Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats



a: 


! 
j 

i fiM 


‘V s ; 



: “3KSC-J^ W > 

' “*■ ■; x ' ^ ]L. “ 


: * tm*** 


; igsssS 

; asHfc 

• - rz-vKhESb 


SI: r„. 

—•-■JS 


• - * ,a 3* Vb^L *: 
■ : , 4S! ®Wiif : 
: Ri 


J -jcary ffl 


; te?3W5j; 
. ■7*. *™»5J 

..?:**«* ffr| 


• •..— vcUa^ 

W-;^ 1 
.’ w ' u ""?£.«£>- 

i*r -r 82 ^ 
"• 

• : T - 

— » kiitj ii^> 


IMKRMTIOS 

cussifib 


udemv inRoi 


'5 -' ’ -'- 


“ • 

, ■jJ.afe?' 

' --Tr^ ;.'**:- 
r •-■. a:;c^ 

;• •• ; ! - 
Vi^'k-s 5 


• ’ -* ■■ ' -a; 

■ * * •'••'•" ‘“l^-Se 5 - 












,<■;■- 

VC - 


_ V 
*** 

- ..• . 


• r.v^T«iv 

i^-* .'Wz 

■" 


.. - ^ 
/ '.V/A 

-• 

■ 

i-'r ..^ i 

" 

^*\ -O'*. 

-*»■ •' .Jh 

•ir 


..I* 


ii*- .. 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 




-if A? 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Monday, June 13, 1994 


Key 100 Days: 
Clinton Faces 
Crucial Tests 
On AU Fronts 


By Ruth Marcus 

Washington Peat Semce 

WASHINGTON — President BiQ Cfinion is 
racing what could be the critical months of his 
presidency. 

He reutmed from Europe lest week to con- 
front challenges on every front: domestic agen- 
da, foreign policy leadership and his character 
and stewardship of the White House, of 
these is likely to come to a dimax in the next 
months, improving his fortunes or underscor- 
ing public doubts about his capacity to be an 
effective president. 

The capstone will be the midterm elections in 
November, which are likely to determine Mr. 
Clin ton's ability to achieve owwi^ 

during the remainder of his iwm 

“This year started with great promise and is 
threatening to end in a m uddle." said Win 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Marshall, president of the moderate Democrat- 
ic Progressive Policy Institute. “It's up to the 
president to turn this around.*’ 

Kenneth Duberstem, White House chief of 
staff far Ronald Reagan, said: “This is the 
crucial 100 days of the Clinton presidency. This 
is the time we check not only what the tempera- 
ture of h^fe care is but also the general health 
of Bill Clinton. The country and the world will 
see if he measures up.” 

Clinton aides soy the administration has 
gone through a series of “makeor-break* mo- 
ments before— votes last year on the economic 
plan and the North American Free Trade 
Agreement —and w31 face more such tests in 

the future. 

But they acknowledge that the next few 
months aze when Mr, Qintan can show voters 
that he is able to deliver oo his promise of 
change, or reinforce their fears about Ins leader- 
ship abilities and character deficits. 

“It’s a time of risk and tremendous opportu- 
nity,” one senior administration official «iH_ 
“If at the cad of the year, people feel reassured 
that he’s comfortable in fee commander in 
chief role, feat he’s fcxJ a number of foreign 
poficy successes, that he's had a number of 



domestic successes, 
Yeah, we’re oomfi 
dent/" 

“The 



win Slop and say, 
wife him as presi- 


wt?coa£it 

fc$4 ‘ 



Affelft Minster 
headquarters in Vienna. 


U.S. Aides Detail Korean Sanctions Plan 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

httmadonal BefddTrBme 
WASHINGTON — UA officials described 
a plan Sunday that calls for sanctions to be 
imposed against North Korea in phases, with 


cence, and that treats Pyongyang’s threats of 
war as a bluff. 

The officufo, appearing in television broad*' 
casta, did not prefect certain success, bm char- 
acterized the sanctions plan as a necessary step 
in a risky process that continues to indsae 
“good things” for North Kona if h renounce! 
nuclear weapons or unspecified severe mea- 
sures if it dtxs not. 

the US ambassador to Japan, Waller F- 
Mondale, said the United States would not 
“bend to those threats” of war repeatedly is- 
sued by North Korea as a reaction to possible 
economic sanctions. 


“We don’t think they mean it," he laid. 
“Wtfte taking no dunces but we don’t think 
if* going to happen." 

. Ire did not address the possibility of terrorist 
attacks mounted by the North Korean agents in 
response to sanctions. 

Mr. Mandate said he believed that Japan 
would ultimately cut off the flow to North 
Korea n hard currency earned by Koreans in 

featkvd. /uuThcrsJticfil was sigrefficant that 
China, while opposing economic sanctions in 
its statements, has. not said it would veto a 
United Nations Security Council move to im- 
pose them. 

. Initially, however; US. officials plan to start 
wife mater, noneconomic measures, iadudmg- 
a cutoff UN tedmical assistance and a halt to. 

scientific and cultural exchanges. The New 
Yadc'Rmes reported. Any ban on di shipments 


or the transfer of hard currency would be de- 
, it said, and do decision has been made on 
to call for a voluntary cm' 


anus sales or purchases invoking North Koi 

President Bill Gin ton has not yet decided 
which international sanctions to seek first in the 
Security Council, a senior .American official 
said Sunday. But it appears that he will be 
largely limited to steps on which U.S. allies and 
most Security Council members can agree. 

Mr. Mocdale, a former U.S. vice president, 
said of the sanctions plan: “It will not be weak. 
It wfll not be mild” 

The process of budding a consensus is still 
under way, Robert L Gallucci, the top U.S. 
negotiator on Korea, said Sunday. He repeated 
recent U.S. assertions that there was no sub- 
stantial difference between Tokyo and Wash- 

See KOREA, Page 2 


Kiosk 


Swiss Voters Bar 
UN Peace Role 

- GENEVA (AP) — In a humifiating 
blow feff government foreig n jpojtey . and a 
victory tor treditnmanat defenders or 
atritt neotrafity, Swim voten on Sunday 
rejected plan s to pro vide United Nations 

pg ^^S^te^wqd.that57 Jperom t 
ot the etectoraie voted [against a proposed 
constitutional «nendm^ th^would 
have allowed for the dispatch ot 600 “bluo 

hdmet&r” 

^ 555at lore of the propoi^ said tire 

outcome would rale 
tempt by the govenanent to join the umt- 
edNattea. ^ith the no vtilft Ae 
mtde it dear that Swy jaw Hgl ; ibeff 
not be tampered wife, fee coaamtiee 

t conumttee forced fen retet ndom , 


xs asa-sas 


for the dteptdcb rf petuk&pcn. 


Haiti’s teflKny reghne dectertda 
emergency^ . . • ^* #3 ’ 


Books 

Bridge 


Page & 


The North Koreans Send 

6 Message’ 



WaM^tamPmSerrict 

SEOUL — Norfe^qire aww to have sent 


■a 

its aQtes by 
wodd 

dutnge.for 0. 
assistance: 

The North 
attend fee gesture —’in 
wanting! of .wac." 
sending via ity 
mertfag ‘ 
based Ana " 
after 

Sfe 

dowmeot tor 


. . .. . Peace, based in 

Washington, roetthc 8Lywrs^d North Kwe- 
an leadre as part of a weekteng visit to Pyong- 


Statesand 
Scholar that it 
_ in ex- 
recognition and 

Kim II Sung, 
contrast to 
had been 
press — in a 



Harrison. u^North Korea would offer 
its latest position to fanner President Jimmy 
- Carter win ho tnvdi to Pyongyang on 

w afeg,.. .. 

"tire message they wfll give is that they will 
freereftefr tfttiqnim p rogram If they can get 


. finn commitments for assistance" in building 
other forms of nudear power plants, he said. 

Mr. Harrison said Mr. Kim and other North 
Korean leaders he met were “remarkably re- 
laxed" and “in a mind to negotiate," in sharp 
contrast to the tough rbetone and nnbumsuc 
threats that fyongyang is broadcasting to 
South Korea atm Japan. 

He said he bad particularly noticed an ab- 
sence of warlike rhetoric on North Korea’s two 
stato-nm domestic television networks. 

*T watched TV every dav I was there, and it 
was business as usual," Mr, Harrison said. 
“There was no sign of mobilizing the popula- 
tion or preparation for wax.” 

Mr. Harrison said the North Koreans “are 
not expecting sanctions." 

“They don't think China, Russia, Japan or 
Sooth Korea will go along," he raid. 

- In recent weeks. Gin ton administration offi- 
cials have declared the possible development of 
nudear weapons in fee maverick Communist 
state to be a major crisis threatening world 
peace. 

The United States is lading a drive for 
United Nations sanctions against fee North. 


Europeans Slap Leaders 
In Most Assembly Votes 


By Barry James 

IniematuntaJ HeraU Tribune 

Voten endorsed Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
Germany and the Italian prime minister, Silvio 
Berlusconi, in voting for a larger and more 
powerful European Parliament on Sunday. 

But in Spain, fee Socialists went down to 
defeat, and fee Conservative Party in Britain 
was expected to lose heavily. 

The election for 567 seats in fee European 
Pariianxni focused heavily on national and 
local issues, giving voters a chance to cast 
midterm judgments on their political leaders. 

Late Sunday, these trends were emerging: 

• In Germany, computer projections gave 
Mr. Kohl’s Christian Democrats and their sis- 
ter party in Bavaria 47 or 48 of the 99 German 
seats in the assembly, compared to 39 or 40 for 
the Social Democrats and about 12 for the 
Greens. 

• In Spain, voters rejected the policies of 
Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez, who conceded 
defeat The Socialists also were likely to lose 
their absolute majority in the regional parlia- 
ment in Andalusia. Mr. Gonzalez's home base 
and long a fiefdom for fee left 

• The governing rightist parties in Italy 
emerged as dear winners, scoring 485 percent 
of the vote, according to an exit poQ. within 
that total the Forza Italia party of Mr. Berlus- 
coni obtained between 273 and 34X2 pe rcen t of 
the vote, up from the 21 percent it won in 
genera] elections in March. 

• The main parties in France lost ground as 


maverick parties on the right and left creamed 
off pan of the vote. 

• Britain’s Conservatives appeared headed 
for one of fee worst political defeats in memo - 

tr- 
ibe first official results in Span showed fee 
opposition conservative Popular Party ted by 
Jose Maria Aznar trouncing Mr. Gonz&kzs 
Socialists, who are deeply mired in corruption 
scandals and unpopular after 12 years in office. 

The Popular Party win obtain more thaw 39 
percent of the vote.' giving it 28 of Spain’s 64 
seats, compared to ouy 22 seats fw the Social- 
ists, wife about 30.7 percent of fee votes. 

A Communist-led coalition doubled its share 
of the vote, and is likely to get nine seats, the 
figures showed. 

Tbe projections in Germany indicated that 
the government allies, tbe Free Democrats, 
would get less than fee 5 percent of votes 
needed for a seat, as will tire far-right, anti- 
fordgner Republican Party. Exit polls also in- 
dicated fee Christian Democrats were ahead in 
local elections in Eastern Germany. 

It was the first head-to-head lest between Mr. 
Kohl and the Social Democratic leader. Rudolf 
Scbarping, who win face off in a general elec- 
tion in October. 

Italian analysts said fee vote would strength- 
en Mr. Berlusconi's hand against bis neofasdst 
and separatist Northern League partners. Bat 
some projections said fee neofasrists could win 
as many as 13 seats in fee European Parlia- 
ment, compared to only four hdd by its prede- 


cessor far-righi movement in the previous as- 
sembly. 

France’s mainstream parties took a beating 
in fee Sunday elections, wife the opposition 
Socialists slumping to their worst result in de- 
cades, according to exit polls. 

The center-right government coalition was 
expected to win between 24 and 2S percent and 
fee Socialists barely 13 to 16 percent, computer 
projections indicated. Maverick lists on both 
fee right and fee left each got about 10 percent 
of the vote, robbing the main parties of support 
and clouding prospects for next year's presi- 
dential elections. 

On fee left, Bernard Tapie, challenging fee 
main Socialist Party, was likely to get about ID 
percent of the vote, about tbe same as a group 
led by the anti-Maastricht camp aigner , Phi- 
lippe de Vflliers on fee right. 

According io fee projections, the extreme- 
right National From of Jean-Marie Le Pen will 
get about 11 percent of tbe votes and fee 
Communists 7 percent Voter turnout was high- 
er than expected at 55 percent. 

Portugal’s opposition Socialist Party looked 
set for a narrow victory wife 34.8 percent of the 
vote against 342 for the ruling nght-of-center 
Soda! Democrats, partial results indicated. 

Early results in Belgium showed a fall in 
support for fee traditional parties, but a stun- 
ning rise for tbe extreme-right Francophone 
National Front, which came from nowhere to 

See VOTE, Page 4 


A Resounding Austrian ‘Yes’ to EU 

In a Surprise, 66% Reject Warning of Loss of Identity and Jobs 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

VIENNA — Voters resoundingly approved 
membership for Austria in tbe European Union 
on Sunday, rejecting warnings that their small 
Alpine country’s identity, neutrality, riches and 
jobs would be swallowed up. 

Final results in what pollsters had predicted 
would be a dose race showed a margin in favor 
of EU membership — to begin Jan. 1 — of 66.4 
percent to 33.6 percent. 

More than 80 percent of Austria's voters 
turned out to make what many regarded a&. 
AistrU’s most important decision since World 
Warll. 

The vote was a clear rejection of a shrill anti- 
EU campaign waged by tbe rightist JOrg 
Haider. 

“Austrians have said dearly today that we 
want to determine our future ourselves." Chan- 
cellor Franz Vranitzky said. 

The vote, be said, was to make Austria an 


“independent member of a larger Europ ean 
community." 

Foreign Minister Aids Mode, who acknowl- 
edged having been concerned about tbe out- 
come, raid fee vote committed Austrians “to 
optimism, and to the future." 

“Austrians have shown once a gain t hey ’re 
much betta than they believe they aie,” he said. 

Mr. Vramtzk/s Social Democrats and the 
second-largest party, tbe People’s Party, which 
Mr. Mock rep rese nts, govern in coalition and 
.negotiated terms of Austria’s membership. 

Proponents of membership cdtbrauoi across 
the country. In Bregenz, the capital of the 
westernmost province, they raised fee EU flag 
over government offices. Crowds celebrated in 
downtown Vienna. 

The positive trend held in rural areas, where 
farmers are concerned about declining subsi- 
dies and cheaper EU food, and in Alpine areas 
like Tirol, where there is widespread concern 


about environmental damage from heavy trade 
traffic. 

The solid majorities included Mr. Haider's 
stronghold, the province ot Carinthia. 

Tensions rose in fee final days before the 
vote as polls showed tbe result would be dose. 
Mr. Haider warned of a loss of identity and 
political neutrality for Austria, along with jobs 
and money. Vandals defaced some Haider post- 
era with swastikas or scrawled Hitler-like mous- 
taches on his portraits. 

Mr. Haider denied that it constituted a per- 
sonal defeat, and continued his criticism. “It is 
now easier for the government to raise taxes 
and to gloss over the fact that accession wfl 1 
entail the loss of thousands of jobs,” he said. 

The vote could also be a needed boost for the 
European Union itself as member countries 

See AUSTRIA, Page 4 


ft.-. .. . y * ~ . 



i — . -a*. 


to LnyMioxc Francr-Pro* 

LUBAVTTCHER REBBE DIES — Followers of Rabbi Meoachem Sdmeerson, the 
bead of the Lubaritcher sect in Brooklyn, New York, mourning fab death. Page 4, 


The Appeal 
Of Zhirinovsky 
Is Fading Fast 

By Lee Hockstader 

Was hington Peat Service 

TOGLIATTI, Russia — Six months ago, the 
auto workers of this smokestack city on the 
Volga River voted — and voted big — for the 
extreme nationalist parliamentary candidate 
Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky. 

Embittered by Russia’s economic mess and 
attracted by the candidate’s bravura and stem 
promises to crack down on crime and corrup- 
tion, they helped send Mr. Zhirinovsky’s far- 
right party to a spectacular victory in Russia’s 
first free parliamentary election. 

Today, Mr. Zhirinovsky's appeal is fading 
here, where be made his strongest showing. In 
several dozen random interviews here last week, 
workers who had given Mr. Zhirinovsky fear 
support Iasi December said they had seen few 
results and were unlikely to vote for him again. 

The overall im pre ssion is that assembly Hog 
workers, foremen, quality-control specialists 
and engineers at the Volga Auto Factory, Rus- 
sia’s largest car maker, now see Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky much as they see virtually every other 
figure on the Russian political scene: as part of 
fee problem, not fee solution. 

Since his rise to prominence, Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky has also posed aprotriem to the West He 
has vigorously called for fee re-creation of fee 
Russian empire and the pursing of non-Rus- 
sians from fee country, aim has called fee 
United States “fee evil empire." 

As Mr. Zlnrinovsk/spopularitv has receded, 
so has that of other politicians of the right and 
the ldt, polls have shewn. Rising prioes, falling 
production and, now, the specter of mass uo~ 


v 


jjgwgstgnd PHcw 


Andorra -...9.00 FF Luxembourg 

Antilles-..] U0FF 

Cameroon Qatar --.Ate* 

Fayot^^E.P.5000 R6imton™.U^FF 
FSSce^.:.v.9.0ftFF MAARMbJRM;. j 

Gabon MGCFA * 

_300Dr. Spain 

Italy Lire TWffiP 

iSy cam# .I-W6CFA JS&rJhgSEX; 


Don’t Sink Spy System, Science Says, Give It to Us 


By Wflliam J.- Bread 

■ He* York Ttartelte ;: 


NEW YORK —- The 




on 


tips and 

ib dr fandenn wmttfc But 
tojsve as much of fee 
.netwafc w Jcr«wiromnem*l re- 

sa^eh and ofetf tjwfian uses. - 



tot ahifo in ocean temperature that could 
portend climatic trouble. 

“It’s ridiculous io throw away a S 16 billion 
investment when it's got so many uses for 
man$md," said Admiral James D. Watkins, a 
former dlief of naval operations who is now 
president of fee Joint Oceanographic Institu- 
tions,- a Washington-based consortium of 
universities and research groups feat study 
thesea*. 

Tbe Sound SurvdDance System, or Sosus, 
was used dining the Cold War exclusively to 
track fee ships and submarines of America’s 
foes. 

Started in the mid- 1950s, it spans fee globe 


wife a network of more than 1.000 underwa- 
ter microphones grouped in arrays and tied to 
navy shore stations by 30,000 miles erf' under- 
sea cables. It can trad; undersea sounds over 
hundreds and sometimes thousands of miles 
of ocean. 

Wife military budgets shrinking fast, the 
navy has quietly begun cutting maintenance, 
closing shore stations and preparing to dis- 
mantle or mothball about 80 percent of fee 
undersea arrays, navy officials say. 

A navy team was kept from destroying part 
of fee system around Bermuda this month 
only bv the intervention of Commerce Secre- 
tary Ronald H. Brown. 


Among other things, fee C omme rce De- 
partment is studying the undersea network as 
a way to monitor vessels involved in drift-net 
fishing and whaling, winch are banned by 
global agreement. 

Tbe Sosus budget is down sharply, from 
about 3335 million in fiscal 1991 to S165 
million feis year. Far fiscal 1995, the Clinton 
administration has requested about $60 mQ- 
lion. The number of personnel feD from 2J50Q 
last year to 2,000 tins year, and is to drop to 
750 by 1996. 

“The navy is chartered to do national de- 
fense, not marine-mammal research," Cap- 

See LISTEN, Page 4 


spectrum disgusted with polities and public 
leaders. 

It is not feat grievances have changed; the 
same Utter complaints about crime, non-Rus- 
sian ethnic poops and Russia’s sinking status 


in the worid are frequently heard. But the 
diafflu&oiuneiit of the Russian body politic 
wife established politicians suggests that the 
door may be open, as it was for Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky last December, for a completely new 
figure to capture the public’s imagination and 
heart and capitalize on its grievances. . 

“I think we need a man who people would 
obey, a strong man to pnt things in order," said 
Yitati, 54, _a quality-control specialist who de- 
clined to give his full name. "I voted for Zhirin- 
ovsky, but now it seems like he's keeping sSent, 
like he’s gone undo- the surface. We don’t see 
any action from him. We don't see anything we 
can follow." 

Such comments are bad news for Mr. Zhiria- 
ovsky, who says be mil run for president in 
1996. From fee start, he has tried hard to 
position hirasd/ as that new figure —an angry 

See WORKERS, Page 4 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 1994 


mWi 

^ Rejecting Violence,’ China Vows a “Positive’ Korea Role 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

Wetv York Tima Service 

BEIJING — China said Sunday that it 
still believed that United Nations sanc- 
tions against North Korea would be inef- 
fective and warned against using “vio- 
lence” in trying to end Pyongyang's 
nuclear weapons program, a Japanese 
spokesman said after a meeting between 
the Chinese and Japanese foreign minis- 
ters. 

At the same time, the Chinese foreign 


Beijing would use its veto to block a resolu- 
tion on sanctions in the Security Council, 
the spokesman said. 

“We did not come here expecting a de- 
tailed discussion with China on what mea- 
sures are to be taken at the United Na- 
tions." the spokesman said. 

He said one purpose of his trip “was to 
stress the importance of China's role" as 
the nation best suited to "transmit the 
atmosphere of the international communi- 
ty in the best manner" to the government 


aee - - ^ . TTZ r ^ of President Kim il Sung. 

a £ e minister. Qian Qichen, told his Japanese 6 . . 

— counterpart that Beijing would play a posi- In its aKCunlof lhe raetimt. China 

live and conMnictiCe role in tbe comina maims “add only mlensdy he contra- 


Security Council debate over punitive mea- 
sures aimed at forcing North Korea to give 
up its nuclear program, the spokesman 
said. 


dictions and even lead io results that all 
parties would not like to see." 

The official Xinhua press agency also 
reported that Mr. Qian had expressed re- 


Tbe Japanese foreign minister. Kqji Ka- gret that the board oF the International 
kizawa. did not press Chinese officials in Atomic Energy Agency had voted to end 
two and a half hours of talks on whether its technical assistance to North Korea in 


response to Pyongyang's refusal to allow 
inspections. 

“We appeal to the parties concerned to 
make efforts to open dialogue, mitigate 
contradictions and seek a wav of •■ettling 
the problem step by step." Mr. Qian was 
quoted as saying. 

The visit by Mr. Kakizawa. after an 
agreement by the United States, japan and 
South Korea to press ahead with a graduat- 
ed set of sanctions in the Security Council, 
reinforced the image that China was going 
to remain engaged in the United Nations 
debate while continuing to express reserva- 
tions about the use of sanctions. 

“The Chinese told us they have been 
making a variety of contacts” the Japanese 
spokesman said of Beijing's diplomacy to- 
ward North Korea. “Mr. Qian Qichen told 
us that applying sanctions to North Korea 
would be ineffective judging from the fact 


that ii has been already isolated and has on Sunday for tiying to heigh tOT^a^s ^onV Blair K^HS lOT U* • m cAeaaaxitd r 

little economic contacis'with the rest of the over the inspection of nNDON (LAT) — Tony Blair, the domes trcaJTatfs &****?•”* ‘ . 

world “ installations with war talk. Reutcn report- LONDONiLAl} « fonaa Uy entered the race to be the ; 

. . ed from Tokyo. the oppostuon woor r«i., 

The spokesman also referred to China s - ^.^amorinafor party’s next leader. ^ tc ,h P “modenrizatj® 

"behind the curtains’* role of carrying on a “The Umted States is no* Korea's Mr. Blair, 41* who wprjsejjj* win lhe post in a partv cm 

dialogue with the North Korean govern- a pre-empuve. st^eagau^N sinmun. immediately became ** fa*w»te preJoru LaboriT employment; 
menu That dialogue came into sharper nuclear installations, the Rodong immua other candidates arc 3^)eaal^ 

view last week ^President Jiang ZedS the orgnn of North Korea's nrlmgCommu, fecial. to P»V* 

was host in Betiing to the chief of staff of nists, reported Sunday. Davies. _ „ ... - tjr r 


Tony Blair Runs for U Jfc 

lUJij domestic affairs spokesman far. , 

1 formally * ** » be UK 


was host in Beijing to the chief of staff of 
North Korea's army, Choi Kwang. It was 
the highest level visiL by a North Korean 
official since the nuclear crisis began more 
than a year ago. 

“China deems i i an unshakable policy to 


its. reportca bunaay. Davies. d«i Oxford University, Mr. Blair is sccabyptohw^''. 

doJLirfffl SS’SkTwo^' 

In a separate dispatch. North Korea crit- 
icized a resolution passed last week by the 


friendship between the two countnes. Mr. US. House of Repnsenu 
Jiang was quoted as saying by the official sanctioiis against Pyongyang. 

China Daily. In a third article, the news agency said 

US. forces in the South were inciting rai 
O 'War Talk* by LIS. Charged fever by showing Patriot missiles to the 


epresentanves uipns 


U.S. to Renew Efforts on 

JERUSALEM (AP) — Secirtary of SweWgw 
visit the Middle East later, tins month 
impasse in the lsraeb-Syrian peace jalki 


North Korea blamed the United States South 


public. 


Q & A: High Stakes in the Kim Regimens Nuclear Program 


The United States is trying to put 
together an international coalition that 
would use economic sanctions force 
North Korea to open its nuclear instal- 
lations to inspection. James R. Lilley, 
a former U.S. assistant secretary oj 
defense for international security af- 
fairs and a former ambassador to Chi- 
na and South Korea, discussed the 
Korean crisis with Michael Richard- 
son of the International Herald Tri- 
bune. 

Q. What is at stake for the United 
Slates and Northeast Asia over North 
Korea's refusal to allow full inspection of 
its nuclear facilities and plutonium 
stocks? 

A Nuclear weapons plus ballistic mis- 
siles in the hands of that particular lead- 
ership. given its track record and stated 
objectives, would make it a very danger- 
ous destabilizing force. That must be of 
particular concern to China. Japan, Rus- 
sia, Taiwan and Southeast Asia as well as 
South Korea. 


These weapons and the technology 
that goes with them would not just re- 
main in North Korea. They would be 
spread all over, including Libya, Iran and 
Syria. They will go to anyone that wants 
to buy them. 

So that makes it a serious problem for 
the both the U.S. and Asia. That is why 
the North Korean nuclear program must 
be discontinued and dismantled. And 
there must be verification. 

Q. How do you achieve Lhis when Chi- 
na refuses to go along with any form of 
sanctions against North Korea? 

A. I would challenge that. Look at 
what happened between 1990 and 1992 
when the North made major changes in 
its policy on nuclear weapons, such as 
allowing' international inspections and 
ratifying the Nuclear Nonproliferation 
Treaty/This happened because there was 
leverage and pressure on Pyongyang as a 
result of cooperation between the U.S.. 
China and other concerned countries. 

Friction between the Clinton adminis- 
tration and Beijing over trade, human 
rights and other issues in 1993 blew Lhat 
coalition apart Now the confrontation 


has ended, you can get back to the old 
formulas that work. 

o 

Q. Is an economic squeeze on North 
Korea likely to be effective? 

A. The North is dead afraid of eco- 
nomic pressure because it could bring 
down the regime of Kira H Sung. China is 
against sanctions because they don t 
want the regime to collapse. 

If this pressure is applied in the stri- 
dent. public and humiliating way the 
U.S. has sought, it is going to cause all 
sorts of problems. Beijing wants Wash- 
ington to speak softly but carry a bis 
stick. Pressure has to be delicately cali- 
brated. 

China does not want nuclear weapons 
on the Korean peninsula. On the other 
hand, it does not want 4 million North 
Korean refugees pouring into Manchu- 
ria. 

Q. What should U.S. policy be? 

A First. America must make it clear 
that while it does not want war. if North 
Korea starts fighting it will be rapidly 
and decisively defeated. The U.S. must 


back that up with power to make sure the 
North Koreans get the message. 

Second, .America should tdl the North 
the choice is between nuclear weapons, 
starvation and implosion, or peace, sta- 
bility and prosperity. The US. should 
guarantee the survival of the North Kore- 
an regime with China providing its nucle- 
ar umbrella. But only in exchange for the 
North's nukes. 

• 

Q. Should the U.S. let China take the 
lead in shaping Korean policy? 

A. 1 don't tin ok so. Beijing wants to 
play a quiet role as it did in 1992. but not 
be out in front China controls the main 
economic lifeline to North Korea. About 
65 percent of the North's oil comes by 
pipeline from China and is sold at con- 
cessional prices. People say sanctions are 
not effective. But without oiL you cannot 
run a war machine. The North has stock- 
piled ofl but ii is drawing down these 
reserves. 

China is short of oil and could ratchet 
up the prices. This is a subtle game. 
Around 40 percent of North Korea's 
grain is imported, a good portion from 


China, where there is also a grain short- 
age. There’s already malnutrition in the 
North Korean military. If the U.S. gftts 

China and other suppliers on side, it will 

have leverage. 

Q. What can Japan and South Korea 
contribute? 

A The South can halt trade with the 
North; Japan can cot the flow of vital 
hard currency remittances, worth at least 
S600 million a year, roughly one-third of 
the North's budget If they were cut by 30 
or 40 percent while fuel food and trade 
were also being cut, it would be very 
effective. 

Q. Is a sanctions coalition of the Unit- 
ed States, China. Japan and South Korea 
really feasible? 

A.' It would take a lot hard work and 
skillful negotiation. There are stOl a lot of 
frictions in there. Much could go wrong. 
But the raw material exists to make soch 
a coalition work. 

It has b em done before with consider- 
able success. I don't see why it cannot be 
done now. when the danger to Northeast 
.Asia from North Korea's nuclear pro- 
gram is even more apparent. 


impasse 
A gov 


S m the remainder of Mr. Chnsopbers itmerazy m rfe M^St 
last trip to the region fa eariy 

to end the IsraeK-Syifan deadlock. At tite ' ■ 

Hafez Assad of Syria an Israeli proposal fwwithdiw^’OjwsSwandjwftjr 
from the Golan Heights, which Israel captured i& tte HW ? - 

war. The Israeli plan did not include a pledge to withdraw from all £ " 

G ol an as Mr. Assad demands. 

Libel Trial by Accused Co!la^rat«» ^ 

BORDEAUX (Reuters) - Maurice Pap^- the last : 

cused of crimes against humanity yet to be brought to trial - 

coun on Mondayma hbe| case that he lodged against 

who wrote a book about him. ( . A. .:'k 

The hearing is a part of Mr. Papon s lawsuit agamst uerara ■? ■- . 

whose recent book “Maurice Papon: A French Burcaumt m Co&bpt*^ . .. 


KOREA: U.S. Aides Detail a Phased Sanctions Plan 




lion is xuiea wild a»cgaumu> * &» * ■- •* ***- ■ - -r-.—j-— .■ -■ — r. ^ - ; 

^ VEvejpoaHtiL isaocused of sending 1 ,690 Jews inducting 223 dadj^ 
to death as the secood-rankfag civil servant fa the Bordeaux region dnjjp£-;V 
the Nazi occupa tioa. - - ■ ; _ >' r . . - \ : 

U.S. Veterans Marie Battle ofBu^e > ; 

BASTOGNE, Belgium (Rentas) —Five huiidred Ajnscrican wteatas: ? 
on Sunday commemorated one of the bloodiest battles of Wodd^ja^ v _■ 
in the hills of southern Belgium. ’ 

At a service at a monument near Bastogfte. where troops of the U3L 7 ' ; 
]01si Airborne Division were surrounded by adyawmig Gernian foge&U'- 
U.S. and Belgian officials laid flowers in bright sunshine fa memory rf y- 
those who fell fa the so-called Battle of the Bulge, from tmd-Decefaber,' ;/. 
1944 to mid-January 1945. Basxogne Was relieved on Dec. 2frby dfcXISijj 
3d Army of General George S. Patton. '. L - . : ,7 

The Battle of the Bulge, fa winch the Germans surprised the AIBesbitt « 
failed fa the attempt to take Antwerp, cost 80.000 American mid l^QO.v- 
British and Canadian casualties, and mare than l(Xy)00 German. . • 7777- 


Continoed from Page I secretary of slate, indicated that nuclear bomb, would rq 
diplomatic doors were stDI open as “very dangerous new 
ington on how to treat North Ko- long as international inspectors menu" Mr. Gallucci said, 
rea. ana working cameras remained al a Mr. Mondale said that 

Mr. Gallucci confirmed that a storage pool where spent fuel rods good things can happen’ 
phased set of sanctions would be from a reactor have been placed. North Korean regime b; 
sought at the UN but offered no As of Sunday, inspectors were still what he believes to be thei 
characterization of the type of present at the pond, he said, to become a nuclear power. 


nuclear bomb, would represent a 
“very dangerous new develop- 


long as international inspectors mem." Mr. Gallucci said, 
ana working cameras remained al a Mr. Mondale said that “a lot of 
storage pool where spent fuel rods good things can happen" for the 
from a reactor have been placed. North Korean regime by ending 
As of Sunday, inspectors were still what he believes to be their quest io 


sanctions envisioned or the time 
frame in which they would be im- 
posed. 

Mr. Gallucci, who is an assistant 


assure that plutonium is not ex- 
tracted from the spent fuel. 

The separation of plutonium. 


He said that former President 
Jimmy Carter, who will make a 
private visit to Pyongyang on 



BREITLING 

1884 

Instruments for Professionals 


NAVITIMER « 

New and smaller version of Ihe timepiece 
worn by flyers worldwide since 1953. 
Rotating bezel with circular slide rule and 
variable tachymeler. Great legibility. 

Its selfwinding mechanical chronograph 
movement is one of the smallest 
in the world. Water-resistant to 30 meters. 
With leather strap or rilot owtaJ bracelet. 


which is a primary ingredient in a Wednesday, had been briefed by 

^ the Stale Department “so that he 

can describe to the government of 

North Korea what our situation is 

and what our policies are.” 

U) *Tm sure he's going to strongly 

urge their compliance" with the 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, 
the ambassador said. 

According to The Times report, 
r V I IV I /■"*► a sanctions plan that starts mildly 

L i S V °1 and gradually tightens with tough- 

1 1 1 1 er measures is designed to build a 

34 strong international consensus. 

0 Mr. Gallucci refused to rule out 

the use of force, a position that he 
and other ILS. officials have taken 
in the past. Mr. Mondale reiterated 
that an informal sanctions coali- 
tion could be formed outside the 
UN umbrella if the Security Coun- 

But there is some pressure in 
Congress to do more. Senator John 
S. McCain 3d, an Arizona Republi- 
can who has been dovish on many 
foreign policy issues, on Sunday 
repeated his view that the Clinton 
administration is following “a poli- 
cy of appeasement." 

If sanctions do not work by the 

ers should attack North Korea's 
nuclear installations. 

But Mr. Gallucci said the presi- 
dent was pursing a prudent course. 

“It’s been the judgment of the 
president that he owes it to the 
American people, to the people of 
South Korea, to the American 
troops deployed there, to try to 
MER w negotiate before we do something 

Sion Of tile tim^ecc else,” Mr. Gallucd said. “We’re 

ircuier slide mie *id about to start doing something else, 

tr. Great legibility. That something else is moving to 

lanical dvtmograph Sanctions.” 





SAN CRISTOBAL, Mexico (AFP) — Peasant lebeb'Bt southern^- 
Mexico have rejected a peace agreement proposed by the government i&77 
the aftermath of a New Year’s Day uprising, guerrilla leaders saidy , 
Sunday. .■ . • 

The Zapatista National liberation Army said, a cease-fire would ; . 
remain in effect even though a canvass of its snpporters fa the state. of . ’ 
Chiapas showed 98 percent rejecting the peace pact negotiated fa March. 

The group cited whatH called the governments msnfficieit response to 
demands for autonomy far Cinapan. Indians and for the release of 
political prisoners. Still the Zapatistas said that 97 percent of thar y • 
supporters said they opposed a resumption cf fighting vAfle 3 percent * ' 
favored additional hostilities. - _ . 

Death Sought for Bangladesh Author : 

DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Thousands of Muslims, inarched ’7 
through a southern town demanding the death of a feminist author • 
accused of criticizing the Koran, an offidal sakl Sunday. \ 

Rewards totaling $5,000 have been offered for the murder of Taslwna ! • 
Nasreen, 32, who has been fa hiding since a court last week ordered her * 
arrest after a newspaper reported she wanted Islam's holy book revised. ■ 
On Saturday, neany 10.000 demonstrators chanting. “Death to Tas- . . 
Hma Nasreen!” presented a statement to authorities fa Barisal town V - 
demanding her arresL They also demanded curbs on forrign-funded aid _* 
groups helping Bangladeshi women. , 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Protests Await British Flights, to Orly 


PARIS f Reuters) — Protests by French airline workers were expected 
to greet the first flights on Monday from London’s Heathrow Ahponlo *■ 

, , . TjnJm/Thc AMOMLrtPrev Paris's Orly Airport, airport officials said Sunday. Unions represent fag= 

A defenoaot in the toanst killings being led from court fa Hangzhou. China, after sentencing Sunday, employees of the French companies Air Inter and Air Libert* have cafledN . 

for demonstrations against flights to Orly by British Airways and its^\ 
4 ~ra • 4^1 i O rw\ • Tayr 1 French subsidiary TAT. as well as by Air France. r '. *■ 

LhiBa Loedemns d in Tourist Murders ^ 

ened to land there without permission. BA’s threat followed a European^ { 

But Relatives ofTaiivanese Say Troops Are Still at Large for ^ 

Aaoaaled ?*** ** *« .Co^unist soldia^ were They arrested three local me a. Most fateStoim] S£S*Se GaSe^i^t^ KoS^ V. 

^ la “ of a “Sr S i_ The , trial b^san Friday fa Hangz- northeast of the capitaLBA already flies to Roissy bmwSL to laSd£ 




A defendant in the tourist killings being led from court fa Hangzhou. China, after senfencing Sunday. 

China Condemns 3 in Tourist Murders 


The Associated Press mg, that Communist soldiers were 

BEIJING — fa the face of a involved fa the March 31 killings, 
public outcry fa Taiwan, a Chinese The killings provoked the worst 
court handed down death sen- crisis in Chin a-Tai wan relations 
tences Sunday to three men con- since the two sides opened trade 
victed of robbing and killin g 24 and tourism links fa 1987. 

Taiwan tourists and eight Chinese. Taiwan is considered a Chinese 
The official Xinhua press agency province but has been politically 

quoted the court ruling as raving s ?P a ^ ted fn ? m Lhe sm “ 

the “facts of the crimes were clear ? e Nationalist government took 
and the evidence was complete." It haven there in 1 949 after being 
said the court ordered copies of the ^ Communists on the 

vm-Hirtc m s* . r, ii,. mainland. 


me trial began Friday in Hangz- northeast of the capital BA already flies to Roissy but wants to land at , 
hou, the capital of Zhqiang. Xin- Orly and later start services between Orly and Marseille. Toulouse arid.-?' 
hua said the three confessed their Nice, using TAT. -:' t - 

gtdt fa court. Eight Orly arrivals and departures to and Tram London have beem-i 

me news agency said m an- scheduled for Monday between 9 A.M. and 10:50 PAL, Paris 
nouncmg the verdict that the de- airport officials said. v . 


fense lawyers appealed for lenient 


The ILS. transportation secretary. Federico F. Pena, has ordered a ^ 

new rtf lhe Fcriml Avi.ii«. •- 1 r ~ - ' 


dangerous 


roauces unusually strong turbulence m its wake that - * 
followmg small aircraft. The review, on a broader 7 


BREITLING MONTRES SA 
P.O.Box 1132 

SWITZERLAND - 2540 GRENCHEN 

TeL: 41 65/51 11 31 
Fax.: 41 65/53 10 09 


To subscribe in SvritzBrkmd 

jusf call, toll free, 

155 57 57 


ask the butler... 


verdicts to be given to Lhe victims' 
relatives, along with the stolen 
money and goods. 

However, fa Taiwan, the rda- 


Chuang Shu- fang, whose hus- 
band, Kao Mmg-liaog, was among 
those killed, said fa a telephone 


Wktrt iruin it •vytr-vf ygn urjml it It it. 


trvies called the verdict a sham and ™^ TVI ®J W l ^ at relatives will press 
said they believed the kfllere to be T* 1 * 8 ” 5 g° verameQl to seek jus- 
still al large. Many relatives believe tlc S: 

unofficial reports', denied by Beij- w f e x °? a . crmse on 

J Thousand Islands Lake m eastern 
Zhejiang Province when they and 
^ the crew were killed. The police 
found the bodies fa the cabin of the 
r boat, which was badly charred, and 

VT) initially proclaimed that they were 

I victims of an accidental- fire.' 

_ — r — Only after an outcry from Tai- 

u • — & _ ■ i • .v - c - a ■ r- o • k • e wan a posjjy boycott by Tai- 
■t. wanese travel agencies did Chinese 

ibm— police acknowledge that the group 

had been robbed and murdered 


«nri Ptv ” f • . o Ivinas, a uv i&T»n, uu a DIUoUCI t 

The authority invite Cf ^ ***none the speed of the agency’s reaction to safety-related 

“ Wcn “ ,U P^urcs for pnwidkg Ml informall t o& ; 

“ ‘STiSSS'M: ^ „ S 1 ; 

inceiwd by lb dr treatment ijteo ""rS 6 “ l.™ 3 *™ d bdn ® “ IMier li!e ^ v ‘ 

*cy «i ScILlS y bamm Damark ' s “ 1* month ot ■ 

claim the bodies. They said they (Reuters) 

were followed, barred from seeing This Week’s Rnliflavc 

the boat and pressured into allow- “ , WeeK 8 ***>003$$ * ■: 

fag the bodies to be cremated. Bartiong and government offices will be closed or services curtailed in i 

T^ncwsp^, ^ Chi- depeadmci “ ^ r 

nese authorities callous and secre- Mnv _. v p y - : 

tive, and President Lee Tung-hui of b”:?,;™ 1 Argentina. Australia, Colombia. Gibrahar, Hong Kong, Macao, i 
Taiwan said the g pvcrar^Qt of ^ 

China was acting “like bandits” 1UE5DAY: Hong Kong, Macao. | 

an epithet not used between the FRIDAY: Iceland. ’■ T 




izuwan saia toe government of 
China was acting “like bandits” — 
an epithet not used between the 
two sides fa years. 


Sources: IP. Morgan, Reuters. 










To call from country to country, or back to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone number of the country you're calling from 


Anljgu 

ti-ailjblc Ifi.'Tti public 
Argenuna* 

Austria' "C' i* 
BahamaffCC- 
Bahrain 
Belgium’ CO* 
Bermuda -r 
Bolivia* 

Brazil 

Canada 

Cayman Islands 
Chiic.CC- 
Colombu^CC't 
Co$u Rica* 


cordphonn only i *2 
001-600-33^-111! 
012-903-0 1 2 
I-MO-W-J-IfiOO 
800-002 
0800. Ilf 12 
I-.W-023-CHM 
0*00-1222 
000-8012 
l.JWP^WiWi'OO 
l-600-b24!000 
OOT-0316 
980-16-0001 
k-2 




Cyprus* 

Czech Republic CC* 
Denmark 1 CC i* 

Dominican Republic 
Ecuadur-r 
Egypt": i: ■* 

tOutfldc cl Cure dial 02 tir^i 
El Salvador* 

Finland 1 CC* 

France 1 o: '• 

Ganihia* 

CermanvIC' 

ibmncJ .n'aibbditx* in ejsrcm 
Grtecc'CC'* 

Grenada— 


080-90000 
1*0-42-0001 12 
8001-0022 
l-W0-751-bb2-f 

ire 

' 355-3770 

195 

V800- 102-80 
I9V-00-19 
00-1 9° 
0130-0012 
Germany.'’ 

00-800-121 1 
1-800-82-1-6721 


Cuaicnula* 

Haiti >C<;s- 
Honduras^- 
Hungaryi'Cr.'* 
Iceland* 

Ireland' Cr.i 
Israel' CC* 
liatyiCi.!* 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

i Available from musi 
Licchlmsiein'CO* 

Luxembourg 
MciricoA 
Monaco'.' i''* 


189 

00 1-800-4+4-1 23HI 
001-300-674-7000 
00V-800 -01411 
999-002 
1-300-55-1001 
177-150-2727 
172-1022 
800-674-7000 

inch. I 080011 

155-0222 
0800-0112 
95^00-674-7000 
19W-00-19 


Use ynur MCI Card.* local telephone card or call culli.-ci...a11 at the some low rates. 

• C l ■ Cttumiv i ?-:fl»unr.- nllmg a-.-aiLiWi Mr i»-< K: .r™LW.- i.v'Iti -m .ill urcrvuiiruI loraucns Ccnjin 
p^incthTT-' iprh + lurjicd J-itbr iL'i ▼ Wjut lor dul tins. A AvaibMi front LtpATCL 
puhlic phonu -jiiU*. Rnu deptni, in coll Mipri in Moku + tnlenuni-ivil cuRuminia'Uitri iorngr 
-* hoi avaibble ff"jn pjbU. ptv plionii • PuMic phone, nuy require ilrpubil 0)0 or phone cord for Jul lone 


Imprime par Offprint, 75 rue de TEwngile, 7 50 IS Paris. 


Netherlands' CO* 
NetheriuKb AndUesCT^. 
Nicaragua 1 CC> 

t'Ouuide of Managua, dial 02 
NorwayfCO* 

Panama 
Mibtaty Boses 
Paraguay-!- 

PcratOuistde of Uma, Jul l<?0 
Poland' CO 
Portugal! CO 
Puerto RicotCC ■ 

San Maritur CC'i* 

Slovak RcpoblicfCD 
South AlricitCQ 


06-022-91-22 
O0I-8OO-95O- 1022 

firx.t 18 $ 

800-19912 
103 
2810-103 
OOK-II^OO 

firs! 001-100 

0V-0I -04-000-222 
04-017-1224 
I -8O-3-ft?$^tO0O 
172-I02Z 
W--i24Wli2 
i380t'-«:-rT01 1 


SpaitPCO 90Ct-99^0]4 

Sl Lucta 191-997-0001 

Sweden 'OC* 020-793 .922 • 

Swiueriand'CCi* 

Trinidad & Tobago 
1STECL4L PHONES ONLY1 
United Kingdom'.CC> 

To call the U 5 using BT 0R00-8 < 5-0' rn 

To oil the U.S using MERCURY omeW-222 
To cill anywhere other ihan ihe US05<>l-800-8tWt 
Uruguay OOtWl -1 

U5. Virpn Is lands 1 CO l-SOO-ttWQoS 

Vatican City -CO m 

Venezuela -5* 800-1114-0 


C«OO-89-0222 

0500-890-222 


WomPHom L 

V. V Frorr, MCI 


Let It Take You Around the World. 


LU-9I OfV*S> 






ill) 


■'"'ll 

% 




--.-... '■: l-. 'u 

- - ”"iiS 

:: ■ • -. ■ : ■* : i/W. 


••; * <:j^S 

• •- ; 

-■“. ■■ 0 ** kfc 

■ •• 

o' • / 

- • . 

■■■ --==•: vV;V&; 

Collgbo 


• " l[ *& 


■_ - ^Wnfig, 


lark SattieofBu]^ 


V””. 8 * 




Peace . 


’ ^ , i 7 


r Bancladefh Ant 1 




-•:• VJ- 


].. IPDATE_ 

f light »#! 


• r ■■ ■*" ’^u\ 


' 9 - '***, 




TMAMERICASL 

State of Emergency < 

Is Declared in Haiti 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, JUNE 13, 1994 


Page3 


r ^ — — . ■-%*- 


So*?. ?.- j-i" "•■ ;•. j4^-. ■;-£: 




m 


...: ■ 3ST 


Action Follows New Sanctions 


Compiled t? Our Staff From Dispatch* 

PORT : AU.PRINCE, Haiti - 
Haiti s military-backed provisional 
president declared a state of cmcr- 
ancy early Sunday, saving the Ca- 
nbbean nation faced ‘'extreme 
danger” and possible "invasion 
and occupation.” 

“Our country is faced with ex- 
treme danger, denigrated, ridi- 
culed, humiliated, strangled." 
Emile Jonassaint said in a broad- 
cast address. “Haiti now risks inva- 
sion and occupation.” 

“A stale of emergency is de- 
clared taking effect immediately ," 
he said, adding that he h 3 d ordered 
the military to prepare “to ensure 
our survival." 

The address by Mr. Jonassaint 
followed President Bill Clinton’s 
announcement in Washington las t 
Friday of new measures to further 
isolate Haiti’s military leaders and 
force them to step down. 

The measures include a cutoff of 
U.S. commercial air traffic to Haiti 
beginning June 25 and a ban on 
financial transactions. Mr. Clinton 
and senior American officials have 
also said they could not rule out the 
use of force to restore the demo- 
cratically elected president, the 
Reverend Jean- Bertrand Aristide, 
ousted in a September 1991 coup. 

William Gray, Mr. Clinton’s spe- 
cial envoy to Haiti, said Sunday on 
an ABC News television program 
that the declaration of a state of 
emergency was not worth much. 

“I do not know what that is 
about ,* 1 Mr. Gray said, noting that 
it took place at 2 AM. on a Sunday 


He evaded questions about the 
possibility of a U.S. invasion, say- 
ing be expected the tightened sanc- 
tions would work. 

Mr. Clinton declared that the 
new measures had one purpose: 
“The message is ample: Democra- 
cy must be restored. The coup must 
not endure.” 

The measures were added to a 
sweeping United Nations interna- 


tional oil, arms and trade embargo 
imposed law month. 

Mr. Jonaskaini, 81, did not refer 
directly to Mr. Clinton or the Unit- 
ed States in his rambling speech, 
delivered in French and Creole. 

But speaking of the international 
community in general be said: “If 
they thought we had an atomic 
bomb they would respect us." 

“Haiti does not have an atomic 
bomb, but it has better protectors 
than that,” he 

He did not elaborate but urged 
all Haitians to mobilize in defense 
of their country. He did not detail 
what measures would be undertak- 
en under the state of emergency. 

Mr. Jonassaint was installed by 
the army on May 1 1 in a ceremony 
denounced by the United States 
and other nations as illegal. They 
continue to recognize Father Aris- 
tide, who was ousted by the mili- 
tary in September 1991. 

Mr. Jonassaint said he was 
“ashamed” that he had voted for 
Father Aristide and said the elected 
leader did not represent democra- 
cy- 

Father Aristide, a popular leftist 
priest, won Haiti's first free elec- 
tions in December 1990 with a 
landslide. 

Mr. Jonassaint’s appointment 
formalized the military's break in 
negotiations with the United Na- 
tions for an end to the crisis. 

Mr. Jonassaint’s message was 
broadcast after state television fin- 

the movie about the"l>bay inva- 
sion. and a reading of Haiti’s act of 
independence: 

The army-backed government 
has been careful to prevent a bla- 
tant provocation of foreign powers. 
Radio reports, however, nave indi- 
cated that the government is con- 
sidering closing the airport several 
days before US. and Canadian jet- 
liners halt commerical flights to 
Haiti cm June 25. 

Both American and Canadian 
embassies have urged (heir nation- 
als to leave by then. (Reuters, AP) 








POLITICAL NOTES 



mm 




m 



V ■■ 


>/v. 


L>«. k'f a. 1 rV 4 .*%_iinl Pit* 

Emperor AkUrito and Empress Mtcbiko greeting a basket maker in Charleston. South Carolina. 

‘ Admirable Question, ’Akihito Says 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 


Scanners Hiat Err 
At Checkout Counter 

A growing number of con- 
sumers are complaining about 
frequent errors on the dectron- 
ic scanners used by retailers to 
ring up prices, The Washington 
Post reports. Many experts say 
it is costing consumers more 
than $1 bQhoc a year. 

A 1993 study by a marketing 
professor at the University of 
California, Los Angeles, found 
an error rate of about 9 percent, 
with most of the mistakes favor- 
ing the stores. 

Other scattered studies have 
found error rates ranging from 
2 percent or 3 percent to 15 
percent, depending on the store, 
the land of merchandise and 
-whether the items were on sale 
or regularly priced. 

“It’s a problem wherever 
we’ve looked,” said Ken Butch- 
er, US. weights and measures 
coordinator for the National 
Institute of Standards and 

Technology- 

Retailers say the nrispriong 
is not deliberate: They cite the 
huge quantity of numbers that 
must be entered into the elec- 
tronic systems as the cause. Mr. 

Butcher attributes the problem 
to sloppy practices. Some con- 
sumer advocates say retailers 
are intentionally chea ting cus- 
tomers. Travis Plunkett, a lob- 
byist for the New York Public 
Interest Research Group, says, 
“Some store managers axe using 
t fa-m to pad their profit mar- 

gin.” 

Ultimately, according to 
most expats, the most impor- j 

tant pricing-checking mecha- 

m«n u an alert consumer. In 
fact, the more careful the shop- 
pers, the fewer errors made by 
the retailers. 

About People 

Gavin WKfcett, the author of 
“GuemllaKindness —A Man- 
ual of Good Worts. Kmd Acts 

and Thoughtful Deeds, was 
mugged by three teen-agers 

j&gsess 

SfflSfS 

kindness of strangers, Mr. 
Wbitsett, 49, said through a »“ 
tured lip. He thanked the pohee 
officers and boeratol staff me^ 

hers who hdped him. As for the 


TO OUR 


M 

bhSum 

ft's never 
been easier 
fo subscribe 
and save. 
Justcdf 


teens: “They could have taken 
my bicycle,” he sad. “Thai’s 
good news." 

ShortTakes 

Rides for membera of car 
pools, suggested by The New 
York Times, include: 

• Drivers shall keep their 
back seats dear of dirty laun- 
dry, Burger King containers 
and empty beer cans. 

• For passengers, never make 
remarks like ‘That puddle sure 
looks like oQ to me,” “What’s 
that stran^ sound coining from 
your engine?" or “Isn’t that a 
new dent?" 

• “Quick stops” for dry 
cleaning are expressly fortnd- 
den.” 

• Commuters must never ask 
other conmmters “for legal, 
medical or investment advice.” 

Eat more cafehna, says a pan- 
d of experts convened by the 
National institutes of Health. 
They said optimal caldum in- 
take is just as critical for chil- 
dren and young adults, includ- 
ing men, as it is for older 
women, trim are especially vul- 
nerable to the brittle bone dis- 
order known as osteoporoas. 
The panel said “nrilHons of peo- 
ple in the United States are sot 
getting enough caldum in their 
diets.* An eight-ounce (25 cen- 
tiliter) glass of milk provides 
about 300 milligrams of the cur- 
rent recommended optimal in- 
take of 1.200 vo 1,500 mffli- 
gramsaday. 

Among the sties of a big new 
MGM musical, “Thai’s Eater- 
tainment fir are Judy Garland 
and Fred Astaire. James Dean 
and Marilyn Monroe are fea- 
tured in ads for khaki clothing. 
A Jlim Hendrix album is on tie 
Billboard chart of best-seUeis. 
'There may be no second acts 
hi American lives," Jim Koch 
reports in The New York 
Times, “but after the third-act 
curtain falls, there is a fourth. 
And it's big box office.” It also 
enriches the hebs of dead celeb- 
rities. Many .states, including 
California, now have laws pro- 
tecting the rights to use famous 
names. So in many such cases, 
“death is a great career move.” 

Gem of the Day, from the 
Ann Landers advice column: 
Never put off until tomorrow 
what can be avoided altogether. 
International Herald Tribune. 


The CASH MACHINE 

instant printing T-shirts, coftee- 
mugs, posters and much more- 


0800 17538 






By William Booth 

Washington Past Service 

ATLANTA — Emperor Akihito 
and Empress Micbiko did not get 
through their first day of their two- 
week tour of the United States 
without being reminded that Amer- 
icans have their own ideas about 
royally. 

At a brief reception Friday at the 
Martin Luther King Center for 
Non violent Action, in whm once 
was the heart of black Atlanta, the 
rabble-rousing Reverend Hosea L. 
Williams, a former city commis- 
sioner and state representative, 
confronted the couple and told 
them be considered the Japanese a 
racist people. 

ll was one of the few spontane- 
ous moments in this most-scripted 
of days, filled with careful mutual 
smile s as Atlantans put on a dis- 
play of Southern hospitality and 
the emperor and his wife respond- 
ed with imperial restraint. 

A hovering courtier stepped in to 
translate Mr. Williams’s remarks, 
although the emperor and empress 
speak fluent English. Their smiles 
— constant and encouraging and 
almost warm — suddenly froze. 
The Empress Michiko in a whi te 
brocade dress accented with a sil- 
ver and pearl brooch, gripped her 
white gloves and peered at Mr. Wil- 
liams, as if to decipher a Zen puz- 
zle. 

“1 found the Japanese people to 
be very disrespectful of African 
Americans,” said Mr. Williams, 
pressing a pamphlet entitled. “Who 
is Hosea L Williams?" into their 
hands. He told them that blacks 
buy $13 billion in Japanese prod- 
ucts — “but not a angle black 
American has a Japanese fran- 
chise,” be said. 

In his soft, almost inaudible Eng- 
lish, Emperor Akflnto, whose visit 
to (be King cater was designed to 
demonstrate Japanese respect for 
black Americans, rfianiraH Mr. Wil- 
liams for “bis admirable question.” 

Other guests quickly stepped for- 
ward to tdl the emperor and his 
wife bow honored they were to re- 
ceive them on the couple’s first visit 
to the American South. 

“Come again any time,” said one 
woman, squeezing the Empress Mi- 


Car Bomb Kills 5 
At Luxury Hotel 
In Guadalajara 

Washington Past Service 

MEXICO CITY — A car bomb 
exploded outside a luxury hotel in 
Guadalajara, Mexico’s second- 
largest city, killing five people and 
wounding nearly a dozen. 

Guadalajara has been the scene 
of violence between rival narcotics- 
trafficidng organizations- A year 
ago, a Roman Catholic cardinal 
was shot and killed in what the 
police said was a case of mistaken 
identity during a battle between 
Mexico’s two largest drug cartels. 

A debuiame ball was in progress 
at the hold Saturday when the 
Mast occurred. No ooe took re- 
sponsibility for the blast 

In a separate incident last Fri- 
day, the police defused a small 
bomb at a gasoline station irTTux- 
tia Gutifarez, the capital of Chia- 
pas state, where a peasant uprising 
by the Zapatista National Libera- 
tion Army has been in suspension 
since shortly after it began on Jan. 

Two car bombs exploded in 
Mexico Chy early in the conflict, 
ranging damage to underground 
parking lots. Until the Chiapas up- 
rising began, car bombs were rare 
in Mexico. Zapatista leaders and 
opposition politicians have warned 
of nationwide violence unless the 
government conducts fair presi- 
dential election on Aug. 21. 


EU1O0 Cidi per da? pnw M n Cofaemufl 

cystatns from £5£00, tHtfla and T-aNrts 
syettme tan £9 .SCO- SpacU badqmn* 
{Mdc photaaj m dwvd M computer and 
can be eonttiod WA your cuwxnan por- 
trait. Syssm* are easy k> iranapon ki ha 
image ear. No bums saBng iMdmd. Sat, 
9 hi foot fraOo ana and ewtomera am 
to you - ahnpto to opanla - no spedW ipiaS- 
Ccaflona required - Immedlata delivery. 
(VWwifaato pitoo for meton). 

KBU DepL EB1, Poattach 17W«. 
MOOT FranMJRMaln 
TaL *«fr4M47B06 
Tata «T 371? Teia ta M» B W 7 S2174 


chiko's arm. “You’re welcome any 
time in Atlanta.” 

Under Japan’s postwar constitu- 
tion, written by U.S. occupation 
forces, the royal couple’s role is 
restricted lo “symbol of the state.” 
But their trip clearly had political 
overtones, as demonstrated by Mr. 


Williams’s polemics and by the 
royal couple’s decision not to stop 
at a Pearl Harbor memorial when 
they visit Hawaii later in the trip. 

Mostly, however, the couple's 
first day in the United Stales went 
as intricately as planned by the 
Imperial Household Agency. 


Trooper Disputes Jones Story 

WASHINGTON — An Arkansas state trooper, 
Danny Ferguson, disputed key allegations in Paula 
Corbin Jones’s lawsuit against President Bill Clin- 
ton. saying in court documents that Ms, Jones had 
praised Mr. Clinton as sexy, had volunteered her 
phone number and had offered to be his girlfriend. 

In a six-page response to Ms. Jones’s civil 
charges that Mr. Clinton pressured her to perform 
a sexual act. Mr. Ferguson confirmed Ms. Jones’s 
assertion that he took her to then-Govemor Clin- 
ton's bold room in May 1991. But be denied he 
told Ms. Jones that Mr. Clinton had wanted to 
meet her or that he had slipped her a piece of paper 
with Mr. Clinton’s room number. He also denied 
that Ms. Jones had been upset when he saw her 
afterward. 

While Ms. Jones has portrayed herself as a low- 
level state employee who naively agreed to meet 
the governor in hopes of a better job, Mr. FeTguson 
said she was at first interested in a relationship, 
then money. 

Mr. Ferguson’s response revealed nothing that 
Mr. Clinton might have said to him, only Mr. 
Ferguson’s conversations with Ms. Jones. That left 
some holes in his account of what transpired at a 
state conference at the Excelsior Hotel in Little 
Rode. Arkansas. While Mr. Ferguson denied Mr. 
Jones’s claim that be had approached her with an 
invitation from Mr. Clinton, for instance, he did 
not explain bow he had come to escort Ms. Jones to 
Mr. Clinton’s suite. 

The acknowledgment that be took Ms. Jones to 
Mr. Clinton’s room “confirms a critical contention 
of Ms. Jones,” said her lawyer. (W?) 


House Loves Those Freebies 

WASHINGTON — House members kept up 
their frequent-flying ways on the tab of lobbyists 


and other private interests last year even us Con- 
gress moved to impose neu restrictions on what 
critics denounce js free vacations, often in fanev 
resorts. 

Destinations popular with House members in- 
cluded back-to-back charity golf tournaments in 
Utah and Idaho during the congressional recess 
last August and a three-day conference the Tobac- 
co Institute hosted in Palm Springs, California, 
1993 financial disclosure forms' showed. 

Most of die 21 members who took free jaunts to 
the Utah Congressional Golf Challenge in Park 
City. Utah, sponsored by Senator Orrin G. Hatch. 
Republican of Utah, or the Danny Thompson 
Memorial Golf Tournament in Sun Valley. Idaho, 
or both, brought along their spouses at no extra 
cost. Congressional couples also predominated at 
the Tobacco Institute outing, which more than a 
dozen members attended. 

Two members of the House Democratic leader- 
ship, the majority whip, David E Bonior of Michi- 
gan, and the Democratic Caucus vice chairman. 
Vic Fazio of California, rook their spouses along 
on a Fourth of July weekend trip to Cape Cod in 
Massachusetts and had all expenses picked up by 
the Washington lobbying firm of CampbeM-Raupe 
Inc. 

Under the House version of a lobbying reform 
bill stuck in a House-Senate conference, members 
of Congress would be barred from accepting free 
trips from lobbyists or lobbying firms, although 
their clients could stillprovide them directly. Both 
Mr. Bonior and Mr. Fazio supported the legisla- 
tion on a 3 15 to 1 10 vote in March. f WP) 


Quote/Unquote 

President Bill Clinton on the welfare reform bill 
that he will unveil this week: 

“This is something the Bubbas of America and 
the liberals can get together on.” (AP) 


GI Families Fighting Wage Gap Turn to Food Stamps 


By Eric Schmiti 

Nevt York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Like other airmen at Hickam Air 
Force Base in Honolulu. 21 -year-old Jason Edwards worries 
about tensions faraway in North Korea that could erupt into 
fighting and involve his logistics. 

But Airman Edwards has more immediate concerns as 
wdL He is worried about bow to feed his wife, Beth, 22, and 
their two small children on his total pay and allowances of 
51, 330 a month. In desperation, the Edwardses fast month 
began drawing 522ft a month in food stamps to get bv. 

“It’s a very tight squeeze for us." Mrs. Edwards said. “We 
haven’t bought any steaks since we’ve been here, and when- 
ever I want to cook something with ham, I substitute Spam 
for it.” 

In a trend that has senior Pentagon officials deeply trou- 
bled. an increasing number of military families are turning to 
food stamps to make ends meet. Three-quarters of America's 
enlisted forces earn less than 530,000 a year, and the gap 
between civilian and military wages is growing. 

To be sure, no one ever joined the military to g« rich. Bui 
neither did they expea to have to go on welfare. 


Military officials wony that a growing demand for food 
stamps and other government assistance may signal larger 
personnel problems in a culture that preaches self-reliance 
and self-discipline. 

The overall number of troops on food stamps is very small 
and difficult to measure because the government does not 
track military recipients. 

About 3 percent of the 1.7 million service members qualify 
for food stamps and 1 percent, or about 17,000. receive them 
monthly, according to a 1992 study by the Defense and 
Agriculture Departments. 

Nonetheless, the Defense Department said the total value 
of food stamps redeemed at military commissaries increased 
to 527.4 million Iasi year from 524 5 million in 1992. includ- 
ing retired military recipients. 

Food donation centers are bustling at bases from Hawaii 
to Florida. And in Georgia’s Liberty County, which serves 
Fort Stewart, 30 percent of the 2,400 households receiving 
food stamps each month are military families. 

Top military officials voice concern that Pentagon budget 
cuts affecting pay could impair both morale and retention of 
service personneL The Clinton administration tried to freeze 


military’ salaries this year and increase them only by 1.5 
percent for next year. 

Congress instead approved a 22 percent increase for this 
year and will probably approve a 2.6 percent raise for next 
year, but neither raise will keep pace with inflation, which is 
about 3 percent. 

“We cannot expect service members to lay their lives on 
the line when back home tbeir families have to rely on food 
stamps lo make ends meet,” said A dmira l W illiam Owens, 
the deputy chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 

The huge majority of service members on food stamps are 
sergeants or below m the army. Marine Corps and air force 
and petty officers or below in the navy. The f amili es usually 
have more than two children, and the spousedoes not work. 
Very few officers qualify for food stamps. 

In a culture that promotes a fierce ethic of taking care of 
one’s own. soldiers’ reluctant embrace of food stamps and 
other financial assistan ce has wounded mili tary leaders. 

“We’ve always told our soldiers drat well provide for 
them a quality of life that’s at least equal to the civilians for 
whom they serve,” Richard Kidd, the sergeant major of the 
army, the senior enlisted soldier, said in an interview. “It’s 
getting, tough to do that now.” 


Away 

From Politics 

• A croise ship gangway broke 
from its supports at a Juneau. 
Alaska, dock, fatally injuring a 
tourist who fell into the water 
and hit her head on the side of 
the ship. 

• A freight train derailed and. 
spilled hydrochloric acid into 
a river 'at Eastland, Texas, 
spreading harmful fumes and 
forcing the evacuation of 
about 50 people. 

• A snail jet doing a low-alti- 
tude maneuver crashed and 
exploded over Mount Clem- 
ens, Michigan, in from of 
thousands of spectators at a 
D-Day anniversary air show. 
The pilot was killed. No one 
on toe ground was injured. 

• A mail-order company that 
peddled pills promising “new 
heights of sexual perfor- 
mance" for men, even those 
who are frequently impotent, 
was closed by a federal court 
in Newark, New Jersey. Au- 
thorities say the “Nitrocci 
HP” pills — which cost S24.95 
for a one-month supply — do 
not work and could aggravate 
kidney problems. 

• A measure that would weak- 
en some of California’s tough 
anti-smoking laws appeared 
headed for the November bal- 
lot after a judge refused to 
allow action aimed at blocking 
iL 

• A suspended policeman was 

convicted of shooting three 
teen-agers to death in Foster, 
Rhode Island, including one 
who had filed a brutality law- 
suit against him. ap 


Mitsubishi Pajero 

European 

Specification At Very 


s mm 


GRAND’ ENTREE 







Mitsubishi Pajero GLS 
SWB 2500 cc. Turbo Diesel 
Inter Coder, with power 
steering, central locking 
power windows. Alio 
wheels, variable shock 
Absorbers, ABS Brakes. 
A.C., Heater, Rear spoiler. 

1 2 Doors, super quick glow. 

| Head lamp level device and 
i multi meter wilh electronic 
compass. 

For further details contact: 

AL HABTOOR MOTORS 
Mitsubishi Distributor 
The G.M. Mr. Naim Hadi 
Head Office: Dubai, 

Tel : 009714-691110. 

Fax : 009714 - 692545. 

Tlx : 48855 HMMMC EM. 

P.O. Box : 19879 Dubai. UAE. 



VjJ rand Entree - a great moment, a great entrance, a grea't new beginning. 
R..-li.»ru in new .-pL-iiJxiir. thi- I.vymlary CiKAN’D HOTEL i* rvi'jvnfnj it? doors. ANA GRAND HOTEL WlElN - a world of luxury 

lli.il (Vatin.-- for ill,* I:m,iy traditional Im-phality t v»rnLiu«l with the comfort and couwiiivncc of rftatc-uf-thir-jrt technology, 

MOKE OE YESTERDAY ■ MORE OF TOMORROW ■ MORE OF VIENNA. 






Page 4- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. JUNE 13, 1994 




New MPs Will Press for Deeper Integration 


By Tom Buerkje 

Iitteraanivuif Kerch! Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The campaign 
for the European elections on" Sun- 
day was easy to ignore, but ihe new 
European Parliament will be any- 
thing out. 

Leaders of ihe new Euro MPs are 
determined lo wield ihe enhanced 
powers given lo ihe Parliament last 
year by Lhe Maastricht Treaty, be- 
ginning with lhe approval Lhis fall 
of a new European Commission, 
the executive agency of the Europe^ 
an Union. 

More importantly, in the long 
run the new Parliament will lead a 
powerful voice for deeper EU inte- 
gration in the run-up to a 1996 
intergovernmental conference, 
which will reform the bloc's institu- 
tions to work for a Union likely to 
grow from today's 12 member 
countries to 20 or more. 

the two biggest party groupings 
fa Parliament the Socialist bloc 
and the Christian Democrat-domi- 
nated European People's Party, be- 
lieve their’ activism will correct 
what some see as a lack of demo- 
cratic foundations in the Union, 
which they say is to blame for the 
public's rising disenchantment 
with European "cooperation. 

"The major issue is to open up 
the Union to proper democratic 
control and scrutiny." said Pauline 
Green, leader of the Labor Party' 
candidates that were projected to 
dominate Britain's representation 
in the new Parliament. 

Dismissing the reticence about 
European integration espoused by 
Prime Minister John Major's Con- 
servatives. she added. “The people 
want a Europe that is about them 
— that isn't just a deregulated free- 
trade area.” 

That theme got further support 
on Sunday with the overwhelming 
endorsement by Austrian voters for 
theiT country’s entry into the 
Union next Jan. 1. The surprisingly 


. ' : j /T-l r : 


The 4 u Press 

NEW YORK — Rabbi Mena- 
chem Schneerson. the charismatic 
who built the Lubavitcher sect into 
a major force in Judaism, died Sun- 
day. He was 92 yean old. 

Rabbi Schneerson. whose most 
fervent followers believed he would 
be revealed as the Messiah, was the 
seventh in a dynastic line of Luba- 
viicher rebbcs. or grand rabbis, 
dating to 18th century Russia. He 
was childless and left no designated 
successor. 

He had suffered a stroke in 
March 1992 and another March 10. 
He died as a result of the second 
stroke, a hospital spokeswoman 


strong 66 percent vote in favor was 
expected to give a strong boost 10 
membership supporters in Finland. 
Sweden and Norway, which will 
hold referenda in October and No- 
vember. All four of those countries 
will bring to the Union their tradi- 
tions of active government, espe- 
cially in the areas of health, envi- 
ronmental, labor and social welfare 
standards. 

Mrs. Green’s call for more de- 
mocracy and European integration 
will carry great weight because she 
was expected to have the strongest 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

voice in the new Parliament. She is 
widely tipped to become the leader 
of the Socialist group. 

The new body will set a notable 
democratic milestone. As a result 
of unification — which swelled 
Germany’s EU-leading population 
to SO million, nearly a third more 
than Britain, Italy or France — 

German voters will send 99 mem- 
bers to the new Parliament, com- 
pared with 87 for the other big 
members. It will be the first EU 

institution to give Germany a 
greater weight than the other large 
states. 

That is a key precedent at a time 
when many EU officials are calling 
for the 1996 conference to Intro- 
duce some form of population- 
based voting rights in the EU 
Council of Ministers, the represen- 
tatives of national capitals that 
makes the bloc's major decisions. 
Over all, the new chamber will have 
567 members, up from 518. 

Like its predecessors, the new 
Parliament is likely to lake its 
strongest stance in defense of its 
own growing powers, the issue that 
unites all party groups. 

Mrs. Green said that would be- 
gin this fall with a close scrutiny of 
nominees for the new European 


Rabbi Schneerson was the first 
Lubavitcher rebbe to receive a sec- 
ular education. Under his leader- 
ship. the sect became the most out- 
ward-looking of the Hasidic 
groups, constructing giant Hanuk- 
kah menorahs in public places, 
proselytizing among less-pious 
Jews and televising his speeches by 
satellite. 

As a result, the Lubavitchers be- 
came the most influential Hasidic 
group. The sect has more than 
1,000 education and cultural cen- 
ters around the globe. Estimates of 
the number of followers vary wide- 
ly, ranging from the tens of thou- 
sands to a million or more. 

Within the sect. Rabbi Sebneer- 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COULD AFFECT 
YOUR UFE: 


Jtsffiss as® > 

Ree&v&rr 3s& Ssss^jjm? \ 

Nstp €&$erasmeB$i m Japeot ■ % 

FCllOW THE WORLD EVERY DAY IN THE IHT 


Subscribe now 
and save up to 



off the 
cover price 


CALL US TOLL-FREE 

AII51HA: M4031S5 LUXEMBOURG 0800 2705 

BEGUM. 0 800 1 7538 SWITZBUAND-. 155 57 57 

FRANCE 05 437 ±37 THE NETHERLANDS: 06 022 5158 

GERMANY 0130 848585 UNCTH) KINGDOM: 0800 89 5965 

O send in the coupon below. 


CMHr+Cuiranrv 
Auwu ► 

Sc'TMn 

Ponmart 

FiftoW 

Franc* 

■i'9run»* 

Gn-n 5nUir 

Grew* 

(ream 

IUh 

It. iw 
rt)lr*T3ni5 

rfcnvjv 

3 cr.-.lll 

5 mit . 

- Mi'-! dcin. tjMg 

iMnw 

- ■ionwr. 

Sjrfjetiar*: 

figsi rt EurstK ei CO 

C3 N AJtxl ifl-me. 

Frerqi A.lnCTV, U.ag4 £<a 

■3<j» Sa'es C*rara) and 
5-jun Are-recj 

flaffoiAhca 


12 months 
* 2 months 
FREE 


.»•; • 

SflfWtOB 
tori year 


6 months 
+ 1 month 
FREE 

3 months 
+ 13 FREE 
Imm 

3^00 

ixaa 

1300 

1X60 

1J00 

700 

1X70 

590 

385 

210 

IIS 

85 

41.000 

22.000 

12S 

275.000 

7.700 

420 

80 

150X00 

4X00 

230 

25.000 

14X00 

26.500 

27X00 

14X00 

14JSO 

1JOO 

900 

1X00 

1.000 

335 

1B5 

SBS 

>45 

345 

190 

430 

495 

23S 

270 


" For <nti>rmj &} n concerning hantS-dmrary m mag* German fifties caft <ot free IHT 
Germany -it 01 KW4 45 B5 of lax 10831 175413. UntJet Geman regulations. a Z-wtek 
free cerod g. ygnl-d lor jd new outer;. 

Yes, I wont to start receiving the IHT. This is the subscription term I prefer 
[cheo'. appropriate boxes): _ 

□ 12 months (364 issues in all with 52 bonus issues). £ 

□ 6 months {182 issues in all with 26 bonus issues). 

IT 3 months {91 issues in all with 13 bonus issues). 

B My check is enclosed (payable to the International Herald Tribune). 
Please charge my: o American Express □ Diners Club □ VISA 
D MasterCard Q Eurocard □ Access 

Credit card charges will be made in French Francs at current exchange rates. 

CARDACCT NO ■ 

EXP. DA 7c SIGNATURE 

FOR BUSINESS ORDERS, P1EASE INDICATE YOUR V&I NUMBBL 

jlKT VAT number FR747 3202 11 261 1 
Mr._i Mis _> Miw FAMILY NAME 

FIRST NAME -- 

PERMANENT ADDPf S3 -j HOME D BUSINESS 


art / code. 

rQUNIRT, 


Return your cornpleted rowan to: Subscription Manager. _ 

IHT. l&l Avenue Chaf£-do-Goufle. 92521 Ced^France- “ 
Fax: 33.1.46 37 06 51 -W 33.1.46 37^6^ - 

This ofe- axairss August 31. 1994. and is oaibbte to ftow subscribers only. 5 
“7 ft t k Lvnjt\.iTl">'.u rw « 4 


Commission, which will succeed | 
the commission headed by Jacques 
Delors in January. 

