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INTERNATIONAL 


r 4‘ 


tribune 


V? PUBLISSJgi) WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

*$»« n rfe/ r 


Paris, Friday, June 10, 1994 


Rwandan Archbishop 
Slain in Clergy Massacre 

Rebel Chief U.S. Resists 
Calls His Men Pressure to Act 
‘Misguided 5 On Slaughter 


C omynUd hv Our Staff Frrrr. Jfcspmchei 

. K JgALL Rwanda — The Roman Catholic 
Archbishop of Kigali and 12 other clergymen 
have been gunned down by Rwandan rebels in 
the first confirmed massacre carried out by die 
rebels in two months of carnage. 

We know it was done by misguided soldiers 
of our army, and we are readv to say that" 
Colonel Frank Mugambage at i he Rwanda 
ratnouc Front, said in the capital Kigali. 

The massacre coincided with reports from 
aid agencies that nine priests and 63 civilians 
, T,”^ 1 massacred in a govemman-held area 
of Kigali. 

u In Rome. Pope John Paul II said he was 
profoundly upset" by the massacre of the 
clergymen and prayed that the victims find in 
heaven “the peace that their well-loved land 
denied them." 

“I beg all Rwandans, in addition to the 
leaders of the nations, which can come to their 
aid, to do all possible without delay to open the 
paths to peace and to the reconstruction of the 
gravely martyred country," he said. 

Colonel Mugambage said four renegade re- 
bel soldiers among a detachment charged with 
protecting the bishops in the village of Byi- 
mana, southwest of the capital bad stormed 
into the house where the clergymen were stay- 
ing. 

"We are bearing that erne of the four said 
these men were responsible for the massacre of 
bur people. They went ahead and opened fire,” 
Colonel Mugambage said. 

The clergymen, apparently Hutus, were seen 
by reporters in the camp of Kabgayi a former 
seminary where more than 35,000 people, 
Mainly Tutsis, lived in concentration camp con- 
ditions. The Tutsi tribe fills most of the rebel 
ranks. 

Hutu militias and government soldiers regu- 
larly pulled groups of people out erf the camp 
and murdered them, witnesses said. 

One of the Rwanda Patriotic Front attackers 
was shot as be fled, and a hunt had beat 
mounted for the others. Colonel Mugambage 
said a commission had been established to 
investigate the kfllings. 

The massacre also drew bitter condemnation 
from beads of slate of several countries. 

If was the first con firmed massacre by rebel 
solders m bloodletting in whfcbtaid .wpritar* 
say 500,000 matidynitgipeople have been, 
killed by Hutu militias and goranment troops. 

Witnesses have, however, seen Rwanda Pa- 
triotic Front soldiers killing mOitia fighters 
when they capture them. 

Colonel Mugambage denied that the killings 
had signaled a breakdown in the rigid discipline 
of his rebel army, whose sokiios have lost their 
families in the massacres. 

“Aren’t you surprised that soldiers who have 
had their own families massacred have re- 
strained themselves up to now?" Colonel Mu- 

See MASSACRE, Page 5 

Saving Money? 
For Pentagon, 
Not So Simple 

- By John F, Harris 

' Wotfongum Pest Service 

WASHINGTON —In the far readies of the’ 
Defense Department, some planners last year 
thought they had found a simple way to save 
money by changing the way the mflitaty sup- 
plies fuel to air bases in North Carolina. 

It turned out the plan — using a pipeline 
instead of ship and railway to deliver fuel — 
was not as ample as they had hoped. A North 
Carolina lawmaker. Representative H. Martin 
Lancaster, a Democrat, compteined that the 

would damage n a t i on al security while 
costing his district jobs- He vowed to “use eray 
ounce of influence 1 have" to block h, 

After he intervened, a senior Pentagon offi- 
cial James R, Klogh, put the cosi-savmg mea- 
sure on bold. Despite an eaenrire Defe^e 
Department study strongly endorsing the 

« * 7. ‘a i intMnncHM fnr ei* tfTWHitne 


U.S. Resists 

Pressure to Act 
On Slaughter 

By Douglas Jehl 

Hen- York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Trying lo avoid the rise 
of moral pressure to stop vhe slaughter in 
Ruanda, the Clin ion administration has in- 
structed its spokesmen not to describe the sys- 
tematic killing there as genocide, even though 
senior officials think that is exactly what il 
represents. 

That decision has left the administration at 
odds with the United Nations secretary-gener- 
al Butros Batros Ghali, and a distinguished 
cast of experts who say there is no doubt that 
(he massacres thought to have left at least 
200,000 and perhaps 400,000 dead are part of a 
deliberate and massive extermination of an 
ethnic group. 

But American officials say that to affix so 
stark a label on what has happened in Rwanda 
since early April could inflame public calls for 
action the administration is unwilling to lake. 
Rather than put the slaughter on a par, for 
example, with what happened in Cambodia 
under the Khmer Rouge, the State Department 
and the National Security Council have drafted 
guida n c e instructing to say merely that “acts of 
genocide may have occurred." 

While no memorandum explicitly prohibits a 
broader draunriaiioQ of the massacres, admin- 
istration officials say they recognize the guid- 
ance as a boundary on their public pronounce- 
ments, 

Thai caution appears to reflect the attitude of 
an administration that has become deeply wary 
of new entanglements abroad, particularly in 
cases like Rwanda in which no vital American 
interests are at stake. With independent wit- 
nesses providing detailed accounts of organized 
killings by Hums of the minority Tutsis, some 
senior American officials acknowledge that the 
administration's public posture reflects a cer- 
tain lack of candor. 

“Genocide is a word that carries an enor- 
mous amount of responsibility,” a senior ad- 
ministration official said this week. If the Unit- 
ed Slates were to join in describing the killings 
as acts of genocide, the official and others said, 
it would be natural — and unwelcome — ■ for 
voters to expect that the U.S. response would 
include sending troops. 

Under. the.1943 genocide convention, the 
United States and other signatories are sup- 
posed to rcaxmd to cases erf genocide by inves- 
tigating and punishing those who conuzut its 

See POLICY, Page 5 



By Bam' James 

Intamiumcl HeraU Tribune 

DUBLIN — Europeans began voting Thurs- 
day for a new European Parliament, and in one 
country, Ireland, there were even some glim- 
merings of enthusiasm among the general mood 
erf apathy. 

Surveys showed a low voter turnout in all 
four countries that went to the polls Thursday. 
But in Ireland, to an extent unmatched else- 
where in Europe, the election was about per- 
sonalities as much as issues. As one official put 
it, the Irish were ejecting the politicians they 
thought “would make trie cookies come our 
way." 

“In Europe you can get a lot of things done if 
you go about it the right way " he said. “Ireland 
is the master of pork-barrel politics. We export- 
ed it to the United States." 


Besides the Irish, voters in Britain, Denmark 
and the Netherlands cast ballots Thursday. The 
rest of the 12-nation European Union votes 
Sunday. A total of 567 seats in the Parliament 
are at stake. 

In virtually every country but Ireland, voters 
have confined their attention mostly to national 
issues such as: the survival of Prime Minister 
John Major in Britain: the corruption scandals 
swaging around the government of Prime 
Minister Felipe Gonzalez in Spain; the political 
future of Chancellor Helmut KohJ in Germany, 
or next year’s presidential race in France. 

The apathy about Europe-wide issues 
seemed almost palpable, even though the big- 
gest complaint about the European Union is, its 
lack of accountability — just what the Parlia- 
ment is intended w redress. 


In most EU countries, people vote for party 
lists rather than for specific candidates for 
parliamentary seats. In other words, they know 
what they are voting for but not whom. 

Not so in the Irish Republic, which has 15 
seats in the Parliament Dublin has been plas- 
tered with the faces and names of candidates 
who are in competition not only with rivals 
from other political parties but also from their 
own. 

"I have been a member of the European 
Parliament for 10 years, and believe me, 1 nave 
had to work for every vote,” said Mary Banotti, 
who is fighting to keepTar seat in Dublin. 

Results of races in aQ 12 EU nations will be 
announced after the last polling booth doses 
Sunday. Analysis forecast that the socialists 

See EUROPE, Page 5 




and bas yet to save taxpayers a cent. ■ 

The fate of this small proposal tcHs a larger 
stotyabotttbepitMsaftiyi^ 

the military. The $4.1 ntiffion annual swvmg 
envisioned by the Defense Fuel Supply Center 
is pocket chang e in the Defense Departments 
$262 bfflicn annual budget. Yet tire issue has 

more far-reaching proposals to change mutiny 



House Demands Clinton 
Allow Arms for Bosnia 


IMHBr lU'IWW'n- numi ■ 

EHeriy Swtfaw checking Gats posted at an aid organization on Thursday to see 
whether they had rawed private food parcels from friends and relatives tiring abroad. 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — The House of Represen- 
tatives expressed its frustration Thursday with 
President Bill Clinton's Bosnia policy, demand- 
ing that the United States allow arras shipments 
to the Muslim government in Bosnia in defi- 
ance of a United Nations baa 

By a vote of 244 to 178, the House adopted a 
resolution that would require the president to 
end unilaterally U.S. support for the global ban 
on arms shipments to the former Y ugoslavia. It 
also authorized up to $200 million in arms 
shipments to the Bosnian government. 

Several legislative hurdles remain before the 
measure becomes law. 

The action, in an amendment to a military 
spading bill, came despite a major lobbying 
effort by the White House on Thursday morn- 
ing that included strenuous opposition by De- 
fense Secretary William J. Perry . Deputy Secre- 
tary of State Strobe Talbott and the nation's 
top military officer. General John M. Shali- 
kashvilL 

Mr. Clinton has said be favored ending the 
UN embargo, but only in concert wiih Europe- 
an allies, who have opposed such a move. 

The House vote provided a platform for 
opponents of the president's foreign policy to 
sharply criticize the White House. One leading 
Democrat, Representative Dave McCurdy of 
Oklahoma, called Mr. Clinton's Bosnia policy 
“a charade." A Republican, Henry J. Hyde of 
Illinois, accused the White House of “endless 
palaver, indecision, paralysis and do follow- 
through." 

But the real impact of the vote was in doubt. 
The amendment must be reconciled with action 
last month in the Senate, which confused the 


matter when it voted in separate amendments 
to abandon the arms embargo unilaterally and 
airo to seek United Nations and NATO agree- 
ment to abandon the embargo. 

Immediately after the House vote, members 
began debate on a second measure that would 
negate (he first vote by requiring tbe president 
to seek only UN support for an rad to the arms 
embargo. 

In a letter to tbe House, Mr. Qimon declared 
that unilaterally ending the arms embargo 
would end the peace process in Bosnia, and his 
aides said such a move would “fracture" the 
NATO allian ce and undermine Russian assis- 
tance in the Balkans. 

His supponers argued that unilateral U.S. 
action would effectively end cooperation from 
West European nations and Russia, would un- 
dermine all other international sanctions ef- 
forts, including those in Haiti and Iraq, and 
would draw U.S. troops into the civil war. 

Supporters of a unilateral lifting of the em- 
bargo often cited moral grounds, arguing that 
Serbian aggression against Muslims amounted 
to genocide. They said the current policy per- 
mitted this aggression to continue unchecked. 

A UN relief spokesman said Thursday that 
Bosnian Serbs were evicting Gypsies from i he 
northern dry of Banja Luka, continuing a cam- 
paign of force removals and tenor against the 
non-Serbian population, Tbe Associated Press 
reported from Sarajevo. 

Peter Kessler, spokesman for the UN High 
Conmiisaoncr for Refugees, said tbe latest ex- 
pulsions at Banja Luka, 140 kilometers (87 
miles) northwest of Sarajevo, seemed to repre- 
sent so-called ethnic cleansing at its most base 

See EMBARGO, Page 5 


AhdcBc* SnKiMcrace Franco Pit** 

A child armed with a pistol sitting in a car Thursday in Kigali, where the rebel Rwanda Patriotic Front was patrolling the city streets. 

European Issues Are Few as Europe Votes 


No. 34,6 II 

North Korea 
Threatens 
Japan and 
South Korea 

Pyongyang Officials 
Warn of ‘Devastation 9 if 
Sanctions Are Imposed 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispel dm 

SEOUL — North Korea threatened the Jap- 
anese with reprisals and the South Koreans 
with devastation on Thursday, stepping up its 
verbal onslaught in a worsening dispute that it 
warned could lead to war. 

After rejecting United Nations inspections of 
their suspect nuclear program, which is at the 
heart of the dispute, the North Koreans are now 
trying to fend off economic penalties that the 
United Slates is straining to organize — at the 
United Nations, if it can, or outside iL if it 
cannot. 

Prospects of the UN Security Council's act- 
ing to impose sanctions receded even further 
Thursday when the Chinese, who as a perma- 
nent member have a veto on the council, re- 
buffed South Korea's attempt to enlis t their 
hdp. China said sanctions were inappropriate. 

That appeared to leave the United States 
with what Secretary of State Warren M. Chris- 
topher has called a “coalition of the willing." or 
governments that would back sanctions inde- 
pendently of the United Nations. Such a coali- 
tion, in Washington’s view, would bave to in- 
dude Japan and South Korea to be effective. 
With that in mind. North Korea focused Thurs- 
day on those two neighbors. 

In Pyongyang, the North Korean Foreign 
Ministry said Japan could be sure of reprisals if 
it took pan in sanctions. 

“If Japan should take the lead or be inveigled 
or join forces in any ‘sanctions' against us, we 
would regard it as a declaration of war and 
Japan would be unable to evade a deserting 
punishment for it," the ministry said in a state- 
ment. 

Then the North Korean foreign minister 
himsdf, Kim Yang Nam. warned South Kore- 
an leaders. 

“They should remember that if they blindly 
follow the policies of tbe United States as to 
sanctions and finally start a war, then in the end 
South Korea will be devastated,” he said in a 
statement in Kiev, where he was on an official 
visit. 

North Korea has come under growing inter- 
national pressure since it refused to let UN 
inspectors test samples of nuclear fuel at a site 
near Yongbyoo. The samples were to detennine 
whether material had been diverted illicitly to 
make atomic weapons. 

In response to the U.S. effort to inflict eco- 
nomic penalties over tbe refusal North Korea 
said it would view sanctions as an act of war. 

Although Japan is on record as favoring 
sanctions, the government is still worried about 
the possible consequences. Tokyo is worried 
about a violent reaction from the nearly quarter 
million North Koreans living in Japan. In addi- 
tion, defense officials are aware that most ma- 
jor Japanese does are within range of the Ro- 
dong -1 missiles that North Korea has been 


Mr. Kim, in his statement, announced that 
his country would continue its program of test- 
ing intermediate-range missiles. 

“Missfle launches occur in any country regu- 
larly, and tbe United States and Japan do this 
most often," he said. “Until now, no one ever 
mentioned anything about our bunches of ex- 
perimental missiles. We don’t understand why 
there is so much noise about it now.” 

The Japanese foreign minister, Koji Ka- 
kizawa, counseled caution on Thursday. 

“We must avoid remarks that might incite 
North Korea,” be told lawmakers. 

In Beijing, where the South Korean foreign 
minister, Han Sung loo, had appealed on 
Wednesday for China’s hdp, the Chinese For- 
eign Ministry spokesman. Stum Guofang, said, 
“We are not in favor of the involvement of the 
United Nations Security Council in this issue." 

“We do not agree on sanctions,” he added, 
“for sanctions wffl only serve to push the parties 
concerned into confrontation with one another 
and result in a situation no one wants to see." 

Mr. Sben urged North and South Korea, the 
United States and tbe International Atomic 
Energy Agency to negotiate again. He said 
there was still “room and the possibility" for a 
peaceful settlement as long as all parties re- 
mained 

In other diplomatic activity. President Kim 
Young Sam a South Korea telephoned Prime 
Minister Tsmomu Hala of Japan on Thursday 
to discuss the stalemate, said a presidential 
spokesman, Choo Don Shik. 

“Japan believes the nuclear conflict should 
be resolved through negotiations but realizes 
that because of North Korea's attitude. UN 

See KOREA, Page 5 


TheDdose Fuel 
bfllioa agency inthe 


The ‘Rise and Fall of an Honest Farmer 9 


Kiosk 


in the United States eway year. 

Sopeniscasat the fud agency dotoedtobe 
interviewed about tbe dispute with Mr. Lancas- 
ter, whose, seat on tbe House Armed Services 
Committee gives him inflnence over the nnn- 

tfljy.Mr.K^thcdcpW^secr^of 

defense for logistics, also decimal to be inter- 
See FUEL, Page 5 


. By John Tagliabue 

New York Tima Service 

MILAN— TTwy used to grace tbe villa along 
the Appian Way in Rome, the bunting lodge in 
Toscany, the apartmemm Milan. But this^ week 
they were on auction at Sotheby's here, the 
ttamnt ]7th-centmy annoires, the paintings in 
tbe French, and Flemish styles, tbe Oriental 


Newsstand Prices] 


Andorra. 
Antilles.. 
Cameroon 
Egypt — 
France— 
Gabon.... 
Greece... 

ivory Coast 
'Jordon..-. 
Lebanon- 


9.00 FF LoxembourBfflLFr 

“11.20 FF Morocco 12 Dn 

uMBCFA Qatar — WDRiate 

E P.5000 R6union.—U-20FF 
POOFF Saudi Arabia JOB- 
"M0CFA Senesal~ 5 g»CFA 
gnpflr. Spain •200PTAS 

rizSoLire TunMa «-i» Wjj 
t ,U20 CFA TurfW -T.L 35*000 
.. 1 JD U.A.€. ;w.A 50 D 4 ril 
I.USS 1J50 U4. Mil. (Ebr.J S1.70 


They once graced the rooms of the powerful 
. Feuuai family, tbe foanders of a business 
empire foil* on fanning and tbe foodstuffs, 
trade, cbenncals, insurance and a hundred othr 


But Italy is Chang in g , and last year the Fer- 
nizri emgsre, crushed by $11 billion of debt 
generated by bad business and, some say, 
CrceKed financial deabngs, was. taken over by a 
consortium of banks. -. 

. .Many of the lamB/s personal bdongmgB 
iwse sored aawdL and it was these— 665 lots 
of. antique furnishings and artworks — that 
started going unto tne gavel Tuesday in Soth* 


eby’s elegant Art Nouveau villa on Via Broggi 
in Milan before more than 10 times the usual 
auction crowd. 

The crowds were drawn by more than the 
reputation of the Fenuzzi case as a triumph 
over corruption. For many in Italy it was also 
tbe vindication erf Milan, tbe crater of big 
money, over the provincial upstarts. Few could 
forget tbe peasant origins of Serafino FerruzzL 
the patriarch, and of his ill-fated son-in-law, 
Raul Gardiai, who married Serafino’s daughter 
Idina and, after the old man ’s death in 1979, 
packed up the reins of the empire. 

Tt’s the fall erf a symbol and it creates a kind 
of nostalgia,'' said Ninfo Bella via, an engineer 
in his 50s who traveled with friends from Rimi- 
ni, in the Fe mme ' native Romagna, for the 
bidding. TV paintings, Mr. Bella vm said, were 
by minor artists, not terribly good 

“Yet it’s incredibly interesting, because 1 
think they reflect the decline of a dynasty.* 1 he 
said. 

Franco Gatiina, a businessman who bid on a 


pair of wrought-iron lamps, said, “It’s not ex- 
ceptional stuff, but they're beautiful things, 
ray rich, and decadent. " 

The name Femizzi, he said, is what counts. 
“There's a lot of curiosity.” 

Mr, Gaxdini was a gambler who in 1 989 lost 
5300 milli on in Chicago, trying to comer the 
soybean market, and a sportsman who hunted 
in Tuscany and whose yacht, II Moro di Vent- 
zia, came tamalizingly close to bringing the 
America’s Cup to Italy in 1992. 

Last July, when the noose of legal investiga- 
tion tightened around the Femizzi family man- 
agement. Mr. Gardini shot himself to death. It 
was reported Wednesday that his widow would 
become a lay nun with the Carmelites. 

The details of the downfall became known to 
Italians over the course of this year in a trial in 
Milan of one of Mr. Gardini's advisers, a Nea- 
politan nobleman and money manager named 
Sergio Cusani, who was convicted and sen- 

See AUCTION, Page 5 


Trib Index 


3.69 m 

3.753.14 p 



The Dollar 

NewYoft. 

DM 

Pound 

Van 

FF 


Book Review 
Bridge 
Crossword 
Weather 


rtw-dew 

1.6672 

1.5095 

103.965 

5.676 


Page 10. 
Page 10. 
Phge 21 
Page 22. 


KIEV (AF)— Ukraine will scjm an air- 
craft earner because it cannot find a buyer 
for the rusting Soviet-era behemoth, which 

haS lan guish ed unfinished fn a shipyard for 

five years, a senior official said Thursday. 

Construction of the canter Varyag's hull 
was nearly complete when the Soviet Union 
brake up. Ukraine inherited the vessel along 
with the Nikolayev shipyard on the Black 
Sea. 

Draoty Prime Minister Valeri Shmarov 
said Thursday that tbe Vaiyag's bottom had 
begun to rust “It’s a tragic and forced 
decision,” he said, “but experts have warned 
die ship may sink because tbe hull is in very 
bad shape/ 

Utoin 

There are benefits to renting a bouse in Italy 
instead of staying in hotels. Page 10. 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1994 




} 5 PLO Wants Aid Funds, Fast 


But It Says Donors’ Supervision Is Humiliating 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — The Palestine Liberation Organi- 
zation is pressing for speedier disbursement of mil- 
lions of dollars tagged by the international community 
for Gaza and Jericho, claiming it urgently needs S 177 
million from a meeting of aid donors in Paris that 
began Thursday. 

PLO officials are resisting stringent measures to 
supervise the spending of these monies, which many 
donors are insisting upon. The PLO has complained 
that some of Ihe requirements for accountability are 
humiliating and cumbersome. 

Surprisingly, Israeli officials who are becoming 
worried that lack of funds may seriously impair the 
autonomy process are joining the PLO in arguing for 
less-stringent controls. 

Israel has sent a delegation headed by Yossi Sand, 
the environment minister, to assist the Palestinians at 
the Paris talks. 

PLO offi cials here said the immediate infusion of at 
least $ 100 milli on was necessary to pay the salaries of a 
steadily growing police force, whose numbers are 
approaching 7.COO. and to begin urgently needed in- 
frastructure projects, supply hospitals with medica- 
tion and pay teachers. 

The money is needed as Israel has set a time frame 
of three months to withdraw from managing spending 
in Jericho and Gaza. 

World donors had pledged some $2.4 billion in aid 
to the Palestinians, but the mechanisms for disbursing 
these sums are yet to be clarified. So far the Palestin- 
ians have received only about $7 million, from the 
United States and Norway. 

Much of this amount has gone to pay the Palestin- 
ian police officers, most of whom had not not been 
paid for over seven months before arriving in Gaza 
and Jericho last month. 

H assail Abu Libdah, deputy chairman of the Pales- 
tinian Economic Council for Development and Re- 
construction, which is in charge of financial aid, said: 


An Oasis Amid Algerian Strife 


Kabyles Are Wary o f Both Regime and Muslim Militants 


By Jonathan C. Randal 

Washington Post Service 

TIZI-OUZOU. Algeria — Tizi- 
Ouzou is a faded sepia snapshot of 
Algeria's past — a city that reminds 
visitors of the way the rest of the 
country was not long ago. buL may 
never be again. 

The main concern in this former 
French colonial administrative 
center is how long it can remain 
apparently immune to the struggle 
between the army-based secular 
government and insurgents deter- 
mined to create an Islamic state. 

So far, it has succeeded. Diplo- 
mats estimate that 4.000 Algerians 
around the country have been 
killed in the 29-momh struggle, but 
only a few dozen here in the Kabyle 
heartland. 

But residents of Algiers, the capi- 
tal, SO miles to the west, say both 
sides would love to entangle Tizi- 
Ouzou — and the mountainous re- 
gion of Kabytia, home of the Ka- 
byle people — • in Ihe hope of 
somehow tipping the balance or 
forces and ending a bloody stale- 
mate. 

The Kabyles. the most populous 
of several Berber peoples who lived 
in North Africa long before the 
Arab conquest, have Sways main- 
tained a separate identity’ within 
Algeria. They have good reason to 
be suspicious of ibe central govern- 
ment as well as of the fundamental- 
ists. Both have records of intoler- 
ance toward minorities, especially 
the Kabyles. 

“We think Algeria is finished. 


and we do not feel involved." said 
Karim. 24. an economics major en- 
countered outside a dining hall at 
the university here. “We should let 
the army and the Islamic militants 
fight it out." 

Yet, Tizi-Ouzou and its 80,000 
residents are still living in an oasis 
of peace, tolerance and reason. On 
weekends a half-dozen hotels and 
three discotheques turn away cus- 
tomers who. fed up with empty 
streets well before nightfall in the 
rest of the country, flock in to relax 
and make merry well into the night 
Most visitors are from Algiers, 
which, after decades of migration, 
is largely inhabited by Kabyles. 

Real estate prices in Tizi-Ouzou 
have doubled in the last two years, 
and construction cranes are much 
in evidence, demonstrating the 
city's attraction for investors and 
businessmen discouraged by the vi- 
olence in the rest of the country. A 
few miles down the road, travelers 
are subject to armed robberies. 

At the university, the only one in 
Algeria where instruction is in 
French rather than Arabic, female 
students are not pressured to wear 
head scarves. 

Students from Rwanda, who at 
times encountered racist hostility 
in other Algerian universities, are 
welcomed here, as is an economics 
professor from Kurdish Iraq who 
was chased out of his own country. 

Beer and other alcoholic drinks 
are on sale in bars and restaurants. 
Liquor stores are adequately, 
stocked- Still, many out-of-town 


just ask the butler... 


nEjr 


WArrr I * rvtti n nil"ii| ft* wj»! is I: h. 


N ■ C- A- P-O- R ■ E 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 


• Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

International Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 


Recently, some Socialist Forces 
leaders have encouraged reconcili- 
ation with a small Kabyiia-based 
party, the Rally for Culture and 
Democracy. But that party is op- 
posed to any role for Islam in poli- 
tics and long has been the bane of 
Mr. Ait Ahmad's existence. 

One senior Socialist Forces staff- 
er argued that such differences 
must be overcome because “all the 
democratic movement has its back 
to the wall” and Algerians in gener- 
al, and not just the Socialist Forces, 
would “not stand idly by” and ac- 
cept an Islamic state. 

An Islamic state “would awaken 
old demons" of separatism in Ka- 
bylia and other regions, lead to the 
collapse of the state and threaten 
long-term stability throughout 
North Africa, he argued. 

Such talk conjures up Kabyle re- 
volts against the French in the 19th 
century, Mr. Ail Ahmad's own 
short- lived uprising in 1963 against 
a new independent central govern- 
ment. and the general fragility of a 
still-fledgling Algerian state. 

But mountains no longer proride 
impregnable hideouts and Kaby- 
lia’s economy depends almost en- 
tirely on trade with the rest of Alge- 


Pius over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 




-Tf CYTERMpifUI.^ « | 

itcralo^^^enbunc. 


' the cngiruj " 

Just tell the taxi driver, 
"Sank too doe 
5, rue Daunou Paris (Opdra) 
_ Tela tl» 42.61.71.14 - 


v» 

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.... r-v. '■* ,* -Vtv ;y. 
. .. ■ • • * •/ • 


WORLD BWEFS 


jgfr*. f 2.x:* £:£ ~ %- ■■ 




‘‘Hie money is the carrot for signing the peace agree- 
ment with Israel We have signed. Yet all we hear now 
is demands for accounting before we even get more 
funds. 

“It’s like bring considered guilty before the trial. ' 
he said. “Let us have the funds and we will account for 
them." 

According to figures by Mr. Libdah’s group, the 
PLO estimates that it will need S381 million this year 
as the self-rule process unfolds. 

Pales tinian officials said they expected to raise $204 
million from taxes and fees collected in Jericho and 
Gaza, leaving a deficit of $177 million. ■ 

“Without securing it we can’t build new administra- 


tions, or pay the police force or employees,'' said 
Ahmed Ourri, the PLO official in charge of finances. 


Ahmed Qurri, the PLO official in charge of finances, 
who also was responsible for negotiating most of the 
economic agreements with Israel related to the auton- 
omy accord that was signed in Cairo Iasi month. 

Representatives of world donors, which besides the 
United States and Norway include the European 
Union, Japan, Saudi Arabia and the World Bank, 
began the two-day meeting in Paris on Thursday to 
discuss problems that are blocking the flow of money. 

Mudi of the focus is on demands by the donors for a 
mechanism to review the spending. But part of the 
problem is an unspoken resistance to hand over cash 
to the PLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, and his team. 

Most donors seem to favor well-planned projects 
and some accountability — procedures that the PLO 
describes both as delaying tactics and an unnecessary 

h umilia tion 

Last week, Mr. Arafat suggested that he might delay 
his return to Palestinian lands if the money was not 
not disbursed immediately. 

“1 can understand that donors are concerned about 
how their funds will be spent, but their conditions are 
h umili ating because no Palestinian official will go 
begging donors each month and tell them ‘Please pay 
my employees' salaries.’ " Mr. Qurei said recently in a 
comment 'that accurately reflects the mood among 
Palestinian officials here. 


clients wrap their bottled purchases 
in old newspapers so as noL to 
arouse suspicion on the way borne. 

It is this kind of reflex precau- 
tion disturbing the appearance of 
normality that gives a hint of every- 
day anguish to the capital of Alge- 
ria's only region not subject to a 
nighttime curfew. 

“Neither police state nor Islamic 
republic” is the slogan of the Front 
for Socialist Forces, founded by 
Horine Ait Ahmad, one of the orig- 
inal “historic chiefs” of the 1954- 
1962 war of independence against 
France, now forced into exile by 
repeated death threats. 

Despite their hold on the “Ka- 
byle bastion.” leaders of the Social- 
ist Forces are aware that slogans 
are not enough to avoid an out- 
come they feel would be to their 
detriment and to that of the Algeri- 
an state. 

They live with what they see as 
the nightmare possibility that the 
army or Islamic radicals could win 
outright or. worse, strike a deal 
excluding them and the other di- 
vided “democratic” forces. 

With such a fate in mind, Mr. Ail 
Ahmad, in his Swiss exile, and his 
younger lieutenants in Algeria keep 
preaching a political solution in- 
volving not just the Islamic Salva- 
tion Front and the anny. but the 
Front for Socialist Forces and the 
National liberation Front, which 
ruled Algeria from independence 
until 1992. Both fronts won seats in 
the 1991 elections. 



MOSCOW woukfSto the I W.b&fitjy: 

Iy!tbeFederation Council wouM not agree to tms 

OTsnnallv oppose it” ^*^4 a deficit of TQiaHftl * 


ly. the Federation Louflcu 

esSliStSSSSiSerSiSSSSS 


finances. ^ ■ 

17 Jailed for ’92 Township Murde*|^ 

PRETORIA (ReuwsV-A^^ 
to pnson for the 1 992 BoqgtMg , .jP Alda’s ‘ 

hostel residents, which temporarily ■ > v 






EKES faSSk li« TteJSc accused white 
asastin^Soipatocg JriBeis, but the allegations were never^np!^^. 

Ge rmans Acquit Trio in IRA Trial . ggh 

gunning down a British army major in 1990. . . 

6 Judge Wolfgang Steffen said prosecutors faM-W 
DoS MaguSrl?. Sean Hick, 34. and 
to chaJSHiih attacks ^ 

tors said were committed by an IRA hit sqnad. While aB fflntejfeig 
probably IRA members, “there is no proof they were the assaontf^r- 
m embers of a hit squad. Judge Steffen said , ^ 

Major Michael DiDon-Lee was shot as he retenredt^^^^B^- 
bome from a the I 


Major Michael Dillon-Lee was snot as nc 
home from a party, five days after the kmingnf two. 


the Netherlands. Prosecutors said the two &umg5 \rere pan a tnetxiae 
IRA campaign. The three were also acquitted of ibe Netnenaimfcafis^. 


1 ■ 0 - 1 .-' liT-ij Vcac Frinu PieK 


Southern Yemenis fleeing Thursday after their village was attacked by northern forces. 


Woman Hurt in Dutch Hostel Attack^- 

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) — A fire that the pohce.said was faiob;: 
badly damaged a hostel for asylum seekers in the Dutch seaside lowa of ; 
Wijk aan Zee on Thursday, the Dutch news agen cy ANP said. • •••/ ’’ 

A woman was seriously injured leaping from a window at die fiqsx. 
spread panic among the hostel's 75 residents, the police said. No dacha* 
K»b»n responsibility, and the police said they had no clues as to who 
have earned out the attack. 

The Netherlands offers refuge to thousands of asylum seekers ewajs. 
month but has largely escaped the racist attacks oc foreigners that ta**;' 
troubled Germany. " • ^ 


In Yemen , Shells and a Truce 


Poll Shows Japan Supports Military 


ADEN. Yemen — Shells hit the outskirts of 
Aden on Thursda> as nonhem aniDen and war- 
planes pounded the southern secessionist capital 

Later, the Nonh Yemen leader. Ali Abdullah 
Saleh, ordered his forces to observe a cease-fire. 
Radio San a reported. It was the second unilateral 
cease-fire declared by San'a this week. A truce 
called for Monday collapsed within hours. 

The cease-fire responded to a United Nations 
Security Council call for a halt to the war. the 
San'a broadcast said. 

The truce followed rocket and artillery battles 
between northern and southern gunners around 
Aden, where officials struggled to secure water and 
power supplies. 

Northern artillery around Aden began firing in 
the morning. Southern gunners hit back, and war- 
planes began attack? at dawn. The Aden airport 
was targeted but the extent ?f the damage there 
was unknown. 


At the height of the northern artillery barrage, 
shells were crashing in and around the city at the 
rate of one a minute. 

Northern forces, fighting what they see as a 
rebellion by southern leaders against a north-south 
union formed in 1990. have tried repeatedly to put 
the auport out of action. 

Southern planes use the airport as a base for 
bombing and strafing northern forces, who have 
now come within 20 kilometers |!2 miles; of 
Aden's northern suburbs. 

Shortly after noon, southern naval fire thun- 
dered from the coast off of Aden toward northern 
positions. 

The naval bombardment followed the arrival of 
a UN envoy. Lakhdar Ibrahimi. in the northern 
capital of San'a on Wednesday on a mission to try 
to arrange a cease-fire in the fivp-week-oid civil 
war. 

The fighting broke cul following nine months of 
dispute over ibe balance of power” La the union. 


TOKYO (AFP) — More than half of Japanese Save a taro rabfc- 
impressinn of the country’s military, according to a newspaper survey^ 
published Thursday. c 


The Yomiuri newspaper said that 53 percent of respondents had a 
favorable impression. The result was up 13 percentage points from s' 
omilar survey in 1991, the newspaper said, and narked the first • 
since 1984, when the paper began taking surveys on the armed forces, that; - 
more than half of reroondents hdd a favorable view. ■ *- j -• 

The newspaper said the increase in support was attributable to the; 
mili tary's participation in the Uniied Nations peacekeeping operation inj 
Cambodia. A total of 70 percent of respondents said dial the military's;- 
participation in peacekeeping operations was necessary. - - > ; 


For the Record 


Eiqieror AkDato and Empress Mkhiko of Japan leay* Fridayforatwo- 
wcek trip across the United States that includes a White House banquet; 
and a visit to a World War II cemetery in Hawaii ; - (APy, 

The U.S. Senate Ins confirmed the noamafioo of Frank Wisncr, a 
veteran diplomat, as ambassador to India and Timothy Cborba, a. 
Washington lawyer, as ambassador to Singapore. (Ratierif 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Barry Sullivan, Film Actor, Dies at 81 The D-Day BeachesCome to Knis 


LOS ANGELES — Barn Sulli- 
van, 81. who starred in the 1949 
film “The Great Gaisby." died of 
respiratory failure Monday at his 
home in Sherman Oaks. California. 

Mr. Sullivan's career, which be- 
gan on Broadway when he played 
the defense attorney in “The Caine 
Mutiny Court Martial.” spanned 
more than four decades, and in- 
cluded television as well as more 
than 30 films. 

After five years on the Broadway 
stage he moved to Hollywood and 
made his name playing dour, un- 
smiling, authoritarian characters. 

His first film was “The Woman 
of the Town” in 1943. Besides “The 
Great Gaisby.” in which he played 
opposite Alan Ladd. Mr. Sullivan's 
other films include “Two Years Be- 
fore the Mast” in 1944. “The Bad 
and the Beautiful” in 1952. “An 
American Dream.” in 1966. 
“Earthquake,” in 1974 and “Oh 
God!” in 1977. 


work. He took audacious liberties 
with television drama, infusing it 
with new life by turning its conven- 
tions upside down. _ 

He was best known for “The 
Singing Detective.” about a writer 
of crime novels who. while lying in 
a hospital bed and being treated for 
a skin disease, sees his life, his fic- 
tional characters and the contents 
or his unconscious parade before 
him . 


utive with .Air France who was re- 
sponsible for introducing the carri- 
er’s trans- Allan Lie passenger 
service in 1946. died of heart failure 
Saturday in a hospital in Miami 
Beach. Florida, where he lived. 


General Yohai Bin Nun, 69, com- 
mander of the Israeli Navy during 
the 1960s, died of a heart attack 
Monday in a New York hospital. 
He lived in Kibbutz Maagan Mi- 
chael in Israel. 


Isb Kabibble. 85. the lovable and 
silly comedic trumpet player with 
Kay Kyser's “Kollege of Musical 
Knowledge,” died Sunday in Palm 
Springs, California. His real name 
was Merwyn Bogue. 


Henri Lesieur, 93, a former exec- 


Earie Warren, 79, an alto saxo- 
phonist and singer best known for 
his work with the original Count 
Basie Orchestra, died of a stroke 
and kidney failure Saturday in 
Springfield,” Ohio. 


PARIS (AP) — An American acoustical artist has brought die sounds 
of the Normandy beaches to the middle of Paris as part of D-Day 
anniversary celebrations. - . . . .' {- 

Bill Fontana's offbeat work involves recording the sounds of waves and- 
seabirds along the coast and transmitting them live into the tunnels' ' 
leading to the Arc de Triomphe as wed as outside the monumenu Tfie 
work, tilled “Sound Island,'’ is to remain in place until the end of August' 
France is tops on the Continent in credt card thefts, according to ft ' 
survey by a British company. Card Protection Plan, showing that 41* 
percent of the thefts reported by its policyholders were in France. Spam,', 
was second with 27.7 percent and Italy thud with 7.7 pci ce n t. Paris was 
the worst dty for creak card thefts, followed by Nice. {Retaessj 

Longshoremen went on strike Thmsday in MaisdBe, paralyzing ship- 


ping in a dispute over privatization efforts in the maritime industry. The 
union said the strike would spread nationwide Friday to Sunday. (AP} 


A one-day strike Thursday by journalists and technicians at the BBC’s . 
World Service disrupted radio news programs normally beard by J20 
million people around the world. The walkout was to protest plans to 
introduce new work rules and to link pay raises to performance. (AP) 


Jovian Comet Crash May Leave Acoustic Truce 


Dennis Potter, 59, Creator 
Of “Tbe Singing Detective" 

New York Tima Service 


Dennis Potter. 59. the caustic 
and controversial writer of the in- 
novative British television dramas 
“The Singing Detective” and “Pen- 
nies from Heaven.” died of cancer 
Tuesday at his home near Ross-on- 
Wye, England. 

Mr. Potter wrote novels and 
screenplays, but it was in television, 
which ne referred to as “the great- 
est of all media” because of its 
accessibility, that he preferred to 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

Ne* York Times Service 

CAMBRIDGE Massachusetts — When 
some 20 chunks of a comet smash into Jupiter 
next month, the giant planet will be the 
noisiest place in tbe solar system outside the 
sun — so noisy, in fact, that scientists may be 
able to see meets caused by the acoustic 
blasts. 

At a meeting in Cambridge this week of the 
Acoustical Society of America, specialists 
from the Naval Research Institute, the 
Scripps Institution of Oceanography and 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute reported 
that although the impacts of Comet Shoe- 
maker-Levy 9 mil be on tbe far side of Jupiter 
and not visible from Earth, the sound of tbeir 


titanic explosions will circle tbe planet and 
perhaps leave visible traces. 

To calculate the behavior of sound emanat- 
ing from the bombardment. Michael D. Col- 
lins of tbe Naval Research Laboratory and 
his colleagues adapted mathematical tools 
used to predict the propagation of sound in 
the ocean. 


Oceanographic physicists believe that 
sound will behave in the dense, turbulent 


that tidal forces had ripped Ihe comet apart, 
scattering big chunks along a line that 
through a telescope looks Eke a string of. 
pearls. 

The chunks are still in orbit around Jfupt- 
ter. ,the largest planet in the solar system, with 
8 that is II times that of Earth’s. But 


atmosphere of Jupiter much as it does in the 
ocean, and will be channeled into specific 


. ~ “““ vi Luum s. out 

the chunks are now doomed to hit Jupiter’s 
atmosphere at about 44 degrees south lari- 

a ta,^ y a ,r od ofonc,rak bt ® mins 

The largest piece of the comet is several 
mlesm diameter and will hit Jupiter at about 
133,000 miles per hour, becoming what Mr. 
Collins described as “a nice acoustical 
source. . 


ocean, and will be channeled into specific 
paths by gradients of density, temperature, 
wind and other factors that have counterparts 
in terrestrial seas. 

Astronomers found in March 1993 that 
Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 had approached 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1994 



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POLITICAL NOTTS 



__ , Jojce NiHdwyM/A|mt Fnm^Prruc 

Health care woriters at a Washington protest calling for a health plan that benefits patients. 


U.S. Supports Compensation 
For Veterans* Gulf War illness 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton administra- 
tion said Thursday that it favored compensating 
U.S. veterans for illnesses they may have contract- 
ed from Iraqi biological and chemical weapons 
during the Gulf War. 

Jesse Brown, secretary of veterans affairs, said 
the administration had decided to give veterans 
the benefit of the doubt, even though no conclu- 
sive link had been established between Gulf War 
service and veterans' chronic complaints. 

In a series of television appearances before testi- 
fying to Congress on the issue, Mr. Brown said the 
government had not yet determined whether the 
so-called Gulf War syndrome existed. 

“The science is still out on that," he said in an 
interview on CNN. “We have many, many smart 
people looking at that” 

By hacking compensation now, be said, the 
administration was trying to be “proactive" and 
“fair” to suffering veterans. 

More than 10,000 Gulf veterans may be afflict- 
ed by the illness, according to lawyers who filed 
suit Wednesday against 1 1 U.S. chemical compa- 
nies in a Gulf War-rdaicd action. (Reuters j , 

HuuKh Car* Plan's Prospects 
Brighton In House aiwfSenats 

WASHINGTON — As pivotal committees met 
on both sides of Capitol Hill, health-care legisla- 
tion advanced in Ine Senate and its prospects 
brightened in the House. 

The Senate Labor and Human Resources Com- 
mittee voted Wednesday to require employers to 
pay most of the cost.of health insurance for their 
workers and to limit increases in insurance rates. 
The chairman. Senator Edward M. Kennedy of 
Massachusetts, said he expected final committee 
approval of the bill imminently. 


ad Democrats on the House Ways and Means 
Committee emerged from a private meeting on a 
health-care overhaul with their new acting chair- 
man, Representative Sam M. Gibbons of Florida, —» ■■ — — 

saying that they would have the votes to send their Quate/Unquot* 

version of the bill to the full House for a vote. — 

Mr. Kennedy's bill is closely patterned on Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton’s, although it would lighten the 
burden on small businesses. Mr. Gibbons’s mea- 
sure has somewhat more differences from the 
president's plan. But on both sides of the Hill, the 


critical question is less what is in the bills and more 
one of getting them to votes by the full House and 
Senate, for the inevitable shaping and reshaping. 

While the Labor Committee's approval has 
been guaranteed since Mr. Clinton first proposed 
his legislation, the prospects on the Ways and 
Means Committee have been less certain. 

With ah 14 Republicans likely to vote against 
the bill, supporters will need the votes of 20 of the 
24 Democrats. Some feared that the indictment 
and removal of the committee's longtime chair- 
man, Dan Rostenkowski of Illinois, would make 
assembling that majority much harder. (N YT) 

Senate tightrope Act Makes 
Ufa Lonely at the Top far Pole 

WASHINGTON — When Senate Republicans 
divide into their moderate and conservative wings 
to hokf separate luncheons every Wednesday, one 
senator is nearly always missing. 

“On Wednesdays." said the Senate Republican 
leader. Bob Dole of Kansas, “I dine alone.” 

At age 70, after nearly 34 years in Congress and 
more than two decades os a national Republican 
leader, Mr. Dole is one of the most powerful, 
adept, and enduring figures in American politics 
today. A' man of extraordinary agility who is 
almost never caught in a tight comer, he is a fierce 
partisan, a conciliator, a budget slasher with a sod 
root for food stamps, a tough guy who weeps at 
the funerals of friends. 

But it may he the solitary Wednesday lunches 
that tell the most about Mr. Dole these days as he 
tries to lead a deeply divided caucus, while jug- 
gling his other roles as senator from Kansas, his 

S ty's top officeholder and possible 1996 presi- 
lial candidate. 

Mr. Dole breaks his rule now and then to attend 
the hutches, as he did recently to discuss health 
care with both groups. But he jokes that he gener- 
ally avoids the lunches because senators are “all in 
there plotting against the leader.” They are not, 
if he were to choose sides, they might. And his 


buti: 

balancing act could come tumbling down. ( WPJ 


Representative Sam M. Gibbons, asked how it 
was to sit in the chairman's seat of the House 
Ways and Means Committee as interim successor 
to Dan Rostenkowski “It's like all the other 
chairs in there. It’s kind of hand." (NYT) 


FBI Checks Cabinet Official’s Trips 


By David Johnston 

JVw York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Federal in- 
vestigators ait examining whether 
Agriculture Secretary MOce Espy 
illegally accepted free travel, tickets 

to sporting events and other gifts 
from Tyson Foods Inc, the coun- 
try’s largest poultry processor, ac- 
cording to people with knowledge 
of the case. 

■ The inquiry, conducted by die 
FBI, centers on a possible violation 
of the 1907 Meat Inspection Aa, 
which makes it a crime far officials 
to receive any “thing of v alue 
from any company or person regu- 
Jat*d by the 87-year-dd federal 
kw. A violation is a felony pmndi- 
abfe by a mandatory aa-year pris- 
on sentence. 

- The issue of Mr. Copy’s reianon- 
ship with Tyson, a poultry compa- 
ny based in S pri n gdale , Arkansas, 
dud the largest employer in Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton's home state, 
c on »« at a time when the Agridd- 


ture Department has begun a cam- in 


practices. 

But the agency has allowed the 
poultry industry to be subjected to 
less stringent inspection standards 
than meatpadters. 

The Agriculture Department's 
dedsiaa in 1993, which spared Ty- 
son and other poultry producers 
from rigorous inspections, brought 
compkmts from meatpadeezs and 
consumer groups about selective 
enforcement of an industry with 
longstanding ties to the president. 

But in March the department an- 
nounced plans to institute a more 
stringent poultry inspection pro- 
gram. 

The dealings between Mr. Espy 
and Tyson Foods, which is subject 
to regulation by the Agriculture 
Department, ted to the inquiry into 
the cabinet official when the de- 
partment’s inspector general re- 
lexred information to the FBI. 

The initial referral showed that 
Mr. Espy had taken a trip paid for 


in part by Tyson Foods in May 
1993 when be stayed at the Tyson 
Foods Ma na ge m ent Center in Ar- 
kansas and flew back to Washing- 
ton aboard a Tyson company jet 

Mr. Espy has told investigators 
that he used the Tyson aircraft be- 
cause he was ordered back to the 
capital at the request of the White 
House to attend a meeting. 

So far, the investigation has 
turned up hints that intern al Af 
culture Department documents 
were shredded in the spring of 1993 
during debates over enforcement 
policies at the department, the offi- 
cials said. 

The possibility of shredding is 
among several unresolved ques- 
tions that have led the federal au- 
thorities to conclude that further 
inquiry is warranted. 

But the investigation is nearing a 
crucial point when prosecutors at 
the Justice Department must de- 
cide whether to pursue the inquiry 
further or drop it. 


Away From Politics 


• A concrete plant wwfcer w» buried up to his ears 
in 100 tons of crushed limestone for eight hours 
and had to breathe through a mbe unffl he was 
freed. David Mclntire, 29, was in satisfactory con- 
dition with a bnrised right leg at York Hospital in 
Pemisyivaaia 

• The chances are Hearty certain for an earthquake 

in the San Fiantisco Bay area by 2020, a seismolo- 
gist for the US. Geological Survey trfd a confer. 
See cm earthquake hazards. New faults found 
after the 1989 earthquake have pushed the chance 
of a loiter quake up to 90 percent from o7percent 

predicted four years ago by the agency, 

• Three nwrt U A cases hare been confirmed, in 


Colorado ami southern California, of the infection 
ty a bacteria that eats away at human muscle and 

• A drag lor ohsessfre-fampafefre disorder might 
bdp men su ff ering from premature ejaculation, 
researchers say. Dr. Stanley AJtbof, a psychologist 
who specializes in urology and sexual disorders, 
said: “Gkumpzamme provides riinfeianc with an 
efficaaoas, relatively safe, long-term treatment 
aitonatrre." 


• Angela Lakeberg, the 
separated last Augtst in 
three weeks before her first 


Siamese twin 
died, just 
Her aster, 

Amy, had died during the risky operation to sepa- 
rate the twins, who roared a liver and heart. Ex- 
perts said their dunce of survival was just 1 
percent ap, Rouen 


Flood’s Aftermath Tests Farmers’ True Grit 


By Keith Schneider 

,Vn Yerir Tuttei Sennet 

HARTSBURG, Missouri — First come 
the flood, which tore nearly 500 holes in the 
farm levees along the Missouri River last 
year and drowned $150 million in crops. 

Now the water is gone, but the rampaging 
river left even greater trouble: millions of 
torn of sand that have transformed miles of 
fertile bottom land into a desert landscape of 
blowing grit and shifting dimes. 

Nowhere in the Midwest was the agricul- 
tural damage from the 1993 flood os exten- 
sive as it was here in Hartsburg and the other 
farm villages that hug the Missouri River. 

The Soil Conservation Service, a unit of 
the federal Department of Agriculture, esti- 
mates that of the 945,000 acres on the Mis- 
souri River flood plain, 455,000 were dam- 
aged by sand and erosion. 

Reclaiming the flood plain, for genera- 
tions Missouri's most productive farmland, 
could cost S500 million, (he conservation 
service said. Perhaps 200,000 acres have been 
permanently ruined by sand. 

“It's an awful mess.** said Orion Bedc- 


meyer. who before the flood Iom summer "la a lot of places out there wc have sand 
grew com and soybeans with his brother, five feet deep/ be said. "The river turned (be 
Glen, on their 900-acre farm here along the best farmland in the world into a giant sand- 

licrmin Div« bOX.” tr 


Missouri River. 

The brothers estimate that perhaps 100 
acres are beyond help, and as Orion Beck- 
meyer climbs into the cab of his tractor, he 
scowls at a landscape of water, sky and sand 
so foreign it could pass for the New Jersey 
shore. 

"We got years til work putting this place 
back together, n he said. “No matter what we 
do, the land will never be as good as it was," 

This will be the second successive year that, 
the Beckmeyera will not harvest a crop. Nor 
arc they alone. Hundreds of fanners ore 

trying to reclaim sand-covered land by turn- 
ing their fields over with immense plows. 

They hope to mix the sand on top with 
more fertile din that lies beneath it, giving 
their ground enough organic maricr :e Nip- 
pon a crop next year. 

But when the sand is more than two feet 
deep, plowing is generally useless, according 
to Russdl Mills, the director of the Sou 
Conservation Service in Missouri. 


The extent of the da may surprised the 
Bockmeyerc and other farmers in the flood 
plain. But the possibility of such devastation 
had been anticipated for riftartrs by govern- 
ment hydrologists and engineers, Mr. Mills 
said. 

The Missouri River, called “The Big Mud- 
dy" by people around here, carries five times enar -:„ h :s, m 

the amount of sediment as the Mississippi 
River above Cairo, Illinois. The Mi^rain ^ mergy of floods 
River also falls swiftly, twice as fast as the 
Mississippi. 

Hemming m such a river with dikes and 
levees invites trouble during flooding. 

The high walls increase the depth of the 
water, concentrate the river's energy, and 
accelerate the currem. Fast water scours the 
bottom, digging beneath the rich layer of dirt 
that usually lies there and chaining up sand 
instead. 

Anywhere along the way that is fiat will 
cause the river to slow down and the sand 


wil] drop out, which accounts for the innu- 
merable sand banks in the river. 

In 1944, as the United States began to 
invest in dams, dikes and other flood-control 
structures an the Missouri, Congress antici- 
pated problems that might be caused by 
containing the river. 

In the plan that they approved that year, 
the lawmakers prop ose d u> build federal le- 
vees 1,500 to ZxjO feet back from both 
banks.. 

The idea was to give the river up to a mile 
space intugh water, thereby dispers- 
if floods across a larger area. 
-* — „ „ a system of farm Jev«s that 
gave the river zoom. Congress sought to 
reduce the velocity of the water and limit the 
amount of sand that would be scoured from 
the bottom and deposited cm farm Gelds. 

But the proposal was rejected by farmers, 
many of whom had already built their own 
levees right on the Missouri's banks to pro- 
tect their fields, and were loathe to move 
them. 

Last snsoner during the flood, the Missou- 
ri reasserted its authority, ripping the levee 
system apart 


13 


r 


Best Help Is No Help, Some Candidates Tell Clinton 


By Richard L. Berke 

New 'tofk Tune* Srnurr 

WASHINGTON — Craig Ma- 
this is a Democrat running for 
Congress from Albany. Georgia. 
He is also running from President 
Bill Clinton. 

The best evidence is in his cam- 
paign brochure, which leaves pro- 
spective voters no clue as to wheth- 
er Mr. Mathis is a Democrat, 
Republican or some kind of hybrid. 

“I will support ihe president 
when 1 believe he's right be says 
in the brochure in bold type. “And 
l will oppose him when I think he is 
wrong. 

Like many other nervous Demo- 
crats. Mr. Mathis, who is compet- 
ing for an open seat in a conserva- 
tive district is something of a 
political refugee running for cover, 
as far from the White House as 
possible. 

Haley Barbour, chairman of the 
Republican National Committee, 
overstated the case when he de- 
clared that Democrats were “run- 
ning from Bill Clinton like scalded 
dogs.” Still, Democratic candidates 
who fear that Mr. Clinton's low 
popularity ratings will rub off are 
beginning to distance themselves. 
In doing that they are causing tur- 
moil in the Democratic Party. 

David Wilhelm, the Democratic 
Party chairman, whose credo calls 
for all Democrats to run closely 
with the president found himself in 
the uncomfortable position of 
learning on national television 
Wednesday morning that his own 
political adviser. Donald R. 
Sweatzer, was counseling some can- 
didates to go their own way. 

Some Democrats had already 
apparently come to the same con- 
clusion. In California, Senator 
Disnne Feinsteio has quietly re- 
moved herself as a sponsor of Mr. 
Clinton's health care proposal. In 
Wyoming Governor Mike SuBivan 


emphatic response when asked if 
she wanted Mr. Clinton to travel to 
the state to campaign for her. "1 
think it's much more important for 
the people of the state of Missouri 
to get to know the person running 
for the Senate seat-" she told The 
Kansas City Star. “I am my own 
person." 

Of course. Democrats never 
snub the president when il is decid- 
edly to their own advantage not to. 

Incumbent presidents in off-year 
elections often spell trouble' for 
their party members because when 
people are dissatisfied with the way 
things are going, they often blame 
the president and, by extension, 
anyone or anything associa ted with 
him. 

Tt happened to President George 
Bush in 1990 because he had bro- 
ken his no-new-taxes pledge. For 
Mr. Clinton, there are several fac- 
tors at play: Some Democrats, par- 
ticularly is conservative areas in 
the South, do not want to be be 
tarred by concerns about Ms char- 
acter and other issues like his ef- 
forts to allow homosexuals in the 
militaiy; others run from his health 
care proposal and other ideas that 
could leave open to attack as big- 
goveroment Democrats, and some 
even cite his stewardship of foreign j 
policy. 

Mr. Swdtzer, the political direc- 
tor of the Democratic Party, feels 
their pain. In an interview in The 
Washington Titties, he was quoted 
as saying, "There are clearly some 
areas of the country where it is not j 


going to benefit a candidate to as- 
sociate himself with Bill Chnion. 
and if you want us to stay away, 
well stay away.” 

