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INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


9 


| IPOBLfenED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


r«, 



Paris, Wednesday, June l, 1994 


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No. 34,603 


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By Lena H. Sun 




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S0VCI7Uncni harassmenno contact the fam- 
llies and give them money donated from abroad. 




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ties had warned law - Auihori- 

marched in peaceful ButMr-J,an S- whohad 

worried about^safetvtf £/? democrac > all spring, was 
square. of Uie “^versuy students stillin the 


°f jjfT ^ <Mn ^^ rf a^^CTL 6< Bui h h bolled lhefrom door 
^ ber on the cheeked ^^<£5 


hope ten for our country.’ 

rhhS 1 V nuI f ,aler ' ^ jian S was shot and killed bv 
Chinese soldiers about two miles west or the square Like 

0th ? c, '? Uans who lried Ioslo P the troops as the? 
advanced from the aty outskirts toward the square he w2 

Ert s^jhera opened fire on the crowd, a bullet hit 
him in the back and ripped through his chest. He died on ihe 
way to a hospital. He had turned 17 die day before. 

dealh launched his moihcr. Ding ZUin, on a one- 
wmw campai^ to kxatc the families of those killed and 
wounded by the army. Mm. Ding, a 57-year-oJd aesthetics 




- , ■ — - - *** interview in her apartment on the 

campus of People s University. **I want the real truth to be 
known. I want to know how many were killed by the govem- 


Does the government know how manv were killed 7 "Of 
cow* ihcy know,- she sad. ‘Bui this is tW ' 

- t l xJ?“? u, l e ? massacre remains the most political- 
ly taboo subject in the countrv today. 

„ The om aal version is that the army was forced to quell a 
■ COIU L^ti3j VO * u uonar y rebellion" to ensure stability. The civil- 
ians killed were counterrevolutionary rebels." “thugs" or 


See CHINA, Page 5 



A New Threat 
Of Famine: 
20 Million at 
Riskin Africa 


Gem ian Pact 
With France 
Lines Up EU’s 
Next Leader 


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By Jennifer Panxtelee 

Washington Rost Service 

_ ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — A U.S. 
aid delegation said here that it wanted "to 
mobilize an urgent global response to food 
shortages in eastern Africa before they 
grew into full-blown famine. 

Ethiopia, which was devastated 10 years 
ago by starvation that claimed hundreds 
of thousands of lives, this year risks be- 
coming the center of a famine in which as 
many as 20 million people in nine coun- 
tries could risk death, according to J. Brian 
Atwood, head of the U.S. Agency for In- 
ternational Development. Famine threat- 
ens a swath of eastern Africa from Sudan 
to Tanzania, Mr. Atwood said. 

Relief workers in Ethiopia report hun- 
dreds of deaths since the current round of 
food shortages began bene. Most of those 
m dang er are victims of recurrent drought. 
Here, as in surrounding nations, the annu- 
al su mmer rains failed last year, and food 
stocks are desperately low. But Mr. 
Atwood said Monday that about a third of 
those at risk this year were in danger 
because of wars — notably in Sudan, So- 
malia and Rwanda. 

Mr. Atwood said the mission, which 
includes representatives of three mam 
U-S. charities, was part of a new Clinton 
administration effort to shift U.S. policy 
from chronic emergency gear to crisis pre- 
vention. 

President Bill Clinton hopes to use the 
mission “to raise consciousness of this 
issue at the highest possible levels” and 
win more aid for eastern Africa from Eu- 
ropean governments and Japan. Mr 
Atwood said. 

“Tins is a desperate situation, and we 
need to respond to it now to avoid what 
could become a major famine as soon as 
August if the rains fail," he said. 

— 1 U.S. team — which includes the 
heads of CARE, Catholic Relief Services 
and the International Rescue Committee 


But Support for Belgian 
Risks a Showdown With 
The British and Dutch 


"MI 


ho! 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS -France and Germany agreed 
OQ Tuesday to support a single can di'daie for 
the presidency of the European Commission, 
making it virtually certain that Prime MmisiS 
wai 80 ** 

The naming of Mr. Dehaeue would ensure 
that a firm believer in deeper European integra- 
Uon succeeds Jacques Ddors a! the head ofthe 
European Union’s executive agency and guides 
it during a period when the Union must rein- 
vent itself to be able to take on as many as 10 
new members in Eastern Europe. 

The French-German decision raised the 
prospect of a showdown with Britain, which 
opposes Mr. Dehaene because of his advocacy 

for nirrmcniB Cl I j ■ _ . ^ 


the Netherlands, whose prime minister, Ruud 
ted openly for the com- 


u>Muauvuu luaun; unmnuiee 

and the leading congressional campaigner 
on hunger issues, Representative Tony P. 



WINNINGLOOK — .tiraCogrier 01 his way to beating Pete Sampras in the French Open, 6-4, 5-7. 64, 64, and spoilhtghis 


j , «, sc 

A Plan to Create Jobs by Trimming Worker Benefits 

cnpto ynmt prepared by Jean-Claudc Paye, laws are often overlv rigid and thus nrevent neonlft have nthm- oSum r 


PARIS — The world’s richest industrial de- 
mocracies will be urged neat week to consider 
diluting minimum wage protection as well as 
employment security and unemployment bene- 
fits as part of a wide-ranging proposed overhaul 
of economic, labor, and social policies that is 
aimed at tackling the global jobs crisis. 

Details of this and other recommendations 
are contained in a long-awaited report on un- 


employment prepared by Jean-Claudc Paye, 
secretary-genera] of the Organization for Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and Development Details 
were made available Tuesday to the Interna- 
nonal Herald Tribune by Western officials. 

The OECD report stresses the need to pre- 
serve a social safety net and points out that 
reco mmend a ti ons are not intended to apply to 
all countries. Nonetheless, it calls on govern- 
ments to consider such measures as reforming 
writer protection rules so that companies can 
hire and fire more easily. It argues that these 


laws are often overly rigid and thus prevent 
companies from talcing on new workers. 

Taken together the recommendations consti- 
tute the strongest package of reform proposals 
ew presented to the leaders of the 25 member 
nations of the OECD, going well beyond the 
rather vague discussions that took place in 
March at the Detroit jobs conference held by 
officials from Group of Seven nations. 

There are a record 35 million people now 
unemployed in OECD countries, and die Paye 
report estimates that up to another 15 mil li nn 


people have either given up looking for work or 
have unwillingly accepted part-time jobs. 


Mr. Paye will present the study on June 7 to. 
finance, foreign, and labor ministers attending 
the OECD's annual meeting in Paris. 

The ministers meanwhile will probably put 
off until this summer the choice of a successor 
to Mr. Paye. who has served two 5-year terms at 
the OECD, according to a U.S. offidaL The 
official said the delay was at the request of 


w 1 r i-wuwii»v a UHJ A. 

Hall, Democrat of Ohio — will go to 
Europe this week to seek multilateral sup- 
port for a program to head off another 
famine. 

Atwood said that the more than 
SI j billion spent by the U.S. government 
to halt starvation and anarchy in Somalia 
had spotlighted the need to prevent — 
rather than respond to — humanitarian 
calamities in Africa. 

The “holocaust” in Rwanda, where the 
United Nations has estimated that 
200.000 people have been killed in tribal 
massacres and battles, also has highlighted 
prevention. 

“Just the other day we m ade a decision 
to contribute S35 million additional to 
handle this disaster," he said “One won- 
ders if we had had that $35 million in the 
previous two years whether we could have 
done something to avoid the tiffing" 

Mr. Atwood said that with the new 
focus on crisis prevention the admmistra- 


See FAMINE, Page 5 


Russian Nationals 
Troop Exercise With U.S. 


•\-y 


By Margaret Shapiro 

Washington Past Service 

MOSCOW — A bipartisan delegation from 
the Senate Armed Services Committee said 
Tuesday that it would recommend that first- 
ever exercises involving U.S. and Russian 
troops be moved from Russia to the United 
Stales because of nationalist hostility here to 
the planned maneuvers. 

■ Senator S«m Nunn, Democrat of Georgia 
and head of the Armed Services Committee, 
said Tuesday that after meeting with Russian 
legislators “it was apparent that this was a 
sensitive area.” 

As a result, the Senate delegation unani- 
mously decided to recommend to President Bill 
Omton that the exercises “be held anAmerican 
soil at a suitable military base and at a suitable 
time to both the American and Russian side.” 


JUC LU LXHU me /UDCUUtU 21IKU 1UUOUU blue. 

The joint peacekeeping exercises, involving 
about 250 ——-'^- *■ u *—' — 


w J. troops from each side, bad beat set 
for July near the city of Orenburg on the V«i«» 
River. The Russian military had favored 


and emotional cause, were clearly relieved by 
Mr. Nunn's proposal 

“It’s not just a question of substance in such 
matters but a matter of tact,” said Vladimir 
Lukin, a former ambassador to the United , 
States, who now heads the ParHameat's foreign 
affairs committee. 

Mr. Nunn said the delegation of four Repub- 
licans and three Democrats was somewhat tak- 
en a b ack when the issue of the joint maneuvers 
was raised because in Washington they had 
been told that, after some flip-flops by the 
Russian side, the exercise “was now back on 
course:” 

“This exercise is not designed to use armored 
vehicles or tanks,” he said. “It is not even 
designed for live firing. But It has obviously 
been a sensitive subject hoe, and it seems to me 
we can farther our objectives by Winning in 
the United Stales." 

- Mr. -Nunn said he hoped that U.S. troops 
would eventually be able to go to Russia for 
'joint esterases. 

“It would be my hope that there would be 



Rostenkowski Indicted 


Trrb index 



A burn of the House of Representatives, 
DanRoatenkowski. was indicted Tuesday on 
1/ federal charges of taking public funds for 
private use. 


The indictment accused the Chicago Dem- 
ocrat of mail fraud, wire fraud, embezzlement 
aod witness tampering, and aiding and abet- 
ting a crime. (Page 3) 


Ht e v5° llaf " 


DM 


-Time, dona 


1.6458 


mwcui dose 


Pound 


1.6433 


1.5105 


Yen 


1.5102 


FF 


104.78 


North Korea Puts Fuel Rods Aside 


104.275 


5.6265 


5621 


WASHINGTON tAP) — The Defense De- 
partment voiced concern Tuesday over the 
speed with whicb North Korea has been re- 


moving fud rods from a nuclear reactor, but 
said it still hoped for a diplomatic settlement. 
Pyongyang's Inscrutability. Page 7 


Lubbers, has campaign 
mission presidency. 

French officials sought to generate an tm- 
stoppable momentum for Mr. Dehaene and 
appease his critics by suggesting con so lation 
P™ “ f i>nn of leadership positions at 
ouier European and international bodies. But 
European and American officials optioned 
that some of the suggested bodies, such as the 
Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development and the World Trade Oiganiza- 
bon, were not for the Union alone to df y jd e. 

President Frames Mitterrand announced 
me accord mi the commission presidency at a 
news conference with Chancellor Helmut KoM 
after a two-day meeting - m Mnlhouse, France. 

I think we will be in agreement to support 
Ihe same person,” Mr. Mitterrand saidHe 
added that the candidate would not bmynw 
mown until ihc semiannual summit meeting of 
HJ leaders in Corfu, Greece, on June 24 and 

Officially, the discretion leaves Paris and 
Bran free to switch allegiance at the last minute 
and avoids the appearance or imposing a candi- 
date on the other 10 EU states. But unofficially 
French and German sources made it dear that 
Mr. Dehaene was their man. 

^ uil * obvious now is that Kohl and 
Mitterrand are m favor of Dehaene, and it is 
obvious that a myority of member states are.” 
one German official said. 

1^. De^e. 54, a Christian Democrat, is a 

puff, hard-nosed politician renowned for his 
ability to hammer out tough compromises rath- 
er than any rigid ideological beliefs. His main 
accomphshmems have been driving through 
constitutional reforms that devolved broad 
powos to Belgium's regions and surviving at 
the.httui °f the country’s shaky, four-party 
coalition for more than two yean. 

.. H * toe eye of Paris and Bonn through 
his skffiful hancflmg of the EU presidency iutfcc 
recrad half of last year, which saw the Union 
finally adopt the Maastricht treaty, resolve in- 
ternal divisions over the world trade talks and 
agree on sites for nearly a dozen EU institu- 
tions. Crucially in Mr. Kohl’s eyes, the latter 

agreement put the forerunner of an EU central 

bank in Frankfurt. 


Japan’s Economy: From Slump to a New World 

Rv CImkki D..I1 A I.L.. l .i ... 


By Steven Bmll 

Innenmtietkd Herat! Tribune 
TOKYO With the stock market on a roll 


Although the govermneni is planning to use 
deregulation to engineer a gradual and con- 
trolled decline of Japan’s high prices and tower- 
ino irnrfo eumlu, —.j... r i n 


wo would have (hat kind of further peacekeejh 

££ ^• nato ^ t ^ exercises here in Russia," he said 

strongly opposed them, saying Ua forces 

should never set foot in “Holy Russia.' 


j .v ■ 7 — tumosi 

daily, tile view that Japan’s longest pas [war 
recession is coming to an end is fast becoming a 
consensus. 

^ Yf 1 toe yodd’s second-biggest economy re- 
mains at risk from deflationary pressures, a 

°*“ aIysts . wam ’ "ito unpredictable 
aod potentially perilous consequences. 






4UU1U UCYCL bCi 1UUI 111 IJW1J A i itMi u . 

Last month,: President Boris N. Yeltsin of 
Russia had. asked the Defense Ministry to re- 
consider the exercises. Since then, senior de- 
fense officials have oven mixed signals about 
the maneuvers, but it was dear that planning 
had aD bm stopped. 

The UiS. defense secretary, William J. Perry, 
had haibd the joint exercise as proof of a new 
cooperative era in military relations between 
the two countries. 


strong yen, are threatening lo get wuv 

far more quickly than politicians and bureau- 
crats would like. 

If that happens, the recession that Japan has 
so far managed with minimal losses of jobs 
could be prolonged and turn nasty. 

■‘Until now the talk has been about deregula- 


tion and improving market access, but market 
forces will prove to be far more powerful" said 
Taij toashi, senior fellow at the Mitsubi- 
shi RpSPsirrh Inc tit ..la “T».» I.. ■ 


ing lrade surpius, raajtei fori*s. especially tic S5EKK5E5SSES ^ 

[ am/ bureau- ^ a complex Iramforma- WM 


So far, the government has done a skillful job 
of limiting the economic and social dislocation 
of a recession that has stretched into its 37th 


See JAPAN, Page 5 


There has been speculation in the French 
press that the Paris government could shift its 
support if the Belgian courts do not release 
Didier Pineau-V alendennes. the chairman of 
France’s Schneider SA. Mr. Pineau-Valend- 
ennes was arrested Friday on fraud eh mw; 
involving several of Schneider’s Belgian subsid- 
iaries. He is scheduled to appear in court in 
Brussels on Wednesday. 

, i Stiff British or Dutch opposition still could 
block EU leaders from reaching a decision at 
Corfu, EU officials said 
The Dutch “are very attached to the candida- 
cy of Lubbers," said one EU offidaL Dutch 
officials have hinted that if Mr. Lubbers loses 
out, they will seek to block the candidacy of a 
senior German foreign ministry official, JOrgen 
Trumpf, for secreiaiy-general rf the EU Coun- 
ol of Ministers as a snub to Mr. Kohl, tins 
official said 

The Dutch wfll find it hard to block Mr. 
Dehaene, though, if Paris and Beam line up 
most other EU states behind him, the German 
offidal said He suggested that EU leaders 
could back a Dutch candidate for secretary- 
general of NATO or the Western Europe^ 
Union, the EU security arm. 

ilation about the NATO position 
^ed Tuesday when Manfred Wdrner, 
who holds the post, informed governments he 
would miss the alliance’s ministerial meeting in 
Istanbul on June 9 and 10 because of his recn- 
peration from treatment for cancer of the co- 
lon. Hans van den Brock, the EU foreign affairs 

See EUROPE, Page 5 



Bussia’s Vast Nature Reserves Stand in Danger of Disappearing 

Fred Hiatt ° ** “ O 


Washington past Service MdatSv^S^ ^ shellered a Mde vanet - v ° r P lam one of the last opportunities on Earth to conserve relatively deliveries. Mr , . , 

POKOINNY BAY, Russia — A huge brown bear, hungiy Now, with^nomic mlhnv mH a c , !n[ aa ecosystems large enough to allow ecological processes its staff will have tol^'^^^ n ° t ?^ fuiKfas00i1 ’ 

tor a long winter's sleep, (oped Sih surorisiiii Sd ? I cen,ral wildlife populates to fluctuate natural" 

aS me^^riSTfrom tKSf oK organization said in a report earlier this ^ 


Newssfqnd Pric« 


ciwu wumnes. after a long winter's sleep, loped with surprising speed 

Russian parliamentary leaders, wy or ■ across a steep meadow land rising from the world? oldest 
handing hard-line nationalists such a viable and deepest ike. In a dealing below, three red deer froze, 

noble and unmoving, and (hoi disappeared into the pine 
forest A pair of red-breasted merganser ducks launched 
themselves from the shoreline, their whirring wings seeming 
barely to the lake’s glassy surface, 

These were the most visible denizens, on a frosty May 
morning, ofthe Baikalo-Lensky nature reserve in southern 
Siberia. They are a tiny part of Russia's natural treasure, a 
wilderness as rich and vital to the Earth as the Amazon rain 
forest and just as threatened. 

While the Soviet Union justly earned a reputation as a 
.monstrous despoiler of the environment, it also protected a 
networ k rif nature reserves ranging from the Central Asian 
desert to the Arctic tundra. These 170 reserves were off- 


Andorra.....9.00 FF Luxembourg tf0L.Fr 

Antilles 11.20 FF Morocco 12 ph 

Comeroorul^OOCFA Qatar ......8.00 Riate 

E9VPt.~...E."P,5000 R6union ....H-20 FF 

France 9.00 FF Soudi Arabia -WX) R. 

Gabon.' 960 CFA Senegal -.^WOCFA 

Greece .^00 Dr. Soahi — -200JPTAS 

Italy i 600 Lire Tunisia ..^I JOODin 

Ivtxv Const .1.120 CFA Turkey ..T.L.3S.000 
Jordan.-.-'-.'^.r.rJD BAt^ASB Dlrti ■ 
Lebanon .„USS1 JO Ud5. AAiL (Eur.J SLID 


• .* LviMpac uuu a oreaKaown oi central 

amnonty, the reserves stand exposed. Poachers and loggers, 
prospotois and ranchers are gnawing away at Russia’s 
mjmral htailage. The "green" movement is moribund, the 
pram motive is exalted and the few rangers and naturalists 
seeking to defend the reserves are virtually powerless. 

Everything is beginning to break up and Tall apart.” said 
Vhtoimir Krcver. ihe World Wide Fund for Nature’s repre- 
sentative in Moscow. y 

^ 85 of the reserves, enclosing as much territory 
J5JS-? “ weD as 8« semiprotecied national parks and 
wuai “? refuges with even more space. Bui scientists have 
J varne d that their deterioration could destroy the world’s 
template foresi an essential defense against global 
wanning, and hasten the extinction of thousands of unique 
spaces, from the Siberian tiger to Lake Baikal's freshwater 


Here in the Baikal region, park rangers who earn less than ®°™ P®°P le are going to go poaching,” Mr. Krever said 
S JJ a month often turn to poaching to support themselves. ■ oc “ authorities in Tuva, near the Mongolian horriw 
onest emolovees have nn ieene Ar now allow domesrimiM r«'n^ . * 


— - — - 1 poaching to support themselves. 

More honest employees have no jeeps or walkie-talkies to 
patrol their vast territories against the incursions of hungry 
IncaLs or criminal bands of commercial hunters. 

Local authorities, emboldened by Moscow's decline, grab 
chunks or protected land Tor grazing or to build new vaca- 
tion lodges. The government can no longer pay for the 
aircraft that used to deliver supplies and fight fires — and 
given Siberia's thin soil and short summers, a forest fire is a 
century-long disaster. 

Reserves in other pans of the country are struggling with 
similar problems. In the Arctic Ocean near Alaska, the 


endangered beavers, sables and other species live. 

Brains vmb right deads; of stria policy, 
nmg a debate stffi raging in Moscow, the Ba 


“The vast landscapes of the Russian federation represent 


—j, and outrun- 

ihe Arctic Ocean near Alaska, the " M0S f W ’ “* B^o-Lensky 

Wrangel Island reserve, breeding ground for ihe endangered bSteJ to; ,l5 . vast 
polar bear, has been unable to pay its bills for last summer’s Umtcd State* advenlu rcrs and eco-tounsts" from d* 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JllSE 1. 1994 




By Jane Perlez 

New York Times Serrice 

BUDAPEST —Soon after the Berlin Wail tumbled 
nearly five years ago. and new governinenis rose in the 
old Soviet bloc, the talk in diplomatic salons was that 
Eastern Europe would join the European Communii} 
within a few years. The chatter on the streets was that 
salaries would rise so Fast that a smart Western car 
would be easy to acquire after a Few weeks' work. 

None of these expectations were meL or course, and 
soon, as suspicion and dissatisfaction with the first 
tastes of Western-style capitalism took hold, the new 
leaders started to be replaced by old faces, regroomed 
and reschooled. 

Within two years. Lithuania voted former Commu- 
nists back into power. Poland followed in 1993. In 
Ukraine, former Communist Party members did well 
in recent parliamentary elections. And now. in what 
seems the most stagering turn of all. Hungary has 
handed Parliament over to the old Communists. 

Hungary was the country where people bravely 
tried to challenge Soviet rule in 1956 and then in the 
1980s settled into a softer form of communism that 
many thought would smooth the way for acceptance 
of a full-fledged market economy. 

But on Sunday, the Hungarian Socialist Party, 
formed from the old Communist Party, won a clear 
15-seaL majority in Parliament under a system that 
gives weighted preference to the winning party. The 


Socialists have enough seats to govern on their own 
and with 35 percent of the popular vote won far more 
than the 20 percent mustered last year by the former 
Communists in Poland. 

In all. these countries it seems unlikely that the ex- 
Communisis will turn back the clock. In Poland and 
Lithuania they have not. and throughout the region, 
while many people long for the economk security of 

NEWS ANALYSIS ~ 

the Communist past, there is little nostalgia for all the 
facets of the old days. Hungary's new leader. Gyulu 
Horn, the last Communist foreign minister, comes 
from the reform wing of the old party and has struck 
West Europeans and foreign investors as serious in 
wanting to continue on the path of a market economy. 

Abroad. Mr. Horn. 61 is remembered as the foreign 
minister who allowed East German refugees to leave 
Hungary for Austria in September 1989. thus precipi- 
tating the fall of the Berlin Wall. 

But in Hungary, he is regarded differently — as a 
tough politician whom some politely call a fox: others 
are more brutal, saying he has the instincts of a bully. 
Younger members of the party have expressed misgiv- 
ings about designating a prime minister who served as 
an auxiliary policeman against the 1956 uprising. 

Around Mr. Horn sit a cluster of former Commu- 
nists with mixed backsrounds. The likelv finance 


minister. Laszlo Bekesi. is seen in Western Europe as a 
talented economist who understands market forces. 
Bur the trade union leader. Sandor Nagy, with whom 
Mr. Horn made a "social pact." comes from the more 
hard-line wing of the old party and disagrees with 
many of the cautious policies that Mr. Bekesi put 
forward in the campaign. 

So far. only the Czech Republic, where Prime Min- 
ister Vaclav Klaus has preached capitalism but contin- 
ued heavy subsidies to ailing industries to keep people 
employed, seems immune from the trend toward re- 
tooled Communists. 

In Slovakia, the choice in September elections will 
be between the current coalition government made up 
of many old Communists and the opposition party led 
by another former Communist the nationalist fire- 
brand Vladimir Meciar. 

The comeback of the ex-Communisis can largely be 
explained by disillusionment with the efforts of the 
first round of reform efforts, analysis and pollsters 
say. 

The rosy estimates of 1990 were naive and far too 
optimistic, even in the best of times. The Polish foreign 
minister. Andrzej OlechowskL said last week that 
instead of the heady timetable of 1994 for Polands 
joining the European Union, the year 2000 was now 
the target date. In perhaps the grimmest revision. 
Zbigniew BnzfzmsJti recently said that it would take 
between 30 and 40 years for the economies of Eastern 
Europe to catch up to those of Western Europe. 


The timetables were sei back not only by 
conditions but also by external events. Just as they 
were trying their various efforts to chwge yywse 
shock therapv in Poland, more gradual transformation 
in Hunsarv — Western Europe plunged into a reces- 
sion. making it even harder for countries “ 
competitive marketplace. And for Easl Eur0 *J“? 
goods that were really competitive — chop sucl 
airi culture, and textiles — Western Europe put up 
trade walls. 

The signs of the frustrations with the length of time 
it is taking for the countries to turn their economy 
around have been mounting for about a year, pollsters 
sav. The economic gyrations have brougm « 0n0 ®* 
hardship rather than improvements to many in aese 
countries. 

Thus, from zero unemployment in the Communist 
years. Hungary’s jobless rate soared to I- — perceaL 
inflaiicm reached a peak of 38 percent two years ago 
but still sits at about 22 percent. In Poland, there was 
economic growth last year — at 4 percent- the highest 
in all of Europe — but for ordinary workers the 
outlook is discouraging. Unemployment rose to 16 
percent and inflation was stuck 2t more than -0 
percent. 

“For 40 years, people were not afraid of losing their 
jobs." said Robert Manchin. the director of Gallup. 
Hungary. “Now half the families in Hungary are 
afraid a f amil y member will become unemployed. 


Christophers Mole 



By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Rabin told a parlia- 
mentary panel Tuesday that he was 
disappointed with recent contacts 
between Israel and Syria, and that 
the U.S. effort at mediation 
through Secretary of State Warren 
M. Christopher had “exhausted it- 
self." 

Mr. Rabin complained that Syria 
was playing for time and added: 
“We can't say right now that Syria 
is serious about peace." His com- 
ments, relayed to reporters by an 
official, follow the recent visit to 
the region by Mr. Christopher. 

Mr. Rabin has pressed for direct- 
secret talks with Syria, which Presi- 
dent Hafez Assad has rejected. Mr. 
Rabin has also pressed for a phased 
withdrawal. He said that so far Syr- 
ia had not agreed to return to the 
peace talks in Washington, which 
were interrupted after die Feb. 2? 
Hebron massacre. “The Washing- 
ton talks are an exercise in treading 
water," he said. 

Although Israel would like Mr. 
Christopher to be involved. Mr. 
Rabin said. “in fact Washington 
has exhausted itself" with the shut- 
tle missions. 

[The Syrian Foreign minister. Fa- 
rouk Sbara. said Tuesday that Mr. 
Christophers shuttle diplomacy 
was being held up by Israeli intran- 
sigence. Reuters reported from 
Cairo. He implied that pro-Israeli 
sympathies in Washington had re- 
duced the influence of U.S. diplo- 
macy. 

[In Washington, a senior .Ameri- 
can official said the “glacial" pace 
of Israeli-Syrian peace negotiations 
bad puL a reuirn trip to the region 
next month by Mr. Christopher in 
doubL] 

Mr. Rabin's comments seem to 
run counter to statements from the 
Clinton administration suggesting 
that Mr. Christopher was getting 
somewhere. 

On Friday, the Los Angeles 
Times quoted President Bill Clin- 


ton as saying in an interview. 
“We’ve got delicate negotiations in 
the Middle East right now" and 
that “the last thing in the world I 
need to be doing is considering 
changing my team. - 

Mr. Rabin was asked about a 
comment made by President Hosni 
Mubarak of Egypt to .American 
newspaper editors this week. Mr. 
Mubarak reportedly said Mr. Ra- 
bin bad told him that Israel 
‘'doesn't intend on keeping one 
centimeter of the territory which 
was occupied from Syria in !%7 
but is demanding in exchange from 
Syria full peace with all its compo- 
nents." 

Mr. Rabin said there was "no 
way" he had said this, and reiterat- 
ed his proposals for a phased pull- 
out. saying the first stage would not 
involve removing any Jewish settle- 
ments. 

Also on Tuesday. Mr. Rabin said 
his government would continue to 
put pressure on Palestinians to 
move the offices involved with self- 
government in the Gaza-Jericho ar- 
eas out of Jerusalem to Jericho. Mr. 
Rabin said he could not rule out a 
visit by the Palestine Liberation 
Organization chairman. Yasser 
Arafat, to Jerusalem, but it would 
not be soon. 

In Tunis. Mr. .Arafat again sug- 
gested that the peace deal with Isra- 
el was temporary, according to The 
Associated Press. He compared it 
to a 7th-cenlury truce made by the 
Prophet Mohammed with another 
tribe. 

Speaking of the Gaza-Jericho ac- 
cord. Mr. .Arafat said. “What hap- 
pened was not all that we wanted, 
but the best we could get at the 
worst time." An earlier, similar re- 
mark touched off a storm of protest 
by Israelis rightists. 

North or Jerusalem on Tuesday. 
Israeli undercover units shot and 
killed two Palestinians, witnesses 
said. One of them was a fugitive 
wanted for the killing of an Israeli 
secret police agent in the West 
Bank earlier this vear. 


Few German Tears Shed for Honecker 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Times Service 

BERLIN — Few tears were 
shed in Germany over the news 
that Erich Honecker. East Ger- 
many’s long-ruling Communist 
had died in Chile. 

Politicians and news commen- 
tators recalled him as a harsh dic- 
tator who built the Berlin Wall, 
enthusiastically joined the Soviet- 
led invasion of Czechoslovakia 
and rejected efforts to humanize 
Communist rule in East Germa- 
ny. 

Even his old comrades had 
mixed praise, lamenting that he 
had not changed with lime. 

Mr. Honecker. who died Sun- 
day at 81. was deposed in Octo- 
ber 1989 after 18 years as leader 
of East Germany. He fled to 
Moscow to avoid prosecution, 
but was later sent back to face 
trial in connection with the 
deaths of East Germans who 
were killed while seeking to flee 
westward. 

In early 1993 he was released 
because of advancing cancer. He 
left for Chile to join relatives. 

“Honecker failed in his politi- 
cal goals” said Dieter Vogel, 
chief spokesman for Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl. "His policies 
brought suffering to countless 
people in Germany." 

Konrad Weiss, a film director 
and member of the German Par- 
liament who was persecuted un- 
der Mr. Honecker. said the "trag- 
edy was that he was a victim of 
persecution who became a perse- 
cutor. a brave anii-fasctM who 
betrayed the humane dream of 
freedom, equality and brother- 
hood." 

But Egon Krenz. who followed 
as East German leader, said Mr. 



Si- ~ - v.rxacd ?iw 

A Chilean son-in-law comforting Erich Honecker’s widow at memorial service in Santiago. 


Honecker's freedom of action 
had been limited by the Cold War 
and obligations to the Warsaw 
Pact. “Honecker was a man of his 
lime, formed by the circum- 
stances around him." Mr. Krenz 
said. 

Newspaper commentaries 
ranged from mildly to harshly 
critical. One called Mr. Honecker 


‘a mediocre ana urumaginatr.e 
itician." and another blamed 
im for "imprisoning 16 million 
people and persecuting ali among 
"them who dared to question his 
orders." 

S3 Fervor at Funeral 

Funeral rites for Mr. Her.ecKer 
were marked by revolutionary 
fervor and much praise. 2 i*-. 


aseacie: reported from Santiago. 

"Mere than a thousand Chilean 
Communir^ escorted the coffin 
;o a crematorium after a memori- 
al led by his widow. Margot, and 
daughter. Sonja. Mr. Honecker 
wished to be buried with his par- 
ents is NimJdrchen. but permis- 
sion has not been granted, the 
family said. uFP. AP> 


Repentant, but Some Germans See Good in Nazi Ideas 


ijfflCt Frjnec- Prase 

HAMBURG — Two out of three Germans consider it positive that 
Germany lost World War II and believe Nazi thinking was "wrong 
and bad”" One in four, however, regards Nazi ideas as haring teen 
"not so bad." 

These are among the findings of a survey of the opinions of 1. 114 
citizeus of reunited Germany, questioned May 16 and 19 b\ the 
FORSA institute for the weekly Die Woche. 

Fifty years after the D-Day landings in Normandy that led to 


Germany's defeat. 64 percent fourc :ha: defeat positive and 69 
percent regarded the capiaiiatior: of ’.be Third Reich as a liberation. 

Only !? percent saw. the Nazi capitulation as a defeat, and 67 
percent said they would not have wanted tc ihe :r. Germany if Hitler 
had won the war. 

Fifty-six percent were convinced that Germany had sought war and 
thus bore the responsibility for it. and in tastem Germany. 6" percent 
of those asked regarded German-, as principal!’- responsible for 
World War II. 


UN Halts Operations as 



Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

KIGALI, Rwanda — The Unit- 
ed Nations halted operations here 
Tuesday after a Senegalese captain 
in the peacekeeping force was 
killed by mortar fire that hit his 
UN vehicle. A preliminary investi- 
gation indicated that the mortar 
was fired by rebels, according to 
Abdul Kabia, a UN spokesman. 

Captain Mbaye Diagne, 52, was 
killed in a clearly-marked UN vehi- 


cle as he was driving back to LIN 
headquarters from a patrol. 

“We would want to believe that 
it is an accident." Mr. Kabia said. 
“We don’t want to believe we were 
targeted. We have temporarily sus- 
pended all activities and told all 
officers and civilians to return to 
their locations while the situation is 
evaluated." 

The 450-man UN force is trying 
to evacuate people under their pro- 
tection in Kigali, the capital. Mr. 



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Kabia said UN convoys had evacu- 
ated to safety fewer than 2,000 of 
about 35,000 people sheltered in 
hotels, churches, hospitals and the 
national stadium. 

The temporary suspension of 
UN operations could prolong the 
agony of thousands of civilians of 
both the majority Hutu and minor- 
ity Tutsi tribes who are trapped in 
each other’s strongholds. 

The Llnited Nations also sent in- 
vestigators to a camp in govern- 
ment-held territory Tuesday, but 
were unable to confirm reports that 
500 trapped refugees had been 
massacred there. 

“We sent military observers to 


check on the reports, and we arc 
not at this lime able to confirm 
mass killing," said Moukhtar 
Gueye. a spokesman for the UN 
Assistance Mission in Rwanda. 

“However, our learn did find 
some wounded and dead and we 


are still trying to check reports that 
some people are disappearing daily 
from the camp and never return- 
ing.” he added. 

The United Nations said it had 
received reports from aid workers 
that 500 refugees were massacred 


on Saturday at the Kabgayi camp. 
50 kilometers (30 miles) south of 
Kigali. About 38,000 refugees, 
mostly o» Rwanda’s Tutsi minority, 
are stranded in concentration camp 
conditions around a former Roman 
Catholic seminary. (AP, Reuters) 


Bosnia Federation Elects Leaders 


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Reuters 

SARAJEVO, Bosoia-Herzegovi- 
na — Bosnia’s Parliament elected a 
Croatian war veteran. KresimirZu- 
bak. 46, as the first interim presi- 
dent of a new shared-power Mus- 
lim-Croatian federation on 
Tuesday. 

But Mr. Zubak said he would not 
replace the Muslim leader, Alija 
Izetbegovic, who will remain at the 
head of the Bosnian state's collec- 
tive wartime presidency. 

A government to be formed by 
Mr. Zubak within 14 days would 
report jointly to Mr. Izetbegovic 
and be endorsed by the Muslim-led 
Parliament 

Meanwhile, the current prime 
minister, Haris Silajdzic, con- 


firmed that his country would boy- 
cott peace talks scheduled for 
Thursday in Geneva unless Serbian 
forces withdrew from a United Na- 
tions exclusion zone around the be- 
sieged Muslim Lown of Gorazde, in 
eastern Bosnia. 

In a gloomy assessment of peace 
prospects. Mr. Silajdzic said he 
doubted that the Serbs really want- 
ed a just peace and expressed con- 
cern that there were no guarantees 
to enforce a settlement even if 
reached. 

Mr. Zubak. a lawyer who was 
wounded earlier in the fighting, ac- 
knowledged that the new constitu- 
tional arrangement was. complicat- 
ed. He was elected unanimously for 
a six-month period until par li a- 


menuuy elections can be held. The 
governing body is now dominated 
by Mr. Izetbego vic’s Democratic 
Action Party. 

The Bosnian vice president, Ejtrp 
Ganic, was elected to the same of- 
fice in the federation. Mr. Silajdzic 
was expected to be reappointed at 
the head of the new government. 
Bo Lb are Muslims. 

Together with Mr. Izetbegovic. 
they will spearhead the Muslim 
side in peace talks with Serbs that 
are reaching a crucial phase. 

Mr. Silajdzic expressed serious 
reservations about a four-month 
cease-fire proposed by mediators. 

He prefers a six-week truce that 
would not freeze Serbian territorial 
gains. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


NATO Rebuff to Russia b Foreseen 

JG* « alliance. 

diplomats and ' ? f £ a ^ d 1] ^ < mtical of the Wat recently and has 
SSorfoz M«cow^views O o Bosnia, laid out what it wanted 
^frdatiSp wth NATO in a document handed to the alliance last 

W The fmat of ties between the two giants on wiudi European security 
depends is expected to dominate a meeting 

Istanbul next week. Russia has promised to sign NATO^tonenhjpfo. 
teSn on doser military lmks but says ii . to define a tender 
relationship with the alliance beyond the partnership that would beLer 
reflect its status as a major world power. : 

C ommo nwealth Welcomes Pretoria 

LONDON (Reuters) — South Africa will rejoin the Commonwealth 
on Wednesday after more that three d e cades erf exile from the w-nauon 
group, the organization said Tuesday. • . 

^Tbc group’s secretary-general, Emeka Anyaoku. sa*L II is with a 
special sense of joy that 1 announce that South Africa will from tomorrow 
return to full Commonwealth membership after a break erf 33 years. 
South Africa pulled out of the organization in 1961 after it was enttazea 
fra - its racial policies. - . . _ . . 

“The end of apartheid and the dawn erf freedom in SouthAmca has 
been a climactic moment," Mr. Anyaoku said, “and one which the 
Commonwealth has been proud to piayits part in bringing about 

Northern Yemenis Advance on Aden 

SAN 'A. Yemen (Reuters) — Northern Yemeni. rioops tightened the 
noose around the southern stronghold of Aden on Tuesday ahead^of 
United Nations discussions that may bring pressure on them to tall the 

war against rivals who have declared a separate ^state. • 

Northern troops advancing on Aden opened a new rrcmt the 
northwest with an early morning raid and said they now hadcontrcrfovcr 
land approaches to the port city, which their southern foes lave dedared 

the capital of their breakaway state. _ . , .... 

Southern officials said that more than 16 hoars after the nad, arfiifery 
and tank battles still raged at the new front and that southern forces Were 
repdling troops from the north. 

China Fears Explosion of AIDS Cases 

BEUING (AP) — In China's frankest admission yet of the dangers it 
faces from .AIDS, health experts warned Tuesday that the country could 
suffer an explosion in the number of cases unless it starts Car-reaching 

public education. , , 

R esear ch papers prepared by government experts and released at a 
conference estimated that China already has 4.810 to 11,415 people who 
are infected with the AIDS virus, HIV. The experts said the number could 
253,000 by 2000 if p re v entive measures are not taken. The 
government generally admits onlv to the number of HIV cases identified 
through official testing. This now stands at 1,361. including several 
hundred foreigners who were expelled after testing positive. 

Seventy-five percent of Chinese infected with the AIDS virus are 
intravenous drug users along the sou th western border with Burma. But 
officials a t the conference said China cannot afford to be complacent 
because infections resulting from heterosexual contact are increasing 
faster than the number of drug-related cases. 

Prague Protests Mark Pinochet V isit 

PRAGUE (AFP) — The former Chilean strongman Augusto Pinochet 
on Tuesday discussed arms deals in the Czech capital where his presence 
triggered a series of protests, the CTK news agency reported Tuesday. 

General Pinochet was on a private visit at the invitation of QmnipoL 
which specializes in armaments. 

The interior minister, Jan Rnml, told Czech television Tuesday that 
General Pinochet should not have been given a visa, but that it would not 
be withdrawn. On Monday, a dinner was canceled at the last minute after 
the owner of the Trqja Castle outside Prague refused to be host to 
General Pinochet’s party fra- political reasons. CTK said. 

Saudi King Recovers From Surgery 

RIYADH (Reuters) — Doctors in Jidda removed a gallstone from 
King Fahd. 72, Saudi Arabia announced on Tuesday. The king was 
reported out of the hospital and in good health. 

The king went to the hospital f« medical tests on Monday, and a stone 
in the tube leading to the gallbladder was “successfully removed by 
probe.” the report said- 

An American physician was reported to have performed the operation 
with a Saudi medical team. 

Women Priest Ruling Fuels Debate 

VATICAN CITY (Reuters) — Roman Catholic groups in favor of 
women's ordination said Tuesday that Pope John Paul ITs “definitive" 
ban on female priests issued this week would only promote further debate 
on the subject. 

“This Pope seems to think that by simply saying things and repeatins 
things he is going to silence those who disagree with him.” said Frances 
Kissline, president of the U.S. -based Catholics for a Free Choice. 

In a letter to bishops on Monday, the Pope reaffirmed the Roman 
Catholic Church’s ban on female priests and said his ruling was definitive 
and no longer open to debate. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Madrid Rail System Is Sabotaged 

MADRID (AP) — Saboteurs removed the controls from dozens of 
commuter trains Tuesday, wreaking havoc on a morning rush hour 
already complicated by strikes in both the state railroad and intercity bus 
systems. 

The delays backed up train Lraffic into the capital by as much as an 
hour, the slate railroad said. The Workers Commission, a union repre- 
senting many of the striking employees, issued a statement condemning 
the vandalism. 

The railroad workers, who have held rush-hour strikes four times in the 
past week, are protesting what they say are plans to cut 14.500 of the 
company s 41,200 jobs. Railroad officials deny that the company will be 
split up and say only 1.800 positions will be cut, all of them on a voluntary 
basis. 

Customs officials in Stockholm said Tuesday they were tight ening 
border checks because two kilograms (4.4 pounds) of enriched uranium, 
reported missing in Russia, could be smuggled to the west via Sweden or 
Germany. f AFP) 

M ech anics of the Romanian state airline Tarom on Tuesday threatened 
fo bait domestic and international flights with a one-day strike on 
Thursday. (Reuters) 

There wiH be a new charge of 1,000 lire (63 cents) to enter the 11th- 
century Rornanesque-style church on Miracles Square in Pisa. Italian 
Dews reports said Tuesday. Entrance will only be free early on weekday 
mornings and all of Sunday morning, when Masses are said. (A P} 

American Exjress travelers checks will be available in tbe United 
i>tat« nationwide in selected automated teller machines, using a lechnol- 
c«y developed jointly by American Express. Diebold Inc. and Electronic 
Data Systems. (Nil) 

The chairman and president of China Airlines, the Taiwan flag carrier, 
nas resigned over the worn accident in the airiine’s history, in which 264 
people were tailed, the chairman. Liu Teh-min, said on Tuesday. (Reuters) 




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CVTERJVATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1994 


Rage J « 





RUPTION’ 


In Blow to White House, Rostenkowski Is Indicted on 17 Charges 

Bv Paul P w 


By Paul F. Horviiz 

WASm^r r " t "“ 

rarerefaj^” 1 ,B cilief power b[ok ^ beallh- 

“‘fctmcnt charged the Chi- 
with mail fraud, wire fraud, 
“®P«inEwith a witness, concealing a material 

^ ^^ zz ^ emenl °f Public funds, and aiding 
ana abetting a crime. ° 

Mr. Rostenkowski, who has been chairman 
« tne Houses tax-writing committee for 14 
years, was accused of fraudulently gaining cash 
with vouchers at the House post office, of 
paying more than S500.000 from his congres- 
sional payroll to people who performed little 


more than; 

of billing (he taxpayers for nearly 540,000 in 
gifts purchased at a House gift shop for friends 
and family members. 

At a news conference, a U.S. attorney, Eric 
H. Holder Jr, accused Mr. Rostenkowski of “a 
pattern of corrupt activity for more than 20 
years." He said the congressman was guilty of 
"a betrayal of the public trust for personal 
gain" 

AS late as Monday night. Mr. Rosienkowski. 
66, vehemently denied any wrongdoing and 
refused to accept a deal in which prosecutors 
reportedly promised a light prison sentence in 
return for a guilty plea. 

“f did not commit any crimes," he said in a 
statement. He vowed to remain active in Con- 
gress and run for re-election. 

Under House rales, Mr. Rostenkowski can 


step 

man of the House Ways and Means Committee, 
where President Bill’ Din ton’s health reform 
package is undergoing legislative review and 
where Mr. Rostenkowski nod forged dozens of 
watershed lax compromises over the years. 

The congressman has also indicated his in- 
tention to remain active in the health-care de- 
bate from behind the scenes, but Republican 
leaders arc expected to object loudly to any 
such role. 

It was undear whether Democrats in the 
House will rally to Mr. Rostenkowsii’s defense 
or shun him. 

Political analysis say that the trial of Mr. 
Rosienkowski. in which' possible abuses of con- 
gressional perquisites will be highlighted, will 
undoubtedly damage the image of the Demo- 
crats as they campaign for re-dection this fall. 


A substantial loss of seats in the House would, 
in turn, hamper Mr. CKmon's legislative agen- 
da across the board. 

Mr. Clinton’s spokeswoman. Dee Dee My- 
ers, said momentum for health-care reform 
pointed to passage of legislation this year and 
said the White House would continue to work 
with all members erf Congress, including Mr. 
Rostenkowski. 

Earlier this year, Mr. Clinton campaigned for 
die congressman in Chicago before he defeated 
a Democratic opponent in a party primary 
election. 

Mr. Rostenkowski Is banking on his ability to 
convince a jury that the alleged abuses were not 
willful but result from differing readings of 
vague House rules that govern government ex- 
pense accounts and congressional payrolls. 


The detailed indictment paints a picture of 
widespread abuse of public funds. 

Mr. Holder said the congressman placed at 
least 14 people on his congressional payroll 
who did little or no government work. One was 
paid government funds for renovations at Mr. 
Rosteniowslti's home, he said, and some 
cashed their checks and the money over 
to the manager of the congressman's Chicago 
office, the prosecutor said. 

Others were paid by tbc public to mow the 
congressman’s lawn or take pictures at his 
daughter's wedding, the indictment said. 

In the parlance of government corruption, 
these are known as “no-sbow" or “ghost* gov- 
ernment jobs. 

Mr. Holder said there were at least 540.000 in 
gifts charged to the government that the con- 
gressman gave to friends, including china, crys- 


tal, hand-painted chairs and similar items pdf 
chased at the House stationery store. 

One of the most serious charges involve 
obstruction of justice. The congressman flUcg 
edly asked a House employee to withhold inf oi 
mation from the grand jury investigating Mi 
Rostenkowski's activities. 


to 

ey 

2 he 
«ss 
*s. 

rt ig 

A trial is months, and possibly years, away] jjn 
In his statement Monday night, Mr. Rostral io e- 


kowsld made it clear that he preferred to fight 
the charges than to accept a plea bargain tbaf 
would remove him from Congress. 

“My conscience is dear and my 42-year ret 
cord as an elected official is one I am proud tq 
once Again run on." he said. **1 strongly believe 

that I am mi guilty of these charges and wfl. 
fight to regain my reputation in court. That is t 
far more attractive option than pleading guilty 
to crimes that ! did not commii." 


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It’s Still the Economy, Stupid’ 

Clinton Aides Chart Political-Business Cycle 


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By Clay Chandler 
and Steven Pearls tein 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
MI Clinton has taken pains to 
avoid a public quarrel with the 
Federal Reserve over its decision to 
increase short-term interest rates, 
but privately he has railed against 
the move. 

And, according to administra- 
tion officials, be has sent staff 
scrambling to provide him with the 
latest details about where the econ- 
omy — and with it his political 
fortunes — is beaded. 

The White House deputy eco- 
nomic adviser. Gene Sperling, can 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

tick off key economic data almost 
’ to the minute. He can tdJ you, for 
example, that on Friday the econo- 
' my is likely to created 3 millionth 

■ job since Mr. Clinton Cook the oath 
of office. 

fat recent weeks, White House 
aides have consulted a number of 
outside experts on the dynamics of 

■ the “political business cycle." 

Among them u the Yale Univer- 
sity economist, Ray Fair, architect 
of the nation’s most sophisticated 
model for predicting presidential 
election outcomes based on the 
performance of the economy. The 
. only presidential contest Mr. Fair . 
has called wrong was Mr. Clinton’s 
victory over President George 
Bush. 

On the White House staff this 
year is Robert F. Wescott, an econ- 
omist whose “pocketbook index” 


for predicting the outcome of presi- 
dential elections suggests that if the 
after-tax income of U.S. families is 
rising at a 3.7 percent annual rate 
or more in the fall of 1995, odds are 
that Mr. Clinton will win re-elec- 
tion. The rate this spring is 3.8. 
percem. 

Ibis constant monitoring of the 
economy's pulse hi g hli g ht* one of 
the most fundamental characteris- 
tics of the Clinton White House: It 
remains exquisitely sensitive to the 
link between its political future and 
the health of the economy, indeed, 
the rallying call for Mr. Clinton’s 
1996 campaign may well be, “It's 
still the economy, stupid” 

“The president is very focused 
on the economy," Mr. Sperling 
said “He has been sending very 
' pals down the chain of 
that even while we are 
: on crime, health care and 
other things, the economy should 
always be front and center." 

At the dose of his first year in 
office, the waves of economic 
growth seemed to be breaking just 
right for Mr. Clinton. The jobless 
rate was falling, there was hardly a 
trace of inflation, interest rates had 
receded and the stock market was 
soaring. With economists predict- 
ing solid growth rates into 1996, it 
seemed Mr. Clinton would be able 
to surf the business cycle right 
through to a second term. 

But the economic tides have 
shifted in recent months. As the 
Fed has raised interest rates, the 
value of the dollar faltered overseas 
and financial markets behaved er- 
ratically. Many private economists 


believe the business cycle continues 
to move in sync with the political 
calendar. But the developments of 
the last three mouths seem to have 
shaken Mr. Clinton's confidence. 1 

Robert E Rubin, the president's 
national economic adviser, is coun- 
seling colleagues to stay the course. 
Mr. Rubin, a former Wall Street 
executive, likens their current anxi- 
ety to that of a white-knuckled 
trader sitting with a billion-doUar 
block of Treasury bonds during a 
unexpected dip in the market. If 
you believe your original analysis 
was right and the economic funda- 
mentals have not changed, he ar- 
gues, there is no reason to panic or 
modify your strategy. 

The administration’s current 
forecast for the economy has 
changed little from the one it fash- 
ioned in the first few days of the 
administration. 

That forecast estimated that the 
economy’s growth-rate cycle even- 
tually would reach 33 percent in 
1994 before settling down to a com- 
fortable nonmflationaiy growth 
rate of 23 percent in 1996 and the 
years beyond. 

The Council of Economic Advis- 
ers is now revising that forecast, 
but expects little change. The pre- 
Kminai y consensus is »nat the eco- 
nomic drag from the recent rise of 
interest rates win be more than off- 
set by the stimulative effects of 
record-high spending on new busi- 
ness equipment. 

The bottom line: Economic 
growth win remain steady, but not 
so strong as to make Mr. Clinton’s 
re-dection a sure thing. 


■ y* . i 

' * A X 



Cuofe Dnfflert/Raricn 

HAITIAN FOOD LINEUP — Haitians waiting for a feeding center in Port-au-Prince to open to receive their only meal of the day. 
Because of the embargo and subsequent irigh food prices, many poor Haitians have to rely on bmanftariai aid in order to eat 


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S.S Court Rejects Appeal by Anti-Abortion Group 

recent rise of v M. M. %/ M. 


POLITICAL NOTES 




Clinton Aide to Pay for Mde 

WASHINGTON — The senior admxmstratiau 
official who lost his job after taking a presidential 
helicopter on a golf outing relented Tuesday and 
said he would reimburse the government. But he 
insists he did no wrong. 

David Watkins refused last week to pay the 
513,129.66 it cost to fly the Marine hdkbpter 
carrying has golfing party and a second helicopter 
that accompanied them. Several senior aides, anx- 
ious to put the controversy behind than, agreed to 
pick up the tab out of their own pockets. 

In a telephone interview from his Washington 
borne, Mr. Watkins said he derided to pay the 
entire bQL "It could be a financial burden on some 
Of those who were going to participate," he stud. 

The 55-tnQe trip to Camp David and HoOy HiDs 
Country Club near New Market, Maryland be- 
came public after a Maryland newspaper pub- 
lished a picture of Mr. Watkins and two other 
administration officials boarding a presidential 
helicopter, with a salute from a Marine guard. 

A second official, Aipbooso Maldon Jr, was 
reprimanded and wiB be reassigned from his job as 
head of the White House mflitiuy office. (jpj 

U.S. Defends Vaccine Man 

WASHINGTON — Trying to allay concerns 
expressed by members of Congress and by drug 


company executives, a Gin ton administration offi- 
cial said the government would not waste money 
or vaccine in a new program to inoculate nuflioas 
of children from low-income families. 

The official. Avis LaVeOe, an assistant secretary 
of Health and Human Services, also affirmed plans 
to use a federal warehouse to store vaccine for 
distribution throughout die country. 

. Drug company executives and some lawmakers 
have criti ciz ed the administration’s plan, saying 
the government was trying to buy far more vaccine 
than would be needed to immunize children eligi- 
ble for the free shots under the program. 

Ms. LaVeUe said the administration would not 
boy any mere vaccine than H could use in the 
program. “We are not going to waste any money, 
and are not going to waste any vaccine," she 
said. Congress has set aside $460 million for the 
project this year. 