She criticized the current back- 
room maneuvering among EU p: 
leaders over Mr. Delores succo 
sot, which has Prime Minister 
Jean-Luc Dehaene of Belgium vy- 
ing with Prime Minister Ruud Lub- 
bers of the Netherlands. 

“It's a nonsense that the presi- 
dent of the European Commission 
should be decided in this way. 
wheeling and dealing between poli- 
ticians." she said. 

In addition, legislators are deter- 
mined to have a real voice in the 
next stage of EU reforms, a voice 
that they lacked when the Maas- 
tricht Treaty was drawn up three 
years ago. 

Wilfried Martens, the former 
Belgian prime minister who heads 
the European People's Party, said 
one of Parliament's top issues 
would be to ensure that it gives 
citizens a say in preparations for 
the 1996 intergovernmental confer- 
ence. 

EU leaders arc expected to agree 
at their meeting in Corfu. Greece. ~ 
later this month lo set up a panel of 
national representatives to prepare 
the conference agenda, and Ger- -i 
many is demanding ihat Portia- ' 
meal be ejven two seats at the ta- 
ble. 

Whether Parliament can uniie on 



““ ~c". p' 

LISTEN: j * 

Give Us Your Egr 


Waffgaa* Rwav Renter* 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl right, waiting his turn to vote Sunday in his hometown, O^erehehn, Germany, for die European Parliament 


tain Harold A. WitaniiSiWaf 
of undersea survdBanifc^tt ms 
naw’s Space and Na^. 

Systems Command, said ms®: fa-. 
iCTvicw. "But personally.-! dank it 
would not be a very *w UMp 
decision to let sysua e© ifa- 

A few federal officios are tqang 
w find a remedy tbat wooid pool 
money from various Ca^sdas to • 
save much of the system for scao- 
tificstijdiesandasafespfwweqh 
on in case Easi-West 
ever renewed tot two in- 

formal talks have produced fide. . 

The Defense and OmBnacrD^- 
panments are to b^in ttstadjem 
July to identify ways .^^n^ 
costs, and Vice Preshtejt Al Go»»: 
said to have shown some interttt m . 
trying to keep the systo amt: 

i The navy is obvicfflSy.m:^ tcin^ s 

ble bind and needs to save,7^il2' 
Walter Munk, an oceano^aphera* 
tbeScripps insiiwuonofOcraEto- 
raphy in La JoBa, Calif«nja, spaj 
is measuring ocean tempeiasmes 
with Sosus. “But 1 thinlul.wra5dbe 
a nristaketo precipitously 4dfae^te 
airays down, if only bccauscrf tbe 
dance a pofitical chao®: atfejs- . 


such policy issues as employment is about 14.5 percent of the vote in 

less clear. The Socialists have coop- iinguisticalJv dirided Brussels. 


S Wide Protest Against Unpopular Governments fi rmans Mark 

roatinued f.tmi Paste 1 repon from the state election pared to 130 seats for the center- wtt Dnllrtft, 

Coatmued from Page l nght European Peoples' Party. WTOIlfi OallOtS 

.1 . * TL . .... CAvnli^t Dnptc Iia 4 1 Li in visa .'uiffli-iinn LJ 


crated with the European People's 
Pany in the past but appear less 
inclined to do so in the future, 
especially if Silvio Berlusconi's 
Forza Italia joiru, the Christian- 
Democratic bloc. 

‘The Socialist group jre very un- 
happv working with people who 
are in alliance with Fascists." Mrs. 


Ireland's main coalition govern- 
ment party. Fiorina Foil, looked set 
to net seven of Ireland's 15 seats. 
Fine Gael, the largest opposition 
group, was set to take four or five 
scats, with the Green Pam 1 taking 
one. 

In the Netherlands, the Christian 


Green said, referring to Mr. Berlus- Democrats were likely to win about 
coni’s Italian partners, the right- 31 percent of the vote, and 10 of the 


wins National Alliance. 


25 seats, according to a preliminary 


son was regarded with awe. Follow- 
ers consulted him on whom to mar- 
rv, what career to pursue, w here to 


welfare and publishing arms. In 
1950, his father-in-law died, and 
Rabbi Schneerson succeeded him 


live. He steadfastly insisted that the early the following year. 


arrival of the Messiah was near. He 
never said so himself, but some 
believed he himself would be re- 
vealed as the Messiah. 


Edward Kienholz. 65, Dies. 
Individualistic LI.S. Sculptor 
Edward Kienholz. 65. whose 


He was the author of numerous elaborate, often macabre sculptural 
volumes of commentary and was tableaux were savage indictments 
fluent in 10 languages. When he of American life, died on Friday at 
spoke — often for six hours at a the Bonner Genera] Hospital' in 
time — his speeches were broadcast Hope, Idaho. He had homes and 
to Lubavitchers around the world studios in Hope as well as in Berlin 
and every word was published. and Houston. The cause was heart 
Rabbi Schneerson himself never failure, said a friend, 
visited Israel in fact, he never Mr Wi*»nhni7 wa« a nwmher of a 


report from the state election 
board. 

The governing Socialist Party of 
Prime '"Minister* .Andreas Pa pan - 
dreou in Greece appeared to be 
comfortably ahead of the conserva- 
tive New Democracy party, with 
about 38 to 40 percent of the vote 
and 10 of the 25 Greek seats. But 
this was down from the 46.8 per- 
cent of the vote that the Socialists 
scored in national elections in Oc- 
tober. 

In Luxembourg, results in na- 
tional elections pointed to a corre- 
sponding victory of the governing 
Social Christian' Pany in the Euro- 
pean poll. 

In Britain. Prime Minis ter John 
Major was expected to suffer one cf 
Lhe worst political defeats in mem- 
ory after the governing Conserva- 
tives lost in five by-elections on 
Thursday. Polls indicated that the 
Conservatives, who had ?2 seats in 
the last Parliament, would do well 
to get double figures. 

European Socialists, the largest 
political group in the oid Parlia- 
ment. predicted they would make 
small gains in the new assembly, 
which has 567 seats instead of 5! 8 
to accommodate the entry of for- 
mer East Germany into the Euro- 
pean Union. 

The Socialists estimated they 
would have 205 to 212 seats com- 


pared to 130 seats for the center- 
right European Peoples' Party, 
which had 162 seats in the outgoing 
assembly. 

.Although the Treaty on Europe- 
an Union, which came into effect 
Nov. 1. was widely criticized for an 
excess of bureaucracy and a deficit 
of democracy, many citizens failed 
to grasp the opportunity to vote, or 
voted on purely national issues. 
Apathy was rife in virtually every 
country, yet outside the Union, 
Austrians voted by a large majority 
to join the EU on Jan. ). 

Jacques Odors, president of the 
European Co mmissi on, said that 
voter abstention was “something 
for governments and us to think 
about." 

“There can be collective Europe- 
an ventures only if the citizens take 
an interest and are convinced that 
the overall direction is the right 
one.” he said after voting in Paris. 

The Maastricht treaty gives the 
European Parliament, which has 
seats in Strasbourg, Brussels and 
Luxembourg, broad powers of co- 
responsihiliiy within the Union. It 
aisc introduced the concept of Eu- 
ropean citizenship. Thus, for the 
first time, citizens of one EU coun- 
try living in another could vote or 
even run for the Parliament. 


Reuters 

BONN — About 268 resi- 
dents of the Eastern German 
town of Ausleben voted in 
v ain on Sunday in a local 
council poll being held togeth- 
er with the European Parlia- 
ment election, German radio 
reported. 

The voters put their marks 
on ballot papers that had ar- 
rived in a package wrongly ad- 
dressed and intended for an- 
other town, local electoral 
authorities said. 

New ballots were brought in 
two hours after the start of 
polling, but officials said there 
was no way of allowing those 
who had used the wrong bal- 
lots to vote again. 


AUSTRIA: 

66% 'Yes 9 to EU 

Continued from Page 1 

chose a new European Pariiamenl. 

It may encourage Swedes, Nor- 
wegians and Finns, who vote on 


sin. i » 

Though Sosus is under siege; 
other treasures of technology. front- 
the Cold War have sucocss&jByl. 
found civilian roles m addition to . 
military duties. 

Early-wanting satellites have - 
spied on meteor blasts in tire atmo- 
sphere, su bma r ine s tewetfiy^t far 
civilian scientists and nuefchr- 
w capon labs have aided whoJeia- 
d us tries, including automobile 
makers looking for new batteries . 
for electric cars. '} • 

For decades, the Sosus system ; 
was so secret the gove rnment al . 
fused to acknowledge its .existences 

In 1963, Sosus data helped mJe -. 
out sabotage or foul play fa the 
cinTring of the Thresher, an ad- 
vanced UJS. submarine that sit 
off Cape Cod, Maurchiise*& 
Close examination of reboftimgpqf 
underwater sounds revealed only , 
tbe airfcmnig ihud of an'siiptbsou- . 
caused by crushing ocean pres- : 
sores, not the sharp report -of. an - 
explosion ' xkr.'r 

In great secrecy, Sosus tracked^: 
submerged Soviet submarine -m . 
1968 as it shattered all previous 
speed estimates for its class by 
chasing the aircraft carrier Enter- 
prise across the Pacific. 

At the Cold War's end^ the navy \ 
began to share the elaborate system 
with civilian researchers. lit 1991, 
federal scientists in Newport, Ore- .. 
goo, began to use Sosus to listen to 
sea quakes, quickly detecting thou- 
sands of them. 

In 1993, tbe scientists monitored 


vtsnea tsraei in tact, ne -never Mr, Kienholz was a member of a „ __ _ 

followers there built as their head- 3KSIS5F K“4 m = e o!lS CLINTON: Tests on AU Fronts 

quarters an exact replica of the ^, raci Fxnressionism c-radualiv 

headquarters in Brooklyn. forsakin^Daimin** in 1'avor of Continued from Page I am frustrated at our mabilir 

His Orthodox views and opposi- scu | plure : His contemporaries in ue Ie bounce bei w«n hizhs and ^ ^ ^ 

tion to a land-for-peace deal rnflu- y me . y nol sensibility, included u ‘ - _.. ., 

enced lsraeh politics. Claes oidenhurz. Donald Judd. -The extreme downside tr.a> , Some Clmton aides say tl 

Lubavitchers lobbied heavily m Dan Flavin, and Robert Irwin. But al! ihe e L^K^d doubu’ ^ su r cf ! “ a 

1988 tor limnson the grand na of wh j, e ^ tt .. ere pin 0 , ihe at him If i ^e lfn r w-r~ u™* ^ 5 ““ ° F Lhe prtfS 
Israeli citizenship to gentiles woo relatively cool Pop or .Nfinimaiist “ - p heucoptsr to scope out 


TTW ftlMH . 7 UUU A UUiJ. "MV VU _ , . . > • 

membership later this year, and ^ exploove /tny of a deqwra 
help open up membership possibO- vofamc erapnon ani dsenl asraaU 
ities fa future years for the fanner ^ re ^ rch . ^ 


Israeli citizenship to gentiles who relatively cool Poo or Minimalist 
were convened to Juaaism bv non- arl movera ems. Mr. Kienholz. who 
Orthodox rabbis. Other Jewish established his career in Los 


_ , , r, : r, — \ . , jji iiiuvciuwjo. i»u. rucuuuu- _ -n. -l 

Orthodox rabbis Other Jewish first established his career in Los 

leaders enuetzed Rabm Schneer- remained laraelv a srvLLv ^“wf oi™ 

son for this stance. tic Toner drawn to heated suhiecis semor sajd Wr - 

He was bom_ April 18. 1902. in ^ work combined elemerJis of 


needed to "build a wall" between 

the Ukrairtianrityof Nikolaev, sort S u^sm. ExpVessfanis^'‘Pop. S“ C 

of a rabbi anc a greai-grandson or .l. teehaiaue of assemblac- sian^r. both b> a re^o.u o« aLf.it. e- 

was a nrodtev. exhausting the 1 . tl„ •. \aiues os hep: esses x.elfie «e:onn 


was a prodigy, exhausting the walk-in scale. The basic unit of his ' ,eu * s ' KVtm 

knowledge of a senes of tutors. , rt was lhe foun j ohiecl and the crime btil. 

At age 21, be met the sixth Luba- r w __ . , ^ For now. however, they are frus- 

vitcher rebbe. Rabbi Joseph Isaac G ‘ . WflGara MarstoR 75. an lrale d by their failure to reap the 
Schneersohn, a distant relative. In a^ior and producer political benefits of steady eco- 

1929, he married the rebbe's ^ osc j£ ur *S rcs “ iclu “ t : lhe nomic improvement and a legisla- 
daughter Chava Moussia. But he dancer Ginger Rogers and the ac- five scorecard that includes such 
also took an almost unprecedented |TJJ S M ,ch «j e Morgan, died corae-from-behind victories as 
step into the secular world, study- Wednesday, family announced House passage of the assault wear- 
ing engfaeenng at the University rf Sa'i^day m Paris. Tbe place and oas ban. 

Berlin and the Sorbonne in Paris. caus lJi ,r dealh wcre 130 an " “ We have a very different pollii- 

As the Germans engul/al Eu- n0Utlcc ' L cal imperative than President Bush 

rope. Rabbi Schneerson fauuigral- Herbert Anderson, 77. a movie did.” said Paul BegaJa. a political 


\aiues as he presses welfare rerorre 
and the crime bill. 

For now. however, they are frus- 
trated by their failure to reap the 


Berlin and the Sorbonne in Paris. UCJIU wcrc an " w e have a very- different politi- 

As the Germans engul/al Eu- n0Utlce,:L cal imperative than President Bush 

rope. Rabbi Schneerson fauuigral- Herbert Anderson, 77. a movie did.” said Paul BegaJa. a political 
ed lo the United Slates in 1941. His and stage actor who was best strategist, 
father-in-law had immigrated the known as the owlish father of tele- George Bush had few domestic 
year before. vision’s “Dennis the Menace,” died achievements going into the mid- 

. Rabbi Schneerson was appoint- Saturday fa Palm Springs. Califor- term elections, he said, adding, 
ed head of the sect's executive com- nia. He had suffered a stroke about “This president has so many, it's an 
mitiee, overseeing its educational, two months ago. embarrassment of riches, and yet 1 


am frustrated at our inability to get 
him ihe credit he deserves for 
them." 

Some Clinton aides say they fear 
that missteps, such as' a White 
House aide's use of the presidential 
helicopter to scope out a golf 
course, reports about a disorga- 
nized White House staff and fears 
about Mr. Clintons handling of 
foreign policy, could gel into a gen- 
eralized public dissatisfaction. 

The arid test on the domestic 
from win be whether Congress ap- 
proves a health-care reform bill 
that Mr. Clinton can credibly argue 
passes his test of providing guaran- 
teed insurance for all Americans. 

His advisers see health-care re- 
form as important not only as the 
centerpiece or the domestic agenda 
this year but as a catalyst to °et Mr. 
Clinton credit for other legislative 
successes. 

“I believe if we cun come to clo- 
sure on that, that accomplishment 
will open the door to all the oth- 
ers.” said Mr. Begala. Last year 
NAFTA opened the door to all the 
other accomplishments, he said. 

The downside is obvious. One 
senior White House official said. 


East Bloc. and submetribles to explore the 

In Brussels, the European Com- ^ ^ ihe navy, the National 
mission welcomed Ausina s vote Marine Fisheries Service and the 
md said it was a good sign for the Coast Guard used Sosus to track 
three other candidates. fishing vessels fa the Pacific, to 

We are delighted. Not only de- explore possible enforcement of fa- 
iled. we are very much encour- ternational bans, on drift-net fishr 


lighted, we are very much encour- 
aged by the positive signal from 
Austria,” said Hans Van Den 
Broek, the commissioner who con- 
ducted negotiations with Austria, 
Sw eden, Finland and Norway. 

“After today I have the feeling 
that Europe has become even more 
European.” the former Dutch for- 
eign rmnisier added. 

His fellow commissioner. Karel 
van Mien, of Belgium, said the size 
of the vote was particularly good 
news. 

“1 think it’s an excellent sign 
because it went far beyond what 
was expected." he said. “It will be a 
positive signal as two thirds of the 
population gave a clear sign.” 

(AP, Reuters) 


From 1992 to 1993, biologists 
used Sosos to track the migrations 
of whales, including a single Hue 
whale as it swam. southward from 
Cape Cod to Bermuda, to Florida 
and back to Bermuda, a trek of 
1,700 miles (2.800 kilometers). 

A planned test, to be run by 
Scripps fa California, would mea- 
sure the temperature of tbe ocean. 
Tbe goal is to send sounds from 
underwater speakers across the 1P&V 
rifle at least once a day every day 
for two years. Since sound travds 
faster fa warm water than cold, the 
lest should detect changes fa the 
sound's speed that would reveal 
temperature shifts as subtie as one-, 
hundredth of a degree Fahrenheit. . 


WORKERS: Zhirinovsky Fades 


Continued from Page I minds about him because he had 

itsider inveighing against the e&- ”°“ff hel1 ,” mU& 81,1 ! " 
uK-iuvi nTl izT 6 ^ seemed lo take into account the . 

EjSTsks | 5Sf3. 

’ J S ^ tepartyfoUowersw^dcct- 

“Ivoted for Zhirinovsky myself, ^ 

1 Kll ym frankly" said Ahdrei « 5 SESSl 

ashirin, 28. a power supply spe- £? 1101 co?to0i 

ilisi at the auto plant. “Not be- w_ 

use I was infected with his ideas 

because he talks tough with the s f,m nf 

est, but because he is courageous, ^ on .? 

d I like that very much. STSL'lfZ ^ 

“But now, whether he is making JSLSS 9 ^ 

ool of himself or there are certain n v t ^ Jv ^° r .f rcsi de ^ B ? ns 

rces behind him, we don’t knmT 


"We're going to accomplish a . ^ 

whole lot this year with or without outsider inveighing against the es~ 
health care, but somehow it is going tablished order. 


[UNE8&9 

E1S 94: Client Server Reporting for 
the Enterprise 

Europe's leading ci'nierence and exhi- ' 
bilion co Executive and Management 
Information Systems. A unique 
conference pre^ramme which gather? 1 
many of the world's best thinkers. 
pracrinoners and case studies, with , 
the aim of helping organ isations link I 
EJS to business goals i 

Canua Business InteDlgence 
TeL 081-54*1 1830 
_ Fax: 08 1 -544 9020 ( 

LONDON 


JUNE 9-10 

Latin America: 

A New Investment Partner 

This, the fifth biennial conference on 
Latin America, will freus on trade and 
investment opponumnes 
m the region 
GwiUft 

Brenda Hagerty, 

International Herald Tribune, 
London. 

Tel.: 144 71) S36 4802 
Fax: <44 71) _&360717 

LONDON 


to be crystallized through the lens 
of health care, ultimately." 


For a time, his strategy seemed 
to be succeeding. But if tbe workers 


Mr. Clinton also needs to show fa Togliaiu are any judge, it is 
progress on crime — an issue that working no more, 
has moved to the top of public “I voted for Zhirinovsky myself, 
concents — with passage of a crime IT! tell you frankly," said Andrei 
bill now mired fa disputes over as- Kashirin, 28. a power supply spe- 
sault weapons and procedures for rialist at the auto plauL “Not be- 


un posing the death penalty. 


cause I was infected with his ideas 


IlfLY 27-31 

World Congress - Evolution of Psychotherapy 
The leading clinicians - The relevant approaches - One conference 

Aaron Beck. M D Arnold Lazarus. Ph D Erving Ftolswr, Pti D. 

Alfciert Ellis. Ph. D. Alexander Lowen. M.D Minam Roister. Ph D 

Viktor Frank!, m D.. Ph.D. Cta* Madanes. Lie Psych. Ernest Rossi. Ph.D. 

Euaene Gendlin, Ph D. ludd Marnier. M.D Helm Stierlin. M D.. Ph D 

William Classer. M.O. William Master. M.D. Thomas Siasz, M D. 

Mar. - Colliding. M.S W. lames Masterson. M.D. Paul Watzlawick. Ph.D 

r lairs Crawe. Fti.D. Donald Meichenbaum. Ph.D. Joseph Wolpe. M.D 

lay Haley. M A Adolf Ernst Meyer. M.D.. Ph.D Irv Yafom. M D 

lames Hillman. Ph.D Salvador Minuchin. M.D. Jeffrey leig. Ph D 

Otto Kemberg, M.D. Mara Selvim Palacoli, M.D 


Mr. Clinton will grapple with or because he talks tough with the chm nf atw* _ IBa ~ r;I 

what could be the most difficult West but because he is courageous, 8 L^ easl °^f 

test so far of his foreign-policy and I like that very much. ^ 

leadership — the stalemate with “But now, whether he is making ^ 

North Korea over nuclear inspec- a fool of himself or there are certain 111 ^ res,c ^ er l t B ? ns 

tions — at a time of facreasfaa forces behind him, we don’t know. s f°^ ranIai ^ despite oon- 

public skepticism about his han- Bui the fact is he’s done nothing for !£S 

dling of foreign policy. The out- us." them. Stffl, the attitude of Mr. Zhir- 

come of the Korea standoff could Indeed, fa conversations outside SPIES' ^ s former tockers seems to 


iMfe»muiIiou and Rs^cunuion: M.E.T. Psychotherapie Tagungs GmbH, 
Bernhard Trenkle. Dipl. Psych.. Bahnhofstr. 4. D-73028 Ronweil. Germany; 
Tel. +49-74 1 -4 1 774. Fax: +40-74 1 -4 1 77?.- 


SEPTEMBER 2 1-24 
The Annual Oxford Summit 

h unique opportunity to assess the 
globai business outlook with a 
distinguished group of academics and 
business and financial leaders 

iJWIilX- 

lane Benney. 

International Herald Tribune, 
London 

Tel.: 144 71)836 4802 
Fax: 144 71 }836 071 7 

OXFORD 


HAMBURG 

OCTOBER 17-20 

The American 

Dietetic Association i ADA) 

ADA's 77th Annual meelinc and Exmcaiionwill 
stbresj ib? dancing dynamic cf led ays heafch 
care martiapboe *tich aie opoung new dare 
to: ihe Jiaeus peresaen It win inducfc 
■uachis eft taiLTfiKlunr, irmds. updates on 
ifelatrs; sa'.Tiif,r reKsm and practice letiv 
mqiRS anc an e-Jnbtion wish nearf-,- 400 com- 
Pimesdisptawncgsi's-jf-thwit resources 
equiiSTKW fxd pc«iix^ and educational [cob. 

Cental!- Gerri A. Salvatore. CEM 
Tel.: 312/899-0040 
Fax.- 3 12/899-0008 


ORLANDO. FLORIDA. USA 


come of the Korea standoff could Indeed, fa conversations outside S. 0 ^^ 8 ^ 0111181 ^ seen* *9 

either cement those doubts, per- the factory gales with workers ■ **“*■ 

haps perilously for Clinton's re- young and old, male and female. Sm ? men ,. ‘J 25 410116 nothfag to 

election effort, or go far toward blue collar and professional only ^ 6( 1? „ l / Therefore he 

assuaging them. one man could be found who said “ ■l usl , J “ e Others. 

Korea is a foreign-policy chal- he would vote again for Mr Zhirfa- - ^.trksome to his former 
lenge of a different nature than ovsky. Nol a single woman had panJ5 ?? S 15 what see as his 
others Mr. Clinton has faced. The anything kind to say about him near ‘° i sappearance from the. air- 
North Korean regime's production and several called him a “fascist" WHVC ?' “Moscow aad abroad, he 
of nuclear weapons poses a direct and a “Hitler" As for those who “ a roriure of the media. But 
threat to .American security. Where voted for other parties fa Decern- ^ provmaaI Toghatti. to 

Bosnia, for example, provoked ber. or did not vote at all their ?? e f tenl look for po- 

Americans’ sense of moral outrage, attitudes toward Mr. Zhirinovsky - ■ 0e ¥? 81 “• ™^y ^ 

the Korea crisis harks back to a had only hardened 7 vision, which to a large extent is 

Cold War threat to security. “He’s a blabbermouth,” said Ya- COntro ^ e ” Mr. Ydtsm’s govern- 

“ Ko ^ ea l , he , highest- kov Saiganov. a 56-year-old repair- . w . 


vision, which to a large extent is 
controlled by Mr. Ydtsm’s govern- 
ment, ■ • 


stakes foreign policy challenge the man who (id not vote, “rve never Aitil0u S h Mr. Zhirinovsky does 
president faces.” one senior official heard a angle worthwhile wkwh ® 1 Revision from rizne to 

sdd _ from him.” tone, it is often fa email sound 

Haiti presents another potential On election day last Dec. 12. Mr -*?’ of him bickering 

flashpoint. “Korea and Haiti are Zhirinovsky's liberal Democratic W1 ”« a - ^ Mr. Zhirinovsky 
both concerning for people because Party received 22.S percent of the I!?? m ‘ on fi‘ w foded, unmtem ipt- 
Amencan hves are at at stake," vote in Togliatti fa a crowded field * harangues. There is Hale time 
another senior official said. of 13 parties — precisely the figure 5* t ^ al ° n ^ television news, and 

The^broad qu^uori of Mr. Clio- it received nationwide. w ho control it are hardly 

toH’^characicr” will come up fa Today, an irony of Mr Zhirin- enough to Mr. Zhirinovsky - 

two different ways: when his law- ovsky’s apparent faUfag fortunes t0 **** P^y K> his strength. 

yer pies the first response to the here is that he is befaguBdercut by Li- 

Paula Corbin Jones sexual harass- the very forces that gave rise to his t- , 

US j™ 1 - ^ when Congress popularity fa ih c fi Si plSe: RnS , t J° OW L readwi ln 
holds the first round of Whitewater aans’ poor political education and s n f ver ^ >een easier to subsdr3» 
heanngs, focusing on White House television. an< * SCve with our new toll free 

siafT meetings w,th Treasury De- Many former Zhirinovsky suo- service, 

partment offinals. porters ^ ^ chaEge J ^ Just call us today at 05-437437. 





U-MftV i: 


Si 








^Ksfc 


: ' r -^ 
•;^>u 


•:.^;^S:- 

r - - -O: lar- ,-, *-. 


‘ . r-'-^i * 

i ” ~v. 

rV-sea*. 

*- ; 4 : C2t;i» 

-• TjR£ . 
--•«=&* 

-’ r ^-75: 


' *■»' • -T;.- >^ a 




c:r.-L;* sr 


.- f. :r= <- 
;•_-: i.Aixc 

: :■».•£ c : . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, Jfl'NE 13 ? 1994 


Page 5 


Rwanda’s Rebels Shell Kig ali 
As Government Seeks Safety 

r^HxiWL. n “ 


,1 i£;- •-. >^4 


&ygg 




: « to 'V 

./•• ft?*.?* 

;$£& 

■ ■ 


***** by Our Siaif F»m D-^sst hn 

KIGALI, Rwanda — Fieri* 
fighting between soldiers and re- 
bels raged on Sunday in ihc Rwan- 
dan capital, Kigali, and the interim 
government reircaied into the 
Hutu tribal heartland. United Na- 
tions officers said. 

■ Rwanda Patriotic From “is 
heavily bombarding the center of 
the city, and four bombs landed 
near the Red Cross hospital." said 
the military spokesman of the UN 
Assistance Mission in Rwanda. 
Major Jean-Guy Plaint 
Fighting broke out before dawn 
and died down a few hours later, 
■but the rebel mortaring of govern- 
ment districts went on. 

Most members of the rump gov- 
ernment established after President 
Juvenal Hahyarimana. was killed in 
h rocket attack on his plane on 


Strike Blanks Norw egian TV 

Return 

OSLO fReuters; — About 2 J200 
workers at Norway’s state broad- 
casting company, NRK, started an 


April 6 fieri their scat in an dd members of Congress have protest* 
schod tn Gitaramj as rebels ad* cd the Clinton administration's 
sauced last weds. statement last week that although 

The self-declared president, "*** ? genocide"had occurred in 

Theodore SindikubwabJ. and sev- R^nda,^ all kilbnB there coidd 
eral of his ministers went to the 35 . , 

Lake Kivu village of Kibuve and sWl***®* ^‘hcrately 

then made their wav loGistmvi in 5 raying that the 

“■ ral - UN to aid TgSdc "a 1 Sl'ta 

The president and some minis- would require U.S. and other far- 
ters went about three or four days gjgn intervention under a 1948 in- 
ago and we were told they would be [emational convention, 
there for a week.” Major Plante The rights groups urged the 
said. United Slates to honor its obliga- 

But with the rebels front control- don and act against leaders in 
ling more than hair of Rwanda, it Rwanda of the majority Hutu tribe, 
w as unclear where Mr. Sindikub- which has been accused of carrying 
wabo's iuncran: government would out most of the killings. 


Nigeria’s Political Rift Widens 

Manhunt On for Putative Winner of ’93 Vote 








The Hutu-led -am) and mostly 
Tutsi rebels have not made much 
progress on the bjniefidd nr at the 
negotiating tabic. 

The government forces are well 
entrenched ia the city center and 
have stopped die advances of the 
rebels surrounded the capital. 

The two factions are set to meet 
again Monday at the UN com- 


indefinite strikeSun^' forpav ‘m- P“* “ ^ ^ 


creases in line with those won bv 
1 the main journalists* union last 
year. There was no programming 
•on television, and radio transmis- 
sions were cut to brief hourly news 
bulletins. 


THE ROOSEVELTS: 

An American Saga 

By Peter Collier with David Ho- 
rowitz. 542 pages. $27.50. Simon 
.& Schuster. 

■ Reviewed by 
Jonathan Yardley 

I N the subtitle of “The Rockefel- 
lers: An American Dynasty,” 
. their first collaborative venture in 
.family history, Peter Collier and 
David Horowitz announced the 
breadth and depth of their bio- 
graphical interest. When they 
moved on to the Kennedys, they 
.called their story “An American 
Drama”; the Fords became “An 
American Epic”; now they offer us 
the Roosevelts as “An American 
Saga.” But no matter what noun 
. they choose, the preoccupation 
with dynasties remains constant. 

In “The Roosevelts: An Ameri- 
, can Saga” there is to be sure one 
change of note. The bode is written 
l rf CoBier “with” Horowitz rather 
than by Collier “and” Horowitz. 
.Why this is so is not explained; 

■ Cbffier says only, in his “Author's 
’Note,” that 1 am appreciative to 


■ L’.S. Potation Protested 

Thomas H*. Ltppmon uj The 
Washington Post reported earlier 
from WasAingiun; 

Human-rights groups and some 


The 1948 convention banning 
genocide, which the United States 
signed only in 1989. bars “acts 
committed with the intent to de- 
stroy. in whole or pan, a national, 
ethnical, racial or religious group" 
by violence. Signers ore obliged to 
“prevent and punish’* such acts. 

A State Department spokes- 
woman, Christine Shelly, said last 
Friday. “Based on the evidence we 
have seen from observations on the 
ground, we have every reason to 
believe that acts of genocide have 
occurred in Rwanda." 

But as a legal matter under the 
convention, she said, “clearly nut 
all of the killings that have taken 
place in Rwanda are killings to 
which you might apply that label.” 






E. ~ m CX . • . — - 


, Ncnr— Frji, k - |>n^ 


A mffi tinman of the government forces carrying a wounded com- 
rade to the Kigali Red Cross hospital during the weekend fighting. 


•igtr.r fr^e Prase 

LAGOS — Nigeria's military 
ruler. General Sam Abachi vowed 
Sunday to steer kis nation toward 
democracy while crushing dissent- 
ers. a day after his arch foe, Mo- 
shood K_ O. AbioLu proclaimed a 
rival government. 

Speaking on television and ra- 
dio, General Abadu pledged his 
"determination" 10 establish a du- 
rable democracy in Nigeria. 

His address 'cume on the first 
anniversary of a presidential elec- 
tion — subsequently vended — that 
Mr. Abiola, a Muslim millionaire, 
was widely believed to have won. 

Late Saturday. Mr. Abiola, who 
apparently escaped from house ar- 
rest earlier in the day. declared 
himself president, army chief and 
bead of government. 

Calling on General Abac ha aad 
his administration to resign. Mr. 
Abiola declared before a crowd of 
nearly 3.000 at a clandestine meet- 
ing that a “new government of na- 
tional unity is Li power,” adding 
that he was “president and com- 
mander in chief." 

The Campaign for Democracy, a 
militant wing of the opposition 
movement, had asked the public to 
join a special mass Sunday after- 
noon at 2 at Marina Cathedral in 
Lag os to commemorate the poll an- 
niversary. 

It has' called for a week of civil 
disobedience, starting Monday. 


Mr. Abiola was in hiding Sunday 
after apparently evading policemen 
guarding his Lagos home. Authori- 
ties issued a rew ard for information 
leading to his arrest for trying to 
overthrow the government. They 
said that anyone with information 

on the whereabouts of Mr. Abiola 
would be eligible for a 60,000 naira 
(S2.7Q01 reward, aational television 
reported. 

During his broadcast address, 
which made no specific mention of 
Mr. Abiola or of recent events. 
General Abacfaa said his adminis- 
tration had the task of performing 
“a mission of aational salvation.” 

"We have undertaken to lay a 
solid foundation for the growth of 
genuine democracy in our coun- 
try." Genera] Abacha said. “We are 
determined to accomplish this his- 
toric task,” 

He added that opponents of his 
regime “engaged in acts of confron- 
tation" and sabotage “must be pre- 
pared to face the full force of the 
law of the land.” 

“Such acts," he said, “will be 
sternly punished." 

National radio, citing a police 
statement, said Mr. Abiola’s activi- 
ties “include well laid-down plans" 


to force the “overthrow of the fed- 
eral military government." 

The statement also asserted that 
Mr. Abiola was being helped by “a 
certain foreign mission in Lagos.” 

An Abiola aide raid Sunday that 
the millionaire was in “perfect 
health” and was preparing a “pro- 
gram of action." 

Most of the Nigerian press ig- 
nored Mr. Abiola’s proclamation 
Sunday, referring only to the arrest 
warrant issued against him. 

The presidential election on June 
12, 1993. was annulled despite be- 
ing declared free and fair by inter- 
national observers, and General 

Abacha took power in November 
after a brief civilian administra- 
tion. 


Bushes Begin Visit to Greece 

Jbum 

ATHENS — George Bush and 
his wife. Barbara, arrived in Greece 
on Sunday on a private visit, offi- 
cials said They said the former 
president was die guest of the ship- 
ping tycoon John L3tsis and would 
go on a cruise of the Grok islands 
aboard his private yacht. 


BRIDGE 


BOOKS 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Tom Price, deputy head of 
mission at the U.£ Embassy in 
Sofia, has been reading several 
books by Hairy Crews and is cur- 
rently engrossed in "The Knockout 
Artist “ 

“He is the Faulkner of our gener- 
ation and he manages to capture an 
authentic version of the rural 
South. I am enjoying this book as 
much as the others by Crews that I 
have read" 

( Michael KdlenbacK IHT) 







my good old friend David Horowitz 
for Sis hdp in rounding up some of 
(the] materia] in the fust stages of 
this book.” Bat though this slight 
alteration may be a matter of inter- 
est to purveyors of publishing gos- 
sip, it has had noapparat effect on 
the end results. The Roosevelts is as 
deftly organized, smoothly written 
and psychologically penetrating as 


any of its predecessors. 

Writing about the Roosevelt 
family is if anything even more 
challenging than writing about the 


Rockefellers, Kennedys or Fords 
because theirs is not one family but 
two: the Oyster Bay branch that 
produced Theodore and the Hyde 
Paik branch that produced Frank- 
lin. All members of both branches 
are Roosevelts, but in important 
respects the branches are dissimi- 
lar, in some ways starkly so. Draw- 
ing their inspiration from the ebul- 
lient Teddy, the Oyster Bay 
Roosevelts tend to be outgoing, 
somewhat eccentric, old-fashioned 
and intensely familial. By contrast 


the Hyde Park Roosevdts tend to 
be detached, somewhat formal, for- 
ward-looking and individualistic. 

These are generalizations and 
thus subject to argument, but they 
broadly describe the two families as 
Cottier persuasively portrays them. 
If the book has a bias, it is in favor of 
the Oyster Bay branch, and if the 
bode has a hero it is Theodore Roo- 
sevelt Jr, who lost out 10 Fr anklin in 
the familial wars of succession yet 
crowned his life with service in 
World War 11 of a genuinely heroic 
nature. But whatever favoritism 
Collier may fed toward the Long 
Island Roosevelts, it does not blind 
him to virtues or faults on either 
side. Indeed “The Roosevelts" 
comes closer to bong a genuinely 
sympathetic portrait of its subject 
than any of its three predecessors. 

Probably this is because the Roo- 
sevdts on both sides have always 
been more interested in influence 
and power than in money. They are 
weE-off by the standards to which 
most Anwicans are accustomed, 
but they are scarody rich, and their 
occasional forays into the realm of 
greed have been marked more by 
ineptitude than by avarice. The get- 



BREAKFAST 

ISN'T 



L'AGEFI, FINANCE FIRST THING IN THE MORNING. 


ling and multiplying of money is an 
interesting subject but also a dirty 
one; by contrast the impulse to alter 
the course of human affairs is not 
merely interesting but also enno- 
bling. even when — no. especially 
when — those motivated by it are 
themselves imperfect. 

Both Theodore and Franklin 
Roosevelt sought power, but they 
also sought to do good, or to do 
good as they understood it. Teddy 
could be blunt, overbearing, exas- 
perating. self -caricaturing; Franklin 
could be underhanded, conspirato- 
rial, devious, disloyal Each man had 
flaws as large as the man himself, 
but ndther was merely acquisitive; 
if anything, neither seems to have 
given any more thought to money 
than was absolutely necessary. 

Collier’s thesis is that the fam- 
ilies became “warring factions” 
that were drawn into “a family civil 
war with almost Homeric over- 
tones that would dominate and de- 
fine American politics for a genera- 
tion.” There's an element of 
overstatement in that, if not of 
overdramatization, but in essence it 
is accurate. Collier argues that the 
coming of the Depression was seen 


by Hyde Park as "the birth pains 
for a new order that would require 
new leaders" while Oyster Bay saw 
it as “a world configuring itself into 
new and ominous shapes.” 

Coffier outlines the history of the 
Roosevdts with precisely the quali- 
ties readers came to expect of his 
collaborations with Horowitz. He 
has a fine eye for the telling anec- 
dote — not surprisingly, a number 
of these involve Alice Roosevelt — 
and a gift far bringing large matters 
into dose focus; he is especially 
good cm the contrast between the 


habited by the children of Franklin 
and Eleanor, whose failures as a 
mother he chronicles in merciless 
detail He is especially good at idl- 
ing the stories of aO of these children 
who sought to make lives of their 
own away from the long shadows 
cast by their famous parents, in the 
process showing bow the Roosevdt 
dynasty allowed itself to disappear 
from the public eye. 

Jonathan Yardley is on the staff of 
The Washington Posl 


By Alan Truscoit 

O NE of the roost remarkable 
stretch drives in serious com- 
petition occurred in May in the 
Cavendish Teams. The foursome of 
Rita Shugan, Bob Goldman. Da- 
vid Berkowitz and Lany Cohen, 
scored 87 out of a possible 90 vic- 
tory points, enough to cany them 
to victory. 

The diagramed deal from the 
event pinpoints a weakness in the 
Multi Two Diamonds, a derice 
popular in Europe. Over East's two 
diamonds, showing a weak two-bid 
in one of the major suits, Sbugart as 
South was able to overcall two 
beans. She arrived in game, and 
received the lead of the spade 
queen. 

This rode to her king , and she 
drew trumps in three rounds, end- 
ing in dummy. A diamond to the 
king lost to the ace, and West led 
his remaining spade. South ruffed 
the third round of spades and took 
two diamond winners, ending in 
dummy. 

A club in the right now settled 
the issue, since East held the crucial 
nine spot. As it happens, an earlier 
dub play would have succeeded, 
but South’s strip play in diamonds 
would have been necessary if West 
had held both long and queen of 
clubs. He wouldthen have been 
endplayed. 


In the replay, Cohen as East 
opened two spades, a normal weak 
two-bid. This made a heart overcall 
much less attractive, and South 
doubled. This might well have led 
to the same bean contract, but 
North-South were using the double 
to show a strong balanced hand, 
suggesting a penalty. North there- 
fore passed and the contract could 
not be beaten. 

The defense took two club tricks 
and one trick in each of the other 
suits, so the Shugart team gained 13 
imps en route to victory. 

NORTH 
A J«4 
O A Q J 10 
U J73 
*.J 6 2 


WEST 
+ Q6 
9873 
O A 10 9 6 5 

*Q74 


EAST (D) 
♦ A 108753 
08 
082 
*K953 


SOUTH 

• K 2 
PK954 2 
OKQ4 

♦ A 10 8 


Neither aide was vulnerable. The 
bidding: 

E«s( South West North 

2 0 2 V Pass 3 ? 

Pass 4 9 Pass Pass 

Pass 


THE CARD 
THAT SPEAKS YOUR 
LANGUAGE. 



mmm 




With Sprint's '/■/? rid Traveler FONCARD. on English-speaking 
operator os close as the nearest phone. Simply dial the A.ccess 
Number icr ih* ■; ouniry you’re in. Then enjoy Sprint's low international 
rates on ever „■ cai 1 .ou mole, lo every place you call. And if you live 
outside the U S ^ vour calls are au I amat really billed to O major 
credit card li ; that easy. And that fast. Now that's language you con 
understand rijnr 

To ord=- .O', free card, call the Sprint 
Access Nu^il.vf r carl collect to the U.S. at Spf’lttt. 


- ~ - F * - Cnnnf Urjguav“> Offtitr 

Acce5S f«u ( - 1 l>er V -rail collect to the U.S. at tJf/M tut. Vaticon City + 172-1877 

.... Vc.ne;uvla - English 800- 111 1-0 

4tf?.3°0 W? -!.e u S. call I -oOO-B:?-^. WorldCup USA94 ^ eoo.m m 

■■■" • •• - s* c a-' n; •. lniirs sifsn.-e' T j CMHW# E&i cu^nt numbers, cusloro-r ser>ice or atMnionul numbers coll 

I .-111- • • t ; > !■ s 1pm- & I r*er rrm . v,*- .n P-5. id dfr.citB 1 3 country colling a«aiiabiliiy. AFONCAKD Mlimj only ike 

G'.'-n Oj'Iti .. -ir • HlJ k>-i-.;rujl . 1 >n:il,.:3 1 o" -.i-mc-r, G^tr;! Csll.ng jppl, ♦iVb'' to* i*corrt lone +Pu 6 Tk phonM itos (tpquue cun 41 taid. 
S-.j.\,H- ,r- • • i. - . A’lj-'i .'-i.-W': C5. :"vy- -fOrtCASC- fc.l’ *0 Ct-'Hict Mli: US Vrmmaiion onl^ ume oiros oalr tho latal OfWoii:* le- camecl 

• . • ’ U ■ • jrG • "V r;-' I aices. .vrft# r - « .0 lac A-J-s/rt** pi«Sw*c Ql&ari. I^ng dcionce crtngei may apply »Pov phorws ont, 


. 

West led the spade queen. 

COUNTRIES 

ACCESS NUMBERS 


New - Bulgaria A 

00-300-1010 

Iceland J 

999-003 

Egypt +- 

356-4777 

Antigua o 

so 

Antigua • 

].«IO-3tt-46&3 

Argannna 

00 1 -B00- 777- 111! 

Austria + 

022-903-014 

Bahamas 

1-800489-211! 

Barbados i 

1-800477-8000 

Belgium + 

078-11 -00 M 

Belize (Hoiell 

S5o 

Belize |PTT pay phones] o 

•A 

Bermuda V 

1 -800-623-0877 

Bolivia 

0800-3333 

Brazil 

OOOBOlfi 

BrHish Virgin Islands A 

1-800-877-8000 

Bulgaria A 

00400-1010 

Canada — 

1 -800-877-8000 

Chile 

0080317 

Colombia . English 

980-130-010 

Colombia - Spanish 

980-130-110 

Como IMco ♦ 

ItJ 

Cyprvs +■£> 

DBO-TO-Gl 

Czech Republic + 

0042-087-1 87 

Danmark + 

8001-0877 

Dominican Republic A 

1-800751-7877 

Ecuador V 

171 

E> Salvador + 

191 

Egypt +* 

356-47 77 

Finland + 

9800-1-0284 

France + 

1960087 

Germany + 

0130-0013 

Greece + 

008-001-411 

Guatemala 

195 

Honduras A 

00 1 -800- 12! 2000 

Hungary V+ 

006800-01-877 

Iceland fQ 

999-003 

Ireland + 

1-800-55-2001 

Israel -t- 

177-102-2727 

Italy + 

172-1877 

Jamaica v- 

1-800077-6000 

t.enya \ 

060CM2 

KuwaJi 

800-777 

Liechtenstein + 

155-9777 

Lithuania V 

86197 

Uvembaurg 

0800-0115 


l »5-80O-877-fflCQ 

Monaco + 

1960087 

Netherlands + 

066022-9119 

Netherlands Antilles 

001-800 7«5-U II 

Nicaragua 

161 

Norway + 

800-19-877 

Pen ana 

H5 

PoraguOy At> 

008-17-800 

Peru V 

196 

Poland + 

0010-4804)115 

Portugal + 

05017-1-877 

Puerto Rico ~ 

1-800-877-8000 

Romania +Cl 

01-800-0877 

Russia +fl 

8-095-155-6133 

Russia (Moscow) + 

155-6133 

San Manno + 

172-1677 

Souli Arabia 

1800-15 

South Africa + 

0-800-99-0001 

Spain 

900*9-0013 

St. Lucia 4 

187 

St. Ucia 

1 -BOO- 277-7468 

Sweden + 

020-799411 

Switzerland + 

15 $-9 777 

Trinidad & Tobago o 

23 

Turley + 

00800- 1-4477 

Ur :ed Arrjp Emirate* + 

800-131 

United Kingdom (Mercury) V 

0500-890-877 

United Kingdom fBT) 

0800-89-0877 

United Kingdom A 

0300-500-800 

UAA.~ 

1-800-877-8000 

US. Vitkin Islands - 

1-800-877-8000 

Urjguav « 

OOtir 

Vatican City + 

172-1877 

Vr-nerutflfl - English 

8001111-0 

VereZ oelo . Spanish 

800-MI l-l 






Page 6 


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 1994 


Ca 

8 N 
c clos 
c in t 
proi 
L offs 
T 

1 age 


bef. 
f 3.75 

s thai 

Z 

i A 

t ery 

{ Sloe 

lion 

ly fr 

J ' D 

| unn 

* pro* 

^ If 

] exw 

t coil! 

I said 

, slra 

' kei 
stea 
the 
bon 
S 
sen 
slur 



eralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PVKl.lSlltn WTTII THE NPW YUKK TIMES ANU THE VIXSHIMITIW VIST 


While the collisions between trade laws and 
environmental laws are sometimes real, they 
ore manageable — both legally and political- 
ly. Hie new World Trade Organization is noi 
going to subvert American sovereignty or nul- 
lify American environmental policy. The 
House Ways and Means Committee wisely 
invited Representative Newt Gingrich, the 
Republican whip, into its hearing on Friday at 
which the administration trade representa- 
tive. Mickey Kamor, was testifying. Mr. 
Gingrich raised ihe sovereignty issue some 
time ago, and the colloquy between them 
served very usefully to refine the debate. 

The WTO will come into existence next year, 
but U.S. participation depends on enactment 
of the trade bLLL Mr. Gingrich wanted assur- 
ance that the WTO would not be able to 
expand its jurisdiction in the future without 
congressional assent Mr. Kamor said thai he 
would support language to prevent that. Mr. 
Gingrich is uneasy about Vice President Ai 
Gore’s suggestion that the WTO, once estab- 
lished. will begin to take an interest in not only 
environmental but also labor standards, neither 
of which is included in its present statute. 

While sovereignty will remain undamaged, 
it is quite true that, as Mr. Gingrich said, the 
new trade agreement will tighten some of the 
constraints on the United States. That is in the 
nature of any agreement: one country com- 
mits itself not to do certain things in return for 
assurance that other countries will follow the 
same rule. First there was the dolphin case, 
and now there is the car case. 

To the outrage erf many environmental or- 


Credit President Fidel Ramos of the Philip- 
pines with blunt honesty in explaining why he 
bowed to Indonesian pressure and censored a 
conference in Manila on East Timor. “What 
was at stake bereT Mr. Ramos remarked to 
reporters. “Some l 5 billion pesos (S700 million) 
worth of investments, projects, enterprises and 
agreed partnerships or consortiums." For that 
consideration, the Philippine government pro- 
hibited foreigners from takin g part in the Ma- 
nila meeting, barring Danielle Mitterrand, wife 
of the French president, and deporting the Irish 
Nobel Peace laureate Mairead Maguire. This 
mess of pottage has apparently satisfied the 
Suharto regime in Jakarta, which wishes that 
everybody would forget its lawless grab in 1975 
of the former Portuguese colony of East Timor. 

As many as 200,000 people there have per- 
ished since Indonesia's seizure and annexation. 
One can fault Mr. Ramos for yielding to Indo- 
nesia’s economic threats, but the greater blame 
and the larger guilt lie with Manila’s powerful 


and bullying neighbor. Still, there is a consola- 
tion. Indonesia’s use of a 15-billion-peso club 
to stifle free speech in a neighboring democracy 
has stirred an up-roar elsewhere in Asia. Instead 
of rendering East Timor less visible, Indone- 
sian diplomacy has achieved the reverse; rivet- 
ing attention on Jakarta's past reluctance to 
permit unimpeded access by humanitarian and 
human rights groups to a people it character- 
izes as content and submissive. 

The reality was expressed in a message to 
Manila from the absent Mrs. Mitterrand, cen- 
suring Indonesia's military regime for relying 
on “terror, prohibition, gagging” and avoid- 
ing good-faith negotiations. 

More may be known about East Timor in 
July, when ii will be visited by a United 
Nations special reporter on human rights. In 
trying to manage the news in Manila. Indone- 
sia has only quickened the world's curiosity 
about what it seems to be hiding. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


After months of ineffective fumbling and a 
brief, misguided lurch toward the hasty use of 
mflilarv force, the Clinton administration final- 


ly seems headed in the right direction on Haiti, 
the two new sanctions announced on Friday 


the two new sanctions announced on Friday 
— banning commercial airline flights and large 
private financial transactions — are modest in 
themselves, but Washington expects other 
countries to reinforce these U.S. measures with 
their own travel and financial restrictions. Fur- 
thermore, the measures come in the wake of 
recently strengthened United Nations sanc- 
tions and a belated crackdown on tire large 
flows of contraband goods reaching Haiti 
through the Dominican Republic. 

These moves reflect the sharp shift in policy 
since former Representative William Gray re- 
placed Lawrence Pezzullo last month as the 
president's top Haiti adviser. Sanctions will not 
topple Haiti's tough-minded generals, but a 
consistent show of U.S. seriousness just might. 

Washington has not entirely ruled oul force, 
nor should it; Haiti's rulers should not be held 
immune from military pressure. But invasion 
talk has now moved off the immediate agenda. 
It would be far better for Haiti and ibe United 


States if the elected government of President 
Jean-Benrand .Aristide could be returned to 
power without the help of foreign troops. 

Military intervention tempts some Ameri- 
cans because the ruling generals can count on 
no more than a few thousand military' and 
paramilitary' loyalists and have scam civilian 
support. But invasions can solve only military 
problems, not political ones. This time there 
can be no question of U.S. occupiers staying in 
Haiti For 19 years, as they did starting in 1915. 
Even an operation with limited aims, like orga- 
nizing elections and training a new army, could 
lead to situations in which foreign soldiers 
would be responsible for restraining crowds 
intent on “cecklacings" with flaming car tires 
and other forms of murderous revenge-taking. 
Once the generals have left and Father Aristide 
has been restored, Haiti's political future must 
remain exclusively in Haitian bands. 

Thanks to a more aggressive U.S. diplomat- 
ic strategy and a more humane approach to 
refugees, removing those generals without 
outside military intervention has now become 
a realistic possibility. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


American Third World 


The “Lessons Without Borders” program 
launched by Vice President Al Gore in Balti- 
more last week is supposed to be a winning 
proposition for all The idea, generated by the 
US. Agency for International Development, is 
to bring to America's poor communities some 
of the lessons AID has learned while operating 
programs in the developing world. Baltimore 
Mayor Kun Schraoke volunteered his city to be 
AID’S opening act His reasons for doing so 
were candid and idling about America today. 

“It is an unfortunate fact of life,” said 
Mayor Schmoke, “that we have in certain 
pans or our city health problems, housing 
problems, that resemble those in Third World 
countries." Those words could have been spo- 
ken by any big-city mayor in America. 

The similarities in the developing world and 
American inner cities and rural communities 
are mortifying. There are poor neighborhoods 
with infant mortality' rates that rank right up 
there with countries where American aid work- 
ers are being sent. Americans think of children 
who die from diarrhea as being found only in 
countries like Bangladesh or Burkina Faso. In 


America's inner cities and in rural communi- 
ties, however, hundreds of children are dying or 
being hospitalized each year from this disease. 
Mr. Gore noted that only 39 percent of inner- 
city children were immunized against measles 
in 1990. Stack that up against Egypt, where 
AID reports a 90 percent immunization rale, or 
India’s 80 percent or the 88 percent rate in the 
Philipp ires. The sad fact is that some of what 
ails the most devastated countries on earth also 
afflicts communities in America: illiteracy, 
poor nutrition, little or no prenatal care, dis- 
ease, joblessness. ultimately hopelessness. 

AID cannot be expected to solve problems 
on American soil; the law prevents that. But 
perhaps the agency, taking a page from the 
developing world, can lend a helping hand by 
advising hard-pressed U.S. communities bow 
they can use techniques from the Third World 
to address their problems. After decades of 
work abroad, AID has learned many lessons. 
Trus experiment can usefully teach Americans 
another lesson: images of Third World depri- 
vation are universal. 


— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED MS? 

KATHARINE, GRAHAM. .ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Cn-CImirmm 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher & Chtef Executive 
JOHN VINOCUR. Eweua\x££h'r & 1 'tee Presuleni 
0 WALTER WELLS. Nc ire Edmr ■ SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES MFTCHELMORE. Deputy EJunrx ■ CARL GEWIRTZ. .Associate Ediior 
* ROBERT J. DONAHUE. FJhrjrrtthc £Ja?rid Pages • JONATHAN GAGE Business and Finance Ediior 
• RENE BONDY. Deputy Publisher* JAMES MvLEOD. AJu.nizin<; Cfcmcw 
•JUANITA L CASPAR!, htummemi Devtlymtm Dinar* ROBERT FARRE Cwciiacn Director. Europe 

Dinrtfeurde la Piibticaiim: Ridvmi D. Simmons 
Director Adjoint dc la PubiicarKtv Kadarinc P. Du mw 


InkrruUoruJ Herald Tribune. 1X1 Avenue Ouries-dc-GiuJfc. 9112. NciuJJ.v-sji-Sdnc. Ranee. 
Tel. : 1 1 ) 4637.93.00 Rn : Giyl 4&37.Q&.51 : Adv_ 463731 1 1 Internee iHT«'aJrokomie 


Ehor jbr .Asa. Miiud RUwbm 5 Gaantwy R,L Dill. Td tf>5' J77-7?Ni Fac {65} 274-2331 

SbK. Dir. Am fiojf D. KtaiepuhL 50 Gloucester Rd. Hang Kang. TeL $52-'t222-IMR. Fas: S52V222-1 190. 
Gen. Mgr Gemuny T. Srii&k'' Fnednchstr 15. t£J23 FmrifwN. TeL t t*wi 72 h 7 55. Far (CWi 72 73 lu 
Pns.lL L MiJucl G warn. SSOThadAie. At-n Kiri S.Y. ID021 Td 1 21 2 1 75 2-iNVU Far i2IZi 755-F7H5 
U K. AM ertismg Office: Ci.i Long Acre. London UTT. Tel. H<~l i Sitf-WMl Fax: (1*7 / 1 240-2254. 
5..A. ou itipihil dr 1.200.000 F. RCS Nunierir B 73202112b. ContmLuiun Puritaire No. bl337 
it' i'*N. btunudmd Hyrdd Trdteie. AJ/ngfti mtnvtL SUN: /XN4JI052 


PINION 


r 



For China 


ganizations. two trade tribunals have now 
found that the United States violates present 
trade agreements by banning foreign tuna 
caught with drif i nets. The purpose of the ban 
is to protect dolphins, but the agreements 
disapprove of using production methods as 
criteria for imports. The purpose is to prevent 
protectionists in, say, Europe from banning 
American beef or soybeans because of the 
way they are produced. The right solution to 
the dolphin case, already in progress, is an 
international treaty outlawing drift nets. 

The car case is different. It involves the 
fuel efficiency roles, which were written de- 
liberately to help American manufacturers 
of big cars and to hurt their foreign competi- 
tors. The United Slates will probably lose 
this one. Itcan then either pay compensation 
to Europe or. better, change the law to make 
it neutral in ib impact on foreign and domes- 
tic cars. Why should the government have to 
do that? To prevent other countries from 
doing the same tiling, on a bigger scale, to 
American exports in their markets. 

The United States exports nearly half a 
trillion dollars* worth of goods a year, more 
than any other country, and it is counting on 
increased exports to lilt American employ- 
ment and incomes through this decade. That 
is why it needs the WTO and the broad new 
trade agreement that it would administer. Mr. 
Kantor never tires (fortunately) of reminding 
Congress that the United States brings more 
trade complaints than any other country, and 
wins four oul of five. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



By Midbaei 


I ONDON — TbcrcJsMkMc 
t lost between China and North 
Korea. Yer China remains: flfr 
North’s last jwottttor, is raaa^eo-L 
nomic partner and the enty-batter 

deuce cm China has tncraMawrm 
confidence in hs pant has ;• 

been shaken. ■ ; , 

The Soviet Union abandoned 

North Korea in 

a. C*""» undercut the posniottdEto. ; 
North by xecognning SooA.iMwa 


u 


■ If Pyongyang consdered - ftkt its 
interests wereTjerng sa enfierttothfr 1 
great-power arid economic ffltsrcsts 
of Bqpng, 

prepared io allow ksprindpal for- 


After Somalia and Bosnia, General Butros Ghali leads his victorious UN troops in die relief of Rwanda* 

Being Multilateral Means Not Being So Unilateral 


W ASHINGTON — Bill Clinton 
has set out to build interna- 
tional coalitions to punish and deter 
rogue leaders in Haiti and North Ko- 
rea through sanctions and perhaps 
the use of force, but the coalitions are 
not jelling firmly. Other countries 
hesitate before taking risks on behalf 
of President Clinton’s America. 

The misgivings have much to do 
with specific problems that the neigh- 
bors of Haiti and North Korea would 
have in marching in lockstep with the 
United States if these confrontations 
slip into hostilities. 

Some of the hesitation, however, 
has to do with the style and substance 
of foreign policy as practiced by the 
Clinton administration. The presi- 
dent’s bid for international help is 
undercut by his penchant for letting 
domestic factors interfere with his 
conduct of foreign policy. 

This has led other countries to con- 
clude that American self-interest has 
become the sole driving force in 
American foreign policy. Without a 
dearer commitment to international 
obligations and cooperation in coali- 
tion building, the United Slates is noi 
in a strong position to ask others to 
bear new burdens, diplomats say. 
Their apprehension is strength- 


By Jim Hoagland 


ened by the defensive rhetoric that 
Mr. Clinton’s foreign policy spokes- 
men have used in recent months to 
emphasize that U.S. resources will be 
used abroad oolv when i: is dearly in 
American interests, with the word 
‘'American” repeatedly underlined. 

Thai rhetoric is a reaction to the 
debacle in Somalia, where the admin- 
istration was caught without a politi- 
cal goal or definition of interests com- 
mensurate with the military losses. 

As a candidate and at the start of 
his terra. Mr. Clinton put a high and 


urgent priority on lightening .Ameri- 
ca’s foreign burden. He vowed to get 


ca’s foreign burden. He vowed to gel 
other nations to do more to protect 
international stability and promote 
justice abroad, and to provide leader- 
ship for a more assertive multilateral- 
ism. But that effort has stalled. 

My point here is not that the presi- 
dent has pursued the wrong policy on 
North Korea, as many Republicans 
and some commentators argue. On 
the whole, the patient Clinton policy 
in dealing with Pyongyang has been 
righL (It does not differ from what 
the Bush administration tried to do.) 

Patience has been pursued Tor pur- 
pose. Only by showing that it had 


given Kim II Sung every chance to 
remain within the Nonproliferation 
Treaty and to permit international 
inspection of nuclear facilities could 
Mr. Chn ion reassure the public and 
political leadership of Smith Korea 
and Japan thai America was not pro- 
voking a showdown with Mr. Kan. 

Sir. Clinton’s tactics have kept 
Seoul in step with Washington. But m 
Tokyo there is confusion about 
whether Japan wiB go along with 
American plans for sanctions that 
include a dear and sharp cutoff of 
funds sent to North Korea by Kore- 
ans working in Japan. Japanese offi- 
cials worry that the Diet may not 
authorize such a step, because of Mr. 
Kim’s threats of war against Japan. 

Before agreeing to block fund 
transfers to North Korea. Japan 
wants to issue yet more warnings to 
Mr. Kim. Tokyo, afraid of retalia- 
tion, puts its self-interest first before 
its international duties in this case — 
just as Tokyo sees Washington doing 
on trade and other issues. 

And I cannot sav that the adminis- 
tration's policy oh Haiti is wrong, 
since it has pursued every conceiv- 
able policy in succession and at times 


sim ul tan eously, as Mr. C lin t on has 
sought to balance conflicting domes- 
tic political pressures 3nd the foreign 

_ ,5 - thp Haitian m- 


pos&ibly 


Taiwan, i&e&ner 


lion and turmoil with incafatarae 
consequences in a region qf pstiflij 


policy implications of the Haitian cri- hnportance to China. . 
sis. This constant shifting is part of Consequently, the Qtmese-.&m; 
the reason why Canada and other tried to put pressure on tbeNarth to 
Western Hemisphere nations have by its ccanmilznexns Td ^tw 


mis givings about signing up for a 
multilateral military intervention led 
or supported by the United St ates . 

p^iviiiian politicians have contrast- 
ed America’s lack of interest in emer- 
gency action to stop the mass k illi ngs 
in Rwanda and its importuning of 
others to help in Haiti, where daily 
violence, while disturbing, is much less 
widespread Canada, which has played 
a major role in development aid in 
Rwanda, has offered to send peace- 
keeping troops to stop the massacre. 

France has hinted to Washington 
that .America's refusal thus far to put 


tried to put pressure oh the Naff* w 
abide by its compmtmqfe & 
proper inspections of asdear faci&r : 
ties by the International Atomic 1 Eft? 
ergy Agency, while ai .the same time . 
holding oat against sanctions. Last 
week the president of China asserted 
his coustxy’s “unwavering poUcj^pt' 
further strengthening friendly /efe* 1 . 
dons with North Korea. But tn li« 
same week Bdjmg abstained frock an 
IAEA resofatroa condemning 
North and suspending technical ajd 
because the North had denied access 
to the ageac/s inspectors^ - 


ground troops into Bosnia 
French cooperation on miliiar 


Frivately, Chinese sources jcfeasi 
tai Norm Korea's progress m ae-* 


French cooperation on military inter- 
vention in Haiti less likely. 

The chickens of the relentless fo- 
cusing on U.S. domestic matters and 
on US. interests abroad could come 
home to roost in Haiti and North 
Korea. When asking others to be bet- 
ter world citizens, the United States 
has to set the example. 

The Washington PosL 


Don’t Bet the Store on CIA Psychobabble From Afar 


W ASHINGTON — As the Kore- 
an mid ear crisis deepens, the 


VY an mid ear crisis deepens, die 
Central Intelligence Agency is trying 
to probe the minds of Norih Korea's 


Bv Thomas Omestad 


leaders. If it can cut through the pro- 
paganda about President Kun 11 Sung 


paganda about President Kim 11 Sung 
and his son Kim Jong D and construct 
accurate psychological profiles, it will 
perform an invaluable service. 

Don’t bet on it. The CLA’s record 
on profiles appears to be poor. When 


of years.” Samuel Lewis, w ho was then 
head of policy planning at the State 
Department, said to me in an inter- 
view. CIA officials “have an estab- 
lished opinion about him. and I guess 
they feel they don’t need to prove il“ 
There was an unexpected benefit, 
though. The wall of secrecy protecting 


there is a risk of war, flawed profiles 
could lead to deadly miscalculation. 


could lead to deadly miscalculation. 

If the CIA’s studies of the Kims 
reflect the in ep in ess seen in its profile 
of the Reverend Jean- Bertrand .Aris- 
tide, President Bill Clinton would do 
wdl to ignore them. The portrayal of 
the exiled Haitian president "came 
closer to character assassination than 
character analysis. 

In a closed-door Capitol Hill brief- 
ing in October, the CIA alleged that 
Father Aristide suffered from a histo- 
ry of severe mental illness and had 
received psychiatric treatment at a 
Montreal hospital in 1980. It Jater 
came out that the CIA had depended 
on the very generals who ousted Fa- 
ther Aristide for much of its informa- 
tion about him, and that he had doi 
been hospitalized in Canada. 

Had the CIA bothered to check its 
facts? It “made no effort whatsoever 
to interview people who had been 
meeting Aristide over the past couple 


this arcane field began to fail. 
For decades. Cl. A psvei 


For decades. Cl. A psychiatrists 
have quietly toiled on studies of what 
makes’ foreign leaders tick. Unlike 
clinical psychiatrists, the profilers 
cannot put their subjects on the 
couch. They seek to psychoanalyze 
from afar, blending political science 
with psychology in’ a hybrid science, 
or art. They review a leader's writings 
and remarks, and rely heavily on such 
secondhand sources as accounts of a 
leader’s life and interviews with peo- 
ple who have met him. 

The profiles occupy a privileged 
place in U.S. intelligence. They land 
on the desks of the president, his 
national security adviser and the sec- 
retaries of state and defense. Presi- 
dents routinely review them before 
meeting with foreign leaders. 

Jimmy Carter became a fan after 
reading profiles of Menachem Begin 
and Anwar Sadat before tbe Camp 
David peace talks. Ronald Reagan 
watched profiles in the form of videos. 


The profiles are highly prized read- 
ing. often chock full erf personal tidbits 
about the foibles of friend and foe 
alike. Brent ScowcrofL the former na- 
tional security adviser, recalls the pro- 
file done during the Bush acimaistra- 
tioc oc the younger Kira, who com- 
mands the North Korean army. “He 
likes to beat up women.” Mr. Scow- 
croft told me. “I gather he's not a very 
manly figure. So be goes out of his way 
to prov e his toughness to the military." 

Ideally, officials hope the profiles 
will offer special insight into bow 
foreign leaders will behave in a crisis 
and how the United States should 
frame its threats and entreaties. But 
interviews with dozens of current and 
former policymakers and intelligence 
officials suggest that the Aristide fias- 
co is hardly unique. The raw informa- 
tion from which psychological infer- 
ences are drawn is often wrong. 

Robert Pastor, the chief Latin 
America specialist on President Car- 
ter’s National Security Council, dis- 
covered rampant inaccuracy. When 
he verified biographical information 
with the subjects themselves, he 
found errors up to half the time. The 
CIA stumbled over such basic facts 
as where a president was educated 
and whether he was married. 

In his memoirs. George Shultz, the 


former secretary of stale, describes 
meeting a Soviet prime minister, Niko- 
lai Tikhonov. “My CIA briefing paper 
on him described an old, doddering 
man ... In came a bouncy, lively in- 
dividual fully prepared to debate me 
energetically.’ I was amazed and star- 
tled; so much for our intelligence.’ ” 
Many officials conrolain that the 
profiles' are so loaded with caveats 
and rife with psychobabble as to be 
useless. Former Bush administration 
aides say tbe CIA profile of Saddam 


Hussein offered little help in predict- 
ing his moves in the Gulf crisis. 


tag Ris moves m the Gun crisis. 

Even those who praise particular 
profiles lend to be deeply skeptical of 


them in general. “Trying to diagnose 
somebody from 5,000 miles away 
whom you’ve never seen does not fill 
me with confidence,” said Robert 
Gates, a former CIA director. 

That same ambivalence infuses the 
CIA today. A senior intelligence offi- 
cial who described himself as “some- 
what mistrustful” of the profiles 
called profiling “one of the weak ar- 
eas of analysis.” 


Bad Feeling in a Canadian Impasse 


O TTAWA — The real national 
sport of Canada is qoi hockey 


W sport of Canada is not hockey 
bul debating Quebec indepen- 
dence. Tbe problem is greatest for 
the English-speaking majority, odd 
as that might seem al first Quebec 
could survive as a French-speaking 
enclave in English-speaking North 
America. But what reason for exis- 
tence has English-speaking Cana- 
da? A quarrel two centuries ago 
over crown powers, long ago fore- 
closed by events? 

Canada still has a queen, but the 
practical connections to London 
that as late as the 1 940s made Cana- 
da distinct and different from the 
United States have disappeared. If 
Quebec were to become indepen- 
dent, much of tbe rest of Canada 
would be under internally generated 
pressures to join the United Slates. 

English Canada’s ability to re- 
main culturally and even politically 
independent actually depends on the 
bmationaiity and bilingualism im- 
posed by coexistence with French 
Canada. The extent to which bilin- 
gualism functions in daily life, at 
less: in eastern Canada, is now very 
striking. This binationalism is un- 
doubtedly responsible for tbe ease 
with which Canadians have opted 

for a multi -culturism stiD intensely 
controversial in the United Slates. ' 

But is the breakup of Canada a 
serious question? The truth seems 
to be “no.” Quebec was a neglected 
province, treated with indifference 
and often contempt by anglophone 
Canada from the end of the 18th 
century to the rise of Quebec sepa- 
ratism in the 1960s. The latter wasa 
product of Quebec’s rapid econom- 


By W illiam Pfaff 


ic development and its emergence 
from tbe cultural and religious iso- 
lation that had been its means of 
self-defense over many generations. 

A referendum in 1980 on a 
vaguely defined proposal for “asso- 
ciation-sovereignty” and subse- 


quent constitutional debate and re- 
form have failed to produce a 


form have failed to produce a 
generally acceptable starus for Que- 
bec, causing the present demand for 
total independence. If the national- 


ist party in Quebec wins Lhe provin- 
cial elections next fall it promises 


dal elections next fall it promises 
to call a referendum on declaring 
(or “negotiating”) independence. 

This has provoked leaders of the 
western provisoes, who challenge 
Quebec’s right to break away by 
unilateral choice. They say that if 
Quebec does go, they will make it 
painful. They note that Quebec's 
borders are open to dispute, since 
two-thirds of what now is Quebec 
was added only in the late 19lh 
century. Alberta’s premier said at 
the end of May that the SL Law- 
rence Seaway in Quebec “is a Cana- 
dian seaway." 

The Indians of Quebec — the 
First Nations, in the currently po- 
lite phrase — are unenlhusiastic 
about leaving Canada. So are Eng- 
lish-speaking Quebeckers, who sug- 
gest that they might declare their 
own independence. 

All of which makes for exhilarat- 
ing debate. However, tbe polls sug- 
gest that Quebec is going nowhere. 
They suggest that the province will 
not vote in favor of sovereignty. 


and even that the voters may not, as 
generally assumed, put the nation- 
alist party into office next fall. A 
poll at the end of May showed a 
majority in Quebec against becom- 
ing “an independent country.” with 
only 35 percent determined to vole 
for independence. Tbe figure has 
consistently remained around or 
below 40 percent. 

It goes down as tbe practical con- 
sequences of independence are 
pointed ooL Many in Quebec are in 
a general or sentimental way in fa- 
vor of independence, taking for 
granted that some association with 
the rest of Canada would go on that 
m ai n t ain ed most of the benefits of 
the present relations hip. But when 
people are challenged to assume a 
part of the national debt and take 
on other onerous and costly respon- 
sibilities connected with sovereign- 
ty, enthusiasm tends to fade. 

The truth seems to be that inde- 
pendence has not enough support 
for Quebec actually to leave Cana- 
da, but too much support for 
French Quebec to be happy slaying 
— which is a bad situation. An 
unresolvable quarrel has poisonous 
effect over the long term. This is 
true even though the issues at con- 
flict are triviality comparison with 
problems in most of the world. 

Canadians might consider what 
Lord Acton, the great English his- 
torian, once said: that “the combi- 
nation of different nations in one 
state is as necessary a condition of 
civilized life as tbe combination of 
men in society.” 

International Herald Tribune 
© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


tics like Mr. Scowcrofl contend that 
profiles “provide a comfort leveT 
during crises. Policymakers desper- 
ately want to understand what kmds 
of adversaries they are facing. 

Since top officials continue to de- 
mand the profiles, they ought to de- 
mand that the CIA do thou righL 
Greater openness — especially, more 
intensive review by outside regional 
specialists and psychologists — would 
root out some mistakes and help deter 
the agency from hewing to a rigid 
institutional view of certain leaders. 

Policymakers should stop pushing 
the CIA to make bold predictions 
about foreign leaders when the neces- 
sary data are unavailable. Such pres- 
sures, in the case of the Kims, could 


that North Korea’s progress m a &. 
quiring nuclear weapons has been «- - 
aggerated. Having helped , in Abe 
training of scientists and. teefrnidans : 
from the North, China believes that 
they have not yet readied tbe stage 
where they can convert Thercpftrtont- 
tun into effective atomic weapons. 
Accordingly, Beijing asserts that time 
for dealing with toe North Korean 
nuclear problem is sol as short a$ 
qi flgesmrf by the United States. 

Ounaprof esses to see tfaeNarth as . 
a beleaguered repine anxious about 
its survival Because of its rigid totali- 
tarian rule and xenophobic national- 
ism, Pyongyang has resisted Chinese 
sug95trot& that it follow China's' 
course in xetainmg Communist rule 
while carrying out economic reform 
and openness to the international 
economy. What is required in the 
Chinese view is patient diplomacy to . 
assure the North that none of the 
powers seek its destruction and that it 
has more to gain from cooperation 
than from defiance. 

China has a well-known aversion 
to sanctions, seeing them as an in- 
strument of Western and partiatiariy 
U.S. intrusion. However, China also 
fears that the consequences of exter- 
nal pressure and isolation cm the ' 
North have not been sufficiently well 
thought through. 

The Northern regime might wefi 
survive a considerable deepening of 
tbe economic misery of its people 
while continuing to make progress off 
developing nuclear weapons. That 
could give rise to demands in Ameri- 
ca for tougher measures. The end> 
result might be the one that C3una: : 
fears most: war in Korea and/or the 
coOapsc of the North. ‘ - 

The objective toward winch Bei- 
jing is seeking to work is one that- 
would encourage the North to caxrir 
out economic reform s , be recog- 
nized by the United States and Ja^ 
pan, and begin tire process ofgradiK 
al transformation while r etaining 1 . 
Communist rule. China's problemis 
that the nuclear issue has so compli- 
cated the agenda that it has not been, 
able to persuade the international: 
community and the United States to. , 
be more patient. 

China is averse to using its veto in; 
the UN Security Council, as tot' 
would entail a wide range of dnrfo-- 
matic costs. However, it also fears, 
that consequences of sanctions. On- : 
nese diplomats will be v&y active.m k 
the days ahead in trying to avoid' 


* « r*i * .r. giiw au Hi u rim; m avuiu 

, ines P^ibly having to make such a stark and on- 

flow tie North Koreans would react palatable choice 


how the Nor 
to sanctions. 


le choice. 


The writer is associate editor of For- 
eign Policy , This comment was adapt- 
ed by The New York Times frnm th* 


ed try The New York Tunes from the 
quarterly’s summer issue. 


The writer, a China specialist, is a- 
reader in international relations at the 
London School qf Economics andPoGti- . 
cal Science. He contributed Ms com- 
ment to the Herald Tribune. . r 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Nervous in Spain 

MADRID — In anticipation erf cavfl 
warin Morocco, and the consequent 
necessity for Spain to be prepared to 
assert her rights in that country, ar- 
rangements for reinforcing the army in 
Andalusia are being pressed forward 
with remarkable activity. Consider- 
able alarm has beat aroused here by 
the rgx>rt that an international com- 
plication has been already created by 
an attack by tribesmen upon French 
subjects on tbdrway to the coast from 
the interior of Morocco. 


Andeznadt last night, four Germans' 
attempted to shove three doughboys’ 
off the sidewalk. In the scrap tot; 
followed. Private Burton was slabbed ; 
in the bade, while a German $us-_' 
rained serious injuries when a dough' 

boy used a horseshoe as a weapon , t 


1919: Biting the Hand 


1944: Aerial Qf fcnaw e 

LONDON — [Fran our New York ! 
edition:] — More than ten thousand 
AlBed planes struck today [June 12] ■ 
ej^^fldds and communities inths 
W^nfle area from SL Nazaiie, 1 oh : 
to Bay (rf Biscay, to Lille, near the!: 


Belgian bonier of France. Strafing 
emy reinforcements, cutting r&flli 




hsviog d dangerous effect on the Gcr- 
nraa5 in the American bridgehead. 
I hey are forgetting that they are be- 
In £ [reaied with a consideration 
wluch , to>' scarcely could have ex- 
pected after the atrocities committed 
m Belgium and France. Hardly a day 
Passes without reports of fights. In 


great fleet of planes ran mto the hea\> ! 
est resistance offered by to Luftiraffe- 
since the invasion. German fighter s 
attacked in groups of twenty to: fifty' 
P™«' but failed to interfere with the ; 

urtioading program on the 
beaches. The Allied off ensi ve ap- . 