Those words led Mr. Wilhelm to 


find himself playing tbe distancing not," he replied. "In fact, I have 
game himself on Wednesday when been arguing vociferously that peo- 
asked on a CBS television news pie should ran aggressive, proactive 


whether he agreed with campaigns, run -with 
aide’s remarks. “Absolutely dent." 


presi- 



ding 
any', 
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and 
is of 
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ons, 
lies, 
d in 
:tal5 
dai- 

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fied 

994 

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New; ROMA 


VanQeef&Arpds 

PARIS, GENEVE. BRUXELLES, CANNES, MONTE CARLO, MILANO, ROMA, BEVERLY HILLS. 
HONOLULU. NEW YORK, PALM BEACH, OSAKA, TOKYO, HONG KONG, SEOUL, SINGAPORE 



tiyt 

of his close friends. But he made it j 
dear he would have none of it. 

"If I am a captive, i: is to Wyo 
ming and its interests,' 1 be said.' 

in Oklahoma, Representative 
Dave McCurdy, who announced 
his candidacy for Senate on Tues- 
day, emphasized that he would 
support Mr. Clinton “when he acu> 
on behalf of mainstream values' 1 
but "oppose him when he depans 
from those values.” 

And in Missouri, Marsha Mur- 
phy, a Senate candidate, gave an 


To subwrgiw in $wttrerioml 

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The Interruitional Herald Tribune 
salutes the American Center ; 
home to American arts and culture 
since 1931, on the occasion of 
its reopening in its new building 
designed by Frank O. Gehry, FAIA 
at 51 me de Bercy, in Paris’ 12th 
a I'Tondissement. 


Pa rix pretfiinrv: 

“Griot New York"- Garth Fagan Dance 

AfiMfi'c bif Wynton Mtnvoli s 
Chorvogruphftand concept by Garth Fagan 
Sc ut by Marlin Pur year 

Three Africav-Ann-i ica n griots or 
storyteller collaborate on th is ebullient 
evening nf dance enttwired tv captuiv 
the youthful energy, gri/tintux and 
enchantment a*.f trial *d with New York City. 
June .9, io, U at .V:-,*" pn: 

June id at u pm 

“Out of Season"- David Dorfman Dance 

Produced iu as witifion with “ Dancing m 
the Street*. ~ 

The David Dorfman Dunce company 
perfanns with 15 m m- professional athletes 
front the Fur is; cvtniiUinUy. 

June J.i, J4 , 15 or Jr; in pin 

June mat 4 pm 

Tickets can be pn>xvu*vd al the 
American Center bos office. 

For renervut tun* and Informul ion call 
44 71 77 Oo. 


HIM SERIES 


This Body, This Soul. This Brick, 

These Tears; Disorder Today 
Four programs of recent short film and 
video twrks focus on disorder affecting the 
Inal g, the soul and structural systems. 
Leslie Thornton and Gregg Bordowitz will 
also present their work. 

June $ - June 45 


LECTURES 

Youth Culture International 
Five round-table discussions will explore 
the origins and impact of irdernational 
“ youth culture" today. 

June a, 11, 15, 25 and 29 

EXHIBITIONS 

Pure Beauty; Some Recent Work from 
Los Angeles 

A new generation of Los Angeles-based 
artists - Richard Dawkins, T. Kelly Mason, 
Jorge Faido, Sarah Seager, Thaddeus Strode, 
Diana Thater and Pae White - present 
site-specific uvr/cs in a variety of mediums. 
Junes- August 15 

Bill Viola: Stations 

A «*.w video installation of five- channels 
of color video projection and sound focuses 
on images of tke human body submerged 
underwater. 

Ju re $ - December 1 

Nam June Paik: David & Marat 

Pa iks two video sculptures combine his 
long-ti me fascination with the human 
form and technology, and were inspired by 
Jacques Louis David's painting, Marat 
assassins (The Death of Marat, 1793). 

They a re on view for the first time in Paris 
at the American Center, 

June S - December 1 

The opening exhibitions are part of 
the Frederick Weisman Company 
Exhibition Series. 


The American Center will be open daily 
to the public as of June 8, 11 am - 7pm, 
closed Tuesdays. For information regarding 
i na ugu ral exh ibit ions and events, 
membership, general admission and tickets, 
please call 44 78 77 77 (in Paris) or 
111 966 0909 (in New York). 






p 

1 Ps. 


Page 4 


uunAU/ I n>m i m r, ? r JUUrt l , J t_'. 


r ot 

9IN 



It Quickly Retracts Support for die Bomb 


Reuters 

TOKYO — The Japanese gov- 
ernment came under strong attack 
Thursday for supporting the legiti- 
macy of nuclear weapons. 

Under fierce political and public 
pressure. Foreign Minister Koji 
Kakizawa scrapped a proposed for- 
mal statement Wednesday that 
would have declared that using nu- 
clear arms did not violate interna- 
tional law. 

Mr. Kakizawa and his ministry 
officials insisted after the retrac- 
tion. however, that Japan still be- 
lieved the use of such weapons was 
legally justifiable. 

"The government was forced to 
take into account the strong anti- 
nuclear feeling of the people," the 
Yonnuii Shimbun said. “But can- 
celing the phrase from the state- 


ment does not mean the govern- 
ment has changed its legalistic 
stance." 

‘‘This issue will run and run,” the 
Yomiuri said 

The Asahi Shimbun said Japa- 
nese bureaucrats had failed to un- 
derstand that the end of the Gild 
War had brought a new, negative 
definition of nuclear weapons, 
which could no longer be described 
as ‘‘necessary evils." 

"Those in charge of foreign poli- 
cy should become more aware of 
reality." the Asahi said. 

The affair steins from a request 
by the International Court of Jus- 
tice to an member states to respond 
toa survey on the legality of the use 
of nuclear weapons. 

The original text of Japan's re- 
ply, drafted by the Foreign Minis- 


Colombia Quake Toll May Be 1,000 


BOGOTA — More than 1.000 
people may have died in the earth- 
quake and mudslides that devastat- 
ed a Colombian river valley, an 
official said Thursday. 

“From what we are seeing, we 
can't rule oui the possibility that 
the number of victims is higher 
than 1,000.” said an official with 


the National Disaster Prevention 

Office. 

The government had previously 
said that at least 250 people died in 
the disaster, which hit the area 
Monday. 

Residents of the Paez River val- 


ley in the southwestern provinces 
of Huil a and Cauca said that many 


of Huila and Cauca said that many 
more people appeared to have been 
swept away than first thought. 


try, said: “The use of nuclear weap- 
ons does not necessarily constitute 
a violation of international laws, 
but their use must never be al- 
lowed.” It added that Japan would 
“make efforts to eradicate them." 

The political row erupted after 
Japanese newspapers published the 
draft text last week. 

Under withering fire from the 
media, some cabinet colleagues and 
the mayor of Nagasaki, one of two 
Japanese cities obliterated by 
atomic bomb attacks in 19*15. Mr. 
Kakizawa said he would strike out 
the first part of the statement. 

"We are withdrawing the first 
pan of that statement that says the 
use of nuclear weapons does not 
violate international laws." Mr. 
Kakizawa told Parliament. 

The government had insisted 

that the offending first pan of its 
draft was purely legalistic and had 
no bearing on Japan’s policy of 
condemning such weapons. 

Mayor Hitoshi Motojima of 
N agasaki led the angry resistance, 
telling Prime Minister Tsutomu 
Hata the response did not lake into 

account the sufferings of atom- 
bomb victims. 

“The indiscriminate killing by 
atomic bombs is against interna- 
tional law on the basis of basic 
human rights," Mr. Motojima said 
in a letter to Mr. Hata. 



Chinese Jet 
Had Earlier 


InHong 

A Wish 1 


Malfunction 


' ‘ ' Rad;. SjM&i/Tbe Assouan! Pna» 

Fih'pino troops on BasOan Island during an offensive Thursday against Muslim extremists. 


Alarm Over Massacre in Philippines 


The Associated Press 

ISABELA. Philippines — A Roman Catholic 
bishop warned Thursday that the massacre of 15 
Christians by allies of a Muslim extremist group 
could trigger a religious war in the religiously 
mixed southern Philippines. 

The Vatican secretary of state sent a message by 
telegram to Father Roinulo dela Cruz, the bishop 
of Basil an Island, where the massacre took place. 


saying Pope John Paul D was deeply saddened by 
reports of the massacre. 

In addition to the massacre Wednesday, three 
people died and 34 were injured in a bomb explo- 
sion in the southern city of General Santos. The 
violence was apparently to avenge a military offen- 
sive agains t the extremist Abu Sayyaf group, which 
is believed to be responsible for a wave of bomb- 
ings and kidnappings. 


The Associated Pros 

BELTING - A Russian-built 
airliner that crashed Moodav. kdj- 
ing all 160 people abooro. had ma.- 
taaioned three da* earho and 
was making its first s*®** 1 ?*} 
flight after repairs, an official 
newspaper said Thursday. 

The China Daily newspaper, 
said the crew of the Chrna North- 
west Airlines Tupolev- 1 54 also •ra- 
dioed minutes after takeoff from 
Xian in northern China that we 
p i ffnff was shaking uncontrollably 

kd asked to return to the anpon. 

The plane slammed into a field 
minutes later. It was Gnna’s wmflt 
aviation disaster and ti r ^ nc *?r 
fears that safety is suffering as On- 
us's airline industry grows faster 
than its supply of experienced crew 
and modem equipment. 

Gao Junye, China Northwest's 
general manage r, said the iu-i>» 
had flown 10,000 hours, one-third 
of its designed lifespan, inducting 
2,857 hours since its last overhaul, 

in 1992, the newspaper said. 

It said the plane crashed on its 
first flight since repairs were con- 
ducted for malfunctions reported 
on June 3. It did not specify the 
malf unctions. 


Deng 

Agenct Franc*' Preor j; ;■ 

TOKYO — J* *^£528 
ter for 
aged sc — 
ping, died _ 

Hong Kong, 
fine, a member c 
Chris Pattens c 
Thursday. 

“From the 
Hoi Kong 
for Deng tc 
lata,” said 
member of — 

Executive Couna 
cheon in Tokyo.. 

Mr. Chen c 
years of Mr. 
anal phase oi 
ing which it it 
dsions to be 


VJ 5< 


. “Nobody will 
major decisions, 
yon did somethin 
will be disastrous 
wifl want to take d 
Miry” Mr. Chen 

Mr. Deng hash 

to be in faffing he 
repeatedly said hi 
visit 

It is. . 

rule. 


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Large stone-paved terrace, barbecue from France, 
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STARTLING 

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The property (21.000 square-metres) allows for construction 
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This is a rare opportunity to buy one of Greece's most 
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( Looking for 
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LUXURY APARTMENTS 

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Price from: Sfr. 1JOT.OOO.- 
Ccr.toct- Mary Moloney 
CMG SA 

9M2 &a«W?ue - tSSOUoniwa 
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YOU* BEAL ESTATE 
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FORT IE NEW JBGEf 
P wone ti t NTC & rim view*, luxury 
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Nil ja* « Kflh dm 


:T i »T«n > 


14 cotro. 3 bedroom. W b atfo. | 'TV' 

Sd * /Va “ i EQU5TED. SMMBti 


$444ioo,'^^n. 

CoS Scohu at 201-592-1400 
WB&BIT JKA1TORS 


T* (1) 44 13 33 33 


TROCAOHO Htgh efcss H 
t b den. fatchen. bath. . — 

Tei. l-4o c 3613? ofnas. 47275347 home 


Owner is migrating to Australia, will sell to highest bidder 
Private Sale Price indication US $2 Million. 


Inspection by appointment only 
Contact: Lars or Anders Josephson 
Telephone: +46 8 782 3771 Facsimile: 46 8 665 0809 



SAVZLLS 


EATON SQUARE, SW1 

This imposing apartment otters 
some 2,100 sq.fL with its own 
streel entrance on the north side ol 
the Square. Completing a detailed 
programme ot refurbishment. 
LEASEHOLD - El ,250,030 

139 Sloane Street 
London SW1X 9AY 
Td: 071-730 0822 
Fax: 071-730 0644 


1&M9I5? <87-771 

MOTOWN MANHATTAN CONDO 
Fifl Semis Luxury Doonnap Wdne. 
150 nun. 2 becroomj/idwl Kedo- 


CAPTTAL E • PARTNERS 

H enri— i ch od ^oaSty apvtncrtr, . 
a9 arcs. Two oid rubrlji 


Terre ar corporate oparftnenr. ittii 

Wafting <fatanai rheetrro/Ga^al ™ 1-4414*211. fa* 1-4771 KB* 

fat'lincob Cmb, Furnished-IMur- 



Tishman Speyer 
r on"t take credit fc 


won't take credit for 
creating Utopia. 

Just developing it. 



Tishman Speyer, distinguished American 
developer of Europe's tallest office building, 
The MesseTurm. and the Freidrichstadt 
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The Water Club is an exclusive residential 
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The Sunshine Group (Florida) Coro- Exclusive Marketing Consultant. 



Poi&sy - 6t. Germain en Lave 

on the banks of the Seine 

Lycee Int'l Area 


jr'T' A 

ir-V"-* 1 *;*'.'.. .“ ’ -ir- ' :■ • . 
^-►(3’. 


Superb 1894 (Nonman-EngUshi Townhouse 
320 sq.m. on 3 levels. Prrvate 150 sq.m. 
garden. Entrance hall. 3 receofion rooms. 

4 bedrooms. 4 dressing room. 

2 bathrooms, l shower roorn. newly fthsd 
kitchen, maid’s room, garage vrine cellar. 
Cerihai heating. All In Immaculate order. 

Tel owner.: (33- IT 39 65 00 15 
Fax: (33-1)47 07 86 04 


Auclkxi Sale at ifw Trtouial de NANTERRE, Thumday, Jura 23. 199J at a p.m. 


APARTMENT in NEUBLLY-SUR-SEBNE 

(Hauis-rJe-Semej 

10, boulevard Maillot 

Consisting ol 7 main rooms. 3 bedrooms and dependencies 
STARTING PRICE : 5.000.CCO FF 
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TeL fll 47 47.25 JO from 4 io 6 p.m Mnttel 361 6 Code JAVEN and 3616 Code ECO 
Visits by Maiire VENEZIA. Baftfl. Neuiiy-sur^ene 
June 20, IS94 fmm 2 pjn. to 3 pm. 


Houston, Texas 


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Tel: 713/870 8488 USA 
Fast: 713*340 8854 USA 



2-fanriy home «lh hrxdoble pod 

1 age for with garden + trees. 2 go- 
+ ve*erol enclosed putanrj 


rogei + teyetoi enclosed 
spaces. Price DM. 750,000. 



GENEVA 

SWITZERLAND 


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Call Geneva 41 22 - 732 28 18. 
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Shouldn't you advertise vour property in the 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE? 


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Owner safe ?00 sq.ru. aportmn V 
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Tsfc 111 46 33 67 15 
Fax; (1) 44 07 07 A3 


grsiwch. cowecnaiT. ilhla. 
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J* °p* wifi dramatic views erf 

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SlUm&n 

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EXCGPnONAL 




NYC.Wl ta/q& ROOMS 

Tramp Pakm Rentals 
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hr tamny or cxvponofion 

Soryo Dunhcm 217 - 891-7030 

DOUGLAS HUMAN 


. Wfl iroQcaerq c wll , IM 

siSSfSS, 


RArora 

-^ gjBi.W WBOR 

®*«sss , a lbB 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1094 


Bluff Called, 
U.S. Casts 
About for 
Sanctions 

By Michael R. Gordon 

Am- Yor K Tima Stntre 

SSL 1 "ZtLpZgaZ 


Page 5 




FUEL: Why It Is Not So Simple, Simply to Save Money in the Pentagon 


r v ;. • ■>■• * •. 


;’V<7 ■ •- 

tf“ 

rat 


«^pauon is stnigslins ^ d£ 

Qdewha.^.c.ionrarS^ 

^^uickly they should be i m- 



For months, W 


loo made it 



“ N ™ Korea thwarted irnenu- 
honal inspections of its nudear 
ales. 

J£ wiJS.srBa & 

Uutton administration has issued 
vague threats while engaging in 
Sparingly endless rounds of con- 
sultation with U.S. allies. 

The administration has not even 
begun to circulate the draft text of 
a sanctions resolution. 

The delay in completing a sanc- 
tions plan reflects the difficulty m 
devising measures that will punish 
North Korea for blocking inspec- 
tions without causing it to with- 
draw completely from the Nuclear 

^SSOSS^T' wfaich • * sm mmmx 

in tbs adnfatoiWcS? r^£* A N * th Kotean sohfier at *** border tm f ‘ ■V °* PaaMunjo® on watch with WnoctteThursday. 

as well as problems in coordinating 

with the allies. Officials said Wash- . 

SM S s 3S2« i taE KOREA: Seoul and Tokyo Are Warned on Sanctions 

needed to be worked out 

Snealrina nr r>u. «r , Continued from Page l ar standoff began, North Korea has “The South is brindne dar 


Coonimed from Page 1 

eastern and central North Carolina arrived by 
ship in Morebead Giy, North Carolina. From 
there, it was transported by rail to several 
military locations. 

Recently, air bases in the eastern United 
States changed the type of fuel used on jets. The 
new- fuel is less flammable than the old and 
easier to transport by pipeline. 

Last fall, those familiar with the matter say. 
planners at the Defense Fuel Supply Center 
recommended abandoning the shjp-rail meth- 
od. Instead, the fuel would be piped from the 
Gulf Coast to Selma, North Carolina, then 
trucked to the air bases. Similar changes had 
been made without controversy in other parts 
of the country, with millions in annual savings. 

But when Mr. Lancaster got wind of the 
proposed change in his district, he quickly alert- 
ed the Pentagon to his opposition. He said he 
was worried about the impact of the switch on 
the rail network in eastern North Carolina, 
much of wbch is owned bv the state. 


Mr. Lancaster and Governor James B. Hunt 
Jr„ a Democrat, told Pentagon officials they 
feared that without the money earned from the 
Defense Department fuel-hauling contract, key 
segments of the rail network would be forced 
out of business. This, he said, would interfere 
with the ability of the Marines at Camp Le- 
icune. North Carolina, to deploy on foreign 
missions through Morehead City. 

Mr. Lancaster acknowledged that there was 
also the question of jobs. For years. North 
Carolina has been planning a major economic- 
development project, the Global TransPark. to 
spur activity at the Morehead Citv port Having 
reliable rad service, he and state officials said, is 
essential to the project. 

Mr. Klugh prohibited the planners at the 
Defease Fuel Supply Center from carrying out 
the switch to pipeline, ordering them to under- 
take a lone study to determine if these concerns 
were vaiia. 

In January*, a draft of the study, which Mr. 
Klugh has not authorized for release, concluded 


it was unlikely that the North Carolina network 
would go out of business, and that at worn the 
Defense Department could run the railroad 
itsdf and still realize savings of nearly S3 mil- 
lion a year. 

As for job losses, the study acknowledged the 
change probably would kill 38 jobs around 
Morehead City but would create 30 new jobs 
around Selma. And, the study said, pipeline 
distribution is environmentally safer. 

Mr. Klugh, following calls from a reporter, 
Inst week ordered the Fuel Supply Center io 
begin studying a new* set of questions, including 
the impact of fuel trucks on North Carolina 
roads. A spokeswoman for Mr. Klugh said the 
new study would not be completed until the rad 
of the summer. 

Mr. Lancaster is unapdogstic about his lob- 
bying. He said his first concern is protecting the 
Marines' ability to deploy quicklv. But he add- 
ed that there was nothing wTong’with a Penta- 


ed that there was nothing wrong with a Penta- 
gon budget that looked out for local jobs. 


EUROPE l As Voting Begins^ Focus in Most Countries Is on National Issues 



Continued from Ptige 1 

would emerge as the latest group, 
with about 120 seats. 

Despite the apathy in many 
cour.tnev the election* touches on 
some momentous issues for Eu- 
rope’s future. The Parliament will 
approve a new European Commis- 
sion. the Union’s executive bodv. It 


line with the vision of the post- 
Worid War n founders of a united 
Europe, who understood that pork- 
barrel politics was more likely to 
knit the Continent together titan 
abstract idealism, .Aid from the Eu- 
ropean Union has helped give Ire- 
land one of the fastest-growing 
economies in Western Europe, 


paigning to become a member for Community in 1973. Then, ihree- 
the liberal Progressive Democrats, quarters of Irish exports went to 
‘•Pooling our sovereignty has given Britain, and Ireland was painfully 
us greater independence." dependent on the larger country’s 


will apprcnc the budget, "6 billion evcn unemployment remains 
Ecus (S8S billion v next year. It will stubbornly high, 
have a voice in future enlargement Ireland is having to think 

of the Union, on a joint political aboul *b? abstract issues as well, 
and security policy and on a single because in 1996 it will be largely 
currency — all called for in the rcs P oas, blc for organizing a major 
Treaty on European Union, the so- conference to review the Maas- 


us greater independence." 

In fact, some commentators say economic ups and downs, 
that Ireland's experience should be Ireland now ships about one- 
reassuring U> Ausrna, where votes third of its exports to Britain, and 
on Sunday win decide in a referen- therefore is much less dependent 
dum whether to join the Union, than it used to be. Still, the govero- 
voters m Finland, Sweden and mem is acutely conscious that if 
Norway will deads in ref crendums Britain rinks, Ireland risks being 
later in the year whether to join. sucked down with it. Mr. Majo?s 

Austria's relationship to its large call for a multispeed Europe — in 
neighbor, Germany, is similar to effect a loosening of the Union — 
Ireland's relationship with Britain has caused profound apprehension 
before Dublin joined the European here. 


called Maastricht treaty. 

Ireland, which has voted over- 


tricht treaty. 

NiaJJ Andrews, who is running 


Speaking at the end of a North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization for- 
eign m inisters’ meeting in Istanbul, 
Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher said, “We’re proceed- 
ing firmly and deliberately to seek 
sanctions in the United Nations 
Security Council and I think they 
can be achieved." 

Meanwhile, Robert L. Gaflucci, 
the assistant secretary of state in 
charge of the administration’s 
working group on Korea, told Con- 
gress on Thursday that there was 
no agreement yet on die terms of a 
sanctions resolution. 

The heart of the problem is 
North Korea’s decision to destroy 
evidence of its past plutonium pro- 
duction by withdrawing rods from 
its Yongbyon nuclear reactor. 

Washington repeatedly has 
warned that it would seek econom- 
ic sanctions if the North Koreans 
prevented the International Atom- 
ic Energy Agency from accounting 
for ils past plutonium production. 

But while the administration 
wants to punish the North Koreans 
for their refusal to cooperate with 
-the agency, they also want to dis- 
suade Pyongyang from reprocess- 
ing the rod taken out of the reactor 
and using it to make new bombs. 

That means, in effect, that Wash- 
ington wants to mobilize support 
for sanctions now while bolding 
other measures in reserve. The 
emerging U.S. plan is likely to set a 
deadline for North Korean compli- 
ance and impose an initial set of 
sanctions Tougher sanctions 
would be imposed if North Korea 
continued to press ahead on the 
nudear from. 

But which sanctions (toes Wash- 
ington plan to seek now, and which 
does it plan to put off until later? If 
sanctions were imposed, what 
would the North Koreans have to 
do to get them lifted? 

“For all this brave talk of sanc- 
tions, there are still some important 
problems that need to be resolved,’* 
an administration official said. 

Within the administration there 


sanctions are inevitable.” he added, 
citing Mr. Hata's comments. 

South Korea, meanwhile, said 
the military situation was growing 
volatile. Defense Minister Rhee 
Byoung Tae told lawmakers that 
South Korea was closely monitor- 
ing Nonhem troop movements, 
but that so far no unusual military 
activity had been detected. He said 
that troop movements had in- 
creased in the past year and that 
the North’s military strength was 
now at its strongest level since 
1990. 

In the IS months since the nucle- 


ar standoff began. North Korea has 
stockpiled military supplies, ex- 
panded underground fatalities and 
deployed artillery and rocket 


“The South is bringing dark 
clouds of a nuclear war over the 
Korean Peninsula.” the North Ko- 
rean daily newspaper Rodong Sin- 


launchers just north of the dernili- mun said Thursday in a comraen- 
tarized zone, he said. tary monitored bv the South 

“With the degree of sanctions, Korean news agenev Naewoe 
North Korean military movements Press. “We are all prepared to repel 
and response will also slowly in- any military aggression against us.” 
crease," Mr. Rhee told a legislative _ . . , 

committee. For ,ls P“ L lhe board of 8° v «- 

On Wednesday. North Korea, “ 0R ^ totcmational Atomic 

via its official news agency, accused ““*§1 Agency, meeting in Vienna, 
the South of movingrecollless guns n “ v * d 10 CUI off ** agency s «cb- 
and large-caliber machine guns aid to North Korea, an action 

into the demili tarized zone along more symbolism than sub- 

ibe heavily armed border. Send slance - 

denied the allegation. (Reuters, AP, AFP I 


with more symbolism than sub- 
stance. 

(Reuters, AP, AFP) 


EMBARGO: House Demands Clinton Arm Bosnia AUCTION: 


Cootmoed from Page 1 

because most Gypsies do not have 
property that Sobs covet. 

“This dearly is an attack on eth- 
nic diversity,” he said. 

The report coincided with a di- 
minishing of the fighting on the 
northern and northeastern from 
lines after Bosnia's waning fac- 
tions agreed Wednesday to a one- 
month cease-fire. The accord 
signed by the Bosnian government 
and Bosnian Serbs takes effect at 
noon Friday. 

Ethnic cleansing, the practice of 
forcing ethnic groups perceived as 
hostile to leave their homes, has 
been practiced by all warring par- 
ties in the Bosnian war. Bui Bosni- 
an Serbs have been identified by 
UN officials as the chief culprits. 

Mr. Kessler said about 50.000 
Croats and Muslims remain 
around Serb-held Banja Luka, an 
area that formeriy had 550,000. 
People are still being forced to sign 


thri? property over to authorities “There is no perpetrator arrest- Vntt nf 
before leaving ed,” Mr. Kessler said. “It is beyond rau "c/TUZSl 

The Banja Luka area was pre- belief that people carrying oui this _ . _ . 

dominantly Serbian before the war activity cannot be caught." Continued from rage l 

but had large Croat and Muslim In a new twist, non-Serb women wnced to seven years in prisoi 
nu ? l ?" tJ “\ , . . are now being forced to cook for falsifying baJance sheets and a 


whehningly in favor of European re-election to the Parliament 
unity in three referendums. re- from Dublin, said the Irish have a 
mains largely positive about the Poetical sense of what Europe can 
Union, which it regards as liberal- 8* vc ^ crn a deep cynicism 
ing politically and beneficial eco- ab !° ul Pities. Nevertheless, be 
nonucalK. said, if he has intervened frequently 

it has 'done extremely well out of jj 1 *** Parliament on foreign aid, 
farm subsidies and regional aid humanitarian questions and bu- 
grants. and it is the job of its Euro- 10811 ^8^ » w* only because be 
pean Parliament members to nv*l<» ta k e s an interest in these issues, but : 
sure that the country gets its fair a k° because his electors do. Ire- ! 
share — more than its fair share if plays an increasingly active 
possible — of anvthing that is of- on the world stage, he said, 
fered. P^y because it feels secure and 

“Clrenulrsm and pretty erode comf enable with its position in ibe 
clienultsm at that.” was how Brian European Union. 

Farrell, director-general of the In- . its big neighbor, Bril- 

stituteof European .Affairs in Dub- *iH* 15 enga g ed in a sterile debate 
lin. described Ireland’s dealings over threats to its sovereignty from 
with the Urticn. increased federalism. Ireland, with 

If Ireland milks the Union for °? ] y 3 * 5 n^hon of the EU*s corn- 
economic benef i is. this is not out of hined population of about 320 mil- 

lion, has no such qualms. 

~ " Being a member of the European 

A T Union enhances rather than dimin- 

A 8 J fi . I Hfl | \: isbes Irish sovereignty, influence 

^ ' and culture, virtually ail commen- 

Fall of Ferruzzi uu ? 0 s ^„, has 

given us power and influence out of 
Continued from rage 1 ail proportion to our size," said 
tenced to seven years in orison for Stephen O’Byrnes, who was cam- 



y&acmbal 




UN relief officials have long Serbian troops and sweep streets, 
complained about terror against he said. Non-Serb men still are be- 
non- Serbs in and around Banja ing made to chop wood and dig 
Luka, including the m ai m i n g and trenches on dangerous from lines. 


killing of civilians and the destruc- 
tion of mosques. 

“Reports of atrocities continue. 
Families are being singled out for 
attacks by thugs,” Mr. Kessler said, 
dting the case of a mechanic who 


lestruo- “The situation is horrible," said 
Mr. Kessler, telling of a woman 
intinue. who was raped twice recently in 
out for front of family members. 

.er said. Commander Eric Chaperon, a 
tic who UN spokesman in Sarajevo, repon- 


was asked by two armed men to ed a “substantial reduction in ac- 
repair their car in late May. He told tivity** along the northern Gradac- 


them to come bade next morning, 
when he was s ummaril y shot to 
death. 

Mr. Kessler said uniformed men 
ere “terrorizing people with impu- 
nity." The authorities seem to 
know abom, if not condone, terror 
by Serb soldiers, he said. 


Ribnica front line and in the 
northeast. 

But the Bosnian Serbian news 
agency. SRNA. said two civilians 
were seriously wounded when 
shells from Bosnian government 
airny positions hit the center of 
Dobqj. 


POLICY: U.S. Resists Pressure MASSACRE: 

Continued from Page 1 Archbishop SloUl 

enmes, and some critics have sug- April, those troubled by a rim.-w 


hasnot been a single set of answers, gated that the White House may record of international passivity 
The Pentagon, U.S. officials be seeking to evsdc the obligations havebegnntolashowwithpanic- 
said, has kmg been more concerned of that accord. ular venom at what they describe as 

ftn adiramsmtion offidak say U* .dmmiflratiorfs hypocrisy, 
than with resolving the mystery of that they flunk the t reaty does not Herman Coben, a former assis- 
whether PvoamnR diverted a carry « ahsahite obligation to act tarn secretary of state for Africa. 
bbmbV wotthaf plutonium in those , wh ° dtfend their lambasted the Clinton arimims tra- 

1989 The Pentagon? approach is ^ ‘J’Jj 88 ' tion last wcck for whal b® iw 

to “go low and dow** onsancti^ J5J Sta . tcs be ? ore “wimpish approach" in Rwanda. 

ifc State Department has fa- Jf®“8“sonnequivocalacasnga- Mr. Cobra declared flatly that the 
vored a tougher approach. Mr. bon is to be absolutely sure of its kfflings there “must be called geno- 


the Noth Korean nudear program 
than with resolving the mystery of 
whether Pyongyang diverted a 
bomb’s worth of plutonium in 
1989. The Pentagon s approach is 
to “go low and slow” on sanctions. 

The State Department has fa- 
vored a tougher approach. Mr. 
GaUucd has recommended two 
steps: a cutoff of financial transfers 
from North Koreans living in Ja- 
pan and a voluntary embargo on 
arms purchases and deliveries. 

Officials who support this ap- 
proach argue that Washington 
needs to issue a “wake-up" call to 
North Korea after a year of on- 

ng afrn L nff -again negotiations. 

■ Carter to Vish Pyongyang 

CNN reported late Thursday 
that former ftcadra* Jimmy Car- 
ter would soon visit North Korea, 
with no official U.S. status rad at 
Pyongyang’s invitation. He is also 
scheduled to visit Seoul 


To mbacribe in Germany 

justeoflf taB free, 

0130 84 85 85 


“As a responsible government, “Another Holocaust may just 
you don’t just go around hollering have slipped by, hardly noticed," 
genocide,” David Rawson, the U.S. Mr. Cohen wrote in an opinion 
ambassador to Rwanda, said in an article, 
interview here this week. “You say _ _ 

that acts of genocide may have oc- . 

cuned, and they need to beinvesti- wl » has opaated from Wash- 
gated." mgton since be Jed an evacuation of 

, - , Americans from Rwanda in April, 

Diplomacy is not famous for said this week the administration 
haste or blmrt troths, and Amen- intended to await a report iron a 
can a d m i n i s trations have proven UN investigator who is not due to 
slow in denouncing previous mass repwt to the human rights commis- 

skughtCT in Central Africa, indud- son for four weeks. 


But Mr. Rawson, the ambassa- 
dor who has operated from Wash- 
ington since be led an evacuation of 
Americans from Rwanda in April, 


Cootisoed from Page l 
gambsge said. “Why should you 
waul to use one incident involving 
four soldiers to show the discipline 
of our force?” 

News of the massacre was broad- 
cast by the rebels’ Radio Muba- 
bura. It gave no clue as to when the 
killing took place. 

It named three bishops — the 
archbishop of Kigali. Vincent 
Nsengiyumva; the president of the 
BishopS Conference, Bishop Thad- 
dee Nsengiyumva; and Bishop Jo- 
seph Ruzmdana of Byumba. 

Meanwhile, the UN Assistance 
Mission in Rwanda said it had 
credible reports that nine priests 


tenced to seven years in prison for 
falsifying balance sheets and otheri 
crimes. I 

The trial brought to light much 
of the clandestine dealing that pro- 
voked Italy’s continuing corrup- 
tion investigations and made Fer- 
ruzzi a metaphor for the corrupt 
alliance of business and politics. 

The story excited the imagina- 
tions of Italians, rivaling the soap 
operas, and its latest act was the 
desperate attempt of the family to 
challenge the banks' takeover of 
the family assets. 

Last month, the husband and the 
brother of the youngest Ferruzzi 
daughter. Alessandro, began tellingi 
prosecutors investigating possiblei 
bankruptcy fraud that officials ofi 
Mediobanca, the leader of the con-i 
senium that took over ibe Femtzzi 
assets, knew about the empire's di- 
sastrous financial straits but failed 
to act. preferring to let the group go 
under, the easier to seize its assets. 

Even as the auction proceeded 
on Tuesday. Mediobanca’s chief: 
executive. Vincenzo MaranghL was! 
being interrogated for eight hours; 
by the chier prosecutor in Ravenna.! 
the Ferruzzi hometown. , 

The moves by the Ferruzzi son- 
in-law. Carlo Sama. and by Arturo 
Ferruzzi were a desperate effort to 
salvage the honor of the family, 
and its finances, but it also reflect- 
ed a reading of the changed politi- 
cal situation since the electoral suc- 
cess in March of the new prime 
minister. Silvio Berlusconi, another 
ragj-toriches man who. like the 
Ferruzzis. came to power and influ- 
ence outside the range oi the big 
Milanese financial circle*. 

But the legal moves could not 


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and 63 civ ilians were killed in a prevent the auction, whose pro- 


govonmem-beJd pan of Kigali. 
Major Jean-Guy Plante, a UN 


ceeds, an estimated SZ million to S3 
million, will go to reduce the debt 
of Montedison, the chemicals com- 


military spokesman, said an aid ™ ™>n teoison. tne chemicals com- 
body the Party that the ceraerotece of the 
mjradedto await a report from a took place in a church F^ruzzi group. A company execu- 

in Nyamirambo district. 2^5?* 


ing the tribal massacres in Burundi 

last fan It is only this month that _ Seeing Rwanda as a first test of 
the Stale Department has agreed to its restrictive new guidelines on 
ertaMty h an office to look into what peacekeeping the administration 
the administration now portrays as has not only ruled out sending 
the five years of genocide under Pol American trocnis to the country but 
Pot in Cambodia that aided 15 has stood in the way of an aggres- 
yearsago. rive UN plan to send an African 

But with the bloody massacres in force of 5,500 there. 


which swarms ’widi Huiu militia. “a small drop” but hau symbolic 

Major Plante said it was imrossi- to underscore the company s 
We for UN personnel to go io the rediscovered frugality. 


church area to verify the rep<.^rted 
massacre. 


SEPTEMBER 21-24, 199+ • BALUOL COLLEGE ■ OXFORD 

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HeralbliMMtribune 



The family p roics led ihe auc- 
tion, unsuccessfully. Massimiiiano 


OXFORD ANALYTIC A 


Major Flame said ihe UN mis- Ferruzzi, Arturo’s son and a money 
Sion had received a fetter from manager who lives in Pari?, said by 
priests from the Nyamirambo phone that none of the Ferruzzis 
Church saying they were in danger, would be in Milan, but in Bologna 
(Reuters. AP) preparing their nexi legal steps. 


For further information, please contact Jane Bcnnvy at the 
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EVTEKIVAT20INAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE ***** 





Austria’s EU Fervor Cools 




But Polls Show Likely Approval 

■2s^«... S|^S55/® 

a« Austrians o repare to vweon ^eihertocast it seeks - a vote of at wasr . ... 


By Tom Buerkle 

[nierruUUvuA Herald Tribune 

As Austrians preptm *° StfS 

X£ concluded three months ajjptajwnu^ 

*r latest polls ^ 


dorsetnent 
in favor. 


Greens 


■nr latest polls indicate that vot^ ^ M ague that 


SfflaBa?w=w= 

•isswwkr. « 

dEISany Europeans hava about EU Integra- pafty |tader . Jatg Hada. «g» *«{ gLB ^ 
U The result, officials say, is «*«“c be "one step lot te rigte^; 

RnlanciNorway and Swettat. m Oetobor and vi “J^ ^. aSK •>£!-£• ->«J±SS&' 


The result, officials say ? is worasome for a btoc 
that had sought a strong push from Ausjna £ 
ensure positive referendum; ^ memba^nip in 
Finland. Norway and Sweden m Ocwbcr and 
November. Support has waned 
and polls show a majority favoring membashtp 
only mFinJand. where fear of Russian instability is 

driving the desire for EUstams. 

The risk is all on the downside because evoyj 


win get lost in aEuiope nmby 

in Brussels, who are perceived 45 S^JfSUQ 

promote the free drculatron of wifett 

“o^^^ivtdairand that EU «MrM; 

rr ■ - 1_ I ia nmm 


The ns* is au on me wwiw« Opponents navc-aanocu uj-m ^ — -w. 

body has more or Jess anticipated a clear-cut yes’ ^ ^ght^tng cwm tries U> dram wa^ 

from Austria," said Stig Beighnd, the spokesman f the Austrian Alps, uni easb a fiood ofGenian^ 




Foreign Minister Javier Solana Madariaga of Spain, right. pointing out wet ground Thunsdaj as the NATO ministers left a photo session. 


Kir. 1 ! Sj-dbji Firmer. 


for Sweden’s mission to the Union. 

The drop in support in Austria, reminiscent oi 
the swing against the Maastricht treaty m refercn- 
dums in Denmark and France two years ago, has 
shaken the complacency in Vienna. . 

The government of Chancellor Franz Vramtzky 
has mounted a vigorous last-minute campaign, 
stressing its contention that the country cannot 
afford to Slav out of the bloc that buys two-thirds 
of its exports. Officials hope to avoid a low turn- 
out, which they believe would give an edge to the 

opposition. 

A “no" vote would turn Austrians into “second- 
class Europeans without a say in making key 
derisions,” Foreign Minister .Alois Mock told the 
news agency Austria Presse-Agectur earner this 
week. 


SlJL* 


Accord 


The effort appeared to be working. A Gallup acaaiuu an pm«/uwm w«y^ ”‘* w ^* * g r~ r T^; j»A 
Poll published Thursday by the weekly magazine alism or single issues like the environment- he 
News showed 57 percent of respondents support- If a defeat dealt a setback: to the Vraeitay* 
ing membership, with 28 percent opposed. But in a government and set off a near, debate ovtt the 
poll released earlier in the week by the IFES country’s role in post-Cold War£iirope.tfWonId 

- .1 In ,'nla r.vr* Afmlv <nlir L. . fnr 4ia I In iri M 'fflP /T( 


W 0 U 1 U allow uciguiANiMe — ■ — - , 

from the Austrian Alps,imleasba fiood orGenjaa.^ 

students into the counuy's umvasUtes , 

turn the country’s ban on'ancfaar power- 
that both parties in the gpveremg coanp^^^g- 
business and union leaders sipwnt nwjab^WK 
just as the Danish establishment had supJKS^TgL 
Maastricht treaty, does' Ettfe to dummstl 

fearSi * ■ " * ■ •* • j 

“It’s crazy," a German official said of th c refer^ 
eudum campaign. “Tberc is - ofc serous crater 
Thev are just hitting each other wish argaitx^4s *s.j 
bizarre as they cwald be." - 

The campaign resembles Dearaadrsv 
1972 vote in favor of membership, and und* 
the broader ambivalence about She Union. . 
Europe, an EU official said. SupportmofferTBt*^- 
nal economic arguments about the ;seed' io-tawf.^ 
pan in the wider European" market, while 


nans run an emotional campaign strcssmgnaii«& 

>• ■. • lit.* . I** baS 4 *T. ! 


By William Drozdiak 

,1V lt/tin^irn Port Senice 

ISTANBUL — NATO foreign 
ministers threw their weight Thurs- 
day behind an effort to impose a 
lerriioriai solution oa the Bosnian 
conflict and reaffirmed their readi- 
ness to send a peacekeeping force 
once the warring parties sign an 
accord. 

The 16 alliance members wel- 
comed a one-month truce among 
the warring Serbs. Croats and Mus- 
lims. scheduled io take effect Fri- 
day, as a "positive first step." They 
urged that the cease-fire should be 
expanded to include the separation 
jf the com baton is. ihe use of Unit- 
ed Nations forces to ensure ihe 
ru:e. and the withdrawal of all 
heavy weapons. 

The latest North Atlanu'c Treaty 
Organization appeal for an end lb 
:he war came as the “con tael 
group," led by the United States. 
Russia. France and Britain, intensi- 
fied their drive to compel the belli- 
gerents to accept a partition of Bos- 


nia along ethnic lines that would 
leave the Serbs with 49 percent of 
the land and give 51 percent io 
Bosnia's Croats and Muslims. 

“We are now at a critical poin i in 
our efforts to find a negotiated sc>- 
lution." Secretary of State Warren 
M. Christopher told his NATO col- 
leagues. He said the United States 
and its main partners "have made 
good progress in putting together a 
territorial proposal that we believe 
could serve as a reasonable basis 
for a settlement." 

U.S. officials said the contact 
group would meet, within a week 
hoping to produce a map that 
would force Bosnia's warring par- 
ties to accept it as the fairest and 
most feasible solution by the time 
the truce expires in a month. 

If the Serbs, who now control 
more than 70 percent of Bosnian 
territory, should refuse to surren- 
der lands as called for under the 
agreement. French officials said 
sanctions would be more severely 
tightened. They denied reports. 


however, that an arms embargo 
would be lifted to allow heavy 
weapons to flow to the Bosnian 
government. 

On the other hand, if ihe Bosnian 
government rejected the proposal 
while the Serbs accepted iu the 
Western countries would probably 
call for an easing of economic sanc- 
tions against Serbia, which has sus- 
tained the war effort by Bosnia's 
Serbs. 

Mr. Christopher acknowledged 
that the United States would sup- 
port lifting sanctions againsL the 
Serbs if they accepted a peace deal, 
though he insisted this position was 
nothing new. 

The push for a settlement by the 
end of the month has been orches- 
trated largely by France, which has 
warned that h will pull out its 6.000 
peacekeeping forces unless an 
agreement is reached soon. 

"Everyone can see that each par- 
ty is gathering its forces," said For- 
eign Minister Alain Juppe of 


France. “The coming months will 
be absolutely decisive." 

Mr. Juppe said France was 
pleased io see the Climoo adminis- 
tration taking a more assertive 
stance. 

The allied ministers also agreed 
Thursday to offer “an extensive 
and far-reaching program’* of mili- 
tary cooperation with Russia as 1 
part of NATO’s Partnership for ! 
Peace plan to build closer links ; 
with former adversaries, which has | 
been adopted by 20 countries. 

While promising a plan that 
would take into account Russia's j 
“size and weight" is thecominents 
biggest nuclear power. NATO’s j 
deputy secretary-general. Sergio 
Balaczino. insisted that Russia 
would not be granted a special pro- • 
tocol enshrining a strategic reia- ; 
tionship — a request from Moscow • 
that frightened sis former satellites . 
in Eastern Europe. ! 

“We will not draw new dividing j 
lines across Europe or engage ir. a i 
NATO-Russian condominium." j 


Kir. Balanzino said, rejecting any 
notion of a “Salta Two" pact like 
the one that ushered in the Cold 
War. “Russia can lake its sovereign 
decisions, but so will NATO. No 
countrv can be allowed a kind of 
veto over NAT O's decision-making 
processes." 


institute, those intending to vote were evenly split 
cm the issue, with 38 percent undecided. 

The stakes are high because the Union regards 
the entry of the four applicants as an essential first 
step toward expansion of the bloc into Eastern 
Europe. A defeat would trigger a new round of 
infighting among existing members. 


be a disaster for the Union, the German officii 

said- . ' , l;m! 

Rather than focusing on enlargement and- the- 
needs of Eastern Europe, the 12 current EU mera- : 

bos would be thrown back into the debate overdue 

need to deepen policy cooperation among lion- ; 
sdves before branching oaL be yaid 




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A Better Way to Help Haiti 


Invading Haiti i s a bad idea supported by 
good people. They see that the embargo is 
unlikely to force the army officers out of 
power, and they fear that the only alternative 
to invasion is to leave them there indefinitely. 
But that does not have to be true. 

Invasion, according to its supporters, would 
be a quick and tidy solution, allowing the 
.American troops 10 withdraw in a matter of 
weeks and leave the country to its elected 
government under the returned president. 
Jean- Bertrand Aristide. That is an exceedingly 
optimistic assumption for a country that has no 
police Force separate from its corrupt army, no 
independent judiciary and no parliamentary 
experience. It is much more probable that the 
invasion force would find itself stuck with 1 wig- 
term responsibilities to referee the struggle 
among the contending factions and protect the 
democratic politicians from their undemocratic 

(and well-armed) enemies. Aside from tbe prac- 
tical complexities, invasion is wrong in princi- 
ple. It is the colonial solution, well intended but 
nevertheless the imposition by armed Force of 
a big country's decisions on a small one. 

The Clinton administration seems to be anx- 
ious primarily to stave off the prospect of 
thousands of Haitian refugees heading toward 
Florida. Its present practice erf picking up the 
refugees at sea and dumping them summarily 


back on the Haitian docks is neither legal nor 
h uman e. Now the administration plans to send 
them at least temporarily to ships anchored in 
Jamaican waters. That would be a substantial 
improvement, permitting orderly interrogation 
and an opportunity to sort out those who are 
genuinely fleeing political persecution. 

If only because of the refugees, the United 
States is not going to be able to ignore Haiti. 
The Clinton adminis tration will have to stay 
engaged. But talk of an invasion only divert* 
energies from the essential political process of 
building a government that can govern. That 
process has to begin with President Aristide 
himself. He is not in a weak position, as some 
of his supporters fear. He represents constitu- 
tional legitimacy, and no government that 
excludes him will get the respect and help 
from Haiti’s friends abroad — beginning with 
relief from sanctions — that it desperately 
needs. He has to work with those of his 
adversaries who accept the rule of law to 
isolate the gunmen. Even among the people 
who are not his friends, there is rising dismay 
at the anarchy and racketeering that have 
seized the country. That presents him with an 
opportunity. But Father Aristide is the presi- 
dent, and he has to take the initiative. .Ameri- 
can troops can’t do that for him. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Tiie Speaker Should Lead 


“Your ideas,” Thomas Foley, speaker of the 
U.S. House of Representatives, tells grass-roots 
Democrats in a recent fund-raising letter for 
the Democratic Congressional Campaign 
Committee, “will help us formulate a list of our 
legislative priorities.” Mr. Foley does not, how- 
ever, care to hear from the grass roots on one 
pressing issue. Missing from the “Legislative 
Agenda Survey” enclosed with his mailing are 
questions about the cleanup of the Washington 
influence game that undermines government 
integrity and that was supposed to be a priority 
for Sir. Foley and President Bill Clinton 

This absence is consistent wiLh Mr. Foley's 
pattern of indifference on the issue. The result 
is that campaign finance reform legislation, 
which seemed a sure bet in the populist after- 
glow of Mr. Clinton’s election, is now in 
perilous shape 17 months into the new Demo- 
cratic administration. It would, of course, be 
admirable if Mr. Foley seized what little time 

is left in the crowded legislative session to 
behave like a leader instead of the leading 
protector of the status quo. But so far, as we 
and others feared, he bas played out a strategy 
of delay that might well be successful It has 
been a lamentable performance. 

Both the House and Senate passed campaign 
finance bills last year. But negotiations to rec- 
oncile them have bogged down mainly because 
House Democrats resist strengthening changes 
that are essential For reducing the grip of spe- 
cial-interest money on lawmakers, and for 
overcoming a Republican-led filibuster in the 
Senate. The Foremost sticking point is the 
House Democrats' refusal to cut their bill's 


receive a smiling picture of Mr. Foley with 
President Clinton and a personalized "Certifi- 


cate of Appreciation.” 

That smile may reflect the speaker's antici- 


patory pleasure at having finessed meaningful 
reform — cheating the country but preserving 
his colleagues’ cherished campaign advantages. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Beyond the Budget Circes 


The sc -called A-to-Z bilL a plan to turn the 
u.S. House of Representatives into a circus 
tent in which members can do budget tricks 
for the voters in anticipation of the fall elec- 
tions. may not be as dead 3S it ought to be. It 
seems that the sponsors still have a pretty 
good chance to get the signatures they need to 
discharge or.d circumvent the normal commit- 
tee structure and bring the bill to the floor. 

.Ail kinds of amendments to cut spending 
right away or to change the budget process to 
force or facilitate spending cuts in the future 
will then be in order. None would be vetted by 
the normal committees; that is in a way the 
whole idea. They would just be brought up in 
what would likely be a weeklong process on the 
floor. They could be specific cuts in particular 
programs, or general cuts in whole categories of 
programs (entitlement or appropriations caps), 
or even changes in the wavs cuts are measured. 
No committee’s jurisdiction would be immune. 

To lock in long-term appropriations cuts, 
members would have to lower the appropria- 
tions ceilings in authorizing legislation. They 
would be going not only into spending levels 
but the mechanics of all kinds of programs. 
About the only thing not allowed would be 
increases, in anything — not a spending m- 
crease^ven if more than paid for by an off set- 
ting cut, and not a tax increase, either, even 
though that might serve no less than a spending 
cut to reduce the deficit 


Circus would likely be too tame a word for it. 
You already hear some members who were 
incautious enough to sign onto the process 
saying they would hope to be bailed out by the 
Senate, which they say would have the good 
sense to let the A-to-Z Ml drop. Maybe, but 
what a way to legislate, and wrhal a weak reed. 

The two real budget battles this year are 
going on in other, less showy contexts. One is 
the normal appropriations process. Tight 
caps are forcing the approprialors to make 
choices that in past years they would have 
avoided at the deficit's expense. The caps 
have been a success so far; the other great 
fight has to do with health care. 

Health care costs are the engines currently 
driving the budget. The health care pro- 
grams, Medicare and Medicaid, are the ones 
that mainly need to be contained. The right 
way to do that — to cut costs rather than 
merely shifL them to the stales or private 
payers — is to impose some credible form of 
cost containment on the health care sector 
generally. That is at least half of what health 
care reform should be about If Congress 
votes health-care cost containment the bud- 
get over time becomes the beneficiary. If it 
does not the budget again becomes the bat- 
tleground. The committees now marking up 
health care bills need to remember that it is 
not just health care they hold in their bands. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Other Comment 


Sttmfeg Up to North Korea 


President Bill Clinton used D-Day to point 
to the dangers of nuclear proliferation. He was 
not being irrelevant One of the lessons of 13- 
Day is that if you do not stand up to a mam at 
an early stage, the price of doing so later can be 
very high. North Korea poses a seemingly 
much smaller but in many ways mote awkward 
challenge than Hitler. IT [world leaders] do 
nothing North Korea will build its bomb and 
give the green light to others to follow, thereby 


destroying the Nonproliferation Treaty. But if 
they confront it, they may drive it into a comer 
and tempi it to react irrationally. Carrots and 
sticks have been tried, but there is no obvious 
alternative to looking for a more effective com- 
bination of the two. The aim must be to per- 
suade North Korea that it would be better off 
as a normal member of the international com- 
munity. As President Clinton has said: “We 
want them to become a part of our world.” The 
dangerous part is getting them there. 

— The Independent (London). 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 18X7 

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Co-CNiiOntn 

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JOHN V 1NOCUR. Eteamue EtBkv & VicehtsUac 

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« JU.ANTT A I. CASPARL International Deiebfwnenr Director* ROBERT FARRE CwbUm Ctinaor. Europe 

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generous limi ts on the amount of money a 
member may accept from a single political 
action committee, or PAC — S5.000 in a prima- 
ry and another $5,000 in a genera! election. 
This is a cynical device aimed at killin g reform. 
Mr. Foley, Richard Gephardt, the House ma- 
jority leader, and their colleagues know that by 
sticking with (heir greedy PAC limits they are 
likely to lose the support of the seven Senate 
Republicans whose votes were crucial in ending 
the filibuster of the original Senate bill. 

There are other big problems, too. The 
House bill, for example, would continue to 
allow members to maintain their own “leader- 
ship PACs” —slush funds that would provide 
an easy avenue for avoiding any new cam- 
paign spending and contribution limits. As- 
tonishingly, House Democrats also shy from 
ending the abuse of lawmakers convening 
campaign funds for personal use — a stance 
that is a shaming embarrassment after the 
indictment of Dan Rosienkowski. 

Unless these matters can be resolved 
quickly, this rare opportunity to transform 
American politics will be lost in the end-of- 
session rush. In his fund-raising letter. Mr. 
Foley promises that those who return the 
issues survey with a SZ0 contribution will 


Up in Arms Over Korea 
Let Cooler Heads Prevail Be Ready to Make War 


By Philip Bowring 


H ONG KONG — Western politi- 
cians and commentators are 
working themselves into a lather of 
moralizing over North Korea. They 
seem to have learned nothing from 
President Bill Clin ion’s debacle over 
human rights and China's trade status. 

Not content with calls for economic 
sanctions, they are now proposing a 
blockade of North Korea and are pre- 
pared to risk outright war to bring 
about an objective that has much to do 
with their own political agendas and 
nothing to do with the interests of the 
other countries in the region. 

The alienation of friendly East 
Asian countries brought about by 
Mr. Clinton’s well-meaning human 
rights agenda and crude trade tactics 
against Japan is nothing to the dam- 
age lhaL would be done if the presi- 
dent were to lose his cool over Korea. 

To hear talk of blockading North 
Korea when the UniLed States cannot 
bring itself to gel tough with Haiti's 
rulers may seem almost comic. But. 
perhaps because Korea is so far from 
Washington, crazy theorizing and 
displays of virility are too easily sub- 
stituted for sound policy. 

Even the South Korean govern- 
ment has been reluctant at times to 
keep up with U.S. policy toward 
Pyongyang, measured though that 
policy has been up to now. Japan is 
even more reluctant to “do some- 
thing,” attentive not only to regional 
security needs but to the fears of its 
Korean minority — as legitimate a 
concent as that of black .Americans 
toward U.S. policy on South Afnca. 

As for China and Russia, they have 
no great fears of Mr. Kim. They may 
find him bothersome but they are 
content to use the nuclear issue for 
their own diplomatic purposes. 

Thus, the four countries closest to 
Pyongyang's nuclear “threat” are the 
least concerned, while Western coun- 
tries leap up and down crying “out- 
rage.” The neighbors know that even if 
Mr. Kim had a bomb, there is liuJe he 
could do with it beyond threatening to 
use it if someone attacked. 

So long as the South has sufficient 
conventional defense capability and 
the U.S. nuclear umbrella covers the 
region, nothing very dire will happen. 
That is the essence of deterrence. 


which has worked well now for 40 
years in Korea, as it has in Europe. 

Western outrage against Mr. Kim 
has little to do with the security of 
Northeast Asia and a lot to do with 
pOst-Gulf War delusions that the 
West acting through the Security 
Council can set itself up as world 


policeman, deriding who will be al- 
lowed nuclear weapons and who will 
be permitted medium-range missOes. 

U.S. policy on many issues relating 
to Asia is bang drivai partly by the 

nonproliferation lobby, for whom 
stopping the spread of bombs and 


Even its neighbors find 
North Korea more a 
bother than a threat . 


missiles has become a cause in itself, 
not a means to an end. Thus, to many 
in Asia, the furor over Pyongyang 
falls into the same category of arro- 
gant moralizing as American protests 
over India testing its medium-range 
Prithvi rocket. 

