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INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




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Clinton Gives 
Berlusconi 
His Backing 

President Meets Pope 
And Cites Differences 
Over Abortion Issue 

By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 

ROME— PresidemBiD Clinton on Thurs- 
day became the first major national leader to 
openly endorse Italy's new, neofascisi- 
backed government during a visit to Rome 
that also revived what he called “genuine 
disagreements" with Pope John Paul II over 
abortion and contraception. 

The president arrived in Rome early 
Thursday, almost 50 years to the day after the 
Allied liberation of Rome on June 4, 1944, to 
begin an eight-day European tour feting Al- 
lied victory in World War n and commemo- 
rating the dead. 

Mr. Clinton will pay his first visit to the 
scene of one of the major wartime landin gs 
Friday when be visits the beaches south of 
Rome, where American and Allied troops 
spilled ashore in January 1944, at Anzio and 
Nettuno, as part of a campaign that led to the 
defeat of Nazism and Fascism in Italy. 

Bat he encountered Fascism's long shadow 
here when he met with Prime Minis ter Silvio 
Berlusconi, who has inspired fevered contro- 
versy in Italy and elsewhere in Europe be- 
cause his newly elected coalition embraces 
the neofascist Italian Social Mov emen t 
Mr. Berlusconi sought to convince Mr. 
Clinton on Thursday that Italy had broken 
completely with a Fascist past that bad 
placed it in alliance with Nazi Germany. 

“The first thing the prime minister said to 
me was his government from top to bottom is 
unequivocally committed to democracy" 
Mr. Clinton said at a joint news conference 
with Mr. Berfnsconi. 

“I think the United States would support 
the judgment of thepeople of Italy and their 
democratic elections, and loots forward to a 
very good relationship witii this prime minis- 
ter. 

Mr. Berlusconi declared: “In Italy, there is 
no such thing as nostalgia! or aperiod that we 
consider to be completely boned in the past 
and having beat condemned by history." 

It was & theme that echoed across the 
president’s first day in Italy under a swelter- 
ing, cloudless sky. 

“Fifty years an, we say Italy win never 
retain to dictatorship, and will never submit 
ton totalitarian regime," said Rome’s mayor,. 
Francesco RiiteOi, as. he hosted' Mr. Oinum 
at MjchdangeloV 16th-century Piazza del 


line Hm “We will defend to the last strand of 
See CLINTON, Page 4 



U.S. Will Ask the UN 


To Impose Sanctions 
Against North Korea 

Yeltsin to Insist Nuclear Evidence 


LuiUon Mriba'Rnilm 

; an audience Thursday at the Vatican. They agreed to disagree about abortion. 


On a Conference 
Prior to Embargo 

By Steven Erl anger 

New York Time Service 

MOSCOW — As North Korea threatened 
once again to withdraw from the N uclear Non- 
proliferation Treaty. President Boris N. Yeltsin 
said Thursday that Moscow would not support 
sanctions against North Korea until a Russian- 
proposed international conference on the ques- 
tion can be convoked. 

The United Nations, pressed by Washington, 
is debating early sanctions against Pyongyang, 
which is refusing to open its nuclear facilities to 
international inspection as required under the 
nonproliferation treaty. Inspection could reveal 
whether North Korea, a former Soviet ally, has 
been diverting nuclear material to make atomic 
weapons, as is widely beHeved. 

U.S. officials believe an early inspection of 
spent fuel rods now bong removed from the 
North Korean reactor at Yongbyon is crucial if 
any diversion is to be proven. 

Mr. Yeltsin's remarks, though couched in a 
general pattern of disapproval for North Ko- 
rea’s nuclear ambitions, are bound to be disap- 
pointing to Washington and Seoul The South 
Korean president. Kim Young Sam, has been 
lobbying Mr. Yeltsin and Russian officials for 
two days, including a session at Mr. Yeltsin’s 
dacha, trying to get Russian support for sanc- 
tions. 

But China, another member of the UN Secu- 
rity Council also is openly reluctant to move 
too quickly on sanctions, so the Russian posi- 
tion, urging careful treatment erf an old aUy, is 
essentially cost-free. 

The Russian and South Korean presidents 
did sign a mutual declaration Thursday urging 
Pyongyang to observe the International Atomic 
Energy Agency control agreements, which call 
for inspections, and pledged to work together to 
denuclearize the Korean Peninsula. 

Mr. Yeltsin, speaking at a joint press confer- 
ence with Mr. Kim, promised to support inter- 
national sanctions against North Korea if it 
persisted in defying the United Nations and 
ignoring its obligations to the International 
Atomic Energy Agency. 

“If North Korea treats the nonproliferation 
treaty like this, the international community 
will have to take adequate measures,’’ Mr. Yelt- 
sin said. “I will discuss this question with Presi- 
dent Clin ion, if I can get m touch with him 
today, since Clinton is in Europe now.” 

But Mr. Yeltsin said that sanctions would be 

See YELTSIN, Page 4 


Israelis Hit Lebanon Base, Killing Dozens 


By David Hoffman 

fVastungion Past Service 

JERUSALEM — Israeli warplanes and heli- 
copter gunships on Thursday attacked a Leba- 
nese training case used by Hezbollah Muslim 
' dozens of people in the dead- 
Israeli bombing raid in a year. 

Later, three volleys of about 25 Katyusha 
rockets were fired from Lebanon into Israel's 
western Galilee. Most fell in empty farmland 
and there were no reports of casu al ties, al- 
though gl as s was broken in some buildings and 
residents wae ordered into bomb shelters. 

The Israeli attack was aimed at a camp in Ein 
Dardara, near the border with Syria, which 
Israel described as a training camp for gnenfl- 
]as. Security sources in southern Lebanon said 
it was a camp for recent conscripts to the 


TmKtimt Hezbollah organization, most of them 
teenagers, many of whom were killed as they 
dept. 

Israeli officials said the timing of the raid was 
determined by intelligence showing that the 
camp had only recently been populated. 

“They are not always there,” said Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who is also Israel's 
defense minister. 

Ihe attack came nearly two weeks after Israd 
abducted a Muslim guerrilla leader,. Mustafa 
Diram, from southern Lebanon. 

There were conflicting accounts of the num- 
ber of casualties. The Lebanese Army said 
nearly 30 gnemSa trainees were killed and 
dozens wounded. Hezbollah said 2d were killed 
and 30 wounded. Israel television said the death 
tdl may be as high as 45. 


Security sources quoted by Reuters said that 
four helicopter gunships struck before dawn, 
firing machin e guns into the tents of the train- 
ing camp. 44 miles (70 kilometers l east of Bei- 
rut. Six Israeli warplanes then fired rockets into 
the camp. Lebanese and Syrian troops in the 
region responded with anti-aircraft fire, but 
Israel said all its forces returned safely. 

Mr. Rabin said the raid was pan of Israel’s 
“continuing war" against Hezbollah. “In every 
place where there is a possibility to strike at 
terror organizations, at Hezbollah, without it 
causing injury to civilians, we have done iL we 
are dong it, and we will continue to do so," he 
said. 

Hezbollah vowed “swift and merciless" re- 
venge for the attack. It has also vowed to 
See RAID, Page 4 


Arafat Has 'Mild Angina,’ Aides Say 


New York Tima Service 

CAIRO — Yasser Arafat, complaining of 
chest pains, canceled appointments Thursday 
and was resting in his home in Tunis, Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization officials said. 

PLO officials in Tunis and Cairo described 
the problem as “mild angina" and played- 
down Mr. Arafat's medical problems. They 
insisted they were in contact with the PLO 
chairman arid denied reports that be would 
be flown out of the country for medical care. 

“Last week he was a bit tired and was in the 
hospital for a day.” said Mohammed Subieh. 
secretary-general c»r the Palestine National 
Council “We have spoken to him by phone 
and sent and received faxes from him. He is 
in good health." 


Mr. Arafat underwent what officials said 
was “a three-hour medical examination" in a 
Tunis hospital a week ago. 

He was twice admitted to a military hospi- 
tal in Tunis last month afterfor what officials 
said was “exhaustion and other ailments.’’ 

These officials said that Mr. Arafat had no 
plans to delay his trip to Jericho in the middle 
of June. Mr. Arafat expects to end almost 
three decades of exile later this month after 
(he implementation of the self-rule agree- 
ment with Israel Under the agreement signed 
in Cairo, Israelis have withdrawal from most 
of the Gaza Strip and from Jericho. 

Jericho awaits his coming Page 2. 


imposed Franc Zone Devaluation 
♦ Leaves Poorest in Africa Poorer 


By Michelle Singletary 

Washington Poet Service 

NIAMEY, Niger — Nearly five months after 
14 African nflriwnn devalued their joint curren- 
cy under pressure from France and the Interoft- 

tronal Monetary Ftad, the dearest result so far 
SS of propie in some of the world's 
poorest nations have been forced deeper mto 
poverty, according to diplomats, economists 
and residents of the region- . 

On Jan. 1Z the 79 million atoms or the 
member states of the African Fmanoal Com- 
munity — or CFA by its Frenc h initial s — 
awoke to discover that their jrant currency, the 
CFA franc, had lost half its value. TTiat caused 








• In Nigs, one of t 7 

some farm production has increased as import- 
ed food has been rendered prohibitive expen- 
sive, said a Work! Bank economist in Washra$- 
ton. Niger has stopped importing nee and is 
cxportmgmore ^restock to otto CFA coon- 
tries, the economist said. In the torn run, sane 
analysts say, the cooseqpoices of devaluation 
may suengltot Niger’s' economy...,: 

it herein Niamey, theimmedate impact of 
die nevahiatibn an fat lives of thepoor is dear. 
The mow especially tort the urban poor 


; such as Ahmed Mohammed, a pan-time 
—Mr and janitor who, like many, God v3- 
„ in the conn byside to scrape out a bared ty 
Irving fen himself, Ins wife, six children and 
three otto relatives. 

Mr. Mohammed’s buying power was cut in 
half to the equivalent of about $57 & month. His 
family now cals just twice a day, which means 
he most send his children to school without 

breakfast. 

Mr. Mohammed discussed his family’s pHght 
in a voice weary with resignation. “The children 
ramplam and ask for money," Mr. Mohammed 
said, “but I don’t tow money to give them.” 

For decades, France has helped (he CFA 
countries, most of them framer French colo- 
nies, to mamton a stable currency by snbadiz- 
ingh and pegging it to the French franc. But 
years of low world prices for CFA products — 
including coffee, cocoa and uranium — dc- 
F A economies and left their gov- 
See FRANC, Page 4 


Kiosk 


Colombia Will Lead 
Nonaligned Nations 

D 

CAIRO (Reuters) — Nonaligned for- 
eign ministers picked Colombia on Thurs- 
day to lead ther grouping through a key 
period as they try to modernize their image 
and adapt to the post -Cold War world. 
Colombia will be host of the meeting of 
the 109-nation Nonaligned Movement 
next year and take over the three-year 
chairmanship from Indonesia. 


Book Review 


Pages. 


Do.vJoifs I Trib Index 



The Dollar 

New York, ~ •pW Ldoag 


previous dose 


DU 


1.6532 


1.6464 


Pound 


1.5105 


1.5169 



Yan 


104 J0 


104.50 


FF 


5.645 


5.6265 


Lund Cncmcm/Tpc A w n ml Pna» 

HOME COURT UPSET — Mary Pierce of France driving herself to victory over 
world No. 1 Steffi Graf in the French Open semifinals Thursday, 6-2, 6-Z Page 19. 


For 38 Veteran U.S. Paratroopers , a Final Geronimo 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra. 9.00 FF 

Antilles 11JDFP 

Qrmernon..l.400CFA 

Egypt E.P.-5D00 

Franc® 9-00 FF 

Gabon.. 960 CFA 

Greece...--— 300 Dr. 

Italy WOO Lire 

Ivory Const .LI® CFA 

Jordan.-. — 1 JD 

Lebanon ...USST JO' 


Luxembourg 60 L Fr 

Morocco .12 Dh 

Qatar. .....8.00 Rials 

R6union.».n-20 FF 
Soldi Arabia -9.00 R. 

senegas.. ~%0CF A 

Spain —...200PTAS 
Tunisia - — 1.000 Din 
Turkey ~T.i_ 35,000 
UJLE-.;...R50Djrt1 
U;S.Mil.{Eur.>SU0 


By Ban} James 

. Imemuional Htmbi Tribune 

PARIS — Looking jaunty in reproductions 
of that IFDay uniforms, 38 veteran U.S. para- 
troopers returned to France on Thursday on a 
misson to jump into the Normandy village 
where American airborne soldiers can do no 
wrong. 

Tto38 veterans, aged 68 to 83, stepped off an 
airliner to the accompaniment of a swing band 
laying “In toe Mood," a World War II song. 
They said they wax emphatically in the mood 
to reenact the D-Day jump at Saime-Mfire- 


Eglise. where Allied troops first landed on June 
6, 1944. 

The veterans overcame strong disapproval 
horn senior Pentagon officials, who feared the 
jump could end in accidents or disrupt the 
carefully scripted D-Day commemoration. 

“We did three jumps just 10 prove to the 
Pentagon that we could do it,” said Thomas 
Rice. 72, rtf San Diego. “And they still don’t 
believe US. They still don't warn os to come." 

Not so the people of Sainte-Mire-Eglise. 

“You go to otto parts of France, they don't 
care," sard Howard Manoian, a former member 


of the 82d Airborne Division, who came back to 
live in the town. “But not here. Here they open 
their doors to you. Once they know you've an 
airborne troop here, you'll never tic lonely. 
You'll never be left out in the street. You’ll 
never be hungry.” 

Thai the town hat. such a strong attachment 
to the United States — so strong that the Stars 
and Stripes always files alongside the French 
flag in the main square — is due in pan to die 
efforts of Simone Kenaud, lie wife of the may- 
or at the time of the landings. 

After the war. she visited Americans' graves 


nearby and began writing to families of the 
dead, often enclosing photographs. In an age 
when traits- Atlantic air travel was slow ami 
expensive, Mrs. RenaucTs letters formed a 


After she died, to son, Henri, kept up the 
letter writing Now the village pharmacist, he 
counts American friends by the score. Ten 
years old in 1944, to remembers looking out 
early in the morning of June 6 and seeing 
sokuers in the town square. 

“When it got tighter we saw th cy were Ameri- 

See VETS, Page 5 


Was Destroyed, 
Inspectors Say 

By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton administra- 
tion called Thursday for economic sanctions 
against North Korea'after international inspec- 
tors said the country had destroyed evidence of 
whether it had developed a nuclear bomb. 

The administration’s move marked a new, 
and potentially dangerous, phase of Washing- 
ton's confrontation with North Korea over its 
nuclear program. North Korea has threatened 
(0 launch a military attack against South Korea 
if sanctions are imposed. 

Washington's decision to seek the sanctions 
follows more than a year of on -again, off-again 
talks in which U.S. officials have sought to coax 
Pyongyang to agree to strict controls on its 
nuclear program. 

“They have triggered this, not the United 
States or anyone eTse,” President Bill Clinton 
said in Rome on Thursday. “I just don't think 
we can walk away from this." he added. 

UJl officials said the sanctions they would 
seek needed to be painful enough to induce the 
North Koreans to rethink their nudear weap- 
ons policy while leaving open the possibility of 
a diplomatic solution. 

One plan, which officials said has been pro- 
moted by Robert L Gallucci an assistant sec- 
retary of state who is the Clinton administra- 
tion’s top official on North Korea policy, would 
be a voluntary embargo on arms purchases or 
deliveries and a cutoff in the SI billion of 
annual remittances that are sent back to the 
country from North Koreans in Japan. 

But some UJL officials said that Washington 
was surprised by North Korea's recent decision 
to destroy evidence of its past plutonium pro- 
duction and was still struggling to formulate its 
plan to compel the North Koreans to comply. 

One admmislration official said the unan- 
swered questions included: Exactly what 
sanctions will Washington propose? Can 
Washington get the Chinese to support them? 
How will they be enforced? What the North 
Koreans would have to do get the sanctions 
lifted? 

At issue Js North Korea’s refusal to permit 
international inspectors to take measurements 
that would enable them to determine how 
much plutonium it might have diverted in past 
years. 

The Central Inteffigence Agency believes 
that North Korea diverted enough plutonium 
for one or two bombs after it shut down its 
nudear reactor in 1989. North Korea denies 
this. But when the atomic energy agency want- 
ed to conduct measurements to see, North Ko- 
rea began furiously puffing out the rods and 
dumping then mdiscriminatdy in a fuel pond. 

Hans Blix, the head of the International 
Atomic Energy Agency, sent a letter Thursday 
to the United Nations secretary-general Butros 
Butros GfaalL The letter said the North Kore- 
ans had made it impossible for the agency to 
conduct its measurements. 

The agency said that, on the basis of reports 
from its inspectors in North Korea, the agency 
has “concluded that the discharge of spent fuel 
from the reactor has now made it impossible to 
select fuel rods for later measurement which 
would show whether there any diversion of fuel 
in past years.” 

Mr. Blix is traveling to New York to meet 
with the Security Council on Friday. 

A nervous Pentagon is watching the situa- 
tion. The aircraft carrier Independence has left 

See KOREA, Page 4 


Chinese Rings 
Of Smugglers 
Alarming U.S. 

By Roberto Suro 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Chinese smuggling or- 
ganizations have vastly expanded their net- 
works of way stations around the world and are 
now capable of transporting tens of thousands 
of people to the United States, according to an 
intelligence assessment that has caused U.S. 
officials to rethink their approach to illegal 
immigration from China. 

For more than a year, public attention and 
law-enforcement efforts have focused on ship- 
loads of Chinese arriving on U.S. shores. But 
officials say they face a larger and more-diffi- 
cult challenge from the rapid growth of over- 
seas smuggling networks that transport their 
human cargo by many different mrang and 
directions. 

Such networks have existed for several years. 
Now, according to the assessment, more people 
are using them than ever before and the routes 
are more complex. Moreover, several develop- 
ments have made this trade more difficult to 
combat. 

The most important and most troubling as- 
pect of the new assessment, senior officials said, 
is the finding that thousands of people already 
have left China en route to the United States 
and are being held by smugglers in a variety of 
locations white transportation and false docu- 
ments are arranged for them. 

“Over the last six months, we have become 
aware of a huge human warehousing operation 
that bolds tens of thousands of aliens at various 
points along the pipeline, often for months at a 
tune,” a senior forton-policy of ficial said. 

The relaxation of border and immigration 
controls in Eastern Europe and the former 
Soviet Union has produced a proliferation of 

See CHINESE, Page 4 






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Race for Delors Job Puts Other European Posts in Limbo 


WORLD BRILLS 


By Alan Friedman formed hi* job from being a senior civil 

and Tom Buerkie servant to being one of Europe's most 

Inienusnoruil HeralJ Tribune visible political figures. 

PARIS - For months, European lead- ‘> L ^ P° 1,u “ of lbss 

ers have been closeted in aEtefllkd qumLessenually European wrangle are no w 

rooms preparing to choose a successor tu ^ In - “ Qevcr ^ orc 10 comm ® 
Jacques Delors as presidem of the Europe- _________ 

an Commission. Bui now, with just three \i?\rc ANAI VQT5 

weeks to go before the decision is to be 1 aW3 Ai\ATI313 

made at a summit meeting of EU leaders 

on Corfu, the smoke is only getting thicker, decisions about the leadership of such oth- 


power brokers are ready to admit, however, taiy-generaJ, for a third five-year term. Meanwhile, the leadership of NATO has 
is that their game-playing is sullying the Gennanv has an unlikelv favorite-son can- entered the equation since Manfred 
image of the top spot in Brussels, already didate, a Finance Ministry official named W&raer. the German who is secretanr-gen- 
seen by many as a dumping ground lor Lorenz Schomerus. Washington feels Mr. cral is recuperating from cancer and spec- 


RwandaNegotiatoBre^Do^ 


*- x 7® Rwandan Amy andrebdcofflmmdm 
JCJGALL Rwanda (AfT) Nations-mediated trace talks 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


and it is even starting to waft away from er multilateral organizations as NATO, the 


Europe and across the Atlantic. 

That is why many thoughtful Europeans. 


Organization for Economic Cooperation 
and Development and the new World 


and a number of increasingly frustrated Trade Organization, the successor to the 
officials of the Clinton administration, are General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 


disgusted as they behold what may well be "We had hoped to be able io choose a 


the most unseemly and public scramble for new secretary-general at the OEC D by the 
the European Commission presidency ume finance ministers fly to Paris next 


since the European Union was founded, week for their annual meeting." said a U.S. 


The fact that two prime ministers and diplomat “But” he added with a Frown. 


the European Union's trade czar are now “die Europeans feel they need more time reduced to proving he might emerge as a 
vying openly to succeed Mr. Delors in and they tell us their choice of a candidate compromise candidate. To his credit. Sir 
Brussels underscores how t he post has been for the OECD has to do with the European Leon has openly campaigned for the job. 
transformed. Union and the World Trade Organization jjc seems, however, only to have won the 


over-the-hiH politicians. 

Earlier this week a bid by France and 
Germany to impose Prime Minister Jean- 
Luc Dehaene of Belgium as the new Euro- 
pean Commission president aroused long- 
standing fears that the big European states 
would steamroller their smaller partners. 

The French-German push triggered a 
backlash from The Hague, where outgoing 
Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers h3S come 
out fighting for his own candidacy. Mr. 
Lubbers, who has the backing of Spain and 
Portugal is hoping to woo the smaller EU 
states. 

All of this has left Sir Leon Briaan. the 
EU trade commissioner who is being 
backed in a ham-fisted manner by London, 
reduced to praying he might emerge as a 


eraL is recuperating from cancer and spec- 

n lot inn ie onwins that hfl IU2 V rSSlEQ be _ 


Paye has been in office long enough and ulation is growing that he may resign be- 
favors Donald Johnston, a Canadian poli- fore his term ends in 1996. The NATO post 

iician. is the most obvious consolation prize for 

Officials say that Germany and France the Dutch, but Mr. Lubbers is likely to rule 
seem willing to dump their candidates at oul aoY srch offer as a snub, 
the OECD and get behind Nigel Lawson, Another piece of the jigsaw is the search 
Britain’s former chancellor of the Exche- for a successor to Peter Sutherland of Ire- 
quer, if only London will agree to support land, who is to leave as director-general of 


* _ 7L.--.fin: at United itauuiBT-w-.--- r 

failed to agree on ■ «*"■- ^ offensive in the capriaL r . 
Thursday as the rebels ESSb lS *ar “A w™i°g g 


' -Weare capable 0/ Patriot FW 

0aly “ 8 ® reema!t * ^ 


ipi" « “ is demsxiing => of » rf 


Mr. Dehaene for the European Commis- GATT before it becomes the World Trade 


Tutsis in Rressdcnt JtfttMl 
people have been pitched the central African 

Habyarimaaa in a suspect plane v 

country into dvC war. __ _ T : 


sion job. 

U.S. officials say they cannot imagine 


Mr. Lawson taking over the OECD, partly ™ ^ 

because he is considered abrasive and part- 15 an mi ’ © 


ni l unuicu wwiub a*** *• -- — j-yi -j* 

S Serbs Renege and UN Delays Talks 

/er the trade post, describing das a Step rEWW . , AP x __ tk- United Nations 


because he is considered abrasive and part- ??”• 1 : 

ly became he displayed nothin* bul coo- S-b^and couM 

>«■ Fnnh. P,LL<*\ iKtimiI m a lake over the EuropaaCommssKaprea- 


lonpl for the Paris-based thmk lank a 

^°\s aLull of these European linkages a summit meeting tala ribs month. 


transformed. 


With his outspoken commitment to Eu- as well." 


ropean integration and determined man- One player in the European Commission 


agement of the single-market program and presidential race noted (hat the tradeoffs 


the Maastricht treaty's vision of monetary being negotiated among Europeans consti- 


and political union, Mr. Delors has trans- tute “a big jigsaw,” What few European 


He seems, however, only to have won the 
support of Greece. 

If the Brussels race seems complicated, 
consider the other elements of the jigsaw. 

At the OECD in Paris, France is backing 
Jean-Claude Paye, the incumbent secre- 


decision on the OECD job now seems 
likely to be delayed until later this summer. 
Washington's displeasure is manifest Stu- 
art Eize nstat the U.S. chief delegate to the 


While Italy is pushing for Renato Rug- 
giero of Italy, a Mat executive, to take over 
the World Trade Organization, the United 
Stales wants the job to go to a developing 


European Union, said he did not like the country and favors Carlos Safinas de Got* 
idea of the OECD slot being “part of a log- taxi, the outgoing president of Mexico, 
rolling exercise dealing with other EU in- Oftra left out of the negotiations is a 


meeting." 


stituuons. 

This, however, is precisely the case. 


Often left out of the negotiations is a 
fundamental issue: Just who is most quali- 
fied for these jobs. 


Yemeni Forces Ignore UN TruceCall 

nnFAS Yemen (AFP) - Rival Yemeni forces fougu sow teak, 
JEftSi iXybatttas on Itoday despite a UN owe^all, 


wime^ssaii^ ^ capital of the ssfi-prbthnmed 

-£» ^ forthe fighting inDofas, 


By Clyde Haberraan 

Men- York Tirwt Scn-:cc 

JERICHO — Now that the po- 
lice have arrived and some of the 
novelty has worn off. Jericho is 
letting its fancy play on the next 
big question mark of the young 
Palestinian self-rule: When is 
Yasser Arafat eomina? 

Those who may know are not 
saying, and those who are saying 
presumably do not know. It is not 
clear if the uncertainty is a delib- 
erate security tactic or another 
sign of disorganization in the Pal- 
es tine Liberation Organization. It 
is not even clear if the PLO chair- 
man will come first to Jericho or 
begin his return to the territories 
after a 27-year absence in the 
Gaza Strip. 

Either way. conventional wis- 
dom holds that his arrival is immi- 
nent. Whenever he comes, and for 
however long. Nadia Hamdoni 
and her large famil y are ready. 

Having completed their inspec- 
tions. sieely-eyed security men re- 
cently told the Haradonis. who 
have eight ehiidren and lots of 
space, that Mr. Anfat has accept- 
ed the offer of their house as his 
Jericho residence. Mrs. Hamdoni 
whose husband. Mahmoud, is a 
wealthy fanner, could not have 
been more delighted. 

“It’s very exciting," she said. 
“My g-year-old son asked me just 
this morning, ‘Mama, why are all 
the presidents of the world living 
in their own country except ours?’ 
He is only 8 years old. and he asks 
that. I was very much astonished. 

I told him that our president will 
soon be here." 


Actually, ihe Hamdonis have 
two houses side by side in a leafy 
compound a kilometer east of the 
town center. The bouses are set 
well back from the main road. 
Both are handsome and practical, 
with many telephones, a satellite 
dish and a below-ground level for 
emergencies. 

And they are boih at Mr. Ara- 
rat's disposal for the next year or 
more while the Hamdonis either 
move intoanoLher house they own 
in Jericho or move in with friends. 
The family’s Western-style furni- 
ture is thrown into the package. 

“After Mr. Arafat leaves. 1 
want to sit where he has sat,” Mrs. 
Hamdoni said. “I want to breathe 
the air that be breathed.” 

General Hajj Ismail. Jericho 
commander of the Palestinian po- 
lice. says his forces are also ready 
for the visit, although he insists 
that he has been given no arrival 
date or estimate of bow long the 
stay. 

While Gaza is much bigger and 
by far the more important test for 
the PLO, Jericho is to be the seat 
of self-government- Offices are 
said to be ready for Mr. Arafat 
and other members, of the new 
Palestinian National Authority, 
some of whom are supposed to 
arrive next week and begin in ear- 
nest the provisional government 
that will run the two autonomous 
areas. 

But few people. Israeli or Pales- 
tinian. believe that the PLO leader 
wifi settle long in either Gaza or 
Jericho. His sights already are on 
the road that winds from here 
through the Judean hills. 



5UUC Ut 9UUUI * vmivu, g » j__ 

in a desert region 35 kiloffiamast^ Aden. 


TteS3TG*B juTto^ 

resolutionSngtora cease-fire in the avfl TOnn Yemen, xrfwi broke 
out on May 5 , *Ae south proclaimed itself indepeadent-<» May^L 


Kiev Parliament Rejects Vote Delay 


m toTr«SiS“ad<^dTprm a plc. Uwmkm ™dpo^>moaLof 
elections set for June 26 would disrupt political reforras m riwfcraer 
Soviet republic and harm die economy. ' . ■ ;/ . : 

The resolution was adopted by a vote of 20i to 69, with 13 attentions. 
Mr Kravchuk, 60, appeared unruffled by Parfaamait s daaooa^Bd 
pledged to seek a second term in office despite earlier threats to withdraw 
bis candidacy. 


East Timor Rebeb Call for Pressure 







MANILA (Combined Dispatches) — East Timor rebel leadeacaBed 
Thursday for international diplomatic pressure to face Indonesia to 
negotiate an end to what they said was its military occupation of the 
former Portuguese colony. ■ . 

The appeals from Jose Ramos Horta and Nino Kums Santana cgsem- 
video taped messages shown at an international conf erencc in Manila on 
Indonesia’s rule over East Timor and its human rights record there. 

The Philippine government, eager to placate att .an gry- Indones ia, . 
banned Timorese leaders and foreigners from attending the conference, 
which is due to end Saturday. On Thursday, Manila also turned hatk for' 
the second two Sri r j»nkan delegates to the conference, but allowed* 

Japanese bishop and an Italian priest to join the meeting, (Rentas, AFP) 


Mootra Kj&ona/AgcficE Fnncpfiav 

Nadia Hamdoni with four of her children Thursday in front of one of the homes the family has offered to Yasser Arafat in Jericho. 


Another Endorsement for the Grape 


At the end of that ribbon of 
blacktop, half an hour by car. is 
where this exercise in self-rule ul- 
timately leads — Jerusalem. And 
the battle for Jerusalem, claimed 
by both Israelis and the Palestin- 
ians as their capitaL is already 
joined. 

On paper, the two sides have 
agreed to put off negotiations on 
the holy city for up to two years. 
In reality, it is already on the table 
with basic questions like whether 
Mr. .Arafat will be allowed to pray 
in Jerusalem at A1 Aqsa mosque, 
one of Islam's most venerated 
shrines. 

There is no sign yet of the PLO 


leader’s having even said he wants the PLO leader’s recent call for a connected to self-rule must be 
to go. But the Israelis have pre- jihad to liberate Jerusalem for confined to Gaza and Jericho, 
empuvely advised him to settle for Muslims. In an interview with Ah The Palestinians have put some 
mosques in Gaza or Jericho. gerian radio on Wednesday, he self-rule offices in and around 
“At this stage. I don't see any repeated his demand that Jerusa- East Jerusalem, plainly to assert 
room for a visit by him to Jerusa- lem become the capital of a future their claim to that pan of the city, 
lem, Prime Minister ^ itzhak Ra- Palestinian state. Jn turn, the Israelis sav thev will 


mosques in Gaza or Jericho. 

“At this stage. I don't see any 
room for a visit by him to Jerusa- 
lem," Prime Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin said at a parliamentary bear- 
ing this week. But he added, “1 do 
not commit myself to two years 
from now." 


It does not require much imagi- 
nation to envision hundreds of 


Lines are also being drawn over “ 0l tac * ori ?n>una 

Palestinian political activity in Je- raise issue s of sovereignty, 
rusalem. including the PLO bead- r The Palestinians retort that it is 
quarters known as Orient House. Israel^ that establishes such 
in an former hot-i rh* “facts, by sealing off ihe West 


East Jerusalem, plainly to assert 
their claim to that part of the city. 
In turn, the Israelis say they will 
not tolerate “facts on the ground" 
thaL raise issues of sovereignty . 

The Palestinians retort that it is 


thousands of Palestinians trying 
to pour into Jerusalem to join Mr. 
Arafat at prayer. It requires no 


in an elegant former hotel in the 
eastern part of town. 


LONDON (Reuters) — Wine may be good for you bec ause il i s a good 
source of salicylic add, the main ingredient of aspirin, according to two 
California doctors. 

D rinking wine has been linked with lower instances of heart disease 
and doctors say this may be because it reduces cholesterol levels; opens 
op the blood vessels or sinroly relaxes people. 

“What many who extol the virtues ol wine seem to have missed is that 
wines, both while and red, are an excellent source of saht^fc arid,” CJ. 
Muller and K.C. Fugdsang of California State Uatvetsiiy wrote in a 
letter to this week’s Lancet medical journal Aspirin, which consists 
mostly of salicylic add, has also been finked with lower incidences of 
heart disease. • 


Mr. OIraert says Orient House 
should be dosed. While the gov- 


imagination at all to predict the eminent has vet to go that far. it 
Israeli reaction, especially after insist that any Palestinian agency 


Bank and thus keeping many Pal- 
estinians from their cultural and 
religious centers in Jerusalem. 

It is an important test of sym- 
bols and of wills, and both sides 
are playing for keeps. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


HOTEL INTER-CONTINENTAL PARIS 

D.DAY 


Juan Carlos Ometti, Novelist, Dies 


The AsscduieJ Press 


could or could not be Montevideo. 


Indonesia Bans 
f Schindler's List' 


MADRID — Juan Carlos On- where he was born Julv 1. 1909. 


WA 


The Hotel Inter-Continental Paris will be 
commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the 
D.DAY landings from 1st to 1 7th June 1994. 


° Norman culinary festival with gastronomic, 
artisanal and cultural attractions. 


elti. S4, Uruguayan novelist and 
poet and one of Latin America's 
most distinguished but neglected 
writers, died of a bean attack here 
Monday. 

Mr. Onetti. whose work was of- 
ten compared to William Faulk- 
ner’s, spent his last years as a re- 
cluse in the Spanish capitaL He 
came to Madrid in 1976 after being 
virtually expelled from Uruguay by 
the rmhlary government. 

Die writer Manuel Vi cent called 


Last year in the London Review 
of Books, Michael Wood wrote: 
“It’s not easy to say what Onetu’s 
fiction is about and perhaps not 
entirely appropriate to try. it cen- 
ters not so much on plot or theme 
or character as on an erratic bul 
insistent inquisitiveness about the 
stories people step into or trail be- 
hind them.” 

Mr. Onetti moved lo Buenos 
Aires in the 1930s and worked for 
the Reuters news agency and sever- 
al local publications. His first short 


natcher”) (1965). His last noveL 

“Cuando ya no impone" (“What’s V nT I 'lnl&Tire 

the Use”) was published last year lOmUX- 


after several years of silence. 

to Montevideo, he was editor in 
chief of Marcha, one of the most 
respected weeklies in Latin Ameri- 


Sel Mrs 

JAKARTA — Censors in pri- 
marily Muslim Indonesia have 
banned Steven Spielberg's Oscar- 


ca, and was jailed for three months winning film “Schindler's List” be- 
by the mihtaiy junta in 1974 for cause if contains too much violence 


publishing a short stoiy by Nelson 
Marra that did not please the au- 
thorities. He also beaded Montevi- 
deo's municipal library system. 


and nudity. The Jakarta Post re- 
ported Thursday. 

Soekaniu. executive director of 


• The crowning glory of the 50th Anniversary 
celebrations will be the AMERICAN BALL 
which will take place in our salons on FRIDAY 7 , 
JUNE 17th 1994 in homage to Glenn Miller 
from 10:30 p.m. till dawn. 

Entrance: 200 FF including the first drink. 
Limited number of seats. 


Srilhtaw Mory w “ fHiblisl,ed “ u Pre “ a 1 


h. ssrg “ . the Indonesian Film Censorship 

r B r d - Siid ‘r 1 ! tan f 

euaee literature with rdm w * m ? de Monday altera P le- 


1932. He published his first novel 


T d lb0 ?f hl -H rSTPSO S 1939. 

, J , _^ d ’.? nd . ha ^ so much respect for Among his best known novels ™ 


d~Th r hT hZ h/H ^ 01 Among to best known novels are 
pn “ :UaiIS "J** »» ™>t» ™ rombre- CA 


far it for some time.” 

Most of his novels are set in a 
place called Santa Maria, which 


Grave With No Name") ( 1959). “El 


astiUero" (“The Shipyard”) (1961) 

an.t i "D.-l 


Junta caddveres" (“Bodys- 


Information and reservation: 44 77 11 11 


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guage literature with the Cervantes 
Award. 

SiAiey GSiat, 86. screenwriter 
and din director who co-wrotc the 
script for the Alfred Hitchcock film 
“The Lady Vanishes” and who bad 
a long filmmaking partnership with 
Frank Launder, died Tuesday at 
his borne in Wiltshire, England. 

Wnfiam Beverly Murphy, 86, a 
former president of the Campbell 
Soup Co. died of pneumonia Sun- 
day in Bryn Mawr. Pennsylvania. 

Herra NeffiL 85, the leading so- 
prano of several of Arturo Toscani- 
ni’s recordings or Verdi operas, and 
who sang at the Metropolitan Op- 
era from 1953 to 1962, died of leu- 
kemia Tuesday in Sharon. Con- 
necticut. 

Red Rodney, 66. a trumpeter and 
band leader known for his associa- 
tion with Charlie Parker, died of 
lung cancer Friday at his home in 
Boynton Beach, Florida. 


nary meeting of the board's 45 
members, the report said. 

Officials from the censorship 
board were not immediately avail- 
able to confirm the report. 

“L was decided by acclamation, 
not by voting, and most of the 
members agreed that the film 
should be banned,” Mr. Soekamo 
was quoted as saying. 

Some Indonesian Muslim lead- 
ers had earlier culled for the film to 
be banned. 


Air Inter Flies Despite Pilots 9 Strike 

PARIS ( Reuters) — The French domestic airline Air Inter mamtameri 
a regular flight schedule on Thursday despite a one-day strike by pilots 
and navigators, bul another strike set for next Tuesday will cause 
cancellations, the company said. 

“Air Inter confirms that 100 percent of its flights are operating despite 
the strike call by three of its four unions," the airline said in a statement 
Bui union representatives said the company had to scramble to meet its 
scheduling commitments. The union said that a number of aircraft were 
left stranded across France and that 180 of Air Inter's 450 flights were 
flown on planes chartered from other French companies. Air Inter 
acknowledged that, during the strike set for Tuesday, it would be able to 
maintain only 50 percent of its schedule. 

Air France's sendee monopoly between France and the French territory 
of New Caledonia is about to end with the arrival of two competitor 
services to this Pacific island group. Additional services between Paris 
and Noumea will be provided by Corsair and AOM and are expected to 
bring down prices and increase the number of European tourists visiting 
the French tenitoiy. (AFP) 

US Africa Airways, a newly established airline specializing in service to 
South .Africa, began twice weekly service this week between Washington 
and Johannesburg. It will be the first U.S. carrier to fly to the country in 
10 3*“* (AFX) 

Human error rather than tec hnica l failure was almost cefttinff the 
reason for ihe fatal crash of an Aeroflot Airbus A-3 10-300 jet on Match 
2. , Rudolf Teunurazov, a senior Russian aviation offi cial, told Interfax 
news agency on Thursday. (Reuters) 

TOe death toU from a heat wave sweating northern India has risen to 
161 , with the temperature rising as high as 49 degrees centigrade! 120 
Fahrenheit), the Press Trust of India said Thursday. Hie agency said the 
highest lempera ture recorded on Thursday was 49.1 centigrade (120.2 
Fahrenheit) at Dholpur in the desert state of Rajasthan. (Reuters) 


It tells the story of a German 
industrialist who saved more than 
1,000 Jews from Nazi death camps 
during World War 1L 
The censorship board approved 
the film last month pending cuts to 
scenes considered too violent and 
sexual. 


TO OtIR READBIS 
IN LUXEMBOURG 


Sonny Sharrock. 53. a major fig- 
re in free-jazz guitar, died of a 


ure in free-jazz guitar, died of a 
heart attack Thursday at his home 
in Ossining. New York. 


But Mr. Soekamo later over- 
turned the decision, saying the 
board did not have a full quorum of 
23 members when it voted. 

Mr. Spidberg h3d previously 
prohibited the film from being 
shown with cuts. 


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jnVTERJVATIQIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 3 t 1994 


/v~0. f\ '? ?\2ES 

*, .■■ k-e 


Page 3 


,. ** . - i w 


Simpfe %- s to Honor Heroes 


/V f.“"' r*".*_. [' .' ! &..■'■ ^ £ -Si E^ii- # -i^ ^222 r?? y ^ =rr p5r>, h. : g « t . f ^ 

vafr- ^ u-j I g ^ g^g j*g£ *£ [c=f | 


ByDebbi Wilg 0r en 

Jt'®*"*'"' *»' w* 

^gmia — Teen- 
¥P p r ^ jrnun S patriotic skits on 
the school stage. A military band 

&**•”** «fi2» «£ 

pictuI ^ lJC courthouse, 
stuffed with wartime 
manorabtha m the local museum. 

J*if SC i.- arc *** sim P^ wavs in 
Srt *“ small town is paving 
tr 5 > “* c lo sons it lost oa D-Day 
a half-century ago. y 


But 


r u> . remembrances are un- 
folduiE throughout rural America 
1 «“ community of 6,000 in 

- jtem Virginia has a tragic dis- 

ddcuoti: It lost more men per capi- 
ta on Normandy’s beaches that day 
fan any other U.S. town. The 
death tofl of 23 was so devastating 
that it prompted the military to 
stop forming units out of soldiers 
from a single community. 

Rffareais after the war. Tew peo- 
ple in Bedford talked about their 
sacrifice. It was too painfuL Even- 
tually, the veterans who made it 
home started gathering each June 
with their families and with rela- 
b ve ® °f the dead, sometimes at a 
small memorial marker that had 
been placed outside the court- 
house. But residents bom after the 


ihdrtQmjiav bad S n!dd ,e S cal ^ hooU ! ° maic lord’s D- 
“At times. I LhouPhtiJui no onr P ay 10,6 a pan of thdr 

cared,” said E R*f « *«stpiy cumcuium. 

retired postal worker and 4 / 11 DCeds 10 •* recorded," said 
s» D-ffv “ST, s IS £ “sf “5 

Bedford. “If s uieir WstOT^it? to ^ on. Bccausc those who 
their heritage. It was an imJSnim P pcn f nced ,B direci impact won’t 
time." W an important bewtthus^whenthfieOthanniversa- 

J^^cnd, members of the 
vowed not to let the halfSmennS Bc f r °, I ^ 1 . School chorus, 
pass unnoticed. ™ haJf - cenlenn131 o^y sJighUy younger than many of 

the fallen soldiers were oa D-Day, 

n^rfnrnwvl m Ik. _-i 


It started with Nancy Johnson. 
55. an apple ranner whose recoliec- 
uons of the war are confined to 

memories of her grandfather's 

strauung to hear the radio bulle- 
tms. She pressed for an exhibit at 
the Bedford Museum, then recruit- 
ed students for a tribute to survi- 
vors and those who never came 
home. 

A* word spread, interest in the 
anniversary grew. Residents donat- 
mementos for the museum cx- 
mbit and lined up for tickets to the 
show at the school. Students inter- 
viewed veterans for oral history 
projects. The local radio station 
started playing patriotic anthems 
and popular music from the 1940s. 
^ ^PPhes store downtown 


performed in the building where 
the troops had attended school. 

The teenagers paid tribute with 
renditions of patriotic and war 
songs. 

for the finale, 23 youngsters 
stood in a semicircle, each lighting 
a candle us the name of a fallen 
soldier was called. Then Joel Mor- 
gan, 17, played taps, wearing the 
olive green uniform of his grandfa- 
ther. a D-Day survivor who served 
in the 29ih Division from another 
small Virginia town. 

“It jusl gets me excited to know 
that I'm doing something for these 
people — like I'm paying them 
back for what they did for us so 
Jong ago," Joel said “It’s not much, 
but hopefully they’ll realize how 

mnrh i ue muinmii. -k.i .i 



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POLITICAL NOTES 


Bostenkowsld-Lawyef Friction 

WJSHINCT DN — , A prominent Washington 
crmunal lawyer. Robert S. Bennett, is very unlike- 
ly to represent Representative Dan Rostenkowski 
m his mal on corruption charges because of in- 
crosmgly strained relations between the two 
The day after Mr. Rostenkowski, 66. chairman 
the House Ways and Means Committee, was 
? he government of more 
than S500.000. sources said there was a "less than 
10 percent chance" that Mr. Bennett would stay 
on as the Illinois Democrat's chief counsel. 

Sources said the decision would have to be made 
sometime near the date of Mr. Rostenkowski's 
arraignment, scheduled for June 10. 

Mr. Rostenkowski, the sources said, has been 
frustrated at the outcome of the plea negotiations 
with the U.S. attorney, Eric H. Holder Jr. The 
legislator had entered the negotiations in an effort 
to reduce or eHminate any prison sentence, avoid a 
long legal battle and retain his nowerfu? rJutirman. 


ship of the tax-writing committee. Prosecutors 
offered a deal in which Mr. Rostenkowski would 
plead guilty to at least one felony and serve a 
limited amount of jail time. 

The discussions ended without prosecutors of- 
fenng any options Mr. Rostenkowski considered 
accqptable. Some of his friends and colleagues 
pnvately complained to the Chicago congressman 
that the plea negotiations, which had been initiat- 
. “1. by Mr. Bennett, may have been a mint* Ira They 
said the negotiations created a media “feeding 
frenzy” and left the impression that Mr. Rosten- 
kowski was guilty of something. * 

Although sources said that the negotiations 
were initiated with Mr. -Rostenkowski's consent, 
evidence began building that a rift was developing, 
and that Mr. Rostenkowski had questions about 
Mr. Bennett's legal advice. Mr. Barnett suggested 
that Mr. Rostenkowski get another opinion about 
the plea negotiations cut the congressman de- 
cimal, the sources said. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Bennett became increasingly 
concerned that he did not have complete control 
of Mr. Rostenkowski’s defense and worried that 
the congressman’s friends had too much influence 
over decisions about bow the case should be liti- 
gated, sources said. 

The same sources noted that the silence from 
Mr. Rostenkowski's camp following Mr. Holder's 
blistering press conference Tuesday spoke vol- 
umes. There was no press conference to raise 
doubts or suggest weaknesses in the federal gov- 
ernment’s case against Mr. Rostenkowski, a deci- 
sion that was said to have infuriated Mr. Bennett 
One source said the tensions between the con- 
ressman and Mr. Bennett were rooted in the fact 
Jat Mr. Rostenkowski finds himself in the unfa- 
miliar situation of not being able to be in control. 

(IVP) 

Brown Sowers Tims With Firm 

WASHINGTON — Commerce Secretary Ron- 
ald H. Brown has sold his interest in a company he 
owned with Nokmda Hill, the Washington busi- 


ness executive whose failure to repay a $26 million 
debt to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. be- 
came a political embarrassment lo Mr. Brown. 

In his financial disclosure report for 1993, filed 
with the Office of Government Ethics, Mr. Brown 
reported he received $250,000 to $500,000 on Dec. 
1.5 for his stake in First International Communica- 
tions Corp., a Washington investment firm. The 
shares were repurchased by the firm, his aides said. 

Mr. Brown and Ms. Hill "decided Iasi year to 
dissolve their partnership due to restrictions 
placed on the partnership's business as the result 
of Mr . Brown's position as secretary of commerce 
and the unfair press attention directed at Nolanda 
Hill because of her ongoing professional associa- 
tion with Secretary Brown." a Commerce Depart- 
ment spokeswoman, Carol Hamilton, said 
Wednesday. 

Ms. HiD, who handled all the operations of First 
Internationa] and was the only other known inves- 
tor in the company, could not be reached for 
comment. Harry Barnett, a Boston attorney repre- 
senting Ms. Hill, said he could noi explain how she 
came up with the money to buy Mr. Brown's share 
of the firm, when last year she was unable to repay 
debts to the government. f WP ) 


L. A. Jury Balks at Forcing 
Police to Pay in King Case 


Clinton Accuser Is Going Public 

WASHINGTON — Paula Corbin Jones plans 
to discuss her sexual harassment lawsuit against 
President Bill Clinton in news interviews andtefc- 
vision appearances, a supporter says. 

‘‘She's going to start speaking for herself,” said 
Cindy Hays, a northern Virginia businesswoman 
who is heading a legal defense fund for the former 
Arkansas state employee. 

Ms. Hays said Mrs. Jones would begin giving 
interviews and appearing on TV shows within the 
next few weeks. “She’s ready to tell her story,” Ms. 
Hays said. 

Mrs. Jones was “not p lanning any circus- type 
shows," and recently turned down a 5700,000 
offer lo appear on a morning television talk show, 
Ms. Hays said. 

Since naming Mr. Clinton on May 6 in a federal 
lawsuit, Mrs. Jones, 27, has generally secluded 
herself in her southern California home. She ac- 
cused Mr. Clinton of summoning her to his hotel 
room at an Arkansas business conference in 1991, 
when he was governor, and making unwanted 
sexual advances toward her. She is seeking 
$700,000 in damages. 

Mr. Clinton has denied the charges. (AP) 

Quota/Unquote 

Judge Thomas ZEDy of U.S. District Court, 
ordering the reinstatement of a National Guard 
officer who was forced out after declaring she was 
a lesbian: "Mere negative attitudes, or fear, are 
constitutionally impermissible bases for discrimi- 
natoiy governmental polities. Prejudice, whether 
founded on unsubstantiated fears, cultural myths, 
stereotypes or erroneous assumptions, cannot be 
the basis for a discriminatory classification." 

(LAT) 


Away From Polities 

• Some staff mesdwrs at the National Geognqifaic 
Society are poa lively up in aims that this presti- 
gious promoter of all things natural has gone and 
spent a small fortune replacing live yewplanta with 
artificial ones outside its downtown Washington 
headquarters. Naked symbolism as id e, the esti- 
maiea $220,000 move to synthetics comes at a time 
when the organization has been downsized by at 
least 800 people as a cosfrcutting measure. 

• The war an drugs and riofcnt crime to America 
nearly tripled the stale and federal inmate popula- 
tion from 1980 to a record 948,881 last year, and 
even stiffer prism sentences are on the way. The 
United States locks up a larger portion of its 
people than any other natiem. In 195^455 of evoy 
100,000 Americans were in prison or ia3t' South 


Africa under its old government was next, at 311 
per 100,000. 

• Pfaffip Morris Inc. (feqwd voters too 
petition for a ballot measure that wo 
smoking restrictions in some California cities, a 
stale offic ial alleges. Acting Sccretaiy of Stale 
Tony Miller said he would ask a judge to lei him 
survey some of the sgners in an effort to keep the 
measure off the ballot in November. 

• A federal judge rejected Exxon’s attempt to ex- 
dude Eskimos tram compensatory payments in- 

1 the nation's wont oil spill. District Judge 

ioQand, who is overseeing a trial stemming 

from the spin, rejected the oil giant’s argument that 
federal maritime law allows for compensa- 

tion only to property owners and commertial fish- 
ermen. WP. AP. NTT, Rouen 


Los Angela Tima Servin’ 

LOS ANG ELES — Drawing to 

a dose Ope Of the most wrenching 
chapters in Los Angeles history, the 
jury that had awarded Rodney 
King $3.8 million for his having 
been beaten by policemen decided 
to leave it at Inal, declining to im- 
pose punitive damages against the 
officers. 

The Los Angeles federal court 
panel, which reached its verdict on 
the 11th day of deliberations, 
found Wednesday that Laurence 
M. Powdl and Stacey C. Koonhad 
acted with malice in the 1991 beat- 
ing of Mr. King, 

But the jury concluded that the 
two former policemen and the offi- 
cers who backed them up should 
not be forced to pay Mr. King for 
his pain and suffering. 


t/.S. Weighs Ban 
On AU Air Traffic 
To and From Haiti 

Las Angela Tima Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — 
The Clin Ion administration is plan- 
ning to ban air traffic, including 
passenger service, between Haiti 
and the United States, as well as to 
cut off all financial transactions 
with the nation, diplomatic and 
Haitian officials say. 

The actions, described by a U.S. 
official “as the next logical step,’* 
augment already stringent interna- 
tional economic and financial sanc- 
tions that have stopped all but 
commertial passenger air traffic. 

President Bin Clinton also re- 
portedly has ordered other steps 
aimed at punishing civilian backers 
of Haiti's military rulers. 

The order affecting air and fi- 
nancial services will come this 
month, perhaps within two weeks, 
a U.S. official said. 

U.S. officials said the latest bans 
are aimed at the wealthy civilian 
supporters of Haiti's military rul- 
ers, who took power in September 
1991 after the overthrow of Presi- 
dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 


Mr. King’s lawyers had sought 
such punishment, they said, to de- 
ter similar acts in the future. 

Mr. King’s camp greeted the ver- 
dict with mixed emotions, as did 
many residents of the city. 

One of King’s attorneys, John 
Bums, described the verdict as a 
“Solomon-type decision*’ that 
awarded Mr. King some money, 
but pulled back from p unishing of- 
ficers, who, some jurors felt, “have 
suffered so much economic hard- 


he lead attorney, Milton 
Grimes, said he was bitterly disap- 
pointed. 

“How do you give a man 
$3,816,535 who was beaten and not 
consider the badness of the beat- 
ers?" asked Mr. Grimes. 

Timothy E Wind, the sole defen- 
dant present in the courtroom as 
the verdict was read, said he was 
satisfied. 

“This has been a long road I’ve 
traveled and I am veiy pleased with 
the decision," said Mr. Wind. 




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INTERNATIONAL 

PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND TUX WASHINGTON rOST 


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Has China Matte raiwu ^* 

Hong Kong Democracy Advocates Fear So 

v ^ , ._ ii. Aiiim't iifnofv. told Mii 


North Korea Rift 


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By Patrick E. Tyler 

JVe*r Kfw* Tima Service 

BEIJING — China warned 
Thursday against escalation of the 
confrontation with North Korea 
over its suspected illicit nuclear 
weapons program. 

“At this time, we do not favor the 
resort to means that might sharpen 
the confrontation,’' said Shen Guo- 
fang, a Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man. He called on the United 
Slates. North and South Korea to 

“remain calm” and “show their sin- 
cerity" by continuing dialogue to 
find a solution. 

Western diplomats in Beijing 
said China appeared to be holding 
to a position of inaction despite 
increasing international alarm that 
North Korea had created a new 
opportunity to diven nuclear fuel 
to weapons production by keeping 
inspectors away from the refueling 
of a research reactor. 


YELTSIN: 

Summit Sought 


Condoned from Page f 


premature before the convocation 
of a conference involving both Ko- 
reas, the United States. Japan. Chi- 
na and Russia, and including repre- 
sentatives of the UN atomic energy 
agency, to Uy to resolve the issue of 
proliferation. 

'Today, when no decision has 
been taken on calling an interna- 
tional conference, it is too early 10 
talk about sanctions," Mr. Yeltsin 
said. 

“But if North Korea takes a 
stubborn stance," be continued, 
“we shall warn it first, given that 
country’s proximity to Russia's 
borders, and then apply sanctions." 

Mr. Yeltsin also told Mr. Kim 
that Russia intended to renounce 
its mutual friendship and defense 
treaty with North Korea when it 
comes up for renewal in two years* 
time, the Itar-Tass news agency re- 
ported. citing a “highly placed" 
Russian official. 

The 1961 treaty promises Pyong- 
yang automatic military aid 'from 
Moscow in the event of war on the 
peninsula, but the official called 
those clauses “nonoperative, in 
practice.” 

Mr. Kim said that be bad won 
Mr. Yeltsin's promise to stop sell- 
ing any weapons or parts, whether 
offensive or defensive, to North 
Korea. 


But the diplomats said China's 
frustration was increasing and that 
it may now be more willing to sim- 
ply abstain m any vote in the Unit- 
ed Nations Security Council to im- 
pose economic sanctions on the 
North. 

Such a strategy would allow Chi- 
na to remain faithful to its “social- 
ist brotherhood" with North Korea 
while also acknowledging the grow- 
ing consensus among Asian nations 
that the time is coming to take 
stronger measures against Pyong- 
yang. 

Mr. Shen gave no clue how Chi- 
na would react to various Security 
Council proposals to impose sanc- 
tions. 

He said China was “very con- 
cerned” with the re-cmcrgencc of a 
crisis atmosphere surrounding at- 
tempts by the International Atomic 
Energy Agency 10 supervise the 
handling of nuclear fuel and to 
conduct tests that would determine 
whether a diversion of weapons- 
grade plutonium had occurred. 

If China was still pursuing be- 
hind-the-scenes diplomacy with 
Pyongyang, it did not appear to be 
producing any results. Mr. Shen 
confirmed that Chinese leaders met 
earlier this week with Foreign Min- 
ister Kim Yong Nam of North Ko- 
rea as he passed through Beijing on 
the way to a meeting of nonaligned 
foreign ministers in Cairo. 

Western embassies last week 
spotted a North Korean govern-, 
men l plane at Beijing airport and 
were told by Foreign Ministry offi- 
cials that an economic delegation 
was in town. 

Chinese officials continue to 
state Lhat Beijing's influence over 
President Kim 11 Sung's isolated 
regime is minimal and that North 
Korean officials will not discuss 
their nuclear research program 
with Beijing, except to deny that 
they are producing nuclear weap- 
ons. 

A number of Chinese officials 
can Don their Western counterparts 
that North Korea is playing the 
current crisis for political and eco- 
nomic gain by seeking diplomatic 
recognition and economic invest- 
ment as the price of their adherence 
to nuclear safeguards. 

Some Western diplomats differ 
with this analysis, arguing that the 
North Korean leadership is creat- 
ing a state of almost constant crisis. 
This, they say. provides an added 
measure of control over the popu- 
lation and justification for the high 
degree of economic privation that 
costs in North Korea. 



■ ... . ■ -if 






sate 


L u Mr patten’s deputy* to !4 Miss 

** 1 .™ group Amnesty International an« ^ ^ ^ wouldres 

ZiSlSB! *<^u±-****&i 

Governor Chris Patten is buckling idca .^.^^ ^ 3 ^^Ikey pushiM ■ ““owm® access to 
under pressure from China after would b^crapp^i W ^ ^ official information, got 3 Similar 
two yean or standing his ground, phrase. Mr-Patteil ^ ^ message. • ... 

According to a deluge of media human-nghts institution Miss Lau said thal such repwts 

leaks. Mr. Patten wiB soon come “durable. , who is had a familiar ring. QrnmJjil 

m*r amine! nMlilKP a human-oabts Anna W u, a legislator d» sumrisiK this has been 


out against creating a human-rights — -y. ^ ^ aun- 

commisson, as sought by some sponsor i ng* Secretary 

members of Parliament in Britain nMU 252T3 




members of Parliament m Britain ~ ^ 

and Amnesty International, but Anson Chan on Wedoesoty. 

opposedby^ina. and wiU a!so kil! medjarqjorted that Mr. Chan, who 
a freedoro-of- inform a Don bOl. 


had a familiar ring. “Of comse ilus 
js not surprising -^jhis has been 
thrii policy afl along,” said, “I 
wiU not be surprised Just very. 

very sad-" - 


Even before the official an- 

CHINESE: Growth of Smuggling 

men 1 Kowtows on Rights Body .. . • ■_ . . * - . 

" d!m " p28el , .setes® usn£ 

BufanalysS^idMr. Patten's new routes, with Moscow recently bf ff as loaded than 

apparent decision probably was emerging as a major hub lorujr w screesl auiine or rad Jraffic for 
man a reflection of political tactics nese smuggling operations, a sew people who obtained wsas with 




more a reflection of political tacucs 


h ‘ ‘ ‘ MEL PEHF • : '&&&' 'BEft tudes in the colonial a dmi mstra- 

’ tion, rather than a yielding to Chi- 

" G R| U 3 <nrA» n »Rertat commentators bad begun pre- 

eijing policemen patrolling in Tiananmen Square on Thursday to head off any dieting that Mr. 

h anniversary of the crackdown on the democracy movement approached. The JJ 1 to r ^ l f r i n ^wJSer 

Jered hotels to switch off CNN broadcasts until after the June 3-4 anoiveisaty. ,dorms ” 01,0 

* But he stood his ground through- 
out a dispute with Beijing followed 
by seven months of fruitless talks 

: U.S. to Seek Sanctions Against Pyongyang iZSSro” 


as a key vote on democratic reform official said. . ■ 

neared and of conservative aid- About 60.000 Chinese im®J‘ 


Cirrj Ua. TV AmxurC fios 

ON GUARD — Beijing policemen patrolling in Tiananmen Square on Thursday to head off any 
protests as the fifth anniversary of the crackdown on the demoo-acy movement approached. The 
police also have ordered hotels to switch off CNN broadcasts until after the June 3-4 anniversary. 


grants live illegally m Moscow, ac- 
cording to a still-classified report 
summarizing the recent intelligence 
findings. “Many are believed to be 
in Moscow awaiting onward travel 
to the the report stated. 

