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Hera lb 


INTERNATIONAL 






^Sribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Paris, Tuesday, June 14, 1994 


No. 34,614 


% ^ i a I > ; i 


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I 


Europe Vote Message: 
All Polities Is Local 

Grand Design 4 Big Losers 
Of Unity Fails Pose Question 
To Imp 


By WiUiam Drozd iak 

Washington Post Service 

1 1 ■ In the minds of the European 

Union s founding fathers, the European Par- 
liament was supposed lo transcend purely 
national issues and achieve a Continental 
voice. But in elections for the S67-seai assem- 
bly, European voters again proved the old 
adage that all politics is local. 

Throughout the 12 nations of the Union, 
voters demonstrated that their pr imar y in- 
stinct was to clobber mainstream governing 
parties for their domestic shortcomings, such 
as involvement in corruption scandals or 
their failure to live up to promises of creating 
new jobs. 

When motivated to cast their ballots by a 
European message, voters generally dis- 
played skepticism toward any further surren- 
der of their national identity or sovereignty in 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

the cause of building something akin to a 
United States of Europe. In France and Den- 
mark, the success of anti-Europe movements 
revealed the depth of lingering suspicion to- 
ward any less of local character. 

The weak turnout on Sunday, which in 
Britain. Portugal and the Netherlands was as 
low as one voter in throe, reflected some 
apathy or disfthuionment with the European 
cause. Nonetheless, Austria's resounding ap- 
proval of a referendum over EU membership 
was hailed by the European Commission 
president, Jacques Delors, as an encouraging 
sign of support for the European ideal, given 
“that the Austrian people are very attached (o 
their national identity, very proud of their 
history." 

Mr. Delore predicted that the Austrian 
vote, with two out of three citizens voting in 
favor of joining the Union at the end of the 
year, wifi cany a “great impact” in other 
referepdums to be held in coming months cij 
membership Sn“N«way, Finland and.Sw©: 
den. 

Pro Europe enthusiasts also found solace 
in the fact that apart from Belgium, where the 
nationalist Vlaams Bloc did weft, rightist ex- 
tremists banking ou a xenophobic message 
did poorly in spite of the disgruntled mood 
among many voters. In Germany, the Repub- 
lican Party lost all of its seals, while France’s 
National Front dipped from 12 to about 10.5 
percent of the vote. 

In the past, European elections were often 
osed bv voters to register dismay by voting 
for extremist candidates, largely because 
throwing an elect oral tantrum would not re- 
sult in any consequences at borne. While the 
trend toward the far right was muffled this 
year, discontent with the performance of sit- 
ting governments was still profound. 

The exceptions were Germany and 
Italy, where the ruling parties did well thanks 
to the brigh tening prospects of economic re- 
covery. 

Germany's Christian Democratic Union, 
led by Chancellor Helmut Kohl, wbo only 
♦wo months ago appeared to be in political 
trouble, surpassed expectations by winning 
nearly 39 percent of the vote, easily defeating 
the opposition Social Democrats. 


r 


N DIE Zli 



By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

The European parliamentary elections 
produced four big losers Monday. 

The results undermined the leadership 
hopes of the French Socialist leader, Michel 
Rocard, and the German Social Democrat, 
Rodotf Scharptog, and seriously weakened 
the position of Prime Minister John Major in 
Britain. 

The elections also underscored the deep 
unpopularity of the Spanish Socialists undo 1 
Prune Minister Felipe Gonz&lez. Bat Mr. 
GonzdJez, in office 12 years, made it dear 
that he would tough out the opposition. 

Mr. Major faced demands either to quit or 
reshuffle the cabinet after the worst election 
performance by any British party in memory. 

Coming on top of the weak Socialist per- 
formance in last year’s parliamentary elec- 
tions, the European vote appeared to end the 
presidential aspirations of Mr. Rocard, who 
had been seen as (he Socialist Party's leading 
candidate in next year's elections. 

Mr. Rocard's Socialists gained less than 15 
percent of the vote in their worst perfor- 
mance since 1971. partly because the rival 
campaign of the maverick Socialist million- 
aire Bernard Tapie took nearly 12 percent of 
the left's ballots. 

Analysts said Mr. Rocard’s failure to rally 
the left around a pro-European ticket would 
make it difficult for him to muster support in 
the presidential elections. But it was unclear 
who might emerge as the Socialist candidate 
in the months ahead, with the exception of 
Jacques Delors, the president of the Europe- 
an Commission. 

Mr. Rocard was handicapped by the lack 
of support from the Socialist president. Fran- 
cois Mitterrand, wbo reportedly encouraged 
Mr. Tapie. 

Mr. Rocard's supporters, meanwhile, said 
that their leader had not abandoned hopes of 
rallying in the autumn. 

Mr. Scbaiping’s hopes of dislodging Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl of Germany in the na- 
tional election in .October wok .« serous i eat- 
ing. it was the East head-to-head test between 
the two men. 

The result, Mr. Scharping confessed, “is a 
defeat and a disappointment." He said: “We 
have quite dearly lost die first round. We 
have been presenting the picture of a party' 
engaged in mi internal discussion with itself 
rather than attacking the government-” 

Mr. Kohl predicted he would win the gen- 
eral election for the fourth time following the 
unexpectedly strong performance of his 
Christian democratic Union. He said his 
Opponents had again made the mistake of 
writing him off too soon. 

The Christian Democratic Union, and its 
sister party in Bavaria, the Christian Social 
Union, got nearly 40 percent of the European 
vole. The Social Democrats’ portico fell to 32 
percent from more than 37 percent in the 
European elections five yean ago. 

The British Conservatives, widely unpopu- 
lar after 15 years in power, suffered their 
worn defcal in memory, with only 26 percent 
of the vote and their seats in the European 
Pariiamcni almost halved. 

With 45 percent of the votes, the resurgent 
Labor Party looked set to take 62 of the 87 
British seats. Labor’s acting leader, Margaret 
Beckett, said the Conservatives bad been 

See LOSERS, Page 5 





ms . ; 









■3>- * 


Ulb Michd/KcuieD. 


Chancellor Hekrait Kohl of Germany beaming Monday after the European elections. 
Europe's 3fe' W ^SrSianftODf A/location by country of tfie 567seafe 


Ireland 
Seals: 15 


Belgium Luxembourg Netherlands 

Seats: 25 Seats: 6 Seats: 31 

Pop. 10 million Pep.: 400,000 Poo.: 15.3 miffion ■ 

A Denmark 

„ — • /v — - Seats: 16 


Pop.: 3.6 "• 




■i— ■—row i 'in i 'in II — y srateras ej ’-r. Mt •S-r’C r-w_-Twa ■ -to- -- 

Portugal Greece 

Seats: 25 Seats: 25 

Pop.: 9.3 million Spain France Italy Pop.. !0.3 million 

Seals: 64 Seals: 87 Seats. 87 

Pop.: 39.1 million Pop.: 57.fi million Pop.: 56.9 million 

Provisional breakdown by potiticat grouping 

Totaf 3 Ok Ger Gr Sp F ir* i Lux ML P UK 

Socialists 200 7 .3 33 1C 22 . 16 1 19 £ fi JO #3‘ 

148 7 3 47 9 30 7 4 9 2 10 1 19 







TotH 

3 

Ok 

Ger 

Gr 

Sp 

F 

ir*: 

1 

Socialists 

200 

7 

.3 

33 

1C 

22 

.16 


19 

European 
People’s Party 

1-18 

7 

3 

47 

9 

30 

i 

4 

9 

Liberals 

•V44. 

S,; 

V 

. $ 


2 

S 

v'1 


Greens 

23 

2 

1 

13 

0 

0 

0 

2 

*? 

-Democratic 
. Alliance 

24 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

14 

7 

0 

Ham bow 

S 

1 

4 

. 0. 

O ■ 

' 1 

O 

0 

.0 

Left Unity 

12 

0 

0 

0 

3 

0 

6 

0 

0 

•Technical 

regbt 

:Ut2" 

£‘\ 

■ £>'; 

M. 

•*•*£&« 

, : d- 

.Mi- 

-o 

>.Q 

Independents 

37 

Q 

0 

Q 

1 

9 

0 

G 

24 

. . Others 

59 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

26 

0 

31 


.1 • to ‘ i' 


•O::- 


SocteBstK Sac<al Detnocralic Soaalisl and Ertrsh latwr parties European People’s Party: Chnsrum Democrais. Brtbti 
and Danish Conservatives European Democratic Alliance: French Gauilisis. Irish riann<a Fail £nd tflwr ce rue* -right 
parlies. Technical Group Of the Right: extreme right Left Unity: Communists. Rainbow Group: Scottish Nationalist and 
regjonafist parties. Source. 1 European Parliament. 1 Eumsiat Reuters liierruiiprij HixiM Tnhuor 


Inflation Jitters Rattie Bonds and Dollar 


Ccoptied hy Our Staff Prom Dispatches 

LONDON —Interest rates in the bond mar- 
kets rose around the world on Monday became 
of new concerns over inflation that also seal the 
dollar tumbling and pushed European nock 

from Germany and Brit- 
ain combined with statements of several central 
bankers to kindle fears of rising pnees m Key 

Weston markets. „ n , a > r „ n r 

Susan Phillips, a Federal Reserve governor, 
said the U.S. economic recovery was nearing 
the point where inflation starts nang. 

“We’re coming to a stage m tte busm^ 

cycle where we have to be concerned, she said. 


The Bundesbank’s chief economist, Otmar 
Issing, said German interest rates “have now 
reached a lew 1 that conforms to the current 
economic environment and the problems to be 
dealt with." Mr. Issing’s remarks dampened 
hopes of cuts in Goman money market rates, 
which now range from 4i percent to 6 percent. 

A comment from the Swiss National Bank 
president, Mark Lusser, that he saw no room 
for a further cut in short-term Swiss rates added 
to the bearish market sentiment, French bond 
traders said. 

In Western Germany, fast-rising prices for 
coffee, fresh fruit and livestock pushed whole- 
sale prices up a higfet^lhim-eqjetted 05 per- 


cent in May, ihe Federal Statistics Office said. 
Compared with May 1993, prices were up 1,1 
percent 

Britain reported a modest rise of 0.1 percept 
in the prices of goods leaving factories in May. 
but the Central Statistical Office said that the 
cost of raw materials was up 0.9 percent last 
month. Although economists noted that mate- 
rials prices were 0.1 percent below May 1993 
levels, the report fed the inflation fear* that 
sapped the strength of European debt and equi- 
ty investments.. 

In the bond markets, 10-year government 
yields rose to 8.6 percent in Britain from S.36 
percent on Friday, while French returns were 


■ Up 
+9.67 

V 3.783.72 

The Dollar 

ilMt Vglfc. 

DM 

Pound 

Yen 

FF 


Mx ji&ze 
1.6-157 
1.521c 
102.80 
5612 


Up 

0.08% h\ 

proi’cus dose 
1.6664 

1.509 

103.525 

5.6705 


Unheard-of Spectacle in Burkina Faso 

Beauty Pageant in Dirt-Poor Nation Tests Age-Old Traditions 

w v • * _ ■ J — - -- IM - fI>A nfrtm#n Pnkfoarm' ic r/vnmAM and ms 


By Cindy Shiner 

Washington Post Service 

OUAGADOUGOU, Burgas 
Packed inside room 30 at the 


SSqS leasing ^ 

in a dressing-room atmosphere o 

"SSL i 

impoverished nation of dry-land farming 

; Newsstand Prices 

' Andorra ...J9 .00 FF “t £ 

: AntiHes^^.mo FF Morocco.....^. Kg 

! ComeroonJ^OOCFA Qator^..-.8.00Rlo , s 
; E9VP»._:E.P.5000 Reunion- - 
1 Frqnce....^^.00 Fr oZn'rFA 

Gabon..... ..960 CFA f en ®f ,, -j«fpTA5 

, Greece™ JOOpr. Spaun^' ’“ jSS D in 

! ImcSEiScw J u ^| y ' T ’B5 oSS 

; i SSSrarfiS 


lagis and doq> tradition, the first national 
beauty pageant was a serious business — and a 
sexual revolution. 

The first Miss Burkina Faso would win a 
round-trip ticket to New York, a color televi- 
sion set and $400 in cash — about twice the 
average annual income in one of the world’s 
poorest countries.' And m a land where few 
won**) have any choice in dress or occupation, 
the 16 contestants would sashay across a stage 
in bikinis and evening gowns, blowing kisses 
and dreaming of career and travel Miss Bur- 
kina Faso is io become a natiraial spokeswom- 
an for f amil y p lanning and the use of condoms 
to fight AIDS. . . 

Most women's movements in tire West dis- 
daia beauty pageants as a degrading holdover 
that treats women primarily as sex objects. But 
the. Miss Burkina Faso pageant is for women 
here what burning bras was to American .wom- 
■ en two- decades ago. -The traditions of the 
MossL-FuIani, Bobo and other tribes, and tire 
infl uence of Islam tightly bind the lives of most 


women. Polygamy is common, and forced mar- 
riages still occur. Most men forbid their whes 
to practice birth control, and the average rural 
woman has seven children, 

Burkina Faso is typical of black Africa, 
where nearly 30 percent of women become 
mothers before their 18th birthday. 

In Burkina Faso’s sexual revriuiv'*n. »he 
beauty pageant was sure to strike with ireaier 
Impact than political rhetoric. Broadcast on 
state television, the contestants, aged 17 to - 11 . 
paraded across the screen, flirting with the 
crowd. 

The only hurdle to getting the women to the 
stage "was to convince their parents." -aid 
Moustapfca Tbiombiano, who organized the 
show. "To them, it’s like exposing Their daugh- 
ters to the public world. Like, would they have 
husbands if they exposed themselves in a f - titl- 
ing suit?" 

Mr. Thiomlnano's energy for promoting a 

See MISS, Paged 


ANCHORAGE, Alaska (APj — A fed- 
eral jury decided Monday that reckless- 
ness by the Exxon Corp. and Captain Joe 
Hazelwood was to blame for the 1989 
Exxon Valdez oil spill. 

The verdict means thj! the plaintiffs — 
more than 10.000 commercial fishermen, 
Alaska natives and property owners — can 
pursue an estimated $15 billion in punitive 
damages from Exxon and Hazelwood. 


7S m 


The former heavyweight champion 
Mike Tj‘on, who has been imprisoned for 
more than two years for rape, "had another 
bid for early release rejected. I Page I7l 


North Korea Declares 
An Immediate Pullout 
From Atomic Agency; 
Seoul Alerts Reserves 


By David E Sanger 

Wph 1 York Times Service 

TOKYO — North Korea deepened its con- 
frontation with the United Nations and the 
Clinton administration Monday night, an- 
nouncing that it would "immediately with- 
draw" from the International Atomic Energy 
Agency and that its inspectors "will do longer 
be allowed" inside the country. 

If executed, the North’s declaration would 
appear to mean that the two inspectors now in 
the country would be expeOed, and that the fuel 
rods extracted from its largest nuclear reactor 
over the last month — enough to make four or 
five nuclear weapons, according to the Central 
Intelligence Agency — could be converted into 
weapons fuel without the knowledge of outside 


7.47 percent, up from 7.25 percent, and Ger- 
man rales rose to 6.98 percent from 6.83 per- 
cent. In afternoon trading in New York. 10- 
year U.S. Treasury bond yields rose lo 7.06 
"percent from 7.01 percent on Friday. In times 

See MARKETS. Page 10 


[The United States said it had no confirma- 
tion of North Korea's announcement to with- 
draw from the agency. Reuters reported. But it 
warned that any removal of cameras or agency 
inspectors necessary for verification would be 
“a new and very dangerous development." 

|Thc International Atomic Energy Agency 
said from its headquarters in Vienna that it bad 
not received word from North Korea of the 
withdrawal. A spokesman said that the agency 
had to be informed in writing if a member state 
intended to quit the agency and that the deposi- 
tory stale of agency statutes, the United States, 
also had to be toldLJ 

The North did not say that it would leave the 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, a step it an- 
nounced and then suspended last year. It cur- 
rently claims tobe in a “special status," half in 
the treaty and half out erf it. But without agency 
inspection, there is no way to verify whether 
any country is complying with the treaty, so its 
provisions become essentially meaningless. 

“The agency’s inspectors now will have noth- 
ing to do any further in our country,” said the 
siaiement, issued by North Korea’s Foreign 
Ministry a few minutes before midnight Mon- 
day. 

Clinton administration officials had clearly 
feared that the North might take such a step in 
retaliation for the agency's vote last Friday to 
enact a mild set of sanctions against the Com- 
munist government. Robert L. Gatiucct, the 
assistant iecretan’ of siaitf who is ujordixwting 
handling of the North Korean standoff, said on 
television Sunday that any effort to bar inspec- 
tors and extract plutonium from tire rods, 
which are a form of nuclear waste, "would be a 
very dangerous new development” 

A far more critical set of sanctions is expect- 
ed to be discussed in the Security Council this 
week, with provisions to phase in more severe 
steps unless the North relents on a series of full 
nuclear inspections. In a long statement Sun- 
day night, monitored in Tokyo, the North re- 
peated again that "sanctions will be regarded 
immediately as a declaration of war." 

In South Korea on Monday, former Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter arrived for meetings prior to 
a highly unusual trip across the Demilitarized 
Zone to Pyongyang on Wednesday. He is ex- 
pected to meet the country's 82-year-old leader, 
Kim II Sung, and lay out specifically what 
North Korea could obtain from the West — 
diplomatic recognition, aid and investment — 
in return far abandoning the nuclear program. 

But the South was also preparing for the 
worst It said it would call up 6.6 million reserv- 
ists to conduct one of Seoul's biggest defensive ‘ 
drills in years. The Sonth issued another warn- 1 
ing to Pyongyang on Monday not to stage an { 
incident The South's director of intelligence. 
Kim Deok, said the North's "leadership knows 
well that war means suicide for its political 
system." 

The Associated Press reported from Seoul: 

The defensive drill, to be held Wednesday, 
will involve all military and civil defense corps 
members, whose job is to organize evacuations 
and provide first aid for air raid victims. 

Seoul has staged monthly dvil defense drills, 
but because of the military tensions with North 
Korea, this month’s is being expanded nation- 
wide and wiU include more personnel and 
equipment 

Almost all army reservists younger than 50 
will be mobilized for the 20-minute drill, offi- 
cials said. 

During the drill streets are usually cleared 
and people rush to shelters. Large-scale evacua- 
tion drills are conducted at selected locations. 

The nearly 2 milli on soldiers of the rival 
Koreas are on heightened alert. In the past 
week. South Korea put its 130,000-officer po- 
lice force on alert and ordered a nationwide 

See KOREA, Page 4 


What Price 
Chernobyl? 
West Queries 

By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Two months ago. 
Ukraine pledged to shut down its nuclear 
power plant at Chernobyl but U.S. offi- 
cials are concerned that Ukrainian leaders 
are having second thoughts, and the 
Americans are at odds over what to do 
about it 

New evidence, including a secret direc- 
tive by President Leonid M. Kravchuk, 
suggests that Ukraine may not close the 
two reactors still operating at Chernobyl 
because it needs the energy. 

Ukraine even appears to be planning to 
restart a third reactor that was shut after a 
fire in 1991, administration officials say. 
That would leave only one of the plant's 
four reactors closed — the one destroyed 
eight years ago in the catastrophe that 
made Chernobyl synonymous with nucle- 
ar disaster. 

Western scientists and government nu- 
clear experts fear that as long as the flawed 
and unstable reactors at Chernobyl oper- 
ate, the danger remains that another disas- 
ter could spew radioactivity across much 
of Europe. 

The agreement worked out in April be- 
tween the United Slates and Ukraine 
marked the first time a former Soviet re- 
public had bowed to Western pressure to 
shut down such reactors. 

Weston leaders are to review the issue 
next month when they gather in Italy for a 
Group of Seven meeting, and the White 
House is scrambling to persuade Ukraine 
to stay its promised course. But the task 
has already prompted a battle within the 
administration over what price the West 
should pay io close the dangerous plant 
completely. 

The State Department approach, with 
cost estimates ranging into the hundreds 
of millions of dollars, calls for the West to 
help Ukraine complete at least three Sovi- 
et-style nuclear reactors now under con- 
struction. But the Energy Department 
strongly urges that the west should not 
help start up reactors that critics regard as 
flawed. 

To compensate for the energy Ukraine 
would lose if Chernobyl shut down, Ener- 
gy Department officials have urged that 
the West help Ukraine to become more 
energy -efficient and to build plants that 
use renewable resources. 

Both France and Germany favor com- 
pleting the three reactors under construc- 
tion, raising the possibility of a dispute 
within the Group of Seven. Aides to Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton say there will be little 
time at the G-7 meeting. July 8-10 in 
Naples, for any last-minute resolution of 
differences. 

But with memories still vivid of the 
failure of past calls for Chernobyl's de- 
mise, American officials say they are de- 
termined that the Naples meeting make 
clear not only that the major industrial 
nations want the plant closed, but that 
they are willing to make it worth Ukraine's 
while. 

In an interview last week. Deputy Ener- 
gy Secretary William H. White, who 
worked out the agreement with Ukraine to 
shut Chernobyl "at the earliest possible 
date,” expressed some urgency about seal- 
ing the deal. 

“I think the Group of Seven will push 
for a plan that wiU detail and outline the 
steps Ukraine should take in closing down 
Chernobyl and what would be planned in 
terms of the role of the West," Mr. White 
said. "And I believe there axe many who 
will want the communique to discuss spe- 
cific timetables." 

AD four reactors at Chernobyl, includ- 
ing the two still running, are of a design 
known as RBMK, notorious since the 
1986 disaster for a reliance on graphite 

See UKRAINE Page 4 


Hamas Seeks a New Role 

Gaza Self-Rule Stifles Intifada’s Flame 


Page 7. 
Page 7. 


By David Hoffman 

tYastnngum Post Service 

GAZA — The single-page announcement, 
signed by a brigadier in the Palestinian police 
force, echoed like a thunderclap across the 
mosques of Gaza. 

it was addressed to “the brothers who are 
imams,” or leaders of the mosques, in the east 

side of Khan Yunis, the second-largest city in 
the Gaza Strip, It said mosques and their loud- 
speakers could no longer be used for “purposes 
of propaganda," and the mosques could issue 
no leaflets or political broadcasts unless they 
were approved bv the new Palestinian police 
force. 

For Islamic leaders in Gaza, the message was 
ominous: The Palestinian police, in the fust 
weeks of self-rule, were trying to stifle the 

S ubtle voice of Hamas, the militant Islamic 
;e*istance Movement, which has strongly op- 
posed the peace agreement with Israel 
Hamas led the intifada, the Palestinian upris- 
ing against Israeli occupation, and its guerrilla 


wing attacked numerous Israeli military targets 
and Jewish settlers, as well as Palestinians sus- 
pected of collaborating with Israel. The move- 
ment clashed with the Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization over leadership is the occupied 
territories and scored major victories in muiuci- 

Abn Nidal ToDower takes Name for the Lock- 
erbie bombing, but there are dodris. Page 4. 

pal elections in 1992. According to Islamic 
leaders, Hamas, in the Gaza Strip and West 
Bank, is being forced into a period of profound 
reassessment of its tactics mid methods. The 
outcome may be crucial to tire success of Pales- 
tinian self-rule in the territories. 

The fortunes of H amas have always been lied 
to the peace talks. When (he outlook was 
gloomy, Hamas gained strength. Now that the 
PLO has signed a limited autonomy agreement 

See HAMAS, Page 4 




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Page 2 


IINTERINATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1994 



Manipulation of the Presidents , Scripted by Beijing 


By Jim Mann 

las Angeles Times Senior 
WASHINGTON — A long-secret, 
two-volume history of U-S.-China nego- 
tiations, released by the CLA. shows how 
Chinese leaders repeatedly manipulated 
top officials from the Nixon through the 
Reagan years, often by playing them off 
against their domestic rivals. 


The report, written by the Rand Corp- 
for U.S. intelligence agencies, is laced 
with examples of how the Chinese han- 
dled America’s foreign policy elite during 
those years, including Secretary of State. 
Henry A Kissinger, a national security 
adviser. Zbigniew Brzeanski. and Presi- 
dent George Bush. 

Starting with Mao Zedong and Zhou 
Rnlai in 1971, the Chinese used a variety 
of tactics, from serving opulent banquets 
to playing U.S. presidential politics, to 
advance their interests on issues such as 
Taiwan and Indochina. 

“The most distinctive characteristic of 
Chinese negotiating behavior is an effort 
to develop and manipulate strong inter- 
personal relationships with foreign offi- 
cials.” the report concluded. 

The study contains the lirst transcripts 
of top-level conversations between 
American and Chinese leaders ever made 
public. It starts with the historic U.S. 
overtures to China in 1971, when Mr. 


Kissinger, who at the time was President 
Richard M. Niton's national security ad- 
viser. became the first American official 
in more than two decades to visit China. 

Until now. scholars say. virtually all 
public knowledge of these events has 
come from the sometimes self-serving ac- 
count of Mr. Nixon. Mr. Kissinger and- 
other U.S. officials. 

The 1985 study, which the Los Angeles 
Times obtained under a Freedom of In- 
formation Act lawsuit after five years of 
requests, paints a less heroic and less 
flattering portrait of the Americans than 
the accounts based on their memoirs. 

In essence, the study shows how skill- 
fully China conducted 'its diplomacy with 
the United States. The lesson was dem- 
onstrated again Iasi month by Beijing's 
success in persuading the Clinton admin- 
istration to back away from its attempts 
to impose human-rights conditions on 
trade privileges. 

From the earliest days of the Nixon- 
Kissinger initiatives, the study says, the 
Chinese tried to exploit individual inse- 
curities. play off presidents against their 
domestic rivals and orchestrate meetings 
to maximize .Americans’ sense of “grati- 
tude. awe and helplessness." 

On the landmark 1972 Nixon visit, for 
example, Mr. Kissinger negotiated the 
“Shanghai communique.” in which the 
United States acknowledged that Taiwan 


was part of China, "late at night after a The Chinese acted as though they did 
banquet of Peking duck and powerful not bear Mr. Brzeanski or bdieve him. 
‘mao tai’ liquor/’ ihe study says. In the “We are looking forward to the day when 
afterglow of the sumptuous spread. Mr. Carter makes up his mind.” Mr. Deng 
Kissinger Is quoted as idling his hosts: said. ’ f,F ' <n,h,Rrt - ’ 


Paris. Mr. Kissinger also added a new 
request that the Chinese keep their dL 
tance from American ‘left groups. 


"After a dinner of Peking duck HI risn 
anything." 

Chinese officials tried, usually success- 
fully, to carry out negotiations on their 
own turf and by their own rules. U.S. 
officials invariably had the disadvantage 
of having io lay out their own positions 
first. 

“We have two sayings/' Deputy For- 
eign Minister Qiao Guanhua told Mr. 
Kissinger in New York in October 1976. 
“One is that when we are the host, we 
should let the guests begin. And the other 
is that when we are guests, we should 
defer to the host” Mr. Kissinger joked 
about the imbalance but volunteered: “I 
will be glad to start" 

Likewise, the report says that the Chi- 
nese were masters at keeping their visi- 
tors on edge and off balance. On a trip to 
Beijing in May 1978. Mr. Brzezinski. 
President Jimmy Carter's national securi- 
ty adviser, engaged in what Rand de- 
scribes as “almosi ewnjcaT exchanges 
with Deng Xiaoping and other Chines* 
leaders as he repeatedly tried over two 


Let us now shift the subject 

Mr. Brzezinski finally burst out in frus- 
tration: “f have told you before. Presi- 
dent Carter has made up his mind.” 

R and completed the study in 1 985. The 
author. Richard H. Solomon, a Rand 
specialist on China, had been an aide to 
Mr. Kissinger on the National Saairity 
Council and later served as a senior State 
Department official in the Reagan and 
Bush administrations. 

The report shows clearly that during 
the Nixon administration's opening to 
China, Prime Minister Zhou and other 
leaders repeatedly played upon Mr. Nix- 
on's fear that the historic first steps might 
he made by Democratic leaders. 

As soon as Mr. Kissinger arrived in 
Beijing from Pakistan on his secret trip 
on July 9. 1971, a year and a half before 
Mr. N Lion's first term was to expire. Mr. 
Chou quietly (old him: “The time that is 
left foT President Nixon is quite limited.” 

Mr. Nixon was so worried (hat his 
political rivals would beat him to China 
that Mr. Kissinger specifically told Zhou 


fhina complied with these requests, m 
large part, the study says , because Sou 
and Mao believed “that Nixod s shift in 
China policy would, in fact, contnbutt to 
the presdenfs re-election and. thus, 
they, by dealing with Nixon alone, would 
put the president in their debt.” 

China constantly tried to pit UJS- lead- 
ers against one another or to make use « 
frictions among the Americans, Mr. Solo- 
mon's study says. , . 

During the Ford administration, tor 
example, Chinese leaders played Mr. 
Kissinger against Defense 
James R. Schlesmger. In late 1975, (hey 
invited Mr. Nixon, then a former presi- 
dent, to China to help bring pressure on 
President Gerald R- Ford for normaliza- 


tion. 


The study says China twitted Mr. Kis- 
singer for vears with Mr. Dengs 1974 
invitation that Mr. Schlesmger visit Chi- 


ns. 


days to Inform them that Mr. Carter that the president ‘^vants no political 
wanted to normalize relations with Chi- visitors before his trip.” the study says, 
na. And (wo weeks later, in secret talks in 


“Don’t be jealous.” Huang Zhen. head 
Of China’s liaison office in Washington, 
told Mr. Kissinger on Aug. 18, r 976. as 
Mr Schlesmger was about to make his 
trip. “You have been to China nine rimes, 
t believe. You even said yoursdf^you 
wanted to go to Inner Mongolia. 


■3P* i. 'ji ■ 

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U.K. and China Cite 
Progress on Bases 


4 


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A Hutu taking cover amid fighting between Tutsi rebels and government forces near Gitarama. The rebels claimed the city had fallen 


x vTA -.*»■- 

Mmnlf )■« Ffiir-Pit - ■< 


Mandela Calls Rwanda Killing 'Rebuke’ to Africa 


Compiled ty Our Stuff From Dispatches 

TUNIS — President Nelson 
Mandela of South Africa, calling 
lie bloodletting in Rwanda “a 
stern and severe rebuke" to all Af- 
rican leaders, called Monday for 
practical steps to end the carnage. 

In an address to the annual sum- 
mit meeting of the Organization of 
African Unity, Mr. Mandela 
stressed the link between peace, 
stability, democracy, human rights 
and development. 

“Even as I speak. Rwanda stands 
out as a stem and severe rebuke to 
all of us Tor having failed to address 
these interrelated matters." he told 
41 other presidents and a monarch 
at the meeting’s opening session 
here. 

“As a result of that,” Mr. Man- 
dela said, “a terrible slaughter of 
the innocent has taken place and is 
taking place in front of our very 
eyes. 

“We know it as a matter of fact 
that we have it in ourselves as Afri- 
cans to change all this. We must, in 
action assert our will to do so.” 


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On Rwanda on Monday, Tutsi 
rebels asserted that their forces had 
seized control of the strategic city 
of Gitarama in heavy fighting and 
were chasing the government army 
from the surrounding area. 

There was no immediate inde- 
pendent confirmation of the report, 
but if irueii would be a key victory 
for the Rwanda Patriotic Front, 
which already controls most of (he 
north and east of the country. 

Kigali, the capital, and Gitar- 
ama. 30 miles (50 kilometers I (o the 
southwest have seen heavy fighting 
in recent days, with government 
troops entrenched in the cities and 
the rebels attempting to dislodge 
them. 

The interim government fled to 
Gitarama after the civil war began 
two months ago. As the rebels ad- 
vanced, the interim president 
Theodore Sindikubwabo. and some 
of his ministers left Gitarama last 
week and headed west toward 
Zaire. 

President Hosoi Mubarak, the 
chairman of the Organization of 
African Unity, opened the 30th 
summit meeting with a call for a 
minute's silence for three African 
presidents killed since the last sum- 
mit and to all victims of violence on 
the continent. 

In introducing Mr. Mandela. 
Mr. Mubarak said the South Afri- 
can leader “would speak on behalf 
of ah of us.” 

The organization, which has had 
little success in managing conflict 
sweeping the continent since it was 
formed 31 years ago. now hopes 
that South Africa's and Mr. Man- 
dela's moral authority will make 
the difference. 


Nowhere is this more pressing 
than in Rwanda. Massacres and 
civil war have killed hundreds of 
thousands Rwandans since iheir 
president and that of neighboring 
Burundi were killed when a plane 
bringing them to Kigali was hit by 
a rocket on April 6. 


Burundi itself had then barely 
recovered from ethmc violence in 
which about 100,000 people were 
killed following :he assassination 
of its first elected president. Mel- 
chior Ndadave. on "Ocl 2\. 


t Usurers. APi 


The Associated Press 

HONG KONG — Britain and 
China announced progress Mon- 
day on the fate of military-owned 
land in Hong Kong. 

The report coincided with the 
announcement of a high-level Brit- 
ish visit to Beijing next month, 
which was welcomed here as a sign 
that the two countries will renew 
cooperation 2 fter protracted wran- 
gling over Governor Chris Patten's 
proposals for political change. 

A British negotiator, Alan Paul 
said he and the Chinese had “suc- 
ceeded in some respects in narrow- 
ing the differences" on returning 
real estate that the British Army is 
leaving as it ends its presence in the 
territory. 

The talks are seen as one barom- 
eter of the two countries' ability to 
cooperate in transferring Hong 
Kong to Chinese rule. 

At stake in the negotiations are 
39 sites, including an empty m\y 
base in the heart of Hong Kong’s 
financial district- Agreement is be- 
ing sought on turning some of the 
sites over to commercial develop- 
ers. while preparing others for a 
post- 1997 Chinese garrison. 

Talks broke up May 18 with no 
agreement, but informal contacts 
continued “in a very positive and 
flexible way.” Mr. Paul said. 

Earlier this month, reports in the 
Hong Kong media suggested a 
deepening nil over the land issue. 
The Eastern Express said Britain 


Tamil Rebels Hit Naval Base 

The Associated Press 

COLOMBO — T amil rebels det- 
onated grenades and mines in a 
raid on a naval base, killing seven 
military personnel and injuring six 
other people, officials said Mon- 
day. No further details were pro- 
vided on Sunday’s atlack at the 
base on Karin agar Island. 



French Cable Operator 


By Jacques Neber 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — British airlines may have suc- 
ceeded in obtaining landing rights at Paris's 
Orly airport, but there’s no room for the BBC 
on basic cable television tn Paris. 

BBC World Service Television, a repackag- 
ing of BBC J and BBC 2. is bang lucked off 
the 20-channel basic cable system to open a 
slot for a new 24-bour French-language news 
channel set to begin operations June 24. 

The move against the BBC comes as the 
French legislature this week is to take final 
action on proposals that would outlaw un- 
necessary use of English in French commerce 
and scientific proceedings. Under the bill, 
those using an English word in business com- 
munications when a French equivalent exists 
risk fines of up to 20.000 francs ($3,500). 

Under the change, cable viewers who still 
want the BBC will pay an additional 30 
francs per month, on top of the 145 francs 
they now pay for their basic subscriptions. 

A British Embassy source said he doubted 


the move was "retribution" for the airline 
flap, in which the French government, in a 
bid to protect .Air France and its domestic 
subsidiary. .Air Inter, tried to block British 
carriers from serving Orly. France backed 
off. and those flights began Monday. 

Bui the source criticized the change on 
cultural grounds. “The BBC provides rich 
cultural diversity in France,” he said. “When 
you reduce access to iu vou reduce this diver- 
sity” 

The BBC itself declined to comment on the 
matter, which a spokesman in London 
termed “delicate ” saying that it was still in 
negotiations with Lyonnaise Communica- 
tions. the cable operator. 

But a BBC source said, “This was sprung 
on us. There is no way we’d want to go on a 
premium-priced regime.” 

Frainjois de Coustin, communications di- 
rector for the cable company, said the deci- 
sion to bump the BBC was “entirely commer- 
cial/ 

“Our market studies tell us that French 


people do not like to watch foreign-language 
programs." Mr. de Coustin said. With a limit- 
ed number of channels in the basic program 
offering, be said, the BBC had to go in order 
to open a channel for La Chaine Info, devel- 
oped by TF1. the country's market-leading 
TV chan n el . 

“We’re certainly not going to get any more 
customers because we are offering the BBC. 
and if they want iL they can still subscribe to 
the extended service.” he said, noting that 
one- third of the operator's 155,000 subscrib- 
ers take the premium service. 

He added that ZDF of Germany and RAI 
of Italy, which share a channel would also be 
pushed into the more costly extended service 
later this year. A Spanish channel TVE, 
already is on the premium extended service. 

CNN and Euronews, he said, would re- 
main in the basic package, although he said 
there was no decision on the planned all-news 
network bang developed by the BBC and 
Pearson PLC. Thai network, aimed at the 
European market, is to start operations this 
fall. 


Murdoch Concedes Concession to China on TV 


Reuters 

LONDON — Rupert Murdoch, the media 
tycoon, has conceded that the decision by 
STTAR TV, his Asian satellite broadcaster, to 
drop BBC World Service Television from its 
broadcast lo China had been influenced by 
the Chinese authorities. 

In an interview with his biographer. Wil- 
liam Shawcross. in Esquire magazine. Mr. 
Murdoch said that although critics called it 
cowardly, “we said that in order to get in 
there and gel accepted, well cut the BBC 
OUL” 


'They hate (he BBC," Mr. Murdoch add- 
ed. “And they don’t much like CNN. They 
really want to control the news." 

He also said that the recent sale of part of 
his controlling slake in the South China 
Morning Post newspaper erf Hong Kong also 
had been an attempt to avoid conflict with 
C hina 

The decision in April to drop the BBC 
from STAR'S northern band, broadcasting to 
China, Taiwan and Hong Kong, was seen as a 
conciliatory gesture to Beijing after Mr. Mur- 
doch angered China by saying that no dicta- 


torship was safe in the media age. At (be time, 
STAR TV cited commercial reasons for its 
decision to eliminate the news channel sup- 
plied by the BBC. 

Mr. Murdoch said be expected to replace 
the BBC’s World Television news service with 
his own Sky News service but that this would 
not be possible for at least two years. 

“What I would have liked to have done, of 
course, was just wing the BBC out and bring 
Sky in,” he said. “But they weren't ready for 
thaL” 


WORLD BRIEFS 


I 


l Tarat) « the bifiECSt donor of wag ia - ,-nf • 


l 


’ImRS?*' dedri'Oka Boyko, 

and banker, as president of the executive commtsaoa, 

ioot had hivn hgad of a parliamentary caairtiaD. -Sass^ jCBwqBk, 

IStreJced in iheproportWrawesratancffl bdlolby 

*s rftnma&Mlist liberal Democrats. =•- j 


Off 


Yemen 


ADEN Yemen (Reuters) - Sbdfitig thaiideEed tramd 

. . <• i„ fiofcrirw* between Yemen ’sxwinngagBMSt •- 


M S^Sl 4 ?SdartAfiAbd£sSdi toldfel^tsia^e«ii4fef ■ 

a cease-fire in Yemen’s tMrdhsouib - 

“continued their violations and aggression against OTranred loroest- aft 
radio quoted General Saleh as teSrag ambassador* from.iw pepa-/ 
neat Member states of the United Nations : 

There was no immediate southern reaction, bat effioas 

regularfy accused the north of igoginga UN 

totbe vrar. Two truces declared by the north tost week b?p 


gave China a virtual ultimatum to 
reach agreement by the end of June 
or else the bases being prepared for 
the Chinese Anav would not be 
ready by 1 997. The report was offi- 
cially denied 

Meanwhile. Hong Kong legisla- 
tors welcomed the news that Alis- 
tair Goodlad, the British minister 
responsible for Hong Kong, would 
visit China. 

But Robin McLaren, Britain’s 
ambassador to Beijing, cautioned 
a gains t hi gh hopes. Speaking on 
Hong Kong radio, be said Mr. 
Goodlad was not coming to negoti- 
ate over Hong Kong but to discuss 
Angio-Chinese relations at a 
broader level. 

Professor Lau Siu-kai. a Hong 
Kong adviser to Beijing, was 
quoted in Monday's South China 
Morning Post as saying the two 
sides had “decided to brush aside 
their differences on political devel- 
opment and to strengthen coopera- 
tion on nonpolitical areas, such as 
economics and social issues." 

China was outraged in October 
1992 when Mr. Patten unveiled a 
blueprint for changing Hong 
Kong's political structures to mod- 
el them more closely on Britain’s. 

Beijing accused Mr. Patten of 
violating the accords ceding Hong 
Kong to China, but failed to make 
him back down. The changes are 
being legislated, and China has said 
it will annul them when it takes 
over in 1997. 


OSLO (Reuters) — Representatives crf the Gtntexnaian gqycr^em 
and leftist rebels met near here Monday. to hhndt an attempt 
their nation’s 33-year-old dvil war to an end. V v-_ - : ~ ;•/.«£ :a^;" 

The two sides began ttdks. ou setting up a /troth conurassuft* ^. 
examine responsibility far atrocities in the conflict, which has eternal 
100,000 lives, and to work out howtobdpfljQosar^rrfdiajbarfpecpfc. 

Both sides said they hopedfor inspiration from Norway's soott nSem 
brokering the histone peace accord b e twe e n - land a&d the Palestine/ 
Liberation Organization last year. kas- Anhidt. (be United Nations 
mediato r at the talks, said, “We are confident thaffnnber pi pg f cs s t aa bc 
made and that agreements could be concluded.” ‘ ; : . _ V 


Serb Attack on UN Unit Mars Truce 


SARAJEVO, Bosma-Haz^crana (Reatere) —Bosnian Serbsanz<±ed7 
a British UN poled on Monday but United Nations officials said' the’ 
latest truce in Bosnia was habfiog despite the zaadeflL_' ... L : . 2-2^ '.'- 
A UN Protection Force spokcanan. Commander Eric Chaperon, sa»d \ 
the patrol, which included two Warrior fighting vehicles, came under fixe 
twice in the Maglaj area of central Bosnia cm Sunday evening. . . - 
Air support was not requested. The weather wnspow mid when^fire - 
was returned it was in the general direction fibre which the sbooti^g v 
came, not at precise positions. “When you are in a whitc-paintcd vetriefc . 
the important thing is to protect yoursdf,” Commander Chaperon sank. 
“The vehicles were hit by 30 roonds. That is quite ah}!/! : '*'■ 


Police Battle Protesters in Nigeria 


LAGOS (Reuters) — Police battled protesters in two Nigerian uwas 
on Monday when they took to (be streets ms^rpon at Moshooi QJL 
Abiola, who proclaimed himself president dming the weekend in' deft-' 
ance of the military government. > ' 

In Ketu. just north of Lagos, at least 10 people were arrested and many 
people hurt in clashes between protesters and riot poEcc, witnesses said. 
One resident said the main highway from Lagos ff> the rest of the country. ^ 
the Ikorodu Road, was dosed. 

la Akure, 200 kilometers (120 miles) from Lagos, the police fired tear 
gas at protesters trying to set up road blocks. “Akure is <m fire,” said 
Michael Ajasin, a leader of the National Democratic CoaEtian, which is . 
spearheading the camp aign to oust the nriKiaxy raki, Genera! Sani 
Abacha. 