P strength to mcotA oi. 
tow soroes flown on D Day. 


.IK 


^ ja 


agn policy concents » fearfiafifr-- 
caied to -those of ^ North Kiorea.; ’-- J 
The problem forG#a 
though n does not wantto sre nudes* 
weapons on the Korean Pcnmstiku h 
fears the possibfe coflapsc of . to 
Comnnmist. regime ro to North.Tt 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 1994 


Page 7 


Protestant Violence 
Is Worrying Ireland 

Backlash to Peace Move Seen 


By James F. Ciaritv 

New York Tuna Semte ' 

k CuerTil J a actions 

by Protestants from Nonhem Ire- 
land operating in the overwhelm- 
ingly Roman Caihobc Irish Reputv 
lie have begun to worry the Irish 
govcmittem. senior of ficiab sav. 

Life here is normal, with no'evt- 
aence of increased policy or arrav 
patrols. Citizens seem more coa- 
cerned about the prospects of the 
soocer team in the World Cup than 
in the unnerving but relativdv mi- 
nor sports of Protestant violence. 

But the government of Prime 
Minister Albert Reynolds is said to 
be worried that the violence — - 
which has killed one person, dis- 
rupted train service and damaged 
several businesses — might hamper 
its efforts to advance a settlement 
of the conflici in Proiesiam-domi- 
nated Northern Ireland, where the 
Irish Republican Array is lighting 
to end British rule. 

Mr. Reynolds has been striving 
for six months to persuade the 
IRA’s political leaders to cease 
anti-British attacks in the north 
and enter peace talks. 

He has urged Gerry Adams, the 
president of Sinn Fein, the IRA 
political arm, to accept the princi- 
ples of the peace plan he an- 
nounced in mid-December with 
Prime Minister John Major of Brit- 
ain. 

The plan, called the Downing 
Street Declaration, offers Mr. Ad- 
ams a place at tbe negotiating table 
in exchange for a formal denuncia- 
tion of IRA violence and a cease- 
fire of at least three months. 

Mr. Adams has not responded, 
and although Mr. Reynolds has 
said that he expects a formal re- 
sponse in the next few weeks, some 
officials fed the sporadic Protes- 
tant violence could weaken support 
in Ireland for peace talks. 

They feel that many Irish citizens 
might attribute the violence to the 
government’s overtures to the IRA. 
One official said people were be- 
ginning to say of the Protestant 
attacks, “You brought this down 
on our beads.” 

Inst month, Protestant guerrillas 
in Dublin tried to (dam a bomb at a 
Sinn Fein fund-raising rally, kinM 
a doorman and escaped. 


VsMHjrtoaAHribt 
fa Graei Britain 
(MlcdltaUw 
0 S00 89 5965 


Last week, a small incendiary 
device was set off in a snooker hall 
in Trim, a sm all town north of 
Dublin. Telephoned threats said 
that other devices had been planted 
around the country and that bombs 
had been set to go off on the Dub- 
lin-Cork rail line and the Dublin 
airport. 

No bombs were found, but the 
threats made from pages and were 
the lead item on national television, 
which showed scenes like those 
common in Belfast, but extremely 
rare in the south, of armed officers 
searching and cordoning off public 
areas. 

This has caused anxiety as it re- 
calls recent statements by Protes- 
tant guerrilla leaders that they con- 
sidered Dublin's peace efforts an 
intrusion into the affairs of the 
north and an attempt to incorpo- 
rate it in a united Ireland. Officials 
here said that hesitancy by Mr. Ad' 
ams has annoyed American offi- 
cials who had supported his visit to 
the United Stales four months ago. 



SJunsl Jufiui', H/rxc F.’jsa Pirw 


A Tajik border guard dismounting, his donkey in Khorog. Border guards are being trained by 
Russian officers to patrol the Tajik-Afghan border, where fighting has taken place recently. 


Serbia Indicts a Serb for Crimes in Bosnia 


By Roger Cohen 

.Vw York Tunes Semee 

SABAC, Yugoslavia — In the first case of its 
kind since tbe war in Bosnia began more than 
two years ago. the district court m this tranquil 
Serbian provincial town has indicted a Serb on 
war crimes charges, including killing 16 Mus- 
lims and slicing off another's ear. 

The case is the first in which Serbs, not 
Muslims, have prosecuted a Sob. and its poten- 
tial significance is considerable. Bombarded by 
the propaganda of state television and mesmer- 
ized by a mixture of history and myth portray- 
ing the Serbs as eternal victims, most pimple in 
Serbia have blinded themselves to the eviction 
and slaying of Muslim civilians in Bosnia. 

Dusan Vuckovic. 31, a volunteer soldier, is 
accused of opening fire on a group of Muslim 
civilians on June 27 or 28, 1992, while they 
huddled in a cultural center (hat had been 
turned into a prison near the northeastern Bos- 
nian town of Zvornik. 

At the time, the indictment says, “a consider- 
able number’’ of Mutisms from tbe village of 
Divio had been detained in tbe center. The 
burst of fire from Mr. Vuckovic' s Kalashnikov 
killed 16 civilians, and wounded 20 others, tire 
Sabac prosecutor, Branislav Popoyic, contends. 

Mr. Vuckovic, a citizen of Serbia who joined 
a paramilitaiy group known as tbe Yellow 
Wasps at the start of the 1991 Croatian war, 
then moved on to Bosnia, is also accused of 
raping a Muslim woman in the Serbian town of 
Lozmca in July 1992. He has been in jail in 
Sabac since November. 

That he was a member of a volunteer para- 
military squad and that he came from Serbia, 


rather than Bosnia, is consistent with accounts 
of the onslaught regularly provided by Muslim 
survivors. Serbia has always tried io portray the 
war as an affair of the Bosnian Serbs. 

Divio, once a picturesque village on the Dri- 
na River inhabited overwhelmingly by Mus- 
lims, is now a ruin that Bosnian Serbs have 
renamed Sveti Stefan. Zvornik. once home to 


Most Serbs have blinded 
themselves to the eviction 
and slaying of Muslim 
civilians in Bosnia. 


more than 4,000 Muslims, has do Muslim resi- 
dents today. The town's mosques have been 
leveled. 

“This investigation was begun about six 
months ago. and to me it appears a fairly cut- 
and-dried case, unless the defendant's lawyer 
produces new evidence.’' said Vladimir Bajic, 
the judge who will preside at the trial, which is 
expected to start in September. “Of course the 
case has political repercussions, but I can as- 
sure you 1 have come under no political pres- 
sure." 

But Dragoljub Dordevic, Mr. Vuckovics 
lawyer, said the prosecution’s case would never 
stand up in court. War crimes are unacceptable, 
he said, “but there have to be proofs, and here 
there are none." 

He pointed to the facts (hat none of tbe 


Aid to Russia: 'Yawning Gap 9 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Wathsngicti Post Seniee 

WASHINGTON — The Ginton administration’s 
high-profile, big-doflar program of economic aid to 
Russia is “srnph inadequate in its strategy, its intensi- 
ty and its impiememanon." the House majority and 
minority leaders have complained in a memo to Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton's foreign-policy advisers. 

Representatives Richard A. Gephardt, Democrat of 
Missouri, and Robert R Micbd. Republican of Illi- 
nois, said officials were following “business-as-usual" 
procedures in a slow-moving aid program, at a time 
when urgent action is needed 10 avert political 
catastrophe. 

Accepting much of tbe criticism, the administration 
is searching for a "czar'” who could begin to deliver on 
Mr. Gin ion's commitment to help Russia's transfor- 
mation to democracy and a market economy, Bui the 
first two approached about the job. Matthew F. Mc- 
Hugh and Stephen J. SoLaiz, both former New York 
Democratic representatives, turned it down. 


After visiting Russia in Apni, Mr. Gephardt and 
Mr. Michel concluded that “there remains a yawning 
gap between America’s good intentions and the actual 
performance of our assistance programs.” 

In a strongly worded memo to Secretarv of State 
Warren M. Christopher. Secretary of Defence William 
J. Perry and the White House national security advis- 
er, W. Anthony Lake, they said that “a strong sense of 
urgency — of potential international crisis and of our 
immediate obligation to avert such a crisis — is 
conspicuously absent in the delivery of our assistance 
to Russia" despite the Clinton team’s repeated state- 
ments that the program is one of die administra lion’s 
highest priorities. 

The two House leaders said the program was “strik- 
ingly insufficient" and “at best embarrassing and at 
worst destructive." 

They urged the appointment of a politically power- 
ful high-profile coordinator who could cue red tape 

and get quick results. 


Sweden Is Stunned by Mass Killing 

7 Die as Disgruntled Soldier Turns His Rifle on Revelers 


victims were named in the indictment, that no 
autopsies were carried out. and that tbe alleged 
crimes did not take place in Serbia, which along 
with Montenegro forms what is left of Yugosla- 
via. 

He also argued that none of the witnesses 
cited — two fellow members of the Yellow 
Wasps and a guard ai ibe cultural center — had 
actually seen the shooting or the severance of a 
Muslim's ear. 

“My client was fighting for the officially 
proclaimed Serbian cause in Bosnia, and if he 
killed people, it was in the name of that cause," 
Mr. Dordevic said. “Now he feels he is simply 
being used by the authorities." 

In effect, the lawyer said. Mr. Vuckovic be- 
lieves that the Serbian government of President 
Slobodan Milosevic is using the case for a twin 
purpose: To distance itself from war crimes in 
Bosnia by showing that such crimes will be 
punished in Serbia, and to preempt internation- 
al war crimes trials that could target the politi- 
cal leaders found to be responsible for what 
happened. 

Mr. Milosevic has been inching away from 
the wilder proponents of Serbian nationalism 
whom he once endorsed and armed. 

A United Nations commission set up to col- 
lect evidence of war crimes in the former Yugo- 
slavia recently handed its findings to a tribunal 
established in Tbe Hague, The commission said 
that Serbian actions in the Prijedor region of 
northwestern Bosnia would probably be found 
in court to constitute "genocide," and that 
other areas, including Zvornik, revealed a simi- 
lar pattern. 


Reuien 

STOCKHOLM — The soldier 
accused of having carried out one 
of the worst massacres in Sweden’s 
history had been thrown out of a 
restaurant for bothering women he 
later killed, witnesses said Sunday. 

The 24-year-old second lieu ten- 
ant, an army shooting instructor, 
went back to his base after being 
ejected from the bar in Falun. 240 
kilometers ( 140 miles) northwest of 
Stockholm, put an his uniform and 
used his AK-5 automatic rifle to 
kill seven people Saturday, the po- 
lice said. 

Tbe police tracked the assailant 
for an hour. In a brief gunfighu be 
was shot in the hip and stomach. 
His condition Sunday was de- 
scribed as stable. 

The gunman intercepted the six 
women, ranging in age between 19 
and 29. as they left a wooded park 
on their way borne at about 2:30 
A.M. Saturday. 

He opened fire, killing four. One 
died later and tbe sixth woman sur- 
vived with serious wounds, the po- 
lice said. He then turned his weap- 
on on a man in a car and a man on a 
bike. Both were killed. 

A police spokesman said the sol- 
dier is charged with murder and 
attempted murder. The police 
would not name him, although (hey 
said he bad admitted the killings. 
Tbe killing of seven people was the 
worst death toll in Sweden this cen- 
tury. 

Fredrik Skating, a soldier from 
the same base, was me of the first 
on the spot. “At first I thought it 
was some kind of absurd joke," he 
said, “h was like something out of a 
horror movie." 

The group of women were also 
based at tbe Falun military camp. 
They had been attending a week- 


long military education course as 
civilians and had been celebrating 
the end of their course. 

Tommy Hedberg. a security at- 
tendant at the Garbo restaurant, 
told tbs Swedish daily Dagens Ny- 
beter that he had thrown the soldier 
out just after midnight. 

Witnesses in the restaurant said 
he argued with one of the girls he 
later lulled. Tbe newspaper said she 
may have formerly been his girl- 
friend. 

Tbe suspect’s laywer, Gunnar 
Lundgren, said on radio his client 
may have been influenced by medi- 
cine he was taking and, in addition, 
his relationship with one of the 
women. 

After being thrown out. the lieu- 


tenant walked the short distance to 
the base. He told a guard he warned 
to get his wallet 

He then waited for more than 
one hour until the group left the 
restaurant to return to base. There 
is almost constant daylight in Swe- 
den this time of year because of its 
northern latitude. 

The suspect's superior officer. 
Colonel Lars Wallen, said the man 
had a commendable record and 
had been promoted last year to the 
rank of second lieutenant. 

He was also a shooting instruc- 
tor. Colleague said be had an un- 
usual interest in all sons of weap- 
onry. His instructing job gave him 
access to tbe rifle, which can fire 
several hundred rounds a minute. 


North’s Forces Close In 
On South Yemen Port 


The Associated Press 

MEIFA-HAGR, Yemen — 
Northern forces have closed in on 
Mukalla, a key southern port, after 
tightening thrir hold on the Indian 
Ocean coast that separates that city 
from the south’s secessionist capi- 
tal, Aden. 

Rival forces exchanged heavy ar- 
tillery and small-arms fire over the 
weekend in the arid mountains and 
palm-fringed plains around this vil- 
lage, about SO kilometers (30 miles) 
east of Mukalla. The fighting con- 
tinued despite three announced 
cease-fires last week. 

The battle for Mukalla involved 
the closest ground combat appar- 
ent so far in the five-and- half-week 
conflici, which up to now had been 


mainly fought with medium-range 
rockets and field artillery. 

Northern forces now control 
most of the 550 kilometers of 
shoreline from here to Aden, the 
main stronghold of tbe separatist 
leader All Salem Raid, which has 
been besieged on all fronts. 

The south seceded May 20 from 
the four-year-old union of North 
and South Yemen, two weeks after 
civil war erupted in this nation at 
tbe tip of ibe Arabian Peninsula. 

The northern president, Ali Abd- 
ullah Saleh, whose rivalry with Mr. 
Baid touched off the war on May 4, 
has asserted that Mr. Baid fled to 
Mukalla and is seeking to set up a 
rump state in tbe eastern provinces, 
apparently with backing from 
neighboring Saudi Arabia- 




4.98 F per minute. 

The friendliest rate 
for calling your friends 
in the States. 

4.98 F* per minute, taxes included. Take 
advantage of our economy rate to cad family 
and friends in the States any day of the ireek 
from 2 am to 12 noon, French time. 


And that's not all J The full rate is note only 
6. 69 F* per minute : taxes included. 


French time 

2 am 


12 noon 

2 pm 8 pm 

2am 

Eastern time 

8pm 


6am 

Bam 2 pm 

8pm 

Pacific time 

5pm 


3am 

5am 11 am 

5pm 

Monday to 
Saturday 

4.98 F 

5.72 F 

' .If 

r’f" V 

5.72 F 

Sunday 
and holidays 

4.98 F 

5.72 F 


-■ Avtiraftc rate < iuire been citlciilnii’d on tl basis tt/6 minute < 
Utile /nun Ihvcmhifr I3.IUVS- 

For further information y don't hesitate 
to call us TOLL FREE at tEMMMM 

And the world is closer. 


France Telecom 













befi 
3,75 
s thai 


; a 

f SlOC 
lion 
lyfr 
r D 




Provided by CS First Boston 
Limited, London, Tel: (071} 
516 40 25. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. June 10 


ForflCofi Nov Vi *6 


CnmboncFeb 0% 97 
Cwtcd 7sv Jwv9vs 7J 
C/FoncterMr are 03 
Cr Local An 7ft ®8 
Cr Local Dc 7% rr 


Gin Gel 13% "J 

Gee Mr Tft ft 

Gee Ccc Jul 7 

Oec Coo Nov 7". 9fi 

S(CC 6 ft 


Canadian Dollars 


Cr Local F« V\ M 


Con Mot Price YloTri 



Cr Local Jon 7 W 
Cr Local Ma> lore ?3 
Cr Local Min as. 02 
Cr Loco) Mr 4ft U 
Cr Local SM H> t7 
CrLwnnApr ift 97 
CrLvonnJui lift 96 
CrLvannMr TV; M 

CrNatiJWl Ift 98 
CrsuttwFeU no. 00 
Daim Hoc 6 V; 96 
Daimler 0d 9ft oi 
D6NOV 10ft « 

Do Fin Apr 7ft 18 
DS Fin Ftti lft 01 
DO Bb Ftb ft 97 


GoccAug 
CcaApr 
Geee Dc 
G rec Dc 
Gere Dc 
G«cc Jul 
GccCJui 
Gmx Jun 
GeccJcn 
Geec Mr 
G#ceMav 
GcccMln 
GCCCMav 
GeccNav 
Geccrtov 
G4CC Oct 
GeccSeo 

GCCCoW 


DO Fin Jan 
□ORnjan 7 U 
Dwimort Fe*j 7V» *6 
Denmark Jul A 77 
DfPtnarkMr Tre 98 
Deo mart Oct ire 99 
DnifOc* «t « 
DnrtBkFin lift 95 
Dmd Fin Mr ft 90 
Dil bk 7% 98 


Dm Coro Jul 1ft 9S 
GMACCOaAugio « 
GMACMgy 7 99 

GMACCOoSepIft 93 
GMACC(4l5ep7% V 
Guim Pic Oct ft 9B 
Hehfto Fin Feorn^ 04 


IbmCdajai II 96 
IbmCdaMar 13% *5 



TteAug 

7% 97 

®7% 

846 -“3D 

Tip Dc 

tore w 

loot 

L4S +47 

T«>J«n 

tore 01 

157% 

9JM +46 

TMCCAuO 

nre 95 

104 

BJD *-5f 

TMCCD5 

6U 97 

«n 

63 ■"? 

T64CCDC 
TMCC DC 

1 95 

9 97 

**»: 

ioore 

» « 

TWCC Jul 

8 94 

n. 

BJS +R 

TMCC Od 

lore % 

100% 

T43 +4* 

TMCCOcI 

Wi »5 

iaire 

618 +>1 

Turaom jun 

11 94 

100 

9.9J +05 

Tcrdwn «m 

4 15 

94% 

60S +49 

■ urdBinDd 

10% 94 

ioore 

749 t52 

Totunlp Fro 

11 9* 

1071k 

«jn mi 

TcrpnioJui 

tore 95 

ram 

7J* 949 

TenmoMov 

9ft 07 

102 

9J5 +42 

Taranto Mr 

sre oa 

ft% 

9Jt -"57 

Total So Jun 

tore ft 

103% 

84f +83 

TMCC Auo 

tore 96 

■03% 

643 +53 

TMCC Jun 

TV* 98 

95 

666 -"35 

TMCC May 

9 77 

ioore 

673 +*3 

TorotnConMy 

ore 9s 

«fre 

666 +37 

UbtAvtlSeo 

t'm 97 


6*2 +3 

1 Uts Fin See 

10 94 

more 

7.49 +11 

I VonscvAw 

10% » 

1U% 

153 +6* 

1 Vonuv 

WO 01 

107% 

9.10 +51 

1 Vikwver 

lire 95 

1029: 

7J5 +S7 

1 V terra Mr 

VII De Mont 

7% ffl 
nre H 

«sre 

103% 

BM +30 1 
678 +’00 1 

Vil Men! 

10% 98 

ture 

9 JO +*» 

V* inti Jun 

ion 95 

101 re 

605 +72 

w«ttb CurS« 

tore 97 

ram 

671 +52 

WRibinl 

ns. re 

K 

6* *81 . 

Winnipeg May 

ore 03 

rere 

9.43 +73 

Zion Aust May 

7% 99 

*sre 

657 +27 1 

ZU> Bk Feb 

ore 96 

97V7 

877 +50 1 


ECU Straights 


Dll Ok Nov 

Dm Aar 

Ebrt Fob 

EDrdMr 

EocAuB 

SocDc 

EOCFeO 

See Mr 

EdcMr 

EiHFeO 

EtflJun 

Efft Seo 

CIO 

EID 

} 10 Asr 
lb Dc 
lb Fee 
EioJun 
EtbJan 
E lb Jul 
610 Mr 

gib Mr 

f 10 Nov 
ID Sea 
eiosM 


lOmCdaOci lire 95 


ibmCdoQep 10 90 
tbmlntl Oc are Ai 


ism mil Mr 
lord 
ion) 
IBrOAsr 
I bra Jul 
IbrflMor 
ibrdMav 
itsrd Mr 
lord Nov 
ibraOei 
Ibrd Oct 
lord Set 
lfc*i* 


Ekiportt Auo lft «4 
Eksoortf Oc 6 99 

EtnoortfMuy 1ft « 
EksoorHNOv ft 97 
SlPwrJun 8* 97 
ElPwrSeo lore 01 


jaDHahwSep ft a: 
J® Jul 1ft 95 

JMMr 89; 03 

JpmlncMr ft 04 
KOMOl Air Jul B 03 
VjitaH El* Dc 8% to 
FBIIoooQO 6'u 98 
>:hu Ini Feo ft eg 
KtwInllAua 11% 95 
KfwlntiFeo 6ft Cu 
r.tm ifl'l Mr ft 97 
Klw Inti Mr 10 01 


Kim Inff Mar »re az 


Eurollma 1(W 96 
Serafima Apr 7% re 
Eurollma Feo ft 98 
Eurof Into Jul 16ft 01 
EuroHma Nov 7 03 

Eurtrflma A 610 95 
ExlmOkDc Bio 77 
s*jm 6* Oct ft 02 
Fean Dc ft 9 t 


F.E.lCAor 7DV« 9S 
F.E-K.AUS UK, 96 
F. EX. A HU ft 96 
F.E.K.DC ft 95 
F.EX Ftb ft 98 
F.E.K. Jut ft 97 
F.EXOct ft 98 
FlnExCrd ruj. 97 
Finland Dc 9 9* 

Fans Cr Mr (ft «s 

FordMCr Aim It ft 
Fore MCr Oct 10% *4 
ForoCoti AliB 10 94 

FarBC® Jul 8 *8 

FpntCrwJwi 13ft *$ 


KtwlnllNov 6 97 

r.vushuEleOcMOw 01 
LAO Aor lift «e 
LkO Fin MOV 7 77 

Macs Can May tore re 
Mtm liana ts «S 
Mtrben* Sen lift 94 

Mel Toronto ft 97 
MinnnotaOct 4 V, 98 
MaWIAusIMovlOV* 96 

Mobil Can 7re «8 
Mobil Con Jan 8ft "8 
Mooli Con May « 97 

Mobil Nz Feb B'j 97 
Manlrt Dc * K 
Menirt Tji Feb lift «B 
Mont real 1 1 96 

Momrtoi Feb 9 97 

Montreal May lit 75 
Montreal Mr 9 as 
MontriDVIl tore 95 
MfoOk Den Apr ft «fl 
N Brme* 11*6 95 
U Barov, Feb lift ai 
N BnimwJOO 13 95 

N S re raw Mav 78 

NBnmswMT 7i< a? 


T" 

•+2+rrr+p‘ 







- T ^ 






•i 







631 944 

MS "44 
AS *73 
6.99 -tJS 

659 nSS 
7J4 +13 

427 »t* 
6Jt +1* 

729 +38 
KZ tU 
&55 +14 
MS ■* 
MS “di 
U3 +J24 
754 

B JB 984 
43D +15 
A3f +JJ 
IUL .. 
75* +2* 
473 +3J 

428 +44 
a» +24 
TAB 

737 +17 
733 +58 
857 +BJ 
447 +31 


Pound SterBng 


SOd 

con Mat pneoVtcTrsv 



Ymn Str*i#Sr 


NASDAQ NA^eQNAL MARSCS? 


OTC Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, June 10. 1 


. AVang 
; AimWn.'io 
AV/ood 
| AimAII 

i Atnerfed 
■ Ammasi 


Sales ' 9*2?** 

Dtv -IIB irnwHiQb Low Qa etiac * |^^rrv 

7J1I'* 9' i TO'.* ‘ j • BFronkM 

... 1803 {'•» 6 —Ml BcmFon 

r _ 75 Si. 5V: S'; — 8cfiK>3 

- 692 4 3 , l , , ) f ;• , BerKlev 

JO 1.7 303 J2»x 


1149 5V 4 JB’i W’ : ■ •' I CotnRK 

2287 11'. oi. 10'.; ■'i.CaiUEJ 

8287 22 J < :r : 2J — ; • CaicISem 


Satr. | Arne rC os 

Div Yld lOOsHian Low Cm Owe Ameriwd 


I Amned .20b 9 +17 

Amgen ... 3S7J9 

imwor _ 496 

Amrecco .20 17 97< 


457 Jt. 4' 

1283 II 9> 4 1| 

181 IS 12 12 

+17 2P , -O' i 2t7 


_t. ScniOG 

BerKkv 

... B-Y>0- 

. Bertucl 

SesiPwr 

_i., i Eestcio 
i. > EunmSc 


_ 1953 IB* 

.. *Z? J 3 . 

.. 1029 3 ! . 

._ tJ-ii 7-, 
At l.l 1067 40' 


— tri I CO'CM 

. I CarnBco 
_. CalnSle 


- 4625 5 : 1 3"» 4':— m ConSre-n 
_ 1463 12‘-j 11H 12’ *i - COnsFn 
_ 7780 2 ’.j 1"; 1-‘i — ti .CnsFnat 

... 809 s", 6< . 6*1 - • CenWct 
60 4. 4 .'4 73»u JO ?J>, - I *w Cont/rj 


10*7 40'. 39'* 40 
J9 I' 14' . !«•; 
IMIS' I 14' . !••* 


. . 1 CaroCo i .12 I.4H394 1H* 
i Col Sc. . 2840 1- - 


...3S749J2'- 6j4. 45’ j — ! Bettis 


28 IP* 11 11*4 

10 ~ M'. 20' ; 


* *j ' C-Ttcdon 
- * : i Colcotnc 


A Pec Pod 

APt'Ji 

AAQN5 
ABC BCP 
ABC Rail 
ABR Info 
ABSs 
ABTBId 
ACC CP 
ACS En s 
ACXTc 
ACCs 
AD ESA 


... 3348 2»x 3+« 4 T * awSSv 

... 1521 1 1”; 10*4 IV* -’■* A^I^ns 08 

_ 2934 1 0 ' i I6‘.k 17 — Amiran 

_ IBI 13 12*i 12* Amiral 

. 4743 10 I7*i l«re — Amv-Sr* 

_. J99J 124. 12'lA 12'* - i ASSbn 

JQ 1J >d001H* 15 15 — 'IIaSmIc 

_ 1640 22*. 21 V» 27'. — 'S ! AiGKtc 

.120 .7 3715 17V, 16 It*, -rt Anbft S 

... 934 IS 12 14^ -"s AnaiWH 

... 800 39'.': J7*. 37*4 — 1*. Ancren 

... 8701 42H 38*-. 39'-*— 27» ArfdiBo 


AEPs Of 

AEREn 
AES Out 
AESOs .M 
AFC Oil 
Ab" Steel 
ANB .BO 

APS Hid 
ARI Nel 
ASK 
AST 

ATS MM 
AWAh 
a aims JO 

AamRi B .08 
AaronRt .0* 
Aba*K 
AbbevH 
AbmsSB .10 

Abiomd 
AbleTet 
Abrams .12 

Abraxas 
AbslEnl 

ACCtN 

accshii 

A claim 4 
AceCsh 
AWIO J2 

AcmeMet 
Actel 
ActPerf 
ActPr wi 
ACf/OK 
AOuom 
Actoftb 
A®qe 
Adonic 

AtSngtn 

Aoeiotin 
Arfiasv Jo 
AdobeS s JO 
AOvHli 
AdvRos s 

"Ovvjr 
Advlnl 
AdvCog 
AdMeS 
AdNCAP 
AdvPetv 
AtfvPro 
AovSwn 
AdvTUJ 
AttrTcn 
AdvTiss 
Advontas .50 
A OV an tec J4 
Ad* Ben 
Ac-autm 
Aerav* 
Aetrium 
Atvrna> 

AbSvcs 

AgncvR 

Agnnog .10 

Agaum 

AgrIDvT* 

AirExp JO 

Ariytetti 

AirScn wt 

AirScn 

AirS-rs 

Airtran .13 
Aknrn 

AKzij 1.74. 


... 800 19'.': 37*4 37*4 — 1», Ancren 

... 8701 42 38*. 39'-,— 27, i , n , ilBc3 
_ 766 14 134 14 - '.+ AnrB JS : j 

— fi* i 7*. B - 1 AncnGm 

JM A 72ai?'6 17** IB' , - '1 ■ tndrTS* 

... 9SS 7’*. 6V. 6 1 - — 1'« ? AndvBc 
... 2083 12*- lire IP* — *« AndvTcw 
.581 3.9 3126 IB',. 14* i IT-, — Anerrrf i 
_ 210 10*. lO'v 10*. -. | Andres 

_. SJS4 2S 2V* 25 -3^ Aneraen 

,B0 II 4525’. 22>i 25 -'..AneSlO 
.. 2742207. 2d'; 20*. — '*,' An.'ec 
„. 1G6 5 4', 4'*, ... AccrTus 

_ 5B2! 13’. 13 13-re -' N i Anmori 

_5IS13 16'.* 14’: IS'-L-rt,,' ApogEti 

4JS jre J'-, 3'* - >« tcojee 

_ 303 ire V', ire Apple-; 

jo sjb i?92 are 7*u e - 'i. Apis*u s 

-'•* Anletwes 
.. . AoiRec, 
.. i ApaE*tr 


Ammon s _ 1233 8'; ;■» 7'; — : ’i 

Amser* ._ m I . : ire V: ' Bindiv 

AmICCDS 08 J 7967 17 14*. IS*-.— 1*.. 

Amiran ... 71 »■ : a*, a* • — ** • 

Amiral JO 1.1 lJ+liare it*. 16 aoAi.v 

Amvosrs _ 2932 S’. . SioSot*. 

Amylm _ 7I92H'..- fl's IV. -2'. 

Antoflk .. 1280 17*. if. 16’: B : oPnor 

AnalvTc J4 1J 6-15*. IS IS*. _ b-oor 

Anolvi 48 3.0 105 17 U It'.—** B-OOrtSI 

Anonoftl K00OS.B 154 17*. 17'. 1~'* -* ■ Biog^i 
Ancren _ 65 Z‘ : —re I w 

AndtBcn - 2420 14*. 14'. If, , -'* Bioied 

AncBWls J4 .9 252 22’; 26*4 27:. - 5,onon 


BigBs 

_■ . ■ BioDTir 
BigRck 

- re ' Bindiv J 
_ii., BesLoqlc 
_re ■ Biota .vs: 

. i . B-oAl'.V atb 
SieSovZlf 
. 7 > , BibSum 

. B'OPnor 
E+cor 

— re B-oers si 
- ' ' BiOSc-1 

—re i B-i«tn wi 


- • : i Coicotnc 

- ’y I C.-iest-ai 

Cc'e * 

- i. Centeno 


32r « £ i- <i — i. | Cciuerw 
14 IJJflll'ali IV; - ■ . CdiO.-n 
. *111.1. lj'. 15'; -'4 CcilPro 

. 2J24 li’j I7‘: 13’ — : Ceiicor 


J5cl.a 63+ 20*. I9*» 57 

: _ iu : ; : 

.. 7993 J9'. 36*: 37*. 

_. P51 16’* 14*. 1“. 

. 3900 S't 4': 5' 

. 25" £•; 7'. S' 


_ 92« 2S'.. .'J' . 73' : — t 1 ■ 


08 .6 1201 13 12' i 12'-: . I Apleoees 

.06 J S9 12*. 12’ t 12*. .. . AolRee, 

_ 3723 T 5 1 , ere ApaE*tr 

_ 3604 19V, 13*. l«re -re ABtosC 
.106 J 458 >4*. 14 14-.,. — APICartm 

.. 1T7 7v* O''* 2' * _. APdDgil 

.. 2412 lire lore 10"T„— =■:. Apflimo 

.12 2.1 *2 5*. ft 5*4 Apfllnovs 

_ 17B1VV. IV'* 12'. _ ApldfASs 

... 370 3' ; 3’» 3' * —V. ; AMVJcr 

... a 3*. a*, a*. — *. ; amso 


_ 2243 4' are 4 

il isre 14' 4 15'; - 
JO 1.4 714 lire i: 12'. J 

-.34805 16' . I”. 1-4 
J8 IJ 87206 77*. 23': 26' I 
.01 .1 2430 24 21*. 23'. -1 

Oi J1179916*. IS'. 15'*— 1 

_ 311 10*. 5': 10. t - 

- 923 7’* f ■ 6'* — 

... 7439 6 J'-. S'-’.. ♦> 


! Biomotr 
Bievnc' 
i Biomlro 

EilScnr, 

Bmv.’ora 

Busph 

BiOSrS 

e*oTlni 
BioT'TG 
, B.rcCi. 

■ SirorAC 
BincT.i 

; BIL.Hv.L- 


.7 >606 12'. I F 

t £9S 13* III 
.. *98 1 2' 

„ HU 9*4 9- 

... 1 222 I 
.. IISS 5' v 4* 
..23754 32*. r* 

. 744 i:** <■> 

- "lj j «. 

. :C3 I’: 7' 

. 711 e . V 

.. 13894 10 . g> 

. 209*1 6 » *’ 


- — C-ll’,lcr 

.. CoiCmA 

— ■ • 1 O.JCr-iFP 


1.4 11394 11*. 13"i 11’* -*i OISa.-Bt 
. 6340 1- r . l'r -’.j'ClrtD: 

436 ' i — ,< CnvSoi 

. 307 15'* 13 . 14'.* COfT*»B 

- 396 3‘i j* : J'i _. CaaorO 

... JW8 27** 23' * 74 —2i. Coaort. 

56118 16 . CocmSk s 

_ 911 6*4 6* i 6-4 -re CoorsS 

. lfM it*, is*, to** — >* Cooctr 

- 7116 23’T 19'. Hire ft 2re CoolevPn 

_ ua :*. ;■ ■ ire — ' . codvih 

- 9;12I3’. ir-re wre _ CorTAc* 

_ 1244 47 45** 46 — ! i CorGoeF 

_ S77 26 25 2S4-* Cl ream 

_. 76824 IS*. IV; 12 —1 Cardd 

. 1347 7'., 6-1 6*» —*# COreiCa S 

1.6 1511 If : IS* 4 lt*> -•* CrnrFn 


Or, re 

»»* Hlpr 

LffA 

Ctf 


Stodj 


30£ »'t 


»■-• 


EC'Tls 

.05 is 

=9 2% 


:re 

-re 

ERE1 

.85 10 0 

.5 Si 

are 

fl': 

- 



25* 18 

16". 

j 

-re 

EL3Q1 


l»l t? 

16'* 

16 ; 


E.*AC In 


6C B'l 





.’2 41.1 

2+8 r. 

’re 


- 


_ 

2J6TItre 

io:> 

nr • 



EPTecT 


Se«s 

Sre +■- »0Cf <*ar Low Cbr One SiseXi 


m — .. CellrTr j _168:4 1S‘. It’s 12 —1 Cara >5 

10*. II — r. • Co'.-r* . 1347 7’.* 6*1 6 *j CCr?>Cai 

2'« -•; Cmi'.l 30 1.6 I6lt If : IE*. 15*4 - 1 * CrirFn 

9-. 9>, .. , O.n.lBa J6 IJ 5651' * ir. 7”* - I Carlmog 

■* •* . I CcntiBc 150113.7 3311’: 11 IV: . CflrctCo 

-•re 4* , — ’.•CeniCri i<£9Mre rc 29 — •» '-arcs m 

29-* 72' 4 I Centrsk _ 937J IS*. 13'. !i»« - 1». uorte^ 

e*. i: •’. CoorrTf 34<iri t?re lore corwos 

?•» J*, : Confn .. 4i:223’; JV; S — *•• Corvel 

:■* ™ ' Crfntxcr _ 102*0613* lore i; ■■•r., y»Cjr_ 4 

*' : o -’. .ConW-V! . 2735 7'j 5 1 * ~ u -7 M UsC.ro 


.. i; rre 7re ?re -re E2ccm 

ai 17V; l6'.T ir I - 1 re EZEVv A 

u :c64i96. isre i»re -re e=sl«bco 
.. vt- 17 is IS*.— :re Ealiii- 

„ 7540 r* . 29 . . 35 -ft , EB?Fc 
.. 40iciore ere lore —re Eo»+d 
_. 10*64 ii » iSre -i f u ' .n T 

_ ::ds*i sere k' , .. Sesoi 

. 456) r ire 3 : * - • Es-'Bc 

_ Tlfc|S 52V. £». if l— 3re Esv-E- 

.. 74?j 25 2 :*» ft-re — i* Eastba 

_ 1S4 5- 1 1 , 5*i _ Ecs*2\r 

.. 2S54 ; !£ 15 — C l ==7e»«t 

_ nc4i6 ir. is** _ Ecrvc-i 


_ 18149 tflv, 16 *m lSVi -H F*=nlVM6 .40 

_ SI i:» V.J ire ~”j prnHUs j? 

_ 1041 lore 13 10 —Vi . FtFmk. JO 

_ 480 sre 6 6+ — ’•■ FHorSs .» 

5J 22 9re 9 » _ RHCW 1.18 

_ 99e 7*. 7'-i 7" * — ; FlHmSv S M 

_ emit’* io>4 i iv,— ire Fy'mtt s J7 
_ 715 6 ■ 7*. 7*6 — V. FKfttBC JO 

_ 1267 *re 9 9*6 _ FTKr»« J3 

<A 6 22*1 21're 22V, —1 PUltV ,J2 

_ 224 lire IS 151k — * FTAlerC J.« 

_ 30*1 V lore 11 - *6 : FlMctl t -58' 

IS 6 5'* sre 5’* -H I FMX3BC ti 

1J 333 31 31 -3 RMdwF 

IS It, 73', 72' ; 23 — W'FWJoes . 

_ *5 4*. are 4'-* ft! a 1 F.V.WA 20 
_ 1C3S4 Tdi . t IV. I2'i«— 10-4 . PNtGa J7 


*j fw** Drv Yifl 10CiH,a.*i Law Ctsc Owe ; StoQa 

ass*/ ^ H FSTJissa 


23 2* TS 39 *2kii GrrnoWl 
3 22’ y Pit ... ! GmtJSu 


Mir VW HfaNiBb.Lpir Cue OBB> . 


- «»5 *A ft Hi . ft,- 
JO 3.0xlre02iV, 2ft 28V> tft 


3&S12re 12< 
2169 4 .1 2*i 
450 19V; ]9 
124 1*. V, 


S 44'-; 03 431k —lb l OrORnd 

«! isre 13V, nre _ ■ erawtr 
39 29'.; 2 S*h 29 re _ i cream 

sn 73v* 21*. are -iw ' GraTace 

360 28". 57*4 28”* *<6lGnWB 

2© ip, 14 re M'A -V* , crowSir 

*2l&.. Are i 5 3 rertt, 4 ;g3^ 

JC277I’.* 70V; »re —Ik < 

X60 25 34-J.2S 


- - 345 7 6% 8Mi — V. 

5. 577 MW lft IM- *k 

■ - 7Tt ■ 1 a '+* 

_ 379 tow to Tore +W 
-a * w ZM 20 - law law +J* 
_ aia ure nre ia^ - . ■ 

ft 14D14W 1ft ift +H 


19- * — ; Ftocjts 
r.= -i'e FtPcNfw 


_ 2B7V 7'* 2*» 2H » Fs-P=Jm 


25*6 10'.* |v* 9'.* — ■ Ecrse*- 
U9 2’-* J's i’-- _ £cs«r«‘ 

3509 are 2o>« jire— :*« E<tsC+ 

£3 1 7 "-, It 1 * 1. c Ex*' 

;*7t4 , if*, ;r, scld. 


Blr.H »*1 A 
BlkH -MB 
BUmnie > 


10m — ' : . BliiLOu 


. 2S»»i"r l 

!.04h 3J VS! M' : :< 


_. ISi i. I. — ,'BlyTn 32 1 6'* S’, o 

.. 825 20 I”.'. IB'.— I'. 1 BoarBnS 1.74 3A 10384 3*’, J5’ .- J4 

..14437', 6 J„ JI, ..IBcOEvn .27 1.3 322B 21*. 21 ' . 2V ; 


1363:5', 27' V 23’* — 


_ 91655 46*. 37’-. 4Ti —5’ - ! BOdvDr 


... 63 3*. 3*. 3*a — *s ApOSc, 

„ S95 9'a B** 9 — '..APOScw 

_ 64937 !»■- IS'. ISA,— J** I APIdSig 

.. 376 BV: J*4 7*. — ’ . I ArobSb 

1.1 5416 isre 15*4 - re ' Aramed 


J2 2.1 54 16 

_ 2142 a 
.. 5862 11 


54 16 15'<* IS*, -• 

3142a Jire SI'-*— I 
5862 11 9 9' •* — ’ 

1891 5 r; -» 


. Zat 4' i 
_ SOI 7 
.. 476 ’ • 

_ 173 5 

4 3* 
- 53* 13' 


: Arcortirg J4 1J.445* IS', 16'; l*'i -2 


'••'l | ArcnCm 


... BB6M** IB>; 10 ' .-!** ArchPti 

... 253 TO'-: If* I*-". — arTICD 

.48 5 6 789 9'k 8-+ «'-» — ■ , Ard-W 

_ 125 5** 5’- 5* , -*» traenPa 

_ 47434 18’ * 16 17' i — 1 ■ ; ! a rc ihuM 

_ 190 15’.. U*. IS'. ArgoGb 
... 503* i4 i3> , lj. , . ! flrgcy. 


.. 227C 23' ; Hi'-, .’3': -I-' 

.. TUB I*’, 17'* IS'. -■ 

„ :IS14>, 14 T4 

_. Jo: 

.9 616-30’: --9 :*»* 


m4S 41- - 44'; -4’ 


. 11112 IV 

.. 1141 13'. 9’ I 
1.16 4J 6*0 75 .'6* 


.J I2.U36-* 35’ :J5 ri - • Arj’jifln 


_ 6I9 2V-. 20-. :d* 


9e0 4 *j A 1 -. 4'.* 
117 3V* 5’. S', 


77 —1*. i Ariodun 

a** .. Artstblt 

74I-. 14*, - I'. I A/kB*ii 

9 10 —7 1 Armor 

» z 1 — ' ' ,, | Arn old * 

4’.* _. j ArriiPti 

S ' : Aro.vFn 

J’ j Aron, Ini 


- ' , • ecllinnw 

-I BonTon 

- e.:ovr.'-ll 

• ■ * i->c>-*6 

— ' ' foomiwn 
— !' : Borol 
-2 Borlnd 
-2-re Eorror 

— ' . b«ta: 
ewiac 
. , Bost-eny. 
. , Co. :t.: 

-4': I L'O'EaV 

. Eo*=r.e 
-V • bo ■iBr.-.j 
— ' - ■ BrocRnni 
' BMP MA 
— ** 3rdP i-.:t 
— '* Bred. Vr 
— ’ ; BrenF. 

- ‘-i ■ Brn’JjL 

-v.. Erji.'ii 

— , BrV\*!g 


*’ : o - • . Contcr tv: 
9': 9' — ' . I CirCOp 

*'« j. — 1 , j CFiCBk 
2 — • z Zj^nGord n 
’ * - • • • . Ortf’Ec 

— ',.0»5C 

*' « .CJorFns 

.. •. — ; CirAVaer 

i .. . C=ctF!n 
10- . IV. .',1 CPiLlo 

j*. J - —' * 'fnSom 

I I'.. . ’Ct'Sou 

»’* 9re-l CntvBc 
• , •, — I Cry So 

'* •'* — ' , : Coonfei 

i‘» " -.Cdiftii 
J S’* ■ 1 CiYbca 
I-, f .. _ Ccrrter 

!*': 2*', . C*fPl9. 

£rei -::iktivr a 

lire il': • | Oialon* 
?>•. .!•. ijotk 

V: V; -slcnmoPr 
'0 . • Owtmodi 

V '• * — ' • ; Chcnrn 


I, •, • 1 ‘-OSV.TT- 1 

~ s, CAsCtrB 


sa &6 Bi3 : * 13'. lore 

. lHr, F< F* 

ac 3 : :n*33 20 t*’* 

- 363 4'4 5'* 

_ 3709 6H 7-. are 

_ ?rg j*, 2 re jre 

_ TOE 6 5-k 6 

_ 991415*4 U 12V.. 


^IDjid s M X* *60 35 fr V 35 r W ( CKftVK “ ~TJ7 TV* Ilk i?> +W 

1% 1% lV“ ^ 47 «h 

Fr^riBn .I’t l.« >19 7 8^ 7 95k!, 

FTS3* 7U ASb 2 6 73 27A* 2S 25 — 2V* | | H 

PTSwKirp .. l*»l«re IS’.k 17V, -IV. ; — - 

mhobt waft 7w 


_ i FF*=TBn 
_ FTS3V 7U 
— '•» RSwkVu 

-re. fsoccp 


. FtSbgnao .13d 1 J 3214 U*k UVk - | HA-U3 

- •+ lsrtrc Mb 1.4 Ja? »V* 33V, M'A ,% E&* 3 


_ FrSouMT 
l'. FtSaBcp 


_ 224 are j-, Fstsime 


554 14’A I3*h I4’t •WlCrrinc 
338 26 25 »’* +1W SSrif 


5CS1C 8*. f* 
3*6 S '.i 4 VS a" 

3 r 9*. ere «« 
343 5*. ! S= 
4C'.7 “’ * 7* 

J?6l£’* 14 c 15 
I75i I*. 7 , 2» 
I2C26 U W 
97 19 >a le 
■-22£ :re : s-. 

24* 10’: 11 


-re fttscCo jo 


4VS *"■ : — re FTStFln 

ere 9«; >*6 FiTecm 

f sre -re fs-tcwi i 


._ 69i2in lire isre +v„ E^rK" 

JO .7 033 30 JO — 2 

13c tA 334 7*6 ore 7 — W ! 

_. 2515 tore 9V, IQ * Va I LKEkr 


FtU’O&CP 
FtUttJ 
F7J*OC & 
pr.vac 
FtV/Cn 


.65 3.7 8415 45": 4T*, «5>A -2*0 
07*13 *w s’ * ore sre -'Airjvgva 
Ji 7J lC 31 31 31 +H2 

jt n :a-n ti*.. or. >1 i rmoco 


-na m 7w 7W -re 

— 16 ft 6 6M - 

J2T*S33IVt 39 30re 

_ an ii |9»A ift —re 

_ 67 aft 4 4Vk -»* 

_ 446ft *TVl» 5ft -V. 

LB 3B3S" 3ft 25 +1 - 

- 1433*16. ft 


22 17*.,* *-3 

*' !«??»*!, J* B& 


. S41 l'r 1 

7 3-. 3 
- X79 3i a 
.6 1 . ' i 13 
Me 1.4 3S2»74'. a 
1 JOB 4*. J- 

.. T3B 6 5- 

jo j i4i a*, a 

. . T,7 r : 4 

_ 679 o' . «' 

j: 4'. - 


a . 7.4 '.'ClvmSn 09 .9t;51«10', 

r’-'W JUFSB 80O7 4 ?3! Z —' : 


3-: ?re 

•j - •::! - - odog pt 

“ ?*' -g • 

I'flM 

1 " w.V CrvorriM 

2: • K - ' 7“ ■ CulInFr 

?3 2uip» 


. 1094 7-* r . — 


. \\7i ire »• 

95 73.C 1*6 4H *'.• 

_ 6456 U *' 
- 558 »3 ♦' 

.. :>« ore 5 
_ 11 16’, 13’ 


:re -re 

4 i — 4 
f * — 


_ 'ATS ! •: - ■ , ' +P-+dBn 

. 246 Ji'* IB' : 11 .. FtFOFns 

_ ran. try ir. ••■i.fi.’Aug 
_. 3:46 11 9=. ig ! * —re treiekin 

2 4 2£ — , 4'-, -3; FVrekBe 

_ 3TJ’ 35 re 32' . 33’.— 7 F’Stbtlm 

:«« «re ic'.— jre *rs«-. 

- 6C9-* it. 9'u c lc3Fr. s 

■ 73657 J! ■ : 1* . 17 — : RSOstt s 

- *sc ft M are -re Rgsfrot 


S'-: -'. FtftdBn I.OOe 5JI 177 17’* 17^ T7'i 


<3. OSD 21 'm 2P * 71 —W 
J 0913 tft tft —*k 

_ ma ft ore 6ft -. 

J 5278 3R4 2ft Tr-ig --ft 

„ 2821ft isre 15ft -re 

.. 301 124* lift ure -re 

02 is I2ft 13ft— ire 


IJb 3 I *33038 


. T3S5J IT’ : 

: 2 fix 


9-k =lcOFr.s J9 

17 — s Flagsrrs 
are -re Fiaafrof 225 
7. - Rc-r .CS 


e!5 6'. 5'- . 6 
111 3‘.k ?’a 2' 


111 J’.* 7'; 2’* - 'T 

s: t s'i l'-. 

569 2'. :*>» 2'-. 


31'. ■ ' : ' Cboomtu 
** ' : — Cneicv i 


S . — • C'jstCn 
o> * ' C.umjPl 


' CmmTrk 
Cam ix:. 

. ChnFin 
' ;im»r 


_ 6516 3''/« 3‘-. 3' i Aromlni 

_. *32 5'-'; S'« ire — 'k Arrai/yTrn 

-. 153* 6 5 e - *. Artab 

... 2': ?' r ?’V — A nnXS 

749S 15 IJ’ > 14=6 ArtV.’Gv 

26 5 4' ; S -re Asanru 

_ 3^6 S'-k 5V. S' i. • "i. ASOtndC 

J 3944 J»'i 3T 33' J Aseco 
.7 9778 357: J3>. 35 — Asbv/m 

_ 358 29''* 38’ V J9': ,*. AspCITi 

... 404 3". 2'Vl. -'n AsoenBfc 

216 9 B'k B'. - re AsdBrc 

_ 337 11V. 10 10 —V. AadCmA 

_ 1604 13% lire 13 - l'-k AsOCmB 
_ JOlft 17', 77ft ... Alices 


Artstl 

— '« AT7i',!G 
— ■ Art Way 
* % Asume 

■ 're Asct-ndC 
— Aseco 
— ', Asbv/rm 
-’* AsPCtTl 
- re AsoenBfc 


_ 4370 13% I2'*» 12% —V, AarnlaF 


.lOe .9 i9$4in« lire lire 
_ 951 13 12V, 12% 
. - 105 3*. 3% ft 


8 747S24V. lire 24% *3% I ArysITcJi 


... 2S3a ft ?:■ 3 _ AicnCsi 

- 1561 2*. 2re 7"% -V,. Attkflio 

_. T89S12H. 11 lire -*, Alnev 

- 2*4 7% 6’.* 6*i — ’, AlVinsn 

.12 1.3 064 9% 8> * 91.4 . *, Artnld 5 

_ 520 J 3% ?7« — v f4 A tlAm 

1.74C3.I 3H37 55*. 54V. 55"'. * V, AtlBcu 

34 i: 726 17 T6' « 16', —ft AMCStAir 

. - 817 13ft II?* 12’ *— 1 l AIIGuH 

1J0 6J S3 19V, 18V, 19 % ■ 1 | AI ISO Air 

AO 1.8*2345 are B"i 22' - —ft AirTefe 

. . 375 9*» a*5 9«6 - re Aimef s 

_ 1404 lav* i6re i6%— ire i Aim asm 

_ 12836 7ft 25% 2ft— 2% I AtrixL 

J8 3J 1687 25ft 24ft 35% — % ' AtwdOc 

- 1798 4'Vi, 4ft 4% - ft ! AuBOn 

Jt XI 130 12 lift JI", _. AuraSv 


Alton* 

Aictde 

Aidikis 

Aldus 

AlevBId 

AlesEng 

AJfoCo 

AliosR 

Abeo 

AlKcrm 

AIIASem 

AllFDIr 

AJICJTy 

Alegw 

AJnOra 

ABooPn 

Alnscmi 

AIBkCoO 

ARdOkS 

Wot 

AlktCoP 

AldColl 

AldCov 

AlkJCI 

AIWGOS 

AldHIPd 

AHdHIdg 

AWL We 

AldWsle 

AUstFn 

Antrisra 

AJoebe 

AtpMW 

AbWlLC Wt 

AUhal 
Alpha I wt 
AlohaBta 
Ai print 
Alphrwf 
aJpLcc 
ah odd 
Atm 
Atieon 


AtamoGp Ji :: 32e 17 
Atantec _ 817 13 

Akntn 1 JO & - S3 19 


... ?427 lj", 13'. 1J. , . BMP VIA 

_. 22? J -*'r -"* -4* 3 rdPiv.’fc 

-. JeeA »*'4 v «'* — '* Bred. Vr 

.. Ji* !' . i' : 4 . — ' , Brcpp. 

JM A 2402 10% 10% 10% ■ Brn’dii. 

W io J4a 72 » 7! % - 1 ■ Urbans 

AO 2 1 229 20 i9 l 6 '.* — , BrVw! g 

_ 634 7 5’ : 6' . — ' * * B'ence 

J2 2.0 571 15% 15 16% -1 %:■. iBroodl 

.12 jo 16020% 20 70% - * * BrertB s 

... » Cl 7'. _ BrdgF 

-.10745 1,,'. l“„ left Br.iev 

1C 1.7 3«.’ r„ £% S’- -%'a-oarrr 
SO 10 if 10 — '- BrabdTc 

_ 2W5B'. “'* ai-,. Bd-islln 

_. 3310 16 14% l£'* — '* ErdPom 

_. 435 * % 7 TV, - ft j 6dwy5cv 

13163 10'.; 91.. 9 ,. _• r | BroCX 
_. 7t3I I5ft 264% 57 — '* , BrockCS 

JO 1.2 141 17 lift 16ft +'; BrorBl 

1.08 10 462 J6’ . 34’.; 36' * ■"» BktvnEc 

_. 234 26'* J3>» lire »'■, Brook stm 

_ 3391 J 6 34ft 75 . BrMree 

.. 2*62 14% 14% 1**> - % Broun 

B74SJ4'v 3ft 34 V 1 -1 BroGour 

12 1J 107 9ft 9 9 —ft BrToni 

.01 e .4 164 2% ?re - ' e Brunos 

_ 43 eft 4% 4' * .. I BrvnAAw 

_ 600 1?T* 12 12% - re BUC5-AA1 

_ n?4 ure U' * i4' * _ Bud'll 

_. 1106 6% J‘* S'* -"r'Butwrs 
t _ 19 7ft 7% 7% - ' BuoCre* 

9i6 'O'. 9% io -re'Buiitfr 

J6 2.0 279 18 17 17% -% EwURun 

... as I'm 7 7'k .. I eurrSr 

_ 23 4», 4% 4V* — % 1 BusnRc 


• ’ * | OmrCp 
I ■ . • . I Qi'jstng 

•=.ClJC Kt 
45’:— 1% J CtiOOSS 
— . 1 CtilJCmp 


H ft 
... :si 4 ■, 
- 5+f ■. 

.70 l.l 22T 12' 


.. 24 2 

.41 13 joo :o 


JO 14 >6 1(1 

... 1606 11 
.070 J ,47 aft 


lire i:% -i 

l". 1% . 

19 161. -' 


8 : — 1 1 , CJiCDrg 
10*- — '- OicDr wl 

4 ■ —re I cioii'!t 
13 - 2 re Cn-cit 

l*'% — 1 ■ ! Otrnmd s 

n% — ■■* | class 


4ti'.*— 3": Om/Ak 
3S% * IV. cm os 
15' j *'j CSprico 


-. i 8urr8r 
— % , BusnRc 


... -0494 .6% 15 13 - 1'* j Cn-Tii 

... 2* !’i J': >'.% —%! Otrnmd 

. l°5j 11% II 11% — i CIB5R 

11T5 II": 11% ure. —re Gdco 

.16 1.8 246 9% ;% 9 -ft Gnico 

- y/5 r 21 II „ CmnFWi 

-IK 93 4V: 36' , 40'.*— 3"; On/Ak 

... I96e Jsft 34 3S% * I v, Chios 

... 354 IS' * 14* : 15' , + % Cprico 

.i 5bJ 7% e% :% _ OrcFn 

... 37JI7% 12 lire _ Orclnc 

._ 1909 11% 11% lift Orcre, 

~ 4315 16 14% IS'-, -re GrcSv 

J4 XO 7663 85* 7'., B -".’y Gnus 

.60 1.9 Jim 1 , 21*. 31% „ Cisco s 

111 8% B'.I are - OlFcd 

45 14ft 13": 14% -re GlotnCo 

^ 16762 20’* 19 19 —ft O'CEnc 

_ 565 15% U 14 —i^ Clkostr 

^ 746 13% 12% 13*. - I CtzBco 

_. 48t 1 L : I"'e i"’u —re cnBndi 

- 9*8 f% 8% 3**t — Ctiz SV.g 


. 1054 * 3 i’» - : e C.ftr 

IIJIJ'. 17% IJ’: -V, Cktx 

253'.'% '% — % 

. -76 11% 19% 10 : _ C.g- 

■ 1 J9ft JTft 39’ : -ft :vn 

79 3ft 5% 3% .. C.rt 

. -7 35*. 30 IO’* . C.-te 

. 1012 5ft - 8ft -:* C-tfi 

.’ 613 9’ : « »’.• — Ctfd 

. SSTo 12* * lift 17% . Cvw 

S09 2’ . 1 . 1- •. C.-ta 

. uk. ii% i: u% - 1 c>if 

. 4C52 4% J-* }•-, — % 

.10607 38% J4% 1ST*— 2 .. I 

. 47S3 4', 4% 4% — •, ■ I 

-*506 64re 62ft *4%-l 
: 675 19’. 18' ; 18ft — re Dil'l 
. 142 i 3% 2* % — MN 

. 135 % % ._ DIV I 

. ft;r 4 J% 3% _% DBA 

. 4*5 21 IE'. 10 ■% PP> 

*400 12% IV 
+J3 6 re c 


C\beron.c 

rso-wc. 

-■ g"'us 

->r, . S» 
L.mi 
C.I«I 
CrTftd un 
Cs KZri 
Cviorsn 


35*f 2% :re ?re — *. 

AJe 1.2 1J4T39-. 36 : 33% 

Of S AUS 5*. 9 9 : - . 

■ 3t 16 J40 55% SI . 55 . — • 

.83! S? 74 10% *% 1C -ft 
- trX 6% 6 6 — . 

.. 2eC 3 ; 2 7 - ; 

. :3ft"-* :2 : r : 

.. ^t 5% i% r . — . 

tV r.-:--; 

"liriaft ;s* 


-i4C3-:e a . 
_ 2A43 4% 3-y 

._ 7418 3 ' , ;'* 
- :c« 4 : tl, 
-17ST i% £ 


cFi 

ElrLTeK 

E’lersr 

frrEt 

S:*rcr 

Sr-br** 

E-ram 

1^ 
E*t*miBC 
=.71» 4.t S 
E-4::c 

=”i3'e 

EtWkV. 

E'Cscr; 

=»t3.5S- 


16 SOS’: 4ft 4% -*. Fionas* 
_ S87I 1 7 16 1*% Pk-nsri 


_ 187913'. lire lire— 1 
146 IX 258 14'/, 13% 13>. 

... 186 13 11 12ft - 
.. 4C ore e% ere . 


4ii 4% i’ : 4*. 

2 '8 r u re v., 


719 eft 4% 4% 
SMI4 . 13'. 14% 
2VC; 6% 6\. 


6*9 2% 9-1 6% 
4'63 5*. S i • 


’J ; : c”S. — ■ 

S’-r 4% ■ . r 

4% "ft 

7‘« : i — % i ;-:.- 

£ - - — i EftVec 


O&M Fn 
D4NF wl 
DIV Hm* 


I3P T 8' : 

31 3 V. 
797 11% 1’ 


EftVee 

Egn 

ETr'CCs 
Eb'.Tc * T 
ERlAYM 
E.-rerv rvt 


_ £5*2 7% 7- 
..lil«41* J' 
- Mil 17 14’ 

... me’; S' . 
.. :-i* 7% t*. 

.18 6X ui 1; ft* 

7s 4 9 r’c* T7 J t; 

.:c ; ; >irn% ? 

r 44 Jr j*, 

.. 4cc 3% 

Ii :.6 41113% »* , 

.. 1-7 6% 5ft 

.. U* o . 5ft 

_ rr J 1 , rre 


-1 Ftextm 
_ FtoFsl 
-ft FTOWW 
-ft Fmmn 
— I FdLwB 

- FdLWA 

_ ' Foailnd 

-% ForaSrs 

— ’ • ! FsrAm 
-f: FareslO 
* ft FrrsiO wt 

— -• ForstC al 
' T - Fcrscm 
— % Fonstm 


... 935 13' . !2'A 12ft —’A ' 

.09 is 7845 6% 56* 6ft -W 
09 IS 16909 6 5ft 6 - ft 


ot ijiorw* □ J*. » V7 , I hm ill i8 

00b SX 63 8". 79/. B _ LT^rS 

.. 1853.’ 26 20 ZJV. — 2*. 

08 3J 14*31*. J0V- 31ft *W SSSTS; 


3821 4 3% 

2 9 2 


7 I HoLfiCh 
A ! HavenB 


i w : 'll nOSSl! 

4' • .. Foster 

i% — % . 4C Son 
1C% — FrnFn 


t-prsiu wt _ i i e i i^rjirr 

ForstCbl .751 5J 7S3I4W 136, 14ft 
Fcrscr. _ 107 13% 13 lift - ft ! mS2£ S 

Forum _ 17 11"« 10% 10% — '« ! 

FTWynos J8 3J> 113077% 2*% 77% ' % !£?£}£, 
FwmnB J0O .9 5751 35% 33T. J4-. -'-a E2S5J 

FcrmBpi ioo 4.7 227 48% 47% 47% - »• iSEjSS. 

mrtSi! _ 1469 20 18' , 18ft —7'* ; 

Poster _ 1739 3% Jft 3ft -ft iKJSj 

4CSon _ 1594 S’.i 4ft 45; — ft 

FrnFn 1.04 3 5 36330% 28 30 -I’-. SKSL 


— : crmFai 1.75 * 2 29? JEft 27 




j% —i crthSnltr 
J l » — FrnmTc 
2’: - ", I FramSv 
7ft ■ ft , Frnloa 
T’i-, - % • FmkBk 
2V : -ftiFrkBVpt 
v„ — ■ . FrakEI 
7% ■ % : FrK6Pb 

3 —1.6 Freas 

15% — ’ * FrsnCbc 
71 —1 '- * Fratftr 


21*. 31% 

8'., are 


15' j 1 '. j Cprico 
• ' * — OrcFn 

II** _ CMcinc 
1 1 ’■* - '•* Drcen 
IS*-" * % GrcSv 
8 -• ".u Grrvs 


- Osco 5 
_ GlFc-d 
V, aiotnCpt 
GUEnc 


_ *400 12% 11% 13 -I • 

_. 603 6% c 6 -% D|PB 

- 5014 1?’* lift I6%— I*. ; PW* 

_ 19 6% 5% 6% -ft 1 E”Tai 

1J8 LA 1680 54% sire 54% -2% ; SJJ/O? 

- 1070 11 9* . 10'., —ft , PJ** 2 

17 S 5441 32% JO' * 32% - 1% I 2L 

6 4'-. 4% 4' . _% 

«8 7 0 x+ 76 14 24 — 7 

,90a 7.7 no n*. m, tire — ^ % r%=r c 

- 517 10% 9>- 9% — % 'mJ-in, 
-J761 8V. 7% 7ft ,re;giSJ£ 
_ 79554 3*V'| 20' ; 30ft— 5ft i nep 

.. e - k a?»-! loTIrHK 


„ l«t 4*1 JV _ , pVV" 

‘J 3% 3 : ~’l feS. 


43". x: ,, JJ'r? — I I DTInrK 

.15e J 595 28% 77V, 28% -| ' OUSA 

wo u* £ Ul. il. i 


- 509 5ft i S’k — 'fcl5XoCps 

_ 1515 14% 15 _,dw5oS- 

759 I8>i 18ft 18ft — % dSwb 
1JW 38 11829 28% 0% -l* dStvA 


_ 551 4ft 3ft 4% - 1 ' a Butter 

.. _ 7232 10% 10 10% „ BulIrMl 

32 1 - 771828' - 77% 77V, — ’■* iButrcv 
.. 686 9% 6% 9 _ . 

_ 37416 28ft I4'.76 n -’u — tft I 

_ 3113 16% 14% 14';— 1", l_ 

.. 254 6% 6% 6ft 

._ 745 13''. 13': ure — % CBrewer 
_ 3l53 22%10'jl9iv,.— 1**„ C-CU3E 
_ 1919? 8*. 7.’,, 7>v„ — Vk CAIWre 
_ 50e2 V. 5% 5% — '.% CBBnc 
_. 043 4 34. 3% -ft! CCA 

_. 107 17 159. IS 1 *— 1 i CCBFn 

.24 2X 101 8*. 8% 8ft - '« i CCOR 
M IX 9097 52% 49 «>.— 3‘ i ' CDW S 

._ 412011% tore 11% ■ % i ce San 

_ 794 7ft 7% TV, -'A ■ CEM 

- 1802 rre 26 ?7ft -lftiCFBcp 
_ 12322 19". 17*. 19 - V* ! CFI Ind 

_ 7*5 3* re 35% 36ft -ft , CFI Pro 

_ 13475 31% 28% 30% I’rlCFSBs 
_. Jl©4 8"; »ft 8% - ■ GS TOl 

.070 A 645 5ft 5ft 5% — ft i CMC Ind 


126 32% 3ire r -re cimns 


.. 6781 14% 12’. ; 14ft -1% Ainoft, 


.15 .B 7*3 18 16ft ig -% Aulolnl 

— 142 1 5% 3". 11. —1 Aul corns 

— 390S2d'i» 2% 7ft — V„ Auloctv 

._ 781 % ft ’« .. AuTorty. 

Jo lore lore tore ■‘re AutoGo 

- 202 8ft ?"n 7’.i - 'i, Autoimu 

J2 L4 79 39 36 37% — % Autolnd 

— 3071 IDA- 94c, 9re — 1 1 AutOtOTS 

- 42*5 12'. 10*. lire Avatar 

„ 1° T* , j 25% 25% —re AvidTcn 

. 59 J-l ..i 4141 ' U 1 * ure -1 Avndlc 

IJD 7.1 1650 17ft 16ft V _. Art CM 

!J5e9J 323 14% 14 16% -% 

122eXA 443 141, 134- 14'- -% ■ 

J8e 4j aiu% 13’.. lire —ft I 

_ 23KF 22*i 71 % 21V, 

.60 2J 143* 76% 25' , 25ft —ft BBAT 

J4 1.7 496144. 13ft 14% — ", BE Aero 

_ 1747 17% 15% IT BE IQ 

■09 e J >49 12% 12 1 7 Vi — % BF Enl 

_ 3041 r% 34. 3ft —ft BPS NY 

_ 707 Oft 54; OA'u BG5 

_ 3ta 19'.. isre 19 ... BHA 

... 202 JV5 3 3 ... BHCFns 

_ 1002 2»i. IT* 2 _ Bl Inc 

- S3 a 'e 7^ v p * re, bisvs 


’50 5ft 4ft 4ft 
774 24' . 22 24' . 

915 5' . 5 S 


_. 107 17 154.15*4—1 

.24 2 A ltll 8ft B% 8ft - 

M IX 9097 52% 49 49*.— JV 
._ 412011% IW 11% - '1 


.07c A 645 5ft 


1.08 X6 2330 30 
._ 1228 f ; 
OS IS * 137 6 


.1201 J 167 10' 


S' : 5% — % . CPI Aor 
3ft 3'%. — re CPI Wl 
20’-: 21 - re i CS&Fn 

23 75 -1 ‘ CSFHIc 

6% lOV. -Ift CSP 
IJ'il3*V„- ». B CTEC 
«V„ — % ; CTL Cr 


i CMC Ind 
I CMG lot 
I CNB 
■ CNB FN Y 
l CNS 

CP AC 
i CPS 
. CPI Aero 
CPI wl 
I CSBFfl 
CSFHIO 


- 865 10% yre 10'.* 

.. 746J 1 7% 15', 15% —2 

_ 7sa 1 1 io ro% * ' 

IJQcJJ 17 30'., 30'.J 30% —I 
... 1634 5% 4’. 5% — 

1 J8 3A <85*36% 36% 38 

._ 2453 3ft 20' : 23% - 2‘ 

_ 16617 24 20V: 72 -’ 

_ 438 3'* 2ft ?ft —ft CsiHirn 

_ 249 13*. 12 13'-: -% Cobane 

JO 2.4 2 21% 21% 21% —ft CaoraE 

_. 6 J'.-, j% 3% -ft Cobra 

... 98*14 12% nu 

AO 21 650 17% 19 19% 

-. 2355 24. 2'., 2ft 


778 31 30 

353 5% S’.i 
17 Tft 7 
1197 8 7'; 

465* 4% 4 
29 2ft 24i 
51312ft l? 
93018 15 


rare *’ i I Omtridls 
30% —re cwth 


5% —Vi. CluBCbr 
38 - re I coOpbv 

23% -2ft I CslBnc 


Cobanes 37 1.9 
CaoraEI 


877 3ft 2V. 2ft 


_ 1514 10** 9ft 
.88 27 xl8*32% 31ft 

_ 23 34% 33 

_ 16 14 6% 6% 
J6 13 20 9' j are 

M XI 10*79'., 28 


124 7ft 7io 7ft — % CTovtor 


- 1BJ> 2> 2ft — % BKCSem 


3775 19ft 18ft 18% — '■* ’ CU Bnc 


142 ft ft 
154*13 in 
3759 2 ft I'V 


I BMC Sit 
EMCWts 
BMJ 


40 re 

re 

re 



1377 4’/. 

are 

4 Vi 

“ft 

BPI PVg 

xo* ire 

!'%, 

ire 


BPI wt?4 

5 3’k 

3ft 

Jft 



Kt* 7 



— '.* 





—4 V. 

BT Fin 






1748 IS", 

IJ 

(4'k 

— .'Ci 




Aim 

—re 

BWIP 

593 3% 


3 



30 28% 

7/ft 

27ft 

—Kb 

Bochlnl 


5254 76ft 23 __ . . 

ifn ti ft 9% lire -ire | caches 

70 |'. 1% 1% .. CACI 

OltSft 4ft 4V, - V* I CodtTvS 

2*9 o a-,, i, % - ft . cadern 

3E7 1 ”i, V., — '. , I Crdmw 

3*3 28' '« 2T% 77' : - ' . ! Coero 
145 29 ' : 28! : 29ft - ' , j Calm 

325 3% 3 3ft - ft ; Cataene 

» ft 2. 2 — U 1 CalAmo 


23 —3ft ; CdbotM 2J2I27J *63 6ft 


_ «6 3% 2ft 3ft _ CoiaOP 

ISel.l 2093 13ft 13 13ft .ft Colauor 

_. 338 23V. 22", 27ft — % CotBcp 

_ 177 10 9% 9% _v, Collins 

- 1520 76% 25' , , - 1 CBcgp - 

- ’H ‘J • ColniGa 

- *55 AW * 4% -% CotnGt 

- 47 1 17ft lift lire „ CoTBnt 

- 824 8% r., 7% -ft CMFst 


._ 2990 r»„ 
357 1 

.76 IS 363 28'-. 
1.12 IS 145 29% 


AmoorFs J4 2_* 39871 20 '.. 20ft - ' - BodBay *4*12 

Amrian M 4.1 48 14ft U% 14*5 Bonorf _ 911’ 

Amortoc -77755 2'A 1'V U 2'ra -V x Bdilby _ 1541 4’ 

APFF 1.60 66 296 26% 73ft 24% ... BV.Hq wt _ 543 

AmFPr 1.06 1X1 118 9ft 8ft 84i _. BakerJ .06 J 5770 IB 

AFT»£ J4 BA 365 6ft 6% 6% —ft Balctlom .03 J 105 10 

AFT*E2 75 8.8 76 9% 81; 8% —ft BldLvB S J4 IJ 314 

AmefOn .Ole _ 7581 77ft 67% nVA— 5'<i BoHJPin _ 14 u 

Amsvoe ._ »! 4 Jik —% BdfvGm - JB&7 u 

AmBCO S JO 19 5916% 16% 17 —IV. Beil 6k . 33 8! 

ABnUr .72 3J 1090 22ft 21ft 27 V. —ft Ban Pone i.00 12 649 32 

AmSioan - 1065 3ft 3% J% —ft BeCne pKLXSO 5J*1339 66 

Am Bldg _ 759* 1 1 % 10ft lift - % BncFsiOK J4 lj 747 1* 

AmBuSIP _ 700 14". lj 14*4-1% BcJfOHs 88 XJ wl 25 

AmGtv S ... 209 18 14ft 16 - % BanCins _ 65 6’. 

ACtattTl _ 363 Tlr H 1’Vu 2 -. BncGalic J2r 1.0 8530 37 

AClasVOY .16 IX 848 16 15 15% —ft Bcosou 1.08b 13 »346 32 

ACokWIS 2» U 477615!* 13'i Untp— ’:/e BCD«J .88 3J 272 25 


-. 325 3ft 3 3ft - 

.. 382 7% 2 2 - 

M ZJX4699I8': IT ft I8V- - 
_. 933 14 11". II — l 

-. 521 3ft 2% 3% _ 

._ *46 12% 11% 12ft — 

— 91 lift 11% 12% , 

_ 1541 4": £ft 6% - 

— 543 ¥c ft 

.06 3 5770 IBS. 18% 10% 

jn j 105 io 9 4% - 

J4 u 3 14 14 14 

_ 14 14V, 14V, 14", 

— 1007 wm ure ure - 


- 58 111 7 7% — ft Comrco 

_ 2742 10ft »lr 10 -s; Com CVS 

IJOeSJ 1310 78*. 27ft 37V, — v, CmcsPS 

499 *v,_ .’’/ r Corn coo 

JO I 1 3455 19% i*s, ij . j CmatHd s 

— I 4 '* ;. JV. Corrufcl 

~ -.Sis A. /Jj ' v ■ ’£'• cammnei 

— 13 ft — * CmndSc 


-ft ClTBndl _ 931 29V, 29": _ 5*n 

GfizSkO S3 34 113 25 74% 25 -ft oSSat, 

—ft Gin Ins _ 67 6ft S'. 5ft —ft DaLTron 

- ClYHkJ JA XI 778 31 30 30% — % Dnmart 

+r>, ClvicBc - 353 5% S’. 5ft -ft Banlm 

_ GoyEng _ 17 7% 7 7% . c^rrSJn 

OconH _ 1197 8 7% 7ft - ■. Cterrco 

9 ClerCdo _ 4656 4ft 4 4ft -ft CNBdcst 

9 devIRI .16 SA 29 2% 2ft ?ft > ft Dta la 

OllDr _. S12 12ft 13 13% —ft DtnMea 

'■■j ainians ... 930 16 IS 15% —ft PtoRsh 

-2 ainlGs - 771 3*V« 3% 3ft _ DtSwtch 

+ 'i Omfrwls ._ 42? 9% 8% gt. _ DtoSysts 

-ft CWh _ 5678 Sft 4V, 4ft — % DtoTm 

-’•u CluQ'Tar _ 597 146. 13ft |4ft * 1% DtTrMw 

-ft CoPrBV J7 1 * 534 20 18ft 19ft .ft Datflx 

2ft CslBnc J0e J 576 17". 17ft 1%/ M _v u Dalfcev 

-ft CstBn pi 2J5 9.1 11124*/. 24ft 24% .ft Dr*mar 

-ft CslHItn _. 2444 35% 32ft 35". *■! I Datscp 

-'. Cobanes 57 1.9 6630 77 27 —1 Dtostto 

-ft CaoraEI ._ 1752 3ft 3ft 1ft *■% Dataware 

* re Cobra 2352 32V, 31 31% — I Dtawfch 

_ CocaBil 1.00 Xb *99 78 27% 27ft —V. Oiawtcwt 

- Cowsri - 1788 3ft 7!. 3% ♦ ft DatoRra 

- CodcEn „ 9145 6ft SI, 6ft . ft Datran 

— CodeAl _ «n 10ft 10'.* 10ft - ft Datum 

* ft COfliMiP _ 1215 21 70 V. 20ft — ", Dcuptm 

-'.i Cooney s - 5048 17 15ft 15% —ft Davco 

-. Coanas v m _ 874 lift 11% 11% .v» Davet 

coJiTSel J2elJ 3015 14'.', 15 ... DavtJsnA 

- Conernt _ 518 12% 12ft 12ft —ft Dava« 

-re Ss?”?" - 968 4ft 3ft 4ft . % DowTch 

-ft CTovtor _. 4825 14% 13ft 14% - % Dawson 

- '-O WtoR ... 2769 2ft 2ft 2ft —ft DavRun 

■ > 7 ,as S. 31 ^re —ft d eVrv 

-% CotBcp s .60 2 4 7164 23ft 7J,.i J3ft _ Dewotfe 

-": Collins - 708 2ft jft 2 v, —ft DebShO 

1 CBcgp A .80 3J 2543 25 23ft 26ft — V* Dec* Out 

"I SH?® !■» S-9 2U2I 20 21 _ DeepToch 

-re CotnCK' 40 2J. 695 24 32ft 22ft —A, Deertohs 

^ It 70% 10ft —ft Deftllnc 

* re ColFst — 342 «2% 40 42ft . 1ft DeflcSM 

-% Conolr J4 1 J 11721 19"; 18 19'/ u *V M DddbE 

-ft Cemroa 294 5% 5 5%, .V„ DfcfcGn 

-ft Comests .0* J 12111 19", 17% 19% , ft DetoOls 

-v, OncsPS J» J 3BT58 19 17ft 18% _ Ctefchm 

1" S2H252. - 7« ure ijft ure _ Dcscptr 

1 Cmojtds _ 297 5 8ft 7ft 7ft DetoFifi 

Corrida I - 963 2H 3ft 2ft —ft DeMnf 

Comrnne* _ 2973 17ft 17 17% —ft Delrina 

-re _ — 956 3% 2%. 3 .9» DaltPine 


„ 2«’ 4 3'-, 2' : . 4 

486 76 74’. 75‘;— 

- 3140 21% 33'; 71 •* -% 

_ 6610-re 9* , 9%— 1 

_ dJll 4ft 3! , 4'. • % 

2J5 ?A lt>l 24% ?3’, 24 r 

_ 638 J’r 3ft 3’r —ft 

.741 SB 947 13% 17 I2>. -ft 

-.37)337 39"; Jlft -ft 

..12840723" 19 2V* -■». 