Russian organized-crime groups 
have formed a formidable allian ce 
with Chinese gangs in the lucrative 
human trade, the report said. 


q uestio nable documents," an bffu 

dalsaid. . 

There is a diplomatic problem as 
welL The Umted5taies hasjnesksi 
China to loosen travel odBitolsta a 
matter of longstanding -human- 
rights poficy. Progress m tius area 
was cited by Prestdemt BabOrntm 
last Thursday when be.aonpunced 

his decision to renew.ChmaVmcGt- 
favored nation trade status. .- v 


Travel' along these smuggling . bfZS' 

twnrks tvniMlIv involves a tiro faiown,offioa]sof^verala^nQes 


networks typically involves a tnp down, m sxvcnu 

w^h^veralsiops along the way. 


Continued from Page 1 , . . - . . . . . . 

.... . nghts record. North Korea ume to change its 

Japan for exercises tn the middle or Mr. Clinton justified lhat deci- mind over inspections, administra- 
Pacific Ocean, but the Pentagon is represented a major re- tion officials said. The weakest rcs- 

COnsidermE. sending It back. vm.il in nart .i« necessarv lo en- nlntinn under review would want 


status despite its poor human- proach to sanctions is likely, to give 


North Korea time to change its 


dais insist that China's objectives *«Th c overall feeling." a State De- 
preciselv match Washington’s. Chi- partraem 0 fficiaj said, is that “it is 
na has resisted calls for pressure cm »<,„ sian with low end. 


ns t m f* .« w- j u Uk lltut. a u 

a Uhina g Cooperation a Key security iisues. 

The Ginton administration has Although administration offi 
been leaning toward seeking gradu- dais Lisisl that China’s objective: 
al economic sanctions, rather than precisely match Washingtcm’s.Chi• 
an immediate overall trade embar- na has resisted calls for pressure or 
go. because of the difficulty in get- Pyongyang, instead counseling no 
ting China to agree to punish the gotiabons with North Korea, a for 
North Koreans, according to ad- mcr ally with which it main tains an heaL” 
ministration officials. uneasy friendship. .As a prime fuel 

)= an imerview u, Washington, tondui, /nd ■Him-parnrr. Chim .Chi' 

Mr. Gallucci said. "When il corns * ou d havc a 
to ho* China »ill vole - il is CT <*“» ?ancuons. Ui. analysii 
somewhere berw^n hard and ta- fX ^ ls « l ?«™ ! 

possible for me lo predio tel." fe "°*' Coimnurasl-led repme. 
r r . Even if China goes along m th« 

Should China not cooperate to Security Council, a gradual ap- 
the Security Council on imposing 
sanctions. Washington may try to 

persuade individual countries rath- TnvrFF^/'Tj'iKT 

er than the United Nations as a f j /I IN j ^ VFil « J5( 
whole lo place economic restric- 
tions on North Korea. Such sane- Continued from Page 1 
lions would require no endorse- 

meni by the United Nations, where our being the democracy that cost 
China widds a veto, in that case, so much blood." 


versa!, in part as necessary to en- elution under review would warn 
sure Beijing's cooperation in North Korea, perhaps with a dead- 


line after which the Security Coun- 


Aithough administration offi- dl would consider sanctions. 


to China. 

A bOl containing his most con- 
troversial reforms faces its final 
vote in the colonial legislature on 
June 29. If passed unamended, the 
Patten reforms would be imple- 
mented exactly as he proposed 
them almost two years ago. 

But in the human-rights commis- 
sion and freedoro-of -information 
bill, the pro-democracy camp 
senses a dimbdown bv Mr. Patten, 


For some, the trip from Fujian 
Province, the principal departure 
point, to New York, the major des- 


would provide added justiffcrijdti 
for a package of anti-smuggling 
measures that were proposEtTby 


unauoo, can 


take two years or Mr. CBntoQ last summer btt have 


Pyongyang, instead counseling ne- slery u y stet> ^ wpr i. V our wav s “ ses » ambdowfl i by Mr. Patten, 

gotiabons with Nonh Korea, a for- ^ spodnm and turn up the whoro ^ 35 

mcr alfv with which it main tains an ulLi ** sume cooperation with China, most 


I r notably on Hong Kong’s huge new 

conduii and trading partner. China China shares U.S. concern about airport project. 
would have to be a primary enforc- the North Korean weapons pro- “No one objects to cooperation, 
er of any sanctions. UJS.'analvsts gram, but would "prefer to work in hm if it is at the cost of sacrificing 
say china is reluctant to weaken a a quieter way. without waving the certain fundamental principles 
fellow Communist-led retdme. sanctioning stick." the official con- then we would be alarmed." said an 


say Cnma is reluctant to weajcen a a qwcici w**. muiwi “*>■ 

fellow Communist-led regime. sanctioning stick, the official con- 


Even if China goes along in the eluded. 
Security Council, a gradual ap- 


IAP. \YP\ 


: Backing Berlusconi 


Continued from Page 1 


Mr. Clinton could face criticism 
that he was unable to get China's 


And Gianfranco Fini, the neo- 


irol and that access to contracep- 
tion be spread around the world. 

Mr. Ginton, speaking to .Ameri- 
can seminarians at the Vatican af- 
ter his meeting with the Pope, said 


independent legislator. Emily Lau. 

Mr. Patten has never committed 
hims elf on setting up a commission 
to protect human rights, and his 
spokesman said only that a deci- 
sion would be announced before 
the end of June. 

The British Parliament’s Foreign 
Affairs Committee has called for 
such a body, and the human-rights 


more. U.S. officials said. 

“One documented air route used 
by alien smugglers originated in 
Bangkok, went to New Delhi or 
Karachi, on to Nairobi or Johan- 
nesburg, and then to Buenos Aires 
or Rio de Janeiro," the intelligence 
report noted. "It then went onward 
to Madrid, Barcelona, and London 
and finally terminated in New 
York City.” 

Most of the smugglers' clients 
leave China legally, a senior Clin- 
ton administration official said. 
They acquire passports and often 
have legitimate visas for their first 
stop outside China, before starting 
their illegal voyage to the United 
States. 

Two U.S. delegations have gone 
to China in the last sly months to 
press for cooperation in fighting 
the ship traffic, but U.S. officials 
said it is difficult to ask for help 
restraining people who leave China 
legally. 


not been enac t ed. The assessment 
also wiB be used Jd seek .greater 
cooperation from several countries 

around the world in educating W 

migrant smuggling. ■ 

Mr. Clinton's package of mea- 
sures designed to combat such 


sentences, expanded esc ot wire- 
taps, application of racketeering 
statutes and more aggressrw sd-' 
zures of assets. 

So far. none- of those measures 
has cleared a full committ ee in ti- 
dier bouse of Congress. Then;. ap- 
pears to be little prospect for any 
action this year. . • 

The government lias mo ready 
estimates of the amount of smog. 
gfing traffic, but officials see dear 
signs that the numbers are .rising 
They note that more- than 14^00 
Chinese nationals applied -for VS. 
political asylum last year — four 
times the number from the year 
before. 


backing over Korea even after the from, but did not completely dis- 
ad minis tration agreed last week to avow, the past in an interview be- 


fascist leader, distanced himself he lhc Pope 

from, but did not completely is- sorae p rognss " m dbcuss- 


maimain Beijing's favorable trade fore attending dinner along with 


mg the LIN conference and stressed 
that his administration did not be- 


FRANC: The Poor Getting Poorer RAID: 


120 outer dignitaries in honor of 

Mr. Clinton and his wife. Hillary coqu©! 


Continued from Page 1 


Rodham Clinton. 


introl. emmenis in debL The devaluation. 

“Our concern with abortion wi th aimed at bringing the inflated CF.A 


loc i ^vs-*^*!*** Lebanon Base Ht 

goods, fabne. blankets and jewelry . • . - - 


It is important lhat the values regard to population is the tens of franc in line with its actual worth. 


today be the values of democracy, millions of abortions that are oc- reducing government expenditures 
and Fascism never presumed to be curring in unsafe ways that are put- and stimulating the economies of 
democratic," he said. “It is no long- ting women at risk." he said. “I die CFA members —was typical of 
er a modeL It is a historical fact." believe we can make some progress the medicine prescribed by West- 
Earlier. Mr. Clinton’s 35-minuie here." The Pope, however, is op- ent financial institutions for na- 
private meeting with the Pope pro- posed to all forms of abortion, call- tions in such a bind. .And it has 


duced far less unanimity, even mg it murder. 


though both men sought publicly At his press conference with Mr. 


to maintain the impression of a Berlusconi later. Mr. Ginton te- 


em financial institutions for na- 
tions in such a bind. .And it has 
raised a familiar debate over its 
costs and benefits. 

“This is the bisgest event of the 


SEPTEMBER 21-24, 1994 - BALLIOL COLLEGE ■ OXFORD 


Renowned scholars and corporate leaders assess 
the global business climate 


The White House tenned the cn- role of contraception and popula- ute resources, and some people will 
counter a ‘Very warm session "and tion policy." The Vatican ban- all fed the pinch." 
both men were smiling broadly af- forms of artificial birth control. Bui critics argue that the West- 
terward. However. Mr. Clinton said, there ere financial institutions and devel- 


— sit idly in makeshift stalls as 
customers browse but seldom buy. 

The consequences of the devalu- 
ation “are numbing." said Ou- 
marou Garba Youssoufou, a prom- 
inent politician. “It’s going to make 
us review our whole way of life. We 
have lo start using local products." 

That change, one of those sought 
by devaluation's advocates, has be- 
gun. Before devaluation, it was 
cheaper to buy rice from Thailand 
than from farmers an hour away 
from the capital. An independent 
local newspaper. Le Republican, 
quoted rice farmers as saying that 


Continued ftoajPag* J 


retaliate for the kidnapping of 
Sheikh Diruni, whomlsdel wanted 
to interrogate about a missing Is- 
raeli aviator. 

The bombing occurred at a point 
when peace talks appear to be 
bogged down between Israel and 
Syria, which is the regional power 
broker and keeps about 40JXJO 
troops in northern, eastern and 
central Lebanon. 

Earlier this week. Mr. Rabin had 
said the recent messages carried by 
the United States between Damas- 


In their meeting Thursday, said *“T n ° 1x1 "SW* 
le Vatican snokesman Tnamiin [ t ,en L on the larger issue, which is 


Three days to refresh your mind. .A creative blending of business and 
intellectual perspectives. A chance to challenge conventional wisdom 
and gain new insights. These are the opportunities presented bv the 
annual International Business Outlook conference. 


the Vatican spokesman. Jwquin ™ issue, wrnen ts 

Navarre-Valls? the 74-vear-old dm we agree with _the V atican that 


Pope evoked “the grave ethical the *■« * ? ^ a 

problems" related to the Cairo c * °, f sustainable development. 


gathering, including “defense and ^ D °nnaUy leads tc improved 
promotion of life and deferuc and 3 les fo [ 3/1(3 sabtlizaL-on 


Effectiveness achieved bv drawing on our vast resources to jive 
timely and objective comment on the world's mo't business sensitive 
developments. 


^ • • — « V* Mllll UVIVIU'V UJIYI f I *1 «* 

promotion of the family in particu- 01 •E?* J_ cn : _ 

jar - r The Pope is recoven ng from a 

' _ . . ... broken thigh, and Mr. Ginton said 

The Pope has been particularly he had been pleased "to see him 

u -- v ^ ,n/cr ^ 1 ? e Pfop 0 ^ 5 looking so well and being so vigor- 
that abortion be used for birth con- ous.” 


Exclusivity secured bv a strict limit on participants to Ln>ure a 2:1 
ratio of business leaders to specialists. 


Hungarian Pilot Is Killed 


Before a formal dinner Thursday 
nigh t. Mr. Ginton spoke tn the 
open air to about 7.000 Italians and 
.Americans at the Campidoglio, the 
mythical location where Romulus 


Stimulus provided by a reflective atmosphere, prominent global 
figures and intimate debate. 


Reuters J UUUI im iuj UIW viUiJpiUL'gUV, Ult. 

mm a dcct * u mythical location where Romulus 

JK1S5F Hung^nan and Remus were suckled by a she- 
mihtaiy pilot was killed and anoth- wo ^ 




S S IUlk , MJG ' John F. Kennedy addressed Ro- 

21 figh.er before it crashed during a ^ ^ l%3 ^ earlier, where 


The Oxford Summit - combines the discipline of scholarship 
with the experience of business. 


_ • • |-| - I . * UIIUU 1AJ » • W HJ1U, UW|> TMIVIt. 

naming fhghtm western Hungary. Gcncral Mark 0ark to ^ 

a8ency rc ' dozens of the newly liberated ritv 
ported on Thursday. on June 4. 1944. 


DEATH NOTICE 


DEATH NOTICE 


l I ML PI I .HI r.i 


Hcralb^Eribunc 


OXFORD YNAI.Y1 It \ 


F»«r further inlormaii-m. plcasv k><niavt j.in, al th>- 

Inti-Tnaiii'ina! Herald Tribune, b> L>>n“ Vr>„ I.nn«Inn v\ v.' ’F •' 
Tel : 1 44 7 1 i SJij 4ti02 Ta\: (4471 i 


DOSCHER 

{>1 May 2B. lOOi 
peacefully in London, 
Charlie, dearly hdoved 
husband of Florence, 
cherished daddy of Peggy 
and Suzie. 

Private cremation h.i« alreadv 
taken place in London. 

Memorial service 
in Switzerland to Ik- 
.innouncej a: :i later date. 


The hoard of directors, 
the management 
and the employees 
of IX>w Europe Sj\. 
are deeply saddened 
bv the loss of 


Charles (Charlie) M. Doscher 


A Pc nv pioneer 
who laid the foundations 
of our company in Europe. 


Bui critics argue that the West- 
era financial institutions and devel- 
oped countries wreak havoc on the 
fi ves of millions of poor people by 
insisting on economic policies that 
strive for long-term stability. The 
people of Niger. Mali. Burkina 
Faso and Gad are among the 
poorest in the worid. earning only 
S200 to S300 per capita a year. 

The CFA comprises the former 
French colonies of Niger. Senegal. 
Central African Republic. Ivory 
CoasL Benin, Mali, Chad, Burkina 
Faso, Cameroon. Gabon. Congo. 
Togo, and Equatorial Guinea. 

Officials and local and foreign 
development agencies voice con- 
cern about the hardships that de- 
valuation has brought. In some 
cases, members of families are tak- 
ing turns eating because there is not 
enough food to go around, devel- 
opment workers said. The hardship 
has spurred strikes and demonstra- 
tions that, in Niamey, have shut 
down the city and its airport sever- 
al times. 

1 n Niger’s villages, where most of 
its population lives, young men arc 
conspicuously absent, having 
trekked to Nigeria or other coun- 
tries in search of work. Women left 
behind try lo grow food to feed 
ibdr families. The luckiest ones 
grow enough to sell at local mar- 
kets. 

But the effects of the devaluation 
are sharpest in the cities, where 
residents have less opportunity for 
self-sufficiency. Prices for some ba- 
sic goods in Niamey have doubled 


before devaluation their earnings 0,5 Jerusalem had produced 
from selling rice could not pay for °° r f snlls - P® 1 * talks in V^ashing- 
the rrin to Niamey 1011 between Israel and Syria have 


from selling rice could not pay for 
the trip to Niamey. 

Now fanners in" Tillabery, about 
an hour’s trip from Niamey, are 
planting rice on land lhat has gone 
unused for years, and people are 
switching from imported rice to lo- 
cally grown grains such as millet 

Devaluation also has stimulated 
the domestic beef market. Sudi de- 
velopments lead bankers, foreign 
officials and some economists to 
express hope that, over the long 
run, devaluation can help revive 
Niger's economy. 


Deeo suspended for several mon ths, 
and tire latest violence may further 
stall the negotiations. 

Last July. Israel launched a 
weeklong offensive against Hezbol- 
lah in southern Lebanon, forcing 
half a mfllion residents to flee their 
homes and kffling 149 people. The 
assault Thursday was the most seri- 
ous since then. 

After the operation last year, Is- 
rael and Hezbollah agreed on an 
unwritten arrangement that neither 


“The daily impact makes devaiu- wou ^ fdack civilian targets. 


anon worrisome." said Aboubacar 
Youssoufou, a Niamey bank offi- 
cial. “But overall, it's a good 
thing," 


Mr. Rabin contended that tire 
attack Thursday remained with 
those rules, because the t raining 


camp was a base for 
ers. But be charged 


Italian Coalition 
Takes a Beating 


Reuters auuuiuauauun nau pro- 

onxrc T, nl „- kered the cease-fire last year, and 

( -J^ I? Italy 5 opposiuon par- said Israel was trying to “straighten 
nes_onTh U ndaywon Sof nchrnr- oul 


ers. But be charged that the rocket 
attacks went beyond the cease-fire 
understandings. 

He said he was in contact with 
the United States about the raid 
and retaliation. He noted that the 
Clinton administration bad bro- 
kered the cease-fire last year, and 


mT.Ti.- M ■ r p | matters out through the under- 


Parliament's upper house. 


Hezbollah — the Syrians 




coni's Freedom Alliance captured nfT 

only two of the five scats Spter 
decnon Thursday after gaining just and 


MiSSS 10 ^ 

onWainesday. SSSSTfiSSS* 


The results confirmed Mr. Ber- r™. ...u . ■ , V"v 

tusconi's weak position in the Sen- process^ ^ * Cft ° f *** ***** 
3lC '. wh ,^ vm- Foreign Mini*,* 


or tripled. Government price con- 
trols nave been ineffective. In Nia- 


Vorngn Nteto Farij Bote 
Unrtk^. I . Jl “ c 5®a tile raid was “a naked aggres- 


irols have been ineffective. In Nia- 
mey's main market, at least 3.000 


Northern League and ihe neofas- T 1 

d S1 -W Nauono] Alliance Wkjus, 55gL“S“ » “™?E' 


mquvuoj /MUdjiw laus US , ni l a - 

short of an absolute majority. _ h _ n secun ty « forms a big 
1 y ' challenge to the peace process." 


CALLING ONE FOREIGN GOt 'NTRV 


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Brnmim AMERICANS / 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1994 


PageS 


i* 




V . .’ *1 . Ai *^’V •*>■►.- : • 

•■_. a. •.—*.••. ii. l l. .■• IPS? 






In Nettuno, Allies 
Brought Liberty 
Anda WeirdSport 


By John Tagliabue 
NETTUNO, IiaJy - U 

only an hoar's dri w couth of KwalSS!!?^ po ? u3alion 35,000. « 
the splendid temple rains at PaesS |? our north 01 

arotSd here they aSyt^S but whra of tradition 


taM T L b ™8lU by Gfe wta ,bey 

5&s** "s" 1 50 *■" » ■« 

to .^ American Anny m 1 W “* ^ 






SSS 


President Bill Clinton 1& PATTYinn nn«4m> *1. _ r#k.i ■ 


sa^^lSSfSf^i 00 ? 118 £ rida * 10 the 50th anniver- 

So ta here and a Utde funhcr “orth* at 

^ P feadeiu will lay a wreath at the large 
Sj£f2fj£5' A® cn « n war dead. and attend a luncheon wirhthe 
Itataaii president, Oscar Luigi Scalfaro, at Villa Borghese. The town 

S^'^b™ g S. Unday - "**"* ° r PM «n B m to 


m P am 01 lbe ianding. they show a photo of an 
^^an^diw they say was named George Bronx in helmet and 

tattMbT ‘ C “ n °" m bact S™ md . as ha 



VETS: 

GERONIMOOOo! 


-> ■ ..«*.**• t . 


nq^jlan reminisce about Horace Mc^^iw t lh Si| r Uep« 1 rf the ^ veteran w ^° ^ parachnte at Sain te-Mere- Eg Lise for the D-Day commemoration being drawn into a dancing welcome at Orlv airport near Paris oo^rhors^^^*^™ 

Ammcai canetery in Nettuno right after the war who taught the * 

fads to play the stranfle American «n nrt in nmine u P rv-^n: j — 


x?r¥ strange American sport In winter, Mr. Canceffi said, 
you beted around a soccer ball, and in summer, you lettheair out of 
it lowed and tied it with string to improvise a catcher’s mit for a 
sport mat ranked in popularity among most Italians probably 
somewhere near sumo wrestling. 


When in Rome 9 the Clintons Do as the Tourists Do 


/OKed generals once called Yellow Beach and X-Ray and 
where Am e ri ca n , British and Can adia n soldiers came’ ashore, have 
notyet arrived. 

The American and Italian flags on the town haH, and the card- 
board “no parking” signs tacked up along the presidential route, 
were not the only things that set the day off. Along the water, four 
big tour buses with signs that read “3rd Infantr y Division” delivered 

American veterans, many reaming for the first time since the war. 


By Maureen Dowd 

New York Times Service 
ROME — Looking like any 
overscfaeduled, two-career couple 
who really needed to get away for 
awhile, Bill and HUkry dmtoa 


Giamuroo, and gave them M&Ms neck. Bone shoes and a matching ronica Lario. the 38-year-oid wife “Hillary and I have a friend 

iui>l< ik* 1 .1 c _:_ l .1 .r - m T. . . ... 


with the presidential seal on them 
(the candy that replaced cigarettes 
on Air Force One). As the children 
looked sympathetic, and as a group 


purse finish the suit. 

“The Vatican: As a sign of re- 
spect for the tradition of the Vali- 


of Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- whom we treasure greatly who is a 


com. 

According to 


can a black Dana Buchman long- pared the two 


Jesuit priest who 1 met over 30 
oca, which com- years ago. who went to law school 
ideal wives, her with us later and who continues to 


held bands, laughed, mugged, y 6 ^ “EE-Ia-ree, EE-la-ree,” the 


of 100 more who were roped off sleeved silk dress was chosen for most characteristic comment was tabor to fulfill his vows,” said the 


The furniture shop is sot tar from the boatyard where Giomo 
Orfeo repairs yachts, and where once infanhv ivuiinc mft 


Orfeo repairs yachts, and where once infantry landing craft came 
ash o re. Mr. Orfeo was 16 when the Americans arrived, and his 
family home was destroyed by cannon fire and his sister wounded in 
fighting between American and Goman tanks 


He watched while Italian Fascists and Germans str ung up Italian 
partisans with telephone wire “They were ugly beasts,” Mr. Orfeo 
said. 


oobed. aabed and held hands some Iirst **dy «plau 
more Thursday as they roamed ^ Chelsea, wi 
Rome. cause she was st 

The Clintons, openly thrilled to exams, 

be away from the land of Paula Later, she t 
Carton Jones, Dan Rostenkowskl Chapel with he 
Republican electoral triumphs and " 
presidential helicopter debacles, ROME N 

hoped the Eternal City would pro- 

vioe some transitory relief. held hands. She 

A profile in The New Yorker wearing matchk 
ma gazine reported last week that waited to shake 


first lady explained that her daugh- 
ter, Chelsea, was not with her be- 
cause she was still in school, taking 
final exams. 

Later, she toured the Sis line 
Chapel with her husband, as they 


Mrs. Clinton's audience with the this: “I forbade my children the use 
Pope. The dress wraps and ties at of the remote control because I 


the waisL In accordance with the think TV must be watched as little 


1968 graduate of Georgetown Uni- 
versity, a Jesuit institution. 


tradidonal requirements a mantilla as possible ” 
will be worn to cover Mrs. Clin- Mr. Berlusconi is Italy’s leading 
ton’s head. All other accessories are television magnate 
peari with gold accents.” Perhaps (he president’s most sur- 

The Italians were not fooled by prising moment Thursday — be- 
aH of this fashion talk. Epoca, a sides using “one of America’s 
People magazine look-alike, pic- greatest sons of Italy,” his director 


ROME NOTEBOOK 


held hands. She and her mother, 
wearing matching black mantillas, 
waited to shake hands with Pope 


prising moment Thursday — be- 
sides using “one of America’s 


lured a waving Mrs. Clinton on the of the Office of Management and 
cover with the tag line, “Hurricane Budget, Leon Panena, as a trans- 


it recurring theme in aS the talk was what the Americans and Mr. 
Ginton would make of Italv’s new eovomnent. with ministers fnioi 


Canton would make of Italy’s new government, with ministers from 
a party that traces hs roots to Mussolini's Blackshirts. 


Mrs. Clinton had some d^dgne on John Paul II untD the president and 
succeeding her hpshand as com- the Pope had a ooe-oc-one meeting 
mander-in-ddef. But, kicking off 1° talk about abortion, religious 


Hillary, What Kind of Trouble later for his speech to the Romans 
Will She Cause in Italy?” and the at the Piazza del Campidoglio — 

“u:ii ■ L. jj : 


mander-in-efaief. But, kicking off talk about abortion, religious 
il^w European swing to celebrate freedom, and international trouble 


headline inside, “Hillary’s craning came when he was addressing the 
(and Bill, too.)" It summed up her American seminarians ai the Vaii- 


“And rate of my most treasured 
possessions that 1 ever received 
from a personal friend," Mr. Clin- 
ton said, “was a letter that he wrote 
to us after he had been a priest for 
20 years, explaining without being 
at all self-righteous what it had 
meant to him to have kept his vows 
for two decades and why he 
thought in a way he had lived a 
selfish life because he had achieved 
a measure of peace and comfort 


Continued from Page 1 
cans, not Germans." be said. “The 
Germans had all left when they 
realized it was D-Day. Early 00 it 
was very quiet, but later the square 
was like the Place de la Concorde 
with all the Americans trying to 
rejoin their units." 

Out of six U.S- parachute regi- 
ments, only two landed where and 
when they were supposed to. Some 
soldiers landed dozens of miles 
from their drop zones. Others were 
machine-gunned as they floated 
down. And many fell into flooded 
fields hear Saimc-M&re-Egtise and. 
drowned because of all the equip- 
ment they were carrying. 

Warren Wilt, 71, who lives near 
Wichita, Kansas, and who landed 
with the 8 2d Airborne, said the 
paratroopers were so heavily load- 
ed that “it was all you do to get into 
the plane with someone helping 
you. 

Richard Falvey. 72, of Ham- 
mondsport. New York, who was 
with the 101st Airborne, watched 
two planes packed with paratroop- 
ers explode in the air ana said that 
all he could think of was “lei me 
out of tins airplane and give me a 
fighting chance.” 

Not all the veterans who arrived 
00 Thursday look pan in the Nor- 
mandy landings. Some were in- 
volved in the fighting in Italy, one 
was in a German prison camp and 

a few were still training in the Unit- 
ed States for the big push on the 
Rhine River. 

But all of them could remember 
exactly what they were doing on 
June 6, 1944. 

“At this hour, a damned lieuten- 
ant was telHngme to walk around a 
hedgerow to see if I could draw 
sniper fire.” said Mr. Rice, who 
landed south of Sainte-Mfcre-Eglise 
with the 101st Airborne. “Good I 
didn't. When I got back, the lieu- 
tenant was gone.” 

Now, he said, the paratroopers 
want “to get pan of our youth 
back.” 


Soros Freezes Assets 
Of Russia Foundation 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — The American fi- 
nancier and philanthropist George 
Soros has frozen the assets of bis 


a uimij ww vi uuuai auu tuuuuil /v T ... - , — „ 

and energy thatbe could have iutiatiw foundation in 


“INe always voted for the left,” said Marcdlo Fieri, a man in bis 
30s who works for the local electrical utility, “but I think that every 
people has the right to make its own choice. ” 

dresgfed*^Tbe >Str0 ^ J5< ^ along Nettuno's seaside^ p romenade 

founders, had just attended a ceremony with other historically dad 
citizens of Nettuno malting the town of Van Bnren, Arkansas, a 


the 50th anniversary of D-Day, s P°ts. She smilingly nodded en- 
America’s health care p«t and top couragement as her husband talked 


philosophy tins way: “Don’t call 
me first lady, rather presidential 


presidential adviser outdid Nancy American seminarians at the 
Reagan and Barbara Bosh in her Vatican, and eagerly grasped his 
eagerness to play the traditional outstretched hand to meet some of 


partner. 


can. 

Although Mr. Clinton is not 
famous for his self-denial, be sug- 


sistcr city, pari of a series of events connected with the commemora- 
tion of the 1944 invasion. 

The anniversary, he said, made Italians reflect 
“There are not only dead, there are also survivors, and we should 
make them tell the young their experiences, so that maybe we can 
avoid future wars. 


first lady role, as her husband met 
with important men about impor- 
tant matters of state. 

. She started the day accompanied 


the priests-in- training. 1 .. 

Her press office issued a release 
for foreign reporters announcing 
“Details of the First Lady Hillary 

DaJL.. n:....'. * • e 


The other blonde center of at ten- gested that this may be the very 
don Thursday — the statuesque Quality America needs to achieve 
one with the long hair — was Ve- peace, comfort and energy. 


found in no other way.” 

“It is that feeling,” the president 
said, “that I think ultimately we 
want for aD the people of our na- 


Rnssia and ordered an audit, a 
foundation spokesman said Thurs- 
day. 

“There have been serious mis- 
management and lack of documen- 


tion and all the people of the tation. But no money has disap- 


peared,” the spokesman said. 


by her mother, Dorothy Rodham, Rodham Clinton's Attire for t 
and Roeeanne Bartholomew, wife Thursday, June 2, 1994; Rome, lta- 


ctf the UJ>. ambassador to Italy, 
touring the Piazza Navona, the 


“Visit 10 Piazza Navona: A two 


“After all, to have a war in order to make people appreciate 
peace," Mr. Ron said, “is absurd.” 


elongated baroque square in the piece fuschia Noviello Bloom suit 
heart of Rome. She took along 21 of a linen Wend. The buttons close 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COULD AFFECT 
YOUR LIFE: 


Heart or Koine, sue took along 21 * *™cu menu. »nc ouuuns ciosc 

pupils of the city’s oldest public tilt front of the jacket creating a 1 
elementary school, Emmanuele lovely U-shape opening at the 


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edby 

R/King 


A .MEMOIR is not, strictly 

speaking, an autobiography. 


It is, in the words of James Lord — 
the author of "Picasso and Dora” 
and “Giacometti: A Biography" — 
an account of his “relations with 
the very interesting people h has 
been my good luck to encounter.” 
A memoir is autobiography with- 
out the risk, not onlyof laying one’s 

self bare to public view but of ex- 
posing oneself as essentially duD 
and therefore pompous. By writing 
a memoir rather than a bald autobi- 
ography, the author can always re- 
treat behind the ky retort, WcD, I 
found it interesting. 

Neither the author nor his six 

women-are dull or pompous. Lord’s - 


• Karl Lodrigpen, a London- 
based automobile industry consul- 
tant, is reading “ Collision and the 
Rax to Own the 21st Century*’ by 
Maryann Keller. 

“I was very mtrigued to have her 
views 00 the future of General Mo- 
tors, Volkswagen and Toyota. Her 
point is thru no one dsc rivals them 
in being truly global motor compa- 
nies. It is a good story.” 

(Erik Ipsen, IHT) 



approach is self-effacing (“1 Hked and ABceRTcUas share a chapter, 
bang Kked,” be admilsX his writing though the spotlight is, fora change, 
style simple and evocative: ’The on Toktas. His portrait of the 
afternoon was lively, spangled with French worfcmg-<Aas$-giri-tumed- 
bumbiebees and songbirds, and we Em-star Arieny (of wbran he orn- 
ate outride on the bridge spanning mbk, “to find a woman who 
the moat." The flavor is attractive, seemed to die French at that time 


has forgiven her dalliance with the 
, enemy. Marie-Laure de Noailles is 
rich, powerful, intelligent and full of 
life, md squanders hoself in experi- 
menting with the various sins and 
playing cruel tricks on friends. Er- 
riefa Perdiltidi, confronted by a war 
and a resistance movement in a land 
she loves, manages to limit her in- 
volvement to some guns that pass 
across her kitchen table, a hidden 
husband and monthly visits from 
the angst-ridden German captain. 
Concerning the final and longest 
memoir, even Lord seems a bit de- 
fensive, beginning the chapter with 
the apologia, “It is a labored bro- 
mide that favorite sons, especially 
ho m osexual favorites, are prone to 
consider their mothers exceptional” 
Although interesting, none of 
than, with the possible exception 
of Gertrude Stein, is as extraordi- 
nary as one might expect, as per- 


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and suits the memoir. 


more qomtessen dally French than 


trayed by a man wbo has moved 
t *k^ among the European artistic com- 

Zr ZLU n n-fc I 

Marie-Laure f omdmysdf longmg for one of his 
deNoaiDes, descendant of the Mar- ““*"**£ wo ““ t0 "R, 8 ® 1 
quis dcSadc, wife of a viscocnt, one do^etinng. Whyamongail the 
S^SiestwoirieataSope, ^ presumably has known, 

SSiT&isis, defender^ ^ choo “ 
Stadece^Slmsuer of the “ft ^ s L yIe \ rare 

longs to Errieta Penfflddi, who fled rf? 

S™ from the Tbrks in 1922, 


The women he has gathered to- Arietty would have been difficult") 
getber are an odd lot. Gertrude Stein is followed by that of Marie-Laure 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


A diamond was led and the 
mi was finessed successfully. He 




SavCTof 11121 West’s queen was probably a 


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Smyrna from the Thrks in 1922, 
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occasional unHkeableness, and with 
no lost in sight, be loved these wom- 
en, even Gertrude Sirin, whom be 


of die world’s most active dub, the 
Beverly, and as a talented teacher. _ 
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Sjpingoki Knockout Teams in 1978 
he arrived in ax hearts - after Jim- 
Hamilton as North had opened one 
dob, strong and artificial in the 
Precision System. 


have length m both minor ants. 

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a diamond, and cashed the spade 
king. West's tatane to niff con- 


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band m the closet lheaxth portrait 


depicts the author’s Indiana-born 

. , - T 1 caea Vision of the camaraderie of 


mother, Louise Bennrit Lord, who 


coed vision of the camara derie of 
men in uniform and told her. 


driaded at the age of 52 to do a 
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are They exceptional? Leaving aside & tiisapprovmg hus- 

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mere woman, it is difficnlt to see ^ *** «* medical bdp 

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3 the writer’s life, ip^ W not an acHOrt-_padred account of , 


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- A io dan” during the writer’s life, spends 

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P* Page 6 


FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1994 

© T> B RT I O N 



INTERNATIONAL 


mite. 


PUULISIIKD Httll 7 UK W VUKK TIMMS .VN|J TIIE W*«!HIPW:T*»N BKI 



Alexander Solzhenitsyn's return home to 
Russia a/ter 20 years of exile in the United 
St2les counts as high drama even in a life and 
a country that have seen much of ii. With the 
writing or his multi volume study of the roots 
of the Russian Revolution, the Nobel laure- 
ate had completed a literary agenda that 
began with his epic recording of the revolu- 
tion's crimes against the Russian people. 
This freed him for the extraordinary home- 
coming that, at age 75 and in apparently 
vigorous health, he is undertaking now. 

Arriving in Vladivostok to begin a slow 
progression back to Moscow. Mr. Solzhenit- 
syn identified his audience as the Russian 
people, and told them he was there to “search 
with you for ways to get out of the 75 years of 
our quagmire." In barely a day. he was ex- 
pressing the sort of tough, value-laden criti- 
cism of the Russian powers that he had early 
on unleashed in the United States against 
American culture and ways. It is plain that 
this figure of large talent and large ambition, 
who himself suffered eight years in the camps 


When a senator denounces rising interest 
rates, iL is not always easy to know how 
seriously to take him. But in the case of Paul 
Sarbanes. Democrat of Maryland, it is a ques- 
tion worth pursuing. He is running for re- 
election this fall and if he wins, he will proba- 
bly become the next chairman of the Banking 
Committee. The incumbent, Donald Riegle 
Jr, is retiring, and although (he committee has 
been weakly led in recent years, it is potential- 
ly an instrument of substantial power. The 
chairman’s views can make a real difference. 

When Alan Greenspan, the chairman of 
the Federal Reserve Board, appeared before 
the committee late last week. Senator Sar- 
banes and others engaged him in the latest 
round of the interest rate debate. In a series 
of steps beginning in February, the Federal 
Reserve has raised short-term interest rates, 
chiefly citing the need to restrain future 
inflation. Mr. Sarbanes objected that infla- 
tion is now at the lowest level in decades, 
with no sign of a rise in sight- Mr. Greenspan 
replied that, by the time it is in sight, it’s 
too late to correct it without difficult and 


Solzhenitsyn in the New Russia 


In his 1 S years as a reclusive writer in Caven- 
dish. Vermont. Alexander Solzhenitsyn created 
an ideal Russia. It existed in his mind, within 
the walls of his household and in the forests of 
birch trees, which had the same sun and blue 
sky that on good days can be seen in Russia. 

He saw few visitors besides his family, had 
virtually no contact with the outside world. 
Instead, he applied the grueling self-discipline 
he adopted during his years in Stalin’s gulags. 

He got up at 6 every morning and spent Lhe 
rest of the day writing, completing “The Red 
Wheel" his four- volume history of events 
leading to the 1917 Russian Revolution. No 
one knows whether that exhaustive and long- 
winded history will ever be published in fuB. 
Few people in the West are that interested. 

.As for Russians, they no longer have time to 


A slinging historical irony awaits President 
Bill Clinton when he begins his tour of emotive 
World War U battle sites with a visit to Italy's 
Anzio beach Friday. There in the early months 
of 1944, valiant American and Allied sddiere 
held an embattled beachhead on their way to 
expelling Nazi occupiers from Rome and de- 
stroying the remnants of Benito Mussolini’s 
fascist regime. Like those soldiers of a half- 
century ago. Mr. Clinton encounters an Italy 
where fascism is a significant political force and 
followers of Mussolini hold high office. 

Mr. Clinton, the first Western leader to meet 
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi since he in- 
cluded ministers from the Fascist-descended 

National Alliance in his coalition cabinei cor- 
rectlv insists on judging the National Alliance 
by its deeds, not its ancestry'- But those deeds 
already warrant close scrutiny. 

It is not 1944 all over again, of course. 
Mussolini ruled Italy through black-shirted 
thugs and joined Germany and Japan in an 

Axis bent on world conquest. Today's Italy is 
a democracy and a NATO ally. The Alliance 
earned its share of cower by winning millions 
of votes in a fair election. There is no way to 
deny its legitimacy without violating demo- 
cratic values. Bui neither should Americans 
gloss over the unpleasant reality of fascism's 
political revival in the land of its birth. 

.Alliance l ea ders say iheir ideology is a kind 
of “post-fascism" that upholds the supposedly 
good aspects of Mussolini's doctrine while re- 
pudiating the bad. They profess loyally to 
democracy. NATO and the European Union 
and are auick to distance themselves from 
skinhead violence and other ugly aspects of the 
fascist inheritance. But the Alliance's post-fas- 
cist claims have been denied by a sequence of 
nasty incidents. On May 14. when black-shin- 


and came to be a conscience of his country, 
has a mission. It is to lake up a role in the 
salvation of a country' that is no longer Com- 
munist but remains under f rightful duress. 

Mr. Solzhenitsyn denies any interest in 
a poll deal role. A lively discussion has broken 
out in Russia over whether the brands of Rus- 
sian nationalism, somewhat-guided democracy 
and individual autonomy that he represents are 
contemporary enough to keep him in touch 
with the post-Conmumist currents of Russian 
society. A political future is a long shot. 

But immense disorder has befallen Russia 
since the Soviet Union and communism fell. 
There is a condition of spiritual and temporal 
up rootedness and a requirement for new moor- 
ings. The politicians are struggling. For some of 
his fundamentalist views. Mr. Solzhenitsyn has 
become a somewhat sidelined figure in the 
West For his personal integrity and his Identi- 
fication with the Russian nation, he appears 10 
retain a broad measure of moral and intellectu- 
al authority at borne. “Presidem Solzhenitsyn?" 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


costly measures — meaning a recession. 

Mr. Sarbanes suggested that the Federal 
Reserve has been conducting a ‘preemptive 
strike" againsL inflation that has turned into 
a preemptive strike against jobs and economic 
growth. In response, Mr. Greenspan said that 
the whole concept of a trade-off between jobs 
and inflation is wrong. The evidence shows, 
he argued, that low inflation brings higher 
growth and rising productivity — which 
means more jobs and better incomes. 

Mr. Greenspan is right about that. The re-, 
cent record leaves little doubt. Choosing the 
precise moment to raise rates is always a matter 
of judgment. But there is a pretty strong case 
that the rircirmstances of last winter, and par- 
ticularly the news of the startlingly fast accel- 
eration of economic growth, forced the Federal 
Reserve to take action. Senator Sarbanes clear- 
ly disagrees. Fortunately, between now and 
November he will have many opportunities to 
explain his position and discuss the direction in 
which he would lead the Banking Committee if 
be should become its chairman. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


read about past history. Like millions of West- 
erners. they are hustling to make a living. 

We wish Mr. Solzhenitsyn well as he returns 
to his native Russia. But we fear he is in for a 
tremendous disappointment. 

Crime and corruption are rampant. West- 
ern pop music, pulp literature and pornogra- 
phy prevalent. He will have a tough time 
trying to reconcile his idealized view of Russia 
with the rudeness and greed he will encounter 
or with the country’s disregard for thoughtful 
writing and high culture. 

.Anticipating the collapse of communism. 
Mr. Solzhenitsyn wrote in 199! that “we must 
take care not to be crushed beneath its rubble 
instead of gaining liberty." .As he moves to 
Moscow, he may realize that life in Vermont 
offered more inner peace. Russia may be 
eternal, but iu too. changes. 

— The Baltimore Stut. 


Korea Isn’t Playing Games, It Wantstii 


S EOUL — t nc latest and most serious act 
of nuclear brinkmanship by Nonh Korea 


ed skinh eads marched through Vicenza giving 
fascist salutes, the .Alliance's leader. Gian- 
franco pin i dismissed them as “airheads and 
not so reassuringly suggested they should be 
sent to work in salt mines. Violence has contin- 
ued. however, leading Interior Minister Ro- 
berto Maroni to warn of a new cycle of terror- 
ism like the one that ravaged Italy in the 1970s. 

There is also a belligerent new tone to Italian 
foreign poliev. Last month the Alliance's Mirko 
Treraaglia declared that Italy's treaty with the 
former Yugoslavia should be "ripped up" to 
press old Italian territorial claims. Last week. 
Mr. Tremaglia was elected chairman of the 
Parliament's foreign affairs commission. Days 
later Italy forced Slovenia site of some of those 
claims, off a list of prospective new members of 
lhe European Union. Then last Sunday. Piero 
Biocarob. an Alliance candidate for the Euro- 
pean Parliamenl chillingly evoked memories of 
fascism’s worst horrors by declaring of homo- 
sexuals that “if it were up to me. Td send them 
all to live in concentration camps." 

Each or these incidents can be explained 
away, but together they constitute a disturb- 
ing trend Fascism got its second chance in 
Italy mainly because corruption scandals de- 
stroyed centrist political panics. But econom- 
ic discontents are also reviving fascist for- 
tunes elsewhere in Europe. 

The 50th anniversary of the assault on fas- 
cist Europe is a time to celebrate a heroic 
crusade for political freedom by .America and 
its allies. But il is also a time to recall the 
damage fascism inflicted on Europe in the 
not-so-distant pasL When “post-fascist" par- 
lies talk about ripping up treaties and sending 
people to concentration camps, they must be 
taken seriously and called to account. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 



| International Herald Tribune 

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O of nuclear brinkmanship by Nonh K.orea 
virtually rules out a cooperative resolution of 
the crisis over its nuclear program. 

The unsupervised removal of fud rods from 
the naacior at the Yongbyon nuclear complex 
makes it impossible io deienrnne whether 
Nonh Korea has been cheating. The U.S. Cen- 
tral Intelligence Agency believes that as much 
. as 12 kilograms (26 pounds) of plutonium, 
enough for one or two bombs, has already been 
diverted. The fuel rods now being withdrawn 
contain enough unseparaied plutonium for an 
additional five or six nuclear weapons. 

In Washington and Seoul. North Korea has 
long been seen as playing a wily game by 
seeking to extract the "maximum ’price from 
the United Slates and its allies before cashing 
in its nuclear card in exchange for political 
and economic concessions. 'However, the 
weight of evidence, and logic, increasingly 
supports the that the friendless and 

deeply paranoid regime in Pyongyang sees 
nuclear weapons as vital to its security. 

The bomb offers the North 3 relatively low- 
cost strategic equalizer against its many ene- 
mies and forces the rest of the world to take it 
seriously. In the pasi few years. Pyongyang 
has not been bargaining to give up a clandes- 
tine nuclear program. ]( has been stalling for 
time to ensure that the program will succeed. 

The North had no choice but to block 
inspection by the International Atomic Ener- 
gy Agency monitoring the unloading of the 
Yongbyon reactor. Proper inspection would 
have provided clear evidence of cheating. 
Now' that the incriminating evidence has been 
hidden, the North is already rehearsing ex- 
cuses 10 explain its obstructionist behavior. 

Pyongyang will claim that agency inspec- 
tors made unwarranted demands and that it 
had repeatedly warned that it had no choice 
but to unload the reactor when it did. Further 
delays would have intensified crewing safety 
risks, it will say. 

Such self-seiving arguments axe not credi- 
ble. However, the Nonh still has one card to 
play. It can withdraw from the treaty to hall 
the spread of nuciear weapons. Freed from 
the restraints of the treaty, the North's nucle- 
ar program would no longer be in violation of 
international law. The country’s status would 
then be no different from other nuclear- 
armed states outside the treaty, such as I&raeL 
India and Pakistan. 

Some .American and South Korean officials 


By Andrew Mack 


nonproliferation treaty, capping its undeclared 
nuclear capability may 50cm appear to be a 
least- worst policy option for the United Stales. 

Preventing the North’s small stockpile of 
weapons-grade plutonium from growing re- 
mains 3 vital interest Two new and much 
larger graphite-cooled reactors, under con- 
struction at Yongbyon and Taecbon, will pro- 
duce enough fissile material for a substantial 
plutonium export industry to states such as 
Libya, iraq and Iran. The first of the new 
reactors will become operational in 1995 or 
1996. Earlier this year, inspectors of the Inter- 
national Atomic Energy Agency reported that 
the North had created a second plutonium 
production line at the huge Yongbyon spent- 
fuel reprocessing plant 

Once North Korea has acquired a modest 
nuclear capability, it will have the deterrent it 
dearly believes is vital to its security. Then it 


may be willing to stop producing 
concessions that have been mreroj 

acutely distasteful because it would reward 
^behavior. But 

hSe few other options. SoulhKmrsm £*££> 
tv planners are less concerned about global 
proliferation than their Amencm «jm- 
uqM are. Seoul is ®uch W 
about a possible outbreak of war ? r 
of the regime in Pyongyang ttel 
the imposition of intern auonal sanctions 
against the North. .. 

ANorth Korea that felt more secure could 
reduce its conventional military budget 
which currently eats up more than 20 percent 
of the nation's GNP. Economic assistance 
that was pan of a future capping deal couki 
also help revive the ailing economy of tne 
North. Reducing the development gap be- 
tween the Communist North and the capital- 


ist South is a necessary av V- ■ 

32 ££££*£ 

ocsGt JBfW 1 . j ^auctions will not 
^ e nffl igh to prevent the North gH- 

> j-tisik. 




Eveo WllIKJUl _ T„_ J- a- .fo. 


Mrusl govern™ 

SniSn the others on die scrap heap 

to dii its naghbozs. jwticulariy Sooth Ko- 
rea and Japan, down with rt. 


The writer, , 


items at the A usmUian Nhicml KMV«: 


turns ui u « /iwui— • T_ 

Canberra, contributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune- 


Stand Tough Together or Hunker Down Alone 


W ASHINGTON — Stalinist 
North Korea watched the 


By William Safire 


way Serbia diddled the “Great 
Powers" of the West — a promise 
here, 2 false concession there — 
and proceeded to use the same 
technique on Lhe “Great Powers" 
of the East. Duplicity worked 
again; years of hand-wringing di- 
plomacy gave North Korea time 


With help from Tokyo , 
Beijing and Seoul, 
Washington can pose a 
most credible threat. 


now argue tnat tne a me nas come to recognize 
that the North cannot be prevented from ac- 
quiring some nuclear weapons. Washington 
must accept this fact just as it had to accept, 
albeit with great reluctance, the reality of a 
nuclear-armed Pakistan. U.S. nonproliferation 
policy toward Pakistan has switched from pre- 
veniion u> containment. It focuses on capping 
Pakistani nuclear capability at present levels." 

Whether North Korea Is in or out of the 


to produce enough fissionable 
material for perhaps a half-dozen 
nuclear tombs. 

We must now 1 decide whether 
to continue the protracted run- 
around, hoping v ainl y that Kim 11 
Sung wants only to be bought off. 
or to enforce international law — 
which would require the credible 
threat of war. The lack of such 
resolve failed in the West; now we 
will see if we can mak e our threat 
believ able in the East. 

Once again. Lhe United States 
will take the lead in trying to mar- 
shal the forces of its allies. Under 
color of a UN Security Council 
resolution, it will seek to coerce the 


nuclear lawbreaker by means of 
economic sanctions. 

That rneanc blockade. Japan 
mug stop the flow of hard-cunen- 
cy remittances to the dictatorship 
from its Korean residents. Ch i n a 
and South Korea must dose their 
borders to all trade with North 
Korea, including vital ofl. And 
U.S. armed forces must interdict 
sea supply of Pyongyang. 

North Korea has said it would 
consider any of that an act of war. 
That’s accurate; a blockade, even 
eophemized as “sanctions,” is an 
act of war. 

What would Pyongyang do? 

One alternative is the one we 
hope for. to recognize that the 
world’s threat of war is credible 
and to “join the family of na- 
tions." Because no more reactor 
roulette would be tolerated, the 
North would back down before 
its plutonium could be developed 
into tombs and placed on mis- 
siles being built to threaten Seoul. 


an enemy that fought it to a 
standstill two generations ago. 
How can Washington gjve Kim 


D incentives to end nuclear 


blackmail and admit inspectors. 

first, get absolute, public as- 
surances from Japan that no leak- 
age will be permitted, and that it 
vSj wage economic war. Russia 
should also announce its inten- 
tion to isolate the nudear outlaw. 

Second, tdl South Korea that 
its days of appeasement and com- 


J lacehcy are over — no more only 
percent of GNP for defense — 
and full-scale mobilization is in 
order its forces would bear the 
brum of the first attack, as U.S. 
bombers destroy the North's nu- 
clear potential 

Third, read) an understanding 
with China that neutrality is not 


enough; if the North besieges 
Seoul allies expect Chinese “vol- 
unteers" to stream across the Yalu 
to threaten North Korea’s caprtaL 

Nice work if you can do iL espe- 
cially that long reach about China 
threatening jts traditional Com- 
munist ally. But the United States 
is not helpless in leading the East- 
ern powers toward posing a threat 
to North Korea strong enough to 
discourage war. 

President Bill Clinton could 
say to the allies; If you are with 


Tokyo and 
The Non 


The North's other alternative is 
the one we dread; to launch Kore- 
an War II and invade the South. 
That would engage the United 
States, with 37.000 troops on 
hand to back up longstanding 
treaty commitments; America 
would then be in a real war with 


us, -we are with you, Togc&erwe 
ran pose the unmeosdy cre dible 
threat; if that doesn’t wKnk r^-. if 
we are dealing with madmen — 
together we can make short work 
of the war. . : 

On the other band. Ire could 
say. you are not doing us a favqr.;:_ 
If you are not with usia stepping 71 
nudear spread here and now — . 
we are out of the Far East Work 
oat your own collective security •: 
and good luck. _ j 

If C hina, Japan, Russia and \ 
South Korea are not worried ' 
about enforcing international law 
to protect those cities from nucle- 
ar missiles, why should America 
risk its troops? 

The United States should join . 
willing allies to intervene strongly 
— or else extricate itself fast. If 
U-S. leadership of proliferation 
police is rejected. Americans 
should await belter' leaders 
abroad and at borne; they can use 
the savings from troops drawn - 
down to build a space shiddr 
thereby protecting America from' 
the next decade's nudear bandits. 

Americans share a vital mterea :- 
wthevetydviUzed nation in stop- 
ping the spread of nukes. Bin if 
UJS. allies East or West dither or . 
choose isolation, America should 
wish them weS and invest in the 
most advanced self-protection. ~ 
The New York Times. . 





Bv Brent Scowcrost and Eric D. K. Melbv 


■TC7ASHINGT0N — The United 

Yv States is in danger of making a 
bad situation in Haiti even worse. 

It seems to be laying the ground- 
work for military intervention, which 
would lead it inio a quagmire. 

if the Clinton administration or- 
ders an invasion to restore President 
Jean-Eertrand .Aristide, it will be 
making a grave mistake. 

There are better ways to help the 
democratic process. 

Even if. given she superior U.S. 
forces. Father Aristide were back in 
office within a few days, in the long 
run an occupation would immerse 
the United States in the morass of 
Haitian nation-building — a futile 
exercise, surely. Haiti has struggled 
unsuccessfully with this task for near- 
ly two centuries. 

The Clinton administration inher- 
ited a Bush administration policy to- 
ward Haiti that was dead in the wa- 
ter. Its own approach has also been 
flawed. It has mistakenly embraced 
Father Aristide, who has shown ao 
flexibility in return. It has tightened 
economic sanctions, which will in- 
crease the regime’s black-market 
profits and the misery of the Haitian 
people. 

This, in turn, will increase the 
number of refugees, threatening to 
make the proposed offshore process- 
ing of them an insurmountable task. 

When it becomes clear (hat the new 
policies will not work, the adminis- 
tration, if we understand its hints, 
will resort to invasion. 

Even if Father .Aristide were re- 
lumed to office behind the bayonets 
of a multinational force sponsored by 
the United Nations or the United 
States, what then? 

The Haitian military and its para- 


military allies would fade out of sight 
to undertake guerrilla activities 
against the occupying force. 

.An occupation would coi be the 
dean operation that some interven- 
tionists imagine. There would proba- 
bly bs casualties and humiliations 
reminiscent of those in Somalia. 

A U.S. intervention might even 
succeed in uniting ihe disparate Hai- 
tian political forces agains’t it. Ameri- 
cans would be dragged into settling 
the Haitians' differences, with little 
chance of success. In the end, .Ameri- 
cans would wind up as scapegoats. 

Additionally, unilateral interven- 
tion would stir up long-standing anu- 
inierventionist sentiment in the 
Southern Hemisphere. 

In short, returning Father Aristide 
to Port-au-Prince would be the begin- 
ning, not the end, of Washington’s 
problems. He would have 10 be sus- 
tained in power at least through the 
end of his term, in December 1995. 

Or longer, according to his calcu- 
lations. He maintains (bat his term 
was interrupted when he was de- 
posed in December 1991. eight 
months after he took office and a 
year after he was elected. 

Given his tendencies, once in pow- 
er he might negate U.S. attempts to 
sow die seeds of democracy in Haiti. 

The brief U.S. invasions of Grena- 
da and Panama provide no justifica- 
tion for overrunning Haiti. In both 
cases. U.S. goals were limited and 
involved no nation-building. 

Even the House, on May 24, ap- 
proved a resolution opposing mili- 
tary intervention. 

There is a better approach. The 
White House ought to drop Father 
.Aristide permanently. Hardly a demo- 
crat. he is part of the problem, not the 


mm. 





' V 

m. 







solution. Although be is the product of 
an election, his authoritarian behavior 
while in office does not augur well for 
democracy. Moreover, despite the ad- 
ministration’s embrace of him, Father 
Aristide has bitten the hand that has 
been trying to feed him by refusng to 
compromise with his opponents. 

Instead, together with the Organi- 
zation of American States, Washing- 
ton should press for negotiations 
with Haiti’s military regime. The ob- 
ject would be to start building a dem- 
ocratic process, beginning with a new 
presidential election as soon as suit- 
able procedures could be put in place. 

This would require several things: 
the departure of today’s military 
leaders from power; barring Father 
Aristide from returning (other demo- 
crats can be Found to support); bring- 
ing in international observers for 
proper elections; dismantling all 


paramilitary organizations and un- 
dertaking a multinational effort to 
professionalize the Haitian military 
and police. 

To put pressure on the military 
leaders to negotiate a transfer of 
power, the tough sanctions against 
them should be continued: no inter- 
national recognition, no traveling 
abroad, no access to frozen financial 
and property assets overseas. 

Although lhe international sanc- 
tions against Haiti's leaders them- 
selves should continue, the trade 
sanctions against Haiti should be lift- 
ed. They punish innocent people and 
add to their misery, including forcing 
them into boats to flee to the United 
States, only to be turned back. 

In any case, all the sanctions since 
1991 have been ineffective. Instead of 
coercing the military into accepting 
the return of Father Aristide, they are 


Only a Credible Threat Will Dislodge Haiti’s Thui 


providing black-market profits to the 
military and its allies. 

The private sector in the United 
Stales should be encouraged to re- 
sume economic operations in Haiti, a 
major source of income for impover- 
ished Haitians. 

Ending U.S. support for Father 
Aristide should induce the military 
leaders to cooperate, because they 
would no longer have to fear for their 
lives if he returned. This would offer 
them a face-saving way out. It would 
help break the deadlock ’. 

Those contemplating direct in- 
volvement in nation -building ought 
to hark bade to U.S. occupation of 
Haiti from 1914 to 1933. 

When Americans arrived then, 
they encountered no vestige of de- 
mocracy. When they departed, none 
was left behind. 

An invasion today would very like- 
ly lead to the same result. 


N EW Y ORK — A few years aao 
when I was on an assign mf-ni In 


X y when I was on an assignment m 
Haiti, a man took me to the back of 

his pickup truck and pointed to two 

young children. They were sitting in 
the bed of the truck and both were 
shivering, although the evening was 
warm. It was obvious they were ill. 

The man said the children were his 
and he begged me to smuggle them 
into the United States, where they 
would be safe and “grow strong." 
After listening to me explain how 
that was impossible, the man quietly 
said thank you. and with an expres- 
sion of absolute despair, climbed into 
the cab or the truck and drove away. 

There was nothing unusual about 
the condition of the children in the 
truck, or the plight of their father. 
After centuries of exploitation, hun- 
ger. disease, poverty and ignorance 
are staples of life in Haiti. 

In the mo and a half years since 
President Jean-Ben rand Aristide was 
ousted in a coup, (he misery has only 
intensified. The combination of fero- 
cious political repression unleashed 
by the coup leaders and the interna- 
tional sanctions that were supposed 
to drive them from power have made 
a terrible situation worse. 

If (he United States is going to 
intervene militarily in Haiti, il should 
do so soon. Prolonging the sanctions 
when they are causing such hardship 


By Bob Herbert 


for ordinary Haitians while having so 
little impact on the renegade govern- 
ment, is cruel and indefeasible. 

President Bill Clinton has spelled 
out why he feels the United Stales has 
a special interest in Haiti, and why the 
use of force to restore Father Aristide 
is being considered. Haiti is “in our 
backyard,” Mr. Clinton said, and it is 
the only country in the Western Hemi- 
sphere in which the military has seized 
power from on elected leader. 

Mr. Clinton noted that if democra- 
cy was not restored to Haiti there 
would at some point be an enormous 
surge of new refugees seeking to settle 
in the Ltnitcd Slates. The president 
also mentioned the thousands of 
Americans living in Haiti and the l 
million Haitian-Americans in Ihe 
United Stales; and the fact that Haiti 
has become a staging area for inter- 
national drug shipments. 