Under the program, the U3. government wiU 
buy vaccine at a discount and make it available at 
no charge to needy children age 18 or younger. 

Ms,LaVdfesaid the government wasstili nego- 
tiating with drug companies over how much vac- 
cine it will buy. (NYT) 

Quote/linquota 

White House spokesman Dee Dee Meyers on 
Representative Dan Rostenkowski, chairman of 
the House Ways and Means Committee: “I think 
it’s important that people keep in mind that he’s 
innocent until proven gnflty.” (AP) 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court declined Tuesday to 
rein in the power of govern men 
sponsored events such as fairs, fes- 
tivals and parades to prevent “in- 
appropriate’’ groups from 
participating. 

The court turned aside the ap- 
peal of an anti-abortion group that 
said its frec-speecb rights were vio- 
lated when it was excluded from 
the 1990 “Great Pumpkin Festival” 
in Frankfort, Kentucky. 

Among other actions, the jus- 
tices: 

• Refused to allow the posting of 
the Ten Cbaunandmenis and other 
religious laws in a Georgia county 
courthouse. 

• Rejected a challenge to a Dal- 
las curfew called unconstitutional 
by some teenagers and their par- 
ents. 

• Let stand rulings that cited 
free-speecb considerations in 
throwing out a suit against the talk- 

show host Phil Donahue and the 
mother of a rape victim who told 
her story on his show. 

The suit had been filed by the 
victim, who gave birth at age 11 
after being taped by her stepfather. 

In the case of the Kentucky festi- 
val, the court also refused to hear a 
counterappeai by the event's spon- 
sor. 

The lone dissemer in the case 
was Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. 

who voted to review the dispute. 

The festival, aimed at promoting 
the downtown revitalization of 
Kentucky’s capital, features booths 
for vendors, civic groups and oth- 
ers along a street turned into a 
pedestrian mall. 


The festival is sponsored by 
Downtown Frankfort Inc., a pri- 
vate organization that took over 
running the event from the city 
government. 

Capitol Area Right to Life par- 
ticipated in the 1989 festival Many 
people complained, particularly 
about the anti-abortion group's 


giving plastic fetuses to children. 

When the group applied for a 
booth in 1990, it was told that it 
was too controversial to participate 
in the festival. 

Similar applications from the 
Kentucky chapter of the National 
Organization for Women and the 
Kentucky Religious Coalition for 


Abortion Rights were turned 
down. 

After the 1989 experience, festi- 
val officials adopted a policy stat- 
ing that booths, which are meant to 
be for fun and entertainment, 
could be denied to any group 
“deemed inappropriate to that 
theme and purpose." 


• A man found shot to death in a s Q 

bed in the Roosevelt Hotel in mid-jj 
town Manhattan has been identic } 
tied by authorities as a banker from^ $ 
Spain. 1. 

The police have made no arrests^ * /- 
and are stdl seeking a motive in the - * t 
case. i 

Police identified the victim as 1 n 
Francisco Javier Munsuri Barona, ; y 
40, of Bilbao, where be worked in ' p 
the credit department of a bank. 

• A yomg gray whale that got stuck ^ 
in shallow San Francisco Bay wa- 
terways died despite rescue efforts. . 5 

Volunteers were trying to herd s Af 
the animal toward deeper water n , 1 
when it failed to surface from a sr* 
shallow creek. h : 1 

The 26-foot (7.8-meter) gray 
whale had wandered through south [■ r 
San Francisco Bay channels since ? »■ 5 
Saturday. ' 

• A 12-yev-old^i who Itew across &-■ 

the United States last year will try g v 
to conquer the Atlantia . t - 

Vicki Van Meter is scheduled to t- \ 
take off Saturday from her home n - 
airport in Meadvflle, Pennsylvania, 
on a two-day flight across the - 
ocean with a plot. Out Amspiger, 
by her side. i 

She would be the youngest girt to r 
fly the Atlantic, he said. ^ . 

• Four tourists died in a motel fire • 
in suburban New Orleans that in- 1 | 
vestigators said may have been set 

by a man angry that be bad been I 
refused a towel 1 

The Maze at the Peacock Plaza r 
Inn started in a first-flow laundry 
room. 

Flames spread to the second 
floor where the bodies of the four 
men. all from Texas, were found ifl 
one room. 

AP, NYJ 


Shooting Hints at Islam Nation Stresses 


. By Don Terry 

Net* York Times Service 
CHICAGO — For momhs be- 
fore hfi was shot and wounded Sun- 
day in California, Khahd Abdul 
Muhammad had been making a lot 
of. people, inside "«d outside the 

Natfcmofidmancy. - 
At a time when the gronp s lead- 
of Iambs Farrakhan, appeared to 
be moving slowly toward the Islam- 
ie mainstream, Mr. Muhammad, its 
natirma] spokesman, was puflmg m 
the opposite and racist direction. 

Indeed, his list of enemies was 
growing as fast as the lines of 
young, disaffected African-Ameri- 
cans who turned out across the 

country to see him as though he 

were a tooting rap star. 

In February, Mr. Farrakhan sus- 




peuuoQ msspunuaisicpavu ““ 

fiezy language, a drastic move that 
touched off nervous talk about a 
power struggle within theorganiza- 
tion. the kind of conflict that mi ght 
have ended in violence in the old 
days of the Nation of Islam. 

For a brief .time Sunday, those 
bloody days seemed to be baefc 
Seconds after Mr. Muhammad was 
shot, a 49-year-old former member 
of the Nation, James Edward Bess, 
was dragged away by police and 
charged with the attadc. 

Mr- Bess's teeth had been 
knocked out add Ins shoulder bro- 
ken by the crowd that bad come to 
hear Mr. Muhammad speak at the 
Riverside campus of the University- 
of California. - • ' • 

But scholars whostudy the close- 


ly knit group say that under Mr. 

Farrakhan’s leadership such inter- 
nal violent conflict is almost un- 
heard of, and that it is highly un- 
likely that Mr. Farrakhan or his 
org ani z a tion had anything to do 
with the shooting. _ 

Nation of Islam officials de- 
clined to comment oa tbc incident. 
' Lawrence E Mazmya. an asst>- 
date professor of religion and Afri- 
can smdifs rt Vasrar CoOege, who 
is an expert on the Nation oflstam. 
saftd, "This is the first time weVe 
seen this land of violence since Far- 
ralrhan began in the late 1970s." 

Mr, Manriya said that despite 
Mr. Muhammad's suspension and 

iris growing popularity, especially 
amo ng young Hacks, be remained 
loyal to Mr. Farrakhan and was 
<riS a member of the Nation. 
“Khalid’s speaking out has 


he said. *Tf s made it Larder for 
Farrakhan to move into the main- 
stream, but not to the point where 
he’d send people after mm.” 

A former member of the Nation, 
who asked (hat iris name sot be 
used, said there , was growing dis- 
content within the organization to- 


ward Mr. Muhammad and his ora- 
tory. But he agreed with Mr. 
Mamiya that the discontent was 
unlikely to erupt in violence. 

“People are upset with his refus- 
al to adhere to Fanukban’s or- 
ders,” he said. “Bui there are a loi 

of hard-core, fire-breathing mem- 
bets of die Nation of Islam who 
really like Khatid. Certainly, 
- there s been a little bad Mood, but 
most of it has been congenial." 

Shortly after learning erf the at- 
tack, Mr. Farrakhan, was said to 
have acted to ensure that no more 
blood would be shed. 

“He has teW everybody to keep 
cahn and not to overreact," said 
Ahmed Tgam, a Sunni Muslim 
from Ghana who has known Mr. 
Farrakhan for 10 years and has 
taught his top ministers Arabic and 
Islamic traditions. 

Mr. ’fijani said that although be 
was not completely discounting 
“outride influences," it appeared 
that the ginmtan was “an aggrieved 
person” trying to settle a score. 

In the early 1990s, Mr. Muham- 
mad was the regional minister for 
the West Coast and may have been 
in charge of Mr. Bess. 


“But there is no power snuggle. ' 
Mr. Tljaoi said. “Minister Farrak- 

has is the clear and absolute leader 
of the Nation of Islam." 

■ Contentions Figure 

The Los Angeles Times reported 
from Riverside: 

People familiar with the suspect 
described Mr. Bess as a devotee of 

Mr. Far rakhan and a contentious 

figure who was removed from his 
post as a leader of the SealUe-area 
mosque. 

He once wrote an open letter in a 
black community newspaper criti- 
cizing the mayor of Startle for de- 
nouncing remarks by Mr. Farrak- 
han. On another occasion, be said 
on a public access television station 
in Seattle that violence was the way 
to deal with blade leaders who let 
down the black communirv. 


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-D-Day’s Secretive Skulkers 

An Array of Illusion ist Armies Fooled Hitler 




By Ken Ringle 

Washington Past Serrite 
The King hath note of all that they 
'mend. 

By interceptions which they know 
not of. 

“Henry V,” Act 2, Scene 2 
BLETCHLEY, England — 
Shakespeare was writing about an- 
other invasion of France, of count, 
but his words, inscribed on a 
plaque in the oak-pandcd manor 
house at Bletchley Park, leU as 
much about what really happened 
SO years ago on June 6 as all the 
tales of blood and valor on the 
.beaches of Normandy. 

For what is still far too rarely 
appreciated, even half a century 
later, is how much the climactic 
battle of World War II was fought 
and won in the shadowland of 
stealth and deception. It was a vic- 
tory achieved in no small pan by an 
anonymous army of toymakers, 
scenery painters, illusionists and 
purveyors of electronic make-be- 
lieve, all guided by a legion of cryp- 
tographic skulkers so secretive that 
their work is still not fully known. 

The de facto headquarters of this 
looking-glass war lay here 46 miles 
-{75 kilometers) north of London on 
the 55-acre (22-hectare) still 
barbed-wire-rimmed remnant of a 
-once-grand Victorian estate. 

Here, in a scries of drafty frame 
huts and dank concrete bunkers, 
about 7,000 people labored fever- 
ishly on the eve of D-Day to secure 
'the invasion of Hitler's Europe bv 
first invading and manipulating 
Hitler's mind. 


So successful were they’ at skew- 
ing his version of reality that even 
as the largest invasion fleet in histo- 
ry hove into sight off Normandy, 
the crucial strength of the German 
war machine was occupied else- 
where, ambushing imaginary ar- 
mies. bombarding invisible fleets 
and repelling thousands of 3-fool 
(1-meter) tali paratroops made of 
straw. 

"If you ask me were the decep- 
tions effective, I would say they were 
absolutely vital on D-Day," says the 
military historian M. R. D. Fool 
“W e would have been mad to at- 
tempt the invasion without them, 
precisely because Hitler bad so 
many more divisions in France than 
we could land quickly. Had he been 
able to mass them to meet us. we 
would have been finished. And it 
was a near enough thing as it was” 

But goaded by psychological 
feints at other corners of his em- 
pire. Hitler ignored an ageless max- 
im of military strategy: Try to be 
strong everywhere and you're not 
strong anywhere. 

Alerted by hundreds erf' landing 
craft spotted in the lochs of Scot- 
land, 16 divisions of German 
troops (Hitler had only seven in 
Normandy), stood poised across 
the North Sea awaiting an immi- 
nent invasion of Norway. The Scot- 
tish landing craft were plywood 
stage props, the Norwegian inva- 
sion a myth. 

.Manned by aerial reconnais- 
sance showing hundreds of troop 
encampments and tank divisions in 
southeast England. Hitler held six 


armored divisions and 19 other di- 
visions north of the Seine to meet 
the .Allied landing that was certain 
to come between Dunkirk and Di- 
eppe at the narrowest part of the 
English Channel in the Pas de Ca- 
lais. The tents in England were 
empty, the tanks made of wood. 

Other German divisions garri- 
soned southern France in response 
to an appearance in Gibraltar by 
an actor disguised as British Field 
Marshal Bernard Montgomery. 

in the predawn June 6 darkness 
northeast of Normandy between 
Le Havre and Boulogne, fleets of 
small launches trailing radar-re- 
flecting balloons pitched and rolled 
their way toward shore while above 
them two squadrons of Royal Air 
Force bombers loosed a specially 
designed pattern of aluminum 
chaff and electronic signals de- 
signed io appear on German radar 
as a huge fleet of warships. 

Ten miles offshore, screened by 
banks of smoke, the launch crew$ 
switched on sound amplifiers, 
touching off the rattling of anchor 
chains, the squeal of steam derricks 
lowering heavy objects and (he 
thump of landing craft banging the 
sides of transports. 

They were all illusions. But as 
captured Wehrmacht documents 
would later show, they were tre- 
mendously effective. They hope- 
lessly confused the Germans and 
forced them to reserve or divert 
armored units that, property posi- 
tioned. would have blown the Al- 
lied landings off the map. 

Still, as Mr. Foot and others em- 



WiDMarch 
In Parade on 


3 


Allied air crew worked around Dakota transport planes at this unidentified English base shortly before the D-Day huxfings. 


phasize, the deceptions would have 
been useless without the work at 
Bletchley Park, where a band of 
eccentric geniuses had broken the 
German codes in the war's earliest 
years. 

“What you have to remember 
about deceptions," says F.H. Kins- 
ley. the Cambridge professor who 
authored the official history of 
British intelligence in World War 
JJ, “is that if they're to be success- 
ful.. two things are imperative: 
Fust, the enemy must be kept total- 
ly in the dark about what you don't 
want him to know, and second, vou 


must know everything he's thinking 
all the time, especially when he’s 
confronted with what you want 
him to believe.” 

Thanks to Bletffhley's early and 
long-secret penetration of German 
radio traffic. Mr. Hinsley says, “we 
were able to locate, early bn. the 
entire German espionage network 
in Britain, eliminate parts of it and 
use others to feed Hitler disinfor- 
mation. We were also able to learn 
Hiller’s thinkin g about where ana 
when the invasion would eventual- 
ly come, play to his prejudices and 
hunches, and learn when and 


whether he took our baiL We were 
reading his mind all the time. 

in the nearly 20 years since F.W. 
W in tcrbolh am’s book “The Ultra 
Secret*' first made public the extent 
of Allied code-breaking in World 
War II. much has been written 
about Bletchley Park and its cast of 
code-cracking irregulars. 

Their work consisted of three ba- 
sic areas. First, it involved the tech- 
nical challenge of engineering what 
became the first electronic pro- 
grammable computers, not only to 
solve the increasing number and 
complexity of German ciphers, but 


to greatly reduce the time for de- 
coding individual messages.. 

Second, it involved meticulous 
analysis of the messages them- 
selves. not only for the sobrieties of 
ling uistic translation but, in light of 
what was already known of die 
sender and receiver, their branches 
of service, their present tactical sit- 
uations and so on. 

Finally it involved the dissemi- 
nation of this “Ultra” secret infor- 
mation to spe cific commanders on 
a need-to-know basis, through the 
small number of liaison intelligence 
officers cleared for Ultra security. 


Cmpded in Our Suff Ftm tksfxka 

MULHOUSE France - For 
the fit* time since the war, Ger- 
man troops will mnbjfm tk 
Champs fete m fanert i tradi- 
tional mffiwry parade Jiay H 
president FranyOis Mitterrand an- 
nounced Tuesday. : . 

Mr. Mitterrand owned ^Euro- 
pean Army Corps, which inciwte 
German sokfiers, w march m use 
oa&dcy ^ gesture of reconciliation 
STihc end of a two-day meeting, 
between Mr. Mitterrand and Chan- 
cdlor Helmut KohL : ' 

Mr. Mitterrand also imsed Mr. 
Kohl to attend the traditional Bas- 
tille Day parade, which marts the 
an niversary of. the 3789 Revolu- 
tion, saving the symbolic march 
would *insrk in a very d ear way 
our European commitment cm this 
fundamental question of common 
security.” 

The chancellor madclos OWE 
goodwill gesture by returning to 
France 28 paintings taken, by the 
Nazis at the end of World War 12. 

The paintings- had. hung in an 
East German, museum since the 
war. 

One painting, an untitled canvas 
by Claude Monet from the 1870s. 
shows a snowy road in the coantry- 
side near Paris. Mr. Kohl asked Mr. 
Mitterrand to return it to its prewur 
owners. • (AP. Reuters/ 


International j Some Recommended Redding About the D-Day Invasion 


© Monday 

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©Tuesday 

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© Thursday 

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© Friday 

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• Saturday 
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Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Orna in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

licralhSSribmre 


.Viv York Tuner Sr 

AMERICA AT D-DAY 
i A Book of Remembrance. 

By Richard Goldstein. 

Delta. Paper, S 14.95. 

Richard Goldstein, an editor in the sport* depart- 
ment at The New Y ork Times, covers both sides- of the 
Atlantic in a swift narrative — woven out of recollec- 
tions of combatants and civilians, new .. account: and 
many memoirs, books and articles — iha: let* Ameri- 
cans feel the burst of fearful excitcmcr.t at home when 
the invasion was announced. 

DISASTER AT D-DAY 

The Germans Defeat the Allies. June /v-*4. 

By Peter Tsouras. 

Greenhil! Books. $ 2W5. 

Peter Tsouras. an analyst at the l.S. Army's Intelli- 
gence and Threat Center, concocts a fine ad.emurc. 
He supposes a few Allied action? during the imafion 
were less successful than they really were, a few 
German actions came out better, and that from these 
small incidents an Allied catastrophe follows inexora- 
bly. This book could become addictive. AH war buffs 
will start to imagine alternatives to Mr. Tsouras's 
scenarios. Who knows how many volumes this one 
could breed? 


D-DAY AND THE INVASION OF NORMANDY 
By Anthony Kemp. 

DLcover.es ; A prams. > ' 2. 9.\ 

The moat tompacL least expensive D-Day book 
may be the most indispensable. Ah volumes in rise 
Discoveries serie- are ingeniousV- designed, but this 
one is triumphant. Its perfect union of photographs, 
drawing? and text makes die most complex machinery 

and movement? of -he invasion underi loadable. 

D-DAY NORMANDY 
The Story and 

By Donaid }]. Goldstein. A'^vw ■ Dtilcn jrj j 
Michael 

Brassy 's i L 5 •. 

The hundred: cf photographs of the invasion ar.d 
rite people involved ir. it.Tvih military and civilian, 
convey almo-t unbearable emotion; ar.d i '.remer.cou:* 
amount of inf.'rtnation about why. happened a; Nor- 
mandy. The accompany:.- g text, although wn::er. by 
diV.inguijhec and r killed historian*, suffers wo often 
from <en f j mental it;,. 

D-DAY 1994 

Edited b, Theodore A. Wilson. 

IWverrKV Press v Kansas. 

Cloth. $45. Paper. <22.50. 

A collection of essay* by i“ people, most ?f ±em 


historians specializing in World War II. follows a 
similar voiume published 23 years ago. also for the 
Eisenhower Foundation in Kansas. A reader may be 
astonished at bow much scholarly digging and the 
release of once-secret information have transformed 
rite history of a war that is remembered by so many 
people sail alive. At times it seems like a whole new 
war. 

JUNE & 1944 

The I dices of D-Day. 

Bv Ceroid Asror. 

Sr. Martins. S25.95. 

Rimseii a World War II veteran and a veteran 
journalist. Gerald .Astor builds his account of the 
invasion on interviews and correspondence with about 
SO survivors of the battle. He largely limits his own 
narrative to setting up the situations his informants 
then describe. That is wise reticence, for tbese are 
touching and often wonderfully entertaining voices. 

PARACHUTE INFANTRY 

An American Paratrooper's Memoir of D-Day and the 
Fail of :he Trdrd Reich 
3} Dcr-td Kenyan Webster. 

Louisiana State Cnsversin. 529.95. 

David Webster survived his parachuting day? m 
Normandy and became a magazine reporter and wat- 


er before be died in a boating accident 33 years ago. 
He left this gutsy, sometimes bemused and sometimes 
angr y memoir behind, and it is now published for the 
first time. It bites and hangs on. 

D-DAY, JUNE 6, 1944 

The Climactic Battle of World War II. 

By Stephen £. Ambrose. 

Simon & Schuster. $30. 

As director of the Eisenhower Center in New Or- 
leans. Mr. Ambrose has been able to use the 1-200 oral 
histories of veterans deposited there plus firsthand 
stories from British. Canadian, Goman and French 
sources. The descriptions of individual ordeals make 
this book outstanding. 

YOICES OF D-DAY 

The Story of the Allied Invasion Told by Those Who 
Were There. 

Edited by Ronald J. Drez. 

Louisiana Stare University. $24. 95. 

This is the natural companion to “D-Day. June 6. 
1944." by Stephen Ambrose. Ronald Drez, the deputy 
director of Mr. Ambrose’s Eisenhower Center at tire 
University of New Orleans, uses the same store of 
taped memories of D-Day veterans Mr. Ambrose 
mined for his book. Mr. Drez cuts and edits the tales 
of 150 of them into a continuous narrative. . . . 


{ m> i 


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Page £ 


In Soweto , Whites Get a Hands-on Lesson in Zulu 


By Bill Keller 

SfYU/ctw « Yorfi 7 * meI Semcr 

surprised to finrfih* 1 / H n f ca — ^ Ursula Prctorius was 
iHTSck first time ip her 29 years, 

arnazemmt township u was nothing compared to the 

Afrikaner worn- 

te,“ bara ^ “> vermilion eyeshadow. on 

oo m Soweto on a Saturday morning. 

ibe fW^S 5 ™ d ? dral dod 8cbalJ and 

nmraiei ^ osa P cr s froze and stared as. smiling 

SnJyfr*® ™ novice Zulu. "Kunjanir 

forUrsula Protons ^ ^ w hiie students in 

to ^ ? f Vasimaa ' Baioy*. the field trip 

Mbowjo the culmination of six weeks of study, in 
j^jjc^thc subject was not just language but their own 

The students are pan rtf a white rush to study African 
•“tguages. Some are drzvm Ity fears for their job security, 
Others by curiosity about the newly empowered black 
major ity, or amply by a sense that with political equality 
ao ZqKr haman ducaura: « now possible. 

Baore, no matter what your thoughts were, you were 
white, said Glenda Maasburg, 31, another student on the 
Soweto excursion. “You were the cause of their being 
where they were. Now they have a black president, and 
maybe we’ll become a little more acceptable to them.” 

The students on this field trip are all employees of the 
Central News Agency, a chain of stares selling reading 
material and office supplies, which has begun offering 
Zulu study as a post-apartheid perk for white employees. 

For six weeks, they have met each Wednesday night at 
t he com pany's hu m a n resources office, under a sign pro- 
c laiming- “We need to redefine management in this coun- 
tryby appreciating the Africanness erf our people.” 

They paired off with black assistants to prac- 


tice the difficult clicks of their new language. They sang 
freedom songs. They learned sentences they had selected 
as most useful to them. 

“Some ask for phrases they can use with thor gardeners 
—Take that weed, not the shrub,’ or ‘Please water here,’ " 
said Johan van Niekcrk, 36. a regional manager. 

Mr. van Niekcrk karaed phrases that would enable him 
to share the thrill of transition: “How does it feel to vote?” 
and “We can make it work." 

“It’s actually opened my mind a bit,” be said. “Getting 
to know the culture. Why they think the way they do. 

“Like; we always wondered why they talk so loud,” said 
Mrs. Maasburg, a systems manager, whose daughter is 
learning Zulu in fifth grade. “They explained il’s iusi the 
way they speak. It’s things like that” 

“Or, we think they’re rode because they don’t say thank 
you if you give them some aspirin tablets." Mrs. Pfetorius 
added Tt turns out they’re afraid if you thank somebody 
for medicine you won’t get well. This has been the prob- 
lem all along.” 

In addition to their phrases, they have learned new body 
language, such as averting the gaze to show respect, 
cupping the hands to show gratitude. 

Thar black teaching aides have given them Zulu names, 
a reversal of the tradition that blades adept English aliases 
for the convenience of white masters. Mrs. Preiorius is 
Nobuhle, meaning mother of beauty. Mrs. Maasburg is 
Busisiwe, or blessing. Mr. van Niekerk is Lwazi, seeker of 
knowledge. 

A few of the men had been in Soweto before, as soldiers 
manning roadblocks after the student uprising in the 
1970s- Most bad never set foot in any black township. 

On Monday, they rode into Soweto the way most blacks 
do, boarding a bright red minivan from the black taxi 
depot in downtown Johannesburg and paying the 60-ceni 
fare. 

Alighting in DiepkJoof, a middle-class neighborhood of 


the vast black metropolis, they strolled the streets, gawk- 
ing and being gawked at. 

“The houses are so dose together!” Mrs. Prctorius 
observed to Mrs. Maasburg. both residents of spacious 
suburbs. 

They shopped for groceries, and then prepared an 
African lunch of coraniteal mush and tomato gravy. They 
sang and played games. Most of aH. they talked, growing 
bolder as Soweto residents welcomed them with evident 
delight and shouts of new South African solidarity, 

“This is very absolutely wonderful," yriri Cameron 
TJhabda, after bantering with Glenda Maasburg at the 
doorway of his simple cottage. “We must enjoy this.” 

Like most of his neighbors. Mr. Tlhabda has impressive 
credentials as a linguist, speaking English, five African 
languages, and a smattering of school Afrikaans, but he 
was warmly forgiving of bis visitor’s grammatical blunders 
and admixing of her intentions. 

As they walked, the whites grew more confident of their 
“snwufwmT (“heBo,” literally. “I see you”), “kunjani” 
(“how are you?”), and yebo" ('yes," used as an all- 
purpose response). 

“Sawubona, Mama!” said Mrs. Prctorius, approaching 
Elizabeth Mafure at the gate of the little bungalow she 
shares with her husband and five children, a household in 
which no one has a job. 

“My name is Nobuhle,” Mrs. Prctorius said. “I work at 
CNA” 

“That’s good," Mrs. Mafure replied. “Can you g« me a 
job at CNA?” 

“Ycbo, that’s a problem,” Mrs. Prctorius said, blushing. 

Mrs. Mafure pressed on in Zulu: “We are happy to see 
you here. If you leave your addresses, then we can visit you 
as weH” 

Mrs. Prctorius turned to her helper, Sonwabo Rozana, 
who translated for her. She smtJed and wished Mrs. 
Mafure a nice day. 


JAPAN: After a Slump in the Economy , a New World JOBS: Trim Workers 9 Protections 


month, a period during winch 
wholesale prices have been in con- 
tinuous decline. But there are signs 
that price declines could accelerate, 
undenmning Japanese fiscal and 
monetary policies. 

Already, for example, monetary 
officials nave lost their ability to 
prompt new capital spending with 
cheaper credit Burdened by excess 
capacity, and with scant prospects 
of profitable returns on invest- 
ments, companies’ borrowing from 
banks fell in the year ended March 
31, 1994, for the first tune since 
Wadd War II, despite interest rates 
at historic lows. 

Political uncertainty adds to the 
risk. The government of Prime 
Minister Tsutomn Hata is Japan’s 
first DBDarity a dmini s tr ation in 
nearly four decades. Mr. Hata 

could be ousted by a no-confidence 

vote at any time, although there is a 
'conviction that he win not 
I in that way, so as to 
prevent a new general election that 
few politicians want. 

In any event, ML Hata, whose 
government has yet to pass a bud- 
get for the year that began April 1, 
faces a difficult rime in campumg a 
series of deregulation ami market- 
opening measures to try to placate 
Washington before the Group of 
Seven summit meeting of kading- 
industrialized nations in Naples in 
early July. Even if Mr. Hata man- 
ages to stay in power through the 
end of the year, the prospect of 
ejections in early 1995 could fur- 
ther disrupt economic pohey-mak- 


to private consumption and eco- nothing compared to what prom- 
nomic recovery. ises to lie ahead,” Mr. Takahashi 

Also promising was news that said, 
housing starts had jumped 11.6 Japan's biggest supermarket op- 
percent in April and that Japan's erator, Daiei Iikl, for example, 
index erf leading economic indica- aims to cut all its retail prices in 
tors, which tries to predict econoro- ' ’ ~ ' 

ic performance in the coming six 
months, had risen to 90.9 points in 
March from a reading of 54.2 in 

February. And now, the trend toward get- 

Tfs quite dear that we’re seeing ting products and materials from 
the beginning of the end of the drape? offshore producers is be- 
recession,” Jesper Kofl, economist gimung to spread beyond earifyim- 
at S.G. Warburg Securities, said. 

That sentiment has been reflect- 
ed in Tokyo’s stock market, where 

the Nikkei index climbed 134.62 _ . w 

points Tuesday to 20,973.59, in Motors Corp- said if would import 
heavy turnover of 530 million sted from Sooth Korea — a trans- 


half in three years. To do so. it has 
rapidly been forging connections 
with foreign suppliers, cutting out 
Japanese 


ported final goods to basic materi- 
als supplied by industries that are 
pillars of the Japanese economy. 

In April for example, Mitsubishi 


shares. The dose put the Nikkei 
winch has spurted nearly 10 per- 
cent over the past two months, at 
its highest level since Sept 13, 
1993. 

The stock market’s rally has been 
driven by optimism that economic 


action that would have been un- 
thinkable 10 years ago but one that 
other Japanese automakers now 
are considering. 

A similar story is emerging in 
petrochemicals, imparts of which 
are set to be liberalized in 1996. Ina 


driven hy np nmv.m That economic iv ucuuaauauffl iyyv. in a 

r ecove ry wffl bring about a turn- classic example of how the Japa- 
around in corporate profits after 0686 economy has been structured 


of declines. It also has 


tour years 
benefited from heavy buying by 
foreign investors, who see Tokyo as 
attractive relative to other major 
bourses. 

“The liquidity aS of a sudden 
favors Japan,” Paul Mighorato, a 


for the benefit of industry rather 
than consumers, prices of naphtha 
used by industry are low. subsi- 
dized in effect by high prices for 
gasoline. 

But last month, a maverick oper- 
ator in Nagoya set up a discount 


sarior^mJfeSFl^na &*«**>* * least, .dtfy- 

Securities, said. “We may seethe ^Jf vennDCnl efforts to ^ 11 
market pause at 21,000, but the Q0W1L 


trend is oegmnety up." . 

opb^^tocons^^que^ FAMINE: New Threat in Africa 

tion or the Japanese economy s re- J 


Continued from Page 1 
European member governments 
who “have asked for more time” to 
narrow their list of candidates 

The unemployment study, two 
years in the making, will be the 
highlight of next week’s minis terial 
meetings. A U.S. official predicted 
that visiting ministers, including 
Lloyd Beutscn, the U.S. Treasury 
secretary, would endorse it 

The report contains nin«» policy 
recommendations, and it is accom- 
panied by a separate paper by the 
OECD’s economic policy commit- 
tee that says there is more room for 
cuts in European interest rates, 
which could help in efforts to stim- 
ulate employment. 

Die OECD study opens with a 
call for governments to follow fis- 
cal and monetary policies that min- 
imize cyclical unemployment and 
provide an economic framework 
for job creation programs. 

It advocates greater flexibility in 
setting wage costs, and suggests re- 
assessing minimum wage laws that 
are deemed to be harming pros- 
pects in some countries for the cre- 
ation of jobs for young people. The 
study says there is a strong case for 
governments to reduce the level of 
payroll taxes and social security 
contributions paid by employers, 
especially in Europe. 

The report recommends reform- 
ing the system of unemployment 


_ at the consensus of economists 
in Japan dearly is that die chances 
of Japan's slipping into a disas- 
trous deflationary spiral are reced- 
ing. On Tuesday, in the latest bull- 
ish rig n , die government reported 
that Japan’s seasonally adjusted 
unemployment rale fell to 2JJ per- 
cent m April from 19 percent in 
March, the first fall in three 
months. 

While most economists expect 
the jobless rate to rise over time, 
I’s imp ro vement was encour- 
_far as worsening nnere- 
t is seen as the chief threat 


tion of the Japanese 
action as its growing exposure to 
international competition feeds a 
spiral of dedming prices. 

Lower prices spell relief for Jap- 
anese consumers, but they also de- 
press profits for Japanese compa- 
nies. That, in turn, could spark 
further job losses and investment 
cutbacks and prolong the reces- 
sion. 

So far, growing imports erf low- 
priced beer and clothing have 
served notice of the coming revolu- 
tion in Japanese retailing. Bat the 
process has just began. 

“What we’ve sees in the way of 
price revolution so far is as yet 


Continued Ann Page 1 
tion was seeking to make Africa a 
top priority for development assis- 
tance “rat a par” with Russia and 
Eastern Europe. 

American officials have voiced a 
co mmi tment to working closely 
with leaders in Ethiopia, Eritrea 
and Uganda. Those leaders, who 
have stressed pragmatism in eco- 
nomic development and in mediat- 
ing conflicts in the region, “have 
started cm a success story, and with 
a little bit of bdp, they can mm 
things around in their own coun- 
tries and eventually affect the 

whole region,” Mr. Halt said. 


But the goal of “sustainable de- 
velopment* in the Third World to 
it underdeveloped nations 
falling into chronic crises has 
long been a goal of the internation- 
al community and has proven to be 
difficult to fnlfifl. 

Such crises as famines or wars 
often force the diversion of devel- 
opment aid funds into emergency 
relief. With pressures remaining 
high to cut budgets and a public 
perception (bat Africa is a “bot- 
tomless pit” for aid money, it is 
undear whether governments can 
allocate sufficient funds for both. 


benefits in some countries to make 
sure that they are not so high that 
they discourage the jobless from 
locking for weak. At the same time 
it proposes a reform of income tax- 
es for low-wage workers, who often 
find their earnings so heavily taxed 
that they become what is known as 
(he “working poor” 

Among other recommendations 
contained in the report are: 

• A call for increased flexibility 
of working time to create jobs that 
meet the needs of workers, al- 
though not by means of legislation. 
Instead, the report says greater un- 
derstanding of flexible working 
hours is needed by both industry 
and trade unions. 

• A proposal to encourage a 
more ent r epre n eurial rJimnti- by 
i‘SwiiMttng red tape increases 
start-up costs for venture capital- 
ists. Governments are urged to set 
up information centers for entre- 
preneurs. banks are told they 
should be more flexible in extend- 
ing loans to fledgling businessmen, 
and the report even suggests that 
accounting firms should contem- 
plate treating human resources as 
balance sheet assets. 

• A suggestion that new technol- 
ogies should be encouraged and 
spread among OECD member na- 
tions to create more high-wage jobs 
in new higb-productivity indus- 
tries. 

• A call for better job training 
programs for those who are out of 
work. 

• A proposal for improved edu- 
cation programs such as on-lbe-job 
training, apprenticeships, and 
U-S.-style headstart programs that 
encourage early entry into the edu- 
cational system for young children. 

The OECD report notes that 
many of workers and managers wiD 
find the changes “wrenching” 

At next week's ministerial meet- 
ing in Paris the OECD secretarial 
will be seeking a mandate to tailor 
its reform proposals for each mem- 
ber country. 


To subscribe in Switzerla n d 

jusi call, loll tree. 

155 57 57 


CHINA: 

A Cause Is Bom 

Continued from Page l 

“rioters,” authorities have said. But 
China has refused to give a com- 
plete accounting of the number of 
casualties or to bold an inquiry into 
the circumstances in which un- 
armed civilians were lolled. Mrs. 
Ding and other families have got- 
ten no official compensation for 
their loss, she said. 

The government claims that only 
about 300 died, most of them sol- 
diers and “thugs.” VS. Embassy 
officials concluded at the time that 
between 500 and 800 Chinese died, 
while human rights organizations 
have said several thousand were 
killed. 

Mrs. Ding has so far located 84 
families of those killed and nearly 
50 other families of people serious- 
ly injured 

In a petition asking for an offi- 
cial reassessment of the crackdown, 
seven dissidents, including a for- 
mer student leader, Wang Dan. 
said it was time for the government 
to “untie the knot in the people’s 
heart.” instead, Mrs. Ding said, on 
the fifth anniversary of Tianan- 
men, authorities have ordered 
stepped-up surveillance of families 
of those killed in the massacre, 
Mrs. Ding said. 

Mrs. Ding i$ a prime target. Of 
the hundreds rtf families of victims, 
only she and her has band, Jiang 
Ptikun, also a university professor, 
have dared to acknowledge consis- 
tently and publicly that a family 
member was killed by the army. 

Policemen watch the couple’s 
apartment and harass anyone try- 
ing to visit. Mrs. Ding said police 
have kept 24-hour surveillance on 
her since May 20. 

Mrs. Ding said Sunday that she 
had written to the government to 
say she and her husband would 
start a two-day hanger strike 
Thursday unless their freedom was 
restored. Writing from her apart- 
ment, where the couple keep their 
son’s ashes in a shrine in the bed- 
room, Mrs. Ding asked, “Is be not 
even allowed to have one untainted 
space in Much his spirit can rest?” 

“Can his parents not even have a 
moment of peace to commemorate 
the fifth anniversary of his death?” . 
she wrote. “We can hardly bear it.” 

Mrs. Ding’s accounts of the 
army attack underscore bow varied 
its victims were: They included on- 
lookers as well as pro testes — stu- 
dents, teachers, whhe-and blue-col- 
lar workers and children. 

Mrs. Ding found the story of a 
nurse lolled by a bullet in the throat 
as she lifted her head from treating 
the wounded. A university teacher 
was (rifled trying to persuade his 
students to return to campus. Mrs. 
Ding said she has found no in- 
stance of the victims haring used 
violence against the soldiers, as the 
government has claimed. 

Mrs. Ding’s campaign has 
helped reveal bow deep is the fear 
of Tiananmen’s survivors. Families 
of those killed are afraid to ac- 
knowledge the deaths, she said 
Several have refused to see her or 
accept her donations, even though 
there are no strings attached. 

Mis. Ding went public with her 
case in 1991 to counter a claim by 
Prime Minister Li Peng that fam- 
ilies did not want an accounting of 
the dead and injured. 

At first, sbe said, it took months 
to get a names or addresses of vic- 
tims’ families because people 
feared political reprisal. But in the 
last year. Mis. Ding said, the leads 
have multiplied and the number of 
families she has found has mush- 
roomed. 

Sbe sends the donations to the 
victims’ families twice a year, with 
the neediest receiving the most. The 
money comes from the United 
States, Japan and Germany. 


China Condemned j"s 
Over Treatment of 
Political Prisoners 


Reuters 

BEIJING — The human rights 
group Amnesty International de- 
manded Tuesday that China re- 
lease political prisoners and end 
torture in its prisons. 

Amnesty, in a report issued to 
coincide with the anniversary of the 
June 1989 crackdown on student 
protesters, said thousand s of per- 
sons arrested at the time continual 
to be imprisoned and in some cases 
maltreated. 

“Despite China’s rapid econom- 
ic changes that have increased free- 
doms and relaxed social controls, 
there has been no fundamental 
change in the government's human 
rights policy," the London-based 
group said in a statement 

“Arbitrary arrests, unfair trials 
and torture continue to be wide- 
spread, and the death penalty is 
used extensively for a wide range of 
offenses,” it sard. 

A Chinese Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, asked about the allega- 
tions, dismissed the rights group as 
untrustworthy. 

“Chinese prisons treat prisoners 
with humanitari anism and in a civi- 
lized manner according u> law.” the 
spokesman said. “Amnesty Inter- 
national is deeply biased against 
China. It has issued many ground- 
less and irresponsible reports in tbe 
past” 

Amnesty’s latest report includes 
a fist of 75 people believed to have 


re 

at 

a 

he 


to 

ey 

■»Tne 

ic ss 

*s. 

Win 


,ty 


been killed by troops during tfa 
crackdown on pro-democrac 
demonstrators. 

“Amnesty International calls a 
tbe Chinese authorities to invest! 
gate and account for all the victim] __ 
of extrajudicial executions, coral > c f* 
pensate their families and bring jt 
those responsible to justice.” the ^ 
group said. 

The report also included an apj 
peal from political prisoners jailed j£_, 
at Hanyang Prison in Hubd Prov- Jt , , 

ince, describing torture and other 
examples of alleged ill treatment ^ 

Amnesty said the accounts ol i ^ 
conditions inside the prison had”"^,] 
been confirmed by other sources. . e 

Beijing has repeatedly dismissed*? I- j 
remits of torture, saying it is far-? > Jt 
bidden by Chinese law. 

“Every political prisoner in Hu- n u 
bei has a history of blood aiidry ' m 
tears,*’ Amnesty quoted tbe prison- a r -o 
era’ appeal as saying. a n ; I 

“From the day of arrest we are ° ^ 
threatened and tortured by tbe po-a, - 
bee to extract confessions,” iheie.j: 0 
prisoners sakL “We are not permit- j‘ 
ted to read books or write; we can — , h 
not laugh or &ng; we cannot see , 
visitors or write letters. We are 
punished frequently for breaking 
prison regulations.” 1 J 

Tbe appeal cited specific ina- : ** 
dents, such as a 24-year-old prison- in - « 
er beaten and whipped for eight d -- 
hairs. 


I 


Berlusconi States Desire 
To Try an Ex-Nazi in Italy 


3 

n 
■x : 
b. 


Reuters 

ROME — Prime Minister Silvio 
Berlusconi told an American Jew- 
ish group ou Tuesday that he was 
committed to seeing a German for- 
mer SS officer living in Argentina 
put on trial in Italy for war crimes. 

Rabbi Abraham Cooper, asso- 
ciate dean of the Los Angeles- 
based Simon Wieseothal Crater, 
said Mr. Berlusconi had taken 
“great pains ” to reassure him that 
no one in his cabinet had any links 
with World War n fasdsm. 

Rabbi Cooper and fellow center 
official Shimon Samuel were the 
first representatives of a major Jew- 
ish organization to meet Mr. Ber- 
lusconi since he was sworn in this 
month as the bead of a coalition, 
which includes minis ters from tbe 
neofasdst-led National Alliance. 

They said they had given Mr. 
Berlusconi and Justice Minister Al- 
fredo Biondi a 103-page dosser on 
the former Nazi SS captain Erich 
Priebke, who was put under bouse 
arrest in San Carlos di Barfloche 
three weeks ago. 


The Justice Ministry has begun 
proceedings to extradite Mr. 
Priebke, 81, to Italy, to answer alle- 
gations of involvement in the mas- 
sacre of 335 Italians, including 75 
Jews, at (he Ardeatine Caves cat- 
side Rome in March 1944. 

Mr. Beriuscod also said Tuesday 
that a remark attributed to him that 
Mussolini “did some good things” 
in Italy had been taken out of con- 
text. 

Political opponents criticized 
Mr. Berlusconi over the weekend 
after the remark, which was part of 
a Washington Post interview, was 
reported prominently in Italian 
newspapers and on television. 

Mr. Berlusconi said Tuesday 
that he had not expressed his own 
view but had sought to explain how 
his coalition partner, Gianfranco 
Ftni of the National Alliance, re- 
garded the wartime dictator. 

Mr. Berlusconi had been quoted 
as saying that although Mussolini 
took away liberties and led Italy 
into war, for a while he “did some 
good things here, and dial’s some- 
thing that history says is correct” 


EUROPE: Deal on Leader 


ContiEned f roan Page 1 

commissioner and former Dutch 
foreign minister, has been men- 
tioned as a possible successor, 
NATO sources said. 

Prime Minister John Major of 
Britain has supported Sir Leon 
BriUan, the EU trade commission- 
er, to succeed Mr, Ddors, although 
most ED officials dismiss his 
chances because of Britain’s fre- 
quent opposition to EU initiatives. 

Officials in Brussels say Mr. Ma- 
jor would find it hard to fight Mr. 
Dehaene at all costs after his em- 


barrassing dimbdown in a dispute 
over EU voting rules two months 
ago- His clout could be reduced 
further if his Conservative Party 
scores badly in next week’s Europe- 
an Parliament elections,' as polls 
suggest. 

One British official cautioned 
that Mr. Dehaene had not even 
declared his candidacy and that tbe 
French-German pressure could 
alienate Spain and Italy. But he 
added, “If a bandwagon gets going, 
we won’t Me down in front of it and 
let it crush us.” 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE I 



THIRTEEN UNCOLLECT- 
ED STORIES 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Oupatches 

PARIS — French intellectual* 
■ere split Tuesday over whether to 
ccome candidates for the Europe- 
‘n Parliament. Some vowed to re- 
gain in the race to push their pro- 
losnia cause despite the pullout by 
■ther leading figures. 

The movement, called “Europe 
iegins at Sarajevo," announced its 
vithdrawal on Monday, much to 
he relief of the Socialist Party. But 
le movement's head. Professor 
*eon Schwanzenberg, a leading 
■oncer specialist, told RTL radio 
hat he would lead the movement 
mo the June 12 vote. 

“We have no right to play with 
nstitutionsr he said. “The prob* 
em now is to know whether there 
ivill be Sarajevo ballots in all 
French polling stations in 15 days 
lime. 1 doubt it." 

A spokesman for some of the 
list's members said the decision by 
j the philosopher Bernard-Henri 
Levy and others to withdraw »a*. 
■‘shameful." The pullout came 
three davs after the intellectuals — 


emboldened by public-opinion 
polls — announced their candidacy 
right on deadline. 

Mr. Lew and others want 10 lift 
the arms embargo on the Muslim- 
led Bosnian government in its war 
with Serbian militias. 

It was not clear how many on the 
87-member list remained in the 
race. The spokesman noted that the 
pullout communique released by 
Mr. Levy “has only nine intellectu- 
als" including Andre Glucksmann. 
Pascal Bruckner and Romaic Gou- 
piL Mr. Levy told French televi- 
sion: “If we’d gone fishing for 
votes, we'd have divided the friends 
of Sarajevo instead of bringing 
them together." 

Polls last week showed the slate 
would win as much as 12 percent of 
the vote, well above the 5 percent 
threshold for seats and government 
financing. 

“The epic becomes a sham." said 
Foreign Minister Alain Juppe, a 
leader of France's largest party on 
the right, the Rally for the Repub- 
lic. (AP. Reuters ) 


By John Cheever. Edited by 
Franklin H. Dennis. 227 pages. 
SJ9.95. Academy Chicago. 


Reviewed by 
Richard Bausch 


T is a strange sensation indeed, 
reading through this small vol- 
ume. As a writer of stories, I am at 
first embarrassed for John Chee- 
ver. knowing that these are early 
pieces and that he did noL choose to 
republish them in his maturity <! 
almost feel like saying “when he 
was John Cheever." since the earli- 
est stories here are so faithfully 
imitative of Hemingway as to read 
like small parodies, and do not 
come near to reflecting the en- 
chantment and charm of the John 
Cheever we know, even at his most 
casual). The first story, “Fall Riv- 
er." bears quoting — and would 
make a curiosity at certain gather- 
ings. where liLerate people play 
word games with each other. The 
game could be called Name the 
Writer. 


“The house we lived in was on a 
Steep hill and we could look down 
into the salt marshes and the high 
srav river moving into the sea. It 
was winter but there had been no 
snow and for a whole season the 
roads were dust;, and the sky was 
heavy and the trees had dropped 
their" leaves for the winter. But the 
sky remained heavy and the reeds 
were dusty for as long as three 
weeks and "when the spring came it 
was hard to remember the snow 
because there hod been so little." 


This, folks, is the work of a 19- 
year-old boy with strong mimetic 
gifts, and is not yet Cheever. It just 
isn't. And claims to the contrary, 
no matter what justification is 
nailed to them by scholarly p hr us- 
ings, are specious. The word “for- 
mative" is used in the introductory 
materials to “Thirteen Uncollected 
Stories by John Cheever." and one 
can admit this about perhaps half 
of the stories here, in that they 
manage to carry dramatic and 
evocative moments with a sense of 
moral resonance — but they are 
not close to the charms and grose 
spells one finds in the work Lhee- 
ver chose to preserve in his collect- 


ed stories, and 1 can't help but 
believe that Cbee\ er himself would 
not approve of this enterprise. 

The stories that do give forth a 
radiance do so in a reflected *a\. 
because of the influences the boy 
Cheever was working through — in 
these, one does feel a gifted writer 
casting about for his truest self, and 
using the materials at hand. Three 
stories lake place at or around the 
race track at Saratoga. New York: 
there are stories about show peo- 
ple, waitresses, out-of-luck sales- 
men; one story traces a young 
man's growing awareness of his 
parents' anguish over their declin- 
ing fortunes: and another, perhaps 
the closest one to the mature Chee- 
ver. portrays an estranged couple 
managing to keep up appearances 
for the sake of a family dinner. 

Ultimately. I am troubled about 
the publishing of work as uneven as 
this in a way that purports to repre- 
sent the author, even in his forma- 
tive stases. This is perhaps espe- 
cially True in this particular 
instance. Astute imitations of 
Hemingway don’t really teach us 
much about any emerging writer, 
since writers of every stamp and 


ability must go through the states 
of imitation to find their own man- 
ner. and since just about £«?<»* 
was more or less imitating Hemin-,- 
wav bv 1931- 


-t%_. Y oA Trow* 

__ ... rn f-rorb fto® n® ,<un 


John Cheever at the top of his 
form and in his own voice is better, 
finally, and more satisfying as a 
short "story writer, than a lot of the 
Hemingway . Certainly he is far re- 
moved from the bqy-Cheever imi- 
tating Hemingway, and the differ- 
ence. along with" Cheever’* own 
intentions, ought to be heeded 
more than ii has been here. 


Richard Bausch, whose collection 
of stories. “Rare & Endangered Spe- 
cies, " will be out this summer, wrote 
this for The Washington Post. 


Cholera Kffls 675 Somalis 

Reuters 


MOGADISHU. Somalia — 
Cholera in Somalia has lolled 675 
people out of 17.000 cases since the 
epidemic broke out in late January, 
the United Nations said. 


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2'/* Zr & rr' Saxi "e f ? 
3SGwK- =a.. rT. 3C-4AJC USA 


PROJECT FINANCE 


Sffikable QuarertM* » mom (w&b 
hr ran ole proem wronged by. 


Bancor of Asia 


CURRENT TRANSFORMED i* -re: 
AVA. USA on an. ir* zt or. ; 

iJe only Fa.. USA (7051 2t» 


c::r z ix'- — ci‘- bare 

0 z hr* a J'i ’*t< ■*•' :r- or.-rts : 
area 

C 2 poficle ir*» er>-;iwl pn ore 


BUBO CLUB FRANCE MADBfifS 

ii BLd v^dekne ■ B = : '-i-e 

v ■■ i- 44 :r Fa. 33 - 1 -^r: «.?5 


YOUR OFFICE IN MUNIOt. C I'TPirjr. 

trn-v-iep x«*i( '.Hi'.* aJmini- 

“crcn te-r;e tteev.. t«b~ 

Zfz-e '-j zrr. T.;-e Tel - ^ [»■-) { 

i:b s' >1: rc. 4; 55: j 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


IMPORTERS. DISTRIBUTORS 
WANTED WORLDWIDE FOR NEW 
BRAND Of AMSICAN aGARETTE. 

’An:e wiir. irv? r:ncrr-. s-;*ie 1 


RESTAURANT FOR SALE s».t 'wr“ 

-j=rv, Tr-r — « :.*»«. * 4.1-7-. 
: . 3 -; 2 -K*s. 5r- --e - : “ 

Is : : l r. :7-u- 3- x.' 

7a 1 4 I* Hr .'!c '■ 


c.^pn.^L wanted 


1 C Mrit*r-3 :*:;a 

Fa !-±tt fir y: f . 


sat AN INCREDIBLE :5.-*rie.- 
ersr:- x- - T -r -rc •■** ‘-i 

3-4...., “e 

==.. *’.u^.:445 -jit 


SEEKING VENTURE CAPITAL >er 
-'J- zr*M erxyr “r z Zr^xr -e- 
rK _ --^r- evj ^ 


VENTURE CAPITAL 

• Mracmm ’JSV5QQ.0K 

• No MOEJtvn 

• Te*er taare 

“ E?uT) finance 

• Broker* fix*eeen 

Anglo American Group He 


CorwisEOfi. earned only 


MTBMATX3NAL flJPWG 

mams 

Coaneraal Piayem Needed 
NoSe* 

NATIONAL BUSWBS . 
RfiPOKIlNG KJREAUUD: ‘ 
521 FWt Avenue. Sra* ISO 
New Yo>L.NY 13017 
T* 21^9229366 Fere 2)2922-289 


r,s? 

hit** 


u 


buy/ sell maurr fa pbg*. lto, 

a/kmnt. axnnaa, ged cede cd, 
nwah, anradtiei Praac&'aKaty 
Wng fac 914 -V 2 B- 7 TO tiSA 


MOtCT MANAGSt SffiS MAJOR 

d«te* for tedh yedd (ragran. D«. 
crenoa aomeL Fa* 


FINANCIAL . 
INVESTMENTS 


PROJECT RNANCE - 
VQ4TURE CAPITAL 
AnfaJefare 
One ranfan US DeApi phi 
term Three to Ten ytrrv 
NT. ■+ W95-C4S10667 
FceeMT. * S99S43M» 
pl.MAASTBfl 




GOLD STOOD Gfed Secsrieet Ca&. 
NASD. 5*PC CoteF D(»d Bene w 
New Vork WsJwntr !12«&6«». 
Free 212-22J-MO USA - 


GOLD & CURRENCIES 


Broker 1 CommuKin . 

Fox (63-21 810-9284 
Tel: (63-2) 810-25 7D or 112-3429 


AS W3LASA PERSONALIZED 
FINANCIAL SERVICE 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS 


YOUR AD0RE5S rear Cramp* Bvie-t 


6 :.«r!fJ3« T J rys 
0 '= u 7«c.**sk- > u ved: erd fo.fdr : 

4 f-.. r <; :-r;re-j r- zi ;'A r -''t: 

6 zri". -.rs IC --9 ona ■-'z’r/TV’d 
■es-.j 


a ready when you nood it, 
even far a couple of hour*. 