J5e .9 <967 71% 35% 27% -2% 

1977 16', 13% 15 -1% 

_ 141 4% J,., 3 

- 1954 16 15% IS*. — % 

- WI4S%3 6ft 4% _ 

- 89 13% 12ft 12% 

818 17ft IB —ft 

7 5% 5% 5% — ■ ft 

_ 45 5ft 4% S 

- 94313% 12% 12% — % 

- 12S 4'.k 3*j 3ft — % 

- 457 i' s 7lv 8", -ft 

- 3288 lS’k 13 13ft— I % 

J2e J 2861 43ft 42 43ft - 1ft 

- 335 4 ] 3% — 

.13 J 97* 24 74 —I 

_. <192 6ft Sft 6 _ 

-. 1280 3ft 2ft 3 - ' 1 

- 86 4ft 4 4% 

_ 60 9ft 9 9ft —ft 

- 933 2ft 2ft 2ft - ’ . 

_ 3863 8% 6ft 8V, -"14 

- 268 14ft 13 13", -ft 


El..rats; 

=->,c>C= 

Enior 

SaufCra* 

Esuinok 

Ecyite, 

EOL'irrc 

EaTvInr 

EatvMin 

BitOJ 

EricTet 

Escatee 

EiMrro 

Esmcr 

EsrCTv 

Etnidtie 

Ev%5ut 

Evans 

Evan^Svs 

EvramB 

EvgrMed 


_ I rtttCrlm 

- *83 5+. 5 i% - ft ! 

.. 4SMM- 1 ,0ft II — 1 It HEff 
, 616 3'. 3% 3ft -'.k 
1.40 1.6 9 38% 38' . 38ft _ 1 KEfr* 

jirid were sb eft -ftiiSESL. 

.90 7J 7312% 11% 12% 1% LIISrtTV* 

J7 5.1 7329 27 » — re HSIL C 

„ - sis lift nre iiv. —re 
jo 1.4 5»4 nre ure lire - £S2£° 

- 13534 29V* 73% 25 —2 *23™*? 

- 27 4% 41, 4% - ft I 

- JI 5 4% 4tk —V; ! rgggT;. 

_ 3 13 IJ Mft ,4ft —ft 

_ s?< «a> rre ire —re ”2SJ r 
-• 150 »re 29*/, 391, I "wan 
.13 7 260 15ft 16'*i 16", —V. ! ScilS* 

4011% n% 11% —% nvj’vjyr* 

M 16 75838 36ft 346k —ft 

.66 3.1 27,21ft 20ft 31V. _. KEEL 

_ _ 107 16". 13ft 141ft— IV* * 

j4 1.7 218$ isv, rare 14ft— 1 rynbp s 

_ <926 17 15ft 17 

1031711% 8V» 8>A — IftinES?* 

. i6<6 ,3 nre in,— ire [ 

_ 454 5% 41, s% -rft |SS1 ! * 

7i». ire ii. — re tssn^ 10 


.. 1*99 2% 3 3 ~% Frees 

_ 1194 20% :a>. 15% — % Frs*OK 

- 7*62 27** 20'Vi, 21 -1'vRWV 

- »?J 5 7'» 2’k 3 — ' > ■ Frevm 

- US077% 16ft 17% * % Freomn 

_. 112 4-'. 4% 4-% - ' ; ! FrisBcv 

.. 351 2": 2ft 2ft —’ft 1 Frill 

_ 273 t'o 4>i 4* , -v 4 FraFds 

06e J lr9j 13"* 13 13% -'«; Fulcrum 

_. 2?15 *’■ <’» 4% — ;% ! FulrftB 

_ 513 S’i 3'., 3ft -% , Fullo-s 

.609 1J15»V1 51 47*k J£ft— I’k 1 Funco 

I _ 81 8ft 7ft 7", — , Fur on 

JO 1.0 X41919'.-: 18ft 19ft - r FusionSv 


ir. —re £*«£r ~ 1959 are are — re i fuiuthi s 

t% _ ES»CTv I.fJ 5.6 » IS 25ft 74ft U*. _ .' FufNaw 

12' 1 _ Eirtid4ld .. 6871 r-r. 7 7 —1 '■» Futrmdia 

18 — % . gie-Xui _ 370 15", 14ft 15% - % FuTmdwt 

5% % .■■rans _ 187 3'/, 3ft 3V.. *'•«. 

5 _% Evan&5vs _ 3*9 7ft 6% 6ft —ft 8 

12% _' , EvgniB _ 111816'/, IS 1 -, 14 — ", I 

3% — % SwgrMed .. 1905 16 14ft 16 -ft 

8% -ft ' Evgr.-Apt 100 7J 600 41ft 39 41ft -2 G&K 5 
13ft— Hi : EvbrnPs _ 6318% 7ft 7V. _ GAB Be S 

4Jft -Ift ■ i.Obvte — 11197 17ft 15 uere— 1'ft GBCBC 

Jft — %'Exw _. 4139 78 74% 26ft -7ft GBC Teh 

74 — t E<en» _. 253 8% 7ft 7ft —ft GMIS 

6 _ I E/cOTcti _ 1059 Sft 4", 5% - ft GNt 

3 -', BttfTkl -4J5 2 1ft 2 -ft GPFnd 


•_ iBira sre 7% -re 
_ itssu 14ft rare -ire 
-5617X2 X5717*. »7'fc 17ft -ft 
32 1.9 1364 1S”S T3ft MV; -ft 

I SB m% are »% -re 

iSwsu ? 

.. 1706 Sft 5ft 5ft _ 
.. 441 Qft aft 2ft 
_ 5D1 2ft 3ft 2V; 

_ 880120*6 19ft ,9ft 
_ 2158 4ft 5ft 6 —ft 

_ i2»i2 nre u -re 
_ iB9i sv, are are —re 

_ 103718VS 18 18 -ft 

_ 3761 19V*' 17V, 18=4 ^ 

06 A 27714ft 1VA ISft .ft 
.16 1.0 8830141* 15ft I69u *'% 
_ 3? B Jft 8 *ft 

- 3887 ure rare tore _ 
-. 1541 1516 l«ft T5H »*, 
_ 60 6ft 5'/. tih ‘H 


HetixTc S J8 2J 173022ft 20 


_ 4678 8ft 8V; Sft —Ik 


Hnry*S JO 22 1548 9ft 8ft 6ft —ft 
ftwbtfe -73 X9144g27*'4 33ft Mft— 2U 


4A IS 3924 
J6 1.9 "31-19 


1071711ft 8V» are — 2V. I SS?T S 

. I6J.13 lire lift— ire “SE”'. 
_ 454 5% 41, s% V re {S” 5 
7 IJ. lft Hi —re |S£ wlB 

Hlngms 

mnsdie 

wrsdi 

^ S 459914% 13ft 13ft —ft fffi*L nlr 
■77 74 „ 130V, 30V, 30V,— 1% HoLrfftk 
33 23 21914 13Vi 14 .ft 


. 3924 23 Z3V: — *4. 

■3199 tore WM, _ 

1264 4ft Jft 3ft —ft 
2D19E% 9V, 9ft —ft 
10317% 14ft 16V— t* 
737 Bft Oft Sft +ft 


174 Ikh >fti <V« *l/|, 
404 8ft 7ft Sft rft 

32 IBS’, MI 10’A . _ ’ 

433 25ft 23Vi 2J —1ft 

mb'* 7ft tre —re 

52 4U 3ft 4ft -ft 

12 Sft a a 
.40 3% 3ft 3ft —re 


- 113 72ft 71% 22V: 


4% _ ; E.’LCJTcat J5e 53 

9% — ", I ExecTI 2J2f29.9 

2ft - ’ . EXTON 

8V; ' E*ide 

|3"» -ft | Emin* .10 S 


13 k 19% -ft Datflx _ 370 7ft 7'/. 7ft _ iSsort 

nre lrt% — Vu Otfkev _. 155 31, 3 3 — % 

24% 34% - ft ! Mmcr _ 10 5 S S - 1% I 

3?% 35% *-1 Ooncp -. 4951 17 16% 16*%— > Eicnrp 

77 Z7 — 1 Dtostto _ 37 4'-, 4ft Jft _ft 

3ft 1ft *■•■■• Daiawore ... 1623 10ft 9ft 10% _ ■ 

31 31% — I Dtawtch ._ 727 Hi, 'V,, Mft — *»_ ■ 

77V* 77ft —V. Oiawtcwt _ 80 re >k — l„ 

21m 3ft * ft DanRc* _ 764 4ft Sft 6 —ft FS< Bn 

5V* 6", +'k Datran .. 139 9 8'/* Bft »ft F&M B< 

10'., loft -ft Datum ._ 559 5ft jft 5 . F&M Br 

70V* 20% — 4k Douptm .97 llS 3857 27% 34% 76ki* *•"% F&M Dt 

15ft IS 1 ; —ft DavCO _ 15117 16'.'; 17 ♦% FM Nal 

11% lift *V V Dave, .. 153 II 9ft 10% „ FCBFrj 

U-, 15 ... DnvtSsnA _ 2250 17*6 15", 16% —ft FDP 

12ft 12ft — % Dawa» - 44 3ft 3% 3% —V; FFBCS 


CocaBil 

Coecnsyi 

CooaEn 

CodeAl 


’#U ■ re coflwip 


Cooney s 
Coon as g 
Cahasel 
Conrmf 
CohoEn 


- 435 2 ire 2 -% GPFna 

Me 52 93 7ft 4H 6ft **„ GTI 

2J2f29.9 966 Bft 7% TV. — ", G-lll 

_ 2473 2ft 2ft 2ft _ GZA 

- 1227 23ft 21ft 21ft— lft Gdey 
.10 S 407 19% IB re 18ft — % Gatiteo 

— 333211 9% 10"'. - % Ganwa 

- ^ ^ 97'* - Ji 5<»n*Mek 

— .M9 TV, 7% 7% — V* GamingW 

_ 124 4% 4 4ft * re Genre’ WT 

— 978 14ft 12% 12’/* — % Gamut g 

Gander 

p I viGtkiloi 

J cSSS® 0 

40 a XI 487 19ft 18ft 19'k -re GCTtrwr 

-80b 34 MZ3ft 27re 27ft _ Gasomcs 


L3 219 14 13ft 14 * ft .1?0 24 40 3ft 3ft 3H — % 

_ 201/12% 10 lore— ire USSR, -’^bi* stuiovv 
_ 5128 13". 12 12 —re G fe £2 v _ — 732 It. ire ii*£ _ 
75 3*-. 3 3ft *■'$ 40 _ 6706 11 re lire lift *V* 

J0e .9 19984 22% 21ft 0% *'Vu 7 7 ' 

- 22" 10% 11 + % - SSS£5S S"* 

_ 200 Jft 3ft 4ft +1 HnWPk. __ 569823ft 22 S3 


- 6706 nre ure nre +v* 

_ WJ5 Bft 7 7 - — 1ft 

_ 486833% 3T ft 33ft -ft 

- 5«B 23ft 22 S3 *%> 


_ 931 19% 18% 19% elfti , 

- 148 3% 3ft 3H _ lS?55 ne 


» 9k I 5S£2E'* r - 70 15 n83J 30ft 27% *16 


4B XI 563 23ft 22V. 22ft -■ 


Gasorucs 

GaleFA 


5ft —% Gat 67000 


l8Vw * 1 CaIBnc 

12 —IV, I CoLtCul 
2% — % 1 ColFra 
13ft — ■» ' CalMO 
Uft ' I CCMlc 


. , \ I CCMlc 
•% 1 CdlSK' 


.re- -. ’ Coiinci 

I Bft _ Gallon 

9ft - ft catowtrr 


ABnw 
AmBiogn 
Am Bldg 
AitiBusip 
A mGtv S 
AQakn 


! BcWHi 88 IS 


8 8V1 - 

31% JH, — 
62ft 65 ft -3 
IS'. IS*’: 


- ft 1 Bancira 
-. BncGalic J7 


. 4 ’ ' 5% 6% * • ComcoS 

,J3T 1.0 853037% 31% 32 — ’ CWinee 
1.08b 13 *3<6 32' : 31 32ft -2 , CWipeA 

8T U 277 25 2< ?<■': I Condelo 


— % 1 Calumot 

... Com** g 

* '■* Ccmoex 

' ’ ; ! Cam Bio 
— ’ * ■ CambNe 
-3 : CamfiSneJ 

— CamSTdi 
- 1 • CerrrrnAsn 

* ft ' CameoEl 


- 37? 5% Sft 5 re ._ CmcEJ.'.O M C I 

44b 2J 1649 19". 17V. W., +j CmcSVA 40b 24 

- 31,5 73ft 21 II' , _ Cmdr .rn 3.7 

- 4618 nre Jire are -% cScva >o 19 

.40 <.0 42 10 9ft 10 * I- QncrGo 

91 !Jt 7% 7% — I CmcBOR job IJ 
.256 8.9 373 J% 2ft I’*,. — v u CmcBNY JO X2 

- 1*8 2re 21. Hi. — '.'u CnidBflll 

... 3*7 Bft 37V. 33 —re Or^dt I 

2. *8 5ft Sft BV« — v„ CwItFdl OBe 3 

- S* ? ?■*% - v : CmCWNC 93t 9.1 

~ ftS 2 1** 1 ,v - Comlntl 


— V. DeMrtf 
— ft Detrlna 

1* '£S A’* ?Z : A, -J* Cniiswj 40b 3 j 502 19ft jflft Mft OeJwG* 

33 ‘ZS, 'I tT? * 17 '* — re OnBNJ PI 1.50 bJJ 39 21 24ft 25 .ft DenT^ptv 

Sft Cmcfl/.NO 48 II 1381 32ft 31% 32 dSgh 

u ai4S"3re ir* i? ' * 7 S!^ VA I 7 ’ 7 "' 25 V, 25’k — % D^oras 

z StSSfi 2 !% SU -% -?o il 2 iSlI% ggE* 

.-s iJ.’ IV* CmeBOR job I.* 215ft 15ft 15% _ Devral 


ACoftou 
AmEoale 
AmEcoi XIS 
AinEduc 
AmFB Jo 

ARttm .96 
AmFrght 
A Greet 1 SO 

AHitncps 

AmHold 

AHomPfU 

AKMF J* 

AititnPfwi 

AminPis 

AmLtopt 2.t* 

ArtiLck 

AMS 

AAtedE 

AmMbSot 

AAAobBe 


- ft I Bcnctcc 


’SS AS /*• 3 % -ft i ComEnA 
«J* ]T -ft ComCIrl 
.2^ jlft IDft ?! -. J GOmSvt 


,2 15ft 15ft 15% _ Devcon 

CmcBISTY JO X2 342 9% 9re »ft ... DeVBu, 

gnegsn _ 45511% 10V> 1t% *■% Devon 

CmcFOl _ 7707 26% 25 2Sft » w OiotPoe 

CwitFdi OBe s 1465 15% laftiiS* **% oSKiic 
CmCWNC .931 9.1 97 10% 9Vi 10% *■% QiorWl 

- Sfl LV“ 1V - 'L v - -%* gioGITr 

ComEnT Mil zv D 7 a DbfBU 

S onl w.1f‘ S Z ft* re re — >, B DOork 

t°rnClrl 22911ft n ,| Dlgllnfl 

GomSv*: 34 19 iyj[ 17ft nre 12ft * ft oSdsu 

ComW4Y .M 3.9 2771*% ,$ | S %_1 

'-S® M *174 30 28% 29ft —ft DgtlLWt 


_ W47 6 S’* S’/. — % FFBS 

- .5* 8 7ft 8 *■ % FFl c Be 

- 1122 16% 16 16% ♦ ft FFYFb 

- 490 27 25’/, 25ft— I FHP 

- ?9I 6ft 5ft Sft —ft FUR 
- 20 3 - a JII 7 1 /'* *ft Sft — % FMProp 

_. 291215ft 13V. 13V. — 1ft FNBRo 

- 1783 14% 13V* 14% *19, FRPPr 

A0 a 1.7 14 37 14ft 34V*— 2% FSHnt 

~ — % FTP SW 

- l 2 ,3 *** - Patmvln 

— -1 I 5 ! IP* 15 15% - FailGrp 

SO^ X6 2M JI 79% 30% —V. Fatrljc 

.100 1A 104 loft 9ft 10 FalrOn 

M 10 218 22ft 31% 27 -ft FateOil 

-9755829% 36% 27% —ft FaLcnFT 

- 328517ft 16ft 16ft —ft FcmBc 

- 1*< 4 3% 3 ft r% FamSJV 

■; S7^t 16% lift 13!',— -ft FrtnHmt 

■95® *. ASOlBft 17ft 18 — re FarmBr 

1.13 4-1 104 18» IS 18ft - 1 FarmMd 

- 2926 39% 37ft 38ft .V. Farr 

IOO UKlSWJIft 30% 31V; -1 

... 16457 14 12% 13ft „ FostCm 

-• <HSBfr is \;*'u -v. p^St 

-. 116 Bft 7ft 8 _ Fed! Ind 

.. 281 lift II lift -% Fffierw 

- 78 Bft 8V« 8% —ft Ferafl 

486 I re 1 ft IV EiOBnCTi 

._ 617 20ft 19% 20 —'4 Fkscp 

- 2290 53 30% 31ft— IV, FUJFdVA 

_ 2648 17 15 15ft— I ft HO+tXSv 

- ’57 5ft 4% AY, -ft RdelNY 

M .-7 1^3. * 3% 3'V* — V„ FitmT 

SO 4 A 549817ft IF/,. 17V* -lft 50-OM 

- »3 9V. 8% 9% - % HggleA 


-58 3J 31818% 17 18 -5, GlwyCm 

■21® 14 77314ft 14 14% -.ft GofvwFn 

, _. 169 Sft 4ft 4ft -ft Debt 

-56 X8 X13714V 13ft 14% >re GnCrHH 

He 10 40 1SW1S ,5ft > V GerS» 

wS -5 965 17 16ft l6ft —v* GeneCTd 


FFBes 56 Xfl <137 14% 13ft 14% 
FFBS 15e 10 40 15ft IS 15ft 

m.CBc J4 IJ 465 17 16ft l6ft 

FFYFn Jlle IJ 347 15ft 14ft IS’k 

FHP _ ,7337 75% 24% 24% 

PCJR -. 214613% 12 13ft 


GnArlRes 

GnBnd 

GnCable 


-. 2855 3ft 3% 3ft — % GdCom 


.. 346 5ft 5ft sw„ — LV GnCpt 

— 65 15 14ft 15 . % GnMog 

”«■ '2% —% GhnSns 

-.121771 18ft 15ft 16 — HV GnPara 

.15 2J 394 7-* 6’>% 6% -ire GerScp 

. - 126 5% 4% 4% _ GerftTfv 

.14 J 78% 27ft 28ft -ft Genetlwt 

■E® ‘I «UI • 10-a 10% —ft G^SSS 


•Tie IJ 1245 43ft 45 _ 

_ 829 6% 5% 5% — % fSS®"., 
_. 271b 4% 3ft 4% - 1 JS^ IN a 

”■ i 5S 6 " /| * re ft —Yu 

- 14% 12ft 12% —% „ 

- 3876 9% 8ft are —i ryreg* 

- U£ 3 ’+ 344 jre -re 

.- 2987 45 39% 42 —1% 

-. 166513% 11% lift —ft HyTtCrM 

- , 6039 2Q',a 18% 18ft— 1 % HP^^Frp 
■ 29327 14% 12% 13ft —ft T2328? 

- 371 >v t r/„ r/ D !2™rG 

-. 3236 13ft 12% 13 —ft H frlf WSc 

- Wo 6% 6ft frft .ft 

_ 439 34V, 33% 34% -ft ££?!2 d 

35 8% 8% BV, ... HerzBcn 

- '3» J 1ft 2ft -ft 

- ) 5 J4'v 14 'it — 

<40 13 1147 17V- 16S 171/4 4.^ Horshd 

1". 970 4% 3ft f ~ j HubCoo 

s?. ?- i- 

Humbtrd 


crept _ 38 9 8 8 

GnMog .IJ* 2j 13 4V , 4 , % ” 

GnYutrs _ 60347 20 14ft 18 —lft 

SSTn '9-i X, ? S *re _ 

9®t^*Cp IJOdJ.O 1140 37V, ao 


2J 111324% 22% 23'.* — 1 
- 740 ft % »% 


Genua 
GenUa wl 


FrtnHms SB .9 1268 36 34ft 35 — v" GerSa^ 
FarmBr X0Q »J 155 177ft 1» 127ft —re GemS, 1 

- f SS«P* M re nre -re 


1 Rrrrei 
-. FostCm 
1 v M Fastened 
_ Ferfllnd 
-% Fd5aw 


.. ■- s<» 5ft 4ft *ft —I 

We A TV 6ft 6% 6% —Ik 


J4 10.1 xlftS 2% 2% 2ft _ ffifiJB 

JO a 3.0 11 40 37V, «j Hun, co 

- 1383 12ft lift t2'. HuntBn 

_ 250 14V, 14ft ,4ft — % 

_ 765 45% A3V, «ft— J HutdiT 

-■ 1% it'/ M -Vu ” vrtp?ir 

576 5 4% *v. Hvcor 

_ 591*14 12 12 ft — ii HygeAth 

z 7 Sf S ft 

- Iff® 87 24V. 24%_2ft 


- 352313% 10V: UV— 1» 

. _ 38018V, 17ft 18% - 

„ _ 2031 7'/. 7 7V, —ft 

■80 AO 14521V, 50% 30% —ft 

JO IJ 29 19V, 18 Y* 18ft +»,l 

-44b 4^1 13516ft ISft 15ft 

•40 SJI 6012 lift 12 

-35 Z2 363 15ft 14ft 15ft *- 1ft 

- 531917 lift 16ft -ft 

_ 14734 7*m 6 «* eft’ 

- 4447 Vu Wn Y» — *% 
162*1 6WuTA$ 16% +1 ' 

- 3213 12 13 .ft 

^ ~ 564 35ft 34ft 35 —% 

JO 7J 326 2ft 2ft 2ft +ft 

■" —SW* Mft 13ft +lk 
. _ =34316% 14ft 15 —ft 

■44 lj 882 31ft 29ft 29ft —ft 

,V. V> 79 »ft — ' % 

J2 U 14414ft 13ft 14ft -eft 

„ .-HBMlJMr 17H, U ft— J 
.11 C XD 270 4 3ft 3ft —ft 

- 214 ®% 9 91fe — 9a 

- 277 8ft 7ft 8 *%- 

_ 1BE12'A lift 12 - : .- 

_ 655 19ft 18ft 19ft - 

„ - JC 16% 14ft 15V.— 1 

JO l.l 7aai8H 17ft 18ft —ft 
.08 J 345 24 22% 2316 *16 

J0b 19X6578 27ft 76% 27ft +5 

- *55 2ft 2ft 2ft + W 


3882 36 30 32ft— 3 

5M 3ft 3ft 3ft - 
390 Sft 4ft 5 *■% 

207 5ft 5% 5ft, .%• 
1169 Sft 5 Sft *ft 


~ <843 4U TV, 4ft, '—ft 1 


_ 5359 7ft 6 
-04 .1 4X0 34% 33 

— ID 5 5 

A0O7A 1617 T& 


GCTUym 
Gent wt 
Gert/y wt 
GentyTr 
Geoovrt 


-• i?S 4V * 3N 4 ‘ii 

- 36K 30% 79 29% — % 


16OT 15'.* Ml : — % ( BandoM 


_ 1928 22% 21": lift— 1 
.96 19 880 18", 15% I6 f/ * —I* 


Candies 

CannExp 


JO 18 861 12 

.16 3J 20 30 


9ft 91k — % Bandopf 1J4C5.6 «674V, 73% 23% — % CarmExB 
4 Vl 4'A — wlBkSoum M livjAMic. lore ib% — % ! Carwm 


- 6924 15% 13ft ink 
_ 203714% 13% 13V, 
_ 1177 8V. 7% 8 
-• JWMft Uft 13% 


315 4ft 4V, 4'A — % BKSoum 

861 12% lire Tire —V, BkGron 6 

30 30 78 29 ~'i BnWlH 

1717 20 19 I9ft * Bant AH 


-SO 1.8168*3 28% 27 V» 28% .1". Bnklitd 
.. 362* 7ft 6% 7 ft —ft BnkUtpt 
„ 7a3H7 s I'ft, J', .y E BFUtFoi 
— 273 16'’. 16 le —Vi Banhrss 

34 x6 245 12 


190 ft ft 
4189 ire •'■’u 


—Vi Bankrvs ... . ___. 

-1 BnkFtt *0 1.9 39970% 19". 7(1% CapAse 

_ Bkntti JO 7.8 1371 22'k 21% 21*. s - CgpBnc 

-*s Bonta J= 1 J ,431 34 XI*., £>' , __ x CepSvres 

ft Banv M3 _. 742 T /i. 1 ’ - '. „ 1 Cao5w 

_ BanySLJ _. 970 I vi. r% i", — ■* . CepriBc 

ft BenvRT JO 9.1 295 Jft Jft ere — 1 ’i.CncTrn* 

BanvnSr -.607816 14* i 15ft ■ ft .' Curaustr 

.09« 1 901 JSV* 33% 34V, - Ccr33nc 

- +*7 P,* 1 7 — ’* jdnHh 

... 1936 12', Il"% 11’. : rvis 

.. J’U u 13’ v 14 -v, tcrcGn 

- *1 3 3. 3 - ’; C precrH: 

- B% ,-f 8*.; “ft . Carolino 

-. 209 40ft 36 ■ *0 • 3 Cren/rF. 

% BosEaPJ _ 433 0'-. 8'.; 8'k _ CarlCn, 

ft BOSWUF .80 2.9 3034 78% 26", 78 -H. CoroFit 

v. ' BalTectl ._ 3653 3ft 3 3"i. — V„ I CarrcllB 

'• ! Bov Pi doe _ 10424 14ft lJft 14V, -*,* J rnrrBW 

.60 2 4 1516 25 ft 74’.-, 25'.* ^ Carver 

140 2J 8028 *5'.* 61 62V*— 1% C«ed6 

.. 2387 4ft 4re 4re — v, j cose.j s 
J8 l.B 873 isv, 1JV, 15". - ' , I CasnCra 
_. 5920 30 77’.. 70'.'. -I ft ComCwl 


.40 I A 38 28 26' : 3E 

J6e 1.1 62524", 23% 23% 
J4 1 J B33 )4*u 15 164, 

.10 IJ 154 8% 7ft 8% 
_ 5910"’. 9ft 9ft 

1310% 9ft 9'.; 


JO XI 56019’.* 1BV. 19', - % CCTJT 


8.B »45 J5"k 7*re 24% — ", Bony M3 


- 1831 23ft 22V. J2ft —ft | BanvRT 


_. iS3» rare 9'i —1 


3107 15V* 14ft 15ft • ft I Borett 


ANTI ns 

AmOiltOv 

AmRac 

APtrrG 

APwrCv 5 

APutdbh 

aRkt 

AmRecr 

AmHesW 

Am&dtRi 

ASavFL. 

ASaH 

as radio 

AmSupr 

AmTete 

ATrawH 

AUWGUt 

AlltdGwt 


.. 87914ft ]?ft 14 *1 


3 JO 4 6 477 48% 47 47V, “V, BarcIBs 


- 854 Bft ?V« 7’k BarctP^ 

— 1*77 1* I4’6 Uft— j % BsTnBrt 

^ 621 2 1% IV. -% BvTnA 

-26371 23", 19% 21 —1% BasHr 

_ 3696 14 13 13ft -% Ba&Expi 

J* 3 A 584 7 6V, 6% - re BoswtTF 

... 9313ft 12% 13ft -v, BalTectl 

>■16679 19'.'* 17ft tBV, * I’ii BovRidge 
_ 324 lift H lift - BavVw 
... IM7 22'*k 21 Ik 21 % — % BayBJ-5 
33 6 4 3270 5% 4ft 5 .. Bavpn s 

.08 2J *966 4% 3ft 3H -ft BouuCU 
_ 71? 30V, 79 29ft —ft BetJBms 
_ 2406 22Vk 18 20ft —ft Bcebci 

_ 1246 1 3', 124* 13 —'k BotFuse 

_ 2801 5ft Jft 4*k »Vk BWdBlt 

1448 1ft 1".’„ I'/p. -I'„ Belize 


-. Oncrsl. 

■ ft Orvtrx 
-‘ u I Cfnscrn 

._ I CmpDt 5 

■ *6 CmplH 1 


CormEzB ... 204 » Oft lu , CemHtm 

Canon 1 Me .7 1137 86ft 83% 66% -Hr, CcmHiS* 

Canonic _ 5*7 4% 3ft 3% ■ % .2omnei 

Ldnsra- jo _ 2721116 II lire. -ft. Compeix 

Cento? .. in *>., 5V, 6v, .. onorsL 

Canlorv _ iai 36; 3ft Oft -re CrrvAn 

ConvRs _ 1405 Jft 3'a 3"'* — % Cmacm 

SaE.* 1 - « "-u ftj. •'% ._ CmpDt % 

CCBT .. 88 1$ 73% 25 • ft CmplH 1 

“ LDPh5c mm. f 'c *vp - [V l~ mnlrln 

CoaBnc AS 3.1 138 21% 20V, 21 re ■ ’k CmpLR 

- 1 6i u% ie lev, -re cptNwt 

* ■■ • ' COOiW Me 1 j 4 39'.; 39 Vi 39% r% CotOuis 

— re . LCOIIBC .26 19 J5 9", 9 9", -ft CmpPr 

— !« ; Coc ,rr » J201.7 UI21T 17*.’; 18ft • v. Compuwr 

Corouitr J6 ’.0 1 56? 18 16% IT", *1". Ctmishf 

LJtraanc JOe 1.4 *7429 Zi“, 29 .ire CmslRs 

JdnHh .1? j 568851% rft 48':— 3% Comtcfi 

s* 1 *. — *45 Wl * 6Vs Cwn«rs 

-o-t"jo 7582 4ft J J*k ■ ft CcdCam 

CortxrHz 13*7 19 19 19% -% CwvcEFS 

carolino . 7739 10V* 9V, 10 LoncHld 

Cr«r/*. ... 1015 Bft 8ft Bft - re CwcOn 

Carl 'ji .91 e IJ 36426% 25ft 26ft -ft Condor 

UiroFil JOb I j 237 14 12% Iji, .ft Condudu 

CorTclJB -. 32* 24 24 ... 1 Canestga 


1« 24*. 25V, 26ft *1 ft 

- » Tm 3% M4 —ft 

- 73i< 2J ■* are 2* -re 

« lift 9ft 11 *2 


fflgPdWfA 

DioMwffl 


Compene SI 3.6>27B8 26V. 2SV'. aft— 1 


Y B ft 1 ft, 
1729 Hu 1 ire 

3592 ire ire Wi, 


’“ -513 2V 3h 3% 


-. 260211V] lore lift 
- 764 4% 3ft « 

_ 1616 5 Jft 4ft 

.7 1100 14ft 13V, 14 

976 10'i 9ft 6ft 

_ t!«B m, |v M ift. 


Vu w irk t: 'h "3 g» 

lUE ;r S* nCti 359M2<V.jllH 12*" t-JS GeSpk 

30% fvn-iv, R^A 32 Ij B75 9 ft 1 9^ 9%‘ 

4ft 4ft “lift RddNY 1 ' Xe i 3694 23ft 22ft a% -ft 

IS A “saSaPt Wk 

?« ifS i 8 * « a** A ^5 gg 

= W rSB? 6 % rS IS 

£ ^ -% z 'g. 7 ,k gj™ 

S'* ?5.. FlfSW ».56 33 77347% 47% 47% Sm™., 


GMLew 
-ft GiooTr 
% GOnfSof 


— JOJZ 3U 'M 39 29 re 1. m 

— SSSIIft 10ft 10% _% 

_ 361 7% 7 7 ft 1-STAT 

- 300 6% b 6% *.% IBAH 

-ff 1 6 83 8 7% 7% COs 

J*el.6 45 18ft 17ft 18ft — % I COp t 

— . .9 4% aft ere % 

-'"Sl are 8ft. —1% [CUMefl 

AO a aft&sss 

~ 17912ft 12ft 12V. ^ [|CBc S 

A0 2J 448317% 17ft 171k —ft £•* 


= ®S» 

b.1 mmk m iiwUi 

-_*9 13ft 13 ft jj* +re 

r pm 

- 206315 Uft -li -ft 


-5 J207 Sft 22ft 22ft Zj% |GLgb 


_ 1246 9ft 7ft. Bft. —ft 


- 2*5913% lift 12% -ft Fnetlns* 


I’M — Vu GiShBi 
“ft GterE-z 


dS.'JS* 5* S ' V » *Y„ 

an e*S 1 0 Ks *■ lb 

A0 10 172 16% 16 1* -JS. 

- B Oft 7 ft Z 

,«aX7 'k? A... . 5 “ + ft 


43 — % GteneSe 
0, “ft Glctiind 


Bft 9ft . .. . _ 

DjtP* - 8*34 BV* 34 .ft FIrsttr ».5fr 33 

HxZncs — 8049 15 13 13",- — I FAlbOrt J00X4 

DIxleYr J8 XI 957 10% 9% 9*k — >9 FstAtert 
DtrGnls .16 A 439236 24V, 24%—, n A Tr T .84 2J 

Dormtg 1.10 S.9 26 9'k lBft 18ft _% FBOhs 1.00 3.8 

Don®** -36 M M'S M 15 FlBSoGA JO 9 lei 

Donfcany — 673524% 34 24 — % FstBkspf 2J5 R * 

R!OT ■“ “ ,r£ ?S 12*. ,sa .r E^’S'r.* 5 ' * 


-2° 2.1 957 10% 9% Mi _'k I FstAterT 


. ft CetOurs 
- % CmpPr 
• v, Compuwr 


’ 9'® ■’ *% 6% — DrctoKu 

~ 'ft 7ft — tft. Dusted 

- 3*2 IJ* 1 4 ft 6ft —Hu Dolmly 

- ,77gn 3% I Jf, . DglsLam 

_ 145)9 44% 36% 39ft— 4 Dovotro 


I FI8S0GA _ JOB 14 


_ 102*11% 1D»* IOtv'u 

_. is ire Hu ire 

.40 XI hlB4 19ft IB 19 


2» *L f Bk 


:w7k 6ft bt gss 

■B4 15 4737 34% 33% 34 GMTffltS 

1.00 3 S 746 26 24 26 “1ft 

JOB 14 *J19 19 19 G/5SJL 

135 8.6 15 26% 26% 36% ~ GdvSm 

J»® 5 *311% lore 11 —ii gStStT 

- 912 4ft 4 4 re cSdfl? 

„ ,1 7% 5ft 4% -ire GvtTd, 

■« 16 =518% 17ft ,8% Gown 

•««W 12144 4= 42 -ft 


»§45?S 47ft vre ifl«s 

. IplU 0 

ft ft~\ Itotc 

4fi .0 4, 7ft TV. yre ' 


- .Si S’* 6 TVi 

- 7ft 8ft rft 

- 80ft 30»-«6." 

- ?> 3ft Jft -re 

- “Il 6ft 6 6Vu— Afo- 

- W 8% 7% 7% —ft 

- 2Vh llv it 2- - 

- 1005 26% 25 a ft 

- n.3 22 21'A 22- *V 

- jji 4ft 5w m "% 

- 415 8U 7% 8 * .. 

_ 1197 ]ft n/u 1 -i* 


r ft Gtdftxd 

“ft Gidnsvsi 

—V, GMnBk8 
‘lft GoodGv 
- Com mi 
• - GdvFam 
— % Gothgrn 


3 to sft a ss 

.. - 15*4 4 Jft 4 


- iSGTeeh 

ai IVF Am 

7ft IVFpf 

► 1 lV)P«b 


*» ‘vu 
44' 3ft 2ft 
149.7ft 6ft 


-»3 

1M 43 wi»ft ’ 

7 SS,V .lu. 


■» 9 ■»«% w 

- B IX 18% lire .ft IBnl 

■» 3"23^ft 2 % 2 ^^» [me 


IBniSuo 

(mextBus 


■V ^*"1 : 


- ???> 2’^ 21% —ft imoBEn 


— ’•* jdnHh 

~ : zvis 

-'1 ' =trt«>o 
- Career Hz 

“ : k Coe cling 
3 ; Cretr/d-. 

— Cnriilm 


19 19% - % CencEFS 

9Vj lo CorcHld 


re I Condudu 
... j Qwmtta 


- 13986 18% 17% 17'k— l'k CjnfTC 


873 ISV, 14% 15". - ", I CasnCra 
tS 3 ? vf,:‘ CdlnCwl 

BS* 4% 3% 3‘k — % . CaiAms 
'63 7ft are 7ft “ V, CnunrDS 
130 13 I?’; lire — "11 . CaV.Vog 5 

977 18V» lire ;T~k ■ % : CnsSswt 


— +H 3% ?’.k !’.k Conmed 

2.8 JTJire 20 ai% . cennwi 
7 T«3I2% lore lire -ire Coaien 
_ I** 7 v. rre 7% .% conssvs 
-• }’* 1ft l’k — re I Conilim 

..48530 14% 10 lire — ?re I CansaPd 


—ft Inmcp 
— % I mane 
— % Imuajr 
—ft irnuLog 
—ft Imungn 

-1 imunpap 

_ Imuney 
_ jmunwt 
_ imurand 
" ft imposv 
— V» InwBc 


- *^’3 13 % iz% M. 

- « Vu ft :-ftf • 

- 6967 BVu 7ft 7%%— Vu 

~ Bft 7ft 7ft -—>* •• 
13% 13 « 

- ,2SS 3ft 2ft 29W +ft ;. 

~ 5V, 5ft - 

~ 4ft 7ft - .«%• 




: VS. 32 =2’ 

: “!3 S-fPr?: 


»<kw ~ Jft 3ft 4ft 

-=iS5g*^ : 

*% IrlceHm - Sft J6W— 1% 

tft , ie ,-s J&S* » . 4ft -ft • 


:: 4853) ure ,0 SEH _ io3 n% i£, u% ^ r e ZJ rSST 5 s ! ?? H-ffl" » -% SOT 

t'EF 9 * sr^siss?,- i«_sSSS‘ gjS 

..1669 1", re 1 — i ConPa 831 7.9 1079 11% 10 1Q% _% 1 ECO - 471 3 2'k 2ft -ft FIFMN* S U 20 35% 34ft 34ft -re 0^5 


IJ3e2j «ij 
13e 2 J ,00 4 


5510". 9% IQ 


, * 

S?: 

^"*v." : ' ■-< 

i*' - • 

e '»r : 


a. 02 °** 

'ft Inbrand 
*ft inaoHm 
"Vk IrxJBcp 




s »d 


Continued on Page U 


v..- 


r. \*>w u*'^> 




















r C-*# 

^ I 

ft 2-.S 

:■£>■ :•• ’ 
•■, »-. \'i 

S3S 
4 $ 


■MR J" " 


f-l u 
vs-? ? s a.: 




ii ■-■ ! 

- «■ *>. -, 


^ m 

»;t-. ‘U St 

3g^S II 


'»=:: * ? e! 




Energy 111-23110-0* +1-08 Capital Goods 11&03115.34 -027 


UtiRdes 119.60 11&26 +1.13 Raw Materials 126.1512542 40.58 


Fmanca 117.7011613 0 +1-20 Consumer Goods 97.25 97.30 -0-05 
Sendees 117.96 117.0 4 +079 MhceHaneous 123^2125.90 -1-81 

The Mae tarts U.S. dWsr «fa«s o/«x*8 jrr Trtyo. New York. Undon. and 


ofrrortetcap&tMto'l otfwndffl ffw Wt^stodaere tmeted 


7 ©MBmrfondHBfBWTitjui# 


CURRENCY RATES 


— . ...._ Juno 10 

Crw * , . b- FJ! . u™ mn s#. ir y» cs tata 

tart wf w *2 ijft tf! SS- W» — ** UW 25.11 SIP 

•nWB *** f'* _ |« B.SH- unt <13' U*p UK* UW •»' 

™ fa T. 2 ^ E5 WHS »n "» u« MU» uni *B 

um*w “5 Tlit X® BM- nan vn w» nu*' imk — 

SS SS S ,MU5 “• ,ra » ,UI 

MOB . »W ZZ 2S wu um *» «MBS UW M 

MwrortfW ’— • WJ« J** ZT uS-jbb mo uw SMI* un usr 

Mi IIS W »» «n w MB uw 

T 0 **> ■“* S2 iSS bS UW* 55 MV 1 uns U»* Urt' 

JSS S5SSSS«»» *» 

t<0R - -.- ^^ Yr*t^aMZui<frto^tnott*rcer*™- 

^T^tStSST^ir m nM •: W* * ** **: mm** **■-' «* 

OMSWMB 


:• 4 

•; ..... .5^ " . • 


r* ■•• v . , 'v.?v» 

•' -jjfi ;’.-Q t 






International Herald Tribune, Monday . /z«e /J, /W 



llgF.-V 


capital Markets ' 

French Convertible Bonds 
Get Caught in Undertow 

By Guy Collins 

P Bloomberg Busing Snn 

££H”T" s,u “ping stocks and soaring bond vields in 
ranee have not only burned investors and shaken govern- 

SSnTSS? < ? ey tave : ah ?f fa >«l Hit counuy-. once- 
mart*** orSJSi ?^n l f or convertiole bonds. With European 
life only slowl? bJLkS?J? a f 5 ars, . aod * e recovery here coming to 

Sd £ y i SeEkkjS m ^ t0K *** * unicd for «W 

hope for new sales of convertible 

SEST to ^ ^ dcbl 10 n* 

twUTn!^,^,S Ve i . COI ? pleted S round to a halt,” said Philippe 
Bostyn, convertible bond speaalist at the Didier Philippe broS 

age house in Paris. “Convert- - 
ibles have suffered because they v 
are linked both to what stocks issues appear 

•IftSSttSiic-t A to ta* ground 

total 20 billion francs (S3.S bil- In a halt 

lion) of new convertible bonds 

w«e sold in France in the first ” 

I ft2? r 4^ ca f 1 y matchkl * **» 20.5 billion francs 
^SSki ^ Iai increased the total volume of French 

comoriUebonds in orcularion by 20 percent, to 120 billion francs. 

. *hde m stock prices in March and the subsequent 

junm in bond yields knocked the wind out of the market at thestart 
of the spring. 

Convertible bonds, which can be exchanged for stock at a fixed 
ratio, are popular with French investors because they combine the 
rela tive s afety of bonds with the capital-gains potential of stock. 
The capital gains of convertible bonds, unlike stocks, are not taxed 
under French law. 

^Because of these advant age s to investors, convertible hoT)ri< can 
carry low interest rales, which makes them attractive to borrowers. 
Several major companies — notably the idecn mmwnifaitinp s and 
aigmewing company Alcatel Alsthom, the tircmaker Campagme 
Generate des Etabhssements Michdia SCA and the carmaker PSA 
Peugeot Citroen SA —rushed into the market in the early part of ihi* 
year, eager to take advantage of the opportunity for cheap funding. 

The three companies alone accounted for 12-5 billion francs of 
convertible bona sales, or 63 percent of the total, with Alcatel 
Alsthom raising 5 billion francs, Peugeot 4 billion francs and 
Michdin 3 J billion francs. 

Other major borrowers included Finaxa, the financial holdin g 
company of insurance company Aim SA, which raised 2.2 billion 
francs; the re-insurer Scot, which raised 1.47 billion francs; the 
credit mstitution Unibail, which raised 1.25 billion francs, and the 
advertising agency Euro-RSCG, which raised 1 billion f rancs. 

But the very heavy demand from borrowers exhausted investors' 

See BONDS, Page 11 

Corf Gewirtz is UL 


Cktaffight I A Woman ’ s Fight for 

O By Brandon Milchener meubkorkers' union, which 

HR A . Itnentanoral f/em’J Tnbtae Of the federation's COMnb 

l O ASSCIS FRANKFURT - When delates of the Engdcn-Kcfcr, a i 


German Labor 


OUMferDoHM-VAbm 


■ *• m m , t • , 


cumm ta* 
HfWtHN M«l 
AMIWLJ U£ 
Aultr.KdflL 1L732 

■ntfcru. Tsasa 


C a U i M nw a 

poatabkm* 4511 
*vn*. i**M 
Fte-nortdw S» 


6*n*s* "S’* 

Btm k+ac. 3SBS0 
HwtKMVS JOT* 

IWS.fDrtrt wa» 

IBBtal rw«t 3us 
Wdo-njflkaj 3U&00 

irtttc un 
aim 

xmtnAB 1 
Motor, rte 2SI5 


cornocy ta» 
Mam 
ILZaatafs um 
Horw,Mr4M 730 

n&BHB as» 
poimziDnr zznz 

Porlnaxto 17*» 
RDB-raW l*B» 
SaoBinral ITS 
DWf ' 


XAAP.mB MtM 
S-Kor.mn KUO 

Mm 7Sm 
TrtwBBl OM 

TMMM »2S 
TDcKbflHra 32138. 
llUdUmni un 
vnatallr. ion 


Forward IUU» - - - •— smbt o mta 

Ss 3S:3 as as 

srt*» e*e MW> ^ (gnaalf M f BOKO Cemrardoto itoOano 

souren: rM; *** * **** < Tokra}; Rarvt ***ofCaMa 

— «v 


01 Balsam 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — Germany's 
two bi geest banks. Deutsche Bank 
AG ana Dresdncr Bank AG, have 
priority over other creditors in the 
bankruptcy of Balsam AG, the 
maker of sports surfaces, according 
lo Deutsche Bank. 

Balsam, which filed for bank- 
ruptcy Friday, bad pledged all its 
assets worldwide to the two banks 
in 1990 in mum for credit, Deut- 
sche Bank said. 

“That means that in the case of 
bankruptcy, claims by Deutsche 
and Dresdncr Bank will be met 
first," said Hellmut Hartmann, 
spokesman for Deutsche Bank 

He said on Saturday that it was 
normal practice in the financing of 
export businesses for the company 
to use global assets as security for 
credit, as fate*™ had done. It was 
also usual when granting a loan to 
inquire whether a global assigna- 
tion of assets had already been 
made to other institutes, he said. 

“It is not the job of the assignees 
of the debt, in this case Deutsche 


Iniermonorjil flera'J Tribune 

FRANKFURT — When delegates of the 
powerful Goman Trade Union Council begin 
a rare, week-loog national convention on 
Monday in Berlin, the main item on thor 
agC&da will be a long-term reform of the 
monolithic group, which has lost 800.000 peo- 
ple, or 8 penxet of its members, m the fast two 
years alone. 

The federation’s member unions, which 
represent <40 percent of the German work 
force, have been losing power rapidly as the 
latest recession, the country's worst in de- 
cades, coupled with the strains of German, 
unification, accelerated the erosion of their 
authority that began in the 1960s. 

One of their most important decisions, the 
election of a chairman to succeed the recently 
deceased Heinz-Werner Meyer, is likely to 
provoke groans among members who had 
hoped for a clear sign of change at the top. 

Dieter Schulte, a little-known unionist with 
expertise in steel politics, is virtually guaran- 
teed a victory bv virtue of his membership on 
the board of JG Metall. the big German 


metalworkers' union, which pays a full third 
of the federation's contributions. 

Ursula Engdcn-Kdcr, a well-known labor 
specialist who has been the council deputy 
chairwoman since 1990, was passed over for 
the succession in what some omoc&s de- 
scribed as blatantly sexist power politics. 

Particularly insulted were many women 
unionists, who account far one-thud of the 
German union movement's 105 million 
members and were the only source of new 
members in the last couple of years. Some 
mailed in their party papers in protest. 

Margret Hdoig^Raane, chairwoman of the 
German banking irtgipanew and retail employ- 
ees union, said that the choice of an outspoken 
labor economist such as Mrs. Engrien-Kefg 
for the council's top post “could save been a 
symbol of the opening for the unions. " 

Although there is one other woman. Mon- 
ika Wulf-Mathies, who is a prominent union 
leader, many German women fed that they 
are prevented from rising to positions of 
power in an environment dominated bv 

But Mrs. Engel cn-Kefer, in an interview, 
insisted the union's debate over Mr. Schulte's 
nomination was a dangerous distraction from 


marc important matters such as the disman- 
tlement d the Goman welfare state. 

She is likely to remain deputy chairwoman, 
which some union observers say actually 
frees her from bureaucratic responsibilities 
and allows her to devote herself to issues. 

“You have to be realistic,” she said, noting 
that two-thirds of German unionists are men. 

“It's much more important that the unions 
get together in the more important questions 
of fighting unemployment and becoming 
more efficient in getting government and the 
employers together." 

A former vice president of the Federal 
Labor Office, she said German unions bad 
demonstrated flexibility in the last round of 
collective bargaining, sacrificing hard-won 
benefits in exchange for greater job security. 

With labor on the run, however, she said 
the council, as advocate for Germany's 16 
biggest unio ns, should assume a more aggres- 
sive pose, “striking back more harshly than 
before,” because, she said, “we have to keep 
what we have.“ 

A member of the Social Democratic Party, 

See UNION, Page 11 


Party Urges India to Revamp State Sector 


made to othw inaitutesThc said ^***«»*«“- 

“It is not the job of the assignees rJJSl ^ mcrc,aU - v mblc - 

of the debt, in this case Deutsche .J 1 } ““ lssucd a It urged the “government to ac- 

and Dresdncr Bank, to announce hf “ n n 8 .^, w jjjjj g ov ^ nm ^ nt . 10 cord the highest priority to the teefa- 
the global assignation Dubliclv" ^cgjn a wide-ranging restructuring nokmcal oreamzational and mana- 


thc global assignation publicly" °cgm a wmc-ranging restructuring 
Mr. Hartmann said. ^ ih* counby s slate-owned I com- 

According to - report in the 


newspaper Westfalen-Blatt, the 
global credit guarantee meant that 
all Balsam’s independent subsid- 
iaries around the world would also 
have to apply for bankruptcy. 

Balsam's four-member board 


dia's economic reforms. 

The Congress Party, winding up 
a midterm review of Prime Minis- 
ter P. V. Narasunha Rao's govern- 
ment, endorsed recommendations 
by two government-appointed 
committees. One key measure 


made by the two committees. 
One proposal suggested the j 


wsc oitmiiJ mvniiu m wuiiuiuccs. vtuc *cy measure une proposal auggcsiea me gov- 

would eliminate the ne^d for prior eramem divest 49 percent of its 
claims for credits onthe basis <$ «°«rniiieni approval to fire work- holdings in state-owned compa- 


falstiied documents. 

The crisis has already hit Pro- 

See BALSAM, Page 11 

’ Hanoi Notebook 


ers and dose companies. 


rues, and said that 10 percent of the 


The parly issued a resolution earnings from divestiture should be 
saying that the restructuring of set aside to lend to state-owned 
state-owned companies was cssen- companies at concessional rates to 


Investors Clamor for a Stake 


Foreign investment in Vietnam has surged since 
the U.5. trade and investment embargo ended 
earlier this year as American business people rush 
to catch up with their rivals from Hong Kong. 
Taiwan, Singapore, Australia and France. 

Foreign investment pledged in the first five 
months of the year reached $15 billion, according 
to the Stale Committee for Cooperation and In- 
vestment, a 29 percent increase over the same 
period last year. Agence France- Presse reported. 
Since launching its economic reforms in 1986, 
Vietnam has attracted S85 billion in contracted 
foreign investment, of which 52 billion has arrived. 

But rather than bask in its success, Vietnam 
should be preparing for further liberalization in its 
investment laws, according to some business peo- 
ple and economists. Hie country expects to raise 
half of the 550 billion it needs to modernize its 
economy from foreign sources. 

When it comes to privatizing state-owned enter- 
prises, current plans envision the state retaining 30 
percent of the equity, the staff 50 percent, leaving 20 
percent for investors, including foreigners. 

“There is a trade-off between high levels of staff 
ownership and achieving greater technology transfer 
and overall modernization by granting larger stakes 
to private investors," said a foreign economist who 
works dosdy with the government. “1 believe the 
government is beginning to debate this internally." 

At the same time, is the realm of infrastructure 
development, desperately needed throughout the 
country, current fixed-time, fixed-return projects 
may give way to direct equity investment in major 
projects or important state assets. 

Reports that stat&owned Vietnam Airlines hopes 
to sell up to 30 percent of its equity to a foreign 
earner may be the start of an investment trend 

David Wicks, genoa! manager for Telstra, the 
Australian communications concern, said while 
Vietnamese officials believe their foreign-invest- 
ment law “may be attractive," they are now “more 
receptive" to me fact that Vietnam faces “increasing 
competition for investment throughout the region." 

World Bank Team in High Gear 9 

When Bradley O. Babson slipped into town a 
couple of months ago, he caught much of the 
international community here by surprise. They 


had not been expecting the World Bank's represen- 
tative to set up shop so soon after the United States 
dropped its trade embargo in February. Mr. Bab- 
son, an American who was working Tor the Bank in 
Bangkok before jumping to Hanoi, said that any 
surprise was misplaced. 

The International Monetary Fund and the 
World Bank began quietly advising the Vietnam- 
ese government back in 1989. “preparing Vietnam 
projects for several years, on the back burner," he 
said. “Now we've just moved into high gear." 
working from temporary quarters in the city center 
around the comer from the old Meiropole HoteL 

The bank is preparing research for Vietnam's 
wide-ranging structural adjustment programs that 
should be ready by September or October, before a 
World Bank meeting in November in Paris. Top 
priorities for the researchers: Reforming Viet- 
nam’s financial and banking sectors and getting its 
accounts in order, a prerequisite for expanding 
loans to enterprises or selling up a stock market 

“No one really knows what shape the state 
banks are in," said Mr. Babson. 

While the government has said it wants to do set 
up a bourse this year, that timetable now; looks 
unlikely, although a less-ambitious market in gov- 
ernment debt may be on the horizon. 

Pore Panache? Purely Pekinese 

For the status-conscious of Hanoi, small Honda 
motorbikes just do not have the same panache now 
that, judging from increased traffic flows, it seems 
everyone can afford them. Nor is buying a larger 
model: Muniopai restrictions now ban* bikes judged 
too fast and dangerous for congested streets where 
traffic lights are still a curiosity. 

A grand new home in the West Lake district 
whose wild architectural style can only be described 
as “Star Trek Meets the Gingerbread Man" also is 
becoming commonplace as an unauthorized budd- 
ing boom grips the city. Instead, some of Hanoi's 
new rich have turned to an interesting expression of 
their success in a country where sense other species 
are eaten — Pekinese pci dogs. Pure-bred, all-white 
dogs are changing hands Tor up to S1000 among 
collectors, 10 times the national per capita GDP. 

Kevin Murphy and Jon Gage 


CONSOLIDATED 
ANNUAL REPORT 


Statement of 
Income 


fforfts period April, 1M3 
to Man* 31, IBM) 
Ift Mattered Yen 


Consolidated Net Sales 

IVimh mka Ujrcn ai j 


Net sales 4,630,907 

Cost of sales 3,345,120 

Income before taxes and minority 

interests 90,190 

Income taxes 75,506 

Net Income 12.140 

Net income per share 3.78 (in Yen) 


Balance Sheet 



(Match 31 . tSS-U in Mifluns at Yen 


Assets 


Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity 


Cash and cash equivalents 595,601 Bank loans and current portion o( 


I j Notes and accounts receivable, 


long-term debi . 


865.395 


trade 1.113.992 Notes and account? payable, tiade .. 813 741 

Inventories 1.102,249 Oiher currem liabilities 1 .067.777 

Other current assets 391 .51 1 Lonq-iei m liabilities i .353 .323 

Property, plant and equipment 1 .33 1 .61 2 Minority interests 1 27. 729 

Other assets B1 5,725 Shareholders' equity in? .725 


Total assets 


. 5,350,690 Total liabilities and 

shareholders' equity ... 5,350,690 


In Touch with Tomorrow 

TOSHIBA 


noiogteal organizational and mana- 
gerial restructuring of the public 
sector so that it operates commerci- 
ally and in a business-like manner." 


meet their expansion and rational- tion said people were ready for 
ization needs. more change. “In fact they demand 

Another report, while calling for more reforms and a quicker pace," 
easier means to fire workers and it said, 
close companies, ai the same time Ir was the first time ih’ Cr 


forTayofis. ac faan 

The state-owned sector, set up sector, 
over the past four decades, is un- t^, c 


It was the fust time tin Congress 
Party so unambiguously speiledoui 
a change of policy toward the public 


force: The Congress I 
tion noted that while 


, ership conclave in the western aty 
' resolu- ^ garo^ decried the govem- 
ment’s economic openness and de- 


fers have invested S45 billion in ^^dedtbe doora be shut to for- 
statc-owned cempimes, returns ci companies . j, said the 

have rareW .exceeded I percent. ofiaamCt new policies had led 
The public sector includes more fZXzZIzIl 


to sharp price increases, unemploy- 


than 200 companies involved l j 
mining , oiL communications, steel, _ ... , 

aSS, shipbuilding, railways, . Il ,K "f 6 

bus transport and holds. in sugar pnces,^uch led India to 


Mr. Raps government, which in- allow private traders U> fitelv in- 
troduced far-reaching economic re- P 0 ?. 5 ^ m .^ )nL Pnce i° f !hc 
forms since comte? to power in pditicaSy taanw [ Conmodity rose 
1991, has been dragging its feet over 35 ««£* ***** ^ shipments 
the dosing of un viable state compa- wcre 

tries because of opposition by trade The opposition party* accused the 
unions and other political parlies. It government of intentionally creat- 
also him alert been slow to divest of a crisis to help s ug ar companies 
its holdings in stare-owned compa- hi an effort to collect funds from 
tries despite pledges to do so. them for the ensuing elections. 

But & Congress Party resolu- ( Reuters , AFP) 


Page 9 

Rationing 
Resumes 
In China 

High Food Prices 
Threaten Reforms 

Compiled fy Our Suff From Dtipztcka 

BELTING — China warned Sun- 
day that rising food prices threaten 
the economy and revealed that some 
regions had reversed reforms and 
gone back to issuing ration coupons. 

"Side effects of the pricing re- 
form and tire rocketing cost of pro- 
duction materials have combined 
to form the Achilles' heel of the 
economy," the official China Daily 
Business Weekly said. 

The Stare Statistical Bureau, 
worried that soaring prices for food 
threaten the entire anti-inflation ef- 
fort, has demanded government ac- 
tion, tire newspaper said. 

China Daily said the price in- 
creases posed a serious problem for 
the government's anti-inflation 
program, with the overall cost of 
living in 35 major cities increasing 
by 232 percent over the receding 
12 months. 

While officials took heart at fall- 
ing prices for machinery and electri- 
cal appliances, food costs have 
shown no sign of slowixm. Grain 
prices in April shot up 3.8 percent 
man March, and by 35.7 percent 
firm a year earlier. Edible oil prices 
jumped 555 percent in April from a 
year earlier because of shortages. 

Meat prices are on average one- 
third higher than last year, and last 
year’s disastrous cotton crop has 
sent clothing prices sharply higher. 

“Some local governments, wor- 
ried that edible-oil prices may run 
beyond what residents can afford, 
are subsidizing grain shops and re- 
stricting consumer purchases by 
once again issuing coupons," the 
newspaper said. 

There appear to be little hope for 
a quick solution, the newspaper 
added. It cited a State Statistical 
Bureau survey that “found no signs 
that the upward trend in prices will 
reverse itself in the months ahead." 

The lifting “of price controls on 
grain and other consumer produce 
last year created imponderable ef- 
fects on the economy that are now 
being felt," it said. (Reuters, AFP) 


USX Seeks Help on Antitrust Payout 

Confuted by Our staff From Duparcfies crated by Penn Central Transpor- Steel companies including 
PITTSBURGH — USX Corp^ ^on Co. prior to 1976. All claims Wheeling-Pittsbuigb Cbxp„ LTV 
seeking to pare its payments for a against American Premier were dis- Coip., and National Steel Corp. 
$630 million antitrust judgment in- missed in the 1980s and that decs- and several docking and trucking 
voiving its former railroad unit, has sion was upheld by the federal ap- companies had filed antitrust suits 
filed bwsuits that seek contribu- P 6 ® 15 in May 1993. against USX that dated back to 

tions for all or part of that amount The appeals coun set the judg- 1983 and were later consolidated, 

from American Premier Under- ^OA against USX at about $630 
writer, Inc, a Cindnnati-hucd in- mfcufoncbg 
surance company. S’ company to take steep charges 

The move comes a year after a Sst year. U.S. Steel Group B 

federal appeals court upheld a 1991 American Premier, which is be- the largest U.S. steelmaker. 


ruling that found the Bessemer & ing sued in district court in Pitts- USX has cut its financial obliga- 
Lake Erie Railroad, a former USX burgh and in state court in Cuya- tions by working out several settle- 
subsidiary, and other railroads tile- hoga County, Ohio, said it would ments since the 1993 judgment 
gaily conspired for three decades to contest the move by USX. The largest one was with LTV, 


monopolize the transporting, stor- It said it believed the actions which it has agreed to pay about 
age and unloading of iron ore at were “without merit" and an at- $375 million. LTV, which last June 
lower Lake Erie pons. tempt to circumvent the previous emerged from seven years of bank- 

American Premier was originally dismissal of dairns against Ameri- nrpttty protection, hil been award- 
named in the antitrust Litigation in can Premier. ed a judgment of $458 million phis 

the 1 980s because it is the successor A USX spokesman refused to interesL 
company to a railroad business op- comment. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 



AND 


THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST 
THE FUTURE 



Omega Speedmaster Automatic. 
Self-winding chronograph 
in 1 8 k gold. 

Swiss made since 1848. 



Q 

OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 












Page 10 


MUTUAL FUNDS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, J UNE 13. 1994 

I Grp Nome WWyiGfpNome WVty GroName WWy GrpName WWy . Grp Nome Wkly GfPNnme , 13V age 

1 FdNone Lost Chge FdNarne Lost Chge Fo Horne usJ Oige fq name Last Gige, FdNam Lost Chs* FdPH*n* Lasr Cage it* 


fflS “SIS l*. LM am: « 


*» :«*«•« LrtSSi”™ u “'^. 


GfPNoma Wklv [Gtp Noma *** ! Emon v Trodrttonct I McdDel r :Q.74 -3)1 Gotop 14 » -JS Honisra/l 14.97 —.07 ' MedTBn 10 M -JSS N*Mno »-7g * 03 gjjgj* 1 l \?J; Z “ GrtnAo ^ ~-SI , 5£*Sv 9J? — 3H Tnf ' CroGtf 

[ Fd Manv Lost Otge ! Fa Home Last Cfl« I China p U 36 — 07 ■ NaK-asr 9 81 * at Grwjfi 14.40 — .« HarucVtn n 20J1 — JU MlMuto 9.95 - .03 M -+mer a . 6j* —Jfi JfSfoSj.-ijj* -;3 H«nA»» CAtaAP 1025 -JJ7. Jjffi T X6 ■ 


Cloic of trading Fnday. June 10. 


GniNoiTM Wklv i Grp No me 

FdName Lost Oi9e; FdMdmc Lost 


AAL Mutual: l GH-vBnn 630 - 

Bond p 9.70 -.01 ' GIOvCo &2S - 
CoGfP 14-54 — XJ 1 GiMgdAa 9J9 
MunBctP 10.79 -AS GIMdn&np9j9 
SmCoSik 9.55 —32 GUVttUC rp?.T* 

UU 9.05 ■ 03 Gv5cAp DUX — . 

AARPInvst: GvScBa 1107 

BalS&Bn 14.6? —3)1 GvScCp 10.06 
amG'n 31 JS —A1 [ Gv7e?7pl3l3 
oHtiieM n 1104 _( GvTIAp SX9 

Grwlncn 33.JJ -.01 1 GvTIBp 8X8 
HQBdn 1152-03 GvTiC d 8 30 - 
TvFHdn 17.63 +10 Grinca I2_S? — 

ABT Funds: GrinCP 12J6 — 

Emergp 1145-^3: HortiAp 14.13 — 
FL Hi IQ 30 - 3)7 Harts o 14 05 — 
R_ TF 10.98 - 09 HifldlrivA P6.31 - 
Gwlhlnp 1013 ‘.09 1 HiYldBp 4X7 -. 
Ulillncp 11 47 -.05 MuBAp 1111 * 


* ■!* 


GovrSec r»14J7 —.04 


11.06 -.07 Resrvan 9.97 -01: CAPIF 
11.53 -.07 Value n 11X6 -.OB CPI2Bt 
11J9 -3)5 IBM Mutual Funds: EnA 

1Z.11 -.06 LaneConii.36— ,04‘ FrrA 
11.40 -.07 MumBc 10.05 -3)5 1 FOAA 
»A0 -.09 SmallConl7.il —.13' GiQA 


AFL9Caen9.« „! MunBBP 10.11 

AHA Funds: f PocxAp 1135 

Baiarn 1103 — .03, PcceBp 1127 
Full 9j»3 —M TEHTt'A pl0.96 
Lim 10.15 .1 TEHiYBo 10.95 

AIM Funds: I TarE.ilApII.2; 


I lS«wiv<SrP'*W-J -Jd 

II SflfOflWBTOS: ... n IMT -JM-V®*?®* Ls.-- — 


.Sctonw Bros 

Coon T7J3 — ll < 14 61 . vefSe^K 

• I trues n 14BS -05 I6-.79 jVBnEBte- • • 


i i Sn3fe"»-»— 71 ! V S^BS>2 : -F 

A ISTi'nKS 4 '..* 


run +JJJ — 1 cniif* - wj UuPUCVn tVU’ — js i urui i 

Lim 10.15 .1 TEHiYB a 10.95 - 0t. I Fsdlncn IOjU .1 Ta»E> 

IM Funds: TarE.dApll.23 - .07 1 vwin 27 61 —12 USGvIl 

AfliGvp 9.66 . TrEIBo 1122 - .06 ! QilinDf. o 12.95 -M Ulilrtf 

AgrevD 2441 -J8 TXMSAp 9.w -3)51CATFIn I0J0 -.06 ValAdi 

BdAp 1540 — .0i| UtilAp 8.63 - 01 California Trash WWinc 

BdBi 1 5 J9 _.06i American Funds: | callncn 1734 -.10 WldWdi 

ChotTB a.83 — .09 AmBolp 1119 -3)1 1 CdUSn 10.43 —.01 | TCBalp 


1175 -.04 1 TEiniiD 13^7 -itt EuroEq 2*.?3 - U Ulftics S.W — .K 7'ncPI AD 10.13 -• 


111! "ST! 1 JM-W nit-> FranfcJnMBdTr VM? 9M '*' > 'K4 

1929-3)1 Found n ILW -03l TxFSI 1019-0? CorpjualP^-A.HSGroup: S5S «S 


WWinc 8 60 +W GloRen 1121 -.10 FinHorfiVl 10JO -3)1 InvOratfe pB.g -JJ2 BJuQ>P 6 36 —.03 f.90 s 

WltJWdl I8J4-.07 LtdMKI n 20.8“ —22 F.nHarMu r 1161 -10 BtiDi-. 0 lffi -•'* SRSS'JtJo -07 

TCBalp 9.51 -.10 MunCdn 10.15 -.02 First Amur Fds A: : Frni*fiii Teiw* ^, 1 ? D fl- i KST 81 7*4 


!rli ■«: Lau'un iua> —hi iv.oaip — .iU| iu.ia *,vi inivMiiw nij". .. ' 1 17.^ t ,■? i r*- D » t*o _ 

CanWI p 16.79 -^5 Amcpp 123)7— 3)9 1 S4P500r 11.00 -.03 TCCort 13.05—2*! -VluniFn 1038 +.112 1 Ail All p 10.37-03 GloPMjr p13.^ — . 0 - fEIp Ti, StCBt '«7 

Gcocp 9.64 „ A mMu »p31 7? -.07 : MPMicI 1124 —.13 TClrcp 1029 -J» : .VUlMran iai4 -,W | Baton o I0J1? Harduifl-p 12.97 -. 2, gjSOWa 10.78 -32 , T^J ,3 L _ 

GfflBt 10 44 -38 BandFa p 1343 -.02 ! Calvert Group: TCunt 1735 — -37 I Retire n 1124 -.ml Eaunvs 5.w ■ .03 1 HttocCurpl^S — .03 =awP1P 10.^ ji uKWrt '»fl9 _■ 

Grlhp lOifl— 37 CapinSI d 32 J9 -.14, Ariel Ml53 — .12 TCNortn 9J3 —01 1 TotRtn 18J4 +.12 i EqlC' p 1063 —.02 Fremant Funds: EAirino 4 ;; -^2 I TxFC_t • 


£ .Si 82g f 


HrldAp 9.63 +3)6 Cnp'W1dpl5J8 -.0?! ArielAp 22.13 -.12 TC5CP1 3.B2 — 18: ValTtnn 15.42—3)1 

HYldBt 941 -.06! CanWGr 17. Si -.07 j GlobEq 17.92 -.10 DelGrpinsft . E*«!Midas < 01 

ItlCOP 7J6 +3)2 EUPOCP 21-41 -.09 j |nco 16.38 — JG Decl ■ HJ8 — .01 lE'Irr^Hio ?J1 +.0S 


(iTtfEp I ui +.10 Fdlnvo 1791 —Ql , mbCAJ 10J7 -.02 CKUwrl I0JO - .03 'FAM Vain 19.91—3)5: 


Lim/Ap 9.«5 Govt p 1U5— 0i ( Munlnt I0J1 -.05 Dfcpl 2J.8 j — A* FBL Ser.es: 

MuB p 8-74 - 03 | GwthFd o 5630 —34 1 Sncfal c 5921 - .05 DlCftl 6.69 - .01 I BlOliP t 18.64 —.01 I 

Summit 9.77—15. HITrsip 1420 -.09 1 soeSd 163)5—3)2 TsvRsi 931 .1 Growth | 13.00 ■ .02 

TeCTp 10.8) -3)3! IncuFQp 1177 +j)S sacEa 21.02 —.12 Detawore Group: HrG+Bd I I0.lt — 3J7 

TF Ini 1024 -.02 : ItitBdn 1148 _ T«FLidnHi48 .. Trendp 1140— .16 [ Hu'Bdi 1016 -.05 


1024 -.02: IntBdP 1148 _i TU-Linn iiiab .. i i renap lino —.10 1 niiDoi iu 10 -.uji jiiwp ioji -ji. | " . ■■+? •« ',■.+£'5 ”S Vn>n_.i. n nil 

1239-05 In vCOA p I&37 -3H| TrFLng [6 43+ .M VdlUep 2027 —44 j Marrgdl 1136 ■ii mfmrMC _ 7AgtfTRte)l J+_ : .Jl ; aRMI^^IIOO 


A^iLSAo 7JS -31 GllnOt •*«' 

SSi-Iffi BSr» 


iA-tt 6! GNMAn T4J0-. Wjsr»»"2 ' t Jf 

XU6 GWWn WjS .M CATFC ^ M .. STG1AP -fW 

1007 +435 GlSmCo W 1 M3 935-50/ STKBT JUB.?J9. 

0J2 -.06 GoWn S- 9JA_a: vau*o 3LH 




ValuBl 20.79 
Valu v 20JW — , 


AslAlllr ivJ7 -.o? Fundamenal Funds: 


We>m p 1435 
AMF Funds: 
AdiMfg 9.(K 
IntMlp n 950 
InrILiq n 10J7 


ixS “iB uraSSH^S 42W? :J8I STp SS ^3\wS!2iaZ- "Wm4i ««|J. »•«! M 

"79— JS NwE«npl4.ri — .12 usGov 1^19 _l Dec in p 16.48 —.01 CodAbp 1 1 24 — 06 Balartcei n)0e7 .■ CA/.'Un 00 8.4} -.11 fO u, i£ I— 1 ) - -® : ■,;? 