Mr. Clinton did not mention the 
important role the U.S. government 
has played in the exploitation of the 
Haitian people. This has occurred 
through U.S. government support, 
direct and covert, for a series of 
repressive regimes, and through the 
long-term exploitation of cheap 
Haitian labor by American busi- 
nesses. The United States has an 
interest in acknowledging those 


abuses, and in making the effort to 
act as a friend rather than an oppres- 
sor of the Haitian people. 

The military in Haiti believes it has 
won its battle of tbe wills. 

“Sometimes." said an American 
diplomat, “the military leaders be- 
lieve we were never serious about 
restoring Aristide, and other limes 
they think we may have been serious 
but lacked the will. Ether way they 
have felt triumphant" 

Almost no one, in or out of (he 
Clinton administration, believes that 
the sanctions alone will drive the mil- 
itary leaders from power. Actually it 
is wrong to call them mfliiary leaders 
— they are thugs, a band of murder- 
ers, rapists, terrorists and drug deal- 
ers who have all but demolished the 
fragile democratic infrastructure that 
was in place at the time of Father 
Aristide's election in December 1990. 

A report on Haiti published last 
March by the U.S. Army War College 
said, “We have >eriously misread the 
Haitian military and its allies, ascrib- 
ing to them a degree of reasonableness 
and flexibility that dues not exist.” 

President Clinton cannot bluff the 
leaders of the coup in Haiti. And he 
should not continue the added misery 
of the sanctions indefinitely. If the 
United Stales is going to lead an 


invasion, then the time to move is 
near. Nothing less than a genuine 
threat of force will dislodge the coup. 

The New York Times. 


Mr. Scowcrofi, national security ad- 
viser to Presidents Ford and Bush, is 
president of the Forum for Internation- 
al Folicy. Mr. Melby, a National Secu- 
rifv Council staff member in the Bush 
administration, is a senior associate at 
lhe Forum. They contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Tunes. 


JN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1894; Scandal in Italy ity in Poland to any class of Jews wt 


ity in Poland to any class of Jews who 
ROME — The great trial of thp 2?' “““ VP 00 a “Nation 

Banca Romana is dart v increasing in 3 Na i K H n ’” “*■ 

interest, and monopolisSSfe^ ^ T 1 ™ U,c *T OT11 scbools ’ 
tion of the ItalianpuNic. The hinh language in official proclama- 

sociai standing of thedefendants the p°f S ’ ^ w .f° do not refuse to be 
enormous *4 which ^es pnmanly and Jews secondarily. 

havin 8 abstracted, and the 1QAA . D ^ . 


fact that many well-known and influ- 
ential members of the political world 
are implicated in this disgraceful af- 
fair, ail trad to excite the morbid 
curiosity or the public, who have ap- 
propriately christened the bank scan- 
dal the Panamino , or tittle Panama. 


1944; Pope Speaks Out 


1919: Jews in Poland 


J*** 18 “ Th* Germans have a vast 


1 — — ... uu 1 ii a vgjujL 

seneme to advertise that the Poles 


LONDON — [From our New York 
edmon;! Pope Pius XII declared to- 
day [June 2J that lhe idea that the war 
must end either in complete victory 
or complete destruction is a stimulant 
toward prolonging the conflict, and, 
expressing hope for an early peace, 
praised the heralds of wisdom and 
moderation." Addressing the College 
of Cardinals, the Pontiff said, as Al- 


■ ^ uidi me roles i;^ ■ 

have entered upon a policy of imperi- SJSf* fPProacbed Rome, that 
alism and of denying to rite Jewish „boever dared to raise a hand against 


ansm and of denying to rite Jewish p w ., aar ® a to raise a hand a gains t 

EJLHSrs o™ hTSLiJSs 


M- Paderewski has chained hi, 
* “T ■“"« declarant 
»PPCM 10 have had a small effect 
outside of Poland. There is no ho ul 


■ . „ , ,r — umui 

ade. In a diamsaon of Christian- 
ity's ewent influence in world affairs 

cl»™h" ne d/? leava S« from ihe 
Church and the “vast division and 
dispersal of religious confessions.*’ 





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Twin Blows, the First Less Remembered 


wsavi.a 

man forces busy in Italy. Allied 
ttjops - « great cost io them- 
sdws — permuted the gigantic 
Normandy buildup to proS At 
the ame time, the .Allied high com- 
mand in Italy was determined to 

1944 ITALY 1994 

gmb world attention in the hours 
before the landings in France 
would wipe the Italian campaign 
off the front pages. 

A* s H^> e °f toe war, hopes 
high that twin blows within 
48 tours on two major battlefields 
would hasten Germany’s collapse 
Of course, that did dot happen! 
It look almost another year io 
reach V-E Day. 

So today, Italy has become the 
forgotten front. Tens of thousands 
of veterans, families and friends 
are expected to pack the Norman- 
dy beaches to celebrate that anni- 
versary. But hardly anyone will 
notice a smaller gathering in 
Rome on Saturday at which survi- 
vors of the Italian campaign com- 
memorate the li berali on ofthe city 
on June 4, 1944. 

From the fail of 1943 through 
half of 1944, thousands of Allied 
troops spent bloody months bat- 
tling Italy's “mua. mules and 
mountains’' as well as Germans. 
A lot of them are still there, in 
a handful of cemeteries. 

As early as September 1943. Al- 
lied strategy included an attempt to 
reach Rome. The Italian military 
chiefs had decided to depose Mus- 
solini and desert their Nazi part- 


By Paul S. Green 


new, and they desperately wanted 
help against expected German ven- 
geance when the double-cross be- 
came public. During secret negotia- 
hods that summer, the Allies 
agreed to drop the VS. 82d Air- 
borne Division on Rome hours be- 
fore Allied force began the inva- 
sion of Italy at Salerno 320 
kilometers (200 miles) south of the 
capital 

Determined to learn whether the 
Italians could protect his troops. 
Major General Matthew Rjdgway. 
the para troop commander, bad his 
deputy, Brigadier General Maxwell 
Taylor, slip secretly into Rome. Al 
midnight, a few hours before Gen- 
eral Ridgway’s scheduled takeoff 
from Sicily, General Taylor woke up 
the new head oTgOvtmment, Mar- 
shal Pietro Badqgfio. The sleepy 
marshal confirmed the worst: The 
Germans had seized control of 
Rome and the American paratroop- 
ers faced slaughter by some of ful- 
ler’s toughest battalions. 

As the clock ticked toward H- 
Hour, General Taylors a farming 
message was relayed to General 
Dwight Eisenhower. Ike ordered 
the mission aborted, but General 
Ridgway could not be reached at 
his Sicily headquarters. He began 
launching his paratroop-laden 
planes. Finally, the cancellation 
message found him in time to call 
his troops bacL “It was a goddam 
close can," one participant re- 
called. 

General Eisenhower later com- 
mented about General Taylor’s 
mission into Rome: “The risks he 
ran were greater than ] asirnd any 
other agent or emissary to under- 
take during the war. . . . Every min . 


ute [he] was in imminent danger of 
discovery and death” 

After a desperate batik* on the 
Salerno beaches, the invasion 
forces managed to move ahead and 
capture Naples in October. But 
German defenses stiffened during 
a deadly fall and winter. In Janu- 
ary. the Allies carried out 
a successful end run with an am- 
phibious landing at Anzin. hut over- 
cautious leadership kept them 
pinned down for the next four 
months. Finally, in May, they broke 
out of the Anzio beachhead and 
began the race for Rome. Allied 
strategy called lor British troops io 

An astute practitioner 
of public relations , the 
general ordered the 
main body of U.S. 
forces to change course 
and speed to Rome. 


advance into and through the capi- 
tal while American uopps pursued 
and cut off the retreating Germans. 

But the 5th Army commands v. 
Lieutenant General Mark Clark, 
wanted Rome for die American.*' 
— and above all for himself. An 
astute practitioner of public rela- 
tions, he ordered the main body of 
U.S. forces to change course and 
speed to Rome. 

Major General Geoffrey Keyes 
candidly told The Associated Press 
why General Clark was in such a 


It’s Good the Germans Are Disturbed 


By Flora Lewis 

F RANKFURT — Germans are wondering about 
themselves again, acutely sensitive to what others 
drink. They are holding int ernati onal conferences on 
rightrwing radicalism and whether it suggests a crisis 
of their democratic culture. Thai is why some wanted 
so badly to be represented in (he D-Day spectacular. 
It would have bam taken as one more confirmation of 
their membership in the democratic community, al- 
most as if their fathers had been on the other side in 
Normandy SO years ago. 

I thought that inappropriate, but the transforma- 
tion is reaL And while for Germans World War II 
seems to have been pushed modi farther into the past 
than in other countries, with the help of their writers 
and filmmakers and some leaders of conscience, they 
have done a much better job of acknowledging and 
coming to terms with it than have the Japanese. 

In Tokyo, the government canceled a planned visit 
the Emperor to the Pearl Harbor memorial in 
because it was too politically delicate and 
might ruffle national pride. In the German town of 
Sohngcn last week, people demonstrated to remember 
the date when a Turkish family’s house was torched 
lasfcyearyarid to call for tougher measures against neo- 
Naris. Johannes Ran, prime minister of North Rhine-- 
Westphalia state, told them that Germany had a 
greater obligation to fight racism than do other coun- 
tries because of its Nazi past There are extreme 
rightists in practically all the democracies. Five mem- 
bos of the successor parly to the neofascists are in the 
new Italian government France’s ultra-right national- 
ists regularly get 10 percent to 12 percenrof the vote in 
nati onal elections. Far-right rabble rousers with fool 
messages keep surfacing in the United States. 

In comparative numbers, the Germans are margin- 
al. Bui the German thugs who shout “foreigners out” 
are most {none to violence, and it is right to worry 
about them and what they mean. 

I went to cme of toe conferences, sponsored by the 
Hessian state center for political education and Johann 
Wolfgang Goethe University. A professor told me he 
just couldn’t understand the idea of rising nati o nali sm 
m Germany “because we don'C have an identity." 

That is one of the peculiarities about reunification. 
It had long been supposed that the sense of unful fi lled 
identity gnawing at West Germans was the result of 
partition. But folly restored sovereignty and national 


unity 'does not seem to have healed it. Gennan-ness 
remains a much debated question, something intellec- 
tuals fed a need to define. 

When the country was divided, many Western cul- 
tural figures felt that East Germany was somehow 
more authentic, more tree to its Germanic roots than 
their Federal Republic. They did not attribute that to 
co m m uni sm, but to less commerriahsm in a society 
that didn't have the opportunity to wallow in greed. 

A thoughtful West Berlin newspaperwoman gave 
me what was probably the closest to the real explana- 
tion. The Russian overlords had no cultural impact at 
aB on the East Germans, who considered themselves 
inherently superior. The Americans exerted a tremen- 
dous cultural influence on the West Germans, who 
absorbed trans-Atlantic tastes and habits to the point 
of feeling they had to question themselves. The nation- 
ality law, based totally on ancestry, helps muddy the 
issue. A person who can trace back German “blood” 
tines can become a citizen the moment he or she enters 
the country, even if his or her forebears have been 
living in Russia or Romania for hundreds of years. A 
person bom in Germany to Turkish or African immi- 
grants, schooled there, perhaps speaking no language 
bat German, has a very hard time getting citizenship. 
^JTbftbtood right has .been extended mainly to people 
from the East It is not dear whether all Americans or 
Argentines or such of German stock can claim it. So 
far as is known, it has never been tested by a Togolese, 
a Cameroonian, a Namibian, someone from former 
German colonies in Africa with many people of mixed 
parentage who do speak German. 

No doubt in the United States, an enterprising 
lawyer would pm together a class action suit and force 
the Supreme Court to rule on how many “pure" genes 
are needed to qualify. Thai could be done in Germany, 
and it would almost surely provoke a more reasonable 
citizenship law, which has been discussed for years but 
never passed. Germany, with some 7 million foreign- 
ers, does have m unusually high proportion. Bui the 
number would probably be reduced by over half if 
citizenship were normally available. Thai would not 
stop far-right extremists attacking people who look 
different, but it would help Germans define national 
identity as loyal citizenship. Meanwhile, they are right 
to be speoafiy concerned about racist violence. The 
more it distorts them, the more reassured others will 
fed about the sturdiness of their democracy. 

© Flora Lewis. 


big hurry. “France is going lo be 
invaded, and we've got to get this in 
i he papers before then." When a 
unit commander insisted his men 
would need the rest of the day to 
overcome German artillery. Gener- 
al Keyes told him, “That will not 
do. General Clark must be across 
the city limits by 4 o’clock." 
“Why?” he was asked “Because he 
has to have a photograph taken.” 
General Clark reached the photo- 
genic heights of Capitoline Hill in 
time to pose for pictures. 

On June 6. when a subordinate 
woke him up io give him the first 
bulletins of the Normandy land- 
ings, General Gark was heard to 
grumble. “Those SOBs — can't 
they even let us have the headlines 
for one day!" 

General Clark's actions still 
cause controversy, bringing bitter 
criticism that he had sacrificed the 
opportunity to destroy German 
forces for the prestige and publicity 
of being first into Rome. 

I was one of six Army reporters 
for the GI newspaper The Stars 
and Stripes who came into the city 
on the heels of the entering troops. 
We rushed over to Rome's leading 
daily, I! Messaggero, and asked 
the staff to help us put out a paper. 
They were delighted but confessed 
they didn't know any English. We 
admitted we didn’t know any Ital- 
ian either. 

While the fighting soldiers 
chased the Germans out of Rome, 
we writing soldiers went to work, 
filling the paper with our stories 
and accounts by civilian correspon- 
dents. As copies rolled off the 
presses, we grabbed them and 
stood out on the broad, sunny bou- 
levards of the Eternal Gty, hand- 
ing them out to surprised Gls. 

Before the last Goman was gone 
from Rome, we had published the 
first issue of the Rome edition of 
Stars and Stripes, under the head- 
line. in big type, “WE’RE IN 
ROME.” The next day. June 6, 
world headlines exploded with Nor- 
mandy landings, and our Stars and 
Stripes, in type twice as trig as the 
day before, screamed. “INVA- 
SION.” 

in those heady days it seemed 
reasonable to link toe double Rome- 
Normandy punch to a quick end of 
the war. A soldier in a weapons 
carrier put it this way: “It won't be 
long now till Jerry gives in, 1 hope. 
Rome and the Second Front will be 
too much for him.” 

An Italian government official 
enihused: "In three or four 
months — finite! Now is a circle 
around Germany —in Russia, Ita- 
ly and France.” 

But in fact the capture of toe first 
enemy capital dwindled into a one- 
day stray. The sizable press corps 
following toe Italian campaign be- 
gan to melt away, heading for Nor- 
mandy. In coming months, with 
Lieutenant General George Pat- 
ton's tanks blasting into Germany 
and a new invasion on toe southern 
shores of France, the grinding war 
of attrition in northern Italy disap- 
peared from public view. And so 
it has remained. 

But American veterans of the 
Italian campaign are hoping for a 
pleasant change. With President 
Bill Ginion's decision to visit 
Rome and Anzio — his only ap- 
pearances outside Normandy 
toe Forgotten Front will be remem- 
bered, at least for a day or two. 

The writer, a former V.S. Senate 
staff member, represents The Stars 
arid Stripes on the Rome 1994 Com- 
mittee, composed of units from the 
Italian campaign that will commem- 
orate the 50th anniversary in Rome 
on Saturday. He contributed this 
comment to The Washington Post 


In Sarajevo , Living r a Little Less Like Cavemen 9 


S ARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegpvma — A 
woman walks her Dal m atia n . She ap- 
proaches a n«n with a dachshund on a leash. 
The Dalmatian wags its tail, but the dachs- 
hund is busy sniffing at some hole m the 
sidewalk, so the Dalmatian shows interest in 
a spaniel farther down the road. 

There is nothing striking about this doggie 
scene. Or is there? 

Only that it happened one evening not long 
n an on a street in Sarajevo known a s Stri per 
ADey and toe dachshund was exploring a 
giant ’pockmark left by a mortar shdL 
Hint Satricvo has been relatively cahnamce 
February, when a frail cease-fire took effect 
Only a few detonations and sporadic ma- 
chine-gun fire each day, so peopte walking 
does are not really challenging the enemy. 
They are defying onr notion of hfe m a 

with the TV images of Sanyevans dodging 


By Anna Hnsarka 

snipers* bullets, carrying plastic containers of 

predous water in pushcarts and baby car- 
riages, bring by canffldighL 
We have Fell scary far them and angiy at 
the politicians for riot doing enough to stop 
the war in Bosnia. We grew accustomed to 
the right of these downtrodden human be- 
ing, bandy surviving on humanitarian aid. 

There were many reports about artistic life 
under siege, theater performances, beauty 
contests and fihn shows, about the uninter- 
rupted publication of the daily newspaper, 
Oriobodenje. Those were heroic acts, signs of 
the town resisting. 

These days, during tins ghetto-like status 
te try to behave as if the war is over. 


at Sarajevo has been locked in a surrogate 
life, and acts that were heroic during; the 
shelling now seem like pathetic make-believe. 


So instead of rejoicing at toe slight improve- 
ments in their horrible living standard, Saraje- 
vans have grown bitter and disenchanted. 

“Do not mistake electricity and water for 
freedom,” they say. 

Outriders expressing enthusiasm because 
the lights finally work sound paternalistic, as 
if they were saying, “Aren’t you happy to be 
living a little less like cavemen?” 

But cavemen do not breed dogs with pedi- 
grees. A mongrel would look more natural 
here, especially if it were scavenging in one of 
toe heaps of garbage still piled up. 

This is why the right of Dalmatians, 
dachshunds, spaniels and poodles being 
walked by their masters is sinking. They do 
not fit in the picture: They belong to a 
Sarajevo that is no more. 

The writer is a staff writer at The New 
Yorker She contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


HeylMdltTogeJher 

Regarding - Battle Scars R^iam 
but Little Has Changed m Norman- 
dy * (Features, April 22): 

Having been educated to toe 
United Sates during World War 

' IT Laniaa tMwHifl iKfi BfltlSn 


Atm at dtetuneof D-Dty 1 
I am in no way a chauvinist I a® 
al«o a fan of Stephen Ambrose^ 
but 1 have to take issue with one 
aspect of his article. . 

Out of .some 19 paragraphs, i 
could count only three which re- 
ferred to the British and Canadian 
contribtttkm. This is wgreMf;®; 
as in' faerthe U.S, contingent 
fmandnaUy) in the minonty. vu 
D-Day, the totals were as follows: 

By Sea By** Ton! 

firil/Ott -75315 7.**> 

UA • • ' 57JOO - 15J0O 7J.OOO. 

-Totals - 132.715 - 23-400 JSMtS 

Out of eight assanlt brigades 
that landed on June ^ 
British and Canadian; of toe total 


of planes deployed that day, 6, OS) 
were American and 5,510 from 
RAF or other Allied contingents; 
but of the naval force, only 16.5 
percent were American, and 79 
percent British and Canadian. The 
3,000 landing craft were fairly 
evenly divided. ; 

Of the mem in command, under 
Hismhower as supreme allied com- 
jjtander (and an admirable choice 
he was, tool), his deputy was Brit- 
ish, Tedder, so were toe three ser- 
vice dud’s —with Montgomery, as 
ground commander, the overall 
chief in charge of toe Overlord 
landings. 

Of course, after the arrival of 
Panon’s U^. 3d Army, toe U.S. 
preponderance in Normandy ^rew, 
very swiftly. Butit is disaiuenng to 
learn that, because tiH Allied vehi- 
cles in the invasion carried toe fa- 
ypfliar white staryFrench school 
chOdfen evidently now beDeve that 
D-Day was; almost entirely an 
American affair! 


Overirad was conspicuous for the 
fantastic amity and cooperation be- 
tween British and Americans — 
really toe culmination of toe “spe- 
cial relationship.'’ But after toe war 
there were too many disputes be- 
tween toe commanders and histori- 
ans as to “who did what," and in the 
nat-up to this 50th anniversary al- 
ready discord seems well en- 
trenched. Therefore it may be help- 
ful to try to set this part of the 
history straight. 

ALISTAIR HORNE 
Henley-on-Thames, England 

TVade, Environment 

While the Uruguay Rounc 
trade agreement may not have sat- 
isfied the desires of various envi- 
ronmental organizations, it is per- 
haps extreme fra 1 Jessica Mathews 
(“ Adrift in the Great Gray Green- 
less GA 7T" Opinion, April 12) tc 
generally condemn the results of 
tire round because of its possible 
environmental shortcomings. 


She rightfully talks of the need fra 
a healthy environment to promote 
economic growth and human wel- 
fare. 

It is equally true that only with 
the stimulation of economic growth 
in developed and developing coun- 
tries and in countries in transition 
will toe move toward better environ- 
mental protection be viable. 

The Worid Industry Counts for 
the Environment (W1CE), a coali- 
tion of toe world's leading compa- 
nies with cot cent for high stan- 
dards of environmental 
management, believes that toe new 
World Trade Organization is toe 
appropriate institution io deal with 
environment-related trade issues 
and to prevent toe misuse of envi- 
ronmental arguments for protec- 
tionist purposes. 

JAN-OLAF WILLUMS. 

Paris. 

The writer is executive director 
of W1CE 


A Record 
Nearly Lost 
In the Rush 

By John G. Morris 

P ARIS — Something woke 
me early, the morning of 
Tuesday, June 6. 1944. I drew 
toe blackout curtain and saw 
that it was just another dulL gray 
London day. colder than spring 
had any right to be. Al least it 
wasn't raining. 

J was alone, in toe flat on Up- 
per Wimpoie Street that I shared 
with Frank Scherscbel. It was 
portentous to be alone, for 1 knew 
what Frank’s absence meant. 
Without saying goodbye, he had 
gone to bis’ battle station — an 
airfield from which he would flv 





Rofccn Mssuofl PWs*» 

Robert Capa took this photo oo Omaha Beach as the first wave of American troops was landing. 


1944 NORMANDY 1994 


reconnaissance over (he English 
Channel, to photograph the larg- 
est armada ever assembled. 

I turned on toe radio, made tea 
and read toe papers — which told 
me nothing. Suddenly, at 8:32 
London time, the bulletin came 
over BBC: 

Under command of Genera! Ei- 
senhower, Allied naval forces, 
supported b\ strung Allied air 
forces, began landing A Hied ar- 
mies this morning on the northern 
coast of France. 

1 said to myself, in what Joe 
Liebtingof The New- Yorker once 
called “the great cliche of the Sec- 
ond World War.” "This is it.” I 
hurried to toe office, even though 
there wouldn't be much to do — 
for many hours, as it turned out. 

I had been waiting eight 
moaihs for this day. There had 
been a false alarm Sunday, when 
a 22-year-old telegrapher in toe 
AP London bureau, practicing to 
get up her speed, had put out an 
erroneous bulletin: URGENT 
PRESS ASSOCIATED NYK 
FLASH EISENHOWER'S HQ 
ANNOUNCED ALLIED 
LANDINGS IN FRANCE. It 
had been corrected within a min- 
ute. but momentarily it upset both 
Allied and German headquarters. 

Now it was for reaL Tuesday 
was a good D-Day for Life maga- 
zine. uur job was to furnish live- 
action pictures for toe next issue, 
dated June 19. which would dose 
on Saturday in New York and 
appear toe following week. Wire- 
photos, of poor quality and limit- 
ed selection, would not do; be- 
sides, they would be available to 
newspapers through toe pool. Our 
only hope to meet toe deadline 
was to send original prints and 


near lives, as many as possible, in a 
pouch which would leave Grosve- 
nor Square by motorcycle courier 
at preciseiy 9 A.M. Loudon time 
on Thursday. The courier would 
take it to a plane waiting at Heath- 
row. which would transfer i\ to a 
larger plane at Prestwick. Scotland. 
After one or two fuel stops it would 
arrive in Washington, and be hand- 
carried to New York cm Saturday. 

1 hud rehearsed my pan in every 
detail. Censorship, al the Ministry 
of Information's ground-floor of- 
fice in toe University of London's 


was of toe essence, and big money 
ortexx awaited the first photogra- 
pher with an exclusive. It was not 
uncommon for a messenger to 
run out of the darkroom with a 
wet print, hoping that it would 
dry before it hit toe editor's desk. 

On D-Day there were 12 pho- 
tographers accredited for the wire 
services; life had six: Robert 
Capa, Bob Landry, Ralph Morse. 
George Rodger, David Scherman 
and Frank ScherscbeL Who would 
gpt toe first picture? Bad weather 
prevented general views from ei- 


7 am a gambler . 1 decided to go in with 
Company E in the first wave. 9 

Robert Capa 


tall central building that backed 
on Bedford Square, was by now a 
familiar routine We were required 
to make four small proof prints of 
every single negative that was to 
leave the country: oae for the cen- 
sors. one for us, one for Washing- 
ton, one for New York. Every ewe 
had to be stamped PASSED FOR 
PUBLICATION, with the date. 
The censor's final act was to bundle 
the “passed” material into an enve- 
lope and seal it with special Scotch 
tape on which was imprinted 
PASSED BY CENSOR. Without 
that, it ooukl not leave the country. 

Life had joined in a wartime 
pod with three Wirephoto agen- 
cies-. The Associated Press, Acme, 
and International News Photos. 
The advantage was gaining equal 
access to major news events, such 
as the current hostilities, despite 
bring a weekly. Tbe disadvantage 
was that we had to make available 
our best “hard news” pictures for 
distribution over toe wires. 

la Fleet Street at that time the 
agencies sold pictures not as a 
“service,” but individually. Speed 


(her air (Scherscbel) or sea (Scher- 
man). Morse would not land until 
later, with General George Pat- 
ton’s Third Army. Rodger, with 
the British, “walked ashore in a 
blaze of anticlimax,” to use his 
own words. Only four press pho- 
tographers landed with the first 
wave of American infantry — a 
dubious privilege which both 
Capa and Landry felt obliged to 
accept Landry’s film got lost. 
Harry Harris or AP bad bad luck. 

AD day Tuesday we waited, and 
no pictures. It was rumored that 
one Signal Corps photographer 
had been killed m die first hours. 
On Wednesday, Ben Brandt of 
Acme, without even getting his 
feet wet, returned to London with 
a FIRST PICTURE! 

Where was Capa? Hour after 
hour went fay and we waited in 
gloom. The entire darkroom staff 
— chief C. D. (Braddy) Bradshaw 
and four young assistants plus 
the photographer Hans Wild — 
had been standing by anxiously 
since Tuesday morning. 

About 6:30 P.M. there came 


a call from a Channel port: “Ca- 
pa's film is on the way. You should 
get it within an hour or two.” I 
called E K. Butler of AP, the pool 
editor, who snapped back; “All I 
want is pictures, not promises!” 

Around 9:00. a courier came 
with Capa's little package: four 
rolls of 35mm film, plus half a 
dozen rolls of 120. A scrawled 
note said that all the action was in 
the 35mm. that things had been 
very rough, and that be was re- 
luming to toe beach. 

Braddy gave toe film to Dennis 
to develop. Hans Wild soon called 
me to say that toe 35mm, though 
grainy, looked “fabulous!" 1 re- 
plied “1 need contacts — rush, 
rush RUSH!" 

A few minutes later Dennis came 

bounding up toe stairs and into my 
office, sobbing; "They’re ruined — 
ruined — Capa's films are all 
RUINED!" Incredulous. I rushed 
bad: to toe darkroom with him, as 
he explained that he had hung the 
films, as usual, in toe metal locker 
that served as a drying cabinet 
heated by a coil on ibe floor. Be- 
cause of the order to rush, he had 
closed the doors. Without ventila- 
tion toe emulsion had melted. 

! held up toe four rolls, one at" 
a time. Three were hopeless; 
nothing to see. But on toe fourth 
roll there were II frames with 
distinct images. They wereproba- 
bly representative of the entire 
35mm take; who can know, but 
their grainy imperfection — per- 
haps abetted by the lab accident 
— contributed to making them 
some of the most dramatic photos 
in toe history of warfare. 

The writer, London picture editor 
for Life magazine in Worid War II, 
was responsible for life's picture 
coverage of the invasion of Norman- 
dy. This is adapted for the Herald 
Tribune from the text of an autobi- 
ography he is preparing 



3 lim* - 9 30am trie io.Bog* Hejiuna Cemetery, truly. 9D0pm Intwwrtitmal Hour - Homtondy. 4 Jum - 6.00 pm Lte toreroge of Betting The Retort ceremony - Portsmouth, Eaglanl. 
S Jane - 1 1.30am Uw towage of Drumhead Service - Pom mouth, England. 11.00pm tala Edition from Normandy, b Jim - 3-4.00nm CNN promts: The Gnat Crusade. 7.00am tin 
coverage ol memorial service aboard the USS George Washington. BJMam Un coverage of Ranger Assault ceremony- Pointe du Hoc KLODom Live cove rage of US Frandr Ceremony at Utah 
Beach. 7.30pm Lne coverage af Inieinmionol Ceremony at Omaha Beach. 5.00pm Live cow rage of fondant Clinton's speech or US Memorial Ceremony - Gnlwiile Cemetery. 7.00-&3Jpm 
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Pag 
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International Herald Tribune 

Si 

Friday, June 3 f 1994 

Page 8 


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By Steven Erlanger 

j¥w Yrvk Tima Scrrice 



The New Yort Times 


S T. PETERSBURG — About Sl Pe- 
tersburg. an echoing, haunted city, 
there is no end of dreaming. Created 
at enormous human cost out of the 
marshes by the singular will of Peter the 
Great, who wanted to force his country's 
face toward the West in the early 13th centu- 
ry. SL Petersburg embodies the torn, neurot- 
ic spirit of Russia. With its elegant vistas and 
pale ice-cream colors, it is a dream-like ver- 
sion of Europe — barely an Asiatic onion 
dome was allowed on these churches — 
executed in the Russian totalitarian style. 

In June, this month of White Nights, the 
poet Joseph Brodsky writes, the buildings, 
deprived of shadow and roofs rimmed in 
gold, look like fragile china. The sky be- 
comes lawny pink, and it’s difficult to fall 
asleep, he says, “because it's too ligbL and 
because any dream will be inferior to this 
reality." 

In the new Russia, however, this transcen- 
dent reality is maned by increasing crime. So 
use the hotel safe, and if you are suddenly 
surrounded by a gang of ragged children, 
break through and run away from these 
pickpockets. 

There is an “official" period for White 
Nights from June 18 to 30. The classical 
portion of the festival includes concerts- bal- 
let, opera and theater. The superb Mariinsky 
Theater, for example, puts on its new, five- 
hour production of Glinka’s opera “Russian 
and Ludmilla" on June 26, and honors Rim- 
sky-Korsakov on June 25 with the symphon- 
ic suite “Legend of the Invisible City of 
Kit czh. " It opens with Tchaikovsky’s opera 
“The Queen of Spades." 

Apart from the official festival dates, 
boys' choirs from Germany, Switzerland, 


France and Russia will give six perfor- 
mances June 6 to 10 at the Mariinsky The- 
ater, formerly the Kirov, the Sl Petersburg 
Philharmonic and at one of the city's most 
spectac ular cathedrals, Smolny. 

Russian classical ballet performances with 
artists from the Mariinsky. Bolshoi and oth- 
er Russian companies are scheduled for June 
25 to SepL 15 in several theaters. Over 20 
international soloists will gather at the Alek- 
sandrinsky Theater from Aug. 16 to 24 in a 
ballet competition. 

The Mariinsky Theater, teL 114-I2J 1 (the 
city code is 812) is at 1 Teatralnaya Square. 
Festival tickets can be obtained through the 
Astoria Hotel Sl Isaac’s Square. 

The principal festival event is the Russian 
Museum’s exhibition of socialist-realist art of 

the Stalin era called “Agitation for Happi- 
ness." More than 500 paintings, sculptures, 
murals, porcelain, lace and handicrafts, some 
of them shown for the first time in 60 years, 
illustrate the abiding myths of totalitarian 
leadership cults and party propaganda. 

This is a city of czars, revolutionaries and 
writers, all of whom have been mythologized 
and remembered in a series of museums. 

First, lake a canal tour of what is also a 
city of water. You can arrange it through 
vour hotel or go to the bridge where Nevsky 
Prospekt crosses the Moika River, where 
there is a landing. Allow at least an hour or 
two if you want to go out on the Neva River 
and see the cruiser Avrora, for instance, 
whose guns signaled the start of the Bolshe- 
vik Revolution. Negotiate, but expect to pay 
S25 or so. It’s worth iL 

The Hermitage, the former Winter Palace, 
which is now one of the world’s largest art 
museums, must be seen, and it can be, if you 
get your tickets through your boteL You will 
pay a bit more than the official 14,000 ruble 
price ($7.60) charged to foreigners, but. with 
ticket in hand, you can walk right past the 


tong ticket-buyers’ fine. CW Dvortsovayft 

Embankment; enter from MoncSr 
10:30 A- M. to 6 P. M- closed on Monday; 

2 1 23 pereajf tax to helped raise 
hotel prices, competition among hotete 
may start to bringthem down. And a travel 
SL may geT&tter rate* »*“*" ‘ 
Second, given the tittve shmW of good. 



avoid tne uooowm uaun-,--- -—j 
Aug. 7. Rales include breakfast and tex. 

A classic (1912) hotel, ceasonabty weU 
renovated, is the 436-room Aston* perfectly 
situated at 39 Gertsena, SL Isaac's Square- 

Bat the rooms are a disappomtmait, wi tn 
their dark Soviet furnishings and modular 
bathrooms. They are dean, however, ana 
service is rood. The hotd takes a lot of tour 

groups. But that can be an advantage, be- 
cause its service bureau on the first floor 

(210-5046), which books tickets, tow* air- 
port taxis and so an, is much cheaper urn 
Si Grand Hotel, especially for Mamnsky 
tickets ($37 here) and small group viats to 
Pushkin or Paviovsk. A standard double i $ 
S21 0 a night. A larger room is $300. Reserva- 
tions 210-5032. fax 315-9668. 

T HE massive Pribaltiskaya, one of 
the newer Soviet-era In tourist ho- 
tels on tire Gulf of Finland near the 

Olympia, five miles from the city 
center, and the Helen Hold, are budget 

alternatives. . . 

There is no shuttle service to the 13»- 
room Pribaltiskaya, at 14 Korablestrmtely. 
and hotd cars -are not cheap. Although a 
double is officially $ 1 60, hotd staff say lower 
rates are obtainable through a foreign travel 
agent or Yelena Morozova of the local Dmm 
agency at 233-7809, who says a double with 
breakfast is S95. Reservations: 356-4135, fax 
356-0094. 


The Helen Hetd’s W 

JgSS .hey expee. » cw pm «o 
about $120 soon. . • • ^ 

SLPwcrabmghasstmic^ni^^fefa. 

Bur however 
the food * ^variably 
disappointing, so choose ampler dishes. .. 

Fresh fish is the great ^ *£*%££**: 
sian resident, and ^ 

Finnish joint venture 86 Nevsky 

site the Nevsky Palace Hold, isafine 


dude grilled salmon, steamed ^^^a. 
fine smoked sturgeon with horseratfidt 
sauce. With taxes, wine is very expensive in 

Russia, with a *91 Sanceire corong 

there is a Mondavi Sauvignon Blanc at S3i 
ninnw for two with one trf thcse wme^aad : 
without dessert is about $80. 

A bustling and attractive Dutch 

joint venture is the Senai-Bar, in the Senate 
building housing the Russian n» dl 
Galemaya; 31+5253. It is a lovd^wdk frcm 
Nevsky fl Vwi g the Neva e m b ankmd rf by tne 
Hermitage and the Winter Palace to the - 
Bronze Horseman statue of Peter tire Great •: 
Go through the huge arch and you. are Atax, 
al ong with interesting cross somonis ofRns- : 
sia's new rich. Than are 100 kinds tf bedv 
inc l udin g exedfent Granjabloam on draft, 
crusty bread and entrees like T-bone or topr- 
nedos steaks, mixed meat kebab, beef Str ega-, 
noff, salmon and a good baked swordfish with . 
Tncdiim rod tomatoes. There is also cheese- 
cake and apple pie; builwcf espresso. Open : 
(torn 1 1 A. M. to 5 A. M. Tire lunch and 1= 
A. M--to-dosmg menu is steak sandwiches, . 
hamburgers and satay. Loach or diimerfor 
two, with beer is $30; with wme; $75. 


I HE HE f IE SEISE 


Thu Hbitetonos 


Directed by Brian Levant 
U.S. 

“The Flints tones." a $45 mil- 
lion dinosaur that needed no 
fewer than 36 screenwriters and 
stars John Goodman, Rick 
Moranis, Elizabeth Perkins and 
Rosie O’Donnell, isn’t just aw- 
ful. It bombs itself into the 
Stone Age. As Fred Flimstone 
might have put it: yabba- 
dabba-boo. After faithfully du- 
plicating the TV show’s familiar 
sequence — in which 
lintstone (Goodman) 
knocks off wort, howls for joy, 
slides down his Bronto-crane 
tail and foot-shuffles away in 
his prehistoric car — the movie 
suffers immedia te comic extinc- 
tion. Leadenly directed and al- 
most soberly scripted, it never 
captures the campy brightness 


of the original series. In the 
third-rate plot, scheming boss 
Qiff Vandercave (Kyle Ma- 

c Lachlan) and his comely secre- 
tary (Halle Berry) promote un- 
suspecting Fred as a vice 
president, then frame him for 
embezzlement. Goodman's 
sweat-induced, growly offerings 
completely bypass Fred’s lov- 
able, pigheaded innocence. And 
with his blond-dyed hair and 
zombielike demeanor, Moranis 
seems more like a zoned-out 
Warhol groupie than Fred's 
perky buddy. Fred’s pet dino- 
saur Dino, with its chintzy eyes 
and unconvincing anima ironic 
gyrations, looks like a low-bud- 
get MuppeL And even Eliza- 
beth Taylor, trundled out to 
play Fred’s insulting mother-in- 
law, falls disappointingly short 
of imperious. She isn’t exactly 
helped by the mediocre bones 


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the screenplay tosses her way. 
When, inevitably, Fred — 
locked out of the bouse by his 
pet saber-toothed tiger — 
thumps the door and yells “ Wil- 
ma!, " it doesn’t bring “The 
Flints tones" to a triumphant 
dose. It just sets the audience 
free. (Desson Howe, WP) 


The Boys of St. Vincent 

Directed by John N. Smith. 
Canada. 

Whenever 10-year-old Kevin 
Reevey (Johnny Morina) is sent 
for an evening visit to the office 
of Brother Peter Lavin (Henry 
Czerny), the other boys at Sl 
V incent’s orphanage in New- 
foundland exchange furtive, 
embarrassed glances- They 
know too well what those visits 
are about, and they know they 
have no recourse. Within tire 
cloistered, terrifying world of 
Sl Vincent’s, it will do no good 
to complain. It won’t help be- 
cause the All Saints Brothers, 
who run the orphanage, exer- 
cise absolute authority over 
their charges. Their authority is 
as physically overwhelming as 
the size difference between 
Brother Lavin and shy Utile Ke- 
vin. It is as morally daunting as 
Brother Lavras stories about 
hell, which be avidly tells the 
children. “You will be forced 
out on the street and you will 
have nowhere to go but the gut- 
ter,” the orphans are angrily 
told, once rumors of physical 
and sexual abuse leak out and 
the events at St Vincent’s 
threaten to get out of hand. 
“The Boys of Sl Vincent” is a 
cool, thoughtful two-part Cana- 
dian drama about obviously in- 
cendiary subject matter, which 
will give it wefl-deserved atten- 
tion. This film previously ran 
into extreme censorship prob- 
lems with Canadian television. 
Its broadcasting was delayed by 
injunctions relating to the uiah 




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HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

AMERICAN WOMAN i peaking 
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■ In auctions, pedigree is every- 
thing. A gun believed to 
have been carried by 
John Wilkes Booth as a 
backup in his assassina- 
tion ot Lincoln (but dropped 
along the wav) was sold 
for $77,000. Next up: Bru- 
tus’s second dagger; the 
axe Mary Stuart's execution- 
er mislaid; the ice tongs 
not used on Trotsky. 


of former Christian Brothers 
whose activities at the Mount 
Cashel oipfaanage in New- 
foundland inspired some of this 
fictionalized story. The fact that 
tabloid television routinely pre- 
sents material much more las- 
civious than John N. Smith's 
serious, responsible dramatiza- 
tion makes the furor that much 
harder to understand. The two 
halves of “The Boys of Sl Vin- 
cent," each of which runs about 
an hour and a half, are separat- 
ed by 15 years. The first portion 
is devoted to discreet accounts 
of the outrages that have oc- 
curred at the orphanage, and 
the events that bring the crimes 
to light- The second installment 
.works as both courtroom drama 
and a longitudinal study exam- 
ining the effects of' sexual 
abuse. Even bleaker and more 
fascinating than the film's early 
exposition, these later se- 
quences cast light on the power 
of such abuse to harm both vic- 
tims and perpetrators. “The 
Boys of St Vincent” offers a 
sensitive, illuminating look at a 
tough subject. It deserves to be 
seen, and its arrival is long over- 
due. (Janet Maslin. NYT) 

Canclun da Cuna 

Directed by Josi Luis Card. 
Spain. 

Josfc Luis Garri returns to mov- 
iemaking after a seven-year hia- 
tus. The subject is a beautiful 
love story set in a 19th-century 
Spanish convent The wise town 
doctor unsuccessfully courts 
the Mother Superior, and then a 
baby girl is abandoned at the 
convent and raised by the nuns. 
“Cradle Song," as the story 
could be called, is a fable by 
Gregorio Martinez Sierra that 
gripped Spain early this centu- 
ry. Garci nad no small task in 
a dapting it to film. He creates a 
slow and mesmerizing rhv ihm 
mining the rich lan guage and - 
studied looks of the principals. 
But the movie could lose a lot in 
subtitles and for those not 
steeped in its cultural context. 
The richly-photographed tale 
has some brilliant scenes, such 
as when the doctor discusses 
love with the Mother Superior 
and when she later talks of hope 
and devotion with a restless 
young nun. The first part of the 
film is best before the aban- 
doned baby grows up. Some of 
the exteriors were shot at the 
Santo Domingo de Silos mon- 
astery, just before the monks 
there became celebrities for 
their hot-selling album of Gre- 
gorian chants. 

(A/ Goodman. IHT) 



In Both sonic chair, you close your eyes, the light pulses, and a narrator describes how relaxed you're supposed to be. 

... ' . *• Jijl'i ;feii , 


How Tokyo Is Learning to Relax 


By David Tracev 


T OKYO — The Japanese are not 
among the world's most relaxed 
people. A life of jammed commut- 
er trains, chronic overtime and tiny 
dwellings could give anyone a nervous dispo- 
sition. But if modern Japanese living creates 
stress, modem Japanese technology is now 
crying to counter iL 

The Asahi newspaper reported recently 
that “a new ‘stress industry.’ primarily tar- 
geted at business people working amid this 
technologically advanced society, is rapidly 
growing m Japan.” 

The article said that health dubs, which 
ordinarily emphasize physical fitness, have 
begun to focus on mental health as well, and 
added that young people “appear anxious to 
relax." 

Mind relaxation centers are using a vari- 
ety of machines to calm their customers, 
ranging from old-style vibrating chairs to 
brain-wave stimulators that can lull the 
senses of sight, sound, touch and smell 
You can decide for yourself whether 
stress-reducing technology represents the fu- 
ture of feeling good at one of the following 
sites in Tokyo: 

• Health Japan has been offering “Re- 
fresh Capsule” sessions in Ginza for 20 
years, even before stress got a bad nam e. 

“When I first opened this place, nobody 
came," said ibe owner. Masayoshi Han ami. 
‘Then in 1977 a jumbo jet crashed in Tokyo 
Bay because the pilot had mental problems, 
and business picked right up." 

Although a sign on the door says the 
center is for members only, the congenial 
Hanami provides trial sessions for newcom- 
ers. He gives you coffee, sits you in a plastic- 
hooded reclining chair, straps a flashing 
band to your forehead and then tells you to 
relax. Sensors in the headband check wheth- 
er you do by measuring brain wave frequen- 
cy. Beta waves represent a typically big-city 
state of agitation. The goal is get your brain 


humming on alpha waves, a relaxed, con- 
scious level found in those who meditate. 

The cost of an hour session is 5.000 yen 
labour $50), enough to stimulate you more 
than the coffee, but it could branch off into 
more than just the Refresh Capsule. Hanami 
also writes pop psychology books, produces 
relaxation CDs and videos, tells fortunes, pro- 
vides counseling and runs self-help courses in 
topics such as Love and Marriage, Slhnrnmg 
Down, and Developing Good Luck. But for 
people living in Japan’s Stress Gty, he admits, 
it may still not be enough. 

Tve been to a lot of places — the U. S., 
Europe, China.” Hanami said. “1 think To- 
kyo has to be the most stressful city on earth. 
If yon really want to relax, you have to get 
out of here." 

Hanami, who also writes mystery novels 
revolving around fishing themes, visits 
mountain streams on the weekends. “It 
works better than one of those," he said, 
pointing to his Refresh Capsules, “even if 
you don’t catch any fish." 

Health Japan is found near the Ginza 4- 
cbome Crossing from Milsukoshi depart- 
ment store, on the fifth floor of the building 
above a kimono shop. Inquiries (in Japa- 
nese) to 3574-1 151. 

• The Rdactive Chib Mother in a back- 
street of fashionable Omote-sando (tel: 
5410-5238) offers a “mind refresh system" 
that can reduce strain, ease shoulder stiff- 
ness, stimulate the imagination and lead to 
“cheerful office working.” 

For 1,600 yen, you can get a trial session in 
which a smiling young woman guides you to 
a private room with cypress- tnmmed walls 
and a Zen rock garden. The cool sound of 
trickling water makes concrete Tokyo sud- 
denly seem far away. You lie down in a 
Bodysonic rec liner so comfortable you may 
never want to get up. Then your legs are 
covered with a wrap and yom - head fitted 
with a device that uses a brain-monitoring 
feedback system to encourage alpha waves. 

The audio input is preselected from a 
choice that includes ocean waves and acous- 


tic guitar — a notch above the New Age 
wallpaper music typical of many dubs. The 
chair begins to vibrate in sync with the 
sound. Tne scent of lavender wafts into the 
room. You dose your eyes, the light pulses, 
and a female narrator describes (in Japa- 
nese) how relaxed you’re supposed to be. 

Thirty minutes later you can check how 
placid you actually have become by review- 
ing your brain activity on a computer in the 
lobby, which doubles as a caffe/bar. “The 
system is also great for hangovers,” noted a 

r esxxum. MjchihiroOda. Oda admits that 
Pioneer audio electronics company, 
which runs the club partly as a way to 
promote its Bodysonic chairs, hasn’t sold 
many at 1.5 million yen each. But he said the 
company stiO thinks the system will catch 
an, as “stress is increasing the world over.’’ 

• The same chair can be tested for free in 
decidedly less relaxing surroundings at die 
Bodysonic Showroom in Apyama, on the 
busy second floor of the Shin Mmanri 
Aoyama Building across from a barbershop 
(td: 3475-1815). The showroom's products 
are based on the concept that sound is not just 
heard with the ears but felt with the body. 

After a quick plop-down in the Bodysonic 
chair, a spokesman, Katsuya Mantyama, sug- 
gest s tes ting a similar chair with no lights but 
powerful “transducers” that thump the lum- 
barwith every base note. Next it’s a vibrating ; 
Bodysonic bed said to help insomniacs, ffan 
a 0 ®™, Bodysonic chair good for watching 
and re efing videos. 

finafly n»dy to decompress 
bade to Tokyo, ny the Bodysonic floor. “This 
nn»tt not be so relaxing,” Maruyama wanted 
35 “rest'forwarded a laser disk of “Termina- 
tor ff* to the scene he wanted. He grinned as 

tne Dow rumbled with each expkxxm. 

Yon need a tittle stress,” Maruyama half- 

shouted as Arnold Schwarzenegger shook 
the room with shotgun bl asis .“otherwise 
you d go crazy.” 


fomafaJu w ™ er H* in S h* 


Another Kind of Masterpiece in Madrid Museu 


m 


By AI Goodman 


M adrid — visitors to the 

capital usually make an ef- 
fort to see the Prado Muse- 
um but how many have been 
to the Ham Museum across the street? 

At the Museo del Jam6n, there are no 
paintings of pigs, just succulent ham itself, 
served by the slice with a glass of Spanish 
wine after a bard day of admiring Goya. 

“The museums exhibit paintings. Here 
what you see is a large quantity of hams,” 
said Francisco J. Munoz, a co-owner of the 
Museo del Jamdn. which opened in 1978. 

The pork shrine displays 600 hams hang- 
ing aromatically from the ceiling It is lo- 
cated at Paseo del Prado, 44, only a short 
walk from Madrid’s lop three museums — 
the Prado, the Reina Sofia contemporary 
art center and the Thyssen-Bomemi szii 
collection. 

The art of making hams gets special 
respect in Spain, where the favorite ani- 
mals undoubtedly are bulls, for fighting 


and pigs, for dining Farm families for 
outlines have slaughtered pigs with fiesta- 
like fanfare in winter, preparing meat that 
would last throughout the year. 

Today, most of the 20.000 restaurants 
and bars around Madrid serve at least one 
commercially cured ham. The Museo del 
Jam6u’s distinction is to offer a large vari- 
ety, from the exquisite iberico ham that 
costs more than a dollar for just one paper- 
thin slice to an ordinary senwio ham at a 
third of the price. 

The undisputed king of Spanish hams is 
made from the indigenous itxhrico pig, 
which forages For acorns in the evergreen- 
oak forests of hilly, southwestern Spain. 
The adage that “you are what you eat” 
applies to these gray-skinned pigs as well, 
because the acorns impart a special nutty 
flavor to the ham. 

A jamort iberico that “is well cured and 
dried in the open air has a sweetness, 
smoothness and suppleness that you don’t 
find in other hams," explained Victor de la 
Serna, assistant managing editor of the 


Spanish daily, B Mundo, and a specialist 
on wine and food. 

But he cautioned that arguments can 
arise over who makes (he bat acorn-fed 
iberico, which sells for $66 to $127 a kilo- 
gram ($30 to $58 a pound), depending on 
the brand. Two prominent production 
towns are Guijuelo in Salamanca Province 
and Jabugo in Huelva Province. 

Hams from the north, like Guijuelo. are 
said to be slightly sweeter, because less salt 
is added during curing in the colder tem- 
peratures, while the hams from the warmer 
south, like Jabugo. are somewhat spicier. 

“You have lovers of Guijuelo or Jabugo 
like you have lovers of Burgundy or Bor- 
deaux. So it’s an endless discussion.” de la 
Serna said. 

I bin co ham is expensive because of its 
relative scarcity and costly production. 

I ben co pigs are a slow-growing breed that 
used to dominate Spain but were decimat- 
ed by disease several decades ago. Pigs now 
rarely contain more than 80 percent of 


pure iberico blood, the rest coming from 
foreign breeding stock. The black-hoofed 
pata negra iWricos are highly valued, but 
some authorities say the hoofs color does 
not affect the ham’s taste. 

The vast majority of Spanish hams are 
made from pigs that contain only 50 per- 
cent tbferico blood or none at all. They are 

arimaHeed ™ Corrais Md nouris hed on 

If iberico beilota. or acorn ham is tons 

' S neebo ’ made from 
a pig fed fodder and acorns. The next rung 
is a broad category known as serrano ham 
which is any cured ham from a highland w 
serrano. in western Extremadura and Sala- 
manca, northeastern Catalonia or else- 
where in Spain. The price may be just 70 
cents for a few slices on bread served as a 
tapa. or snack. 

The pigs live from 8 to 18 months before 
slaughter and the meat is cured for 12 to °36 
months, depending on weight and class 
Tbe prime hams get longer treatment and 
all of them taste better if sliced ihinjy^o 


{he bouquet can rise off a mors 
balances ruby-colored meat and v 

glistening white faL 

lv 9 aesl Pwveyore go 

ly to the factory to select their vrai 

on Alcalfi, 1 
serves onty M 5 -r ca 
¥ nco J“ m - 11 comes ext ‘ 
from S4nchez Romero CarvajaJ 

A., a firm fhat enm« aj.*.!- __ 

the 



rad of the scale is the 

ShS**} at thc Prado MuLiS 

"to f oor slices of com- 

Sundays and holidays. Tel 522%670. 

A l Goodman reports from Spain for CNN. 



Outdoor Dining in Paris: Beware! 


By Patricia Wells 

fn/emcnonaJ Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — So you want to dine out- 
doors in Paris, in the warmth of die 
late spring sun or beneath a field of 
stars? Just try. If a special micTodi- 
inate doesn’t gel you, a staff for whom out- 
door service is simply too much trouble will. 
Recent attempts at outdoor dining have 

been disastrous. Fortunately, we fared better 
on the food, while service remains an ever 
sticky problem. 

The 18-month-old Le Relais du Parc, at- 
tached to H&tel Le Parc Victor Hugo and 
supervised by Joel Robuchon, offers one of 
the city's prettiest terraces, nestled inside a 
ground of carefully restored buildings along 
the chic Avenue Raymond-Poincard On our 
recent visit, an evening chill forced diners 
indoors, where the dining rooms are now so 
cluttered with tables there's barely room for 
waiters to get to you, or for one to make a 
dignified entrance or exiL 
Service was awkward and impersonal, 
with some strange glitches. One table waited 
a good five minutes for the main course, 
which sat cooling out on a serving tray, right 
under my nose. A request for a glass or 
champagne came up with a bit of bubbly 
that bad maderized It was eventually re- 
placed but with neither speed, grace nor tbe 
slightest apology. 

The food, thank goodness, was more glori- 
ous than ever. Chef Gilles Renault seems to 
have found his rhythm, for this was the finest 
and most flawless of many meals I’ve en- 
joyed at Le Relais du Parc. A starter of 
tomatoes, greens and mozzarella was a 
beautifully seasoned refreshing arrange- 
ment of fresh peeled tomatoes, a great mix of 
loader greens. Fine strips erf basil, and a 
julienne of cheese that had absorbed just the 
right amount of vinaigrette to make for a 
tangy palate opener. 

Oeufs mimosa — or deviled eggs to most of 
us — were pure state-of-the-art, beautifully 
stuffed bard-cooked eggs; while a fish course 
of raie au chou (skate on a bed of cabbage) 
was equally masterful. Tbe impeccably fresh 


skate was pillow-soft and moist, on a bed of 
gently wilted cabbage. The accompanying 
sauce was tangy and bright. 

Desserts include their magnificent warm 
apple tan topped with ahuge scoop of super- 
nal v anilla ice cream, and a puckery lemon 
sorbet. Tbe wine list offers some treasures, 
inclu din g a light and velvety 1990 Givry, 
Cl os Salomon, Domaine du Gardin. 

Le Relais du Parc is one Paris restaurant 
that offers two distinct dining rooms, for 
smokers and nonsmokers. 

At a recent lunch at the once~again reborn 
Le Cercle Ledoyen (which used to be Le 
Cane Ledoyen), every aspect of the meal 
worked against the possibility of a good 
time Although the sky was a brilliant, daz- 
zling blue dotted with white puffy clouds, 
tbe waiter insisted that it had rained that 
morning, so the terrace was off limits. Le- 
doyen must enjoy a special microclimate, for 
I had spent that morning outdoors, in the 
very neighborhood, and never felt a drop. It 
was obviously too much trouble to serve 
outdoors. Indoors, diners were treated to the 
ear-piercing sounds of a live band next door, 
just beyond the not-veiy-soundproof divid- 
er. As they fled in search of quieter sur- 
roundings,' not an apology or explanation 
was offered. 


T HE food looks better on paper 
than it is, with good spinach ravio- 
li plopped on the plate; great 
grilled baby bar with a simply silly 
vegetable mfllefeuille, a barely cooked stack 
of bitter eggplant, flavorless tomatoes and 
basically raw zucchini; and a serviceable, but 
boring, planer of Petrossian salmon. 

Service was all but nonexistent, as a host 
of waiters stared into space while diners were 
left to pour their own wine and wait endless- 
ly for a bill or a bottle of water. 

Tbe Venetian-inspired dining room and 
courtyard of the year-old 11 Cortile is a 
delightfully elegant mix of marble floors and 
trompe Tool tile walls, a play of creamy 
yellow and pale green, a setting that's at once 

SOOthing and calming 

II Cortile is the restaurant of the Hdtel 


Castille on Rue Cam bon. situated across the 
street from the back entrance to the Ritz. 

Chef Adolfo Porta's cuisine is savory and 
seductive, and full flavored. A huge fresh 
Wheel of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese and a 
succulent, mahogany-hued ham await you at 
the entrance to the back dining room, which 
overlooks an elegantly pretty courtyard that 
was dosed to diners on a recent- cool eve- 
ning. 

The menu is simple but not of the hack- 
neyed tourist -Italian variety, and includes a 
good mix of antipasti pastas, fish, meat and 
vegetables. If it’s on the menu, try the spar- 
kling fresh salad of raw sliced artichokes, 
ham. Parmesan and arugula, a crunchy, re- 
freshing mix that inspires you to book pas- 
sage to Italy on the next available plane or 
train. 

The restaurant’s classic swordfish, or espa- 
don, with olives is a delight. The Italians 
adore the delightfully finn. fatty and flavor- 
ful Mediterranean fish and serve it simply 
grilled or seared, with basic accompani- 
ments- Here. Porta takes thin slices of seared 
swordfish and tops them with a welcoming 
sauce of green and black olives and sage. The 
wine list offers some real treats, including an 
eminently drinkable 1990 Rosso de Monie- 
pulciano. at 160 francs ($28). 

Service, alas, is of the supercilious variety, 
hau gh ty and condescending- as if every diner 
just landed from Mars and needed help ev- 
ery step along the way. 

Le Relais du Parc, 55 Avenue Raymond- 
Poincare, Paris 16; tel: 44.05.66.10. Open 
daitv. Credit cards: American Express. Diners 
Chib, Visa. A la carte. 200 to 250 francs ($35 
to $45} per person, including service but not 
wine. 

Le Cercle Ledoyen, Carri des Champs- 
Elyseex Paris 8; tel: 47.42. 76.02. Closed Sun- 
day and August. Credit cards: American Ex- 
press. Diners Club. Visa. A la carte. 225 to 275 
francs per person, including service but not 
wine. 

II Cortile. 37 Rue Cambon. Paris 1; tel: 
44.58.45.67. Closed Sunday. Credit cards: 
American Express, Visa A la cane. 150 to 295 
francs per person, including service but not 
wine. 




Til 


0WTJUM 

London 

The Royal Opera at Covent Gar- 
den, tel: (71) 240-1066. A new pro- 
duction o-‘ Verdi's "Alda.': Directed 
by Elijah Moshinsky, conducted by 
Edward Downes, with Cheryl Sluder / 
Ninau Reutio. Luaanad'tntfoo/Do- 
lora Zajlck and Dennis O’Nettl /Mi- 
chael Sylvester. June 16 (premiere), 
20, 24 and 27. 

The Grosvenor House Art and An- 
tiques Fair, tel: (71) 49W743. 
June 9 to 16: More than 90 dealers, 
from Britain, continental Europe, the 
United States and Hong Kong offer a 
wide range of an and antiques, in- 
cluding 20th-century art tor the first 
time since the establishment of the 
fair in 1 934. 

Royal Academy at Arts, tel: (71 ) 
439-7438. open daily. Contlnu- 
Ing/To June 12: "Goya: Truth and 
Fantasy." Small-scale paintings and 
Sketches for some of his refigious 
works, and many portraits. 