! t ru'i. i /ncvnd trfldern o^me; 

vi :^Vexs *xm*. t> -*nt b- *h- 
>Cj czy. -ny!\ etc- 
0 <'.r 'ctr'Ca* pe-manem base 


I-.* 1 . |a.xr i®ri f r'je d'Artrjn 75m8 

' ' ■lH?S--4-G4F ta 425c 305 


p yt; lei m 


DUSSELDORF AREA/ RUHR AREA 

I 1 $ur office m tw 0! C"t*many. 
fiecse colt Tel - 4'-.2Q1.79M0. 


A NSW C'fFA^rrr.if/r ?: 


» :-*s*-c» T.'irc 000'eB. A’ 
IB E — * 


: LONDON ADDRESS BOND STREET. 

: Eleccnt ott'ce*. ft all services 
• V 144.-1 1 49= :,9; Fs» <9^517 


Mcsueun, M -LP.K.B. end Oc. 
FlNANOAL INSTITUTON 
Bruuolt - BELGIUM 

Fox ?:•: f"4 22 77 a s?« 47 . 
Tast ; r .;- 


: 91, Fg ShHonora 75008 PARK 

, Tel {.j 44 3* ret 0 C 


; LONDON Wl BUSINESS CENTRE Alt 

»«>;>t>e;. ?4 hour* .xce*- Tel [A4| 
I n °35 6048 « 9 (44| n 935 79 7° 


; VIEhWA : your Atfaeu we act as 


YOUR OFFICE IN STOCKHOLM 

. ^rwFed cfhc-* cM m*e’. 


ftVJ* cri.ce. Ap..r; Office Serv L -e 
‘ - 7'3 Fa. -4j.1-.-1 3831 2 


-42-1 


CONTACT EUROPE AMSTERDAM. 

-rrits^oral 0ri.ee Sepson lot pecck 
cr tie rc.* rAalbft. TrieoK;m-'Fa. 
V»r -v.i: Mo Ml Ircnsijtir* etc >** 
- :•) 7> Pl. 4581374 


•v :»!* Teiecncne acwmric .«*• 

fir. end secretpr-® esi V 
- i'A^ r --Sy<i c* ” 1 . - 4vc 965-X-j 


1 DBTU - INDIA - ADDRESS, OFFICES. 

M~TW FCOVi Fa. -r Fanr* 

: nr, «:• r ?; r 


( rRANKRJRT - WE RSSS50TT YOUR 

. 3TO.3T,. -Pice s:oc* ana till cri:e 
1 se-ree ac;kye. 3 H-ks GmbH Tel 

I F-bcWCv 


! VOUR OFFICE IN LONDON 70p per 


• ca« Mcsi. fiv.ne Fa.. Tl. aB semcei. 
‘ T*l- 'I tjp £>?« Fa*. 71 580 2729, 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 

*1 a meirbe- cl dv. r c* : :.v *■- 
■ycup. n mejet oecc*i .’••*■ , 
avolaae 19 gerie.'=* 'ar^e ; :*' c 
dtrouch iirvmj. itUrg c. r*rr-c 
ted estate «c*ow~. 
Imereue-J ptrtvss n yi Jt 
cauranei requned Pletre -r,x-c 
*1 wntrnq or lor «mf> b'*e‘ peCS-ono 
ot company details ■; 

Detmci P Coyne 
Wetter 

12 Mam Si U;an. Cf C-.a->* 

Fa. 353U2BI2?) :-etan<; 


DIRECT F8CM RUSSIAN FACTORY. 

c- -r'- F-.J. . ;• -'S-. 
C-OOi-J'jeS ?eT> C c- ' l: s v*r 
Cchfih Mn r*7 1* 

BUIlie FRANCE: 

Fax 33' 1 4829 4013 Die 231952F 


INT'L SOOETT OF RNANGBtS 

®*a : ess.c-a- -v-te-v-c *»rw' k ‘~ 
■■■■rp- s ’7.tt -e* - ■ ‘-'r-r: *tx- 

~>ifs r<~ ?«. m :^:r 


SEEKING WVBTORS 4r rear *cte 
M^«rr zryte - Fa v.- 


Fax 4-44 924 201377 


sa- -rv» — - 4; : ^ x 


OBCRETE PRIVATE BANKING, tnd S. 
F-duoary lervtces- For brochrae 
WORLD MONETARY EXCHANGE. 
So> 533. Aixxhnd. Now Zealand. Teh 
164251 957-777 Fan (6491 377 7728. 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 


DOING BUSINESS WITH THE 

4RAsiAT4 y.\- 4-^er** - Z-.~ 

2 " 5 C:.-, C-»r.- r-. . =4 r-ZM 

-4M -36275 5C 


OSTRICH OWNERSHIP i-v V fot er 
meal * tede S ‘e-r-e**.! I*’ •.! 
nrrodjw jQv ta me yy-.e- or- 
io.eg-netr -J ft* v ;z 5 :*. a** 
nsj'"i yd r-rryje; r -. T*< = 
rr-ri- £■ teller r‘.*-! s«s«*-.-i 'Ir< 
sir -j 3a ;:s -.-s., 

!*'siS;r.e jnp-j, 


SODIUM NfTIUTE - :r» =3T-r- -;r 
v:ie. ftwted 52 r; Pscr >r«.-*s»c 

1 penes in vo-,- er.-'e-ne-.rj tp >•*; 

4i ~77 2225*2 


1 NTERNATIONA 1 LEASING 
1 MMH 31 ATRY AVAILABLE 


TO PURCHASE 

1 Le-er: H C-e* 


| FUNDING OPfO*1UNmB 0- dteWe 
• fa pfaed finarang. We provide cash 
cr esn eoutvafens ta be inert as 
i aOaierd fa fan. JT - 100 M USD. 
' TH iW-tOm F» 407-488-2664 USA 


SUYNGGOID: 

u retired, in powder, 
fnxg^ienQ, WC- 
U ausreraes. make c/kn 
-jy fax {27-71 534 1 1 52 
Belgium. Tele*: 20277 



{iarun 


PURCHASE « SALE 

of cwrenoe*. Hpnwraor 
fa fa PMJ 53416 66 
Belgum- Tele. 23277 


MONACO PRINTING SPONSORING 

srpeft. »rft or-M ornr-.-es veec 
■~v-rc»-- ffa aeta's ;<ease > 
.??' °j 25 57 2T e fa> ?2 25 57 2‘ 


: 2’ -V.*CM- 
r r.-ra y ec.-=r<-.* 
zirzr-. •nenrer a-c ^ecr.-t 
'.*.3 ■c-.-s *er. erre 
Sf»8*s cr-n sy e-je-srreee 


■ 5 on Gutowees 

* C~ve* Acrecrgre C s Ac y t ri 

* te a tv P-rycse 'nv«-on 

THRU MAJOBWTt BANK5 


COMMERCIAL & INVESTMENT PROPERTIES 


f!r i tlUA 


CAPITAL SUPPORT CORP. 

UA J7T41 757-1070 Fox 757-1270 


King 


Hotel in Ankara 

• M one tvwV* 

• EjceBrni .-.3ms y\a pvc*. 

• Ferret Sf«vw. 

• 'Dwei bv: tv, -tr- rrs ; r:-:r-3t 
a S34.5 fa single to er*. pet rjjta 
including btecri^i end •. /! 
o Swimmmc pc*:: 

Gvreniil C»i 1 j. WW a. "W-v:, 

Tef 418 90 9Q 


! SUGAR GRADE "A" 

A, -Simple ! nitron V7 ' : “ 
b5s:» w.: 25? 

! P'ooi p : r- pa-* • 

Fc* {33-.J ’o 75 43 34 


OfWHOM COMPAN1B SKf. 1 : 
rr-.*“ 2-ee-. 2:.*= sc r '.'cr. 
Tv -it:.; -z> yr.i •JF'xi 


2nd TRAVE. DOCJMHvTS - 

4"^ 


fa r-, -r-r—c'-y 

Mmamm MJLP XE otd O*. 
RNANOAL NSTmmON 
Ereneb - ESX5UM 
Fc*. 5 r-:.S3E4~r 

TH£X 22- 


SALES 


.JOINT V&4TUT2S SOUGHT :• J* 

• ;DR»>3n* in a- cc’-a^c-.r: t 
; f-Mgetanan . .e'rw :ta zi 
■ fcuifcing r-oi'isn'ince F'«ur: *,?--’:e*. 
-41 be Ktradeted fa. 5-r- -2*. — ; 

I uk pirn S(^ 


INTB’NATlONAt THPMONE :«l*. 


'WfflUS i UNUMJ7R 


:x-r. :j ---i* rz> :i'- ^ 
S-5.S ;<cF- F=r :'>52f-x 2 .2‘. 


I FUNDS AVAILABLE 

! ■'or bario and pnvde 
•nversc* fa cE facnc-tj 
Vtar ci cech. xrxxs 
dbcunt banr ga=-=CBe_ 
■ - fa - vro i- cr. -Cl 

[32-2) 534 DJ rt 1 Befaum 
Tefac 20277 



HOTE- RESTAURANT 


I ANC9V7 MOUNTAIN RETREAT 30 
; WB FROM NICE, FRB<H RNBtA 
0 roous/'40 seas, pool. Lu e C e ni 
l ssndngn Frencft.'W) eten We fiice 
• negcftoUe. rc* owner at 33-93CG0631 


SBGfUM-fiSUSSBS. near EEC- wrap- 


Mmol luxury house, 33Cbqjn prole*- 
bo^ng, 20 « 


saaai, 33ft*un 


rage. 51JD0J»0BF 


European Fed E*rqw 357733 10 05- 


G8EECE at fat Foil tF rtaeut, five 
floor buldbg 610 so. n*. ufffa i. 2 
shops. Pros £336,000. Wi aiuulfa i 
Mrs: Itautom, Tei+301 J283W6 
fac 3D1-C83047. 


OFF5HORE COMPANIES fa -ee 

r*c-:-.-e y ».:? ~c .s'se* 
— S' ~J' fa<- 4*: j' .far rise 




7"tK j- =ij: 


CREDIT FACUiiQ *«rid- 

•■ate. enrf sarxncr- fa HiA N Fc* 
t*d--«4 -SZ 


OFKE FOR SALE I 

’n Pome. Hoty. Office 20C Sqm 
Covered phn terraces, liqh floor Pan- ] 
orame v*rw Prera^ou orfice aASng, , 
oarage M enunes to Mr Jura m I 


WUBS: SHOP - Off BONAPARTE 
neor S» Siipce. jrec* lr»: 
FF2JM. be FF56fl00-teor. Td. 
1-43 54 21 *5 far T45 97 t*l 4ff 


DUMPS B.YSm, [\DO METRES,) 


80C iq, tn. baking. IOC'S Jt oa pi pwd. 
Former hoed Tei r443 S2W e*arvfty_ 



Ijh^RW^OiMI^FRANi^iS&OPPdirrUNmE^ I COMMERCIAL & INVESTMENT PROPERTIES 


One-To-One Coniacts 
Large 5*^ile Meetings 


All Contacts are Ouarameed 
Discreet G Confidential 
NAFTA, GATT, APEC. European Union 
Eastern Europe. U.S A. 


GLOBAL BUS1NE55 CONTACTS, Ltd. 


**ur prolessional erp-enenced c-ialf has developed substantial cre*dible. 
upper-fa.*! contacts in mdusir/. ^overnmeni. bic-bu'iness. universities C. 


think-tanks Our liaisc.ns can effectively ramp-up your ability to provide 

all pnas^ 


an enhanced, value-added bottom-line in all phases of commerce and 
trade Now you can become more aegressiveFcompetitiue against mature 
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you avail yourself of our services To acquire more Business Coniacts 
notify us Also available Well-Secured Commercial Loans SIM-S100M 
up USD Brokers welcome 


The Conlerence Round Tabic, 3? I * Sacramento 124 
San Francisco. CA nine PI I 36 U.SJV. 

Tel* 413-346-4 - Fax. 415-346- 1350 USA 




mmmt 

^MfteNIES 

iW&^TR UST» EXPERTS 


OFFSHORE TRUSTS. COMPANIES. 
BANK INTRODUCTIONS. NOMINEES 
8 ADMINISTRATION BV UK LAWYERS 


I EUltflf JJKOAPWUrHW KfJ 6WX. 


n miSD (WmHE5) £165.00 

□ 8 S 3 bE OF ma £ 195.00 
a BESAWAKElu; £ 495 M 
a 5 BRSEV £355.00 

g a B.W.L/PfaggfltttA E 265 M 


OFFSHORE BANKS 


• Merdvanl/commoroa! bank 

■ Accept deposits 

■ Clone A licence 

• No qualification requirements 

• No ta*e* or treaties 

• Tola! anonymity 

■ Bearer share* O.K. 

• Nominee directors O.K. 

• I mm ediate delivery 

- USS 1 5,000 or 525,000 with a 
trus! company 


Call or fax for free details! 

Ron Jensen 


London T«l. 71 994 5157 Fu 71 231 9928 
Canada Tel. SIM 942 61S9 Foi 94 2 3179 



f OfTS'MCXRJL Co\ 


JlG'nMZl'ES 


In Pastern Fumjv boh.' .igcncics 
a i jilaNc fr.rm S|X*nccr Oi. 
F.vnraiinns Ud. .uil* of the world's 
brycsi Ofifaii >rv c»> Tru"4 and 
Imnnitr.uinn nraciKcs. Applicants 
musi lx; sun.thiy • iu.ilifli.-vj. successful 
nsenefes alre.idy opmilinf* In Russia 
and Ujllic stales. Training Riven 
Oinl.hX Ot Carter Agency Manager 
SCF URL) on 353-1^62 1554 (fax) J 


ROI 5 X capital yearly. 
90% equity plus bank quarantse. 
Investment USS 10 million pius. 
Details fax 061 898 1 72 1 4 
or 06221 5661792. 
Maximum confidence assured. 


* HOW TO LEGALLY* 
OBTAIN DUAL NATIONALITY 

Dixnvtr Ifv xofl* nf dul nan’Mliv mill mw 100 
cnwrics niirind ihn feme j EX ! PREVIOUS 
TAX PAlEPt ud IfjiBy iwid ids, psanoais 
isd IiiuIl*. Di-.toicr Uvr ia-.ider tan-, jb"«i ij\ 
luvm Ho* in haomc i lefJ TAX EXILE 


For jnor FUKF BROCH URE, and PRI- 
VACY NEWS LETTER ihw -31 bdp 
moke and secure jran* itvmey write he 
Srufic Inl'l Ltd. Has 42R9L 
FxrcUSkV H'>k ■ BiMsik 
R> iwiuxh C»k - Haiu> - KN KEE - U K. 
Td. ♦ 4J Hl5f>3l75l - Fat +44 7115^132: 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
INSURANCE/REINSUnANCE 
COMPANIES 
OFFSHORE BANKS 
ASSET/INCOME PROTECTXJN 


K years eaaWohed - provktao 
ntemationalh 


professional services intematiorrally 
or aS types of business. 

ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTEES 

19 P«l Road. Douglas. 

Isle of Man. IM141S 
TeU 0824 626501 - Fare (KE4 625126 
orLondbnTel- (71)2228866 

Far. (71) 233 1516. 


Leading US- based manufaourerof 
exclusive hi-tech surveillance, night 
optics, airport & government 
security products for over 50 years 
seeks IV partner ;o manufacture.' 
distribute abroad. 'CCS is one 
of the largest C* best known 
companies in Ihe last growing 
surveillance S monitoring indiEtries." 

Fortune Magazine. 


CCS - TEL ■ 21 3-557-3CU0 
Fax: 2 1 2-083- 1 278 USA Attn- Mr. King, 
or TEL: (0(71 4080287 
FAX. 1017! o20 “538. London. 

Attn. Mr. Hart 


Tired of Negative Responses? 
Or people wtio lake trie project 
package and do nothing with it? 

FUNDS NOW AVAILABLE 

for capable applicants, seriously 
ready to move, with sound projects 
in U.S.A., Canada, Europe, 
Sou tin America, and Australasia 
Prompt and Professional 
Interine di ariea Protected 


Interfinance Limited 

Gcnaa OfBot ■ Eunpc 

e-mail: finance® rtntergroupxxtm 
Voice: +31 703500221 
Fax: +31703549144 


CITIZENSHIP 


la* tree. English speaking Common- 
wealth county (not Antigua). Principals 
or their lawyers only, please cm!u± 
Maritime International Ltd. 
F.O. Box 1302. 43C Reddiffe Street, 
Scjohn'5 Antigua, West Indies. 
Fax: (809) 462-2718. 


V 11 1 HI 

# OFFSHORE WORLDWIDE i 
Ready made companies (shells) 

* full management 

* address services 

F r Tt hrod’urt 

INTERCOMPANY .MANAGEMENT 
P.O. Bm 1 60, 9493 Miorrai 
Liechrcnsicin 

F«c 41-75-373 4062 
»wt/S7J 



Diplomat status. 
Honorary consulates, 
Second citizenship. 

We arrange for saheot poqt of people 

. I A fe 

^Faxi 4-49-12 f -47693 99^1 


Tax-Free US. Corp orations 
' " "IwrnuA cornMy^by ' 
VS. Attorneys f 


’ ft 


'nramMu-ircc NctjiIi our ^preuta y.v,; c ci | 
il *1 Suits. Ouinnicc lT compkic iz.-f.nrujr 
Tc oiler Vi aJdn?' wih phora i lc *-.*mc:. 
offiir tmeo. ll.i hml acxr.-nniL* VS •.iu:en* 
M «ervr » 6iU1«i> lOiujifcle LtsI »mr' 2 
3«MMincr, includini: OTC auric! cn:n- & 
nwnisniiott P tax rtqucs our far tfitJiurr. 
niibNc in Enpftfai ft iitmu, 

Dr. Jur. William A. Wri^hi 
Attorney- at Law 

U.S. C.Tpmaii<jn Senses. Inc 
5-tW Bjlmural r*rire Suite «tn 
Sacra memo, CaliTum>a 

! Fax ( USA) 916/783-3005 ! 


International Franchising Information 


Nnrelles-ltfre (Brossels-BolgiaR) 


! 3 


SCULPTURE WORLD™ 

Discover A Gold Mine In 
New Acrylic Sculpture Art 
You Transform 


Posters Into Art 
That Sells from 
SI 00 -S2,000+ 
Great Profit £ 
Return Potential 
No Direct Sales 
Required 



At BjiHpment/fiuff Control 

Investment S15-S25,000usa fsiwj 

716-691-1750 

FAX: 716-691-1766 


LEGAL 

SERVICES 


If you ere irie^es-ed r :c:a’r c." L' S. 

Franchise ■zomssnles [ ha: a-ec’.nar-T'-g .r:e'ra::onel!7. 
Franchise UPDATE r«s : u f: v- .“ s : y : •_ -• ~ 2 

Two safari ai publicaticris ira- suzz ‘. ;- : „• with both 

derailed inicrmation cn opand*'* U S . : r3"*:r’ise systems and 
expert articles on mterr.a:ioral franchise fends and events. 
To rffriiv yf-ijr cop;-:; -y 

The World Franchise and Business Report 

and 

The Executive's Guide to Franchise Opportunities 

via Airmail, send a check or money order for 
S25.OOlUS.lto: 

Franchise UPDATE 

P.O. Box 20547. San lose, CA q 5 160-0547 USA 
or order by VISA or MasterCard by faxing your 
order with account number, expiration date and 
approval signature to: 408-997-77Q3 IUSA) 


Si 


BIG BOY COMES TO EUROPE 



years, Big 
With over 


family 


CI.S. GREEN CARD ! 


■ Owners?) 

Cfa yte 0«| a mjnojs a k«cs; S' a la-oi 
.'cutty? |cutni? iKe 0 7 | fte n 


•wngnwnci bteUS yrr mfe> 
Anap^enctriUIi rauntai atfanev orsd 


yai bfeqi*i aU5 C'^orv cfaimio<np3.Tr, 
U S wsl pams to w -,r*j cv.n hnrans <wd 
ai green cid fa jeu ad sw fai.lc M»a 
OTr star up iVWfa«arftrirrmUjS;0.C'00 
IE noafag Ofahl ta iMv-ucrili hrjvES 
Cantor. U.S taiMrchM Aflornn. 

Foe |21Z) 695-1489 a tel |212) M-V29 
USA tor me aefaltd nsxmcAon aid legal feet 


BUSINESS 

SERVICES 


DELAWARE (USA) 
CORPORATIONS 


Quality mnlHenllal servlet Rcxroiable 
ccet CallWrilc fa fre* Vji 
D elaware Reckfry Ud 
PO Boi 484-H. Wllminel'jn. 
Delaware r<w* usa. 

Tef • 302-652-6532 - Fa* 302*653 -8708 
BOO-32I-CQRP IUSA onkl. 


)0 restaurants in the USA and an additional 150 
intematioruily, Bie Boy offers an unsurpassed franchise system. Added 
values include tne Big Boy merchandise sales program. Big Bov 
Adventure comic book and the Big Boy Cub for duldren. Master 
licenses are now being sold for territories throughout greater Europe 
and other international regions. r 


CONTACT: 

Euro-American in terra ticmal 

P.O. Box 36653, Tucson, Arizona, USA 85740 

TEL; 1 1602)883-6422- FAX: («E) 8836513 


9A- 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1. 1994 


Page". 


North Korea: Skillful Inscrutability 

Again, Pyongyang Attempts to Parry at Edge of No Return 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


^ .. . C L^ - Sanger When North Korea first began playing cat 

TOKYO— Th#-fr«JT ,oSe ^* rf and moyse with the Clinton administration 

North Koreans ihJ* 2? Q< ! W *i l0 c ? n '^ cc ow nuckar inspections, Washington’s goal 

nuclear reactor and^JJJf^u 8 v{ rom 8 sccn *d sunplCL The world’s most unpredictable 
inspectors fromSSP^ 11 ^ led ^ anons Communist state, Mr. Clinton said, could not 

of no they areat the edge be penniued to possess a nudear weapon. 

Sonih ■, - , ... But in the ensuing 18 months, as America 

rJSf'SJi?* 3 s President, Kim Yount Sam, 

KhSv B ‘ D 0:111011 °u Tuesday. Mr. 

£ f}?fif S T D J Saj<1 ^ two testes decided 
mat the issue bad reached a “very dangerous , . 

P<»nt. and ns allies have alternately tried to pressure, 

. , j Security Council, in subdued language 
intended to appease China, which has conS- 
t £P° s «d sanctions, attempted late Mon- 
day to send the same message. 

a «■>«« adopted after days of consul- 
tab«i, the Security Council said further consid- 


ai ^ e ^Jh UN requirements on nuclear 
safeguards. That was a veiled reference io sanc- 
tions. 

But Pyongyang knows no one wants to go 
that route — not China and certainly not Ja- 
pan, where the government is doing everything 
it can to suppress discussion of the extensive 
contingency plans it has drawn up to cut off 
hundreds of millions of dollars in funds to the 
North, and perhaps to participate in a shipping 
blockade. 

Pyongyang may well torn to the technique 
that has worked so many times before: Offer a 
little more transparency, just enough to defuse’ 
the immediate crisis, and keep building at the 
Yoogbyon nuclear center. 


Ute Security Council, in subdued language sw “ t -“ Ik a“ d threaten the North into giving 
tended to aooease China w JlT?. up its bomb project, reality has set in and the 

objectives have grown far more complicated. 

Over the past few days, as the North has 
raced to pull nuclear fuel ont of one of its 
reactors in open defiance of its obligations 
under the treaty banning the spread of nuclear 
weapons, there are still raging internal argu- 
tnaiis among the allies over wbat to insist upon, 
how much nsk of confrontation to take and 
what to settle for. 

The problem is that Mr. Clinton's initial goal 
— to establish with certainty that the North 
does not possess a bomb — is now virtually 
unattainable. If the North has built one or two, 
and if that still stymies intelligence agencies 
around the world, the chances of finding it 
anytime soon is next to nO. 

So over the past year or so Washington and 
its allies have subtly shifted goals. 

More important than finding one or two 
weapons made in the past, American officials 
began to say late last year, is preventing the 


North from acquiring more. While it would be a 
bad precedent to pay countries off to observe 
the terms of the Nonproliferation Treaty, the 
Japanese suggest, it would be worse to let North 
Korea become the first country to abandon the 
treaty. 

While a auclear-anned North might be scary, 
many in Smith Korea question whether it is 
worth risking a second disastrous confrontation 
on the Korean Peninsula in 40 years, especially 
Mien the prosperous South has dearly won the 
economic contest and has so much to lose? 

The result has been a muddying of objectives 
that explains in pan how officials could exude 
that a solution was in sight one week and then 
despair about looming disaster the next. 

“No one is sure exactly what we want, and 
what we will settle for,” a senior Japanese 
diplomat said the other day. “So no one is quite 
Sure bow bard to push.’' 

The North has sensed the confusion, some 
Korean experts argue, and capitalized on it 
skillfully. 

Several times now Pyongyang has changed 
the terms of the argument. For seven years it 
barred inspectors altogether, despite the fact 
that it signed the treaty in ] 985. When it finally 
allowed inspections, it entered an argument 
over whether they had the right to visit two 
mysterious waste dumps, detected by American 
satellites, that might reveal how much plutoni- 
um the country already possessed. 

When that issue seemed likely to trigger Se- 
curity Council action, Pyongyang announced h 
was withdrawing from the Nonproliferation 



TAKING THE PLUNGE — A youth trying to beat tire beat with the help of his elephant in New DdhTs Vanning Riveras the 
Infian capital wilted under the highest temperature recorded Sieve in 50 years — 46 degrees centigrade, ov 115 degrees Fahrenheit. 


Treaty, sending Washington scrambling to 
come up «itfa incentives to halt a step that 
would quite legally bar all inspectors. 

A few weeks ago, facing a new threat of 
economic sanctions, the North switched topics 
once again. It let the inspectors finish their 
sampling work in one building while unloading 
began on fuel from the biggest nudear reactor, 
a step that would give Pyongyang the raw 
material for four or five more bombs and would 
destroy the best evidence of how much plutoni- 
um was diverted in the past. Suddenly, rather 


than focus on history, the United States raced 
to make sure none of the new load of fuel was 
diverted. 

The current crisis is focused ou the unloading 
of that fud, which over the weekend proceeded 
at a startling pace. The director-general of the 
International Atomic Energy Agency, Hans 
Blix, waned last week that within days his 
organization would not be in a position to 
verify that all nudear material is accounted for, 
mining that there was little left to negotiate 
about 


Those accusing Washington of taking too 
soft a line say it has simply been strung along: 
The North is moving flat out to build a bomb 
and the elaborate dance is simply a {day for 
time. 

But defenders of the keep- talking strategy 
say that what the North wants more than a 
bomb is to retain the mystery of whether it can 
buDd one or not Unless its’ adversaries are in 
the dark about the dimensions of the program, 
according to this theory, the North will be 
forgotten and not receive the economic aid. 


■^le 

*11 

iC 


St 


East Timor Conference in Manila Tests Southeast Asia’s ‘Good Neighbor’ Policy 


“a 

n 

r o 

°:i 

f d 

!,. 

j 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — ■ In an unusual assertion of 
its weight in Southeast Asia, Indonesia has put 
strong pressure cat the Phflippines to caned an 
international conference on East Timor, a for- 
mer Portuguese colony annexed by Indonesia 
in 1976. . 

The pressure forced President Fidd V. Ra- 
mos of the Philippines to bar Danielle Mitter- 
rand, the wife of Preadent Francos Mitterrand 
of France, and several dozen other prominent 
foreign supporters of sdf-detenmnation for 
East Timor from attending the conference. 

But the Rtilippiiie supreme court on Tuesday 
allowed Fihpino participants to proceed with 


the meeting, although it upheld Mr. Ramos's 
right to exclude foreigners from taking part. 

The affair raises sensitive questions for Indo- 
nesia, the Philippines and other ASEAN mem- 
bers over what amounts to interference m each 
other’s internal affairs. 

The issue goes to the heart of the ASEAN 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

cooperation accord first signed in 1967 by In- 
donesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore 
and Thailand. Brunei joined later. 

Although now widely acknowledged as a 
group that has done much to help bring peace 
and rapid economic growth to southeast Asia, 
the ASEAN countries were in a state of chronic 


conflict with each other before 1967 over terri- 
torial, political and other issues. 

Since then, Indonesia has been careful to 
ma i n ta in a low-key posture toward its neigh- 
bors, despite the fact its size and population of 
188 million make it the giant of the region. 

Some ASEAN officials maimiiin that the 
group could break up if any of its members do 
not show restraint when responding to the 
internal problems of other members. 

“It is important for us to take sensitivities 
into account, and we must not talk of rights as if 
they are in a vacuum," said Syed Hamid Albar. 
the law minister of Malaysia, when asked on 
Monday whether the conference on East Timor 
should be in the Philippines. 

“One of the principles of being good neigh- 
bors is that one must understand the differ- 


ences and sensitivities of your neighbors," he 
added. 

Following a Portuguese pullout from East 
Timor and an outbreak of fighting between 
Timorese supporters and opponents of inde- 
pendence, Indonesia invaded the territory in 
1975 and formally annexed it the following 
year. 

Although Jakarta insists that the handpicked 
East Timorese representatives in this “process 
of decolonization" chose independence 
through integration with Indonesia, the United 
Nations has never recognized the move. 

Indonesia's military-hacked government re- 
garded the East Timorese independence move- 
ment as a crypto-Communist group and feared 
that its success would fan the embers of seces- 
sion in other parts of Indonesia. 


President Suharto of Indonesia, who autho- 
rized the takeover of East Timor, has said be 
could not envisage what would have become of 
Indonesia if it had tolerated the “seeds of seces- 
aomsm." 

In a statement issued in his name on Friday. 
All Alatas, the foreign minister of Indonesia, 
said that the planned involvement in the Ma- 
nila conference of Jose Ramos Horta and other 
leaders of the political and urilitaiy movement 
to win independence for East Timor was “dear- 
ly pan of a political campaign" to attack and 
discredii Indonesia. 

The conference was also “leaning toward 
interference in Indonesia's territorial integri- 
ty," the statement said. 

The statement also indicated that Indonesia 


remained unhappy that the conference was in * 
the Philippines, adding that Jakarta retained ' 
the right to draw its own condnsiona. 

Indonesia had earlier withdrawn its delegates 
from a major regional business conference in 
the Philippines, and an Indonesian minister.! 
had not shown up for a scheduled meeting with i. 
Mr. Ramos. | 

Indonesian officials had also said they were * 
considering other retaliatory measures, indud- ; 
ing withdrawing Indonesia's support as a host * 
ana intermediary fra- long-running peace talks ■■ 
between Manila and an Islamic group seeking 
independence for Muslims in the southern part 
of tbe predominantly Roman Catholic Philip- 
pines. Indonesia is the world’s largest Mnsfcn 
nation. 


Baron Marcel Rich Dies at 79; 
He Founded Bic Pen Empire 


Agace Fmnce-Presu 

PARIS — Baron Mated Bkh, 
79, the founder of the Bic empire of 
pens and disposable razors, died 
Monday, his family arid. 

The Bic company be founded in 
1950 made him one of tbe worid's 


Biro-Swatmin 1957 and the follow- 
ing year took ou the lucrative 
American, market 
His Bic peas quickly became a 
household word, with exports 
around the gfaibei The baton bead- 
ed a multinational com pa ny that in 
industrialists . as dri>- j 1992 _' registere d erf 6 bfl- 
aod latcr ra- lion francs (more than a bflhoa 
doBanl 


. --S' ’ 1 ’’ 


and other 
objects won a worid- 
i market 

The baron headed his firm until. 
1993 when he turned over the 
chairmanship to his son, Bruno. In 
1973, the Bic company also took 
ova- DIM, a weH-known French 
hosiery firm, and tbe Rosy wom- 
en's lingerie company, making his 
group tbe leader in lingerie in 
France and Italy. 

He was also a yachting enthusi- 
ast, and his boat competed in (be 
America's Cup in 1970, 1974, 1977 
and 1980. 

Born on July 29, 1914, in Ibrin, 
he was the sc© of a French mother 
and an Italian father, tbe engineer 
Baron Aim6 Mario Bidi, who was a 
descendant of an old aristocratic 
family from the Savoie region. 

Freon the age of 19, Baron Bkh 
started working as a door-to-door 
salesman before joining an office 
equipment firm, where he rose to 
be drrector of production in 1939. 
After World War fit he used aH Ins 
savings to buy a small pen factory. 
His goal was to produce his own 
cheap, disposable ballpoint pea — 
an unknown product at the time. 

The Bic pen was put cm the mar- 
ket in November 1953 and caught 
on in postwar France with a success 
even the baron never imagined. He 
!it Ins product to Italy next, 
then bought out tire Fn g K - sh firm 



In 1971, he branched out further, 
buying part of the French couture 
house Guy Laroche, then MM two 
years later, followed by Rosy. 

In 1975, Bic launched its dispos- 
able razor Bra, defying the heavy 
competition that already had a firm 
hold on the market in 1983, he 
took control of the pencil firm 
Conte. 

Ezra Taft Benson, 94, 

In Eisenhower's Cabinet 

New York Times Service 

Ezra Taft Benson, 94, president 
of the Mormon Church smee 1985 
and a secretary of agriculture m the 
Eisenhower administration, died 
Monday at his home in Sah Lake 
City. 

Mr. Benson, who had been in 
frail healthin recent years and rare- 
ly appeared in public, died of con- 
gestive heart failure, said Brace Ol- 
sen, a spokesman for the church. 
Mr. Benson suffered a broken hip 
several years ago when he was 
standing near a horse and it rolled 
over on Mm. 

He took cfaarae of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 
seven years ago, as it was emerging 
as rare of the world’s fastest-grow- 
ing denominations. It was also en- 
joying great prosperity (to remain 
in gooa s tanding . Mormons must 
pay 10 percent of their income to 


tbe church), and its political influ- 
ence was growing, particularly 
among conservative Republicans. 
Indeed, Mr. Benson once ques- 
tioned whether it was possible to be 
a good Mormon and a liberal Dem- 
ocrat at tire same time. 

Mr. Benson became well known 
in the 1960s and ’70s lor his opposi- 
tion tothedva rights and the wom- 
en's movements and fra his associ- 
ation with the far-right John Birch 
Society. 

Fabririo Manoneffi, Headed 
Sistine Chapel Restoration 

ROME (AP) — Fabrizio Man- 
cinfilli, 54, the Vatican art official 
who oversaw tire restoration of Mi- 
chelangelo's frescos in the Sistine 
Chapel, died Sunday, several 
months after doctors operated to 
remove a tumor from his pancreas, 
a colleague said. 

Mr. ManrincDi officially was the 
Vatican Museums' director of Byz- 
antine, medieval and modern art, 
and was responsible for the picture 
gallery. But he also was an author- 
ity on Raphael and Michelangelo, 

Jan Carlos Onetti, 84, a Uru- 
guayan-born novelist and poet and 
one of Latin America’s most distin- 
guished writers, died of a heart at- 
tack Monday in Madrid. 


Vatican Stamp for Galileo 

Tbe Associated Press 
VATICAN CITY — The Vati- 
can issued issue two stamps on 
Tuesday commemorating tbe 17th- 
century astronomer Galileo Gali- 
lei, who was once condemned by 
tire chinch for contending that tire 
Earth was not the center of tire 
run verse. 


JUNE 5-11, 1944 

SEVEN DAYS THAT CHANGED 
THE WORLD. 

The historic week started with the fall 
of Pome and continued with the D-Day 
assault and the Affied advance into 
Normandy. 

To commemorate these dramatic 
days, we wHI reproduce the seven front 
pages from the New Ybrk HeraJd Tribune 
which chronicled the first week of the rebirth 
df liberty on the European continent. 

Fifty years later, you’ll foBow the 
events day-by-day from the reports of the 
Herald Tribune’s award-winning team of war 
correspondents. 

Don^ miss the IntemattonalHer^ 
Tribune’s special commemorative series 
starting Saturday, June 4th. 


CVTKRNATTOfW. 



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A brief history. 





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I Tbe lalesl peace initiative for Nonhem 
reland. set forth by the Irish and British 
i ovemments in December, received a small 
I ase on life Iasi week after months of siale- 
aate. Gerry Adams, the leader of Sinn Fein, 
•olilicai aim of the Irish Republican Array, 
promised to respond to the December pro- 
losals after the elections for the European 
’arliament on June 9. Nothing guarantees a 
lositive or even an encouraging response, 
jut the pledge represents a small adjustment 
if Mr. Adams’s previous stalling. It was 
indoubtedly prompted by a tough siaiemen i 
nit of Downing Street that provided its final 
rlarifications of the proposal to negotiate 
tnd. with Irish backing, sent a take-it-or- 
eave-it message to Mr. Adams. 

Compared with Rwanda. Bosnia or even 
Washington, the killing in Northern Ireland 
[appears to be a only a minor catastrophe. On 
[average just over 100 people have died each 
(year in the sectarian violence that has been 
going on for a quarter of a century. It is no 
small problem, though, for Lhose who live in 
the province, or even in Britain and the Irish 
Republic. Two weekends ago. for example. 
Protestant loyalist terrorists made an unsuc- 



cessful attempt to bomb a pub in central 
Dublin, killing one man and wounding anoth- 
er. This followed a week in which four Catho- 
lic men were shot and killed by Protesiam 
gunmen, a British soldier was abducted and 
killed by the IRA. and an employee at a Royal 
Ulster Constabulary police station Iosl his life 
to a bomb. This continual violence obviously 
takes a toll on both sides and prompts respon- 
sible national leaders to move toward peace. 

Though the IRA is seen as the primary 
roadblock in this effort its counterparts in the 
loyalist community have not been quiet. Prot- 
estant paramilitaries, in facL were responsible 
for more deaths than the IRA in 19°2. IW 
and so far this year. This stepped-up activity 
may simplv be retaliatory and could end when 
IRA terrorism abates. It may also signal an 
intention to claim a place ai any negotiating 
table where the IRA is seated. The prospect or 
including loyalist terrorists in peace talks 
should spur the IRA to sit down at the peace 
table now. rather than later. In any event, 
a permanent cease-fire is an absolute precon- 
dition to talks, as it should be. There is no 
reason for Mr. Adams to delay his response. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Slovakia Needs Friends 


In the 15 months that he served as prime 
minister of the newly independent slate of 
Slovakia, Vladimir Meciar came close to run- 
ning it into the ground. Production dropped 
10 percent in 1993 alone, and unemployment 
rose to 15 percent in the cities and 30 percent 
in the countryside. Along Lhe way. Mr. Me- 
ciar. an ex-boxer and longtime Communist 
apparatchik, never ceased pounding away at 
Slovakia's beleaguered minorities, the Gyp- 
sies and Hungarians. Booted out in March. 
Mr. Meciar wants his old job back. Western 
governments and investors have reason to 
hope he doesn’t set it. 

Once Slovakia split from the Czech Repub- 
lic in 1993. Mr. Meciar brought privatization 
to a sharp ha/L He canceled several completed 
deals and grabbed the privatization portfolio 
for himself. Understandably, foreign inves- 
tors stayed awjv. Then, in February, when his 
grip on power began to fairer, he hurriedly 
sold off 45 of Slovakia's leading companies to 
cronies at bargain prices. 

Fed up. several members of his own party 
defected in mid-March and kicked Mr. Me- 
ciar oul He was replaced by Josef Moravcik. 
who served as foreign minister in the last days 
of the unified Czechoslovakia. Mr. Mcrav- 
rik’s government pledged to step up privatiza- 
tion and began to patch up relations with 
Slovakia's 300.000 Hungarian:.. 


That eased but hardly solved Slovakia’s 
problems. Mr. Meciar s demand that new elec- 
tions be held in June was thwarted when the 
courts threw out his signature petitions. Bui the 
agreed election dates — Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 — 
limit the new government's time to make an 
impact, particularly since the International 
Monetary Fund has already demanded some 
prompt bell-lightening. 

Despite his miserable record. Mr. Meciar 
remains a formidable contender. HU oppo- 
nents. while competent, lack his rabble-rous- 
ing style. Meanwhile he continues to bash 
the Hungarian minority, and recently added 
the Czechs to his hit list. One of his first 
statements after being deposed was to assert 
that he had thwarted a planned Czech mis- 
sion in 1992. Not a shred of evidence to 
support such a claim has yet turned up. 

Slovaks still pay attention to what they 
hear from Washington and Western Europe 
about their new nation. During his time in 
office Mr. Meciar labeled every critic of his 
regime an enemy of Slovakia. By responding 
positively to the r.e» government's opennos. 
Western businessmen and government; will 
have a rare chance during the next few 
months to let Slovaks know- that there is >till 
something in the outside world they thought 
they had Tost. Frond*. 

— THE Mill YORK TIMES 



Instead of fighting to dismantle Washing- 
ton's big money system. President B:!i Clinton 
has helped his party become its biggest benefi- 
ciary. Pledges to clean up American campaign 
financing procedures notwithstanding. Sir. 
Clinton has expended more time and energy 
courting well-to-do donors at fancy private 
receptions than prodding Congress to enact 
terious political reform. 

Since Mr. Clinton accepted hi? party's pres- 
idential nomination in July 1992 and took 
control of the parly apparatus, the Democrat- 
ic National Committee has raised an astonish- 
ing S4; million in “soft money." The 520 
million in soft money collected by the Demo- 
crats during the first 15 months of the Clinton 
presidency is S" million more than the Repub- 
lican Party reported collecting during the first 
15 months of George Bush's term. 

This represents aggressive use of a yawning 
loophole that allows special interests to evade 
limits on direct giving to candidates by mak- 
ing huge contributions to the parties. The 
party can then spend these unrestricted funds, 
known as soft money, to help candidates. 
Meanwhile, for want of real presidential lead- 
ership, the cause of campaign Finance reform 
still languishes on Capitol Hill. 

Mr. Clinton cannot even claim to be work- 
ing bard to change the rules while he helps his 
party to rake in all that money. Far from iL 
After his striking inaugural call to "give this 



capita! back to the people." he bowed to 
House Speaker Thomas Foley's insistence on 
delay, thereby capping the momentum for 
reform growing out of the election. He capitu- 
lated to House Democrats again last spring, 
embracing a legislative proposal that failed to 
reduce the amount a Hou*e member may 
accept from an individual political action 
committee, or PAC — a out Mr. Clinton 
strongly favored a* a presidential candidate. 

Since then, Mr. Clinton has rarely been 
heard on the issue. The House of Representa- 
tive') finally passed a campaign finance bill in 
November. It needs to be" reconciled with the 
stronger measure pasvM hy the Senate. But 
House Democrats keep resisting making need- 
ed changes that would reduce incumbent*' ad- 
vantages and also make it possible to overcome 
a Republican-led filibuster in the Senate. 

A major sticking point is the individual 
PAC limit. But there tue other problems as 
well, such as the House bill’s preservation of 
members' own “leadership PACs." and its 
failure to crack down on members' conversion 
of campaign funds for personal use. 

With time fasL running out in the session. 
Mr. Clinton must now decide: Is he committed 
to cleaning up Washington, or does he warn to 
be remembered as the 540 Million Man who 
proved that the Democrats could sweep up 
more tainted money than the Republicans? 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


I’d 


Advance 


TASHiNGTON — While much of the 
world's at '.Sr, lion has tented to Europe, 
the D-Day celebration and she triumph of our 
values over tyranny : n the long Co id *ve 

must not waver in the chaiier.gc advancing 
those same values — freedom and prosperity — 
in Asia, and especially in China. It is in this 
region that many of the profound challenge? to 
America's national interest can be found: it is 
in litis region that our generation's progress will 
in large part be measured 
A 21st century economy is taking shape in 
Hiint iThina !aO tmr -.vn< '.he world i ffiSteSi 


We will have more contacts, 
more trade . and more intense 
dialogue on human rights. 


growing economy, a market for $S billion 
worth of American-produced goods, and the 
source of 15Q.00Q American jobs. China has 
an atomic arsenal and a veto in the United 
Nations Security Council: it is a major factor 
in Asian and global security. 

We share important interests, such as □ 
nuclear-free Korean Peninsula and sustaining 
the global environment. .And it is in China 
where the march of freedom must cover some 
of its most difficult ground. 

We won the C'old^War fry realistically and 
rersisiently balancing the security, economic 
and moral interests of the United Slates. We 
will protect our interests and make progress in 
China by doing precisely the same Thing. 

Our challenge’ is how" to trade with China 
without trading away our ideals: how to help 
economic growth lead to greater individual 
freedom: how to advance our interests in a 
more open China while recognizing other sub- 
stantial interests in China and throughout Asia. 
That is why I have renewed China's most- 



Bv Bill Clinton 

•/ 


fevored-njtion trading status and embarked on 
a new course to support forces of constructive 
change in China while strengthening the U.S.- 
China relationship. 

In Mav 1993. I issued an executive order 
conditioning future renewal of China 5 MFN 
status on overall progress regarding seven as- 
pects of its human rights performance. After 
Years of argument and veto, we no longer had 
tw o China "policies — one from the Congress 
and one from the president — but a single 
American policv toward that nation. 

The executive order, together with expanded 
high-level contacts with China, bore some fruit. 
The Chinese resolved urgent emigration cases 
v-c have called to their attention and are permit- 
tinn inspection visits concerning Chinese ex- 
ports produced with prison labor. 

The aovemment released Wang Juntao and 
Chen Zoning, rwo of the most important dissi- 
dents from The Tiananmen Square era, along 
with several prominent religious prisoners. It 
provided us with an accounting of some other 
prisoner*. China has engaged in serious conver- 
sations with the International Committee of the 
Red Cress about allowing prison visits. The 
Chinese government has voiced its acceptance of 
the Uruverrz! Declaration of Human Rights, and 
has h«un technical talks with us about ending 
the jamming of the Voice of America. 

I welcome these steps — but I do not believe 
they constitute sufficient progress. To say oth- 
erwise would not honestly or accurately reflect 
the situation in China. 

Although China released some dissidents, it 
failed to release many more, and during the 
same period, it arrested or detained other 
Chinese who appear to be guilty of nothing 
more than peacefully expressing their views. 
And there has been little or no progress 
regarding the protection of the dminctive 



in sl More Open Chins 


religious and cultural heritage of 

While the executive order anc i&u other 
efforts clearly produced results iba. ma^ a 
genuine difference in some eeopfe s ^ 
ing human rights to most-tit' ored-naii 
t«h^en usas farasilcaa.Beca^o^e 
progress China has made in a nme or j 
turbulence and difficulty, very few advocates 
of human rights have called for a toial liT g 
of MFN. But some still propose targeted but 
sweeping sanctions or linking human nghts to 
America's annual MFN review. 

I believe such approaches are te*J**v 
advance the cause oflnunae nghts in Chraaan 
more likely to undermine our own interest 

• .1 Tt 1 mrrtirjnP JVfmu- 



Licoaita mums 1*11 1 * iv M—a - t , 

U to block needed progress on seomty and 
conontic issues while yielding utile if an> 
irogress on human rights. . . 

We must pursue our human rights agenda 
4th China in a way that docs not isolate China 
ram us. We cannot help change human nghts 
a China if we are not there. The best way to do 
his is with more direct and targeted means to 
chieve continued improvetacais- We will thus 
ursue a new and vigorous program to support 
hose in China working, for democracy and 
iii pan rights, delinked from MFN- 

« We wtU tefl freedom's story to the people of 
Tuna. We will launch Radio Free Asia, tnorase 
ae Voice of America's radio broadcasts to Chma 
nd inaugurate a weekly VOA television pro- 
ram to report on developments in Chma. 

• We will support others who stand for the 
Ignity of the Chinese people- We will encour- 

ae .American nongovernmental organizations 
5 aw assistance, where it is desired and can be 
iwfuHy received, to the many new private 
rganizations working in China to advance the 
ause of human rights. 

• We will encourage the business community 

■» fV-wr nrAimwai’^ W <? WlQ 35k 


ATmore u? improve working roattooos, ex* 

tS mesof Chinese 

uonarid otherwise enhance human ngim con- 
ditions in China. 

• We will engage others-— ® 

Nations and elsewhere — m 

improve human rights in Chma. Tbs wffl hdp 
ibw onphaaze ihai human rights ate unwHsal; 
standards, not Americajwniposed ideas. 

• As appropriate, we wiB m mmaio tiypres- 

cure of sanctions to combat continuing hwnac 
rights abuses. We will «tend &JMBJ s 
Loosed by the United States as a restft of the 
events in Tiananmen Strain. I amalsobanmcg 
the import of munitions, pnaapaflygm? anq 
ammunition, from China. , 

IbdicvcthecouraelhavTch osCTy iteOsthc 
best chance of advance® Amtaica s mteresti 
with Chma. We will have more contacts, more 
trade, more international cooperation , and 
more intense and constant dialogue bn human 
rights issues. We must see onr relations with 
China within the broader context of our inter- 
ests in the Asian Pacific region, of which Amer- 
ica is an integral pari. 

In three decades and three wars in this centu- 
ry, Americans fought and died in the Asian 
Pacific region to advance the nation's security 
and its ideals. The goal of promoting, more open 
societies abroad — advancing democrat hu- 
man rights and an evolution toward market 
economics — is deeply embedded m America's 
history, ideals and security. The actions! have 
taken with regard to China are in the long-term 
interests of both the United States and China. ! 
am confident that they wifl prove to be the best 
way to advance the cause of human rights. 

The president wrote this comment in response 
to a request from the Global Viewpoint service of 
the Los Angela Tima Syndicate, 



Takes the President Prisoner 


N EW YORK — Soon it will start 
sinking in — just how much 
President Bill Clinton and the United 
States will have :o pay for hi? broken 
promises about China. The truth is 
that payment ha? started already. 

Politically the Chinese Commu- 
nists have token a new prisoner — the 
president. Ar.d at a time when misun- 
derstanding about American intent 
could bring war with the North Kore- 
ans. how are they now supposed to 
figure out whai Mr. Clinton mean? 0 

"Children often think they ear. 
break their promise? and zet away 
without penalty if they ;u«i put on a 
sugar-face. Bat when grown-up?, par- 
ticularly a prsr. idenTiai grown-up. 
cam that fantasy into adulthood. life 
can get nerve-racking for everybody. 

Some of the economic men-boy* 
around the president told him to for- 
get that order imposing a tariff penalty 
if Beijing continued to destroy dissent 
by arrcsL tenure and forced labor. 

Forget ihai Beijing, in ;-cur face, 
refused to budge. Tomorrow the vot- 
ers will not remember If you break 
your word. Some of them’ will even 
forget that most of the China trade 
jobs were going already. Do it — 


By A. M. Rosenthal 

American rig business will remember. 

Chinese Communists do r.ot play 
children's games. They know the 
president has put himself into their 
hands and the;- - know how to squeeze. 

From rime to time they may release 
some political prisoners." The Clinton 
administration will dance happily on 

the strings, it has committed itself to 
another Tantasy — that Beijing, in 
gratitude to Mr. Clinton, will relax 
rule by police terrorism. 

That iiu;t astonish Beijinz. Didn't 
the Communis:.* say repeatedly that 
the “stability'' of their government de- 
pend;. on putting down opposition 
and that an-esLs are likely to go up 
overall, not down? No pretense There. 

.And r.c-w they know there is no 
possibility of economic reprisals by 
the United States, the one thing that 
might have brought a bii more than a 
one-night stand on easing repression. 
Now the jailers can turn to the prison- 
ers in the political cells and say . where 
are your American friends, you fools? 
^ When more arrests do come, the 
Clinton adminisiration will not be 


just an innocent bystander tm-tutting 
away. Washington did not arrest Chi- 
nese dissidents — it just put on dou- 
ble locks, that's all 
Without outside pressure Beijing 
will not give up repression. It fears 
freedom too much. But sporadically 
k can tighten or loosen a bit. 

When it tightens. Mr. Chnton will 
look foolish. Then, as the reward for 
loosening repression for awhile. Beij- 
ing will coflect political or economic 
reward from America. It will be a new 
game, but not for chDdren. 

The price Mr. Clinton wiH pay for his 
turnabout win nrvoKe only hrm.’ .Ameri- 
ca's honor, tens of millions of Chinese 
prisoners and forced laborers. Tibet’s 
existence and such fringe matters. 

But the price in Korea could arouse 
even economic bottom- liners in Wash- 
ington. The last lime North Korea 
misunderstood American intentions 
and resolre ii started the war that 
devastated Korea and brought China 
and the United States into combat 
So far Mr. Clinton has played a 
bad Korea hand carefully and gener- 
ally wefl —few threats, much empha- 
sis on negotiation and compromise. 
But compromise what when and 


how? One day the president says 
North Korea must not be allowed to 
have nuclear weapons. Another day 
LIS. defense and intelligence people 
say North Korea already has than. 
One day international inspection 
looks hopefuL another day it is one 
more Korean trick. 

China helped North Korea get mis- 
siles and nuclear techniques. What 
Beijing does in the future does not 
depend cm U.S. human rights policies. 
Chma wifl decide its Korean stand 
and what it thinks are the risks of war 


from North Korea. Even then Beijing 
may not be able to control its cheats. 

Tbe North Koreans will make their 
own final decisions largely on how 
they read Mr. Ctintoa. The world has 
some trouble doing that about Bosnia 
and Haiti. Now the president's whirla- 
bout on China makes North Korea's 
reading light considerably dimmer. 

That can be dangerous, for them, 
for South Koreans, for .Americans 
and for Chinese — in or out of the 
doubly locked cells. 

The New York Times. 



ib-,rX- <, c 1? 


