Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats



-■■■■.^^^ f 
- -. :- v “-^ 

■ - *■ !•••{, • - 1 : 

■ • *y *■■*%*+■ 

. ■ -A.:^ 

',-^Sr^S 

.-.: /-- ^Dlof 


! --:'r.'‘-f.^i^ 

- -^>^ 2 .-. 

. ;.- r-- ii.;.;>4Js 

• :• • 'f ,Q 5ibt 

- ■ .Uzi c^j 3ad 

; ' . -* 

r ":- ^ I 

.._ . . - '.. *&«* 

- - " .7: Ili -' in. 

! 

' • • • -;C !°PP*d ) 

---- :r Ft - rivals t 

‘ ’ -•-v.?l?. l,e *ai ! 

• •••• .. ^ dan. 

■*-■ -.-n I 

■■-• i-..c :: Kt 3 [5 

• ■ ’T 'r “ ehi: i^ai 

.. ' ■^‘f.^rpo* J 

• 1 

• K <ni£a i 


/ yh-\ 

-■ ,« & 
■ "-is cit 

'•: if ta 


4 Co acerb 


-..33 

,p p j:v . . ^ 


» , fc .. , j C- 


UMllOVU 

AssIHKB 


-,.. 06 ® 




. - ■ r v,<£: 






Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 







PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris. Monday, June 6, 1994 


Homage to a ‘ Magnificent Endeavor 9 

Heads of State 

Pay Tribute to S 

D-Day Heroes t sAJL 


By R_ W. Apple Jr. 

. _ Ne " r«* Tima Service 

JSSJKD M -S- PWDH OF PORTS 
English Channel — In com- 
pany with ships of many nations, the Ameri- 
Geo, S e Washington, with 
nresdem Bill Clinton and his entourage 
aboard, steamed Sunday night toward Nor- 
mandy and a rendezvous with memories of a 
oughty victory. 

n , "?* Chnton and other leaders of the 
World War II allies, a Sunday as mild and 
sunny as Saturday was dank and rainy passed 
m a swirl of color and high British militar y 
pageantry. Kings, princes, presidents and 
prune ministers from three continents had 
omte together to marie the launching, precise- 
ly half a century ago, of the greatest seaborne 
umjson m history. Operation Overlord. 

That assault, die president said in an anni- 
vwsary message, signaled “the begmninE of 
the aid at the Second World War." 

In a speech to the crew of the George 
Washington, at 97,000 tons the largest war- 
ship afloat, he called D-Day a “magnificent, 
heroic, almo st unbelievable endeavor." 

At a drumhead service Sunday morning on 
Soutbsea Common, a spacious waterside 
green in Portsmouth, England, the colors of 
the 14 nations whose soldiers landed on the 
French beaches were stacked together, tepee- 
fashion, to symbolize unity of purpose. With 
upturned drums forming an altar, the flags 
were b lessed as in days of yore, when such 
cere moni e s were hdd for troops as they went 
into bank. 

The royal family attended the service, in- 
cluding Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, a 
naval officer in World War H, and Diana, 
Princess of Wales — but not her estranged 
..husband, who was in France. 

Still, the focus fefl upon survivors of D- 
Day combat from many countries. Many of 
the British veterans, the biggest contingent, 
wore their medals on business suits or wind- 
breakers. hi their ranks one could pick out 
commandos, in (dive green berets, and para- 
troopers, in red ones. 

There were similar if smaller services in 
ebonies afl around Britain on Sunday, and 
there were also many little persona] acts of 
commemoration, as ibis nation, which feared 
for & lane isihe early 19t0ls that it would be 
overrun by fifties-, gw* thanks* 

WheH-a groop -of Americans finished their 
dinner at the white Horse Inn in CMgrove, 
near Portsmouth, on Saturday mgbt, the pro- 
prietor, Barry Phillips, hauled out a bottle erf 
1944 cognac. 

Fifty years ago, the original fleet set sail in 

a very different world —minesweepers first, 
255 of them; then landing craft carrying 
tanks and jeeps; then 6 batfleshins, 21 cruis- 
ers, 68 destroyers and numberless smaller 
craft, iradudtng PT boats, barges and troop 
transports. 

Together, they formed die most powerful 
armada ever assembled — thousands of 
ships, pointing for a50-nrilc stretch of French 
coastline. 

Emerging from a hundred harbors up and 
down Pn gfrnd, the ships assembled just 
south erf the Isle erf Wight, off Portsmouth, at 
a point the sailors referred to as "Picadflly 
Circus," then buried south across the Chan- 
nel 

Fifty years ago Sunday night. General 
Dwight D. Eisenhower found a way to escape 
what he later called "the interminable wait 
thm always intervenes between the final deci- 
sion of the high command and the e arlies t 
po s yfok detenmnatton of success or failure.'’ 
He went to the encampment of the 101st 
Airborne Division to talk to its men as they 

See LANDINGS, Page 12 




t *.ikS 


— \ ■■■ — : - 


yr .. o'* 








I fmg&3r* 


~ : y 


■ ' A 

4$g — i 


*. ■ i '**' 




>■ 

JF*. a 






Ctc*tt Ptnov 


Huirfreds of vessels, including a helicopter carrier, following in the wake of the royal yacht Britannia on Sunday as it left harbor in Portsmouth, England, botmd for Normandy. 

Who Will Remember in 2044? One Vet’s Hope 


By Wiliam Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

SAINTE-MERE-EGUSE, France — As 
the American veteran PhD Juuas stepped 
forward at the mayor’s office here to receive 
the Legion of Honor, Ins eyes were riveted on 
a U.S. Marine, Sergeant Timothy Broyer. 

Mr. Julias. 78, was being honored with 
France’s highest civilian award for his work 
in sustaining the memory and meaningof the 
D-Day invasiea 50.yeais-ago, laithe could 
riot keep his mind off the future as he stared 
at his grandson. Sergeant Broyer. 

• “In 2044, Ton will be 74, and I kept saving 
to myself that be must serve as the bridge 
between the 5Mb and the 100th anniversary," 
Mr. Jntras said. “When those of us who 


fought the war are uo longer around, how can 
we manage to keep the legacy alive?" 

Ever since he came back here two decades 
ago to many a woman he met during the 
invasion, Mr. Julras has dedicated his life to 
running a museum that extols the wartime 
exploits of the 82d and 201st Airborne Divi- 
sions. Each year, thousands of American vet- 
erans return here to renew their wartime 
camaraderie and savor she warm hospitality 
inspired by this town’s everlasting gratitude. 

“Geopolitics is changing so fast," Mr. Ju- 
tras said. “Just look at tow much competition 
there is now between France and the United 
Stales. There is a nationalist tint to Europe 
that I find disturbing. And it could tear 
asunder the hope for a more unified Europe." 


As Mr. Jutras and other veterans gathered 
for what may be their las; hurrah, they were 
quick to acknowledge that the world is a 
much more confusing place than it was on the 
day the)- set out across the Channel to liber- 
ate France and end the Nazi occupation of 
Europe. 

“The future frightens me, because the 
ideals we fought for seem so murky in the 
modem v-nrld." -raid Steve Epp -. a retired 
textile plant manager front Lancaster. South 
Carolina. He landed here as a 19-year-old 
para troop. 

“Who or what is the enemy now?" be S 3 id. 
“Bosnia? Gadha/i? Iraq? Our purpose and 
cause was so dear when we fought. We knew 
we had to liberate Europe and destroy Hitler. 


Everybody says they believe in liberty and 
democracy, but at what point do you fight for 
them? I suppose if somebody like Hitler came 
along again, a new generation of Americans 
would be willing to fight But wfll the menace 
be so evident?" 

Germany has become a respected democ- 
racy and a faithful member of the Atlantic 
affiance. The threat of a Soviet invasion has 
vanished. And many veterans wonder how 
long a postwar alliance can last in the absence 
of any tangible threat or identifiable enemy. 

Mr. Epps said he and other members of Iris 
parairoop regiment have started teaching 
high school history classes on the war. 

Sergeant Broyer. who was motivated to 

See LEGACY, Page 11 



Do’s and Don’ts 9 and Anchors Aweigh 


Hemingway Covers D-Day 

"if you worn v> know how it was in an 
LCV(P) on D-Day. when we took 
Fox Green beach and Easy Red beach 
on the sixth of June. 1944, then this 
is. as near as / can come to it.” 

So wrote Ernest Hemingway in an 
account for Collier's magazine, 
reprinted in today's Trib. Page 4. 


By Maureen Dowd 

New York Times Service 

PORTSMOUTH, England — President 
Bill Chnion and his top aides have only read 
the history that many here have lived 
through. And as the administration flotilla 
started across the English Channel to recreate 
the invasion of Normandy, there were signs 
everywhere that this is not exactly the Lmdy 
Hop, Spam fritter and “Pennsylvania 6 - 
5000" crowd. 

In a fashion statement that it is hard to 
imagine Brent Scowcroft making, Calvin 
MhdwU 3d, a. National Security Council offi- 
cially on the D-Day memorial tour, wears a 
gold hoop in his left ear. 

At 32, Dee Dee Myers, the White House 
press secretary, is so young that her father 
was a U.S. Navy flier not in World War U. 
but in Vietnam. 


Chad Griffin. 20. a communications offi- 
cial, blazed in neckwear (hat no Republican 
would be caught «earing: a "Save the Chil- 
dren" tie. 

□ 

When the president visited Lbe Cambridge 
American Military Cemetery on Saturday, 
U.S- Embassy officials handed out a replica 

REPORTERS NOTEBOOK 

of a 1942 booklet that was given to American 
servicemen going to England to prepare for 
the invasion. 

Called “Over There," the booklet aimed to 
acquaint soldiers with British ways and warn 
(hem not to help (he Jerries by spreading 
“distrust" between Limeys and Yanks. 

Important Do's and Don'ts included: 

• “Don't make fun of British speech or 


accents." even when “all the a’s in ‘banana’ 
sound like the a in 'faiher.' " 

• “Stop and think before you sound off 
about lukewarm beer or odd boiled pota- 
toes." 

• “If British civilians look dowdy and bad- 
ly dressed, it is not because they do not like 
good clothes or know how to wear them. All 
clothing is rationed.” 

• “Don’t play into Hitler's hand by men- 
tioning war debts" of Britain from World 
War I. 

Perhaps the embassy should have given the 
president a copy. Mr. Clinton broke one of 
the most important rules just before he ar- 
rived here. In a section entitled “Keep Out of 
Arguments, " die U.S. War Department ad- 
vised: “You can rub a Britisher the wrong 

See NOTEBOOK, Page 12 


Kiosk I Reining In North Korea: Ironic Ris 


Delors Speaks Out 
About Neofascists 


uonumssKJB dkwjhu, 

spoke out on Sunday agaiust neofasosts in 
Italy’s new government, saying tte (pen- 
ny had been contaminated by “a hideous 
beast" 

Mr. Delon was responding to remarks 

by the -Italian neofasdst leader, Gianr 
franco Fini, who said the D-Day landings 
marked the loss of Europe’s aihnral iden- 

D ^T read that with rage in my heart," Mr. 
Ddors said after an. Italian pa^er pub- 
lished the interview with Mr. rim. 

Sports 

As their kb* Wu*e4 Arantxa Sdnchez 
Vfcari© 4 Ss«Ei Brag** of 
French Open tanns titles. rage a 


By Daniel Williams 
and R. Jeffrey Smith 

Wlasttngftm Past Service 

WASHINGTON —The Qinton administra- 
tion describes the stakes in its standoff with 
Noth Korea as crucial to regional and global 
peace, yet Washington has stepped gingerly 
around the question erf how far it would go to 
stop development of nuclear weapons by the 
redu&h«CtHniiuiitist regime. 

For now, the United States has settled on 
trying economic sanctions, an effort no one 
expects to stop the unclear program in its 


Tm rwang «wrt«nn< ahn rnns an gQnjc risk; 

Meant to face North Korea to confess to past 
efforts to create a bomb, they may prompt 
Pyongyang to retaliate by formally withdraw- 
ing from the Nuclear Noaprofifcration Treaty, 
the 1970 treaty to limit the spread of nuclear 
weapons. Thai would free North Korean nucle- 
ar "p 1 ”" of even the minrmal constraints 


they have observed for the last two years, and 
possibly help them to build more nuclear de- 
vices than they already may have. 

One American official said that risk was the 
pome reason for not going further now. "We 
are doing all that we reasonably should do to 
not provoke the North Koreans to stop cooper- 
ating on the most important issue," which is 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

ensuring continued inspections to prevent di- 
verting fud to build new bombs, the official 
said. 

"One doesn’t throw the baby out with the 
bath water," he said. 

Beyond sanctions, no one seems clear on 
which direction the policy might go. should 
North Korea resist and simply continue to 
build its weapons. Will Washington simply try 
to waft out North Korea in the expectation that 
Pyongyang will at some point choose to join the 


world rather than board a few atom bombs? 
Encourage the overthrow of North Korean gov- 
ernment? Go to war to destroy the weapons and 
facilities? 

One American official warned that tfiere 
might be no significant progress on the issue 
until North Korea’s octogenarian leader. Kim 
II Sung, dies and is replaced. Bui (here is no 
guarantee his replacement will be more amena- 
ble to American interests. 

In the meantime, administration officials 
say, sanctions are a necessary means of main- 
taining Washington’s credibility and that of the 
International Atomic Energy Agency, which is 
responsible for policing global nuclear arms 
proliferation. North Korea’s defiance must be 
shown to have costs, they say. 

“What is immediately at stake is ihe IAEA 
safeguards regime,” a senior administration of- 
ficial said. ’The regime would be seriously 

See SANCTIONS, Page 6 


Tfrralh «£fi§3e9. Stibu nc Bjj ll 
Invasion On, Allies Land in France 
As Planes and Shijis Blast Coast; 
Montgomery Leads the Advance 

I*. =_~ w. r+e I jrff 1 gST i Urfj 

*SS.'.nd 





/ 


No. 34,607 


Bosnia Talks 
Stillborn as 
Muslims Seek 
Advantage 

UN Plans Final Attempt 
To Get a Cease-Fire as 
Prelude to Settlement 

By Roger Cohen 

.Vw York Tuna Senicf 

GENEVA — The Muslim-led Bosnian gov- 
ernment, rejecting United Nations- sponsored 
cease-fire talks, appeared to be opting on Sun- 
day for a deepening of the Bosnian war. 

After the government delegation boycotted 


would make one last attempt to convene them 
rai Monday. 

Mr. Akashi’s decision followed more fruitless 
efforts to end the Bosnian government’s boy- 
cott, which has been justified by the continuing 
presence of Serbs in (be eastern Muslim enclave 
of Gorazde. but is clearly linked more critically 
to deeper, tactical considerations. 

“We want maximum pressure in the political 
talks on a territorial settlement,'’ said Mu- 
hamed Sadrbey, the chief Bosnian delegate to 
the United Nations and one of a 12-member 
Bosnian delegation staying in lbe Hotel Riche- 
roond. “That is not achieved by a cease-fire 
freezing the Serbian advantage on the ground.” 

The Bosnian Army, strengthened by a new 
alliance with the Croats and by what UN mili- 
tary officials say is an improved flow of weap- 
ons, logistical supplies and ammunition up 
from Ihe Croatian coast, has recently held its 
own against the Serbs and even won some 
minor victories. 

Given this changed military situation, Bos- 
nia’s political leaders have become markedly 
less enthusiastic about stopping what had been 
a one-sided war, with the Serbs bolding 72 
percent of the territory. 

“Hitler also offered a cease-fire while he 
occupied half of Europe," said Ejup Game, the 
vice president of the Mostim-Croatian federa- 
tion. “We don’t want to legalize the Serbian 
position." 

The failure even to begin the cease-fire talks 
represents a considerable setback to the latest 
U.S.-backed diplomatic attempt to end the 26- 
manth-old Bosnian war. This “contact group" 
initiative has brought together the United 
States, Russia and the European Union, whose 
foreign ministers called jointly last month for a 
four-month cease-fire. 

A cease-fire is regarded by the contact group 
as a critical prehide to a political settlement on 
a territorial division of Bosnia. 

Mr. Akashj had believed the cease-fire was 
within reach. This led him to call the Geneva 
talk* and prepare a plan for a cessation of 
hostilities, the positioning of UN troops be- 
tween the rival armies, a withdrawal of heavy 
weapons and an exchange of prisoners. 

But instead, the last four days were spent in a 
costly, unproductive, often grotesque minuet, 
as officials scurried between the Bosnian 
stronghold at the Hotel Richemont!, the large 
Serbian encampment at die Hotel Inter-Conti- 
nental and the gloomy UN European head- 
quarters here, to no visible effect. 

The official differences were over the situa- 
tion in Gorazde. This Muslim enclave came 
under Serbian assault in April and and its 
central area^ was supposed, under the terms of a 
NATO ultimatum, to be dear of Serbian forces 
by April 23. 

But about ISO armed Serbs, variously de- 
scribed over the last six weeks by the United 
Nations as “policemen," “militiamen," “weap- 
ons-canying civilians” and “soldiers,” re- 
mained on the east bank of the Drina River just 
within the 3-kilometer (2-mile) exclusion zone 
set by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

These Serbs finally moved out Saturday, 
prompting Mr. Akasiu to declare that the cease- 
fire talks could begin. 


OMOTMIIW , 

HB&- 8 .KW.* f •% 
MiuOT.-fwn. 

■x 

iws^wV- 


• The concluding article in the Herald Tri- 
bune's series about the future of the relation- 
ship between Europe and the United States 
appears on Page 4. In it. Francis Fukuyama 
of the Rand Corp„ the author of "The End of 
History and the Last Man," writes about 
what remains and what can be sustained of 
the Atlantic community that developed after 
World War a 


• From die New York Herald Tribune, 50 
years ago, the reproduction of another histor- 
ic front page, reporting the D-Day invasion 
only boms after Allied forces stormed ashore 
in Normandy. Page 8 . 


Does Greenspan Have Clinton’s Ear? New Book Says That’s the Case 


Page 1L 
PagelL 


Newsstand Prici : ~ r I 

Andorra ^.9.00 FF UwwnbowB40L.Fr 

Antilles. U-20 FF MBraeBh^.lS m 

SSSeroon-lAWCFA Qatar MM Rtt* 

Egypt E.P. 5000 Rdonlon^.UJOFF 

Friwce .9.00 FF ScaidiAroWa^^ 

GdxS? .9MCFA 

^Swa-l31»0Din 

tSSSn'-tiaUO UAMIUEurmw 


By AanDevroy 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Insistent advice from 
the Federal Reserve Board chairman, Alan 
Graeospan, to.PttsidaH KB Gfinton during the 
presidential transi tion and early in the new 
administration kd Mr. (5nt<mro pursue lower 
deficits at the expense of the economic popu- 

V • _* «• X 


- The bock, 4 Tbe Agenda: Inside the Qinton 
White House," by Bob Woodward, a Washing- 
ton Post assistant managing editor, is an inti- 
mate look at how tbe new Democratic resident 
and 1&- stumbling, fending team of advisers 
struggled to formulate and adopt an economic 


gogram during Mr. Clinton's first year in of- 

It depicts a chaotic poHcy-making operation, 
crucial intercessions by Hillary Rodham Clin- 

WWte Howe moves quickly to reject the 
book’s portrayal of the preshkss. Page 3. 

ton and an active policy role played bv four 
outside political advisers. 

The four were given open access w lbe White 
Hous e, winch they used in pan to criticize the 
economic team. They complained that Mr. 
Clinton's fall in popularity was a result of 


policies being promoted by the economic advis- 


ers — or at least the wav those policies were 
packaged for sale to the public. The two groups 
are described as virtually at war with each 
Other. 

The book describes Clinton temper tan- 
trums, and it depicts him as frequently indeci- 
sive and reluctant to delepte. Ii portrays virtu- 
ally every member of Mr. Qinton 's inner circle, 
including Hillary Clinton, as Critical of the 
president’s management styie. 

On the vital economic front. Mr. Greenspan 
is described as a central player, albeit once 
removed from the inner circle. The book re- 
counts what Mr. Woodward calls a crucial 
meeting between Mr. Clinton and Mr. Green- 
span in Little Rock. Arkansas, in December 


1992, the month before Mr. Clinton's inaugura- 
tion. 

During the two-and-a-half-hour session, the 
Fed c hairman told the president-elect that re- 
ducing the long-term federal budget deficit was 
“essential" and that the economic recovery 
could fall on its face if policies credible to Wall 


Street, particularly to bond traders, were not 
advanced. Mr. Greenspan, in later conversa- 
tions with Treasury Secretary Uoyd Bemsen, 
put a number on what would be credible: cut- 
ting the deficit $140 billion or more by 1997. 

By tradition and law, the Fed is an indepen- 
dent agency —it sets monetary policy while the 
White House and Congress decade how much 
the government will spend, raise in taxes and 
borrow. 


It is customaiy for the president and the Fed 
chairman to hold periodic meetings. Bm in Mr. 
Woodward's recounting of their relationship, 
Mr. Greenspan, a Republican appointed by 
President Ronald Reagan and reappointed by 
President George Bush, comes across as a se- 
nior adviser, almost a teacher to Mr. ainion.In 
what became apatttm, the Fed chairman made 
suggestions, Mr, Qinton acted on them, and 


Mr. Greenspan rewarded the action with ap- 
proving words to Congress, or other public 
comments meant to si gna l his approval. 

Mr. Greenspan outlined to Mr. Qinton an 
economic approach Mr. Woodward calls the 
" fina n c ial markets strategy," Policy was to be 

See ADVICE, Page 12 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 


Casting a Stronger Role for 



With New Priorities 


When ministers from the 25 member nations of 
the Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development hold their annual meeting in Paris 
this week, they will face issues ranging from the 
global jobs crisis to relations with Russia. David 
Aaron, 55, the U.S. representative at the OECD, 
talked about the organization's clumging role with 
Alan Friedman of the International Herald 
Tribune. 

Q. Members of the Clinton administration, led by 
you, have talked for months now about wanting to 
shake up the OECD. What kind of future does the 
United States see for this organization? 

A We want to urge a stronger role for the OECD 
and we want to urge certain reforms. We would like to 
see the OECD become an organization where the 
major economic players of the world can discuss the 
common problems that flow from the world economy. 
And the proof of this is that for the first lime in 1 i 
yean a U.S. secretary of state is coming to the annual 
meeting. Prior to the Clinton administration, the U.S. 
tended to neglect the OECD and it became a very 
routine operation. For the organization to be impor- 
tant to really senior policy makers it has to address 
major issues. For example, on unemployment, for (he 


first time we will all agree on a common problem and 
solutions to iL 


O- What reforms do vou have in mind for the 
OECD? 

A The organization is now dealing with what are 
called cross-cutting issues, and it is competing 'Mth 
institutions that do economic analysis tike tire Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund. We think' the strength of the 
OECD lies in ii doing more microeconomic analysis, 
in looking at structural questions such as agricultural 
subsidies and unemployment. Also there is a manage- 
ment job required here, not in cutting staff bui in 
reorganizing the OECD with a greater sense of priori- 
ties. That may mean chaaging some of the 
directorates. 

Q. Can vou discuss other specific goals for the 
OECD? 

A The organization has to expand. Mexico hasjust 
joined, but we have to reach out to other countries that 
arc not members. This week we will begin the member- 
ship process for Poland, Hungary, and the Czech and 
Slovak republic*. Wc will take another step toward 
membership for South Korea. We will sign a coopera- 
tion agreement with Russia. And we will re-emphasize 
our willingness to establish a relationship with China. 


Q. What are your plans for relations with the so- 
called -dynamic nownember economies?" 

A. We want to strengthen ties with the Asian tigers, 
with countries like Taiwan. Singapore. Malaysia. 
Thailand, and also with Chile, .Argentina and Brazil- 
In fact we will have an OECD meeting on this subject 
in Tokyo in October attended by high level officials, at 
the subcabinet level. 

Q. What is the significance of the new accord with 
Russia? 

A. Historically 1 think this is very important because 
it was Stalin's refusal to job the Marshall Plan, the 
predecessor to the OECD, that starred the Cold War. 
At this week's meeting Russia will become a country 
that has a special relationship with the OECD, and 
that will end the last lingering aspect of the Cold War. 


Q. Washington has said that it wants to replace 
Jean-Gaude Pay?, the secrelajy-general. with Donald 
Johnston of Canada. Why? 

A. We think Mr. Paye has done a good job. but we 
also think it is Lime, after 10 years, for new leadership. 
Mr. Johnston has fought hard for free trade, and he 
has the right personal qualities Tor this clubby organi- 
zation. We are all very close here and it is important to 
have a personal siyie that develops consensus and 
tolerates differences. 


Q. Does Nigd Lawson, the British candidate for 
Mr. Paye’s job, have those personal quahues. 

A I don't want to comment on the other candidates. 

• 

Q. Mr. Paye's term is up in September, but you have 
said that the European members have asked Lhai a 
decision on his successor be delayed bevond this week 
because their choice is linked to the politics of rinding 
a successor to Jacques Ddors as European Commis- 
sion president. Nigel Lawson, the British candidate, 
may end up being backed by France and Germany for 
the OECD if Bri tain supports their choice for Brussels. 
How do you feel about that? 

A We think OECD members can and should make 
up their minds about this organization and we don't 
think it adds to the credibility of a candidate to be the 
candidate of some other process. 

Q. What are the key results you are looking for this 
wed:? 

A. The endorsement of a jobs strategy, and the 
direction of further work on unemployment issues for 
the Group erf Sewn industrialized nations; new rela- 
tions with Russia; the start of tangible work on trade 
issues of the 1990s such as trade and the environment, 
labor s tandards, and competition policy: and the Erst 
serious discussion of establishing a wider investment 
code, meaning a kin d of GATT agreement on 
investment. 


In B alkans , Arms for Drags 

Albanian Groups at Center of Huge Traffic , Report Says 


K V.Ji;' 


SwtiMiiii 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Albanian groups in 
Macedonia and Kosovo Province 
in Serbia arc trading heroin for 
large quantities of weapons for use 
in a brewing conflict in Kosovo, 
according to a report to be pub- 
lished Monday by a Paris-based 
narcotics- mo tutoring group. 

In recent months, significant 
quantities of heroin have been 
seized in Switzerland, Germany, It- 
aly and Greece from traffickers 
based in Kosovo’s capital. Pristina, 
as wet] as the Macedonian capital 
Skopje, and the northern Albanian 
town of Skorda. the report said. 

Italian policemen recently dis- 
mantled a major I tali an- Macedo- 
nian connection, seizing 40 kilo- 
grams of heroin s hippo! via the 
Balkans, it said. 

It said Albanian traffickers were 
supplied with heroin and weapons 
by mafia-like groups in Georgia 
and Armenia. The Albanians then 
pay for the supplies by reselling the 
heroin in the West. The report said 
the Albanian dealers also traded 


directly with Russian soldiers for 
weapons in exchange for heroin. 

The report was drawn up by the 
Observatoire Giopolitique des 
Drogues, which said it conducted 
an investigation lasting nearly a 
year. The organization carries out 
research on behalf of the European 
Commission in Brussels, as well as 
publishing a specialized monthly 
newsletter and an annual survey of 
the narcotics trade. 

Albanian Muslims form a restive 
minority in independent Macedo- 
nia but make up the bulk of the 
population in Kosovo. 

In Kosovo, the Albanians are re- 
pressed by the Serbian .Army and 
Serbian nationalists and have been 
cut off from most economic activi- 
ties. Nevertheless, the report said, 
many f amili es survive with funds 
euphemistically described as 
“Swiss.” 

Kosovo, on the southern frontier 
of Serbia, is a potential flash point 
because of conflicting Serbian and 
Albanian nationalism and religion. 
.Although in the minority, the Serbs 
consider the province part of great- 
er Serbia. The drug rep on said that 


a large influx of weapons “is fuel- 
ing geopolitical hopes and fears,” 
and adding to the power of Albani- 
an mafia godfathers. Albanian 
leaders, it added, “are inherently in 
favor of an uprising in Kosovo.” 

In Macedonia, about 2.000 U.S. 
troops are stationed under United 
Nations mandate. 

In Western Europe, particularly 
in Germany, the Albanian traffick- 
ers compete with Turkish crimi- 
nals, the report said. They are not 
so weO known to the police and 
have forged dose links with Geor- 
gians and Armenians, who distrust 
the Turks. 

Abkhazi separatists in northern 
Georgia have set up yet another 
connection for arms and narcotics 
traffic toward the Balkans, accord- 
ing to the monitoring organization. 

The report said Albanian mafio- 
si who wear expensive suits and 
who travel ostentatiously in Mer- 
cedes cars accompanied by body- 
guards, have taken over a floor of 
one of Skopje's best hotels. It said a 
suspected heroin refinery was in 
operation near the town of Koman- 
ovo in Macedonia. ■ 


mww< 




$ 








syrmm 




g:V. -A r v*. 









ivvty*. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Israel Reconsiders Its Ties to It^y^ I 

Sto apjxxnttDcro -widwM any 
ties,” be said. “I definitely dturt think cutting h . : . 

6 G^; Death in Kuwait for Bush Mot 

KUWAIT fAF) — Five Iraqis and one Kuwaiti luwbecn s^eaccd to 

to l" 3 to assassinate footer . 

a JraJ^igSalso sentenced and . 

SdplSSed not guilty after they wot arrested m t&'.-W 

rnkffl Mr Bush. President Bfll Clinton accused Iraq of mutaimmg - .- ^ / zi . 

Se pl^dordered a misak attack in Jnnc 1993 oo m mtdhgoa &^.;ry 

to Htexte on mm,, &:?:■' ■ ' 

t^^der. Rood oVAsodi. leapt t» fi. tern to tavay Setoff | . ' 

courtroom and shouted: ~n»ere is no jurtice! He was then ptmefa^an ” 

the face by another defendant - • - 

Cuban Gunboats Fire on Refngec^ ^ - 

MIAMI fAF) — Cuban gunboats fired formate than Ibur botus r • 

Saturday on a Cuban freighter loaded with Florida-bound refug^es^who $Ly 
reportedly bnacked the vessel Seven peopk were WOTndedyoMaiticBKfc- . 

Four of the wounded, including the ship’s captain, were tafceahyUiL 
Coast Guard hdioopten to a hospital in Key West, Flonda. Three peo^e 
who were hurt scrambling for cover during the shooing were QMdp&to- 1 

the ship, the Coast Guard said. Z ' 

The freighter was hijacked by the people aboard, WTVJ-TVraa^d 
Saturda y night, and a Coast Guard official said aBthoii ti es^bdBeveA . 
hijacking may have occurred. Pa s s en ge r s said 

tried to stop the freighter Rene Bedia Morales sotmaficrrtlefitlrepoiVal 
Marie! on Cuba’s northern coast The Coast Guard brought 59 peopfe- ~ 
ashore. 

Some Foes Boycott Ethiopia Vote ‘ 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (Reuters) — Mfflwns of Etirit^sans Tfflted' 

Sunday for a new legislature without major incident, ebsertfen^nfi- .V 
despite a boycott by some opposition parties. 

Voicrs queued peacefully in viflagesand hamlets to sdecunembqcSierfa; : 

547-strong assembly that is scheduled to pass a draft oo reti h fflfw 
allowing the country’s many ethnic groups the right of secession. y-y ; V 
Some opposition parties, which draw mart support from the Arafeara 1 
ethnic group in the capital, boycotted the polls because theybefieved 
new constitution could fragment die country. The Red Sen province! ig/ 

Eritrea seceded last yea r after opting overwhelmingly for maepen&ace: 
in a referendum after years of civil war. v ^ r :. 

A Bomb Wounds 26 in Philippines w 






DUTY FREE ADVISORY 


sj I 


fm 



i 



rrm»Pn« 

A wounded rvwandan bov Sunday as he was carried away from a plane at Orly airport near Paris. 

UN Plane Is Driven Out in Rwanda 


KIGALI. Rwanda — Government troops bom- 
barded the Kigali airport as a UN C-130 transport 
plane landed on Sunday, forcing it to take off 
hastily with a senior Italian official on board. The 
attack was part of an army counterattack against 
rebels who seized it two weeks ago. UN officers 
said. 

With the plane barely in the air, a second mortar 
bomb crashed into the runway, sending chunks of 
gravel flying past wailing UN officers and journal- 


ists. Four more shells hit the airport less than an 
hour after the UN plane took off and returned to 
Nairobi. 

A Reuters correspondent c-n board said stunned 
Italian officials, including the under-secretary for 
foreign affairs. Franco Roecbena, were speechless 
during the bombing and emergency takeoff. No 
one was wounded on the ground or* on the plane, 
which was bringing food desperately needed by 
Rwandans displaced by two months of massacres 
and fighting in which an estimated 500.000 people 
have perished. Nearly 2 million are homeless. 


North Yemen Bombs Oil Refinery 


U3S‘ 33.000 p 2 :a o;.t at each 
draw. US5 11 Million won so 
far. In. the world-famous Abu 
Dhabi Duty Free raffle. Each 
ticket priced at USS138. Just 
1.200 tickets entered in each 
draw. Approximately 6 draws 
every month. Available 
exclusively to passengers 
travelling or transiting through 


Aou Dhab. Airport. Notificarcn 
■mmedi.atefy oy phone and ny 
ma I. Money oaid in cash, bv 
bankers checiue or directly 
into the winners bank account. 
US$11. 000. CG0 hard casm 
The easy way. 


§=P Abu Dhabi 

Airport Duty Free 


The way the world's going 


Reid errs 

ADEN. Yemen — Fighting in 
Yemen’s civil war stepped up on 
Sunday, and officials in the break- 
away south said northern planes 
had bombed the south’s only oil 
refinery. 

As rival forces traded fire on 
battlefronts around Aden, up to 10 
shells landed in the area of the 
city's airport, which has been cru- 
cial to southern success in blocking 
the north’s bid to reunite Yemen by 
force. 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHH.OR’s • MASTER'S * DOCTORATE 
FcrWotK LfeaxJAcadEmtBtpome 
THvu&CorAvrientHomeSUty 

CS ICO 47 1-0306 exL 23 
iggjgfc Fax: (310)471-6456 

fOSSa# w s«nd debated resume lor 

SeiP FBEEEVAiiwnaM 

Paafic Western University 

600 N. Sepulveda BM.. OepTso* 
Lea Angelas, CA 90049 


But the uorth, which put off a 
decision on a cease-fire denied 
bombing the refinery. An official 
accused the south of attacking its 
own installations to fuel hostility 
against the north. 

A southern statement said. “As 
part of a dangerous escalation in 
the war and in a flagrant violation 
of mediation by the international 
community, Aden's refinery was 
bombed” by northern planes, “set- 
ting fire to one of the storage 
tanks.” 

Southern officials said the refin- 
ery was able to keep producing, 
adding there was no danger of the 


ask the butler... 


yf tX^/otffeu 


fire spreading or affecting domestic 
supplies of refined products. 

■ 5 in Golf Recognize Aden 

Five Gulf Arab couotries on 
Sunday implicitly recognized the 
breakaway southern stats, A grace 
Franoe-Presse reported from Abha, 
Saudi Arabia. 

Foreign ministers of Saudi Ara- 
bia, Kuwait, Bahrain, O man and 
the United Arab Emirates, at a 
Gulf Cooperation Council meet- 
ing, termed as “a fait accompli the 
declaration by one of the parties of 
the Yemen Democratic Republic 
and the return to the situation 1 ' 
before ibe country was unified in 
1990. 


ZAMBOANGA, PftiHppines (AF) — A bomb exploded late Sunday ® 
a shopping area, waundmg at least 26 people. The police said the mast 
could have been retaliation for mili tary attacks agamst Muslim extrem- 
ists. 

Earlier Sunday, the nrihtaiy said troops had killed 28 members of the 
extremist Abu Sayyaf group during a three-day offensive on Jok> Island 
about 160 kilometers (100 miles) southwest of Zamboanga. 

The police said the bomb, which was placed under a car m front of -a 
restaurant, exploded near the Shoppers Cento- commercial area. The 
blast plunged a wide area of the city into darkness. The Zamboanga 
Regional Hospital said 26 injured had been taken there. 

Roads Slow Indonesia Flood Relief 

.1 

PANCUR. Indonesia (Reuters) — Poor roads h am per e d refief efforts \ 
on Sunday in a remote area of Indonesia where earthquake-generated 
tidal waves killed 200 people and perhaps many 'more. - ■ 

The waves struck Friday as most people slepL Officials said a 100- 
kilomeier (62-mile) stretch of coast once favored by tourists and surfing 
enthusiasts bore the brunt of up to 12 tides that swept away homes 100 
meters (109 yards) inland. 

More than 1,000 wooden homes were battered by waters in Pane®, 
now akin to a muddy battlefield tittered with debris and broken palm 
trees, and five other nearby fishing communities. 

Ruling Due in Suit Over Altai! Book 

PARIS — A Paris court is scheduled to decide Tuesday whether 
Jacques Allah, President Francois Mitterrand’s framer chief aide, plagia- 
rized the work of the writer Eiie WieseL 

The ruling by the Paris commercial court could prove the latest 
embarrassment to Mr. At tall who resigned as bead of the European Bank 
for Reconstruction and Development last year after auditors criticized 
him for lavish spending. 

Legally, Mr. Wiesd's publidring company, Odile Jacob, is accusing 
Mr. Auali’s publisher, Fayard, erf unfair competition. Odile Jacob's 
lawyer. Bernard Jouanncau. told the court last month that Mr. Altai 
“stole” 43 passages from exclusive interviews that Mr. WiescI conducted 
with Mr. Mitterrand in 1988 and 1989, and reprinted them in his memoirs 
entitled “Verbatim.” Odile Jacob seeks IS million francs ($2.6 mflfion). 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

. USAfrica, the first U.S. airtine to serre South Africa in 10 years, made 
its inaugural flight to Johannesburg over the weekend. It will fly twice 
weekly between Washington and Johannesburg. (AFP) 


m 


-Ve.vic 


5-l-N-C-A-p.Q. R. E 


.vuHoniiMTj iHm^earcunu vaienoaana laua 

in eastern and northeastern Spain and in the Balearic were largely 

under control Sunday, officials said. (AFP) 

A casino Ins opened opened on the Egyptian side of the Red Sea resort 
or raba, with Israelis from the neighboring resort of Eilat expected to 
make up the bulk of the clientele. ^ (AP) 

China has expanded its fleet of svpbs Soviet-era commercial jetliners 
by leasing five Tupolevs, the Xinhua press agency said. (R&M&s) 

This Week’s Holidays 

^ be dosed or services curtailed in 

S2&J3SU5J" depcndcnaH ™* i— * 

I Ll coDAY: Malta. 

THURSDAY: Uganda 
FRIDAY: Macao, Portugal 
SATURDAY: Hong Knag. Libya, Malaysia. 

Sources : J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 


- . ■ 


p*;: - •-ii'). 

V;. *. 


: tr ' >"v. ' ■ V'l-. 

:> v VV. '.V 

■ ■A ■+*;.: . :: 

• t V ' . - V . r- 


To call from country to country, or back to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone number of the country you're callina from 

Cvpnis* nsn-wooo y you re calling Trom. 





. V,'- • ^ • v.._ v>| 

••• U4: Jmr 


Antigua 

< AvailaKI- :r->rt public 
Argcniina* 

Austria CC* 

Bjiumas'CC 

Bahrain 

BctgiumCC* 

Bermuda 

Bolt'u • 

Brazil 

Canada 

Carman Islands 
Chile- CC 
Colombia'-; 

Cosu Rica* 


wa"-*se 2ta c iso* 


.■arAia«i-«i,aw 


kardphone, onlv i 

0CI-S00-B3-mi 

1-W-p:4-I0iV 

soo-iv: 
twoo-iooi: 
I ■S00-023-04S4 
o-fkv-::;: 
iw-wi: 
I-S006tjlj-S0» 
1-^10-6:4.1000 
Ww-Oil') 
W-INWOI 
tr>: 


C'-prus* 

C=ech Republic-;^ 
Denmark CO* 
Dominican Republic 
Eciudur4 
EgyplCC'* 
lOuLldi- of C :1 r._>. Jul 
El Salvador* 

Finland 

France 

Gambia* 

Gcrnur.j 

iLmn-.u j..i:ljhilHy in 
GrwIC 1 * 

Crcruda— 


OS'-WCOO 
UO-42-O001 12 
1-0022 
1^00-751-6624 
1 70 

02 lirsi i >51-5770 
1^5 

OtkUi- 1 02 -SO 
NT-oO-Ivi 

00-1-99 
VI JO-0012 
cjsicm Cnrrninnv i 

00600-1 Z 1 1 
l^t *2-624-8721 


Guaicuula* 

HaiUtCLH- 

Honduras-f 

Hungary 1 CC i* 

Iccbnd* 

IrcUndlCO 

Israeli CC* 

IialyiOr* 

Jwnajci 

Kenya 

l.V.-jibhir from must 
Liechtenstein- COt 
loourmbourg 
McticoA 
MwucpO -* 


!.S9 

OOI-AXM4-4- 1234 

oot JUM’-i-r ooo 
vx»v-avi-oi4ii 

uyujulj 
l -SOU- 55-1001 
177- 1 50-27:7 
I72-IU22 
80Q-t> M.-000 


nujor cities ) 


es ) iinOOl t 
I >5.0222 
0800-0112 

I9Ta>%10 


NciherlandsiO'<* 
Netherlands Antillev-' 
Nicanifjua'CiI. 
tilhj|«Kk i>f Managua 
Norway CC-* 
Panama 
Miliury Bascj- 
Parjguav+ 

PerafCmtUeolLiina. 
PoUuliCC • 
PorLufvaPiCC- 
Puerto RicoiC-.' 

San MarlnivCC** 
Slwvak Republic. C.C ' 
South Africa".' i. • 


L*n^'22.V»l -22 

001 -fiOiMJO. 1022 

. 0*al 02 lir-st 1 iws 

800-19912 
I i>8 
Z8IO-10R 
■XW-1 1-800 
di.d I'Wnrsi ) r.H.iJ-190 

OT-ni^K^t.iO.222 
05.017-1234 
I -800-886-*, xyi 
1 72- i i*22 
OO-42-0ilOll2 
OSOO-994JOI l 


Spain ICC* • a«L9W»l4 

V- 191-997-0001 

Sweden, CO* 020-79W»22 

bwitzcrund'CC* 155-0222 

Trinidad & Tobago 
‘.SPECIAL PHONES ONLY3 
United Kingdom* CO 

call i he US using BT 0800-89-0^ 

* j all the U S. usmg MERCURY 0500-890-222 
Tc* all anywhere other than ihe USO5O0-8OO-8OO+ 
Uruguay 0«M12 

U^. Vlr^n IsJandsfCQ 1-800-888-' 8000 

Vatican C.ryiCC) 172-1022 

irli+* SOO-1 114-0 


0800-89-0222 


F J X\ 

v i' 


r r: 


Use yuur MCI Card.' local iel*ph*nc end or nil CulWn _all ai the wine l«w rates. 

it- ull_ ; .r I •* ■■ V j. jiuM.: i.^i.un jll nu-nuu-uul Iixjjutk Cenan, 

no. «. arrl* + U:*- H J x , liNI..- V w m l.< . „yhi J«t A .\,j,U4,- lam LALWTFL 

puhlv. i. Jt .. -, lw j; ,. rul , „, -.|,-,fc,. t liiieinji n'lul . .immutni-Jipne i-jmcr 

* — -1 jvjiLiNi l:.«n p.ho. pliHV.- *1 .1 k rbsfc- nvr.-u^uic. ilp.Mi i4umi *v phi«n utd fur duliivr 


tnprimi pa- Offprint. 7j rue Je I'Eiangile. 75618 Paris. 











sSs**** 


J^TEBNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 


*'££ a s 8 ij&& 



15 


ublican 


%r%? 

.■asSSr-". SSSI^ 25 ssassaars ssuasaa.^ 


3 ^ 5 *. 

•- . .■■■-“ jv^/^sen^ 


-A i' ’ 


; liai 


^ ‘'■i • -J"» i . 


^enl 


: - J^.W»££*C 


By *» Janof ^v 

• Virginia — h c ^wmtioiTof l J99? ,V1SlVC naUonaI jr- "^wanam-t^ 

^saasa 5 ^® ^sSSsSss 

SteSUl 111 ^ roDodcd, fu^far^culaied agenda. 

Bui now that Oliver L Mn«».u L“i Ml *“ r - an economist and a 
won ihcVuginia RcTubhS^? i&*u* m * in ** R «*“ 
nation for the U S J a ? mj " w ™ le House. 

ing James c. Miller 3d on Saturday •» no record 35 a lawmaker 
ai the state parry convention, poli/ QT J n a , < ^P aj f D dominaied by his 

p« 4 Wi 

pb >' "*“= - "Srsiffl 


Part of his populist rhetoric 
nows out of political necessity " 
said Dougins Bailey, a Rcpubliran 

mnoilfilnl in X7«ll« m. L If - 


then 

nSSSfei 


• 

« :? vfs 




KT'”' ■ ••’V JUU UUU* 

paign that climaxed with his vic- 
tory Saturday, Mr. North drew in 




, s *£83fW» 

■mmmm p 


'V 


■ ?wsa 


• • ' .? ■ ■ v; * • 


■ ‘ WIVJ.TV ' 


v '"£!£fi3K$5j 

—■**«■* »J5 



- 'T/W 


Ethiopia Vote 

i.. -• ^Ecpians^ 

:• ■‘ 1 - w -o=anto i 


m 


'■ L 

" - - .. f " *7^* i ^*om 

i v "J ‘ : r ^" : « >ttuiaL 
"... 

\* V' S^^’afadfc 

H' .' __ " M5 CipijjEi 
■ *• •:: ^Qv. 


WMflfll 


19 S 4 


in Philippine, 


05 as he traveled around the stale, personal > Z£? 

SiSS&EEE 

with the sheer force of an engag- as a «arr nvmU^r T* » 
mg personality. Mr. North has gan^ NaticmTsSn^ 

—v. Dai icy, a republican gu« as he did again Saturday that Mr North™, CounciJ - 

^MlmFall/chu^v, ™ America is fallKcfo^lfc , 

la. But he will occr be perceived ^ P°Ud« of .he CUmoa *riri£ “ d 

asone of the boys, and he will never iMraiipn. that government has no 

berarne one of the boys.” place in people’s lives, that family ™^‘^ u 8 0 vc ™a‘“'N l ca- 

ihroughout a two-year cam- structure remains the backbone of His role in the «-anrt-»i 

-•aswrsss jrsMaiiawE 
SseisfiK: S-Sgws: 

would do are not so well defined. nu^tTk-r , *■5*. Be OVcr5,ud - 

h ? s«d in hs spewh the state in Washington 
Sf T?* * M°rc than a few tunes during the 

fora>T«d^ P “ ° r convention, thesiaiep^ 

Buf fiX* 50, has taken tSS^SS £ 
STrolTf™' 3 ! But Itmg before the convention’be- 

seijteboJESiSSSta 

Eft MMTS r TS sfflKJS; N d 

ajfes.'s.ri 6 ?«SSSS 

TTm ftmhesfhe wrnidrn from a fn ^.il^ Sfj 1 !.. 1 ?* 1 ‘? u]d 
Stud conservative agenda is sup- dSrrJ^S^ e may be a force 

ssft»fft£ sSSSS? 

SJg"*® ss tg -J-Ja 

But beyond what Warren B R ^ u r b ^. Rona *£R“gan was." 

£fz^r“ S b s Zhc 

Bgiajajjaj 

gaassaa^ wag 


Governor Curbs Him AmhHion 


, — Governor Carroll Camp- 

b<£of South Canflina, a Republican who has bum 
actively tesime the war at* r« r « fi_i _ .»» 


actively testing the waters for a possible 1996 
presidential campaign, has abruptly 

*Ii4> k. ..71 .i_ _ . r j 


"X*& 




Ho Cakawalk for Konnadv 

^WORre sTER. Massachusctfs - Edward M. 

s ™, tm “ d l«fcr of the 
f ^ OU5 poiiucal dan, has been 
J 21 dues and towns across his 

y^hWaS^“ d0iES for ‘ he 1251 32 

^^“ 51 = «atKSt 

teU them what he s done. That’s what campaiens _ 

are about." campaigns aooai uoveraors' Assoaation. was seen in Repub- 

Ihc senator, 62, always runs hard. But analysis SnSl, 3 ? a Io^ 8 ? h 1 0, . for Republican 
hfte saythat this year, with the anti-incumteni a potential vice presidential candi- 

mood abroad m the country, something is differ- 

an. For the first time in seven contS? they sav sccraaiy, Tucker Eskew, said that 

Ted Kmnedy may have something like a real raw .w^Sr^ ^ 52^ “ d *•“ offer from the life 
on his hands. msurance council, Hecame to the conclusion that 

“Prtr th* •; — w ^ M oifln t want to ran around the country for two 

years for the possibility of a vice presidential nod." 

fU’Pl 


thnthe^ fo^oHpSrf 
ihe Ammcan Council of Life Insunuie when his 
term expires next January. He is not allowed to run 
for a third term as governor. 

Mr. Campbell, the current chairman of the Na- 
tional Governors’ Association, was seen in Repub- 
lican nrrlw ,r . I l r _ . _r 


“For the first time in Massachusetts political 
history this will not be a cakewalk for TedKenne- 
dy, said Ralph Whitehead, a Democratic political 
analyst and journalism professor at the Universitv 
of Massactasens at Arnhem. “It doesn’t mean 
bell lose, but be will not have the margin of 
comfort that he’s enjoyed in the past." 


<»T) 


Rostenkowskl’s New Lawvar 



w j — - .. ».. M wigwu jjj mo uwq parry, 
expected to ran against Mitt Romney, a Republi- 
can millionaire businessman with no elective polit- 
ical experience who is best known as the son of 
George Romney, the former governor of Michi- 
gan. 

R 9 nme y- **o is expected to win 
the Republican primary on Sept 20. has said that 
be is prepared to spend 58 ntifiion on the race 
Much has been made here of recent opinion 
polls showing that while most voters give Mr 
Kennedy high approval ratings, they think it is 
time for a new senator. 

“You wouldn’t bet against him, but you 
wtddn t bet it heavy "saidLou DiNatale, a pohti- 
ad analyst at the McQmnack Institute of Public 
Affairs at the University of Massachusetts at Bos- 
ton, which conducted one pofl. (NYT) 


attorney in Chicago, ^ ^ WCOD> „ new 
lawyer to defmd him against corruption charges 

cfaainnan of *c House 
W^fs ami Means Committee until his indictment 

P“ ^ ***“ Counted upon 

by President Bill CUnton to press his health arc 
legislation. (NYT) 


Quote/ Unquote 


Mr. dm ton, spealting to sailors aboard the 
aircraft earner George Washington at the D-Day 

commemoration: “If the allies would stay t * 


and sta 
Day 
country 


_ _ stay together 

stay strong, we would never need another D- 
’■ Th ? t is what you are guaranteeing, and your 
nry is deeply m your debL" fapj 


*• • • “ x.ti _ 

r r • “•.’r.-lii'fes 


‘ ■ iz 


- 7:; Zzrzi 

'•.T." ‘ - 1 j ” L'r; 


White House 

ggSS gSK m-ssisS^ Calls Book 
jw^a ^ SSZsSS SSSSSiSy- Inaccurate 

AMEKICAN 


ATLASECO 1994 


TOPICS 


ia Flood Relief 

saarf 


«'-■ ■ i-l .?.7^..s 


da 

LtsMS 






^\er. 


AttaliBoot 


r mTa . ibS 


■•S ZiZZ' 


Stanford Bccreis the Bubble 
Of Rampant Grade Inflati on 

Stanfoni 


- 77 — -- University in California is 
jrackmg down on gradeinflation. Nobody 
has failed a class at Stanford since 1970 
when the ‘T** for failure was S 
--‘■Vor-M .the.etqjhnmiatic “No OediL" 
K^’r. f flili ^- T -stadems will receive an 
TjJ i fw “Not Passed." 

-Nor will students be able to withdraw 
nom a course on the day of the final 
e xamin ation with no mmwqip>^ _ amt 
thm npeax the. comae again and again 
*&y get -the grade they want 
Tins practice has . generated bkarrish- 
fxee transcripts. But banning in the 1995 - 
96 ac adem ic year, students who drop 
classes betwan the fifth and eighth week 

of a quarter will have a W placed on their 

transcripts to marie the withdrawal Stu- 
dents who are still in courses after that 
pomt will be in them for keeps. The 

changes win also bar students from retak- 


ing a course more than once, and ail re- 
peated courses will be recorded as such on 
transcripts. 

“Stanford liberalized things like every- 
one else, but just went further,” said Gail 
Mahood, a professor of geology and chair- 
man of the faculty committee drafting the 
“Probably it overstepped. Now 
it s trying to bring its policies back into 
balance” 

The president of Stanford. Gerhard 
Uaspa-, said, “Unless you dare something 
and admit that you may fail you are living 
in an ffiusionary world, and that is not 
something that should be part of the no- 
tion of an education." . 


lots of potatoes, without baiter or sour 
cream, and lots of salad. How did beget 
overweight? Mr. Foley said, “Washington 
hfe or whatever.” 


About People 

■n»mas & Foley, speaker of the House 
of Representatives, stands 6 feet 3 inches 
(192 meters) and weighs 225 pounds (102 
kilograms). This is down from 287 pounds 
four years ago, when he decided to start! 
din and exexcise pro gram . “I didn’t work 
well with a diet that was 2.5 ounces of 


Short Takes 

must be ent to an 
anrotate HBi inium for the new supersonic 
jethner sponsored by a 51.5 billion federal 
program. One technique, the Los Angeles 
T]mK reports, is a radical new design in 

which pumps would suck turbulent air off 

the skin of the wings through millions of 
microscopic holes. The so-called laminar 
now over the wings would be virtually free 
of turbulence, cutting the drag. 


More than 90 percent of U5. 
grume are too dangerous for chUaren. 
socaroing to a survey by the Consumer 
Federation of America and the U.S Public 
Interest Research Group, a cons ume 
watchdog organization. The survey, based 
on 443 playgrounds in 22 states, revealed 
that 406 of them, or 92 percent, had no 
cann on ed surfacing under jungle gyms, 
aides, swings or other equipment, 55 per- 
cent had equipment that children could 
get their heads stuck in and 57 percent had 
equipment so high that falling from the 
top would cause injury. 


n y T All ows citizens to carry con- 
cealed handguns. To do so. an Alaskan 
must be at least 21 years old, with no 
criminal record, be fingerprinted and pho- 
tographed by the slate police, pass a gun 
safety couree and pay S125 for the permit. 
Arizona passed a similar measure in April. 
Alaska’s governor. Walter J. Hickel on 
signing the measure, said, “Those that 
impressed me ihe most were the women 
who called and said they worked late and 
had to cross dark parking lots.” 


People are keeping their own teeth long- 
er these days, according to the Institute of 
P™. Research in Betbesda, Maryland. 
It credited the use of fluorides and seal- 
mis, better nutrition and better consumer 
education. The number of toothless adults 

iQ 7 nf Cd /£ 0m 9-9 P erccit 7‘ tfw early 


1970s to 3.8 percent in the mid-1980s. The 
•thJessne 


rate of toothlessness among those SS 10 64 
years old as cut in half, from 29.7 percent 
to 14.6 percent. 


T»!Sv- 


.v£: !iS 
, V 7wr £ 

:rJ& 





... v 


fie bdieved only one gun w&s used 

gsa»a?K SESSS 58 -aSS® K ,hM ^ 

Mr. Sanchez mdKodotfo Mayoral point-blank: range; with one bullet 
Monies said he had collected speaiang with Mr. Aburto mo- entering hisb2d frames rSt 
backing away from his own widely h^lpboto- Before t he^°ting. Mr. skteand another entering his abdo- 

-pobtimed conspiracy theory, say- «« fsassmaion, Sanchez also is shown m photos men from the krfL Mr. Montes said 

ingMrwdiatSD acaised gmunm ^o^redasthe candidate 
appens to have acted alone. * OTwd 01 

ny pnaya.toe.Mlga dMentea Since the begriming. Mr. Montes 

nf{ hf. fine rmi’eniwl #ti« — ' 


By Tod Robberson 

Washington Post Service 

MEXICO CiTV — The special 
government prosecutor investigat- 
' mg the assassination of Mexico’s 
leading presidential candidate is 

koaUn. «... f 


— .»vuu« e OUU IliOl 1VU . 

Aburto was the only g unman . The 
«emingly roposite irajectories of 
the bullets, he explain at were the 
result of Mr. Colosio’s body spin- 
ning reflexivdy after the first shot 
to the head. 


The Associated Press 
WASHINGTON - The White, 
'House moved quickly to reject a 
new book’s portrayal of President 
Bill Clinton as following the lead of 
the Federal Reserve Bank's chair 1 
man, Alan Greenspan, on econom 
ic matters. 

Robert E. Rubin, chairman of 
Mr. Clinton’s National Economic 
Council said the president "relates 
to Alan Greenspan the wnv wayi 
he relates” to other policy exp ert s. 

He said the president heard their 
views and made his own dwria on s. 
“There was no question about 
where the buck stops and who was 
making the decisions," he said. 

The White House offered Mr. 
Rubin’s comments after The Wash- 
ington Post reported that a new 
book by Bob Woodward, an assis- 
tant m a n a gin g editor of The Post, 
depicted Mr. Greenspan as “a se- 
nior adviser, almost a tear her to 
Clinton." 

The White House press secrc- 

a i Dee Dee Myers, traveling 
the president in Europe, dis- 
missed me book as "all process." 

“I think the American people 
mil judge President Clinton and 
his administration on the basis of 
results," she said. 

_ The presidential counselor. Da- 
vid Gergen, said of the book, “So 
what’s new?" Mr. Gergen said sim- 
ilar material had been written be- 
fore. 

But White House officials were 
clearly uncomfortable with the sug- 
gestion that Mr. Greenspan was 
heavily influencing Mr. Clinton, 
and set up a conference call be- 
tween Mr. Rubin and reporters. 

“The president is extremely w 
grounded in these issues," Mr. Ru- 
bin said, “He came into office with 
a vision.” 


FIRST TIME IN ENGLISH, 

Written by a world economist 

Olivier Cambessedes 


sS 


A unique economic 

World Atlas 




235 countries - 816 pages bound 
and small enough to carry around 


History ; governments 
Agriculture r 
Mining and industries 
Economy and foreign trades 


rr-'? . _,-:5P 


rw; 0 3,r^3T^,Hn™. suiee the beginning, Mr. Montes 

Sw ?* 118 IZLZddT* ESI 

t toTeem m accused of assistmg the Mr. Abarto acted alc^OTttabe 

ms aided by several accomplices 


Away From Politics 


& 


• ,T «*-■ 


-.-vf. - 


.-5a: K 






' ,3 £P 


s' 




‘allied gunman. Mario Afaiirto 
Martinez, in the March 23 

1 ■ ofthe govoir — 

LaisDcnaldo 

But be acknowledged that no 
new evidence has surfaced against 
thexhree, all of whom were arrested 
and charged an the basis of photo- 
graphs depicting suspidous-look- 
* mg w=ii«n« moments before Mr. 

- Ctdoao was shot at a Tyuana cam- 
paign rally. - 

Mr. Montes’s statement, issued 
late last week, was only the latest 
development effectively slowing 
the investigation while the nation 


who coordinated to bloShfcCo- 
losio, impede his bodyguards and 
dear a path so Mr. Aburto could 
gain dose access. 

Mr. Montes said that he had al- 
ways presumed that the assassina- 
tion was the result of a “concerted 
action” and that three men current- 
ly in prison with Mr. Aburto — . 
Tranquilino Sanchez, Vicente 
Mayoral and his son, Rodolfo 
Mayoral ’-played key ides. 

“I must note in 




&PRINMPS 



• — jprv— ■ wiiii Mr. 

Montes said, (hat the investigation 

~~ — r hai not uncovered new dements of 

gears up for hotly contested juesi- proof to strengthen the case against 
dental elections on Aug. 21. Offi- the three other ddendants. ’The 
dais of the governing Institutional hvootheris has been bdstered that 
Revolutionary Puny ay they fear 


has been bolstered that 

homicidfr was committed by 




The PRINTEMPS 
DEPARTMENT STORE 
commemorates D - Day 
and the courageous men 
and women who made it 
all possible ! 


TO ORDER MAIL COUPON BELOW 

E.O.C. - 4, rue de Comrnaille - 75007 Paris - FRANCE 
Tel ill 45 48 37 77 - Fax {lj 45 48 29-76 


^ II Veteran.* : just show this ad at the Welcome 
bemcr of any Frimemps Department Store 
mentioned below u > receive vour complimentary gift 
am! I U^r discount eard. 


Our in J»ariN jii. I in Mnnuaiklr rrlrEiratiiiff lh<’rvrnf : 

*' 1 ,s 11 'USSM \ \ \ - \I.ENt;oi\ - CAKN - DE \U\TU V - 
KV REIA - I.K II U HE - KOUEN - V EH NON 







DON’T JUST 
UPGRADE YOUR 
SEAT, UPGRADE 
YOUR AIRLINE. 




RSI 


j Airline 

Business Class 
Sleeper Scat 

Business 
Class Pitch 

eesseh 

NO 

40* 

Air France 

NO 

38* 


NO 

40* 

i CONTINENTAL 

YES 

55* 


NO 

41* 

I92BHB, 

NO 

40* 


NO 

40* 


Flights from London, Paris. 
Frankfurt, Munich and Madrid to 
New York, Houston and Denver and 
on to 130 U.S. cities. 



Co 


J r f ' m in 

ntffiprfif.isn w.ih l^nimmuL ^mren Whn;h Airline 


n 




y&*jrr-jrrrrz- 
S ■ l. 


id- 

ur- 

a’s 

v’s 

ilv 


ter 


ip- 

of 

os. 

m_ 

lid 

he 


to 

<S. 

he 

in 

ts. 

.Tn 


us 

:h 

xi 

ai 

cr 

k’e 

~S, 

S- 


10 

54 

id 


il 

le 

nr 

.0 

> 























Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 


little i: 
curre > 
on W r 
trim a- 

tradi' \ 


steac i 
5.62( 1 
Swis i 
pour J 
from ■ 


Coming Ashore With Hemingway on Fox Green and Easy Red Beaches 

a/ ... . f three metal t 




This article originally appeared in Collier 's in July 19 W 
It »'or reprinted in The Washington Post by arrangement 
with Charles Scribner’s Sans, an imprint ol Simon «£ 
Schuster, from “By-Line: Ernest Hemingway" 19U lac 
Crcmril-Collier Publishing Co.. Mary Hemingway and 
“ By-Line : Ernest Hemingway ” Inc 

By Ernest Hemingway 

NORMANDY, Aboard an Allied Landing Craft — 
No one remembers Lhc date of the Battle of Shiloh. But 
the day we took Fox Green Beach was the sixth of June, 
and the wind was blowing hard out of the northwest. As 
we moved in toward land in the gray early light, the 36- 
foot coffin-shaped sted boats took solid green sheets of 
water that fell on the helmeled beads of the troops 
packed shoulder to shoulder in the stiff, awkward, un- 
comfortable. londy companionship of men going to a 
battle. There were cases of TNT. with rubber-tube life 
preservers wrapped around them to float them in the 
surf, stacked forward in the steel well of Lhe LCV(P). and 
there were piles of bazooka rockets encased in water- 
proof coverings that reminded you of the transparent 
raincoats college girls wear. 

All this equipment loo, had the rubber-tube life 
preservers strapped and tied on, and the men wore these 
same gray rubber tubes strapped under their annpits. As 
the boat rose to a sea, the green water turned white and 
came slamming in over the men. the guns and the cases 
of explosives. Ahead you could see the coast of France. 
The gray booms and derrick-forested bulks of the attack 
transports were behind now. and, over ail the sea, boats 
were crawling forward toward France. 

I was trying to dry my glasses, but it was hopeless the 
way the spray was coming in. so i wrapped them up for a 
try later on and watched the battleship Texas shelling thk 
shore. She was just off on our right now and Tiring over 
us as we moved in toward the French coast, which was 
showing clearer all ibe time on what was. or was not, a 
course of 220 degrees, depending on whether you be- 
lieved Andy (Ll (jg) Robert Anderson of Roanoke, Va_) 
or Currier (Prank Cunier of Saugus. Mass.) the cox- 
swain. The low cliffs were broken by valleys. There was a 
town with a church spire in one of them. There was a 
wood that came down to the sea. There was a house on 
the right of one of the beaches. On all the headlands, the 
gorse was burning, but the northwest wind held the 
smoke close to the ground. 

Those of our troops who were not wax-gray with 


seasickness, fighting it off. trying to hold onto them- 
selves before they had to grab Tor the sted side of the 
boat, were watching the Texas with looks of surprise and 
happiness. Under the steel helmet they looked like 
pikeraen of the Middle Ages to whose aid in battle had 
suddenly come some strange and unbelievable monster. 

There would be a flash like a blast furnace from the 
14-inch guns of the Texas, that would lick far out from 
the ship. Then the yellow-brown smoke would cloud out 
and. with the smoke still rolling, the concussion and the 
report would hit us, jarring the men's helmets. It struck 
your near ear like a punch with a heavy, dry glove. 

Thai up on the green rise of a hill that now showed 
dearly as we moved in would spout two tall black 
fountains of earth and smoke. 

“Look what they’re doing to those Germans,’* I leaned 
forward to hear a GI say above the roar of the motor. “I 
guess there won't be a man alive there.” he said happily. 
That is the only thing I remember hearing a GI say all 
that morning. They spoke to one another sometimes, but 
you could not hear them with the roar the 225-horsepow- 
er high-speed gray Diesel made. Mostly, though, they 
stood silent without speaking. 1 never saw anyone smile 
after we left lhe line of firing ships. They had seen the 
mysterious monster that was helping them, but now he 
was gone and they were alone again. I found if 1 kept my 
mouth open from the time I saw the guns flash until after 
the concussion, it took the shock away. 

□ 

Now ahead of us we could see the coast in complete 
detail. Andy opened the silhouette map with all the 
beaches and their distinguishing features reproduced on 
it, and I got my glasses out and commenced drying and 
wiping them under the shelter of the skirts of my burber- 
ry. As far as you could see. there were landing craft 
moving in over the gray sea. The sun was under at this 
time, and smoke was blowing all along the coast. 

The map that Andy spread on his knees was in ten 
folded sheets, held together with staples, and marked 
Appendix One to Annex A. Five different sheets were 
stapled together and. as I watched Andy open bis map. 
which spread, open, twice as long as a man could reach 
with outstretched arms, the wind caught it and the* 
section of the map showing Dog White. Fox Red, Fox 
Green. Dog Green. Easy Rod and part of Sector Charlie 
snapped twice gaily in the wind and blew overboard. 

1 had studied this map and memorized most of it but 


it is one thing to have it in your memory and another 
thing to sec it actually on paper and be able to check and 
be sure. 

“Have you got a small chart Andy?” I shouted. “One 
of those one-sheet ones with just Fox Green and Easy 
Red?" 

“Never had one.” said Andy. All this time we were 
approaching the coast of France, which looked increas- 
ingly hostile. 

“Thai the only chan? - I said, close to his ear. 
“Only one,” said Andy. 

□ 

I wish I could write the full story of what it means to 
take a transport across through a mine-swept channel: 
the mathematical precision of maneuver; the infinite 
detail and chronometrical accuracy and split-second 
liming of everything from the time the anchor comes up 
until the boats are lowered and away into the roaring, 
sea-churning assembly circle from which they break off 
into the attack wave. 

The story of ail the teamwork behind that has to be 
written, but to get ail that in would take a book, and this 
is simply the account of how it was in a LCV(P) on the 

day we stormed Fox Green beach Out a way. rolling 

in the sea. was a Landing Craft Infantry', and as we came 
alongside of her I saw a ragged shelihole through the 
steel plates forward of her pilothouse where an SS-mm. 
German sheB had punched through- Blood was dripping 
from the shiny edges of the hole into the sea with each 
roll of the LCL Her rails and hull had been befouled by 
seasick men. and her dead were laid forward of ha 
pilothouse. Our lieutenant had some conversation with 
another officer while we rose and fell m the surge 
alongside Lbe black iron bull, and then we pulled away. 
□ 

An LC1 was headed straight toward us. pulling away 
from the beach after having circled to go in. .As it passed, 
a roan shouted with a megaphone. “There are wounded 
on that boat and she is sinking." 

“Can you get in to her?” 

The only words we heard clearly from the megaphone 
as the wind snatched the voice away were “machine-gun 
nesL" 

“Did he say there was or there wasn’t a machine-gun 
nest?" Andy said. 

‘T couldn't hear." 

“Run alongside of ha ag ain, coxswain. - he said. “Run 
close alongside.” 


“Did you say there was a machine-gun nest, he 

* h Anflffic6r leaned over with the 

dime-gun nest has been firing on them. They are an* 

mg.” . . 

“Take ha straight in. coxswain," Andy 
It was difficult to make our way through JfL s, “2 
that had been sunk as obstructions, because there woe 
contact mines fastened to them, that looked like Iwge 


and were blowing nay pflfeoi 


out of the grtjunu ~ n arm doit sail 

of German of one sheDbun*. 

hidi up into the atr m tne lounwttui^ 

It reminded me of » scene 


andhadsmeoDOvatbainflge-i^ t 


max naa oeen sun* ® vyauw-.-,™-, -- — — . j v j oone nn ova umi ““j--"- 7 . ► - - 

contact mines fastened to them, that looked Iflre huge •***££* now. We ran In to a goods^wefcad : 

double pie plates fastened face to face. They looked ^ and put our troc^s ^dTlmr TOT. 

though they had been spiked to the pilings and then tluartieutenaat ashore, and 

asse^led/They woe tbeugly! 


assembled. l ney were me ugiy, “7 j — 'v:. .u-f 
that almost everything is in war. We did not know what 
other stakes with mines were under us. but the ones that The Gt 
we could see we fended off by hand and worked om w av g i ns , shif 

to the sinking beat. It was not easv to bring on board lhe fire until 

man who had been shot through the lower abdomen, were still 
because there was no room to lei the ramp down the way had left p 
we were jammed in the stakes with the cross sea. we left, f 

I do not know why the Germans did not fire on us evidently 
unless the destroyer had knocked the machine-gun pill- The he 
box out Or maybe they were waiting for us to blow up the waves 
with the mines.' Certainly the mines had been a great steadily. 1 
amo unt of trouble to lay and the Germans might wen n ds throi 
have wanted to see them work. We were in the range of now. with 
the antitank gun that had fired cm us before, and all the stakes sul 
time we were maneuvering and working in the stakes I 
was waiting for it to fire.^ hal 

As we lowered the ramp the first time, while we were 
crowded in against the other LCV(P), but before she ,_ ■. 
sank, I saw three ranks coming along the beach, barely {**“ *. 
moving, they were advancing so slowly. The Germans la . . de r 

them cross ibe open space where the valley opened otjo ^j ddcv j 


The Germans were stfll shooting win tbdrantitaak 
guns, shifting them 

fircuntfl they bad a target they wanted. 

were stiD laying a plunging fire 

had left people behind to snipe at the beacbeyrnd-wb® - 

*7iefL&. ail these peopk who were f Gang wot * 

evidently going 10 stay until dark 

The heavily raided ducks that bad loysaetty so& a 
the waves on their way in wae now n^g tte.bcactt - 
steadily. The famous thiny-onnute clearing of me chan- 
nels through the mined obstacles was still a myth, ari 
now. with the high tide, it was a tough trip mwrth the 

Stakes submerged. 

We had Six craft missing, finally, oat of tix twen|y-_ 
four LCV(P)s that went m from the (attack transport = 
Dorothea M.) Dix. but many of the crews > coaid hgg 
been picked up and might be on other vessels, at had- 
been a frontal assault in broad daylight, agamsra named 
beach defended by all the obstacles nnfitaiy mgemmy 


OI lire. IflCXJ I a utuc luuuuaui m 

over and beyond the lead tank. Then smoke broke out of fosx through had seamanship. All 

the leading tank on the side away from ns, and I saw two ^ ^ wcrtf lost by enemy action.; And we lad 

men dive out of the turret and land on their hands and . ■ u 

knees on the stones of the beach. They were close enough “j® 1 lD f * .. . •• 

so that I could see their faces, but no more men came out There is much that l have not written. You cprao write 

as the »ank started to blaze up and bum fiercely'. for a week and not give everyone credit -for what he aid ^ 
By then, we had the wounded man and the survivors on a front of 1,135 yards. Real war is new like papa- 
on board, the ramp back up, and were feeling our way war, nor do accounts of it read much theway n ux^.. 
out through the stakes. As we cleared the last of the Bert if yoa want to know bow h was in a&LCV(P) onB- 
s takes, and Currier opened up the engine wide as we Day when we took Fox Green beadv and Easy Red ' 
pulled out to another tank was be ginnin g to bum. beach on the sixth of June, 1944, then this is as near as T 
We took the wounded boy out to tire destroyer. They can come to iL . : 


For the Atlantic Allies Today, a Fraying of the Sense of Moral Community 


By Francis Fukuyama 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

The writer is a consultant at the 
RAND Corporation in Washington 
and author of "The End of History 
and the Last Man." 

Fifty years after the Normandy 
invasion! what is it that binds 
North America and Europe togeth- 
er in an “Atlantic community”? 

A useful distinction made by Lhe 
German sociologist Ferdinand 
Tdnnies toward the end of the last 
century separated gesellschaft. or 
society — meaning the legal, im- 
personal ties of modem industrial 
society — from gemeinsdiaft, or 
community, meaning the organic, 
moral bonds or village life. 

A North Atlantic gesellschaft 
clearly exists, in the form of die 
NATO treaty and all the buildings 
and bureaucrats that embody it at 
Mons and Ivere outside Brussels. 


Indeed, given the difficulty of elim- 
inating public institutions repre- 
senting entrenched interests, 1 be- 
lieve that NATO as a political 
structure will be far more durable 
than many of its supporters fear. 

But what about its gemeinschaft, 
the sense of moral community 
which began with the Anglo-Amer- 
ican alliance during World War 11 
and which endured during the pro- 
longed struggles of the Cold War? 
Here. I think the prognosis is much 
less good. 

Historically, the Adantic com- 
munity has been based on three 
things: ideological affinity, cultural 
identity, and strategic self-interest. 
In the post-Cold War era, only the 
last of these factors, stratcgjc’self- 
interest. will endure as a glue to 
hold the community together while 
ideological and cultural bonds will 
decav. This will not be a healthy 











WHEN IN PARIS 
WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT 
OUR MUSEUM AND SHOVROOM 

Five trnlr.incc - 30 I’is? rue do Farad ir 15010 Pa rip 
T.-I: 4-/ 1 0 fi4- 3P Ofh.ii inday - Ejiurdav 


situation, and the task of states- 
manship on both sides of the At- 
lantic will be to slow down this 
process of decay. 

The first of these three factors, 
ideology, was very important in 
binding the community during the 
Cold War. Not only was there a 
sense that the “free world” was a 
small enclave, embattled from 
without by a Soviet threat, but in- 
ternally many European countries 
faced a significant communist chal- 
lenge to (heir domestic institutions. 
There was a clear sense that the 
survival of all was dependent on 
the survival of each. 

But ideology has declined dra- 
matically in importance in recent 
years because of its very success. 
The circle of friends has gotten 
larger, extending well into Eastern 
Europe, while the circle of enemies 
has become far more restricted. 

Not only are the states posing 
radical alternatives to the West — 
Iraq, North Korea. Iran or Serbia 
— relatively small and weak, but 
they do not represent serious chal- 
lenges on the level of ideas. 

The rest of the world has become 
a vast gray area: nations like Rus- 
sia, China, Rumania, Mexico, Sin- 
gapore or Turkey are not necessar- 
ily unfriendly. But they have only 
part of the liberal-democratic-capi- 
talist equation down right and thus 
occupy an ambiguous position vis- 
i-vis the West. Ln Europe, this am- 
biguity is highlighted by the Gin- 
ton administration's Partnership 
for Peace initiative, which serves to 
dilute the ideological meaning of 
the Community by opening it to all 
comers. 

□ 

What, then, about culture as a 
basis for community? Harvard's 
Samuel Huntington argued last 
summer in Lbe quarterly Foreign 
Affaire that with the decline of ide- 
ology, conflict would occur along 
civilization al fault-lines. 

Mr. Huntington is clearly right 
that all of us are going to be more 
aware of cultural differences now 
that the Cold War is over. It is still 
the case that an American busi- 


nessman will feel far more at home 
(and have a much easier time) in- 
vesting in Europe than Asia, while 
an American man or woman of 
letters will much more readily un- 
derstand (he debates and intellec- 
tual currents in Paris or London 
than Tokyo or Seoul. 

But what is the essence of this 
cultural identity? At an abstract 
level, the truly common threads 
binding Europe and North Ameri- 


tance are difficult to understand 
except in such a cultural and intel- 
lectual context. 

But while Europeans and Ameri- 
cans may understand each other 
better sharing such a culture, this is 
hardly the basis for any kind of 
effective political solidarity. While 
some people may still be ready to 
die for their nation, few would die 
for the abstract principle of ratio- 
nal individualism, immolating 


Fifty Years After D-Day 


This is the last article 
in a series on the 
fiuurc of the 
American-European 
relationship. 


** * »*». 
#• it * * » 

I ****** i 
+ **-*-*■ , 
• < , , 1T ■ 


ca are Greek rationalism and 
Christianity, and the secular politi- 
cal and intellectual trends that 
sprang, historically, out of the com- 
bination of the two: rationalism, 
individualism and libera] democra- 
cy itself. 

Mr. Huntington defines the 
“West” largely in terms of its 
Christian cultural roots. But given 
the secularization that has taken 
place in virtually all societies of the 
Atlantic community, particularly 
on its European side, what does it 
mean to be part of a Christian civi- 
lization any more? While Muslims 
engaged in bitter political conflicts 
with the West might identify the 
latter with “Christendom.’' when 
did a modem European or Ameri- 
can think of himself as such? In- 
deed, many of the latter would find 
themselves more estranged from a 
fundamentalist Protestant than 
they would from an urbane, secu- 
larized Middle Easterner. 

Shorn of its spcdfically religious 
identity. Western civilization repre- 
sents rational individualism, the 
basis both of modem capitalism 
and modem democracy. Phenome- 
na like feminism and concern for 
human rights in distant pans of Lbe 
globe with no immediate impor- 


themselves to fulfill the agenda of 
Amnesty International, however 
worthy its cause. 

The concept of rational individ- 
ualism and universal rights that 
came out of the Enlightenment 
have, in any case, been under sus- 
tained attack in the West itself for 
the better part of Lhe last hundred 
years. 

Hie West has lacked a basic cul- 
tural coherence for some time now. 
as its premodem and postmodern 
camps battled. The forma camp 
argues that rights are permanent 
and come from God or nature: the 
latter argue that they are culturally 
relative. There is is no common 
ground between the two. 

□ 

Beyond such cultural abstrac- 
tions, the Atlantic community was 
held together by very personal ties 
of friendship and trust between 
statesmen on either side of the 
ocean. The generation of “wise 
men” leading U.S. foreign policy in 
the early postwar period — states- 
men like Chip Bohlen. Dean Acb- 
eson, John J. McGcy, George Ken- 
nan. Averell Harriman 3nd Paul 
Nilze — often felt more at home in 
Europe than in vulgar and “popu- 
list” America. 


People often underestimate the 
importance of personal factors in 
history, but the fact was that their 
personal ties to the European lead- 
ers who emerged after the war were 
crucial to the creation of a durable 
Atlantic alliance and to the Euro- 
pean Comm uni tv. 

* Even when these mainline Wasps 
bad given way to social upstarts 
like Henry A Kissinger and Zbig- 
niew Bizainski in the 1970s, their 
influence lived on. 

The most formative historical ex- 
perience of this entire generation 
was Munich and the spectacle of 
the democracies caving in to totali- 
tarian expansion. They had a vivid 
sense of the fragility’ of Western 
civilization and of the imminence 
of impending catastrophe; they 
had lived through the largest war in 
history in which alliance solidarity 
a] one assured the margin of vic- 
tory. 

This historical lesson was so 
deeply burned into the conscious- 
ness of this generation that it was 
applied to many situations where it 
was inappropriate, such as Suez 
and Vietnam, but it gave those who 
lived through it clear-cut under- 
standing of the critical importance 
of Atlanticism. 

George Bush will probably be 
the last .American president to have 
served in World War II (assuming 
Bob Dole is not elected in 1996), 
and the last with a sense of noblesse 
oblige toward Europe. It seemed 
quite natural to him to call Marga- 
ret Thatcher as his first order of 
business after Saddam Hussein in- 
vaded Kuwait, rather than the Jap- 
anese prime minister or the United 
Nations secretary-general. Bill 
Clinton’s generation is quite differ- 
ent: (heir formative international 
experience was the Vietnam War 
and what they regarded as the 
abuse of American power. 

Mr. Clinton may now seek to 
distance himself from his anti-war 
past but be and his contemporaries 
have little invested in tbe Atlantic 
community. Europeans, incidental- 
ly, should not fed too bad about 


the Clinton administration's an- 
nounced intention to turn the focus 
of American foreign policy away 
from Europe and towards Asia. 

Up til! now. this has simply 
meant that (he United States has 
chosen to pick fights with the two 
most powerful states in Asia. Japan 
and China, as a first order of priori- 
ty. Europeans should be grateful to 
be. for tbe moment, out of the lime- 
light. 

□ 

There are many other important 
demographic changes going on in 
the United States whose cumula- 
tive effect will be weaken the cul- 
tural community between Europe 
and America. There are today 20 
million residents of the United 
States who were born outside its 
borders, the vast majority coining 
from regions other than Europe. 
Ten percent of (he American popu- 
lation is Hispanic, while another 
three percent come from Asa. 
While Washington and New York 
remain heavily All anticist in out- 
look. the same cannot be said for 
Houston. Los Angeles or the Bay 
.Area, all of which fed a more natu- 
ral affinity with .Asia or Latin 
America. 

There is something in American 
fas opposed to European) culture 
that has been stimulated by the 
dynamism of Asia. It is no accident 
that American companies like Ford 
brought Japanese lean manufactur- 
ing to the United States long before 
any European auto manufacturer 
managed to domesticate this more 
competitive approach. 

There is a kind of irans-Pacific 
cultural creation going on in ihe 
business world that is foreign to 
Europe, and that in time will make 
America seem more foreign to Eu- 
rope. 

This leaves, then, only strategic 
self-interest as the most secure 
bond holding the Atlantic commu- 
nity together. Realists like Mr. Kis- 
smger hare for long argued that 
durable alliances ought to be 
formed cn the basis of interest 
alone, in preference to ideology or 


sentimentality. But there i& good 
reason, to question wbetber sdf- 
inxerest alone is sufficient to. sus- 
tain an alliance through a genera- 
tion of ups and downs. Foriagn 
policy is no longer made by s mall 
elites; broader publics have to be 
persuaded to bear the costs, both 
financial and in.-tenns of casualties, 
of foreign commitments. 

Moreover, to the extent that the 
true basis of power is becoming, 
more economic than military, Eu- 
rope is becoming less strategically 
important to the united States. Eu- 
rope has become less and less com- 
petitive as a result of the growth of 
its welfare state. Until it faces that 
problem squarely, it will find itself 
increasingly marginalized in world 
politics. 

AQ of this spells trouble for the 
Atlantic community in the long 
ran. , and more for the Europeans 
titan for the Americans. The threats 
to the West may now be vastly 
diminished, but if they return in the 
form of a resurgent fascist Russia 
or a nuclear- armed Iran, Western 
statesmen on both ades of the .At- 
lantic will have a much smaller 
fund of political capital with which 
to work. 

Policymakers most do what they 
can to slow down the deterioration 
the community’s ideological and 
cultural identity as the embodi- 
ment of the West Operationally, 
this means expanding NATO to 
match the progress of democracy in 
Eastern Europe: the new Mood 
from Poland, Hungary, and the 
Czech Republic will do the alliance 
good provided standards are set 
sufficiently high so as not to dilule 
NATO into another toothless re- 
gional organization. 

More importantly, the existing 
stock of political capital should be 
husbanded for the serious potential 
threats of tbe future, and not wast- 
ed in fruitless threats and posturing 
in sideshows like the B alkans . 

Neither policy will ensure the 
survival of a healthy Atlantic com- 
munity, but they wul at least do no 
harm. 


IUNE8S9 

JUNE 9-10 

E1S 94: Client Server Reporting for 
the Enterprise 

Europe's leading conference and exhi- 
bition on Executive and Management 
Information Systems A unique 
conference programme which gathers 
many of the world's best thinkers, 
practitioners and case studies, with 
the aim of helping organisations link 
E1S to business goals 

CwiM. Business Intelligence 

Tel.: 051-54*1 1830 

Fax: 081-544 9020 

Latin America: 

A New Investment Partner 

This, the fifth biennial conference on 
Lann Amenta, will focus on trade and 
invesenen; opportunities 
in the reejon. 

Omlari- 

Brenda Hagerty, 
International Herald Tribune, 
London. 

Tel.: (44 711 83b 4802 

Fax: 144 71 1836 0717 

LONDON 

LONDON 


CONFERENCES, 

:;H epUR^si^ ; 
g AND 
^EXHIBITIONS 


JULY 27-31 


World Congress - Evolution of Psychotherapy 
The leading dinidans - The relevant approaches - One conference 
Aaron Beck. M.D Arnold Lararus. Ph.D. Erving Prttaer Ph D 

Albert Ellis. Ph D. Alexander Lowen. M D Mtnam Polster Ph D 

Viktor Frankl. M.D.. Ph D. Clo£ Madanes. Lie Psych Ernes: Rossi. Ph D. 

Eugene Gendlin. Ph.D. |udd Manner, M.D. Helm Suerlin M.D.. Ph.D 

Wiliam Classer. M.D. William Master. M.D. Thomas Seas. M.D. 

Mary Goulding M S.W. lames Masttrson. M.D Pay! Watdawick, Ph.D 

Klaus Crawe. Ph.D. Donald Meichenbaum. Ph.D. loseph ’Aolpe. M.D. 

lay Haley. MA Adc-ir Ernst Meyer. M.D.. Ph.D. !rv Yalom. M.D. 

James Hillman. Ph D Salvador Minuchin. M.D. leffrey ;eie. Ph. b. 

Ono Kemberg. M.D. Mara Sehfini Palasoli. M.D. 

\njomalimand Rtaemnini: M.ET. Psyehothciapie Tagnngs GmbH. 