CH REPUBLIC 


Prague 

Klnsky Palace, tel: 231 -5135. To 
July 3: 'T. F.- Simon: Color Prints." 
Prints and etchings by Tavtk Frantt- 
sek Simon, one of the co-founders o! 
Hollar, the association of Czech 
graphic artists. Simon’s themes in- 
dude scenes from Prague, Pans, and 
sketches from the Orient 

FBAHCE . " 

Caen 

MusOe des Beaux-Arts, tel: 31-85- 
28-63, closed Tuesdays. To Aug. 31 : 
"Desir de Rivage.” From 1820 to 
1945, generations ol artists have 
been inspired by the Normandy 
shore. About 100 paintings try MWei. 
Courbet Boudin. Seurat. Van Dong- 
enanddeStaet of the beeches, elms 
and harbors between Granville and 
Dieppe. 

Paris 

MusSe du Louvre, tel: 40-20-51-51 , 
dosed Tuesdays. To Sept. 5: “La 

Reforme des Trois Carraci: LeDessin 
a Bologne. 1580-1620." More than 
100 drawings by Lodovlco C arraa. 



Neue Natkxislgaierie.tal: (30) 266- 
2662. dosed Mondays. To Jutfy 31 
“L'ldea Ferrari." Fifteen models ot a * 
car which has become a symbol for 
speed and perfection. ■ 


Antoine tte Saint-Exup&ry is commemorated in Paris. 


fes two cousins and their pupfe. do- 
cumenting how the Bologna artists 
developed a new style based on the 
study of nature. 

Muste. Mamnottan-Ctaude Monet, 
lei: .42-24-07-02. To Oct 2: “La 
Nouvefle Vague: L'Estarnpe Japon- 
aise de 1 868 a 1 939 dans ta Collec- 
tion Robert O. Muller." More than 
150 Japanese prints, dating back to 
the openfog of Japan to the West in 
1868 and including works by' artists 
ol the Meijl era, such as Kobayashl 
fGyochfca and Yoshu Chikanobu. 
Also indudes works by 20th-century 
artists. 

MusSe de la Monnaie, tel: 40-46-55- 
33, closed Mondays. To Aug. 7: 
"Regards sur Saint-Exupery.” Pho- 
tographs of tin French pilot and au- 
thor by John Phillips, commemorat- 
ing his disappearance in flight above 
the Mediterranean 50 years ago. 


Kunst- und Ausstettungshalfe, tab 
(228) 9171-200. To Oct. 16: “Euro- 
pe, Europe: Des Jahrhundert der- 
Avartgarde in MitteU und Osteur- : 
opa.” 700 hundred works by 200 : 
palm era and Sculptors from the for- 
mer Iron Curtain countries. There are 
works by weH known artists such as 
Brancusi and Chagall, -and by post-, 
war artists who were isolated from: 
Western cultural trends. 


ITALY — 

Sws^SEs- 
-a BSSte* 

;5, 7, 9 and 12- y.-.- ; 

Venice (4i‘l 5200- 

Paiazzo Fww"* J?AnS Aarosav 
995. To June 

Andy Warhol: **5, : 

date Cotiezione deinJm&PgfjZ. 

■ Mic3vgan."60 

1 991 including prints, drawing .. 

photographs. . 

fHUW 

. Madrid ^ ,o. on 

Botero Tn MadricLja^g. ^ 1 ^ 
the Paseode Rdcotetos-ana Plm» _ 
Cibefes an installation Of 21 l®B®v 
than-Wfe ^ 

.Colombian artim FerrandoBm«aA| 

the same time, the Gatera 

■ bcjgh exhibits 25 efra^ngs 

: vas, representing Botero s favorit 

ysifojects. ' 

;VHia Favorite, tel: (90.51-61-5- 

- .open ^ Fridays, Saturdays and- 

- days. To OcL 30: Europe and 

,'lca 1 9th-aod 2081 Centuy Painting 
.and-Watercdtore." 150. works from 

- - the -Thyssen-Bomemisza - collection 

are displayed in newly resIor ®' 
’rcoms/.ft Includes works lrom the 
, Hudson -Ffiver School of panting end 

fromthe American liT¥ifessfonBts as 

■weti as Cubist and Gennan Expres- 
siontet works, -Russian avant-garde 
. :.and. American Abstract Expressions! 
paintings. ■ • - . • ; ' 

UMITEP STATES 

Me» Yoric. : =' 

Mefropofltan Museum, let (212) 
570-39517 dosed- Mondays. Contm- 
. iilng/To'July 24: "American ItTfores- 
- sootenrand Realism. The Painting ol 
.. Modem Life, 1B85-1915." . . 




“MAMAKON" 

tens Furnished - Week 
• Year ■ Work or Vaoaton 
PAWS - NORMANDY 
BIARRITZ- COTE D’AZUR 
CARIBBEAN 

Tel/Fax: Park (33-1) 4529 2608 


PROVINCES 


CHATEAU DE MONTCAUD 
|Neor Avnwn, Ardeche, Onnge. Uzes] 
Sfflal. Mouttul & or oondlioned. 

1 1 acre private pork- tern. gym. 
summing pool Mono, hamnran, b>W 
WEBCLY SUMMER-PACKAGE 


fiom FF 5,100 /person in do u ble room. 

Chateau de Akontcaud 
30200 Bagnob-wCexe, France 
Tel: (33) M 89 60 60 
Foe (33)66 89 45 04 


S 6 1 Red Estate 


FRENCH 


HM, superb dvdei. S/TO persons, 
great wew> anocy. WeeUy. 4 Mr 
fl August- feTowner: 142850463 



CAPD’ANTBe, 
BEAUTIFUL ESTATE 

wf. SEA WATER SWIMMING 
POOL < bedrooms. 4 bathreorra with 
wa. AIS CONDTTIONffKE STAFf 
AVAAA8UE Cook & dmng lady. 
BMiA Arne. Juhr. posUe momNy. 
Tel: MBS J33-1) 4742 1415. 
foe 42 6rf98 36 affira ham. 


CHATEAUX COUNTRY noar Ambaae. 

penoramux tie- Pretty dora | mnANY in country motor near St 
hoj«^3 bedro orm. 2 5. ^ 90 not [Mi beach. 23 rooms. 

USS500 weekly. (33-1) USD (0 77 j Vettrot rala. Tel/Fax 543809456 


NORMANDY 


let PARIS (33-1] 4742 1415. 

Ana 42 66 98 36 office ham 10 AIMS ROM MONACO 

SUPS® ‘^HlADCMAinS- . 

4 bedrwma. 4Vi bobjons iwnmetg new Free August For de/era Tet 
p ool, y atpfrored. gromds. [33| 93 25 V 3- Fax.- fXI) 93 25 57 21. 
Avaflabie Wy and.' or Aureal. T* 

617-277tiOS/Fac 50&67ti£m USA 








Tel(3393010086.Ftw93014>45 


PARIS* SUBURBS 







aTAOMESnOCADBtO 

29 bit rve Sturdier 
PAMS 566 i 


Your rtetSo or 
1 week or more. 

toll) 


or uLxrh nenl (or 1 day. 

m. Tdfll) 44 3* 73 73 
1)47 045007 




ROOQO / north. Id ( 


| r.yi 7; 




[e'le’ *TiTe! A* 


aasgssg 

m 




ii l - 8 ;<,*j l 


GOLF 


GOLF DU TOUQUET 

Le Manoir Hotel*** 

Near the Channel Tunnel, on the Cote d'Opale, 

Le Touquet offcis two well-known courses; 

• The Sea Course reminiscent of Scottish links, 
restored to its pre-war glory 

• The Forest Coarse set among pine trees, with new fcatares 
Country house atmosphere at Le Mandr Hotel. 

A renovated driving range and a full-fledged 9-bole 
course make a perfect setting for 3-day sessions r 

at the gnlf school. I 

Information and Resenvxions: 

Tel.: (33) 21.05.20.22 V 

Fax: (33) 2 1 .05 J l .26 OPEN GOLFCUJO 


PROVINCE HOTELS 


VlCHY, the capital of health, beauty and leisure, 
lust 3 hours from Paris in the Auvergne region 

filetti Palace Hotel 

a 133-room. 4-star hotel with turn-of-the-century 
atmosphere and a gourmet restaurant, 
flietti Pass Summer Special 
FF.I8®0 - 3 nights, half board, induding an hour of tennis, a green fee. 
casino entrance & according to program either a nig ht at the Opera or 
an entry to the racetrack - 3 place Joseph ALETT1, 03290 VICHY 
Tel.: 133) 70 3 1 78 77 - Fax: (33) 70 98 ! 3 82 


ACCOMMODATION 


PARIS 

"BETTER THAN A HOTEL 1 




i r> t O r 


OFFER YOU!!! 

QUALITY APARTMENTS 

• Luxury furnished 
• Fully equipped 
• Maid &. linen service 
• Special rates for long stays 
• In front of “the Seine" 

Close to the Eiffel Tower and “Trocadero" Square 

Prices starling ai US$700 per week. 

For further information & reservation 
call 1-4525 9501. Fox 1-4288 2991. 


Normandy - Chateau to rent 

Near Dalai, small Louis >311 family chdteau, hisiorical monument, to rent 
summer or year mund. 8-1 J persons, all comforts, period fumkure. 
large park, south racing lenacc. 10 km sea, near golf, tennis and pool. 
Reasonable rates. 

Contact uivncn (33-1) 46 47 54 05 (*& or &*) 


NIGHTLIFE 



You haven’t seen Paris 
Until you’ve experienced the Lido. 


* .'V 

... 

t 

•7? -'V 
dm*-' 

- - 






The most 
famous night-club 
in the world. 


LIDO 


116 bis, avenue des Cbamps-Elysees - 750CB Peris - Tef- : (If 40 76 56 10 


HOLIDAYS 

AFLOAT 


EUROPEAN 
WATERWAYS LTD. 

(EST 1971) 

Luxury Canal Cruising 
6 znghts indasrre from 
$1,590-32^65 pp. Exossoas. 
Gourmet cciaine. en-snite c a bi a a. 
Burgundy, Provence, A taase, 
Englaad-Scodand-Ejxe. 
Cotonr brochure 

IQc (39 S7 H 94 20 FIX: (3Q 6! 31 44 33. 


HOTELS IN AND AROUND PARIS 





Bussv-st- Georges/ 
Marne la Values 

Stay with someone 
you know 
120 luxurious ■ 
bedrooms, 
restaurant, bar, pool, 
fitness & parking 


Special Promotion 

F.Fr. Bed & breakfast For two persons per night 
Valid 1st May - 30 Sept. 1994 (minimum 2 nights) 

25 km from Paris & 5 km from Eurodisney Resort 
Highway A-l - Exit 12 

(near tfje Cb&teau of Guermantes & Fdrri&re) 

39. boulevard de Lagny - 77600 Bussy-St. -Georges 
TeL: 64.66.35.65 - Fat 64-66.03-10 


SV.tT^CA 

MI77KI, B V7J7 > LVB 


Package 
2 nights - 2 days 


2.100 FF* 


- 2 rnnhu- Ltcng ifrc- -*tj 
• tsam >ttphr MFhurfvry+ri 

• 1 -a-buLdic-n' ticuuiwnt m the 
Espacc Phyrr-rx-r m J ili>> and 
p«.v ptTscm 

• I suppta ntn t w y free ore 

• - snwn-fwr> [x.v p-rr-on 

• - bntbe. >>r ciaainx Jt (he Cluh 
House iffld.jdin^ Iwmges' 

Slrvjie >./■ FT 
Extra per ^•i'T FF 



RIVIERA HOTELS 


Tiie Golf Piary HojeL in Sainit>Maxime 
facing die Gulf erf S.iim-Tiopez 
- Special - 
“Les Proven^aies” 
from \hv 1st to October 31st 19^4 


Package 
6 nights - 5 days 


FF" 


• '• raphe- l.-tviny ihc 

I'inM k.jfv j'n 'FFpvrpctsimt 
- ! ‘Ooc r~l.ir.r tp-.nn«mi in U*v 
Espa rr Ph«emcr cm 3 diys and 
prr cctNir. 

• 1 sopplemenurv free care 

• •• js»en-JtT» per f>.-rvm 

• '■ .’uRC.ho ‘jt Jirmer- at the Club 
Hc^'-e i esdudmg lurtvrjgcsi 

rKitn. 1.5UO FF 
per rurr- ei - Suite-. 1.500 FF 


Bumctri and IbiiMr.'ur. lijtf , :, _ua m-J. c: j spLAo and tdivHion 

■ These n £ « tire prrpervn ami lit Amhle n.-m. iruluitlfc breutfuti 


Heservatipos 


HJVLG 

GOUFPIAZA 


Tei 33-1.47J23-75-13 

TeL35.94,56j66^6 


-.-.pj -Smral padtagq koBday i a rt aiti n e ^ pona and rariolariWto 
an tmnns trro (for -aamplei 

*** MM ram r Hijjh wmi 

FF 3 010* r approx. £ J90i I FF 3 500" (appros. £ 455) 

■Rate-, rr pema is dfeble m«n 
l 7 fngbu accomctlauGS. ■ brealicsrs. free acucsi ujott private beach ) 

Rea* ask for our detailed bnx-hurc - 

GARDEN BEACH HOTEL IS-i7 &J Bwdon feMil'AS L£S PINSlFraoce) 
Tel . 33 67 25 25 F«.33«)3f,J 1665 


■ . .. ” ’Discover. • . 

Springduie in Paris ' 

HOTEL DES MATHURINS 

★ .★ . 

~ 43, niedes Mathurins,75008 

’ Exceptional Offer for . . ; 

International Herald Tribune Readers 




The Maifaurins; with -ite 33 rooms and_3 suites is- aisrnalL, 
luxury^ hotel, ideally situated for business and pleasure in 
Paris, dose to department stores, arid Opdra. The design 
conception by Eieux, the furniture by MOTabito, and-the 
ease of our underground. parking, ensure a refined and 
relaxing stay. * V . " /• - . • •' -' ■*' : •.*■'. ' ’ ' " ' 

Call Yannick,Kessor orAnja far reservations 
TeL: CD 4494 20 94 ^- raxi (X) 44 9400 44 V 


yiarEC ^Esidt^b * * 

between the Seine and the. PantWon: ■ ■ s . 

Charming rooms and apanments giving onto the Square 
Paul Lang EVin. equipped wfih kitchenette (ideal for kmg stays) 

* » Rates From 900 FF to 1200 FF per day " 

• ’ ' •Jtrfy^BstdlsaHmti:'. * '• 

. Lcagth of Stay .. . Room Apaitwea t . 

J days 1,800 FF •' ' 0 : ' ' i400 FF 

IS days ’ 7,000 FF -- : . (0,500 FF - : 

30 days . 12,000 FF - - . ■ I8M0FF 

• Special 20% cfiscoeat for Herald Trlbtiae readers, 

' ' mU tiOMsfrA'P? |i»( uiulofrK laljhAs^ feenutb], - ! - 

■50 rue des &eraardins, 75005 PARIS -TeL (i) 44 4131 81 - But(i) 46 3393 22 


HOTEL ARC ELYSEES 



HOTEL 




56 rue Monsieur Le Prince 
-75006 Paris 


Tel: 1 1 1 43.29. 1 0.80 

;1«&4 Fafc 11 * d3 - 54 - 26 - 90 
40 meters from the Luxembourg Gardens, this superb I860. private 
residence has fust been transformed into e charming 8 elegant boteL 
Its rooms are built around the interior courtyard garden and are air- 
conditioned and sound-proof, with cable T.V.. mlnlbar S private 
number phone Fa* available. Salon bar wttn nreplaoe. 

Complimentary Breakfast for Herakl Trttmae Readers 
Member Of CHATEAUX- HOTELS mOEPtMOWS 


TWm HOTELCAMBON 

I j B * * * * 

? roe Cambon, 75001 PARIS - 
TeL tH 42.60.39.09 Fxc t! 1*2*03059 

Charming 4-star Intel renovated In W?. lust off the Tuileties Gardens, 
Concorde, the Louvre, the Musrfe d'Otsay. near Faubourg Saint Honors. 
Room from FP 980 • • Suites from FF 1480 


Just off the Champs Bystes. Charrrfng riaw.tiotsl, 23 rooms 
; ■ (15 on coortyanj) alr-contfittoned, sramd-proof, 
mWJrar (soft drinks free), cable T. v./bmakfast room, bar. 

: .Ptfand^offidant wetoome. Rea«>riabte rates. = 

Hftin 75008 Parts- TeLi (33.1) 4533J»33- Fee (33.1) 4&637&2S 


Directly os the Tuileries 
garden near the Louvre 
and Place Veirfflrae. , 
Traditional *- Freneh re- 
finement conned with 
ail nfodon comforts and 
eiceflent-service. V-* H- 
PrivafotearoonL offers 
an intimate cosy OTot for 




Hotel*** * 
Eiffel - Kennedy I 

Cfiarxriag emfrrfy renowned Jui ‘ - 
.”*■**■ Mrffrf lfe Unu*. 9 
UdMfaRttaf Pasjy amL tut 

wtf AmrifeEiflH. fR, 
pea toons, tvasonaaeia^s. ~ 


^ RSl TRAD mOtL : CHARACTER ' 

















































































































u 9 


r> i‘i jU 

£ ii'iS ' 
:? n "<i u , ' 

D tj U: 

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P. jj:|: 

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*&£ ■■?*;: iuzdim 

International Herald Tribune , Friday, June 3, 1994 





Page J/ 




Asia/Pacific 


Appro, weighting: 32% 
Close; 131.36 Pmvj 132.93 


M 

A M 

J 

1994 

Europe 


Approx, weighing: 37% 

Closs 1KL97Pravj 11068 



U.S. Review 

™jSjilSDEX: 111.790 TV Deal by 

tomans n* 1 ; 


hy BtoombQrg f = MlirdOCh 


By Paul Farhi 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — \JS. regula- 
tors are reviewing approval of one 
of the biggest television-station 
deals in history — Rupert Mur- 
doch's 1985 acquisition of six big- 
city American television stations. 

With new information about the 
purchase emerging in the past 
week, the government is trying to 
learn whether the purchase violated 
U.S. law prohibiting foreign own- 
ership of broadcast properties. 

The investigation could have 
multibillion-dollaf consequences 
for Mr. Murdoch and the company 
he controls. News Corp. The six 
stations — in Washington, Los An- 
geles, New York, Chicago, Dallas 
and Houston — framed the basis 
fra the Fox network, which has 
become the Gist U.S. broadcast 
network to compete broadly with 
CBS, NBC and ABC. 

[News Corp. told Renters that 
the challenges had come from com- 
mercial adversaries, including oth- 
er broadcast networks, as well as 
from the New York chapter of the 
National Association for die Ad- 
vancement of Colored People.] 

The key question was whether 
the stations were bought by Mr. 
Murdoch, a naturalized American 
citizen, or by News Corp„ his Aus- 
tralian corporation. 

Federal Communications Com- 
mission offi cials confirmed that 
they are close to completing their 
review, prompted by an NAACP 
complaint contending that Mr. 
Murdoch’s ownership squeezed out 
members of minority goups who 
want to buy stations. 

Ironically, the issue came to a 
head just as News Corp. said it 
would spend S50Q nriHion for a 20 
percent interest in New Wodd 
Communications, a company that 
owns or is buying 12 television sta- 
tions around the United States. 

Mr. Murdoch’s attorneys ac- 
knowledged last week that more 
than 99 percent of the equity capi- 
tal had come from the Australian 
company. 


Chivalry or Investment? 

Saudi Prince Gambles on Euro Disney 




North America 


Appro weighing: 20 % 
dose; B3.48 Prm_ 93.61 


M J 


1994 

1993 

1994 

Latin America 

EM 

Appna.W0f{|Wng:5% 
CtowlM^Aw.: 117.47 



By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — It is unclear 
what is in it for him except a big 
gamble that may pay off. But 
Prince WaJid ibn Trial Abdula- 
ziz’s decision to bail out Euro 
Disney will certainly lake pres- 
sure off Walt Disney Co. and off 
the banks that have financed the 
ailing theme park near Paris. 

Equity investors do not direct- 
ly gain from the move, but the 
prince's investment has done 
much to dissipate the clouds over 
the amusement park's future. 

On the Bourse in Paris, Euro 
Disney SCA shares rose to 32 
francs (S5.69) Thursday, up 6 per- 
cent from 30.15 francs on 
Wednesday. Chi Wall Street. Writ 
Disney’s stock was up 37.5 cents 
to S44 a share, in late trading. 
Walt Disney currently owns 49 
percent of Euro Disney, whose 
stock traded as high as 107 francs 
in 1990, the year it was floated.. 

Disney revealed oo Wednes- 
day that the prince would buy up 
to 24 percent of the amusement 
complex, investing as much as 
1.9 billion francs m conjunction 
with a rights issue that was ar- 


one of timing and pricing. It be- 
gan operations when Europe was 
tumbling into the worst recession 
in a decade and charged stiff 
prices for family entertainment. 

Yet the analysts said, the park 
argue, could well turn profitable 
as the European economy im- 
proves. If these analysis are 
right, the prince could make mil- 
lions, and it is on this opinion 
(hat he bas placed his bet. 

In the short run, the largest 
beneficiaries of the investment 
will be the banks underwriting the 
rights issue. The prince, a nephew 
of King Fahd of Saudi Arabia 
who helped bail out Citicorp three 
years ago, is essentially under- 
writing the underwriters of the 
rights issue, a banking syndicate 
led by Banque Nationle de Paris, 
Banque Lndosuez, and Caisse des 
Depots & Consignations. 


braied bottom-fishing invest- 
ment in 1991 when he bailed out 
Citicorp by buying a 14.88 per- 
cent stake fra about $800 mOnon 
in convertible preferred shares. 
This provided capital for Ameri- 
ca’s largest bank when real estate 
and other accumulated losses 
had brought it under federal tu- 
telage and virtually under water. 

The bank recovered, and the 
prince wanted to increase his 
stake, although Citicorp said he 
did not obtain approval from 
federal bank regulators. It was 
never made clear whether ques- 
tions were raised about the inves- 
tors behind the prince or the gov- 
ernment simply objected to any 
foreigner’s owning such a large 
share in a major U.S. bank. 

In any case, last year tbe 
prince reduced his stake to 9.68 
percent, turning a profit of $177 
million on tbe shares he sold and 


Investors Shun 
European Debt, 
And Yields Soar 


Bfaamhay Businas Ne*z 

LONDON — Spain canceled 
two government bond auctions 

Thursday, and sluggish demand at 
France's sale of government issues 
sent yields surging, underscoring 
tbe growing problems European 
governments are having in borrow- 
ing cash. 

“People are not really buying 
cash braids,*’ said Bronwyn Curtis, 
an analyst at Deutsche Bank. 

“They're terrified of what's going 
cm. Most of them axe already under 
water on their bond portfolios — 
and that's a problem for govern- 
ments trying to sell paper." 

Just two days ago. Germany can- 
celed its second bond auction in 


growth will fuel inflation and erode 
the return on their investments. 

That's a problem for governments 
trying to persuade investors to buy 
their bonds but not wanting to pay 
more for bond buyers’ money. 

Esther Baroudy, an analyst at 
Crtdjt Lyonnais in Paris, said even 
though none of the French auctions 
had been canceled, the cost of bra- 
rowing was becoming a problem 
far tbe French Treason'. 

“It’s the price at which they’re 
having to raise it which is bothering 
them," she said. “They budgeted 
on average yields of about 5.5 per- 
cent this year.” 

In an effort to soothe financial 
markets, the Bank of France 


ranged with bank creditors to down their slock somewhat, if 


If public demand is so strong percent, turning a profit of $177 
that the prince gets less than |3 million on tbe shares he sold and 
percent of the theme park, Dis- meanwhile earning up to 1 1 per- 
il ey will sell him up to one billion ( * nt a nn ually on his money 
francs' worth of stock, thus re- through preferred dividends. A 
during its 49 percent stake to as Citicorp spokesman said it main- 
low as 36 percent. 14105 “correct" relations with 

" For V* alt Disney, they have a Ponce Walid and welcomes him 
God-given opportunity to sell as an investor. 




shore up tbe park’s finances. 
Although cultural critics have 


they're interested in doing that," 
Rebecca W inninglon-Ingram, an 


roasted Euro Disney for trying lo analyst who covers the stock for 
feed European visitors a homoge- Morgan Stanley & Co. in Lon- 


nized version of their own culture, 
some business analysts said the 
venture's real mistake was simply 


don. told Bloomberg Business 
News. 

The prince made his most cele- 


Cidcorp spokesman said it main- 
tains “correct" relations with 
Prince Walid and welcomes him 
as an investor. 

TTie Disney deal does not seem 
as sure an investment as the Gti- 
crap dal and it lades the «me 
cash flow. But a spokeswoman for 
the prince in Paris said several 
months ago he approached Dis- 
ney — not the reverse — through 
tbe Carlyle Group. 


eight days as officials refused to shaved another 0.01 percentage 
cough up the high interest rates point from its intervention rale on 
investors were d emanding - Thursday, the ninth such move in 

Poor demand for new French just over three months. The cut, 
braids Thursday rattled tbe market which brought the rate to 5 JO per- 
and sent average yields on 10-year cent, was seen by economists as an 
and 31-year bonds surging. Yields attempt to reassure French finan - 
at auctions of French 10-year cial markets that the cost of credit 
bonds have risen every month this was coming down. 


year, reaching 7.44 percent Thurs- 
day from 5.72 percent in January. 
The Treasury sold 16.53 billion 


The Bank of England has had to 
come up with innovative bond fla- 
vors in its last three auctions to 


francs (S3 btBion) of 10-year bonds entice investors to buy debt 


M Wbrtdlndu 

Tba Mat frocks US. doter values at stocks tx Tokyo. Now Yort, London, and 
Argoitffno, Australia, Austria, Bofgtum. Brora, Canada, Chao, Danmark, Finland, 
Franoa, Oannany. Hong Kong. Katy. Uaxtoo, Notheriands, Now Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sancton, Switzerland and Vtonawto. For Tokyo. New York and 
London, the Me* is composed of ttw 20 top issues In tarns of iwsrftel capttaKzaflon. 
othenrise the ten lop slocks am tracked 


industrial Sectors 


Goods 
RflvMateftob 
Consumer Goods 
Kscsflsneous 


Pact on Japan Trade Plan Falters 


By Steven Brail 

International Herald Tritnme 


and 237 billion francs of 31-year On March 22, Britain sold its 
bonds Thursday. But the scant de- first-ever floatmg-raie gflt, which 
maud from investors left banks pays higher interest as money mar , 
holding the bulk of the bonds it ket rates rise. The Bank of England 
sold, adding to piles of bonds was tapping those investors want- 
they’ve bought from their clients in ing to bet on higher British rates, 
recent weeks. The central bank has also sold 

The Spanish Treasury's refusal three-year gilts that can be 
to sell 10-year and 15-year bonds at swapped into longer-dated bonds, 
its regular monthly auction shows On Thursday, investors snapped 
how tough it can be for European up long-dated British government 


cause Brussels remains uncertain 
about UiL policy, a European 


TOKYO — The United Slates u °wn official said. 


and Europe have now largely given 
up hope of forging a common nego- 


The U.S. demand for numerical 
targets bas been criticized by the 


Energy IIQJB 109.62 40.42 

UjjjWM 118J35 118.42 -J.06 

France 1173 D 1 17.89 -039 

Sendees u&n 11624 -028 


11348 116.17 -2J3Z 
125.60 126.12 -0.41 
9737 97.41 -0.04 
12550 126.73 -0.97 


dating front to win trade conces- EU, which says this amounts to 
sions from Japan, European and managed trade and violates prinri- 


UJL officials raid Thursday. 
Although Washington, in bilat- 


ples of free trade. 

“We still haven't succeeded in 


Far mom Maimafan about the Max. a booklet is available bee of chatge. 

Write to Tib Index. 181 Avenue Charles de Gautio, 82521 NeuBy Codex, Fiance. 

O International Herald Triune 


era! talks with Japan, bas now understanding the objectives of (he 
dropped its demand for specific United States," tbe EU official 
targets in terms of shares of the said. He said Sir Leon Brittan. tbe 
Japanese market, it has been un- Union's trade representative, was 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 

Reasons for a Letup in Europessimism 


countries at least, the public's faith in Europe 
is recovahrg from the shock that followed 
Denmark's initial rejection of the Maastricht 
Treaty two years ago. 

But the most raffing harbingers of change 
are the signs of Kfe in the economies of tbe 
main Continental countries, notably France 
and Germany, where business confidence is at 


By Reginald Dale countries at least, the public's faith in Europe 

International Herald Tribune is recovering from the shock that followed 

W ASHINGTON — Europessi- Denmark's initial rgection of the Maastricht 

irrism may be on the way out Tr ^y J*® y® 815 ... . , 

The stage is set for a lifting of But the most idling harbingers of change 
the debflitatmg gloom that has are the signs ofHfe in the economies of the 
stalled tbe drive to European unity for two main Continental countries, notably France 
years and raided many Europeans to ques- 800 Germany, where business confidence is at 
tirai whether it should be pushed any further. — ■ — 

By far the most important change in the 
scenery is the hesitant drift erf Europe’s eco- A promising get of 

nonric weathervane from stormy toward fair. . 11 

But a p romising confluence of poiinca] car- dTCDlIIStailCeS COIlld help 

cranstances could also help grt the Eraopean « e t the European Union 
Union back on track, provided — a big pro- o j 

vided — that its leaders rise to the occasion. back on track. 

Starting with next week’s European Pariia- 

mait elections, the EU is tmtering a period of . , . 

institutional rcnewaL By January, the Union last recovenng and growth rates should ap- 

wffl have a new executive commisaon, a new proach ennsmg speed next year. 

d nccimrimr the voters of European integration has always progressed 


A promising set oi 
rircmnstances could help 
get the European Union 
back on track. 


aide to win European support for “a bit stuck.” adding: “You can 
its position in the negotiations be- scarcely expect him to agree with 

the U.S. framework approach if it's 
— m — , „ not dear what it is: but we’re un- 

likely to get clarification until the 
talks are finished, but by then it's a 

bit late 10 get on board." 

The United States dropped its 
• _____ • demand for specific shares of tbe 

1T1 1 filTl Japanese market last week, a con- 

* a ■■■* cession that led to the resumption 

of negotiations this week. 

Dff on the right foot. Bonn is . Sir Lg" has renewed instruct 
1 to tackling Europe's jobs crisis 't oas }° EU dffinals 10 566 whether 

julation and greater labor-mar- cooperauonwas oossible, 

I - and to drawing Easiem official said Thursday, 

r to the fold. In general Europe shares Amen- 

san Parliament elections will be ^ of P«^8 

sstsaa&K aSsSSti 

MMsss SSaSiP-- 

commission wffl be Jeailuc Ja ^n wer da^ulatmn. 
lelghun, a tough-minded, prag- Thc Unned Stat« is eager to 

anwbo will £ml to steeV the »' Pj™ of C0lU,tncs “ 

urn- Hir^iinn Eur °P e “ d elsewhere. 


Parliament <md — assuming the wtras of 
Finland, Austria, Norway and Swedai ap- 
prove — four enthusiastic new members. 

This week’s French-German M i mo ut Ins 
resumed some welcrane dynamism to tbe Paris- 

Brain axis, tbe stiD-esseotial motor of econom- 
ic and political integration. The Union is about 
to be treated to an unprecedented jomt 
French-German presidency, intended to 
weave tbe two countries’ successive six-mo p tbs 
stints into a seamless 12-month stretch. 

Prodded by Alain Lamassoure, Frances 
minister for European affairs, a crucial debate 
is starting rat tbe strengthening of the Uroon 
due in 1996, prior to its expansion to the east. 

PoEtidans and public opinion mcreasmgty 
recoerias the need to grasp the histone oppor- 
tmrityto irrevocably bind the Contmaifs two 
halves. There are indications that, m seme 


European integration has always progressed 
in fits and starts. Not surprisingly, it has made 
its greatest strides in periods of economic 
recovery. 

Optimum is even beginning to revive among 
usually hard-headed people that tbe Maas- 
tricht Treaty’s call for of a single currency by 
(he end of the century may not be a jape dream 
after ah — at least for a hard case of countries 
grouped around France and Germany. 

Which is where Mr. Lamassoure cranes in. 
His proposal tins week that a group of “new 
founders" proceed faster than the others to 
wYmfwnrr. md monetary onion — and to com- 

— pomo’the wtym whidhlS^U^OT^ffl 
inevitably have to develop as it expands. 

Meanwhile, the German half of the 
French-German presidency, due to start July 


1, is setting off on the right foot. Bonn is 
giving priority to tackling Europe’s jobs crisis 
through deregulation and greater labor-mar- 
ket flexibility — and to drawing Eastern 
Europe closer to the fold. 

The European Parliament elections will be 
mainly about local issues. But the new Parlia- 
ment will soon want to test the increased 
powers conferred on it by Maastrich 1 — pow- 
ers it is likely to use to press for closer unity. 

Whai is more, after the French-Germ an 
summit, there is a good chance the new presi- 
dent of the commission wfll be Jean-Luc 
De h acae of Belgium, a tough-minded, prag- 
matic politician who will want to steer the 
Union in the same integrationlsi direction. 

(The minefield of Belgian politics, strad- 
dling the Continent's North-South cultural 
divide and strewn with linguistic booby traps, 
is the best possible training ground for EU 
leadership. Indeed, running Belgium for a 
year should perhaps be made a prerequisite 
fra high European office.) 

Of course, the rosy scenario could all go 
wrong, as it has so often where European 
unity is concerned. The German elections in 
October, and France's presidential voting 
next May, could throw tbe whole thing off 
course. 

The French-German presidency may turn 
out to be a bast Modest economic growth 
may not end Europe's stubbornly high unem- 
ployment — tbe biggest single factor behind 


“We’re not interested in gan g jn g 
up on Japan, but if others have 
similar problems in the same sec- 
tors as we do, there's no reason not 
to work together,” a U.S. trade offi- 
cial said. “It makes you lots more 
powerful." 

Bnt Europe’s distrust of the U.S. 
agenda runs deep. Even with 
Washington dropping its demand 
for binding targets, European offi- 
cials suspect any agreement to 
open the Japanese market, even 
one that does not mention US. 
goods, might work against the in- 
terests of European exporters. Af- 
ter all, the EU official said Japan 
would be aware that tbe pressure 
was coming from the United States 
and would have a natural incentive 
to favor American suppliers over 
European rates. 

Tbe U.S. official did not dismiss 
this concern but said it was a rea- 
son for Europe and other countries 
to cooperate with Washington so 
that their interests would be repre- 
sented from the earliest stages of 
negotiations. 

The split will leave Europe and 
the United States pursuing sepa- 
rate talks with Japan. The talks, 
however, will have tbe same goals: 
(tying to expand Japanese domes- 
tic demand and to accelerate and 
shape Japanese efforts in a bid to 
undo regulations. Tbe rift also al- 
lows Tokyo to point to Washington 

See TRADE, Page 16 


recent weeks. The central bank has also sold 

The Spanish Treasury's refusal three-year gilts that can be 
to seO 10-year and 15-year bonds at swapped into longer-dated bonds, 
its regular monthly auction shows On Thursday, investors snapped 
how tough it can be for European up long-dated British government 
governments to borrow the money bonds to lock in high yields, send- 
thw need to fill their budget gaps, ing prices to the biggest gains of the 
European bond yields have year, 
climbed almost without pause this investors such as insurance com- 
ycar. panics that have fixed financial ob- 


German government bond yields ligations simply couldn’t resist 
are at 17-month highs. Tbe yield on locking in yields above 8JS percent, 
the benchmark French 10-year traders said. 


braid is at the highest level since Tlie yield on the longest conven- 
March 1, 1993. tional gill, the 8.75 percent bond 

Investors are demanding these due 2017, slumped 33 basis points 
higher yidds. They are wonW that to 8.43 percent after reaching 8.76 
an unexpected surge in economic percent Wednesday. 


EU Joblessness Rises to 11% 

Bloomberg Business News 

BRUSSELS — Unemployment in the European Union rose to 1 ! 
percent in April, the highest level in the 36-year history of the trade 
group, the ElTs statistical office said Thursday. 

Eurostat also revised upward tbe March rate from 10.9 percent 
reported earlier to 1 1 percent. That means about 17.8 million people 
are oat of work in the 12-nation EU. 

Rising long-tom interest rates and sluggish growth mean unem- 
ployment is likely to keep rising, economists said, as companies find 
it hard to expand and sol more goods. 

In London, Prime Minister John Major of Britain said Europe was 
heading for political turmoil unless it adopted the labor-market 
flexibility of tbe United States and Japaa 
He told a European Parliament election rally of the governing 
Conservative Party that “Europe faces a crisis we haven't seen since 
the 1930a.” He said tbe anemploymeni rate in Europe "is almost 
double the rate in America, nearly four times that in Japan" and called 
on Europe to adopt “the right policies" to fight unemployment 
Economists said expansion of the labor market increased produc- 
tivity and reluctance of companies to employ people before there is 
proof that recovery win be sustained had contributed to Europe's 
jobless total 


But for almost a year, starting in Norman- 
dy next week, a succession of 50th anniversa- 
ries wiD act as reminders of why European 
unity is so essential. It would be nice to be 
optimistic for a change. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


YM. cs Peseta 
1JM- tJUS U»- 
UB VM WC 


Crons Rates June2 Eurocurrency 

■ r « nu F J>, un W> AF. «=• V". ° 

> m«Nn te« UP un Jg £ 3 ! W — ’ *5 ^ S w ® olter 

g re y t> 3MS 5W® ** cw tri 1 moafti 4fc-4* 

LStaSi us I* W MM BM SW ™ 2® 3860 3 month* AW* 

LNflM-(o# M m u mi icua TUB 4L967? W I2MS5 • HW s it 

msa zw« “ JS a m m urns us* ius 

**" S Sstsuoii® nun nu >» ai 1wnr 

HawYar* CM 20 m Utt *xm Sam- «A Ot OCr Sources: RmriertUoy 

y* “■ “2 *55 xu un ju# uw ™ «p»nnp«WWr®*# 

T *** *** «SM a won- uw US’ >«*’ 

TortBte UH JJ« »» “g VS. ™ uw- — usn* uut IBP 

znira un id* ^ iwi zfjxt us quh U 22 S issr Kny Honor R 

iS S S ’2 rS S ******** 

TjfSLmm sssr 

available. com. paper m days 

■— .... - XnaaffeTrenanrollt 

WBS hot*. knot 1A45 IMorTWteiHli 


asa un w *u» 

IMS 47 JS LUU 1S» US* 
liSJJ MM U*B HUB ISS7 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

Swiss 

Dollar D-Mark Franc 

Sterling 

Frencfi 

Franc 

Yen 

June 2 

ECU 

1 moafti 

4tt>4* 

5 Sr5 8, 

**4Vi 

5*4 

S V5 

J . 

S ‘■’■6 ■ 

Smooths 

4VW4S 

5 ¥*& iW 

4 van. 

SMrSH, 

SKrSK. 

2 V2v- 

Tv-* 

6 months 


SMh 


SV5H. 


2 v. 

S .-6- 

1 rear 

5W54S 

5fr5«> 


61V4H. 

SW-ffV. 

2 V2 1. 

5 


Sources: RmritrtUovmeen*. 

Bates OBrtJWWr to krurbenk deetatts at SI mtoan minimum toraoulvoUnti. 


Key Money iUtns 


Ctete Prov. 

3Vi 3Vi 


Antr.scUL 1U* 
tevdtcnsc. man 
Otatawo BMM 
CMUttnm 2&M 
Qilrtlnro— un 
eovtApoonO J» 
RamarttB SAtSS 


MWB-Wfnt IBS 
\aSvsroPte 3iJ5 

5 Tm*- 

lr»* 

— V ItWj 

win — 1-_ 

KomsUtnM* a»w 
nmar.tim. z» 


PUL pen 26JS 

pvnescsdo 17134 
Ra0.nsie WaoO 
Siwdirtrd MSB 
SMS 1 - BZ7 


TstwaaS 27JB 

Tbalbatit 25J0 

Torwssdro 30U4. 
U*E UH BO ffl U73 
VONCLbOltV. u&oo 


Forward Rates 

SSSrt- 3S « 'S 


cufifln^T 

own ***** 

JBanMiw 


mdi Wrior 

tjus uaw 

10U4 1D42T lOMf 


Sovran tHGBaWt fAntrierasm);Jndfu>^^ w (TokYa) 
OWMlt Aomce France 

(Toronto}; IMFtSWO. t*rmr*#t*n« Reatereaae 


- tawmeeUi Bonea Commetebrie IbOano 'mmwW 

,- tndoov^B^kf*^» i/i Rmvt ^ ponada town* Wo w* 


3l-reor TreawY bond 7J4 

MenWLreKhJMovlteadv Otari 1* 
Janan 

DtaOMrirate 

Cot! moan 1 H 

t-rmdh tatertonk 2 w. 

hnoBtbWortaok 2h 

frmatktatalHBk 2* 

Government bead 405 


Lomaoraroto 
ConmoMY 
VmanM totertoa* 


■ 0 V. BrilriB 

3Vi Bonk bna rate S'- SU 

714 CuHmoon S 5 

4 * 'Hmrtb tntertnok 5 5 

403 3-roamt] Krtfrt ca fc 5 SK 

4J0 t-gwntti Wei taaJt 5 5'. 

4M lOHrcorCm 8« 

SJ7 fnmcM 

MtmaHoa role 5JD un 

Col m oon S *« Sr. 

5|« Vmoatti lo tortt u n fc 5 \ 5 '. 

Xnoath interbank 5V» 5V; 

iy, Uneobkiterbonk 5S SVi 

337 Mw oat 7J9 in 

Sources: Reuters, eteomoere Merritt 
1* LmclK Bonk ef Tokyo. Commenoa n», 
14 Oreetm ett Montana Credit Lvettnals. 


US. Hollers per ounce, condo n official fix- 
bm 2utich tmd New York opening on) ctw- 
tog prices: Mew York ame* I August i 
Source: Reuters, 


traps. T y • 

X Indonesia 
Z Eases Curbs 
EE On Investors 

turn JAKARTA — Indonesia on 
owth Thursday scrapped major curbs on 
nem- foreign equity ownership to com- 
:hind bat stiff competition for funds 
from China. Vietnam and other 
man- Asian countries, 
ersa- The announcement was wel- 
pean corned by foreign bankers, who 

said it would help make Indonesia 
a prime Investment area in eco- 
nomically booming Southeast Asia. 

“We had clients. Fortune 100 
companies, who had pushed lodo- 
m nesia down the list because of the 
restrictions, which made it loo 

much hassle when there were so , 

many other opportunities in the 
June 2 re S’ on '” a foreign banker said. 

Government ministers said re- 
ECU sirictioos on sectors, regions and 
s , ^ . minimum capital requirements had 
5 »^ been dropped, and foreign compa- 
s nies would no longer be required 10 
s - transfer majority ownership to In- 
donesian partners. 

"Considering the tough competi- 
tion from China and Vietnam, 
which are following open economic 
policies, wc have to further expand 
5 .„ 5 k, our economy." Industry Minister 

s l Tunky Ariwibowo said.’ 

I 5 1 Foreign investors now may oper- 
s *v 5 '- ate in Indonesia for 30 years after 
B .95 195 commercial production starts, and 
sjo i 40 die period can be extended. They 
5 ^ sn also can sell their stakes to local 
*£ investors after 15 years, and a pre- 
ss 5b vious requirement that foreign in- 
1 * > Merntt vestars had to ensure local partners 
menoJnk. a 51 percent stake in projects after 
»'*■ 20 years has been dropped. 

Government officials also said 
Ch ^ e that foreigners in joini ventures 
with local panners could now in- 
—270 vest in previously restricted strate- 
\ D .f & c sectors, including ports, dec- 
Htandcioi- tcictiy . telecommunications. 
ousti shipping, water, public railways, 
atomic energy and mass media. 


Blanc pain 



Since 1735 there has 

NEVER BEEN A QUARTZ BlANCPAJN WATCH. 
AND THERE NEVER WILL BE. 

MEISTER"*" 


JUWELEN LHREN SILBER 


ZtljRICH 

Mcirier Uhren AG, Bahninfstnase 53, 8001 ZOridi,TtL 01/211 1033 


ft a. r* Y 1 KY S 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1994 


p . Page 12 


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Compiled frv Our Stuff Fnm Pispjnha number," said Ken Sullivan. a irad- 
NEW YORK — Treasury bond er at First Chicago Capital Markets, 
prices rose and slock prices were That sentiment kept stock irad- 
mixed Thursday as investors set lethargic. The Dow Jones in- 
positions before emplovtnem data dustrial average closed 1.84 points 
for May are released Friday. lower at 3.758.99, while gaining is- 
" You've got a big economic indi- sues outnumbered losing ones by a 
cator tomorrow." said Gerald Sim- 3 - 10-2 ratio on the New York Stock 


mans. manager or institutional 
trading at Inlerstate/Johnson 

aj.s. Stocks 

Lane. ■‘Slocks will piggyback on 
whatever that is. If bonds go down, 
we’ll go down." 

The price of the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond rose 15/32 
point, to 86 29/32, with the yield 
falling to 7J4 percent from 7.39 


Exchange. 

Retail stocks were generally 
weak after the release of sales fig- 
ures for May. WalMan was the 
mast actively traded Big Board is- 
sue. slipping ti to 22k Era an man- 
aged to gain to 15k despite 
reporting a sales slump for the 
month. 

U.S. Surgical dropped 1 ■'* to 19'« 
in active trading after Ciba-Geigy. 
the Swiss pharmaceutical compa- 


Daily closings of the 
Dow Jones industrial average 
4000 



3500 


D J F M A M J 


■1993 


1994 


percent Wednesday. . . ■ , . . L 

Bond investors reused on signs «>■ ™nied market spoliation that 
that economic expansion was slow- 11 was interested in taking over Inc 


fog. reducing the need for the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board to raise interest 
rates again to head off inflation 
that might accompany growth. 

But many traders were wary ihai 
Friday's jobs data could show large 
increases in nonfarm payrolls, 
which could reverse Thursday's up- 
beat mood. 

“No r«ne really wants io have a 
large exposure into tomorrow's 


U.S. medical-supplies company. 

International Business Machines 
fell IS to 62‘s after the computer 
maker’s shares were downgraded to 
“neutral" from “buy" at Dean Vv li- 
ter Reynolds. 

Mylan Laboratories jumped I to 
to 2 Mi on expeclations for the ge- 
neric drug maker to report strong 
earnings Tor the first quarter. 

iBIoomberg. A Pi 


Rebound in U.S. Bonds 

>©Uar a Lift 


Bloomberg Businas Vi-i. j 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against most other major curren- 
cies Thursday as U.S. Treasury- 
bonds gained for a second day. 
restoring some confidence in 
American assets. 

“People think there’s money 
coming back home from abroad " 

Foreign Eadianse 

said James McGroany. managing 
director at Athena Global Invest- 
ments. "Thai sentiment helped the 
dollar gain." 

The dollar closed in New York at 
1.6532 Deutsche marks, up from 
1.6464 DM on Wednesday, and at 
104.80 yen. up from 104.50. The 
dollar rose to 5.6450 French francs 
from 5.6265 and to 1.4032 Swiss 
francs from 1.4010. The pound 
weakened to 5 1 .5 1 05 from SJ_5lo9. 

While U.S. bond prices rose, 
most European bond prices tum- 
bled. further encouraging a flight to 
dollar-denominated assets. 

“The whole argument for a 
weaker dollar has been based on 
the notion that atpiial is moving 

out or the 

said. “That 
changing now. 

Expectations of strong U.S. em- 
ployment data For Muy.'due lo be 
reported Friday, and concern 
about rising tensions between the 


United Slates and North Korea 
also helped the dollar rise. 

President Bill Clinton sent his 
sternest message yet to Pyongyang 
on Thursday, saving the United 
Nations must discuss imposing 
sanctions on North Korea for 
breaking the nuclear nonprolifera- 
tion treaty. 

The dollar often gains in rimes of 
global turmoil as investors seek a 
haven for their investments. The 
yen often suffers most when ten- 
sions rise in Korea because Japan is 
so close to the Korean peninsula. 

“North Korea is something you 
have io keep your eye on all the 
time." said Jim Raphael, 2 trader at 
Nat West USA Bancorp in Jersey 
City. New Jersey. “The dollar 
could pop a lot higher against the 
yen if we wake up to a crisis there 
one morning." 

Other traders said they were 
skeptical that Thursday's dollar 
gains would last. The key for many 
is how the dollar reacts to Friday's 
monthly jobs report, considered 
one of ihe broadest assessments of 
the economy's strength. 

!f the report shows a strong rise 


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I7L. 

. 1 g 

Cscos 

23018 25 

24 

24 '.v 

Vj 

weitflr s 

195*7 26V. 


25’*? 

- J 4 

DSC % 

18536 23". 

21 to 

22> t . 


MCli 

IS404 ?4 

23« 

73»v 


OollCinr 

1777.1 


7«V, 

- I-U 

AMEX Most Actives 


VaL High 

Low 

Lost 

019- 

E-pLA 

20740 l» » 

l'*s 

VK U 


NlChl^A 

9265 17 

1 l 3 J 

ll’i 

'. ■ 

WiChiSC 

6751 1 1 

l|7j 

llv 

' d 

iva>Cp 

4128 19’v 

18W 

10'v 

. '7 

Echofiay 

4061 ll*'. 

JO’* 

11 

... 

ICH 

3907 5V, 

5'. 

54. 

— 1 ■ 

TexAAer 

3274 135, 


u 

- 1 j 

Hasbro 

JI33 33to 

r+< 

32 Li 

_'x 


2846 9’. 




Dai ami 

26 T S J+n 


3".. 

• *»• 

Market Sales 


Dow Jones Averages 


Low Lost Chg. 


influx 

Trans 

Uhl 

Cot 


Open High 

r,*D M 3TT0J- 3'« ’S 3756 « -» W 
li3U Ji i+31 4* '- 1*1* ’* — 1 50 

184 2a IB6S 185 4? 145.7* —CS2 

IjUjjJ tJtiJJ 1308 70 1306.*' —2.81 


Standard ft Poors Indexes 


High Ur* UtrU CUB. 

SP IOD J25 38 4M.5» 434.47 _0X7 

ZP 500 -I.r8.58 <i’.5* JP4i - OJB 

Induv-rloJ'- 533 55 WJ IT S32J8 .0 38 

Transo. J96 47 J«J2 3«.M —7.30 

Ui.ii'.e-- 1M ’j IW'S 15171 — CX3 

Finernc* -s 15 *0.01 


NYSE indexes 


High lom Las eng. 

CemflOile 70 37 .'sirs 353 08 -073 
indu-jncl'* 3H 31 310*1 3I0.B8 -Ojr 

Tramo 751.06 26*87 -1351 

nn iVT 107 57 707 07 »I.17 -0.17 

France 3*5 M- JI7 5I 118 34 *04 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


Cine 

Bid &$k 
ALUMINUM (High Grade) 

Dalian per metric tan 
Soot 132300 in DO 131*3)0 137000 

FonrortS IJ49.BB 135000 1348.00 134*00 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Dolton per metric ton 

Spot 222030 222130 22000 221400 

Forward 2231.00 2ZJL00 222740 2228.00 

LEAD 

Dollars per metric ton __ 

SMI 501.00 »3J>0 S00JX) 501 JIO 

Forward 518.00 S20A0 51 7 M 51800 

NICKEL 

Doll an per metric ton 

Soct blotun 6170.00 6II0i» 61203)0 

Forward 6250TW 4255.00 6205.00 62103)0 

TIN 

Dollors per metric ton 
See! 5505J0 553X00 5S05J» 551X00 

Forward 5580.00 MOJO 558X00 55*9.00 

ZINC (Special High Grade) 

Dalian per mclrte Ion 

5oot 9&JJC *55X0 K100 95X00 

Forward *«X0 *8000 *80J» *81X0 


NASDAQ Indexes 


ConwJic 

ir Ajiiric 1 *, 

Bonks 

Insurance 

Finance 

TrCtoB 


High L*w Last Qig. 

’3°.<V T+.29 rp.oa -3.44 
-J? V 7-W « 7«S7 - 3-57 
741.86 737.41 741.86 - 424 
*0l 24 tfC'GS COG. 44 -4.34 
93*6’ *33 75 939.34 -4J9 

712 37 207 ^2 7D9.01 


AU’ZX Stock Index 


High Law 
440.44 431.41 


Las) Oift. 

*40.54 -0*5 


Sow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
10 umine* 

10 industrials 


Close 

*745 

94.74 

100X4 


Cn’ae 
+ 0.06 
*-ao 2 
+ 810 


MYSE Diary 


Ctose Prev. 


NYSE 
Amo 
Nasdaq 
In millions. 


271.11 

1X88 

2*7X3 


334.33 

18*2 

300L3* 


Adunnce-I 
Ojcti-wd 
■Jr*nar»>.-c 
Total Issues 
new Hi^nv 
He« Low, 


1J9’ 

S70 

641 

2828 

43 

41 


1177 

934 

*»1 

JBC2 

JO 

Ji 


AM2X SSary 


dose Prew. 


4j*.CTC«i 

C+al.ncU 
Unctiaiae«l 
Tec 31 r/m 
!+t» Hlgns 
Ne-.v Lows 


XI.' 

301 

22 * 

812 

15 

1 * 


24B 

341 

2172 

791 

13 

14 


NASDAQ Diary 


7-tt.ono.-n 

Declined 

Ul>3'anai'd 

Taial rsim*> 
New HiOhi 

Now LO.V*. 


Close Prev. 

1749 1449 

1250 1*1* 

1913 1448 

5022 5033 

107 93 

SO ICO 


Spot Commodities 


Cammodir* 
Aluminum, lb 
CoHee. Brai- lb 
Cooocr elecirolvllc. lb 
Iron FOB. Ion 
leod.ib 
Silver. Ira* oz 
Steel ( scrap 1, ton 
Tin. lb 
Zinc, lb 


Today 

0X99 

1 . 1 * 

1 JJB 

213X0 

0J4 

5.33 
127J3 
3. 7075 
0.4555 


0-59* 

1.19 

1JJ7 

213X0 

0J4 

540 

137X3 

X7T22 

04530 


Financiaf 

High Low cine CMnsa 
3- MO NTH STERLING ILIFFE) 

ESoiuM - pis on do pet 


sep 

Od 


High Law Lob Bottle OT» 

15X25 156.73 157XB lgXO — W5 

161 J5 159X0 160* 1«» 

1*2X0 161-50 
D*C 164JD MiaS 1*1H +“ 

Jen 1*4 JO 1*4X0 1*6X0 14*80-025 

Eel. vokm: TJP9T - Owm ltd. 11 JW 

BRENT CRUDE OIL CIPEI , M 

Ui aolton per bonel-wts BMXOO bmws 

JaJ 16.72 16X4 1X42 1M? +M6 

An 16X0 1625 16X1 

Sep 14.50 16X2 1623 

OS 16X4 1615 loM 

Not 1632 1617 J6.JJ 

Doc 1637 1615 lfc» 

JU N.T. N.T. NX 

Ftb N.T. N.T. N.T 

Mar N-T. N.T. N.T. 

Est. urfume: «.ll6 . Open mt. Ml J97 


16X1 UK*. 
1626 —623 
162S —0X2 
16X2 -007 
16.19 — 0X8 
1618 — O10 

16X8 — aw 
1618 — OlII 


Jim 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Jim 

Sea 

Dec 

Mar 

Jan 

See 

Dec 

Mar 


*4.71 
94 JO 
*364 
92.95 
*2X2 
91.74 
91X2 

90.99 

9077 

WJ 6 

*QJ7 

*0X0 


*4*9 

9422 

9152 

*1X4 

91J1 

90X8 

9067 

*050 

KUO 

70.13 


WTO 

94X8 

*3X1 

*2.93 

*U 2 

91.75 

*1X1 

«0.*9 
90 77 
* 0 J 6 
90X7 
*0.19 


Est. volume'. 77X03. Ooen Ini.: £Ux7*. 
J-MQNTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

Si million ■ pts oi too pet 


+ 0X1 
+ 0X6 
+ 0.12 
+ 0.13 
+ 0.14 
+ D.IJ 
+ 0.15 
+ 014 
+ 0.15 
+ 0.M 
+ 017 
+ 0.14 


Jon 

°5J0 

•129 

95J2 

sep 

94X2 

*4X1 

96X5 

Dec 

74X2 

94.00 

94 JOS 

Mar 

93JB 

93.78 

93 A3 

Jun 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9155 

S«B 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9133 

E si. vofime: ifld Ooen vnv.; 

I0J30. 


+ 0X4 
+ 0.10 
+ 613 
+aio 
+ 0.15 
+ 615 


3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 
OM1 minion - Pts of IDO PCt 


Jim 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

Sep 

Dec 

Mcr 

Jan 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 


*4.90 

*5X0 

94X3 

*4X9 

94X4 

*4X0 

visa 

91X7 

93X7 

93X3 

N.T. 

N.T. 


74X5 

94X8 

94J1 

94.44 

<4X8 

rax? 

raxs 

*3X9 

93.15 

N.T. 

N.T. 


94X7 —0.02 

*493 — 0JJ4 

94.78 — ODD 
94X3 —0X4 

94.18 — 0JSS 

91X9 —am 

93+8 —009 
9052 —0.1* 

93X5 — 008 

9117 —0.0* 

93X1 — 010 

*2X4 —OX* 


Est. volume: 713X92. Open In).: 1X33X87. 





Muni Partners Fd 

FFS million 




Muni Fortners 11 

Jon 

94.63 

94X8 



Tad Iron Ltd 

5cp 

94X2 





Dec 

96J4 

94.15 

*4.17 

-ai5 


War 

94.10 

93X6 

<1J3 

—0.15 

Espiriio Santa Fin 

Jun 

93J0 

93X5 

93X9 

—120 


sen 

*3X9 






9128 

9110 

*114 

— a.19 1 




92 J3 

92X9 

— 0.17 

ft 


Stock indexes 

High Low Close Cnonoe 
FTSE 168 (LIFFE) 

(25 per Index poM 

Jan 2980X 2*23J 2968X +60X 

Sep WLO B3X 29B0X + 9>S 

ESI. xaRUTte: 19X06 Ooen W.: O&950. 

CAC40 (MATIF) 

a S£Si *tss 

sS 20D1XO 19BTX0 »KJ0 +36^ 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2WWQ +M0 

Mar H.T. N.T. 204QDQ +38X0 

Est. volume: 35J47. Open hit.: 7*589. 

Sources: Mot'f. associated Press 
Larxtan Wtl Financial Futures Exdtonae. 
Mi Petroleum ExChQKK- 


Dividends 


Com pony Per Amt Pm Rec 

IRREGULAR 

Court Quids PLC * -202 J-22 B-17 

NAIC Growth - «# W 

74»orox omount per ADR- 

STOCK SPLIT 

Saratoga Brands 1 for 10 reverse spilt. 
INCREASED 

Kraruco Realty O -ff J-S 

Tootsie Roll Q -M 6-23 7-12 

CORRECTION 

AmerodaHeM w *' 13 6-30 

L+Rlon Group r +26-2a 

w-corracted record date, 
x -revised effective dotes on 1 for 6 reverse 
soli). 

REDUCED 

M an 4-13 4-30 
M MS 6-13 6-30 
. X8 +9 6-30 


_ 1 JO *-10 4-24 


EsI. volume: 1D4J74. Open Ini.: 214.755 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) I 

(50X00 - PK A 32nds Of 100 pd 
Jon 102-02 1(0-09 101-29 -r 2-05 ! 

Sep 100-28 77-03 100-20 +2-00 1 

Dec 98-10 <8-10 99-20 + 2-00 i 

Esr. volume: 15DX39. Open ini : 4 1J8.7S1. ( 

GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) j 
DM 250X60 - Pts Of 1 M pet 
Jun *2.73 91.711 9142 + 0X0 | 

Sep 9100 90.90 *1X4 + 0.J4 

Dec 91X5 *0.92 91 Jt +61* 

EsI. volume: 217J56 C>pen mt.. 174.116 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONOS IMATIFI 
ffsmxqo • Pts of laa pc: 

Jun 117.0* 115X6 11130 — <Lo8 

Sep lltiXo 114x0 .... 