84 -J6 f4ewPerD 14.94 -.02 Cambridge Fds: I DecTRp 13.B9 — j 01 F^dlr. HOI .! Eqldrtn 1063 -.07 N> Alurnp .Ot -fli HmEp S 3J -.02- EmMj a | -3 

55-14 smcpv/ps*! -.24 copGta -PI Mow p 18.79-04 InlGv 9.97 1 .07 I F.OlncI n 10 67 - 01 USWvn 1.62 - 03 ftowC'O 13« 1 ggMB U 

Ta-.E*P1P11.78 -314 OvlnA 11K -.05 InllEap I2J8 -.151 SeiVrtae pll 56 — .04 GovBal n 9.14 . GAMFunds: £> e , p . Iff ■£? I R£|2?!I i*- 

« . TxEaCA pI5J3 + .07 GwfhA I4^S -35 DefcfiA p 6.69 SmCOGrnlM? -I .?» -pi C-tXxx iftie -> -,oi. UM* L 


SeiVrtuePll'54 — !o 6 GovBpI n 9.14 _ GAMFunds: 


SmCoGrnn.17 ' _ I rtman 9 72 - oi nta r ifiw — V &ycA « p f» — -jj •' 


5 38 ~m , GtoEqBn !6.[3 -W Mathersft MX + Gl vaujAB ’ 


Oi! PAt«nl3^^r 


ruu-n SMi. i.t9-.Sil S', ISST^j «Kio-S +Si SW’VK.tS^T Wj? ‘® «« j.«s - « ^ 

n 1021 — os AmerMdM Funds: i MuincBfc:i492 -.u T*FaAp 142 -.05 i ww F^din 9 40 — 04 5poceqi n I5.9v -03 Jncpmen (j.lj .. ~- 0> {J., + 1,. rf-- 7'Aritfcn n 74»5 -01 NtliiP 

: 9 46 -.01 Growth 4 JO -03 .;aoM*lp.nlieil -02 Dimerroonol Ftfe I FMB Funds: SiocHn lUi i - .02 SiSLngn 11.04 •« -• {it? wrrtil-rmdi- iScnwe 

n 9P7 .1 Income 21.<! - .05 | Qjpp«IIo Rushmorft [ USLrgs «M-U| p.vECo 11.44 -.07 'First AmerWUrtuat SIS PM n JsjV 15 ;Jg pirts A^rrSiijt -_C9 -seiLdr 


InrILiq n 10J7 . T^EvVAplSA) -.08 CtsrGrBlUtS — .01 TreasAp ’34 -IFFEMJ 1021 -3)5 Lldlnd 

MigSecn 1155 - 312 1 WshWlutP 17.60 —.01 GvInBI 13.03 -.05 TxUSAp 1120 - 3)5 | FFTW Funds: I A'.iqSer 

ARK Funds: AmGwln 9J9 — 01 GwihEt 1AA6 — JS TxlnsApn.it -3Xl USShnrr 9 95 .. MunBr 

CauGrn 10.15 — 13 AHerilfl n 1.1? -.0i I incGrSt 15.W -*3C TxlnlAp 1041 -3»| YrtWHcda 9.63 — .01 RegEq 

Grlncun IOJI —.05 Amer Mctfl Funds: i MulncBtel492 -.11 TaFoAp 8.42 -.05. 'WWFxdln 940 — 04 5pec£e 

Inavne ’ *6 -,oi Growth 4 JO — 03 |i-goMMd> nil 01 — 02 Dimensional Fds: I FMB Funds: Sioctli 

ASMFdn 9312 . Income 21.«1 - .05 QjdpmUo Ruikmore: US LTOs 13 74 — 11 | D.vEC a 1 1.44 —.07 ! First Arr 

AVE5TA: TriUcx 1538—07, EmgGrn 11.16 USSml a4J -01. DivE I ll 4J — .07 Divrur 

Botanced 173J2 -3)3 API Gr tan 1120— .1#, Grwth 11 tl — .08 US <-10 n 11.40 —.01 : lnt<3Cp 10.01 _ Eqlncc 

EqGrq IE»2 — 06 AmPerturm: ' ComielUII 859 Japcnn 2876-1.12! InIGI ldOl - Mtmgii 

Eqlncwn 1818 -.10! Bond 9.41 .. i Qjp stone Group: ; UK n 72.75 - 01 i M.TFp 10.43 -.05 FsfBosK 

Income 15.47 — 01 Eauitr 1133 — .05 ■ FundS'W 15A6 — 10 Com n 15J7 -.11 rAiTF l 10.4? -05 FslEoal i 

Accessor Funds: I IntBd 10 28 — 01' Gwllnc 4.80 -.01 DFARIEstW.9I - .0+ 1 FPA Funds: FryFiffi 

InlF'Inn 11.63 . i AmUtiFd n 20 J5 : MCORs 17BS — .12 I Fi.dn< 101.11 — 20 i CflOil 19.69—^18 FrsIFtffl 

AccTAorigll 30 -.02 AmwvMu't 7J5 — .11 . Mifand 11J3 — 24. GIBd <■ 98.37 —.77 Mewlnc 10.65 , FiHwMu 


Lidlndn 990 -.oi ' PkB« 197 65 Wectp 190 -jl . GjbFxB 


V.tgSecI n 9. *7 - .w ■ Gc Eltun SiS: 


Sloe* p 19 Jt —.02 . G<bF*A 


MunBdlnl0A5 +i06 KversWnl3.97 — .03 StrAggl 13.77 —.18 . GvIA t 


93)1 —.It TcE 


ACCMongiido -.02 AmwvMurt — .11 . Nzund iui 

ShllnlF* 11.94 -j)i AnalrtShTGtf 9.74 -j)i tuatxjn 0.20 

Acwnln 15-81 -X3 Anolrticn 12.W) -0? US Trend 1257 

AcmFd 13.18 — 3» AnchCapI 19.83 - .10 cardinal Family: 
AdsnCap 20.96 - .12 Aauila Funds: AggGlh 9 A3 

AdvCBtji p 10.1* — JI7 A2TF 10 A3 -.0*! Balanced 9X5 

Ad-CEetO 9J7 — 03 CO TF I0J6 -3)6 Fund 12.64 

Advest Advanh. HI TF 1124 -.06; GovlOblig 8.17 


Gvdnr® I6AS — 13 NronstTF 9.77 - U6'CamegOHTE?.S9 -.04 Baton n 46.34 — 17 
HYBdp 8.90 -.03 OR TF 10J1 -3»|cnKBIA 1147 -.23. Income n 11.15 -.01 

Inca no 1255 -.02 T *FUT 9.63 -.07'CnK.BIB 1L44 - J4 1 Slocf.n 5J J3 — 29 

MuBdNat 9.54 -09 Aquinas Fun* .CentumO P 8 6« - .02 I DomSodcl 1127 -JB 

5Pdnp 19A4 — 37 BaJancEn 9.*2 - 01 CnirvSnrn 23.80 - .12 I Dreman Fundv 
Aetna Advisor; Ealncn 9.7* -07 ,q>ccpBC 13.10 -.08 1 Comm 13X6—01 

A etna r tOM — M • F»/ncn ».6> -<Ct*!sGrm I2.9S — JB ' HiRIn 1*3)9 — f'.’ 

Bondi 9X0 _ 1 Arch Funds: ICHestnt 143.60—1.31; SmCri/alnll.lS - 01 

Grtncom 110.92 — j}2 Bol 9.90 —02 ,CWcMi!wn 143.81 -.19 iDrevha: 

InflGri 1IJ.+ -21 Em Orth 1153 _ Oiutty>ln 1628 - .04. . a Bond n 1 4.05 —.01 

Aetna Sefed: GovCorp 1002 — 02 , QiubbTR 1450 - 04 1 Aprecnn 14*0 — .08 

Aelnon 10.61 — X4 Grolnc 1300 — X4 aipaern 49J4 — 02: AsseiAII n 12x2 — .02 

AitonGrn A51 -.0) AtaTF 1151 - .06 : colonial Funds.- > Bolncp 13.41 —03 

Bandn 9.61 _ US GO. 10A4— 02. miEatD 1731 -XI ■ CaTT. n 14.77 -.07 

Growth I0JI — .16 Armsing n 8 49 _ -2, calTEA 7.1® - .05) CMInln 13J8 -.05 

'Irwinct. 10.93 — 3l2 AllanlaGr P11313 — .02 , Con TEA 7.43 -315 CTlntn 13.17 -.05 

intern 11.23 - J1 Alto Funds: , Fed5« 1 DAO —.02 I Drevtas 12.76 — O’ 

StnCoGr 10X4 — XS CafAuni 11X1 -X5' FLTEa 7 41 - j]9 1 EdEIInd 11.43 — Jl3 

Alger Funds: CAlns 10.07 -.021 FundA 0X7 -.Oil FLlnln 13X8 -3)4 

Growth! 19X9—40: GvtSec 9.99 —ill , GrvuthA p 13.75 —.07 | GWAiUnp 14.47 -.05 
incGr r HAS —14 <Groinc 13 57 — Oji H ,VldA a.70 -.05 1 GoCA 13J4 -10 

/AidCoGrtli 44 — JO , NaMunl IIOJ -.05 incomeA paJ 4 -.or GMBdo 14 83 -.09 

SmCdnl 20.73 —J» I BBAT Funds: 1 inlGrA 10.35 -.12; GNY c 19.98 -.10 

Aitcmce cap: BalB n 9.88 —.01 j MATtA 7J2 - .05 1 Grinc n 16JO —.06 

Alioncep 6.S8 -.07 GrolncTn 11.13 -XI mi TEA a 93 -.05. GwthOpnitiXl — .11 


Bc-C-nB^C? — 03 iritOvtiw 9X7 — X3 StKlttx P 


1 Security Foods:, 


Sit-in Roe Fd^ . 


Explorer DA3J3 .— d 


ErtgGrlns:l.S a — 12 

incGr A 13.’ ' —.11 
JncGrB 3137 -.13 
.V.VGrS ‘'4.7o —.05 


BontfFdX 9A1 —.04 


ATI „ i setoaed Fuito:. _ Hi" , 


10 12 - ja STTsrv n • WJK +331: 


Baton p ILSS — .05 1 InlGavTn —.02 ' MM TEA 7.11 -.04 j fnsMun npI7^6 -.15 
BoianBi 1 4.25 —.06 1 miTCB 9.97 NaiResA lL’o - 04 miermn ll** - .u: 

avulAn l’>0( _ HI . Cir-TuTn 9 75 — ill : n . TC ... 7 At - I InhvCr n 1 S 77 .17 


BijndAo 12.95 -01 | SIGovT n 9.75 —.01 Mi TEA 7.04 -X6 interEa P 1 5 23 -.13 
Cnslvlnv 10J1 —.01 BEA Funds: . _ OtlTE A 7+3 - JJS , InvGNn 14" -02 


CpfldB P 1295 
CnBdC P 12.95 


EML61 21X0 -.06 I SniSIh O 1 7X6 —.07 ! MA lr»» n 11.12 - .08 
intlEq 19X2 “JO SirtlncA 4.92 -.04 MA Tar ri 16.20 -.06 


Count p tr ip —J]? . SrgFwmp M.U - .08 1 Tt&ad ti38 - 10- Munfidn 12J7 -08 
GJDGtIB d 9 16 -09 I USCFi.ln 15X1 -.02 1 TsinsAo 8.12 -.05. NJInin 13.33 -.06 


— l-» WY.gr 14.25 — — 

- 09 Natiyrg nf 17." - 20 


7 -.05 North Am Funds: 
a _ As-AliC cn il.ii — 02 


FTotiSn IiUfi 
FSTI is n a 79 
FC-RQn 22.14 


LifefiC p 13.8: — X® EmMrl ILS? -X3 US C-.1 9X7 -XI Bctacon - 

Litt+tm 10.61 -.11 EmiWiB 15.80 -3)4 invesat: totmirin 0--' — 01 

USA no 11 Jj — O' . Europe 0 10X0 -.13 D/nmn ’.JO, —.15 S&PSOOn 10 JO — 0- 


1438 — X6 ■ TqHRetn 


0X3 -.0*1 vatiWomert3X7 SgSW'S'S: .: 

5.M .ofi i stranon FimkK: InatExIn 1 B.co — 10. 

3X1 -X3 DSSe«ina5.M - ® IrUTath 
X7& +.03 ; Growth n 21X8 + .17 W»G«m» -9^ — * 
7.00 -36' SmCstm 2639 - .16 1. KhrtWtl T|JO - BT 
6X3 - ,2£ ) Strong Frants; . MxSmC .15:0 — X9 


MGISSn 10.12 -03’ Equity n 1< 
MGSSn 10.70 -03 F«dlncn ' 
MifJSSn 10X7 -.02 ; SIF-lnn ' 
Mo>Cgd 11.73 -.02 FPDv.-4.slp K 
Mimcupn 11X7 —.06 [FPfAuBd p i: 
ShrtTerm 10.21 -.01 First Priority: 


StrctB I0.9J . !l(i 7e:Rln l|0o — 05 Spin, np 21.03—10 


ST F. p 9.61 — X2 , vsfcjoC :n r 73 . <r 
ilrop^pp 70.17 -20. valuoT n ITS • +3 
Fidestv Instil ut: Flag Investors: 


GibSA o 11 32 — X4 I BFMShDu n 974 uSGrA 11 84 —.03 ' NJfAunn 13J4 - Q9 . incOt D> 14.79 .Wi&fTn 5 .^ . GfTHp ® 

GovlAp 7.98 — .01 BJBGIA p 11.15 -.03 USG. A 6.46 - .01 | NwLdr 33 56 —,0ft ' LidTERplO.lS - 06 1 TICMurtCl ’oV • .01 Gt6.-.1hnp?i 

GavtBo 7.98 —.01 BJBIEqA P 11X3 -05- utjlAp I? 17 - 07 1 M'riT. np 11.39 -.04: utfTBR 1052 -01’ USGxlBa 0 VriCcnG U 

GovtC P 7.97 -X2 BUY Httmatan: • CATEBr 7.19 -05 1 NYTrun 15J4 -.08, LltfTEI 10.15 -.06 USGrtC r 74’ . Vcluos U 

Grolnc P 720— .Oil Ealncn 10.88 —.0? . CTTEBf «X3 .05 NrTEp 17.93 -.10/ OvscaP li8J -.13! i .Mu -02 Gala* v Fundi 

Gwth>: 2055 —.11 : InIGovI ’ 53 — XI FtdSdSI 10X0 — 02 1 Pcinlnd I 15.c3 — tu I ST F. p ®.6l — .02 VshtoC :n 1’ 73 - 02 i-»i4ll nl? 

GwIhFp 74 J? —.13 - NYTEn 10.08 - 04 FL T « B I 7X1 -.09 PecMia ml *.35 — .1 7 : jlrafDpp 20.17 -20; vatKrTn ITS +3 ”Mun < 

GwthBt 2054 — ,12 1 Bcbson Grow; , FundBt 5.05 . SrilnG^n 10.«J Fidefilv insMut: Flag Invertors: SoGrm >1 

C+rlncB P 2J2 — .02 * BandLn 1.53 .. GIEdB 12.18 -X3i ST Inc po 1 1 90 . • EqPGIn 28.15-7? EmGIh o M 6? — ’a Eor/ol ’2 

GrinvB 11 58 — .00 j BondSn 9 SO —.01 ; GwthBI 13.67— 06 1 ChlnTo 13X5 -.02. EqPlln 15.68 • X8 ; Inline 1007 • XI Ealrv:m.-.12 

mrj lAp 9.as -.09 Enierrfp l*J9 — xur 1 HfMuBI 9.89 -X?l ThdCnlrn 7.79 -08 iSMGv 9.4 P . IfKTrp 1322 -.16 HiCSd 10. 

InsAJi.B «.86 -.09 Entrnn 65+ -.11 HYSecBI a JO -X5| UST mi 12.81 -.01 I liBi n 1053 -.01 ‘ MMun.p 10XS O' inlBa 

InsMCP 9.85 -.09. Gwthn 100 ! incomeB a2 1 -01 UST Lng 14 J8 —.02 IFideldV Invert: I O-joIGt u 12^4 —.09 IntEat n 

n 2£ p ‘ J? . *21 -V0. ipIGrB 10J1 -I3| USTShn 15.1J — .Gl ■ AqrTFrnll.6? -.08 TeilncStlclJ 12 - X4 1 .'AAMun ’ 

InrlB 17.99 . ; 9ndwn 12.05 -.01 MAT 1 7.77 ■ .05 1 Drevto Comstodfc 1 AJ-Agr m 14.56 - 10 T 0 tPTsvp9S7 Ntf.Wn «a 

MrtgA c 8M -.02; Ta>Fr3n 10.77 - 03! NalResB 112J1 -XJ' QtPVolA 11J4 -.06 I AMgrGrn 13.72 — .133 value 0 1IJ4 -02 STBdn ’ 

MrlgBp 8.60 -.02: Tatfrt.n 8.J7 -.0 ? , fjr T,£» 7.04 -X6 1 CoaVoiBnllM3 -X5| AMgrlnn lOJ? -X? IpiogshipGrowi: SmCoEanll 

MrigCo &5» -.01 UMBBn 10X7 -Xl OHT.Bt 7+3 -.05 PiigAp 9.17 Balonc • 12.73 -.02 , A ATE a o 10." -X*' TEBandniO 

MlgTrAp 9.71 -.01 UMBHrtn9.4S -X4’ ynlnBI 6«2 -X4 PtSlgvGt 9.17 -.01 RlucCh 3520 —.46 AATECP 10~ ■ .0? Gateway Funtl 


S» phzi&Rh'ci*np£ ’ TFHYA 1 4A\ -!lfl ' SCTxA 7.M ♦ H5 i STMunn 1W1 -£S OHinsn . “-CS 

iisi las^jta 


— 7 Phoenx Series TFHYA 14X1 -.10: SCTxA 75 

. -rSJvBt i4xi +.io: usGvtAP *i 

•n is -> CalTxED 13X8 -.10 TFIflBI 14X9 -.10 HiYBflAp X< 

-,C5 Cob AW 19.07 ^10 [ USOvA Pk 12X1 — J7 SwSwdGniuifc 


MtgTBp V.71 -Xl UMBStn 16X4 — 04 t»E.^BI 13JH - .10 | Dreyfus Premier: 

MWTrCp «J1 -01 VaHMn .?6 J 7 .— 0 3, TEInsB 1 0.12 - .05 i CA MunA 12J4 -.08 

MltlGC ?.9f — 01 . BadanlBtelil&Kaiser: ; uSGr B i 11.74 — 02 CT rj\i-A 12.02 - X7 


(WHGC 9.95-0 BadaroBretu&Kaiser ■ uSGrBt 11.74 —02 dMuA 1102 - X7 

Mlllnt 1X4 -.01 Dnre+so n 12J7 -.051 uSGvBI 6.46 -Xl CaoGm 15X3 -.04 

MMSAa 83 . InOfqn 6.K -X6I UlilBf 1117 - X7 CTMuBI 12.01 -.06 

ftAAASBt 8^3 ^inOHn 8.39 - 05 Columbia Funds: ■ FL MunA 14X9 - .08 

MCAAp 10J1 -X9 Baird Funds Balance n 17 66 —.02 GlblrrvAntSJl -X9 

MuCABalOJl -.09! Adilnc 9.70 . camSiVn 1535 ~X2 ! GfclnvBI 1S.37 -.09 


MUM 7C P 9 51 - .09 Bartten Funds: MunQ 13X8 - t* NC MuB HIM - XS 

NMuAp 10.15 - .08 | Basc'/l n 15J6 - .01 . Compass Cnpeafc MY MunA 14.41 -.to 

NtlMuCP 10.15 -.08 | FiuMJn ’X* .. ! Eqlylnco 12.79 -.03 NY MuB 1 14X1 -09 

NEurAP 12.28 -.04. SmTmBdn’X8 ... Fvpi n 10X5 _ OHMuA 12.92 -.06 

NEurSn 12.06 -.051 vllrH (£40 -.07; Growth lO-S* _ i3HMuBt 12.?’ -.06 

N-GvA 8 96 -.14 iBascpmBai 22.62 -.031 IntlEq 14.04 - JO PAMunAlsJO -.09 

MAC-vBp *96 -.15 i Boy Funds inrt , JnrtFI IBX2 - Wl pa MuB r 16J’ -Xi 

NAG-vC 8 ’5 —.15 ST Held 9.«9 — X2 | MunBa 1054 - 07 I TXMuA 20 85 -.12 

PrGrthA Pll 6 j — 13 I Bondn 9J3 . NJ Mun 11.10 -.07 | VA Mu A 1*X2 -.11 

FrGrtnBpl155 — .14 1 Equity 1053— .06' stirilnl 10X7 - .01 ■ VAMuBt 1442 -.11 


AqrTFrn 11.62 -.08 TeilncSr 
ATAgr mi 16.58-10 TotPTs, 
A/AgrGr nl 3.72 —.03 valueo 
AMgrlnn 107? - X? iFtogshipl 
Balonc. 12.73 -.02, A ATE a . 
RlucCh 3520 —M AATgr 
CAlnsn 10.15 • 07 , AZTEA 

CATFn 11X7 -X? CTTEA 

Canada n 17.16 —.15 COTEe 
CaaAno 16 34 -05) FL TE o 
Caplnconr 953 _ GATE* 

Canstrtl n 148.72 —.81 C-idPj) o 

Conlra W.17 -.33 imTEp 

CnvSoc n. I5J8 - 15 K YTEA 

Desilnvl uxi — xt K'-TEs 

De-it.nvll 28 11 -.13 LATE A 

L+sEqn 1BJI— U LldTEp 

DiverlnMnT+05 ■ .08 | MITE A 
DivGlhn 11.52 — .06 MOTE a 

EmgGror 1552 -.4* Ml TEC 

EmrMM 16 78 -0? NCTEA 

Eautlnc r 32.78 -JJ2 NMTEi 

Eull n IB 78 -.13 NY TE t 

EnM. um i ■ 1 nun: i 


WldOpp 1CJ4 - 03 


I ■ Jrf -j n . manixii •w.inmui. _ ■ 

13X9 -X3i S&PMid nil J7 —.12 ! IqterBdhl 9X2 — J2 1 R PFGR t !«£3 — X3 


v T7X2 -J3 


. LgCapv 10.07 —JD3 IVtoaryfumb: 

-! S5ra^r8sFH=fl 


ID JT -.08 
9.48 -.81 


4 3 ID 31 • ,U> I toui.i’n IAW — 14 L-I5c»tji B.3i — u Lmurmc T.-o - u. 

a ?»; -.05 inlGov n 10 M -01 Growth 0 ISX2 - 18 Undner Funds: 

;p lou -08 min 1373 - 25- irocore 12.74 —.05 Bulwark n .0 —32 

p 10.67 - OI’ Mumntn 'CIO -.04 LTGvAs tst • 01 Divn 26.12 -.14 


■VnlnsB ! 0M - C! Ealtcm 1555 -04 AR5I 


-’.riLtCB- T.^O -Xi :wr 


.'/.uirtS '0 51 -.'.i L.'-sC-j-n »?£ 


•.7'C -.os ARSI-A 7.03 


: &G.BI 13J3-X3. SPSJOn 10X5 -JO; hiflEqn . 1148 -JBV RFFQ -£2 

9.?< -XI FLTx&l 9X0 -X6| STGvtn 9X9 +X1 i LaCopGrn?67 —.07 i. PPFCy T7 JC -J3 

,153 - W GlGrb t 9J3 -X7 ; YldPIn 999 - ! LgCapv 1007 — iB j Vhdon r Fumb: 

Itr.01 - Grins ra IJJ6 -.05 1 imf=UfK& l M&Mti »f-07 - la ~ li 

9X4 -.37 HhnBt 36 65 -.12: GovMed 9^ -I Sn^OPG l.« -J7 ‘ CwPBd —XJ 

146 -.13 HlNldBl 12X1 -.10; Grolnc n 1050 -.13 1 SnCwV 12.02 £qu£. ’S-S 

15’ -.16 incomeB l 6J6 -XJ MATElnn 9.W -X4 TolRlBd 9J* -.C? ! GffrtBc; 9XB —.01 

nio.14 ; invB i 7X0 -X7! TExMedr 110-03 -X4 Tempiepw Grom* > Income 9J7 . 

MATuB i 7 19 -.05 ShowmulFds-lnvesl! Amer Tr r Jig— fl? Jntnl 10.07 -.79 

7.1 1 MUfliBf 090 -XT' Firdlncp ?XS — 03 Cap ACC 15-3? -XJ , VYTtf 1793 - 07 

7J3 . MJTkBI 8.98 +X6 GrEouitvpIOai— .14 { DevMkJpllST -Xl I SWGvlriri 9 a3 

68* -JO NWOPPB 72299 — J3 GflnEq P 1074 -X4 FarunP +X2 Vs^nc »» -0| 

7X2 — X3 ' NYTxBt 8.93 +J08 lrtGVlnlnp»X3 +.01 GfabOcp 12X9 -.oi , y YsnH TTF 9.77 - tb 
7X0 - . OTCB1 1050 -.18 &nCpenpl0X»+X2| Growmp 17J4 +XS 'VnJaFyptte 1 • 

7.03 .. ' T6&.B1 8X9 +J08 ShnwnmlMs-TTrMt I Irtcomp 9.1* +X2 ftdA 11X6 - 

7.14 - USGvfifx 11SB —M Fcdlncn 9X9 — X2 REStP 1143 — X5 ; Bondpn WX5 +X1 

6 82 -.03 Ul.lBt 9X3 -X6 1 Gr&dTr 10X1 -.14 ; SmotCop TJJg -££ CAInf 9X0 -M 

ISA — X3 ■ VistaBt 7.10 — X8 GrtnEq n 10-75 — X3 ; World P 16X9 -.0*! CaoGr • 3JJ3 — 37 

6.5 f —.03 • VOvBI I1J1 — .15! IntGvInn 9.63 +.01 (T^mpietealDSfit _ CcpGrB! 3124 -J3 
2iT -.04 Quantitative Group; LTlncn 9X3 *X2i EmMSP H 64 — X3 ^qul?vonl2X7 — X3 


income 9J7 
Intm iao7 -.19 
KYTxF 17,93 - 07 


SmCvton ,?X3 


XRS ll 7.14 - USGvB lx 1758 — 

A31U5 *U — .03 UlilBt 9X3 - 

AC,USII 494 — X3 1 VistaBt 7.10 — 

AUSm 6.5 < — .03 YQvBI 11X1 — 

jNMA 12iT - .04 . Quantitative Group: 


299 -33 GrtnEO P ia74-X4 FarwiP »J* +.®2 VTsnGriK WM-.09 
8.93 +JB8 lrtG»rtnlnpfX3 +.01 GtobOop 12X9 -.01 , VrsnNYTF 9.79 -Co 

8S Til &p p M :s ‘TgrTai o7 

&CK i *=«! &ss£. wizS; mr." ss :fl 


■X2 i EmMSp 11 64 —53 EdL'iTv Otll2fl7 —03 


EqkIa 16.9+ —.14 OHTEAplUS -.04 Grtnc laJ? — C? SaOosA 7.2« —.12 Grilnn 12 56- 

ErCopAo nllXJ . PATEAplOI’ - .0* InllEd 16 73 — .QS SacGosB inliSan 12?* 

Europe l?X2 -.13 1 TnTEAp 10.’4 ■ ,0« Muminc 13.25 - 09 StrtiicAlp 7-» ■ .02 SmCcon +.&» - 

E-chFdnina.’t-A')' Ut-IA o 10.04 -o: SelEq 1549 • X? Strlr.cB ’+0 -02 Lord Apt Counset 


GloBaln. 12 27 -X? I Growthnpl30o _■ SlirtTF 9.78 -03 GlInB: 8'I -.02- AKilrdP 10 58 V.J3:-.;3: jt 

Gvtsecn ’.64 — .07 ! fAuirtd tan S 3? -Xl ST Gov c 77 01 GlcbAo 13 27 _x+ BortdOec p» 9J4— S3 Merrimcn Fds: 


-:i Hi v Id a 6.16 -X3 BostforGr 10J6 -.12! SmCpET 1QJ0 -X2 FprEqS 1125 -.01; Gautnc UX7 — .01 

i -J. . -VcsCjp 116 1 —.35 8asKrwfn«.77 -X3,Semi Trust FEsafS 7ttP3 -.02 GrJnc 29£9 -.< T 

-s. .. STT.WII 72' BasNumO 14.93 — J7 • CAUisMlA alOJ3 - GrwlhS 11 78 -X4 : GwWshp 1544 -.84 

255-21 SnrtTr? 6.7S -01 BasNumO 1 5.06 —38 1 CaiMuApl0X7 - X6 ThirdAW 17J3 -01. GrtnBr 2973-18 

= — f Pillar Funds Quest For Vntate CotncAp 10 )6 —X7 ! Thomson Group: indeqA 12X1 - JS 

-7.1 BatfrAn 1C 40 - X2 CATE 10.68 -.03' EmGrAp 1358 — X0 ; EqlaA 12.12 — X5 MV TF 11.4? -09 

?*■ - j' EqAgAn 11.32 -23 Fund 1231 -.03 FLInsAp 971 -.10' Gvrth* 31 J T — J» ' 5TBdP 9?3 -.8! 

■Jj - 'i EeJrArt 10.70-02 GC q 14J0 -.13' GrlncAp 71X7-.05, lnflA 12X3 -.30. TFlncm 11X6 +J8 

EclnA ia?6 -02 GrincA 9.92 +X4j Gro«mApll.l2— .12 1 GporA 26X4— Ul VSgmel 1452 -.11 
'4 . F.cinA 9.95 —XI 'nvQln 10.25 — X2 ; IntIGrAp 10.98 - .11 ! PrcMIA 1X14 - X5 ; Voyaojur Ftfa: 


„ -- ... GroCo 2780 —44 Fontaine n io.js • Xl • Gff.-SWna 30 70 GtoBi OX 3 —.02 Dew.;)Gm s’i? — 24 AstAiir.t ii.J3— ;* Z—Ztj- 

QusrAo 21.99— 78 BwFundslitv^: (QimPOsileGroup: , Drovfus Sfrate^e i Grolnc 72 (6 + 07 Foriis Funds: GovetfFPnds: GllnA 8.72 -XI Ea I-KOP 14 17 -.02 Cjsapp MC.V - " ’rSjA i.'i - X: 

STMlap BX6 — Xl i STYieMn 9.49-02 1 BdStkAp 11.71 -Xl GIGrc 34.17 - 73 1 HTrld 1272 -0? AsiAllp 14.03—11 DvloBd 274-04 Gtopc* 36.11 -.13 FdVaiuP 17.S3 -.01 R9>3dtnl&.2? -Xi '■"■Circs, s." -Xl 

STMlb I -U»— fll Benin 9.73 ' GwlhAp 1X54 -.03 1 Growttip4flJ7 -,54| msMunn 11.55 -.10 CopApp 21.70 - 67 EmgMK 15.97 - 02 GIT+cti 1 oa 9-S3, GlEap 1X60 -.1! Grin 1CX8-3: .)1 Cc-t:C :0j: -04 

Tectio 25X5—1.33 Eauityn 10X3— 06 1 mFdA n &XP — .02 1 inconiep 1350 — .01 ) intfidn 101) Cop.ii d. 17.P»_+4! GliGvln 8.85 —.03 GDldA 15.00 —.11 • Gllnco 8.18 -.03 MetLXe SlafeSI: Opperheimer Fct 


1X25 — X2; lntlGrAp 10.98 - .11 ! PrcMIA 1X14 - XS ; Voyawur F*U 
10.80 -X6. NatMuApll 14 +X6 ! TargetA 1X31 —.19 AZlns 10.71 +XS 

... ._ 10.93 -XS , STG1A o 2J* USGvA V.M — XI COTF 1043 -XS 

own 19 7 1 +.11. STHPOtA P 7 40 EqtoB 1X09 —.04 J fH. tosd 1041 -X9 

SmCap 1X11 -.11 USGavAo 9.40 _• GrwfhB t 20.« — X9 ( GraSihp 17.7(7 — to 

11.15 — X5 Signet SeMk ' IncomeB 1 770 -• 1ATI 9J2 - 13 


ISS? D 33 -15!®!." i2-S — 9S I lnF <^ 0 8X9- 02 income P 13X0 -Xl imBdn 1011 _ Capilip. 17X9-24! GiGvln 8.83 -.03 GoitlA 1S.O0 -.11 

«H2Si n i. P =..i* 7 •'atcwSJL. 2 2S “■£ NV9 50AP14X9 -X2 InvA 17.98 -16 inletGvt n 9.4J _ Hdua-P J8W — 18 InlSq 12*2 -.02 GOKJB l !i0i_tl 

*25^"’ = 06 T.EaAP 7.59 - XS IpvBi 1970 — I*. mtlGrin 17X6 -.15 GlbGrtr.a 1172 -.’1 PtaSlg 971 -.t4 PatBaS 1576 -.IS 

o2S , “ in a ~21 le* „ J USGvAo 1113 .. DupreeAtufuot InvGB n 7.18 —.01 GovTPa 8.IB — .01 , SmCas ISJO — .11 . RgfifA }220 -13 

’ 10X9—06 Batonced n ?.B5 -X2 Conestoga Funds: int Gpv n 9.83 — X3 Jancnrv 14X7 -.43 Grwth p 25.01 -fJ .GvIEqrrn 22X0 -.04 - - - 

*5"tV4 'J" -^1 BondAn 19.32 -X3| Equilv 1A64 -X2 KYTFn 7.37 +.03 LatAmnr 1472 — .M HfrldP 8.4* - X5 Gnidisoii McDanaUt 

lnm '0- 17 - !?Y$M fn 5.21 _ LtdMur 9.52 -.05 TFMN 10J6 -.os' Esival do 2U0 -X2 

LidTAai x 1023 —.03 Eqld»X n 1072 ; LldMat 10X5 -.02 EB) Funds: LowPrr 17.55 -.'31 TFNal ia?4 -.06: Gavincp 1161 

.5"“* JZ-Ji? — -Sf Conn MutuaL Equity p W.68 -77 | WUTFn 1158 -X9 USGvt ’.12 — Xl I OHTFp 1X81 + .05 

Amonglnc. 1L4 . Ml nnBdAn 19X8 -.14 i3wt 1073 .. Fterp 5X47 —X? • MNTFn 10X6 -XT Fortress Invs* : OppValp 18X1 — .14 


HiYId p ex* -X5 Grodisati McDonald: 
TFMN 10J6 -.05' EslValpn21.0O -.02! 


Ambassador FUt 


EB) Funds: LowPr r 17.55 —.01 TFNal 10.24 -.06 1 Gavincp 1161 

Eauitvp 99.68 — 77 | Ml TFn 11X8 -X9 USGvt ’.12 — Xl I OHTFp 1X8) 

Fterp 5X47— X? ■ MW TFn 10X6 -XT Fortress tovst: : OppValP (8X1 


GlinB : 8 "1 -.02- AKllrdP 1058 V.:3:"3: 3 »i - !4 ‘Tt :*IMiGsA n’.92 — 01 NtjfTTE 10.80-3)6 NatMuApll Id +3)6 ! TargetA 1X31 — .!« Anns 10.71 +XS 

Globio i?2? — xi? BoridDer d» 9J4 — 53 Aterrtmcn Fds: >V: r4 -Xi ‘IJMuAn 10 43 -.04 NY TE 10.93 -3)5 , STGtAo 2J* USGvA V.M —Xl COTF 1043 -JS 

GtobBI 13.0 s — .0? D?v.;IGms’39 — 74 4.MAH-: 11.43— V 'ii:— 32 “InvA n 9.9* . Owwrr 197 1 +.11. STHiOtA P J 40 _i EalnB 1X09 —.04 1 Ft. lrisd 1041 -379 

GllnA 8.72 -3J3 Ea |9V0 p 13 1? —.02 Cjpapp MC.V — " V«ja - .0: Pioneer Fund: SmCap 74.11 -.11 USGavAo 9.40 _• GrwThB t 20.94 —379 < GraStkp I’JX — 70 

Gtopc* le.ll -.13 FdVotoP 12.S3 -Xl R9»3dtn)0J? -Xi '."Circo V?; -X : Ecinco I6A3 -X* USGov 11.1$ -X5 SgodSelett ' IncomeB! 7 jo _■ lAtl 9J1 -13 

G(T+^i loA* — S3, GlEap 12X3 -.1! Grin 1C.‘0 — jZ UCa-MC lOJi -04 A/neric P 10x7 -Xl RBBGvtp 9X2 _ MOMultnlOJS -X5 ! Int®7 1X30 +.0? MNlns TO 4? +3)6 

G’idA 15.00 -.11 • Gllncp 0.10 -.03 MetUfe Stalest: Opperheimer Ft BonoP 9.18 -X2 3CM Fund 20.12 -.15 ! USIndtn 1002 Opor8t 25*5— 1X8 1 Mirourd WX6 +X5 

GOHJBI 1104— tl' GovtSfip 2.74 —5! CaoAoA i*' 4!S4-Ar !X~ -X' 'ZacGrp 15J4— 02; RSI Trust I U5lncTnlOX2 - ‘ F*recMetBll J’ - 06 MiortTP 1X22 +X7 

PatBas 1576 -.15 Ta*Fr o 11.10 - .0? CcpasB ?.5* — :> 'C4“E i o'li? Gild 7 J1 — .06 ActSd 2*J6 — .01 ValEal tn 11.96 — .11 ShlGvB 949 _. MOIH5 1003 -X9 

RgBf'A TF CT a 70.17 -X6 C«>4 S C *. s? - 15 OsY: + -25 JfwtlO II..’4 — +« . Cam 3d 354—70 VaJBqTft IIX* —.11 I Tan&Bf IJJ3 +3M i WcllTF 10.10 -3W 

Rfl&vBI 22.31 -.13 TaFiOjI dIO.6* - JS EalncA ill — ,C5 G.scr : = 34,ti — .44 Income p 9.?} -.01 EtrtGr 33X1^27 VAAftuTn 70A4 -XJ 1 Targets 12.17 —.19 rjDTF ’0.45 -.06 

Hancock Sovergn: . TFFLP JX3 -.04 EaincC — E5 £3;ro4 3 Euronen -.10- IntBd 25A5 -Xl VoMunl I 10X4 - X4 ; USGcvBt 8.96 —Xl USGv 9.96—03 

AchA 1204 — 15- TFMOo 5.12 -.02 EainvsiA 1X«0 - ) j =a>rc£; ;.?4-.C2 FlanrFC p 03)3 - .06 . STlF 18.15 -Xl SkySoe Funds: Tlwmtsuro Fds ;Waddefl«*«ft 

AchB | 11.97— ,u, TFNjp 115 -XJ EqlnvC p 12 -i —.12 :-«S:p: if.Aj —01 PlRMBd P 10X4 -3)5 Value 26.04 + 3)9 Europe 9X5 +.03 ; IntMu 1104 + M ■ TolRef 1203— .14 


hep B-’B -.03 MetUfe Stalest: Opperheimer Ft 

^vtSeCP 2.74 —tl CdOAoA - 4' —li ASM'AS ■ X 1 

TaxFr p 11.10 - .03 CctAsB ?.S* — ?r '14 -£i o' 13? 


SSSfA" )??? Grwth 14.98 —.02 Income p 4 «l 76 -.03 | Magellan 6*43—1X0 I AdiPi 


5 °!s ^ S'2 -- 09 n 1S-21 x Income ’".48 -XI Muhillj. J9.’1 — X6 Mkilnd nr 34X3 — X8 B«ni 


-451 TolRel 14 J4 


CaroGrFn 15.99 -.17 SmColA 11.10 -.0* CG Cap Mlrt Fds: 
Growth n 12X1 — J6 USGvA n 19X7 +.03 Em&Url 82* - 
JdxSTXr 1 1X6 — 1 03 j U5Tld.rAnl9.5B — XJ (SrSTn 798 - 


intBcndn 9X1 -.01 Benham Group: 


_ ESCSMnA 9.97 +3Ml MA TF n 11.41 -X8 &qlncFSIHJ3 . i Greensomg 1442 - 04 invAp 14.59 —.11 1 TF Ml 4 

Eaton Vdassie i MidCop n 9.80 . GlSIm 8.60 -XI (GriflinGrtn 11.18 — .05 mvBo 14X7 —.11 TFWAp 4 

-X3 ChYiao BJ2 — X4| MlgeSecnl0J4 +X3 Munlnc lx 10X7 —.01 'Guardian Fuad v USGvA p 971 — X3 i VoIuApopU 

-XI FLLWp 9.67 -3)4 1 Muncpln 8.1? + XT OHFdrtp 71.70 -XT AslAllac WM -.07 L/SG.E' 9 70 —.03 I Lutheran Bra: 


loirs* n 19 99 wl ArfirJwn 9*1 nj : 'nOEq n 10X0 -23 Govtp 9.43 -.01 NYHYn 1X0? 

c?^n n ioxJ -u! JS -SS ssaa?* SS - Si S2&BL.II« 


GlSIm a*a -XI IGriflinGrtn 11.18 — .05 mvBo 14X7 —.11 TFWAp 492 -X? MgdAarB ?. 7 6 -.05 K.'rtdA 1381 -M USGvp 9.86—01. DSiDv 10.93 —3)5 1 IncGroA o*X94 — x5 ; Tocnuev 13X1 -v05 iWortwro PfnQB; 

Munlnc lx 10X7 —.01 'Guardian Fuads USGvAp 971 — X3 i VoiuAcopUXl -.06' WlgdAsiA B.79 — X5 HiY)33r 132! -XU VYmnREI 11*4 -3)2 , DSILM 9X8 +X1 incRetAx 9.47 — x+ I Tower Funds CapAppnU77 — .06 

OHRortp H.W -XT AsiAlloc 10X6 —.02 USGvE f . 970 -03 1 Lutheran Brx „ _ MgrJA^c SM-X5 'FST£AoJ?34 -.If Pfper JaUrtnc . . FMA spc 70J8 — .07 ■ (n«A 1773 +.15 1 CopApp 1144 -XU •' EmGihn 3CXT — Xl 


SmCoGrnll+5 — 1» CaTFIn 10.94 -03 
Ambassador Imr CaTFIn n 9.79 -.04 


LoGrw n ?X4 — XB NaliAAunp’40 - .06 NewMkrnlO. 


Bandn 9.48 -Xl CaTFSn 10.15 -.02 
CoreGrn 15.97—17 CalTFH n 9.16 -.05 
■Vwihn 12J0 — .2* CafTFLn 1X98 -X5 


inis " LflValn 9.15 -03 Eaton V Marathon: i NewMill 11 a3 — 

n 9 1* In 5 MJgBl-dn 7J7 +xi OHUdt 9.90 -.04 OTC 2X70- 

Munin 0.34 +.06 STGOII 8.62 -031 Oh TFn 1UA - 


inlBondn 9j E^ton 1L95 -M J? J’ *•« ^ ‘ 

InHStV. n 1X97 -X7 EurBdn 10.40 -.14 8-86 — .0 Owal >.96 - 06 P«Bts 19-7- 

MlTFBd 943 - JJ7 GNMAn 10.31 +3E r I!£^„ n --K Iff? 0 ', JJ21 ^ 

SmCoGrnll24 — IB Goldin n 1184 -.19 g$gg?" > 9 -* < +• 06 ^ “ "*11 w 4- 

TFintBdniOJI - j 34 tncGron 14iS 111 CoreFimcs: MALWf 10.12 - .04 RrtGrn 17.79 — 

Amtw+idar Rel A; Kn 9X-J5 BaJanAn 1X2! -.02 MILral 9.87 - .(M SJrJTBda 9.0* - 

BaSi 9 48 - OTi NITRn 1X7 0 + 03 EaldX 21J4 -X2 NatlLId I 10X? - .04 STWWn 9.47- 

CorSi is!?? -171 NITFLn 1143 -X7 GIBdAn 9J1 +X2 NJUdr 10 JO -.05 SmallOiP 10.20 - 

Grwth 1X40 — J6 STTreasn 980 GrEqAn 9X4 — 3)8 NYLtdl 10J3 -3)5 5E Asia nrl 3X8 — 

IntBend 9.51 -01 Tar 1995 n 94+0 -.1+ InlBdAn 9.71 —.01 PALidl T0J8 -3M SH'Scn 18X5 — 

imlStk 1X’7 -.07 Tar3000 n 683M — X2 InrtGrAn 1342 -.10 ALT.FI 1047 -.10 SfrOrwi 20J? - 


Tronsamerica: 


! Weiss Peck Greer 


1X’7 — .07 Tarjooo n 68JM — X2 InttGrAn 1342 +.10 ALT«F I 1047 -.10 


SroCcSr I3.Z4 — 18 f Tar2005n 47 04 — J0 [_ ValEaB pnIJffi!— .03 A 2T*Ff 1(743 -.70 Trend 1 

TFInIBd » 10 31 - .04 I TarMlfl n 33 47 — Jl OnWnOpA 1X36 — .14 ARThFt 1045 - O’! U£BI n 

Amcora Vintage: 1 Tar+oisn 24.6* — J28 lCoweniGrAl 1.15 +.06 CaUClunii 9.68 -316 1 Utillnc 


Ehiiitv 10.44 — X5 \ Tar.020 r» 17X0 -.25 ! Qobbe Huson: 


COTtfi 1030 -.071 value 


Fxlnca 9.79 ., TNoten laoa .1 AstAllp 7X82 — X7 1 CTT*F I 1X2* - .07 Wrldw 


>rn 






m) 


G*5vA p 8 Jt - .02 I Blanchard Funds: 


CatTxFr 1 11*2 -.06 1 WVTsFl 9ja -.07! Leisrr 37.’6 — X* 1 GlUlilo 1267 - .03 1 HwnrtdBd n 5X6 


mtqins 1 3X5 +.16 MdSdA 10* +.04 uas ’.39 -.01 SoiCdV 1X47 +.06 Growth n 2DJ0 -.01 LldNY p 3J6 +XI SrrtfbBnivSIirS. «- 

LIMallns 9.79 +X2| MuHiA 8.« +X5 EmGr M.9J _.io UiiSlk n 8.95—3)3 Gwihlnn 16J2 - Rodney fcuwre A^BtSl®" 

I J?° L ! A . “5J &2«f» >«• - 74 (FIMCD Funds.- HiYJdn 8147 -X4 Dtotap 12I4 _ A^BI “ 


MuLIA 7S> -.01 I EmMfct )6.9< -.24 ,FlMCO Funds: HiYJdn 8L47 -X4 Ovlno12Jj 

MuaLAp 1047 +.07 | ErnMJfOjl n8.J6 - .13 , TgiRein 10.06 —XI Incomen B.71 — Xl I Growth p 16JH — 16 

MUARAP 9.9e -X7 n 11.7* -.05 TPllI 9X1 -XI l IrrHBdn 9X5 -.09 i IrrHEap 1+77 - is 

MuCAAO 5X4 -JB3\ F+dlnc 10.10 +X2! LowOum ’.92 -Xl InHDtsn 17.18 - .06 I RoutrtMl Fundsf 15 


***,■-*=- J*|ST n 10.01 +.01 WflBomPenit 

Sf, \B i SS&* K -4 

dSSS’i ■—21 _ lari —30 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


WWAO C?9 |nc l0 -'9 +-U7’ LOVfCurn 1.72 -Xl InriDKn 17.18 * .06 ! ROUrtoo FurxK: 

XyP^EinSI 'n« 1 Hi *•!! ' t£.'' *■£> InWkn 1216 -.14 1 GvSecnvTl 


BELGRAVIA 


(Continued From Page 12) 


gwwi .J® * M Value n 118 "+X2 

EurpBI 14.10 +.16 Vislan 9i7 on 

UjtomeSlkns!li +^ 
mjvaiBr no — X4 USAA Group; 


i Wlnthrop Focus 
) WInFlln 9.95— Xl 
WicGrln 1080 —.12 
! WmMTp 9X2 +X3 


ORCHIDS 


ESCCWT & TBAVfi SBMC£ 
Tet 39-2 407 78 72 


LONDON PAMS ESCO RT AGE NCY 

CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 


UK 071 589 5237 


" »W m£r* facort Service 

ZUBCH* wuns 

CradT cadi aecepM. 

For ZURICH crik 077/ 63 83 31 
Other city DM Wl +39-2-494297 


TOKYO EXECUTIVE 
Escort Service. Crerii cwi. 
TaL 03-3474.7170 


• PARIS t LONDON 
* E L E C+ A N C E ■ 


AM5TBSUM BUTTHOIY Escort 
Servers Td: »)2(M47I570 
Crrtfa Cords 7<cet*^i 

"WTCHTS8BDGE ESCORTS" 

—■ New 7of* USA—- 

Tel 212+47.7^0 Woridwnfe 5er<+;e 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

Serm - WarkJwd e 
Teh 712-765-rmHrrwYorK USA 
Mofar Gtdii Cards Accepted 


LONDON BRAZR1AN fecort sv«d»l Stockholm 

Service 071 724 507/91 - o«5t cads eCORT SBNKE 

THjOB 1OT2I 


Eicon Sennce London (7I| 394 5145 miCYO ««• 

MTimr nwvunu vw* KOpled. 


Tek CQ31 341M598 

*”PAfiS.8RUXBi£S ■* 


OB5EA ESCORT SBIVKX. 

51 Beouchanp Place, London SWl 
Td: 077 584 0513 


MARX FOR M9I ICW YORK 

i Ejoon Service 

Tel: 213-26W361 


ANGOS Of SWTT2BOAND 

Exert Serna: 

Zgridv Bariev Beroq, Lucerne, 
Gwwvo, lavsairw, dt 
077/43 48 47 a 077/ 43 44 76 


MISS GENEVA & PARIS 

Escort Agency 344 00 89 enSl canfc 


ZUHCH / EQM / BASE 

Esaxl Service 

TeL 077780 06 60. 077, BB 0* 70 


ly'Trt Service. Pleae cJ BweSa 
12-2-201 - 07 00 

MWS BRUSSELS 

VB 1 Exwi Semce. 
hill 32 2 28)1860 pwji earth 
TAJ MAHAL ESCORT SBIVICL 
MAJOR CPEwr CARDS aCCSTHJ 
LOhOON 071 286 41(H 


ORIENTAL ESCORT SSV1CE 

LCMX3N 

j PLEASE PHQME 0T1 22S 3314 

HWKFURT KOLN DUSSHDORF 

l pil ernes, Eicon Service. 

069+73296 

PARlS-SAiZBG-SWtTZ-WUSSas 

j Fine Escort Service. 

Tel- toll +3B 773.20-78 
MUNICH 'WELCOME 
ESCOIfr & GLIDE AGB4CY. 
PLEASE CAU. 089 . 91 23 14. 


.-‘""rT 1 -tl • uo + 'J - ui wiaanr n 3.U6 +.ui Rovce Funds: rtiromt ic-« m nrwi p SJSI +X4 

MoMSAp’JV +^ lntl&, 1SX6 -.17 HiYId 10^3 +.05 MdTxFr nl0.ll - DS P^mJJb. 21 +01 roSSr *'2| AgsvGIh r»17.99 — X5 WinGItn 11 M — . rp 

MuNCApllXO +335 JPoEory 10J? -.28 ! i^rwthn 14.02 —.04 MidCop n 14.72 —.03 Eqinc 5.45 * -3B gotanced n 12X9 ♦ .06 ! WtoAG In Iti? ~m 

MuNYAp OM -X7 RMYIdn 9.16 -.10 j LTUSGn ?xo -04 NewAmn2*X6 -.07 OTC MS +X5 Gro^i 2* -= CA Bd n 10 J6 + X6 IWOOdwnrt Ffc 

MuSCAptXOl +X8 yalueeonlJflg - (D PNC Funds: NAsrtin 9J5 -X7 fS f-S* 9^ —03 Comrtn 2X38 +.06 BCtantE Mi — X2 

MuTNAp 0X5 +X7 ..SC ym.n 10. 78 -X? Balances 1128 — X2 NewE ran 20X8 _ vSuem »i2 Ixi ! S *19 GNMA 9xi -X3 1 Bond^ Im Txi. 

MuVAA p 11-33 - M Muhla*rripWi47 — .08 j Balonc I7J8 -Xl NwHrznnlSJM -.17 RuSnvareGiwir J> S°l?. n ®-5S -.09 • EqlSt It M -X3 


«. -• \4 _ 

r-- 




i 




OTCB 7.72 —16 OHTEIdIOJO -Xil MaW9edll0.il 
MIGB 1031 —Jl EquilvftnllXJ — 02 ; ManogedS10.ll 
RsehB 111? — 08 NO Ttf r tm 924 - 09 ; FATFP 10.21 
Sectfi l 12.51 —.18 NWffl. NurthsiOr-. i STBdl 9.72 


ui-ii KSWktiS T33 I*SES?5 < * ! rj» — w 54?’ ISi+S SS SS2S- 

s •- 3SS . (S*sJ '38 :* 


Ollnc iai7 +.03, 


I MuWVAnllJ? +.08 HiYIdA A77 - 03 ; 5nKapVSlil9 -M j US Lang lil -X4 11 Jtl n 1 

*1?HRIST1 NA ••• •’• MuBdB '0X7 +X7 incGrA 9.95 —.05 | SmCooVI I3J0 -J17 I Vo TF n 10.67+3)* bSS^ "m I E5 n !!. p 7-95—. 


Sm««ni»Si™Fd Si _ luSTMatfen 


PmPjein 9X7 — xi ojio 


tjwpmg nxe-xi 


1 LONDON * ESCORT * SERVICE 
'T6L:07J-499-2899* 


FAGS UK 

WORLDWIDE ESCORT AGWCY 


GENEVA* PARIS 

(Yrtly Wonxvi b«rt Sc+w* 321 99*1 


TH: UK 061 694 202016 LINES)* 
IH. UK 0956 37) 159 


LONDON PREAMGUS 
ESCORT AGWY 7a 07 1 73X Wl) 


TO OUR READERS 
IN BELGIUM 


! ZUBCH * BBM * UJZB94 

I NATHALIE Escort Service 
I T* 01 i 4*3 23 3e 
* ZURICH ■ SUSAN * 

Escort Service 

Tet 01 7 381 <9 4! 

“L O E W A " ZURKH 

Escort Service 

l 077 - 63 85 90 

** G64EVA A111ANCE ** 

&an Service ad Travel AWitoml 

Tet 022 / 311 07 24 


T«P0I 12X9— X2 MuhiA 4 64 - 01 vomer 11 -to -30 Pyjmryi 
value »X1 - NYL toW Fto: , Values 1 1 JO *X4 Pmdptl 

WoEqBI 658 . EAFE 13X0 -Xl .PRARBvn 10X1 -Xl OivAd 

WaGvS 1J.11 +X5 Bond 9.7D _IPocific«JS ?04 -3)2 GavtPi 

WoGre 16X6 -X8 CrtEa 13.93 -J4 iPacrficGrih 9 81 +X3 IqsTEi 

WoTotB 10J7 » 3X3 ItKtcBd 10.75 _ i POQhC Hdruort SP 100 

MttJnBJ ATI +315 litoEq 1170 -XJ; AdG rp 23.U —39 TE Prt 


-■» I VontEP 16.73 


-i\ i 

l. +.., 


* 


Nonficn 9X4 —29 
SpnnfMin 6JS +X6 
SwB&n 9X6 +J8 


MrinBJ an +X5) i na*E9 iots-xs aso-p swx-xp te nt av -x* (nTiF^Dnioi Cm +** LTre ?« Z rr S£S£" 

MIM Furtds: i MuHA 11X1—01. CATFp 7.24 +.03 PrinMBS 9X1 _m ! 2 in « « S«eHrlhimlE JS 'U " 4JS *&• 

Bdlncn 9.13 —95 ST BO T0.28 - 01 : Copincn 14X5 +.04 Prhcw Fwnfef I InlGvtnD Sll "ni .W -JB NYTE 8M +Jtt 

StKIncn 10.12 — X4 1 VdEq 1166 +.01' GorpBd 15J? +X4 BiO*> 11.89 . norT ° 1Q« 7'ii 1U8 — X5 PanEuro 7W 4 "?j W nwI> FU, ^« - 

SflcGrvrn 1^-JliNBlnd T2cl8-X91 USGv 9.43 - Bond 10X3 I Eqtacnp in t m --10 STIMk W j ^£ n H? « 

JJ£5. n «J22 1 — 70 ; CaoAcc 20X0 -Xl 1 ESUtoSnlCM IS !5S5f_. ^ *.M| -.STTax&r 73D .m! IUI t£S 

MIMUCRmrift „l AdrSBAp 9.77 -.01 APr«nl 1008 +XI | EmgGr 74.33 —.73 

AsSIAll 13J9 — X8| AaiRTTAn 9.77 -01- Balance 11X6—02 Gam 1A7] 




■S.MI ssr- £ ssa.!i« r«: 


, j. 

'■ f,>p„^ hm! m ' 1 


PEACHES 

LOMX3N ESCORT ssma 

071 938 2641 


Exautste scouts sama 
LONDON m 935 d533, r 0Ba MW 


moan -juua scam taax 

SBMGU5439 OK 0330 234392 


Just call toll-free 

0 800 1 7538 


PRIME TIME BlTBinBB 

In Manhattan 

71 2-2798522 USA, 

■GENEVA * GMGB ■ CANW 
Barr iems 
TeL 072-731 M fil 


MMPrOtn 9.W-, 
MMPxlnln 9 At +. 
MSB Fd n 16X6 +. 
MndiemtoGm 
AdiGvAO 972 
AmerFdPllU *. 
CA Mun p OX? 
Canada 10X1 — 
Flxincp PX3-. 
Global 12-4* — ■ 


rn ^ am t 5SIS| Sill RKSw. 1 ^^ 3 S S5B? S 3M0 xoi ESSE MjgjJ T 'I1 

1SI +X2 fSS" t !!S* J ll BsfcSRltS-^HMWa** ETil SSUSfldf. 

9-9? -?J| COPAAP 11.60 -.24 Endyeiim9_.l3 T^Uro+n 55J t m !'S T l”-^ 


<< . • 
C-h r '-<7ir : . : ' 


5E:.S 

Service. Cd Viema 4- 43-1-310 63 19 N ' WunP 


9X3 - - 


1 AMtou 7037 -S3 1 ZS^- 


. C* V *S> | 


i ir 

r L v - fv . 

j * IJ 'C“r' 




■j&V )'jkS^> 


*orQ 


■S 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 1994 


Page 11 


; : iv 

v :“ ' 


&ei 


:=■ : --v 

.*2? 

■■SsSgfe 

z.y -.• , : 

: — ■ ^ * 

■ - - "V ■;•'»«**.■ 


• . ‘ T‘: *‘~’-C!s£» 


• - !! rj. 
'■'■■ r^ : 
; y-»^as 

,""J ■. Vt 






■‘ -■’ — ■ ■.li'. 




•;•' '___■ - v* 5, 

«.■ -■ 

,- .'• - {.at 

..-'.CS- *• 
-,4 


.J, - / p “ 


. • i - 




•• HLf' 

. r ■■’ 

- 


- 

, , ; • L «* J 

. !• - V ' 


- ■:- ^55 

. ' 

-, • y A 

■ >' ‘y S J>: 

' . . H - ">•• . ■'-■ 
-• .5 :• • 


ft ew Igternn rional 



Iwuar Amount Cq™. 

(mHUon») «*■ ^ 

Fteattn g ~ “ 

Advance BanT ~7 ^ — “ — ; 

Akfitfafin S255 1999 0.K 


Bond Issues 


Price 
Wee end 


Advance Bank 
AustrdRo 

Oxporodon Andmo 

defanerto's 

Sweden *~“ 

^•d-Cou^T 

European Investment 
flank 

Ontario 

~U relever *" 

Wd-Mort Stores 

Bonk of Oww 
labobanlc 

Sweden 

Crfecfit National 


S125 1999 

"“250 1999 Ah 7 


$500 1999 & i 99 53 IQO^T Nonct&jWa. fan 02S% (T4Uo furop,.] 


51 -°°0 2004 7h 99.841 100X0 


$2 50 2004 TA 

$250 1999 6:7 

Q“300 1999 Tn 

d«250 1999 6 * 


100^6? 99 jos 
101.325 99JS 

101.425 — ~ 

102JS — 


Nonujflabto. Fm 033V [SafemoA Brothw* 

FnrtJ 

HMtttnd at 99, TW, Noncoflobk. Few JV jDeuactw Bgnfc.) 

RaoiWi at 99V. NonufabM. Fbm KiV (CoUraan Sods 
Inti.) 


£100 1999 #6 90-369 — 

*1.500 2003 7vi 98 jo 98 . 3 o"" 


toifuto Bancaria San m 500,000 20W 10« 
rooto cfi Torino 


100 99.50 


Raiffeisen 

Zentrolbonk 

Eurofima 
SBC finance 
Oesterreiditsdie 

KontroKbank 


m. 150.000 1999 9H 101_o0 — 


Of 4QQ 

DF350 

« 1,000 


2001 7 

1999 6W 
1999 9M 


10014 9970 
99°j 99 jo 

1014115 99.25 


pmada Mortgage & csljOOO 

Housing Corp. 

Commerzbank CS150 

Oversees F inance 

Bectricit* de France CJ125 

Sodfitfi Nahonate des CS 150 

Cheminsde Fer 

fronpns 

Sweden cs20Q 

Australian Industry AmS 100 
Development Corp. 

Export finance & Aus75 

'Insurance Co rp. 

Bank of East Asia HK$ 1.000 


1999 B'/« 99.236 99 JO 


NowoUbWa. F»ei 2Mk {ConwwrfboBlLl 

Kwffatwl a 9880. Nonultohto. Fni 2V {CSfB Wkakv 
bonk) 

Nonenfabta. Fungibl, «Mh oumndtifi ww*. lung Mol 
amount to £300 m*oni Fra not ctodowd (Sotomon Brottwn 
Inti.) 

NonaAible Fim^bln with autAnbip «m. losing total 
amount to 5 J hthon hgna. Feel 035%. (CrMn Commeroal 
do ft ana.) 

WwDwWtn 1 999 huo a ftoafcng rate note paying Mavnt 

tMKMh Urn. NoncaOcte. Fees 2%. Increased hoffl 200 
Ukon be; Last ICO bitban tranche priced of 101 JO. p*ftjto 
BanooriQ S on Pboto d Torino.) 

Ibotlered at 99J& NancaBable. Feei ] tkV (Banco Comnier- 
dale boliom) 

faofimred at 99 J5, Ngncnlfable. fees IV [ABhMMBQ B anfcj 
faolfaed at 99 NoncofloMe. Feet IV (SBC) 

Keoderad at 99 J9 NancaBable. feet IWt We'L) 


Seewwwdhr. NoncaBabie fiMtal notes. Fe« 0J5V (RBC 
Dtmnen Skuah.) 


1998 8V4 10114 99 JO Reeifered ot 99.85. NoncaBabie. Feu lH*. pHJ Inti) 


1998 614 101.32 99jo 

1999 BM 101.145 99.10 


1996 7V« 

2004 814 


100.983 — 

100.15 97.15 


buffered at 99.92. Noncattoble. fern 1HV (PVWx» CcKMd 
Mnrfcett.) 

Reoffered at 99J2. NamxdUbfa. Fba IfeX. Swai Bart. 
CorpJ 


Recrfferedot99J83. NoncJobte.faesIWXi.tScotiqltVieod) 

NonaJafafe. Fees 2HV (Hamfaros Bant] 


1996 7 1014)7 99.50 Noncafafen. Fmta 1KV (Commonv^ahh Bank of Autfrota.; 


2001 714 100 — 


Abbey National r 30,000 1996 lio 100.137 — 

Treasury Services 

American Honda y 10,000 1997 lio 100 JO — 

finance 

L0Rheinland4>fak YlO^OO 1999 3m 10014 ~ 


Noafic Investment Y 15^00 1997 316 

Bank 

Toyota Molor CrecSf y50^X» 1999 4~~ 

Carp. 

ftufty-Unkwl 

Sapporo Breweries $200 1998 2fb 

OSvetli " m. 300,000 1999 W 


100X07 — 


100 JO — 


Sramwnud wteimi wiB be 7K% unit 1996, when blue is 
aifafcfe at par. Thereafter 10.10%. Fees 0.45%. Denomno- 
ftore HK$500J100. (MetrJ Lynch fell) 

NoncaBabie. Fen a 1875V DenemieetioM 10 mKon ft n. 
Pahua Europe) 

Interest wffl be 3.10% und Oct. 1995. when issue is enable at 
pat. Thereafter 316%. Fees 0J0V. Denaninalions 10 m&on 
yen. (Verril Lynch fed'L) 

HonaJctile. Fma tX2?V Denomination 10 trillion yen. [Sc4o- 
mon Bro thers Inti) 

NoncciaUe. fees 0.13% Denaminaiions 100 m£on yen. 
pvttfao Europe) 

NancaBable. foes QJ5% Donaminaiiom 100 mSon yen. 
(Nomura fell} 


Noncaflrfjte. Bo* 510,000 note with two warrants axeren- 
ohleeito company’s shares at 991 yen per sham and at 105,10 
yen par' dollar. Fees 216% [Yamakhi Infl) 

Natnlobfe, Convertible ct 3JBB6 Sre per share, an 8% 
premium. Bees 2H% Amount of Hue decreased to 300 bKan 
Cm from 400 bKan fee, whBe coupon was raised to 3H% from 
3H% (Morgan Stanley Inti) 


BONDS; Convertibles Swamped 


Contfaoed from P*§e 9 
ability to subscribe to new issues, 
while the slide in bond and stock 
markets sparked by rising \JS. 
short-term interest rates and the 
gathering inflationary fears haspai 
a halt for the time being to fond- 
nrising on the mufcet. 

“Conqjanies were getting too 
greedy, and the Alcatel issue; which 
was too expensive and too big, end- 
ed the ran," Mir. Bostyn said. 

Investors have lost money on 
convertible bands this year, al- 
though to a lesser extent than on 
otter major markets. The EFCI 25 
convertible bond index, calculated 
by the Fans brokerage Exane and 
based on 25 key bonds, has fallen 
5.2 percent since the start of the 
year, while a rival index by Didier 
Philippe has shown a 9 percent 
drop. Thai compares with a 12.7 
percent decline in the GAC*40 
French bine drip stock index and a 
10.7 percent drop in French 10- 
year government bond futures. 

“Investors generally are having a 
really bard rime, ” said Esther Bar- 
oody, bond economist at Crtdit 
Lyonnais in Paris. “Wefre seeing 
incredibly high yields on 10-year 
bonds, and the equity market has 
dried up, and these c ond itions are 
hitting convertible bonds as wdL" 

Foreign investors, who never en- 
joyed foil tax benefits have been 
particularly reluctant to buy 
French convertibles recently. 

“Unless we can expe ct a hig her 
retain from buying a convertible 

than a straight equity, we wouldn't 

buy it,” said Anna Brown, French 
investment manager at Fleming In- 
ternational Management in Lon- 
don. “We raped more perfor- 
mance from equities:” 


Demand from French institu- 
tional investors has driven the de- 
velopment of the French convert- 
ible bond market, taking h to 
second position in Europe, after 
Britain, in terms of bonds out- 


earlier this year, France was Eu- 
rope's leader in issuing convertible 
bands. 

For corporate borrowers, con- 
vertible bands offer a chea p son ny 
of funding at a time when competi- 
tion on the stock market has been 
tough- Interest payments on such 
bonds are low, typically from IS 
percent to 43 percent, compared 
with 8 percent or 9 percent on tradi- 
tional beards. The payoff far inves- 
tors comes later, with the tax bene- 
fits and lha equity opportunities. 

As a result, a company can raise 
money at a rate even cheaper than 
the Bench Treasury. Akatd and 
Peogpot sold convertibles two weeks 

mart in March at yields to maturity 

ctf 53 percent and 5 percent, respec- 
tively, 95 basis points bdow the pre- 
vaffing yield on the benchmark 10- 
year government bond. 

Since Marti 23, when Alcatel 
and Euro-RSCG announced their 
convertible bond sales simulta- 
neously and market con- 

ditions began to deteriorate, the 
flow of new issues has virtually 
stooped. The yield on the bench- 
mark French 10-year bond has ris- 
es to 7.4 percent from 6.4 percent 
over the period, white die CAC-40 
stock index has slid from 2^00 to 
yi23, a drop of 8 percent. 

As a result, companies have little 
incentive to crane to the market with 
new issues at substantially higher 
yields. 


UNION: 

A Wbman’s light 

Costumed from Page 9 
which hopes to oust Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl from power in parlia- 
mentaiy elections this October. 
Mrs. Engden-Kefer said she feared 
European and global liberalization 
of trade in goods, labor and capital 
nndennmes the effectiveness of in- 
dividual countries' labor move- 
meats and warrants a drastic 
change in tactics. 

“We need to pay more alien Lion 
to international relations,” she 
said. 

The union must also present a 
unified front “When you have high 

difficult fortnuie unions to exer- 
cise pressure,” she said. “Conqtany 
payrolls are shrinking even faster 
thin anions’ membership rods.” 

“It’s voy important that trade 
unions keep their unity. That’s a 
specific strength in Gennany com- 
pared to other countries.” 

Mrs. Engden-Kefer was bran in 
Prague in 1943, but moved to Ger- 
many as a child. She studied eco- 
nomics and worked as a freelance 
busmess jouroahsi before going to 
work for the council as head of the 
trade muon council’s international 

She serve*? rawrewesideat of 
the Nuremberg-based Federal La- 
bor Office from 1984 until she was 
elected vice chairwoman of the 
council is 1990. In that round, she 
was dectfid with 86.8 percent of the 
vote. 

To subscribe in fearm uny 

jurfeafl, toll free. 

0130 84 85 85 


Who Rules? It’s the Bond Market, Stupid 

By Louis Uchitdle . After rising sharply from Febnnrv io Mas. whose various mutual bond funds have 1960s, and a greater wiliingne 

.Ynt York Tuna Semce interest rates have leveled off for non, b^t 425.000 shareholders. Mae to the moil when tiu 


SO00Q {JP Morgan SncurihatJ 

~ 0~J U*> Nontafiobk fWD«ft 

J 1 0,000. [Goldman Sochi bii'IJ 

— iiitetuu mt.IJ be Pte 3-«roruti Atbor, wtfi a mceumun of 10% 
fJcncoBabte faaOJO* (ABMAMBO BarLJ 


By Louis U chi idle 

Yr» York Tuna Semce 

NEW YORK — “It's the economy, stu- 
pid.” When James CarviUc coined the slogan, 
ne meant lhal his chat. Bill Climoo. would be 
wdl served by (humping for a stronger econo- 
my. Mr. Clinton did. and he won the presiden- 
cy. But now, it turns out, there are an awful lot 
of people who favor a weak economy. 

Favor a weak economy? Who would do 
that? Enter that mysterious and slightly sin- 
ister entity. The Bond Mattel, the pre-ctni- 
ncni force in the economy today. 

More than any other group, ine bond mar- 
ket determines how many Americans will 
have jobs, whether the jobholders will cam 
enough to afford a house or a car, or whether a 
factory might have u> layoff workers. 

In sum, the American economy is governed 
by (he bond market — a loose confederation 
of wealthy Americans, bankers, financiers, 
money managers, rich foreigners, executives 
Of life insurance companies, presidents of uni- 
versities and nonprofit foundations, retirees 
and people who once kept their money in 
passbook savings accounts for under the bed) 
and now buy shares in mutual funds. 

While some would recoil at being called 
enemies of economic growth, the fact is that 
the confederation has ruled in recent months 
that the economy should lose strength, not 
gain it. 

“The bond market's members speak in a 
monologue, and thdr message is contract the 
economy. "a UK official said. “They wan t the 
weakest economy they can have, as long as it 
does not get so weak that loans are def aimed." 

Through the years under former President 
George Bush, they were quiescent. The U.S. 
economy was pretty weak on its own most of 
the time, and die bond market fraternity did 
not feel compelled to lake action. But the 
surge in economic activity that started last 
fall gpt juices flowing. 

With a rapidity that took the breath away, 
the fraternity exercised its power over inter- 
est rates, pushing them up so that people had 
to pay more for things like mortgages, car 
loans and new machinery. 


After rising sharply from February to Mas. 
interest rates have leveled off for now, bit 
inevitably the surge in economic growth so 
evident last winter has kw some of as bloom 

“There are other things that affect in teres: 
rates, but point number one is where is the 

ocoocray going,” said Paul A. Voider, for- 
mer chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. 
"If you have a weaker economy, you have 
lower rates. That is not a great world, be: 
that is the way it is." 

Mr. Union's administration does not ag- 

ence for subdued economic growth. Officials 
US. CREDIT MARKETS 

sayb the economy is still strong enough :o 
withstand most of the recent drag from the 
increased interest rates- 

Congress is sumlarty reluctant to challenge 
the bond market's power. Early in Mr. Clin- 
ton's term. Mr. CarviHe himself recognized the 
problem with ihe aphorism be hod made fam- 
ous. So he came up with a new one. 

"1 used to think that if there was reincar- 
nation. I wanted to come back as the presi- 
dent or the pope or as a .400 baseball hitter ” 
be said. "But now 1 would like to come back 
as the bond market. You can intimidate 
everybody." 

Most Americans have only a rough notion 
of the bond market’s nature.’ The name itself 
suggests financiers on Wall Street. In fact, the 
fraternity, which is as old as the Republic, has 
changed over the decades and has appeared in 
different eras under different names — as the 
Eastern bonking establishment, for example, 
or the sound-money faction. 

Some of its newest members are ordinary 
Americans, who enter by buying shares in 
mutual funds that invest in bonds — and 
they may be unaware that they have joined 

such a heavyweight dub. 

"A lot of times they move money into the 
fund from a passbook savings account or a 
bank certificate of deposit and they don't 
realize that they are moving into another 
world where they can get hurt,” said James 
R rnham chairman of the Benham Group. 


whose various mutual bond funds have 
425.000 shareholders. 

What does help to make tte connection is 
some understanding of the essential nature 
of the bond market. Whatever its name or its 
membership through the decades, one defin- 
ing characteristic has endured. The bond 
market is a huge storehouse cf accumulated 
wealth — a giant vault, so to speak, from 
which saved money is loaned out not for a 
few weeks or months, but for years at a time. 

Those multi-year loans totaled more than 
S10 trillion at the end of last year, according 
to the Fed’s most reccai dau That is a huge 
sum. If the 510 trillion were somehow to 
disappear, refilling the vault would absorb 
the entire national income — wages and 
profits — for a year and a half. 

Naturally, when they lend from the vault, 
the people who own the S10 trillion, or their 
agents like Bonham, want it paid back intact, 
undiminished by inflation. 

Inflation at the moment is not a problem. 
While the economy is stronger than it was a 
year ago. the inflation rate has barely risen. 
What is more, the administration and many 
private economists believe that it will not rise 
much, even with brisk economic growth. 

Even the Federal Reserve's top officials, 
who usually side with the bond market, do 
not see much inflation ahead. 

Until the 1970s, the bond-market fraterni- 
ty was more willing to accept such a view. 
Preserving wealth from the inroads of infla- 
tion, even at the expense of economic 
growth, was not such an obsession. 

But the doable-digit inflation in the 1970s 
vaporised big chunks of the wealth in the 
hood market’s vault. Although interest rates 
rose above 15 percent for a while, that extra 
inco me failed to offset much of the damage 
and that money memory r emains fixed in the 
bond market's collective mind. 

“When economies go through a major 
bout of inflation, it leaves a lasting imprint," 
said Paul Romer, an economist at the Uni- 
versity of California at Los Angeles. “It may 
be that in the population at large, there is a 
greater fear of inflation than there was in ihr 


1960s, and a greater willingness to stop iu" 

Marc to the point when the bond market 
reacts, that reaction is more pronounced than 
in the past Interest rates move faster. One 
reason: some of the 51Q triHioa can be pulled 
out of loans m America, con vrned to marks or 
yen and lent in Gennany or Japan —if rates 
m those countries are higher or the dollar is 
losing value against those currencies. Getting 
the money back requires higher US. rates. 

Then there arc mortgages. In the post, a 
bank that issued a S100.000 mortgage at. sav, 
S percent interest, kept the loan on its hooks, 

whatever the inflation problem. Now tte hank 
packages the mortgage with, say, nitre otters, 
each for $100,000, and sells than as a bend. 

The new owner is often quick to sdl the $1 
million bond if inflation, or the threat of it, 
erodes its value. That would happen if interest 
rates were to rise to. say, 9 percent while his 
bond is paying only 8 percent, or $80,000 a 
year. To turn that SSQ.000 into a 9 percent 
return for a fresh owner, he has to sdl tte 
bond for S89QXXX). losing money. 

Hundreds of billions of dollars in mon- 
gages and car loans, once never traded, are 
now- bought and sold in this way. The bond 
market’s influence grows as a result, and the 
balance between borrowers and lenders, be- 
tween mors growth and less inflation, shifts 
again — toward a slower economy. 

■ Bond Yields on Uptrend 

UJL government bonds fell and yields rose 
last week as concern about the pace of infla- 
tion gripped investors, Bloomberg Business 
News reported Friday from New York. The 
Commodity Research Bureau's index of 21 
commodities, an inflation indicator, rose for 
four consecutive days and offset a govern- 
ment report that producer prices fell. 

For the first tune this year, the market 
failed to rally after the release d the govern- 
ment's producer price index. Each of the last 
five times the index was published, bond 
prices rose. 

The benchmark 30-year bond dosed the 
week at a yidd of 7.31 percent, up from 727 
percent last Friday. The 10-year bond's yield 
rose to 7.02 percent from 6.99 percent. ’ 


BarikA merica Covers Loss From Derivatives at Money Fund 


Las Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — BankAmerica Corp. has become the 
latest mutual-fund sponsor to cover shareholder losses 
caused by so-called derivative securities — in this case, in a 
money-market fund, the bank said. 

But while more such disclosures are expected from normally 
safe money funds between now and the end of the quarter, 
industry observers and regulators said the problems appeared 
to be manageable and were unlikely to be widespread. 

"We don i see this as a major crisis," one Securities and 
Exchange Commission official in Washington said Friday. 

BankAmerica confirmed Friday that it injected 317.4 
million into its Pacific Horizon Prime Money Market fund in 


May to cover losses on securities the fund was forced to sell 
at a loss before they matured. The cash injection allowed the 
fund to keep its share price constant at SI , which is one of the 
hallmarks of money funds. 

The Pacific Horizon Prime fund, which mostly is used by 
institutional investors, suffered a double blow in March and 
April, BankAmerica said. As short-term market interest rates 
zoomed, hordes of its institutional holders pulled their cash 
out of the fund to invest directly in money-market securities. 

The fund's assets have plunged from a peak of S12 billion 
earlier in the year to $4.6 billion now. 

Forced to liquidate securities to meet redemptions, the 
fund suffered losses on certain investments that hid dropped 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, June 13-17 


A echedma at Uua week's economic end 
financial mwits. compj*>rf for tho Imamu- 
tonal Herald Tribune by BoomBorg Bust* 
ness Nows. 

Aala-PacMIc 

•JgM 13 AuMrafia Public noiMtey tor 
Oueen’s birthday in all bums but Western 
Australia. FtouncWl mnrkata closed. 

Tokyo Yoshto Tarosawa, tfaractor^garv 
enl ot Economic Planning Agency, to 
speak m Foreign Correspondents Chib on 
Japaneaa economy's patfi to recovery. 

• JIM 14 Tokyo Bankrupt Ctea In 
Uay rotaMCd by Tokyo Shotto neaamcn 
and Taftohu Data Bank. 

Tokyo April macMnory orders. 

Tokyo May stool production. 

• Jumis Buying Britten Chamber ol 
Commerce reorasontatros vtert. Through 
June 18. 

Tokyo U S- and Japan begin talks on 
aaratco n ductom. 

Tokyo Revtsod April Industrial produc- 
tion figures. 

Earnings aapacM ABC Comnwttca- 
dona. 

• June 18 Tokyo May trade balance 
figures. 

Earnings expected Sung Foo Kae Hold- 
Ingj. 

• JteM 17 Hong Kong MarcIWO-May 
imamptoymant dais 

Hang Kong Seminar an ~S«UinQ PRC 
Jotot Venture Products m Chine" 0130- 
nizwi by Asia Law ft Practice. 

Monaata inctapenctence Day hoMay. 
Wa M n g ton April renal sales. 

Earnings sapsettd CkanslMd Hokhngs. 