The fact is that access to nuclear 
technology is growing all the time. 
Nothing will stop it. The United 
States did not stop Pakistan. let 
alone China or Israel. Iraq was only 
stopped as a consequence of an ag- 
gressive folly that Mr. Kim is unlike- 
ly to emulate. The only reason any 
country will renounce nuclear capa- 
bility altogether is if it feels 
safe without iL 

The Nuclear Nonproliferation 
Treaty crusade had well-meaning ori- 
gins. But its advocates have become 
so obsessed with Mr. Kim that they 
now look to a blockade justified by 
the nuclear issue to overthrow him. 
These people are becoming more 
dangerous than the ruthless but uo- 
suiridal Kim D Sung, whose regime 
has scam chance of outliving him. 

Meanwhile, neighbors daily be- 
come less concerned about" Mr. 
Kim's possible bomb and more 
about Bill Clinton’s ability to ignore 
the noise and identify the true re- 
gional interests of the United States 
and its Asian partners. 

International Herald Tribune. 


W temporary absence of the Sovi- 
et Union’s representative from the 
United Nations Security Council in 
1950 enabled the United States to 

counter a gg ression from North Ko- 
rea under a UN flag. That diplomatic 
cover was useful; it was not a case of 
North Korea against the United 
States and its ally South Korea, but 
of an aggressor against the world. 

Though the Korean Conflict was 
never officially called a war, it cost 
the United States about 150,000 ca- 
sualties. Because Chinese “volun- 
teers” intervened after General 
Douglas MacAnhur had victory in 
his grasp, it ended in stalemate. 

Now the Chinese are apparently 
coming to the aid of North Korea 
again. The qualifier “apparently” is 
used because we do not know what is 
being said behind sOk screens. 

However, when the Chinese for- 
eign minister declares “sanctions are 
not a sensible choice,” he sends an 
unmistakable signal to Pyongyang: 
China will be in its seat at the Secu- 
rity Council to oppose economic 


f iressure. (Ah. the benefits of most- 
avored-nation trade status: quick. 


favored-nation trade status: quick, 
Henry, the linkage.) 

What is the Chinese strategy? It 
cannot be to bring about a nuclear- 
armed North Korea on its border, 
which could cause Beijing one day to 
think again of digging tunnels deep. 
Nor is it to enable North Korea to 
become the nuclear arms merchant 
to terrorist states, diminishing Chi- 
na’s strategic importance as a nucle- 
ar club member. 

China’s emerging strategy is to 
do what the Soviet Union failed to do 
in the 1950s: get North Korea recog- 
nized and limit its confrontation 
to South Korea and the United 
States, this time 3dvised by the 
toothless International Atomic 
Energy Agency. 

That would keep the United Na- 
tions — including China — ont of 
any Phase 2 of the Korean Conflict. 
After North Korea’s nuclear facilities 
had been obliterated, ending that 
threat, China would be positioned 
to act as the mediator between its 
Communist ally and the Americans 
backing SeouL ’ 


Clinton must be prepared 
to crush a vaunted 
million-man army in 
Asia much as Bush did 
in the Gulf War. 


The Pope Didn ’t Take It Far Enough 


W ASHINGTON — The Pope 
has said, in a forceful way, 
that the Catholic Church can nev- 
er ordain women to the priesL- 
hood. He gives us this reason: 
“The church has always acknowl- 
edged as a perennial norm her 
Lord's way of acting in choosing 
the 12 men whom he made the 
foundations of his church." 

Now that is an excellent princi- 
ple, but the Pope bas not gone far 
enough in applying iL If we are to 
take the Lord’s way of acting as a 
perennial norm, we must be more 
selective than we have been. It is 
not enough to restrict the priest- 
hood to men. The Lord’s way of 
acting on this did not slop at a male 
monopoly cm the priesthood. 

There was, for example, the Jew- 
ish monopoly. The Lord chose 


By Garry Wills 


only Jews for his apostles. Admit- 
tedly, it may be difficult, now. to 


ply the depleting ranks of the 
Catholic priesthood — but a prin- 
ciple is a principle. Do we mean to 
make the Lord’s way of acting our 
perennial norm, or not? 

If so, we must expect others 
(and not only women) to be sacri- 
ficed to ihe principle. Those 
priests now in ministry must pro- 
duce evidence of their Jewish de- 
scent. If they protest, we should 
just lecture them on the Lord’s 
way of acting, as we have lectured 
women for so long. 

The Lord also chose married 
men as his apostles — certainly in 
the case of Peter, and probably 
(given the culture) in that of the 
others as welL Peter, after all. is the 


tedly, it may be difficult, now. to 
get enough Jewish converts to sup- 


most important example in the eyes 
of any Pope; and this Pone, if he is 


of any Pope; and this Pope, if he is 
to take the Lord’s way of acting as a 


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perennial norm, must instantly go 
and find a wife in order to conform 
to Peter’s example. 

This, or course, assumes that the 
Pope has not already had to resign 
because of his lack of Jewish par- 
entage. Perhaps by stretching the 
case a little (even perennial norms 
must have a little “give”), he 
could qualify by first converting 
to Judaism and then reconverting 
to Christianity. 

Once we have taken firm hold 
of the perennial norm, our work is 
cut out for us. The apostles spoke 
Aramaic and a little Greek. 
Stretching things again, the Pope 
can perhaps give priests a dispen- 
sation from Speaking Aramaic, 
but they must certainly get back 
to speaking Greek. It is, after all. 
the language of the Gospels, and 
what more than they can be con- 
sidered a perennial norm? 

This is a wonderful principle, 
once we start applying it, the 
Lord’s way of acting. He never 
went into a Christian church: 
there were none for him to enter. 
He never read in the New Testa- 
ment; it had not been writien yet. 
In fact, so far as the Gospel re- 
cord goes, he never wrote any- 
thing except some scribbles in the 
dirt when he disrupted a capital 
punishment in progress. 

What a sigh of relief we can 
im agin e from the small number of 
male, married. Jewish. Greek- 
speaking priests when they are 
told that at least, in imitation of 
the way the Lord acted, they need 
not write anything. If only the 
Pope had adopted (hat per ennial 
norm before penning his latest 
words on women. 


go for tins coaxing, blaming China’s 
veto threat and Japan’s unwtDmgness 
to sever its hard-currency support of 
the North Koreans. 

A Pammmjom-style negotiation 
would follow, giving the dictator the 
time to fit nukes cm missies and place 
them in the 60 submarines be has just 
bought from Russia 

A Jess sdf-deceptive strategy is 
proposed by Senator John McCain erf 
Arizona: Prepare for war. Position 
bombers and tankers and stocks in 
the area; upgrade South Korean de- 
fenses with the latest rocket systems 
and counterartillery radars; deploy 
more air power, including gonships, 
to the region. No last-minute Penta- 
gon scramble; contingency targeting 
should be under way now. If Seoul 
win mobilize to fight, Japan will sus- 
pend economic support, and C hina 
and Russia will go along, Mr. Clinton 
must be prepared to crush a vaunted 
million- man army in Asia much as 
his predecessor did in the Gulf War. 

If not, America should prepare to 
defend its cities from nuclear black- 
mail in its own way. 

But President Bill Clinton says: “I 
don’t want any war talk.” Does he 
prefer to s ur pr i se the Americari'peo- 
ple? War — conventional sooner or 
nodear later — is Topic A. Let’s hear 
from Him now, in prime time and 
sober detail from the Oval Office, 
about our risk and his resolve. 

The New York Times. 


By j. Robinson West 


W ASHINGTON — The *as- 

sian federation is : no* 

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and it fcartiisawered a sccnnsgly 
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that was greal optmsas hased 
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their fields. . _ : V.- v-yv . 

In Kazakhstan, huge discoveries 
were made by. tire Ria&m&Sjnre 
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also tunred ro Wcstcrocompmica. 
hoping Tar bipmifs- o€ dollars of 


By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON — Only the That 

temporary absence of the Sovi- tins week of Noth Koras contempt 
[^representative from the for a Secun^ Coun^wte on smc-_ 
Nations Security Council in lions. Inste^Chma aif* 
abled the United States to Stales, Search Korea ^d tte IAEA to 
aggression from North Ko- neonate directly with North Korea. 
raUN Gag. That diplomatic Wednesday, North praised btt- 
i< nw-fiii-ir was nnt a case of ter nudear behavior — if the United 


States acceded to hs demands. 

What is the North’s strategy? Any- 
one who still thinks Kim II Sung is 
not trying to become a nndear power 
is a fool He is building atomic weap- 
ons to sell them to rich rogue states 
like Iran and Libya, thereby bolster- 
ing his shrinking economy, and to use 
th«in in forcing the South into unifi- 
cation on his terms. 

What should America’s strategy be 
to stop an outlaw regime from gain- 
ing the power to blacbnafl the wodd? 

tiarrHiners in conservative think 
tanks (joined by doves demanding an 
invasion of Haiti) call for preemptive 
concessions. Send a big-name envoy 
to flatter “Great Leader” Kim. and 


matic respectability, trade, Bid and 
who knows what else if only he will 
let us look at his nuclear facilities. 
Known as “the coaxing option.” this 
fits China’s plan for United States- 
North-South talks. 

I hope 1 am wrong, but my hunch is 
that after much tough posing, the 
Clinton national insecurity team wifi 


. lcum production. V-; '• ; - - 

OreYrcmisBowKsama 
vdomngrire gjastlValgiz:^! field, 
similar in size t o Alaska’s Prudhoc 
Bay. Given the iarobrtafich of this 
deal. President Bill C&txm' cafe- - 

■ For Western companies, negotia- 
tions have bccn difficolt in both 
countries* particularly in Azerbai- 
jan, due to the lack of legal; and 
tax re ghra , o o r r v j tf Km ~ pol- 
iticaT Instability. But pro gre ss q 
bong made. . - .5ji V :; 

- - A dance at' the map, however, 
identifies a problem: For Kazakh- 
stan and. Az e rbaijan (o getfheir od 
and gas.to market, ihey nHBi go 
through Iran, Russia. 'unstable 
; areas m the Caucasus to reach ex- 
port terminals in Tmkey. The 
American government, ^ wisely 'or ; ‘ 
not, will block any hanks t 
companies from paclKapatiag. ei 
an Iranian project.- . V . . •' 

Rnssia is thus die only remade ■ 
exit route, and Rnsna is squecfcmg ; 
. and Azerbaijan hard. - 

Russian companies aft sowjfrrire 
forced into the consortia that wifi ' 
operate these hnge fields, although . 
they cannot offer eithdr.eapiwJ : 
or technology. .Large transit fees' 
are being sought, and Moscow, is 
insisting that roe oil be loaded at a, 
Russian Black Sea port, probably 
the stormy and unsuitable harbor 
of Novorossiysk. • . ‘ 

Not only do the Russians want 
the money from the projects in eq- 
uity and transshipment fees, they , 
also want power. Control over tire 
oil and gas from its former colonics 
will give Russia control ..over fhe^ 
only hard-currmcy-generating as- , 
set of either country, petroieom- 
Thc Russians will be able to use the 


S pdines to force both nations into 
te so that they make important 


line so that they make important 
political concessions on issues such 
as weapons and the rights of Rus- 
sian minorities. 

The Russians do not wish the 
Azerbaijani and Kazakh oil industry 
well, given the successor these coun^ 
tries, which they regard as inferior, 
in attracting Western capital. Not 
do they welcome competition, par- 


ticularly is European gas markets. 
Until recently. Western obsen 


Until recently, Western obsen-. 
era assumed that once the petro- 
leum reached the Black Sea, ns ac- 
cess to markets was ensured. After 
a spectacular collision in the Bos? 
porus in March, however, the Turks 
nave increased objections to mare 
tanker traffic, demanding new 
pipelines across Turkey. Russia is 
insisting on its rights of passage 
under the Montreux Convention of 
1936. The Turks respond that tin:, 
convention was signed with the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Rcpub-' 
lies, not Russia. Intense controver- 
sy can be expected. 

'pie pipeline politics of Central 
Asia are a high-stakes game. At a 


minimum, hnge investments and po- 
tential dividends are at risk. More 
important, the future of several 
countries and the stability of the 


countries and roe stability of the 
re gio n may hang in the haian«» . 

The industrialized nations and 
their banks as well as the Woiid 
Bank and the European Bank for 
Reconstruction ana Development 
should put pressure on the Rus- 
sians, using such leverage as export 
credits to their petroleum sector, 
to stop this blackmail. Russia 
should not be allowed to hold hos- 
tage yet again those stru ggling sew 
nations that it had commercially 
plundered and enviro n mentall y de- 
molished in the past. 


The write; a former assistant secre- 
tary of the interior, is president of the 
Petroleum Finance Co., international 


this comment to 


r ts. He contributed 
Washington Post . . 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Trouble in Siam 


BANGKOK — There is a serious 
deadlock between the French and the 
Siamese. The latter refused to pro- 
duce Phra Yot, ihe Siamese mandarin 
accused of killing the French inspec- 
tor Grosgurin, before the tribunal for 
judgment to-day [June 9J, and pre- 
pared to prevent the Fiend) man 
seizing the gunboat in which be was 
conveyed. The French insist that the 
attitude of the Siamese is menacing. 
Prince Devawongse has left to con- 
sult the King. Preparations are 
openly made by the French to arrest 
Phra You and force Siam into ad- 
mitting the suzerainty of France. 


were Ministers — in which freedom . 
of the Press is eloquently and s t ro n g * 
fy advocated; yet others use sarcasm. 
“Bonsoir," for instance, replaces arti- 
cles excised by the Censor by a “cuf 
of M. Clcmenceau reading 
“L’Honnne Libre" — the Free Man 
—the Premier’s own paper. 


1944: Allies Take Viterbo 


WITH THE 5TH ARMY AT VI- 
TERBO, Italy — [From our New 
York edition:} Viterbo and Taiquima: 
fefl today [June 9] to spearheads of 
the 5th Army thrusting northward 


1919: Hie Cemor’s Knife 




Mr . Wills, a Catholic, writes about 
Pope John XXIII in his new book, 
u Certain Trumpets: The Call of 
Leaders. ” He contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post 


PARIS — Scarcely a newspaper in 
Paris appears un censored at present, 
e fact which is not calculated to allay 
public anxiety concerning Peace. 
Some papers protest but protests arc 


oomc papers protest out protests are 
vain; others quote passages from 
speeches by Ministers — before they 


very light resistance. At 6 tun. troops 
rawer lieutenant Colonel John J. ' 
Phelan Jr . . . entered Pope CLe- . 
ment’s Gate of the walled city of • 
Viterbo. This town tf3QJ)00 inhabit- 
ants, (be former residence of popes, 
the scene of ihreepapal elections 
renowned for hs fine medieval houses 
and the twelfth-century cathedral of 

San Lorenzo, was cruelly damaged by 

bombs and demolitions. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1994 

0 PINION 


Just the Standard-Bearer 
V They Want a Holy War 


CfifcrCY 


HKFF '(W EFFEP HKp ANY 
^ POimeiAN? 


Bv Frank Rich 

Nas?* ~ ** Amtncans 

iL\™ “““■ «**««» ihj.v week on 
men whw kJ ' ed 

SSL ™ ni . fasc,sm < a un tidier was 

teadj^a^e 1 coup back home. 

N^ J Lrl ch J n « nd con, *niMn. Other 
? e P ub,ic ^ nomination 
{" J5J Scnat ^ in v ! r Sm> a and in that 
instant gave ihe radical Christian richt 

SifU! °H 1 V ,0 1 Ui * victory >ei in its pur- 
sut °f political power nationwide. 

to appreciate how scan; Mr. North 
and his movement are. consider this list 
ot those on the right who have tacitW ot 

aedvd” * ■ ~ 

Ronali 


i“'c wnn% oi 

SW**®* Senate campaicn: 
-Jnaid Rsigan. The Wall Street Jo'ur- 
naiedjionalpase. George Will. Robert 
Bork and Edwin Meese. Virginia's Re- 
publican senator. John Warner, will 
back an independent candidate. Bob 
D«e and Gerald Ford are wavering. 

Why does. Mr. North arouse such 
antipathy among his conservative con- 
federates? The answer begins — but 
does not end — with the character 
issue. Not onlv is he a consisted liar for 
his congressional testimony during the 
Iran-contra hearings, but he is a com- 
pulsive liar Among other self-aggran- 
dizing tall tales, he invented an evening 
spent with President Reagan watching 
television in the White House living 
quarters during the Grenada invasion. 

Yet the gravest danger posed by Mr. 
North has less to do with him thpn with 


the radical forces he represents. His 
convention victory in Virginia was 
made possible by the legions of funda- 
mentalists who are working tirelessly 
caucus by caucus, stale by state to take 
control of the Republican Party. 

As Richard Bcrkc has reported in 
The New York Times, the radical 
right has captured the party apparatus 
in six states besides Virginia — Texas. 
Minnesota, Oregon. Iowa. Washing- 
ton and South Carolina — and is mak- 
ing major inroads in many others, in- 
cluding New York. You don’t have to 
look far (o see why Republican leaders 
are alarmed by ib» spreading coup. It 
was the radical right's intolerant ver- 
sion of "family values” that soured 
the Republican nominating conven- 
tion in Houston in 1902. greasing the 
skids for President George Bush's 
electoral defeat. The more power the 
movement gets, the more it splinters 
the party, sabotaging the Republi- 
cans’ chance to capture the Senate this 
year or the White House in 1996. 

What makes Mr. North’s ascendancy 
inspire panic in his own party is the 
boost he gives to the insurgents, whether 
he ever gets to the Senate or not An 
enormously telegenic national fund- 
raiser with a secular, derring-do public 
image, he is a far more salable front man 
for the radical right's agenda than the 
likes of Pat Robertson or Jerry Falwdl. 


m.?vw.NBj£R:&ot! 

I'M AM UPKl&tfT, M0N6ST 
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stkm6*t American . 
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^MATORN ORM. 
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«UB 


For whatever reason, OUie North , as a young marine, consulted a psychiatrist. 
Perhaps that is where it all began . . . 


For Democrats, a rising religious right 
dividing the Republican vote is an elec- 
toral dream, presaging a rerun of the 
Republicans* 1964 Goldwaler debacle. 

But for anyone of either party who 
cores about civil liberties, this funda- 
mentalist crusade is a nightmare. 
Even without winning elections, the 
radical right can make tile punishing 
at the state level for women seeking 
abortions, for homosexuals, and for 
racial and religious minorities. 


And there is more to worn about 
below tbe surface. In New- York, the 
Anti-Defamation League has just re- 
leased a book-length study of the reli- 
gious right, including such prominent 
cheerleaders for Mr. North as the Vir- 
ginia-based Christian Coalman. It doc- 
uments both the movement’s anti-Se- 
mitic rhetoric and the ferocity of its 
efforts to enforce its exclusionary or- 
thodoxy on local governments and 
school systems. 


Throughout his Bible-thumping 
campaign. Oliver North has been 
short on substance and long on mili- 
tary exhortations, referring to family 
values as a "battle cry” and even lik- 
ening his Senate race to the Norman- 
dy invasion. For once he is not entire- 
ly lying. Whether be wins or loses. 
Virginia is only an early skirmish in 
what promises to be a protracted and 
ugly holy war. 

The Sew York Times. 


The Second Time Around, 
The Captain Took a Cab 


By Thomas Crampton 


P ARIS — A French friend of mine. 

Hugucs Dupuy, has a house in 
Normandy just behind the towering 
cliffs of Poinlc du Hoc. one of [he 
centers of this week's celebration of the 
D-Day landings a half century ago. His 
family once had a house overlooking 
what is now- Omaha Beach, but when 
they returned to it after World War II, 
□ot a plank remained. 

Hugues, who is 47, wanted to wel- 
come Americans for the D-Day com- 
memoration and told officials 'at the 

MEANWHILE 

nearby American cemetery that he 
would* open bis house to veterans. He 
finally got a call on the evening of June 
5: A veteran bad arrived with no hotel 
reservation. Hugues was ecstatic. 

In less than 45 minutes he had talked 
his way through all the security check- 

S ts (o pick up Bob Sawdon at the 
jvilte-sui-Mer cemetery. 

Bob. now 75, is a remarkably robust 
retired policeman who lost a good deal 
of his right hand, and nearly his life, in 

Qrfan Jdraap we retraced Bob’s trail 
from his Jtme 12 landing at Omaha Beach 
(soldiers were still coming as bore com- 
bat-style). An annv captain then, be had 
fought his way south to Saint-Ld and 
then toward Monain. His route had cut 
across the checkerboard of swampy 
fields, lined with hedgerows; roads hod to 
be avoided because of land mines. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 




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China, Trade and Rights 

Regarding “ America’s China Policy Is 
Back on Come” (Opinion. June 8) bv 
Henry A. Kissinger and Cyrus R. Vance: 

Alas, Messrs. Kissinger and Vance 
missed a few essential points. Until his 
May 26 derision to unlink most-fa- 
vor ed-na lion status and human rights. 
President KB Clinton had some leverage 
on tbe Chinese leadership to push them 
in the direction of improving tbeir despi- 
cable record on human rights and demo- 
cratic reforms. One can certainly not 
expect a totalitarian leadership to let go 
overnight, but Beijing must come to & 
realization that repression equals loss of 
international face. Continuous pressure 
is needed in this direction. 

Mr. Clinton lost tbe only leverage he 
had on May 26, due to the selfish push of 
big business, only concerned with selling 
products, not caring whether in doing so 
they strengthened a repressive, brutal 
political system. 

The victims of the American side are 
the small companies that will see the 
markets for their products flooded with 
cheap Chinese goods. More American 
jobs w Cl be lost due to this than are 
-gained tiue'to MFbLextmsian. 


The victims on the Chinese — and 
Tibetan — side are tbe people who have 
dared to come out to democracy and 
human rights. The Chinese government 
will fed free to suppress them at will, 
and will feel unrestrained by interna- 
tional opinion. 

GERR1T van der WEES. 

Washington. 

While Mr. C Union deserves credit 
for ultimately making the right deci- 
sion on most-favored-nalion status for 
C hina, and praise for discontinuing tbe 
import of Chinese-made rifles (which 
are often converted to assault weapons 
once in the United States), one would 
hope that he has now learned what 
many assumed he knew before becom- 
ing president: that democratic values are 
least served through political rhetoric 
and best served by a decidedly less me- 
dia-driven approach to foreign policy. 

Former President Richard Nixon said 
it best just weeks before his death when, 
reporting on his trip to Russia, be wrote: 
“The highest art of diplomacy is ... to 

profoundly important strategic relalSra- 
sfups.” No doubt, while many in the 
United States and China got the MFN 


renewal they were 
American relations have 


goal of U.S. foreign policy in 
should be democracy. That was 


for, Chi nest* - 
damaged. 
J. B. EBERLE1N. 
Vienna. 

fig ", America and China : The 
Goalls Human Welfare "(Opinion. May 
10) by Robert W. Barnett: 

The 
Chinas! 

its goal in Europe and South Africa, 
and now that it has succeeded there, it 
should not desist with China. 

JAMES G. KEEHAN. 

Gort. Ireland. 

If the business moguls who exerted so 
much pressure in the pursuit of their self- 
interest really believe that upholding MFN 
status for China w21 eventually benefit (he 
oppressed in that country, let them imag- 
ine what they would ask Mr. Qintoo to do 
if ooe of then- loved ones were imprisoned 
in a Chinese labor camp. 

HASSAN el SAWAF. 

Cairo. 

An Envoy’s Obligations 

Regarding “U.S. Emmy Rebukes Ger- 
mans and Kohl an Foreigner Issue” (April 


16) and "U.S. Disavows Diplomat's Re- 
buke of Kohl” (April! S): 

I applaud Douglas H. Jones, the senior 
U.S. diplomat in Berlin, for denying anti- 
foreigner sentiments in Germany. As an 
American who has lived in Beilin for 
almost three years with my German- born 
husband, 1 have experienced countless 
incidents, large and small of aggressive 
unfriendliness on the pan of civil ser- 
vants. shopkeepers, landlords, telephone 
operators, as wdl as people in lines at the 
grocery store and on public transporta- 
tion. Mr. Jones is coned in underlining 
tbe seriousness of this mind-set, as these 
altitudes have implications beyond ihe 
day-to-day discomforts of life in 3 bur- 
geoning European capital 

1 was most discouraged when I read 
that Mr. Jones had been rebuked by the 
U.S. Embassy in Boon, and that the U.S. 
ambassador apologized to the German 
government. 1 understand that senior 
American diplomats must maintain cor- 
dial ties with their host countries. But I 
believe they also have an obligation to 
express the sentiments of those whose 
expatriate voice has no other means of 
expression in a xenophobic society. 

PAMELA JENSEN SEIDEL. 

Berlin. 


A Brawl Upon Takeoff 

In response to "Jetliner Crash Kills 160 
in China’s Worst Air Disaster” (June 7): 

1 flew from Beijing to Chongqing tbe 
day before tbe tragic accident at Xian. As 
is normal in China it was free seating on 
tbe aircraft. Following a dispute over a 
seat, fists started flying between two pas- 
sengers. The fight continued as the plane 
taxied down the runway to take off. 1 was 
appalled to see a complete lack of in in- 
vention by either the cabin crew or the oo- 
pBot, who witnessed tbe start of the fray. 

Such apathy and lack of training is an 
indicator of poor management. Such in- 
cidents hardly inspire confidence in 
safety with airlines that continue to al- 
low passengers to roam about the cabin 
during or prior to takeoffs and landings. 

STEWART KENT. 

London. 

Involuntary Exposure 

In response to “ Danger : Anti-Smok- 
ers” ( Features. June S) by Russell Baker: 

Nobody is “crusading” against 
smokers. We nonsmokers are not trying 


to rescue smokers from themselves, but 
to rescue ourselves from the life-threat- 
ening effects of involuntary exposure 
to smoking’s noxious fumes ana from 
the immense health-care costs smokers 
load on the rest of us. 

JAMES CLARK. 

Paros. Greece. 

I read with delight Art BuchwaJd’s 
column “Vive la Cigarette" (Features, 
May 10) just before lunch at the restau- 
rant nan-fianeur Le Jules Verne. There I 
discovered, with due attribution to tbe 
National Rifle Association, that restau- 
rants don’t smoke, people do. 

LUCILLE BECKER. 

Paris. 

Now Look at Television 

Regarding the report “ Young American 
Criminals: ‘A Game. Right T "(May 17): 

It took 30 years for tobacco company 
findings that nicotine is addictive to be 
disclosed. Will it be another 30 years 
before America admits that television 
creates young criminals? 

LLOYD WHITNEY. 

Paris. 


Each time Hugues drove him around 
the countryside. Bob asked to stop so be 
could photograph the hedges. Nobody 
back in Nebraska understood what he 
meant when be described them, be said. 

It was not unusual in those fields, dur- 
ing the war, to sense that an enemy sol- 
dier was only feet away, on the other side 
of one of the im pen e t r able hedgerows. 

Bob told us how German soldiers 
would lob grenades over the hedgerows 
and bow fie would throw them back 
when the grenades landed near him — 
"just like quickly tossing a grounder to 
first base,” he said. Then a grenade blew 
up as be tried to throw it. shattering his 
right hand and breaking his leg. (He still 
walks with a slight limp.) Shrapnel cut 
into his upper body and face. 

Two soldiers strapped a rifle to his leg 
as a splint and waited with him for 
transport to arrive. While they sat. a 
German soldier approached bolding a 
to throw it. “He was a 
young blond-haired boy.” 
said Bob, “might have been 17 or so." 

With no weapon at hand. Bob told 
one of his soldiers to offer the German a 
cigarette. On seeing the pack of ciga- 
rettes, the German threw away the un- 
armed grenade and put his hands up in 
surrender. “Cigarettes may kill,” Bob 
joked, “but they sure saved my hfe.” 

Finally, by evening, a jeep arrived to 
take Bob to the field hospital and the 
German to a POW camp. As they drove 
back along the road, the jeep hit a land 
mine. The driver was killed: Bob and the 
now badly injured German prisoner 
were hurled into a ditch. 

Not until dawn, when a mmesweeping 
crew came by, were the wounded men 
found. Bob was taken to a field hospital, 
then airlifted to a hospital north of Lon- 
don. where he spent almost a year recov- 
ering from iris injuries. 

By the time be was flown out of 
France, Bob had lost 80 men and 4 
officers under his co mman d. He had 
been in Normandy just under two 
months. He was 25 years old. 

Bob's decision to return to France this 
month evidently came at tbe last minute. 
He flew into Paris on June 5, took a $400 
cab ride to Normandy and arrived with- 
out a hotel reservation. Perhaps be fig- 
ured someone in Normandy would look 
out for him, for all he had done 50 years 
before. He was righL 

At the end of his two-day visit. Bob 
gave Hugues the Purple Heart be had 
earned fighting among the hedgerows. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor” ami contain the writer’s sig- 
nature. name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject io 
editing We aumol be responsible for 
die return of msohdted manuscripts. 



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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, June JO, 1994 
Page 10 


A A 7 


^ .** 

Becoming an Instant Insider : A Guide to Rental Houses in Haty 


Wl 


By Alexander Lobrano 


L UCCA, Italy — It was the coun- 
tess’s baker who solved the mys- 
tery. For 10 days, we’d dined under 
the gaze of the beautiful young 
woman dressed in a floating pink tea dress. 
She was the subject of the full-length portrait 
at the end of the dining room in our rented 
villa in Castiglioncello. 

“She was the count's grandmother.” the 
baker told us. “She was from Buenos Aires, 
and she met the count’s grandfather when he 
was there to see about importing Argentine 
meat on his steamships to Genoa.” Intrigued 
by these facts, we felt as though we’d some- 


how fleeungly become part of the famDy. It's 
the possibility of this intimate interaction 
with a foreign setting that is perhaps the 
most appealing reason to rent a bouse in- 
stead of staying in a hotel in Italy. 

There were, of course, numerous other 
pleasures our group of six — two French, 
two American and two British — discovered 
during our two-week stay in an elegant turn- 
of-the-century villa cm the Tuscan coast 
south of Livorno. Thanks to the countess’s 
recommendations, we were instant insiders, 
knowing from the day we arrived where to 
buy the freshest fish and not only which of 
the local trattorias to try but what their 
specialties were. We never met the countess, 
who divides her time between a Roman pa- 
lazzo and a Sicilian estate, but we were 
received everywhere as though we were her 


friends, and she called several tunes to see 
how we were getting oil 
T here was also the relief of returning to 
the cool calm of our palm- and pine-shaded 
garden at the end of a foot-weary day of 
touring in Pisa or Lucca. Drinking ihe excel- 
lent local white wine that the countess had 
suggested, we'd sit outside listening to the 
fountain spatter and muse over various pos- 
sibilities for the following day. We also rel- 
ished the superb country cooking of the 
countess’s housekeeper, who prepared din- 
ner for us twice when we knew we'd be 
returning too late to fend for ourselves. Less 
gastronomically, it was a treat to stay up late 
with a novel in the garden and be able to 
make a grilled cheese — mozzarella, in this 
case — in the middle of the nighL 
We appreciated the fact that renting an 
Italian vula often turns out to proride not 
only a highly memorable but also a surpris- 
ingly economical holiday. Since we rented in 
May, we paid a low-season rate of S 1 .200 a 
week, including six hours of cleaning, or 
$200 apiece — the equivalent of two nights 
at many Italian luxury hotels. The same villa 


our group had bad a miserable experience 
the year before. They’d been on the road all 
day and arrived at their rented farmhouse at 
night to find not only that there were no bed 
linens bur that the electricity bad been 
turned off. Worse, the company they’d rent- 
ed from was closed for the weekend and had 
left no emergency number on its answering 
machine; then, the following day. the attrac- 
tive swimming pool pictured in the bro- 
chures turned out to be a shallow basin that 
had formerly been pan of a fountain. 


rents for $1,800 during the high season, 
which runs from Julv 9 to Aug. 20. If it had 


which runs from July 9 to Aug. 20. If it had 
had a swimming pool, it might have cost 
$ 1 ,000 more a week. Other accommoda lions, 
such as a simple two- bedroom apartment in 
a converted outbuilding on a Tuscan farm, 
cost an average of 5500 a week low season. 
£800 a week high season. 

We had carefully researched villas before 
choosing this one, as one of the couples in 


S HORT of reming through friends or 
the friends of friends, the best way to 
avoid such a disappointment is to 
work with a well-reputed rental 
agency. The Solemar agency, through which 
we found the villa in Castiglioncello. had 
been highly recommended. Founded in 
1 976, it offers more than 700 carefully select- 
ed rentals in Tuscany. Chianti and Umbria. 
They range from apartments at rustic farms 
to villas of astonishing splendor, like the 
17th-cenluiy Villa Aureli. a baroque master- 
piece just outside of Perugia, and all proper- 
ties are well-presented in the company’s ex- 
plicitly written and well-photographed 
catalogue. 

Once we’d decided that we wanted to be 
on the coast, and hence didn't care about a 
swimming pool, and that Lucca and Pisa 
were the cities we wanted to be near, we 
made a list of things we agreed were indis- 
pensable. Our first requirement was that we 
be the exclusive occupants of the bouse: 


another person in our group had once rented 
an apartment in Chianti and had been made 
miserable by neighbors who played the same 
John Denver tape all day and into the night 
for a week. We also wanted someone to clean 
a few times while we were there but did not 
want a live-in domestic, and we specified a 
washing machine, dishwasher, six chaise lon- 
gues for the garden, a short walk to the beach 
and a fireplace. 

Several Solemar villas met these require- 
ments. but after receiving photos from the 
English-speaking staff, we settled on what 
turned out to be the beloved holiday retreat 
of a noble Italian family through several 
generations. A $600 deposit was required, 
and we were also charged $15 each for clean- 
ing after our departure. The young woman 
who took our reservation told us that she’d 
seen the property, that it was a delightful 
place and that she would send us a dossier on 
ihe house and vicinity, including directions 
by car from the airport in Pisa. 

She also suggested a guide service in Luc- 
ca. explaining that it was an outfit that only 
handled small groups. Though none of us 
generally liked even casually organized 
tours, we took her advice, which led to a 
fascinating day in the city and environs with 
Ua, a polyglot language teacher, and Anton- 
ella. an architecture graduate student. What 
distinguished this Turislucca tour was their 
approach: They included geography, boi- 






FUn-t 


EMSaiTOr ‘ -V 


any. biology and sociology in their talks, 
which were conversational in tone. 


J’al pss SommeU 

Directed by Claire Denis. 
France. 

Paris by night, Montmartre, A 
neighborhood that never sleeps, 
where aa lives and tourists, 
strays and deviants cross paths. 
A serial killer has been stalking 
old women for their jewelry and 
market money. Ninon (Line 
Renaud J. no longer young her- 
self, runs a hotel and gives kara- 
te lessons to senior citizens. The 
kind of woman who takes 
charge, she befriends beautiful, 
enigmatic Daiga (Katerina Go- 
lubeva), who has driven all the 
way from Russia on the prom- 
ise of an acting career and ends 
up as a maid in the hotel. 
Rooms are rented out to the 
likes of Camille (Richard Cour- 
cei), a black cross-dresser who 
comes with his lovers; “such 
nice boys,” says Renaud, affec- 
tionately. Camille's musician 
brother (Alex Decas) has a 
stormy relationship with the 
mother of his child (Beatrice 
Dalle) and dreams of returning 
to the Antilles. There is no clear 
line between hero and victim, 
and nobody is in exactly the 
right place in this edgy, superb- 
ly “incomct” movie. The mood 
is far from musical comedy, but 
music, from Charlie Parker to 
Jean-Louis Murat, casts a spell, 
and Renaud does a surprising 
dance number. Claire Denis, 
who was Wim Wenders’s assis- 


tant, knows bow to film a city. 
“ChocoLat,” her first feature, 
was a backward look at her 
colonial childhood; this fiction, 
based on an actual case, is a lot 
stranger than truth, an investi- 
gation of nonintegrated lives in- 
tersecting in an urban night- 
mare. (Joan Dupont, IHT) 


have to stop and ask directions 
because that's not the cowboy 
way. (Rita Kempley, WP) 


The Cowboy Way 

Directed by Gregg Champion. 

as 

A really crummy rip-off of 
“Crocodile* Dundee,” this 
horse op ry is supposed to be a 
buddy comedy, but as far as 
Woody Harrelson is concerned, 
his co-star, Kiefer Sutherland, 
is just scenery for his strut fesL 
Uninventively directed by 
Gregg Champion from Bill 
(“Lonesome Dove”) Wittliffs 
screenplay, the movie follows 
Pepper (Harrdson) and his dis- 
gruntled rodeo partner. Sonny 
(Sutherland), from their New 
Mexico stamping ground to 
Manhattan. After the pair bust 
a couple of broncos, they head 
east to find Nacfao (Joaquin 
Martinez), a friend who disap- 
peared while searching (or h is 
daughter (Cara Buono). The 
film finally attempts to live up 
to its premise as the partners 
commandeer horses from a 
mounted cop and charge after 
the bad guy. who’s aboard a 
crossiown subway. They may 
be bumpkins, but they' never 


The Endless Summer 59 

Directed bv Bruce Brown. 
U.S. 

Surfing has come a long way 
since those lazy. hazy, crazy days 
of the early 1960s when the sport 
was a cult phenomenon in 
Southern California and Hawaii. 
As Bruce Brown's “The Endless 
Summer IF makes abundantly 
dear, it has grown into a world- 
wide network of enthusiasts with 
its own professional tour circuit 
and star galaxy. But while “The 
Endless Summer IF notes many 
of the changes in the sport, from 

the shortening of surfboards to 
the overcrowding of popular 
beaches, its main goal is to re- 
capture the innocent mystique of 
Brown's 1964 film. “The Endless 
Summer ” It was 30 years ago 
(h a< this modest, 16-millimeier 
feature film became an interna- 
tional hit and did much to popu- 
larize the sport around the 
world. In that movie, which had 
the perky ingenuousness of an 
early Beach Boys anthem. 
Brown uekked around the globe 
with two young surfers on a 
quest for ihe so-called perfect 
wave In “The Endless Summer 
II.” Brown retraces many of 
those steps with two fresh-faced 
surfing fanatics, Robert (Wing- 
nut) Weaver and Patrick O’Con- 


nell. who look and act like 
throwbacks to three decades 
ago. As be did in the original 
mm. Brown narrates their ad- 
ventures in the gee-whiz style of 
southern California teenagers in 
the early 1960s. Technically. 
“The Endless Summer II." 
which was shot in 35- rnfllim eter 
film, is a lot more sophisticated 
than its forerunner. Had it stuck 
to its subject, it would be a pleas- 
ant diversion. But it is weighed 
down with frivolous travel vi- 
gnettes that are as dull as they 
arc cute and contrived. 

(Stephen Holden, NYU 


Cuendet is another reputable agency, 
based in Q Cerreto in central Tuscany arid 
with 10 overseas offices, that offers a broad 
assortment of holiday rentals all over Italy. 
Its catalogue, which costs $12, is detailed 
and includes a basic inventory of the house- 
hold furnishings you’ll find at your rental. 


right down to “two boxes of matches.” In 
addition to offerings in Tuscany and Um- 
bria. Cuendet has pr oper ti es in the Venero 


and in southern Italy, including Puglia, Ca- 
labria. Sicily and Sardinia- 
Among the most luxurious of the rental 
agencies is the Florence-based The Best in 
Italy. It’s run by the personable Contessa 
Simonetta Brandolim d’Adda, and she 
knows her properties personally since many 
are owned by friends or family. Among her 
offerings are a villa created from a 14th- 
centuiy Florentine guard tower in Chianti 
and a sweeping estate in Pratohno just out- 
side of Florence that abuts the famed Demi- 
doff gardens. Almost all of The Best in Italy 
properties include domestic staff and are 


single-occupancy properties thaf attract*? 
weti-heded international dUntd e c ts hra ea*' ,7 
surate with their prices. 

Solemar, Via Cavoor SO, 50129 Florence;*-' ;, 
tel: (55) 218-112/3/4; fax: (55) 287-157. ^ ; > 
Cuendet, E Cerreto Strove, 53035 Manser-^ : 
iggiani; tel: (577) 301-012; fax; (577) 301- 

149. ■■ - • 

The Best in Italy, Via Ugo Foscolo 72,- ; 
50124 Florence; td: (55) 223-064; &MS5)~' 
229-8912. 


Alexander Lobrano is a Paris-based jour-, 
natisr who mites on travel and style topics 7- 


The Savor of Shopping in 


By Suzy Menkes 

Internet tonel Herald Tribute 


Fear of a Black Hat 

Directed bv Rusty CunJieff. 
U.S. 

Flattering the daylights out of 
Rob Reiner and’ his “Spinal 
Tap” crew. Rusty Cundieff turns 
“Fear of a Black Hat” into an 
unapdogctic “Spinal Tap" imi- 
tation. And there’s no point in 
faulting Cundietf for such deriv- 
ativeness. because “Fear of a 
Black Hat" is too savvy and 
cheerful to warrant complaints. 
Anyway, the more the merrier: 
What “Spinal Tap” did for 
heavy metal certainly deserves to 
be done for rap. which is the 
target this time. This film's musi- 
cal parodies have titles and lyrics 
that are mostly unprintable, of- 


ten borrowing From specific rap 
hits. (Janet Maslin. MTl 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 




•FLIGHTS 


HOTELS 


, O r 

rrequent /Iyer 

J TRAVEL Jc. I U B 


fa is priwif mxh bad, in the reson anter. (ke Canfen Bad Haul 



ANTIGUA 

BARBADOS 

SAN FRANCISCO 

DUBAI 

NAIROBI 

HARARE 

SYDNEY 

NEW YORK 

LOS ANGELES 

RIO DE JANEIRO 

TOKYO 


I JiAf7b„__L -174 rooms and suites with all modern cwrvcnicflccs lair roodinoainfit 
LEPiMsDcaCD -Us private bead) wtti water activities 

HrjtPl «ht*I [wl a gB holiday tadudin* sports and varied activities 

4XU LCI Rales sr ranging from (for example) 

**** MM season I High season 

FF 3 010* (approx. £390) * FF 3 500* [approx. £ 455) 
_ . ‘Rales aie per jvtsoti in double room 

1 7 mghix accomodation. 7 breauasu. free access to our pm ale beach I 
Please ask for our detailed brochure : 

GARDEN BEACH HOTEL 15-17 Bd Bandoin- 06160 JUAN LES PINS iPrancet 
Td : 33 93 67 2525 Fax : 33 93 61 16 65 


■ Next month Hormel is cele- 
brating the five billionth can of 
Spam with a “family event” (in- 
cluding the always popular 
“gelatin jump"). Hcimel wants 
to remind you it hasn’t been 
standing still: There is not only 
normal Spam but also Less Salt, 
Lite and smoke-flavor Spam. 
No word on caffeine-free. 


S AINT-REMY-DE-PROVENCE. 
France — Is it possible to imagine a 
tourist area that throws up no tacky 
souvenirs? That the things you brine 
back from vacation might have a long and 
useful life after they emerge from your bags? 

Provence is that happy hunting ground. 
Although it is possible to’ find in the" hinter- 
land of southern France those cheap and 
cheerless objects that gather dust or clutter 
drawers, it is hard to major on bad taste in an 
area where the postcards are by local-hero 
van Gogh. 

Taste is the secret of shopping in Provence. 
And smell. And touch. For these are the 
authentic savors of the small towns, with 
their rsd-iiJed houses, shutters lidded against 
the soporific heat and the tree-lined market 
squares, where all the action is. 

An open-air market is the place to start a 
shopping spree, for food that will travel home 
if you pick packs of spices, vinegar with 
fronds of tarragon or the local olive oii- i Get 
bottles wrapped in plastic bubble packing!. 
You can find soaps fragrant with eglantine 
for a dollar apiece": or vials of ritroaella (the 
lemon-scented perfume that is supposed to 
ward off mosquitoes): or the lard-like blocks 
of Savon de Marseille that locals still use for 
hand-washing. A gift-wrap with a twist of 
ribbon is part of the service. 

Lavender bags hang in packs in gaudy 


sive versions of the Provencal patterns that 
o riginall y rame over the trade routes from 
India. The shops also sell touristy Spanish 
fringed shawls and some tough leather belts 
and bap from the Camargae region. 

But Soulriado (with stores in the major local 
towns) is the home of upscale chic. Here prints 
come dean and dean in sky blue as a bathrobe 
with 2 white lory lining selling for 1 200 francs 
(about 5210); as merry prints on denim (its 


Ceramics are a typical Provencal buy. al- 
though difficult to transport And eves if you 
are seduced by the sea-green or saffron-yel- 
low glazes, it is wise to remember that tradi- 
tional earthenware will not be dishwasher- 
proof and the Goliath-sized breakfast caps 
may chip round the rim. Unde, doody gram- 


glass goblets are snapped up by the second- , j 
heme owners in this ewebrity-stndded region. ' j 


The small towns with 
red-tiled houses and tree- 
lined market squares are 
where all the action is. 


Provencal prims. But you can also find hand- 
stitched. sachets in better fabrics. The same is 


stitched sachets in better fabrics. The same is 
true of clothes, for Provence takes its rural 
arts and crafts to a sophisticated (and rela- 
tively expensive) level. 

Round the arenas at .Arles or in Saint- 
Remy s narrow streets you find the inexpen- 


name originating as a local doth known as 
serge de Nimes); and as cute kids dothes. 

In general the apron dress (wear it over a 
plain T-shirt) or and the tailored shirt (best in 
dark colors and good for men with a plain 
jacket! are the hot fashion items. A small 
straw basket (not the classic shopper) can 
also be a fashion item in this ecologically 
correct age. But you need to search among 
Chinese and Vietnamese imports for the 
round shapes in rough weaves marked “fait 
main /artisanal frames” to denote French 
regional products that won’t be hanging in 
Macy’s back home. 

For modem shoppers, home is where the 
an is. .Although there are stores selling wan- 
nabee-peasant wood carvings and fancy can- 
dles (look for those hand-made ones with 
pressed flowers), the local hardware store 
(the hard-to-say quincaillerie) may offer the 
most authentic,’ useful and cheap housewares. 


bcane owners in this craebriry-studdedregicn. 

Those ubiquitous Provencal prints come as 
furnishing fabrics by the meter to be made 
into drapes, bedspreads or cushions. Ready- 
made linens are pretty, buz ibis is a country 
where laundry often goes to the “Pressing” — 
not the tumble dryer. If you axe prepared to. 
pay for the pleasure of starchcdp3kwcases 
and tablecloths, you m igh t be wiser to buy 
old — perhaps one of the Provencal while- 
work stitched quilts — from the antique 
stores or markets (look for the sign “Bro- 
cantc"). ‘ > 

Flea markets are held in different local 
towns every weekend and at L'lsle-snr-la- 
Sorgne there are streets devoted to antique 
and junk shops. For 150 francs you can find 
small pots and framed pictures, pieces of 
paste jewelry, embroidered tray cloths and 
French colonial bamboo bits and pieces. For 
10 times that figure, there are gflded mirrors 
or Erapire-ish vases (French, but not local) 
and antique olive oil vats (but how will you 
get them home?). If you want to invest in ’ 
good antique furniture, the shops wifl ship for 
you just as they would in Paris. 

Even if you do not want to buy more than a 
“Sunflowers” postcard, browsingin Provence 
is a pleasure, and you wiD seldom be impor- 
tuned as you might be m tourist shops on the v 
Cdte d’Azur. If you buy local goods, you not M 
only have the pleasure of an authentic coun- 
try purchase, but also the knowledge that the 
price is the same for the tourist as for the 
Provenijal peasant waiting in line. 


s-sffi-r.; 

• ..-j-a.r_ - 


Vt abo ben discounted fares EX Europe jo 
telephone or bautyaar dtiaSi 

S3WimSTT«TL()«OHraTO.FWE1tS5t214 
FuB|f bonded •ATOL33M-ABTA D5284-IATA 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


sons 


| 071 493 0021 | 


EYGAU9ES KOVBKE. rwtorad mca 
on 12 ha Pool, 4 bsdroaret, 4 beats, 
targa Bving + 1 ndapmfart Bov 
Parana! item idudod W F80,00a 

Sept raama w ot w w so. 


WALKING SHADOW In the meantime. Spenser wiD 

d. d j._ n n _> have bberally indulged his affec- 

By Robert B. Parker. 270 pages, don for Pearl the Wonder Dog, 


HOLLAND 


WHAT- THEY’RE READING 


DpUOGNL FOR RENT: SEPTEMBER 


0 very nk» vSam in Dardotpe, 
' JO*. hoiaa. Ft.OCQ per martH. 


HOUSING EXCHANGE 


A'tvhoiaa FCOOO per 

7«t too 03-11 45 JB 05 7a 



$19.95. G. P. Putnam’s Sons. 

WHITE SHARK 


who scales new heights of lovable 
undiscipline in these pages, and his 
taste for offbeat literary allusions 


EXCHANGE CHAT HOUSE in eh e 
jtfjwb |5 bednxxnj ■ Carden) 


CHATEAU M GASCOGNE, to* to 
OdL 4 bedrooms + 2 and 2 baths. 

Tab 1-47 22 63 12. fa 1-4$ 40 OB 89 


TUSCANY HUS, owner rams beautiful • - , 

Reviewed by Christopher ' 


Bv Peter Benchlev IP? (“Probably at least 13 ways of look- 

ay reier aencmey. J.4 Lug at a blue jay.” he muses after 

pages. Random H ouse. wondering how a bird he is watch- 


far house in Ung Word, nen beathc 
hum 8 10 27 Aligns. Tel Peris 03-1' 
47 32 35 <1 fax ISM 1 40 53 01 ft 


FRENCH RIVIEra 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


K Spenser and Susan together will 
Le hmann Haupt have bought an old farmhouse in 


HOLIDAY RENTALS 


HOUSEFOB BENT 30 Uame wn north 
ST TOP& Ifth century Kstoricd 
ITT .3 j»*oorm. 3 hi baffa. 


SUMMB BENTAl, VBSAfUES 


J DcOrOOxn, 4 (XW, UU UHJIT1 and 


A S almost always with one of Concord and begun its long-term 
Robert B. Parker’s Spenser renovation as yet another excuse 
mysteries, you fall into “Walking for being together without cohabit- 
SHadow” as if into a favorite ham- i 


• John Wazreo, chief financial 
officer of United Biscuits, is read- 
ing “The Blue Afternoon'’ by Wil- 
liam Boyd. 

“I have read all of his earlier 
books, and this one 1 find main - 
tains his usual high standards.” 

(Erik Ipsen, IHT) 


65 tool pool. FwSured m many mao- 
aona. Pm time maid. 528 jXO /wi 


Qxufirl. Ai(aad to chctoou 25 nwi. 
to Pad Carter. W75/w Avofabfc 


CARIBBEAN 


azra. rM nme nod. 528 JOCO Auoust, 


monthly. No arrmauoo fee. Teh MY 
(212] 362-8274 Prance 39 50 3> 01, 

ON LUXEMBOURG GAKDBL ocep- 
hond new, artels eftier, 4 rooms, 
120 jam. To rtn iuh & Auacr. 
FI 8,000/ month. ^ {33-11 4633 73317 

WGHJEH TO MM5 PAJQS, resided 
s*e. himdied rental Write owner: 
P*er. 47 ove Cantor, 95380 Entfren. 
CACHAN, 10 me PARTS, RBj B. 
fcnt Hoi. deeps 1 Jufr & August. 
HJ00 pet month. Tei 1-46 63 68 44. 

16*. lOYRY 6 BOOMS, freestone 
bu-Wng, : bpth pouo . 3 reosptxn. 
PTBJOO/mo. Tel 1-45 04 22 19 e*w. 



srjAjmfifltr. awl... ova 200 



ST. TKOm Sedhded resefeoriof area. 
4 bedrooms. 4<4 bathroom, swimmmg 


GREECE 


SAfff MABT1N ISLAND - UV£ LKf A 
KING m a luxwious 7 bed VILA Midi 


mock. Just as you are getting com- 


% 


er will have instructed us on 


forlable, Spenser, while attending a matters great and small, from the 
waterfront repertory theater near advantages of searching a premises 


Boston with his friend Susan S3- neatly over tearing i( randomly 
verm an, witnesses ihe fatal sboot- apart, to extensive details of Chi- 


face and dragged it to Long island 
Sound, where it accidentally broke 


Only evil people like the Naas.. 
would do such a thing . The good . 
people in “White Shark” know tfasT : 
great white shades are rare and re-- . 
ma rk a b le creatures that rarely at- V 
tack people unless provoked. ;1' : 

In fact the hero of “White -” 
Shark," amon Chase, is an oceano-. . 
graphic researcher whose mission it 
ts to save white sharks, by 1996 - 
endangered species. Great white ; 
sharks dangerous to humans?^.. 
Benchley’s new novel would have -- 
you wonder where people get such 
outla ndish ideas. Certainly not ' 
from anything Peter Beochky has.' 
ever written. 


w ton 


■ l_ r ■’ 




You have to think that they fig- 
ured out in those last desperate 


ing of an actor onstage. 


nese- American culture, which he 


loose and began to prey on die hours of the Reich that 


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The actor was s inging the words, acknowledges having learned from 
“Lucky in love, lucky in love, what Gwen Kinkead’s admirable “Gri- 
dse matters if you're lucky in natown: A Portrait of a Dosed 
love?” Society." 

Is this killing connected to why Ana the reader upon finishing 
Spenser happens lo be at the the- “Walking Shadow” will have found 
ater. which is to find out who, if that the time has flown, 
anyone, is stalking Demetrius Wilh the publication of Peter 
Christ ophdous. the company’s ar- Benchley’s latest thriller of the 
tistic director? After Spenser inter- deep, “White Shark,” it becomes 
views Rikki Wu, a wealthy trustee apparent once more that the author 
of the theater, her husband, Lon- has something less than two strings 
nie, appears in Spenser's office to his bow. which is just tine as 
with two teenage Asian boys and Jong he does his thing as neatly as 
tells him he better get out of town if he did it in “Jaws” and “Beast," 


natives. 

Now why the Nazis called this 


couldn’t win die war they could at 


In any case, Bendiley fails to. 
work up much narrative drive with 
his unwieldy but predictable story. - y 
This is Peter Bendiley sea-mon- . - 


f- 


doomsday machine the While era who a hatf-centay hern* might 
Shark is a mystery, since it looks be made nervous by any reference; 
more like Arnold Schwarzenegger to a white shark in a Peter Benchlev 
than any fish. deep-sea thriller. 3 


least throw a scare into those read- ster story No. 1,237. The one that’s ; 
era who a half-centoy hence might 001 CVB0 slightest bit scary. : 


^ .... -'c T . 


SteiV;? " 


ter Lehmam-Baupt is { ■ 
of The New York Times : t 


Sbc 

Ef: r»- 


m hi 


f - v 

A:'- - 


By Alan Truscott 


T HE 20th annual Cavendish 
Pairs at Loews New York Ho- 


IHE NEXT “SUMMER IIV FRANCE” 

will appear on June 1 7. 


he wants to stay alive. among bis half-dozen previous 

“I looked at the kids for a mo- novels. w t Raton, Florida, and Kit Woolsey of 

menu” Spenser narrates. “They Butin “White Shark,” he doesn't Kensington, California, who are 
were not something new. They were trouble to work up a sweaL let both involved in options trading, 
something very old, without family, alone a story plausible enough to They both previously won the Cav- 
or culture; prehistoric, deracinated^ scare even the most credulous of radish event, with different pan- 
vicious. with no more sense of an- readers. Seems that while the Nazis ners. 

other's pain than a snake would might have failed to split the atom. The biggest swing of the event 
have when it swallowed araL . . . they did come up with another su- hinged on the opening lead of the 
They weren’t even bad. Good and perweapon shortly before the end. diagramed deal: Gaylor Kasle 
bad were meaningless to them. Ev- Named it Der Weisse Hoi, or the played “poker" with the world's 
erything had been taken from White Shark, Shipped it on a U- top-ranked player, and won. He 
them. They had only rage.” boat 10 South America in the spring bdd the North cards, and Bob 

When Spenser eventually deals of 1945. But the U-boat was sunk Hamman, who owns a Large colllec- 


long he does his thing as neatly as 1 Pairs at Loews New York Ho- 
be did it in “Jaws” and “Beast," td in Manhattan ended in May in a 
among his half-dozen previous victory for Neil Silverman of Boca 


; > "P»t3in u a aoSdKdto, » » «<b pW* uuttd «f 




Contact ; 

Fred RONAN 


on +33-1 46 37 93 91 


top-ranked player, and won. He 
bead the North cards, and Bob 
Hamman, who owns a large colllec- 


Ha mman was convinced that a 
void diamond was about to appear 
m the dummy. He therefore led a 
heart, and Hayden as South 
claimed Us grand slam 

Should Ha mma n have known 
which red suit to lead? Perhaps. It 
was not likely that East held the 
hean acc. since that would mean a 
grand slam bid off two aces, and if 
Nonh was void in diamonds the 
grand slam was probably unbeat- 




WEST 
4 10 
<7732 

^AK 10 9765 
*53 


NORTH 

♦ K 9 7 5 3 
ri — 

* 2 

+ AKJJ0 7B4 

EAST 
• 86 

7Q1096&4 
r 65 6 QJ 63 

*9 




J? 8 t 


with Lonnie WtTs boys and gels to wilh all hands lost and the While tion of world titles, sat WesL 


the bottom of various mysteries Shark lay in a coffin on the ocean 
with the help of his longtime black floor until 1996, when a camera 
sidekick. Hawk, nothing will turn team commissioned by National 
out to be as it seemed. Geographic brought it to the sur- 


The four-diamond bid by North 
was a splinter, showing a singleton 
or void in West’s suiL East showed 
hearts, and South bid Blackwood. 