U*3 


B 


’I 


For the Record 


A Qantas Airbus-300 returned to Sydney fur an emergency teafiog 
several minutes after takeoff on Monday because a warning light indicaT- 
ed an engine problem, an airline spokesman said. The 156 passengers and. 
14 crew members were evacuated without mishap. Qantas enginecrswtsr 
examining the suspect engine. (JFF/ 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Orly Protests Anger British Airways ; ; 

LONDON (AFP) — British Airways threatened court action Monday 
if Air Liberte employees continued to delay Rights .to Heathrow Airport ;• 
from Oriy Airport in Paris, 

Air Li bent employees delayed flights by British Airways and its/ 
French subsidiary, TAT European Amines, "by 30 minutes. They we’ ' 
protesting competition from foreign companies in what is widely seen as 
■ ~'J«* in reform of the European airline industry. 


Air Liberti has been authorized to fly from Orly but has complained to 
the European Commission about its failure to obtain la n d i n g rights at 
Heathrow because of congestion there. • • -.-j 


Air Fare Discounts Spread in U.S. ' ? 

MINNEAPOLIS (Bloomberg) — Major U.S- air carriers have matched.. 
fare cats of up to 35 percent being offered through Friday by Northwest" 
Airlines. Tickets are good for travel through Sept. 12 in the continental. 
Umied States, Hawaii. Canada and some Caribbean locations. They mud. 
be bought at least 14 days in advance and require a Saturday mghrstay. 

American Airlines and United Airlines extoxlod the discounts system-- 
wide. Others, including Delta, TWA. Continental, and USAir, matched i 
in markets where they complete with Northwest America West Airfities/ 
is offering up to 30 percent off its fares to some dries until June 7? TW -, 
promotion is good for travel through Nov. 16. Fare discounts to Europe ” 
ended Monday. i - 

The Dutch raSroad strike that brought train services to a halt cst 
Monday is almost certain to continue Tuesday, the ANP news ageorr % 
said, quoting officials from the transport union. The strike was called 
over plans for 470 job cuts among drivers and conductors. .. . (Reutersf 

PhiBpfipe Airlines, which dropped flights to Rome last rntmth, sS3 ‘ 
Monday that it would continue European routes to Paris, Frankfoctanik 
London. ...(ABPf. 

heat ww to northera India that kiUed more than W people inW 
last threewreks is over, meteorologists said Monday. The weather bans* 
in New Data said the maximum temperature on Monday was 29 dcgrw*“> 
centigrade <« ^Fahrenheit), down from the 50-vear peak of 46 degrees : 
centigrade (1 15 Fahrenheit) Iasi week. (Reutov) 

Britain’s rdroads w9 be halted for a day Wednesday to a strike ^ 
signdnien over pay. union officials said. For safety reasons, the railroads ’ 
?? a $ le lo °P CTal f setvk * s without the signal operators. The- . 
London Underground rad network will not be affected. . >•"- ' 


‘t, .. 



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THEAMERICAS / 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1994 


Page 3 


fdS 




O’! IMl 





M 


-£L LS 



U.S. Chemifxd Arms: Harder to Destroy Than Build 

By Thomas U/ i _ v 


Washington &IEf! man Thc ^ oodc ^ is next. At the Jilical suppon for the seven other incinera- 

STOCKTON Utah .iT - . .. ® Aberdeen, Maryland, indnera- tion plants the army plans to build in the 

just beyond this’isolarerf Jj . 30,1 Va ^ ey * to bt *™ “» W*. a* toe earliest. contmentaj United States, according to 

T^r,T^ d r^ l o m 
ssasss.-ss^sstsssf 

eap0nS b ? m *X'. rockets, mines and are .? t 2 red - sa ^ I^biyjeakmg and po- cal weapons treaty and takmgon the obli- 
gation to dispose of their own arsenals, 
some analysis say. 

Russian officials are ‘intimidated by the 
estimated S10 billion cost of destroying 
their stockpile of chemical weapons.*' a 
Washington-based analyst, Amy E Sm 
son, wrote in the April issue of 
ly Survival. 


mortar shells loaded with nerve eas or ^baBy unstable.’ They win be transported 
blistering agents manufactured to inflict ■/ 


acute pain and death. 


few yards in pant sealed containers, 
_ disassembled by robotic machines in 

Used during World w»r r »., ***** rooms, then incinerated at 2,700 

by Egyptian Lons ; J P° sa Wy degrees. The residue, detoxified but still 
reamttiW oSifhl but “ considered hazardous, will be dumped in 

ons are 


Ira ^’, cbeinical weap- government-approved landfills. 
2JS£“!JV « “terna- The army is running dummy 


running dummy shells con- 


Smith- 

quarter- 


Russian weapons experts are frequent 
viators to the Utah site and late this year 
will take up residence to monitor the weap- 
offirials, because die Environmental Pro- ons destruction process, according to 


tional treaty awfcrinT^Jr L- . , '«e army is i 

United States, RusS?andl 5 ?II. Ej^ Uje tai ° in S a S&»1 solution through the disas- 

tories. s^nbly process here in preparation for foil- 

army to clmnna lbc scale operations next spring. The tests are 

2004 eUBniiai F «w US. stockpile by extenriKTand rigoroaTacrading to army 
Rur iho.a. j officials, because the Environmental Pro- «“» uwuuwu «u Kwnuug 

““““B out to be tection Agency and the state of Utah de- Timothy Thomas, the prefect manager, 

than S« C » l li? < !L CX 5 C0 ^ Ve nd of mand it and because the army cannot af- The army has invested more than $400 

"P* foi d mistakes or failure. million to build the Tooele Chemical Agent 

was thTmm .AW leak, explosion or accident or a Disposal Facility. Mr. Thomas said. The “In Gnuusvffle they I 

has already beam me ^ Kx ^ ^ utcmeratron that allowed toxic current projected cost of constructing in- ven tional weapons.*’ he said. “That’s not 

stor^^ t 8 ^ ? ea P° ns to escape would ondernune the dnerators and bunting stockpiles at John- 

00 JO »nston island, a Pacific atoE army’s chances of winning public and po- ston Island and the right mainland sites is 


$8.6 billion. But aropr officials have told 
Congress that figure is Likely to grow. 

Environmental groups and some ciuzcn 
activists in communities around the eight 
sites are strongly opposed to incineration. 
They argue that it is potentially dangerous 
because dioxins and other harmful by- 
products ought be emitted, and that dis- 
posal technologies still being developed 
might tern out to be cheaper and safer. 

The army’s position is that the Environ- 
mental Protection Agency. Utah authori- 
ties and independent scientists have ac- 
cepted incineration, and that techniques 
perfected on Johnston Island ensure emis- 
sion-free indnera. tico. 

Chip Ward, an anti-incineration activist 
from nearby GrantsviUe, said there is no 
chance of preventing the Tooele plant from 
starting up. Local residents are more upset 
over the army’s detonation of conventional 
ordnance at a rite near GrantsviUe, he said. 

“In GrantsviUe they blow up old con- 


But you mm lion incomplete combustion, 
their eyes glaze over.” 

He said he had obtained the most he 
“could hope for” in a citizens’ commission 
appointed by the governor to monitor ac- 
tivities at the disassembly plant and a com- 
mitment from the army that the Tooele 
plant will be decommissioned after the 
weapons at the site have been destroyed. 
That will take about five years, according 
to Mr. Thomas. 

Mr. Ward said he recognized that, if the 
plant was successful, there would be pres- 
sure in Congress to change the current 
rules of the destruction program and use 
this facility to incinerate weapons stored at 
other riles as wen, rather t h an to buQd 
additional incinerators. 

The army has promised not to do that, 
because its te chnician? say transportation 
Of the weapons is much more dangerous 
than destroying them on site. But some 
members of Congress, led by Senator Hank 
Brown, Republican of Colorado, are clam- 
oring to save money — and eliminate the 
prospect of chemical weapons incineration 
my issue. It scares the horse, wakes up the m their states — by extending the use of 
dog, rattles the windows. Rrople get upset, this facility. 



Neighbors Rallying 
For Action on Haiti 

Majority Book Intervention 


Beta,' Millin'.' The Awxaital Pie*» 


Otfldren carrying water over an open sewerage drain in Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, where the economic embargo is hitting hard. 


Boy Faces Adult Choice of Life or Death 


By Vernon Silver 

New York Times Service 

MIAMI — For 15-year-old Benito Agrelo, 
the logic of his decision was simple: His 
transplanted liver will probably fail even if be 
-takes his medicine, and the ding, which could : 
give him a few extra months to live, has such 
painful side effects that he would rather (fie 
sooner, and without the discomfort. 

The drug that helps Us body accept the 
transplanted organ 15 toxic, and before he 
stopped taking it in October be was in so 
much pain that he could not walk. Benny, 
who was boro with an enlarged fiver, has had 
two transplants, the second in June 1992, 
That is why, he said, he decided to let nature 
take its course. 

His doctors say his condition is nearly 
critical, and, last week. Florida social service 
officials took Beamy from his home in subur- 
ban Coral Springs and put him in Jackson 
Memorial Hospital Five police cars and two 
ambulances were involved, said his mother, 
Armanda. “He kicked and screamed and 
yelled,” rite said. 

For four days he was hdd on the bospitaTs 
organ transplant floor, but be refused to give 
blood or submit to any examinations other 
than a baric physical and checks for vital 
signs. Then on Saturday, a Broward County 
draul judge, Arthur Bakov who had met 
with Benny in the hospital, derided be could 
go home on the condition that he get psycho- 
logical counseling. Us mother said. 

A hospital spokesman, Mark Cohen, said 
the reason for detaining Benny “has to do 
with the endanggment of the lire of a child.” 

Officials of the Florida Department of 
Health and Rehabilitative Services declined 
to comment on Benny’s case, or to say wbeth- 

r they would appeal the judge’s decision. 

“I 4 k> » M have the right to make my own 


derision.” Benny said in an interview as be 
was leaving the hospital. “I know the conse- 
quences, I know the problems.” Taking his 
medicine; he added, “could make me better, 
but not for long.” 

. At a time when ^weft-known people like 
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Richard 
Nixon have been praised for rejecting treat- 
ments that could have prolonged their lives, 
Benny’s choice has troubled some health pro- 
fessionals. They say that his age and the small 
chance that treatment could save his life 
make his derision to die less dear-cut than 
that of an elderly cancer patient. 

Besides, said Dr. Andreas G. Tzakis. his 
prognosis is bad, but not as hopeless as Ben- 
ny says it is. “He’s deeply jaundiced and his 
liver is enlarged and it is almost hardened.” 
said Dr. Tz&kis. who performed the first of 
Benny's two liver transplants when the boy 
was 8. He also examined him last week. 

“The chance is he win die or he wifi need 
another transplant,” even with the methane. 
Dr. Tzakis said, and his odds of surviving a 
third transplant are worse than 50 percent. 
Nevertheless, a third transplant would still 
give Benny a chance to five, said die doctor, 
who is co-director of the University of Mi- 
ami's transplant program at Jackson Memo- 
rial Hospital 

Benny, however, said be would refuse to 
have transplant. Aside from a third 
transplant, doctors have already exhausted 
the options, Dr. Tzakis said, including the 
more traditional ding cyclosporin, which, like 
the newer drug Benny had been prescribed, 
FK506, suppresses the immune system so 
that h does not attack the alien organ. In his 
first transplant, which failed. Beany was on 
cyclosporin. Dr. Tzakis said. 

There is the possihQity that keeping him 
alive could open new options. 

“In a year or so, maybe well have a new 


drug.” Dr. Tzakis said. “If be allows us to 
exhaust the possibilities, we might be able 10 
save him.” 

But, Benny said. Tm tired of feeling the 
pain.” He complained that FK506 caused 
back and leg pain that kept him from running 
outside with friends. The drug also caused 
headaches that kept him from his other pas- 
sions: reading and Dungeons and Dragons, a 
role-playing game. 

Because of his illness, Benny left school in 
the sixth grade. 

*Td rather stay home and live as close as 1 
can to a natural life and die without having 
side effects,” he said. 

As he left the hospital on Saturday, his 
mother said she had learned to respect the 
wishes of a son she called mature and bright. 
“This means it's up to God only.” she said. 
“They claim he could die any day now.” 

There is no dear ethical code by which 
Benny’s choice can be judged, said David 
Rothman, professor of social medicine at the 
Columbia University School of Medicine. 
“Tins goes on all the time in cancer protocol,” 
be said, adding: “If s hard to put this particu- 
lar story in this pattern.” 

“Were he an adult, it would be simple.” 
Mr. Rothman said. “Adults of a sound mind 
have the right to chose which medicine they 
wish to take.” 

But with Benny on the cusp of adulthood. 
Dr. Tzakis said he must consider both the 
patient’s childlike decision-making as well as 
ms adult self-dctenmnation. 

“I hope we don’t pm the child in the corner 
so he won’t change his mind,” Dr. Tzakis 
said 

Benny, however, said he had not given up 
the fight, just changed his idea of victory. 

“I do want to go on living.” he said, “but 
not is pain.” 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A majority 
of Western Hemisphere countries 
have quietly told uS. officials that 
they are prepared to support mili- 
tary intervention in Haiti if sanc- 
tions fail to force out its mifitanr 
rulers, senior administration offi- 
cials say. 

Although the leaders of several 
countries have publicly attacked 
the idea of inLerveniion.U.S. diplo- 
mats have received quite a different 
message in private meetings over 
the last two weeks with offi cials 
from about 30 Caribbean and Lat- 
in American countries: Most sup- 
port intervention, although often 
with strings attached. 

“A majority are willing to con- 
sider intervention if aU else fails,” a 
senior administration official said. 
“There are some countries that are 
prepared to join a multilateral in- 
tervention force if sanctions don’t 
bring these folks down.” 

The renewed emphasis on sanc- 
tions by the administration, and its 
playing down of immediate inter- 
vention, are meant in part to show 
that Washington is intent on ex- 
hausting ail diplomatic and eco- 
nomic means in hopes of lining up 
as much support as possible before 
any military action. 

“This ratcheting up of the pres- 
sure is pan of an effort to bring 
people along with you toward 
stronger measures,” a senior ad- 
ministration official said. 

According to UJS. diplomats, 
several nations that just a few 
months ago attacked calls for inter- 
vention nave wanned to the idea 
because the repression in Haiti has 
grown worse and Haiti's military 
leaders have shown only contempt 
for international pressures. 

“A lot of countries are increas- 
ingly concerned about (he implica- 
tion of the coup leaders' being suc- 
cessful and how that might 
encourage coups elsewhere,” an ad- 
ministration official said. “They’re 
wondering what does this mean for 
democracy in the hemisphere.” 

At a meeting of the Organization 
of American States last weds in 
Brazil foreign ministers from sev- 
eral countries made it dear to the 
U.S. deputy secretary of state. 
Strobe Talbott, and to President 
Bfll Clinton's adviser on Haiti. Wil- 
liam H. Gray 3d. that they would 
support intervention now. 

Others nations backed interven- 
tion but said they first wanted to 
try tougher sanctions for several 
months. 


fragmented U S. Blacks Meet, Seeking to Bridge Their Gaps 


By Kevin Merida 

Washington Pest Service 

JALTIMORE — African- 
terican leaders started a major 
Bring here pledging to be frank 
art differences nut respectful of 
h other’s views as they deyejop 
itegies to i mp rove the quality of 
for Mack Americans. 

[he forum, sponsored by theNa- 
ial Association for the Ad- 
1 cement of Colored People, 
sned Sunday al ihe orgamza- 
i’s headquarters amid heavy se- 


at leader. Outside, about 50 
pie. most of than Jewish, pro- 
sd his presence, saying it. lent 
timacy to a man who stirred 
-Sesmtism. 

ut inside, Mr. Farrakhan was 
joined by a divase 
xdpants, and the mood reTect- 
strong desire not to Jet exter- 
forcesT” as raw leader put it, 
n the 


The Associated Press 

ANGOON — Bufln&and^* 

ifiSSKS 
SISSSWi «■? 

lines are separated by a 25fr 
n*a (159-nrik) stretch efthe 
onTlbver. Ufldra 

H fi«d boundary 

, g 'the! rften-cbaogniS ”*** 
aid as the border. 


"There are some who have 
thrown stones at ns simply because 
we’re trying to bring our people 
together,” raid the NAACFs exec- 
utive director, Benjamin F. Chavis 
Jr, who mentioned “vile threats” 
against officials and the need for 
leaders to travel together fay bus to 
an evening m e etin g to ensure their 
protection. Hedid not specify what 
the threats were' or who was sus- 
pected of malting them. 

'Hie meeting comes at a time of 
urgency in the blade community, 
some leaders said, citing racism, 
crone and violence and the need to 
resurrect community institutions, 
to boftd businesses and to testae 
hope among tbose^of a younger 
generation who have lost their way. 

The meeting follows a tradition 
of such meetings in the black com- 
munity, dating bade to the 1830s, 
when , there were annual national 
Negro conventions to strengthen 
the resolve of Macks to free them- 
selves from bandage. 

Grand West, a noted theology 
professor and director of the Afri- 
can-American studies program at 
Princeton Unrrtoity, said it was 
important to have braids of trust 
even arin'd.disagrednent 

Earlier, Mr. West had come out- 
ride to embrace Michael Leroer. 
editor of the Je wish magazine Tik- 
fcno, and tell protesters that al- 
. though be dgMored. Mr. Fairak- 
han’s views rat lows, there was a 
need ro include- bim in a dialogue. 
He said he hoped personally to 
“sway sune people” from anti- 

Semitism. ‘ .j 


Addressing the meeting, Mr. 
West said, “The blade freedom 
straggle is bigger than each and 
every one of us.” He added: “We 
must not exdude or dismiss one 
another. But we must be frank with 
our critiques.” 

Mr. Farrakhan applauded Mr. 
West’s remarks, adding that as a 
member of the Nation of Islam 
under Elijah Muhammad in the 
1960s, he had not shown the proper 
appreciation for the Reverend 
Martin Luther King Jr. and other 


civil rights workers because they 
were integrationisis. 

“Each of us was pan of some 
group or organization who fell that 
our organization alone had die so- 
lution to the problems of our peo- 
ple,” Mr. Farrakhan said. “We 
were like spiritual and intellectual 
children who could not see the val- 
ue of others for being blinded by 
the assumed value of ourselves.” 

But he added: “We have 10 begin 
to see the value of each component 


pan of this struggle. And everyone 
m this room represents values to 
end that struggle.” The opening 
session was attended by about 60 
leaders, representing a broad cross- 
section of African-American life, 
including representatives of soror- 
ities and fraternities, church orga- 
nizations, independent political 
movements, academia, the media, 
community groups and profession- 
al associations, such as those repre- 
senting black dentists and black 
energy specialists. 


Several others indicated that 
they would support an invasion, 
but only after receiving a mandate 
from the United Nations or the 
Organization of American Stales. 

Others said they were strongly 
opposed. More nations say they 
would back intervention than 
would contribute troops to an in- 
vading force. 

In congressional testimony last 
week, Mr. Gray said the Caribbean 
nations were the biggest supporters 
of force. Comparing the hemi- 
sphere to a large neighborhood, be 
suggested that Haiti was a burping 
bouse and that those who lived 
nearby, who see the repression up 
dose and are being swamped by 
Haitian refugees, are the most ea- 
ger for intervention. 

Barbados, the Bahamas, and 
Trinidad and Tobago have ail 
strongly backed intervention, while 
officials from Jamaica ray they will 
support it rally if the United Na- 
tions or the Organization of Ameri- 
can States first gives the green fight. 

“Those whose house is adjoined, 
next to Haiti, are very concerned 
and don’t want 10 debate how 
many buckets of water will be 
thrown on the fine per minute,” Mr. 
Gray said. “Those who are across 
the street have a different point of 
view.” 

Several officials at the Brazil 
meeting said Venezuela and Argen- 
tina also supported intervention. 
On toe other hand, several of toe 
hemisphere’s heavyweights, most 
notably Mexico and Brazil, remain 
strongly opposed. That is why U.S. 
officials acknowledge that it might 
be harder to win approval for inter- 
vention from toe 34-member Orga- 
nization of American States, which 
works by consensus, than from the 
UN Security Council. 

With the international commu- 
nity fed up with the intransigent 
and repressive Haitian regime, 
which deposed toe Reverend Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide as president in 
September 1991, U.S. officials 
voice confidence that they can per- 
suade the Security Council's 14 
other members to approve inter- 
vention. 

In toe view of administration of- 
ficials, some Latin American offi- 
cials have denounced intervention 
mainly to play to tbeir domestic 
audience. But U.S. officials ray that 
if there is intervention, most of 
these Latin American officials will 
other keep silent or announce 
grudging support. 

Toe Clinton administration has 
often said it wifi not wait indefi- 
nitely for sanctions to work. Mr. 
Talbott and Mr. Gray refuse to give 
any deadline for sanctions, al- 
though they say that toe adminis- 
tration will assess day-to-day how 
well toe embargo is working. 

“We do feel a sense of some 
urgency here, for toe very simple 
reason that people are dying.” Mr. 
Talbott said last week. 

Some countries have eagerly and 
publicly backed Mr. Clinton’s sug- 
gestion that force should not be 
ruled out. At toe Organization of 
American States meeting in Brazil, 
Peter Laurie, toe foreign minis ter 
of Barbados, said his government 
would “suppon whatever measures 
are necessary, including a lawful 
multilateral armed intervention.” 


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APOLITICAL NOTES A 


Special Prosecutor Interviews Clintons 


WASHINGTON (AP) — President Bill Clinton and his wife, 
Hillary, have been interviewed under oath by the Whitewater special 
prosecutor. Robert B. Fiskc Jr„ the White House disclosed Mon- 
day. 

The interviews, conducted on Sunday, focused on events sur- 
rounding toe death of toe White House deputy counsel, Vincent W. 
Foster, and communications between the Treasury and White 
House staff dealing with thc government investigation of Madison 
Guaranty Savings & Loan, a Tailed Arkansas thrift. 

“As the president has previously announced, he and Mrs. Clinton 
are cooperating fully with the independent counsel and voluntarily 
agreed when the interviews were requested.” the statement by White 
House special counsel Lloyd Culler said. 

The brief statement said that Mr. Fjske had requested that further 
details of the interviews not be disclosed. 

Mr. Foster's death last July was ruled a suicide, but questions 
later arose about that judgment. Mr. Fiske’s investigation looked 
into Mr. Foster’s death ana the way the White House reacted to it. 


‘Destinies Linked,’ Clinton Tells Akihito 


WASHINGTON (AP) — President Clinton recalled the warfare 
of the past and pointed to toe challenges of the future on Monday as 
he welcomed Emperor Akihito of Japan to the White House. “The 
destinies of our two peoples are inextricably linked," he said. 

At a ceremony on the South Lawn. Emperor Akihito thanked the 
United States for helping Japan rebuild after World War II and 
said. “Today, our two countries have overcome the deplorable 
rupture brought about by war.” 

The emperor was greeted with full honors, stepping out of his 
limousine onto a red carpet, where he and Empress Michiko were 
greeted by the president and Hillary Rodham Clinton. 

After a 21-gun salute and the playing of the two national an- 
thems, the president and emperor reviewed assembled troops from 
all branches of the U .S. armed forces. 

’’Your majesties visit us at a moment when it is clear that toe 
destinies of our two peoples are inextricably linked.” Mr. Clinton 
said. “It is a moment in history when every day yields new chal- 
lenges. But those challenges bring with them the opportunity for us 
to carve new paths together." 

“The Japanese people will not forget the generosity of support 
which toe United States extended to my country after World War 
said the emperor. He also thanked iiis hosts for “toe indispens- 
able role played by lbe United States in assuring Japan's security 
and world peace foT the past half century.” 

President Gin ton and his wife were holding a state dinner, the 
first of Mr. Ginton’s presidency. Monday night for the emperor in a 
lent in tbe While House Rose Garden. 


Dole Backpedals on Health Care Filibuster 


WASHINGTON (NYT) — The Senate Republican leader. Bob 
Dole of Kansas, has moved to soften reports that he planned to 
filibuster health care legislation in the Senate this fall if it included 
any requirement that employers buy insurance for their workers. 

In an interview on CNN. Mr. Dole said the reports, based on a 
speech he had delivered over toe weekend in Boston, were “mixed 
up,” and that he intended to remove the employer mandate from the 
legislation, not kill the legislation altogether. 

*Tm going to fight the bill and try to change it, try to amend it, try 
to clarify it. try to knock out employer mandates.” he said. “It may 
be so bad you’d have to rad up in a filibuster, but certainly we're not 
at that point yet. We’re a long way from deciding any strategy. We 
don’t have arty bill. Nothing’s passed.” 

In his speech to Republicans in Boston, Mr. Dole had seemed to 
say something stronger, suggesting that he warned to delay action 
on health care legislation until 1995 and instead allow Republican 
candidates to campaign on the issue in this November’s elections. 


Quote/Unquote 


Fred Greenste'in. an authority at Princeton University on the 
American presidency: “Clinton is not getting the mileage and 
bounce out of toe basic state of toe economy. And the fact that he's 
not getting credit reduces his political clout.” (NYT) 


Away From Politics 


• Homosexual pofice officers marched in uniform, and gay politi- 
cians waved from convertibles as 250,000 people turned out for the 
24th annual Gay and Lesbian Pride parade in West Hollywood, 
California. Tony Miller, acting secretary of stale and toe fini openly 
gay candidate to receive a major party's nomination fra statewide 
office in California, rode in the parade, as did a Los Angeles city 
coundlwoman, Jackie Goldberg, a lesbian. 

• A Cuban pOot picked up his sister and brotoer-in-law in his vintage 
crop duster, flew to the naval air station in Key West, Florida, and 
requested political asylum. Tbe pfloL, Arid Correal Gonzilez, 29, left 
Aqua Gaius, Cuba, on a spraying operation, an air stat ion spokes- 
woman said. He stopped for pesticides, picked up his sister and her 
husband, and headed for Florida. 

About 200 Hawanans who dasn they bold native rights to a popular 
slate beach were given another week to leave it or face arrest. The 
state had set a Saturday deadline for the sovereignty activists but 
gave them an extension to allow them time to prepare for tbe move 
and hold a weekend htau to celebrate toe King Kamehameha Day 
holiday. Hundreds gathered for toe luau, many waving pro-sover- 
eignty signs. 

• Thousands of teachers protested outride toe statehouse in Trenton, 

New Jersey, over Governor Christie Whitman’s plan to make them 
pay more for their pensions. The governor, who upset toe Democrat- 
ic incumbent last year on a pledge to reduce stale taxes, is proposing 
requiring teachers and state workers to increase their share of 
payments to the pension fund by 2 percent of their salary. That 
would save the state $98 million. ap 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1994 


Lockerbie Admission of Guilt 

Terrorist Confesses, but There Are Doubts 


'■"“ft* Sayed Mina, denied Mr. Shaaban’s 

DtlRUT — A Palestinian fol- assertion that he had mentioned 
lower of uie terrorist Abu Nidal the Lockerbie bombing during 
asserted Monday that he had car- questioning about rbe Jan. 29 kifl- 
ned out the 1988 bombing of Pan ing of Naeb Umran Maaytah, fust 
Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, secretary at the Jordanian Embassy 
Scotland, killing 270 people. in Beirut. 

The downing of the jetliner has “It's a mere lie," the magistrate 
been attributed variously to Iran, said. “Had Youssef Shaaban con- 
Syria and Libya. Tripoli has been fessed to such a case that still pre- 
targeted by international sanctions occupies the world, I would have 
for more than two years for ref us- given it utmost priority and invest- 
ing to turn over two suspects in the gated promptly.” 
attack. “I believe this confession is for 

Youssef Shaaban, 29. of Abu Ni- the purpose of deception and aims 
dal's Fatah Revolutionary Council. At misleading the investigation, 
took responsibility for the attack nothing more," he said, 
during his trial in Beirut on a Court sources speculated that 
charge of assassinating a Jordanian the defendant might have been in- 
diplomat in Beirut in January. stiucted by Abu Nidal to make the 
“I personally blew up the Lock- claim to divert international out- 
erbie plane," he told the Judicial rage over the bombing away from 
CounriL the country’s highest trial Libya, the chief backer of the Fatah 
court. “I've told the investigating Revolutionary Council, 
maastrate about it before but my Abu Nidal is believed to be livine 


rants for two Libyan suspects, 
Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi and La- 
men Khalifa Fhimah. 

Libya has refused to hand over 



ing of Naeb Umran Maaytah, first the two men for trial and that led 'Jpk", $ 
secretary at the Jordanian Embass y the United Nations Security Coua- \ *!•$ 

in Beirut. cil to impose sanctions, be ginni ng ; 

“It's a mere lie," the magistrate in April 1992. ' T' : ; 

said. “Had Youssef Shaaban con- Mr. Shaaban has acknowledged v 


occupies the world, I would have 
given it utmost priority and investi- 
gated promptly.” 

“I believe this confession is for 


that he is a member of Abu Nidal'* 
Fatah Revolutionary Council. Abu 
Nidal is the notn de guerre of Sabri 
Banna. He is wanted in the United 
States, Europe and some Arab 


the purpose of deception and aims countries for killing scores of peo- 
at misleading the investigation, pie in terrorist ai lacks. 


nothing more,” he said. 

Court sources speculated that 
the defendant might have been in- 
structed by Abu Nidal to make the 
claim to divert international out- 
rage over (he bombing away from 
Libya, the chief backer of the Fatah 
Revolutionary Council. 

Abu Nidal is believed to be living 


confession wasn't documented. I somewhere in Libya. 

CflV ll aoatn nAu> . _ * 


On trial with Mr. Shaaban for 
the Jan. 29 killing ore Bassem 
Atiyeh Jabr, 32. and Youssef 
Mhiob Abawaoi. 32. 

The three men told the Judicial 
Council on Monday that they had 
nothing to do with the killing ’They 
said that their confessions, given 
during interrogation, had been ob- 
tained through torture. 



Chernobyl Fears 


instead of WW ! fj?. 

audear reaction- Graphite d*** 

justTrOd megawatts of 

■ abbui3pcrtentirfj;kratiJesncei' 

officials 

■ they art notprepand to shut th£® 
down until five new reactors sup 


LINKED IN PROTEST OF PALESTINIAN SELF-RULE — Jews from the Naama settfement, near the Jeridio amoopnwwi 
i»bninmg themselves to a fence on the IsraetJordan border Monday. They protested the Israel-PLO accord, citing secnrity pro 


say it again now. 

The investigating magistrate. 


BBC Correspondent 
Is Arrested in Angola 

Agence France -Prose 

LUANDA, Angola — A BBC 
correspondent, Chris Simpson, was 
arrested here as he visited a prison, 
police sources said Monday. 

Mr. Simpson, a British national 
was detained Sunday when he went 
to the prison to interview SouLh 
Africans charged with involvement 
in drug trafficking, the sources 
said. 


Mr. Shaaban made no other dis- 
closures about the attack, which 
occurred on Dec. 21, 1988. and in 
which a bomb destroyed the Lon- 
don-to-New York flight over the 
Scottish town of Lockerbie. Ail 239 
people aboard the plane and 12 
people on the ground were killed. 

Suspicion initially focused on the 


Cairo Targets Nonviolent, but Illegal, Muslim Group 


ahcxL V- r _ 

’ - Perhaps even rBOre UDubhriS- 
administration officials say. a 1 ®. 1 "' 
dka'tions that Ukraine is 
to restart OKsiioby) Vait r which 
has been' out of sflrwce since uw 

1991 fire. - .. . ■» .- ,, _ 

: . A copy of Mr. Kravchuk s direc- 
tive, made available last week by 
: the Natural Respprew Defense 
Council, air environmental group 
• that' has expressetLafenn at Chet- 
: oobyTs continued operation. lists 
the reactor aspire that W“ aine 
--should “bring oaJinc" in 199?. j ■ ■ 
■ ." Jjj sedong-to block ihati-adnun- 
tttrat^Tcfi&aals: say they have 
agreed that the West should at least 
• • pledge to upgrade any new reactors 
to. meet Western safety standards. 

■ -In looking ahead to the G-7 meet- 


By Chris Hedges scores of Muslim Brotherhood damentalism, who t he pre sident 
Nr* York Tunn Service leaders, signals a drive by (he gov- contends are merely terrorists. 

CAIRO — After a series of raids eminent to curtail not only those “This is the first time this gov- 
and arrests that have weakened Is- movements that have carried out eminent has linked us to terror- 
lamic groups trying to topple the violent attacks, but also one that ism, raid fssam Irian, a senior 
government by force, Egyptian se- has come to dominate many mu- Brotherhood leader in Cairo, 
curity forces have begun a crack- nia'paliries, professional and labor “It is part of a wide move by the 
down against the country’s most associations and university facul- government to curtail all forms of 
powerful opposition organization, hes. democratic participation, be said, 

the Muslim Brotherhood, which re- The confrontation pits the gov- “ u , 3X1 eroressioii of the govexn- 
iects violence. enmwrn of President Hosni Mu- ment s weakness. But by narrowing 


uspicion initially focused on the and arrests that have weakened Is- 


suspicion initially tocuseo on inc 
Syrian-based Popular Front for the 
Liberation of Palestine-General 


“This is the first time this gov- 
ernment has linked us to terror- 


Command, headed by Ahmed Je~ curily forces . 
brO. down against 

But the CIA said in 1991 that it powerful opp 
had found evidence that Libya was the M uslim Bi 
behind the Lockerby bombing. On jecis violence 
Nov. 14, 1991, U.S. and Scottish The campa 
legal authorities issued arrest war- the detention 


dons, including medical, engineer- 
ing and legj groups. 


Bat Brotherhood leaden say the 
government wants to. silence the ' 


And, aside from the rejection of only effective opposition to a emm- 


mg. - they also say that there is con- 
sensus wi tHhv the administration 
that a QymriTQniqn6 beuiR drafted 
by aa Itafito-ted working group is 
too pennKstvejixt-.dcclanng that 


curily forces have begun a crack- 
down against the country’s most 
powerful opposition organization, 
the Muslim Brotherhood, which re- 


tire campaign, which includes bank for the first time against the 
the detention and interrogation of intellectual authors of Islamic fun- 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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RESIDENCE CARTEL 

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confrontation pits the gov- ^ “ ^ssson of the gomn- 

» of President Hosni Mu- s weaklier. But by narrowing 
or the rust time aaainsi the ^ opportunities for democratic 
aual authors of Islamic fun- participation, the Mvenmreoi is 

| creating more problems than tt is 

solving.” . 

The Muslim Brotherhood, 
founded in 1928, is the prototype 
for modem Islamic fundamentalist 

tuisuii 

*h Boor/nt, view on iw Avoftftie Although it was officially 

JS msm «79 Si l ^“ ed “ 1 ^ 4 .- il ^* as . a 

or office: m 69 08 fen stop estimated m the hundreds of 

to kbi t ' * * * ‘ * thousands and is tire largest Egyp- 

S’tb^oSrALE dan oppoation movmnem, le^j or 
partners Td. p) 46 u B 2 ii. Ftst OlegsL It dominates many of the 

-Qb 1 /: 96 --- — 14,000 private philanthropies that 

provide services from health dinks 

Evng, bedrocm, b*hav drawer room. 10 primary School S. . 

SretS. iRASHt t assets, with badting from 
7ft. ST dominique is nm. sudo. supporters here and in Gulf coun- 
a new. bgfa. fafy wmppef Mb?*, tries like Saudi Arabia, run into toe 
SSSWmttw , a ,,,B ^ hundreds of millions of dollars. 

6 ft. st gbumjn ob Hffis. 2 room The Brotherhood, which has its 
° pqrtni f re -, headquarters in central Cairo, calls 

for the estabHshmem of an Islamic 
7 nw 155 ** . 5181,5 ^ peaceful means. It rejects 
g^so/mo oeqyA h! Td I - 4576661 9 . the violence used by outlawed or- 
gannatit^ tike the Islamic Group 
Nocommaon-Tet p )45 04 19 38 in there efforts to topple the gov- 


No convoo»oii. Tet p )45 or 19 38 in their efforts to topple the gov- 

paris area unfurnished eramenL . _ . 

* '■■■■■ ■ "■ ■■' But at the same time, the Broth- 

erfaood has mounted an aggressive 

Cmbmcv CmleP campaign to take control of a vari- 
tmoossy service ^ ^ charitable institu- 

YOUR REAL ESTATE [ tions. It now dominates the largest 
! AGENT M PARK °f EgyP 1 ’ 5 22 professional assoda- 

Teh 11 } 47 . 20 . 30.05 


the use of force, the gpius of the rry rhat nommaPy has a multiparty too pennKswe iHt'.acciarmg xnai 
Brotherhood dovetail with'those of system, but where the . same rating- Chernobyl should not. be dosed hh* 
the underground groups. group has been : in -power since - tfl UkrahKfs.dbiriesbCj energ y de - ■ 

The wide reach of the Brother- 1952. V : . . mands cOT.brsati^ 

hood is basal on its charitable Whale refusing to Bfi4heban oti^ --cal- prices ; .• t ■ . - 
wmk, including ' scores of clinics, tfie Brotherhood, J^dr; ^ MubardC ?'■ '■ ‘ J ' ‘ “ .7 

hospitals and schools. But it also bas, uritil ncfWi allowed it tourer- ■ t? ' A- " ' 

appKals to many Egyptians, espe- alt Brotherhood- riKantrera were ■ M fl i riA Z . 
aaJly those in the professional even permitted tq,>run in.MifiE-p^. - h - '• 

classes, as the only credible opposv- mentary dectkms in I988, aitnough - /Vioitt ILuinoric 
don movement the candidates ran as members of ; V ' 

But there is a price for effective the tiny. Tibei^aiid fan&smri 'y . l *rg P'Y • • 


Evng, beDraren, btchov ftower room. 
Nrwfv redone. Free vwuetiufafy. 
F7J0Q pg monft Td 1-43 Z7 64 70, 
7ft. ST DOfWBQUE 35 kutl sMxio. 
a new, Sgkf, Wy «pippM, fid baft, 
wefter-ftyer. Mmd sernco avaiUaie. 
Fr6J01 Td HI 45 48 19 54. 

6ft. ST GBUMJN OB PCS. 2 room 


[ 75ft, I emtOOM RAT, Iwraos. Bi, 
i moe funvtwe, qnci. My-Aua. Svpt. 
f5550/mo osqokfah. Td 


classes, as the only credible opposi- 
tion movement 

But there is a price for effective 
organization. Wbmen,for example, 
must wear the hejab, or head scarf, 
if they want to enter the Physicians’ 
Union, a former leftist stronghold 
with a membership of 80,000 that is 
now controlled by the Brother- 
hood. 

“The Brotherhood provides 
loans, cars, furniture and even elec- 
trical appliances to union mem- 
bos, at low cost,” said Mohammed 
Farhat who is noi a member. 

Untfl now, the government con- 
centrated on banting the Islami c 
Group, which has waged a two- 
year campaign of violence in which 
nearly 400 people, mainly police 
officers and militants, have bees 
failed. But security fortes have 
killed one militant commander and 
captured several others, putting the 
underground groups on the defen- 
sive. • 

“The security situation over all is 
much better now than a few 
months ago," a Western diplomat 
said. “This has made it easier to do 
this. The government has the ener- 


• bund Sodalisi Labcar Party, 'both of 


which the Brotherhood ^ -'pow^con- :<heck of223,000 undorground shel- 
trols. ' •••• -. . V> - . iers and ^0,00Q ranttgenejr water 

The mam «qjf>oMtion piutiies,in- supply ptants. 
eludi n g die Socialist L^borPafty, . -.In another precautionary action, 
have boycotted subso^uent-pariia^- officials of tire Setrel city govern^ . 
mentary elections because ctf- whaK meat said Maoday that they were 
they say is fraud. But the.toferance nmddng ouiyfflys to ensure emer- 


of tire B rothcrhoodappeafs'Wbave. 
ended.’ -* • •• * ‘-Iv - 


gg^^cr vlriens ' for tire capital's 
. The gprtrinaem is reajmnresd- 


Losing Ground 

CoBthwedfeom ttgel 


two weeks and set aside emergency 
footis sucfiTas ia^ta^ nbodles. It 
-also tnrged dtizens to store fud, 
lanterns, &st aid kits; gas raadrs. 
blankets and drifting water. * 




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Hamas. and IsUuuic Jihad activists, of- tire resohmcni Would seek to 
and thrcaieBed to confiscate weaj>- reniedy North Korea's past failure 
ens and to pursue those who attack to owperate with tfre Jutcniational 
Isradi taints. Atcmre Eraaw Agency and ^Iso to 

• What is temaikable about tire tonne that fere was n& drveraon 
movemetifs internal reassessment - in tire-future ofphUpnxum from the 
is the desroB to whidi Hamas lead- . nuclear fud rods- that were re- 
ars said they had be^m to thinknot : moved from a .reactor recently, 
about how to fight the peace, but •_ . J ‘OMre vatfaus -tiungs that, the 
about bow, practical^, to make the council -deals With; rail, of Which is 
most of iL to effect, theyhavecome boportant, there isno question in 
to the realhankm that their worid my mind that , this is an issue at 
suddenly has changed. - least that lhe UnUed Staies sees as 
r “It is now evident that nfl th ff ', % I PMt Ill^MtaBt BSUC fpT US to 
Hamas nor the other opposition deaTwitii. And certainly I fed that 
factions can disnriss what has taken • thisiswhair am going to be spend- 
place so far,' " said Ziad Abu-Amr, a ‘•* B 8 111051 — tiroc on," she said, 

political science professor at Bir ‘ LllLl _ 5 - ' - 

Zdt Unberaty in the -West Bank.: ^ • 

“They are trying to find certain. T|/|TG(i. 
mechanisms that will allow them to' 'lTClkyM* • ■ 
enga©; in the neWxHricr." Wi ‘ ; • " 'n . 

“The majority of Palestinians- jBeffUlY Pu&SOIlt 
support the national atrthority.and ° 

we condemn and renounce attacks ; . Ontteedfitiin Page 1 
t^inst Israel” ^said Mahn^d Hoflywod-style cultural icon in 
Abu HuejadL who nms a falaTd Qjt sub-Saharan savanna hasalog- 
siandneartheGaza beach-Hemo-' kalfooL Bei^eni several yearem 
noned aa^sthe ^twaj£a. Hoflywoodwa musician and clear- 
waD pamredVuh graffiti pfai^ag i y absorbed &e culture With emhu- 
H a m a s. “Those young people who siasm. 
sffuggiedmtbe past for freedom- The pageant was a ntiz of Mr 

thCTare.mh^ i rn^]^Tbe Thiombiand 1 ® nathu and adopted 
rrason for tire stroggfe Waste cnltuies. .Raiotfically daringS 
fact the pcaqretion mivtad now' five-hour dmw; I^jiiqyed 
tins reason is over. Now they are: the steering wheel of iSra 
.wdtingabmcrlife.- ; 

Abdallah Mansour,abeacfrped- promotion aid juiced titingsnp by 
dler of boiled com cm the cob. said nonlriug theTujrh. ' ^ J 

a few days after two Israeli soldiers : ; Hoa&ses red T-shirta 

were killed Mot 20 j at the Erez . promoting Titidence-brand con- 
CbcdqpoinU “V/e are mrt support- : doms Boated among the dinner ut- 
ing the violence. Jf weare gang to : blcs. ’nic'contesianis strode down a 
km them, one day they Wul come rimWayrim defended out over the 
and kmmy brothworim'Tieighbor hotefs poql Wrearmg bathing suits, 
or a Palestinian. We always pray eveamggdwns and traditional'cos- 
this wiE be popped, soon." tnraes. As the women paraded, bats 

One of tte strongest agpals o£ swopped pari:^ ^ffirqugh the night air 
dhangesofarha5b<«^p«diJCQs- ut.ibe end, Tvfiss Buddna 
sion by Hanras leaders, such -as: Was 19-year-old Amina ta Konatr ' 




mm 

it 


killed. But security fortes have with Israel;. Hamas'; is posing 

killed one militant commander and ground. Should the agreement col- - The US. drier debate at the 
captured several others, putting the apse, the Islamic ungfants could United NatiOM,Madeieirie K. Al- 
underground groups on the drfen- wdl riseagam. . 1 .V ; . : bp^t^ said Monday that the first : ' 

sive. But rwo powerftd factors have drrft iof a Sfmcoe^.-EescitnioQ 

“The security sitnatira over all is pot tire miHtant Islamic movenrent mi^ht^ ''.he distributed, within 24. 
much better now than a few c® the defensive. One is the surge . horns and indicated tire embargoes 
months ago " a Western diplomat °f enthusiasm that has taken bdd would be ; escalated in sevotty, 
said. “This has made it easiff to do mGazaancelsrafihtroops kti last ReuterSR^orted frotn New York.- . 
this. The government has the ener- mouth. Hainas Was bom ifi The fi- -.Sre.toid reporters dic.eraected- 
gy and the manpower available to «y «®rfy radnths; of the intifada, I tp haye *^d«rieuts^rf Absolution 
go after what U sees as a second-tier «b« apw - tire jfttifadg flatnefiaran. ; : 

oxganuatkra." ' but died put Hamas no longer has taer . Tuesday ot Wean^day. • - 

: +- enou^i support in Gaza tocanyoa .Mra. Albo^it said, that the .“res- 

- with strikes. _ olntion, as it looks now, will be 

CM COULD AFFECT Tbe otirer factor -has been ibe phasedsothatlhtm^iwlll^cmain 

1 jjFE arrrralof the Palestinian polkre;an^partsctf it that snll bddesiaied to~; 

army under fire cpmmano.trf forces fry to ensure tiiai thelJlOTtb Kore- 
loyal .to Yassa- Arafat, the. PLO - ans correct some of their behavior,: 
chairman, fat tbe last fwweefcL tire and some cfit-wfllTreidfesigned^ ^to 
. pofice have been inareasmgly bold deter some future behavior- that 
, in challenging Islamic militants.. would be unaccqjtable." 

