2,201JM 


Sydney 

Alt prdinarias. . 

3,042.10 , 

2^41,70. r^,03 - 

Toicyo 

Nqckei225 

30;»7Ap 

20.1^;30 

1 Kuala Uirmao; Comporite 

1,026^ 

1.(mi9 , .40.80 

Bangtok 

SET 

1,371.33 - 

1.367.M ’ *6:^, 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

gsfso 

^3432 ^ :ii&S 

Ta^i 

Weighted Price 

6,^13 


Manila 

PSE 

2.781.14 

2.784.60, .+0.23: 

Jakarta •. 

Stodc index 

452Sr7 

4S3,37' -0:09- 

New&stend 

NZSE-40 

3,008.95 

2J)2^2': -0.89. 

.Bohmay 

^ Nafon^ index 

1,94^ 

1,950:35 ""rOil 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


iMCflistioaa! Henid Triinme 

Very briefly: 


• Sumitomo C3iemtcal Co.*s pretax loss narrowed by 86 percent in 
the first six months of the year, to 402 million yen ($4 i^on). as 
cost-cutting offset a decline in sales. 

• Viebiam said it was willing to form joint ventures with foreign 
investors to spur offshore exploration for oil and gas. 

a Hong Koi^s exports increased 6 perceni in June from a year 
agp. wnfle re-exports rose 20 percent. 

• ESeedttinx AB plans to buy a 51 percent stake in a washing 
madune manufacturer in In^ Intron Ltd. 

• Sii^qwre Tdeconmnuticatioiis Pte. has bunched a 10 million 
Singapore doUar ($7 million) public mobile data service to provide 
wireless communication. 

• Tanran's investment in six Southeast Asian countries totaled 
S3.03 billion in the first sb months of the year, a 680 percent 
increase from the first six months of 1993. 

• Tahnn will open its wine and tobacco markets in Sq>tember to 
the 123 countries in the General Agreement on Tarifis and Trade 
to try to hdp its application to join the uade body. 

• NqqNm Electric Qass Co. plans to set up set up a television 

picture-tube glass manufacturing venture in Britain with Schott 
Glaswefke of Germany. ap, Ooombers, afp. Reaea 


Arrest of Aide to StcadeyHo Is Disclosed 


Bloombefg Biainea Seta 

HONG KONG — Fttiioe arrested one of 
Stanley Ho’s assistants last December 
after raiding the (^ces of Mr. Ho's main 
listed investment vdiide. Shun Tak Holdings 
Ltd., court documents here show. 

High Court Judge Neil K^lan said that, 
based mi background investigations and on 
documents found on Josqih Tam, a Shun Tak 
officer, police believed “there was in exbteoce 
a prima fade case of fraud.“ 


Police also believed “that there are reason- 
able grounds for tielieving tiiat there has b^ 
an attempt to povm the course of justice in 
respect m the investigation of that fraud,** the 
judge wrote. He said police had carried out 
another raid on Shun Tak offices March 30. 

Mr. Tam's job has been described by a 
government-^pointed investigator into al- 
leged securities violations as “handling per- 
s<^ matters” for Mr. Ho. No charges have 
been filed against Mr. Tam. 


NewLidtHieriaiiTV 

Reaen 

JAKARTA — A television sta- 
tion controlled by Liem Sioe Liong, 
whose Salim grcaqi b Indonesb’s 
largest conglomerate, will enter the 
counuys broadcasting indostiy 
next month, the Antara news agen- 
cy said Thursday. Media sources 
said, however, that it could taVe as 
mu(± as two more months for FT 
Indosiar Visual Maodiri to start 
broadcasling. 


f^VEMBER 1994 




MARK YOUR DIARY! 


As projects for economic recovery brighten in the U.S. and 
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focus on three key sectors - tdecommunications, tran^oitation 
and energy. 

Oar iiinfitrimifi group of speakers will include: 

■ Ttffaw-fa Rangomumiij Commissioner and 

Former Economics Minister of Germany 

■ WoUjgangRotlij^ce President, European Investment Bank 

■ Marianne Henderson, Vice President, Chief Financial 
Officer, Bell Atlantic 

■ Eberhard von Koerbei; President, Asea Brown Boveri 
Europe Ltd. SA. 

■ lT«^Tiing Christophersen, Vice President, European 

Coinims^on 

■ Christopher Garnett, Commercial Director, Eurotunnel 

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