Kasle and Hayden gained 239 
nnps, but would have lost 527 if the 
grand slam had failed. So after (he 
routine lead of the diamond ace 
they would have dropped three oo- 
smons m the final standings, and 
Hamman and his partner. Walt 


SOUTH (D) 
♦AQJ42 
vAKJB 
98 

*Q*2 


% y - 6 


wSi - 5 '* 5 Ili 

fr* 3 w f ?j* ftT 
IS. ^ 




Weal led ihe heart two. 










Woodstock 2: A Generation Gap 

Why. the DTDmotm mtnn a ir\p 


International Herald Tribune 
Friday , June 10, 1994 
Page 11 


Jggggg gSf* 

NSsfSSH 

aara SJs sara 

ej-yJaaasassR 

between dermhh,-^ lcUin S Terence 

Re late wiSTffSSl"? 1 

inspirit for anoKlS®^' to reddle 


h J2 y ' **“ prc ®“ IefS reason, can't AIDS, 
homelessness and the environment galvanize 

W0 y Uieirs was stined by 
ibe Vtetnan 1 War. the civil rights movement 

taw 55 **■« 


r" “uuiuntyf ajw what 
Dctter place for this to happen than at a 

Pjjcal extravaganza set against the niral 
backdrop of upsute New York? 

generation has to focus on these 
conaras. sard Lang, who is 49 but retains a 
youthful thatch of curly brown hair. ‘To use 
uns opportunity as a vehicle to 


this _ 

the spirit of 
we’re aH 


ta aSk?j?& r » ! ss" 

FisSSSapass 

communal^i bathdJ? £3??^ Iore - » a 

SE£H3§IS 

^EeEpS*** 

the two-day rock-muJi^f arou ? d ’ tickets to 
5135. whii »*» sdi for 

“jjac continuously* . bUre 

!®own as WocxSk J^ff? tock 
interactive video theme rlrt *? feature an 
goers will sam^e J here C£ ^ ncen_ 

tual reality. Aifor^if.^-5 dv “ ces “ vir- 








J. 


as a vehicle to re-enei^ 
r oodstock is, 1 think wi 
• . -■e-otodo." 

.fcifT • 5 Lang ‘ s eotnmenis. however, is 
that he is -5 years older this time around 

Planning a concert not for his peers but for 


For starters, consider $135 
tickets, pay-per-view TV and 
stadium food, not to 
mention a different cast 


SJjfJj and Cypress Hill, a rap group. Jetti- 
such Wo °dtt«k fix- 
K”f “ Na Na* Country Joe and the 
Fish, and Sly and the Family Stone: 

surr o || nding the rust 
oodstock is the fact that it was intended to 
oca money-making venture, a S3 million 

*5 was i° v* 1 ach c°a«rtgpcr 
* 8 _ r ^ rec days. But the organizers were 
so unprepared for the crowd tiatshowed up 
estimates ranged from 400.000 to 600.000 
— that almost all were admitted free. 

debt - lic f «“«l did noi turn a 
E“ » u ??ani2crs until about IS years 
hiSif” 8 *** T ? maie ^ (hat does not 
known , l ^ c Original promoters, 

taSSSfeiS M Wood5tock Ventures, 
SS™? cntertainmem company 

L“ ettin T l 

«m .SsS!" 

fa bypekennaster), pay-per-view 


U J ei J.n q nn mm. mu 


gcopic young enough to be his children. 
What remains to he wn n«~ ^.i ■ 


l| 0 

— 




“It Sounds HTJiST” 1 ■ * seen - 
Vegas in upstate New^oric 1 ”} 11111 k 0D 
can affardit." said tvJmt?- those who 

-neSSr' rSSJniS^ author «* 

“It’s <* Rag*" 

as a result or look hark ™^J? l r Pregnant 


-IZZ^Z — r-e- ms enuaren. 

^ rauuns to be seen, since tickets have 
3« to go on sale, is whether they will hand 
war J135 each to spend the weekend with 

^ To be sure, there will be similarities be- 
tween the two festivals. Crosby. Stills and 
Nash have agreed to be among the 30 or so 
acts that will nlav at rhi« WaJh«i. — 


- . — “ K*-' Uinnc lor me 

T «^cuuj and, in another sign or the times 

taed WoodsMct T-simTuk taSi 
a concert movie and album are planned. 





WmJ p - WI U I IIIH IH WOO 

hdped soothe people at Woodstock who 
>n LSD — will be back too, 


i-fsSs*-' 

' :-r ^ ij 

' - r? 


: v_ 

: ' r -^iriisja- 
: -■-*•■■ :; z:;sz; 

Tile L* TiZSI 
JSr 


'-"C“Fts r~?-. 


.... - ^.rj^-.-jercr. ^ 


tata tta toflniu - 

asirAi s 

Wfi^SSS 

^ ^ have to be where thefield 

iSSS^-ssss 

The rngoiizers contend that the Snrent 
S^r tema f^? ld twsntysomethings are 
^>erienaflat3 do 
w <»dstock did for many of 

£S!L. P S? t i And ** oiganizere should 


- wuuii# 

“freaked out” on 

this tune nuking offbeat announcemMts 
owor the public address system. 

The promoters were unable to reach 
a^moit with Bethel officials to return to 
Ya$guris Farm. But they feel they have 
founda comparable substitute in Saugerties: 

dahy farm dotted 
^j^aghark hickory trees just off the Gov- 
ernor Thomas E Dewey Thmwav atwir inn 



■ ' w '» «iv ivtru ui r 

name but little else.) 

. ^ hs Predecessor, the new field is in the 

o^calgoen mU be encouraged to sleep un- 
tS.rfffL a dec ! d “ fl y different sound. Al- 


non 

«S3t i E^rh ie r Pre ? Si0n ° f a 

asMulL Even the farm s mosquito popula- 
being measured to detomme i/Dre- 
entptive pestiade sprays are needed. ^ 

T HOSE who abandoned their cars 
P^oad and walked miles to the 
last Woodstock, take note: Your 

stock •w'SfST J 1 ® ^ «® Wood- 
stock 94 in rdative luxury, on 800 shuttle 

fj®“ *7 parking lots through- 
Ei-™" VaUe y- °“« they getlo 
fZffiE** ff^goers will be shepherded 
IV a detail of 900 to 1300 security piards 

food service at the last 
Woodstock was so overwhelmed bv Ae 

S£F*msK 

be sold through a stadium vendor. Fme 

Host, at six festival marketplaces. 

^Will such elaborate planning be reward- 


Taiwan/Hang Kong 


^S^5ffl5S5a«g- , gg 

I#2SSS3 


""^-CONUNEWTAL Worldwide 


executives who masted on anonymity ^ 
Ins™, the executives said, the concert 

b^<b tfSfS** 1 ^ ***** » town of 

bands^ that came of age after Woodstock, 

jSSfESj C£f“ B,th t ** Pow^bourerf 

> 7 /US FOOT thfll THMITU ivmhI.. l . 


aid he and tosfncnds have already made up 
thar muds. They don’t nl»n m i 


JAPAN AIR LINES 

Europe to Asia 

MALAYSIA AIRLINES 

Malaysia 

QANTAS 

Britain to Asia 

(SANTAS 

Bangkok/Srngapore 


«w_Buu jju incnas nave alrc 
Jorminds. They don’t plan to attend, larws 
ly because of the $135 ticket price. 


festival in some 
»rt of ambitious pdhtical terms is either 

f £ rSLff* 1 ma, ^ etin & , ’ s»id Eisenberg. a 

JSnflS^-Si V TO f Fair “aga^ne in 

Manhattan. I don t fed like Tm going to 
musotit on some seminal moment for my 
8,51 10 8° down to 
Bowcry 10 hear some music 
than to trek up to upstate New York." 


UNITED AIRLINES/ 
HILTON INTERNATIONAL 


London to Brussels 


shuMe 10 ^°Pping and ^ ^ 

°? ra <fe0 ? Un,s “P <“ 60 

SgSHS 

10 «« )■«— *— i °n 

thecoumnrwi|hMAS(exd U dingansepOTeaidB^i^!^ to0rft Dm 

hfciSSs SJS 


Worldwide 


bus *» s ^ tota for one month far 

SSS«3 






Mileage Plus members earn double mites ri nnm «*+, ^ . , 

room trinie mites /i <wt\ _ . » ,txx}) with a standard 

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•wnwisBttnByta ummmeimun. orunabb tobookman 




zs:r.n^:~ 

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:: 6 =' 


-its*' 
■ir: c: 


j Z 


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A . . ■ 


; —sr. ^i 

I -* ■*■ 1 




" Europa , Europa' 


BRITAIN 


—°"Z^T mleft ' " DieA “ eSyna * ose 

faseteabon wfth the hi^nan form and am arvr , s p } JU 


l 


■'*?:=**'&* 


=»■ 

■.■•fSWj 


Edtafaurgh 

National Gallery of Scotland, td: 
(31 ) 556-6921 , open daily. To July 
10: ’Raphael: The Pursuit of Perfoc- 

tton." The genesis of tfw “ &tcfejewo- 

terMffltonna," the “Holy Family with 
a Palm Tree" and the "Madonna del 

" ored through pro- 

and technical In- 


technology wNch were inspired by 
Death of Marat 1 ' by Jean Lous 


. _ 




lr t .’ 


'-i-a Kt 


’ v -£g*£p 

11 "' 



London 

National Gallery, tel: (71) 839- 
K26, open dafly. To Sept 4: Caspar 
David Friedrich to Ferdinand Hodter: 
A RomanticTradttkin." 100 paintings 
and 40 drawings from a private col- 
lection of Gennan, Swiss and Austri- 
an art They include many views of 
alpine glaciers and waterfalls by Ca- 
spar Won. Friedrich, Alexandra Ca-. 
«me and Hocfier. The exWbWon wW 
travel to Geneva 

Royal Academy, tel: (71) 494- 
5615, open dafly. To Aug. 14: "226th 
Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 

1994."AnexhfDitlondrawlngtageth- 
r .er a wide range of new work by (Mng 
artists. Painters, sculptors, printmak- 
era aid architects, some of whom 
have never exhibited before, show 
their, work alongside that of re- 
nowned artists. 




Uusde d’Art Contemporaln, tel: 


j unit wviiKniiKv> HII| i 

(514) 647-6226, closed Mondays, 
to Sept 25: "Henry Saxe: Worts 
from 1960 to 1993." More than 100 


"The 

David. 

Centre National da la Photogra- 
ph la. tab 53-76-1 2-32, closed Tues- 
days. To July 31: "FSHce Beato at 
I'Ecoto de Y okoha ma. 1883-1877." 

The RaHaobom photographer spent 

15 years In Japan In the second half 
of the 1 9th century. At atkne When afl 
things Japanese became fashionable 
In the West, his photographs of gei- 
shas. samurai, wrestlers and Bud- 
dhist monks were wldeiy published In 
Europe. 

Musee du Louvre, tel: 40-20-51-51. 
closed Tuesdays. To Sept 5: "La 
Retorme des Trols Carrad: Le Dessin 
a Botogne, 1560-1520." More than 
100 drawings by Lodovico Carrad 
his two cousins and thek pupils, do- 
cumenting how the Bologna artists 
developed a new style based on the 

study of nature. 

MusAe d*Orsay, tel: 40-49-48-14, 
dosed Tuesdays. To Sept 11: "Na- 
dar." 50 portraits by the French pio- 
neer in photography, during the 
years 1854 to i860. Includes photo- 
graphs of Gautier. Baudelaire. Dela- 
croix, Rossini and Napoleon III. 

Mus6e Picasso, tat 42-71-70-64, 
dosed Tuesdays. To July 17: "PL 
casso Photographe: Les Annees Cu- 
bbies 1 901-1 91 6." Photographs tok- 
en and often developed by toe artist 
Include setf-portralta, portraits of 
Apoffinalre, Braque, Marie Laurencin, 
and views of Rcwso’s studio, show- 
ing paintings at efitterent stages in 
their execution. 



theuanaoen sctxpfor. 

Musde dee Beeux-Arts, tel: (514) 

265-1600, dosed Mondays. To SejA 

“Rcy. Uechtenstejn." In honor of (3 o) 830-13^1. To July 7: "Die 
Ltehten&ein's 70to birthday, a retro- ^chiomStedtanderSeldenstrasse: 

speeflve of nearly 100 canvass, 20 - 

soiptures, as weH as preparatory 
drawings by the American Pop fr ts . 


OERMAMY 


tS'l’f 


III-' 

* V.J 


WUMCE 
Parte 


rrerw 

American Center, tel: 4MJ7W7, 
open daily. To Dec. 1: W Vtata* 


Baffin 

Museum "fOr bidische Kunst, tel: 
(30) 630-13^1. To July 7: "Die. 
Schwarze Stadt an der Sefctonstrasse: 
Buddhistische Kunst aus Khara Kho- 
to.” Khara Khoto. located on the SHk 
Road between China and Tibet, 
played an important poHical and eco- 
nomfc rote. Features paintings on sHK 

and canvas, as wefl as boo6, sculp- 
tures and manuscripts ckdfng back to 
toe 11th and 12 centuries. 


era and sculptors from the farmer 
Iron Curtate countries. There are 
wwks by well known artists such as 
Brancud and ChagaH and by postwar 
artiste who were Isolated from West- 
ern cultural trends. 

Frankfurt 

Schfrn KunsthaWe. tel: (69) 29-98- 
ffi-11, open daily. To Aug. 7: "Goe- 
toe and toe Vbual ArteT Paintings, 
JS^-SO^PturM ranging from 
classlral Greek and Roman to the 
ye» of Goethe's death in 1832, In- 
ctudteg works by Raphael, Ruisdael, 
Lorraln. Constable and Turner, docu- 
ment toe relationship between Goe- 
the and the creative arts. 

Hannover 

Swengel Museum, tel: (511) 168- 
M75. Jo SepL 11; "Dip Orte £ 
Kunst: Der Kunstbetrleb els 
^l^wertc" Deals with the current 
g^onof an scene and toe 
totoactlon between a work of an and 
toeptace where It Is presented. Palnt- 
Jm^ipures. Photographs and in- 
®aflattans by arilsls such as Jeff 
and Bertrand Lavler demon- 
WMB that art can be a cultural ob- 

52Ll^? ¥nodi,y w m object of 
speculation. 

Munich 

Nwe Ptoakothek, tel: (89) 2384)5- 
.y.S' ck®ed Mondays. To MuzZ. 
IMthebn Uribl: Gedachtnlsausstal- 
aetateteo." Features 

who found inepi- 

Ulm 

KJS (7 I t J 161 -^ 

SS&S£?^ 

70 drawings and water- 

Mtorefrom toe artist's early years 
“Actions In the iKSd 
states. Mainly portraits and land- 


J^ottofBfism to the technology, di- 

raate^ soGWneeete of toe new stale 

ofteael. ExhfaHed are documents. 

“wring plans, models and furniture. 

decades 01 Ns architec- 
tural creativity. 


17th to the 20th century. The exhibi- 
tion also features Items by contempo- 
raiy designers such as Hanae Mori 
and Kenzo Takada. 


Lissitzky and Stanislaw Witkiewicz. 


ITALY 


HEIHERLAHPS 

Amsterdam 


Florence 

gtoiMedicl-RJccardi. tel: (55) 
fZ®?,]!- Wednesdays. To July 
IS'-iLM”?* del Samurai." About 
oOpleces deling from the 13th to the 
t«n centuries, Including lacquer- 
w™ 8. Paintings and screens, weap- 
or» arfa prints, and a lew compiete 
suits of armor. 

Venice 

ODt a ^_E 0rt J ,ny> ,B|: ( 41) 52 W- 
Contlnuing/To June 26: "Da 

TP *™™* a Andy Warhol: Rftratti 

aAdtatoatf daila CoflezJone deirun- 
wrate dal Michigan. " 60 European 

portrafts aaHns from 

Cultural center, tel: (41) 

i^.>^L°l* open ^“y- Continu- 
ing/ToSepl.n: "China 220 B. C.: 
The Xian Warriors. Life-size terra- 
«™waiTk)rs from the army ol 7.000 

sssKsr 11 01 me ^ 


Van Gogh Museum, tel: 20-570-52- 
o Oct. 9: "Van Gogh's Self- 


uuyus iJdi- 

Portraits from Paris." While van 
Cat ? h S?^? e d m °re landscapes than 
portraits, he had a preference for de- 
picting the human figure. At first he 
portrayed peasants, but lacking mod- 
eis, started making self-portraits. The 
exhibition features IB sen-portraits 
painted in Pans in 7886~ie87 


POLAND 


Warsaw 

National Museum, tel: \,2) 621-10- 
31. open daily. To Aug. 31: "Klasycy 
Wspolczesnosci." Contemporary 
classics, the theme of the exhibition. 
r ®P refi ®2 * he Polish artists who have 
shaped toe image of 20th-century an 
in Poland, included are works by Ta- 
rieusz Brzozowski. Tadeusz Kantor 
flno Mans Jerema. and by contempo 
rajy wtlsts Roman Opalka and many 


SWITZERLAND 

Lausanne — 

,el: < Z1 ) 617- 
4621. dosed Momays. To Auo 28- 
Le Dialogue de la Difference " Si- 
mone Oppliger exhibits portraits of 
immigrants in France. Also "Le Con- 

^L. 500 ^'" ptiotographs by Larry 
rirat, an American artist. 

Lugano 

Villa Favorita, tel: (91) 51-61-52, 
open Fridays. Saturdays and Sun- 
days. Continuing TTo Oct 30: "Eu- 


150 works fromtoe ThyssSSSne- nSSri -fS Some were 

misza collection disptey^in^X Women" 

restored rooms. emerged from "Guemi- 


UMTTEP STATES 


New York 

Metropofftan Museum of Art td: 
SepL4; Rcas8o and the Weep- 


, ~ rMww euw me weep- 

nTgvy tomea - The Years of Marie-The- 

rese waiter and Dora Maar. " A selec- 




Museum of Modem Art tol* 19191 


japan 


SPAIN 


Kyoto 

Npjojwl Museum of Modem Art. 

1 1 1 ■ c,osed Mondays. 

SSKe"^ 0 June 19: * ,Ja P°P- 

kjFawilon." Reviews the Japa- 
?™J[™6nc8 on Western modes by 
160 costumes, dresses 
ano oasslng^oyvns produced In Ja- 
pan and worn m Europe from toe 


Madrid 

Museo del Prado, M: { 91 ) 420-26- 
36. ck»ed Mondays. To July 12: 

Escultores oel Renaci- 
miemo Itaiiano al Servicfa de la Corte 
ti® EsP 003 -” 27 bronze and marble 
sculptures and 46 medals by the Ital- 
^ulptore Leone and Pompeo 

Ctortes , V C Utfin ® seweral * 3US1S 


Wekam Ffirafri 

Museum, M: (7821) 

Z5: “African 
Seats. Seats from sub-Saharan Afri- 
Mfrom the simple etoStotfrepearl- 
adomed throne. 


tin 1 st s§t s 


j 1 


open aaay. To Dec. 1: *■«» 

Statjons." A video installation rffive 
darmete of color video 
and sound focuses on images w toe 
humanboN underwater. 1W0, Nam 
June PWteDevtt & MaraL 
eo sculptures combining too ad»s 


Bonn 

Kunst- und Aussteflungshafie. tel; 
,00ns 9171-200. To Oct. 16: “Euro- 




(228)9171-1 

pa, Europa: . Das Jahrhundert der 


Jerusalem 


yet, uajDiuuDu uor 

Avantgarde in Ketref- und Qsteur- 
opa.” A mukkfiscipinary^ exlilbfzlpn daiy."Tlie 
of TOO hundred worts by 200 paint- ' 


Israel Museum, tel: (2) 708-811 
open deny. To Oct. 27: "Munlo Gttai 
WainraA: Buildteg tor a WoridngSo- 


and 


7 


On June 12: "HommMe a Henry 
Evenepoel 1672-1899/' Musee 
d Art Modeme, Brussels. 

"HbiBl, Antes: Wilder von 
1959-1993. Von der Heydt-Muse- 
um, Wuppertal, Germany. 

iSaXE, !. 2 -i-", New Y6rh; A Magwi 

ML^T^ M8 ’ rOPOllla " Art 

01 AQuamlles 
gracoijeafans Sulsses ef du Musee 

«S?I n '»j-5 >ndatlon piarr ® Glan- 
Mria. Martigny, Switzerland. 


SKLif e n ' ,s * la v,me 

On June 12: "New York; a Magnet 
for Artists Tokyo Metropolitan Art 
Museum. Tokyo. 

"Mctee Kisling; Le 
Pnnoe de Montparnasse " Petit Pa- 

idis, wri6vdi 

° n June 13: "Le Sole.1 et I'Etoite du 
Nora. La France et la Suede au 18e 
Sfecre " Grand Palais, Paris. 


‘SUMMER FUN” 

package 


$ 129 ' per person 

per niqhi, double occupancy 


This Year 38 MiQionHotel Guests In 27 
Gties Wffl Turn To WHERE Ma 
For Directions & Advice 


UiYA II 


es 


indudes 

Fully equiped standard air- 
condftionrd room 
Buffet breakfast in *La Scab’ 
gounnei restaurant 
V.I.P. welcome 
Free mattress on the private 
sandy beach or by die rooftop pool 

Free access to the Fitness dub 

AD toes and service charge 
* Available June In through 
October 3ln 1094 
(Except FesUiab) 

Dally single supplement : S85 
Superior room supplement $20 

per room per ntgbt 
RESERVATIONS 
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IK toll free 0345 581 595 
USA loll tree 1600 221 24 24 


IVOGA HlLTOIY 
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so boulevard dc la CroNelic 
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Vol. Civ No. 3j.r»3«; 


rarKlit. IH4. 
X«w Ttrt TMta- !«. 


SATURDAY. JUNE 10. 19-H 







^dJLJLi s 





Cherbourg 




\8ee Him in V . S. 


naval fiSatf iie 

Near Us hant 
Wok by Allied 




18 MilesFpo®ri 


»at«e rmns- ~ ri ^ French wuujjyM* 

' They'll Ghouar Qicn Rule: . • 

3 Ranking H. S. Offirnu Doean (Mention DeC anile 'i Nazi l^eslroyers 1 ry | 

Sen. lo London to Help j By ^7T^ w , * Attm* Ut*~.Jh* 

Direct Invasion A Slacks’ Washington. June 9— Pr«i- Sunk, Ano^herBeac..-d| 

Ident Roosevelt revealed today thac 

Srhmliale Arrauffcdi 11 ' w,u recelve General CharlM de Americans &lasi 

tJCIlCTHUIie /*■ fl GaulJe ln lhe Unllcd Slates some __ 



zs&M 


Sit*. 

and Formignyylafei? 
ToialofiOCwtfersfldd 


Cii£5?tfSi^ 


If*. A<lvavori£»«4*tn) OflV time i5efore Ju] ? 14 * TTie an- 
JlnAdVanOeOliJ'fiJ'aV nouncement was followed tonight 


Another Flotills 


Allies Move'.AJwid; 
To Cross Peninsdla 


by expressions ln other quarters of 


Roosevelt Sava Prozress hop,,—but not « rt * l,|t v— Ui»t the IT. S. Warsmps Drive Off 
1 ‘ ® .'Italics may lead lo a solution of »u. ai .!i v 

of Drive in trance is, 'most of the difficulties that have Heavih Armed 


French -American 


Vessels Off Norrnandv 


Slow-but It's Progress! r ^ iarred French-Ameriean reia- Vessels On Normandy 

n Ik I At London - aImost simultane- By Ned Russell 

By George Folk joualy. General Dwight D. Eisen- „ rntJLmt ip :« H^ae mea,. 

WASHINGTON. June 3.— Fresi- lil0wer issued a proclamation by copjrun-.. :»«. Vrw rori Tribuw lae. 
dent Roaswelt announced tonight | i ea Q e *. to the French SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, 

that the nation's three top-rank- : people promising that when France Allied Expeditionary Force. June 

lag m ilitary leaders — General, a liberated they "will be free to 0 Sight British. Canadian and 

George C. Marshall. General choose a t the earliest possible mo- p 0 ush destroyers broke up ar. »i- 
Henrr H. Arnold and Admiral ment un der democratic methods Lernpt ear | y Aday by four German 
Emest J. King — have arrived in conditions the government destroyers to attack the Allied sea 

London for Allied staff confer- 1 Continued on poor 4. column 3 1 !Jne supporting the Normandy 


By Ned Russell 

3)1 Telephone to ‘.he Herds Tneatt 
Copyright. : 9 «. Sr- York Tribune lac. 
SUPREME HEADQUARTERS. 


enri*«. 

The three men — chiefs nl lhe! 
Army SUIT, the Air Forces and 1 
Nhval Opera t ions, respectively — I 
Cunferred with the President for 
a jl hour and a half Tuesday morn-' 
ing. a lew hours alter the invasion' 
ot France was announced officially. 1 
and. so far ms Is known publicly.! 
d.d not see him again. Presum- 1 


beachhead. They blew up one 0 : 
.. a. Ik Tnllr.vM the German ships, forced another 
C i BO J.£iII\S3!]l ashore In flames or. a tiny island 
_ -j, . a and damaged the other two. which 

St oU A ms V S i flerl to sa^y- 

cSRiia aiy S The cnemy dMlroy ers were 

Ifalur sighted not long before midnight 
al&l llB 1UUV by an Allied airplane patrolling 
— * the sea lanes leading out of the 



Bitter Fighting al Caen; 
W calher Slows , Rytn& 
but Slore Forces bwd 







, Z , „ esum lA m pri, n n. p,„u Tnwnr.1 German naval bases In the Bay 

ably they left for Qreal Britain American# Fu*h J o-rtar ‘l] 0f Bls , fly . The enemy ships were 


A*w:W!cd Pr*» wlrrphoio from Slfnml Oorp* radtopholo 
THE A. E. F. MOVES INLAXP— Amerlrnn lro»n>. ?n background, r.rr tnoring ferwerA at more, wen mnd MMpptle* remth Him bemtkkemd 


toon afterward and carried with 
them Anal instiui lions from ilic 
Ati<n ii-mi Cuntma nilrr in Clurt 
Kl-|i|in. T. Early. Urn White 
]|i.u«# nerreUiy, made public 
I*i rsident KooanelL’i announce- 
meiit of Uie ani'.ai and said tire 


' inf Biscay. Ttie enemy snips were __ _ *r m. 1 t * ¥1 f. 

How (i Beachhead Was Taken V. S. Glider Lit on a Rooftop 


By ffomer Rigart 

I»J Wtrrifi t •• the Hernia M»|M 
Cnpyrir^i. !B 4 ». Me— York TrlSunc Inc. 
WITH THE STH ARMY AT 


western extremity o! France, and 
were sLcamlns northward. 

Enemy Is Enzagsd 
Admiral Sir Bertram Ramsay. 


By Geoffrey Parsons Jr- - 
Bp Telephone u iw Htrej a t naina* ; _ • 
copjricht. IW. Wtw York Tnbt mo iaa. .- 
SDPREME HEADQUARTEK3, 
Allied Expeditionary- Forces. June 
10 (Saturday. — American troops 
have cut the main hftfhwsy' 4«4 
the broad-gnutre .railway of: the 
Cherbourg peninsula at several 
points between Car f« tan and. 
Cherbourg. K was announced offi- 
cially early today^- -- . s: v 

The Americans have, captured 
Ste. Mere EgUse. a mwn oa ihe 
Cherbourg highway, eighteen mflea 
southeast of the great Vwt.; and 
the smaller town at Forndgny. 
thirteen miles northwest oT-OP-: 
hired Bayrux. on the main highway 
10 Carrntan. Progress, slow but 
steady. Is being made toward the 
tsolatinn nf airrbmtra. on the tip 
of the prnltiMUa, . ‘ . 

To Uie rwiit. Uie' British and 


Over Sand Stream W ith Dead And So Fi rst French Town Fell 

— . . « _ r, „ «• fn bitter flgh Ung around Caen, the 


u;p had been planned for some ! yjTERBG nalv June fl — VlLe-bo A, !!* d " aVa . 1 . co ™ !nan 
l.mr lu ukr place .sown alter D Day. „ » f.!, , , 7 n ,l r ordrrcd qu ‘ cic 

Combined Maffc lo Meet I* ? ■ - ' P MUM* teAnytn. 


n n T 1J in DiLirr ummw 

commander m CosTPupondent ^ ho There Tells Slor>* of an The Story of the Air-Bomr Troops on If Day, lold llM Norman c ,iy whieh is in 
k dis positions cr his Ain^rirEu A*.«*ault Waves Landing Oaf l CouldnT liv a Lolnnel Who Wrnl A. W. O. L lo Jump flames. . 

Get in the FirM Time, Otiised for Hour. ' With H» Me., an.l Landed in a Tree . ^ 


Brltbh Gsln Near Bayem 
Around Bayeux the British sr* 
driving to the west and sonth of 
the city. They have not pene- 


. .. . *■ ann Tarqinma ii-ji tnfiay m spear- -Uf.wjg H Cf ,i, p yeie and before I . . , , „ W .. L ... it i_.« ■ T Brltbh Gain Near Bayroz 

Combined Maffc 10 Meet heads nf the Mh Army ihrus!inRi dftWn four 3r!lul . destrevsrs. the! fjCt hi the Firal Time, Lmised for honr*i ^ dh Hw Men and Landed in a Tree Around Bayeux the British are 

“They vent to London." Mr. northward toward Florence and i Tartar . Ashanti. Eskuno ar.d Ja-.c- . ta d- u 4 I T„K;« driving to the west and sonth of 

Ear . y «iu. -to al lend a previously Livorno against very light resist- 1 ljnf i og £thcr with two Cana- Bv John O'Reilly By Richard L. 1 obin the citv They have BOt pent- 

scheduled mceung of the com- ante. Iffian destroyers, the Haida* and w-ia-.w ^r,.: - ^-r > a. rn.rv, taTted' w any%cat”eplb. heml- 

bmed chiefs ol staff there which At 6 a. m. troops under Lleuten- Huron, and two Polish destroyers. WITH THE AMERICAN FORCES !N FRANCE. June 7 • Delayed 1 . SUPREME HEADQUARTERS. Allied Expeditionary Forces. June ^ ^ monUng> but 

was planned 10 take place as soon ant Colonel John J. Phelan Jr., or lhe Blyskawica and Plcrun. were —The Invasion of France by Allied armies, comprising tiie area'-fM 9— Tins is lhe story not only of the greatest air-borne operation in gaining ground. The 

as possible after D Day." 333 West End Avenue. New York, moving Into position to engage amphibious force that ever attacked a hostile shore, has been the rr. .rs: history , but also of unexampled Al lied planning and unqualified sue- gouijnmt at 

Announcement of the three son of the New York Siale Boxing lhc enemy. stupendous sight that mm could 5 *crss. It also la the story of an commanding the ap- 

1 voders ' arrival «as made a few Commissioner, entered Pope Clem- 1 -when sighted, the enemy was witness in an era of spectacular ry • T”* J rt* * HP L C. American colonel who made lUa h the r i|- are pet- 

nun u lea after S p. m., several eni.*x n«ip nf ih- wniipri riiv nf 1 __ *■ .. rvpiir-pnMt a miirfprn invasion ff 1 s b 8 ■ 910 111 IH 1 vUl*# first parachute jump on the ...... . • in. uU 


By Richard L. Tobin ™« U> 

FI. Te’erf.ene -n ;>e Urrcll Trlhnne Cnppnght. tH 4 . Hew York TrlhBM Inc. the City. Th ey k * 7 * 

SUPREME HEADQUARTERS. Allied Expeditionary Forces. June 5ris^monUng h ^S 

-T-:... i. Hu „A,r Tir* nntr nf ih» creat.pst slr-bomp n or ration in quarters said tnlS morning. 


It also lx the story of an Rights to the 
American colonel who made his Bayeux. commanding «.■* >* „ 
first parachute Jump on the P r «*chra to the city. ,ue\ PJ^ 
night before D Day. how he hung manenOy In Allied hands. To tot- 
in a French tree, heard the rows ot Bayeux. British • rmo ted 
moo In the silence or a northern forces *re engaged In 
French meadow and couldn't tell *n Important ridge. The battle 
a German soldier from an Ameri- 1® described as fluctuating- . . - j r 
can because of those new-fangled A raap ^ ^ ,led 
Yankee Itelmela. drawn on the basis of Axl* radio. 

I He was Colonel Ralph Bogby, and P«s* reports. Indlcalra that 
forty-eight years old. of New the Invasion forces no« have .* 


irnavra »m\ai maae a xew Commissioner, entered Pope Clem- "When sighted, the enemy was witness In an era of spectacular ry ■ j T\ • * HP I O f 

minutes after 5 p. m., several enfs Gale of the walled city of on an opposite course." an official occurrences. A modern invasion k\l(lS UlG III t TBTlClt tjUTT parachute Jump on 

hours after the President had de- Viterbo. This town of 30.000 In- announcement here said, “and from the sea J.s an awesome sight. night before D Day. now he 

ciared at his morning press con- habitants, the former residence or h. m. 8. Tarur. with H. M. Cana- anrl this l.s the greatest nf all Mick D.. ? . n H H/. v J n MomfirV ln R , r - 

lerenre that lhe invasion forces popes, the scene nf three papal fjlon ships Hulda and Huron and Invasions. This amphibious opera- Ouf fl Jf mJ iJt f V M ft lie MM 19 I’M rfllf/l J mnn In Uie Alienee of a nor 

flahtuia their way inland hum i-irntlons and renowned for ILs fine h. M. S. Ashanti, turned to the linn is so vast that It Is possible — *- French meadow and couion 

tne French coast were making medieval houses and the twelfth- north before opening fire, ln or- for one man to see only a segment R i l n r j, cn |I jl^cced lillle FrancLs went lo work R G ^ ra * n T fr0 “ “ * 

kow pu^ress but were making crnlury cathedral nf San Lorenzo, der lo bring all guns to bear. The of It. But in that .segment almnsl M a welder in (ho Kearny slilp- ? n J ,ec “ u< ?' of * hose new - fl1 

p.og CM. ine sea was a bit WM cruelly damaged by bombs enemy also turned lo the north all plmses of modern warfare are r...k irwi^ [yards until November. 1943, when ,„ e ,,cl ™ , 

jouicl.rr too. be said. and demolitions. and now. steaming on a parallel represented. ABOARD ASSAULT HEAD- ‘he wajt inducted Into the Navy. _ ' He C 010081 *r7 pl1 

in ripij lo a reporters question Apparently the city's bullrflnes rnurse. firpd tornednes. In nsricr For US who came In with the as- oiiARTERS FLAGSHIP. Bale de ba thir,v c n- n « ■ mMak# forty-eight years old. or 


MOB of the invasion. (Continued on pope J, cofumr. 2 i 

Conermnen Approve ft "' 1 ' 1 = ' 1 i 

Announcement of the arrival in tut v 

London of tho three tup- ranking mews on si 

American commanders was re- || 4J _ 

cnvrd favorably in CiingrmaloiiRl 

(iiiirt, a 11] i npiruiuni of hope TIIE INVASION 

tiuit co- ordinal uni of nulitaiyj Canadians' coiuitrr-ai Lacks hurl 


News on Inside Pages 


(Continued on page 2. column ZJ 471 impenetrable wall still sends .. If j never see another bcach| more .*' ters today. seventeen mtlea of Cherbourg 

- ^ columns of smoke along the U11 ^ too snon.” says Franrb. a Francis went Into battle with A During his story hr told how the si . uSra to ffeW* 

' beach. The gateway for the Al- smR u mivn wtt li a 111 Lie blnck nmi- . s j,-k alnmach and a heavy heart, town of Sir. Mcre-EglbH*. on i n „ ftrn i in d Cai cntan There hava 

*J_ ,,wI ftrml ” l,M bprn opened, and Uc]w anrt blR brown eyes Unit nil He had tried lo get Into the flea- the Cherbourg peninsula, was cap- ■ r<rMlUn ^ 

E ’L&Q £ GSZ&S Lhrnugh the wreckage and nmong W | Ul i Pftrs M he relates hN 1> Dav hres. where he could havp followed lured by 7 n. m. on D Pay beranse „ . _ .... h . , h ___ 

— ■ , i ^ tlin bodies of those who gave their t-xperlcnri's. "| never saw mi many hln i rmlr nf welding, bill Uie an Amerlran gilder landed on lop _ . * . 

lives to open tho gateway Liooiw mrn ,jj p iirhirx In my life." Miys Snibees were full up. so Francis of a French farmhnaso and llie * a 11 u * 

CITY AND VICINITY and equipment move In tm endless Franc I*, "and Lliey were not grown was shunted into the amphibious Germans Inside were too nsinn- p ' K 1 


CITY AND VICINITY 


e-fuii « uuid be unproved and ific. 
w«i thus shortened. 

Senator Lutrr Hill, Oemocrai, 
of Alabama, member of the Sen- 
ate Military Affairs Commutes, 
&a;d. "Their arrival means that 
every impetus will be given to the 
in i as i on lo bring the war to as 
speedy a cuncluslun as possible." 

HrnsiiiT Hairy S. Truman. 
Democrat, nr Missouri, a member 
of the sainr ronimillrr, declared. 

' I'lul^ublnlly l hr pir.M-lu e of Uie 
Uuee ofiuers will facilitate the co- 
oid.nalixn and cn- operation of ail 
forres involved in the invasion.' 

Clare Bool lie Lure. Republican, 
of Connecticut, a member of the 


German panzers back. Page 2 
"Flying Irishman" tries his gilder 
tricks on the Nazis. Page 3 
Clouds ground Allies' planes. 

screen foe's movements.Page 3 
Two glider pilots cache their 
supplies, then elude foes Page 3 
U. fl. Rangers scale a cliff In-fare 
of .ilnmg Nazi fire. Page 4 
Elsrnhnwer promises French they 
will choose own rulers, rage 4 

WAR 

Bnnuml submits mblnel ll.il lo 
Humbert, bars Badoalln.Pagp S 
Russians say fighting flares near 
Tarnopol. Old Poland. Page 5 
Paiml audience lor Clark is st-i-n 
as aiding the Allies. Page 5 
Allies advance In all major 


Mysterious head turns out lo be stream. 


an Ir.ran souvenir. Pago 0 
Kevmlt Roosevelt memorial held 
at St. James Church. Page 10 
City Council demands return of 
the six exiled firemen. Page 10 


men either. Just kills." 


corps and lie is hardly Uie am- tidied and frighlenrd to fight. 


ten tonight. 

Thrust for Nt Lo Reported 
The Germans also report a Brit-. 


3 Yesterday morning, as the vim- Francis went Into lhe Army In phlblous type. Blit what really. In the beginning the colonel, a The Germans lisp report A Brit- . 

‘Id guard of the mlvltly Invasion fleet November. 1940. and wits honors- weighed him down at dawn yesler- small, baldlsh man with ribbons (fi h thrust, a rather deep 'one." 

. approached the French coast be- ^ly discharged a few weeks later, day was the fact that lie had in three rows across his left breast, westward across the broad of 

10 fore dawn, waves of bombers and would rather have stayed in the quarreled with his wife, with dropped with his men because the peninsula toward St- IA. 


New Edgewood State Hospital Is flffhter-bombers roared over us to Army, but my legs gave out and I whom he is much In love — the some one had to be In charge, and j twenty miles southwest of Bayeux. 


leased to government. Page I! drop their loads nn the enemy. As rnU |f1n't keep up with the wife who has borne him one child anyway llie rnlonel wanted tn see Al loser her Hu* German version &' 
oman tcsl pilot halls out safely dawn enme llie fleet could he seen mi , r ,.|,ps." says Francis, flo. bow- it'nii/luurd oil pace 2. cirfumrt 6> «hat was going nil. Actually, lie lhe Allied ■uv.iu™. ■. - rt 

fmm hlBTlnv nlona Pa*e 17 ■lealalilnn f rt ! 1 in liiielvAn In mi ■*)« _____ POWHUII » inOrC I 11 *" 


House Military a ft ■ int C nmmu iw Indla-Burma sectors. Page 6 

7w uTTl. . “r Brazilian charges Latin-Ameri- 
toought the inp a grand Idea. can blundering by U. S. Page s 
Bm said: "I think it u fitting for Court martial is ruled out In case 
/Cos finned on page 2, column 3i of Major Omeral Mtller.P^ge 3 


‘Woman tcsl pilot balls out safely dawn came lhe flerL rnuid lie wen ]nn rclirs. a * says Francis. Silo, bow-1 fCnnllnunf oil 
from blazing plane. Page 13 streLclttoB to tlic horizon In each « w n I, hut his command- .w T 

is S Four Japanese Destroyers Slink — ““ •— - 

"iSS 1 : sLl™«hIoh r^"a rj;: Attempting to Save Biak Island off at II o'rlnrk Monday nlglil .iheadquarlers seem to agree : chat 

Bnrker assails Federal control included in this Invasion flotHln" 4 — He WBS nnP of mny hunrtrcd -'' of ,hp «*verest flahim. ««« '«»« 

over Insurance flrm.i. race 24 wrrp nrw types nf rrnft nml niil wtii- I'urxm-u Amrrlrnn Infai' 

NATIONAL ones adapted to many new Mses. ALI.1ED HklADQUARTERS. Rn air base wi 

American delegates to the mone- T,ie sh, P* whlch were 10 unload Southwest Paclflc, June 10 'Salur- the PhUlpplnes. 
lory parley are named. Page s the spearhead troops took their day*.— Four Japanese desiroyers The corarai 


HV T9* I’Rlfryf fmi 

ALI.1ED tl^IXJU, 


_• at; 1 T,M “ colt mel and Ilia men took Until llir enemy and Allied 

Hlfljf lo ijJIVC ISlclK ASIHlICl off at 11 O'clock Monday night, headquarlers seem in agree chat 

Si He was one nf many hundreds of the severest fight me now craters 

. . . _ . _ . speelallsla carried In lowed gliders, at CBen. wlirre increasingly heavy 

H KA I XJUA RTFRS. [ Rn^o ,r "base' wi'llTToo miles* oJ ^ ?S* Whl “■ 

fie. June 10 i Salur- i ha Phiiinnines. A" A 1 * dartc * ^ “ A 1 * ** soles. "Heavy fighting." 


N. L. R. B. rales for Uie Wagner places in the line. Hundreds of were sunk and another damaged Mitchells sank tho four destroyers i, t _ * ,01 In all areas. . - 

Act over Florida's law. Pmee 9 other vessels were moving In for- In Geelvink Bay. in western Dutch with l.OOfl-mnind bombs, marinv _ Oir-DOrne Squadron WSJ Iw Poshing Inland during the -first- 


BUYING A HOME? 

8* M'S '• H« SkIwi III si 5— Sm t't 
HotiIS Tnb«M Ym writ M Iws- 
ot hot properl mt fl^Wfiiad Ml 

ia« Clauilicd ImI Eiiois fapt 
Ht/e arc a few fu mnyb: 


ZX1SIIS ROUT K Y Kra CnflaM C«la. 
T m rer.-e, uii. 4 evdt’tvnu. 4 u«au 


Wbi-rrORT COHN — Wood med ■umr 
* : -ai>. 'J CctSs. (scrlknt He- 
irs * 1 - '»■ 

mooewooo y J — *«*» rvamdl- 

tWM SrSrr. Ugh ISBd Sll 


i»W brSrr. Mgb land Jlt.ijCO. I m t 
PJXSDXC. XT— ABCrteiH CMnbl Views 
■n 1 hobs. Miin plot bcsmifnar I “ 
■ucmipm iu mo. Ian 


■FORTH 

Dodgers beat Braves, 3-3. behind Editorials . 

McLlsh's five-hit ball. Page 16 Lippmann . 
Met. A. A. U. title meet at Ran- Major Eliot . 

dill's Island today. Page 16 In Short . . 
Racing al Aqueduct today lo aid Bridge .... 

war charities. Page II Webster , . 

N. Y . women sweep nine matches "Mr.and Mi 
in Bean Cup tennis. Page 38 Nature stoi 
Views of Sport, bp Al PmaJa 


Act over Florida's Jaw. Pare 9 other vessels were moving In for- ln Geelvink Bay. in western Dutch with J .000-pound bombs, roaring ~~ T* tnucsran wm iw tnxsning Uliana during UW-®* ' 

Report on Nazi captives In U. S.: motion across the English Channel. New Guinea. Thursday aflernncn in over their quarry at mnaU ,A‘ r V’" U ? J Peninsula, well behind few daya. the Allies passed by, 

of Major General MUler.P^Be 7 Army admits mlstafees.Pmse At 5;5 o B . m.. forto minutes be- by American Mitchell mrdtum height. Ul lT* r . . . many German strong potato. Thesa 

^InVthe^J ir Colton fore lhe nrat troaps wpre to ,wld - bombers. General Dnuglas Mac- F-srorllng TJghlnlng fighters, fiy- ^ rlnTiriS “*»• 

War coiSmwISJs Pm« 6 the bombardment storied from the Arthur annmmred Uvlay. A .lapa- ln g from ailvanml American bases et ** ^ »rcaf her deter lorafed dqrtnr 

EDITORIALS AND MIMCFJJ.ANY gra. Battleships, crul.vni and de- nese cruiser anil one ilcslruyrr m Dutch New Gulnra. battled ten KH ^ P ^ m * lMT Ibie Jolt, but ilia day. There was virtually, no. 

Page Page stroyers sent shells whining shore- escaped, the ,-nnimunlque reported Japanese fighters over the enemy , n °f UKl *° RMlUy Ul * 1 ^ * |r itotlvliy over the beachhead- 

Editorials ... 14 Fashions 11 ward. From hundreds of smaller The attack on the seven war- convoy and downed five, probably Ur°.*v r * 1,lze *** had “* r laotdlng operations were aUa'-ia 

Lippmann . . 13 Food 11 craft missiles poured on to the ships was the fourth lime in five destroying a sixth. Three Allied f*” ,ch earth unUI * ound W* continue without lnlemipttoB. 

° tol ' ' ll Society 15 beaches. Rockets spurted through days that American bombers rang- planes of unspecified types were CtlMl * Un * !, ' d Bbove Wm In* tree, however, because the' wffid W 

oi,j S " 0rt — '‘':?the air in banks, ploughing up mg over western Dutch New lost. “ A Parachutist is unsatisfied," shifted around to the -south we*V 

Webfrer IS iv,« q RCr “ of land as they struck. The Guinea had struck at Japanese The success brought to eight the “ W , “** cota,ie1, ‘ ,,uilea5 hi* P«*- which meant an off-shore bretee. 

"Mr.and Mrs. ”23 Rea] estate 22 ve5Sel 4 varied their distance from attempts to send ships into the number of Japanese warships sunk chu “ te ****** enough so that you It was Mowing up late today. bo!#r 

Nature story.. 15 Radio . ..22 t* 18 *hores, according to their size, waters around Biak Island, where or damaged in the four a * ffra * 1 * ****** times. So I had the ever. Rom Force 3^«s_tbe Bcau- 


Puzala 23|Obituariea ... is The firs waa returned tram enemy 


Pag* 1* 'Books Ilf 


r Continued on page 2, column 3) 


WMHW M a# llw wdi ma- 
ins. 'Thin b SiJorn.“ Merrlns 
BUB Lanas. S r. s^wos — un. 


destroyer waa sunk last ***&* out of the fort scale, at nooa. it had ifwo 

I to the txee. W. knew) to Force 4 by MUUn.Mja 

pope B. column 9J I i Continued on page 2. column S) about as s tr o ng '*• ot&uhoir 

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hRESP 1 '^ S&L%J imposed of 


280 rntemaiioriaily\nve5teht^r? e S « ,OCK S?®* *'• composed o< 

byBloombers BL4e£^^| , ^«J*^ “"*« 


AFP Decides English Is the Key 

Bv JacnJM»« \J»hor i. .i™. r • ^ 


Page IS 




Applet wfj!t!Tar 
ctose I32e3 Pie. 132 


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Ctosa: 91M Pibvj 93.68 


Appiw wegJEnq 37*. 

Cxf m 59 Pnr*. 112 15 




Appro*, weighting: s% 
Closa: 1 i7mPrev.: 118J1 


By Jacques Neher 

Inunuhotuil Herat J Tnh-tnr 

PAWS — While France prepares 10 sbp 
fines of as much as 20,000 francs (SJ.5U0) nh 
anyone using English unncccssarilv in everv- 
aay commerce, .Agencc rrancc-Prevv;. the 
ftovcmmcm-siipponcd nw?i service. j s pmnine 
Hi future on the language of Shakespeare 

Lionel Flcuiy, chairman of lhc news f ugen- 
cy that has provided France's view of die 

world for more than 150 years, explains it this 
way: My mam objective is to get an increas- 
ing share of the world market, and to do that 
we have to produce in the language most 
understood. We must increase the quaittv of 
onr English service." 

His stance illustrates the heightened com- 
petitive environment facing AFP and other 
international news agencies. Founded in 
1835. AFP today is locked in a three-wjv 
battle with Reuters Holdings PLC of Britain 
and the Associated Press of the United States 
for the attention of editors around the world 


V *j/so .faces growing competition from spe- 
cialized services such as Bloom here Business 
News and Knight -Ridder. 6 
Another major wire service. United Press 
International, has been basical ly squeezed out 
of the global market by competitive pressures, 

f We have to produce in 
the language most 
understood/ 

Lionel Fleury, chairman, Agenee 
Fraoee-Prase. 

although it was saved from liquidation in 1992 
by the Middle East Broadcasting Center. 

Mr. Flewy. who was named head of AFP 
last vear. moving up from the No. 2 posc, savs 
his long-term strategy for the news agen ev- 
il] eludes: * 

• Moving away from public funding, 


which could lead to eventual privatization. 

• Expanding mto Asia with AFP-Extel. 
Uic English-language financial-news venture 
it shares with Pearson PLCs Financial Times 
Group urnt The plan, which could double 
Ari'-t*iel s size — it currently employs 68 
pwple and expects sales this year erf £1 2 
nmlioQ fS5 million) — will probably be de- 
cided by the partners this fall. Officials sav 
the savice, launched in 1991, is viewed daily 
on about 15,000 screens. 

•Developing multimedia products, such 
m CD-ROM disks that could permit users to 
retrieve the information, photos and graphics 
produced each day by the agency. Tbeagency 
!S m jotnt- venture discussions with several 
publishers. 

In the longer term, Mr. Fleurv said, AFP is 
studying the feasibility of launching a general 
service for China. With 
more than 2.000 newspapers, China would be 
a promising market for any Western news 
See AFP, Page 16 j 


Lonrho Seeking 
A Major Mining 
Stake in Africa 


Noanberg Buanm News 
LONDON — The British con- 
glomerate Lonrho PLC is playing 
on us African connections to hit 
the acquisition trail after announc- 
ing an 86 percent increase in profit 
from continuing operations. 

Tiny Rowland, joint chief execu- 
tive njrl ThimH... .1 


ing a venture or merging mining 
operations with another company. 
But be said Lonrho intended to 
maintain its 73 percent stake in the 
Western Platinum Ltd. miaine 
company. He added that the con£ 
pany was comfortable with iis cur- 
rent debt levels —its debt-to-equi- 
ty ratio is about 25 percent — and 


** Thursday thero^^my 25 ^ -lod 

was examining a major minings- ^ or forms of 

quistuon in southern Africa tha. fu «ling were being con- 

would make ih» PAmnifiu'n — - — sideretL 


Low-Inflation Study Attra< 

By Keith Bradsher ( — 

WASHINGTON*^ Abn I f ^ ■* ft^UCtivity 


World index 19M 1993 IBM 

i&IXSL S 12? SSL"**. « "■ Ww, Yo*. London. «n» 

Soigapore. Sorin. Swmm J?™ T T <ta ' Nw ' Norww. 

London, the Max ts conmisM^H^n *** r °*>W Now York am . 

othervetze dw h^i top ** ‘ SSUeS m t0rms 01 marlM aipdaSzaOan. j 


Industrial Sectors 


U8BBW 

Finance 

Snvfcea 


■«». fmt % 
dw» change 

109^2 109.60 +03 9 

118^0 11921 ^QJB 

71B-50 na54 -0.03 

11139 118.17 +0.19 


Capital Goods 
Hawlfatal ats 
Constaner Goods 
Miscellaneous 


115.46 115.03 +0^7 
125-37 126.40 -Q3 11 
8738 97 M ^0.39 
123-89 124.04 -0.12 


" ifc .-v.vrf 

m ,ndex ' e boM ^ « nailable fme of chan* 
Write to T& Index, 181 Avenue Charles da Gaulle, 92521 NeuifyQifaiFr 


By Keith Bradsher 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON - Alan 
Greempon, the Federal Reserve 
chairman, has found another argu- 
ment to justify his attempts to 
shove inflation ever lower with re- 
peated increases in short-term in- 
terest rates. 

Buttressing his argument with a 
new Federal Reserve study, he con- 
tends that the central bank can in- 
crease productivity by pushing in- 
flation even lower than ih f 2.4 
percent rate recorded for consumer 
pnota over the year that ended in 
I ApnL 

- J 1 !? re ^ onin 8 goes that lower 
tniiation forces businesses to be- 
come more efficient because they 
oranot raise prices, and that when 
businesses are more efficient, eco- 
nomic output and living standards 
rise. 

Mr. Greenspan's fascination with 
me hnk is important not only as a 
aefoisc of past interest-rale in- 
creases but also as one of many 
signals about future poky. The re- 
search may help to explain why Mr. 
Greenspan has gradually become 1 

more willing than nmn Fed officials 

to raise interest rates this airing, 1 
after some initial reluctance. 5 

The study contends that with a \ 
reduction of one percentage point 

in the influhrwi — 


SU998st a ** b8to »" 

Bg»i=aSC5I3SS5J£r 

SSSSSSSSSSSS^ffl 

volatrie measure than the Consumer Price Index. 


Years with low Inflation 
tend to have high average 
productivity gains 


inflation rale .fen productivity 
Loss than 2% 

.■ 2%to3% BBS^ 

- 3%t0 4%*SSTO* 


When inflation Increases, 
Productivity gains usually 
slow down 

toyaanswhmtaflBtion i 

was bigfwr than tfw 


4% to 5% ^1 +1.07% 
Mora than 5% £+0.34% 


When Wfetfort was 


[ ing Committee, “but I think it’s 
becoming persuasively the case 
that not only is it — which every- 
one agrees to — important to bring 
the inflation rate down from 10 
pereMt to 5 percent, but it’s in- 
tjeasmgly becoming evident that 
the lower we get under 5 percent, 
the more stable and growing the 
economy is.” B 

Mr. Greenspan has previously 
indicated a desire to reduce infia- 


would m ak e the company's opera- 
wm5 “far laraer" than its current 
sales level of £350 million {5525 
million) a year. 

According to Dieter Bock, the 
company's other joint CEO, 
Lonrho has “offers from institu- 
tional investors to supply the nec- 
essary funds." 

Earlier in the day, the mining 
apiculture, hotel and trading con- 
glomerate said pretax profit from 
continuing operations for the six 
months ended March 31 had risen 
to £41 million from £22 million 
during the like period a year earlier. 


Mr. Bock said many institutions, 
particularly in the United States, 
were becoming more interested in 
Lonrho as an African and mt-nfs 
company. According to Cohn Mat- 
thews, the group’s chief accoun- 
tant, U.S. investors now hold al- 
most 20 percent of the com pa ny 1 ; 
stock. 

Meanwhile, Johnson Matthev 
PLQ a London-based diversified 
metals company, said fiscal 1994 
pretax profit rose 10 percent, be- 
fore one time gains, as its sales ad- 
vanced 5i percent. 