The poUce have arrested several She appa re ntly meant that pajrt 


■* I 1 


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HQW£ J 8USNESS. 


Mahmoud Z(rirer>ri!3G«n9^)tya- tiwfmirtfw^ sj^hifdrenof a Mus- - 
cian, about creating, a fe^iimate ua fanmyi Nfiss Konate was * 
political party, Hamas ^S refused crowned, with a gaper tiara studded - j 

to recognize the newTriatictialTanr : with pfastiegcnB and enthroned * 

tikaity under Mr.. Ayifitt. !Many ; ‘SwaDoWeiLro. ifeliy -.-^ an ennr^ * 
Hunks lead&S preSbt^as seff-ririe ; moos chmr thaMooked like a jirav ^ 
enterprise <arenti^%jwfl^ctfl^jse, . mardunaHow. & 
but lor 'now, the toovoment-idwiriy ' Runners- up were a ward erf 
warns tocaptoreso^rflh^ tound^trip fiigflbio^ ^the capitals ^ S i 

lar endmriasm'geeei^jrfbJ.thc neighboring cfcrics. Ua-ulaS 5 

parmre of Israefi trob^v.^- - ; mtestant^ received S20 £&'* 
■ Moreover, HamasJsaders fear '•J™*.® #nky(»Csaid Miss - 

breaiU ^* " 

lifs airawaianamsto.TOfftbby.feie y n * ^cwscbnfcrence, shepressed t 
iawting on pfaraSinlto.^pfew ffe '-iwritaBoa. “I ; 

thrir .TootikM m.titt ^erritbries. to-cowmae my studies, and '■* 
“Vmcut somMta tageuew .^v 0 ^ Vo*rn «e i 

ntaoiil sheaid. 1 


ImoAr«qMBs August J?. 1994. OTdba»oibfcJrto^fcfc#ft4taor^. ! 


‘TTwtftrtsofii^i 
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N'o^-ta^ne; - 

0130 84 8585 '■ 











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EUROPE VOTES / 


German Far Right 
Soundly Rejected 
In Voter Backlash 


ESTER1NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1994 





By Rich Atkinson 
Pos ' seTv,te 

BERLIN — European elections 

cEf^tv ^ sbo K 11141 political 
rwc rftbe German far right, once 

as an alarming bartlhger of 
resurgent extrwbism in Europe's 
Digest country, has crested. 

.. Republicans, Germany’s 
oiggest rightist party, won only 3 9 
Percent of the vole -less than the 
a percent minimum needed for rep- 
resentation m the European Pariia- 

fS5» JI !^ tr?sboulte -.’ nie 

forfeit the six seats it won in 1989. 
when the Republicans collected 7.1 
percent and appeared to be an as- 
cendant force in Gferman politics 
Sunday’s defeat: was the latest 
re'Wal for a party recently beset 
with high-level defections, a muddy 
political message and voter antipa- 
thy. And despite persistent attacks 
on foreigners by neo-Nazi skin- 
heads, poll s suggest that the Ger- 
man flirtation with far-right politi- 
cal groups has ended, at least for 
now. 


fortunes have tumbled. The federal 
internal security agency has kept 
party leaders under surveillance 
since December 1992 on suspicion 
of extremist activities. Last week, 
without providing any details, the 
government disclosed that Repub- 
licans — whose core membership is 
estimated at 23,000 — have been 
linked to 14 crimes in the past year 
and a half, including one beating 
death. 

In March. Republican candi- 
dates wot only 3.7 percent of the 
vote in Lower Saxony state elec- 
tions. In May. two senior Republi- 
cans quit the party and publicly 
denounced its political agenda; one 
of them, Udo Bosch, warned that 
“all manner of anti-foreigner and 
anti-Semitic hate propaganda 
courses through tins party," And at 
a pre-election rally in Munich last 
Thursday, J JOO Republican sup- 
porters were vastly outnumbered 
by hecklers shouting, “Nazis out!** 
Yet, Germany’s problems with 


! °w. far-right extremism have hardly 

.. virtually all opinion surveys in- vanished. Since the firebombing erf 
dicate that the Republicans will fall the Lfibedc synagogue in March, 



far short of the 5 percent threshold 
needed to win seats in the German 
Par l ia men t in federal elections this 
October. 

Other far-right parties have 
fared even worse; the leader of the 
na t i on alist Union of Free Citizens 
not only failed in his bid to win a 
seat in Strasbourg, bat also had to 
cancel rallies in four cities after 
being pelted with tomatoes and 

eggs. 

Several factors have contributed 
to what the Sflddeutsche Zeitung of 
Munich called “the end of the Re- 
publicans' winning streak.” A 
modest recovery from the worst re- 
cess on since World War U has 
begun putting people back to work 
and has eased economic anxieties. 
A compromise last year by mam- 
stream parties — particularly 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's Chris- 
tian Democrats and the opposition 
Social Democrats — sharply 
curbed the number of asylum-seek- 
ers flooding Germany, stripping 
the far right of Its most explosive 
campaign issue. 

Also, the German government 
has banned several neofascist 
groups, while other rightist groups, 
including the Republicans, have 
been discredited by alleged links to 
violence. Several new protest par- 
ties have been founded in the past 
year, further fragmenting disen- 
chanted voters. And Mr. Kohl and 
other centrist politicians. hav& sto- 
len some of the far right’s thunder 
by tempering their enthusiasm for 
such pan-Enrojpean proposals as ft 
common currency, a scheme 
viewed with deep suspicion by 
many Germans. 

“The mqorissues for the Ramb-. 
beans — asyhnn, bousing andjob- 
kssness — have been taken over by 
the other parties and so no one 
needs to vote for them anymore,” 
said Karl- Rudolf Korte, a political 
scientist at Mainz University. 
“They will not enter the German 
Parliament.” 

The polling firm Infas estimated 
that 700,000 one-time Republican 
voters deserted the party on Sun- 
day. The analyst Manfred GfHtaer 
of the Fora Institute suggested 
that many were revolted by the 
xenophobic violence plaguing Ger- 
many. 

“The murders in MOUn, in So- 
tingp.n and the burning of the syna- 
gogue in Ldbeck have shown Ger- 
mans what they have done by 
voting for right-wing extremists,” 
Mr. GQUner told Reuters. "Those 
who stHl vote for the Republicans 
today are largely former Nazis and 
neo-Nazis.” 

Similar problems have befallen 
other far-nght parties in Europe, 
notably the Nationalist Front of 
the French nationalist Jean Marie 
Le Pen. His group had hoped , to 
capture 1 5 percem of Sunday's vote 
but instead scored only 10-5 per- 
cent, down from 12 percent m 
1989. Political analysts in Paris 
noted the conservative French, gov- 
ernment's success in urn - * 
stricter immi gration control 
defusing the National Front’s pro; 

eminent campaign issue. 

But the Republicans’ decline has 
been more dramatic. Founded m 
1983 by Franz Schflnhuber, 71, an 


Jewish temples have had round- 
the-clock pohee protection. Last 
month, mi estimated ISO neo-Nazis 
attacked African residents and 
chased other terrified foreigners 
through the streets of Magdeburg. 

Federal security authorities in 
Cologne report that the number of 
violent attacks with “proven or sus- 
pected right-wing extremist moti- 
vation” dropped 15 percent last 
year to 2232 incidents, compared 
with 2,639 in 1992. The downward 
trend has con tinned this year, with 
413 such incidents recorded 
through mid-April, compared with 
663 in the same period of 1993. 

But, as recent federal report con- 
ceded, episodes such as the riots in 
Magdeburg show that “there is stiB 
a considerable potential for vio- 
lence.” 


Ma Au> HxLd/A*cncr Fmcr-Praac 

Id Dresden, rote counters faced a mountain of ballots, which piled up because of combined European Parliament and local elections. 

EU Agrees on Trade Pact With Russia 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

LUXEMBOURG — The Euro- 
pean Union agreed Monday to en- 
ter a broad new trade accord with 
Russia, one of the most significant 
Western efforts to keep Moscow on 
the path of economic reform. 

The agreement, after six months 
of delay, came as France dropped 
its objections to the pact after win- 
ning safeguards for its nuclear-fuel 
industry from exports by the Rus- 
sians of relatively cheap enriched 
uranium. Those safeguards “satisfy 
us completely,” said Foreign Min- 


ister Alain Juppt France is the 
Ell's leading uranium producer. 

The accord, reached at a meeting 
of foreign ministers here, allowed 
EU leaders to extend an invitation 
to President Boris N. Yeltsin to go 
to Corfu, Greece, on June 23 to 
sign a cooperation agreement. 

The pact will be one of the high- 
lights of the leaders* semiannual 
summit meeting, which formally 
begins the following day. 

Separately, France and Germa- 
ny urged Union leaders to agree to 
a major initiative to help Ukraine 
shut its remaining nuclear reactors 
at Chernobyl and complete the 


U.K, Labor Does Best in Decades 

Conservatives, With Only 27% of Vote, Seek Comeback 


By William E. Schmidt 

New York Tuna Service 

LONDON — British voters casting ballots for 
the European Parliament handed the opposition 
Labor Party its best showing in a nationwide 
election in more than two decades, and left Prime 
Minister John Major and the governing Conserva- 
tives trying on Monday to regain their political 
balance. 

With nearly all the votes counted. Labor claimed 
victory in 62 of the 87 seats at stake, as it gained 


press conference in the garden at No. 10 Downing 
Street 

He conceded that the Conservatives had done 
But he suggested that Labor may have 
sefited in part from a sympathy vote following 
the death Iasi month of John Smith, the Labor 
Party leader, and said the results must be measured 
against a low- turnout among voters. 

But Labor Party leaders described the results of 
the balloting as incontrovertible proof of resurgent 
Labor fortunes. 

“Voters have crossed the Rubicon to vote La- 


aboot 44 percent of all ballots cast. At the same ■ bor ” said Jack Cunningham, the party's campaign 
time, the beleaguered Conservatives, with just 27 chief. “That is what is really significant" 


it of the vote, lost 14 of the 32 seats they had 
I in the Continental assembly. 

The Liberal Democrats, Britain's third largest 

C ; took 16 percent of the vote and won their 
two seats ever in the Parliament, which is 
made op of representatives from all 12 European 
Union commies. 

But while some disgruntled Conservative politi- 
cians called for a change in leadership, the Conser- 
vatives stiD did better than same public opinion 
pedis predicted, and party leaders called on the 
rank and file to unite behind Mr. Major. 

For bis part, the prime minister came out swing- 
ing Monday afternoon, saying be had no intention 
of surrendering the party leadership before naiioo- 
al parliamentary elections, sometime before March 
1997. 

“Do 1 look fed up? Do I look as though 1 am 
about to turn my back?” Mr. Ma^or asked at a rare 


Labor candidates captured seats in several tradi- 
tional Conservative strongholds in the south of 
England , raising hopes that the party might be able 
to regain control of Westminister for the first limes 
since 1979, when Margaret Thatcher led the Con- 
servatives to the first of four consecutive national 
victories. 

Labor’s victory comes as the party is preparing 
for a leadership contest to replace Mr. Smith, the 
Scottish banister who had taken over the party 
reins in 1992. 

WhOe four Labor Party politicians have de- 
clared themselves candidates for the leadership, 
the odds-on favorite is Tony Blair, 43, the party 
spokesman on domestic affairs. 

Facing the prospect of a general election cam- 
paign ag ain st the telegenic Mr. Biair, Conservative 
strategists were talking on Monday about the pos- 
sibility of tax cats to woo voters, and considering a 
possible cabinet reshuffle this summer. 


construction of three modem reac- 
tors elsewhere in the country. 

The European Commission said 
that a recent mission of technical 
experts to Ukraine estimated it 
would cost 350 million European 
currency units (S400 million) to 
dose Chernobyl for good and an- 
other i billion Ecus to finish the 
other three reactors to Western 
safety s tandar ds. 

Despite the initiatives toward 
Russia and Ukraine. Germany 
poured cold water on the aspira- 
tions of East European countries to 
achieve early membership in the 
Union. 

Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel 
said fostering reform in and devel- 
oping closer ties with Poland, Hun- 
gary and other Eastern countries 
was “the central foreign policy 
question" for the Union, and 
would be at the top of Boon’s agen- 
da when it takes over the rotating 
presidency of the Union on July 1. 

But be said talk of membership 
by the year 2000, as several or those 
countries have suggested, "will 
probably have to be lengthened a 
little bitl" 

With EU budget trimming a pri- 
ority in the German election cam- 
paign. officials in Bonn have indi- 
cated that the Union cannot 
consider for now the huge farm 
subsidies and development aid that 
Eastern countries would be entitled 
to as members. 

The Russian trade accord will 
give Moscow much wider access to 
the markets of its biggest trading 
partnerand hold out the possibility 
of a free-trade pact with the Union 
sometime after 1997 if the country 


makes progress toward developing 
a market economy. 

France had stalled on an 
accord far months because of fears 
that a pact would unleash a flood of 
cheap Russian uranium exports. 
Following a visit by Mr. Jupp6 to 
Moscow last mouth, EU officials 
said the agreement would include 
provisions to monitor the market 
with a view to maintaining the 80 
percent share of the Union market 
lor enriched uranium held by EU 
producers, primarily French. 

The Netherlands said it was pre- 
pared to drop its separate objection 
to the pact pending confirmation 
from Moscow that five European 
banks with branches in Russia, in- 
eluding ABN-AMRO and 1NG 
Bank of Holland, would be allowed 
to do business with local residents. 


Italy Communist 
Resigns Over Loss 

By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 

ROME — Achfile Occhetto, the leader of Italy's former Commu- 
nists, resigned in humiliation Monday after European elections 
brought voters flocking to Prime Minister Silvio fieri usconi, untrou- 
bled by the neofascist presence in his coalition government. 

Mr. Occbetto’s resignation was by far the most dramatic fallout 
from the elections, which had been depicted as a test of national, not 
European, issues. Jl suggested that the upheaval in Italian politics 
after more than two years of corruption scandal was far from settled. 

But equally idling for the future of Mr. Berlusconi's rightist 
alliance was a poor showing by the Northern League, his most 
troublesome coalition partner. The setback for the Northern League 
could put its rambunctious leader, Umberto Bosst in an even more 
belligerent mood as he struggles to recover lost ground. 

Mr. Berlusconi’s other coalition partner, the neofascist National 
Alliance of Gianfranco Fini, maintained almost the share of 
the vote as it did in national elections on March 27-28, showing that 
Italian voters had not been swayed by the alarms raised in Europe 
and elsewhere over its historical ties to Mussolini 

Mr. Berlusconi’s own share of the vote soared from 21 percent in 
the March elections to 30.6 percent in the European. Par liamen t 
balloting on Sunday, while Mi. Occhetto’s Democratic Party of the 
Left dipped from 20 percent to 19 percent. It was the second time 
since March that the former Communists had failed to deliver 
promised electoral advances. 

“I want to avoid groundless objections and controversy by sub- 
mitting my resignation,” Mr. Occhetto said in a letter of resignation 
made public by his party. u My decision is not capitulation but an act 
of pride and struggle,” he said. 

Mr. Occhetto, 58, became head of the party in 1988, when it was 
still known as the Italian Communist Party — the largest in the 
West After the fall of the Berlin Wall one year later, he oversaw the 
remolding of the party, founding the Democratic Party of the Left in 
1991 while Communist hard-liners broke away to form Communist 
Ref winding. 

While his personal style has always seemed lackluster and door, 
Mr. Occhetto’s problems also relate to the difficulties facing the left 
in redefining its aims and identity following the Cold War. 

Mr. Occhetto left no easily identified heir to the party fcaHwhip 
The party’s deputy leader is Massimo D’Alema, but a recent opinion 
survey showed the newly elected mayor of Venice, Massimo Cacciari 
and Walter Vdtroni. editor of the party newspaper LUni la, to be far 
more popular choices among the voters. 

The European election result seemed to show that Italian voters 
had not been at all swayed by any of the criticisms of Mr. Berlus- 
coni's adversaries —notably that he has brought Mussolini's politi- 
cal heirs into government for the first time since World War -11 and 
that, as the owner of a huge television, publishing and adver tising 
empire, he cannot be an impartial prime minister. 

But it seems certain to deepen divisions between him and the 
seiparatist-mmded Northern League, which maintained a strong 
showing only in parts of northern Italy. 

As ejection results became known Sunday night. Mr. Bossi, the 
League leader, launched an attack on Mr. Berlusconi's television 
empire and what he characterized as Mr. Berlusconi's “manipula- 
tive” political techniques. Mr. Bossi said that Italians could finish up 
yearning for the return of the corruption-stained old guard. 


LOSERS: Defeat of 4 Raises a Question of Leadership 


Continued from Page 1 

shaken by “a political earthquake.” 
The third-placed Liberal Demo- 
crats got 16 percent of the votes. 

Pressure mounted from both 
sides of the divided Conservative 
Party for Mr. Major either to step 
down or reshuffle the cabinet. The 
pro-European faction accused the 
prime minister of pandering to the 
anti-European right, while the so- 
called Eoroskeptics supported Mr. 
Major’s call for a less united “mul- 
tispeed Europe.” 

Losses by the Conservatives in a 
previous European election 
touched off the party revolt that led 
to the ouster of Prime Minister 


Margaret Thatcher and her re- 
placement by Mr. Major. 

The Labor Party was clearly 
hoping that the Conservatives’ fac- 
tional fighting would (ear the party 
apart long before the next general 
ejection, in 1996 or 1997. Riding 
high after its success. Labor was 
expected to elect a dynamic new 
leader, Tony Blair, to replace the 
late John Smith. 

But only 35 percent of the elec- 
torate voted, and Conservative op- 
timists hoped the abstainers would 
come bade to support thdr party in 
the next general election. 

In Spain, the conservative Popu- 
lar Party, led by Jos6 Maria Aznar, 


achieved its first nationwide vic- 
tory over Mr. Gonzalez’s Spanish 
Socialist Workers Party, which has 
been deeply damaged by corrup- 
tion allegations. 

The prime minister, in office for 
12 years, conceded defeat but made 
it clear that be would fight back. He 
said he still had “the fighting spirit 
to make sure we win the next elec- 
tion.” 

The Popular Party won more 
than 40 percent of the vote and 28 
seats, against 30.6 percent of the 
vote and 22 seats for the Socialists. 
The Popular Party also advanced in 
Andalusia, until now the prime 
minister's stronghold. 


Nana Mouskouri 
Reluctantly Wms 

Agence Frvnae-Pmse 

ATHENS — The Greek singer 
Nana Mouskouri, who has lived 
outride Greece for the last 30 ware 
and concedes she knows “nothing” 
about politics, has wot a seat in toe 
European Partiament as a member 
of the conservative New Democra- 


wFrencta.gov- ty party, 
in imposing Her candidacy 
CTfltrofc) rims frie nd s h ip with the 


Nazi Waffen-SS in World War H, 
the party shocked Germany and its 
neighbors with a strong ahowmg m 
the 1989 European elections.. Ad- 
vocating pro-nationalist, ano-fox- 
dgner pofides, the Republicans m 
TW2 wcn II percent in state assem- 
bly ejections in the prosperous 
ante of BadeorWOrttemberg. 

then, however, the partys 


reflected her 
fri endship with the party’s, leader, 
MUtiade Evert, who added Miss 
Mouskouri to his fist in Sunday's 
elections. "But Miss Mouskouri has 
irritated public opinion because of 
her kmg absence abroad and her 
apparent indifference to Greece’s 

with Macedonia. 

s no question of my gpt- 
involved m politics, which 
tans me and about which 1 
know nothing,” Miss Mouskouri 



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3 Page 6 


TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1994 


Heralb 


DVTERJVATlOiVAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THF. NEW YORK TIMES AND THE HASH INK TUN POST 


Mixed News for Europe 


Tbe crispest summary of Europe’s pariia- 
meotary election is that, with a single excep- 
tion, this was a vote not about Europe but 
about 12 separate countries, it will send no 
tingle down the spines of those who seek a 
Europe prepared to act as one. Turnout, at 
around 56 percent, was slightly lower than io 
the previous election in 1989. And those who 
did vote overwhelmingly wanted to say tilings 
about their national politics, not about the 
politics of Europe as a whole. 

What they said was bad news for John 
Major’s Conservatives in Britain and Felipe 
Gonzalez's Socialists in Spain. Just as pre- 
dictably, Silvio Berlusconi's new Italian gov- 
ernment was given the Euro-slot previously 
occupied by the scandal-smashed Christian 
Democrats. The vote confirmed the German 
opinion polls’ earlier good news for Helmut 
Kohl, whose steadiness under fire in economic 
hard times now gives his Christian Democrats 
a chance of bedding off the Soda] Democrats 
in Germany’s own election in October. 

By the all-Europe test, this was parish- 
pump voting. The exception was in France, 
where the pony led by Philippe de ViJJiws 
won a startling 13 seats. These people go to 
the European Parliament to resist the central- 
izing power of the Maastricht treaty. They did 
far better than the German anti-centralizers 
led by Manfred Brunner. In that contrast lies 
a potential test for the European Union. 

The new Parliament’s Christian Democrat- 
ic contingent is bigger than expected, mainly 


because Chancellor Kohi did so well in Ger- 
many. The Christian Democrats want a feder- 
al Europe, and will hope to point the Union's 
governments in that direction when they meet 
to talk about the Union's future in 1996. But 
no great change in Europe can happen with- 
out the joint consent or France and Germany. 
And it will be harder for any French govern- 
ment to agree to new centralizing moves now 
that the French doubters have won a foothold 
in the European Parliament. This road for- 
ward looks even stonier than before. 

There is. however, another road that sud- 
denly has a clearer dew ahead. The most 
important Euro-vote of the past week was in 
none of the Union’s 12 countries. It was in 
Austria, whose people on Sunday said with a 
clear voice that they wished tojoui the Union. 

The Austrian vole makes it likelier that 
Sweden, Finland and Norway will say the 
same when they hold their refereadums later 
in the year. That will make it easier to argue 
for extending the Union deeper into Central 
Europe, to lake in Poles and Czechs and 
Hungarians — maybe even Slovaks and Slo- 
venes — as welL The widening of the Union 
will not be easy. It will mean battles about its 
farming policy, about the distribution of its 
regional aid. about the shape of its future 
constitution and about the purpose of the 
entire enterprise. But a wider Union is the one 
thing that most Europeans dearly seem to 
want by the millennium's end. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Change in Mexico 


Mexico’s political life is moving far from its 
accustomed track. The presidential election is 
on Aug. 21, and the long-dominant Institu- 
tional Revolutionary Party, the PRJ. is heavily 
favored to win. But for the fust time since 1929 
this is not an absolute certainty. And that is not 
the only evidence of fundamental change in 
Mexicans’ attitudes about the generally benign 
but highly authoritarian one-party system that 
has been naming their country. 

The PRTs candidate, Ernesto Zedillo, is a 
highly skilled technocrat, but he lacks the polit- 
ical experience of his assassinated predecessor. 
Luis Donaldo Colasio. Now that the part)- is 
under unusual pressure, one question is wheth- 
er Mr. Zedillo will allow himself to be pushed 
into compro mi ses with the party's old-line 
bosses, who are by no means ready to share 
power and patronage with other parties. At the 
top of the PRI there is a real desire to open up 
and dean up the electoral system, but there has 
always been a strong temptation to resort one 
more time to the old tradition of vote- rigging. 

Until recently it had seemed that the major 
challenge to the PRI would inevitably come 
from the left. But the left has been fading in 
the polls, and the real opposition is now on the 
right — the National Action Party and its 
candidate. Diego Fernindez de Cev alios. One 


consequence is that the North American Free 
Trade Agreement with the United States and 
Canada is not turning into much of an issue. 
Most voters seem more interested in which of 
these two parties can best lead the country 
through rapid change and growth driven by 
the foreign competition to which the Mexican 
economy is now exposed. 

The PRI has been damaged by its mishan- 
dling of the response to the Colosio assassina- 
tion in March. President Caries Salinas de 
Gortari set up an investigative commission 
that has now resigned in a body, charging that 
the government never gave it the authority it 
needed for a genuinely independent inquiry. 
The president also appointed a special prose- 
cutor. who first declared that the killing in- 
volved a conspiracy, (hen some weeks later 
acknowledged that there was no evidence that 
it was anything but the work of a lone gun- 
man. The effect has been to generate clouds of 
suspicion and conspiracy theories. 

In the past a Mexican presidential election 
has been little more than the ritual enthrone- 
ment of the PRTs choice. This year it’s differ- 
ent. For the fust time in, the life of all but the 
oldest of voters. Mexico is moving toward 
results that are not totally predictable. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


ihan to Clinton 


Of the Eve congressional committees han- 
dling heath care reform. Senate Finance may 
well be the one with the best chance of putting 
together a bill with enough Republican sup- 
port to carry the full Senate. Its makeup of 1 1 
Democrats and nine Republicans encourages 
bipartisan bargaining. That is why the odd bill 
proposed last week by its chairman. Senator 
Daniel Patrick Moynihan. is important. 

Viewed as a health care plan, the bill disap- 
points. It borrows in modified form the presi- 
dent’s idea of requiring employers to pay for 
workers’ insurance. But it would allow indi- 
viduals to use outside regional purchasing 
cooperatives: that invites the healthy to peel 
away and leave the chronically ill And Mr. 
Moynihan shrinks bade from proposing a 
linril on the tax deductibility of premiums — 
the best way to get consumers, and therefore 
health plans, to pay attention to costs: be 
thereby proposes a market-based system with 
noeffective market incentives. !n a word, odd. 

But Mr. Moynihan was playing politics, not 
health economics. And his touch appears deft. 
He offered a bill that, despite differences, 
borrows heavily from the Clinton plan be- 
cause he knew it would Fail — proving once 
and for all that the president’s plan cannot 
win and that horse trading is essential. 

The Moynihan bill will not attract moder- 
ate Republicans, like John Chafee of Rhode 
Island and John Danforth of Missouri, or 
conservative Democrats, like David Boren of 
Oklahoma, because they are not ready to 
accept a strict employer mandate. After the 
plan fails in committee, Mr. Moynihan knows 
that the key players will have to make a fateful 
decision: either compromise or walk into the 
November elections with no reform in hand. 

The disturbing outcome of last week's goings 
on is that "no bill" seems an increasingly popu- 
lar option. Republicans like Representative 
Newt Gingrich of Georgia and Senator Phil 
Gramm of Texas are gearing up to go before 
voters and take credit for saving them from, in 
their view. President Clinton's version of social- 
ized medirine; and the right-wing tug seems to 
be driving the powerful Senate minority leader. 
Bob Dole, away from compromise, perhaps 
afraid that his colleagues will sf/cc firm up if be 
makes a deal with the White House. 


There are plenty of Democrats, like Repre- 
sentative John Dmgdl of Michigan, who are 
also threatening to pass. They privately ex- 
press a willingness to go into November blam- 
ing the Republicans for the death of health 
reform rather than accept a bill that backs 
away from Mr. Clinton's lavish promises. 

Ending 1994 without a bfll would squander 
a historic chance to guarantee citizens of the 
richest nation that medical catastrophe will 
no longer lead to financial catastrophe. The 
legislative season w3l be shortened by the 
elections. The only force big enough to turn 
the politics around in time is the president. 
And he will have the opportunity when he 
brings Mr. Moynihan and the Finance Com- 
mittee's ranking Republican. Bob Packwood, 
to the White House on Tuesday. He should 
state unequivocally what compromises he 
could swallow in order to get a bipartisan deal 

That might mean phasing in universal cov- 
erage more slowly than he originally pro- 
posed. It might mean exempting, for now, 
small employers from an employer mandate. 
Independent studies show that more than 92 
percent of the population, accounting for per- 
haps 97 percent of health care expenditures, 
would be covered by reform that required 
insurers to sell coverage to every applicant at 
identical rates, with government subsidies for 
low-income families. There are many ideas 
around for picking up the stragglers. 

Mr. Moynihan has put the ball in Mr. 
Clinton's court, which is where it belongs. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 

Other Comment 

Russian Sacrifice for D-Day 

1 thought the Normandy campaigners came 
off well last week: but my own thoughts dwelt 
heavily on the people of Russia. Between 
Hitler's ill-fated invasion of the Soviet Union 
in 1941 and D-Day. oar Russian allies lost 
some S3 million combatants, 49,000 tanks 
and 30.000 airplanes. Yet they were still hold- 
ing down about 200 Geiman divisons on the 
eastern front — W. F. Deedes, commenting in 
The Daily Telegraph (London). 



Internationa) Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 18S7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Choumm 

RICHARD McCLEAN. PuNiOier & Chief Etrcuthr 
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Dirraeur dr Ui PubUnOicn: ftefionift Swmvni 
Duvcuvr Adjoin deki Fiddiuiruvu Aagarfe* P . PanrM- 

International HeraW Tribune. 181 AvtawcGiariesde<inilfe,9252l Neuilh-wr-SeHB. Frarte. 

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r Crispy crow with most favored noodles — God, I love Chinese food ! 9 

A Serious Setback for Human Rights Diplomacy 


N EW YORK — BiD Clinton was seeking to 
solve a political problem when he snapped 
the link between China’s human rights practices 
and its American trading privileges. Yet by re- 
warding rather than p unishing China's rejection 
of reasonable American human rights demands. 
President Clinton damaged the credibility of 
American human rights diplomacy everywhere. 
That is no small loss. 

Two decades of intenniUeni and occasionally 
successful US. human rights pressure on behalf 
of, among others. East European dissidents. 
South African blades and victims of Latin Amer- 
ican juntas made a difference to thousands of 
individual lives and made it easier for democrats 
in those societies to fight for political change. 

The unhappy consequences may sot be con- 
fined to citizens in dictatorships. Values can 
unite and inspire Americans in ways that brutal 
realpoHtik or money lust cannot Campaigns 
against arbitrary imprisonment torture and 
forced labor and in defense of free expression 
broaden the appeal of American foreign policy, 
drawing ordinary citizens into world affairs. 

Even after a heavy business lobbying cam- 
paign, polls showed strong popular support for 
using trade leverage to expand human rights. But 
the rhetoric of mega-profits and jobs in the hot 
China market eroded Washington support for 
trade sanctions. Mr. Clinton then shoved aside 
what had been a unifying expression of American 


By David C Unger 

ideals in the name of economics and geopolitics. 

The message to the world’s repressive regime* 
is now painfully dean U.S. threats to impose 
economic sanctions to enforce human nghts 
standards can in most cases be safely ignoreolf 
your market is aoractive, your support for U-S. 
diplomacy unreliable and your military power 
menacing, you ran abuse your citizens at will, 
regardless of promises that you may have made 
to Washington or international agreements that, 
you may have signed. 

Why should China's leaders now think twice 

ing aStnraTwarlare or^Tlbet or intimidati^ 
domestic and foreign journalists? And if the 
United States puts human rights pressure on 
smaller, weaker nations, tike Haiti or Singapore, 
they can credibly claim to be victims of a great- 
power double standard that allows twisting the 
arms of the weak but not of the strong. Such 
bullying may work, but it lacks moral force and 
invites a nationalist backlash. 

Recent American human rights diplomacy was 
launched nearly two decades ago by the moral 
idealist Jimmy Carter. Although directed at dif- 
ferent targets, the diplomacy was enthusiastically 
pursued by his anu-Communist successor, Ron- 
ald Reagan, before being shelved by the Reulpati- 


hker George Bush. Prcsidait Bush was riot inter- : 
ested in using American leverage for human . 
rights. But human rights sanctions remained a O 
credible tool for use by a future president 

China, for example, had to think' about the-! ■ 
possibility of a tougher stand Try Mr. Bosh’s 
Democratic successor. By deploying' Iranian . 
rights pressure and then retreating at the fust' 
sign of resistance. President Clinton has sacri- 
ficed that credibility, perils for years to come. 

American foreign policy cannot pivot exdu- 
stvdy, or even mainly, around human rights. •. 
Hardheaded issues of anfitaty security and eco*- ; 
nmnic interest are compelling and must form the 
centerpiece of any sensible approach. Yet tdr 
deserve and win the support c£ the American 
people, a foreign policy must also reflect and ./ 
advance American values. * * • • r - -. 

From the days of the Monroe Doctrine,' first : 
formulated as apolicy of keeping the Americas 
free from Old wold imperialisms, to tbegrF 
sading zeal of the Cold War, succcssfuIAmeri- 
can foreign policies have always contained a 
strong idealistic component. With the Evil Em- 
pire rolled back and the United States physical- . 
ly secure, that idealism requires .a new and 
constructive focus if America is toremaurintef- 
nationally en g a ged “ . 

It is ashame^m morewaysthan oitothatMr. 
Clinton caved in so easily on human rights. 

The New York Timex: 


criod^Ctontegn pcOicy * 
wavering and thmks.be can bluff ® 

action against hwVnnetear wapons 
program, he is making ajnpB&e. 

P On this issue ihe 'admmistraUOT s 
watchword is resolution. So I b*b 
after conversations here. I do not 

sense the tentattyencss »at has 
marked the search for effective poli- 
cies in Bosnia and Haiti . 

Th e American national. security 
interest ih-tfie Korean dticfcar ones; 
tioriis ovetpowenngjy clear. U fie 

or ' 10 yearif ftonr/now North Kona 
'were- -making .numbers of nuclear 
weapons arid 

sQe systems, to Iran or Iraq or other 
rogue regimes,. it. would be a differ - 
eat -wbriuT-^- an. intqlerabty.-more 

dangmms one. V. .. . . ‘ , . • 

For three years. under Presidents 
George Bosh arid Bill Clinton, tne 
United States . tried to deal with the 
probfcm *y diplomacy. The North 
Koreans responded by 'bobbing and 
.weaving, indicating at times that .they 
wcnld alfow ft® inspection of their 
nodearf^dfities if jhe United. States 
opened' ^pTorriatic relations, then 
abruptly ■ barring international in- 
spectors frbminie';site that would 
Have shown whether they had divert- 
ed nudearfnel to bomb^ making. 

. Now the Omion administration is 
moving to economic sanctions. Over 

-L! . »• A 


spectra's from: 


agreed on a sanctions package with 
two crucial partners, Japan and 
South Korea* The Japanese govern- . 
mwit -was other less reluctant about 
the idea than had been reported, or 
die United States brought it around. 
The plan is for sanctions to be 

^yseweff^ri^K^ra remains ' 
in transmit/ Far example, a ban on 
; North Koreans in' Japan sending ; 
roct ne^bc^ — they send as much as 

imposed nntihlK second phase. But 
. the mtke,p®&age"haj.btea agreed 

middoes hotfune tp berenegotiated 

with Japan orSouth Korea. - 
Tbe W^qncstkxi inark on sanc- 
tions is Coina, North Korea’s neigh - 
borandsappUcr of the one import cin „ 
which it is most dependent: ctL The 


Back to 'Reform,’ 50 Years After Bretton Woods 


W ASHINGTON — This year 
brings the 30th anniversary of 
the international conference at Bret- 
ton Woods, New Hampshire, in July- 
1944 that established new rules fontie 
global monetary system. The Bretton 
Woods agreement created the Work! 
Bank and the International Monetary 
Fund, and set out the’ system govern- 
ing major nations' exchange rates. 
Dollars, with a precise value in gold, 
were at the center of the system. 

The Bretton Woods agreement un- 
derwrote a period of global prosperi- 
ty from 1944 through the mid-1960s 
by maintaining fixed exchange rela- 
tionships among the major curren- 
cies. Then inflationary cracks began 
to appear in the system. 

In 1971, after a celebrated meeting 
at Camp David. President Richard 
Nixon broke the link between the 
dollar and gold, creating a system of 
floating exchange rates. Since then 
governments have tried to “manage” 
the float, or to keep exchange rates 
within acceptable ranges. But success 
has been elusive. 

Now, in the post-Cold War era, 
there is increasing talk of “reform" of 
the monetary system aimed at restor- 
ing, at least in part, the fixed-rate 
concept that began in 1944. 

A commission headed by Pan! 
Vokker, the former Federal Reserve 
Board chairman, will issue a report 
this summer suggesting adoption of 
formal “target zones" for exchange 


By Hobart Bowen 


rates, long advocated by the Insti- 
tute for International Economics led 
by C. Fred Bergsten. Mr. Bergsten 
would limit fluctuations of the dollar 
against the yen, the Deutsche mark 
and so on to a “zone" plus or minus 
10 percent of an agreea-npon figure. 

Unexpectedly. IMF Managing Di- 
rector Michel Camdessus said in a 
speech last week to the Bergsten 
group that a move toward target 
zones would allow for a more stable 
and predictable economy. But in 
Spain on May 9 he conceded that he 
had not dealt with “the more funda- 
mental question of the central anchor 
of a stable world system.” 

la the Bergsten scenario, the IMF, 
rather than the Group of Seven, 
would have responsibility for manag- 
ing exchange rates. Without that 
function. Mr. Bergsten warns, there is 
lirtJc excuse to continue the IMF as a 
separate agency: it could be merged, 
instead, with the World Bank. In the 
fall, at the annual IMF/Worid Bank 
meeting in Madrid, all these issues 
will be discussed. 

What would loom most important, 
especially to business people, is any 
way to reduce the volatility of ex- 
change rate fluctuations. Many of the 
recent high-profile hedge and deriva- 
tive fond operations were triggered 
by a private effort to create insurance 
against wild swings in exchange rates. 


But it is easier said than done, as 
former Treasury Secretary James 
Baker discovered when he tried to 
set up a system in between fixed and 
flexible rates, at the famed Plaza 
Hotel conference in New York in 
1985, again in Tokyo in 1986, and 
then at the Louvre m 1987. 

Trade imbalances remain political- 
ly troublesome after these exchange 
rate experiments. The experts are 
back at the drawiqg boards, seeking 
that elusive formula for currencies 
that will create just enough stability,, 
but not rigidity; and just enough flex- 
ibility, but not huge gyrations. 

The significance of Mr. Camdes- 
sus’s endorsement of reforms to re- 
duce the volatility of exchange rates 
is his implied blessing of the present 
rates as close to the right one& Japa- 
nese officials, who have seen the mar- 
kets boost the yen close to 1 00 to the 
dollar fit was 360 td tire dollar at the 
end of World War JI), will not like 
being locked in at that rate. 

Chilton administration officials are - 
skittish about endorsing precise target 
zones. Lawrence Summers, Treasury 
undersecretary fra: monetary affairs, 
doubts that governments can get the 
rates “right” If the markets challenge 
the rates, Mr. Sommers disputes the 
notion dial they can be defended - 
merely for central bank i nter v ention in 
the foreign exchange markets. 


In Taiwan, a Bubble Threat With a 


T AIPEI — Japan’s bubble and its 
aftermath are well known. Hong 
Kong ,is in (he throes of one, with the 
familiar meny-go- round of cheap 
credit feeding’ property and sioct 
booms. Taiwan, despite being shel- 
tered by controls on inflow from last 
year’s world liquidity boom, is show- 
ing similar signs. 

Didn't Taiwan have its bubble 
back in 1990. when the stock index 
went from 4.000 to 12.000 and back 
to 4J0Q0? True. But that bubble was 
created by liquidity in an economy 
that for several years ran a trade 
surplus of more than 10 percent of 
GNP. where hank loans to deposit 
ratios were only 60 percent and do- 
mestic credit was only half of GNP. 

The boom and bust had Gttle eco- 
nomic impact other than to redistrib- 
ute ownership and wealth and make 
the Taipei stock exchange into one of 
the world’s busiest: even in 1993. a 
duD year, its turnover averaged more 
than SI billion a day. nearly double 
that of Hong Kong, The current Tai- 
wan bubble is different. 

The pace of adjustment io a strong 
currency and high wages has exceed- 
ed expectations. Domestic demand 
has fowmed, while U5.-enforoed ap- 
preciation of the currency and double 
digit wage rises have led many indus- 
tries to move to cheap-labor locations 
in Southeast Asia and China. The 
ending of travel restrictions has made 
Taiwanese into some of the world’s 
most eager tourists, spending a colos- 
sal 575 billion last year. 

The net result of all this is that the 
trade surplus is down to around 2 
percent of GNP and the current ac- 
count is ratiy in the black because of 
earnings on its $85 bfifion foreign 
reserves. Meanwhile, S5 to S10 billion 
a year in capital is moving ouL 


By Philip Bowring 


All this is good news for neighbors 
and trading partners, fear Taiwan con- 
sumers and even for many industries 
which have sbtfted into nigh value- 
added activities. A combination of ex- 
pertise and mobile capital is making 
Taiwan an ever more inqjortam player 
in elec troni c s and computer peripher- 
als and pabting its plastics and fiber 
companies to more than hold their 
own in the global marketplace. 

There is bad news. too. While do- 
mestic mamTfMpfm-fng investment has 
been shiggish. there has been an ongo- 
ing boom in land prices and private 
construction. &ock prices have had a 
bumpy ride since 1990, but land prices 
have been boqyed up by ever increas- 
ing amounts of credit A speculative 
budding boom has been spurred by 
tjumgys in land use regulations. 

The situation is dangerously un- 
sustainable. Underlying demand is 
real enough. Taiwan’s bousing stan- 
dards fall far short of its attainments 
in oUjct fields But few can afford the 
sky-high prices. Apamueai prices in 
Taipei are between 10 and 15 times 
average household ireomes. 

Even with 30-year mortgages, that 
explains the ewer growing inventory. 
Estimates of the cumber of empty 
apartments range from 550,000 to 
700.000, m a coonny ofjust23m3- 
Ikn. Axri the buikfing goes on. Vacan- 
cy rates for new offices arc 30 percent 
in Taipei and higher elsewhere. 