Complicity With the Khmer Rouge Must End 


By Morton Abramowitz 


W ASHINGTON - Cambodia 
awoke from i Ik*-> ear night- 
mare in May 1^3 wish historic UN- 
spnnsored elections. Ninety percent 
ri the population deftea Khmer 
Rouge threat- to vote for reaec. 
There ws; iy pc that Cambodia was 
or the read to recondLziior. 

Bui today. Pol Pot'-* v-cakened 
forces are on the attack again. In the 
past few months the Khmer Rouge 
have recaptured their Paiiin head- 
quarters. establishing control over ar- 
eas in northern and western Cambo- 
dia ar.d displacing 60.000 villagers. 

The ineffectiveness of the Phnom 
Penh government and an ill-conceived 
military campaign are key reasons for 
Khmer Rouge successes. But a major 
external factor is Thailand’s help Tor 
the Khmer Rouge. The Thai military 
provides them with goods, sanctuary 
for their leaders and reportedly . arms. 


Despite Thailand's impressive 
growth and us halting move? toward 
democracy . the That military ar.d its 
civilian supporters dominate foreign 
po!i:;.. Cross-border gem and timber 
rrarjaaicns between Thailand a ad 
Cambodia are murky but highly prof- 
itabi: for both sides — amounting to 
perhaps 520 million a month. 

: ne Thai government's altitude to- 
ward Cambodia has beer shaped by a 
troubled history. Bangkok never 
liked the earlier Sihanouk govern- 
ment and helped stoke up border 
insurgencies. In the 1980s. when the 
chief concern was getting the Viet- 
namese out of Cambodia, the United 
States and Southeast Asian nations 
did not put any priority on ending 
Thai and Chinese support for Pol 
Pol The Vietnamese left after the 


1991 Paris peace agreement China 
reportedlv ceased its support. 

Some Thais want to keep a band in 
Cambodian affairs and create a sort of 
permanei:: buffer rone against a rena- 
scent Vietnam. A senior Thai official 
tola me in 1992 that protecting the 
Khmer Rouge was an important de- 
ment of Thai security. Tbe Thai gp»- 
eminent publicly proclaims the oppo- 
site and provides economic assistance 
to rite Phnom Penh goveramenL Bui if 
it does not condone the military’s 
complicity with the Khmer Rouge, it 
has not controlled the practice. 

Perhaps it cannoL given the Thai 
govemmenfa weakness. Whether by 
graft or statecraft Thailand has be- 
come Pol Pot’s best ally. 

The war in Cambodia could not 
have been brought to an end. nor 


could 370.000 refugees have been re- 
turned from Thailand, without the 
largest UN peacekeeping and assis- 
tance operation ever assembled, cost- 
ing S2 billion. Now only the world 
community can help ensure that 
Cambodia and its hopes are not de- 
stroyed by the Khmer Rouge. 

Pol Pot's insurgents have suffered 
serious political setbacks and losses 
of manpower, but they are tenacious. 
The United States and regional gov- 
ernments need to focus on the issue. 

The problem is a tough one. Trade 
sanctions and other punitive efforts 
against a friendly Thailand would be 
ridiculous. Providing weapons and 
training to the Cambodian govern- 
ment might help, but its top-heavy 
army does not inspire confidence. 

Tbe only tools remaining are moral 
and diplomatic suasion. Bangkok will 
resist having the issue raised, but do- 


ing so tnultilaterally can put greater 
pressure on die military and perhaps 
induce Thailand’s top figures, includ- 
ing its respected monarch, to weigh in. 

Secretary of State Warren Christo- 
pher's participation in Association of 
South East Asian Nation meetings in 
Bangkok this July offers a prime op- 
portunity to air the world’s concerns. 

President Bill Clinton has rightly 
said that America cannot solve every 
world problem. But it should work 
with others when U-S. participation 
can make a difference, working with 
the Western allies and ASEAN to 
help break the Tbai-Khmer Rouge 
connection is such an opportunity. 


The writer is president of the Carnegie 
Endowment for International Peace, and 
was U.S. ambassador to Thailand from 
1978 to 1981. He contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post 


Land Reforms A Prickly Challenge for the Mandela Government 


A Balanced Decision on OilnH 

President Bfll Clinton acted appropriately in 
decoupling human rights from trade policy in 
renewing most-favored-natiou trading status 
for China. “We have reached ihe end of the 
usefulness of that policy," be said, and we rausL 
sadly agree. It was a difficult political decision, 
but one thoughtfully made in recognition of the 
need to build a productive, long-term, strategic 
relationship with China. A C hina engaged and 
open is far more desirable than a Communist 
giant in isolation. 

That is not to suggest that China has made 
vast improvements in human rights. It has qol 
N or should the United States abandon the 
issue. Tbe president was unequivocally clear on 
two points: that the United Stales will continue 
to champion human rights and that abuses 
continue in China. But the attempt to leverage 


trade for improvements in human rights has 
fallen short. The question now is what is the 
best way to pursue human rights in China? The 
issue is real, but it should not be the defining 
element in political economic and security 
discussions wilh Beijing. Mr. Clinton now be- 
lieves that advances in human rights are far 
more likely under improved relations and when 
they are not beneath the cloud of the annual 
MFN review. The favorable trade status is 
accorded the vasL majority of U.S. trading 
partners without annual reviews. 

Tensions between the Beijing government 
and the provinces have widened with modern- 
ization; further stress is resulting because 
changes in leadership are expected soon. With 
China in flux. Congress should support Mr. 
Clinton’s balanced decision on MFN. thereby 
presenting a united U.S. front to Beijing. 

— Los Angeles Times. 



International Herald Tribune 

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L ONDON — "Awaking on Friday 
t morning. June 20. 1913. the 
South African Native found himself, 
not actually a slave, but a pariah in 
the land of his birth." 

Thus Solomon Tshddso Piaatje. a 
founder of the African National Con- 
gress. began his book "Native Life in 
South Africa." an outcry against one 
of the most harrowing laws ever in- 
flicted on black South Africans. 

The 1913 Land Act prevented 
them from owning any land outside a 
few arid, worthless parcels: About 90 
percent of the country was cordoned 
off for whites alone. 

Eighty-one years later, the land 
question has lost noneoFits urgency. 

Before the next presidential elec- 
tion. in 1999, President Nelson Man- 
dela will be under immense pressure 
to address the land hunger of blacks. 

It is no coincidence that the ANC 
woo by the widest electoral margins in 
the northern Transvaal the eastern 
Cape and the northwest — the regions 
that suffered most Tram the territorial 
plunder of the bantustan system, 
which, after 1960. saw the segregation 
and forced resettlement of black’Sduib 
Africans into 10 ethnic reserves. In 
such places, as one land rights activist 
said earlier this year, “we have seen 
our land dry up and blow awav in the 
wind, because we have been' forced 
into smaller and smaller places." 

The new government will lake a 
first step toward land reform in the 
coining months, when it is expected 
to introduce a bill in Parliament es- 
tablishing a Land Claims Court 
The court, which could convene by 
the end of the year, will embark on 
the gargantuan labor of weighing 
black South Africans* claims on land 
seized under the 1913 Act and subse- 
quent laws up until the 1980s. 

Some groups, notably the Pan-Af- 
ricanisl Congress, are critical of the 
ANCs refusal to review land seizures 
prior to 1913. The PAC maintains 


By Rob Nixon 


that any property held by white set- 
tlers since their forebears docked at 
Cape Town in 1652 should be avail- 
able for reclamation. Such a policy 
would suck the courts into a 440-year 
quicksand of often undocumented 
claims over territory that has changed 
hands over the centuries. 

The government will have to act 


The government will have 
to act promptly. If it fails 
to do so, it faces the risk 
that communities will 
take matters into 
their own hands. 


promptly. Otherwise, it risks the like- 
lihood that communities will take 
matters into their own hands. 

This is precisely what tbe Mfengu 
tribe did last year. Since 1841, the 
Mfengu had worked a strip of eastern 
Cape farmland, granted to them by 
the British colonial government in ap- 
preciation for their support during a 
war against the Xhosa people. 

Then, in 1977. soldiers arrived with 
clubs, guns and armored trucks. The 
regime had decreed the Mfengu terri- 
tory to be a "black spot" that bad to 
be removed. The Mfengu were 
dumped in a desolate bantustan. and 
their land sold ro while farmers. 

Since 1960. milli ons of South Afri- 
cans have been similarly dispos- 
sessed Whai is remarkable about the 
Mfengu case, however, is the way the 
conflict has been resolved. 

After all their appeals fell on deaf 
ears, a Mfengu delegation returned to 
the eastern Cape last year and occu- 
pied some property adjoining their 


old farms. Several of the white farm- 
ers heard their story and sympathized 
with their appeal for restitution. 

Frederik de Klerk's government 
was pressured to buy back 19 of the 
original Mfengu farms and return 
them to their rightful owners. The 
white farmers and black claimants 
then brokered a remarkable agree- 
ment whereby the whites could con- 
tinue to farm, but as paying tenants 
of the black landowners. 

The amicable resolution of the 
Mfengu land claim is momentous: It 
gives substance to Mr. Mandela's vi- 
sion of a conciliatory “ rainbow ” 
South Africa. But does it foreshadow 
similar accords nationwide? 

A property rights clause in South 
Africa's interim constitution ensures 
that land cannot be expropriated 
without “just and equitable com- 
pensation. In the Mfengu case, this 
amount was judged to be Sl.l mil- 
lion. If that rale of compensation to 
white fanners were maintained else- 
where, decisions handed down by tbe 
Land Claims Court would quickly 
bankrnpt the new government. 

The National Lind Committee, a 
grassroots organization made up of 
representatives from all over South 
Africa, has suggested these strategies: 
Surplus government-owned property 
should be redistributed among pro- 
spective black fanners. Unfair subsi- 
dies to white farmers should be ended 
and Hmits should be placed on the 
number of farms anyone can own. 

The committee also advocates en- 
suring that black South Africans have 
access to tbe kind of bank loans and 
local government Support that they 
have been historically denied. 

The urgency of this issue was 
brought home to me as I traveled 
through the rural Western Cape after 
the elections. In several cases, I found 
that white farmers had sacked and 


banished laborers from their proper- 
ty after learning that they had voted 
for the African National Congress. 

Settling post-1913 claims will prove 
exacting. Since I960 alone, 3J million 
blades have been forcibly resettled. 

Most of those have been women. 
Black women make up the bulk of tbe 
rural population. The democratizing 
of land ownership will remain pro- 
foundly compromised if traditional 
laws that often make it impossible for 
women to acquire or inherit property 
are not revised. 

The ANC heads a government of 
national unity with opponents from 
Mr. de Klerk’s party and the Zulu- 
based Inkaiba Freedom Party. Thus 
tbe ANCs new minister of land affairs 


will have to strike a truce with an 
agriculture minister who is a holdover 
from the old order. This suggests that 
the ANCs ambition of redistributing 
30 percent of all South Africa’s farm- 
land by 1999 will be exceedingly hard 
to achieve. But the new government 
would be ill advised to let the land 
question dip too far down its agenda. 

As the peasant uprisings in Mexico 
have shown, too little land reform too 
late can rouse visceral passions and 
leave a legacy of lingering unrest 


The writer is author of " Homelands. 
Harlem and Hollywood: Soui'i A fricari 
Culture and the World Beyond" He 
contributed this comment to The New 
York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Arrrvederct All 

ROME — According to a report of 
Cavaliere G. P. Riva, Italian Consul 
General in New York, it appears that 
while tbe Italian emigrants landed in 
New York in 1892 numbered 57.830, 
in 1893 they reached the number of 
69,201. In 1893 Italian immigration 
in New York was the greatest in the 
last ten years. Cavaliere Riva thinks 
the increase comes from the high 
wages, but he adds that the condition 
of the working men in America is not 
so prosperous as it once wasu The Ital- 
ian government has sent a circular to 
the prefects advising them to discour- 
age emigration in tbe United States. 

1919: Turmoil in Mexico 

WASHINGTON — Mexico is again 
in a turmoil according to despatches 
received here. Not only is General 
[Pancho] Villa making trouble, but 
the Yaqui Indians near Juarez are 
restless. In the Mexican capital ma- 
chine-guns have been placed on the 


roofs of the palace and the cathedral 
while the military guard has been 
doubled. General Obragon has re- 
fused to march against the bandit 
chieftain Villa, which leads to the 
bdief that President Carranza is un- 
able to cope with the insurrection. 


NEW YORK — [From our New Y. 
echlion:] A young and vacillating 
boat commander, who asked his E 
l ®5 Wnors ky radio whether 
should torpedo the Portuguese refu 
ship Serpa Pinto in the nrid-Atlai 
last week, kept 385 passengers ; 
crew men in a state of tenor as tl 
drifted in fife-boats for eight ho 
waitingfor the Nazi to get his ordi 
when the instructions, probably fr 
some office in the WUheim-strai 
away, came through, tl 
told the submarine commander qoi 
sink the ship. He permitted the p 
sj-flSCfs and crew to go back abex 
the Sapa Pinto and proceed on tt 
course to Philadelphia. 


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INTERNATIO N AL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNE SDAY, JIHVE I, 1994 

OPINION 


9 

Page ‘ S — 


Ashes of Memory in Sarajevo 


Sif AJE T?’ ^^-Heizegovi. 

aa Throughout that lone 
“"““ShU S^o wa i H 
liantly riJununated by the fire rag 

mgmtheVgecnica.ttiwSSS. 
SgilfL** tater beSmTSL 

Nauonai Library of Bosnia-Herae- 
gwa- Bhc^wtJV. still hoi but. 
terfbes -- books and papers 
a flau», the library’s treasure — 
we flying around 'and falling over 
*«ant pans of the dty. 6 
Crowding in from surrounding 

sheets and alleys in total disregard 
of danger, half of Saraiero — 


By Ivan Lovrenovic 


I bod underestimated 
die barbaric hatred of 
memory, ofcmUzatioru 
&£ same hatred that 
had burned down the 
Vijecnica library. 


starved and misery-stricken people, 
exhausted by a long and cruel siege 
— rushed to save the soul of their 
aty. Nothing could be done. 

Flm rite roof of the old building 
was hit by hundreds of incendiary 
rockets from the Serbian artillery 
in the hills overlo oking the city. 

As the blaze readied Neronian 
proportions, every access to the Vi- 
jecnica was blocked by constant, 
m a ni ac a l fire from machine guns 
and mortars. Hundreds of thou- 
sands of volumes — rare books, 
m a n uscripts, periodicals, precious 
documents — all had disappeared 
by daybreak. 

Also gone was the Vijecnica it- 
self, Sarajevo's most emblematic 
building, an architectural symbol 
of the bizarre and entangled history 
of this city. 

A luxurious imitation of the 
Moorisb-Spanish style the Austro- 
Hungarian authorities systemati- 
cally introduced into already pic- 
turesque Bosnian towns, it had a 
strange triangular ground plan and 
an octagonal atrium supported by 
monumental marble pillars. 


The Vijecnica burned down in 
August 1992. Another fire that 
summer destroyed Sarajevo's Ori- 
ental Institute and all its books. 

Written over a thousand years in 
the peace and quiet of God knows 
whai scriptorium in Sarajevo, Sam- 
arkand. Cordoba or Cairo, hun- 
dreds of unique manuscripts of ex- 
traordinary value disappeared 
there in a single infernal eight. 

The monastery, the church and 
the school of the Franciscan Semi- 
nary in Nedzarici, a western suburb 
of Sarajevo,, was also home to an 
irreplaceable collection of scholar- 
ly and anistic treasures. There were 
thousands of books in the common 
and the professors* own libraries, 
sculptures, stained-glass windows, 
mosaics, paintings by the best- 
known modern artists of Bosnia 
and Croatia — all arduously, pa- 
tiently and joyfully collected, com- 
missioned or built with the devo- 
tion the Franciscans have shown 
for seven centuries. 

The Franciscan collection was 
public property. Everybody was 
free to use it and everybody who 
came was treated as a welcome 
guest and friend. What no one 
knew was that work of a different 
kind had been going on in Nedzar- 
ici for years. 

The army of the former Yugosla- 
via, preparing for the crimes it is 
now committing, had built a fan- 
tastic underground system of bun- 
kers, corridors and storage spaces 
for ammunition and heavy weap- 
ons placed on camouflaged hy- 
draulic elevators. 

The Serbs put this system in oper- 
ation and occupied Nedzarici in 
June 1992. Within 24 hours, the 
Franciscan Seminary was looted of 
its priceless works, and the profes- 
sors and staff brutally expelled. I 
hear that in Belgrade markets one 
can now buy precious books, at bar- 
gain prices, bearing the stamp of the 
Franciscan Seminary in Sarajevo. 

Today, you can see everywhere 
in Sarajevo reminders of the public 
inheritance the city has lost. 


Yet the fires and bombing raids 
have also wiped out thousands of 
private libraries, art studios, an 
collections, stocks of invaluable 
documents, personal files and irre- 
placeable mementos. 

An acquaintance of mine, exiled 
from Grbavica, a Sarajevo neigh- 
borhood under Serbian occupa- 
tion, told me a story about tbc 
paintings of a Serbian artist The 
painter, although a Serb, had fled 
to the unoccupied part of the city, 
and Serbian soldiers broke into ltis 
studio looking to steal money and 
equipment They were incensed 10 
discover an Islamic lekva — -a calli- 
graphic inscription from the Koran 
— which the painter had mounted 
as a wall hanging. They took i( 
down and, cursing, butchered iL 
According 10 witnesses, they took 
all of the artist's paintings, drawings 
anri lined them up against 

the front wad of the house and exe- 
cuted them with machine-gun fire 
until they were in shreds. 

In May 1992, when my own fam- 
ily and I were forced to flee Grba- 
vica to save our skin. 1 could not 
take with me so much as a single 
pencil. Books, sketches, photo- 
graphs, files — everything that we 
had cherished for' decades had to be 
surrendered to fate. 

Thousands of pages of a diary 
written over a quarter-century, an 
unfinished novd. a pile of story out- 
lines, essays, synopses for a number 
of literary biographies. A Vulgate 
Bible from 1883, inherited from a 
grand unde, a Latin-Croatian dic- 
tionary of die same age and prove- 
nance, a fragmentary and invaluable 
copy of a catechism by Friar Matija 
Divio vie, the first Bo snian publish- 
er and printer, from 1611. 

In addition, we bad a collection 
of family documents, legal papers 
and memorabilia. 

Throughout all the convulsions 
and catadysns we have suffered — 
from the Turkish wars in the 19th 
century through two world wars, 
and in spile of the continuous de- 
cline of my family under the repres- 
sive regimes of me Karadjordjevic 
monarchy and Marshal Tito in this 
century we always managed to pre- 



The Gass of ’94 Needs 0 
To Throw Itself a Party 


as 

w »re 


By Garrison Keillor 


es tat 
ic 
ar 
<1 


a 

.he 


Ji^EW YORK — Exhausted 


10 


Faculty. Anxious Gradu- 
ates, Weepy Parents and Angry 
Taxpayers: ll's a great privilege 
to be your commencement speak- 
er, but nevertheless I will be brief. 

First, my congratulations. I 
wish you a good career and a 


Then other people throw uf 
their arms and screech at him anc~ ™ 

at each other and someone mako_ 

.a 


a little joke and other people glan“ 
you? — an<r 


ne 

iss 

rs. 


we 


in 
j- ley 


MEANWHILE 


at him — bow can you' 
finally when everyone is bi 
out or livid with anger, 
home and write in our journals 
about how awful everyone was. 1 .* 
Fm sorry, but this is not civi-* . av 
ized. It isn’t even nice. , 

3 


serve something: an old book, let- 
ters. sepia photographs — such as 
the one from 1908 showing my 
grandfather and his brothers, all 
stiff and dressed up Tuikisb-style 
with fezzes on their heads, together 
with grandmother and great-grand- 
mother and some unfamilia r kids, 
probably later uncles and aunts. 

For months after being chased 
out of Grbavica. as we wandered 
around Sarajevo staying in other 
people’s empty apartments, I kept 
on quietly hoping that the most 
important things would be miracu- 
lously saved. I was wrong. 

I had underestimated the barbar- 
ic hatred of memory, of civiliza- 
tion. the mim haired that had 
burned down the Vijecnica, that 
had machine-gunned the paintings. 
One day we got ihe news: They 
have burned your library. 


I did everything I could to find 
full truth. F m, 


out the full truth. 1 managed to put 
the pieces together after several 
months of searching and question- 
ing eyewitnesses. Not only had all 
our possessions been burned but 
an entire ritual had been per- 


formed for the occasion. Armed 
men had forced people out of their 
apartments to "watch the burning 
of the Ustashe library of Ivan Lov- 
renovic,” a reference to the Nazi- 
era Croatian fascists. 

- The scene of burning books is 
not unknown in European history. 
Yet books were last burned under 
totalitarian regimes, and it was ex- 
actly this past decade that saw the 
coBapse of such re gim es 

This makes Sarajevo’s and Bos- 
nia’s experience even more horrify- 
ing. It Qhmunaies pqsi-Communisi 
European civilization with the 
flame of the great Alexandrian Li- 
brary of Egypt. 

Is it possible for anyone who 
identifies with Western civilization 
to remain calm in the face of the 
haired that burned down the Vijec- 
nica, that murdered the paintings, 
that bums private libraries and 
intimate memories? 

If permitted, that hatred would 
bum down the human world. 

One dully evening, at sunset, I 
walked to the ruins of the Vijec- 
nica. Nothing left but steep, high 


wails. Up above where the g|a_« 
dome had been, a dear sky with a 
few stars in it Sturdy marble col- 
umns grotesquely melted from the 
flames, crumpled as in Dalfs fan- 
tastic visions. Nowhere anything 
that makes sense. 

I jump over tom. entangled 


pipes, wires, cables, broken pieces 
of met ' 


metal shelves — everything ugly, 
filthy, sodden from recent rain. 

I stop before the half-bkxked 
door of the cellar. I bear voices. 
I flick on 119 lighter. Some slobber- 
ing, crazed children’s faces, 
stopped in the middle of a snack, 
are looking at me. 

The children ding to pieces of 
bread they have in their hands, as if 
scared that I might take it away 
from them. I leave them in t hri r 
salutary darkness. 

I am reminded of Saint-Exu- 
pfery: "In each of these little heads 
a Mozart has been murdered.” 


wonderful life. In fact, life is 
pretty good in America today, ex- 
cept for the fact that there is more 
self-pity than ever before, but 
that is the fault of my generation, 
a glum bunch to be sore. We are 
counting on you graduates to 
do better. 

My generation felt we were 
sensitive idealists compared to 
our folks, the earnest materialists 
who had hauled up out of the 
Dirty Thirties and built the sub- 
urbs and freeways. We were go- 
ing to live genuine lives and 
not be phonies. We were going to 
be poets. Instead, we became pa- 
tients. 

Absorbed in our own child- 
hood, we turned maudlin as we 
aged and we shifted the focus of 
public life away from the celebra- 
tion of American culture and to- 
ward confessional therapy. 

Somebody pulled the sickroom 
shades in America and now Ameri- 
ca feds dysfunctional, abused, ad- 
dicted, dependent, in pain, trying 
to come to terms with it 

Now fat people are considered 
disabled, there are programs for 
owliness, and everyone who leaves 
the house in the morning carries 


He 

>ld 

He 


he 


lized 

As your commencement speak- 
er. I ought to be orating about' 
Americas role in the world or. 
about the value of hard work.! 
America is a great country and her' 
role in the world is to stand up for 
democracy and the Freedom of the- “m 
human spirit while waging hard- 
headed diplomacy. Work is a ne- . » 
cessity and a privilege, and if you I 
do your job and do it well, you can 
look anybody straight in the eye. . /as 
__ But I am less worried about our. 
vision and our industry than I am- 
aboui our lack of humor. 


to 


The greatness of America is that 


■ wj 


nd 


it produces exuberant geniuses' or 


i_as Louis Armstrong and Fred; _ J 
Astaire and John Updike and ' 
Leonard Bernstein. We are meant 


to be a jazzy people who talk bi. 
id jump 

dance. We aren’t supposed to be 


rv- 


talkanc 


up on the table ; 


an 


dopey and glum and brood over _ v 
old injuries. Laughter is what 
proves our humanity, and the abil-^ p 


ity to give a terrific party is a sign; 
or true class. 


py 

jr- 

ws 


When Moses came down from 1 
the mountain with the day tablets. ' nv 
be said, "Folks, I was able to talk ' 
Him down to 10. Unfortunately, 
we bad to leave Adultery in there,- . 

but you will notice that Solemnity * 

auote from his Inner Mom saying, was taken oul” And that night the L. 
“Be gentle to my boy, he has Been Israelites killed the fatted caif - 
’i’ ' fc * T “ and drank wine and told Bible ■ j|_ 


Mr. Lovrenovic is a writer and 
historian. This was translated 
tor The New York Tunes by Midhat 
Ridjanovic 


Through a Lot 
AH m all. there is more self-pity 
available to wallow in now than 
there was daring the Great De- 


gression when your grandparents 


From the Beaches to the Seine: Surprise, Sacrifice and Some Good Luck 


O SLO — The Allied strategic 
concept far Operation Over- 
lord was simple. It was to transport 
forces from England to France, se- 
cure a bridgehead, and theo move 
across Fiance to the Seine River. 
There would also be a landing in 


By John C. Ansland 


that would have confronted us bad 
we gone ashore at where we were 
supposed to. 

As it was, with the help of the 82d 
and IOlst Airborne Divisions, the 


planners had concentrated on the 
hading, and we h«d no training for 
coping with this easily defended 
tenant, which was covered with 


senthem France. However, because ' 8 th spent the first night miles inland, 
the number of landing craft was not far from Ste.-MSre-Eglise, which 


hedgerows and swamps. 

in 1992 th 


— - limited, this would take place weeks 


1944 NORMANDY 1994 


after we went ashore m Normandy, ' 
The difficult advance np the 
Italian peninsula would be contin- 


ued, if onhr to tie down German 
ns. Unde 




divisions. Under the grand strate- 
gy approved at Tehran, there 
would also be a major Soviet of- 
fensive on the Eastern Front 
shortly after the Allied la n d in g. 

The location and exact timing 
of our landing s cm June 6 took the 
German oommandera by surprise. 
Allied deception had reinforced 
Hitler’s conviction that they 
would take place at the Pas de 
Calais, where the Channel is nar- 
rowest. Field Marshal Erwin 
Rommel, lulled by the bad weath- 
er, had gone to Germany to cele- 
brate his wife’s birthday. Never- 
theless, the German forces in 
Normandy soon pulled them- 
selves together and put up a deter- 
mined resistance. 

We were lucky to have Hitter 
calling the shots, rather than the 
commander in chief in the west, 
General Gerd vonRundstedL Con- 
vinced that Normandy was a diver- 
sion, Hitter heritated to redeploy 
his armored divisions from the Pm 
de Gulak area. After be ordered 
them to move to Normandy, their 
progress was retarded by constant 
attack* by Allied aircraft. TOese 
were in turn helped by Albed intel- 
ligence, which had broken t he Ge r- 
man code and was reading Gexnan 
radio traffic. At a critical point, for 
example, the headquarters of Fan- 
7 £x Group West was dem ol ish e d. 

Desrfte the tactical surprise, the 
success of die Allied forces vaned 
from beach to beach. . 

Catood James Van Fteet’sJJlh 
Regnnmt of the 4th Infantry Dnn- 
san, with which I came ashore as 
artflleiy liaison officer, lantol op 
Utah Beach to the south of where it 

was supposed to. This was fqrtu- 
na lpL smee Gentian def r os e s there 
were- less effective than where we 

were expected to land. 

Since I went directly 


wasbdd 

Three weeks later, the 4th and 
79th Divisions captured Cherbourg. 
The attack up the Gqntentin Penin- 
sula- was. however, hard fighting. 
The 4thlost nearly 800 killed, most- 
ly in the rifle companies — an ex- 
tremely heavy casualty rate. Its com- 
mander, General Raymond Barton, 
observed that Ins division was not 
the one with which he came ashore. 

Furthermore, the Germans had 
wreaked sntib damage to the port of 
Cherbourg that it was a long time 
before h could be fuBy used. 

The 1st and 29th Divisions ran 
into unexpectedly strong resistance 
00 Omaha Beach, a German divi- 
sion having moved into that area 
shortly before the landing. Despite 
heavy- casualties, the US. forces 
manag ed tO pUSh inland. Hus Story 
has been trad mady times, but do 
more dramatically than by Bruce 
BGven Jr, who was there, in Ids 
book “The Story of D-Day.” 
Lieutenant BBvea had the same 


As 1 drove in 1992 through the 
winding lanes with their hedgerows, 
I found the beauty of the country- 
side in dipurbing contrast to the 
memories h evoked. A particularly 
painful recoUectioQ concerned a 
night attack across a swamp against 
a German atrongpoint on a peninsu- 
la. Hus m jji i mari rii assault failed, 
with heavy casualties. 

I can neva- forget visiting the pen- 
insula just after the Germans had 
withdrawn and seeing our men piled 
up like coidwood, with a fittlc earth 
scattered over them. Further evi- 
dence that the Germans had d 
ed in a hurry was a German 
nearby, his head several feet from 
his body. 

After extremely heavy fighting, 

the 29th and 35th Divisions cap- 
tured a demolished Sl L 6 . Dm- 


I shuddered as I looked 
at the concrete bunkos 
that would have 
confronted us had ice 


inland 


job as mine, to locate positions for 
the 12 axtfllery pieces of his unit, _ , 

the lllth Field Artfflery Battalion, gone ashore Where We 

This unit suffered an even worse 

fate than ary 29th Fidd Artfflery IcereSUppoSedtO. 

Battalion. The 29th came ashore 

with eight setf-propeiled howitzers, 
after a landing craft with the other 
four hit a mine. The 11 1th got only 
one ashore, since waves swamped 
the fragile landing craft that car- 
ried one towed howitzer apiece. 

The greatest disappointment to 

General Dwight Eisenhower* 3 com- 
mand was what happened on the 
pritisb-Gnnariian beaches. These 
fences were supposed to take Cam 
soon after landing. Instead, h toed: 
them sa weeks to complete tbe task. 

' When we read accounts in Stars 
arid Stripes of the fighting near 
Caen, there was a great (teal of 
grousing about General Bernard 
Montgomery's slow progress. This 
was reinforced by critical com- 
ments in the American press. This 
criticism, however, did not lake 
sufficiently into account the 
forces ffitier threw into the battle, 
because he feared a breakout on 
the Cae n front toward Paris. 


of the 7th Corps under Gen- 
eral J. Lawton Coffins attacked up 
to a road running from St. L6 west 
to Peri ere, which was captured by 
the 90th Diviarax 

By this time; General Montgom- 
ery, in overall command of the land 
forces, and General Omar Bradley, 
in command of the Americans, were 
under heavy pressure to get moving. 
In both Washington and London, 
there was fear that Allied forces 
would get bogged down. 

Despite the failure of earlier at- 
tempts at heavy bombing on the 
British front to destroy German de- 
fenses, General Bradley decided to 
make another by, using the St. L&- 
Pericrs road as a bomb line. The 
result was Operation Cobra. He 
chose General Coffins’s 7 th Corps to 
make the assault, after saturation 
bombing by thousands of bombas 
and fighters. General Bradley allo- 
cated the 9th and 30th Divisions 


notion with the 40th anniversary 
of the landings. I shuddered asl 
looked at the concrete ounKers 


General Coffins, however, asked 
tfaefrooqgr but we named the hedge- for another division. As a result, 
row country. Our difficulties were the 4th, which had expected a re- 
aggravated by the fact that the spite, found itself in the center 


of the attack. Although the bomb- 
ing phase of the attack prepared 
the way for converting a stalemate 
into a breakout, it was at the price 
of more than 100 dead and 500 
wounded when a number of the 
bombs fell on those of us in 
the front lines. 

There has been considerable 
controversy over why so many of 
our men were killed and wounded 
by our bombers. General Bradley 
maintained it was because they 
did not attack parallel to the Sl 
L 6-Periers road, as he requested. 
The air commanders insisted that 
they had not agreed 10 this, for 
operational reasons. 

General Bradley described it as 
"a serious breach of good faith in 
planning.” This was remarkably 
strong language for an American 
general to use about the Allied air 
force commanders. 

Whatever happened at that inde- 
cisive planning conference among 
the generals, the reality was that a 
southern wind blew dust and debris 
northward and obscured the road, 
which was the bomb line. For some 
reason, there were no communica- 
tions between the ground forces and 
the bombas. As a result, many 
bombs fell in scattered patterns on 
our positions. I was saved by the fact 
that 1 was on a country lane that bad 
high hedgerows on each side. 

To the rear of where I was. Lieu- 
tenant General Lesley J. McNair 
was killed when one of the bombs 
feQ near him. So were more than 
a hundred others. 

Despite the shock of this experi- 
ence, most oT the units woe able to 
move forward over the mooolike 
landscape left by the bombers. Lieu- 
tenant General Fritz Bayer! ein com- 
manded the Panzer Lehr Division, 
which took the brant of the bomb- 
ing. He later commented, “The sur- 
vivors woe like madmen and could 
not be used for anything” This was 
not entirely true, but the resistance 
was certainly lighter than it would 
otho-wise have been. 

This attack took place on July 
25. The following day. General 
Collins turned his armored divi- 
sions loose. The breakout that en- 
sued was accompanied by a spec- 
tacular campaign by General 
Patton’s 3d Army, which was acti- 
vated on the west coast on Aug. I. 

After the failure of a German 
counteroffensive launched at Mcw- 
tain in the early horns of Aug 7, the 
Allies swepi across northern 
France. In the process, they de- 
stroyed a great many Goman 
f cutes in a pocket near Falaise- 
Martin Blumensen, who wrote the 
official U.S. Army account of the 
fighting in Normandy, describes 
this operation in his recent book 


“The Battle of the Generals.” He 
blames both American and British 
commanders for the failure to 
close the gap and destroy all the 
German forces. Whoever was at 
fault, we had to fight later those 
that escaped. 

The Allied force landed on the 
south coast of France on Aug 15 
against light resistance and made its 
way up the Rbdne Valley to take 
over die front north of Switzerland. 

On the Eastern From. Marshal 


Georgi Zhukov’s offensive, finally 
launched on July 23, was making 
dramatic progress and destroying 
whole German armies. 

On Aug 25, just one month after 
Operation Cobra, the French 2d Ar- 
mored Division and the U.S. 4th 
Infantry Division entered Paris. 


The writer, author of “ Letters 
Home: A War Memoir,” contribut- 
ed this account to the International 
Herald Tribune. 


in grimy little bouses with 
newspaper stuffed in the cracks 
and worked so hard their bodies 
hurt at night 

Complaining was against their 
religion, though. They believed 
that if you smile, you'll feel better. 
And so they were big on throwing 
parties. People back then liked to 
stand around a piano and sing 
People danced at parlies and 
they told jokes that made each 
other laugh. 

Today, when people my age give 
a party, we sit slumped in a circle 
and talk about sexual harassment 
and child abuse and people weep 
and uncover painful memories 
and some guy says he doesn't un- 
derstand what afl the fuss is about. 


jokes in celebration.cw0 
So I call on this class of 1994 to 
throw itself a party. Sit in the 
moonlight and drink Champagne 
or put beans up your nose and tell 
limericks; do what needs to be 
done. Just be sure not to spend 
much money or drink if you’re, 
going to drive, and don’t invite f . 
me. Td only slow you down. n 
Get together in a comfortable n 
place with people you like a lot, . P 
dance, be romantic, be aQy, and. 
see if you can get each other laugh- 
ing by malting fun of your elders. 

Satire, kids, is your sacred duty 
as Americans. Be funny. Poke them ; 
cows and malce them moo. 


The writer is author, most recent- 
ly. of “ The Book of Guys. ” He con- 
tributed this peroration to The New 
York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Am» for the Bosnians 


To PrcsMaii AHja 

that the arms embargo 


request 


the supreme gpod for modem d©- Who Needs Sanctions? 

mocracies. Has not the time come . 

-to rehabilitate as right and honor- Hah^ which seems unHkdy lobe 

.able the 
Chamberlain 


sight in making such a decision. I 


applaud her doctors, who accepted 
the fact that it was time 



o ANTIGUA 

ARGENTINA 

+ABSTBIR 

BAHAMAS 

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+ BELOW 

BBJZE (HOTEL) 

B&CEjmiW PHONES) 

✓BERMU1A 

BOLIVIA 

BRAZIL 

WBSW BUR0S 
- CANADA 


#0 

001-800-777-1111 
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t-BOO -388-2111 
1-800-877-8008 
078-11 -0014 
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ECUADOR 
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With the WorldTraveler F0NCARD** 1 it’s easy to place a call almost 
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What's more, all your calls will be conveniently billed to your 
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tune to stop 


spirit in .which Neville acquiring nudear weapons, has beeu trying And I applaud tire family 
lain refused in 1938 to subjected to sanctions. North Korea for not getting in the way. Such 

44 s_ 1 . ic MT-hwit rtt wrtina mirUara iw n. resiWi for ftvino ic enrrwthinp thfll 


«, the leader ofthe FJnch? 0 ^ 
mentis list in the forthcoming -Eu- 
mentS elections, Dominique 


sacrifice “peace in our time" to is hefl-bent on ge tt ing n u dear weap- respect for dying is something that 


SS^ re^ooded that 


thenmnberaT wca P t ® s . in ^ JM , e * 


- r /Vv 

. - • - 1 # 


; .. Vi- 

.V 


meat that peace could ** 
saved by “adSg war to w*r. : 


: : ■ J* '-■$ * 
. •**«*?* 


;and 

^Swrid,andtlreW«tEtt- 
iopean nations ’ap proclaiming 
Rol and deed, Thai peace is 


the shrill claims of a handful 
of Czechs? 

What peaceful purpose coaid 
have been served by giving them 
weapons? How many mfllions of 
lives could have been spared if the 
landings of fane 6,1944 had never 
happened? in celebration of this 
new European order, I move that 
the D-Day ceremonies be can- 
celed, and ihat Munich be conso 
craiedas the capital of Europe. 

CLAUDE DOUBINSKY. 

. ... ‘Tours, France: 


ons, but US sanctions, let alone 
any other action, seem inaeasingjy 
unlikely. I don't know if tire U3. 

me. 

H. THORNTON. 
Hong Kong 


could bdp alleviate the health care 
crisis that American is now facing. 


TULLIA M. LYNCH 
Munich. 


Coorageoas at the End 


What struck me most about the 
death of Jacqueline Kennedy 
Onasris is that are wem home. 

I applaud her courage and fore- 


Lettas intended for pubbeaaon 
should be addressed Letters to the 
Editor^ and contain the wnter's 
sigmire. name and j foil address. 
Letters should be brief and arc 
subject to ailing. We cannot be 
responsible for the return of unso- 
licited manuscripts. 


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Sprint 

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WorUCu^mm 


V, 1 nil t-r .■■nr'.|.riii! lVirUTVw«rlrr Fl i\CARI>- , ICiu«-SjH4luI£lpm*s Vfunui 

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Page 10 


Living in a Two-Hande 

Zronyn and Tandy: Lifetimes of Achievement 


By Mel Gussow 

,Vw York Tima Service 

E aston. Connecticut — 

Hume Cronyn and Jessi- 
ca Tandy have often held 
the stage by themselves 
i two-character plays. which the 
■nglish call two-handers. 

Although they have a close bond 
/ith their family and friends, their 
ile has itself been a two-hander, 
ndividually and together, they 
iave been showered with awards: 

• onys, Eramys. Obies. Kennedy 
Tenter honors, the Common 
Vealth Award — 50 or 60 prizes 
tl together, by Crooyn’s counL 
They seem to be missing only a 
'Jobd Prize (“What fori?" asks 
Tandy. "Court jester?"), and in his 
;ase, an Oscar. He was nominated 
ince. in 1944, for “The Seventh 
Cross." His wife won for "Driving 
{Miss Daisy” in 1990. 
j This year when the Tony admin- 
uslraiion committee decided to give 
jits first lifetime achievement 
award, the choice naturally was 
[America’s first acting couple. 

Although Cronyn can joke, “It's 
a little like a premature obituary- 
belter give it to them while they're 
still vertical," Lhey will accept it 
with alacrity (on June 12) because 
the theater is, in his words, “home 
and mother." 

The Cronvns live in a two-story 
Dutch colonial bouse on five acres 
in Lhis quiet countrified communi- 
ty- 

A visit there last week fell during 
a rare pause in Lheir professional 
life. Tandy had acted in two movies 
in the past year, including "No- 
body's Fool" with Paul Newman 
(who lives nearby), and they 
starred together in “To Dance With 
the White Dog” on the Hallmark 
Hal) of Fame on television. 

For the moment, neither had 
anything on tap', she is considering 

acting in a film directed by Kathy 
Bates, and the screenplay that 
Cronyn and his writing partner. Su- 
san Cooper, did of the Anne Tyler 
novel “Dinner at the Homesick 


Restaurant” is once again edging 
toward production. 

The conversation began in their 
large, cheerful living room, deco- 
rated with Eskimo Inuil sculptures, 
continued in Cronyn's neat, book- 
lined study, then moved to the din- 
ing room for lunch. 

Comfortable though their house 
is, it is a far distance from the grand 
houses of their past For many 
years, they designed and created 
their own homes: An elegant lake- 
side estate in Pound Ridge, New 
York, and, before that at Chil- 
dren’s Bay Cay in the Bahamas. 

With a land grant from Lhe Ca- 
nadian govemmen l — Cronyn was 
bom in London. Ontario. Tandy in 
London, England — they carved 
out a breathtaking retreat on a pre- 
viously u ninh abited island, sur- 
rounded by white sand beaches. 
This was where they escaped be- 
tween acting assignments, and 
where their children, Christopher, 
Tandy and Susan (Tandy’s daugh- 
ter from her previous marriage, to 
the actor Jack Hawkins) spent their 
holidays. 

In these and other cases, when 
they felt the lime had come to move 
on. they sold their property. They 
have a way of knowing when to 
take the next turn — from stage to 
Hollywood, from television back to 
the theater. This approach has pot 
only sustained them through a rich 
and diverse career, now in its sev- 
enth decade: it has also kept them 
open to challenges. 

Despite their age and her bout 
with cancer, they retain their resil- 
ience. They cannot imagine retir- 
ing. “If vou don’t act,” Tandy said, 
“you’re just going to lose it." A 
brief time without working sends 
Cronyn into anxiety. He reads 
scripts and books avidly in search 
of new projects. 

The Cronvns grow wean- of 
hearing themselves extolled for 
their compatibility. 

Inevitably in interviews, they are 
asked. “How have you made it 
work?” Once, on “60 Minutes." 


Mike Wallace asked The Question. 
Deadpan, Tandy answered. “I 
don’t think this is really the time to 
announce this, but we were think- 
ing of splitting up." and her hus- 
band added, “Jessie has got anoth- 
er fella, and 1 want to play the 
field" 

So how have they made it work? 
Without missing a beat, she said. 
"We’re both perfect," and he fol- 
lowed with, “She's the reason ii 
works." 

P ERHAPS it works be- 
cause they are imperfect 
and aware of each other's 
differences. She is intu- 
itive; he is analytical. She floats; he 
dives (in their pool, which is kept at 
84 degrees, bot-tub temperature). 
He saves and Files everything: she 
saves nothing. He has written a 
memoir, “A Terrible Liar." as well 
as screenplays: she is not interested 
in recording her past. 

Tandy, who is 84. locks frail, but 
her voice and her memory are crys- 
tal dear. 

When her husband talks about 
having stoned his career in 1931. 
she quietly intellects that she began 
hers in 1927. Despite fighting 
against what he called “chronic 
clinical depression." which can 
send him upstairs to his “sulking 
room," next to his study. Cronyn at 
82 is vigorous and athletic. 

Eagerly he undertook two recent 
ventures. A New York University 
film student sent him a script for a 
movie short. He decided to play the 
role, but when he learned that he 
was to be paid a quarter of the 
538,000 budget, he declined his sal- 
ary. He is also busily updating film 
footage from an African safari they 
went on 30 years ago. For this doc- 
umentary film, he is planning to 
return to East Africa in July. 

Between Lhem there is banter as 
well as great mutual respect. He 
especially savors the fact that she 
had a classical stage career in Eng- 
land before moving to the United 
States. She speaks of his fortitude 


- A - 'I 

» > ■ I 

3 ' 1 









Seme DcCtii: The Mr, t e-i Tasr> 


and farsightedness, bow he talked 
her into plays like “The Fcurpost- 
er." which site was quick to dismiss. 
It became one of their longest-run- 
ning hits. 

On a wall outside his study are 
small posters selected from their 
substantia. 1 body of work: For 
them, plays by Edward Aibce and 
Samuel Beckett; for her. "A Street- 
car Named Desire": for him. Rich- 
ard Burton's ''Hamlei" (in which 


he piayed Poloniusi and "The Mi- 
ser." in which he gave a hilarious 
performance a: the Guthrie The- 
atre in Minneapolis and the Mark 
Taper Forum in Los Angeles. 

“It was the best thins I ever did." 
he said. “Nothing gave me as much 
satisfaction." With consternation, 
he added, “Now I play kindly old 
men or objectionable old men who 
have a heart of gold." 


Drama at Barcelona Opera 

. .. . av which dates from ! W7. The pnvatt 

— central stairway, won® as is ihccooserva- 

By John Rockwell box -holder club’ salwun^ ^ devastation. .. 

in York Tuna Senice . lory upstairs. But . ^ tsnmased a mcKJcriwaik® 

— T~T 7TTI Officials had the iheaiecVsw-; 

ARCELONA. tan - 5 plan in the anuq»a»i , 


COjKUUUU. » 

-M-*' tatfifl oy a tire mat mi L ~ in charge of culture rf , 

stage a smoking shell. ^ Nadal said the tdea *«* -odrast- 

Now after a nastv fight involving private seal- ^ Jr* h Ae warren cl commercial aw 

owners and public authorities, squabbling structures around the " 

Spanish-O talon tensions, aggrieved artists, duehng d«i £}<>wn ^ replacing 
pnma donnas and even intimations of the HL* ttopennit repertory pcrfonnancebybi^ 

plans are about to be announced to reburid rad scenery storage space, wmoto- , 

modernize the theater and to reopen it in t££jSS«i«l » aghlhncsM'; 

there are those within the theater administration. ize bacctayoj K protection. . 

includine Albin H&nseroth, the artistic director, who fi*gPfc “*552^ — disastrously, as it aimed out 


including Albin H&nseroth, the artistic director, wno nnally.ro “fddaved -—disastrously, as it aimed out. 
are doubtful that the target date can be met. wors _ by tbe mayor’s unwillingness to 

On Monday, a meeting of the — proceed before the 1991 eteam. ; 

consortium of interested parties is without a political cooseasas. Sot 

scheduled to formalize a complex AU~ r a naefy fiffhU before the fire, a rdocanc© and 

agreement by which the reconsiruc- Alter a nasi) n&u * Sensation agreement had to 

lion can proceed Already, charred n ] aTt c ar & about tO he reached with the inhabitants of the. 
beams and twisted nibble have /" adjoining buddings, several ofihoa 

been largely removed from the au- announced tO vanguard artists (protesting bra- 

ditorium, which now looks rather . ners s ^n festoon the facade) add 

like the Coliseum in Rome. # reblllid the theater. financing for the reconsuvctK» 

.Aside from fervent attestations was in place. Indeed, it was a wetd- 

of the will to rebuild and fund- from prelinrinary mod- 


n oi tnterestCQ parues is without a poiurcai 

to formalize a complex Aff~ r a naeiy light. before the fire, a relocation and 

t by which the reconsiruc- Alter a ucL. ) » compensation agreement Tiad to 

iroceed Already, charred n 1 anc an > ahntlt to be «,ched with the inhabitants of the. 


been largely removed from the au- announced tO vanguard artists (protesting bra- 

ditorium. which now looks rather . ners s ^n festoon the facade) add 

like the Coliseum in Rome. # rebuild the theater. rmandne for the reconsuyctwa 

.Aside from fervent attestations was in place. Indeed it was a weid- 

of the will to rebuild and fund- ^3 from prdinrinaiy mod- 

raising campaigns announced by . , . , that touched off the fire. . 

°Sfs30 mi inon had .b y ^ 

the Liceu cas^phe were matted —4r »» 

y jwv of Spam's leading prima donnas. Victoria de struction will co^ another 
los Angdes and Montserrat CabaBfe, loured the ruins work another 58 nti^on. 
with photographers in tow. Each took it upon herself paying S 14 million. ^ 

to emoodv tbe^ spirit of the Liceu and implied tbai the sponsors. Tbe aty. the Calais ^on^dthenaiiTO^ 
o K doing it for the pubh'dty. Dc los Angeles ^vemmern are to SSSS^S^ 

said Caballfe’s Ssit “makes me lai^h." “As soon as of the rest., with Madr«Jj»ymg a slightly higher 
someone dies, the vultures move in," she added proportional share (37.5 ■ 

jwecdv Aside from physical rec onstru ction, there is lhe 

On the occult front, it turned out that the Liceu had painful issue of what will happ en to t he compan y — 
been built in 1847 on the site of a convent tom down in the orchestra, tbe chorus, the technical personnel — m 

1831 Mother Rafols. a nun. responded rather unchar- this four-year interregnum. 

.. .u_ ^ I .k,. Kniv Uinwnvh a f>rman who became astatic GlTCCVOT 


Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy: " IVe're both perfect. " 


itably at the time by predicting that the opera house 
would be struck first by fire, then by a bomb and 
finally by a collapse. 

The fire arrived in 1861. burning out the interior in 


Hanseroth, a German who became artshc director 
in 1990 and who had already ag reed before the fire to = 
become general director in Hamburg in 1997, said his 
idea had been to cany on with the normal subsidy and 


1 ne tire arrived m imj t. burning out u»e micnui m urea nan dcku w mui j ™ .. _ j — j t 

exactly the same way as this year's fire; etchings from attempt to present the full repertory m alternative 

1 S 61 and photographs from 1994 look eerily alike. The spaces. • .. . . 

theater in those simpler days was rebuilt within a year. But from tbe outset, he said, the politicians had 
but in 1893 a terrorist bomb killed 14 people. New the chosen to allocate two-thirds o f the o perating budget 
roof has collapsed, although it also collapsed in 1861. for reconstruction, leaving tire compa ny w ith only a 
ActuaQv, the entire theater didn't collapse either time, skeleton schedule and forcing the orchestra ana 
and that, along with a pre-fire modernization plan, is chorus into unemployment for at least five months a 
Barcelona's biggest advanta ge when it comes to a year. “What good will it be to finish the theater and 
- have no one to perform in ilT Hanseroth wondered. 


prompt rebuilding of thin city landmar k i»<b m w»«. ■ — ... 

Walking down Las Ramblas. the main thorough- “Everybody here says the Cata l a ns can do tbe job 
fare, one hardly notices anything amiss- Toe theater’s on schedule," he added dubiously. “But I am not very • 
modest facade is intact, as is its main foyer and ornate confident about the opening date." 


After the Bickering and Resignations, Spoleto USA Is Alive and Well 


By James R. Oestreich 

New Ymi. Times Settee 


C HARLESTON, South Carolina — 
Three days into the Spoleto Festi- 
val USA, John Kennedy sounded 
an unofficial keynote in "the first of 
the 20th-Century Perspectives concerts he 
directs at Grace Episcopal Church. 

Pointing to a theme of redemption in tbe 
programming this year ( most notably in Bee- 
thoven's "Fidelio"), he opened with Henry 
Cowell’s brash “Return." written in 1940 
when Cowell was released from a ihree->ear 
prison term. 


Kennedy directed the series from 1<W0 to 
1992 but bailed out last year after a dispute 
with the new music director. Steven Mer- 
curic. Now everything has changed. Gian 
Carlo Menottl who founded the festival in 
1977 and directed it through 17 seasons, re- 
signed last fall after years of farcical bicker- 
ing with the board and the city, and Milton 
Rhodes, the former director of the American 
Council for the Arts, took over as general 
manager. 

Mercurio left, and his predecessor. Spiros 
Argiris. was reinstated as part of a triumvi- 
rate of artistic directors. Kennedy’s brief ex- 
ile has ended. And most important, despite 
dire predictions in Menotti-loyalist quarters. 


Spoleto has survived seeming! v in fine shape 
and with a palpable sense oi tranquillity. 

Before Menoui's departure, the festival an- 
nounced that because of a mounting deficit, 
the season (which ends Sunday) would run 
only 12 days this year, down from 17. with the 
number of events also sharply reduced. In fact. 
Rhodes has crammed in 1 10 events, hardly 
fewer than last year. .And the debt, he reports", 
is under control. 

The festival's continuing commitment to 
young performers was evident in two cham- 
ber concerts at the Dock Street Theatre, with 
several excellent performances, and the inter- 
national mix was striking. 


Charles Wadsworth, 'he pianist who di- 
rects the chamber senes, played a Kreisier 
Prelude and Allegro with an excellent young 
violist. Nokuihuia Ngwenyama. Ngwen- 
yama. 17. is the very personification of multi- 
culturalism. having been bora in Los Angeles 
to Zimbabwean and Japanese parents. Chee 
Yun (a Korean violinist). Alban Gerhardt ta 
German cellist) and Anne-Marie McDermott 
(an American pianist) gave a stirring full- 
bodied account of Brahms's B-major Trio. 

Under Menoiti. opera was the hallmark of 
the festival, and again this year, two opera 
productions are at the ham of the schedule: 
“Fidelio" and Handel’s “Acts and Gaiatea.” 
But what emerged seemed self-conscious, al- 


most embarrassed: opera in spite of itself. 
Both works pose almost insuperable dramatic 
problems. “Fidelio" famously so, and in each 
case the director chooses to sidestep them. 