Excluding onetime gains and 

PhanM r_i_ _ H . . 


yoar-earlier net income charges fiSn kSun ^Sh“s 
^f 75 .,™ 111100 mcluded earnings of sale of its European iewelrv 
£53mrlhon on discontinued opera- sUw businesses and the formation 

^ P**? 011 Matt bey Ceramics, 
inert was no news from the P r °fit before lax rose to £77.1 mil, 
“mpany about a successor to the J? 011 m the year ended March 31 in 
chairman. Rene r Arinin line with anaivctc* !■ 


before, ptttkic&tof 


pnees, productivity gakw are ttiarme o* ehfflma ni 


Source: New York Times analysis of Federal Reserve figures 

and economic growth rates both ready low inflation rate. Uw F«i 

ofa ,hra>lm,h5 S JSfiSLE?!? *• ■— 


of a percentage poinL 
But the argument does not im- 
press top government officials or 

VI Ffl* nnmfA _ 


— iwuivi uib tu/uir 

my and needlessly cost the country 
jobs. } 

Mr. Greenspan first cited the re- 


__ j fvuuwiiuu 01 one percentage point 

© International Herald Tribwig in the inflation rate, productivity 


m SSI*! 


WALL STREET WATCH " 

Why Brokers Share the Pain 

Rv Cncan 4«4.'11. /> 


■ — - VMUUJ3. 

syS'ifS? jsSSSSSS 


1- — — — vi vui 1UUUIU. 

“We don’t have enough observa- 

ns If] Imnw that it's mnr4..n.,J.. 


MW , r —-•mj IWMUUI U LUC 

Mr ■ “test Of many justifications that 
w ■ 1“ central bank has offered over 

^ the years for raising interest rates, 
n' m effect, the central Hank j; argu- 
m S ihat short-term economic pain 
W. may be necessary for long-term 
economic gain 

The new study found that low 
ss inflation had gone hand in hand 
"♦ with high productivity over the Iasi 
l^F « years in the United States. The 
same correlation was found over 
Fed ? milar P«iodi in Britain, Canada, 
mo- , France - Germany, Italy and, to a 
a try lesser extern. Japan. 

The study also used a muefa-de- 

: re. bated statistical device to make the 

any case ibat it was low inflation that 
raised productivity, rather than 
-va- high productivity causing low infla- 
rdy Lon. Finally, the study's authors — 

nk- See GREENSPAN, Page 14 


. ~ imiuu. uum- “-"j uuui me r. — •• iwc mjj. 

Uon to I or 2 percenu as measured “mpany about a successor to the J* 011 m the year ended March 31 in 
by the Consumer Price Index. chairman, Rene Ledezio, whose ^ jvith analysts’ forecasts. In the 
The productivity research is the Sf 051011 t0 was announced P™™* yw. ihe company had a 
latest of many jiisrifications that ““ »3-« million profiL 

the central bank has offered over . ** J® 86-year-old Mr. Row- “This has been a Rood vear for 

the years for raising interest rates. - 1 * sa f d: “1 have no intention Johnson Matthev, in which all our 

Jn effect, the central bank is atgu- °J rcIir iiig from business for five or divisions have earned higher Drof- 
mg that short-term economic pain J?™5! re ^ 1 dec ii 10 leave its.” the chairman, Da^oSc 

J*. n «»sary for long-term i may start up another said. “The new financial yearhas 

sonomicgam. co^any. started weB for all ourdS^ 

„SfJT. J SIUd - v /° ,md . ^ ^ .. UMuto executivK declined Johnson Mauhty whidi m. 

ntlm- _ , . 5 


By Susan Antilla 

New York Times Senior 

^ T WaU Streea. executives 


N c — ux WJJJU1 investors 1 

^ T WaU Street executives havmg been given the wrong imp 
jrere n k a t i ng n to the atrival of Santa potential risks of an investment. 

Ess » 


Consnmer advocates, however, applauded the 
reamt moves in which investors were assisted after 
baying been ghrai the wrong impression about the 

potential risks of an mvesim«*iir 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches HmIt " ea ;<( , 

FRANKFURT - The risk ol Si aT. mS’SJ 1 ' 0 ”’ ^ 

mother mninr k..!. 


German Scandal 


SSsSS*- S5f”^ : 

Mr. Bock did not nile out lonn- SI 

Mandela Has Doubts 
About Privatization 

Ctm vfcl by Our Stiff! From Dispatches 

wM“not JS^ B ^» ft S fcnt - Ne ? son Medela said Thursday he 

«id ceruin «,<£ of 

Pnvatization is a form of main tain mp anarth^H Km..,,,. 1.1—1.. 


. 1 — me nsic ol 

another major German bankruptcy D . — — «•»» ji 

grew on Thursday as a dispute . «usam s excursions into the for- P®™.® Prixedo. carried no re 
erupted over plans to bail out a f l8n 7o^f ncy sl aned in the s P onsj biL'ty for losses, 
major financing firm that had been ^ it German banks rq'ected the pro- 

plunged into crisis bv alleged mai ? 5 for . doUars to ob- posal and called on AKV to come 

fraud. S tarn cheaper financmg in the U^. up with a belter offer. Fcrejm 

SWTLrLB »»!Sr M 

the brink of insolvency ^[er^the Another meeting has been sched- 

arrest this week of the rathe board ! I a ^ d S 

of its largest ch'enL Balsam AG. Rm*™ !? r Proccdo w file for hankniDlcv 


?£t < ? U ° n5 ^ ritat Mr. Beuter had told the credi- 

^lal. Munich brat lou [hut his Enn. which ownTH) 

Balsam s excursions into the for- percent of Proccdo, carried no re- 

tlKnirrenrv mart** ci.n^i • 1 ffinnahilitv fnr 




! 

■■ -sj :of. s ’ f 

•“ • v "■-« r.2*- ' ‘ 

i 

■ \ 

,’r j 

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:'1-l J; 

-v 


r r'^\ 


_ ■ - H* JV. I. 

. . T- ■ -iV V ' 

fv 

- - ■ ' . l 


— , - j , 7 mjuuuoiu: in a 

mutual fund It said it would invest at least 510 
nuEhon m its Institutional Government Income 


uiwhik; ruiKi, wDicQ has attract- 
ed JJ.7 biliion from investors since it was startedixi -Jaaornypcajcoi 511.02. 

1^0. The ifund has suffered as a remit of losses dys Mutual funds will fed increasing pressure to 

spring in instruments based on home mortgages. pony up some extra cash when losses occur, said 
In part as a reaction to a class-action lawsuiLibe 2f mur Abbe y>* New York lawyer who represem- 
bruterage firm will partly cover the losses in its rrf BP U P investors against Paine Webber. “I 


Another meeting has been sched- 
uled for June 17, a legal deadline 
for Proccdo to file for bankruptcy 

If npTKCani r * 


In pan as a reaction to a 


------- fi™ will partly cover the losses in its Sf 1 ? ou P <rf investors against Paine Webber. “I 

mutual fund and wifl pay the lawyers who repns Uank . n woaJ ? be vay hard now for a firm that 
seated the investors who sued ^ cncnccs . sazne ^mg 10 take a position 

The financial community was asking whether a 10 Webber ^ — and every firm has 

socialistic principle had invaded Wall Street. But *^” th«e things, he said, referring to the shon- 
that may miss the point. It may be that in the wake g o rcniment-bond category of mutual fund 
of the sharp decline in the bond and stock markets Paine Webber’s was noi a simple case of inves- 
ting year, there is a fear among money managers of ^ taking a hit because a market bad gone hay- 
a lass of investor confidence. wire The fund’s prospectus said that it relain«i 

Arthur Levitt Jr, chainnan of the Securities and rifi M to t rade in mortgage-backed securities. 

Exchange Commission, said be was generally theproqjectus also said that it had noimmedi- 

pleased by Paine Webber’s action, noting that alc plans to otweise that right, 
investors had been shocked to leant that some A Paine Webber spokesman said that while its 
funds with the soothing word “government’* in portfolio manager probably bad not violated the 
therc titles were not as secure as they sounded «**» of the law, the firm had decided to bail 
But he conceded that the movement to repair the mv *f Ior ? 001 becausc i “We chose to take the high 
damag; of maikets that go bad could backfire. “I roadaodsay, ‘Loci, we’re not banging our hats on 
don't think it’s gone too far yet," he said “But if the ^ “8"**.’ ” 

notion were to mevai] that Hu in the interest of fund Several USL government-sponsored aaendes 

managers to subsidize the performance of all fnnds, pod mortgages and create bond-like 
thm wouW bevoy distort^ to the market.” from ^Smiker^u^&SS 
Pame Webber’s generoaty istroublmg to believ- these mstraments to ^ue more mSchn£ 
os in a market economy m winch investors enjoy meals, whk* could be considered pari ofthe 
the gams and tolerate the pam of a market's ups povemment bond maiket It was SiffiqSd 
instruments that caused the fund’s problems. 


• - J iwi n 1x4 ill Hull 

eroenences lhc same thing to take a poatrai 

different to Pame Webber — and «vpru n™, 


that may miss the poinL It may be that in the wake 
of the sharp decline in the bond and stock markets 

this year, there is a fear among money manager s of 
a loss of investor confidence. 

Arthur Levitt Jr, chairman of the Securities and 
Exchange Commission, said be was generally 
pleased by Paine Webber’s action, noting that 
investors had been shocked to leant that some 


JSSStSWSiK MMr M 

the brink of insolvency ^a/ier [be 6*°^!?™'°” P”®* Anolhermeeling has been sched 

arrest this week of ihTSitirc bcJmj ?«. far J-. lT, iJdiS 

01 “ .'“f 51 CUC ; U AG - Reserve sough^fo Stop'S f°!^^ " rile f0r "““"W 

rhis latest financial scandal economy. „ ■ . 

comes on the beds of the collapse Factoring comoanies lik*. Prw. one ^ pope’s lead- 

s»a";s. i ss’.'SK ~ , &si5jfc£ issSj A"Sss 

fewri Esaasasa sss S'ZT 

mBEftnfir* » b ‘ r k R , D ^ ulsche own activities with bank credits. (Eeufers. Bloomberg) 

manes ouiionj of bank debL i„ .. . . 

Precede, owtted by the U^e « ItSfSd S-‘ ~ ^ - 

Gennan insurers .Mleemdne Kre- «dn d ^ 


Balsam is one of Europe’s lead- 
ing manufacturers of flooring ma- 
terials used for tennis courts and 


■ -r— j "im j uimuiL LJCULSCDC 

marks (53 billion) of bank debL 
Prooeda owned by the Urge 


STiSSSSaa 

^ ^ w ould be aWc to fund iris government’s Recons.r.«- 

£d hc . said . 2J rand (5690 milE£) 

todaJrrad^r been rased through savings and “distortions would be 

s£jEft ssk i ■sasLi'yre: s iz 

10 billion rand on arms and tanks 
l Routers. Knight-Ridder) 


BESSESg 


banks about IJ billion DM. com- 
pany sources said. They said in- 
coming payments should, however, 
reduce this sum to 1.1 billion DM. 

Early Thursday morning. Pro- 
ccdo creditors rejected an initial 
proposal to rescue the factoring 
firm after a meeting that lasted 
many hours. 

An options- trad ing scheme at 


. . Wl LVI- 

lecting puls, a codudod practice 
termed hidden factoring. 

Frocedo sources said Balsam 
earned out the alleged fraud by 
misinforming it about the value of 
the orders and by presenting falsi- 
fied U.S. accountants’ certificates 
that inflated amounts had bom 
paid to it in the United Slates. 

Procedo's creditors had been 


Ms 

Blanc pain 


n a j«vr, j B rroceaos creditors had been 

Balsam may end up cosung Ger- asked bv the AKV rhairrna n 


r,u ; n — mmii™ wax ucuier, to rorave 00 percent 

Mbi„„ ™ “ 0n ^S- nrarl i 2 of fa' loans thry &d cxretK! 

fare 0n r.? M “ crw * Jl - P 55 ® ^ in exchange for a promis- 

face, currency specialists with soiynote. " 

kmawlcrivo nr >h. J 


■ — -vuwj WIUI 

knowledge of the situation said 
Thursday. 


According to one banking 
source, the banks had expecicd 


CURRENCY A INTEREST BATis 


“Balsam was □ client or every SSr ’to 2-7? had f 5t P ec,cd 

bjnk *- - »pS 


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S t OJ*. Ff. Ura DJI UR. slp. ftu Q pm, 

*mstert«o UW UB5 UP U» ww — ««- UM U»* S* 

BranMl M3 5UI 3UH ua Las' TO SU*S to aK XT7- 

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rates or Jam 

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f-moatn im enn i R* 5^ SV: 

tlHrmrOAT 7J0 

Sources: Reuters. Pioombera Merrill 
Lynch, Bank of Takvo. Commerzbank. 
Crcanwell Montaov. Credit L ronnois. 

Gold 

„ AM. PM. Cll'ce 

grt? 3BIJ5 38245 +J5)' 

LBCCon 382J0 382J5 +1.IQ 

■towYcrh 3 wjo 3auo +iai 

doMnrs per ounce. London etfktoi tu- 
taos/ Zurich and Hew Yam aoentna amt elos- I 
“W prices; New York Comes Muousri I 

Source: Neuters. 


For 

investment 

infemtation 

read 

THE MONEY 
REPORT 
every 
Saturday 
in the 



Tourbillon 


A 'vniiumw 

Since 1735 there has 
NEVER BEEN A QUARTZ BlANCPAIN WATCH 
And there never will be. 

LUIGI VERGA SAS. - 

Dt VALERIO VERGA & C. - OflOLOGERlA 
Tat. 02/aaSfiSai - OF. e P. IVA 04370140156^ 


<-*- \s, y 





i Page 1-1 


1 I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1994 


MARKET DIARY 


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Compiled by Our Staff Frm Ptspaicha 

NEW YORK — Siock prices 
dosed mixed Thursday as a slump 
in beverage stocks, sparked by a 
profit warning from PepsiCo, was 
offset by gains in drug slocks. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age fell as much as 8.93 points 

U.S. Stocks 

before recovering to close at 
3.753.14, a slight 3.69 points higher 
than on Wednesday. 

About seven shares gained for ev- 
ery six that fell on the New York 
Slock Exchange, where 252.9 mil- 
lion shares were traded, down slight- 
ly from 256 million Wednesday. 

Dealers said the market was also 
unnerved by the prospect of U,S. 
producer price data on Friday. 

If the data are much higher than 
expected, they could be taken as a 
signal of renewed inflation and that 
could “wallop stocks and bonds," 
said Steven Goldman, chief market 
strategist at Weeden & Co. 

The bond market, a focus of mar- 
ket bears for some time, was nearly 
steady Thursday, with the yield on 
the benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond holding at 7.28 percent. 

Shares of PepsiCo, the world’s 
second-largest soft drink maker, 
slumped 3 to 3 Hi after the compa- 


ny said second-quarter earnings 
would be “about even" with those 
posted a year earlier of 53 cents a 
share. Before the announcement, 
many analysts had expected Pep- 
siCo" to earn about 62 cents a share 
in the second quarter. 

Pepsi’s profit outlook heightened 
concern tnat U.S. corporate earn- 
ings in the second half as well as in 
1995 might fall short of expectations 
as the Federal Reserve’s policy of 
raising interest rates to slow the 
economy and inflation takes bold. 

“It’s clear that there will be in- 
creased questioning of corporate 
profitability," said Doug Kass, di- 
rector of institutional equities at 
3.W. Charles Securities. With Pep- 
siCo's announcement, “there's no 
area, no sector of the market that’s 
sacred” 

Pharmaceuticals shares, howev- 
er. rallied after a securities firm 
raised its ratings on five drug 
stocks. 

Merck rose 1 to 31 3 4. Eli Lilly 
climbed 2 to 57. Pfizer surged l to 
63%. and Schering-Plough rose h 
to 65 W. 

The Nasdaq Composite Index 
continued io sol ten. falling to 
728.87, adding a loss of nearly a 
point to its drop of 9.50 on 
Wednesday. Intel dropped y 4 to 59 
and Novell eased % to 1 6‘i. 

I Bloomberg . AP) 


Korea Ignites Dollar, 
Cools It Off 



Blnamherv Business A'ems 
NEW YORK. — The dollar was 
mostly unchanged against other 
major currencies Thursday, giving 
up early gains amid lingering con- 
cern that the United Stales and 
Japan were making little progress 
in trade negotiations. 

Many traders bought dollars in 
the morning amid speculation that 

Foreign Exchange 

the U.S. State Department planned 
to pull nonessential personnel out 
of South Korea in anticipation of a 
possible North Korean attack. The 
dollar gave up its gains after the 
U.S. denied having such plans. 

‘The dollar rose on rumor and 
innuendo about North Korea to- 
day. so it's not surprising that it 
retreated,*' said Kevin Lawrie, for- 
eign exchange manager at Mellon 
Bank in Pittsburgh. 

International strife often boosts 
the dollar as investors seek a baven 
for their assets. The U.S. currency 
rose to a two-month high against 
the yen last week after Washington 
called for UN sanctions against 
North Korea for refusing to com- 


ply with the nuclear nonprolifera- 
tion treaty. 

The dollar closed at 103.985 yen. 
little changed from 103.950 on 
Wednesday. It rose as high as 
104.50 before concern about North 
Korea faded. 

The U.S. currency slipped to 
1.6672 Deutsche marks from 

1.6684 DM on Wednesday. 

“The dollar couldn't make any 
progress after the Korean specula- 
tion faded,” said Sudhir Patel, for- 
eign-exchange manager at Nations- 
Rank of Texas in Houston. That's 
because “trade negotiations with 
Japan are getting sour." 

The dollar fell against the yen 
Tuesday and Wednesday afte* - 1 f .S, 
officials said they would use trade 
Laws to pry open Japanese markets 
if current trade negotiations fail 

“It's going to be a struggle for the 
dollar to rally” without progress on 
trade, said Steve Gecvanis. manag- 
ing director of foreign exchange at 
Merrill Lynch & Co. “Japan’s trade 
surplus with the U.S. isn’t going to 
go away." 

The surplus means Japanese ex- 
porters must sell dollars for yen 
when they bring profits home. 


Vkj * no: "a red Pioh 


II The Dow 

Daily dosings of the 

Dow Jones industrial average 

4000 

■ ii 

* {% 


m- J- \ 

jA 

P . 

3700 * 


3S» 

W 

3® D J F M 
1993 

A M J 
1994 


NYSE Most Actives 


PCPiiC 
EMC i 

Cwnwo ft 

CocoG 

TcfMc, 
WaiMort 
DesfiY s 
OtceDeo 
Malarias 

MiCrTCS 

PhWAr 

GrMotr 

BeorSl 

McDoYJa 


VoL 

High 

LOW 

LOW 

Chu. 

709303 

37 

7?+'i 

31 1 1 

—3 

71053 

13*y 

12U 

13-. 

— I»j 

477+5 34%. 

33-i 

34 Vn 


3490* 

41 Vn 

Jfl'Y 

40 '4 

o-'n 

33BI7 

3l’-« 

31' » 

3l^i 

• *0 

i*«a 

at 1 j 

aO*« 

an. 

— 1 te 

7*527 

I5*a 


JSW 

- 

361 19 

X«A* 


:5K 

— H 

2382* 

35+k 

337-4 

34‘- 

—3 

I998J 

45‘a 

44' 4 

-U>4 

— *u 

19633 

32-a 

DP 4 

E'-j 

— r . ; 

19043 

5 <*» 

J9 ! ‘J 

50'* 

. 

IB17D 

Si 

ffl 

SO 1 * 

- ' 1 

181*9 

19 

Ifl'-S 

18'* 


1*7*2 

At V- 

59<4 

59". 

— • 


NYSE 
Arne* 
Nasdaq 
in millions. 


Today 

4:00 

252.V4 
2471 
255 JO 


Pro if. 
cans. 
315 WJ 

rx-ar 

426X75 


Dot* Jones Averages 


Open High Ioa- Leu Otg. 

lr.au-, J+47 1" U’3S -j -;:j 57 ;-r; u } 

Tran- 141.* V i*i? m »:'* it _? rj 

urn •«-■» mx *3>ii — rj a5- 

Cumo I3t?t-+. U J •7'"/ i- 2v)Z*. —III 


Starccard & Poor’s indexes 


men Lew Cios? cirae 
Industrie 1 LZ'.Ai 529.2* fflt.JS — I.Ofi 

Tram*. 111.71 JJXM md ^-11* 

Utilities ) 56.10 156J3 156.90 +• 0.06 

finance ikS- 1 44.35 *LW - 0.T2 

SP 500 i 5*27 -1S5.66 4PJo Y0JI0 

SP 100 J2J.2T 421.90 4}4 JS +• 0.79 


l ITT 


KYSS indexes 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


VOl. Hfclft 

LOV. 

LOW 

Chg. | 


tom so', 

SB*. 

S9 

3 4 1 


190 x 1 57 s . 



■ ’ J | 


477*0 7 ++ 

0 • te 


■ • 1 


38711 I* 1 * 



1 ,4 I 


37279 36 



1 + 1. 1 


37191 17' j 



— - J 0 [ 


37145 8 

7 *'»* 




UHl C4‘. , 





M752 JJ'i, 



!■ 1 


30706 I*'* 



- If I 


39730 IB' 

■ 4 


1 ' A | 


78800 42 



—2 


78381 l"- n 



■ 11 - 


2ft 17* 77 



■ a | 

IntaDv 

22J38 7?' * 

24„ 


'"'I 

AMEX Most Actives j 


VoL High 

Low 

LaD 

aid. 

OievDh s 

44304 19' • 

IS*- 

17' J 

— 2- m 

E ,pLA 

36974 1 >* 



_ 


ItB.'l 29 ' : 



• I 'J 

yincm rl 

11651 7»k 

6' * 


— -te 


10095 |i'„ 



- - 1 . 


8989 




Vk>^ 

B063 30 V: 

J8 

30=4 

- J 


660ft 364 


3 • 1 . 

• , j 


ad.’* 17 

I4-*- 

W-4 


Teller 

3113 I4>'4 

13 

1J . 

— 1 M j 

Market Sales ! 




LOW LdM 

Chg. 

CfimoryjiK' 

’S3 3° 

?52M 253 (|9 

■9.(11 

mauiirioi. 

310. it 

335.90 2’Clft 

-0 14 

Tronip. 

If 

.’J5J3 2J5 7o 

— 1 J1 


"5 

tv. r- rp° :r 

—0 IB 

Fingr;, 1 

21* U 

;ie.5i :i9c.- 

— 4T.0J 

NASDAQ indexes 


High 

Lew Las) 

Chg. 




— 1 72 

Induilricls 

- il .77 

’3J.^ ’:c 

—1.4* 


7?’ j- 


- 1.37 


co;.-,: 

-7 »_•: 

• r 51 


9J81J 

94/65 


Trjiftp 

6«.t2 

-.1* :c 4V*9c 

■103 

AMEX Stock 2ndex 


Hl«n 

Low Lost 

dig. 


441 11 

43'.5J AiU* 

0 J3 

Dow Jones Sand Aweragas 



Close 

Ch'ge 



?671 

■vinfl 

loumnm 


«X83 

t 0.18 

10 Inav6ir:als 




NYSE DSary 


D/Ki.nve 
Up thcmi+S 
Trust iSSMfl 

Ktvr Hirjns 
N*» Lev- 


Close Prev. 

134 155 

‘.cn»i isrs 

"44 4J2 

?s Ji 

s; j® 


A3SEX 553arvr 


-Ovanc-M 

'jRcnansca 
Total issues 
Hew Hirin', 
Ucw La a . 


261 
s m - a 


;j: 

il c 

725 


NASDAQ Siary 


idv.wo.s! 
Dcclmta 
Uncfianoocl 
Total 'SSurr. 

Maw.- L aw: 


Close 

lj*f 


1*36 

5015 


Pro*. 

JJ3C 


Spat Commodities 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


previous 
Bid An 


Onto 

Bid Ask 
ALUMINUM (High Grade i 
Dalton per metric ion 

Seal | W| hi 1459.50 139150 115150 

Forward 148X53 1J86-M 137X00 1380.00 

COPPER CATHODE s (H loti Grade) 
Mjarsparnwiric.on 2Z71* 

F^ware I3MXQ 2395JM 237 SM 2375® 

LEAD 

Dollars per metric ion 
Seal 52X00 S31J» S1400 515J» 

Forward S37M 53100 SSIM 53U0 

NICKEL 

6MO.OO 6390.00 

FDTwara *49000 6495X0 MTiOO M0® 

TiN 

3y ,m "W ! «S* SMS£0 ««« 

Forward S480® 5490® 5680® 549M0 

ZINC (Special HKrti erode) 

Donors per metric tan 

Soal 962® Ml® m® HR® 

Forward 966® 987 ® 9S2.H 9B3® 


Financial 


High Low Close C&ange 
3-MONTH STERLING ILIFFE) 

I5MA00 - MS Of IN PCt 
Jun 
Sea 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
Sep 
pec 
Mar 
Jim 
Sop 
dec 
M?r 

Est. volume: *3453. Ooen ini.: 0 
3JMONTH EURODOLLARS IUFFE) 

SI million -pKOftNPO 


94.79 

94.76 

94.79 

94X1 

94® 

9640 

93 32 

9X75 

9X77 

93.17 

93® 

9110 

9C® 

9X50 

9251 

92.68 

91.99 

92j01 

91.70 

91 J9 

91 AS 

91® 

91 J29 

97® 

9117 

91.10 

91.13 

W.95 

90.90 

9090 

90J5 

Kj69 

9QJW 

9030 

90.46 

9047 


+ 0® 
unch. 


— BJH 


JUR 

9XA3 

95X2 

9X42 

Sep 

94® 

94® 

94® 

D«C 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9AJU 

Mar 

94 JIT 

94JIT 

94J0I 

Jun 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9X75 

Seo 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9X51 

=si. volume: 716 Open Int.: 

11J59. 


Unch. 
+ Q.0T 
*Om 
Unch. 


3-MONTH EUROMARKS ILIFFE) 

0M7 million - pfs of )M net 
Jun 949] 9490 9492 -HUB 

Se? "4 96 94.96 94«7 Unch. 

Dec 9483 «477 94H — OuOl 

Mar 94^1 M Wj&O — OjOl 

Jun 94^5 943) 9423 — Ofll 

Sep 91 « «. 91 9193 — 0J32 

Dec 93 J2 9149 9170 — 102 

Mar 9153 9150 9331 — OjOl 

Jun 93J6 9132 9134 —04)1 

Sep 9120 9114 9117 + 0JJ1 

OK 93® 92-99 9101 + IU)1 

Mar TLM 91 82 92M +CUM 

ESI. volume: 84*15. Open Ini.: 981256. 
3-MONTH PIBOR (MATIF) 

FF5 million -pts of 1M pci 
Jun 94A6 9443 4444 —ID) 

Spp 4453 J4A9 94® 

Dec 9JJ6 9430 9433 

Mcr 94.12 94D7 94.10 

Jun 9181 9177 9179 _ _ . 

Sep 9333 93 AS 9330 — <U1 

Dec 93J3 9126 9126 — BJJ5 

Mar 93/ 5 9109 9110 — 0.03 

Est. volume: 5631 S Open bit.: 21431 1 
LONG GILT ILIFFE) 

ISOMO ■ pis A 32nas of 1M pel 
Jun 103-02 IE-11 102-19 —M2 

Sep 10129 10D-24 101-11 —M3 

Dec N.T. N.T. 100-11 —Ml 

Est. volume: 6SJ24 Open Int.; 16,364 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND ILIFFE! 
DM 2S4UJOO - Pfs Ofl® PC« 

Sep H0« 9237 9233 —0.10 

Dec 9285 9125 9ZJ8 —ATT 

EsI. volume : 12U94 Open Ini.: 135,442. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATIF1 
FPSMUMW - Pts o! 100 Pd 
Jun 118.02 I17A0 11730 —124 

Sep UTO? 114.46 11664 —0.24 

Dec 115.90 11530 11576 — 034 

Es«. volume: 301,649. ooen lm.: 141.349. 


Industrials 

Hrth Low uwt cn, °* 

i lllli 

I liill 

5S. iaJi 1»J5 1SWS 158.75 +4 B 
Esl.VCUwne: 23311 - 09»W- 

a its its? m ™ "■ 

5 5 1 427 153 1422 


Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

Jon 

FeB 

MOT 


14.18 15.90 

1B.M 

1612 IS.® 
14.10 15.W 

1637 1607 

1610 1610 


1617 

1601 

1600 

1607 

1607 

1610 


1631 + 0.15 
ita +o» 
1617 +02B 
1613 +62t 
1610 +«; 
1610 +021 
i6w +og 
1610 +021 


Esl.volunie: 64474. OPenim. 15005 


Stock Indexes 

HMl Low Close C(W9t 

FTSE MB tUF Fg] 

^permoex^W aoaaUI — ljg 

» g ffl ^8,=!Si 

Esi- volume: 16227. Open bit.: 61A46 
CAC 40 (MA TIF ) 

ani® 

S 

sS 200® 2015® j-ata 

S?- N.T. N.T. ms* 4<OW 

n!t: N.T. 2082® -f-20® 

Est volume: 25.107. Open bll.: 712® 
Sources: «««; A*««fofed Prws. 
Lafdbr] Ml Financial Firfurrs DccWWA 
Inn PelrvUwn Exctianaa. 


DMdends 


Copper eleciral.i. 
Iran FOB. tan 
Lead. 15 
Silver, irsv or 
Sn*el iscrcpt. i or. 

. Tin. io 
I Zinc. IQ 


ToCav 
ll|7 
1 IS 
1.11 
?I2J» 
UJo 
5 r> 
13:3: 
r.6 

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lb 
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H's easy to subscribe 

in France 
just coR, toQ free: 

OS 437 437 


Conwemr Per Amf Pap Bee 

INCREASED 

Hail Moer Inca .15 626 9-lo 

INITIAL 

Firsi Slate Cons - Jg 6-JS 7-1 

ShansPatrochem x J793 6-16 

*-nra pavmenr since going public; approx 
amount per ADR; oav dole unannounced. 

REGULAR 

AflanHc Enerov 
Bloc* Drug A 
CPAC Inc 
Dillard Deni Sir 
Dorchester Hugoton 
Easterner Caro 
Eatanvan MarTaiBt 
EatonUn Trd TarRt 
Eauhv AT&T 
FILM National 
FtodJfy Fra am 
First Inter Bncn 
Global HIIncoDllr 
Greit Bros A 
Harnls ch teger Ind 
Hotteras incoSec 
Illinois Rwodlol A 
llllnoK PwodlWB 
Jones Medical 
LTC Properties 
LovcJa Can 
Morsn sunrmJrtASB 
n ico n Inc 
Pofriat Prem Dv 1 
Peril ana Gen 
Praped SI Hilnco 
Ross Stores 
5 th A labama 
aK2Taraef Term 
Tolepnone Dam 
Traraonlc A 
Tromonle B 
v^estern GasRnsour 
wrhjlevWm 
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monttrty; warier it; s-MmFoiwoai 


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L- 


ured bv Study Linking Low Inflation to Productivity 


Continued from Page 13 

two Federal Reserve economists. 
Glenn D. Rudebusch and David 
W. Wilcox — attempted io adjust 
for the booms and busts in the 
business cycle, although they ac- 
knowledged tbat their success 
could be questioned. 

Instead of consumer prices, the 
new Federal Reserve study uses a 
different measure of inflation — 
prices charged by businesses for all 
goods — that produces slightly 


lower numbers and offers a broad- 
er comparison to business produc- 
tivity. The study excluded prices 
and productivity on farms and ir. 
government agencies. 

Laura D‘ Andrea Tyson, the head 
of President Bill Clinton's Council 
of Economic Advisers, disagrees. 

She said in an interview that 
while extreme. 1 ;- high lev e:.-. of infla- 
tion miciii ha : .e hurt produclivu;- 
elsewhere, inflation in’ the United 
States had never been high enough 
to have a demonstrable effect on 


productivity, even in the late 1970s. 

Barry P. Bosworth, an economist 
at the Brookings Institution, said 
research had failed to document 
any dear link to productivity for 
inflation rates below 20 percent. 
He suggested that in arguing for the 
existence of a link at much lower 
levels. Mr. Greenspan might be 
looking for a politically palatable 
explanation for the central bank’s 
imerest-rate increases this year. 

But Stanley Fischer, an econom- 
ics professor’ at the Massachusetts 


its. Businesses Push tovesttne* 1 jt^ h 

wMawun» "» * n5BS - ^ 

expected to increase investment ^* w01l]d * the biggest ns. 
average of 8 J percent this y^r- . ^ ^ «uter. « . . • 

had fweeast a modest decline. # 

First Data to 

transfer business Western Union ^tnan can wire cash »o -■ 

trivet notn will ammre WCSlCTD UniOH rSl, tsanlcnirl- 



Instinne of Technology who is 
soon to become the deputy manag- 
ing director of the International 
Monetary Fund, said his research 
in the last two years suggested Mr. 
Greenspan might be right. 

Susan M. Phillips, one of five 
sitting Fed governors, said that 
when inflation was low, businesses 
were more willing to judge long- 
term investments on their merits 
and tended to make more efficient 
decisions, adding to productivity. 


countries, l . 

cj^Jawprotecticmfiomjtecr^t^MwwAiu^ iafornwrion- 

westem Union will te adjkd to ™ 
processing businesses. In addition. First Data 
pensi on-fund liabilities. 

FCC Plans for New Mobile-Phone Era 

pr^dSr&M^raBltmg in cha^ u, 

below lioss for ceOular tdeplione Aixbm* II* 

Federal Communications Coamusacm, ReeaHunat.^ 

Xh e ohooes should retail fw about S150. The service is ^ 

a viable toKimeocmsumefs in 1995 at the eariksL But m 10 

veara. Mr Hundt said, between 80 million and 100 mfllKffl shouM>e 
to the new service, which can '*^. aa *J** ^ wa ^! P 3 ® 11 ^ 
mobile faxing and services that have not bear imagined vet- 

Sale Set for Southern Padfic Bloc 

SAN FRANCISCO (Bloomberg) — Southeni Pacifk^l^I wid 
Thursday it would file a registration statement with the Securities aod 
Exchange Commission for a proposed public sale of 1*. million cooppo-a 

shares by some of its shareholders. A 

The company said some additional shares would be offered, subject to 

an overaDotment option. , . , 

Southern Padfic Rail, which operates a freight tadioad network, saia 
Ansdiutz Crap, and Morgan Stanley Leveraged Equity Fimd lhe princi- 
pal selling stockholders, would continue to own substantial interests m 
the company. 

Mexico Gets Environmental Loans 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The World Bank on Thursday approved 
5918 million in loans to bdp Mexico tackle same of its most pressing 
environmental problems. s . , - ' 

The loans are the fust under an agreement signed by. foe Woria Bank 
and Mexican government last year that would provide Moacoas much as 
51.8 billion in loans for environmental protection over the next three 
years. 

The loans include 5368 million for a northern border environment 
project and S3S0 million, to be matched by the Mexican government, to 
improve water and sanitation services across Mexico. 

Morgan Stanley Chief Pessimistic 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — The chairman of Morgan Stanley Group. 
Richard Fisher, told shareholders at the annual meeting Thursday that 
the outlook for the firm’s business in 1994 con tinned to be less favorable 
than in 1993. 

He did not provide details or figures. Last month, . the company 
reported that net income for the quarter ended in April had fallen to 51 ^7 
a share from S2.40 the previous year. 

Mr. Fisher said be was optimistic about the securities anderwriting aiid . 
investment advisory concern’s longer-term oatlook. . 

For the Record 

New York Times Co. said it had started an interactive news service on 
America Online, allowing owners of a personal computer-io read The 
Times. ..... .. 

American farmers will reap 1.67 billion bushels (58.6 billion liters) of 
winter wheat this year, down from last year’s crop of 1.77 billion. 

(Reuters} 


STOCK MARKETS 


,S. FUTURES 


Agencc fiance frame June 9 
ChaoPnv. 


Via Aiujoo-ad Pram 


Ju-e « 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACP Holding 
Aaoon 
Alula 
Akzo NOMI 
AMEV 

Bali-Wessanen 
CSM 
D5M 
Elsnvlar 
Fakfcor 
Gist- Brocades 
HBG 
Helrwken 
Hoagavans 
Hunrer Douglas 
IHC Calond 
Inler Mueller 
Irm Nederland 
KLM 
KNP BT 
Neonavd 
Oce Grlnim 
Pakhoed 
Philips 
Polya ram 
R abaca 
Roaamca 
RaUnco 
Rorento 
Royal Dutch 
Stark 
Unllrver 
Van Ommeran 

VNu ^ 

W«l»n/Kluiwr II3J0 I12JO 


47.40 4CJ0 

44.70 45 

98.90 99 JO 

47.10 47J0 
205.10 20650 

77 JO 77 JO 

J9J0 37 JO 
6460 44.70 

13X50 135® 

166A0 167 JO 
1610 1MO 

47.70 46B0 

325 321 

225 TW.ljfl 

72JS0 7160 
74 75J0 

37.70 3630 

8650 60 

BO 77.90 
5650 5630 
4fl 48 
67 JO 67 JO 
7650 7650 
49® 4690 

53.10 52.70 

78 79 

12650 1 30 JO 
SV.40 59 JO 

122JD 12260 

89 B&7D 
19690 19620 
47 JO 47.W 
19260 1V2J5D 

52.90 52.90 
175 175J0 


Brussels 


AG Fin 
Artwd 
Bared 
Bcko^ri 
CocJterlll 
Cobopa 
CWI ha lie 
Electro boi 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevoerf 
Kredlettxmk 
Petroflna 
Powerfln 
Royal Beige 
5oc Gen Banoue 


2745 2700 
4880 4680 
2300 2340 
25050 24925 
TS7 187 
5990 5960 
1350 1352 
5780 5800 
1570 1570 
4460 4450 
9200 9100 
6700 6730 
10575 10725 
3125 3150 
5150 5150 
8290 8300 


Soe G«n Belglaue 2295 _ 2345 


So lino 
SaWav 
Troctrtel 
UCB 

Union Mlnlere 


15300 15175 
15100 15300 
9950 10050 
24473 24S00 
2670 2690 


nseiriur’’""" 


Frankfurt 

AEG 17816630 

Allianz Hold 2438 3447 

Allans 641 645 

AskO 1038 Iff* 

BASF 315SC31W 

Bavor JS 7.80 -777 AO 

Bov. Hypo banlr 426 427 

Bay ver etasbk 454 449 

BBC 707 Tie 

BHF BarU 397 398 

BMW 809 816 

Commerzbank 32833050 
Continental 258 260 

Daimler Benz 7825080450 
DMUSSO 5045051650 

Dl Babcock. S45JDM750 
Deutsche Bank 740JD73750 
Douahn 565 566 

Dresdner Bunk J7950 37650 
Faidmuehle 347 347 

F Kfu» Hooch 217 J19 


Ha metier 

Henkel 

Hucniiel 

Haoctnl 

Holzmann 


IWKA 
Kali Sab 
karsloffl 
Kurd no) 
KHD 


3S 335 
60950 610 
1087 1085 
348® 351 
897 900 

230 230 
383 388 

145 14650 
636 629 
51 950 569 50 
13620 136 


KioKkn>rWerkel49®i51® 


Linde 
Lufitwnw 
MAN 

Marwsrrxmn 
Metaumell 
Muench Ruecfe 
Porscne 
Proussoo 
PWA 
RWE 

Rholninetali 
Scherlno 
SEL 
Siemens 
Tnysien 
Varta 
Vebo 
VEW 
yias 

Volkswagen 
Woita 
DAX Index : 212632 


923 939 

19250193® 
410 411 

44550 448 

2283150 
2870 2900 
705 760 

441® 447 

22623250 
441 451 

328 338 

1070 >081 
389 m 
49770660 

SI 450 51450 
38250 385 
477 476 

4735004® 
968 9* 


SSH3JP 


Ctao* Fray. 


Helsinki 


Amervy/itymo 

Enso-Gutzelt 

Huhtamakl 

K.O.P. 

Kymmone 

Metro 

Nokia 

P oh Kilo 

Rewaa 

Stockmann 


130 130 

3610 3650 
173 111 

II® 1130 
no in 

170 172 

415 41< 
79 79 

8690 89® 
225 230 


PSW? wW 


Hong Kong 

Bk Emt Asia MJO M.7S 
Camay Pacific 10.90 Hjo 
ammo Kano 3755 38® 
China UahIPwr 41.75 41,75 
Dairy Form inH 10® IB® 
Hans Lung Dev 73^ 13® 
Ham Sona Bank S3 S3 JO 
Honasnon Land a® 41® 
HK Air Ena. 42JS 4325 
HK China Gas .1560 15.90 
HK Electric 2460 34® 
HK Land 20.90 21® 

HK Realty Trust 2240 22® 
HSBC Holdlnos 86 87 

HK Shcno Hfli 12.10 12® 
HK Telecomm 15.10 55 

HK Perrv 14® 13® 

Hutch Whampoa rt.*i 32® 
Hyson Dev 21® 22® 
Jardlne AAalh. 58 59® 
Jardlne Str Hid 3650 31® 
Kowloon Motor mo 15 
Mandarin Orient 11® 13 M 
Miramar haw 2210 22® 
New world Dev 24.10 24® 
SHK Praps 5650 52 

Stalin 365 363 

Swire Poc A 59 58® 

Tal Cheung Pros 11® 11® 
TV6 365 3® 

Wharf Hold _ 3625 30® 

wing On Co InH 11® 11® 
Wlnsor Ind. 11® 11® 

WSMWffi"”' 4 


Johannesburg 

AECI 
A/ reef] 

Anoka Amer 


Barlows 

KBSr 

Do Beers 
PrMCntaln 
Gencor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
HlohveM Steel 
KlOOf _ 
NedBankGro 

Randtonteln 

Rusplat 
SA Brews 
SI Helena 
Sasal 

■luiism unu 


rM i» 

8® 685 
46 47® 
113J5114JS 
59® 59® 
11® mm 
114 116 

24® 24.75 


a® 51 

30 29® 
41 41 

94 92 

94 94® 
43 43 

2445 2*AS 
166 166 

SS«?1SSSS9 ;55MJ1 


London 


AOhey Non 

4J1 

426 

Allied Lyons 

5A5 

568 

Arid Wtarins 

2J3 

2.72 

AruyCI Group 

2A0 

134 

Ass Brit Fell* 

5JB 

XXI 

BAA 

9J1 

9.TH 

BA* 

4® 

4.70 

Ear* ScottawJ 

1.92 

1.94 

Barclays 

ii* 

548 


520 

OO 

Xl9 

442 

BET 

1J1 

122 

Blue Circle 

2J7 

7.W 

BOCGrew 

7,18 

72S 


S31 

SL32 


4J7 

443 

BP 

174 

327 

Brit Airways 

198 

X91 


Ut 

778 

Bril Steel 

1J7 

IJ9 

Brit Telecom 

X75 

176 

BTH 

171 

3.79 

Cable wire 

4.48 

4JS 


466 

473 

CnredHi 

X17 

123 

Coats virefta 

232 

232 

Comm Untan 

SM 

558 

CourtoukB 

ECC Group 

530 

361 

5.15 

173 

Enterprise Oil 

4JK 

194 

Eurotunnel 

150 

363 


1.45 

144 

Fart# 

2J4 

226 

DEC 

XI0 

3® 


56* 

5® 

Gkixa 

549 

544 

Gnnd Mel 

425 

4JP 

GRE 

1JD 

1 J! 

GuIkjwss 

4JS 

439 

GUS 

U 9 

557 


251 

252 

Hlibdawn 

1.71 

1® 

HSBC HfdBS 

725 

733 


t.TO 

8.14 



Ctaet 

Prev. 


430 

492 

Kingfisher 

5® 

523 

Lodbroke 

159 

159 


655 

64! 

Loporte 

752 

745 

Lasmo 

1J9 

1-35 

Legal Gen Grp 

437 

440 

LiovOS Bank 

555 

5*9 

Maria SP 

457 

406 


4J0 

454 

429 

424 

t . . mmH 

462 

4/4 

NtaWst water 

462 

4/8 

Pearson 

658 

640 

P40 

660 

664 

Pllklnatun 

1J7 

1-/6 


470 

449 

Prudennal 

X99 

XU5 

Rank Oro 

X92 

5.10 

m 

mum inti 

8117 

0.14 

Reuter* 

489 

4® 


856 


Ralls Ravat 
Rottunn lunlt) 
Royal Scot 

150 

X96 

416 

41S 

RTZ 

853 

850 

Soinsbury 

352 

xw 


557 

5® 

Sad Power 

344 

346 

Sears 

1-22 

Ul 


5.10 

5 

Shell 

637 

455 

51 Otoe 

574 

547 

Smith Nephew 

1® 

151 

SmlttiKllne B 

196 

X92 

Smith IWH) 

4® 

492 

Sun Alliance 

113 

519 

Tate* L vie 

413 

414 

Tosco 

2.18 

2)0 

Thorn EMI 

10.93 

1079 

Tomkins 

X22 

258 


223 

2.18 

Unilever 

10 

10.10 

utd Biscuits 

1® 

i?4 

Vodaton* 

514 

518 

War UxnOVft 

42 

42.13 


5.72 

550 

Whitbread 


527 

WjJIKmtsHdas 

341 

345 

Willis Corroor 

159 

159 


Madrid 

BBV 3145 31® 

Bco Central Him. 2885 2905 

Banco Santander 4910 48® 

BrewWp 1055 1025 

uraoixkra 2260 2305 

Endasa 4290 *3® 

E/cros 219 217 

Itordrola 1025 11)20 

Repul 4810 4865 

Tahacaiora ms 4100 

Telefonica 1650 1885 


Milan 


Banco Comm 5125 5210 
Bastaol 183 1 81 

Benetton ornw 267® 21i"C 

af 

Crod Hal 
Enlctiem 
Ferfln 
F erfln Rls> 

Flat SPA 
Fln m e min lca 
Genera II 
IFI 

I talcum 
(Fa tats 
ItalmoUllare 
Medlofxmco 
Montedtsan 
Olivetti 
Pirelli 
RAS 

Rlmucenta 
SalPem 
San Paolo Torino 10400 10460 
SIP 4580 4570 

5ME 4030 3m 

Snta 2590 2615 

Stando 37200 38000 

Stat SS95 5670 

Toro Aral Rtso XI® 30500 

KiMTif 



Montreal 


Atatm Aluminum 
Bonk Montreal 
Bail Canada 
Bombardier B 
CotWHor 
Cascades 
OiminionTnfA 

DanotiveA 
MacMillan Bl 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Core. 
Quebec Tet 
OyMwA 
Quebacor B 
Tetaotabe 

Urrfva 

V K tao t ran 


27 VS 31 L. 
2Aki 24 U. 
6744 4ffU 
2114 21V 
181* I8W 
lv* BV* 
6*8 64* 
m* in* 
1B4* IBM 
B46 84* 

71 21V* 
2DM 214* 
IB 18 
174* 18 

1B9* IHi 
64* 6'm 

13 TJW, 
186438 


Claee Prev. 


Parte 


Accor 675 674 

Air Uaulde B01 B03 

Alcatel Ale thorn 63B 630 


Ajco 

Bancolre ICle) 

BIC 

BNP 

Bavyoues 

BSN-GO 

Carretaur 

C.C.F. 

Cents 
Charoeurs 
Clments Franc 
Club Mad 
Elf-Aqultalne 
EI(-S<mof1 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Earn 


1360 1377 
5« , 557 
1268 '1269 

247.90 253 

657 664 

838 847 

1858 1890 
230 233.10 

111.90 110 
1383 I4TS 

315 322 

41B® 415 

ete® 41610 
861 B90 

34.10 35.» 
2265 2344 
43630446.10 
560 568 


Imefol ... w 

Lotaroa Coupee 413® 412® 

Leonnd 6ra} *270 

Lyon. Eoux 532 551 

Onto) (L'l 1154 1160 

L.VJVLH. 872 HI 

Molra-Hachetia . 113113® 
Mlchdln B 233.40 229® 

Moulinex 145 139 

Forlbas 388® 395 

Pectrtnev Inti 169 169 

Pernod- R I card 37B® 3Sfl.“Q 

Peugeot B31 82* 

Plnault Print 92B 934 

Rodtatechnliwe 
Rh-Pajlanc A 


RaH. Si. Louis 
Saint GatMln 
5.EB. 

St* Generate 
Suez 


484 475 

137 138® 
1645 1645 

tf 7 SI 

607 613 

311 315® 


Tbamson-CSF 167® 172.10 


Total 

UAP. 

Valeo 


320.4*1 321® 

152® 153 

254® 257® 




Sao Paulo 


Bonca do Brasil 

Bcrosoct 

BrtXMSco 

Brahma 

Camlg 

Eletrobros 

itaubanco 

uaftf 

Parana panama 
Pairabras 
Soma Cruz 
Tehibras 
Telesa 
Usiminas 
Vale Rio Doce 
Vorfo 


40 34 

77 17 

13.90 1360 
550 556 
150 150 
415 460 

494 4«o 

460 480 

39 39 

220 213 

11.79912500 
B4® 00® 
675 650 

2J2 227 
220 210 
220 NA 

awi"" 


Singapore 


345 US 
7.90 7JS 

HJO 1U0 
aio 


Cere bos 
City Dev. 

DBS 

Fraser Neeve 11® 18. . 
Gentlno 1310 18.10 

Golden Hope PI 247 240 
How Par 3® 3M 

Hume industries 5J5 520 
inetwaae 5® 5® 

Kepaei 11.10 10.98 

KL Keaeng 3® KM 
Lum Oxmo 
Mn Aryan Banka 
OCBC taretgn 


OUB 
DUE 

Sembummu 
Shanorllo 
Sim# Darby 
SIA foreign 
SHore Land 
Statr* Press 
Sing Steamship 
S'pore Telecomm 146 3-53 

Straits Trading 3J6 172 

UOB toman 17® 77 

UOL 225 23B 


1® 1.44 
8® 8® 
HID 1130 
6J0 6 JO 
8® BJ5 

NA - 
130 535 
1B6 1*6 
1270 12® 
7A5 7® 
15® 15® 
4.H 6.14 


Stockholm 


AGA 
Asca A 
Astro A 
Aflas Copco 
E lectrolux B 
Ericsson 
Essen e-A 
Handolsbanken 

investor B 

Norsk Hydro 
Procardia af 
S ondvlk B 
SCA-A 
Sjfe Bonken 
SkondJo F 
Skmska 
SKF 
Stem 

Trelleboro BF 
Volvo 

A ff a sr i raeridwt ; 
Pravtaus : ibsam 


395 400 

575 602 
W 171 
1&S0 96 

372 377 

385 391 

122 123 
103 103 

17B 182 
225 231 
125 127 
113 114 

113 116 
,50 SO® 

114 176 

178 180 
138 14| 
410 412 
107 110 

736 743 
1841® 


Toronto 


Abltlbl Price 

17 

17* 

Agnlcs Eagle 

!8fe 

I5Te 

Air Canada 

636 

63k 

Alberta Enemy 

204» 

®=^ 

Am Ban-lckRes 

33 

31* 

BCE 

471* 

483k 

Bk novo Scotia 

2SVi 

25»S 

EC Gas 

1478 

r4«te 

BC Telecom 

»h 

241b 

Broirnrteo 

A2B 

059 

Brunswick 

10«. 

HP* 

CAE 

6"* 

7 

Camdev 

5 

5 

CIBC 

29'ft 

294, 

Canodion Paclllc 

an* 

M»k 


Close Pro. 


lessen Season 
“19 " lo* 


Ciren Hnm Low arse Cp tr- 


| Sydney 


Amcor 

955 

ejO 

ANZ 

4.11 

4.1* 

BHP 

1X50 

1862 

Bornl 

350 

3® 

Bouoalnvlllo 

056 

G.72 

Coles Mver 

437 

■154 

Camalca 

545 

X4l 

CRA 

19.04 

19® 

CSR 

490 

4® 

Fosters Brew 

1.13 

1.15 


157 

1® 

ICI Australia 

nae 

11 

Maaallan 

2 

1.90 

MIM 

332 

118 

NatAust Bank 

11.16 

II® 

News Caro 

904 

9® 

Mine Network 

4 ;s 

4.75 

M Broken HIM 

3.72 

3A5 

Poc Dunlop 

42V 

4® 

Pioneer Inti 

X05 

XOS 

Nmndy Poseidon 

225 

132 

QCT Resources 

143 

143 

Santos 

XVI 

my 

TNT 

2JV 

Z4J 

Western Mining 

112 

7.95 

Wesfpoc Banking 

451 

451 

Woodside 

447 

451 

All ortBnnrtes Imkm : 207470 
Previous : 207950 

I Tokyo 



527 

514 


772 

770 

Asohl Glass 

1270 

1280 

Bank of Tokyo 

1680 



1650 

1*40 


1780 

1790 


1370 

13® 

Dal M Japan Print 

19® 

1930 


1540 

1560 

Dolwa Securllhn 

1840 

1B20 

Fanuc 

47*0 

4740 

Full Bank 

2380 

2390 

Fu|l Photo 


8>--8l 

Fujitsu 

11® 

11® 

Hitachi 

mu 

11® 

Hitachi Coble 

925 

912 

Honda 

19® 

1940 

Ito Yafcodu 


5358 

Itochu 

74V 


Jojmh Airlines 

72* 

7TI 

Kajima 

963 

9*2 

Konsol Power 

26® 

2700 

Kawasaki Steel 

416 

417 


12® 

1250 

Komatsu 

9*3 

974 

Kubota 

732 

725 

Kyocera 



mo 

iejI 

Matsu Elec Wks 

II® 

ii® 

Mitsubishi Bk 


2750 

Mitsubishi Kasel 

5® 

515 

Mitsubishi Elec 

716 

710 

Mitsubishi Hev 

B19 

787 

Mitsubishi Corp 

1240 

1230 



826 

MltsukMhl 

10U 

1030 

Mitsumi 

2010 

20® 

NEC 

1240 

1*40 

NGK Insulators 

tan 

11® 

Nlkka Securities 

1440 

14® 


10® 

10® 

Nippon Oil 

775 

777 

Nippon steel 

368 

365 

Nippon Yusen 

645 

*37 

Nissan 


BSt 

Nomura Sec 

2S5S 

24*0 

NTT 

*1; 

Olympus Optical 

IK1 

IfY.'ll 

Pioneer 

3000 

30® 

Ricoh 

VV5 

998 

Sanva Elec 

M3 

578 

Sharp 

18® 

1840 

Shimozu 


758 

Shlnelsu Chem 

2240 

2UQ 

Sonv 

A35V 

*3® 

Sumltama Bk 

T240 

2210 

Sumitomo Chem 

5® 

4VS 

Suinl Marine 

IDUO 

979 

Sumitomo Metal 

300 

2*9 

Tatsel Carp 


Si 

TaWio Marine 

B00 

Totodo cnem 

1200 

1210 


49® 

HUI 

Tallin 

54/ 

544 

Tokyo Marine 

1350 

1350 

Tokyo Elec Pw 

3700 

37® 

Toopan Printing 

14® 

1490 

Torav Ind. 

752 

737 

TashRm 


8*3 

Toyota 


2140 

Yamaich) Sec 
a: x 101 

990 

«59 





Con Tire a 

Cantor 

Care 

CCL Ind B 

Cine ole- 

Comincr 
Conwesi =xpl 
CSA Mai A 
Dotasco 
Dylee a 
E cho Bay Minn 
Equity Silver A 
FCA Inti 
Fed Ina A 
Flarchor C.U.T a 
FPI 
Gen Ire 
Gulf OJc Fes 
Hees Inti 


11-x 

IB'* 

4.C5 


U'. 

ir. 

0.83 
14V* 
0® 
5® 

0*7 

7744 

r« 

0.48 
41* 
14 

Hernia G Id Mines 111, 


Holllnaer 
Horsham 
Hudson's Bcv 
Imp sco 
tnco 
Jannock 
Labatt 
LobiawCo 
Mackerels 
Magna Inti A 
Maple Leal 
Maritime 
Mark Rm 
M atson A 
Noma ind A 
Noranaa inc 
Noranda Forest 
Norcen Energy 
Nthn Telecom 
Nova Coro 
Oihawa 
Paaurln a 
P lacer Dome 
Paco Petroleum 
PWA Coro 
Rorreek 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 

Rothmans 
Raral Bonk Can 
Scepfre Res 
Scott's Hoso 
Seagram 
Sears Can 
Shell Can 
SherrJft Gordon 
5HL Systemhse 
Soul ham 
Spor Aerosoace 
S telco A 
Talisman Energ 
Tecfc B 

Thomson 
Toronto Damn 
Torstor b 
T ransalio Util 
TrcnsCoa Pipe 
Triton Flnl A 
Trlmac 
TrlseeA 
Unicom Energy 


IP- 
19 
J8't 
35 
3SVj 
16 
31 w 
22»* 
91. 
SS'i 
12ie 
25« 
BVs 
nvt 
si* 


uw 

18'.: 

4 

4J5 

22^4 

2I 5 * 

Il'i 

20’s 

DJ3 

141* 

aw 

285 

I7A. 