The government is keeping interest 
rates low in an effort sunuitaneosuly 
to arrange a soft landing for real 
estate and banking sectors, and help 
manufactured exports by weakening 
the currency. The policy may succeed 
with exports. Matty dewlopeo will be 
safe bettuse they -acquired land before 


the price boom. But no rare can dis- 
pute that in the past fair years domes- 
tic credit has risen try 110 percent 
while nominal GNP is up less than 40 
percent and the ratio of bank loans to • 
deposits has risen to 90 percenL 

without bis land price falls — - 
which would hurt government reve- 
nues as well as deveknieis — Taiwan 
may be headed for a stamp in domes- 
tic investment. Yet the necessary price 

fafi. which tbedr vriopc raareresirohg, 

Thetmnlu; stilTaS^ bav^mwority 
state ownership, so there wouM be no 
question of coQapscs. With inflation 
under 4 percent, an increase in infla- 
tion to provide a soft landing is toler- 
able. As for the economy as a whole, 
its export orientation — and weaken- 
iqg currency — provide alternatives . 
not available in Japan,~wbere a rising 
yen added Co the deflationary impact 

of the bursting of the babbie: 

if private investment' stumps, the 
government could speed up its own, 
recently curtailed m&sstuctuze: in-' 
vestment. For now, the Easier money 


central bank has brought stock prwes ■ 
back above the 6.000 mark from 
4,000 a year ago. But attics .suggest 
that this is merely helping ttvpush 
cash-strapped developers and banks . 
with poor asset quality into shallower 
water farther from ftie shore. . ; 

For once, foragi investors may not ' 
have been booted. Foreign institu- 
tional money, moving, in asfajt as, a." 
reluctant central bank wSTaBowi goes 
mostly into manufacturing stocky es- . 
pecxaUy electronics, plastics and tex- 
tiles. financial , and co n st r ucti on rec- 
urs are being avoided But Taiwan is 
suffkieatiy small and enough manu- 


- Mr. Sumners fedS that- it would 
also take tnatupulation. of interest 
rates. And that might nra c o n trary to 
an adnrinistratioii s domestic agenda. 
No American, president would be 
happy if he woe forced to. put the 

nation through a domestic recession: 
to defend the dollar's ^termtintwi - 
exchange into 

Treasury Secretary Uoyd.Bentsoi 
continues to look on the Group of 
Seven as the vehicle for international 
cooperation, Mr. Summers said He 
does not plan to transfer, exchange , 
rate management to the -IMF- The . 
role Mr.Srmmias sees for the IMF cf 
the future is -less involvemenr with 
tire indrtis&Miiatiran^-exdiange rate 
problems, and more with the devel- 
opment needs of the Third World. 

The Qmton vision of international 
monetary reform, as outlined by Mr: 
Summers, is aimed at “widerung" the 
process rather than “deepening" h. 
The buzzword is “shared prosperity" 
in the post-Cbld War era., 

It is less a replication rtf Bretton 
Woods than a focus :ou micro issues 
(such as jobs, as discussed at tire 
recent conference in Detroit) and oh 
inclusion of other countries m the 
dialogue, in the pattern of the North 
American Free Trade Agreement 
Next on fine: extension ofJMAFTA- 
fite privileges to 24 Caribbean ^ 1 
lions at a Miami conference at the 
end of this year. ; 

The Washington Post, V . . 


facturejshavedabbledtnprppmyde- 
vdopmenf that a bad afcodeot iri that 
sector would have wider rmnffications. : 


will induce the authorities to speed tqj 
Sberafization and mak e s erio us efforts 
to develop .Taiwan.*! a xegkmalser- 
vice as writ m mauufaemnna center. 
Itefor^ner irntynotbeabretobity , 
those empty apartments, bm refugees 
from Hong Kangfs even more absurd 
reaLestate prices and artcertam politi- 
cal future could fill some of those 
empty office blocks. ' •' 

{ntentmiaTtaf Haxdd Tribune. 


of sanctions. But there are afecrsrais . 
that if is worried aboutthe msrabflity / 
caused by the Uuriear policy of Its * 

one] can ; 

besnne'lhal they will persuade Kim D * 
Sung to back down on his nuclear 

tfictatorxhip 5 ^ igtorc^ul£ccpm-“ 
tom Bat the country’s economy is in 
teniWeshaperand sanctions will at a 
.mhrimmTi increase dm pain. 

; It wfll in any event take much de- * 
.termination for the Untied States and * 
its friends to see the pd Ecy through. . 
North Korea ’wffl imdoubtedljr float * 
new negotiating ideas*, as h has al-~ 
ready started tado. Rea] results will „ 
DOtcoroe instantly;-; ; ? ■ ; .■* ■ 

What are the results that the Clin- * 
ton polity seeks? and mosl im- . 

portant, to prevent diversion of nucle- 
ar fuel to weapons aL^as future — by 
opening : the .critical processes . to in-- 
spection. SoeoruC toJriti out, ^ "as best 
inspectors stiUcaa, what happenedin 
the past, so (hat toe uorfd does not, 
seem to be wiidting at past vidations'i 
of North Kraea’s obligations under, 
tbc Nooprofifcrafioc Treaty. 

. Some obseryeri are critical of the 1 
phased sanctious plan as too slow, ; 
too weak. Botou tins problem steadi- • 
nesalimort important than speed. 
Fortfarap om her &oqitid: fix. Talk of ^ 
a preemptive strike on North Korea’s., 
nudear faahties tgnorcs the reality- 
tbatjmch a strike could spread nude-” 

. ar fafioot over much of Asia. And ^ 
North'Korea would -sorely respond 
by attacking the South — whose capi- ' 
laLSeouLiSTHst 50 kflbmcters from.- 
the border. The allies would win the 
war, batata heavy cost in casualties. ' 

. lie best "Wty to show firmness is to - 
beef «m the U-S. railhaiy force in 
.South Kraea, now 37,000 strong. Tbe'.- j 
Clinton administration has sent Pa- f 
trioUneales aiid taken other undis- 
dosed .measnres requested by the*^ 
K Hrun a nding ^mneral, Gary Lock. I 
thin k n sh ould take the demonstra-- 1 ' 
five further., step of reodnjgone or*, 
more additional force umis/The Kim 
Bovernmenti, after all, has said it' 
would regard sanctions as an act of _ 
war. Sanctio n s must be accompanied - 
by a strengthened detenenL . 

Presidait GSntoia has n6t yet m ven - 

fin al approval to the obi for 
m Pyotig 3 «ng Who, ^ 
ooes, ne- should explain the states 
and tos measures to the public. 

• ' The ffew York Times. 


m QUB PACES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO ' 
18M; CoreanGdsb 

. PARIS ; — Africa Knot the.riatybpa.-:,. VlJO .Kmsjf reesritiy arrived in such a V 
tineat which canses anxiety Jo .$»■: ^g^mqr-Ctiiidition .&ai even snear 
PWrersof Eorofto Area b oontribut- - 1«u^whok^e butchers refus^to' 
ingita share, 4otf the fatest nafcemty Md for it 

caved-from Coca is tatyrhmg bdt: ; '-r-f---: 

^wn vAesfier or notrt ts specif' AMERICAN 4TH DI “ 

directed gainst fore^p*rs?. aouid ' V^QN .NEAR MONTEBOURQ 
sudi.proverto be New York edition' l”' 

Japan mid Quna, bat Ru^& ioay -Jbfrwnxttns foi^it their W av back T 
interfere. Another- Easton Mon lebourg and Carentan this “ 


would be moet waksnaHc; ; 

X9I9i&»tofep&L0|^, 

tiie h^ 

the crartouy^ a ^ 


imuTHE AMERICAN 4 
■^[QN .NEAR MONTE 
;-r {fiFpm.sair New York 
' TbfrGerfeans fouriitthrir i 
;inc^Mon Wwurg and Cara 
’toon^puM'l^-andthei 


K r — 

is man to man 
with deadly figh 
® uouse. So close 

t&onshaven men h 
-has veeased- 


allowed to rot daily. A ta ViBette 


: rr oouds and . 

mm. lwt all they can do 

German armored ieinfari 

• -the death-strewn roads ou 








, . *• ’ T. ** 










v n '-<i l 

h,r ^ 


Peres’s Letter on Jerusalem 
Does Away With ’Forever’ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1994 

O P IN ! O N 


Page 7 


By William Safi re 

w_za-s^ 

wa ? racoKted) the issue 
Arafat blurted out the truth , asser v 11 ? 81 ® 1 “ oofonger being put off 
assurances he ‘T*u 1b * fmal stages of^S£aik«- 

Israel's gomitSS, gnoni J a fiiS! 


Minister Yitzhak Rabin de- 

Sjg?Sfii5£Sa,s; 

raait, wfacb concerns Jerusalem." ^ 
But there was such a leuer before last 
month s agreement in Cairo. It was front 
Foreign Minister Siimon Peres, dated 


'peace process’ is headed 
— toward a s tep-by-step 
shrinkage of their state 
— and they want to get 
off that train. 


Ocl 1 1. addressed to the late Norwegian 
intermediary, Johan Holst, for transmis- 
sion to Mr. Arafat 

In it, Mr. Pens thrice treated “East 
Jerusalem” as a separate entity, pledmu; 
not to hamper the activity” of m Pak£ 
tmian “institutions,” thereby putting the 
capital erf Israel into negotiating play. 

The secret letter’s contents were sub- 
stantive; Mr. Peres now says it saved the 
talks from collapse, and obviously Mr. 
Arafat considers it a great coup. 

T have this letter,” he told fellow 
Muslims in triumph. “In this leuer 
we are responsible for all the Christian 
and the Muslim and the Islamic holy 
sacred places.” 

Afier_Mr. Peres's tortured excuse for 
his deceit — M a letter is not a document” 
— lire opposition leader Benjamin Ne- 
tanyahu asked a direct question in the 
Knesset: “Are there any additional let- 
ters?” The reply by Mr. Peres was a gain 
slippery: “In the foreign Ministry there 
are thousands of letters.” 

Why does Mr. Peres want the Jewish 
Yalta agreement kept secret? The fire- 


- - wj-HMy .HUUUVMy 

or the state of Israel is not intended to 
end with the division of the West Bank, 
but with the division or iniemationaliza- 
DOO of Jerusalem. 

Is that what Israel is willing to con- 
«de? Not now, not yet: that is why Mr. 
Rabin and Mr. Peres are assuring Israelis 
that Jerusalem will be undivided “forev- 
er.” President BO] Clinton recently reaf- 
firmed his 1992 campaign statement that 
Jerusalem is “an undivided city, the eter- 
nal capital of Israel” 

Forever and eternity are to end in a 
couple of years. The basis for negotia- 
tion with the Palestine liberation Or- 
ganization is to satisfy the desire of 
Palestinian Arabs for a land of their 
own; the notion that the desire can be 
satisfied by forcing settlers out of the 
West Bank is a delusion. 

Mr. Arafat speaks of Jerusalem as 
“not their capital; it is our capital!” 

Arguments now being advanced 
about ruling a foreign nation will soon 
be applied to East fat least) Jerusalem. 
The UN’s Resolution 904 in Match of 
this year identified “territories occupied 
by Israel in 1967, including Jerusalem. “ 
But of the 550,000 people who live in 
Jerusalem, 320,000 live on land not un- 
der Israeli control before 1 967; a major- 
ity of these 330,000 are Jewish and may 
not lake kindly to the imposition of 
Palestinian sovereignty in the eastern 
portion of what Israelis were led to be- 
lieve was their nation’s capital. 

For this, they will be denounced 
as intransigent colonizers, obstacles to 
the peace process. Voices in the White 
House and Congress will urge cutting 
off aid to (he “occupiers” of Greater 
Jerusalem. World opinion win unite to 
condemn the territory-grasping Jews 
who dare to claim sovereignty over the 
cradle of three religions. 

And would even that final conces- 
sion bring peace? In his speech to Mus- 
lims, Mr. Arafat compared his agree- 
ment with Israel to the prophet 
Mohammed's deal with the tribe of 
Kuraish, which became a model for 
deals with infidels: Such a “despicable 
truce” is never permanent. 

But give the PLO leader credit for 



A True Javanese Fairy Tale: 
The Sultan and the Mermaid 

By Paul Spencer Sochaczewski 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


stonn that swept through the Israeli Par- more frankness than Peres of the Tbou- 
liament at being kept in the dark makes it sand Letters. “The irony would be," says 
clean The majority of Israelis now see the Likud's Mr. Netanyahu, “if Yasser 
where the “peace process" is beaded, and Arafat's unintended candor saved the 


they want to gel off that t rain 
Israelis in West Bank settlements have 
already been demonized and are destined 
to live under Arab ralt By ngecting what 
he calls “our control of a foreign nation,” 
Mr. Rabin rhetorically recognizes what 
the PLO calls the state ofPalestine. 
.And according to the newly drafted Pal- 
estinian constitution, “Jerusalem is the 
capital of Palestine." 

Thanks to Mr. Arafat’s revelation 
of assurances given him (be didn't know 


I AM ROE: 

My life, Roe v. Wade, and 
Freedom of Choice 

By Norma McCorvey with Andy 
A f eider. 21 6 pages. $23. ffarper- 
Collins. 

Reviewed by Katie Roiphe 

S UPREME Court cases tend to 
have names but no faces. We 
know the textbook version and the 
newspaper version, bat we seldom 
know the human stories behind the 
legal facts. Norma McCorvey’s col- 
orful memoir gives us the life of 
Jane Roe, who was the plaintiff in 
the 1973 Supreme Court case that 
brought legal abortion into the 
lives of American women. 

McCorvey was young, destitute 
and pregnant when she accidental- 
ly stumbled into her role in legal 
history. After maintaining her ano- 
nymity for 16 years, she publicly 
embraced her identity as Jane Roe 
in 1989, giving speeches on abor- 
tion and exposing herself as a tar- 
get to the fierce opponents of abor- 
tion rights. 

Even if she had not been Jane 
Roe, McCorvey could never be de- 
scribed as ordinary. She is a sort of 
modem-day Moll Flanders, chron- 
icling her life with energy, humor 
and verve. Her story moves from a 
small Cajun community in Louisi- 
ana to a school for delinquent giris 
in Texas to an abusive marriage in 
California to an abortion rights 

fnarrti in W ashing ton. She is a bai- 


By Robert Byrne . 

T HE Jones Murphy Jr.-Aroeri- 
can Ch«s Foundation Inter- 
national Tournament, winch took 
place in Man*, ended in success 
1 For Alexander Wdtidewta. 

/ In Round 6, wqjlkiewicz dem- 
onstrated logical counterattacking 
’ play in the center in winning from 
the Brooklyn international master 
• Joshua. Waitzkin. • . _ 

The fiancherto with 6 g3and 7 
Ba2 is a quiet, positional method of 
. dealing with the NajdorF Vanatwn 

of the Sicilian Defense: the white 
KB reinforces the e4 pawn and is 
;; intended Xo squelch a black cotm- 
’ terattack in the center with a ia- 
ter„.d5. By developing with 
V 7..J3d7 and 8~Nc6, thus postpon- 
ing _0-0, Blade prevents his fang 
from becoming an earfy target for 
attack on the fangside. 

The plan in playing 9 Nce2 is to 
prepare for a Maroczy bind with a 

V follow-up c4. However, after 
9_Rc8, a result of IQ c4 Nd4 1 1 
Qd4 b5 12 cb ab would hawb«n 
to dissolve fha fetter and free me 
black queeoride. 

WojtJdewicz prepared 
'.. for the kev counterattack, 

which negated whatever mari me 

white position suPP^fJ “ 

have. On20 ed Bd5 21 BdS Rd5, 


land of Israel 

The New York Times. 

Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to 1 he 
Editor” and contain the writer's sig- 
nature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are stdyect to 
editing We cannot be responsible for 
the return of unsolicited manuscripts. 

~ BOOKS 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


A Response From Jakarta 

Regarding “ Indonesia as BuHy” (Opin- 
ion, May 25): 

This New York Times editorial is yet 
another salvo in a relentless campaign to 
smear the international reputation of 
Indonesia. The facts surrounding the 
process by which the people of East 
Timor opted for independence through 
integration with Indonesia are well 
known and speak for themselves. Bui 
regrettably the editorial chose to repeat 
the lies and innuendos being spread by 
Indonesia's long-time detractors. 

How could the editorial describe In- 
donesa’s protest and expression of con- 
cern over the Manila conference as 
“crude pressure"? Those were simple 
and normal diplomatic efforts on the 
part of Indonesia. What it was protest- 
ing was not a “human rights conference” 
but an activity oiganized as pan of a 
political campaign against Indonesia 
waged by a small group of East Timor- 
ese based in other countries, abetted 
by Portugal, with the help of a small 
group of FIKpinos. 

By involving itself in such activities. 
Portugal has clearly violated the spirit of 
the agreement on confidence-building 
measures reached on Sept. 17, 1993. and 
May 6. 1994, in the course of its dialogue 
with Indonesia under the auspices of the 
UN secretary-general. 

The most obvious lie in the editorial is 
the claim that Indonesia threatened to 
refuse to host peace talks between the 
Philippine government and the Moro 
National Liberation Front, orMNLF. if 
the Manila conference was not canceled. 

On this. Foreign Minister -\li .Matas 
has emphasized: “I have never stated 


that the talks would be stopped. What 
causes a delay is a search for a suitable 
time for all sides." Anyone who has 
closely followed the peace process in the 
southern Philippines would know that a 
great deal of technical work has 10 be 
completed before formal negotiations 
could resume. That this work may take 
longer than earlier expected has nothing 
to do with the Manila conference. The 
government of Indonesia remains corn- 
mined to facilitating the talks between 
the Philippine government and the 
MNLF. Indonesia enjoys an excellent 
relationship with the Philippines and no 
amount of fact-twisting will change that. 

I fail to see the relevance of linking 
Australia to the issue of the Manila 
conference. Long ago, the Australian 
government recognized the integration 
of Hast Timor with Indonesia: the edito- 
rial's attempt to excoriate Australia for 
laking such a position serves no respon- 
sible purpose. The editorial’s snide ques- 
tion. “Win Australia be the next target?" 
is clearly a deliberate attempt 10 mis- 
guide its readers. 

Every country has a right to express 
its concents frankly to another country 
— that is an integral pan of internation- 
al diplomacy. When occasion demands 
it, we shall not hesitate to express the 
position which we believe to be in the 
interest of 186 million Indonesians. Our 
fellow members in the ASEAN family 
realize that, and we expect any of them 
or any sovereign country, for that mat- 
ter, to do no less when the occasion calls 
for a frank expression of concern. 

IRA WAN ABIDIN. 

Jakarta. 

The writer heads Indonesia's Director- 
ate of Foreign Information. 


Incitement to Violence 

Recent correspondence in your pages 
about Rwanda and the former Yugosla- 
via has failed to highlight a factor which, 
in both cases, has aggravated ethnic hos- 


tilities. In both regj 
played a role in inn 
In Rwanda, shocki 
Mille Cabinet engajs 
mem to "ethnic c 


s, the media have 
ting ethnic haired, 
ly, the Radio des 
in outright inci te- 
nsing.” using the 


word “nettoyage,” French for deansing. 
In ex -Yugoslavia, media abuse look more 
varied forms, but included the harass- 
ment or dismissal of journalists who at- 
tempted to maintain traditions of objec- 
tive coverage: military attacks on radio 
transmitters: lies and misinformation; 
and the constant use of demonizing ste- 
reotypes to describe ethnic enemies. 

CATHERINE DRUCKER. 

London. 


A Survivor's Eloquence 

Regarding " Ashes of Memory in Sara- 
jevo ” f Opinion, June /); 

At first the article by Ivan Lcvrenovic 
left me speechless. I had no reply to this 
account of one roan’s struggle to com- 
prehend something which I. in the safety 
of my home, cannot touch. But now this 
war is on my doorstep. 

I want to thank Mr. Lcvrenovic, to try 
to relieve the loss of the destroyed librar- 
ies, to send paper and penciL 

For now, this message will have to do. 
1 do have a little hope. Something was 
saved from the fires: Ivan Lovrenovic 
still has his voice, his words. 

MOLLY B. GROSS. 

Berlin. 


P ELABUHAN RaTU, Indonesia — 
Those who pay special attention to 
royal affairs of the heart ought clip a 
lock of hair and a fingernail or two on 
June 21 in honor of one of Asia's most 
intriguing love stories. 

On this date Sultan Hamengku 
Buwono X of Jogjakarta will celebrate his 
official birthday by trekking to this spot 
where the surf pounds against the slate- 
gray southern coast of Java, the main 
island erf Indonesia. Here he will offer 

MEANWHILE 

women's clothing and his own nail and 
hair dippings in honor of his 1 5th century 
ancestors: Seropati, a Javan king, and 
Nyai Loro KiduL a mermaid goddess. 
Local belief has it that this unlikely cou- 
ple began one of the world’s longest- 
surviving royal families — the four Java- 
nese sultanates of Jogjakarta and Sola 
Years ago I set out to meet Hamengku 
Buwono IX, father of the current sultan 
of Jogjakarta. Eventually a friend, her- 

duced me to the sultan,’ who had been a 
vice president of Indonesia as well as 
finance and defense minister. He was a 
wefl educated man. powerful but kind. 
He had earned respect for his courage in 
standing against the Dutch during Indo- 
nesia's war of independence. 

I had one question I wanted to ask 
Hamengku Buwono. and I tried to 
phrase it in a refined Javanese manner. 
How was it that this man of pragmatism 
and worldly experience could pay hom- 
age every year to a mermaid? 

Over sweet lea, the sultan told me that 
during the Indonesian fight for indepen- 
dence he had fasted for two weds, eating 
only rice and water, in order to meet Loro 
Kidul in a vision. Then I saw her. Eyang 
—1 call Loro Kidul 'Eyang.* grandmoth- 
er — sealed behind two of my nephews," 
he said. “She was young and pretty.” 

He said that in his vision, the young 
men were killed. And in fact, his two 
beloved nephews died within the week. 

The sultan then described a critical 
moment for him during the independence 
struggle. It was a time when difficult 
decisions were being made about when to 
fight and when to negotiate. The Dutch 
ruled all but the 7 percent of Java that 
was governed, under contract by the roy- 
al houses of Solo and Jogjakarta. Each 
time a sultan died, the colonial adminis- 
trators would impose a new contract re- 
ducing the power of the incoming ruler. 

Negotiations between Hamengku 
Buwono IX and the Dutch were long 
and difficult According to the sultan, 
the crucial moment came when Loro 
Kidul appeared in a vision and told him 
to “give them their contract because 
soon they mil go home." 

He signed the contract, but never read 
it, having been reassured by Loro Kidul 
that the Dutch were on their way out. 
And Loro Kidul’s predictions came true. 
A year later, in 1942, the Japanese 


invaded Indonesia and evicted the Dutch. 

I was more than a little skeptical. The 
sultan gave me the Javanese equivalent 
of Shakespeare's There are more things 
in heaven and earth. Horatio/ Than are 
dreamt of in your philosophy." He con- 
cluded: “'When I was 4 years old 1 was 
already living with a Dutch fanriW. so 
my brain is m some ways a Western 
brain. But many things happen which 
cannot be explained in a logical way." 

I left, only half satisfied. 1 pestered 
K. R. T. Hardjonagoro. the regent of the 
Susuimnan’s palace in Solo, Tor a touch 
more enlightenment. “In 1966. Sultan 
Hamengku Buwono attended the open- 
ing of the Samudra Beach Hotel, on 
Java’s southern coast, which of course is 
Loro Kidul's home territory,” Mr. 
Hardjonagoro told me one evening as 
we watched a wayang kufit shadow play. 

“The night before the opening, a local 
village headman asked for an audience 
with the sultan.” he continued. The old 
man told the Hamengku Buwono of a 
dream be had had the previous night in 
which a lady said she wanted offerings. 
She was dressed in green. 

The sulian, of course, knew that the 
old man had seen Loro Kidul His High- 
ness thanked the old man but explained 
that be would not make an offering since 
he was attending the hotd opening in his 
civilian capacity as minister of defense 
and wanted to separate the affairs of state 
from the mystical duties of the palace." 

As Mr. Hardjonagoro spoke, the da- 
long puppet master sang half a dozen 
pans. “I was outside, near the pool, 
when the sultan said goodnight to the 
well-meaning old man,” be recounted. 

“Shortly after his refusal, I heard the 
sound of a locomotive. The noise in- 
creased until it sounded like 10 locomo- 
tives were coming towards the beach- 
front tenaoe where we were." 

Suddenly a 10-rneter-high (33-foot) 
tidal wave rose from the sea, which had 
been calm, Mr. Hardjonagoro said. It 
knocked down trees, wasted away the 
hotel's buffet table and soaked visitors. 
Shortly afterward, the sultan changed his 
mind. “He said his prayers to Loro Kidul 
and made the appropriate offerings, and 
the sea was calm once again.” 

I was incredulous. Mr. Hajjonagoro 
showed me photographs of the damage 
caused by the tidal wave. And he told me 
to go to the hotel and ask for Room 319. 

Some time later, 1 did this. The room, 
it turns out, is where Sultan Hamengku 
Buwono IX made peace with the easily 
irritated mermaid queen. It is kept 
locked and reserved for her. For a tip. 
hotd staff will allow people access, to 
pray to the Queen of the Southern 
Ocean, ft is a good business. 

The writer is a professional associate at 
the Easi-West Center in Honolulu raid 
Head of Creative Development at WWF- 
World Wide Fund for Nature in Switzer- 
land He contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


* Peter H®?, theoretical physi- 
cist and deviser of a key hypotheti- 
cal particle called the Higgs boson, 
has just finished reading “Syirpo- 
rimC a novel by Muriel Spark. 

“I am getting rather addicted to 
Muriel Spark novels, and I thought 
this one was a rather good example 
of her craft.” (Barry James, 1ST) 


i#u tm 



tender, a pool player, a drug dealer 
and a bouse deaner. She drifts 
from place to place, attaching her- 
self to hippies and gamblers, even 
joixnng, a carnival and running a 
freak, show. 

In spite of all the social cards 


btanism and alcoholism among 
than — McCorvey is not one for 
self-pity or fashionable invocations 
erf social oppression. Instead she 
writes with disarming frankness 
and tmfimebing detail about her 
own failing s, regrets and limita- 
tions. 

What is remarkable about 
McCorvey’s story is precisely how 
nmnvolved with Roe v. Wade she 
actually was. After agreeing to be 
the plaintiff, “Jane Roe” had Hole 
to do with the historic case argued 
in her name. She was not present as 
tbe case was argued in the Supreme 
Court and she had almost no con- 


CHESS 


MUlKEWfCZ/BLACX 


Eh ■ 

: . . L_i 

■ 

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D Hi 



So ■ 

3! 

■ 

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PosttfcmafterSSM 

Black would have been ready to 
attack the weak, backward c 2 
pawn. Moreover, 20 g$ could have 
been rebuffed by 2fi._Qe5 Bd6 22 
Qc3 b4 23 Qe3 Nd5 24 Qe4? Nc3. 
'WaiBfcn chose 


tact with her Lawyers. The most 
vivid measure of her detachment 
from the legal process was that she 
found out about the court’s deci- 
sion by reading about it in the 
newspaper. 

She describes, though somewhat 
obliquely, her feeling of resentment 
that the law was overturned too late 
for her to have an abortion. When 
she realized she would have to car- 
ry ho - baby to term (and give it ap 
for adoption), she felt betrayed by 
her lawyers; die thinks back on the 
moment when she realized “this 
lawsuit was not really forme, it was 
.about me.” 

One of McCorvey’s great virtues 
as a narrator is ter unwulingnes5 to 
shy away from the more uncom- 
fortable dements of her stray. She 
squarely faces an issue that is' often 
glossed over by the optimistic femi- 
nist rhetoric of consensus: class 
tensions within the feminist move- 


Rc3 Bg5 27 Rc8 Rc8 28 Nf4 Rc2 29 
Bd4 (29 Rbl Re2! 30 Qg3 B!4 31 
Qf4 Bd3 32 Qcl Qb6 is annihilat- 
ing} Ra2 was powerful Waitzkin 
could not play 30 Qe4 because 
30_Qe4 31 Rc4 Bc6 would have 
won a piece. 

On 31—Qb4, Waitzkin could 
have defended by 32 Qc3, although 
Wqjtidewicz could have gotten a 
winning end game with 32-.Qc3 33 
Bc3 Ra3 34 Rbl Bd3 35 Bb4 Ra2 
36 Rel RbZ 

After 33 b4, Wqjtidewicz scored 
the decisive breakthrough with 
33_e3! After 34 fe Bed! 35e4 Bd2 
36 Re2 Bc3 37 Ra2 Bd4! Waitzkin 
otter had to lose his rook by 38 
Kh2 Qa2 or his queen, by 38 Rf2 
Qg3, so be gave up. 

SICILIAN DEFENSE 


WaiBian chose 20 t5, but after 
20~Ne4. Wojtkiewicz exgoyed ex- 
cellent piece play and 'a' powerful 
initiative. 

Wanddn avoided 21 Ne4 be- 
cau5e21_j3e22Qe3h623Qe2Bg5 
24 Rcdl Rdl 25 Rdl 631 26'Bc6 
Qc6 27 fe Qc2 28 Rd2 Qbl 29 Kg2 
Qa2 would have cost him a pawn. 

Jt is. not dear why, .after 25 oL 


25JRd3. Of course, bis 55_.be 26 


WU*c Blue 
Wtiuun wot&tfaitt 

1 h e 

3NB <tt 

344 Cd 

4NM WE 

SNt3 *4 

7 Ib2 M7 

800 NcB 

BNGtf *8 

»W » 

11 Bb2 0*7 

12 S3 OO 

13Qd2 QaS 

14 Bc3 Qc7 

15 Sac) Ml 

IS M| fiefi 

17 SMS 

IS an Qb? 

10 hlg! & 


MMe Block 

ffateua vquewis 

20 eS NH 

0M M 

22 QbS Bt* 

23 Bel (Se- 

24 RftJ M 

3SM be 

2G Rc3 Bb5 

29 RcS Rt9 

ZB N« RC2 

20 BM 5U3 

DM el* 

34 fc Bc6 

35 e4 Bffi 

38 Rc2 Bc3 

W4 

3S Resign 


mem. McCorvey faithfully records 
her feeling of awkwardness with 
the two female attorneys who rep- 
resent her and her awareness of 
their feding of awkwardness with 
her. She describes the differences 
between their clothes and hers, 
their language and hers, their con- 
cons and hers. The gulf is most 
dramatically illustrated in a discus- 
sion about money. After they are 
all paid consulting fees for the tele- 
vision movie version of Roe v. 
Wade, one of her lawyers suggests 
that McCorvey should do what she 
did and donate the sum to the Na- 
tional Organization for Women. 1 
McCorvey wryly announces that , 
she prefers to get health insurance 
and get her teeth fixed. 

The history of abortion rights 
and the standard pro-choice rheto- 
ric stitched through the story arc 
the weakest pan of the book. 
McCorvey’s story itself is a more 
eloquent argument for legalized 
abortion than her wooden political 
speeches. 

The real value of this book is noi 
in its straightforward political mes- 
sage, but in the sometimes clumsy 
but always honest confrontation 
with a difficult subject: the way 
politics and history collide with ah 
individual life. When McCorvey 
met with two lawyers in an Italian 
restaurant in Dallas she was not 
looking for political change, she 
was looking for a way out of her 
third unwanted pregnancy. 
McCorvey is one of those rare indi- 
viduals who are struck by history 
like a boll of lightning, which illu- 
minates and transforms. The ran- 
dom drifting events of her life are 
ordered by an almost evangelical 
sense of political purpose. She 
feels, as she describes it. “chosen.” 
After a life filled with hardship. 
McCorvey finds meaning and re- 
demption in the abortion rights 
movement. 

This absorbing memoir gives us 
the elusive sense of history made 
immediate. It is easy to forget that 
there was a time when abortion was 
not available on demand. McCcr* 
vefs account of her personal strug- 
gle animates what has bv now be- 
come a political abstraction. 

Katie Roiphe, the author of " The 
Morning After. Sex. Fear and Femi- 
nism,” wrote this for The Washing- 
ton Post 


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International Herald Tribune 

-\»p* x ARJS— Dressing a wom- 
gjp an from the navel to the 
shower cap seems to be 
XL ifae new aim of Chanel. 
The midriff got a double-C logo 
instead of a navel-piercing ring and 
the floral shower curtain came out 
as clothing in Chanel's ^uise Une. 
The collection Karl Lagerfeld 


SPRING SUMMER 
COLLECTION 

ESGMM 


Marie-Maitine 

3 , rue de Sevres, 

Paris 6fth 


sent out Friday on models young 
enough to raise eyebrows was cute, 
funky and sportive. 

The show opened with cashmere 
twin-sets with cropped sweaters in 
fruity colors, edged with a Chanel- 
printed band like gift-wrap ribbon. 
The knits were slung over itsy-bit- 
sy teeny-weeny bikini bottoms and 
worn with bobby socks and higi 
heels. It set the tone of little gins 
dressing up in mom's clothes m a 
way that seemed sweet rather than 
in dubious taste. 

And so to the shower curtains, 
the flowered fabric quiltcx^ glazed 
and turned into wide-legged culotte 
skim worn with the brief sweaters 
or boleros. The shiny effects — 
including gum-pink plasticized 
shorts — have been whizzing 
around fashion’s cyberspace. But it 
T fl ir»»g Chanel to make a nylon mob- 
cap chic. . 

“It's just an unpretennous jotte 

lairing chintz from the wall and 

used for a material you need on the 
beach," said Lagerfeld, who had 


attracted a big crowd for this be- 
tween-seasons show. Front row in 
the Rue Cambon salon was Susan 
Gutfreund, who pronounced the 
show ‘‘wearable and packable. 

Easy pieces included jackets 
shown with A-line divided skim, 
and for evening Fine-striped cotton 
sweaters worn with chiffon pants 
with a rippling frill down the sides. 
Predictable, but pretty, were Cha- 
nel’s Bardoi-esque gingham corset, 
shorn and shin ensemble, which, 
like the brief black bikinis, will be 
international beach chic. 

Christian Lacroix's cruise line 
had a salty freshness in its opening 
sailor-collared blazer over jaunty 
pleated shorn. The marina look 
was taken up too for soft, wide 
pants and a little dress with its 
sailor neckline trimmed with lace. 

Navy, while and red — including 
stretchy fine-striped knits wa^ 
the color theme of the show, which 
included discreet versions of La- 
croix's signature Provencal prints. 

The spare dress, s trappy, simple. 


but perhaps with a rim of lace un- 
der Lhe short hem was a flirty but 
sophisticated look. So were mmi- 
kilt skim and curvy jackets with a 
bow tied at the back. More roman- 
tic were pajama pants in subtly 
patterned crepe de chine, wuh a 
high-waisied tunic under a loose 
shirt-jacket. 

For evening. the fabrics stiffened 
up, and a taffeta long skirt with a 
gold lace busder top seemed a long 
way from the original concept of a 
cruise line as jet-away clothes. But 
decoration was discreet: lhe ever- 
present lace (including the dainty 
high-heeled mules), or a Tyrolean 
ribbon trim. 

Fresh and lighthearted is the 
spirit of these cruise lines, which 
are not intended as winter vacation 
clothes, but collections delivered 
before Christmas to give the bou- 
tiques new clothes with a hint of 
spring. 

Suzy Menkes 


become a household 
word (aUeast with British tabloid naden) nue 
Ifcw strategicallY placed safety puts and a very 
Side black crepe partially 

Elizabeth Hurley at the London premiere tort 
month of "Four Weddmgs and a Funeral the 
KS whichher boyfriend, Hugh Grant, stars. 

“Just a boring old punk classic," said Versace 
to describe an outfit that made front pag“ “d 
boosted his reputation as the emperor of glam 
frocks. The crowd waiting in line at Harrods for 
the maestro's signature was buying a piece of 
the star-studded action. 

First up prof erring books for signature were 

Beverlev^loom and her mothCT. Rto. wiih big 

blonde hair and bigger Chanel bag. Thsj 
S collectors oRff ' Versace's works of book 
an ( this is his third). The designer \ teky Holton 
was bringing one or her ties (gilded tassel fringr 
tag) SpSSn 10 her hero; St 
Dino S ta this was head to heds in \ ersace blade 
leather, rattling with gflded belt. 

love the glitz and the glamour." be riffled- 
The book has a lot of mer^ ana sc^s 
Elitz from its gilded leaves, on wbch the super- 
Ircdels Naomi 

and Christv Turlington besport themselves in 
all things tight and fanciful 
Illustrations of women with 
lace-hosed legs overlay blowups of jwl^bm 
ions, crustaceous embroideries and $3L sea* “ 
patterned with the classical remains of \er- 

sace's southern Italian background- 

How could mere words do justice to tms 
□lossy tome, where even the chapter headings 
are written Erte-style with figures bent msonial 
ecstasv to form the letters of the alphabet, ^et 
there is an essay by the Italian author Isabella 
Bossi Fedrigotti; a tribute by theater designer 
Julia Trevelyan Oman: homages py Vogue 
fashion editors; and a few carefully chosen 
quotes from important figures i deceased). 

“One either is a work of art or one wears it. 
i announces Oscar Wilde, beside a picture of a 
I naked man pouring jewels over a barely clothed 

“The words of a man are the measure of his 
spirit, but do not express it as style can. claim 
Marcel Proust, in conjunction with, a model 
wearing nothing but designer stubble reflected 
in a gflded mirror. 

“Every act of creation is above all an act of 
destruction," says Pablo Picasso, on a page 
fringed with beehive hairdos. 

S* Versace writes about his close friendship 
with Diana Vreeland. chelate fashion doyenne. 
m_ and expresses his gratitude to KarlLageneld 
Uv among other generous thank-yous- TJe nook : s 
a epithet seems to be its closing words from Karl 
Kraus: 



- -if. -7^-eSV- ■ !■ I 





s 





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International Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK —With his 
internal antennae at- 
tuned to changing fash- 
ion, Michael Chow 
picked up vibes about glass. Bora 
in China, famous as the founder of 
modernist restaurants in London. 
New York and Los Angeles, Chow- 
collected over the span of 20 years 
the most translucent and watery of 
precious objects. 

Now he is selling his rare collec- 
tion of crystal jewelry and glass 
objects: the ragged, speckled, one- 
of-a-kind designs by Maurice Mar- 
mot and the frosted rock crystal 
necklaces by Geoqjes FouqueL as 
well as the rectilinear An Deco 
silver jewelry by Raymond Tem- 
plier and Jean Desprts. They all go 
under the hammer at Sotheby’s 
New York on Wednesday and 
Thursday. 

“Marmot is the best glass man of 
the century — each piece is 
unique," Chow says erf the French 
craftsman whose work from the 
1920s, often with interior decora- 




' v; >. 

; 

I T'"- 

. * ■T' Y W! , 
« V ' 

•f • 





Three of the Jean Despres brooches from the early ’30s. 


tion, is known mainly to connois- 
seurs. 

Chow was drawn to the Art Deco 
jewelry, worn by his late wife, Tina, 
by its “sculptural quality," but he 
insists that the period of creative 
design in both glass and jewelry 
was very short. 

“When people talk about Art 
Deco jewelry, he claims, “they are 


looking at a watered-down version 
influenced by the masters.” 

The star pieces among the jewel- 
ry are the two 1925 Fouquet pen- 
dants with their globular crystal 
beads and icy pendants and a 
Desprts necklace, circa 1930. of 
hammered stiver and ivory baubles 
joined with rectangular silver links. 
Flat brooches with geometric pan- 
els that look like a math lesson in 


CUUCCUJI UUU1 U1W 

he garnered as a child to bisra*!* 1 
thm of self-portraits by trip*?* 
printers from Francesca Gnu®' 
and David Hockney, through 
lian Sdmabd, Cy Twopabte'^f. 
Andy WarboL . 

He believes that his Chmere f^' 
tagp and its aesthetic tradrtgp:* 
s culp ted muff bottles prob&bff.s*' ■ 
traded hfm to Mannrt’s 
That indudes, in the largest 
tion to come up for puWwsa^Bjfc 
bellied bottles with 
steppers, some in yivid Tatoies»fi> «T 
sea green,, others in snafcyjS|j? 
and browns with a galaxy Qy PSJr 
bles. • 




“There is an abstract quMStj^F- 
says. “I look at each pie<^ andu^ 
abstract expressionism indtodow 
in the bubble." . . r 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 4) 




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CoBego parti. MD 20742-IB44. U25A 

Tat +1(301)985-7442 
Fax: +1 {301)385-7870 


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in the Heart of Europe 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR IBUNE? 


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110 


100 


90 



1993 


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150 


130 

110 


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^ox. waging: 32% 
Ctosa: 133.01 Prevj 131.54 


Appro*, wolghftnj: 37% 
Cl 08 Kl 11 JflPrw_- 11£12 




M 


^^WlgMnB:26% 
Ctee; 93.40 Pjwj 93.82 


Apprax. wighfing: s% 
Ctosa 114^7 Piwj117JB 



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1093 

World Index 

Slngap*», Spain! "*■ TaekBnd, Norn*. 


industrial Socto r s 


f| — - ftm % 

J^-i^-'.l 1Ja -W 115.46 1 Tm ^ 

y« ^3-56 llm -M3 iWilteW. ,26X4 B Btt ^ 

■ — — 1 18- 25 117.70 40.47 Consamer Go ods gj 4g gj^s ^^5 

g°?« 117-41 mx -0A7 Kotara, ^7 m62 

O ftwematlonaJ Herald Triune 

Thinking Aheq<i /Commentary 




Stocks 
Plunge on 
Shangh 
Market 


Compiled by Oir Sufi Fran Dispadta 

SHANGHAI — A planned 
ntxw of new issues and a loss of 
confidence in company mquag c - 
mem sent Shanghai shares tum- 
““S .« percent to their lowest 
close in more than a year, brokers 
said Monday, and the outlook for a 
turnaround is bleak. 

Shanghai's A share index lost 
23.41 pomts to 497.79, the lowest 

close since the start of J 993. 

Its fall below 500 points “further 
wakened investors’ confidence, 
and the index is likely to continue 
falling m the coming days,” a bro- 
ker from Haitong Securities in 
Shanghai said. 

Since last year, China’s fledgling 
exchanges in Shanghai and Shenz- 

S2^T ridcrablyfram 

Shanghai’s A share index, which 
is denominated in yuan, has lost 70 
pooem of its value since its peak of 
1,640.71 cm Feb. 16, 1993. 

Brokers said heavy new listings 
were behind the sharp fails. The 
Shanghai stock exchange listed 5 
billion jyuan (J579 million) in new 
shares m 1993, more than the total 
value of new shares listed in the 
previous two years. 

In the first half of 1 994, 2.42 

bmion new shares have been or will 
be brought to the market. Shanghai 
rarochermcal is scheduled to list 
ZOO million new shares Monday. 

But the biggest cause of the de- 
cline may be the success of China’s 
overall effort to tap the world’s 
financial markets. When shares re- 
senjed for foreigners began trading 
m Shenzhen and Shanghai in 199^ 
they were one of the few ways for- 
eign investors could cash in on Chi- 
na s rapid growth. But now Chinese 
shares are listed on exchanges in 

H< ?f New Y «*- Vancouver 
ana Melbourne. 

Because these exchanges are 
more mature and have more strin- 
gent hsting and reporting rules and 
regulators with proven track re- 


Duty-Free Latin A 

Trade Accords Sweep Across Hemisphere 

L? r £* e S witb RaM QIC 


— days ^ 
and his cabinet. 

Brazil s trade with Arac&tina, Uruguay and Rara- 
ripfcd since the four fanned an 

krifA * 1 it . . . _ 


By James Brooke 

Nev York Times Service 

. BJODE JANEIRO — In what could be a mairtr 

3S3«v«S 

cars for the Mercosul market. Eastman Kodak Cri 

UD & tarirf-frr^ chmnlna /Vann# T% 


*ujon cmzens under a duty-free umbrella. 