Bernhard Trenkle. Dipl Psych.: Bahnholstr. A D-78G25 Rottweil: Germany 
Tel.: +4*1-741-41774: Fax- +40-74 1 -1 1 773 


TO ADVERTISE 
PLEASE 

CONTACT PARIS 
ON FAX: 

( 33 - 1)463793 70 


Russians 9 Recalling Sacrifice , Resent D- Day Snub 


By Fred Hiatt 

Washingivn Pm Service 

MOSCOW — Russian officials 
and veterans hare expressed bitter 
resentment that they were not in- 
vited to the D-Day commemora- 
tions in Normandy.' 

Many also have expressed irrita- 
tion at Western media accounts 
that are treating the D-Day landing 
as the turning point in World War 

Most Russians believe that it was 
their sacrifice on the Eastern Front. 


and particularly their costly victory 
at Stalingrad, that broke the back 
of the German Army and allowed 
Ihe D-Day invasion to succeed. 

“Only two of the most important 
participants in the war were not 
invited to the commemoration.” 
the Rossiskaya Gazeta commented 
on Saturday. “The first is clearly 
understood: After all. it is Germa- 
ny which was defeated in the war. 

“But probably it is also clear why 
Russia was not invited,” the news- 
paper wrote. "It would be uncom- 
fortable to highlight your own mili- 


tary successes in the presence of 
those who made the main contribu- 
tion to the victory over Hitler’s 
Germany." 

The Russian resentment at being 
excluded from the ceremonies is 
pan of a wider sense among manv 
here that the West does not accord 
this nation the respect it deserves as 
a great power. Many politicians 
and others here are convinced that 
Washington and its traditional al- 
lies are happy to see Russia poor 
and weakened, and would do what- 


ever is necessary to keep this coun- 
try on its knees. 

Tbe unhappiness over D-Day 
follows a similar dispute with Ger- 
many, which has scheduled a host 
of triumphal ceremonies in Berlin 
to mark the departure of Allied 
troops from that city without in- 
cluding the Russians. Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl and President Boris 
N. Yeltsin instead will lead a lower- 
key ceremony in Weimar to mark 
the departure of the last Russian 
troops. 

But tbe exclusion from the D- 


BEST OF EUROPEAN SUMMER RESORTS 


HAMBURG 

SEPTEMBER 21-24 

OCTOBER 17-20 

The Annual Oxford Summit 1 

A uniQL-e opportunity to assess the 
global business outlook with a 
'distinguished group ol academics and 
business and financial ieaders 
Contact 

Jane Benney, 

International Herald Tribune, 
London 

Tel.: (44 71 1836 4802 

Fax: 144 711 836 0717 

The American 

Dietetic Association (ADA) 

Alp's TH n Annual meeti ne and Exhibition will 
adthesr t he chancing dram re ct icdr/s heath 
care nwi rtrUtece arjiitf r an? ovnrc new doors 
(or ihe dwjaics prcteision 11 »il! include 
instep on furore industry iwivfe. updates on 
the fciea weitif ic research and practice tech- 
niques and an ethiation with neartv <00 ctun- 
parocsdi;rtavir.f:saii*cf-{te-jn resources 
oquptnem (red pnWucs and eduatwral icnfe 
ConUd Gerri A. Salvatore. CEM 
Tel.: 3 1 2/899-0040 

Fax: 3 12/839-0008 

OXFORD 

ORLANDO, FLORIDA, USA 


AUSTRIA 

{'A*) 


Day commemoration has touched 
an especially sensitive nerve, rekm- 
dling long-standing resentment 
about the West’s rede in what Rus- 
sians call the Great Patriotic Wat 

Soviet textbooks, while paying 
scant attention to America’s war.io 
the Pacific, taught that tbe West 
waited too long to open a Western 
Front against Germany, allowing 
Russia to bear the brunt of Nazi 
might. More than 20 million Sovi- 
ets were killed during the war, with 
I.i million dying during (he battle 
of Stalingrad alone. 

'The world has begun to forget 
to whom it owes the victory over 
F aarism,” wrote Nezavisunaya Ga- 
zeta last week. 


ixi r-i i«t. iiiki'i/ uoti.i. 


A Crent W inter Howl 
in lhc AJpim.- Summer 
A-fjMSi GinMifh 
Timl. Au'iria 
Tel . i4?i 5-u/i ;<iM 
Far <Jtj sjjh 35 jj 


FRANCE 


ITALY 


TCirNm-ircit 

Swimmin" K»ik Tcnnk Court-. 
Coll. Evening Emenjmmeni 
Ruui) ■£ Fill*.-'.-. Comer 
3503! Abano Terme. lulv 
Tel . i.W-J'Jj.sfo v|i1| 
FivrtftHyiRhfttrw 


Swimmn; Prot-Boiu!) & bum-.. Comer 
S hu ps-Rr-aaurjm- Nielli Club 
Av Paul Siena:. S.WO Si. Tr.vpc,. F rjna . 
Tel : l?T) 94 07 IRJOJ 
Fw.t.tyrtUTAOS: 

One lU 7 Vfr.* y 


MALTA 


SjLMjJN PALACE HOTEL 


Luxury awl HiMory 
Combined in Malta's 
Musi CJurmin; Hold 
SdmunSPBIfi. Malta 

Td : r*5f>» .vn IWi 

Fax • i J 5 i,j 52 1 li» 


MONACO 

HOTEL LOEWS 
MONTE-CARLO 

The Mom l'p-To-Daie Ddiwe Reson 
on lhc Riviera 

Crcal Restaurant \ Emcnainmaii 
anti Fitness Facilities 
12. Avcnur dex Sndumicx 
9X007 Monte-Carlo. Monaco 

Ti-I:<33i$.i50tf Oft 
Fu :l33>«J .tool 57 


SPAIN 


SWITZERLAND 

fio/tfavs rt **t*c/r 
rtrjre t&atr pf casus* / 

ifi&i 


MnVTECASTILLO 
Hilcl A GWf Rrs.ni 
Like a Palace Within a 
Fanlasiic Gulf Courxc 
Great Fund. Sijhl.s and SfXKls 

Canwerj de Arcus 
I l-UKt Jerez. Spain 
Tel : 1 34-Sh) IS 12 mi 
Fax i34-Sbi 15 1 2 in 


Jr V/J I ^ ' Fax : 

{Lvj 1 1* • 'A I -27/4.1 55 n 

Vlonl4na Swiim*d 


TURKEY 

m Sf 

Sheraton Voyager 
. ..Antalya 


H O T E l. - 
TV Be-. 1 R..*\ori 
in Turkey 

H*l. Til Ruhari 
AiKntoa i.V’i>5»|. Turtes 

hia.i:j:,2j.» 2 ut»- 


2 Die of Heart Attacks 
Coring D-Day Events 

Agencr France- Presse 
IGNDON — a British veteran 
died of a bean attack on Sunday 
during a gathering in southwestern 
England with his framer comrades 
rarhng the 50th annivercaty of 
ihe^D-Day landings, his relatives 

r Jf Dunne, «9, of Brad- 

ford. died at a hotel in Dartmouth, 
Devon. Another veteran died at a 
hospital in Caen. France, after sof- 
icnug a heart attack on Friday, the 
police said. His identity was not 
immediately available. 


in France 





















St^ . 


T - >\~v. 

■-•i— w ->■:•. 


''its':' 7 ?’}- *• ... * • / ■ 

": -Cr^o iVv. . 
_ ' : .V 

’• ‘ "•’■•’ -. ._ i- ; 
-;j ?-.■{ \ y 


• ^-.y - j : • • -v •' ■■y. 




■■ 

• ’. • v ;V ' ■ 

• • i * OfS/.** r •• ’■ 
•v,:v. <i+!-V' V ... . 

V" ; -i-jws ?•<.• 

•• .• jj; :.••■■•• ■ ; ■ 

V • •; ••. 

1§ ^ • . ■ 


» ■‘.iV*’*'-- 

■■ "i* r-.-v *•'■“. 
- :c*A:£> 2 !<v.. 

• vi- ■•« ■• 

* ;■> *;••-.■ . . * • 

' jj'J* •' 






4-.- V . 

"V - • i -* •* • 


}\ % , -\ S A J r. . 


.V 


f£ 

Ss.y:: : . 




lass* 

§&£.v- 






THE ART OF 








£ ■Wfcpjt 


■pt 


/ >4 ^4// > 

btir^L 


im 





J EWELLERS SINCE 1 8 4 7 

\ 1 ^5y e „ d y 1 y P , a j x ~j 3 C 1 ) 42 SI 58 56 - London ~ 175/176. New Bond Street - 44 mi 403 fig 67. 

^®^ enue - 1 f 212 ) 753 01 11 'Geneva: 35 rue du Rhone-41 (22)311 80 66 - Milano : Via Montenapoleone, 16 - 39 ( 2)76 001610 

, Munchen: Bnennerstrafie, 12-49(89)28 86 61 w UUJt>lu 

feSfey-'' ■ ■ and one hund red and forty Cartier stores in major cities worldwide. 









Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 



T 

t 


Corr. 

H 

: Ni 

[ 

little 

1 

O 

curre 

* 

3 

on W 

2 

7 

trim 

4 

4 

tradi 

1 

2 

Tb 

m 

1 

1.64* 

1 

3 

•J 

1.645 

t 

dowr 

i 

i 

mmmm 

a 

« 

steac 

i 

i 

« 

5.62( 


Swis; 


pour 


from 



M 
rope 
,'lral I 
bank 
at a 
Sievt 
bank 
Ihet 
doll* 
level 
trigg 
defei 
“1 

M 


ropi 
plac 
. H 
kels 
Eur» 
cIo* 


grov 

fidei 

tael 

fori 

M 

ecor 

amo 

was 

lery 

"and 

leriz 

mar 

a l 

. T 

bon 

lerr 

irai 

gaii 

Ne 

yet 

po 

ut> 

cei 

on 

tic 

pf 

re 

a 

c\ 



Bv Lena H. Sun 

Washington! Fmt Service 

BEIJING — Chinese aulhorilies have arrested a provincial labor 
organizer and a leading Shanghai dissident, part of an effort to 
ensure that the fifth anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crack- 
down passed quietly. 

Zhang Lin, 31, was arrested in Beijing and sent to a detention 
center in his native Anhui Province, his wife said by telephone on 
Saturday. 

Mr. Zhang, a member of a recently formed independent labor 
organization, has been on the run for two months. The group models 
itself on Poland’s Solidarity union and claims to have 300 members 
nationwide. 

Mr. Zhang suggested that dissidents were going to try to stage 
symbolic commemorative acts to mark the June 3-4 Chinese army 
crackdown on demonstrators five years ago. in which hundreds, 
perhaps thousands, were killed. 

Public security directives were sent out weeks ago. and hundreds 
of policemen as well as office workers were mobilized to prevent 
evert the smallest protest in Tiananmen Square or the university 
district. 

The hunger strike of Ding Zilin and Jiang Peikun. two People’s 
University professors whose 17-year-old son was killed by Chinee 
soldiers, was the only known public protest on the anniversary. 

Mr. Zhang's wife. Ji Xiao, said she received a police notice 
Thursday saying Mr. Zhang had been turned over to authorities in 
their home town of Bengbu. in Anhui Province. She was not told 
when he was arrested by Beijing aulhorilies or what charges he may 
face. 

The couple's home has been under surveillance for two months. 
Mr. Zhang was nearly caught a few weeks ago when he relumed 
home because his wife was about to have 3 baby, he said in an 
interview before his arrest. 

“They said he bad done a lot of bad things.” said Mrs. Ji. who had 
her baby on May Zl. 

Mr. Siang. a nuclear physics graduate from Qinghua University 
in Beijing, has been jailed five times. 



Japan's Involvement Hits a Snug 

efforts to enforce a bloc! 


Reuters 

TOKYO Japan's minority government ran 


Compiled try Our Sutij Front Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Defense 
Secretary William J. Perry warned 
North Korea on Sunday that a mil- 
itary confrontation over its nuclear 
program would bring “devastating 
consequences" and said that Wash- 
ington may seek to impose eco- 
nomic sanctions on its own or with 
allies if the United Nations Securi- 
ty Council rejects them. 

“We have discussions under wav 
with our allies about sanctions." 
Mr. Peny said in a broadcast inter- 
view. “Even modest sanctions will 
be very painful for North Korea." 
considering the weakness or its 
economy, he said. 

China, a member of the Security 
Council and a sometime ally of 
North Korea, has been reluctant to 
go along with sanctions proposed 
by the United States as a way of 
pressuring North Korea into com- 
plying with LTvl strictures on devel- 
opment of nuclear weapons. 

Japan also said Friday that it 
might be willing to impose sanc- 
tions even without a formal UN 
vole. 

Mr. Perry said he did not believe 
a militaryshC'W'dovvn was imminent 
over North Korea’s refusal to allow 
inspection of its nuclear facilities. 
But he said the United Slates 
would, if necessary, strengthen the 
3S.OOO U.S. troops already in South 
Korea, and use them if fighting 
broke out. 


Mr. Perry said a preemptive mili- 
tary sirikv again?; Pyongyang’s nu- 
clear installations “is an option." 
Bui he added ‘dial be would not at 
presen; recommend that. 

"We do no; see die danger of a 
war at this lime and we’re noi going 
to take actions to provoke a war," 
he said. 

Nonetheless, he said the United 
Stales would not hesitate to defend 
the South in case of attack. 


to show no inclination to allow full 
nuclear inspections. 

North Korea does “not have the 
intention to meet an unjustifiable 
demand." said a North Korean 
commentary carried by the official 
press agency. KCNA. and moni- 
tored in Tokyo. 

Should Pyongyang quit the non- 
proliferation treaty, inspectors 
would not be able io enter the 
North, and the Communist regime 


into 

to 

as 


“We will defend South Korea," would have no legal reason to obey 
he said. “We have a commitment to its pledge to shun nuclear weapons. 


defend South Korea. We are pre- 
pared -o defend South Korea. We 
are capable of dei" ending South Ko- 
rea. And any war that would be 
started would have devastating 
consequences on North Korea.” 

North Korea is suspected of 
making nuclear weapons. It has re- 
fused to let international inspectors 
examine its stocks of plutonium, as 
required under the Nuclear Non- 
proliferation Treaty that Pyong- 
yang signed five years ago. Plutoni- 
um is an ingredient of nuclear 
arms. 

The North says iu nuclear pro- 
gram is peaceful and has refused to 
back down against international 
pressure. It has warned that sanc- 
tions would be regarded as an act 
of war. 

On Sunday, me North said it 
would abandon the nonprolifera- 
tion pact unless the United States 
agreed to direct talks. It continued 


President Bill Clinton said Satur- 
day that uniess North Korea al- 
lowed inspections of its nuclear fa- 
ciliiies. it was “virtually 
imperative’’ that the United Na- 
tions consider international sanc- 
tions. 

Mr. Perry said the sancuons 
would be aimed a! two goals; re- 
moving any nuclear weapons 
North Korea has. and sustaining 
the integrity of the nonprolifera- 
tion treaty. 

In a broadcast interview Sunday, 
a former secretary of state. James 
A. Baker 3d. criticized the Clinton 
administration Tc-r moving too 
slowlv against North Korea. He 
said the United States should have 
already sought UN sanctions. 

“I'm not sure that the North Ko- 
reans understand how seriously we 
lake the fact that they're not wiling 
to abide” by the nonproliferation 
ireatv, said Mr. Baker, who served 


,u strong domestic opposition 
its proposal for sanctions against North Korea, 
leftist legislators denounced the plan. 

The protests raised questions about how much 
Japan could contribute to any mtemauonal effort 
to punish North Korea for its refusal to permit 
insoeciion of its nuclear facilities. w 

“The Socialists as a party are against ihis idea, 
said Wataru Kubo, secretary-general o. in- oppo- 
sition Socialist Party - 

“We should be cautious about sanctions before 
the United Nations has even decided on any- 
thing,” said Mr. Kubo. whose party is the second 
most powerful in Japan’s parliament and has tradi- 
tionally been close to North Korea’s Communists. 

Under a 10-poinl package proposed by the gov- 
ernment of Prime Minister Tsutomu Haia. Japan 
would take action against North Korea including 
bans on trade, air links, investment and cash trans- 
fer. government officials said. 

A~ Former foreign minister, Michio Watanabe. 
said laws might have to be revised to let Japan 


curmort ifltemationfiJ efforts *Q enforce a blockade 
which could involve, a bnnsms 

h ^ l £SErf 1 l.o slop tbo flo» 
nermleand money without new legislation. 

said. “But the Self-Defense Law must 
be S to Oder to supply fuel, for cxmopfetO 
U S warships taking part in a naval blockade. 

Under a 1952 bdateral security treaty. US. 
forces can use Japanese facilities to maintain peace 
MdwcuritY in the region, but cannot necessarily 
ireive Japanese support outside Japan s teiftlwy. 

North Korea has put the Japanese government 
under additional pressure by warning that any 
sanctions would be seen as a declaration of war 
and that Japan could be a larger, for a missile 

attack. . J; v 

Some Japanese conservative leader indicated 

they were wflfcig to fight a domcst^p^bcal battle 
if the international community deqded on sanc- 

tt °*if Japan cannot do anything, the international 
community will stop dealing with Japan,” said 
Ichiro Ozawa, a senior figure “ ?«e governing 
coalition. 


as secretary in the Bush administra- 
tion. “I don’t think you should ever 
sit down and try and negotiate 
down from international standards 
and requirements with a regime 
like North Korea.” 

Seoator Jehn S. McCain 3d- Re^ 
publican of Arizona, echoed and 
amplified Mr. PenVs remarks. 

“Vital national security interests 
are what’s at stake" in North Ko- 
rea. he said, adding that U.S. forces 
should be built up in the area and 
that Americans “should be pre- 
pared to act now." 


SANCTIONS: Korean Puzzler 


(AP. Reuters} 


A great new plus. 

The more times you fly 
the bigger your bonus. 


(OVER AND ABOVE THE REGULAR MILES EARNED!) 




III.GHTS PLUS 90% 


\ . - 








^FLIGHTS PLUS 100% 





7 FLIGHTS PLUS 110% 


if LIGHTS PLUS 120% 


TS PLUS 130% 


jr 

a&ik- 










■*-? -liViisxz; 


S 10 FLIGHTS PLUS 140% 


10+ FLIGHTS PLUS 150 0/ < 



ROYAL 

ORCHID 



Thai offers its Royal Orchid 
Plus members one of the most inno- 
vative and exciting bonus offers 
ever created for frequent flyers. 

This new bonus offer is available 
to members who fly a total of three 
First and/or Business Class inter- 
national flight sectors on That's 
worldwide routenet between April 
1 8 and September 30, 1 994. 

The new bonus is over and above the miles you would 
normally earn. 

For First Class, the normal miles you receive are the 
miles you fly, plus 50% for travelling First Class. 

For Business Class, the normal miles you receive are 
the miles you fly, plus 25% for travelling Business Class. 

We add the bonus on top of these miles. 

And the more times you fly, the bigger the bonus. 
Here's how it works. 

For example, if you fly just six international flight 
sectors we will add a 100% bonus, which will double 
your Royal Orchid Plus miles. For more than ten 
international flight sectors flown, we'll add a 
bonus of 150% to your Royal Orchid Plus miles." 


It's a great opportunity to rapidly and substantially 
boost your mileage account and earn free 
flights or any of our unique Experience 
Awards faster. 

You can also earn or redeem 
miles with our credit card, hotel and car 
rental partners. 

OVER 70 DESTINATIONS WORLDWIDE. 

Thai can now take you to over 70 destinations around 
the world, including eleven cities in Europe, five in Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand, Los Angeles in the U.S.A., and 
more destinations in Asia than any other airline. 

THREE GREAT NEW DESTINATIONS. 

We've expanded our service into China and now offer 
1 8 flights a week to the four key cities of Beijing, Kunming 
and now Guangzhou and Shanghai. 

Plus, we have also added Dubai to our 
rapidly expanding routenet. 

SMOOTH AS SILK ON THAI. 

But, perhaps the biggest plus of all is 
flying smooth as silk on Thai, enjoying 



our world renowned Royal Orchid Service all the way - 
award winning food and wine, 
charming cabin staff and a fresh 
orchid for every passenger. 

If you're not already a member of Royal 
Orchid Plus, there’s no better time to join. Pick up an 
enrolment form from your nearest Thai 
office or complete the coupon below. 

Membership is free. 




ENROL NOW IN ROYAL ORCHID PLUS 


Pick up an enrolment form from your nearest Thai office 
or simply complete this coupon and either mail it to Thai 
Airways International. PO Box 567, Samsen Nai Post Office, 
Bangkok 10400, Thailand or fax it on 66-2-513-0222. 

Please allow three weeks for delivery. Complete in English. 

D Mr DMrs DMiss □ Other Title 

Name 


Address 


FIRST KAME 


FAMILY NAME 


POSTCODE 


Phone 


COUNTRY 


HOME 


BUSINESS 


Continu ed from Page 1 

challenged and put in jeopardy if 

the international community does 
oot respond properly.” 

The U.S. push for sanctions is 
likely to face resistance, however. 
China, with a veto in the United 
Nations Security Council, is reluc- 
tant to endorse* them. Russia has 
proposed an alternate route, an in- 
ternational conference, but has not 
ruled out supporting sanctions. 

Following its long-standing hab- 
it of making bellicose threats, 
North Korea has said sanctions 
would be an act of war. But many 
South Korean officials say they do 
not expect any North Korean mili- 
tary action. 

There have been hints from 
North Korea that the “act of war” 
statements merely signify that en- 
actment of sanctions would violate 
the armistice agreement that ended 
the Korean War. But the risk of 
war is attested by the hundreds of 
thousands of troops who line the 
heavily fortified border between 
North and South Korea. 

A big risk with sancuons is that, 
in practice, they take time to pro- 
duce results, if "they succeed at alL 
Already. North Korea has used a 
year’s worth of negotiations to in- 
crease its capacity for producing 
weapons from nuclear fuel 

In Haiti, more than two years of 
heavy commercial isolation has yet 
to force a change in regime and the 
Clinton administration is ponder- 
ing an invasion to overthrow the 
government. 

Serbia has resisted two years of 
UN sanctions and continues to aid 
insurgent Serbs in neighboring 
Bosnia. Five years after the sabo- 
tage of Pan Am Flight 103, Libya 
bas refused to give up a pair of 
suspects, despite bans on imports 


of ail equipment, xnSitmY sappbes 
and other machinery. Saddam 
Hussein remains in power despite a 
grab bag of UN sanctions that per- 
mit only humanitarian supplies 
and food to enter. 

The threatto isolate aa already 
largely isolated North Korea seems 
minimal considering the stakes as 
defined by the administration. 
Nonproliferation is at central facet 
of Clinton’s foreign policy. Wash- 
ington fears that Norm: Korea: 
could touch off an arms race m 
East Asia, with a netroos Japan 
prompted to rearm. The 40-year- 
(rid armistice line between North 
and South Korea would become a 
more dangerous flashpoint with the 1 
introduction of nuclear bombs.; 

“This conjures up a vison-ofan 
isolated and embattled North Ko- 
rea run by apersonalistic regime, 
with a nuclear weapons arsenal and 
a large conventional army on the 
border of Sooth Korea,” i he Amer- 
ican official said. “This -is . not a . 
recipe for a secure East Asia. ” 
Outside of East Asia, otheredun- 
tries with nuclear ambitions, ' in- 
cluding Iran, Iraq and Libya, are 
watching to see whether atomic 
agency inspections can be riddled: 
with ease, a senior American eiBh'-' 
dal said. The agency has never ' 
turned to the Security Council -to 
help it implement infections. 
“This is the first test” the official 
said. 

North Korea also sells rmfitary ' 
equipment to nations that the Clin- 
ton administration describe as 
rogue. Beyond mfesfles and tech- 
nology. American officials worry 
about North Korea selling an off- 
the-shelf bomb. Washington wants - 
to block Korea’s acquisition of a 
nuclear arsenal not just its use of 
one. 


India Test-Fires Missile, 
Ignoring U.S. Opposition 


The Associated Press 

NEW DELHI — Ignoring U.S. 
opposition. India has test-fired a 
ballistic missile that can reach tar- 
gets in Pakistan and China. 

The S-meter (26-foot) Prithvi 
missile, with a range of 250 kilome- 
ters ( 1 50 miles), was launched from 
Cbamiipur, in eastern India. 

The missile, which can carry a 
one-ton payload, will be deployed 
in a few months on India's bonier 
with Pakistan. Disarmament ex- 
perts say India could arm the mis- 
siles with nuclear warheads, al- 
though India denies it has an active 
nuclear weapons program. 

The final tests on Prithvi were 
put off last month because Prime 
Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao did 
not want to anger Washington just 
before a meeting with President 
Bill Clinton. 

The Prithvi and the longer-range 
Agnj missile are showpieces erf a 
prqject handled entirely by Indian 
military scientists. 

Mr. Rao has been under pressure 
at borne from both leftist and na- 


tionalist opposition to continue the 
missile program. 

The United States has been try- 
ing to persuade India and Pakistan, 
longtime enemies, to abandon riu; 1 
clear and ballistic weapons pro^ 
grams. . . . ' .. ■ 

This week, Frank . Q. Wisoer r 
U.S. ambassador-designate to In- 
dia, was quoted as saying that' he' 
hoped India would reconsider de- 
ployment of the missile. 

India claims to need missiles for. 
air defense and to counter the 
threat posed by Chinese-made M- . 
1 1 missiles deployed by Pakistan. 

India has successfully test-fired a 
total of four different surfaCe-to^ . 
surface and surface-to-air missiles 
including the Agni and the Prithvr 
launched on Saturday. The other 
two were surface- toair and anti- 
tank missiles. 

India exploded a midear device 
in 1974. It maint ains a mili tary 

force of 1.2 million, and has fought 
three wars against Pakistan and 
one agains t China over the past 
four decades. 


p 


HOTEL INTER-CONTINENTAL PARIS 



The Hotel Inter-Continental Paris will be 

r^ 5 ?!i\^ m0rat * n ® ^th Anniversary of the 
O.BA\ landings from 1st to 17th June 1994. * r - 

• Norman culinary festival with gastronomic, 

artisanal and cultural attractions. • 

• The crowning glory of the 50th Anniversary 
celebrations will be the AMERICAN BALL 

ur‘wr^ 1 il^«E laee in our salons on FRIDAY, 

■Kn , h 199 i"? homa S e ‘0 Glenn Miller 
from 10.30 p.m. till dawn. 

Entrance: 200 FF including the first drink. 
Limited number of seats. 

Information and reservation: 44 77 31 n 


HOTEL 

INTER-CONTINENTAL 

PARIS 

nie dc Caxiiglicne - 75040 Paris Cede* 0 1 








«esss& 


■'!■:>>■ 






i .mk^0% 








• “i' . . . • - 


dJWV. 




■~V r - 


Phipps 

W&?i+ 


'* : V Si 

V. T^fe 1 

mmmm 


.•4;... v 

&&*&& 




INTEBMT.ONAL HERALD TR1BTNE. MONDAY. JUNE 6. 199 + 












































Pa® 


P 


T 

l 

• Cite 
: N1 
little 
curre 
on W 
trim 
tradi 

■ Th 
1.64C 
1.64? 

dOWT 


stcac 

5.621 

Swi& 

pour 

from 

• M 
rope 
itral 1 
bank 
at a 
Sievi 
bank 
the fc 
dolls 
level 
trifig 
defei 
“3 

■W 


ropi 
piac 
. H 
kets 
Eun 
clos 


grow 

fidei 

bacl 

fori 

M 

ecor 

amo 

was 

teiy 

and 

tera 

mar 

a I 

; T 
bon 
im 
irai 
gaii 
Ne 

ye 

po 

12> 

cei 

an 

lit 

re 

a 

C» 


1) 





Plan cfl Hammer at Nazis 
Jamming Highways to 
North ; Tanks Follow Up 

Enemy May Delay 
Sfand for 150 Miles 

500 U. S. Bombers Blast; 
Rail Lines to Cut Off 
Flowof Reinforcements 


By The A*atzttaUd Prtu 

ROUE. June 5. — Allied armor 
and motorised Infantry roared 
through Rome today, crossed the 
Hirer Tiber and proceeded with 
the task of destroying two battered 
German armies fleeing north. 

Allied lighter- bombers spear- 
headed the pursuit, jamming 
escape highways w.'Ah burning 
enemy transport and littering 
fields with dead or wounded Nazis. 

The enemy was tired, disorgan- 
ised and bewildered by the slash- 
ing character of the Aliitd assault, 
which in twenty-five days had In- 
flicted a major calastn phe on 
German forces in Italy rod liber- 
ated Home almost without damage 
so tfie historic city. 

Aerial forces including SCO 
American heavy bombers blasted 
railyards at live points In northern 
Italy between Venice and Si nln! 
slang which the Germans might at- 
tempt to move reinforcements sod 
equipment to bolster their be i li- 
en loth and 14th Armies. 

Foe Expected to fall Bach 
It Is assumed that the Germans 
wlfl fall beck about ISC miles north 
of Home. The northern A pennlne 
fountain range provides a for- 
midable barrier. At no point short 
of that* wifi they find a natural 
defense line comparable to the 
shattered Hitler and Gustav lines. 

British 8th Army forces advanc- 
ing from the east continued to 
et stubborn opposition, particu- 
larly northeast of Valmontoue, 
where the Germans were fighting 
in mountain positions. The enemy 
had been driven completely out of 
the Sacco Valley, including the 
towns of Pluggi. Plgllo. Pal lan o. 
Ouarcino and Cave. Palestrina, 
astride on Important retreat road 
four and n half miles north of 
V aim ta tone, was seized by Allied 
troops yesterday. 

British troops an the coastal 
flank of the Alfred advance pressed 
to within six miles or the Tiber 
below Borne. Pifth Army troops 
pushing through the Alban Hills 
captured the towns of Gottafer- 
rata. Marino and Genzano and by- 
passed some pockets of resistance. 

Frenzied Throngs Greet Allies 

By Russell Hill 

Jl WKcfcai u Uu Mttau rntax 
CcpnifUL, Wi Haw Tori Tnbuna 1 d=. 
ROME, June 5. — Hundreds of 
thousands of the people of Rome, 
haif-dehnoos with enthusiasm, 
surged like an Immense flood into 
the broad streets and spacious 
squares of this capita] city today 
to greet the men of the Allied 5th 
Army as conquering liberators ano 
to give them the heartiest welcome 
an Allied army has received in UiL* 
war. 

The cumulative uproar from Ui* 
applauding, cheering, siioutlnj 
throngs of civilians had to corn- 
pet* wiUi the Knuid of gunfire 
flora the front north of Home, 
where parts of the 3th Army were 
iCmBnuea an pc ge 2. column i> 


iBSiiraiice 

Subject to U. S. 
Anti-Trust Law 

Supreme Court Rules II Is 
Interstate Trade, Upsets 
75-Year-Old Precedent 

ftex tts Hera'.C T'ttcu Barton 
WASHINGTON, June 5— The 
Supreme Court, upsetting a sev- 
enty -five-year-old decision, ruled 
today In a 4 -to -3 opinion that the 
insurance business may constitute 
Interstate commerce and Is. 
therefore, subject to Federal regu- 
lation under anti-trust provisions 
of the Sherman act and under the 
national labor relations act. 

The decision ;n the amt- trust 
case was reached on a government 
appeal from an action by the Fed- 
eral Tlrir.ct Ccvirt for Northern 
Georgia dismissing Federal anti- 
trust proceedings against 196 
stock fire insurance companies 
operating in six Southeastern 
states — a case which brought At- 
torney General Francis Biddle per- 
sonally before the Supreme Court 
for the poly Ume this term. The 
decision paves the way for similar 
Justice Department actions al- 
ready planned against other com- 
ps ales. 

However, Congressional attempts 
specifically to exempt insurance 
companies from interstate com- 
merce regulation will be pushed 
with renewed vigor, in view of the 
Supreme Court's decision. It was 
made clear in Congressional and 
other quarters this afternoon. 

Senator Joslah W. Ba.Iry, Dem- 
ocrat. of North Carolina, and Rep- 
resentative Francis E. Waller. 
Democrat, of Pennsylvania, have 
sponsored. Identical bills which 
they have said were suggested by 
the prosecuting of the South- 
eastern camp aiiles. The Senate 
nieasure has been the subject of 
(Cantinucd.or.vcne 13. column 1 > 


By Bert Andrews 
WASHINGTON'. June 5.— The 
capture of P-ome was hailed to- 
night by President Roosevelt with I <j 
the exultant exclamation that :tj j 
is now “one up and two to go." 
as f ar as the Axis capitals of Italy. 
Germany and Japan are con- 
cerned, but with a sobering warn- 
ing that "It will be tough ar.d H 
wUi be costly" before Berlin and 1 
Tokyo are also conquered. 

Then, in another of the cryptic 
invasion hints that have kept the 
Germans tantalized, the Presi- 1 
dent, in words that were earned 
over ail American networks ar.d 
to the rest of the world. laconical:? j 
remarked that the Italian triumph 
is only a foretaste of more blows i 
to be struck by the United Nations. J ? 

"Our victory .comes at an ex-! i 
celled time, while our Allied forest; .. 
are poised for another strike at 
western Europe and while armies! ?, 
of other Nazi soldiers nervously 
await our assault." he 52!d. "And 
our gallant Russian allies." hu 
added in a sentence that suggested 
Germany will soon feel new offen- 
sives from both east and west, 
"continue to make their power felt) 
more and more." 

Concent rating on Germany 
So much did the President con- 
centrate on what Germany has 
coming to It and so little die he 
jpeak of Japan <he never men- 
tioned Japan by name and spoke 
of it Indirectly only once, when he 
lumped Us capital in the "Iwc lo- 
go” category that his words gave 
new cznphs.sl.-t to the fact that all 
of the 1944 Allied strategy In based 
on the beat- Germany -first, theory, 
after which Tokyo will be spot- 
lighted In the unenviable position 
of “one to go.” 

For the Italian rulers, the Presi- 
dent had the warning that their 
dreams or buiiding “a great mili- 
taristic empire" by conquering 
f Continued on pc pc co/unin JJ 


Bilbo J 


mfi&i 


H lirrc :hf -mil'll Uurr ulmrk in Frtmr* 


Pope AecirtmislKiiig of Italy Given Up Powers 


News on Inside Pages 


WAR 

British protest use of Dardan-Il cs 
by German vessels. Pas* 5 
Nazis tighten their penal code as 
the Invasion nears. Page 8 
Elsenhower. Churchill keep in 
touch with De Gaulle. Pag,. 8 
Power-producing train Is given 
final tests In U. S. pare 9 


CITS' AND TICDOTY 
474 cadets a-uj receive degrees 
today at West Point. Page 13 
Two city districts will vote to- 
day on Congress seats. Pare IS 
Quill's backers are denounced 
for visit ’o Albany. Par* 15 
Drive to clear dormant files id 
assiSL paper salvage. Page 2* 


Somes Escape 
F roiB War Ruin 


U.S. Troops in ThrongTha! 
Cheer? Pontiff? Speech 
Front Si. Peler*? Balconv 


tv Tic c-.urt rrm 

HOME. June 5. — Pope Pm:. XU 
spoke briefly this evening from 
Ihe central balcony of Si. Peter's 
to a vast throng crowded into llie 
public square in from ol that his- 
toric church. In his -address he 
gave thanks to God for the fact 
that P.cme hac been spared. 

Pope P:ur. who seemed lo be In 


Senate extends Pe&rl Harbor trial j Brewster seeks right to re-hire £ ealih ’ *** cli»vred wildly 


Opportunities for Work 




nr vaSna colcbxj 

B37S 

kin nt" 'ntfoi »\»c isppUn . 

Baiatl Bicrt s|r Ban Gou: sb -iio.-nk.! 

aeon* l 

•- r: t l.Mr. C*<ln .aw. |l> — l 
iMv'.iLui-Ljpal. relic! »M navi 


deadline for a year, page 9 
Japanese v. nguarda are 25 miles 
from Changsha gates. Pace lo 
Jackie Coogan tells of air com- 
mando experiences. Page 18 
Liberators sink a Japanrse war- 
ship off Halmahera. Pate id 
P olish Premier arrives in U. S. 

for Important talks. Page 11 
War communique*. page io 
Navy casual lie*. Page 16 

SPORTN 

nm Piddle wins a* 25.563 at- 
tend Aqueduct opener. Page 22 
Goldbeck and Volk take West- 
chester golf after tie. Page 22 
Defense capturaa Minute Man 
Purse at Suffolk. Ps«r 2Z 
Two-day rest welcomed by bat- 
tered Giant pitchers. Pbsc * 23 

nith, 7 ankees fare poorly as American 
League Is scrambled Page 23 
Ov-rnseas Letter, by Stanley 
vrocdwud. rase Z3 


men wiLhin 60 days. Pag 21 

NATIONAL 

I ekes declares racial intoler* vr 
can lead lo defeat. Face 13 
H^use conferees approve cabaret 
lax cut to 20 per cent. Page 15 
Ernest Woodruff dies; helped 
develop Coca-Cola. Page 16 
Biddle again defends the seizure 
of Montgomery Ward. Page 17 
Senate vo«- s in limit (nod sub- 
sidies to one yrur. Pag.. 32 
I EDITORIALS AND MIRCELLAN V 


Page; 
Editorials . . lgj 
Lippman 21 

j Major Eliot 21 
In Short.. 21 

Bridge . . js 

Webster 23 
"Mr. and Mra.'io! 
.Nature Sloiy !*, 
W-azJe « 

jEeoas ....17 


Page 

Fashions 12 

Food 12 

Society . . . .19 
Arausem'ts 16-15 
Fresh Air 29 
Rea] Estate. . 28 
Radio ... 28 

Obituorleo 16 

Financial t 6 - 2 * 

Susmeu ..2<-23 


when he aDpcared on the balcony 
alter bell3 had rung for five min- 
utes. The people waved handker- 
chiefs and haLs excitedly. In the 
throng iherc were some Amcrnun 
soldiers. 

At a a. m. today crowds appeared 
j before Si. Peter's, drmruu.rratmg 
and rcQuc5llr.g Uial tin- Pujic < nmr 
out Up appeared iirlrfiy uinl im- 
parled a benrdi' l!«n fium 1 1t* 
balcony. Jfr np|iriui-ii iigiiiii m 

10 a. m. 


To HU Son • but Retains Title 

Victor Emmanuel Names Crown Prince Humbert 
Lieutenant General of the Realm, Gives Him 
Royal Authority ’■Irrevocably’ for Life 

By Tie United Ptm 

NAPLES. June 5 — Kins Victor Emmanurl III of Italy signed 
over lus royal power:, loriav to Crown Prince Humbert, as Lieutenant 
General of Lhe realm, carry me out his pledge Lo Allied officials that 
when Allied troopr. liberated Rome • ” . 

hr would civ.- up lhe royal authcr-j5 0 .6 o Gold Nearly Equals 

ity he lias held for nearly forty- ' - . _ * 1 

four years- 

The King, who is .seventy -foul 
.-ears old. did 1:01 abdicate his 
throne. A formal statement said 
that he had turned over all his 
powers “without exception” to 
thirty -nine-year -old Humbert, who 
would hold ihrm "irrevocably" as 
long ns lie lives, bin llial Victor 
Emmanuel v:nul>1 remain Kina of 
I Lily mill hrnd f»r lhe House nl 
ISntuy. 

Tlie historic ilurumems were 
slsnnl nt 3 p «» in Uir King's 
rlt'M-lv cU'iriieil villa ill Itnvello. 

'flu- miimi viitiii'tl »»nl n» ihe lellvr 
Ills Apiil 12 pleilrr hr I In- Allies 
llmL ' Hurt ii |i|H illil fiu*ti I I .if Htiin- 
bi-rt us I knU'iuuil Cknei ul 1 will bt 


4,000 Planes 
Raid Axis From 


Heaviest Blows of 24 Honrs 
in Calais-Boulogne Area; 
Versailles Is Hard Hil 


ev^ l |r ! r B n n h /'m e! ? 0,tolrfl | liC,n come effefUve by a formal transfer 
eienlng on American plane flew non .„ r nn ri! . u nr. a-h.rh 


overhead, sprinkling fiowers on the 
crowd, which Included representa- 
tives of all the Italian political 
parlies and a number of Allied 
prisoners of war who had escaped 
to Vatican Clt;- from the Germans 
Vatican City wan not da macro 

/ Continued cn pace 0, column is 


of power on the day or. which 
Allied troops enter Home " 

The' swift transfer of power 
came as a surprise to Naples polit- 
ical quarters whirh hod expected 
the linrd-iin-r.aeil lirad of the 
lloiirr n( Savoy U> li»lM.’ tn thr 
{Continued on pope J. column 2f 


66- Year Record in Gty 

New England Reports Frost; 

Warmer Forecast Today 

The temperature came within 
six-tenths of a degree yesterday of 
equaling a sixty -six -year-old rec- 
ord low for the date. At 5:20 
a. m 11 was 50 6 degrees In the 
my. ThP low for June 5 was 50 
ilrerecx in 1878. 

Thr hath yrxlrrday was 67 at, 
12 50 p. m In LctkCWood. N. J.. 
111 iu>rih-r Morris County 

11 ir AvMM'laLril Press rriwu-trd a 
]..w i.f 3I> iti-iiifp... ail. I 111 rirren- 
villr. Mi* . I hr Lrni|x-mlurr dropi>rd 
in 27. M«-ir<in<IONlcal o (71 rials In 
Bastou said frost killed many . ic- 
lory gardens and damaged crops 
tM-ouxhout New England. 

The forecast lor today is partly 
cloudy and warmer, with the tem- 
perature tn the dty expected to 
rw to 75 or 80 degrees. 

WIIO-4 Hitf -> nw. 

n.t irkl.lilf ;i»blnM- Dial . 

■1 l.i* later — woil— sen. 


By Richard L. Tohin 

fljr B lrrlfj* tn thr Herald Trlbant 
Copyrichl. 1144. Mew York Tribune Inc. 

LONDON. June 5.— Up to 4.000 
Allied planes of every shape and 
sue attacked Hitler's Europe In 
the twenty-four hours ended to- 
night from bases In Great Brit- 
ain and Lhe Mediterranean, drop- 
ping a total of 1.000 tons or bombs, 
according to unofficial estimates. 

The heaviest of six raids from 
English bases during the day and 
night was an 8th United Slates 
Air Force raid on Boulogne. Calais 
and Dieppe in which 750 Flying 
Fortress** and Liberators were 
escorted by 500 Thundei bolts and 

Mustangs 

There n»s nr. enemy fighter 
o|ipusiil«Mi. bin Hie American Ay- 
ers encountered heavy rockri flak, 
giving watchers on the southern 
coast of England a firework* 
demonstration of the sort known 
In London as a "Brock's bene, 
fit.” after the name of England's 
largest fireworks manufacturer. 

One group of Mustangs, return- 
Ing from the raid without piertln* 
enemy fighter*, spotted a N* *. 

lConSlnst£m page 5. column 2) 


AliackonEaropeFoilowi 
Air Campaign to few 
W ay for Land Force* 

Invasion Centers 
In SeineEstucatry 

Air-Borne Troops Drop 
After ‘Terrific’ Bain 
of Shells and Bombs 

B» Tltfi w c irtii frm 

SUPREME HEADQUAR- 
TERS. ALLIED EXPEDfe 
TIONARY FORCE. Tuesday, . 
June 6 . — American, British 
and Canadian troops land- 
ed in northern France this 
morning, launching the great- 
est overseas military opera- 
tion in history with word from, 
their supreme commander. 
General Dwight D. Eisenhow- 
er. that “we will accept noth- 
ing except full victory" over 
the German masters of the 
Continent. 7 -• 

Text of the communique ; 
'Under the command of Gen- 
eral Eisenhower Allied naval 
forces, supported by strong 
air forces, began landing Al- 
lied armies this -morning on 
the northern coast of France.” 

The Germans said the land- 
ings extended between Le 
Havre and Cherbourg' along 
the south side of the Bay of. 
the Seine and along the north - 1 
ern Normandy coast. 

Parachute troops descended 
in Nozmandy, Berlin said. 

Firal ToM by Berlin • ' 

Berlin lir?U announced : the. 
landings in n iwrien of fliwhcn- 
thal began about firBO *, ju;/ 
(J2:.'i0 a. m. Eastern War-. 
Time). 

The Allied communique wa* 
read over a trans-Atlahtfc' 
hookup direct from Genand 
Eisenhower’s headquarters' at 
9:32 a. m. British War Time 
Communique No. I." 

A second announcement by 
S.H.A.E.F. said that "it is an- 
nounced that General Sir 
Bernard L. Montgomery is in 
command of the army group 
carrying out the assault. This 
army group includes British, 
Canadian and United States 
forces.” 

The Allied bulletin did not 
say exactly where the invasion 
was taking place, but Berlin 
earlier gave these details: 

Allied naval forces, includ- 
ing heavy warships, are shell- 
ing U Havre. "St is a terrific 
bombardment." Berlin said. 

Other Allied units were 
si ream ing ashore into Nor* 
mnrnlv from landing bargeu. 
Eiw-niiawrr'a Order 
[General Eisenhower, in his 
first order of the day, as moni- 
lored by N. B. C.. in New 
York, read as follows 

"You are aboui embAifi 
OR a great cnisadc. 

"The eyes of the world ar* 



IN THE NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE 

Follow the new* of the D-Dj> landing in NnnTundy 
exactly as it appeared on the I root in lime 1V44. The<e 

commemorative front pace reprints fr.rni the archives will 
appear even. - day from June Stn through June 1 1 th. 

This way, nur readers will he able to follow their 
excitement, successes and setbacks as the troops established 
beachheads across a "5-inile streren id the Normandy coast 


Because the Taris-hased European EJitinn 
ot the newspaper did mu publish 
during the war, these pages are taken 
from the archives oi its parent 
newspaper puhiished in Nvv. York. 

To purchase a set ol Sall-si-e 
reprodueclori; ot these seven 
hunt panes dune ? - lune ! I, 
l'^44! printed un glossy paper, 
which can be iramed or used 
as posters, please u?e the 
attached coupon. 



Return your order to: International Herald 
Tribune Offers, 37 Lamhton Road, 
London $W20 OLW, England. Or fax 
tn; {44 811 944 8243. 


NAME 


.NswYoftHaaBTribuns 


(IN BLOCK LETTEBSI 
ADDRESS 


• "” y ’ r.'T 




Please send me 


.sets of 


the seven New York Herald Trihunc 
Normandy Landing historic front 
: pages - fune 5 through 1 1, 1944 - 
at UKY 1 K | US$25) p er S ct, plus postage 
• per set: Eurooe il.30 r rest of world 
: E4. 10. 

Please allow 3 to 4 weeks for delivery. 


cirYzeonE/couNTRv 


Payment is by cred.t » d only. 

pkJ ^ hawmv □«« n««J 

1—1 Amcx LJ Eunocawl Q V | S a 

CARP N’-’ 

EXP, 



\ t>yi 











. ... 

l; -' 'V. . 

- ’ J ■ " • 51 

: : -iiS 

- . 

-■ ... . S - $£>' 

* r •■ ■‘r j 

: . : v-^ 

: - • ^ . -r<» I 

- • ■ - a."- 


Photo Keystone Paris 


.* ■- 

•j. ■*» • " . , 


■ • •• 


t 0 t 

r'i ' 

" . ■ "C - .. . 


'• ■ . -.< -< 
a '* • >/ 


Galeries Lafayette. 





_ P Page 10 


T> 



Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH nil? NEW YORK TIM ICS A NO THE WASHINGTON TOST 


A Bit of Glory for Clinton 


With they- country less threatened than it has 
been in many decades, ordinary Americans can 
relax. But presidents are left with precious few 
opportunities to earn foreign policy glory. That 
has proved an especially acute problem for Bill 
Clinton, who has shown an uncanny knack for 
making sensible, un drama tic stewardship ap- 
pear diimsy and inept. 

But when glory cannot be earned, it can 
sometimes be borrowed. And Mr. Clinton is 
borrowing copiously on his current European 
swing through the legendary battle sites where 
American and Allied araries turned the tide 
against fascism in Western Europe a half- 
century ago. Be ginning Friday with the blood- 
drenched beachhead of Anzio and continuing 
through Monday's climax on Normandy’s 
rain-swept shores, the president is making the 
most of what the accidents of historical anni- 
versaries and the powerful symbolism of his 
office have thrown his way. 

The gloty is borrowed, but fairly so. The 
heroism of these epochal battles belongs to all 
Americans; not just the Worid War U veter- 
ans of Mr. Clinton's father's generation but, 
as the president hims elf pot it at Nettuno 
on Friday, to all “the sons and daughters of 
the world they saved." 

Mr. Clinton has honored the past and its 
U.S. and Allied heroes with dignity. Both 
American veterans sensitive to the issue of 
Mr. Clinton's avoidance of Vietnam military 
service and foreign leaders nervously alen to 
any unsteadiness at the helm of their most 
vital ally have been reassured by the presi- 
dent's performance. Mr. Clinton and his 
speechwriters have done their homework, 
and it shows. 

The president has dodged pitfalls and 
grasped opportunities. In his meeting with the 


Pope, Mr. Clinton combined courteous re- 
spect with principled disagreement over abor- 
tion and contraception. He honored democra- 
cy by endorsing Italy’s newly elected rightist 
coalition government 
Though the presence of neofascists in Prime 
Minister Silvio Berlusconi's coalition is jar- 
ring. especially during these anti-fascist anni- 
versaries, any snub of Mr. Berlusconi would 
have pointiessly insulted Italian voters. 

In England, Mr. Clinton's main risk is un- 
flattering comparisons with wartime leaders 
like Churchill and RoosevdL At Pointe du 
Hoc Monday, the comparisons will be with 
Ronald Reagan’s rhetoric a decade ago. 

In his first year and a half, Mr. Clinton has 
generally looked better at foreign policy when 
he travels than he has in Washington. Recall 
his positive notices in Vancouver, Tokyo. 
Seoul and at the Asia-Pacific summit meeting 
in Seattle. On these occasions, the reality of 
continued American power is self-evident; the 
usual roar of domestic criticism, partisan and 
otherwise, momentarily falls still 
And perhaps foreign leaders are somewhat 
more aware than most Americans of the 
changed dynamics of a worid no longer clear- 
ly defined by a Communist East and demo- 
cratic, capitalist West. 

When President Clinton returns to Wash- 
ington on Wednesday, it will be back to hard 
decisions on North Korea. Haiti and any 
number of other continuing crises. But if past 
form bolds, Mr. Clinton wflj probably come 
back with a temporary boost of energy and 
stature from his time abroad. He may also 
benefit, for a few days at least, from an 
infusion of borrowed glory from a more dan- 
gerous, if more heroic, past. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Let North Korea Know 


President Bill Clinton is beginning to rally 
international support for economic sanctions 
on North Korea. Sanctions, especially those 
its neighbors are likely to impose, may have 
limited economic effect on the largely self- 
reliant North. But their purpose is political 
anyway — to show the world’s resolve not to 
let North Korea trifle with the Nuclear Non- 
proliferation Treaty. 

It is thus imperative that any sanctions 
enjoy the broad backing that only a vote of the 
UN Security Council can muster. Mr. Clinton 
is right to direct his efforts to that end. 

North Korea is bringing sanctions on itself 
by sowing doubt about its nuclear intentions. 
It can head them off by entering immediately 
into talks on practical steps to assure interna- 
tional inspectors access to evidence of any 
past diversion of spent nuclear fuel. 

North Korea has not yet foreclosed all possi- 
bility of getting at its nuclear past. So long as all 
the spent fuel rods are held in secure storage, it 
may still be posable to reconstruct the record 
of bow much spent fuel containing up to two 
bombs' worth of plutonium, the North may 
have removed from its reactor at Yongbyon in 
1989. .And North Korea has so far allowed 
the International Atomic Energy Agency to 
verify that an additional five bombs' worth 
of plutonium is not now being diverted while 


the reactor is shut down for refueling. 

But Pyongyang's refusal to satisfy a rea- 
sonable request to set aside selected fuel rods 
for assay and its rush to remove the rods 
from the reactor have made it impossible for 
the IAEA to carry out its preferred method 
of sampling and raised broader doubts about 
North Korea’s willingness to break the nu- 
clear deadlock through diplomacy. 

The North’s action warrants starting down 
the road to sanctions. But it should not pre- 
clude the possibility of resuming talks. 

North Korea's neighbors, especially China, 
are reluctant to impose a complete embargo, 
especially on vital oil supplies, for fear this 
would cause a chaotic collapse of the regime. 
And Japan might find it difficult to keep its 
Korean residents from sending hard currency 
home. Short of a total embargo, sanctions 
would do little to worsen the North's already 
bleak economic prospects. 

An embargo on aims trade seems the most 
fitting first step, and sends an appropriate 
message to a garrison state. But the exact 
content of the initial sanctions is less impor- 
tant titan the support they receive from other 
countries. Their main message is political: 
The world means what it says in insisting on 
a non-nuclear Korea. 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Show Resolve in Bosnia 


Loose as it already is, the international grip 
on Bosnia is getting looser. Talks on a cease- 
fire have had to be postponed because of the 
Bosnian Serbs’ continuing defiance of a 
NATO “ultimatum" ordering them to with- 
draw from Gorazde. An American-supported 
plan to partition Bosnia between the new 
Muslim-Croat federation and the Bosnian 
Serbs is one more piece of fluttering paper. 
The Muslim-led Bosnian government thinks 
its military prospects are improving and pre- 
fers to Fight on. The Bosnian Serbs and their 
sponsors in Serbia do not feel sufficient mili- 
tary or economic pressure to mak e the former 
yield up a fair share of their territorial con- 
quests. Europe sees diminishing reason to 

keep its peacekeepers on tbe ground. 

The awful truth of the Bosnian war is that 
both the parties and the outsiders have 
learned how to live with iL NATO, the United 
Nations and the humanitarian agencies, by 
con Laming and cushioning the effects, enable 
the struggle to go on. The war could yet 
expand into the inflammatory southern tier of 
Balkan states. Thai would generate a new 
wave of world concern. But such a develop- 
ment would make even less likely a concerted 
strategy to deal with the war and associated 
refugee flows, misery, political repression and 


economic debacle in the northern tier. Mean- 
while. North Korea is becoming an ever more 
potent international distraction. 

A jolt needs to be administered to these 
transactions of institutional convenience that 
threaten to keep feeding tbe fire, rather than 
dousing it. There must be something to concen- 
trate people's attention on the sheer madness of 
.this state of affairs. Here is a simple proposal. 
NATO should start enforcing the UN resolu- 
tions, one by one. It could start with the six- 
week-old resolution demanding Bosnian Serbi- 
an evacuation of Gorazde. There is no dearer 
or more typical case of Bosnian Serbian con- 
tempt of tbe international wilL 

Would the Serbs retaliate a gains t UN forces 
on tbe ground? If so, those forces could be 
defended or removed. It seems the United 
Nations has taken to authorizing strikes and 
then informing the intended Serbian victims. 
Much lets the Serbs halt tbe offending action 
and moot tbe strike. No more. A strike autho- 
rized should be a strike conducted. Period. 

A policy of serious delivery on UN prom- 
ises is not going to untie every knot in Bosnia. 
But it could break the dangerous and dis- 
graceful pattern of inadvertent international 
complicity in the Balkan wars. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Fruits ol Hungary’s Revolution 


The electoral triumph of Hungary’s re- 
formed Communists joins up a line of East 
European suites, from Lithuania through Po- 
land down to Romania, which have thrown out 
the free market reformers or installed govern- 
ments that borrow some of their ideology from 
a collectivist past. These new parties must be 
watched, but it need not be assumed that they 
are secretly pursuing S talinis t models. Hungar- 
ians, it se e ms , threw out the government they 


elected in 1990 for tbe sound reasons that 
destroy governments in the West: because it 
failed to deliver on its economic promises. 

It is perhaps too quickly forgotlea that Hun- 
garian reformed Co mmunis ts were slowly cre- 
ating wealth and liberty long before it was 
allowed elsewhere. They have still to negotiate 
the shoals of coalition politics: but they have a 
popular mandate as they enjoy the first fruits of 
Hungary’s "negotiated" revolution": a demo- 
cratic change of government. 

— The Times I London I. 



International Herald Tribune 

EFT.LBUSHED 1887 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chairmen 


RICHARD MACLEAN. Publisher & Chief Executive 
JOHN VINOCUR. EjtaaneErfaor A Via President 


• Walter wells. ,w m * • samuel abt. katherine knorr and 

CHARLES MTTCHELMORE. Deputy Edurn • CARL GEWik iz, .Afscaate Editor 
• ROBERT J. DONAHUE. Editor of Ok Efittm id Pages • JONATHAN GAGE Business anti Finance Editor 

• RENEBONDY.ZJey^'PuHu/tfr^J.AMESMcLEOD.AAwiirin^flrecwr j 

•JUANITA L CASPAR! baemakwied iMvbpnm Directoru ROBERT FARR& Cmdooan Director. Europe i 

Directenrde la Publication. Richard D. Simmons 
Dircaeur Adjoint Je Li Publication: Katharine P. Da trow I 


MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994- 


© I s I N I O N 


(tribune 


: Disaster Could So Easily Have Struck 

the Allies wnlh u Iarg< 


Iraenuhonal Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Chartes-tfc-CauDc, 9252 1 Neufliy-sur-Seme. France. 
TcL : 1 1 1 -t6_17.95.CCI. Fax ; Gn:_ 46J7.065 1 : Adv_ 463752.12. Internet !OT<?miiDlcom.ie 


&fiKr for Akk Michael Rich entsm 5 Cased#* Rd. Smstporr 0511. TeL |A5/ 172-7768 Fax: Ift5» 274-2551 
Mng Dir Asia RrlfD. KtcnpuM. SO Gloucester Rd.. /for* Kcng TeL 852-922-1188. Fax: 852-922-1190. 
Got Mgr. Gema nr T. Schluur. Friednchstr. 15. £0525 Fnmhfun/M. Td 10691 72 67 55. Fax 72 73 10 

Pro.UK: Michael Gum*. 850 77 fcMir. Hot fofc NX 1002 Td t2l2) 752-3890 Fax lift 75545785 
U.K, Advertising Office: 0 3 Long Acre. London WC2. Tel. (07/1 S 3b-t802. Fax: (07 If 240-2254. 
JJ. tin ccpiicd de 1.200.000 F. RC5 Nantene B 75202112b Commission Paritaire No. 61337 
■£' I'M. bnemmend Hendd Tnbme. AH riffti resend ISSN: 



H ENLEY-ON-THAMES. Eng- 
land — The triumphant success 


XI land — The triumphant success 
of Operation Overlord and rite ensu- 
ing Normandy campaign, launched 
50 years ago Monday, led to the de- 
struction of German armies rotating 
more than 250,000 men, making it the 
greatest success by the Western Allies 
ta all Worid War’ll. Its very success, 
however, tends to lead modern-day 
historians, in the brilliance of hind- 
sight, to take it as a forgone conclu- 
sion. It was far from that. 

Realization of the grim losses on 
Omaha Beach had. by midday on 


By Alistair Horne 


1944 NORMANDY 1994 


June 6, caused General Omar Brad- 
ley, a calm and competent command- 
er, to fear that his 29th and 1st Divi- 
sions had “suffered an irreversible 
catastrophe.'’ He came within an inch 
or ordering withdrawal of rite Omaha 
force — the main bulk of the .Ameri- 
can D-Day effort. 

Such a'Dunkirk-style evacuation, 
disastrous as it would have been, il- 
lustrates just what a risky and coura- 
geous undertaking it was to invade 
Normandy in June 1944. ft was. how- 
ever, only one of the ways in which 


have rushed some of his 60 available 
divisions to tbe threatened area. 

An absolutely essential ingredient 
of Allied success on D-Day was the 
skillful (and British-initiated l decep- 
tion scheme. Operation Fortitude. £ •' 
pretending to have a whole army 
group under U.S. General George S. 
Patton in readiness in southeastern 
England, the Allies deceived the Ger- 
mans into believing that the main 
invasion effort would take place in 
the heavily defended Pas de Calais. 

Operation Fortitude succeeded so 
well that it fooled Hitler into keeping 
a whole German army, the 15th, tieo 
down uselessly in the Pas de Calais 
even after General Patton’s U.S. 3d 
Army had landed in Normandy, sit 

weeks after D-Day. 

If Goman patrol boats and sub- 
marines had been properly alerted by 
their intelligence on D-Day. losses 
inflicted on the .Allied armada could 

have been devastating. 

Then, when landing on deadly 
Omaha Beach. General Bradley’s men 
r an unexpectedly into a first-class 
German division, the 352d. the only 


one of its standard in Normandy. Ca- 
sualties were appalling higher than 
anywhere else — though slender in 
proportion to what was at stake. 

If General Bradley bad been forced 
to withdraw from Omaha, and had it 


a ■ r utuc confronting the Allies with n Uigd) 

tenibie damage g^ um st Western Europe, 

one week after D-Day), Bniam. -nie recently released papers from 
economy and morale would ha e Britisil {4blic Records Office 

<*“ Rnmmers show Hiller by April IWpUamng 


*n senousiy r sbav Hiller by April iw puuumiB 

It ^ Field Marshal SmnoUtion accompanied by .a 

me that, if he could destroy the At seu“^?- Gftttcrdammer- 


hope that, if he could dptray me m- Gdttcfdammer- 

£2oa tbe western M M Sof dSKS in Bmp* With 
mig ht be able to force Stalin to some through 1944 and 


towitnurawuomvu^^a^.a be able ro f^Sralm to *jme continuing through ,1944 md 

been repeated on the British and Ca- deployed 1945, it would 

nadian beaches (where, thanks chiefly The 60 Germandj ^ opportunity to destroy Paris. 

to Fortitude the landings had met in the west “Shi™, That none of these dread_ scenarios 


to Fortitude the landings had met 
only limited resistance), the cutting 
edge of the D-Dav forces would have 
been lost Almost certainly a large 
proportion of the indispensable inva- 
sion craft would have been lost loo. 

Such a reverse would have meant 
the almost certain postponement of 
another Overlord attempt to the sum- 
mer of 1945. The Americans were 
under strong pressure from the “Pa- 
cific First” lobby of Admiral Eniest 
K ing , the chief of naval operations, to 
transfer forces — and landing-craft 
— to the Pacific. 

With British manpower critically 
depleted, die main effort against Ger- 
many would have been American. 
Under the rain of Hitler’s “secret 


in the west tnighl ^tSSeoMtoc^ 
balana against tile Red Anny. which J^J^d^ded huge* <* two. 
dflWmf millions of casualties. too* TTV-.- 


had suffered millions of casualties. 

If D-Day had failed, at best conti- 
nental Europe would have been sub- 
jected to another year — and certain- 
ly the most terrible year — of war 

Before liberation. Hundreds of thou- 
sands would have starved. The T^nal 
Solution” would have consumed the 
tnc i r emnan ts of European Jewry, 

Finally. Hitler’s scientists had been 
working for years on an atomic 


JJJoi --General Eisenhower and h» 

C d-forces commander. General 
rd Montgomery — “Mgrtjr- 
Ike himself was superbly quafirtec to. 
wdd together harmoniously afi the 
disoaiate Allied forces. Bui the do- 


wuiarne J— * “ . , 

bomb. They might noi have achieved 
it by 1945; but, with greater certainty, 
the Allies would have dropped “Fat 


weapons.” ihe pilotless V-l missiles 
(which began landing, and causing 


Boy” in Europe, not Japan. 

With Allied ground forces stalled 
in the west, then the war might wdl 
have ended with the Red Army occu- 
pying all of a “nuked” Germany. 


►-Day might have failed. 

D-Day was one of the greatest sin- 


gle achievements in all military histo- 
ry, a triumph of British- Amen can co- 
operation. The vast armada that set 
forth from England on June 6 was the 
largest that ever pul to sea. In it were 
nearly 6.000 vessels — from battle- 
ships to tiny invasion craft — at least 
11.500 aircraft, 156.1 15 ground troops 
plus three elite airborne divisions. 

History can play strange tricks: E»- 
Day could so easily have gone terri- 
bly wrong. Secret papers recently re- 
leased in London suggest that, by 
1944, it was by no means impossible 
for Hitler to have won the war. 

In the first place, the invasion 
might have taken place in 1943 — or 
earlier. Stalin wanted an invasion as 
early as 1942. So did the U.S. Joint 
Chiefs of Staff. But British caution, 
and — - in this instance — good judg- 
ment, prevailed. 

The disastrous Dieppe landing of 
August 1941 where the Canadians 
lost 3,369 of a total force of 5,000. 
illustrated the catastrophe that would 
almost certainly have overtaken any 
premature all-out invasion of north- 
west Europe. Success in June 1 944 was 
predicated largely on massive -Allied 
superiority in the air — which had not 
yet been achieved the previous year. 
Equally in 1943 the British and .Ameri- 
cans bad neither the essential numbers 
of tanks nor of landing craft. 

Second, there was the weather. To 
get the right combination of tides and 
moon, there were only a few days in 
June 1944 that were acceptable. As it 
happened, the invasion was post- 
poned from June 5 to 6. on die deci- 
sion of the supreme Allied command- 
er, General Dwight D. Eisenhower, 
because of bad-weather reports. Had 
it been called off yet again, the next 
possible date would have been June 
18-19. But on those days, the worst 
storm in 40 years struck; 800 vessels 
were destroyed — together with die 
whole .American floating harbor 
called Mulberry. 

Thus, if postponed to June IS- 19. 
the British-American invasion force 
would almost certainly have suffered 
the same fare as the Spanish .Armada 
in 1588 —scattered and sunk without 
a shot being fired from shore. 

Third, D-Day could have failed if the 
Germans had had access to anything 
resembling British intelligence. Had 
Field Marshal Erwin Rommel known 
where we were going to land, he could 



The Cost of Freedom 


of the invasion forces, be had entrust- 
ed to General Montgomery, y*. 

The British general was the one 
man on either side who could fare ■ 
lost the war ca D-Day, It almost, 
ce rtainl y would haw bear tat 'if 
Monty had accepted thepfcas he 
inherited in January 1944. These tad _ 
prescribed a wboBy inadequate land- 
ing by three divisions, from the Very 
beginning,. Monty insisted th$ Affies- 
lanri five divisions on a 50-rn3e^ i wide 
(80-kflometer) beachhead. : - 

As it turned out, although find 
victory was to be delayed another 


year, success at D-Day assured the. 
fall of Hiller. It also shaped die mod- 
era world. With Americaawtdmnir 
nance in the'- war manifestly estab- 
lished — U.S. troops in Europe griw 
from parity wilh the British ton ratio 
of 3-u>-l - D-Day was the moment 
when America rook the Jead of the 
alliance. Today's frontiers in Europe 
and the structure of the 50 years of 
peace that followed hark back to.that 
success. Without iL what remained of 
Europe would suirfy have been teft to 
face liberation by the Red Anny. - - 



. I s s * ■ o « 




aw; 

? S.& 4 - -d 

huai 


iWtita,. i •££(>. 








Mr. Home, a historian and co-cutfior 
cf “ The Lonely Leader, Momy 1944- 
45," was training in England for the 
Guards Armored Division w ha the D- 
Day invasion was favnc 'vL He contrib- 
uted this lo The Washington Post. 


The News Was of Liberation but Also of America 


N EW YORK — D-Day came late for me. 
meaning that I heard about it some time after 


IN meaning that I heard about it some time after 
it happened. News didn't reach Lhe place where 1 
was as fast as most places. We were on the far side 


By Elie Wiesel 


of an abyss separating life and death: we were the 
living dead. For us. news was never anything 
greater than the size of our daily bread ration. 
Normandy was not part of our universe. 

Perhaps the SS guards knew more about what was 
happening in the world. Some among us were able 
to read their expressions. But I never looked at the 
guards. 1 was afraid they might notice me. 

Just three weeks separated me from my home in 
the Carpathian mountains in Hungary. My body 
had adapted quickly to the horror of conditions in 
Auschwitz, bui my spirit refused to accept it and 
persisted in keeping ray mind far away. 

I can "i remember exactly when I heard the news. 
One evening, after wort detaiL my father told me 
what had happened. But both of us were think ing 
the same thing: Now the Allies are going to win the 
war. but it wul come too late for us. 

Only after the war did I grasp the magnitude of 
Overlord, a nuJiiary operation of unprecedented 
scope. I devoured everything I could find about it: 
books, magazines, newspapers. I wanted to know 
how General Eisenhower had managed it: I wanted 
to hear all I could about those who fell on the 
Normandy beaches: aboui the paratroopers in the 
famed 10ist and 82d airborne divisions; about the 
young colonels and the grizzled sergeants: about 
how they took Ste.-Mere-Eslise and how Sl-Lo fell 
I knew of the daring of some men. the panic of others. 

I felt admiration, affection and gratitude for all 
those, known and unknown, who had come to 


liberate the Continent from the curse of Nazism 
Mv personal D-Day came later. It was .April 11. 
1945'. Comrades of the men who had stormed the 
beaches suddenly appeared in the Buchenwald 
camp to rescue us from death. 

For everyone in Europe, the sight of tbe GIs 
brought feelings of hope and gratitude. Liberated 
peoples welcomed them without knowing quite 
now to thank them property, exactly bow to tell 
them how much we owed them. Lining village 
streets, girts jumped onto jeeps and tanks to kiss 
them: men offered cognac and Champagne. 

Beyond the men in uniform, .America itself fasci- 
nated Europeans. Never before or since were 


seized power in Czechoslovakia, showing that Mos- 
cow was determined to dominate Central and East- 
ern Europe. Co mmunis ts everywhere, eager to fd- 


American culture, manners and style so profound- 
ly and genuinely popular. Tbe books of Faulkner 


ly and genuinely popular. Tbe books of Faulkner 
and Steinbeck were literary revelations. There were 
long lines to see American movies. Jazz was the 
music that spoke to young people. Smokers wanted 
Camels and Lucky Strikes, not Gauioises. 

Camus. Sartre and de Beauvoir, who were to 
mold the minds of a young generation, were openly 
fascinated by American-style democracy and art. 
by the .American dream. 

So strong was this mood that it generated a 
backlash: After their original enthusiasm, Europe- 
ans gradually developed a feeting of inferiority, and 
then resentment, vis-a-vis their liberators. Was this 
lhe start of a new era in Europe — particularly in 
France — a sobering and then a disenchantment? 

I was living in Paris in 1948 when it seemed to me 
that a turning point was reached. The Co mmunis ts 


low tbe Soviet line, started looking for a cause — a 
political philosophy and system of government to 
□ate and fight against. Tbe United States afforded 
an ideal target. As Soviet repression worsened, the 
Communists stepped up their criticism. 

Then, in 1950, came the Korean War. After that 
everything American became anathema to Commu- 
nists. Leftists carried considerable weight in inteQeo 
tual and also political aides. Yesterday’s saviors 
became, almost owemidit. the devil's minions. 

The silent majority did not really go along with 
this political fashion. People continued to admire 
American cultural achievements and consumer 
goods. And eventually, the Soviet Union ended up 
getting tbe punishment that it had sought to mete 
out to the United States. 

Slowly, Europeans weaned themselves from 
Moscow's ihrafl, turning their backs on its propa- 
ganda of hatred and anti-Americanism. 

And now, 50 years after D-Day, has the West 
come full circle? Are Americans again viewed as 
generous, faithful friends whose presence in Eu- 
rope is helpful and welcome? No. la us not indulge 
in self-illusion. 

But the memory of that day in June, when the 
heroism of American troops spelled a dawn of 
human freedom and dignity, should remind os 
always (hat courage ultimately outweighs fflasions. 


The writer, an author and lecturer, received the 
Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. He contributed this 
comment to the International Herald Tribune. 


Americans Just Want a Steady Hand at the Foreign-Policy Helm 


B OSTON — Bill Clinton and his 
people came to Washington be- 
lieving that foreign policy would mat- 
ter little, if at aU. io his political 
success. Late, very late, they have 
begun to understand their mistake. 

Americans may say that they do 
not much care about foreign affairs. 
But making a mark in the world — 
being seen by other nations as a fig- 
ure of authority — is crucial lo a 
president's establishment of author- 
ity at home. So it is ominous for Mr. 
Clinton that recent polls show a 
sharp loss of confidence in his han- 
dling of foreign policy. 

Mr. Ointon's present European 
trip is seen by the White House as an 
opportunity to improve his foreign 
policy standing. He is also going to 
make more speeches on foreign issues 


By Anthony Lewis 


in the coming month. But the as- 
sumption of all that is that the policy 
is fundamentally sound and just 
needs to be explained better. I think 
that assumption is quite wrong. 

What people find troubling is ihal 
even if a particular policy has merit, it 
may be good for that day only. There 
is a sense of vacillation and incoher- 
ence, of policy driven by the vagaries 
of public opinion rather than by a 
president’s firm beliefs and a long- 
term vision of how io achieve his goals. 

Certainly America’s friends 


abroad have such feelings about Mr. 
Clinton's foreign policy. The Interna- 
tional Institute for Strategic Studies, 
in London, said last week: ‘Tbe 
United Slates, even more than usual. 


does not seem to be following a 
steady compass." The Economist put 
it: "One of the few predictable things 
about Clintonite foreign policy seems 
to be that every zig will be followed 
by yet another zag." 

One of Mr. Clinton's problems is 
his tendency to agonize in public — 
to talk about how trying the issues 
are. Then again he calks so often and 
so eloquently on so many subjects 
that be retains no mystery. The pub- 
lic prefers to have a sense of a presi- 
dent's basic verities in foreign policy. 

President Ronald Reagan was the 
Opposite. He had a foreign policy so 
basic that no one could misunder- 
stand: Pul pressure on the Soviet 
Union but be ready, at least after 


The Colonel Wins a Battle , Not a War 


W ASHINGTON — The highly 
decorated nurse who a iudee 


YY decorated nurse who a judge 
has ordered reinstated in the Washing- 
ton National Guard is also the woman 
who prompted President Bill Clinton 
to promise an end lo discrimination 

against homosexuals in the military. 

Mr. Clinton was not president 
when he gave this pledge. He was 
campaigning in Seattle in 1992 at a 
“town meeting” when Colonel Ma- 
gorethe Cammermeyer stood up and 
asked him if he would end the ban. 

“He looked me squarely in ihe eye 
and said ‘yes,’ *’ Colonel Cammer- 
meyer said later. “He then went on to 
tell the audience who I was. I was 
very touched by that ... 1 was 
amazed that he recognized me.” 

Mr. Clinton was the first presiden- 
tial nominee to seek gay and lesbian 
votes, and be needed Colonel Gam- 
menneyef as much as she needed him. 

But by the time he addressed the 
Seattle town meeting. Mr. Clinton had 
come under fire as a draft evader and 
was on ihe defensive. He knew that 
many Americans were uneasy with his 
promise to eliminate a long-standing 
policy that declared homosexuality in- 
compatible with military service. Mr. 
Clinton wanted a symbol to demon- 
strate the unfairness of judging people 
by sexual orientation rather than by 
what they did for their country. 

Because she was a decorated war 
hero. Colonel Cammermeyer was ihe 
perfect symbol. In 1985 she had been 


By Lou Cannon 


private matter had she not applied to 


chosen from 34.000 candidates as the 
Veterans Administration Nurse of 
the Year. She had served 27 years as a 
military nurse and the board that 
recommended her discharge also 
praised her for “superb leadership.” 

Margarethe Cammermeyer did not 
set out to be a hero or a symbol. Bom 
in Oslo in 1942 during the Nazi occu- 


the War College in 1989, hoping to 
strengthen her candidacy to become 


strengthen her candidacy to become 
chief nurse of the National Guard. 
She did not realize that this required 
a top security clearance or that die 
would be asked if she were a lesbian. 
But Colonel Cammennever told the 


1983, to make deals with Mikhail 
Gorbachev on just about any subject. 
Whatever the merits of this Reagan 
action or that — Lebanon, Grenada 
— the simplicity of the grand design 
was highly effective politically. 

Of course life is not so simple after 
the Cold War. No president can offer 
us a policy as two-dimensional as 
standing up to the Soviet Union. 
Skepticism is in order when Mr. Clin- 
ton s policy is attacked by the likes of 
James Baker or Brent Scoweroft, who 
in the Bush years failed so miserably 
in Yugoslavia, letting Serbian aggres- 
sion grow unchecked 

The trouble with American policy 
now is not a party matter. Cnarles 
William Mavnes, editor of the quar- 
terly Foreign Policy, was right when 
be told The Boston Globe recently 
that the whole foreign policy estab- 
lishment “has been afraid to confront 
the new reality” after the Cold War. 
"Both parties want a cost-free foreign 
policy, he added. 

But Mr. Clinton is president, and 
the burden is on him to offer credible 
policies for a new age. What can he 
do to improve not just communica- 
tion but substance? 

First, have a bottom line on the 


tough issues, and tell the world — 
and the American people — what it 
is. It is fair oiough to tell Americans 
that a problem Is hard But a presi- 
dent has to go rat and say: Here is 
where we are going and how we are 
determined to get there. 


Second, stop saying defensive 
things such as that he has talked with 
100 foreign policy experts. Even if 
true, that hardly builds confidence 
that the president is a man with con- 
victions of his own. 

Finally, do not just talk firmly but 
act firmly. I believe that Bill Ointon’s 
presidency would lot* altogether dif- 
ferent today if, early on. he tad made 
a real commitment to stop Serbian 
aggression and genocide — and led 
die Europeans to act with the United 
Stales instead of caving in to their 
fainthear tednes s. 

What is needed now is a signal of 
determination. The most likely place 
is Haiti, which for all the historical 
doubts about U.S. intervention is a 
boD waiting to be lanced. If tbe presi- 
dent really leads, the American pub- 
lic will support him. 

To amend Shakespeare slightly: 
Steadiness is aB. 

The New York Tunes. 


i m 


But Colonel Canunenney 

truth and was subsequent - !' 


subsequently fired by a 
rho wept and called her 


R ation, she was the daughter of fierce 
lorwesan patriots. According to a 


Norwegian patriots. According to a 
family story, her mother hid guns in 
her baby carriage and delivered them 
to resistance fighters. 

The Caramerrneyers emigrated to 
America after World War 11. Maigar- 
eibe Cammermeyer enlisted in the 
army nursing corps in 1961, volun- 
teered to serve in Vietnam and won 
the Bronze Star for her care of soldiers 
wounded in the 1968 Tet offensive. 

She later married an army tank 
commander. Forced to leave the ser- 
vice in 1969 because she was preg- 
nant with the first of four sons, she 
re-enlisted in 1972 when the regula- 
tions were changed. She was a profes- 
sional success and a good mother. 

Over the years, however, she be- 
came deeply troubled in her marriage 
and aware of her sexual orientation. 
She was divorced in 1980. Only the 
family and a few friends knew why. 

Margarethe Cammermeyer' s sexu- 
al orientation would have remained a 


commander who wept and called her 
a “great American." 

Margarethe Cammermeyer was 
not eager to become a test case. But 
she fell a duty to “go out fighting for 
what I believe is right.'' 

When I interviewed her in 1992, she 
expected more of Mr. Clinton than he 
was able to deliver. He underestimated 
the intensity of military and congres- 
sional opposition. He was forced to 

settle for a “don’t ask, don’t tell” poli- 
cy that satisfied no one. 

Mr. Clinton’s retreat left the issue 
lo a federal judiciary that has become 
increasingly skeptical about the con- 
stitutionality of job discrimination 
against homosexuals. In ordering 
Margarethe Cammermeyer’s rein- 
statement, U.S. District Judge Thom- 
as Zilly found that military anti-gay 
policy violated the Constitution's 
equal-protection clause. Lawyers say 

this ruling or another like it will even- 
tually land in the Supreme Court, 

Gays and lesbians can only hope 
that the test case that will decide their 
cause is Margarethe Cammermeyer's. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 yf.ars 


1894; European Arms 


PARIS — The conclusion of the ses- 
sion of the Prussian Landtag has 
been highly interesting Herr MiqueL 
the Prussian Minister of Finance, 
gave some singular details respecting 
the finances of the country. The Bud- 
gfds show a continued series of defi- 
cits. The Budgets in evoy country in 
Europe are equally unsatisfactory 

SSI 10 * town i 

Utal all this financial weakness is due 

Irr 6110 ™ 0 ^ mamas with 
which Europe is burdened. 


unsettled. The Council of Four will 
probably not fix definitely the sum, 
because that would mean altering one 
of the fundamental principles, laid 

bv the Trpotv aae'm^i 


imimhiuvu loi pjuiLiuica UUU 

by the Treaty, against which both 
President Wilson and M. Oemen- 
c*au are strongly opposed. 


1919: War Reparations 

PA Die TL « 


d^i?et74 71 ^£ 0unal of Four k* 
definitely dotded upon a number of 

Ranges in the Treaty with Germany 

yesterday resulted 

SLaT* yd Gwr S e reaching the 

mg without affecting its princinles 
TTe auelion JTjwSTS 


1944: The Invasion Is On 

LONDON — The Goman' news 

a y Transocean said today in a 
cast that the Allied invasion 
had begun. There was no Allied con- 
firmation. Tbe Ger man broadcast 
could be one which Allied leados 
fave expected would be made with 
the puipose of upset ting patriot plans 
reside the conquered countries. The 
Assooated Press recorded the broad- 
cast, which said the invasion had be- 
gun from the west and that the 
v™ port of Le Havre was being 
shelled . . . The reported landings, if 
true, could be an Allied feint of which 
iTune Minister Chui duD ha g wanted 
the Allied worid to expect in advance 
of the main Allied blows. 


Op 


fren 


LEGAC 




*1‘ ' \ T- ■ • ... 

• • -• r- :iK 


"t ■— • - 


I.--'' . . 
■V ^ I- 




£ U-\z ^ 


io? rl_ 

i* x'-i.-v r . 




v ■■ 7 . *.-/ 


-r-l v ... 

‘lr ‘ 

. 1 -. . .. 7 *. 

9- > r - ' .. . 7 

a.- --.T-.. -“ 

, , 








fjpsag 

5*3$ 


■ : . >-r 2 ; =.r «w?S 
' ’ JS-' 

' . • - --Ji.r- r..^ “• l *el tojft 
. -' r v- 0 . 

NV ZV . ■. ."’- %i* : 1 



• ..'l*j - j^iaeai 




*D iv 


■"••-■.■: t. -* W >"“*■£ 

-■v **2 

. . ; _. ■ -ox uie'- ^ 


tr .; ■- • '■ r- I: .’ " a Eet 

s.,.c.. iV. ^«4*4 
-.,• - .-'■-::;;:^ r ^ F 

■-**** 






«** 

!fc *Si: 
- .4; 2 ^. 

r>~" 


>/ America 


' r * ;■ . -»v 




olkv Bela 


• V 

V^: * 

.-■ ■■■ I‘— jc’ 


: -fr* 


... -r-% 

-> " V 

' -: ' : 



.:■■ ;•■; . ::>.; \: •' 


' ... - x '7. *■«•.:*■ 


•r* 

■ - ■ O' ,• 

-# # . ** . 


- ’* ■" y v 

> -*y* i - 

.-a ./.» ■ 



** 



^ACKTONORMANDY/ 1 dm 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 


Page 11 


§“ £ $ 4' : 

IHL: p!: * 




jBoys o/ ? 44 Leap Again Into Normandy 




■ 








By Ken Ringle 

Washington Past Service 

SaINTE-MERE-EGLISE, France — For- 
ty-one aging paratrooper veterans who 
leaped into history SO years ago reclaimed 
their chutes and jumped again Sunday, this 
time into the hurts of France. 

On a day when the hedgerow checkerboard 
of Normandy glowed rich and green under a 
June sun. the members of the Return to 
Normandy Association floated out of a 
cloud-flecked sky. They were laden with flags 
and memories of (he World War II comrades 
they honored. 

Cheering below were politicians and digni- 
taries. military brass and brass bands, hun- 
dreds of French and American troops and 
more than 30,000 flag-waving spectators, pic- 
nicking in pastures dusted with buttercups. 

“I was coming down between this cow- and 
the river, ** said a mud-covered Richard Te- 
desky, 73. of New York City, explaining his 
late arrival at the ceremony area. “I avoided 
the cow." 

Mr. Tedesky. a 5-foot, 4-incfa construction 
worker, had landed north of here 50 years ago 
and had to fight his way into town. 

It was easier this time, be said, “even with 
my arthritis and everyone wanting auto- 
graphs.*' 


RoffieDnff,78, a former US. paratrooper, getting in some final ground practice at Caipiquet France, beforeSTreal thing Sunday. 

F rench and Americans Bury the Hatchetfor a Day 


The old guys provided both drama and 
suspense. Earl Draper, 70, of Inverness. Flor- 
ida. found himself with a tangled main para- 
chute and a malfunctioning emergency rip- 
cord. 

A safety device deployed his reserve chute 
automatically and he rode it to a bumpy 
landing in a ditch conveniently near the first 
aid tent. A French doctor pronounced 
healthy hut be was taken to a Cherbourg 
hospital anyway. 

Mr. Draper raised a fisted band in victory 
as he was evacuated. 

“It was one hell of a step out there, one hell 
of a jump,” he said. 

“He did exactly die right thing and I*d say 
he did an excellent job," said Colonel Rich- 
ard M. Bridges of the U.S. Army. 

Rene Dnssaq, 83. a soldier of fortune and 
Hollywood stunt man wfao parachuted into 
Normandy before D-Day to coordinate the 
French underground, faded to turn up after 
thejumpin a muster at the at the drop zone in 
nearby Amfrevifle. 

He was discovered several hours later sign- 
ing autographs in the town whore he had boat 
carried by local farmers after riding wind 
gusts to several miles. 

Other jumpers rode back from their land- 


ing in &n ambulance, but only because that 
was the quickest way along the narrow, traf- 
fic-dogged country roads. 

“It was a hell o( a tot of work and I fed 
really good about the day." said Richard 
Mandreh, 69, a San Diego engineer and 101st 
Airborne Division veteran who founded the 
Return to Normandy Association and orga- 
nized the memorial jump. "But remember, 
we’re not the real story. The story is why 
we’re here." 

Mr. Mandich and a handful of other veter- 
ans had been working since last fall to make 
their jump the centerpiece of D-Day activities 
here. With a fierce sense of persona] mission, 
they believe they owed it to Use thousands of 
airborne veterans lulled during World War II. 

Guy Whidden, 70, a retired teacher and 
coach from Frederick, Maryland, carried 
with him on his jump the names of 3,000 
airborne dead. In response to reporters who 
asked about bis fears, be read instead a pray- 
er for fallen comrades that he had written. 

Rollie Duff, 79, of Ft. Myers, Florida, 
carried and displayed cm his jump an Ameri- 
can flag that had covered the casket at his 
brother’s military funeral He landed dose to 
where he had landed SQ years ago as part of a 
group of pathfinders to plant radar f 


Washington Pun Service 

SAINTE-MERE-EGL 1 SE, 
France — For one glorious after- 
noon, as bright sunshine filled the 
Normandy sides Sunday in a break 
from gate-force winds and rain, a 
special warmth suffused the 
French- American relationship that 
is usually renowned for its tempes- 
tuous nature. 