6 

0® 

4.45 

14 

11*1 

151, 

19 

79 

35 

35 

16V7 

S’* 

22M, 

91S 

54 

IZVh 

251S 

84* 

227* 

5U 


Grains 


WHEAT ICECT) jjoo In, ->.n4*VT'- ooBor, 5 


jJ4 

257'. 

165 

141 

15D-: 

J42K. 


HI Jul»4 J36 

ic: Sen v* 344 
3W Lk?J SJ4 
IT .’.lar«i 25* 
3.1±’:M3r95 
3.11 


;».ie 


XI*' : 133' 1 14 543 

X45'1 1® 1C-,— lat-! 

XT'l jjl : 3J4 -O.a-; 

159 155 ISVa— 3JC--1 

147V.-C.Bls 


1-441 

L9i9 

61 

zn 


0.4* 

10 

?■>=*, 

I9»* 

741* 

2B 

13«i 

8*t 

42*4 

71* 

42 

1)4* 

*** 

lBfe 

16 

7** 

28 

24'- 

154- 

31>* 

3TL 

141b 

'i7> 

tM 
1S’7 
014 
1 AS 




0® 

IB 

29V* 

1914 

74 

27*4 

13V* 

Bv* 

42 V* 
7V, 
4141 
7714 
*V, 
181ft 

16 
BV* 
28 V* 
24 Hi 

16 

2IVa 

231* 

14V> 

17Vft 

AM 

151m 

0J4 

IAS 


Zurich 

ACIa mil B 245 

Alu9vls.sc & new 64? 

BBC Brwn Btn- B 1Z20 1223 


Cltra GelTr B 
CS HolairiTs B 
Elefctraws 
Fischer B 
Interdlscounl B 
Jelmoll B 
Landis Gvr n 
Moevenpick B 
Nestle P 
Oerilk. Buenrie P 
Parsew Hid B 
Rocne Hdg PC 
Safro Republic 
Sando: a 
Schindler B 
Sulrer PC 
Sarveillcnce B 
Swiss Bnb Coro B 
Swiss Relnsur R 
Swissair R 
UBS B 
Winterthur B 
Zurich Ass B 
SBS index : 97761 
Previous : ?w.« 


JUI93 U7‘l 127ft J27 - .: 3r , ft-C.t4". 
cec;* 33r*-ao4v. i 

Est. Mies 18JXW Wee's, sates 23J82 
vrea's ooen int gtJM7 ua 1 5504 
j WHEAT (KSOTJ Jjtfoou-i^murrv. awarsnarBianvi 
XS5 197 Jul 94 3M 145’ft 143 341’ft— 0® 11777 

3Jf* 3®ViSeo94 XJ3 146 V> 143 143 V —O.oi 4JJ79 

3.4C i!2’ftDec94 1®'* 1541* lee 1 * isow-aOM* SJ32 

JJS’t 125 tAarV5 15! 153V; 149W 150>6-0.QUi 1.019 

U5 321'ftMav9514av* 3^1 1«W 140V,_0.B2'ft 19 

133't 3.02V, JuMS 133V. 3JHi 13» i3J»i ‘HXPi 23 

En.wies NA Wed's. Mies BJJtb 
W eO's ooor inr IAJ49 UP 1324 
CORN tCBOT} LOODoum * nunum-cDdOrt par umM 
3.1*' , i Ul Jul *4 U3 'm 1744. 2_W* JJVi-aW’M 98.675 
2.92'/i 140’-, Sep 44 167 269 164=* 165W 37,940 

2.7H4 134V, Dec 94 158 2,41% 157V, 2J8 -OJXTVj B8.245 

179V, 24B%Mcr9S 264W 166 164'A 164=* *OJ30^ 10J62 

2J3 2® May 95 170'., 271 W UBW 268V.-0®VS 1^55 

Ul't 1S4 Jul 9) 171’* 172V* 170 170 -Q-OOVi 7.B34 

147 255 5e*»W 260V- 140V, 158V* 2JSW -0JH 13 

159 143 Dec 95 151 W 25414 251 Vi 252W -0J1V, 3.775 

Est. soles 50®o Wkts. rates 41.726 
wed's ooen In 241299 up 68 
SOYBEANS (CBOT) J^JOBu rTVrWTum- aolcn c 


K 1 * 

25 

7 JO 

5.94 Vi Jul 94 

4® 

6.77 

4® 

472te 

12 

12lk 

7J5 

6® 

Aua*4 

6.711ft 

4.7SV1 

469 

4®W 

I4*B 

Ul3 

7.081* 

417 

SftnU 

455Vi 

440 

454 

455 

47V, 

4TVi 

7J57 lt i 

5J5\5N0vM 

444 

M9Yi 

441 V. 

442 V5 

NJJ. 

— 


413 

Jan 95 

491 

454 

447V, 

447 Vi 

Mi.-: 

®’ft 

7.0C 1 '* 

418 

Mar 95 *J4'ft 

4J7W 

453*. 

453 

140 

130 

7.03 V. 

6JI 

May vs 4MV* 

459 

455 

455V. 

79*7 

29*8 

7® 

6® 

JU 95 

440’* 

46J 

458 

458 

10 V* 

10 

bSOVi 

561 Vi Nov 95 

416 

4)9 

414 

4)8 


249 

470 


853 873 
602 AOB 
372 366 
1370 1400 
2470 2450 
875 B70 

flta MS 
450 445 

I1W 11*9 
145 144 

1640 I6» 
6805 6890 
124126® 
745 74J 

7700 79IKI 
940 955 
21® 2090 
420 424 

MU 408 
774 792 

1242 1253 
745 J» 
13*5 1400 


PB* wB tofl-free: 
0 800 2703 


H's easy to subscribe 


Est. rates HUM Wed’S, soles 43684 
Weds ooen ini 148324 up 1632 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) ntm- Mannar kn 
230.00 185.20 jm 94 I9A00 195 JO 193® 194.10 

223® I M® Aug 94 19180 195® 17360 194.10 

J10M 183. 10 Sep 94 19100 19440 t92® 192.90 

S1LM 180 DO Od 74 171® 172® 170® TC8.W 

209® 178 K Dec 94 1«0® 191® 189.50 109.70 

701® 17850 Jd" 93 HI® 191® 189 JW 1«® 

203® 181® Mar 95 191® 1 92® 191® lft® 

201® 181 OOMaVH 191® 191® 190® 190JU 

,98® ,82® jui 95 19200 moo mm ivg® 

Est. sates 17.000 Wed's, sates 14644 
wnfsooenlm 82.244 lb 611 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) tamte-deOn-i ear loam. 
3062 21® Jul 74 27® 27J77 27® 27® 

3065 2165 Aug 94 27® 27® Z7® 27® 

30J» 22® 590 94 2764 2764 2763 27® 

2954 22.1000 94 26.® 27.12 21W 26.96 

:aiff 22.M Dec 94 2665 2669 2465 24.45 

J8S 23. 65 Jen 9S 74® 2t® 26® 24® 

:a® 74.70 Mcr 95 74.15 26® 26.15 26.15 

38.05 2 462 May 95 74.10 76J0 76® 24® 

7’55 J465JUJ9J 25.95 25.95 2590 2590 

Aug 9S 75® 25® 25® 25® 

Est. sales NA Woo’s, sates 16.167 
Wed's open w 85.562 up 470 


bvmd 
0.05 


-0.D4 

♦0® 


4fl®9 
17664 
9J85 
61,018 
5542 
3540 
1 .436 
1685 
1625 


-in 

-1.10 

-ajo 

•0J0 

-uo 

-0® 

-0® 

-0® 

-a® 


*an 

-0.15 

»C.IJ 

*0.19 

-a® 

*0jU7 

>0J5 

*0JO 

*0® 

4115 


21.224 

17611 

10.7U 

5614 

17.920 

1651 

1618 

359 

2*1 


23.050 

15,130 

IIJ79 

8.146 

21J77 

7.053 

2656 

774 

201 

1 


Livestock 

CATTLE IOMER) 40600 bk- cent, 1 


7427 

4X30 Jun 94 

6475 

liU 

6420 

64B 

*1 87 

62.15 Aug 94 

6415 

65X5 

6X57 

SX80 

74 ID 

45.7000 VJ 

67.75 


67 J» 

47.15 

74J0 

4+®D«V4 

64+5 

69X5 

6440 

64*5 

7J.25 

67. 90 Feb 95 

49.95 

7825 

6M0 

49.40 

7iia 

67/40 Apt 95 

71 DO 

71® 

7015 

7IU7 

71 50 

6490 Jun 95 




67 30 


Est rates 19.157 Wed's, sates 19622 
wed s ooen ini 71. m up 1328 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMEBI SOJHOfak-ewRMrte 
Stitt 71. 10 Aug 94 7120 73.67 7250 72 JU 

3170 71® Sec 94 7X02 7305 72® 7140 

BIOS n.SOOdW 72.95 7160 7135 7132 

8800 7265Nay74 7645 74® 7350 73® 

90.95 77. 95 Jan 9ft 74® 74 SO 7173 73® 

s0 25 77 65 Mar 94 71® 7160 7X02 7X02 

7485 7145 AW 96 71® 73® 72J5 TL75 

Esi. sales 2.837 Wed's, rales 3471 
Wed's open ini 14,179 i*> 233 
HOGS (CMER) 4W00b4.- eems owls 

5607 6X20Jwt74 45.40 46 40 45® 4197 

55 37 45 X Jul 94 4640 4693 4635 4665 

SI 40 44® Au* 04 4597 46® 4585 4660 

49.75 42.4503 91 4X55 44.05 4X45 43J7 

50® 40.05 Dec 94 44® 44® 4X9S 44® 

50® 4U0FriJ« 44.15 44.27 44.® 46® 

48® 40. 90 Apr 95 43® 4165 4130 4X23 

51® 4760 Jun 9S 4t» 4X75 4HJP 

44® 47® Jut 95 48.40 48® 48® 48® 

Esi. Mies 5840 Wed's rates 9J9J 
Wed's roen in) 29603 on 368 
PORK BELLIES (CMER) NMn-Minh 
SS 39J0.M94 39.95 40.90 39® 40J2 

5*50 3i.TSAua9t 396S 4039 39.15 39.67 

61.15 J1.1 0 Feb 95 47.55 48® 4760 47.75 

38 ftO Mar 95 47 35 47JJ5 47® 47JK 

61® mo MOV 45 «® 

52® 50 JO Jul 95 «® 

5U2S 49.75AW9S . «« 

Esi rates 1618 WctTssflles 4®3 
Wed's open In) 8488 ofll4 


+ 0® 9634 
—O.I2 31.138 

-O® 14.914 
—0® 11.1*3 
—OlS5 4-987 
-063 3®2 
-0® 601 


—9.0 7,257 
-0® 2J92 
-065 1175 
—070 1.701 
-O® S2S 
_<L23 48 

-0® *1 


*0® 2613 

4 0® 10618 

,ac 8.779 
-0.10 4672 
.BIB 3663 
—0.10 752 

—ft® 436 
—AOB 202 
-0.10 30 


*0® 4J97 
*925 X544 

40® 33 

1? 
3 


Food 

COFFEE C (MC3EI irjtates-wNswyte. 
iS® 64 «!mM 1J7® 129® 133® 136.85 

- SiaStM 126JO 120® 122.00 12365 

7T 10 Sc 94 124.35 125® 120® 13085 

!n® m iits 

Est, sates 13J03 Wed’swtesi 14457 
wed's ooenlni 5 aJ® up 943 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 INOE) iiUOOlB.-(teMSMrta 

SrSfpisJujia 12® 1360 12® 1*62 

11D *.47tXJ94 12® U-J* (Mf 

II® T.I7Mqr9i 11® 1310 U *7 


141.80 

IJ7® 

134® 

133® 

)30® 

125® 


-3.10 I7®4 
-445 18653 
— XD5 I2J01 
— SLID 7M» 
—1.75 8W 
~2M9 «n 
-400 ® 


-AM 39,236 
64«d 

—8.05 25,90ft 





MM 


mmm 



Season 

Stetson 



mmKm 


Hi'jr 

Lew 

Coer. 

High 

Law 

Case 

Chg 

OP.Int 

Won 

Low Open 


LOW 

Cose 

Chg CoW 



11.99 

12X2 

11.95 

11.92 

—0X2 

3.93« 

94730 

9X710 Jun 95 91760 

91770 

93J10 

9X748 

—7025X306' 



11 93 


li.vo 

11® 

— no 

1/477 

94520 

9IJ10SCP9S 9X530 

91540 

91690 

91510 

-30 '.7X643 

!1JK 





11.79 


726 

94280 

91.1® Dec 95 91310 

93410 

7X170 

93280 

+-30*37.745 






1U9 

+0X1 

51 

94220 

9X750 Mor 96 «J60 

91270 

9X210 

9X230 

—35134299 

Esr. scies 24708 wea'Lstfei 

1 33153 




I Est. sates na w«r*.jote» 

421892 




wec'scpenlnt 13363s up 2374 
COCOA (NCSEI 10 name mm- s wnon 


999 Jul 94 1340 1344 IT’D 

1023 Sac 94 1370 1372 1313 

1041 Dec 96 1407 1—8 1158 

T07T V\or 9S 1435 I4J5 73»S 
1078 Ulav<S 1443 1443 1443 

1725 Jut *5 
lZ655eo9j 
1290DK95 
1150, War 96 
ED . sales 13.207 Wad's soles 11.228 
wen's ooen fce 74jn ott 734 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTNJ ISAM tes^cente mr 
13500 fZ65Jul« n3S 9550 9595 

95® Sip 94 98JS 99-tO V7J5 
96J5Nav94 1U.4S 100.45 99® 
97,70 Jan 95 101® 101® 1W.W 
99.75 Mcv 95 102® 102® 10473 
IK® Mov 95 
105.00 JU19S 
I II® Sep 95 
Nov 95 

E*. rates 1 M0 Wea-s. sws 3655 
Wed's Often 1m 22651 up 340 


;j«6 

1 14« 

; :sr 

| IH 

, in 
1593 
1353 

I iro 

I 1408 


134® 

13LOO 

132.00 

12125 

11425 

1W® 

111 ® 


l®I 

1329 

13*6 

1396 

1415 

1*37 

1457 

1490 

IS71 


fS-SO 

97.95 

99® 

101® 

1D2J5 

104® 

10475 

107.75 

106J5 


—40 21,1® 
-41 2X375 
—41 1035 
—41 7,869 
-41 2.937 
—41 2.345 
-41 1,170 
-41 3.163 
-41 3 


-OM 9.176 
—060 7.716 
— 0J5 7638 
♦035 MU 
♦ 1® 1,118 
♦ 0® 36 

♦0® M 


'0® 


Metals 

HI SHADE OOPPER (NCMX) a6M4a.-antsperb. 
10445 7410 Jun 94 109® 109® 109® 109® 

109® 

109® 

107® 

102® 

102 ® 

107.58 
102 ® 

ICDJte 

105.00 
1DX® 

92® 

92.00 
10460 
9105 
99® 

94® 


74® Jul 94 109® 170JO 109.90 10965 

74® Sao 94 109® 110.20 108® 109® 
7X75 DK 94 10&® 108® 107® 107® 

76.90 Jon 95 107.15 

73®F*9S 106.60 

7100 Mar 93 10665 107® 106.80 106® 

7665 MOV »5 1G4J5 

70® Ju< 95 104® 106® 104® 1DX45 

7JJ0AUO9S lia® lift® 109 JO 1IW® 

79. 10 3«P 95 102.90 103® 1(0.90 1D265 


10X55 

708.10 

101.95 

10175 

101® 

10505 


586J 

sno 

5970 
564. 0 

IjMJI 

6065 

6100 

6150 

*2BO 

5750 

6180 


7570 Oct 95 
77.75 Itejv 9S 
88® Dec 98 
0850 Jon 96 
62® Mar 9* 

91.10 Air 96 

E». sain njna wed'n. sate! i*.iS7 
wed's Open Ini 61,191 ua 1344 
SILVER (NCMJO UNirara.-CMiMiina. 

5MO J7SSJWI94 5315 53SJ 53XJ 5360 
3710JUI94 5340 5430 5340 5375 

AU094 5404 

3760 5*P 94 5405 5470 5370 5 *24 

3800 Dec 9< 5465 5550 5440 5490 

401 J) Jan 95 SS1J 

4I*JMcr 95 5546 SSBjD S54J 557^ 

4160 May 95 5640 5640 5610 5627 

•280 All 95 56*0 5*90 5*95 568A 

49}OSep93 574J 

5390 Dec 95 ohj 

5750 Jan 94 5864 

5ES.S,Marfl* 39XJ 

Es>. sates 200® Wed's, sates 12.999 
Wad'S open M 723063 off 882 
PLATINUM IHMERl smu-unHirwa. 
437® 357® JUI 94 399® 402.90 399® 401® 

435® 368000a 94 40450 406® Ml® 403® 

42»® 374® Jon 55 «UK) 4WJ® 406® 406.10 

4B.no 39800 Apr 95 407® 410® 407® 408® 

Est rates 2J96 Wetfi soles 6513 
Wed's men im 245S5 up 9*6 
GOLD (NCMX) Wreni-ikknnltwa. 

417® 339® Jun 94 382.® 384® W® 38110 

38*® Jut *4 38190 

341 50 Aug 94 384® 386® 38X70 -■WSta 
344® Oa 94 187® 3t»® 387® 388® 

343® Dec 94 398® 392® 189® 391® 
3*350 Feb 95 39550 3*550 39550 394® 
36*50 Anr 95 397® 197® 397® 398® 
361® Jim 95 401. IB 401.10 401.10 401.90 
40550 
409® 
41120 
417® 
421® 


415® 

417® 

42650 

411® 

417® 


41250 

41X38 

*29® 

42450 


38850 Aud 95 
410® Od*! 

400 50 Dec 9 5 
41 250 Feb 96 
Apr 9j 

Efl-soies 26.000 Wed's, rates 15.567 
WM's open kit 135440 ott 97S 


4.DL8S 758 

*890 34.545 
*0190 1X528 
+855 1938 
+0® 

+0L25 

+0® 2,190 
-025 782 

+035 726 

♦ 0.90 578 

♦ US 526 
+ 0J5S 

+ D.4S 

+0® 772 

+(145 
+070 
+0JH 


+12 

+2JJ 74,636 
+ 2.0 

+2.1 14J16 
+ 2.1 I64T7 
♦XI 

+11 5730 
+ L1 
-11 
+LI 
+X1 
+11 
♦II 


+ 1® 12,781 
"1® 7J07 
‘ 1 ® 1.212 
-I® 1,055 


-1® 1.056 
♦1® 10 
+ 1® 70.120 
+ 1® 5,179 
+ 1® 2X916 
*1® 5.741 
+ 1® 6.171 
♦1® 7,495 
91® 1,163 
+ 1® 

*1® 4500 
♦1® 

*1® 


9,980 

17,361 


Financial 

U8T.BILLS ICS6ER) IlnOftn. DKBlinMI 
951b 9L26Jun94 9X81 9X82 9XB0 9581 

96® 94675s>94 9X34 9X34 9SJI 9X34 

94.10 94® Dec 94 94.79 94.74 44JS 94^8 _nni 7™ 

9X05 919BMOT9S M52 «*5S 94J2 945S -OX) w 

ED. rates MJL Wed's. rates 4516 
We& imnm lre 3X684 up J.TS 

I VH. TREASURY (CBOT1 (laftaqea+M- iu_. 
11245103-075 JU1941QS-315 106-02 UJ5-29 106-00 - ftl M 777 

110- 195102-12 SCP 94105-035 HBHJa 105-00 0Q5 

104-18 101-24 Dec 44 iS_M_ 

ED. sates N-A. wed's, sates 60.9M 38 

WOO'S ooen Int (97.«S up 117 

iolHlTI^WURY ICHOTl iivunmn-MixKnisDlDDK] 

115-21 102-11 Jun 98 106-19 106-22 106-13 1M „ 

115- 01 101-18 S«>94 106-15 105-19 105-09 lOS-le - ni lu 

114- 21 100-25 0« 94104-13 u£ia 1M-13 «I)8 1 2 

111- 07 UO-Q5 Mv 95IIQ-2J 10-25 103-23 ja£a 0 

I OS-22 99-70 Jun«S 10X03- m a 

Est. sates NJL Wed's, sates 99,717 111 9 

Wad'S door In) 262J24 ott Ton 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBCm I* aeMW*®*^ « M 1M „ 
119-29 91-06 Jun 94105-18 105-34 105-11 IB-23 
!!«-» 90-12 Sep«4f«-a 104-27 l£ { |£2: 2? 5 

118-01 91-19 Dec 94 1 [Vs -OO 104-06 )03-2i Inlla* - 2! 

116- ® 99-14 Mur 95103-11 IftJ-ll 1^4 I H 

115- 19 98-15 Jun9S 2* 

HJ-'S 99® Sep 95 ]S_?1 l 

113-14 98-27 Dec 95 jE U * “ 

11M6 98-a M»9* S ;S ‘ * 

ES. rates NA. Wed's, sates 394.057 B 

Wed's open lit *1x493 ott 105c 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBOT) 

104-07 17-06 J«l94 9i® 

95-1? «-« 5cp M9!HJ* »07 rZll J 3 # 1 ~ >W« 

Est. sates NA Weffs. sates 10.759 73-23 - U 1X554 

Werfsoocnira jq®j m ss* 

EWWD0LUU8 ICMERl 

9XM 90.400 Jun 94 ISOS 9X0^9X42? ««, 

MJD0 W.MWP94 MM 949® JlfS S52 315.73d 

95.160 90710 Dec 94 S4®a 94.340 uSm S™ 

9X» «7« Star 03 «I M j«»Mg 


3ri01 

1.185 

1*2 

23 

<0 


BRITISH POUND ICMER3 lnvosuno-l oamr«aslMi 
1-5226 1.4474 Jun 94 1J106 1JT10 1J»*0 1JW5 +M Z4.T1J 

1J200 1A440 Sep 94 1 SM 1.5090 1X038 TJ076 -!0MjS»7 

1^170 1,4500 Dec 94 1JOSO 1J076 1J020 1JO60 -13 in 

IJ170 lA44QMcr 96 1®** - )C . 14 

ED. sates NA Wed's, sales 18J77 
Wad’s ooanim 44324 off 888 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) iMrarintemP 
0-7005 171 13 Jun 94 07274 07282 072*9 07273 

0.7740 07068 Sep 94 072*0 07253 07238 OJ243 

0J470 07038 Dec 94 07220 07224 07715 07215 

07695 0.70® Mar 95 0JIS8 

0.7522 ft 6990 Jun 95 07143 

03160 0.70643X395 03140 

ED. Idles na wed's, saws 12371 
Wed's open in) 44,735 

OSIMANMARK (CMER) »oarrno». I pok*aauausSJ90m 
03133 0.5607 Jun 94 03991 06002 03965 0599J +10*4358 

O6101 03600 Sep 94 03978 DJJW3 03956 059B7 

06105 03590 Dee 94 03979 03985 03960 03988 

0®« 03980 Jun *5 060C4 

0®ra 05B10Mar96 03980 03MO 03980 03998 
Est- rates NA Wed's, sates 61322 
Waft's Open In) 14X325 oft 900 



♦ IT 47.279 
-I! 684 
>12 55 
-12 651 


JAPANESE Sf?W l CMER) Star w-i MMataDaiftl 
00099589308871 Jim 94 0®96iaOD(»e260®r56®®9A21 
OJ1001»JW8 M2Se p96 ODD966SUKi I 7£390.00962RL 00968* 
031007aU)09S2SDae 94 tUD774IS®97SD0J)O97D00.00f752 
0.0101 500j009776Jun 95 0309899 

0.01 m 2J0.0094*QMcr 96 ftawai smwai a_noroooti.ooy6a 
ED. soles NA Wees- sates 40j/s 
Wad's aeon Int 8X771 ofl Bl 
5WIS3 FRANC (CMEJD spertrane-lnaHt«iwein.mi 
07174 06590 Jun 94 07074 07095 07044 07087 

07190 03400 Sep 94 07074 07099 0.70*7 0.7092 

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20.66 

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Marty's 
Reuters 
tiJ. Futures 
Reseorefi 


Commodity Indexes 


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>^8QJ0 

1.WX80 

14X64 

23145 


Pravlous 

1JP140 

1,979.» 

14573 

230.99 


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Pa. 


Page 16 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1994 



^ Chairman Links His Income to Performance 


Bloomberg Businas 

Cn " LONDON -—Saatchi & Saalchi 

NpLC said its chairman. Maurice 
ctoxSaaichi, had agreed to take a pav 
in ban of £425,000 (5641,000) and said 
profits board members would run for 
offstre-tfleciion every year. 

T1 Saatchi, which built itself into 
age the world’s largest advertising com- 
__pany through leveraged acquisi- 
tions in the 1970s and 1980s, only 

to stumble when recession gripped 

befethe media industry, said it was 
3.75 making the moves “to reflect the 
thanfact that the improvement of this 

Ajcompany's performance now de- 
exy .pends not on financial engiaeer- 
Stocing” but on the “reversal of for- 
jj 0n tunes and growth of the operating 
ly f r companies." 

q Maurice Saatchi, who co-found- 
unn ,ed the company with his brother 


announcements came in part from 
their indication that Maurice Saal- 
chi and the chief executive officer. 
Charles Scou. had healed a rift that 
was threatening the company's sta- 
bility. Mr. Saatchi was said to be 
investigating a buyout of one of the 
company's advertising networks. 

Mr. Scott said profit in 1994 was 


PiOdngton Says Profit 
More Than Doubled 


proc 


Charles, said he would link his saia- 


jj. ry more closely to company perfor- 


mance. 


”P C Generally, board members only 
"Rpui their positions up for a share- 

said, 
stra 
T' 
ket ' 
s(ea- 
the j 


holders' vote when their contracts 
come up for renewal, about every 
. three to five years. 

The importance of Thursday's 


Revien 

LONDON — The glassraaker 
Pilkington PLC on Thursday re- 
ported more than doubled earnings 
for the year to the end of March, 
but the company warned that it 
could be some time before it re- 
turned to profit levels of the pre- 
recession era. 

A one- Lime gain on (lie sale of its 
Sola leos business last year lifted 
pretax profit to £98 million {S148 
million) from £41 million a year 
earlier. Even without the Sola gain, 
earnings rose 57 percent to £72 mil- 
lion. at the top end of Forecasts. 


bon, 

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up' 
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LONDON — The accounting firm Coopers & Lybrand said 
Thursday it believed an attack and death threat in Istanbul against 
one of its paruiers was (inked to a battle ever the assets of the 
collapsed Polly Peck empire of the fugitive businessman AsiJ Nadir. 

Two Turkish men jumped Chris Howell, a Coopers partner, on 
Tuesday night outside his apartment and beat him up but took no 
valuables, then fled in a taxi, a Coopers spokeswoman said. 

She said Mr. Howell. 36. was taken to a hospital to have (2 stitches 
for head wounds, then got a death threat at his office Wednesday 
morning from an unidentified caller. 

Mr. HowelJ was attacked the nighL before a Turkish court hearing 
addressed criminal charges that had been filed on March 31 against 
the administrators of Polly Peck by a public prosecutor after com- 
plaints made by Mr. Nadir. 

“We don’t think it’s a coincidence, his getting assaulted was on the 
eve of this court hearing.” the spokeswoman said. 

Mr. HowelL a London-based accountant sent to Istanbul eight 
months ago by Coopers to work on the Polly Peck affair, is now 
getting police protection. 

Polly Peck, a London-based conglomerate whose interests includ- 
ed fruit, electronics and other businesses in Britain, northern Cyprus 
and Turkey, collapsed in 1 990. 

Mr. Nadir faced charges of theft and false accounting in London 
after that, but fled in May 1993 to his native nonhem Cyprus, which 
has no extradition treaty with Britain. 

The charges filed March 31 in Istanbul named three accountants 
from London. 


ret 

«g 

Ba 


ir o English Called Key to Growth 




^ Continued from Page 13 

for service permitted to compete 
ro* against the state-run China News 
the Agency, which currently has a mo- 
cai noooly. 

Ni .Around 15 percent of the ap- 
proximately I million words sent 
C 3 , :■!!£ each day to A FP's 2. <X*0 media 
clients are in English, either written 
by English-speaking journalists or 
^ translated from French: about 60 
- percent of the output is in French. 
_ The agency, which employs 
1,095 journalists and several tbou- 
ab sand free-lancers in 100 bureaus 
££ around the world, also offers ver- 
sic-ns of its service in Spanish. Ger- 
m man, Portuguese and Arabic. In all. 
c| AFP employs nearly 2.000 people, 
Mr. Fleury said English-writing 
staffs operating from bureaus in 
hi Paris, Washington and Hong Kong 
would be bolstered, while overall 


5h journalist staffing levels would re- 
|jj main constant. Over the past four 
w years, the agency has eliminated 60 
& jobs to reduce costs. 
pJ In November. Mr. Fleury set off 
an outcry among French intellectu- 
als with an editorial in AFPs in- 
house publication titled, in English. 
“Adapt or Die.” He said the interna- 
tional market particularly in Eu- 
rope. was quickly losing interest in 
the agency’s French service and that 
AFP needed to “redeploy' - in Eng- 
lish. 

A group of writers and artists 
responded with a petition titled, in 
French. “Capitulate or Live.” in 
which they took issue with Mr. 
Fleury ’s “defeatist” attitude. 

‘It’s a strange reasoning ro say 
that we have tough competitors so 
we must give in to them,” the peti- 
tion said. “Jt is as if winegrowers 
would say: The whiskey makers are 
powerful, so let's pull up our vines 
and make whiskey.’ " 

Mr. Fleury dismisses the contro- 
versy as "much ado about noth- 
ing." He said his strategy did not 
conflict with pending legislation 
that would restrict the use of Eng- 
lish in public gatherings and largely 
ban its use in advertising, even of- 
fering that “to speak more and 
more English in France is probably 
a bad dung.” The language bill is 
scheduled for final legislative ac- 
tion next week. 

.Anglophone editors say AFP is a 
valuable asset to their newsrooms. 


particularly for its speed in report- 
ing breaking news, but suggest that 
it will have to move much further 
toward American and British jour- 
nalistic standards to satisfy their 
needs. 

AFP also is fighting a credibility 
problem because of its government 
links. “It’s too deferential to the 
French government." an American 
newspaper editor said. “1 can't en- 
tirely trust it." 

AJFP’s managers say the agency 

— a nonprofiti partly public and 
partly private cooperative — is not 
influenced by the government. 

Guaranteed independence under 
a 1957 law. AFP has a 15-member 
board composed of eight represen- 
tatives of private French media, 
three from government, two from 
stale broadcasting organizations 
and two representing employees. 

More troubling to foreign editors 

— and a factor often cited by 
AFPs competitors — is the agen- 
cy’s funding. About 45 percent of 
AFFs 1993 sales of 1.07 billion 
francs came from French govern- 
ment customers, such 3S govern- 
ment offices in France and French 
embassies. 

“It’s true that the French govern- 
ment is our No. 1 client.” said Dan- 
iel Bartholooi. international sales 
manager, "but we renegotiate our 
contracts on a commercial basis, 
and we provide the client a real 
service.” 

Nevertheless. Mr. Fleury ac- 
knowledged that selling AFP would 
be easier if there were no govern- 
ment connection, and he said his 
plan called for AFP to steadily re- 
duce its public funding by develop- 
ing new business abroad.' 

Even with the government cli- 
ents, AFP has been operating at a 
loss, though the picture has im- 
proved in recent years. Its deficit 
narrowed last year to 16.9 million 
francs from 27.4 million in 1992. 
For this year. Mr. Fleury hopes to 
break even, with sales rising to 1.2 
billion francs. “ 

Even while agreeing that English 
was the future. Mr. Bartholooi said 
one of his strongest sales points 
was that AFP was not an .Anglo- 
Saxon organization. 

“In some countries we are valued 
because we offer another point of 
view ” he said. 


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expected to be higher than last 
year, despite lower revenue, as a 
result of cost cuts. But he said he 
still expected 1994 revenue to be 
higher than budgeted, as a result of 
new' accounts won by the company. 

Ifte new accounts include the 
pl ann ed national lottery in the 
United Kingdom and Miller Lite 
Ice beer in the United States. 

“1 think it helps underpin esti- 
mates like our own."said David 
Forster, an analyst at Smith New 
Court. “One hopes that they are 
turning ihe comer.” He forecast 
1994 pretax profit for Saatchi of 
£29 million, compared with 1903 
pretax profit of £192 million. 

Mr. Saatchi said his new contract 
granted him a base salary of 
£200.000 a vear. down from 
£625.000. 


A pTi .O 

Ad? dr-mu 



Take Fonts 


He told shareholders at the com- 
pany’s annual meeting that the 
contract included a performance 
bonus based on revenue growth 
and stock options “which will only 
show a gain when the company’s 
performance has reached certain 
levels agreed by shareholders." 


Compiled hr I'tur Staff From DlSfauke 

BRUSSELS — Stockholders of AG Group and NV Amev have 
agreed to change the companies' names to Fortis AG and Fortis 
Amev. the Dutch- Belgian insurer Fortis said Thursday. 

Maurice Lippens. Fortis's joint chairman and the chairman of 
AG, said the aim was to identify Fortis more closely with its 
constituent companies, 

Fortis houses "the combined banking and insurance operations of 
the Dutch holding company .Amev and Belgium's AG. 

Fortis also reported that net profit in the first quarter of 1994 rose 
29 percent from a year earlier as revenue gained 62 percent. Results 
were buoyed by acquisitions, a capital injection and improvements 
in all operating sectors. . 

Fortis said profit was J09.7 million Eujopean currency units (5 127 
million) in the period, compared with 85.1 million ECUs in the like 
period of 1993. It said revenue from all business lines jumped to 4.16 
billion ECUs from 2.56 billion ECUs a year earlier. 

“The sharp increase in results is attributable to successful opera- 
tions in virtually every Fortis company." the group said, adding that 
the first-time inclusion of results of the Belgian banking and insur- 
ance group ASLK-CGER, in which the group owns a 49.9 percent 
stake, in ihe latest quarter had a strong impact on revenue and 
earnings. 

Fortis said ii recorded 2.5 billion Belgian francs (S73 million) in 
capital gain on the sale of its stake in the Belgian insurer Assubel- Vje 
to the French insurance group AGF. The statement also said the 
1994 earnings forecast took the capital gain into account. _ 

Fortis AG and Fortis Amev each hold a 50 percent stake in Fortis. 
Operating companies AG 1924 in Belgium and .Amev Nederland in 
the Netherlands will continue to offer their services under ^ their 
existing trade names. Fortis said. (AFX API 


Media Aim 
Charges at 
Two Firms 


Investor’s Europe 


■■■ . Awrfnrf.- :r;* : > 


In France 


Bloomberg BusinOi 3U*K 

PARIS— Shares in France’s two 
top water-distribution companies, 
Compagoie Generals des Earn SA 
andLyotmaise des Eaux-Dumez 
SA, fell more than 3 percent Thurs- 
day amid news reports, strongly 
denied by both companies, that 
they way have been involved in 
corruption. 

Lvonnaise shares fell 325 percent 

Z — a 




■ ■ - ■ ■ ■■■;/ ' ■ M.J* ' C CrjLa.rnt* 


• f >.!■ .i ■ ■ d . 


to 532 francs (S94), extending a 
it recorded 


drop of 2.3 percent 
Wednesday. GSnerale des Eaux 
shares fell 3.4 percent, to 2065 
; their declii 


iO€li 


Pact 


francs, bringing their decline of the 
past three days to 6.6 percenL 

The drop in the stocks followed 
publication of “The Black Book of 
Corruption,” an exposi by a 
French judge, ThietTy Jean-Pierre, 
who is running for election to the 
European Parliament. 

While his book does not name 
specific companies, it does refer to 
two large companies he says were 
lved in political 


MaHrirf *y^'(g9Be# » ^ , .I i 


-jSg W: 

Stockholm ' tji 

... r L jm ■ ■ -I 'y r " ■■ ■- .t 

Vienna 


Zurich 


SBS 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 




laemiiwHl HosMTHhiac^i 


irJd-.-J l,- 


Very briefly: 


involve 


Reuien 

GENEVA — Bulros Buiros 
Ghali. the linited Nations secre- 
tary-general. urged governments 
Thursday to develop a social pact 
to distribute the world's wealth 
fairly and curb unemployment. 

Speaking to the annual confer- 
ence of the International Labor Or- 
ganization. he said foundations for 
such an accord should he laid at J 
L f N-orgamzed World Summi: for 
Social Development ia Copenha- 
gen in March. 

"Today, we must together fay 
down a new social pact for the 
whole world.” he told representa- 
tives of governments, employers 
and unions from about 180 coun- 
tries. The appeal was the latest 
move in what UN officials said was 
a drive to redirect the world body's 
efforts towards tackling the prob- 
lems that lay at the base of many 
world conflicts. 

Mr. Buuos Ghali said social de- 
velopment was one of the most cru- 
cial issues the world faced. But he 
recognized resistance La some West- 
ern countries, particularly Britain, 
to defined common policies for so- 


cial security and welfare. He said it 
was not for the United Nations "to 
dictate to members of the interna- 
tional community" the kinds “of so- 
cial benefits to be provided to indi- 
viduals or to their communities." 

“Bui." he added, “we must also 
say forcefully that there are in the 
social field issues that have an un- 
questionably international dimen- 
sion.' Certain principles of wealth- 
sharing could only be invoked ir. an 
international context, he indicated. 

Separately. Prime Minister Paul 
Keating of Australia, working to 
expand trade links with Asia, 
warned rich countries on tnursday 
not to use low pay rates in some of 
their trading partners as an excuse 
for protectionism. 

“Disparate wage rates should 
not lead to a dosing of markets." 
Mr. Keating said in Brussels after a 
meeting with Jacques Delors. presi- 
dent of the European Commission. 


They discussed global economic 
developments, the future World 
Trade Organization and relations 
between Australia, the European 
Union and Asia. 

"I said I saw no future in these 
issues being used for protectionist 
purposes.” he said about his tgllcs 
with Mr. Delors. Mr. Keating said 
be was referring to suggestions that 
countries, such as those in Europe, 
with relatively high wage rates 
should be allowed to impose pro- 
tective tariffs on imports from na- 
tions that have relatively low rates 
ot pay. The latter category includes 
many Asian countries. 

“In our country we are con- 
cerned about social exclusion. We 
don’t want to see an army of low- 
paid people." Mr. Keating said, 
“but we would not want to see 
concerns on this issue being played 
out in such a way that it would lead 
to prohibitions bn trade." be said. 


TO OUR READERS 3 ^ LUXEMBOURG 


It's never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Jusf call toll-free: 

0 800 2703 


! political corruption. 

On Thursday, the weekly maga- 
zine L Evtnement du Jeudi, citing 
the book, published a 10-page fea- 
ture on Gtoerale des Eaux with the 
headline “Enquiry Into the Laby- 
rinthine Empire of Ghnhrale des 
Eaux." The story also referred to 
Lyonnaise des Eaux. The article 
summarized the companies' com- 
plex relations with local govern- 
ment officials across France. 

Among other things, it suggested 
the water companies' provided gifts 
and other free travel to some offi- 
cials and their families. 

Lvonnaise des Eaux Chairman 
Jerome Monod also strongly de- 
nied the reports at a shareholders' 
meeting Thursday. 

■ Budget Chief Talks Tough 

France will meet its target of 
holdin g its budget deficit to 301 
billion francs. Budget Minister 
Nicolai Sarkozy said Thursday, ac- 
cording to an Agence France- 
Presse dispatch. 

The minister told the finance 
commission of the National As- 
sembly that the target “will be 
strictly respected and no one 
should’ doubt it.” He said deficit 
control was “absolutely vital" for 
France' s economic recovery. 


• ABN-AMRO Bank, lead manager of the — 
Nederland, said that applications for the shares totafcd 
the 138 nxflfion shares on offer to investors. 



TV 


m ! 


jet it 


I hi l 


selling an ray companies u* ujt h»vvk«*»« — ... — r- - — — i — r. r 

with me the sacrifices it took to create il be sard in the lest s*M ^ 
interview to be broadcast. Two of his children recently joined the 
of Fininvesi. :• "d'Ad £ 

• British Land PLC a property company, said that pretax profit alhttr 

doubled to £53.9 million (SSI million) in the financial year ended March/:.;-/.; 
31 as the company benefited from a recovery in property values and hn'< Si - 
investment venture with George Soros, the financier. dAt ■■ 

• The Netherlands' Cdxtml Bureau of Statistics said that Dutchconsujp/ 

era spent 2.8 percent mere in the first quarter of 1994 than in ! 

period a year ago. v -:_ ■.'■.AdC-- 

• Eanetcom, the venture launched by France Telecom and. D«<scfce j 

Bundespost Telekom, said it won a five-year contract worth mafelhim . ' ? 
$200 million from Dm A Bmdstteet Corp. to expand itSdamtxHnmtm^.vy 
lions network. >• : \ Aj 

• Qrabb Security PLC, the maker of security systems, said pretax profit ■ 

rose 25 percent, to £77.1 million, in the year ended March 31 aod- Vr- 
announced a dividend increase to 625 pence from 4.75 pence as / 
general recovery buoyed its business. - 


! 


■ Dahnler-Beaz AG. Germany's hugest company, set the subscription ... . 
price for a rights offering at 640 Deutsche marks (S384). The subscription- /v 
period is scheduled to run from June 20 to July 5. : ^ ' 

• Huta Waraowa, the Polish sled mill in which Italy's Lucrfrim groap -f 

bolds a SI percent stake, was the site of asil-in strike as workers sought a. ] 
30 percent pay rise, according to union officials. ~ -‘,i 

• Ukraine’s central bank said it devalued the official exchange rate of its 
currency. A dollar will now fetch ML500 kaifiovancts, up from a previous 

rate Of 1 2,6 10. AFX, Bloomberg. Kragki-Rxtder. Jteoten 


t. 
!• 

— ■. 

- V F- 


First three months 1994 


ING Group achieved good results for rhe first three months oi' T 994. Net profit 
increased by 26.S% to NLG 501 million i first three months 1993: NXG 395 million). 

Net profit per share went up by 21 .3° o to NLG 1 .94. 

Total assets increased by 3.2% to NLG 350.5 billion in the fust three months of 1994. 
After the sharp increase by NLG 5.9 billion in 1 993. shareholders* equity decreased from 
NLG 21.5 billion at the end of December 1993 to NLG 20.7 billion at the end of 
March 1994. 

The Executive Board expects that for the whole of 1994 net profit will at least equal 
1993 level. 


.Amounus in Dutch guilders 

First three 
months 1994 

First three 
months 1993 

% 

Change 

t millions) 




j Result before taxation 

656 

530 

- 23.8 ' - 

Net profit 

501 

395 

+ 26.8 

‘guilders) 




Net rrom per share 

1.94 

1.60 

-2IJ ' 

1 

31 March 

31 December 


I 

19*4 

1Q93 


j (billions) 




! Total assets 

350.5 

339.4 

- 3.2 

Investments 

131.6 

132.1 

- 0.4 

Bank lending 

147.1 

144.9 

+ IS 

Group capital base 

21.3 

22.6 

- 3.5 

i guilders! 




Shareholders' 




equity per share 

79.75 

82.70 

- 3.6 


•J ' 


1 


r ■ 


1 


ING 


GROUP 


The report for the first three months of J 994 can be obtained at the following 
address: Internationale Nederlandeo Group. P.O. Box 810. 1000 A V Amsterdam, 
the Netherlands. Tel. (+31)20 541 54 60. Fax: 1+31) 20 541 54 51 . 


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to the International Organizations in Vienna 


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1NTKRNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1994 


Plage 17 



Japan’s Insurers 
Squeezed by Weak 
Investment Income 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


c omptltd by Our Stuff Fnm, Dttpattw 

TOKYO — Japanese life insur- 
ance companies are bavura a hard 
lime earning enough of a return on 
ihnr asset to pay the interest thev 
owe to policyholders, executives at 
Japan s Qght largest life insurance 
companies said Thursday. 

By law, Japanese insurers must 
pay policyholder* their promised 
returns from interest and dividend 
income unless the Ministry of Ft- 
nance grants them permission to 
pay a special dividend from capita] 
gains on stocks. 

. As °f the end of March, Japan's 
eight largest insurers were obliged 
to earn an average of 5.39 percent 


Big Four 
In Japan 
On Upswing 

Ctmspiledby Dw Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan's big four 
securities companies reported 
higher profits Thursday, 
boosted by strong gains in 
commission income and un- 
derpinned by lower costs, for 
the year ended March 31. 

Nomura Securities Co. was 
the most profitable, earning 
67.8 billion yen ($649 million), 
up 2.1 percent from the previ- 
ous year. A Nomura executive 
said a rise in commission in- 
come had more than offset a 
decline in interest earnings. 

Dmwa Securities, which bad 
suffered a loss of 6.5 billion 
yen in the previous year, post- 
ed current profit of 57.8 billion 
yen. 

Nikko Securities' profit for 
the year rase to 34.8 billion 
yen from 1.9 billion yen the 
ous year, while Yamaiehi 
rides was able to post 
, it of! 1 billion yen after a 

loss of 32.7 billion yen. 

Meanwhile, the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange's key index 
rose to its highest dosing in 
more than two years Thursday 
an buying by both foreign and 
domestic investors. 

The 225-issue Nikkei Stock 
Average rose 0.66 percent, to 
21,402.78, after climbing 1.94 
percent Wednesday. 

(AFX, At) 


on insurance prenuums they re- 
ceive from policyholders with equi- 
ty stakes in the companies. But the 
booked in the general ac- 
counts of the companies returned 
only 3.B3 percent during the year. 

■4s a result, the companies had to 
ask the ministry for permission to 
use capital g-iin* to maicg up the 
difference. 

Speaking to reporters at the 
Bank of Japan press club, execu- 
tives of the companies said they 
had Mid off much of their foreign 
securities holdings to try to boost 
their returns on assets. 

One of the companies, Chryoda 
Life Insurance Co., even trial to 
get rid of much of its domestic 
bond portfolio to shore up profit- 
ability. 

“We started reducing our domes- 
tic bond holdings last year to pro- 
tect ourself against the risk interest 
rales will reverse course and rise," 
said Azuma Ono, senior managing 
director of Chiyoda Life. 

Life insurance companies have 
stopped buying bonds, dealers 
said, because of signs that the Japa- 
nese economy may be starting to 
recover after more than three years 
of decline. A growing economy 
tends to bring higher inflation, 
which erodes the value of fixed- 
income investments such as bonds. 

The benchmark No. 164 10-year 
Japanese government bond cur- 
rently yields 4205 percent, consid- 
erably less than the amout the in- 
surance companies need to earn. 

The eight companies said their 
combined investment income had 
fallen 5 percent, to 62 trillion yen 
($59 billion), in the year ended in 
March. 

The decline was largely due to 
falling interest income, but the ex- 
ecutives said capital losses on sales 
of overseas assets after the yen had 
risen against the dollar had con- 
tributed to lower returns. 

Nippon Life Insurance Co., the 
largest life insurer as well as the 
largest institutional investor in Ja- 
pan, said its return on investment 
fell to 3.48 percent in the year end- 
ed in March, from 4.18 percent a 
year earlier, 

(Bloomberg, AFP) 


APEC: Down to Business? 

Talks Seek to Emphasize Private Sector 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tr.bwtc 

SINGAPORE— Business leader* will meet here 
Friday and Saturday in an attempt to .short-circuit 
some divisive issues and political maneuvering that 

critics say are hampering the Asia-Pacific Econom- 
ic Cooperation forum, the centerpiece of a fledg- 
ling economic community. 

On the agenda will be a search for practical wavs 
to reduce barriers to the flow of goods and sen id-, 
and an efTon to put more emphasis on the private 
sector. The organization bus been under fire for 
being preoccupied with governmental objective*. 

The group, which will meet behind closed lioorv 
was asked by President Bill Clinton and other 
leaders to identify issues the communis should 
address to smooth regional trade and investment 
and encourage development of business network*. 

Known as the Pacific Business Forum, the group 
consists of two business executives from each of 
the 17 member economics. It will make its report to 
a summit meeting in Indonesia in November. 

Some businessmen, officials and analyst* ;ee the 
need for a strong role for the private sector as a 
means of bypassing a debate among government* 
over the structure and aims or the organization. 
They say the members should focus less on divisive 
ideological issues and more on lowering barrier* to 
goods and services. 

Members are Australia, Brunei. Canada, China, 
Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea. Ma- 
laysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, 
tin; Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and 
the United States. Toe grouping accounts for 40 
percent of the world's population and half its gross 
national product 


“Some people in government alwav* want to 
change organizations around for different pur- 
poses," Said Douglas C. Heack. the Har.g Kong- 
bused chairman of the Abb-Pacific Council of 
American Chambers of Commerce. “But the aim 
cf APEC should be to funhc economic links 
between ns members in a wav that would he 
helpful to the business community" 

That sentiment was endorsed recently by Ma- 
hathir bin Mohamad, the Malaysian prime rmnir- 
tcr who was so riled at attempts by the United 
States and Australia to force regional integration 
that he boycotted the APEC summit meeting in 
Seattle late last year. 

Noting that the economic dynamism of the 
Asia-Pacific area was the result of market forces 
and r.oi government intervention, be raid that the 
“most important sustained builders** of a Pacific 
community would be “the workers, managers and 
entrepreneurs" uf regional countries, noi the offi- 
cial*. Mr. Mahathir said that to try to construct a 
Pacific community along the Sine* of the European 
Union would be extremely disruptive. 

Instead, he said, governments should simply 
establish the framework within which individual 
contact could flourish and "entrepreneurs can go 
about their daily business of profiting from Pacific 
dynamism, thereby building the relationships of 
invest meet, trade and comprehensive economic 
interdependence” (hat would provide a solid foun- 
dation for a regional community. 

“A Jr.i of the bureaucrats of APEC member 
economies don't really core about private-sector 
participation,” said Jiisuf Wanandi. chairman of 
trie Indonesian national committee of the Pacific 
Economic Cooperation Council. “Basically, they 
see it as a threat to thdr own control over APEC." 


Australian Jobless at 3-Year Low 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

CANBERRA — Australia’s un- 
employment rale fell in May to its 
lowest level in almost three years, 
the government said Thursday, and 
the news triggered fears of a rise in 
interest rates. 

Bond prices slumped rose after 
the government sard the jobless 
rate had dropped to 9.8 percent, a 
32-month low, from 10. 1 in April. 

The number of jobless people 
shrank to on adjusted 851,800 in 
May from 875,100 the month be- 
fore, while the number employed 
jumped to an adjusted 7,863,000 
from 7,833,000. 

The price of the active June 10- 
year bond future fell to 9M55 
cents shortly after the announce- 


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ment. from 91.330 cents ai 
Wednesday's close. The effective 
yield was 8.875 percent, as bond 
dealers said (he growth in employ- 
mem triggered fears that economic 
growth might bring higher infla- 
tion. 

The government said employ- 
mem grew by a strong 30,500 in the 
month. Andrew Kennedy, a bond 
trader at Citibank, raid the jobless 
number had caught the market by 
surprise and said bond yields could 
rise further. 

But Australia's treasurer. Ralph 
Willis, said he saw no implications 
for official interest rates from the 
May labor data. Asked by reporters 
whether it would force’ an earlier 
change in monetary policy, Mr. 
Willis said simply, "No.” 

The labor market is now play- 
ing very quick caicb-up with the 
growth we have been seeing in the 
economy," said Bruce Freeland, an 
economist at Commonwealth Bank 
of Australia. 

The growth falls within the limits 
envisioned by the government in 


making up its 1994-95 budget. Mr. 
Freeland and others said, so it is 
unlikely to provoke any immediate 
policy changes. 

The participation rate, which 
measures die ratio of those working 
or seeking work to the total eligible 
work force, was unchanged in May, 
contributing to the fall in the un- 
employment rate. 

f Bloomberg, Krtigki-Rulder) 


Output Rise 
Fuels Fears 
Of Inflation 
In China 


C&rptfai by Our Staff From Dupatcha 

BELTING — China's industrial 
output was up I7J percent in May 
from a year earlier, casting doubt 
on the government's effort to cool 
off the economy. 

The figure was down slightly 
from the 17.9 percent rate reported 
for April but up Iron: the 16 per- 
cent rate registered is the first 
quarter. The figures were released 
by China's statistical bureau. 

Zhu Rongji. China’s deputy 
prime micister. ordered state banks 
to ease lending limits in April to 
curb labor unrest at state compa- 
nies, which were unable to pay 
workers. He ordered credit to re- 
main tight on construction pro- 
jects, however. 

"A relaxation of the govern- 
ment's working capital loans policy 
and an increase in overall credit 
bad a stimulating effect on indus- 
trial production.” the report said. 

Some 16.7 billion yuan (S2 bil- 
lion) OT short-term loans was made 
in May, 6.4 billion yuan more than 
in May 1993, the report said. 

Industrial cutout in the state sec- 
tor climbed S.tf percent in May, 
compared with 22 percent growth 
in toe first quarter. Collective en- 
terprises still outperformed state- 
owned ones, growing by 30 percent, 
while the private sector bad 42 per- 
cent growth. 

Western economists worry that 
the new surge in China's economy 
will aggravate inflation, which ran 
ai on annual rate of 20 percent in 
(he first four months of this year. 

Beijing is anxious to avoid a re- 
peal of the mass protests of five 
years ago, which were helped along 
by state workers whose factories 
had been brought to a bait by a 
lough austerity program. 

( Bloomberg, Kitigjhi-Rulder ) 


Investors Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

’.3>i2 


Singapore 
Slratts Times 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 


IKE- 




m p 

21H) 1 

f- — IfiMOf 


T9B4 

Exchange 

Hong Kong 

Ti 17 

1994 

index 

Hang Seng 

X MJ TnK j T F’5T 
1994 

Thursday Prav. 
Close Close 

.9,19064 9291,18 

A' M a* 

% 

Change 

-1.08 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2J282L34 2^65.65 

40.74 

Sydney 

All Ordinaries 

£076.70 2,079.70 

-0.14 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

21*0240. 21.251.90 

+0.66 

[ Kuala Lumpur Composite 

981.72 869.31 

+1.28 

Bangkok 

SET 

1,38748 t .370.41 

+1.24 

Seoul 

CompisilB Stock 

935J9 833422 

+0.30 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

5,94238 .B.09S5& 

-256 

Manila 

PSS 

&99QJS5 3,017. 1 6 

-QJ37 

Jakarta 

Slock index 

484.90 484.90 

Unch. 

j New Zealand NZSE-40 

2,125 ST . 2,116.35 

■rOAS 

Bombay 

National Jndax 

1,963.06 1^43.98 

+0£8 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 

Iwcnaaooal KenldTnbuae 

Very briefly: 


• Ford Mmot Co. launched three models in Japan and became the first of 
America's Big Three carmakers to export right-hand drive vehicles to 
Tokyo. The models are versions of the European-made Mondeo and of 
the Probe sports car assembled in the United States plus the Laser, 
assembled in Japan by Mazda Motor Corp. 

• South Korea indefinitely postponed a plan to issue $400 million in 
bonds in the United Siates because of the crisis over North Korea, a news 
report said. An executive of underwriter Lehman Brothers and a South 
Korean official said market conditions were the reason for the delay. 

• Resolute Resources Ltd. and Manama Exploration NL reported a 
-hi g h-grade" gold find at their Kanaall Well joint venture in 'Western 
Australia. Separately, Western Mining Corp. said it was withdrawing 
from the Cuiong nickel project near Kalgoorhe, leaving Resolute Re- 
sources as the sole owner of the project. 

• The World Bank plans to lend Kyrgyzstan Sl-5 billion to help the 
Central Asian republic carry out its three-year economic reform program, 
Interfax reported; the International Monetary Fund ordered Kazakhstan 
to reduce its projected budget deficit as a condition of making a $173 
million standby loan. 

AFP. Bloomberg, Knighl-Ridder 


BellSouth Wins Right to Set Up Singapore Data Network 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SINGAPORE — A joint venture between a 
unit of BellSouth Corp- based in Atlanta, and a 
unit of Singapore Technologies Ventures Pie. 
has won a license to set up a wireless data 
network in Singapore, the Telecommunications 
Authority of Singapore said Thursday. 