Even as the ink dries on the accord, EraSor will 

ask to join and is likdy to be accepted^ 

For exporters in the United States the 1 arm 

mve tmvftnt tv*. 1 . : j _ . • H* f-atm 


Central Bankers 
Join Chorus to 
Relax Job Rules 


-- — - — — jwuj, luiuug #00 billion last vear iree-lrade area that would unite, in a common 
Afflmcan^exports to Colombia have gone up 80 jffjif!; r® coun Fj“ comprise Mercosui, the 

its borders three *** ^V 1182011 Imtiaiiv e and, finally, 

said. Brazil s prescient. Itamar Franco, said last 


percent smee Colombia opened 11s dc 
yearn ago, an American diplomat said. 

for U S - 60ods from 
Orand Cherokee jeeps to peanut butler, Latin 
America s economy is expected to grow by 3 per- 
emt this year. This expansion is taking place 

tflmhf nirr/in vi 


week. — 

cSSE*?*!* 0f J* Pact “ Bolivia, 
S^S ! a,ador ’ Pau Md Venezuela — agreed 
last mon th to orate an Andean Free Trade 
on J® 0 : 1. with duty-free trade. 


toat free-trade agreements 
arenotfjust about free trade,” said MoiSlWa 

iMmo minister of industry in Venezuela. “Trade me unueo states anrf 

whl “ a prradill S a Mvador. GuuSa 

^tntry after comnry in Latin America is dis- Co^bia has emerged as the most enereetic 
^ VennS ,. ll l a V after *** United Sutcs * its 10051 ^ trade. Three years ago thenSon 

it trading partner are neighbors. Two- JjJ® 0 , free-trade pacts. By August when Mr. 
e between Colombia and Venezuela. for Gaviria s term expires, he expects to have siEned 

free-trade pacts with 22 nations. 

In Aiidiifi n . ■ 


important trading partners are neighbors, 
way trade between Colombia and Venezuela! for 

iTife? ^ 0Ubk 5 d a eustoms union 
took effect m 1992, dropping tariffs to zero. 

n 


_ Reflectiiig a new political integration between 
I** 1 D( ^y went to war in 1987, 
fteadent C&ar Gavrna Trujillo of Colombia and 
his entire cabinet flew to Caracas last month for 


Sprint European Link Reported 

By Jacaues Neher A cninv it "p.i.,.. 


See CHINA, Page 13 


By Jacques Neher A source at Deutsche Telekom 
Herald Tribune said the parties had sealed an 

rAKJa — A global telecom- agreement to cooperate, Reuters 
mum cations a l l i ance Unking Sprint reported. 

Corp. with France Telecom and 

Deutsche Telekom will be an- On June 7, Sprint, the third-Iare- 
nounced Tuesday, sources said m U -S- long-distance carrier, an- 

, i nounced that it was in discussions 

rv™ d ^ men of ^ F . rrach “d with Frcnc h and German operators 

news conferencesfrt ?^^ t t0 ^ onn a “global partnership" that ‘ I ” V1 '-ommunicauons 

In Wastogioo, a SprSlS^' ^d involve the European S>mpa- ^p- The accord rails for BT to pay 
said Monday that he would “have {*“* l ? ,cin 8 slakes in Sprint’s equity bfflK>n for a 20 percent stake in 
something to say later," after the by s 005050 ™! to new Sprint shares. JfCL.and for the companies to put 
cteeofUAnockmarto,. ^ Ust year, France Telecom and 

Deutsche Telekom formed a joint 
venture. Eunetcom, to develop pri- 


vate networking systems tor mum- 
national companies. The compa- 
nies could exchange equity stakes 
after they are both privatized, like- 
ly within the next few years. 

The deal would crane a year after 
a similar link-up was announced be- 
tween British Telecommunications 
PLC and MCI Communications 


_ — — “jvuii vuituic, urn- 

cert, to offer a range of telecom- 
munications services aimed at the 
global business market. 


. - ““ rrtm ttaptocha 

BASEL, Switzerland — Officials 
of the world's leading central bank- 
ing organization on Monday joined 
the drams of Western leaders call- 
ing for deregulation of the labor 
“V ket ’ “Ending relaxed rules on 
turmg and firing, to tackle the em- 
ployment crisis in industrialized 
countries. 

Andrew Crockett, general man- 
ager of the Basel-bared Bank for 
International Settlements, said un- 
anployment would not be resolved 
°y abandoning fiscal and monetary 
ngor aod stimulating demand. 

In its annual report the oreaniza- 
tion said that unemployment, oar- 
ocularly in the Enropei UnionTis 
the most serious problem facm R 
policymakers. 6 

V*. central bankers’ 

oentod bank also singled out the 
rigidity of real wages” as an im- 
portant obstacle to job creation in 

Wage structures must be flexible, 
uie report said, to ease the intro- 
duction of technologies ih»r re- 
place unskilled labor. 

Flexibility was also called neces- 
sary to meet the growing competi- 
tion from low-cost areas in the de- 
veloping worid. 

“The international correlation 
between the degree of labor-market 
ngkhties of various kinds and the 
level of unemployment is becoming 
increasingly clear." the organiza- 
tion said. e 

The report said the ELTs unem- 
ployment rate, which is partly cv- 
chcal, should decline as recovery 
proceeds. But it also noted that 
even on the most favorable esti- 
mates." some 7 percent to 8 percent 
of hard-core or structural unem- 
ployment would remain after a cv- 
chcal rccoveiy. 3 

The rqrart came less than a week 
after a study on employment by the 
Urganizatran for Economic Coop- 
erauon and Developmkm also con- 
cluded that greater flexibility in la- 
bor markets would be needed to 
cope wi th nearly 35 million jobless 
arapng its 25 member nations. 

Separately, discussing the grow- 
ing market for the trading of deriv- 
atives. Mr. Crockett intended 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


American Tilt to E 


that administrative controls wens 
nottiie best way to regulate. 

ine derivatives market consists 
or futures contracts that are de- 
nved from so-c al led underlying in- 
strum ents such as commodity 
Prices, stock market inrie»fy gm-. 
renaes and interest rates. 

The report said that the rapid 
growth of derivatives trading last 
vear and heavy losses by some mar- 
ket players underlined the need for 
closer monitoring. 

. Bm it said that imposing or rais- 
ing collateral requirements “could 

PH 1 * volatility of 
the pledged financial assets.” 

Mr. Crockett stressed instead 
that market-onented policies, such 
as greater disclosure and transpar- 
ency, would be more effective be- 
cause they would avoid the poten- 
haJ volatility that could arise from 
ladt of information about market 
participants. 

The organization's annual report 
suggested that establishing clearing 
houses fra - over-the-counter deriva- 
tives trading could substantially re- 
duce risks in this market. J 
It added, however, that such fa- 
milies would have to be properly 
designed and that there wsrenu- 
merous technical and practical ob- 
stacles to extending the clearing- 
house concept to over-theWto 
markets. 

In another comment, the report 
said stability in Europe’s exc hange 
rate m ec h an i s m may be marimiw^ 
by coordinating the economic poli- 
cies of member countries and bv 
mowing looser exchange-rate ar- 
rangements. 

Drawing on the lessons of whatit 

termai the relatively benign crisis 

that last August led to the widening 

of currency-trading bands, theor 
gamzauon said that one reason for 
the stability of exchange rates after 
the crisis may have been the careful 
setmig of monetary policies by in- 
dividual countries. 

The fact that in the circum- 
stances they could achieve so much 
relative exchange-rate stability 
be taken as an encouraging 
sign, the report said. ^ * 
Turning to the subject of infla- 

See JOBS, Page 10 


ASH3NGTON — The pendu- 
lum of America's attention has 


•. p * ;i 

t * I *- 


The finks with Europe are in 

i uc muui-uLteu inti mai me urmea Mates r“ 

now trades more with Asia than with Europe many Ways more va hfflUe than 

is no reason to that ihp A^nnnmir> _i • « . a 

those with Asia. 


W swung too far, and too unques- 
tknringly, toward Asul It's tune 
for it to shift at least part of the way back 
toward Europe. 

Last week's massive media coverage of the 
D-D ay commemoratim may have helped to 
remind Americans of the dimgers of turning 
their backs on the Old Worid. 

But neglect of Europe is not just danger- 
ous fra America’s national security. It is a 
mistake fra America’s economic interests 
too. 

The much-died fact that the United States 
ow trades more with Asia than with Europe 
is no reason to conclude that the economic 
relationship with Europe has lost its impor- 
tance. On the contrary, the links with Europe 
are in many ways more valuable. 

That message is well argued in a report 
titled “Shrinking the Atlantic," just pub- 
lished jointly by North Atlantic Research 
Inc. ana the Economic Strategy Institute in 
Washington. 

Rather than entertain notions of “playing 
the Asia card against Europe," the report 
urges Washington to form a common front 
with Europe in tackling the challenges of the 
global market 

The report* s authors, Robin Gaster and 
Qyde V. Prestowitz Ir., say that in the key 
areas of trade, investment and technology, 
the relationship between the United States 
and Europe is far healthier and more profit- 
able fra America than its dealings with Asia, 
which are chiefly characterized by a massive 
structural trade deficit in manufactured 
goods. And it’s likely to stay that way for the 
foreseeable future. 


a ?°™ y Americans so obsessed with 
Asia? The simple answer is the region’s huge 
Potential as a market for U.S. exports. 

. While Asia has been dramatically boom- 
ing, Europe has been in a dispiriting reces- 
sion, and the Continent’s attempts at poiiti- 
cal and ec onom ic integration have met with a 
senes of humilia ting setb acks 
Trans-Atlantic trade relations have been 


industrial policy, many experts believe it 
should look to Asia as an example because 
toropean industrial policies have failed. 

What all this overlooks is the commonality 
Qt interests and principles between Amen- 
earn and Europeans. It is the Europeans, the 
rc*»rt rightly says, who most strongly share 
U-b. views about the future of the world 


other divisive issues. 

But there is more to it than that. President 


inuu-Awuiut uauc reunions nave been miuic oi me world 

dogged by high-profile disputes over agricul- orocr — especially on issues like 

tnre, Airbus, telecommunications, steel and irafle Jaw * coni P etltJ on policy and labor law. 
other divish® i_«n« America’s embrace of Asia is 

highlighting differences in values on issues 
ranging from China’s attitudes toward hu- 
man rights to Japan’s view of what consti- 
tutes an open market. 

In a wodd in which, as Mr. Gaster puis it, 
“the united States needs friends," the Euro- 
peans are the most obvious candidates. 


Bp Qintrai personifies the coming to power 
M a generation that did not know Worid War 
F- The traditional, Atlantidst establishment 
is m retreat. 

As other cultures increase their influence, 
the United States is being gradually but inex- 
orably de-Eu ropeanized, a trend that has 
been encouraged by the Clinton administra- 
tion s emphasis on “diversity” and accentnat- 
edby the assault on “Emocentrism" in the 
country’s educational system. 

, The switch of the focus of forei gn policy 
from security to markets also means more 
attention for Asia. Mr. Gaster argues that 
baarae security concerns so long dominat- 
cd U.S.-Europcan relations, Atlanticists are 

to ^ found mainly in the State Department 

and the Pentagon, while officials dealing 
with economic issues tend to have Asian 
backgrounds. 

Equally, as Washington experiments with 


point Mr. Gaster and Mr. 
Prestowitz get a bit carried away. They pro- 

30 “ econo ™c parallel to 
NATO, which would apparently be part 
tottufflion group, part international lobbying 
organization and pan economic bloc. " 

What the worid does not need is another 
international economic organization. It 
wotM be a great idea for Europeans and 
Americans to collaborate more closely on 
me world stage. But that can be done bv 
fireattong life into the bones of the trans'- 
Atiantic dialogue that is already meant to be 
imdra way between the United States and 
the European Union. 

WMe that is being done, Washington 
should put as much effort into elaborating a 
coherent .international economic policy as it 
chd mto defining its national-security strate- 
gy in the past As Mr. Gaster says, “we need 

JPf 1 a set of ongoing quarrels with 
everybody. 



0 


■ e“ ■' 


June 13 

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•.Reuters. 









Pa 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY. JUNE 14. 1994 


U.S./ATTWt 


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Ccmpt.'ni fa ttar Stuff Front Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — Stocks closed 
mixed Monday as a rally among 
shares of economically sensitive 
companies offset weakness in Ex- 
xon Corp. and other oil issues. 

"People arc trying to pick up 
what s valuable, like ihe aulos. air- 
lines and some of the computer 
jiocks.” said Steven Van Brum, 
head trader at Nikko Securities. 
“The feeling is that interest rates 


U.S. Stocks 


aren’t going much higher and ibe 
economy i> growing at a stable 
rate.’ 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age rose d.fj? io 3.7SJU2. driven by 
.-hares of companies that are at- 
tuned to swings in the economy, 
such as Aluminum Co. of America. 
DuPont Co. and International Pa- 
per Ox 

Trading was relatively light, 
dampening the significance of any 
movement. 

Many investors, analyst; said. 

were iooking for direction to eco- 
nomic data due out this week, in- 
cluding Tuesday’s report on con- 
sumer prices. 

Another factor contributing to 
relatively light volume, analysts 
said, wai Frida v';. scheduled quar- 


terly expiration of stock index op- 
tions and futures and options on 
individual slocks. 

Still, stock? sensitive to the eco- 
nomic swings such as papers, autos 
and chemicals buoyed the Dow 
Jones industrial average. Investors 
were encouraged by word of lower 
steel prices. 

The yield of the benchmark 3»> 
vear U.S. Treasury bond rose to 
7.35 percent from 7.31 percent on 
Fridav. 

Declines narrowly outnumbered 
advances on the New ’i ork Stocr. 
Exchange. Big Board un'ume to- 
lled million ^are- agam?t 

272.61 million traded in the previ- 
ous session. 

Amona major market indicator'. 
Standard & *Pew> wdc*. .»i 5«/» 
blocks rt.AeO.J3 i<v J ? g - !'■>• «hi1e the 
NYSE V composite index rose *•. ’• ■ 
to 253.7?. The Na-wiaq composite 
index, meanwhile, fell 2.2H- !■' 

731.97. while ji the Aaitticjn 
Stock Exchange. the market value 
index fell 0.b5'toJ4 1.1“ 

Blue chips held small gams, but 
were weighed by a .-harp drop in 
Ev.on. -which fell 3 to 5 C! : after a 
U.S. court determined the compa- 
n\ w; t i reckless in the 1 ^ Valuts: 
spill in Alaska. 

tAf hm ttowircrvt 


f^tieydbiSY^i«| 

Daifv dosings of the 

Dow Jon«s indusiriai average 

m 

b. 






f 1 

j* 


MB 

In 

» 1 

^ D J F M 
1993 

A K J 
1954 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Htth LOW LCU Chg. 


iiicul J.’« ;i rr.u vs* 3 ‘k i: -u? 

Trans l40?JS IWJ'J lotfc.!a 1*13.1° -*93 

U:y IHSH7 106*9 itS $4 1*497 -13 7* 

■“*«» .au JJ i3:ms txsis uu.Si -s.JO 


Standard & Poor's Indexes 


f 

i Influslrlcli 

, Trcnso. 

, vviitim 
, Finance 
1 SP Mil 
I S» IOC 


Hiatt Law Close Cn'ge 
S22.M 435.25 532.12 — CJ4 
30*07 3°2.1S +178 
1 58 os urjr i5-.r: - mz 
ii.il ic52 4.86 +021 
45* :* 452*8 4S* 10 +5 43 
425 19 423.02 42434 +C.J 15 


' fjYSE Indexes 


High Low Lost Qig. 


Coin49> : lc 
Ir.-cVr ml-. 
Trcn.P 
Ulilll > 
Finance 


253 85 7532* 


i> ! 0- 

?4- 07 


:c*.3* 

245 3? 


?:o 54 


•0.0 

-0 1* 


1.56 


,;o ;> rw.i." ;o*i! — 0*1 


.-70.05 71 ® V —0.04 -Oil 


MASSAC indexes 


MYSE MosS AeSfves 


Crnipc: 

' )w(a... , riC l v 

! 53''- :• 

I i-ijurgnca 

| Trrr.-A> 


H<ah Lew 

-2X: •• 


-43.?: 

3a 


Last Oio. 
73i &4 — J.JI 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


HU* 


tow LWt CBVP 


M.ecCorp.^^'Wlert^ 


Close . 

BW Ask 

ALUMINUM lHi9« GrOde) 

£SW«CATW0651h»» 

isr” fw &ra** 

Forward WlJlr 

LEAD 

WWnHrm^ 

Fame.-- K 54'S) 

NICKEL 

DolWrj per metrje jen 
sooi i37s.Cv lxSJC 

Forward 2*3 39 e*0OCO 

TIN 

Forward !7M.C* nc.jC 

ZINC rsoeciol Wen Gtwjei 

gff nnrml &g a va 

rSfUra «ia "2-*® 


Bid Ask 


'380 JO iJS'Jfl 
1«6JI :4£sJ0 
Orcoei 


5371 JO 2371CC 
73S3.0S 23S5J5v 


gg* m M 38 
SS 38 128 M =*s 

=J*. •aiume'd-’M. Coen ml. '5J2 j 
BRENT CRUDE OIL I IfE) 

u J. dolion oer borreWOts ef UW O® 1 * 1 * 


7ZL02 22iJQ 
5402)0 54030 




*86* 

•81.00 


8flV.X 


Stock Indexes 

Close Cb«»e 


LOW 


Rnancial 

Hioh LOW Uose Ctiem 
3-MONTH STERLING (L1FFE1 


742.2= 


— Xb4 I 

.. — ... -C.TO 

41- « "1JJ; 7*1.74 —0.18 

<-'2; :4»-< •SOC4 — ' ?> 

'J.'.Ci ~U2C: — t.X‘ 


Hunr.on 

Tvlf.tu- 

P-WC 

«iil.V.r 

E«cr> 

Trilcl 

CiK..tO 

Carnuoc . 

KfOenti 

NWS5 n 

I6W 

Gr^.'.m 

VJ0 iur? 

inm s 

7i<o'f 


5V. 

31 

rP 

57‘. 


17 


. 

31’ . 
P’- 

50' 


;h' 




VOL HiOti Lew Lem Olq 

788111 I' 5 '-. 

4I74f. . 

3«oJ7 31'. 

W. 

30.-.' 1 67' . 

:it7D 2B'i 

J1(0’ 4U 
14-IJV) Ji 1 ? 

2778t • 

.-re 

?ll'5 .-t*. 

nr. .’3 1 . 

It? £S li 1 > 

1MO' Jl .. 


A?3EX Stock index 


»4.W 

13M 

*si2 

*4 41 


*130 

C..*7 


324 ? 

n 11 

*1*5 

7292 

<7ijJ 

y_ 1* 

*227 

*) *; 

*1*3 

9IJ7 

*1JS 

*1.43 

*147 

«irt 

it.l* 

*1 li 

ej no 

MOT 

+0 94 

i?32 

90.77 

65 "1 

*021 

9 {lS 


*030 

tore 

9325 


Hint) L~* Lost CUB. , 

447:0 14; ill I 3 — O L" 


jun 
Sea 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
Scp 
0<c 
Mar 
Jun 
Seo 
Dec 
Mar 

Eit. vOiume: SSSZt 'Coen ii'.; C 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFEt 
Si million - on 01 1M act 


-C.G* 

— g :I 

— :.ir 

— 318 

- 117: 

— W 

-Gl-7 


Hlsft 

FTSE 100 tLIFFEI 

!W5 mi* -W 

k "ffl-s 1 . 

Crj, yfljy.w 2X019 Open irtf.: 6Z.7BZ. 


Shawrnut to Buy Northeast Federaf v 

N EW YORK (Kni&ht-Ri^ert - Shawmiut NaiK'..J: ^ t - k 

day that it had signed an agreement to purchase . or- be. 

>r SP2.1 million in stock- . . p .- r sh'^eh^A' 4 

Under the terms of the agreement. ^"^£**4* r^c-.u:- 

^•e 0.456 shares rf AM i2"SKiSS!? W rd^- 


fV. 

I- 

U' 


-Sis 


CACWCMATlFl 

^ -eg 

jo? 19M.K ’7SV.D0 lwa5C -n^c 

ViL NT. N.T 146M -syw 

cf? raax :<=7MK I17SJD -SI JO 

35SIJ0 5CMM -si JO 
r5i?3C 205*00 JC 2 .W -St JO 
Ej 7. vQ-'u.T.e: 7*4)63. Qoen «L: Wfl56 

Sa— "-as- .«or,f Associated P rcff. 

LC *eon inf- Pinjrxtat Po* irvs ErMt rW 

.Yif > Pptrp.W*! fttfiuiTt 




— • • I , 


! Sow Jones Bond Averages 


Jun 

Sea 

DM 

Mar 

JUD 

Sep 


: s.*i 

7JU 

4'‘l1 

NT* 


7* 47 


s <13 


NT 


55^4 

•4 15 
43 V- 
»3a: 

««5JT 

rise. 


■ J«: 


• :o 9.51175 

• 10 •.ilililtil' 

I 10 :ii 2US1"'C | 


Clcse 
: 5 4j 
)' -i 

151J7 


Cn-qe 1 

— ca: 1 
-oji ; 


£>• volar If 73: Coer, .n: ■ 
WAONTH EUROMARKS 1LIFFEJ 
DM1 mlil'cn - on ol in pet 


— J vft 

— 50« 

— c*’r 

— 

— Cl! 


Dividends 


Company 


Per mint Par ReC j 


NASDAQ Most Actives »Y 83 Siary 


Kids Plummet 


Continued from Page 1 

of high inflation, bond investors 
demand hefty yield* to protect 
them from the de'-aluaii*-'n of the 
money they invest in fixed- income 
securities. 

As for European equities the key 
British and German indexes fell 


Foreign Exchange 


more than l percent, while the 
French benchmark wasdcun more 
than 2 percent. 

"Europe t; weak .t whole be- 
cause of bad news from the bond 
markets." said Remhold Brunn- 
leehncr at Bayerische Vereinsbank 
AG in Munich, “The big institu- 
tions are not buying at the mo- 
ment.” 

Amid the turmoil in financial 
markets, the mark -.uvnathened. it 
was supported by a good showing 
from Chancellor Helmut Kohl’-' 
governing Christian Democrjcts in 
German elections f*'r the European 
Parliament on Sunday. The stable 
outlook fur Germany weighed on 
the U.S. currency at a lime when 
President Bill Cfinton is having do- 
mestic political problems and when 
it is unclear whether his govern- 
ment is trying to keep the dollar 
weak against the yen. 

Lawrence H. Summers, the U.S. 
Treasury undersecretary in charge 
of international affaire, said the 
United States did not have a policy 
of trvina to “artificial! v manipulate 


exchange rates for competitive ad- 
vantage or to bring leverage to 
bear." 

The comment'* by Mr. Summers 
were not particularly new or con- 
troversial. but traders, already 
bearish on the dollar, used them :t> 
an opportunity to take ihe dollar 
dnwn further. 

After plummeting in European 
iradins. ihe dollar continued to 
weaken in New York, ending at 
102.800 yen. off from ire closing 
quote of 103.515 yen or. Friday, 
and at J.&457 Deutsche m.:rk.-. off 
front 1.6664 DM. it had traded as 
Jew as J02T00 yen and I.r44? DM. 

Traders said there had been only 
limited buying interest in the dollar 
and that many market participants 
had liquidated tong dollar posi- 
tions taken la.-t week. 

Some deaiers said sale-- of the 
dollar were encouraged when there 
was little sign of central bank inter- 
vention. Stephen Jury, a dealer at 
Union Bank of Switzerland, said 
intervention was unlikely t.> occur 
unless the dollar tested’ ire recent 
low of around 1.63MJ DM. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar slumped to 1..W7 Swi-s 
francs from a closing at 1.4057 
fanes on Friday and 10 5.6 1 2D 
French francs from 5.6705 francs. 
The pound firmed 10 5J.52I" from 
SI. 5090. 

;ff/< Hmtvrz 
Xr.itiht-Rhiiicr. A F\ > 


-.1' - 

uol High Lo* 
J576*. 63 >• SI - 

iC-B Cm -. 

254-17 s'- 

2u>.l5 rii 

70513 73 - 77 - 

> 

1*0)0 ??■ . 

iniol 

i7;;b m 1 

wfz Cm 

IW .’5ft 

CrT,riiLi 

IBOf.’ !’ft Ii’» 

•:t'®jc * 

I '.li lift 35 , 

lciu., 

1 0-391 ilft SO'- 


14-490 ;*■ . 36' . 

i.tjas*.- 1 

1S069 63’ . 51 

:ic,.:-n 

is’oi 1 r • j a 

■Zt'df O’ 

IJJjl J' . J ' 

EiCA-t 

14339 ir’, it 

.v-Mnan* 

1366* 13 12’. 


fix 

o~n^ 

*!.« 
•i as 

l 4 Li 


'4=4 

75.01 


=c: 


54 »i 




Close Pre». 

•?j: ll.'s 




«74S 
tZ2i 
•> 2 . jo 


57 r 


3; 


_ - -s 


AMEX Diary 


«4ir 


AHiEX MosS AcCib-ss 


i ?. 3IVC..HJ 

L'nrrarox! 
To -of : 

:j v ^ Hi-irt*. 

r:.*A Liw: 


ac« prev. 

y.z 




m t 


1 

VoL High lo 

E-pLA 

1 040* t • '' 

Ov:-5:is 

739.1 r- .. ij 

; Hasbro 

o«4’ 32 Jl* 

Oiri'CP 

PJ! 1 * 

:.c-Cp 

5434 ir *6' 

Thrrols rl 

4+3j? 1 # ' 1 

wnwrd 

4d;.r lift n 

[ '.TccwiC 

3(5-4 ('.. r 

1 Thmolvewi 

2 a; 7', - 

■.ToCri’ rl 

?'i) -ft o- 


■^T . NASDAQ Diary 


dose Pre-j 


— c-.nr'o.-’ 
iC-’CA'c 
* UriC’0»Mt 1 , <l 

■ Tcui^su-y. 
i.V» H-pn; 


P30 

5-j: 

53C 


?c:: 

iS.H 


■ Spot Commodities 


! ESarfcot Sales 




N.SE 

t-rm 7 

Na&oao 

in millions. 


Today 
4 ojn. 
34 

ISM 

IS«7a 


Prev. 

erns. 

^ *■: 


Commodirv 
' Liomlnum. It 
. Col lee- Brc; . ID 
i C3iD?rpiec‘roU«i7.'S 
rjn POB. ion 
, '.IOC, ID 
1 51 is or. :ro< o: 

• ;m*J tscraoi. :in 
r n. lb 
l Zinc, it 


7oda3 

•3>V 
VIS 
: »3 
:ijoo 

55« 

iJi5 

itr 23 

3“>4 

W!» 


Pre». i 

04,72 
1 18 
;.i3 : 
3?iM 
jjc : 

ye 1 

T"j3 , 

3.-710 

1 452? : 


Jun 

See 

Dec 
Mor 
Jun 
Sen 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
Sep 
Dec 

Mcr - . — 

Ev:. .ciu.-ne- '.ilJJ! Cse - . 3 
3-MONTH PI BOR CMATIPl 
FF5 million -nlsuf 100 pc 
Jun »4JT -*C 

Seu S JLS7 74iC 

Dec =443 !4rs 

AAar <4 != e. ;• 

Jun «3iS ■*; “3 

Sen n ;T *X45 

dcc =3 3; =;z3 

Mcr «;i’ — . 's 

Es*. jcI.-t?. MJt-: Cs*n . 7‘!J*2 
LONG GILT tLIFFEI 
U34XW - on a Kne» ot ioa pc 
J un IC3-T: I£i->e ’ C = S — 

Sen i7i -’s *.3 —■■■ 

oec T . ■: - K -:< 

5s!. vCi\i“'e' ;=X4£. '7ocn .*•*. ’ 774-1 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BOND ft, IFF* ■ 
DM 7S0A00 - 9ls at 1DC pet 
Sen °!4= 43 ii ‘ZiS — - i 

Dec N r. W.7 “ -j - :: 

Ss:. .slvine: '■ Pj 1 Deer ■f.- 3 — 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATIF) 
FF5MJ« ■ Pli M 190 PO 
jun r.8.73 :i'43 :*"4e — : 

Sen yy? 1-fJs ’1£J= —’A 

Dec I’C ,: 4i7 ='4*4 —.4 

Mar rje* XS43 "lit — 

Sst. .a'lir*. C-K-. r--.. 14 3 =U 


IRREGULAR 

Driertnie-rt Ce*B' * 6 -V 

r.-oe* Se.'A Vns * 33, 6-DI 

F^ei —O' ‘iccS'** . 4J0 o-iO 


I 1UIU ■ 

f °Sbawinm U acquiring 17 offices in NjvvYo 
chuseits and eight offices in Cwinccncot. The deni 
California branches Northeast agreed to sell to Hoitu. S-' * ■ . . 

onS^apeCod branch Norths ag«ed *-W**~£~ 
Cooperative several months ago. The aojuisuion 

encash deal, which dosed Saturday; under »lMb P;, 

chased 10 Federal Corp. branches m MnssachtiKire ar.d Rh^e i 

Macy Gtes Probe of Federated Talks 

NEW'YORJi t Knight- Rjdden — R. H^lacw & 

dav that it had spoken with FederaieC 

potential roeiger and said the New ^ork^law attorney l,uw- 
started a “formal investigation” into the talus- 


I. - 
1 • 


uv 


= IS«ll»- t»M- 

F 3r' LSEs *-=■•« 


■ «33’u oe- ADR. 

STOCK SPLIT 

a=s; B r"T' 2 'or 1 s«iL 


INCREASED 

C 33 5S 


-14 


CORRECTION 

_»=«•, * JOS yx 2->£ 

, ----- oc - ■ i.---sv-as aa- n^enw* ouar- 
!e*:- 


4UIU)WU} ^lUMdllluu «**' 

reorgannation plan with - 

emerge from bankruptcy as an independent eoowanv. < 

Concerning the investigation. Macy s said tt had beet D4,ev. Jp 1 the 
attorney general’s office to provide information and docamirnre esUnng 
to Macy’s business and the compctinvc envtroniTieaj in <t> ctjrkets .re it 
relates to Federated” and to other competitors. The company suki if 
planned to cooperate with the attorney gcneraTs request . • -= j 


REGULAR 


:»»' F S .r ^<3 
r r Auff 
fs= gR-lrSL B f 

j Sec - -' 

r^i.r -C .'5C-- 

-'rM-iC.s#; 

--TT^.jr =a - “ 


Industrials 


H/5 ft lo* Lair sente Cr.ge 

GASOIL MPE1 

UA. aallars per metric ton-teis s* IX ioni 

JUl U‘S? 147. -» 143 ?i ‘is 7f - lli 

auu istzj i4 »_'i i5C7f -ij.-s 

See 15750 JflJO tizr: 1*7 *5 - '-Li 


-.ZAP Z s 
“ = >es A7*M'S 
-.o Ci'= 
r-se.- :- 5«“ 

-.oe-rr -30f 

-.«• 1.- :xi 
■A3TN*e‘ SL-«**" v r 
rr;t *.W«3 
=*T. RE!" 

~e~.r. cr.'j Cs^i 

p.-r-.f- C -srjinaB 

S^'S-.nr ;-ij5 

“c«C3 Zirs 
t-ti'n B-t'o.-p 
oo^rruai; u^cfsIXe i 

RiCRTWt; o-<i^crlfrn'r . 


.’4 7- IS 
.‘i vTO 
y y?t 
S£ 74 
3KJ S-3C 
33? 71? 

js'i 3-?: 

J75 y’-t 
37- S-li 
.uti t-U 
.55 ft-1* 
364 3-14 

C4 7-1J 
;;s t-:j 
15 4-3i 


6 - 1 $ 

►IS 


7-1* 


7-1* 

6-jC 

P-3P 


o« i-X 


y 73 


S-ll 

’•1 

"■2* 

8-1 


7-# 

5- 23 

6- 72 


Community Health Plans Merger 

New York (Krught-Ridder) — Community Health S\?tetns.inc su'd 
Monday it would merge with Hallmark Healthcare Corp./m a SJ75 
uuTfion transaction involving slock and debL • • 

Community Health will exchange 0.97 shores of ire L\vnhx«i stevit mt 
each of the 3* million outstanding"* hares of Haliirurt ciifertton and 5 ■ 
shares of Community Health common for each of the 33,000 oaiKacding 
shares of Hallmark redeemable prei'emsi stock- Community Health is- 
assuming S87 million of Hallmark debt. ... : ' j; • 

Tne proposed merger would make Houston-based CofRmunify KeaJih 
one of the nation's largest owners and operators of acme-care h^piLire ir 
nonurban commuflities. 


SK 3-17 
KS fK 


>5 4-X 

‘a e-J; 


7-2 

8-li 

!-ia 

e-3C 

2-1$ 

0-7? 

7-14 


For the Record 


i CuniMion funos: 

s-jeni. -annual 


m- 


o Central Bankers Join Call 


Continued from Page 9 


lion in the Group of Ten advanced 
industrial democracies, the organi- 
zation said inflation raure w ere ex- 
pected to continue declining this 
year. 

In 1993. inflation in industrial- 
ized o:*umrie> jveraged pereent. 
the lowest rate since l°i>r-. 

Wint Duisenbcrs. the Dutch cen- 
tral bank chief who is af*o presi- 
dent of the organization, -aid the 


challenge for monecar- authorities 
in the industrialized countries 
would be to generate sustainable 
economic grow'ih "while maintain- 
ing the basic coumerinflationaiy 
thrust of poliev.” 

Meanwhile. Viktor Guerash- 
chenko. chairman of Russia's cen- 
tral bank, said -n Ration was under 
control for the .ime being in Rus- 
sia. It is no* running at ~ percent 
to 9 oercen: month!'-. 


Euro Disney Rights Issue Set 

5:. -. ,t.v7 • 

Euro Di-r.ey*? lor.g-p'.ir.r.ed ngh:> ofr’enna of ne.v rhare^ 
e 20. priced at ! 0 Fren :r. frzr.ss 1 i a -hare, the company 


Ben Cohen, co-foonder of Best & Jerry 's Homemade Joe., announced 
that he was stepping down as chief executive, and the ice-cream company 

is seeking a replacement. *AP} 
After-ta\ profits of li-S. manufacturers rose to an unad lasted average 
of 4.7 percent of sales in the first quarter. . ap from 2.9 percent in the 
fourth quarter last year, the Commerce Department *>aid Mondav. 

(ktiiriu-Ru&eri 


! Renter.. ArX. Bfo-.»!her°! 


5;. ., jr.V'r r.^ 

PARIS — 

<H start Junei 
said. 

Existing shareholders will be inriied »v ba\ s:cyk a: a ratio of seven 
new shores for every two already r.e’j Tne prcir.g is in line with the 
company’s plan* unr.our.aed oi a "shareholder meeting lost week. 

The offering, which will close or. Juiy I re designed to raise 5.^5 
billion French franc* in fresh cash. 

Euro Disney’s parent company. 3k ait Di>ney Co., has pledged to 
subscribe to 4® percent of the offering, while creditor banks are under- 
writing the remaining 5 ! percent. Prince Vv aiid ibr. Talai ibr. Abdulaziz of 
Satidi'Arabia recently Announced plans acquire a L* percent :o 24 
percent siake by participating ir. the right.- 


Weekend Box Office 


The AssocuucJ Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Speed” dominated the V. S. box office sriri; S 
gross of SI4 million over the weekend. Following are the Top 10 
moneymakers, based on Friday ticket sales and estimated safes for 
Saturday and Sundav. 


4’ 

f N 

i 


1 "Speed' 

S- "The FHirtsiones" 

1 Twentieth CeMvn'-Fc * ' 

1 universal' 

St4 ml 'lion 

SIX! million 


A -t»fy SllctenMi” 

tCotumota) 

SilJ (mil-on. 

• fi 

4. "Mover kk" 

(Warner Bromursi ' 

million 

>; 

5. "Renaissance Mon" 

(Touchstone Pfctunsl 

. S4t million ■ 


0 "Bevertv Hills Cop f«l" 

i Paramount 1 

U5 imiiror. 


7. “The Cowbav Wav' 

t Universal 1 

SCJ mm ion 


0"When p Man Laves a Woman* 

t Touchstone Pictures] 

SXXmmftn . 


9. "Tne Crow' 

(Miramax 1 

371 mllhcn 

”1' 

10 "Four Weddings and 0 FunergT 

(Grumercvl 

• ' '*1.1 iriiirwn 




CtK-’ -"J-. Lon 3-frn- Chg Op (nf 


Amsterdam 


asm Amro Hid 
ACF Haldino 

AS9tir 

Ahold 
A»:*Not>e( 

AMEV 

Bois-W65sonen 
CSM 
DSM 
Elsevier 
Falser 
GKI-Brocades 
H8G 
HeirHSkcn 
Hoo^ovens 
Hunter Douglas 
IHC Color'd 
inter Mueller 
lnll Nederland 
klM 
7.NP BT 
Nediicra 
Oce Grlnlen 
PoWiceu 
Philips 
FolYOram 
Rubeco 
Rodamco 
R oiinco 
Roren I a 
F.avcji Dutch 
Srcrk 
Unilever 
Van Cm merer) 

VNIJ 

Woltcn/ytvYfcr If l lOUlJO 
EOE Index : 4gi^» 

Previous : 406JI 


eJlOO il.40 
Al.Ofl 44.90 
»7.ia »9 

46.70 4/ JfO 
207 "0 209. ID 
73JC 7-LSu 
36-60 JiJd 
(4.90 s4J0 
123.10 133.70 
165.20 146.^0 
15.90 16.10 
<8.60 48-30 
371 333 

218 n 733.60 
TIED 7Z50 
7« 75 

J7 373l 
81J0 80.50 
7190 80.30 
50 60 50.90 
47-50 47 JO 
70J0 7IJO 
7370 7140 
43-BO 49 

£240 53 70 
7lM 77.B0 
119.90 1 TO-DO 
59 56.80 
723 I22JO 
B«70 89.40 
1*7.80 199.10 
47J0 ST.7Q 
1*07(1 193 

5250 53.2 D 
174JA 175-30 


Brussels 


Close Prev. 
VEW ISO 2S3 

VI05 473 475 JO 

Voll'Sviagen 4J74a5 : 0 

■Veda 97097JJ0 


Helsinki 


Amer-Vhrvma 
Ensa-Gutieir 

HuniamaM 
K.O.P. 
t.ymmene 
Me fra 
NcMo 
Ponlola 
Peoola 
Sloclriann 
HEX. Index : 1A9U5 
Previous I I712J9 


im 

130 

J7JB0 

3720 

174 

1’4 

10.70 

11 20 

111 

111 

166 

160 

400 

4U? 

79 

73 

BoM 

8'jo 

2»S 

216 


AG Fin 

Alman’l 

Artx-d 

Barca 

BBL 

Be^.oen 

CBR 

CMB 

Cock prill 

Cobcoa 

Colruvl 

Defhoiie 

El-cirabel 

Elec trail no 

GIB 

GBL 

Grvaerr 

Glavprhel 

immotjel 

Kredlerbanh 

Mu sane 

Peirallna 

Rawer I in 

PecHcer 

Rovale Beige 

Sac Gea Banque 


3750 7735 
7760 7760 

46W 4700 

2380 2300 
neo 4X0 
25300 25125 
126/5 122CC 
7400 3410 
IB7 IB 
5*60 5°80 

75*C 77M 

IJ46 1IW 
5760 S7«0 
3725 3725 
1555 1560 
4450 4420 
*200 92C0 
4710 4800 
Jim 3160 
6630 6600 
1580 1505 
10500 10500 
3100 3300 
50a 510 

5210 5300 

&T8Q 6280 


Sue Gen Belgioue 73*5 7320 


Sol ' no 
Solvov 
Tessendcrio 
Trcclebel 
UCB 

Union Minlore 
Current 5 roc* index : 7417.71 
previous ; 7625-77 


15350 15350 
15075 15025 
10350 10350 
*950 9*30 
24450 24300 
2670 2t*0 


Frankfurt 

ASS 177 779 JO 

Alllom Hold 3444 2474 

Altana C40M5JO 

Astro low 1058 

BASF 306.10 315 

Barer 364365.20 

Boy. hypo oanh 4J6 «o 

Bay Verermfrf 4elj045yJ0 
BBC 

BHF Bonk 
SAtW 

Commerzbank 
Canilnenial 
Daimler Benz 
Deaussa 
Dl Babcock 
DeullChe Bank 
Dt/utlas 


710 2£ 

T»6 397 

1W BIB 
327 331 

747 253 
747 775 

SOI 509 
23774450 
74150 746 

568 574 


Dresdner Bank a0J03B2J0 


Feklmiiehle 
F xrupBHoescn 
Harpener 
Henkel 
HocMIBi 
Huecnsr 
Houmann 
Horlen 
IWK* 

Kali Sal: 
K.otttOdl 
KCMJlbDl 
KHD 


r.iaeckner werke l» 1 
Linde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesman!) 

Mefaffeeseii 
Muench Rueck 

Parsdw 


Preussop 

PWA 

RWE 

Pnelnmeiall 

Scmrina 

5EL 

Siemens 

Tnrssen 

Vgrta 

veto 


346 349 

2I921BJD 
331 332 
60S 617 

1082 1006 
34 1 3 MS JO 
891 7CQ 

223 230 
J&JS7J0 
143 144 

622 621 
5235J4J0 
13*00135-20 

918 917 

r 92 193 
3984iiia 
434J0 446 

217 222 

2770 2850 
780 770 

42644030 
129 226 

431504*2.20 

Si Ki 

1073 1077 
395 37V 
6WJ0 *97 
276J0?7S» 
314 314 

516J051630 


Johannesburg 

AECI 
Aifeeft 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blrvear 
BuHels 
De Beers 
Drtelonleln 
Gencor 

GF5A 

Hormenv 
High veld Steel 
Moot 

Medbonk Grp 
Rondfonleln 
Rasoicr 
SA Brews 
Si Helena 
bowl 

Weslem Deep 

S ompMHe Index : 571 1JU 

revious : 542364 


15.50 25 

120 1M 
22913450 
3* MJO 
IIA 
44 JO 48 
114J0 11425 
*1 60 
12 11.40 
115 114 

24 JO 31 JO 
28-50 78-50 

sun 

30 30 

40.75 40.75 
*6 94 JO 
*5-50 9i25 
43 43 

2525 24JS 
176 150 


London 


Adhy Nan 
Ainea Lvom 
Aria Wfggtns 
Argyll Group 
Ass Bril Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bonk Sea II and 

Barciovs 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BGC Gcmjd 
B oars 
Bowaler 
BP 

Bril Alnwavs 
Bril Gas 
Bril Sled 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Cable wire 
Cadbury Scb 
Camdon 
Coats vlreiia 
Comm Union 
Court guide 
ECC Gruuo 
Enterprise OH 
Eurotunnel 
Flsans 
Fane 
GEC 

Gen-i Acc 

Gloio 

Grand Mel 

C-PE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlllsdown 

HSBC Hirty. 