Gone war the snide French allu- 
sions to America as the clumsy gi- 
ant, trampling on European sophis- 
tication by imposing a kind of 
cultural hegemony on the world 
through its brainless television 
shows, violent movies or concrete 
theme paries. 

Forgiven were the angry ex- 
changes over European miHlary se- 
curity, prompted in America’s view 
by France’s reluctance to face up to 
its wartime h umiliation Nobody 
seemed to recall that when Charles 
de Gaulle demanded the United 
States remove its soldiers from 
French territory in 1965, an embit- 
tered Secretary of State Dean Rod: 
asked: "Does that order include 
our war dead, too?” 


In the weeks before the D-Day 
anniversary, French newspapers 
and magazines have been flooded 
with articles emphasizing the im- 
portance of the Allied invasion in 
toppling the Nazi occupation re- 
gime and denigrating the often 
mythical exploits of the French Re- 
sistance. 

Even President Franijois Mitter- 
rand, who has built modi of his 
political career and personal alli- 
ances fry touting as Resistance 
rote, on Sunday acknowledged that 
the D-Day events ultimately deter- 
mined the fate of France and the 
war. 

In a message that was hand-de- 
livered to each of the 40,000 veter- 
ans attending the 50th anniversary, 
Mr. Mitterrand thanked them pro- 
fusely for their valor and detfica- 
tion in achieving victory in the bat- 
ties that liberated France and 
decided the fate of Wodd War IL 

“I express the gratitude of 
France to those who 50 years lata 
have come bade to pay respects at 
the graveside of their comrades and 
viat the rites which saw so much 


glory and so much suffering,” Mr. 
Mitterrand wrote. 

In the past year, France has tak- 
en giant strides toward acknowl- 
edging the extent of its wartime 
collaboration through the Vichy re- 
gime, which rounded up Jews and 
sent them to extermination cam ps 
even without bring asked byits 
German Nazi patrons. 

Paul Totzvier, a Vichy intelli- 
gence officer, became the first 
Frenchman to be tried and convict- 
ed of war mimes two months ago 
for executing seven Jewish hash 
(ages. For nearly 4) years, Touvier 
and other important French collab- 
orators had been protected by pow- 
erful figures in the political estab- 
lishment and the Roman Catholic 
Church. 

The frequent jousts over history 
and diplomacy between Paris and 
Washington seemed light years 
away from the scenes of brotherly 
love on the jammed streets of this 
rabidly pro- American town, where 
US. paratroopers liberated some 
1,500 French residents 50 years ago 
from their Nazi occupiers. 


Everett Hall, a 75-year-old resi- 
dent of Rhode Island who is one of 
41 oldparaboopere who participat- 
ed Sunday in the re-enactment of 
the famous drop, stood cm a street 
corner near the local church bask- 
ing in the praise of townsfolk who 
have never forgotten the men who 
freed them from four years of Nazi 
rule. 

“I love you," he crooned to well- 
wishers pasting by, while bragging 
that his jump was "nothing but a 
piece of calm.” He smiled and em- 
braced the giggling matrons who 
were happy to buss another of the 
old heroes wfao have come back, 
time and time again, to relive what 
many of them call the greatest ac- 
complishment of their lives. 

“We have a duty to show our 
gratitude and recognition for the 
men who saved our town,” said 
Mayor Marc Lefebvre, shortly be- 
fore urging French visitors to stay 
home ana watch the anniversary 
events on television so they would 
not interfere with efforts to provide 
comfort and special attention for 
the American war heroes. 


LEGACY: Who Will Remember in 2044? American Vet Has Hope 

Coafikmed from Page 1 


nowadays that 

become a Marine after absorbing the D-Day not the will to fight their own battles." 
lore at his grandfather's shrine during sum- Leroy a retired railroad diqmr-hw 
xner vacations here, has empathy for the . from Tnnmonsville, South CarofinaT iswot- 


World War H American paratroops. 

remember standing single file with 500 
guys going off to the Gulf to fight in Desert 
Storm,” he said. “We were aD asking our- 
selves: Where are we going and what’s going 
to happen? Well, those guys had the same 
feeling, oily twice as bad. 

“But they also had a crystal-dear mission. 
When you look at Bosnia, at Somalia, things 
are less straightforward for us these days. We 
can go in and clean up, but keeping it that 
way is another thing. And a lot of us feel 


ried about the fate rf the values be fought for 
at Normandy because, in President Bin C3m- 
ton, American forces have a commander in 
chief who disdained military service and 
wants to cut the mflhaiy budget. 

In a driving rain and gusty wind, Mr. Leslie 
iccalted hoar many of bs friends were moved 
mtearabyabari ceremony this nmrniiig that 
twinned a local cemetery here with the war 
memorial in Gettysburg Pennsylvania. 

“Yon always ask yourarif whether aD those 
lives were lost in vain,” he said. “But in our 


war, there was never any question of that, 
because we knew our friends laid down their 
lives for a just cause. I have to wonder: Can 
we depend on this president to lay his life on 
the hue if necessary like our comrades did? 
That’s the real reason why he has no standing 
in the veterans' movement.” 

John Jacula, another Normandy para troop 
veteran from Lutz, Florida, moderated this 
view. “Come on, let’s be .realistic," he said. 
“After afl. the Gomans aud the Russians are 
now reconciled to being our friends. We 
ought to be happy about that trend of history 
and not be complaining all die tima about 
lack of leadership.” 


Some 1,200 U.S. veterans are be- 
ing fed and housed during their 
stay in the private homes of local 
residents. It is a rite of hospitality 
that is highly unusual in France, 
where privacy is greatly cherished, 
but it is a service this town has 
provided to the veterans every year 
without fail since the liberation. 

“Each time I come here, I find 
the French people have been gener- 
ous and we/coming to a fault,” said 
Joseph Morrettioi. 69, a former 
paratrooper from Erie, Pennsylva- 
nia, who is attending his third anni- 
versary here. “Sure, we saved them, 
but nobody expected they would 
remember us for this long." 

While most of the veterans say 
the 50th anniversary will be their 
swan song, a few of them say they 
cannot resist the temptation to re- 
turn to savor the adulation and old 
memories. 

“It can be even more pleasant in 
other years, when it’s not so crowd- 
ed and vendors are not just trying 
to make a fast buck.” said Len 
Lebenson, a former paratrooper 
from Elizabeth, New Jersey, allud- 
ing to the $65 umbrellas and the 
“Manitoba clic-clacs” that ped- 
dlers claim are just like the real 
metal clickers that paratroopers 
used to identify themselves by 
making a noisy cricket sound. 

—WILLIAM DROZD1AK 


Vintage Bomber 
Drops Poppies 

Age nee Frenct-Prcste 

PORTSMOUTH, England — A 
gossamer cloud of crimson wafted 
flee Hugh 1 over the English Ghannri 
on Sunday when a World War II 
Lancaster bomber released 2 mil- 
lion poppies to mark the 50th anni- 
versary of the Allied invasion of 
France. 

The biodegradable paper pop- 
pies, manufactured by a British vet- 
erans organization, were dropped 
over a flotilla of neatly 100 mili- 
tary. merchant and pleasure vessels 
crossing to the Normandy beaches 
of northern France. 

An Eisenhower Statue 
Is Unveiled in Bayeux 

„ Agnee France- Prare 

BAYEUX, France — A bronze 
statue of General Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower, the supreme Allied oom- 
mander who was the architect of 
the D-Day invasion, was unveiled 
Sunday in the presence of U.S. vet- 
erans. 

General Eiseohowet’s son, John, 
also a U.S. general was among the 
3.000 people attending the ceremo- 
ny in Bayeux, the first major town 
in Normandy to be liberated in 
June, 1944. 


Invitation to Normandy 
Not Sought , Kohl Insists 


Agettu Franar-Prase 

PARIS — Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of Germany insisted Sunday 
that he had never sought an invita- 
tion to ceremonies martitig the 
50th anniversary of Allied landings 
in France. 

President Franqois Mitterrand 
of France, in a joint interview with 
Mr. Kohl stressed that there had 
been no misunderstanding between 
the two on the issne and said that 
Mr. Kohl would be invited to cere- 
monies next May to mark the Nazi 
surrender in 1945. 

In the interview, published in the 
French newspaper Liberation and 
the Suddeutsche Zatimg, Mr. Kohl 
was asked whether be regretted not 
twang present at the commemora- 
tive ceremonies on Sunday and 
Monday. 

"Certainly not,” be rallied. 
“Even though people naturally pre- 
tended the opposite, I never sought 
an invitation as I believe that Ger- 
man participation on this occasion 
would not have been appropriate. 
On this issne there has never been 
the slightest difference of opinion 
between President Mitterrand and 
myself.” 

The lack oS an invitation to Mr. 


Kohl sparked a controversy in Ger- 
many earlier this year. 

A ceremony took place at a Ger- 
man military cemetery in La 
Cambe, Normandy, on Saturday to 
commemorate the German soldiers 
who died during the landings. Pre- 
sent were 300 Goman veterans and 

a representative of the Ge rman 
Embassy. 

In the interview, Mr. Kohl said: 
“I understand very weQ that the 
Allies want to commemorate 
events of great importance far the 
whole of Europe and to remember 
their dead. We Germans must also 
remember that part of our history 
in order to draw just conclusions.* 

Mr. Mitterrand also stressed that 
on the issue of inviting the Ger- 
mans to the D-Day ceremonies, 
“there has never been a problem or 
misunderstanding between Chan- 
cellor Kohl and myself. June 6 is a 
commemoration mid history does 
not rewrite itself. 

“The chancellor and myself 
therefore decided that the anniver- 
sary of the landing is not the most 
suitable occasion to celebrate and 
consolidate Franco-German 
friendship.” 


BOOKS 


SHOT IN THE HEABT 

By Mikal Gilmore. Illustrated. 
403 paps. $2435. Doubleday. 

Reviewed by 
Midtiko KaJcutani 

T HE photo on the cover of Mi- 
kal Gilmore's astonishing 
itMj flvwr 1 is a family portrait, much 
like mam' family portraits from the 
1950s: Dad and Mom lot* like 
u pdated versions of Grant Wood's 
stoHd farm couple in “American 
Gothic”: he wears the beg inn ings 
or of a tired smile on hts 

face; she lodes weary, stoical a 
little worse for wear. 

Tbe oldest son, Frank Jr. is mak- 
ing a face at tbe camera, while the 
youngest, Gayleo, offers ns a 
bright, affectionate grin. Gary, the 

son in the middle, has adopted a 
<ja«ric western g unslinger 's pose: 
one hand on his pocket, as though 
ready to poll an imaginary pistol 
from a nonexistent holster, an ent,- 
law*s scowl pasted on his 10 -year- 
old face. Their baby brother, Mi- 
kal the author of this book, has not 

yet been bom. 

Years later, in 1977. Gary, the 
scowfing child, would achieve na- 
tional fame, when he beeaare the 
Brat individual in a decade to be 
executed under legislation restor- 
ing the death penalty. 

In a senseless act of anger. Gaiy 
Gilmore had murdered two young 
Mormon men, and he had later 
refused ins right to appeal ins seo- 
He insisted that the state of 
Utah bo ahead and meet the date it 
had set for his death. “What’s there 
to be proud of r he said to fas 

brother MDraL'Tmjustg^g to be 

shot to death, for sometim^ that 
should never have happened. 

The events leading up to anfl 
following Gary Gilmores tom 
have already been mrttultoly 
chronicled by Norman Mato fa 
“The ExecnSoer’s San£j [1979). 

Now, an equally compdlii^yol; 
mne that traces tire rad, vWenj 
history of the Gilmore family and 
.shows, in its anther’s words, “how 
its webwoik of dark segets t aud 
fs 


.'HAT THEY'RE READING 


• Stan McGee, Rhodes Scholar 
at Oxford, is reading ‘ ‘Remember- 
ing Data?* by Calvin Triltin and 
re-reading “Lincoln at Gettysburg* 
by Gany Wills. 

“Trillin’s work is a poignant and 
often times disturbing account of 
the potential dangers of {daring too 
high of a burden of expectations on 
ourselves and others. “Lincoln at 
Gettysburg* is a personal favorite.” 

(May Louise Stott, IBT) 



with bis parents ancestors: fas 
mother’s British 
joined the test of tbe 
hand-carl expeditions to UfafaHe 
tells how his mother* the faro* 


and how she 


riafans she grew Up on fri ghtening 
stories of sm and retribution. She 
left to escape her family’s 
harsh regime, and met and fell in 
love with a ne’erdo-wril con man 
named — among many other 

alias es — F rank Gilmore. 

The omens for an auspirious mar- 
riage were not vary good. It seems 
the secretive and highly paranoid 
Frank had been mamed six or seven 
times already, and bad Ml chfldrcn 
scattered across the country. 

He ? d been more or less aban- 
doned by both his parents as a boy. 
and had spent the better part of fas 
adult life on the road, drifting from 
job tojob, scam to scam. Even after 
ms mama* to Bessie, he stayed on 
the run. Tbdr second driM was 

bom on the main Texas. His birth 
was registered under an alias, Faye 
Robert Coffman; Bessie latex re- 
named him Gary. 

Her husband later became con- 
vinced (incorrectly) that Gary was 
not bis real son, that he was tire 
product of an affair between Bessie 
and care of to cwn sees from an- 
other marriage, a conviction that 
perhap s helps explain why be ad- 
ministered such brutal beatings to 
the boy, 

Actually, none of the Gilmore 
beys (with the exception of Mikal, 
who was realty too yotmg to experi- 
ence ranch of his father’s wrath) 
escaped tire accderatisg violence in 
tire Souse.They were beaten for not 
eating their food fast enough. They 
were beaten for knoddng things 
over. Sometimes, they were beaten 
far nothing at alL . 

Gary breatne obsessed with the 
injustice of tire punishment. “It was 
as if," Mika] writes of his brother, 
“for ihe rest of his life. Ire would be 
re-enacting the drama of his fa- 
ther’s punishments with every au- 
thority figure Ire encountered." 

. Froth, the age of 14 on, Mika! 


writes, Gary’s life became “one 
fore unbroken chain of trouble un- 
til the day be died." Stealing cook- 
ies and yo-yos gave way to break- 
ing and entering and assault; 
juvenile reform school gave way to 
prison, where he was raped and 
drugged and made to go years with- 
out a functioning set of false teeth. 

What makes his stray so poi- 


gnant isn't his seemingly inelucta- 
Ble slide into crime, bat tire chances 
for a new start that continually 
eluded him: his father’s refusal to 
pay for counseling, his own failure 
to register fra a special program 
(hat would have enabled him to go 
to an school the sudden death of a 
girl he had planned to many. 

By c uttin g baric and forth be- 
tween his own memories of his 
family and tire memories of rela- 
tives, Mikal gives us a shattering 
portrait of his family, all of them 
trapped made their hellish house- 
hold, longing at the same time to 
escape and to stay and remake their 
emotional past 

Mikal Gilmore refuses either io 
seatiinenudxze or judge, rather, be 
writes of his famil y with infinite 
sympathy and grief and under- 
standing. He has written a remark- 
able and devastating book. 


Michiko Kakutani is on the staff 
of The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

np HE 20th Cavendish Invitation 
X Pairs, a prestigious event con- 
tested by most of America’s top- 
ranked players, took place in New 

Yodc,iaMay. 

Among tire Four foreign partner- 
ships competing were P. G. Bias- 
sou and Tomas Magnussoo of Swe- 
den, using a strong-club style that 
permits (onward major openings. 
On die diagramed deal from the 
first session of play, Ehasson land- 
ed in three spades after an artificial 
sequence. Two ntHramp promised 
spade support, with game interest 
or better, and three dubs showed a 
minimum. 

West kd his top dnbs, and Sooth 
raffed in dummy and was over- 
raffed. This was not a surprise 
■tiiuy East had signaled by playing 
high-low. East returned a heart to 
dummy* sjack, and Sooth was con- 
fident. Stoe West had failed to 
overcall holding a solid six-card 
dob sttit, it was wildly tmlikety that 
he held anv other significant card. 

So South pdeed 19 the tramps, 
cashed two more bean winners 
coding in the dummy, and ted the 
diamond jock. He allowed East to 
win with the qneen, and that player 
had to concede a trick — either by 
leading from the diamond king or 
conceding a riff and sluff. A safer 


way to make the same nine tricks, 
perhaps, was to discard a diamond 
on the third round of dubs. 

At other tables (he usual opening 
bid was one dub. This resulted in a 
spade contract from the North side 
erf the table. Since East had no 
reason to lead a chib, it was easy to 
make nine tricks. Ten tricks were 
available if East led the diamond 
king, and were in the balance after 
a passive heart lead; West would 
have to lead diamonds whatever 
possible to save his partner from 
the eodplay in that suit. 

NORTH 

* Q J 7 65 

9KQJ 

o J 196 

*93 

WEST EAST(D) 

*92 *K4 

992 V 10 6 5 4 3 

0975 9KQ84 

* A K QB52 *107 

SOUTH 

* A 10 6 3 

$A87 

O A32 

* J 64 

Both sides were vulnerable. The 


bidding: 

East 

South 

West 

North 

PM8 

1* 

Pass 

2 N.T. 

Pasx 

3* 

Pass 

3* 

Pa« 

Pass 

Pass 


West led the club king. 



¥M 




"of. , p jilwjymi 

■f? y /// J - A M 

MammMsmFk 


WWW 


/V 


tffcjvzk 


fy ! ttj'yr iii r\ T 

wm rm 


h vAmI f iit,*' y v. j jr } 1 - . 


rwi. 


M ft';. f/XVlv ■ 

jB|r. r , 1 ‘ 

jpV / '■ 

wmm h K 1 

' - - r -‘ ' 




5 /'V - . 


. Iflil 

m® 


PA 

mMwm 


fete 




ilmMm 5 

P If 

|§|||1 

mMA 




•• 

-■ •tV*’:" 


wmm 

! serf® 


tf 


, ■ - M 


W’W 2 -' ^ ■ " 

v - 1 #» A* -.4. vVti*. * 


r. wifissis 


pflp 

'SfVi’tfy- 


High performance needs 
more than refreshment ... 

Understanding our eating 
habits requires a very close involvement 
in all forms of human activity. 

Pliysical effort makes special 
demands on the body's energy, fluid and 
electrolyte levels; balanced nutrition is 
rbe key to good physical condition. 

Good food is more than just 
refreshment and balance; it must give 
the right amount of -energy in the right 
form to sustain the effort for the time 
required, have a pleasant taste and 
be convenient in use. 

As the largest food company 
in the world, we must be concerned with 
food problems in their widest sense, 
and, by extension, have a dose interest 
in all forms of human activity. This, in 
the end, is what makes Nestle products 
more than just food. 

TAv ’Cs 'Z P r,=r=rr=3H r\c=S 
, } K'v) f Y§© pi 
Lf J'xr^^'oLikS? more than 

just the world’s largest food company. 


* 

- 1 ~t ''O' 




ife- -m 
W S 


15 


td- 

ur- 

a’s 

y's 

ily 

ter 

~%s, 

‘P- 

of 

ns. 

m, 

iid 

he 

to 

<5. 

tie 

in 

is. 

ay 

its 

:h 

xi 

at 

er 

ve 

^s. 

s- 

to 

'A 

id 

at 

tc 

•y 

.0 

> 

»e 

is 

•e 

r 

k 

■e 

n 

is 









*4 


M 


p Pape 12 


l 


Gw. 

: ni 

little 

cune 

pn\fc 

trim 

tradh 


■ Th 
MAt 
1.64! 
dow 


sleac 

5.62( 

JJwis 

pour 

from 


. M 
rope 

;ral 1 
bank 
at a 
Sieve 
bank 
the t 

dot La 
level 
Lrigg 
defei 
“1 


M 


rop« 

plac 

. H 
kets 
Eun 
clo® 


grow 

fidei 

bad 

fori 

M 

ecoi 

amo 

was 

wr> 

and 

leriz 

mar 


a I 

T 

bon 

ten 

trat 


gaii 

Ne 


yef 

po 

lai 

eei 


an 

tic 

pi 

re 

a 




* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 


’ WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL BOW 


Provided by CS First Boston 
Limited, London, Tel: ( 071 ) 
516 40 25 . Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. June 3 


Dollar Straights 


Sod 

Cm Mol Price YU Trev 


Governments/ 

Supranationals 


as m 

Vk B 
7 * 23 


vu <n 
m u 
m oo 
iw oo 
m tn 
avj m 


Mb Jul 
Mb Jon 
AdbMr 
Am Apt 
A ftfcAnr 
Ah* Mr 
AANrtaPrDc 5 97 

A*«nvPrPcb7 n 
Alberto PrNawftft W 
Alberto Pr No* 7» *8 
AsmmFtti Tit ID 
AwfrloPeb 
Austria Feb 
Austria Jan 
Austria Jwi 
Austria Mr 
Austria Mr 
Austria Mo* 

Belgium Ac* 
MghimFfb 
BrtgkimJun 
Batstum JuJ 
BeW um No* 
BMeluoiOa 
BrCotmbjun 7% 03 
C«t whwt Feb W V 
Cbe im *4 

CdaFeb 9 *6 

CM Apt 6% 05 
CHOP tV* 99 
Cr Fender F*ta*M *9 
DeanarkAva fin 97 
Denmark Feb rit 97 
DeniiKifk Feb 5% 91 
OeomortOd 5ft 97 


7Vi 02 100060 7 M +a 
fit* a 92% 7X7 +J3 

*ui - 


753 +37 
I01ft 7X1 457 
91ft ON r«4 
4V> B 91060 7X7 +*t 
m 646 +14 
94ft 7X0 +48 
104ft 651 +35 
101% 7.13 447 
19ft 7X9 +46 
l«7ft *X» +J 7 
96ft 744 +JJ 
itoft M 3 +37 
105ft 7J4 +37 
102ft 7JS +44 
106ft 7 AS +33 


6ft 00 88488 7 & +30 


105% AS* +» 

103ft 60S +34 

94ft A«1 +2« 

M6ft 748 445 

jft IB Staff* 7 £2 +44 

■ft 01 103ft 751 4$1 

109ft 


8 % 
l 97 
SH M 
M 98 


Few Mr 

EdcAor 

EOCAer 

EdcAug 

EdCJiA 

EDCMr 

EdeOd 

Edf Feb 

EM Ml 

EC) Apr 

El b Apr 

ElbAar 

EM Aug 

EJtaDc 

ECDDc 


7x0 +54 
95ft *57 +37 
KUft 

104ft A3 +35 

90ft 7X1 +38 

96ft A96 +11 

100's 7.17 +40 

9Sft A50 +6 

99ft 457 +2S 

96VS AS3 «7 

9#ft 457 +79 

57% 705 «7 

94ft 409 +30 

7ft 07 Ml 049 7M +51 

8ft 03 IQSft 7 A* +53 

6ft 99 98ft 7.15 +32 

Ift 00 106020 7 JO +43 

6ft 04 *3ft 740 ++i 

95ft 453 +23 

108*4 7.16 +40 

Mlft 6J8 +2 

10B% AM +32 

106ft 704 +Z7 

100ft 739 +3* 

92ft A94 +71 

1 04ft 721 +20 


«» a 

5% *0 


Aft 97 
9ft 99 
7 97 

IS 97 
Bft 99 
9ft 00 
5 98 

B Ol 


ElbFeb 

5 

96 

«ft 

402 

+i* 

Ett, Feb 

Elta Jan 

iVl 00 
4% 97 

97% 

95ft 

499 

4XB 

iU 

ElbJuJ 

0% 96 

106ft 

6*6 

♦37 

Etta Jan 

7to SO 

T01Y, 

LB4 

■19 

Elta Mr 

9ft 79 

109V* 

7.13 


Etta Mr 

7V* 9* 

101ft 


-3 

El b Mr 


04 

»ft 

)J8 

r)7 

EltaNev 



651 

+11 

E!b Sen 

7ft 96 

HCft 

6X4 

+27 


7% « 





4% 98 

93% 

657 

+33 

Exlmb* Feb 

6% DO 

90040 

7.17 

+30 

Extant* Fata 

1% 01 

104% 

7X3 

+9 

Exlmtak Jtm 

9V> 00 

110ft 

126 

+46 

Exlmbk Jwi 

1% 01 

07050 

7X2 

+44 

Extan tab Mav 

B 

K 

>02% 

iS 

+47 

Extan bk Mov 



+0 


ExIfnbfcMr 
FlnfctaU Apr 
FUwanoAtor 
Finland Sep 


ladbAuB 

ladbAsr 


I odd Aug 
10® Feb 
la® Sap 
I bra Alto 
1 brd Feb 
ibrtFeb 
Ibrajoi 
ltrd.tan 
IbraJun 
ibra ion 
tort Mm 
lord Mr 
ibrdMr 
ItodMi 

.brt Hm 

lord Oct 
IbrdOct 
rbraOd 
lord Sea 
IfcDe 
Itc Feb 
tfeJul 
Itc Jon 
lie Mr 
FniFbiDc 
IreVondMr 
lltrt+ A pt 


9ft 99 709510 7.18 +40 
7ft 77 101069 601 +41 
9 96 104ft A40 +31 

4ft 96 96ft 633 +16 
Aft 03 94ft 7.44 +34 
6 97 90ft 654 +11 

9ft DO Mlft 731 +16 
Bft 01 107ft 7X6 +47 

IQ 91A4D 737 430 


6ft 97 
7ft 96 

9 97 
9ft 9? 

10 01 
5ft 97 
6 ft 02 


ts 

-5 


100ft 660 +29 
102ft 6X5 +29 
106ft 677 +32 
109ft 7.10 +34 
U Jft 7X7 
99ft 623 
99ft 697 

w noose 7 si +30 
Jft 23 98ft 771 +41 

Oft 94 105ft 634 +30 

Bft 97 KSft AS +26 

8ft 01 105ft 727 +32 

9ft 16 112ft Ul +42 

»% *0 107ft 706 +35 

Oft 95 103ft 5X6 -17 

7ft 94 102ft 622 +11 

Bft 99 10A060 7.10 +7» 

5ft U 87ft 733 +6 

7ft 96 101ft 657 +32 

5ft 9» 91ft 613 +26 

Bft 94 HMft 4X2 +33 

5ft 99 93ft 7 A0 +2» 

VU 98 104ft A«S +38 

5ft « 92ft 721 +51 

6ft 83 9Sft JS3 +16 

9ft 97 I06ft 609 +51 


Sed 


Issuer Cpn Mol Price Yld Trcv 


liolr Feb Bft 
Holy Jan 5ft 
Itolyjufi Bft 
Italy Mr 9ft 
JlolY5ep 4 
Italy SeP £» 

JopHstwJun 8ft 
JOPHaltwMr 5ft 
JOB Han* NOV Bft 
J® DC Aft 

JdbFeb Bft 
JOb May 10 
Jab Nov Bft 
JdbNav 9ft 
jtcMov I 
JicMav Jft 
Jtcrrw Jim 7V* 
KonsotAlr Jul I ft 
K onset Air Oct Bft 
Kobe Citv Auo W 
Kobe at) Jul 4ft 
LanJHm Dc 7ft 
Madrid Jul S' 
Nib Oct «* 

Norway Apr Tn 
Norway Dc 7 
OfcbApr 
OfcbDc 
OKb Jul 
09b Jul 
OMtJul 
OUMr 
om Hydro NOV 8ft 
On tend Pr Aug**) 
Ontario Pr Feb Bto 
□maria Pr Jan 7 
Ontario pr jun *ft 
Ontario Pr Jun 7ft 
Ontario Pr Jan 7ft 
Ontario PrOd 5ft 
PartReoOct 5ft 
OuebHydGU 8ft 
QuebHrd Mr 9 
OinbHydScp 9ft 
Quebec Auo 9ft 
Quebec ABay 9 
SekApr 
SnctFeb 
Sod Jul 
Spain Sep 
SweaenDc 
SwadeaFeb 
Sweden Jon 
Sweden Mr 
Sweden Mr 
Tokyo Nov 
Tokyo Od 
Trans TkyNav Jft 
VTcPubU® 8ft 
Yokhamo Aug 7ft 
YakfiorRa Juf oft 


7ft 

7 ft 

8ft 

♦ft 

7 ft 

8 ft 


Bft 

4ft 

9 ft 

£ 

Sft 

9ft 

4ft 

Ift 

6ft 

Bft 

5ft 


01 

105ft 

IIS 

to 

96% 

7.10 

in 

97ft 

7J0 

9* 

108ft 

7J7 

U 

89% 

7JI 

n 

Oft 

BJ6 

01 

lDtft 

7X4 

00 

54059 

ito 

96 

104ft 

156 

99 

toft 

7» 

01 

104ft 

7X2 

94 

106ft 

60S 

96 

104ft 

657 

97 

106ft 

60* 

03 

107% 

753 

03 

91% 

758 

04 

99ft 

757 

*3 

ID4ft 

708 

99 

toft 

7.t3 

a 

9917 

757 

03 

92030 

741 

02 

Mft 

7.48 

*0 

94ft 

725 

to 

toft 

640 

97 

101ft 

6X9 

96 

laift 

6X2 

97 

ni% 

656 

to 

101%, 

657 

to 

103ft 

640 

00 

100ft 

732 

02 

100ft 

731 

01 

IBS*. 

7.44 

01 

IIQft 

7J5 

to 

1 03ft 

6X7 

01 

104010 

720 

■w 

99010 

7J4 

00 

93ft 

753 

02 

100ft 

7JB 

03 

97% 

708 

97 

96% 

6.93 

03 

BTft 

701 

02 

HOB70 

80S 

01 

105ft 

70B 

99 

10fl% 

7X1 

01 

106ft 

7.95 

01 

105ft 

732 

to 

103 + 

6.40 

97 

95ft 

654 

98 

109ft 

706 

99 

97ft 

7.12 

»5 

*9% 

5J8 

to 

106ft 

70S 

97 

95ft 

650 

96 

103ft 

6JS 

03 

toft 

7X1 

to 

103ft 

656 

03 

86ft 

758 

03 

07ft 

7X3 

02 

TDTft 

7.73 

OS 

toft 

>5* 

03 

91% 

7x0 


+5* 


spd 


issuer Can m=i Price rid Trsv 


6ft 

5ft SB 
Oft 02 
Aft 03 


Lb Sen GlrAor’Jft 96 
LbSrtiLin JunBft ft 
LO Sen LUX J®4Vi *7 
Lb Sell Lur Jul Bft 97 
UbFInDc W ?7 

LkbFInjui 
LkbFHiMr 
UbFTnOa 
Kara Giro Mr 
Rat) afacMav 
RabobkOcl 
SBCCmn Jwi 4ft 
5BCOTU1 Mr Bft 94 
SBCCmnSao ID 95 
SBCCmnSm Ti 9b 
SBC Jersey Jmtft 04 
Stamen CP Aw 8 01 

Solnlot. Jun 7V; *7 
Ubs Fin Fab 9ft 02 
UrbfHiMtaNov^a 98 
Zion AM Oct Jft ft 


4ft 94 


97V» 
IOOV: 
>5ft 
99ft 
98ft 
91 +. 
95ft 
94ft 
*lft 

WJUO 

95ft 

999) 

I 0 ?ft 

104 ^) 

102ft 

TOft 
99W 
101 
108 
97ft 
♦9 ft 


606 +4 

615 r? 
A40 +J3 
661 +21 
6J7 +2S 
722 +43 
669 +1T 
7X7 +3? 
?A1 *6* 
6J6 -* 

634 +1 7 
651 +10 
A52 *54 
604 +47 
A57 +41 
JJ1 *54 
8 JH +102 
7.11 +70 
7x* +OJ 
7.4B +78 
6A7 +47 


+44 


+102 


+94 


+4* 


Global Corporates 


: When It’s Anchors Aweigh LA1NDINGS: The 



Abb Fin Feb oft 96 
AIIKCFIDAIIO 69 97 
Amo Con See 7ft 07 
Amo Co Mr 9ft 14 
AIT Apr 6ft 97 
AtTAur 5ft 98 
AITFW 5 ft 99 
AIT Carp. Jun *ft *6 
Booard Fin Jul 5ft 98 
B(8f Fin Aug 7 99 

Basl FhiAur J 01 
'Vc.lFmV* t 96 
Bat Cop Apt 6 98 

Bel Con Nov 4« 03 


IK 

91050 

97ft 

lUft 

99ft 

96ft 

94ft 

100ft 

93'h 

95% 

75ft 

107ft 

95ft 

Blft 


621 Hi 
7. IB +73 
767 +54 
724 +130 
621 -1’ 

6 AO +B 

A9I +22 
5.93 -13 

7jZ +9S 
73} +43 
7A4 +88 
633 +48 

7 JO *71 
029 r 110 


Banks & Finance 


99ft ASA +37 
*9Vj 671 ♦» 
97ft 631 +29 
W All +3* 
92tt 7.73 +5* 
94ft A67 +43 
9Jft A47 +51 
92V. 60S +15 
97V. 6B4 +3J 
99ft 12! +1B1 
96ft 60 +10 
. .. 93ft 735 +47 

l*h *5 101ft 5X6 +32 

77ft A99 +52 


97ft 752 449 

left abb +r 

93ft 672 
96 AH -3 


Abbey Noll FobSft 95 
ABbev Tsy Aug 5ft 95 
Abbey Tsv Apr 4ft 96 
Abbey Tjy Jan 5 *7 

Abbey Tsy Maydft ID 
Abn Amro May Jft 94 
Aim Amro Seo 3ft 9» 

Bay Land Nov 4ft 98 
BavLndesFebB 98 
Bk Greece Jun HW 97 

Bno Bk Mr 5 97 

Bng Bk May 6 00 

Bnp Jan r 

Blip See 4 97 

Ba Pcrlbos F«b7 ft 94 100ft 654 +104 

CncoMav 7ft 9* Ulft A52 +46 

Com banc Jul 5ft 96 97ft Art +41 

OxmancMcn 7ft 97 101ft 7.13 +73 

CumbancSep 7ft 95 Wl*i 621 +o0 

Cr Fancier Jon 8 02 102ft 7J7 455 

Cr Load Aug Bft 95 lOZft 5J3 +33 

Cr Local Apr tu 99 9frta 7JH +Z7 
Cr Local Feb 7W 01 

Cr Local Nov 5ft 95 

Cr Local Nov 51* 9B 

Cr Local Oct ift 96 

Cr Local Oct Bft 9* Ibfft 7JI +44 

Cr Lyonn Jul * 96 101ft A73 +A< 

CrLyarmJun Bft 98 to«ft 728 +47 
Cr Suisse Jan »* 77 *S*V 661 +37 

CsLdnBrSce Bft « mis )_H +35 

Db Fin Jun *H 99 IMU 7J6 +53 

Out Jul BN 103 7.12 +47 

" - 7ft 95 101ft 597 +36 

A 08 83 002+73 

7Vr 96 102 AJJ +30 
Aft 77 ®Sft 635 +1 

Sft 96 103ft AJB +37 

7 9* ?9ft 739 t2A 

Bft 94 100ft 635 +41 

Halifax Bs Aor 4ft *6 *7ft 637 +71 

HalHtOfBsJul 5ft *S 97ft S.+3 +42 

HefobaNov 6ft 06 as> 7ji +ar 

HekiboSep I <6 102ft ta +c 

Helobo IntFebift ft idooso 631 +47 
Klw Inti Feb A 9B 97ft 665 +10 

Kfwlntf Feb 7ft 07 97ft 715 +9 

Ktw Inti Jun 9ft 95 lOft 535 +34 

Klw Inti Jun 7 99 99ft 739 +27 

Klwlntt Jtp) 7* 00 94ft 7.10 +21 

Klwlnrl Mr Bft 90 104ft 692 +35 

Kfvr IntlOcJ Bft 01 103ft 7jg +K 

yJwlntlSee S=» 97 77ft Art +3 

Lb RiWlnJO DC 5ft 9B 93ft 7JE *36 


Dwl Sec 
DresdNov 
DU bk Apr 
Dll bk Feb 
Oil bk Jlrt 
Dll bk Jun 
DsJbkMr 


Boyer Aug eft 94 
Bemm TCJun 98 
Beitsrh Te Sen eft 08 
Bmw Lea Nov 7ft 96 
EmwllsCcMr 6ft 04 
Bnp See 4 *7 

Boots Pic Jan * 57 

BPamerMr W *6 
BPamrMr 9ft 9+ 
Boar Fin Apr Bft *8 
Br Gas InJ Jul 4'<< 03 
BrGmlntSaa Bft 9* 
Br Gas Pic Mr 4ft *7 
Bt Fin Aug (ft 79 
01 Fin Mr 8ft *5 
Bt Fin NOV 
Bt Fin See 
CaHewlre Dc eft 03 
Cheung Fin SeoSft 9S 
Chino Rep Feb eft W 
Chutu El Aug Jft 0] 
OtubuEtJan 9 
ChubuEIMr 
ChubuEISeo 
OweoEiFeh 


107V: 

»<ft 

B5ft 

lOtft 

Vi 

9rt 
104ft 
KSf. 
109 
HSft 
Wft 
104ft 
97ft 
104 ft 
lWft 


9ft 98 108350 
7ft *e 102ft 
B9ft 
90ft 
07 ft 
90ft 
97 105JB0 
96 100 ft 

103ft 
100ft 


ev. »0 


697 +92 
LX +18 
706 +56 
A 79 -57 

7.98 +77 
7.00 +41 
7X5 +<B 
656 +U 
7X0 +63 
7J1 +73 

7.HI +55 
734 +52 
679 +4* 
7 2- +43 
-50 
7.17 +45 
658 +41 
6 TJ +« 
823 +155 
064 +1*4 
771 +55 
AJ1 +52 
4.46 +50 
720 +51 

627 *47 


Continued from Page 1 
way by idling him *Wc came over and won 
the laM one.' Each nation did its share.' " 

In a June I speech at a Washington war 
memorial. Mi. Clinton gave America sole 
credit for liberating Europe, in the view of the 
snarling British press. 

•‘Fifty years ago, the men and women of 
America saved democracy in Europe and 
changed the course of history for the world." 
Mr. Clinton told the audience. 

The Daily Mail tartly replied with an arti- 
cle entitled “‘How America Set Europe 
Free.’ by Biil Clinton.” quoting an official at 
the British Embassy in Washington as com- 
plaining, “The least be could have done was 
mention the word 'Allies.' " and a long-suf- 
fering Canadian diplomat as muttering: 
“We're getting used to iL" 

Hie president was more a litUe more diplo- 
matic at Cambridge this weekend. "The Brit- 
ish gave our troops the feeling that they were 
not so far from home after ah," he said. “The 
British gave us inspiration: the Americans 
gave in return hoDe." 

□ 


There were no embarrassing incidents of 
mockery among the troops, lie the one in 
March 1993 when the president visited the 
aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt and a 
Marine made fun of Mr. Clinton’s policy on 
gays in the military by putting on a burlap 
wig and mincing around, and a commanding 
officer openly made scornful remarks about 
the three-hour visit representing the extent of 
the president’s military service. 

One sailor remarked sympathetically: I 
think he feels the stigma more than we in the 
military do." 


Continued fn*n Page 1 
waited, their faces blackened, for their leap 
into the dark. 

G^cral Esenfaow«:, .tIie 
commander, whose deoaon 
launch the invasion despite deOT^J^y jffy 
also wrote out m onteof tire d^. 
“TOeSe has turned!” he said- 

of the wwid are marching toward wdoiyi 

™ toutory wonfa: To us is gwee the 


ADVICE: Greenspan Is Heeded, Book Asserts 

_ - if. #Vinf 


George Bush, the youngest U.S. Navy pilot 
of World War II. would have been in heaven. 
Bui if Dante bad devised a third circle for a 

G resident with a problem of draft evasion in 
is past, he could not have done better than 
the D-Dav anniversary celebration. 


Outgo El May 10 +» 

OmgoEINov 8ft W 
OboCoroDc Jft 77 
CJboOUPMl- 5ft go 
Clba Con»Od 51* 78 
CbtD Ami Now 7ft 9A 
Dolmlrr Apr 10 99 

Daimler May B<+ 96 
Daimler On 8 90 

Da+Krufl Jon 10ft 96 
Diwonl El Apr Bft <6 
Duanl El Apr 0 02 

Dupont El JUT Bft 90 
Ouponi El Jun 717 77 101250 
EcC! ®0-7 Nov 9ft 95 HM 


105ft 

IM'. 

rtft 

93ft 

94ft 

101ft. 

109ft 

102ft 

102ft 

105ft 

WPs 

101ft 

ltoi 


El Co Ni Jul 
Ell UllvJiX 
ETtroiu* Jan 
Emerson 7ft 
Snerglo B« Jul 00 
ErtesunOct 7ft ft 


9M ft 10+a 
5V) 90 *Sft 
7 90 77ft 

7ft 90 109*0 

92ft 
KG 


EstlonrwlT Mr Aft 04 K'y 
E uraUmo Mtn (ft 01 107JBO 
Exxon Mor Aft ft 

r § 

Aft 08 
bft 03 
9ft ft 
7ft 00 
Oft 97 


Euan Mr 
Exon Oct 
Euon Sep 

F DC NOv 

Ford Aar 
Ford Aug 
Ford Jur 


Ford MCr Feb 7ft 94 
Ford MCrFrb Aft 90 
FurdMCrJon II ft 
Farm Fin Nov 7ft 9A 


9!ft 

IfGft 

05ft 

809* 

104 

1IF« 

104ft 

104H 

I06ft 

100ft 


C«c Apr 

OectApr 

Geer Auo 

GaccFeo 

GeccFefi 

GrccFeb 

CeccJun 

Gecc Jun 

GeccJun 

Gecc Mr 

Gocc Mr 


7W 97 
5ft ft 
4ft 00 


101ft 

9Jft 

07ft 


6 ft «6 101050 
4 93 77ft 

89ft 
+6ft 
IBS''. 


4ft *6 
Oft 94 
4ft 97 
4ft 94 

5 97 


74ft 


6J3 +67 
6.91 +68 
4A2 +10 
7.19 +J7 
A90 +20 

6J» +fl 
752 +72 
664 +59 
7 22 +58 
6 l 50 +rf 
L50 +50 
7+6 +62 
7.17 +54 
72* +41 
427 +57 
UO +72 
601 +17 
77* +1» 
7J3 +71 
725 +35 
6.90 +70 
7J9 +58 
755 +56 
+20 +17 
7J0 +37 
7JB +3« 

7 20 +4? 

A10 +92 
A70 +77 
7j6I +78 
7.14 +73 
401 +7? 

721 +6* 
A72 +90 
7 JO +ID0 
4X9 +1J 

40» +31 
7 JO +51 
Art +28 
4J5 +M 
ISt +35 
616 +10 
4X0 +42 
AJ1 +11 
62# +3 
647 +|4 


It is clear Mr. ClintoQ is trying hard to 
enjoy himself and stress that he is both hon- 
oring, and learning from, the past, even 
though his days are filled with talk about 
duty and conscience, and with colliding 
memories of “good” wars and "bad” wars. 


Continued from Page 1 

designed to send a message to Wall Street and, 
ultimately, drive down interest rates. According 
to the theory, the economy would improve and, 
as a result Mr. Gin ton would have more tax 
revenue to spend on favored domestic pro- 
grams and be re-elected in 1996. 

The theory, and the policy Mr. Gimon 
adopted, bore little resemblance to the econom- 
ic program on which Mr. Gin ton had cam- 
paigned. Mr. Clinton’s “Putting People First” 
campaign banner stressed government “invest- 
ment" in programs that would improve the lives 
of middle-class Americans such as job training, 
early education and government promotion of 
cutting-edge technology. A middle-class tax cut 
and health care for all Americans were addi- 
tional sweeteners. 


He reviewed the troops; jumped up for a 
rendition of “The Halls of Montezuma;" 


stood for the color guards; watched jets flying 
in formation; gazed up at the flyovers by 
Mirages. Mustangs. Spitfires, Liberators, 
Flying Fortresses, Dakotas. Tornadoes. 
Hawks, Lynxes and Wellingtons, and lis- 
tened to bagpipes play “Amanng Grace” and 
a brass band boom “Anchors Away.” 


As events developed, Mr. Greenspan’s eco- 
nomic scenario was not entirely accurate. The 
bond market did react positively to Mr. Clin- 
ton’s economic package initially, but then early 
this year nervousness about inflation began to 
push interest rates up again, and Mr. Green- 
span’s Fed raised its basic lending rate by 1.25 
percent. Today, long-term interest rates are 
nearly identical to what they were when Mr. 

Gin ton took office. But the economy is stron- 
ger now than in January 1993 and has added 3 
mifl i on jobs since then. 


Mr. Greenspan’s advice to Mr.Clm ton that a 
long-term deficit-reduction program was o 
paramount importance was backri not anfroy 
Mr. Benisen, but also by Budget Direct!^ Lwj 3 
E Panetta and Ms deputy, Alice 

according to the booL The presulratsa^ 

ic advisers, with his assent, qmckly jetusoned 
the tax cut, delayed health care reform, a nfl 
added an energy tax and spending cuts. 

Mr. Clinton's political team — the campaign 
advisers James Carvflle and Paul Begala, the 
media advise* Mandy Grunwald and the poll- 
ster Stan Greenberg —are portrayed as hom- 
fied and disgusted with this effort to please tne 
market Mr. Carvflle is quoted as joking beused 
to want to die and come back in a second life as 
the Pope or president, but now he just wanted 
to be the bond market because it seemed to run 
the wodd. 

Even Mr. Clinton, while intellectua lly acq ui- 
ftsring in the devastation of his investment 
programs, raged nonetheless at how it hap- 
pened. 

While the book depicts him as highly 'intelli- 
gent and energetic, it recounts sevanl Gin ton 
temper uwitnrnis, quoting a senior aide, George 
Stephanoponlos, as calling them “the wave 
overpowering, prolonged rages that shocked 
outsiders and often seemed far out of propor- 
tion to their cause. 


honor of Sriki^ a WW fis ^ wiS 

“’Lllf^of »« &* wWjfew. 

Qnmfaos, fnx FraA- 
Czechs and others were jahore 
ihantiheataB. *aid 
the A«*bish?p ct Omre*, 
SS^who led the rirnmlpd o craiwgs de - 

. ^ asa^tkmals^^^tonora-, 

tion, thanksgiving and fe-deokahon. 

He noted the special pragnancy fm- ma ny 
M soldtom ^ 

Jesus that he took as to text, ^jreat^Kyre 
hath no man than this, .thauuato fcy4«a 
his life for his friend&“ > 

. Renrindiiig the tens of thmwmb.df ofc.; 
lookers how much ^hey^d 
unborn owed to those WhP^fo p-Pqfc 
the archbishop said that all ;toig %Tsar. 
Eleanor Roosevdt kept 
a that said: “Hdp me to remembej; Some- 
where out there a man dkdfor-nte today. As 
long as there be war, I nmst asfcmd itoswer L 
‘Am I worth dying fdrt\" r.-; V 

Archbishop Carey paid tribhteio'^B who 
fAnaht to stop Lite Nazis. inducftpR the Soviet 
Umra, which few other speakers this week- 
end have mentioned. He hafled&ose wbo 
had suffered on “the vast, BeKHc^Srissaa 

fronL” Bat the whete drumhead c^ebxfeiy, , 

while unmistakably Eritish in :ib censncstial. 
tradition, accorded a speaal sratcs io the 
United States. .. *’• . -: : ; . . - V. 



Not only Mrs. Koosev^L wtfe erf^he war- 
time preadenL but Abraham Lincoln, a war- . 
time president himsdf, was ctooted by the 
arch bishop. And the Band of toe Royal Ma- 
rines, in their distinctive white topees;- was 
joined by the U.S. Army Held Band. 


Sunday afternoon, the presid ent and, ftis 
wife, Hillary Rodham Gintaa, rebomded the 
royal yacht Brittania to watch a flyover iy 
100 vmtage planes, in rin d mg a tiny, dpw- 
moving Swordfish toq>edo b<»rfj«3- xf ^ihe^ 
type mat sank the Gcnnan battfcshm ffis- 
mardc, and to review the flotifla in theSrfent, 
between Portsmouth and the isle Of Wight 


SPtf 


Issuer Cun tAol Price Yid Trsr 


C«XMr 
CeccMr 
Gecc Mr 
G0CCNDV 

CtaccOcl 
Gecc Sep 
Gecc Sec 


Bft 98 105.050 

4ft 79 97ft 

5ft *9 94ft 

5ft *5 90> 

Bft 99 106 

Aft 96 96 

5 98 94ft 


7JD +44 
4.74 -7 

6.96 +IB 
5.94 +22 
724 +49 
6.18 +2 
662 -5 


GeccDrosNo»4ft 96 
GMAC Aft *8 

GMACJUl 9 94 

GMAC Mr 9ft «6 
Grand in* Jim 7 *9 

Culm Pic Jan ® «6 

H J Hein; Otr 7ft ft 
Mend FmDc I 90 
Mliocnl Cr Dc 7ft 9e 
Hitachi Cr Jui 7ft 97 
HIIOCNi Cr JJI S’7 98 
HeeoislMr s', 77 
HoecfBiAua t GO 
HcYlral Ele Sen 9ft % 
KrAurtk. El Nortft *6 
Mokurl* El Del 6ft «7 
McndoMiT Feb9ft «7 
lam Japan Dc 6ft 97 
Intelsat Aug 7ft 02 
Inlet SCI Jan 6ft 00 
In+esir Ab Jan 6ft 99 
JalCoJul oft 01 
Kansal Ele Mr 10 9* 

Kansci Ele Sea 9\, 94 
Kadah A or r* 97 
Korea El De 6ft 03 
r area EISA 4>- ft 
Krustiu Ele Jul trh 03 


95 

95ft 

103ft 


103ft 

Wft 

103ft 

101ft 

91ft 

IDOft 

IGOft 

94ft 

103 

9Tl 

Iflift 

104ft 

97ft 

105ft 

»7ft 

«Bft 

»7ft 

93ft 

90ft 

105ft 

105ft 

101ft 

B6ft 

9*ft 

91*. 


tS* +32 
722 +88 

720 +*0 
6 a *44 
741 *59 
6JI +40 
6)0 +57 

024 +161 
4X7 +62 
726 +64 
:.|9 -it 

721 *46 
7X7 +J7 
4 89 ■*■/? 
693 *11 
725 +57 

724 +93 

»2J +72 
762 +55 
72B *47 
7.94 +118 
&13 *« 
4X4 +50 
663 +46 

725 +09 
827 +138 
7.11 *97 
7.74 +58 


Spa 


issuer Cpn Mol Price YW Trsy 


KeusnuEaULD 10 ft 
rvinftu EnU7 Bft *4 
MaflnaXM 4 ft 
Matnt El Aug 7%. 02 
MendiCgDc 5ft 90 
MeillieFdOct 7ft 94 
Mihuti ESI Jun 9ft 97 
Mllsub EM Sea 0ft 01 
7X5 Fin Jul Ift ft 
mi Sn Tel Mo, 7ft m 
N Zealnd Jul 10ft DO 
noti Power Dc 6ft 03 
Nestle HMXw 6 ft 
Nestle Hid Feta 6ft 97 
Nestle HM Feb 5 97 

unite hw Am 5ft ft 
HrsHe Hid Nov 7ft *6 
Nestle HFd Oa jft *9 
Uer» Hyo Aar Bft 97 
Norsk Mva OO 0ft 01 


NITDC 
NIT Feta 
NIT Jul 
NITjul 
NI T Mr 
NIT Nov 
NI T Nov 
r» T No* 


Bft 9« 
6 ft 
9ft 97 
9 99 

6ft 97 
7ft 9* 
A 1 . 97 
9ft ft 


Osaka Cos MgvSft ft 


1051b 

IWft 

93ft 

97ft 

94ft 

107 

105ft 

104ft 

103ft 

101ft 

114 

89ft 
97ft 
99 
94ft 
96ft 
101ft 
84 ft 
103ft 
I Blft 
104ft 
93 

106ft 

ID7 

100ft 

101ft 

99 

107ft 

95ft 


A A3 +47 
691 +47 
7.11 +93 

721 +74 
AA1 -13 
4.7* +58 
7.14 +72 
723 +03 
fL5H +47 
627 +77 
527 -56 

727 +69 
A'A *20 
622 +2t 
AJ1 +11 
60S *35 
6.4E *26 

7.10 +26 
72* +90 

0.12 +111 
A 43 +38 
661 *5 

A.90 +47 

730 +44 
625 +21 
624 +31 
624 +5 

72* +52 
7.10 +49 


Sad 


Issuer Con Mol Price Yld Trr* 


PnllmaCa Aar T*t 
PNImoCo Feb 9ft 
PbllmoCn Jul Bft 
Piulmo Cp Feta fii 
PMWnoCnien Bft 
Procter Feta 9ft 
ProclerJan *ft 
Pru Fin Oct 1'- 

Rwfland IJs Jut7Vi 
ReedPutalJut 9 
Reed PutH Jul Jft 
RocfieXw 7ft 
RccneMav 3ft 
Rr Cap Inc Jul 7ft 
5alnsOurv May 8ft 

SalnsOurv Mtn 5ft 
ScmsburrOcl 9ft 
Sondaz 0'S Mr Bft 
Sanaa) o/s Sec* 
Scct90ftJul 9ft 
SctxrMoMav 7ft 
Sears Acer Apr 0ft 
Sears Euro Aar Oft 
Sfil+ok Auo 8ft 
Shikoku El to. 10ft 
Sterner Co kw t 
SneaMr 7ft 

Some mov S 

Sony Caall Jul 5 


97 um 
90 ID I ft 

96 1133ft 
87 99ft 
99 

98 107ft 

01 1102S0 
01 102ft 

77 100250 
94 IMft 

97 106ft 

00 75*0 

01 7*1* 
03 93ft 
ft 103ft 
90 94ft 

96 lOAft 

00 ftft 
90 09 

97 105ft 

ft 101ft 
96 103ft 

« 103 

03 90ft 

96 105ft 

02 101ft 

97 roift 
96 lOJft 
94 97250 


7.14 +JB 
na 

421 +74 

7-04 +» 
773 +W 
7.13 +5S 

721 +47 
724 +B3 

722 +78 
663 +43 
715 *72 
7J7 +49 
7J4 +40 
LIS +99 
UJ +59 

7.10 +« 
AJB +40 

7.11 +25 
7.D4 +31 
7X0 +90 
A 71 +47 
629 +40 
524 +54 
735 -49 


720 +62 

8 3! 

222 +42 


sea 


Issuer Cpn Mat Price vid Trsy 


Stand on 727 7ft 
SlgDrugAAr 0ft 
Sun Hurra Nov 5ft 

Swl»relMXW 3ft 


Mi 

Bft 


7ft 

S 

7ft 

Aft 

5ft 

S 


Tec Aug 
Tea Aug 
Tea Juf 
Ttaynen Aug 
TMCCAug 
TMCCDc 
TMCt Feta 
TMCCJan 
TMCCMr 
Tehaku Ele Aar7ft 
Tokyo Gas Jul 5ft 
Tavata Fin Dc 4ft 
Toyota Fin Jun rtk 
Toyota Fin Mto 5 

TavutaMc Jun Bft 
Toyota Me Mr 5ft 
UnllevMay • 
Uni lev Mr Ift 
unUevMr 9U 
U n wst Jul SH 
VattcRtaHJan A 
Vw lan Aug 3 
VwlnHOct 9ft 
VMt-MrlOrt Sft 
Worrier L Aor Bft 


91 

8416 

IMA 

103ft 

98 

96ft 

98ft 

tflft 


99 


*7 182ft 

98 9*ft 


96ft 

97ft 

98ft 


96 RZW 

90 106250 

« um 

91 94ft 

98 98 

01 73ft 
90 100ft 

90 93H 

96 102ft 


607 +2 
605 +103 
8J» +13» 
7.17 +r 
tS +45 
7J3 «8 
728 +42 
L29 +745 
198 +47 
635 +31 
662 +33 
601 +18 
449 +16 
6.98 +51 
7JH +40 
611 -J 
630 +15 
520 +r, 
670 +*• 

608 +31 
657 +52 
699 +41 
7J3 +42 
7.14 +51 
7.10 +56 
822 +103 
7X7 +77 
60S +14 
667 466 


Dollar Zeros 


5pd 

Mat Price Yld Trey 


Ado Ana 

06 

45% 

70S +36 

Amer Has> AM 

oa 

41ft 

8.16 +KD 

Amer Mil Alia 

04 

45 

i]| +* 

AmexBkOc 

00 

61 

709 +72 

Ami inti Usd 

97 

71% 

1126 +435 

Austria Ju. 

95 

raft 

SJ5 +24- 

BPCapJwi 

95 

Uft 

S.94 +51 

Br Gcs Pic Nov 

21 

10ft 

855 +H 

Cue May 

01 

Ml MB 

7X7 +44 

Cra May 

07 

36ft 

8J1 +41 

CcceP 

■9 

29V5 

855 +41 

Own Hr Fib 

K 

96050 

5J7 +71 

OiemNy Feb 

96 

89ft 

603 +92 

Own Nr Fee 

97 

02% 

7J9 +** 

otemNvFeS 

99 

TOM 

7 m +n 

OvtuNy Feb 

01 

59V, 

117 +M 

Own Hv 5=eO 

02 

54ft 

6.15 +88 

Own Ny Feb 

03 

49ft 

548 +90 

DbFMJril 

95 

261ft 

ha 

Denotata*. Ava 

*0 

TSft 

604 +10 

Ed* SOP 

94 

98% 

429 -7 

E apart) oa 

*4 

90ft 

<a « 

Exxon Nev 

04 

45ft 

7.91 +29 

Exxon Cpv Aug 

M 

99 

5xJ *56 


Issuer Con Met Price Yld Trjy 


Fst F«d Feb 
Gecc Jut 
G2CCMT 
GeaMKHAPO . 
GwMttSAlV 
knE.Dc 
hjdtaDc 
hum Dc. 
WdbJun 
fa* Jan - .* 

larfcJwi 
WdtaJun 
RmJlffi 
tadbPDc 
iBcdoa - 
(tec Mr 
Italy Mr 

Mta d m o nn JiA 
Mrwta Carp Jut 
NElStaRFOB 
NftSes - 
PhfimcCr Jun 
Pru Realty Jan 
Solo Nov 

sac Ol* no* 
Soar 0/5 Jol 
SekSaa 
SltviM* Jan 
vftPublSeo 
WMtimRflMiv 


« 48ft 
90 - 86040 
W Hi - 

04 44V. 

13 Bft 
M 04ft 
82 'Sift 
M 35ft 
M frft . 
» 86030 

5 ^ 

S3 49ft' 
88 31 
02 SOS ■ 
97 Sift 
•99 79 
W 3BS 
W Wft- 
99 67ft 
914 99ft 

96 99ft 
99 71ft 
94 97ft 

97 39ft 

98 74099. 
94 SSft. 
R S9ft 

99 67ft 

94 90 


. 174. +1 » 




SB 
632-+9S 
9.18 +T18 
400 +56 
SJB. 

U> -442 
732 +286 
64* +40 
725 +46 

724 +52 
8 » +72 

U0 -» 

771 +ta 

772 +05 
723 *V 




651 


*79 *7 

nr. 

721 -Ml 

720 +72 
479. 4 

723 ‘MI 
726 +40 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MA&gdT 


Sales 


DK ild lOOsHign Low Cbe One 


OTC Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, June 3 . 


Stocks 


1 BHA 


5otes 

Kv Yld IQOs Hftti Low Cbe Chgo 


00 


J2 


APecPod 
A Plus 
AAONs 

ADC BCD 

ABC Rail 
AHR Info 
ABSs 
ABT Bid 
ACC Cp 
ACS En s 
AO! Tc 
ADCs 
AO ESA 
AEL 
AEP5 
AEREji 
AESC hn 
AESCDS 
AFCCDJ 
ak steel 
ANB 
APSHIO 
ARI Net 
ASK 
AST 

ATS Med 
AWAh 
Aames 
AamRt B 
AnronRl 
Aba* is 
AbbeyH 
AbiroSB 
Adnmd 
Able Tel 
Abraxas 
AbsfEnt 
Accel 
AcesHlI 
Ackdrtis 
AceCsti 
Aceto 
AcmeAAet 
Add 
ACIPCTI 
ActPr M*t 
ActVolc 
Acxtorn 
AdocLta 
Adage 
Adapfcs 
Adngtn 
Adetamh 
AiSaSv ,ie 
AdObeS s 20 
Mom 
AdvRoss 
AdwOr 
AOvInt 
AduLoo 
AdMkSv 
AdNMR 
AdvPoly 
AdvPro 
AdvSem 
AdvTLb 
AdwTrtt 
Adwru 
Adwantas 30 
AdwanlBs _7J 
AdwBcp 
AeoulTtt 
Acrovx 
Actrtum 
Alsma* 
AVSvcs 
AOncvR 
Aonrcoo 
Aooum 
AgriDvn 
AirExp 20 
AlrMerti 
AirSen wi 
AirSen 
AirSvs 


_ 311 4+< 4ft 4ft — >J 

_ 671 lt»+ It II —ft 

2023 IB 16ft 17ft ~l'i 

_ 249 13 12ft 13 * ft 

„ 798 10V, 18 left *V; 

_ 6477 ly M lift I2ft 

1J 1032 15ft 15 15ft -ft 

_ 1331 22ft 22ft 22ft 

■12a .7 161717ft 16 16ft —ft 
_ 997 15 14 15 - ft 

_ 1499 40 36ft 3*V, »2ft 
_ 11250 43 30V* 43ft -4V, 




715 

14 

13ft 

13ft 

- 



112 

7ft 

7 

7ft 

—ft 

.0B 

X 

339 

Uft 

17% 

IB'. 




MW 

7% 

7ft 

7ft 




lift 

Uft 

U'/< 



X0I 

3.7 

4792 

10ft 

17', 


r r«| 



660 

II 

10 


■ 



4760 21% 

■JO’,1 

21ft 

+ft 

00 

32 

9 

24% 

24 ft 

24% — 1ft 



48620*. 

20ft 

20ft 

• ft 



1032 

Sft 

Aft 

4ft 




13V* 

13 

T3V„ 





15ft 

15ft- 

-1% 





3 Vi 






3 

U'. 


l.j 

JO 

38 

755 

8% 

7ft 


— 1* 

.08 

.7 

*751 

13'/. 

Uft 


.06 

.5 

4128 

13ft 

Uft 

17% 

—ft 



548 

'ft 

6ft 

ift 

— ft 



4728 

19% 

18% 


-ft 

.toe .1 

3/1 

15 

14 

14ft 

-v„ 


30 


-50 


Sdos 

Pi* rid mosHigb Low Cbe Otoe ; 

ACtaVoy .16 12 616 16ft IS )5ft —ft ! Bl Inc 

ACaLoidS 24 12 2*03 ISft 131. 15'* - Ift ! &ISYS__ 

_. 3374 I5ft 14' , IS ... . BMC SN 

OSe 2 *15010'/. 9ft 10 BMC WI S 

_ B45 4ft 4ft 4ft —5* I BVU 

1.7 140112ft 10ft MW * ft I BNH 

- 1403 19V. 10ft 19 _ . BPI PVg 

1218512 29ft 27 27ft —ft BPIwrt4 

_ 2236 B 7ft 7V, —ft BPI wt«6 

TO 1ft TVn |iv s — BSSBca 
_ 1817 16W Ibft • ft . BT Fin 

12 120 11'* 11 II — V. iBTShD 

- JJS kj: ’•7’ /.» - I HT U im 

_ 50»3 IVe «'t l 1 * 

82 t.’4 M 1 * 24ft 23’« 

_ 2091 23ft 72ft 23ft 

_. 2464 10ft 91. 10' ■ 

_ 3807 15ft Mft 14ft — 

_ 609 13ft 13'-; 12ft 


2A 


AmEogle 
AmEcnl 
AmEduc 
AmFB 
Amfrghi 
A Greet s 
AHIttlCDS 
AmHold 
AHomPoi 
AlndF 
AmlttPiwi 
AminPf s 
AmUcof 2.16 
AMS 
AMedE 
AmMbSot 
AMobilc 
ANtlns 220 4.7 
AmDiirov 
AmPoc 
APhyG 
APwrCvs 
APubUsh 


76 2.B 
1.12 19 


15340'. 


-ft 


- '* 


259 7 6 6't 

_ 2394 11ft 10ft 10ft — *V,. 
_ 297 12ft 12V to 12'* _ 

_ 122 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 

_ 190 4ft 3ft 4ft —ft 

_ 281 9ft 9 9ft +ft 
_ 55362 191* 15ft 19 +2ft 
_ 805 9 7 Bft + ft 

LI 6B15ft 15ft 15V* —ft 
_ 1403 Ml. 22'* 27ft— 1ft 

- 0359 9ft 9 9ft 

_ 907 5W 4ft SV* »V, 

_ 396 1 «V* 1 r ft 

_ 762 21ft 70 ' j 38ft— Ift 

_ 1156 7IP.ii 20 20ft —ft 

X0 SX 914 9 Bft 09. — V* 

- 530 5ft 5 5 —ft 

- 0592 10ft m* IBft rift 

_ 359 15V. 14ft 15 —ft 

- 6699 13ft 11 13 +1W 

X 193737 36ft 37 - 

.737223 30ft 36ft 20ft + 1 ft 

- 1935 22ft 20ft 20ft— 1ft 

- 96223ft 22ft 23*i — V* 

_ JTOl 12ft lift 13 „ft 

_ 133 1V S !>/„ in,, — Vr 

- 554 4V. 4ft 4ft _'S 

_ 412 5ft 5 5ft ♦ ft 

- 3692 4'/^ JV M 3*i. —/.ft 

- 7120 SV, 5 5ft +«. 

- 2619 5ft dft 5ft _ 

.. 44 2ft 2ft 2ft 

_ 86815 14ft 15 *U 

_ 177 5 4ft jv, _ft 

- 2210 5ft 5ft 5ft _ 

J 5906 39ft 36ft 39ft -ft 

.7 77B2 36ft 34'* 35ft -V* 

- 271 28ft aft aft 

- 913 J>* 2>v« 3 

_ 470 ift a aft 

547 111, 10 V, IP., 

- 1961 12 lift lift 

_ 47 10 17 17'*, _ 

- 581314 131, 13ft +ft 

lOe .9 374011ft lift lift . v* 

- 1046 13ft 12ft 12ft —ft 

_ 2501 3ft 3'i* 3ft —ft 
.9 674 21ft 31ft 2P* —ft 

2929 3'. 2ft 3 +>* 

_ 505 Jft 2ft 2ft 

_ :ai lift tow lift .>* 

_ 197 7ft 7ft 71* _■* 

1.4 *342 Bft a av, 

Akorn _ 336 3V„ J'v,. 2i* u 

Also 1.490 3.1 2091 66ft S4ft 55ft— 15a 

AtamoGp J6 2.1 30 16V* IB - -. 161. . '* 

Almtec _ 65114ft 13V. 13 U— ift 

AlQten 1J0 6J 16 19'. 10ft 18ft — ■* 

X0 U 1446 23ft 72 ft 32ft -ft 

_ bl 9ft Ift 8ft _ 

_ 3683 IBft 17 173* .ft 

6997 201* 27 27V* »'* 

00 3.5 2713 ZS 1 * 24V* 25ft ,ft 

_ 336 4ft 4ft «, —ft 

36 3.1 42 12 lift lift —V, 

_ 3075 14 13ft J3'. —ft 

.15 .9 14 I0> , 17V. 17ft — Vi 

_ 334 5ft 41* J, t —ft 

_ 4085 3ft Jft 2'Vt. -<ft 

... S22 1 ft ft — 

- u lift 10 10 —v. 

_ «0 7ft 7ft 7ft .•* 

15 a 7ft 7ft —1Y, 

11 38 37 38 -J 

17J61I 10ft 10ft —V* 

4885 12 10 17 .ft 

96 34ft 23M 26ft -2V, 

5614 13ft 131* — 1 
016 17ft 16ft 17 . ft 

653 14ft 13ft 14 — >* 
271 14ft 13ft 14 * - ft 
133 14ft 13ft u<* 

_ 510 23 32ft 2?!-. — V* 
60 13 1386 76ft 747* a * >p 

.24 1.7 B09 15 1 .. 14ft Uft —ft 

3815 18ft 16 left — Ift 

332 12ft 12ft Uft +J* 

BBS 4'* 311 3ft —1* 

942 O'* 

300 19 
142 3ft 
901 2 


Ataonk 

Alcidc 

AIOIIOI 

Aldus 

Ale .Bid 

Ata*Eng 

AftoCDS 

Alias® 

AOca 

AlkeiTn 

AHASem 

AIIFOr 

AUCry 

AlegW 

AJIeoian 

AiDOro 

AlianPti 

AhtSemi 

AIBkCOP 

AfldSk s 


J? IX 


A0 


. . 19 
AttCapC 100 7.1 
APdCaD 1050 9.6 


AJdCnll 

AldCac 

A1MO 

A/tdGos 

AttHTPd 

AOdHiaa 

AWU«c 

AKJWae 

AnstFn 

AUlrisra 

Atoette 

AipMsc 

AlpMiC wi 

Alpttcl 

Atohal wt 

AipnaBta 

Atpharl 

Alptarwf 

AM.ce 

AlroGId 

AfKH 

AUNT 

Altera 

AKflese 

Anrcms 

Armor 

AaCrStr 

Anwar 

AflKOrFs 

Arnrions 

Arrteftac 

AFFF 

AmPPr 

AFT «E 

AFTxE/ 

AittaOn 

AmSvce 

AmBcpi 

ABrttr 

AmBiagn 

AmBldB 

AmBustn 

AmCfvs 

Adorn 


1J3e8X 
08e 4.1 


i»C J 


238 'ft, 
_. 777 Ift 


5"-i, 5V* — V, 
V8ft 19 
3 3 -to 

Ift 2 *v, 

to ift. 

2=* 3ft - >* 
ft ft —ft 
Uft Uft -to 


:• 2k 


_ 203 ft 

_ 637013' . 

1786 7Vu l'Y„ Jft. 

- 28 to ft ft 

_ 321 4", 1". 4 —ft 

_ 3064 IV„ Ift Ift, _J/„ 

- 21 3ft 3% 3V* -V, 

_. 264 Jft 6ft 7 ft _ 

-20952 355* 31'* 34ft -3'* 

- 4011 74ft 22V* 24 -ft 
460 ISYr Uft 14ft —ft 

41* 4". 

2to 3ft 

00C 3.1 38 28ft 30ft 21ft - Ift 

04 7J 1021 71 ft 20ft 20ft —ft 

.60 4.2 77 14ft Uft lift — X* 

- 6364 2 1 9. ? , 

1.60 60 330 74ft 23ft 24ft -ft 

Um 12.1 no 9'* a*, a** 

S* B2 170 6M1 6ft 6to - to 

35 0J 3*2 9ft 01* Bto -to 

01* _ 1849* 77ft 44 7SV, -»•>. 

_ 2917 4V» 3to J 

00 3,7 7 TBV; 18V* IBft - | 

.73 3J x699 22to 32 ft »'i — U 

-. 1320 Jto Jto 3ft —to 

„ 4415 10ft 18 18ft . to 

_ 543 13'* 13 13 —I* 

- 915'.* 14V* IS'/, -p„ 

_. 257 31ft It. J 


ARecr 

AmliM 

AmResid 

AmSafRi 

ASavFL 

ASott 

AStUfiO 

AmSun- 

AmTete 

ATravel 

AUtdGKl 

AUWGwt 

AVana 

Animate 

A Wood 

Am All 

Ameried 

Amrtiasi 

Amerces 

Amerlwd 

Am led 

Amaen 
Am 1st tx 
Ampfai 
Amresco 
AmrJon s 
Amserv 
AmlcCp s 

Amiran 

Amhnol 

Amvests 

Amyltt 

An logic 

AnalvTc 

Anaty s 

AnanoBl 

4ntr«t 

AncnBcp 

AneSWb, 

AncJiGm 

AndvBc 

AndvTog 

Andrews 

Andros 

Anergen 

Aneslo 

Antec 

Aoertus 

Auhton 

AoooEn 

AnpleC 

ApISOUS 

Aaieboes 

AptRecv 

AndEttr 

ABiosci 

AdCartm 

AKE»gt1 

Apdlmu 

Aodlnovs 

ApMMts 

ApdAAkr 

ApdSCl 

ApdSdwt 

ApkISig 

ArobSh 

Aramed 

ArbarQrn 

ArborHI 

Afbr nh 

ArchCm 

ArcJtPIs 

Arcico 

Arson 

ArdcnPd 

Areflnisa 

ArontBs 

ArooGp 

Anwsv 

ArousPh 
Artadun 
Arlstoi s 

Ark Best 

Armor 

Arnolds 

ArrisPh 

ArowFn 

Arowlnl 

4rTowr«n 

Artsfl 

ArtistG 

Asonle 

AscerdC 

Ascoo 

Alhwrth 

Asncin 

AsocrBk 

AsdBne 

AsdCmA 

AldCmB 

As lees 

Aaornp: 

AdroM 

AsJror 

Aslrasv 

AsyslTdi 

AtcnCsl 

Altiena 

Alhcv 

Atkinsn 

Atinfds 

AnAm 

AitBev 

AhCsIAk 
AllGuH 
Aide Air 
AtrTeie 
Atmel s 
AtrttSH 
AirtoL 
ANttOc 

AuBon 

AuraSy 

Ausoe* 

AUlirint 

Am cams 

Auteetv 

Autcak 

AutaGo 

Aufoimu 

Autolnd 

Autatais 

AvaltF 

AvkfTcn 

Avrvue 

AdcM 


32 

M 


I 


BaldPi a 
BalvGm 
Belled 

BcnPonc 100 
BcOnootCajO 
BncFsro: 24 
BcfSIOHs 06 16 
Bondns 


J» 


JO 


10 

20 


BcnNJ 

Bon dec 

BandoM 

Banda nf 

B+Soutta 

Bk Grans 

BnkNH 

Ban»AH 

BnkUtd 

BnHJtrrf 

BkJUIFol 

BarrVrs s 

BnkFm 

Bknth 

Banta 

Bony M3 

BanvSLJ 

BattyRT 

BanvnSv 

Boren 

BaietBs 

BaretRs 

BlTnBrt 

BsTnA 

BasPIr 

Bas&cpl 

BassetIF 
Bat Tech 
BayRktae 
BayVn 
BovSkj 
Bayptl s 
BeauCta 
BedBttis 


— I BWIP 

— 1 Bofcoge 

— ■ Bcctalnf 

— ' BacfcBav 
I BodorP 
: Bailer 

47 — Ift BkMflWl 

_ 4rt6 8'j r>„ 7V. _i . Baker J 

_. 2056 16ft l^j <6 .. 1 BalcPem 

27 11* lto lto — ’.IBOULVS 

- 28556 3C?++ TVft 22' . - 3ft BldCvE s 

- 2010 I Jft Uft 13ft 

34 3.7 203 6to Bft 6ft 

m Uft 12ft Uft _ 

-. 080718ft I 'to 175. — ft 

_ 995 lift 11 lift —ft 

- 2IM 22ft 32ft 72ft * 1* 

6X 2406 S’. 4ft 5 —to 

2.1 1147 4ft 3H 3*4 -ft 

_ 762 31 29 30 _ 

_ 63631 IBft 21 -2ft 

_ 3598 13ft 12ft 13 V* -ft 
_ 3420 4ft 4ft 4ft - 
... 709 1V„ |i./ B 1ft — 

_. 175 UV* I0to 107,— Jft 

3547 6ft 5*. 6ft -ft 

- 289 5ft 5V> 5ft + '* 

_ 1002 4 3iV„ 3'V„ — V„ 

00 1.9 331 42to4P* 42ft -to 

- 208 4ft 3V* Jto 

._ 3077 I Oft 9 Vi »to —ft 

- 36 Uft Uft 13V, 

JOb 10 (3 71ft 70 to 71 + ft 

- 4 1 586 47 to 45ft 46ft * v„ 

- 94 1ft 1ft 11* 

- 520 20 20 —1ft 

JO 20 4*1 7ft 7 7ft -ft 

- 5123 8ft 7ft 8'* + ft 

7 ift ito u* 

0 3870 17 16 16ft 

_ 37 9ft 9 9ft - ft 

1.1 6717ft lift 17'* -ft 
_ 1794 9V. ift 9'* -ft 

- 1V51 9ft Bft 6ft —ift 
202 17 left 17 

21 15ft 15 15ft _ 

16217 16 17 +1 

1.00c 50 44717ft 17'* ITVw— Vh 
_ 94 2?* 2ft 3ft * to 

_ 4694 l*ft I3 1 /, 1 A, + 'V„ 

J4 .9 857 37ft Mto 36*. —to 

- 607 15 14 15 -to 

JSel.8 169920ft Iflto 70 -1 

I — 20 II* ltVi, ItUi, _ 

_ 4437 37^ , 34ft 37 t PA 
... 2356 16 IS 15ft -to 
1032 5 4ft 4ft —to 

- 1053 Bto 7>. 6 -lto 
_ 5B53 25to 23V. 35ft 

3025 JVu Jto 4 
_ 7015ft 14ft IS 

JO Z* 587 12to mi 12"* - ft 
.48 1.7123372 29* 26ft 27ft— 3ft. 

02 .1 12577 22' . 20ft 22 —V* 

J 654016ft 14 16ft -2ft 

_. 353 11'* lOto 10ft —V) 

_ 2557 7ft 6to 7*» 

._ 2203 ift 5ft 5ft —to 

_. 1T90 v„ V B 1* 

-. 445 20to 19". 20 * *) 

51 7'.* ift 71* 

“ n *‘ «: * + '•» I Bettis 

- 47183 47 to 41ft 45to -3ft 1 Big 8 s 

- £* 3ft 3ft 3ft • ft I BtoOTir 

- 363 7 6 to 7 - ft I BtoRCk 

- 100 Ift, 1V« 1V B — Vr I Bind hr 

91 5 4to 4V, — to I BioLooh: 

“ , 2 -^ s’? 2 ft * ** ' BioMWsl 

T 19ft IBft 19'/, -1 1 BttNVN wtB 
926 16ft 16 16 rl A. -*h I BioSpecif 

- 1137 21ft 19V* 306. -to 1 BioSurf 

- 7731 30 17* 18ft — ft I BioPnar 

- 1136 14ft 14 1 4ft — to I Bkkjt 

995 JVc. 2't 3** _ Bhxtvsi 

J 454230', 27 29ft -2ft Blown 

- 23 431* 40 40 — ?' • I Blaonwi 

- 206 II 11 11 to ' BtaStJ 

_ 128 IP.* 10** IP* -to 
tl 4 22'.* 19V, 19'*— 2to 
1.1 739 20 27' . 28 - to 

- 5070 15V. 13V. 14to —ft 

2223 SV. 4ft $ _ 

P62 9ft 9to 9 to _ 

- 49 51* 5 5 

.4 1134 11 10 v, mto — to 

04 3J 6112 30ft 30 30'/. —'ft 

X0 11 2760 Mto 19 19to —ft 

55 4 to 5to 6ft - ft 

32 2.1 262 1SV* 14'* 1$ —ft 

.12 A 596 Mto 2D 20 

_ 190 Sto 7V) 7V. — -V, 

"S'O 17ft lift 14** —to 

10 531 5to SV. 5'-t 

.. 2463 7ft SV. 1't -lto 

... 1651 15ft 14ft IS!* - ft 

- 2432 7V, 5*4 TV* - to 

- 3750 10ft 9ft IK* -'.ft 

_ 10290 Z7-, 25 27V. -II? 

IJ 203 17V* 16 16 —lto 

10 447 35 to 34' iSS-rft + Ift H 

_ 175 34V. ?3 J4 * 1 

- 4TB 15 Z3to 25 -Ito 
„ IJ7017 IS'* 15' r — Ito 
... 8616 336* 31 to 33to - l' l 
U Utat 9to 9Vj - ■** 

A 5 tat n. 1*1 - to ' BaaleB 

- 77 4'.* 41* 4 to — Vi, ' Baomtwn 

.. 300 l?‘A 11V, 13ft -ft i Bon*” 1 

_ 791 Mto MV, I4U _ , Bcrlna 

1287 6*, 7ft 7ft — ft | Borrar 

I 7'-‘4 7'm ^ 1 BostAc 

1333 9* fV. 9H “HfBosiBc 

a 17 16V, 17 - Boston 

- 22 2'.* 7 2V* _ - 

_ 154 Jto 4ft 4ft —v* 

- 834 Dft Jto Jto 

_ 1393 10ft 10 10ft 

1.1 8905 20 36V, 38 -1 

- 1161 9ft 8to 9 


XO 73 


_ It 20'; JOto 30', — 

.80 3J 507 24 23 24 -to 

,12c 1 J 305 9ft Bft 9ft - ft 

JW 0 2375 15to 13ft 14- a — 'Y n 

_ 684 5to 4ft 5 *'* 

_ 3171 19 lBto ISto — !■ 

...12140 59 54'. S0to -3ft 

._ 1568 26'* 25ft 26ft - to 

... 134 10V- 9ft 9ft _ 

_ 2600 Ito Ift Ift —1',. 

_ 5227 5 4ft 4to —to 

_ 336 ".I, ft ft —Vu 

930 1* to ft — V* 

446 29 37 37ft — ft 

8S 39V, 26", 38to „ 
32 3 3 3 — 1 ft 

234 2ft 2 7- u -V.. 

1526 18 I7to 18 
6477 13’. II Uft 
._ 311 2ft Ift 2ft _ 

_ 1639 12to Uft IJto -to 
._ 46 13V, lift lift— 2ft 

_ 3090 7 5ft 5ft — 1 
79 to to, ft — i 

J 1 1065 19ft 17", 18V; — 1 
J 160 0ft 7V: 8ft -1 

1.5 933 15ft lift 15ft - 

1.6 4320 Mft Mto 14ft ■ 

_ 2 Mto Mto 14'; 

_ 5062 MV. 13to 13to— i' u 

2 6 0 8 
3.1 505 37'.- 31ft 31ft 

5.5 1014 63 41 62 to -Ift 

10 253 15ft 15'. 15' 

10 24 

96 5V: 6 


Stocks 


S taw 

D.v n d 100s Higti LOW else Otoe Stacks 


5oies ; 

Diw Yld 100s HWi Low cue Oroe ; StaOs 


Sold 

D~ YU IQQs hfitai Low 05* Otoe 


BuctaAm 

Buckle 

Bultals 

BuuCrek 

BuUtrr 

BuORun 

Burr Br 

BusnRc 

Butler 

ButlrMI 

Butrev 


_ 245 0 ft 0'. 8ft -Vr 1 CWtTch 


Checkrs s 
Owdcmte 
Otesdc 5 


_ 17115ft 13V. IS'*— ift 

_ 9205 19to 18ft I9to -to 

43fl IS 1 -* Mto 14to _ . 

_ 197 lZft Uto Uft —ft 1 OMTtTrK 

_ 108 I''b I'u I'U D — '/» l Chmftta 

_ 2453 »+. Bft 0ft — I. OimRn 
640 Uto 31 V. 32ft — ft Oimpwr 
259 5V. 4ft 4ft _ QiryCp 
_ 59 221* 2'ft 23 —ft I OiesEno 

.. 669 5”, 5 s _ 1 QiesTVs 

■ Cta Doric 
I Chimss 


4ft 4ft —ft I Cordis 
5ft Bft -Vu I CordCps 
CrttrPn 


- 63* 4to 

- 7953 6H 

_ 741 Bto 7V. 8 
_ 2118 17ft 16'A 17t„ - ft 
_ 7829 7ft 5ft 7ft -1ft 
_ 100 10ft 10 to 10 to— I to 

32 H 3*to 39 39 

_ 244 3 to 3'u 3U —ft 

_ 503 31 28 30ft -1ft 

705 Bft ito 7 'A 


Corirra 

CaraCB 

CorCpwt 

Corforii 
Corves 
. Corvef 
1 GosClr A 


1J8 14 


BncCdUc J2 r .0 388538ft 36to 34ft— I to 
Bcpsou 1.08b 3.5 101 33ft 38 30V; 


XO 2.1 
xo in 
00 2.9 


JB 


.04 


.SB? 

' ift , Ben io 

I Bed Ben 
BetlMc 
BellSbl 
BenJerrv 
BFrankR 
Benhon 
Ben ICG 
Bertclcy 

BerkCto 

Bertucl 
BesfPwr 
Beslan 


-I5e .9 


.16 10 


08 


J4 1.4 


J8 


04 


Biomalr 


JO 


.TO 


.12 
01 e 


Biomet 
Btomira 
BiaSafetv 
Blasenra 
Bknota 
Btaavs 
BioTItW 
BioTcG 
BlroCn 
BirdATd 
Brrtctar 

Bfldtawk 
BlkHMrtA 
BlkHwtB 
B&meies 
BltsLou 
BlocOv 
Bia-xi 
Btvtti 
BodBn 5 1J4 
BobEvn 37 
B0C0R5 
BodyOr 
Bollinger 
Bon Ton 

1 eooFjvuu 


1 „ 


36 XI 


BasiTc 
1 Ba.EnA 
I BavErt B 
1 Bard Bros 
1 BrpdPhm 
j BrdPwtA 


_ 45811 39ft 34ft 28k« - 3*4, I BrOP win 
... 1 70S lift ISto 16 -v, ; Br-ttyw 

- 2» 6>J, BT. 6ft _ ! BrZire 

- 3M0 Uto 13% I?Y. —ft ; Brrrtd5v 

- 6737 32ft 19ft 71ft - Ift : Brnuns 

-i™ HIV,. rv a «v ta - ; BriiTo 

- »<• ■‘•'-.Bronco 

_ 419 4 Jft Jft —ft • wIBrervS 

, v M'/.. 15ft 16% -to BrentBs 
34 27 283 Bto 8 Bto - to BrdaF 
X0 .0 391152ft 51", 52 ... BrSSv 

— NO lift 10V, 111* * ft BroodN 
670 8 7ft 7to -ftlSSdTc 


_ 646010'', 17to 17% —ft 1 BrdPttt 

” M»? ^39%-l%jB^ SW 

.. 1470 B 7ft 0 - ft HruckCS 

03e X 50 SV, Sto 5% -to J Brod5f 


BkhmBe 


B 


j; Broaksin 


BB&T 
BEAera 
BE I 61 
BFEnl 


1.0B 16 1738 30 39ft 29ft 

._ 7904 9to Bto 9% 

1 J 64 4 Sto 6 

_ : j'.* 4ft 4** 


00 


Brkfree 

Srukli T 
BroGour 
BrTam 
Brunos 


• to 

-to 

- to 1 BrvnMw 


BO 3.2 73 25 J3to 24to 

.. 1977 22", Zlft 22", -1 
.96 50 589 17'* IP. 17ft -ivv 

06*30. 9 74V, 24 34'.* -V* 

X4 23 2653 19ft 18% IBft 
X0 1.4 6720 26 28 +ft 

J6e 1.1 x715 24 22% 24 *1 

34 1.6 1091 ISto 14 15to + to 
.10 10 U Bft B 

1210V, 9% 9% —ft 

_ 39 9W 9V, 9ft — 

80619% 18V* 1ST. * 
103 30% 20ft 20ft — 

31 4 21 to SO 21 + | 

02 10 1391 33to 33% 33to +Y. 
_ 58 2 l'Sft J'to, _ 

_ 034 Uft 1ft 1% _ 

X0 &9 259 4% 4'5 4to _ 

_ 6404 15% Mft 15to 
02 e .1 1098 34'.* 33V. 34 -V. 