Dec 115.16 1M.OO 114X2 —0x6 

Est. volume: 3*7376 Open ini.: 150X25. 


AST Strategic 
Allegheny Pwr 
Amwest Insur 
Blkrk 2001 Term 
Blfcrk Broodlnv200» 
BlkrV CA ins 2008 
BIKrk FL IBS 2008 
BILr6 ins «Aunl 
BDrk Ins A8un2008 
Blkrk InvOualMun 
Blkrk NY ins 2006 
Blkrk Strol Term 
CohenStoer Tot Pet 
Daniel too 

DlwreGrpDvInco 
Delaware GIOI Dtv 
71STO _ n «, , Drrrts SlrolMunBd 

iSb -a$ i SynSI^I 0 


industrials 

Low Lost Settle Ch'ge 


DuttPhelp UtTxFr 
1 EosfmanOtem 
. Emeralno MHFItRt 
fkib Cora 
. First Union PJEst 
, Gen Public Uill 
i Global Portnrlneo 
Gran lie Construct 
[ High Yld income 
l Houston Ind 


Htoit 

GASOIL (IPE) 

UX. dollars Per metric ron+ots of IN ions 

Jun 154X5 15225 15125 152X0 - 0X0 , 

Jal 1S625 15625 153X0 10-50 — 0.75 B-annual; v-aavable m Conadtan funds; m- 

Aug 150.15 155.00 15600 15525 — 0X0 I monthly; a-auuj let ty; s-searfanoual 


a X2S 

o .02 

M X35 

Q M 

a in 

M £5*2 
M OB75 
M J3712 
M one 
M XS2 
m sim 
M X75 
M X712 
M £583 
M A8 
Q JR5 

M X92 
M JM8 
M JOSS 
M X98 
M .08 

- .40 
M .D25 
O 07 

- .10 
O -45 
M .1117 
Q .05 
M X725 
O J5 


7-5 7-15 
4-34 74 

+% 

M0 7-15 
6-15 6-30 
+15 6-30 

6- 15 +30 

+ 15 +» 
+15 +30 
+15 6-30 
+15 +30 
+15 +30 
+15 +30 
+15 +30 
+15 +2* 
+17 +30 
+15 +-30 
+14 +26 
+15 6-30 
+15 6-30 
+75 7-1 

+71 +30 
+10 +15 
+30 7-29 

7- 29 8-31 
+13 +30 
+X 7-22 
+15 +30 
+ 1 * +10 



STET Says Profit Rose to $961 Million in ’93 


Bloomberg Business .Vns 

MILAN — The Italian telecom- 
munications holding company 
STET Group SpA posted 1993 in- 
creases across the board due to a 
decrease in debL less spending for 
technological improvement and in- 


tance service and local service, was Another important factor was a divisions performed well during 
I.039 trillion lire (S96I million) decrease in the amount that STET 1993. STET reduced its work force 
compared to 1.425 trillion lire for invested in technical equipment to bv 1.700 to 136.000 in 1993. 


as..- hr. McGroany ^ . 

look, I, I* ,1 mishr be Board could be ^mor; r -filing ,0 ^ W .o +Tld 


* 992. modernize i ls network and’ senices. 

Total revenue increased 9.6 per- It invested 8.4 trillion lire in 1993 
cent in 1993 to 29.S00 trillion lire, compared to 10.6 trillion lire the 
Operating profit before taxes and previous vear. 
other charges was 14.843 trillion STET will pay shareholders a 
ure ' dividend of 100 lire a share for 


raise in teres i rates to head off the 
inflation that often accompanies 
economic expansion. Higher rates 
usually male dollar-denominated 
assets more attractive. 


vestors this year. 

Net profit for the group, which 
controls separate companies for 
equipment manufacture, long dis- 



As a step toward the company 's 
privatization, five Italian state tele- 
commu nications companies under 
bit Is wing agreed last month to 
fuse into a single company. Tele- 
com I tali a. 


To subscribe in France 


Financial debt decreased by S 00 
billion lire to 22.085 trillion lire. 


rights. 

The company said that ail its 


just call, tod free 
05 437X37 


Leading U.S. Indicators flat in April 

WASHINGTON (AP) - A !>*%(/ 

mounting evidence that economic ‘ J* ^ second halt 

panicularlv as higher i merest rales apply . f iodine «co- 

The Commerce Deparcmem said index or 

oomic indicators, the government s mam forecasting ga ge 

“SSfcSSSS?.^ dV iihas Staves 
the three most recent reports after incwasingfor sixsuaj^ qj 

Commerce Department also said orders to U.S. facion ■ 

percent in April, the second drop in three months. danger of 

1 ^Tsee a pause. I don’t necessanly tebeve the 
stall ing or going into recessjon.'' said the economist Paul Kasrtel , 

Northern Trust Go. in Chicago. 

Shoppers Passing Up Gothhig Backs . 

NEW YORK (Blotfflibeigi — Shoppers pased by the ctolhlng raefom - 
many stores Iasi month, leading U5. retaners to report mixed sales, 

fienres for May on Thursday. „ . , , - . - 

Apparel sales continued to trail those for hard goo*, such as apph- 
anc^: furniture and other household items, amdysts and omipames ajd. 
Among retailers that depend mosUy on clothing sales, those d»t target , 
midd]£ to upper-income consumers did better than those with lower- ^ 

income customers, one analyst said. . . . . ». 

“The apparel business has been so soft that it is even derailing the sales . 
performancefor some of the smaller general awrchandisc chams ihatdo • 
just 20 percent of their business in apparel, sard Thomas Tashjian. a retail 

analyst with Fust Manhattan Co. 

Workers Strike at GM TecK Center ; 

DETROIT (AP) — About 3.500 workers at General Motory Coro, i 
technical center went on strike Thursday after tfae aiilomaka.and the 
United Auto Workers failed to reach agreement on -a new contrast. 

The walkout foDowed by two days a strike by workers in similar jobs at* 
CbjYsJer's technology center, which is continuing. ' 

Union officials said both companies bad failed to offer adequate 
assurances that union workers would not be displaced by salaried - 
employees or by outside contractors working at the centers, where cars ' 
and trucks are designed. The strikes do not involve workers who assemble 
cars or build components, but they have the potential to disrupt design 
and engineering operations at both companies. 

Ukraine Defaults on U.S. Payments : 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — Ukraine on Thursday defaulted on j, 
payments for 52.6 million of purchases of U.S. agricultural products, the. 
Agriculture Department said. 

“It's the first occasion." said Christopher Gpldthwait. the department's , 
general sales manager. Ukraine owes banks about. &2Q mfiliou in pay- -■ 
ments this month. 

Ukraine’s default came as Western nations met in Paris to reschedule* 
510 billion to 512 trillion in Russian debt incurred by the-fonner Soviet-. 
Union. : . 

Trump Plans a $350 Million Park 

BRIDGEPORT, Connecticut (Bloomberg) - The real estate developer 
Donald Trump has proposed to develop a 5350 million theme part and 
seaport village here, according to Nonna Foerderer, Mr. Trump’s exeat-' 
rive assistant. 

She declined to comment further. Bridgeport which is about 50 miles 
east of New York, threatened to declare bankruptcy about three years 
ago. 

Mirage Resorts Inc. of Las Vegas and three Connecticut Inchon tribes' 
have proposed to develop casino resorts on Bridgeport’s waterfront. The j 
state, however, would need to enact legislation that expands gambling, j ' 

Royal Bank Reports Income Rise -.‘J 

TORONTO — Royal Bank of Canada said net income in the quarter . 
ended April 30 rose to 273 million Canadian dollars (USSI97 million)' 
from 243 million dollars a year earlier. 

For the first half. Royal Bank posted net income of S573 mfifion, up * 
from 5497 million a year earlier. ~ 

J 

For the Record 

Nynex Corp. said it would open a research and development laboratory , 
in Thailand to plan and design telephone and cable television networks - 
for Southeast Asia. Nynex also will enter into a strategic alliance, called J i 
TelecomAsia, with Charoen Pokphand Group. ~ ( Reuters ) 

AUiedSignal Inc. said it won a S2 billion contract from Boeing's 
commercial airplane unit to supply the airplane maker with its 13 1-9 < B) 
auxiliary power unit system as standard equipment on the next genera- 
tion of its 737-X aircraft. (Knight-Ridden 

Trans Worfd Airfines Inc. plans to lay off 250 to 300 employees at its 
Kansas City overhaul base on July 4. (Bloomberg) 


Ajen 


AbH 
ACF 
Acf« 
Ahof 
JUux 
AMI 
Boh 
QSM 
D5 « 
Else 
Foil 
Gist 
HBC 
Hair 
Hoo 
Hun 
1HC 
Infe 
Inti 
KLA 

r.NF 

Ned 

Ocr 

Pafc 

Phil 

Pol-. 

Rob 

Roo 

Roll 

Ron 

Rov 

5for 

Unll 

Van 

VNI 

Wol 


AG 

Art 

Bar 

Bel 

Co- 

Co* 

Od 

El* 

GH 

GB 

Ge 

Kn 

Pe 

Po 

Ro 

Ux 

SO- 

So 

50' 

Tr 

Ut 

L'r 

Cn 

Pr 


AE 

All 

All 

As 

Qje 

Be 

Be 

Be 

BE 

Bi 

nr 

a 

a 

Di 

Cm 

O 

D- 

D 

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F- 

F 

M 

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Agmee France Prei» Jin 2 
Close Prev. | 


Close Prev. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 

ACF Holding 

Aeoon 

Anew 

Amo Nobel 

AMEV 

Bais-Wessanen 

CSM 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Fa I ker 

Gtst-Brocodcs 
HBG 
Hefnefcen 
Haoaavens 


*0.911 «o 
*5.10 45 

95 95X0 
<7MJ 47X0 
203X0 206 

74i0 72X0 
40 40 

64X0 45X0 
134X0 1JT-LO 
165 165 

1+40 IL40 
*658 46SD 
316 315 

224X0 224 

£120 »7 


Hwjtor Douglas 6660 69X0 


IHC Coland 
Inier Mueller 
inn Nedenand 
KUM 
r.NP BT 
NedltovtJ 
OcaGrinten 
Pakhoed 
Philips 
Palvernm 
Robcco 
Rooamco 
RoIUicq 
R orenlo 
Royal Dutch 
Stork 
Unilever 
Van Onuneren 

VNU 

Walters/ Kluwrr 110X0 
EOB Index : J99J4 
Previous : J97X7 


37 37 

88 79 J» 

76.10 7SJ0 
51^0 51.90 
47.90 47X0 
WX0 63X0 
76X0 77X0 

49 49.70 
2X0 5640 

29.10 77 JO 
119 Jo 116*0 
5920 S9.ID 

121.40 121-40 
90 9Q.2D 

197.40 lf&JO 
4850 47.*0 
19IJ0 191X0 

S 1 J 0 51.70 

147X0 1« 

111 


Brussels 

AG Fin 26«0 266i 

Arted 4*00 4910 

Baras 2350 3400 

Befccerl 25300 25550 

Cocicerlll 181 186 

Cotwna 5<50 !*M 

Deihalse 73*0 iis* 

Electrabei 57 to 5730 

GIB 1510 1510 

GBL 4435 44Q0 

Gevaerl 91*0 9300 

Kredlelbank 6630 A7W 

Pelrailna <0825 10800 

Powerfln 3210 3200 

Ratal Briw 5100 5130 

Soc Gen Bonaire 8170 HI 70 

Soe Gan BeHHaue 7435 2435 

Selina 152100 15700 

Solvav 15300 15050 

Tra-debel 10300 10175 

UCB 24000 24300 

Union Mlniera 2660 2660 

Cenront Stock Index : 7623.12 
Previous : 7652.44 


Helsinki 


Amer-’raiymo 
Enso-Gul^rll 
Huhlamaki 
K.O.P. 

Krmmtne 
Metro 
Nokia 
Panioia 
Reoqlc 
Slockmcm 
HEX Index : 1777X0 
Previous : 1771 js 


133 

133 

Land Sec 

6 X2 

08 

38X0 

38 

Laoone 

7X0 

7X6 

212 

209 

Las mo 

1X5 

143 

11.90 

11.90 

Legal Gen Gra 

4J0 

4.13 

115 

113 

Llavcls Bank. 

5X7 

5J9 

177 

TO 

Marks So 

3.97 

341 

•no 

605 

MEPC 

4X3 

4X9 

as 

as 

Nall Power 

42B 

4LI0 

9QX0 

90X0 

Natwest 

6X3 

4J2 

310 

225 

Nmwst water 

100 

4.97 


Hong Kong 

BL East Asia 36 J6J5 

Camay Pacific 11.10 11X0 
Cheung Xong 38 39.25 
China Light Pwr 41.75 42X0 
Dairy Form I nr I 10 x 0 10.70 
Hang Lung Dev 13X0 14 

Hang Seng Bank 53.50 5450 
Header «vi Land 39.75 40X0 
HK Air Ena. 43 44.25 

HK China Gas 16 I6J0 
HK Eleclric 24J0 24 JO 
HK Land 2Z1D ZL40 

HK Realty Trust 21X0 22.40 
HSBC Holdings 66X0 86 

HK Sllano HII5 12220 12_50 
H6. Telecomm 14X0 15.40 
HK Ferry 12J0 12J0 

Hutch Wtnmwo 32X0 33 

HrsanDev 22 23 

Jardirw Malh. 59 62X0 
Jardlne Sir Hid 30X0 31.25 
Kowloon Motor UXO 15.10 
■Mandarin Orient 10.90 II 
Miramar Hole‘ 2Z<0 ra 
New World Dew 23.20 24.90 
SHK Proas 50 52 

Slelu* 3X0 3X5 

Swire Pac A 59Xfl 41 
“ai Cheung Pros 11.10 11.70 
JVB „ 643 3X0 

■■JharlHoid 30X0 33. ?< 
“Jn« On Co mil 11JJ nxo 
Wlnsnnnc 11.40 11X0 

^«»7 :9S22J4 


Close Prev. 


Klngllsher 
LOd brake 


5.17 

1.65 


5X3 

1X3 


P 60 
Pllklnaian 
Power Gen 
Pnmenivai 
Rank Org 
Redfand 
Read Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rovce 
Ralhmn (unll) 
Rovol Seal 

ftrz 

Salnsbury 
Seal Ncwars 
Scar Power 
Sears 

Severn Trenl 

Shell 

Siebe 

Smith Neohew 
XmlttiKIlne B 
Smlrh IWHI 
Sun Alliance 
Tale & Lyle 
Teseo 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
T5B Group 
Unilever 
Uld Bbcuns 
Vodctonc 
War Loan 3 15 
Wellcome 
wniibread 
Williams Hdgs 
WillEs Corroon 


637 

1X2 

4+2 

2X6 

3.77 

4*9 

609 

4X2 

8X3 

1J9 

175 

4X5 

626 

3.77 

5JJ9 

3X6 

1J1 

5.03 

7.10 

5X0 

1X1 

3X5 


6J4 

1X1 

4X9 

273 


610 

4X6 


in 

4X4 

131 

3x8 

5JJ3 

038 

1.17 

4.96 

7X2 

5X9 

1X8 


10 B 194 

418 4.TS 


111 

1640 

124 

2X8 

- 10.01 

123 

5J3 

NXL 


2X7 

1625 

2.15 

KB 

9.*8 

3.18 

122 

NA 


5X3 5X8 

5X4 5.19 


3X7 

1X9 


3X3 

1X0 


F.T.sa index: muo 

^1^2^55 :2mj0 


Johannesburg 


!N 


It's never 
been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 
Jusf call 
toll-free: 

0 800 1 7538 


AECI 
Allech 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
BlYvogr 
Ekrffels 
De Beers 
Oriefoniein 
Gencor 
GFSA 
Harmanv 
Hiahveld Sieel 

Kiooi 

Ned bank Grp 
Randlceilein 
Rusoioi 
SA Brews 
Si Helena 
Sasol 

Western Deep 
Composite Index: 
Previous : 5415X3 


26 X 

N -A. 120X0 
220 220 
3625 37X0 
8X0 675 
47 46 

106X0 ID0.75 
55 57X0 
1035 1615 
to* 1QS.40 
25 25 

28 2650 
47 48 

2975 30 

42 47X0 
87 85 

98 *6 

43X0 41 

74.75 24.75 
166 167 

5461X2 


Madrid 


London 


Ateev Nan 
Allied irons 
Aria Wioglns 
Argyll Group 
Assent Foods 
SAA 
BAe 

Bank 5C0lKWd 

Bar days 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boats 
Bowoter 
BP 

Bril Alrwo,g 
Brit Gcs 
3rd Steel 
Sri: Telecom 
BTR 

Coble Wire 
CedburyScfl 
tor Mon 
Coals virella 
Comm Union 
Courtaulds 
ECC Group 
Enterprise Oil 
EuroJuimet 
P lions 

Fone 

GEC 

Cenl Aec 

G>a*g 

Grand Mel 

GPE 

Gutrmess 

GU5 

Henson 

Hillsaonn 

HSBC Hfdps 

iCt 

Ind- cane 


410 

5X3 

2.73 
?J 1 
577 
1J4 
4X7 
1X0 
5.19 
533 
470 
135 
2.8* 

7 17 

536 
4JS 
3X4 
378 
2X3 
138 
3X4 
371 
479 
457 
373 
Z?i 

537 
5.15 
3X5 
191 
3.45 
1.40 
326 
2.92 
5X8 
5X7 
4J2 

1.74 
468 
5X8 
2X3 
1X3 
737 

8 10 

4X6 


197 

5.73 

2 X 0 

222 

574 

9.10 

4X3 

1.75 

4ft 

5.18 

403 

172 

2X4 

7+J 

5X6 

417 

3X4 

3.77 

2X0 

135 

153 

3X8 

475 

6X5 

3M 

223 

5.15 

5.15 

3X6 

3.*3 

174 

139 

274 

718 

5X9 

5J® 

474 

1X7 

471 

5.60 

2X3 

162 

7J7 

B 

4 7B 


5J V , . 3185 3160 

Bco Central Hlw. two 2930 
Banco Santander 47X 4885 
kmc ioeo 
XW) 32J0 
2325 2240 
4430 4400 
,224 217 

1000 993 
C95 4135 
4100 4010 
1835 1765 


Ekrnesia 
CEPSA 
Draoodas 

Enoesa 

Ercros 

Iberdrola 

Pensol 

Tabacaiera 

Teleton ica 


5.EL General index : 32074 
Previous : 722X7 


Milan 


Boned Comm 
Brntoot 

Benetton or aus 

CIR* 

Crad Hal 
Enlchem 
Berlin 
Ferlln Rlsp 
Figi SPA 
Flwneecanlca 
Generali 
IFI 

itofcem 
1 la loos 

ItolmotiJIlare 

Mediobonea 

Maniedlson 

OHveW 

Pirelli 

HAS 

RJnascenle 
Saipem 


5155 5145 
17t m 
26300 2 M 00 
1158 1158 
■Ota 2J9S 
7365 3340 
M70 2955 

19*5 2010 
1230 1228 
6805 4630 

2010 3RD 
44800 4455b 
25150 23650 

16200 16150 

5245 5265 
45050 45600 
15430 15575 
13*7 1X0 
3600 2655 
5715 5300 
28250 28700 

10850 108 10 

3**S 3*55 


San Paolo Torino 10040 10220 
SIP 4350 4205 

SME JTW 3835 

Sflta 3385 2408 

SKJOda 37000 37500 

5 lei 5320 S380 

Tora ASSI Kite 30400 30400 

MlB Index : 1187 

pf**w»: IM 


Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum 31V. JI*. 

BffWi Montreal W* 25*4 

Bell Canada -CP* 43H 

BontDordler B 21** 21 

CamMor it* 1* 

Cascades B'x 8 'h 

Domlnton Text A HI it 

Donahue A 124* izv, 

MacMillan 01 1** 19 

Nall Bk Canada 9 9 

P+mr Con*. 21 U 21 

Quebec Tel 224 22%. 

Qwebecor A ISW 18*4 

OuebecorB 18 18*5 

Teleotobe 19 Hto 

Union 6V* 6** 

VldMfran 13V, lju, 

Indntrlah Index : 1905X7 

Prev leas : 1905X3 


Ckae Prev. 


Paris 

Accor 
Air Llaulde 
Alcatel Als thorn 
A*0 

Ban cal re (Cie) 

BIC 
BNP 

Btxjvaues 
BSM-GD 
Cor retour 
CCF. 

Cerus 
Choroeurs 
Cl men Is Franc 
Club Med 
Elt-Aaullalne 

Elf-Sonofl 

Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 
Havas 
I metal 


Lear and 
Lvon. Ecu, 

Oreal (L’l 
LVMH. 

Marra-Hacfietle 

Mlchelln B 

Moulinex 143 144.40 

Paribas 385X0 391 JO 

Pechlney (nil 164 164 

Pernod- R I card J76XO374J0 
Peuoeal 817 800 

Prlnlmnps (Aul NA — 
Rodtatecrmtaue 469.90 480 

Rh-Pouienc A 137X0 137X0 
1627 162* 
NA - 
650 640 

525 525 

302 296JO 
169 160 

314305X0 
147.90 143X0 
240 238 




Amcor 



790 

/ill 

ANZ 

A0* 

4J! 

007 

591 


10X4 

ibx: 

1278 

1257 

Boro! 

15J 

XX. 

528 

520 

Bougainville 

045 

045 

1225 

1195 

Coles Myer 

42* 

A1 

25040 

251 

Como 1 co 

5X0 

5X5 

449 

02* 

CRA 

too 

18X1 




4.94 


1852 

1823 

Fosters Brew 

7.14 

1.11 

224J0 


Goodman Field 

139 


107 107.70 

1CI Australia 

1040 

18.97 

1301 

1385 

Magellan 

2 

2 

318 

315 

MIM 

3.14 

3.1; 

424 423.90 

Nat Aust Benfc 

11.74 

1146 

607X0 40110 

News Cora 

0.90 

VJl 

064 

803 

Nine Network 

440 

4i*i 

J2 

30.15 

N Broken HIM 

1*0 

3X5 

2330 

23*0 

PacDunloc 

4X« 

4X8 

650 

440 

Pioneer infl 

J.12 

112 

563 

551 

Nmndy Poseidon 

7.26 

2J8 

402.90 390.90 

OCT Resources 

IJV 

1X9 

0200 

0000 

Santos 

348 

llffj 

550 


TNT 

235 


1124 


western JMinlns 

7J2 


87S 

as 

Westpoc Banking 

4X5 

4X7 

__ 107 113X0 

WoodsWe 

4X0 

4X8 


Ratt si. Louis 
gKtoutelLa) 
Saint Gabaln 
Si A. 

Sle General* 
Sum 

Thomson-CSF 

Total 

ujlp. 

Valeo 


Markets Closed 

The stock markets 
in Frank/un and Sao 
Paulo were closed 
Thursday for a holi- 
day. 


Singapore 

Cnrebas bxo 870 

C'rr Dev. 775 7x5 

DBS U Jo 1,50 

’8-40 18X0 
* **» ■ 17X0 18 

COWwHooe Pi 2.19 279 
how Par 2Mi 

K umy ind ustries 5-40 5^0 

KffgjL ^aao io so 

•yV. KaCoon g 3 IDg 

.LwyiCftarta 7X9 


Close Prev 


Sydney 


All onflaarhslndex : 2877 
Previous : 2897,20 


Tokyo 

Ako* Electr 513 512 

ASOhl Chemical 780 799 

Asahl Glass 1280 1260 

Bank oi Tokyo 1660 1600 

Bridgestone 1650 1660 

Canon 1760 1780 

Casio 1310 1320 

Dal Nippon Prim i<20 i»id 

Dalmi House 1580 1570 

dcivvq Securities laoo laso 


Forme 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
FUlllSU 
Htlachl 
Hitoefti Cable 
Honda 
I tO T 0*000 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kailma 
Kcstsal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kuboh, 

Kvocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elecwks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kasei 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hew 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mitsui end Co 
Mlfcufcosftl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nixro Securines 
Ntpcon Keeaku 
Nkwan Oil 
Nippon steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 

Ngmura Sec 
NTT 


OUfl 

i DUE 

Sembawong 
Shanorlla 
SlipeDarbv 
SIA foreran 

S pore Lend 

i’pore Pres 
Sing Siecmshio «.,* 

S pa re r, leg" !," ^ 

ueStellS ?* 1 * 9 ,»» 3J7 

UOBtarelon nxo 12x0 

UOL 127 2J\ 

Stroll* limn Ind. : 22SZJB 
Previous : Sbm 


8X0 L75 
1130 13U0 
12S 7X0 
.8X0 835 
NA - 
3-25 £20 
172 180 
13 1110 
7X0 7X0 
15J0 1138 
4.12 4X8 


Stockholm 


AG* 

AIM A 
Astra A 

Altos Copco 
E lectrolux H 
Ericsson 
Enelle-A 
Handel sion ken 
Investor B 
Norsk Hyare 
Procardia AF 
Sandvfk B 

5CA-A 

S-E Banken 

SJcondioF 

Skanska 

SKF 

Slant 

TralMoro BF 
Volvo 

AHo e rsTQcrM en . 

Previous : luui 


380 38] 

«n 6 iD 

167 167 

473 4T7 

387 3*5 

3*7 3*3 

128 11B 

104 105 

■S3 186 

31232X0 
124 125 

115 IIS 

113 114 

48X0 49X0 

116 IIS 

IBS 181 
138 114 

407 414 

lit 111 

7Z3 72* 

: 1069.1 Z 


4540 4560 
2360 2380 
2250 ZT70 
1120 1130 

ioec uoo 

TOO 906 
195D 1920 
5390 5450 
711 *4* 

733 730 

956 957 

2720 2 TOT 
41* 423 
1260 1240 
9*1 957 

706 70S 

6850 6890 
I860 1870 
1160 1180 
2730 2770 
534 528 

690 698 

772 767 

1230 1220 
830 815 

10T0 99T 

1990 1950 
1210 1220 
1060 1060 
I39U 14)0 
1050 1050 
776 778 

369 J76 

630 645 

8*7 900 

2470 7450 
8830a 8920a 


Olympus Optical 1150 1140 
Pioneer 7*io 2940 

Rkah *77 9*o 

Son™ Elec 559 573 

SMTP 1800 1820 

SMflftoni 752 758 

Shine tsu Cttem 2230 2230 
Sony 62*0 6340 

Sumitomo Bk 2200 2210 
Sumitomo Cnem 4*9 503 

Suml Marine 1030 1010 
Sumitomo Metal 304 30* 

Taiul Cara roi 6*9 

Tatsho Marine 863 880 
TakedaOiem 1200 1710 
TDK 4830 4790 

Telllil 560 560 

Tokyo Marine 13«S 1370 
Tokvn Elec Pw 3320 3310 
7 ocean Printing 1490 1460 


Toray rnd. 
Toshiba 
Toyolo 

YamakMScc 
a: r na 

Nikkei 235: 21809 

SS®! 

Prev k»s : lae* 


732 — 

837 045 
215D 2170 
*53 946 


Toronto 

Ablllbl Price 
Agnlco Eoole 
A|r Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Am Barrlck Rn 
BCE 

Bk Neva Scolla 
BC Gas 
BC Telecom 
BF Really Htfc 
Bramoleo 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Cgmdev 
CISC 


17’i 17 

16'. 161* 

TVa 

2191 2I*« 
331* 33U. 
489* 48-7] 
26*9 26% 
15 IS 
25* 25* 
N.O, _ 
0J* 029 
10** Iff*. 

7 r~ 
Tt 3'. 
J**5r 29 ■* 


Canadian Pad fie 21** 21** 


U.S. p 

Vrt Aupc-aied Pres* 


Secscr Season 

L9» 


Ooen H^n Low Oase Cho Oa.IiU 


June 2 


Close Prev. 


Can Tire A 

Cantor 

Cara 

CCL tnd 8 
Cineplex 
Comlnco 
Ccnwesi Expl 
CSAMyl A 
Denison Min B 
Dofasco 
DylexA 

Echo Bov Mines 
Eaulty Sliver A 
FCA Inn 
Fed Ind A 
Fletcher Choi I A 
FPl 
Genlra 
Gull Cdo Res 
Hees Inrt 


i iv. 
i«-a 
420 

4.70 

22 '-. 

l*i- 

N.O. 

21 '« 

0X8 

15*V 

0X0 

3X0 

6 *» 

18*4 

6 'v 

0X7 

4^0 

14 


12 

?<Fn 

4W 

9'si 

4X0 

22*6 

•v 

irl 

21*4 
0X5 
1 W* 
0X1 
3X0 
6 ^ 
I8*v 
•H 

0X7 

4X0 

14 


5e:sor Sisson 

lo.» 


0=hi L5x GW Cho Oa.im 


Hunlo Gld Mines Ills I2*s 


Halllnaer 
Horshom 
Hudson's Bav 
Imasco 
Inca 

Inlerprav pipe 
Jannock 
Lahort 
LatHawCo 
Macketuie 
Moono inti A 
Maole Leaf 
Maritime 
Mark Res 
Motion A 
Noma Ind A 
Noronda Inc 
Noranda Fares! 
Norcen Energy 
Nthn Telecom 
Nana Cara 

Oshovnj 
Poaurln A 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petroleum 
PWACorp 
Rayrock 
Renatisonce 
Boners B 
Portlmons 
Foval Ban* Ovi 

Sceprre Res 
Scott's Hasp 
Seoor ai n 

Sears Con 

Shell Can 
Sherrin Gordon 
shl Systemuse 

Southern 
Spot Aerospace 
Stelco A 
To Usman Enera 
Teck B 
Thomson 
Toronto Damn 
TorstarB 
TransaHo Util 
TransCOa Plae 
Triton Flnl A 
Trirnac 
TrliecA 
Unlcora Energy 

TSe - 2 S» l ?w^® UB 


15** 15L. 
I9’x I9vg 
30to 30 Vj 

ay* as ** 

34** 347* 
N.O. 301* 
1 Tl 17*5 
27** 21*1 
22*4 23 

9H 9<n 
*2*4 62V. 
12Vj 12% 


31 ■* 31’ ^ 
io^v low 
DJ2 0X1 
)8 18^ 
30W 30te 
20 199* 
7Vi 7*Vi 
27** 27S* 
1311 1316 

a** bs* 

421 411* 
711 TVi 
£7V. 471* 
12V. IP* 
9i* - 


17H 
16** 
81* 
2811 
Be 
16*. 
2U. 
23 v» 
14*k 
lav* 
4X5 
■S’- 
0J7 
1X5 


199* 
16*6 
8 '* 
28 1* 
2SVi 
16V. 
2 I*S 
234. 
16*6 
18 
4’.* 
IS** 

IL27 

1.45 


Zurich 

Ad la inti B 
AJusulsse B new 


2*8 

650 


272 

649 


BBC Brwn Bov B 1315 1235 


Clba Geigy B 
CS Holdings B 
E Wit raw B 
FrtOtor B 
intrraiscoonl e 
J el moll B 
Lend Is Gvr R 

Moevrnolo B 

Nestle ft 

Oerilk. Buehrle R 
Pdraesa Hid B 
Rogvs Hdg PC 
Salra ReputHk 
Sandaz B 
Schindler B 
Sulxer PC 

Surveillance 3 

Swiss Bnk Core B 
Swiss Refrow R 
Swlssolr R 
UBS B 

Wlnlerlhur B 
Zurich Ass B 
SBS Index : 961X1 
Previous ; 949.41 


845 8TO 
6T6 623 

350 

145D 1486 
23*0 2J90 
B9Q 869 
885 885 

<30 430 

1146 I ?53 

1670 1680 
67*0 *7*0 
120 125 

T10 770 

7800 2200 
MS 900 
2080 2110 
404 408 

588 59) 

■82 TOO 
12in 1212 
715 715 
137S 1360 


Grains 

[CBOTl IMllU H.iwn.-n. Q>t— .. DC- RAW 


156 

2-9* 

4.4 ?J 

324 

i 71 

12! 

1J7'-j 

307 

Sec 94 

1.9 

133 

3 79 

3^5 

Jit* 

Cec*4 

IO 


UI 

15? 

127 

MorlS ]-1 

153 

3 43' 

3X0', 

J.I6»;MC,9S 



HI 

toll 95 

irr 

137 

331 


Ea.scies 1+000 Med-s sous 11.994 
Wws open ml *4X8< or. *52 
WHEAT (XBOT) l6ntvmivn<jni-.*<Lr:MTt),yi.i 


3j: -322 .'195* .... 

3J»7. -on*. aXI9 l 1153 
3<a'« -162-. 11.04? i '*73 

ixi : -li.03 1JI3 

3X3': -0.51 r 

33’ -SL0:». 193 


3X5 

UP; 

160 

3X3'v 

33* 

133 


IV Jut *4 3.29": JJ6 
LBTn4eo«< 12 ? i-. U» 
X12*:Dec94 139 '-i 147 
125 Mor95 3X1 1X8 

121' , Mov *5 

JJ2V-JUI9S 


3J8' 

U? 

139''; 

141 


-103 117*9 

336' » -OtC' : 4X3* 
1*6 -0.07’-. 4X34 

1X7*1 - CLflT’ i 797 
3X2 *» - 0 07*. 17 

3X9 —0X1 'V 2? 


EH. -Jrtes NX>. Wtod'S-wle* 4 535 
Wed iopentni 21.977 off 32t 
CORN (CBOTl U>066urTm<T1u<TV-<B*arinrQU9»< 

U*'* 141 Jul 94 2JS 2X19: 175 2X1 113,771 

2X0' : Sop 94 2x9 zp 2x9 I7*v; -1x1 35.209 

2.73^ 2X6"^ Dec 94 7 43W 271 7X2V, 2X0- . -0.01*i 90490 

2J9V) 7X1 6- Mar 95 7.49'v 2J6*V 2.»7'-. 2J4 1 * - 0X7 1 '; 10.147 

2X2 7X3 Moy 95 274 2»’V iM 7XOVi .QOVi 1447 

1XJ'. LS4 Juris 2 7S 2X1'* ui 2x1 h - 0x319 1775 

2X4'*: 2X4 S4P 95 2*4 2*7 734 2^7 -HOI'i IQ 

2 J9 2X3 Dec 95 2X2 2X7 251 ZJ7 ♦0.(0 l.bU 

E51. we, 75X00 Weo's. sales 71X54 
Wed's ooerlrt :S6.S67 up J193 






S-CDObu 


«- *frrVk 




7X0 

SX«V,JUI*< 

+90 





23 

7X5 

A JB Aon 94 

4X7 





5H 

748 9. 

A17 See «* 

+7t 





25W 

7X7 '„ 

5X5'VHov94 

6X3 

6.79 



13 

13 

6.97*. 

0.13 J(to95 

+*1 

644 



14k, 

14W 

7 02'r 

+18 Mor9S 6X7 

648 



42 k. 

43 

7 02'j 

6JI Moy *5 6X7 

644 



N.Q. 


T.O 

614 M«4 

+JS 

LEE 



20 'A 

TtPV 

6X0W 

541V>Nov9S 

+21 

6-339, 

+17 

+33 9, 


-0.01 54X54 

-0X0'. 14.542 
*0 03 9J34 

* 0X3*. 56A*4 
*0X6 4.9J7 

■0.05V, 7X88 
1.2*3 
1.286 

._ — 0.fr2 I, CM 

EsI. sales 55X00 Wed-Lsdcs 52X86 
Wed's ODcn-nf I50X7» od 390 
GO r BEAN MEAL (CBOTl IHM-Mniieiix 
230X0 IB5J0JUI94 199X0 »IX0 197J9 Ml JO -1X0 27.73* 

185J»Aug«4 198.00 XI. 50 197.10 XI. go —I DO lt.7&| 

18110 5ep94 197.00 701X0 I9LS0 7B0SD 

1 80. oa 00 94 I94JD 199X0 1MXD 199.00 

ITIXODeeV WMO I9A50 19J.70 19*j* 

T7UDJ(gi*S I94JQ 19*50 194 60 191X0 

iaiX0Mor»5 196X0 700 S3 194.00 MOJO 

111 XO MOV 95 19650 7WX0 19650 199J0 

I81X0JUI95 I98J0 198X0 177X8 I9BJ0 

EsI. sales 35.000 Wetrs.sdes 18X17 
Wed's open W 82.8*5 oil 1866 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) iuwbv«6npe'iab 
30X7 21X5 JUS 94 2B.W 78.70 78.70 78X7 

7148 28.13 78X7 

74X0 27.95 78X0 

78.00 Z7A5 2797 

27X5 76.90 77X3 

77JS 7*A5 27J5 

27.15 76X0 77.13 

76.90 "LTD 74.90 

?6Xfl 2640 26.78 

19.902 


223J30 

710X0 

20600 

709X0 

701X0 

703X0 

501X0 

198X0 


3045 

30X4 

59X4 
28 07 
78X5 
28J0 

78 OS 

77.15 


21A54U9*4 2SJ0 
22X0 SOP 94 27.98 

72.1000 94 27X0 

22 00 Dec 94 27.10 
27.65 Jan »5 76X5 
24. 70 MIT 95 76X5 
74.62 MOV 95 7*75 
74X5 Jul 95 76.40 


Ess sales 75X00 Wed's, soles 

Wee's com bn M.toi 0 n sn 


-0X0 10X99 
-0X0 SX61 
17.170 

-020 1.719 

- , ' 4M 
*0Jd 2<3 
—840 Jto 


*002 25X97 

♦ 0X9 1441* 
-006 10,779 
*0.17 7.528 
♦016 20474 
‘015 2-894 
—0X2 1X64 

-X.10 937 

-804 162 


I IliO 1057 Oct 9S 118? 

I nxo laxSMorto 11*0 11 x 0 11 X 0 11.62 

EST. sales 15.143 Wed's, sates 20J44 

! Weirs ooen im i?t.99i up 7422 
I COCOA (NCSE1 >0 Wf* Ions- % ver *1* 

1446 999 Jul 94 13*8 1«N 115* 1J72 

I 1455 1QMSec94 1424 UT 1337 1435 

I 1ST 1041 Dec 94 1448 I4S3 1425 1431 

■ 540 '.377 Mar 95 147 1487 1454 1463 

in irtMayf) 1500 1500 1485 1485 

1593 123 Jul 95 15(P 

1755Seo95 1B7 

199 Dec 95 1557 

1438 1 350 Mar 9* 1588 

Ess sales 11 649 Wed’s, sales 12X57 

wed's csert'itf 80.9*8 aft J2S 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTNJ iXFBW^crwsew-w. 
'35.00 92X5 Ait 9J 1P055 100.95 99X0 TOCUH 

I3LS 9SX05*C«4 103X0 103X0 102X0 10240 

til CO 9x25943V 9J 10A75 I04J5 103X0 104X0 

ViOO *7 JO Jan 75 1D6.W 186X0 104.75 1(0X0 

•24X5 99.75 Mot 95 107X0 197X0 104.75 106X0 

114J5 1JUJJJ Mav»S 106X0 

I19JJQ 105.00 Jut 95 11100 1 11X0 111X0 109.90 

111X3 injDSeo95 joe.eo 

, Nov 95 109.90 

Esi. sales 2X08 Wed's, sales UZ5 
Wed s open int 2LS6S oil 10 


-012 

-0.14 


617 

37 


—7 33X53 
-I 39441 
-3 9.233 
— 5 8.829 
-5 2.923 
—5 2X61 
— 5 fll 
—5 2X25 
—5 3 


— (US 12,194 
-U0 WHO 
—1.80 1X15 
-050 2JB8 
-0X0 1.042 
-0X0 25 


Season Season 

Hign low 


Own Hian Low Onse Cho OpJnt 


—1X0 


Metals 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCM3C1 2U»ts- can nr to. 
107-17 74.10 Jun 94 100X0 IBIX0 100x5 10' JS 

107 J5 74J0JUI94 1OL90 IB2J0 HXU0 101 JO 

1KX0 7490 Sep 94 IHL60 101 J5 100X5 101.70 

7X75 Dec 94 10040 100X0 10030 100X5 
WXO 7+90 Jan 95 10870 

97X0 7iOlF6B*5 100X5 

107X0 7X00 Mv 95 99X0 10CU0 *9X0 160X5 

»oi 10 74X5 Mav *5 loan unoo ioooo **xs 

0090 7B.OO Ai95 99X0 

105X0 75X0 Aug 95 101.90 101.90 101.90 101 X0 

99X5 79.10 Sen 95 99 JO 99 JO 99J0 98.95 

92J0 7520 Oct 95 IOIJ0 

92J» 77J5Nov9S 101.10 

2-«0 88X0 Dec 95 180X0 99JS 98X8 9LS5 

92X5 R8XDJCP96 *8X5 

*125 62JDMar*4 98X5 

94X0 91.10AOT96 100.10 

ESI. sales 7J00 Wed's, iakr. 19.747 
Wed's open tm 40.167 off Z438 
JB-VtN (NCMX) 5X00 bay at. arts *er Troy 01. 


S34X 539.8 S26X 


544.0 

S51J 


SS9X 

5625 


546.0 

561 X 


536.9 

5385 

541.4 
54X3 
SSQJ 
SSL 5 
55BX 
5442 
57DX 
574X 
58S2 
58SJ 

995.4 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMER) Atoto cenp"* 

»527 42 JO Jun *4 64X0 6527 6427 

73X7 *307AUO«4 44X0 4471 bX10 

7410 iSJOOel »4 WJ7 47 40 44 95 

74J0 6720 Doc 99 68X7 68.91 *8X5 

7425 67.90 P*b 95 &«A 5 49 80 4925 

7110 *940414 95 71X0 71.25 70*5 

71 M *6 90 Jon 95 66X0 48X0 68J7 

Esl.Mtof 16.3® Wed's, sales 75,711 
Wed's apart ini 7184! uo *2) 

FEEDS? CATTLE (CMER) AMOtov. -emtsi 
83.00 71 .10 AuP *4 7X10 040 7240 

81 70 71 JO Sep H 7100 7110 7225 

oils nxood*c Tils ojo ruo 

4S.M 77X5 Nov W 74X0 74J0 7170 
80.95 72J5Jan*4 74 12 7120 7380 

8025 7X55 MCP H 

r*xs His Apr to rxu 7x45 7310 

Esi.mwb IMl WWisate J,*6i 
Wedsooenm ijjm oti *o 
HOGS ICMERI joowe^-cvrtf-.wrek 


64X0 
64 IS 
47 J5 
6177 
49X2 
71.10 


7X9$ 
7192 
7182 
7415 
74 08 
7120 
7X70 


-0.03 16X16 
—a 10 246*1 

♦ 8(0 13.301 

♦ <LDJ 9X67 
.117 6X11 

—0.15 2X12 
573 


•0XD 7,245 
< 8 J 2 2 X 0 
<062 1X71 
•0X3 1X02 
•0.18 49J 


IKs easy to subscribe 

h fa ttt ah d w g 
N «d l oB I tb c: 

0 300 2703 


5+77 

41TJurt94 

6+75 

474j 

4+40 

<700 

—0.30 

+790 

55JJ 

45 30 Jul 9< 

46 TO 

6+80 

4625 

4+75 

-4X20 

9.767 

51« 

4L30Auo 94 

4U7 

4+45 

+S 97 

45.40 

—022 

4X20 

69JS 

42X700 94 

47 90 

4US 

47 X? 

42.97 

•0.B 

13Q 

50X0 

6105 OeC V 

4162 

CL85 

6125 

4185 


2.9S5 

5040 

O.)0Fcbf5 

4345 

6195 

43X7 

<190 

-41.10 

706 

*840 

BWArrto 

4197 

61)5 

42J0 

4107 

■002 

314 

51X8 

67.40 Jun *5 

48.70 

41*0 

48X0 

4842 

—0X8 

166 

J8.JS 

47, M Jul 95 

48.78 

48,70 

68XD 

4170 

• mo 

13 

E=S VlleS 

ttoifc Weds sakss 

9 IU 






Wed's open mt M.470 UP 879 
PORK BELLES | CMER) JHAtotos.-ccWiDPrei. 


67 00 

5*X0 
4> 15 
40.90 
*1X0 
52.00 
tan 
E si. tom 


39J0JUI94 40 45 

«30AW994 40.15 
3»IBFeb*S 87 75 
18. 40 Mar 95 J**5 
47X0 Mav *5 58.10 
50 JO Jul 9$ 

47.7SAWJ*i 
1414 W«7» sain 


Q33 

41.95 

«.?S 

48.95 
51 J5 


40X0 

J9.B0 

49.0J 

4BJ7 

SID 


4707 
41.57 
49.95 
41.90 
5 US 
50 JO 
50 75 


•I. IB 4999 
■071 1955 
'0X8 304 

-Olid 15 
>823 10 

17 


wed's ooen int X4|7 ua 213 


Food 


COFFEE C (NC5EI l/XOO*y< (rmirf* 
145.® *4 90 Jul 94 125.40 174 90 197.08 

*xas*p« id 50 i?ub mss 

77iODec94 170X0 121 JO H7X0 

74 9DMCT 9S llin 118X0 116X0 
47JBMav95 117X0 117.50 116 00 
8500 Jul 9S 11780 11700 H40D 
WXOjCPTS 
Eit. rak-s 9X59 Weds, sales 12.611 
wed's ooen 4it 5SJ59 ah nur 
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE1 1 1 :ju& In. - iwk i 


U18D 

IM 

11400 

13X75 

130X0 

175X0 


124.25 

17175 

121.15 

IIB25 

117.00 

11 ».» 

114X0 


• 3.25 J0.417 
. 7 15 1SJ7* 

• 3 05 11.763 

. 220 4.595 
■ 125 773 

• 1 . 2 S *8 

• 050 37 


5480 51 SX Jun 94 

K4J mOXflU 

Aug 94 

990X 3765 S*P 94 539X 

597 0 38QO KC 9* S47X 

544X 4710 Jen 95 

41 AS Mar *5 SS6X 

606X 4180 May 95 542J 

61X0 4208 Jul 95 

6110 4910 5fP 9S 

62BX 5390 Dec 95 5*00 583X 5800 

Jen 94 

6188 SOLO Mar 96 

Est. soles 26.000 wed's, solas S3J77 
Wed's open W IZ7X77 off 957 
hATVAJM [NMSD NimaL-a4ckiMriravn 
437X0 257X0 Ail 94 398.10 4C7JB 397.00 401.40 

415X0 366X0 Ori 94 40810 404X0 3*9.00 40370 

479X0 374JC JodVS emn 

C8X0 39800 Apr <5 406X0 40600 40600 407.W 

Ed. sales NJL Wed’s, sain x*71 
wed's opened 21.271 off 41* 

GOLD (NCMX) vgermroz - ASfanwrnu 
41770 332.«Juntt4 jklsd 34L40 382X0 384X0 

■6X0 306X0 Jul 94 755X0 

6J608 341 JO Aug *4 38610 387X0 30690 386X0 

41700 344X0 Oct *4 309X0 39810 388 JE jn rn 

426X0 343X0 Dec 94 392X0 3*160 3*1.70 3*370 

JH.90 KSJOFeD*} 3*670 

417X0 364J0AfV*5 399X8 399X0 399X0 400J0 

478X0 34170 Alii 95 AITO 

417X0 38OJOAU0 95 407X0 407X0 407X0 407 40 

41130 4163D Oct 95 41140 

479.00 400 JO Dec 9S 41100 415 38 414X0 415.70 

4U50 4IZXCFCO 96 419 80 

Apt *6 474X0 

Ed. sales 22X00 wed's salts 46x57 
Weirs open ini 146X15 oH 1M8 


»ars ix3i 

*0.90 37*202 

♦ 0X5 9,983 
•0X0 6614 
♦075 

•OJ 0 

•0X0 2JD9 
♦0x0 771 

+ 050 7D8 

♦ 0.90 504 

♦0X0 469 

+0X5 
+0X5 

•0J0 402 

-03D 
+ 0 J 0 

. 11411 


• 3A 

+ 15 84.132 

• JX 

-X5 12X43 
*1» 15X53 

• 3X 

• Jx 6705 


M2W 90JSOMar96 92.970 93090 91970 9UBD +« 120X45 

Est. sales HA Wed's sales C2.990 
W ed's m en rt 2X72X77 up 37 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) ifw+peund- 1 BOM courts sawn 
1X226 :xJ74Jun»4 1J17J 1X178 IXDJO 1X107 —64 42.936 

!-39 1X440 Sec 94 JX140 1X142 1X0*2 1X080 — 44 4 JXS 

1X170 1.4500 Dec «4 1X372 —64 7V 

IXlto 1X640 Mar to 1J062 _** 14 

Esi. sales NA Wed's, sates 22J28 
Weds open W 47X52 up 2576 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) Smrdlr- ipoMewetolOJUll 


07805 

07740 

0-7*70 
07605 
07322 
OJUO 
Est. sales 


O.nUJimTa 0.7200 0J721 07288 SJJll 
a7068Sei>«4 0.7186 0J189 tt7174 a717* 
07(08 Dec 94 0.7155 attSO 07150 07151 
0.7020 Mar 95 07125 07128 07125 07124 
0x9*0 .ton 95 07090 07090 07090 OW" 
07000 Sep <5 0.706* 07044 0.7066 07073 
NA Wed's, sales A679 


36.109 
-1 7.417 

-2 1x18 

•3 680 

*4 116 

♦5 7 


06101 

06105 


04070 


♦ 14 

3JXB 

*15 

1,207 

*15 


♦ 15 

7X171 



♦ 15 


*uo 

15.222 

♦ 1X0 


• 1JB 

1 


983 

•0.70 


• 0X0 


*0x0 ; 

78.126 

•BXO 


-oxo : 


• oxo 

5X28 

*0X0 




’0M 


•040 


•060 

A626 

•040 


•040 



Wadsocenini 4i*42 up sis 
p E * MA H6*ARX (CMBt) ipariTOk- 1 petoi coups MUOoi 
OXia 0X601 Jun W 0.4070 0X075 04033 06015 — 30117,916 
0X600 5ep *4 0X060 06061 0X076 0X038 
0X5*0 Dec 94 0X047 0X050 0X038 0X043 
0.5980 -ton 95 C.6065 

OJ610Mcr96 0 j0S3 

ESI. Sales NA Weds, sales 33.179 
Wed's open int 132X10 up 592 

jfmSSrSUS?)! 96+ym-IPOWWWON *0X00001 

QJ»9547(lXmS920J*RSma»53J -33 5U1C 

MlOOlJdXMtejSepto 0X09*350X094500X0950*1X09601 “ 

*t*»9«U»«7ja009*S50JJ09674 
(Un015flD.0099l5Jun93 0009837 

0010t2SL009e30Mcr *6 0.0TO720aJB972S[La7772IIUW»751 
Est. ides NA Weds, sales 22.121 
weds open ini 71J99 up 124 
SWHS FRANC (CMER) laorlwc- 1 pen Kiueass6OQ01 
5-7174 0X590 API 94 07141 07150 0.71 0B 07124 

03190 0X600 Sep 94 17139 07150 07111 07177 

07105 0X865 Dec 94 07145 07147 07130 071*0 

.ton 94 0722* 

&l. soles NA Wed's, spies 19JM 
weds nuen tre *7X63 us 228 


— JI 13X47 
-JJ 340 
-35 S5 
—33 652 


_ 11X43 
-M 1.177 
—37 67 

—36 302 


-13 40X62 
—16 6.754 
-33 344 

-33 3 


Industrials 


COTTON 2 mcnO »X0Ha..»es* 

BJXS MJOJUlM 07X0 8295 

78X5 59X1 Oa 94 77X5 78.50 

76X9 59X8 Dec 94 7600 76X5 

77X5 62JOMnr95 79.95 77X0 

77X8 64 00 MOV *5 77.40 78 JO 

7875 TOJOJUISJ 77.90 7H_25 

MX5 71X0 Od *5 74.15 7415 

». sates 9,500 Weds sates 9J75 
W9ds Open kit $4X87 .ip Jsr 
W4TMGOIL (NMEJtl Kmes-cmeierM 

4 1.70 Jul 94 49X0 49X0 48X5 48LX0 


61X5 
77 JO 
75.91 
7690 
77X0 
77.90 
7415 


8289 

78X0 

76X0 

77X5 

78.D0 

7438 

7440 


♦ 1.17 IBJ64 
+OJ0 A .258 
♦0X2 243*8 
+ (U0 3X54 

4 MB 345 
+ 0J5 55 


57X0 

HXO *2.70 Aug 94 4995 SOJO 

F.ri 43X0St»W 50X0 50.90 

4490 Oa 94 51 JO 51.75 

56J0 46.x Nov 74 S ? 5 Q 52X0 

59-00 6480 Dec 94 53X5 53X0 

gJS 43.25 Jon 95 S3J5 53 JO 

<7.95Feb9S 53.70 S3JO 

57X0 47 DO Mar 95 52X5 S2JC 

«X0 43X5APT95 5140 5IX) 

51X0 47 80 May 95 50X5 50X5 

51* 46.79 Jun 95 50X0 50X0 

»J8 67X5 Jul 95 

»J0 47.40 Aug 95 

»J0 48X55ep95 

18X40 

rS£L < 5£. ,rt Off 8936 

y^TSW^CRUOE INMER) UmteN-deews 
'4]5Jul9i I8J* 78.50 1408 18X3 


69.00 49.17 

SOM 50.12 
®X0 51JJJ 
SJS 51.72 
5295 S2X2 
5255 53J7 

SLSS 5X12 
51.90 51X2 

51X0 50.72 

SUS 49.92 
50X0 49X7 
49*7 
S0J2 
51 J2 


-0.93 *4507 
—075 17.685 
-070 11.750 
—070 7juj 
-XX5 5X77 
-0X0 14X39 
-OM (Uns 
— 6J7| 
-070 2XP9 
-075 1X31 
-075 1,945 
-0J5 2.112 
1J60 
—0.75 752 

-0J5 354 


?i:i 

fill 

<463 

9*J8 


Financial 

(1ST. BILLS 1 CMER I Ji nXSen- nhoOWix} 

96.7* 9436 Jun 9* 9i#0 TV 71 9S48 

MXB <462560 94 91X7 91)3 9107 

9410 94JSDec<4 *450 94X3 <457 

9505 93.98 Mo 1 <5 «433 MJj 9433 

Efl. sates NA weds, sales 3X74 
WOdSApgn tol 37X10 UP se 

S YR TREASURY (C2SOT) luxumpmvra SJMtggiM 
112-05103-075 Jim <4105-015 105-11 105-01 105-105 - 10 

11+195107-12 Sep <4 104-04 104-145 10+035 104-135 - 10 
I05-® 101-36 Dee <6 103-24! ■ lg 

ESI. sales 61X00 Weds safes 71x70 
Weds open M I9W72 off 32* 

J0YR. TREASURY (CBOT) sl64XW.eki-eb4.4mav, .MM 

.. .. .. — — - 13 


0.04 I ISIS 
0X5 15X72 
OX* 7 .l4< 
0X8 854 


105.78* 

■9x7} 

8 


17X0 
17 40 
1203 
, 11*8 

118? 


9.15 Jui •* 12.1* 

l««l« 12 32 
9.17 6«r» 11.95 
1DX7 May 75 11.77 
I0J7JUI9J 1188 


1275 1192 

1121 17 01 

II to 11.77 
1197 11.9 

I 1 « IIX) 


1187 

11.79 

11.74 


—0.17 43X66 
—6 13 56X77 
-4)17 24715 
-0 17 3X00 
— 0 17 1X04 


IS+3S W3-14 Sues <4 IBS-SO 10+23’ 10+10 ii+a- 

115-01 101-11 S6P<4 104-04 104-18 10+04 10+18 • 

11+71 100-33 Dec 94 1IO- 1 J 110-20 101-11 103-20 • 

111-07 100-85 Mor 9JT02-2I 107-20 102-20 107-28 - 

105-22 99-20 Jun <5 102-13 182-13 102-06 107-08 • 

Esi Mdes 100X0] Weds sws I57.SU 
weds opun int 775,330 up tju 


117-15 99-oo Sep 95 
H3-I4 98-27 Dec 96 
11+06 98-23 Mw9i 
Esi. sam 425X00 weds sao 572.228 

WedscpenM 446J64 up 5X8) 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBOTl 
10+07 87-06 Jim 94 93-03 92-71 92-03 

9+17 0+13 Sen W 91-12 91-28 91-17 
Esf.siaH 7X00 weds son HX78 
w eds ope n ini 3IJ87 up 917 
EURODOL L ARS (CMER) II nunon-ebai •! 
95.090 9t«0Jui94 93380 9SJD *5.2S 

95X70 *0X60 Sep 96 <4.620 94X00 Mxl( 

95100 90. 710 Dec 91 91010 94X90 44001 

«J08 to 3+0 Mar » 93.780 93X70 93.771 

94730 90 J10 Junto 91500 93X90 9U0C 

94570 91J10SCP9S 9174B WO *3JK 

•U» 91.I80D9C93 91030 91150 93. (W 


1*3*3 

■31.576 

1.367 

60 

7 


70-74 

»JB I4J5AUB *4 17.97 
MJ* 14X0 Sep 94 17.82 

TOW 1665 Od 94 17.7? 

7069 14X7 Nov <4 17X4 

2RW 16.73 Dec <4 17X0 

J-65 15.15 Jan 95 17.50 

19*0 i?xsr«*i9s 

1066 15X2 Mar 95 17.60 

|J® SS5Apr9S 17X5 

19J3 1 5x9 MOV 95 17J6 

30J0 15,73 Jun 95 17X3 

J IS 16X5 JW 95 17X0 

J*-!* Aug 9$ 17X4 

**i 6J85ep95 17X9 

1*1; 6f7 Oct 95 17.73 

+ -2S 17:58101/95 »7J7 

20.80 16X0 Dec 95 17X2 

«« J7. 15 Mar »* 

TttAO 17.22 Junto ., 

122,561 Weds. sales 7BXS6 
weds OHn art *19.941 off 3685 
(PR-EADED GASOLR4E (NMER) <7 XCO BM. _ 

HUO 44. 10 Jul 94 J4J» i5« CMi rn. 

SS e»Avg94 5120 

1W0 *3.90 Sop 9* 57X0 

S&75 4110 Gd to J0X5 

69 JO 62.75 Nov *6 69 JS 

SX83 MXOOecM 5170 

5110 5150 Jon *5 51X0 

Si'S sixoFea95 

na Wed's sales MMi 

weds open «« 93.970 on * 1 SJ 


18X8 

17.86 

17.73 

17J0 

17.67 

17.60 

17X0 
17X5 
17X6 
17X3 
17x0 
17X6 
17 69 
I7.T 
P 77 
PX 1 


I7J2 

17X8 

17X0 

17X6 

17J6 

17X2 

17.60 

17J5 

I7XS 

17X0 
17 60 
■7X4 
17X9 
17 JJ 
I7J7 
17X2 


17X2 
17x6 
P.51 
17X6 
17X3 
17X3 
17X1 
17 40 
17.3* 
17.67 
17X5 
17X8 
I7XI 
17X1 
P.S 2 
17.63 
17xt 
17X5 


+ 0® 111X14 
—a® 65 .341 
-0D4 36.536 
—*06 23.1J0 
1*J>I6 
-J06 29.Ui 
— O-O* 16X46 
-JO* 9x49 
—0X7 11.228 

-MB 8.168 

-0J7 J.I4J 
— 10X86 
—9-07 4.1S7 
-OX8 2X66 
-J-JJ *J7B 

—ox» a*n 

—009 


1100 ^»1«65' 


54 JS 
54X0 
SB.90 
S0L7B 
49.75 
SUB 
53X0 


S3.40 
53X5 
5215 
'JU5 
69 JS 
53X0 
5170 


SXS 

0.14 

52J7 

5047 

69X4 

5144 

52X9 

S2J9 


!! L* 3 ® 

— °-'9 70X00 

~o.il mw5 
-fll xm 

Z909 
-HUM 2*250 

lf2 721 
— <109 45 j 


Stock Indexes 


■9+en & nwh t* lgsarti 

' 104-H • 

13 

166.378 

I 103-7* < 

14 

740X30 

> 103-03 • 

H 

3 5M3B 

i 107-15 - 

13 

1690 

181-30 ■ 

>3 

990 

101-14 - 

13 

184 

101-01 • 

13 

23 

100-22 - 

IJ 

40 

♦.Ao-aia 


<7-30 • 

i5 

7D7J7 

91-:; - 

to 

11X70 

»pct 



1 91330 

. 30343 102 

1 •>4X70 

.6039: :s 

1 9+080 

70jl:.j9i 

1 91860 

• 80364X47 

1 93X90 

■*0J5*.».V 

1 91370 

9QIV.4M 

1 71141 

■ to 135 J« 


SSP Comp, index lOXERl 

|sio SJo ^ —0.10182.964 ; 

& STSSK -»» «s ffls a 

aw 0 ®® 

2i7J0 241.00 5COVJ 153.90 ?Sl< 7^7 ^ *0.10 Ijh “ 

miSD«*4 JUS ;i^ .an ‘rn 

75S 00 768X8 Mar 95 25SM .o.| 0 "J 

Ex-tact NA lwrsii^ • JS) 75 Sj» -Jig “ 

VVed44mn.nl j** anus *** 20 



WMD 

145.10 

3J3J? 