Nikolaus Lehnhoff opts for the decon- 
struction gambit in ridelio." At several 
junctures, an annoying know-it-all stands be- 
fore the audience and pontificates about arti- 
fice: not only the ruses in “Fidelio" but also 
the inherent unreality of opera isteif. Since 
any possibility of compelling drama is thus 
written off, it hardly matters that Lehnhoff 
dispenses with all the spoken dialogue, reduc- 
ing Act I to a quick series of set pieces played 
out on Thomas Gabriel's abstract sets. 

As for “Ads." tbe director, UIderico Man- 


ani, writes: “It is an opera in which no special 
event occurs. ... It is more appropriate to 
speak of con tempi atioo rather than of ac- 
tion." Perhaps: Ads. a shepherd, loves Gala- : 
tea, a water nymph. The Cyclops Polyphemus 
takes a shine to Galatea, too. and. spurned 
and jealous, mortally dobbers Ads with a 
boulder. Galatea magically brings Acts back 
to life as a spring. 

But Mammi does not even make an at- 
tempt at persuasive drama, and what he of- 
fers for contemplation throughout this gentle 
romp is unedifying and often ghastly. 
Nymphs and swains in Nikes and sweats 
seem ready for a softball game in Central 
Park. 


ASIA MA 


Ail bn ! s 


Arcadia’: Theatricals and Chaos Theory 


By Sheridan Moriey 

International Heruil Tribune 

"T7" ON DON — Tom Stup- 

| pard's “Arcadia" moves 

| from the National to the 

Haymarket with a new- 
cast and one well able in Trevor 
Nunn's agile production to raise 
the play's ultimate ciy: “It’s want- 
ing to know that makes us matter." 
This is what links “Arcadia" to 
such earlier Stoppards as 
“Jumpers" and “Rosencraniz and 
Guildensiern Are Dead." 

On a second viewing, some of the 
apparent obscurities of his time- 
traveling analysis of chaos iheoty 
and the Secood Law of Thermody- 
namics become more dear. But 
from its opening academic gag 
(“Carnal embrace? The act or 
throwing one's arms around a side 


of beef) to the final dance of 
death and rebirth three hours later, 
this is a hugely theatrical treat, 
accessible on first viewing. Roger 
Ail am and Joanne Pearce lead tbe 
new team. 

“.Arcadia" is about more than 
the gathering of knowledge, howev- 
er; it's about the jokes and tricks of 
history, and the way in which ab- 
stract theories can be turned into a 
reality. In this endeavor, we have 
All am as the flashy media don and 
Pearce as his undercutting oppo- 
nent, but they are only two of a 
dozen characters, each intricately 
linked and cross-referenced over 
two centuries in an open marriage 
of science and the arts. If Stoppard 
lived or worked in Paris, this is the 
script that would get him into the 
Academic Fram^aise. As it is, we 
have to hope that a tourist audience 




d " pa r i s 


BASTILLE 


OPERAS 

SIMON BOCCANEGRA 
MAD AMA BUTTERFLY 
LE NOZZE Dl FIGARO 
LUCIA Dl LAMMERMOOR 
LA DAMNATION DE FAUST 
UN BALLO IN MASCHERA 

DIE ZAUBERFLOTE 

IPHIGENIE EN TAURIDE 
I CAPULETi E I MONTECCHI 

BALLETS 
SPECTACLE D'OUVERTURE 
LE LAC DES CYGNES 
KYLIAN/BALANCH IN E/GRAHAM 
MAGNIFICAT 
NUINSKA/NIJINSKI 
GISELLE 

ROMEO ET JULIETTE 
ECOLE DU BALLET DE L'OPERA 

CONCERTS 

INFORMATION 33 1 44 73 13 99 


at tbe Haymarket will not be de- 
terred by Lhe sheer brilliance of the 
verbal fireworks from looking at 
the darkness all around them. Tor 
this is a play about people who 
cannot connect until it is almost 

LONDON THEATER 

too late and for whom both scien- 
tists and historians often offer cold 
comfort. 

Tbe Atlantic crossing can still 
prove surprisingly rough. Seen off- 
B roadway last year, during a long 
and successful New York run, 
“Whoop-Dee-Doo!" is one of the 
most inventive revues I had ever 
seen. A strange, quirky celebration 
of gay vaudeville, it managed si- 
multaneously to be a lament for 
lost glitter and an angry affirma- 
tion of survival in tbe face of AIDS. 


CARR'S k*sh 

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Its best number*, were sheer genius; 
a tribe of African natives transfixed 
when a uunk of Elbe! Merman’s 
show-biz memorabilia Tails on 
them from the skies; a hypochon- 
driacal Tinkerbell mourning the 
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Mary Martin, in a song called 
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Edwardian picnic number entitled 
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In moving the show to the suit- 
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bizarre a show as you will ever see 
performed by eighL middle-aged 
men in glasses, but an English cast 
(splendidly led by the ineffable 
Christopher Biggins) and an Eng- 


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lish audience seem less a; home with 
the sharpness of this satire. Revue as 
a concept remains so dead over here 
thaL most theatergoers under 40 
ihink of it as a misspelling of “re- 
view." while the peculiarly .Ameri- 
can mix of gay rage and vaudeville 
valedictory is also oddly as foreign 
to us as a banana daiquiri. 

For all that, “Whoop-Dee- 
Doo!" is a high-camp, wildly politi- 
cally incorrect response to a sexual 
plague: a cheapskate, catchpenny, 
joyous affirmation of the power of 
theater to rise above underbudge i- 
ed awfulness and say something 
about the survival of enjoyment 
under pressure. Philip George's 
production, here as in New York, is 
a masterpiece of minuscule lawdri- 


W HEN “The Bed Be- 
fore Yesterday" (Al- 
meida) opened 20 
years ago, it was no- 
table for giving Joan Plowright a 
long and rare success in a West End 
comedy and for the fact that its 
author had just written it at the age 
of 89. Ben Travers, Big Ben him- 
self, was then enjoying a huge re- 
vival or interest in his classic Ald- 
wych farces (both "Plunder" and 
“Banana Ridge” were simulta- 
neously on show in London), 
mixed with a feeling of faint guilt 
that he had been so ignored for 
about half a century. But this, his 
last play, was always, in his own 
title, “a cuckoo in the nesL" 

Not so much a farce os a dark 
comedy of belated sexual awaken- 


| ing, it has unaccountably now been 
moved to Coronation Year, 1933. 
from its 1930 specification, and 
Brenda Blethyn has a hard time 
rivaling Plowright as the frigid har- 
ridan who discovers sex just in the 
nick of time; Charles Kay is. bow- 

SHORT CUTS 


-*y 

.-.if. Jfcsa: ’\\* A -V 





Joanne Pearce, center, in Tom Stoppard's “Arcadia, " at the Haymarket. 


ever, superb as her bemused hus- 
band. 

Travers was unquestionably Lhe 
am fury's greatest British farceur, 
but here be was attempting some- 
thing different, a play in which we 
would care about his characters 
rather than simply laugh at them, 
and as a result, “The Bed Before 


Yesterday" treads that more diffi- 
cult and dangerous of stage border- 
lines, the one separating comedy 
from farce. In moving it forward to 
1953, the director. Peter Wood, has 
created more problems than he has 
solved, for the sexual mores of the 
tunes were already very different 
from Lhose of lhe early ’30s, and a 


rather half-hearted subplot never 
quite gets itself together. 

For aH that, Travers was a mas- 
ter of comic situation and charac- 
ter, and even in his late 80s there 
was a genial assurance and genuine' 
warmth to his writing, which would 
still be the envy of many of his 
successors. 


• ZAP MAMA, “Sabsyima" (Remark): This 
feminine a cappella polyphonic quintet from 
Brussels sings a repertoire their iso describes as 
“Py^my gospel, pklms b la James Brown, Ab- 
original rap. Zainan rai, Indian hip-hop and 
their own urban inventions." Three of the sing- 
ers are Belgian of Zairian ancestry and of the 


To our readers in Switzerland 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
and save. 

Just call our Zurich office 
toll free: 

155 57 57 

or fax: (07) 48? 82 88 


two Parisians, one is from Cameroon and the 
othCT, PortugaL They sing songs based on mate- 
rial from a number of continents and epoques 
in English. French and several African lan- 
gnages. They call it k grand mix de la vie 
According to Billboard magazine, the group led 
World Music sales in the United States last 

year. 

•TED IWWKINS. The Next Hundred 
Years (Geffen): Hawkins, 58, has been broke, 
unlucky m love, and in and out of prisons and 
hospitals most of his life. At the age of 15, he 
was picking cotton in Parchman Penitentiary in 
Mississippi. He’s had his share of local hits — 
Raffing Stone called Ms album “Watch Your 
Slep <»e of the best rock ’n’roli records of ail 
time. Mostly be busked cm the streets. He sold 


his cassettes on the streets of London. Moving 
to Venice Beach, California, be worked the 
boardwalk. “1 just heard one of the best singsrs 
mihe world," the singer-songwriter Michael 
Penn told the producer Tony Berg, “and be was 
right under my window." Critics compare Ted 
Hawkins to Sam Cooke and Otis Redding, 
although he’s coming as mnefa from bluegrass 
as blues. 

DAY AND PRES, 1937-1941" 
(Night & Day); Listening to the best of Billie 
nouaay and Lester Young together you also 
hear the best of both individually. A new 2-CD 
compilation from a small, smart French com- 
pany. 


MikeZwerm 


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International Herald Tribune, Wednesday , /me /. /9W 






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ly^Bloemb^S n ^ s ^ s ^ 5 i ;'^ey«. compiled 



£&■;&- ■■ 
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World Index 

S/31/94 close: 112.45 
previous: 1 12.73 


• ..\. 


□ 

1993 


Asin/Pacific 


* 1 » > 1 »»■«■■■■■ i -a :» 

MAM 

1994 


Europe 


150 


Close: 132.16 Piw.: 132.67 


130 


V* 


'=* rw^ 


110 ift j/ ' . ' s '■' ■ L . ' ..* 


90 




D J 
1903 


North America 


Appiox. westing: 2fi% 
CtaBK 93.B4 Piwj 93.78 


/'pprojL wofgh&jg: 37% 
Close: 1T1.45PIW4 111.71 


7T= — ^ "■>,.*■ ■ ■;■■ 
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.■j ■.'■'■ '' ■". 

0 J F M A M 
1994 


1994 

1993 

Latin America 

B 

Appnn. weighing: 5% 
Close: iia^ftev.- 11142 


‘130 



7)W Index backs U S. (toSar vaftjas a/ slocks in: Tokyo, Now York. London, and 
Aigontuu. Australia, Austria, BMgfum, Brad, Canada, CtiKa, Denmark, Fbdmd, 
France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, SwHnrtand and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New York and 
London, the index is composed of the 20 top issues n terns of matter capdaBzslion, 
offwrwfce the Ion top stocks are traded. 


[ industrial Sectors 1 


tm. Pm % 

dose dote change 


Tut 

don 

Pm. 

don 

% 

change 

Energy 

109.95 109.96 -0.01 

Capital Goods 

116.08 

11527 

40.18 

Utfflfcs 

117.21 11720 +021 

Rm Materials 

126.75 

127.06 

-026 

finance 

11823 11828 -055 

Consuner Goods 

97.18 

9754 

-027 

Services 

116.70 11620 -0.09 

Uscefianeous 

128.10 

12728 

40.17 

For more information about the index, a booklet is avaHabts true of charge. 

Write to Trto index, 181 Avenue Charies de GauSe, 92521 Neullly Codex, Fiance. 


C international Herald Tribune 


Issing 
Sounds 
An Alert 

Bundesbank Says 
Inflation Looms 

Bloomberg Buuness Newt 

FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank on Tuesday gpve markets (heir 
biggest inflation scare of (be year 
when Otmar Issing. the central 
bank’s chief economm. warned that 
double-digit money supply growth 
would mean a pickup in prices. 

His comment that Bundesbank 
monetary policy is “preprogram- 
med" by its money-supply targets 
was the strangest hint yet that after 
months of htgb monetary growth, 
during which interest rates were cut 
repeatedly, the German central 
bank wQl turn to lighting inflation. 

Mr. Issing reminded the financial 
markets that at some pant the third 
straight year of undearabJy fast 
money-supply expansion will breed 
inflation. The question is when. 

European stock and bond prices 
tumbled as the conviction spread 
that the Bundesbank feds it has 
given the economy enough stimu- 
lus and will sit back and watch 
cheap credit do its magic. 

"Mr. Issing isn't to blame for to- 
day's market coQapse, but he helped 
see the risks in a dearer light." said 
Adolf Rosenstock, senior economist 
at Industrial Bank of Japan. 

European bonds plunged, drag- 
ging stocks lower, as Mr. Issing's 
inflation warnings added to con- 
cerns that European interest rate 
cuts have stalled. 

“We would struggle to get senti- 
ment mare negative than it is at the 
moment," said Ian Williams, a sales- 
man of British government bonds at 
Klein wort Benson Gilts Lid. 

Yields on British government 
bonds and German bunds soared 
to their highest levels since Febru- 
ary 1993. French bond yields were 
their highest since March 1993. 

Stock indexes across Europe fell 
as much as 22 percent before re- 
bounding from the day’s lows in 
Germany and Britain. “You see the 
blood on the floor? I think we hit the 
bottom for the time being’' said 
Juergen Zexmer, chief equity trader 
at Merck, Finck A Co. in Frankfurt. 


MEDIA MARKETS 


An Industry on the Edge 


By Daniel lilies 

Special w (he Herald TrOnme 

P ARIS— The marketing industry has nev- 
er before found itself in a position so 
riddled with threats to its long-term 
health, yet so ripe with possibilities. That 
is the outlook offered by WPP Group PLC the 
London-based holding company that counts the 
advertising agencies J. Walter Thompson Co. and 
Ogflvy A Mather Worldwide and the Hill & 
Know] ton public-relations concent among its sub- 
sidiaries. 

In a WPP report on global issues and trends in 
the industry, which was to be released Wednesday, 
the threats and challenges are numerous. 

“Many people have been painting a depressing 
view of prospects,” said Martin ScareD, chief atco- 
mjveof wPP.“StiP these are mall e npGS wmeu are 


Sorrell said, and one not being met with overriding 
success according to some industry observers. 

Bob Willott, a partner in WiDort Kingston 
Smith, a London-based consultancy specializing in 
advertising and marketing services, said he did not 
think ad agencies had been particularly successful 
in distinguishing value for many cheats’ premium- 
priced brands. 

“IPs not all their fault, however," he said. “Man- 
ufactures have not given enough thought ihem- 



SO sigmucam. oppwuuuuM w 

One of the primary challenges facing advertisers 
and their agencies is the marketing of brand-name 
. .products in mature markets, such as Europe and 
the United States. Falling manufacturing costs 
brought about by technological advances are 
. “making it hrcreasingly difficult to differentiate 
between products and services, Mr. Sorrell said. 

The improving quality of store-label brands, 
Xrfrich typically sell for less than brand-na^moj 
chandisc, is cutting into market share heM by 
-■ growth of this 
already cut into revenue of companies like Coca- 
-Cola Co. in many important markets, including 
P-tuiAi and Britain. 

. “No longer do such “private-laber brands repr^ 
senL lowe^or poorer quality at lower prices, the 

the low-priced produce 

■i very, very difficult issue to deal whh, Mr. 


and told them to go off and just seD it- 
what store brands have taken advantage of." 

As a result, marioeting and advertising agencies 

are setting up shop in underdeveloped, product- 
starved markets. There has been an advertising 
explosion in Asia and Latin America, 'Mule sharp 
growth is esmected in South Africa, Eastern Europe 
and parts of the Middle East 
From 19S2 to 1992, the report said advertising 
spending in China has grown by about 2,700 per- 
cent, wMe Thailand and South Korea saw spending 
growth of between 425 percent and 52 5 percent 
This contrasts dramatically with spending in- 
creases of 46perceol in Britain and 32 percent in 
the United States daring the same period. Bat 
while spending in (hose two markets has not kept 
pace with Aria, Britain and the United States 
together accounted for 58 percent of the $755 
billion spent worldwide on marketing of products 
and services in 1993. That figure, which includes 
sp ending on traditional consumer advertising, di- 
rect marketing and sales promotions, is expected 
to grow between 1 percent and 2 percent in real 
terms this year. 

The report cites extraordinary’ revenue potential 

See MEDIA, Page 12 


Frisson for French Firms 



By Jacques Neher 

International Henjtii Tribune 

PARIS — With the top executive of one French 
blue-chip company silting in a Belgian jail on 
allegations of fraud and another facing jail on 
charges of insider trading, the tightly knit French 
business community is beginning to 'fray. 

Observers said they doubted that France was on 
(he verge of a full-blown corruption scandal simi- 
lar to Italy's. But “suddenly we’re seeing cracks in 
the facade." said Dominique MOfri. political scien- 
tist at the Institut Frames des Relations Interna- 
tionales. 

Those cracks, observers say. are due to the 
impact of recession and to the internationalization 
of business, which has created a new impulse for 
more transparency. 

“We're seeing financial dealings becoming sub- 
ject to more scrutiny because of increasing global 
interactions which bring to France more universal 
values of right and wrong." said Peter Hamilton. 

B rofessor of French society and culture at Open 
University in Britain. “Before it was possible to 
keep secrets because everyone operated in a busi- 
ness clique that shared the same values. Now. 
they’ve got to be looking over their shoulders.” 

The arrest in Brussels last weekend of Didier 
Pineau-Valencienne, chairman of Schneider SA. 
and charges of insider trading lodged Mondav 
against Pierre Bergfc, president of the fashion 
house Yves Saint Laurent, add to a series of affairs 
arising in recent weeks and months. Among them: 

• Pierre Suard, chairman of Alcatel Alstbom. is 
being investigated for allegations that he built a 
security system for his apartment on company 
funds, and that a subsidiary. Alcatel CIT. had 
overcharged France Telecom at least 60 mOlioo 
francs (SI I million), in a letter to the company's 
! 95,000 employees last week, Mr. Suard denied the 
charges, saying that the company had become 
subject to a “campaign of denigration.” 

• Bernard Tapie, the entrepreneur- turned -poli- 
tician, is being investigated for alleged game-fixing 


by his soccer team. Olympique Marseille, and on 
allegations of tax fraud linked to his use of a luxury 
yacht. He was recently fined 1 million francs for 
knowingly giving investors false information about 
a company he controls. Testut SA. He is appealing. 

• Jean -Yves Haberer and Francois Gille, former 
top executives at Credit Lyonnais, are subject to 
arrest if they travel to Switzerland. An investigat- 
ing magistrate there has charged them with com- 
plicity in the bankruptcy of Sasea, a company 
involved in the takeover of (he Metro-Goldwyri- 
Mayer Inc. movie studio. 

But the jailing of Mr. Pineau-Valencienne. 63. 
has been the most riveting of these cases, and 
insiders say the Paris financial community is still in 
shock. “No one had ever gone to jail before." a 
market analysts said. “These people are worried." 

Mr. Pineau-Valencienne, a graduate of Harvard 
Business School is to appear in a Brussels court on 
Wednesday charged with fraud and swindling in 
connection with two Belgian subsidiaries, Cofibel 
and Cofimines. He has been in prison in Belgium 
since Friday, along with an Italian businessman 
Valentino Foti, whose arrest was announced by the 
public prosecutor on Monday. 

The French executive was to appear in judge’s 
chambers on Wednesday where a decision will be 
made on whether to prolong his provisional deten- 
tion. Schneider, which is not related to the German 
company Dr. Jurgen Schneider AG, denial the 
allegations against its president. 

Last Sunday, a group of chief executives signed 
their names to a newspaper advertisement in sup- 
port of Mr. Pineau-Valencienne, but others cau- 
tioned their fellows about criticizing the legal pro- 
cedures of another country. 

“1 think it is remarkable that some bosses, just like 
that, without knowing anything, because he is a 
member of the same dub, would swear on their 
honor that [Mr. Pineau-Vaiendennej is not guilty," 
Audit Roussdet, founder of the French pay televi- 
sion station Canal Plus, said on French radio. 


Nissan Motor 
Posts $2 Billion 
Loss for Year 


Prodi Quits As Head of IRI 


Reuters 

MILAN — Romano Prodi. a 
driving force behind Italy’s privati- 
zation program, resigned Tuesday 
as chairman of lstituto per la Rr- 
costruzione Industrial, the gov- 
ernment holding company said. 

Mr. Prodi, a former industry 
minister, was appointed to head the 
IRI Iasi May by the prime minister 
at the time, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi. 

Newspapers have reported that 
Mr. Prodi wished to distance him- 


self from SQvio Berlusconi’s govern- 
ment, which contains ministers from 
the neo-fascist National Alliance. 

“Professor Prodi through a let- 
ter sent to T reasury Minister Lam- 
bert© Dim, has given back his man- 
date as the chairman of IRI. The 
government reserves the right to 
evaluate it and to decide on it." the 
Treasury Ministry said 

Mr. Prodi is credited with mov- 
ing Italy's long-delayed privatiza- 
tion program off thedrawing board 
and into the markets, selling IRTs 


stake in Credit© Italian© SpA and 
Banca Commerdale Italians. 

He had aimed to create broad 
share ownership for Credit© and 
BCL But his plans were thwarted 
when Mediobanca SpA managed 
to gain effective control of both 
banks. 

Shortly before announcing the 
resignation, IRI said it had a loss of 
1023 trillion lire (56 billion) for 
1993, worse than its 4.4 trillion lire 
deficit in 1992. 


Compiled by Oar Sniff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Nissan Motor Co, 
Japan's second-largest auto mak er, 
on Tuesday said its loss nearly dou- 
bled in the latest year and blamed 
the result on weak worldwide de- 
mand for autos and the strong yen. 

Nissan said its current loss wid- 
ened to 202J6 billion yen (S2 hil- 

Japan's three largest airfises re- 
port losses for the year. Page IS. 

lion) in the year ended March 31 
from 108.1 1 billion yen the previous 
year. Its net loss also grew, to 86.92 
billion yen from 56.00 billion yen. 
Sales were down 6 percent, to 5.80 
trillion yen from 620 trillion yen. 

But Nissan executives said the 
company performed well in the 
United States. While its group car 
sales fell 4 percent to 2,690,000 
during the year, Nissan said, sales 
in the United States jumped 15 
percent, to 710,000. 

Its performance in the U.S. mar- 
ket helped offset a 14 percent drop 
in European sales. 

The average value of the dollar 
was 107 yen in the latest year, com- 
pared with 124 yen in the year 
ended in March 1993. 

Nissan estimated the rise in val- 
ue of the Japanese currency had 
reduced its worldwide revenue by 
170 billion yen. although it said 
hedging operations had offset 100 
billion yen of that loss. 

Nissan, like most other Japanese 
automakers, said it expected de- 
mand for vehicles in Japan to re- 
main weak in the near term but to 
begin recovering along with the 
economy late in the current finan- 
cial year. 

Nissan's exports fell 30 percent 
in the latest year, to 629,990 vehi- 
cles, the second consecutive annual 
decline, because of low deman d in- 
ternationally and the strong yen. 
Sales in Japan rose 0.7 percent, to 
1,130,000, their first gain in three 
years. Globa] sales of all Nissan 
cars fdl 13 percent, to 1,763,886. 

Heiidii Hamaoka, Nissan’s exec- 
utive managing director, said: “I 


regret to say that we recorded a 
heavy loss because our vigorous 
cost-cutting measures and exten- 
sive rationalization efforts could 
not offset the impact of the appre- 
ciation of the yen and slumping 
demand in the domestic and Euro- _ 
pean markets." " 

He said the company had cut 
more than 1,600 workers in the S 
latest year and would continue re- 
ductions this year, especially by 
curtailing recruitment. 

{AP. Reuters. AFP) 


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Tokyo Paints U.S. 
As Top Violator 
Of Trade Rules 

Ccnptled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan turned the ta- 
bles on the United Slates on Tues- ’ 
day, charging Washington with : 
breaking international trade rules - 
and using unilateral measures to 
resolve trade disputes. 

“The United States is without * 
parallel in imposing measures that > 
force its trading partners to abide' 
by unilateral judgments and shows . 
□o signs of abandoning this prac- ■ 
lice." a report from a Ministry of 
International Trade and Industry 
panel said. 

The sharply worded report came 
just a week after Washington and 
Tokyo bad agreed to restart talks 
on trade that had been stalled since' 
February. 

Despite the heated rhetoric in 
the report. Prime Minister Tsu- 
lomu Hata said be was “confident 4 
that things will proceed in the right! 
direction” in the trade talks. 

Although the report covered nine \ 
countries and the European Union, , 
it reserved its most strenuous pas- 1 
sages for the U.S. Super-301 trade \ 
law, which allows America to unilai- , 
eraDy retaliate against any nation it • 
deems an unfair trader. President ! 
Bfl] Clinton revived the law in • 
March wbOe the talks were dead- ■ 
locked. (Reuters, AP) r 


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South Korea 
Scores High 
With OECD 

By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — South Korea, which is 
seeking to become a member of the 
Organization for Economic Coop- 
eration and Development — the 
so-called rich nun’s club of indus- 
trial countries — scored enviably 
weD in the secretariat's first eco- 
nomic assessment of the country 
published Tuesday: 

• Economic growth, up 9 per- 
cent in the first quarter from a year 
ago, is likely to average 7 percent 
for the year — far exceeding the 2.5 
percent average for the OECD’s 
existing membership. 

• The size of the public sector is 
small, with government spending as 
a percentage of overall output “low- 
er than in any OECD country." 

• Gross central government debt 
is small — already less than 10 
percent of gross national product 
and falling — and “the quality of 
government spending has been 
kept high.” 

The assessment also points up 
high scores of students on stan- 
dardized tests and expectations for 
per capita income to grow to twice 
that of Turkey by 19%. 

The downade of the assessment is 
an “uncomfortably high” rate of in- 
flation, which is expected to exceed 
6 percent this year and unlikely to 
fall to the targeted 3 percent by 1997 
unless there is a change in policy. 



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■ • f Ir 


U883 TWO UW 
104J4 10iT5 WOW 


forward Rata* comae* 

Ctomcr thdm t***t cauMtm** 

. fiwd«a rttoa _ IK ; • UJJ Jfg joinaieiew" 

Sorasr IMG Bank 1 jokra tTokeei: tori Bank 

atoms .moat From oust ah. 

PtoBtoW l IMF tSOR}, oner data tram nnaer> 


Sources: Haunt* Liam Bank. 

RbMan dk30bttttMafbmdeaom<dSlnua^mkmim(»cquivakun>. 


Bfttoto 

Book base rate 

Collmoaey 

iHmnrtk totorboHc 

OaMNiMerMtot 

4-awnto Intenmk 

ihftaron 

Praaea 

l o tenrenoa rate 
Coil money 
t-wntti taterftpH 


HHrKr OAT 

Sources: Rautara. Bloomberg. Merritt 
Lynch. Bank of Tokyo. Commeribank, 
wwnwaff Atartopf. Credit Lvatmais. 

Gold 

Zurich 
LobAm 
H awTom 

US dot Iocs pec ounce. London official tl- 
btmZurkh and New York aaeffitv endue* 
too prices; New Yen Cemex < Aitov# > 
Source: Routers. 



4.14 4.U 
Sj07 SM 
5M SSS 
*31 «J3 
MO 6J7 

7.15 7.11 

7.43 7J? 

Mo n H I Lthcb 3Htnr R» o»v ano f X32 130 


5'm 

5Vj 

4TY 

5.00 

s s 

5J» 

5 v . 

5 A. 

5Hs 

5 

8.77 

85? 

5.40 

5u40 

5H: 

5% 

515 

5Vj 

5V: 

S’* 

5W 

5% 

731 

7.14 


ObawirtraM 

OH) tower 
hBOBW H a tertinn l r 
^flMHtototortaak 
Unoott totertaak 

imirew mim iKto 

Oonwoor 

Lsmiordrate 

CounoMr 

THnaoto toterbook 

mwtttotertw* 

4 m o wto toteriMoe 

iwnarBond 


1% Hi 
Z83 un 

IVt 100 

zm 2w 


ZVh 

rut 


Zte 


MO UO 
5V5 5Vi 
IS Si* 
5.10 &I5 

5-10 5.15 

am. mi 


AJA, 

PM. 

Ch'oe 

38845 

38735 

+ 2J0 

38US 

387 A0 

+ 130 

38800 

3tt.DC 

+ 130 


Banking Clients Have Always Expected 
Outstanding Personal Service. 
Today They Find It With Us. 



D uring the Renaissance, 
trusted advisors helped 
administer die finances 
and protect the inreresrs of" private 
individuals. The role demanded 
judgment, commitment and skill. 

Today, clients find that same 
personal service ar Republic 
National Bank. We believe that 
hanking is more about people than 
numbers. It’s about the shared val- 
ues and common goals that torge 
strong bonds between banker and 


client. It’s also about building for 
the future, keeping assets secure 
for the generations to come. 

This client focus has contrib- 
uted to our leading position in 
private banking. As a subsidiary 
of Safra Republic Holdings S.A. 
and an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part of 
a global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and more 
than US$50 billion in assets. 
These assets continue to grow 


substantially, a testament ro the 
group's strong balance sheets, risk- 
averse orientation and century-old 
heritage. 

All banks in the group are 
locally managed, attuned to the 
language and culture of their cus- 
tomers. They share a philosophy 
that emphasizes lasting relation- 
ships and mutual trust. Those 
values were once the foundation 
of banking. At Republic, they 
have been and always will be. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


A SAFRA BANK 

Timeless Values, traditional strength. 


REPRESENTATIVE OFFICE: HONG KONG - &/F JAR DINE HOUSE - I CONNAUGHT PLACE ' CENTRAL - HONG KONG - TEL. (893 1 S24 83 34 
HEAO OFFICE! GENEVA 1204 ■ 2. PLACE OU LAC ■ TEL. (022 1 70S 55 55 ■ FOREX: (022 j 705 55 50 AND GENEVA 1201*2, RUE DR. ALFRED- VINCE NT (CORNER 
OUA! DU MONT- BLANC • BRANCHES: LUGANO 6901 - 1. VIA CANOVA ■ TEL (OflIJ 23 85 32 ■ ZURICH 8039 • BTOCKERSTRASSE 37 * TEL (Oil 288 18 IB ■ 
GUERNSEY * RUE DU PR6 * ST. PETER PORT • TEL, (4811 711 76t AFFILIATE; REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEVI YORK OTHER LOCATIONS 
GIBRALTAR • GUERNSEY - LONDON - LUXEMBOURG * MILAN ' MONTE CARLO • PARIS - BEVERLY HILLS * CAYMAN BLANDS * LOS ANGELES * MEXICO CITY • MIAMI ■ 
MONTREAL - NASSAU • NEW YORK • BUENOS AIRES ' CARACAS - MONTEVIDEO ' PUNTA DEL ESTE - RID DE JANEIRO • SANTIAGO • BEIRUT - BE LUNG • HONG KONG - 

JAKARTA ' SINGAPORE - TAIPEI • TOKYO 


v; 


i 



Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1994 



Compiled bt Our Stuff From Dtipatchtt 
NEW YORK — Failing Treasury 
j>ond prices resulted in a muted 
nowing Tor the slock maticeL where 
trading was thin after the Memorial 
bay holiday weekend. 

the Dow Jones industrial aver- 
se edged up 1.23 poini. to 
3,758.37. but losing issues outnum- 
bered gaining ones by a 5-to-4 ratio 


:.s. stocks 


on the New York Stock Exchange. 

Slocks look iheir cue from the 
bond market, where the price of the 
benchmark 30-vear Treasury bond 
fell 12/31 io 86 J/3Z sending the 
yield to 7.43 percent, up from 7.39 
percent Friday. 

Bonds were weighed down by 
rising commodity prices, which in- 
vestors see as a sign of impending 
inflation. Rising inflation also 
would be likely to spur the Federal 
Reserve Board to raise interest 
rales again. 

“It's alarming for those watching 
the Fed." said David Duerscn. a 
trader at BA Securities in San 
Francisco. 

Many investors are were hesitant 
to buy bonds before Friday, when 
the U.S. government is due to re- 
lease employment data for May. A 
jump in nonJarm payrolls also 
could prompt the Fed io acL 

In the stock market, gains by 
major banking companies as well 


as rr.tod. gold and oil stocks offset 
weakness in retailing, electric utili- 
ty. beverage and computer issues. 

Citicorp rose \ to 39 ! :. 
Countrywide Credit jumped Ui to 
17'A in active trading. The mort- 
gage company has been rumored to 
be a takeover targeu 

Blockbuster Entertainment was 
the most actively traded U.S. slock, 
gaining I to 2814 on a buy recom- 
mendation from Roberuon, Ste- 
phens & Co. 

American Barrick Resources 
rose *4 to 24 J i in step with rising 
gold prices. Gold for June delivery 
on the Commodity Exchange rose 
5140 an ounce, io 5387. 10. 

In over-the-counter trading. Cel- 
lular Technical Services fell V* to 
1 II*. The company said a software 
contract with McCaw Cellular 
Communications might not be 
worth os much as ihe S 100 million 
value that some have attributed to it. 

Apple Computer Fell 11/16 to 
2?Vi after it said sales of its Power- 
Mac may have slowed because of a 
lack of software created for the 
computer. 

American Express rose 14 to 
274 and Lehman Brothers fell '% to 
38: Lehman was formally sput 
from American Express Tuesday. 

Chevron rose 3/4 to 87 1/4 after 
it was raised to “above average ' 
from “neutral" by Merrill Lynch. 

t Bloomberg, ,-t Fi 


Via ftett 


Mflj 31 


Daily closings of the 
Dow Jones industrial average 

m 



m 


N D 
1993 


J F M 


A M 
1954 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Own High LOW Law Ol; 


Metals 

Cloie 


Indus j’*'.; 11 J’litw J'ia • i.?j ) 

Tfom Itui IK 1630.11 i»r« 16.V93 -jor] Bid ash 

uni iau' .!<??*■ I ALUMINUM (Hl®h Grpda] 

Dollars per metric ton 


Previous 
Bid Ajk 


CTO I3S&SS I31J?V I3US0J S3S0SV 


I 00 


Standard a Poor’s Indexes 


iht 


NYSE Most Actives 



VOL 

High 

LOw 

Lost 

dig. 

BtetekE 

313-75 

28 


26', 

- Ph 

TolMCJ- 

wia 

OJU. 

*l'7 

42‘- 

* 

PhilMr 

77*16 

50>n 

49' * 

49'-. 

— :, e 

LenmBr 

77606 

ia*t> 

I7V; 

18 

__ a ■ 

A'oiAVan 

J40J7 

IJV, 

ru„ 

23*, 

— 1 u 

■itiCrds 


17'« 

15', 

17 , 

- 1 '■« 

Ci lino ra 

22417 

at Si 

3« 

yit 

- A'h 

■More* 

2I5S» 

. 

30' m 

At’i 

mmm 

C-ervEli 

19313 

4-7 

JB'-V 

IT* 


■'.lotcrlas 

17903 

47 

46' 1 

J*', 

■ n 

GnMotr 

1*836 

SJ'« 

53V, 

S3', 

— N 

RjR Nod 

15691 

6 

5V* 

}♦< 

— ' « 

Feu .iC 

■ ♦S3* 

J* 1 : 

3* 

3a 

—*"1 

IBM 

1X09 

*3Vj 

*7', 

*3' . 

_ X., 

FordTA 

1421* 

5k'. 

57*j 

5”, 

— 'm 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


Hign Low Close Ch'ge 
Ir.Ousirlats S33.*: W0.90 S33.ll — IW ! 

TransO. JMOD 3°IJD 393. Jj — D ! 

uiiiuies iw.« 154 00 154J1 -o.se 

Finance 45 .71 li.M 4541 

SP SG0 457.61 355 16 45* JO — 0J3 j 

SP 100 C3.I1 422*0 4 ZS3t. — CJ5 


2255 00 SSo-OO 

SW.M HaLM 


50I.M 

518.W 


5D2.r4 
SI* JO 


NYSE Indexes 



UiC'.n s 
Intel 1 
ftookC 

. C'soss 
j Novell 
1 3Com 
i»ricCsl i 
DSC-. 
DellCaii- 
US Him 4 
WMItll i 
Orocte s 
NwONf 0 
Sole* 

■5 lvoS . 


VOL 

Hrgn 

Low 

Last 

d»9. 

44889 53ri u 

5I». 

53*. 

-Po 

27060 

62'4 

*1 

*2' ! 

1 *• 

72922 

24'.- 

24': 

29' , 

— 11 

21934 

25’ » 

26V, 

247. 

‘ H 

2<»41 

IS' 

Hi, 

174, 


17948 

48 

J*f 

4» 

— I'm 

)5®M 

1J'» 

IV.. 

13' . 

— 1 ■ u 

15461 

22H, 

21', 

22' - 


155*2 

2? 

28 ’v 

78*.. 

— ■ l* 

1539* 

40' * 

39', 

40'V 

- I* •, 

14039 

28 

:«>, 

?i J , 

— Pa 

136*2 

34 ’-v 

33', 

34', 

- 1 +9 

11*62 

J*', 

43-'. 

4*'» 

V n 

11286 

16 

1JV- 

IP. 

— j 

f Ifil 

8'Vi. 

7-t 

8'. 




High 

Low 

Lasl 

Chg. 

ComatTsitir 

Inju-jr.ais 

TrcnsD. 

Ulilir« 

Finance 

752.85 
Jir 32 
250.13 
2U'J* 
216 34 

251 SD 
J09«4 
245 3- 
:o*.46 
:us: 

7:174 
3ICJ4 
2J9.37 
7516 H 

:u r. 

—0 55 
—a vr. 
-0*0 
—in 

-0.46 

WASOAC5 Indexes 


High 

L6W 

Lagt 

a®. 

CompdiJic 

Industrials 

Bank! 

Insuranu- 

Finance 

TrartiP. 

714.21 
■45.00 
7311.44 
B«4 «■ 
93342 
7157} 

■X'« 

74? 96 
7)5 ,T 
2SI.1I 
♦JIM 
ril v 

7jJ ?> 
7liM 
T0.A6 
393 31 
933 42 
71136 

-1.07 

-0.:: 

■ 3jr 
— : is 

A3SEX Stock index 


High 

Law 

Lost 

Otg. 


441 51 

4 10.45 

—0.45 

—O 

Dow Jones Bond Averages 



Close 


Chtee 

2P Bonds 
louiiiiim 

to indusirlols 


97 ’4 
94.88 
I004>9 


-005 
+ 0.10 
uneh. 

NYSE Diary 


I Snot 1337 JO 1I3S55 1235.9*> <334.00 

' Fwword 134*M >«£»««» 
COPPER CATHODES IHieSt Grade' 

Dalian per metric Jon 
5MI tI54.CC 

forward 726A.OO — i-aW 

LEAD 

□Dllon oer meiric ton 

W 505JJ 5.4}.'? 

Forwcrd ST3 03 —4 ■ w 

NICKEL 

Dfliiprspernteinricn *35.00 bum 

F^word JKO& 5330.00 a<Bi» 

TIN 

Dotjarspermer.^" sSflS.OO S*5J0 
VSLrd MOW UiSM SWIM fc»5JC 

ZINC (Soecloi Hlflfi C'omi 

Dollars per ntrine wn ^ ^ 

IgUora *HJK *** 984 W «87JO 


« i T 

94 J8 

— 052 

963 


-0.09 

*?i8 

93*9 

— 3.19 

92.95 

92.9* 

—o^ 

T’ J5 

713? 

-02* 

eiA= 

91.8* 

-0J7 

■;i ii 

9141 

— 0J1 

ci 

9ir» 

-a-2 

9C.50 

90 =C 

— 0.32 

90*fl 

°0.6* 

— 6J2 

»0JO 

9(348 

— QJ3 

N.T 

00 ja 

-0.31 

Caen int 

: 5WA45. 


jr-i 

NT. 


Jun 

Seo e -.*G 

Dec , r ; J; 

Mar ’ir 

Sea .1 7 N.T. 

Esr. velum* -55 Ose-i .m.: lOJai. 
1-MONTH SUROMARKS ILIFFE) 
DM1 million - ofs ut KM oei 


=525 

C4J7 

1J.97 

7344 
=3 JO 


Advanced 

De-aine.3 

Uniicnqed 

Total iwurt 
IJe-.v Higr.s 

N.-.v LCvvs 


740 

C04 

<-N 

rso; 


Prev. 

it’9 

713 

”f3 

2793 

33 

}£ 


Jun 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
I Scp 
I Dec 
I Mar 




«:s: 


°J.!3 

= 5 01 

®iiS 

«iJ5 

Oi. II 

7 ■ Of 


ESI. Wtilur--. 


»4 03 

«Di 
ojJ7 
04 hi 

?o> 

«4 « 

73.9T 

-r< 74 

'Lx 

0138 

0327 

iZJT» —i 

: t -Iltjjto 


AMEX Diary 


ACvancx.ofl 

IMemtafiJ 
Toiai .iiuTi 
Neww Hrmi 
flMv Loa-% 


Close 

;»7 


Prev. 

.’OJ 


: 3-MONTH PIEOR tMATIF) 

1 FF5 million • pts vf IK P<3, 

1 .itui 94 42 

3 *.iC 

*3" 

• s«p 

~6 J7 

®4J3 

Uncrt 

Dec 

■J4 45 «4Je 

J4J3 

— 0.02 

• Mor 

:4J: 9J.'3 

*4.1! 

~'iCS 

1 Jun 


93 AS 

~0.il 

Seo 

7ZJ£ 

— 0.15 

□rc 

; 4 47 

*2.62 

— C.tt 

! Mar : .'Ot ~ — 

*22* 

— 0.18 

, Esr. voium' 

s : -1642. Oaer irv 

r : 2t; 

£92. 


AMEX Mos3 Actives 


Bhi'riiberjf Bidi'KSS .Vrt-j 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
again?! most major currencies 
Tuesday, buoyed by optimism that 
the United States and Japan 
wouldmake pr<^gress in trade nego- 
Jtaitons set to resume this week. 

U.S. officials are scheduled to 
begin talks in Tokyo on Wednes- 
day on insurance services, a 
spokeswoman Tor U.S. Trade Rep- 
resentative Mickey Kamor sard 
Tuesday. Talks on autos and uuio 

Foreign Exchange 

parts are scheduled to start in 
Washington this week. ?hc said. 

"The dollar's fate depend- on 
whether the trade talks with Japan 
are successful." said Karl Halitgan. 
a trader at 1NG Capita! Markets. 
“That's what everyone is waiting to 
see." 

The dollar closed in New York at 
104.750 yen. up from 104.275 Fri- 
day. U.S. markets were closed 
Monday for a holiday. The dollar 
rose 1.6458 Deutsche marks from 
1 .64.-3. to 1.4027 Swiss francs from 
1.4025 and to 5.6265 French francs 
from 5.6210. The pound, however, 
edged up to SI. 5 1 05 from SI. 5 102. 


With progress on trade, the U.S. 
government is considered less like- 
ly to resume calls for a strong yen 
to curb Japan's trade surplus, a 
strategy it pursued Iasi year as the 
dollar fell 20 percent against the 
yen. .A stmng yen makes Japanese 
export:- expensive. 

Japan and the U.S. said last w eek 
that they would resume formal 
talks, which collapsed without pro- 
gress in February. The dollar 
stayed above 104 yen since that 
announcement. 

“People are encouraged because 
at least the two sides are talking 
again." said David Selin, a partner 
at Foreign Exchange Analytics, a 
market consulting firm. 

Speculation that the world's cen- 
tral bank* are poised to shore up the 
dollar should it plunge also steadied 
the currency. The U.S. central bank 
and 18 other central banks teamed 
up to buy dollars on May 4. after the 
dollar fell to a sr.-month low against 
the mart; and neared its record low 
against the yen. 

Sentiment that European inter- 
est-rate reductions were nearing an 
end while U.S. rates had further to 
nse also kept a floor under the U.S. 
curenc-. 


I E>dLa 
J Inlrnifin 
1 EN5CG 
, Clw-SH i 
I '.vtntrrl 
; RsvGlOn 
r PWjOM 
| EenoBo- 

■ Roodmsi 

■ ijlcv. 


VoL High Low Lost 

768-7 l a !<•; I) M 

MO' M ■&>: 18 . 

«IJ J 3'- 3'.. 

?4i8 :()■• 

J44I it 
3345 J’-. 

33019 17 
i«: to> 

1711 4»|. 

1 874 S 


OKI. 1 


NASDAQ Diary 


I0-.V 

4‘ . 

N'j 


— „ | 

C3a» 

Pre«. 

3 ’ 1 Ac.oricoa 

toe: 


.1, j O.'CllPOrJ 

147-j 

1433 

•„ i 'Jncioni-i-J 

r->s 5 

TOSO 


5Tj) 


. u ; rfe.i Higns 



■„ [ Ht.. LOvrt 
'. 1 


|l 


LONG GILT lLI = FEf „ ^ 

■ cstUMQ - an a. zznai 01 106 act 
Jun '“-M '•Vr'-o — M* 

• Saa «■(; -M« 

'Dec ■- N.T «*:M -M* 

■sl.vciuT.0 :3*->.nt.- t3Ci22 

I GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND fLIFFEI 
j DM 350JHM -715 7- 1W acl 

J sS !i£ «it =Eii 

' Dec * : ’7_ — 345 

, Ec:. -olo~7. ’3-5 T9tn»rl.- 
10-YEAR FRE.YC- 30V. “ONES (MATlFl 
FFS004HW - Pti 3! 'Oise: 


Spo* Commodities 


JUP 
Scp 
D ec 

Ev. .t'cn-j 


7 ISC: 

V7*: 


- jn 

S3 


M772 

•v*. 7j _ :.m 
;<«: — 


3iiise.CBe<- ■«* ;£i£Ti 


Market Sales 


N> 5E 
Arnej 
lie ulan 
in millions. 


TfMjOY 
4 p.m. 
31SJ8 
1101 
189AJ 


337 3; 

IS^I 

:orj: 


Ccrtmotfitr 

Alymiftuni. “!■ 

Co i lee Bro:. lb 
CflDDcr cloct'O' > lie. ID 
lro«i FQg ion 
lmc Id 
S it.e- I to- o: 

Sltel fjc-cst. ton 
"in. is 
lilt'-. Lb 


Today 
lil'7 
;.is 
i or 
3I2JC 

o.w 

5jiI 
137 3 
J.Til 

P.4ftl 


Prev. 

DLt.15 

l.l« 

1 . 0 * 

■ 

or* 

i-s 

0 4i 3* 


Irdusirials 


L3- 


Lcn: Sertte C-'oe 


Hi-tl- 
GASOIL tlPE'. 

ua. dollars oer ricl-le ton-tols at 130 ion* 
Jun 1:1.15 

Jul IfTiS ~?7i 

aui l;.'-. zz’i 'i-h s 

see «v ’ii* ~ ~-J r 

c«r :=:i: re: -uc- ai* *L7 : - 


1 

High 

Lew 

Last 

sente 

DiVe 

1 NOV 

16025 

153.95 

16035 

16025 

+ 100 

1 Die 

It US 

161 JB0 

161-50 

I61J0 

+ 025 

. Jan 

16100 

161 JO 

16200 

16200 

+ 0J0 

iFeb 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

16O50 

Unch. 

: Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

158.75 

unch. 

Apr 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

157.75 

Unch. 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

L5&25 

Unch. 


U.S./ATTMEjlOSf 


. EM. volume. 14 Jao. oner ini. TMfil 

.BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE) 

! U J. aollars oer DamiMof* of 1 ROD bcrruH 
Jot I4JD 142S 1(.15 IMS +0« 

Aug 1M7 16.IB lsjj 1443 +ai2 

,*W rus td.12 IdJ7 I6J7 +020 

OC1 1432 16JT I4J0 14J0 7-0.15 

. Nov 1A13 14.11 11.12 1430 *6.t7 

,Dk ItSO 1M5 14^8 1427 +0.1S 

Jen N.T. N.T. N.T. 14J0 4- OlIB 

<Fe* N.T. N.T. N.T. hUO +0.1T 

MW N.T. N.T. N.T. 16J0 +at7 

. Eh. volume: &Q34. OoenM. 13&0M 


Stock Indexes 


Financial 

Hish Lew Close Change 
3-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE1 


Jun ?J7t 

Sep 3 ~J' 

Dec 7; 74 

Mor c -j- 

Jwft ^5: 

Sea 35 

Dec 

Mor 

Jun !•••- 

Sep ®0.?C 

Sic CCJ3 

Mar N.T. 


J^mONTK SUFODOLLARS tLIFFEl 
JV million ■ cts c‘ IM pet 


Hteb 

. FTS £ IM (UFFEI 
- 05 per index neisj 

Lew 

Close Change 

1 Jun 

39610 

29010 

2959.0 

+ 190 

Sep 

367.5 

2919 J 

2971J 

+ 1BJ 

1 .. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2SB1J 

+ 1741 


EM. volume: 21071. Open Inf.: 40378. 

CAC tt {MAT IF J 
1 FF200 per Mm petal 

■ mar 33KJJ0 201 2 JO 2027.90 —23.10 

-Jan 201400 mm 2013 m — 2tuo 

Jul 2311 no tmjn SBKUffl —2050 

I Sw 200.00 20I5J0 HQO00 —2 L00 

1 p«= M-T. N.T. 205900 -20JQ 

.-Mar 20M09 2073J0 assm — 2SJ0 
1 EM. volume: 71185. Open Inf.: KL57E. 

: Sources: Motif. Associated Press. 

London inri Financial futures Exchange. 
. mn Petroleum Exchange. 


-001 

— 0.0i 

— G.fij 

_. ft <n 

— J.04 

— 0i4 


Dividends 


Unth. 
Unefi 
— 0 61 

— CJU 
-iJW 

— 0.50 

— ass 

— 0.0? 

— o.ce 

— 0.12 

— 0.:: 


Company Per Aral Pay Rec 

IRREGULAR 

Asia Paci<ic Fd . zj 7 6-15 6-10 

STOCK 

Fsl Pntrlo! BKMir _ 2<fc 6-tO M0 

stock sPLrr 

Evoress Scrlots2 lor 1 ssflt. 

Fipeim Fed Bna> 4 tor S SPhf. 

INCREASED 


Century Srh Bks 

O 

085 

6-15 

7-7 

Dibreii Bras 

O 

20 

6-3 

-6-15 

FFWCorp 

a 

.11 

6-15 

6-30 

AVnonDLxon 

0 

J4 

6-3 

6-15 

tAcOcnaias Carp 

Q 

.7? 

6-7 

+17 

Sliiwslti Prooerry 

a 

32 

7-1 

9-13 

CORRECTION 



Arbor Drugs 

c 

J to 

6-15 

7-6 


Soecfro Science 
c: Revised recent gate. 

6. i-hjr-5 reverse smIt. 


a cordis inc 
Airtran Co-n 
Block HR 
C»r*e* Cara 
Dev e Ico DtversiW 
FL PuliC uni 
Favs Inc 
FM Libertv Fin 
Home FHBnai :n 
H untcs inc 
Laclede Gas 
MTS Systems 
.‘/oss Heal in* Ed 
Mercury General 
Docen Cora 

“ctric: Set Div 
PriiMsame LgC>st 
Ouanor Cora 
Fa iron- Rat Purina 
5.T*e Aj/tc Fin 
Sun TV 

WsrtMngt o r: Foods 
e-aoorc> ltcu iii in UA *ur.is. 
0-annual ; p-ceraMe in CanaAtni 
montMTi a euar f eefi : t-eemVaiw u 


.is 
.03 
as 
JB 

.43 

39 

sa 

JOB 

Q £75 
_ ai 
Q J05 

Q .14 
V MV 
Q .175 
O 3125 
v .IM1 
e am 
Q 14 
O JO 
O JM5 
O JOT 
O J33 


6-9 6-23 
M 6-23 
6-10 7-1 
6-15 7-6 
6-30 7-15 


6-16 
6-24 
6-13 
6-2D 
6-7 
6- 10 
6-10 


7: 

7-e 

7-1 

7-1 

6-13 

7-1 

7-1 


6-7 6-30 
6-15 6-30 
6-14 7-5 

s-10 6-24 
6-15 7-15 
6-15 M0 
US 9-9 
6-7 MS 
6-7 6-17 
6-24 7-29 


fuatss; m- 


To subscribe in Germany 

i-t? cdl. free. 

C’2C hi :5 S5 


l Future Rife with Pitfalls cud Promise for Marketing Industry 


U.S. Growth Ma> Be Losing Speed 

WASHINGTON (.API in Anr 

percent following a healthy 0-' P* mtl nths With mortgage rates rising. 

i- April ^ a wcather-re.^ 6.4 

figures in line with expectations. ren«l 
ooSny .hai b likely »*>-««. further 
later in the year because of rising interest rates, analy* - 

Summer Hiring Surge h Forecast 

WASHINGTON ( WP) - U.S. 

S us - . 

“ n, “S 0!k "^ 

amdirions. said MUcheU S. Fromstein. Manpower's chief exix’utire. 
“despite a lingering downsizing tn some companies. 

Unprofitable Armaiu Unit is Sold 

MILAN (Bloomberg) — Siroint SpA. a “ S 

controlled bv designer Giorgio .^rmaru, Mid «^ d ^ 

unprofitable US. retailing chain. Io Ong Bcng Seng, a Singapore-based 
retailer, as pan of a restructuring. - 

The Simmi board on Monday accepted Ong Ben * 1 5f2f 15521/? 
bffljon lire (SI3 million) for Simim USA, which owns the 41 Armani A \ 
stores. Ong Bcng Seng aLro will take on Sinut USA s operating deficit for 
1 1994. estimated to be between 3S billion and 40 ImDiot 
I holds a majority share of Fmar. which owns 16.8 percent of Surant bpA. . 