- 450 12ft Jlto 11% _. 

13CM4 13ft 13V, —V, 

- 151 2to 2ft 3to -to 

_ 2119 Bft 7ft 8% —ft 

M 37 37 37 

- 557 9ft Bto 8ft 

00 30 1421 27ft 26V , 2*to 

- 3745 3% 3% 3ft -ft 

_ 731914% 13ft 13W* 

XO 2.4 676 25ft Mto 25'; 

1X0 2J 3971 64% 63 641* -ft 

_ 359 4ft 4ft 4to - to 

1.9 1011 15 12% 14% -1% 

-,18616 31ft 25% 29% +3V, 

- 410 4ft 3ft 3V. —to 

- 493 6ft 4% 6ft -ft 

99411 U'A 12% -ft 

36* 17ft 17'. Uto 

_ rtSSIto 50 SOft-1 

- 1240 12ft 9to 9% —2ft 
_ 7531 30 26ft 28V, +2 

- 2793 18ft 15 17V.+2 1 .* 

-. 324 4ft 4% 4ft —ft 

_ 4 Jto 3'* 3ft -ft 

_ 17340 7V. 4". 7 - to 

1.1 1101 40 37% 39ft -lto 

60 1917 Mft 16V. _ 

-. 184316ft Mft Mft— 1ft 

- 412317 V, 16% 16% —V. 

_ 31 lift 10% 11 

4M 6 5ft SV* -ft 
93611ft 10% 11 -to 
-. 383 1ST, 14% 15ft -ft 

_ 1814 Mto 11% 14 -Jft 
7 1065 12'. 11% lift —to 

- 257 3ft rft, 3ft - ft 

- 2109 2Vu 2 2ft -ft 

- 310 ’* to to -v B 

_ 952 12% lift I2to _ 

- 428 Ift 2V. 2ft 

- 718 9ft 8ft 9% - % 

_ 7425 P» % 

... 937 5ft 4ft _ 

- 19634 34ft 31% 32 —1% 

- 176 13ft 116. lift— 1** 

-. 5555 2ft 2Yl 2ft -ft 
_ 413 2ft 1% 2'5 -to 

_ 196 6ft 5Vs 5V, —to 

-.1061210'.'. 9to 10ft -V, 

- 1415 6% 5% 

- 563 Jft 3 

- 3693 7to 7 

10 8 7 

- 158 6ft 6 

-. 22 r, B 

- 6547 3'.. 21. 

.8 630 lift 10 

- 868 3% 3% Jft *%, 

_ e91 1ft, Ift _v„ 

-. 394 70ft 9to 10ft -ft 

_ 283 ft % to _ 

.- 379 1% to 1 

315 7ft 651 T _ 

_. 27 4% 4ft 4ft -ft 

lto lto. 1'Vi, 

lJKblS 126 31 29% 39+1— | * 

_ 678 S% 5 5ft -to 

3.6 16740 34ft 33V. 34 —V* 

U 5434 21% 20ft 71ft +4* 

- 1708 7% ift 7'* -ft 

-. 705 2 Ift lto 

- 571 12 10 10 —1% 

_ 718 8% 7ft 8ft —ft 

- 980 33% n 23% -% 

- 399 30’.. 29 301* -ft 

- 34017% 16 16% -ft 

1.09e5j 4 21 20% 21 —to 

_ 27579 JO"^ BVr 9to —to 

101 8". 7% 7% — V, 

AO 20 111316V, 15% 16ft -ft 

.76 2.5 3187 321* 29ft 31 -ft 
-10284 41 35% 40 V, , 4 to 

-. 442010ft 9% 10ft _ 
216to 16V» T6‘A -2V> 

- 2369 lQto 99. 10% — >ft 

- 377 10 to 10V. up* -to 

- 1064 2to 2ft 3'to, -ft 

- 1544 l'Vu IV. 1% -Vu 

_ 313 to "ft - Vu 

].S 167*7": 66 46% _j£ 

U £43 16' ■; M% 16 -1 

- 301 "1. V„ V u -to 

- 234 ift 4 ft 4ft - ■+ 

- 43* *1. V* to _ 

10 257311% IT 11% -ft 

46 lto lto 1% 

44 2J 341 30 19' V W -ft 

JO 2.0 90 10 0»,ft 10 +W- 

- 1212 111* 10% 11 

3 n 6% * 6% -h 

- 606! 16 Mft 15ft —ft 

- '711 3% 3% 3»ft -ft 

25011ft lDto Uto -ft 

-■ '71413% 11 17 —to 

10 117 9 0ft 0% -ft 

- „ 33 !T% 2T 21 

_ 1 1 194 *4 v, 43% .3 

- 46834V. 33% 34 

_ 393 15ft 14% 15 -V, 

- 380 7ft 6% 7ft 

-. 379 12% 12 Uft -ft 

3400 12'. 11% 1153 —to 

- 250615ft Mto 15 —ft 
24 JJ 2538 JV, Jig 7V„ — Vu 

1.9 16 J?'.« 31% 31ft— 1 ft 


6V. 

'I'U -V n 
3 —ft 
11 -I 


08 

JO 


X0 21 


143010 9% 9% —ft | 

3SOOUto Mto 17to -ft 
1045 11ft 10 10 —1 

115 31 Vi 30'-: Jlft -V. 

554 6V. 54* 5-V'u -'ft 

406 Jr>* 36 37ft - 1 ft : Lneura 

1583 21 30'4 20T. —to I ChcOr wi 

6816 216. 18'* 21ft - 2% f Ctaalest 

921 3to 3% 3ft - to I Otrrdl 

390 Uto IT Uft ; Oimmd s 

230 13ft 12'-. 13'i -ft-CIBER 
223 IBft 16 10% -Vi, ' Cdco 


CbidCmn 
OiildDls 
Chiraek 
Onpcom 
I CtatpsTc 

CTiiran 

Oiitnds 

OiriSro 


»3 Uto 19to 19ft _ I CosCIrfi 
.4 85 9% 9\. 9ft — ''i|CottCb5 

_ 4134 12% 111* TO* - Vu ' CJnSU 

_ 633 2V'u lto IV, -'A. ! Courer 

_ 157 llto 11 lift _ I Covntrv 

„ 1)70. 4% 2to 3ft - ft Cr+rBri 

830640to36'Vu37tV u — P.’u . Crttmde 
«. 2474 4% 4to 4W„ -V u CrnyCm 


08 

.12 

.10a 


02 
01 e 


0B zn 


.76 2.7 
08 XI 


—to 
— V* 
-to 


CarmExB 
Cananl 
Cononie 
Carunr 
Cartel 
Cantory 
Canvfo 
Cxsiyvrt 
CCBT 
CapASC 
CcpBnc 00 
CapBnaf 1.95 
Civsvos 
CapSw 
Capture 
CapTms 
Caraustr 
CardBnc 
GrdWHIl 
CVIS 
CoreGP 
CareerHi 
Caroline 

Crenwk 
CartCm 

CaroFS) 
CnrrnOB 
CorsPir 
Carver 
CascdC 
Casevss 

CasnCTd 
CasnCwt 

CosA/tlS 
CaslnoOS 
CasiMogs 
CasRswi 
CasnSsc 
CnsflEs 
CoTafSetn 
Crtatyt 

CotnBco 


390 J 


JO _ 


X2 

9X 


toCps .14 
SCI 

Cetoaon 
CrieWnc 
CetasM* 

Ce4e* s 
Cetaanc 
CHIGtaM 
CeHPra 
Cel tear 
Celts tor 

WCmA 
Cel Cm PR 
CdlrTes 
Critr* 

Onfed JO 
CerttBcP 06 
CetrtIBc 1001130 
Cortical 
ClrBnk 
Cenh’bfc 
C entxTi 
CentBrrn 

CentDcor 

Center wt 
OrCOo 
CFlOBk 


CctiGcrdn 

C7T1IN8C 


JO 


.me 


.16 


.60 


IN8C 
CJerBc 
CJerFn 4 
ClrMlac 
CPaFfet 
CR*Lto 
CnSom 
CrtSou 

CntyBe 

ClrySo 

CepWn 

Cerovn 

Certaca 

Center 

C»P*ex 


_ 2402 Jto !to Ito — V.' 
94 3ft JV, 3to —ft 
611 fi* Ito 9ft -ft 
107 32ft 3P j 31 -ft 
6 34% 34'., 34V: *1% 
485 6% 6% ito -•>„ 
45 9to 0ft 9to -ft 
409 28% 27V* 20% -Vi 
255 7% 7to 7% 

394 3 % 2to 3V* — V* 

.15e 7 J 148513ft 13 13 —ft 

_ 262 23 23to 23 -to 

_ 18 10 9ft 9ft _ 

_ 746 16ft 25ft I5to 

_ 940 IP* 10% 10ft —to 

_ IJ93 6% 5ft . 

- 6012'/. 11% 11% _ 
_ 710 7% ift 7 _% 

2221365 1715 8% 7% Bto -% 
_ 49 7to 7 7to 

_ 846 9ft 9% 7ft 

1-50* SX 7TT 28ft 27V» 20 
_ 171 1 fa - 1 - 

JO 1J S90 17 16% 17 

_ 13W 7to 7 T-i 
_ 950 7% 7Vu 7Vu — Vu 
_ 12987 14ft 12% 14% -1% 
_ 655 3% 3to 3ft -to 
J6 32 r 14817% 16% 17% -1 

- 141 Sto Sto Sto —ft 

X4b 2_4 927 17% Mto Uft -ft 

_. 5681 21% I9to 21 to +1 
_ 5003 22V. 19% 22 *1% 

X0 42 6 9% 9V, 9to 

J5e8J 50 3 3 3 -to 

- 401 7to 2to 21* —ft 

_ 1399 33% 33V. 33% -to 

-. 2410 6 5ft 5ft — 

_ 366 4% 4 4ft: -ft, 

_ 1736 lto I 1% -to 

- 462 6 5ft 5ft 

-. 5*3 TV. 7% 7% -% 

_ 611 17% 16% uto 

_ 203 Tito 10% 11 —ft 

_ 3283 14% 12% 13% -v, 

- 3834 23'* 22"* 23 

- 152 5% 3% 3% I 

- 121 2% 2% 2to —ft 

_ 37 13 lift 13 

55 10ft 9% ig _vu 

706 85% 83 84% +2% 

746 3% 2% 3ft -ft 

3301I*Vj, I0to lift +1 
155 Sto 5 5ft -ft 

1959 3% 3ft 3to v* 

- 2562 3ft Sto 3Vu -to 

_ 646 Utu IVu -ft, 

- 41 2 S'; 24 34V. —1 
653 i*i> >V b i*u — l/u 

15 21% 21 21ft 
2 20% 20% 20% — 1 
27 14% Mto 14 ft — _ 
»art* Mto Mto -to 

38 9% 9 9V. >* 

227 10ft 17ft 1/ft -ft 
-1 42517'.'. 16V. lift 

J 190 27% 27% 27% _ 

J 9295 51 "a 44% 50?« + 4% 

- W ^ 6 6% -ft 

- 3283 4to 4 4 —to 

- 684 19ft 18% 19 -to 

- 1543 10% 10 10ft 
— -•= 'S? 2 8 % 7% «% -to 
JdeXO 713 27% 25% 25% —146 
JOb 10 26013% 12% 134* -V* 

- 145 34 20% 24 

- 5790 19 17% 18% -% 

oi ,« 2% -Vu 

08 0 457310% 10ft Wto —ft 

— US 7ft 7ft 7ft 

- ISO 2 1% 2 -to 

-43114 19V* 13% 13%— 6 

- 3921 26% 21% 25 -TV* 

- B496 0V. 7ft 7% 

- 599 Ift 1% Ift —ft 

- I1M ito 5ft 5ft —ft 
“ J25 ,2V * ’•% Uto -to 

- 2BQ0 2ft 1% 2ft 

- 1767 6% Bft 4% 

XO 50 6 13ft 12 12 

- 2251 10 ■»% g% 

10x7177 17Y, II 1J _i 

- WJli/u -Vu ift, - v u 

- 1092 14% 13 73%— 1ft 

- -ill 2** yj<‘ 3% 

- 2295 28V. 24% 26% +1V, 

- » IM 16% ... 

- 6% —to 

- U7iift 11 MV* +% 

-. 9316 33% 19"/,, 23 -3% 

- 536 7% 2% 3% -to 

- 4SKJ13 119. 12% -% 

~ .S' 6 * +T 

- 1B09 ISto 23V. 25V, +2 

- 13% 11 13 +% 

_ 475 7ft 6% 6% —ft 

U 1969 70V* Uto 18% -% 
M7 26V. 23 26% +3 

27 llto MU Uto -ft 
_ 1944»ft 19% 20 V* —ft 
■04e .4 9310% 10 10% -% 

_ 473614 12% 13% -% 

- 54411 10% 10% _ 

~ 7387 23% 22ft Bft —ft 

- U IP* lift— Ift. 

_. 1319 7ft 5»* 6ft _ft 

- 63912ft IP* 12 
3J 4619 33ft 33ft 33ft 

38 10ft 9% 9ft —ft 
4926V, 35ft 26ft -ft 
409 27 % 77 77V, - ft 

SI '0 161* II -ft 

2415 14*. 14% 

2*22% 72 22V* - V* 

85 Bft 0 8ft + % 

- 5012 11 12 —ft 

U3 7 gift. 6% —ft 

J2 4to 4ft 4Vu — Vu 

-34 H 111% 11% 11% “ 

- 1544 in* iiy, 11% _ % 

- 71 2% 7% 2% —to 

- 753% 3% 3% -ft 

- 4673 30ft 27 29% +IU 

- 130 13% Uft Uto +1 


1.28 


.17 


.40 10 
J0d 7.7 


XOe 10 
J0 30 
030 70 
36 XI 
JOe 
.12 


+ to 


-1 


-ft 


l.U 


1.08 30 


0* 30 


11 


Omco 
OnnFin 
GnMic 
Chios 
d price 

ClrcFn 

Qrdnc 
Grcon 
CrcSv 
Orrus 
Cscos 
crFed 
CiatnCat 

CIBnc 

OzBcp 
CfzBnch 
GMzBka 
Gfnlns 
CJVHW 
aviese 

□avCng 
OeanH 
GerCda 
QevtRI 
aUDr 

GfDrpf 2J1 
Qiricm s 
OinIGs 

Ointrrab 
Ootta 
OiOCar 
CoOoek 03 
CstBnc 00c 0 
CsiBnaf 2J5 
CslHIth 
Cbbancs 02 

CobrtS 
Cobra 

CocaBH 100 
Cbcansvs 
GodoBi 
CodeAl 
Coflexin 
Coonexs 
Coanosb 


_ 70363 66% 63ft 65% -2K 
XI 285 19ft 18% Uto -ft 
_ 7373 3ft 2% 3ft, -'ft 
_ 325 to % to -ft 
_ 416 4 3% 3% 

_ 975 20'.-, Uft 19ft -ft 

_ 3SBO ISto 12 12 — Ito'CresArwt 

_ 147 Bto 8 8ft -to • Cr5tFn 

_ 1731 19 ISto 19 -to ' Crilioc 

_ 145 6". 5% 5** —ft ' CltabG 

20 1413 52ft 51ft 52 _ ,CrooGpf 05 21 J 


CrStaMoC 

CrTctaLt 

GedSys 

CrdAcps 

Otabh 

CrosAir 


80 


Cotaemt 

Catao&i 

CTayVar 

CoUiR 

Cotooen 

QUBcpS 

Conns 

CBcao A 


_ 3499 IP* urn 10ft —'A CrasCam 
X 3657 Uto 39% 3o% — lto , Gossmcn 
343 4% 4". 4% - to 1 CrwtlAn 

M 26 25V* 26-1 , CwnBk 

15711% llto 11% -to CrwnRs 
_ 423 10V* 10 IQ —ft I Cryenco 

.. 624 7to 6% 7 - to I Cryolite 

_ 36390 36% 33 36ft -2ft ' Cryomed 
_ 95489 25% 23V* 24% —to ; GAtFr 
.ISe 0 433 27". 26 27ft - % Culp s 
_ 296 SV, 5 5to -to I CumbFfl 

_ 11515 Mto T5 - % 1 CupNBk 

212 29 26’.. 28% -to 1 Curaflex 

7 30% 29% 29% — % ' Cur Tcta 

165 25 24ft 24ft _ ! CuStOl 

M 6% 5% 6% -to 

384 33 27 31 -4% 

_ 112 Ft S'/. 5V* _ 

_ 562 7ft 6% 7ft 

_ 656 7% 7 7% -to 

_ 3589 4% 4 4 —to 

.16 50 4 2% 2% 2% - 

21 12% 12% 12% —to 

5 27 27 27 —I 

31215% 16% 15% -to 
100 3% 3% 3V* 

_ 925 9% 8% ito —ft 
- 8310 5% 4% 5 -to 
_ 77914 13 13% +ft 

1J 211 19 IBft IBft —to 
37 Uft 17to 17ft -% 

9J 3824 % 74% 24to +W 
_ 6273 35ft 34 34% ♦ ft 

1.9 7830 27% 28 —to 

_ 14rt 3% 2% 3% +A>b 
_ 433032ft Mft 32ft rift 
30 131728% 25% 27ft -Ift 
_ 1MI 4% 3 3ft 
_ 2655 6 5% 6 * ft 

... 362 lOto 9% 10ft +to 

_ 127721ft 20ft 20to —ft 
_ 932119% 15% 16%— 2% 

_ sxniv* lew* us* +% 

J2»10 215 IS IS _ 

.. 771 13% 12% 13 —ft 

_ 1023 «to 3ft Jft —to 
,. 651414ft 13% 14 
_ 2133 3 TV* 2% -ft 
_ 2398 22% 21 21to— Ift 

00 201515923% 21% 23% +2% 

_ 256 Zto 2to 2to —ft 

00 3J 7538 34". 22'434«% + TVu 


_ 10990 34'A 48% 52% +3% 
-10957 24% 22ft Mto -lto 
_ 1C 5to 4ft 5ft +to 
_ 3928 17% 16% 17% +% 
_ 4261 lift J5ft 15% -to 
_ 682 9ft 0% Bft —to 
_ 1471 10ft 9% 10ft _ 

- 3* 3% 3% 3% - 

_ 51 1 24ft 21 V. 22% —1 ft 

- 34 17ft 16% 16% —% 
_ 691 16ft lSVt 16 -to 
-27756 22 Uto 21% -Jft 

1J 5 7% 7ft TV. —ft 
0 100 17 15 14 _ 

- 3476)3'* 46 47% +1 

.1 11699 27ft 23% 24% -% 

.1 311 10ft 10 I0ft—to 

_ 3160 Ift, 1% 1ft* — to. 

- 3403 4% 2ft 4 + ft 

_ 1B064 32% 29% 31 —ft 
_ 6691 19% 18 ISto —% 
_ 2304 25% 23% 24% -Vi 

- 223 0to 7% 7to —ft 

_ 720 3ft Jft 3ft 

_ 106 1ft 1 Ito _ 

- 503 22V. 22 22% rft 

_ 497 2ft 2ft 2ft -Vu 

632 1ft lto TU _ 

4 4ft -% 

10'* 10% —to 
Bto 9V. -ft 

6% 


176 ito 
_ 639311 
_ 574 9% 

- 27 6% 

_ 10 

_ 1813 6to 
_ 496 3% 
_ T22 6 

- 2478 Ito 

XSelJ 1540 39 
08 2934 10 

031 B0 


5ft 

2% 

5ft 

2ft 


U 


5ft 

2U —ft 
5ft —to 
2to -to 
36to Mto - lto 
Bto 9ft —ft 
691 SSV* 54% 55ft +to 
HO 9% 9% 9ft 


Dtat YU UOsMgh Law On Cbge 


wmm 

Kwnrn 

DracoE 

DresB 

Drewin 

Dredr_ 

□rvyerG 

DrugE 

Drypera 

Duc fO rl 

DuraPn 

Durocrff 

Durkn 

Duriran S 

DvnRsta 

DyfctaC 


X0 X2 176 ISto 18 18% +% 

- 129923V, 22% 23to +lft 

- 1C TO Sto Sto - 

_ 749311ft Wto 11 - 

- 21411 10ft 10% —to 

- 502 6ft 6 6ft + V* 

J4 10 3280 23% 22to 23% *%. 

- 2863 5ft 5 5ft _ 

- 130413 lift 12% —ft 

- 36011 9to 9to— 1 

_ 144710ft 8ft Bft 

_ 255045% 43 43V4 — 1% 

_ 209 17% 14% 14ft — % 

02 2 J 514515ft 14ft 15ft -to 

XOntLO 109 4 jft 4 _ 

_ 4444 21ft 17% 91 -3% 


ECC3 

n» 


B5M1 
BJKSI 
EMC In 
EMCON 
EMPIS 

EHO 


ESELCO 100b 40 


_ 24918ft 17 IB +% 

4 3 2% 3 +ft 

-28034 10ft 17 17ft +to 

- 69 2 Ift 1ft —ft 

- 68710% 10 10% +to 

- 169 6% 6 «ft +V. 

50 X44 9ft Bft 9 —ft 

_ 938 7ft 7 7Vu +V U 

_ 2572 13% 12V. 12% —ft 

_ 640 7% 7% 7% _ 

- 3001 W6 8% 9ft +ft 


CybfOpT 

Cytaeraric 

CvtaneD 

Cyanus 

Cyrix Cp 

Cyrk 

Cvlcl 

CyiRdun 

Cyioctc 

Cyioon 

Cvtaitar 

CrtRx 


» 13443 6ft 5H 6% -% 

- 82 3ft 3% 3% -ft 

- 1296 25 24". 25 

- 102 Sto 5ft V/u -V U| 

- 239 9 7% 8ft 

- 5 t97jg vm is Uto —to 

_ 1770% V* 7% PVu —Hu 

_ 97CT2SV, 26ft 27to _ 

_ 3889 25ft 24 24 —1 

- 1734 37. 3ft 3ft + to 

- 173 4% 3ft 4 

- 1407 4% 3% 4% 

-17146 6% 5ft 5ft — % 

- 217 9 8ft Bft —ft 

- 1773 5ft 5ft 5ft —ft 


EZC om _ 

EZEMA JOb 4.1 
EZEMB JOb 42 
EaataBCP -Si a 1J 
EotBsta 00 3X 
E«JFd 
EolHrd 
EcntaT 


S —to 


Estnflc 

EstnEn 


.14 


Eastovr 08 
Eaferle 

EataiVart 00 

EcoSri 

Ecogatt 

Ecoonwrt 

EdtaOr 

EdcAtt 

Edudns 

Eduneflc 

Edusofl 

BIIBl— | 

HIUQN 


80 


20 


+% 


J 


CoInfGas 106 60 11121 20 21 

CoblGo 00 X6 247 24 23% 23% — % 

CoBnk _ 109 11 10 to I Oft +% 

COIFsl _ 330 41% 39% 41 +V6 

Omar 2A 1J1B85U 18% 19 +ft 


ComrcD 
Contests 
One sps 
C omcoa 
CmdTHds 

ComtSal 


_ 244 5ft 5 5 — V U 

017237 19% 17Vu 19 +1 

033*76 Uto 17 IBft + 1 
_ l« 13% lift 13% —»r, 
_ 488 Bto 7% 8 r to 
_ 764 2ft 3V* 2ft rto 

_ 2153 10% 17 17ft +W 
_ 297 2ft 7ft TV* +Vu 
52619% IBft 19% +ft 
42 Mto 24% 24% - 

90832% 31V. 33 rto 
11327 25% 26% rft 

31210 17% 17% —ft 

239 10 17 17V4 —to 

_ 042 T6U 15ft 14 +to 

JOb 1.9 1315% 15 15ft _ 

CmcBrtY 30 33 80 9 to 9V. 9% +to 

CmdBih „ MKMu 10% 10% —ft 

CmcEtS _ 7674 25ft 34% 25% rft 

CwItEdt 00 P 0 110314ft 13ft 14ft rft 

CmCMNC 031 9X 27 10", 9ft 7ft _ 

CBmlntt _ 0348 1%. 1 lto 


CmnOSc 
CmcBNJ jUbXl 
CmBNJpl 1.50 6.1 
CmBcMO 00 XI 
OnefiVA 00b 2J 
■ - JO 40 
JO 4.1 


ComErt 
ComEnA — 

ComOri _ 

CornSyi J4 XI 
CamBcNY 00 33 

SKg 5 '£ IS 

CmtvBn J4e 10 
CmtvFBFl. 
CcmEtBk 04 3J 
ComPBpllJS 60 
COrrtHOti - 

COmHlS v - 

Commit 
CompBnc .92 

CIWRL 


OiilXfX 
Cm pan 
emoOts 
CmplHs 

Oripttn 

OnnU? 

CpINwk 

CPIOuts 

c moFT r 

Cumpunr 

Omnstar 

CmsIRj 

Comtah 

Comwers 

CcdCan 

OdncEFS 

Csnrifld 

QmcCm 


750 1%, Vb Vj, —Ift 
54 ft to, —ft, 
64411ft 11 11 —to 

511 llto 1] 11% -V. 

57 16 Vi 14% Mto rft 
43M 38% M +1 

2 34% 34ft 34ft „ 
4715 15 IS 

910ft 10 to — % 
10513% (3 13V1 _ 

61 26% 25% 25ft -ft 
50+4% 3 ft 3% —ft 

- 867 24 23% 23ft +% 

_ inn 9% 9% - 

3X 1158 76% 25% 26% -to 
_ 1355 12% lift 11% _% 
_ 2515 4ft 4 4 —% 

Il?3 5 4% 4% rft 

J 234 Mto 13% 14ft +ft 
_ TUlOto 9% 10to +V* 
_ 1707 !V U 1 Vu 1ft. -ft, 
J2 4.6 996 7% 4ft 7 +ft 
_ 8484 7ft 7ft 7V U —ift 

- 8* 5% 5V. SV U — Vu 

- ,7 SI5 4 3*^ +Yu 

_ 10139 43ft 41 43% —ift 

- 54713% 12 Uto— IM 


DAN Fn 

DANF wt 

OfYKbTW 

DBA 

001 

DS>A 

DS»B 

DEAR 

DHTcta 
DM Mol 
DMA PI 
DMA Pt 
DNXCP 

DSC* 

DSGmt 

DSEGp 

DSP 

DTInds 

□USA 

□Vim* 

DdaCpi 

DfyJour 

DchyA 
Dries 


Pridrort 

Oomark 

Donfca 

Donskin 

DartGp 

DfBdcsT 

CKO ID 

DtoMeo 

DtoRsta 

DISwirii 

DtaSvsr 1 

DtaTm 

DtTrNw 

Drift. 

□afltey 

Dafmar 

Driscp 

Dtadti 


- 735 Bto 7ft Ito +to 

-. 11 3 3 3 +to 

- 9817% 11% 12 —to 

_ 497 4% 4% 4% —!A 

- 721 3ft ZM 3ft +% 

- 376 3ft 3V6 3% —ft 

- 463Hft Sto 3to —ft 

- 82426 24% 26 +% 

- 441 Tito 20% 20% — % 

- 5210ft 10 10ft +% 

- 4230 4% 3ft 4 —to 

L25 90 12924ft 23% 23% 

_ 274 4% ito 4% r Vu 

J4I 62 1SS7 12% 12 12 _ 

- 1053 32ft 31 to Jlto— lto 
-57605 23% 21ft 21%. 

250 10 1343 25% 23% 25 rift 

- 38414 13% 13% 

- 1109 4ft 3% 4 ft rft 

_ 1WJ14 15% 15% —to 

- IK 4ft 4ft 4ft —V* 
_ 1W Ift 1ft 1% 

_ 48 13% 12% 11% _ 

- 418% 17% T8to rft 
1 4% 4% 4% —ft 

- 740 13% 12ft 13 —ft 
_ 207 4Vu 3ft 3ft —ft 

119 8 7% 7% —to 


28 23% 21% 23% _ 

915% 15 15% r% 

194 10% lOto 10ft 

40 5% 4% 

11 5 4% 

429 29 29 —2% 

8323% 22% 23% _ 

_ 14 4% 4% 4ft rto 

-11141 Mto l!%14Vu+lft. 

- 151 12% 12% 12% — % 

- 3543 4 to 3% 3ft —to 

0 694 19% 19 19% +% 

- 342 1ft 1ft Ift — 

995 3 2% 2ft + ft 

610% 10% 10% _ 
327 Sft 5ft 5% —ft 
730 29% 27 29ft +7V* 
_ 4151 Sto 4riu Sft 

- 4195 Bft 7ft Sft 

- 352 2ft 7ft 2ft 

- 154 6% 5% 6 —ft 

- 3630 17ft 14ft 17 +2ft 

- 1612 9ft 8 9 —to 

_ 580 Sft 5 5 — % 

_ BMlOto B 9ft +lft 

- 54 Sft 5 5 —ft 

_ 1777 00*. 7ft 7ft —ft 
_ 111015% 14 15 rft 

- ~ Jft 2% 2ft +Vu 

■We 1.1 5527 24 24%— 4 

32 20 2618ft IBft 18ft +to 

- 1446 2ft 2 2ft —to 

_ 336 11% 10% II —ft 

_ 209 14 13% 13% —% 

- 209311% 10% 10ft - 

-10 22 4 4ft 4% 4% t% 

« w 3M? 36 33 +2 

■file 14 201 51ft 49 49ft— Sft 

- 99 9% Sft 9M +ft 

-2919021ft 20 21 rft 

- 100 8% 7ft 0% rft 

-.2 20 'IU \ l 

_ 371 5 Uto 16 16Vu — ¥« 

, - 374 13% 12% 12% —ft 

.140 1.0 >16 14% 13ft 73ft —ft 

- 7312% lift Uft —ft 

- 427 8% Sft 8% —ft 

- 4M ift 4ft 4ft r V. 

- 400 1 riu 1 _ 

- 465 7ft 7 7ft —ft 

- B22 C% 4% Cto —V* 

- 117516ft 12% Mft +1% 

- 2007 4ft 5ft 6to rft 

- 3448 9% 7ft 8% 


Dhr YU TOOcHrit Low Cbe Ota* 




FomS» 
FmtHm g 22 
FdimMcta 

Fonr 

Farm 04 e 


04 


_ 24«%, ft ft - 

3 2479 35ft 33% 35% +lft 

_ 275715 13ft IS +1% 
_ 236 5ft 5% Sft - 

0 22 6 % 4 % 4 % +% 

-24313 0ft 4ft 6ft— J% 
J 835333% 32% 33% + J 

- 10 4% 4% 4% —ft 

XOaXJ 4417% 16% 17% - 

_ 843 £ 5ft Sft — 1 % 
_ 449711ft 11% lift +% 

W ‘Ab +ft 

20 21U55 54 SFW'r'A 

_ 8811 4ft 2ft 4% +1 

- 473411 10ft 10ft - 

- 172211% 10 lOto rto 

_ 290327% 26 26% rto 



.i - 



FWtaT 

so-oni 

0BBtaA 


- 204 8% 8 8% +ft 

S3 in 3ft 8% 3% —to 


FHBiHlA .181 SJ _ ... ... 

Fndln*s J4 t5 1312% 12% 12% — % 

FTncCnc _ 711 19ft 18% 13to— t 

RnTst 1.12b 20 2243% 42 43% rl% 

FrnancSd _ 1723 6ft 6% 6% rft 

FinSdwt _ 1148 ft % % 

as r ... x'Miksr-iKi :3 

FAJbon JOb 20 T3 8% 7ft 7ft —ft 

FMAtori - 196525% 24 25to +1% 

RATn 04 20 595234ft 33 34% +1to 

PMN C 04 12 220 20 2) —1 

FBOh S 100 4.1 175424% 23% 24% rft 
FIMoGA 0D010 119 19 19 +«* 

WBtert 205 80 1827 24to 26% - 

FUBcstK 05 e A 32011% 10% llto rft 
FstCtah _ 1483 4ft 4% 4% ♦% 


FtChrtfik _ 

FtOvt 08 20 

FOzfiA JO a 10 

WCtf J9I AS 

FOoffln 00 X5 

FCriOwi 1J3 5 l3 

FCofctGa 086 30 .. 

8 100 IX 5621 M 


2138 8 ito 7V. rift 
53 lift 17 18% r lto 

1043 42 42% +% 

142 Uto 12% 13 e% 
782 24% 24 24% —ft 

5634 33 33 —ft 

Xf2 18 17% 17ft rft 

- — — - 2^ -.v 


V • 


\ 


29% 


PI1J1 SB 21 36% 36 36 —to 

_ 589 4to 3% 4tt ♦% 
122 11 11X23% 21ft 23% +1% 
Rfstn _ 194 73 26% 26% — Vu 

.17e20 1575 Bft Bft B% _ 
02b 12 46416% 15% 16% —ft 
JO 20 331% 31% 31% - 


X3N3.1 
00a 10 


EncoreW 


-22a 


.13 


Dtawfcwt 

□afaRce 

Dalian 

Driwn 

Dauptan 

Dana, 

Dowd 

DavdSnA 

Denxni 


.10 


_ 40?33jV£, 2J7u 3to —Vu 


- 931 4% 4 4% rto 

- 2434 9% Bft 8% —ft 

- 4»4to 3% 4%, 4 Vu 
_ 1566 23 U. J|% 23to * 1 Vu 
_ 451 lift 10ft 1PA rift 

- 2712 2 


X7 1J 
J5 X7 


2J 
2.7 
20 
M 30 


Cervycri .43e 1.1 1060 24% 23% 24 


ChobkiTa 
Ctaotane 

Chamois JO 

OwtapPr 
Chompps 
OtrrnSn 09 

ChlFSB 
CtartFdl* 


t _ 


Otmn * 


ns 4% 4 4% rto 

in 4 5% 5% -% 

- 123 24 22% 23ft _ 

- 3S3 4% 3% 4 

■ »t 5% 4 
.93*454 9% *% 9V. rft 

00a 2X 1076341* 25 33%*0% 

■■ 13212ft lift 12% 


.60 


2J 4765 22ft 27V* 22% — Vu 
- 805 4% 6 6ft — % 


Conductu 

Cenestoa 

CortfTr 

Conmed 

CortrtWt 

Cannp 

CaraSvs 

Consfcn 

CritsoPd 

Coo pop 

ConPd 

ConSWtn 

OonsFn 

Oxi Wri 

Contta 

OUUUO 

cnsovpt 

arror 

CnvSO. 

Com-** 

CooerD 

CWPrt. 

CODPBfe s 

CcorsB 

Coport 

Coplevs 

Coprtal 

CorTtaer 

C orCobF 

Corcam 


- 7712 2 1% in*, Vu 

_ 93 5% 4% 5»f r% 

_ 103 Sft 4% Sft rft 

_ 320*14% 13% 13% r% 

.. 2310 5ft 4% Jft rft 

_ 30312% 12% 12% ” 

101 6X 3*25% 244 25% 

_ 400 5'u 4% 5VCl rft 

.12 10 11712 lift 12 +ft 

- 2764 7 54 6% —ft 

_ 74 13ft Uft IJto - 

T JB 03 1791*0 39 39% — % 

031 7 3 40911% 10ft 10% rft 

- 131 6% 6 «ft -ft 

05 X5 20 2% 2 2 —ft 

1.14 6.9 779 17% 14% 16% -% 

- 0»1 144 15% 16% rft 

XO 4J 20I47U 14 14 _ 

J2 SZA 314 1% 1ft 1ft —ft 

_ 233411% 10ft llto r to 

_ 131 2% 1ft 2% rft 

J4 _ 5MV» ICVp 16V. *•/„ 

_ 1 1% 1% 2% _ 

ID 74 7'4 7% _ 

„ 2416% 15to 15% - 

00 20 5T2BX 19% 19% — Vr 
_ 1755 >«% 15% lift rlto 


DcyR^ 

DeWrife 

DebSip 

DoricOri 

Deep Tecta 

Dearbki 

Deftttnc 

□aflcSid 

DricftE 

DktaGti 

DeloOti 

Dririvn 

DeOCatr 


- S5rt& + S 1* 


_ 1140 

4181 9% 9ft 9 to —to 
3859 20% 19% MV, r% 
_ 2769 4ft W« 3ft rift 


SSE 

DatrfHne 

DeftNG 

DenWXv 

DepGlY 

D*"il 

Destanss 

DstlW 

Daisy* 

DefrxC 

Devean 

□avBui 

Devon 

DtaiPge 

DtoUofc 

Dtanoo 

Dfauifr 

D«xetl 


_42to 42 41 

~ 129 3% Jft 3% —to 

J 12 70 75 75 —1 

_ 1406 6% 5% 6 - 

- 2% 2% — % 

- 13 ito 3% 4V. _ 

- 58 9% 9 9% r% 

- 87 2ft 2% Jft 

- 5373 7ft 6% rVu rft 

- 6 13ft 12% 12% —to 

- 197 22ft 21ft 21% —ft 

- 156 7% 7% 7% —ft 

- 20 3% Sft 3% r ft 

- 45 5 4U„ 4'Vu — Vu 

- 215916% 16 14% rft 

_ 47 4% 4% 4ft —V. 

- 153810% 9% lOto _ 

- iMIVu >%. 1 —ft 

Isg?” & & rV" 

- M9 9 8% 0% —ft 

- 90 4ft «to 4% rft 
.92 30 1478 24% 25ft 26% rto 

- 12917 Mto 16% rft 

_ 280 10% 10'4 10% 

- 182619ft 17 17 -3% 

- £8 3% 3% 3% _ 

_ 464 8V* 7to 7*6 

- 887 16% 14 16% 

- Mft -ft 

S Vt* 6% 7 
_ 2135 15ft 14% 15 _ 

492 14 12% 13% —to 

4237% 34ft 37 rft 
453 7ft 7 7ft _ 
47012% 11% 12% rft 

80015% Uto Uft rto 
1933ft Mft Mft— 2ft 
5110 9% 10 - 

04 20 BT 22ft 21ft Sft +ft 
-7147430% 27% 28% — 

“ fS '/. V ’ t^ft rft 

- 138 3% 3% 3% —ft 

- 2534 Uto 15ft lift r % 

■Me X 196 19% 18ft 1096 —ft 

1.12 6X X1B 17% 17ft rto 

- 435338% 37 33% rl 

100 3J 129031 30 30ft —to 

.10* 435 1ft. IM 1ft. rft 

- 744415 13ft 13ft— I 

- 2145 2 W» 1ft — % 

- 33* 9 0 8 —1 

- 72 Uft lift lift 

_ 327 8% 8% 8% - 

- sn Ift lto i% _ 

- 243720% 19ft Mto rft 


108 


7 $% ~X‘ 


EnvrWwf 

Envin, 

Envgc 

Envtrris) 

EnvavCp 

Etnan 

EqutCrdt 

Eaulnax 

C q u Hag t 


r-oSa , 
„ “ liiiiss m ii* +« 

J6 40 47 14 14% 14 rft 
30 2.4 73 8ft B Bto rft 

- 219 4% 3ft 4ft _ 
,, ■- 185 3ft 3ft 3% Z 
.16 10 137410ft 9ft 10ft rft 

- 45 4% 5% 6 _% 

- 114 6% Sft 6% + 1 ft. 

- 212 3H Sft 3% _ 

- 12 2 1W„ pVu v u 

- 117 7ft 7ft 7W rft 
-*» 

w ift 


RFCOP 
FFBBCY8 
FTFWUS 
FFd&l 
Ff=SLOM 

H=dBrwi 

FtFdCOs 00 17 
FFncOH z 1-08 20 
FtFnBk* 1.12 30 
FtFnQ-l 0 19 

RBT. 5 ?0 

FFhWMs XO 1 J 
FtFnHds X8 30 
Rftl* 0B 10 
FtGriida 

FMorSs X0 10 
PHtm 1.10 43 
FMnSvi XO 20 
FtaMB 02 U 
PdCnm JOe 0 
FtLbty 02 2X 
FWterc 
FTMdi* 

FMbXc 08 2X 
RMdwF _ 

FMWA Job 1 J 
FNtGo J7 33 
FNDehll .98 40 
FNthSS 02 3J 
FtOric s JO 10 
FtFcNtw 
FstPoim 

FtsvMra _ 

FSacOp 10* 30 


32 IX 0199 23 21ft 2Tft 
XS 20 S3 Uft 16ft 


17 


34513% 13ft 13% r% 
1531 30 31 —3 

14 22% Zl% 21% rto 
12639 X 39 +1 

531ft 31% 31ft ♦ % 
25413% 12% 13% rto 
94414 15% 15% - 

935ft 3* 35ft +1 
■78 36% 23ft 24 —to 
402 15% Mft 15% rto - 
428 24% M%— 2% 

44 6% 5ft 5% —ft 
1522ft 20% 22ft - 
36820 27%. 27% rft 

30M 14 M rft 


• "“If.*. 




Fretaenaa 

ItaSnc 

FISdUDXt 


_ ___. ^ rto 

125 M 13ft 13ft —% 
100 IX Xl329ft 28% 29ft +1% 
00 b 3.1 396 22% 21% 21% —to 
462 28% 27% 2B +% 
137 IS 14% 14% —ft 

11 11% 11% llto— 1 

55 2114 20ft 21 rft 
1724V* 23 2416 — 

233 Mto 13ft Uft — % 
... 118 29% 28 29% _ 

- 3736 FA 8% Sft — % 

- 195418% 17% 18% —to 
_ JgUto IS 15% +to 




1 29% 29% 


tnvrccp - 117 7ft 7% 7W +' 


JO 2.9 


00a 10 


00 20 
•10b 10 


— 12 5'6 
MO J 159913% tf 

- 70S 4% 

_*75 3% 


102 


— 100333ft Sft n /s ft 


DtoUnil 
Dig l*g 
□toitao 


SfiJu? 


DtaPdwtA 
agPdyrfa 
DtoPra 
Dlgtsd 
Otottsv 
DIntaFn 
Dtanox 
DbcZnes 
DlxtaYr 
DkCM£ 
Domna 

S5SS“ - 

□atniw 


- 2555 17 14% 

- 2120 Sft 4% 5 +ft 

^ 1895 4 3% 3ft 

52x1563 16% 15 15ft — 

493 9% 8% 9 — % 

- 4974 M 13 13ft —ft 

- 73914 lift 13% rlto 

- 387 9V. 8% 8% —% 

- S21 1S% 13% IJto— 1 to 

- 148613 11% 12% r% 

ft. 

ars 


m im rrw 

= Jfi £ 


- 4307 pvv, Ift Ijyu rft 


.14 _ 

1.10 5J 
06 3X 


- 459 SHi 3% 3ft 

- 772 9ft 8ft 9M - 

- 75030ft 32% 33ft rft 

_ 1070 15ft Mft Mft - 

XO <1710% 9M 9ft rft 
0)453036% 23 25% — % 

40 U'A IBft 19% *to 

- 47 14% 14 14% rft 

- 2065 23V. 34% 34ft rft 
Ul 131 13ft 12% UM rft 

_ 565511V* 10 lift r Vu 
_ HM IV,, Ufa Ufa _ 


- 110 2ft 2% 2ft 

- 3ft 3% rft 

- 10 % 20 +i% 

- SS?, 23ft rft 

- 3ft 2ft 3ft + ft 

- ins 17% 14% 17 _ft 

- 313 4% ift 4ft 

- 733 JV, 3ft 2Vu — ft! 

13 13 -ft 

„ $5 2 f -ft 

isa 

jq 1, 1M1 i9Vl - 

a 

- IDS 0% ftfa Ift 
_ X259 15ft 14ft 15 —ft 

" 2*1 IS 3* -* 

- 4B8 7ft 6% 7 rv+ 
“ .2? ,4W 15% 14% +ft 

yi ™?1S* UVi »*% _ 
7-4 SWA— 1 

m =4iR IE 

CxcTTcri 0Sa 50 m lu . .‘j 4 + ft 

ExatfTl 202728.1 7« 8% 8ft 8VA 

- 1773 2% 2ft 3% ~ 

- 1694 24% 2314 23ft ft 

.10 JMI9 U%U rl£ 

- 1364 11 9ft ovi_,u 

- f -**5 

— Wfl fiu ■ Pm a iL 
~ wi 4% 4 4 " 

- 3978 Mft W 13ft * 1 M 


Eskimo 
Esmor 
EbxOv 
E ltalCHM 
EvnSut 
Evans 

SsSr 

EvorMed 
EvarMpr 300 
EvgmRs 
ExrinOe 


FIMbsG 

FtabMRl 


EXTON 

Exfde 

Explni 

ExnrAm 

Rxp5cp t 

Exstar 

Emmy 

Ercorp 


.186 10 13 Mft I3ft ... „ 

XOblJ 2733* 22% 23% rto 
06a X K» 12 14 13% 14 +% 

X0 10 95025% 22ft 25 +2% 

gST Rn .TO* IX « J% ’ito ’jto* tvt 
gTrixn - 341910ft 8% Wfa rltafa 

FUTot 1X8 40 3309*3 42 42M rto 

FfUMBcp 07a IX 37 5 4% 5 

gUW JS IX 731 29V* 29Y,— 1ft 

A3 23 1220 17 17 — IM 

™fji “ am wf 7» 

fKgSK.s 

, _ - 85 7% 7ft 7% rft 

1 JO 3J VMM 37 37% rft 

- 21) 30ft »M 20 —ft 

- 00 5 4% 5 rto 

- 4726 20ft 20 S0V* — % 

43410 9 9% —to 

4827 21ft 21ft -ft 
90420ft 19ft 19ft —ft 
100 4 Sft 4 +1 

14315ft Mft 15 +ft 

U'AiTOW-iie 

- 3333 6% SM 6V* rft 

SbiS m J% f& P 
s 5 * p 

SIM 13V, 14 rto 
95914% I3U 13% — % 
U9 11 10% 10M - 

3»Z7to 26ft 27ft rft 
33% 34 rft 


* .J ~ 


Hsdllm 
Ptaorv 

FVogstrs _ 

Rsstrsf 225 105 
Flair 0Ba A 
.13 U 
XB 30 


RaxstiW 

i—» « .. 

' iftorn 
Rc4=ri 
Flowtri 
Foamex 


108 


Cnnrtnl 

r > oonTia 
ForaSvs 
For Am 
FOrestO 
ForflOwt 
gnrsnpT J51 50 
WSCn _ 

ForsUrt 

PWrtftS 08 X2 - 

PortnB 000 .9 2821 34 


PartrCpt 10Q jj 5847% 44% 47% + lto 

- 1364 W4 19ft Uft -ft . 

SsSt “ ™ » ♦» 

gta£ 104 30 ^ TiJ 

- 'SI V* IM* lift -ft 

“ ^ ** 3ft — ft 

10 ft to to —ft 
2®% 38 30% rft 

® »ft Bto Bto +to 

a '3 nSS 



FrttaStain 
FVamTc 

Fr»nSv _ 

FraitiS wt 
gridd 1X0 3X 
ErtS* 01 r zx 


FlCBn 

FiMBc 

F&MBn 

F&MQs 

SJNO* 

RFBci 

FFBS 

F«_CBc 

ZZ F " 

R-IK 
FM Prop 
FMSFn 

FRPPT 

FSlInt 

FTP Sit 

FrixtWl 

FaitOn. 

FaMK 

FrieOn 

FricOM 


X0a3J 47219 m IB 19 ♦+. 

■ K,0iA ni? fey* -% 


* U 19% 3a rl2 

V5 s% +TM 




IJ S !5* Mto ryZ 
06 19 H, 5 ". Aft 5 +% 


>g5 4ft 5 

fl-B jaabia 

SaW jg^ {J* Mft +% 

^10213 243 Sn t 

— pi w iaiA 1 1 a 

: 

- 


— .508 12V, ||ij| 12% , j? 

li “SI 7. ’Ift -ito 


— 24*9 JV. 411/u 4% 

“ ’ffl Jto S’/. 5M _ 

- >30 IV* |tfa iv,, 


FrkBK Bt 

FmfcS 

FrttBPb 

FfWU 

F+WtCtac 


JO 7J 
02 |.| 


Frjedmn 

Frisacfy 

Frtti 

Ftofts 

Fvfavxn 

FubHB 

Foltons 

Funa 

Form 

FutaonSy 

SSSI* 

Futrmdla 
FTrtma WT 


.12 


11% Uto —to 

-tin 27ft 

- ? 5 ¥* 4,4 

“ *7 14 % 1»* lift +*% 

- iJi 4jto 3ft 3ft eft 

nS ii% t%. 

.. ^ 573 38 37 JPA — 

M 11 74421% 20% 21% +1% 
04 |7 ® ]** Mft 13ft- - 

U -JS ‘ J5% 15% —ft 

~ ?£?,'?£ lift 15% +% 

= sir ® s* ^ 

= s?i% ^ b 3 






c» 


SB u 




■‘41T 4 * 


V’to ,x . 

VN v. 




cues 

CAB BC* 

GBC6C 

GBCT&, 


0X1336UM 13% M — U 

u 1 32 a » rl 

19614 13ft 13% -to 
lift lift —to 


Nil 


- 1« ... 


ax 

- 35512 


Caotmwd oa Page 16 





'Vj it* 

V*v, 

^sr? -... '•-> 



X 


5 




«? - ' ■ * v-* 

:r S..;; S il- 

• C 

OtfcJS 


?*z ' ;si * 


'" ■ v. : a... 


f^-’iSSSfc 

V. -r r.-j^ttgf 


* : S.u. 

- ' * J*3.. 

f •• ■ - - ■ ;»; 

si"“ ig£ 
I ; ?fc!i 

•-" ■ . : t. 


1 - -■ -! ~. V 

; .- *- ■* r £' £•' 


: -" T --. jl 

- ^ .-- «-i Si 


i. . : j "•■ ■• ‘ 


4-. - : i !■’/;;•« 


i. : _ ' : - s> • 


>V : ;f S 

. .-:. I .. r- .N v'r 


*;•" r -?*vK 

■* ' ; , ' . *.•■■» ?,.' 
•■' • _x .-• • * r . 


“i-i '.- 

'i* tt- 


r 


:: ;**.V 

• , 


^ > ! t ^Markets 

China Orders Clampdown 
On Short-Selling of Bonds 

<:yyedfy^ Su9 ^ Dts ^ 

market China kJ^ con ^ ( ^ cnce in its bond 

^sca^ m ^£i e T cd ? ««**** houxs 10 *°p 

the official China rw? 50 ? ^° n< ^ the dealers own, 
Simday. The Finance Weekly reported on 

selling ownership cenjKS nSlSrS^ houscs to sto P 

ownership certificates for rc^fh^! f f 1500(15 to exchange all 
newspaper said. ^ or cash b >' June 20. the 

(Sioffi^ 1994 Tre^LmfL! ^ ee *^ uaners of *1* 87 billion yuan 

V “ ' ^ 1 reasur > bond issue, just 60 days into the ihrec- 

nxmtb issuing period. Many 

brokerages issued ownership rm 1AA . , 
certificates after they ran out of * “ e 1994 bona issue 
bonds to sell to the public. ; „ ,i_ . 

“This practice, in effect, 18 “* cornerstone OI 


bonds to sell to the public. , 

“This practice, in effect, ex- 18 t “ e Cornerstone OI 
pands^ total amount of Trea- Benins’* battle 

suiy bonds, endangering the •J“» &uawie 
country’s macroeconomic man- against inflat ion, 

agement and investors inter- __ 

ests.” the newspaper said. 

„ ““e b the cornerstone of Beijing’s battle 

’ r WhlC r h rOSe 31 311 3110 uaJ rate or 20 percent 
naoonwide tn the first four months of the year. 

fman^S B wenuno « will not prim money to 

*f mL ^auai. il will sell Treasuiv bonds , 0 
cora-TOMsed spending on energy-, transportation and agriculture. 

Tne gove rnment notice orders that all ownership certificates must 

Sa-SSTc-* 0 ® *%.*?”“** July I, any bond- trading institutions 
wdating Finance Ministry rules will be suspended “from doing 
business for three months to a year, the China Daily said. 

The new rules come as Chinese brokers express concern that the 
of the bond issue boded ill for Shanghai's A - share market, 
which has lost more than 65 percent of its value since opening in 
1990, sending many people in search of safer investments. TheA- 
class snares are open only to Chinese investors. 

The two-year state bonds carry interest rates of 13 percent, just 
above bank deposits, and the three-year bonds are set at 13.96 
percent. 

China’s last Treasury bond issue, in 1993, which was three times 
s m a ll er, was completed a month behind schedule and only after 
state employees were forced to take bonds as a substitute for a 
portion of their wages. 

In another development, China has decided it will soon issue 
bonds denominated in yen. Japan's Nihon Keizai newspaper re- 
ported. Dahva Securities Co. and Nomura Securities Co. are to 
underwrite the debt. 

It would would be the first bond issue sold in Japan by the 
Chinese government. The size and the timing of the issue have yet to 
be decided, the newspaper said. (Bloomberg, AFP) 

Carl Gewinz is ilL 



THE THIS INDEX 


International Herald Tribune 
World Stock-Index, composed 
of280fnternatioriaRykiveetabl9. 
stocks from 25 countries, 
compiled by Bloomberg 
Business News. 

Weekending June 3, 
daily ciasmgs. 
Jan. 1992= 100. 

™ Ash/P*cWe M 




ns iSlH jffl 

lie 

US 

114 

113 


F M T W T 


Europe 





F M T W T 

Latin America 


too Worth America l 

99 

rr: ;t . j ■. • . 

98 ■; • ; l »\r<A -7-71 ~ " 

97 a? ■ •» . v>y* ? r * t 

•yt- . ' ■*• '*■ 

96 ■»■■■■ 

95 


** F M T W T F 

Industrial Sectors/Weekend dose 

• sum saw % «** s*™ 

dam da— ^ c * 9 ** ”* - 

E nergy llQJ>»loaJ7 ->0.15 Cepta* GmxkIs 11&34 xtsai 

11730 48J0 R aw Materials 125.42 127.73 

France 116.30118^9 -Z26 Consumer Goode 97.30 97-59 
Services 117A4116J6 +0-15 MlsceBaoeous 12S901Z7.71 




CURRENCY RATES 


Cross Ratos 

, ■ DU ?*' ure 0^1 BJF. . SJ. Yw C* Pmw 

urn ,«i« JJI5J- S, Hi" is uns* uw uo* 

TT*T* nS wS S ua 1 turn . — JUBJ u» WH sir 

,!2 » — m ua* un w un uw- ijw uu« 

RVBtfW t U«D JSl'iiMi 2M< 514BI ZQM 1JM* 2M7 JKJB 

lumbw u rfZT >«• run urn van nui« <U»» — 

*S S »U7 — «£ *2 WU5 IU» uu» 1UJ1 

Man UK25 ZU35 Bw . uu '«w VXJH UKt UfcJJ 

! £L Vmtm S" iS — W tl» urn SM6‘ AM 

fiL ' J£L SS liana* u.i» w — warm 

I*** ^ Sf e« uro w' aen« urn uw* — w 

“ 07TW 1J0B > tmu iw JW17 urn «fli UP U»JM 

S • US SSS SS JS MW* tso m-vm w.ua wm 

ovum ftte" 


Other DoBar Valua* 

Centner- ."-MrS Cwitncr ^ 

intANB W* 

Agemi ua hwhkww* 

WAS ’SS 

Bimflen * fc ^ SKSSTflSS 

cxccnRoniM »« uoe 

DonWiferaM &515 

na.naw' ** 


Max. n«n 
H.Z«3wa» 

Monr. Krone 

ML MM 

K oa ma onr 

pgrLWcadD 
RUM.roMe 
Saudi rtynl 

AMI 


C u naacv P*f $ 
S.JM’.roMl U&G 
xmr.woa nun 

SMAbsM 7JM 
Totamn) VX 
TMtnU. 2S30 
TarMAHni XBK 
UAEtfMHHI 3 
Vran-totiv. UCJD 


r wnmf cnrnicr ‘ Miter «Mar f*on ■ 

1 ffS[ ^22 SSSSdalfar 1JM* UNI UW 

!3S S5 IMS «««*««. 11** «** 

.MR «"■ M" .. • 


Oil Rush Vietnam Sets Course for Economic Ideal 

FIMjPij'Hfy By Kevin Murphy and lechnolc®' to transform itsdf into a people, the second-biggest in Southeast tor in chief of Vietnam N 

'* t7 **■ InunuruMul Herdd Tnbune market economy and to raise its per capita Asia. language daily. “Social « 

^ W HANOI — The offer would have been income beyond 5200 a year, refuses to The end erf the U.S. trade and invest- f*>“ 15 ^ w fo ^. 1 for 

ff/)/VT*0 /v M good enough to snap them out of their chase those goals at any cost ment embargo has created a bullish emi- il r 0112 ^ the objective a 

1 CUlb UU rfteraowtebajCTBjfariMWtoaa . rmnrat hm m » coomry U1.1 npau half ^ 


Spratlys 

By Michael Ridnardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Advances in 
drilling technology and growing in- 
terest of Western companies in ex- 
ploring for oO and gas in (he South 
China Sea are fueling dangerous 
disputes between China and South- 
east Asian countries, officials and 
energy specialists said 

China and Vietnam have recent- 
ly sought to reinforce their conflict- 
ing claims to large areas of the 
South China Sea around the dis- 
puted Spratly Islands by awarding 
exploration and production con- 
tracts to Western and Asian com- 
panies that say they can martial the 
capita] and technology needed for 


By Kevin Murphy 

htttrnational Herdd Tribune 

HANOI —The offer would have been 
good enough to soap them out of their 
afternoon slumbers even a few months ago. 
But for the trio of pedicab drivers sprawled 
in the curbside shade, nothing less than a 
dollar for a 10- minute ride around town 
was acceptable. 

“Not enough.” said one of the group to a 
final offer, too unimpressed to shift his 
bicycle taxi into the oily’s fast-growing 
traffic, preferring instead to till his pith 
helmet down over his face, adjust his sun- 
glasses and dream on. 

Vietnam, while competing against other 
developing Asian economies for money 


and technology to transform itsdf into a 
market economy and to raise its per capita 
income beyond 5200 a year, refuses to 
chase those goals at any cost. 

Whether it is opposition to high-rise 
buildings and neon signs in Hanoi's grace- 
ful dty center, or a landmark labor law 
now before the National Assembly likely 
to raise minimum wages and enshrine 
workers’ rights to strike; a Vietnam that 
paid heavily for its independence is not 
about to surrender to anyone rise's model 
for economic growth. 

At the same time, Vietnamese expecta- 
tions have been raised by a rush of compa- 
nies eager to enter the market of 72 duUjou 


people, the second-biggest in Southeast 
Asia. 

The end of the U.S. trade and invest- 
ment embargo has created a bullish envi- 
ronment here in a country that expects half 
of the $50 trillion it needs by 20QQ to build a 
modem economy to come from foreign 
lenders and investors. 

But as the initial euphoria subsides and 
international suppliers of every product 
and service required by a war-weary, back- 
ward economy try to profit from their 
investments, the question will be asked 
whether Vietnam's expectations are unre- 
alistically high. 

“We don’t want to wear a shin cut for 
someone rise." said Nguyen Khuyen. edi- 


Move to Ecu Far Off \ BOE Chief Says 


The introduction of new technol- 
ogy “means that the petroleum 
companies can move further out 
inio the South China Sea. drill and 
recover oil and gas in rougher wa- 
ters, and go deeper into the seabed 
to discover reserves,” said A.J. 
Troner, Singapore bureau chief of 
Petroleum Intelligence Weekly. 

Reflecting growing U.S. interest 
in the South China Sea following 
the lifting of the U.Su economic 
embargo against Vietnam, Occi- 
dental Petroleum Corp. recently 
bought a 45 percent stake in an 
exploration mode 300 kilometers 
(185 miles) off the coast of south- 
ern Vietnam that is held by PT 
Astra of Indonesia- 

Earlier. another U.S. oil compa- 
ny, Atlantic Richfield Co., bought 
50 percent of an adjacent block 
held by British Gas PLC. [On Sun- 
day, The Associated Press reported 

See SPRATLYS, Page 15 


Compiled hv Our Staff From Dispatches 
LONDON — The European Currency 
Unit will have a greater role in the public and 
private sector as the European Union moves 
closer toward monetary union, but the day 
when the Ecu is Europe’s sole currency is still 
a long way off. Bank of England Governor 
Eddie George said Saturday. 

The Ecu is developing rapidly, Mr. George 
said, addressing a meeting of international 
currency traders, and its importance should 
expand as it increasingly plays a “role at the 
center of the arrangements within Europe.” 

The Treaty on European Union calls for 
EU members to move (o a single currency 
late in the decade. But the Maastricht treaty 


also lays out guidelines on economic condi- 
tions that must be met for member nations to 
join a currency union. 

Mr. George said that creating a angle cur- 
rency in (he EU was risky when nations’ 
economies were so diverse and when unem- 
ployment — at 17.8 million in the EU — was 
so high- Mr. George also said he was against 
any attempt to resurrect a global regime of 
fixed exchange rales. 

“It would be a high-risk strategy to fix 
exchange rates when there are such large 
disparities in unemployment," he said. 

Mr. George said EU member nations could 
expand ibe Ecu’s importance by using it more 
for money-market operations and bond issues. 


The two-day currency -traders meeting was 
dominated by worries that centra] bankers 
would introduce rules to limit the explosive 
growth of so-called derivatives, innovative 
but volatile trading products. 

Dealers made millions in 1992 and 1993 by 
speculating on currencies such os the British 
pound and the French franc — whose values 
were Imkwri to rate another through Europe’s 
exchange-rate mechanism — as central banks 
sought to prevent rates from moving below 
their pro-fixed limits. But the system was effec- 
tively suspended last year when European cen- 
tral banks made the fluctuation bands so wide 
that they were virtually meaningless. 

( Might- Bidder. Reuters) 


Kidder’s Jett: f I Won’t Let Them Railroad Me 1 


By Sylvia Nasar 
with Douglas Frantz 

Hew York Tima Service 


individualist who made few close ing out about himself, his upbring- maintained i 
friends and drove himself hard. ing, his career on Wall Street and his to fight bee 
Since mid-April, when Kidder, days at Kidder. Only months ago, he Mr. Jett sail 
Peabody & Co. accused him of or- was Kidder’s employee of ibe year, a railroad me.” 


maintained his innocence. “I have 
to fight because 1 am innocent.” 
Mr. Jett said. “I won't let them 


NEW YORK — From the time chesirating a $350 million fraud star trader who earned a $9 milli on In the weeks since Kidder em- 
he left a small town in Ohio lo make and dismissed him, placing him ai bonus in 1993. Now be is unan- barrassed itself and stunned the 5- 
his way through Massachusetts In- the center of one of Wall Street's ployed and under investigation by namtial world by charging Mr. Jeu 


stilute of Technology, Harvard • biggest scandxk, Mr. Jett has been 
Business School and three Wall more isolated than ever. 


the Justice Department and the Se- had outwitted its controls and au- 
curities and Exchange Commission- diting systems, die firm has rccog- 
Manv have soeculated about mzed5350 million in losses that it 


Street firms, Orlando Joseph Jen For the Gist time since that scan- Many have speculated about nizea 5350 million in losses that it 
was the ultimate outsider, a fierce dal unfolded, Mr. Jeu, 36. is speak- bow that fall took place. Mr. Jeu has attributed to Mi. Jett and has 

offers no single answer. Bat in a opened itself to armies of outside 


A Stereo Freak Sounds Off 


four-hour interview last week, he 
kept returning to what it was like to 


investigators. 

Mr. Jett, meanwhile, has assem- 


lor in chief of Vietnam News, an English- 
language daily. “Social equity and justice, 
this is what we fought for for 30 years, and 
it remains the objective of the Communist 
Party." 

Moving to bolster workers’ rights and 
wages at a time when the country needs to 
find 1 mfiHon new jobs* year to keep pace 
with its population explosion — let alone 
double its gross domestic product by the 
year 2000 — appears to reject the path 
taken by sane more developed Asian 
neighbors, where unionism is tolerated but 
not encouraged. 

Such countries as Taiwan, Singapore. 

Sec VIETNAM, Page 15 


U.S.-Japan 
Talks on 
Telecoms 
Bog Down 

Compiled ty Oar Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan and the United 
States concluded two days of talks 
on access to Japan’s telecommunica- 
tions market with no major progress 
and an accord still out of reach. 

The two sides, however, did call 
the talks that ended Saturday posi- 
tive and agreed to meet latex this 
month for another round of talks. 

Meanwhile, the U.S. trade repre- 
sentative, Mickey Kan tor, told the 
Los Angeles Times that (he White 
House has concluded it would be 
unable to reduce America's grow- 
ing trade deficit with Japan during 
President Bill Clinton's first tom 
in office, it and no longer considers 
this a key political objective. 

The principal disagreement in 
the U.S.-Japan talks centers on 
what criteria to use to measure pro- 
gress toward opening the Japanese 
market The talks had collapsed in 
February. 


be‘a black man in a largely white bled a team of lawyers to free money __ A Japanese Foreign Ministry of- 
soriety, and how that has affected from his Kidder accounts and to 1 “f ^ 


his career and his life. 


cope with any possible legal charges. 


IS M A L L| 
BUSINESS 




By Jacques Neher 

International Herald Tribune 

WATERFOOT, Scotland — Ivor Tiefenbrun. 
the 48-year-old founder of Linn Products Ltd., a 
maker of premium audio equipment, appears 
much more excited about- the effect his products 
have on' listeners than the more earthly details of 
sales, profits or production. 

“I am obsessively concerned with sound quality, 
but Tm more interested in music than technology,” 
Mr. Tiefenbrun said in an in- 
terview at a picnic table in the 
backyard of his factory, tuck- 
ed away anrid grazing sheep in 
the bills near Glasgow. 

“Most people have never 
heard good high Oddity” he 
sayt “It’s the key that wiD give 
>pu access to die wodd of mu- 
sic, which is essential for human development and 
weQ being. The pay-ff is that it changes your life.” 

A self-described' “60s drop-out,” Mr. Tiefenbrun 
over the past 22 years has bull a Scottish version 
the type of New Age company more commonly 
found m California’s Silicon Valley. Most of Linn’s 
150 employees, including the boss, dress in jeans 
and work shirts, hi Linn’s brightly colored £A5 
miltin g ($6.75 million) factory, thae are no walls 
between managers and their administrative staff a. 

The convivial atmosphere puts employees at 
ease, free tojoke at Mr. Tiefenbiun’s expense: “He 
hasn't a clue what he’s doing,” offered one long- 
time employee. “He's only the boss.” 

Qneless or not. Mi. Tkfenbrun has established a 
reputation for Linn as rate of top-quality names in 
the industry, first with its turntable — long consid- 
ered one of the finest made — then with amplifiers, 
compact-disk players and loudspeakers. 

One of the keys to quality is Linn’s highly auto- 
mated, yet people-intensive manufacturing process. 
Compttter-directod rotate deKver pam to work sta- 
tions and takeaway assembled pitfucts. which they 
then automatically store in an adjacent warehouse. 

Nevertheless, there is no assembly line. Each 
product is eotirefy assembled, tested and packaged 


by the same person.“Wben you need brain surgery, 
you don’t go to an assembly line, but (o a angle 
surgeon,'’ Mr. Tiefenbrun explained. 

Employees say the production process makes 
them feel responsible for the end product, to which 
labels bearing their names will be affixed. “Tm 
more careful because I know that if there’s a 
problem, there wiD be no one to blame but me," 
said Margaret JaconeQi, who can assemble seven 
different products made by the company. 

Despite Linn’s lofty prices — its complete top- 
of-lhe-line system sells for around £21 .700 — sales 
have remained strong Last year, revenue grew 19 
percent, to £11 J million, and Mr. Tiefenbrun 
forecast growth of 1 5 percent to 20 percent in 1994. 
Earnings, be said, are reinvested. 

Unlike many manufacturers in the sector, Linn 
has maintained a strong hold on its distribution 
network, often generating controversy in the trade 
by forcing dealers to abide by strict rules, spelled 
ran in its confidential handbook for demonstrating 
its products and servicing customers. The compa- 
ny is currently in the process of winnowing out 
distributors and dealers that Mr. Tiefenbrun says 
are failing to meet its standards. 

A distributor recently let go by Linn in France, 
Michael Seiler, criticized the company for a lack of 
marketing savvy. ‘Their approach is that their prod- 
ucts are so good that people will naturally want to 
buy them, and that you don't need to sett,” he said. 

Some critics also question the wisdom of Linn's 
long delay into the compact-disk-player market. 
The company retied throughout the 1980s on its 
“LP 12” model turntable, which remains a stan- 
dard in the trade, while the rest of the industry 
flooded into the CD business. 

Bui Mr. Tiefenbrun. who rallied against CDs 
when they first came out as “killers of music.” due 
lo what he viewed as their antiseptic sound, says it 
would have violated his principles to come out 
with a “me-too" CD player that was unable to 
deliver true high fidelity. Only after correcting 
what Mr. Tiefenbrun fdt were flaws in CD-player 
technology did Linn a few years ago introduce its 
own system — priced at over $6,000. 

Articles in this series appear every taker Monday. 


Initially, he stud, the notion of a though none have yet been filed, 
certain isolation appealed to him. Some people familiar with Mr. *«= u.o. tmoassy ae«xiDea me 
He talked of the lure of WaD Street Jett’s situation contend be was ™^ngs as cordial and condnct- 
as a dace where he would be iudred mendy recording his trades the way “ “ a positive atmosphere, 
not by the color of his skin, but by he was told by his basses, to make *S^S2?iiSS&!.2 


sides had had “positive and con- 
structive talks." 

The U.S. Embassy described the 


Kidder’s taote look better for the •JfP an ** United States 
benefit of prospective buyers and said they would adopt qualitative 


as a plate where he would be judgpa merely recording ms trades tnc way 
not bythe color of his skin, but by he was told by his bosses, to make 

the amount of money he could Kidder's books look better for the Ju 5’ # ^ U “ lcd 1 ?? e * 
make. “The govern m ent bond mar- benefit of prospective buyers and tbey would adopt qualitative 
ket is exquisitely objective.” be said, for Kidder’s parent. General Elec- ^quantitative catena to monitor 
“It cares nothing about a person’s trie Ca That is an accusation that s : market-opening efforts to 

race, col or or creed. Trading was lie Kidder’s general counsel called reduce its massve trade surplus, 
perfect job." “preposterous” and “defamateny." The Foreign Mimsuy offiaaJ 


But he was reminded again and 
again, he said, that that was not 


entirely the case. He recounted how der 
out-of-town Kidder employees in 


Mr. Jett’s legal strategy has al- 
ready borne fnrit_ On Friday, Kid- 


mistakenly walked up to one 


ow der gave Mr. Jett $138,181 that was 
ees in deferred compensation ac- 
fns count, though he is still seeking the 


white colleagues to offer congratu- remainder of more than $8 nuIIion 
iations for his own promotion. “It he had in other Kidder accounts, 
never entered their minds that 1 Even though Mr. Jett is now hav- 
could possibly be Joe Jett" be said, ing bis say, he says he feels that 
Mr. Jett said he craved recogni- with GE and Kidder against him, 
(ion, and tried harder and harder to he is facing a colossus. 

teJ ? I ClSSSmSS “After what has been done to me 

tb« is no room for truth,” he said, 
it was tin .performance — the ex- staking his brad.^ they’ve depicted 
cepoonaLbutapparentfyphantom, STaTa despicable ^iracS. The 
profits be managed to show on the lJtL* j ,l,_ 


reduce its massive trade surplus. 

The Foreign Ministry official 
said the two tides “didn't discuss 
quantitative criteria, but they did 
discuss qualitative criteria." 

He added, “Both sides raised no 
objection to the adoption of several 
criteria to measure market open- 
ness.” 

The U5. statement said that 
“considerable movement was made 
in narrowing differences in qualita- 
tive criteria.” 

It also noted that the U.S. side 
had “indicated some major areas 
where the plan feO short of elimi- 
nating our concerns." 

The United States contends that 


=f ‘siarsafii.f saassusssaas 


his downfall at Kidder. 

With the current investigations, 
Mr. Jen’s lawyers would not allow 
him to discuss his trading. But be 


truth turned merrily on its bead.” 

In tones measured and sad at 
times, angry and scornful at others. 

See JETT, Page 17 


its telecommunications equipment 
than other developed nations. In 
1991, Japan imported 5 percent of 

See TRADE, Page 17 





r a 


Cyprus Petroleum Refinery Ltd 


Debottlenecking Project 
Prequalification 

Cyprus Petroleum Refinery Limited (CPRL) are proposing to debottleneck their 
Crude Distillation and Hydrotreater Units as well as build a 24,000 cubic meter 
floating roof tank at their 18,000 barrel per day refinery at Lamacn. 

Consideration for inclusion in the selected list of tenderers will only be given 
to contractors with previous experience in the design, procurement and 
construction of refinery or petrochemical projects. They will be required to 
demonstrate their ability and experience in Process Design Engineering. The 
successful contractor will be required to guarantee both the expected increase 
in capacity as well as the forecast performance. 

Contractors wishing to be considered for inclusion in the selected list of 
tenderers can obtain the prequalification questionnaire as well as a description 
of the envisaged modifications incorporating the relevant PI diagrams, for an 
amount of Cyprus Pounds 1,000,00. Only contractors who have responded to 
this notice by 17th June 1994 will be considered further. Such contractors will 
be issued with prequalification questionnaire after this date. 

Interested contractors are requested to apply to the General Manager, 
Cyprus Petroleum Refinery Ltd., P.O, Box 275, fjamaca - Cyprus , 

enclosing tbe amount of Cyprus Poutids 1,000,00. k 


THE FIRST AND ONLY WATCH 
WORN ON THE MOON 


Omega Speedmaster Professional chronograph. 
The first watch worn on the Moon 
and still the only watch 
qualified bv NASA for all 

manned space missions. 

Swiss made since 1848. 



OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 


vbp.w-v YSCc'SS S.SS ?? S q * ii S-r S-SPs-fT”© STE.B £ 2.7? 









Pag 


sleac 

5.62( 

Swis' 

pour 

from 

• M 
rope. 
traJ I 
bank 
at a 
Siev« 
bank 
tfwt 

dolla 

level 

Irigg 

defei 

“1 

M 


ropi 

plac 

. H 
kets 
Euri 
dos- 


grow 

fidei 

bad 

fori 

M 

ccor 

amo 

was 

ten? 

"and 

reriz 

mar 

13 I 

T 

bon 

inr 

irai 

S^i< 

Ne 

yei 

DO 

ial 

eei 

an 

u*: 

pi 

re 

a 

er 


INTERN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUINE. MONDAY. JUNE 6, 1994 




Biw -»« ^ 


my 


J uvgSvs w« - » , us'rjFr-i^'-w "jj 
, Hog K.U --C3 WrWCWal^— 2 * 
+ -Yi I - - VWJ .- — rVdFflrtit: S.&3 

oi-|VMJ"R*f. . - 

’ i asniildxrKfc3? i ? « _'2I 


AALMuluot . GI&--3: 

EcndP 9.71 -4U 1 GlG.i 
CsGr p iij • .05 • GvSeA : 

MuiBdP IJoJ - .07 i C-.'ScB; 

SmCoSiK ).&: - . 1 ; 1 JtZcc i 
UM *.n *.C5 ! G/Tsn 
AARPlnvsl: i G/~ 

BolSiar. 14 ?3 - II ; C.TlBi 
CopGm 31.77 -.35 . GvTiCi 
C+n.+Mn ii.uA -.07 
Gr*1r.c l 
HO be i 
T.’PBai 
A8T Funds: 

Emwoi 
FL HI 
PLTF. 

Gwthin i 
uannci 

AP LgCap r 
AHA Funds: 

Brian n 12.0 
Fun 
Lim 

AW Funds: 

AdHSv i 
Aijrsv i 

BriA i 
BalBI 
Chorli 
Cotnllt 
GoSc: 

Gftnsi 
Grttip 
HYICAi 
HYidB r 
Incoo 

!2JF.?b, ’ ? C- Jl • M-i=o t jj” !#! rlSdn - of '“fare's "1:7-7 -.0: 1 Hf-Bcfi iaii - 5s IFire! Artier Funds: Fincofricnta: Funds: .Mi:A = 5 .a« -.05 ;"ar7.\g7aK2c -.02 Gvtincr. _ „ 

LJ ""' 5 - *'• - ° - - - T r — . n • . w • < -0-1 _g.,, fjgn-Q, 1 1,63 ..oil A5TAIIP )0'-« -Xi CAAWWB.^ +.« ‘ ?.}NJES 5.24 +J» ARMinstf 1? OT . irtSdr 9A2 -M GrCpAp 12.60 + .W 


;auE s 


0?! ir.rSdc 1?:P -.Ce. TrFLm I:.!; -H 


DvGCp wjj ■‘■-in ■ 

EuGrO 9-37 —.12 
GtGJD 10.W + _K; 
NT«Dp 1J3 -.IS 
GrttTO 19.23 -J4 
GlInGt 10J4 — 4H 
rtlncOo 841 —sn I 
irvGD 1 0.1 5 -SB 
NYTxDp»1047 - .09; 
■V.HID o* 10-26 +J» ■ 
3TG«rtD p 2-30 
SmCdPD 1020 *4)5 
SrlDo 937 


-.08 OPPort jilawSwds: | AmAp » -»« 

^ *' Bg-M -% i*gH* fl* - v : « r -g 

SfflX JStSi £S& ,fl{sa«sr 

TES -s; sas.*H2fl 

mei-g-jiinow.M - |4 j 5®“ iijS :*---aWfiW :S 

SaiBf y^B WSg* — >• 5?to-o 4.PS .JUrWflfflt 973 -41 




PnutanWolln**. ”jj .;?o. sStoS 8J4 -.15 1 ASmlTn VjW -SB 

r 12 4? -Dfl:S*e«lnw.FwdB 


myi™ life 

VuuumuUGeiMP: 


Act Bain 1C. TO -■» 

: H' : lii«iS2V B n J 133 ‘ ;3 i assoc n 

Invest n 


AShtTn 0J4 -.72 


jv - ->* •• 1 nr.nri iba- 1 assoc n • J2 — JS1 ■ AsaetAn lAJ9-r.li 

S?=J 1 gKS'S^S 


Ccr-i3rfrsilI.S4 -.C* 
E.T^>A ,? .K -.13 


MuBdC 10-M ' 07 
•rnCosC 3144 -48 


Hi - J1 E—.Tjr B ?l.£i -.12 Porkstwe Inv A: 

[I; -ii ErriG.-“s::41 -.13 BonaFd 745 -j08 


Putnam FundSi I c^SSS^Funda 7 

Ai£Ao 1041 - .04 Security Fimas- ■ 

SScvAO 14S -Jj| gMJ' 

SS5,Sp'U!^: ISSK iSSrii: 

Sssa." !*-B. «*;, 1 % :■?!. 

. urro 4.46 '333 I 

5etecttd RsndK. 


HvMuRR 1142 *.10 I 
income n 949 *.BS.| 
inimBdn 8JA +J»i 
SntMunn 11.18 ' Sfi ■ 
inltn ID M —.!« 



CasOPP n 30-7£ - 36 Mergsu is 1738 -.10 
Gvttncn 94? Pnpcpn 19.14.-45 


Qiar.ln 1574’ + .10 
STARfl " HO *.!0 
Trtmifi 3Z43 —.17 
TrUS 3046 *-2t 
SiTsryn S 0 JX -J 2 ? 


Gwtnnp 1 0-5? - .O' i Aou'KOS Fund: . . Cnr-.Ct:rn 23„ - - ... . ... — . ... 

MVSdP 33"— 0i- ac'ancpn - C- 1 CbCT-'BC I2.G7 -.02- . Corrrn U -12 FlTSiP 9.°8 -.02 PA TP 3 17 j0 - 13 1 Grlncfi 1C3— .0 

li»i>nr. I! -.(!«' E<JlnT >1 <4« 03 1 Ch.i',7-^*' 1XJ3 - > HiR'il 1*1# 'O’ FuqllSn 10JJ -42 I SavCBd 1140 -.05 HnCrfl li. I ' - I. 

MuBatlnt 9.-" T -.12! F linen Set -.fri OHoi^l 144 .:i-;J 5. SmCP’-j: nll.il - 0* FaiflIilSSPlOJI -.02, SpSiId t~ 2i -.24 HllrtcS '2-2- 
S&ctr.s ?') ijj - 3' l Ardi Funds: | '3^ i-r . >' Nv n 1 47._jr • .46 { Dreyfus: _ . ! F 5T n_ 2x~5 - 05 | s_9.*5 - 0? hilny I7-|— 04 

inll p IC —.0" 



S-jrycvt) ■— "5 — .17 Leord Group: 

-.r l.c r 1542 - 22 Esiiitv 1426 
2-jlC n i.TS — Of : IrriEa 
G>*5.-<tnnDi573 -.01 MIS! lv iO — 46 

HimScr. J4.U -.73 ; SnC:? 15 7! -23 
nT-idrf 1-r . 3=Ea i:52 -.’34 

:p:!"Sin;l52C -.07 3rr;Va — S3 

n::-o-r. 1244 -A4 •L«bWi: v 7 M - II 
in:.i--i 1£45 — .11 LeebPtrn 13^5 —.01 
L-.vj.-tn 31.*" -23 LessMcscfi: 
s :asnlf2S . in-r'.Js : .'l 

;- n i-s MiJ4 -34 GoiGovTP i: 


IS I STCojpi 

1 ITTwvil 1O.08" '3J 
1 - GNMA 71 9St —SSS 
, rTCwor 74? ‘■SB 
LTTsrvn 944 +12 
LTCorpn 8.50 -SX 
• HVCcrpn 7<:-j(D 
Prefdn-: 849 *M 
: IdxToeR 944 ' AS 
itbciTlBn. 929 +43 
UttfTBn 945 *SS 


FL in' n 1344 -.10 Mires 10.05 

GN/AAnpslA4'— 03; A'u^CaP 11.74 -.OS 

■r-nCS 1 J 24 -.03, fAir.icao nil 43 -11 

3. MSC t 14.7J -.09, anrlTerm 1020 -.03 

4. -;': i 1*.83 -.14. us Gavin *47 -.10 

- - . _ _ ...... . GrJi-r. - 07 | ST.MT SS Pi 0.20 -.03 

.*.CG*f 1 i _=■» - 04 J boibn- lO 1 * . . .■.-.ITS- -.Sr! G-.-nOs n 10.3. — .III i SBFAnc 16.19 — (Vf- 

WkKpC-i 111.74 ..12; GretncTiull.U -4i, .*.1:17=1 ’O’ - •:£ InstAunrslV: -.17 iFme&tv Advisor: 
knCos: 21.21 -.41 inSrO-/i n*9.»i -4^. ri c ;4'.->4. 1^72 —53- imermn 1JTO - Q7 EjPGR ?8a1 '.14 

" — ■— (nie'scp if.10 — .H. EqPinc 144? - .C,' 


Growth 10 17 - 05 1 CaSto/rn 10.76 - 10 • Funi4 5 W - rf 

GASinai i0.°i -.04 CAlns 10.05 -07: GrvShA » l!.s: -.C 5 

mUC-rn 1)07— .0*» I C'JfS+C - °9 -.07- Mi-'d4 C sS -02 

SmCoGr 1049 -.02 1 iVt/nc 13 e 1 - 01 rr.-:?m«A5 4.33 • Oj 

Aieer Funds: i NaAVjni 10 c '7 -9?. ir G-a i0 72 — .03 

GfC-vti: i+49 — .01 | BEiT'FunCS: I ,v.£T-.4 -4: .7. 

VndCpL-T II i.74 • .12 : Orel'*:!' iwll.14 - .\ii . >.1:1 7= 1 

SmCas: 21.27 -.411 liwGovT n«9.M -4^- rjc;4-.‘ 

AeanCiGfip: SIGorTmVo -04. 7 j T= 

Aiiano.-P i.TS - .08 ! 3sA Funds: 1 on 7 5 + '.li - .:» 

Brian P 13 AC -.07 1 EVAEt 2144-15 :m3H- 5 1' ‘3 .11 

Sricnn 1 14JI -.10. In 1=4 1*1.’— 14 ;;r::rr- : — cl 

ajr.iiAp i: 96 -.CZ- ZnF iln i lo.'>0 - nil 12;= • 10 

CnsTifcr. 1047 ,3c I U SCF'in 14 9‘ -,C7 T.lr.IAC 7.3" - Do 

CpBnc-3 1:.?: - .0: : 5FV.:hDu n c.74 - j> 1 uS'-r- li Sr -.04' 

CPBCCO 1:45 -.c: IBJ&7I-5 11-32 — -Cc- : ij j j* 7 > 4? -32 

Gounis 1'2;1 • 4i , BJ3l£oA p 1 1 iC — 0 e 1 ■: iv c 12 io -01. 

GlDGs t5 a - O' ■ ,C3 . BMY HomiKcn: ;_4 r“£ : - 35 , 

C-lPSAp 1I7'6 —05 =qlncn- IC.^f -02. .— T= S • -«7 

live-*:' '44 -,JT ’.i.j: - 3‘ 

Go<:aP -.Oil tl . =r> 1C.04 - Ci I 4: *.32 . .c: 

Gs-iCp ".'- 1 .05 ; BaSscn Group: =,.-1,3= ■ ici - Ci . 