ICI 

Inc hen pc 

Kingfisher 

LddbroVe 

Land sec 

LaPorte 

Losmo 

Legal Gen Grp 
Uayds Bank 
Marks So 
ME PC 
Natl Power 
Notwesl 

mnwst Water 
Pearson 
PAD 
Pllklngtan 
PwwrGen 
Prudential 
Rank On 
RetHH COI 

Reaiand 
Reed (nil 


4.28 
SA7 
2 J2 

2.44 
524 
9J2 
460 
1A4 
548 
AW 
4J1 
122 
184 
727 
53? 
4.21 
1*0 
3-9| 

2J9 

1J6 

3J0 

3.66 

4J9 

4.45 
3.2? 
2.32 
A10 
AM 

3- 55 

4- 02 
128 
IJJ 
133 
102 

5.45 
5 JO 
41* 
175 
471 
5.78 
2.57 

1.64 

7.11 
7.97 
4.70 
AW 
1.60 
6.29 
7 47 
1.47 
ejr 
A74 
4JH 
4™ 
4J5 
4J8 
4J9 
A17 
6-J9 
1.77 
4 JU 
2.96 
3.V4 
A 83 
502 
AOS 


4J0 

5-68 

175 

148 

A?9 

9*8 

4-65 


A43 

A 13 

4-23 

132 

2.92 

7J2 

5.40 

A3* 

39D 


1.93 
1.36 
182 
175 
447 
4.53 

3.25 

133 
530 
A22 
iT 
4.11 
345 
1 47 
135 
109 
157 
Ml 

4.26 
137 
07 
A95 
151 
IaV 
726 

a 12 
476 

134 
IJfl 
637 
7J2 
1.42 
4JV 
A73 
411 
430 
433 
4J7 
4.7? 
4J9 
6-53 
IJ9 
4^» 
102 

3.94 
it a. 
5.10 
B33 


Peurerr 
PMC GnuP 
Ralls Rovce 
Rslfimr turn 1 ; 
Pc^al Seal 
PTC 

Sainsbury 
Seel Mentors 
Seal Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

State 

Smith Mcphew 
5milnhiine B 
Smiih (WHl 
S>jn Alliance 
TateALrte 
Tesco 
Tnom EMI 
Tomk ins 
TSB GrauP 
Unilever 
Uld Bisculls 
Vodalane 
War Loan JW 
Wellcome 
Whlibreod 
Williams Hags 
Willis Corroon 


8*0 

1.9: 

i.r 

4 12 
1*4 
3/M 

a:s 

3J9 

1.74 

A?) 

7.10 

5-79 

1.91 


4.96 

3.T8 

4JT 

237 


1046 11.05 

121 170 


125 
10 0 ? 
330 
A 17 


414)6 4197 

AW 5.«2 


F.T.M index : 7345-20 
Previous : K14J0 


5.38 

35? 

IJ8 


EGBHH'— 


Madrid 


BBV 3140 3180 

BC6 Central Hisp. 2840 2?*5 
3anco Santander £010 5020 


Bones tp 
CEPSA 
Drogados 
EnO«a 
Ercros 
Iberdrola 
Repsol 
Tonaioltra 
Teielonlcu 


1055 lOSS 
3310 3360 
2345 3370 
6210 6300 
ZJ4 238 
1010 1030 
4100 42S5 
3*30 4D60 
1020 1865 


S-E. General Index : 323,00 
Previous : 324J0 


Milan 


Banco Comm 
Baslogl 

Bcnatlan group 

CIQD 

CIP 

Cred Hal 
Emcnem 
Ferfln 
Fernn Riso 
Fiai spa 
F inmeccanica 
Generali 
IFI 

llalcem 

italooi 

Halmobihare 


Mediobanca 

Manloaison 

oriveni 

PlrHii 

PAS 

Rjncscenfp 
Salpem 


5080 5a» 
„ 170 ISO 
25800 24400 
IOT7 114 4 
2615 2680 

2220 2300 

3045 3000 

2035 2080 

l?tS 1340 
6M0 6*00 
1“P0 79B5 
43600 645.-0 

25700 26450 

15380 16100 

S7sa S3 60 
45550 4O0Q 
15000 1S*30 
140) 1470 
2540 2575 
5320 5345 

20200 28700 

1ASJ0 10*70 

3975 4055 


San Paolo Torino 10125 104*5 

SIP 4450 4435 

SME 3975 4Q7(j 

Snla 2S00 i.IS 

Stonda 37000 37250 

S'e' 5460 5610 

Tors A55I Rlsp 79850 30950 

Ml B Index : 1199 

Previous : »21S 


Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 

jjft 


Bank Monireai 

74' u 


Be« Canada 

■17 s * 


bombardier B 

21', 


Cumbiar 

10ft 

IB": 

cascade* 

S 


Dominion Ten A 


6ft 


nii 


MacMillan El 

10ft 


Kail Bk Canada 

8ft 

*». 

Power Corn. 

20 s * 

ZJ^li 

Quebec Tel 

20 ft 

30's 

3ue decor A 

18 

17ft 

3unOecor B 

III 

IU 


10ft 


LIJllvo 

dft 

4rta 

Video Iran 

12^ 

13 


1863.46 

Previous : ISAM 




Markets Closed 

Slock markets in 
Hong Kong and Syd’ 
ney were closed Mon- 
day for a holiday. 


Paris 


Pc cor 
Air Linuide 
Alcatel Aislhom 
A «o 

Bar.caire (Clel 

BIC 

BMP 

Bhuyouw 

BSfJ-GD 

Carretour 

C.C.F. 

Cer us 
Chorgrurs 


66 S 170 

771 7*6 

620 643 

255 1351 
540 M4 
1266 1266 
241 JTO 345.10 
67* 637 

826 835 
1833 1878 
»5 22*30 
109 40 lll.»0 
13*0 14M 
' 313 

41? JIB 
401 JO 404 JO 
837 863 

31*0 34.40 
3235 3226 
421 JO 430 JO 
543 560 

400 415 


Clmems Franc 30110 
Club Med 
Ell-Aauilaine 
Ell-Sanafl 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eau» 

Havas 
imeiai 

Lafarge Cop pee 
LegraiW 6020 6180 

L-.-an. Eauv 521 57* 

Oreel IL’) 1094 i|» 

L.VJWH. 872 879 

Mofro-Hacherte 114.60 11640 
IVIIChetln B 229J0 2XL20 
Moullne*. 

Paribas 
Pecntivsy Inti 
PemrdRlcord 
PHuaeot 
Pinaull Prim 
Radiolechnlaue 463.10 482.90 
PJi-Poulenc A 131 £0 134.10 


11£5 
i:s 
17 36 


12.35 
U97 
11 -S 


okyo 


525 


A ksi rtactr 
Ascf.i Chemical 
Asahl Glass 
Ban) of To) ro 
Briageafonc 
Canon 

Cosla . 

Doi Nloaon Print 3020 1950 
Daiwa House 1570 1560 
Daiwa Securities i860 1850 
Fanuc 


52T 

785 17? 
1290 1280 
1640 1660 
1 6*0 16*0 
IBM 17*0 
1360 1160 


141 14170 
372.50 380 

161-20 166 
371 377.10 
823 833 

IT* 917 


Raft. Si. Louis 
Soinl Gabalr) 
S.E.B. 

Sie Generale 
Suez 

Thomson-CSF 

Total 

UAP. 

Valea 


1632 1636 
643 670 

515 S32 

605 609 

293 JO 

141.70 163-20 
31BJ0 330.il) 
146.60 15190 
74a 10 255 JO 


SSSSMttW** 


Sao Paulo 


Banco do BresJI 39J0 4)50 


Banespa 
Brodesca 

Bro'nma 

Cemta 
Etalrobras 
llaubanco 

Light Jia 

Paronapanema 4050 39 

Pelrubras 273 237 

Souza Cruz 

Tel tores 
Teleso 
Usiminas 
Vote Rla Dace 
Varig 


17.40 17J0 
1135 USD 
560 565 

154 f54 

470 480 

410 410 

4*0 518 


loves po index : 79469 
’rtvrom : 30JM 


11.999 11000 
S3 KM 
715 710 

147 2J3 

rr 232 

730 22S 


Singapore 


Lereftos 
citv Dev. 

DBS 

Fraser Neave 
Genii ng 
Golden Hope pi 
H aw Par 


8.40 BJ0 
7.9S 7 90 
1IJ0 11J0 
IBM 193 
18J0 18*0 
2-54 7-50 
3J0 140 


Hume Induslrtes 555 SA5 


Incnccoe 
Kernel 
KL Keaona 
Lum Chang 
Malayan Banks 
QCBC foreign 
OUB 
OUE 

Sensaovvang 
iftonarlla 
Sime Darnv 
51 A foreign 
i'pato Land 
S'oare Press 

Sing Steamship ... 

SWore Telecomm im 3.46 

SlraiTs Tracing 3.76 3.74 

UOB foreign 12 11.90 

UOL 225 225 


5J5 A55 
10.90 1IJ20 
JJ8 3JZ 
1J1 1.47 

ASS B.75 

1*20 I3L20 
6JC1 625 
3_55 BJ5 
NJL — 
510 520 
3.94 3.96 
1250 12J0 
7M 7.W 
1610 1620 
4.13 4 14 




Stockholm 

AGA 350 

395 

Asca A 

S93 

S9J 

Astro A 

lo£ 

187 

Atlas Copco 

95 

*6 

E lectraluk B 

374 

374 

Erics ion 

307 

381 

Essellc-A 

J17 

110 

Handel sbenken 

100 

100 

investor B 

170 

ieo 

NorsK Hydro 

77550 

225 

Procardia af 

136 

125 

Sandvik B 

111 

115 

SCA-A 

113 

113 

JFE Bankert 

40 4 *M 

Skanqia F 

112 

114 

Skanjka 

170 

174 

SKF 

136 

138 

Siora 

395 

407 

Trelleborg BF 

no 

108 

Volvo 

742 

742 


AHdersvaerMen : 1337JS 
Previous : iBoe.il 


Full Bank 
run Photo 

rUllTSU 
Hliochi 
Hitachi Coble 
Hondo 
HQ Yokodo 
ilochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kailma 
Eansal Power 
Kawasaki Sicel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kvacert) 

Malsu Ele-: Infls 
Maisu EiecWVs 
Mitsubishi B) 
Mllsuolsni Kavrl 
Miisublsni Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui ana Co 
Mltsukashl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulalors 
Nikko Securities 
Nippon Kogaku 
NIpdcxi Dll 
Nippon steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 


4720 4o7D 
7350 2330 
23cQ 7100 
1170 1160 
7170 1100 
92* *29 
1910 1*70 
J3S0 5340 
754 755 
725 723 

975 960 

2630 2630 
420 419 

1240 1220 
988 9*3 
742 734 

6910 6*10 
1*20 18*a 
Tl60 1 1SO 
2760 2750 
525 527 

707 703 

328 830 

1230 1220 
639 844 

T 100 10*0 
2000 2000 
1290 lZm 
1090 1D7D 
1428 1410 
1120 1130 
778 760 

370 367 

661 659 

879 853 

2570 2500 
87200 8740a 


CCL I no B 
Cinentei 
Cammco 
Conwesi E’Pl 
CSA Mai a 
D olascc 
Drlf A 
EJno Ba> . Vines I4A. 
Eaultv Silver A i)JS0 
FCa inti HA. 

Fm Ind A 


Fleicher cnoiiA ir^ 


Olympus Optical 1240 uw 


Pioneer 
Ricoh 
Sanvo Elec 
Shorn 
Shimozu 
Shlnelsu Cnem 
Sonv 

Sumlloma B) 
SumKarpo Chem 
Sum; Marine 
Sumlioma Metal 
TolseiCorp 
Talsho Marine 
Takoda Chem 
TDK 
7ellln 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokvo Elec Pw 
Tapoan Printing 
Toros Ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Y amalcnl Sec 

0 : v /da 

Nikkei 225 T-7U53 
Prrviot 


Win 3010 

foio row 

S88 
1660 1850 
770 770 

2270 7230 
6380 6370 
2230 2200 
536 334 

995 997 

303 302 

697 6*2 

880 B75 

1700 1200 
4*60 4970 
,545 J59 

13JO 1330 
3210 3190 
15-3U 1490 
768 764 

8)0 863 

2160 2120 

v*a 99J 


Previous : 21393 
Topi* Index : 1713 
Previous : 17W 


Abtlibl Price 
Agnica Eagle 
Air Canooo 
Alberta Energy 
Am Barrlck 
&CE 

SI Nava Scolia 
BC Gas 
BC Telecom 
Bra males 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Camdev 
CfBC 


Toronto 

, 17 lfrTU 

1«'V 1* 

4A6 «4 

21W 20’k 

32'-. 3)« 
47U. 47V) 
25)9 23’* 
tJ'.e l4*b 
24te 24 te 
OJt 028 
tfl'A JOVi 


6’S 
5 

29*7 2W: 


Conoaien Pacific Jovj sot* 
Can 1 ire A ll>* |)S9 

IB 10ft 

4J5 4,05 


Confer 

Carp 


FPl 
Qer.ire 
Gulf Cda Res 
Hees mil 


<1.48 


13-m 


Hernia Gld Mines ;r* 


Haiiinger 
Horsham 
Hudson's Bov 
imuca 
Inca 
Jannock 
Laball 
Lobfow Co 
Mackenzie 
Magna mu a 
M aple Leaf 
Maritime 
Mark Pes 
MoJson A 
Noma ina A 
Noranda Inc 
Naranda Forest 
NorcKn Energy 
Nlhn Telecom 
Nava Corp 
Cshawo 

Pagurln A 
Pkrcer Dome 
poco Petroleum 
PWA Corp 
Ravrock 
Renaissance 
Ropers B 
Rothmans 


15*u 
19'- 
tB 
344, 
36*-<) 
15', 
21'- 
22 ‘.« 
9’,. 
£8 
12 
2S>- 

22W 
S’* 
25^, 
12 ', 
I4'A 
C'u 
NJ3. 
20V5, 
Mi 
29 Ju 
10ft 
a^a 
17V 
7»t 
19V 
73 


Prev 
EL 
4W 
22^, 
23 
11 ', 
20' c 
0M 
14ft 
0.80 
3J0 
6ft 
18 
i 
(M0 
4A5 
13’ 1 
71ft 
15ft 
1* 
28ft 
35ft 
36', 
13ft 
21ft 
22ft 
*ft 
54ft 
17 
25ft 
8ft 
22ft 
5ft 
25V 
12ft 
l-*ft 
42V 


Grains 


"t- iXfiCtM '2J4 

3 '■■■- « iiij 
•::: -rvr.'s :C2 

■ iZ ftjTCCfJ "4f Uld Udd It 

•' :I 'IM.Vjrft 
EiV I4.es :-y Fri 4. s&es : 

: r. i zeer .r.- < 33.125 OB 113 


iLJl 
1101 
1 1.99 
11.95 


1IJ3 


-«J|I 694110 
- 0.K 26.796 
-0JM 4JS5 
•OK U9« 
-0.05 t?* 

-OJS 49 


Season Season 
man Law 


Open NWi Caw CiW Chs loi 


WHEAT 1C8CT1 irr.zv-- x — 


-.3 
1J7 . 
3:5 
3M 
7 50 '-: 


:« 
73 : 
sj * 


3.1. 


: 21 


; si 

jii 

:.»j 

Lie 


Roval Bank Can 27ft 


5ceoi re Res 
icon's Hasp 
Seagram 
Sears Con 
Shell Can 
Sherrill Gordon 
SHL Svsiemhse 
Soul ham 
Suar Aerospace 
Stelco A 


13ft 

Sft 

43 

7Vj 

42 

lift 

*ft 

18ft 

TSft 

7ft 


Talisman Energ 77’^. 


Teck B 
Thomson 
Tamila Damn 
Tarslar B 
Transalfa Uhl 
TransCda Pine 
Triton Finl A 
Trlmac 
Trliec A 
Unicorn Energy 
TSE 309 index ; <2HJtO 
Previous : 42IL50 


25 

15ft 

21 

23ft 

14ft 

17ft 

tt 

0J7 

1-45 


»'-J 

3ft 

2*ft 

10'A 

0J0 

17ft 

2954 

19ft 

73 

28 

13ft 

■ft 

43ft 

7ft 

42 

11V 

10 

18ft 

16 

7V 

27ft 

34ft 

15V 

21V 

23ft 

14ft 

17ft 

4.45 
15ft 
0J6 

1.45 


Zurich 


228 235 

677 66* 


581 5*3 
379 373 
1360 1560 
2389 2374 

B70 B7U 
860 860 
450 455 
118) 1182 


Adia mu B 
Alusuisse B new 
BBC Brwn Bov B 1212 1217 
Clba Geigv B 855 860 

CS Holdings R 
ElellrOrrB 
Fischer B 
Inlerdiscount B 
ueimoJi b 
L andis Gw R 
Moevenoick B 

Nestle R .... ..„ 

DerllK. Buehrie R 142 146 
pargesa Hid B 1ft20 1610 
Rocne Hag PC 6760 4770 
5dra PjpuWic 1!4W 126 

Sandal fi 740 rji 

Schindler B BUM 7990 

Suiter pl 935 914 

Surveillance B 208D 2150 
Swiss Bnk CorpB 406 414 

Swiss Remsur u 

Swissair P 
ubs a 
Winlerihur B 
2urKh as£.b 
SBS index ; KA73 
Previous : 97m 


m 600 

717 790 

1206 1227 
735 745 
1380 1395 


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1.60 lli'j&ecft 153 JJ9 

JJ6 2.25 tfa 7«! ZS2 2 34 

344’: UlftMSY 0 : 

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Ed salts MA. Fn's. sales J 
Br.'s 9Pen ini 7S.Dt 
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53: . - ; 53 : . 


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3 4i 3 4-; 

in ! fi* I -i:ir 

:j3 256 

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I3J0 

1366 

1336 

1362 

*37 16,752 

- • : 


;ros?3« 

in 

13*5 

1345 

13*1 

•40 27.525 

_ . .f 

•KT 

WiCec)4 

1J3< 


IWT 

1429 




IWMarlS 

>44? 

1455 

1433 

1454 

*35 J.W7 

- c: 

■Ti 

:c.-3 V* 95 




14T3 



I". 

IZSjv‘9! 




1495 

•35 2.34S 


■;k 

i:«&SP75 




ISIS 

-35 1.170 


.n 

i:m Deris 

1>43 

1543 

1531 

1548 

*35 3.10’ 


UC-' m 

>3£ftV4L' « 




137* 

♦ 35 3 


Ei' 5dte 

lATT Fri 

■ sales 

9.887 





95500 

7*7M 

94530 

94380 

«4JM 


—Pi is) 7?Z 
— .‘C20f J’l 

-051:5574 

-72 '25-50! 


'JlOft t_91j4 

:ji» 


-1M 2SW 

'7rj- 197. 

• no 15 


:P.' 

5 5*5 


•■•secen.nt TJJ57 UP 12 
ORANGE JUICE INCTN) ’SOTO 


:!5X 

’JAvO 


9450 
97.10 
9* JO 


Lie'* 

L41 

Jul *4 

?:i 

2.7* 

16* 

1741 j 

-i.31 

r -iS7 

5.92ft 

X40' 

■ See *4 

X6i 

L72-. 


1 ’%l . 

■ " j*!- 


2.73ft 

2.36' 

••Dec 94 

7 U) 

i*S'. 

153 

“ Si' 1 


W429 

179’ 1 

2.«ftMcr*5 

264 

in 

245 

2.7-1 

-cm 

10.500 

2.B2 

ZS3 

Me. *S 

It* 

'JJ 1 -; 

2.5* 

2.7-1 

-;or 

1.432 

2.03ft 

;j4 

Jul »S 

171 

175 

’?!?• 


• 3.31 ’ 

1W9 

IP 

2-55 

5co*5 







L59 

2M 

D«*5 

7 53' 

X57 

xi:--. 

2-W ; 

•6 21 

1*01 


■»:ajui!4 95.4S 95.90 

95X5W4 98.00 9455 

»»JSttev94 100.10 100.10 
77.70 Jan M 100.80 I0I-7D I00M 
99"5 Mar *5 1 02.15 103.75 10150 

lMJ0Mav9i 106.00 106.00 106.00 
15' DO I05 J»JuJ 7S 
“1153 I II5i SepM 
Nov *5 

Eit. sates 2*500 FrTv sales 1575 
Fn's open ini J2.655 up 267 


'■2425 

UJ25 


9SJ5 
97 JO 
?9J5 
101.75 
■0175 
10600 
107 JO 
IIP JO 
109XO 


-085 8.414 
*0.75 8J20 
*070 1.721 
-0JO 1019 
'1S5 1.1Z7 
*1« 47 

-U» 

• U» 

*1430 


Metals 


5.94' 

Jul 94 1.71 

i«3 

*70ft 

690-ft 

-0 34’ 

47^4? 

62b 

Aug*4 4 T! 

6.90'. 

643': 

fit 

-i.Ct 1 

17.9K 

L .7 

3eo« tJi 


151 


-0:27 

9.550 


itoil M5 

6<7 





6 IJ 

Jan *5 *J1 

1 70ft 





t.w 

Mar *5 6J5 

6.74 

6S7 





Mov*S 6J5ft 

67*": 

4-5 S’/.- 

US'; 

-O.Ii 



Jul 95 6.58' 






501 ’tj Nov *S 614 

627 

613 

6137. 


1JJI 


EsI. sales 554)00 FM‘6 sales 47.95* 

Fri's OPen ml 741.427 up J47D 
SOYBEANS ICBOT) s.t'OT rr’.rr — II^T.- do'kir^ tX' 'A/Ve) 
7 JO 
7J5 
7.00'T 
7 5T1 
6*n> 

7.07ft 
7JO'., 

703 

6J0ft 

Ed. sales 7Djm Fn's. sales 35.480 
Fri'icneneit 148.00° go 5*9 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBOT) ion nv— . couo. % pc* 10*1 
23000 I85JDJU(« 19450 20A40 19JJD 300 JO 
185. OO Aug « 19450 700.50 194-50 2H)J0 
181. 10 See 94 1*350 199 Jo 1*130 1*9*0 
iBO.oooaw 1*2.10 190 2u ipi.ro )°ejD 
1 78 JO Dec W 1WJ0 19730 1 90 JO 197 10 
178.80 Jan95 19130 197 }0 IJl.oo 197JB 
IBUlOMor °5 1*100 19*00 1*733 199.00 
Mf.OOMdV 9S 19600 199 Oo 1*100 190JI3 
I83JMJU19S 19350 197 00 1*350 I97£0 
Ed. solos 25.000 Fri's soles 16,251 
Fri's open ini BI.U9 cm B 54 
SOYBEAN OIL ICBOT) rt 000 1 cry- 00 nan oe* loonss 


723J3U 

3 HUB 
20600 
709JD0 
20150 
20350 
301.00 
1*8. SO 


■LOO 

■320 

-1M 

-180 

*J80 

-370 

-380 

-150 

-100 


14. SSI 
I7-M4 
10 . 88 * 
5.907 
18.149 
7-641 
1.761 
368 
2*4 


21-55 Jgl 94 77 30 

7lA5«ua9J 27 30 
22.90 Seo * « 77 JO 
22.1000 W 7*80 
22.00 Dc-: *4 26 JO 
2165 Jan *5 34 15 
24 70 MV 95 2*10 
24A2Mav95 7**0 
24A5JUI95 M.9Q 
25JQAjg 95 
EsL sales 19.000 Fri's sate 
Fri’s open ini 854306 ah 515 


3082 
30.65 
33 J« 
1*54 
71^ 
70S 
29 JO 
20X6 
27.85 
75-30 


37.75 

ux: 

27.70 

-MB 

31.3TD 

27J7 

U32 

2740 

-xos 

15.958 

VMS 

71. IS 

77 Jl 

-0.11 

!• <090 

VO, 

26J0 

2723 

•0.18 

8.744 


.’635 

2690 



^88 

7615 





36.10 




•M.65 

7590 





25.90 

7655 

•035 




2655 

- QJ3 

2 


Livestock 


7107 

7410 

74JD 

74.25 

7110 

7150 


6545 
65-62 64 45 

68J0 *'-55 

»* W Ml) 
70J5 StA? 
71 JO 70.S5 

ASJ5 hit,*, 

17.512 


81.70 
81-35 
&8.00 
0095 
88 35 
7485 


7155 73.47 

73 45 rija 
7660 7145 

■4jse 74M 

71 75 73 to 

7175 73 JO 


CATTLE ICMER) «Jni».»n 
7*27 42-J3 Jun «4 *54r *63 

62-15 Aug 94 64 75 
*5 70 Oct *4 6885 
67 Jo Dec 94 19 00 
67.90 Feb 95 70 00 
*9.40 Apr 94 70*5 

64 9DJV19S *7.90 

Esr. sales WAS* Fri's. sales 
Fri'sopenlm 75.7B3 0« 1063 
FEEDER CATTLE ICMER) u8oa tm 
HOa 77IOAUOM 74 00 7420 72.90 

7IJ0F4P94 7145 ~ 

71 JO ud 94 7110 
72 46 NOV 04 74 tfl 
72.95JV196 74JS 
7785l4ar96 7190 

7245 Apr 96 7115 

EsI. Aries 2977 Fn's. sote 244 
Fn'sopehirl 14 478 JO 111 
HOGS <CMER) 48,000 »».-m'is oer m 
5627 45J0JunN OX 4853 J7J0 

45JQ Juf *4 47 4)0 

44 JO AIN 94 47 JO 
42.4500 94 44.12 

XL05DOCW 44.60 

43.10 Feb 95 4630 

80 WAV 95 «3JD 

4740Jun« 4885 

47J0JUI9S 4872 

Eii. sales 0,781 Fri's. sate 7,130 

Frr'sflvnin! 7* SO oH 234 
PORK BELLIES ICMER) eM6,.j"ru, 
*100 39J0JUIM 42.00 47 *5 <1 T> 

30.75 Aua *4 41430 41.75 4190 

39 10 Feb 93 4785 40.40 47 *5 
30. 60 Mv 95 
4280 May 95 
50J0JUI75 

49 75 Auo 95 

Es). sam 1851 Fr.'s Mies 2.671 
Fn'iMDM 8 I» OH 4» 


4583 

WTO 

67.B2 

M*7 
49.55 
T185 
*7 75 


>0.10 8.118 
-4)07 29.970 
->0.05 I5J89 
—030 11,17* 
— 0 40 7J79 
-4L50 3J74 
-4)30 S*5 


pw* 

73.05 

72-50 

7385 

7341 

’407 

7140 

73» 


-0.45 7M5 
-0.IP 1375 
—OJO 2.16* 
-0.13 1.744 

*8 05 409 

—OjIS 5» 
•020 05 


S5J7 

5140 

4925 

SOJO 

5080 

48.00 
51 JO 

49.00 


48.55 47.45 
4080 47J5 

44.97 44 ID 

44,92 44J5 

44 JO 44 JO 
4380 43 JO 
4385 4370 
46J0 40.72 


4S.S0 

40.30 

40JJ 

4487 

44.90 

44J0 

JL25 

40.75 

■WHO 


• 1.50 7.15) 

-0.W J.JJI 

1.00 8,653 

• a*' 4830 
•0.28 LO# 

• 0 » 010 

—0.15 451 

-4.IS 117 

-020 3* 


99 Jfl 
61 15 
60.90 
41 JB 
52J0 
50JS 


4307 
41 15 
47.75 
4695 
49.95 
5D.» 
50.X 


— 0.IB 4.074 
-023 3.5*4 
-085 468 

-<LSS J7 

n 

12 

3 


Food 


CtHnFEEC (NCSE) 3'.4«P bi - «* pw b 
145-50 64.90 Ju 1 *4 132.10 139.00 U0J0 

60JOSWM nun 1x00 m.ts 
77.IOOCC94 12130 ItSJB 127J0 
1090 Mar 95 175.05 125.05 12475 
B2J0Mav95 17C15 124.15 1}4.I5 
8500 Jul 95 

»J30S«>9S 

Esi. sales I A 254 Fri's. sous 13.101 
Ffi'*DP«nW 55,229 oH 5*4 
SUGAR-WORLD II INCSE1 iiftXBte.* cents 
12 40 9.1531894 12J5 12J7 1231 


14IA0 
137 JS 

I34JO 

12325 

1X00 

12U0 


1 30 JO 

137.90 

l» 5G 

13305 

124.15 

123.15 

122.15 


• 13-10 144)14 
■ 1340 S-412 
-AM 12.200 
-4 00 7 424 
•600 1,010 
-600 123 

•64)0 X 


—0.00 u.lf> 


HI GRADE COPPSt (NCMX) «8M #».- (Mi per b. 
10440 74.10 Ain 94 111-50 III JO 11IJD 111 40 

74-20 Ju I'M 110.45 112.0Q M0J5 11140 
7L90Se«94 11845 I11JBQ II 825 111A5 
7575 Dec W 10980 109.90 10080 10985 

76*0 Jon 95 10945 

73J»Mar« 107 JO 108.10 107 JO 108.10 
7180 Ail *5 105-33 10350 10350 10350 

7SJ0Aug95 nOJO 111 JO 11070 11180 
79 1D56P9S 105.25 

73200a 95 II 085 

7775 Nov 95 11025 

88. no Dec 95 10360 10.90 10340 104-50 

8«J0 Jan M (OLW 

62,70 Mar 96 104.15 

Est. soles 11.000 Fri's. sales 10A31 
W tnum W *1.954 <4/ 31* 

SILVER l NCMX I vinm)ru.-onriiwiiw< 


I10J0 

naw 

1DE80 

10280 

-07J95 

10400 

nano 

1BXJ0 

*2JO 

102.60 
*205 
99 JO 


•205 5*7 

*2JD 3L239 
+225 154175 
*215 6A40 
#2.10 

J 185 £.241 
*105 729 

•2 JO 575 

♦ZOO 
• 21S 
*2.15 

♦2J)5 800 

+ 205 
*205 


yutn 

S86J 


S90J 

mo 

5640 

6040 

606-5 

6104) 

6130 

678.0 

S730 

4140 


5tSJA«94 
3718AJI94 SJI0 541.0 5340 

Augft 

37W5W 94 536.0 5430 

380.0 Dec 94 5454) 55X0 

4014) Jar 95 5330 5330 

4 16-1 Mcr *5 5530 558J 

41AQMOV 95 


S37J 
S38J 
5418 
53L5 543J 

542.0 55DJ 
KUO 5522 
5530 S50.4 

663-7 


4204) 4ul *5 564J 564-5 564.5 5698 

4*20 Sep 95 57X5 57X5 57X5 5733 

S39J)Dec95 MU 5814 S81J 5B48 
5730 An 96 5878 

SMLOANrWI 594J 

EsL sales SUWI Fn's. sales 19JI7 
Fn's open int 124J49 ah 11 18 
PLATINUM (NMER) u »av ot- Mnnma. 
4374)0 357 00 AT 94 401 AO 403X0 399.10 ttXQO 

43300 3*8-00 Da 94 404.00 405 JC 402.00 «5j50 

429 40 17*40 jar 95 406.00 40? 410 Mian 607,70 

4284)0 39tUX>Apr?5 407 JO 407 JO 40 7 JO 409 JU 

EsI. sates MA. Frfx soles 22W 

Fn's oner int 2Ufl7 up 40 
GOLD I NCM X) <00 iruvoL- dollars Be* Irm «l 
417 JO 339A)Am9* 381 Jtl 38X10 391-50 3m an 

3864)0 Jul 94 384.10 

341 JO Aug 9, 30X80 J83B0 38X60 30340 
WiWOrJ W 38? M 309.00 38733 388 to 
3«L00D«:M 3904)0 392J» 389.00 19IJO 
36X50 Feb 95 J9A00 39330 394 JO 3*5.10 


*1A 1 

* 1 J 75A9 

+ 1J 

*14 15465 
*1.0 17-335 
*14! 

+ 14 5403 
*14 X23* 
♦14 1.703 
♦14 <35 

*14 1082 
* 1.0 
+ 14 


12.192 
‘M0 0031 
*0.10 1.204 
*0.10 1,160 


38640 
4154)0 
4I74D 
42650 
411.00 
4174)0 
X20S1 
412J0 
41120 
427 00 
47A50 


HI 


36A5Q Apr ft 
3»T 2D Jun *5 
38flJ0Aug95 
JltJOOCtOS 
400-50 Doc 65 
41250 Feaft 
Apr 96 

E 51. sales 704KJ0 Fti'X sales 15.486 
Fn's open Ini 136417 130 168 


3*060 

4U2JO 

405.90 

«9J0 

4fi7D 

*17.70 

42100 


-OJO 
— 030 
—020 70.756 
-HUB 2109 
—020 24.150 
“OJO 5419 
— 0J0 6.395 
-070 7.407 
—a 10 
- 0.10 

A479 


* 0.10 


Financial 


9U0 -0.03 0, 1W 

9iJ9 —Oja 17.783 
94.68 -04)6 74185 

9444 —006 1,5*4 


US T. BILLS ICMEfll itean+HuyiPM 
9* 76 95 J* Jun 94 9i79 9200 95.77 

9648 9A62Se«94 95J0 9230 9A36 

96.10 *< 25 Dec 94 94.49 94 To 9447 

9505 9198*tar95 94A5 944J 94.41 

Esf.Mles NA Fn'x sales MID 
Frrsopcn mi >*.45* oH 987 
SYR. TREASURY (CBOT1 ilttLOMpm-MsA Snfeoi 100 act 

Jun 94 105-19 105-20 105-14 105-345- 07 SI 124 

litirEJ “"“*=»**’ E ' 3:l l 

Eiisate 40,500 Fri’s. soles 50.510 “ 

Fn’s open ini 177 J69 up 4JJ9 

I 1 '®'** *•'*'- on * KrvKo, 100 »d 

»S31 Sl 4 !SrS K M= SI ”- TO 

tits 53 $£,% «■» “ !££= s 

”'*S 102-15 102-11 102-15 - 09 

Est safes 70.000 Fri's. sdlcri tl4A2f 
Fri's Open In! 265 AID up 1055 

USTREASURY BONDS ICBOT) BPdriinuiW-nititttetfiaiprji 
119-29 97-Oj JwlW (05-05 105-10 104-21 10400— tq si ra!i 

jjf2s 5-3 1w "' 3 ,B * a l04 -«- 10 

*1'™ ommio-si 103-23 lawn im-11— 11 ■ 

” 1C7-2J — f 

ID9-IM — | 

101-19— | 

ID 1-04 — ) 

100-24- 


1BM79 

1.344 

63 

9 


116-70 99-14 Mcr 15 
115-19 98-15 Jun 95 
112-15 91-0) Scpft 
1 10-14 9B-77 Dec ft 
T14HH 99-23 Mar 94 
Esi. sales 2*5.000 Fn's. sales JOiAft 
Ri'sooonint 4I5A30 up 979 

nuSd^tIm 81 ^, -i’S’ 1 Wyhiiwi w 100 pa 

10 10,801 


11 


36391 

3.014 

I.1U 

104 

73 

40 


0.77* 

DJtTO 

0.7405 

0.7522 

0-7140 


24.7j3 

—r. 1 .to 
—35 55? 

-3 III 

20 


*0i240Mcr 95 73 730 93.4U 918ES «X'*IJ 

90.710 Jun 95 9X633 93 M 9X503 43»’P 

9iaifl5ep*5 93.380 93.400 RK J 13t: 

91 180Dec95 93140 93140 HK 97133 

91L75G Var 96 91100 97. !:: nOM 97030 

Ess sales N A Fn-s sacs 4*0974 
Fri's open ini 2A61A24 oft iiJJ 

BN/nSH POUND (CMER) Jer* WJM «.\p. 

'-5224 U474Jun94 13150 U7K) 1 _5T2£ !.S1»: - 1-32 1?4D 

1.5300 l.4M05cp94 15074 '.J7IJ 15370 IHX 

IJ170 1 4500Dcc»4 1J1DJ 15180 

I -5170 1.4643 Aflor 94 

Ev. sates N.A. Fri's. sate I+.9* 

Fri-ioaenml 43 4®J rft ijq 

CANADIAN DOLLAR ICMER) Iwri- ♦wvreua.usr 
0.7805 ILTlUjun-M 0.7250 0T3Jt X7234 0.7:18 —?» 101W 

0.7060 Sep « BJ25Q 0.T250 17203 3.7207 
ft 7036 Dec 94 0.7710 0J7!£l ft772J J.7'74 
0.71120 Mar 95 0.7150 O.nSE 07140 OJIAI 
0.4990 Jun 95 ILD 35 0.7T3f 0 7220 0.711* 

0JOt*Sep9S X.'OM 

EsI. sate 0A FriA sates ISJ97 
Fn's open ini 4X401 nil 40 . 

GERMAN WUK ICMER) Joe* rwn- 1 ton* ssuci. lami 
0JI33 OJRPjunW OJOtS 0.60S4 ottos S4JU -62 rajJa 

06101 06600 Sep 94 H5W5 06073 OJ99T OjM -74 56.467- 

0-5=90 DCC * 3 iLeUD 96073 asKO 0.6070 

05*00 Am 95 amt 

0.5010 m™ 96 0.40*5 

&-' sales HA Fnv. softs S2,J*9 
Fn's open nr U6674 oft 203 

J APAN E SE TE N (CMERi imrv,*- 1 roranioe UOdW 
0J»»9540JiaiB71Jun94 OJB966BU»ri)40JD9l«)il«l«70S -ST 26 7 IT 

ft0100in.DOBM2Sep94 UM9T1 MH0977W.0097091 00*770 -« 55-310 

OillfB7in.(»K25DecWOJ098fnXOW64ai«7779jr.i»9M/ 

00101 500, 00977 Uun *5 00099750 XW 50.00997 50 a 1 00X3 
00101250 00*6W6Aar 94 0XJW9X: 

1*1. sates N-A. Fri's. sate 39.72 1 
Fri's open liu 06.155 off « 

SWISS FRANC (CMERI 1 oer epic- 1 poke HimKaoi 
07176 0AS90 Am94 0.7145 0.7169 0.7142 0715? 

0.7790 06600 Sep « 07113 0722S 0 7107 0.7709 

0J1B5 0-6865 Dec 94 0.7156 0.7721 07154 9 7221 

Jun 95 07193 0.7160 0.71*3 OT77S 

_ AtorW 0.7743 

sate TLA Fri's. sate 31.^6 
Fri's oaten M 46A49 u« 25aS 


tt 


(UUU 

04040 

04070 


75 LB* 
*75 ff 
-72 J 53 - 


•» 06 1 770 

'# e 

*66 356. 


•«? D*73 
-45 20*U 
*6f S39 
■ 19 3 
-04 I 


Industrials 


7040 
7840 
77 JO 
77 AS 
7020 
78-50 
7440 


WTTOM * tJJCTN) sum tu. - eerts rwt b. 

I 7 ' 70 «« ^45 8070 *0.40 HAS 

7X40 Aug 94 7&.4Q Tim 70.40 T9JJ0 7 

S-22SL?. 77 90 74 ' ,a 77 -* s -am 6.5W' 

5* 48 Dee 94 7SM 77.15 76.00 74M * ; ) 7 27JSS 

6X50Mar75 7695 7X00 76 *5 77^ +8U 3J09 

44-00 MOV 95 77 JO 77 JO 7740 78J5 -02B 1JW 

HLMAJI9S 7747 7BJ6 7/J7 7iJ5 *040 « 

- — TIAOOa 95 7445 7445 >4J5 74JJ -0.2* U3 

Est. sates 7J0O Fn's. sales 9.320 

Friiaoenln 1 51.145 git 415 - 

fNM|EN> •n.OOOsr*- Ctntieh. Del 

”'22 11-2 i" 19 ! Ai * D a n 4744 1 074 X5.TB ~ 

n it 47 -5 48J0 4750 48.14 -044 WB 

* -7 'SiS A S fl6J0 WilJ '047J oust: 

44.90 Da 94 4955 49J0 49J5 49.9* *011. 9J37 

S' 44 SOm S' 144 5°^ -0.24 7A3S 

S1J5 51A0 51J5 51.7? *0.37 15.179 


57 JO 
S8J0 
59 JB 
*7-25 
50.75 
57.50 
SUM 
SI JO 
51.00 

5026 

4945 

50X5 

5X00 

51*0 

SL70 


SM6 K.'j» -03* K907 

SJSf? 1 !. 5 S9-15 52 JS SXI0 EJ* —am A7SS 
®®0Ma , B S 51 40 5140 51.40 SI 3* --* ■— ■ 


4X0SApr*S 
47JMMOV95 
46. 79 Jun 95 49 J)0 49 00 49JJ0 J*J4 


4745 Jul 95 
47. AJ Aug 94 
4045 Sep *5 
5240 Cid 95 
52.90 t*ov 95 
SX’O Dec * j 

E». sate _ 17.214 Fri's. Kfts 20J6S 

Friswenml IZ7.475 up 34*4 

'H* 18.90 1039 1044 ■ 

1705 1010 1780 WOO 


-aB4 1033 
5044 —QJ3- 

njs -001. 1 A0« 
. 2,132. 

*025 1 JIB 
‘025 . 989 
*025 544 

•025 l 
*025 • T 
*058 I 


49J4 

50.44 

51.34 

5234 

53J4 

5424 


20.70 

?07B 

30.73 

206* 

2X80 

IMS 

20J0 


*016 85264. 
0H)«L04i 


•TTZS”. "“j I»'0 ■ I OU IB Ml 1 0 HI KLB4A 

iScKli » 7 « -H«S 

It 2 '?■* -0.1120.147 


^ \ 7 M ”■» 

,7a ’!■» ‘7L4I *0)3 332140 

lUBPebij ir.iso 17.60 i?*n -njj KL33? 

17 « 

Fn s open mt <37 . 105 up *664 

«J0 EA °^Si fl 6ry* IB r, , JS IWBB1 493reoBl.eiMisp4raw ' ' 

B&iSZir S-2 S'S S* ».*« ” 45 39J77 

SiSSS? 11 '0 SIM SI. 10 Slij *0Jf I3JI7 

**-50 50.® J9 JO 50.07 *025 050 

,9 ' DC J? ' 80 ttso "JO +021 'MM. 

wm 53M •OXS'J.MT 

miSSIS 5" 50 ®J0 51 JO SMS -0J3 1200 

&f'<«*s yL t Q . » 00 *023 CO 

Ef.'JSS ,J£‘ A iS,!7 r ' i -' sae * w-iM - — 

Fr'^open Int 73Ji4 M 34a . . 


60® 

S4JJ0 

9075 

49.75 
54® 
SLID 

52.75 


Stock indexes 

“PCOMP.INDEX fCMER) ' : - 

» SkS SS SI S- " : s«s- 

puTO S » a a is 

Frt'5 o pen htl 240424 off MI ■ 

5°5SS s XS' m 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1994 



Page l l 5 


Balsam Denies 
Fraud Charges as 
Creditors Rebel 


Compiled by Our Staff fro* Dima,*** 

— Fricdel Bal- 
sam, chief executive and majority 
owner of the insolvent worts sur- 
faqng manufacturer BaUam AG 
LP? Monday a H the charm 
°* J™ 1 " 3 Jod §od against him by the 
pubhc prosecutor's office. He was 
taken into custody a week ago. 

Meanwhik. creditors of Balsam 
reacted angrily to claims that Ger- 
many’s two hugest banks had oref- 
erental terms on loans to the com- 

Rlcd for bankruptcy last 
week after its four-man manage- 
ment board was arrested cm 3- 
aon of having defrauded the group 


Ruhrgi 
Off H. 


'as Net 
t.4%as 
Prices Soften 

Bloomberg thinness News 

ESSEN, Germany — Rohr- 
fias AG, Germany’s largest 
natural gas company, reported 
Monday an 8.4 percent drop 
m 1 993 net profit, to 729 mfl- 
Uon Deutsche maiks ($437 
million), amid a decline in 
wholesale prices and growing 
competition. 

Sales fell 0.5 percent, to 
14J5 billion DM. 

Chief Executive Klaus Lie- 
sen cited “very fierce” compe- 
tition with other natural gas 
snpphers and falling wholesale 
prices as Europe’s energy mar- 
ket becomes more oomoeti- 
tive. 

Despite this year’s drop in 
natural gas prices, which has 
mirrored a similar drop in 
crude oil prices, Mr. Uesen 
said he was optimistic that 
group sales in 1994 would 
match 1993 levels. 

The company has begun 
looking abroad to secure its 
future as its comfortable re- 
gional monopoly comes under 
assault from a wave of Ger- 
man deregulation. 