Chrysler Technologists on Strike 

DETROIT (Reuters) — About 850 salaried workers at Chryster- 
Corp-’s Technology Center in Auburn Hills. Michigan, went on strike 
Tuesday, a United Auto Workers union official said, while a second 
group averted a strike by reaching a tentative agreement. 

David Coriiss, secretary- treasurer of UAW Local 41 a- said the umi 
primarily includin g designers, analysts and clay modelers went on strike 
against "the shifting ctf work at the center to outside companies, aou 
against on-site contractors. - <ru . t 

He said a second bargaining unit representing more than 400 workers 
reached a tentative agreement on a new labor contract just before the 
strike deadline. That group includes the center’s maintenance workers, 
skilled trades workers and builders of wood, metal and plastic prototype 
models. 

Flight Attendants Out of UAL Vote 

CHICAGO (Bloomberg) — UAL Corp. employees represented by the 
•Yssodation of Flight Attendants will not join a S45 billion employee 
buyout effort before a shareholder vote this summer, the union said in a 
recorded telephone message to its members. 

The message said Gerald Greenwaid. who will head UAL if sharehoid- 
as approve the sale, told the flight attendants union last wed; that there ‘ 
a not be enough lime to conclude on agreement with the union before the 
referendum, the message said. 

The international Association of Machinists, the Air Line Pilots . 
Association and a nonunion employee group have signed a definitive 
agreement to buy 55 percent of the company for a S4.9 billion package of 
wage and work-rule concessions over almost six years. 


Continued from Page 1 1 

for intemational agencies in China, 
with its population of 1.2 billion. 
India with ROD million people, and 
South Africa, with 40 million peo- 
ple. South Africa is a Ley market 
because it offers a gateway to a 
continent 600 million strong. 

“The fact that business grow th i;. 
focused on the Hist jnd Latin 
America is not a problem but a:: 
opportunity." Mr. Sorrell said. 

Competition for tlui bu-:ne.v 
should ipur ad agencie- ;o rethink 


their traditional sources for dc- ;!- 
oping advertising, the report said. 

li caused an uproar in the incis- 
try in !9°2 when Coca-Cola de-.:;- 
ed to tap a Hollywood talent jsor.- 
o. Creative Artist- Agencv. ra'.-.-r 
than its lonE-iime New VorV aa 
agency. McCann -Erick '-on. for - 

large percentage of ti> cr;jl : ’-j 
work. Sony Corp. fi. 'iowed .; -nj!- 
iar -traiegy in l 00 .*. u* ! ng it.- n 
Sony Picture- for jJ Jr-c'orne".; 
rather than h.- agency. L.v B-j:r.r:;. 

Those m- 've* -rurred -om-- accr- 


ete.-. j’-cr. a- •> r 
Th-'-p-. r.. ;• ev 
7 bin- H.. : > - 


j. Vv 

- r-V. . 


a: ter 
:cv- 


r-r :e-ev 

:'pe preiereea :h?i.e 
iookirg to reac’ r - ;!"e 
-• fpe.tpie for the i-.-w 
: han zm g t n -• i r.d u .-t 
Ir.3cp cnc.-r;. 

isle - , i -.or. char.r.ei: 
incrra.-tru!;- r-.-raL: 
State-. ir, £-'■ 


—i- 

; .- 
iar: 
e>t 
r-. 
ic a 




r.c .-at: 

bec-’c 
the I r 




r.els are expected to compete in 
roughly equal numbers with broad- 
casf char.r.e's by the year 2000. 

Interactive media also has impli- 
cations for advertising. ^Izh meaia 
becc xmg iscrearizgly fragmented, 
-grr.rie- cave y. enormous task 
ahead cf them ir. figuring out how 
best tc communicate with these 
r- cr- s? : .:r. tiring audiences. 

“Media pfaruir.e and buying will 
recctr.e more important as frag- 
mentation ir. creases." Mr. Sorrell 


Wwkand Box Office • 

The Aaocmuxi Press 

LOS ANGELES — “The Flintstone" dominated the U. S. box office 
with a gross of S37i million over the weekend. Following are the Top 10 
moneymakers, based on Friday ticket sales and estimated sales Tor 
Saturday and Sunday. 


e '-or. "or- >a:c. 


I. The Fimtstonea" 

Z'AtaverJcir 
a 'Beverty Hills C«Mir 
L “When o Mon Loves oWofnon- 
1-TheCiW 

4. “Four WRfcflnwsoral a Funeral' 
7. “Craoktvn' 
g. -With Honors - 
»“UWt ButfcSta" 
ia Three Ninias Kick Back" 


(universoii 
(Womer Brothers! 
(Paramount) . 
(Touanraie Pictures) 
OVUramox) 
(Or am erc r ) 
(Universal) 

I Warner Brothers) 
(Miramax) 

(Trtstar) 


S37S million 
$18 million 
5J53JTHIUOO 
17.1 million 
56J million 
B7 mifltan 
ST JS million 
13^ million 
$834400 
S74&00D 


ajenic (Verier Cw.ir Mo» 21 

Clasa Prev. 


Amsterdam 


ASM *mro Hid 

60.40 

60 JO 

7-C- H ciamg 

*5.10 

*5.10 

Aegsi-. 

9tJ0 

vtf 

A hots 



a*:o Nobei 


A.-.VEV 



Egis-YJesMnen 

40.10 

*020 

■ZSM 

65.90 


DSM 

13* 136*0 

Elsevier 

1*7.70 168.90 

FOkker 

16*0 


Gisl- Brocades 


49 

MBS 

315 

214 

neir>e*en 

ns w yy* ^ 

Huogoven* 

48*0 

70 JO 

Humer DDuglcs 

7320 

7320 

JHC Co land 

37*0 

38.20 

Inlw J/uelter 

81 JO 

DO 

Ini 1 Nederland 

75.90 


I'.LM 

5120 

5220 

KNP BT 

47.90 


Nedllord 



Dee Grlnlen 

79 JO 

auo 

Pakhaed 

49.90 


Pnilips 

5120 

51.10 

Pol rq ram 

76.70 

76J1t 

Rabeco 

119.10 


Rodamco 

59 JO 


Rolinca 


Rarento 

91 


Roval Dutch 


Stork 

48.10 


Unilever 


Van Ommeren 

54 

53*0 

VNU 

1*9 JO 

171 

Woilers/K lower 

11150 11*90 

EOE India ; 400,77 






Brussels 


AG Fin 

Arbed 

Barco 
Bekoert 
Cnchertll 
CotKPa 

Dethalze 
Electro bel 
GIB 
G8L 
Gevoerl 
Kradletbank 
Pelrollna 
Powcrftn 
Roval Beh* 
SocGen Bonque 


2685 7700 

4970 4900 

2440 2465 
2547S 25WI 
189 I9J 
590B 5950 
1368 1358 
5000 5830 
ISU 1565 

4430 4455 

9740 9810 
4800 6880 
10975 11000 
3250 3250 
5230 5250 
8150 >190 


Sac G«i Belgian 2450 2450 
So Una 15775 15325 

Solvuy 15750 15825 

Trade be I 10250 10275 

UCB NA 75000 

Union Mlnlere 2700 2705 
Current Stock Index : 7677.16 
Previous : 773WI 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

18*20189.10 



Alllaru' Hold 

2413 2377 



Altana 

*1461850 



Asko 

960 975 



BASF 

112 313 



Bauer 

363.10 365 



Bav. Hype bonk 

•03 *30 



BBC 

BHF Bank 

779 JO 729 
403401 JO 

London 

BMW 

820 850 

ADbev Nal'l 


Commerzbank 

338 338 

Allied Lvons 


Carrtineniai 

772J0 275 

Aria Wiggins 

275 

Daimler Bern 

807 JO 79950 

Argvll Group 


□rama 

502 506 

As Bril Foods 


Dt Babcock 

23723720 



□eulsGhe Bank 

73773250 



Douofas 

571 576 

Bank Scotland 


Dresdner Bonk 

374J0374J0 

Barclays 

527 

Fefdmuehle 

345 348 

Bass 

5lI7 

F Kruno Hoesch 

712J0 214 

BAT 

429 

Haraener 

346 346 



Henkel 

613 *13 

Blue Circle 


Hochiiei 

1055 1055 

BOC Groun 

7.11 

Hoechsl 

J36J0330 JO 

Boots 

V.IO 


875 870 

Bowater 

420 

Honen 

238 239 JO 

BP 

385 

IWKA 


Bril Alrwavs 

179 

Kail Sol; 

14714720 

. Brit Gas 

2 AS 

KflrsfatJl 

604 *04 

Brit Steel 


kUsulhol 

51850 522 

Brft Telecom 


KHD 

139 JO 145 

BTR 

3.73 

k loeckiter Wcrke U8J0 148 

Coble Wire 


Linde 

8*8 895 

Cadbury Sch 


Lufthansa 

18718450 

Coraflgn 

326 

MAN 

41550417 JO 

Coats VI.elia 


741an neunann 

436424 JO 

Comm Union 


Melal toesell 

229 227 

Courtoulds 

5.18 

Mwncftfiueck 

2959 3000 

ECC Group 


Porsche 

765 792 



Preuuap 

46245950 

Eurotunnel 






fiWE 




Rhsinmetcul 

305 315 

GEC 

ita 

Scherlna 

■E7JE3 

Gen'l Acc 

557 

SEL 

•VJu'V.'l 

GtQkO 


5ftmens 

677691.5® 


4.41 

Thvsswi 

2765P 280 

GRE 






VHkl 

50*50520 

GUS 

5.79 


38850 38« 

Hanson 


VlQB 

46250*63.20 



voikswogen 

484 JD 483 

HSBC HU9> 


Wella 

922 928 

IC! 

B.0B 


Inch cape 

497 

HKEhiar 

Kingfisher 

Loauroke 

Land Sec 

5M 

157 

A *5 


CIom Prev. 


Helsinki 


Amer-fhNma 
Envo-GuiiC't 
HuntomaM 
»: O.P. 
r.vmmene 
h'elra 
Kalrla 
Pohiola 
Reuolo 
SlocLmarn 
hex index - 178X30 
PrevKHil : 180543 


133 

39JI0 

I1Q 

i; 

114 

176 

403 

85 

90 

220 


Hong Kong 

Bk Easl Asia 
Cathay Pacific 
Cheung Kang 
Chino Light p*, 

Doirv Farm irtl'l 
Hang Luna Dev 
Hang 5ertg Bonk 
Henoerson Land 
HK Air Ervg. 

HK. China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Land 
HK Prolfv Trust 
HSBC Holdings 
HK Shcno Hiis 
HK Telecomm 
HK Ferrv 
Hutch Wltamnoa 
Hv son Dev 
Jardine Math. 

Jaraine Sir Hid 
Kowloon Malar 
Mandarin Orient 
Mlromar Hotel 

New World Dev 
SHK Props 
Sietun 
5 wire Poe A 
Toi Cheung Pros 
TVE 

Whorl Hold 
Wing On Co inti 
Wlrvsor ind. 

'Seng Index 
low : 9S234J 


WWSi 


38 37J0 

11 10. °5 
3V BL2f. 
AJ 42 

nan ujo 

14 14 

56 55.50 
41J5 40J0 

44.75 *430 
I 630 1630 
2-J0 700 
2260 2230 
22A0 22J30 

89 8V JO 
12J0 12.70 
I5J0 15.30 
1X10 1120 

33.75 34 
TJ5Q 73 JO 

63 62 

3175 3150 
1520 1520 
10.90 11 

2220 22 

15 24« 

5250 51 

358 355 
5958 5950 

12 11.80 
320 320 

33 32.75 
11.70 1170 
1210 1230 
755X54 


Market Qosed 

The Johannesburg 
stock market was 
closed Tuehdav for a 


Lcaorie 
La wno 

Lewi Gen Gra 
Llo-ds Bank 
Marks 3o 
MS PC 
Non Pokier 
NaV.Ves; 

Ni.tWsi -.Veter 
P«r?on 
P-iO 
Pllkin7ron 
Power Gen 
Pnidential 
Ponk Ora 
“eekllt Cat 
Pecicna 
Peed inti 
Peuters 
PMC Groun 
Pall; Ro»ce 
Rofhmn (uni)} 

Po»ol 3coi 
PT2 

Sainsbur/ 

Scot Newcas 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 
sneli 
Slebe 

Smith Nephew 
Smilh Kline B 
Smith (WH) 

Sun Alliance 
Toie & Lvle 
Tesco 
r horn EMI 
Tamkln* 

T5B Gnjoo 
Unilever 
Uid Biscuits 
Vodafone 
War Loon 39j 
Wellcome 
wnttw-Bod 
Wiliams Hdgs 
Willis Car roon 
F.T. 30 index : 235420 
PrevttjIS : 2346J0 
F.T5.E. 100 Index : 297050 
Previous ; 2966.W 


Close Prev 

7J5 

-63 


1 6* 

4 1? 

4.11 

17 

5*: 


3.9? 

4 J0 

4 67 


4.1C 

*:s 

42" 

4.ȣ 

4 94 

C.JU 

c.l'J 

4.72 

126 

ItM 

1 8J 

JJ8 

4 J* 

2.7J 

? 

3.79 

3.81 

594 

i.fc 

J.o 1 

iE9 

i:a 


657 

iJ9 

6.92 

B vi 

1J1 

1.80 

170 

J.*fl 

4.10 

4.11 

8 J3 

BJ8 

1*7 

365 

S.IJ 

5.17 

350 

JJH 

1.19 

1.19 

4.96 

4.'J0 

725 

6.98 

SJ7 

5J6 

147 

1 *6 

LB* 

3Jb 

4.76 

4.77 

2.92 

257 

421 

422 

2.12 

2.12 

1028 

1027 

222 

222 

2M 

207 

10.11 

10.04 

320 

3.21 

VJI 

5.18 

«25 

42.19 

5J0 

J.M 

5.1* 

5.1B 

355 

3J6 

157 

159 


Madrid 

BBV 3195 3250 

Bco Centrol Hlsp. 29M W5 
Bonco Scmtonder 5940 6090 


Boneslo 
CEPSA 

□rogtxlas 

Enaesa 

Ercras 

Iberdrola 

Reosal 

Tobocalera 

Teletonlco 


1085 1080 
3275 3310 
EH® 2335 
6550 6690 
209 3M 
997 1015 
4am 4350 
4150 4130 
1840 1870 


S.E. General Index : 32655 
Previous : 32955 


354 

5J9 

259 

239 

5.44 

9.12 

4A4 

1.75 

504 

5.10 

4-17 

120 

291 

7J>7, 


Milan 

Banco Comm 
Basing I 

Benetton group 

Cioa 

CIR 

Cred l tat 
Enictiem 
Ferfln 
Ferlln Rise 
Ffal SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Generali 
IFI 

■talcem 

Nainas 

Italmcblllare 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnnscenie 
Safnem 


S1IS 5055 
181 180 
26850 26000 
1164 1133 
2600 7595 
2250 2300 
7900 7910 
7005 2000 
1205 1214 
6800 6785 
2059) 2000 
45300 44600 
75800 25400 
16390 16400 
5190 5250 
45300 44900 
15950 1S72S 
1383 1320 
2710 2680 
5225 5150 
28750 777K 
10700 10350 
39aS mo 


s.10 San Pooto Torino toioo 10300 

4.13 SIP 4300 4 WW 

3.87 SME 3840 3835 

3.71 { Snla 2400 2345 

169 Slanda 37000 36900 

1-37 1 Sfet 5440 5415 

147 1 Toro Assl Rise 30450 30300 


3.75 

07 

445 

3.06 

ITS 

535 

5.17 

4.78 

4 

JfiO 

Ml 

235 

304 

5-42 

5J2 

4.43 

1A4 

4.77 

582 

253 

IAS 

7.45 

509 

4JI7 

550 

1J1 

6X9 


Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 

32 

3Ub 

Bank Manfred 

25*. 

2S*» 

Bell Canada 

4ff«B 

43»* 

Bombardier B 

21 

2D*b 

Cnmbkir 

19V, 

19Mi 

Cascades 

81k 

Sl'i 

Dominion Te»I A 


bin 

Donohue A 

12 

12^ 

MacMillan Bl 

1938 

19 

Natl Bk Canada 

9 

9 

Power carp. 

?1 

21 

Quebec Td 

221k 

23 

Ouebecar A 

IB* 

18=% 

Ouebecar B 

lBtt 

in* 

Teleglobe 

19lu 

19. 

Univa 

6Vb 

6=^4 , 

Vldrotron 

IIP* 

M’ 4 i 

indusinais Index : 
Previous : 191-151 

: 192851 


Close Pre«, 


Paris 

PCCor 
Fir Ltouide 
Atcaiei Aijinam 
-•a 

Bancsire idol 

BiC 

BMP 

Bou.gues 

S5N-GD 

Correfour 

CC.F 

•-eras 

Chorgeurj 

Clmenis Franc 

Club Med 

Ell-Aaullalne 

Elf-Sanoti 

Euro Qlsncv 

Gen. Eoux 

Havas 

imeiol 

Lafarge Can nee 

LeOrond 

Lyon. Eau> 

Oreo I (L'l 
L.VJW.H. 

Mafra- Hoc belle 
Michel in B 
Moulinex 
Poribas 
PeOilnev Inti 
Pernod- Ricard 
Peugeai 


6« 

4*9 

Anf.jr 

«*: 

’j; 

77? 

7 K 

an; 



*u 

*i: 

3HP 

.p~f* 

isr- 

1292 

IJW 


" f “ 


541 



on 


1230 




-iji 

749 

25? 


>20 

15T 

*51 

6i .' 

CPA 

is n 

1522 

847 

857 

CSR 

4.S'J 

49J 

18*7 

18W 


1 r 

I.K 

778.10 

233 


12* 

l.*L 



10 -p 

IU2K 

1401 



? 





-'J 

322 




11.82 

II.8i 

*1820 

410 

News Core 

V.W 

9.1t 

890 



4.75 

AJl 

31.10 

3120 


J68 

3*9 




4A<l 

<JO 

455.10 

*61 


3.05 

3 .01 

5*5 



224 

iS! 



IJ8 

I2T, 




.183 

3.91 

571 

575 


2J0 

2JC 

1150 

1165 


720 

7.78 

867 


Westpac Banking 

4A* 

<)'i 

1 16 



439 

■Lit 

14050 140 

All ordinaries index : 3081JUI 
Previous : 2091J8 


164.90 1 66 

376 382.90 
009 022 


Prlntemm (Aul 1005 930 


. Roakitechntque 
Rh- Poulenc A 
Raft. SI. Louis 
Redout e (Lo) 
Saint Gabo In 
3£,B. 

Ste Generole 
Suez 

Thomson-CSF 
Total 
UAP. 
valeo 
CAC4L.- 
Previous ; 


485 505 

14080 143-40 
1655 1666 
922 933 

660 676 

534 535 

611 610 
304 30 307 JO 
168.50 174 

3HL7D 314 
157J0 153J0 
748 254 


Sao Paulo 


Bunco da Brasil 

29 

2881 

Banespo 

16.50 

16.10 

Brodesco 

23 

23 

Brcmnrn 

430 

420 

Cemlg 

114 

106 

Eletrabras 

372 

370 

itaubanco 

380 

365 

LlDtlt 

415 

*00 

Paranau'ji lema 

32-50 

XL50 

Pelrobros 

185187.99 

Souza Cruz 

9700 

9*50 

Tele bras 

72 

71.40 

TelBSP 

545 

545 

Usiminas 

1.97 

2 

vale Rio Doce 

190 164 JO 

Vorig 

215 

195 

PSe«?sai 

24*72 



Singapore 

Cereoos 8J0 8.75 

City Dev. 7.85 7.95 

DBS UJO UJO 

Fraser Necrve 18.40 iaJ0 
Gentlng iB^o 18.40 

Golden Hone Pf 2J0 240 
Haw Par 740 144 

Hume Industries 560 5J0 
Inch cape 560 iso 

Kefiael 
KLKepang 
Lum cnonn 
Mo la van Banlrg 
OCBC foreign 


OUB 
OUE 

Sembawang 
Shangrlla 
SI me Darby 
SIA forefsn 
STwe Land 
5 ’Pore Press 
Sing Steamship .... 

S'pore Telecomm iso 148 

5 1 rolls Trading 3A4 174 

UOB foreign 1 7 m ig 
UOL 2.19 230 

Shmjjs Tl^buL : 228147 


1080 1080 
3.10 LIT 
1J3 151 

885 BJS 
13.40 1IA0 
7 JO 7J5 
8J5 D.70 

1280 12.90 
5J0 SJO 
386 380 
I3JO 7 JO 
7 JO 7.70 
1SJ0 1SJ0 
4.12 4.04 


Stockholm 

AGA 
A WO A 
Astro a 
A tlas Co PCD 
Electrolux. B 
Ericsson 
Esseite-A 
Handelsbanken 
Investor B 
Norsk Hydro 
Procardia AF 
Sandvlk B 
SCA-A 
5-E Banken 
Skandla F 
Skat tska 
SKF 
Store 

Tretleborg BF 
Volvo 


382 385 

612 422 
144 149 

483 406 


119 123 

I0S 109 

190 194 
236JD 240 
177 127 

118 120 
116 120 
50 JO 51 

117 122 
187 192 

131 138 
428 429 

111 115 

722 734 


AHaersvoerMen : ' 
Previous ; 1895.lt 


Close Prey 


Sydney 


Tokyo 


Akai Electr 


50* 

Asatii Chemical 


800 

Asahl Glass 


1330 

Bank of Ton ro 


1*80 

Bridgestone 


■El 

Canon 


1730 

Casio 


1320 

Dal Nippon Prim 


1860 

Dalwo House 

I5W 

1550 

Dolwa Securities 

1800 

1800 


^rti-o i| 

4*50 

Full Bank 



Foil Phota 


2310 

Fujitsu 

uoo 

1090 

Hitachi 

1080 

1070 

Hitachi Cable 

870 

834 

Hondo 

1880 

I860 

Ho Yokodo 

.5380 

5320 

Itochu 


723 

Japan Airlines 

7*4 

743 

Kali mo 

953 

940 

Kansai Power 

2*50 


Kawasaki Sleet 

42* 

423 

Kirin Brewery 

1240 

I960 

Komatsu 


970 

Kubota 

703 

707 

Kyocera 

6760 

g/Si li 1 

Malsu Elec Inch. 

1830 


Matsu EfecWks 

1160 

■JTjl 

Mitsubishi Bk 

2£O0 

j 




Mitsubishi Elec 

m 

6 91 

Mitsubishi Hev 

n 7 

768 

Mitsubishi Carp 

1240 

1710 

Mitsui and Co 

825 

EM 

Ml tsukoshl 

1000 

972 

Mitsumi 

1960 

1870 

NEC 

11*11 


NGK Insulators 



Nlkko Securities 

1380 

1380 

Nippon Kogaku 

1050 

1020 

Nlpoon Oil 

740 

7S2 

Nippon Steel 

376 

377 




Nissan 



Nomura Sec 

2420 

2410 



Olympus Optical 

1170 

mo 

Pioneer 

2880 

2870 

Ricoh 


968 

Sanya Elec 

557 

Shorn 


IMn 

Shimazu 

744 



2210 


Sony 

6220 

*180 

Sumitomo Bk 

2250 

2270 

Sumitomo Chem 

502 

502 


1000 

1010 

Sumitomo Metal 

306 

307 


687 

696 

Talsho .wosine 



TakedaChem 

1210 

1200 


4720 


Tetfln 

5*3 

$55 

Tokyo Marine 

1370 

1370 

3200 

Tokyo Elec Pw 

3230 

Topoan Printing 

1420 

1420 

Torav Ind. 

730 

730 

Toshiba 

845 

838 

Toyota 

3110 


YoRiatcht Sec 

0 : * too. 

977 


Nikkei 225 : 20979 
Previous : 20839 
]>Plx Indtuc 11683 
Previous : io» 



Toronto 


Abttibi Price 


17 

Agnlca Eagle 

16 

15% 

Air Canada 


6% 

Alberto Energy 

21 Vj 

2 Hu 

Am Barrick Rea 

34W 

321b 

BCE 

48 tk 

-10% 

Bk Nova SccJlo 

77V: 


bc Gas 

15 

$Vb 

BC Telecom 

25% 

25Vr 

BF Realty Hth 

00? 

3.02 

Bromolea 

0.20 

3.2? 

Brunswick 

in. 

0% 

CAE 

m 


Camdev 

5V. 

5% 


j Close P-e. 

I cibc :: - : 

Canadian Pcc>iic :: 

Can Tire A ” • 

Cantor :2-- Cv ; 

Cara -i: -'f 

CCL ind B > - 

Cineoiei -Ji 

Commro 22 12 : 

Canwest E spl 22'- 7 - : 

CSAMgfA M's l ■ x 

Denison Mm B 0 oj 
D a IOSCO 25 c n-: 

D/le» A 0.*: 2.»2 

Echo Bor Mines if- IS'- 

Enulrv Sliver a cji d.ji 

FCA Inti JJO 2 ; j 

Fed ind A r >■. 

Fleioier Cnoll a I8> if-. 

FPI 6V o'-? 

Centra C -i P.J7 

Gull Cda Res -L65 s'-. 

Heesinri U t u-j 

HemloGW Mines U's 17V» 

Hoi linger 1^ Ifr 

Horsham l er "-n l°'o 

Hudson's 3av 30': 3t:? 

Imnsco 34' e 35’s 

Inco 

Interprov pipe 
Jannack 


La baft 
Loblaw Co 
Mackenzie 
Mogna Inti A 
Maple Leaf 
Maritime 
Mark Res 
Malson A 
Noma ind A 
NoranOa Inc 
Noranda Forest 
Moreen Energy 
Nttin Telecom 
Nova Corp 
Oshawo 
Pogurln A 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petroleum 
PWA Corp 
Rarrock 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 
Rothmans 
Roval Bank Can 
Sceptre Res 
ScorrsHosp 
Seogram 
Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sherritt Gordon 
5HL Svstemhse 
Soultxun 
Spar Aerospace 

SielcoA 
Talisman Enero 
Toe* B 
Thomson 
Toronto Damn 
Torstar B 
Transalla Util 
TransCda Pipe 
Trllon Flnl A 
Trimac 
Trftec a 
U nicorn Energy 
tse 300 Index : 43264a 
Prtvhnis : 432BJB 


35' s 35‘-s 
JtP? 
its, IT', 
711 : 21'* 
23’x 

4-, «, 

6|lg 61V> 

12^ 12’J 

25'3 2T-? 
Bk. 84. 
23‘t 22--, 
5X. 5Vi 
25X, 2s'« 
13 12> 
14^ 14V. 
43V* 4J<« 
lHh ll'Si 
20 Ve 20’. 
340 345 
3U-s 31^1 
IQ'. 10'v 
0J2 0J2 
IW« I9K: 
31% 31 

20 vs 20’ .- 

76h 7V 
ZDa 29 Vh 
I3W 13V: 
8ry 8k. 
41 'X 40»X 
7V» 7Vt 
■UH 43’* 
l?>* 111* 
W* W* 
19V* 19-* 
169* lehi 
8V* 8>m 

29 Xm 29’X 
254. 25** 
164. 167* 
214. 22 

23z* 2«e 
144. 15 


18 18'* 
4V: 440 

154* 13'i 
027 028 

1.45 1VJ 


Zurich 


62D 626 

35® 351 

1480 rsio 
22*5 
,846 850 

NA 890 

435 430 

1147 1150 


AdlO infl S 270 271 

Alusulsse B new 658 til 

BBC Brwn Bov B 1740 1280 

Ciba Gefov B flao 893 

CS Holdings B 
Elekfraw B 
Fischer B 
I rrierdlscoiin! B 

Jelmall B 

Landis Grr R 
Moevenoick B 

Nestle p 
Oerflk Buehrie P 15a T54 

Pargeso Hid B 1660 1670 
Roche Hdg PC 
Satra Republic 
Sandai B 
Schindler B 
Sutler PC 

Surveillance B ...» .... 
Swiss Bnk Cora B 404 407 

Swiss Reinsur fi 584 597 

Swissair R 7gn 701 

UBSB 1195 ]i«g 

Wimertnur B na 712 
Zurich Ass B 1350 i sin 
58S index : 964.14 
Previmu : nui 


6695 6620 
123 129 

720 724 

£570 8625 
_905 *28 

2110 2180 


If* easy to subsa&e 
m Belgians 
lest cal to H - fr eei 
0 800 1 7538 


9 O CGTO a 


Grains 


'■'.‘HEAT .CSOt: 


j-j 


■ -jsj 

: • :u 


>5«" 

>«4.- 


- 5' 

~jo «r. 

-.j- 

' i' 

•• r • ““ 

"iC 

’ ’ J ‘ 

■:r:s ! ! ■ « 

" 6* 

' * ^ 




1 f- l ides 

S8U 

=• ! -.or- -1 Tf-W r“ :K 

COCOA 

N<3& • : -jr- 1ST . 

t or 



'zr 

i=i 

27.3*7 ■: 1^** 

!4H 


• AZ-K-i 

I4T 

Vr 

is :*>: 

»«H 


.“5 vr,=; 


• -v 



■3X 




r<c««5 


-3. 

;3KV=-«4 


E? »c« 

"!Ti Fn s. sees 

J3.9M 


lj* C5se erg Oo.y.r 


ieasm Season 

H Wi Low 


Open Hgn Low do» Che OcJm 


"255 

ij£f 

143 

1«C 


I" 55 


;ju 

.414 

1448 

•«; 

isw 

1544 

1584 

’614 


- 1. *6 1-04 
■CIS 640 
■i.: 4 37 


•C 34A-0 
-36 M.7M 
-36 9.116 
-40 AiC 
-60 1312 
■*a 2»1 

-49 546 

-49 2.038 
-49 3 


1 ! -.str “ £’.996 11c S33 
ORANGE JUICE INCTN1 il«av-awu 




_ __ 




1 Ti y 


9L7f 

133.03 

9*35 

13185 

-4.10 13.183 


a -4 : 

• ■> 

' !" 



iis: 

;LTie=®J 

99 50 

ID4.75 

9950 

1MJS 

-155 

4.706 



• j*. 

■ ** 


--2C' 


«tI5-%ev *4 

'.0135 

135,95 

101 25 

10550 

-3J5 

i-tn 

'• • ‘ 


■ ■: 



4-C' 


0": jsn*S 

13300 

107 CO 

103.00 

107.00 

-3J5 

2.725 

s r ‘ , 

■ ■ -r : r ■ 

“ Zp 

232 

:■ jt, -3'J- 


3 3 

M.TJyfi 

10X50 

icajo 

1MJC 

105 00 

-*W 

933 

22 s 




1-: . 5i . 


r.ijs 

X5CWcv9j 




HOW 

-400 


in 

j " .1.. zzl 

X. 

LT : 

in 

' 

: e V. 

itJuJui 55 




111.00 

-400 


E;t sa'es n*. =-. s 

; v 




via: 

HI JC Sea 95 


t tjh 


112-00 

+ 400 



CORN ICBOT7 i :':a. -v-. sc >=- s.- 

;:v: L4! Jc.f4 . :rs-. IT. -Ci: 


EF.sc.es J.."o: Fri-ssjies i./M 
F'-'S:d-t. .nt 22.407 UP 347 


: v 1 

243 

:j* 

:5eB»4 
■ C+cti 

: 

IS 

L~3 : 
23U 

r*6 -■ 

-J 17 
-P.12 

SJ+Si 



Mefafs 


I *?' : 

:ii’ 

■ f.'*rs i 

n 

1TZ 

2.1' 

i“i 1 

■j;; 

•C5J3 

HI GRADE GQPPEH 

NCMX) botatK-anni*'* 

li: 

35) 

Vc. 

2 7c 


175 -. 

Ua 

-Z 'I 

1.356 

• 3773 

7410 Jun 94 

10420 10120 10150 

103.95 


2M 

Ju:?' 


i. 30 

2.77 

2JT-: 

-C.H' 

1)32 


74MJUIM 

10130 10485 10133 

10175 

:5* 

7 Ja 





2^! 

-:s: 

I 

105-50 

ru.wSepO* 

102-50 tp4«l 102. SO 

1DL05 


7A7 

Ctecis 

li? 

2.5*? 

3 -■*'•-■ 

15* 

-asi 

. :su 

iOUi 

7575 Dec 94 

10160 10943 101 30 

101 65 


Ei! sotes 40.000 Fri'AMMs J4J1* 

Fn'o coen >n: isisn -jc t^so 
SOYBEANS ICBOT1 s^o6o/r-M»im.-n>-or»ani*«'iauin«i 


MAO IA32 
‘070 7>AD 
*070 9.5JB 
>020 S.S05 



5.94* : Jul 94 

7W 

’0* 

iM 

701 

-07.7 

E.9SZ 

73s 

*ja Aug 94 

732 , 

7.0?' ♦ 

4 93 

?00 J : 

-078’: 

!S,t5s 

7 OF' ; 

*17 Sep'H 

4J8S», 

*4JJ, 

*78 

si?’. 

-0J0 

8.754 


5J5V.-Mov94 

613’. 

6.73V, 

6.65 

673** 

-DJD 

54 -Ml 


613 Jan ®5 

*79 

W 9 

671 



6*37 

7.02' » 

*If fWfi 

642': 

6 82 : 

*26 

*82' i 

-0JQ 

(.Oil 

7. Cl' 1 

4.21 Mav9S * 85* c 

*55': 

476 

4 34 

-078’s 


703 

474 Jul ®5 

6.63 

635 

679 

6 AS 

-0J0 

1777 

*JC'T 

SBfeNovOS 

6.AJ 

*4) 

6JJ 

LW'.I 

-air ; 

’.JT2 


Eli. sales iSXm Ri‘s. sales 26.F70 

Fri’s otwn ini 149,640 uo 27 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOTI TO -d-k- aoBan m r®n 

ZKLOO IBS JO Jul 94 204 .U 204 JO 2O0J0 202.60 -8 *30.017 

33 as lojoOiuow nuu so totjo joao -on iejs: 

210 W IB3 10SCP94 702 JO 700-50 WOO 702JH -9J) 9J72 

TCftCO 180.00 Oct *4 700.10 7)010 197.00 200.10 -10 00 JA89 

209.00 HIM Dec 94 177.00 199 00 196.00 199 On >10310 17.355 

W1J0 1 7830 Jon «5 I9°_M 1WJ0 I973B 199 JO -HUB 1.774 

79150 101.00 Mor 91 201.00 30100 199JM -01 JVI -10M 1J88 

197 00 18 LOO Mov 95 201.00 201.00 199.00 -OftJO *9J0 294 

moo 162.00 jui n itojo -nun 7*8 

EM. sows 25-000 Fr-'s. sales 6812 
Frl'soacn>nt K.4»? on 

SOYBEAN (ML [CBGT1 mi^jw *»- dolto^ »nr rrjot* 


XU3 
3065 
9L34 
79 J4 
HE) 
J6j>V 
-a jo 
78.05 
PM 


71.55 Jut 94 28.97 2892 2830 3BJ6 
21.65 Aus 94 28.85 76 85 1432 2433 


♦ 0.44 

-448 

r?40 5eo94 2BJ0 28A2 28.13 2115 -UJ3 

22-UiijG 94 23 00 28 00 77 AO 7I5S -04*5 

27 JO 
?/a 
27.25 


27.00 Dec 94 2750 

22.65 Jon 9S 27 40 
21 70 Mar 9:'. 2725 
24 67 May 95 2720 

74.65 Jul °S 77 JF 77 07 

EM. soles 2D .000 Fris. sates IL«D 
Ri'imoM 86.470 Oh 3 Md 


27 17 77J2 -472 

27.10 27.10 -0l70 

26.95 26.95 -470 

7480 2684 -DAO 

2660 2622 -0AS 


29.224 

14.166 

14744 

7.262 

19.670 

2372 

IA46 

868 

t» 


9S00 


101*5 

• mo 


9« JO 


101.45 

+ 070 


107 JO 

73.00 Mar 95 

10173 

-070 

2.197 

101. IP 

?6JSMav9s 

100.75 

-0.90 

955 

IDCJO 

m00 Jul 95 

10040 

+ D.2B 

KM 

10!. 00 

25JOAU0 95 103.75 10375 

1(075 IU3.40 

-070 


99 JS 

TV.IOSeoVS 

laojB 

-070 

445 

9270 

7LZIOa9S 

1D24S 

>070 


9i00 

77JiHav95 




99 70 

03.00 Dec 95 

9975 

♦ 070 

612 

92J5 

88-50 Jan 96 

99J5 

>070 


9125 

6170 Mar 96 

9975 

*070 


9480 

91 W Acr 96 

101.00 

-070 



7J00 Fri'!. soles I0J» 




Fri's. open -nr 61.«73 aH B5 




SILVER 

[NCMX) XBaairmoz.-Rite>p 





51 55 Jim 9* 

S SLQ 

+ 7A 

7 


5863 


5*CJ 
597.0 
564 J) 
6040 
6065 
6140 
6140 
6240 

HBjO 


556.0 

S67.D 


569.0 

577.0 

5834 

5900 

5950 


5564 

5654 

5785 

547 5 

587 JJ 


13381 


win 

557.9 
5605 

567.9 
569.6 
576.1 

5B1J 

5*78 

PAD 

6014 

6045 

6135 




Livestock 




CATTLE 






7S27 

6230 Jun 

6*05 

6*45 

65.00 


>0 80 2tU6* 

23 82 

6102 Aug 9* 

s*m 

66 50 

6d.ro 


— 0J2 24.201 

74.10 

65.70 Od w 

bt 86 

69 45 

Afi 

68 r» 

—0.18 13.987 

2430 

6770 Dec 94 

■2000 

2060 

69.90 

*9.9? 

— 0J0 

8.90* 

7475 

67.90 Feb ®S 

7080 

2175 

20 JO 

70J7 

-038 

5481 

25. ID 

6® J0Apr®5 

71.90 

22.45 

71.90 

71.9! 

— QJ3 

Z.7DI 


6*9] Jun 95 

*9.75 

69.75 

69J0 



5M 

Ell sakr. 

H.132 Fr, 


|7.9fl 





Fri'S open Int ?S.I2* 

Jtt 1571 





FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

50 OOO KR2 - 




S3 OO 

71.(0 Aug <<4 

741(7 

74- 2D 

73 30 

71« 

-a*j 


8170 

71 JO Sen 94 

7475 

7L30 

7145 

7J90 

-8.92 

2.0*0 


71 JOG* 94 

74.05 

7475 




1.973 


7265 Nov 94 

75.10 

7L35 

74J0 


—0.90 

1.5*5 


J295 Jan 9* 

75 4i) 

75j10 

74j50 


— 032 

475 


72J5MCV 9* 

2175 

7430 

7345 


—080 

42 


7145 APT 76 

2240 

74J5 

7Xo5 



40 

Esr. sates 

2.9B0 Fr. * sates 

2505 





Fri's ar«n ml 14.753 

aH 115 





HOGS ICMERJ uaasa^. ci^norrx, 






4J77 Jun 9J 

4770 

47 72 

4 735 

47 JD 

•0.09 

8.230 

55JJ7 

4L30Jul94 

J7A5 

-0.15 

47.12 

DU 

—0.13 

9476 


45. 55 *ug 9* 

4*77 

*4 75 

44 JU 

4435 

-0J3 

S3JB3 


42J703 94 

43 10 

4JL50 

dlAS 


• 0J2 

2.917 


•G .05 Doc 94 

<MS 

<4.40 

4165 

443)2 

-a jo 

2.951 


O.i0Fth95 

44 05 

4440 



>088 

685 

-HL60 

42.90 Anr 95 

4117 

4240 

4317 


•IU5 

375 



48J0 

49.40 

4150 

®.M 

♦0 JB 

123 


42.30 Jul *5 

48 90 

48.90 

48.10 

48JD 

•1.10 

5 


SJI3 Fn's. sates 

4.054 





Fn'sapen int «J*5 

81 96 






PORKBaXIES (CMER) te HD mr. - mm or 





3910 Jul 94 

41 J5 

*260 

4120 

41 J0 

—032 

5.193 


*070 Aug 94 

41. 70 

42.25 

4L85 

41.35 

—0.17 

2,291 


]910l=ob«5 

J9.«5 

»40 

49 90 



400 


3B.60 Mar 95 




49 JA 


35 

61.00 

42 60MOV95 




52J0 


31 


51.MJ14 95 

5300 

5200 

513)0 

5137) 


fr 

50.10 

49.75Au«r®S 

JUJJ 

J025 

50.25 

50.25 



EsJ. sates 

2734 Fri S. sates 

1.679 





Fr, s open in f.99> oft fB 








Food 

C0FFEEC INCSE1 I'AMCK-amRoerli 
i3i50 66.90 Jul 9* 17620 1Z7JD 125.10 12iM 

Ml 80 6450 Sep M 17400 12515 IKJ5 12183 

137 JS 77.10Det« 122.00 172-25 12025 12080 

13480 7490 Mar 93 I19J0 17005 11850 119.95 

1SZS 83JOMOV95 118.75 119.25 11475 11450 

130 00 0 LOO Jul 95 11*50 

1HJ0 89 AD Sea *5 117 50 Il'JO 117 jo iisio 

Es>. sates NA Fri's. sates 15.578 
F/I'sooer kit S7.2T3 off 876 
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NC5EJ > 

12J0 9.15 Jul 9* 11.92 

UJO ?.«0d9* 1110 

12JJ3 9.l?Mflf95 118* 

11.48 I4J7MOY95 l>78 


-4 70 22417 
-5J5 15,731 
-455 12478 
♦5.90 6J06 
♦ 5A0 687 
-500 91 

■ 5X0 35 


3714Jul 94 5518 564.0 551 JJ 

Aug 94 
3745 SCR 94 
380 J! Dec 94 
401.0 Jan 95 
4i4Sfltor95 5934 
4140 Mav 96 5*75 
<204 Jul 95 5954 

*934 Sep 95 
S3® O Dec 94 
Jan 96 
590 QMcr ®6 

E3 sates 21400 Fn's. sdes 
Fri'sooenmt 127460 Off 103 
PLATINUM (NMERJ Hma-Monrcrlnviii. 
43700 35740 AJI 94 401.00 FVL50 *0140 40*00 

*3540 36840 Oct 9* *0340 *0740 40X00 406A0 

*1940 37*80 JtBi 94 409.00 40440 40740 40X60 

42840 39040 Apr 95 *09 JO *0®JO 409 JO *10 JO 

Est.soifs 1^71 Fri-S. safes ICW 
Fri's open Ini 2240* off 242 
GOLD (NCMX1 lODtm ol- iUkvs oar trays. 

41740 3»A0Jun94 38540 38840 tt«® 70 387.10 

30640 Jul 94 38X40 

341 JO Aug 94 38840 391.40 38840 390.00 
344.000a W 39IJ0 394 JO 3 «ijo 39310 
34X00 Doc 94 39440 vnta Vim 39640 
36X50 Feb 95 399 Jo *00 <0 39® 40 399,90 
364J0 Apr 95 40IJD 40170 40170 WSS 
361 JO Jun 95 407.10 

3SL50AUO95 410.90 

4IDjaOd95 *14.90 

400JDD8C9S 420.00 420.00 42040 41900 

412J0FCO96 id 

Apr M 427.30 

Est. sales «UX» Fn's. ides 60.0*7 
Fri's open id I49J06 UP 477 

Financial 

UST.BKL5 fCMEKl 11 mluor. of 141c t 


38640 
4IS4Q 
*1740 
*26 JO 
41140 
417.00 
cm 
4I2JQ 
41X» 
42940 
424 JO 


♦ ’J 82.772 

*7A 11.913 
*73 17JJ2 
*73 

♦7.8 5J93 
*7.9 

♦B.I 1407 

♦E3 

-8J 

♦ 82 

+ 8J 


♦ 4 JO 15.742 

♦ 440 

♦ 4J0 1470 
+ 4J0 1,076 


♦ X40 I2AU 

♦ 230 

♦230 72D402 
♦230 6314 
-230 34.319 

♦ 230 5.501 

♦ 230 6323 

-230 7*)65 
♦240 1.095 
-240 92s 

♦ 140 4A22 

+ 2A0 


96 76 

9L26Jun94 9L*5 

9i66 

9J.6J 

9546 


1J.EK1 

9*48 

9442 Sep 94 9SJB 

9S0S 

9581 

953H 

— ILK ilim 

91 TO 

9*25 Dec 94 «4J6 

94 JA 

94 J1 

94J4 

— «UM 

7,390 

95315 

919BMW5 



9*33 

— D^J5 

251 

Estates 

NA Fn's sates 

34*5 






Frfsooon W 37-62? off 600 
5YIL TREASURY ICBOT] |iagA6pm-Bn6 32rw»o» lOOna 
112-05103-075 J«l 94 104-78 104-2*5 104-23 104-265- 0?s 1283*6 

[10-195102-12 Seo 9* 104-00 104-005 103-2*5 101-30- 075 SOjC? 

102-01 101-26 Ctec 94 103-09 103-0* ]BJ*>4 103-06- 075 i 

Esr. sales 56.500 Fri's sate n,lj6 
Frt'sooenlnl 10M13 off 523 

10 YR. TREASURY ICBOT) tlBUrourn- 6 antic' ICC no 


115-21 102-18 Jun 94 105-12 105-12 11)4-22 104-31— 13 

115- 01 MU-18 Seo 94 104-07 104-07 103-16 103-26— 13 

114- 21 100-75 Dec®41014H 103-02 107-73 103-30 13 

111- 07 100-45 Mar 951 02-04 MU-47 107-04 102-07 — 13 

105-22 99-70 Jun 95 101-76 101-26 101-27 101-22— 13 

Esi.sdes 110.102 Fn's. soles 109.954 

Fri's open M 267,434 O H 902 

IB'n tfkOJ WY BONDS (CBOT) ilKj-UBUOf-msmiaiaiinrr,] 
119-79 91-06 JUtl 9* 104-00 104-0) 103-43 IID-ll -IS 2SM7 
HB-26 90-12 Sen 94 HD-05 103-05 107-0 ) 07-30— J 4 

II8-« 91-19 DecM 1024D 10S-4K 101-1* 101-31- 17 

116- 70 99-14 MOT 95101-41 101-18 101-01 ,01-12- 17 

115- 1* *8-U Jun *5 ino-p _ 1? 

112- 15 99-00 3*0 95 100-11- 17 lC 

113- 14 98-27 Dec 95 99-30 — 7 M 

114- 06 W-H Mar 96 *M 9 , 17 2 

Ett.SQiK 4111000 Fri’s. sales 401,224 W 

Fri’saoenire 46SJM up *058 

MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBOT) liani iimi4K 1 &*s« iom 
104-07 87-0* Jun 9* 91-30 *1-20 91-03 91-V_ u ru«n 
95-17 86-13 5CP 94 90-14 90-34 90-17 _ 2 

E9 sates 4.000 Fri's. sales IA32 
Fri’s open *it 30,5*7 off 778* 


178,558 

87^13 

1AB7 

55 


148.107 

36JJ50 

ZA0S 


' r23M0tes . cents ocr a 


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95390 

90. 400 Jlflt 94 

9SJ40 

1108 

11.91 

12J4 

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95-570 

90J60Sa>94 

94430 

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1208 

1215 

1 0.14 52.707 

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11.91 

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95-588 

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11.90 

11.78 

11.90 

-0.1* 3442 

9L730 

90.710 Jun 95 

93470 


-1035X674 

-60409JJW 

—70412,71} 

—40260.981 

— *707A*3 


7*iM ?IJI0Sep>5 93J40 93JX 9117C »2J» -XIE.961 

94J50 4l.lB0Dec9J 9X010 91020 92950 73013 -30I34J59 

94.20 93.750 Var 96 91940 92970 9X8*0 95.950 -KI7CJ5B 

ES7. sates NA Fri s sates 461438 
Fr, *3 open IM 7.706-37* up 791C3 
BRITISH POUND ICMER) SBe-ooimJ- InMVNwOMOni 
IJTo 1 .**74 Jun 9* 15090 15727 1J37* I50S8 47J6C 

1 5700 lAUOSepM IJ070 151 ID 1JD73 IJ076 — s 2662 

15170 !4S00Dec94 15068 —4 78 

15170 1. *640 Mor 96 15060 — < 1* 

Est. sales na Fr.'s. sates ®.903 
Fri's open uit 45414 CM 204 

CANADIAN DOLLAR ICMER) iwar-imrmPtUOilDi 
0.78Q2 0.71 1 3 Jun 94 07207 0.723* 07302 0J325 ♦3 38.060 

077*0 070*8 5eoM 0.7170 0.7307 07170 0.7193 *71 4.1*1 

C767D OJUMDecV* C7I50 0 J1T0 0JI5D OJlti -JO ( SI 

0-7605 07020 Mar 95 07138 -W 679 

07532 04999 Junes 0.7100 07100 O-hOO 07113 -13 HO 

07160 0.7080 Sen 75 07089 -1} 7 

Est sates NA Fri's. soles 4418 
Fri's open inf 44.548 ofl 498 

GERMANMARK ICMER I w mnr*. 1 mMtoMRtami 
0*133 0560? Jun 94 060“ 0*097 06062 06069 —11117363 

0*101 95600 Sep 94 06070 0*092 06055 0 6064 

0*105 0 5590 Dec 94 9*097 0.6097 8*060 066171 

0*040 Q-OTQJun 95 0*098 

0*070 OJBIOMcr 96 0*0*3 

Esl sates NA Fn s s^ 35*07 
Fri's Open bit 130*17 off 2703 

JAPANESE YSI (GMEKJ 4 eer vnr- I mnf ewti W*D000t 
00099560 008871 Jun ®4 0 00957BO0095900JB954ja00re*9 —47 60477 
001091 10.00B9iQSeD 94 0*096500.009650050951 10iD9&lS -48 7.981 
DJn0070000f525D8C 94 0009690000969900096850.009689 —50 MU 


-10 11*69 
-9 JW 
-B 49 
-8 657 


67 

307 


0.0)01 500.0099 1 SJun 95 0*09854 —5* 

0.01 01 7SMX79830Mar 96 0.0097*7 —52 

Eat. sates NA Fri's. soles 19453 
Fri'sooenint t**93 Ml 799 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) bpvr franc- I mh* bw* IAB001 
07174 0*590 Am *4 07175 07156 OU07 OU73 —2 41*66 

07190 0.6400 Seo 94 07135 07164 OU17 0.7134 —1 4,110 

07185 0*885 Dec 94 0.7159 —I J40 

Am 95 07753 —7 3 

Est. sales NA Fri's. sales 12*17 
Fri's open Mf 4X919 off 627 


Industrials 


COTTON 2 INC 1 Ml SUMh-artinrlL 
84*5 5840 Jul 91 83.33 &4A0 8U3 

S9J1DC7M 77 JO 78J5 77*0 

5F*8Dec91 76J00 76.50 7*00 

62J0Mor95 77*0 77*0 77*0 

64 00 May 95 77*5 77*0 77AS 

7050 Jul 95 77*0 78.15 77*0 

71 80 Oct 95 73*5 74.15 7A0B 

Est. sates 9*00 Fri's, sales 0970 
Fri's open «rt 54493 off in 
HEATING OIL (NMER) anogd-amn,, 
58*0 41*0 May 94 4845 50*0 484$ 

41 JO Jul 94 43. AJ 49JD 4845 

42.70 Aua 94 49*0 50.15 49*0 

lAWSepM 50*0 51*5 49 JO 

44.900094 SOJO 51.90 5080 

46*0 Nor, 94 52.75 5745 52*5 

«*0Dec« 52-55 53*0 52*0 

*335 Jon K 53.10 54*0 SLID 

4T.95F«b9S 5U0 *3 91 5X70 

CJBMcr9S 51.70 51.90 51*0 

47*0 May 95 49*5 49A5 49 JB 

Es). sates 50.018 Fri’s srtes 3U16 
Fri's open inf 132,905 off 2630 
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 1.U0MV- 
2078 14.15 Jut 94 17.90 1847 17.90 

14. 35 Aid 94 17*1 T7.98 17J0 

1 AS) Sep 94 17*8 17.71 17*4 

14*500 94 17*0 17 JO 17 J7 

14*2 Nov 94 

1493 Dec 94 1748 17*0 1741 

liI5Jwi95 |7J4 (7.65 174* 

1538 Fell 95 1745 1735 1745 

15*7 Mar 95 1746 77 JS 1746 

15J5Apr95 1745 17J5 1745 

15*9 May 95 1745 1TJ5 I7JS 
1173 Am 9j 1746 1740 17J* 

I6JKJM9S 17J6 17*3 1748 

16.16 Aug 95 
I6JB5ep9S 

16*20095 17*0 17*0 17*0 

17.15 Nov 95 
1650 Dec 9S 
I7.1SMOT96 
1747 Jun 96 
Est. salea 73*36 FrFs sates 69X19 
Fri s open tnt 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) Mn 
61.00 4410 May 94 5340 53*0 SL 15 

60J0 44 10 Jul 94 5250 S3J5 

41 90 Am 94 5240 5135 57 m 

41*0 Sep 94 S1JO 5250 51*0 

O.IOOCJW 5045 50.70 49*0 

42.7SNOV 94 48.90 4950 48*6 

50*0 Dec 94 53*0 SJ.70 n.70 

52.05 52JJ5 SI 90 

51 50 Fab 95 

ED. sates 47,066 Fri'xsotei 31.559 
Fri'sooenint 93.968 up 1578 


7615 

7645 

77.15 

77*0 

77.95 

7400 


57.00 

5X60 
57.17 
5730 
5840 
59 JU 
6245 
5675 
57 JO 
51 JO 


20.78 
2678 
3673 
70*9 
70*0 
17*0 
19*0 
20*6 
19*8 
1943 
2040 
17.93 
1690 
19.84 
19.17 
17 J8 
20*0 
17*7 
20*0 


5400 

S0L5S 

49.65 

5X80 

5110 

52.75 


8149 *0.16 20*15 

7845 ♦ 0*5 5*55 

76*8 -Oil 21486 
7748 *0*3 2*82 

77*5 -047 1*53 

7623 *048 2S5 

7423 *048 47 


49 JB 
49 JO 
sun 

50.90 

51.90 

<b 68 
5150 
53*5 
53 JO 
51.90 
49*5 


*1*7 11.202 
*0.94 42.904 

♦ 693 16.988 
♦093 11401 

♦ 1.08 7,135 

♦ 090 5*68 
*■698 14*86 

♦678 7.713 
♦ 0 at 4*42 
+ 623 2.741 
♦603 


«PlFrbN, 

1141 *62811X186 

♦ 045 59 438 

♦ 625 33409 

♦ 644 23,167 
*044 15,214 

♦ 643 26708 
*042 16126 

♦ 621 16121 
♦041 f 1,168 

♦ 041 7*86 
+022 9*20 

♦ 043 16383 

♦ 620 AJW 

♦ 042 2*67 

♦ 042 
♦042 

♦ 642 

*622 11*53 
-623 

♦ 642 


17.93 

17.77 

17*7 

17*7 

17J9 

17JS 
17J7 
I7J7 
17 J7 
17J9 
17*2 
17A5 
17 J9 
17.n 
1747 
17*1 
17*7 
1603 
18.18 


5340 
S3J1 
5X16 
5244 
50.40 
49 J$ 
53.45 
52*5 
52J5 


♦ 1.09 10*86 

♦ 1.03 45*29 

♦ 0*2 I7JS 

♦ 663 10*7* 
>656 X6S 
-njl 2.7S1 
+651 1.894 
+ 0J6 601 

♦ 0*1 


Stock Indexes 


“FCOMP. BNDEX ICMER) SawM*. 