'i^'inco -ZS -.02' ScnCL n I*? -m- Gi= a 5 ;;n>— io 

G-mC iiXfto -.iWI BondSn 7.31 -.35, . n: 

GvnnFD 24.15 -.06 Em*rp:r»li.?i -05 H'Vu c : -'i ? -05 

Gv/fha I 20.6c -.05 cnirpn li^J'. -.11 

GrlncBp 2.5£ -U2 1 {«IRn 1 2.00 -.05 

GrlntB 1 ! 45 -.05: ln:l lc 5! —01 

InJIAAP +.‘o -14 51075*. 1 i'J 04 ■ .05 

lns- - -t»e s- -14 1 Tc.F-ir. IC.74 -.5; 

InsA'C p : *.!4: To-FrL n 172 -.i 11 
in:|A& V. li — Oj U.i*3n I0.2J - C-o 
::.r. 3Ap rii ■ 1-4 i Hrt M.41 -.05 

;.ii j 9pp t-jj - 04 i 2:n li J£ -.O’ 

.‘.Iris'! P 353 -.05 ! ,2': ?' 

c/.-jTri p 'i.-'c . 'BeflerlSiiUlHsis.-.': 

mmtbp ».:c —.oi C....-WI — u» 

MM“rC 3 7.70 — Dll i)i|!E4 .1 (UC— '14 
Ml HOC ■> ?i .02 | 

/Alim I 1.85 


mas 10 42 — o; 

Janon a 12 '2 —.22 

4cxp rvC-rS 17 U — — 

Lai4uT»j_7J 
LaiAmGE -.4 • 

P»:i‘P i2 4i— i4 

Pc:u3 ilj? — j-- 

FP .‘.luBd P 1 'S- - Xi ■ Zlr-T.A = iO.2 ! —.22 

Firs! Priority: I S!rc:3 if -J — .1; 

Ecuir/Trnl3 43 — 01 . T..-I.-3 li.l. —3’ 

FvfllncTr 9.3c - !h . Telitir’l 1-5-4 — .CE 

LldAi:--. +.'5 - 03, ■■■•IJ.-. p !*.91 —Of 

Firstuniere v.«.-3 — 7£ „ _ „ - . 

8al7n 1 1 -jJc.G^tJiTi Ftr.ds: in. i'G'-iBI * ■-■u -.K- ToiRe: r.s -.06 

Bcicn 11.57 -Of -ECt VJIS -.j: fvHFanc 14.'2 -.12 ValTrns 15.'.^ - := 

‘ Asic: nc 1.' ■ _'5 7- Groj.tr l6l- : . . LexirglW Grs: 


InTrEa: « K -43 
7r.=ree-wT5J+ -.ID 
~eLi n 21"2 - li 
Tc’Rn. Ic.l i — .12 
USGO ■- np - XT 
U:ilj ^ ■ 75 -.08 


C-.und.-.p 1301 
HP:' 1C P 14 J*. -n 
i-.wGr np 7 75 - .35 
AttfT Fn 15.83 -.0> 
F4TF p 14.02 -73 
Spinv no 27.74 - C~ 
Erin! p i5.Q c -,0c 



•ViLlrTrA iS.r -.:& 

/.Vitr:A :jjg -.03 
■LIMA 7-2A2 - y> 


EcCon px ITjSO 
Eairsn* 11 A0 MoTtll 

:n.R C C 9.96 - J? MITxIlp 

inFIln 9.96 -XP I MuniA s 

MCaGH TJI9.75 -.14 r^nTxll O 

STriCan 9J0 -412 

JTrlln 9J0 -M 


5qBb 
F.* ln3 p 


U.57 -Jo 
-.3o 


In.GIi n 14.7* OfrlRosc 1690 -.06 FUnTr ->*2 -.05 

MAI.fi n 1404 -.00, Gc. In o ?J4 *06 HiC-dTF3plO.45-.iO 
/AA - CiHl*!4 -.10; Grj.Gtpp25.92 -.11 HiC-d“C:i0 4i - JO ' 


*.lun3C n 1149 - SB 

:;j»n:n 15 2? *.10 
ilJ'VnJnn 1115 - iP 
N-M-dr J2t4 -.74 

mi-/ r. P ::c;s -.10 

7J‘ Tc- f li lo • 15 
DfT= r 17^3 - 11 
FctslPll li - W 

Snl.f'j. n 10. -4 


HI MU P 1132 -.10 
HT;ldpn 1139 *.01 
IncGlp 1479 —05 
LidTERpiOjfw -.08 
LrtfTBR 10 j! -JJI 
LIcTEl 10 i? - .ue 
G.;mP 13 r C — .16 
ST F. p VcG —.01 
llrstpc 1 1 .T -J9 
F.d.l.r-' iRoiitut: 


ST Inc PO li.«S 03 E-;rO-|n 25 ?7 -.IS 
ShlnTP 13 j 53 -.02. EaPlln li.;0 -.07 

ThCCntr n 7.i’ -.« ! iSnlG.- 9.45 *.03 

H-£ecS- c.:i - 02 - USTIri 1L£2 -4U I LfBln 10.52 - .01 

ir.;:mea =.22 .<72 I uSTLno 14.40 -. ID. FMeiav Invest: 

i •;-= 10.18 — j02 • USTain i5IS -02 AjrTFm Il4>4 .0° 

• LT *5 • 7;” • .3" Dreyhis Gomssodu 

i-dp-rseiiLo: — jjj 1 ccpvsja n.;e— 21 


N-. 7-fir >.’8 -.Oil Caavdiaill.13 — .21 
CHT.ai r.,6 -J» P“i\QA 3 ='.17 — .11 

71-i.fai o at —.31 | PrSiovGt 7.15— .11 
T. =j 5 ! 1325 -.10 Dreyfus Pretnier: 

T=ln,3r 5 07 - .Cc | C* Men A 12.7c - 09 j CATFn l|j» *10 
US'Vji 1 1.7« -.0-1 CTMuA 1195 - ,)9 | Cunodon 17J1 — .10 


Altar n 1-1.68 * >33 
AMgrGr n I J 7S -.03 
AAlsrtnnclO.75— til 
Balanc 12.74 —ill 
BlueCh 25.M ♦ 40 
CAinsn 10i» - 12 


r.ViBdT n J.'5 - 0 7 
NGMunCr °7? -.12 ! 
USGvIE n «.46 -,0i 
USG.lCr '4? -.Co 


- Cf 1 


GITirt p 1 92 - .07 EirjV.l Es Hi 1.55 

■jrjs'.yr. nr 27. 1 2 -.14 niEsvn 10.&7 — 4J4 
SriCipG li.9, - 15 S7=onJn ITS -03 

'.'ClUi p li* 1 # - d imciiC? n 10.12 ■ .0B 

VcIusBP 17. '4 -.04 •Gnlsf'FunCf £elE?:-n 1‘ 2-2 - C3 

ValueC tr, 17. '04- AsitiJ.il p 17.75 - .03 Jccucn rlclitnct 

CTiliun '.*£ - ’’ G:c-'.1n lC»s -.07 

Ecunn 13 C2 -.03 t_f ■ V5 - .0! 

Ec:. cl 17 82 
Eclncm r. \J j7 

H.0 3C ID H -.11 Jnnus Fund: 

inlSd 5 F: - U Ealcnc;e:ni2.i4 -,?9 

in:Ecrn 12.52 —.07 
MA 6‘jn 9 65 -.li 
Ui Uun 10:0 - '! 

ST BO n Z .V - .03 
SmCcEerll ’a - 14 
TE Bone nlt.il ■ i)9 


UCC-.s • 


Ini'Fl r. 3'^ -a 1 uiilBV 1710 - or 
- j— ' 1 CoIurrPia runds: 


•CO=G:r. 15 3° —.12 C03APP 1 6^9 —.04 
CTMuBl ll.*S -.10 Cc»lna>nr9.S3 
R .14*14 14il -.09 C.-.rvcrSl 1849^3 - IAS I 


’oiueT r, 1 
Flag invcslors: 

Sn>?rhP H.rfi - J2 
Ir.lln oi 1C 0c *.C7 
Iriiro 1 1 0* —.14 i 
/AMunip* 10.33 -4>4 
QuolGr P *2.63 
TeJlncSfl cjCi)8 -.0°. 

T«RT S JD»9J7 -JU' 

Value a 1 1 42 - .05 
Flagship Group: 1 

AATEa A 10.71 -,D» 

AATECo ,0 7 C - 09 Gatewpy Funds: 
AZTEA P 10.52 — 09 1 InttiPIn 15*5 -04 
CTTEAt 1026 -.08 SllftlVG Hit -.31 
COTEp 7.72 - O 8 : GnSec iia 12.4* —01 
FL TE a i0.4& -.07 >Giniel GmuF. 
GATEAPIOZ: -.08 Erisa np ^80 17 

GTdRbp 1* JO -15. GinilFan 1J.87 
IpITEp 1022 - .05 i Gfcnmeds Funds: 


GoiaJd n 

Gihlncn 15?? -.10 
io:m 1017 — 07 
SI Go /t n °.23 -.02 

sisi 4.03 -a: 

2:ln-. 2.41 -.05 

TESdr. 102: ■." 
wAdEm 'I'? — .-: 
12 . J - .01 LARTr FamDv: 

Tc:4“r 1967 -.07 AmLdr j4.?c -.07 

ScStCia'inj - .14 

E;ln.r7 : liif - 14 
H.iraBa M64 ..33 
Hinse; : '•! 54 - 24 
Ir.lEa-l lie- 

inilin: ‘C 2: —22 

.‘.vise 'i2' - :-9 
Us G-.tC = ■ " :! -21 
U573 j=*;a 7£; 

LMilFd . i‘0: — *7 

LlIilFcC:* 1’.07 

Finanriac 


Irr.CAC-r rlC.Cf -.17 
T*Ea=! .f 13.13 -25 

. L'SGff.-n * r - - C4 

!; W .VJ1A 7,24 -.15 Norwes Funds: 

PJCA r.~ -23 6 JUST ?29 -.01 

PA MA 1 * 0£ -.:» ACiGa.-A 

Pbp.A .724 -■!. CCT= 4 «78 -JK _ 

Ss.iA —2: G.‘‘.r.;Tt 5.27 -.31 Perm Port Funds: 

7P-2-A 12 57 -2: G«e.-iS t.Z' -.Cl PemPl n 16^6 —413 

£~GlAp 221 — .07 iriimeT: Sjc - 23 T/Un 652' '416 

Teen 4 £21 -20 irsr»i IS' -23 -'Send n 5423 -.10 

F. VA :C2~ TFir.iA SA 7 -XU PerjiCG n ;rCE -JJ5 

.jiaipcA 3. £2 —.77 ~ .nsT 9 6c -X~ ^hilo Fund _ 6A - O 9 

AciRo ?2i -.C2 <• Zifj'A \"*20 -.08 

An-.e-i.-3 1 7.2' —.07 Ycl.Gc” »!-29 -.1’ BaicnFd 

N'uveen Funds: 

CAiiS 1C2S -.C9 
1727 - 36 
7.98 - Oi 
t;j' -.07 


523 -28 
9.14 -438 
J TO - 07 
8i4 -.08 

3J8 - A8 

NJTxAP B.92 -.0* 

NkOpA S 23 J3 -2? 

NYTfAP Ur -.07 
NY'CDAP BfrS -JU 
OTCEC 10.76 -2£ NCTxA 


LATxA 820 -4)7 i AmUJiin 9.7? -4B ; 

MnssTcA 7.88 - 04 j AiaPgcnlOiJO 'il 
MDTtA 7.TO * 4)8 CmSXn 17A° — m . — -- 

MJTxA 823 -.071 Discovn 1628 -XU Mu«YdnlO20 +4B 
MinnTrA 7.87 -435 ; GcvScn 104U -29^ Aliputtfin Ii07- 


WxEorn »^ti— J7 
tdtPcen 11 A0 —434 
HttinsJO <LM '23 


F_ . 
l-i'.-jf 
'.'£!• .D 


En:*r»r-i 21.74 -.47 

rM-. : ’‘*T • 03 

Fc-C 1 ”24 
C-rrMnc 14.32 - -39 
lr.rG'7 4 91 - .117 

.‘.lercurv 1151 -.07 
C'-irseain’.FJ — .G* ' 
ilTniDr. 7. >1 
T*enr 23 27 - I’ 


V<*r.*r r J" It -51 LiScrv I 
7 V.TUV 2521 —46 Gninc 


Cl JaocnFdn 1111 • 17- JnsMuni iuJ. . 

. John Hancock: Tx? :r,c ‘ S' 

K'iTEAP 10.74 .. 35, Equity n 13.14 -.03' CATE! 1>.4j - .03 tJSwCv e.sc -.0i 

KSTEp 9.92 - .08 InlGov rw IOjJ' . Ksc.E I s. 7 ' -.10 ■ -'fi 

i.il> - 06 LTMFIs a f.ES - « 

2.20 - .05 • Lm.Trm p -,-c - 

Sj3 ■ jfli t-lndncr Funds: 

I . pc 3ui»ci* n .'Is —.'1 

-.oe E 1 - ; ;:•;= -- V : 

;7 - I] -unrn 2.C; -..- 

, wi J.»ur+i4.'J - .12 crigL-rJ my* - .ub , .tr.libP " ui -12- ’.x-^r 1 i. -.,. Siji.-diD ?:7— 01 5 ‘ 

I MD//uSM7aI -.03 1 Emr/.UI l*4f7 —S3 \ N>TEp 10 43 -.03' Glbln.; ■ 12.2 : — .N fraEAp '.4S5 - ;; : L «^T l !, s . Sa >f^ ; .. 


*cv*: iJAi -.lv 
2=i2T_ :l« - 

Z o'Vr.6: '.1A' - '■ 
ca ..x\ _ _oj= - :c 

fsv5 r ‘*'H - Cl VA.rs 10.1! - ic: 

:in.<GdS T -.ll -.0e WVa f S. -.2c, 

•i.Tc: '.i.-: -*i V. .s «2’9 -,C3 

C'«5= li.»5-4j V-jruBd IC -.« 

Eurcs* ,442 -7! Nj vcl Iv.j' -.07 

Ft tie :£■ 7 46-25 ‘.Vlrs 1C— T -.IC 

=14.15: 9.87 - • ‘.-y.;i l;J2 - J£ 

=z=T=: 14 s“ -.27 0>-vT '2^4 -.27 

;A= -,C4 =4 .’i 

S 5 li -X-5 OTOFtW 1 ' " 1 ' 

C-r:.5* "1.79 - K Cd=A=oAn9.±3 - Ci 

ji c • 2 : 13 45 -.34 ErnG-r.4 ni.?; - C. 

C-i‘4-5- :;.s7 _.J 1 Ga-.'iecA no - 2' 
3r:==i *7^9 -j; Tsi-^z" r 

— .-c:-a; 1 A: Ga-m-s 24*5 - J c 

,"HEd5: "■ I 42 -21 jc*.— *il 14 47— il 


CafTxEp 
Can At* IE. 17 -.06 
C.FdSer 1775 -437 
Ear .-On 3 7.44 -.06 
Gru*ln ieJfl 
HRIMd t 0.49 —.05 
;nGr A p 9 JO * .07 
iniSrai 9j» -4F 
inf- 32 j« ^17 
MolFiA O 72 j« *435 
.MolFiB P 12/M *.05 
iloo-Fd I3J9 -.10 
i^ac v. 03 -.39 
“arP.etp ISJE -415 


MOTyA* 7J7 -JOS. Growth n 7098 -4» ; MuUdn 106) +4B 

McHTjcA TJ3 -436 1 HiYIAVj 9.71 -417. MuLdngn1066 -4» 

NJTxA 7A3 -437' Incon 9 a 1 -.09, MirtnJfln 1J.71 * 479 

NYTxA 7.96 *.Wl InsMun 1079 -.14 MunSWn 15.49 +53 

.... __ ... .. 7.6? +4» mn n 1409— J2, CA!nslTn!O10 +56 

OnTxll c S 8* - 0s I OhioT xA 8.16 - X7 ; Invsl n 1143 *11. CAiroi-7 n;07B * .11 

ra 9.1? -.07 ORTxA 7j4 -416 1 tAunSBOn MS -.11, FT-Uisn 10A7 *ST> 

T.-ExA p 8 81 -.07; PATxA 7J3 -4»! gopfnhrflMJJ -.09 MJ'ran 11-55 “-K 

„ TFInAp «J8 -.14 CAHfTxA <L-C -JU. STBoodn MV - SB . NYlnsn 1(L59 ■*.» 

15.47 -4)6 TFHYA 14.3! -.101 CAOTxA 6 A3 *437: ST.Wmn 1113 -432, OHInsn 11.17 -M 

13.18 -.11 TFhvai 14.31 -.10 ! SCTxA 7.B9 -.081 Totcln 2172 -J?! PAtasn I&J4 *438 

-- Tp lnB . ; 4 »8 ,.U. UsGvtAp 6J0 * 4J3 ; SunAimerica Fds ; SPEnrgr 1174 — j02 

L'SGvAs 1168 -.08: HTYBdAp 6A2 — JH BriAseWpM.74 *4)6. SPGcUr 1170 *4)1 
UMAd 9 21 - .07 ‘ Sentinel Grouse BaWsefBpWA8 -.06 SPHHI).- J4.»3 *414 

VstuAp 7 J2 -4)7 Bclcnced P14A8 -4)3! DivlrcBp *A7 : 5PUtl> It54 *J6 

VoyAo *lja -20' Benda 6.'*5 -.05 EmGrA p 16A0 *J3I USGrcn <517 *.17 
ACiBi 10.i fl -.04, Camliv.o 29.13 +.11 


As<aB 1 Uj)2 —.07 . 
AA301B1 8.?? -412 1 
AACnB 1 8.23 - 03 
AAGthBt 842 -.03' 
5!GvBi AH -.01: 
CAT.Bt 84J0 -417, 


. , EmGrS 16.32 -42, InttGr 13J1 — 4» 

EmGrp iSS -.10 1 FedScDplOi; -M\ AtiMyn 1941 -.18 

GvSecsn 9.73 -.06 | GrawThA pliS8 -.11. Wftimn 20.17 -.13 

HilncAp 7.70 * 41) Wndsrn 1444 *23 

HWncBP 721 -ill ; Wndsfl 77.17 +.12 

TE InsA o 12438 - : Vcftfure Arfvaert; 

LJSGvA “21 *40; JrcPI* AW — 435 


Grawitip 1427— ^06 j 



■3mcs 1C?. — 0Mr*e,s i:jo — .*. 
LrAme -.is SecenTE ? TCi? - '• 

.v.a.*A 2: ;cr - i: otfr*. - +£f 

.V.i.VjB! 9 72 -.li lew— .1C 

.■.LI//. 5 : \'4‘ - Tfi it.;: - 2X 

.V.-IrsE: ! '/-■ - TS Cl vrr^tc Trust: ... 

•v. ■!_•:£ : =4f Be- rases 1« r - jj TZ.i 

<“!: -12 -Xi Ea’ncm !554 -.l 1 
.■.•■iTI+: ■!•?: — - )c l-t] n ""—.I? 

NJVB ■ 1 C-.ic -.03 tU. C-j: r C. ; c -XI 
i.'fs 1 3124 - '0 One Group: 


PATFp 13.03 
TFIncp 1119 tJJ9 

, WcrW p 1174— .10, «... 

_ Crifuai 18.98 -.13 SentrvRfn 15435 -.13 ! USGuBD 8J0 +40 ! MurttOv 9.18 

USSvBji 9.23 -413 DvrlnBt 12.00 -4U!SeqUriOn S6J7 -.41 | V0>ue8 1525 *4)1 ' NYVef. 12J1 -.14 

v/WOpp 10J! — 4» EuGrBf n a0 —23 1 Seven Sees Series: , TARGET: [ RPFShc 64)2—40 

GeoBJ 1X66 -.12! Matrix iu 11 j? — 435 | InlerBdht 9.89 +43; RPFGRI 15436 -Jf 

GiGvflt 1376 -1 SIP Mid nil A? -4»i hiHEan 13.19 —24 1 RPFG1 11J0 -.75 

FLTiBt 59J *1)9! SPSOdnx ICW8 . ; L9CapGrn9.74 +.06 i RPFCv la.9* -21 

GiGrBl 926 —4)9 1 STGv+n 0A8 -4)3: LflCaoV 10419 - 4D Victory Funds: 

GHoBt 13.41 -.13! YidPIn e.vd -4)1. MibBw) hi 9A? -.Wl AscrGr »J2 '.09 

HtlhBi 26.77 -24 1 1784 Fundi: SmCocG 11 El -.12* CorpBc 9J7 -4« 

HnridBt 1151 -.05 GavATOC 9M -434 ; SntCapi/ 12.11 — AM f Esaiir, ML45 -4 34 


P fe rpcfitFdg 
Bcrtfr. 9.95 -4)6 
T=3cncnTi.* -.06 
Ema'/Ea W 4)1 -.01 
EflUilV n 19 S I -.Oi 
ZzrzAoa r.;i J9 -.17 
intiEan I1J£ -.04 


PjEoEG 1241? -.17 Incomes' 575 -414 i Grotncn I0a3 - Oil ToiRiBd 9.74 +4«l GouiBd 9J9 +416 
PugrimGrp: • ~ — — “ — ■-■ — ~ 


•-1CVB: 

GrtMB I :a Jc 
=» ccl: 


ARS 1!! 

7.1! 

-.01 

ars 

7 £2 

-.Cl 

AUS l-A 

4-SV 

-.01 

AaiL'jlV 

■4)5 

-Jl 


’CC 

- ui 

ARS l-A 

7X' 


AR3 II 

7.U 

-J] 

AdiUS 

i25 — .o; 

AtSUSll 

X9? —4); 

AliS'H 

692 


GNMA * 

I24U 

+ .02 


NIV.VjC d 15 C" -.17. BoyFynds Instl: 

UEur^ ; ,.'24 — 11. ST ."ei; ’.fl -,3i 
I!Eiir=r, 1101 — It 1 Ecr.-in - Oi 

MAG f A MO— 436, Eag.r.' Mi? - Oi 


riAG f : p ■ 11 — .43 
NAi/tC M ! — 04 
PrOrthA sll.TE -.« 
FrC-nhEallci -07 


3c*?mas !r. *«+ 
sr.,ii;r. 1J, -01 



10.6# — .1? 


1 j9> -.04' 3HmuS: ::a' - oa 
1144 . ? A. Mur A I6.71 ..Tl 

If.:? — IE PA .UuBl leJl -.11 

i?.4' - 1)2 ■ Tt •■■•■uA 20. '3 -.17 , GIcBoln 1134 — A9 

11.0? - M; jA.-.WA IcJl -.10 GvlSecn 9.66 ‘4)7 

MX# -J3i! VAMuSt i&j; -.16 GroCc, 252-1 -.14 

Bond r. J.71 -.93 'Ccmposiie Group: Dreyfus Slrotegic 1 Grolnc 2114 -.13 

, Eri.uT, n 1059 -.CJ; cdSi^AP li^O -.10; GIGrp 33 94 -.23 1 H.Yld 1113 -.10 

OtK-'Ac ?i:r -.07lBeocK.il 30J9 -.2o G.-.ihAo 1X5! -21 Grovrtti o 39 J3 - 09 ! ln<AVjnnll45 -.14 

TTMlae * i ' —.03 1 3SEmgOPr 9.44 -Xi | inFc^r j.’l -jr income c !3J; -fa. imBdne 10.11 — or 

STMIbi s a" — .03 Bentimark Funds. • WfuAp H'! - .Cl I Inv A 2T.'£ — C£ InierGvt n ?45 +03 

T«'P hj.9-. -ij| Ealancednse; - 0i T.E/As 7 i4 -x= : in.-a: 1J.W — (A\ irllGrlr 17.71—07 

WaTcp 1 #r .1 Eor.oA.f l?.^ -15 UXC'. - P »-!.) j - .CS ■ Dupree Mu:uot 1 invGBne 7.19 _.io 

AmSvUlh Funds: | D-vGrA n 12 24 -.12 Can sits 5= Funds: 1 in'Govn 9 !t -.0? ! Jar-air. UJ9 -.09 

EriS'-An 10.75 - or" Ecuit. U<# - .OS I ti'-TFn 


10J5 - 12 1 Gtolnon 9;? — 0! 
10 J7 -.0/ 1 Grov-l.T ns 13.0c - Cl 


Balcno* ll.# 1 - -,i!Gl talS'-An IQXi -02 Ecu?.. U<# - .OS I (C'-TFn ’ il -03 

Send 10:5 +0? ; FocurA.ilO.crj -.0', mem ifl.l? - I k'/Wl.i 5.21 -XI 

Equir. li.'f .111 inttBCA i' 19 .'; — .j; LiiMc: 10 43 -.oj ;E3i Funds: 

Gviln 9ji - jjj | inirsrAn ill ?— ,k Conn Muhich I Eauilvp JJ.9J -.15 


Lia/.'c: lo.2t - Oi i SnlSwrr. 10X0 

ResEo I'.li - IS ■ 313d An l'6i 

AmanakK 12.73 — i: 1 SmSriA 11.1# 

A-itcuicdorFid: | USG . A n 11.4# 

BalncF c.81 - rp 

B'ltCr,. 1.49 +X3 

CoreGrFnlu.16 -Jl 
GrovJitm 12 a 7 -.01 
ie>5» n r 3« - .03 
IntE'jne n* sjn -.01 


-i Gcvt 10D -.Ml Re<p 5X54 - JO 

.34, &r*m !>i» +.lo, InctrmeD 46.23 -.18 

13 1 income »42 - w | AAuiiifi* J9.*7 -.1* 

03 | TjiP+i ll?4 - .13 ; E5C SlririA 9.93 -.02 

UCTId'A nl9j9 - .15 CGCapMhlFis: 1 EotGn V Oassit 

Benhorr, Group: Em ir.'i ■ 6J1 — 4)4 China p 8.25 —.13 

AdiGcv n ?X7 - 01 ! m:rF . r. 2.97 - 0: ! fl Lid P 9.63 ■ X7 

CaTFIn 10.91 -.03. IrllSq r. 10X7— 0# [ Go. ID *M -X5 

Ca~mn 9 7S -10. Inllr/fi 0.C0 — JO l NatlLidD ?.*A -jjs 

, ClTFSn 15.13 - .03 1 LpGran -Jffll NcflMunp9.34 -.10 
IntlStk n 12 05 -.« \ CnTTrH n 9.11 -.03 , L;vri n M2 - .05 ' =riw» V Marathon: 
5mCaL-rni3/U -.1# | CatTFL n 10.93 -.10 1 Mta3kdn 2.7e -4)5 uHLTdl 9.86 -.1)6 

EoGron ll.T -.0?; .Vunii ?.18 -10 STGbl I X6i — .07 

EurBdn 10Xc — j 7 1 SmGrrilt 1X11 -.11 I CALICI 1Q.1A -.06 
GNAAAn I0J° - 07 1 SmVsfn 6.?7 - .08 I China 1 11.99 —JO 

Golem n 12 03 — .24 ; TtIRinn 7 .TO -Si' \ FLLld i 1027 +.07 

incGron !4.#4 -.HlCapM-n 19.60 -.09 /ifALral la08 -M 
LTreasn 9.2: - .13 CBreFurtdS: MILidl 9 .r -.07 

NiTFln 106 7 -jOTi BcianJn W23 -4tol NanLtdl 10 25 -.05 

flfTFL h 11 J£ -.0?. EaIC.- 21 Ji -,I3| NJLIdt 10.15 -.0# 

GlEdA n S.19 — .13 : HYLidi 18.18 +.Q» 

GrEoAn «.£i -.11 PALIdl 1024 *.07 

ln:3CAn 9.72 -.03 ALT/FT IOlT 7 -.13 

InnGr An 1X31 — .01 AZTsF t 10X3 -.13 

‘.’ClEsSPh 17.08 -.03 | AHTjcF! 102# -.13 


Muirld ton 5_>c _ ‘ 5T 

Fonrqinen 10.44 — . lu . Gy*S:Brvd 20.70 
Fonts Funds: 1 Gave it Funds: 


934 . A/Tecn ic li -.oi 

995 -0C En-.mAc 5 7? -.Oi T ^ - 

— M, L^ C Iiben:“~ 

'--lOD-i Z « J — .0- -Kit-- ■ l: _ i’,- 

««: »?” -- -L 


lCJfi - AsetAilDi cJ8 - .04 

.10 BiueCEa.lSW - 22 '+■« * 2i : VovBi 11-36 -.19 

__ 21.:? -,33 C-S4 -■=: # 1X32 . T lJ duontharnre Oroup: _ , 

= a.V=- '05 - ./■ Esnccx '7K -.M 'fSS _ i? BasIForGr 10 64— .05 ! LTIncTrn 9jl -04 For€aS 

=fr.= : t; Sr - !4 G.An-h 'rit-X-i Bos.*GrwlntS.20 - 04] SmCpET 1C.68 * 08 1 FEsafS 


InvBl 7.8? -.01, MATEInn4.90 * 08 | TempMnn Group: , Inccme 9J7 *4)2 

MATjcB * 9.14 -.08 TE/Med n 9.M *.09 1 AmerTr r 13A4 — j)S < mini 938—416 

MurdBl EfiJ - .07 , Shnwmut Fds-lnveri; J CapAcc 1SJ1 ^>3 ■ NYTxF 12.91 +4)9 

NJT*Bi 8.97 -.08; F*dlnclrp?.n -SK[ DevMkt d 1196 -.0? 1 StvGufnn 9A3 +.02 

NaOpoBiZU? -M . GrEarvIn Pi0.:5 - .li 1 Forgro 9.51 — 35 ■ Vsn-Grtr#; iai7 -.05 

NrT'31 135 -.9? Grln£qlnp;<J70- 0* • GWbOpp IX« — ->c IVTUJVTF 9J£ -.08 

OTCB' V1.68 -ii! IntGvlnln P9A2 + .04 . Gwrtnp <7A6 -.07 > Vista Fundt ■ 

TxExBf ejl -437; SmCpElnpi0A7 -4)3 Incomp 9.14 — .0! 6olA 114)6 - 08 

USGvSt 1154 +4)3 , Showmus Fds-Trush RIEstp 1242-416; Bond p rue 10A4 -01 

UtilB: 9.17 -.07) F»dlncTrn a .71 +419 SmolCoc 64)2 —413 < CA Ini x 975 -03 

VistoBt 7.18 -X7l GfEalTr 10.15 +.15 World P 1603 —439; CapGr 31JS -79 

GrlncETmlOTS +.06 |T«mdrton Visht I CapGrBl 31.47 -79 
IntGvITrn 9.62 -434 1 EmMS p 11A7 +X7 ■ Equ<Tvpnl290 +75 
" 1274 -14 Go v Inc X ! 14)8 *.04 

| FEsafS 10.91 —.11 ■ Grinc 334)6 +.12 


s.l5 —i, !r-.==r 1 

■*Virc3t c c" —72 .:!:}■ 


PfftarFunds- 6 "" ^ BosNumO 15.29 - 72 1 S«rn Tiwsfc i GmrthS 11.74 — 7? I GwWsfin 15J8 -.10 

BalGrAnlP 18 -0= BosNcnOlXM -73 1 CriMuAplOAi *.09,ThMAvV 17A2 -M SrtnBr 29.96 +.12 
IpigAp 1!79 -.10 OuestFar Value CpIptcAo 10.18 - .1? I Thomson Group-. inilEaA 11.92 — 08 

“iarfcn lajl - 20 ’+*- 


=:!nA 10.94 - .38 

FxdlnA 9.76 -418 
intnGvAn^.TO -.0/ 


10X5 -419 EmGrAp 13 66 -71 
1278 -434 FLInsA p 9 AT *.10 
I41T - .01 1 GrincAp 1172 +40 
9J6 -.03! GrowthA p 1 1 74 - 437 


Ambcssadf r Inv: 

Band n* 9.47 - .03 
CorvGrn I4.W -.20 
Gr-v/TT, >« >2X4 -.64 

mieenan/ ■>.?) -431 
InhjIV n 13.04 . c? 
MITFBa * 9 3c - 43* 
SmCoGr n I3.J? - IS 
TFIrtlEdOf IO." - 03 
Ambassador SK A: 


STTreos n 9 80 - .133 , 
Tarl«in »Jii8 -.28 I 


Bondi* 9.4= -.a; I T crXflQu n #6.06 - '7 

CjrcGr Ic W TorjnOi n 47 J2 -.91 

iGnvlh IX'7 - 04 Tcr?010 h 33 75 - '4 

IniE-aid.' M3 -.01 _ 

InTIf. 

Sr-i'CoC 
Trim 3J ... 

Amove Irtmcwu : Berger Group: 

EoyBv IO.41 -.68 IvOpn JSSi +.15 


MNTFn 10 70 -.10 
Magellan i?.43 -.67 
W.rln+nryiAU -.02 
.VJtTFn 11.36 -.12 
1 MlgeiscnlOJl +435 
AAunarin 8.12 +.0? 
NYHYn 11.99 +.13 
Mflnsn 11.47 -.11 
Ne»Mnnl31l -.04 
Newflisn 1173 -.11 

OTC 72.93 -.21 
OtiTFn 1179 -.11 
Ovrseon 237J —JS 
PacBas 18 90 —72 
Rurilcn 15A3 -416 
RealEsI n 1474 - jn 
RelGrn 1783 - 4)5 
ShlTBdn 9.09—02 
STWldn 9J1 -.07 
SmaKCaP lili 2 - 2 t. 
SE Asia nrl3J)9 —75 
St+.Slc n 19.06 + 415 ■ 
StrOPPI 20.17 -7« 
Trend n 56.44 - J5 
ySBln 10/11 -.07 



Ffu O • 12 - 05 
TcN-c 11430 -.04 
TFT. a J.94 -.10 
TF PA a 4.76 - .0i 


LalAiTWK WJ4 -.1? 

LldMun 9.47 -X9 . 

LowPrr 1736 -.0? i Fortress Invst: OnpVciP 18.15 -09 Belt p lOX" -.09 

MITFn 1147 -.101 AdiRM 7.12 -DllGHMJITE ?7» -.13! BriBo 3076 -.09 

Becar 9.38 - 06 GHNalTE lOTO -.08: Bonia to IJil -.05 

GiSIrnc X#.’ . ' Greenstvrva W 78 — .05 EondB 14i! • .06 

Mumnci 1CA3 +.11 GrtfflnGrin 1173 -.12 InvAp W.'O -15, TrH/F ATO -.06 

OHFarlD 11.11 -.11 Guanfian Funds: InvSo W.6S -.14 1 tf;,h j.se -06 

Util r 1X34 - 0J AstAlloc 1X88 -73, ’JSGvA s c .?4 -.05 Tr WAD 4.29 -06 
44 Wall Ea 6.18— .03 GBC-lnil 112: — 07; iJSG^i ‘-.'3 -.03' 7aluApopllA5 - 03 
Forum Funds: I Bandn 11 98 -.05 ■ JAVBoi 1X51 -.14 ' Lutheran Bm 

InvBnd Mil *0# Part A v leiO - 40 iKSWun ill 7 -.09 1 BroHiYd »7? - .0? 

ME Bnd 1044 -4)7 1 Since n 28.97 -*/ KSLMunu 1106 -.10; Fund 1775 -.C‘9 

TafSvr 10 45 *4)7. T»E- 9C • 06 , h'cuAnon n* 142 -414 1 income 8.40 -.0? 

Founders Group: | US Govt V32 + .02 | Kemper Funds A: , Muni 8.32 -.03 


cjn.yt ;xc3 - 0: 
Ec-nvCo tXCS - 32 
C-r/Se^A '.05 -.05 

H.IncA 6X4 - K 

HIIr,c3 672 -.C? 
InllEcCp 104# — .K 
iriiF-mf 7 .EC — 71 
AAcCAsa B.M -.01 
e.ipdAslA 5.83 -.01 
.MgdAs.'C 9 54 -XI 
RwnSoiC 976 -413 
Tzr= ..A 7.93 - 06 
Tx=r? 7.92 -.0; 


DiSC=da aw -35 
E3I-C4P S.77 -05 
Eo,nc3: 0.;; _.je 
GWoa 19 a* -4» 
GIG* a 15.C4-.10 
GirbEiv p 59: —.07 
GlcaaiApar: —73 
GfafcIH I 36 J2 —73 
Grids 


FIcnrFi b 22.97 -.12 ; ErrXV 23.78 -A0 

P:nMSdP 10.19 -M7, inlSd 25.44 +.15 

IrflGr 21.94—77; 5T1F 1X14 -71 

Piero IIP 1X86 -.07 Value 25.95 - 74 

PioThree p 19.68 -.08 Rainbow n 3.J0 -4)6 
ST Inc 186 .. .RecGrap 1334 - .07 

To*Freepl24)8 -.12 iRegisFund: 


VaMunll 10X0 
5kyfine Funds: 

Europe 9.82 —.15 
AAonftilyln 9A4 —XI 
SpEcnjirn 1736 *417 
SpSouMI 1070 -4)9 


US Gvp 9J7 -4)5 
WmhREI 11#2 +.13 


HTridA 12.7? — J31 Piper Jaffruy: 

HTYldBr 1X73 —4)1 Balance 12422 *419 


Balne e.fO — .0: I HTInsEq c 1X64 — .07 J AOGovA j.39 -.02' OppGt 3.77 -.19 ,M1Mulrc 3066 -.09 

BtoeChp nr,£.^ -.01 1 HTMgFI p 9.65 -.05 ' BlueOipA12TO - ! MAS Rjrtto; MidweS 


Cfocvp ia?9 + .13 ; HonlfnCaio °.C? 
Frntr np 25 63 » 76 Hanover In v Fd v 


CoOFTxA 7 26 - 435 
DivIncaA s 5.96 - OJ | 



I15TEA p 16 6? -.19' 
IntricD 34.43 -.10 
invGrAe 1X±3 -.07 
LTGovA P10J7 -.05 
MnSiCA 124)2 -.12 ' 
A5SlncGrA21J9 -.11 : 
V.rglreA 13.42 -.06 
N>TaxApliJ5 -.1? 


CcpAnijnl6.lt -JB 
Growth n 1X64 + 1: 


37 s * H 3 • ToSOlS n 74.94 -.73 .XlwcnCtot 1JJ0 -.07 I ColMunTI ».c,2 -.09' Ulfllncn 14.42 -j» 

• V'i • X ' TarXjCOn 17 *; -.53 iQwemGrA 11.09 - 47? 1 COT.FI 10.13 -.11 Value r, 4113 - jj I 

fan - : - 3 , 4- ~ ' ■•' ,0 ' en I0J3 - 05'CrctoC rfusar.: 1 CTT/Ft 10.19 +.1*1 Wrrdw 1 3JS — .18 1 

-4«; uiuinepn 9J5 -4k, Aitahp 1X89 - 08 Eqlnt ia66 - 01 | Fidelity Select 


EauilVP 16.00 - 06 1 RoTrFI ioJo +.Ti| F1 A?? VSe, *lJ79 -07 
OB i\lun N1X36 -4)7 | GAT rF I 9.96 -.12 1 AmGold f 2 1 A5 — 77 


WiewGr p 1 7J33 - 414 : Harbor Funds: 

Fau.ilain Souar? Fds: , Band 10.74 -.04 
Bclcnced S.82 + .07 

Go-.-fSec ? # 7 - .04 1 

MidCap 15 71 -.00 1 

CvulBd ”S7 +.07 1 

OuaJGr -\7B * .06 I 

Fra.Ucfiji Gkup: 

AGE fund Y2.58 — 02 1 Heartland Fds: 


Hrrwds 800 *4)5 1 
InCcpA 574 +J37J 
irdA 10A1 —.09 ; 
KIP STPr 


Iniln 24.16 —.li I MuniA 10.04 -.09 1 

IntIGrn lOJ# —SB : MYT.A 10J4 -j)* 

ShIDurn X7I *71 ! OHTFA 7.64 -.10 1 

Value n 1371 +.05. Retire! 11.09 +.07 1 


Balanced nllJO -ST j AdiUSG/r 9.92 — 01 
EmerGrnl673 -.15 Gov: p 9.46 -435 
Ecriiyn 70.98 -.14 IniGv C 10A8 -M 
F<dinlln ia73 -.07. LeshLIiiA 10.62 -.03 
Fxaincn 11.20 -.07 LeShTsvA F.00 -41? 

GIFxin iai2-.il I CH TF 11.98 -.10 
HYSecsn 9.04 -C4. TFinip 10.81 -05 
intlEa n 1454 —.Of : Msnetto 15.15 -70 
InlFitln V/0 — XXIUttWCMC 1JJ3 -.)D 

LldDurFJ n 1071 -.03 I Monitor Funds: _ 

MluSKFc 10.19 -.07 I r ’ Ir.T 20.»7 -.15 | StaSTlAp 4J2 

MunFxl laJO -415, GftaWT 25.99 -.12 1 SrlnGrAo 5 00 -.02 

SefEqn 17J6 -.16. InEaT 2231 -.30 StriiTvAp 4.80 +4)1 1 Ealnar 

SelRn ial6 -.06, iVituBK Tj> 7 -J», Tarpeic 2S93 '76 1 Grincn 


EmerGr 1&83 -XU 
Govrn X83 +.05 
Grinc 1076 +418; 
InsrGv 057 -415 
InstGvAdi 9J9 -4)2 
MNTE 1045 -.10! 
NanTE T0J6 +4W 
PocEurG 1S4D —.18 


N’rTxB mlX46 -.17 | Sector o 1775 —419 
Opcen 10.54 -432, Value P 19.10 -75 
PA TE A (01.00 +.13 'PiprTilD 975 -4)6 
SredAp 2874 -70|KprTr£hD 9J6 +4)3 
SirincAD 4.B7 _ ; PlailTNhi 1D7B -J» 
SlrlncBt 473 - PortlepFds: 

BclKn 21.96 *.17 
Edldx 




4*2-?] -.W I " 2s — : S»"CceqA 571 -.061 MJGA’p IOCpO - 13 ' Er.v3.MkI l«t - 09 1 USGvtp 9J4 -SB 

C+.HY2ap?.al -.08! LAmrVal ?.sa -.17, TectiA 10.07 +.13! BonaAw 12J6 — 4)21 GtoiCom ;i(M —.11 I VdlSfAp 14.48 -.07 



j SmCtpn 15.92— .15, ST Govt 50A8 — 4)4 | 


USGvIA 10.23 -418 Adi'JS 


Preferred Group: 
AssetAro, 10JJ +.07 
Fcdlnn 9.9) -.06 
Growthn 1X33 +.15 
I ruin 1271 —75 
ST Gov n 9.B1 +412 
Value fl 11.64 —.02 
Price Funds 


C&aBal 13.89 -4)2 
CAB EC 1X33 — J» 
DSlOv 10.78 -.14 
DS1LM 9.57 +.06 
FMASPC 1079 -.01 
ICMSC 164)2 +.03 
SAMI Pfd i\<9J4— 436 
SirSoEan 14JJ3 -75 
SirGwrhn 9J0 +4)8 
SrSTRn 104T -.02 
SirBaln 7J4 +.08 
SlerSTFn 973 +71 
SferBln 1176 +417 
TSWEc 10432 +.11 
TSW Fix 9.91 -4)7 
TSW Inti 1372 —.08 
RctiTcng n 1777 —4)1 
Rem brand) Funds: 
Asian 9J4 —.16 
BatTr n 9.75 - .03 
G1F»lnTrn9.99 —17 
GwlhTrroiiXa -71 
lntlEnTrnl2J7 —.03 
SIGvFIT 9.64 +.01 
SmCaoT 971 -.04 
TEFITrnc97l +434 
TaxFrrrnx9.7P +4M 
ValueTrnxl073 +.11 
ReynBfCh 1479 +.04 
Rsfiffme Group: 
BlueChc 32.82 —.02 
RTFflnft)3572 +413 
GovSecp 1104 



thvlnc P 9.87 -4)5 : Di.-lnc5 557 

'IS : STi 6 13.10 -1 LMMAd 713 -.01 iMoroStonFds: , 

i I A V &Q r P .!-?S "S MI'S® S- 00 -I CITCAP 7.9i .J AsianGrA )5.7« -70 VRGA 9M +.02 Bofance 11.64 +.07 1 Rimco Stk 11.99 +4)9 

5mCapSpT6« -.08; KIPSTln RsOiAp 107? +11 AsianGB 1X7! -70 PBH&Grn 14.15 *77 BIChG 1178 -.05 Riverine a;? -17 

\ HiBtiMartc Funds SWtoll fl.ll -4)7 1 Sea Ac IXTJ -.05. GlobESA 1X29 -.05 IPFAMCo Fds ! CaiTxn 10.04 +4)9 RiwrttGVI 972-40 

-1 SllnAp/. 7^3— 0#'. C-ni,EaBnl?70— J15 ] Brian 1075 +417 1 CapApr n 1X75 +4M ; RWerskle Cop- 

TatRAp 12.91 - O' : Moron GrenML- I CaoApn 1J7J +4)8! OivGran IIJ# +415 1 Eqmrv 15.ro— n* 

3 — 01 ; EnicriEq 976 -437 I DivLiwn ll/I -.11' Eolncn 1660 *.11 — 

j— 11 e/lnan 10 16 -.07 EmsrgMKlJja— .191 Eqldxn 7372 * JU 
!■:— Mj GtealF.no.68 — 11 | EnhEon 1179 -.r~ “ 


Smith Barney A: 

CanApA 1X67 +.14 
GIGvtA 11.94 —.12 . 
incGroAplX99 +.05 Tccquev 
IncRetA 9.49 *4» “ 

InflA 17.53 —79 
MoGovtA 1279 +4)7 
MuCalA 1278 +.12 
7/UFLA 1197 +.13 
MuUdA 6J9 +.05 
MunNfA 1146 +.12 
MuNJA 1X40 +.15 
MllNYA 12.98 +.11 
SHTSY 4433 -4)2 
USGvtA 1116 +4)8 
UfflAo 1275 +.11 
Sinflh Barmy SAC 
CqpAuB 1152 +.14 
IncGrS 12.98 -4)5 
InMB 11 M —79 
InttC 17J7 —.29 
AAuLttB 678 +4)4 
SmitfiBmvShrsii A: 

AtfGvAp 9.77 — ifl) 

AdvsrAp 2576 +4)7 
ApGrAp 25 AS *52 
AporAp 1T.11 +438 
TelGAp 1103 +J1S 
Telln 106.46+178, 

AlMuAp 9.94 +.11 : 

CdMuAg 1170 +.17 
DivsStlnc P7.B5 — .05 
RJVatA 0 8.16 +.05 
GtOuAp 29.06 —76 
GrinAp 979 


T!i7 +.li: MY TF < MAO +.08 

21.45 -.07! STBdp 9J7— 40 

1273— OS: TFlncm v1178 -.10 

27A5 +A3 iVc+umet 1473 +4)3 
VoyageurFdc 
AZIib 1073 +.13 
COTF 1075 +79 
FXInsd 1072 -.11 
GroSHcp 17.80 +04 
IA Tf 979 -04 
MNlns 10J6 -.10 
MiraiinJ 1XB1 + 05 
-MinnTF 1X15 +.12 
MG Ins 9.99 -.10 
NcfiTF 10.02 +.12 
sn I Targets 1X36 -75 ND TF 1079 +417 
USGovBl 8.97 +.06 USGv 104)1 +JH 
ThombmuFdv 1 Woddril Meed: 

IntMu 12.98 +.07 1 TatRet 1X18 +4)5 

LWTin 11.92 +.04 j 
LtdCol 1X65 +434 1 
LtdGvtp 1278 +.05 
LldMun P 1377 +74 
NMJrrt 1X90 *416 
1X56 +4)7 


Growth 1195 +72 

LtdTerm 9Jt +4M 

Muni 1072 +.12 

Global 970—4)9 

WcOSt 776-438 

Warburg Pincus 
TO»«r FuwJv 1 Cc»AppnlXB3 +48 

CocApp 1X48 -I EmGthn 2072 +74 

LAMun 10.92 +4)9| R«Jlncn 977 +75 

TotolRei 9.74 -JOS I GlabIFxd nlOTB— .1 4 


USGv 1071 -76 
Trademark FuadA: 
Eagltyn 1070 *.10 
Govttnco n 9.42 +4)9 
KYMunn 9.TO +.00 


Grincn 1403 +76 
intEaun 1973 — BS 
InstEqn 1575-74 
IntGvtn 9J9 +415 
NY Muni nIOTO *76 


SI Govt n 9.42 +4)5 [WasotchAB W76 +.M 
Traisamertsa: ! Weiss Peck Greer 


972 +71 


MidCap p 2870 _. ._. 

1 SocAwo 26.66 -.01 i HilncAl 11J3 -.04 
466 „ | RimOD Bd 979 +4)7 ) InfCAA 873 -43# 

intrrrA 879 -.07 


Batoicen'x9.74 -03' SmGcpS 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


3 &SRAV 1 A 

OKVm $ 

lOfCgi PA XS SSCOST AGOCT 
CiSxr CA.2D5 ACC=»TH) 

UK 07 j 5S9 5537 


TAKfflA ’5 

“»» - PADS BCOCT S3VKI 

07 ) 266 0566 


ESJTERSGASi WTl 

SCOOTS WOS1DWDE 
i^GWOBSRYIG 
UK 071 52A 7293 


A»"i ilw 

ICKCCNSCMTSSYia 
071 92S 264: 


WTSiNATlQNAL E3COZTS 

Srvcr - Wc 

ftt 212-765-7396 Now rati. USA 

uct5r urn Acxoimi 





(Continued From Page 1 6) 

* VICXST • S*eart Service 
_ZU3G-i * PAMS 

CrecJii ts r i <xcrpi?d 

For Zwicn- ral 0” 63 S3 32 

0*er atr. dal INTI +i5 43 97 

GENEVA- PARIS 

B r-tiy Wcman Bcort Ser.tce 32 1 99 61 

■PABIS A LO NOON" 

* = L E >3 A N C E • 

aron S erase London (711 3?4 5145 

TOKYO 

BCOfT A r* GUIDE AQBJCt. 

PABS BRUSS&5 

VP aeon SeroKr. 

132 2 2W1K0 creditor* 

ANC3QS OF SYfflZSlAIO 

Sicod Sernee 1 

ABtidi, flcJe. Bring, bicanie, 1 

mw - MS A ESCOBT & GWOE 
50PVICF 865639 Off 0330 334392 

* LWIDON • ESCORT • SB5Y1CE ■ 

. * T = L : 0 7 1 -499-2B79* 


077; <3 4S 47 (X 077/43 46 76 

OTOUKTOfiSCOffTS 

J aren. feon Sronre 

067-C37W 

FACES UK 

WOMWIDE 3C0CT AG»K7 

T9- UK 081 694 :«0 16 UNES1 gr 

tel me 0*6 my? 

5S?Wa - LONDON 071 955 4533 

■ zuam * SU$AN * 

ESC/ 1 xrJKt 

’• , •Z^JEICH*Vla#JA•• , • ■ 

Tefc 01 • 381 9°46 

SUWEte ESCOBT (NiatWTlONAL 
P '9B +*k*i. Geneva. Uru. 
S<id**Q. kiroixvd + fl 1 5321 |3J 

TEL: 06 157321 

WW0M SSAZUAN Sxori 

u'i 5: c - -71 . ceil ay* 

Fine fit on Sernte. 

Tel: Wl -‘322-23-70-Te: 

DUaaDOttF KOlN 80bW 

Intone Escort Sernee 

TA016I I2C45 19 

TOKYO EXECUTTYE 

bear) Sflmce. Oeifi erodv 

Tri a»r77i:c 

MAJKFOffMBJNEWYOfiK 

Exon Servo 

QiSSeA ESCORT 5»V|CL 

51 B+cuchcn® Floe* London SW1 

H 071-564 *513 


To subscribe in SwitxeHand 

|u5l coll, tall free, 

155 57 57 

t MISS 08€VA & PARIS 

Enrol Ageror. 346 OO 09 c-ak cadi 


ZUiHCH * raN * LUZESN 
KftTHAUE Enrol Sernce 
Td. 01 ■ 4ol Tt, 39 


LDll 9.8? 
ShoriTn 9.90 +4)2 
Frgnr 9.84 — M 

GkjOd n v.72 —436 


ZURICH / BERN / SA5S 

EieortSenK* 

T«/. 077.88 06 60 CT7. 88 06 .Tj 


F BAN K F U S T - ‘TOP 1ST 
E5CCBT 5SYICE 
m: w ■ y: JO* 


AMSTEUJAM Bl/naRY EkO+t 
S ervice. T4 (0J2lW47I5?0 
■Iredil Card: AxEpr-d, 


MUNICH* WELCOME 
ESCoraGote ageno. 
PHASE CaU. 089 ■ 91 23 34 


WUB4TAI ESCOBT S«YKI 
L0MX3-I 

HiAg PHONE 071 7 K 3314 


ZLPHOI kEGOE 
Escort Service 
Zurrt 0: • 383 08 55 


—.IE 'nUmCsnlOAS — .05 1 crinen 1173 -.14 

-.05! MuiiBtJ 10i9 -4)7 1 Intln 124)7-4)7 

iT — 41? AAnvlTSap 13JJ + .0?| AApdBdl n 9.6? + .07 
17 i Mora iron Instl: I MidCao 1J.?S -.23 

_ I AdOrv n 174)2 — XU I SmCoG 18.49 -J9 

" : 4S.onEa n2* J7 — 22 \ SroCpV 1X41 -4)7 

I Sci 9.38 +417 1 unsn.n 8TO -435 

■ EmGr ISJ)2 -J2<PtMCO Funds: 

MuCAAu 5J1 ■ Ufl Ental 1653 +.01 | TotReln 10.07 -4)3 

MuFLA 0*948 — .01 1- EmAlirDbl n8.63 *4)4| TRIM 9.00 -4M 

MuGAAp* 10.48 -.03' Ec;Grn ll 33 +4Mi LawOurn 9.92 -.01 

MdMAAp*W F+CInc j 10.08 -433 

■V.utAOApM 01 - .05 CIEdTV 1140—4)1 
r/ajMoA p*9jl - .04 I Gl c <)n h 10X4 —24 
MuP4CA pj 1 1 22 — C4 ; H, -lion/ ;0J6 — .05 
AluNYA px 10.59 - 021 InllSCn 1640 —.16 
MuSCApyll TO --02 1 Inil&s U.E9 _ 19 

MuTNApelOM - .05 ! JOnEAtt TO LI , . 

MuVAAPklliS -.03; R ear Hdn 9.06 — 39. PNC Funds: 

UFIB 7.12—431. ValuoEq nlX05 -.10 i Balances 1X30 -.06 
CcsOBI 14.00 +.07 SCValn 1069 +.06 1 Bricrv 12.29 +.05 

Bond 3 v 12J4 — m Mutileri-mriJWS -.08, GsneEri 9.98 -.09 

EmGrBI 1023 -~1 iftlurMAIGB IDAS -.09 1 CweEdS 9.97 +4)8 

GridBl 625 —.10 MutlBn!) 1031 -14 

I GvAAgB rx X4S - .01 Mutual Series: 

! Gvscst* 9ja -.01 Beacorn JX50 +4!8 

J HifrBI 504 .. Dhttur/ ll.e5 -.06 

! InhnB ri 836 — 05 Qurild n 27.94 - 31 

I MA ITB 11 a 5 -.36 anarusn 83.13 +85 

OTCB 7.88 NCC Funds: 

MtGB 1052 * 13 I Eauihclp 1X84 -.14 

RsatB 13J7 +10, F/dlnclP 10J3 +.07 

SedBt 11*9 -4)5 [ OH TEI a 1056 +4» 

MuWVA PX) J1 '4)5 Eaui^rfr P1X86 -.14. 

MuBdB ia80 + 08 NDTiFMm 9.33 —4)61 STBdf 9.72 +4)3 
TolRB! 11.91 - SB . NWNL NorthSMi', SmCdPVSlXll +.01 

VatuB 9.61 — 111 Hit IdA tJA —01 5mCOPVI 13 J 2 +.02 

WoEaBl 1X28 — D9 I incGfA HUM -A? Vcluol 

WoGvG 1106 — .IBj._Mullia 4 63 -.02 VolueS 


LWMup XI2 +JO 
LldTrp 7.37 + XU 


AtfiGvA 
BIChip t 
CaoGrp I1J8 +.05 
CATFB 10.17 +4)9 
EmGAp 24.92 - JS 
EmGBI 208 +J4 
GrinAp T l.i 1 —.03 
GflnBl 11.13—4)3 
NdtRst lAfll — XiS 
Gvlnct 8.15 -JOS 
CATFAp 10.17 +47? 
GtdncTr 786 +.05 
GvSecp 771 - SSS 
HiYIdB 7.87 +4)3 
HYTF1 934 *36 
InstGv 2X15 —.01 
tnvQA p 149 -STl 
TFBd A 1023 +10 
TFBdBI 1033 +.10 
Trust For Cred Urt 
GSP 931 — OI 
MSP P/57 -4)1 
TMP1996 935 +4B 
TFE397 9^4 +4)3 
Turr.er&E tHX12 +4)6 


F»dlri 9JB -J06 
TNMuC* 104)2 -4)8 

Rcbertson Stephens: I NvMuAo 16.65 +J4 
CDTTron 11.71 —32 1 FYMIAp 20.11— .08 
pnw p 1832 + 4)7 SpEhA o lB.i; 
liriPlus 144)5 -A0 1 PiTRA 15.76 -4)3 
RcritesferFds: UtilAo 1X48 +.1J 

BdGrow p 1X34 -.10 ! W|ncA p ».i2 — JM 

RoMud 17A8 +.13 1 WWPAo 1^9 .01 

LldNVp 335 +.02 SmbtiBrnyStirsn B: 

AgGrBi 25 J 7 +.61 


Europen 1181 —30 
FEFn 13.70— .14 
FLInslnTnlO.15 +4)6 
GNMn 932 +4)7 

GATFn 9.9? -4)7 

GlbGv 9J8 —.10 

Growth n 2031 +.11 

Gwtninn 16J2 +30 __ 

j rorjdn 8 J7 — .01 [ Rodney Vmrxr: 

narroen X72 +.05 1 Divine 1X74 +4)6 

rdlBdn 9 M — 34 j Growth a 1635 +.19 

IntLjisn 17 1? — 30 ( inncao 1?.62 — .07 

hfSikn 124)2 — .13 Routstan Funds: 

Jown 11 jt -.09 GvGecn J.di ^ 07 

LriAmn 916 -.05 Grin 10.90 -17 

M^vln 5435 -4)1 MrdWGr l!.9l - .12 1 FdValB I 

’ GlSdSl 


SSSf - * p Jff ? + -09 I TweedvGV ll^a —XU 
MaMilA p 1575 + .16 : 20th century' 
Mri9toAplX« rM) BrimSVTtSJ, 
NIMuAp 1175 -.11 


AdptB I 11.06 -4)7 
CaMuBt 1X70 -.17 
Crowe 1 -J437 . ,1; 

DvsInB i 7 85 —.05 

fyjPBj 13.94 -JO 

FLAtuBT 9 U +.12 


Divine 1X48 +40 
Govt 9A2 +JM 
Grinc 2X88 +4)1 
Gwth 106J5+IJ0 
OuantEanXTO +4 B 
Tudor n 2135 +.11 
WeltTPVal n 9.74 +.13 
WeffzVrin 16.11 +J1 
WestaVE 

AZTF 1056 +4» 
BdgPI 1449 +.11 
LTBa 9J5 +.10 
ModVri 1X87 +.13 
ORTE 1X32 +.15 
Brilmrin 1X13 '.11 
Basvun 21435 +.15 
Ealnln 1069 +4U 
GNMA In 1X45 +.13 
IrrtBdln 1D438 +4« 
MIDCOln 16J6 +39 
STGavtl 1535 +.03 

eminvRfblUO +.H 

GNMAR fplX43 + .13 
MiOCoR fp!6J8 +J9 
STGovtR fDlSJ5 + 4)6 
Westwood Funds: _ 

. BailTOt 7.14 +417 

Batin* n 1576 —39 Eolnst SM *M 
Gdl n 1+65 + AS hllBdl 933 +417 
Growth n 22^9 —M BatSvc 7.10 +J» 

Herlrtvn I0J4 +.07 1 EaSvc 5J9 +JM 

InllEmGrnS/l? — .11 I IntBdSv 973 +417 
imiEa n 7.56 —.121 WaGamBlrir: 
LTBonan 9.28 +.081 Growth*! 9:7! +JD 
Select n 36.92—418] income 10.18 +4» 


T»ESTn 10.00 +.02 
Treimn 1039 < 4)6 
TxELT n I03S -SB 
Ultra n 20 JS +.19 
USGvShT n't JS -.02 
Value n 5.14 +4)1 


inttGfhn 1X54 
WiSamPena: 
PennSap 1077 +4)5 
PATxFr 1091 +4)7 
QuaStv 1X13 +4X 
US Gov 1030 +4)8 


Vfcran ias -75 jWMbrosFacnx 
USLorjoSIKBSOB +4)1 , WinFIfn 996+9* 
USAA Group: , WlnGrfn 1092 +97 


HTYId 10.33 -41! ! MdT(FrnlO.G6 +J8 iRWMRmdil ’" * oBd™ ' Isl? *14! {5* » ,Clh " l ftM -J« WinMT p 979 +4)7 

Grwthn 104 +.12- MiflCdc n K75 +35 FonnMu £30 -X5 OTOoBi ~\i\ B«ancWr.lI.« -4)3 ! YflnGHn 1146+4)3 

LTUSGn 9.M -.12 NewAmn 24.63 +J? Ealnc Io +03 9 C?Tm! IS - 20 WinAGfn 15J5 +.15 

I K^=°ra„4-i5 “if SEC. t* -bi GrinBi t^f §?™« n ** + J?|Wb«JwdMFafc 

1 : SIi fXf Tli 2 n *■”! HiincB t u.33 +j4’ - 

n 1+51 9-5S -415: Ironic® 1 11^7 -18 

wiTFn ia. > -4)7 | Rustimore Group: J MqGvSfn 12.47 +4)9 


*■ G3CYA 1NTS5NATK»WL ” 

EsoChT Serbia 

T&.m -731 tiS • C77-I57280 


NJTFn 1072 
PJYTyFn 10A8 
OTCn IS.07 
SoTchn 18.19 
ST Bd n 4X5 
ST Gib n JJd— .02 
SmCVI 1473 -.09 
SoecGr M.75 +.06 
S&ecln 1091 —01 
TxFreen 9J1 ».0fi 
TuFrHYnllJO *417 
TFInsIn 10J9 -4)5 
TxFrSfn 577 +4)2 
US Inl 114 +.02 
US Una 9.95 +.51 
. VATFn 1061 *.07 
UA? +.C9 IPrimryTn 1 174 -.01 
11J6 + 438 1 Prnctoi Presv: 


Grnwttit 3X12 
IdxEo 10.96 -415, 
InlmBdS 9.22 - .07 > 
IniGvtS 9.55 t-.Cifl, 
lltlTBdl °.27 +4)7 
InTGcvn 9.95 +4U 
IntlEa 1X15 -JOS 
IntlEaS 13.14 ^.05 
Managed 1 10.1? +.10 
MancoetfSI0.li -.09 
PATFp 10.14 +.J1 


+.081 AmGasnli.il -jx| MaMuBt kh -u 
+.17I USGLg 6 9J4 -.1-'! UJMvBl I if 

*.n *«! Al\ \l T d : : ]i 


IVOGTS 16.18— 051 NYLmsirtFtSc ■ PR* Rnv n IXU2 + I? I DrvAch 1X43 * .11 

WoTwB IOJJ — Mi §AFE 12.79 — W ,PoodicUS > "4)0 -437] GTWIPlt 7J4 +.C5 


PRIME TIME ESCORT SBtVKB 

In Mrofanan 
2I2-279-8522 USA 


‘KMSHTS8MDGE ESCORTS" 

**«New Y«1 USA 

Teb 2124477230 Worldwide Service 


TOKYO ESCORT SERVICE 
Mqor aedt us6 accepied 

TVJSL30M598. 


. MulnB I B4i +4)5) Bond 
MIMFunds: 1 &^Q 

Bdlncn 7.18 +05| fnaxSd 
Sfk Irtc n 10.16 -.VI, [m)»Ea 
STVGrwn 1X8) +^6 
ShtAon 1441 'J® 

MlMLiC Funds: 

A55IAII 13.37 -.12 
FttOIncm ® » *■* 

Invl 1X« + IB 
MI05K3 9.®S *0- 
MMPrGl n 9.99 • 4J8 


9.70 ‘.08 
1X16 -.18 
I07S +.09 
1X81 +.09 
Mi/ 1 1 A 1192 +06 

ST Bd ia?7 - .04 

ValEo 1X65 +438 

Ntlind 1277 +4M 

Malians Fund: 
AdiRtlAO 9.H +432 
AdiftiTAn9.71 *4)2 
BriltJi 1043 -.07 


(MMPrintn 948 - 08 : BO TA n 106? -.08 


••• PA«5 - MttJXHiS — 
Escort Sernee. Hease call BnpeUe 
32-2-201 ■ 07 00 


VBTNA'FMBS* MONACO'ZURKH 

EUBOCONTAC htl Escort + Trwel. 
Sen-iW. Coil Vienna +434 310 63 19. 


taj Mahal ESCORT sarvicE. 

MAJOR CRBJiT CARDS ACCSTO 
LOT'DON on 36 4 1 OS 


Mot* <m or Gm: 
AdiGi'A P 9.73 . 

AmerFQ dI 2 13 - 06 
CAMunplOJM +M 

Canada 1072 *.0l 
FixlMp »A4 +.07 
& local !Z4B —.16 
LtdMup 10.15 -4M 

NYMuriD 9.W. -.0; 

NatM'j a e.rj * .08 
, NAnrcrp 570 +.03 

I Mackenzie I w: 


CAGrinP I1J4 
DivIN I 10.04 
DivlTAn 104)6 
EmCTA 10.82 
EqmdNt 11.56 
EalnIA 11J7 
ErinTA 1IJ9 


ElndTA 9.98 *4T 
FFdnlM I0J5 + .07 

GAITAn 1X45 -.0? 
CvtTA n 98 7 -06 
Gmr.'jr 9 8? -.04 


PaCmcGrtn/7.7B -.02 
Pacific Hon zott 
AgGrp 24JU -.17 
CATFr 7J1 +.0* 
Ccplnco 14 J1 +.09 
Carped 1X25 - .10 
USGv *J3 +4)2 
PacfficaFds: 

APrcsm 1X07 -4)1 
Balance 11 J3 +.07 
CA TF 1X69 -J06 
Eaval 1?JJ -4)2 
Gir.'lncg 9.77 -4M 
STCAn 9.99 ,4)3 
Paine Webber: 

ASSt An 11418 -.05 
ATLAp I5J? +4)2 


litsTE* 991 -.11 
SP 1150 PI U.n *4)6 
TEPrt 191 * 10 
PrinMBS 9 ,m +.1fl 
Prinoor Funds: 

BiCtw 1 1 87 -.09 
Band* 1X64 +4)2 
CasAcc 20 21 +.16 
EmaCr 2155 ‘ J3 
CO*.* UL<3 +JM 
Growth X66 +.46 
Managed 1248 -4W 
TEBdx 1160 +.07 
Utiiihes 9 A3 -M 
■World ?xx — 13 
ProorsVI 10.21 —.03 
PlFF*dlnen9.70 +J5 


^, Hr . ®-M +J4 ! Balance 9.B8 +SX 

Gown 864— .12 j Bond 937 +JP 

IfS " SI or/Dl 1TA0 +419 

DSSttin JX7? +.0E ‘ IntBd 9J3 +4^ 

■notrilen 1172 +.10, intrns 1X67 +4)1 



gnmad 9ij -j2:' r 3S'Nfc 

Wrmd8dpt9* -4)t' rnnl 1 
SWGv na 9 80 - JJJ , , 

nUFrin on 10.04 — 1 7 ; 

SS 'Sts :* ISTSb - 1 ' 

&~ 3 S :fii Ie 


*J0 -.0. , Swiss D 9.76—14 
P^Evro /.8? —Ji i Wright Funds 
STGySec X91 . Cwln 1X12 +JB 

S-TfS. 6 *. T.00 * S£ ; GvObn 1103 +.17 


BlueAp 1503 -.14 |PIFIntMutPlOJ7 +07 
CalTAp 10.92 -.10 1 Prav Inv CoomeL 
CapAAp 11.84 -J2 EndvCtf 11.12 -.12 
CmTcA 8.95 +13 instGrth 1 1 JO *.12 
DvGtap 1975 +4)3 SmConGr JZJ37 -79 
EurGrSp 9.48 — 1? (ProdSpcnp 678-02 
GEnAt 1175 —4)5 PrvdenOut Funds: 
GllnA p 1024 -4)3 I NKhA 
GIGlAp 10 SS -.02 H.<hB 



SIFE ... _ _ 

S GrW V won «i Gviln iJJS if/l SggJ* ^ 

i is isiua#- « -|i as? \s -.si g Ik is 

,F a - OS ISAM Van X78 Ini n“£9* 10-79 -S 3 - ZS&rA wc 9« * 01 

lafflyiSiBdiS ;g *wj MpaV*^ ;5i 






USTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, J10VE 6, 1994 


Page 15 




Utsuer 


Amount 

(millions) 


Easing Bond Yields: Just a Short Pause? 


Mat 


Coup, 

% 


PrtM 


Hoa tl ns RWe Kotos 

Krung Tho» Bonk 


Price 

end 

week 


Terns 



Abbey National 
Treasury Services 

Morgan Stanley 
Group 

Bank of Oum 

ABB finance 


Over 6-month Ubor. Noncoflofais. Fennardudoied Denon*- 
i $500,000. [Chernmt Socuntw Asia.) 


v 20,000 1999 


Ovc* 3-morth Ubor . Maximum intruwl BV Noncaftabie Fees 
0 125%. PBHBHmwiew £10,000. (S.C. Warburg Smuims.) 


ft 100 — 


lntar«> bo b over Libor until October. thereafter a find 
4%. Noncofldbfe. ft** net dnckned (Morgan Stanley Ml.) 


Y >5,000 2001 (Us 


100 


— Oww SflWrth Liber. NoncoBdfo. Fees 0.275%. pBl Aua ) 


5200 1997 6!* 100JI5 


Counal of Eur ope 

Deutsche Bonk 
finance 


— SeOffwod at V)M. Noncalabta. Fees 1«% (Goldman Soch, 
tar’ll 


5150 1996 6 99m — NoncaBoble. Fear roi dndomL (UBS.) 

m% (Deutsche Bank.) 


$200 1996 6ft 100.93 lOOxe BeoHtrfed at 99.73. NcmcoSaUc. Fc 


Export Finance and 

Insurance Cora. 

IB ScWeswig Holstein 

$250 

1997 

6fc 

100.M7 

99.70 

bofferad at 99.66. NoomUohlo. fan 1 HX. {BJ Iml ] 

$200 

1997 

6fe 

101.047 

100.05 Mtend ol 99.8*7. HonaJtdatc. F m IML (Bar dm da 
Zoaie Wadd.) 

Morgan p.P.J & 

Gompony 

$300 

1997 

69s 

101.007 

99.95 

Beoffared a> 9988 NoncaBoble. Fan HML li.P. Margin 
Secwitiev] 

Conipognie 8ancair« 

ff 1.400 

1995 

5»4 

99 JO 

— 

Noncolaye. Fen 0.15%. fGxna Natisnata de Ottft Agu- 
eotej 

Bancano San 
Paolo di Torino 

m. 200,000 

2004 

10^40 

100 

98jh 

EwhangBofala n >999 mto a floating rate note paying H a«ar 
frmonlti bbor. NonctOr***. fan 7%. paihito fiannno S»i 
Paolo d Torino.) 

AAmtloba 

a 150 

1996 

B 

100H 

9970 

Reoffarod at 99575. NoncaU^a. Foes 1 MV (Wood Gundy J 

General Bedric 
Copitd Corp. 

Ass575 

1997 

7% 

100J85 

99^0 

NoncaBoble. Fan JMV (Barclays de Zoefo Wrctd) 

Mitsubishi Estate 

y 35.000 

2000 

3.85 

101-855 

— 

Roofferad at 10028. Nonedfa We. Feet KftV Denomnotians 
>0 rrifton yen. (Nfcto Europe.) 

Mitsubish Estate 

7 20,000 

2002 

4 

101.90 

— 

Reoflered at UXL275. Speed tobta. Fen 3V Denoouncxion 
10 aUon yen. (Yamacte firtXf 

Suedwest Deutsche 
Uxndesfaaik 

Equfty-Unked 

Y 20,000 

1998 

3% 

99.665 

— 

NoncaBoble. Fen 0.225%. (CS Frsl BostoaJ 

Aduvn Perdana 

$135 

2004 

31 h 

100 

— 

KecteemaHe at 1 2569 in 1999 to yield 1 point over 5-year US. 
Treasuries. Convertible at 19.11 negpl pet fixve. a 1580% 
pretniwe. and at 258 nnggil per doflar. Fees not daclased. 
(Robert Fleming & Co.J 

Sapporo Breweries 

$200 

1998 

2ft 

100 

— 

NoncaBoble. Each $10/700 note weth two mananti exercis- 
able into company's shorn at on expected 211% pnxiuum. 
Fen 2ia». Wire to be ser June 9. (Yamoid* InfL] 

Olivetti 

m. 400,000 

1999 

3ft 

100 

— 

Noncolable. Convertible at an expected 8 to 10% premum. 
Feet 2H%. Terms to be set June 9. (Morgan Stanley Inti} 


Campled by Our Staj'f From Dupatcha 

NEW YORK — U.S, bond prices rallied and 
yields tumbled last week amid signs the econo- 
my has slowed its brisk pace, easing concern 
about higher inflation and interest rates. 

But many analysts predicted that inflation 
concerns would swell again and perhaps men 

U.S. CRED1TMARKETS 

prompt the Federal Reserve Board to hike rates 
again this summer. 

News Friday thai that economy added 

191.000 jobs in May, much fewer that the 

289.000 economists had expected, helped send 
yields tumbling to two-week tows. 

“The bottom tine was the increase was wa> 
under expectations and that shows the econo- 
my is slowing down,'' said Patrick Reizer, who 
manages the S77 million Heartland U.S. Gov- 
ernment Securities Fund. 

For the week, the yield on the 30-year Trea- 
sury bond dropped to 7.27 percent, from 7J9 
percent a week earlier, while its price advanced 
to 87 22/32, from 86 13/32. Meanwhile, iwo- 
notes yielded 5.85 percent, compared with 
95 percent a week earlier. 


Weak economic reports trickled out all week. 
On Thursday, the Commerce Department said 
factory orders in April fell 0.1 percent, surpris- 
ing many economists, who had predicted a 0.2 
percent gain. The Labor Department also said 
that the latest four-week average of state unem- 
ployment claims rose to its highest level since 
mid-February. And retailers reported slower 
sales in May than in April. 

Bonds also got some help this week from 
failing commodity prices, a rising dollar amid 
speculation the Federal Reserve Board was 
buving securities for its own account. 

The Commodity Research Bureau’s price in- 
dex fell 2.05 points this week to 233.25. most of 
the drop occurring Friday. The CRB index is 
regarded as an indicator of inflation, which 
erodes the value of bonds and other fixed - 
income securities. 

At the same tune, however, analysis panted 
to the fact that the economy continues to add 
jobs and that the unemployment rate is falling. 
Such trends, they said, might prompt the Fed to 
raise interest rates a fifth ume this year when its 
officials confer in July at a regularly scheduled 
interest-rate policy meeting. 

Anthony Karydakis, economist at First Na- 
tional Bank of Chicago, said be would “not be 


Russia Gets 
A Reprieve 
From Debt 
Payments 


By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Post Senior 

MOSCOW — The world's lead- 
ing industrial nations agreed Saiur- 

S to reschedule much of Russia's 
t for 1994, giving the country’s 
troubled economy some badly 
needed breathing space. 

The agreement, reached after 


VIETNAM: Hanoi Sets Course for Economic Ideal 


CostiHoed from Page 13 

South Korea, Malaysia and Thai- 
land advanced through rapid devel- 
opment of low-skilled work forces, 
competitive exports and frequent 
decisions to favor economic growth 
over environmental protection. 
From a low base, these economies 
have seen their workers’ skills rise 
and better-paid middle classes 
form. But progress has forced 
many eantreprmeuis in these coun- 
tries to lode abroad far new sources 
of cheap labor to protect their ex- 
port competitiveness. 

Vietnam welcomes the trend, as 
booming foreign investment — 
more than 51 billion in the first 
quarter of this year, compared with 
$2.8 billion in 1993 — and expand- 
ing manufactured exports testify. 
But it plans to do so on its own 
terms. 

“The more exactly we have fol- 
lowed a particular economic model, 
the greater our losses have been,” 
said Do Du Dinh, head of the devel- 
oping economies study department 
at the Institute on Wood Economy. 
“We adopted the Soviet model, 
which focused an heavy industry 
and centralized planning, and we 
failed. It left a strong impression. 
We now see in most cases some 
good tilings and some bad things." 

Vietnam’s support for a U.S.- 
and European- basked initiative to 
introduce fair wages and environ- 
mental protection into the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
negotiations took it out of step with 
most of its Asian neighbors. They 
have criticized the idea as discrimi- 
natory and uncompetitive. 

But barkmg an idea that 
force developing economies to 
come less exploitative at home con- 
forms with recently enacted strin- 


gent Vietnamese environmental 
regulations. It also sits squarely with 
the Communist Party’s continued 
leadership of a country stiD heavily 
sensitized to the of socialism, 
according to Vietnamese, foreign 
observers and business people here. 

“There is a perception that edu- 
cation, health care and and social 
welfare sendees have not fared well 
in the transition," said Erich Spit- 
filler, senior resident representative 
for the International Monetary 
Fund in Hand. He was referring to 
the dot mot. or renovation, process 
that began slowly in 1986 and has 
seen Vietnam accept a market 
economy and foreign investment. 

Vietnamese 
expectations have 
been raised by a 
rash oi companies 
eager to enter its 
market 

“Tbe labor law is seen in the 
context of maintaining the public's 
willingness to continue the re- 
forms," said Mr. SpitSIler. “It is in 
the interest of stability to bring the 
workers on board so that they don’t 
fed at the mercy of a system they 
don’t understand.” 

Most Vietnamese government 
o fficia ls, economists and foreign 
analysts agree that the continued 
smooth rule of the Communist Par- 
ry depends on its ability to achieve 
economic growth without sacrific- 
ing Vietnam’s identity to the wide 
income disparities found in other 
developing countries. 

Vietnam "wants to avoid a Latin 


American situation, with huge slums 
outside big cities," said Mr. Spi(- 
’Iler, who said he believed Vietnam 
could, and would, spread develop- 
ment to the countryside tiurnigb im- 
proved agricultural efficiency and 
expanded value-adding food pro- 
cessing. 


the work force, and accounted for 
about 37 percent of gross domestic 
product in 1993. 

"There is clearly a real commit- 
ment to maintaining the integrity of 
this society, to haring economic 
growth without losing their soul," 
said Bradky Babsoo, the Wold 
Bank’s recently installed resident 
representative m Hanoi. “They are 
not trying to import someone rises 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, June 6-10 


A schedule at m» woak's ec onomc and 
ftianoaf warns; compded tor ifto Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune by Btoombtug Busi- 
ness Newt; 


Aila-facHIc 

• Jm A >— fcoome Australia & New 
Zealand Banking Group releases results 
Of |tt>3 vacancy survey for May. Forecast 
nae of 25 percent. 

Tokyo May imported vehicle sales 
Tokyo April machine-tool arum. 

• JilMT Betpng Fifth Aate-Pnatic In- 
wnailoial Trade Fair. Through June 13. 
at CNna international Exhibition Center. 
Tokyo Economic Planning Agency re- 
leases monthly economic report. 

Tokyo Deposits and lending amounts a 
1 1 dty banks announced by the Federa- 
tion of Bankera Association ol Japan. 

• jkwwa Canberra Alexander Down- 
er, new leader of the coraervame opposi- 
tion. addresses National Press Club on 

dfraction and policy over next decade. 
Hong Kong Trade Minister Richard 
Needham of Britain speaks at a British 
Chamber of Commerce luncheon. 

• l an e 9 Canberra Employment data 
tor May. Forecast: Jobless rate to drop io 
10.1 percent employment to increase 
11 . 000 . 

n gto ii Overseas trade prices, vol- 
ume and nrms ol trade data for the Janu- 
»y-March ouanw. Forecast Terms of 
trade to drop, export prices to decline but 
volumes to remain strong. 

Singapore Tatecommuntcstion Aulhor- 
ity of Singapore to hold a ceremony tor 
aware at the Public Mobile Data *»d Lo- 
cation Tracking Services License at Re- 
gent Hotel. 

Earnings expected James Hard kt Indus- 
tries, Japanese llto Insurance companies. 

• Jw»a 10 Tokyo Bank of Japan re- 
leases bo* lendng and deposits tor May. 
Tokyo Bank of japan releases May un- 
Mn survey tri business sentiment. 


Frankfurt Eastern German Match pro- 
ducer prices. 

Pads Apnd M-3 

Frankfurt Western German April mad 
sMas. Forecast: Up 02 percent m the 


Pan-German April retail sales. 
Forecast: Down i .0 patera in year. 

Apnt ratal sacs volume. 

IO London international Mone- 
tary Conference for world's banking in- 
dustry. Through June 8 



Europe 


April 

manufacturing orders. Forecast Up 0.7 
percent. 

Frankfurt April M-3. 


London World Gold Conference. 
Through June 7. 

Luxembourg Meeting of EU finance 
nWssfert to discuss inflation and eco- 
nomic targets for European Union. 

Parle Organization tor Economic Coop- 
eration and Deveupment briefing ahead 
of ministerial level meeting. 

Amsterdam Royal PTT Nederland NV to 
announce subscription price tor initial 
stock offering. 

Earnings expected British Airport Au- 
thority. 

e jbm T Fmkfiat Western German 
first-quarter GDP. Forecast: Up 0.5 per- 
cent- 

Frankfurt May unemployment Western 
Germany. Forecast up 1 7.000. Also. May 
unemployment. Eastern Germany. Fore- 
cast Down 20,000 

Paris Organization for Economic Coop- 
eration and Development meeting. 
Through June 8. 

Parts Industry Ministry conference on 
Franco-German industrial relations. 
Earnings expected Vodafone, 
a Jhm 8 London U.S- Federal Re- 
serve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan. 
Bundesbank Presmem Hans Tietmeyer 
and central bankers address American 
Bankers Association. 

London April manufacturing output 
Forecast Up 05 percent m month, up 2.1 
percent in year. 


Leaden April industrial production. 
Forecast Up 0.4 percent in month. 
Brussels EU commissioners to rule 
whether Mont e d iso n and Royal Dutch- 
/ShaH Group anil be adore a ID merge 
plashes laws. 

Parte Prune KUuser Pau Keating of 
Australia holes separate meetings with 
Prune Minster Edouard Bafladut and For- 
eign hbrtister Atom Juppe. 

Earnings expected Scottish Hydro- 
Eiectnc 

e June 9 Frankfurt Bundesbank 
counal policy meeting. 

Paris March industrial prod ucnon Fore- 
east Up 0.4 percent m month. 

Europe Eiecwms tc tne European Par- 
fl ament heW m Bream, Ireland. Nether- 
lands and Denmark. 

Frankfurt Daimler-Benz AG ngms offer- 
ing to ba pnced. 

• JimlO Paris May pretrmlnaty con- 
sumer price index. Forecast up 02 per- 
cent m month, up 1.6 percent In year. 

A— rl c— 

Caning* expected fhfa aid Club 
Med Inc.. 50-OFF Stores Inc, Northwest- 
ern Steel A Wire Co.. Thor Industries Inc. 

• Am 6 Washington sum annual 
Computerworld Smithsonian Awards 
honors innovators m computer industry, 
including Larry Bhson. preatdan t ol Ora- 
cle Systems Corp-. and Seymour Cray, 
founder both Cray Research Caip. and 
Cray Computer Corp. 

e Jbm 7 RoekvOe. Mwyiand U.S- 
Food end Drug Admukstranon’s Onco- 
togte Drugs Advisory Committee condd- 
ere new drag application from Burroughs 
WellcorneCo.torNairaSiinefOf lr x aU nsfW 
ol breast cancer. 

SMsr Spring, Maryland Food A. Drug 
Admlntetrauon-o Vaccines & Related Bio- 
logical Products Advisory Committee 
considers Issues on develop m ent and do- 
sign ol vaccines for [he prevention of 
Lyme disease. 

New York Grubb 6 EHis Asset Services 
Co. and Ross Dove Co. auction more than 
5100 ml Aon worth ol commercial hotels. 
resorts and goit courses at the EquMabto 
Lite Assurance Certtw. 

W as hington Federal Reseree Board re- 
ports Aprfl consumer credn. 


surprised if the tightening already happens in 
July." He 3dded, "We are stiil having signs that 
the economy has a solid momentum, which will 
keep Fed officials on the defensive." 

Consumer prices rose only 24 percent in tbe 
12 months that ended in April, down from 2.7 
percent last year. But while inflation has not 
been a threat this year, this may be changing. In 
May. average hourly earnings jumped 6 cents, 
to SI 1.1 1, the Labor Department said; econo- 
mists had expected a 3-cent increase. 

"What that tells roe U labor scarcity is being 
reflected in upward pressure on wages and 
salaries." said Charles Liebennan. director of 
financial marjceis research at Chemical Securi- 
ties Inc. “This economy is very close to full 
employ mem or at full employment, no matter 
how you measure it.” 

He added: “The economy is unambiguously 
svong. There's no wav to avoid the need for two days of negotiations in Paris, 
higher rales." reflected the West's desire to sup- 

But Stuart Weiner, economist at the Kansas pon President Boris N. Yeltsin of 
City Federal Reserve Bank, said that while **we Russia and his economic reforms, 
are probably below the natural rate of unem- It also reflected a degree of realism, 
ploymern," it would be “a mistake to expect since Russian officials have said 
inflation to be rising at exactly the same time as they were unable io repay all of ihe 
we slip below the natural rate." Soviet debt now falling due. 

(Bloomberg, Knigfu-Ridder] Russia owes about 580 billion to 
foreign governments and banks, 
most of that inherited from the 
Soviet Union, which collapsed in 
1991. According to initial reports, 
the agreement reached Saturday 
would save Russia about $7 billion 
this year. 

The new schedule of repayments 
is intended u> give Russia as much 
leeway as possible during the next 
two or three years, assuming that 
its economy will gradually gather 
strength. Some payments have 
been set back as many as 17 years, 
said Russia's acting finance minis- 
ter, Sergei Dubinin. 

But Russia is still expected to 
have to pay back more than S4 
billion this year in principal and 
interest, officials said. 

Mr. Yeltsin and his government 
have promised to make good on the 
Soviet debt eventually, but they 
have asked for reschedulings to 
ease tbe current transition from so- 
cialism to a free market. 

Some Western economists have 
criticized Western governments 
and banks for not being more 
forthcoming in rescheduling Rus- 
sia's debts- Despite all tbe talk 
about Western aid. the critics have 
said, Russia has had to pay more in 
interest on old debts than it has 
received in new aid. 

But Western officials and bank- 
ers have maintained that an orderly 
rescheduling of debt, rather than a 
write-off or default, is important in 
order to maintain Russia's credit- 
worthiness and to allow it to con- 
tinue borrowing on the internation- 
al market 

Mr. Dubinin, who led the negoti- 
ations in Paris, welcomed Saturday’s 
agreement but said Russia would 
soon setik a longer-term, more com- 
prehensive debt rescheduling. 