INTERNA TIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1994 


Page 13 




‘ •• •••.c I ■ *.•■>. 


KIM to Lease 7 Boeings 

Airtirw Decides on 767s to Replace A-310s 

- J- 


taTt? AMSTERDAM r °vi D ^ a ^ in l “ nc * t had chosen such an arrange- originally contracted to bay seven 

-'I* Dutch A^„« .r? LMRl) yaJ “” L Airbuses for $700 million. 








--vniO > 




-‘ 7 - 

• - n-: 7f" ‘“toS 

i -i v-. V-'dxtauf 1 


: J =- -■* *Sr»*kk 


U-. :• 

j:- 1 c 'r^- r ;^J 5 

- » -.T~' ~ 


. », ^**'('■55 

, T . - - ' . " : 

' 7-r j.fz 



;;r,< vs v. ^Ssfe&wSB 

i TfliliV 


. *: T--TJ£i ’ 


Relax 


-eU " 1 






■ * <■' V 


.-■ . -r- • a 1 • 


c ^^ SUUFnnD ^’ 

Bo f n S "jjp j«s for seven years to 
ooc announced Thursday 

«ifl be leased through a 

sailed operauonal lease cap- 
tract, marking a significant change 

tvTZH* 1 *?“ ils i«s» 

Tne Dutch earner, which re- 

ended Man* 31, sard it had simed 

ImmmSmI 

Le^e Fmance Corp., a unit of the 


The agreement gives KLM an 
<^>uon to lease eight more Boeings 
and allows it to extend the contract 
by five years. 

In its statement Thursday, KLM 
raid it had decided to replace the 
European-made Airbuses with 
U-S.-madt Boeings because the Eu- 
ropean jets could not be used effcc- 
lively, particularly in Europe. 

The decision is dearly a blow to 
die European aircraft maker, which 
is the No. 2 manufacturer worid- 


KLM also reported that it soared 
hack to profit last year because of 
its cost-cutting measures and in- 
creased air traffic. It announced a 
beUer-ihac -expected net profit of 
103 million guilders (SS6 million) 
for the year coded March 31, re- 
versing a loss of 562 million guil- 
ders the previous year. 

Analysts had expected KLM to 
post net profit of between 30 mil- 
lion and 70 million guilders. 

Stiff competition, recession and 
the strong guilder forced KLM into 
several waves of cost-cutting in the 
early 1990s, but the company hopes 
it will be well placed to benefit 
from an upturn in traffic in an 
economic recovery. 

It expects slightly better margins 
this year but still needs to control 
costs. 

KLM shares moved as high as 
5170 guilders in Amsterdam trad- 
ing before dosing at 5 1 .40, down 50 
cents on the day. 

(Bloomberg, AFX, Reuters) 


American International Groun ^ Competes intensely with 
Inc* under which International B ®Pf8 ™ a market that has been 


Inc* under which International 

KLM said the contract would 
allow the replacement of its Air- 
buses with Boeing 767-300R jets 
between June 1995 and August 
1996. 

“It offers KLM the flexibility to 
adjust itself to fixture developments 
m the atrime industry," the carrier 
said. It added that this was the first 


soft for some time. 

Air Lanka, for example; has cut 
its original order for seven Airbuses 
to five. It announced Thu rsda y *h«t 
it would take delivery of two new 
Airbus A-340 aircraft in September 
to replace aging Lockheed Tristan. 

The Sri Lankan carrier’s chair - 
man, Sepala AttygaBe, said in Co- 
lombo that a third A-340 would be 
delivered by February. Air Lanka 


Insurance Results Prop Up ING Earnings 


Bloomberg Businas Nan 

AMSTERDAM — The banking and inoiranry 
company Internationale Nedertanden Groep NV said 
Thursday flat its first-quarter net profit jumped 27 
percent despite a deficit at its banking division that ft 
said was related to the rise in American interest rates. 

ING said it had a loss of 99 million guildera ($54 
minion) in the quarter from financial transactions 
including securities trading because of “unfavorable 
developments” in the market for debt of emerging 
econ om ies and, “to a lesser extent,” in currency 
arbitrage.*’ 

The company said the main reason for the loss in 


value of the emerging nations’ debt was the rise in 
interest rates during the quarter in the United States. 

ING said first-quarter profit rose to 501 million 
guilders, or 1-94 guflders a share, from 395 million 
guilders, or I. 1 60 guudos a share, a year earlier, mainly 
because of “substantially higher results” at its insur- 
ance division. 

The remits exceeded analysts’ expectations, which 
generally wore for profit of no more than 450 million 
guilders. 

The company said h expected full-year earnings to 
be “at least equal” to those of 1993, when it earned 
2J>3 bflfion ganders. 


Expectation of Offers 
Fuels Ciga Trading 

Blooming Business Nats 

MILAN — Shares of Ciga Hotels SpA traded heavily for the 
second consecutive day Thursday on expectations that a takeover 
battle could erupt. 

But the market won’t get a dear signal until Consob. the Italian 
stock market regulator, releases data on buyers from a recent rights 
issue. 

ITT Corp.’s Sheraton Holds unit has confirmed that it bolds 
about 14 percent of Ciga’s stock, making it a leading contender for 
control of the hotel group. 

Consob had said it would release names Thursday of other holders 
wbo had bought shores is a recent rights issue, but no such an- 
nouncement was made. 

A spokesman said. “We don’t have all the information compiled 
yet, and we can’t release a partial list ” 

The rights issue was designed to give Sheraton control of the hotel 
chain, but it backfired when other investors bought up the stock and 
banks acting for Sheraton were unable to acquire enough shares to 
give the U.S.-based hotel operator control. 

Ciga shares closed unchanged at 1.158 lire (73 cents) Thursday. 
Volume was 8.8 million shares, making it the sixth most actively 
traded stock on the Milan exchange. Volume on Wednesday was 8.5 
million shares. 

Traders said Wednesday that those accumulating Ciga shares 
included Bankers Trust New York Corp. and the U.S.-based Hyatt 
and Marriott hotel chains. Spokesman for all three either denied that 
their companies were interested in buying the shares or would not 
comment. 

Sheraton Hotels was set up to acquire financially troubled Ciga 
last month, when the company was controlled by the Aga Khan, but 
the unidentified investors then outbid the banks that were buying for 
Sheraton in the rights offer. 

Under Italian law, if Sheraton turns out to be the largest share- 
holder with 13.7 percent, it must launch a public offer for the 
equivalent amount of stock at a price no lower than what it has 
already paid. 

The situation won't become dear until Consob makes its an- 
nouncement If Sheraton must buy another 14 percent of the shares, 
it might have to offer substantially more than the estimated 1,100 lire 
a share it has paid for its existing stake. 

Ciga last year had a loss of 200 billion lire, compared with a loss of 
252 billion lire in 1992. 

Analysts say the company could be profitable if it were part of a i 
larger group that could insen it in to a world wide reservation system. , 


Nokia Says 
Profit and 
Sales Rise 

Compiled bf Ow St& Frm Dupattba 

HELSINKI — Nokia Oy, the 
Finnish telecommunications com- 
pany, said Thursday that operat- 
ing profit more than doubled in 
the first four months of 1994 from 
a year earlier as safes surged in its 
cellular phone division. 

(SU^Tsrillion) 
from 362 million markkas in the 
1993 period, and net sales rose to 
&56 billion markkaa from 7.10 
trillion w*artfVa» Nokia said the 
figures were preliminary and that 
official results would be released 
Jane 16. 

Nokia said the rise is sales was 
mainly attributable to its telecom- 
munications and sxririle phone di- 
visions, while cable and machin- 
ery division sales were unchanged 
and consumer electronics sales de- 
clined. 

Operating profit rose in the tde- 
communicagons, mobile phone 
and cable and machinery divisions, 
while the co mpany ’s operating loss 
in the consumer elec troni cs divi- 
sion narrowed. 

Nokia shares surged on the re- 
sults, closing at 420 markkaa, up 
15. 

“Ndda’s clearly improved Jan- 
uaiy-April result was a very good 
piece of news,” a dealer said. 

Stocks also reacted positively to 
a report saying that nmrisb com- 
panies improved their profitability 
on average last year by reducing 
debt rather t han making new in- 
vestments. 

(AFX Reuters) 


Frankfurt 

PAX 

• 2«0~— 


London . . 

FTSE 100 index 


Paris 

GAG 40 





•rTFV A' 
•V 1W 

Exchange' 

Amsterdam 
BnraBctfc , 
Frapftfurt : 
f’ronkfuft. "Z! 


ilxasriay ' Pim. 
•Ck®e dose 


-Ck»6' - : r 
399.74 •*;; 
: 7,623.12 
Cf09«* > 
Closed 
1,77*60 


397.62 

2,12970 

B0£36/ : ; 

L77135 


•ETSEiflO 
General kit 

• C5AC40 


London 

MRrar-’V 

Stockholm 


(■Zuric*T>.; ; -.- SBS 
Sources.’ Reuters, AFP 


Very briefly: 


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W;. 

r"#6g i : 

2,007.3a - .li97&£8 ":v+V»/ 
1,869.1* \ 

lsk»ed Jl '~44a.as“' 'V 
965J1. ■■■■■■•■ 988.41 : /. s ^.45 
IntcraatiamlHcnldTribOTc 


English Rides the Information Highway Into Eastern Europe 


By Hemy Copeland 

Special to the Herald Tribune 
BUDAPEST — Eastern Europe offers a 
enagerie of Frt gKsh-Iangnpgg publica- 


tions, from Prognosis — a biweekly maga- 
zine for Prague hipsters — to Hungary 
Around the dock — a daQy faxed digest of 
the country’s newspapers. 

On Internet, Radio Free Europe’s 
32,000-byte DaOy Report is E-mailed to 
8,100 addresses. Now there is “Central 


29, an owner of Word Up! Inc* which 
produces “Central Europe Today.” 

With economists at the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development 
predicting that Eastern Europe’s econo- 
mies win outgrow Weston neighbors by 
two percentage points ayear in the second 
half of this decade, publishers are flocking 
to the region. 

Other sections of the globe may excite 
anrilBr interest soon, publishing executives 
said. 


ness audience across the region with com- talists, “Central Europe Today” hitchhikes and six-mouth blocks of advertising worth 
moo interests and common needs wbo can on the information superhighway. Pro- S 100,000, Mr. Cornwell says, 
be targeted with a common message,” said duced in Budapest on an computer pro- With projected revenue of $500,000, 
Simon Phillips. pubhsheT of the Economist grammed to function as a tape machine. Word Up! foresees a gnul! profit for its 
Group's Business Central Europe, the digitally encoded radio program is first year. If all goes according to plan, its 
Launched, a year ago, the monthly maga- phoned to London at 6 A.M. every week- young owners hope to parlay their network 
zinc now has a circulation of 20,000. day. From there the show is beamed to the 


zme now has a cuculaboo of 20,000. day. From there the show is beamed to the 
Business Central Europe’s most obvious ASTRA satellite and back down in Eastern 
audience might seem to be the 200,000 Europe. Radio stations rebroadcast the 


. shares surged cat the re- • llie European Bank for Reconstruction and Development reported a net 
jsing at 420 markka* , up loss of 66J)00 European currency units ($77,000) for the first quarter, 
after a loss of 18.9 million Ecus in the fourth quarter of last year and a 
ia’s clearly improved Jan- profit of 489,000 Ecus in the 1993 first quarter, 
ril result was a very good • Kramer Industrier AS sad the 1994 pretax loss in its shipping 
news,” a dealer said. operations w31 be reduced by as much as 180 million kroner ($10.5 
; also reacted positively to mObon) from last year’s 185 million kroner. The company also said its 
saying that Finnish com- Kvaemer Mas*- Yards in Finland plan to invest more than 220 million 
nproved their profitability kroner in new plant and production equipment, 
tge last year by reducing • fayafe Bdge SA will acquire a majority stake in a new bolding 
her than making new in- company to take over the insurance activities of Union des Assurance de 
is. Paris in the Netherlands. Terms were not disclosed. 

(AFX Reuters) # ag^jd to acquire 83 percent of the share capital in 

— Arcade Sfaippmg AS from Reading Bates for 1.80 kroner a share, or an 

estimated 195 milli on kroner. 

[T ■ General Electric Co.’s GE Capital Sweden plans to acquire consumer 

,1 IfY}]TW? credit businesses in Sweden and double its total asset value to 20 billion 

kronor ($2J bOlion). 

• Overseas Private Investment Corp* a U.S. government agency, .wdl 

locks of advertising worth invest $2j trillion in Russia and the former Soviet republics before 
ornweil says. September 1995, up from $1 trillion approved so far, the agency’s 

sd revenue of $500,000, president, Ruth Haikin, said. 

• Spar Handels AG, one of Germany's largest supermarket chains, said 
netprofit stamped 39 percent last year, partlybecause of the cost of 
budding stores and stocking facilities in iheEasL 


Mr. Cornwell’s half-hoar radio program, 
launched a month ago, joined a quarterly 


wSmerdal radio stations in wSsrw, 

Prague and Budapest produced by The WaJ Sroet Jbunial/Eur- 

-6 op^ monthlies owned by Enromoney and 

“Central Europe is too small a market the Economist Group and three locally 
for Ted lYuner or Rupert Murdoch to owned weeklies with Central Europe in 
beanne involved m, yet there are a huge ret thrir tides. 


foreign nationals doing business in the re- transmission early in the morning. 

am, but more than half of the magazine's _ . . . . . . 

Sb«iiba,mlo<al.Mr.PliiIIi^Sr Tte minuniw ihe pnwnm. t apiul 

Russian baa been the rtgion'Vcommon "*■ U f 
language, but publishers are wagering that JMBonly $50,000 a 3 wr.ibe local radio 

toSyrSnvarsSmd shatm wilHnSa in ^ *S 

FngH.fi -We are reaching the emerging s ? 1 30 ““ nds advCTImn S n erlher end 
yuppie in these markets, the people wbo of *** P rD 5 ranL 
are taking advantage of the new opporuini- Operating expenses are low, with 15 


are taking advantage of the new opportuni- 
ties that are available,'' said Mr. Phillips. 


staffers earning a total of $20,000 a month. 


of opportunities,” said Trevor Corn wdl, “We are suing an emergence of a boa- To deliver daily news to awakening capi- Four companies have bought three-month 


of radio correspondents into a regional 
television news operation. They dream of 
expanding into Asia. 

While more reserved, executives at the 
Economist Group admit that Business 
Central Europe offers promise for similar 
publications m Asia and Latin America. 

To our roadara in Franco 

it’s never been easier to subscribe 
and save with our new toll free 
service. 

Just caB us today at 05-437-437 


NYSE 

Thursday** doming . 

Tables Indude the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wafl Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Vis The Associated Press 

(Confined) . 


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Charges Limit Boots’ Profit 

Compiled bj Ow Sasf} From Dispatches 

LONDON — Bools Co. said Thursday its pretax profit rose nearly 3 
percent in the year ended March 31, but earnings were hdd back by heavy 
one-time charges. 

Boots, which operates a chain of drugstores across Britain and manu- 
factures pharmaceuticals, posted pretax profit of £415.9 million ($631 
million), up from £4052 millioa a year earlier. 

Sales were up 52 percent, to £4.17 billion. 

The company took one-time charges totaling £68.5 million far the sale 
of some of its Do it All chain of home-improvanem stores and for the 
withdrawal of the heart drug Manoplax from the market 

Manoplax. used for the treatment of congestive heart failure, was 
withdrawn from the market in July. Three months earlier, Boots had 
recommended to doctors (hat they reduce the dosage because it was said 
to increase the risk of death. 

Boots shares jumped 20 pence, to 526, on the results, despite analysts’ 
expectations for a better bottom line. Boots said it would pay a second- 
half dividend of 10.1 pence, making a full-year dividend of 15 pence, up 
from 13.4 pence a year earlier. 

Sir Christopher Benson, Boots' chairman, said the company was pleased 
with the results and predicted further improvement (Bloomberg, AFX) 


Police Search 
Schneider SA 
Chiefs Home 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dupadta 

PARIS — The home of Didier 
Pineau-Valencienne, chairman of 
SchneideT SA, was searched Thurs- 
day at the request of Belgian judi- 
cial authorities, the French electri- 
cal engineering company said 

A French judge accompanied by 
police investigators also searched 
the Paris headquarters of Schneider 
on Wednesday night as part of a 
fraud inquiry involving the compa- 
ny. Schneider executives said. 

They said Judge Jean Zamponi 
and the investigators had taken the 
documents they deemed necessary 
for their investigation, which is fo- 
cusing on alleged illicit asset-strip- 
ping and defrauding of sharehold- < 
ers by Mr. Pineau-Valendenne. 

The executive was detained last 
week in Belgium along with Valen- 
tino Foti, an Italian banker, on i 
charges of forgery, fraud, embez- 
zlement, falsifying accounts and I 
breaches of accounting roles. I 

The investigation is focusing on I 
Schneider's purchases of shares in i 
two subsidiaries, Cofibd and Cofi- I 
mines, and subsequent manage- 
tnenl of the companies. Mr. Foti is | 
| suspected of the same offenses. 

A Belgian court decided Wednes- 
day to extend the detention of both 
men pending further investigations 
in France and Switzerland. Mr, Pin- 
eau-Valencienne appealed that rul- 
ing mi Thursday, and the appeal 
must be heard within 15 days. j 

Schneider shares, which had i 
been suspended from trading 
Wednesday, tumbled Thursday on 
news that the chairman would re- j 
main in jail. The company closed at 1 
368.90 French francs, down 21.60. i 
or 5.5 percent- i 

I AFP. Reuters. Bloomberg) 


net profit slumped 39 percent last year, partly because oi me cost or 
budding stores and stocking facilities in the East. 

• MEPC PLC, Britain’s second-largest listed property company, said 
fust-half pretax profit rose to £47.6 million ($72 million) from £43.8 
nriffion in the comparable year-earlier period as it added assets and the 
property market started to recover. 

• bad reported diamond exports of $315 million in May, a 26 percent 
increase over the 1993 month. 

Reaen. Bloomberg AFX. Knigfa-Ridder 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

• Monday 

. International Conferences and Semhars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 
•Thursday 

I nt ernat io nal Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 


Phis over 300 headii 
Monday 


js in International Classified 
trough Saturday 


For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1)46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

It Ik. immiKiuLmd 








)f'K 



Heading for the islands 


Good news for private international inves- 
tors: Bank Julius Baer (Guernsey) Ltd is 
now open for business. 

A member of the Julius Baer group - one of 
Switzerland’s most prestigious private bank- 
ing organisations - Bank Julius Baer 
(Guernsey) Lid offers a wide range of off- 
shore financial services. These include: 


• Asset management 

• Trust services 

• Custody facilities 

• General banking services 

If your financial needs call for sound off- 
shore planning, simply get in touch with 
Colin Grant or Michael Rivett-Caiuac. 


jB“B 

BANK JULIUS BAER (GUERNSEY) LTD 

P.O.Box87, Frances House. Sir WWbm Place. St Pater Port. 

Guernsey, Channel Islands. GY1 485. 

Telephone 0481-726618, Facrfmfle 0481-728813 


Deposit* with Bank J nil in Baer (Guernsey) Lid in Guernsey arc dot covered by the Deposit Protection Scheme under 
ihe Banking Act 1987. Bank Julius Baer (Guernsey) Ltd & repsewd in Guernsey under the Protection of Depositors 
(Bailiwick of Guernsey) Ordinance 1971 as amended. 


n V 


Page 14- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1994 


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ASDAQ 


Thursday's 4 p-m. 

This list compiled by the AP. consists ol the i .000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value, it <s 
updated twice a year. 


iZMonfti 
Hum Low aw 
16V. id CAiWre 
33", |7%CTEC 
10+a 4 CACI 


VTJ PE 100, Ugh LowLpcmOi ne 

... _ 73 10* 10 10 —V. 

194 I4'.: 75' ; Salr; - I 

_ IB 133 9* 9>, 9-, 


J3*25'ftCaahy5 1.504 5.4 121 7 78 37* 77*—% 


UMonlh 
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11% 5'.;Cocrr ._ _ 3*7 7>i 7 7*j — % 

17V, 10 Catvene 194? 14% 13% 14* - % 

33 9 3 ,CoMWO _ 40 1933 II* 20' . 21 ■% 

31". lA'-jCsLAfllc ._ 1? 2598 71*. .H*. Jl", - * 

33 l7'-:CWin£A ... 15 3687 33 73": 23’'. _ 

05% 59* Canon J9e J 45 130 64% 8a — 1'.. 

JO 14 corausir 36 ZI IS 195 lfl* 16% 161, 
50*7S*CMnHlt .12 J 41 ■05tu51 l >i 46 '-b *'.» - 14 

Zi 16'iCareerH: 3DS l?v ; 19 w _* 

|4'.i S'. 3 Careline . 1733 106. 10 10' i ■ % 

19 IDl.COrsPir _ 174J 19 18", IJ* - % 


Diw 'lid PE 1009 Hiflh Ldn LdesPJi'oe 


Zi I6*career«; 30S l?v ; 19 w 

|4'.i B 1 .: Careline . 1733 106, 10 lO'-i 

19 IQi.CorsPir _ .. 174J 19 18", 1J% -6 

13*, 8*CafteY>3 .09 Ji IS 1772 10% 10*. lu% 


U", 4’.',AAONk .. 191233 17% lb'<* 17'ii ‘1 

30*9 12 PBCRail . ... 37 1844 1H* IB* „ 

30 IS ABT Bid .. IS 384 22'/, 23'/, 77* - * 

36"l IZ'.-I ACC Qt .17a 2 10 454 17 16", 16% — * 

24 5 ACSEns — _ 133 1C 14 14 —6. 

44*30'', AO Tfc .. M 773 3? 3815 3811 ._ 

44 74 W ADC r. ... 33 1676 43 41 % 47* * I 

17", ll',A&5 0in _ ... 1040 13V. 13* 12V, -'i 

23*14 AESCBi Ml 18 17 879 IB 17* 17*. -* 


25 lO*Ca4Ams 

34 9 Ca>haD5 

37% »*Oajl\A0BS 

25 7'ACasltE v 
19* 9 CoitiSfr 


IS 3074 19 18". IB* — * 

31 1011 76'.' 74 75* r I* 

d 12*9 fl'ft r* B* - *'i, 

l 68 12* 1 1* 17 — '*i 

12 771 IQ 3* 10 


74* »",COtoCPS .14 14 >4 2233 12* 11 II * — * 
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25 19>',AK Sled 
2211 15' 1 APS Hid 
IS* 4* ASK. 

33 13* AST 

39', 17* AbbevH 
31* IZ’-a AdOim S 
77". 13 AOTWWVM 
20* B*ACtOl 


. _ 1079 31% 70* 21* •» 

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m 1194 13% 13 13'.. - 

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_ 17 1308 W 18* |9 

.. 3314690 19* IB if,, -V„ 
... 13 573 23* 32* «* -'■« 
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34* 73 Celestial 
3** i»*OHiPro 
70* 7%Celi«or 
40%34%CelC/nA 

26'.. 16 CtfOnPP 
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74'.l7*centc«i 
11% 4",Cwb,n 
43 i7*Cefimrm 
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„ _ 175 10* 10* 10* *Vi» 

_ 20 2779 23", 2!* 23". -% 

8840 13* II* 12** -9. 


IS* 7* AdocLb .48 5 7 7 357 8* 8* fl* — * 


U'*, 9' .A0aoics 
24% 10 Adel an h 
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_ . 7973 11% 11 M* _ 

.16 A 21 14 37 34% 37 t 


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I7"i 4>kAch.Pro _. _ 830 5% 5 5% * * 

ll* 5 AdvTlu - .. .46 i\i S', 5>. 

44 V. 25* Advanla % JO J 19 1798 39* 3B 39* -l* 

38' 1 ZI AduomS 5 24 7 18 879 34* 3S* IS* - * 


38' ,71 Advanie 5 24 

'5 7!i AqncvR 


7 18 879 34", 35". 35* ■ * 
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1 Or*. 7", A3HIC0 Q .10® .9 _ 730 11* 11* 11* "A 

14* i-*A<Kurn _ 209 12* 17', 13* - * 

14* 1 % AirMeth _ _ 41B 3 3* 2% — % 

amaav.Am v.«e 3.1 _ «u ss m* ss — v, 

31', 13 Alontec .. 75 1J% 13% 13* ♦ * 

23* 16*. AlbanK .40 1J 13 530 ZI* 23* 33% - % 

19% 9% Aldllai _ 34 744 18* 176. 18 

M*I3*AJ0US .. 35 1903 28* 78* 38% 

IS'. 2} AKvBId JB 3J IB 744 ZS% 34* 25* *6, 

|9", 6* AllOSR . 34 713 13* 13". 13%—% 

3*. liV-AJIASem _ 14 1044 3* 2* ?% 

U I'.AbanPIV . _ 477 11 10", ID' 1 — * 

16 7'.jAln5«ni ... 16 3347 11% 11 llll -* 

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33* 71 V. ANdCp 5 .40 U 7 593 76*. 24V. 2S66 * * 

22*14 AlldHIdg _ 9 «B 17* 146. 16* _ 

Jo", i-.Aiunol ... _ ns 3% i* 2'., _* 

35'.- II iiorwfltn . _ 4433 13* 12* 13*—* 

T9': 16'. Altera _ 78 4570 35W 34 * 34* - Vi» 

74' : v- : AlPXn 5 _ 13 88 1S19 14% 14* 


34 TS’.CFidBM 1.12 U 12 945 33% 33* 33'..- — * 

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zllm .S is* 15% -% 

SSjPBC % .i.s iis g q 

31 3*SLMS _ 35 720 H% 'Ofv — Vr 

45". 47% 5afea> 1.96 3J • 739 56* SSV. Sg, — % 

33* IV eSttvlst - 34 35 25% 25, 25% *% 

30* 6’ftSoseTcs — 32 90? 15* 14% )3V« ft* 

39V,24 1 «SlJuae AO 1.4 IJ 550! 27 27% 

mi !3"aSlPoidBS 30 IB 10 465 21% 70% 20% — % 

3V ft 13V, Sanmina — 14 1494 22 19 20% ftl 

jji, 3HScB>ians - 167 3S9 5* 4% 5 ft* 

3 iflKiSw - - 10 ia% 10* to* _ 

2B* 17 ScrvdBdc I .. 8 25% 25% 25V, ft % 

33V.I7"iScnnitn- .10* J - 37S 19 IB* 19 *V> 

M'.33%s5vicn - 16 XI 36* 35* 36% -H 

JO' , lfl' , Schuler _. 13 1072 21* 21* 21* —IV 

28% II Scnlmns 30 I J 22 3653 25". 23", 34", — % 

M%l6*lc!&TQ e : 21 684 H* B* 33% r* 

SLiKissr 1 j? ^ is 

19% 7 SoeQd* _ 7 8459 f* d6k„ 6* — % 

20", 15',Sa)tts _ 16 1790 18'. 17- . 18;/- ft 1 '/„ 


_ nor s% 5% S* -% 
17 388 18% 17V, 18% ftl 
_ 10/8 13% 12% 13 ,% 

25 1271 u35V, 33 34* -1% 

7 52 286 17 16% 16* — % 


24*i4 rSSfr - « s ms am 

22* lOVaTchDol S - IS !- «£ f? 1 ^ 

E4:©* ss «• a” r- rs 

r -W 

= S # F 

- 33 5« ffl£S5Jfe +tS - : 

| JO 2B ll J« C% .jlU-5- 

{s h r*T?s z **$2 11% i«s ^ - 

90 13%-rrSil I “ 602 IS’ A 14* 15% ftii 

16V, 'iAiTsSia 30 2.9 IS 500 7% 6% 60, 

25 18%TYWn .00 A 18 2®1 

I,]. | iKCon — 10 320 1B9: 1 ZVfli "48 - 1 "*ft % ' 

22* 'JftVUS Lena - 3fi MtS 11% *C% II*. tWi, . ' 

Ifl’u ’ U5AMU -. — 1°/ 9* “ 8* Vlft 

14% 7%UST CP - - 375 13% 13% 13% — % ' 

rn l js^Unflob — 70 ^059 ST a. S** Sik .' 

mS-lSSESS-h — 37 157 18% 17% m ft% ■ 


15* J’AToleWt 
25V* 12*7etedta 
37Vi11*TdlataS 
24%lO%Tdular 
18% 74fcTe0«b 
19% 9 Tencor 
34 Vi 20' • Teva 
63% 19% 3Com 
®V, 9 3DO Co 
19* 8 Vi Today Art 
11* 6%TaPPS 
75 ’ , 21 TraCSuP 
16% 4%Trnmed 5 
J7 ir ftTrnRcCn 
47% X* Tmwck 
17% ID TriPod 
M 9*.Trtnrt 
17% SleTrlmea 
18 8%Tr«auifit 
20 12* , Trism 
14V> 6%Tsena 
25 18% Tyson 

18% lJ*USCon 
22* 9% US Long 
tD'v 7 USA MU 
14% 7WUSTCp 
30% ITVrUItraSfcp 
7% 4% Unflab 
22* 14% LfnSwtch 
48 I'ftUnCoiFs 
i9Vkio%uwrats 


77* 14% LfrSwtch _ 37 IS 7 18% 17% MM ■*%' 

« jiSuI^Fs B0 1.0 13 488 38% 38 38k, -5 

19% 10% UMInt s — — 16 IS 13* 15 ftl 

M%22 USBr<» J8 3.2 18 2868 28 27% 27Ci 

AS I3»;iiwi «% WESL.-S! 


46 20V. us RaM 


18 63 A? 32% 30% 


55* 49*USTrsf ZOO 18 17 >0 7 H 


19% 10% UtdWste 


„ IB 974 IB 17% 18 «% 


46% 38%Unirrin IBO 3J 26 2M 4l% . *K* 


M 4%UnvElc 
31 *1 30", UrbnOtB 
18 v. 7% VLSI 
23% 4%VarTech 
15% 4 Va) VU A 
35 2 Tm Vordd 
12* 7%Vengaid 
46 15% Ventrtb 

29»* iSUVarline 
20 SWVertxPti 
30V, 13 vfcor 
26% 14 '.V VJcnro 
23 9 VideoL 

so iftViViewto 
S3 31 VMng 
28% 9V,VISX 
6* 3 Vitesse 
23% 9*Vmarfc 
101 %46'.«Vaiva 


32W16WVn_RFd 
33% 23Vl Watoro 
13% sv, Walkint 
60 17VMWOM3ata 
21* lflkWmLab 

Z9*c20WWF5L 

38% 18%WMSB s 
38* 12%WatsnPTi 

29 Ml* Waflsln S 
35 O'/ftWousPs 
17% l4*Wabcalnd 

30 1 1 V, Wed Mat 
43*19%WBimts 
33% 2D’.« Werner 
22% l3*WstlWo- 
24>.i 9 WNewtn 
XV* 22 VftWstOne s 
24% UPftWstCOtS 
14V, tiv.Westmied 
20*11 WstnPb 
30*14 Wsrwatr 
19* lPAWstSvs 
10% ?% WstwOn 
35 29 WhHeRvr 
2SV, 14% WWFd s 
30% 5 WtKHrvs 
24% IZ' .MnckLu 
»*3S*v/aiamr 
39% 10 WmSons 

31 23%W3inTr 
74* 38% WiSCCT 
29' i 13 WOndwre 
21% 1 a% Worths s 
S9% 29% Xfliinc 
28% 17 Xircom 
tS%1I XonSle 

23 i?v. TyteolC 

X ISVftkyFtex 

X', 16V. YePawCp 
32*9 ll Younker 
n% 3 Zotecp 


_ 13 U2 7% rb 7* — 

_ 3 23% 23% 73*5 — % . 

_ 23 4366 15* 14% IS* 

_ _ 58* 7% 7V. 7M. -bJ 

_ _ 1654 4’4 4 4% ft 16 

.. 1043 X* 32 32% • % 

7% 7% 7% — % 

_ ^ 1400 24* 23 23% — % 

_ 19 616 17* 17 17% »% ' 

_ 42 115 13 llttU ' , 

_ 33 143 25% 25% 25% — % 

Z 10 1052 15 14% U% . 

_ 14 38) 13% 13 - 13H- -W ' 

_ 30 927 22 'A 71 U 31 Vk — 1- . 

_ 38 4197 u 53% 50* ja* #T% 

..340 123 17V, 16% 17 — % 

_ .. 2204 S* 5* 51% »■>% 

_ 48 536 19% 18% 18% — * 
,Wt 1.1 40 92% 92% 92% -% 

W-X-Y-Z . | 

~S 1.1 20 514 28 zfuTza ~ 

B0 IB 16 X 25% 25% 2516 . _ 

_ 20 1086 7% V* 7% ft* . . 

_ X 1700 39* 37 39% ft 2 

_ _ 946 12* 12 12% -*u 

38b 19 9 364 22% T2Vs 22% _ ' 

31 U 1 9012 21* 20* 2IV5-+U* - 

... 23 1OT1 18% 17% 18% +1 

S .9 19 506 24* 23% 24% ft I 
.9 16 382 36% 26 26 

_ IX 15V, lV.v I5VK — % 

„ 29 19 21 TO Vi 20% _ 

-. 31 1«OT 26* 25% 75% — V, 

.10 J3 22 J92 79V, 28% 29% *% 

_ 32 I 19* 19% 1«%— 1% 

B0 TJ7 21 l7)-uMVft.24 STA, 

.72 13 12 2377 70. 31*3hY» ft'V, - 

77 233D -ll -M " is Hi 
jOSe A _ IJ® 14 13% 14 «% 

_ _ 3« 11% 11 11% — * 

_ 48 56 21% 21% 21% ft*. 

_ _ 2231 IS* 14% 13% -% 

_ _ 1493 8% 7% 8% -I 

_ _ 156 33% 33 33 

,. 27 S53 16% >5 16% ft% 

_ 76 2988 IS 12% 13% ftl 

_ 13 342 IS 14% IS ft% 

.96 ZI 22 9833 45* 43% 45% *1% 

_. 42 83P 33V, 33. 33% — % 

1.00 43 11 596 26 25* 26 *% 

_ 24 501 TO 69 a — * 

34 1683 14 U 14 ft* 

B0 ZI 22 973 IV* 18% 18* _% 

27 409 48 46 46% — % 

_ 22 6010 17* 14', 17 -* 

_ 40 603 l/ 1 * 16* 17’B • * 

. 19 56 10% 17% 1B% *% 

_ 11 414 15* 14* 15 — * 

.94 S.1 37 1393 19% 13% 18V, —V 

- S 578 14% 14 14% — * 

- - 2239 9% BV. 9% -'A 

- 21 4157 X* 30% X%*1% 

- 21 1918 17% 16% 16% — % 

- 21 944 35 34 35 ftl 

1.12 U 1 Hi 41* 40* JO* — * 

- 72 306 18% 17% 17% _ 




M 17-13 22Vfc 32; 

- _ _ 408 27% -»% 27 - — 

_ 1110802 -12% 21 pVs i.%- 

44 J « 1W W» » Wt'-, 


_ 58 2317 XP* Z&sTP* . - ' 


_ _ KJ7 32 33* —4ft- 

_■ 25 245 35t.i jp6.29 V%- ' 

_ M T7K -ly.li B% I?* ft* 

_ S710»9vi6% S3*. StfHr-^%" 

„ _. «45 is% ,iS5 





12 Atari th 
Hmh Low Siocl 


Mv fid PE i«K Hian LawLaeuai'TO 


13 Monti 
HWiLow stock 


Pw I'd PS life. Him lQ.L=i<SlCKsK 


12 Mono 

ITOUii 5*» 


SIS I 12 /Aonln 

P>» ria PE UDs >5gr. LawLoiesiCvae ' wiw Slack 


Dm *no PE loos Won low Latest Of a» Hah Low Slock 


Sts 

0t» Yld PE 100s 


Thursday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


17 Monm 
Hi9>l Lew. Sw> 


Div nd PE 100s HWt LnwLrtestOi’Be 


;* 0 AIM sir B2 SJ 
37 14% ALC 

I •:» WAMInwl _ 

14J, 3 A76C 

24%:3DV.AMCPt US 7B 
5 l"i, ARC 

26*22 ARM F pf 138 9.9 

2V'« U-,A5R J3el3J 

T5%61'»ATTFd RZI* 4JJ 
fl* I’aAcftCom _ 

4 ! A A<knR5C _ 

6* w JViAdYFin _ 

15", iuJ-’/.vm 
5* kAOvMetTT „ 

10 ft J'lAdMdpf 
s* 3 3 « Advpnn 
16 ■» 7' , AirWat 
4 : 1' uAirCM 

5* Alamcd _ 

17;. B",Abaw _ 

fl S Alencin 

’ ..AiertC W1 _ 

18' >16 AHaoonn 1.44 7.4 

2* 'V . Alfin 
I?', 4’iAlidRsn 
ll* fl’.jAJiouH _ 

6>a 3 AJAnclrt _ 

U' - 4* Aipmor 
IB SS' -.Alcoa pi 3’S 6J 
• - J’.ftmdnl _ 

I". I. ■ : A-nmtfi _ 

14 ll 4F>,PZ 1 J5 14.1 
.31' • IT AFstPT IJfl 8.J 

25 1 : I0 3 , ABkCT IX 6.1 
dVtftJo’.AmBill JO A 
fl'« I", AmEcos _ 

!■-. I'.AEftCl _ 

29 ” AEJUSlpt 

I4'I 3>«£IM64 I.44C41.I 

14'- 13* AIM 35 1.44 v.8 

14*11', AIV.060 JOe dj 

15 11 >..417.189 0 J5e 3.9 

£7 3t',Alsroel I .die !J 
I7>,ll lAmListS J0P 4B 
?’»a IJ'aA.MleA 64 ZJ 
’I IJ'. AM:>?B 44 IJ 
id'« AmPoo n _ 

o-a ft'iAPElnvn JO 11.4 
IS' a » iRnlf 150 15.0 
8* ?--aASoE 
4 3 . i.ArnSrird _ 

i 2' .. ATi.'ChC 

IJ'a 7' :4mpal _ 

2'* " ■ Vmsal wt 
14'.- •*, JimuTTSt Jfl 24 
SJ,, 9 . 4,ulrea „ 

■S’, '"AnoPar tdJOC ... 
i'r J .Anufica _ 

U .1 S'oADfngnn 

11' J T ArtRcf 
10 4 AtTOwA _ 

II' . S' : Vn/Ttl _ 

4* 2 : ,AS!rolC _ 

I’, 1 >Asinivi _ 

IT', I- ., Are-. 

6>, 4 . aiiottis .05e J 

" • ‘jAIIoOm _ 

Ifl-'a IP 1 , Audvo- 
4-» -.Ajdre „ 

IO 1 :. s AurcEl _ 1 

I . I , 4; co n _ 


1 "i BS.H .Mr 
S', .".BiHO 

11'aBAT i .44 e 
02'. 10, .BHC 
W'.-.a'.gNFBt SA 
S', 3,«BalO-w 
2J 3 . It'iBonFa 1.91a 
1 4* M l0 3 ,Baastra 
I ’,Sft SFrar. 

ZSV, Ji--,BTct.T , :nlJI 
lo'.kjl* .ST c\ T ', 1.90 

' : -- It B*3n yHI 

i- t-.SanvnSr: 

?*•, .4' , barrLO 

M'. 7 Bar.PO 

4" ., r-- 100.01, 

6', J'tBSHKwf 
'"a 3"' iBSHh awl 
j6*29',BSMRKn 2X1 
7'v I ' . OccraCo 
3 . 1 Boimac 
25', 15 BrncttE 
fl* 4'iiBanEvo 
104 S?':BcrsCa 2U0e 
ll'a 4',bel7Wl* 

I-.. ..BcinCc 

IJ'.jr.apiJW Xr 

l>HI0 Biop A 
1- . I Biophn 
1 5’ « 1 1 8'ft BI0» n I 05 

is . 1 1". a,' 4 iq , 79a 

IS II’- BfiJIC 77 
15'a it'-.BNVIQ ,79 
5J’-, 26 srairCn 205 e 
?-% 20 : a Blessing .70 
V", ilVftetauiY.A 50 
Ift' i 13’. BOM* 174 
li"» a";6s«Vgl 
13’ , I? Bow I A .71 
5 -i ! 1 , Bcjvmr 
JB 1 '. IS'iDownr JO 

* Biot PE .M 

'"'ft -’".BranCn 7? 

14 u V'aBrvcnn '.M 

d 3 , ; ..BrockCp 
3> . 1 . B-ihton 
33 '» ”'.eusns 00 


27 414 3% 

._ 8 24V. 

... 26 1> 
_ 34 67% 

16 U 6* 
14 77 5* 

22 117 3 ", 

_ 75 11% 

- 44 1% 

-7 8* 

r 

55 34 2% 

18 5 6% 

20 5 11 

- 1142 S'" 

- 30 Vi, 

_ 487 lfl* 
-. 30 1% 

5 45 5* 

14 79 9% 

_ 235 4* 

- 35 5 

_ ll SO to 

.. 1130 4* 

10 * u 
5 II 
71 lfl 

8 2 21* 

12 B 48', 

- 41 3* 

- 775 V.u 

4 28'. 

fl 34 ]* 

0 41 IS 

10 23 12* 

Jl 47 | J* 

15 7 4? 

IB IVulSVft 

28 «4S 20'. 

a rn ao'.» 

- 253 8* 

-. 32 4-a 

4 A 10 

- 62 4 

5 * 

13 22 7* 

JS 279 8 

. 310 * 

8 14 131ft 

95 133 19ft, 

J 79 l'«l. 

14 19 4* 

- 55 10 

:s 5 r* 


a* a* _ 
31* 31* — * 
% % 

111. II". _ 
23* 23* _. 

3 3 '/a ft V v 

23y« 24 Vi ft% 

1* l» -ft — * 

66* 47', ♦* 
1% 4% - % 
5Vr 5* _ 

3 3* » "i 

11* 11% — % 
i % j ", — j/u 
8* 8* -VS 
tv,, —% 
8% a* ,* 
2* 2* - * 
.6* fr* _ 
11 11 — Va 

5 3% ... 

" „ ft Yu 

18* 18* ft* 
1* 1* -1% 
5* j": .. 

9V'» 9* 

4* 4* - * 
4* 5 -* 

60, 60 —v, 

6’A 6* — * 


635 4* 

100 6* 
225 v„ 
153 )2* 
504 1 

1IO 7% 
199 2* 


11 11 
17* 17* 
21* ZI* 
47% 48% 

3* 3* 
1 ", 1 *. 
28 28 
3* 3 V, 

14* 14* 

12* 12* 

12 12* 

42 42 - 

17V. 18 

19 V. 20 

20 * 20* 

b* a* 

6ft, Al'a 
10 10 
3'Vi, JVu 
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r': 8 V " • 

0 * * 
Ijv, 131. 
19 19 

I* !'*, 
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9!a 10 
7* 7* 
7* 7* 
5* 5 Vi 
2* 2' Vi, 
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4*-.. 4* 

5V. 4% 

i?X: ,2* . 
7VJ 7*5 ” 

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25 1 

50 2* 

in 12* 

III 77 

26 79 

3< r.i 

5 21". 

3 13* 

60 O',, 
.40 22% 
147 22", 

51 ’S 

4 l<i 

65 17* 
63 20% 
31 4 

100 3* 

145 4* 

9 X* 
I Vi* 
361 iv„ 
14 24 

61 7* 

10 W 

224 7": 

1 '»% 

6 21* 

105 17% 

5a i'< 
77 11* 
44 11% 

:o 12% 
12 12* 
61 40% 
16 76* 
939 36% 

2 13* 
40 II'., 

1 19% 

44J Ti„ 
817 22* 
238 9V. 

39 16 
*86 13* 

40 3* 

56 1% 

197 37 


1 I 
I* 2V« - 
12'.ft 12% ft", 
75* 77 - I % 

2B'-i 79 .V* 

5* 5% t % 
21* 21% -% 
13V, 13* — * 
* % — J% 

22% 22", — * 
3* 22* - * 

l’v2 tS ” 

17* 17% —I. 
19* 19* —'.i 
4 

3% 3* — * 

-J 

Vi “ 

23% 23% — % 
TV, 7", ... 

88* 881: „. 
7% 7* _ 

'Vk - Vi, 
71% 31 % • V. 
Id* 141'm — % 

| V|, IV.. _* 

ir, ii* -* 
ii''-i n* 

!7% IJ* _ 
12 12 — % 
40* 40* • % 
26% 76'i - * 

S , 36 — * 

% 13% -'.k 

lt',« 11 V, ft * 
19% 19% - I, 

3 3 Vi, - * 

71* 33* • 1'4 
9',k 9% -Vk 
15* 16 — % 

13* 13* — ' * 
5 3V. - lr„ 

1* I", _ 

26* 37 


,13'aCFVCp AAD 4.5 14 IS4ul8’-ft 18*16* 

■ £ , .'!i ,lp,n .. 7 88 5* v V 5'i 

■ WM Mo1Z7 73 8'.. 7* rr, 

. J «CMICo . 16 ID5 7* i’ft 6’-, 

■ I'-CiTEnt _ ... 777 I* I* l"u 

, l0'..C-/BFn J30 2.5 10 1 12* 12". 12% 

• i ; scvpFnn .. I ID Ik I), 

3J.CcW.sr . . 1426 45% 44 45% 

.IS ,4.0nV*4y IO .8 7 I H*a 14* 74* 


4", ]S%£ombrx JO .9 14 
2*10 "«WC9 J8 _. _ 
25'., 17%CdnOcg AO _ 

3V, 107« CaoPtvT .96 8J 47 
5 11 CaoRIOn 1.68 140 22 

4* 5% Carmel _ 5 

i s 43, CwaPpl SOQ 7.9 _ 
14* 9*Cor1ngrn _ 76 

5, « vtiCinDen . «. 

7«'j 3 '^Cason of _ 

ijSa?.? 1 : 

I r- essssu. « :* li 

S A'ACenlTcn _ _ 

%,CenfTcwr _ _ 
21V, 17*CnlrPrn I JO 7J _ 
6 4"*CFCdao -01 -2 _ 

17% i4*CerUSe 1.45e 9.7 _ 
131ft 6%OvCm 641 BJ _ 


5Vft 3".p^evA 

n QipSr 
2B 15 ChrlMed 
14% 6%ChtPwr 


1.65e 9.7 _ 
64t BJ _ 
- 52 
_ 51 
_ 17 


14% 5*ChtPwr .11 J II 
30* 16*OieySfls _ 72 

34%25%OiiRv lJOa 4J 11 
X* 25%Chflnlpf f Jl 7.0 _ 

29^ro*8S«pf l JO 4J ” 

15* 5«,l-ircaPt< _ 23 


15% 5* Circa Ph 
TO* is.atoaei 
9 AVftCtzFs) 
B% 6*Cliz1nc 
40* 30".OearCS 
5Vi Vu 

IDVft 9**caServ5fr 


JWe .9 IS 
_ 34 
_ 54 


12 11* 
4 12* 
69 9 % 

HO 43 
127 10 

"? A 

ft S2 
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IS ’s' 
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S9 31% 
52 5% 

ioa 17% 
107 7’, 

402 3* 

23 3Vk 
378 X* 
109 34% 
73 1J% 
2383 19* 

J *** 

20 24 

*9 J* 
=* 

33« io 
160 6% 
1169 8% 

97 8% 


10% 9 CohervStr 68 7.0 ^ 

3!%13%C<3hu J* 16 ID 

24* 16", ColAa ofA 2J0 10J 
34'.k mCUIAHpf JXIU1 ... 
7* '.Col Data _ 45 

6% y/ftColLti ... _ 

10V, 7% Col u Ena .941100 10 
17 iD%Cominc ... 

7* 6'ftCmciAstn .tde 20 _ 
25V, Il'-ftComotUi _ _ 

I 'k vftCmpm: _ 

10% rv.ConodF _ 7 

33' « 5 Convrsn 2J0I _ 14 
9 7 cnvstE _ Jfl 

3* I'.CorNGn _ _ 

l7v,12%Cross M 19 271 

74* 14%CmCP _ 19 

23'ft l7',CmCP B _ 17 

21*13 CwnO- .12 6 19 

78%20'ftCmKXI „ .. 

33* 1B*Cut>ic 51 24 IQ 

lfl* 13 Curtce AS sj 

J» u Z'-tCusimd 14 

44, *Cvcom n _ _ 


r '1 X 55 

68 7.0 _ 19 91, 

J* 16 10 35 17 

!J0 10J J09u24% 

IX f 111 ... I036 U24* 

- 45 112 4* 

... - 990 j 

.941100 10 7 9* 

... 17 16* 

,14e Z0 _ 24 7 

_ _ 116 U'ft 

_ IX la 

_ 7 17 7* 

L301 _ 14 185 4* 

-Jfl 31 7* 

_ _ 105 2'i 

64 Z9 27T 59 lfl* 

- IV 158 19 

, _ 17 20 17% 

.12 6 19 48 70* 

„. — 14 30’ft 

S3 24 D 1 1« 

64 4J 146 IS 

_. 14 21 2* 

- - SS I'., 


'I* % 
% %. 


»> IO* 
TV* 22V, 
10% IO 3 : 
13* 13* 

5 5 

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21* 21% 
5* 5% 
17 17 

7* 76, 

3 3* 

J/k 3Vu 
X 31 
74% 24* 
13% 13V, 
18% 18* 
2a* 78* 
36 24 

5 5* 

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9% 9% 
fl* 6* 
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8'., a* 
37 ». 38* 

A •£ 

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16* It* 
24 24* 

74* 24* 
415 4": 
4% 5 

9* 9* 

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fl* 6* - 


71: T* 
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71, 7* 
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lfl* 16", 
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17", 17% 
30'., 10% 
tp% to;. 
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S"ft 2%ORCA 
3* 1% Dakota n 

3 *Da64iiwT 

B% « Danina 
4* H u DC arm 
10* 4l.Dataram 
T% 4 Dovstr 

4 1 7„ Davy wt 
fl* PiDa-or 

'li: riSssr 

S!iI'>uOsBnlm 
2T* 17'ftDevnE 

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S'.i 2*Dioa 8 

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9% lHDivCom 
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31% l4%Coneir> 
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11* 8*Ot"YtMu 
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5% T'aGucam 

ill. 9 £jupte>. 

4 :,ECI im 

5* UiEZEcfft 

21*14%E0B1Rl 
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ISlft B'.EchoBay 
18% 12 EcolEn 

5 l"'i,E(SstD wt 

12* TVftEcflsto 

*% 2 EOWCY. 
47-.. Z7* Elan 
33% 14* El on wf 
34% 20% Stan un 
9* 6*Eld9rad 
3* l v„EJcChm 
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| 9% 8*Eisvmrt 

6*<i 5%EmcCar 

6* 9*EnvrTc 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1994 


Page 15 5 


Japan’s Recovery 
To Be f Gradual’ 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


3 ^ 3ns economic 
Tccovay is likely to be *wer™ 
tunc than « was after prwfcw£ 

oamtottusehwiSbewK 

po»n^ consumption rather than 
by capital mvestraem, a* Baakof 
Jaran said Thursday. 

Possibility high that the 
recovery tempo will be only gradu- 
al, oven advene effects of oozing 
balaac^sbeei adjustment and re 
Stractnnng of industry infrastruc- 
tune, the central bank said in ita 
annual report on Japan's monetary 
and economic activity. 

TJnt assessment was echoed by 
the Ministry of International Trade 
and Industry, which predicted that 
capital spending would reverse the 
trend of declining this year but re- 
main sluggish. 


China Speeds 
State Funds 
For Industry 

Agent* France- Press? 

BEUING — China has 
poured more than $50 billion 
mto industrial modernization 
in the past three years in a bid 
to improve efficiency and cut 
energy consumption, the Chi- 
na DaOy said Thursday. 

State investment in industry 
totaled 648 billion yuan ($54 
bflKon) in the first three years 
of the five-year plan covering 
1991-95, already far in excess 
of the 400 billion yuan invest- 
ment fear 1986-90. 

Xu Penghang, vice chair- 
man of the Economic and 
Trade Commission, said in- 
vestment had been focused on 
expanding production of 
stateowned enterprises, with 
60 percent of the funds aimed 
at developing new product 
lines, improving quality and 
conserving 

Priority was given to devel- 
oping power plants, raw-mate- 
rial producers, transport and 
telecommunications, which re- 
ceived HI billion yuan last 
year, Mr. Xu said. 

Draphe increased govern- 
ment investment, an anti-in- 
flationary credit squeeze rein- 
troduced at the end of last year 
has hit the state sector hard, 
with half Of the com p a n ies in 
the sector posting losses for 
the first quarter of 1994, up 
from one-third in the compa- 
rable 1993 period. 


“Overall, it will take some time 
before a stable recovery m capital 
spending emerges, as there is the 
high possibility of further delays in 
the completion of ongoing destoefc- 
utg due to uncertainties over final 
demand,** the ministry said. 

MITI predicted capita] spending 
would rise M percent in the year to 
March 1995 alter faffing a revised 
8-7 percent in the year to March 
1994, its second year of declines. 

/‘Companies look like they are 
still cautious in boosting capital 
spending, despite the expected in- 
crease in the fiscal 1994 outlays," 
the ministry said. 

The Bank of Japan said a long- 
term restructuring of Japanese in- 
dustry was “inevitable” as the 
country moved oul of recession. It 
also called for easing restrictions 
on business to hasten the recovery. 

“Deregulation will contribute to 
a swift adjustment of Japan's econ- 
omy, 1 * the central bank said. 

Deregulation also would help re- 
duce Japan's politically sensitive 
trade surplus by encouraging pri- 
vate investment in social infra- 
structure and bousing, it said. 

The central bank wanted that 
recent government reports have not 
indicated a turnaround in the econ- 
omy, although there were signs of a 
bottoming 

"Consumer spending, which 
usually lags actual economic activi- 
ty. may lead the recovery this 
time,” the central bank said. 

It pointed out that consumer 
spending began to decline early in 
the economic downturn and that 
proposed tax cuts should encour- 
age an increase in spending. 

The central bank also said con- 
sumers had been preferring import- 
ed goods over domestic products 
because of declining import prices. 
That may result in the economy 
failing to benefit fully from the 
rebound in consumer spending. 

“Overall reservation is needed 
before concluding whether the re- 
cent improvements seen in con- 
sumer spending, exports and inven- 
tory adjustment will lead to the 
economic recovery," the bank said. 

(Knighi-Riddcr, AFX AFP) 
■ Focus on the Consumer 
Japanese companies coold 
emerge from the recession with a 
fresh edge over Western competi- 
tors because of a new focus on 
customer satisfaction. Renters re- 
ported from Geneva in quoting a 
Swiss study. 

The study, issued this week by 
the I.i»inaniTu> Internationa] Insti- 
tute for Management Develop- 
ment, said the change was under 
in both domestic and export 


China City Seeks Funds 

Mayor Hopes to Turn It Into a Hong Kong 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

DALIAN, China — With his dark blue suit, 
smart haircut and bright smile. Bo Xilai. 44, the 
mayor of Dalian, could pass for a high-powered 
young executive. He’s at home talking about in- 
vestment incentives and infrastructure develop- 
ment, uneasy when the topic turns to politics. 

One of his major goals is to find investment to 
turn this port dry into the Hong Kong of north- 
eastern C hina . Yet like the Chinese economy, 
which is liying to navigate a treacherous course 
from central planning to market forces, the mayor 
and much of his surroundings are still moored 
partly in the past 

The meeting room in Dalian's government office 
building is a miniature version of the chamber in 
(he Great Hall of the People in Beijing where 
China's leaders at in overstaffed chairs that face, 
not their guest, but straight ahead. In Dalian, the 
chairs and (he room are kss plush, bat the arrange- 
ment is the same; a fresh bouquet of flowers on a 
table between the chairs ensures that eye contact 
can be no more than fleeting 

The government building, built by the Japanese, 
overlooks Statin Square, a broad expanse of green- 
ery crisscrossed by sidewalks and flanked at the far 
end by a lowering monument built in 1953 that 
praises the Soviets for helping to defeat the “Japa- 
nese fascists 1 ’ in 1945. 

The mayor is also very much a product of the 
Communist revolution. His father. Bo Yibo, 
trekked with Mao Zedong on the Great March and 
served as finance minister of the first Communist 
government, formed in 1949. Now 86, he is still 
regarded by Chinese as on the same level as Mao 
ana Deng Xiaoping. 

These days, however, the mayor is less con- 
cerned with the revolution than with drumming up 
fresh investment for the city. 

“We won’t be able to catch up with Hong Kong 
in toms of gross national product or per-capita 
income in several years,” he said. “But we can try 
to perfect the functioning of the port and the 
formation of the market system.” 

Mr. Bo has been especially eager to attract 


apart, 

lian was controlled by Japan for four decades after 
it defeated Russia in 1905. The Russians came to 
Dalian in 1898. turning what had been a sleepy 
fishing village into a commercial port. 

“In the past, there was indeed an unpleasant, 
even painful relationship between China and Ja- 
pan," he said, referring to Japan's invasion, coloni- 
zation and slaughter of millions of Chinese in tire 
decades before the end of World War II. "But now 
we should establish a new relationship.” 

His openness to the Japanese, echoed by many 
hoc. is partly explained by the fact that the atroc- 
ities committed m the name of Emperor Showa 
occurred outside the city, either farther north in 
Manchuria or in southern coastal dries such as 
Nanjing The Japanese also helped lay the founda- 
tion of the region’s industrialization. 

The Japanese influence remains strong, from the 
municipal government building to the central rad- 
road station, which was built in 1937 and modeled 
after the Ueno station in Tokyo. 

Dalian is one of only three cities in China with 
street trolleys (the others ore Anshan and Chang- 
chun). All were built by the Japanese, and the 
original yellow and green cars are still in service. 

At its peak in the 1930s, more titan 100.000 
Japanese lived here. Not surprisingly. Dalian rest- 
dents, who now Dumber 53 miUioa in the metro- 
politan area, have picked up the custom of eating 
sashimi, or raw fish. Each year. Dalian attracts 
about 100,000 Japanese tourists, who come mostly 
for nostalgia but also to enjoy the city's spectacular 
coastline. 

The influence of the Russians also remains 
strong, from regal state guest bouses on the coast 
to onion-domed buildings downtown. The city is 
organized around several big circular plazas in the 
Russian style, with eight or IQ streets radiating out. 

It is dear, though, that Dalian, is slowly im tether- 
ing the past In lure with instructions from Beijing 
making it illegal to name streets and places after 
individual^, Stalin Square and Stalin Street will soon 
become People’s Square and People's StreeL 

“The names were chosen by the masses; the 
masses," the mayor said with a chuckle. 


Warrants 
Pull Down 
Hang Seng 

Bloomberg Busatess Hews 
HONG KONG — The Hang 
Seng index fell 3.05 percent Thurs- 
day as investors tad down shares 
that had rallied before brokerage 
companies announced they would 
sell covered warrants on them. 