2k 5 SfSi'"** «6j5 «£T%lso 

*^70 43L7SSTO94 457*0 459 95 Mtan 
«.1D 47?JDDecM 441S S2 

KtoWS ^ M 

Fri sopenint 3*24 gfij ,3W 


45615 

458*0 

46240 


251.90 

257*5 

25175 

254*5 


Moody's 
Reuters 
D_l. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity indexes 

Close 


1,370*0 

1 , 955.10 

147*8 

235*2 


Previous 

1^57*0 

1,945*0 

14538 

23088 


DUbLCIHED WITH USE !R1f TIMK roiu 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1994 


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Russia to Ease 
Restrictions on 
Foreign Banks 


Germany Faces a Void 

Empty Military Bases Dot Landscape 


Ctm P^ b f Ov Staff FnmOi^dia 

MOSCOW — Russia will abol- 
ish restrictions on foreign banks, 
probably as soon as Wednesday of 
tbe chairman of Rus- 
sia s Central Bank, Viktor V. Ger- 

ashebenko, said Tuesday. 

"Pressure has come from several 
countries and also from Russian 
commercial banks, which, in their 
attempt to open subsidiaries over- 
seas, felt like they were running up 
against a watt,” Mr. Gerashchenko 
said. 

The restrictions, which went into 
force with a decree signed Nov. 17 
by President Boris N. Yeltsin, were 
aimed at protecting the country’s 
domestic banking industry from 
large Western competitors. They 
were to remain in effect until Janu- 
ary 1996. 

Under the measures, foreign 
banks operating in Russia could 
only serve foreigners. Those that 
had begun working with Russian 
clients prior to the restrictions were 
unaffected. 

Bui that meant that of the 12 
foreign banks awarded licenses to 
Operate in Russia, only three were 
unaffected by the restrictions. 

The decree aroused strong criti- 
cism from western countries, which 
lodged protests and stressed the 
important role of foreign banks in 
Russia. 

The former decree limiting for- 
eign bank operations was designed 


to please Russia’s strong anti- 
Western banking lobby. 

“Alter Yd tan signal his decree 
on November 17, we have found 
ourselves in an awkward situation, 
especially with the council of the 
European Union," Mr. Gerasb- 


Twdve foreign banks had re- 
ceived licences before the curbs. 
These include Credit Suisse, Chase 
Manhattan. Citicorp. ABN AMRO 
and ENG of the Netherlands, and 
Turkey’s Yapi Kredi Bank. 

Mr. Gerashchenko did not make 
dear whether all or pan of the 
curbs would he abolished but said 
the government and central bank 
were working on two options. 

The total capital of foreign 
banks in the country must not ex- 
ceed 12 percent of that of Russian 
banks. 

The nripimum capital required 
for Russian banks currently stands 
at 2 billion rubles (SI £5 million), 
well below the S3 million required 
for foreign banks. 

Central bank officials say that 
only 7 percent of Russia’s 2,048 
commercial banks meet the mini- 
mum-capita] requirement. 

Earlier tins year. Prime Minister 
Viktor S. Chernomyrdin said Rus- 
sia was Hkdy to review its curbs on 
foreign banks because a protected 
environment for local banks was 
not beneficial. 

(AFP, Reuters) 


French Jobless Rate Rises 
With little Relief in Sight 


Confuted by Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

PARIS — France's unemploy- 
ment rate edged up to 12J percent 
in April, the first rise in four months 
and an increase that brought job- 
lessness to a record lcvd, the French 
Labor Ministry said Tuesday. 

The ministry said 4»900 new job- 
seekers were registered, bringing 
the country’s total number to a 
seasonally adjusted 3,325,800. 
ApriTs increase breaks a four- 
mouth streak in which the French 
unemployment rate ~ already at 
post World War II highs — bdd 
steady at KL2 percent. 

Economists said forecasts gener- 
ally put the average annual rate at 
125 percent for 1994. But the in- 


crease in joblessness has slowed. 
During the first four months of the 
year, 23,500 new job seekers were 
registered, compared with 11 MOO 
in the anrilar year-carfier period. 

They added that unemployment, 
which nsoatty lags other economic 
indicators in showing recovery, is 
unlikely to stabilize until later this 
year. 

Those who entered the unem- 
ployment rolls as a result of layoffs 
grew by 93. percent in April 

The jobless rate, based on Inter- 
. national Labor Organization crite- 
ria, rose to 123 percent in April 
from 12L2 percent m March, it said. 

(AP, Reuters} 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

HAHN AIR BASE, Germany — For 40 years, 
planes leaving from this U.S.-con trolled enclave 90 
minutes' drive west of Frankfurt carried troops to 
take part in NATO war games and airlift emergen- 
cy aid. 

Since April in a shift symbolic of Germany's 
pOSt-CoId War conversion of military installations 
to civilian use, the Wednesday and Saturday after- 
noon flights from the lonely airstrip in the cool, 
clammy HunsrBek hills inslcsd have hauled tour- 
ists to beaches in Crete and Mallorca. 

Other signs of dunging times include four flying 
schools and a plastic-recycling company. Together 
with the charter business, they provide work for 
about 170 people. In addition, a state police acade- 
my might soon occupy schools and housing once 
used by American soldiers. 

But change has not come easily, or cheaply. The 
air base used to employ 900 German civilians and 
pump 230 million Deutsche marks (SI 52 mil! ton) a 
year into the area's economy. Many of its former 
employees have either gone into early retirement 
or had to look elsewhere for work 
For all its promise, Hahn is still a lesson to state 
and community leaden across Germany that it 
could be years, maybe decades, before they see 
anything of a peace dividend for their 40 years of 
patience. 

“Hahn is lucky," said Walter Struts, an official 
with the Economics Ministry of Rhineland-Paiaii- 
nate, the West German state with the highest 
concentration of military installations. “There 
won't be a peace dividend everywhere. Sometimes 
it will be a loss. Wba.t"s most important is restoring 
a local source of livelihood." 

Because it was the home of eight air bases, 
Rhineland- Palatinate used to be called the aircraft 
carrier of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 
Today, with five of those bases in various stages of 
dosing, the state is at the forefront of Germany's 
experience in converting to a nonmililary or less 
military economy. 

“The other stales are learning from our mis- 
takes," the most common of which has been ex- 
pecting quick results, Mr. Strutz said 
For many of the former military sites, which 
tend to be fairly far from major cities, the only 
immediate hope lies in attracting light manufactur- 
ing and other sorts of businesses as an industrial 
park. 

ZwtibrOcken, an air base whose desertion by the 
U.S. military two-and-a-half years ago initialed a 
wave of closures across Germany, has gone this 
route. Birkenfeld, a training ground, is destined to 
become a regional recycling center. 

But the military rites are being vacated much 
more quickly than they can be occupied by indus- 
try, leaving many empty or put to purely provi- 
sional uses such as storage or bousing immigrants. 

Rhindand-Palaiinaie has set aside about 500 
milli on DM for conversion assistance in the next 
two years. 

At Hahn, for example, the government is invest- 
ing 283 million DM in an advanced instrument- 
landing system to try to attract year-round charter 
business and eventually freight service as well. 

The stale's conversion committee dreams of 
turning Hahn into a round-the-clock European 


hub for express mail and freight, capable of win- 
ning business away from Frankfurt, which is con- 
siderably more expensive and increasingly over- 
crowded. 

It will be a “long, arduous way to profitability." 
Mr. Strutz said. “The real profit comes of not 
having to pay people unemployment" 

The state s investments are already starting to 
pay off. however, sometimes in unexpected ways. 
Klaus Hartmann, an airport official said a com- 
puter-driven noise Surveillance system being in- 
stalled to counter locals' fears of increased noise 
pollution would eventually be marketed to other 
airports; and a group of local businessmen has 
bought a couple of small planes and established a 
fledgling regional airline. 

The head of the Frankfurt airport. Continental 
Europe's busiest, has offered Hahn some needed 
moral support. 

“The airport is worth fighting for." he said 

It could be years, maybe 
decades, before German 
regions see an j kind of a 
peace dividend for their 4-0 
years of patience. 


recently. “It won't be a flop, but success also won't 
come in a day." 

In the meantime, local residents rejoice in the 
proximity of an airport that offers free parking pet 
kennels and a quick, comfortable check-in in a 
former officer’s club. 

“No one says anything if you come 20 minutes 
late," said Rudolf Heidenblut from nearby Em- 
melsbausen, who was on his way to Crete. 

Brigitte Rabe, who was a community-relations 
liasoo person for the U3. military for 27 years 
before their departure from Hahn last August and is 
now the airport spokeswoman, said the Boeing 737s 
that land here were routinely fuIL “Flights to Ma- 
llorca are booked for the whole summer," she said. 

Hahn is lucky not only in its proximity u> 
Frankfurt, but also in the relative quality of its 
infrastructure. Though the departing troops took 
with them the last pieces of cheap U.S. coal that 
they had imported to heat Hahn's buildings, they 
left behind well-maintained buildings, tennis 
courts, a nine-hole golf course and the airstrip. 

In Eastern Germany, where the Iasi of 380.000 
troops of the former Soviet Union stationed there 
during the Cold War are making their exit, build- 
ings are routinely stripped of windows, doors and 
sinks. At Neunippin, an air base near Berlin, the 
departing soldiers even tore up the concrete-slab 
runway and shipped it back home. 

In addition, sites used for military training and 
aircraft maintenance in both Western and Eastern 
Germany are frequently contaminated and have to 
be cleaned up, at considerable cost. 

Mrs. Rabe, who cried when the last U.S. plane 
took off from Hahn, was optimistic that the air- 
port’s revival wfll draw back Germans who left 
when it closed. “We just bad some people come 
into our office and ask about flights to Bolin." she 
said. “That's a start" 


Scharping 
Defends 
German 
Tax Plans 

Reuters 

BONN — The Social Democrat- 
ic Party leader, Rudolf Scharping, 
defended his party’s tax plan to 
German business executives on 
Tuesday, claiming it would allow 
for more consumption and lower 
labor costs titan that of the ruling 
coalition. 

Speaking at the annual confer- 
ence of the Federation of German 

Industry. Mr. Scharping attempted 
to alleviate fears among business 
people that his party would pursue 

iax-and-5pend policies if it won 
elections on Ocl 16. 

He defended his plans io impose 
a 10 percent rax on high incomes in 
place of a general 73 percent “soli- 
darity surcharge." which Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl's center-right co- 
alition plans to reintroduce from 

January 1995. 

Mr. Scharping said the solidarity 
charge would nil people on low 
incomes, discouraging the unem- 
ployed from taking low-paying 
jobs and lead to higher social secu- 
rity payments. 

He also said Mr. Kohl's Lax 
would lead to a drop in private 
consumption and discourage 
unions from accepting moderate 
wage increases. 

“If consumption declines, invest- 
ment will not lake off.” Mr. 
Scharping said “No economy ex- 
pands if capacity is unused" 

The Social Democratic leader 
said his proposed 10 percent levy 
would affect only the wealthiest 20 
percent of the population and have 
less impact on consumption. Unions 
would be less likely to seek large 
raises, wage costs would fall and 
investment would be encouraged. 

“Cutting supplementary wage 
costs is the key economic question. 
The tax levy is much less impor- 
tant," Mr. Scharping said noting 
that the Bundesbank had been cut- 
ting interest rates partly in re- 
sponse to moderate pay deals in 
Germany this year. 

Opinion potis show Mr. Scharp- 
ing’s initial strong lead over Mr. 
Kohl dwindling, although the So- 
cial Democratic leader is still ahead 
in terms of personal popularity. 


To our readers In France 

It s never been easier to subscribe 
and save with our new toll free 
service. 

Just call us today at 05-437-437 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

24» 


London 

FTSE 100 Index 

£jfc= 

mj—v — 


. Paris 

CAC40 



D J F MAM 
1893 1094 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Brueeote 

Frankfurt 

Frankfurt 

Helsinki r ~ 

London - ~ 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Paris 

Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Sources: Reuters. 


1994 

Tuesday 


AEX 

Stock Index 
DAX ■ 

FAZ 

HEX - 

Financial Timas 30 

FTSE IPO 

General Index 
MIB - 

CAC40 

Affa&svaetlden 
Stock Index ■ 
SBS 
AFP 


4Q0.77 

7,877.16 

2,127.70 

798.66 

1,78330 

245420 

2L97OS0 

326.65 

1,181 JW 

i.02950 

1,864.96 

448.21 

964.14 


1983 

' Prev: 
Ctosa 

402.42 
• 7.734.71 
1 '2,1 IB. T5 
803.85 
1,805.43 


Change 

-0.41 

•4J.74- 

+0.45 

.-■OM 

- 1.20 


23483Q ‘ 4031... 
2,966.40 +0.14 


329.65 
1,188.00 
24352.51 
1,895.11 
449.29 
970.55 ' 


-0.84 ' 
-0.59 
-1.10 
-1.59 ‘ 
-0.69 
- 0 . 66 . 


1 menus pud Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 

• Montedison SpA said its operating results for the first four months of 
1994 were improved from a year earlier, largely because of its restructur- 
ing plan, but added that “the journey is still a long one." 

■ Winterthur Sdmeizerisdie VerricheraDgs-Cesettsdiafr said the insur- 
er’s 1994 financial income would rise at about the same pace as in 1993, 
when it gained 20 percent, to 3.48 billion Swiss francs (£2 billion). 

• KLM Royal Dutch Airlines said it would cut 1 39 positions from its work 
force of about 29,000 in the current financial year, ending March 31. 
1993, and said it was helping those affected seek other jobs. 

• Bouygues SA said real-esutte sales were expected to fall about 13 
percent, to 4 billion francs ($711 million), but the French construction 
company said “the trough has been reached." 

• Britain’s transport secretary, John MacGregor, cleared a code-sharing 
arrangement between Delta Air Laws and Virgin Atlantic Airways, 
allowing the two to cany each other’s passengers to their next destination 
after their arrival in Britain or America; the deal awaits ITS. approval. 

• Amstrad PLC named an executive of Philips Electronics NV, David 
Rogers, as its chief executive, succeeding Alan Sugar, the U.K. electronics 
company’s founder, who has said he would remain as chairman. 

Return, Bloomberg. AFX 


Philip Morris in Ukraine Deal 


Bloomberg Business Nm 

KIEV— -Philip Morris Cos^ rac- 
ing to grab new cigarette factories 
across Eastern Europe, said Tues- 
day that it bought a 31 percent stake 
in a Ukrainian tobacco facility. 

The Kharkov Tobacco Factory is 
Philip Morris's eighth production 
site in the region and increases to $1 
billion the U3- cigarette giant’s in- 
vestments in the framer Communist 
bloc, a company spokesman said. 

The company refused to disclose 


the price it paid for the stake or the 
amount committed to upgrading 
the facility. The plant has a produc- 
tion capacity of 5 bQhoo cigarettes 
a year, although it worked at half 
capacity last year. 

Philip Morris estimated 
Ukraine’s cigarette market as the 
lStb-largest in the world, with an- 
nual demand of about 75 trillion 
cigarettes. It estimated demand in 
the entire former Communist bloc 
ran between 650 billion and 700 
billion cigarettes annually. 


HYSE 

Tuesday's Ctos*n* , 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Sheet and do not retoct 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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Operations and results show strong growth 

. . •*'•*:“* 

... ■■*/■.! V 

•• ' S2 7 5th anniversary in 1 994 of .thjjjbn k‘ s f 

2§ Vigorous expansion of customer deposits ygy-' 

& Intensification of Priv^telSanking service^.. 
m Increase in lending ^.corporate and prtvefeciistorners 
S Significant growth in' commission inedf*^'- ^ ^ 

IS Major revenue Contribution from tra<$fg&i 
monetary markets J: 


- J***- ■" 

■ ' . ■ ** # S*V; 


■' /&' .x. 


Consolidated key data 
(in million USD) 


Balance sheet total 
Customers' deposits 
Loans and advances to customers 
Loans and advances to credit, institutions 
Own funds (1 1 : - f '*■ ■ - 

Net profit for the year •; ’ y \ 

Dividend per share {in USD) <2) * • 

Jubilee dividend per share {in USD) <2> ' 


18,115 

12,487 

3,139 

8.440 


20,566 
14,448 ,-•••• 
3.820 ; - 
10,Y39 
882 
' ' 68.6 
23.3 
2.8 


Differential 93/92 

+ 13.5% 
+ 15.7% 
+ 21 . 8 % 
+ 20.1% 
+ 11 . 8 % 
+ 30.9% 
+ 20.0% 


11) after allocations of 1993 profit 12) gross Exchange rate: 31.1Z93 : 1 USD » 36.10 LUF 
The annual report is available from the Corporate Secretariat In French. German and English. 


Banque GenErale du Luxembourg 

RC Lu*e.M»QV*C B 6461 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1994 


Page 15^“" 


Top 3 Airlines 
In Japan Post 
Losses for Year 


ASIA/PACIFK 


Shanghai Seeking a Renaissance 

China Looking to City as Model of Economic Reform 


Investor’s Asia 


HongKaog 
Hang Seng ; v 


Singapore Tokyo 

.Strafts T^es '- . .' - Nikkei 225 


WWrv 

TOKYO Japan Air lines Co 
* ml “wsecutive annual 
jj? ^? ay ’ ^ ^ rival, Afl Nip- 
poo Airways Co, reported a loss. 

a ^ Parser profit 

rne slump in the airline market 

loss Japan 
Air System Co., the counties third- 

Sr “ the year cmfcd 

AU three airlines suffered de- 
dmfisra revenue because of sewn: 
pnee competition and weak de- 
mand for domestic and interaa- 
tkmnl flights amid the prolonged 
recession in Japan and Europe. 

,, J ^ L .¥ moanc 6 d a net loss of 
2536 billion yen (5243 million), 
narrowed from 43.78 billion yen a 
year earlier. On a current basis, the 
loss was 26.16 billion yen. com- 
pared with 53.81 billion yen. 

Japan’s largest airline said reve- 
nue fefl 5 percent, to 9323 billion 
3 «J, depressed by price competi- 
tion on international flights and a 
further decline in business travel. 

“Continued recession in the Jap- 
anese and Western European econ- 
omics considerably affected the 
market," the company said, 

JAL predicted it would have a 
current profit erf 1 billion yen in the 
current financial year, on revenue 
of 1.01 trillion yen, helped by an 
improving Japanese economy in 
the second half of the year and 
continued cost-cutting. 

It said its international traffic 
had been showing year-on-year im- 
provement since November. 

ANA said revenue fell 4 percent, 
to 774.8 bflHon yen, and it posted a 
net loss of 2-91 billion yen, revers- 
ing net profit of 2.42 WH on yen tbe 
previous year. Its c ur rent profit 


shrank 82 percent, to 2.84 billion 
yen from 15.87 billion yen. 

“The decline in profitability re- 
sulted mainly from weak demand 
m Japan, which reduced passenger 
volume on domestic routes," the 
company said. 

“bantings reflected the growing 
price sensitivity among customer 
On both domestic and international 
rou tes," it added. “Profitability 
suffered, especially from a down- 
turn in business travel" 

ANA which forecast continued 
“difficult" business conditions for 
the time being, said it still expected 
to break even this year, on revenue 
of 8073 billion yen. 

ANA’s revenue from interna- 
tional passenger flights fell 3 per- 
cent, to 103.9 billion yen, but its 
international cargo businesses had 
a 3.7 percent gain, to 14 billion yen. 

Japan Air System had a net loss of 
10.93 billion yen, widened from 534 
billion yen the previous year, and a 
current loss of 12.69 billion yen, 
compared with 4.82 billion yen. 
Revenue slipped 03 percent, to 
271-5 bfflkm. (AFP, AFX. Roam) 

■ Taiwan Officials Resign 
The chairman and president of 
China Air Lines Ltd., Taiwan’s flag 
carrier, have resigned over the air- 
line’s worst-ever accident, in which 
264 people were killed, Reuters re- 
ported from Taipei 
Liu Teb-min, the chairman said 
he had tendered his resignation to 
the airline's board Saturday, and 
the president, Yuan Hsing Yuan, 
had offered to resign Tuesday. 

A China Air Lines A-300-600R 
Airbus stalled and crashed while 
trying to land at Nagoya airport in 
Japan cm April 26. Only seven 
people on board survived. 


By Paul Blusudn 

Washington Post Serna: 

SHANGHAI — Percy Chu's eyes glisten as 
he recalls Shanghai in the decades before the 
1949 communist revolution, when it was “the 
Paris of the East," pulsating with Jazz Age 
energy. It was Asia’s most cosmopolitan city, a 
hub of free- wheeling capitalism, high intrigue, 
bacchanalian night life and brazen crime. 

Mr. Chu, 95, was a prominent banker in 
those days. Amon$ his prized mementos is a 
1940 newspaper dipping reporting his abduc- 
tion by a gang so audacious that its extortion 
letters bore a return address. “1 survived," Mr. 
Chu said “I’ve survived a lot of things.” 

Now heady times are returning to Shang- 
hai — and the city's old capitalists like Mr. 
Chu are gaining a new lease on their pre- 
revolutionary way of life. 

After four decades of stagnation and decay 
under communism, Shanghai is bidding to 
regain the glory it once enjoyed as a center of 
international finance and trade. The city's 
rulers are wooing foreign investors and 
spending massive amounts on public works 
in an effort to build a glittering nexus of 
commerce on old Shanghai's rains. They aim 
for the city to rival Aria's modern urban 
jewels, like Hong Kong and Singapore, with- 
in the next two decades. 

The endeavor underscores the sense of 
hope and progress engendered by China's 
explosive growth as its economy converts 
from slate planning to free enterprise. Given 
Shanghai’s dreadful overcrowding and anti- 
quated infrastructure — the majority of 
homes lack flash toilets — the city’s aspira- 
tions are ambitious to say the least. But tbe 
atmosphere of rejuvenation has aroused the 
capitalistic spirit for which Shanghai used to 
be famous, fading one of the most spectacu- 
lar booms in China's reform era. 

Members of Shanghai's old-money elite 
are back in clover. Mr. Chu, for example, 
belongs to an organization of elderly Shang- 
hai reridaits who were stripped of their assets 
during tbe communist era and brutally bul- 
lied by Mao Zedong’s Red Guards. The 
gram using money that had been repatriated 
by the authorities, recently helped launch a 
local construction company, whose shares 
have soared on the Shanghai stock exchange. 


Chinese companies that left Shanghai after 
1 949 are streaming back with an eye to tapping 

bcs^el^Jt^ work force a rwajpflwds that 
are rock-bottom by world standards. 

Chung Slung Textile Co„ whose late 
founder fled Shanghai for Taiwan, has 
formed a joint venture with tbe Shanghai 
apparel factory it had owned before the plan! 
was nationalized by the Communists. The 
Sincere Con a Hong Kong based department 
store chain whose flagship store on Shang- 
hai's Nanking Road also was nationalized, 
opened a glitzy new store last year a few 

doom from tbe rile of the old one. 
Multinational companies from the United 


After four decades of 
stagnation under 
communism, Shanghai 
is bidding to regain the 
glory it once enjoyed as 
a center of international 
finance and trade. 


States, Europe and Japan also are pouring 
billions of dollars a year into offices, fac- 
tories, bank branches, chemical plants and 
distribution facilities. 

Shanghai's comeback is emerging as a key 
test of China's ability to shed its communist 
fetters and create a modem market economy. 
The city of 13 million, China's largest, en- 
compasses nearly all of the country's most 
troublesome economic problems — poor 
transportation and distribution systems, inef- 
ficient stale entoprises, poorly defined prop- 
erty rights and imperious bureaucracy. 

Tbe Chinese government, aware thal a suc- 
cessful renaissance in Shanghai would send a 
strong signal of tbe country's advancement, is 
treating the city as an important showcase of 
economic reform — a major change from the 
1980s, when Shanghai was held in check. 

Tax laws have been changed to entice for- 


eign-funded ventures, and S17 billion worth 
m infrastructure projects are nearing comple- 
tion. including power-generation plants, 
waste-water treatment facilities and two 
bridges over the Huangpu River. A second 
group of projects is under way, including a 
new airport, subway, ring road and container 
ter minal. 

Seldom, if ever, bas so bald a venture in 
urban renewal been launched in a city where 
history echoes so clamorously. 

Shanghai attained its international fame as 
tbe result of some particularly shameful ex- 
cesses on the pan of Western imperial pow- 
ers. In the 1840s, colonists from Britain, 
France and the United States — including 
many opium traders — carved out sections ra 
the city exempt from Chinese law, with exclu- 
sive parks and gentlemen’s dubs. 

Hundreds of international banks and trad- 
ing houses set up shop in Shanghai. European 
refugees fleeing Bolshevism and Nazism 
flooded the dty between the two world wars, 
as did Chinese refugees fleeing civil strife and 
the Japanese invasion. 

While Shanghai's high society thronged to 
cabarets, tea dances and greyhound races, its 
vast underclass endured slave labor, opium 
addiction and starvation. 

The Communists rid tbe dty of its most 
sordid blight, and Shanghai became a bastion 
of ultra-leftist zealotry during Mao’s reign. 
But now the Maoist legacy weighs heavily on 
the dty. 

Nearly 3 million Shanghai residents work 
for state-owned enterprises, many of than 
unprofitable, and the authorities dare not 
allow the extensive layoffs that would en- 
hance efficiency. Foreigners complain that 
bureaucrats, eager to fill municipal coffers, 
are demanding absurdly hi gh amounts for 
property leases, which is threatening to cool 

investors’ ailhmimim 

Yet Shanghai's development goals, which 
once evoked widespread skepticism, are no 
longer the object of derision. 

“Three years a#>, I would have been raiher 
reserved," said Amuck de Kerandeo-Be&Jz- 

marm , manapy nf the .Shanghai p ffw*» nf Ran- 

que Natiooalc de Paris. “Today, when you 
look at whaf s going on, you have to admit, it’s 
quite surprising. It’s not just a fantasy," 


Ma&m 

msmn 


IMS 

Eva! 

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pil 


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pA*-- : S I Ato-Jk >kt ; 'KWBf^ 


aow^o - 2.09 UJ0 ■ -0.48 


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pT^THB I 

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Sources; Reuters, AFP lamrioaelHmld THInk B ad 


Very briefly 


Suharto Adviser Named in Jakarta Fraud Case 


"t ' »>/(«/■ will*' ■'! -Aii«l mi tiiil'JiKil'Jillil 


that will allow the Canadian company to mine tbe eastern Kumior deposit- , 

• Acer Inc, the personal computer maker, raised its net profit forecast for ? 
the year by 60 percent, to 14 billion Taiwan dollars ($89 million), on ; 
strong sales at hs computer-chip subsidiary and strong U.S. sales. 

• Sanyo Electric Co. of Japan and Western Digital Cocp. of the United 1 
States will jointly develop an integrated circuit to link computers and I 
compact-diskdrives. A sample should be available by the end of the year. 1 

• Mitsubishi Cocp. plans to issue about 200 billion yen ($2 billion) in five- [ 
year straight braids next month. The issue will yield 3.45 percent annually 
and wffl. be priced at 99.90 yen per 100 yen value. 

• Tarim's current-account surplus for the first quarter narrowed to $272 . 
million, the lowest level since tne third quarter of 1981, as exports slid and 
imports rose, 

• South Korean companies wanting to invest directly overseas submitted 
double the amount of applications fra government approval in the first 
four months of 1994 as m the comparable 1993 period. 

• China's trade deficit reached S2.75 billion for tbe first four months of 

the year despite government efforts to ran in imports, but the deficit was 
slightly narrowed from the $1.77 billion shortfall posted in the first four 
months of 1993. Ratten, Knight- Judder. Bloomberg, AFP. AP 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


The Associated Pro* 

JAKARTA — Two framer directors of a 
state-run bank acknowledged Tuesday that 
pressure from a senior official forced the bank 
to make a loan that has led to a major fraud 
scandal 

“indeed, the credit proposal submitted by 
tbe defendant did not meet tbe bank require- 
ments," TowiQ Heryoto, a framer director of 
Bank Pembangunaa Indonesia, told the Cen- 
tral Jakarta District Court 


Mr. Heryoto said a letter of reference from 
Sndomo, President Suharto’s chief adviser, led 
the bank’s board to lead $430 million to the 
Gcdden Key Group, controlled by the Chinese 
magnate Eddy TanriL 
Mr. Tansil, 40, went on trial in mid-May on 
charegs of convoting a letter of credit so he 
could draw on the loan without actually buying 
the machinery for which it was intended. He 
also is accused of bribing banking officials so 
he could divert pan of the loan for personal use. 


Tbe court has been told that the unrepaid 
1991 loan has caused a loss to the state of 
$448.8 million. 

Also testifying Tuesday were the former di- 
rectors Syahrizal, Bambang Kuntjoro and Adi 
Sugondo. Mr. Heryoto, Mr. Syahrizal Mr. 
Kuntjoro and another former director, Subekti 
Ismaun, also face trial in the case. 

Maman Suparman, formerly bead of the 
bank’s Jakarta Brandi, already has gone on trial 


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Pm Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 1, 1994 



f Tuesday’s 4 p.m- 

Thu list compiled by the AP. consists ot the t.oqo 
— i mos, lrac |ed securities in terms ol dollar value. »t is 
updated twice a year. 


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30 IS ABT BIO 
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4bV.3n'*AC' Tc 
44 26% ADCs 

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Tuesday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do no: reflect 
late trades elsewhere. t'Ja f/ie Associated Press 


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Pta Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1994 








■ :rS' . 


it The Alienated Press 

Vj I) 

ji A few more games like this by 
j, $ Randy Johnson and the Mariners 
^ n and maybe Ken Griffey Jr. will 
' ^ want to stay in Seattle. 

if j A day after Griffey criticized 
3/ U some of his teammates for lack oF 
bt p desire and claimed the team's con- 
_ j? Stant losing “is killing me,” the 
i; Mariners routed the Minnesota 
- Twins. 12-0. on Monday. 

Johnson pitched a two-hitter and 
J struck out 10 For his second straight 
J 1 shutout. Keith Mitchell hit his first 
~ s two homers of the season, doubled 

i< *• 

pi AL ROUNDUP 

r ar.d drove in five runs as the visit- 
y I ing Mariners ended a three-game 
i * losing streak. 

v $ Johnson was surprised to hear 
1 J; Griffey's remarks. 
r J “I don’t really want to comment. 

v but I'm kind of shocked that Junior 
; \ would say that sort of thing." he 
! ? said. “1 look around here today and 
1 ? I'm proud of a lot of these guvs, 
ft especially after the way they played 
7 today.” * 

i j He added: “A lot of these guys 
. } work hard between the game*. But 
* maybe it is good that he sard whai- 
1 ever he said if we start playing like 
' this for an extended time." 

; Johnson won his fourth straight 
. J start. He extended his scoreless 
} streak to 21 innings, including a 
■ four-hit. 1-0 victory Wednesday 
J against Oakland. 

I “For us, it was an all-around 
] good bailgarae.'' Johnson said, 
i “Bui for me. this one was work. I 


• . t* 


started losing mv wind in the eighth was hit in the left thigh i 
inning - drive from Frank Thomas 

The Mariners had made it easy a five-minute delay. 


for Johnson by then. 

Rich Amaral had an RBI triple, 
two doubles and a single. Mike 
Blowers also had four hits For Seat- 
tle and Edgar Martinez homered. 
The Mariners got 17 hits. 10 for 
extra bases. 


Indians 10. Angels 2: Charles 
Nagy came within one out of a 
shutout, and Geveland beat Cali- 
fornia for its 10th straight victory 
at Jacobs Field. 

The Indians’ home winning 
streak is the longest since a 15* 


2: Charles ^ 

e out of a ' ~ y H 


r •*> r-v-^ 


■ ■ ' ' "" 
it v: m * 








■‘.fc** 


Carlos Pulido began the day with game spree at Cleveland Stadium 
a 4.93 ERA. best on the Twins’ in 1965. 


staff. But be lasted only 3!i innings, 
allowing four runs and five hits. 

Tigers 5, Orioles 3: Tony Phillips 
hit a tying, two-run homer off L*e 
Smith in the ninth inning, and De- 
troit wound up winning in the 1 1 Lh 
at Camden Yards. 

Smith had converted 20 of 21 
save chances until Lou Whitaker 
led off with a walk and Phillips 
homered. Baltimore blew a chance 
to win it in the bottom of the ninth 
as Tim Hulett struck out and Brady 
.Anderson flied out with the bases 
loaded. 

Mickey Teuleion homered in the 
Tigers’ 10th and Rafael Palmeiro 
homered in the Orioles’ 10th. In the 
11th. Travis Fryman fail an RBI 
double off Tom Bolton and scored 
on a single by Chad Kreuter. 

White Sox 7. Yankees 2: Sur- 
prise starter Scon Sanderson 


Nagy struck out nine and walked 
five. He « 2 ve up two-out RBI sin- 
gles in the ninth inning to Jorge 
Fabregas and Gary DiSarcina. 

Carlos Baerga hit a two-run 
bomer and Wayne Kirby and Ed- 
die Munav had two-run doubles 
for the Indians. 

Athletics 6, Blue Jays 2: Brent 
Gates doubled home the tiebreak- 

ing run in the ninth inning and 
Oakland went on to score five times 
to win at the SkyDome. 

Rickey Henderson was hit by a 
pilch from Scott Brow leading off 
the ninth and reliever Randy St. 
Claire bobbled a bunt for an error. 
Gates followed with his double for 
a 2-1 lead. Mike Aldreie had a two- 
run single and Gorommo Berroa 
and Scott Brosius had RBI singles. 

Rookie Mark Acre pitched a 
scoreless eighth to win his first ma- 


•• vV-v'-rf* 

-V 


41 a ■ • \ 





m. 







pitched seven strong inni ng* and jor league decision. 


Chicago won at Yankee Stadium. 

Sanderson was moved up a day 
to pilch in place of the ailing .Alex 
Fernandez. Sanderson allowed 
four hits, including Daryl Boston's 
solo home run. and walked none. 

Danin Jackson hiL a three-run 
homer off Jim Abbott. The home 
run came two batters after Abbott 


» a*i- 'Jf 


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9 


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M- * 

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llll 


mi 


Rangers 5. Brewers 4: Jeff Frye 
and Manuel Lee singled home runs 
in the ointh inning as Texas rallied 
to win in Milwaukee. 

Frye had three hits and drove in 
three runs. Lee tied the game with 
one-out single and Frye put the 
Rangers ahead with a iwo-oui hit 
off Mike Fetters. 

Kevin Brown gave up 1 1 hits in 
eight innings. Jay Howell retired 
Greg Vaughn on a fly ball with 
runners on second and third for hts 
first save since 1992. Howell 
pitched in 54 games for Atlanta last 
year, mostly in middle relief. 

Red Sox 6. Royals 5: Damon 
Berryhill doubled home the win- 
ning run in the JOth inning as Bos- 
ton beat visiting Kansas City. 


£ ■ “ 

if ^ 


Af* 


m 








" -Ate ■ ’ 


mjSSkSrtB’, 










sqacOafei'AfsaceFnace-FiBM 

Patrick Ewing, who led the Knicks with 25 points, trying to battle his way past the Pacers’ Ric Snats. 







rowers ne 


Over Expos 



Pie iisraau-J Press 

Before the game it was Deion said this. Deion 
is wearing that. Once play got under wj\. 
though, it was Kevin Mitchell. AM Kevin 
Mitchell. 

Mitchell homered twice Monday night to 
help Jose Rjjo gel his 100th career victor, a* 
Cincinnati defeated the Montreal Expos. 7-3, in 
the debut of Deion Sanders with the Red*. 

Sanders, traded to the Red* on Sunday in a 
deal that sent Roberto Kelly to Atlanta, arrived 

NL ROUNDUP 


held Phiiadelphiz hitless for ■■ innings and 
won his career-be<: fourth straigr.i sun. 

Banks blanked iie Phillies until Kim Batiste 
grounded a single to iefi with one down ir. die 
eighth. Bar . -ls allowed only that hit and struck 
out six ir eight inning:. He ■**; hi: Lt back of 
the hip by a pitch from reliever Bob Weils in the 
sixth, arid left ;hc game after the eighth with 
tightness in hi* back. 

Randy Myers completed the combined one- 
hitter. pitching the ninth for his !2ih save. 

.Asn-os4. Merlins 3: in Houston. Craig Biggie, 
drove in two runs — including the game-winner 


fw T '.VSi 


ii 


at Riverfront Stadium wearing hi* usual as, on- mi * 1 lu ^ ut , si ^5 1 » ^ n ? ni P’ . . 
ment of iewelrv and announce,! during a nr - . k hn A ! " C cf: “la ’Min a single 


..,3V 

'nr r-Prc- <■ 

Seattle Mariners' center fielder Ken Griffey Jr., rear, making the 
catch after a bouncing bafi flew by the second baseman. Luis Sojo. 


ment of jewelry and announced during a or- 
ganic press conference that he was ready to 
show Cincinnati fans his talents. 

‘Tm ecstaLic to be a Red." he said. «jth 
owner Marge Schott at hi* side. Sender* singled 
in four trips. He received the gome’s loudest 
ovation when introduced. 

The night, however, belonged to Mitchell. 

He hit a two-run homer off Ken Hili to rail} 
the Reds in the fourth, and the other Sanders — 
Reggie — homered two pitches later to tie it at 
3. Mitchell hit a solo homer, his 1 4th. In the 
seventh. 

Rijo escaped threat after threat to set 
No. 100 on his fourth attempt. He gave up six 
hits, walked four and hit a batter in six innings, 
but forced the Expos to strand nine runners, six 
of them in scoring position. 

Gibs 3, Phiffies 0: In Chicago. Willie Banks 


of: Robb Ner. and coo* second oc a sacrifice by 
5-v-:; Serials. After Sii rrcom walked and 
in me.- Momc.i • track cut. S: Finley drew a 
waik to load \:.2 base.- fer Bizgjo. 

Tom Eden* pitched tv-o perfect innings us 
rive the .Asirc. their ninth victor, in 12 games. 
Florida hx« io-t ei.iht yi 10. 

Rockies 32. 2: In New York. Andre* 

Galarraga hi. ”i? -.econd grand slam of the 
season to par; the Rockies.” 

Colorado loaded the bases with no c uts in ihe 
sixth asairdi .Vauro Gozzc- and Golarrap ho- 
mered 'off hiike Maddux for his fifth career 
slam to make it c-I. 

Kevin Rita. ir. his second start of the season 
after almost :v.o years of inactivity ioiiowicg 
reconstruct]-: -urger. on his right elbow, was 
ihe winner. 


Braves 4. Giants 3: In San Francisco. Jarvis 
Brown hit his first major league home run in the 
11th. 

Brown had been 0-for-7 since being called up 
from Tr.pls-A Richmond on May 4. Known for 
hl« speed and defense, he got into the game in 
the ninth as a pinch-runner for ouuieJder David 
Justice, and won i t when he drove a one-ouL 1 -2 
pitch from Rod Beck Into the left-field bleach- 
ers. 

Brawn's homer, in his i93d al-bai In the 
majors, made a winner of Greg McMichael. 

Roberto Kdiy. in his first game for Atlanta 
since bone traded Sunday for Deion Sanders, 
went l-for-4 with a walk. He scored two runs 
ar.d stole i base. 


wry in two years. 

Mike Piazza, who missed three game* be- 
cause of bruised ribs after a home-plate colli- 
sion. homered In Lis return to the Los .Angeles 
lineup. 

Palacios, who pitched m the Mexicar. League 
las* year, allowed three runs and seven hit*. 
Mike Perez go; hi* 10th save. 

The CardinaLs. swept at Saa Diego over the 
weekend, scored arunia each of the first three 
riming* against Ore! Hershi-er. 

__ Padres 10. Pirates 2: In San Diego. Tony 
Owynn had a career-high five RBIs and .Andy 
Ashby pitched a four-hiuer for his firs: victon. 


Pacers Full Ever 

As Knicks Blow 

A Late Chance 


By Clifton Brown 

Sat York Tima Service 

INDIANAPOLIS - The to*- 
ana Pacers gave the Knicks a! last- 
minute chance to stern a viowy- 
The Knicks dropped the bah- 

With New York trailing ty™* 
points, Huboi Davis dropped Pat- 
rick Ewing’s pass out of bounds 
with 6.8 seconds left, sending New 
York to a frustrating 83-77 loss in 
the fourth game of the 
Conference finals Monday ai Mar- 

NBA PLAYOFFS 

ket Square Arena, tying the series 
at 2-2. The four-of-seven-garae se- 
ries resumes Wednesday at Madi- 
son Square Garden. 

While neither team has won on 
the other’s court, the home-court 
advantage was about the only thing 
the Knicks could fed good about 
when thfc game ended. The Pacers, 
on the other hand, could smell an 
upset in the works. 

“I like our chances better now 
than when we came here down, 2- 
0," said the Pacers’ coach, Larry 
Brown. “They thoroughly whipped 
us in New York. There were some 
guys on our team who bad doubts 
we could beat them. Now I think 
we believe we can beat them." 

It was a game of missed shots, 
miscues, and missed opportunities 
for the Knicks. But Davis's mistake 
was the most costly. 

Derrick McKey gave the Knicks 
life, when he missed two free 
throws with 26.S seconds to play, 
and Indiana leading, 80-77. The 
Knicks called time-out, looking ei- 
ther for a quick two points, or a 
three-pointer to tie the game. 

They got neither. Ewing was 
swarmed in the low post. So the 
Knicks passed the ball around the 
perimeter. Finally. John Starks 
passed to Ewing, who started to 
shoot a jumper but then spotted 
Davis alone on the right wing be- 
hind the 3-point line. 

Had Davis caught the pass, he 
would have had a chance at a wide- 
open three-pointer to tie the game. 
But the pass went right through his 
hands and out of bounds in front of 
the Pacer bench. 

The crowd roared. Davis hung 
his head. Then Haywoode Work- 
man made a free throw with 5.2 
seconds left, making it SI -77, 
Charles Oakley committed the last 
of hi s right turnovers when he 
threw an inbounds pass intended 
for Ewing out of bounds. The 
Knicks’ fare was sealed. 

“I just didn't catch the ball." 
Davis said. “I was ready to shoot 
before I caught it It went right 
through my hands. It was a perfect 
pass by Patrick. It's my fault. No 
excuses.” 

The Knicks committed 26 turn- 
overs for the game, succumbing to 
intense defensive pressure. Some 
were forced, others were careless. 

.And the mistakes were too much 
for New York to overcome, espe- 
cially because Reggie Miller went 
wild for the first time io the series, 
leading all scorers with 31 points, 
including 17 of 19 from the free- 
throw line. 


Miller bad a I ^poiin fourth 
quarter, sparking a JO-2 run that 
turned a 70-70 game into an 80-7 2 
lead, a deficit from whiefc.New 
York never recovered, v; . ’ 

Neither Starks, nor Derek 
Harper, nor Greg Andwo v ccwld 
contain Miller. Aadeoacfi Par Rfl- 
ey elected not to pat Davis on 
Mffler. • . 

“He got to the free-tfcrow fine 
jest too many times,” RBey.said. 

When asked about the Knicks’ 
inability io score, Raley said; 
“You’ve got the two best defenses 
in the league, going after one an- 
other tooth and nan. These games 
are going to be in the 80s.” " - 
He added: “We 'have to execute 
with more force. We have to be 
stronger with the balL Vfe have to 
be smarter with the balL We get a 
lot of credit for being a physical 
tffflrn, bm they’re one of the most 
physical teams in the league. I don’t 
mind (hat. We've just got to be 
stronger.” 

Ewing led the Knicks with 25 
points and L3 rebounds, bat the 
knicks did not get Ewing the ball 
nearly as much as they warned to. 

“They make it very difficult for 
us to enter the ball 1 don't care 
what you run,” Riley said. “They're 
encouraging you to throw nothing 
but lob passes to him, and they’re 
just going to rotate to tie balL h's 
just a war down on the block.” - 
“We’re getting used to the waV 
the Knicks play. Brown said, “if 
you don’t play the way they play, 
you're going to get killed. They’re 
so physical and so aggressive and 
we can’t back down. The kagne has 
allowed tins stuff to go on and yap 
have to accept it.” 

And the Knicks. who lost their 

fifth consecutive road game in the 
playoffs, had to accept another al- 
most must-win situation at dje 
Garden, where they are 8-0 in the 
playoffs. The Pacers are 6-0 at 
home. ! 

After another half dominated b* 
defense, the Pacers led by 42-39. 
People who enjoy watching higfi- 
scoring basketball were oat of luck. 
It was rare for either team to score 
on two consecutive possessions, j 
For those who appreciate tough 
defense, it was a clinic. Almost ev- 
ery shot was contested, as well q* 
every rebound. The Pacers feel 
ih dr defense is just as good as New 
York's, and die Knicks' offense hats 
struggled the entire series, particu- 
larlyin Indianapolis. The Kniclfr 
shot 31.4 percent for (he first half 
and the Pacers were almost as bad 
at 38J percent. ' 

After be missed his first three 
shots. Ewing finally scored on a tip- 
in. Having passed his 1 -point per- 
formance in the previous game, 
Ewing relaxed and ended the ha# 
with 12 points and 8 rebounds. - 
But Ewing’s production was off- 
set by Miller, who led ail first-ha# 
scorer* with 14 points. Miller made 
oniy three field goals in the half, 
but he was 8 for 9 from the foii 1 . 
line. 

Other than Anthony Mascd. 
who sparked the Knicks off the 
bench with six first-quarter point*. 
New York had no other low-post 
threat to complement Ewing. 


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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1994 


9 

5- 


Page 19 - 



Courier Spoils Sampras’s Hopes 
Of 4th Grand Slam V ictory in a Row 


& 

-IS 

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es iai 
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dt! a 
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ofthaL Yet m dust is like motor oil 


By Ian Thomsen 

Inumaa&uii Herald Tribune tO Courier's gamg 

PARIS — The orange dust col- “I think it's a long rime that I've 
lected around the ankles of Pete had the discipline in a long match 


WoridNo. 


Loap OwmB/A|cnR Fnaer-Picitr 

a fourth-straight Grand Shun title bite the dust on Tuesday. 


Sampras's socks, in the crevices of 
his shoes; it filled in the eyes 
around his dirry white laces; it 
worked its way into the vital gears 
of the game’s most intricate ma- 
chine; It played with his mind. 

The world No. I came to a grind- 
ing halt Tuesdayjust three matches 
short of becoming the first man 
since Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all 
four Grand Slam titles. Sampras 
was beaten in the French Open 
quarterfinal, 6-4, 5-7, M. 6-t, and 
by the end be basically was strand- 
ed ankle-deep in a desert, unable to 
come forward as he would on any 
other court. 

It was a day long anticipated by 
Jim Courier, the former No. 1 who 
lives in Florida near the 22-year- 
oid Sampras, and has remained 
Sampras’s greatest rival in spite of 
losing 10 of 12 previous meetings. 
They had never met on clay. The 
other surfaces emphasize Sam- 
pras’s superior serve, volley and 
1; but the clay gums up all 


like 1 had today ” said the 23-yeai- 
old Courier, who has fallen to 
No. 7 in the last year. “I had a 
pretty solid idea of what I wanted 
to do out there, and through the 
ups and downs of the match 1 was 
able to Stay with iL" 

What makes one great player su- 
perior to another? This match was as 
humorless and lacking in rhythm as 
their final at Wimbledon last year, 
winch was won by Sampras in four 
sets <m the basis of two tiebreakers. 
Perhaps the surface — grass there, 
day here — is aS that separates 
than. Neither was willing to give in 
to the spirit of the occasion, to be 
swept up in this meeting of the 
world's two best players (they have 
shared eight of the last 14 Grand 
Slam titles, so never mind what the 
computer says). It might have been 
an empty stadium anywhere in the 
world, the way the 17,000 spectators 
were largely excluded from the cere- 
mony of each player stubbornly tak- 
ing on the other’s characteristics. 


tried vainly to play from 
while Courier won by 
invited. 

you’re out playing, you’re 
doing what is most cranfortabte." 
Sampras said. *1 just fell most com- 
fortable staying back. I should have 
forced myself and told myself to 
crane in on the trig point. 2 don’t 



stay hack And if I had to do it ova 
again. I would come in a bat more.’’ 

A cold gray snap gave way Tues- 
day to the first splendid day of the 
tournament. The court was faster, 
the tennis balls lighter — Sampras 
should have felt better. Instead be 
acted like a guest in his opponent’s 
home. Courier won this tourna- 
ment in 1991 and 1992, and has 
now won 25 of bis last 26 matches 
here, and he must have felt honored 
to see Sampras mutating him be- 
fore serving — • bouncing ihe ball a 
half-dozen times like a dripping, 
broken tap. The match was played 
at Courier’s pace, and as he broke 
Sampras in the fourth game to win 
the opening set, and picked up an- 


Canucks Looking for Victory 
. . . And a Little Recognition 


By Dave Sell 


■;?!> 


NEW YORK — The New York Rangers begin 
the final phase of tbdr quest for a Stanley Cup on 
Tuesday night at Madison Square Garden. An 
opponent? Well, yes, as a matter of fact, there is 
one; They’re here somewhere. Ob, of coarse; it’s 
the Vancouver Canucks. 

The Canucks have one of the best hockey players 
in right wing Pavd Bore. But they have goo; largely 
unnoticed in the National Hockey League playoffs, 
which seemingly have been dominated by thoughts 
of 194Q,theyev tteRangcralastwonaCup. 

Games 1 and 2 will be played hoe before the 
best-cf-seven series shifts to Vancouver for Games 
3 and 4. By then, the Canucks and Bure; the 60- 
goal scorer, may have made a bigger impression. 

Bure was injured and sat in the upper press b«t 
at the Garden daring the Canucks’ Irate visit here 
daring the regular season. That area is surrounded 
by some of (he Garden’s most vocal fans. They' 
verbally — and nearly physically — assaulted the 
New Jersey general manag er, Loo LamorieDo, dur- 
ing the Eastern Conference final series. 


tab and Devils in the first three rounds, have j 
only six nights .in holds and had two 
plane flights. The Canucks played in Calgary, 
Dallas and Toronto, so" — though they’ve had a 
week's rest since efimmatiog ihe Maple Leafs — 
they are the much more frequent fliers. Thai dis- 
tance may be a factor. 

But that distance also enters the psyche. Folks in 
Vancouver drink they are sometimes ignored or 
unappreciated by people in the East. And by (hat 
they mean eastern Canada, so that feeling could 
intensify south of the border. 

“All the focus seems to be out here,” said Ca- 
nada left wing Greg Adams, who scored in over- 
time of Game 5 against Toronto to clinch the 
Western Conference title fra the Cannc&s. Adams, 
Bore and captain Trevor linden form the Ca- 
nucks’ most potent line. “Unless you turn on your 


own news, ihe locus is always rax the Eastern 
things. Westerners resent that a little bit.” 

The quickest way to gain recognition will be to 
beat the Rangers, who haven’t played in the finals 
since 1979. 

Pat Quinn, Vancouver’s coach, general manager 
and president, did not know wtiai frame of mind 
his team would be in. 

“We're not a real experienced team in this situa- 
tion and I know the gnys are pretty tight," Quinn 
said at a Garden news conference. “We've tried to 
loosen them op. They win have to deal with the 
Stanley Cop finals for the first time. It’s a new 
experience for most of them. And it is a Stanley 
Cup final in a city that’s so hungry that they are 
gong to try to trill their team to the Stanley Qip.” 

Collectively, the Rangers’ players have 28 Stan- 
ley Cop rings. The Canucks' have four. 

The Canucks chang ed a lot during the season. 
Petr Nedved’s free agency hung over them until he 
signed with Sl Lewis on Marti 3. Then there was a 

satioo. Once an arbitrator' decided h wajTcjaig 
Janncy, they had another two weeks of uncertainty 
because Jarmey refused to report They tried to 
trade him to several teams before tradinghim back 
to St Louis for center Nathan Lafayette and 
ddODsemen Jeff Brown and Bret Hedican. 