Europe 


Exported this awl Prankkirt Wes- 
tern German April retail sates. Forecast 
Up 02 percent In year. 


An EU Currency by *97? 
'Better to Wait’ Until *99 

Reusers 

BASEL, Switzerland — The 
chances of a majority of European 
Union countries being able to 
merge thdr currencies in 1997 are 
at test slim, European Economic 
Af fairs Commissioner Henning 
Christoph ersen said on Sunday. { 

“1997 will be very difficult, so 
there is a general consensus that it i 
would be belter to wait until 1999," i 
Mr. Christophersen said on the eve 
of the annual meeting here of (he 
Bank for International Settle- 
ments, the central bankers' central 
bank. “Unless we get 3 percent 
growth in 1996 and more in 1997. it 
will be impossible," be added. 


ftmktiirt Paf*-Gennfln April retail sotea. 
ForacvstDoMn i.O percent in yssr. 
FrenMurt May mriotes ate price index. 
Forecast Up 2.0 pettwnj. 

• ten* 1* B—i . SaUrind Swit- 
zerland Bank tor InMnuiionH Smtte- 
reents two-day annual meeting of 33 oon- 
trsl bank governor*. 

Lmaobmag EU foreign aftetm meeting. 
Mlntetarc Rossktfy tegn trade a gre emen t 
with Ukraine. Through June 14. 
UMotmng EU transport ministers 
meeting on ways to reverse losses m in- 
dustry. Through June 14. 

Oslo May trade balance excluding 
ships. Forecast 13 MUon kroner surplus. 
Stockholm May unemployment rate. 
Forecast: 7 J percent 

• ten* 14 Amsterdam Producer 
price index. 

Copenhagen April new housng stuns. 
Madrid May consumer price index. 
Forec a st Up 03 percent in month, up 5.0 
percent In year. 

Madrid May unemployment. Forecast 
17.6 percent 

• *■•18 Copenh a gen March trade 
figures. 

HsMnhl May consumer price index. 
Forecast Up 03 percent to month. 
London May unemptoyrnanL Forecast 
Down 25.000 

London Chancellor Kenneth Clarke 
Okras Mansion House speech. 

Vienna OPEC ori mi rasters hotel their 
midyear con faience an pricing and pro- 
duction strategy. 

Earnings expected Thames Water. 

• Jhura IB A airtmtwn March- May 
unemployment- Forecast: 7.8 percent 
Porta March current account Forecast 
SXI bdUcto franc surplus. 

Paris Praflnwwy RrsHtuaner gross do- 
mestic product Forecast: Up 05 percent. 
MBan HH SpA's 808 billion bra share is- 
sue begins. 

Earnings expected Royal Ahold MV. 


• Jana 17 Paris April trade balance. 
F orecast 6-5 biflion franc surplus. 

tow r lpM 

Earrings expected Ms week Dtgican 
Inc.. G on corp Inc.. Getty Petroleum 
Corp-. J.M. Smicker Co- Nsxtel Commu- 
nications tnc^ TC8Y Enterprises I no. 
Wausau Paper MUs Co. 
a jane 13 W mhlngam TheU-S.Agn- 
cutlwe Department releasee os-weekly 
report on planting progress tor seven 
crops. 


in value because their yields were less than what was avail- 
able on the open market BankAmerica said those securities 
included some money-market derivatives, in this case hy- 
brids of 10 volatile investments whose returns are derived 
from, or tied to, interest-rate trends. 

In May, Atlantic Richfield Co. said it would make up a 
S22 million loss caused by derivative securities in an employ- 
ee retirement fund. This week Paine Webber Group agreed to 
put $33 million into a government bond fund it mnnay* 

Federal regulators noted that there have been other cases 
m recent years of money funds, in particular, covering 
unusual losses to avoid angering shareholders. 


Euromarts 

At a dome 

Eurobond Yields 

JmNMi) WMskWlBW 





Ottawa Aprk new housing price Index. 
Smi F fi w dte c o Sun Microsystems Inc. 
CEO Scan McNealy is among me featured 
speakers at SuiWorid *94. a sa-day expo- 
sition teawng 330 compontea who mteia 
products connected to the wortti's larpest 
workstation computer maker. 

Haw York Cowan & Co. conducts annu- 
al technology conference with proaanters 
from computer, semiconductor and soft- 
ware companies. Through June 14. 

Earrings expected Solectron Corp. 
a Jam 14 Washington May consum- 
er price index. 

Washington Labor Daparonam reports 
May re« eantings. 

Washington May reiaU sates. 

Mm York Pacfcard-Ben Electronics Co., 
one ot fits biggest U-S. persona) comput- 
er makers, schedules announcement ol 
new "MagicSox - hne of muttmocSa PCs. 
New York Eastman Kodak previews 


products and services it wfll be seeing this 
holiday season. 

New York Johnson Redbook research 
service releases its weekly survey of 
same-store sales at more than 20 depart- 
ment, dtecount and chain stores. 
Washington American Petroteum Insfi- 
tuta Issues Its weekly report on US. petro- 
leum stocks, production.' imports and re- 
finery uttfizanon. 

Earrings expected BET Holdings Inc, 
Chock Fun O Nuts Corp, Circuit City 
Stores too, HJ. Heinz Co.. McCormick S 
Col 

• *mo IS Washington Federal Re- 
serve reports May industrial production 
and capacity utikzation 
Washington Commerce Department re- 
ports April business inventories and 
sates. 

Washington Labor De pa rtment reports 
nwtssd productivity and cons tor me Bret 
Quarter. 

Washington First quarter currant ac- 
count Manco. 

Wash in g ton Federal Deposit tosurenca 
Corp. reports Rrat-quener bank ml sav- 
ings & loans profita. 

Washington Mortgage Bankare Associ- 
ation ot America releases weekly report 
on mortgage applications. 

Maw York Money Magazine/ ABC News 
release their weekly consumer confi- 
dence index. 

e June IS Washington Commerce 
Department repons May housing state 
and buildtog permits. 

DetteH General Moure’ Saturn corp. 
outlines us 1995 plans at an Automotive 
Pi a ss Association Puncheon at the Re- 
naissance Cantor 

W eaMn gion Labor Department reports 
initU weekly state unemployment com- 
pensation Insurance drims. 
e June 17 Wa shin gton Federal Farm 
Credit Banka Funding Corp- announces 
auctions. 


US.VW» terra 

IS 

7 JO 

7M 

h41 

USLiMIre 

7JB 

7.10 

7.0 

SM 

Ui. S, ihort ttnn 

42» 


Ml 

US 

PBMdsiterfiBg 

AS* 

ue 

t a 

Ate 

Prmcti inaDca 

7JB 

Ml 

7.17 

577 

mOoaHrv 

Ut 

aay 

SM 

741 

INnbttkrMHi 

141 

MS 

7J1 

*40 

Ssttdtakknan 

M7 

&J2 

UD 

Ml 

ECU, tate tens 

173 

J M 

7.75 

Ate 

ECUntootenn 

7M 

731 

745 

541 

Om.% 

an 

a m 

871 

Ate 

AM. t 

170 

SJ1 

*171 

Ate 

Mil 

MS 

IK 

140 

&» 

Yes 

3J7 

175 

Ml 

247 


Souncr; Luxrmftaurp Stock Exchange. 

Weekly Salas j u 



5 

nom s 

Moot 

5mlOUS 

KSLS0 

1549 M*1JD 

Oil 

Comrt. 

AH 

- 713 JO 

4*30 


— 

A0D ZIMK 

22X70 

ECP 

AMI40 

1 475.10 TZTE40 

342040 

TOM 

A7WL20 

lJOAfl 1SW5J0 

0X7 JO 

affsMyy ktoittl 




CbM bnxkir 


1 

Ptaos 5 

non 

Hrrisbh 

ASUO UtfUO 71 4VUS TUtote 

GBDWt 

telto 

W.W UtIJD 

875-20 

nwi 

5-07-90 

142140 H7340 

242740 

ect 

&M»n 

MSAlti 1A3U29 2UQ40 

TeM 

iwtwo tunn zgjnsAi suom- 


Sourer.- Eume tear. Cadet 


Ubor Rates 

i-reoats 

imam 

Jun. 10 

AonuS 

UiS 

«te 

49/1* 

fit 

Drattcbemarit 

SI/ 1 * 

51 /M 

51/14 

PonMstertlxf 

s 

5V> 

5* 

PrxocS (note 

5te 

JW 

59/14 

ECU 

5 15/16 

515/M 

5 15/1* 

Yon 

Tte 

23 fU 

TU 


Sources: Uxrrds Bonk Reuter*. 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


M 


Currency Management Corporation Plc 

Winchester House. 77 London Wall - London EC2M 5M> 
Tel: OT! -382 9745 Fato 071-382 9487 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Dally Fax Sheet 
CaU fr»r further Information *& brochure 



Signal 


O 130+ software applications © 
O HT DATA FROM 510 A DAY © 
O Signal SOFTWARE GUIDE O 
Call London: 1 44+ (Q) 71 231 3556 
for your guide and Signal price fist 


BALSAM: Banks Orion Priority 


cede, Gcmumy** laixeslttport fi- 
nancing concern, which owes 
fomlrs over 13 bflfioc Deutsche 
marks (S90Q mffliwt). - 

Balsam w»s Procedo’s biggest di- 
ent Procedo stwiccs haw said u»t 

n ■ - J atlnoil fmlKI 


hdd a secret stake in, according to 
a dispatch by Bloomberg Business 
News from Frankfurt. 

Mir. Dieter denied the allega- 
tions. 

In a report released before publi- 
cation on Monday, Spiegel said a ; 
sohadiaiy of the copnccring and 
triecomnromcatioaS cant paid or- j 


vatoeofcRfcraandnKHaiiingfakisd 
certificates from. US. auditors. 

A meeting of PTOccdo’s .creditors 
and shareholders aimed at bailing 
out Precede broke down late last 
week with the two sides ifivided 
over the terms of the rescue. Bank- 
as have warned that j t migh t not 
be possible to salvage Preceda 
■ Swegd ABeg« * Sana . 

TV magazine Spifig^ said iff its 
newest edition that Werner 
chief executive of Mamtewiami 
AG, for years podttted ’Tmlhonar. 
by routing orders to ooropaiw* « 


from two dosety held comp a nies in 
which Mr. Dieter is a partner. , 

IV magazine said that Manoes- 
matm Retro tb GmbH bought H aE 
most exdosivdy” from Hydac and 
Flutex, ttecompanks co-owned by 
Mr. Dieter. 

Mr. Dieter rejected the charm 
■ and said is a statement released by 
Manntsmaim that he disclosed ms 
ownership stakes when he joined 
the company is 1968. He (fid not 
say whether he holds an interest in 
Hyds:; ot Fluiec. 


This week’s topics: 

O The Rescue of Credit Lyonnais 
O Europe: Executive Scandals 
O China's Airlines, How Safe? 

O Japan: NTT's Battle Plan 
O The Bad Buzz at Sony 


Now available at you r newsstand! 

»ed ho | ■ ' ' 

: joined BusfnessWaak International 

did. not 14,avf0ncby f CH-1906Laus»aeTsl.4t-Z1*617'4411 
WBt m For subscriptions call UK 44^28-23431 Honp Kong B52-523-293B 


Duff Forecasts and Market Myths for 1994 

The US dollcr will soan dollollon wlli conlinue; gotd & mcut-commodilfex 
wonl i lie. Japorl j economy. & itocK maiKel villi Dew epic. Voo did 
NOT reed (hat In F-ilerMohey ■ th^lconoclaific Jnvesjmenf (on'or. 

Co'i ■Cyc r h';i*Ci)o? otairpis iuv»(onc*cn)y}oJ ChorTAndtyss yd. 

7 Swcliow Si:»ot, tondon. W !3 7 HO..U 1 C To! lo.ioo'i 71 -^ 3 ? J 961 
(071 mUIOtwfa. 7l-Z3P<Mi ' clMtix UcHc 


LONDON & GLOBAL 
FOREIGN EXCHANGE PLC 

PREMIER SPECULATION SERVICE 
QUOTE UP TO 100 MILLION USS 
Top Row. Cameo House, ? 1 Bear Street. London WC2H 7AS 
Tel.: (071) 839 6161 Fax: [071) 839 2414 


FafureSburce The real -lime information system 

wn^^memmomamonMm preferred by Institutions end now 
cvcilable to treders af home. Unnvclod -coverage cl an unrivaled 
price. Futures • Options • FX * Energy ♦ Commodities * Metals « 
News * Full Charting & Technical Analysis from our Worldwide 
coverage - cvailoble via Satellite through Europe. 

Cali FutureSource Tel.: +44 71-867 8867 Fax:+44 71-481 3042 


•FOREX •METfllS 'BONDS 'SOFTS 

Objective analysis for professional investors 

(44) 962 879764 

i > Fiennes House. 32 Souihgste Street, Winchester. 
Hants S023 SEH UK Fax (44) 424 774067 


rrSIC'C: •; {”: 

: '.ite'J : u: :vvv r*1 

24 hours a day- only S100 a month! 

LIVE FINANCIAL DATA DIRECT TO YOUR PC LareJ 
^ ■ 1 H/poCCri! * 

For more information Fax +4S 4587 8773 


1^1 



Margined Foreign 
Exchange Trading 

Kjni OmipeEitivc Quotes 2-t Hours 
Tel - + -4-t 71 tilS Gti >) 

Fjx: + -h 7! 329 3019 


si ms 


Tmefy. spaclfcptaienrnar- QC^^iSl 

ter strategies, cfe#vererfd£^, B M L iE SBBwi 

befytB the martets OfXn lalflmla 

towrewwrani FINANCIAL TRAD EBS. LTD. 

flteSBBGStf fora me copy SSOOsor Avenue 

of Via market letter of your HD^Dpau^, /vy r j 788JJSA 

i®.: 51&-935-480Q 
emoa. pax; 579-455-4697 


For further details on how to place your listing contact PATRICK. FALCONER in London 
TcU (44) 71 836 48 02 - Fax: (44) 71 240 22$4 

Hcralb ^p^ ribunc 


* t-‘C St 
%' n/ 
yi .. . 



Ca 

li N 


c clos 
? in l 


11 proJ 
u offs 


T 

1 age 


bef. 

:* 3,75 

s ihai 

« 

i A 

■: ay 

} Sloe 

lion 
lyfr 
T D 

| unn 

1 pro* 

i k 


i «p< 

I si&n 


. coul 
i said 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUIVE, MONDA Y, JUNE 13 , 1994 _ 

£iASPA@ MAWOMUi MARKET 


SHORT COYER 


«■ LOTUS 

ET 

H ■ L ovate 

LuflUn 

lunar 

^■u *'Tu mmJ'nt 


OTC Consolidated trading tor week I kite, 
ended Friday, June 10 . 1 kllv. 


Strike Looms at Daewoo Shinvard 


(Continued) 


Saw 

Dn, s ia lflfc wisft lp» Cse aw 


Bhomheni Businas Sews 

PRAGUE — Tomas Jezek. 
chairman or Czech National Prop- 
erty Fund and chief architect of 
former Czechoslovakia’s revolu- 
tionary “voucher privatization" 
plan, lias resigned amid allegations 
of incompetence and corruption 
within the fund. 

The leadership shuffle Friday rep- 
resents a victory for the government. 


Mr. Jezek end Czech Prime Min- 
ister Vaclav Klaus, friends since 
childhood were among the chief ar- 
chitects of former Czechoslovakia's 
voucher plan, which was designed to 
put shares of state companies into 
the hands of individual Czechs. 

In 1992 , about 1,000 Czech com- 
panies and 5(0 Slovak companies 
were sold through the voucher plan. 
The Czech government currently is 


SEOUL (.AFP) — Union workers at Daewoo Shipbuilding & Heavy jndBhui 
Machinery Co.. South Korea's second-largest shipyard, voted o*.er the 
weekend to strike after two month.- of wage negotiations had failed, inco gs 
according to reports in Sunday edition; o: local newspapers. irucSus, 

The reports said that the strike was endorsed b> 5 '^ percent of the !mh£ 2 a 
shipyard's 8.300 union, members. SS^ B 

But union leadcis urged limited action, starung on Monday, before 
going into a full-scale sink* They are demanding a pay increase of more 
than 10 percent and improved working conditions. imsAm 


which has fought with the fund oyer u^g i 0 sell about 700 additional 
control of the more than 50 billion companies by the same method, 
koruny ($ 1.7 billion) raised from 
sales of state complies since the g Seeks Partner 

fall of Communism m l 989 . shareMders of lhc Czech oa- 

Two of Mr Jffidt s ma-chlir- ania CSA haw! v01ed l0 


BAe Reportedly Revives Taiwan Deal 


men also have been dismissed and a 
fourth top official of the fund re- 
cently was arrested on charges he 
misused confidential information. 

The Czech National Property 
Fund bolds shares in all state com- 
panies set to be sold and collects 
money from the sales, answering to 
a presidium whose members are 
appointed by parliament. 

“As the sales continue, the Nati- 
onal Property Fund is becoming a 
more and more important financial 
institution.” Mr. Jezek said. “You 
can sec the jealousy of the govern- 
ment. which has no right to take the 
money and use it as part of the state 
budget. " 


sell a stake in the company to a 
foreign partner, said Pavel Kafka, 
transport ministry chief of staff, 
according to a Reuters dispatch 
from Prague. 

“1 can’t say which foreign part- 
ner has an interest,” Mr. Kafka 
said, "it’s s trade secret.” 

In March. Air France sold its 
19.1 percent stake in CSA to the 
Czech state-owned Konsolidacni 
Banka, after the majority owner, 
the Czech government, demanded 
the shares back. Czech press re- 
ports said Delta .Airlines. United 
Airlines and Singapore .Airlines 
have shown interest. 


TAIPEI l Reuters j — Tui -an Aerospace Corp. and British Aerospace j£JJ£ 
PLC are trying io revive an ill-fated 5773 million deal to manufacture wjggjjf 
regional passenger jets, and Chi na is willing to join in. according to news JJJ““ f 
reports on Sunday. __ jnj** 

The newspaper China Times quoted unnamed sources saying that m«Fn 
Chairman Sun Tao-isun of Taiwan Aerospace was visiting London to 
discuss with British .Aerospace the possibility or a ’-emure by all three |^, 0 
parties. _ . . . . insiui" 

The paper also said that Mr. Sun aad earlier m May visited China s wwjw 
related aerospace officials and that dies' had been sirongh in favor of /ow*-. 

IriWw. 

joining the venture. 


_ 5310 & S’ s 6 - 

.60 A 6 7 T-- rt 

J 1 1.6 «IP‘ t ‘ 

*0 3.6 327 17 16 V > ***• ‘l* 

^ sCKlfcft I 5 ‘'J 15 & — 

40 ? % S 

- S j’ - 

“ 35 ? 26 % 2 J*: S«V— Vfa 

27 J'i i «'■: -»■« 

:.:ifiss 2 s 2 ,’* ». ->;■ 

_ 188325 V; 23 V. 2 ’* 

I 3 W 3 *i i*i — ** 

_. 891 J : . 3 ’i 3 'A 

113 8 '- S 8 — •* 

T6 B ft 7 ’. ?'1 — !i 

■■ 713 ? IS'., U'.i 14 ’ t —in 
'"low 18 ’-, 16 14 ’ J •;« 

_ ?J 1 JV. s : - » 

„ rso 2'. 1‘* “*'* I 

•** *■« T ^ -Z j 

- ,%s?" ’?{ 

~ 12 J 6 :ti 1 ft 2 W -% 

J 1530 6 b fr.'i, 6 ".’c —y~ l 
.. in 1 II I • *: 


KLLV. 

KTnjn 

Kcner -W 
KobRse 

Komon aa 
KccTWjn p* 355 
KMUtfcB 
Kcycno M 
KetyO-i 

teetyOirt _ 
KefvSAl .23 
KetySBs W 
Kernel 

Ken or -** 

K gnPWK ft 

Kenrcn pt 

K«nr j 

Knrdr»a 

KerrfEW 

Kyvaa 

Kwei 

Kwfc'n 
KewnSc 
kwpt a 
KtvTse** 
KBvTm 
KtrFn 1 JB 


I? 1 ® '' ^ J, WOifP 

3 si 2SBl 


nHL M'h ^ iim5 S5?» tfffc 32II14 riW| 

r ,0014% « 16 SUSS 




- saw a? w sgg, 
: ssr 

*«n 8 u 9 L ms sac* 


244 17 '«* 14 

- ^ess 

■s -3 L B Ji" g 


“ 3's-s.--£ sass„. 

j. -’.TSSrtS.f.’** 


SiuoRtn 

MHDPe 

MlneSf 

MinrNtS 

MlonEflU 

AMnntc 

iWUnunn* 


w _ nrrin.M wg 
-a nr', irw 'Z ^ -7 

- 1 * 14 3457 JO’t »i » -’ 


IBM -lie 


- Sf ia' |V?-, nw — % 

- «»’- Zi 31 -A 


: mys T T S 

~ ^ wi Miiekar 

10’A f«‘* MiJyWe 

1 —Vi MODtCS 


WGI PW 7 TlS Sta 4 % 4 % — 1 ^ VJDUjS 

.VSHVWVW lflC 4 2? r S *IT„ — Vu A 4 W 7 W 

iak.Sbm ■=«?» IB 6 , ir>'. -131 M0WW 


_ 127413 lift y * 1 V, Law 


■ 5-r 5 x3 sv 8 ^ «r r -3 

14 *43 s 4i« -j* 555225 


. “ !S'3Vi a 3% - V, 

— |' B a/M. 77 25 % 7 '>Wt 

J7 . , - 9 frt£n- 

■ a 7 ati “ 2 *fc —ft 

■“ “ w-wjrvjft^ 

#11 ipv? —ft 
n u » lift lift- •»«*.—■ % 
NI 5 D 14 IS 4 ' 1 SK : ’A 
’ 2 ® _ 1 (W 17 ISft-» 

_ 1097 4 * •-•*%} 7 >» 
1 JK 17 42 ZJVS 28 -ft 

_ a*M» »ft wa. -v* 

” S? 7 W 7 ft Zft -.’1 


-ft 


16 « ^ .r a T s 

- ,SS 5 ^ ^ ^ -ft 


Morftce. 

Mchw*s 

AtotecDv 


*J m 7 ft 7 ft Ml 

s » 


- w IS 5:-? S MRveSi 

_ 391 J'- 3 ft -** iMRVwr 


I 1283 7 4 ». 7 - AfiSCOTT 

K^Fn" 1 JS 4 J lBCMdi 2 *ft »% *1 JUrc©* 

& 'm a jssi ‘i S'’ -? ss“ 

.« at* ft at B -5 Sl^ 
^ - ,ai - 

l^v 66 3 L 5 Wflpft H >w» 

bSSc ” 9514 ft M 1 « -*■ jSSSEl 


O’* ?ft —ft I Knwiw 


iriStSr 

ifaS.s 

in:;v<s: 

■n:d 

Inici*’ i 
InrS- 
Iritir v»i 9 
InilSraS 


Spiege! Sees Snag is Media Venture ggsi 

HAMBURG (Reuter.) — GencunyV Federal Cartel Office believes £&■', 
the planned joini venture between Benelsmann AG. Deutsche Bunde- 
spost Telekom and Leo Kirch, the Bavarian media mogul, contravenes 
competition nil**, according to a rep.:-rt to be published on Monday in 

the news magazine Spiegci. , 

It noted, however, that the office is not officially handling we merger ini^r^m 
since the comcanies have not vet applied to it for approval. ISi’Shi. 


288 r ft tft IV. 

_ 3359 W 123 23 - :- 2 ft 

. 2545 18 ft jS 8^ - Ai 

_ i» ib ir« t7M 

. 313 7 '.i 6ft 6ft — ■- 

.OS 1.9 no 2 ft 7ft 7ft .- 
14 1.3 1504 lift 1 * —ft 
1335 14 ’*: 14 ft 14 ft - 
I; W 5 35 ’ . 34 34 H -’. 

_ <J1? lift ICP* lift -1 

„ 772 117 . ID’. ID-i 

M] 1 24 ft ? ?ft — 5 ft 
: 778 7 ‘. 4 ft 4 ft -ft 
1 £B 2 ??' i 19 ' j 31 'j - ' -1 
I WUftl’ft lift - 
3126 3 *.» 2 J . -1 

14 11946 J 063 58 ftS 9 *»«— T h 

. .13643 15 '.* ' 3 ft I 4 »» 


; KrrtrLwi 
KndrLr 

I KioP-'ic 

1 Kbnae 
Kinress 
KlrscM 
Knepev 


| Koaki 
KalUWS 
KolIRE 
KoURIp! 

I homag 
Kawn 
1 V.C4S 

! Krone* 

I Kruo 
Krvstm 
! Ku^cKe 

: Kurzrwil 
■ KianL*. 

1 KojhLCWt 


4528 n, s ft Vd —Va MoomP 

_ 175 v u 3 b V|» —h McflQoS? 

' 14337 23 1 * 50 Vi — ZV j MaoGp 

~ ngf IM 14 >S 14 —VS AtaOTtSlS 

I 457 14 VS 13 ft 13 «/i. — V- WcriBx 

: TZ 717 14 ft -v* Mama 

17l 4 J 241 4 V» Sft 3 ft — V'u MOiriSlCB 

_ 253 34 Vi 14 14 _ MdoM 


* vssg 

54 £&&&&£ Sr 
I « iH&ssa^ SSL 

- fMV., ^ j --Vi u tenaySt 
“ 5 W 91214 9>3 10 %— tft WinM 

~ SSS-IVft 10 ft lift 

^ 1321 4 3 H g? YT°‘^l I 

7S9 4 tVk 51 U —*u MooraHd 

- .1809 9 * " ^ 

45 W 30 VS 3 29 — , ft 

17 5 25 l 9 W IB W 4 Atoscwn 


Z 325384 ’* » 23 ft - 1 ft 
-1518 BVu 7 1 ! 7 '.* .-ft 

ff-SISStg 3 ^-f* 

.j msysti as. ssft— 


- . StHi iwt m.-i, 

z.m st 5^. 

^ U6 3 ft- 2 • 2W 

7 rv w ?^..*w. 
; is r s * • « — y-. 

_ 1 S 9 S W 9 Oft —ft 

16 .9 aaswft *Md 15ft 

3 Jt U 157517 ft I? « 2 * - 

_ Va P.i 4ft 4ft — H 
_ 2 «» 1 » I]-, -srft— TV* 
Z nB M ; 14 -!-_•■ 

2 5 0 ft ' 4 ft. 4 ft :— ft 

ju» a n aw vh 7 w . 
jl ii 1321 ^4 -» -Hg' 

04 i'KB'IM 7 ft 7 ft —ft 


■'k |Main 5 lCB 
_ Motelw 


“ 5044 IS 14 Uft -ft MflBon 
_ 1425 i Jft 2 ft— I Mi M on t r n 

_ 11532 1 ft IMr l*'r — 7 a McntAJt 
_ 1437 ft ft - v = Manugw 

Maoirto 


r 4 ft Jft -ft MuggP.-W W 

“ 3378 9 no 9 ft— 1 ft WUgar 


" 1153 3 '.- 2 ft 
_ St; Mi. i ft I ft - ft 

.12 I i 41394 2V. l-r-i lVft— 3;. 
_ TSi 10 ?'■- 9 *i — s 


JO 2.1 251 IS lSft 14 '*. 

.. 5736 4 *« « V'l -ft 

)3 1.8 4£B 10ft 9'; 10 — * 

_ 1 W 9 M 5 -* ?'• - 

77 IS 140 72 ft 21 ' 1 71 ft — 1 
2.0 3 ?;£ 13 'a : 2 > ir *— r» 


113 ' ]-l 3 ft Sit -'■* 

810 7 1.1 T. 


service company caned Media .’service umm. ine l(llr , ;c ,, 

that the cartel office believed Telekom, the state telephone monopoly. [£££? 
would have an even stronger market position because of the joint venture. [£[££, 

,rilG>l* 


.. 910 7 4 4 7 

j’ 6 ? 9 '* ®ft - '•« 

. S-JSI’i 43 iift — 

_ 2 e«<, 2 S --4 13 ft a=ft — ' • 

. 2354 6 ft S ! 4;* 

. 4 C 3 6 aft £= -.* 

_ yi'i 144. U’j ir- - *= 

... «K I 4 7*4 ’*< - 

16 3 3 344 I t 4 -. 4 -. — * 

.. IZi N ft ; - a 

. 243 S :*| J ft 2 ft — 1 » 

.. 2363 71': lift 2 J '■ 


I LA T Sot 

■ LCllntl - 

1 LCIlrrtO* - ’JS 43 
LCS -10 
LDOSa . - 

D* CP *<6 3 .Q 
1 LrSdCP — 

. L 5 SNC* £ 23 
• LS-:ne xs £ 

I L-i?lMS - 7 'e 2 J 

: LsJoUfft - 

' LoJolPwKt _ 

' *.cZresc ^ — 

' Lm -B. 7 i 14 

1 — 

. UcoflFf 1 ! 1 J 
. LsovLuek 


" ItcJi ' X'i 39^6 * 9 i MorDrt 

w 43 £VP* 29 29 'ft -1^ MerinerH 

16 1 J 22 4 ft 4 ’/J 6’5 —ft MnCflp 

29679 IBVj 16 ft T 7 ft — % MkTwrtS 

.16 3.0 3 ) 5 ’-. ! S’* -ft MSMet 

llUlP^ 15 1 S*A -ft Mlar^S 

Z2 23 l 7 20 >8 18 —1ft Alo«»l 

XS 5 84311 W 70 —Vs McmS 

_ 6476 3 ft 2 2 — Mcrum 

71 « 2 J 37631 ft 32 -.'! 30 ft — ft ftft-shSB 
_ «!lft 11 11 —ft MnhSU 

_ 7Si5 S*“ PS 5V* Mcrvlift 

_ 406 Q jv. 5 « -£ -'-'a wionhFn 


I MoTBFn 

wvorcnm 

M 0 BC 4 G 

5 ft - 1 ft Marie* 


“ 719 23 ft 20 W 21 
U 337 9 ,. 8 ft 9 


1 ijg« e 

SS IS _ m««wyiLVs..t> 


27 ia 954 * 9 ft 
14 B 317 IS 
3 ftiJW 38 . 33 ft *3 


_ 1S47 10ft Itr* 10ft —ft IMWgar 

_ 1007 5ft 4ft —Vt {W ulSvq * 

I 316 9 8ft 

_. 3279 5 ft 8 ft S —ft | ***** 


~* 327» svk 4ft 5 —ft Mylex 

_ raaozift 20M1 Tov, —2ft r- T. 

i 0 17 143 M'i IS 5 * TJJ»' * I — 

.96 3J l»29ft 29ft W* -ft N-V»OW 

_. 31 S 40 39 V* a -ft NAB AM 

J» IS ** fS j TS * 

«. 3 B 9 Ti\* 1 JJ* /_ ^ MAI Tc»- 


Z 9SS » « 4ft. -ft 


_ 98716 ft 1 P% T 5 ft —» WfiC ' 32 i 2 xDOMft 5 Bft 8 «t *■» 

_ 238212 ft 10 ft 10 s * —ft NBTBep 46 b if 388 MVt 159 v 15 W — 

LB 177 9 ft 9 9 ft -ft rSaMi „ 569 18 W., H -—ft 


N-WoM • . „ 8C3 » Jft «• —ft 

MAB AM 13 Be 30 JJ 140 S* 5 - •■ 5 * *. 

NAcrai : j* i AffiSft SO. . 31 ■ *ft 
N«TCr sar& * 1830 M 4 » A *— 4 VT 6 V, 
NBSC S 2 5 x 5 DWft -ft 


,J 1 14 ’i ’- 3 ft 13 A 
SS 21 ’- 29 ft 21 


505 lift 15 ft > 4 ft - ft , wtartCoi 
27 ? f. 8 . f —ft MflFdBC 


6 V. 6 ^ -1 ! 


u u 177 9 ft 9 " mo ncji 

14 u £ 7 10ft 10 low *ft 
M M 9069 22 SI* * 21 ** -«? NEC 

_ 339 9 ft 9 9 — *u NFORss 

_ 41410 7 ’* 9 *. - ftiFS 

_ 1219 . 17 ft 19 - NMR 

_ 197 9 ft BV: 9 ft -1 NN acll 

42 13 IS 29 ft 28 % —ft NPSPftn 


, 10 e 616523 17 ft iSVi 16 ft — ft ] NS 


NMR 
MV BOB 
NPSPtttn 


„ 910 2 ft Ift 

Me B 25961 5 Ǥ. 85 Sv* 3 ft 

„ - 2446 l 3 * ..'UVk. IS ■ *rift 
a 7A - 2 M 30 >*» , 38 ^ 

■ -,-mi 

■_ .-ora i 7 ft is vi 17*1, .ft 

_ 693 6 5 ft 5 ft —ft 

32 uoxiraw* meant' -it 


Ob Emergy~Indmtry r Parts 


Congo Joins FrivalisaSon Trend 

BRAZZ.AV 1 LLE. Congo tRvyers' — Cong, is preparing nx *Uie- |j« 5 : a 
owned firms for a first v.jvo of privatization under the terms of a law ww,_ 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

MOSCOW — President Boris N. 
Yeltsin has taken a step to help the 
beleaguered oil and gas sector by 
abolishing a value-added tax on 
some imported equipment needed 
by the industry. 

Economics Minister Alexander 
N. Sbokhin said the presidential 
decree granted the tax exemption 
to companies carrying out con- 
tracts concluded before January 
1995. It also exempted equipment 
bought with credits from foreign 
governments or international lend- 
ing agenciea. 

Many oil producers complained 
that the 20 percent value-added tax 
and a special 3 percent tax to fund 
vital sectors of the economy had 
made the rehabiii union of wells un- 
profitable. Mr. Yeltsin's order of- 
fered significant exemptions from 


both taxes, which were levied on 
imports starting in January. 

“These benefits should stimulate 
investment and allow us to imple- 
ment those projects that are al- 
ready well advanced.” Mr. Shokhin 
said. The decree must still be ap- 
proved by ParliameoL 

In another move unveiled Satur- 
day. Mr. Shokhin said that Mr. 
Yeltsin had authorized three for- 
eign banks to join those already 
competing in the Russian market. 
One of them is Socicte Generate of 
France: the other two arc Dutch 
organizations but were cot named. 

Mr. Shokhin stressed that only 
banks based in countries affording 
reciprocal rights to Russian banks 
would be authorized to operate in 
Russia under the decree. 


adopted by parliament last i hursdjy. parliamentary sources said over the jntTwt 
weekend. wim»:a 

They said the companies i:- be on*. allied would include a petroleum JJgf 6 
production company, ar. oi ! refiner, the state electricity and water jUJj£ 3 i 
companies, the posL and telecommunications company and a rail and 

river transport company. 525 » ,= * 

Planning Minister Clement Mouamba told parliarrient the government j"-^, 
was negonaiing foreign credits to support the program and compensate in-^Br*. & 
workers who lost their jobs. 1 

J J lt..o‘r : 


ms«n"r . I re _. 


.. 9 * z-i J » -ft -: « 

. T 4 U 4 I”. -S ' -.-i 
:? 17 % *’*J 

.■ws 1 4 15 : •«'» - 1-1 

_ 534 B -. . a-» -ft 

_ 046 ^4 s% y. - » 

. ;ast i- # i ; . 

.. iu i', **i 9 — - . 

Oi la JT 7 4 — 3 .»*• 

.ir* 2K’: : a ■- . — • 

_ 1934 9 % 9 ■ 8 -* — 

_ 91 i : : J i-"= — 

_ if I Pi S - * 


Lsrce 

Lsno* 

LyiOair 

L.C.T ,KBC 

i^srSBr-C 

LtfT-jBI 

Lerffn 

>c.-=sr 


•55? S 

187 C IB 1 * IPi 17 ’ *— l=i 


2«S. Tb *ftl . 

_ 71710ft 9ft 9ft —ft Mamie 
_ 37010% 9 loft +ift No m ura 

_I76HI5>< 13%I5U->7<ft» No pen . 
_ 167413ft 12ft 13ft -ft NoShF 
_ »o fi’/j 5ft tfft -ft pmmmia 

_ 5651 5«ft 50% 52V, — J NBAIUt 

_ 7605 6 Sft 5ft —ft NMW 

49t S.3 373 9ft S% 9ft -ft NSCoPH 

_ 127311’/. ID 10 —ft NQVB 
_ 33 jot* r% jiHi —ft NOvfin 


_ H 7 H 7 <i 7 ft — ft • 


. 124 6 . 5 : 5 % -p -OK"S„ 
_ 3 i 5 '-o-. e ■■ : — * . -rfZZs- 


. ITMIJ'. •! *. It.. - 

JI 0 O;-. Oft -• 


I 279812 11 % 11 % - % j VM=»cmr 

_ 4951 21 "j 27 ft 2 ^%— 3 ft 

_ 4287 2 i ft 17 ft 19 ft— 1 ft , ££=«£»" 

_ 33 « 26 % 25 V. J 5 ft - V. I 
_ 3462 n* 6 7 % - 1 H gjg Wg; , 

_ 317 7 ft 7 7 ft 

u k, • _ ! Ma*vrtiSi 

yon 4ft J*-. 4 —ft f (Wcy®!j0 

- 10% r 9 — % MCVtlGrp 

" iSS 7 5 ft 5 ft —ft Mavnoi 

_. ’ssais'T i 6 % ir%— ift yje»tj 


Mamie - i -5* >3> 

Nmm - ISOtti.. J* Wi -ftc 

Naaea — .39 4-. Jh 4 r. jft 

rikKUP 32 43 1775 T® 17 17% _ 

s ^ 

MOnBcs AO ZjK 21423 % 22 ft 23 <i ^ 


„ w . 

_ a»:=-:". s’i ? i — . 

. 47 ssy. !■": 33 : — ■ 
Clc - 3417 2 ! 'W-- ? 7 : 

_ :w »5*. % f,‘— • 

xo ir 4 i». : 

, 0 e 16 „» »% 5 . S . — % 


■ lijIBcs -2<C 1 9 s: 13% 12ft 12% _ 1 McAftc 

• . B M rS/l 4% 4ft — V. ’6«cpft 

“ • 4 £ 2.1 eC 5 S% Sft 22 *% _ f AV^lil 


144 6ft 6ft 4ft —ft NOwyl - “Si SS'jHL 

329 8 ft 7 ft 7 ft —ft NHVCrw - TO BJ-IW IWV -ft 

4702 531 % 51 ft 52 ft - ft NTDwnHex - 27 W «■ JV» — fft 


Cable Oa>e2 , £tor& I Up in Britain 

si ...... . _ . 


:r 9 3874 :j .i :i% ir*i _ i McZor 
Zcy~a - tOU. i\. -ft MdHrri 

n=*- 7 Jr B 24 E% B B _ ■ McGrtS 

rgSp fcf ! _ 63592 .— * 25 % 27 t« - 2 ft | McMaRn 

Snr- _ 645 ’.6 iS 1 '. 1 S% — ft 4 V»rkRr 

Lecs*w=-, _ 260 II * 7 % 9ft —ft , MadTc 

tiST. _ 20 9 ft 9 V.* —ft MMImun 

. -tTf iS 157 9% «*l 1 — % MMOJt 

Ltfc-.' 4 -S - If 54 ' 3 % 12 ft 1 -ft —ft MeCnLsl 

-«CSPS» _ 1796 1 3 lift 12 ft -lft MeoAIBc 

js(r _ '7654 33 % 29 '.- 30 r— 1 ft j Meoapn 

U 6 > 6 Cf! _ 1 OT 4 5 ft 4 "l 4 /j —ft I M *07 


_ 329 0 % 7 ft 714 —ft WVC™ 

_ 34702 53ft 51ft 52ft - ft NIDgllW 

_ 539 13 lift 12 _ NofGVW. 

.48 13 575621ft MP-. 21 —ft NaJGVWt 


_ 297 5ft 4% TA -ft tNttHme 


Wireless PLC will combine their Bnti-h cable telenston joint venture i 
with Jones latercable Inc.'s British and Spanish telephone and cable , 
operations. They will then >cl! shires ir. the r.ew entity to the public. | p 
Under the transaction. Jc’iic/ J:acf Global Group L r .c. uni t will merge j 
its cable and tsiephoav ODerauon> in Britain and Spain with ihe new 
entity, to be called Bell Cablemedk PLC. the companies -aid Friday. | 

The agreement is cor: indent upon the successful completion of a I ££ 33 
public offering for the new company. .After Lhc offering, Bel! Canada will j*| il Pr 
own 42 percent of Bell Cablemedia. Jones U percent ar.d Cable & I 


L<s‘.*ssa* 6 ec aJ 


I Reuters, AFP) Wireless 13 percent. 


, INTERNATipNAL OI^A. 



SWHW’Vll 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


BOU 1 NC STONES-NEW YOBK 
WOMD CUP A 1 LCITQ 


AWeniicn visitors 
from the U.S. ! 


Tidal Extra] txaresd & Bonded 
fetTI 8 - 966 UI 0 I F 0 . 718 -W-I 533 US 


0 INTERDEAN 

(Hf(i*l4(raK6i «ov/*t 


*WOKD CUP TICKETS* 

I All games ovatabk. Tel: [ 310 } 277 - 47 B?; 
I fo: ( 3 I<?| 277 552 ? USA 


FOB A rPe BTlfAATE CAli 

PARIS 11] 39201400 


Fodnp Hart CONCORDE LASATHTc 
Luvwiow 1 ryXK. P/dw 
No eg ^ 7 -- 1 — . ro.“M. 

In* i rv-jriji y rtK i 
- 5 . Eld ‘jcv.'jo ft rsi, 1 7 rK 

T<H fl. *3 59 oS SI 


ALTO RENTALS 


23 *T f'TOM Dei© AUTO 
“ 5’ 5 

SreCW. OFFS 7 C-AY 3 - rr 10 CC 

PARIS TeU (1) 45 87 37 M 



,?=3S 


ALCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS Ewfah j 
ipeaWitg meenres dad*, ’et PaRS|i 
QJ 46 14 !9 5 . ROME 678 CcM.i 1 
JWWaST 5 ° 747 , 5 . 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CAFiTAli o MRHRS 

Horviade-j ejdf- ops.-Btf.iiv 
c 3 teev 'Jtc cod vib.-rtr.. 

t«i i- 4 a :4 scr. =ox 1-47723096 


LEGAL SERVICES 


JC~"C— 

. jcmesrin 

1 jo-^yrs. 

! ..Jc-.Jcc 

■ jecnP-r 
1 JeHrCe 

■ JefB:r 

1 „<ePS. L- 
, JettW a 
; JetSm.-* 
jen*Cv 
JetFrrn S 
I jmor 
JWA 

I JohnsinA 
( JonmZ. 

I jernKtf. 

| Jone-iA 

I JsnesM 

< JOSBar* 

I jasivn 

ju-ol: 

1 -VsSFFecr 
I JuiiTi.s 
1 Jtii'm 


L**=ne 
L-eCH 
L* 7 — rS 

‘.■Bet: 


.. .-7; 6% 5ft 6% • LftW 

_ •; ■: ,1 . % • Lftcn 

12: i ~ i — % L't— t l 

ST !• %-■ 1-. - • i-'-Wl 

_ ^ 4 % :% «'i — % 

':e 1.6 k; 7'1 r, _ • .-: ~3 r = 

_ 233 2 : 2 1 7 ft r' 2 riT' 

J 1" t "i -ft 

. 973 '.%. i 2 • ii% -% rli-U 

m i.z :t% a% 

1:3 »ft >•. » . 

. > 4 ? 17 ft 17 ,-r?- ■ 

i4 . % . —ft w -5iia» 

. ;«ii r »•'. -% r£? * 

:wi: 7% 9% -■% o-, 

. 3?c? >% . ;i. - . r ?— 

. Xt 9 23 % Uft 72 % •». ■ lii.r — 1 

nun- . :2 re, •% rr 

rr » -2 ?»\ r , rpStp 

» 1 J% 13 '-. 13 ft ! KriS. 

- ciju>. ia . 13ft — 1. : £££? 

“ % ‘ V, H - ’ : ^uBr- 

1 .K 4 .J 17 ft 2 S ' S 4 % 11 _ ^ 511^4 

25 I 5.T.J !»■; ’5': l» -ft tSSS 
’31* ; r '- :* »tj'i , - : i 

, . . ,v V* A'.* - ' To-zOv- 


»4*3 4ft 41* 4H - I 
541 9 % 0 ft 8 ft —Vs 
336 4 ft 4 V-, 4 % .ft 
32 12 lift 12 -ft! 


AAewmo 

.VtofTftt 

A8MTB01 

MrtSh 

MetficSS 

MeencwtB 

MMlcfttC 

MWtal* 


L V--S 2t :.3 »6’D 15 


_ 36 T ‘3 lift 12 - ft ! C-ftOjCV* 

. It 3 ! 2 % lift 12 % -ft: 5 SH 2 ? 


M 2.7 9217ft 16ft UH —ft MHHB 

_ 2017 6ft 5ft 3ft —ft Nlflnaa 

_ 4231 2 1ft 1ft - NOTH* 

_ w ift ift ift —ft NMfterc 

_ 3920 10’c 8ft 9ft »1«I Iflftpn . 

_ 934 7ft 6ft 7ft -ft IS”?. 

_ 537 14ft 13% 13ft —ft Nt^a A 

„ 454 2ft 2ft 2ft _ MPzoB 

„ 7457 33ft 30V* 33ft ^3ft NS«V 

_. 60913ft 11 5 —ft NttfR«al 

_ 542 5ft 4ft 5ft t’A NfSanD 

507 ift 1ft ift *Vk NTsam 

.16 1 3 17613ft 12ft 13ft —ft MTnai 

1.08 3.1 X58J IS 34ft 35 - NaTVten 

„ 38078 6ft 4ft 6 +lft N1WVWJ 

_ 242 1616 15 16ft _ Nlwda 

.. 492 2V„ TA *b Nc«6«er 

.. 119 Jft 4ft 4«£ -V* NtfWr*rtr 

.. 9ft Vi _ NaturFd 

_ 333 2*n 1ft 1’lft -Vi, NatrBT* 

_ 252 4ft 4V1 4ft —ft NatrSwn 

_ 321 7*4 6ft 6ft —ft NovDcns 

_ 347 <Vn ft Vi - MOVCTY6 

- 306 3ft, 2ft 3 - NowOg 

_ 966 Sft a ft aft —ft Noucor 

M 13 7042244 22 22 —ft NehnT 

_ 216* 'li S» iv k _ Neontl 

= “s si sg z .« 

_ 294 17 16ft 17 -ft Noes m 

_ 1964 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft Nattroi'ne 


_ 14357 36ft 35ft 3S». —ft 
■ _ 1QBZ2 - WM 20ft, —ft 

260 Eft 7ft 

_ 37 2ft 2V9.JHI tft 

J7r xi • 28 Wft i» . na 

J2 4J 102 E TV* 7ft. 

„ 601 4^>. * -4 . — 

M 2J -2173T-3S1MK— 1ft 
69 Bft > Sft -M 

445 6ft M « 

_ 5S7 6<6 5ft 5ft -Ji 

* pill 9ft 9ft 

„ 3293 4ft Ift m — V4 

34 2J> 6 Wft 32ft -12ft ; _ 


34 2J) tm Wft isft ; - 
_ 289S6rir« 6ft 6ft . *.«w 
B4e 17 IK 2ft 2ft 2ft .—ft 
_ 1»7 nt. 6ft rt?. —ft 
_ 14939 »*%r 

_ 2718 13V1 12ft. 13ft -ft 
_ 41510ft 9ft WTA-: - 

„ B7B a’6 ' 5 5ft —ft 
_ 189 7 6ft 7 ift 
_ 117334 iy« 7 - J**.— 5r% 
JO 1J 48315 Oft 1 jVr —ft 
. - BM22HS Mft lift -ft 
_ 66 4ft VS 4ft -ft 

_ 51219M 17ft 18ft —ft 
— M31 27ft 27 . 27 Ul * w 
.16 A Z322lft 20ft 2Cft «. 
_ 3156 3ft 3ft T61 « 

_ 4H-M Sft 5ft - 
- W Ift Ift. 1ft- - 
m. 4 34 . 36 M -ft 


.. 493 ciS’.i!B‘-iH 9 '* -'^l/wedstaf 


„ 25511ft 10ft lift -.ft Notmna* 


^.n«5B ■ AC 13 I6S53 50 

a: rs 55513 14ft 15 


-istt-o* 1 94 ’U 


_ 64952244 23 r'A —ft ) MPScm 

:« 372 is a- as ip 

Js T 5 5 i/% 'ft”-.. 

32 : S 230 7' 4 6% 7*., -ft AMlom. 

.. 61 32 31ft 31' , -ft ; MoUonP 

3i J122I2 4Bft Oft 45ft— 2>> MeriWW 
. 2*38 6ft 5ft 5ft _ I AMmiee 


2074 15ft 14ft 14Va —ft 
_ 103 1ft 1 1ft *ft , 

„ *92 5ft 5 5 —ft 

_ 14392 * 7 7ft — 1 

_ 2441 IBft 16% 17 —1 
- 710 4% 3ft 4ft -'A 


_ **»10Wi 9ft 1C —ft 

- 6902 17 OW 14 V* — nv 

- 1463 5ft 4ft 5ft -ft 
„ 1785 5 4ft «ft *1% 

- SWT Mft «ft T7ft -ft 
-.'3150 8ft Pi — >■, 

- in 6 5ft S>M -V* 


NwfcUnpt US 9.1 274 UMi ' 21 ft . 22 

MhwkSlx „ 155716 ft 15 % IS 


->C- Ezt 
L l~=- 
— 

- L'Sxm 
! ujw- 
LcjcA 
• Loo-.A 
; LcsbEtt 


94 ’IJ 196 17ft 17*4 17ft _ 1 (W^llerJ 

-. 3CC° 8'.*i res 7ft -ft I WftflWn 

AX. 1J 273 34 31 34 Manrqr 

58 .6 126 13". ir-s I3V, AtoWS *■ ... 

_. 25* 23 22% 22'i'j, — n MreSk* M 24 

-. 1306 6ft 6V« 6ft -ft M^cer 

Z 10545 8ft 7ft Tft Ift MrchBcn .17 ■ 1 
r m 12 11% lift -ft MtrBkNY 1 JO 11 
_ 2035 12ft 10ft 12ft -Ift OGn JO U 
06 _ 3CH7 24% Oft 74 - ft Mmint _ 

_ 238 9ft Bft 9ft - ft MrdlBc 1 J6 4.2 


j 03 « .3 511 % 10 ft lift ‘ft 

113 1 ft 1 1 ft -ft 


313 1ft l 1ft -ft 

_. 1980 29 27ft 27ft —ft 

... 1471 14ft 13 13ft -ft 

...10767 II 10 10ft —ft. 


a 

Nwkunp* : 

minu 111 

KSSSc 


„ 155716ft tS.i 15ft —ft 
3791 6ft 6ft ' 6V5 —ft 

- 127212ft 9ft II —1 

- 454 3ft 3ft —ft 
_ ' li'A 6 (ft 

_ 4856 9 Tft eft —ft, 

37 \A 1045 30*4 Ift 19ft —ft 

- 441 7% 4ft 6ft -ft 


JOT- JO Mft -ft NE Bin JO 43 762 1W*. »• .. IT4 —ft 

9 9ft -> NHmpTh 35 S3 78 9ft ?ft *ft, — *, 


a wihr: 


= WE R m&'il ti ,0 fol^r -is 

1 7 -‘76 8% 'ft 7^ r Ateraira J4U 23 34 Iff* 10% JO’* -ft 

. 750 11% 13ft 13-v.. M«rpr83 _ 23 4 3V. 3% -1 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


If you enjoy reading the IHT 
when you travel, why nol 
also ger if at home ? 
Same-day delivery available 
in key U.S. cities. 


WORLD CUP FINALS, Sam's. 
2d Place. 4 w. a sa*na 10 raw; 
from field, 15 meten Frm ce*>l«. Fq* 
bot offen; USA (6191 W9-Q1Q4 
WORLD CUP USA. 5 Firtf dm nclu* 
for ihe gomes 0# Orianda F® Pars: 
(33-11 39 39 85 23 


NBJItiY - SAINT-JAMS. Top fleet. 

»er/ OlMl, surrowded ««ifli )■«, TOP 
[ QUAUTY 250 «vm aPAZIMENT. 
I Bafcoma -r 200 sqJii. lenace with 

360" VIEW. 3 b«*ooms. 2 barfiroamj. 


sts, ..'arc.?. ;s. '/.ww jcm 
^ mr=:rrsc:. ill; 7 Ltrx;.>ec. ixk- 
ron ~xr, r'-ff: 1 — 7. :• bed'Kmi. 2 
bed* oo^a. I trie /«:be«t r*rc sror. 
age focm i rrid'; ram r! 1 0C0 f 
■Gorges 7ef. nr »a)v C71 2 fW 1 21* 


DT/OKS FAST. tSSSX PC. 2c * 

#0. A-.J-.**-. Za C: ea* * Sw.si 
f:-'l U 3 - I 


. 750 11% 13ft IT'-'., : MarPt83 

i=e” snr, OT1 ; -i ; wrisL 

...:*W1J1% 179 . 75:,— 3% ] W«r<vl 
.- 4C«4 7V| 4% 7% _ i.. M*r*«M 
_ 14:40 lift 14% 15- ■: -ft MeriKCo 
..3787 13 10 Iff-,— 1> % ’ McniCO 

• . .-to: : :• % :j„ ic* 1 •:• , ' oat 


_. 4671 4ft 3ft 4ft -ft 
-.114888 17ft a 10 -7ft 

= 3 1 s r- ^ -ft 


5 KS£T 

NcwQJr 

NwpkRs 


2 padufXfl 2 edars. U toque deaoi. N3JR1Y, PORTS MAiltOT, ve- 
Tet P) 46 37 28 27 a fit 46 24 61 77 g*r. f*gh dev. jtc :Tqo>. 2£j 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


lisssfr Week’s Markets 


All Pavers crrusxf close s* trst.-v Fr : • 


ALL TICKETS AVAUAKt 
World Cwp. WMMm a- 7V«re. 
Td 44 71 4B0 6163 Fq. 71 733 3?03 


TROCAD6K3 hrf< dotv 34 am Ucdo ^ ‘M-- ^"*5- 4 ! 

* botany. Iritaen. bo*. FI . 080 , 000 . ^ r ^ T3 - J . Moiercortjrg. . 


139 ctoe*. 47T5AC heme 


Cati ( 1 ) SCO 882 2884 

[in NowYa* aB 212 752 33901 


WORLD CUP TICKETS Suy/Seil 
AH ganes. AB ones. Td: 310-207-7070 
Fa* 31M2M002 USA. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


BcraibrfB&:©ribunf. 


MOYING 



AGBKE CHAMPS ELYSSES 


Sfeddta tn fumafied coarrmem, 
rwdenrid we®. 3 montfe nd marCs 


becffooiTj. j CaiM. corfura . A I 

F2SJC0 + Tel i-TTl OTAL } 
C0NVMXK, 75 n . j* floor. < Ne* lori 
mooem 4 .tflnr L.ing :oan. 3 bed- London 
nans, i tab. tags Ljtdien. ^o.^CO 6450mi 
- dioraa.Te!l-r; 3 a 4 34 I - 
LATIN QUARTS, T-rootr fta in !o»r 

heuw emraice. . sunn/. 

■new, hwana Qy«per Td 1 ^ 0:46569 
C 9 OTRAL PJRNISHaJ APARTf® 4 TJ 
Ptptptj: dottl Anenccn siutidu 1 dv. 

BEST NEST Tel •« r® 33-U2 50 96 22. 

VICTOR HUGO, elegcm. 3rd Boor. 110 


ACC5SYCYAGE3 i 

Orro Wey Pound Trip ■ United 51g 
Ner. iori 71995 ] DJ Indvs. 

latdon r&O F 7 KJ Oj util, 

i 43 0 metre d«n-r-nj yevnd xrid QJ Tron . 

OTi 40 ofrerefi: x'leduW erners. . p lfw 

fesfr.cSo-j -nev epeh 5 “ Z ™ 

Td: I-4fl.l3.0103 i 1-4121.4*.94 S i P 500 


; Stock Indosos 

! united Slat® June !Q 
! DJ Indus. 3.793.45 


Money Rates 


F*x: MS 08 83 35 
MmM: 3615 ACCESSVOYAGG 
*,n» Piart* Utu), 75001 Pmi 
Moko - SR OishM Ira Hdtai 

JU. 1.75.1 11).. and ata 


“SUMMER 
N FRANCE” 


Sfiedd Hearing fa 
Holiday Kenab 



Tel: (1] 42 25 32 25 

fra 111 45 63 37 09 


g.m, lima dirtmc, 2 bedroom. 
FI 2X00 + eferaev. Te» U723 tU34. 


PARIS AREA UNFURNTSHED 


ACCE5S IN LYONS 
. Td: (16) 78 63 67 77 
Bo«k now by phon# witti cmdil card 


AT HOME IN PARIS 


PARIS PROMO 

_ apartments to W tumd>ed or nol 
mb A ftaperry Maragamenr Services 
25 Ay Hodw 75008 ?®!! Fox M 5(.1 1020 


Friday, June 17th 


Teh (1)45 63 25 60 


For more information end to place your 
odwrtBeinenf, (Arm contact 


I.H.T. in Paris 
TeJ: (1)46 37 93 85 or 
Fax: {33-1 1 46 379370 



GROSPIRON 


Embassy Service 

YOUR 8EA1 E5TA7E 
AG&fi IN PARIS 
Tel: (1) 47.20.30.05 


tVOTJDVWK Speed departure a» the 
wwut ever oncxnt: economy arfare. 

OetSt cadi pcwUe. Tet Para f)| 42 
89 ID 81 Fa> <2 56 25 62 


SAP Ind 
NYSE Co 
Britain 
FTSE 100 
FT 30 
Japan 
NlMcrl 225 
Carmenr 
DAX 

Hooi Kona 
Hang Sang 


June 3 OiYt 
ZJ 7 Z 32 - 0 X 3 ft 
1 B 7 X 6 — OJOft 

IjqT&aI — QZ 3 s c 

42 Ai — Oolft 
440.12 — CJ 2 ft 
53573 —062 ft 
2504 —059 ft 


United Statna 
C ; scount rote 
Prime rate 
C eceral tunas rate 
Japan 


1997 JO -ri. 94 ft 
1379 X 0 +U 7 ft 


20.954. + 110 ft 


114839 — 0 . 71 ft 


9 J 3417 —133 ft 


Discount 
Cell money 
3-montfi Interbank 
Cnrmawy 
Lombard 

Coll money 

S-montn interbank 
Brltrtn 

Bank base role 
Cali money 
3-monttt Interbank 


June IQ June3 


SOESJIH) daily fightj; la, buanms. 

economy at lowsr roros. ato Ddor 
_spead. Tel IFT Paris ( 1 ) 47 55 13 13 . 


I MesaAr 
. MmCo-t 

w-ewtee 
I Mettian* 
i MethdB 
i r/ettidA 
Mnrrcm 
Metrocall 
AwrroBcp 
Metratm 
WiamSD 
VtOlIF 
AtenS*r 
Mkmt=n 
Mlcnwt 
■'JiicomC 

MCT Inc 

MlcFocu 

MicroHlt 

MlcWors 

Mta-Ao s 

MicroPro 

AAKProwt 

MtoctlDS 

Mlarc 

Micrdy 

MIcrRck 

Microflu 

Mi&Btx 

Mierotrtf® 

Micro la 

Mcmta 

Mtooti 

A/U oos 

MjcSem 

Mlcsfls 

Mtonak 

Mlertost 

MlctcnSv 

MWOai 


... 49 2ft 2% 2ft —ft 


ass?" 


_ 258 12ft 13% 12ft -v, 

.. 13539 13ft 12ft 12 ft -ft 
.05 J 5017 16 17 -ft 

JM A 7939 15ft 14ft 15% - ft 
... 4313 14ft 16 16ft — 2% 
-. iS4 13** 1 3ft 17ft 
.. 9314% 1M 14% 

I 18W2H 2Vy 2ft I 

■» “ifisasar-sn 

1.« 33 1331 27 31 *2ft 

100 ^ ware a* *- 
i- s’a. r* is. zz 

^ 2534 30 18 18ft —ft 

- 3ft 3ft -ft 

976826ft 23 24’.<-— 1ft 

_ 35245 25% 20ft 21ft— 2ft 

i s? r-' r - v * 

- 31ft 32ft— 2ft 


-47 9ft #• » . , - 
.. - 13824 T3% ID-rtr lOftLJl^ 
- - 5WT7ftTMAT6ft 
_ 128 4ft 4ft FA —ft 

-,15379 12ft 'Tft lift -ft 

_ 675 lOft Tft TO’* —ft 

-154348 «% 37ft 38ft— Ift 
3Q 13 S771OT4 70ft 131* _ 

- 2298 16 IS 16 

■IN A 772 6ft 5»i 6ft -ft 

- 451 6ft 6ft 69 k —*•*!, 

-2691937ft 34 3Jft— Ift 

- TO lift 10ft 70ft — H 

J15a A 511 6ft ■ 8 —ft 

STtVl3 41311 *ft *ft — *4 

- 7387 7ft 7 T —ft 

2JU 5J 151941 39% 40ft - 

- 610 7ft 6ft 7ft -ft 

_. 16688 1ft 1ft VA, — V", 

34 13 419ft 18ft 19ft -ft 

AS BJ) x61 6 SVa 6 *W 


I 18 

* "l 8 
1.« 12 . 


. . — . 4662 36 33% 34ft— Ift 

NordSB M 1j 0 124656ft 5S 56ft -tft 

NnrUsl A0 J92321744’* 40% 42ft— 1ft 

Noraon - 1*10 1* io irn *i% 

NABIO - 4714 631, 6ft 6ft *Wr 

NAWDtch Jfle 3 16912ft IJ 12ft -ft 

NoBncsha - 4S2 12% lift 12ft -V« 

NoSdoSv ^OblA 1459 23ft 22ft 22ft— 1ft 


- 969 6 
2.1x2774 43 


5ft 5ft —ft 
41ft «2» *9, 


NorTltot 3.13 55 231 56Vi 5*ft S6U ■ - 


5V,, 5ft -ft 


303 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

- 3015 5% 5 SV. -ft 

- 727 5ft 5 S’/,, — Vu 

.. 1856 7 ift 6ft —ft 

- 2B3 7ft 7ft 7ft *ft 

- 322 l*i, 1 lVi, —ft 

- 1723 5 4ft 4ft —ft 

_ 10073 6% 5ft 5ft —1ft, 
_ 1015 37 25 25ft— 1ft 

- 1401 5% 5ft 5ft tft 
-792246 54ft sift 52ft, — v„ 

- 165 6 ft 5ft 6 +ft 

_. 610514 13 13ft —ft 

- 1947 22ft 20ft 22V, 

- 563729ft 27ft 27ft— Ift 


NtMWLb 

NoridCr 

Nihrlm* 

NihstCF 

Ntftstr*B 

NwstAIrl 

Nwstib 

NwNG 

NwSrSrr 

NonMc 

NarwFn 

Norwood 

Novmbc 

Nova# 

Novlu* 

Woven 

Novtrm 

Nowsca 

NuHrzs 

NuWIno- 


- SS3 7ft 6ft 6ft —ft 

28 1 A 1281 Mft T7 17 ft —ft 

- 100 7ft 7 7 —ft 

.11 13 MJWb 7ft 7?-, *W, 

... 51S 7ft 6ft 7ft 

„ -1177614ft 13ft 14 — V». 

JO 23 83 U 17ft 1* —ft 

136 33 905 31ft 30 30ft —15 

- W 5 41* 4Vi —ft 


1 36 33 TOJlft 30 30ft —ft 
2*9 5 4ft 4ft . —ft 

JSe 3 j 0 984 12 lift lift —ft 


- 8610ft 9ft 9ft -ft 

„ 903 4ft 4 4ft — *1 


- 106473 IBft l*ft 17ft -ft 
-2276T37W Jl 33ft— 2ft 
- 3009 14ft 13ft 14 - -H 


^ - 110 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

330 - 922 17ft I6W W*.3S 
- 8Z8 Bft 7ft «ft -ft 

74 4ft 3ft 3ft -ft 


61690 +050 ft London run. flxS 383U5 382.95 +055% [ wdAml n M »93714ft 14% 14ft _ 


(Continued on 


World Index Fnm Moncn Stanlet Capital Inn. 


HOLIDAY RENTALS 


The Inti movers 

Aroirt (he world 
careMy. sdtly 


YOUR NOME IN PARIS 


•nlh a frioirfly pasond touch l 
W Peril (33-1148 11 71 71 


INTER URBIS 

Luray rentds & sales 
31 n* de Moneeou, Pons 75008 



PARIS & SUBURBS 


Tel: (1)45 63 17 77 


--S. v- . .BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER; V . iiH, 




REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


lSIh. 1 BBKOOM RAT, tenow. (ft. 
nee furniture, quiet. JufyAua^Ky. 
% 950 /n» negohetia Td 


EZuSSSSBl!] 


SERVICED OFFICES 


Ided tar-avatdonce vehdu. 
lew profile, lot free & European. Svv 
able far tredinft consultancy & otHer 
aOwfies. Far imnw Jo^ service exxrort 


CONDON - BONO STREET. 
Your effico & cM service; 
TJ 44 71 499 "1*2 Fofc 71 409 7517 


pCI VIPCJALSBONG 

OURAC^ ep eri n ra ft HKJH OASS 

, ** H ‘Wjq.m. 5 room:, eqwpped 
.faygv * bdrrooms - mj»o room, 
1»9" floor, quiet, sunny, Lolccny or 
teircce, parbnq, 7th or 3th aiea 
Tol {1} 45 62 56 74 


VBtBia. BE) 8 BREAKFAST w pri- 
ras 5 -sttj resdmee, July 3 August. 
For data* el Paris ( 33 - 1 ) 45 51 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


EMPLOYMENT 


POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Sib Morphy, Undo, S arawi gu 
Cempiray Servicra. 56 te » Rw 
Sqatre, Dublin 2, lrakmd 


Teh +353 1 6613490 Feet 66)8493 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE COMPAMS 

* Free proferatnd conwltasora 

* WjrtAwfc nCDpOratiarB 

■ Imma iMte awiAty 

■ M ewifiitial services 


$AVE ON 
Internationa! 
Phone Calls 


I W GIISH WOTrffl? tenoue steerenes 
I ti-gend, reer'e-d "or rcm^xcr. and 
pwwcnwi poaiKrs. Ceil Scene, GR 
Interim. i»ars- ( 11 41 e l 83 1 1 


Scientific-Atlanta, Inc. 

.Innovative Products and Systems for. 


Satellite Communications 
Cable Television 

Test Instrumentation-Telecommunications, 
Microwave, Vibration 
Telemetry and Tracking 
Low Frequency Signal Analysis 
Energy Management 

Scientific- Atlanta, Inc. Sctelltif IC 

One Technology Parkway, South Atloriin. 

Norcross. GA 30092-2967 Mlfaiild 


ImlltaSSribunc 

i . . „ - ■ Hu i ■ — / 

LIVING IN THE U.S.? 
Now Printed in 
New TURK 
For Same day 
Delivery in key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1 - 800-882 2884 






ms 


(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-7525890) 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


. DO YOU A 70? KCSTARY 7 
l Cofi 5 ochn. -.-F hot in. °jt Td f|l 
i ■noi»:-n 1 


• Landctr represmedve 

* Full ot ta nigrai on sentas 


ASTON CORPORATE TRUST® LTD 
19. Peri Road, Dowlas, Ids of Mon 
Tsfc 0626 426591 fw 0624 6251% 



Ntxr you cot a£ Ihe 
US ana save es much as 
45 % ewnpored te local phn 
awipcnei v cofing cord etas. 
Q£ from ham. office or fiottfc 
old surthar^ei 
Awilabie n dl ccvnmes. 


SDLC'.T!ON.^L 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


j 9IGU5K TEAQSiS, Wrguol. vperv 
I £*«■ rjRsnm. tess? or nraaai 
I Incr-ftdg* 0<-re.r«d T e l : Cyfarie 
l longue - Pons fi) JlfiAia .26 


It's never 
been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 
Just call 
toll-free- 


0 800 2703 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 


MAILED FROM AMERICA 


Cdl now far n*es ad xe haw 
you con besyn sewag today. 


Lines Open 24 hours. 


FUNDS AVAKABIE 


HONG KONG CO. S520 Amri cast 
J4J0 58 lid 701. 35 Queen, U. C. 
Ht Teh B5MS0275 Fa» 8W-840CC17 


TOPIMCHASE 

* Letter: of Crerfl 
■ Sant Guraantws 

* CTher A cc rartb Collateral 

* Boded by Pm^e hvakn 

THRU MAJOR WIT BANKS 


Tel: 1/206-284-8600 
Free 1/206-282-6666 


CAPfTAL SUPPORT COUP. 

OS. (714) 757-107Q Fra 757-1270 


417 Serad Avenue W«i 
Searie, WA 981 1* USA 


BUSINESS TRAVEL 


1 mr— w 




r.i," -.j 


Internationa] 
Herald Tribune 
•ds work 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 


EUROPE 
HUNCEpQ|:>*a. " 


NORTH AMERICA 


TeL Ml 493793 65. 
fra. (I) 4b 37 9370. 


03MW. AUSIBA & QfllWU. 
EUBOft Franlaun. 

Td. 069 ) 72 57 55 . 

Foe f« 7 } 7717310 


PCWYOK 

Td J;i:|752 j 890. 
Tea«eei»(a 572-7311 
Tdac 427 l~S 
F«t (?i 21 755-8785 


ASIA/PAQflC 


SWlffiRLAhOtPufly. 
T«i. 1D31J73B 3021 


UW JJ73B502I 
for (021] 738 » 91 


UNITS KHGOOM; kn<Hn, 


7d.:«J7 11836 4«2 
TdecM2009 
Fm /Or 11240 2254 


HONGKONG: 

Td^ ( 852 ] V 222-1 108 
T«fec ol 170 Him, 
Tra. (857)9323 1 19a 
SWGAPORL- 
Td. 223 M 78 . 
^^^4 1566 . 
Vac 2 P 4 kHTSN 


• Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

International Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 


ft* the History of the World on Your Computer with. 

CENTENNIA ™ 


A dnaDcd, canographic «uilc m die hsaxy of 
Earope and die Middle East horn the year 100QAD 
too* proem (with frcqucni upditcs). Cemraaia’s 
ewAv tfynomkaOy. Wateh Ac rise and &]] of 

adazaini^irobDraiiKiiKdlnalSysaBitiiietotiic 

modern Soviet From Normandy to Bacnia to 
falesnijc, Centajnia pus today's hcadHnes n hs- 
joncal perspective, lachidn detailed tea raptani- 

Httf llt« rilrai . _ ^ 


■tgcvtnlssihgr occur on-craa IndoasofMopIc, 
places, and emits arc baked dfrmiu m x» — 



pix^anCarvts arc baked dheaty COQ 

For ffiM-PCsand compaiblcs wiih EGA or VGA 
graphics (fonncTfy maitrta] as "MBtautara'l. doc 

^312)281-3132 Fag(3 1 2)327-6012 cSs 


Moiqr CMen nepied. 


Oodkwodi Software 
P.O. Box 148036 
Cttcggp. g. 60614 USA 


Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 

For further information, contact Philip Orna in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 


DISCOUNTS UP TO 25% 

On ifouwi any US Unofc m pn m 

worldwide mail order service 
imlng individuals & SasUiutioiul sccuuws 
NEW WORLD BOOKS 
2 Caibj Road • PO U,.« K 78 
Sufltm. NY lflMOl 

« Fax: QM.344. 1056 


To place an ad ' 
in this section 

Pkase contact; Sandy O'Hara 

International Herald Tribune 
850 Third Avenue, 8lh Floor' ' 
New York, N.Y., IQ022 U^A. 

TcL 212-752-3800 
= Fax: 212-755-8785 ' — 

























t 


jriisa®'' 

i ■ 

;> 

> * j ■ - 

\{\ 

V-, „ \ 

; - V ! 

' <IP? 

• * * :L*' 


V-jf 





X 

. t 1 

t- : 

'" iv 

, T+ hl ’ 

* ( -rf •;> 

i ; - ..- .M 


■ji 


WO II D J Y 

SPORTS 


PTTERNATIOJVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. JUNE 13, 1994 


Page 13 


Tabasco Cat 

At Belmont: 
It’sDejaVu 

By Joseph Durso 

New York Times Service 

ELMONT, New York — With a 
ttro-ksogth victory in the Belmont, 
Ta **P?° Cat took giant strides to- 
wanf the top of this year's talented 
class of Triple Crown colts. 

For the frisky, edgy chestnut 
from California, Saturday’s race 
was a dynamite encore to his vic- 
tor “ the Preakness three weeks 

ago. Tabasco Cat spent most of the 

mile and a half stalking Go f or Gin, 
who won the Kentucky Doty five 
weeks ago, then caught him m the 
homestretch and roared past in a 
remarkable repeat performance of 
their duel in the Preakness. 

Go for Gin survived a dosing 
nish from Strodes Creek, to keep 

second place by half a length. 

Tabasco Cat became a kind of 
soap-opere hero when be won the 
Preakness and redeemed a streak of 
personal and professional misfor- 
tunes endured by bus trainer, D 
Wayne Lukas. He was the first 
base to win a Grade I stakes for 
Lukas in two and a half years. He 
also was the horse who trampled 
Lukas’s son and deputy trainer, 
■Jeff. during a runaway break at 
Santa Anita last December. 

Tabasco Cat ran the di starr y jn 
2:26 and 4/5s, the fifth fastest Bel- 
mont on record, under another pre- 
cision ride by Pat Day. 

The raoe also gave Wayne Lukas 
his first Belmont victory in nine 
starts, and he exulted in the win- 
ner's circle: “We did it, we did it. 
We got brim.” 

Bat it was another missed chance 
for Charlie Whittingham, 81, the 
trainer of Strodes Creek, who has 
won 600 stakes races in his 60-year 
career bat never the Belmont. He 
said afterward that Strodes Creek 
was bearing down in die stretch, 
and “as soon as he heard the crowd, 
be did it again,” meaning he 
flinched and failed to catch the 
leaders. 

The Behnont, the last and long- 
est race in the Triple Crown series, 
was run for the 126th rime on New 
York's day of days in thoroughbred 
racing. 

But h was a day darkened by a 
new outbreak of Triple Crown mis- 
fortune: Brocco, the winner of the 
Breeders’ Cop Juvenile and the 
Santa Anita Derby, and one of the 
favorites for the Behnont, was 
scratched from the race with a 
bnrised foot ..... 


Rangers on Verge of Snatching Defeat From Jaws of Victory 


By Hdene Elliott 

Angela Tima Service 

VANCOUVER, British Colom- 
bia — Pushed to the brink of the 
biggest collapse in National Hock- 
ey League history, the New York 
Rangers are staring into an abyss of 
54 years of Stanley Cup failures. 

Given two riwniv-sm clinc h ihwr 
first triumph since 1940, the Rang- 
ers have failed twice and failed mis- 
erably. They were thoroughly out- 
played in a 4-1 loss to the 
Vancouver Canucks on Saturday, 
leaving them one stumble away 
from becoming the second NHL 
team to squander a 3-1 lead in the 
finals. 


“We're angry and 
ed,” said Brian Leetch, a 
defenseman. 

It has come to this, to one gamp 
on Tuesday in Madison Square 
Garden, because the Rangers could 
not counter the Canucks’ robust 

STANLEY CUP FINAL 

hitting and the pressure they exert- 
ed on New York’s defense. It has 
come to this because the Canucks 
the sharpest goal leu ding from 
’ : McLean since the series open- 
er, when be made 52 saves. McLean 
29 shots Saturday, 22 in 


the last two periods. 


It has come to this because the 
Rangers, despite hundreds of 
games of collective playoff ejgjeri- 
ence, lacked the poise and spirit the 
Canucks displayed before a roaring 
sellout crowd of 16,150. 

“We wanted to take it to them, 
and we did,” Vancouver winger 
Sergio Momesso said. “We bad to 
win Game 5, and we did. We came 
up with a big effort in their build- 
ing because we bad the motivation 
of coming home. 

“Now, we've taken this where we 
wanted. Now that we’re there, 
we’ve got to go and get it” 

This will be only the seventh 
Game 7 in the finals ainee the best- 


of-seven format began in 1939. It is 
also the first since 1987, when the 
Rangers' coach, Mike Keenan, 
coached Philadelphia and the Fly- 
ers lost to Edmonton. 

The only otter team to take a 3-1 
lead In the finals and lose was the 
1942 Toronto Maple Leafs, who 
were overtaken by the Detroit Red 
Wings. The Canucks have done it 
twice in the first round, this spring 
against Calgary and last spring 
against Winnipeg. 

“We’re a very confident hockey 
dub,” said defenseman Jeff Brown, 
who scored twice Saturday. “Even 
though we got down, 3-1, we al- 


ways felt we could come back. 
We’ve just given ourselves another 
op p ort un ity 10 do that.” 