AH 33 stocks in the index fdJ, 
taking it to 9,22134 points, a loss 
of 289.73 on the day. 

Brokerages Issued warrants on 
four Hang Seng stocks this week; 
Hutchison ’Whampoa LuL, China 
Light & Power Co., Cheung Kong 
(Holdings) Lid. and Swire Pacific 
Ltd. 

A warrant gives its owner the 
right, bat not (he obligation, to buy 
shares in a company at a set price 
within a set time, wren an issue is 
covered, it means the issuer of the 
warrants owns or has ready access 
lo ihe underlying stock. 

The underlying stocks became 
less attractive investments once the 
warrants were issued because in- 
vestors could gain the right to buy 
shares in the future without risking 
the full cost of the stock, said An- 
drew Hall research director at 
Morgan Grenfell Aria Securities. 

Brokerage companies that issue 
covered can warrants on a stock 
often bid up the stock before an- 
nouncing the sale of the warrants 
because they have to buy shares to 
back the offer, traders said. 

For example, Robert Fleming & 
Co. issued warrants on existing 
shares of Hutchison on Monday. 
The stock, which rose 124 percent 
Monday, has since lost 5.84 per- 
cent, closing Thursday at 32.50 
Hong Kong dollars (US$41 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 


Singapore 
Straits Times 


Tokyo; 
Nikkei 225. 


K 

: . ' •• 

"n 

l •• - 


M 

h 


l . 

r J F'U‘ A' *4 J' 



. Exchange _ ' ' 

Hong Kong 

Index 

Hang Seng 

• /Iburaday • ; Prev.. * 

Cfcwe ■■ • Close Change 

Singapore 

Sttafts Timas. 


Sydney 

;ab Ordinaries .. 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

21JM9.00; 21.053.11 -0.21 

Kuala Lumpur Composite - ... 

95SL44 S82.8q ; ':~^78 < 

Bangkok. 

SET . 

•1.35&82 1,308.35 -0.69 

Seoul 

Composite Stock • 937-43 832.77 • . +050 ") 

Taipei • 

Weighted 

5,958.62 SJ«W5 -OjOB 

Manila. 

PSS - 

.■Wm 3.11444* . -1.12 : 

Jakarta - 

Stock index 

&7.40. -. 484.33 *1.40 

New Zealand 

NZS&40 

2,147.76 - 2,136.50 +053 . 

Bombay • 

- National Index . 

• 1£62j39. 1*84067 +1.18- 

Sources; Reuters. AFP 

lmcraawroaJ HcraW Triboue 

Very briefly; 


AIG Swims Against Ebb Tide of Asia Investment 


By Michael Quint 

New Vent Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — While Asian stock markets 
have been plummeting and tepid investor de- 
mand led Tiger Management Corp. to cancel 
plans for an investment fund in emerging econ- 
omies. American International Group has 
raised more than SI billion for a fund to invest 
in large infrastructure projects. 

With an illustrious history that began in 
Shang hai in 1919, American International is 
seen by corporate America as an “old China 
hand/Mt is a well-established insurer in many 
Asian markets, including China. 

The new fund, called the AIG Asian Infra- 
structure Fond, will make large, long-term in- 
vestments in projects for developing energy, 
transportation, electric power and petrochemi- 
cals. It will be managed by two former execu- 
tives from the World Bank: Moeea A. Qoreshi, 


who rose Lo become the bank's second officer 
and served last year as interim prime minister 
of Pakistan, and Donald C. Roth, a former 
treasurer of the bank. 

Mr. Qurestri and Mr. Roth became founders 
in 1992 of Emerging Markets Corp. 

Their familiarity with government officials, 
local businesses and other financiers helped the 
fund attract twice (he 5500 million target set in 
late 1993. By late May, when the fund was 
clued, it had nearly two dozen institutional 
investors. 

Officials at American international and at 
the new fund declined to comment, but inves- 
tors reportedly include the Singapore govern- 
ment, with $250 million, and American Inter- 
national itself, with $100 million. 

Although the growth potential of emerging 
countries in Asia is attractive, many outside 
investors have a hard time finding outlets be- 


cause local stocks cannot readily absorb large 
blocks of capital In addition, there is the risk of 
volatile markets, as shown by declines this year 
of 20 percent in Hong Kong, 23 percent in 
Malaysia, 19 percent in Thailand and 16 per- 
cent in Indonesia. 

"In these markets it is hard to find enough 
publicly traded stocks to invest Urge amounts 
of money ” John A. Griffin, president of Tiger 
Management, said last year when he an- 
nounced plans for an emerging-markets fund. 
"You could readily invest $100 million in a 
power plant or container port in China, but to 
buy $100 milli on of stock is inqmssible.” 


• The PiriEppuie government plans to sell an 82 percent stake in Manila 
Gas Corp. within the next three months, ana British Gas PLC has 
expressed interest in acquiring a stake. 

■ Jaitfine Matfaeson Hotdmgs Ltd’s subsidiaries, including Hong Kong 
Land Holdings Ltd, Dairy Farm International and Mandarin Oriental 
will discuss giving up their Hong Kong Stock Exchange listings. 

• Sooth Australia is seeking a buyer and operator for the airport in 
Adelaide and said it would be interested in fmigapane Airport Te rminal 
Services, a subsidiary of Singapore Airlines Ltd, as a possible operator. 

• Toyota Motor Corp. is considering cooperating with Nissan Motor Ca 
and Isnzn Motors lid on the production of auto parts in Thailand 

• Hitachi Ltd plans to increase its purchases of foreign raw materials by 
20 percent in the year ending in March 1995, particularly from other 
Asian countries. 

• China warned Japan to exercise prudence in taking unilateral measures 
to curb textile imports from China. 

• India has imposed a limit of 150 million rupees ($5 million) on a bank’s 
total overnight outstanding positions in foreign currencies. 

• Australia stiD plans to privatize Australian National Line, a shipping 
line, but the government said it would like the buyer to be Australian. 

Kmghi Riddcr, AFX. AFP 


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office 

personal 


Berliner Bank AG 1993 Annual Results 


A Leading Bank for Germany’s Capital 



Since January 1, 1994, Berlin has once again 
become the headquarters of a major German 
bank: BankgeseUschaft Berlin AG. Consti- 
tuted as a holding company, BankgeseUschaft 
Berlin AG, on the one hand, serves as head 
office for the Group, linking Berliner Bank. 
Berliner Hypotheken- und Pfandbriefbank 
and Landesbank Berlin under one roof. On 
the other hand, BankgeseUschaft Berlin AG is 
a bank operating primarily in investment 
banking for the whole Group. In order to 
establish the holding company, Berliner Bank 
AG was renamed BankgeseUschaft BerUn AG 
as of January 1, 1994. The Berliner Bank AG 
shareholders thus continue as shareholders 
of the same, legally unchanged officially 
quoted stock corporation, BankgeseUschaft 
Berlin AG, which is now operating under a 
new name. The operative bank business and 
Berliner Bank AG’s holdings, apart from a 
few exceptions, were taken over by the “new’’ 
Berliner Bank AG, which has been operating 
under the name Berliner Bank AG since 
Januaiy 1, 1994. 

The last financial year of the “old 4 ’ Berliner 
Bank AG and of the Berliner Bank Group in its 
old structure was also the most successful. 
Our Group business volume, i. e M the balance 
sheet total plus endorsement liabilities, in- 
creased by DM 8.4 billion, or 15.2 %, totalling 
DM 71.4 billion by year’s end. Following 
Berliner Bank AG’s positive development, ihe 
Group’s earnings have improved considera- 
bly. In spite of increased administrative 
expenses, the Berliner Bank Group achieved 
a partial operating profit of DM 372.4 million 
in 1995, compared with the previous year’s 
figure of DM 251.8 million, which has been 
adapted to satisfy the new legal requirements. 
The Group’s expenditure for risk provisions 
totaUed DM 541.4 million, compared with DM 
322.9 million the previous year. The Group 
thus shows an operating profit of DM 303.2 


million for 1995, i.e. an increase of DM 165.4 
million, or 120.0 %, over the previous year’s 


figure. 


also participates in the strong growth of this 
market segment outside its core region of 
Berlin/Brand enburg. 


From our 

Group balance sheet 



From our 

Group profit and loss account: 


(in DM millions) 

1993 

1992 

(in DM millions) 

1993 

1992 

Loans to customers 

49,142 

41,622 

Net interest received 

1,358.2 

996.4 

Liabilities to customers 
and from bonds issued 

49,137 

41,089 

Net commissions 

254.6 

204.9 

Volume of business 

71,444 

65,091 

Total operating profit 

505.2 

157.8 


Success passed on to our shareholders: 
dividend increased to DM 9.- 

For 1995, the Group shows a consolidated 
profit of DM 114.5 million as compared with 
DM 65.7 million for the previous year. We 
suggest that DM 86.6 million of this annual 
profit be used to pay a dividend of DM 9.-, up 
from DM 7 per share. 

As a supraregional, universal bank within the 
Group, the “new” Berliner Bank AG has a 
total of more than 245 offices in Germany 
With 139 branches in its core region of 
Berlin/Brandenburg alone, the Group covers 
Ihe whole region completely. In addition, it 
has branches hi five centres of the new and 
six centres of Ihe old federal states. 

Therefore the “new” Berliner Bank AG, 
supported by its London branch, offers a 
network of branches covering the most 
important financial markets and showing 
good chances for continued qualitative 
growth. With its subsidiaries Allbank and 
DSK-Bank, which specialize in retail banking 
and operate 95 and 25 branches respectively 
in Germany, the “new” Berliner Bank Group 


Our group accounts for 1995 include Berliner 
Bank International S.A. in Luxembourg, 
Allgemeine Privatkundenbank AG in Hanover, 
DSK-Bank Deutsche Spar- und Kreditbank 
AG in Munich, Braunschweig-Hannoversche 
Hypothekenbank AG, BB-Leasing GmbH and 
BB-Data Gesellschaft fur Informations- und 
Kommunikationssysteme mbH. 

We would appreciate your interest in our 1995 
Annual Report 
Please contact: 

BankgeseUschaft Berlin, Investor Relations, 
Hardenbergstr. 52, 10625 BerUn 
Phone: (+49 50) 31 09-24 30 
Fax: (+49 30) 31 09-50 51 




BANK 

GESELLSCHAFT 

BERUN 


n o-t* 5" W.Y y 






'ftjfiWtfl 




IKAlifi: Joint IJ.S*-European Negotiating Strategy on Japan Is Unlikely 


CllffiENCY A ® ( A PITAL MARKET- SERVICES 


Coo. Ji 

: N! r 
liulc » 
curre w 
on W v 
trim m 
tradi’ » 

Tb jj 
J.64C g 
1.645 31 


Continued from Page 11 
as Lhe odd man out among its ma- 
jor trading partners. 

“Now were trying to find a Tew 
sectors where we have common 
goals,” one official said, “But it's 
become much narrower than the 
original vision.” 

The framework talks resumed 
here Wednesday, three and a half 
months after then-Prime Minister 
Morihiro Hosokawa told President 
Bill Clinton that Japan would not 
accept U.S. demands for numerical 
targets. The deadlock was broken 
last week when the United States 


said it would not seek numerical 
targets and Japan confirmed its 
commitment to measure improve- 
ment in market access with a vari- 
ety of quantitative and qualitative 
indicators. 

Talks on insurance trade ended 

Thursday with a U.S. official say- 
ing there’ had been “a good two-day 
discussion.” but adding, “we obvi- 
ously still have considerable work 
ahead of us." 

Talks on access to Japan's mar- 
kets for cars and car parts were to 
resume Thursday in Washington, 
with negotiations on Japanese gov- 


ernment procurement of medical 
and telecommunications equip- 
ment slated for Friday in Tokyo. 

B EU to Redirect Tariff Aid 

The European Commission an- 
nounced plans Thursday to curb 
tariff concessions on certain im- 
ports from some newly industrial- 
ized countries and to redirect bene- 
fits to poorer countries, Reuters 
reported from Brussels. 

It also held out the prospect of 
special increases in tariff conces- 
sions for developing countries that 
observed international norms in 
such fields as trade union rights 


and environmentally sustainable 
development. 

The commission's plans were in 
a 10-yearly review of its General- 
ized Scheme of Preferences, under 
which developing nations, mostly 
in Asia and Latin America, get tar- 
iff concessions on expons to the 
EU. 

The commission’s director of 
North-South relations. Rene De- 
fraigne. said the aim was to redis- 
tribute the advantages of the pro- 
gram in a way that would 
encourage development of poorer 
nations. 


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PERSONALS 


THAW YOU SAINT JUDE and Saoed 
Heart of Jesus for croyeri antwviH 
and biesra bestowed. MM. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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SmmTbinffc Manhof R re^ Treto 




BELGIUM 


BRUSSELS, Town House, Ave. Mofwo- 
noa ofM- 5 bedroorw, 3 

bathrooms, 2 eera wc'i. Very targe 
super hunched kitchen an jmcil amny 
Carden. Lvmg room with fireplace, 
firing roan and study. LOGEUBOP 
TeL32-2-3459080 Fan: 32-2-3J 55765. 


„ WEST INDIES 

20 ace ate with beachfront. World 
das hole) & ccndtu with coreo license 
& tar abatement. Molly Beach Front. 
Broker commotion gixsarreed. Priced at 
S2_2 miSon. 

Td. NYC ISA 
1113) 8W-7555 

(212) 371-9133 


ESEiE& ffgSS 


CALAIS, small townhouse. on 2D0 sclttu 
g rount ^, to 'Kxrvcta FF150.000. Td 
owner: (33) 35 88 12 96 (otter 8 funj 


BASQUE COUNTRY COAST 

® SP15NDD CHATEAU: 14 rooms. 
6,'SD sgja view on Pyr4nt«. 
Sarti 30 Kik. ff4.400JWCL 

• EXCEPTIONAL PROPERTY: 25.000 
«*m. treed park. Sfred room vSa. 4 
OOttn iwimming pool PF5JOOJOO. 

• *AUTBUL VtUAi 5 beekaams, 
UOO nm, gardoL Frl.BOOLlOO. 

• SURGE 7 ROOM VUIA; an «. 
tacmg mcudiirB, 1 ha yudea J*rim- 
<nmg pool FFl^ttJOa 

W-T* 13375936 06 07 
Fas (33) 59 36 OS 63 


AVEYRON. m Ccrtabre (Lsted vdlogeL 
1^! cent with BU p Off uti 

«K*w»on needed, wloge on rock, 
sptantM i»*, lots of charm. 110 sam. 
on sewral levds. 2J5 ore* attached 
Braond* FF22D.OOO. Td awrw Pens 

ni43 27 55?D(everwKpJ. 




LAKE GENEVA ft 




17th CENTURY HOUSE. ORLEANS, 
border forest, 1 how from fares, 180 
iqjn., 3 bedrwTO, tar(» attic. Abom 
• caes. orchad, mfi kin. FF1J M. 
TeLI-G 56 04 36 F« 1-42 56 05 37. 


53SEZE5S5 


FEAR MCE ft AIRPORT Le Verdon 
opo r tme n t for sde 118 sq.m, balcony 
45 sqm. 3 bedroom*. View to the sea 
No ogerev TeJ LSA + 1-202 3630803 


Urrgue and me Opporvnily, 
taeated m o smd< de luxe 
condominwtn 

APAJTMffvfT-YIiA. DUPLEX, 
targe fixing roam, 3 bexfrogms. 3 bath: 
Urgeda**: gongn. Private garden 
®wng deed access to the coot. 
Earjr access to lhe beads. 

Ref V/A 1B55 

19. Bid du Gtnirol Lederc 
06310 BEAUUEU-SUR-M9 
1*1(33)93010413.70,53)03011196 


"Villa Karapoliti" 


liM'lMrtW*] 1 1 Kii liWiVI 


Exclusive house on its own peninsula, spectacular water 
views, 4 bedrooms, 4 Italian-designed baths, imported 
German kitchen with latest appliances. 

Large stone-paved terrace, barbecue from France, 
1 8m x 8m seawater pool, private beach, double garages, 
champion-size tennis court, separate guest-house or staff 
accommodation with bath & kitchen. 

The property (21.000 square-metres) allows for construction 
of 3 additionnal houses with water views and privacy if so 
desired or a helipad. 

This is a rare opportunity to buy one of Greece's most 
luxurious summer houses situated on the mainland 
Peleponnesos. south of Athens. 

Owner is migrating to Australia, will sell to highest bidder 

Private Sate Price indication US S2 Million. 

Inspection by appointment only 
Contact: Lars or Anders Josephson 
Telephone: +46 8 782 3771 Facsimile: 46 8 665 0809 


NYCity 5th Avenue/E 60s 

STARTLING 

2 BR apartment with huge- windenv* 
tacinc 5th Avenue. Perfect location 
tor ^ inline & I nine. Oox to shops, 
dinine. museums. Owner, caper tor 
quick sale. 1'nlvlicvablc price of 

S525.000. 

Jane Bayard (212) 439-1503 
Susan Kaplan (212) 439-4530 
fiwe (21 2) 968-0192 

A WY* / ASH FORTH 
omm/ WARBURG 


AW\\\\ ’ ▼ ASSOCIATES 

369 Madison Avhij* N«w ton, N.Y. 10021 


iefajrfrfateB 
25 Avrew de ta Ccsfc 
MC 9BC00 MontoCcrio 
Tel: 93 25 15 00. Fro 93 25 35 33 


Between CAP MARTIN 
AND MONACO 

facapfwnd Hot wftfi I merer bedroom 
ft WMuitB brtfrroore 2 loros bedrooms.' 
2 bathrooms, afl morale floors. 
Maderti equ^ped kodiei. 
Terrace fixing the tea 5mci tagh ckm 
buAingwrth poef. fvA teeunty, p uHiwg . 
Far rYwmation ceil owner: 

Tefc (33-11 45 24 52 57 
ha 133-1) 40 67 73 93 


SOUTH OF FRANCE - GRASSE 
18 Km* from sea. 250 sqm. VILLA 
on 1.800 nun. GROUNDS WTTH OLIVE 
USES, t wi mn w g poo'. 5/6 bedraonB. 
ihtwer rooms. IxnKoorni. Superb view 
ond peacefri enrerormenL 
5* by omw. Confirmed tree: 
FF3.60OD0a Negofrcfrie 
T* [33] 93TO41 31 laffire). 


**■ HOTH - RESTAURANT 

ANO&JT MOUNTAIN ff78£4 T 30 
MAES FSOM MCE FRENCH ttVIBlA 
8 rocm/W scare poaL bcefcrU 
candnon Frendi/liu'l cfcm de. Pnee 
negwiotfe. fan owner ot 33-93030631 


MONACO 


age roam S parting space, stpefb 

wew. /££? , 

A AGED! 

7/9. UJes Mains. MC99000 Monaco, 

ret 33-92 165959 Fax 33-93 50 1942 


1 ifc?U® E S TS »« 

4m floor, SPpsytC.hitftCHfegs, 

4 mimandng recnprion areas. 
b««W View. 4 bodrooms, 3 bahj. 
T«fc MJ 45 01 96 99 
Na (1J 45 00 54 91 






&*Aassy Service 
YOUR REAL STATE 
AGENT IN PAJU5 
Tel; (!) 47.20.30.05 


„ BCC9TI0NAL 

„JOP ROCS - BALCONY 
30 tqjiL. fressone. frii das 
mreef* stieSa Tefc n) 4471 87 96. 


WESTERVELT PARK . 


Corporals retreat, convention center, 
embassy escape, country club. etc. 
Westeryett Estate- 5,000 SF manor 




GERMANY 


lour bldgs on 11 acres. 45 offices ♦ 
conference center Private dual-lane, 
surfaced, tree-lined entrance. Smash- 
ing views. 7 Km from new Disney Amer- 
ica near Wash.. DC All lor S2.950.000 
or sell SQft interest. Call owner USA. 
804-493-0700 or lax: 804-493-9386. 


SWITZERLAND 


Blh, VIEW on TUHBUES 

Cgnaanfe/Bfhd Tpwyr 
fop noof . Qnpnd aparfermt 
oroire d 740 >qit t + 40 jclb. moirfj 
opretmunt, targe ptxbng 

8lh,Fg SAINT HONORE 

raor. around 230 iqjn. 

4 borinxvns + maid's room, perking. 

_ IENU LA BOETC 
Tab (1) 4008 10 10 


. NBmrr-HDBBCMI 

Lpareou* gaortmag, refined decora h og 
2 baAoam. lovely frvmg, shower & 
joato. cdfar & pertato F7S50.CO0 
For «te« md hingha FF200Q0 per 
monft. TeL 1-46 40 1692 


T0 *wwi^ - RARE 

Butte , Qgjmprt - d xJini i vj and in 




NYC/Gertral Pork Soudi 416 ROOMS 

WWCTINVESTMBIIS 

Cbxwtwiw wu* for rent uvait&e m 
ttpJja^AawMbe loen. J595K, 

SSwt Za^SSSL S3S0 ^ "“""I 

51775; ired $200, rented at SI 495. 

UMW. 

MR. MCHB. MACUE 
212-891 -7W2/te*. 212644^351 

DOUGLAS aUMAN 


Ari£“jll“*®22M?A«T A rt 
2™5 cro * lc bulk in the 

bSSStaV'r 8 J?V rf k r i fa 

+ Geed Home ft Staff 

*3°° fejjs M. Dick. 

INTI 

Td: (407] 6596866 USA 


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Price: Sir. 1,600,000.- 

CofltBK-MaryHctorwy 

SGBGrwdfloe- WMamm 
TeL-41 »21 -983 80 88. Fez; 41 .21.9828019 



COV E R A NEW AND-- PERSONALIZED 
^SOLUTION TO BUYING PROPERTY IN PARIS 


TDp immobiuir 34, avenue Marceau - 75008 Paris 
lUv cotoultamI Tfels (1) 40 70 03 49 
THE PARTNER FOR YOUR REAL ESTATE PROJECTS 


YOU SAW THIS AD. 

So did nearly half a million potential 
real estate buyers worldwide. 

Should n 7 you advertise your property in the 

international herald tribune? 



AROflTECT 0E9GND VUA. 3» 
iftrrt, on 5 ooes wooded hSade. 


J4W One, 50 nmta from ON AVE GEORGS MANDB. 

MmAoere ww. 2 bedreane. 2 frerehree bwUng. firfi daa. 230 

,BBd Co# mm + nod* raanL 5th floor, 

tom* (39^ 371 9332 FfB 300.00Q Trf W52761 59 


MAWAB/ , ^ gton 7 




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ti 9 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1994 


Page 17 
















Wl 

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ADVERTISEMENT 

international funds 


June 2, 1994 


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w Erwritoge Amer rife Fd s au 

irErrnlroge Emr Mtts Fd 1 l4ja 

SUROPA FUNK LIMITED 

rf American EOUlTV Fuid . — J 26L54 

tf Amman Option Fund s maa 

w Aiku Eotrttv ft, . _ .1 I Jft-,6 

w EurOMOn Equity FO S 12270 

EVEREST CAPITAL (tal) 2B tW 

mEveres* Capitol Ml LU S 1J9.66 

FIDELITY IKTL IMV. SERVICES (Lnl 

tf Dttcowry Fund. I 2443 

tf Far Easi Funa — _i sxy 

0 Fid Amer. Asaota-. S 201 53 

a FkL Amer. vaues IV s I lamm 

d Frontier Fund * ja* 3 

0 Globe! tod Fund S 1928 

d Global Selection Fund___i tus 

0 Mew Europe RM } 112* 

tf Orient Fund s UJ.dl 

tf Specie! Growth Fund * mo 

d world Fund » 11193 

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w Delta Pram lum Carp 1 l XfJX 

FOKUS BANK AS. 472 436 535 

wSomtaKhinn&wmiFd™* too 

FOREIGN ft COLONIAL EMGRO MKTS LTD 
Tel: London 8n«30IZM 
dAroennnimiJMHf easterns »» 

d Brad I ton hrvett Co Slcnv s 77 il 

a CokxntUon IrrvcS CoSKtN-S 1*13 

tf Indian iimest Co Stcov_^s 11.87 

d Latin Amer Extra vWdFfl* I02JM 

d Latrti America income Co_S t.«S 

d Latin American invent Co— 1 IS M 

a Mrxican invest CoMov— j KX> 

d Peruvian Invest Co Slcnv __5 1116 

FDHD MARKETING CROUP IBID) 
p.a Bo* mm. Hamilton. Bermuda 

mFMG Global (JO Aar) t IK? 

ItlFMG N. Amer. (30 Aar) I I a (2 

mFMO Europe (JO Apr! S 10.98 

mFMG EMC MKT (30 Aar)— 1 T7JJ 1 

m FMG O (X Anri S «.18 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA! LTD 
w Concepts Fore* Fond__J* IBM 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

wGata Hedge n s 139J6 

w Goto Hedge 111 J 1113 

nr Cota Swiss Franc Fd 5F «jt» 

IV GAIA F» -- — A 1065* 

m Goto Guaranteed CL I— 1 bam 

ntOoioO uBra wteeaCi.il S ur 

GARTMORE (NDOSUEZ FUNDS DMM 
Tel: MSZI 445424470 
Fa* .-(352)46 54 23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

d DEM Bond DttJLM DM 64) 

0 DJvert»nd__Db 174 SF 106 

ft OoltaT Bend DlslM 5 ZM 

S European Bd — Dls 1.IA Ecu 12* 

French Front DU 1072__FF 1107 

d Gtobot Bona OH 2.16 J 243 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

d ASEAN i *47 

d Asia Pacific i 448 

g Continental Europe Ecu 1*7 

a Dovotnolno Morten » 4.16 

d Fmnr, PC IMA 

a Cemtonv DM US 

d internal tenet S 244 

d Japan Y 2*720 

0 Norm America _J KB 

0 Svrifraria ort C F 177 

d United Kingdom c 151 

RESERVE FUNDS 

tf DEM PH S 414 . D M 4264 

d Dollar DU 2299 S 7.147 

d French Franc FF 1175 

d Yen Reserve— Y ».» 

GEFINOR FUNDS 

London:Tl-4W n Tt*enevo.4V-33735S53C 

wScattlSl World Fund S 454*25 

iv State St. American S 348.77 

GENESEE FUND Ltd 

iv IA) Genesee Eoote s Wj| 

tv (B) Genesee snort S 4*56 

i» (Cl Genesee Opportunity _jS 15127 

w (F | Genesee Hon-EquItY— S 1402 

GEO LOGOS 

Hr II 5frntoM Bond B Ecu I06U8 

iv II Pod Ik Bond B SF 141*58 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
II Athol SLDougJaVl Ot Man 445H*240J7 
ivftAiA^ifn ■ 445.75 

wGAM ArBNrade— — S 3*745 

iv GAM ASEAN S 43111 

*GAM AuNroHo S 2S4JB 

w GAM Boston S 332 J* 

m GAM-Cory IIJ MAinelonJuj_J 10254 

iv GAM Combined DM 127.11 

wGAMCroswuiorliet S ID85» 

wGAMEldWewi S 7152 

w GAM Fmce FF 1ISVJ6 

wGAM Frtmc-vof SF 249-71 

WGAMGAMCD S Tlft.46 

wGAMHtohYleta 5 1S657 

ir GAM East Asia Inc S 70*55 

w GAM Japan 5 >74.76 

w GAM Money MttsUSS * 10L1I 

d Do srwi me c iai.» 

d Do Swill Franc. SF 10153 

dDoDmtscflemodL- DM 102.19 


a DC Yen y 1002950 

ir GAM Allocated Mitt-Fd. S 1/5552 

wGAM EmereMJrtSMtn-FdJ 16357 

WGAMMIK-Euroeeusa 3 iWJi 

nr GAM MMf-Eurape DM DM 135 J I 

wGAMMIN-Gtabta USS S 177J4 

nr GAM Trading DM. DM I29.K) 

nr GAM TrotHnp USS _S let* 

wGAM Dvenera s 165M 

wGAM Podflc S 7S1J3 

w GAM Retotlve Value 3 \ll. 10 

wGAM Setod Ion S 632J5 

w gam Sktonpare//Mokiv3iD_S 71U6 

wGAMSF Sandal Band SF 112.11 

wGAMTYthe- — — S J43J4 

WGAMU5 I 201-25 

wGAMul Investments J 85*61 

wGAM Value 3 MTjO* 

wGAM WiHelfiont S 1*164 

w GAM Won (Urine S 68654 

wGAM Bond USS On) J 14147 

w GAM Bond USS Special 3 18257 

WGAM Bond SF — 5F Ml 58 

wGAM Bond Yen Y I4tnJ» 

WGAM Band DM DM 11322 

w GAM Bead ( 1 1S450 

wGAMLSoodoi Bond 4 137A2 

wGAM UntveraX USS 1 158.12 

w GSAM OmoosHe S 33854 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1-422 201 
MuWeDotftjtrosse T7XCH B03L2urtcl> 

d GAM ICH Europe SF 76.W 

d GAM 104) Mondlol SF 16L92 

d GAM fCH) Pocme SF 301 A3 


SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

135 Edtf S7rd Street JJY 10022213BBM2BO 

WGAM Europe S M5J 

• GAM Global S 14555 

wGAM MHlMfcnaJ S 19172 

w GAM North Ameriai S 17A6 

w GAM Pactflc Basin S 197.13 

IRISH REGISTERED UCITS 
Eartotori TerrosaDucrin 3. as3-t-»NF630 

wGAM Amertoona Acc DM 8750 

wGAM Europe Ace— DM 13461 

■v GAM orient A/cc dm WL53 

wGAM TofcVO Ad DM 17655 

w GAM Total Band DM Arx — DM 186-0 

w GAM Universal DM Act— DM 174J* 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Baraiuda-.UM) BS4B® Fwirai 2*5«iec 
JWH GLOBAL ST RATEGIES LTD 

w O Flnmdol & Metals % 1RL38 

W DJ Global Diversified S KBJH 

w F) G7 Currency S BUI 

w H) Yen FTnWKfal S 16472 

w J) DtaersHled Rsfc Adi — S 11759 

w KJ MH Currency 4 Bond _J 12134 

WJWH WORLDWIDE FND-S I860 

GLOBAL FUTURES A OPTK7HS SICAV 
mFFM Int Bd Proor-CHF a -SF M 

GOLDMAN ilCHS 

w GS Adi Rata Mori. Fd II — S 9.93 

mGS Global Currency 1 12061 

wGS World Bond Fteid S 1122 

wGS World tncome Find S 957 

GSEOUITY FUNDS SICAV 
wGS Euro Small Cop Port — 3 

wGSGtobal Eauthr s 1U8 

wGS US Cop Growth Pori S 

wGS US Small Cop Fori I 

GOTTEJt FUND MANAGEMENT 

w<3. Swap Fond Ecu 135862* 

GRANITE CAPITAL Nm. GROUP 

VGraRlCtolM Emmy i 09897 

wGrantteCapHallAIrtNeulratl 0.9503 

» BrniMe Canltot Mortange -4 UM 

GT ASSET MANAGEMENT (IRELAND] LTD 
TM: |44J Tl- 71845 67 

<S GT asot Fd A Share. S 

d GTAscwiFdB Stares S 

d GT Asia Fund A Share * — t 

dOTAsta Fund B Shores i 

d GT Aslan Small Con* A Sh3 

S GT Alton SmPU Comp B ShJ 
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dGT Bond Fd A Shares S 

d GT Bond Fd BSharee 3 

d GT BJa ft Ap Sciences A £ti_S 
d GT BID GAP sciences BSlLS 

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d GT Doftor Fund B sti 1 

g GT EntoraBiB AIMS A Sti _S 
d OT Emerotag Mkts B Sh — 3 
tf GT Em mw smod Co A S*i_S 
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d GT stratadlc Bd Fd a Sh — 1 
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tf GT Telecomm. Fd B Shores! 
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OT 0 MA4 MpeSIirffl xf*mrw4sg) 
d G.T. BtotachrHeaMi Pund-S 2&41 

d G.T.DeutKWand Fond S HE 

tf G.T. Europe Fund 3 hlu 

p G.T. Gtobot Smnfl Cd Fd I tfJ! 

d G.T. Invsstnwnf Find— S ZSM 

w 6.T. Korea Fund. 1 455 

wG.T. NewtyindCewitrFil— S 6251 

HG.T. US Small Cbowmb-A 1C9 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

f GCMGtotelBeLE* 3 W7.18 

GUHME5S FUGMT FD MNQRS Item) Ltd 
GUINNESS FUGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 

g Managed Currency S 3964 

G GHfllBMd S 3179 


J Gi-i&jI Hian Ipicjnf Bond. .5 77J" 

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tf cure H*n Inc Bend.... — t 22*7 

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• 1 UK l 2541 

d eurgo mr. - 1 11IM 

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a Deid^cnemari Mane, DM 897IJ 

d US Oottar 'Jloncr 3 2t«J 

tf us Dollar Hun vj Bona i ?*— 

d Lit I UclancK! Crtti — 1 3*6: 

MASS NBICHLER ASSET MANGT GOJIWH. 

w Haimeiailer Com AC I 62S0 A) 

w HotenbicWf* Cum me S IH51 

- Havcn&sMB' Cm S 13*1 

WAFFT 5 129305 

HDF F INANCE.TellZL l)48TM45LR0t 4E766U5 


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w Mendlnve!l Futures F F lit J* 

HEPTAGON FUND NV 09IMIJSM) 

I HoptmanQLSFund 5 9UI 

mHcotcaon CMC Fund 5 7010 

HERMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda l8u?t?*5 4300. Lu- : i353)4M 64 61 
Fir® Mas 

mHenrw-EuMKon Fund— Ecu 35040 

mHerimNerm American FM 2*03* 

mHermei auwi Fund t 3®C* 

mMfrmr. Emcro/Vttl: Fund-5 122.11 

mHermK Circtaales Fund— S 6B661 

mHermrt Nevlral Fund 1 1119* 

(*■ Hermes G.cooi r u nd .! Mon 

m Hermer Uontf Tuna Ecu I77 LsO 

ntHerme' Sterling Fd i 1B744 

mHermci Grid Fund 5 4B9J9 

INCOME PARTNERS (A5IA) LIMITED _ 

w Asio« FI tea income fj S lOU* 

INTERINVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/D Bank at Bermuda. Tet ' SN 295 ®M 
mHeaee Hag & Conserve Fd-6 9M 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
Z Bd RerOL L.7447 Lu«vmDoura 

w Europe Suae Ecu 9113 

INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 

d Amer lauedu Nord J 1M6t 

d Europe Ccmmcnioto DM 16M5 

d EtlremeOlenl AnglosoaanAS 10829 

d France ff id3* 

d Italic LU 10I7K00 

tf Zone Alkittaue V 1007460 

IWVESEO iNrn. LI D. POB 771. Jersey 
Tel: 44534 731)4 

0 Mulmum income Fund 09300 

tf Start urn Mnod PHI ; MW ' 

tf Pioneer Maitrls i 12310 

d Oimon Global Siroreor S 1 7ji« 

d Asia Super ijrowta t 246*90 

tf Nlppan Wtu rent Fund S 7A800 

tf Asm Ttoer wamun 1 *7500 

tf E-jropean Warrant Fund S 36400 

tf Gfd N.W. 1994 J 9 6SU) 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 

tf American Gra*>«i i 66000 

d American Erttmrhe I «J100 

0 Ai» T/oer Growth ! 171M0 

tf Dollar Reserve- - 5 5JS» 

tf Eurooean GrowPI 3 SJ9TXI 

tf Eurancon Enierwlse i » 4000 

, tf Global Emerging Markets JS 9.1*00 

tf Global GrovfM 5 57300 

tf Nippon Enlercrbe . _ c 6.1300 

tf Nippon Growth. i 53400 

tf UK Growth t 56400 

tf Sterling Reserve < 

tf North American Warrant _s Atom 

0 Greater China 1 7X7D0 

ITALFORTUNE INTU FUNDS 
w Class A ( Apor. Growth llaUS 8285080 

w Class BlGtobatEauHv) S 11.92 

w Cioss C IGtcbol Bona) s 1897 

» Class D (Ecu BortJi ECU 1877 

JAR DINE FLEMING , GPO Box 11441 H« <9 

d JF ASEAN Trusl 3 $445 

tf JF Far Eosr 14 ml Tr % 25. U 

tf JF Global Conv. Tr 5 14 JO 

dJFHonp Kona Trust S 1054 

tf JF Japan Sm.CaTr y SVbLQO 

tf JF Japan Trasl Y uaino 

d JF MolaYMa Trvtt - ! 71*0 

tf JF Pacific me. Tr J )Ua 

d JF Thai tone TrusJ S 37.18 

JOHN DOVETT MAJ4T (1-0 M.) LTD 
Tfl: 44424 -62 94 30 

w C-o-Trit Man. Futures r ’X’ 0 

tv Govett Men. Ful. USS S *JH. 

w Covens Gear. Cur- i 1J60 

wGovgHSGltH BoLHdoe S 189997 

JULIUS BAER GROUP 

tf Boer bond je 

d Cprbar SF 

tf Eouiboer America—— 5 

tf EouiDoer Europe SF 

d SFR-8AER SF 

tf Stodtbcr I F 

tf Swtsbor 5F 


W-RLQ INCOME POP I FOLIO 

7 8 CKBl A S 851 

2-J7 tf Clou D * 651 

°f*l MERRILL LYNCH 

OLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
'*7 -USTRALIAN COLLAR PORTFOLIO 

254) e Catnary A AS 1X29 

HIM OCWeaorvB AS 17.95 

Canadian dollar psiptfolio 

tfCaieacr.A CS IXW 

a Catenary B- . — .ci ijj* 

24* CORPORATE high INCOME PTFL 

3*4- d Class a. i j *jj 

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I tf Chr.-. B.I 6 tjS 

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13*: DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 

129365 0 Cnlvocrv A _ Q M I’M 

*746455 tf catogorv a d«a i»?J 

133X57 EUROPEAN fiONC PORTFOLIO l DM» 
1451.96 JCIeaA.I . _ -- t 1«*2 

I32I.L tf Class A-2 S 1569 

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9131 tf Cta'.-.A.i - nv gjg 

TOM d Class A-2 DM 1037 

3 tfCknsB-1 $ gjj 

1*1 tfCttuB-2 S 1069 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

BKD tf Coreaary A c ISAS 

?«34 a Category 6 1 1569 

3860* US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

lan - Caiegpry A i )K7 

*8*61 a Caeopr-r 3— 8 1X12 

11104 lEN PORTFOLIO 

44in d Cataacr-r A Y Ui* 

IJTA*! 0 Ctflegoey 3 V I2SS 

1IW* MULTI CURPENCY BOND PTFL 

489J9 d ctou a 3 2165 

r» tf Oaa B s 21 O 

IILX)* US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

tfCtouA S *35 

tf CK&s B 3 9X5 

944 MERRILL LYNCH 

EOUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 
BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 
9X13 tfOswA i 14.TB 

JND ri ftlMt 4 14,14 

HUt CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

18M5 tf CJ0S3A JS U 16 

10039 aCtouB 1 1125 

50714 GLOBAL ALLOCATION °TFL f USS) 

I7K0D if Clav. a S KLCT 

107480 tfClauB S IC4* 

GLOBAL EOUlTV PORTFOLIO 

tfCfcasA 5 1031 

09300 * tf ClasiB I 744 


d LMulboer S 

tf Europe Bond Fund Ecu 

tf Dollar Bond Fund — S 

tf unr.iw.it.al « 

tf Swiss Band Fund ^ SF 

tf DM Band Fund DM 

tfOvtmrl Bona Fund SF 

tf Global Band Fund— DM 

tf Eura Stock Fund Ecu 

tf US Stock Fima s 

d Pacific Stock Fund 3 

d Swiss Stoct Fund SF 

tf SoKhtf SwHs Stock SF 

tf Japan Stock Find _Y 

tf German Stock Fund DM 

d Korean Stack Fund. —4 

tf Swiss Franc Cash— — SF 

d DM Cintl Fund — DM 175880 

tf ECU Cash Fund - —Ecu 

tf Sterling Cash Fund c 

d Dollar rash Fund S 104280 

tf French Franc Cosh FF 111280 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

m Key Global NedBe 259.50 

RlKrv Hedge Fund «VC _4 1<»4I 

Kl PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT EHC 


2.1980 ‘ EURO EQUITv PORTFOLIO 

62310 d Class A i UJB 

7-StOO tf ClessB 5 1355 

4J790 LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

74300 d Class A ! 1*44 

*750# tfChnsS S 1533 

13*00 IVCRLG NATURAL RES<2UPCES PTFl 

9 6560 d Class A s ltjv 

e Ock B S 1138 

000 DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

7J100 ff Class A S Ia20 

11606 tf Class B i 1594 

53880 MERRILL LYNCH INC t PORTFOLIO 

1371X1 d Class A 1 *44 

* 4060 a cion B S 886 

1 it® d Class C L *37 

5J3HO MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

1I3M tf Ate*lcanincSPfftCIA i fS7 

53400 d Meocnn Inc SPtll Cl B S 9.77 

53*00 tf Me. icon Inc Peso Pttl O A 3 9JC 

d fMxIcon Inc Peso PHI Cl B 5 983 

*4000 MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 

1A700 W Momentum NavetUer Per(_S 9452 

mMammium Roinoon Fd— 3 iis.45 

95080 m Momentum R>c R.u S 873* 

IW m Momentum Sfoctcmoster ! 25171 

1*97 MORVAL VONWIUER ASSET MOT Co 

1**7 W Wilier T-toam s t.n 

9 <9 taWJltortunds-wiitoraoiuCccs t:*0 

5*45 wWlltartuntfs-V.IOeraandEurEcu 1243 

».*7 » wiltartimtfs-Willercn Eur Ecu 737; 

M30 wWUrerfunCs-Wiltereo itaY-Ut 1375180 

1884 w WiUeriunds-Willerea N A S 11.17 

toLOO MULTI MANAGER N.V. 

16180 w Cash Enhoncemenl S 984 

7196 w E merging MorttiS Fa S 21 47 

125* w Eur ocean Growth Ft Ecu 15.14 

37.16 wHedoeFund S 12.91 

» .'epaneoe Furd V St# 

w Marker Neulrai > 10.16 

’X’O » Warid Bins Fund Ecu IXTS 

•JR. NICH0LAS4PPLEGATECAPITALMGT 

1330 wNA Fie* idle GrowHlFd 5 14082 

L9097 w NA Hedge Fend l 132.95 

NOMURA INTI- (HONG KOMG) LTD 

TaJte ff Nomura Jakarta Fivrd i 1 9S 

B4J7 NORn CURRENCY FUND 

15685 mNCF USD 5 82085 

/09j)4 mNCF DEM DM 89449 

8888 mNCFCHF- SF 9*4.79 

8134 inKirFFRP FF 446080 

ISM* mNCF JPY Y 8369408 

9*80 mWCFBEF BF 7703X00 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
27.90 21 Grur-enor Sl.Ldn Wl r 9FE44-T1499 7996 


Kl PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT EHC 

mKIAMa Padlk Fd Ltd __S 1141 

.KiDDCR, PEABODY 

b QiesoMbke Fund Ud S 3U4Vt 

8 III Fund Ltd _S 113780 

b Inn Guaranteed Fund, S 1173.n 

b Stonehenge Ltd S 1679.49 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 

tf Allan Drogwi Part NV A— S 98J 

ffAsJen Dragon Pori NVB—S *82 

tf Global Advtiori II NV A S 1*13 

tf Global Advisor* 1 1 NV B — * 28 ’3 

tf Global Advisors Port NV A-S tOSJ 

tf GtoSal Advtsan Part NV BJ 1C.J* 

6 Lthmor. Cur Adv.AJB 7 J3 

tf Premier FuiuresAtfvA/a_5 »A6 

LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
34/F Uopo Tower Cenlre, 89 OiwwawovjtK 
Tefl8S2 ) 847 6*M F 0 « IBS2) 596 BBi 

w Jove Fund _S 9.47 

w Awon Fixed Inc Fd J *.»5 

w ID R Money Market Fd 1 1251 

w USD Moner Morkei Fd 3 I0J9 

w Indonesian Growth Fd N.*A S tail 

w Alton Growth Fund S 10.97 

wAsVxi WoTTorO Fund S *XS 

LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT (652) 145 4411 
» Antenna Fund. .. -S 1 /86 

wLG Aslan SmaltcrCasFd^J IL95C 

w LG India Fund LW S w.ti 

LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS! Ltd 
Ltovds Americas PanNuio (809) 32*4711 
w Bolonoed Mode t ale RfekFd! 454 

LOMBARD, ODIER B CIE - GROUP 
OBLIFLEX LTD (Cl) 

d Muhlcurrencv S 32JC 

0 Donor Medium Term S 2484 

tf Do Itar Long Term J 2QQ6 

tf Japanese Yen Y S04Z8C 

tf Poixtd Starting — £ 386 

tf DeufsdwMark DM 1/47 

d Dutch FIcrtn FT 1832 

rf MY Euro Cummcfc! Ecu ls.03 

tf Swfc* Franc SF U3J 

rf U5 DoOar Short Term— 5 1784 

tf HYEuraCuriDJrttfPny—Ecu 1U9 

d Swtss Mutticurrew SF 16.14 

d European Currency— Ecu 223t 

tf Belgian Franc BF 1107 

tf Convert Wo $ 149$ 

tf French Franc J=F 1S777 

tf STrtE Mum-DNUerd SF 9.9» 

tf Swiss Franc Short Term SF 1*685 

tf Conoolnn Dottar a UC 

tf Dutch Ftortn MuW Fi 1587 

tf Mu Franc Dlvto Pay SF 10.78 

tf CAD Muffleur, Dlv. CS 1281 

tf Medlmrrtineotf Curr— SF 1083 

a CenvarHbtes SF 9.93 

MALABAR CAP M8MT (3vmudel LTD 

mAJatabcr Infl Fund I 1939 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 
ibMInt Limited - Ordinary —3 4481 

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Ifs never been enfer 

to subscribe end 5Qvt. 
Just col InJMre©: 


08001 7538 




For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


a . ir 


The conference program 

will highlight the investment 
' opportunities in 
Latin America following the 
region's economic revivaL 


Latin America 

A A/iew Investment Partner 


LONDON • JUNE 9 - 10 - 1994 

r-ft 1 14 k« XV 

Hcralb^feSribmif ®j 


FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION ON THE 
CONFERENCE: 

Brenda Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71)836 4802 
Fax: (44 71) 836 0717 























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1994 


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The MssmateJ Press 
Ryan Thompson was shown up 
publicly by teammate Bobby Bon- 
illa and did not appreciate iL 
The wo New York outfielders 
nearly came to blows in the Mets 
dugctu after Thompson's menial 
error allowed the go-ahead run to 


NL ROUNDUP 


advance in the sixth inning of the 
Colorado Rockies' 4-3 victory 
Wednesday night in New York. 

Thompson and Bonilla ex- 
changed words, but were separated 

by pitcher Mauro Gozzo before 

punches were landed. 

The incident began after Colora- 
do's Dante Bichette opened the 
sixth with a single to left. Charlie 
Hayes followed with a single to 
center, his third hit of the game. 

Bichette rounded second and 
stopped, seemingly daring Thomp- 
son to try to throw him out at third. 
When Thompson did not and Bi- 
chette took third easily. Bonilla 
pointed his glove twice in Thomp- 
son’s direction. 

One out later Mike Kingery hit a 
sacrifice fly and Bichette "raced 
home with ihe margin of victory as 
the Rockies swept 'the three-game 
series. 

After Thompson struck out to 
lead off the sixth, he and Bonilla 
went into the dugout runway and 
emerged minutes later after talking 
things over. 

“Your eyesight is pretty good if 
you could see alt of that "from the 
press box." Thompson said. “1 was 


shown up and that’s why I got so 
mad. Bichette decoyed me and ttaaL 
wasn't supposed to happen. He 
stopped and 1 relaxed. Then he 
went running to third and I was too 
deep." 

He added; “Bobby was frustrat- 
ed, but 1 would have preferred that 
he speak his mind privately." 

Kent Bouenfiela, the second of 
five Rockies pitchers, relieved 
starter Mike Harkey in the bottom 
of the fifth with two on and two 
outs. He got David Segui to fly to 
center to end the inning. 

Steve Reed pitched the eighth 
and Bruce Ruffin worked the ninth 
for his sixth save, striking out Jeff 
Kent with the bases loaded to end 
the game. 

Dodgers 7, Cardinals (k In Los 
Angeles. Ramon Martinez pitched 
his 14th shutout in 155 career 
starts, and Tun Wallach and Eric 
Karros homered for the Dodgers. 

Martinez scattered eight hits, 
struck out four and walked three. 
Bob Tewksbury lost for third time 
in four decisions. 

Karros and rookies Garey In- 
gram and Raul Mondesi each had 
three hits for the Dodgers. Ingram 
balled leadoff in place of Bren But- 
ler, who traveled to Chicago where 
his mother is hospitalized. 

Braves 1. Giants 0: Greg Mad- 
dux became the first nine-game 
winner in the majors as Atlanta 
won at Candlestick Park. 

Maddux overcame slx walks and 
six hits and escaped a pair of bases* 
loaded jams in eight innings. 

Greg McMichael struck out Wil- 


lie McGee with two on to end the 
game for his lii’n save. San Fran- 
cisco stranded 14 runners. 

The Braves scored off Salomon 
Torres in the fourth inning on a 
leadoff walk to Roberto Kelly and 
a sacrifice fly by Tony Tarasco. 

Expos 10, Reds 9: Marquis Gris- 
som hit a two-run single to cap a 
five-run rally in the eighih inning 
that lifted Montreal over Cincin- 
nati at Riverfront Stadium. Cincin- 
nati had been 21-0 when leading 
after six innings. 

Deion Sanders tripled, doubled 
and singled for the Reds, scored 
two runs and drove in one. 

Larry Walker homered for the 
Expos. Tony Fernandez hit a dis- 
puted three-run homer in the ninth 
for Cincinnati. 

Tim Scon was the winner and 
Pedro Martinez, making his first 
relief appearance of the season, got 


two outs for a save. Hector Car- 
rasco. who had not pitched since 
May 1 1 because of an infected right 
foot, was the loser. 

Martins 3. Astros 2: Jeff Con- 
inc's two-run double in the fifth 
inning sent '-i siting Florida over 
Houston. 

Dave Weathers pitched six in- 
nings. and has both or the Marlins' 1 
wins in six games against the As- 
tros this season. Robb Nen finished 
with three scoreless innings for his 
third save. 

Jerry Browne Hsi an RBI single 
and ConLie hi; his go- ah aid double 
off Shane Reynolds. 

Phillies 4. Cubs 2: Shawn Boskie. 
traded from Chicaao to Philadel- 
phia. pitched rwo-hJi ball for seven 
innings against his former team at 
Wrigley Field. 

Boskie struck out five and 
walked two. He gave up a home run 


and single to Ryne Sandberg. Doug 
Jones pitched the ninth for his 12m 



TV *zr..Y7j.Vi» Piw 

With the way the Chicago White 
Sox hit its a wonder that Wilson 
Alvarez ever thinks he will lose. 

Alvarez though: his 15-game 
winning streak was over Wednes- 


ar.d 


AL ROlQVDiT 


day night when the White Sox went 
into the oinih inning trailing by 
two runs at Yankee Stadium. But 
after Frank Thomas. Julio Franco 



•’cctma were done. 
Chicago had rallied for a 5-4 win 
■over Nc« York that left .Alvarez's 
siring intact. 

"i'm not going to give up with 
this team anymore." .Alvarez said 
after winding up with a no-deci- 
sion. 

Aivarsz's record remained at 8-0. 
lied with LaAJan Hovt for the 
longest regular-season winning 
streak in team history. His next 
start likely will be at home against 
Toronto. 

thought everything is over. 
±c streak is over and w-e start over 
again." he said. “1 feel like the most 
lucky guy in the world. With ihis 
team, you never know what will 
happen." 

AJvarez pitched six innings and 
gave up three runs. He walked sev- 
en and allowed five hits. 

Dennis Cook was the winner and 
Roberto Hernandez struck out the 
side in the ninth for his fifth save. 

Danny Tarubul! homered and 
drove in three runs, giving Jimmy 
Key and the Yankees a 3-2 lead 
after six innings. 

Bob Wickman relieved and 
slopped the White Sox until the 
ninth. But pinch-hitter Joey Cora 
drew a leadoff walk. Tim Raines 
singled with one out and pinch- 
hitter Warren Newton walked, 
loading the bases. 

Thomas, the .AL player of the 
month for May. hit a sacrifice fly to 
the wall in right field, making it 4-3. 
Franco singled home the lying run 
and. after Steve Howe relieved. 
Ventura hit an RBI single. 

Indians 3. Angds 3: Rene Gon- 
zales drew a bases-loaded walk 
from Mike Butcher with one out in 
the 10th inning, giving Cleveland 
its llth straight win* at Jacobs 
Field. 



save. 

Pete Incaviglia singled during a 
three-run first inning against Mike 
Morgan, and hit his I Oth homer in 
the seventh off Jose Bautista. 

Padres 6, Pirates 4: An error by 
five-time Gold Glove center fielder 
.Andy Van Slyke helped San Diego 
stare three unearned runs and de- 
feat visiting Pittsburgh. 

The Padres won their sixth in a 
row and sent the Pirates to their 
fourth straight to*- 

Van Slyke dropped a long fly 
ball by Billy Bean for a three-base 
error in the sixth inning. San Diego 
went on to score three times off Jon 
Lieber For a 54 lead. 

Pedro Martinez went HS innings 
for the win and Trevor Hoffman 
worked the ninth for his eighth 
save. 


seven i nnin gs, with Clemens giving 
up four hits and Cone five. 

An error by second baseman 
jose Lind led to Cooper's single off 
Mike Magname. Tony Fossas won 
a day after being recoiled from the 
minors and JefT Russell got his 1 2th 
save. 

Tigers II. Orioles 3: Travis Fry- 
man went 5-for-5 and Detroit won 
a season-high fourth in a row. The 
Tigers moved past Torcmio and out 
of last place in the AL East for the 
first time this season. 

Danny Bautista had three hits, 
including a home run. for the Ti- 
gers. Tim Huleu homered for host 
Baltimore, which has lost five of 





•• • " /.'■.It - . 

•••••• *•. 




W if.:' 




i . -♦ 








Garesdn Cakji^Tli AMocaKd&bk 

Striker Marco Van Basten working out this week at the MHaaeflo tr aining camp near Varese, &$$$%.' 


SIX. 


Tim Belcher gave up four hits in 
eight innings. He is 3- 1 since losing 
his first seven decisions. 

Mike Mussina, who began the 
day 5-0 with a 1.57 ERA lifetime 
agiunst the Tigers, was tagged for 
10 hits in six innings. 

Athletics 9, Blue Jays 5: Ruben 
Sierra hit an RBI single and Gcron- 
imo Beiroa was hit by a pitch with 
the bases loaded as Oakland rallied 
for two runs to take the lead in the 
eighth inning. 

The Athletics completed a three- 
game sweep at the Sky Dome, and 
have won five in a row against 
Toronto this season. 

Roberto Alomar’s iwo-run 
homer put the Blue Jays ahead 54 
in the sixth. After the A's went 
ahead in the eighth, Mike Bordick's 
two-run double keyed their three- 
run ninth. 

Reliever Bob Welch was the win- 
ner and Tony Castillo was the los- 
er. 

Twins 2, Mariners 1: Chuck 
Knoblauch hit two run-scoring 
doubles and Minnesota won at 
home. Knoblauch leads the majors 


Van Basten to Go to World Cup 





The Athletics' Scott Srosius was safe at third, just under the glove of the Blue Javs^Ed* Swame? £01 - a H *n ^ j two , a cow Ffocolmi’ 

* - ^pras^e- deaston. Each allowed two runs in sacrifice fly and was hit bv a Ditch. t#n crvK in il 


The Indian:' home wincing with 25 doubles. He has six games 
streak is their longest since thev ’with at least two doubles litis sea- 
won 13 in a row at Cleveland Stadi- son. 

urn in 3965. Cleveland is 7-1 in Kevin Tapani won his fifth 
extra innings, a year after going 2- straight decision. He gave up six 
12 in extras. hits and Rick Aguilera pitched the 

Gonzalez walked on five pitches ninth for his 1 1 th save, 
after Eddie Murray was intention- Chris Bosio pitched a complete 
ally walked. game for Seattle, allowing nine hits. 

Rtd Sox 4, Royals 2; Scott Coo- Brewers 8. Rangers 1: Cal Eldred 
per singled home the go-ahead run pitched a five-hitter and Milwau- 
ir the eighih inning as Boston beat kee beat visiting Texas. Eldred 
Kansas City at Fenway Park. struck out five and walked three in 
The game began as a pitching his second complete game, 
duel between Roger Clemens and Brian Harper drove in three 


Corrp: led f. Our Stejjf Fccm Dispatches 

MILAN — Striker Marco Van 
Basten. sidelined for more than a 
year by a slew-healing ankle injury, 
announced Thursday that be would 
join the Dutch World Cup team. 

“I’ll be the 22d player of the 
Dutch team in the United States," 
Van Basten said at AC Milan's Mi- 
lanello tr aining camp. 

But the 29-year-old center-for- 
ward stressed that he could hardly 
play a full game in the upcoming 
world competition and that his 
Italian dub. AC Milan, still must 
give its green tight. 

The three-time European Foot- 
baller of the Year said he had con- 
firmed to the coach of the Dutch 
squad. Dick Advocaat, that he was 
ready to replace Ruud Gullit, who 
quit the team Monday. 

“I told him I am all right,” Van 
Basten said, adding he would go to 
the United States "not to play but 
to work." 

“If Gultit hadn't left the team. I 
would have stayed behind at Milan- 
ellc training." he said. “Given that 
this opportunity has come up. I'll go 
and train in America instead." 

He said he would not play with- 
out consulting AC Milan's and the 
Dutch national team’s doctors. 

"It would only be for the final 10 
or i5 miDuies of a match, only if i; 
was necessary," he said. 

aC Milan, the European champi- 
ons, are reluctant to let their star 
player run the risk of aggravating an 
injury that has taken so long to heal 
Hie club" 


should under no circumstances play 
because that would put at risk his 
entire career, which could last an- 
other five years at the highest leveL" 

According to published reports, 
Advocaat was expected to take a 
final decision about Van Basten on 
Friday. 

Advocaat reportedly had two 
more players lined up as Gullit's 
possible substitutes — Johnny Bos- 
nian, who plays for Anderecht in 
Belgium, and Hans Gfllhaus, of Vi- 
tesse Arnham. 

Final lists of 22 players for the 24 
World Cap finalist teams will be 
officially announced by FIFA on 
Saturday. The deadline for changes 
is midnight Friday. 

Van Basten has required two op- 
erations on his right ankle. Helped 
by painkillers. Van Basten played 
his last match in May 1993. when 
AC Milan lost a Champions' Cup 
final to Olympique Marseille. 


The Dutch forward said he had 
tested his right ankle hard in the 
last three days (rf trammg “with 
satisfactory-results." . 


Hiller 1 


“I had no problems," he added. 

Milan doctors said recently Van 
fiasten’5 troubled right aT »kle had 
grown some cartilage in the last 
two months, improving die player’s 
chances to return to active soccer. 
At one point his career appe ar ed to 
have crane to an end. 


Thei 

Ronald Roeman, said Van Basten 
was just the sort of personality the 
team needed to replace GuIHl t 


“And, more importantly, be.has 
a positive attitude." Koeman said. 
“Obviously, Marco won't be a reg- 
ular in tbestaxting lineup, but I. bet 
our opponents wicm'i fanc^ steing 
him warming up cm the towiline?* 


y< • — 


r.\\ 




If 


(AP, Reuters. AFP) 


An America’s Cup First 


Reuters 


SAN DIEGO A wrightlifter. a television star and some of the best 
Mtlors in the United States have been named to the first all-women 
America s Cup team. 