Since (he be ginning of the 
year, Rohigas has signed a co- 
operation agreement with 
Hungary’s national gas com- 
pany and bought a 20 percent 
stake in a subsidiary of Ten- 
Deco Ina of Houston. 


to owe money to around 50 banks. 

tjerman newspapers reported 
over the weekend that Deutsche 
Bank AG and Dresdner Bank AG, 
'jermanys biggest banks, had 
agreements with Balsam dating as 
far back as 1990 in which the com- 
pany pledged that their daims 
would be met before those of any 
other creditors. 

“We are investigating legal ac- 
tion against all the people involved 
tn knowing about the global agree- 
ment who didn't let us know,” said 
Heinrich Schaumburg, spok esman 
for BFG Bank AG, the German unit 
of Crfcdit Lyonnais, which is owed 
33 million DM by Balsam. 

“Had we known about this, we 
wouldn’t have continued our busi- 
ness relationship with Balsam,” 
Mr. Schaumburg said. 

“We didn’t know this,” said 
Erast Neubronner, spokesman for 
BHF Bank, which is owed about 80 
million DM “There is a need for 
explanations. There is a certain irri- 
tation." 

Deutsche Bank is owed a “mini-' 
mal” stun by Balsam, according to 

its Spokesman, HellmOt Har tmann, 
who added that the amount was 
“substantially less” than 100 mfl- 
lion DM. 

Regarding another accusation of 
foul play in G erm any . Mannes- 
ntaon AG said Monday that Wer- 
ner Dieter, its chief executive, was 
considering legal action agwinct 
Spiegel magazine after it said be 
had pocketed millions of mints in 
profits by channeling Mannes- 
tnatm contracts to two companies 
in which he held stakes. 
Mannesman!) shares closed 2.1 
it lower, at 436.30 DM, on 
ay. 

Regarding the fugitive real-es- 
tate mogul, Jflrgen Schneider, the 
Frankfort stale prosecutor’s office 
said the Swiss authorities had fro- 


Estonia ’s Economic Train Slows 


By Steven Erlanger 

New Vorfc Times Struct 

TALLINN, Estonia — To any- 
one accustomed to traveling the 
nations of the former Soviet 
Union and watching their transi- 
tions to market economies, the 
Tallinn Department Store is riv- 
eting, simply because it is normal. 

The building is renovated, 
well- lighted and contemporary. 
The floors are stocked with a 
range of goods, local and import- 
ed, from Duracefl batteries and 
Nike footwear to a complete 
choice of Philips light bulls. 
There is even a Western-style su- 
permarket, with bar-code scan- 
ners. and all goods are available 
for the local currency, the kroon. 

More surprising yet, this West- 
ernized nonnality exists in what 
remains a state-owned store. And 
it is almost entirely a result or 
Estonia’s economic success, be- 
ginning with the creation in mid- 
1992 of a currency fixed by law at 
eight to the Deutsche mat, com- 
paratively low inflation of about 
35 percent a year (Russia last year 
had inflation of about 1,200 per- 
cent), and the successful effort, 
through easy customs rules and 
low taxes, to attract investment 
from Scandinavia. 

But “the little country that 
could,” as one newsmagazine 
called Estonia, is beginning to 
cough. The coalition government 
with cabinet .ministers mostly in 
their 30s, is Lorn by dissension 
and strong whiffs of corruption. 

As wonderful as the Tallinn 
Department Store is. its remodel- 
ing is not complete and has even 
been halted. 

The reason is the huge, Soviet- 
built Hotel Vim, into which the 
government poured millions of 


*-.• SS 

■ • ‘tew '■ '! 

Russia 
195% 


fl&&efsin33&9 



dollars for renovation but which 
was privatized for the mmimum 
allowable bid of S2J. million — 
and to a company fronted by the 
former ideology secretary or the 
Estonian Communist Party. 

After the Viru fiasco — which 
on its face followed all the rules 
of the independent privatization 
agency — the government decid- 
ed to slop spending more on ren- 
ovating the store than the state 
may get back from iL 

The Viru is regarded by Esto- 
nians as a t candfli . and it is lump- 
ed together with rumors of pay- 
offs to politicians. 

The prime minister. Mart Laar, 
a 34-year-old reformer who warns 
to keep unemployment benefits 
meager lo encourage the jobless 
to work, may lose his job this 
week. His four coalition partners, 
mindful of swings toward former- 
ly Communist managers and pol- 


TbtMn Yort. Timet 


itidans in Hungary, Poland ?n<j 
Lithuania, say they want some- 
one older and less radical to lead 
the government before elections 
in March. 

Estonia's government, howev- 
er, has provided a successful ex- 
ample, albeit in a tiny setting of 
only 1.6 million people, of radical 
economic reform. 

After the by now customary 
post-Communist decline, gross 
national product is growing again 
in Estonia, at about 5 percent for 
the year, industrial production 
has also turned around; hard-cur- 
rency reserves are up; the private 
sector is burgeoning, especially in 
services, and the state budget has 
a surplus. In Tallinn, there is vir- 
tually no unemployment, but the 
number of jobless elsewhere is 
rising as reform and a function- 
ing bankruptcy law begin to shut 
down inefficient factories. 


In an interview, Mr. Laar, who 
became prime minister in Octo- 
ber 1992, said rumors of corrup- 
tion did not mean corruption, “at 
least not on the state lewd.” Snch 
rumors, he said, were an instru- 
ment of political intrigue, “and 
with elections coming, same peo- 
ple in the party are losing their 
nerve.” 

His coalition partner, TtinneV. 
Keflam, deputy speaker of Parlia- 
ment, was more blunt. “Corrup- 
tion is deeply human, let’s face 
it,” be said. “Unde the Soviet 
Union, it was only decent to steal 
from the state. So for many, it’s 
still hard to distinguish between 
what belongs to the state and 
what belongs to you. 

“Many ministers are young 
and inexperienced, and some- 
times they’re unprepared for 
these risks.” 

But he said he still feared an 
electoral backlash that might 
bring back the old party bosses, 
who would slow Estonia's pro- 
gress. 

But Estonia’s flight from Mos- 
cow is perhaps bestffioslrated by 
foreign trade. Three years ago, 
Russia accounted for 90 percent 
of iL Today, the figure is about 20 
percent. 

Mr. Laar says the biggest chal- 
lenge now is to help people “pri- 
vatize their mrndg, to learn the 
dear relationship between then- 
labor and their pay.” 

“Whatever happens to me,” 
Mr. Laar said, “we've tried to 
create conditions for the future, 
to do a lot of difficult things now 
that would be much harder later. 
The train is going too fast now for 
anyone to stop iL” 


Investor’s Europe 



Sources: Reuters, AFP 


lafcrnUional HenklTribune 


Very briefly: 


Dutch Telecom Has Busy Debut 


Caaqrikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

AMSTERDAM — Shares in Koninklijke PTT Ne- 
derland NV, the Dutch postal and idcommunica lions 
company, dosed at 50220 guilders (527) Monday, a 


to trace a total of 245 million 
DM to Geneva thai had been trans- 
ferred there by way of London and 
the Bahamas. 

Mr. Schneider apparently man- 
ta take IS motion DM in 
the office added. 
(Bloomberg Reuters, AFX) 


Amsterdam Stock Exchange. 

The 6.9 billion-guilder offer values the entire com- 
pany ai 23 billion guilders and is one of several 
European state telecom privatizations scheduled for 
the next few years. 

Demand for shares was almost triple the amount on 
offer. A third of the shares were placed with s mall 


Jan Kalf. chairman of ABN/AMRO, the bank that 
managed the float, said be was confident the price 
would rise because sb many foreign investors had been 
disappointed after failing io receive the full amount of 

d. 

million shares to 
each and to 

private investors at 47.25 guilders each on the first 75 
shares allotted 

The government plans to sell its majority stake in 
the company, known as KPN, and the next tranche of 
shares will be offered in 1996 or 1997. 

KPN win be the third biggest company listed on the 
Amsterdam Stock Exchange, behind Anglo- Dutch 


investors. Over half were sold to foreign institutions, heavyweights Royal Dutch and Unilever. 

-in r- jx- , " „ ■ . _ . Rut liv> VPM flntitinn u iminiw in il\M i 


To subteribw in France 

jurf cufl. toB free, 
05437437,, . . 


with about 20 percent finding buyers in Britain and 
175 percent in the United States, bankers involved in 
the placement said 

"lie company’s qpenipgprice matched market mak- 
ers’ indications, and withm a couple of hours more 
than 14 imSon shares had changed hands, more than 
the rest of the bourse pm together. 


Bui the KPN flotation is unique in that it indudes a 
postal service that is profitable and regarded as 
eflirienL 

In 1993. KPN made a net profit of 1.8 billion 
guilders, 8 percent more than in 1992. The state 
received half of this as a dividend. 

I Reuters, AFP, AFX, Bloomberg) 


Moulinex Widens 
Consolidated Loss 

Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatcher 

PARIS — Moulinex SA said 
Monday its coosotidaled net loss 
widened to 598 million francs 
($105 minion) in the year ended in 
March from 41 million francs the 
previous year. 

The household appliance maker 
died sluggish Western European 
economies and currency fluctua- 
tions in Britain, Italy, Spain and 
PortugaL 

Sales totaled 8.09 billion francs, 
down from 829 billion francs the 
previous year. 

Moutinex also said it expected to 
reach an agreement with Euris, an 
investment group of French busi- 
nessman Jean-Charks Naomi on a 
] billi on-franc capital ugecthn by 
the end of June. (AFX, Bloomberg) 


• Aegon NV of the Netherlands and AXA SA of France reportedly have 
joined a growing number of suitors vying for Denmark’s largest insurer, 
Baltics ForaftringASh 

• Mediobanca SpA said its operating profit in the 11 months to June 30 
would be 65 percent lower than a year earlier. 

• British Petroleum PLC said it has taken a 45 percent stake in a 
Venezuelan oO project known as the Quniqmre Unit 

• Valeadana de Gemeutos SA will be ready to sell 49 percent of its share 
capital through a public offer this summer, with the exact date depending 
on maiket conditions, the Spanish company said. 

• Affianz AG Hoitfiag said its Italian unit. Undone Adriatic* <fi Sicurta 
SpA, had purchased a 30 percent stake in Berner Hotting. Diethart 
Bidpohl, the Allianz finance director, said the price was “rather less” 
than 200 minion Swiss francs ($142 minion). 

• Dixons Group PLC said it dans to sdl more than 100 of its Currys 
electrical retailing outlets in 1994. 

• British Aerospace is in talks with both Triwaa Aerospace and mainland 
China about a possible joint venture to build planes. 

• Hitachi Ltd. is in negotiations to acquire a majority stake in the Czech 
steelmaker Moravsfce Zekzarny Otonouc. 

• Swedish unemployment in May fell to 7.1 percent from April's 7.4 

percent AFX. Bloomberg AFP. Krught-Ridder 


Amstrad to Buy Viglen in Cash Deal 

Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — Amstrad PLC, one of Britain's biggest electronics 
companies, said Monday it planned to buy Viglen Ltd, a British mrfmr of 
personal computers, tn a cash deal valued at as much as £60 million (S9 1 
nnffian). 

The Amstrad chairman, Alan Sugar, wants to sdl products directly to 
customers, as Viglen does. 

Amstrad is tryiitg to come back from a loss of £20 5 million in the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1993. 

Amstrad said it would pay £30 million initially and another £30 million 
during the next three years. Viglen, whose management will stay on, will 
operate as an independent unit 


NYSE 

Monday ’* Closing 

Tables include the nationwide pnees up to 
the dosing on Wail Street and do not reflect 

late trades elsewhere. Vie The Associated Press 


*m i 8? 


S 3 

1.M 113 , 


T 8 


■US 




is » n.’fj 

tMs e 9 

l.w fl 


s 


UK XT « 

1 a m3 


;sh?p 


-s 


HMontti 

mphLov. 



ft =!: 

— I Vi — a 

1 — Jj 

h is* 7 ? 

~ ft U> MW U> 

2 3 & i’S iS 

i 8 i 1 ! fe t % a 
>1 s i i i £ |! i 

1 m 1 1 1 =1 

I SS 75 

Continued on Page 12 


Concentration on clearly defined whole- 
sale banking sectors again produced good 
results tor Luxembourg-based Deutsche 
Girozentrale International S.A. in 1993. 

Active principally on the Euromoney and 
Eurocredit market, we boosted total assets 


ment funds of Deka International S.A.. 
Luxembourg, which recorded major growth 
during the year. 

Despite narrow margins in a highly 
competitive market environment, the Bank's 
earnings progressed satisfactorily. Interest 


Business Year 1993 


THE RESULTS OF COMMITMENT 
AND WELL-DEFINED TARGETS 


by 7 % to DM 8.4 billion. A large part of this 
growth was attributable to an increase of 
DM 0.7 billion in the securities portfolio. 
Interbank business showed significant gains, 
and lending to European public-sector 
borrowers was stepped up considerably. The 
year saw increased activity in the innovative 
market segments as well. 

Deutsche Girozentrale International S.A. 
is also the custodian bank for the invest- 


and commission income were up 
substantially, and trading operations were 
again positive. Net profit for the year 
amounted to DM 7.5 million, a rise of 50%. 

Backed by quality financial and human 
resources, plus dear goals, Deutsche Giro- 
zentrale International S.A. is poised for 
another successful year in 1994. 

A copy of our annual report is available 
upon request. 


Financial Highlights (DM million) 

1993 

1992 

Total Assets 

8,409 

7.891 

Balances with Banks 

4,028 

3,823 

Advances to Customers 

3,054 

3.357 

Securities 

1.164 

439 

Liabilities to Banks 

4346 

3,922 

Other Liabilities 

3.736 

3.571 

Capital and Reserves 

199 

194 



Deutsche Girozentrale 
International S.A. 


16, Boulevard Royal. L-2449 Luxembourg; Postal addres: P.O. Box 19, L-2010 Luxembourg, Telephone (3 52) 462471-1, Fax (352) 462477 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1994 


Page IS 


Hanoi 
Auto Import 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Reuters 

Vieina ® wiU raise its 
import duty on new cars to 200 

makers said Monday, and the 
Preach automaker Rebuilt SA m 
nowwed ^agreement to have its 
can assembled locally 

JLSnL^^ of Vie »nam 

5t I 53r I l J ^ the compa- 
SS had rece,ved confinna- 

Uonof ihetax increase to start on 
hope it will be very good 

^ for ns. because impw^d 8 ^ 

J 01 ** very expensive," the execu- 
tive, loacjum Roa. said. 

He said the impact or the in- 
crease would depend on efforts to 
prevent smuggling, which generally 
mcr eases when governments raise 
import duties on cars. Vietnam's 
cmes are developing rapidly but 
remam dominated by motorbikes 
and bicycles. 

News oT the tax increase, which 
could not be confirmed otherwise 
should boost demand for cars as- 
sanbled from imported kits by 
Vietnam Motors and tire only other 
local carmaker, Mekong Com. 

Vietnamese officials say tbe gov- 
ernment wants to encourage Me- 
kong and VMC, both of which pro- 
duce below capacity. Foreign 
carmakers are advised to matn» deals 
with Vietnam Motors or Mekong. 

Renault signed a letter of intent 
with Vietnam Motors last week to 
start assembling kits of a new 
1,800-cubic-centimeter model at 
the company’s plant near Hanoi in 
early 1995, both companies an- 
nounced. 



lQ T Sfi! W, ^ sl * ed 00 ^ Ren auh 

j , ** * e second European 

modd produced in Vietnam, after 
the BMW 525. due io roll off Viet- 
nam Motors’ assembly lines in Sep- 
tember. 

A Renault executive. Eric Mau- 
det, said in Ho Chi Minh City that 
the government's tax changes may 
also include raising the duty on 
some imported kits to 40 percent 
from 30 percent 

Vietnam Motors, which al$n as- 
sembles Mazda 626 and 323 care 
and Kia saloons, is a joint venture 
of Columbian Motors of the Phffip- 
prnes. Japan's Nichimen Corp. and 
a Vietnamese state company. Co- 
lumbian Motors has a 55 percent 
stake. 

„ ^ or P - 3 Japan ese- 

aoutb Korean joint venture with 
Vietnamese companies, assembles 
four-wheel-drive vehicles at a plant 
in Ho Chi Minh City and has a 
plant near Hanoi that produces 
tight buses and trucks in coopera- 
tion with lveco. tbe cormneraaJ- 
vehicle division of Fiat. 

■ Top Manager Arrested 

Vietnamese authorities have ar- 
rested a prominent businesswoman 
once hailed by the country's priva- 
tization program on charges ol mis - 
m a n a g ement, Reuters reported. 

Officials of her company con- 
finned that Nguyen TTu Son, 44, 
former director of the state-owned 
garment maker Legamex, was ar- 
rested after allegations that money 
raised by tbe sale of company 
shares had been misused, in part to 
benefit bo- relatives. 


In China, Worker Control 


Reuters 

SHANGHAI — A group of 

202 workers have done what 
Kail Marx perhaps had always 
intended: They have bought 
their factory from the state and 
become its sole owners, the first 
such case here. 

Their prize, the Shanghai Lan- 
tern Factory, is a three-story 
building down a lane off a nar- 
row, crowded street market. 

They bought it in April for 1 
nriflkm yuan (SI 16.000), an aver- 
age of 5.000 yuan a person, equal 
to about 10 months’ salary. A few 
of the managers made the maxi- 
mum investment of 15,000 yuan. 

For a city government desper- 
ate to rid itsdf of the burden of 
naming hundreds of companies, 
many of them unprofitable, it 
was a godsend. 

“This is a breakthrough in re- 
forming ownership of state 
/inns,” the deputy mayor of 
Shanghai. Jiang Yiren, said. 

The move means that the com- 
pany. which makes lights for fac- 
tories, hospitals and apartments, 
is divorced from the state and 
will no longer receive state aid if 
it has losses. 

In Communist Chinese par- 
lance, it has broken its iron rice 
bowl of state protection. 

Mr. Jiang said the message 
was dear Do not wait for a 
company to go broke before sell- 
ing il 

Official figures show that tbe 
slate share of national industrial 
output has been f alling since 
1985, dropping to less than 40 


percent last year from 48.1 per- 
cent in 1992. 

Private, collective and joint- 
venture companies are growing 
much Taster than state ones, of- 
ten providing competition that 
stale enterprises cannot match 
and forcing them to shot down. 

According to city government 
ires, there are 120,000 unem- 
Joyed state-company workers, 


’Now that we 
own the firm, we 
will have a 
stronger sense of 
commitment. ’ 

Shanghai worker 


most of them women from 31 to 
40 years old. They receive a sub- 
sistence wage of about 100 yuan 
from their former employers. 

No longer able to count on 
lifetime employment, state work- 
ers are being forced to reconsider 
their future. Tbe staff at the Lan- 
tern factory did just that. 

The factory was set up in 1964, 
making lanterns for ships. It led 
an uneventful life under the old 
system until 1988, when compe- 
tition from rural companies with 
lower costs and no retired work- 
ers made profit faff. 

Its core business threatened, it 
diversified, setting up two hos- 


tels and restaurants and shops 
selling its lanterns and related 
products. It also branched out by 
supplying its products to fac- 
tories, hospitals and apartments, 
as well as taking special orders. 

Its gross profit m 1993 was 2 
million yuan. 

Wang Hoag, a worker at the 
plant for 14 years, said that over 
the last five years he and his 
colleagues had considered many 
ways to improve efficiency. 

“The staff here saw the way 
things were going,” he sakL 
“They saw that state firms are 
gradually leaving the state sys- 
tem. Firms must find a market 
and develop their own products. 

“What we have dime carries 
both danger and profit. We all 
have confidence; we are in this 
together. We need that sense of 
risk to motivate us. Now that we 
own the firm, we will have a 
stronger sense of commitment.” 

The power to choose tbe fac- 
tory manager now rests with tbe 
workers, or shareholders, who 
will vote on the matter at the end 
of the year. 

One dry official said that do- 
ing what the Shanghai Lantern 
workers had done was practical 
only in s mall and medium- size 
companies whose assets were 
small enough that their staffs 
could afford a buyout 

Thousands of Chinese compa- 
nies have issued shares to their 
workers. But at big companies, 
the workers’ share of ownership 
is small usually less than 5 per- 
cent with the rest held by insti- 
tutions or government agencies. 


Minebea Stock Rise: Another Sign of Japan Growth? 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

TOKYO — The share price of 
the Japanese ball bearing maker 
Minebea Co. has more than dou- 
bled since the start of the year, in 
what could be another sign of bel- 
ter economic health in Japan. 

Since Minebea is an important 
maker of parts for home electronic 
appliances and computer hard-disk 
drives, a turnaround in these most 
recession-hit of Japan’s markets 
would be gpod news far the compa- 
ny. 

And in fact, many of Japan's 
electronics giants are forecasting 
better earnings for the current year, 
ending in March 19 95, and demand 
for electronic products and com- 


puters is growing in Japan and 
abroad. 

Analysts said that could be the 
reason Minebea's shares closed 
Monday in Tokyo at 900 yen 
($8.64), up from 490 yen at the start 
of the year. 

“Demand for Minebea's prod- 
ucts is good, and they are expand- 
ing into China,” said Tim Marra- 
ble, industry analyst at Baring 
Securities (Japan) Ltd. 

Volume of sales trill be good, he 


said, although he wanted that price 
competition in the United States 
among hard-disk drive makers 
might mean that Minebea’s profit 
would not keep pace with sales. 

A Minebea official, who asked 
not to be identified, said the rise in 


the company’s stock price was a 
“positive comment from investors 
on tbe company’s performance.” 

An increase in orders, he said, 
might exceed Minebea’s ability to 
keep up in tbe coming months. 
Most of the orders wiff come from 
abroad, he said, and domestic or- 
ders are Hkely to be little changed 
on tbe year. 

The rise in Minebea’s stock price 
may be related to an imminent so- 
lution to problems facing one of the 
company’s subsidiaries, stock trad- 
ers and analysts said. 

Minebea Sun pan, a consumer- 
credit subsidiary, bad 18 billion 
yen outstanding of nonperf arming 
loans on real-estate deals as of June 
1993, the Minebea official said. 


Tbe company is disposing of the 
loans at 3 bObon yen a year over the 
next six years but may retain some 
of the land bdd as collateral he said. 

If land prices in Tokyo stop fall- 
ing or even begin to rise slightly, 
tbe debt burden on tbe company 
mil ease, the official said. 

Some traders had speculated 
that Minebea might sell the subsid- 
iary to finally be rid of its prob- 
lems, contributing to the rise in tbe 
company’s share price. 

The Minebea official said this 
was “not at all true.” He said the 
company had no intention of sell- 
ing Shinpan as it did its unprofit- 
able NMB Semi conductor Co. in 
January 1993. 

NMB was sold for 5.5 billion ven 


to Nippon Steel Corp.. which also 
assumed 30 billion yen of debt. 

Shares in NMB. now called Nip- 
pon Steel Semiconductor Corp., 
soared on Japan's over-the-counter 
market just before tbe sale was an- 
nounced. 

Minebea reported an extraordi- 
nary net loss of nearly 60 billion 
yen in that year, after the sale. 


To subscribe in Germany 

just call, (oil free, 

0130 84 85 85 


Bank Chief 
Says Japan 
Economy 
On Mend 


Bloomberg Busmen News 

TOKYO — The aovnnor of the 
Bank of Japan, Yasnshi Mima 
heightened the debate over Japan's 
economic outlook Monday by idl- 
ing Partiamem "There is a strong 
possibility that the economy has 
started moving toward recovery.” 

For the conservative centra] 
bank, that is a strong statement, 
analysts said. Evidence is mounting 
of a fledgling recovery, but many 
economists remain hesitant to de- 
clare the worst over. 

Japan’s gross domestic product 
for the January- March quarter 
probably rose 3 percent at an annu- 
al rate, according to an average of 
14 forecasts compiled by Bloom- 
berg Business News. 

“The clinching evidence will be 
another plus number in the second 
quarter,” said Groff ery Barker, an 
economist at Baring Securities. 

While 3 percent growth would 
more than offset a 2 2 percent de- 
cline in the last quarter of 1993. 
first-quarter number are generally 
strong because of the increase in 
business activity just ahead of tbe 
end of Japan’s fiscal year on March 

Mr. Mieno was careful to say the 
central bank would watch develop- 
ments before judging whether the 
economy was going to continue 
along the path to recovery. Jiji 
Press reported. In the wake of ms 
comments, however, share prices 
recovered from early losses and 
climbed to more than two-year 
highs, while government bond 
yields rose as prices fefl. 

Tbe Nikkei 225 Stock Average 
gained 157.63 points, or 0.74 per- 
cent, to dose at 21,552.81, its high- 
est since early 1992. 

The benchmark No. 164 govern- 
ment bond finished at a yield of 
4.245 percent, up from last week’s 
dosing yield of 4.165 percent. 
“Micno’s remarks really pushed the 
market down.” said Mmako Main- 
tain, a trader at Dai-icbi Kangyo 
Bank. Braid yields rise as bond 
prices faff. 

On a quarter-Lo-quarter basis, 
Japan’s first-quarter GDP will rise 
0.7 percent, the economists predict- 
ed. 

Tbe Bank of Japan’s May survey 
of business sentiment, released Fri- 
day, showed that corporate manag- 
ers believed the economy was rer 
bounding. 


Japanese Utilities to Sell $576 Million of Bonds 


Bloomberg Businas Sews 

TOKYO — Three Japanese electric compa- 

taneously sell a total of 60 billion yen ($576 
million) of three-year bonds to individual in- 
vestors starting Tuesday. 

The bonds, which all haw tbe same interest- 
payment schedule and maturity date, will pay 
individuals 3J05 percent in annnal intoest, 
slightly above current rates cm comparable in- 
vestments. 

By offering the first jump in interest rates in 
three years, the utilities hope to attract individuaJ 
savings away from tow-yielding bank accounts. 

The offerings are part of a group of bonds 
bring sold to individuals tins month, just as 
many Japanese workers are receiving one of the 


two boons payments they get each year from 
their companies. 

"The basic idea is, individuals get the same 
chance and return fra* investing in their local 
power company," said a Yamaichi official 

The three utilities are Shikoku Electric Power 
Co., which wffi have Nomura Securities Co. 
manage its sale of 10 biffion yen in such bonds; 
Kansai Electric Power Co., winch appointed 
Yamakhi Securities Co. to manage its 30 bfl- 
fion yen bond sale, and Kyushu Electric Power 
Co., which also retained Yatnaichi to manage 
its bond sale of 20 billion yen. 

The braids have the same yield because they 
have the same rating from Japanese credit rating 
, and they aff mature rat June 25, 1997. 
ie Japan Braid Research Institute, rate Of 


the largest credit raters in Japan, gave all three 
companies its highest rating, AAA. 

Moody’s Investors Service Inc. the U.S. 
credit-rating company, has given only Kansai 
Electric its highest rating Ii rates the other two 
companies one notch lower than Kansai. 

Tbe bonds will be marketed in three regions 
of Japan. 

Kansai Electric, which is based in Osaka, will 
market its bonds primarily in ihe greater Osaka 
area, which also includes Kyoto and Kobe. 

Kjrnshn Electric wiff sdl most c*f its bonds to 
individuals living on Japan's main southern 
island of Kyushu, where tbe company is based. 
Shikoku Electric will market most of its bonds 
on Japan’s smallest main island, Shikoku. 


CHINA: 

Stocks Plummet 

Gootianed from Page 9 

cords, the stocks are more attrac- 
tive to investors. 

Reliable information is some- 
times in short supply on die Chi- 
nese exchanges. Tbe unofficial 
shang hai Securities News reported 
Friday that five companies had re- 
ceived approval to issue American 
depositary receipts in New York. 
But the New York Stock Exchange 
later tcJd tbe International Herald 
Tribune that there were no applica- 
tions pending for listing of ADRs 
by Chinese companies, 

“If l were- a foreign investor, I 
would prrfer to invest in a more 
liquid market with better disclosure 
req u ire m ents and lower trading 
costs,” said Lawrence Aug, head of 
China . research for Swiss Bank 
Corp. in Hong Kong. . 

On Monday, large-capualization 
shares suffered heavy losses. 
Shanghai Petrochemical, tbe sec- 
ond largest issue, with 250 mulion 
listed A shares, fell 0.18 yuan, or 
8.78 percent, to 1.87 yuan, agsmst 
its issue price of 3 yuan, on volume 
of 770^)00 shares. . 

The Shanghai B share index 
dropped 2.04 percent, or 1.48 
points, to 71.13 on tbm volume or 
4.1 mffiion shares. B Stares are re- 

served for fora'gninytetras. 

In Shenzhen, tbe A mdex also 
lei] sharply, losing SA7 points, or 
U percent, tol2$.4fc The Shaar_ 
ticnB market did not trade because 

China’s strong sale of treasury 
-nds, which has diverted a lars: 
aunt of money from to stock 
uker, and a lack of confioeoce m 


(Rentas, SYD 


Unites States 

Aerospace - 

IXlse Clams 
CE and ROSE. . 

*EYS AMD COUNSELORS 
WSrWvOTON O C 
iSOSi 778 -MSa 
PARIS • 

4A.2SI 0 41 
US AMC PJBS 
r3lQ. *77 2000 



REPUBLIC OF GREECE 
MINISTRY OF TOURISM 

INVITATION TO PARTIES INTERESTED 
in Hie 

DEVELOPMENT OF CASINO ENTERPRISES IN GREECE 
(LAW 2206/94 GOV. GAZ. 62/20.4.94) 

All interested parties are invited to obtain information regarding the imminent 
invitation to tender for the grant of ten (10) casino licenses. The casinos are to be 
in accordance with international specifications and will be accompanied by 
investments in the field of tourism which will extend to the entire country. 

The locations of the casino enterprises to be established are the following: 

1. The County of Attika, at the Mont Fames location on Pamitha 
Z The County of Attika, outside the boundary limits of the municipality of Athens 

3. The County of Salonika, within a fifteen kilometre perimeter of Aristotelous Square. 
Salonika 

4. The island of Crete 

5. The island of Rhodes at the Hotel of the Roses 

6. The island of Corfu 

7. The Porto Carras hotel complex in the County of Halkidiki 

8. The boundary limits of the Municipality of Loutraki-Perahora 

9. The County of Achaia 
10. The island of Syros 

The objective of the invitation to tender is to establish casinos of high standard and 
to realize substantial investments that will benefit tourism in Greece and the national 
economy. The investments proposed by the candidates will be evaluated based on 
their contribution to thb development of tourism in the country, as well as the 
upgrading of tourism in the areas where the casino enterprises will operate. 

The establishment of facilities and special projects involving the tourist Intrastructure, 
which wiff attract high class tourism to Greece such as Convention Tourism, Winter 
Tourism and Maritime Tourism (Yachting), mil be especially evaluated. 

Investors, who wish to participate in the invitation to tender may obtain information 
at the address below; 

MINISTRY OF TOURISM 

COMMITTEE FOR THE INTERNATIONAL INVITATION TO TENDER 
FOR THE GRANT OF CASINO LICENSES 
2 AMERIKIS ST. 

5th FLOOR - OFFICES 517-518 
105 64 - ATHENS - GREECE 
TEL. 3221239 
FAX. 3232605 


DREYFUS AMERICA FUND 

SICAV 

1, Boulevard Royal 
L-2953 Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B-22S72 


Notice is hereby given to the shareholders, that the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

of shareholders of DBEVFl'S AMERICA FUND will be held at the 
company’s registered office, 69, route cfEech, Lr2953 Luxembourg, 
on July I, !W at 2.00 p-m. with the following agenda: 

5. Submission of the Report of the Board of Director* aad of 
the Auditor; 

2. Approval of the Statements of Net Assets aad of Ihe 
Statement of Operat i ons for the year end e d as at February 2ft, 

199* 

3. Allocation of net results; 

4. Discharge to the Director s: 

5. Statutory appointments; 

6. MtsecSaneous. 

The shareholders are advised that no quorum is required for the 
items on the agenda of the Annual General Meeting and that 
decisions will be token on a simple majority of the shares present 
or represented at the Sleeting with no restrictions. 

In order u* attend the annual general meeting, the owners of 
hearer shares will have io deposit their shares five clear days 
before the meeting at the registered office of ihe company or with: 


BANQtiE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG 
2, Boulevard Royal 
L- 2953 LUXEMBOURG 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Investor’s Asia 


HtmgKorig V! / Singtprae fc ‘ ■■ Tokyo =•, 
,HanQ^9' . 'StraMTb^es..'' ' cei '229 

<wto ■ . • i* v. v . •.* tfa* v? *■ 



;.23&92;- v-2,294-13 






IJBIW” 




r*4js£ : - 




•*» j i . rH ' ■ j m * i. ■ ' j ■ ' ■ v ' / ' ii h . ... on. . 





Sources: Reuters, AFP 


lottnational tfcnkt Tribune 


Very briefly: 


a Nissan Motor Co. said it was negotiating with China’s Nanjing Auto 
Works to form a venture to produce commercial vehicles and auto parts. 

• The Far Eastern Frei^it Conference, a group of shipping lines that serve 
routes beween Europe and Asia, said in Singapore that it might impose a 
surcharge to cover an increase in insurance premiums because of the civil 
war in Yemen. 

• South Korea is to sign a 52 biffion contract with the French-British 
engineering company GEC Alstom to build the country’s first high- 
speed trains, ending 36 months of negotiations. 

• Victor Col of Japan wiff boost the share of audio equipment it produces 
abroad freon 60 percent to 70 percent of total output by the end of 
September as pan of its cost-cutting effort 

■ NEC Corp. of Japan will raise its production of 4- megabit dynamic 
random access memory chips in Britain from 2 million to 3 mffiion a 
month by the summer of 1995 to meet growing demand. 

• Japan’s Ministry of Finance gave a provisional go-ahead to Asahi Bank’s 
plan to set op a brokerage subsidiary, making it the first of the nation’s 
top 1 1 commercial banks to do so, Kyodo news agency reported. 

• Kirin Brewoy Cot is to buy a 16 percent stake in a hotel that All Nippon 

Airways Co. is to open in Vienna this month, for 150 mffiion Austrian 
schillings (512.8 million). AFXi AF p, Knighi Ridder 



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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, JITVE 14. 1994 


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Monday's 4 p-m. 

This list compiled by lhe AP. consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value It is 
updated twice a yBar 


iriuenm 
Hton Lin* Sloe* 


511 

* M PE to®, HpTti LQALalgjOi'' 


Ca 

N 
clos 
in 1 
prol 
offs 
T 
age 


bef. 

3.75 

thai 

A 


ijrAom.i 

High LOn SKK* 


CWv YhJ PE i Ws High Low.LaIfSiOi'0*.- 


IB’.j 4‘iAAONs 
»%I2 aaCBo.l 
3D 1 5 AST Bid 
160, U'.kACC Co 

34 5 ACS En s 

46 0,301: AG* rc 
44 17 '4 ADCs, 

17'.* u'.AESChn 

Mu it aescd? 

35 ttftAJi SIWH 
92 1 , IS 1 /. APS Hid 
rS'4 6ft A*. 

33 13ft 6ST 
TV** 174, AbOevH 
31’, 13’kAdan, 
771., 13 AonoMel 
20 V* 8’., Acid 


15' H 7%AaocLb 
— V: 90. Adonic 5 
76'» 10 Adelon n 

.46 

SJ 7 210 
_ IS IWI 
44 

37'-': 19% AdiaS v 

16 

J M 


37 lift AdobuS 5 
IJ' 1 : 4Vj Adv/Pro 
11% 5 AdvTiu 

.70 

7 74 

152 

569 

C4% 760; AttrOTila 5 

?tl 

J 19 


3?%2i:.Acfvan10i 

1 S 7% AtjncvP 

JJ 

. 17 

375 

lift 7'.*Agnicog 

.Ifle 

.? 



i — *, 

L -ft 

I 'I, 


1JJ* H 


_ 76 733 17% 16% I4*i 

... ... I '3 19". 1B*» 10*. 

. 14 401 27 21 0; Vl’-'J —ft 

,12 a 3 10 173 17% 14+i 17% -% 

_ ... 70 IS 14 V* 144, 

..34 145 » 3?»» M'i 

_ 30 4443 »’.*> 33'.* T» 

_ MS 12'** HW 17'« 

Afll 3.8 17 470 18 T7 IS 

_ _ 7346 rj JS'-l 74! j 24’.) 

15 173 304* JO** 2Q": 

_ .. 7430 13'* 13 13 

... _ 1074 ISV. IS 155, , 

.. 12 472 19% 10'.* |}',i 

IB 7418 lSl, ISft IS*, 

.. 12 1195 72' : ?I'.I 71% * !k 

39 1040 O’ , 815 O 

10 «'> 8% 90 

41 17*5 16% 14' 

44 134, 13',* IJ'. 

35'* 35' 1 35'. 

77V, J4V* 27 

6 SV. 4 

Sft 5ft 54* -V.. 
304, 38 301 J *1 

35 V* 344* 35"* * 
13% I’I; 12 V* 

Il’V. 11% 

57 17% I. 1 ’* tJ'i —Vi 

221 3”. 7:. 3% 

204 541-. 54 54 *} 

. . 274 l2'.«dlOV* 10%— 

I.T 13 640 22’, 22'. i 72*, 

. 31 533 17% lit: 14"* 

. 31 460 25', 75% 2S*5 *% 

.88 3J 17 208 25’.: Sift 25 
... a 417 14% 14 14% 

... 13 452 2"., 2% 2% 

. ... 21S 10V. 9% 10 -V* 

.. 16 310 11% 11% lift — % 

Jl SoK IT": IP* 11% 

.40 ?.-l ? r2 o 34 3SW —ft 

_ o 1 16% 14V, 16'., —Vi 

_ 7B0 Jft I", 7% 

. _ 404 12 I IV* 12 

.. 2311331 30", 2B% JS%— lVi 

... 13 272 14V* 14 14 

Ole . 113 749 71 68% 6B’* 

.73 U 9 1039 22% IP* 77% 

5% JjftACIdsVov .16 ljO 43 107 I S’--? 15% I5 1 -: 

33 lOtlACOtaa 5 14 17 19 779 14** |4 Uft 

33 289 20',* 19% 20*.* 

50 1.8 18 4122 28% 28 IS*'., 

_ 10 127 7*, 6’o 6% 

21 1414 23% 22% 23*, 

... 15 394 «V. 9": 0-. 

_ . 213 16 IS 1 * 15’ • 

_. 34 43oI 21 |9V* 10 

9 714 19', 18': 19’: 

... _ 134 JO’-t 29 30’- 1 

... _ 24 3W6 JO", 20"* 

.. VI XI6 13 12'** 13 

07 11 10’* 10" * 

JOb 1.0 10 7 21% 70“ * 20** 

... 17 5474 46 45' , 45’ : 

_ 18 07 7'* .-’,* 7'* 

.5 10 1600 15’.: IS 15% 

9 361 Uft 14’* 14V* 

„ _ 100 14' s 14 14 

_ 28 2407 37’; ;7 J7‘ 


i tv* 7%Agoum 
I4v. i** An-Mein 
41 14 38% Alvin 
?iHii%Akm:«: 
23% lCViAKranK 
i«% iu%Aidrhi5 
34V>13ViAMva 
28'. *23 AJe*BW 
19'.* 6V:AliasR 

at. I*. AllASem 
14 7%AharPn 
I* ?'',AlnCemi 
24<->ll%Allda 
32* « 2(% AJfdOo 5 
72**: 14 AMdKldO 
24 1 * 1 '** Alplvil 

IS'-.-u AtsnaBla 
39V: 16*. Ancrc 
O'., aiitc s 
OJ 31 AmerOn 
30 5 * :i%ABnkr 


:iV*lS',iAmF«m 

34I.,2S%AI>/^1 
24*1 6% AHlmCb 5 

23 Vi 14% A/AS 
17 W 

72 14' , AmMbS-31 

30*; lfi' , APwrCvs 
23** 15' : AmRend 
39i*2I% A/nSuw 
27 l7'*4iriTele 

I4% OVfcftTrnvei 
16** 0 AmcrCcs 
26% 16% A ml-.-a 

32 31 «moen 

15 5 Amriofli 

33'* M'.jAinlcCPi .08 
l6'_ 1 1% AnctiB,3i 
17''* 10V* Andoim 
■J9'; i”, Andrew! 

T r ' ■« 1 3 Arvsros 
30', IB' r Amec 
45', 32 6poioC *18 1 

27'* 12'VArtSou S .02 

25 1 * 10% Aotebce s .04 
25 l3’*AoiCqrt 

33 St.iAbdlncvS 

52 25' - t-x*n'M s 


137 16' 


15’ 


|6 


1334 23' 

8 _. 8183 27V., 26% 27 
I 45 4M 74'* 73 24% ■ 

J 3D 1340 15% !J‘r 14% 

„ _ 100 18’: P% 18 

... 48 174 23 % 22 23 

. 21 7371 41% 39% 39% 


_ I2*j ArtwrHl 
10 lO'.ArctiCm 
35' i 76' .AnwOP 
36 l3'.*Ar90s» 

15% 8%Ark.B.:si 
22 le Armor 
22% 14' .- Arnold s 
24% r% Arlsir 

13% 6'<Ashwnn 

46 20% AspciTI 

J41.I8 *WOlW 
33% I7*< AAdCmB 
20** 1 1 Astec s 

34*. 27% Asl or .OF 
38**24": AJISeAir 
20% li Aimeis 
26% 16'-* AuSon 
0*i, AKAimiy 
14'.-* 4% AUS».!i 
6 1 J j 37 Auiodt 
34' *23% Aurolnd 
29'.* lJ%AulO)0's 
il’A|6 A*rfTch 


- 722 73% 22% 13 - 

... 322 14% 14 14% - 

1.16 4J B 35 27", 27 27% - 

_ 4« 017 13% l<»* 14'* - 

04 4 10 134 10% 10% 10% ■ 

64 1.0 20 52 21% 21% Jl'-J - 

JO 2.1 If 19 I?« 10 10 - 

... 73 ’SI %% 16’ • It," i- - 
. 22 1201 0"; o 9% - 

_ 21 517 27% 76'* 27 

_ 1390 20 76 24% 56 -I 

_ 1250 30 2i 25 25 

14 fO 14'.i 1 6% la’ 4 - 

. ... I5£J j34% 34>i, 14% - 

Ji 1.7 18 1009 77% 76% ?7 — 

si 105;. 23% r% - 

... 32 282 70% 10% 70 

_ .. 2751 8-r ?>, 7-« — 

. 16 MB 5%-„ S’ : S% ■ 

.48 TO 1» IWO 50 48’-* 48% — 

_ 20 344 78 77% 28 

_ 40 7125 19 13% 18% - 

.. jo tar 30% 20% 30% - 


ihe C 


B-C 


7 J % 28 % BBS. r 1 08 
15*: T2' *BHC FUS .08 
24% la BIS15 
71 44':B/.*C Sil 

30% 0 B/AC Wl S 
’7**15 EWIP .40 
20% B%6abo9*> 
75-,IS*aBoterJ Of 
14 IO*o BvlIvGm 
17 **24% B*anPanc I OD 
78 F 7 ' : BcOnv D1C3.50 

JS*.I9 BncGol.'c JTr 
7* % 17% Bona-: C 

20% n %et iouin 

33' :7<>'-*Bania 
25% 13 BanvnJv 
38 22% Be roll 

li i’.B-jfeiPj 


J2 

.02 e 


1.40 


.44 


.16 


2'.iBO!T..-cn 

65'*38%iJQvBH 
35% 13%BeriBins 
5#% 33 BelIBcp 
15% 6%3cM.*A-C 
49’-: IS*':B.?IISrl 
9% I'.BenlOG 
40 22 airkter 

26 14‘iBerhj.;r 
20% 14 %B«|Pwt 
13% o' * BiaB s 
52%25%B»«*n 
l3'-i 8*'.E*,Vfn<?l 
6% I 1 iJicTcG 
3i 7s% BoaiSn s 124 
Z2'.. U'-EcbEvn J7 
2s>*P'.aocviwn 
2»‘ : 13 Bo.jmrwn 
7i' t 3' :Bo/lod 
51 U Bosnlncv. 