The Canucks controlled the play 
in the first period Saturday but 
emerged with only a 1-0 laid. 

Brown gave them that on a power 
play at 9:42, when his shot de- 
flected off Ranger forward Esa 
Ukkanen and past goalie Mike 
Richter. 

Geoff CourtnaD made it 2-0. also 
on a deflection, at 12:29 of the 
second period The Rangers scored 
on a power-play goal 2:13 later, 
when Alexei Kovalev’s shot from 
the right circle glanced off Murray 


Craven’s leg and between 
McLean’s pads. Thai made them 
confident they could mount a 
third-period rally and cany the 
Cup home. 

“We felt we had done some 
things weD and could play better, 
Richter said. “We still had a goo 


chance of winning It’s a 
that third goal went in.” 

The goal, by Brown, resulted 
when he intercepted a Ranger 
clearing pass and blasted a 40-foot 
shot from the right side at 8:35. “I 
really didn’t get a good look at it,” 
Riditersaid. 

Referee KH McCreary didn't see 


CourtnaH’s bac khander zip under 
the crossbar and out of the net with 
1:32 to go, and so allowed play to 
continue until a stoppage occurred 
and it could be reviewed. That 
stoppage arose when the Rangers' 
Mare Messier tucked the puckin- 
side the right post with 58 seconds 
to play. However, when replays 
showed CourtnaD's shot had gone 
in, the clock was moved back to the 
time he scored and Messier's goal 
was disallowed. 

The Rangers didn’t argue. 

“If you sit here and think of the 
negatives, your mental state isn’t 
going to help when you’re prepar- 
ing for the next game,” Leetch said. 


Ski Championships 
To Be Held in Vail 

The Associated Prea 

RIO DE JANEIRO — The Colorado resort of Vail 
has been awarded the 1999 Alpine World Champion- 
ships by the International Ski Federation. 

Vail beat out Gannisch-Partenltirchen, Germany, 
and Sl Montz, Switzerland, in voting Saturday at the 
federation’s biennial congress. 

“Ibis was a victory for Colorado hospitality and a 
victixy for skiting,” said Jim Roberts, director of 
Vail's Mountain Operations. 

The 1989 Alpine championships in Vail were 
among the most successful in the history of the 
- international competition. 

The 1995 championships will be held in Sierra 
Nevada, Spain, and the 1997 ate is Sestriere. Italy. 

The 1999 Nordic Ski World Championship went to 
Ramsau, Austria. 

Ibe congress also voted to add a new category, 
snowboarding, to inte rnational skiing contests begin- 
ning in the 1994-95 season. 

The new category, a cross between surfing and 
skiing, has been especially popular among young? 
skiers and fans, representatives said. 

The federation also announced the World Cup 
schedule far the 1094-95 season, which features a 
return to Ok ate of (he 1994 Winter Olympics. 

The women’s tour opens in Park Gty, Utah, on 
Nov. 26-27, then moves to Vail on Dec. 3-4. 

The mens’ schedule, which opens at Sestriere on 
Nov. 26-27, features a visit to Kvitfjell, Norway, site 
of the Alpine speed events in the 1994 Olympics. 

The men will contest a downhill and super-giant 
slalom March 11-12 an the rnnHntniri where the 
American Tommy Moe won the Olympic dow nhill 
title and claimed a silver in the super-G. 

The only North American stop for the men will be 
March 4-5 at Aspen, Colorado, for a downhill and 
super-G. That means that, if be sticks to bis previous 
statements, the Italian star Alberto Tomba has made 
his last visit to North America. Tomba, trim has said 
he win retire after this season, does not compete in 
do wnhill and super-G. 



Victory Over the Rockets 
Gives Knicks Home Edge 


By Clifton Brown 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Having gotten 
the one victory they needed at the 
least in Houston, the New York 
Knicks have returned borne hoping 
to put the finishing touches on a 
memorable season. 

The National Basketball Associ- 
ation champi onshi p series was tied 
at one victory each after the 
Kiwis’ 91-83 defeat of die Hous- 
ton Rockets in the Summit on Fri- 
day night, with Game 3 bring 
played Sunday ni ghi in raucous 
Madison Square Garden. 

By winning their first game in 
Houston since 1988, the Knicks 
captured the home-court advan- 
tage. The Knicks have an 8-1 home 
record during the playoffs, and 
(hey wfll gain their fust champion- 
ship since 1973 if they can wm the 
Dext three games. 

Game 3 was also the first in an 
NBA final to be played in New 
York since 1973. 

“The pressure is on us going 
bade to New York.” admitted 
Rudy Tomjanovich, Houston’s 
coach. “They can dose us out, and 
we’ve been poshed into a comer. 
But maybe that’s what this team 
needs. We’ve come back in the 
playoffs before.” 

The Knicks won Game 2 with 
by defensive plays and dutch 
shooting. With New York leading 
by 84-81, Patrick Ewing made per- 
haps the game’s biggest defensive 


play. Hakeem Olajuwon leaped 
high over Ewing to take a lob pass 
two feet from the basket and ap- 
peared to have an nncon tested 
layup. 

But after Olajuwon bead-faked 
Anthony Mason, Ewing came from 
behind to block Oiajuwon’s layup 
attempt. Then Derek Harper made 
a dutch 3-potnt jumper from the 
top of the key ana it was 87-81 with 
two minnles left. 

After a Houston timeout, Ewing 
Came up big a gain this tifflr steal- 

NB A FINAL 

ing Sam Cassell’s pass to 
Olajuwon. The Rockets were frus- 
trated. Robery Horry missed a 3- 
poiitt jumper, then after Vernon 
Maxwell lost the ball at midcourt. 
Mason soared on a fast-break dunk 
with 44 seconds to play and it was 
89-81. 

A hush came over the Summit. 
And the Knicks could look forward 
to a happy plane ride back to New 
York. 

They had been able to overcome 
the Rockets’ defense by making the 
jump shots that had hurt them so 
badly in Game 1, as John Starks 
and Harper sank seven 3-pointers 
between them. 

In Game 2, it was the Rockets 
who could not make shots. It was 
the Rockets who committed costly 
turnovers. 

Harper and Starks badly out- 
played the Rockets’ starting guard 


tandem of Vernon Maxwell and 
Kenny Smith. Starks scored 19 
prints, Harper got 18 along with 7 
rebounds and 3 steals. Maxwell 
scored 20 points, but he also had 
seven turnovers. And Smith had 
just two points and six assists on 
aoB-for-nx shooting. 

“We were not mentally ready for 
what they threw at us defensively,*’ 
Tomjanovich said. 

Ewing had a splendid all-around 
performance, with 16 prints, 13 re- 
bounds and six blocked shots. 
Olajuwon, though finishing with 25 
points, scored only four in the 



job on the Rockets’ center. 

Mason used his strength to mus- 
cle Oiajuwon away from his favor- 
ite low-post spots, and used his 
quickness to deflect several passes 
into Olajuwon. Ewing was nee to 
roam the lane and intimidate de- 
fensively. 

“If s a relief,” Ewing said of Ma- 
son’s defense against Olajuwon. “It 
frees me up." 

The Knicks made no bold pre- 
dictions after about whether they 
would end the series in New York. 

“There are no guarantees," said 
the team’s coach. Pat Riley. “We 
have a good chance right now, but 
we can! get lightheaded about this 
thing. That’s a great team over 
there." 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


OTC Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, June 10. 

(Goofmned) 




Oh 


Nvwn 

NVWIpf 

IWCMtf JO 

NUcISrt 

NUKOft-A 

Humor 

Muir-max 

NYCRpf 1JO 

Nyar 

NVCOTA -It 


_ MOW. 

_ 40126% 126 
1.1 13 


ym S m£wwi lo» aw cw 

IV. IV. — Vu 
1124% 124 12ft +3W 

■ iwi ins is% _ 

_ 233 45* 4 4 — Vl 

- Bow taw » +% 

_ 1441Mb 12 12W +% 

_ 1309 9W SK, ?M +1 

* JIT Hsf-J 

AM BDia M M + % 


= 


VAu _ 

1 Fn M 2J 

OSF me .10 _ 




+ 1 * 


17» 18 
1* IV. 1% 

_ J4ft AW iy» 

.14e 3 2327 2214 20M 20M 
_ *1411534 MW 15*4 

- 41V 2S% 26 V. 27V. 

222 22 22 — Vl 

35 1M4 10W 10% —44 

. If r § i 

_ 356 4V. 4 4\4 —v, 

_ sms me avk + 

_ 2B40 TVk TA 2% — 1 

_ 5070 20% lav. 1OT4 — 

vXXMSEfl _ 588 '+u %> Vu 

Z 330 9% Bft ?% 

Z sS 9% 8M. rvu 

- 4029 13% 12**\. IWfc + % 

JO 13 1425V. 24ft 2«ft —ft 

| M XI 4W7 28W 27V 28)4 + 1% 

no gw" JO IJ V211VS It ID9 +J) 

SSSrr _ 1372 11 V. 914 11 +1* 

g&SS t.14 ig 

gJS^ 451 36)4 12 T 

OkfiocBc JO 2J> 21 4014 40 *0 

o*mF*i - am sit s*t 5U »» 

OtrniFpf 1® 7M 113629% 24 2SV4 

“ St m VP* +214 


□mtvH 
Otvmws 
OrrwoaEn ■ 

ass * 

S£^i» 

OnbCPPf MO 

DncOOn 

Oncer 

ja 

g3S£ 

Opto 


_ 8497 6 Vt 


5M -W 



IS X2B25)* 2414 2SV> _ 

S501S l*Vk l«fc *Vt 

** St Sf 

_ 7TW 64t 5* 6 — 44 

_ 1147 19V. IBS If* — £ 
3J *124 27)4 26 m 2M6 +M 
_ 1544 HV. MW 2U4 
: mow B}4 gw 
_ 330 4 SVfc 5)4 .. 

1J *413 «fc 614 *Yn 


7S614V4 14)4 

73230 21V. 

St » 


.4 


“ S76 5 M4 3 +W 

Z ftSrjl'A IV* — s 

- § 4* :s 

453 ^ 15 


~ 28111 !6» 1544 ♦S 


Z 3SW 


!43i y «* 

I Jga S 5 

_ 3764 — 


^ 15 


517 1«4 10V» '«> 

130 714 g4 *g T J* 

^1T5»S»S 24 24W— tfe 


OiUHC 


*Vt 

Jo Ml ]01? -rj 

23*69 5BV- S2 5314— JJ* 

“ WB11 10*11)4—1)4 


" ’T47 13V4 1214 T3W 
476111* 1 


PDKMtl 


poesm 

pocttCB 

Worn 

nmi 


_ 69 1WU 

_ 775 

, O! 

J% i3 257a 9 
_ 17*10 

I W20 5)4 
.^.115^2 

■ : S 

- 

• _ 328 11 V. 

o I «*» 41* 

Z 13 J ■» 
l».S7 237 23 
_ 1557401* 


% 


—14 


pnmrTCn 

PWWlC* 

PWftC 

PWBOtl 

pBrtovsn 

Prtwfii) 


J 


(•oriHW 

mvs 

PM*# 

Pta&a 


sss 

_ 4* a* 

J4 ua 

_ 3000 4V* 
_ 4500030 

_ T557KM4 

_ 5024 • 

Z i*aisw 
Z * • 

*Z 1J 13530W 
M BJ 

- 43S33 
_ 5M 7 


ltVu Wo — 

St m 

S 13 

... 51 *i4 

lSto *5 

i.8 

mt tat* — J? 

rsM a 

S6 Si -4V4 
m a* +* 

nk- Mt — * 

014 

ms w» +i» 

fr ^ Ss 

r; 

M V s * — *0 


DM YU 1001 Higll LOW CU due 


PotEn *rt 
PHtrni* 
PauCon 
Pavrtixs J4 
WD 

PecATdi 


- -* 1 * A — W 


me 1098 6 w§ — mem 

Z 5M 1414 im MU 


♦ V4 


P»«rRv 


. -JN 

PtopOic 


1* 

44)4 

V> 


PeaSwFn J8 
PwpT^IS 


3 20458 33V. 30)4 3314 +3W 
210 94. BV« Mt 4 Vi 

- 21* 12)4 1114 1114 

_ 4637 avt * a 

- 517 3H 214 3)4 

54 ffl 9V, 9 VA — - 

_ 15371iWt «4 TOVi — 14 

PMinAm _ 393 7 4)4 4)4 — V4 

PcnNGm „ 3971 IMt 8W 8W — lift 

PenTrt _ 141 MU 14)4 MVi _ 

PwmVa lJ0a&4 2233114 32 33V) — V. 

PonnBc Jt 26 10 15 1314 13 ft -In 

PonrH J32* J 1728 rn m Hi —14 

Pontalr» -72 SLl 1*16 3514 U* 35 - 

Pomat _ _ 443 6!* 5W 5V. — IS, 
Penwst JO U> ZM 19V, I8*A 1914 +l)t 

PcaFsti .42 1 J 7425, 23*4 3414 — H 

PuoOCD* -4Q 2.2 311B>*1* It 

PeSOHs -54 2J *3523 21 23 *1 

P«»CT M 4.1102341114 10D 1M4 * 
Proper pf4J5 4.1 1727 71)4 45)!. 70 

Mb 2 J} *7 25 23 24.. 

.16« Jt 2 21 30)4 2014 

_ 3296 25 22)4 23 

Me M 2858 1314 13 13 — 

X 23 «•» 40 40 -5 

_ 330 5* 5 514 * 

14 741 20’A 18)4 20 *714 

_ 11886 6Vi SD fii -t 

^1032334 2914 3314— IV. 

_ 4120 JO 17H IB —1 

_. >794 17W I6V5 16V. — % 

„ 622 22V, 2014 22W+1H 

_ 533 3V, 3 3 — % 

_ 1841 13 12V* 12W -r V4 

_ 1296 12 111* 1114 +14 

_ 34591 1416 15 16)4 +14 

_ 485 HD* B14 9)4 — ’A 

_ 2476 414 414 4)4 *Vt 

_ B071314 13 1314 +% 

_ 577 P*t 814 9V4 

_ 394 954 W4 914 

- 441 2V, t 2 2 

_ 2714 W M — 118 

SS 7.3x5422 7V. 7 TV. -It 

132 17 127432, 30>6 304 - 

PeJmw. 

PWUVtart 

PtvmMa 
Pharmo* 

PharUi 
PjyJCon 
PPSErrv 
PhHJaoob 
PtroTc 
PhatoC 
Photonic 
Ptwrln 
PhvCor 
PhyCA* 

PhvSate 
PtiyCWi 
mvCPt 
PhysicHU 


Pertum 

Parmecp 

PenwJwr 

Perioos 

OvuMa 

n-x. — -^ -4 
I III vxw 

PWcoAn 

RUrUW 

PWrncp 

PelDv 

PtrJGep* 

PlHeatA 


_ 7M1 * A 1 4-1)4 

_ 7208 70)4 8)4 8V, -1)4- 

_ 1074 B 7 » +V4 

Z 457 516 5V. 5Vt — V- 

_ 804 2W 2V« » +* 

_ 272 10 m 10 +J4 

_ 37 6V. 51* 5)t — vi 

MS O *423 1016 10 10V, _ 

_ 2473 5M, 4*4 *9t — Vu 

Z 59 4 516 514 

_ S9S 3V. 3W 5A — J- 

_ 1730 20)4 1914 20 —14 

_ 7224 321* 2814 32V4 +3)4 
_257B1 2SW 21% 25)4 +3V4 
_ 10)614% 13Va 13% - - 
_ 339 12W 11*4 11> - _ 
_ 1874 444 3)4 4V4 +14 
_ 740 26 2414 25V. 

gggr " 

PWdBnl JA 3J X50 21 2D 21 

PIMMS 31tVt 111* 1114 — 

KqnvS JSt 13 75 VW 8tt * +1 

KSTi*.. ji 2.1 X32 30V, 29 29 —1 

_ 1MW4 15V) 15)4 — -1 
15 218)4 IBM IBIS — 

_ 803 ) 614 15V.14 —'A 

.9 S4123VU 221* 23 - 

1J 3395 40W WW 39V4 — )5 



1.1J 


mjo 35W 32V, 3514 +2U 
A 6782414 ZD* 231) —14 

10V.-54 

_ 3790 7>* M4 6*4 +Vl 
I 348514 1214 12H — 14 

“11^21 19V419iV«— *Vu 
Z 2330 814 714 79t _ 

*3 *n 27 2*14 26 +1)4 


~ 35715V. 13)4 15 — W 
M 2J> 10020W. 1W4 2DJ4 +)4 


Plenum 
Plexus 

BBS “ = 

“ 65 1CH* 10 IQ — V4 

43-23 isT fe B -t 

>i «w 
- .13 Wu 
_ 767 6*4 
_ 9412 5 

_ sum 



E IBtt ^ 


*14. 


prmAnes 
PrrreBc ■ 
Prmflm At 
PrwnFh J» 
PimRU 


M 


PlflETT 140 


+ V4 


_ 1? — yw 
sw 

4H, 

Z 174 3 m 21 'A 
_ 271* 114 V* 

_ 11644 17V, 17 
& Mir* 17 
U 4220)4 >» 

^JftCflkiE 

7Jyl900 34 Vi E« 33)6—1 

^ 

522?. ~ *§S T4W 11V, 13)4 +11* 

I 2B/2 24)4 2414 24J4-a_ 
2J »B2114 20)4 2VA <U 
_ SK 21* 2V. 2*4 -V» 
, J 290r9*A 18% 19 +«■ 

SLl 5180 W4 25 


PTM»r« 

PTBSLf 



u 


21W N » 24 — V<f 

“ 13Vh lit 12*4 +1)4 
in 293 2SW 341* 25W +S 
_ 4899 194« MW 19*4 +W 
_ 274 4)4 4V4 414 —IS 

“ naoaw nw 33. —lv. 

|J 140222 18)4 2114 +2)t 

10 »<* M4 9W — W 
Z 643 10*4 TO Tg'* ^rr 
- 335 10W 9 9^ +W 

Z 75231MS 15W 'S? - 

imu % !£-£ 

i3 lit nt w +16 

8 JSSfP:! 

_ 763 5W 4N 5 +)4 


Stocks 


Proxtono 

Psicor 

PubSNC J2 
PukattK .56 
Putees *0 
PvtoeEn 
F^jrrTC 
Purepac 
PurDBen .12 
PuroPd 
Punts 

PvrrnT 
Pyxisft 


DN VU HOsHUi Law Ose Oft | Stocks Pit YU Law Che Oue 1 Stocks 

— 1 RsvttFn* «* 


_ 2BB 8 7 r .4 

_ 5587 10*fc 9V. 10*t -lit • RsvtlFpl 125 
_ 958 V4 814 Sit —'M I ~ - 


17X1121 MW 14)4 14)4 »Vt 
25 3827)5. 2114 2214 -4. 

IB 30916 15 16 
_ 1438 6>4 6'A fr)4 _ 
_ 80JO 714 41t 7T4 

_ arneiaw sw vh *i 

- . J 4384 2V* 1914 2114 -1VS 
-64 3J 5557 17H 14*. 17 —1* 

_ 1209 8 61k 74i ■» I 


2J 4977 l«V. 17*t 17". — ! SS<V\y 
4.9 193 68)6 6**t 6614 - It r " 


.1? 


_ 637 *14 6 6H —It 
5 2857 25V, 22>t Z5V» -2V) 

- 2546 'Vs — 1 1 . 

- 1143 ’V P • * ”c — )’» j SimnOur 
■lOe 7 3212 14 1 13% 13'V,, — Ww Slmplnd 

_ 1441 4 It 4'-i 4’* — 14 I ■' 



Racers 
wptosest 
vffnwO 
RassStr 
RnssSy 
Roteai 
RotoRTr 
ganunO 

J8blJ 512714 27' 2714 - 1 14 | Rouse pf 025 L2 X381 53 SJV, 5C)j _ 

„ 2535 7*1 7)6 7)4 — )4 RyBPA 581 5J 1*7 10 V-. 10 10 _ 

- 22753 21 W If 20 *)t RovlCrto - 391 9 7*4 7>* — IVa 

RoyOTC >. ICOT 71t 4V, 414 — *» 

Rirfelnd 44 9 8W 8*4 *•-» 

Ri*a«4el _ 340016*4 lilt 16 *1 

RyonBct- -04 a J 148 4*. 6V. 6'-4 — 1i 

RyiBF _ 10416 Tit 7*t rn — Ml 


Sates 

Dw VM 100s HUn LOW Qt ChQe ] 
- 691 1014 !0'4 104* — )* 

_ 427011)4 10 1 * 10Vi —Vt 

_ lllh Ut 6'h. + '* 
_ 1968 I0W 9W 10 —V. 

48 TJX K542 24W 23' 4 24L. ♦¥* 
_ 90 4 5V, 5V, — W 

56 17 783 70*4 1»W 20)4 


Dhr YU 100s HkA Law Clse CH» 


SunMUWl . HSU* »«i, X* _ 

Sunsrote __ _ 53 8 7W I » W 

5unsKX pf 375 12.9 13 29 28*k 79 . Ilk 


1441 4H 4>-i 4V. — V. I SimpSMMI _ 538 12W 12 12W ‘ 

1133 201* 20 20*w - U > fisijn _ 906 Sit *1t 5*t - 

47 28 24W r -1 :St.vW<*S .05 a J 9913 30W 25 26 -4 


11 _ _ 

- XM «W 7V, 8W . .. 
36X1646 19W IB V. 19> —It 


McOf 

Oucnex 

OueenCly 



-14312 36*6 33 36 * 2*1 

- 1000 5V. 4*t 41k — M, 

_ 2259 11 10 1QW — TV*, 

- 307 7V. V’.'p VA — Vu 

- ni7 m lif iw _i 

J3 14 905181) 1714 lew *»fclSK 

- 3057 11)4 n 11*4 -V. S&TBO 

8 14 13)* 14 *1* S3 Inc s 

_ 22510181* 17V, 18)6 *■*• I SB£ 

_ 49211’* 11 ll'A *8 SOSVJ 
_ 694 31* 3W 3W — W SDNS 
S 41W24 22 23 *'*|SE1S 

- 1071 sw 5>Vu 6 _ SR=ed 

- 75704 16)4 12% 139k— 3W SFXBrt 

- 930 32*6 29)6 31U— 1W SGI Int 

-25449 4)0 4 * *b ' SHL 5v 

_ 560 I 9* Wf. xVhISJNQ 

- 279641)6 39 W 40)0 — *k 

-15t 2 3 1068 714 6*4 6W —14 

- 1792 12)4 111) 12W. -W. 

- 6433 I2W 11*4 12). —14 

_ 1971 3)4 3 3)0 — >4 

- 1)6 1W 1)0 1)0 

- 31751410 1294 14 +1 



Soowtan 
SomrGp 
SomstSs 
Sanestn 
5orbcO> 

SonlcSal 
SonocoP *6 
SonocPpf 5J5 4J 


SociMOBc 

SolukJA 

SMOlG 

SestTnr 


JXe 


J 1443 18 17W 17W 

_ 518)8)0 1716 18 — W 

- 5 3U 3W 3)4 —14 

1J0 2Q5T2H6 19V4 12 *7% 

- 9716141k 16’* J6V0 — Vt 


J 


R&BInc - 4317 7 4 7 *<4 

RFSHB JB0X3 3S431B 1710 1716 — U, 

RHT4B .12 J 94 14V I2W MW -1)0 
RKSFn t - 44 10 *0 9k -W 

RPM -52 3,0 344818 17 1716 

RSPnJ M 10 91024 2Mh 24 -3 

Racolok - _ _ 

RadaBc 


Rcarai 

Radius 


- 1919 7)0 414 410—1 

- 2479 314 3 3% — ) , 

_ 1210 1)4 1 IVp — Ve 

_ 5«9oio)o m 9)5 — A 


RtBrtTc 
RaUyx 
Ranfti 
Ramsay 
Ramouu 
RndAcc* 
Ra-tnBcS 44 2M 
RostrOp 
Ram Stl 


- _ . m s m. 

- va M » » .4 

_ 3321 25 23*4 23*4— 1W 

- 3344 1414 13)4 14 — W 

_ 8168 It H A + V|» 

- 44 4% 3)0 4 

_ 910 7*4 414 630 , 

- «94 5H SV. SV. — W i 

- 84444)* 414 4V, —e 

M016W 15)0 1610 -rl 

- 2841 5)4 414 

- 1434 lit 1)4 


SltwPs 

_ 280 lilt 1014 11*0 -)i SoHSoc 
1.01 ZJ 4 39W 37*« 39V. ♦ ]*■ SotoSrv 
-11467 9*4 8*» BVi.— I V» * Somonlc 

- 28 0 7’t 7W -•/, .SomnwtB 

_ 5598 16 13V* 14W— 1** I Somlw 

- 73 3*4 2V» 3 

.14 J 180*20 18 70 - !*. 

M IJ 2449 2114 ffl»4 21 ’« * W 

_ 403515 14'.4 14W — 

- 4390 3*4 2*i. 2»4 

_ 2845 TV, 6t 7',j -W 

22e 19 155 7*4 7 7W — W 

- 65318 17V. 1714 -) 

.11 U 760 11 10 II -1 

- 7903 12*. 11 U'* r*4 

- 32 9 tPf! 9 +14 

- 44 5 A M — 

_ 1451 10 BV. 81* — 1'/„ SoSCC 

1.94 3J 645558*. 54 58)4 *2W SftinEflH 

- 183 irt 13V. 131) —Ka SoMwxl 

- 240 15 M>* 14*4 — >4 , 5mno5v 

_ 505* 75V, 76*. MV, — 1« I Soutnml 

_ 375 12*. 12 17 — V. 1 Socnwol 

_ 493 10V, 10'i 10*,. ♦*»„ ISwUBcp 

- 2210 IS 1 .) 1314 14), — ** SwBcsTi 

- 250814)0 IS 1 * 16** -1V0 I SwHTBs 

.13 U 145 71* Tv 7V. — 't Sw9SC4 
.40 \A 15159 30 28 2* — SwWafr 

.16 TJ 393 13 12*4 12*4 * W SovBoi 

-30 7835 21*. 71 2116 _ \ SpooM-t, 

- 1536 14't 1510 16 —'4 1 SpanAm 

- 248 2V« VA 2W — V* SoanfM s 

- 1252 1W UO 11* — I SpecAAu 

_ 1978 V* )0 -ISPOOV 

- 313 21', i I'v* 21 U ♦•JlSprtEaP 

JO 17 344 17*. m* ir4 — W iPClPaa 

JO 1-5 501 14 12'4 T3W “Hi Spcrran 

-lOe J S3515W IS IS — . Swdro 
J5e J 1122 10 9)1 »'• pecCK 

- 2» r/ H 7 7 — ’ • [ SoecHoi 

- 4499 *0 17W 19 _ poecTCJi 


— —4*6 

_ 1448 IM/m 10W ll»4 
_. 77 4V, 4’t 4'A 

- 174 “A. >Vt "A, — W 

.16 2.1 34 710 7 7 V, • V. 

_ 7140 25*4 22 W 75V. +2)4 

_ 9S469 2S*i 23U 24 —Tit 

_ 2387 17 W 14W IS*.— 1*4 

_ *86 6V* *'■. 6 1. 

_ 3060 15)4 14 14 

_ 1007Z3H). 23** Z3W —*b 
-10276 14 12)4 l»k +«0, 

- 507 0)0 8 Di 

_ 675 J 3V. 4 

_ 4383 5W 4Dt 5% 



1930 lit 

9ft 

11 


1912 1*4 

1W 

1*4 


3582 1% 

1ft 

1W 

rm 

154 Vu 

ft 

Vu 

_ 

2044 5% 

5*4 

S% 

— 

3524 7ft 

6ft 

7'A 


SunwTs 
SUPRW 
SuaMoc 
S upTeCTl 
Sucercul 
Supertol 
Suflrtex 
SupSed 
SuplnM 
SuryLsr 
SurpTc 
SorvTc 
SuroBns 1J0 
SuttRsc 
SwltlT* 
AwnoSid 
Swish w» 
Swisher 
SvOslTc 

Svtxrj) s 

5vtxon 

SvKanPd 


ASe 5a 


+ V. SvnOpi * 
212lfc 1214 1214 +94 
- 2257 IW IV, Ilk +Vu 

*12 • a a — a 
21 — 14 

914 +•* 


- 1292 21 Vi 21 
_ 384 ID 9 

2.7 13724 30*w 20 


404 47*4 rru. 


20)4 *1 
47)4 +1 


Racoms 

RecvEna 

RedtedBc 

RMkixxi 

ReodJwi 

Reflrtno 

B«WQ n 

Rncr&i 

r geat n m 

Reals 

RehabCp 

RahaM 

Hog* 

Re S^ 

RmiCph 


RenolTn 

RaooAIr 

RnJrotc 

Rma 

Rtpion 

ReposAu 


RpTUA. 
Repgcs 32 
Reren* 


RepScc/ 

ROMM 


^Onc 

Resound 


Rett* 


M 13 71020 18)4 18)0 

.86! AJ 481 1914 18*4 19)4 -Ui , 

32 24 412V, T2V. 12V, _ SchdCD 

_ 418T910 1814 19 - 

-25081 13 1214 lJVu—ns, 

- *3 *S — ^ 

- 4137 35 3TM 3*14 — Vt 

- 248814)4 1310 14. +W 
_ 225612)4 11*4 1114 — V, 

_ 1078 17 14 17 -.14 

4 11VS 1014 ms +V0 

- 190 7>t 7V4 7)4 —It 

- 117633 31 'A 32V. —'A. 

- 1670 A 50 10 — V> 

KA& -% 

ITS ZA mm 34)4 35 -.**. 

- 839 13)4 12)0 12)0 —'4 

_ 38313 12 13 +16 

- 277311)4 10V, 10V, _ 

_ 46£ 3H 3'6 2ft* _ 

_ 91 SB 12 lilt IT**— Vx 

- 878 10 9)4 M6 — It 

- 18992414 23V) 23*4 —14 

- 1155 21 19V* 1956—1 

_ 2156 6)4 514 514 - 

_ 3985 7V, 6W TVS **6 

- 1206 3V. 2*b 3)6 -Vi 

_ 1259 41k 4. 4)4 — Vt 

- 75S 2 lit TV,* * y» 

_ 572 1114 lift). 11)4 —>U 

- 1009 17V* 16)0 ITVi +'A 

2-5x1820 1214 1250 1214 +V4 

- 403 110. Tt It — V. 

Jtae 1.1 277 31t 3)4 3*4 —14 

75 7.1 7210)0 lOVi 1M0 - 

- 502 314 3)4 3<« 

- <AT8*& 1714 1BVS -VS 

22 U 1 410 450 450 - , 

- 478 9V. 8*4 8*4 — *6 SedaSpC 

- 4197 9 B54 IVk .Vt 

- 2210 9V4 10 -It 

-511 5.1 240 IOVm 10 lOVu -tlh, 

- 971BV, l» 18V, —14 

- 6124 2** 1*4 2*Si + 1 

- 407 9 810 9 +V4 

- 4203 71* 6*4 4K _ Srounf 


Rhromi 

Rtottn 

RichSJ 


ReutHdE 1.121 261OT8 45 4350 «H*— *10, 

RaxSons - 473511 9 9*4 — V, 

RexAaC - 373 9)4 7*4 8 —1*4 

Rextm - 1014 W) » 55k .14 

_ - 43 5V4 5 514 — V. 

- 10 1)0 1)0 1V0 — )0 

- 2395 8*4 8 BV* + V* 

.16 U 300 5 4*4 4V, -'A 

- 510 4)0 6 6V, tV) 

■08 AX0981S14 15 1SV- — )* 

649 3 Mk 2*4 —VS 

- 14893 9 8VS 9 -*t 

_ 749 UPA 15 UK— 15) 

- 117 414 450 414 

- 31 0 VA 8 +14 

- .409 2*0 2 'A 2V, 

_ 3220151k 14 14)4—14, 

Me A 94*21*4 2014 21*4 +44 

M 17 3*736 35 34 -V4 

- 647 ISO. 16)4 16)4 - 

- 14 8 7 i +14 

RfcrNH _ - 406 6)4 t . r 

RoadSv 1.40 ZO 44g71 dm*. 

~ 08 » _ 

RagnCa ZOO SJ 4J3S 33 35 

RebMvr JO IJ 5020*4 18*4 2DU, - 

Rebec _ 3411 qftt 0*. -It 

- ' - 784 13 11)4 ll'A— 1 

_ 438426*4 25 2£)t-lVu 

RnbNua .12 1J B7 604 4V6 4*4 -It 

RctwJVs _ 3122 656 514 Six +'A 

RocnCS _ 10575 1914 ISIS 1814 -ellt 

BCfCSc* 1JS 15 2363114 29)0 31*4 +2 

RackTen Mm 3 1391 16*6 16 icu -v. 

Rackys, _ 3X710)4 9)0 10 

RobCwtH - - 3*8125*4 24*W 2S)t -Vt 


&yR*j«id 



ShMnB 


_ _____ X5* 5), —'t 

- 2147 5 4>S 4)t —IS 

- Ilian’S 9*4 10)s— 1*4 

_ 407 3 7>. 7’s —Is 

- 9099 5* 50Yi 52 +1’S 

_ 403 3 'S 3 3v,a —Vi, 

_ 187 *4 V. *. 

_ 578 n 71* 7 — «t 

- 12880 25'-. 2310 24V* — W 

_ 144 21ft* 70'S 20*4 * A 

.10e J 235421V, MW 21V. -2V, 
_ 35253914 36 'S 39 -2H 

_ 2120 25V. 22V. 24 -1 

JO 1J 6990 25*4 24'* J4'.i —Is 
.14 M> 42317 I6A 14'o —9, 

- 4220 I'-m Vi* 6*4 —V. 

_ 148 lit 10*w 10*. - 

_ 3368 36 32)1 35 -lit 

_ 1350 5 1 * 5 5!t -V. 

JO 1-9 72 Id's »W 1010 

- 13065 2910 26 76)4— 2*0 

_ 5454 7V, 4*4 TV. -14 

- 15i 2V« Us 2’- -A 

32 XI 11220 1ft, 14 V, 17 * V,. 

-14410 BA 6*s 8V. +Tt 
Aft SJ 9 53*6 53*4 13V. _ 

_ 571519 16*4 16<S— US 

-IOel.9 987 9+a 5*S 514 -)4 

1-SO 1J 2798 92 96 +5 

AS 2A ISftlB’A 51V. IBS’. -1 
_ 447 2050 19** 70 'A — ** 

1 JO X2 230 39 37V, 379,-1 

-75575 23V. 21 -t 22'.i — J * 

Aft 14 420 13V. 13U 1«4 — *4 
_ 114 14*0 14 UVt — )4 

_ 571 II 10'S 10 Vr — 1 't 

_ 222 T5V. 15 15*4 - 

20 10's 9V, 9 VS —1 

112 2’S 2W av* 

131 31 31 -Vs 

30 27 2 7 27 

7-3 X112ISV. 17<- ItV. + V4 
-44 2-9 132 15 14 IS 

_ 6378 45 1 4i 41V. 41 -2V, 

- 145 3'*. TV. 2*. —V. 

J0 2-0 X398 145S 12V. 13*S - 54 

,m XI 44 *V. 4 *' • - vt 

J4 J 19X1*6 34V. 3J1* *11* 

_ 7136''. ?4U» 25V. +*A 

_ 2973 I Vi. IV, . 1V» 

_ 553 IV* 5W l«t _ 

1.12 4-6 313 25'. 34 V, 24V, _ 

_ 734 6*. 6** 6V. - 

_ 12 20V. l»is 20V. - •/, 

_ 1994 4‘.t 5H PS — 4, 
_ 14101 15V. 141* IS -*S 
_ 4953 4 > , 3*. 3 It — 

_ 810 4 P- — V* 

_ 44B 9*w 8'.. 0Jt — > 

- 01 4*9 *'■> 4't -> 

_ 1767 20 IS*. 19 +JS 

_ 388 8*t 7V. 7*t —V* 

- 23918)4 175S M’ i -« 

- 353 8 T'4 B - 'a 

14 5290 25 Zftt « -!** 

_ 715 3*. 3’t ft* •> 

- 535 4*9 4 «* — *S 

_ US Mia J5> ;s; * _ 

_ 52313 im 11", 


jab 27 36 19). 10V* IM* 

_ 320 71t 7>t «t 


-IS 
-It 

_ 1581 10’s MS ID - 's 

- 1036 70*4 20 M's _ 

- 13 1*S 1 I 1 * , - 

A4 ii am 20 

- 305 IB 17 17S* *1t 


103510 


_ 1441 10T. 10V» 10*t - 

_ 1756 SIS 41s 5V» _ 

JOb 4A 3 T 10V, J7)s 18'i. + '* 

I 09 e 48 1351 &** 21*6 22V, -1 

- 2459 7H 71s 7V, — « 

_ 1659 13'S 13 13 —>* I 

AS 5-7 535 'Vu W„ +• —V u 
JO 13 70 15*4 15 15 

AB 11 9677 22 71 22 -1* ' 

_ 673 3*4 3 31k 

J19e .7 557 I3W 12*4 IDs 

1 JOe S-0 232 24*4 34 24 +«A 

U» X3 2 29V, 79Vs 29*S +V U 

.12 1A 011 8 7'., 7*4 

AO 18 99 11 TO' t I0W - 

,10b .9 6877 11)4 10*4 11 — H 

_ 7253 23 2D** 71 V. 

.10 10 46 5*', 5 5 

Me J 13701 19V: 14*4 16Vu— 3Vu 
_ 148 7 5W 65S 

._ 855 IDS* 9V, 10V, +!«* 

_ 1271 8 7i.t 8 +W 

_ 1140 9V. MV F*w -V, 

- 74 8 6V> 5'* 5*» 

_ 191 5*u IV* It* -Vu* 

_ 27D 3 714 714 ♦ *4 

- 2B54 9 0W 8*. - W [ 

-17265 2W 11* I** — W 
_ 3108 44* I’S 4> i + W I 

- 923 low 9 9 — 1*4 

_ 3416 St 54 5*1 — *4 | 

JO .910424 23'* 21 *w 21*. 

_ 24 4 4 4 

_ 78 3-V„ 3V4 3>* — V, | 

- 259516V, IS I6'i 

_ 9»7 42W 40>V* 41 
_ 742 V. W ft* -V* 

_ 197 Vt W. 'V +'4 

- 759 ?4 'Vi, 'V U -Vu 

_ 175 3*4 2’S 7*S — )% 

_ 10 Mt 9 9 —Is 

_ 80 3 3 3 —V* 

- 1437 5V. 4 V, 4*s -W 

_ 6280 5'.'* 4*4 S'* - > 

_ 7613 TV* ?W 71* —'4 

- 467 W V, 'Vp _»»' 

- 3540 3*4 3*4 3*4 —It 
-. 1515 5W 41* 5W. — Vu 
_ 6783 17*4 16*4 IftWu — Vu 

AS IS 625 71 W 21 71V, +*4 

_ 1172 la 1 /. 15*4 151* — *s 

- 386 131. lit ll’A— 2 
MB AX6511 18'. 17 I7*S +1* 

_ 353 at JW at —VS 
_ 50 'S W W 

- 83 t t 14 

-24715 30 W 27 1 271.— 2)- 
_ 5860 atj, <’.» Hh, — Vb 
- 22286 32ft 7* 30ft— US 

- 792 10'.'. 9W 9W — ** 

- tea i2*w 17 IT’S —)* 

.18 IJ 62 14't 13 W 14' i -V, 

JOe IJ 34615'* 15*4 15V, —14 

AO 12 183 13t 17 I2W +14 

-21429 7V* 5 S*t —14 

J6 1322346 43 W 4!t 47W —5. 

_ 454515*7 13*4 13)7— I 

- 511 ID rn 14 

M .5*2774 I7*w 161s Ift. +1 

- 60 I3’A 125s 12VS — W , 

- 2038 71 W IMS IMS— US 

_ 14*36 22’S ISW Sit +t I 

30 2J 14439'* 30*. 39 

AO 2-5 12917 16V'. 16'A —54 

- 50* MVS UV, 14 ’■'6 

- 501 26W 25*« 26W +I>A f 

JOb 7 J *0 21. 2*4 >14 

J4 -5 5459 45 43** 44 W — W 

J4 J 1 111 25*. 24 TS'.S * 5 

_ 648 11 10'. 10’S _ 

- 4976 10‘s 9*. 10’ i . *A 

_ 457 11 8*4 B<S - 

- 261 20 1* 191s 

_ 5544 23W 21 22*4 —'A 

1.(0 5.4 373 20V. 19*4 30V. 

.. 10 31* 3*. 31a 

_ 8339 I0W 95S 9t 

JR* J 61242B*-'b 27' . 78W , 1»* 

- 41 S' . +W S’/. • *A 

- 932 "-r 'S! — V U 

- 1303 4't it 4ft - Vu 

SubBen 1» 15 97 M 'S *8 68 

SuOBnco JO 1.4 545 14 131* 14 *W 

Sutourv — 1261 6*4 696 6*4 — t 

SutfBnc -48 3J 54 22 21 21 

iullOn _ as; 1st 541, 54*1 

Sun, 10 JO 15 263 23 23 2211 + ** I 

Sumltopf 2413 8.5 1732 341* 22*s 23t +H I 

Summcf _ 1796 27*4 73 74 —3V* 

Summo s ... 737 6t 5*4 6V. 

SyrftflPn _ 749 0 7)* 7t —16 I 

SurnBWA .14 1.6 463 0's 7W BV) - V. | 

SUTIHB M 17 1774 73 23'* 2216 

SwntBTX J4 ?1 26171* 17H 17)6— 1 >4 | 

SunCra 


-150631214 MMITVu + IWu 
_ 12012V6 lit B)i fit 

_ 4573 n. W 6V> — t 

- 881 616 SV, 516—1 

_ 1109 1216 1154 111* — 

_ 494 17VS 11VS lit —vs 

_ 1037 454 3*6 3»4 

_ 702 2'Vu 2V. 2V, * Vu 

- 369 lit 10W lOH —14 
_ 1261 4Vs US 3 VS — V* 

- 770 y* 416 5Vu t Vu 

_ 7111 10 10 ft +1S 

<2 245 24 W 2316 24 

- *lk — *s 

_ 3291 311* 2BV4 3154 +114 
_ 550 10*6 91k 916 —It 

_ 126 H W t _ 

_ 386 4 3)6 314 —54 

_ 3300 12)4 lift 11W —It 

- 98475 57 4916 S3 —1)4 

- 610 25 2314 24 —1 

_ 878 1014 «fc 914 — V* 

- 1346 15*4 1316 15)s *1 

_ 9435 1416 1216 1216—114 
_ 527 9 W 8)6 ft + V* 

- 7450 0W 616 St +1)5 
-ST079 16H 1514 16)6 +V» 

1.9 5719 18)4 19 +*4 

_ 150 4 St 314 —'A 

_ 5341 10)4 VA 10 
_ 156 354 3Vu 3Vu +Vu 

_ 309* MS 9 9t — t 

- 1272 16 1416 1414—1 

- 7064 42)6 38V. eS3 —2 

- 1156 3t 234 7*4 —It 

- 651 2t 2Vu Zt — Vt 
A 5586 T514 14 ft 1411 — )i 
_ 4083 6t 514 6W. +54 

- 4B61656 14U 16ft +2W 
_ 2324 19*4 1714 1714— It 


9>») 

TrtPad 

TrtCOPd 

Titaxix 

TrlCOrd 

TrfdMiC 

Trimark 

Trimbto 


Trlnzic 
Trion 
Triples 
TrtPas 
Triautal 
Trttm 
Tristar _ 

TrustNJS -32 XB 
TrsINYft 1J0 19 
Trstmk s AO 

none 20 

TuOsa> 

TuCkDr 
TUCSM 
Tufco 
ToSCln 
Tyson 


Dhr YU 1 00s High Law Ote One 

- 1681 15). 1)14 lit .14 

1J» 18 21 27 74 28)t +1 

_ 2S99I45S 1314 14'A • 16 

_ 6156 14)4 17'4 13V, , «6 

- 566 6W 5Wu 6 — Vt 

- 447 016 8 BV, _ 

_ 1327 1014 9*t 10 —W 

- 1479 0W 7V, TV. — *4 

- 799 4V, 4W 4VS - 

- 160 6 W 5*6 SV. +V4 

_ 270 15 131* 1316— I'A 

- 761 9 61* 714 —t 

_ 19320 IQt 4% 414—514 

- 803 15)6 M)6 14V. —16 

194 4W 39* 45* 

3041114 115* 1114 _ 

aS JO'a 19 V, 70 VS +t 

19VS 18'A law — '* 

2681 VA m 714 

_ 2376 SV* 5t 51* - 

- 925 5 4t 4t 
- 1135 416 4'A 4W —'A 
- 23 616 4V) 61k +t 

JO IJ 133 15W 14)6 15 —54 

JOB A 17162 23V* 2114 22 1 + 1 


Stocks Qlw YU lOOsHio h LOW Qse Owe 
\nuru - 6S76 S3*6 SI’A 53V.— 5W 

VilSpM „ 17 0t 7's 8'A 

VoBcti .16 2-0 174 8 714 8 -V» 

VoWT -06 e J I7B15 135s 15 +lt 

VodGo -M 3 3 3 +t 

VtuonSc, _ 283 6'A 51* 516 — 14 

VtSX - 3347 10 17 IT’S + It 

vnmson 744 91* at 9V* + *6 

vmi* .. *53 50t 50 10 +'/. 

Vitesse - 6366 6W 514 5*4 +VS 

Vh/u* _ 1747 14)4 13t 1314 — W 

Vmork _ 2828 MW 17 1 20)4 +Tt 

VoMrf _ «6 57t Itt 57 —16 

Value .99e IJ 2026 95*4 93V. 94t + 2 
VW - 892 S 4*4 4W — W 


WCTCin _ - 2411 7 6V. 6t — t 
WO 40 2-00a5J 4517 38 1 371t 38W — y. 




554 
lilt tW 
3 — 56 


aS 



StorTc 


- 2954 3Vt 3V6 3Vft +V6 

- 1598 J3t 1354 13>A +V4 
A4 1.9 2102 23)* 2214 22V. -W 

_ ni *H 3»4 4 —56 

- 1790 4t 316 4)4 +14 

- 1763 I4'A 1216 14)6 +114 

-32536 ltu It, It — 

72 IJ 2853 23 21 ft 22 W +>* 

J7 IJ 7267 21 W 5l 21). 

_ 3303 7)4 61ft 7 

- 2006 1 5)4 54)6 15 +t 
_ 1911 4W 514 5*6 — Hr 

- wm 6A M — t 

- 3135 lVu t, IVu +W 
.14 1A 30 lift »Vt lift — Vt 

- 110 414 J*. 4t - 

- 2329 6W 5*6 6 — t 

I _ 6506141* ll'A 1714— I VS 

_ 41897614 75% 76W +t 

- 167 1M6 1714 18Vt +11 

_ 1S1B 4 VS TPS S’Vu _ 

- 212 35* 216 3t + Vs 

z&&.X£a^ 

_ 231 ft 'A 6 6U> *'m 

- 365 514 5* 51* — W 

_ 3997 1714 16 1716 +1W 

-27923 I7W 15 15*4 

-56 5-1 20 12 II 11 

237 11W IM* ll'A +t 

- 559 8*6 7 7VS — W 

_ 2181 6'A St 4 6t +t 

_ 40I8M 135S 14 

- 3832 41k 4 4 

JOa IJ xlOO 5U6 511k 5114—214 
-80 a 17x2091 «U 461* 48 +1 

- 981 29t 2H 2*4 —'A 

- 1045 H) M IS -V. 

- 670 6 55s SW —>m 

- 345015*1, 14 141* — "»u 

- 415 Vu W Pfa +V B 

— 106995 23ft 2IW21Vu— l'/u 

- 35 74)6 23 W 2414 +1u 

- B423 514 414 4t — W 

- 5051 14)4 13 14 + W 

- 1816 31k 3*4 3)4 —It 

-47697 35)* 27 W 31)6— 3 V, 

- 461 5)4 ft VS 5V. +t 

_. 3253 15)6 1154 14 _ 

Jl .1 6570 1754 14)4 lSW— lit 

- 2301354 12 13H +1h 

- 264417)4 16 16V* — W 

1-20 10 33 421* 42W 42)6 +«A 

- 749 20)* 19)6 19 *4 —Ik 

373 816 8)4 81k - 

-23e 3 15572 2514 2214 25W. + 'Vu 
_ 639 J4V4 13 14 +4 

- 5423 14W 1114 12)4—114 
_ 1286 454 JJS 46 

- 309 55S Wu 5t — W. 
_ 15213 lvrft 12 ** —'A 

„ _ 25914)6 14 14)6 — W 

J8 I J x2 19 19 19 +25S 

73 1 J X31 17 16 1654 +t 

XOBeT.l 7D9 30)6 2954 2954 —14 
J0 I J <2 9 2416 231S 23V, — H 

-10583445)6 40*6 4414 — t 

- 2505 3 254 TV* — Vu 

_ 6306 1PA 55 15ft —ft 

- 310 12W 11)4 125* +*4 

_ 1864 3 2)6 2H +1* 

- 4947 <4 *4 Vu 

_ 90 7 6 7 +1 

243510)6 10 10)4 + 54 

90 4 314 4 + 44 

65615 1454 141* — V* 

164 65 61*8 64 VS +t 


J6 1-5 
.38 e A 


6% 7ft * ft 

SumJTTe 

z 

6405 79'., 

76 

29 'A +2% 

9ft 9W —V* 

SunBncp 

360 3.1 

10 31 

r> 

30W +IW 

7'. 9ft 

SunMlc 


19V, 10ft— It 

23ft 23ft ... 

SonS« 


409 4ft 

)W 

$% 

law iBft— it 

SunTVs 

M .4 

5275 to** 

10 

10 —ft 


serial 


0W 

9'.',, +Vu 

$h ^ 

7t 7'4 —54 

39 V. 39+*— 1 
7 7 —*t 

♦ 54 

_ _ « Vu 

- 149 10 9«* 9*6 +V* 


_ 1953 8'-. r-S 
- 410 9*4 B'A 
_ 55 3«u 31* 

_ 046 514 S'.t 
_ 1964 8 
J3 A 11316 41 
_ 553 71* 

_ 626 SV. 4)* 5'S 
_ Maito,, 1'S 1*6 


Sunbefl 
SunSav 
SunSv M 1 JO 
SondHmc 
SunG+d 
5unalass 


9 A 


7W 
354 S*t 
24013 
1338 6's 

1648 37 


7 7'.i — ■« 

5'-. SX* 

12'.. 12Vt —'A 
5 S'* —t 

35'A 37 + 1*4 I 


SunBCA 

SunBcNY 

SunUva 

SunrTe 


- 6626 30'S 27*6 28'.'. — Vt 


.151 6J 32 2t JW Jt —54 


- B34 10' 

- 766 6 

_ 5136 5*6 


17 W 1B',1 

S'-. 6 
55* 5*4 


3089 4W 31S «Vu — W. 

310 14*4 1364 13ft —VS 

1.WDZ7 3738 OSW 37)6 —14 
J8 X9 9798 7)4 6ft 7)4 

_ 470 7V> 6 7 +16 

_ 100 454 3*4 316 —56 

_ 1164 14'A 1314 14 +V4 

- 1S2 1054 16)4 1614 — Vt 

J4b M 5411 T*t ME, 7)4 +54 

_ 370 654 5Vh 6W, — Vu 
_ IBM M 754 I — VS 

_ 1740 26)4 24*4 24)6 — 1ft 
.. — «V4 1214 —’A 

-56 17 W7 15ft Mt 15 — 'A 

- 571 3«k 3)4 3)4 — W 

- 67 lit 10*6 II —W 

_ 71 2 2 7 

_ 503 7* 2W JW — 54 

1 — 9 1 1 I — V* 

1 : 

- 180 414 4 4Vu +>Wl 

- 1273 1214 11 II — T 

- 16D24W 23 23t - 

- 339 2V,, UVu 214 +*„ 

I - >277 72» 1214 1214 — W 

_ S9 2 it lift)* 3 

.16 U 45 15 MW Mt —IS 

TOO 2JXJ0964W. 4J'A 4214 - 

_ 1£B 3Vft 2W 2(4 +V U 

- B I5V4 IS IS 

_ 957 5 **fc « —ft 

_ 1ST) 914 11 +1)6 


UFto JO IJ 25229 27W 28W — W 

UAftBFn JOb 2.4 xl46 3d 33 31 +t 

UNR JO QX6 5M5S 5) 5W 

wt _ 5 414 41S 4*4 _ 

1J0 X5 10430 26 W 2BW - W 

- 1033 1BW 17)4 18)6 ♦ *S 

- 3165 4)* 4 4*4 

- 4 5)4 5*4 

- 4918)174 II 

- 683 3 W 2t 

- 9859 K Via 

- 1640 9 8)6 ... 

- 271 17 16'A 16'A — W 

- 522 W, 3 V. 3*u —ft 

- 408314 I2+* ITVu tV* 

- 667 7ft 6V4 7ft * ft 

- 764 6 S’* 6 +16 

_ 1640 16'* 16'A 16 +1W 

_ 3290 22V, 20 21 V4 — W 

J7o I J 140 J 41* 41* — 14 

.12 1.1 320 11 10'A 10), +'A 

_ 3840 3W 3Vu 3W, —ft, 

_ 18831 5 W 5ft 51* + ft 

_ 9321k 2W 216 +)6 

1A A9 *457 29ft 28’A 781k + ft 


IB, 
USHmcr 
USUme 
US Lena 
US Wire 

USATrs 

USMX 

USTCp 

UltPac 

Ubrohs 

LtercfHe 

UBraStro 

UnicoA 

UnMrce 

tMgen 

Unllob 

UnkiM 

UnBflk 


UnBnkpl 2J» 8A X334 245S 24)6 24ft +14 
UnBKCp -M2 A 525 25 IS +3 

UnkmSsb 1.00 111 145 714 6ft 744 

UPlrflpfE 2J0 53 5857 38 W 37ft 37ft +ft 


WFSl _ 
WLRFd 
WPIO+P 
WPP Go 
WRTEn 
WRTpl 
WSFS 
WSAAP 
WTO 
WVSPn 
WainBk 
womm 
Walklnt 

5® 0 


_ 5657 13ft 12ft 1214 +14 
42 M 430 JB W 27*u 27Tli —Vs 

- 56 3. 2)6 2*6 —ft 

Me 13x5533 3ft Th. Vt* — 

_ 1175 9ft Bt 8»4 +ft 
2-25 9J 334 34W 23ft 2414 +ft 
_ 238 4ft 3)6 37* + ft 

_ 15 5ft 4ft 5ft - 

_ 2736 3'A 2*4 3ft + ft 
Me J 273141k 13ft 13)k +t 

- 30 4 4 4 

AO 1A S3B36 25 JS 1 /. —ft 

- 697 9'* 714 Oft +IW 

_. 6746 42W 375s 38 — 1)6 
_ 4912ft 12ft 12ft —ft 

J4 27 853 11 V. 10W 101* —ft 

Wtold&n _ 9610ft 1M4 10% fft 

WonoLdb -10094 13'/. 12ft 1214 +54 

WaneCwt _ 51 6*4 6ft 614 + 'A 

Wamft: _ 1472 41 Vu 41s 4ft - 

Warren _ 306 7ft 7ft TVS —ft 

WshBO, _ 83 15*4 14ft 14ft 

WFSL _ .880 4.0 1459 221* 22ft 22ft — Vu 

WsirPDC _ 487 4ft 314 4 —ft 

WM5BS M 3J MOW 21ft 21ft 21*4 +ft 

W«ASBPfCJ-2B 84 179 26*4 25)1, 26)4 +ft 

“ 520 95ft 93*6 95ft +1* 

198 23). 22ft 231k +lft 
93 8ft B'4 8)4 + ft 

9 2 2 2 

4846 21 17)6 18ft —ft 

— 1314 26ft 25 26 +14 

33 IJ 2156 26ft 25 25 *a— l'A 

_ 5329 7>.i 6 7ft . 1ft 


W64SBPH36JB 43 
WMSBPfEl-90 BjO 
wotttvr _ 

WafrJri 
WatsnPli 

wbsw s J3 J 
WousP5 

Wavafrnt _ 

waver A4 2.3 11919ft law 19)6 +14 

Webcoinfl - 49616ft 15ft I5W — W 


UnSwldl 

Un/pnase _ . _ _ 

UnrvfTc _ 939 4*4 

UBWV 1J4 «X XSS326 
UCarSk JO X5 25623 
uarGs l.oo 6J stu ii 
UnCosF & .40 1.0X2331 41 
UFinSCs .16 13 *77513 
UFbeC IjOB 23 3141 

UG one _ ' 

UiUHmL 
Utdlns 

Uldlnl* - 

UNBWJ 1 JOb X9 
UtdNwso ASe 3.5 
UtRenul _ 

USvBK 72 3A 
USBcOR ‘ ” 

US Bn of 


_ 416518)6 17ft 18 —Vi 
_ 467 SW S 8 

‘ 3ft 3)4 
ast 26 +t 
22ft 23 + *6 

15ft 1514 —ft 
37ft 40*6 +2V. 
lit lit _ 
. 39ft 39 W +W 
1377 6*4 6ft 6ft —IS 
102 3% 316 3*4 +ft 
4626ft 26'6 26'A + ft 
231 15 I3V» 13ft— 1ft 
78 3Sft 33ft 34*6-1 
141816 18 18*6 — 

1147 8ft 7*6 8ft +'A 

... 3031114 1714 1814 +ft 
3JXI7S23 2814 27% 27ft— 1 
8J> 29425)6 2414 25)6 +14 


US Enr „ 214 41k 4IV« 414 _ 

US Fad _ 2534 14ft I3W 13% —IS 

USHttns AS IA93612 43)s 40ft 41H + 1ft 
US Paoino _ 520 4'A 4 454 + ft 

USRdW _ 193153116 26 27%— 2% 

USTrsr XDO X9 330 52 51)6 51)4 

US lam Afi X6 196811 10W II +ft 


UnTetot 

UWVidso 

uw*hfle 

UM1M6 

UnitoQ 

Unibin 

Unlvax 

UntEK 

UitvFdr 

Unvt-Hd 

UIWHSP 

Unwlnt 

UnvSeis 

UnvStdM 

UnwNn 

UPerEn 

UranRes 

UrbnOirt 

Uromed 

USBPa 

lAMMd 

umx 


- ,2i t7 ' A 4544 + 1ft 

_ 1032 13 W 12ft 13 +ft 
_ _ 24517*4 17 17 _ 

A0 1A 598 31 28 2V W — 1 W 

.12 A 709 27 W 26 27 

1 AO 3A 1065 41 W 40 W 41ft +14 
_ 137 854 79» BY, +*4 


JOS 


_ 1805 8'A 
J 1622 7*4 




7*4 —ft 
7ft +14 

3 
7 

It +ft 

4 +*k 
lift 

32 —I 


_ 435 3 

_ 75 7W 

_ 7W 1ft 

_ 1206 4 3' 

- 3052 Tift 11 

6A 3634 32 

6J 6718ft 1716 185ft +'VW 

_ 285 4V, 3*6 314 —ft 

_ 878 24W 22 W 23W —ft 

_ 3800 6 5VS * + W 

1J0 4,0 1Z3 2S16 24 S’A+lft 
_ 1321 7ft 7 7ft —ft 

_ 274 514 5*6 514 + ft 


V Band 
VLSI 
VSBBCS 
VS E 
VWR 
VoeDrt 
VarTech 

V alien 
VtovSy 
Vatncor 
Valmnt 
ValAdCm 
VaiLn 
VafWs A 
vftma 
Vtot 
Vcrttm 
Vartens 
VarSprr 
Vajgtn 
VMBk 
veciraTc. 
Vangoto 
Vemrite 
VbOy 
V enlwm 
venme 
VBTillB 
VTFlfl 
VTTaddv 
vena 
vesfar 
VertexC 
venxPn 

VetO Am 

WIAmiwf 

Vlosene 

worn 

Vlcor 

Vkxrp 

VirtBn 

VlflFns 

vidDsa 

videoL 

wedtFr 

viewio 


_ 72 4ft 414 4*4 —ft 

_ 18377 15ft 13% 14ft — »* 
72 IJ 172 22ft 21ft 21ft - 
JO 2J 312 17 12 —ft 

AO 3-7 205 lift 101* lOt, —ft, 
J&0 J 3610ft 9)6 9)4 —16 
_ 6408 7*6 6ft 7 —ft 
_ 19212ft 11*6 11*6 —ft 

_ 95 2)4 1% 2 +54 

T> XI 106316ft 15ft ISt +V4 
.30 2J 465 15ft 14ft 15)6 —ft 

_ 465 4 3 W 4 

.80 2J X81 35 34)6 34'A —ft 

-18021 SW 4W «ft -’U 

- 7504 34 W 33V. »* H * Vu 

.. 242 5)A 4ft 5ft +ft 

_ 20510 9ft 9ft —ft 

AO 2-0 5020 20ft 19t 20ft —ft 

- 16514ft 15ft 16ft +ft 

_ 243 5ft PA Sft *'A 

_ 690 10% 10 I0W —ft 
_ 9J7 TV, 6ft. 7ft 

- 1291 Bft VA B'A ♦** 

- 851523 30ft 21 ft— I W 

_ 63 2ft 2*4 2ft —ft, 

J5 3A 2 at avt aft — t 

- 2917 18 16** 17’A —'A 

_ 5499 17ft 8*4 11 —5ft 

AS 3-5 96420 18ft 19ft +1 

- 4M 8)6 B'u 8t —'m 

22 a 72 857 14)4 14 14*4 +ft 

_ 352 6*« tV, 64* 

- 13713ft 12ft 12ft —ft 

_ 153513*6 12ft 12ft — V, 
_ 911 7V, 7 7V* — >r* 

- 304 Ift, IM 1ft —ft 
_ 3024 4% 4*4 41* —ft 
u. 9651016 914 10ft +'6 
_ 3949251* 2316 23 —316 
_ 111415 >4ft 14ft _ 

-S3 2J 13272514 34 2594 +Us 

_ 675 7W 61k VA -ft 
_ 44 216 2ft 2* -ft 

_ 518513ft 10'.6 12 —1 

- at 4ft 4 Aft —ft 
_ 13646 20ft IBM 20ft +ft 


WtedCO 

WMtek 


Well stood 
Werner 
WC5bcnc 

WstMor _ 

WtMnss AO 27 
WNewm AO 1.7 

WstOnes 
WAmBc 


-53b 2-3 1014 34% 23 33 —It 

1.101 8.6 231 I3'A 12ft 12t —V. 
_ 3364 4ft 3ft 4 — H 

_ 4307 20ft 19 20 +1 
_ 233321 20 20*6 +ft 

— 62652 26 ‘ft, 231* 25’A —ft 


.10 A 
3A XO 


JO 1.7 


86 6 Sft 6 +** 

^29W 26 28 W— 'Ml 

3t3 27*6 TVA 37ft —V. 
209 ft 4* *4 —14 

309 12 lift 12 -ft 
16221ft 19W 20ft +W 
64 law 57ft VB'S +94 
317 24ft 34 24)4 * VS 

73 2J 10746 32% 31*6 32 +*4 

... AO 2.0 513 30ft 29ft 30ft +14 

WestooB .He J 300 19W 18ft 19ft ♦ ft 

WstOrts - 3840 16ft 15ft 15ft +V4 

WtltBrted J5B J 2208 14*4 13H 14*4 +% 

WlBonkS -Mr 12 21116*6 15 15ft —ft 
_ 590 7% 6ft 7 

1603 7ft 5ft 6 —1 

_ 2225 12ft 10% 11*4 *46 


WstBeef 

WMldTc 

WstnPb 

WsiWotr 

Weston 

WStSVS 

WstoBc 

WsfwOn 

wetsooi 

weyoi 

Whcrt 

wbeanv 

WhiteRvr 


.. Bt 7ft 7ft —ft 

1414 15ft 14ft 15 _ 

_ 19 3 3t 3 +ft 

_ 1431 8ft 71* 7ft —ft 

_ 1081 3ft 2% 3ft +'A 

JO 2-3 110 35V, 33 35 + 3>A 

-20 _ 22 »t 9 9 — 1%. 

J4 J 5156 14ft 14ft 14)4 

.. _ 330 34ft 32 W 33)4— 1ft 

WWWd* AO 13X72127 76V. 77 +\S 

WttiFd S u. 14591 17ft 14ft 16ft — W 

_ 2706 6ft 6ft 6ft +Vu 

_ 4791 16 14 14)4 — W 

_ 3)74 1SW 14W IS „ 

1.10 IJ 208 83 82ft 8Tt — 1% 

.96 XI 4554 46ft 45t 46ft —ft 

_ 5818 3SW 33ft 34Vu +Wu 
IJS 19 1495 28ft 26 28 +TW 

_ 695 6*4 5% 6Vh +V y 

~~ 9 9 — ft 


WltoCefl 

WhlMtys 

VJckLu 

wnvj a 

wnkxrtf 

WmSans 

WIUtiTr 

WtodRlwr 

WinstFu 

WmsMnH 

WHIMS 

WBCCT 

WoWm 

Wontiwre 

wooctod 

WrkCap 

WldAcp 

WorlFds 

wanna s 

Wymen 




ft 


. 1214 12 12ft 

_ 1286 69ft 6V 69 —ft 

J8 3.0 397 14ft 13ft 13ft —'A 

- 3039 14ft 12)4 1354 —ft 

34 23 549 15V, IS 15 —ft 

36 XD *124 28 ■.! J7V, 28 Vr „ 

- 145019% 17% 19ft + IW 

.12 1A 106 9ft Sft 844 _ 

AO XI 2184 IV5S 10% 19t + W 

- 33S3 6t SV. 6V H +V„ 


XOAAA „ 2273 3*u 3ft 3t +t 

X Rite .16 A 196826ft 24ft 255* +1 
XoeMto „ 1730 12ft 10W 1DW— 1ft 

XteDT - 4557 2ft 214 3t _ 

xmnx _ 32364 45 W 39 39ft— SV, 

Xircom _ 24253 18W 15W 16W— 1*4 

Xpedrte _ 1149 17% IS** 16 — ft 

Xnkir _ 82 1ft ft 1ft —ft 

Xvtonic _ 947 IBM 17% 18 — W 

Xypleii _ 1129 15W 14 14ft —ft 


ESSr* 

YorttFn 

YarkRs 

Yourtcer 


M 5 0 774319 17« Mt, +V» 

_ 91 IV, IV. 5W _ 

JO Z 9 108 21 20ft 20% + V, 
- 2121 4% Sft 3% — W 
+ 1631 Mft 14ft 14ft + ft 


ZSevn 

ZrteCp 

ZateCpwi 

Zcxino 

zetra 

ZenLabs 
Zen 
31 DO 

Zionaca ; 

SW 

ZBOMed 

ZoRoK 

ZromTl 

Zycod 

Jiw . 

ZYnokh 

Zytoe 



2617*A 

lift 

17ft 

+ % 

_ 

3031 Mt 

8% 

8% 


__ 

97 3 

2ft 

3W 

— V) 


266 8% 

S’* 

Bft 


. 

4552 34% 

32 

33ft 

— 



7371 181* 

16ft 

17ft 

-ft 

— 

■868 3 

2ft 

2ft 


«. 

3959 35 

32V. 

33% 

—ft 

2.7 

397 41ft 

40ft 

40% 

+ ft 

_ 

2833 4ft 

3W 

4% 

+ % 

»M 

2392 IBM 

17 

I7W 

+ «6 



838 8ft 

7 

7ft 

+ V4 



437910ft 

9ft 

10 

+ 54 



POSl'Vu 

2ft 

2ft 

—ft 


46 7ft 

6ft 

6% 

—ft 


7® 3 

2ft 

2%u 


- 

414 10ft 

9% 

I0¥g 

+*£ 


























■ Pai o 

i jyj Fage14 

; ' M © N 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. JUNE 13. 199* 


Co 

1 N 
c clos 
f in t 
1 prol 
L offs 
T 

1 age 


. bef. 
: 3,75 

s thai 


1 exp ( 

r sign 

( cou! 
] said 
, sira 

i ^ 

to 

stea 

the 

bon 

S 

sea 

slur 


D A Y 




diumacher Bree 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MONTREAL — Michael Schu- 
macher pulled away from the field 
on the opening lap and easily won 
the Canadian Grand Prix on Sun- 
day for his fifth win in six Formula 
One races this season. 

Schumacher, driving a Benetton 
Ford, started from the pole and by 
the end of the First 90-second lap 
around the Circuit GiUes ViUea- 
ueve had a lead of 1.767 seconds 
over Jean Ales, driving a Ferrari. 

That was as close as anyone 
would gel to Schumacher the resL 
of the day. 

Damon Hill of Britain, driving a 
Williams Renault, took over sec- 
ond on the 31st lap when Alesi 
pitted and held the spot at the fin- 
ish. But Hill couldn't get dose to 
Schumacher, who led by more than 
30 seconds by the time he came out 
following a pit stop on the 40th lap. 

Schumacher was so far in front 
by the 69th and final lap that he 
slowed three turns from the check- 
ered flag, flipped up the visor on his 
helmet and began saluting the fans 
with an upraised arm. The winning 
margin was 39.660 seconds, with no 
other finisher wi thin a minute of 
Schumacher. 

Hill did have the consolation of 
outr unnin g Alesi, who started sec- 
ond on the 26-car grid after being 
the fastest car during practice and 
the first qualifying session. 

Schumacher said he had not had 
a perfect start and was worried by 
the challenge of Alesi but pushed 


hard on the opening laps to estab- 
lish his lead. 

“I Teel we have luck on our side 
again at Benetton.” he said. “1 got 
several good breaks in the traffic 
but in the end 1 eased up to take 
care of my tires and brakes.” 

The victory padded what was al- 
ready a runaway lead in the driver 
standings for Schumacher. The 10 
points he netted for this victory 
gave him 56 points on a record of 
five victories and one second. Hill's 
second place, worth six points, in- 
creased his total to 23. meaning 
that Schumacher could skip the 
next three races in the 16-event 
series and stUl be assured of leading 
the points chase. 

Alesi. who had hopes of ending 
Ferrari’s 55-race streak without a 

victory, settled for third, followed 
by teammate Gerhard Berger, the 
last car on the lead lap at the end of 
the 69 laps. Willi ams-Renault’s 
David Coulthard took fifth in only 
his second Grand Prix start, mov- 
ing up a spot when Mika Hakkin- 
en’s Peugeot engine expired on the 
from straight six laps from the end. 

Schumacher covered the 1 90.832 
miles in 1 hour, 44 minutes. 31.887 
seconds, averaging 109.536 mph. 
With the cars slowed by aerody- 
namic change ordered in the wake 
of the death of three-time Formula 
One champion Ayrton Senna in the 
San Marino Grand Prix on May 1. 
Schumacher wasn’t close to the 
race record. Alain Frost of France, 
now retired, averaged 121.591 mph 
in winning last year. 

(AF. Reuters > 


to 5th. Formula One Victory 







■r’grflr 




j % soscH V- \ 
i\3gSS Ik* 

A " f- * • ' 




Nisei Mtnsell left and Mario Andre'S traded in their Indy cars for scooters to ride through the pits after qualifying in Detroit 

a Tdmstti Set » Be*™ «-*«»!; 5SW^£g&gZl SSSTdSuSSf ™ ££E 


r . ' 


U — ru"n TV VucutrJ P"?- 


B m-*s*»**~ srass-M? 

former Formula One champion “Absolute! v.‘* Mansell said, will be in Cleveland. MaiseU wouid announce mat ne 

will return to that form of racing. "There’s been' so much nonsense But the Newman-Haas racing JJ- JacacSKid Au^ 

but it seems he will The Associated spoken, about this being mv Iasi team, for whom Manseh won the Pnx. and m in.n?aDgxjanj*w- 
Press retried From Detroit Indv car race. I'm italh ipseUith Indy car title last year, has said mat traban ^ w^cb come af the 

Mansell said Saturday during a lot of media who nave actually it would honor a provision in his contusion of die lacy suson. 


Penske DomituU 
Detroit Indy Ra* 


The Associated Pros 

DETROIT — For the fifth 
straight race, die powerful Penske 
team dominated Indy car racing as 
Paul Tracy of Canada ran away 
from the rest of the field in the 
Detroit Grand Prix: on Sunday. 

Tracy was docked in 2 bans, 32 
minutes and 29 seconds. 9.25 sec- 
onds ahead of teammate Emerson 
Fittipaldi and 4:13 better than 
Danny Sullivan’s track record set 
last year. 

Bui it was a rough race with 
bumps, brushes and crashes. Nine 
of the 28 cars which started were 
unable to finish. 

Ai Uoser Jr„ who had won the 
three previous circuit races, was 
forced into apile of dres after being 
brushed by Tracy’s car with 40 laps 
to go and finished 10th. 

“It was a tough way to win,” 
Tracy said. “We had to make a 
move there. 1 made a mistake and 
Fm going to have to apologize to 
.41. AD I can do is offer my hand in 
apology. It was my mistake.” 

Tracy, earning his first win of the 
season, averaged 86.245 mph in his 
Penske-Ilmor Indy V8. 

Rohbv Gordon was third in a 
Ford-Cosworth XB. 1 1-29 seconds 
behind the leader over the 2. 1-mile, 
14-turn temporary street course on 
Belle Isle Park, aq island in the 
Detroit River. 

But the main reason the Penske 
team was able to dominate again 


was because t&ar m 
don — Bushman* 

was out of the T7- 

12 laps remaining, . 

Mansdl, who. bn 
track record by q 
108.649 mph in task 
worth XB, brought e 
caution flag when he 
rear of Fittipsldfs ca 
into a wall on the. 57i 
.... Mansdl juhaped w 
-pit, but later geit bad 

thecartoibepitwbc 

was installed. 

“1 think it was ft-b 

front ofirim tbdt mac 
Mansell said. “It die 
be Emenoo's fault, 
racing.*’ 

. It fobbed inthefia 
Unser would have ft 
winning his fourth 
Unser passed Manse 
ond lap and Tracy pt 
bade mtothnda few 

Unser was leading 
then made a pit stop, 
stopped after a cant 
out a lap later, aftes 
nandez crashed. 

It was- Unser, To 
and Mansdl when il 
out, mainly becau 


Vukneuye putted in 
seO, fonringtrim to 
brakes as he was lea' 


■ r- 7 jc” j-Mjf T‘.-l V ?“!• 

: vil: wirojn " ■.•jrnwr ' ^,17*, 

Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



East Division 

W L 

PCt. 

GB 

New York 

35 23 

603 

— 

Balllmore 

33 25 

J6> 

2 

Boston 

32 26 

-552 

3 

Detroit 

31 28 

525 

4>; 

Toronto 

29 30 

.492 


Chicago 

Control Division 
33 24 

577 



Cleveland 

32 2S 

561 

1 

Mlnnesalo 

32 27 

542 

2 

Kansts City 

30 29 

508 

4 

Milwaukee 

27 33 

.450 

7te 

Te»os 

West Division 

X 29 

508 



Seottle 

25 34 

-424 

5 

California 

25 37 

A03 

6^ 

Oakland 

18 42 

-300 

ITVl 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. GB 
Al Ionia 38 ffl A55 - 

Montreal 37 23 ,417 2 

FlorWo » 37 ATt 9*4 

Philadelphia 30 32 AM 10 

New York 77 X AVS 12 

Central Division 

Cincinnati 35 25 iO - 

Houston 34 36 547 1 

SI. Louis 31 Z7 534 3 

Pltlsburgh V 32 .458 Tv; 

Chicago 23 36 J90 ll'k 

West Division 

Los Angeles 31 30 set — 

Son Francisco 28 33 AS? 3 

Colorado 27 33 .450 38; 

San Diego 22 3* JH v 

Friday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
New Yut* 000 080 020 — 2 6 0 

Toronto 073 002 lta— 7 11 1 

Abbott. Hernandez 1 7). Gibson IBI and Stan- 
lev ana Melvin 14 1 .- Stotllemvrn amt Borders. 
W-Stottlemyre.5-3. L—AM»tt.6-5. HR— Tor- 
onto. Olerud 151. 

Chicago 001 130 001 0—6 13 > 

Minnesota MO 100 0C5 2 — 8 8 0 

<10 ImiHS) 

McDowell. Hernandez 19). McCosMil (10) 
and LaValllere.- Erickson. Caskm (8). Ste- 
vens (») ond Walbecfc. W— Stevens. 1-1. 
L— McCasklll. 0-1. HRs— Chicago. Thomas 
(221. Minnesota. Cole (3). Mode (7). 


Baltimore 813 110 031—10 20 1 

Boston 202 200 ISO- 7 77 0 

Mover. OaulstU), Bolian ill. Smlih i?jond 
Halles; Darwin. Horns (51- R»on lfl». Fosses 
IB), FrolTwirth (8). HesVeth i*t ond Borrvnlil. 
W— Oaulst.2-1. L— Rvan. M. Sv— Smith iMi. 
HRs— Baltimore. Satw (3). Bclnes IS'.Sosion. 
Vaughn 117). 