Thejotnt venture, ST Mobile Data Pte.. is the 
first company licensed to operate a country- 
wide tdecomm uni cations network in direct 
competition with Singapore Telecommunica- 
tions Lid. 

Singapore’s population is just 18 million, but 


the city-state has a voracious appetite for tele- 
communications services. 

As of March 1994, 63 of every 100 Singapor- 
eans woe mobile telephone subscribers, while 
22.8 of every 100 had a pager. Only Hong Kong 
has a higher concentration of pagers. 

ST Mobile Data said its wireless network 
would be operational within six months, offer- 
ing sendees such as electronic mail, vehicle 
location and remote data entry and retrieval. 

ST Mobile Data's partners will invest 63 
million Singapore dollars (US$41 million) in 


the data network over the next 15 years. The 
license is initially for five yean. 

In another Asian telecommunications ven- 
ture, France Telecom will establish a Japanese 
multimedia joint enterprise with 19 Japanese 
companies that will provide real estate and 
other Information to consumers, Tomen Corp. 
said. 

Tomen and 18 other Japanese companies will 
share 85 percent of the venture, which will have 
capital of 150 million yen (St million)* with 
France Telecom taking 15 percent. ( Bloomberg, 

AFX) 



NYSE 

Ifntrtday’sCMnB 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


(Continued) 


HWilOwSWt* Div YMPCJfifc— tgtflgSB 



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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. JVXE 10, 1994 


NASDAQ 

Thursday’s 4 p.m. 

This list compiled by the AP, consists ot :he t.QOO 
most traded securities in terms ot dollar value, it is 
updated twice a year. 


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1.7 71 17 


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1216 Xircom 

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1.12 2J 10 73 41% 4 

- 22 850 18% 1 



Thursday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide pnees up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 v«muh 

Hi^h Lew Il5Q- 


Diy TW PE 10th High LowLcidOrt 


9% 8 AIM sir A3 5.2 _ 

Vi ‘fctjsfinBB Z “ 

J8S U5 73 ™ 
5 ARC - 78 

It’ . 27 ARM F pl 3J8 9 A _ 

J»i. 1V..ASR .23*11.9 _ 
15V*t1MATTFd 2.71 e 3.9 .. 

B*. 3MAdrCom _. 17 

Jv„ l'.Aclon _ 10 

6'.. * AomRiC _. M 

T: z z 

101] 3':AdMdnf ... _ 

5% 21, AdtfPnot ... - 

3M IMAenuon _ 6 

16% 7",AlrW« _ - 

4*1 I'/.iAircoo - 55 

7’. SMAIomco — ... 

12 Vo BMaIdoW _. 20 

5% i Aiorrcin ... _. 

189* It AHaagnn I A* 7.7 _ 
2 k, ip„A|fln .. _. 

17’*: *V, AnOPlh - J 

11*6 SMAllouH 13 

4*» J, Alpfrain .. 

12'. . *Vb AloinGr ... _. 

64 S5M Alcoa ffl 175 6S _ 
7M JMAmdni .. _ 

T'-i. 'YAmnim „ 

16 lOMAFsIPT 1.SS 14.1 _ 
:r«T7 AFURT 1.50 0.4 ... 

53 '« 74** AmBilt J0 .6 14 

8'» I l lAmEais „ _ 

l'M. HiAExdI — ... 

U'Y J** AIM 04 IA4Q4I.1 | 
16' , 13*, AIM BS 1.44 9.8 10 

14% 1 1 '-■ AIM B6n 60 e 4.B 10 
15 1 1% AIM 88 n J5e 7.® 11 

47 JTV.Alsroel l.Die 2J 15 
l0’-4 ll 7 , AmLiSfS Mb JJ IB 
»%I4MAM»A .64 3.1 70 
2l'i 14'» AMTOB At 3.1 10 
IJ’i I’iJrriPoan „ _ 

9V, 6’ aAREIrr/n A0 11.9 - 
is ® vResrr IJO »5A 6 
41, -"l, AmSflrd _ _ 

S. 2"nATechC ... H 

IJ 1 * 7M AmPfll ... 35 

Z’« '-.-Amooiwl _. „ 

14' Y 9’»Amw«l J6 2,6 9 

53’, 9*-* Andrea ._ 09 

4V„ HwAnoMig _ M 

15% v, AnoPnr l*J0c — J 
t'a 3'wAnunca ._ 16 

IJM 5' oAjnxmn — ... 

4M JMArfzLd JSe SJ _ 

11', 7 ArV.Ral _ 25 

21 , 'YuArmim _ ._ 

10 6 ArromA _. 13 

4% 7% AltrofC _ 38 

l", ',A4rtwl ... _. 

12M I' .AIori -. - 

all *' ■ AnonlU J5e 9 13 
>->, MAiliCM ,. _ 

3" . I Alfaswt _ 

IBM 7% Audvax — 7 

4 - » v <«Avdr* _ — 

4’» 6 AurorEI .. 33 

2*.i I’M Azeo n — — 


_ 68 BM 

Z5 593 31% 
... 18 11 
13 25 ll'i 

... 51 24 V, 

28 102 3*i. 

- 43 24% 

_ 16? 2 

.. >04 60% 

17 JO 6% 

IB Al 3% 
U I 5YY 
-• m « 
_ 131 IV, 
_ 12 0% 

- 264 IVj 

6 28 3% 

- 161 «*• 

« £ 5> - 

20 10 11 

.. 89 5% 

_ 134 1BW 
_. 30 W u 

5 10 5% 

13 73 9% 

.. 31 4'. 

_. 140 46, 

_ z5Q 57-, 
_ 1562 *K, , 

Z 221 S li 1 '" 

... 27 10 

14 30 u54Vi 

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... *60 1M 
B 81 V., 

10 la* 14' ■ 

10 27E 13'* 

11 20 12 

15 6 42% 

18 J 17** 

28 92 20% 

20 2 20 V; 

_ 65 0": 

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6 16 10' ■ 

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H 16 3% 

35 145 B 
.. 0909 ).-|. 

9 14 13% 

89 127 17". 
11 11* 4M 

2 I IV, , 

16 S2 6% 

... 22® 9% 

- 5 4".',§ 

25 5 7% 


aR .« 
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24 _ 

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2% 

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11 z 

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571, — ■. 
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53 1, — <■ 
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477 B 
324 >M, 

25T 7% 


5% 7V»BaNO 
T7M12"iBATs 
02% 70% BMC 
J9V, la' .HMFBe 
24% 19 BCdWM 

I1M 6'.,Ba*er 

5M SMBaldw 
I3V, 19MBanFd 
I'i MBWSFran 
25**71*1 BT cv7'Y n 
26M21%BTcw7% 

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26", 14'., Barn_a 
71 M rviBon Ro 
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7*»3",.BSHKpwt 
36% 29% B5MRK fl ! 
2% ) ' j BoordCo 
I-/., f awmoc 
Ji 1 . 15 BencnE 
¥n 6' * BcnEve 
104 82'iBergCa 
I? - * tMBefaWl* 
73M Il'hBinvjlrtl 
19**10 BfoR A 
3‘, I EUecom 
3".', I'-.SiSCAPP 
ir.ll BlkBIOVn 1 
15 IIUBCAia 
lS’.llMBFLiO 
IS 1H.BNJIC 
57 36‘.Y BldirCp 
28% 20% Blessing 
37% IJHBlaonfA 
16", I3M saddle I 
12% 8' : Boe'-'a 1 
5% I'lBownf 
78' : I6’,6awrw 
9% IMBraaRE 
I7'» 7’ iSrandn 
j-t. ’tB'-sna/vv 
14% «MBrscn J I 
4% 7 ■ 1. BrocT.Cp 
3v„ 1 Built on 
J3% 7HBUM1S 


... 124 3 

... 191 13V,, 

12 6 77 

14 15 29% 

15 10 23% 

.. M3 6’. 
76 331 5% 

17 22 72 

.. 30 % 

_ 57 27% 

_ 21*8 n 
... 490 

- 21 2 
25 126 176, 
20 2T3v2l% 
29 2 16% 

_ 46 3’-* 

JO 3". 
-. 52 33', 1 

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20 B4 24% 
_ 354 7% 

5 90 

. 317 7". 

50 50 77 

9 22 It", 

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14 24 7 V, 

.. »69 |l% 
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... »2 12 
11 261 40% 

13 BB 78% 

33 A W 3i% 

16 17 13% 

4 11% 

.. 134 rVi, 

10 424 Z?% 
Jl IZI 9% 
10 IS 16% 

5 5% 

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17 10 3".. 

a 84 IM 

19 610 26% 


ja-,. 3 wu a 

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29% 29% _. 

23% 23% -% 

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11% 21% _ 
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131. 2? pm »*l 

'in - 

It 1 ■* — >■ 
17% 17", -% 
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33 11', - V. 

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34' '* 5«M - ill 
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89 90 

6». 6’i —v, 

71 % H -% 

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17 12 - % 

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40 40 — % 

»'•. 28% — % 
25% IT, - % 
13*4 13% — % 
11% 11% — % 
3% 3% _ 

JIM 71% 

9% ®% - % 
16 If. ... 
3% 3% »% 
I3-. u:« - J . 
1".. 3".. — '* 

I ' - ii 1 % ... 

24% ?4%— 1% 


I 121 5% S'-l 5% _ 


IB%13%CFXCP .B4&4J 14 1 10% IBM 10% -% 

7% 4%CMFln , R 121 5% S'-l 5'/> _ 

0% 7%CIM J4b10J „. 140 B rtt 8 

9'. 4 CM I CP ... 13 030 6 % 5% 3',i — 

3% 1 V, CSTEnl ... 200 1% 1% 1", — '1 

5% lMCVDFnn ... . 282 2% l'w„ 2% ■ % 

l’-i. V'.CXR - ... 2240 l»u I'M 1", - 


U m. 140 0 7t. 8 

... 13 030 6 % 5% SU — % 

... -. 200 1% 1H I'M — 

... . 203 2% 1'W„ 2% • *■ 

- ... 2240 l»u I'M I'i 


:: /.vitm 

Hi;H Lji, 

7J ii'*Cat»N5n 
i': ' „ CaiDrco 
3' .■ Conor 
74' 'J IPMCornOm 
I7’«10 CMarcq 
25’ • 17'iCdrOCO 
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1JS* 6% Carmel 
14’* 9% Caring tn 
21 '■ 12 CasileA 

sr is sa, 

f% jMCentCen 
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2V,17%CnirPrn 

17t',14%Cpn«S 0 
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9% 5%, Chad as 
S'» JMChOovA 
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3*'» 13 CncEn 
28 15 ChrtMea 

14V, 7%ChtPwr 
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34%23'iOliRw 

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32',', 25*60,11/11 ot 
7 !, JlaOtllCS 
3® 30' 4 Chiles pf 

15M TiClrcaPn 
20 1 >i J .CIOdel 
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8% tViOtiZInc 
40%20MClecrCi 

S’-, '■i.a.nicp 
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10' « 9 Conors tr 
73% UMConu 
24V, laM ColAg D»A 
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5". T'i.CoH-O 
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10% JMCoUEno 
17 KUtCom/ftc 
7% a'aCmclAstn 

li'S 12%CamproK 

I'i % Cmpirc 
10% SMConcdF 
16% 13 CnsTom 
33' 5 Convrsn 
9 7 CnvslE 

11% 9 Copiev 
17% 11% Cross 
23% Il'iCmCPB 
21*. 13 CwnCr 
6'- 1 3 CruisAm 
28% JO'.Crv.lOII 

73*, IBM Cun ic 

ir« 12 Curtce 
3",. 2'.,Ciisimd 
J% WCrewnr 


1% 'M.DMnd 
5 74.DRCA 
3’-» lMCX*o!a n 
2 MDoKOl wt 
B T 'a 6 DcnIHd 
4'., 1'MDvJJnm! 

13% JMOawram 
7% 4 Do* sir 
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12% r'-rDcearal 

BM J' . Do 1 Etc 

5% I'VuDsanrm 
77% l-' .DevnE 
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3’t IMDiaican 
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l4’.ir':Cr n ePDf 
11% 14'-, Donenv 
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5% IMDucom 
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4 '.EOlnt 
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71 % 14%EOBlFn 
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48%32%EchBF« 
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£ l"-'iiEdislo<*t 
12% 7%EdiSM 
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37% 14'tEian wl 
36": 70% Elonur 
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BM JMEbartor 
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Ali ^..EmoCar 
31",24i*ENSCM 
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13*i BMEnger 
11% I'-iEicdBi 
TA’.i 13", Eeitooe 
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IBM * Equusll 
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36%39%Fablnds 
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15 IMFafcaif 
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24% ViKjaP 

72 16'-. H3PUI 
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INTERNATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1994 

ADVERTISEMENT — "" " " ■ 

854TERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Page 19 


Juno 9, 1994 


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w Wtllerfund^Wtllerea Fgr_Ecu IUI 

wWIUeriundj-WillereoitatvUJi 1171138 

*W1lifrfundvWUtefeqNA_J llj 

MULTMUNAGER N.V. 

w Cash EnttaKemem 1 136 

wEmergWB Mortals Fa S 21*7 

w Europecr Growlh Fa Ecu 111* 

w Hedge Fucrt j 1291 

w Jaoanese Fund — Y 8L9 

w Martel Neutral S 1814 

wWorld BOM Fund Ecu 1175 I 

NICHOLA5-APPLEOATE CAPfTALMGT 
wNAFlexIUe Growth Fd 5 >«£C 

• NA Hedac Fund i 1JC.9S 

NOMURA INTL. (HONG KONG) LTD 

rf Nomura Jakarta Fund J fl.95 

NOR IT CURRENCY FUND 

ntNCFUSD S 120.95 

mNCF DEM DM E9S6J 

niNCFCHF SF 92*29 

ftlNCF FRF. FF 444840 

mNCF JPY Y 82*9530 

mNCF BEF. BF 7703330 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grasvener SlLdnWIX 9FEA4-7M99 2999 

0 Odrv Eurosegn DM IU9. 

wOriry European S 13*60 

»Ode> Etna Growl* lnc DM 1*2*4 

w Oder Eurta Growth Acc — DM I*L16 

wOrfev Euro Grm Star tnc_i S659 

W Odey Euro Gnu Star Acc — £ 5679 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
WNDami House. Hamilton MMI I. Bermuda 
Tel: 909292-1016 Fax : B09 295-2305 

wFtosfturv Group i afljl 

wOtvmpia 5eajrile SF SF l*72» 

WOlvmala Stars EmergMktsS 007ft- 

wwinrti. Eastern Dragon S 173* 

w Winch. Frontier 4 778D9 

w Wtnch. FuL orympla Star — 3 15146 

w wmch. Gl Sec tnc PI (A)__S 930 

• Winch. Gl Sec Inc Pi IC>_S *24 

wwirteh. Hide Inll Modtoon_Ecu 149527 

w winch. Htdgimi Ser D Ecu 174932 

w winch. Hide Inn ser F Ecu insjo 

w Winch. Hide Olr Star HeapeS 1084(31 

w Winch. Rater. Multi. Gv Brf-S 1843 

• Winchester Thoitond 3 3136 

OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front St. Haml|loiLBennudoap*2f«6a 
w Qallma Emerato Fd LM — S ».9v 

w Outimo Fund S 1L01 

w Out im o Futures Fund 5 174J 

• Outimo GloftH Fund __S I3J7 

w Optima Perteuta Fd Ua s *49 

w Oatlroo snarl Fund S 7J5 

ORBITSX GROUP OF FUNDS 

rf orWte* Aita Pac Fd s 527*; 

a orowei Growth Fd s ISM 

d Orftl re r Health t Envlr Fd-S S07W 

0 Orftltex Joftan Small Cos FdS iMV 

rf Oitjriec Natural Res Fd CS 15.1729 

FACTUAL 

d Eferotty Fane Ltd 1 a*42B* 

d immiiv Fund ua » *ci4L! 

rf Star Hlgn TUM Fd LM 3 ti'.OL 

MII9AMMUP 

wLuxar. . . 5 iC 

rf Parvest USA B i 1XS 

d Porrost Jeewn B Y 61M X 

rf Porves! A ski Podl B S -33* 

rf Porvest Eurooe B Ecu 

d Porvml Ho'tcnd a FI I37.:» 

d Porves! France a FF 122185 

d Porvest Germany B DM 41724 

a Parve-J ObIHJollar B t 1751.97 

rf Porvest Oftll-DM B. DM. 1E7JJ7 

0 Porresl Oft h Y m B _r 15773130 

d Porvesr Oftl-GirVlen ft Fl IS9eJ: 

rf Porvest OWJ-Franc B r F I97».l» 

rf Pa'vtts) Otni-Ster B £ 1S5W 

d Porvest Cwi-Ecu B _6cu llLis 

d Pmvest OtHFBeta* 0 LF 1*9*136 

0 Porvest S-T Dollar B S 17847 

rf Porvest S-7 Elvdpp B Sat J3IAJ 

d Pftrvesl GT OEM B DM 4«t.9S 

rf Porresl S-T FRF B FF la»K 

rf Parvasr 5 -t Set Pim B. BF issaiw 

d Porvest Gtoeai B U= 77 luo 

d Porvest Ini Bona B S 2 UN 

rf Parvesr OPIFUra B Lil 534<793C 

d Porvest Int Eauittes B I 10982 

d Porvest UK B c 89 .li 

1 d Pprvtsa USD Pius B 1 TtSS 

ff Porvest S-T CHF B SF 25817 

rf ParveSI Ofti-Canacto B Cs 18721 1 5 49c Bond PTH-U55 B 

rf Porvest OW-OKK B DKK «32J1 - “V™ friivsjc^Q, 

PERMAL GROUP 

/ Drakjcar GrowWr N.V : 7T y«4 ' 

•{ Emerging MktS HUBS S UiJ* 

/ EuroMir (Ecu) LM Ecu 1*2739 

1 FX Flnandols & Furures _s 94*91 

i Investnient Hiras N.V s :7>*S-t 

< Media A Cammuntcottam_s 101387 

I Nascol Ud S 183382 

PICTET A CIE -GROUP 

wP.CFUKVoIILuti C 68«3 

w P.CF GermowDl (Lia) .DM 9*4f 

W P.CF Norantvai (Lu*1 S 

WP.CF VDHwrlLuxI Plos 975WC 

W PC.F Vail tolls ILu.i Llf r7rt*400 

■rf P.CF t/ottrance I Lm 1 FF imjw 

w P.U.F. VaRwnd SF R !Uu| _Sf 26? 17 
rfPUF.VottwKl USD ILUO-S 224.46 

w P.U.F. Vclbend Ecu ILux)_Ecu 17121 

W P.U.F. Votaond FRF iLUfr i.F F *3100 

WP.U F.Votaond GBP lunlJ 13.73 

w P.U.F. Vatoond DEM (Lux) DM WL44 

W P.U.F. US S Bd Ptfl ILU.1—S \KACM 

WP.U.F. Model Fd. Ecu 12JU4 

w P.U.F.PIellte SF *'14* 

wPAJ T. EwwraMMk (Lu*t— S 1612-1 

w P.V.T. Eur. Ouport (Lo*j Ecu M72* 

ft P.U.T. Global Value (Lu.j _Ecu 15282 

w PjU.T. Eurevot (Lu»5 Ecu 222C8 

rf Pictet VMsubse (CHI SF 444JS 

mimt Sman Coo (lOMi, J 48164 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
cn> PA BO im Grand Carman 
FO»: 1Bt19>94M9*l 

m Premier US Equity Funo_5 Jl«l~ 

m Premier Inti Ea Fund S i3B\si 

in Premier Sovereign BdFd^S 797.44 

m Premier GtabclBBFfl s 14S575 

m Premier Total Return Fd S ID1*£S 

PUTNAM 

rf Emerging Him Sc. Trust 3 3*.*: 

• Putnam Em. info. Sc Trust 8 3547 

d Putnam Gleb. High Growth j 1 a.9? 

0 PtnnomHtohlncGNMAFn LX 

d Putnom Inn Fima — _ s IL» 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

w Asian Drfvetorf mant , j Mil 

w Emerging Growth Fd N,V._J 152.15 

w Duontum Fund XV. s i*J«Ji 

wOuontum Industrial s 15? 11 

» awmtwn Realty TtvsC. J 1^84 

w Quantum UK Reafty Fixsd_c 101.94 

W Quasar inn Fund N.v__S 153.13 

w Ouofo Fund n v t i t « j; 

REGENT fund management ltd 

w Hew Karra Growth Fd s 1 18? 

w Wovo Lot Pod fit Inv Co S 4 911 


1 w Pew-’ Ara,’-=g« Ca 5 980 

; pi 7 L. UUT'i -lrr Fi t te* 

I a tww Fr. G~n Fs s Alim 

> i Began' G^ Eu.ro crafej 1VT4 

• d Stir. 1 os- :r.3 G-m ►; % 2294* 

, da9StrtGW.ss2y1-.FC_8 UID 

. wesert V.1I' Fee.* Lst.n J *47*1 

. d Prsen* 5 1 ?- Rejcr.e I 2.1734 

I S Reoent I*' Rrsasrm i 3231 

1 dSMer jat sr 5 U« 

rf Besenl Gift 'JR O-r ft J. 181*4 

I w *40er» McatL' Fa U3 — S 925 

1 trtenr,iPaLi<*w:xi s 1 178744 

j w Peg:-! Sn Larks Fd. 8 044 

w Uirtee-mtoec Aise'j Sr- i_s 11*4 

S09CCO GROUP 

I PC3KwK0A2 Srftr-3rr.T.:!S234t2J4 

• a RiA-TNr'caFrfas pi mijb 

d SG L jrsao Fu?C Ft 13280 

I dPGPcs WcFisa Si tsua 

rf RG Divirer.te Fune — c» «r«a 

d PG«ar**P:j»F F*.___FI 1H83 

3 RS Moftev P..1 f s 5 I8J.99 

d RG Mflftev Plus F Dr* SM lltAl 

Ct RGMWV Plus' SF 5F 10788 

Mare Foaccs see to-a wttn Slacks 
ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DC) 
MHtOUSC FUNDS 

rfAskn CcoUc* HftkXTss «J 6) Jl 

• DoJublCF Rcffnchua fid-6 ud*? 

w 3=iws lcp Rcmcn eo s 100721 

w Fra Col“. TrsTJ-on ch? sf TKTSji 

wLeleom — i 3SSS3B 

• Leveraged Cos Ka;d'n5s_3 6243 

1 wCftfFVcrCV SF 97*22 

• Prl Challenge SwtS Fd SF 114941 

ft PneQdTy Frf-Eyroge Ear 1IAU7 

ft Pjleouitr Fd-HHvelto SF 10687* 

ft Prieauit* Fd-LstmAm X 148T91 

ft Priftand fan Ecu Ea ir296 

t Prtscnd Funa USD S I1J9S2 

ft PrUtonrfFrfHv EmerMUsA 111439 

• Selective inreit SA t 34783 

ft Sc.Yce - — * ltUOft 

i w LS Bone Phil S 942. IM 

w VftriCBIJV Ecu 1091 90 

ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
OTHER FUNDS 

d Asto/jopcin Emerg GrawthJ 17*7130 

wEwrt Eur Pern IrrvTsi Ecu 1M9.IS 

wEircoSiralcg r.ma !d_Ecu 1B330 ' 

C integral Fui^res S 953** 

e oghgesicicftoi Fa General DM 190238 

ft cmlgesr OlLaal (.* mcomrDM 145765 

rf Psor^: Nice c ura s 888 

w penrel Dtavkii On*- ;r.'_S 777*33 

1 SMChCB HOriSLi FF 9117123 

ft virt-r-n 6- -rj * 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (Cl) LTD 
mhemrue '.everaaed Hie __L U3.U 

SAFDIC GROUP-eXY ADVISORS LTD 
mre» aiven:r.rait£F3L*a8 U8C39 

SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 
w Republic GL»» < V4335 

w Ptsudv- GAM 4oncc 1 1104 

• Sep GAM Em VJrtl GISjCJ 137.95 

W Eo GAY. E.T .Vita Lot Am! 11*29 

w Resubito GAMEtiroocSF-SF 11584 

• PC3U3LC GAM Europe U&S8 10189 

• Re?u3; C SAM Grwlo QiF-SF 10782 

nPcou3,i:3AYGr?nf-Y£ I 1*75 

t w ReX2rfl£ C-AM Srrwfii UK* 1*926 

1 w ScsuEl:; Cam Ooucrtunttv 1 13983 

• ResiiftLc GA.V pwt.b - * <n 

, w ResuftiicGnse-Goi m: X 1036 

• Peouftllfr. Croe> El- ine . dm iaa 

W FoBUftlc LAI A!P Alto: 5 9988 

WRtrkJWIc US Am Argent S 9880 

w RftOualto Let Am Brsil i tos.1* 

• Republic Lot Am .vm.se i 1D0.7D 

w Qeeuftiic Lot Am v ac s 912* 

«• °ep le «non 3tre* r dLta_S H09 

SANT ANDES KEV7 NDRLD I MY. 

mCammond-rFur^ J 100113 

T.l^irrrc Furrf S i rm 

SKANDINAV15KA ENSKILDA BARKEN 
S-E-&AMKLN FUND 

a EufCSC Inr- X 3.95 

d FtanwOsternlns 5 uo 

rf Gtotol Inc S ijl 

0 Lflta.-r.Mrt Ire 5 0.92 

rf vcrlSen Inc * 1ft4 

a laaan Inr _ ... Y 10033 

e .Milto inc - 9 0Je 

d Sverige Inc. 10*9 

0 i.'ontonerfta mr s dp* 

0 Teknotooi :nc 3 )D4 

rf 5-iertoe Rantefan: Irt r.. _L ek iml 

SKANDIF3NDS 

0 Equity Inf! Acc - « 17.12 

3 Eault. Ini I Inc 5 1323 

d Exorfy Gtabci S 184 

rf Eault ir Net. SaaurCK__S 127 

rf Eoulr. Joec'i Y 11170 

a Equity Nordic S )8B 

It Equity U.»( r 183 

d Eaulty Continental Europe J 187 

d Equity Merftterro neon J IJU . 

rf Equity Kerin America S 2ft] I 

S ExjllV Far East % 483 

a inn Emtralno Mar lets 3 1J8 

rf Bert (nrt Acc — S 132* 

d Band ire- 1 Inc — S 7 jo 

rf Band Europe ACC « 185 

er Bond Eurooe inc s aw 

d Bond Sweden Ac: Sek 1*73 

d Bond Sweden the JM 10*9 

d Bans DEM acc DM 125 

0 B6TO3 DEM Inc DM 083 

rf Bond Dollar US Acc 5 1*0 

d Bond Dollar US Inc S \Oi 

e Cuiy. US Dollar s 156 

rf Curr. Swedish rronor Jek 12*3 

SOCiETE GENERALE GROUP 
SOCELVjY FUND IGF) 

W SP BOmr A U8.A - 5 1420 

• 5F swids E Germany DM 3185 

wSFEonc&C France FF 12624 

» SF Bonds E GB ! lift! 

w SF Bonds F jooan Y 2396 

wSF Bonds G Europe- Ecu Pjb 

» SF Bonds H Wbrlrf Wide — _5 1B23 

wSF Bonds J Beta lam BF 811JQ 

wSF Ea. K North America — s 17*1 

w SF ta. L w^uroce Ecu 1LN 

wSF Ed. MPccdfic Basin — _Y 1597 

w SF Ea. P Growth Countrlaft lifts 

w SF Eq. Q Gold Mines S 3151 

wCFEa-HWortoWld* _5 1586 

w SF Short Term S France — FF 171*515 

w SF Short Term T Eur. Ecu 1644 

SODITIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

w JAM Brazil f 14522 

w SAM DtversMed 1 13251 

• rf*g 'ft tcCc r r * 1WA9 

W S6.V. Ooportunlty 5 12210 

w 5AM credo S 

wJAM strategy S 11SJ9 

tr r j?nc L-'M s lTioj 


w iS AT/ Comuc^te, 

SR.GLCSAL FL - J*D LTD 


mSR internonorai 5 its 

SVENSXA HANDELS BANICEN SJL 
146 Bd de ta Prtrvsss. «_.3so Unrmbourg 

ft SHB Bond Fund__ — _S St 

w 5tenUra Set. FC Amer Sh X IS 

i* Svert.'c Sei. Fd German' _S It 

• S.smko Sri. Fd :nr> ad SftJ 13 

wSmmNslel Rt inrt Sh S 5* 

** avanafce jri. Fd .'coon y < 

w Svcikrt Sri. ri MlltWt _Ss* 116 

w Svtraic sr_ rrf -icrci: SEK v> 

*Ztcr&c Sri. FJ Pccil Sh — j i 

n S.crsko 5el Fd :*rrd Bde^Se* 1436 

* Svynstg Set Fd Sylvia 51* —Ecu 116 

SWISS BANKCOSP. 

O S2C lea Indfrfr Cuna SF 1XMJ 

rf SEC Equity PtfFAuKrolto — AJ 211.1 

C SBC Equity P«Koi«to — CS 7151 

J SEC Eouity P*fi-Eurooe Ecu 19BJ 

rf IBC Ea PttFhrthertonas Fl Xtd 

rf 5BC Govern B0 A/8 S J 1009. 

d SBC band PtlV-LuSi S A AS lfllJ 

rf 5BC BanSPTtFAictrSB AS 12*1 

rf 33C Bond PrtI-CO"8 A CS )0L 

ff SZC Ben: PtfKoni B CS 12Ai 

0 JLC Borri OMFDMA. DM 156J 

cSaCBcrttPTO-QMe — — DM 179. 

rf 5BC Bjnrf “tfFDulCh 5. A — Fl 156J 

£ SBC Bend Prn-Duteh G. B-FI t774 

rf SBC Bond Pth-ccu A Ecu 165: 

o SBC Bond PIIFECU B Ecu 136: 

a sec Bona pmi-cf a ff Sjoj 

rf SBC Bond P*fl-F F B — : FF 44*1 

a SBC band Ptn-Ptas A.*B — Ptas 947W 

d SBC Bond PttFSlerllng A C 49.1 

d SBC Bond Ptfi- Starting B— s SBJ 

a SBC bond PorttoCo-SF A SF ltoJ.1 

d SBC Band Portfarfo-SF B SF 137*/ 

rf Sec Bond PMV-USS A S 991 


d SBC Bond PHI- Yen A — Y 

a SBC Sons PtfLYen n v 
a S&C MIUF- AS — - A l 

rf SBC W1MF- BFR BF 

rf S9C lAMF - Coils — Q 

& SBC CM Short-Term A DM 

rf 55C DM Short-Term b dm 

rf SBC MMF - Dutch G Fl 

rf SBC AVBF • Ecu Ecu 

rf SBC MMF - Esc Esc 

0 SBC MMF FF FF 

a SBC MMF - Lit Lit 

d SBC MMF - Ptas Pto 

rf SBC MMF- Schilling — _A5 

rf SBC MMF • Sterltag — l 

rf SBC MMF • 5F SF 

ff sec MMF - US Dollar S 

ff SBC MMF - USL’II 5 

rf SBC MMF - Yen Y 

ff sec GtoFFYn 5F Grtn SF 

ff see GlDFPnl Ecu Grin E CO 

ff SBC GtoFFHI OSO Grth S 

O sec Glohptfl SF YW A SF 

ff SBCGDPPW 5F rid B SF 

rf SeCGIW-plIlEcuYIdA Ecu 

rf SBC orw-ptf! Ecu no B Ecu 

d SBC Gtftt-Ptff USD Yid A 5 

C SBC GW-Ptfl USD YW B S 

0 SBC GSM- Pit; SF Inc A SF 

d SBC Glft-Ptfl SF Ire B SF 

rf SBC Oifti-Pttl Ecu inc A -Ecu 

3 SBC GtaHWft E ai inc B Era 

a SBC QW-Ptll USD Inc A S 

ff SBC GiftFPin USO Inc B 3 

0 SBC GIB! P1GCM Growth _DM 

0 SBC Gift! PlfFDM Yid B D M 

d SPC c-id Ptii Dii inc B DM 

ff SBC Emer g i n g Martetv 8 

d IBC Smalt SMK Cora Sw^SF 

a AmertartMlar i 

a AnglcVolar t 

d AKiPontoiiD S 

d Convert Bend SeNciian SF 

d D-Mork Bond Srtedton DM 

d Dollm- Bend Selection 3 

0 Ecu Bond Selection — Fn. 

0 Florin Bond Select ton Fl 

d FranofVBior- _ ff 

d GerawiloVolor DM 

rf GotoPorttollfl 5 

« IBeriftVBtof Pto 

rf Ilcrvdor LH 

a JnonFsrtioib y 

ff j ter! too Band Selection _C 

d Sn Toreisn Soiw SetoctlunJF 

ff SMvVniHr — *c 

0 Universal Bftrt Se*edlon_5F 


8F 15MOC 

211 211.00 

-CS 71SM 

-Ecu 19BJJ0 

ji 2*a i 

8 1609.M) 

-AS 181*6 

M 13089 

• Cl IflUl 

.CS 124*3 

-DM 15US 

GM 179.11 

81 15615 

Fl 177*4 

-Ecu 16520 

•Ecu 13621 

.FF 53*85 

JF 64*81 

•Pros 947500 

X 49.16 

1 58*5 

■SF 1063.10 

SF 137*61 

3 9909 

8 110*2 

•V 10C620Q 

,Y 11449200 

AS 433197 

BF 11X7100 

CS 470990 

DM 1031.13 

DM 133192 

Fl 739184 

Ecu 37*122 

Esc 46T2S7J0 

FF 3533174 

Lit 54 151 EL® 

PtO 364145JM 

AS 3215146 

I 2842.9? 

SF 592519 

I 73(390 

5 209869 

Y 59914880 

SF 118163 


ff UMveroOt Fwie SF 1SLM 

0 Yen Bend SrtacMn Y 11SS7O0 

TEMPLETON GLOBAL STRATEGY SICAV 

a Gtoo: Growth S lZ9t 

d CM Gtoed Growth OM UTS 

0 Smaller Comocnies -.1 Cl.* 

d Amenran . 5 l*2t 

d Eurnoean SF I ’25 

fr» trwr PM « !4JI 

0 Fin>n.i«iltarw i 4 1630 

a Global lacomc , -.) lift) 

e DM Gloom DM DM If 85 

d Emerging «Us Fix inc S 1L5 

d US G o roromml » 9*3 

ff NQ<en _ fc 1024 

TEMPLETON WWIDE INVESTMENTS 
GROWTH PDRTFCLIO 

dCtoUA-l 3 \U) 

0 COBA-3 S 17.10 

0 f taw A-t « ism 

dCtoOSB-l e 12*8 

d QaiB-j- x Hja 

INCOME PORTFOLIO 

»rnm « 982 

e CtoH B 8 985 

THORNTON MANAGEMENT LTD 
3 PpOf ISVl Fd SA £ r U90 

0 Pool Iftat Ffl SA D M .. — 0X 4 J7.44 

rf Eastern Critsotser Fund —J 1124 

d Thar. L.trf Dragon* Fd Ltd j 37,73 

a Tftornion Orient me Fd lW s 77*4 

a Thorn tei . Tlg«v Fd Ltd S 538I 

d McnooM Selection S 21M 

wJatgrto 1173 

d Korea t 1*45 

NEW TIGER SEE- FUND 

rf HOOg Kana — * 5141 

0 JOBOn S 1*27 


ff Jason s i* 

0 RtlMlprtne* . * 66 

0 Thailand-. j r, 

0 Matoysta. 1 30 

0 Indonesia 5 f 

0USSLtouk3tv x K 

ff rni~< -- « ]A 

o Singesera— s 22 

THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 

rf Eauhy lno»ne S 11 

d EgaUy Growth S is, 

d UaiAmiy s la 

UEBRRSEEPAMK Zurich 

ff B ■ Fund — SF 1217. 

rf E - Funs SF 647. 

rfJ-Funa SF 4K 

rf M - F'-W AC IJQ2, 

rf UBZ Euro-Income Funa SF 10. 

ff UBZ Worid Income Fund Cm 5* 

d UBZ GoM Funa S 125. 

ff U92 Ntapon Convert sf 13*7. 

ff Aita Growth Convert SFR-5F 131 
rf Alio Growth Convert USS—S )1«L 

d UB7 DM- Bond Fund DM tin. 

ff UBZ C ■ Fund — . ..DM 108. 

a UBZ Swhs Edutty Fund SF 111 

rf UBZ American Eo Fund 5 9l 

rf UBZ S-Borol Fued S 75 

rf U9Z Southeast Asia fa S 99. 

UNION BANCAIRE ASSET MGT IUSAMJ 
INTERNATIONAL. NASSAU 

wArdrttovMt S 2SJL 

w Arroinvnt S nu* 

• Bacatln s ito*. 

W aacUtotcst - ... 3 1351! 

• BwwJnvfrW — * 1151 

wCmstnveu S 858. 

wDtofutures 5 lnsu 

wDtavost % 06*! 

wDtovedAslaS 5 10701 


wDlnvest Gold SMetah S 99 *m 

• DtnvextiKlFuincStrat—S KOTO 

w Jagliwest S 1977 J* 

wLeranlnvest i 744*3 

wMoroinveS 5 116223 

wMorfinvesi S 1277*4 

• Mm knot S 154*13 

nr Moortovesi Comlnoled 5 97680 

wMourtmtoNBcu Ecu 161784 

• P .nw . » 187055 

WPrflBPDvtJTY i 17*582 

wOusnhnvest } 2*4173 

wDuonflnvestn s 1JB8J) 

w 5 teta Invest S 01334 

• Trllmii-W * 1 11484 

• L'rslnvejf S 4K23 

UNION BANCAIRE ASSET MGT UBAM) 
INTER NATIONAL LUXEMBOURG 

wUBAM S Bond _* 115*47 

W UBAM DEM Bond DM 119989 

w UBAM Emerging Growth _S 97789 

W UBAM FRF Boat FF SGSftl 

WUBAM Germany DM 115115 

wUBAM Gtoftal Band Em 1*1488 

nrUBAM Japan— Y 1032*00 

WUBAM Starting BoiW t 96U4 

W UBAA* Sto Porflf 6 As/O > 19U6 

WUBAM US Equities S 118589 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND/ 1 NTPAG 

0 Antra— SF 4625 

ff BoncHftvesl SF 57.70 

ff Brtt-lovest SF 144A0 

rf Canoe SF 7825 

d Ccnvert-lnveS .SF 137 Jo 

ff D-Mart-Inves DM 2HE60 

rf Da llor-l nves)_ _ f 113JG’ 

0 Energie-lnvest SF 11980' 

0E3MC SF 1«J» 

rf EwW SF 359 80 

d Foma — SF 33080' 

rf Frond! — „ SF 31tft0' 

d Germac SF TOM 

d G4ototnve3t_ -■ SF 11980; 

ff GoKMnvast SF 250801 

d Gutttevinvert — t n 27ILM’ 

rf Hrivertnvest SF 102*9 ; 

d Haitand-mvnt. SF 33580 1 

d Mac SF TS5JB , 

ll Japan- tnvtsl SF 27156 1 

0 Focmc-JoyfOl SF 48*40i 

0 Sofil SF 20189) 

0 SkoMLnovlEn- invest SF 24180 1 

l &~=k B 

d Svtoraal SF 18980 

rf UBS America Latina SF 1OBJO1 

0 UBS America Ltftoa 5 7681 1 

0 UBS Asia New Horizon SF 9SA0i 

0 UBS Asia New Hartxon 5 4987 1 

0 UBS Small C Europe SF 10290 ] 

ff UB5 Small C Europe DM UlJOi 

0 UBS Port Inv SFR inc SF 1B7A5I 

d UBS Part Inv SFRCagG — SF W25i 

0 UBS Port Inv ECU Inc SF 140851 

0 UBS Port Inv Ecu Inc Eou «L4fii 

0 UBS Port Inv ECO COP G_SF H*45l 

0 UBS Port low Ecu Cop G — Ecu 6L.TJ ’ 

0 UBS Part Inv USS Inc S 7*21 ' 

rf UBS Port Inv USS Inc SF 10*95- 

0 UBS Port inv U5S Cos G_SF 10584, 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1994 








Compiled hv Our Skiff From Dispardia 

HOUSTON - The New York 
Kiiicks. who usually thrive in that situ- 
ation. lured the Houston Rockets into 
a low-scoring game of attrition in the 
second half of the opening game of the 
National Basketball Association 
championship series. 

That ’.he Rockets won anyway had 
them fceiing like sonwoae who had 


NBA FINAL 


just homered off one of those Nolan 
Ryan fastballs that used to fly around 
these pans. 

“This is the worst we've played in 
awhile." guard Kenny Smith said after 
Houston escaped with an 85-78 vic- 
tory Wednesday night. “We were for- 
tunate to get away with a win. Carl 
Herrera looked like he wa* the only 
one that had been piaying all along." 

Game 2 of Lie besi-of-scven series b 
set for Friday night in Houston. 

While Lie Rockets complained of 
rusliness after an eight-day layoff, the 
one player who looked sharp was Her- 
rera." the reserve center-forward from 
Venezuela who last played May 17. He 
averaged 2.8 points in the playoffs, but 
finished with 10 on 5-fer-6 shooting, 
helping Houston build a first-half lead 
i: never lost. 

The Rockets won despite .scoring 
only 31 point 1 : the second half. But. 
with the Knicks getting just 32. it was 
the lowest scoring half in the history of 
the final, easily breaking the nark of 
69 sei by Syracuse and Fon Wayne in 
1955. And. Houston's 54 points in the 


first half n oc the mc*l scored against 
New York in its last 12 games. 

Hakeem Olajuwon. on whom the 
Rockets usually rise or fail, did his 
pan in the first half, scoring 19 points 
on 9-f or- 1 3 shootiDs. In the second 
half, he got just nine more points and 
missed eight of nine shots from the 
field. 

The Rockets as a team made.] usi 2o 
percent of their shou in ibat naif. Bul 
by nin king just 24 percent. 12-for-50. 
the Knicks just did not have the of- 
fense to make a successful run,_a|- 
though they closed a 1 2-point, deiicit 
to three in the fourth period. 

“We had a chance to win the game if 
we just make the shots," said their 
coach. Pat Riley. “But that’s a univer- 
sal disease of ours. We let i'. slip away 
at the free-thrc>tt line anu from the 
oerimeter." 

Especially from the perimeter, where 
John Starks was 3-for-lS. Derek 
Harper 3-for-lO and Hubert Davis 1- 
i'or-6. Center Patrick Ewing, despite his 
13 points, also was forced outside for 
most of his shots and missed 16 of 26. 

“It was the kind of game we wanted. 
In the second half, our defense began to 
scar on them," Riley said. "But we got 
this Far by making shots, and tf we had 
been able to step up and make some 
shois. we would have been able to win." 

"We were piaying a great defensive 
team, and our defense had to carry us 
tonight" said the Rockets* coach. 
Rudy Tomjanovich. “We knew it was 
going to be a dogfight. It v.-js like art old 
football game plaved in the mud. " 

\AP. H P. ,V>Ti 



Owners Back Salary Cap 


tting Stage for Strike 

L i- . tiuf rfl 


P-.-.-Px 


By Richard Justice 

Washington Pon Secricc 

CINCINNATI — In a move that vastly 
the possibility of a strike by major league baseball 
players Oris simmer, the owners of the teamstaw 

* - - , 1. hgfSSI RIDE DTODOS* 


S&Sngto lose. 

wfll declare an impasse dunng tbe ******??$, 

umlateraBy impose the new $yaeffl, '■ 

nrrmosal on Tuesday, tern-,. 


seven previous laoor connoniauraa. 
ratified an importam change Wednesday in the Major 
t wgur Agreement. Under that change, any labw 
agreement must be approved by tbrcc-quancra of the 
28 owners instead of by a simple majority. So only 
debt owners are needed to block a deal, ana there 
aDpcais to be at least eight so-called hard-liners will- 
ing to shut down the game in nridseason rawer wan 
compromise significantly. 

Richard Ravitch, the owners chief negotiator, will 
present the labor plan to Donald Fehr, executive 
director of the Major League Players Association, at a 
meeting Tuesday in New York. ... 

The interim commissioner, Bod Sdig, said the play- 
ers "should receive the details of the plan before 
there’s any public discussion-" He added, "I dent 
want the players reading driblets about the plan. " 


umlateraDy impose toe new sja*— ( 

that includes revenue-snanug «•« » «-»- v ~rz n A ft— £ ets the propow M \ 

With a history of caving in to the Payers during meet with his executive board of playersT^odj^k:^ 
ven previous labor confrontations. the ownere also •«_ ^ jyjy j i the players wiS mettagidB,^'; 

tified an importam change Wednesday in the fjto; 9wSburgb. probably to finable a strike date. *<;k; 
sague A^ment Und* ** dhMjft, ig J*" “MS not virtual^.gimnt^,; 
Moment mu «» he nnnmvfld bv ihrcc-ouancis of the inM.!? on nnhmtst. f in oletHKi 


you'll understand the significance oT , w i?^2fiSS - 
joday. Once you know the details of die plan, . 

‘“/Kgh he declined to discuss < ^ < s^ *&»; 

rami. il apparently indntte a <ta* *“ 2SSS--' 

saiaam 

not affect any players 

The question for the payers then bocoayft.vnB - 
they be willing to strike for an issue that 
others. • . -' V-V-*v -< 


Indians Stop Kingdome 




(.od^ 

Tb'> 
I? ? (H> 


. , „jR2SSB8SS^^\:^ZZ±i* • • 

Jrir Averse F:ao-nrv< 

Hakeem Olajuwon foiling Anthony Mason: When shots went amiss, defense saved the Rockets. 




Hiajor League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



Ent Division 

W L 

Pet. 

GB 

flCr/ York 

34 21 

418 

— 

S-.5lan 

32 24 

J71 


5o‘i:r-.ors 

Jl 25 

J54 

3\- 

Crai.-ol! 

» 21 

iOC 

4'S 

Tnan'a 

77 7» 

•4£2 

7'2 

LMlOCC 

Central Sivlsicn 
33 21 

fill 



Cicvclana 

31 21 

574 

: 

k.amos Cl*k 

79 27 

518 

s 

Mlnn«7lo 

29 27 

-518 

5 


75 22 

.429 

Q'S 

T^.a» 

W=st Division 

:s 23 

SCO 

_ 

^.i-Marnn 

25 3< 

424 

4’ : 

3ui:il9 

24 ?; 

421 

4’: 

Om’s t.c 

IT 41 

xn 

u 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



coil Division 
w L 

Pd. 

GB 

itlop.’o 

r i« 

■Ml 

~ 

A-tTiIn-Ol 

W 12 

596 

3V; 

=!cr:a? 

30 X 

517 

i 

Wise !ior>-a 

r> m 

.477 

V. 

r.rv re* 

77 70 

.474 

10’s 


Ccnl-n. 1 Di\ i .Ion 
32 Si 

56" 



Cnir'kAaiS 

37 25 

511 


S: Louli 

:® 75 

577 

-i. 

Pi.k.iurg;: 

74 n 

427 

k 

Ch'cuga 

27 35 

236 

10’ j 

LS'.Anncic; 

West Division 

30 3« 

538 


5an Franc’ us 72 31 

■47i 


Ce'.vcf*j 

.7 37 

574 

- 

Si.i G ! :sc 

:o jt 

.33" 

10 


** edneaeay’s Line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
I C Vi CM MS—: 3 0 

• two Ml QM-3 ? 0 

r.Corr»*ii l3).Casllllo(8).Ha»l9lond 
i- Serz.Caak (81. Johnson iBIandKar- 
Luvalilerc iB). W— Jannsor. ML 
K 1-2. HR— Toronto. Sprague (»>. 

120 OH Oil— $82 
OH 3(10)0 00s— 14 15 I 


FlimvsIJ. Howard l4» Fr;h*.rlh (41, Har- 
rl; (5). P.wysil li'. ma Pov/ipnd: Gull lemon. 
Gardiner (fii.S-Oavis (7). SM-hom (BJ. Henna- 
man (f) ana Krcuter. »— GaiKC-son. r-t 
L— Flnnvaio. 0-3. HRs— Boston. Vaughn lie). 
Rowland HI. Delroli. FWiaer MSI. 
Minnesota 0M S20 002—1 8 0 

Californio no OQS M*— S 7 I 

Desftolm. Merrlmon (7). Willis '7). Coslon 
(81 and Woicecfc; Lcnwjon. Bjlchor (B!. 
GraM (») dm CTorr.-r. w— Lanas tor. >4. 
L— Gctliaiei. 7-0. Grahe HI. MRs— Cali- 

fornia. Owen ML BJacksan ,7]. 

New Vork US COJ €01— S 12 1 

Te*a* 002 003 OH— S 6 0 

Poraz, Gibson (7). Pall (81. Howe 181 ano 
Storttar; Hurst. Smith la], Haneycutr (I). Oli- 
ver (O) and Rodriguez. »— Smith, 14). 
L— Perez. 3-1 5r— Oliver ill. HRs— New 
York, B Williams MO). Stanley <£). 
Baltimore 111 aoo 300-8 12 0 

Kansas CHv l« W 000— « 8 I 

Pernandoz. Mills 16). Poole 13). Smith (91 
and Hollos: M"o;kl. Brewer (71. Meecnam 
(7) and Maeforiane. W— Mills. 1-2. L— Mi- 
lackl. O-l. 5 v— Smith 123). HRs— Ball I more. 
Ploken loi. Kciwas Clrv. McRae (31. 
Milwaukee 010 000 WO-* 19 1 

Oakland 100 Ora OOO— 1 7 1 

Bones. Ltavd (9j and Nlluon; B.Mti. Hors- 
man (8). Acre (8). Lclocr ib> and Slelnbacn. 
Vf— Banes. 4-4. L-Hersnon. 0-1 HRv-Mil- 
waukce. G.vquohn 110). P.Henderson ill. 
Cleveland QM M mi — i • I 

Startle M2 0W 010— J a 1 

M.Ciart.,Lliiloylsi (7i. Farr (Bl.Shucr ("I and 
SAIo-nar: Cummings. J.Neiicn (4i. T JJavb 17). 
Gasscge (9« and Haseiman. w— M Clark. H. 
W— Cummirrw, 1-2. Sv— Shuev 13). HRs— Cm- 
v*!ana Belle I1J), Ramirez l?l. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Son Oleco OM 180 Ml — ! 3 0 

Alfa nia JM oio Id*— 5 ll i 

wnitchjrs:. Martinez il). Soger hi. mou- 
i«r (di. Ha'lrrt.ir ivi and Ausmm. Giovlne, 
Wohlers (8). rAcMicncei ( 6 ) and O’ericn. 
W— Glovinj. 7-5. L— Wfiltohwsi. 4-7. 
Cincinnati 200 030 000-2 4 0 

St. LOUll 020 012 12*— B 14 0 

Smiley. Ruffin f*«. Pariugno (7). Carrasco 
IB) and Darsett, Waison. Habvan (oi.Arocha 
17). Porn (0) ana WtcGrlfl. W— Watson. 4-1 
L— Smiley. 

New York ora w lao— 4 if e 

Colorado 210 000 02*— s 12 o 


Sgbartwgen and Stinnett; Fr«nr\ .vesre 
(81. B.Pullin (»1 and C- Irordi tV— Mg c-r. 1-1. 
L— Saberhoger. 6-1 Sv— B.fiVlIln (d<. 
HR— New York, Fv . rrnmroon {lJl. 

San Franosca coo )K coo— i ; : 

Pittsburgh oil ora 00*— 3 6 I 

Torres and Mon waring: Noaole end °or- 
rlsh. W— Torres. 2-4. L — N eagle a-6. 

Chicago 0M ooo ooo— o s i 

Philadelphia oio m2 co>— 3 4 o 

Faster. Otto (4). Wendell (d.. P't!0C 13' end 
Parent. w«sf. tlxiiM (i). Jcnc- Mi cr.d 
Do u ' ton. W— West. T-i. L—F Oiler. 3-1. 
Sv— Jones MAI. 

Houston DM 202 307— ' 11 0 

Montreal 002 ooc ooo— 2 a o 

a. WIIHcrm. Huflc> (V and Euseals- Fas- 
sera, show ie). Looney (7). Havne* io) and 
Fletcher, saehr IB). W~B. Will lairs. 3-2. 
L— Fassora. 4-4, HRs— Hauslan. 3co»eil 2 
MS). Cam Ini 11 (111. 

Los Angctei 0W DM OCT— 4 io : 

Florida 100 COT 133—5 7 i 

AsloclQ. Worrell 1*1. Os one («1 and Pir.Sg: 
Rapa. Lewis IS), rrojer 18; ana Samlaao. 
W— Frasar. 2-0. u— Worrell. 3-XHR— Lea An- 
geles. Walloon II 41 


Pacific League 



’.V 

L 

T 

Pci. 

GB 

rciei 

21 

Jl 

0 

-MA 

— 

2o-ou 

3T 

IB 

D 

405 

1 

on. 

22 

24 

0 

.489 

T- 

lo^c 

22 

25 

0 

.448 

8 Vs 

Klnleisu 

18 

28 

1 

an 

12 

Nlrcan Han 

19 

31 

1 

580 

13 


NBA Finals 


Tuesday’s Results 
Dele! Or- 2 
Nippon Harr. II. ScCw 7 
LSSM 2. x :n!e*:w I 


four or 'taiy 


The Michael Jordan Watch 


WEDNESDAY’S GAME: Jordon ,.^m t. 
lor-l wilt! O IlneMil. nrnmrtO<»f. ‘I!- f'l nrd 
glnglotcileil Inc? 7 .’Icigr. P'.ir C.'V-ni.'i-:. 
He hod (sgr outa-.'tg in nom Mela 
SEASON TO DATS’. Jgrgjn ^ batin’. .701 
(4!Mor-l«; win it runs. 32 singles. elgh:d:u- 
Olos. 2) RBij. Ip wc'kv. 37 StnvcOMK and Is 
stolon bases in?3 altemms He ha* t3 pu'ems. 
one assist and six errors In rigni !’CC 


Japanese Leagues 


Results cf Thursaar’s l»Tti slow. 212 kilo- 
melon tram Levaana Io Bra: 1. Massimo 
Cnircno, :»l t . ZG MobiH. 5 bolts 2b minutes 
U> soconds: 1 Raf Sorensen. DenmcrV, GB 
MG. some Hme: J.M.assins “oflenjana. Italy. 
tJa.lvsrc.5 i : 4. oodsiio Mass'. Usir. Amorc 
jr.d vi’3. vi.. :. =*aoi= Fornaciarl. Italy. Mer. 
cai one. 2 mingles 17 vecangs bgn.na. 4, Fablo 
Bordonall. Halv. Bresclalol. s.t.; 7. Maurlzlo 
Mollnarl. i laU—more ana Vila, w.: 8. Andrea 
Ferrlgatc. nolv.ZG MobUI. s.t.; •. Foblo Ros- 
CtoJI, /fair. arsscioJC si; >0 .‘Aorlwjc P)c- 
:oit. nalr. “e reel on*. >.!. 

C r rrraK smndings : ’. Ewgenv Berzin, rus- 
•ia. Gr— iv, Sg"gr. (d hours *c minutes 2° 
it can-Jc; 2 Me m: °cnten:. uai«. Carrera. 2 
minjies 55 5ccc ng-, uenind. 3. Miguel Indur- 
am. Scjia lanesio. 3:23. 4. Gianni Buora. 
Italy- Pafi. 7MS; J. Armerd de las Cuevas 
France, Castorama. 7:lo. «. Wladlmlr Belli, 
Halv. Lompre. 9;12; 7. Povel Tankov. Russia. 
Lcmpre. 11:03. 3. Claudio Chlcaouccl. Italy. 
Carrera, 11:32; 9. Nelson Rodrigger. Coiom- 
olc.ZG.Mobl:l.l5’2i. 70 Andy Hamoslen. Uj. 
Motorola. I.':53. 


WEDNESDAY'S RESULT 
New York 34 22 17 IS— 71 

Houston 24 38 II 13— 85 

Houston leads series i-C 
New York: Oaklev o-l 1 EHJ 12. CSmim 4-7 (.; 5. 
Ewing 10-26 3-4 22. Harper 3MD0-0E.Starks >-;32- 
511. Mason 1-! 3-5 & Williams 3-1 0-2 0. ArTorr. 3- 
7 GO 6. Davis 1-e 2-3 A Totals 3i-*’ 12-1* 7# 
Houston : tsorrv 3-10 1-4 ». rtwrae S-S*-6 
Dlalwwon 10-Z 6A 2& Maxwell *-16 !-S 11. 
ICSmltti 1-4 GO 2. Cassell 2-4 4^8, Herrera 5-4 GI 
ll Jent fr 1IHI 1 E lie 1-3 M 2. Tohsls Jl-7< 19-33 B. 