Bill Koch’s America3 syndicate announced that 23 women had been 
selected from the nearly 600 who applied for a spot on the U.S. crew, the 
Am female crew to compete for yachting's most prestigious trophy. More 
than 40 finalists were given tryouts aboard an America's Cup yacht. . 

Among the crew chosen were Ste ph a n ie Armitage- Johnson, a weight- 
lifter who has been working as a -* ** * - 


if - . 


364 Da 


sacrifice fly and was hit by a pitch. 


S aier wtn been working as a strength coach at the University of 

St Washington, and SheUey Beat tie, a California body-builder wfcKo 
?™lt sa £‘-J YF known as Ice, one of the muscular competitors on the television series 
American Gladiator*. 


World 


DENNIS THE MENACE 






wm 


UPBRAL 


Pfmunsworhfm: f. I. j Jt f 1 


l*nMm (omyrcwi 

jm-oti* capon benmi* ohspub 

Ann*f«r Ifliji tus eanmuryi CUM IW tfa9«L 


To owr readers in Switzerland 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
end save. 

Just call our Zurich oKict 
loll free: 

155 57 57 

or fax: (01} 481 82 88 


w Li ■ Cv :■ 


7 























Page 19 





■ ..j 

-tt 






Pierce Stuns Graf, Sanchez Vicario Wins 


By Ian Thomsen 

IntemuBoruJ Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Her faiher always said 
Mary Pierce could play like this. 

Of course, no one seemed to 
know where Jim Pierce was on 
Thursday, as his 19-year-old 
daughter was demolishing world 
No. 1 Steffi Graf, 6-2, 6-2. in a 
French Open se mifinal 

She became the first French 
woman to reach this final since 
Frampise Durr in 1967. and on 
Saturday against Arantxa S&nchez 
Vicario, the 13th-seeded Pierce can 
become the lowest-rated player to 
win a Grand Slam tournament in 
the 26-year Open era. 

Id 77 minutes. Pierce shook and 
ultimately flipped her sport upside 
down. To look at it from her point 
of view, she has turned herself right 
side up. 

“Many things have changed in 
the past year." she said. “On the 
court and outside the court, my life 
has changed. Outside the court it’s 
more fun and on court it's more fun 
also." 

Pierce was born in Montreal, 
raised in the United States, and is a 
French citizen by way of her 
French mother. A year ago at this 
tournament, her American father 


eveld, who work with her in Bra- 
denton. Florida. 

“Because of Sven and Nick, I've 
b«n training a lot physically, and 
when you train physically you fed 
very good, you have a lot of confi- 
dence. I discussed it with Nick and 


should think it’s the first round 
against a pi aver I should beat." 

The opening match, delayed 
more than an hour by rain, brought 
two Spanish women in a Grand 
Slam semifinal for the first time in 
the Open era. No. 2 Sanchez Vi- 
cano beat No. 3 Couchita Marti- 
nez, 6-3. 6- 1 . It had as much emo- 
tion as a third-place consolation 
match. Everyone, it seemed, was 
waiting for the featured women's 
event of the tournament. 

Graf had won the last four 
Grand Slam events in Monica Se- 
les's absence, and she had played in 
20 consecutive finals. At long last a 
rival came to visit, and Graf wasn't 
ready. She was broken twice in the 
opening 13 minutes. 

“I can tell vou she plaved very, 
very well todav." Graf said. “She 
attacked the ball, she look it early. 

. „... she played very deep, she played 

was banished from watching her ^ [ here was very little 

play. An ensuing LLS. restraining 1 cou, “ “ 0 .” 


Graf bad claimed to be looking 
forward to a challenge, but she 
found nothing to like in this one. 

"No, not at afl," said Graf, who 
looked ready to cry. “There was 
respect for the tennis she was play- 
Swn m ~ 7“ “S* bul *t’* been difficult for me to 

S? I^hnni^ f d **“>’ “J°y the fast few weeks. 

SmifL ? “ i“£. rf u “ ! Why? Well, if you were watching 

semifinal against Steffi — dm I me the last few weeks playing, may- 


Jidk 


fe Knocks’ Charles Smith to a loose baD in t^firaT quarter 


order prevents Jim Pierce from 
contacting his daughter, after she , — „_ 

detailed repeated incidents or 'GfW ' 
physical and emotional abuse by * js r- .-Jii -' jm » 
hixrL She threw off an enormous 4 * - 'Wje-’A"*- 

weight; within a year, Steffi Graf ' 
was no great obstacle. 

“It's been a year that I haven't 

been working with my father any- JssSA 

more, but don't think this is be- 
came of that." said Pierce, who 
then gave credit to her new coach- 
es, Nick Boiled eri and Sven Groeo- 


be you would undeisiand a little 
bit." 

She looked like someone who 
had forgotten how to plav a match 
like this. She is only 24, but she 
seemed much older than that, in the 
worst son of way. AD of her varied 
strengths were made irrelevant. It 
was inconceivable earlier this 

K wben even Bolletieri wrote 
> one was likely to challenge 
Graf until Sdes came back. Pierce 
had lost both of their previous 
matches. 

“It's different because she can 
take the baD even earlier than Mon- 
ica." Graf said. “So probably she 
can play even faster than Monica.” 

Graf broke back in the fourth 
game, but within moments Pierce 
was back in charge, swinging as if 
every ball were a hissing snake. 
When Graf missed with her first 
serve, Pierce was moving in to take 
the second, and more often than 
not converting it into a winner. 


When Graf had an overhead, she 
seemed rushed; when die finally 
held serve, 33 minutes had passed 
and it was Pierce's turn to serve out 
the scL 

This she did after Graf had wast- 
ed a break point. At set poiiiL the 
crowd began to applaud in sup- 
portive unison, and Pierce danced a 
few unwary steps to the rhythm. 
Then she shut her eves and stood 
straight, tipping back her head like 
a swan, breathing deeply; and all 
over the noise went away. When 


she opened her eyes she was ready! 
and her ensuing forehand was ' 

lobbed out of bounds by Graf. In 
celebration Pierce knocked the ball 
away without looking across the 
net where Graf, preparing to serve, 
had to duck to avoid being hit. 

There are two kinds of nerves: 

One kind is paralytic from the be- 
ginning, and Pierce clearly didn't 
have those; the other kind bum out 
and fray when extended and pres- 
sured. Graf said her only hope was 
that Pierce would not be abl< 
keep hitting winners. 

"It’s so hard to keep playing like 
that." said Graf. 

Down a break after five games of 
the second set, Grafs prayers were 
answered. It began to rain. 

“I wasn’t looking forward to it 
rai ning ," Pierce said. "I didn’t want 


to stop. 1 felt the momentum going 
with me. I think she was waiting for 
that, because I think she felt there 
wasn’t much she could do." 

The delay lasted 40 minutes, 
which might have been enough 
lime for Graf to play a video in the 
locker room of Jana Novotna’s col- 
lapse against her at the Wimbledon 
final last year. But all she says she 
did was to change clothes and wait. 
When they returned to Center 
Court, Pierce needed just 11 min- 
utes to win three consecutive 


Results 


able to 


WOMEN'S SINGLES 
Semifinals 

Aramxo Sanchez vicario (21, Spain, del 
Conenlia Martinez (31, Spain, 6-3 4-1; Mary 
Plorce (121, France, def. Steffi Graf (II, Ger- 
many. 6-2. A-l 

MEM-5 DOUBLES 
Semifinal 

Bvton Btocfc.ambO B w . awJ Jo nu l nun Sl u i k 
(21. Uni red States, del. David Adams. Austra- 
lia and Andrei OttnvsMv 161. Russia 6-3. 6-3. 

Quarterfinal 

Slark 

(Zi, Unfed States, dot. Wally Mastir, Australia 
Wd David Pate, United stales. 

MIXED DOUBLES 
Quarterfinals 

KriuieBooeen awl Memo oasi ing. Nether- 
lands, def. jin Hettwringior, Canada and Pat- 
rick Galbraith (8). UJL. 3-6. 7-S, 6-2 

Helm Sukova. Czech Republic, and Todd 
WModbridoe (11. Australia del Natalia Mas 
vedeva Ukraine, and Paul Hoartmts (111. 
Netherlands. 71 s-7. 6-2 


s & jl -r w&w i 

■i ■' • AT ' : ZrjkSti 




Miller Lifts Pacers Over Knicks, 93-86 

The Associated Press __ . <f 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Reggie MilJer was in the 
TwigM Zone. He was unconscious. He was 
. Jordan- like. 

All those terns were used to describe Miller’s 
phenomenal fourth-quarter shooting display 
apmst the New York Knicks in Game 5 of the 
Eastmi Conference finals Wednesday ni gh t, 

Miller scored 25 of his 39 points in the final 
penod, including a playoff-record fiv e 3-prim- 

NBAPLAYOFFS 


-.1 .’•id. 


iV (up First 


***• tire Indian a Pacere rallied to beat the 
. Kmcks, 93-86. and move within one victory of 
the NBA Finals. 

. “He was In the Twilight Zone," said Derek 
Harper, one of several New Ycak guards victim- 
. ‘When, a guy gets hot like that, it’s 

hard to stop him. He catried the team on bis back 
and his teammates fed off of Ms heroics." 

Miller made eight of 10 shots fiom the field 
and was 4-for-4 man the foul Kne in the foorih 

quarter, which started with the Pacers trailing 
by 1 2 paints and ended with them holding a3-2 
lead in the best-of-7 series. 

“He was unconscious," said the Kmcks* 
coach, PM Riley. “He had a Michael Jordan- 
type game , a Michael Jordan-type quarter. He 
■ was hitting evetything he threw up there." 

The 6-f ool-7 guara personally outscored the 


Knicks, 25-16, in the last quarter and fell only 
four points shy of Sleepy Floyd's playoff mark 
for most points in a penod —set by the Golden 

State guard against the Lakers in 1987. 

“It was a special performance and we needed 
that,” said the Pacers* coach, Lairy Brown, 

“It took a spectacular performance from 
Reggie to put us in this posi tion.” 

Thai position is one victory away from a 
finals matchup against the Houston Rockets, 
who won the Western Conference title by beat- 
ing the Utah Jazz in five ganu-e 

The Pacers can finish off the Knicks on 
Friday night at Maiket Square Arena, where 
Indiana is 6-0 in the playoffs. If the Knicks win 
Game 6, the series will return to New York for a 
decisive Game 7 on Sunday. 

“I think Friday’s game is going to be the " 
toughest of the year,” Brown said. “We’ve got 
to play like it’s a sudden-death game." 

Riley think s the Knicks can still won the 
senes. “I amply believe that we are going to get 
it done," he said. “We have our backs against 
the wall. The only thing .that will come out of 
this is that we wifi find out what kind of i«*m 
we have, what we are about" 

If the Knicks are to stay alive, they’ll have to 

be a different team than they were in the fourth 

quarter Wednesday night. 


After New York bufli a 14-point lead late in 
the third period, Indiana went on a 23-6 run to 
fske a 75-72 lead on Miller's 3-pointer with 7:40 
remaining in the game The Knicks closed to 81- 

79 on two free throws by Patrick Ewing with 4 : 1 1 
left, but the Pacers then went on a 6-0 mn and 
New York never got closer than six after that. 

The Knicks didn’t hit a field goalin the fim 
seven minutes of the fourth quarter, and made 
only three of 12 shots in the period while 
committing nine turnovers. 

“We had six consecutive turnovers to start 
me fourth quarter, which really gave them life ” 
Riley said. “We have no one to blame bul 
ourselves. Miller got off, but we contributed to 

it." 







SCOREBOARD 


•Ewing scored 29 points but grabbed onlv two ._ v . J88m , 

oki?U SkhE Wwker5 SWeepiDg ™ ,er » ff *• “n» corertog center court after rto delayed the start of TtaradayV, French tZL’dS?-*- 
Starks each had 16 points for the Knicks, who 
lost their first home game in the playoffs after 
eight victories. 

Rik Smits, Indiana's starting center, was held 
to six points and two rebounds before fouling 
out in the fourth quarter. But backups Antonio 
Davis and LaSalle Thompson made key contri- 
butions. Davis had 12 points and 10 rebounds; 

Thompson had three steals in the fourth quarter. 


s" V -C 


Major League Standings 


FolartaOHvar (7), Whiteside (7j. Bromley 
(8) and Orftz; E Hired ana Harper. W— E Id rad. 
L — Faiarda, M. 

Kon »“ air 2M 800 Mo— I 6 * 


364 Days Later, Game 5 Strikes Again 

essassss ss wsMsesz 


New York 
Boston 
Ball I morn 
Delrofl 
Tor on Id 



By George Vecsey 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Three hundred 
and sixty-four days later, it hap- 
pened again. The Knicks confront- 
ed the ghost erf fifth games past, but 
instead of conquering that specter 
they staged one of the classic col- 
lapses in their history. 

Last year in Game 5 it was Mi- 
chad Jordan and eight other arms 
swatting at poor Charles Smith, 

Vantage 
Point 

who couldn’t push the rock up tin; 
hill and therefore became a symbol 
for one unfortunate moment. 

This Game S, who needed Mi- 
chael? This tim e it was. a wraith 
named Reggie M31er, who had fig- . 
nred oat in two games in Indiana . 
last weekend that the Knicks were 
not very, shall we say, resourceful. 
This time Reggie Miller Ht up Mad- 
ison Square Garden for 25 points in 


the fourth period as the Pacers 
stunned the knicks, 93-86. 

This time, 364 days later, “it was 
a total team effort,” said the 
Kmcks* coach. Pal Riley, after the 
Haningi- was done. 

There is nothing surprising 
about tire Knicks not being able to 
think on their feet, but these cir- 
cumstances were shocking. The 
Knicks carried a 70-58 lead gang 
into the fourth and that fell apart. 
Spectacularly. 

Riley said: “You have a chance 
to put a team away, you put it 
away. We did not handle those last 
10 minutes wefl at afl." 

And that was the most optimistic 
spin that Riley, a most positive 
thinker, could put on it The 
Knicks will head to Indiana for the 

sixth, and shaft we presume final, 
of this series, of this year, 

_ the boos of the fans. 

Late during this fiasco, Derek 
Harper was dribbling the ball up- 
court, making eye contact with 
some heavy hitters in the expenave 
seats who were hounding him , 


.u l staggers, and they have ihi’s 

§omg to turn on the home team, his toy of fifth games. 


Mels Choose Pitcher as Draft Begins 


tins was the occasion. . 

The heckling got so bad that Ril- 
ey actually took his team out on the 
court during a 20-second timeout 
in tire final minutes. Usually be sits 
them down on the bench, but that 
was too dose to the heme fans. 
Now the Knicks, who are 1-6 on 

win to survive, in die tank town 
where they play shrieking car tapes 
at the visiting team, in & name of 
sport smanship and fair play. 

Not that it lakes much to distract 
tire Knicks. They have suffered 
from lack of smarts in tire back- 
court in recent years, and it got 
worse after Doc Rivers went down 
with a knee injury tins season. And 
on Wednesday night, one night 
short of 365 days of Game S, they 
hit a low point. 

It started so beautifully. Sm ith 
c am e out and made a stutter-step 
move and then a strong dunking 
(hive to tire basket for a 9-2 lead, 
and he shook himself at the crowd 
in amodified boogie, idling them it 
would be different this time, 364 
days later. 

It was not different. These are 
the Knicks. after alL You want 


pretty sod choreographed and art' 

NEW YORK (AP)— The New York Mefs selected Florida State pitcher fnl, yongo to Lincoln Center or the 
Paul Wilson with the fest pick in basebalTs amateur draft cm Thursday. Joyce Theater or someplace where 
Wilson, a right-hander, was 11-5 with a 2.16 earned run average for tire they do opera or dance. You want 
Semmoks tins season. He struck out 144 batters in 125 innin g s . smart, yon look at old film clips of 

Oakland chose second and picked high school outfidder Ben Grieve, a Magic's Lakers, Bird’s Celtics, 
son of Texas Rangers general manager Tom Grieve. Grieve, 18, batted Isiah’s Pistons. You want chest and 
.485 with three home runs and ]J -RBJs at Martin High School in forearms, you go to the Garden. 



Arlington, Texas, tins year. San Diego selected right-hander pitcher 
Dustin Hennarison of Kent State, who was 5-4 with a 2.69 ERA. 

Selected next was^ ^Anthcmy Williamson, a third baseman at Arizona 
State, who batted J56 with 13 home runs and 67 RBIs. Florida picked 
next and took shortstop Josh Booty fiom Evangel Christian High School 
- in Shreveport, Louisiana; Booty batted .428 this-ytfar.: 

For the Record 

HreHanftaf Whafcrs havebeoisoMfor$47J minion to two Michigan 
computer company executives who intend to keep the National Hockey 
TjiwgtM fawi tnHg^^Goimecticut.^ The new owners. Peter Karmanos 
and Thomas Thcwes, are tire major owners of Compuware Gup. (AP) 
Andrea Ftirrigato won the 12 th stage of the Tour of Italy, edging Fabio 
fold a to in a sprint in the Slovenian town of Kimy. - - (AP) 

Tbe Mfarai Heat derided to keep coach Kevin Loughery, the Miami 
Herald reported. Lbughoy, whose three-year contract wash) expire July 
14, signed a two-year contract with an option for a third. (Ar) 

NBC £hreris has acquired the rights to the U-S. Open Championship 
from 1995 to. 1999, giving tire network a major golf tournament for the 
first time since it televised the U.S. Open in 1965. (NYT) 

The NAACP said it Ired begun an iovestigafion into “blatant” discrmii- 
naftwy hiring practices of tire Dallas Cowboys and the rich's failure to 
ffe ni more fixiamvrivwith minority vendors. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones 
called the NAACP*s criticism “unwarranted." T (AP) 


The Knicks were 8-0 at home 
during these playoffs, but it never 


In lasty ear’s ni ghtman *, they were 
supposed to have a home-team ad- 
vantage, but Smith was blasted by at 
least five Bulls, and given the slate 
of ballot-box stuffing and poorbox- 
robbing and other chicanery thai 
goes on in Chicago, he might have 
been hit by six or eighL There was 
no whistle, partially because Jordan 
was one of the people flailing away 
at Smith’s arms. 

Aay way you look at it, that’s a 
nightmare, and the Knicks were 
promptly bombarded in Chicago. 
They have been Uving with that 
horror fen- 364 days. 

Now they must live with this one. 
There was the rising bad-moon 
specter of Reggie MBJer, t akin g his 
marching orders from his big sister. 
Cheryl* getting braver bv the min- 
ute. 

There was the setting sun nighi- 
mare of the Knicks’ guards unable 
to get the ball upcourt against die 
Pacer* defenders, to the accompa- 
niment of sound tapes, “A1 Unser’s 
Greatest Hits,” the whine of Indy 
race cars. 

“This team has gone through 
three years of a mental, physical 
and spiritnal push," Riley Lid. 

“I amply bdfewe you get it done." 
Ruey added. “Maybe this is the way 
jtfiasto be for us. It’s never easy. It’s 
harrowing. We have lo look at it as 
one of the great experiences in our 
life, m see you cm Friday." 

The Knicks (fid not want to go 
bade to that horror show one game 
down, but now they must. Game 5 
has struck again. 


ChlcoiM 
Cleveland 
Minoru to 
Kansas atv 
Milwaukee 

Texas 

California 

Seattle 

Oakland 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 
W L 
33 7* 

31 19 

=7 22 
3-1 25 
74 77 

Cemrai Division 


Pci. 

A73 

357 

^90 

.471 


JO If 


Wesr Division 
23 27 

33 30 
2t 30 
16 3a 


Atlanta 
Manrreal 
New York 
Florida 
Philadelatiia 

Cincinnati 
Houston 
St. Louis 
Oilcooo 
Pillsbursti 

LosAnoeles 
Sem Francisco 
Color ado 
San Diego 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 
W L 
3? IS 
?S 2? 

-3 26 
25 77 

25 r 

Cemrai Division 
29 23 

» 53 


.612 

-563 

J70 

JDO 

412 

.460 

A3* 

.412 

J06 


Pci. 

*40 

■5*9 

.490 

481 

481 


1V» 

2ta 

e 


3V, 

TVS 


76 74 
S 70 
71 29 

Wesl Division 
29 2* 

25 20 

74 27 

19 34 


-SM 

-558 

-520 

AM 

.420 

■M7 

.472 


Wednesday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Seattle 001 Ml BOO— 1 a I 

Minnesota 001 Ml lOx— 2 9 0 

Boslo and Wilson ; Taoani. Aguilera |9I and 
Waioeek. W— Tapani. *-2. L— Boslo. 2-7. 
Sv— Aguilera nil. 

Oakland ooi in to— 9 if 1 

Toronto on 012 DOO-S 8 2 

van Pooael. uvelcn .Si. Briscoe iBI. Acre 191 
and Homand. Slrtntwch tin Lelier. Castillo 
171. Brow (91 ana Borders. W— WHcft. 1-5. 
L — Castilla 2-1. HRs— Toronto. Alomar (Si, 
Sorague (51. 

Texas 880 no 

Milwaukee DM sit 23»- 


Cona Mognanle ( 8 |, Meacha m ( 8 ) and 
Mavne; Clemens. K.Rvon (81. Fassas ( 8 ), 
Russell (9) and BerryMIL W — F rasas. 2 -a 
L— Mogntaila l-i Sv— Russell (ijj. 

Ca Hernia 111 0 M OM D — 2 IB | 

Cleveland DM Old ISO 1—3 7 j 

(10 Inal nos] 

Leftwlch. B.F’ottenon (9),Butctier (IB) and 
C. Turner. Fabregas (9j; DaMorflnez. Mesa 
(101 ana JLAkwnar. W— Mesa, S- 2 . u — BJ’at- 
tersan, 1 - 2 . 

Detrall 120 HI Ml — 11 14 • 

Baltimore OH BOO 012-2 7 1 

Belcher, Gardiner (9) and Tettloioa Fta- 
henv 19) ,- Mussina Williamson (7), Poole 171. 

T .Bolton 19) and Tackett. W— Belcher, 34L 
L— Mussina 7-3. HRs — Detroit. Bautista ML 
Baltimore, Huletr (I). 

Chicago 2M Mi MJ — s f 1 

New York 180 020 010—4 7 1 

Alvarez. DiUetmson ( 7 ). cook <81, RJier- 
nandez (»| and Kartovlce, LaVallfere ( 9 ); 
Kev. Wldunon (71. Howe (9) and Stanley, 
w— Cook. 3-0. L— wickmaa 2 - 1 . Sv— RHer- 
I5>- hr— now York. Tartabuil (10). 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Philadelphia 300 BOO lie— < s 1 

CWeooo 188 080 110—2 3 • 

Bosnia Slocumt) ( 81 . Jones (9J and PtoNs 
M orotai. Paulina (7). Crlm (9) and wiikkw. 
W— Boskie, 3-2. L — Maroon. 0-7. Sv— Jones 
( t?i. HRs— Philadelphia incaviaiio uo>. chi- 
caga Sandberg 15). 

PIHstHirgh 188 « 880—4 5 1 

San Diego om 112 0i»-4 11 1 

Ueber. RManranlllo (6). Dewey (6). Bat- 
lard (Hi. Ml evil (8) and Parrish.- S .Sanders. 
P.A. Martinez (5). Elliott (71. Hoffman (91 and 

B Johnson end Ausmus (8) . W—PAMort Inez. 
M. L— Ueber, l-l Sv Hoffman (8). 
HR — T.Gnrvnn (6). 

Florida 000 CM MS— 3 f ■ 

110 OM MO-2 9 0 

Wear hprv Non (7> and Santiago; Revnokta 
TaJones (71, Edens (9i and Servafs. Eusebio 
W — Weoltiers, 6-3. L— Reynolds. 3-2. 
Sv— Nen (3J. 

Colorado IBS 201 088-4 12 • 

New York 118 1M MO-3 18 8 

Harkev. Bahenfleid (5). MJMunaz (61. 
S.Reed (li, B.Ruffin (9) andGIrardl; P^mlth, 
MMMUux (7) and Himfley. W— B otfe nt leia 
** L— pjmirh, M. Sv— B-Ruffln (6). 
HR— New York. Ry.Thampson (ID. 

Meehtal 008 K3 BS2-.1l is j 

Onclrtnafl 2M 821 084— » M 1 

wnlta Homes (5), Scott m, Rolen (8). 


PJJMartlnez (») and D. Fletcher and Sue hr 
<81; Jarvis. Fartugno (6). JRuHIn (6). Cor- 
raw> (8). JAronflev (81, Schourek (9>. Han- 
son (9) and Dorset! and Taubensae (9). 
W— Scott. 3-1 L— Carrasco, 3-2 Sv— PjJWar- 
thka (1). HR— Cincinnati, T.Femandez 16); 
Atonlreal Ju.Beii m. l_ Walker (71. 

St Louis NO 100 mo— a a 1 

Los Angeles 111 220 Mx— 7 14 • 

Tewksbury. Urbonl (S), Evenoard (7), Ho- 
hvon (8) and Pognozzl; Rjviartlnez and Piaz- 
za W— RMarHnez. 4-2 L — Tewksbury, B-a 
HRs Los Angeles, Wallacti (12). Karras (7). 
Attain 808 180 880-1 4 2 

San Fraedsco Me mo mo—# « • 

GJWoddux. McMIctnel (9) and J-Lspez; 
Torres. Gomez (7), MJocksan (8). Beck (91 

and je. Reed. w—GJMaddux, 9-2 L-Torras. 2- 
2 sv— McMlchatl (li). 

The Michael Jonfan Watch 

^ WEDNESDAYS GAME: Jordan went o- 
Ion* ground im out three limes ana striking 
oul once In a M lass to Itw Memphis Chldu. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan Is batting .198 
(36-for-lBI) with 28 singles ana seven doubles. 
Hs has dri ven In 21 runs, stolen 14 bases In 71 
attempts and strut* out ss times. He has 
walked M times and scored 12 runs. 

Japanese Leagues 


Romania 2 Slovenia D 
The Netherlands 7. Hungary 1 
Germceiy 5, Austria 1 
Spohl i Finland 1 


basketball 


Yomhirl 

ChunlchJ 

Yokohama 

Yakult 

Hanstkln 

Hiroshima 


Central League 
w L T 

27 16 0 

27 20 0 

22 21 0 
22 23 0 

20 24 0 

16 25 0 

TborsdaVs Resorts 
Yokohama & Yakult 4 
Hiroshima 1 Harabln 2 

Pacific League 
W L T 

SeKXI 28 16 0 

DOW 2B 16 0 

Orl* 22 21 0 

Lotte 19 24 0 

Kintetsu 17 25 1 

Nloaan Ham 17 29 1 

Tike-Mar's Results 
Sdbu 5» Kintetsu 4 
Orix 6, Nippon Ham 3 


Pet. 

-420 

534 

512 

489 

■455 

■390 


PCI 

53k 

528 

512 

442 

407 

-372 


Wednesday’s NBA Result 

EASTERN CONFERENCE FINAL 
Indiana it 19 a 3S— 93 

Mew Yort 38 IS 77 16— M 

, ^ 1*8000 leads series 34 

lodhino: D.Dnvh 3-8 0 -* a AAcKey HOO^ia, 
^ltsW0^LMNIor]4-26W39.Wortanan*^ 
4-4 12. Fleming 3-60-16, A-Davks4-9 4-8 12, Scott 
K -W' ,Unm # 1-d M 2, Conner 0-00-0 0, 
Mitchell (HI DO a Thompson 04 BOIL Tola Is 37^ 
7B 13-26 91 

New York: Oakley 3-96-6 12. Smith 6-10 4-4 
16. Ewtne 10-156929, Harper 2-7561 A Slacks 
5.16 24 16, Mason A3 M 1. Anthony A1 04 Ol 
H. D avis 0-1 040, Kwmiams 1-1442. Totols27- 
63 26-30 86, 

MHdnf Pools— Indiana 6-14 (Miller 6-11, 
Fleming 0-1, Workman 0-21, New York 6-16 
r Starks 4* Ewing T-l. Harper 1-&AnfrKx>v M. 
h. Davis mi. Pouted oal— Smits. Rebound. 
*— Indiana 58 ID. Davis 12J. New York 36 
IDakiey 13). Assists— Indiana 20 (Miller 6), 
New York 25 (Starks 8). Total fouto-lndlana 
26, New York 24. Technicals— New York Ille- 
gal defense, Mason, Harper, E w i ng. Work- 
man. Indiana coach Brown. 


4V, 

5 


7*1 

ID 


5Vj 

BW 

10 

12 


Tour of Italy 






a Irish' 


. WWM cop ExbMtioa Matches: 

Canada 1, Monica 1 

World Cop Mann Up Mo ta i ei : 

Mnmeiu n • 


Thoradors 128. stage. 204 kBo- 
*^rs ^2A4 m Hes) from Bfldoae. Italy to 
i. Andrea Ferrlgato. Italy, 
ZSMoMU Selle Italia 4 hours, 47 minutes, 4 
weonds; 2 , FcMo Bataonv Italy, mg MaalMcJc 
Techne gym, some time; 3 . PlortwMlng Abdou 

htad. 4, Dmitri Konvchev. Russia jolty com- 
PBnlbllL si.; S, Sletano 2onM, Italy, Novleen 
Bkw Storm, str 6, Fabio BardonoiL Italy, Bras- 
aotat Refin Ceramic, si; 7. Jens Keppner, Ger- 
many. Tetekwn. sjj & Gtannd Buona. Italy. 

Team Pom. S.L. 9. Mfcheie Btatoi), rtaiv, Merao- 

toneUno MedeahlnL sU 10, Francesca Ciao- 
■randtltafy. Mercwone Ung Medeghlrti. u 
Overall Standings: 1, Eugeni Berzin, Rus- 
s la. Gew iss Ballon. 46 hours, 25 minutes 42 
seconds; z Arnamd De Las Cuevas. France, 
Castarama 2:16 behind.- a Bugno, 7 :Bt < 
DUgimi indurairL Spain. Banesta. 3:39; 5 . Mar- 





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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Dangers Anti- Smokers 


By Russeli Baker 


N EW YORK — In ihe firsi 
place everybody has aJwgvs 


IN place everybody has always 
known that smoking is unhealthy 
and addictive. I already knew iv 
could kill you when I look my first 
drag under the bandstand at a Sun- 
day-school picnic in or about the 
year 1933. 

Even then ihe lethal danger was 
so widely known that American 
youth in Lhe8-to- IQ-ycar-old bloc I 
inhabited referred to cigarettes as 
“coffin nails .'* 

It was widely stated and general- 
ly believed that cigarettes would 
kill you and also “sLunl your 
growth” once you were "hooked” 
on them. 

For the young, who know they 
can never die. death was not worri- 
some. Stunted growth, however, 
was a grave threat to boys yearning 

to be 6 feel tall, an awesome height 
in that era before athletes went gar- 
gantuan. Those kids knew ciga- 
rettes could “hook" them on a 
stunting habit. 

"Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That 
Cigarette)," a popular music hit of 
1945, celebrated both the deadli- 
ness of the habit — "until you 
smoke yourself to death.” the song 
commanded — and its addictive 
nature. In one verse, having 
smoked himself to death, the candi- 
date for Heaven tells Sl Peter to 
wait because he simply has to have 
another cigarette. 

□ 


rally slan by being admirable, pro- 
ceed to being foolish and end by 
being dangerous. The crusade 
against smoking is now clearly well 
into the second stage where foolish- 
ness abounds. 

There is now talk in Washington 
about a smoke-free America with 
new laws enforcing prohibitions to 
save the country from smoke's 
deadly reach. Doubtless there are 
smoke-haters eager to hear steel 
doors clang on incorrigible smok- 
ers. for this is a real crusade, make 
no mistake, and the true crusader 
doesn't stop at burning the village, 
killing the women and children and 
making off with the cattle if that’s 
what it takes to purify the world. 

□ 




By Mike Zwerin 

Iniernational HeroU Tribune 


P ARIS — The judges were following 
complicated written scores during ihe 


1 recite this tedious history be- 
cause, tedious though ii be 16 you 
and me. it is apparently unknown 
to the parties engaged in the farci- 
cal doings between Congress and 
the cigarette industry. 

Astonishing though it seems, a 
congressional committee is in such 
doubt about tobacco's addictive 
properties that it recently had to- 
bacco executives in for a grilling. 
Equally amazing, the grilled wit- 
nesses insisted their goods were not 
addictive. 

We keep hearing that the nation 
mil die of a profound ignorance of 
history, but I hadn't believed it 
until confronted by this asinine 
spectacle of statesmen and corpo- 
rate giants disputing something ev- 
ery 10-year-old once knew with cer- 
tainty and was celebrated 50 years 
ago in every juke box in America. 

What we have here is a crusade 
in its second phase. Crusades typi- 


The crusade against drugs has 
already filled prison cells with 
harmless people serving ridiculous- 
ly long mandatory sentences at im- 
mense expense io the public. A 
smoke-prohibition crusade would 
push us into realms of public-poli- 
cy silliness even more absurd. 

What accounts for the present 
zealotry of the ami-smoke crusade, 
which began for such good pur- 
pose? Part of it may be explained 
by the natural urge of Ihe high- 
minded to rescue the rest of suffer- 
ing and ignorant humanity from 
ignorance, squalor, godlessness 
and evil habits. 

Automobiles, guns, food of al- 
most every variety — all are killing 
us. just as surely as cigarettes, but 
for every crusader against each 
there is a'stalwart defender to mod- 
erate the attack. 

Some businesses are refusing to 
hire workers who smoke outside 
the workplace, on grounds that 
smokers' health problems are bad 
for their employers. 

This is an illustration of a crusade 
entering its dangerous stage. Give 
employers the right to control the 
habits of their workers outside the 
workplace, and you set the stage for 
a tyranny even worse than the evils 
of too much government which keep 
conservatives so alarmed. 

It would be proper for conserva- 
tives to get concerned about the 
anti-smoking crusade. What it at- 
tacks, after alL is precisely what 
conservatives ought to care about: 
the right of those who are disap- 
proved of by the high-minded to be 
left alone. 


Vm’ York Times Service 


L complicated written scores during the 
Thelonious Monk Piano Competition last 
year. Judge Herbie Hancock turned to 
judge Dave Bin beck, palms up, and asked: 
“Where are we?" 

Brubeck pointed to a measure on the 
page and replied with scholarly assurance: 
"Right hert" 

"Herbie just lost his concentration for a 
second.” Brubeck explained to the Bill- 
board critic Jeff Levenson: “Thai's ail it 
takes.” 

You get the impression that Dave Bra- 
beck rarely loses his concentration. Or his 
energy. It is hard to imagine him just staring 
into space. At the age of 73. he is busier 
than ever, says he plays the piano better 
than ever, and his memory is sharp. 1 asked 
him when he had been on’lhe cover of Time 
magazine and he replied without hesitation: 
“Nineieen-fifty-four. November.” To be 

sure, appearing on the cover of Time is an 
unforgettable date. StilL you can be sure he 
always knows what measure he's in. 

Last week he performed at the Theatre 
des Champs- Elyses with his current quar- 
tet: Bill Smith, clarinet, and Jack Six and 
Randy Jones, bass and drums. Along with 
the Modern Jazz Quartet, these Iout gen- 
tlemen play the son of finessed, respect- 
able. well-aged chamber jazz that Brubeck 
and John Lewis had key roles in develop- 
ing and that launched jazz out of beery 
saloons and into prestigious, smoke-free 
university concert halls. 

A second generation is taking over the 
family business. Dave recently recorded 
with sons Dan, drums, and Chris on fret- 
less electric bass. Sons Matthew, cello, and 
Darius, keyboards, were unable to join 
them. Brubeck is finishing the score of 
“Jazzanians,'’ a classical piece inspired by 
the music he heard by South .African 
musicians from the University of Natal 
conducted by Darius. 

Darius Brubeck taught a multiracial 
class in improvised music at the University 
of Natal during the 1980s. It was not PC to 
be in that country Lfaen. but his South 
African wife’s mother was ill and needed 
care. It was a family matter, he had no 
choice, he bad to make a living, he did 
what he could. It was a triumph of human- 
ity over race and politics. 

The French composer Darius Milhaud 
was Dave Brabeck's composition teacher 
in California. Milhaud, whose “Creation 
of the World” was one of the first jazz- 


classical mixtures, told his students they 
could orchestrate their fugues for jazz in- 
sunmemation if they wanted. {Brabeck’s 
first band, an octal, was born that day in 
1946 in that class.) If you want to express 
America you must have some jazz in your 
compositions, the master said. Never give 
up jazz, you have so much freedom. 

"It was so wonderful having one of the 
greatest composers alive telling me not to 
give up jazz." Brubeck says, wearing his 
iradernark-For-aU -occasions smile, which 
sometimes seems painted on. In those days 
you were not allowed to practice jazz in 
conservator) practice rooms: “Thank God 
for Darius Milha ud. He saved me. 1 named 
my son after him. It's as simple as that.” 

Actually nothing is that simple with 
Dave Brubeck. He composed music before 
having learned to read il Although his 
linking of jazz with classical structures and 
odd iime signatures was described by 
many as “unswtngmg," both grew com- 
mon after and to a large degree because of 
him. There is something pedantic about 
him that both informs and depletes his 
music. “My whole life has been like final 
exam week,” he says. “A deadline a day 
for years.” He made the landmark album 
“Jazz Goes to College.” 

His best-known album, “Time Oul” 
still sells 60.000 units a year 35 years after 
its original release, and you stili hear the 
Dave Brubeck Quartet’s versioo of his 
ahoman-sidekick Paul Desmond’s 5/4 
classic “Take Five" in airports, behind 
television commercials and in the Paris 
Metro. Brabeck’s songs “In Your Own 
Sweet Way" and “The Duke" nave be- 
come jazz standards. He plays close to 100 
concerts a year, be records often and when 
he's not playing music he writes il 

Earlier this year in Seattle. Russell 
Glcyd conducted "Earth Is Our Mother.” 
Brabeck's choral setting based on the 
speeches of the native American Chief 
Seattle ( the city was named after him ). His 
work for chorus and orchestra. “The Light 
in the Wilderness.” is being reissued on 
CD. Tne Montreal Ja zz Festival Orchestra 
performed his composition "New Wine” 
to celebrate his 70th birthday, and the 
London Symphony is planning to honor 
his 50th year as a professional musician 
with a program featuring his four sons, his 
current quartet and Stephane Grappelli. 

In 1955, the cinematographer Gjon Milt 
was figuring out camera angles for the 
documentary he was making about the 
quartet. They were in a recording studio. 
Mili described the son of music he wanted 



PEOPLE 


Jadde’sWUlPute - 

Wraps on Her Papers 
jaeqadme Kennedy -Omsk Jtft 
the bulk of her estate to her dakinen. 
join Kenedy Jn and Canfioe 
Ketmedy'Sddossbeifc. and tognard' 
he* orivaej ewn^ after deaths in- 
gmicted - lit 0 * 1 ■lO.'kflBp'h® jssowd 
papas &isn evier. becoiijfflg-pti&fiii. 
She named her -hmgtnne compan- 

rcSn as . 

gs Tpiw was not dbdoMd,- Sw new’ 
reports havepul il aiSl.Q0"JffinkJo.To 
$200 million. Her sister. 
RadzmS, “for wfcaa'I fcaw^re# 
affection,” was not provided foe be- 
cause, the will said, *2 tove aln&fy 

done so during .S£ttin»T.OnSs- . 
as left $250/100 lo/Naacy Teeter- 
no, her longtime spokeswoman, 
and made many bequests io charity. 
She died May I9aLtbeage o£6£ef 
lyjnpbatfc cancer. . 

- ;p i:-i, fY/- 

Brigitte Bardot says sbe*5 leaving 
Saint-Tropez because aTa turners* ' 
convention bang bdd than this ' 
weekend. Bardot .France’s Jeadirig 
animal-rights activist sad, “In ihe 

face of such a provocation, after 
living for 36 jots m Sain^Trcpez,! 
have no other choice but to leave.'' .* 

_ - v • " 


fill 


• 1?- 


I * 
, Ifrfl \ , * 


. i7 * t m‘ 7( 
: , nr .* 1 


Jirii& Roberts, who starts fBunng 
a new version of fheJekyilandTfyde 
story this week, says his pst is ihe' 
movie is the closest she bas-cotne to - 

a d rea m role. Roberts, at Patewood 
Studios in England, where “Mary 


Dave Brubeck. at 73. plays nearly 100 concerts a year and records often. 


to hear by musing: "1 sure would like to 
see Audrey Hepburn come walking 
through the woods.” 

“Gee,” sighed Desmond. “So would I.” 

Desmond was a kind man, a chess play- 
er. a reader and raconteur-around-town 
well known for the beauties his “think 
Yiddish, dress British” image attracted. 
Asked to explain his success with women, 
he said: "These models will go on a fling 
with a jazz musician but then they'll marry 
some businessman in Gstaad. That’s the 
way the world ends, not with a w him but a 
banker.” He was the soul of the quartet. 
They improvised a slow blues for Mili's 
camera. The track was released as “Au- 
drey." Desmond's solo was soulfuL 

Last year. Brubeck agreed to participate 
in a Unicef-sponsored Audrey Hepburn 
memorial tribute in New York but asked, 
“Why me?" He had never met her. Her 
husband told him that she often bummed 


“Audrey” while strolling in tberr garden in 
Switzerland. 

Last year’s European tour was mterupt- 
ed by an unsteady heartbeat. Sold-oul 
concerts were canceled. He has bad triple- 
bypass surgery. The doctor said: “Dave, 
we have to get your heart back in rhythm." 

“In what rhythm?” Brubeck asked, 
“Take Five” in mind. He cannot escape 
‘Take Five.” Not that he wants to, but he 
has played it at least twice a week for more 
than three decades and the only way to 
survive such a prolonged arranged mar- 
riage is with humor. 

“Five,” the doctor deadpanned. 

Brubeck insists be is not making this up: 
“The cardiologist made more tests. He 
couldn't find a way to get my heartbeat 
steady again, but it was O. K. for me to 
play. He turned to me with a straight face 
and said. ‘Dave. I'm afraid you’re going to 
stay permanently arrhythmic.’” 


KEUiy WIU UC MJUL &«UU, 

read a script and warn to <k> it. Si 
started with a stomach acbe and J 
still haveh — it's Eke great monarch 
buttesfljES.” - • 


President Carlos $ft& Menem 
apparently has done a U-turn on 
the director Oliver Stone's “Evita," 
based oh. Andrew Uoyd Webber’s 
musical . on- the fifeof&a Ferfia." 
Argentina’s former first. _la££ ; 
Menem who reportedly last month 
gave Stone permission to film atihe- 
presidential building in Buenos'. 
Aires, said, “That opera is total 
infamy. If fcsstorical truth' is not ' 
respected, the movie has no chance 
of. being filmed in gove rnme nt 
house orin any official bundin g " . 


INXERMIOim 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on 8.9 & 16 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


ACROSS 


Todov Tomorrow 

Htgfi Low W High Law W 
OF OF Or OF 


AJ gum 

23/73 

15/59 

* 

20/79 

19/66 

a 

Aiiatwiiom 

17/K 

B.-40 

■h 

17*62 

10/50 

»h 

Ankn 

asco 

7/44 

0 

20/92 

1355 

a 

AOwm 

31/80 

I9M 

5 

32 <89 

2170 

9 

&oraton» 

26175 

17162 

a 

27 m 

1BJW 

a 

Botgradi- 

33/91 

1>«2 

» 

31.88 

16.81 

pc 

Bertn 

21,70 

12/53 

pe 

10*64 

6/43 

■h 

Snsseta 

10*J 

10.50 

m 

1661 

6.43 

c 

Budopea 

31 W 

17/82 


28.82 

16.5? 

» 

Ccp/i/ufpn 

19.50 

l.’ra 

oft 

18.84 

7-44 

ah 

CnaMSol 

27/80 

19*06 

% 

29.81 

22/71 

s 

Di*fa 

13/55 

7/44 

1 

13/55 

7/44 

ah 

BwU/igli 

13/55 

10/50 

r 

1355 

8.46 

*h 

Rwwica 

31/88 

1661 

% 

25/84 

13.55 

PC 

RmMui 

19/W 

10.50 

PC 

18/S* 

9/49 

th 

Grvn 

3/71 

12/53 

pc 

21/70 

11.52 

pc 

Hrtw*a 

17/62 

13/55 

* 

18IR4 

1253 

ah 

laurtxn 

ae.iK 

16/61 

» 

3188 

l?<56 

a 

LosPWnaa 

24/75 

17/62 


24/75 

20.68 


Loton 

21/70 

13/55 

■ 

21/75 

1854 

i 

London 

17/82 

9/46 

■h 

14*7 

7/14 

ah 

Mndnd 

25/77 

1152 


29-V 

1752 

a 

Mtar 

28-8! 

1651 

1 

2780 

13 55 


Mom* 

te/6« 

1050 

pc 2170 

12.53 

\ 

Minth 

23/73 

10/SO 

pc 

20/08 

0/43 

PC 

N« 

26/79 

10/81 

s 

25 T7 

15/59 

1 

CMb 

IB/64 

1Z« 

1 

20*08 

9U8 

it. 

Pot™ 

25/77 

19/66 

a 

25/77 

IS5G 

1 

Pwia 

18/64 

10/50 

Bh 

17*62 

9M8 

sh 

Pmgua 

a/71 

11.52 

PC 

19/66 

8 43 

DC 

H^igav* 

10/50 

7/44 

■m 

1253 

4/33 

9h 

Rn/ne 

si m 

18«4 

PC 

20.82 

10/61 

9 

a Pmnbwg 19/60 

13/35 

* 

2170 

11/52 

ih 



Tod ay 
High Law 
OF OF 


W High Low W 
C/F OF 


1 Spring weather 
forecast 


BengfcoL 

HmgKong 


32*9 24/75 
31.88 15*9 
29*4 26/79 
3301 15 '77 
43/105 29/A1 
29/8* ie»1 
30.-WI 19«6 
32/09 27*71 
02 /W 1966 
M75 16*1 


Vi n-51 20/ 79 pa 

* 29 0J IB. 64 pc 

I 29/01 29/79 pc 
1 33 HI 2475 pc 

i 4J.M07 30 *5 K 
% 20/92 16 51 pc 
» 25 84 22*71 f* 
pc 32 W> cc 

» 31 86 3373 pc 

* 2679 16 64 pc 


My man, 


UnawnorubV 

Cola 


[ Unseasonably 
Hoi 


North America 

Tho nonheas:p<n U.S from 
Washbigion. D C-. I" Bosion 
will have sunny, pleasant 
weatner Jus weehend. Mon- 


day will be sunny and 
warmer The Hirfr Plains and 
southeastern Rockier, will 


southeastern Rockies will 
have ho: weather lh« week- 
end. A few thunderstorms 
wfl break out from Nebraska 
\o Kansas. 


Europe 

Damp, chilly weather will 
prevail from Scotland to 
northern Sweden this week- 
end. Soaking rati wfB devel- 
op late this weekend Irom 
Stockholm io Helsinki Parts 
through Geneva win have 
showers Salunlay. Sunday 
and Monday wfli bo dry and 
cooL Hoi weather wil devel- 
op over Spam by Monday 


Asia 

Bailing iq Shanghai will be 


mainly dry and warm Satur- 
day Into Monday Thunder- 
storms will occur along ihe 
condor litvn nonhem Mvan- 
mar through south-central 
China. Hong Kong to Tape) 
wil have very warm weather 
with scattered downpours 
Tokyo will be warm with 
showers by Monday 


Alg.,n 

C-wTpwn 

C.watUnea 

Harare 

L»M3 

Uawtitt 

Tuna 


20*8 e M C 26 « 1 

9 -46 m Id 61 S 41 pc 

14.5“ 1 J5 7T 15 66 pc 

9r*8 pc 34.75 11-52 PC 

J4;7S sh M'66 J4.75 pc 

n V * 5371 !3 55 pc 

13*6 pc MV! O'* * 


5 Grey and others 
io Docs 

13 Persona/ prefix 

14 “Simon 

5 see an eg ra." 
e 9 

15 Defense 
mechanism 

isTtamp 

17 Motherly type 

iBSeep 


ie Plan; holder 

21 Quickened 
pace 

23 Coin on the 
Spanish Main 

24 Can 

25 1995. 2005 and 
2003. in China 

so Vowel sounds 
in ‘melee* 

31 Wheel pan 

32 Cry out 

34 Released felon 

35 Spcon 


Solution to Puzzle of June 2 


North America 


Middle East 


StocMnhn 

Suuboug 

TaBnn 

Vw*» 

Vlma 

n™» 

Zurich 


14/57 9/48 r 18/61 8.’*5 c 
22/71 It/52 pc 19« 6 ’43 pc 
10*4 13/55 i h 18/6* 12/53 ah 
2 1Q'B4 9 28/52 16*1 }C 

24/15 U"5T pc Z3/T3 U.5J » 
2*n? 12153 i 25/77 iorW pc 
23/73 l I.Sf PC 21/70 7/44 pp 


Latin America 


Anchvntp 

AUartfl 

BjOem 

Oacugo 

DHIWr 

OflTiW 


Low W Mgh Low W 


afi/79 1B«4 a Mta 19/68 ■ 
32/89 15/M l 32 JOB 18*4 • 


Oceania 

Auckland ISM 573T ■ tS/59 8/46 pc 

Sy*wy 19«6 12.53 pc 19-66 1253 pc 


28 /EC 10/50 a 29/84 11/52 ■ 
28/82 14/57 a 29/84 16*81 « 


34/93 16/61 a 36/97 16/81 s 
43/109 24 75 s 42/10722/71 a 


Tod^r Tomorrow 

Wgh Low W Wgh Low W 
C/F CIF OF OF 

BwiwArw 14/57 3«*t p: 17/82 11/52 pe 

Cwwaa 31/88 21/70 pc 32/89 21/70 a 

Iona 20/88 17«2 i 1BA6 18/61 pc 

WoWop Oly 27/80 1355 pe 28/79 12<63 pc 

RadcJanno 25/77 19/68 pc 25/77 1B/B4 pc 

Serttav] >8^4 5/41 a ia/p4 V** pc 


Houaon 
Loa Angelas 
M*t» 

VknraaS 
Hassau 
Hew 'VoV 


Legana: s-simy. pc-pwtty douty. c-ckwdy. sh-stvws. Hhunaeratmns. t*an. st-snaw IVxrfes. 
sn-sr/ow, Wee, W-Waather. Al nwp*. forecam and d«a provfctod by Accu-WaMher. hie. 0 1894 


SanFiwi 

SeafUe 

ToreKlo 

Vlaowrfm 


14/S7 e/48 C 

31/88 19/B6 pc 
25/77 1.1. » a 
22/71 10-50 a 
28/92 14 «7 pe 
23/73 li.ST * 
30.TO JSr\ C 
3ii«8 2J/7I I 
28/62 17« pc 
32/89 24 .73 l 
26/79 16/99 ■ 
ISM 0/48 pc 
31/88 23.73 PC 
23/73 13-55 » 
42/I07 2S/77 a 
avsa 1203 a 
21/70 11 02 c 
21.70 S/48 s 

26/79 14. -57 a 


15/61 7.144 pc 

28/H3 I5H pc 

23 -3 13 *5i pc 
27.90 14 57 » 
32.69 13 56 » 

24 75 13 25 J 
33 /86 21 70 pc 
12/83 21/70 pc 
I8-'82 IS 'S3 pc 
32® 24.75 pc 
28-82 17.62 pe 
21/70 10-50 pe 
31.88 23 73 pe 
<4/75 14,97 s 

41/106 24.75 a 
21/70 12 53 pc 
19/55 I1/S2 c 
24/75 11/52 s 
27.813 10/61 a 


0BQQ00 ^CDHOIHtaaH 
HtatUHiinG QDBEnaaa 
ODI3QDI10 noaaana 
ansao • aancaa □□□ 

nBD B'BB DBH ,H0Ha 
□nu'iSHiiiiici ’ aisaaa 
HHBEinQa-.QainaizKg 
•oiiin □□□ 
□BHEitDB aaaaBaa 
DOHiua aaaaa aaa 

□QQQ QD0QQ 33(33 

□eq EEQEQ'aaaaa 
□□□□□□a aaaaaaa 

□□□□□HQ QEJ£DBI3I3E3 
QQ0D000 EEQ3EU 


38 high-mmded 

37 Adolescent 

38 Multitude 
» Dresden s 

location 

40 1996. 2001 and 
2002. m China 

43 Road to .Roma 

44 Lee or Teasaale 

45 Elastic cord 
« Used a pony 

52 Pamers 
equipment 

53 Its capital is 
Kinshasa 

56 Western necktie 

57 Fighter of 
1899-1902 

58 Dreaded 
computer word 

SB Nation on the 
Strait cf Hormus 
go Remnant 

61 Siumgullion 
and pepper pot 

62 Decimal system 


DOWN 

1 Spray 

2 Lay off 

3 Important person 


4 1 994. 2000 and 
1938, in China 
5 They have 
many signs 
• ‘Rocky* villain 
Creed 

7 Bottom line 

8 Before, before 

9 Unbecoming wit 

10 Debatable 

1 1 Stun 

12 Road ending 
15 2004. 1997 and 

1999. in China 
20 Encored, in a 
way 

22“ du lieber!' 

2« Blackout 
*s Onetime 
Chinese rebel 

2« year 

(annually) 

27 Haunted house 
sound 

28 Saarinen 
namesakes 

29 Nonelectric 
shaver 

30 Court call 
33 Layer 

SsSeckel or Anjou 
38 Auslronesian 
language 


30 Blessed events? 45 Actress Daniefs SO Panache 
38 Philanthropists ofThesiients - siGrandees 

41 GeneviSve. ' 54 High school 

e.g.: Abbr. 47 Shortfall cPa^s 

42 Place In trust 40 Endured 69 Sharp feeling 


D-Duy 

V- 

XT'* . ? /" 

I* itli t 



Pvzzla by Honan S.Wtnr 


O New York Times Edited by Will Shortz. 


Travel io a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


XKT Access Numbers 

How to call around the workL 

I . L'sing the chart below, find the country you are calling from. 

- Dia l the corrcjpondingAEiJ Access Number. 

To receive yotirfree^ wallet card of ABETS Access Numbers, iustdial the access number oT 
the country you're riarxl ask for Customer Service. 


Australia 

China, PHC*44 

Guam 
Hong Koqg 

India* 

Indonesian 

Japan - 

Korea 

KoreaAA 

Malaysia* 

\i-u- Zealand 
Phnippines* 

Saipan* 

Singapore 

Sri Lanka 

Taiwan* 

ThjiLind* 


COUNTRY ACO 

Brazil 

run* 

Cohiruhia 

Costa Rica’a ~ 

Ecuador* 

El Salvador 1 * 
Cuatemala* 

Guyana** * 

Honduras 

MeadcoAAA q 

Nicaragna pMana gua) 

Panamao 

Peru* 

Surinam*- 

Uruguay 

Venezueti*a 


@ »sr a****** | Imagine a world where you can cal] country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
- re3L ^ ^ C ^ reC ^' r ^ rom 0ver ^ countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 

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yourvoice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible xx-ith ARSC 1 

' 4 To ^ ^ ese serviccs ’ the Access Number of the counuy you ’re in and you'll get all the 

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convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


AT&T 


j re* uui uiLaccefs numoeror 

tnecDuniry >Wre in and ask for Customer Service. 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS 

ASIA IgjT 172-1011 BrazQ 

Australia 1-800«81-01I Uechtenstein* 155^)0-11 Fhr L, ' 

108U LEhururto, 3^ 196 5 BbS 9 

G — Lmembourg C^80(MllU C^taRica’a 

809-1111 Macedonia, F .YJg. of 99^0(M2WI E^dnr- 

^ a> - 00^117 Mata- 0&00-890-110 H Salvador** 

^2^1 * »-«»-* ? i9^oon 

W &m Nyhotond?- 06-022 -9111 G uyana*** 

800-190-31 Honduras 

TrZT* — PotaPd**- 0^0 10-480- 01 11 

^ 8000011 Portugal* 05017-1 -288 wSjSoto iS r" 

01-S0fM288 Poramaa 

PhUippines^ 105-11 ggsla-tMoscow) 

^ ^L. 564^0101 

sms ^-JlZ ZZZgg^ocun 

- n tonka 43 lM 3 0 Sweden* KMt.'Ttwjii i v — 

Taiwan' 0080-102884 Switzerland* ■ -g ” 30 ^ 

m w-llii uH -^O^i CARIBBEAN 

h® 6 pe 5^? 

Xrmenia^ - Baltin KuDDLEEAST - ~ 

Austria— 022-90^011 ^ 

Mgtaa- 0800*100-10 ^yn^lsnds ^ 

oo^oolo 5S5 -vdSZZ* ^ 

c^da— - 99W0li — ^ 22i32 

ggchRep^ 0(^42000101 ^banon (Beirut) sSr7=a — 

tx™***? 8001-0010 Qatar WYUni - gPj ^ 

9800-100-10 Saudi , 1^5 

Pranoe 194-0011 Turkey* ~ 0 0-800-177 ^ E AFRICA. 

<*rmaoy 01304)010 UAL* fimTJT ^^ r(Calro ^_ 

5/=^: ASfflMCAS 

2^2^: 001^5^7777 

Iccbnd'w 599-001 Belize* ^ 7 T?' . — . 

5^ g^IZ ZI 555 

^ c r^n^:^'r R “ TUS ^ 

W USADWn- vn»c » Ji JIUI4- jD 0^., ^ Ihu^i jhoi* ftom ^ Jnsto 


Armenia ** 

Austria**** 

Bdgbun* 

Bulgaria 

Croatia'* 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

FlnLunk ~ 

Prance 

Germany' 

Greece* 

Hungary* 

Icebnd'w 

Ireland 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
ltaJ y* 172-iofi 

Uc rhrens teta * 155-00-11 

Lfthoania* sXl96 

Luxembourg Cl80(Ki1U 

Macedonia. F.YA of 99-800-4288 

OSOQ-890-110 

Monaco ' 194-0011 

Netberionds* 06-022-9111 

Norwa y 800-190-11 

Poland- * *■ 04010-480-0111 

Pomr 8 a ^‘ 05017-1-288 

Ro m a n ia 01-8004288 

gt»8ia*tMoecow) 155-5 Oi2 

Slov *fc* a 00-420-00101 

s P ain * 900^39-00-11 

020-795-6 11 

Switzerland* 1SS4K1-11 

^ OSW^OQU 

UkraiQe, _ 84100-1 1 

MIDDLE EAST 

_ 900-00 1 

090-90010 

177-100-2727 

800-288 

Sfcfr”*) 426-801 

0800-01 1-77 

2 1-800-lQ 

00*800-12277 

800-121 

AMERICAS ~~ 

001-80Q-200-lin 



O-fiOO-1112 


Bahrain 

Cyprus* 

Israel ~ 

Kuwait 

Lebanon (Beirut) 

Qatar 

Saudi Arabia 
Turkey* 

UAL* 


Argentina* 

Belize* 

Bolivia* 


ACCESS NUMBER 

000-8010 

004-0312 

980-11-0010 

114 

_tl9 

190 

_190 

165 

123 

95-800-462-4240 

ag«0 • 174 

109 


191 

156 

00-0410 

80-011-13) 


Bahamas 
Bermuda* 
British V.i. 
Cayman Islands 
Grenada* 

Haiti* 

Jamaica** 
NeflLAntfl 
St Mns'NevIs 


Egypt* (Cairo) 

Gabon* 

Gambia* 

Kenya* 

Liberia 
South Africa 


CARIBBEAN 

1-800-872-2881 

1-800372-2381 

l^XHT2-268l 
nds 1 -GOO-3*’ 2-283T 
1-9X1-872-2881 
OL 1 1 -800-97 2-2883 
0-800-872-2881 
001-800-872-2881 
is "T-80WT2-2SI81 
~ AFRICA 









510-0200 

OOa-OOI 

D01U 

0800-10 

797-797 

0 - 800 - 99-0123 




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W UMDHn* vnve. JVJU4- jD Ihuti^^ 


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