Cleveland Ml U» 001—4 S 3 

Milwaukee 004 oog 003—7 IS l 

Nagv. Plunk 18). Mesa iV> ana Alomar . 
Scanlon. Ignasiak (6), Llovd (At. Henrv (9], 
Fellers (») and Harper. W— Fetters. 7-3. 
L— Mesa. 5-1 HR— Cleveland. Ramire: 110). 
Kansas City 000 030 00*— 2 ft 2 

Tens 000 2N IDS— 3 V 0 

APPier. Belinda (71. Mognonle (81. Mea- 
cham IB) andMovne: Brown. Hone, cun i 8 >. 
Caroenrer (V) and Rodrigue a w— Brown. 5-7. 
L— Appier. S-A. 5v— Carpenter l5l. 

Detroit 820 021 021— 8 12 > 

California 110 Mi oci— « 7 1 

Moore. Gardiner IBI and Flaherty, Mo- 
grane. Mieiter (6). LeHerls lB>. Butcher 17) 
and Fabrevas. W— Moore. 7-1. L— Magrane.2- 
1 HRs— Detrail. Fryman (?». Tenieion dOi. 
California Curlls 15), CDavIs 111). 
Oakland 001 »10 000 J— » « o 

Seattle DM ooa 002 >— 3 A D 

(ID innings) 

Reyes. Welch 151. Eckerslev IV). Briscoe 
(10) and Stelnboch; Johnson, Rlslev <701. Da- 
vis 1101. Gossaoe <101. Avola <191 and Wilson. 
Haselman (lOi.w— Eckersler. 1-3. L— Rules. 
5-1 5v — Briscoe 111. HPs — Ooltond. Fo-* 111 
Seattle. Tjvwrliner (8). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Los Angeles 000 WJ W0 — 7 4 0 

Chicago 800 BOO 001—1 7 o 

Ke. Gross ond Piazza; Tradisel. One 101. 
Crlm ivj and Wilkins. W— ricGross. 5-J. 
L — Trachsel. 4-4. MR— Lcs An jeles. WaUoCD 
<151. 

Florida 103 000 000— » i: 1 

Pittsburgh 704 000 Ms— 5 12 0 

Hammond, Lewis I3i, Fraser 161. Hen |7) 
and San II ago, wogner, Dtwev |7|, Pena l?) 
and Slough), w— Wagner, 4-4. L — Hammond, 
*4. Sv— Pena (2). HR— ^ Pittsburgh. Hunter 
(5). Florida Canine 111). 

Colorado 010 M0 (DO— 4 70 2 

Cincinnati 003 120 04»— 10 17 0 

Harris. Reed 15). Munoz (01. Moore ill and 
Glrardl; Roper, Carrasco (Bi. Branliev <21. 
W— Roper. 2-a L— Harris. 3-5. H R — Colorado. 
Bichette (15). VanderWol 13), Cost Ilia (7). 
SL Loots 0M 180 380—4 18 I 

PWlodelphJo 003 8M 008—3 5 2 

Suldltte. R.Rodrlguez (7*. Perez |2> ard 
Paanozzl; Williams. Andersen (7), Stocumb 
<»> ana Doultan. W— Suiditfe. 3-1 L — Wil- 
liams.?-! Sv— Perez (12). HR— SI. Louis. Ali- 
cea (2). 


Montreal 2M 0M 0»-i ? 0 

New York 2M 000 0?e — 1 7 0 

hill. Polos 171. vveh eland 13) and Fletcher. 
Spear iBj; Jones. Franc© i«l SM HundlCv. 
Sunneu 171. w— Hill. 8 -3. L— Janes. cr‘ 
Si. — Weiietond [ to i. H R— Monlreal. AlouffOi 
Atlanta id: tm om— s ? a 

Houston BCD 02C 008—2 4 1 

small:. Wohlers re i. mcmiokwi i ®i <m 
O'Brien: DrcSeL Edens <6). Powell if I. Jones 

l«l and Scr-rals. W— SmollL •»<. L— Or ac-e* . 8 -0. 

Sv— McMiaioel 1)4). HP— Allan! J. Justice l3>. 
San Diego IM 001 300—5 U 0 

Scr. Francisco 000 000 017— 2 f 1 

Hamilton. EU 14 n iftl.Holfmon •«) andAus- 
mus. Burl eii. Frev |7i. Gome: '8’ ona Man- 
waring. W— Hamlllen. yo L — Bu' 1 ell. 4-i. 
Sv— Hallman (9). 

Saturday's Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
BolMmore 2M Ml 020— 5 5 0 

Boston roe om 002—2 5 1 

Mussina. Mills 19) and Tackett; Sele. 
K.Rvon 18). Howard <?i ond Bcrryhill. 
W — Mussina. 21 L— Sele. S3. Sv— Mill* I2t. 
HR— Bali I more Baines <9| 

New York *10 004 882—2 17 1 

Toronto 000 007 008-2 7 1 

Kev. WlcK man <6i and Levritz; Slcwan. 
Timlin (A). Smalt (8) ond Borders W— >.e». 9- 
1. L— Stewart, 4-5. Sv— Wlc‘«nan 131. 
HPs — New tori'. Benns ie>. Ta'iadull I III. 
O'Neill 11?. 

Chicago 008 0W CiO-fl A 0 

Minnesota DOT <03 OSr— < 10 fl 

A Fernandez. Assenmcc/tcr (7). DeLecn tBi 
and Karktvice: Tapani and Walteck.W— Tc- 
panl. 82. L— A.Feraande:. S-L 
Cleveland 003 ow ^—5 4 0 

vxwartce oai 130 zm— : s : 

Grlmsie < one S.Aicnor; Elarca. JjAer- 
cedes I’l and Harder. V— -Grmslev. l-o. 
L— Eldred. A-7. HRs— C lev clone. Thom- 17). 
SJHomor (41. Milwaukee. G.Joutnn (111. 
Kansas City C01 flic 070 — » J o 

Texas M0 030 080—3 i 2 

Gordon. Brewer (8i. Montgomery <81 ona 
Madarlane; Pavlll. Dimllh (8). Howell (81 
ona J.Orra. W— Gordon. 84. L— Dimrlh. 7-1. 
S«— Monigomcrv {9>. HR— Te-as. W.Ctarft (bi. 
Oakland 100 0C2 000— 3 4 1 

Seattle 020 70C 12x— 4 4 1 

Darling and Slelnboch; Bosio. Ayala (8) 
and D. Wilson. W— Baslo, 87. L— Darling. 4-8. 
Sv— Ayala (8). HRs — Seal) le. Griff ev Jr. 125), 
Blowers (31. TjMarllnez 191, D. Wilson 111. 
Detrait 027 040 004—11 75 0 

ColHornio 700 020 20O— 5 9 0 

Belcher, Soever 1 7 1. Groom 17). Hennemon 
(9) and r.reuler; Springer. LeHerls (5). Doo- 
san (7). B.Pafterson (9). Butcher i9) and Fa- 


brMOS. W— Belcher. 5-6. L— Springer. 0-1. 
H Ps— Ceir oit. I..Glbson 2 11 j 1. Ten lelon ( 7 1 1 
California Fell* (7). Salmon 1 131 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Montreal 310 ooi 010-7 14 7 

New Yrrk eoc 030 ODI — : 7 1 

Rueter. Hersdn (Si. snaw tTJ. Well eland 
t«i and □. Fletcher. Soehr (*i. Goiro. Mascn 
161. Linton 18) ana Siinncn. vy— Heredia. 3-2 
L — Gozzo. 2-3. Sv — Y.erteland ill!. 

HRs— Montreal. Grissom 1 Si. Bern. r;>. New 
Yort. Llndemcn <11. Banina <701. 

Los Angeles 020 200 OOG— I 9 I 

Chicago WO H» 0**—7 10 1 

Hershlser. Osuno (fl. Oreilon 181 • BanVs. 
Myers 19). VV— Banks. - -5. L— Hershlser. 3-1 
5, _wers(l3i. HRs— Chicago. So*ci I*.. Po- 

OerS'Jn 131. 

San Diego 020 000 Ml— J 15 0 

San Francisco DIO 000 000—1 4 1 


rule douole In ine seventh, in the second game 
Jorocn Ml into c fielder's encice m the firs' 
inning walled in the third and filed ou; to 
eerie' in :nesi>tn JordcnccvshthwctivMUs 
in no first gome, ana was me desis-veted 
hitter m me ntgmcao. 

SATURDAY'S GAME: Jcracn was 2-fer-s 
with rwo PB's as me Borons lest 4-3 te the 
Chattanooga Lookouts, jorder, hit a two-run 
single in (he sixth inning ar*d his first triple ot 
the secscn in the ninth. 

SEA50N TG DATE - Jordon «s netting 235 
(43-tcr-210l with 33 singles, rune doubles, one 
Ir lole.23 RBI . ISStelen oases In 24 cheroots- 22 
kcH send 5? strikeouts. Df tensive iv.ner.es 36 
outouts. or* oss-s: and si » errors In right fie'd. 

Ja pa nese Leagues 

Central League 


Tour of Italy 


Ashbr and Ausmus; Portugal. Burba (81. 


w 

L 

T 

PCt. 

GB 

Hlekersan |7). Beck l«1 ana Menwarno. 

Yomiuri 

33 

16 

S 


— 

w— Ashbv. 2-L L— Portugal. 5-5. HR— Sen 

Chuniehl 

25 

25 

0 

SK 

r : 

Francisco. Bonds t!4i. 

ralult 

25 

26 

3 

490 

£ 

St. Louts 000 131 200-7 8 1 

Hanshln 

24 

27 

0 

.471 

0 

Philadelphia AID 010 200 — l 3 1 

Vakofiomc 

n 

V 

3 

.440 


Olivares. Murohr |2).Arocha 18) ana Pag- 

Hiroshinc 

20 

27 

0 

,-*2t 

" 


nozzl; Bcskle, Coner 10). Duanirill IB» ond 
Doulton. W— Olivares. l-O. L— Boskie. 3-3. 
Sv— Anocha (4i. HRs— SI. Louis. Je Her les I4i. 
Lanl ford <131. PhilodelpNc. DouHon iljl. 
Colorado 112 0M M0— » 70 2 

Cincinnati 101 030 10*— A 9 7 

Hurt. Bottenfleid Ifti.r.LMu/io: r> cr.a Gir- 
ordl: Jarvis. Forlusr.Q *s: j.Puttm '4».Mc5l- 
rev 13) c«d Touoonsee W— Fertugno. Hi. 
L— tiled. W. sv— Mcsiror (31. H=s— Cclor- 
adz, Ccsillla Ci. VcndertVai Hi. Cincinncii. 
Plunders HO). 

Florida 720 0M 000—4 ? a 

PIHstmrgtl 103 123 B8x— 10 1* fl 

Millor. R Lewis li i.Va-IiG ( ».• znd SzTiaga: 
Cxve. Hue 16). White •<! 3rd Slsughl 
'.v— Cooke. 2-5 l— M iller. 3- 1. h^s— F ionas. 
Carr (7|.Cai6runn ill. Pmsburgn. J Bell 101. 
Hunter <6t. 

Atlanta 301 020 008— ft t 2 

Houston 07 7 002 003—7 4 7 

Avery. Stamm (A). Bedrosion »7i. Me Mi- 
chael (9) and j.Lopcz: f.lle. Veres »5l. Hcmn- 
lon <6). ToJanes (7) and Servcls. 1V—T0- 
Jones. 1-2. L— McMIchcel. 2-t HPs— Aiianic. 
McGrltf <181. Housion, Bcgv.eii 2 it7i. 

The Michael Jordan Watch 

FRIDAY'S GAMES: Jordan was l-for-5 os 
the Borons' sndl a doubleneader with I he 
Chattanooga Lookou tv winning (he ooener 7-4 
and losing the nightcap 5-1 in the first game, 
Jordan was i-tor-3.Heoauncea into a fielder's 
choice In Ihe first, ground oul to shnrlslop In 
I he third, walked in the tilth and hit a ground- 


5a turd c Vs Results 
Yomlurl 3. Ctiunichi 0 
Yckult li Hiroshima 7 
Hcnshln S. r'oiohama i li innings 
Simdcv’s Results 
Churochl ». Yomlurl 2 
Hansh.p i rolahzma 2 
v okulf w Hi'cshiroa. pw. 'ain 
Pscitic League 



W 

L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

Seibu 

34 

15 


z54 

— 

Dciel 

y. 

Vi 

C 

57£ 

2 

Ori. 

2ft 

15 

5 

515 

T" j 

L6^? 

24 

*“ 

j 

4“ 

« ; 

MZ30-* .-3.ro 




J" 


r.inteisu 

7J 

j- 


-ji: 



Salurdcv i Results 
Seihu 17. Dale! t 
Orl* 7 Lone 2 
lOnlersu 3. Niopoo Hero 1 

Sunoar's Results 
Seibu «. DcVei o 
Nippon Ham 5. Ainlclsu 3 
Orli 4, Lane 3. 10 innings 


RUGBY UNION 
Argemlno 19. S-tettand U 
WDles 33. Canada 15 
South Africa 27. England 9 
Australia 32. Ireland IB 


Results tram Saturday's 2lsl end penulti- 
mate siage, 121-kilo meter (75-mile) stretch 
from Les Deux Alpes. France to Sesfrfera 
Italy: !. Pascal Rlcnord. Switzerland. MG 
VagiifieJz. 3 hours. 30 minules. S3 seconds: 2. 
ucrsm Rue. France. Banesto. 1 minute te- 
Mnd: I VleheleCoaeolillo. France, Novigare 
Blue 5:0m. 1 minute. 31 seconds Behind; A 
Lcurfrn* Mcoouas. France. Cartorama same 
time: S. UfR CWuretc. Italy. MopcI Ciav 
3.36 her rwi 

a. Rett Sorensen, Denmark. MG MavllRde 
TeermoEYTr.. 4:Z7 Eenind: 7, Oaudio Chiop- 
cuco. irol>. Carrera Jeans Tcssoru. vt.. i 
Ne.'scn Rsdrigas. Colanda. ZG Mobih 5e«e 
Italra. 4:30 Behind: 9. G«nnl Buuro. Itslv. 
Teen Poi*i. 4:34 Behind: 10, Massimo Pcden- 
:anc. l:a(v.;.a.i3cre Blue Storm. 4. Behind. 

Results from Sunday's 72nd (last) stage, 198 
kilometers (I23mlles) tram Turin to Mtian: I. 
Ste+onaZonini. ilc:v. Nctgare. four hours. 54 
minutes end 38 seconds. 2. Diamolidme Ab- 
souicocrrm. uzBeuiSton. Pollh same Sine: 3. 
Rnoerrs Pagtir.. :(cly. Nav.gore: s.t.i *■ Gio- 
vanni LamacrdL llclv. Lampre. st.: 5. Fo- 
Diano FontanellL Italy. ZG MobtlL s.t_ 

6 Glznluea Gorlnl. Italy. Jolty Comaanllifli. 
y. Gicriuco Borioiami. Heir. Yaoel etas. 
l:.:L Andres ^errigaio. itciv. ZGMcblll.sJ.: 
9. cnarei Tere'.ouk. Kczakhstcr.. .mop«i -las- 
s.T. . :q. C'cua* Criascucd. s.t. 

Overn.'l SlsnSings: I. Eugen, Berzin. Rus- 
s s. Gewiss Ec'lzn. IOC heurs. 41 mnaies ana 
21 seccncs: - .•.'«*» Pan rail. Hz' Car-era 
2 51 Ben re :. V.gvti inzurgiN Spam. Bon- 
e’.:z.;:ZZ: *. Pa-.-: Tcnno.. Fvsjis. Laisore. 
*:;7o; L ;:ci;3(3 CitdBPuCO. II'SS; 6. rieiscn 
Rodriguez. 13:P; 7. Vcssim© Podenzana 
t*'.a:2.&idT,nl Bvgne. :5:2s: Limoni arias 
Cuevas. France. Cniorarb 13-.3S: :o. Anzrr 
HsmssJen Ji. WsKnie. 17:J|. 


QUEEN'S CLUB TOURNAMENT 
In London 
Semifinals 

Pete Samaras 1I1-U.S. c;‘. Jen Aset I . Swe- 
don-i* 7^ <7-51.8-2: ToodMartmiSl.u.S.def. 
Ch-lsto von Penscurg. South Atnca. 0-7. 0-*. 

Final 

T«M Meet in del. Pete Eorooros 7-o <7-41,7-6 
17-41. 


BIRMINGHAM CLASSIC TOURNAMENT 
in Btf-m bighorn, Emtoad 
Semtflnots 

Zina Gorrison-Jccxson ni.U^deLNaTna- 
lie Tauzlot (4). France. 6-4, J-4. 6-3: Lori 
McNeil <21. u.S.def. Branaa 5eHut»r(57.Nett»- 
■rtends. 3-6. 7-5. o-Z 

Final 

Lori McNeil def. Zina Garrison- Jockson6-Z 
8-2 

CONTINENTAL TOURNAMENT 

in Rosznaten. Netherlands 

Semifinal] 

Karste" Braasch IS). German r. def. David 
Adams. Australia. 6-4. 6-4: Richard Krajicek 
<71. Netherlands def. Henri Leconte <61. 
France. 6-4. 4-4 

Final 

Krai leek del. Braasch. 6-3. 6-4. 


/ 3 35 g 

jf-z.7i Nifc MfCrJak 


FOOTBAI 
. Nat ion al Poothat 
DALLAS— StonedGodfri 
■r, to >v«ar um l fii cl am 
hgfit end. to Wear contn 


NBA Finals 


New York 34 78 38 W-*7 

Houston 70 72 23 18—83 

Now Yore: Oak lev 5-9 IK) ID. CSmltti 4-8 2-2 
10. Ewing y-ioj.2 16. Harper Al 1(H) 18. Starks 
6-T » 4-4 19. Mason 5-7 3-4 U Antoafry 2-4 <H) 4, 
Davis 0-0 1-3 7. Williams 0-00-8 D- Totals 3669 
IMS 91. 

Houston: Harry 4-72 1-2 17. Thorpe SB04) 78. 
Oiaiuwan 18-21 5-7 25. Maxwen 8-77 2-3 20. 
K. Smith 1-6D-02. Bullard 1-7 1-24.Cassoll24l4- 
4 9. Herrera 1-1 GO ZE IM 0-2 0-00. Totals 32-62 
13-18 S3. 

3- Paint goals— New York 7-11 (Harper 4-4. 
Slocks 3-4. Anthony 8-1 1. Houston 6-22 (Mox- 
wei! 2-6. Horrr 2-7. Cassell I -2 Bullard 1-4, Elie 
0-1. KSmttn 0-2). Fouled out— None. Re- 
Lounds— N-w York 41 ( EnN 131. Houston 44 
'Thorpe 12) Asilsts— New York28(5tork»9). 
Houston 2o IK. Smith 6). Total fouls— New 
York 22 Houston )& Technicals— Houston IF 
legci defense ' Harper. Cassell. A— 16617. 

BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON— Sent Todd Froh«irth,pitchrr, to 
Pawtucket. I L. Recalled Nate Minchov. Pilch- 
er. from Pcwtuckel. 

CLEVELAND— Signed Dtn Graves. Pilch- 
er. 

National League 

FLORIDA— Pul Chris Hammond. Pitcher, 
on 15-dav disabled list. 

LA. DODGERS— Agreed la terms with 
Paul Konerko, catcher. 


Stanley Cup FIna 

N.Y. Ranger* 

Vancwrew 

Serin Bed 
Rnt Fcrtod— I. yancau 
(ten). 9:62 <«M. PeaaUto* 
<eft»wfna). 3MZ: Loefcfv . 
9:39. 

Second Period— 2 vaac 
(Lumne. Bure). 12 J9.1 N 
(Messier. Leetdt). U:C 
Motne M Q, Van (Merit 
dude. Van (tnggtoB}..?:: 
(goalie Interference): 13: 

TMra Period— t Vorxw 
i Vancouver, ConrTnofl 
duck). 18:28. Pemdtte*— • 
snot* on bow) N ew Yo» 
couver 16-8-7—31. Powers 
—New Yort 1 of3; Vancm 
—New York. R toiler, 15-7 1 
Vancouver, McLeaftTS4) 
Referee— BUI McCreary. 
CriUns Gemi Gwttder. 


HONDA OP 
M scores an Saadar 
(6465 meter*) par-73 oavra 
Goff Club In Mvcstohe, G 
Robert Allmbr, AustraUa 
Mauel Angel Jimenez, Spc 
R odger Davts, Australia 
DavU GIKanL England. 7 
Bernhard Lunger, Germac 
Paul Lawtle. ScoUona 48 
Andrew Coffnn Sattssnt 
Gabriel Htartstcdt. Swedf 
Russell Claydon. Engdand 
Barry Lane. England. 73- 


WORLD CUP WARM 
Italy 1, Casio Rica 0 
South Kona X Honduras 
Switzerland A Bolivia 0 
Mexico 3, N orthern Ireia 
Soofn Z Canada 0 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



fEAW. I COD3T 'fOJG FBCEKTS 
HSURED f00T> WEOd TIER 
\ CAR. BEBRE. >fcM WERE kb. 






GARFIELD 

WOW. x CAN'T BELIEVE I’M 
GOINOr TO B£ SIXTEEN. 
WHERE DIP the VEARS GO? 


WIZARD of ID 


f 1 think r a 

y JUST ZINGEP J 
C MVSELF J 



















l,f| Ofes 

ft«c e 






MO N D A V 

SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 1994 


Page 15 


Home Run 
Lifts Jays 
Cher Yanks 


Italy Looks Little Like Contender With Opener a Week Away 

frWiSHSi.-' W . •* 


The Associated frets 
Devon White hit a two-run 

SESfi’SSSftSSS 

ronto Bine Jays to a 3-1 victory 
over the visiting New York Yan- 

KCC8, 

Hentgen (8-5), who allowed 
three tats over eight ^ 

loek«J in a pitcher's duel with Scott 

K a nn em e da (4-2) over the Cist 
eight innings before White’s 
homer. 

In the eighth, Ed Sprague singled 
on Kanacmed ri and pinch-hitter 
Rob Butte sacrificed pnwh-nmner 

ALKOUNPUP 

Domingo Cedeno over. One out 
tea. White hit a 2-1 pitch over the 
wan m right for his ninth h on *r 
White went 3-for-4 for the Blue 
Jays, who moved to within 5% 

gaznes of the first-place Yankees in 

the AL East New York has lost 
five of its last six, and has lost four 
straight series. 

Hentgen struck out six and RtanfinRa 

walked five. Tony Castillo allowed 
two rmmers to reach in the ninth 
but got Randy Velarde to hit into a 
game-ending double play for his A 11 
first save. AJIi 

The Blue Jays took a 1-0 lead in 
die first when Paul Mother don- -r* 
bled down the first-base line with Ill'll 

two outs and scored on two wild 
pitches by Kamkmcdri. 

Jim Leyritz’s two-out double to iIW 

left scored Don Mattingly to poll . c* 
the Yankees to 1-1 in the forath. 

Mattingly walked to start the in- 5 UDda ^ 1 1 
mng and took second when third :>piU J 10 
baseman Sprague tumbled over the nmphon 

fence after catching Paul CXNefll’s They 1 
foul pop. Jimtaezi 

Twins 6 , WMte Sox 2: Kirby 
Puckett had three hits and drove in jiin£L*i 
three rans to move into the maar- iSw* J 

ltagne RBI lead as Minnesota won 
at home for a four-fame sweep of ™ ^ 
fr>iragp Amene 

Puckett homered, singled and ABenbys] 

doubled in .his first three ct-bals to by astro 

increase his RBI total to 63, one missed a ; 

more than Toronto’s Joe Carter. Rodger 

Jeff Reboulet also had three hits from San 

and scored three runs far the and finish 

Twins, who have won six of their # 
last seven. that* (nr 

Carlos Pulido (3-5) allowed two ^ 

runs and six hits in six innings. 
the Twins’ sixth nm. A&icamti 

■ In SatvrtJay’spnnes: . Classic in 

Yankees 9, Bue Jays 2; Jimmy L— — 

Key put a halt to the Yankees’ 
four-gune losing streak with a fine 
pitching effort. - ■ ~M AT 

Kw(9-1) is off to the best start |V| 
by a Yankees pitcher since Tommy J. T JUM 
John went 9-1 to begin the 1979 
season. He is 4-0 tins season in A 
decisions following a loss by the GL i 

Yankees. -aVO 1 

Wade Boggs hit a three-nm 
homer that capped a six-run sixth The, 

inning. Paul CrNefll and Danny Gmg Mac 
TartabuH also hamered. 10-game w 

Orioles^ Red SoxihfikeMus- leagues Sand 
sin a became the American hits and lead 
League’s second nmegame winner past the AsU 
and Harold Baines homered for Maddux ( 
visiting Baltimore. the first pi 

Musana (9-3) gave up five hits in straight Cy 
8 % innings, induing Mo Vaughn’S 
two-run double in the ninth. Alan hj. the : 

hfifls then camera and got the final Madduxw 

ool for Ms second save. f ■ 

Twins 6, White Soot fc Kevin "SteJ “ 
Tapani pitched his fifth career HS,* 
shutout to lead Minnesota. 

Tapani (8-2) allowed six hits to j**™ 

win his seventh straight start. He runs and eagr 
struck out four and walked two in 

his first shutout since last Scptem- 

b ‘te&ms5,Brewos2:SandyAlo- JgW “j* 
mar Jr. hit a tfarewnn homer and McGnff > wbl 
Jason Gnmsfcy pitched a fivc-hh- Dodgtxs 2 
ter as Cleveland won in Milwaukee, diotti pitche 
Alomar’s 420-foot shot in the MfteThazza 
tfaixd and Jim Thome's 435-foot ahead run in 
homer in the seventh were two of Los Angeles 



By Alex Yannis 

New York Times Service 

NEW HAVEN, Connecticut — The marquee 
between Italy and Ireland in the first round of the 
World Cup is just a week away, bm the Italians seem 


Voted the year’s best player last season, Baggio 
ployed the entire game despite a slight anVi* injury, 
Lme but he failed for the third game in a row to create the 
the kind of excitement that is expected of him. 
cm He missed two marvelous opportunities shortly af- 

* U. ik. r rv. uc. _i . i 


fa r from being ready m their quest for a fourth world ter he made the pass for Sigoorfs goaL His shot from 
championship. the right sailed over the crossbar m the 65th minute 

Italy, playing mils last preparatory mat c h before its and he just missed the left post from the right side five 
opener with Ireland at Giants Stadium, managed just minutes after that. 

VSfwSSSi ^ 3 CZ0W i 0f 23 *? 7 One of the reasons the Italians didn’t look impres- 

SUsHlOS J™ «®Samday afternoon. Except for ave tins time or in thdr 1-0 victory over Switzerland 
It r y ^ s I r ° oc ***7* "fi® — when Signori again scored the only 
coach, Am^) Sacdn, used the play- WonuCUD goal — is a change in tactics by their coach, 
ers that win start against Ireland. ■ . — _ _ L. o . - ■ T_T^ , 
but they showed little of what it QAQVI . Saccta ts ttym g to mplem enl a .formation qf four 
takes to ested in the World Cup. UOMwJH defoAas, three nadfidders and three forwards, bm 

“We had sane improveman in PBrtnCT OT 

the second half,” Sacchi said. “We’re + % attack for Roberto Baggio and Signon. 

still working to improve oar mtensi- »*r— ^ . Pierluigi Casiraghi, 25, the strike from Lazio, is 
ty at the rigbf moment and the rigid probably the ideal man for that spot. Casiraghi scored 

moment is against Ireland.’’ a goal in the 2-0 victory over Finland on May 27, but 

Italy was outplayed for long did not play in the last two tune-up matches. Alberigo 

stretches in the opening half against " Evani and Bern are two of the candidates for the third 

a team that failed to qualify for the World Cup. The ^ x,t 00 alls »cL Evani played on the left side and was 
uninspired play by the Azznrri limited the celebration more effective than Berfi, who was replaced at balf- 
of thdr fans to the tnmii^iim time by Massaro, another candidate for that role. 

Sacchi brought in Roberto Donadoni and Daniele Sacdu has been criticized in the news media for bis 


did not play in the last two tune-up matches. Alberigo 
Evani and Bern are two of the candidates for the third 
spot on attack. Evani played on the left side and was 


On* Cetfa/Tfe AworiiioJ Pita 

a coovindng victory. 


Massaro for the second half in place of Nicola Berti 
and Dino Baggio for his only changes in the game. 
Their entrance brought some spark to the Italians, 
who finally got a goal in the 63d minute. 

Giuseppe Sgnori, the leading scorer in the Italian 
League with 22 goals for Lazio of Rome last season, 
put in a left-footed shot from 12 yards out on the left 
side after a marvelous pass from Roberto Baggio. 


time by Massaro, another candidate for that role. 

Sacchi has been criticized in the news media for his 
selection of players, his training methods and his 
tactics. Italian journalists insist that their countrymen 
are more effective playing with two forwards. 

Although thdr coach played down the gam*; with 
Costa Rica, ft was apparent the Italians wanted to 
have a good showing in their final exhibition. 

“We are improving,” Roberto Baggio said. *Tm 
sure we will do well in the World Cep.” 


Aflenby Defeats 
Jimenez in Golf 

The Associated Press 

ALVES LOHE, G er man y —Robert Allen- 
by of Australia parred the third playoff hole 
Sunday to defeat Miguel Angel Jun&nez of 
Spain in the Honda Open for his first tri- 
umph on the European golf tour. 

They had tied at 12-under-par 276 after 
Jimtaez missed a long putt on the 18th hole. 

Both paired the first two extra holes, bm 
Jiroi&ez bogeyed the 449-yard (4 II -meter} 
18th after twice hitting into bunkers. ABen- 
by, 22 , then sank a nine-foot putt for par. 

Jimenez shot 70 for the last round, with 
ABenby shooting 69. He had led the Spaniard 
by a stroke throughout the round until he 
missed a short putt and bogeyed the 16th. 

Rodger Davis of Australia bounced back 
from Saturdays disappointing 76 to shot 68 
and finish thud at 2 / 8 . 

• Lee Janzen, his game rounding into 

week; shot 7-under-par 64 to a one-shot lead 
over second-round leader Ernie Els of South 
Africa into Sunday's final round of the Buick 
Classic in Harrison, New Ymk. 


Mexico Bounces Back With Shutout of Northern Ireland 


Compiled ip Owr Staff From Dispatches 

Mexico has rebounded from its 1-0 loss to the 
United Stares with Luis Garcia scoring two first- 
half goals during a 3-0 victory over Northern 
Ir elan d in a tune-up match in Miami 

Mexico, which plays in the group that includes 
Italy and Ireland, opens June 19 in Washington 
against Norway. The victory Saturday should give 
Mexico some, confidence against Ireland, which 
plays a amilar style to Northern Ireland. 

It gpt another boost with Hugo Sanchez return- 
ing from a two-month layoff and playing the first 
69 minutes at the Orange Bowl 

Stachez, the 35-year-old forward who plays for 
Ray VaBecano in Spain, has been out seven weeks 
with a tom thigh muscle. He was Mexico’s hero at 
the 1986 World Cup and a five-time scoring leader 
in Spain. 

• Bolivia and Switzerland played to a scoreless 
tie in Montreal, but the biggest concern for the 
Bolivians is the status of thdr best player, mid- 
fielder Marco Etcheveny. StiH not folly recovered 
from a serious knee injury suffered during the 
winter, he didn't play and remains doubtful for 
the squad’s opener Friday against the defending 
world champion Germany in Chicago. 

Marco Pasco! o, Switzerland’s No. 1 goalkeeper, 
returned with a bandaged knee after a three-week 
absence and played the first half. 

Stephane Chapoisat wasted several scoring 


chances near the end of the first half for ibe Swiss, 
who open Saturday against the United States. 

• Jcong Woan Ko scored one goal and assisted 
oo another as South Korea won its final tune-up. 
beating Honduras, 3-0, in Duncanville. Texas, its 
training site. 

Forward Hwang Sun Hong, a veteran of 1990 
World Cup, hurt his left knee m the match and will 
miss at least two days of practice. 

But team officials said Sunday that No. I goal- 
keeper Cbd In Young was recovering from an 
injury sustained in (he June 5 gamp against Ecua- 
dor and may be ready for the team’s opener 
against Spain on Friday night 

Korean residents of the Dallas area have tried 


“The knee is back in perfect shape,” Hierro work and the third largest brewery, Kaiser — 
said, y just have to watch it over the next coming owned by The Coca-Cola Co. — had paid for 
days*” exclusive rights cm Globo. The Brahma brewery. 

In Friday's only warm-up game, Spain beat rather than pay the mfllioa- dollar fees for World 
C a n a d a , 2-0, in Montreal on goals by Joho Salinas Cup advertising rights on the networks, gave fans 
and Juan Castano. giant banners to take to the stadiums. 

• Defender Patrik Andersson, who banged up 


In retaliation, the networks reduced camera 


t ■ 1 > _ .■ c _ ... | - , - XU avMftuuHviif UAV hviuviaj i vuuwu wnrnvi u 

““ IPP 1 * 1 *** Fnday. was likdy to miss Mgles ^ censored tfadr transmissions to avoid 

Sweden s final tune-up Sunday against Romania, showing the banner during matches against Can- 

rffl ada and Honduras last week. Teams appeared to 
DO iSrli? Andersson sard m San Diego. ^ pj,™ *fth 9 pliers, not II. The camera. 
Midfielder Kr as In gesson practiced after miss- instead of following the ball’s movement, fre- 
rng the = teams workout on Fnday because of a auemly avoided it b?not showing certain parts of 
bnnsed thigh. die pUwng fields. 

for .he ™ ecworfc sail toe, 


to make the players fre! ju home by sending Cafifornia, that they had voted to replace Stephan ^ 

speaal Korean dishes and grfts to the team’s hotel. TatawascaptamwithgqalkeeperJ^-A^ ^ ^ 

There are more than l imfllion Koreans living in BelL who has been an^a iheolavSas^ne for ^ ag ^ H Salvador. 


the United States. 

• In Lisle, Illinois, where Spain is training, its 
coach, Javier Gemente, worried that South Korea 
may be more difficult for his team than Germany. 

“Korea is the most complicated team,” Gemen- 
te said. “It’s the one that has progressed most in 
recent years and the one that could cause us most 
problems. They are a team that won't let you play. 
That’s what they aim lor, and that’s hard to 
combat.” 

Defender Fernando Hierro, who hun a knee 
Last week in practice, said he'll be ready for South 
Korea on Friday night. 


BeU, who has been among the players asking for 
higher bonuses. 


higher bonuses. " ~ • Norway's players might have thought they’d 

Bell got 14 of 22 votes while Tataw got two. awakened in Oslo cm Saturday had it not been for 

Roger Mffla, the 42-year-old forward, gpt one ^ Danish flag fluttering outside their hotel in 

vote. Princeton. New Jersey. 

It is the first time the Indomitable Lions players On their first morning in the United States, the 

have elected their own captain. In the past, cap- players were served Norwegian-style bread, baked 
tains usually were appointed by the minis ter of for them by thdr hotel. They drank milk flown in 
youth and sports. from Norway, and chatted in Norwegian with 

• In the battle of the breweries, Brazil’s angry reporters, 
fans have forced the television networks to back But then their hotel the Scanticoo-Princeton, is 
down. Scandinavian-owned. And it had a Norwegian 


oath and sports. from Norway, and chatted in Norwegian with 

• In the battle of the breweries, Brazil’s angry reporters. 

ms have forced the television networks to back But then their hotel the Scanticoo-Princeton, is 
own. Scandinavian-owned. And it had a Norwegian 

The country’s second-largest brewery, Antarcti- flag waring alongside ones from the United States 


ca, had bought ad time on the Bandorantes net- and Denmark. 


(AP, WP) 


Maddux Is First to Win 10 
As Atlanta Beats the Astros 


The IHT World Cup Competition 


The Associated Press Angdcs and Sosa connected for the and eight hits in eight innings. Orel 

Greg Maddux became the first Cobs. Hersmser (3-3) took the loss. 

10-game winner in the major Pirates 5, Mar&is 1: Dave Gaik Padres 3, Giants 1: Andy Ashby 
leagues Sunday, working aroand 1 1 went 4-for-4 and drove is four runs pitched a four-hitter and Tony 
hits and leading tire Atlanta Braves and rookie Jonlieber pitched five- Gwynn had four hits for visiting 
past the Astros 3-1 in Houston. hit ball over eight innings Sunday San Diego. 

Maddux (10-2), trying to become as Pittsburgh mushed off a four- Ashby (2-5) walked none, struck 

the first pitcher to win three game sweep of via ting Florida. out four and retired the last 13 
stra igh t Cy Young Awards, low- Garit tat a two-nm homer and batters in his second complete 
eredhis ERA tol38, also the best two doubles and sS-for- 10 fifetime game He escaped ajam in the fifth 
mark in the majors. against Marlins starter Dave after Royce Clayton and Kiit Man- 

Maddux walked none and struck Weathers (6-5). waring smgkd with one oul Pitcb- 

oatfouTin his fourth complete ^ Ljeba (2-2), angfc-fcmdcr who MaiiPortugai(5-5) nounded 


Ashby (2-5) walked none, struck 
out four and retired the last 13 
batters in his second complete 


K^™ SMpCdiV ‘ hr “- — Expos 7, Mets 4: In New Yort 

MJOCT®lJP 

nmsandta^ttalsmoghtmnmgs. math m 12 ganes. 

He struck out five and walked one. tnmed t he Pi rates recent succcs- Noises AJonhit an RBI double 
The Braves scored in the ninth off jnKjg^srftmg out 

^toHudtikvdiaiR^ertoK^ ^gpoTcSTmtal TSS2Z 

smgfed and a double by Fred §??? ,, homer, Ms fifth, for a 6-3 lead in the 

McGriff, who wen, 4 -for- 4 . *4 Md fcny hh his fourth 

Dodpra 2, Cuhs l: Tran Ca*. eighth- Reliever Gil 

wSfflpincb-bmer Kevin Roberson 


Weathers (6-5). waring singled with one out Pitcb- 

Liebcr (2-2), a right-hander who er Mark Portugal (5-5) grounded I 
began the season in Doable- A am- into an inning-aiding double play, i 


NL ROUNDUP 


Greg Swinddl (5-3) gzve op two SzL nutJIWur 

runs and eight hits in eight in ni n g s. . . . w . . 

He stntok out five and walked one. toned the Pirates recentsmxes- 
Tbe Braves scored in the ninth off son of strong starts, stnkmg out 
John Hudek when Roberto Kdly three md waDting^ihree while low- 
singled and a double by Fred 

McGriff, who went 4-for-4. U In Stamps games: 


off Cal Bdred (6-7), vAo ftnidcout 

a season-high 10 in eight timin g s . 

Boyab 4, Ibu&n x In Arimg- 
T»-E 5 W dees Gazne broke a tie 


Mike Piazza smgledhraae the go- Can&ia!s7,Pfcffies4 l G reggJrf-| 

ahead run m the o^itii mnmg for the eighth inning. * three-run homer and 

Los Angeles m Chicago. Chicago trailed 4-3 when Rober- Lankford added a two-run 

li?Stalo ! fttor& nth time soTtaKtorpiSS Wiffie to lift the Cardinals in Phila- 
in 12 games. Banks, led off die agiuh with Ms 

Candiotli (5-2) walked none and third home run. Marie Grace hit r . Pt ? 65 • ffi’. 
struck out seven in Ms fourth com- into a double play later in the in- Lo uisvflie last week, 

Mete game. He gave up a two-out mng. but Sosa connected with two 5?““®“ tomue aM added two 
with an eighth-inning saennee iry. dooble to Samflty Sosa m the mnth, outs for a solo homer, Ms 14th, and ."f 1 - - e 'V° < ? a 

Wiliato three-nm homer m ^ May oa a Jose Hernandez added a two-run Mtoh«l the final two innings for Ms 

the fifth gave the Rangera a J2 erounder to end it T sm^e. °S5 0 S ? V d^«« : a. mi 

tat the RoyateMtoi «n the Tjm wdtodl homered for Los Banks (7-5) gare op foor nms 

Gaetti ledoffwfthapanch- ■ Stadium as ibe Reds turned a piv- 

dnSteandhfikeMacfaxtanedrew. |UBe 

ififtS-M SIPEU NES 

Berzin Easily Takes the Tour of Italy 

^e’sfce main ceding races, the T<mr of Itety. (1-0) got Ms sec 

sacrifice fly to ngbi. Rusty Greer s secondsbeforc ItalfsMBiroftntam.Two- QQd ^ I 

the win. rima defending i ctenqnrai Miguel Indnram of Spam was third, 3:23 back. 4: Brian 

* Braril Wins Women’s Basketball Title ffialA'S " 33 

SYDNEY le^SSSSS^lSj^i 

Ken Griffey Jr. hit tas 25th homer finMmtenwtwnMgaiMO^ra^tod^M^^ beat Chma, 96-87. Hunter lewd a thiSSn tMrf in- 

'“S'SwStd Nfikc Blow- 29, BrazD 

era rdsobcmieied for the Marias. the de f e ndin g cha nqiio n United States, I lM07, Sat grday night. It Steve Cooke (2-5) got Ms first 

Oms Bosk? (3-7) aHowed ara.tate. ™T the 11 years a US. team had lest at the championships. g 5) gpt Ms f 


SIDELINES 



*- 


- s 


for Seattle at home. • • ‘ to win its first worn 

Tino Martinez and Sfike Wow- • Hortcncia \ 

era also homered for the Mantra- beat the drfeaffing ( 
Oms Bosk? (3-7) aHowed see tats. : was the first time m 
walked one and strode, out five m 

W i* NgugiOra 

fourth tune tarns last five starts-. . MONTE CARLC 


wm smee April 29. i 

r . i nn Ron Astros 7, Braves 6; Center Adder I 

fjMft-toifig fte NffUfil Granted Aroitralion OH oan Roberto Kdly’s error in the Moth 
r fa-4 five 5 tam MGtm CARLO Monaco (AF) —He fateraa ri onal Amateur Ath- inning allowed Lms Gonzalez lo 

BOT^Aw^taAnaheou, jeticFederatkm voted to send the suspensions M J^m Njngj, thefive- scrae&mnfiist as the Astros ratoed 
SSa, Tgfrfc Gihson drove in a time world eross-cotmtiy champion from Kenya, Dm^ ' thrower 31 . 

t hnrfa sevmnms with a grand Erik tie Bntin and Nigerian hurdler lme Akpan to artatration. With two otu pinch-hitier Sid 

^S?^Somer«DO'- ft dotied arbitratiOTtoworid KXMnetCT%dIes dian^oii Lymimfla ftamsmgled off Greg McMidiael 


safsssssfiss-- SS 

Njmwhibmko of Rnssaa, and refused an ^>ealftaeariyreaistatenaeat for (2-4) and Andujar Cedeno walked. 

ras^ssj;. 

SSfSfcSffiSS For the Record . 

the ! 8 th straight otamone Maradle wfll be bought by Intemalpial Sport Invest- rolled afl the way to the wall as 

(5-S) got *F-. v *2“ y : d ?55S?2S : ' m«2a^Sh subskfiary of a Dnbai-based bank, the troubled French Gonzalez raccdhome with ihewin- 

ing, eight team’s financial manager said. “tignm. • 


TbeTr^rabati four homos* m- three Austrian ^nntets who adrmnea usmg oanmu 

For die Record 

&£§i 5 Si£ 'j»«sfe^^ssaBS 


(Ratters) 
re World 


rafaiya. With a titte-game record 16 hit s, wm the Cgl«e Worid Tbdd Jones (1-2) pitched 
Scries baseball tide, beating Georgia Tech by a record score of 13-5. (AP) kss innings for the victory. 


Win fabulous prizes. 

Winners will be chosen from an official drawing. 
The first 16 entries drawn, with at least 6 correct 
responses, will win one of the prizes listed below, 
determined from the order in which they are 
drawn. 

Grand Prize: Two United Airlines business class 
round-trip Europe/New York tickets plus five 
nights accommodation at the Stanhope Hotel in 
New York. 

Five second prizes: Sprint Collectors frame pre- 
paid phone cards in celebration of the World Cup. 

Five third prizes: AT Cross, 22k gold, diamond 
cut. Roller ball pens, from the Signature 
Collection. 

Five fourth prizes: Gold Pfeil men's wallets. 


HERE’S HOW TO ENTER 


For each of the 12 days leading up to the World 
Cup, the IHT will publish a question in which the 
response predicts various outcomes of facets of 
die World Cup. There are 12 questions in all. 

After answering the question each day in the 
coupon provided below, hold your responses and 
send them ah at once to the IHT. A minimum of 
6 responses must be postmarked on or before June 
17, 1994 — the World Cup kickoff day. 

Only clippings from the newspaper will be 
accepted. Photocopies and faxes do not qualify. 


RULES AND CONDITIONS 


1. IndtacfuaJ coupons wtll not be accepted. 

Minimum of 6 coupons to qualify. 

2. Cut-off date is postmarks of the first day of the World 
Cup— June 17, 1994. 

3. Valid only where legal. 

4. Entries w?l! not be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, its agents and subsidiaries. 

5. Only original coupons will be considered valid. 
Photocopies and faxes are not acceptable. 

6- No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
postage will not be accepted as proof of receipt 

7. No cash alternative to prizes. 

8. In some countries, the law forbids participation in this 
competition for prize awards. However, in these 
countries, you can still play for fun. The competition is 
void where illegal. 

9. Winners will be drawn on day after the end of the World 
Cup and published in the IHT on Thursday 21 July. 

10. On all matters, the editor’s decision is final. 

11. The Editor reserves the right in his absolute discretion to 
disqualify any entry, competitor or nominee, or to waive 
any rules in the event of circumstances outside our 
control arising which, in his opinion, makes it desirable 
to cancel the competition at any stage. 

12. The winners will be the first correct answers containing 
six or more coupons picked at random from all entries. 




Group A 
USA 

SWITZERLAND 

COLOMBIA 

ROMANIA 

Group B 
BRAZIL 
RUSSIA 
CAMEROON 
SWEDEN 

Group C 

GERMANY 

BOLIVIA 

SPAIN 

KOREA REPUBLIC 

Group D 
ARGENTINA 
GREECE 
NIGERIA 
BULGARIA 

Group E 

ITALY 

IRELAND REPUBLIC 
NORWAY 
MEXICO 

Group F 
BELGIUM 
MOROCCO 
NETHERLANDS 
SAUDI ARABIA 


TODAY’S QUESTION 


Which team will win the competition? 


Your responses 


Job Titles. 


Company;. 
Address; 


Country: 

Telephone; 8J13 

Send responses to: fHT Worid Cup Competition. International Herald 
Tribune, 181 Avenue Charies-de-GauUe. 92521 Nenjfly Cedex, Ftarce. 


itcralfcS&ribimr. 





XNTEBJVAT2 ORAL HERAJLD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. JUNE 13. 1994 


befi 
•: 3,75 

s lhai 

} A 

C ery 
1 Stoc 

lion 

• ly fi 

J 0 

■ unfl 

* pr<* 

; u 

i «p< 

i si&i-i 

. coul 


fllTB 


By Man Wolf 

L ONDON — Julia McKenzie lists 
“cooking” as z primary imereai, bul 
the British actress has a new career as a 
musical cannibal, on stage and — if all 
goes well — on screen in Stephen Sond- 
heim's “Sweeney Todd." 

Her yearlong run as Mrs. Lovett the 
endearingly murderous accomplice to De- 
nis Quiiley’s vengeful barber Sweeney, at 
the Lyttelton Theater, ended June 1. but 
her involvement with the material will 
continue. 

Plans are afoot for a feature film of 
“Sweeney.” to be produced by Britain’s 
C'nannefFour and directed and deigned 
by Declan Donnelian and Nick Ormerod, 
the team behind the National production, 
which won four Olivier Awards. 

The film would be shot on location in 
and around the seedier stretches of East 
London and. if McKenzie has her wish, 
would co-star Anthony Hopkins. (Can he 
sing? “Enough." says* the actress, “and 
anyway, you can get help on the tracks”; 

All of which means that one of the most 
exciting and. over some 20 years, enduring 
collaborations of the contemporary musi- 
cal theater remains ongoing. And while 
McKenzie. S3, talks about putting musi- 
cals behind her to return to plays and TV. 
one senses that Sondheim will always be a 
lure. 

There's Mama Rose, the legendary stage 

mother in extremis of “Gypsy.” for which 
Sondheim did the lyrics; ‘Tm not a Rose 
m the conventional sense, but I wouldn't 
mind looking at it with Declan; he's taught 
me to use my old bag of tricks in a new 
way." 

.And there’s the hope of creating a Sond- 
heim part from scratch. “Thai’s obviously 
my deep, deep wish," says the performer, 
who has yet to premiere a Sondheim role. 
“That would be the culmination of my 
entire working life.” 

The two remain as unlikely a match now 
as they were in 1972. when McKenzie 
stepped in as the lone Briton surrounded 
by .Americans in the West End company of 
Sondheim's “Company." He. of course, is 
the quintessential Manhattan sophisticate, 
as urbane as he is private; she’s the apple- 
cheeked English suburbanite, the happily 
married 'wife of the .American actor Jerry 
Harte. who gives as her hobbies “cooking 
and gardening.” 

Still, what difference if their intellects, 
lifestyles and backgrounds represent the 
greatest contrast imaginable?’ "We meet 
somewhere on an emotional line." 
McKenzie insists with characteristic un- 
derstatement. “We hit it off; we just hit it 
off.” 

“Yes, my syntax breaks down when i 
speak to him.” continues McKenzie, 
whose training at London's Guildhall 



A. ffij- 

II jilt 



language 






- ™ •*c/» 



Following London stage hit as Mrs. Lovett, a movie niaj be neM step. 


School of Music and Drama led her rust 
into operetta and then musicals. 

“1 don’t have anything like his educa- 
tional capacity for thought. He leaves me 
miles behind, but then He leaves millions 
of people miles behind. But I feel that 1 
can understand his stuff emotionally; it 
triggers off immense feelings for me." 

And so it does for a “Sweeney” audi- 
ence watching McKenzie's transition from 


roisterous music hafi comedy to ;nc an- 
guished realization that ih; man sec loves 
in turn loves only liis rar 
Angela Lirubuh . who created the pan 
on Broadway 1979 so?a:i:e L;r» Cari- 
ou's Sweeney «. offered a kewpie zo'i hero- 
ine gleefully obli - "ouj ;o the grotesque 
dealings of her pariner-:r.-c:in;uba:isrr.. 
McKenzie's N'eliie Lovett is altogether 
more self-.-. ware, as the first jighi of her in 


the opening chorus, boozy and glasty- 
cyed. made clear from the start. 

“1 think it has the best last 20 minute? o? 
anything I 've ev er beer. in. in nr. life . ' say? 
McKenzie, aware, too. lhai the production 
gained from its presentation within the 
state-subsidized confines of the National 
and away from commercial pressure. (Its 
debut British production in 1980 was a 
West End flop.) 

“We had seven weeks of rehearsal. " as 
opposed to the usual month or sc. the 
actress explains, “and two weeks of impro- 
visation before we started discussing 
things about ourselves: if we ever planned 
to kill anybody, if it was in our makeup, 
what we would do. how we would do it. 

And what did she discover about her- 
self? ”1 realized I couldn’t deal with the 
face. I probably could under desperate 
circumstances deal with the rest of the 
body, but I'd have to cover the Face up. 
although I think that's probably a discov- 
ery about Julia McKenzie, not Mrs. Lc- 
ve'tL” 

"Sweeney Todd” marks McKenzie's 
fifth Sondheim show — seven, if oae in- 
cludes her two stints directing his matenai 
— and they cover a spectrum not even 
Lansburv or Bernadette Peters. Sond- 
heim's two leading ladies across the Atlan- 
tic, have embraced- 

In “Side bv Side by Sondheim." the 
1975 musical revue. McKenzie sang patter 
songs and ballads, comic numbers and 

torch songs; the show's Broadway transfer 
from London two years later brought her a 
Tonv nomination. 

In' 1987. she played the hapless Sally 
Plummer in a London version or* "Follies. " 
a showgirl turned housewife who years ago 
married the wrong man. Reunited with her 
former flame in a derelict New York the- 
ater. Sally embodied good cheer teetering 
on nervous collapse, as McKenzie remind- 
ed audiences nightly in her climactic song. 
"Losing My Mind” 

Three years later, in “Into the Woods." 
McKenzie inherited Bernadette Peters'? 
role as the Witch. earning a new song no; 
heard on Broadway and lending a moral 
center — and sense of fun — to a poten- 
tially amorphous enterprise. 

Now. after the Sweeney run. McKenzie 
is keen to remind people that “l do act 
without singing; 1 mean. 1 don’t come 
joined at the hip with a voice.” 

Bu; while she waits to see what’s next, 
she knows “Sweeney” has made a differ- 
ence: “I think it has awoken in me an 
interest to be stretched; maybe 1 was a 
little more complacent earlier. I'm ready to 
be challenged.” 

Mon Wolf is un American theater critic 
and journalist based in London. 


WEATHER 


Aimlwd'n 

trim 

ttovK. 

3c‘j«ir 
Bjtm- 
011/5 JOS 
Bom r«*t 
Cos ’V'tia^on 
Cun Dei 3d 
Dutfir 
Ettrtwnjr. 
P/w 

k, <— .1 

•Ra-u • 

'-lifc'nci 

L.-i.-'i 

Ljrjar 

MiRnfl 

..tiU- 

Mmco • 

Mi-** 

■fir? 

Coil 

P/wro 

Psic 

Piagu- 

P?T» 

3". =CT«T»J>3 

Swr'irlrn 

SireMW-fj 

Tafcvj 

'J oriel 

Wm 

Wnn 

Curt* 


Today 
High Low 
CIF C/F 

W75 17192 
IT-** K'S' 
SWT* l».W 

3>-es z'-ro 
i:e 
i-.s? 
22 r\ 1 cvtc 
12/7 1 11/E 

S4.-7S IS/» 
I9.W 13-55 
24/75 10 fr: 
Ji/75 ID'S] 
IWV . i U'SS 
i» s 
jitc »:<s: 
?;.75 

■■■a. 

ir -ic 
iat-! 
,-4/75 I6.o’< 
:V7? iso: 
2 */-'■ 1010 
12 n\ 14 i? 

7T.7I 

D-W &/« 
TC'PB 1««! 
i9«6 iifla 
tc/sa 18.W 
12/53 
nr-w •7.43 

?/« E.'« 

22 .— u/m 
.4/57 5.4.1 

:?/82 n a 
23/73 1i« 
17/52 P/48 

2173 IT.’S 
21/70 1353 
20.78 19-50 
31-70 11-82 


Tomorrow 
W High low w 
OF Cff 
9 nrrr \ 7 .e 2 > 
PC 21-7X3 14/57 i 
1 26/79 >4/57 ah 

5 32.83 22-71 pc 
pc 24rE 16/61 1 
6 h 2B/B2 16/51 c 
do .M.73 1 J.S/5 p: 
3 nrn 11.57 3 
oe 27W 17*2 pc 
til 24/75 12-53 po 
s xm ifl w 1 

1 21.70 10/50 1 

3 Ifrfrl Ifl/SO 1 

an 73/73 WC7 1 
24/75 U/37 3 
rc 23-73 14.57 3 
13.96 1152 c 
pc ;i-54 li «■ in 
i 24/75 ID-69 1 

c 74 .75 17,£2 S 
9 23-73 14. -57 ■ 

x 27 m 17 53 5 
■41 25-77 16 91 9 
pc 27/7! 1355 c 
pc 22-71 12-53 s 
9h 22.71 10/Hi ■ 
3h 21/70 5/41 « 

pc 23/73 IE 54 a 
a 25/77 15/69 i 
sc 22.71 14.57 pc 
cl* 1152 5/4: pc 

1 24-75 1457 ■ 

I 23/71 1253 6 
pc 21/70 B/4Q e 
PC 25/77 14/57 9 
pc I9/S6 11.33 ; 
9h 25/77 15/64 B 
pc 22/71 15.-58 pc 
oh 24/75 14/57 pc 
pr 24/75 13«5 i 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weaiher. Asia 


Bangtail 

Bcyng 

hfa^gKong 

1/tanU 

flew C«lt 

Swjl 

3.‘un?v-. 


*lyr:n 
Cap* Tom. 
CjUaUaUM 

Kwof- 
La gos 
flwab 
Turw* 



Tpdpy 

High Lew W 
C.7 CF 
54-;-2 27 er *0 

29-34 1-C56 c 
30 BS 26C7 • 

32 S3 :4 -s • 
:*/ 57 31 .to v> 
23-ii: 1351 pr. 

27. 227: oc 
3 2 B9 24.75 m 
32 V) S-17S ah 
25-77 2C-69 I 


Tome new 

High Law W 
OF OF 

30- »: 26/79 1 
32.69 7173 pc 
30.K 27 90 =c 
•12 35 24 -i 1 
r 79 29.04 pc 
re-H2 »7-«c pc 
28.-52 21-70 pc 
32-S9 24 75 pc 
32-89 23-73 pc 
28.T? 19 -M pc 


ACROSS 

1 F/cgeralC s 
lone 


Keep Your Eye Upon the Bagel . . 

N - FW YORK — “As vou ramble on through life, b^^atxording to the Yiddish^* Leo ko^. 

brother,” goes the profound poem in the May- ^ jf^ deed in the community r ^ l3aa£ ^, 


_ _ , . . jMSIKSSWpa* "f.fe' 

fi 0W er coffee sh^s* “whatever be your goal keep your kQW< Pdand, in 1610 ; the toroidal roll w snto to oe a 
eve upon the doughsuL and am upon the hole. gift to women in childbirth. . . - . • 

’ Sage advice. tighUy sugared; however, ft now appe^s for thcaoedw^ jawtnafce was 

thaidoughnuts mav be what worried markclecscall a ^ Eng ^ b from the Yiddish heyg? which ffl 
mature product” .And the notion of dunking a dough- and in 1932 was shorter^ to &$#■ 

nut into a cm of coffee is so mature as to be decrepit tfae Barnhart Dictionary °f 

What is the essence erf a doughnut, sonretmies ^ moied in the Old High Oernait^g; retetea lo 
spelled donut? Its ctreularity. you may say. or similar- beod ^ [nm tbeProto-Gamamc hacsxnm 

rtv to 3 ring; wr geometry teacher would say a ^ j a do-Enropean though-. ; .= . • j/. 
dbu^mut is toroidal, and if pressedfor an “planaii*». . y ^ .feavaied dough has , not .been aqjpea or. 

would describe the surface generated bv a nonmta'- n««i®d in nearly boflnig water -for at laaa a long 
sating line and closed curve rotarir® about tl m the before hating, the tcucii dalpgicta^gnw be. 

same plane as doughnut-shaped. ■ ' defined as a&ogef, but fe more pnya^cqnadfl^an. 

It's made of dough, but why is it called a doughnut, uncrumbte-able doughnut. {Scene -wlB : »OTaeMBijf . J. 
Nuts don't come with holes in the middle, like Efesav- j^b^ed mmtmbk-oSe; that s to mate ^sify pro- .. 


hft 


ers (Life Savers, the brand name for a doughnut- a word that may never have: been teed 

shaped ram*, took the name of the circular device before. Unoumbteabhi looks '.funny because* tml&e 
deicncd ;o keep swimmers afloat, thereby saving their ur g >nmotaJ axdde, it is unfanuKan) A thrcjff«i»s-that 
LH-es- when the product was ofifered to airimepasea- CoWWarrioisnsed to calPcoavergecqe” dough- - 
eers bv Right attendants, then called stewardess^. become more chewy white bagds baomp mtae 
some nervous passengers panicked, thinking that the ^mhfy nntil there is no dear d^creatiiw te^ etwera 
plane was ditching in the ocean; for that reason, the them? Perish forbid - ■ • f. \ : 

Right attendant now offers “mints, j Dwk, a word even more dtosdy associated wlh 

Where was I? Yes: Where is the toroidal quality in a 1 doughnuts than &&&&,' te.'fiCB C: lhe 'Pfflffi 
nut? Tne answer is that a nut has no such quality; as Dutch dunke, “10 dip, to anmase in^Dd^i 


you ramble on through Hfe. you will never come across 
i nut with a hole in "the middle. 

The surliest reference to a doughnut was Washing- 
ton Irring’s 1 809 description of “an enormous dish of 
balls of sw setened dough, fried in hog's fat, and called 
doughnuts, or olykoeks.” In 1851. Herman Mdville 
wasVenhanded in “Moby-Dick" in referring to “old 
.Amsterdam housewives’ dough-nuts or oly-cooks"; in 
the nomenclature competition, though, the Dutch 
“cil-cake” iost out to the American “dough-nut," 
because the Hole brownish bomb of chioresterol was 
originally shaped like a large nut — spherical, but 
without a hole in die middle. In the early 19th century, 
the Pennsylvania Dutch (from Germany. Deutschland, 
not from Holland > got fed up with the soggy centers in 
their Fastnacht cakes (a Shrove Tuesday treaty and 
crea:ed tie hole ia the doughnut 

What makes this background necessary to news 
junkies (consumers of junk food for thoaght) is the 
item in USA Today that consumption of doughnuts, 
sweet rolls, and Danish pastry has increased only 
slightly in the past decade: from 1 1 per person in two 
weeks 'in 19S4 to 12 per person in two weeks last year. 
According to my projections based on personal sweet- 
rcti and Danish wolf -downs, that amounts to about 
one doughnut per person every three days. 

Meanwhile, Nana HeBanch writes in that Gannett 
publication. “Bagels are the fastest-growing food on 
the menu. People ate an average of 7 bagels per person 
tin a two-week period) in 1993. op from 2.6 in 1984” 

What does that tefl us about toroidal food consump- 
tion today? Tnat’s one bagel every other day. com- 
pared to one doughnut every third day. Bagels have 
already outstripped doughnuts, and are pulling away 
in popularity with each passing day. 

Linguistically, this means that 'Merriam- Webster 
must soon step defining bagel as “a hard glazed 


earlier German root. .The famous Dnnkarf C&urch 
(known as Dtmker Church in many histories), a Marv- 
tanri landmark in the Battle of Antietam^Aras i&e 
bouse of worship of Geansn-Americaa Baptists vto 
practiced total immersion in baptism Ttedtsmay of 
(km^hnut dunkers who lost^ ^ iheir^tty- 
during the process of dunking led to the toon sudtm: 

Dunking is proper for dougbnuls;_it isbarbarie for 
bagds. ' 

' 0 ; •■iVg 

Whence mot and branch? ■ ' ' i . . 2 * ' '-:Jr 

In a political dictionaxy.'CRstfii for cohM^eisywea - 
to Justice William J;- Brennan Jr. in Green v. Go«aty 
School Board of New Kail Comity. Yirgtnia {196*}:. 
“In which racial discrimination would be ehraiasdoA 
root and branch.” ' • . : - 

CcmesnawSoiSttbametz,exaxtiye<et£^ 
dom House dictionaries, who had been dipping into> 
what he calls “that ever-revealing source of- Ei^h-' 
idioms, the BibleL*' . 

From Malachi, last of the Prophets, 4;J , in the King 
James Version: “The day that cometh shall burn them 
up, saith the Lord erf hosts, that it shall leave theta , 
neither root nor branch.” 

Coincidentally, now that I look at MabchL ihe 
verse following this dire wanting.' of destruction con- 
tains a phrase used by both Woodrow Wilson 4ad- 
Richard Nixon in stirnng periKationsr ^Ihe Son oT 
righteousness arise with healing in his. wings. ” r-/ 

fie*? York Tunes Serrter - . 


INTORNATIOIVAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appear* on ft tge 12. 


i9=p*!7.«ie a ■ 
se: 

Z2 iear.ro e- 
Thersse Ast' 
33 Be'-ewe/ •- Sec 


S Shortening MB#W - 

8 unie aigsy 2 *PzC-~’ 

30 5U.C-S' 3:-: 

31mC9!uOJS j.. ;e 

a SuaDutn Lascviccs 

reirady ;oo-5 


Jniirwin 


I UnscofioobK 
Com 


UtvsoABOfiob ty 

Md 


North America 

Hoi weain*r su/^e -r.io 
Zh-cajo and Dsiron Twos- 
day and Wednesday, and 
will also push eastward Into 
New York Ctty. Philadelphia 
and WashlngieR, D C.. far 
ihs midoie at the week. 
Seattle and Vancouver will 
have unusually cool weather 
Tuesday through Thursday 
with showers. 


Europe 

Lands sauin of Scotland and 
Danmark and north ol the 
Alps wiH havo limes ol wann- 
ing sunshine through ihe 
□grind Farther north cooing 
winds and passing showers 
will oredominaia. Italy w III 
have a few early showers, 
than aurmler weather, Spain 
and Portugal wilite settled. 


HHMWy Js?\k? Hn*V 

JAaki Smm 

Asia 

Tno rainy season is under- 
way from Shanpnei and -hD 
hoan ol Crtna east r. ToKyj, 
rams will vary from passing 
showers to lasting dawn- 
pours; a little sun is likely 
Bel|lng and Seoul wilt Have 
hlt-or-mlss thunderstorms 
Expea a passing aawnpaur 
or two In muggy Hong Kong. 
Sxigapoio and Bangkok. 


riTO :dV. 4 24 75 17/83 r. 
13-» :--3 5 212/flfl 11/52 pc 

24 -s ii-s -.0 01 ; 

;:r: t .s : ;4.-s r sa pe 

21-94 -3-2 j- 32 •“ 14-75 jx 

33-C5 1? 53! K 22C! :! 53 oc 
22 7i .5.57. jr. S7--9C IE '5i 1 


13 tmcetuO'JS 
ie SahOurn 
rerredy 

19 Rule tne — 

16 Agitate 

17 Have or* 

is Smcre s 
senes' 


33 5e:-:c 
35 O'- Aft" 

asuaits, 
M*-cr - c::- 
37V.:n-c.-='- 


Middle East 


Oceania 

kirn kind 15/C-J S Mfl pc iflifll 10/50 pc 

Svflnty 17IC2 7.'4a 3 17/C 10W ■ 


Mgti Low W High Law W 
OF ClF OF OF 
29 AM »«a * 29-34 22/71 * 
34-33 1fl«1 s 36/97 22/71 ■ 
Z9/B4 13« 3 30/M 18*51 ■ 

27/00 16*9 9 70/82 18/M 1 

41/1M 17/* s 42/107 22/71 ■ 
41/106 22/71 s 41/10624/75 s 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

High Low W Hltfh Low W 
OF OF OF OF 

BumosAlraa 15/59 8/43 pc 16/BI 8/48 pc 

Cbthcbs 31/88 25/77 pc 31/08 28.79 pc 

Lena 19/06 IMI pc 18/BB 16/61 pc 

MsccoCay 24/75 13/53 wh 24/75 13/53 Bh 

Rtad&twiMP 24/75 17/82 pc 24/75 1B/84 pc 

SaWia^l 18/81 4/39 pc 14/57 2/35 9 


Legend: s-sunny, pc -party cloudy, c-doudy. sh-snowem. l-traaOe/iHuiiia, r^aai, d-anow Curies, 
sn-snon. Nee, W-Wealher. All mapa. twce an i and data provided by AwWlrtwr, Inc. 1/1594 


North America 


Anc/ionige 

Altenu 

PoUcn 

'3i-M0P 

Dcnvrr 

OlrcJ 

Kwuw 

KM» 

Ln-vncnlea 

fihnepab 

Manirosl 

Mjssau 

NwM 

P1JOWWI 

SwiF/sn: 

SealllD 

Tcxorti 

Washn^on 


24.-7S 11.53 
31.80 21/70 
27/90 17-52 
’*-■30 IB-54 
22 « 15 59 
31 •££ "“*4 
27 64 22 71 
33-83 23.73 
17-63 
33 91 Z€,79 
17.52 
25/79 10.1 J 
31-88 24,7? 
30/80 21.70 
4J-TQ9 27/HP 
22.71 /J75 
I7/8J 9,40 

2?/a ? 12/53 
30/86 21.73 


(K i:.frd 

1 m/si : 
pc 2s<ei ■ 
1 32.91 i 

I 37/96 
t : T--30 
x 29-fr. ; 
pc 2Z -7-5 . 
W 27«) 

9 32-05 : 
PC 29.-33 
pc 24/75 ' 
pc 32.0,9 ! 
pc 9:/B3 1 
» 40/1071 
J 23.73 : 
r 10*4 
?c 3679 ' 
pc 34.-33 t 


Solution to Puzzle of jane 10 


qhb oaaatia .Qnaa 

H □ Q □ H □ tn HHCT : MR30 
□ujuyia ciFitiififinn 
r non Hfflm nnna 
inaHy Hinnfaw.fZJHHaa 
onB : aamsaaa&m 
iBataaQQD “Scnapun 
QQQ QGK3-*' > QUZILf 
C1QQQD HQQOHEIQ 
□□0SQI3QG1 -' 0DET.:r » 

bq □ ciq sia > : aaoiaa 
qeiliq saaaacziQiiotia 
□bos aaaaaBvjmaQ 
bqhq Qaaoraa; aaa 


ss Ear.i-ia' 

e.-ewr. 

Wsaseoaiis 
Qc-cieday 
a? as 1 *-/ satrer 

43 r . a 1 , c- 

44 -Q.eS" 5" 

eoSetarr.c.e;". 

4r 5a— s»a- s 
-.O-rrer. :cr 

M Ssau 

54P..S 
ss £.e i£.-t7 
37 T 2>? 23S' '.O 
•■-■i :a-sci .r.i 
ZS ~.v ' c '22' 

53 §:■ 5 vocal- 51 

oo German r.tfe- 
ai ‘Let's Ma^e a 
Dsa" cftcice 

32 r,*2i-3 2 catjie 

s:.;ch 


1 Last year s jrs. 

2 Marcus Porcius 

3 M Mary 

4 Farm machir.e 

5 Waiter ol cases 

6 Not a weather 


CROSSWORD 

7 AODey or 
Tobacco, e g. 

• Sufht tor 
41 -Down 
9 Alarm bell 

10 Catcalls 

1 1 Wee atoll 
i2Enamglcrhip 

or noop 
13 Ecsnfls fi 
subscription 

20 School founded 
In 1440 

21 Fragrance 
24 0c:cbfir 

birthstone 
zsP^cefOf a 
necklace clasp 
as Hellenic H's 

27 Obliqueness 

28 Moray pursuer 

29 Aquarium hah 
32 Sitarist Shankar 
sa Bodement 

34 Voting district 
37 Politician with a 
limited future 

39 Hurricane of 
1992 

40 Smile broadly 

41 Word before 
deep or dive 

42 Demosthenes, 
e.g. 


<3 Impatient one 

4« Bumped 
tmpotrtety 

48 Spanish 
direction 


47 Grimm wiafn 
48"YipeBf 
4eOtdfbgy 
sc Don • 
si Netmait Lendl 


S2 Gfirrel 
. --'“Tbotrie" 'W. 

so Thirty's 'The 
— -ofthe- - • 

• - W--: - 


ummu m*m* 


uiBiggaiiHBHHaa 

anil 

mum hih 

!■■■ ilia 


Puada by Jem OrowwoB 

© New York Tunes Edited by Will Shorts, 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


4 % ^^ \ Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
^L^gg||g reach che U.S. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
52 ^ language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 5 sun. knowing they’ll get the message in 

y our v oice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AT£T i 

To use these services, dial the ABET Access Number of the country you're in and you’ll get all the 
help vou need. With these Access Numbers and your AKSET Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ABET Calling Card or you'd like more information on AIXT global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


AT&T 


• ‘p> l-^ABST 


ATXJ Access Numbers. 

How lo caD around the work! 

1 Uslnp U:i; char. Vslw.iJidihe coumi> - vou ire calling Erom. 

2 Dial the c-iirresjv rfcint; .^leiT Acc-jss Number. 

v. .\n .■JSS' Enylish-spealimp Operator or voice prompt will ask for the phone number you wish to caD or connect you to a 
cusomer service reptiaenum'e. 

To reccn-c your free wallet card of. J QS3^s Access Numbers, Jist dial the access nuiriber of 

the counlry you’re in and ask forOKttmW Service. 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS WJMM« ; 


Australia 
China. PRO** 
Guam 
Hong Kong 
India* 
lndoocsLT 

J.ipari’ 

Korea 

KoreaLq* 

Malaysia’ 

Mew Zealand 
Philipptatw* 
Saipaa" 
Sinpaporg 

Sri Lanka 

Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


ASLA ftaly- 

1SOOS81-011 Uechtxauteta* 

10811 lithiianta* 

018-8^2 Luxembourg 


172- lQll Brazil 
155-00-11 Chile 
8*196 Columbia 
0-800-01 12 Costa Rica"a 


800-3^1 Macedonia, F.YJL of 99-8004 288 Ecuador 

POO-H? Mala’ 1 0800-890-110 El Salvador*! 

0 01-801-10 Monaco* ~ 19 a- 0011 Guatemala* " 


EUROPE 


Armenia*" 

Austria.*"" 

Belgium* 

Bulgaria 

Croatia** 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

Germany 

Greece* 

Hungary* 

lceLar.J* p 

Ireland 


0039- 1 1 1 Netherlands' 
009-U IVorway 
11* Potand**** 
800-0011 Port ug al- 
i»J-91 1 Romania 

105-11 BmsiaTMoscow) 

_ Z55-2872 Slovakia 

800-01 11 -ill. Spain* 

430-430 Sweden* 

0080-1028 8-0 Sw h a w r l /> rufi 
Q019-9P1-U1I UJC 

Ilb Blnf * 

8 *1411 1 Mipnt 

022-903-011 Bahrain 
08 00-100-10 Cyprus' 
00-180CKJ010 Israel 
99-38-0011 Kuwqji 
004^*00101 Lebanon (Beirut) 
8001-0010 Qatar 
9800-10 0-10 Saudi Arabia 

19*-0Qll Turkey* ^ 

0150-0010 UAH.' 


06-022-9111 Guyana*** “ 5g 

800-190-11 Honduratria - - r ^ 

“ 04010-480-0111 MerictUA* 95^00-462-4240 

05017-1-288 Nintrasm ( Mamgiw) 174 

01-800-4288 Pn nnmn w jqj 

Moscow) 155-5042 gjju* 191 

00-420-00101 Su rinam* jjg 

Uruguay QO-QjlQ 

020-795-611 Venezuela** 80-01 1-lS 

**L 155*00-11 CAgjgg&W 

.OWfr-BSMWll Ba hjwi flfi 1-800-872-2881 

— — 8a100 ~ 11 Bermuda' 1-8 00-872-2881- ~ 

MIDDLE EAST British VI 1-800-872-2881- - 

— ^ 0t> ' 001 Cayman Islands 1-800 -872-2881 ‘ 

080-90010 Grenada* 1-800-872-2881 •' 

177 ' 100 ~ 2727 001-800-972-288^:/- 

__ — ggp- 288 Jamaica** 0-800^72-2881;-/ 

4a& ^ 01 Ned i. Arn ft POl-BOO^rrTU ^R? V 

; ° 800 ^ 13 ' 77 StHW/WeWfi 1-800^72.2881-/ . 

^ A^ICA 

f) 510-0200 ;'■/- 

004*001 - , / • 

ooin /t 

0800-10 / .fi 

797-797 • 

Q«M»llia. V 


000-8010 

004-0312 

980-11-0010 

u4 

119 :• 

190 

190 
165 

: 123 - 

95-800-462-4240 . '- I 

0 m ■.*« 

109 •'.* 

191 


™*fiO-12Z77 ^ype* (Cairo) 
800-121 Gabon* 


_00^00-1311 ~ AMERICAS 

OOa-gQOOl 111 Argentina* O01-800-200.nn 

^ 555 ^ 

-^°°- 5504)00 M56TTI2 


Ai>7 CiUin^ ij[j nrt ji-jfijr*: m J[ .^runwi AtST World Con«ci - 

[uitrei'c/Batrvtoixurari t-m «i nv.xr itun 7^ oxiana. HilmlirMi it»w 
4M>ytd tn 

Worid Coonecr" prtew . nmw . V *lBfr LSiUHreci* raci pta jn ajdiooial dame 
loacJixithccDixturv .ouanrtalUn/t 

ABT USfilMrtst* S-ntcr l- ji-j.Libk fasm iD iSc ccuublcs Ivied 

US7 Lir^ ia^-»,..fi^ow».U>e.p/lc>fcf IflitiTWMUuo Inovc* 1401a«v 

KUifet 

Tufjtli.- phone, requite Uepo-aol culncr phone carj lurdUl tone 

“FubU.- phMte. rrq-jife Jep Mk of cnlo or phone a nl for dbt tone DU1 Q10-WUJI 1 1 

from nujorUTiim.- herds 11 


^^». tane ^ ,Pha " t 

N« ywsmilahiefnHii aQ hcb. 

* A*aa jeccnd dul tone 


ana EumpeuiooiSIoir 


l.V> 9 »CF'»a» 


0<W,(W1