Analysts said tbe new deal re- 
flected a vote of Western confi- 
dence in Mr. Yeltsin and in Prime 
Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin. 


WMNngton Commerce Depanmem nr 
pons April vrttoiesate trade. 

Lo ui siana. Missouri Election hek! to 
vote on whotnor to snow nverboat gam- 
bling in :he town . 

Washington American MettieaJAssocia- 
toon plara to presem sigmficarit new tmF 
ingsoniheeMecteiaaeeniHiandamoka 
on women. 

Washington American P et r ol e um insti- 
tute issues weekly report on U S. petro- 
leum stocks, production, imports and re- 
finery u ideation. 

Earnings expected Giant Food. 

• June 8 Ottawa Monthly housing 
starts. 

Washington international Business Fo- 
rum presents the Second Annual Forum 
on Financing Infrastructure Projects. 
Through June 9. 

Washington Mortgage Bankers Associ- 
ation ol America releases ns weekly re- 
port on mortgage applications. 

Haw Yock Money Magazine/ ABC News 
release weekly consumer confidence to- 
on. 

Earnings expected American Software 
Inc. 

e jbm a Washington Labor Depart- 
ment reports initial weekly stae unem- 
ployment compensation Insurance 
dams. 

Washington Agriculture Department la- 
sues its monthly crop production forecast 
ana world gram supply and demand esti- 
mates. 

Msw York Pensions 8 Investments and 
International Business Forum hold Fifth 
Annual PSl Investmeni Management Con- 
ference. Through June to 
Earnings expected Fred Meyer Inc.. 
Shoneysinc 

• *mm IO Washington May produc- 
er price index. 

Ottawa May labor force survey. 
BettMsda, Maryland Food 8 Drug Ad- 
ministration’s CstMovascular & Renal 
Drugs Advisory Committee considers 
Genentech Infs Activase. 

Ptaento Bankruptcy court deadline for 
submissron of otters to buy America wasL 
Houston Baker Hughes Inc. releases IB 
weekly survey of the number of active oil 
and gas dotting rigs In die United States 
and Canada 

Esndngs expected today Dycom indus- 
tries Inc.. R2 Medical Systems Inc 


Fed Bought 
$700 Million 
OnApril29 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Tbe top foreign- 
exchange official of tbe Federal Re- 
serve Bank of New York said the 
U.S. central bank bought $700 Bul- 
lion worth of U. S. currency through 
the sate of Deutsche marks and yen 
on the last trading day of April 

Tbe disclosure, made during a 
quarterly foreign-exchange press 
briefing, marked the first details of 
bow much the central bank spent 

aiHsarttfifSE 

minus a glow- “*»' -dWWrtM. 


Beyond the Socialist ideology, 
Mr. Babson said he had discovered 
that there were deep “social and 
cultural values" in Vietnam “cen- 
tered around bang fair." 

u At the level of policy, the Viet- 
namese are very involved with fair- 
ness. valuing the labor force," he 
said. 

Nor will Hanoi run up massive 
foreign debt to finance develop- 
ment, Mr. Babson added. “This gov- 
ernment does not want io trade a set 

of political dependencies for finan- 
cial (mes.” 

Labor unions expect a shorter 
working week, more overtime pay- 
ment and a rise in the minimum 
wage to $50 from $35 a week for 
unskilled employees of ft 


tng local perception in Vietnam that 
foreign investors receive a dispro- 
portionate level of incentives, com- 
pared with domestic investors. 


SPRATLYS: OU Hush Fuels Fears in Disputed Zone 


rn ui n mwi frool Page 13 
that the two companies bad begun 
drilling for csl and gas.] 

Both blocks arcjust north of two 
large ofl.-fidds. Blue Dragon being 
developed by an in taxational oon- 
sortium headed by Mobil Corp^ and 
Jffig Bear, winch is to start produo- 

tionm October acccathngro Austra- 
lia's Broken HID Pty. BHP operares 
the Big Bear field in pmtnaslup 
with Malaysian, Vietnamese, Japa- 
nese and French companies. 

All four of these bfocks awarded 

by Vietnam fall within a huge sec- 
tion of the South China Sea that 
also is claim ed by China. 

Vi etnam and Ch in a need to 

make large increases in ther ofl and 

gas reserves to sustain rapid cco- 

nomtedevdownent 

Vietnam ’s interest m moving 

search far new iwM Mitt oS- 
sheue has been intensified by the 
failure of explorers over the past 
couple of years to find oommenaal 
deposits in Modes closer to the 
Vietnamese coast that are not con- 
tested by China. ... 

The new technology enabling 
companies to.driB in deepw wat® 
andmore difficult ooildiuons than 
before is significantly reducing the 
cost of oQ and 

soch areas. It includes extended an- 
gle drilling and inqjroranrats m 
methods for ftristang on the 
seabed rather than the s^face- 

W.E. Bradford, preadrat^ 

chief operating officer of Drtsser 
Industries Jna, a leading US. p* 


that saves as a production center 
for a whole series of outlying satel- 
lite weHs." 

Analysts said that these ad- 
vances m technology had brought 
many areas of tla South China Sea 
previously considered inaccessible 
into commercial contention. 

Despite angry protests by Hanoi, 
Beijing is serikmg to strengthen its 
Sooth China. Sea claim fay encour- 

S Crestone Eneray Corp., a 
independent UJT cal compa- 
ny, to start drilling lata tins year 
with China National Offshore 03 
Cop. more than 1,000 kilometers 
south of the last undisputed piece 
of ffrwwaa territory, Hainan Is- 
land. Vietnam’s claimed offshore 
boundary Hes just to the south of 
the Gestone contract area. 

The 25,155-sqnare-kilometer 
Creslone contract area is immedi- 
ately west of Mob3*s Blue 
oil fidd and two gas fields, 
flower and Orchid, discovered by 
British Betroleatn Co., StatoO AS 
of Norww and the OB & the Natu- 
ral Gas Commission of India on 
what Vietnam says is its continen- 
tal shelf. 

, Analysts said BP and its partners 
bad discovered from 2 trillion cubic 
feet to 3 trillion cubic feet of gas 
but had not dfedosed details of the 
find because of concern over Chi- 
na's reaction. 


Sea, but had been rebuffed, Agence 
Francc-Presse reported from Ha- 
noi on Sunday.] 

Mr. Tracer, of Petroleum Intelli- 
gence Weekly, said China and Viet- 
nam woe using foreign o3 compa- 
nies to "stake their claims." 

A number of other large offshore 
petroleum projects in Southeast 
Asia are inside tbe Chinese claim. 
They include die Natuna gas field, 
awarded by Indonesia to Exxon 
Corp. of tbe United Slates and the 
Indonesian state o3 company Per- 

raminn; and tbe Jin tan fidd, 
awarded by Malaysia to Occidental 
Petroleum Corp., Nippon Oil Co. 
of Japan and the Malaysian state 
oil company Fetronas. 

Mark J. Valencia, an offshore 
resou r c e s analyst at the East-West 
Center in Honolulu, said that inter- 
national oil companies woe mov- 
ing into prospective areas of the 
Smith China Sea to stake out posi- 
tions in case oil prices rise and 
make commercial production from 
deep-water zones considerably 
more attractive in future. 

Moreover, he said, disputed 
atolls in tbe widely scattered Sprat- 
ly Islands could tie used as dnffing 
platforms to bring down costs. 

China, Vietnam and Taiwan 
claim all the islands, atolls, reefs 
and submerged banks in the Sjxat- 
ly chain, Malaysia, the Philippines 


Peter R. Fisher, manager of for- 
eign operations for the bank's trad- 
ing account, said concerns ova a 
weak dollar, brought on by the 
breakdown in U.S. -Japan trade 
talks and strong demand for marks, 
led to ibedeason to buy dollars, an 
effort to prop up the currency. 

The Fed purchased $500 million 
worth of UB. currency against the 
German marie and $200 million 
against the Japanese yen on April 
29, Mr. Fisher said. The last major 
intervention taken by tbe Fed oc- 
curred in late May 1993, when the 
central bank purchased $693 million 
against the yen, he added. 


THE CARD 
THAT SPEAKS YOUR 
LANGUAGE. 


. Begmg has reportedly promised mid Brunei cMm those parts that 
naval protection if necosaiy to the lie closest to their shores, 
operator of the Grestone drilling All these countries, except Bru- 
nei, have put military forces on the 
C Thompson, Ores- parts erf tbe Spratiys they occupy. 

quoted China and Vietnam fought a brief 


tone’s president, has 

^ now bang by tire offidal Grin* Daily as say- naval battle in 1988 ova several of 
dSTinic often; thailevd & [» ft JW' ■£*£ **Serailys. _ 


itSttpforatwn and that drill- 

ariagbJ • , 

S’Sciaaw^ofopcS^ 

wTcaid “Tor example, you can officiate to work out a compromise 
todJda single offshore platform oneaptorafaoninllwSciulhaHna 


Anan da Kri-^hian, chairman of 
MAI s<bw a Malaysian company 
with petroleum interests in South- 
east Asia, said tbe last tiling the 
region needed was “a gunboat 
( (A ling an ofl rig, and we might 
not be Tar from tins." 


Euromarts 

At a Glance 


Eurobond YMd* 


Jun«3Mav27 YrtUMYrlnw 


US. J, tons term 

7J2 

7J» 

7M 

Ml 

U8. L nifBi term 

7.18 

7.12 

7.17 

845 

UiLstertltnx 

L34 

M7 

511 

Ul 

Peeed»itaiHM 

tea 

827 

882 

AJS 

Freack Cranes 

7.11 

L10 

7.11 

5jh 

Italian Br« 

BJ2 

tat 

as2 

7.91 

Duxlsti krone 

JM 

7.11 

7J6 

820 

Steedtatitoemi 

B22 

833 

877 

784 

ECU, Key tom 

7 M 

7 JO 

7 M 

811 

ECUoMrabna 

7J1 

7.10 

7J1 

jjn 

Con.* 

874 

a at 

8*1 

830 

Mil 

171 

8M 

871 

8 » 

uzt 

BJB 

114 

L9 

8W 

Ym 

175 

XBS 

L01 

Ut 


Sauna; LunmftwrB Stock Exctmm. 

Weekly Safes June 2 

tamaa 

Cefitt turodenr 

S Nw I MM 

K70 MU MJO 2.13S.T0 

— - SUB IJB 

F*m 2J0 HD 20180 45D-70 

ECF «Sjd IESU0 KL01VS UAU 

TM0 427tU0 15*4.10 KUtIM fc43L«0 

mtukiu 

CettM E Meteor 

1 MM I Mont 

St rtoOti h 707171 tUKJO ZZJ2QJ9 2U7*J0 

CMtefl 421 JO 44940 9S5JB 1,172.40 

F«M* unit 1444 JO 20-924*0 WAIW 

KF W01JC 4.1SIM 727A70 2W4SJ0 

Taw 1MDE40 24J0340 SU7«J0 SM17J0 

Seme: Eumdcar, Cadet. 


LEbor Rates 

I-ewn 

Semdh 

June 3 

* awalti 

IL81 

«* 

44* 

i 

DeutecfieiMrt 

31H5 

5VI4 

53/14 

PtoMsstrtteg 

Sint 

51* 

54* 

Fr«a*r*c 

59/16 

54* 

5 ll/l« 

ECU 

6I/T6 

tint 

A 1/16 

Yee 

Jrt 

21/U 

5U 




JM:. 


* 




B . ‘^4';' 


*S^^rv5 


Wiih Sprini's WorldTroveler FONCARDi'an English-speaking 
operator is os close as the nearest phone Simply dial the Access 
Number for (he country you're in. Then enjoy Sprint's iow international 
rates on every call you make, to every place you coll. And if you live 
outside the U S all yOur calls are automatically billed to a major 
credit card It's thol easy. And that fast. Now that's language you can 
under stand, right? 

To order your fiee card, call the Sprint 
Access Number, or cal! collect to the U.S. at 
402-390-90?-?. In the US., call 1 -200-329-3643 



Sprint 
woddeu^'m 


COUNTRIES 

ACCESS NUMBERS 

New - Bulgaria ▲ 

00-800-1010 

Iceland -O 

999-003 

Egypt —JT 

S56--777 

Antigua c- 

SO 

Anligu-3 • 

l-S00-3w>-io63 

Aigeiilino 

001 -800-777- Ull 

Austria + 

032-903-014 

Bahama* 

1 -800-389-21 1 1 

Barbados A 

1-800-877-8000 

Belgium 4- 

078-11-0014 

Belize (Hotel] 

S5t 

Belize (PTT pa, phones) © 

-4 

Bermuda V 

]-ffl£L62^0fl77 

Bolivia 

060CU33XJ 

Brazil 

•WSOIa 

British Vagin Islands A 

1-800877-8000 

Bulgaria A 

00-800-1010 

Canada — 

1-800877-800 0 

Chile 

0090317 

Colombia - English 

980-130-010 

Colombia - Spanish 

980-130-110 

Cotta Jfica + 

163 

Cvpius +a 

OBO-40D-0! 

Czech Republic -1- 

004 2-087-1 B7 

Denmark + 

8001-0877 

Dominican Republic A 

1-800-751-7877 

Ecuador^ 

PI 

El Salvador + 

|9| 

Egypt +it 

356-477 7 

Finland + 

9800-1-0284 

France + 

1990087 

Germany + 

01300013 

Greece + 

008-001-41 1 

Guatemala + 

ltd 

Honduras A 

001 -B00-12I3X0 

Hungary V+ 

009800-01-877 

Iceland +£1 

999-003 

Ireiand + 

1-800-55-2001 

Israel -1- 

177-102-2727 

Italy + 

172-1877 

Jamaica V— 

i-eco-arr-Boai 

Kwva V 

0600-12 

Kuwait 


Liechtenstein + 

155-9777 





Iwembouig 

0900-01 IS 

Mesice 

95 -BOO- 577 -3000 

Monaco + 

1990087 

Netherlands + 

069022-9119 

Netherlands Antilles -t- 

001 900-745- IM1 

Nicaragua 

161 

Norway + 

800-19-877 

Panama 

115 

PQrogoa/ Ac 

OOB-12-6CO 

Peru** 

196 

Poland + 

0010-480-0115 

Portugal + 

05017-1-877 

Puerto Rico — 

1-800-877-8000 

Ronwnia +12 

01 -fl 00-0877 

Russia +L2 

8-095-155-6133 

Russia (Moscow) * 

155-6133 

San Marine* + 

172-1677 

Saud‘ Arabia 

1800-15 

South Africa 4- 

0-800-99-0001 

Spain 

900-99-0013 

St.LwraA 

187 

Si. luoa 

1 800 077-7468 

Sweden + 

020-799-011 

Swhteriand + 

135-9777 

Tnnidad L Toboga o 

ID 

luriey + 

OOWO-l-«7r 

United Arab EntltOlK + 

8QCM31 

United Kingdom (Mercury) \ ! 

0500-890-877 

United Kingdom (BT) 

0800-89-08 77 

United Kingdom A 

0500-800^00 

USA. — 

1-800-877-8000 

US. Virgin Islands — 

1-800-3 77-8000 

Uruguay u 

C0tWI7 

Vatican Gty + 

172-1877 

Venearela English 

800-111 1-0 

Ventzavla - Spanish 

8CO-IMI-I 


Sources: Uavds Ban*. Reuters. 


C-rtOMi rv.:i v. CIO?. rtK. count , IO rouillr, iollir.g o,3itebfe 
l SCC 1 4 Vki .fc. t itv- «.rt r*. SptiW Actt'i 1-Innbw- ol ‘.r~- tOtiMiy >n tolo crwnir, Io country editing ouaitobiGiy 

G’iwl Collrr.g I J.71-PM + P 1 M |ptr;5>Ml ic^rliliojllon ayir.btj:| Glotol Calling rar* : . g^l„ ♦v*,'oii loi Kicond tone +• Public dI 

/ A .tS.' .tjUj j: (Kl 1 ph'-nt-. 

*:*> lw 11* Sp-inl Or-aoicr 


listing subiAct io enough For curenr fiumb-ts. ciftiomer tervicu or additional nun bar, coll 

ifONCASD biting only Ute 

Ir^rttataJ iterfhliaiion numb*! : I Global Calling nr* : . a^i,. ♦v‘, oir lor jocond tone +• Public phonm may inquire com or card 

iLr loio.J’bWtr 'ic<r, ro, piOnes. -FDMCaZD o>|tav] Colle;: cclb US itsmuoiicjn emt/ «4n jc*» ««». oti it» toeal oparaior to cormecr 
Cane. 'Ja.l "0C" rt-.-n aec«s runber e A, static licvi* iolicatud pbonm diocoJ-lcmg diaoTKe ehvgo, nvy appi> -Pn v phowK only 


Page 16 

NASDAQ NATIONAL 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 


Vkt IttHBi U* 


rvTTiT 


GenoLTc 

OnAHRcs 


Solas 

Stocks On Via Iflfc Hah caw Ou OW 

HOdCD 535 7% 6 % 6* — H 

Hbw JO .7 174} 27% 36 w ' j 
HWmAut _ 683 1 5* IS* 15* -'A 

hWImkCa ... 56312'A 1114 J13A ** 

HaQmitHI _. Ml 15* '* 

HtfwwJCn Tl 33.9 190 7V. 2 7% *39 

Hmb Hm _. 194 4'« _5* * ' > 

HanHnBc - 136*1 35* M'** 34* »% 

HarrURi - 2W 5 4* 4% 

HampCp - 912 n<* 

HmcHd .72 3.2 X40 29 27* 2? tl 

Hanoev — 174 6* 6 5* ** 

HcrtrFd ,11c J niM-AlOTH* - 

HrrioAs « 61 M 6%i » 

Hartovs ,64 10 24072* 21 'A *1* -« 
HrlvNts J*o1J 4*33 31 33 ‘V 

HwlvSav .40 1.7 2 74 34 34 — % 

HamwV .00 e A 21 70* 30*4 20* • % 

HcrpGfl 20 I J 641 IS 14% 14’,* - Vi, 

hkx^Ha -. 106 6* 6W 4V,. -7 U 

Hori&Svfl Xrit A 4411* 17* IS* _ 

HvyFar - 30212 11 11* - A 

H^vlnd - 241 13 12!* 125'. «■ * 

HarvlDf - 41037* 27% 37* 

HOtdwv JOe 7J 2® 2* 2* 2* - V. 

HoiiiOi — 2000 7* 61* 7 

ftawiB - 3304 16 14* 16 ^1* 

Havrtd J6b3J 1716 17 17 

Havrtvs 27 1 3 1314 1 5% 14* 14* -9. 

HowkB M 23 1803 20* l« 20* -* 

HowVC .Mb 2* 774 7 0'A 7 ♦ A 

HowlFn — 1J 5 4* 5 - * 

HIPlCSV - 23=3 124* 12* 12* - 

MBM&i _ 406326 * 24* 25* *1 

HrthPwf - SI 13 12* 13 _ I 

HWlRlk .. 2805 B 6* 7% * H | 

I HHMetr 
HliCrlm 
HCImwl 

HltCmp 
Htmdvn 

HlfhdyTc _ 

Hlltwif 

HTTVrAm i - 

HmtITc _ 

HrflndE 
HnWi/e 

Hctlflfi 06 A 

HchoA .16 UJ 

HedCm - 

HeidBiTk 

HetenTr — 

HeUan ~ 


led 

mtnlSup 

fmaaBus 

imaoEn 

Imasclnd 

imwrfi 

hnclne 

Imucar 

ImuLoo 

Imunon 

ImunRsp 

imumm 

Imumwl 

imunmd 

Imncrs* 

InwrBc 

IrppCrd 

InFocu 

InHame 

inocom 

rntirand 

incoHm 

indBCP 


3a)n J 

Div YU 10K HHjH LOW aw Chje 3 stock* 


_ 162 l 1 * I* lv„ -«* jfljoni 

._ 179 13V. 12 1 -. 12'.*— !■.. CSSEj* 

- 5P* 4" > -Y- 23w 

_ 3654 8* •'•» B'-« • inHrGa 

_ 2278 B% 7’.. * ... 

- ,3 £S i V, ‘ 2 S it? -'I- SSfcUt 

.. 602 3 1H P. — V. jaft5Mi 

._ 16*9 Pk 5 5% j£fK£f 

- 551 5 4' . 5 _ jetF rm s 

.. 2863 11V. ID*. IO>, -v. j£.~ 

_ 1624 14'.* 13* 13* — U nun 

7 14 14 14 —1* jflhnitnA 

-- 72*3 «'* 3* j'*. — vj jonnsSv 

... 125 T* 1.* l.’l n. Im lrti l 

I ._ 1310 18% 17* 18* jS^Ta 

l.!4tiai 1X3I1 J - 11% 11% — ■* 

_ 117414' . 13 V, 13*. .<1, 

- 3' W 2% 3. 7% -*Vu 


HMlRlk .. 28D5 H 64* 7* * H 

HllMetr _ 495 6* 546 5% — J* 

HliCrlm ... 1059 34* 2'* 3* — * 

HCImwl - 743 24. 2W 2* — H 

HltCmp . 8107 20V. 19* 20* + J* 

Httndvn -. 071 6* 6* 6* — 1 * 

HlfhdyTC _ 6911* H* 11* r' 

Hlltlint - 6254 O'* 746 09* * * 

Him Am * * 434 18% I« 

HaanTC — 2704 19 764» 104.-2. 

HrtlOdE - £051** 30* -* 

HrrWi/e ... 4101T 10 |0% — •» 

Hctigfi .06 A 10S15VI 18% IS* -W 
HdwA .16 1 J) 7536 IS*A 15 15* - /« 

HeclCm - 4,5 /** 7* 7* — * 

Mridflm, -. 568 I IV. llRy 104. —4* 

HeienTr _ bmis 1 . 13% 14% -1 

►Stan *•* 6% 5* 5* — * 

iSixTCS AH 23 1457 20*. 19% 2fH* -1* 


IndepHW J»e 2 
IndBkMA - 

IncfilMI 40 17 
Indlnv 
WtfTelM 
IndlFd 

IndUtd 
inxSooNV — 

IndusH'd 
IndH wTA 
liWH wtB 
IndSci 
irttfTm 
Intnem s - 

InfaSufl 

Inftwrt s 
infOAm 
hjfftsC 
IntoRes 
Intormu 


. 9*2 13 Vi 11% 13 -4. 

- T‘ 

1.16 H 27M«% 39* 40'* Ol. SmrT'* 
j»a J 17 3 3 3 

_ 2786 5% SVj 5V« j 

M 12 55 21' . 3D* 21l'i - % | 

34 1.5 61 15' 1 IS* IS* ... 

6154 2% I'-« 2% -Vi ,■ Sms 
.60 X6 42*17 16'. 16* — % 

.40 1 7 34 23* 22% 22'-: — % f/T 

_129ri»* IS 14 -5* KLL4A 

- 3 2* 3 > -* 1 '* KTron 


[Xu IU lOOlhSoh LOW cte Qnll Stacks Dw Yta lOOiMBti low Cue doe 


37611* 11 11 

... 71 1% 1 IV. 

... 414 11% 11 11 

JO S <17 41 38* 40% 

M 3.1 071 22* 21* 214, 

_ ■« 9'* 0* B% 

.. *13 17% 17 17 

_ 376? 14% 13% 14* 

._ 357 10% 9% 10* 

_ 1719 6'. 74. 8 

_ 3729 IV,. 1*; 1% 

473 74 22% 22% 

. 511521* 19 20* 

JO .9 5022 21% 21V) 

_. 335 14 12* Id . 

... 060 1412 13 14% 

.10 .9 1062 10% 10% 104* 

_ 1077 9* 8% 8% 
1J0 4." 285 25 24* 24* 

.38 1.5 1337 18% 18% 18% 

._ 1401 14 12 13 

_ 1250 4% 4 44* 

.16 IJ 1<JJ 12% 11% 12* 


k Swiss 

2 5-w 

f! Iw-A 
™ IKLLM 


- 413a 

24 

26 

— ,y u 

_ S5 4»-„ 

■1 

4»'u 


5737 25 

=1 

?4% 

-* 

1969 25% 

74* 

25% 

-* 

59 J* 

J* 

3* 


2182 3* 

3* 

3* 


187 9 

7% 

S 

-I* 

. 4780 15* 

14 

15 


17064 16% 

15'.’. 

16 

-* 


limertf/n 
InroddTa 
Inodto wt 
innove» 
Inotek 
inputs 
InseFn 
insllcn 

InSiioVW 

. > . - _ InslIE 

Hcnosurc - Z2I3 04* 0* 8% ♦ insItMd 

Hnryjk % JO 2.1 1645 9* 8V« 9% * % InsilTc 

Herb He .72 2.7 18933 27',. 23* 264. +2* InsAul 
HrloFds M 19 3024 23 23% *4* Inlegracr 

HcnoFS M 1.9 3319 18* ifl* - lnle*CfC 

Hertev -. 37S 4% 4* 44, - % intgDv 

HfTcPhrs — 315 10% 9* *% — 1 IntaMJc 

HlberSv — 73 17% la 1 .. 17% ' V InlSilSe 

hhptaln s — 950 04. 74, 8% — * IlgSvs 

Hiflhwdg _ 130 % % % — k intpWM 

HHIle - 145 8* 7% 7% — % Intel S 

HnsmS OJe A 85 10V» 9% 10* » *k imei wt s 

Htasdle -. 53 25% 25 1 /. 25% — IntSrwtA 

HJrsch - 331 8% 7* BV« -* intSrwte 

Hi to* _ 14 3’. J't 3% — H InllSrBS 

HoLoPat- .. 138 0V, B 8 — % imelEl 

Hoeniu .10c 2.4 210 4% 34a 4% -% IntrTel 

Honan .I'e I A 620 9% *9. «% — % infwSva 

HktyRV ... HS 2 1% l Wu — <% Inlerc 

Hallnaer AO ._ 1500 HVi, 11% HVy —t/i, intNtwk 

HtvwdCo — 5314 8% 7% 844 + 1 Intr cr go 

Hail/wdE _ 723233* 24 33% ♦6% Inlercel 

HlwdPks - 4335 234,. 21% 22Vj —V. inlcllBh 

HhataPpf .70 15 21310% 19* 20% — > (nrrhan 


_. .in J-** J'l — iKetvSA s 

- »,V F , s s 

-'"Sl'ft taSriMl 

_ 488 4* 8% 4% — * (.’fruch of 

_ 219 2V,. IV. IW„ — % 

M A1 77911% I01WO’ . —V. £ met vEl 

.. 2138 7% 7* 7* ,. iSffinr 

.. 3151 S 3’k 44. •*■« 525£d 

_. 1091 IV. 1% li. 

- «7 7 6% -* |£SS 

J2 2.1 758 10'/. 7'h 10V. 


419 14k 1% I* 
6565 =6 25 25 J . 

478 101. 16 I3 3 .i 

5&9 17* 17 174, 

129. 7' : 6% 7* 

57 2V. 2% 2* 


.14 IJ 1379 12 


18301.* 18V. 18% — V, 


K-cwnSc 

LevPrd 

nevTech 

KevTm — 

." KevFn 1J8 4.3 

V t:,*sHn l.w 3.3 

% kimDal .84 1. 

~ KndrLwt _ 

7* KndTLr 

'■ klnciic .15 4.0 


_ 3663 35' i JMi 344, ,2 L;£md 
_ 75 11% 10* 10* -% k SSs 
~ 174012". 11* 11* —V, KSS* 


_ 51277 31* 26* 31 


70 7% 

_ 980 30 1 1 l»'-: 19% —4. 

_. »7 17 . 11% III. -■ J 

... 695 3% :% 3 ‘-a — % 

JM A 141 195 65 61 S3 ‘ l>. 

_ 20486 16’-. K* 15 -% 

_ 250 1 2"ia 2 . „ - *i ; 

_ 497HV,, l’k IU.: — 

... 773 7' a 7 

J2 151371173% 21% 214. '. 

.. 1552 1C* 9'-- 10 —V, 

JO 7.1 88 L tj% 18 

_ 40 4* 3'Vib 1"'.. — A w 

„ 217a Vt ,% 

.18 1^ 5 10* 10% 10% 

... 165 9% B% 9'., 

J2 1.4 802 22': 30* 224. - 2% 
JA 1.8 1792 131a 13% 13% — ' % 

.16 3 4 62 5 4* 4% -% 

518 3% 3% 3. a 


HoKjgic 

HC'icahnr 

htaisnB 

HomBen 


70351. 9* 12’ . -24, 

552 18% 17% 18% - * 
142 7’m 7 7% _ 

28 21* 70% 20*— 1* 


. 1 Krwrv/ 

Kama 

-77* ktollMS 
‘ KclIRS 
kOURIPl 
karroo 
Kaoin 
loss 

/ 'Kranos 

- 

« kr.s:al 
I kulexe 

_ , ' ' I KurTA-eil 

‘ I KustiLk 
jkusnLcwl 


HmFdINs JO Ij5 177 20 ISWIS^/m— I‘-7m 
HFMO _ 904 544 5% S'", —"a 

HFdSvF ASb 4.1 9114 15*15* - '■. 
HmPn .60 541 53 12 11% 17 - * 
HmSvFL .70 b 24 173 29% 28 28* — % 


.08 .« «9 23 S 23* 

... Ill 6* S',, 6 

„ 16=73 4144 38 4146 

_ 95 17 156. IS* 

_ 347 10% 10 10* 

xa, a 268 10* 9% 10* 

_ 2515 12 11 12 

M 4.6 761 9* 9* 9',j 

... XI 17 16* 16% 

AO 1.8 4A»27* 21% 22% 
- 14010 7* 64k 7* 

... 3484 29* 25V. 28% 

.73 2.6 2141 77* 26% 27* 

.. 543 Wi 15* 16% 

.24 IJ lOIB'.a 17% 18* 
4004 19* 18* 19 
_ 2239 20V, 70 SO* 

_ 257 1% % V. 

_ 1411 11 11* 12* 

... 87 K'.i 31 21 

.. 19 0% 4 6 

... 447 12 11* 11* 

19 IV. 1* I* 

6 3* 3% 3* 

- 809 4* 3% 3% 

_ 76 7 6% 7 

_ 1721 7* 6% 1 

1J8 4.3 512 30 29V) 29* 

l.W 3.3 25 J4 31*31%- 

.84 14 302 24* 34 24* 

- 125 5% 44. 5 

... 175713% 72% 13* 
.15 4.a 91, 4 3* 344 

,10 2.9 1631 3* 3% 3* 

.. 6195 5* 4* 4W B ■ 

95 7\’j 7 7 

t _ 85 1214. 13V. 12% 

66 3.7 35 18 P% IB 

. 8381 II 8'.; 9* - 

_ 219 7% 6V. 7 

_ 734 14* 12 14* , 

_ 1379 t'/ 3 V„ 

._ 38 "r B '/g ,f B • 

_ 7529 23 21 V, 22* 

_ 206718% la Vi 164,- 
... 84814* 11* |4 - 

. 5C1 12 16% 16% ■ 

.171 -J 70 4V. 34, 31Vy 

_. 1387 14% 14 14 

_ 99J7 16% 14* 14% - 

- 953 S* 4% 4* . 

..21954 V7p f'. c 1* 

_ 1381 * * W- 


30«9 4* 4 4Va 

._ 7661 35W k 37* 39% 


fi’." - ,V * LCUnlpI 1J5 4J 399 28V. 38 


nme5«n 
HrneThea 
H&Swl 
Homa-M 
Hmacrp 
Ho mode 
HtmwG 
HmtwBc 
Home TB * 
< Honlnd 
HorznBk 

Horn ok 

Horand 

Hosoas 

HufKoo 

Huoot&i 

HumOen 

Hum jb 

Hvclco 

HuntBn 

Hurcs 

HulctiT 

HvolPnr 

Hvcor 

HydeAtb 

HvaeAiB 

HvdrTch 


- if.V* * Y’ lntm«C 

_ 11710 61',, 5"'.. 6* -'m I mtrrnrr 



I! 

172! It* 

14* 

15* 

— % 

imcatjl 




2813 

12 

12V. 

— * 

IrrtCbte 



1076 351, 

34 

15% 

+ % 

InDarA 

JO 

7jb 

385 ?* 

2* 

2* 

— % 

InDairB 


__ 

44 13 

17V. 

12* 


Inti mag 


_ 

552 16 

14* 

15* 

— * 

Ini Jan 

44 

1-5 

925 30'.. 

28 

30* 

-Vi 

Inltlesm 

32 

23 

69 14% 

13* 

14 


InfPlr 



4373 16* 

15* 

15* 

-* 

IntlPpsI 

.lie 2.9 

44 3* 

3* 

3* 

*% 

IntRsfi 


_ 5453 77 * 24>i 2^ u — „ LC5 

_ 2897 6*. 6% 6% — * LDDS 

_ 1004 5* 5 5% — V. LOICl 

._ 1799 IJ 1? 12% -* IlFSB, 

_ 805 B* 7* -. jLSBN 

.16 3J 233 5% 4'.J 5 _l * LSI irk 

_ 67 1% % % — ! LT> 

_ 994 4 3* 3% — 'alLVMh 

_ 1149320% 18% 20% 

_ 361 18% 1=' ; IT’a - % 

4 174, 17V. 17% -% 

_. 1405 1* 16* 1H‘ .• 1% 

_ 240 7* 7% -% 

_. 1792 S*. 5% 5% — * 

_ 401 lln IV, . I*,, ■%, 

_ 130 9% 8% 9V„ -V. 

3)8 2.6 38 J’v 3' 1 3' j 

lOe .. 5 12* 17% 12*— « .. 

_ 1719 9'/. 9 4% 

„ 817 7* 6% ’V. -% 

.. n 2* 2*'„ 24. 

_ 19 61. 5* 4% 

_ 547 9% 0* 9.-, - ■ , 

_ 57? 9% 8% f . — 1% 

_. 1384 12% 10% 11 * — 1 1 

JO 1.6 1 334 13 12% 12* — 

_ 787 7'.- 2% 7% 

_ 393510* 10% 10% — % 

_ 4771 36% 33% 36 
,01e _ 1850 7S 27% 27' . 

_ 1935 161, 14-e. 15' : ■ ' : 

JO 17 3? 18% I7% 19'. 


.. :i6 9% 8% 9% -3% (nfSemTc 
_. ID 7* 7 7* - % irnTatb 


... 142512% 12 
... 571 19* 19 

JO 1.1 5000 19 18' 


18% * '* intptue 


JX J *655 24% 70% 73 -=% mtpnl 

JOb 10 4787 27 26% 27 -% intpom 

_. 370 ?* 2'.i 2'.a —V, Intarslv 

- 3154 36V. 33 34% ln irlnis 

... 266 JH 3% 3* - Vi infuijS 


... 286 3H 3% 3*6 - Vi inftrisS 

... 119 S 4* 4* — * intvdtt 

_ 194 s* 5% S% — % Inluil 

— S* 5 S — Invcara 

- 7380 4* 31a 4% — % InvTedi 
invBnks 

IrrvTiH 

I | tomepa 

IOwoNIS 

_ 2324 1S% 13* 15% -1* 

_ 586 3 * 3 3 — % [23S. 

_ 926 6% 5* 6% - % !T?r Pn i 

1^9 8.0 164 31 2D* 21 »% ““ 

_ 2031 4% 41, 4% — '.t } g«_ . 

454 13V. 12 12* - % “TS* 

-517413 14* 5Va 8 — «V„ *^7$, 

_. 277 37, 3* 3* — % JW®? 


•-STAT 

(BAH 

ICOs 

ICOpI 

ICOS 

iCU Med 

lOBCms 

I DEC 

IderLbs 

lECEIc 

IFR 

iG Lab 


.9 1?4 8% 8* 8% 


550 2* ?". 2V, — % LeserPr 
76 :4> . =3 73 — ' . 1 LcvniT< 

318V, 18'a 18 Vi -'’"a. • Lcsrxp 
60 17'al6 17% -1 Laniers 

229 23'-. 23', 23% - I LdwrSB 
32 10% 9% 10 — 1 . LWW 

1012 7* 6* 7% - 4. LwvrTiil 

103 IB* Ift'.'i 17%— IV. Leri* 

19 16 14% IJ 1 -:— » LozerTrr 


7 ,= 

-.% L5i ina as 

lt> 

- . LVMH s .71 e 

- ' a 1— *‘E 

- "a LaJoOPn 
- ' . LaJolP wt 
1 ' « LcCrase 

- 1 . LaOOnc 27 
— LociedoSI 

- %, LaddFr .12 
-v. LodvLuck 

. . Lai A3 s 

- ; LkeSnre J? 

— LokloFl aOa 

- % Lokclnd 

*'■ LakerwSv j)6e 
LcmRs s 

- ' : LancwtT 64 

-I': Lance 96 
— 1 1 Lancii 
— % Landoir 

£_dmJ:3c f 

- V LondBnC 

LdmhCob 

... Laid*, 

■ ' : Lcnmi 
_ Lamol 

- % LanOCNc 

a LCSCrPr 

— ' . LcvttiTc 
*'*. Levies 
1 Lattice s 
1 LdwrSB 
• Lcwsn .48 


HH0II7 



40 7* 

7 

7* -% 




1 6* 

6% 

6* -% 

HBOs 







35321 

19* 

20% — * 





4* 

4% 

HD V S wtB 



13 * 

* 

* 

hEIMn 



236 5* 

4% 

5 »% 

HFFnc 

JO 

2.1 

11824 

23 

24 * V. 

HPSC 



10 4 

4 

4 — % 

HSRsc 



770 22 

IB* 

21 -2 



1291 73* 20* 21*— 1% 

Hocks 

.13 

.» 

39 15 

13* 

15 


" 277 3%' 3* 3* — % lltncBC - 2B017* 17V. 17% — % LeadrFn 

. 3225 33 31* OV> +1* ItoYokd IJ?e .6 1 23 208'. ,204 * 204'..— 2' : I LrnoCg 

2505 14* 13% 14* t Itron _ 142019V. 18* 19% -% . Leave war 

377 9% Hi 9 '6 (werks — 1336 B'-: l'-i 8% — * LsgSdi' 

- 53 6 5% 5% -Vi I Ltclec 

_ 716 8* 7% TV. —Vi I i 5 Loerooe* 

.. 1393 32* 29* 32* -2* I = 1, Lceas-d 1 

... 12 4 31*. 3Va — '/. iaeBHIt 

- 1587 7* 6V« 6% — * J&JSn _ 1069 13 12'., 12% — % LctsCn 

_ 271 8'4 7* 8 JBRst _ S» 6* a 4’ . — ■ LspGn> 

_ 918* ytu l«. 2 JGina - SI* 1* 1% .. Lesns 

_ 550 26* 25* 25* _. JLG .10 3 1166 32V. 29 jp, — LesPoi 

91 21% 21% 21 V.— I JMCGa - 

_ 223 7 AV. 6% - _S»E 

_ 519 8* 7 8 -* iSBFn 

-. 218 1W * 1% -% jabll 

- *S 2J i? JockHwi 

- 52 7* 6* TU »% jarneiec 

19» I* -% jaSa, 


- *. JGina 
. - JLG 
-I JMCGp 
- JPE 
-* JSSFn 


_ 1069 13 I2'.i 12% — % LctsCn 

_ S99 A* 6 4’ « — ■ . Leo'3iT> 

- SI* 1* I* .. Lesns 

.10 3 1166 32V. 29 Jp, — •; Lev Pat 

.07 1 ._ 496 3* J% 3’ . - 1 LevelOn s 

_ 69 11% |! 11 — I Le«inHS 

A4 2J> 1120 24* 24 % 24% - % LDtvBc 

326 6V. 6 6' i . LibBcO: 

_ 3411% 10% 10*1—1% LblvHA 

_ 36 8% B* 8* - v. Lib/AedA 

JO 3-5 34 14'.., 13V. 14V. LtatvNB 

_ 239 13/, 12* 12* _. LtortvTc 


10 15 8 6* 6% 6* - % 

-.26894 19', 17* 18V. — 1 

16 32 45 5* 5 5 — * 

_ 1=86 IS* IS IS — V. 

.4= =J SS 20 18 19% -1% 

JJS 5 405 10* 10 10* — * 

_ 24SI 2* 2* 2* -v B 

.71 e 2.3 192 31% 30* 31% — * 

... 46 11% II 11* +% 

_ 4977 5* 5* 5* 

_. 2730 I * * 

_ 109 14% IJ'/i 14V. -V, 

27 3.5 =31 21% 20* J0% — * 

-. 102 16 15V. 1SV, - V. 

.12 1 A *168 9 8% 8* — % 

_ 1446 0% 7% 7% 

_. 1627 6% 6 6* 

J? IJ 267 31% 30* 31% -% 

aOa 3J 21211* 174. 18% »1 
_ J« 4* 4 4V. -V. 

J6e 4 282 1 5 s . 15 15% _ 

...20681 31* 27 * 30* -2* 
64 1.4 2060 47' V 45* 47'.. - * 

96 5J 1085 18% 18 18* -'1 

_ 555 12% 11% 12% 

- 31 19% 19 19 —A. 

f _ J 74 1 4% /* - 1 

_ 3993 11% 10% 11* - ', 

_ 4067 34' : 30% 31*— 2% 

.. 1 7 3S 22 . 21 21% — I. 

_ IIJDJT 25% 25', — 1, 
_. 2996 7* a A* — % 

_ 267 8 7* T.’t, 

_ 466 4% 4% 4' . — * 

- 5497 10 9% 9", -* 

_ 754 r. 5% 5* - 1. 

-10726 19", 17'« 19% - IV. 
_ 344 SV, 41, 4* — % 

.48 :.l 1042 23% 22* 22% — * 
.12 .1 2487 12* 11% 12A. -% 

_ 1277 6* 6 6* -V. 

_ 752 «* 8 8 

_ 1541251. 75* 25* • 

- 3240 151. 14 V. 15* -1 

_ 249 11% 1C* 10* — * 

534 9% 8' 1 9% -% 
J2i SJ 31 9% 9 9Vr 

- 3429 131. 11* 121. -% 

_. 1979 IP, 10* 11’ -I -* 

..19487 33 29% 32* -2* 

_. 48 5* 5% 5% 

.. 125 % V. * -% 

.07 J *718 16’ 1 15% Id* - 
571 S.l 201512 TO". 11V. — * 
_ 2865 18* 17* 18% — * 
r4B 3.0 643 16V. 16 lA'.k — ' 

.600 IA SKI 24* 23* 24* - % 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


FRENCH RIVIERA 


••-vm’;#!/ ie-1 






Err 



J0 246 2B4J 3% 2* 3V. — * JoCorCin _ 239 13'/, 12* 12* _. Ubrtvl 

, „ Jamesnin .129 1.6 B34 TV. 7% TVs — * Lida 

1-40 6-7 392 20* 20 20* _ Jasmine _ 289 2* 1* 2* _ Lklr* 


LibBcOK A0 a 1.9 176 31 30% 31 

LblvH A 21 II 20 9* 9% 9* 

Ub7/iedA . 5665 22* 70 22% 

LtatvNB 78a !,6 2541 30% 27% 30 

LArlvTc . 184 7* 7 7 

Lido _ 259 3* 2% 2% 

Lida* -11735 TV* 2% 2% 


(Lc. ]7&lin_B0rfi 



The key to a US $40 billion market... 

Europe’s leading 
business magazine for 
the computer industry 

On the eve of the Software Publishers Association Europe’s - f , 

Fifth Annual Conference in Cannes, European Computer ^ (MipitfP* ^ 

Sources would like to stress the importance of software tm 

in the computer industry. 

In today’s fast-changing software industry, the SPA 
Europe conference is a vital opportunity for leading ?§£?■ 

software executives to discuss the dangers and 
opportunities in the industry today, and share their 
vision of the future. nllE ^ ; 

European Computer Sources (the only tri-lingua!, ^ ^ ^ --v S’ » 

pan-European reseller business magazine) would also : gg 

like to highlight the importance of having resellers who are ****•'* 
knowledgeable about software solutions. (Our readers, what the computer industry 
calls “resellers", are the retailers, distributors and systems/software houses that bring software 
solutions to businesses). 

We would like to thank these software companies below for their support to resellers: 


am 





SJFTTiTliffi 


Mametiond KenM Trifaura a 
bedr®, For a yooog mi Mhuabc 
t d amo rte fc i to fan S CWifld Ad«er- 
tamg taleoiorkrkng taorn in Fora. 

Y« should how a proven trad record 
*i Wunuliil i m mi be able torts* 
new badness a wefl os odd to iha 
Mang ao« ban. 

Engfah tarther tongue and Rueoi French 
raquirad, rafcrg papers essertd. 


*wohd cup Tiasn* 

Al gemes crtaioble. W (310j Z77-47B8; IfOLTOAY RENTALS 
Faw piO) 277-5528 UAA 

FRENCH 



Database Software 


CaIhNet 


Optical Character Recognition 


[ALADDIN 


KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS LTD 


Accounting Software 


TrainingProductivity 

9 « s 

*°ORNETIX 

Networking Sotware 


EliaShim 

mMcmmnnsLn 

Software Security 


BETTER ON-UXE SOLUTIOM 

Networking Software 


F orward 

D iMlrilMition 


Software Distribution 


Multi-language 

word-processing 


C 

TECHNOLOGY 

OCR Software 


CHATEAU H GASCOGNE, June tol 0OE0N t na vww of 
Ott 4 bedrooms + 2 and 2 baifo . 1 999 - vww * 

Tel 1-47 22 63 1Z Fa* 1-46 40 08 B9 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 




Pubtlib your business 




COMPANIES £195 

tod kzt-amlanca veKdet 
tow proBe, tax free & European Swf- 
oUt for taxing, coroukancy & other 
odivifa. far enwedk i l e nrvue wrtoO; 

BU Murphy, Dnctur, Sovwwgn 
Cookprxiy S nrim, 56 Htnuntliaa 
Sguare, Ouilfa Z Irafatod 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


$AVE ON 
International 
Phone Calls 

Now you car cal the 

US aid saw a> much oe 


aid ow ed surcharges. 
AvofluUo vi al DMiriv. 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REM ESTATE 
AGBIT M PAJUS 
Tel: (1)47.20.30.05 




6 53 96 or “-47 Q 61 


EUBSESgrra 


P!*;, 

t >«:•-' 5523 2 \ >' iTr> 

i.it 


14353 4596 


l£GAL SERVICES 


— »-.e,>^e »kk- 


Networking software 



m s 


Accounting Software 


RECOGNITA 


Security Software 


Optical Character Recognition 


Computer Sources 

Bringing software solutions 
to Europe’s resellers 


For more information on the above software companies or the 
pan-European marketing opportunities available in European Computer 
Sources (three simultaneous language editions: German, French, English), 
please contact Bob Snyder at our European headquarters: 

Hoomzeelstraat 21 a, 3080 Tervuren, Belgium 
Tel: 32-2-767-6004 Fax: 32-2-768-0084 


C05HOREGOMPAMES 

* Free profenrond coradtotiem 

* Worth** KOHrofnira 

* banetto u w rtM ly 
•Fdla>Ma*dierviea 

* London leuuentaliK 

* RJ uduwMn dM n MraflB 

ASTON C08PQGATC TRUSTBS UD 
19, Pwl Rood, DogM Isle * 4tar 
Tat 0624 626591^*0624 625126 


YOUR OfflCEM PARIS 

k raadr ethee you need % 

fwr far a couple of hours. 

• Fyfcr fundati madam office 

ml conference rooms to rant by the 
hour, day. etc — 

• Your to oi e rf or permanent bata 

• prdigf fflaAto ad*«B. Al MtvtoH 

BBi 

91. fe SMfBHHV 7S008 PAMS 

Tel (1) A7UW6. Fa* {1| 4Z66.15A0 


Tel: 1 / 206 - 284-8600 
Fax: 1 / 206 - 282-6666 

417 Second Avenue West 
Seaile. WA 98119 USA 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


CONFIRMABLE DRAFTS 
, SACKED BY CASH 

■ fated vi Taer Name 

• Ccafaecd by Moor be! Bank 
to Prove AvaUwiy of Fords 

• Boded by FtmVe tonetan 

CAPTTAL SUPHXT COUP. 

US. (714) 757-1070 Fax 757-1270 


iteralbjag^^ribiin^ 

PLANNING TO RUN 
,, A CLASSIHED 

SsfK afi?Sisias- “ntac your 

You will be ML 

on« payment » mode your od 

48 hours. All major O JtCaJi Acc^ld' Wrthm 


EUROPE 

KlRSnft 

swnzawciPUL 

UWOra^GDOhtlaidm, 

Tax; (07 1 1 2402254. 


NOEWAMBW 

tEWYOOt 

Si®- 

fw PI 2J 755-8785 

£?A/PA®C 

sS®"” 

T eL 223 6478. 
fcjc (65)224 15 66. 

Wm 28749 9fT5B^. 


tf Cl if: 


















































■ a 

n*~. ;* 

$ 

: : "i \o'* 

S:i 

.A? rig 5 > 

Sli 

. ‘ ~ ■ -M * 

'Ss*V* 

r.' - :. !® .? 

; alWA 

:£ U:| 

#a 

: r^t 


■ -p^'* 

m 

V S-4 

.:. • cjs 3 

ft ■$ 

p ; i 

m 

:; r l-l t 

is 5 

-r.Vi-i .i 
. - ■ ^ “ 


\?>i * : 


• -i- r ! 


, *. ;■ - 


SHO RT cover Saudi Economy Fine, Privatizations Coming, King Fahd Says 

Slam d/iw, Ti — j — mrr »» m Afenrr France- Press? : j# ■ ..... * 


on EU Beef 

weekend il would raise its N**Cbmmera: Ministry said over the 

c°«mnes to 46 percent Eu . r 0 P can Union 

. ™f. “H? 1 * on Saturday f ? f ji] ? ed dumping, 

investigation into allcgaiio^Li ^ goVCT7mKIIt an 

had been subsidized 2nd sold Ifc? horn European Union countries 
The investigation followed a a i,^ low "“d** prices. 

Cattie Confederation in wh;„i, c ® m Pkini [filed by the Mexican National 


S?-«s 


d us tries. 


overseas assets and had been forced to deficit in 1993. 


iRRS aeanut Saudi Arabia S economy. ' After rhs rmnm aArv.nri^t ihi> k;.' c .. >k.. ci? k . k-, i.. irvm . .. ° 


analvsts said. 


tattle Confederation In whSTiiaSSf c l!ed by lhe Mcxican National ff®J13 u^L^fiSr ea ? rlo - m ‘ V '' . Af ** r .J ,e fepons appeared the Interna- bias total debt at more dun S17 hiiiicu. a boom of the eartv 5980s. but three savings 

*bs» }^is?sttJ2££ss* rsL *» **«* m-~ *“ ». *»» «* >» t* » »«**£ £ 


reused by the Mexican Naiinn*i r .v#? "? Mexjco - u - s - companies 
Moofon Lnc^ H&H Foods P? 1 >e Confederation are Excel Carp., 
MB International Core a r S'\ A f pba ?*“■ International Iuc„ IBP Inc., 

Taas **• ^ uSt/S SM, ■Sb.E’S! * » - 


It's never been easier 
b sfaa oe and saw. 
Just coll ipH-fny 
0800 1 753B 


iraas me., bun Land Beef Cn ~ U3CU « <* TE v r tf T' T „„ „ , ,, , _ , ^ rminr 

Aiiso^sDs. ^ c ^gma Aiimemos international inc. JJfcil J. : / Wont Let Them Railroad Me, Trader Says 1KADE: 

PARIS t, AjSUDCu r olls C o n ti n u e d from Page 13 His defenders say he developed a ors. His lawyers refused to discuss ToifiS L 


faiJcd C ^ l v C S Ule d iaunchin S 01 *»* wlelli,es by 
ann failed to dhragagj^^y^^y rr,0nuo 6 **** a mechanical 

IM^e t !^nia^ S alfd ^nr-'r^ 1 ? 3 . Ihrcc Wlcllj, ». wo for the British 
mimicatio^S^SL r In dsau a 8 * ob4j consortium of telecom- 

fOT tS^SratiSTalid bSad^Mi salcUilcs ® orbil by 1 999 
the island state said Sui? purposes, a newspaper report m 

Polish Steelworkers Press Demands 

wori&^ta ^ rkCTS 31 pD,and ’ s biggest stecl- 

S?nor meei ay ^ manasemenl ■“ il 


His defenders say he developed 


be portrayed himsdf as a driven, hi « M * P rofiu “ e maB5 ^ '“‘“S “•»“« » ( **■ *“'• ade «f 

, . . . . mvefflmfni hnnric while cniics the Story. 


S ™w M n J«iT n government bonds, while critics the story. 

Iieht a fim tmderaTiLkliis^r irariine contend that the snaiqy was a cou>- ■'There is a lot more here than 

department, who made enemies aslr 3 Higem for covering meets the eye and has already been 

aSiP anri “P a WTelc hed trading record that disclosed publicly.” said Lewis 

uo^uac ire Good government bond traders. By the tune Kidder stopped the 

TJ- :_i. ,.f... .. t former traders said, usually have trades in April and summoned Mr. 

reMMucs of S10 millionlo S30 jnill- J«l U. a m«ta S wiri. ,op eaacu- 


ion a year. But in 1993. Mr. Jett's lives where he was questioned, 
Co. Mr. prorusbegan exceediDg $10 million f.bout^50 billion m allegedly fieri- 

ttT a month. Mr. Jett had invemed a nous trades was still on the compa- 


leagucs and'suparviso^by nulling Mr. Jen had invemed a lions trades was still on the compa- 

Siandb^TSrffortmfit SSSSfh nys 1 

in with other traders. After less than c 01501 ^ “at nirned a modest mon- Early in the week of April 11, 


two years, he was laid off. 

When be landed a second job at 


nse and jo percent monthly bonus demanded by the strikers. 

Bolivia Opens Up Its Metal Deposits 


ne was careful to present a new 
persona. “1 fell I simply could not 
allow a personality." ne said. “I 
became vary dry. My God, did I 


ey maker into a powerful money Kidder alerted John F. Wdch Jr.! 
^.hinc. the GE chairman, that the problem 

Mr. Jett refused to comment on could affect Kidder's bottom line, 
ius technique. People familiar with At that point, Kidder contacted 
his trading, however, say he was the SEC and New York Stock Ex- 

- — - change, alerting its regulators that 

it expected a major loss of capital. 


^ DOUVia - « WWW. has invited private- 
arfor fads to explore 15 million acres (1 million hectares) of land 

,*“? “™» mainly in the southern department of Potosi, site of Bolivia's 
commat-era silver mines, contains deposits of gold, silver, zinc, antimony, 
bismuth, iron and lead. 

3DO Shares Jump After Cash Inflow 

REDWOOD CITY, California (Bloomberg) — Shares of 3 DO Co. 
rose almost 17 poceni on Friday after the multimedia technology 
company got an infusion of capital 

Dismal safes of its video-game system had put 3 DO in a cash squeeze. 
Now, three n ew A aan partners and more money from all but one of its 
early backos pumped 837 million into 3DO. Only AT&T Corp. did not 
sweeten its stake, .though an AT&T spokesman said it may do so. 

New investors include Korea’s Gold Star Instrument & Electric Co.: 
-Singapore’s -Creative Technology LtdL, which last month signed a tech- 
nology affiance with 3 DO; and Creative’s chairman and chief executive, 
Sim WMig Hoo. ; ; 

3DO smd it sold about 2.98 million common shares at $12,375 each. 
3DO stock closed at 515:50, up $225, on Friday. 

Diplomatic Way Out for Schneider? 

BONN (Reuters) — JOrgen Schneider, the fugitive German real-estate 
tycoon, may have fled Germany with a diplomatic passport, the news 
m a gaz i n e Focus says in an article to be published Monday. The magazine 
cited information gathered by the Federal Crime Agency. 

Mr. Sdmader, who disappeared in April with Ms wife; C laudia. 
leaving^ billion' marks ($3 billion) in bank debts, is under investigation 
for falsification of documents ana possible tax evasion. 

Basfagjts report.po a memo Mr. Schneider wrote to an associate before 
Ms.duuppearanc^ Focus said he had arrarmed for monw to be transferred 
to banks in Switzerland and Britain. It added that Mr. Schneider also had 
millions of m a rk s in Austrian accounts and thai he had tried to sdl one of 
his buddings to the suhan of Brunei for 80Qnaffion marks before Ms flight 


Former colleagues at CS First 
Boston said Mr. Jett was dismissed 
in early 1991 partly for poor perfor- 
mance and partly for inflating his 
resume; including overstating his 
experience at Morgan Stanley. But 
Mr. Jett says he was let go after the 
firm discovered he was looking for 
work at Kidder. 

Mr. Jett said be had a “hand- 


Mr. Jett dashed 
with Kidder’s sales 
force in his 
efforts to make 
government 
bonds a priority. 


On Thursday. April 14, Mr. Jett 
was summoned to me meeting with 
Mr. Cerullo and other top Kidder 
executives. He denied that he had 
done anything wrong, offering var- 
ious explanations. At the end of the 
meeting, he walked out the door of 
Kidder for what was probably the 
last time. 

On Sunday, April 17, Mr. Cer- 
ullo sent Mr. Jett a cun letter tell- 


Tatks Bog Down 

Continued {ram Page 13 

its needs, while other Group of Sev- 
en industrialized nations imported 
an average of 25 percent, according 
to U.S. figures. 

Negotiations on telecommunica- 
tions market ac cess are one of five 
areas earmarked for special consid- 
eration in the so-called framework 
talks. The other areas are insur- 
ance, medical technology, intellec- 
tual property rights, and automo- 
biles and auto pans. 

The telecommunications iall« 
have previously been bogged down 
by disagreements over whether or 
oot procurements by Nippon Tele- 
graph & Telephone Corp. should 
be treated as government procure- 
ments. NTT, a former government ' 
monopoly, has been partly priva- 
tized: but two-thirds of its out- 
standing shares are still held by the 
Finance Ministry. 

Regarding the trade imbalance, 
Mr. Kan tor said that instead of aim- 
ing for a specific reduction in the 
Uik-Japan trade deficit, now about 
860 billion a year, .America would 


It’s rare to find 
a tax- free haven 
with guaranteed 
growth 


NO WONDER SO MANY INVESTORS KEEP 

SWISS PLUS PRIVATE. 

■ Multi -currency annuity investment with 
favourable fixed rate of interest 

■ Guaranteed grow th, with no tax or redemption 
fees to pay 

■ E\tra annual dividends to boost your investment 

■ The opportunity to take advantage of strong 
currency exchange rates 

■ Access to all or part of your capital whenever you 
need it 

■ All the privacy of a Swiss investment account 


Reply today and recieve a FREE subscription to 
JML's Money & More. 


shake agreement” to join Kidder in executing a high volume of iransac- Later that evening, GE issued a 
early 1991, but that (he deal fell Dons, called forwards — nothing press release saying that it would 
apart after be lost his job a l First more than instructions to the back have to reduce its after-tax earnings 
Boston. Six months later, in June, office to get securities ready for by $210 million because Mr. Jen 
Mr. Jeu landed a job as a bond settlement for a particular day — had inflated his trading profits, 
trader on Kidder’s government and recording the anticipated can- Kidder also froze the $8 million 


ing him that he had been dismissed, emphasize Mr. Clinton’s efforts to 
Later that evening, GE issued a increase exports in key industries. 


desk. Bui within six months, Mr. fags as current profits. 

Jett said, he was in danger of failing He apparently started small. In 
again and losing what be const d- May 1993, Mr. Jett was trading 
ered “the dream job.” about S3 billion a month, not an 


that Mr. Jen had left behind in 
three pemonal accounts at the firm. 
Despite Ms fears, the former Kid- 


ered “the dream job.” about S3 billion a month, not an der trader can stfll focus on funny 

Despite a regimen of 12-bour unusual amount for government moments in the bizarre twist that his 
days and much Study at home after bonds, a person familiar with the life’s plot has taken. For example, 
hours, Mr. Jeu received a warning Kidder investigations said. Mr. Jett recalled the media reaction 


in December that he would have to 
become more profitable or face dis- 
missal, according to two people fa- apparently had earned profits of “That Monday I woke up in a 
miliar with his record. more than $200 million for the daze,” be said ”1 got dressed in a 

His boons that year was $5,000, a .year. He was paid a $9 million suit as if 1 was going to work. When 
pittance by Wall Street standards bonus and given a coveted chair- 1 got downstairs and opened the 
and practically an invitation to man’s award. door,” Mr. Jett said, stepping back 

start looking for work elsewhere. In the first few months of 1994, and imitating a man in the glare of 
- At the time, Mr. Jell was living in as Mr. Jett’s trading volume in- sudden lights, “there was a network 
a 400-square-foot (36-square-me- creased, the computer system had television crew. “And you know 
la), $700-a-mmUh apartment. To difficulty keeping up. a person fa- what?” he said, laughing. “They let 
punish Mmsetf for Ms failure at CS miliar with (he Kidder investiga- me walk right by. At that point the 
First Boston and poor work at Kid- tion said. media didn’t know 1 was black. So 

der, be deprived himself, he said, of Kidder’s computer specialists they let me walk right by.” 

“every. •comfort’* Mr! Jett said he were stunned when they saw the 

got nd of Ms furnrtnre and began scale of Mr. Jett’s ostensible trades 

sleeping mi lhe flow. and noticed that none of the trades . 


r investigations said. Mr. Jett recalled the media reaction 

the end of 1993. Mr. Jett’s a day after Kidder accused him of 
g had soared and his system making phantom trades, 
rally had earned profits of “That Monday I woke up in a 


LONDON (Bloomberg) — British Airport Au thorities PLC will invest 
£20 mhlioa (S30 tmIBon) in theme park attractions at Gatwick Airport, 
Britain’s second-largest airport, lhe Observer newspaper said. 

BAA win extend the south terminal by I00JX)0 square feel (9,000 
square mdos) to accommodate virtual-reality games and flight simula- 
tors. Last year, $00,000. people visited Gatwick airport u> watch planes 
arrive and depart, in addition to the 20 miffion passengers who passed 
through the facility, the newspaper said. . 


MAILED FROM AMERICA 


Pot the History of Che World on Your Computer with— 

CENTENNIA »■ 


He said the absolute size of the 
U-S.-Japan deficit, was “less im- 
portant" than the “content of the 
deficit." 

(AFP, Bloomberg, LATi 


Taiwan Edgy on China Trade 

. Reuters 

TAIPEI — Government officials 
will be “laden with anxieties" when 
China and Hong Kong replace the 
United Slates as Taiwan’s largest 
export market after the colony re- 
verts to Chinese rule in 1997, a Tai- 
wanese negotiator with China said. 
Trade between Taiwan and China, 
including Hong Kong, after 1997 is 
expected to acooum for over 30 per- 
cent of the Taiwan's overall trade, 
Lhe Independence Morning Post on 
Sunday quoted Shih Chi-ping, dep- 
uty secnaary-general of the Straits 
Exchange Foundation, as saying. 


Published 4 times a year, this 
informative newsletter keeps you 
up to date on topics of interest for 
the international investor, Swiss 
and European views of world 
events and abreast of new 
investment opportunities / . » 

in Switzerland. *S£: 






0 YES, lam intended in learning more abuu l Swiss Plus. 
Please send me a FREE informatiiMi pack immediately. 


DATT OP BIRTH. 


| (MLlurgM Laitamm AG. 

I STATE— Swiss Investment CuuasrCon, 

CcnnzuiimrK. A 

arccoe/ smzu»*.w«*TVtt*i i v< i 

POSTCODE FaKCH(-niZurtdi|ll3MW4 J I L. 


sleeping cm (he flow. and noticed that none of the trades 

In 1992, Ms fortunes suddenly ever led to any actual securities 
improved. He not only made lots of c han g ing bands, two people famil- 
money trading, but he attracted the far with the events said, 
attention of Edward CernUo, the If the trades were never coosuro- 


money trading, but he attracted the far with the events said, 
attention of Edward CernUo, the If the trades were never coos lira- 

powerful head of fixed-income mated, where had the hundreds of 
trading at Kidder. That year, Mr. mUlions in profits Mr. Jett had 


Jett took home a S2 million bonus. 
By March 1993, Mr. Jett had 


booked cook from? 

As the computer people were 


become such a big star that Mr. joined by accountants, Mr. Cerullo 
CeruBo decided to hand him the and other top executives, the alarm 
government trading desk, where he grew. Mr. Jett's profits bad been 
suddenly had enormous authority booked but the underlying trades 


government trading desk, where he 
suddenly had enormous authority 
and 32 people reporting to him. were apparently never completed. 

‘T was asked to remake the gov- Two or three days before a trade 
eminent desk,” he said u It re- was to be finalized. Mr. Jett alleg- 
quired doing things (hat were emo- edly rolled the trades over but kept 
tionally hard for people to do.” the profits on the books, the person 

Mr. Jett said he dismissed four familiar with the investigation said, 
people and clashed often with Kid- As his phantom profits accumulat- 
aers sales face in Ms efforts to ed, Mr. Jett allegedly executed larg- 
makc government bonds a high pri- er and larger trades to keep the 
ority. People familiar with toe in- scheme afloat, the person said. He 


:’s profits had been 


A detailed, ta nn grj pt u c guide » the 1 unutf of 
Europe and die Sfiddle East firom thcyesrlOOOAD 
id the present (wifli frequent updates). C onm nat 
rntfaevobtedynoirienlfy. Watch flic me and fall of 
a dre^ cimuij aiftpai lhe medical D j pjiiitin i . lo the 
mode™ Soviet Fnxo Nomtmndy ro Bosnia B3 

ty win^, Ceafjt pUB wiaft h c adBua « h«- 
toricalpenpectireliidiidesiIriaSedtestoqjbm- 
we*i®aethesoceuTai'M«^ A __ AdiSkrwBMm*4 

pbce^jud crods se- Baked duvcdyntheuapB. $89 
For BM PCgeodoac p itfofa with EGA or VGA ^ 

graphics (fennert? m arta cd as 'MBJeaeiiini'). Qodnrodt Softwau 


ority. People familiar with toe in- scheme afloat, the person said. He 
vestigation into Ms trades, bowev- also used numerous trading varia- 
er, said that be also stepped up the lions to make his accounting ma- 
unusual trading strategy that neuvers look like real trades, 
would ultimately halt his rapid rise. Tbe allegations contrast sharply 


Special issue of 12 gold and silver collector’s coins. 

“ La Liberie retrouvee '' -A limited edition. 

There are some voices that resonate 

LONG AFTER THEY’VE FINISHED SPEAKING. 


(312)281-3132 Fax:(312)327-6012 


Clockwork Software 
P.O. Box 148036 
Chicago, IL 60614 USA 


unusual trading strategy that neuvers look like real trades, 
would ultimately halt his rapid rise. .The allegations contrast sharply 

Descriptions of what Mr. Jett’s with defense theories that portray 
defenders say he did are diametri- Mr- Jett as someone who impte- 
caffy oppposed to what Kidder and meoted sophisticated, highly lucra- 
outsde investigates^ say they have five trading techniques with the 
found. knowledge of profit-hungry superi- 


CIRREXCVAM) CAPITAL M-VKKLT SERMCES 



.•VaJli 


Currency Management corporation Pic. 
Viucbster Bouse, 77 London Wall - London EC2M 5ND 
TeL: 071-38Z 9745 fax: 071-382 94S7 . 


FOREIGN' EXCHANGE 


^ Hour ixmdoo Dealing Desk 
Competitive Kates & Daily Fax Sheet 
for further information & brochure 


O I30f software applications ° 
O RT DATA FROM-Sl 0 A DAY O 
€» Signal SOFTWARE GUIDE O 
Cal London: C44+. (0) 71 231 3556 
fbryourgukfo and StjyraJ price BsL 



Duff Forecasts and Market Myths for 1994 

i,!l T?c v.'H! s«c r ‘ ddloHcn Will continue, gold •> racst corrmcaties 
* stock market w,i: Do weak Vou tfa 

hot * 0 d mat in ful&Money ■ lhe !conoc!csl;c ir.v«tm*ni •c-tV 

r r , KVa P*::!.pi tof a se»wp!» r --' ;r ' ' 0!,c0 r- ;y / - a 

'■'.v . . ri2cP v."a ;v-.j b< -.r- 

, O ..00 • • = v, 71 . 43 . 945 *^ - 


LONDON & GLOBAL 
FOREIGN EXCHANGE PLC 

PREMIER SPECULATION SERVICE 
QUOTE UP TO 100 MILLION USS 
Top Root. Comeo Home, 1 J Bear Sheet. London WC2H 7AS 
Tel.: ( 071 ) 839 6161 Fax: ( 071 } 839 2414 


RifureSource The- real-time information 
**“***^^^^"a* preferred by Institutions and now 
available to traders al home. Unrivaled coverage at an unrivaled 
price. Futures • Options • FX * Energy • Commodities • Metals • 
News • Full Charting S Technical Anclysis from our Worldwide 
coverage - available via Satellite through Europe. 

Call FufurcSaurce Tel.: +44 71-867 8867 Fax: +44 71-481 3042 

•FOREX -METALS 'BONDS /SOFTS 

Objective analysis for professional investors 

(44) 962 879764 

Fiennes House. 32 Southgate Street. Winchester. 
Hants S023 SEH UK Fax (44) 424-774067. 


?v| '• 4, 




A REUTERS 1000 r77i 

w 24 horns & day - only $1Q0 amonthf rVj 

A [jyEEMiWKlft 1 naTADBECTTOYOWPC ^liiiig^ 

. L_ 

Fhr rTK>re lnftTf T 7»atTnn _ Fax^*46 458L«TO. 

Margined Foreign 
|^B I Exchange Trading 

Past Competitive Quotes 24 Hours 
’ TeJ . + 44 71 815 0400' 
MEMBER SFA Fax: + 4471329 3919 


Tenely, spedSc, proven mer- 
tetmi 0 ls*cfeforBrfcty, 
before the markets open 

~ . ^.ZT FINANCIAL TBADEBS.Lro. 

FieBSBGBBfOraFHBECOpy looser Avenue 

Of the market letter of your ^Buppauge. NY 1179$. USA 
/ ^ v , Tel: 516-435-4300 

cnac& Fax: 516-435-4897 




ill : I in- I'.iii' r, 

nn.li!u i..:,.n . 


>: ! U) lo : ;; 




(.« U<Sl ’ «Birt.' VmwrfJrll Ua— « W tniw.Sf. ini ill Jr kjmfa It 


For further details an bow to placeyour listing contact PATRICK FALCONER in London 
TeL (44) 71 836 48 02 -Fax: (44) 71 240 2254 




Vi 




The art of remembrance. 






mm 




;naie de Pa his 


i.»! nr. -f >IV({ 


/lift tJUirnniin I **r\- #V m. Ua/irn/V ini': WiuiVVJ Bu Itobv*, V'viTjMt Jiun/ Bn&Uir Hr VnurOmma, Xaiftiml JrhwrlMmnftrmna tit Hmww Uutr^\iOfUvmin 

■mi I 'M'MLnn B«Aw< r: R*nt m Far, fir ».W5. .VainJr Ui*.- tjrfcwl .« Jr hi librnr. Ju hpw IWl. drUaallr 4demanf]'*t>3. Collection available in J. Oar tll-rnin rases. 


P n 5 ifiA S S-JJ-S. 9-^ £ 8.«3 ^-^VrK-S-Pj^ 6 £,g .!=-9 3£ 






c 

. I 
litl 
cur 
fin 
trir 
trai 

1 

1.6 
l A 
60 ' 


sic 

5.6 

Sw 


IS 


ro f 

tra 

bai 

at 

Sie 

ba 

iht 

do 

lev 

iri; 

de 


1 


ro 

pi 


kt 

Ei 

cl. 


gr 

fit 

fo 


ec 

ar 

w. 

1C 

ar 

ie 

m 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. JUINE 6. 1994 



On 
G t 
Gt 
Oe 
&. 



3y Stephanie Strom 

,V<w York Times Service 


Gill 

Oa 

MO 

Go 

■3<B 

Go 

da 

or 

CHr 

&k 

Go 

Ce> 

>3n 

Ge- 

C-- 

Go 

On 

Go 

'JO 

Go 

<3n 

Gn 

G* 

Go 

&.■ 

Gc 

CA 

Gc 


NEW YORK — A wave of 
shareholder opposition swept away 
Kmart Corp.'s plan io raise S60G 
million 10 $900 million bv issuing 
Mock tied to the performance of its 
specialty stores. 

The defeat was an embarrassing 
setback for Smart's management, 
which has been under increasing 
pressure from shareholders unhap- 
py with its inability to rejuvenate 
the company's flagship discount 
store business. 


The opposition's victory late Fri- 
day took the company and even the 
leaders or the dissident sharehold- 
ers by surprise and came in .'•■pile of 
Kraart's last-ditch efforts to get out 
the vote by extending the deadline 
for balloting by eight hours. 

“1 think all the people who 
worked on this are stunned Lhat the 
company couldn't get the votes it 
needed” said Michael R. Zucker. 
director of the Amalgamated 
Cloihing and Textile Workers 
Union’s office or corporate and fi- 
nancial affairs. The union owns a 
small number of Kmart shares. 


Tne dissident shareholders, led by 
James Severance, executive vice 
president of the Slate of Wisconsin 
Investment Board, have argued that 
Kmart should spin its specially 
stores off completely so that marn 
agemeru can focus its attention on 


reviving the chain of discount stores. 

The proposal, which would have 
offered the public the opportunity 
to buy stock that reflected the per- 
formance of K mart's specialty 
store units, received the support of 
61 percent of the shares voted. But 
under Michigan law. it needed the 
approval of more than half of the 
416 minion shares outstanding 
The meeting was held in Troy. 
Michigan, where Kmart is based. 

Joseph E. Anton ini. the chairman 
of Kman. who had personally lob- 
bied hard on behair of the proposal, 
said the company was disappointed 
in the outcome. He noted that the 
proposal was defeated in large part 
because 27.8 percent of the shares 
outstanding were not voted despite 
a last-minute scramble to win addi- 
tional votes by Knurl's proxy solici- 
tor, Georgeson & Co. 

Mr. Antonini said management 
and the board would begin assess- 
ing alternatives to unlock the value 
of its specially store units — its 
office and building supply chains, 
as well as its book and sporting 
goods chains — whose perfor- 
mance and growth prospects are 
overshadowed by Knurl's flagging 
discount store business. 

“f think it may be a blessing in 
disguise because it tells manege- 
men i that ils strategies are being 
questioned in a strong enough 
voice to smack them in the fact" 
said Thomas H. Tashjian. a retail 
analvst at the First Manhattan Co. 


Shares finished the week buoy- 
ant in busy trading, with the main 
AEX index up 3.34 points, at 
403.08. despite lack of a clear fore- 
cast for the coming sessions. 

KLM finished down despite re- 
leasing good 1993-94 results on 
Thursday. 

ING pushed ahead 2 percent af- 
ter first-quarter results above ana- 
lysts' expectations. 


Frankfurt 


Shares moved ahead slightly last 
week, but the market still showed 
signs of nervousness over uncertain 
trends on bond markets. 

The DAY index of 30 leading 
issues ended at at 2.148.39 points, 
up 0.34 percent for the week, but it 
failed to pull back any more .if me 
4.S3 percent it lost a week earlier. 

Most of the gain came Friday a* 
dealers spoke tentatively of recent 
share falls in Frankfurt coming to 
an end. 

Commerzbank said it viewed 
earlier falls as exaggerated but be- 
lieved markets would see only 
small gains during coming sessi^n^ 
in view of persisting uncertainty. 
The bank ako forecast the DA\ 
would soon hit the 2.350 mark on 
the back of expected stronger com- 
pany reports. 

BMW lost 40 Deutsche marks 
|S24) to close at *23. 

The bind market was depressed 
as uncertainty over U.S. interest 
rates continued. 


liengKong 

Prices tumbled 2.5 percent dur- 
ing the week in volatile trading with 
the blue-chip Hang Seng Index los- 
ing 235.36 points, to close the 
week's trading at 9.234.27. 

Average daily turnover shrank to 
3.929 billion Hong Kong dollars 
15504 million), compared with the 
previous week's 6.96’billion dollars. 

Mom leading blue-chips lost 
ground, including Hongkong Bank, 
down 4 dollars "at S5.50 dollars; 
Jardine Matheson. down 2.50 dol- 
lars at 59.50 dollars; Hong Kong 
Land, down 60 cents at 21.90 dol- 
lars. and Cheung Kong, down 50 
cents at 37.75 dollars. 


Eurotunnel rose 4 pence to 363 
pence after dropping on Thursday 
as it launched its rights issue. 


Milan 


iGTldoil 


The Financial timcs-Stock Ex- 
change 100 index of leading shares 
closed on Friday at 2.997.3 points, 
showing a weekly gain of 31.4. or’l 
percent, after encouragement from 
the futures market. 

On Wednesday, the index closed 
at 2.931.9. the lowest level for six 
months. 

Inflationary fears were height- 
ened by a recent study by British 
purchasing managers pointing to a 
shortage of raw materials, pushing 
prices upwards in May for the sixth 
consecutive month. 

Shares in Euro Disney, which on 
Thursday announced that Saudi 
Prince Waiid ibn TalaJ ibn Abduia- 
zi^ would buy from 1? percent to 24 
percent of its capital, rose by 20.25 
pence U’0.5 cents i to 386 pence. 


Shares started the week well, 
only to fall buck later amid polirical 
reverses for the government, with 
the Mibtel index finally creeping 
up 0.67 percent to finish the week 
ai 1 1,709 points. 

Dealers welcomed moves by the 
new Italian government Monday to 
stimulate the recovery with a pack- 
age of reforms, but the optimism 
was punctured Tuesday by doubts 
about the leaders of the semipublic 
Mediobanca over the Ferruai af- 
fair. 

Montedison meanwhile put on a 
creditable S.13 percent to 1.43b 
lira, while among the banks. Comit 
advanced 2.66 percent to 5.214 lira 
and Credito Italiano added 5.40 
percent to end up at 2.381 lira. 

Elsewhere. Olivetti was down 
3.70 percent to 2.570 Lira. Stet also 
slipped 2.15 percent to 5.331 Dra. 


the w eek, at 1041.74. it still was 10 
percent below its year's peak. 

Market analysis feared higher 
growth in the United States and 
Europe would come too quickly, 
pushing inflation. But some traders 
believed better news on unemploy- 
ment and a turnaround in perfor- 
mance was imminent. 


which rose 60 cents to 11-30 dol- 
lars. Loser; were led by OUR 
which tumbled 1.15 dollars to 7.00 
dollars. 


Paris 


Worries about the situation on 
the other side of the Atlantic influ- 
enced the performance of the mar- 
ket last week amid worries of resur- 
gent inflation. 

On Wednesday, the pessimistic 
outlook pushed ihe market below 
the 2.000 point mark for the first 
time since mid- 1993. 

Although damage was limited 
with regard to the C AC-40 index, 
which ended 0.8 percent down on 


Singapore 

Prices staged a broad recovery 
on Friday alter Four consecutive 
days of losses. 

The blue-chip Straits Tunes In- 
dustrials index closed 16.32 points 
higher at 2A68.70 while the broad- 
er~based SES All-Singapore index 
was 2.12 higher at 560.1 1. 

Turnover fell to 93.9 million 
units valued at 233 J million Singa- 
pore dollars (5152.5 million) from 
105.9 million units worth 263.8 mil- 
lion dollars. 

Dealers said a statement by the 
Malaysian deputy prime minister. 
Anwar Ibrahim, on Thursday ask- 
ing investors to ignore rumors and 
trade on fundamentals helped mm 
sentiments around in Singapore. 

Idris, a finance company, led the 
active stccksm adding 15 cents lo 
2.47 dollars, on 7.7 million units. 
Mulpha International followed, 
dunning 13 cents to 1.94 dollars, 
on -6.4 million units, and Promei 
was next with a nine-cent gain to 
1.39 dollars, on 4.05 million units. 

Sea view, the hotel concern, led 
the gainers with a one-doll ar hike 
to 1 0.20 dollars followed by the car 
distributor Cycle & Carriage, 


Tokyo 

Domestic institutions joined for- 
eign investors in active buying last 
week. Tbe 225-issue Nikkei Stock 
Average peaked 3t 21,191 points on 

Thursday, topping the previous 
peak of 21,148 set last September. 
It ended the week at 20,954.19. up 
Q.9 percent. „ . , . . 

The Tokyo Stock Pnce Index of 
all issues on tbe first section gained 
0.5 percent, to 1.679.62, from 
1.670.76 a week earlier. 

Brokers forecast gradual recov- 
ery in share prices in the coming 
weeks with institutional investors 
following foreign players mlo the 
market, as a series of corporate 
business reports in recent weeks 
pointed to better earnings in the 
offiog. 


Strike Hits 
SEAT Over 
Job Cuts 


Reusers 


BARCELONA — Workers at 
Volkswagen AG’s Spanish unit 
SEAT, failed to show up for work 
on Saturday and threatened more 
strikes unless Volkswagen and its 
Spa nish government. " produced i i 
rescue plan for the carmaker. - 
Abont 1 ,500 workers stayed 



away from their jobs, al SRATs 
plant 


Zurich 


The week ended on a small high 
with the Swiss Performance Index 
rising 11.99 points, to finish at 
1 .792. 1 8, an increase of 0.6 percen l 
O ne dealer said trading was slug- 
gish in view of holidays in several 
countries at the start of the week 
which saw many investors largely- 
staying away. Most activity was 
concentrated in the banking and 
insurance sectors. 

Of the industrials. Fischer slid 
back 90 to 1.410 and BBC lost 62 to 
12127. Nestle ended up 2 al 1,147. 


new Martorell- plant to protest 
against working extra Saturday 
shifts while thousands of thek, col- 
leagues are being lad off and ca- 
pacity is not being fully used dur- 
ing tbe week. . ■' ' /_• v . 

They have threatened two more 
Saturday strikes this month arid 
another ’on Thursday, June 23. 

VW is presang Madrid for sub- 
stantial government -'aid io keep 
SEAT aHve ay an independent car. 
producer, but the govemmem says 
it is cot prepared to pout in large 
sums of money, ft also says it hands 
are tied by_ Europe®? Union com-, 
petition rules. ...... 

Industry Minister Juan Manuel 
Egiriagaray he wtMiid -not change 
his position when he meets with the: 
VW chairman. Ferdinand 'PiScfa, 
this week. • 


.ii if V? I* 


. I J ;i> ; 

’ : I' 1 


; p* 4 


VW, which wants toi slash several . 
thousand jobs at -SEAT, .says it 
needs 800 mill ion Deustdte marks 
($480 million) to restructure. ... 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COULD AFFECT 

YOUR LIFE: 

v" v ,, ? ! .• ; * •* : .** ^ .*/ . ,VV • v\iv .** . ^ ip&xf "*• : .• .• ■ .fV.. •• • . .•.■% 





FOLLOW THE WORLD EVMsW SAY IN THE IHT 



Oft f 


cover or 

i 


CALL US TOLL-FREE 

AUSTRIA: 0660 8155 LUXEMBOURG: 0800 2703 
BELGIUM: 0 800 1 7538 SWITZERLAND: 1 55 57 57 
FRANCE: 05 437 437 THE NETHERLANDS: 06 022 51 58 
GERMANY: 0130 848585 UNITED KINGDOM: 0800 89 5965 

Or send in the coupon below. 


Subscription Rates & Savings oft IHT cover Prices. 


Country/Currency 

12 months 
+ 2 months 
FREE 

■'■'•V v , " ,> . • A % ■! 

6 months 
+ 1 month 
FREE 

3 months 
+ 13 FREE 
issues 

Austria 

A. Sch. 

6,000 


3,300 

1,800 

Belgium 

B.Fr. 

14,000 


7.700 

4.200 

Denmark 

D.Kr. 

3,400 


1,900 

1,050 

Finland 

F.M. 

2,400 

4» 

1.300 

700 

France 

F.F. 

1,950 


1,070 

590 

Germany* 

D.M. 

700 


285 

210 

Great Britain 

r 

210 


115 

65 

Greece 

Dr. 

75,000 


41,000 

22.000 

Ireland 

Slrl. 

230 

37 

125 

68 

Italy 

Lire 

500,000 


275,000 

150,000 

Luxembourg 

L. Fr. 

14,000 


7,700 

4.200 

Netherlands 

FI. 

770 

: mm, ; j 

420 

230 

Norway 

N.Kr. 

3,500 

35 

1.900 

1,050 

Portugal 

Esc. 

47,000 


26,000 

14,000 

Spain 

Plas. 

4S,000 


25.500 

14,500 

- hand deliv. Madrid 

Ptas. 

55.000 

£' V . 

27.500 

14,500 

Sweden (airmail) 

S.Kr. 

3.100 


1.700 

900 

- hand delivery 

S.Kr. 



1,900 

mmrml 

Switzerland 

S.Fr. 

610 


335 

185 

Rest of Europe ex CEI 

S 

485 

<V.Yy.'"- yf" 

265 

145 

CEI N. Africa, former 

French African. Middle East 

S 

630 



190 

Gull Stales. Asia, Ceniral and 
South America 

s 

o 

00 

r- 

i 

430 

235 

Rest of Africa 

s 

900 


495 

270 

* For information concerning hand-delivery in major German cities call toll tree IHT 

Germany at: 0130-8* 85 85 or fax (069) 175 413. Under German regulations a °-week 
free period is granted for all new orders. 


l want to start receiving the IHT. This is the subscription term I prefer 
[check appropriate boxes): 

□ 12 monShs (364 issues in all with 52 bonus issues). 

EU 6 months [182 issues in all with 26 bonus issues). 

0 3 months (91 issues in all with 13 bonus issues). 

CH My check is enclosed (payable to the International Herald Tribune). 

I 1 r^l i _ . . 


□ Please charge my: □ American Express □ Diners Club □ VISA 
□ MasterCard Q Eurocard □ Access 


Credit card charges will be made in French Francs at current exchange rates. 

CARD ACCT . NO. 


EXP. DATE 


SIGNATURE. 


FOR BUSINESS ORDERS, PLEASE INDICATE YOUR VAT NUMBER 


(IHT VAT number FR74732021 1 261 ) 

U Mr. G Mm □ Miss FAMILY NAME. 


FIRST NAME 


PERMANENT ADDRESS: O HOME O BUSINESS 


INTENTIONAL 

. *L-J V - - ( 

PIHLISHED WITH THU MiH V«JHK TJ.MKS AND THtrl WASHINGTON p-.JST 






CITY/CODE 


COUNTRY 


TEL 

FAX 


Return your completed coupon to: Subscription Manager, 

IHT, 181 Avenue Charies-de-GauIle, 92521 NeuiHy Cede*, France. 