3-Pelnt toots— New York 4-15 (Horeer M 
Slarks 2-8. Antnonv 5-1 . Ewing 0-2), Houston 4. 
14 (Horrv 2-4. K^mlth 1-1 Me v well l-o. Jem d- 
1. Elle 0-1 1. Rebounds— New rorx y> (Gakiev 
14). Houston 62 (Thome 14). Assists— Nr* 
York 23 I Hamer 5). Houston 71 (K^miin j.. 
Total tools— New York 24. Houston 21. Tecnm- 
cols— Oaklev. EMe. Olofuwcn. Maxwell. 


Tne Associated Press 

Even Ken Griffey Jr. can't come 
through even’ time. 

Griffey struck out against Derek 
Lilliquist with wo runners on to 
end the seventh inning, then filed 
out against Paul Shuev with two 
runners on in the ninth as the Seat- 
tle Mariners lost to the Gevdand 
Indians. 5-5. Wednesday night. 

The In dians b 2 d iosr nice in a 
row at the Kingdome, and Griffey, 
batting 324 and leading the majors 
with 24 home runs, was in position 
to make it 10. But he hit merely a 
fly ball in the ninth with runners on 
first and second, and Shuey fol- 
lowed by striking out Jay Buhaer 
for his third save. 

"If Buhner hits it out, that’s 
fine." Shuey « 2 id- “If Griffey hits it 
out, that’s fine. too. 1 might be back 
in the minor leagues, but I’m fight- 
ing as hard as I can to stay here 
because I like it here." 


mirez hit home runs that helped 
Cleveland take a 4-2 lead. 

Rangers 6, Yankees & Texas, 
playing at home; reached -500 lot 
the first rime this season as Dan 
Smith and Darren Oliver provided 
late relief. , . . 

S mith, called up from the mi- 
nors, got his first major-league vie- 


AL ROUNDUP 


toiy, stranding two runners in the 
sixth and escaping a bascs-Ioaded 
jam in the seventh. 

Oliver took over is the ninth 
with the score 6-4, the bases loaded 
and no outs. He got Gerald Wi- 


liams to ground into a double play 
with his first Ditch and retired Bob 


with his first pitch and retired Bob 
Melvin on a foul pop for his first 


Albert Belle and Manny Ra- 


major-league save; 

Benue Williams and Mike Stan- 
ley homered for the Yankees, who 
lost far the seventh rime in 10 
games. 

Orioles 6, Royals 4: Cal Ripken 


homered for the 

eamc and then angled tbsttfrr ' ■ 
three-rco tally in the sewfcxrih asjc 
Baltimore won in Kcnsas’C ^jp&X’stv . 

Rafael Pabfteiro and 
Baines hit RBI 

ma doubled home a run ta Abe - 
seventh. 

Tigers 14, Red Sox ft 0x3: . . 
F Wtfer singled twice dntn%a Vt - .. - 
ran fifth ami hit h»15th bosqer 4$ . 

Detroit beat ^siring Btsun. ."i-. Py-' 
White Sox &«dd SqsTiXteoki ■$- 
Jackson and Mifce LaV^ficre ’2nT' 
RBI singles to- the bociom of riie. - 
ninth in Guc^o to beaf TomstSK ; 

Brewers 6, Addetles l:\DBve 
Nilsson's RBI dembte spaifad- a : 
fi vo-run eighth as Mflwankec won • 
in Oakland ’* w .. . 

Rickey Henderson extended hfctr % . 
oqor league record for teadoff. 
home runs to 64 is ifaefint ' •: ; 

Angels 5, Twins 4: - 

led on with. -a honre rah -and 2kv 
Jackson hit a two-run homer later..'- . 
in the first as host California beat t 
M innesota. ■ . /’■ i ’■ ■ 


s ’ 


v:r. '• 


Dodger Bullpen Blows It in Florida 


Whitbread ’Round the World 


Cantrc; Lraauv 



W 

L 

f 

P.’n 

Ce 


vamlurl 

:i 

1* 

3 

-el 

— 


Chunlchl 

24 

22 

0 

JT ’ 

e : 


Yofiahoma 

22 

25 

0 

Ac 

9 

WORLD CUF WARM UP 

Hanshln 

72 

24 

0 

448 


Bololuir. 3. Htmoarr 1 

Yokull 

72 

76 

0 

4S8 


Brazil 1 Honduras 2 

Hiroshima 

19 

25 

0 

.437 

1QV-. 

Ballvla 0. Peru 0 


Tuesday's Results 



Gormanv 2 Canada 0 


WHITBREAD 60 CLASS 
ramohe. 1M doi 14:15 :0C- 
Inirum JustlMo. 121 don, 05.29:24. 

Go I Ido »3 Pescaoava. 122 0=^. C«:i;.23 
WlnsrofL 122 Oars, 09:32:09. 

Toklo. 128 dayu la: 19:48. 

Brookstteio. 130 days. 04:29:2» 

Halnwn Saboaiaodirv. 135 ooi. 23:17:52. 
Hfllneken, 136 tovs. 22:30:47 
Rwbok, 137 dev*. 21:03. 17 
Oacua, 151 Oavi, 04.34.49. 

MAXI CLASS 

New Zeamno Enoeavaur. 170 tori. 0J:39:3J. 
Merit Cub. 121 tovs. 0J.50:«7 
La Post#. 123 tfcvsu 22:54:51 
UruBuov Neturai. i4j aov*, oo: 17.44. 




Yomlurl II. Yakuli 2 
Chunidil Z Yokohama 3 
Hiroshima Z Hanshln 1 


AUSTRIAN FIR5T DIVISION 
Final 

Sv Salzburg - Admira Wackcr 0 


BASEBALL 

TEXAS— Signed Sfeohen Larkin, outlleia- 


Trx Asso.-tacd Press 

If ’.he Los Angeles Dodgers h3d a 
beiter bullpen, they »ou!a be lead- 
ing the National League West by 
far more than two games. 

That bullpen, for the 1 5th time in 
24 games, blew a save Wednesday 
night in Miami, this lime failing to 
hold a 4-2 lead ir. the ninth as the 
Florida Mari in j won, 5-4. 

Todd Worre!! faiicd for the fifth 
time ir, se en save chances inis sea- 
son and .A! Osuns gave up a aame- 
winning single to Mario Diaz. 

Manager Tom Lasorda was also 
irate tha: Worrell had conceded a 
5tciei» base to Chuck Carr, who 
scored the tying rjc_frcm second 
on a single by Jesus tavarez. 

”1 don't know row you can let 
the tying run go to second base 
without hcicing him," Lasorda 
said. “I've never heard of that." 

Tavarez drove in Kurt Abbott 
and Can. ihe ball eluding left field- 


er Cory Snyder when he tried for a 
shoestring catch. Tavarez got to 
second on the error, then on Diaz's 
hit slid home head-first when cen- 
ter fielder Brett Butler’s throw was 
wide up the third-base line. 


Pirates 3, Giants 1: Denny Nea- 
gle pitched his first complete game 


INI ROUNDUP 


in 124 major league appearances, 
shutting down San Francisco on 
four hits in Pittsburgh. 

Andy Van Siyke and Orlando 
Merced each tripled in a run while 
N eagle also picked Barry Bonds off 
base twice — once while he was 
stealing and once while he was 
sleeping. Bonds called it “stupid." 


checked San Diego on onernaarid' - - . 
six hits in seven innings. . ■ "‘ '-t 

Astros 9, Expos 2; Jeff Bagtydl '> 4 
homered twicc, fc» four ' . 

while pitcher Brim W illiams went . - 
2-for-4 and drove m the deciding -L ' 
runs as Houston ended host Mos-; 
treal's six-game winning streak, .. 

Williams, a . 1 36 hitter, brokea 
2 tie in the sixth with a twwwti £ 
two- run single to left oh ah B3V.' 
jMtcfa from Jefi Fastoa ’ 

Cardinals &, Reds 2: Terry 1 0. 


McGriff, the badom caicber.drove 
in three runs as St Louis easily beat- • 
visiting CindnnatL ' • ‘£ ' 

Rockies $ Mels 4: Dante jKr 4 
chctte and Joe Girardi hit RBI sin- 
gles as Colorado, for the second , 
straight day, beat visiting Nefr •.* 
Yorit in the eighth. • T P 

^ PMffies 3 , 0 ; I^ vid^W e^ ,^ ' 

five, as Philadelphia baadedLwsii ir~\ 
ing Chicago its ninth straight loss; . 


Braves 5, Padres 2; Terry Pen- 
dleton got three hits and three RBIs 
in Atlanta while Tom Glavine 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 





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HOORAli ■' 1 
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HEV, OWE, JON BOUGHT VOO 
AN AUTOMATIC PO&GlE. POOR 



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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1994 


Page 21 


Brazil’s Best Hope — and Biggest Problem — Is Named Romano 


: V- 


By Jere Longman 

York Timet Servuc 

SANTA Clara, California — So far this 

Sed ® razilian , ™ Romano has 

[SjfJS STH? y I etarded -” ^ his father 
lo ai ncxl lo a partial- 

nSEL "" * ,eam ' s cluner «* '» *> 

So it was do casual proclamation when Ro 


- 


mwo jounced that he was, of all things. 


television audience. Still, the 28-year-old Ro- obey his elders, Romano retorted that Pde was 
nano is making an honest effort to be accom- "menully retarded." 
modating at Brazil's training camp, playing “People think Romano is a problem, that 
samba drums with his teammates on the team everyone can talk about me but I can’t say 
bus, stopping to sign auto- , anything back." an unrepentant Romano «"- 

rvOfluUUp plained. “1 have my way of doing things. If 
someone criticizes me, 1 strike back.** 


, 


And not a momem too soon. With the recent 
death of Formula One driver Avrton Senna. 
Brazil is in dire need of a sporting' hero. It is in 
even greater need of a World Cup tide, having 
gpne without one for 24 years. 

If R omano can keep his ego under house 
arrest for the next six weeks. Brazil might get 


*% 


1 

r _ - - - 


% 


■ ■ *• 


M11 “ Sl f ikcrs are egotists, selfish," Romano said. 
We have to be,” 

So, self -effacing he isn't. Maybe it's too much 
to ask of a guy who. in 1988. married bis 37- 
year-old girlfriend cm a soccer field before a live 


graphs, even cooperating 
with the news media. 

"I'm going to give my life 
to win this World Cup," he 
said. 

Actually. Romano may 
give up pieary if be doesn't 
win the World Cup, given 
Brazil's national desperation 
to repeat the victories of 
1958. 1962 and 1970, and his 
own hotheaded sense of what is provocation. 

Earlier this year, he took it upon himself to 
suggest that the national team's coach, Carlos 
Alberto Pbrrdra, ought to include his friend 
Edmando on the roster instead of another for- 
ward. Muller. None other than Pde. the Brazil- 
ian legend, suggested that Romario ought to 
leave to the coaches. Ever willing to 


Even if that someone is the greatest soccer 
player who ever lived. 



"In my opinion. I hadn't said anything signif- 
icant; he shouldn't have criticized roc,” Ro- 


mano said. “The Brazilian n*a«" today is not a 
Pete team. It doesn’t depend on Pete." 

No, it depends on the artistry of strikers such 
as Romano and Bebero and the 17-year-old 
Ronaldo, who wears braces and the burden of 
being "the next Pde." 


demanded a window sear and refused to sit next 
to Bebeto, his fierce rival in the Spanish League, 
where they play professionally. 

Romano pumped in 30 goals this season as 
his Barcelona club won its fourth straight 
league title. H« job is to score, and he does it in 
flurries using a stocky body and rapier elbows 
with which to fend off larger defenders, and the 
speed and fda is and wondrous dribbling logo 
around those be can't go through. 

"I have scored against every team, every 
country, every defender in the world." he said, 
assessing his talent. 

Said Parrcira. “He doesn't move much left or 
right, but inside the penalty area be is the king," 

A king now, but for the longest time Romano 


Parrcira has scrapped the European- style de- 
fense employed in the disastrous 1990 World 


in the 

Cup, wbere Brazil and its sweeper were swept out 
by Argentina in the second round. The new for- 
mation is an attacking 4-2-2-2 with Romano and 
Bebeto up front, if not up close and personal 
. On the night to the United States, Romano 


was merely a petulant prince. He plaved little 
‘ ' 1990 World C 


during the' 1990 World Cup, when on injured 
ankle swelled to the size of his ego. 

Parrdni then took over and largely ignored 
his difficult star. Romano was not mvfted to 
play with the national team from December 
1992 until September 1993. When he was fmal- 
ip. he provided both goals in the 2-0 


victory over Uruguay that secured Brazil's spot 
in this World Cup. 

"We had some disciplinary problems, but 
those problems have been overcome,” Parrcira 
said of Romario. “He's here doing well It’s 
finished. He’s perfect" 

* Only last month, however, Parrcira was won- 
dering whether the kidnapping of his star strik- 
er's father would "perturb Romano's head.” 

Though Romario was said to be devastated, 
he remained in Spain to play in a crucial league 
marc h. In an appeal to the kidnappers pub- 
lished in Brazilian newspapers, he said: “The 
suffering has been great for me and my family. 
I'm a simple person, bom in a frnAa" — \ 
shantytown — “and never let mysdf gel carried 
away by success.” 


"Thank God, this has been overcome," Ro- 
mario said now. "If it bad not been overcome, I 
probably would not be here. Those were the sU 
most difficult days of my life ” 


The next day, acting on a dp, police raided a 
itdevair Souza 


facing 200 reporters and photographers at prac- 
tice each day and carrying a nation's hopes on 
his shoulders during the World Cup seems light 
and bearable. 

“With Senna's death, Brazil has been left 
with a void," Romario said. “If 1 can lead Brazil 
to a fourth World Cup ride, I wfll definitely be a 
possible replacement," 

So far. he has been on his best behavior. Not 
that he doesn’t have his impulsive moments. 

Before Brazil left for the United Slates, said 


ly called up. 


Rio bousing complex and found 

de Faria sitting on a mattress watching televi- 
sion. The day before, he said, his abductors had 
provided the television so that he could watch 
his son play in Barcelona's 1-0 victory over Real 
Madrid in the Spanish League. 


Ney Almeida, a Journalist who has covered 
foi 


Brazilian soccer for more than 30 years, Ro- 
mano was playing beach volleyball when he 
noticed a new apartment building going up. 

Romario inquired about the price of a condo- 
minium, Almeida said, and decided to buy one. 
On second thought, he bought 10. 


— .ay 




lo,n e Sluh 


Confusion, 
Thy Name 
Is Soccer 


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Compiled by Our Staff Front Dapalcha 

pie United States won’t let Ni- 
geria land its airplane, Bulgaria 
won’t let reporters talk to its play- 
ers, New Jersey police still don't 
believe Greece's claim that its play- 
ers were robbed, and the Irish are 
awash. In Florida. 

Soccer has definitely arrived in 
tire United States. 

While four World Cup warmups 
were played Wednesday, soccer's 
lop event pul on a good show of 
confusion and dispute. The off-the- 
firid events overshadowed Brazils 
8-2 rout of Honduras, Germany’s 

2- 0 victory over Canada, Belgium's 

3- 1 triumph over Hungary, Boliv- 
ia's scoreless tie with Peru and Ro- 
mania’s 5-1 victory against the Los 
Angeles Salsa of the American Pro- 
fessional Soccer League. 

In Lagos, the U.S. Embassy said 
Nigeria’s World Cup team cannot 
arrive in the United Stales aboard a 
Nigeria Airways flight but must use 
another airline. The Super Eagles 
bad planned to fly in Monday. 

But, following the mflrtaiy's an- 
nulment of last year’s presidential 
elections, the United States and the 
European Union introduced limit- 
ed sanctions on Nigeria. Nigeria 
Airways was barred from flying to 
New York, and U.S. airlines from 
flying to Lagos. __ 

In Austin, Texas, Bulgarian offi- 
cials ejected reporters from the 
team's first practice in the United 
Sates. 

When reporters arrived at the 
Burger Center, the team adminis- 
trator, Alexander Dinev, demand- 
ed they leave. When local news 
ertws who had been issued creden- 
tials to cover the Bulgarians’ train- 
ing camp did not comply immedi- 
ately, Dmev started shouting and 
KVUE-TV photographer 
Kenny Itaplan. 

The team’s security officer, 
Svetla Gosteva, attributed the con- 
frontation to a wearying trip to the 
United Stales. He said Bulgaria’s 
c o ach , Dimitar Panev, was not told 
that reporters would attend prac- 
tice ana ordered cameras removed. 

Russia’s team, hit by a player 
mutiny, arrived in San Francisco 
with its manager, Pavel Sadyriru 
p r omisin g only that the team would 
t play with dignity.” 

Organizers announced that the 
Russian federation had decided 
that the team’s training sessions 
would be open to the public but — 
another blew to the media — that 
fairing pictures during the sessions 
would not be allowed 

FIFA, soccer's governing body, 
says it is up to players whether to 
speak with reporters, although it 
has asked teams to make players 
available to the press. 

On the crime front, police and 
stadium authorities reiterated that 
they don’t believe the Greek team’s 

riaim that it was robbed of $17,800 
in cash and jewelry during Sun- 
day's game against Colombia at 
Giants Stadium. 

Allegations that bold keys, mon- 
ey and jewelry were stolen are “on-' 



For U.S., Who’s on Defense 


By Sieve Berko witz 

Washington Pan Service 

PASADENA, California — The day Cle 
Kooiman walked into the U.S. national soccer 
team’s training center for a tryout late Last May, 
there was a question in the minds of virtually all 
present: Who is Cte Kooiman? 

"Yeah." recalled Kooiman, whose name is 
' ounced as if it were Gay Koy man “No- 
r had a clue." 


Thai included the national team's press offi- 
cer, Dean Linke, who bad to interview Kooi- 
man before he could write a news release an- 
nouncing his arrivaL An amazing story 
unfolded over lunch at the team's hotel that 
day, and Kooiman has been adding to it ever 
since- 


S treking his sinister-looking mustache and 
goatee, he said of his ou-fidd style: “When a 
player comes on t be field and sees me, he's 


going 10 Hy. ‘Oh God, I hope this guy’s not in 


my area.’ On the first tackle I come in on, he’s 
going to know that he’s in my area. After that, 
he’s going to think twice abont dribbling by me 
or he’s going to think twice about even touching 
the baQ. That’s what I’m trying to get into his 
brad.” 


. _ Vuaec Bucci'ApiKc Fiatup-Plttfc 

Cafo, who scored one of Brazil’s eight goals in San Diego, was kicked in the face by Cesar Obaodo of Honduras as he tried to bead the ball. 


Although his U.S. national team debut came 
late in his career — be is in his 11th year as a 
pro, and will turn 3 1 cm July 4 — he has become 
one of the most indispensable members of an 
ofien-shaky defense. 

For four of the previous five years, be has 
played in the Mexican first division. That is 
where Bora Milutinovic, who had coached in 
the first division and coached Mexico’s nation- 
al team before taking over the UB. squad, 
found Kooiman last year. 

Until then, however, Kooiman's involvement 
with any U5L national team had consisted of 


two matches with the UJ>. “B” team at a small 
tournament in Mexico in 1989. 

A standout high school soccer player and 
football kicker in Ontario, California. Kooiman 
was the first-round draft choice of the North 
American Soccer League's Los Angeles Aztecs 
following his senior year in 1981. 

Two weeks after the draft, the Aztecs fokied 
So be played at San Diego Slate for two years 
before signing with the Los Angeles Lazers of 
the Major Indoor Soccer League. For the next 
five years he played indoors professionally, and 
played outdoors between seasons. Then, with 
the U.S. “B" team in Mgrico, be impressed the 
coaches of another team in the tournament: the 
Juarez Cobras. 

He signed with the Cobras, then a first divi- 
sion team, and played well enough to send 
videotapes to Bob Gansler, the coach then 
preparing the U.S. team for the 1990 World 
Cup. There was no reply. 

Said Kooiman. whom the snub angered, “I 
figured I should've at least gotten the chance to 
play a couple of games." 

His self-confidence led him to sit out the 

1991- 92 season when the Cobras wouldn't meet 
bis salary demands. He moved back to Califor- 
nia, played for some semi-pro teams and 
coached a youth team. 

Then a Mexican agent placed him wiih Cnrz 
A zul. the Mexico City team that is one of the 
league's traditional powers. 

He became lhe club's captain late in the 

1992- 93 season, a remarkable achievement for a 
U.S. player. He also was an immediate success 
for the U-S. national team, playing in 10 march- 
es last year before returning to Cruz Aznl for 
the *93-94 season. Now, he is preparing for his 
first World Cup. 

“I figure that something like this should have 
happened a long time ago." be said. 



Roberta Pfal/Thr Auaatfnf PK» 


Fritz and Trade Hacheoberg, from near Frankfurt, had a baH at Germany’s ttmeup in Toronto. 


founded and unsupported,” said 
"Migor Carl Williams of the New 
Jersey State Fobce. 

Ireland’s squad called off a 
morning training session in Orlan- 
do to avoid the nsk of being struck 
by banning as an eigbih successive 
day of thunderstorms left central 
Florida flooded. 

At the Citrus Bowl, in which the 
match between Belgium and Mo- 
rocco wfll be played June 19, the 
rain had caused a targe hole to open 
on the field. 

“We came here for the sun and 


we haven’t seen any yet,” said Ire- 
land’s coach. Jack Charlton. 

As for the warmup matches: 

Brazil 8, Honduras 2: Romario 
scored three goals in San Diego and 
Bebeto had two for Brazil, which 
Russia on June 20 in 


U 1 fed our team is ready to play 
Russia,” raid Brazil's coach, Carlos 
Alberto Parreira. “Relative to the 
strength of Honduras, we were not 
womed about our opponent. I was 
worried about Brazfl.” 

2, Canada 0: Matthias 


Sanuucr and Rudi Voller scored in 
Toronto as tire defending champi- 
ons played their last exhibition 
match before the World Cup open- 
er against Bolivia in Chicago. 

German forward Mario Basler 
twisted a knee on a tackle and was 
carried off the field on a stretcher. 
The extent of his injury was not 
immediately known. 

Belgium 3, Hungary 1: In Brus- 
sels, Josip Weber got an assist and 
scored another goal for Belgium 
after getting five last Saturday 
against Zambia. (AP, Reuters! 



SIDELINES 


Tj^iwlran Ends lhe Whitbread Race 


SOUTHAMPTON, England (AP) — Henekea, with the only all- 
woman crew in lhe competition, put an end to tins year's Whitbread 
3tamd the^ World yacht race when it readied the fimsh late Wednesday 
tiiehL It had broken two rudders m the last week. 

In Montevideo, two crewmen of the F renrih y ac ht La Poste 
an bail after 10 weeks injafl and are to icta® wFmcerott wdcraA 
Patrick Detofe and Florect Riroen were arrested March 20 with 
p S5nl ! t RC ctc and Ives Kemeteguea for allegedly beating a 
burglar who entered their rooms in Ested^g a Whitbread 

Lasse and Kemdeguen were freed on bail May 17. 


Davis Leads by 2 in Honda Open 


JHES SaBSOKSSBa^ffi 


• S' 



leadover Paul Lawne ot acouaoa, 

tod & ^ 

73 and was pessimistic about playing in next week's U.S. Open. 

Ghirotto Wins Stage in Italy 

nil a. Italy fAP) —Massimo Ghirotto of Italy hdd off Rolf Sorensen 
rf SSJK tl Normal cprintThursday to win the ramy 19th stage of the 

retained the leader’s pitf jersey but said he 
coiicen^ abou! Friday's op-hill leg, especially if the weather is as bad 
as it was today" 

For die Record 


por inc ncwiu 

WeraSnser the Fonnula One driver who crashed in Monte Carlo, 

mat bran iso™; Ms 

jjogtOf raid in Innsbruck, Austria. • \*n 


Ticket Buyers Go to Court: 


Cfmpikd by Ow Staff From Dispatcher 

Disgruntled World Cup ticket-holders m Chicago have filed a 
class-action lawsuit in an effort to resolve what they say are massive 
ticket problems, while soccer fans throughout the United States have 
been reporting snafus that range from their getting incorrect seats to 
being issued seats in lhe wrong city. 

The lawsuit charges consumer fraud, deceptive practices and 
breach of contract lie named complainant is Anton Naunheimer of 
Chicago, ton his attorney. Stephen Diamond, said the case repre- 
sents about 3,000 ticket-holders in Chicago. 

The World Cup *94 chairman, Alan Rothenberg, has said that 
those with ticket problems should can a World Cup public informa- 
tion hot line. That numb©: is 310-277-9494. 

Diamond said Naimbeuner paid for Category I tickets, advertised 
as being between the end fines. His seats at Soldier Field are behind 
the goal, Diamond said. The suit charges that World Cup organizers 
reconfigured the sealing plan in the stadiums to allow for more high- 
priced Category I seats. Consequently, (he best seats began to curve 
around the corners of the stadiums and into the end zones. “If s not a 
tough case,” Diamond said. “Either they lied to us or they didn’t.” 

Some who paid for Category I seats at Giants Stadium outside 
New York have said they received mezzanine seats behind the goals. 
The entire mezz ani n e at Giants Stadium has been sold as Category I. 
the World Cup USA 1994 spokesman. John Griffin, confirmed. 

In Los Angeles, those with ticket problems for Rose Bowl games 
me still dogging World Cup office telephones. Paul Levine of Mar 
Vista said he took out an ad to find other disgruntled fans. 

Levine said he requested Category I tickets as part of the "soccer 
family” sale and received Category U tickets. But even those seals 
were m the end zone with the worst seats. Category III. 

U I have a friend flying from Switzerland just for this," Levine said. 
"He took off work. His trust in me is going to be really bad from now 
on. F m rcaOy upset about it." (Li T, A Pi 


The IHT World Cup Competition 


Win fabulous prizes. 


Winners will be chosen from an official drawing. 
The first 16 entries drawn, with at least 6 correct 
responses, will win one of the prizes listed below, 
determined from the order in which they are 
drawn. 


Grand Prize: Two United Airlines business class 
round-trip Europe/New >brk tickets plus five 
nights accommodation at the Stanhope Hotel in 
New York. 


Five second prizes: Sprint Collectors frame pre- 
paid phone cards in celebration of the World Cup. 
Five third prizes: AT Cross. 22k gold, diamond 
cut. Roller ball pens, from the Signature 
Collection. 

Five fourth prizes: Gold Pfeil men’s wallets. 


HERE’S HOW TO ENTER 


For each of the 12 days leading up to the World 
Cup. the IHT will publish a question in which the 
response predicts various outcomes of facets of 
the World Cup. There are 12 questions in all. 

After answering ihe question each day in the 
coupon provided below, hold your responses and 
send them all at once to the IHT. A minimum of 
6 responses must be postmarked on or before June 
17. 1994 — the World Cup kickoff day. 


Only clippings from the newspaper will be 
accepted. Photocopies and faxes do not qualify. 







,'F V'- 'j” •; -i:., ' . . /\.' v i , • t v ' 1 1 > 


. -r/.i 




Group A 


USA 

SWITZERLAND 

COLOMBIA 

ROMANIA 


Group B 


BRAZIL 

RUSSIA 

CAMEROON 

SWEDEN 


Group C 


GERMANY 

BOLIVIA 

SPAIN 

KOREA REPUBLIC 


Group D 


ARGENTINA 

GREECE 

NIGERIA 

BULGARIA 


Group E 


ITALY 

IRELAND REPUBLIC 
NORWAY 
MEXICO 


GroupF 


BELGIUM 
MOROCCO 
NETHERLANDS 
SAUDI ARABIA 


RULES AND CONDITIONS 


TODAY’S QUESTION 


i. 


2 . 


5. 


6 . 


Individual coupons will not be accepted. 

Minimum of 6 coupons to qualify. 

Cut-off date is postmarks of the first day of the World 
Cup — June 17. 1994. 

Valid only where legal. 

Entires will not be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, its agents and subsidiaries. 

Only original coupons will be considered valid. 
Photocopies and faxes are not acceptable. 

No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
postage will not be accepted as proof of receipt 
No cash alternative to prizes. 

In some countries, the law forbids participation In this 
competition for prize awards. However, in these 
countries, you can still play for fun. The competition Is 
void where illegal. 

Winners will be drawn on day after the end of the World 
Cup and published jn lhe IHT on Thursday 21 July. 

10. On all matters, the editors decision is final. 

11 . The Editor reserves the right in his absolute discretion to 
disqualify any entry, competitor or nominee, or to waive 
any rules in the event of circumstances outside our 
control arising which, in his opinion, makes it desirable 
to cancel the competition at any stage. 

12. The winners will be the first correct answers containing 
six or more coupons picked at random from all entries. 


Which team will concede die most number of 


goals? 


Your response:. 


Name:. 


Job Title:. 


Company:. 


Address: 


9. 


Postal Code:. 


-City:. 


Country:. 


Telephone:. 


6J10 


Send responses to: IHT World Cup Competition. International Herald 
Tribune. 181 Avenue Charles-deGaulie, 92521 NeuiJJy Cedex. France. 


KTERIWTOfttL 









Page 22 


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OBSERVER 


Fun in Old Virginia 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — For a long time 
the bumper stickers said. "Vir- 
gjnia Is For Lovers." This was silly. 
Virginia for lovers? Surely it hadn't 
come to that for the Old Dominion. 

For lovers? Virginia, Mother of 
Presidents, was being advertised as 
just another piece of hot-mattress 
geography like Las Vegas? 

As a Virginian, I found the slo- 
gan distasteful. A pleasure of being 
Virginian is the right to find dis- 
tasteful things distasteful. People 
of other stales feel obliged to ad- 
mire their states' worst features 
even when they don't. 

I have heard people of other 
states boast about their caves, their 
locusts, their traffic jams, their 
reeking stockyards, their insuffer- 
able slums and their unbearable 
climates. 

Virginians don't have to do that 
They are supposed to be snooty — 
“elitist," to use the vogue word. So it 
was distasteful seeing the old place 
boomed as a love nest, and it was all 
right to say so. Let provincial slates 
stand loyally by their tourist bu- 
reaus. Not Virginians. Virgi nians 
don’t have to abase themselves be- 
fore the vulgarities of salesmanship. 
□ 

In fact, it would be more precise 
lor bumper stickers to proclaim. 
“Virginia Is For Elitists." 

Even more correct: “Virginia Is 
For Horses.” Is there any other 
stale whose highways are cluttered 
all weekend by horse owners taking 
their horses out for rides in horse 
trailers? 

“Virginia Is For Tax Haters" 
would be all right too, for the domi- 
nance of soak- the- poor lax theory 
makes Virginia a paradise for the 
well-heeled who have suffered the 
soak-the-weD-heeled tax theories of 
places like Massachusetts and New 
York. 

Or why not. “Virginia Is For 
Pavers"? It is a state of magnificent 
highways, the product of an un- 
stoppable road-building bureau- 
cracy known by the Darth Vaderish 
name of “V-DOT," an acronym for 
Virginia Department of Transpor- 
tation. 

Now. however, Virginia de- 
scends into farce. It is embarking 
on what promises to be the most 
entertaining campaign since Madi- 
son and Jefferson invented the 
Democratic Party. 


With this show on the road to 
titillate all America, a new bumper 
sticker is in order: “Virginia Is For 
Fun Lovers." 

The circus opened when Repub- 
licans in convention nominated Ol- 
iver North, the glamorous Marine 
shredder, deceiver of Congress and 
hater of Washington, as their can- 
didate for the Senate. 

□ 

The seat he wants is held by 
another former Marine. Charles S. 
Robb, a Democrat. Robb, always 
called “Chuck.” is married to for- 
mer President Johnson's daughter 
Lynda Bird and burdened with a 
playboy reputation based on re- 
ports of wild weekends with a fun- 
loving crowd at Virginia Beach and 
his own tale of a massage-by-beau- 
ty-queen in a New York hotel. 

Many Virginians, whatever their 
politics, are appalled by their op- 
tions. North, after alL was convict- 
ed of violating the law in the Iran- 
contra scandal before being de- 
convicted on the most technical of 
legal technicalities. To many, 
Robb's lack of devotion to wife arid 
family values makes him as odious 
as North’s record of contempt for 
the laws of the land. 

Ugly as this seems for the Demo- 
crats, the Republican prospect is 
no prettier. The slate's senior sena- 
tor. John Warner, a Republican 
and onetime husband of Elizabeth 
Taylor, has declared North “unfit" 
for the Senate because of lack of 
integrity. 

□ 


He backs a candidacy for J. Mar- 
shall Coleman, whose mainstream 
Republican credentials contrast 
with North’s support from evan- 
gelical Christians and the sort of 
conservatives who approve violat- 
ing the law when they think the 
cause is just 

If the future for both parties 
looks chaotic, the prospect for ah 
who love a circus is glorious. Con- 
sider: five candidates, two violently- 
split parties, tales of massage and 
peijuiy and criminal shredding, 
old-time religion amok all over the 
map. a sulking senator, and who 
knows what else. 

Madison and Jefferson it's not. 
but what state can top it for sport? 
Yes. Vugutia, you truly are for fun 
lovers. 


New Kurt; Tima Service 



» ■0 1* 


2 ?. 


nn i 

•OrpTTTirO ft r ' 


be Man With the Quadra 700 


By Mike i«erin 

Internal;/ ««*/ Her;.!:: Tribune 

P ARIS — Erwan le Mare'fcadour v.-js recording a song 
in a style called acid The name « is indented by a 
British disk jockey in the Midlands i us: because he liked 
the sound of it to describe a merging of elements of 
traditional jazz with “Os-jtvie rank, a '90s hip-hop beat 
and cutting-edge technology. 

Le Marc’hadour’s acid jazz cons! ruction mixed 1930s 
big band riffs with new synthesizer licks fed into his bank 
of hardware. The old riffs and no- licks were mixed and 
synchronized without waiting for rewinding or misplaced 
spools. There were no spools. There were no razor blades. 
Scotch (ape or snippets of recording tape ail over the floor 
as was once usual in such a situation. Watching him. I was 
r emin ded of word-processors replacing typwrirers. Aside 
from the fact that everything went so fast and effortlessly, 
the most amazing thing about it was the total absence of 
recording tape. 

On an anonymous street in the decidedly un-state-of- 
thc-art 20th airondissemeoi. it L unlike any studio I have 
ever seen. There are others like it, more and more, but very 
few in France and not yet many anywhere. In order to do 
what he's doing in only calf his living room, he would hav e 
needed a three-car garage rive years ago and he couldn't 
have done half of it in the first place, no matter how much 
space he had. 

Despite minimum sound isolation, titere are neither 
complaints from neighbors nor street noise on the tape. 
There is no tape. The sound g>vr-; directly onto the hard 
disk of !e Marc'hadour £ Macintosh Quadra 700 comput- 
er. In fact, he invents instruments rather ihar composes on 
them. Or maybe it would L/C Stiff .iccuraie to say he 
invents new software programs He canno: read and write 
music, though he has a printer u> translate what he has 
programmed into a written .tewfe. 

Ail this is well and g<:eo. he !c-’«es -sporatonr work, but 
still he misses playing for a j> e audience. He once played 
with rock bands. He's afraid he> becoming “mo intellectu- 
al" in the studio, always anaiyang v. hat he’s doing rather 
than just doing it- His functions combine oapecis of com- 
poser. improviser, program designer, architect and alche- 
mist- He calls himself “a chef in my kitchen. I am a cook." 

He cooks his brew- of sound usirg 14 synthesizers, four 
drum machines, two sequencers, five keywords tone grand 
piano) and two samplers They are ail linked up through 
MIDI (Musical Instrument DigitJ Interface). Synthesiz- 
ers are “like strings on a piano." sequencers “provide the 
musical gesture.” A sampler is a box comparable to a tape 
recorder but with memory chips instead of tape. Sound is 
recorded on a chip in the form of numbers. You can 
retrieve and play the sound in reai time. No tape. The only- 
need for rape is portability, to take your music home. 

Le Marc'hadour is a soft-spoken Breton with a weil- 
ordered mind and excellent English who is excited by the 
opportunity to recount the history of ihe pots. pans, ovens 
and sauces he cooks with. "Those guys ever there." he 
points to the primitive synthesizers on the walk "are my 
modular Mocgs. Robert Mocz signed and dated them 
himself. They were burl: in .May 1 96?. z funny date if 
you're French. Each little feil-’w. has its own function. 
They’re a little bit like virzjse cars. E\ er. when they're old 
they're not old. Some of mem generate sound, some 
modify sound. They're very specialized. Keith Emerson 
jof Emerson. Lake and Palmer] was very courageous when 
he used them on stage in real time, ii involved a lot of 
wires and cables, a lot of spaghetti. 



Email le Marc'hadour The ‘'cook" with the Musical Instrument Digital Interface. 


“After that Bob Moog built the Mini-Moqg, which used 
a keyboard to control the sound It made the synthesizer 
popular, you could now take it out of the lab. The modules 
were prepatched inside. It was extremely ergonomic. The 
only problem was that it was monophonic, one note at z 
time. 

“Then a company called Sequential Circuits in Calixor- 
nia built the Prophet 5. a keyboard that was abie to drive 
five synthesizers at a lime. Five notes at a time. Now I 
could' play like a whole saxophone section. The Yamaha 
DX7 was ihe First commercially successful digital synthe- 
sizer. Press one button and tomorrow you can retrieve the 
entire complex sound you constructed today. It remem- 
bered. Digital sound Is easier to work with and more 
accurate than analog. 

“The onlv trouble was that if I wanted to hook up. say. 
an EMS with a Roland I had to use converters because 
they were not exactly the same volt octave. .After Dave 
Smith, the guy who invented the Prophet 5. invented 
MIDI, you could drive a million dollar Syn clavier with a 
$100 Casio. Or the other way around’. Everything is 
compatible, everything is possible." 

It’s easy to get carried away by technology. The human 
dement can get left behind. Means become ends. Electric- 
ity can be a great levekr. The instrument plays die 
instrumentalist rather than the other way around At the 
extreme it becomes simulated music. Vinuai music. With 
the possible exception of Joe Zawioul (Weather Report), 
noi one syruhesiM has made a major original aesthetic 
statement on the instrument. But it should be remembered 
that, according to le Marc’hadour. the synthesizer is still 
in ihe Stone Age. He compares it to a pianoforte in 
Mozart's time, an instrument still evolving. 

He started to buy his first “toys" and to leant how to 
manipulate them at the age of 16. twenty years ago. The 


people who were inventing advance technology ****£" : 
awav and spoke another language. Like a few otoer 
French youngsters his age, Jean-Mkhd Jarre among, 
them, le Marc’hadour taught himself which buttons did 
this or that. Few of the youngsters had both eaougn 
ambition and talent, let alone enough money, to continue. 
There was nobody around to teach them. At Fust le 
Marc'hadour did not even know what an oscillator was. tt 
was frustrating, mystifying and inti mi d atin g to be in front 
of all those nobs, switches and buttons and not knowing 
what to do with them. 

Now (hat it's all up and running, the best thing is total 
independence. He needs nobody else and no other equip- 
ment to compose and perform music. He does not have to 
worry about a stoned drummer or an unreliable bassist. 
Bui collaboration can be a pleasure. In addition to his aod 
jazz project, he’s been working on an album with the 
percussionist Robert Thomas Jr. 

He’s composed the music accompanying; a 1 S-rmnute 
“History of Western Man" on an Interactive CD (CDI) 
for Bayard Pres se, Paris. He makes publicity music. His 
commercial clients tend to be people who hired him in the 
first place because they respect his taste and abilities and 
so they let him gp for it pretty much on his own. Still, the 
context is theirs. He makes his living writing to other 
people’s specifications. He would like, for example, to 
write a symphony. 

For most of his professional life he has felt a disadvan- 
tage being French- America is where the technological 
action is and France is not a major player. This bothered 
him until Thomas the percussionist said: “Erwan. you’re 
French. You have a Latin sensibility. It gives you a special 
personality. I've never heard music quite like yours any- 
where. Be proud to be what you are.” 


people 




New Role for 


— r j - ■- y- 

PUdft DumfagP & 


i : 
the Post iq****-* " 

dose to DommgP and the •. 

momh. Dosmflgo wwM -gwofe* 
.. wAo wRresasznasv-/. 


general director of the company ah- 

terthe 1994-95 season . Th e 

nv is expected to appeal 

manager as well , 

whether Domingo would pwna^; . 

with the company- ■ 

. O • 

Susan E |gfl. 

Broadway, ran out tf-tbe 
the beginning of Aa U 
peansi After a fe» immies Ibertfc^ : 
tain came down, and wiiea 
Sm Huber, the uadersMY. wffl- 
taken over, lookfagter^ihejj^^ ; 
like Egan but seven mc tes jafe ty - 
g pn had fatten and dsteGfifedxso*^'. 
dtaw. She wm be out of ih 
for about a week. ■- 

-• a... 

. The book that 6nj.lbaS|^: 
refers lo in this week’s 
bury”, cartoon ship is^“Sataegot^r.f . 
Unions in Premodeni J&ffupe^fa^a 1 ... 
the Yale Univerat>' professaf4^fe;-.- 
BostKffl. In fain, most of the prittfcif 
tices cited in the; book areasstx*jj£;Vy 
ed with Greek Orthodoxy. rati&gf.;: 
than Roman 


has revealed that she andbtt - 

ce, the Amieccam ^ 

Cofperfidd, could - 

by next year, according to •!' 


ry oy at 
German 


the year after thau ■ 

The. dance pioneer and acrivisi 
Kafaerme Ouaiattr ihe < 
an who wsi on a amds-i 


hunger strike for Haiti BLT$92n a^. . 


living ia new poverty 'in' ‘Boi -SSft 
Louis.- fllnois, m :x> hbnse wfear^ i. 
pigeons have_p«ied ^tia^ggh TfecL - 
roof, acccpding to frkaMis- quoted 

by the Chicago Tribune. 


INTERNATIONAt 
CLASSIF1EB : 

Appear? mi Paprf i-b 


“v- 1 




WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 



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18/01 

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23/73 

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AHmu 

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Baic<Mons 

24/75 

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Bdoad* 

24/75 

15/59 

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22/71 

1253 


Borin 

1407 

7/44 

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8*46 


Broads 

14/57 

6*43 

BC 

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10/50 


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17/02 

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11*52 


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13/55 

11/52 

pc 

16/61 

11/52 


Fbme 

20/50 

12/53 

sh 

21.73 

B '46 

c 

FnmUul 

15/58 

B <48 

* 

17.02 

0/46 


Genws 

17/02 

10/50 

PC 

18*84 

10/50 


HriaHd 

10/01 

8/48 

pc 

17 /K 

9/40 

m 

Inanbri 

36/70 

17.02 

[C 

27.80 

17/02 

ah 

LnPakmu 

20/02 

21/70 

3 

27 (BO 

2170 


Lnfaon 

29/04 

21.70 

1 

31.-08 

10/84 


London 

17452 

B /40 

pc 

I 0 /B 4 

10/50 

pc 

Warid 

29/84 

12(53 

s 

30/08 

14/57 


Mian 

21/70 

12/53 

jh 

21/79 

10,50 


titCSCOOl 

20/82 

17/82 

pc 

2579 

15*59 


Munch 

14/57 

6/43 

ih 

16/61 

0/43 



21/70 

13/55 

a 

20/60 

13/05 


0 *> 

14/57 

0/46 

ih 

19/56 

11/52 

ih 

Pa*na 

23/73 

13(55 

s 

21/70 

17/62 


Pam 

10/04 

6/43 

pc 

20*68 

10/50 


PIB 0 IW 

15/59 

7/44 

ih 

16/61 

7/44 


ReWtavO. 

I 4 /S 7 

0/46 

1 

I 4 .T 7 

7*44 

PC 

Pome 

22/71 

13/55 

ah 

I 9 r 56 

11.82 

*h 

Si Pannbug 22/71 

11/53 

pc 

23.73 

9*46 


S»xWx*n 

14/57 

6**3 

m 

17/61 

8 / 4 « 


SinubMig 

14/57 

7/44 

sh 

17/02 

9/48 


Taflm 

10(81 

B /46 

pc 

17/62 

9/40 

•ft 

Venor 

21/70 

IB/El 

ih 

19/66 

14757 

c 

Waira 

17*2 

12/53 

1 

19/60 

11/52 

pc 

Wanm 

17/02 

10/60 

m 

21/70 

0/40 

PC 

Zwicb 

16451 

7/44 

ib 

» 7 / 8 ? 

8*46 a 

Oceania 

AuEMwd 

17*2 

ia.w 

tit 

16/61 

9/40 

PC 

SyriW/ 

10*4 

0/48 

8 

17/02 

11/52 

pc 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by AcoWeather 



JrMrearo 


H-nvy 

Ram 


tt-vi*. 


North America 

Hot lweaitier wiR emervl Irorn 
Houston inraugh Ihe Desen 
Soulhwesi to Los Angeles 
this weekend Showere and 
thLndersiorms will dampen 
iho Nonheasi this weekend 
A few showers and heavy 
thunderstorms win eruoi over 
ihe central Plains Sunday 
and spread toward Chicago 
Monday. 


Europe 

Coo< weather will continue 
horn Srocfthokn lo Berlin ttus 
weekend A! the same lime, 
warmer weather wil begin lo 
beHd mio Pans and London 
Sunday and Monday. A (un- 
hedged heal wawe is possi- 
ble over western Europe by 
ihe middle ol ne«; week. 
Southern Italy 10 Albania wil 
have heavy rains. 


Asia 

Heavy rain «n9 sea 

Irorr. Shangn.’i ;c Czgasa-i 

inis wee-end m: ied 

wee 1 . Sh jwei? sr^:hwnd.:r- 
storms may iea-r. ~z>y: 
area o-r Monde-, TT19 r.crn- 
em Phliacmcs wJ te surr.v 
ar.d very hpl Inr. #.-;e»cnd 
Beiiing »"l :■* *unn» and 
seasonable. A sho-A-ore 
may reach Seoul 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Rrymfi 


Today 

WBh Low 
OF OF 

at < bb r im 

3T«a 17«S 
3 area I7«? 
31/8B 18tt« 
36/97 23/73 
«nor 2«/75 


To 

High Low W 
Clr OF 
3IJS8 23/71 9 
31/08 18/M S 
31 m 14/BI a 
30/88 10/0* a 
38/10023/73 a 
41/100 24/75 • 


c«y 


Today 
High Lew 
OF Clc 
18/M 7‘44 

3O-0C agfl# 
I0/W 16*i 
2J.7I. IJ-SS 


FBodMonofeD 24 / 7 S 
SorOago 2068 


High Luw W 
OF OF 
I 7 .-K . 1 /J 4 se 

30-&J 51 "3 5 
1S C6 IF 61 c 
2 S/T 7 13 /Si Wl 


17*2 pc sers :a.M 
6143 s 18 •« 7,44 -c 


Legend: s-sunny. pc-partty cloudy, c-doudy. showers, i-thunderstoms. r-n ki. Ssnow f-unes. 
irwiow. Mce. W-WaaVier. An mapa, torr ca ata and data provided by Accu-Weathor. Inc. 1 NC 


Asia 




Tomorrow 


High 

Lem 

W 

Mfjjfi 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

C/F 

3sr 

37*91 

2? 77 

ih 33*91 

25.79 ac 


22.80 

20.58 

5 

32-09 

20 66 1 

30-86 

26 79 

PC 

30 86 

57-80 pc 

* IvH' 

DB.V.J 

74.-5 

DC 

XJ.9I 

2475 pc 

■’ '•.■Ibi 

J?.TC2 28T2 

: 

40 - 29/84 6 

5--.J4 

26,82 

H 57 

a 

2882 

17*62 PC 

Srjvi^VB 

2954 

t! r " 

K 

je-BS 

2271 pc 

5 ir**^ ry 

r 51 

24-5 

X 

33 91 

24*75 pc 


x-r* 

2%T? 

X 

K03 

23-T0 pc 


25 — 

16*1 

1 

26-79 

19 64 pc 

A ir.zs 


:jt3 

14 5? 

s 

53 73 

17.62 1 

C.1C .* ~irm 

16-51 

9*40 

s 

15/66 

12*S3 pc 

•a.-J.ib'.w'v* 

;e-32 

19 65 

c 

2’-80 

16 84 pc 

H-t'll 

ZZ Tt 

3 -6 


24-5 

11.52 [< 

,r.** 

29-44 

24.75 

57. 

20 56 

24-75 pc 


i 1 70 

>1 1:2 

V. 

21.79 

i: 53 pc 

Tltj:- 

71.75 

11-57 

% 

2?.73 

12 53 I 

3-isrth Amerlbi 

a 




■i'L-J-tal 

1-0 

0:4«. 

Ih 

18 64 

r 48 pc 

20.86 

1986 

1 

29 8* 

19-68 pc 

Bciui 

23 73 

14,57 

f 

19.66 

13/55 pc 

•tFiblJP 

257* 

13.55 

c 

23 73 

1253 pc 

C-rntr 

27/00 

1315 

9 

26-79 

11 ■s; cc 



T--.3 7 


22-71 

rrsr e 

Ci-VO JI.J 

2**92 

22 7i 


29*84 

23 73 dc 

Fixtay 

3301 

2116 

X 

M /91 

23.73 x 

L*M Ar»*4n 

M-W 

1894 

» 

27/eo 

17.62 ce 

!.«o*n 

X-91 

24,75 

a 

33*01 

r.TO pc 

>.*rnejpo5i 

26*79 

13,55 

PC 

2373 

13/55 PC 


2170 

9.48 

PC 

2170 

8 46 p< 

NottJU 

3150 

2473 


32.09 

24/75 pc 

?>-* Vori 

*5-79 

17.82 


2373 

14 57 lb 

Pbor.ro* 

44/11: 26/82 

t 

41/106 26.79 » 

San Fnxn 

34/75 

13.55 

9 

a /71 

12*53 a 

S-MCl? 

22 71 

12-03 


29*66 

10 50 pc 

Trnrta 

23/73 

14.57 


20/50 

11*52 pc 

W^sHr^ton 

26.79 

1782 

pc 

24/75 

18.51 c 


ACROSS 


1 Helen Gahagan 
him role ol 1935 
4 Mirthful 

10 Guzzle 

14 Electioneerer. 
tor short 

isOna-twotiet 

16 Perpetually 

11 Sian at a letter 
arrangement 

15 Broadway's K 11 + 

20 Blowout 

21 They can'! be 
oe2i 

23 Mother's charge 

25 Show eagerness 


26 More of 'he 
arrangement 

30 Laminated 
rocks 

31 Fade in the 
stretch 

32 Mc'.0*is!5' arg. 

33 Prim maker 
Craven 

34 End of die 
arrangement 

37 Star ol the 
exDlanation ol 
the 

arrangement 

41 Wide wicih 

42 Laurel anc 
Hardy 


Solution to Puzzle of June 9 
folAtllSlE mMPl 



43 Alfonso XII* s 
queer. 

44 Actress Anne 
«7 More of aw 

explanation 
so Pyrenees 
resident 
32 S:cwe girl 
so Wroer m scope 
54 Get out of :he 
way 

S3 Venetian 
honcho 
59 End cf the 
explanation 
63 Men’s names 
meaning ‘lion’ 
•4 Receive as a 
member 

65 Former 

66 gm 

67 Pe-ks 

68 Tne enc 
;apcropria:ely) 


DOWN 


1 1nitials >n 
anc>eni Rome 

2Six-hme N.H.L 
M.V.P. 

3 Mountain road 
abbr. 

4 Flying woe 

5 Acetylene 
starter 


• de-Vire 

(histone French 
valley) 

T Here, in Tours 
s Lacking a key 
9 Collar extension 

10 Air 

fi Egg receptacle 

12 100 centimes 

13 Gets the lead 
out 

ia Sailing hazard 
» Copied 

24 ‘Macbeth' tide 

25 Jamaican beat 

26 Finishing toot 

27 Early evening 
hour 

28 Winter mo. 

29 Tight spot 
33 Drafted 
35 Like 

Shakespeare’s 
Valentine and 
Proteus 
as Goa! feature 
27 At lunch, maybe 
as Scale notes 

39 Pioneer 
performance 
artist 

40 Stir the air 

42 mother 

44 A Gabor etal. 

45 Join the party 


4« Slowly 55 The gamut 

47 Speech source . 

«5 Turns outward “ E*c«e 

43 Mr. Shankar 57 Matter's ‘Das 

91 Get back to Lied von der 

even " 


•OSlabSUcalattef r 


61 Suffix with 
command 


62 New Deal prog. . : V.V 


» 

M 

M 

M 

U 

M 

II 

■ 

■i 

II 

■ 

■1 



ho* bv win™ Mm Mm 

O New York Times Edited frv Wilt Shortz. 


1 ravel in a world without borders, time zones 

or 




AKT Access Nurobersi 
How to call around the work! 

1 I. <tr.g the chan below, find the countn- you are calling from. 

2 Dial the corresporhiing .AST .Access Number. 

5. .vi XTKT Englis h-5peaking Operator or voice prompt wil! ask tor the phone number voy wish ro call or connea vou to a 
customer service representative. 

To receive your free waOet card of AIKTs Access Numbers, iua dial the access number of 
the country' >tx/re in and ask farCustomer Servlet 


COUNTRY 



Imagine a world where you can cail country to country os easily as you can from home. And 
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your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with JOSEfi 

To use these services, dial the AIKT Access Number of the countn- you're in and you'lJ get all the 
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If you don’t have an A 1ST Calling Card or you’d like more information on ABET global services, just call us using the 


convenient Access Numbers on your right 



ASIA 

Australia 

1-600-881-011 

China, FHO** 

10811 

Guam 

018672 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

India* 

000-117 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Korea 

009-11 

Korea** 

ir 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Singapore 

11-111 

Sri Lanka 

430-430 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1111 

EUROPE 

Armenia** 

8*14111 

Austria - — 

022-903-011 

Belgium* 

0800-100-10 

Bulgaria 

00-1800-0010 

Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

Czech Rep 

0042060101 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

France 

19*-0Q11 

Germany 

0130-0010 

Greece- 

00-800*1311 

Hungary* 

00*60061111 

Iceland-* 

999-001 

Ireland 

1600^50600 


Italy 


173-1011 


Lithuania* 


15 5-00-1 1 


O-OOCKilll 


Malta* 


Monaco* 

Netherlands* 


194-0011 


Poland**** 


800-190-11 


Portugal* 


Romania 

Bu9Sia**CMascow) 

Slovakia 


01-600-4288 


Spjlrtm 


Sweden* 


Ujc 


155-00-11 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

Brazil 

0006010 

Chile 

00*6312 

Cohunhia 

980-11-0010 

Costa Rica “■ 

114 

Ecuador 

119 

ElSaJvador-u 

190 

Guatemala* 

190 

Guyana.” 

. 165 

Mexico*** 

93-8XM62-4240 

Nicaragua (Managua) 174 

Panamaa 

109 

Pern- 

191 

Suriname 

156 

Uruguay 

00-0410 

Venezuela*! 

804)11-120 


Ukraine* 


0500^9-0011 ftilKwnoc 


CARIBBEAN 


Bahrain 


MIDDLE EAST 


8*100-11 Bermuda’ 


1-800-872-2881 


British V.L 


1-800^72-2881 


1-800-872-2881 


j 300 * 001 Cabman Islands 1-800-872-2^1 


Israel 


080-90010 Grenada* 


Kuwait 


177-1QQ-2727 Haiti* 


1-800-tr 2-2881 


Qatar 


Turkey 

UA.E* 


900-288 Jamaica** 

426-801 ffrth iwn 
(BOOOll-77 SUOm/Ne^ 

- I-WB-10 AFRICA 


001-800-972-2883 


<>800^72.2881 


001-800-872-2881 

1-800-872-2881: 


AMERICAS 


gBfpfCCteo ) 
Gabon* 


510-0200 


Gambia* 


OOa-OOX 


Belize* 


001-000-200-1111 Kenya * 
555 


00X11 


Liberia 


0800-10 


■ffitf CJe KCa ig hut jvaiiaMe m aft coumnei AW WurliI€J umi e a ~ Semee 
r^nrutj itfuKrr mcnunn, callbv bcwBi more ifua 7? mcun ixrtidnii dioij 
tivc-J m buU »bwe. 


. OflOO-1112 Sooth Africa" 


797-797 


0^0-99^123 


'ZP 3 ***' fnm «=» phone 

«T“wj in tmu jbsnr 

rtttrySA PIre n- «jviutitile fteta all flir rounutg Used Jbt*r - .- J ?!hhle Hem afl 

Lmpotfr Lmc-icivt(riotfeQ^.Ltic-i*cnclrenpraatt-r inwrr 140 hn- 
WWK 


A mond dial iuk. 


© 1994 -<KT