The changes came together at the very last 
minute. Down 3-1 to Calgary in the first round, 
Quinn put Linden back at center, Bure started 
scoring some of Iris NHL-higb 13 playoff goals and 
goalie Kirk McLean became nearly unbeatable 
(1 1-2 since then). 

It has been a wild ride for a team that did wdl in 
die previous two regular seasons, stumbled in 
those playoffs and then finished a mere seventh in 
the Western Conference this season. 

“Yon might call it a roll, but 1 look bade two 
years,” Qumn said. “We made a breakthrough 
mentally m the Calgary series. We beat the fear of 
failure. We were considered failures for not ad- 
vancing the past two years when we had in excess 
of 100 points. That is sometimes a hard barrier for 
an athlete to break through.” 


Graf to Meet Pierce in Semifinals 


Compiled bp Our Surf Fhm Dispatches 

PARIS — Top-seeded Steffi 
Graf and Mary Pierce set up a 
semifinal showdown with decisive 
victories Tuesday in the French 
Open. 

Pierce, the No. 12 seed, routed 
Petra Ritter of Austria, 6-0, 6-2, to 
reach a Grand Slam semifinal for 
the first time; In her five matches 
through the quarterfinals. Pierce 
has lost only six games, the best 
showing ever in the (oumamenL 

In the other semifinal, Arantxa 
S&ncbez Vicario will meet No. 3 
Conchita Martinez. 

In the men’s semifinals, Jim 
Courier, hoping to regain the 
crown be wot in 1991 and 1992, 
will seek revenge in Friday’s semifi- 
nals against Sergei Bruguera, who 
dethroned him in last year’s final. 
The sixth-seeded Spaniard, yet to 
lose a set in five matches here, 
ousted No. 4 Andrei Medvedev of 
Ukraine, 6-3. 6-2, 7-5. 

Courier, the No. 7 seed, upset 
lop-seeded Pete Sampras, 6-4, 5-7, 
6-4, 6-4. 

Graf overcame lnes Gorrochate- 
gui of Argentina, 6-4, 6-1. She has 
reached at least the semifinals in 
every French Open since 1987, 
when she won the first of her three 
titles. 

Sknchez Vicario beat Julie Ha- 
lard of France, 6-1, 7-6 (8-6), and 
Martinez rallied to beat the I6tb- 
seeded Sabine Hack of Germany. 
2 - 6 , 6 - 0 , 6 - 2 . 

S&ncbez Vicario, the winner of 
the title in 1989 and a finalist two 
years later, bad to slap back a brave 
second-set revival by HalanL At 
one stage the Spaniard led, 6-1, 5-3, 
before Halard, cheered on by the 
crowd, farced the second-set into a 
tiebreak. Halard managed to save a 
first match point at 5-6 in the de- 
ader with a superb cross-court vol- 
ley bat Sanchez Vicario made no 
mistake with the second 


Pierce, brought up in the United 
States but playing for France, is 
assured of moving into the Top 10 
for ihe first time when the next 
women’s rankings come out next 
week. 

She won the first seven games 
before the I03d-ranked Ritter fi- 
nally held serve. Ritter, who had 


never before advanced past the sec- 
ond round of a Grand Slam, men* 
bade in the fifth game to break 
Pierce’s serve for only the second 
lime in the tournament, but failed 
to sustain the momentum. 

Pierce made rally four unforced 
errors and hit 25 outright winners, 
compared to only three for Ritter, 
in the 58-minute ™*i,rh 


Bruguera used his relentless 
baseline game to wear down Med- 
vedev in jnst 1 hour, 55 minutes, 
avenging a straight-set defeat in the ' 
Monte Carlo final this spring. 

Brnguera averted three sets 
points m the 10th game of the third 
set. He said he played “near ten- 
nis bm still doesn t fed as confi- 
dent as he did last year. (AP, AFP) 



other break m the third game of the 
following set, you recognizee! him 
as the Courier of two years ago — 
not the Courier whose placid confi- 
dence was dislodged by losses in 
the French Open and Wimbledon 
finals last year — on this day, 
is bewitched rival, he was 
invincible Courier. 

“It’s certainly a good one for my 
bead." Courier said. “It's been a 
long time since I’ve won a big match 
in a big tournament like this against 
a top player. It is definitely one of 
the more satisfying wins that I’ve 
had, but I don’t want to gel overex- 
cited because I still have to come 
back and get busy again on Friday." 

Sampras was never far from 
overtaking Courier’s score. He was 
technically very much alive just 
four games from the end, and yet it 
seemed impossible. How he came 
back to win tbe second set remains 
a mystery, a lonesome indication of 
the competitiveness he acquired at 
Wimbledon last year. Three or four 
dozen times be would whack tbe 
clay off his feet with his racket, as 
if it were manure; sprinting down 
rate of Courier’s effective drop 
shots, be slipped at the net and had 
to touch down with his left band. 
With a sour look be shook the dust 
off that hand and wiped it clean 
across bis pants and his shirt. 

With two game points in hand, he 
nonetheless was broken by Courier 
in tbe penultimate game of the third 
set It happened that way again in 
the seventh gpme of the fourth set 

The warm conditions should 
have helped, but instead be com- 
plained that it left his strings feel- 
ing loose and soft. He sent his rack- 
ets out to be resitting and threw a 
tantrum when they were slow to be 
returned. HeyeOed at himself as he 
felt a year’s inspiration 
through his fingers. Tbe 
lectea wherever be . 
be yelled as Courier 
throughout the last year. 

“I don’t know what to think right 
now," Sampras said. Tm sure this 
definitely adds to (he hurting. Tm 
getting closer, and to win four in a 
now would have been something 
that, you know, would have been 
written about for a lot of years.” 

Courier pointed out that it 
wouldn’t have been a real Grand 
Slam anyway. “It would have been 
a bell of an accomplishment, don’t 
get me wrong,” Conner said, and 
he should know. Just two yean ago, 
there had been talk of lus accom- 
plishing the same tiring. 

Results 

ME ITS SINGLES 
Qpor Mr nmm 

Serai Bruguera (6). Spoiadat Andrei Medve- 
dev (41. Ukraine, 6-1 6-2, 7-5. 

Jim Courier (7), U.S. def. Pole somorns (9). 
UA. M,».WW 

WOMEN'S SINGLES 


lust 

and 
yelled 


i Pad Nuct/Rracn 

Maty Pierce had oo problem with Petra Ritter, winning their quarterfinal match, 6-0, 6-2. 


Arantxa SmdmVlcorta ( 21 .SpaUbd 0 f.JuUe. 
Hakvd. Franca. M. 7-6 IB-6). 

Mary Pierce 021. France, def. Petra Ritter, 
Amir** ML 64. 

Steffi Graf til. Germany, del lnes Gorracho- 
teeuL ArMnDmi. fc-k 6-1. 

CancMio Martinet (J), spam det Sabina 
Hock (MX. German*, 2-4, 6-a 6-2. 

MEN’S DOUBLES 
QuartsrflnnU 

Jan April, Sweden, end Janas Blorknwi 021, 
Swadan,deLTeddWoodferW«e.AurtToUa.m 
Mark Wnod i orde Ml. Australia. 3-6. 6-1 IDA 
Grant Canned Canada, and Patrick Gal- 
braWi (II, U^. det Sereto Casat. SPaM, and 
emfflo Sanchez, Saata. 7-* CM), 5-1, 6-1 


Krzyzewski Decides to Stay at Duke 

f DURHAM, North Carotina (AP) — Mike Kizyzcwslo, who coached 
'Duke to two national basketball titles, announced on Tuesday that he 
iwraild remain at Duke and was not leaving to coach in the National 
’Basketball Association. 

i Kizyiewski said at a news conference here that he was happy at Duke 
and Ifkpd Durham. Last week, he confirmed that he was exploring other 
offers. In his remarks Tuesday, be dectined to identify which teams he 
had been talking with, and said that iris most recent conversations with 
i NBA executives had been about possible draft choices from Duke. 

1 ”11 was realty a very easy decagon,” he said. “I am not in a c a re er 
^crisis.” Kxzyaewski gpt the Bine Devils into the NCAA Final Four seven 
: in nine years. 


i-M 1 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Dfvutea 



Did Anyone Check for Magnets? 

The A s sociate d Press 

COLUMBUS, Nebraska — Hdes-inot* are rare even for a golf 
oourae. How about five people in a foupday span on the sane course? 

That’s wbat happened Memorial Day weekend at tbe Elks Country 
Chib — fododmg three sees co Mccday. AH five people are from 
Columbus. “It’s incredible,’’ dub pro Skip Tredway said Tve never 
seen atnthingfike H.” There were witnesses to each shot, Tredwaysaid. 
- It sterted with Jeff Pfietz <® Friday at No. 8, oovesing 153 yards 
with as an 8-boo. On Sunday, Carol Baksud aced the same hole, 
going 106 yards with a 7-iron. Charlotte Lambert, ffifl Means and 
Dfck Gdowski alt made their hotes-in-one on Monday. Lambert 
aced No. 4, 130 yards with a 5-iron and Means connected rat the 
fame, frit* grang 142 yards with an 8-iron. Gdowski aced No. 1 7 
from 178 yards with a 1-wood. 


v 

w 


t 


For the Record 


Olympique Marseille Shapes Rescue 

■ PARIS (AFP) — The Otympique Marseille soccer dob presented a 
^financial resene package to theFrendi league here Tuesday. 
iThe dub’s fmaSSrector, Alam Laroche, told the league s financial 
'watchdog: the DNCG.lhat aCanfidian mining ocmp^ry was ready to put 
franca ($12 nriffion) on the fable md a further 200 milhon 
Bancs nesri season. Laroche would not name the backers and dismissed 
kjanp« the dnh was rat the vetpe oS fi nan dal c&Bapse. # 

5 Last wed. a Marseffle commercial court ord«td an nrvestiganoa of 

ithectab’saocotmteafierenmKfiiww^ 

dub had daimed its net deficit was 67 million nancs. 



W L 

PCL 

GB 

New York 

32 IS 

401 

— 

Boston 

so ia 

JOS 

2VV 

Brithnare 

27 20 

474 

5 

Toronto 

24 25 

jm 

9 

Detroit 

22 25 

m 

50 


Central Otebtoa 



CMcogo 

29 18 

417 



Oevatand 

26 21 

453 

3 

Kansas City 

24 24 

400 

5V6 

Mhmasoto 

24 24 

JDD 

5W 

Milwaukee 

20 29 

408 

to 


WestDtetetaa 



Texas 

72 26 

458 



Cflttfomto 

29 29 

442 

) 

Ssottte 

21 28 

429 

m 

Otatood 

14 36 

330 

9 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



GartDtvtsIM 




W L 

Per. 

GB 

AUwta 

20 54 

425 

_ 

Montreal 

28 n 

471 

3W 

Nsw York 

25 » 

410 

90 

Ftarioa 

24 24 

480 

7 

PhlladBta«a 

23 27 

4M 

t 


CtatrriDtefSlM 



dactanaH 

» 22 

460 

— 

Houston 

28 22 

440 

_ 

If. Louis 

25 33 

425 

2 

Chicago 

22 24 

458 

5 

Ptitabursh 

Zl 27 

438 

6 


West Division 



5jq Angeles 

28 23 

£49 



San Francisco 

25 at 

490 

3 

Cetarado 

22 27 

449 

5 

son Dtego 

17 34 

-333 

11 

Monday's Line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


■Coosai City 

000 H0 0M 

w 

9 1 

Barton 

3M M0 8» 
mtanMgs) 

1—4 

U 1 



• MawiHMi t jainnriffeaflentor luuau uw-w'aw*. 

iri, Iras surrendered to the police after an arrest warrant was issued » 
judge investigating* suspected Iraud cffl gram exports and imports. (AP) 
Dtamofidme Abdoqapanw of Uzbekistan won the 115-kitonKter Hhh 
-staseoflheGiro d’ltalia btcyde race at Maroshea, Italy. (Raters) 
' Mkhad Inin, wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys, underwent 
isoiMiy after he partly cSsk>cated his left shoulder last week. The 
■opoa&n went wtiland he was expected to m the. opraer against 
Pittsburgh on Sept- A, Cowboys oamer Kevin-CWetU said. (AP) 
‘ Tbe Argentine Grand Ptix. which already had been delayed and 
iextehiled for October to ave its organnas time to cany out reneva- 
iions, has now been canceled, its promoters said m Buenos Ames. (AFP) 


A ffai r . Belinda iu, Maanante (|), Mont- 
gomery (6k Ptchcrdo (10) ana Mocfarhme; 
S ate. Harris (5kQwanfrIfl <a>. Ryan (V) ana 
Rowlencl W— Ryan, Ml L— PkMmkV 0-Z 
HR*— Kansas CttY'Jovner (4). Boston, Grtttt- 
«nU (Ik TomMrtht (Ik 
tattle U in 17 2 

Woaosata Ml m M-l 2 I 

JoMW) one Mtoom Pulido, Stevens (4), 
Me r r l man (I), Aguilera (*) and Paris. 
W— JoHrmlMl L—PuMa24.HR6— Seattle, 
EJWarftnez Ok Mliaieil 2 0. 

wi •» ms » ■ 
mi mi ne— « i 2 i 

Brawn, Carpenter (W, Haneycim (V), Haw- 
•R (II and Rodriguez; weaman Oracee IS). 
Uovd Ok Palters W and NlSjoa. W— Brawn, 
4-7. b- Ferrers, (M, Sv-HoweH ft), 
a tape Ml m lew n e 

Nn y«n Ml Me in— a ■ e 

Sanderson, Johnson (I), Assenmoctier 111, 
Hernandez (?) aid Kanwvfce; Afattffc Her- 
nandez m and Stanley. W— Sanderson. 44. 
L— Asbatk 4-1 HRs-CMcasa, Jaetaen (71. 
New YOU. Barton 13). 

CORfontia MO M« *e*-2 « • 

OowUind Ml Ml *1*-— T* IS ■ 

FMVetk Leffcrts (5), Dooson (4), Butcher 
(U and Fabregas; Nagy, Farr (91 and SJU6 
mar. W— Nagy.44 L-ForreH. 1-1 HR-Cie- 
veJanO. Baerga (W. 

Ortdma «M Ml MS-4 9 t 

Toronto MB SM MW 9 1 

Onshore*. TbvW u), Briscoe (61, Am (B>, 


Hcrsman (9). Eckersknr (9) and sieinbacti 
ondHemond (II; Stewart, Brew («. St.Clolrv 
W> and Borden. W-A ere, 1-C. L— Brow, o-a. 
HRs — Toronto, Delgado (9), Huff <1>. 

II— J 14 • 

•e— j ■ ■ 

(II tattoos! 

Doherty. Graam (I), Hwntflwn 19k Knud- 
sen (10), Baever (11) aid Ftotwrtv. u miter 
(9); Mover, wutlonaon 171. Miffs (I). Lee 
SmWi (9), Bodon (10), EKfthom (II) aid 
Holies. W—Anodsnv 1-a. L — Bolton. 0-1. 
Sv C orner (I). HRs— Detroit, Phillies (*}. 
TettMon IB). Baltimore. Palmeiro 111). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
cotorode BM M SIB— 12 H 1 

Mew Vera ete eos ne— 2 7 3 

RIti, Blair (7) and GiranB ; Gatao. Modau» 
(4), Hillman (7), Semlnara (8) and Hundley. 
W-Rttz. 14 L— Gabo, 1-1 Sv-Btatr 111. 
HR»— Colorado. Gotaragae lit), VOnderwai 
12), Klnaery (25. New Yore. Seoul (71. 

•b bm oee — 3 * T 
ne obi ear— i » a 
Hammond. Aquino (ik Nen (B) and Som lo- 
go; Kllei, Edens (I) and Servols. W— Edens. *- 
1. L — Hen. 24 HR— Houston, Servols (S). 

1 1 
7 a 

Munoz. Wells Ml. Carter (el, Borland 181 
and Dautlen; Banks. Myers (9) and Wilkins. 
W— tariek** L— Munoz, 0 - 1 . Sv— M vers (12). 
HR— May (5). 

A ltad a WI OH Ml 06-4 M I 

San Praecttce Ht Ml BM so— 3 7 l 

(11 l eeim ) 

Smonz. Olson (IB). MeMidnel (10) and 
O'Brien; Burton. Burto (I), Pray (8). 
MJoclaon (9), Beck (ID and Monworlng. 
W—McMI chael. M L — Beck. H HRs— At- 
lanta Brawn (1), O'Brien (3). 

210 OM BOO— 3 7 ( 

MB HI ttx—7 Tl 1 

ICHIII, Shaw (Stand Ptelctwr; RltaMcEL 
tw (7), JJranftev (I) and Dorsefl. W-Rlta 
M. L-4CHIK, M. HRs— MsAlreak Cordero 
(3). ClnctaioTL MltdMl 2 (U), NSanden (7). 
smarts 15) m toe— 6 9 a 

Uo Angeles oot m dm U t 
PCUdeo. Evonoerd 17). Aractw (7), 
ALPerez 19) and Paonazzl; Hcrshlser, Mc- 
Dawett tW. TftWorrel) (B). Wayne TO and 
Mana W P otado a , 14 L-HerahKer, 3-1 
&*-tKPirtz no). H Re— Los Angeles, Plano 
MW. Webster (I): Sk Louis, Whiten Ml. 
PmilWHh BM 0BS (04— 2 4 1 

Son Mom 280 B8B ne-ll f 0 

Wooner. RManzanlNo (5), Mtaell (7). BaE 
ton) (I) and SJought; Ashby and Ausrws. 

14 L-RMonzanilta 1-1. 
HRs— 5an Dteao. T.Gwmn Ul. Shlgtev ill. 
Gtrtlerret (I); P M sbur eh, Merlin 14). 

Tire Michael Jordan Watch 

MONDAYS Game: JoraenwoeO-for-iwlni 
one gnankwi ei a 3-1 loss to toe Memphis 
Olidcs. Iteota struck out 3 rimes. inmeflekL 
Jerdtet a one (hr ban In right center. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan K boMlna 202 
OMBr-173) In 47 games. He has 28 sing ley and 
7 dteWea. He has driven in 25 runs, stolen 14 
taes In 21 attompls and slrudi out S2 times. 
He has enlua 14 lima and scored 52 rum. 
Defensively. Jordan has If putauts. one assist 
and 5 errors. 

J a pan es e Leagues 


Yakub 

2) 

22 

0 

488 

ite 

Houston 

19 

23 

a 

457 

7 

Hiroshima 

14 

2* 

0 

-385 



Tuesday's Results 
Vomlurl 5. Chunicni x to mnlnos 
Yokohama 10, Yakult 0 
HamWn i Hiroshima * 

Pacific League 


BASEBALL 


SeKw 

OoW 

Orix 

Lotte 

Kintetsu 

Nippon Ham 


Pci. 

•64J 

420 

AH 

452 

.400 

JU 


6to 

8 

ID 

II 


Results 

Setttu L Kfartctw x 10 Innlnes 
Dale! 7. ustte S 
Ortx A Nippon Ham 2 

Monday’s NBA Result 

EASTERN conference final 
M ew York 28 19 14 22-77 

IMtano 17 26 20 31—83 

Series ned 2-2 

Mew Yerti: OoMrr M M Smith i-s Wl l 
Ewing 9-1I7-72& Harper LT2M 9. Storise-UO-O 
5< HDBdlHH & Mason 0-5 6*LH.tNt«tamsO- 
0<H) a Anthony 1-4 0-0 X Totals 2649 IMS 77. 

ledieno; Daavb 3-55-2 7. mcKfv ho 1 4 to. 
SmHs 7-13 1-1 IS Miller 7-18 17-r* 31. Wantman 
2-4 1-2 5. AXtovts 2 5 5-2 5, F5tming 5-S 2-2 4. 
MllcMIl 0-1 M a Scofl 24 04 L K.WI lllams 1-3 
frflXThompaonO-l Ml Conner MiODMotois 
29-71 2632 0. 

Mtolat goats— New Yort 6)8 (Srarta 24 
HJtavIs 24. Anthony 14. Harper LSI- Indiana 
14 iMcKev V2, Miller 0-1, Workman 0-1). 
Footed ou9— Harper. Rebounds— New rm1< 57 
(Oakley 151, Indiana a f DUavts. Miller. Work- 
man 7). Assists — New York 14 [Starts e>. indk 
ana 14 (Workman 6). Tefal teals— New York 
2L indtau 22. Tecmical*— n.y. megai oe- 
tehta Indfara Illegal defense i Oat lev. Smith. 


Tour of Italy 


Remits et Ttwaooys lent sma, o circuit 
race over 115 kilometers f7t3 miles) in M ar- 
orttog : 1 . DkPiMUdlne Abdouloporav, Uzbek) - 
stoa PoNL 2 hours 33 minules and seven sec- 
onds; l GlovOnnl Lombard). ltol«. Lam are. 
same time; 1 FoWo Baldoio. rtaiv. OB wG. 
sJ.; < Roberto Pagnbi. I talr. Novigare. sr . 5, 
Andrea rerrtoa ta Italy. 2C MoMLsL; 6. Rp» 
Sorensen, Denmark. GB MC. s-l. 7, Mario 
Chiesa. liolv. Carrera, s.1.; L Franco Chtoc- 
doll Itary. Mercotone. SJ.; *, Fable Bordon 
all, Itoly. Bresdalal. s.!., 10, Glonnl Bugno, 
Italv, Prill. sJ. 

Overall staedln g s (after IB isaecsl: 1. Ev- 
aenv Benin. Russia. Gewtss Ballon, 37 Hours 
3Qmlnuie&31 seconds: iArmanc deles Cue- 
vas. France, Castoramo 2: 16; L Buono. 3:37; 
L Mlfturi Induraln. Spain. Banes to, 3.39. 5. 
Marco Giovanneiti, lh»v. Maoel Ctas. 4.54; L 
Froncescn Cosaaranae, italv, Mercotone 
5:02; 7,Wlaaimlr Belli, Italy, LomPre.5-». 6. 
Pavel Tonkov. Russia Lam err. 6.09; 9, Mas- 
simo Podenzaita lloly, Novtoore. 4:2S: 10- 
Moreno Argentln, naiv. Gewlu Ballon, 6:4?. 


Central League 


Yomkiri 

Onsitad 

Yekrtma 


w 

L 

T 

Pel; 

Cfl 

■a 

16 

0 

419 

— 

22 

tv 

8 

437 

3K 

21 

20 

0 

412 

4 W 




INTERNATIONAL FRIENPLY 
Araentlng 3, Israel 0 


CALIFORNIA— Put Rex Hwfler. Inflefder. 
an IStoov disabled I isl, retraaettve Mav 28. 
Recalled Rod Correia, tofleider. tram Van- 

muvtr, PCL. 

DETROIT— Put Gene HorrifcPHcher.on 15- 
day disabled Itet Recalled Kurt Knudsen. 
pltcner, from Toleda IL- 

MILWAUKEE— Activated Bill Wep m on 
and jase Mercedes, pltchens from 15-dovdte- 
abfed llst.OanonedjeH ClriiksMbcaamaato 
New Orleans. AA. Put Jett Bronkey, pitcher, 
on 15-doy disabled list, retroactive Mav 2S. 
tvntenai League 

MONTREAL— Signed David Morango and 
Chris Weldert. pitchers. 

FOOTBALL 

Notiooai Football Leamre 

HOUSTON— Agreed to terms with 
Haywood Jeff) res, wide receiver, on We ar 
cont rad; Al Smith, llnebotter,on2-ygar con- 
tract; and Kenny DavMson, defensive end, on 
3-veor axUajc i. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Signed Robert Brown, 
defensive lineman. 

KANSAS CITY— Re-stoned John Stephens, 
running bock. Orimed Kevin Little, linebacker, 
oft w ai vers tram San Frondsca Signed Barry 
WIbum c u rrier noc k ; DorreH FuUtagton. sate- 
hr; Arnold Ate linebacker; Alien DeOraflen- 
reta wkfe receiver; Nick Mauofa dHenrive 
tackle; Russ MCCuUOugiv offensive tackier 
Pete Shutoff. Rneoacker; Kettft Trgyhr, defen- 
sive end; and AUn Van PeH, auartertxxk. 

la. RAIDERS— waived Steve Smith, talk 
back. Signed Dan Mocebar. center, Obtained 
Derrick Gainer, running bock, tram Dallas tar 
past coraideraiions. 

LA. RAMS— Named Pete Russell scout. 
Agreed to terms with Tobv Wright, safety. 

MIAMI— Signed Tyrone Braxton, conver- 
bock. to 2-vear contract. Ternrfnoied contract 
of Tom Thaver. linebacker, waived JTCan 
Barnett and Leevarv Cavlngtorw linebackers; 
Jimmie Hook ins. defensive end; and Sean 
Richardson, hifttxick. 

MINNESOTA— Stoned Cartas JthUnx Ibc- 
bedeer, to 1-year rantreri; Antee Ware, auar- 
lertxxxana Bryan Barker, pumer. (Mart 
Seoftfc Graham, running back; Ed McDaniel 
Hnrtfedwr ; and Mike marrivcerter. Aaratdta 
terms with Henry Thomas, nose tackle, and 
Amp Ufc running bock, on Wear contract 

NEW ENGLAND- RMtoned Michael 
Tjmpson, wide receiver. Andre Ttopett, line- 
backer, retired. Signed Willie Mc G bwrt, itnc- 
backcr, te 4-year ran trod; and Ervin Collier, 
tackle; Joe Buren. center; John Burke, Kent 
end; and Steve Howklits, jgfefy. 

NEW ORLEANS— Reached agreement 
wim Doug n wsnwler, guortrrtwx on 3-year 
con (rod. 

N.Y. GiANTS— Signed Peter Nre. wide re- 
ceiver. 

N.Y.JETS— Signed AVigtfOghsta.itateesIve 
lineman, and Pat T erred, defensive back. 

PITTSBURGH— Stoned Jim Miller, augr- 
(tfbac*. Brice Abrams, running bock, and 
Elbert Elite, wide receiver. Bryan Hinkle, 
Knebockei. retired. 

SAN DiEGO— S igned Sean itarttoree, cor- 
nerbock. to 2-vear rant reel ; Curtis WhlHey, 
center, and Zone Beehn. linebacker. Named 
Jett Beattwrd Seoul. Signed Tony iwrtta 
wide rece i ve r , to 2-yeor caniroa extension. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Stoned Rod Moore, 
wide receiver; Frank Pol lack, offensive tack 
ic; and Eddie Tovior. eanterbaek. 

Seattle— signed Brian Blades, wide re- 
ceiver. to 7-yegr contract. 


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Pta Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JUKE 1, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Law’s Sticky Tentacles 


0 : h 


•I 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Lawyers arc on 
ihe radio. It is a talk show. 
The talk is about Paula Corbin 
Jones suing President Bill Clinton. 
It is not the first time I have heard 
lawyers on talk shows lately talk 
about this suit. Lawyers love it. 

Is it because the suit makes our 
legal system look so preposterous? 

Yes. preposterous, like the hip- 
popotamus, to which — or whom, 
depending on your animal-rights 
position — we owe the word '‘pre- 
posterous” (You can find it in Ar- 
istotle. “Preposterous, the hippo- 
potamus!’’ he said, though in 
Greek of course.) 

Lcticographcrs say we would 
not have “preposterous" but for the 
hippopotamus, but listening to 
these talk-radio lawyers tempts me 
to say, “Fie on lexicographers.” 
The lawyers talking about Jones’s 
suit persuade me lhau even if the 
hippopotamus had never been 
born, the word “preposterous" 
would have sprung up shortly after 
the American legal system pro- 
duced its first wriL 
I mean, now. really, listen to this; 
Defending yourself in this sys- 
tem is so expensive that even ihe 
president of the United States can- 
not afford it. 

All right. I'm no social-equality 
fanatic. If you want a quality law- 
yer you ought to be ready to pay 
quality price, and the president 
makes only S 200.000 per annum. 
This is peanuts, but only compared 
with the income of ruD-of-the-raill 
second basemen, investment bank- 
ers. rock stars, best-selling novel- 
ists, entertainers and lawyers. 

In other words, we have a legal 
system affordable only to mediocre 
baseball players and professional 
people of comparably extravagant- 
ly rewarded mediocrity. 

□ 

The preposterosity of it seems 
never to have occurred to the talk- 
show lawyers until Jones sued a 
president. They are fascinated by 
the problem it creates: How* can a 
president with his pauperish 
S200.000 possibly amass the vast 
sums needed for his defense with- 
out compromising himself and his 
office? 

A nice question it is. too. but 
these talk-show lawyers seem indif- 
ferent to the millions of nonpresi- 
dents who lack the typical presi- 


dent’s resources Tor staving off 
financial ruin if summoned to en- 
dure the law's majesty. 

Is it not preposterous that, until 
3 president was subjected to Amer- 
ican law’s tendency to impoverish 
all but the most extravagantly re- 
warded mediocrities, lawyers never 
took to the radio to discuss it? 

In these talk-show discussions 
nobody seems to find it odd that 
courts should be so complacent 
about the financial disaster they so 
often visit even on the innocent. 

The talk-show attorneys, obvi- 
ously undisturbed by the prepos- 
terousness of the system in which 
they toiL seem interested only in 
the problems with which its aston- 
ishing expense confront presidents 
undergoing ordeal by lawyer. 

□ 

Then there is their argument 
whether a president should be al- 
lowed to put off dealing with suits 
like Jones’s until after he is out of 
office. Some say yes: some. no. Yes 
or no. however." all acknowledge 
that being sued takes up an awful 
lot of a person's time — so much, 
some say. that a president might be 
bard pressed 10 find time in which 
to do some governing. 

Here again the preposterous i> 
ignored, and the sued president 
treated as a special case: Should he 
be temporarily excused from the 
time-consuming rigors of trial law? 
Spared those hours, days, weeks, 
months, years it takes a case to 
wander its tedious way through the 
American legal maze? 

“And why," one yearns to 
scream, "should the presidency ab- 
solve a citizen of the obligation to 
submit his life to that same eternity 
of American l3w that threatens ev- 
ery citizen caught by a summons 
server?” 

All this talk-show talk about cut- 
ting special deals to excuse the 
president from the preposterous- 
ness of a legal system that every- 
body else must endure implicitly 
acknowledges thaL the sy stem is. in 
fact, preposterous. 

After health-care reform, we 
might move on to court reform. In 
a civilized system a two-day trial of 
Jones's suit, held two weeks after it 
was brought, would settle the mat- 
ter one way or the other. Lawyers' 
Fees of $75 an hour should be about 
right. 

•Vc* York Time* St nitv 



er French, or Even a Woman 


By John Rockwell 

;Vrt> York TTtmtfS Senior 

P ARIS — At the wizened age of 24. with eight years of 
an international career and four acclaimed solo re- 
cordings behind her. the French pianist Helene Gnmaud 
has finally made her first concerto disk. It’s terrific, and it 
imm ediately jostles for consideration among the preferred 
versions of both works: the Rachmaninoff Second Con- 
certo and the Ravel Concerto in G. 

Aside from its excellence, the new CD is noteworthy for 
its inclusion of the first piece of French music Grimaud 
has recorded, it serves to call attention to an artist w ho has 
had a most unusual career, flouting expectations and 
stereotypes. As a glance at her discography suggests, she 
has single-mindedly concentrated on Romanticism: Ger- 
man Romanticism in particular, and Rachmaninoff and 
Brahms in double-particular. Bus may seem odd not only 
for a French pianist but also for a female one. 

With Grimaud all cliches about precise, coloristically 
subtle French pianists and graceful, flowing lady pianists 
go right out the window. Her playing, on record, in recital 
and on stage with an orchestra, is fiercely purposeful, 
rangy, confident, proclamatory and —in scores that invite 
iL like the Brahms Opus I IS — mystically intense. 

As it turns out, she considers herself hardly French at ail 
and, for that matter, hardly female, at least in the glamor- 
ous sense to which she might easily lay claim.' 

“I never liked it here.” she said recently in the office of 
her Paris manager, speaking of France as a whole. "It’s not 
that 1 have anything against French people, but I felt more 
at home in Italy. There is not oae drop of French blood in 
my family.” 

Although Grimaud was bom and raised in the southern 
French city of ALx-en- Provence, she stems from North 
.African. Corsican and Italian Jewish roots. Her family 
changed its name from Grimaldi before she was bora. 

“Mv father came from a background of Sephardic Jew s 
in Africa, and mv mother’s ancestors were Jewish Berbers 
From Corsica,” she said in her excellent English. She 
speaks in a rapid-fire manner and, despite occasional 
flashes of nervous insecurity, seems the sort of person who 
brooks trivial banter with impatience. 

Indeed, she seems to have always had a reclusive, con- 
trary streak. She was “agitated - ' as a child, she said. Rest- 
lessly seeking an outlet through dance and sports, she finally 
hit on the piano, her fust musical instrument, at the ad- 
vanced age of 9. Only three years later, after private study in 
Marseilles, she entered the Paris Conservatory in an appar- 
ent stroke of luck: The next year, the minimum entrance age 
was raised to 15. But she increasingly chafed asains: the 
rigidities of the French system, with its bureaucratic insis- 
tence that everyone study the same things in the same wav . 

She also resented a new conservatory director who de- 
manded that all the students plunge into the most complex 
contemporary music, moving from their 1 9th -century stud- 
ies without transition through ihe classics of earl;, modern- 
ism. Her rebellious intractability on that score stall persists; 
she has little interest in playing new- music. 

At J5 she made her first recording, w hich was acclaimed 
in Gramophone magazine and elsewhere. In the same year 
she won a first prize at the conservatory and. defying her 
teachers, entered the Tchaikovsky Competition in Mos- 
cow. Though one of the 12 finalists, she was appalled at 
the role mechanics of the competition and never entered 
another one. 

A year later she quit the conservatory and embarked on 


- +•' ...■>* e c 





•.« 

*sS : . - A* 
=k - jui 


l nr Prrtnom (n He Wo Tort Tima 

The pianist Helene Grimaud: “I had these strange ideas. People looked at me like 1 was an extraterrestrial 


a career with no teacher in the wings. But no teacher did 
not mean no guidance. Grimaud attracted the interest of 
several older performers, chiefly Daniel Barenboim. Mar- 
tha Argericb and Gidon Kremer. They offered engage- 
ments. provided support and. above alL made her fed that 
her sometimes cranky independence was not utterly nuts. 

“I had these strange ideas.” she said. “People looked at 
me like 1 was an extraterrestrial. When I got in touch with 
these other musicians. 1 realized 1 was not the only one.” 

For the last three years Grimaud has been based in 
Tallahassee, Florida. She offers various explanations for her 
choice, but the main one seems to be that her boyfriend 
teaches bassoon at Florida State University there. She keeps 
five pet black wolves in Tallahassee and maintain* no base 
in France apart from her parents' home in Ah. 

“I don’t have legal status in .America, no green card.” 
she said. “But inside of me. I feel like it's home. I would 
really like to become a legal resident pay taxes, etc. I play 
a lot" in Germany, and I like European cities, but I might 
be distracted in "a city like London. I like a place where f 
can be left alone when I come back home after tours. I like 
being a recluse. In America. I enjoy the friendliness, but 1 
can be anonymous." 

Grimaud is building her repertory slowly. accepting 
only about 50 dates a year. “My career has evolved very 
gradually." she said. “I never felt pres iured to play more 
than I fell was necessary . 1 made choices based on the ide 2 
of being surrounded by intelligent people." 

She has performed her share of chamber music, induc- 
ing four stints at Kramer's Lockenhaus Festival ir. Aus- 


tria. hut she prefers concerto dates. *T find playing 
with orchestras so rewarding.” she said. Musicians come 
up and talk with me after rehearsals. Even conflicts with 
conductors can be rewarding, because they force people to 
defend their positions." 

Like so many pianists of her generation, she adduces 
Glean Gould as her idol although she concedes that her 
plaving tittle resembles his. She admires hts structural 
rigor and rhythmic incisiveness, insisting that she uses no 
pedal except in actual performance. She considas Gould 

2 soul mate in part because of the way his recordings eerihf 

cenifv thing s she has already done on her own, she said. 
She discovered to her delight that Gould corrected the 
same “wrong" note in Brahms's Opus 118 that she did. 
And like him she often breaks chords by playing one hand 
slightly before the other — unusually, the right hand first. 

From the beginning. Grimaud resisted not only the 
French system and French repertory but also any sugges- 
tion that as a woman, she was physically or temperamen- 
tally unsuited for the music she wanted to play. “At the 
conservatory, I was always told that Chopin was my 
thing.” she 'said. “Maybe i was not ready, physically, to 
plav Brahms, but l haven’t changed that much since. 

“People always say u> me cow that I play like a man,” 
she added. “I never felt feminine at alL When I was a girL 
people would give me dolls, and I would throw them 
across the room. It's true I don't have short hair, but 1 
don't do anything to it and 1 don't own a skirt or dress, 
and I never wear makeup or jeweliy. I’m not gay, but I 
always thought I should have been a man.” 


people 


Tutu's 


i Desmond Turn, hoid- 
er of the Nobel Peace Prize for his 
straggle -against • apartheid, told 
about-' a speech fan twee gave -to 

2,000 : Australians; “ the 

trouble with , us is -that we don't 
celebrate who we are,’ and i sad. 
‘How about giving odesdvesaven; 
very warm hand.' And they did a 
humdinger of an uppIaoser Tutu 
said in Los Angeles. “Then 1 said, 
‘Well how about ~gtving/God.a 
s tanding ovauon, J and they nearly 
tot* the roof off,' * fee said, “And, 
without thaikmg,ar ihe etd of h. I 
said. Thank you.' 

■ -Q -;-.V ;■ 

acjKg and 

rohave Egypt’s pets'ster^S^M 
revive thetB^’fviahhids. that, 
atronfing io Bardoi obtained a 
the time of the pharaohs, when cats 
and baboons were venerated, - . 

• D\ 

If the names Michael Zaskw, 
WaftWBfc5,!StrickM«£W%Me. 
Sssa Reeves, Etic Dtaedea and 

Jeanne Cooper don’t' mean - anv- 

thing to ypo,,yoo aimdpt certainly 
dean waste your . rime watching 
soap operas. But lots of Americans 
do. ana just far them. Mackinaw 
City, Michigan, is hokfing a Soap 
Opera Fan Fair, Oigwccra say 
severa! thousand tickets, have been 
sold. (InddeniaQv. the fasted actors 
star on The Guiding. Light,” “All 
My Children,” “Days of Oiir 
Lives," and “The Young- and the 
Restless.") 

D 

The actress Ten Gan* body de- 
nies dial she k j»s multiple sclerosis. 
And she blames the “hairdresser 
mafia” for the rumors. Her biz mis- 
take, she says, was confiding m the 
fellow codling her that she had a 
faille numbness in her back. Diag- 
nosis: disk trouble that exerdse al- 
leviates. 

' □ 

Peony' Mandtafl, SO. the director 
and former “Laverne and Shirley” 
star, was taken to a Long Island, 
New York, hospital because of 
chest pains after playing tennis. 
She’s fine, doctors sav. 


imERIWiOML 

CLASSIFIED 

Appear* on Pngn 6 & 75 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 



High 

Low 

W 

High 

Low 

W 


OF 

OF 


C/F 

OF 



M'7* 

13-55 

K 

22.71 

17*2 

PC 

Amman 

as/ro 

16.01 


22/71 

12103 

1 

Ankjm 

jam 

6.43 


34.75 

9.48 

PC 

tJhenn 

3HK 

14-57 


27, *3 

'1.05 

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31/W 

soieei 


S8/82 

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pc 

B-lyaib 

!9.V 

1.VS5 

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2170 

pc 

B 

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1**53 


31/BB 

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9 

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26-79 

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WAS 

ISSTi 


xm 

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4 

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pr 

S.’/8i7 

»'48 

9 

1 Ol Sol 


iBta 


xev 

20^8 

PC 

D'ikn 

19 -* 

10«CI 

1 r. 

10.64 

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16-61 

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31 . BB 

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31 « 

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14/57 


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temt-.r. 

xm 

15*61 


1?-*3 

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15*53 


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PC 

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am 

10«4 


36-06 

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2373 

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Si: 71} 


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I7M 

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ro-sa 

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1 

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10 50 


2?I64 

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9MB 

5-42 

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11.52 

4-41 

pc 

R-rrw. 

30 T* 

17 M 


DIDB 

21-70 

s 

Si Prt-nt«n-| ia»ss 

4/3) 


18761 

0-7 

sh 

CiycMutai 

M<sr 

7'44 

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S*a*0UP3 

31 IBB 

17M 


31 08 

KI03 

PC 

TdBffV' 

1t»i 

6/4) 


14-07 

7/44 

pc 

Vnmcn 


ia/64 


»M 

18 W 


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27/00 

ism 

- 

Jl/BB 

IS 59 

s 

V/jrvi* 

21/70 

7144 

pc 

27 'BO 

14*7 

% 


31/88 

16 61 


38.62 

12/53 

SK 

Oceania 

Auckland 

17 /a 

1«B 

* 

ISM 

9*40 

pc 

Sydney 

21/70 

12/53 

PC 

2:.70 

11-02 

PC 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday. 3S provided by Accu- Weather. 



•■v ... > • 

■Waii-im 

North America 

D*y Dleasani wcainpr will 
prevail across ihe EB9l«m 
United Sure:- including Near 
i or* £/Jy arr/j Washin;lorj. 
D C . Thursday mio th* 
w**«crd A neat wave will 
c omtr.ue !/on rorthen Men- 
co Through Denver and B*s- 
mjrv to Winnipeg Fans of 
Central America will have 
heavy ram 


Europe 

Very warm weather over 
western Europe writ shill 
eastward across central and 
easrerr Europe as »h* woefc 
progresses Cooler woaiher 
and a lew shower* will reach 
FrarHun Thursday and War- 
saw by Fndav London and 
Pans will be seasonable 
larer this week with a shower 
or rwo 


Asia 

EasJ-ccmr*l China, lreudmg 
Shanghai will have svnnv. 
hoi weather later ;ms week 
Warm weather will e»;pnd 
nonhward toward Seoul and 
Tokyo as well Hono hem 5 
will have scaiierod. heavy 
downpours while Manila 
through Bangkok will be very 
warm and humid with a lew 
aUemoon thunderstorms 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today 

High Low W 


High Low W 


Today 

High LOW W 


Tomorrow 
High Low W 



OF 

OF 


OF OF 



OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 



2760 

1966 


2760 1804 


Buonm A..F* 

22/71 

13«5 

P 

24.75 

12 53 

P< 

Cm 

31 W 

15 09 


32-69 18-84 


Caracas 

31100 

21/TO 

5 

3UBB 

2170 

pc 

CuuTucu* 

29-84 

1305 


2964 13 45 


Lma 

21/76 

17M 

S 

22.71 

17*62 

PC 

JariMirm 

i67» 

14/57 


2679 14/59 


Uo«oCav 

26/79 

13/56 

PC 

26/79 

13-55 

pc 

Lura 

41/106 20.68 


41 '106 19.66 


RndaJanean 

24 .73 

18*4 

pc 

26/79 

19« 

pc 

Riyadh 

40/113 27.60 


45-11327.60 


Sacrogo 

>9iW 

7,44 

pc 

:««8 

8.46 

PC 


Legend: 3-nmr/. ac-oa/Uy doudv. c-ctouoy. sn-snowerj. i-ihurwersiorms. r-ra*i. si-snow tones, 
sn-snow. Meo. w-weaiher. All maps, forecasts and data provided by Accu-Weother, Inc. •' 1994 


Asia 


7l 

adrr 


Tomorrow 



High 

Lun 

W 

Hi£h 

Low 

IS 


CT 

C.T 


C.T 

0* 


BaraS;- 

3413 

.*3 73 


3? S- 

2£ “* 



35 75 

22-71 

* 

37 W 

Z m 7D 


Hong nong 

27.60 

24 75 

V. 

20 ar 

74*75 


Man*. 

3269 

24*75 

1 

33-91 

24-7 i 


NawEWi. 

46/115 29 64 


44-1P29B4 

s 

Sec*. 1 

25/77 

1005 

< 

36-82 

1- (2 

rr. 

Sn-viixai 

26-79 

15 51 

3 

2/ W 

■ 9 04 

3C 


37.69 

23-73 

PC X. 9J 

,3 73 

PC 

Torooi 

29 er 

21 m 

* 

25 SJ 

ri ^ 


Tr*vn 

23 70 

1253 


• 

•250 

PC 

Africa 


3371 

2175 

oc 

2J £4 


. 


23 73 

1.353 

9 

22 “1 

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- 

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25-79 

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22 7t 

11 12 

cc 

25 77 

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L-K»1 

3168 

15 M 

PC 

?1-W 

r* *3 



21 1"0 

U 52 

PC 

ZZ 

-3 £6 

PC 

Tcmr 

33-c; 

18 £4 

s 

3255 

2’T: 

5 

North America 

Anchor app 

176? 

—44 

;< 


4 ?s 



306*5 

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1 

r.* £--■ 

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9o5ion 

2652 

15W 

PC 

23 T? 

ic f;- 

rc 


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6-40 

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Dnr.p 

22*71 

1060 

1 

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21.70 

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32-69 

21 70 

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2: £8 

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Lor kivyln 

2679 

1702 

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27 ‘^j 

1” £2 

PC 

LS-WTH 

3269 

24.70 1 

32-*? 

75 "■? 

1 

Mrtkvpoln 

22-71 

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5 

23 — 

1:.*: 

5 

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2170 

948 

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16.61 

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31-88 

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39 *102 2577 

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4 1 - 106 26 7S 

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23-73 

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pc 

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S-anie 

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a 46 

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22 -7i 

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Toronio 

I9C6 

9/40 

sh 

17 62 

e--* 


WarJwvjto 

0168 

16161 

l 

27 

•.7.-S3 

PC 


ACROSS 

t WonccoW 
CurChoSfi 

6 G»C“r:e 

10 Sinking B«3:i* 

MjvUg *vai 
is German 
numeral 

16 Snsde of red 

17 Kind ol dressing 
ib Boccaccio 

work wirh’T^e' 

20 Actress 

S-Yfnsc.n 

21 Glasgow 


22 t £ Vi**VT“ 
Cece 

24 PuTCrn 

2 S?sui>_settir-.s 

27 At r-as-er 

keytoardisri 

29 Gel U3 
30 136“ 
V.'inatedcn 
winner 

11 Zdcr Jarrttngs 

35 T i n T n 

36 From Nc.-- Sac 

39' NC 

- J co-s' 

-*0 Beats 
tack&cr.e 


Solution to Puzzle of May 31 



□QHS 


IYIEINIS 


42 G«-ss!e' ruM 

«3 •vvre.-nj ra:~s 
4S c a!:?:*e* 

47 Lc-;-es3ec 
snr-ecirc 

48 Azress Jjr.e 
so ■‘.fer.o'ac’e 

sr.^ce 

si MONACO 
54 Sa-.an s domg 
57L=MCr..er 
58Ba;ie"’s 
S“«-d- 

59 S=a.'.-s~ 
r'c-.'-ce :■ 
car :a. 

60 A" fAS 

5 ses e : 

61 S' era." ran 

62 C-.e- 

63 Z-i'% 

5-=r- -a 

MV- ?S 

DOWN 

1 Vats 

2 A-ana- 
fc.iars:- 

3“ANG:5=. 

4 Sneames 

5 c.-can 


• Sh^nge to say 

7 Kind of rug 

8 Gumshoes 

• Son o»*.heWest 
Wind 

10 Befo'e kickoff 

11 Gcldfirge's 
Trsi name 

12 Convoy chaser 

13 Boston suburb 
is Waiter’s 

handout 
21 Turns target 
23 Fr holy women 

25 Sergeants 
•cice 

26 Canal opened 
m 1325 

27C:aer drum 

28 '!:s :c !8ff 

a he" 

30 Var.tcca Indian 

32 MOSCOW 

33 'Of. If, a: s what 
ycu mean’’ 

34 Pans s Gare de 

37 Contes: 
responders 

38 S: Petersburg's 
river 

41 Shoe: Brewery 
wor'-er of 70's 
TV 

44 Gershwm's 

to ’Watch 

Over Me" 


48 Utah's State 
flower 

<7 Tankard Apple 
48 Hebrew prophet 
48 Writer Chekhov 


so Detroit output 

51 Shopping 
center 

52 Delano 

(F.D.R.S 

mother) 


S> Witticism 
55 Spring flower 
58 Teddy materia: 
88 People or GO 



Pliancy Bob LuPhw 

O AVw York Times Edited In Will Shortz. 


1 ~ 


in a world without borders, time zones 
or language barriers. 


4 AW 


83b JQ06T- 

. ■ vSS 



Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the U.S. direct)}' from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it's translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they’ll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AIST 1 

To use these services, dial the ATST Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
help you need. With these Access Numbers and your ART Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ART Calling Card or you’d like more information on ABcT global sen-ices, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 



V l'*H ATC.T 


AJ&T Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1. L'sl^ -j;e ctur rsoi . A„-id the country you ore calling from. 

2 D-j! Lie co.-respoTahr^ .‘JZT .Access Number. 

5 -\n AliT EngU/h-sp^afaq;* -Operator or voice prompt ^ill ask for the phone number vou n-iab 10 call orct>nnea \x>u 10 j 
customer service repr-isemanve 

To receive \xxtr free wallet card of A&Ts Access Numbera just dial the aca» number of 
the country you're in and ask for Customer Service. 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA 

Italy* 

172-1011 

Australia 

l-SOO^Sl-Oll 

Uechtensiein ’ 

15540-11 

China. PRC*»w 

10811 

Lithuania* 

8*196 

Guam 

018-872 

Lu.\trmbourg 

i)-800-0lll 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia, F.YJL of 99-800-1288 

India* 

000-117 

Malta* 

0800890-110 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco - 

19*-00ll 

Japan* 

003*111 

Netherlands* 

06-022-9111 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 

Korea** 

ir 

Poland** *• 

0*0104800111 

Malaysia* 

8000011 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

New Zealand 

000-Qll 

Romania 

01-8004288 

Philippines' 

105-11 

Rns8la*lMo5cowj 

155-5042 

Saipan- 

235-2872 

Slovakia 

0042000101 

Singapore 

800-0111-11! 

Spain* 

9 OO-O 9 -OO-H 

Sri Lanka 

h30-*30 

Sweden* 

020-795-611 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Switzerland* 

155-0011 

Thailand* 

OOIO- 9 OI-IIII 

U.K. 

0500-89-0011 

EUROPE 

Ukraine* 

8*100-11 

Armenia** 

8*14111 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ansaria**** 

022-903-011 

B.ihraln 

SOO-OOl 

Belgium’ 

0800-100-10 

Cjprus* 

08»>90i)i0 

Bulgaria 

00-18LXMM10 

Israel 

177-1002727 

Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

Kuwait 

800-288 

Czech Rep 

00-320-00101 

Lebanon (Beirut) 

426-801 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Qatar 

0800-01 l-T* 

Finland* 

9S00-100-10 

Saudi Arabia 

l-axMo 

France 

19**0011 

Turkey* 

00-800- L2277 

Germany 

0130-0010 

LJLE* 

OiW-121 

Greece* 

00-800-1311 

AMERICAS 

Hungary* 

Q0*-800-01111 

.Argentina* 

001^X1-200-1111 

Iceland** 

09941 n 

Belize* 

>55 

Ireland 

1-800-550-000 

Bcillvij* 

O- 8 OO-U 12 


COUNTRY 

Brazil 


ACCESS .NUMBER 
000-8010 


Chile 

Columbia 


004-03 L2 


Casn Rica*» 


980-11-0010 

11-t 


EaudoC 
El Sahador** 


]J9 

1% 


Guatemala* 


1<>U 


111 Guyana* 


165 


Hald* 


Jamaica** 

Neth-Aotil 

St Kins. -Nevis 


1^0^72-2881 
'XU-SOO-9"2-28S3 


AFRICA 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

Gabon* 


0-800-g"2-^SSl 
001-800-87z7^»3 
U8LXMT2-2881 


Gambia* 


51OO20Q 

OO4-001 


Kenya* 


OQlll 


Liberia 
South Africa 


CtfQOOO 


797-79f7 


1 Jians ■ -in; ih »c h jiume in Jl i'«nRf WnrUi 

utI^aT ' Jhn ' i ‘ vra;, -' n rtlin Itktolmuititt* 

Tw*! Cbnnsa- rrtoe, -X .nSTUSAIBrea* raio- plic. jn .ul dur,. 

'Svt i"rt\xeB.»'adjl4el[iai jlMI*ro«Bin^ IuiaI 

iSkT WL,Wr L “ K ^ ScT '*-'*' ' OifWhMfcw mupKurtr a «i I to bn 

ri* .4 Jn .v pik n- I.J, jj ,u=. 

r WI ‘- l" u JLpri-V V.. 4 n>vp<iiW^nl|. 3 i.Uilli<lhi nUlilIrt-Muilll 

in nn nu* .i a jr jn tfcv.-S * 1 1 


-'Ijvnji hr jvzdjWr lk<n cvTO pW 

“ alUng unh 

' 


0-800-99-0 U3 


• Nky 


A vcond dal tone 


Pr 


Honduras** 

123 i 

Mexico*** 

95-m0-i62-i2-i0 i 

Nicaragua (Managua) 174 , 

Piruman 

109 f 

Peru* 

1H1 ! 

Suriname 

156 ! 

Uruguay 

00-0*10 ; 

Venezuela** 

80-011-120 j 

CARIBBEAN | 

Bahamas 

1-800-872-2881 1 

Bermuda* 

1-800-872-2881 1 

British VI 

I-£00-S“2-2881 

Cayman Islands 

l-ftXi-872-2881 > 




•• 


1 


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1