Fax: 33.1.46 37 06 51 - Td: 33.1 A6 3793 61 

This offer expires August 3 1, 1 99J, and is available to new subscribers only. ^ 


O 




Last Week’s Markets 






a H ttoum are as of close of Ironing Friday 

Stock Indexes 

United States June 3 
377222 
1B74XS 

isiao 

47M6 
460.13 
S35J3 
25434 


DJ Indus. 
DJ Util. 
DJ Trans. 
S & P1Q0 
S & P 500 
5&P ind 
NYSE Co 
Britain 


Mo* 27 cnae 
3,757.14 tOAIN 
136.73 +0.18% 
1^2283 — 

42442 + 0.43% 
457.33 +0A1°i 
S3131 + 0.45 % 
252.77 +0J1% 


Money Rates 

United State 


FTSE 100 
FT 30 
Japan 
Nlktel 225 
Germanr 


299780 

237980 


2,966.40 +1414% 
2J46.90 + IA0 % 


70.15*. 


□AX 

Hong Kong 
Hang Sens 
worm 
MSCIP 


214a39 


92307 


20777. +085% 
2.14099 +035% 
9^7013 —£49% 
61 7 JO —006% 


616.90 

World I nder From Morgan Stonier CadM hm 


Discount' rate 

Prime rote • • ", 

Federal hmdsrtrte - 

Jppon 

Discount 

Call money 

3-monlh Interbank 

Germany 

Lombard 

Coll money 

3-month i n ter b an k 

Britain 

Bank base rote • 

Coll money 
3+nonth Interbank 
SaM . . ; June 3 

London mi AkS 382.95 


June 3 

3"2 

• n * 

4 3/16 


MCW27 

3Vi • 
-.7V,. 

43/1* 


1 15/16' 
21/16 


• VW 
' • 2«r 
title... 


ooo 

5m 

5J0 


400 

500 

S2D 


i : ■ 


r, r [r)r‘ h\-<’ 


r* 

51^- 

5.3*16 . 
May 27 
385.40 


5»* 

SjOS 

ams:; 

—'064% 


S-‘i ■ .-r— 


Republic National Bank 
of Ni: w York (Suisse) S.A. 


has the pleasure of announcing that 


Mr. Karim Chakroun 


will be joining our 
Asset Management Department 
effective September 1, 1994. 



A Safin Bonk 



i -T 


This week's topics: 

O Special Report The Information Revolution 
O Eurocars Burn Rubber In The U.S. 

O EuroDisne/s Prince Charming? 

O Corporate America’s China Bonanza 
O NASDAQ With A European Accent? 


l'v~ 


i 


I? 


Now available at your newsstand! 


BusinessWeek international 
14, av d'Oucfiy, CH-1006 Lausanne Tel. 41-21-617-4411 
For subscriptions call UK 44-628-23431 Honu Kono 


International 

Classified 

SvlARICgTgsLACE 

nday 




® Monday 

0 TuS 0 ™ 1 Conhn2nCes and Seniors 

Education Directory 
® Wednesday 
Business Message Center 
® Thursday 

International Recruitment 

• Friday 

• SET Marketplace ' and Travel 

Arts and Antiques 




■+ 


J 0 


i t' v 


*.■> 


ss 



.%V-' 






































*es 


t‘ er® rSfat 
-:0 '*% 

;_;^<X 

:: ~ '.is rijlv.r 14 ht H«y. 

• Z - T lr L ^3 bZ 

i^ananed 


•3- ^ *e2ad 

'.- *■ ^beal 

. .• -."'7; .‘r,^>i l ^b. 
— 71 T - ^ Lcrv, ?^PaD- 
. : ~‘ c Easily 


; C “KRfd 

‘- ; Jtuargj 


nitv 


■; : '-- c ai 

* -• - ; a Jt 

- - - -,-j. roee 


' - -i ’■>?* ?t 


'-' -*“-r V •_-.: iVr. JUJG 


'• :: : -.. ■rji^'S'Z 


..'. r v-- .T-r.i'- 
^' r 
■ *~'2Z’ 




. v- - ", . 


TV Snub 

» _ ■$ 

<$?&* 

— - -T .!V' 


: \V>: 

-7: 

v • ■ a 

. *.‘ -■" " '-<■■ ** ' 

i#v* 

- i ... rV'..*' 

, ■- •n:‘ v .;n- 

■o * * ws? 


•>• . * ’•■'.4' 

->,?• >t'<.:}‘ 

- -••■' >«i v 

■ "*■ 1*^ 

• »-.■»• ; 

"' ... „"-■’■ '.■*••■'• r 
' * 7 *r 


wo N D A V 

§PQBTS_ 

SIDELINES 

lad Sunday and won . fron ? nvc *hois off tic 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 


Page 19 


• Bobby Swje"” Pcw hSw^i 4 

da/ 5 iM round Of ft, S “’ 

CdticArms Wins French Derby 


¥iuu nmu a, me hesi ttf a Rritiri, ; ~ * *« «* toigut, 4j .«> 

kagths badL The ° UI ?. 1{ ! t ’ finishing ihird, another M & 

Moonlight Da**, ti* only filly tithe g 

to bSL n Sr Si?* Itali ? n fatey Frankie £ 

Arab Emirate uiS^^" 51 hor * traMKl “ UmKd '< 

Bowe Has Back Injury, Bout Is Off 

BOTrehM^^d^KTir^a fWn l CT l heavyweight champion Riddick 

sa&'zi^ *- •*— jr - 

Dr Spanin 5 May 27, had been examined by 

orthopedic surgeon and lower-back specialist, and 
wta ordered to rest for a week 10 10 days ^ 

* 8 h®? a 8™ st Franz Botha of South Africa on 
■ . -^ tg a.cnt under his eye while sparring, hasn’t fought 

smcelosmg the IBF and WBA titles to fender So® ra NovT 


England Stuns South Africa in Rugby 

PRETORIA (Renters) — Flyfaalf Rob Andrew scored a team record 27 
pomts as England’s rugby squad stunned South Africa, 32-15. 

^ P* 031 ^ ««> conversions and a 
*^ed_ gMl Satonifgr to break .Jonathan Webb’s record of 24 points, set 
against Italym the 1993 World Cup. Andrew was only three short of the 
wood record set by the French Qyhalf Didier Camberabero against 
Zimbabwe m the lyjjl World Qq>. 

• Can^a hid further claim to consideration as a major rugby nation 
with an lo-jo upset of France in Nepean, Ontario. It followed Canada’s 
even more surprising defeat of Wales in November in Cardiff; Wales 
(days Canada again next week in Ontario. 

• In Brisbane, Australia ran in five tries to one to overwhelm Ireland. 
33-13, in a test match. 

For die Record 

Mareo Parian of Italy won Sunday’s 15th stage of the Giro dltalia 
cycling race, while Yevgeni Bonin of Russia retained the overall leader’s 
Pkkjray- . . (Reuters) 

HaSe GdnsdasK of Ethiopia broke the men’s 5,000-meter world 
record in Hengelo, the Netherlands; his time of 12 annates, 5&96 seconds 
beat by 1.45 seconds the mark set by Said Aouita of Morocco. (AF) 

An NCAA spetiti t mmgffr e studying college football playoff propos- 
als said the idea has merit but needs farther study. (AF) 

Kart WeotiEnger, the Austrian Formula One driver, has regained 
co n sciousness more than three weeks after his crash d uring practice for 
the Monaco Grand Prix, Team Sanber sail (Reuters) 

senior crew continued to dominate Yale with an eigjat- 

Oce Qurtey ^C^na knocked ootCrisemto E^ana of 

Venezuela 57 seconds into the 12th round to win the WBA wdterwdght 
tide in LevaBois-Fenet, France. (AF) 

Steve Robinson of Wales retained his WBO featherwddit title with a 
mammons victory in Cardiff over Freddy Cruz of toe Dominican 
Republic. (AF) 


NATIONAL 



Royals Finish Sweep of Yankees 


Ttetoriarifto, (TNall singled twits is four at 

Kevin Appier combined with bats to raise his major league-lead- 
two relievers m a seven-itiuer Sun- mg average to .430. 
day and the Ka nsas City Royals Abbott struck out two and 
scored three runs in the first inning walked cone in eight innings, al- 
ter a 3-1 victory and a sweep of toe lowing eight hits. 


second compfcte game this season. 
He walked two and struck out none. 


The Twins' 2] runs tied the mark 
set on May 20 agmnsi Boston. The 


Scott Erickson allowed just six 24 hits matched the club record set 
tuts in seven-plus innings, but three on May 25. 1977. against Boston. 


Yankees in New York. 


Orioles 8, White Sox & Cal Rip- 


Appier walked two and struck ken’s RBI single brought in thego- 
oui seven in 7*o innings before be- ahead run in Baltimore’s four-run 


ing relieved by Mike Magnantc. seventh inning as the Orioles do- wt „~T C i. / ' . 

Rusty Meacham pitched the ninth Feared vis ting Chicago. - ic* 

for his second save. Leo Gomez, Rafad Palmeiro 

The Royals three^ame sweep and Harold Baines homered for the ^5epiiS^£SJd^S 

Ncw Ywk ^ ■——— ■■ ■■ seenrive shutouts. 

U Ld'oNdD 8 drove in the Yaa- ALROUNDUP JotafiOTwon to fifth ^me in a 

lone run with a single in the Oriolesoff starter Alea Fernandez S^h^^^hini^sstrcStoS 

r , w - as Baltimore won fw just the sec- Marie Langston ind Johnson 

Tun Abbott threw 40 pitches m a ond tune m seven games. The loss cad, have mtched back-to-back 

^ O^’s three^ame win- shutouts twiS before for the Mari- 
mng stnak. nets. David Cone of Kansas City 

scored three times. Jubo Franco had two RBIs for pitched three straight shutouts ear- 

Vrnce Coleman fed off with an Chicago and now has 58. Taranto's «wc t^n 

infidd single and Greg Gagne fd- Joe Carter entered Sunday’s action The dub record for consecutive 
lowed with a angle to center. Both leading the majors with 57. scoreless ™nii. £t is 34WbyLane- 

ranpm advanced on a catcha Tramng 5-4 in the seventh. Banes ston in 1988. 


bxSans 8, Afttetics 2; In Oak- 
oore Bed at 3 after Phillips led off land, California, Eddie Murray hit 
theaghth witha homer and Um his 450th homer and drove in four 
Whitaker walked. nms. Jack Morris piched seven 

In games played Saturday: strong and Clevdand won 

Mariners 2, Btoe Jays 0: Randy its seventh straight. 

Johnson strode out 15 to slop visit- Morris allowed seven hits in win- 
ing Toronto, and became the first rang his fourth consecutive decision. 
Seattle pitcher 10 throw three con- He struck can six and walked one. 


ALROUNDUP 


Jim Abbott threw 40 pitches in a ond Hma in seven games. The loss 
first inning in which the Royals ended Chicago's three-game win- 
collected five of their eight hits and ning streak, 
scored three times. Julio Franco two RBIs for 

Vince COleman fed Off With an r hiwgnandn^ w Km ffl Tnf nme '< 
infield single and Greg Gagne fd- Joe Carter entered Sunday’s action 


*ao ran m oaimnores rour-nm Jn xamgs Saiurdav: 
venth mnmg as the Orioles do- _ . 

fd Harold Baines homered for Uic 

I " ■ sccntive shutouts. 


lowed with a single to center. Both 
runners advanced on a catcher 
Mike Stanley’s passed ball. 

Brian McRae's groundout 
scored Coleman and Dave Hender- 
son singled in Gagne to make it 2-0. 
Henderson then scored on Hubie 
Brooks’s double to left 


tied it with an RBI single. After „ . .. O J ,, 

Ripken put the Orioles ahead. Mark . Twins Zl, Tjgers 7: Pedro Munoz 
McI^-moTT- and L** Vrivt fnOfwwt nomaud twice and drove in a ca- 


McLenwreand Jack Voigt followed 
with ran-scOTing hits. 

Tigers 5, Tinas 3; Tony Phillips 


reer-high seven runs and Minneso- 
ta tied team records for runs and 


* : ■ • • v.-i .. >,» \# jfv - , . • ,y-'> 

y • 1,. />;; . ■ ... » 


- Mat Lcnnhc-'Tbr Aaocmed ho* 

New York’s Pat K^y turned fee doiAile play over Brian McRae- 


Appier didn’t allow tile Yankees intched a six-hitter, leading Detroit 
more than one bascrunner in any over visiting Minnesota, 
inning until the sixth when Luis Pb- Phillips had his first career two- 
lonia singled, moved to second on homer game, and Kirk Gibson also 
Don Mattingly’s one-out walk and homered for the Tigers, 
scored at O’Neill's two-out angle. Moore allowed three runs in to 


Ml £0 hinerTami hits ^th a rout of the Tigers in 


lainuMa uuv triwiv j** * 

pitched a six-hitter, leading Detroit 1JC&0lt - 
over visiting Minnesota. Alex Cole had four of the Twins' 

Phillips tod bis first career two- 24 hits. Scott Lei us, who homered, 
homer game, and Kirk Gibson also Derek Parks and Munoz, each had 


three hits for Minnesota. Chip Hale 
runs in to hit a two-xun homer in the ninth. 


Royals 4, Yankees 3: Terry 
Shumpert had the first two-homer 
game of to career, driving in three 
runs and helping Kansas City tri- 
umph in New York. 

Rangers 10, Red Sox 4: Jose 
Canseco had four hits and a two- 
run homer, and Kenny Rogers won 
his fifth straight as Texas pounded 
out 19 hits to win in Boston. 

Canseco, who hit a pair of two- 
run homers in a 13-2 triumph Fri- 
day night, hit his 14th home ran. 

White Sox 7, Orioles 1: Jack 
McDowell allowed five hits in sev- 
en innings and rookie Norberto 
Martin hit to fust career homer — 
a grand slam — to lift visiting Chi- 
cago over Baltimore. 

Martin, who played in eight 
games with the White Sox in 1993, 
hit to first career homer in to 46th 
major-league ai-bat in the ninth off 
Jim Po (tie to make it 6-L 


Braves Get 6th Straight Victory, Rallying Past the Dodgers 


The Associated Prea 

Jeff Blauser’s two-out, two-run 
double capped a four-run rally in 
the eighth toning Sunday and the 
Braves beat the Los Angeles Dodg- 
ers, 6-5, in Atlanta for their sixth 
straight victory. 

The Dodgers woe swept in the 
three-game series and have lost four 
in a row oreraH Atlanta is 6-0 


followed with a single and after with a major-league low 239 aver- In games played Saturday: 


Todd Worrell relieved, Blauser 
drove a double to the wall in left- 
center field. 


age and scored only two nuts in the 
fast two games of the series. They 
took out their frustrations on Rick 


Mark Wohlers earned the victory Sutcliffe with six runs in the Gust, 
with innings of scoreless relief, getting a season-high 17 hits and 


NL ROUNDUP 

He retired Tim Walla cb on a fly 


against Los Angfite this season and ^afl warning track in right 
18*1 against NL West opponents. ggy with two runners cm for the 
ThtTBraves trailed 5-2 what Da- tot out. 

Giants 1ft, Cardinals 3: Mark 
Sw!? Portugal allowed five hits in eight 

jSU! iiu ri n ff and had his first career 
wa " re r three-mt game as San Francisco 

op a angl e to Jjner Lopez, loading broke oturfa prolonged slump 
me oases. with the victory in St Louis. 


Mark Lemke bad an RBI for- 


whh the victory in St Louis. 

Matt WUHams hit his 20th homer 


cectrt, making it 5-3. But Lemke had three RBIs as the Giants 
was picked off first by Dreifart. avoided a three-game sweep and 
Dave Gallagher then singled, ended a five-game losing streak, 
scoring Pendleton. Roberto KeBy The Giants entered the game 


scoring more than three runs for 
the first time in eight games. 

Astros 4, PUffies 2: In Houston, 
Darryl Kile allowed five hits in 
eight innings as the Astros stopped 
Philadelphia. 

Kile walked Lenny Dykstra to 
start the game, then gave up consec- 
utive singles to Mario Duncan, Milt 
Thompson and Darren Daulton 
that mil Philadelphia ahead 2-0. 

Kne was helped by a relay that 
cut down Thompson, and be re- 
tired the next two batters to end the 
first inning. Kile did not allow an- 


In games played Saturday: Brews 4, Dodgers 2: In Atlanta, 

Stress 

SLi tee - ran ■“» 

decisions. Braves. 

Drabek struck out th ree and McGrifTs 15th borne run of the 
walked time in his fourth complete season came on a 3-2 tongmg cum 
game as the Astros defeated the from Kevin Gross in the fifth in- 


Braves 4, Dodgers 2: in Atlanta, reliever Joaas Manzanillo set up 
bn Smoltz won for the first time the eighth-inning rally, which gave 
seven weeks and Fred McGriff the Reds their first victory in five 
t a three-run homer for the games a gamst the Mels. 

avcs ‘ Marfins 4, Padres 3: Jeff Conine 

McGrifTs 15th home ran of the angled borne Chuck Carr with one 


Phillies for then- seventh triumph ro ning and broke a I -I tie. 
nine gainer Smoltz gave op five tits in eight 

Pbfladdphia errors led to three innings, striking out nine and walk- 
of Houston's runs. mg none. He had lost five straight 

Expos 6, Gobs 1: Marquis Gris- de^Mandh^notwonanceaJ- 
romledoff the game with a borne 2raun^iovaChicagQonApril 17. 
run and Lany Walker and W3 Cor- Reds 8, Mets 5: Eddie Tauben- 

dero later connected as visiting see’s two-run double lannched a 


out in the 10th inning to beat San 
Diego in Miami. 

Canine tripled in the ninth and 
scored the tymg nm on a single by 
Greg CoTbrann, who had three 
RBIs. 

Gnritab 2* Giants 1: In St. Lou- 


2triunq*ovttChicagponApcfll7. ^ R^y Lankford branoed on Mike 
Reds 8, Mets Sc Eddie Tauben- Jackson’s first pitch in the ninth as 


Kne was helped by a relay that straight loss, 
cut down Thompson, and be re- Pedro Martinez gave up one nm 
tired the next two batters to end the on seven tits in seven timings. WB- 
firsl inning. Kile did not allow an- lie Banks , who began the game with 
other run, setting down 10 straight 8 17-in ning scoreless streak, al- 
at one point, and struck out two lowed five runs and seven hits in 
and walked three. five innin gs. 


Montreal handed Chicago its fifth stx-nm eighth imring as the Reds 


see’s two-run double lannched a the f-Hrrfmnh handed San Francis- 
six-nm eighth imring as the Reds co its fifth straight loss, 
took advantage of New York’s Pfrates < Rockies 3: In Denver, 
dewiness to finally beat the Mets Kevin Young til a bases-lo&ded 
in Cincinnati. triple to help Pittsburgh snap a 

Ryan Thompson and Joe Orsu- season-high five-game losing 
lak each drove in two runs to help streak. 


took advanti 
dewiness to 

in tjnrwiimri 


New York build a 5-2 lead in the The victory ended Colorado’s 
eighth. Bui a throwing error by winning streak at four games. 


Soȣ I 

otv Y W tOBBHtoH LM Cm On I Stocks 


Sole* 1 

Dh YU 100* Hfitfl Low Oso dW Stacks 


Drv YU Hiofi Low Ose One I Stodu 


OTC Conaoftdated trading 10r week 
ended Friday, June 3. 

(Continued) 


Povctocs ja 
Poyco 


Sate* 

Dtv yu TOBoHUi Law On due 
_ 1575 6 5 « SW — Vb 

_ 90S MYi 13V MM -M 


_ mwvii»i» —j* 
■11294*3314 2OT4 3 OH— 3M. 
_ 1HM 8V» —M 

_ 170 174 11W 1 VA 
_ 5121 »'* B 04% - 

- 223 S 72f* 3 *Vi 


PsJcor _ _ 185 9V, 8% 9 +VS RsVtIFpl 3J5 4.9 1244«7Vi MV, iM _ SScVTv 

PU6SNC ja SJ 129S14H 14\4 UH _ Repay. _ 140 4*4 i'A 6*4 *V> SBcnVT 

PukaKF M ZJ >42214 22 22 _ Ravi .12 J 029 Z3%* 22 23 _ SBcnx 

PUbmt M 1 9 248 1514 m 15W _ VJRJJSCSI _ 93* Vi» «*b <Vb - SMCina 

PUiSOfen . i M4 +W vStooB 1143 'ft *, "4 *V B SlrryiR M 

PureTC -UAOA TV. Mi 7Vii -V4 RocsSIr Me A «4SB 14<4 12V. IJfi -W„ SlmnOol 

Pureoac _ 1790 9 m — Vfc RatsSy _ IBS 4*v 4 4V, - H Smplrvl J56 

Pwlwen .U J. 2S4»’X 19V, 1914 — ’ U Rowch _ TOlWi 20 »V, ,'4 SSrrxpsrMJ 

PvntV M 17 122010^ 1715 17% — 4* RoWRfr S6 Z3 91 28 24 2* _ Sfekon 

Pirns _ iis 7U MM — * Rofflund _ 3(0 0* TV. 7K. ScvWesi J>5 

PutnTr JWBIA xnmkKVi 2iVi 4V| Rouse M 15 2049 19V, W 19V, —>* SkvbM 

PyimT — 3435 B 7Vb TV, — » Rouse of 125 12 204 53 53V: 52V, _ SmfOnwt 


Dh YU I0OSM0I U>m Cte Choe 1 Stocks Otv YU HSaHoft Low Qse One I Starts Ur YU WOsHWi Low Cbe Owe 


- 440 low 10 low +to Sunstalte _ 1071* 7W 7Y% — I TWooPcT 

_ 6474 11 W low It +W Sunsfetpt 173 115 1027* 27* 27* — WlTHamx 


stocks CSv YU nOSHbil Low Cbe Quo p-yss* jd S3 2710 fW 10 +U 

NuKcOeA _ 190 19 intiw 4}i - 251 ,v * US? 

KiSmta ■“ wn* V aw Tw Z laoi iff* w* 10* ♦* 

N^Sf IJO »5 **! m* VTA 1% Xv* g-jSta lJUei3 TYaf 4 

Nvcnr ^ 1T7 3W 3W 3W +W W 

NvcsrA .14 <9 20 3W 3W 3W -W £££** J2B0 5W 3* 

34)4 U„ +W 


_ 300 6» , 4Vu — Vu SuowT * 

_ 632 I0>« 10'i 10'/, — W SuoKta 

M 2.0 120 23 V. 23 23,9,,-iV,, SupMoc 

^ 272 6 5W 4 -V. SupTacft 

J56 ZB 137V 20 If 20 *W Svpmxrl 

- 134* wv. 13 lav. — V, Suporw 

- Ilffl 4T* 4* 4V. - W SuprtoK 

JOS a 118933 23 30W-2 SupSpCl 


- 2iB0 lo*. io iim — % Tnaevt 

418 12% II IIW +M THdMK 
1481 7* 5* tv* —On TrtmoHc 
287 4* 6V. 4W — Jfc Trlmbte 
485 12V. lift 12W +W Trkned 
287 17 1VA 12 +V, Trtntfc 

7«3* 3W T* Trion 


_ 18400 2114 IB* in*— 1 


Perm -02 e J 3290 5 
Pentolrs J2 11 1613 35 
Poricti _ nil 6 


Oicero 

OMGrv .14* 

opn 


O I Poi«l - 1181 4V% 5W 5W* 

— — ■ PowS -20 1.1 193191% ff IB» — w 

JMI. trih M ,u IVofSIl JO 1-7 19 3 23ft 25 — 

- 'fiVL ?L ^ PPoBcps AO t2 111* 18 18 — V» 

— itt «S E FWHI -56 2-5 6923 21 22 +1 

- Zff PWOCT M 4 A 344S11 10W 11 

''nSn 1§4 ™ iSS JTl* *tooeCTo«A25 taS 151 eg* *5 66V, — V. ■ 

“ imoS! 2«f +* pK&MN -ICO J 13422V, 21 , 2T> _ 

— i?i aft an* m* pmOv _ 1792 241* »* — . 


_ 191 26V, 24W 2M +* gSchc I7WMW 241* »* — W 

- “ & * ft *£ Z 6K^l| iov 

I 3® 9W 8% r* +W pSSSp “ 2o 12 * izv 

ootocr =,MuZ f 

8sss* - s'SWWwtz ^ = 3w a 

SSSSf I ‘’ISm m, 5& - 1&$? ^ 

n5£!! 1 u £3 251635 341* 34* — * gjJJ™ - SS SS 

m J HDD 10* 10 10'S — Vu £ 5 ?* “ SSf uu. 


_ 323919 18 19 +W , 

_ B94T7W. 1SW 17 +W 

_ 68021 W 20W 20V* — W 

- 701 3W 3 jw +W l 

_ *60 12V* 121* 12W — W 
_ 0911ft 10W IIW 

_ 1B92D 15M IS 15W +W I 
_ 510W m 9ft - 

- 1494 41* » M fft 

_ 679 13* T3W 13V4 — Vil 

_ IAS 9ft V* 9ft vw 
_ 253 9W 9» +V* , 


_ 15009 SW 29h 331* +3 RtvBi 
^ 104 5W 4* 4* _ RvotlP 

_ 2927111* 10V% KW«-W« 

- 142 7V, 7 TVt, —9u I 

^ 1684 1W 1W 1W +W I 

JO 3J M1B>« 1746 17** —V* _ 

« 547911* w* Yw»*iw, s ye 
_ 1814 131* 131* _ SAT Be, 

_34S4618Vi 15W 18 +1 53hKS 

_ 2673 Hi* 11 uv% +* 

_ 925 3* 3* 31* 

JO S 168Z23W 21 VS 221* — V, 

_ 25 4V, 4 & 

_ 5121 2 16V* 15V* 16 *1* 

_ 8547 331* 31W 32 i* 4-1 

- _ 9717 3*. 3 Mi ■*■%» 

QuartK — 224 1 ft ft — H 

QueonCTy _ 934 41V, «0W «M4 ~W 

SuSlM .151 iO 2076 7* «% 7* +W 

□uJdcRSO _ 1S2012W 111* 111* _ 

OltfckJT _ 3BS6 IZW II T2W -11* 

QUdH - 3225 316 3 31* -ft. 

QuMelWl _ 3 11 IV IV* — V« 

OlSSv _ 3481 131* ir* 13 +to 

JUe -5 ins IBM 17H 1716—1 

UB31B1* 17V. V«1* +w 

_ 74 4 4 +Vi 

33 T.l 6562DK 1916 1M — V, 
_lmil7<4 1*4% 1«V% —ft 


J noSfSw ^ 103 ^ g ^ ,3! r* is 




aSSSL sssr 

SKES, Z iiw inS 

SI5» 1A0 3J 2OT3M* 30W JJW 4-W 


_ H ft ft ft 

_ 9617299% 27V* 20V* — U> 

_ 733 Tit 616 6Vfc —V* 

_ 16391016 FU 916 — Vt 

- 07 a 716 7W +16 

_ 490 5H. SW 5*, —Vit 

_ 93 3W » 216 _ 

_ bib n* n* - 


ZTr* 1A0 3J W* tvs Pt3&v Z 49 6W *3 3* +S 



= jsst r a 

Z 112819% 18* IPV6 

_ 470 5J% 

„ 46 6 S’* 6.. -t-V* 


1 ^ Is 2W nS S5™ * Z 

^ “ ii”iiw?iwnw 

■ iS'iS 

: z £32* ^4 35 ^3 5w ?SS TS 

™ 1 rn 7 ft V* — V6 PienSJd 14 * 24W 7316 24 * V6 

' = ss ss r* ^ pESf jo » ^ ^ + ja 

~ 5» » »-* «a Hff ■- «0Hlk ITO 11 — » 

>nal2 SSlK I Mff 64% 5W 6K +W 

dwwiw. . - g» J16 m 7w. *w - an aw wo rw ~v% 

122 O 3wxn% ww +« 1.1s *s 

“ICiPfa®-? aiPM 

lT76725«! 48 53 ♦«% PrtyW - ^ 

- 0813 gr- flCCk^t 

I p 1 £3K _ ro St m *'* * » 

1 — — E «5«»5 JMPlmtP-ft 

- SVS* s* 4 * 5* - _ 7861 4W 5W JW +■* 

- .SB SS F* T* SSES I muSS ™ ^ - 


_ 1676 M A % _ 

- 31 5W 51* SV* — ft. 

_ 7901 271* a a *\k 
^ 1914 UW 13W 141* -*1% 
_ 32312 10%. 12 -16 

_ T329 4V6 M* 39b -V* 
^ 53S25V* 24 25ft. +11* 

t _ 233 516 416 « —VS 


Ooamer 

ontrfx 

Ort*a 

CTnmir 

OrttepT 

<»«n 


_ 1340 TV* 6V% 6W —16 
J8B32 329 IB 17W 18 +H 
.12 J 4712ft. 11V, 121* +W 
1 _ 241 16 H % +V* 

J2 23 34Z7 1816 17W 18 —16 

M U 494211* 30 21 +1 

— 2202 71% 7 _ m +WlvKMm 
_ 1444 4 3V% 3V* —46 I SaidTc 


RyBPA -58 T U 306101* 9V* 10 — 'm Smrtrfld 

RaytsHp _ 33J9ft 4ft 9 —V. SmW 

RovOTC _ STS TV. it, 6*. _ Snopevs 

Rutplnd „ 2 8 W 8V, BW —V* SOOC+ 

RunkMM _ 1911 15 13W IS +1 SOftEOl 

RvanBck JOte J » 6V% 6 Vo 6Vs +Vu Sottaesk 

RvaftP _I030B 77% 7ft 7ft * V* Sefltma 

Softkev 

I . * Scrftkvwt 

J I SHETc 

SYPrw 

SK _ 17811ft. IBft, V. — Vft S«+*^ 

SAT Bcp 1X0 2-9 S5391* 371% 37*6 ♦!* SoBSoc 
S3 hies « 8106 70 9V* 914 -JW SotoSrv 


_ 180 7V. 7 TW —V, IcmarK 

« 12434 16 15%% 16 +9% SamnwS 

2 24* 7*6 216 —V, samtbr 
.13 7x1402 13V. 17 W 1BVV -ft. Samoan 

-7H |J 1703 20,6 20 20*6 * '« SomrGo 

_ 701 1416 131% 14W +16 SomsfS* 

- 1602 2TS. 2v„ SonlcCp 

_ 1505 ,ft tft 7 _ , SonlcSrt 


„ 2*14 im iov> n +v* sumnn 

_ 36 •v,. <v.i uS. - SuraLsr 

za 38 7V* 6ft. 61* —V* SuroTc 

_ 1468 Wv 52V, 22W —ft, SUTvTc 

- 32296 2? 24V+ 26W +2W SusoBn s 

- 2106 1BV4 m« 17V* — 1W SuTHtsc 

582 4=6, V/. 6V% — SwHITs 
_ 4525 17%. 1? 14 —3 SwnaSU 

_ 187223*1 ZJ'.SZFVn *"a Swohwt 
_ 6549 UH ir-u 12Wi. - <* Swtsnar 
30 Vi. V„ +VB SvQstTc 

- 731 f ? 7V* *4* SybcMS 

_ 714 41* JV* JV* — ft. S v^ron 

- 2353 5V, 4Y» — SvfvcnFB 

_ 137*114* 71 lift, — U SvhmLrn 
_ 3776 lv. lift iv„ —v* Svmrtc 

_ 5521 \\\ tv., lift +«^ &/m»x 

2475 1* v u '«' r -W I Svmetrtc 
_ 379 5*. Sft. S’* —V* 1 SvnOPt s 

.. 4175 Ift 7 7 — lftilSyncttY 

_ 7BI21'. 111* 114* — 1 la Svnbto 

- 1334 >*%, 14* 111, +V u| SvncDr 

_ 992 21 ** 711. 711* — V, Svnrcm 
_ 584 11 9 T\— 1 Svneron 


247 7V* 2W IS + V* TrfieS 

m ltv> 11 11 —V. Trip**. 


tJO 4-0 1526ft. 24 2SV6 — V% Vkira 

_ 10721416 13W 14 +W VBSPM 

- 5036 139* 12 13 _ VoBch 

_ 964 6W 6 6W +Vu VoP*7 

„ 233 8» TV* IV, +lZ VYoGo 

- 2054 10H 91* 1BV% +) VWonSd 

_ 8724 BV* 7*% 814 +9% V»C 

_ 1107 4*6 416 4V, — W VBaSon 

251 6V% 5V6 5V% — V* VgtolC 

_ 3T7151* MW 15 _ yntsae 

_ 99 7W S 7Va +3 VhruS 

_ 753 11 W 10W IOV6 +W Vmcrt 

_ 1834 151* 149% 15 +W VaBIIlf 
4 V. 3% 4V. _ VolVO 


. “ !JZ Trtpo, _ 99 7W S 7W +2 Vlvi 

- S 22! 55 TriSiw _ 753 nw iow io** +w vng 

- A Trism _ 18341516 149% 15 +W Vo» 

,£ Ii5 IS *S ~ T S TAstor _ ICS 4V. 3% 4V, _ VoTu 

* 1J0 43 12 ISS St 4 T5 TfWINJ* -32 2J 397 1146 111* IIW - VW 

- <«32W 3014 31V6 +W TrSJNY 6 1JJ0 5.1 3«2D 19W 19V* —ft, 

. - S 5S£?Si?S; *5 Trttanks 40 XlxllWWW 17V61BV4+1 I 

1 _ 26109% 1016 104% — » Tseng JO 2J 2406 7V% 65% 71% _ I 

r dtk = =*sp as a jus 

; zXgtSjjgS:# ffie* z m di ffiSSJA!® 

■■a ~ laSaiSft vv? "nocln 30 1J 58 T5W 1« !JV% +W WLF 

n Z 2TM15W 13 U* -5 ^ J 571821*6 IIW 21V6 +W JW 

- 8811 149, U»* 14 V* +V6 SSs 


> 9203 S3V* 47 53ft. +4V. 

_ | 81* BW Bl* +46 

.M 2J) 214 1ft Kt m +96 
XMe A 264 Ml* 111* 139* +1 

- <7 3 2ft Jft -ft 

- 4«*«W 59* *W +96 

_ 13S2 17W 16V* :«* — W 
_ MS 9 8 BW — 

_ £29 10ft, 9V* 9ft. — 1 

_ 3642 SW 5 54* 

- 21814’* 139% 141* +1W 

_ 2280 20 1BV6 1546 —V* 
_ 72 179* 161* 1796 xlM 

390 1.1 5729496 919% 9ZV6-JV6 

- 468 49* 4W 4V6 +W 


7 10W 916 9** — VS. Sonoef** 36 IB 9543 20 ■* 20 29 _ Svnufc 

371 1816 1*46 1BW - -■* I SonocP pf 2J5 4JI 1 63 47 1 . 47 «7V% + Vi Svnopws 


.11 1.1 33 IOW ID ID |SouMo&£ 

- TmilW 10*i 114% +4* SoinxtA 
_ 54 9 BW 896 — Vt SMchG 


787 10T% 104% 101% +W, 
152 S’* 4% 5 1 * — W 
JOB 4 4 237 18’* (7 IS + U 


_ it* 9 iw. r* —9% 

J4 1.9 414 19 18 IBW +V? 

- 397 39* 3M 396 +» 

_ 8230 104* *V* 10 —96 

_ 479 316 3 314 

_ 3280 99% 9 916 —96 

_ 2418 16W 1496 159* +IV» 

— 12835439* 3796 41 +JW 

_ 1137 396 3 316 +16 


_ » 4V* 4*» 4*6 — >+ S«miT U7»e 5.1 ESI 21W J3». Jtft +l‘i SYShntl 

717 10<* 9W 9»9* * V„ SoBrc _ 2368 79* 6V, 796 - iK, Svs»mi* 

1.9* 3J 3574 5614 5516 MW + 1 SfhnEnH _ 378 13W 13 131, -rV% SYMCpl 

_ €3514** 1296 136% — W SoMlnrl fl5 SJ 1852 l “>4 >*m +Vu 

- 253 15 )4M 15 +1 SlhnoSv JO 13 7015V, IS 15 — W I 

- 254 26'., 25 25 —1 SourtOra M 3-2 6792 21ft. TOW 21”. — M. I 

677 129* 119* 174* tW So-rwa( _ 917 34* 3 34* +W 

- 49711 1016 10ft, —4* SwftBcp JT>e J 4513W 12ft. 1296 — V6 TAT TO* 

- 2246 IS 1 /. 14 J i 15W +'% SwCcsh 1 JO- 5.1 B7 34W 23A. 23*% — 96 TBC 

— TO 154- 15 ISftj +>. SwSTN,s 1X14 34 479V H a l* JJV« —V* TCA 

.12 1J 168 7*6 n* 796 + W Swsttc* .12 1J 637 8W TW 7ft, —ft. Tg Ira 

-40 1-415898 7*’+ 76 ft, 29ft. -7 SwWMr .40 18 8911 10’ i 10 V, - TXcfl 

.14 U 457 12*6 17ft, 12W — W Sowto -10D .* 507511 W 109* 1196 , 9* TFCEnl 

JO 14 273921V, 20V, 214* - ScocaLb _ 2315 23’* 27 Vi 27W —V. TMQ 


_ 4676 6*6 596 
_ 17149* 139* 

- 3592 1946 IIW 




JO U 2408 7V6 416 796 - I S. I 

— SM) 51% 596 546 +16 

_ 54 5 4 VS 44% —96 WCTCm - 2077 7V6 «W 496 —96 

- 1075 5 4W 49* +V% WD40 2-00 a 5.1 51 1 40'+ 3BW 39 —VS 

_ 16 7 *V% **% — *St WFSBOp __ — 7418 12 W 11 12 - 

JO 1J 58 15W 144% I5W +W WLRFd J2 1.1 1034 28ft> 27W 28 - 

J0$ A 521621*6 21ft. 219* +W WPICjp - 170 3 2Wo 3 — h 

WPP Go .040 1.1 12M*Wa 3W TVu - 

n 1 *SI &1 - 6'0 31% 8W 89% +W 

S I WRTpf 2-25 9 A 346 2(1* 23 34 

W5FS - 164 416 396 39* —ft, 

29 — W WSMP _ 45 5W 4W 5W 

349* +W WTD - 457 3V* 21* 3 — V6 

5W — W WVSFn S*e J JT 14V6 13 13V. —9* 

496 — to WOnfik - 44 4 4 4 +V6 

254* +W 


JO 1.7 104 299* 
JOb 12 153*9* 

JOB 3-6 3245 59* 
_ 24 4W 

1-00 It 628 

_ 12(0 1BV, 


U 628 28 2* +9% Wdbro AO 1J 798 259* 25 254* ■ 

_ 12401BW 17W 179* — W WoBclM - 1871 796 7 Tft - 

= JSMfc iow flu + +^ SBf- .. - fe, SS *. 


JO 1J 15098 2f+ 76W 29ft, +2 SwWMr 
.14 TJ 447 12*6 12ft. 12W — W Sowto 
* JO 1A 2739 21 W 20V, 214% - SboobUi 


- 655 16' , 1SW 16W - SoanAm .10 2-0 


XI 23 494 21 W 20 21 +1 

- 2202 7V, 7 m +W. - . _ 

_ 1444 4 3 VS 39* —4* | SuHlTft 

- ion i*u iw, iv* - 

.10 A 22718V* T796 18» +96 
_ 7375104%, 9V* IOW +V%, 

_ 3744 5VS 59% 59% — 9% SonHto 

- 278 3W 3 316 — W SOnW 

= «SwS Swtia 
:*8?raft 

_ 821 79% 7 7W +96 

- 947 6W 596 596 — W 

AA 35 1496 nW VSt 

RoBhOp _ 1899 59% 49% 5W 

Rotnsn _ 878 2V% IWu 19% 

* “ is^*}^ir+-T?s 

IIBIEWI | -mm 9SZI TZVl T3 m ayaiaiuiu JW f u> 7J1D 1778 6AT2 nm ' '• 

ReocklA m. 7910 mm +U, Scftvttz .16 S 39 17 16*4 17 « Vt 

Es& z as?asa aw* & -a ^ 

_ 270912V* 99% 12 +1W SdDyn _ uift »v 2** — w 

- 156017 16 1696 —96 SdGmo 

274 « 7 71% —46 

_ 1244 33V* 30W3n*,+2». 

r*S& & 

_ 2241496 139% 149* +1 

RcgnFn 1J0 3J 184234*6 34W 349% +V% . 

~ . - 500 13 129* 129* +9* SeraBds 

- 701 UW 129* nw —96 SCoCT 


* « jE 12 Iw a*. 


POK 2 7W2® «b , B* ** KSS, • Zss£i£k MW « +7W 
racSf C J9. *5 ^ 7^-1® 

3*a 1J 8Z8T5 T JJ? 7 ^? “w - BUTT*. UW T7 +9* 

®5Sr Jltt W& :S 

gks-3 ^ ;,jg»{wK=S 

R+?ftHrtNitE.rriKefci 


:S8I S J *! 
u 2 ^ 

— 25321 <09* 51W 6C +7W 
Z WOT* rtW 21 VS — J 3 

% 23 WA 19» 20V& +i* 


RopopI 

gePton M 

RbposAu 

Irbpauwt 

sss> ■ 

PepBcn 


gwwnfl. 

S? Ji.iY 
Ravfrn 
Ranor 
Rutrvrt 
R«trCr* 


_ mu t , m +w 

_ 4158259* 23W 21 -«* 

- 755 21 w mi ZOVt — W 

_ 54Z4 6W 4W 57% +1W 

- 2471 MAi 4W 691 +96 

- 2120 346 3 3 — V* 

- 1318 49* 31% 496 +96 

_ 1132 2W 196 19% +96 

- 4*4 9% Vk 46 +Va 

- 445119* IIW IIW +9* 

_ 2W 179*16* 17 +M 

JS 26 17B2 1296 129% 12W — W 

JMm 14) 207 4 39* 4 +96 

JS 7.1 ■ to IOW 1016 IOW 4V6 

- 186 39% 39* 396 -Wu 

- 122189* IB 18 —9* 

J2 A 9 19 594 4W 4W *W 

_ 9SB 996 89% 9 +9* 

.2390 1 794 BW +9* 

J11 £T ft 10 10 10 +96 

- 3201896 TB 18W +96 

- 1347 194 lVj, 1W, +Vfe 

z a a -5 


- 43 2V* Ha 2 V, +W SptlMIS XlSe J 901 WW It 

- 532 116 19* 19. —V* sregto _ 84 7 6. 

- 207 '+ V% ’+ —ft-* SpcJDv .. 1959 >0 b^- 

- 40 2*+ !*% 1‘W, — IS, ScdPop _ 134 9 a”, 

JO 1.7 118 1796 IT’S 17ft, + VS Soorai _ 9115 6W * 

SonReo 30 1 A 48913 IT 1 ., 13'.* SpeCBp - 313 19* 1W 

SondCflP .10e 3 12815ft, IS’J 159* +9* SpecOt - 159 3 29% 

JJS* J 409 VOW 9W 9V, — Vi SoecHol _ 3*41 «V. ■ 

- 130 n+ 7 79a + W SpetTcb _. 7928 7Wi 2 

- 327*22 lift. 19 + W SpdSJo _ 1157 3ft, 3' 

^ f* +< tsas z&'u.'i 

- 1597 11 W 946 1IW+IW SpAMWl JO .V 8121 8394 21 

- 4019 9 W 7V, 716 — W Spire 2 4 4 

- 209 IIW lO'i IOW — W SplOied - 57 4ft. 3' 

- 143 3W J 3W +*„ sprtmn _ 1472 159* 14 

- 376 16 *6 ft, — W SportRec -100542 3a- 

- 541 tw 7W 7*6 —ft. SWHera - 829 iv„ v 

- 1776 251m M’S 25 + ft, SBfKTWI _ +52 ft, ft 

- 43 20*6 nw 2DW - Seorrd. _ 984 r.a * 

■10« J 3367 19 1BW 19 SpcmTn - 341 3V, 2’ 

_ 2574 3*W 3SW 34fti + ** SpreC*oi _ 33 9+6 9’ 

. . _ 373S23W 21V. 23 *19% SqucYM _ 25 3 W 3’ 

SsMmn* JO 1J 9318159, 22W M*% — *% StoorSor _ 840 5V, 4’ 

.14 J 3P 17 14W 17 + W SMC0BC _ 4590 5 4' 

- 4334 7W 49* 6*6 —9* SIDcays _ 2W 2*lrtj 2' 

_ 13109* 10*6 109* _ StOCV* wt _ 104 mt ■-■ 

_ 54 29* 29% 2** — W SlnfBU _ 1427 31V.. 3’. 

- 1314 33 W 32+4 33'6 • W STOMP* - 7449 5 W 4' 

_ 1547 5W 4V* 4 *% * Vi SWMK _ 4484 17V* 15 

JO 2.1 491DW 99% 99* —9* SWN At 12 2683 21W 21 

» 85D1 30 29W 2 TV* — V. SmUTl „ 1114 14”, 15 

- 2231 *>6 69% <*', - SlontFos _ 541396 13 

_ 1 19% |9, 1H —9* SJorrt -08 J 1945 17V, 15 

48 11 2055 14»% 1516 +•*„ 5*aoayri _ BJ H, 1‘ 

-21039 aw 5W 7 —19% StOOflywt _ 197 9* V, 

At 23 8149% (39* ?3W — W Stasia* 5 -1067130V, 23 

- 4393 IB96 17 18ft, +1W SIorTc - 2244 iVu ft 

.1062X1 1718.?*%. 49% 5W •'■’a 5Vwtx5t s _ 27B37 2? '* 28 

1J0 1J 1544 919% «J +3 StarcflAu _ 51310V. «• 

At U 22 T8 179% 17’+ - StaTTH _ 4*8 1796 12 

_ 100 21 20!, 20W +W STOTAUl .18 1J *7514 13! 


XlSe J 901 1*W Iflfti 19V, — Va TNTRs J7 1J 

_ 84 7 6ft* 4W - V. 7PI 6n - 

1959 10 8 ft* 9 ft, -i« TRFne 

_ 134 9 B”, 8W - h TRMCPY — 

_ 1192 6W * **, “W THOLm - 

- 313 1W 1W l+> —9% TSI CP — 

- 159 3 296 2** — 96 TSI Inc .16 1 A 

_ 3*41 SV* ■ BV* - T5R - 

_. 7928 7Wi 2 2 — ’% TVXGW 

_ 1157 3ft. 39% 39* *W TOcaCcbs - 

- 72411 10'* 10ft. —ft'. TOkcOr _ 

- 340* Sft. *W 59* • W Tamver _ 

JO .9 8121 23’.% 21 22W *■ 1 TpnWpv 

2 4 4 4 — W TcwtsJm - 

- 57 4V. 39, 4V, *V% TOPOIvU _ 

_ 1672 159* 14 15ft, +196 Tor BBTf 

-1043642 3Bft%41'Vu - 2'fta TcSTTGePe 

- B29 iv u W ■■: —V, TcroPtl — 

_ «2 ft, ft* ■* —Vi. Tolhom _ 

_ 984 P/a V. ft. — Va TciiOat t —I 

- 341 3V, 296 3 - T child 5i 4.9 

_ 33 9+6 9'* *>• ■ ■« Techno — 

_ 25 39* 3'6 J ft, — >Vp TchCom _ 

_ 840 5V, 49, 4W — W TocnSol _ 

- 49*0 5 4’ * 49* —W TeencKM _ 

_ r»2!ft 29% 2W - Tecnmt* 

_ 104 „ 1-B ft* -Vo TocuOi JO a U 

_ 1427 3iV«, JV H 3W -ft, ToCuA* AD a 13 

- 7449 SW 4ft S'. ‘V, TKOnn — 

_ 4484 179* IP, 17', -96 TeMtoc - 

AS 33 2682 219% 21 21 —V. Tofcnfcm 

- 1114 16”, lift! 16 _ Tetaa 

_ 541396 131* I3ftSa _ TeMCt _ 

JOB J 1945 17V, 15V* I7W -V* TUOnA _l 

_ 322 2ft, 2+6 2W _ TetCmB _ 

_ 1V7 16 v* s»b +w, T«e«: -l 


- 2443 316 396 3** —ft* 

- 3909 1316 1246 1356 « l* 
M 1.9 13T7 23ft* 229* 2396 —V* 

- 1*4 49* 316 41* +|C 
_ 895 496 39* 39* —96 

- 100713W 129* 1296 -96 
— 10*14 1W *V„ IV* +tfe 

32 1J) 234S23W 21 219* — W 

37 7 .8 12938 22 W 209* 2156 —96 

- 23» 75% 69* 7 — W 

- 3295 15W 13*6 1416 +9* 
_ 985 4M 59* 4V6 +V6 
„ 295 7** 6V, 7V. +96 


— W TSI CP - 2835 1W, *9%, Wu +Vb 

-’A TSflnc .14 1 A 771196 lift 1194 +W 

_ TSR _ 7 4V6 VVn 4V6 +«» 

— «* TVXGW - 48540%. 6VS, 4W _ 

- v, TOcoCcb* _ 2752 1596 14 14 —19* 

—ft-. TpkeGr _ 421* 7596 70W 7596 +59* 

*W Tpn«h«B<- - 283 18 17 179% — W 

-1 Tanfctav - 470 4 396 3W» -Vo 

—ft* Ttwfclm - 385 3 296 3 +9% 

-V% TtioaliW _ 394 9%. W, W, +W, 

t 196 Tomer _ 37624V, 2396 2396 —W 

2>Vu TSoGei* - 452 6V4 * 4 

— V, TeroPh - 431 55% 55* 5W — ** 

— v* ruffian _ 23051*56 1596 1656 +W 

— '.a TchDott -228B4 17V6 155* 14W — W 

- TChnc* A* 4.9 213 12W 11 119* +9* US 

•>* Techno - 4B2 1196 109* 11 —96 US 

-•Vp TchCom _ 100 8 7 8 +1 US 

— V* ToChSol _ 1448 4V6 596 6 +Vu LIS 

— ft* TecnolM _ 245414 139* 14 +V4 US 

- Tecnmt* - 134 5 4W A6 — W US 

-v? Tocust JOB 1-5 17 549% J096 5456 +21* LB 


Z 105853396 

_ 548 2V6 

- 128* 96 

- U558>Vu 

- *417 
_ *80 396 

- 4031396 

- 225 7 

_ 304 596 

- S276 1594 

xn. 

.12 ij a§ 

:K 

_ 21* 296 
1J0 U 2342896 
20* B_5 258 24V, 
30 23 322 

1X0 13.1 48 7*6 

200 SA 25738 
_ nnnv. 
_ 1051 BW 
_ 735 4W 
3X14 At 144 24 
30 3J 22423 
1XU 4.3 417 1414. 

M 8 iSS?R 

1X» 2J 1340*6 


2X0 *J 219 20, 
_ 101 496 

— 1443 1496 

-48 1.7x48189 41V* 


JOB 13 1224 4856 4396 47 


LI 88 3BW 37W 38W „ SWefish JDe 1 J 1301* 
— 37454 2496 229* 23 — 5* SlfWd AO 3-3 44 12% 



r ms« 51» gw 5SSaf JOB 3 ^Iirw it* +» 

ja 3J 429 69* 79* 7W — "A "JJSfp, 2S 2*96 25 +W 

“ atftW HSfflr _ 1443 296 3V6 29% „ 

- ^ '■ ri6 +W M U • 1 MW 14W 14W-1 

®? KSP ■■ 2 Awi^tIS 

® s ":a S* zUSStLSi a 

S. M a S * « sssaisisj,* 

pSSSp _ 831 2796 » raSft Z 10 496 4V6 496 +W. 

3984 7%% S -~Z’ 2S5? - 9*69 38 W 33W 3«*— » 

- 484 & Zv£ 555 5 AO « fl* »W MW MW - 

• -367173m* » OTJ +1» . _ 44 IOW 9W 9W — 9* 

; _ 1711JM OTJ * Jw 2SSt . . ... 44SM96 *» row +9* 

” m 159% 15 15 g SSSdu 1 - OT»W 

=r--^: ,T Si-.*.® TS ^ - SB4. a a ** 


PoraOan 

Patftot 

PofThTdi 

m 

PBrUrva^ 


Rettx - 1757 7 *W 41% +V6 

di MSI 3Jisiai44w 4tw4m.+m*. 
rbxSuOs - 243* low *W low _ 

- 14**96 * 996 +16 

„ 723 496 596 59* — V, 9IVO+T3 

- 34 5W g* 596 +W SVFOQWU 

- 1534 I Vi 79% B — V% SrvSri 

.15 12 18 5 496 5 +V% StaiCih, 

- 4105 4 6 — W Shorresi 

■***• ^ i w*w=s ssa. 

zEtiLi SSSSo 

- 17*49% BW 4Vfe —96 

- 15 7W 7W 716 _ W ShattnB 

- 211 296 21* 2W| —Yu Shton 
_ 3762 1556 3396 15V, +3 V, 

Jfle ^83442 2056 2DW 209% +9t 
AO V WWW 35 3SW - ShprrBl 


At 3J 322135* 13V, 139. +'A SteArl 

- 51 15 14 14 - StaSlBm 

- 551 IIW IOW 1096 _ gntneas 

- 454 15ft* I4W 1594 +I'A !?XCXVn 

M 1A U10W 9W IOW +1 SWofTe* 

- 143 rife 2V, 29% - STtWVO 

M XI 3432 SOW 38W-1W SfeinMls 

J2 23 33 1896 17W lBIfe +1W Stofls 

A4 10 S34I496 13W 14*6 +96 Serges 

- 4097 42W 3H* 42W +3W StrlBnc 

- 5JJ96 7W 3 — Vt SnirilWA 

jo u i7su irw 13 +w snym 

J4 J 10 3496 32 33 — 1W SirlWsl 

- 38 MW 25*A 25%9 — W SrwSlv 

- 5451 19% 1 IVu —i/u SrewEns 

- 648 z 16 ft - Stfanson 

1.12 AA 29325W 24W 24 W — W Stofcety 

- 10 496 49* 496 - SMlCrm 

_ 1021 M'AMW+1 Stott 

M. 7193 69% 51* 696 • W BWOn 


_ 10671 30V, 29'* 30 • 1 Tetodta 

- 2204 *Vb ft* * V B Tefias 

-27107 32V, 28 32 >3 TeDcSM* 

_ 513 IOW «•'. 10’, +116 TrtrOrtl 

„ 498 129* 12 12V. - Tehikr 

.18 U *7514 I3W 1»4 Tefcffln 

JBelJ 13016 15V, 1P% 4 9* Teirrtm 

AO 33 44 IIW 12 12 -W Tenor 


- 47310 9V, 9W tW 

_ 127 6 5W $96 — W 

- 2787 15»* 1*9* 15Vu +9%, 

_ 895 W 9* ft* — *» 
-87571 23 20W22W+1W 

_ 1824 Z3W 24 *196 

- 14797 5W flfe 596 +Wi 
_ 554 139* 171% 13V* — 

_ 1390 K M M *H 
-1491337 34W 35W 4 VS 
_ 240 496 3%. 49% +W 

- 2892 14 1JW 14 +196 
.1 34771796 14W 17V6 +46 


-I2S99 3294 
ZOO 18 502 52 
AO 3-7 20W11W 

- 274416 

- 447 13W 

- 2925 IIW 
At 13 XS043TW 
.12 J X257 27 

MO X4 989 41 W 

- 142 89* 

- 1203 a 
AS J 2712 7W 

- 314 3W 

- 271 

- 429 7W 7 


39* +4* WtOshr M 23 *95 IOW 10% 1016 +W 
W +16 WOndGW - 472 TOW TOW 109% — V. 

BW _ VtooUO - 5835 129* 11W 12%* +9W 

1696 — V6 ftTnoLwt - 19* 49% 6W *9% 

Wh — Vu Wvntc . 1209 4W 4 4W +V6 

law — 9* Worrot - 5S a 796 796 — V« 

7 +W WtohBCP - 97 >416 14W 14% _ 

596 — V6 WFSL JObAO 3021 27ft* 2296 2»'» —14, 

14W— 3 WtflFOC - 12S3 4W 39% 4V6 +W 

2196+196 WM5B* AB 3J2TB9471M 20W Z1W +W 
5V% +W WAflSBpjC2J8 BJ 5824 259* 24 

5V% - WMSBPR3&XB 4J 1154 *49* *1 M *49* + IV6 

IOW +V6 WMSBplEIJO 84 117 229* 22 229* + V, 

3W — Vs WiBfdW - 42 BW 8V6 896 +1* 

5V, + Vt wartn — TO 2 2 2 

29% — W WotartPh _ 424319V* 1496 1*W +296 

2M6 +46 Wafts hi I J3 .9 4502 2SW 229* 25W +116 

24W - WtwsP* M 3 *77 24 W 24 26W _ 

22 —2 WnwUrrt _ 7275 *% 5V. 6V* - 

796 +W, WOmbt M 2A 222 18W 17V* 1BV% +9* 

37 — V* W&3S9JM _ - 4411* 15V* I* +ft* 

1BW +96 WtSlFn -52U Zl 21S24V6 23 24V, +1 

8 +W WMbO l.lOtSJ T7SI3V6 12W13 

4>« - VMBek - 1257 496 49% 496 — Yu 

259% - Wettxn - 310 19V, 19 19 - 

2296 —V* MfeBMgt - 1909 219% 20 W TOM— 1 

14 —V* WMIS — B5B1328 24U 3SW— 2W 

«W~+W M 3 2BJJ& gw^ + i« 

39 - Wvsbmc -84 10 432S 27 3B +V, 

496 +V* WSICMCA — ISO W Vu W 

396 -96 WdCOH. JO 1J 2912 11V. 11V* - 

2«V% —V» Wsttfcr - SC 109* 19W 29M +9% 

15 +W WNewtn XO 17 20 Wm 24 34 

3SW +2 WsJOr»» -72 23 454232V, 31 31> +Wj. 

B —Vt WXunBc 30 23 32*30 2896 29V* - W 

ISV6 —V* WeStcoB .130 J 94 17V* 189* 19M + W 

2B96+19* WsfCUs -92102159* 14 1SW +1V* 

249* +U Wtostoried X»e A 126714V* 13V* 13V, +«* 

49* +9* Witolfcs JDril 179 149u 15V* 14 +9* 

14 — W WtrOeef - 174 7 <W 7 +% 

409% +¥u WRPlt AOCXI 39 28 25 30 

4 — vt WMKTc - 2317 7V, yw 7 -1 

30ft*— 1V6 WsfnPb _ 2147 12 II ITV* —ft* 

S2 +W WstWotr _ 960 73 21 219%— IV* 

109* —9% Weston _ 75 8W 796 8 — U 


4JW — W WnSYl 
129% —94 WHoBc 
17 —9* WsfwOn 

31 — 1W HYatSert 

24 —1 WhaoOY 
4096 +W WMtoBvr 


- 4267 15W M% 15 — W 

_ 25 39* 2ft* 24* + <* 

- 3895 |W 79% a +*% 

_ 242 3V6 3 3 —V, 

JM J 1*570 15 WV, 149* — W 

- 24934W 329% 34 W +W 


8V* +9* WMMdS AO 2J 3C7D28W *5 24W+1W 

7ft* _ Whlf-ds. - 317717 15 169% +1W 

*9% — W WhoCafl _ 434 4ft6 *lVu — Vu 

3 _ WwHfyi -725414 12*6 15»A +1W 

19* - WfeSOju _ 2B1V15W UW 15 —V. 


23 —V* 5ff=nd +0 3-3 J4 IIW 12 12 -W Tenor 

134. + V* SteArl — 1«90 8 4 W 4W — l V u Tenpcrs 130 18 

M - StaSf&D J4 1J 1404* 43 40W 43 -2V* TetroTcs 

10ft* _ Statncas - «ks is jut, isw -w Term _ 

1S96+1W fleck vn - 48 9W 896 896 —96 Tam -23e .9 

IOW +1 SMafTo M A 3833 17 ISW 1*6, -W TexRCOf -1 

29% - STTWVO - 4341346 I2W 13 +W ThfTCfl 

MW— 1W SfcJnMls - 400ft 21 Vj 179, 21 +9* Ttiroen _ 

1BW+1W Starts - 6707 21 30 7IW +1 ThofOun 

149* +ft* SJerSes JB U 33 38ft, 38 v* 38ft. .. Thrniody 

GW +39* SfrlBnc JO IA 9917 I6V6 >69% - TTiommG 

3 —1* S/rlFnWA - 267 139% 17W 13ft* -1W ThomMA JO U 

13 +tu SWF pf - 26425M 74ft. 25V* - Thmsr 3J»B 73 

S3 —life SfrlWsI J00 7J 5 2ft* 7+1 2ft* -Vu ThmAV Jfl 1.1 

uv* — W 5IWSIY J4 J1I2M45W 41 44ft* 4 2ft, 3Com -1 

lVu —Yu SlewEns J4 J J124J4** 23%; 34’., -W 3DSyS 

Iftfc _ Slimsan - 787 IP* W* IO”, — V, 300 Co - 

MW —to Stately - 171010 9W 10 - to TltfeWB 

896 _ SMCOnx - 532 Wu iW 89% — W TUeMrk 

MW+1 Stott _ 350 »W row ww— 1 1 Tlaera - 


- 112129% lift* 1296 _ 

_ 0701796 1516 1496 +16 

JB ID 1574396 42V, GW — W 

_ 5702016 19U. 20 +96 

- 1338 996 BW Mh — W 

-23b .925314 25 221% 24W +W 

-i 1465 14W 1296 1396 +** 
_ 1871 T5W 139% 14 +1% 

_ ns 4W 316 — 


- 705 496 396 496 + 96 

_ 2Z7 5W 59* OT, +W, 

- 231 139% 13 13 —to 

_ 1201496 1496 1496 +9% I 

JO U 101796 1* 16 —196 I 

2J8b 7J 370 319* 20W 29H—1 
Jfl 1.1 497259% 94to 249% —19% VBo 

-112421 50 4dto 4496— 396 vug 


— Mil IT, — nj**W m. ffll, l,n w, 

- 429 7to 7 1 -96 WtyJA 1.10 1J 28B4V. 82W 84"6 - 

- 363 196 1W 1W — 9% WtDnmt JA 2.1 19«5 «W 43V, 4*v% -I 

Z 237 4 39* 3»* —ft* WmSon* _ 201 33W 31to 339% +lft%. 

m. 60871196 IOW IIW +96 WfttlTr 1JJ8 4.1 25072aW 2SW UV9 +W 

MO 4J2 47 34 319% 33 +2 WjndRtor - mjj. m j —to 

1.17 tA 115189% 17ft* 176* _ WfeHlFu — 122 99% * *96 +>6 

- 258 496 3to 31% —4% WinstanH -139831196 10 11 — W 

Z 89 34W 23to 239% -W W6«£R8 JO J 68129% 12 1? -fc 

- BS3 6W 5to 5W — Vu WlseCT _ 458370 489* 4M* —to 

JB ZJ 12S2S96 2399 24 —96 WOtahn JB 23 831 1496 1396 14 —9% 

- 1110 796 7 TV, +96 Worshrre - 399014 13 13to +96 

- 88 5W 5W 59* — 1* MwdM J4 2J 20 15W 159* 1596 - 

WrfcCao -54 23 1328W 271% 3to - 

• — f WJdAco _ 34318 1TW 17to - 


990 14 13 13*6 

20 15W 159% 1546 
122BK 271% 3to 
343 18 171* 17to 


- 44 41% 4 4>% - Wyman 

-19450159% 13W 1596 + 196 


WldAcp _ 34318 171* 1796 - 

99torff=ds .12 \A 134 9 Sto 09* - 

WartTVS AO II*26531W* 1896 1* 
Wyman - 160 698 59% 6 —to 


- 3530 3 296 29% +9% VSSBcs J8 1J 2522 21 W 219% — V* 

_ 4G616U 12W 151% +296 VWft AO 3J 205119% 1096 109% +96 

- 7BI2VS IIW IIW - VpcOry XlSe J 26 IOW 996 TOW - 

- 05 2V6 m 2 - VrfTee fi - 2365 8 7 796—96 


- 7193 A 9% 5to 6to +W I STTWOTl _ B780 23ft, 2M* ZJto 4 I W I TlmBSf 

- 16515 15H 13H 14W +19% smuoa f.ia 5.4 140771 lev* MW — v« I TodavM 


_ 657 «Yu * * - Srab+r 

- 004 69* 59% Sto + to SrrucO _ 

_ 113 »to 9 » -96 Sfnrfeer -07 e J 

- 7B2 aw *’.% «w —to snuiEn 

- 2702 ISW 179% IBto +to SturtDS 

- 2868 8 7W 79* +96 SuOAUcr 

_ 78 18V, 171% 171% —5* StfiBcp 1.00 1J 


_ m to* 6%, +V„ VaMtai 

- «1 6 6 - VetvSy 

- 201* 11W 99* 1096—1 VtJBCoi 


- 1416 W W - TwMAO 46 13 40 49% 366 396 - 1 V(4mnt 


_ 13087 1096 9 to 10ft* 4 Vi Todtantr _ 339 15V* 149% 1494 — M VaMdOTI - 9*3 

-07 e J 47593’., 36V, 2*to +9* TokioF JBe J 19366 639% 43H — W VofLn 

_ 60 Sto «V% 5 +W TohaSNU - 1913 4V, 36% <96 „ VUVtaA 

502 'W: v h "u +'/» TmkPK JOe 3A 44! lJH 13 13H +to VordCJ 

549 4W 4 a , -v„ Tomato) IJObZA 304 38 38 + 96 Vons 

49 WW U tt —to Tow* 39 X9 B7» 71% 6*% 7V6 +9% Varflm _ — ~ 

•9* 13'+ IS 13W -9% TobsAbI - 343 *W A 496 —to Vtffeni AO 1.9 757 

983 69% ft*, *9* TorRoy _ 235 49* 4 4 —9* Vllfvt *™ 

4*822'.% 21 21 to +to TotCoffl - 58139% 13 139% _ VousB® 

251 I5Y: 14ft-. 151% - W TdfJTel - a 189% 17 17 —1 VBdSfe 


- 339 15% 149% left* — V 



J4 3A 9990 239% 221% 73V6 - SvdbwY 

- 854 3ft* 3to 3W — V, SiAIBnc 

- 316 4to 4ft* 4ft* + 9* SuUOnt 

- 958 169% 15V, ISW— Ito Soman 


,9% SubBnal JO 1J 49ft 13W 13 


_ 327 129% Uto lZto +96 XRfts 
_ 18 IH il% 11% — V* XcetNsr 

32 11 531 in* 14to 159* +W »ar 

JS 15 32* ISW WVk 15W +VA Wftx 


_ 983 «lk *to ftftfc —to TorRoy 

AS 3.1 *4822'.-, 21 21 to -to ~«Cfl»)l 

_. 251 15 V: 14ft-. I5t% - 9% TotlTW 


vdAdCm _ *63 4 no - ffrenn 
VWLn JO 3J *35 32 35 +3 Xpedto 
-12481 4*6 4 6W, +w» X**W 

- *8193394 32 XH* + 1to, Xylooic 
_ U3.S 49* 5 +9% XVttfct 

AO l!* 7021 20* 2094 +46 I 

_ 5214 15W 159* —to I 

- S» VA 96b Sto — V% . 


_ 1525 39* 394 396 — V» 
.16 A 1215 2(to 27W 34V4 +2 

- 158S12W 1194 1196 —to 

_ 25*9 2Wu 2W. 29% —Vt 
—3125248 3996 4496 +4 

-23S881BW 1594 17W +1 

- 3189 1796 1496 1*9* -96 
_ l«lVl 1V» IV, _ 

- 1630 189% 1796 irA +96 

- 805 ISW 14ft* 15 +(* 


If UW Tll% 1196 — ' to Sumltapt 230 BJ 5423 139,3 4 W TrDcor 

44 18U 17to 189% + 1 Sornmof _ 2*17 *7W 24*’. 27’* -to TrncSup 

789 796 AW Vn +to Summos - 484 ft 1 ., Sto *'% -to TrekAU 

408119% 8to *W— SW Sunmon - 1531 8to 7to 7’i ■ Vj TmsFln 


— W Tout Air XMe A 480 7W *to 696 —4% VoefraTe 


9% iw +4* somim 


RoartGasl 

RotWtyr 

RofeW 


- l w 14y ‘ — V* ShrWWj A4 3J 137209% 19'* 199% +9% SumftTX 36 

— 49* 6 6 —9* a»rwO - 2270 17V, I6W 1?>» +W SumCre 


J4 3.7 1701 OTi 27 72 v, 
J6 1.9 70 18V, ItV. Hi, 


fiSr-vri rssiii^i = 886 . a a * 

pSrfpT - ^ 1* 6W Sto 4W +96 J) ]j . K^w 3196 319* -96 

'&k: ■— .f ®.-« S5 

I 184 896 7» 7V, -IW 
+. 1183396 09% 9to +4% 


z'3t : X- 

_ 40 W. VW, 


7 +1 Prw*ri 

Vi, uwJ prOT*»». 


’5 B-TISCSeat^ *•** 

2J» 53 8135 33 35 +W 

« - " r * f 

. . _ 343 U lift* law +96 

_ 977725V* 2396 Z5tfu *Vm 

.13 1J 434 49% 496 4to — V% 

_ 499 5to 59* 546 49* 

- 4477179* 1496 17 +W 

. _ . US S3 1556299* 28W 2996 +16 

FtortTen ’Se 4 ? ^7 MW W6 ft +5 Smlr 

R^I^fl I H82 25W 249% 25 — W sSvb^ 

SvOWlS At 2A 13934 18 1491, If +H SfareGc* 


- 854 11 IOW II .. SumltTc 

- 355 7V, 7 7W - SuflBnQi 

- 1676 IOW «» 9ft* —to SonMIc 

- IOC 2V U Vt, 2Vu — vs. SunSot 

.Me A 2005 239% 224* 33 to +W Sun TVs 

-19751 229* 189% 209%— lft* iunBefl 

- 1197 8to Tto B —to SuiSov 


TOW 70 'i —to Sun«WA .14 1.7 25 0”. 7ft* IW - TffiLW 

4* Somim J4 17 1701 22to 27 71', ■ '■« Trittrtus 

9% SumtSTX J6 1.9 70 18V, 1*96 >8', ■ Ito Tronllt 

W Siamcre - 1717 SOW 20 .’ll —to TmsWtf 

.. SunWTc _ 2178 J?W 26 24*, -9% TrnNtw 

- SuflBncp .9*b 13 125 31 2* 29 - Trrnml 

to SunMIc -35*78 229% 20 to ?1 to .to TmmerJs 

7% SunSot „ 635 54* 4to 59, 4 W TVnReCo 

to Sun TVs 44 A*Sm lOto 10 IOW ■ to i Tmsnl 

ft* SunOafi 127 7W 7 71% - ' i l TromtJtG 

to SunSov _ 1B6 5to Sto Sto • W TrwtBC 


- 385 SW 8 89% • to ] Sun5v ot 1 JO 9* 3912ft* UW I2W - V, TrovPri 

- 94 3to 3to »*iu 4 V a SunUTOnr - 4173 74% S'* 6 — U'-'i. Treafca 

- 4116 Sto SW SW _ SunGrd _ 381*37 35 a .% 25’+ —to Tm«* 

- I4W 8to 7W 7H —ft* ) Sunutau -14023 3096 271% 209* -9% TMcore 


- 4116 Sto SW SW - SunGrd _ 3814 37 35to 2Sto —to TriMcX 

Z IJW 4W 7to 7ft* -ft* Sundtau -14023 3096 271% 2096 -9% TTfcore 

J 6242G>A 40 40*6— IW SunSCA .151 5.0 225 3 2D 3 -to TriOdGty 

_ ffiJIV 2 79% + 96 SunBcNY _. 635 18W 164% 18 + 1 TrtaaSY 

- 1597 Sto 496 5 + 4* Sunuo _ 103 SW S 1 * Sto —to TrianBc 

_ 215 ito IW lYu *Vu SunrTc _ W74 5W 5 19* +«% Tr-Poa 

- at 9W *5% 99% - SuriMn w? .. 170 to "a -v'u IVlCoBn 


Tracer - 60 89% 8 896 — W VUiboM 

TrocSup _ 1083 2596 21 25 +146 VMrttx 

TrckAU - 4313 12V* 13 +>6 VttlCty 

TmsRn J* 3J 360159* 14 159* +4% VBrtum 

TfltM - 200 34k 346 3ft* +4* VBrAto 

TrnAAtH - 33 IIW 1046 119% +96 Veritas 

T/onlrt - J® L ]> 2 —W VlPOi 

Tmswsr - 3f1 34* 3W 2to _ VTTedtfy 

Trrww - 13(3 1046 10ft6 10ft* +16 Versa 

Trmml - 56 496 4 4V„ +V, VeSta* 

Tmmeris - 1693 1396 IOW 12 +4% VBfflmC 

TVnReCa - 3421 2496 2246 23W +W VertxPh 

. Tmsnl - 254 Zftto life HYu —96 VefOAm 

’ , | TransncGs - 386 12K lift* )79* ♦! VatAm wl 

W TrwtBc Aft 4.9 5 14 14 U —to Vkotne 

W TrovPri - 1353 2W 196 3 — V% Vlcnt 

rreudeo .16 1.1 24 15 149* IS - Vtaur 

Tmud! IX» 13 62* 43 41W«2ftt+196 Vlcom 

Trtcnre - 456 3 29% 2«Vu +W. Vlctfln 

TriodGty - 15615ft* MW 15 +W vnetftii 

TrtaaSy v 796 5W 646 44% t W VUDIO 

TrtanBc - 1411 996 99* - VUcuL 

TriPoa - 190 lift* lift* llto —4* VltMFr 

TnCoBn 40b 2.1 19 19W I7W >99% +3 VtoiriB 


971104* 1096 109% +9% V*8««Q> M SJ) 6S57 19W 189% 1896 + 96 

811 794 6 7% +lto YesOVi _ 6 194 IW 196 _ 

U9 79% 796 7W' — \6 YortcFf) AO XD XD71 SOW 2DV6 - 


„ 811 794 6 7% +196 VesOtfi 

_ U9 79% 796 7W'— ’A YpritFft 

- 4379 34*6 22W 2294— I W Varkta* 

_ 360 Vh !94 2Wa *toi Your*er 

JO 3.1 35 9 VA 9 4194 

- 3401 17ft* 17 17W f — — ' 

- 8219 16W 16 W — IW I 

AB 2A 71 1096 18Vk 1BW — Vk 

_ m M4 8 Oft* - Z5ovn 
32 c 22 131(96 I4to 1444 —to ZafcCo 

_ 1055 746 69% 646 —to ZaWCpwt 
_ 391 1916 129* 139% +to zarino 

- 2538)3 13 129* - Zebra 

_ 320 7W 79% 79% —4% ZenLobs 

= ifts » g 3E ss 
iiBjrass *!! sr- 

-8)8715 14W T4W —’A ZoHMed 

42 XI 180 3444 24 3*96 +61 Zottafc 

- *5 2? St ZJ* ioornTT 

_ 5 Ito 294 2 to +9% Zvcad 

- 1150 13 to 13 12 — Vk Zyao 

_ 91 4(6 496 44* —3/u rvneuis 

- 4879 279* 19 1996— 2V, ZrWC 


- 1676 446 316 496 +V4 
11631496 14 MW +96 


- 5317 14 17 +1 

. 8473 996 BW Sto —to 

- 209 3 39* Iftk 

™ 20 894 8Vu 89* 

- 717336 29WJ4V» + TBu 

- 9553 17ft* 1696 17 

_ MIS 2ft* 2ft* 29% +96 

- 58043596 3146 3JV% +2W. 
1.12 2J 625 (Ito 40V% onto —to 

- 1957 496 346 (to +W 

» Mao iav% ir* irw — w 

- 572 896 7 7% —ft* 

_ 5103 1296 99* rife -716 

- 2202 3 3to 25U +V» 
_ 148 7W 7 7W +to 

- 871 246 24% OT„ + ’A, 

- 25* row 9w io " 


i 



-“Air.- 


Pa 

«" P: 


Page 20 


M 

i 

i 


c 

'■ t 

lilli 

cur 

OD 

irir 

trai 

■ T 
l.fr 
1.6 


sle 

5.6 

Sw 

po- 

fro 

■ I 
r°f 

Ira 

bai 

at 

Sk 

ba 

till 

do 

lev 

irij 

de 


J 


ro 

Pi 

kc 

Ei 

C|i 


S' 1 

fit 

bd 

fo 

ec 

ar 

w; 

le 

ar 

tc 

m 


b. 

te 

ir 

& 

N 

y 

p 

u 

Cl 

a 

ti 

0 

r« 



OT 

snr 


sue 

GM 

GNI 

GP 

GTI 

5-1 

CtZ- 

Got 

Cl3l 

Gar 

Gar 

Gw 

Go 

Go 

Got 

viG 

Go 

Got 

GO 

Go 

Gal 

Gal 

GtY 

is 

Go 

Gri 

Ce< 

Gn 

Go 

Gn 

On 

Go 

Gn 

Gr 

Ge 

Go 

§ 

Ge 

Ge 

Ga 

Gc 

G« 

GO 

Go 

Gc 

Go 

£ 

£ 

Gc 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 


■ .... 



Rangers Take 2-1 Lead 
As Canu cks Self-Destruct 


The Associated Press 

VANCOUVER. British Colum- 
bia — Goodbye PaveL Goodbye 
McLean’s magic. Goodbye home- 
ice advantage in the Stanley Cup's 
championship series. 

Pavel Bure was qected after 
high-slicking Jay Wells in the face. 
Kirk McLean put the puck into his 
own net and the New York Rang- 
ers capitalized on all that to beat 
the Vancouver Canucks. 5- 1 , Satur- 
day night and take a two-games-to- 
one lead in the hesi-of-7 series. 

“Maybe if the first goal doesn't 
go in. we keep the momentum." 
said McLean, who stooped S9 of 93 
shots in the first two games but was 
done in by bad breaks and his own 
bad play in Game 3. “Everything 
kind of collapsed from then on. " 

Vancouver was leading. 1-0. on 
Bure's first goal of the series when 
McLean, who stole Game 1 with 
his 52-save performance, steered 
Brian Leetcb's shot into the net 
13:39 into die game. 

Simply trying to keep possession 
in Vancouver ice, Leetch, who 
scored again in the second period, 
flipped the puck toward the net. 
McLean got down on one knee and 
prepared to steer the puck to the 
comer, but it hit his right skate and 
trickled between his pads. 

“They were pressuring us pretty 
good and we were trying to sur- 


vive.” Leetch said. “To get a freak 
goal like that, and all of a sudden 
vou're tied up, it obviouslv deflated 
them." 

Then, with the Canucks on a 
power play at 18:21, Bure and 
Wells came together near the right 
boards and Bure, trying to lift 
Wells’s slick with bis own, jerked 
his stick into Wells's face. 

Referee Andy vanHeliemond as- 

STANLEY CUP FINAL 

sesssd the automatic five-minute 
major and game misconduct penal- 
ties. 

Fifty-four seconds later. Glenn 
Anderson scored the winner for the 
second consecutive game and the 
Canucks never responded. 

Bure, who led ihe league wiih 60 
regular-season goals and has a 
league-high 14 in the playoffs, will 
not be suspended, said the NHL's 
senior vice president. Brian Burke. 

Mike Richter made 24 saves for 
the Rangers, who had temporarily 
surrendered the home-ice edge by 
losing the opener. If they win 
Game 4 here Tuesday night, they ’ll 
have the chance to wrap up the 
series Thursday at home as they try 
to win the Cup for the First time 
since 1940. 

The most physical and conten- 
tious gam e of the series turned out 


to be the most decisive loss or the 
playoffs for the Canucks. 

Leetch, the Rangers’s only offen- 
sive-minded defenseman because 
top regular- season scorer Sergei 
Zubov was out with a chest injury, 
moved past Wall Tkaczuk into 
third-place on New York's career 
playoff scoring list with 52 points. 

Steve Larmer and Alexei Kova- 
lev added third-period goals. 

While McLean allowed more 
than four goals for the first time in 
18 games and only the second time 
in the postseason. Richter held the 
Canucks to one goal for the second 
straight game in clearly outplaying 
McLean for the first lime. Richter 
allowed only Bure’s breakaway 
goal 1 :03 into the game. 

After Leetcb’s fluke goal tied it. 
the Canucks still appeared to be in 
good shape when Leetch was pe- 
nalized at 17:56 — meaning the 
Rangers had to kill the penalty 
without Leetch and Zubov, their 
best two defensemen. 

But after Bure's penalty and .An- 
derson's goal, Vancouver looked 
like a beaten team. 

With the teams skating four a 
side. Sergei Nemchinov shot from 
the slot and Anderson, who was 
facing center ice. deflected the 
puck through his legs and between 
McLean's pads to put New York 
ahead for good. 



For Knicks or Paeei|g 
Game 7’s a Lucky 



Wud Etna Tac .luoexal Prru 


fifty-four seconds af rer Pavel Bure's ejection. Glenn Anderson beat a fallen 
goalie Kirk McLean to score the winner for the second consecutive game. 


By Clifton Brown 

New York Tones Serriee • 

NEW YORK — A compelling, emotional 
and unpredictable series was to come to a. 
dimax Sunday nighL . 

Either the New York Kmcks would reach the 
National Basketball Association’s champion- 
ship series for ihc first time since 1973 or ws 
Indiana Pacos would get there for the first ume 

Those were the lofty slakes for Game 7; of the 
Paqgm Conference final between the Kmcks 
and Pacers in Madison Square Garden. The 
winner will open the best-of-seven game final 
series Wednesday night in Houston against the 
Rockets. . 

The Knicks. written off by many after their 
stunning borne loss in Game 5, showed charac- 
ter and resiliency with a remarkable 98-91 vic- 
tory Friday night in Market Square Arena that 
canceled the party ready to begin in the Pacer- 
crazed dty of Indianapolis. 

John Starks, who leu the way to victory with 
a 26-point, 6-assisi effort, said; Tm very confi- 
dent. Going home makes it a lot easier, on our 
home court, and we have our fans behind us. 
We’re going to get the job done.” 

If many expected New York to lose Game 6, 

even more were expecting Indiana to lose Game 
7. The home »«*ni has won 18 consecutive 
Game 7s in NBA playoff series, dating to 1982. 

Starks was the best player cm the floor in 
Game 6, making five 3-pointers and playing 
tenacious defense against Reggie Miller, who 
scored 27 points but who made just 8 of 21 
shots. 

It was vintage Starks, full of fire and energy 


that rubbed off oa hs 

nc since be returned just oefareAhe 
from arthroscopic surgery cat tas left 



nbaplayotfs 


? 


□arter, but Starks was the aggressor*? Ganur 


‘I thought John Starks had. an ueraj&k. 
game, especially considering whai/Reggrc 
Miller did in New Ywk,” said 
Pacers’ coach. ; : v % :- v 

With Miller contained, .the Facets attempted 
to go to center Rik Saaxs in the low post 3nfh£ 
did not deliver, making' 2 of 7:shots from: the r 
field in the third quarts 1 . And noLo&hr dsL 
Stmts not make his shots, be rardy passetL 
Knowing that. Patrick Ewing was able falwil*-- 
er Smiths attempts with a gg ressive .' - 

The Knicks had suffered a tmgbr setback 
when Ewing committed his second foatatli&iv 
of the first quarter, sending hint to tberhea&: : : 
for the rest of the quarter. He had 11 fit&ftgf 

S hits, but the fold tnxibfe prev t u fe d iugrSo&) 
ving a bigger half. And tire Knj&s^gttatiK 
was fortunate not to be catted far lus tiigsL . 
personal moments before halftime, "whea hr 
tripped Miller as the guard draV? to the baste*. - . 
The foul was called on Starks, bd it waa fil- 
ing's leg that Miller stumbled over: ■' " 


.-i • 




^ - • 


‘L 2. IJ : 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 



East Division 




w 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

New York 

33 

18 

-647 

— 

Boston 

31 

11 

-996 

2Vs 

Baltimore 

» 

24 

.538 

SVj 

Detroit 

25 

27 

A81 

8 Vi 

Toronto 

75 

28 

A73 

9 


Central Division 



Chicago 

32 

19 

Jt.71 

— 

Cleveland 

29 

21 

580 

2 VS 

Kamos Ciiv 

77 

7S. 

519 

S'-v 

Minnesota 

27 

25 

519 

Sift 

Milwaukee 

23 

30 

434 

10 


West Division 



Texas 

25 

27 

.481 

— 

Californio 

23 

32 

.418 

Ti 

Seattle 

22 

31 

•41S 

2<1 

Oakland 

16 

38 

-396 

10 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East Division 




w 

L 

Pci. 

GB 

Atlanta 

34 

18 

554 

— 

Montreal 

31 

22 

585 

3W 

Florida 

27 

77 

500 

8 

New York 

26 

27 

.491 

SV] 

PWtaOtlphta 

1b 

29 

5? 3 

V.] 


Central Division 



Houston 

31 

23 

574 

— 

Cincinnati 

30 

34 

556 

1 

St. Louis 

28 

24 

538 

1 

Pittsburgh 

22 

30 

423 

8 

Chicago 

22 

31 

575 

SI: 


West Division 



Las Angeles 

2* 

26 

527 

_ 

Cotoraaa 

25 

28 

.47! 

3 

Sen Francisco 

25 

30 

AS I 

4 

San Diego 

1? 

36 

265 

10 


Friday's Une Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Kansas City 130 000 023—7 12 I 

New York 210 MO 001— 4 11 1 

MJIacki. Brewer 17). Bcllndc fBI.Monrgam- 
or> (?) and Moyne; Perez. P.GIDsan 16). 
X.Hsmondei l?i.Hllcnoock (9). Pall (?) and 
Stanley. W— Brewer. 3-0. L — P. Gibson, M. 
Sv — Montgomery IB). HR — Kansas cilv, 
McRae «). Gaettl (8). Gome M). Mew York. 
Mottlitalv (4). 

Texas 100 220 208—13 13 0 

Batten Ml 100 000— 2 9 1 

B .Hurst. Oliver (6), Howell (8), Carpenter 
|9)and l.Rodriguaz; FlmvoWL Frohwlrtti (SI. 
Howcrd (7). Harris l?) and Bcrrvhlli. 
W — BJHurst. M. L-PIimvoM. 0 -2. 
HRs— Texos. Conseco 2 (13). Palmer (61. 


cniewo oio 2M :»-< ; o 

Baltimore Ml 010 SOO-2 7 0 

Bene. Cook IBl.McCasklll (81. R.H*rnondez 
(7> and Karkovlee; S Fs.-immu and Holies. 
W— Sere. 7-1. L—S. Fernandez. 3-3. Sv-RHer- 
nandaz (61. HRs— Chicago. Thomas (21). Ven- 
tura (11). Baltimore. BvJUiaerton 16). 
Minnesota 031 flit 038 ON 0-8 14 0 

Detroit 2M 90S 010 ON 1—9 17 0 

(T3 innings) 

Dethglet, Will.] «ej, Morrlman It). Guthrie 
(8), Aguilera (8). Caslon (10). Sfevens (10) 
and waibeck; Guiildisoa S. Davis it). Gardi- 
ner (0). Hennemor (I), Soever (101 ono Telt- 
leton. Fkmerty not. w— laovor, XL L — Sht- 
vans.O-1. HRs— Minnesota, A.Cole (II. Mock 
(6). Detroll. Phillips (71, Fryman <7>. Fielder 
2 114), Fell* 15). 

Milwaukee 003 IN 000-4 7 I 

Californio ON 210 000-3 7 1 

Bones, Ignaslak 17), Fetters (?) and Nils- 
son; Langston. WLLflter 15). B.Patlerson (8). 
Grohe (?) and CTurner. w— Bones. Sh. 
L — Lanostart, 2-4. Sv— Fetters (4). HRs— Mil- 
wouitee. JotKi (8). Surnott (2). Colltomlo, 
CDovls (10). Edmonds (2). 

Cleveland 030 002 3IO-? 11 1 

OflMaOd 020 000 012-5 12 2 

MXIark. Plunk <6), Lllllqulst (9] and SaIo- 
mar: B.WItt, Harsmon (6), Tavfor (e). Reyes 
IB) and 5tclntech. Helfand (71. W— M.CIork, 
6-1. L— 8.Wlit,*t HR— Oakland. Bordlcx (1). 
Taranto 0M W» hm 13 s 

Seattle MI M2 3M-4 4 I 

Guatran,Codam (81. w.wvi warns 181. Hail I?) 
and Knarr: Seine to, Hlboord (3). Gassage (61, 
TJJovlj 18). Ayola (91 and O.Wllson, Haseimon 
(9). W— Guzmcn 6-5. L— Salkeld. M Sv-Hdl 
(3). HRs— Seattle, Solo (4). Burner (111. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Montraal M0 060 021—3 1 0 

Otlccao 900 1D0 000—1 8 2 

Fassero. Shaw (7). Wctteiond (8) and 
Fletcher. Wobster <8i; Foster. Bulllnoer 19). 
Plescc IB). Crlm (8). Myers (9) and Wilkins. 
W— Shaw. 3-2. L— Crlm. 2-1. Sv— Wenelond 
(7l. HR— Montreal, Milligan 111. 

New York Ml lit 100—4 i g 

Cincinnati MO in on-] 8 0 

5a be mourn. Franco (9) and Hundley; Smi- 
ley. Carrasco (B) ana Dorset!. W— Sabemo- 
oeti. S-2 L— SmlMV. 4-7. 5v— Franco 173). 
HRS— New York. Seoul (l).CIndmon.AAorrls 
13), Mitchell (16). 

Sea GteOO M0 M0 Ml— I 6 8 

Florida 23C MO 00k— 3 9 2 

Whitehurst. Soger (2i. Mauser (5), Tabaka 
(E) and Ausmus: Rapa, Men (9) ana Santiago. 
W— Raop. 4-1. L — Whitehurst, 4-A 
Philadelphia 101 0M BOO— 3 8 2 

Hoastan 200 in MX— 4 4 0 

West.Quantrlll (6), Andersen (7) and Doul- 
ftHi; a williams, Hampton (8),Hudek 19) and 
Eusoblo. W— awilllams, 2-L L-Weot. i-s. 


£v— Hudek 17). HR— Houston, Bagwell (73). 
Las Anaoles Ml 0M 000—6 12 1 

Atlanta 305 0M OOx— « 19 0 

Astoria Wavne 13). McDowell 141. Ostina 
[sj.Gott IB) ana Piazza; Glovlne. Wohlers (si. 
Stanton (8). McMichoel (9) and J.Loaez. 
W— Glovlne. 6-S. L— Asiacla. 3-5. Sv— Mrivtl- 
chaal 02). HR— Attonfa Klesko (8). 

San Francisco ooo oio ego— i t o 

5L UUU MI CM ID* — 3 10 D 

Hfri'eraon. Burba (7) and Maiiworino. Je.R- 
eed (7) ; Watson. Habyan (7), R. Rodriguez (8). 
/APerez (9) and Paonozzl. W— Waisor.. 3-3. 
L— Nickerson. 2-i Sv— (VLPorer till. 

HRs— Sen Franrisca McGee <51. Si. lcuI^ 
OimIHi (3). 

Pittsburgh OM 0M 013— t 8 1 

Colorado 1M 103 10X-4 13 I 

Neaole. Hope (6). White (7) and Staugni, 
Freeman. MMunoz (8). SReea (9). S. Ruffin 
(9) and Glrardl. W— Freeman. 5-1. L— Neaole. 
5-6. Sv— aRuflln (71. HRs — Colorado, Girard 
ID. Blctwtte (14). 

Saturday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Karan city on im hm t i 

New York 1H CM 002-3 7 1 

Gublcza Pichardo (7). Brewer (3). Moni- 
oamerv (?) and Mafarlane; Mulhoilond ana 
Levrltz. W— Gublcro. 4-*. L— Mulhoilond. 5-6. 
H Rs— Kansas City. Shumperl 2 (»), DXenOcr- 
son (5). New York. Levrlta 110). 

Minnesota 1M 012 303—21 34 5 

Detroit ooo ni aw— 7 to 1 

Mohomes. Guthrie (7). Morrlman (?) end 
Parks; Dohertv, Knudsen (2), Stidham 1:;. 
Gardiner (4). sxtavis (7). Groom re) and 
K router, w— man antes. 5-2. L— Dahery. 0-4 
HRs— Minnesota. PMunor 3 i’!. Lcius lo). 
Hale (1). Do troll. Samuel (I), Tramme'l .3). 
Tens 012 372 330—73 77 0 

Boston 200 Ml 190— 4 9 7 

Rogers, Whiles toe iai. Haneyan; 181 ora 
LRadrlguu; Darwin. Howard <61. Harris iai. 
Fossas (7). Frohwlrtti (8) and Berryhin. 
W— Rogers 7-1 L— Darwin. 7-t HRs— Texas. 
Conseco (14), Greer 12). Boston. M.voucnn 2 
(13). Rowland (2). 

Cleveland 32s 012 ooo—* is g 

Oakland ooo He nfr-j 7 1 

Morris. Farr (81 and Pena; Jimcnei.W8(ai 
IS), Reves (7), Eckerslov (9) and Hemond 
W-Morrl\«. L— Jimenez. T-4. HRs-creve- 
lond, Murray (9). Oakland. Storm (i2). 
Chicago 2M BN oas-7 is 1 

Baltimore Oil no 000—1 s I 

J-McDawelL Asset! mocher (8), McCaskin 
(8), DnJahraon (9) and Korkovlce. LaVah 
Here (9); Moyer, Mills (8), Poole (8). Wliilam- 
son (9) and Halles, w— JJWcDowdl, 3-7. 

1- — Moyer, 2-4. HR— Chicago. Martin (l). 


Tarjnic 3M NO CJO-C i 1 

Seattle ieo Ml Mx— 3 7 0 

Siolilem/re. CasMIo nil jnd Borders; 
RJohraon ana D.wlison. *%— RJanmon. 7-3. 
L— Sioitiemvrr. 4-;. HRs— Seohle. Solo iS). 
Bitoncr (12). 

Milwaukee 301 2:0 002 m—7 12 1 

California oio 01! 200 00— 4 13 1 

Ml lnn:ics; 

//ejmsr. G'cscr I6>. lzrvsjlck !7i. JjWer- 
ettors 1 9). ne-iry l»>. Feavrs : II !ana Nilsson. 
Flnle.. Grafk. i’i E.Petterisn (ICi. Bulcner 
O', .and rXSCOtr W— rt.-nrv.M.L— B.Patrer- 
icn. 1-i :/-Fener; .Si. HRs — Milwaukee. 
T.Ward I61. Ceutarmo. Curtis (4i. Edmonds 131. 

MATIQHAL LEAGUE 

Montreal sci oio 010 — 4 id 1 

Chicago 010 0M 000—1 10 2 

Pj.Mc.Hne2. ScsK I3). P.olas (3) ana 
D.Fie'cticr; 3am. s, Giro It), Bautista <8) ana 
iVill ins. W— PJMarMnei *■ 3 L — Berks. 6-S. 
HRs— .wcni.'ici. Grissom :ai LWaiker rs;. 
Cordero :«>. 

Us Angeles 013 ow 010—2 5 0 

Atlanta 010 020 Cflx— 4 9 8 

Ke.Gross. Tc Worrell IS) and Piano; 
Smoltz. McMichoel |7) and O’Brien. 
W — SmcilZ. >a L— Kc.C-ross. 4.3. Sv— McMJ- 
aujcl 113). HRi— Las onwics. Karras (B». 
Mondesi (Si. A:ian:a. McGr.it US). 

New Yaris 100 VX 331—5 5 1 

OiKliWIi J-S SK :6» — 2 1; 2 

BJWtai J-Vaniznilio I7i, Meson (0) 
M^Yicadu* .’SI ore Hundley Rlic. J.Brunlie- 
(:) and Dorser. Tcwscnscc W— R110. *-3. 

L— Meson. 7-iSv— .Viractlo lit. HRs— New 
Ycri.TneraFSon • I!'. Oncirncii. Howard (3». 
5 on DlCCfi 020 1« MO 0—3 7 0 

ricriaa 2M jt; ;m 1—1 14 0 

< ;; 1 v.rv.) 

s-a.—iiim. - - A-crilnt: “a'fn-.cn S7i 

end A-jsr.-ij Hwjr .»i F-cser (®). 

.•■?! :-o:. 1 r 'c.-cz ■ iC‘ ana ’’i.-.yicv. ia.y;l- 
ojo i Jt. W— ’’.Pi--; ■_ — .rn-vjn. 

hf— 5rr Diceo. 3.3c.' 1'). 

Sen Frencisco )w occ t:i— 1 S 0 

SI. Louis 016 030 757—2 5 0 

Burkett, tt . Jackson ill and Msnwcrinc; 
Poladas. Arocnc (?t a t.i Pcsr.c^i. w— Aro- 
cnc. 3-1 L — M. Jackson. >2 HF— St. ljuIs- 
Lonkferd it!’. 

PhficdelMila 103 ZU .ii— : 5 3 

KCU'.mr, IK n. Tts— S 7 6 

BJi.1ur.az. Jvur.tr HI :?! cio Cc-iior; c.*> 
osL ana S*r<3K. w— S.-;ssk. 3-1 

L— BMvrjz. 0-i 

PltTlhurah 000 034 mc— i 7 1 

Colorado 010 7C0 D01— 3 7 0 

iSmlth, A. Pena (01. Dews, (?) und 
Slaugtit; Ritz. Blair (61. M.M.um: iS), Moore 
(9) emd Glrardl. W— Z-Smith, S-S L— Rltz. 1-1. 
5v— Davtcv (11. HRs — Colorado. Hoves (5). 
Johnson (5). 


The Michael Jordan Watch 

F Rl DAY’S GAME : JordCA went0-for-3 with 
c noil' as ine Carolina Mudazts beat me Bor- 
ons 5-2. 

SATURDAY'S GAME: Joroon went I-for-3 
and scored two runs as the Boron beal Caroli- 
na 5-1. He led off the third inning with o double 
one came around to score, grounded out In the 
atm. waived acw stale second in the sixth, ana 
reached second on a (lower’s ritotce In the 
eighth and cameoround to score his second run 
e< me came Jordon also mode taurcatcnes in 
right field Including fne Dome's last out. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan Is Dotting .199 
(38-lor-191) with JO singles, eight doubles. 15 
runs scared, 71 RBIs. IS stolen eases In 72 
attempts (fourth In the Southern League), 16 
wofks and 56 strikeouts. 

Japanese Leagues 


Stanley Cup Finals 


Central League 



W 

L 

T 

Pet- 

Yamiurl 

30 

16 

0 

552 

Cnunicni 

3 

22 

0 

511 

Yokohama 

22 

24 

0 

>78 

Honsnin 

22 

25 

3 

am 

Yakult 

22 

25 

3 

AU 

HlrssMma 

18 

75 

0 

-419 


GB 


6'd 

6 


8* 

10-y 


Saturday's Results 
Yonuuri 2, Yokohama L i'. Innings 
rianshin A. Oiunlcfll 2 
H'rashlmo 5, Yakult 3 

Sungari Rrsolts 
Yomiuri 6. Yokonamo 5 
Konshin Z Chunfchl 1 
Hiroshima 3. Yakult Z 15 Innings 
Pacific Leogae 



W 

L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

Dciel 

33 

17 

0 

638 

— 

Cel St 

:o 

"7 

9 

538 

— 

Dri. 

S3 

23 

0 

-5C0 

6'-: 

Lorta 

21 

zs 

0 

457 

I-- 

Ksitetsu 

ie 

77 

1 

A07 

ti 

tiippan riam 

is 

21 

1 

J7Z 

*3 


Saiureoyl Results 
Crrn 4, Seibu > 

Colei 2. Klntelsu 1 
Nippon Ham 10, LfJffe 5 

Sundes's Results 
Snou Z on* 1 
Dclu I 9. Kintetsu 4 
LCttc 1 Nippon Horn 1 


.... . . - r ^v^. : 

FIRST TEST 

Enataod m. New Zealand, Feurtn Day 
Sunday, la Nottingham. England 
New Zealand 1st 1 mines: 251 
England 1st innings: 567-8 
New Zealand 2nd innings; 184-7 


N.Y. Rangers 2 1 2-5 

Vancouver 1 8 •— ! 

N.Y. R a ngers lead scries 2-1 
First Period— 1. Vancouver, Bure 14 (Lin- 
den. Adams), 1:03. 2. New YerH. Leetch 8. 
13:29. X New York. Anderson 3 (NemcMnov. 
Beukeboam), 19: IV. Penalties— Wells. NY 
(trlpalne). 2i54; Anderson, NY (roughing), 
5:42: Hunter, Van (cnargtaa 1.5:42,- Lumme. 
■Von (holdtno). 9:57; MOCTavlsh, NY (hold- 
Ine). 15:4: Leelen. NY (trleplns). 17:56; 
Lowe, ny irngthsttcklito). 18:12: Ronnmg, 
Van (Mgn-sttcklng). 18:12; Messier. NY 
(raugliingMB:l2.- Mamessa Van (rougning), 
18:12; Bure. von. maior-game misconduct 
(nign-stlckingl. 18:21. 

Second Period— 4. New York. Leetch9 ( Tik- 
xaner, Beukedoomi, 18:32. Penalties— Lowe. 
NY (roughing). 5:34; AmasM, Van (rough- 
ing ], 16-2S; Messier, NY (roughing). 16:28. 

Third Period— 5. New York, Lormer 7. :2S.6, 
H rw York. Kovalev 7 (Groves. Messier! , 13:03 
fool. Penalties— Tlkkanen. NY thaaklng). 
3:13; HedtcavVan (holding), 5:3*: McIntyre. 
Von (holding). 7:28: MccTbyIsil NY (hold- 
ing), 9:46. Vomesso. van (cress<necfcJng). 

Geilr.as. Van (roushtag). W:3S; An- 
tosKl. Var, dauDM minor ( cross-check (ng. 
roughing], 14:19. 

Shots an goei— New York f-10-6— 25. ven- 
couver n-5-9—25. Power play Opportuni- 
ties— New York I of 7; Vancouver a of 6. Coo- 
lies— New York, Rlcnter. 14-5 (25 ihots-24 
saves], Vancouver, McLean. 13-7 (25-201. 

fT. • s-*"!' ■' ' 

Tour of Italy 

Results from Sotardav*it4tfistage,23SMIo- 
meters 045 ntllei) front Uenz, Austria, la 
Moreno, Italy: 1. Marco Pontanl, itarv, Cor- 
rera Jeans Tauonl. seven noun, 43 minutes, 
lour seconds: Z Gianni Buena Italy, Team 
Po'tL 4a seconds behind; X Claudio CMop- 
puccI, Italy. Carrera Jeans TassenI, same 
rime: 4, Day <de Rebcilln, Italy. MG Moglfflrio 
Tecrnogvm. s.1. 

5. Eugeni Berzm. Russia- GewlisBaHan,s.r; 

6. Miguel I ndurnln, Spain, Bof>osta,s.t; 7, Mas- 
si me Podetuona. 1 taiv, Navigare Blue Storm. 
s.1. ;X Flov to Glucponl. I rely. Brssclatat Refln 
Ceramic, s.1.: 9, Arm and De Las Cuevas, 
France, Casrarama, s-t.; IX wtadimfr Belli, 
Italy, Lamore Ponarla s.t. 

Results from Sunday's 15tt> stage, 199 kilo- 
meters (128 miles} from Memo to Arnica, 
Italy : 1, Marco Pontanl, six hours, 55 mtnutei. 


jB seconds; Z Claudio CMappwcd, 2 minute* 

S3 seconds behind; X Wladindr BeliL 3:27/ 4, 

Neim Rodriguez. Colombia, ZG Moblll 2^9: 
X Miguel Induroki. 3:30; 6, Evgeny Berzfa 
4:06; 7. Udo Bolts. Germany, Tetofcom. sJ.; S. 
Otarnti Buena 5:50; 9. Vladimir Pookifkov. 
U kndna Carrera. sJ.; WL Pavel Tonkov, Rus- 
sia Lomora s.t_ 

Overall Standings: 1, Berzin, 67 hours 19 
minutes ond 49 seconds; X PantanL 1 :18s 3. 
Induroln. 3 AX- X Bugna 4:«; X MIL 4:41; X 
Armand de las Cuevas. France, ccstorama 
5:12; 7. Tonkov, 7:53; X OdapPUCCL 9:13; 9. 
Rodriguez 10:15; IX Andy Hnmratea US. 
Motorola 11:48. 


and Chan Mcvbar.lnft&feri,' ManConwWfr 
ond Jeff Twtot catchers «d Jim_Le***a; 
outfielder. Hut Roberta MeOamoad Kior. 
maa to Cokralp Gpringa.-PCL, Rpeated.: 
Vtnnv CasriUa infMder, Pan Cdarqtki 
Springs. . t ■ 

FOOTBALL 


*2o 


BELGIAN OPEN 


X96Xy«rd (4886 metenX par-71 Royal Zoata 


Colin Mantgamerta Scotland, IHM8-2D2 
Bernh ar d Longer, Germany, 694X68-205 
Peter HadWanv Sweden 69-7365-207 
Jaakim Haagnman. Sweden W4866-2N 
Nick Faldo. England, 6F7X6F-3aB 
Ignacio Garrtda Spain. 47-7X71-288 
Philip Walton, England, 7M7-4A-2D9 
Andrew Murray, England, 09-71-49-2179 
Barry Ume, England, 65-70-74-711 
Mike Clayton Australia 6B-7D-73-CT) 


.TRANSACTIONS 


BASEBALL 

Amariam Lnm 

CALI FORNIA— Optioned Eduardo Pergz. 
first baseman to Vancouver, PCL. Recalled 
J.T. Snow, first baseman tram Vancouver. 

DETROIT— Activated David Weltx Pitch- 
er. tram 15-day disabled net. Bought contract 
of Phil stkmam pitcher. from Toledo. IL. Put 
Bill Krueger. Pitcher, on waivers tar Purpose 
at giving Mm his unconditional reiease . Op- 
tioned John FWierty, catcher. Is Toledo, 

SEATTLE— Si g n ed Shawn Buhner, first 


CHICAGO— Agreed to Swear eonfradwtli 
Kevin Buffer, kicker. . . 

N.Y. JETS— Released Leonard 
defensive Kneman. ' ' l 


BASKETBALL 


- EASTERN GONPBRBJtCE FINAL 
New Tart " 39 » -22 

MtaH If 28 .18. 22-41 

- Sette tW M 

New Yera: Oakley 5-7*414. SnlRNHC 
6 wing 4-1809 T7,ttarper5-11 1-2TL5tarks8>1f . 
M 2X RWHBcras M M A Maeatt X5 MIL 
AiMtoay M M X HJMvISMMX Banter H T_ 
(HI A Totals 31-40 30-31 *8. ' . 

lodJona: CXwvts 1-lVJlMOWMHt, 
Smlts 9-19 4-4 ULMiiNrXTT 9^1227. Workman 

2- 42-4 7, A^avts 4-53-6 IL Fleming 444-512, - 
Thamnean MMX Scott G2 04X K-WOUmns- ' 
M Ml MiteheS HMaTdsbMMn. 

ypelat t eals- He w York. M3 (Storks 5-4,. 
Anttxmy l-XHJDavIsB-L HoraerM), Indiana - 

3- 11 (Miller 2-7, workman l-X McKey- «-t, 
Fleming Ml. 


a 1 


— New York 41 (EWfng 10). Indiana 46 (AGa- 
vb9). Assists New York 16 (StarU61, lm»- 
ana 19 (McKey,F(emlitgS).Tetelfedti-Nvw 
York 29. Indiana 2X A— 1X539. . . 


mm 


3 ; 


TEXAS— Agreed to terms wfth Reid Rytm 
and Janas Brisco* pitchers and Joe Kail, In- 
fielder, signed Rob Nelson, first baseman, to 
contract with Tuba, Texas League. 

National Laaom 

CINCINNATI— Signed Mike Hampton, 
third baseman; Scott Sharp and Jett An- 
drews. catchers; Clay Caruthera, Clinton 
Kappa, Adam Bryant and Brian Lott, pitch- 
era; Dec om bo Cornier, outfielder; and Ray 
Brawn, first baseman. 

COLORADO— S igned Doug Million. Jason 
Dietrldi, Arnold Gooch, and Scott LoRock, 
ptrenars; Jonathan Mathews, Gory Janes. 


WORLD CUP WARM UP MATCH IS 
united Stoles L Mexico 0 
Argentina 0, Croatia 8 
Saudi Arabia X TrtnWod ana Tobago 3 
Belgium 9, Zambia B 
■Italy t. Sw i tzerland 0 - 

Colombia % N or th er n inland 0 
Ireland 1. Czech RenASc 3 
NORDIC CUP 
Fteot 

Sweden X Norway 0 


, . RUB,V UNION 
New Zealand 34. Fill » 

South Australia 12, Italy 60 
South Africa lx England 12 
Canada IX France 16 
frgemtno tx S c c t ksm 15 
AratroOa 3x Ireland 13 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Hi 


£ 


OO 


"* . 


_ _ 

¥■.; , , l 

=« ...” 


-ax ■ . 



To our readers in Switzerland 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
and save. 

Just coil our Zurich office 
toll free-. 

155 57 57 

or fax: ( 01 ) 481 82 88 









sSXH 

uj 


r 

Sr. 










-*» ^a> »v^ 'cfonW 


"**S» 


: *\S^523S 

'££e 3 ££ss 



•■'iT G --.pi • ’ "|j*ftfctaii 

Ethiopia Vote 

- . 'T^V‘ f ^5 c pi*BM 
;:.;“ 7 ." **»* * 

!!- w : : ’S** 8 * 

;.. .:~ - s 'r 3 -- ^oaofe 

,■': - • ; t~ \*S3EML 

; - -^bsEa-Aife 

7: j~‘ ^r ^soweiS: 

■■_' J • i - ^ Sc wjiiat ^ 
’ : ^ 1-> ?r* icipofaj 


ID 


Philippine 


1 "■■ ^■•■CSCliiiSCCl'E 

'•*•;-? ■ :.? "iXiijiiiDgE 
' -'- * • V.UL2 33B 

;• k-zz'J !^oq de 

- : ~^r r-^rS% 

-.- . ._'i;.s' ~" Za.xae 




Rood Relief 


.-»• -. ;- 

.. .. . si-r-rfecx 

7-"7 : - — rusi^ 


ver Attali Book 

. . . , ~^zi) 

. . -ni-isSas 

.. "7? /. if, Jp 



« \fr«a -., jiif.P: 

..-is-- :* 


>■*. 

-.*c» 




- --=«= 'rfCas#? 


.,ss£ 

^ - J* H— 

- 

_ *7* 



** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUIVE 6, 1994 


Page 21 



* * 


SEQRTS 


,*v - — f^z-TsSas ,V 
. :zrr.:~^ss 



-V!!n9 ,r - 


~''V\ i 
• - - •*!• I 


Cup Teams: 
Many Faces 

In u.s. wm 

BeFamUiar 

The Associated Pros 

ZURICH — Nine of the 1 1 play- 

JWftwSTr f0 L G ?®“ y in & 
1990 World Cup final m Italy arc 

on the roster for the 1994 cfaampi* 

toship touraamcat. which beans 

m less than two week's time inthe 
United States. 

Five of the playcis who started 
for Argentina in the title match 
lour years ago are retumint too 
including Diego Maradona/ 

The rosters of the 24 teams, an- 
nounced by FIFA soccer’s govern- 
ing body, contained most of the 

Baggio of Italy, Bebeto^and Ro- 
mano of Brazil, fisisto Sioichkov 

of Bulgaria, Roger Mifla of Camer- 
oon, Faustino Asprilla of Colom- 
bia, Rashidi Yekini of Nigeria, 
Gbeorgbe Hagi of Romania. Mar- 
tin D ahl ia and Tomas Bmlin of 
Swede n and Stephane Chapoisat of 
Switzerland. 

Among the missing were several 
injured players, including Marco 
van Basten of the Netherlands, a 
three-time European player of the 
year. He wanted to play but de- 
clined because of pressure by AC 
MSan, his dub in Italy. 

His Dutch teammate, Ruud Gul- 
fit, was dropped after walking out 
of training camp, apparently in a 
dispute with the coach, Dick Advo- 
cast. 

Russia dropped four stars who 
refused to play for its coach, Pavel 
Sadryin: midfid ders Andrei Kan- 
cbeOtis and Igor Shalimov, a ryl for- 
wards Sergei Kiriakov, and Igor 
Kolyvanov. 

Of the German players who 
started the championship match in 
Rome on July 8, 1990, awy sweeper 
Klaus Angenthakr ami forward 
Rene Litfbardri won't be in uni- 
form when the defending champi- 
ons open tins tournament cat .T im e 
17. Augenthaler is an assistant 
coach with Bayern Munich and 
Littbaiski is playing in Japan. 

Maradona, who gave Argentina' 
its tide in 1986, wifi be playing in- 
his fourth Worid Cop. Also return- 
ing are goalkeeper Sergio Goyoo- 
chea; defenders Roberto Senszni 
and Oscar Ruggieri; and midfidder 
Josfc Basnaldo. Claudio r»nigg« 
who was suspended for the last 
final, also is back. 


Then Brugu 



By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS —The dock spun back- 
ward to 1992 and the Olympics 
moved north like a traveling circus. 
It was supposed to be the French 
Open — with a French woman on 
the verge of winning the title for the 
first tune in 27 years — but three of 
the finahsts came from Barcelona, 
and behind them sat their stoic roy- 
al charm. King Juan Carlos I, just 
as be sat two summers ago in are- 
,nas throughout Barcelona whenev- 
er anyone Spanish was on the verge 
of winning anything. 

He probably felt odd not drap- 
ing gold medals around thrir necks 
on Sunday in Paris. 

Fust, No. 2 Arantxa SAnchez Vi- 
cario of Spain beat No. 12 Maty 
Pierce of France, 6-4, 6-4, to win 
the women's title in a match sus- 
pended by nun Saturday. 

Then the defending men's cham- 
pion, No. 6 Sergi Broguera of 



pton, no. 6 Sergi Broguera of *** * •* mmmmzmm 

?3 A T?°25rS No * 2 ^ AlMt3 “ S4llctoVic ^ her experience to irithstand tire sm^ May Pfer^ 

completing a Grand Slam sweep crown its first native women’s Sanchez Vicario on the first point die- Vkarin absorbed two breaks wiiander in h« 


ZW 


V.-.cxg 


Mary Plate had cause Id frown as she was stopped in straight sets. 


Other Finals 

Woamrt dm M as 

GW Fsmandez. U^.ond NetoflcZvw- 
mo (t), Brtm Set undsov Oowmart 
and Lba Raymond (IU. UA. Mb VL 
•tort DooMm 

Byron Black. ZknbabM and Jonathan 
Startcnt.U^aeL JanApoUeMJonai 
Bfortonon (»», 8 — don, W M USi- 
Mind DmMh 

Krlslto Boogert m Mmmo Oosttns. 
Nathorionds. ax. LorEsao mint un- 
vtouawt AndrM OtankW m. Russta.T-S. 
M, 7-5. 

Bonestwi es 

Jumbo DtatSootrvdef. GtorotoGaiim- 
dtflt, Italy, Ml M (7-5). 

Umne DaaUes 

Gustavo Kuerten. Brazil, and N Icofas 
LapanHL Ecuador, dot Maximo Boyo 
and Ntantas Escudo. France. Vi. M. 
GinrsinBfes 

Martina H lasts. Swttzartoxi dot So- 
nya Ja wata n. Canada, M. 0-1. 

mnr Dooms 

MosItaaMnatvSwnzortand.andHaa- 
rtetattogyavaSiovaftiade{.Lwito]Cait- 
hma and Ludmila McMorayaCwoi ite- 

Pobnc. 6-3. Vi- 


completing a Grand Slam sweep 
for their country. 

“I heard the dapping and I know 
somebody was in the president’s 
box, and when I walk by from the 
changeover, I saw there was the 
king of Spain. So I was very con- 
centrated/’ said S&nchez Vicario, 
who had just broken Pierce in the 
fifth game to get back on serve. She 
would never trail again. “I am very 
proud to know that he can see me 
win today. The king of Spain made 
it even more emotional for me.” 

She had been expecting to fed 
lonesome on Center Court, the vil- 
lain in a contrived French plot to 


crown its first native women’s 
champion since Fran^oisc Durr in 
1967. Pierce, in fact, was bon in 
Canada, raised in the United States 
and is French by way of her moiiier 

— an international melange that 
had more in common with D-Day 
celebrations than with her new- 
found French public No matter; 
They couldn’t cheer long enough to 
disrupt the Spaniard. 

After playing for 17 minutes in 
the rain Saturday afternoon — 
both players questioned the deci- 
sion to play alter a 4V4-bour rain 
delay — the final was resumed at 
noon Sunday, with Pierce breaking 



farid LmariL/AgcnBC FimcrArac 

winner, right, and Alberto Berasategm. 


Sanchez Vicario on the first point 
to go up 3-1. She seemed to be 
plowing ahead with the strategy 
that had destroyed the world’s 
No. 1 player, Steffi Graf, in their 
straight-set semifinal Tim strategy 
was to hit the ball harder than any 
woman in the game today. 

Unimposing. S&nchcz Vicario 
made hex gains emotionally — mix- 
ing the pace, chasing down every- 
thing. Pierce's first service gam e 
went on for IS points, as if Sanchez 
Vicario did not want to break back 
too quickly; better to break her 
rhythm, too. The Pierce forehand 
that beat Gral bad to be recreated 
two or three times in a row to win 
the point against S£ncbez Vicario. 
Pierce might have come in more 
often u> pul Sanchez Vicario under 
a different kind of pressure, but 
mw-ad the Spaniard’s scrambling 
shifted that pressure, and Pierce’s 
graceful serve and groundstrokes 
wilted. She showed her frustration 
openly, to the Spaniard’s delight 
“I was taking the game loo seri- 
ously,” said Pierce, 19, who 
bloomed here within a year of cast- 
ing off her abusive father and 
coach, Jim Pierce. “Up until now 
I’ve just been enjoying myself, but 
today I was loo nervous. 1 wanted 
to win too much.” 

Sinchez Vicario broke ahead at 
the end of the first set and broke 
Pierce again to begin the second. 
Pierce evened the match against 
SAnchez Vicario's serve — but in 
this belter skelter, (he advantage 
belonged to the calmest head. S&n- 


cbez Vicario absorbed two breaks 
in the second set but broke back 
immediately both times. By the end 
of that set Pierce was pummdmg 
her groundstrokes, and she always 
appeared surprised when the ball 
ram* hart- 

“I have more experience than she 
does because 1 already played four 
finals before in the Grand Slams, so 
I knew bow to handle it," the Span- 
iard said- “I think it was probably a 
lot ofpressure for her because she 
beat Graf, and then she has to come 
back. I think I was more ready men- 
ially than she was today." 

The French public had little to 
cheer when the Spanish men took 
over Center Court about an hour 
later. It seemed like a mighty exhibi- 
tion to honor Juan Carlos. Berasato- 
guTs last chance died with three 
break points in hand to even the 
second set. Broguera responded 
with five straight points to take a 2-0 
lead in sets. He continues a trend of 
back-to-back champions here, pre- 
ceded by Jim Courier in 1991-92. 

“I know Alberto, and maybe that 
was the advantage for me more 
than the other players.” Broguera 
said. ‘They were so afraid of Al- 
berto and they almost lost even 
before they played. ! know maybe 
his weaknesses and that's helped 
me a little bit" 

Raised in the northern city of 
Bilbao, Berasategui, 20, now lives 
in Barcelona. He had won every set 
before the final and was attempting 
to become the first u ns ceded 
French Open champion since Mats 


Wilander in 1982 His unfathom- 
able “severe Western" grip —forc- 
ing him to hit his backhand as well 

as his monsttous forehand from the 

same side of the racket — was his 
own childhood creation, tot his 
growth has a lot to do with a na- 
tional prog ra m undertaken in 1988 
to prepare Spanish tennis for the 
1992 Olympics. So a circle was 
completed when his king came 
down onto the coon to present the 
trophies. Elsewhere at Roland Gar- 
ros, yet another Spaniard, Jacobo 
Diaz, was winning the French 
Open juniors title. 

T didn’t know how to act in 
front of him," Berasategui said of 
the king. Tie told me that he was 
really happy about two Spanish 
guys being in the final and ft was 
great for Spain. 1 also met the 
queen, and sbe also is really nice." 

They were enjoying it Sunday 
while they could, for the Grand 
Slams won’t return to their favored 
day for another year. Wimbledon 
starts in three weeks, with Broguera 
appearing for the first time in four 
years and Berasategui declining to 
play. Thus, it’s a short and happy 
life for Spanish dominance. 

“It is going to be crazy," S&nchez 
Vicario said as her two compatriots 
began their final T think that 
when we go back, the airport is 
going to be crowded for sure with 
people. It is very emotional also. I 
am going to be more proud because 
another Spanish man is going to 
win in the same year, so it is going 
to be double.” 


The 22-Man Rosters of the 1994 World Cup Teams 


Mrs to ponafMsb): 

ARGENTINA 

GeoNnpors: Luis Mas (12J,Saroto Goyco- 
Citoo OL Mortorto Seaponl (22). 

D timm t m z Srata Vw>m B>. Jams Bop- 
•111 fW. Oscar Roassrl W. Ja» Ctamot Of. 
Retorip SanM (45. Fernando Cocant* (13), 
Homan Diaz <161. 

MMflaMcrs: Fernando Redondo (5), Dle9D 
Simone I M), AMandro Mcxicuso <211, Hao 
Perez (U). Jon HwmMu ifi,MKMxt- 
nano (TO). Leonardo RodrtoUK CAL 

Fervent*: Gabriel BaMsiiita (V). C l audto 
Ctadaoia ID.AMI Bafto nw.AmaWoOrteoo 
(17). Roma Medina Bello dll. 

Coadr. Alda Baslie. 

BELGIUM 

GoaStee»«n;Mlchoi Pmniommo (i).FV 
IIP Oe Wilde (12), oany verUnden (20). 

Ditaodore: P&ntco* Atari ML Vital Bar- 
kvtmans (JLMfcM Do WoH 04), Marc Em- 
mets 051. Games Com (13). Dir* Medved 
(21. Pasad Renter (22). Raifl Srnkfls 15). 

MMBoMsrs: Omv Boflln I1M, Euro Sdfo 
not, Lorenzo Staelens (6). PrwkY Van der 
Elat (7). SMm Van dor Heyden (Zl), Eric 
van Meir (W). 

Fwwnk: ANx Czendatyotid (11), Marc 
Dasnrsc (9), Luc NIHs O). Joslp Weber (17), 
Marc WOmats 061. 

Coach; Paul van Him). 

BOLIVIA 

OoaOttMra: Carton True® (1). Dario Ra- 
tos 112). Marario Terries 09)- 

p« te nder*: Mtauol Rtataa M), Gustavo 
QaMtoras ISL Marco S«tdr HI. Uds Crts- 
taUe (Mi.-iuwi Manual Pena CB.OnxrSan- 
dia (171, Modesto Serueo (13). 

MtaMdOTK jase MlNoa Motaar tn. Juno 
Cesar BaMMeso (22), Marco EtdHvercy 
no), Erwin Svdwz (21). Mawicto Rwnn» 
CM). Mario Pineda (7). Vtadknlr Sorie (IS). 
RaaUro OnHKo (26), Carlos Berta (4). 

Hwarta WHKom RaraaKo (18), Jidme 
Moreno (TIL Guillermo Alvaro Pono m. 

cenck Jtavler Azfcaroorta 
BRAZIL 

(llililllllipni I Taftaoi (1), GUnW (22), 
Zoftl CTO. 

Defenders: JorytanoCU.Caft* 04). Leonar- 

, (U). Branco iM. Rksnto Goma (41, RF 
i ftocna (31, Aldolr (13). Monelo Sanns 


(U). 

MMMden: Maura SBva (51. Omgajth 

MaxW»n7).Zta)io(9),Bal(l8).FoutoSwBto 

(161, 

w ruei : BoBeto Ol. ReraWto fill. Ron- 
aldo OB). Muller OW, Vtota (211- 
ceacb; Cartas Ataerto PamHra. 
BULGARIA 

OoMtanpen: Borlstov Mfinlta 111, Pto- 
men Nlkotov <T2L • • 

Defender*; Emil Kramna ov TfHon 

IvrowTO.TinntoTZiammcwMI.F eyHiib- 

dm (51. Nkotal 1 1 lev (15). Itt» Klmtor 

04}. 

NUdReMeTL’ YordanLetfikov (9). KroVrnlr 

BMataw(».2tatl» vorttw (iLBondwG^ 

dww (M). Dadel BortnUrav (II), @earw _ 
^^^f Krtsto StatcHwW. End! (ttta 

JBeRBdvfTJ.WAiemei^^vwKo^ 

tov OIL IvofloAndonov tS). H**n Sim 
(M). (wfle YorxJonev (13), Peter MMonk) 
07). 

CMKlt DtWtW Pew- • 
.-CAMEROON 
ouu — c un -r 

(1), jaoqaes Sooocfo 02). TTwmos I* tone 

^neUMUif Stephen Tataw (ML Samuel 
(Sta («,VldarRdU>|AKem(». ^ 
mom Kafla on. Maabeft Bitaonana 3o« 
13). Ham A^o-OSL ’ . . _ 

iiMMdW Marc VTvtcn Roe 0W» . 

Emoe Mboufi (»- 


Roeer mwo (»), uouts mm> 
OO). Georoes Mourcmd-Etoooanco HD), 
Pnmco ta Omam-Mylcfc (7). Dovtd Embe 
(T9), A)pnon»e TcJwtH fM), Emmimual Kn- 

sack Matoum m). 

Conch: Heart MldwL 

COLOMBIA 

Oocdkeemrs: Oscar cordoba (1), Farid 
Mandraaan 02L Jaeo Marta Pom CO). 

Detandm: Luis CHIOS Poroa (15), Alexis 
AMfKkan (3), Andros Escobar (2). Luis Herre- 
ra (41. Widen Pores OSLOscs- Cortes 06). 
Nestor Ortiz (13). 

muUrntOm i- Frady Rincon nw. Leenel M- 
variK (MLBdbrMGotnK MLCvteViMor- 
raraa (16>. Mourtcto Swim 071, Herman Ga- 
vlrta (5). Harold Lxaono (•). 

rsrwwrdi: FautftaoAsarHlo OIL Ivan va- 
ImctaM (f). Moffo Valencia (11 ), Antony de 
Avfla (7). Victor Aristtzobdl DO. 

C o ac h? Francisco Matorana. 

GERMANY 

n iioa n ii M i *' Bode lUsnor (1), Andrea* 
KosbIw 02), Oflvor Kahn (22). 

Defenders: Thomas B ort t iold CM). Andrew 
Bratane (3). Guhta Budmald Ml, Thomas 
Holmer S). Jueraen r p W r ML Loltiar 
MoHha e w s oo), Thomas smtm TO. Martin 
(TO. 

Marta Bader (21), Stefan EL 
fenbora CBLMaurtatoGaodtao (15). Thomas 
Monster (■). Aadreas Moaner (7). Matthias 
IU). 

UN Klxsfoa 09), Jueroen KHiu- 
mcsm(in.Ksrtakn Rlodta OLRedi' Voattsr 
(TO. Staton Kim* OIL 
Coach; Bern Vouta. 

BRBECE 

Heataesasrss Antonis mwu HI. Christos 
Karhosnanls (IS), Idas Almotaldss (20). 

PH seds rc : Sbotos Awmotatas (2), Vain 
Koraraanta 03), ThanoKs KoMshktafa <3). 
yaems Kamzakis (5), Ms Dos M anotas (4), 
Kyriafca* KarotaUss 08). Ahods Ataxlew 
tm - 

MtaBsMsT C Minas Hotzhtes 07). PtHWO 
Us TialoulitaBs <61, NlkoaNlenaot(S). Savvas 
KOffldH OfL Sevres Maranaas (TO, Ahods 
A to ond ris TO). 

psnsmdK Nikas Madilas CfLIUkK Tslan- 
hdds OIL Taws MltranouM (TO, Atasds 
AMocoudB (ML Vassllts DtmHriadn (ML Di- 
mitris 5artnuhos (7). 
ceneb: Alfcatai Ponoaimnrn 
DM LAND 

. P s afh ss Mrs: Pat Benner (1L Atan KuBv 
(22). 

Defenders: Gary Keffv <121. Denis Invta 
TO, Pool McOraHi (5L PM Pdbb 04), Atan 
Ksmaaban 03). Kevin Moran (fl. Terry Ptie- 
Tan O). 

MfdBMdus: Rot HoufMoa (DJan McA- 
tasr (21), Kean* («, John Sheridan 06), 

Andy Townsend 17), Rnnnte Whelan OIL 
Steve Summon (OL Eddie McGridrtck (171, 
Alao McLeuehUn (19L 
FOneardB: John Aldrldae OLTomrCaocor- 
taoflfl.Tomnrr Coyne (15), David Kefrr(2Pl. 
CUd: Jack CharTloa. 

. . ITALY 

Beotaoeoeri: otamuoo A—s (lKLoea 
M uirtte a tartf (TO. Lun Buod (22). 

Defenders: LotolApoilani m, Antonio Beo- 
arrive (3), Laren» Mlneffl (7), Alsmandra 
Co el D cu rt u W.fmn a i Bored (6).PaotaMoV- 
dtof (SI, Moon T assort) (9), Roberto Muni 
TO- 

MMMdsn: DA* O btain (13), Antonio 
Canto {WDWwrto DonodBta (t6), Damstrio 
AtosrtM OIL Ataeriao Evorfl 07), Nicota 
Berff (M). 

' Fenmrdc Roberta BoaWo 06), Cl u w w* 
Stanort CB9, Pier LoTOCMtra^l OIL DTO- 

Mta Masiare (TO. Otanfranco Xeto OIL 
SacchL 
MEXICO . 

0). Adrian 
Chavez 02). Wtot ****** 0*L 
Dl l esde rV i Hnado Aotortt W. Rauf Gu- 


•torro* (21), Juan Ramiros (3), Raman Ra- 
mirez 15). Jose Sotaado (16). Claudio Suarez 
( 2 ). 

MMfMdsrS: Marcodno Bernal Ul, Juan 
Carta Chavez (13), Jmuta del Oimo (14), 
Mtasast Espinosa (151. Benfamln GaUndo 
07). Ataerto Garcia (6), Joroe Rod r ta w 

00) . Uds Vokta 06). 

Forwards: Luts Alva (11). Luis Gordo 
(W. Cories Heramtllo (7),LulsMtguelSal- 
r. (TO Hobo smtaz (9). 

Mtauol Malta Boron. 

MOROCCO 

Khata Azmi TO. zokerta 
Atooul 122), Sou Debar (12). 

Itetenitert : Naurredine Nuytiet (6). AbdoF 
tah Hoar (2). Ismafl Trtoi (5), AbdeUcrtm 
HadriaU Ol, Ahmed Metaam (141. Rach Id 
Nefcrouz (16). 

KUdlWMirc: Radi id Daoedi mi. RacMd 
Azzowl (U.Lorta HobaW (15],Tahar Lakhtol 
(4),Mustataa Had 1 1 (7). Mustanda Hoddaoul 
(ML 

Forwards: Mohamed Chaoudi (9), Hasson 
KacMosd an, Hasson Nader (MLMild Bowr- 
bouh (TO, Ab d sfl teu Laahrtssl 071. Ahmed 
Bahia (13), Aziz Sanndl (21). 

Goacb: Abdeltah Airi. 

hetherlamqs 

Geaflestaers: Ed de Gaev 0). Edwin van 
dor Sar TO), Then Smlders (22). 

nmalirr-. Oannv B«nd (IS). Franh de 
Boer Q), Ulrich v* Gobbet ( ML John dewoff 

01) . Stan Valdez (181. Ronald Koetnon (4). 
MldfMdsrs: Frank Rltkaord 111, Rob 

Wltschae (5), Arthur Human (14), Jan 
Woutars (6). Wlai Jonk (8). Aron winter (20). 

Forwards: RencM do Boor TO. Mare Over- 
mars (7), P rior van vossen (T9L Gaston Tau- 
menl (171. Donnls Borakamp (TO. Bryan Rav 
OH. John Basman 112)- 
oick AdvocaaL 

NIGERIA 

i: Pater Ratal (D.WMfredAp- 
banavbore (22), Aitov Asu n«. 

De trude rs: UCbe Oka tor 00), Augustine 
Epuavaen (2), Stephen Kesfci (4). Odd 
Nwaau (6), NUke Emenaio (19). Emeka 
Ezeuao 03), Ofcechukwu UcM (5), 5undav 
oilsetl (15). Ben Iraha (3). 

IMdtleWers: Thompson Ottaa (•>. Eton 
BMko ( TO^aranoa Stasia (TO. Field) Georpe 
(7). Augustine Ohadw (TO. 

Forwards: Radridi Yektal (9). Victor Ifc- 
peba (T7L Mutiu Adepolu TO). Emmanuel 
AawnBce (UL Daotal AmokoeMe (ML 
Coacb: Oomens weslertioL 
NORWAY 

gnmutnori: Erik Ttmtuedf (1), Frode 
Grodans (TO. Ota By Rise (13). 

Dtfsadtrs: Gunnar Halle (2), Runt Brat- 
sstb (4).Stto tags Bloemefave (5). Roger NII- 
ssn (U).Atf lagpHaatand n6),HmnMaorg 
t»L Ertud Jahnsen 13). 

AUdEsMsrs: jostofn Flo (6), Erik Mytctand 
I7L Oevtad Leonfaardsen (8), KJstll RUukd 
Odl.Jchn Ivor JokoDsen ())), Lots BdtitaM 
(22), Kari-Pfttar Looked (15), Root Strand 
TT9L Dan Eagan 117). 

rwiSMOi: Jan Aaga Fkwrtod lOLGoanm 
Sotfleta (ML Start RushMdt TO). 

Coach: EsU Qtsen. 

ROMANIA 

B iM k i M ir i : Ftortn Prunoo m, Bogdan 
Staton (TO. Stefan Gabriel Prado (22). 

D ston ds n ; Don Pstresca TO.Mfawag 
lodedlci (4). Daniel Claudto Prodert (3), 
Gboorghe MtaaS (UL TVwr Selymee 113). 
Comotlu Pflpuro (19). 

WiWt s I dW i : Gheorghe Popsscu H). 
Ghocrahs Head (TO.KnutLupescu IS), Mtao 
Ototta TO. BcHHob Nla Pandura (TO.Dvt- 
(EuStlnga (SOLConetanfln CHca (IS), Dorinel 
Muntaonu(T). 

Forw orn: Florta Vfllertun Warinctata (*). 
Marian (von OIL Vtatl Moldovan 07), life 
DwaiHresai mi, (ou.vudotu (UL 
God: Anohd Hbhto 





7%e Associated Prat . 

Iidand, wiridi had won in the Netheriands and 
Germany, became the victim of a pre-W odd Cop 
noset Sunday wi* 11 it tost* 3-1 ,.in Pubtin 1 st a 3am- 
SSser, the Czech Republic. 

4 Pa^ Knka scored twice and im dfk Mc r Jan 


holes m an 

tkJridtibS^ asBd^inn beatZara^U, IQ, Sato- 


in his interaa- 


day nig ht in Brussels. It was Belgium’s largest 
margin of victory sxoce it began playing interna- 
tional soccer in 1904. 

. Weber, who left his native Croatia because of 
the war, received Bdgpndtizenshqxxi March 11 
'.«• *Rqy Wcgcric sowed seven minutes inw the 
second half to rive the United States a 1*0 victory 
over Mexico in Pasadena, Cahfonaia. The crowd of 
-91,123 m the Rose Bowl was the largest a soccer 
jgame in the United States since the 1984 CHympics. 


RUSSIA 

Stanislav Cnerchesov (1), 
DmRrv Khorin ««. 

De fe nders: Dmllrv Galyamin (41. Dmitry 
Khiesfov TOL Yuri Nikiforov (5), Seraol Gor 
lukovirii (31. vwor Omaha (IB), wiodistov 
Ternovsky (6). 

MWflcUsrs: Dmitry Popov (6), Omari To- 
tradn (TO. Andrei Pyortnltskv (7). Dmitry 
Kuznetaov (2). lira Tsynibatar (17). Alejuw 
iter BoratvuK OIL loor Komevev (ML loor 
Lodyokrtov (TO). 

iterwivds: Sarael Vuran ( 22 LOteBSaienka 
(9), Vtartmlr BexhastnyUi (IT). Dmitry 
Radclwtdw (15), Alexander Mostovoi (in. 
Votary Kantti (16). 

Coach: fowl Sadvrln. 

SAUDI ARABIA 
Coate e s ai r s : Menammad ri-ooavea (1). 
Hussein ai-Sadta (21). Ibrahhn oLHIlwa (22). 

DofcsTOn: Abduibdi Al Dosari TO, Awad 
aLAnadl (16). Abdulkto Satah (19). Ahmed 
Mortal (5). Foul Amin It), Mohammad ot- 
Khliawl (31, Abdudofl Zabermowl (41, Soleti 
M-Daoud (15). Mohammad Ahdel-Jawwad 
(13). Teaser ri-TaHl (17). 

MMfWdere.' Fahod Al BhM (8). Total oJ- 
Jlbreen (1*). Soeed aFIrwIrcn ( ID), Foha oi- 

MuhoflD (11). 

Forwards: Moled Mohammod («. Khaiid 
Al MinwiUd ( ML Sami tn-Jaber (12). Fahaal- 
Ghashavan (7), H an wnh Fotatoh (261. 
t: Joroe Satorl. 

SOUTH KOREA 
»: Choi In-youno (1). Lee Wan- 
h» (22), Fart Chm-woo (21). 

Dsfoadarc: Hone Mvane-ba (20). sWn 
Honors (7). Chung JodP-sqn (2). Park JunO- 
boo (5L KJm Pwvkcun (4LGvSrme-bum (17). 
awl Young-U (12). Ahn ik-soo (131. <31 Lee 
JOng-tiwa. 

Mi d floW e r s: Kim Jooauno (9). kp Joong- 
woon (161. (41 Lae Ywm»4tn.Neh Juno-yoen 
(6). Choi Moon-stdk (19). Seo Junp-won (II). 
Choi Doe-sMc 04). HP Seok-fu lift). 
Faromnte: cho Jiivho (IS), Hwong Sorv 

hono ( 18 ). 

Coach: Kim Ha. 

SPAIN 

OoaB e oepcrs: Andonl tuOtewTeio (II, Jose 
Canfaaru (DL Julen Lopetooul (22). 

Dataadsrs: Albert Ferrer (2). Serai Bor 
Mitel (l2LM)Bucf AnsN Ncrial (2D). Abetanto 
Fsrnmdn (5). Rataol Alkarta (18), Salvador 
Vora ( 17), Jorge Otero OL Fnmcbca Camar 
asd (4). 

MUBaWorc: josa Maria Bakero (101. Juan 
Cateoetxsa (7). Altar Beoulrlsmto (II). Je 
GuanBela (f ). Fernando Hierro !«). Josa Co- 
mtnsra (151. Juten Guerrero (81, FeUao Mln- 

ombres ( 10 ). 

ranmdKLubEnrlquB TOL Jm» Castono 
'Juonoiv (U>. Julio Salima (19). 

Coach: Jovtar Oemento. 

SWEDEN 

Grafts war s; Thomas Ravtfii (i). Lars 
Eriksson (TO. Moanw Hodman (22). 

Driwuterc: Patrik Andsrsson (3).JaacMm 
BIoridwidM), Jan ErHusan (ULPonhfi Kao- 
mark (Ml. Roger Uung [51. Mikael Nilsson 
(131, RohiM NHsson (Zl. 

MMMden: Jemr Btonwtst ( 21 ). Kias 
Ingsnon (■). Anders UlWar (Ul. Hofcan 
MIM n». Staten Rstei (TO. Staton Schwarz 
ML Jonq» Thorn (9). 

anw Mi : Kennct Antertson (TO. Tomm 
Bnlln OIL Martin Datum (TO. Magnus Erl- 
■nomark (30). Henrik Uraon (7). 

Coach: Twnmv Smbsm. 

SWITZERLAND 

CB nllM N te OT: Marco Pascoto (D. Martin 
Bnmnor TO), Statan Lehmann mi. 

Dotamtare: Andl Egll (MLAtain Grig er (5>, 
DomlntauaHaT (4). Mare Hottlgri- (2). Yvan 
ftntitin QL Marllp Rvada (16), Juara Sluder 
TOL 

MMMden: Thomas BKMl (Mi. Gooroot 
Brtgy (6), Sabasttan Faumtar (17). Chris- 
topho Oftrri TO. drlaca Sfoap (101. Atoin 
Srttar m. Thomas wys 121), Patrick Sri- 
vostra (30). 

itarontdi: staphane Chamraai ( 1 1 LMorco 
Grass! (UL Adrian Knua TO. Nestor subtat 
(ML 

Cooch; Rov Hodnon. 

UNITED STATES 

BnaHnsn s n : Tony Meota (l). Jueroen 
Sommer (UL Brad FriMri UB). 

D s isRdsr s: Mike Lapeer (2). Mike Bums 
TO. Cle Koolman (4). Morceio Bdiboa (TO. 
Paid CaDgturi (20). Fernando ciaviio TOL 
Atari Lotos (22). 

Mtof tafc te ri : Thomas Dooley (5), John 
Horicts m. hum pprez (7). Tab Ramos (9). 
OKU Jones (ij), Ctoudto Reyna (19). Mlkr 
Sortwr (14), 

Pwwwds: Ernie Stewart TO. Rov Wsgerto 
HO), Eric Wynalda (11). Frank Ktopas (14), 
JotaMax Moore (UL 

VWIbor MllutlnovlC. 


The IHT World Cup Competition 


Win fabulous prizes. 

Winners will be chosen from an official drawing. 
The first 1 6 entries drawn, with at least 6 correct 
responses, will win one of the prizes listed below, 
determined from the order in which they are 
drawn. 

Grand Prize: Two United Airlines business class 
round-trip Europe/New \brk tickets plus five 
nights accommodation at the Stanhope Hotel in 
New York- 

Five second prizes: Sprint Collectors frame pre- 
paid phone cards in celebration of the Worid Cup. 
five third prizes: AT Cross. 22k gold, diamond 
cut. Roller ball pens, from the Signature 
Collection. 

Five fourth prizes: Gold Pfeil men’s wallets. 


HERE’S HOW TO ENTER 


For each of the 12 days leading up to the Worid 
Cup, the IHT will publish a question in which the 
response predicts various outcomes of facets of 
the World Cup. There are 12 questions in all. 
After answering the question each day in the 
coupon provided below, hold your responses and 
send them all at once to the IHT. A minimum of 6 
responses must be postmarked on or before June 
17, 1994 — the World Cup kickoff day. 

Only clippings from the newspaper will be 
accepted. Photocopies and faxes do not qualify. 


:>a. .vvC'. TV 

Group A 


USA 

SWITZERLAND 

COLOMBIA 

ROMANIA 

Group B 

BRAZIL 

RUSSIA 

CAMEROON 

SWEDEN 

GroupC 

GERMANY 

BOLIVIA 

SPAIN 

KOREA REPUBLIC 
Group D 

ARGENTINA 
GREECE 
NIGERIA 
BULGARIA 
Group E 
ITALY 

IRELAND REPUBLIC 
NORWAY 
MEXICO 

GroupF 

BELGIUM 
MOROCCO 
NETHERLANDS 
SAUDI ARABIA 


RULES AND CONDITIONS 


1. 


lndh/kSua] coupons will not be accepted 
Minimum of 6 coupons to qualify. 

Cut-off date is postmarks of the first day of the World 
Cup — June 17. 1994. 

Valid only where legal. 

Entries will not be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, its agents and subsicBaries. 

Only original coupons will be considered valid. 
Photocopies and faxes are not acceptable. 

No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
postage will not be accepted as proof of receipt 
No cash alternative to prizes. 

In some countries, the law forbids participation in this 
competition for pri 2 e awards. However, in these 
countries, you can still play for fun. The competition is 
void where illegal. 

Winners will be drawn on day after the end of the Worid 
Cup and published in the IHT on Thursday 21 July. 

10. On all matters, the editor’s derision is final. 

11 . The Editor reserves the right in his absolute discretion to 
disqualify any entry, competitor or nominee, or to waive 
any rules in the event of circumstances outside our 
control arising which, in his opinion, makes it desirable 
to cancel toe competition at any stage. 

12. The winners will be toe first correct answers containing 
six or more coupons picked at random from all entries. 


TODAY’S QUESTION 


Name one of the four teams that will make die 
semi-finals. 


9. 


Your response:. 


Name:. 


Job Title:. 


Company:. 
Address: _ 


Postal Code:. 


Country:. 


Telephone: 2J6 

Send responses to: IHT World Cup Competition, International Herald 
Tribune, (81 Avenue Charies-de-GaulIe, 92521 Neuilly Cedex. France. 



u 

r 

5 


ling 

to 
the 
ing 
)m- 
:ur- 
iui- 
uid 
s of 
on- 


ins, 
ics. 
I in 
cals 
lai- 
un- 
al- 
ly’s 

hey 

led 

m 

be- 

ad- 

nd 
y’s 
nd 
on 
cs. 
ul- 
in 
he 
I a 


:or 

mr 

3f- 

es. 

ias 

ag 

as 

it 

li- 

ce 









Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 6, 1994 





An occasional scries 
about people for \ihom 
style is a way of life 


Stanislav Libensky. when she began study- 
ing glassmaking in Czechoslovakia in the 
early '60s. She went on to work two years 
at CrystaJex, one of the country's main 
glass factories, then studied art education 
at Charles University in Prague. Although 
she left Czechoslovakia to marry a Ger- 
man in 1973, she remained interested in 
glasswork and fascinated by what she calls 
“the fourth dimension of glass." In 1988. 
she opened the Glass Gallery HittfeJd in 
this village outside Hamburg. 

Unlike many painters and sculptors 
who were forbidden from producing ab- 
stract works during the Communist era. 
glass artists were left pretty much to them- 
selves. and about 150 of them earned a 
living from their commissions, mostly for 
architectural projects. “The glass artists 
worked abstractly and were shown in the 
entire world. Officials didn’t see that then- 
work involved more than just a beautiful 
material," Stilting said. “If the same ob- 
ject had been created in bronze, it would 
have been forbidden because it wasn’t a 
soldier with a sword." 

The Velvet Revolution of 1989 turned 
out to be a mixed blessing for both Stilt- 
ing and Czech glass artists. On the one 
band, it awakened great international in- 
terest in things Czech. The millions of 
tourists who have since come to Prague 
have been exposed not only to shops full 
of traditional crystal products but to some 
of the modem glasswork as well. 

On the other hand, the economic 
changes that followed the revolution se- 
verely strained the finances of many of the 
country’s glass artists. For Stilting, it 
meant her gallery no longer had its almost 
exclusive access to the Czech scene, and 
she found herself dealing with several dif- 


By Ann Brocklehurst 

H ITTFELD, Germany — As a glass 
art dealer specializing in Czech art- 
ists. Elista Stilting is dedicated to getting 
people to take glass seriously as an artistic 
medium. Her main interests are not the 
traditional and well-known forms of glass- 
work such as crystal wineglasses, stained 
windows and delicate figurines. Rather, 
she is promoting the sculptures of the so- 
called "Studio Glass Movement" that first 
appeared on the scene in the late 1950s 
and in which the Czechs, with their long 
history of glassmaking, have always been 
considered among the leaders. 

Stilting became acquainted with die 
movement and one of its early leaders, 


Tastemakers 


ferent and inexperienced middlemen in- 
stead of the familiar one. 

But the HittfeJd gallery, unlike Czecho- 
slovakia itself, survived the revolution and 
lived to celebrate its fifth anniversary last 
year in the middle of Germany’s severest 
postwar recession. Most objects are priced 
at 5,000 to 16.000 Deutsche marks labout 
S3, 125 to $10,000), a level at which Stilt- 
ing believes they are affordable to a fairly 
large group of people. 

She said she regrets that many of her 
customers buy the objects simply because 
they find them pleasing to look at. "Hie 
objects should be seen like pictures.” she 
said. “They should not just be seen as 
something beautiful without any message 
or expression." 

The glass artists, who include Jan Fisar. 
Milan Hand! and Oja Bilek, still live main- 
ly in the Czech Republic’s Bohemia re- 
gion, where most of them spent their 10 
years of training and apprenticeships. Fre- 
quently used techniques for working with 
hot glas s include melting, blowing and 
pouring and, for cold glass, polishing, 
painting and engraving. 

Stilting says glass is an extremely diffi- 
cult medium to work with, more so even 
than metal and stone, and, as a result, 
artists sometimes forget or neglect their 
spiritual message as they struggle to over- 
come the technical difficulties of produc- 
ing a sculpture. “It a material that can be 
dumbfounding. Artists who work with 
wood and stone don’t have to fight agai ns t 
their medium. When you work with glass, 
you must wait and be disciplined. Other 
materials lead to more imm ediate results/ 

Working with glass is also relatively 
expensive and, in the Czech Republic, be- 
coming ever more so as the prices for the 
glass itself, electricity and work time in 
glass factories climb ever higher. .Artists 
who once lived from their work must now- 
find business on the sidelines to help sup- 
port their art. _ 

Stilting said that, although interest in 
glass appears to be growing, there is still 
utile more than a speculative market for 
glass sculpture. Prices usually cover only 
the cost of the glass used and the amount 
of labor by (he artist, a phenomenon Stilt- 
ing says Is limited to the field of glass. 
"When an artist does a drawing, no one 
asks how much the paper and paint cosl" 

Despite her misgivings. Stilting is fairly 
optimistic about the future of glass sculp- 
ture. which she says is now taking bold in 
Japan as well as Europe and the United 
States. While she believes the Czechs will 
no longer be able to afford to produce 
some of the expensive works they have in 
the past, she expects the financial pres- 
sures will cause them to develop a new 
style of equally high quality. 


kech Glass ^ Masterful-Master i 



r /■. r- / '-t*'. 


fiy WiliUmi s^trr 



For Eiisk.i SdHting. “The objects should be seen like pictures.’ 


AliraJ a:o; t-n t 


Woriang with glass, building a market 
and spreading the gospel clearly poses its 
own technical obstacles for gallery owners 
as web as -nis’.s. Stilting says she eften 
works until the early moning arranging 
her gallery’s four annual exhibitions and. 
recently, helping to plan shows in New 
York, Stockholm and Toronto. 

She visits the Czech Republic eight or 


nine limes a year, a constant reminder of 
the financial difficulties facing the artists 
represented in her gallery. “I am not a 
businesswoman in the original sense of the 
word, but I know that the artists must sell 
to pay for further works and I feel a 
responsibility toward them." 

Ann Brocklehurst is a journalist based in 
Berlin. 


Global Currency System. ne cover w H7 tt , . pVul ^ . 

The word the reviewing librarian intended is master^ .Huston’s Wl scree ^ a ? T pic ^ l .^,!^j^.S £ 
A; "expert, with the skill of a mger"; up from DashteC 

Wdmg to Webster's New Worid Jlurd im ftus, Hammett’s JESKTSS 

CalicgcEdition, means “fond of acung the part of a . j. Q^^Uer turned mtothe noun cour-vp 

master; domineering; imperious" Ac Simon & ^ sense we know and shiver aver today. 

Schuster lexicographer includes, as a second sense, .soMwiiteis say, then. I wrote, 'T Crar- _ 

"having or showing the ability of a master; «pal, ^ lexicon of political scandal is a 1968:'. 

swfimsurty.” It adds ominously to this second. ffler Louis Wolfe* 

sloppy sense: "usage objected to by some. ^^^i^wdthAbe Porta s, in which the SapraK : 

rm one of the “some." Memam-Webstert Tenth c _ Qrt 1usticc ^ Tour giving me and my accepting . 
Collegiate goes further in its usage note ^ the foundation post was nothing bat a axer-up- _ - 

“Some commentators insist that use of masteifid strata ewida Wolfson objects to-ibis •; 

be limited to sense 1 fmdined to pk, the mesto) » ^ .■ 

rader to preserve a distinction between n and mastedy. citation ^ recorded convosatioo 

The distinction is a ot^ excogitat^ by a ^ ; 

century pundit in (fisregaid of the Jristoiy of the ward." with Fortas, which he says snows mere 
Using masterful to mean “skfflfaL" Meniam-Webster unethical m the reference. - .-=•■ ■ /. / , 

insists, “cannot rationally be called an error.’* “Your letter,” Fortas said to Waffson.‘‘ 2 Bri dj 

The pundit bang sneered at by the roundbeded subsequent accepta n ce of the foundation post wmbe 
uDsiarrs. led bv E. Ward Gilman in Sprinefiald, Mas- together and wfll be construed as fOuawsirHui - 




Collegiate goes further in its usage note some-tng up. 
“Some cmnmeatatiffs insist that use erf mtsterftd should 
be limited to sense 1 {inclined to play the master) in 
Oder to preserve a distinction between « and masterh/. 
Tte distinction is a modem one, excogitated by a 20th- 
century pundit in disregard of the history of the word. 
Using masterful to mean “ skfllfa l," Meniam-Webster 
insists, “cannot rationally be called an error.’* 


The pundit being sneered at by the rcrandbeeled subsequent accepta n ce of the foundation post w3n>e 
upstarts, led by E. Ward Gilman in Springfield, Mas- pm together and wfll be construed ^ Mflaws-rtpsi- 
sachusetis, was Henry Fowler, the superusagist "The your giving n» and ntyaccqjtmgtiefwnKiawngj 
■domineering" sense of masterly dropped into disuse was nothing but a cover-up and that wharw® jeafiy 
around the end of the 18th century" Gilman notes in happening was that I was taking a gratuiiytrom yoom , 
the masterly but determinedly unxoasterful Merriaro- ^rrms of the statute and supplementing asysaltiQJxotr. 
Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage. “Fowler ^ And that is very bad. * 
seems to have thought the world of English usage thai n»» what seemed, wit of cogtatt, Sea 

would be a tidier place if masterful too were limited to c g H fts ^ op hi fn a dif fr mit tight —m copteM.»how tbe 
one sense. He therefore dedared the differentiation aclion wonU be construed by others. From a leiaco- 
be tween the two words to be complete,” whit* was however, the FortaS xitatkw 

"only wishful thinking in the first place." remains the cariiest known example in print bf^faeuse 

Fowler! thou shouldst be hying at this hour to ^ cow-ap in the sense <rf “deliberate o&fiBscaoGQ.*-T;. ; 
excoriate the excessive excogitation of the “turn ’em wolfcon argues that it is erroneous to bbznehzjttfor - 

loose, Brace" school of lexicography. Here were a . - *- - 


loose. Brace" school of lexicography. Here were a ^ mxaaax ^ conflkt of interesi that somerfus 
couple of words that cried out for separation: tie triggered Fortas's resignation. V¥Mle:lTtad 

language for centimes drove a wedge betwren the two, ^r olfaon . 5 attention, I wrote back to ask iFhebe&«d-^ 
and a great usagist, on the side of danty and preaaon, ^ ^ recording of a idepbone.comw- 

issued his useful guidance to a watmg world. sation, when the otfaerperson on the hue hasji.re^B?- 


language for centimes drove a wedge between the two, 
and a great nmgist, an the side of clarity and precis on, 
issued his useful guidance to a waiting world. 

This was not a case of Bishop Lowth’s cooking up a 
"rale" of grammar (never using who as an object) to 
force En g li s h into I-atin ways, nor was this an instance 
of language snobs looking down their noses at ain’t. 
This was a sensible prescription by a man of anthonty 
to help En glish sneakers stamp out confusion between 
rwn similar modifiers. 

Call me irrational, bnt I say anybody who uses 
masterful, “imperious,” to mean the same as masterly, 
“skilled,” is in error. 

O 

In a recent piece about Whitewater words. I wrote, 
“Used loosely, the noun cover-up means ‘an action to 
conceal a mistake’; used with more intensity, the word 
means ‘obstruction of justice.' ” Then came the ety- 
mology: coinage by Raymond Chandler in a 1935 
story in Black Ma sk magazine. I will stand by this 
coinage despite the Oxford English Dictionary Sup- 
plement’s listing of a 1927 book. “Those ‘Ashes’ " by 
Montague Noble, which uses cover-up as a term used 
in cricket for defending- 1 also rgect a 1920s use of the 
noun- to mean “a garment worn by a woman over her 
bathing suit"; this also lacks a sinister sense. 


able expectation of privacy, is ethicaL r . . •. •.•-•-V.v: C, 
“Looking back,” Wolfson replied in part, *%ad.ij 


jdace. The fact is that this recording was made, , wife; 
out my knowicdgje, by some members of ay pktufy 
who thought they were being helpful to tMw.^ .ij.vL 
have never been a party to secretly rccartimg.^in 


have never been a party to secretly rwxmangrflay 
conversations and have always placed among the iwfr '- 
est type of bos anyone doing such a thing." . s -w£ 
Secretly made tapes are a frequent source of’stag-^ 
and nonstandard usages. Some an^c-minded lericogy { 
raphers hope the nefarious practice continues, theabj:/ 
providing un-sdf-consdons sources fe thelangMge/ 
as it is really used. But it would be wrong. V 


New York Times Serrwe 


■--.•-■VVB I 


INIERNAHONAL 

classified:: 

Appears on Page 16 




*9*V 

m-: 

Stj- v 








Europe 


Mgam 

AnoJordam 

Antes 

ABWB 

BofCtkwa 

BetaB* 

B«ki 

Bnjucfc 

Bm JwjI 

Cote OH Sol 

OiMl 

&Hur^h 

FVoiwee 

Fnnte 

Otwe 


Las Pakios 

Usban 

Ixnicn 

W«M 


Pn»J* 

n fyite* 

Homo 

Si Peimburg 
Seddufen 
Stalbotn 
Tate. 


Today 

Hlgti Lour 
Cff OF 
20/94 urea 
IT/S? 15159 
27/BO 12/53 
26/79 WW 
26/79 17 IK 
16/64 7/44 

16/61 BUfl 
1BW4 13-55 
19 V? 9-46 

17/62 9-44 

31/ W 22/71 
1B«4 11 152 
15/59 12/53 
23/73 12*3 
16(61 

31/70 14/57 
19/64 12/53 
23/73 15/W 
28/79 21/70 
28/82 l8/«4 
18.-64 12/53 
31/86 16/61 
23/72 15/69 
21/70 1569 
16/BI B<4? 

33/73 16/81 
17/83 9/48 

24/75 19/86 
20-OT 10/50 
15/59 7/44 

1 1 /53 8/46 

23/73 10150 
23/71 16/61 
16/81 8/48 

18/54 13/55 
18/B4 12-53 
23/73 18/81 
1 6/BI 7/44 
15/SO 5/41 

16A4 12/53 


Oceania 


WEATHER 


Forecast lor Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weaiher. 


CROSSWORD 


Tomorrow 
W High Low W 
C/F C/r 
1 29.-54 19 W pc 

Wl 20/68 14*7 • 
a 2f/79 12.53 oc 
pc 23/73 14/57 pc 
1 26/79 ie.64 i 
1 22/71 12-33 5 

•: 31-70 12/53 s 
Hi £3 T3 13 SI 1 
sh 2?'T3 14-57 5 
pc 22-71 12J53 x 
s 30-95 21/70 pc 
Hi 15 51 0 - 43 3 

sh 14-57 3.46 1 

* 34.75 14.57 s 

e 22/71 1365 a 
pc 24.-75 14.57 j 
pc 19-66 12/53 -Ji 
pc 3475 14/5’ J 
1 2572 2170 5 
i 27-8n 18 64 S c 
Hi 2271 1153 5 
1 33-89 1762 % 
pc 2679 17-82 s 
I 2879 14-57 1 
C 2271 12/53 s 
a 23/72 17/93 s 
1 21/70 9/40 c 

5 25/77 19/M 1 
t/1 24/75 13 65 ( 
c 21/70 13/53 9 
•h 13-55 8/43 pe 

24/75 1 4/57 ^ 
l 34/75 13.55 Sft 
pc 18/64 il«2 c 
sh 35/77 13/55 s 
pc 18/84 13.-53 ah 
pc 25.-77 18-B4 3 
pc 21/70 13/55 a 
9h 32/71 12/53 sh 
sh 24,75 13/55 ■ 


IcJ Jfe 


o/njoi. 

Heoij 'coj 
I.tWIiLl 
ite D-W 
£~.ul 
5f.,.rrsuU 

S-n»n-/. 


JrtJmo 


! Uig aa3CT iaM|i 
CcM 


UrBoaonl// 

He 


North America 

Thera couW be a Jhunder- 
show in Kew York City and 
Washaigicn. D.C.. Tuesday. 
Pa::ly sunny Wednesday 
and bright and sunny Thurs- 
day Becoming hoi in Los 
Angeles Tuesday and espe- 
cially Wednesday. Turning 
rather cool lor the season In 
Onawa and Mom real Tues- 
day and Wednesday. 


Europe 

It will be changeable (ram 
ihe U. K.. Ireland and north- 
west France lo Itonvay and 
Sweden. Cool winds and 
showers wdl meld with some 
sun. Germany ihrough 
southern France and north- 
ern Italy wW begin wa/m with 
sun: it wB cool with showers 
by Thursday. Sun wiH heal 
mosl erf Span. 


gH.«.v o£gi-M.-. 

gn«r. ?-t • 

Asia 

Most qI ChciE «miI- :a-. c 
and-oil rain semi m -no 
souiherri nail will ce era*', 
In Japan, iam wn me 1 . To-'.o 
and there wdl be showers <n 
Osaka and Nagcya :c tx-j.i 
the period. Korea will be 
warm and mostly rain ir&? 
Singapore and Bangkok nay 
have sudden cownpours 
each day. 


Middle East 


H&i Low W High Low W 


Bw4 

Cbio 

□n/mscuB 

JoruisJem 

Luur 

Rwodh 


OF C/F 
36/83 30/88 


OF C/F 
29/84 21/70 • 


35/95 19/08 1 34/93 18/84 1 

29/84 13/55 ■ 29-84 13/59 9 

37/80 16/81 s 37/80 18*1 s 
39/US 19/88 a 41 /10B 17/63 * 
40/104 33/73 S 43/107 24/75 9 


15/59 9/48 9 10/61 B/44 pe 
17/83 11153 I 10,84 11/52 pc 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

Wgh Low W High Low W 
C/F C/r C/F OF 

BunmAn) 14/57 3/37 pc 13.-S5 2.-3S pc 

Caracas M/Be 20-68 pc 30<W 20.68 pe 

Lkiw 10/84 18»i s 13/56 18/51 pe 

MancoCHy 28/E? 14*7 pc 28/82 14/57 pe 

ftedeJarteo 39/84 18«4 pr 31/SS i9,« pc 

Eaiteg9 11/52 -1.31 s 13.55 4/39 4 


iir-t 'c*n 
C-rat lanez 


Taday Tomorrow 

Hlqh Lpw W High Low W 

C/F C/T C/F C/F 

33 91 34-79 sh 33-51 15 77 pc 

28.07 17 M V. :-9H4 I9 « pe 

;■? « 267? I 2=54 25,79 pc 

33 b m - 23T3 sh Jj.J: 23-73 sh 

43109 29 6J s -‘7.12925 Jj ; 

w-7« :3.6? s re .73 ic-t; ae 

23 -94 22 -T- } 20-32 22.— pc 

??-«■: 25 77 p: 32-r. 24.75 pe 

y> 9-; 27 7: ;r 31 5; 22 73 ; 

24 ' c i> •!-/ : JJ :? 9J sh 


2il~? is« s :e~; :9 T< ; 

'47- *--43 pe £2 9-46 pc 

27.8C 1? 56 pe 2? 62 ‘9 64 i 

2271 :-cS -c 24 “i ::.23 X 

x e* 24 75 sh 3C «r 217s t’. 
22 7- M52 pc 23^7 13 55 sh 

27/W 12-53 s 26.7- 15 T9 zn 


North America 


Legwid: s-sjnny. pc-oarDy doisJy, cloudy, SHWwn. MmsmBrSarms, r-ram. si«iiijw nwim. 
sn-siow, nw. w-wsaOiet. All maps, foracaats and data provided by Accu-Weathor. Inc. C 1994 


fnclste.]* 

«Aima 

Boslon 

CI-«.r^o 

Cwnvsr 

Cewjn 

Konck/iu 

Hnawn 

In Angeles 

Main 

Mnmopofa 

Montnal 

Nxzmi 

New York 

Riow* 

Sar Fran 
Sewnin 
Tc-of»o 
V/adurtglcn 


17-62 8-46 

28 02 20-68 
2372 1f-6l 
29-54 15/59 
32/83 U-57 
29-5J 1561 
29/51 22 71 
3J.-83 22-71 
24/79 14/57 
32/88 24/75 
29-64 1559 
23/73 11-52 
30/86 23/73 
77.-80 IB-64 
41. 108 28/79 
19/68 11/52 
16-51 9.48 

20/73 14*7 
27/80 16-54 


T 18 64 

1 29/94 

sh 24-7; 
DC 20-79 ' 
PC 25-84 
1 24 75 

pc :9 -sj ; 
K 34-33 : 
pc 31/m ! 
I 32/99 : 
1 2f./79 1 

PC 23.73 
pc 31/88 . 
pc 28/7? 1 
* 78.-100; 

pc 22/71 1 
ih 16/61 1 
sh 22/71 1 
I 27.90 1 


ACROSS 

1 Gregory Hines 
specialty 
4 Take for 
granted 
10 Colorless 
14 Actress 
Gardner 
IE Slay-at-horr.e 

16 Root overhang 

17 House nemasr: 
Abbr. 

IB Interior 
aecoratw s 
hi/ee 


so Wields the 
gavel 

22 Swear 1 : 0.1 

23 Pinker insice 

24 Ooponen: 

25 Greek geo.Te: 

27 Premciar 

31 Panic 

32 3e;-e:s 

33 Pc; -n’redie-: 

34 Pea oca e: 

ag-oy 

33 C-fficence 


Solution to Puzzle of June 3 


00130? HnaBS'-^vClfilQ 
O0O0 -0QQIJH E30EJQ 
0(300 00D00 0000 

1900 0 an Hr ^flaa aaa 

^fe‘<Q0QI3'. , rSCH313H 


1 1300000.; aaa xiaaa 

□□000 >Q0D 00000 
DB0C1 000 0000001 
□□□□□□□DQQQOS 
□B00 0000-v 
000000 0000000 
QQ00 00O00- 00H0 
0000 00000 -□□□□ 
000 00000.0000 


38 Sword'S 
superior, in 
saying 

39 Craving 

41 Ends' partner 

42 More man fa! 
44Slerec 

comaonems 
« 32-card card 
game 

47 Ettec a 
makeover 

48 Maoo-eon's 
cavalry 
comnanaer 

43 Slow, in music 
52 Brine an -ssue 

horr.e 

55 Pe: rcc*. maybe 
57 Hair acolication 
SB Formerly 

59 Mother 

60 The 90's. e g. 

61 Goes cu: with 
regularly 

62 Archeological 
finds 

as Director 
Howard 


1 Canvas cover 

2 Declare 
oositively 


V-jW'i-"- >■ 


3 Houseman TV 
series, with 
The- 

4Two are often 
prescribed 

5 Under the etms 

8 "Great! ' 

7 Salt Lake City 
team 

8 Russian tor 
"peace" 

9 Makes mare 
valuable 

10 Person who s 
feeling down in 
the mouth? 

11 Fad 

12 Lexington and 
Madison: Abbr. 

13 Lahr or Parks 

19 One of the 
Aleutians 

21 Shopper's lure 

24 Adjutants 

25 Noblemen 

2S Exhaust 

27 Ties 

28 Toothless threat 

29 * my case" 

30 Gift recipient 

32 Kind of power 

28 Barn dances 


37 Legendary 
hemlock drinker 
40 Sidewinder 
lock-ons 
43 False god 
46 Actor Dui lea 


46 A form of 
46- Across 
48 Tycoon 
48 Primates 
bo Madonna's 
“Truth or — 


-51 Church SnSSpT 
52U>-Ctf .'- 
RrMr.Moster---^ 
M Flir 

5oChowdowo^/. 

- 1, 



J-/V4 - v- 


Ihe 0 


Fol* by RctMMZkmaiBai 


.© New York Times Edited by Will Shorty 



Iravel in a world without borders, time 

or language barriers. 




^ass , oaxgam < [ Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

reach the U5, directl > r from crv ‘ er 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 
langu3 8 e ' since ic ’ s CaU your clients ac 3 a.m. knowing they : Il get the message in 

: your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now Dossible with AIKE 1 

' r t tftttnn 4 

w jo ^ these senices, dial the AI53T Access Number of the countn* you : re in and you’ll get all the 

help you need. With these Access Numbers and vour AIST Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don't have an ATCT Calling Card or you’d like more information on AIST global senices.. just cal] us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 


AT&T 


© 199-4 AHET 


AB3T Access Numbers 

How to call around the world. 

1. Using the chan below, rind the ccmnrrv vou are caDing from. 

2. Dial the corresponding AKT Access Number 

Torec^eyotirfree wallet cart cfAGSTs Access Numbers, jutt dial the acceM number trf : 

the country >txiYe in and ask far Customer Service, 

COUNTBY ACCESS NUMBER CO/WTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ArrraiwiMmn, 


Australia 
China, PitOte 
Guam 
Hong Kong 

India n 

I ndonesia* 

Japan* 

Korea 

Korea** 

Malaysia* 

New Zealand 

Phili pp to e s* 

Saipan* 

Singapore 

Sri La nka 

Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


ASIA Italy* 

1-800-681-0 11 Uechienstein- 

10811 flrtiwa,^ 

018-872 Luxembourg 


172-1011 Brazil 

155-00-11 ririb 

8*196 Columbia 

t^SOGOlll Costa Rica*n 


— — ^ ‘ '-AWU 

800-1311 Macedonia, F.YJL of 99-800-4288 Ecuador 


Armenia*" 

0ZW 03-Q11 BtiS nrv^ T 

0800 - 100-10 ^jggn Islands 1-80 

ftjisma oo-iaotk Mio SSd &***■ l-m 

9HM0U <X>1*Q 

0042000101 L^non (Being) 0^0 

Peainari7 ‘ 8001-00 10 ^ 0 idwfS 001-800 

Finland* 9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia — IBl * /Nevta 1-801 

g™* 19A-0011 Tteter AFRICA 

Gcrmag y ■ 0130-0010 ual* ^ gi^ Caif °) 

0M0M311 — i£55P«— ^ ^ ' 

OOa- 800-01111 Argentina* OOT-aOO-2OT-lTrr ^ 

| gg iand * 999-001 wtei — 

***** 1-W550400 Boi taf ~ Q^au TT? 


OOO -117 Malta* 

001 - 801-10 Monaar 

0039- 111 Netherlands* 

009-U Norway 

11* Ftoland"*- 

.800-0011 Portugal* 

000-911 I tonwnb 

195U ^te-CMoscow) 

Slovakia 

800-0111-in . Spain* 

43CH30 Sweden* 

0080-102 88-0 Switzerland- 

0019-99 1-mi Ui 

EUROPE Uta ntoe * 


0^0^90-130 ElSah-adoCb 

19*-0011 Guatemnla* 

06-022-9111 Guyana*^ 

800-190-11 HonduntshS ‘ 

0 *01(M8<H)in Aferi cq*a* ~ g 

°S° 1 7-I-288 WkaiapBf Mmgn^ 

01-800-4288 Pana mara 

V*5Q*2 p Sr 

00 ~A20-00101 Ai ri«p»w. 

900-99-00-11 U^ ma y "* 

— Venezuela 


000-8010 

QOa-0913 

980-11-0010 

114 

119 

190 

w. 

165 

123 

95-800-462-4240. ; 
>) IT* 


109- 

191- 

156 . 

00-0430 . ; 

8O811-120J.' 


8*14111 


MIDDLE EAST 


— auaBBFJw -r 
— O* 100 " 11 Bemmda* i-#wojt 77 . 3 <ni. 


BritidiVl 


Cayman Inlan ds 

_ 080-90010 Grenada*' 

_ 177-100-2727 

000-288 famalca— " “ 

_ *26801 PfetAntfl — 

— Q80<Mll ~ 77 St Kitts./Ne\ , is 

1-SOO-lQ r 


J55?£15!Z 5^r(cum) 

— 800-12] Gabon* 


1-800872-2881 

1-600-872-2881 

^ 1-600TO2881 ’ 

1-800-872-2881 . 

003-600972-2885 ’ 

0-800-872-2881 

001-800-872-2881 

1-800-872-2881 

AFRICA 


5104)200 

OOa-Ogt 

ooiu 

0630-10 

797-797 

0-800-99-0123- 


^Ungwgrlji**Sailcisfrfteoi^ilr^teoekwerpwMtelnowsrl40liii. 

^P 0 * . df&n phonr anl /brdU] tone Bte pSi 


DS10HMWMJ11I 


atiSSEKt . 



w iy v - 


^ Li 


fieb 


l «f - — . . . 

. 


*v"r ^.r/Q r, 2 a ' 


■>, 'j;'- -* ‘ J - m . - -c