.4% 4- ■ BOSITc 
14% 9-.ao-enB 
ii% 4 Si-'e - ' 

SI 1 *11 BrdtKfTc 
SO’.Jl'.sBrodM 
21% ox.croGoof 
1-' : 10' : BrTom 
II'* 7%Er'.’no* J4 
77% 17':BuHetS 
13% V-BUiWT 


J.6 10 42a 

A 0 368 
-. tO 17a5 
_ 74 1374 
_ 17 1269 
2.2107 345 

‘ii i'i 822 
_. ... 285 
3J 10-1637 
SJ _ 435 

1.0 .. 1683 
... 15 670 

2J 1? 200 

1.6 16 SJ8 
_ 139 1 471 
.1 25 0 T 
... 19 1 54 

2.7 16 2121 

- 44 I6S8 

_ 15 03 

- 10 290 
.. 23 HU 

.. 841 

1.1 17 .103 
_ 73 4BS 
.. 13 710 

li 16 67 

.. JO 2527 
.. 17 1748 

572 

3.6 I! 2085 
IJ 19 540 
_ 32 43 

. 37 69f 

r.i^P 

. 32 1561 
_ 96 231 
... _ 422 
.. _ aig 
.. 25 1082 
. . 207 

_ 406 1030 
3.0 15 459 

- 441 

155 


.10' * 29% 30% - 1 

14% I3‘,:ll-.j- • 

16% 18% 18% 
S2W St 51% — ■ 
23' 1 21% 23 
18% 18 1B% — 

IP, 

18% 18% 18% - ' 
14% 13% 14 % v* 
11% 31 31 — 1 

67% 66*: 67% - 1’ 
JU* 30% 30% — 1* 
72% 71% 21% -» 
18% 18% 18" „ 

33': 32% 33% — ' 
15% If li% — ' 
J4»-, 34' * 34*: — ' 

14 13% 13". 

1-.. 3 3% 

63% aJ 63' : - * 

20 

52 50". SP. * V 

15 10% 19% 

15** <125 2W t — 1'., 

7% 6% 7 

40% 30% 40 
13% 14"* IS’* . 
IB 17% 17% • '■ 
11% 11% ||% -*■ 
32% 31 31% — *■ 

10 9", 07.— i, 

3 2% 3 

34% ill, 34 

31'v 71%2r.„ — '•* 

24% 74 24% 

16% 17% 18 
9 8>* 8'»u— *■ 

38% 3 7 ' * 38% — " 

ia% 0% 10 — • 

10 9% 

IP. 10% II 
IB 17% 17%—'. 
40% 39 39% — *1 

U IP: 17 
16% 15% 16% 

S 7% 8 

10% |9 19 

U 13% 13% — 



Monday's Cloning 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not retieci 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


11 /form 

Hgft Low stoo 


Dr* Y19 PE 1005 Han Low LMeslCh oe 


9% 8 AJM Sir 
3? J?'*ALC 

11 e%AMlnHn .. ... 

Pk ':6Mlnw1 .. _ 

IJ 7 . B’/*AMC ... U 

24ViID‘*AJVlCp» 1.75 7J _ 
5 1'i.ARC . 28 

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5ft HuNVR wi 
1 Nabors 


J8a 67 
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24 Ti : J 
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11 Ui 
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43 9*, 

405 91* 

50 20' : 
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32 


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liv,. 


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78 7 6?, 


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41 13 I 


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5‘? J ICN Bio 
lift 70,101 
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38% 291. ImoOil g 1.80 
40? Jftincstar 
ii’, Aftincyien 

110'. 9ft InolWlkl 
2 SV. 7 mieicm 
20? lftlnltaSvs 
4 TftinCrPd 
18 13ftlnF-.n5u 
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1304 7'.'*lnfLofry 
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38'* ltftluaaCb 
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14'.* 4'jJanB0ll 
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72 AftKefyOi 
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23ft 14'. Kirby 
11% 7ftk.il MfO 
10', 4 Ki«Vus 
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6 4V* LXREUon 

??■« 9'^Laicer 
17’.* 14 V* Landaur 
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9% 5% Lazk'.ap 
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90, 7 ft LB El* wl _ .. 

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a%24%LefiGTeln _ - 

35'<* 28ft LehCWCL >2.31 6.8 * 
13 4'tLenYenwf 
8V: AftLcnjl wt 
72ft II VLIIWsm 
77'., 3"lL'lfH6 
8"* ?%LoriCp 
16'-, 9 Lumex 
I5"» fl'kLuna 


328 S', 5V. 

118 140, 16'-. 
91 3»'„ 3% 

95 I Oft 10 
167 3*, 31':,. 

36 3 70, 

_. - 335 30% 30' * 

_ 53 107 J».'i. 2ft 

.. _ IS 10ft 10ft 

■flic i _ 9a 100. 10 

... 2638 14"* 13ft 

_ 56 2 l'v„ 

... ._ 26 2" b 2ft 

.70 47 9 n 16V. 16% 

- ... B28 4>* 4ft 

Jit 1.6 94 216 |9'k 18% 


_. _ 60 1" 

_. - 150 7%,. 

... _ 6* 7V: 

. .. 125 % 

. 20 80 J 

. 8 70 2”% 

_ 18 35 4*1',, 


Sft _ 

left — ■ * 
3"-. — "1. 
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71k _ 

U% —■* 
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10ft —ft 
10ft • ft 
140k -ft 
2 — ft 
2ft — Vi, 

la% —v, 
4"« —Vi. 
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I ft —ft 
T 1 !* —0* 
9"? -ft 
— ft 


4', 

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5 I Aft la'. 
... 32 T I ft 

.4 14 504 17 d IS' 


.18b 


10 


11 11% mi 
1 53 u 10’ 10 
632 6% Oft 

60 lift 1 

65 9% 9ft 

S « 44 

74 8‘ * 8 

33 B>* 8% 

4% 4% 


- a 242 37 36ft 


70 96 64 333 

_ 40 
.. 12 
_ II 


Bft 8 

20 13ft 13% 
5ft S’k 
4’- 


_ 23 105 18% 180". 

_ 17 16 I IV* lift 

_ 10 4'k 4% 

.. 36 158 90? 9% 

2 13 19 I 7% 

_ _ 206 4ft 40* 

_ 9 55 1 ft 1 ft 

_ 21 7 10ft JO'? 

M 6.1 IS 110 14ft 14% 


.06 


. 16 

_. 7 30 

. 13 356 

_ 27 
_ 31 
35 


3% 3 ; 'i 

STi V 


16 


4'. 4 

9 Bft 
1 4'k„ JIV„ 
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8 45 44ft 
120 250k U 
26 34’* 33% 
_ 44 S'„ 5 

_ - 1162 6% 0 5% 

70 1.0 14 53 190k 19 

* 7 101 «i. 4% 


6 

6% -0k 
7'k 

2 -’.i 

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1% — '.* 

| Aft —ft 
111'. — 'i 
10 

60k — ’• 
1 —Vi, 
9ft 
44 

8ft —ft 
B'.', 

4ft _ 

361* *'.* 
Bft -0k 

13ft -W 

5 0k -0k 
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It'* t % 
4% _ 

9% 

a 

4ft 

l": 

70 ft — % 
14% -V, 
3’'i, —'% 
j V, _ 

A —ft 

9 * ft 

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44 ft —0, 
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33*', — V; 
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4% —ft 
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10% 1 ft 
8% — ■•» 


7% 4%NATrs| 
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13% 8 NCdOo 
17", 13+iNartnbav 
63 49% NIPS ot 
3% 2%NirvtTch 
15% lOftHCAPI 
15ft 100- WLAPI2 n 
15% 11'kNFLPI 
1S% 12'aNGAPI 
150k II NMDPVd 
l6ftU%N»MIP2 
15ft IlftrttJJPD 
I3'4 IDftNNYMI 
150, lOftNHVPI 
ISV: 1 J % NvOHPI 
15% lOftNOHPlIn 
15', 10'kNPAPD 
15% 10ftNVAPI2n 
15!', IlftNuwWA 


6 S'-* 

133 10 
8% 


40b 2.2 





475 

8 1 





J*6e 2.0 

ii 

25 7>'-„ 

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•78a 6.B 


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11% 

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1,2 


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17 12ft 

i:>. 





34 17% 










6.1 


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IT' 7 


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130. 

13'.* 







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67 


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5.7 





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13-k 

lift 


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34 ft 22 Ofiien 
lift 9ftOneLibl 
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301* I2‘ iCnenl v 
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7%3'VuPLCSks 
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la'.'*T2%PMC 
70!* 52 PeErt BfD 
ICi2%8aftPcEn p*E 
23% 18% PGEWA 
21ft IA 1 * PGEWB 
191k 14%PGEpfD 
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19'*, 14' '* PGEfHG 
18'*11%PGEPIH 

MftMftPGlptO 

28% 24 POEpfP 

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76l» 71 liPC'EjXU 
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4% IftPooeAm 
lift 4 PWHKwl 
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10 av.PW5PIMlld 
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5% 7 PWU5D wi 
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16 12 ParPl? U»a 

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45% 34 PorniTr ... w 

26% 27 P-ftPE 188 7.7 v 

/'.* 4% Period 70 19 12 

13'* 9-.,Pu/in'iC ... 46 

15%2I PcrtlCM 2.12 9J0 — 
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6 IVi.PtUliLOS 
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J60i J4';F8iPviri .90 

39V-, 24 Pinwav 40 

38'421?,Pilfw> A JO 

11% SftPInRk: 

25?* 10 PlyGwft 12 


78 

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2.7 15 66 

ir 4 
i 

low 

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vA 10 ft — % 

2A 

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7' 0 

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9% 

90* 9V, - V, 

_ ... IS 

530 

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IV* 

lift 

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11 11% .0. 


7.7 11 3 

7ft 

7% 7>. 

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5.9 18 45 

4'V,. 

3’k* 

15’.* 

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151k 15% -ft 

4.75 

7.9 _ Zlfcd 

60 



82 ...28300 

93’., 

92v? 95’i + I'i 



It"* 

19", 19ft -0', 

IJ7 

7.4 ... 20 

IB 

17% 18 Ift 









1.20 

7.7 _ 13 

lift 

15% is% — % 





1.96 

BJ) to, 9 

24’. 

24% 24% 

JIW 

7J ... 3 

.'.kft 

75% 35% —ft 

2.05 

7.9 10 

26% 

25ft 7a ♦ 



23 ft 

73 | - 73^ • u 

1.76 

7.8 _. 47 



.100 

_ .. 23 

l7l ..’ 27 

221. 

3'-'„ 

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71% 72% 

V-,t Jft 

la’k 17 —0k 


PS 

:■ : 2: Psi'.n £ 

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lift'* . Ftci_“ 

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:9. :: s«jLn 
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lift IftReloc 
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A', I ' .Pehv 
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14 10' :RsH1n 

2% I RSInt 
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30* l":RspTcfl 
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1-'^ 8.5 


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96 178 
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13 


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orr* 71"* 

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27’* 22% 
14 16ft 
19ft I0‘i 
I j", 18 * 

1 7ft 17ft 
16'-* I o'. : iA'-i 
left 16% 16% 
16 IP* 16 

•0 ir, ia 

14ft 14'.* 14% 
15 14ft 15 
15'* IS 15% 

9% 9% 

Uft "49, 14ft 
lift 12% lift 

i:v. 12% i2i> 

130, 13ft 
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6% 6% 


ift 

2"'.. 

left 

h 

lift 


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15 43 32 
.. 35 " 
_ 1650 J 


?% 9"* 9 vo 

Bft 4'k 8% 
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Aft AVi Aft 
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2% 21,1, 
3% 3Vi. 

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1 1 
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2 2 
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v u <v„ 
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103 Sft 
135 40 * 1 , 
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62 


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2J 14 
1.7 11 
7JS 12 
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1 94 6% 

I 70’. 
37 17"i 
41 13% 
5 IS”* 
6 47 871 IS.', 
.1 12 I 47ft 
-.48 5 16 '* 

16 74ft 

1 3\u 

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J 21 211 68% 
89 1% 

132 2% 

56 75') 

10 Y> 

9u40% 
31 37 

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5 2A 687 27V* 
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3.1 30 
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47% 47% 
36** 366* 
74ft 24ft 

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11% 11% 
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sift AS 1 * 
lft Ift 
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25'.* Ii0r ■ 

77 J9 
390* 40ft 
3A‘. 37 

5% 5"k 
21 ft 22"* ■ 
?*. 1 ?% - 


470:35’ :5JW 2.10 5.7 

4' ia a E soifnd 
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21 s HI SoaaCom 
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180, 6V*5arv3am s, 

Ift. v-OanoGBl .051 6 7 
16% lOftSoWm s AO 7.8 
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JO0kI3»,SaiOECn 273 10 J 
85'.7».SafHWPn A0I 5.2 
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35 2BV*5nfORCLn2.30 6. 7 
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291 . 74 SaTSNPL n 2.12 87 
4 "to IftSolPP* 

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15% 10’i SD9C PfB «0 8.0 

26ft 72% SDdO pfH 1 82 7 JI 
9% 4'kkondv .12 2.0 

10ft AftSMeriBk 
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7ft 'Vi.ScandC 
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7'.* 3"*5cnoib 

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6ft ?/„5emPc* _ 22 

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§',3>vu Service _. 19 

5** 3ft Servo Ir _. 10 

90k IftShefldMd .. _ 

16% 7*.-ShllCm a Dc 2 9 

B 7 ', 3'kShwdGp 6 

4% 3ft3wo«. JO 15.4 _ 
4*1 2%5*1co _ .. 

12', JftSiinvU _ 31 

!i v * OftHoanSdP .79 15.B .. 
40 Z30kSmittis .52 18 n 

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104 2'k 

88 11% 
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10 i~ 
254 
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6"' 

V, 

IJ'* 


30 25‘, 
305 77 

7u«ft 

14 34' * 

31 39V; 

38 2S 7 . 

101 J'i. 

12 9% 

10 lift 
18 73ft 
8 6 

15 Li 10*1 

843 37% 

43 1ft 

5 9% 


t> . 6* 
4% 4% 
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3AV, 3*0. 
2% ?% 
16% 19 
lift 12% 

1% IV* 

da 6 

j4*k 14% 
45 45% 

14% 24% 
76% 77 • 

MW 88”* 

34 34% 

39ft 39 W 
250k lift 
4 4 

9V, 6V: . 

lift lift 


HF, 10% 
37% J7% 


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16". »v.ThmF*i 
34 ’■ 75ri,Tnrlnrt 6 
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10'* 7":ThrmP _ 

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11', JftThrv'ol 5 

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lift 9"*Thrmfxs . ■ 

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97". 76 TofEpfC 7.76 13.1 
106 9Ji.;7olEpfD 10.00 106 
9-m 70* Tolland 
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10 7 , 7 TmsL* .14 IJ 

IJ0; WSTranB 74 2.9 

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IO% 9'*TroAG95 *U( AB 
I 7 * I 1 '.. Triton _ 

-u li.Tnian wt _ 

Aft 4 TubMe* 

19' 1 17%TomBA 
Z?% 17 TumBB 
13 o'lTumrC 


_. 54 


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07 


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17 

406 

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551 

31 
225 

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34 

347 

153 

163 

479 

19 

19 

1 

32 

1 


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249 

3 


21% 21ft 71ft —ft 
14ft 14ft Uft 
38% 30 30 , 0k - 

8 % 8% &% -ft 

8 % Sft Sft -tt 
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Bft Bft 8ft —ft 

ft ft - 

IS 14% i«?k— % 

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76% 76ft 74ft —ft 
94% 94ft 94 'k 
9% 9V* 9% *% 

Sl. Jft A'/,* 

15% 15ft 15ft ‘ft 
3% 2% ,1%.. 

3 7ft 2ft —ft 
lft l'ft 2m 

9’-t •% 9ft • 

lift 11 ?'* lift *ft- 
3% 3ft 3ft —ft 
9ft 9V> 9 Vi —ft 

r 5! ’’is *- 

5ft 5% Sft — S . 
JBft 15ft 18ft _ 
18% 18ft 18ft —V« : 
8ft Bft 8% «■<*-' 


_y=v_ 


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IS’k UftSmlBrnM _8Sa 67 


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74 1 *]? SCEfl P’G 1.45 
^^TI'.'SCEdolP 174 
73% llVikaLiCo V .91 
5ft 2 7 ', Sea rich 
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lift 7ft3Dec1VD 
Sft TikSpfSupwf 
'■ 3% Stone 


-Wyi43!'' B 5PC'R 
IQ'-* S'kSlarrfH 


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l.tte 2.6 


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7% A 1 j SlrlCap .Blellj 
154* a U-inEI 
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7’, 5 SrvGod 
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IT"* 4 St rut her 
17% ID'.; jlkleVid 
1 1 v* 2'Vto Sulctr: 

I2'-, 9'kSumlT, 

4ft 2ft5unCIV 
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lt% 40', Till 
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1100, 7t.t(*Prd JO 

I5‘ki0%iasrv 52 

16 BftTceOeS » 

38% 23"* Tccnirl 1 12 
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1 7 "* IJftTeinR 10 7 

57 36 TcOa 76 » 

18 i7'*TempCU 60a jo 

7^ I'-' 1, Tone, a 

7ft 3>,TerBlun 
14". 7ft TeKMee 

19 9 V; Thermcl 5 


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51 7 
IJ 3M* 

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SI 140, 
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13 23ft 
fS 18 

111 4’ to 

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351 2’V„ 
1 1 3*.'ii 
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For expert advice on personal investing. 

Every Saturday, the International Herald Tribune publishes The Money Report, a weekly section that provides 
■ a penetrating analysis of financial products and services available to today's high-net-worth investor. 

For timely investment information, read The Money Report. 


Jteralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


’ribunc 


WUID WITH tisr rot* no ms nw wiawcnwi 




























































































I 


I 


I 


n 

I 






In 


EC 


nicks < 


By Scott Howard-Cooper 

Lm .■! ngela Trims Sen if if 

NEW YORK — Sam Cassell 
had ihe wind so knocked out of him 
early in the founh quarter that it 
prompted the Houston Rockets to 
call a 20-second time-out. But the 
rookie point guard declined to 
come oul Instead, he knocked the 
wind out of the New York Knicks. 

The team that hadn’t played well 
in the fourth quarter in the first wo 
games of the National Basketball 
Association's championship series 
held steady Sunday in the face of 
another impending disaster and 
Cassell took it from there. He sank 
the go-ahead 3-pninter and. then 
four consecutive free throws in the 
final 22 seconds to give the Rockets 
a 93-89 victory in Game 3 and a 2-1 
edge in the best-of-seven series. 

It continues with games Wednes- 
day and Friday nights in Madison 
Square Garden. 


“It was a big character win for 
us," said Houston’s coach. Rudy 
Tomjanovich. 

Coming off back-to-back disas- 
trous fourth quarters at home, one 
which thev survived and the other 
that did them in, the Rockets en- 
tered Madison Square Garden 
shooting a combined seven of 37 in 
those 24 minutes. Then, in Game 3. 


NBA FINAL 


thev had a stretch of 1 1 consecutive 
misses and five turnovers that be- 
gan at the end or the third penou. 
The offense consisted of four free 
throws, and two of those were from 
illegal defense calls. 

Fittingly. Cassell broke the 
drought with a driving lay-up with 
7- 18 left, pushing a Rocket lead 
Ibai was 14 in the fourth quarter 
back to four. 75-71. It was a nice 
warm-up to his personal cnarjc.er 


test, this 24-year-old from Florida 
State who had seven turnovers to 
six assists the first two games while 
going four of 12 from the iield. 

That cushion held up until Pat- 
rick Ewing’s 18-Footer from the left 
side with 2:52 to go put the Knicks 
ahead. 82-81. The Rockets regained 
the lead, then New York went up 
a gain , finally at 88-86 on a baskcL 
by Derek Harper with 53 seconds 
to go. 

The Rockets answered by getting 
ihe ball inside to Hakeem 
Olajuwon. But when the defense 
collapsed around him. pan of the 
Knick tactic that limited the regu- 
lar-season MVP to 21 points on 
eiftht-of-20 shooting. Olajuwon 

P. * ■ ■ it x iV.rt l-*fr rtitcf 


whipped Lhe ball from the left post 
to Cassell, standing just beyond me 
3-point arc and straight out from 
the baskeL 

“I was making my move. 

Olajuwon said, “but 1 saw on ,.»pen- 


r ers 


By Kenneth N. Gilpin 

.Vrt York Tima Stmt* 

NEW YORK — As the New 
York Rangers and the New \ ork 
Knicks press on for league champi- 
onships. the teams' new owner. 
Viacom Inc., has quietly acceler- 
ated its efforts to sell them, along 
with Madison Square Garden and 
ihe MSG cable television neimm 
that carries their games. 

Last week Allen & Co., an ut- 
vesimeoi bank representing Via- 
com, mailed detailed packets of fi- 
nancial data about the properties 
to a small group of potential bid- 
den.. 

The sale of the Knicks and the 
Rangers would lead to their depar- 
ture from New York, yet ownership 
does mauer owners hire the gener- 
al managers and often the coaches. 


and decide how much to pay a star 
— sometimes even whether to re- 
tain him. 

Almost since it bought Para- 
mount Communications earlier 
ibis year. Viacom, which is carry ing 
510 billion in debt, has sent strong 
signals that it would not mind if 
someone else signed Patrick Ew- 
ing’s and Mart Messier's pay- 
checks. 

Stanley Shuman, who is oversee- 
ing the process at Allen & Co- 
declined to say how many prospec- 
tuses had been sent oul who had 
received them, or what price Via- 
com hopes to receive. 

Viacom officials have said that 
inquiries about the properties have 
been received, though they stopped 
well short of discussing who the 
potential buyers might be. But in 
sports arenas and along \< ail 


StreeL. the usual suspects have beer, 
rounded up. 

These include Time Corner, pu 
entertainment and cabie television 
dam. and Tele-Communication: 
Inc., the nation's lugest cable : '• 
ccmpanv and owner of severa 1 re- 
gional sports networks, both & 
which have declined tc Lvnxrr.i. 

Also mentioned have been 
Nynex. which has denied any ’«■*- 
est, and ITT Corp.. whicn o-.-nr 
hotels, insurers and fiiunciji-ecr- 
vices companies. 

.Among individuals nter.ucneo. 
none o: whom responded tcpnone 
calls seeking comment. x r r 5r i : 
M. Sleinbrenner and Sun lev !■■ 
Jaffe. the former president of ? ara- 
mouni Communications, both « 
whom are said ro be working * 
groups of investors to organs.* or. 
offer. 


ins. And it was wide open. Id rath- 
er take a three than a two. That s a 
chance I wanted to lake. 

Cassell went up as Harper start- 
ed to run at him with a raised arm. 

The shot got off. then went through 
with 32.6 seconds left to pul the 
Rockets up. 89-88. 

•■Dream created it aD " said Cas- 
sell. referring to Olajuwon. He 
had three guys on him- He made 
the pass. I mads the shot." 

The Knicks called time-out. 

When Charles Oakley couldn't find 
someone to take the inbounds pass, 
thev called another. Oakley got the 

ball to Harper on the next uy. but 
disaster struck: Ewing, setting a 
pick a few feet from the basket on 
Lhe !e:: side in hopes of springing 

John Starks Tree for a jumper or 
->ass inside, was called fora moving 
Screen by official Jake O'Donnell. 
Offensive i'jul. 

-*Ycu :an‘! make a call like that 
eipeoidiy at that point in the 
c.ip-i-f .* swing said. 

= Said O'Donnell. one of the 
Naur's most respected referees: 

- ■ “-vji j judaraent call. The play 
, ;>icfc and roll. He moved his 
pjn ci: ar.d titen he did ii again. I'm 
r. :*i j'jnnj let it be twice. 

The KmcJ.i wire now forced to 
foul to Mop the clock. Harper 
crabbed Outsell with — seconds 
fe:'-. Cassell made both. Starks 
n:ade one free throw with 3.9 left 
and purpose!; missed the second ir . 
ho'e: oi -it. offensive rebound and 
•-.-in V basket. No luck. Tne Rockets' 
Oi:s*Thoros got the loose ball and 
called time-out. 

■,vv- r . Tassdl look the entry - 
■'a-?, be v.as intentionally fouled 
2.4 ieconds left. He again 
made both, it was 93-89. and the ^ ■ 
Rocket? hai turned the ubles on 
the Knicks 

“The bigger the challenge, the g 
more he sue* up." Tomjanovich 
sa.d of Cusseu. lasl 



The Assoaeacd Press 

The Cleveland Bjdiaw joneja 
growing list of wans 
Httle trouble solving Teddy _H|- 
guera as they moved into afa&- 

^ fie irithOacago in ^Amer- 
ican League Central ptwa pa- 
Albert Bdle’s grand slam capped 

iieaussiJSSiS- 

hc ^tinocri a disastrous strt^ 

isaasa#* 

with nobody out in the secOT^_ 
In his last four starts, Higucra 
has allowed 20 «nt^rans 
innings for a 19-29 ERA. He 
shipped in the rotation race duffle 
that span with a tired arm. 

Oriotes 8, Red Sox 4: Bra Mc- 
Donald, after a two-hour ram de- 
lay, won Ids ninth game as Cal. 
Ripken, Rafael Palmeno and Leo 
Gomez homered and Baltimore 
completed a weekend sweep in 
Boston and dosed to one game or 
the East-leading New York Yan- 


balwd writing 'Detroit? -wnsnmg \ 

streak at four; - 

Sierra went 4-ft»-5 with fivrRite 

and Stan Javier ta 2 *J£2* . 

homexasCteklandwOTmSffl®^- . 

Sara had ari KBrsmglt rntd-a - 
run-scoring tatong . . 

his 15th homer m the 

15 hits against ttaec Scatflfc ^Ba- 

ers. ■ - 

fi^yab % - 

QtvV David Cope became ihe 


ALBOtWWJP 


teague’s&st 

h>g hnst Texas U> three h® 5 .®.™ 


kecs by winning six of seven. 

McDonald (9-4) allowed three 
runs and six hits in dgbt-plus in- 
nings as he got his 50th victory in 
the majors. Brady Andason went 
4-for-4, with two RBIs and two 
steals, for the Orioles. 

Angels 8, Tigers <fc Urfn-hitting 
Gary DiSanana and Spike Owen 
hit bad£-to-back homers that end- 
ed a fifth-inning tie as California 





111 canied=A iwo-hit /shutout >. 

nito the eighth before the Rmtgss 
dosed to 6-2 wi& *3*™.%*. 
earned runs. Coaejcsds the -AS. ■; . 

for CooewithrmKBIdoeSeiniher 1 
third and a two-wa triple.m jM . 
sevemth. • ; ... • 
iJ« gww TqwfW.,w.;*»e,. 
Monday aBmms: ■ . v : 

Twins 6, White Sox * Kxtby v 

Puckett bad three hits anddrore in ; 
ihree runs to move into die to*#" 
league RBUead with6Jas Mmae - - 
sou swept fbargames tom ria&g .» 
Chicago. : , - . / <; 

Bloe Jays 3, Yankees Devoa - : 

White hit a tw6*nm boe»r rariw: ; 


QgQUIUk iUWUWU ■ 

its fourth stta^ht riariefi/^V-; V ;; 

m Giarife'M^ 


The Associated Prcn 
It was difficult to distinguish the 




Car* rrxax-Preu* 

Sam Cassell driving around Patrick *^**5*’ 

last seven points to hold off the Knicks in Madison Square Garden. 


pretenders from the contenders at 
Candlestick Park, which siowiy is 
turning into a house of horrors for 
the San Francisco Giants. 

The San Diego Padres, wto be- '■ ' NL RO CNPC? ^ •- f 

zan the three-game series witha 5*- - . ■ ■ ■ . • . 

24road record, completed a sweep ahead rmm the ogJithw£wA^ r/1 
Sunday with a 5-2 victory. Andy > 

Bcnes struck out 12 in eight mnn^s Pint* & Mar tot- , 

and took over the major league wcnt4-for-4and dro re rogg ^^ v •/.- : 

strikeout lead with 100. as Pittsborgh jo ® ;- t 

The Giants have now lost fonr in • - ' '-*7 '• ' 

n «. dninhl at hnnw. '* - 


mar, hdped 

as Atlanta woo-nr^HboshSL; 

(Um> - A>)« Jr < i : 


J ';9 


Sunday’s Line Scores 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Eon Division 



w 

L 

PCI. 

NCM York 

35 

24 

593 

Baltimore 

34 

25 

576 

Bo-, ten 

*W1 

27 

J42 

D-.troP 

3i 

20 

517 

Tarcnio 

» 30 

Central Division 

580 

Chicago 

33 

25 

549 

ClwvlanC 

33 

25 

549 

Minaesaia 

33 

27 

550 

KansciClty 

3' 

29 

517 

MllvfOUkS* 

27 34 

We3l Division 

A13 


X 

3 

580 

aCCtlw 

a 

25 

.4)7 

Caiitcrma 

To 

3t 

,J'.3 

Jtl 

CariOirt 

1" 

.1 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EosJ Division 

w L Pci. 

Alton, a V » -«*i 

■AapirtOi 17 2* aO. 

PhllcdJioqlo <31 32 

FI9r‘?T 20 32 

Non -'urk » ^ tZ2 

Cortrol Division 

Cincinnati IS 34 ■*** 

Nuuslon ^ 37 

31. Louis 31 28 

pmsSurjn ® 13 

Chicago 23 37 333 

West Division 

LosAn«l» 32 “ SH 

CiVoroOo 78 C3 AS9 

San Francisco 28 34 * 5 - 

Sar. Diego 23 3» 371 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
NOW York wo 100 ooo—l 4 0 

Toronto 100 000 5?s — 3 < I 

Kamlonteckl and Le/rltii Honloen.Casllllo 
(9) and Knott. Borders 1*1- w— Hentgen. S-S- 
L— Komlenlecki. 4-1 Sv— Castillo HJ. 
HR— Toronto. White (9). 

Chicago BIO 100 008-2 B 1 

MlnnaMto 2M 101 !® 

AlvartL DeLeon 151. Jannson «1 «" tf 
kovlce; Pulido, will-* C7i. Guinrlo «». «auL 
lera (V| and Parks VO-PUIWO. 3-i L-AI- 
vares. B-Z HP— Minnesota. Pueken noi. 

clove lone 1W « »:« » ; 

Milwaukee 310 200 008- » ■ 1 

Martinet Plunk (61 and Pena: Hieuera. 
Navarro (2). Mercedes I7J. Liovd (»J ond 
Harper. W-Marilne*. *4. L-Hlguera. 1-S- 
Sv— Plunk (II. HR— Cleveland. Belle 
Gcnsclos Ml. aocroa 1*1. Mllwcukve. Volcn- 
iin (41# Reed (II. 

Baltimore ” * 

Boston 00* 

McDonald. Bolton 1TI. ElcWiom Ml ond 
Hones; Minchev. Mcskoih (31. Harris (41. 
Bankhead i7). Fossa* (81. Russell (*l and 
voile, w— McDonald. *-4. l— M inenev. O-l. 
HR— Baltimore. Goirwi 171. Palmeiro Cw>. 
Ripken (7J. BOCTon. Dawson 1111. 

Dctron o» eoo 040-4 * t 

Coilfcmlo 200 Ml 0t*-« 12 0 

wells, siionam iSi. Dohoriv lol and Fio- 
hortv. icreuier (HI; Anderson. Leltar IBI. 
Grohe |0i and Tumor. Faoregos I»». w— An- 
aorson. 4-1. L— Wells. 1-4. Sv-Grotw 1101. 
HR— Del rail. Come* Ml. Fryman (101. Cali- 
fornia, DISarcLna (3|. Owen 121. 

ChHUand 1«2 131 H0-1I 13 > 

Seattle 100 000 100- 2 7 2 

Van Popoclv Acre IB). Tovlor IPI ond He- 
mandi Flemlno, M.HIH 151. Cumminos IB) 
and D.Wlhon. W— Van Poppel.M L— flem- 


Ino. M. HRs— Oakland. Jo/ier Mi. Sia-'cc 

OS), Seattle. EAuamnei t*l. 

Kansas CRY «2 0“ 3,1—7 11 \ 

Taxes CK 450-1 " ’ 

Cano . most ante (Bi.Meoaiam IS. an<j nu:- 
far tone; Falcrda. Burrows lEI. Whiteside •*] 
ond i.Rodrloue*. W— Cone, 181. L— Folcroa. -- 
1 Sv— Meactiam 131. HR— K.C- J»e 13.. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Florida 000 081 «0-l 4 0 

PittiBuron 008 2M «X— 4 » 2 

Woofflers. Fraser 181 and Sontlaoo; L.eeer. 
Pona IV) ond Parrish. W— Llecer. 2-- 

L-WtWinen.6-S. HR-PlltsBUro-.C'a-K Ut. 

Atlanta 025 000 081-3 0 0 

H OOSl on 810 003 000—1 1 J 

Maddux and Lapei: Swindell. Mode* » lend 
Eusebio. W— Moddu*. 102. l— S wlnoell. 5-3. 
0,/M^ao 010 010 =01-3 7 0 

Cincinnati 001 001 000-= 7 0 

Poirier, Blair (51. Reed 17!. S.P.uMin i»; 
and Glrardl; Hansoa J.RuNir. (7*. Carrasco 
(9) and Dorsetl.W— Rced.2 L— COTOJCi. ; 

1 Sv— B.Ruflln (9|. HP — Csiorcao. He»e3 l . 
Montreal M3 »o IOC-4 i 0 

New York 013 wo v.i— 5 * 

While, Henry (21. Role: I’i era =:ete.-er. 
Spehr (Bl! Smith. Maruonlllo I7>. Franco l?l 
and Sllnnett, Hundlev (31. W— Manrar Hlo, 1- 1 . 
L— Rains. 2-2. Sv— Franco |U). HR— Ne« 
York. Seoul (*). McRevnolOi = ML 
Loo Angeles 018 008 010-2 i 8 

Chicago boo ooo tift-i s o 

Condlotll and Piazza: Young. PJeiJC (.1. 
BcuTHta (8). Crlm (91 and WtiKtai. w— wan- 
alatli. 5-2. L— Youno, 3-5. HR— Wollach Mil. 
Son Dloga Ml Ml 035-5 9 1 

San Fronds co on 10Q 010-3 7 1 

Genes. HeMman 19) and Auimus; Swht. 
Ftw (81. Bursa IB) and Reed, w— Benes. 4-9. 
L— SwIH, 7-4. Sv-«oHman HOI. HR— San 
Francisco, Wllilamo (221. 

«. Louis 100 Ml 0*8-2 9 8 

Philadelphia 818 400 02*-7 Ml 

Towkxburv. Evomaerd (4J,Murottv (7),Ho- 
bran (B> and TJWCGrtffl DnJackson. Slo- 


curr.B 1=1 one Daultan. A-Dnjcwsan. 8-1. 
L-7vw(«ur. £-5 . hp— S t. Louis. Wn lien (51. 




Tlia ?jjichael Jordan Watch NBA Finals 


SUNDAY'S GAME: Jordan wen! I-tor-* 
with two sinpies end an RBi in an n-S las* to 
NcsnHile. He also struck out ana died out. 

SEASON to DATE: Jordan is batting 
l45-for-?l2l with to runs, nine doubles, one 
triple. 24 R 3 is. 20 walks. S9 strtKeauts and 15 
Motrn bases in 25 attempts. Me has *4 oulouts, 
are asslsl ail si« errors in rlgh* Held 




BUtCK CLASSIC 

Final scores Sunday at Ihe IU million four- 
nancnl on me LTTi-mrd ( i.IOI-melerl .oar-71 
3U.nz :.i Harr.s=n. N.Y.: 

L.-c .'cnic.: i’-:0-4i-s6— 2t3 
Srn-v Els 4Mw4V.«8-271 
3 red Fa*cn TGeo-rO-oe— 2M 
20' Haas b3-=0--^ s7— — 4 
a r .c Burns 7I-W-73-6S— 271 
Sieve Pale 64-~-4 , -6=— 2 7 ® 

Blllv Andrea? lO-Tl-sfr-b®— I=e 
Jell Mcooerl 72-7?-4<-6 | t— 277 
Rooln Freeman e*-4*-49-7U— 2=7 
wart Er»K2 71-71WW-70— 7=7 
Halo Irv.-in 78-rke5-T8 — 2= 

J?? Osc’-il 47-oT-o '-72— 277 


SUNDAYS RESULT 
Houston *4 '* •* 

New York H 20 *5 24-W 

Houston leads series 2-1 
Houston : HsrrrS-U S-6 '.4. Thort* V5 3-5 *. 
Oleiuwon 6-20 21. Maxwell 5-15 2-2 12. 

KLSmimJ-t 3-3 to. Cesiel 1 4-o 4-5 li. Hernn -! 
2-1 4. EI1C 1-3 3-4 4. Torsi* 30-75 27-31 O. 

Mow York: Ockie v M 1-27. CSmith 3-53-4 V. 
E w i ng 9-2? M H.Hcroer 9- ISM 21. Stones o- .4 

S.72D, Meson 3-7 4-510. Anthony 1-5M1 Do-n« 
MMO. Bonner l-l Ml Totals 35-87 13-1? Br. 

3- Point goals— Houston 6-17 ICasseh 3-3. 
Eiie 1-1. icsm'rn i-l Harry l-s. Mexweit D-o). 
New York M9 i Harper 3-7. Starks 3^. An tns- 
r.r M. Ewing IWi. Rehounas-Houstcr. «2 
(Oleiuwon in. New YcrkZ* (Ewmg 13'. As- 
silts— HdL'Sta^, to 'Ci3lu4tBr 71. New Yarn 17 
( Storks' 1 i.TC*=!tauis— Houston la. New ''sr* 
25. Technicois— A'Jrweir «aw York .i.egd 
edense IHousis" mega' ceienscl 


veur'ea G«gul*nln, BrsitL Revnord Ford- 
Ccswsrtn XB. 77: «. Bryan Herta. Ui- Loto 
Fers-Ceswa-n XB. 77; 11 At Unaer Jr- U J- 
Pensk e-amor Mcy vi 77. 

CANADIAN GRAND PRIX 
Results ot the FormuM One race on Ihe AOS- 
ki tom* ter CUMnIM Circoll OJIto-Wl^; 
nouve, o total ol »7A5 kllomotor* tlfOJH 

miles), in Montreal: 

i. Michael Sdumsctier. Germany. Beaot- 
t". Ford. 69, 1 four. 44 minutes, 31 J87 seconds. 
176343 kor 1 1 w J34 mph) : Z Damcn Hill, Brit- 
oln. yirimams Renault. 49. 39A40 s*HAnfls be- 
ntnd; 1 Jew Aiesl. Fronce. Forrorl.o 9.1 min - 
utft H380 seccndsbdtlndi 4,Ge rha re Berger. 

Austria. Ferrorf. 1:11409 

5. David Coglthard. BrfldliL Will term ne- 
noult.48; 4. Christian PltflpaWl BrUol»v Fort- 
work Ford. 48:7. JJ. Lento, Finland, Benrtttn 
Fora. 48.; t Rubens Borrtchrtlo. Brazil. Jor- 
dan Hart. s8: 9. Jetirmy Homert. BrMato. 
Team lctjs. M; 10. Pierluigi Martini, Italy- 
.Minardi FrnJ. 68. 


1UUWU, ““; , . . from vishmiHorida. 

The Giants have now lost four in 
a row overall, six straight ai home. 

S^ITand are^ Cubs’ Sandberg 

runoers in scoring position. m -n ' 


-■ .V. w 

+ 


timers in scoring position. .... n / 

Mels S, Expos 4: Kevin QllitUHg ISaSeBall 
[cReyndds, who homered twice, TVWnirfto . 


McReyi lOlVkll "84V — M M— w- - ■ 

tripled and drove in four runs* hit a 
leadoff home run in tbe eighth that 
gave New York its victory over 
visiting Montreal. 

Rockies 3, Reds 2: Charlie Haytt 
doubled heme a run in the second, 
homered in the fifth and doubled 
and scored in the ninth on Nelson 
Liriano's hit as Colorado got its 
first victory in Cinc inn a t i. 




WORLD CUP WARM UP 
Netherlands 1 Canada 0 
Brazil A El Salvador 0 
Sweden 1. Romania 1 

INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
Australia 1. South Africa 0 


DETROIT GRAND PRIX 
Results of the infir ear race on ttieCl-imie 
(338-k11omcW!/l4-fjnt temporary raoe cir- 
cuit ttircuan Bel!* Isle. In Detroit: 

!, pau! Tract, Coredc. PorsM- umc* :rry 

va, 77. m-7js man « ■ jS. 7&0 «.oi:. *n 1 ho jr. 52 
minutes. 29^2 seconos: 2. Emerson Fitrl 
paldl, Brazil, Penske-ilmor indy v*. 77. 
second* behind: 1 Bcfeey Gordon. -J.S . Lo'c 
FonKUwarlh XB.77;4,TeoFoti.naly.Rf>- 
narO-nmar I nay VA 77. 

5, Michael Andrenl. u J- Rcrncra =crd- 
Coswarm XB. 77: A Booby Ranol. 'J 5. Loia- 
Hondo Indy VA77; ». joaues Vllleneuve. Can- 
eda Reynard Fo.d-CM worth XB. 77; A 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON— Activated Scott Bankhead. 
sitster. tram 15-dar dHoWed Hit. Put AndY 
Tsmeeriin. outfielder, an iS-dflv dNaBlediin. 

CLEVELAND— *ctl voted Jerrv DlPrtO. 
eit^ier. tram 60-der disabled list and cottoned 
him te iri-o-.c. IL Doignated Brian 

acmes. a:twe’. tar asstanmefH. 

Hollar, ol League 

Fi.ORiCA— Activated Gcry Sheffield. «ui- 
•ieider. (ram I54tav aisrttad iai. 

FOOTBALL 

Natiaeoi Football League 
DETROIT— Signed Anthony Carter. wMo re- 
ceiver. and Joceivn BorgeikL defensive bade. 

GREEN BAY— Signed Steve McMW»eL 
detenslv* toekie 

N EW E N GLAN D— Signed Mike JoneAdrtem 

ftlw end. waived Kevin Gttvm. wide receiver. 


The AssoCtoied Pros 

CHICAGO — Ryne Sandbag 
the Chicago Cubs' lu-thne AltStar 
widely coaridered ihe hj ostsec^ . 

ond baseman of "hte era, -retire A 
Monday because hub was unhappy 
with hb perfoimancc. 

"I am not the type of posoa who^ • 
can be satisfied with anything Jess, 
than my very best effort-ana tny 




Mil 


Smprd.^ 


Jackson 

Eisenreii 


delphia, playing at home, scored 
four quick runs after Bob Tewks- 
bury, the Sl Louis starter, was 
struck just above the right ankle by 
Milt Thompson’s line-drive single 
in the fourth. 

■ In games reported in some 
Monday editions: 

Brain 3, Astros 1; Fred McGrif f 
went 4-for4 and Greg Maddux be- 
came the majors’ Drat 10-game win- 


park and fed comforta 
future is set regardkss. 
“And I am certainly j 


: that my : 


of person who can aric tire - 

organization and Q uOW > Cwa ^ • 

fans to pay my salaxy wnea I-tQf.-V". 
not hajjpy with my mental ap^lr- 
proach and my performance.” - 
Sandberg, 34, signed a te-ye^ .: ; • 
528 milHon contract last yc tf bPt -v. :• 

■ has been in a prolonged : 

only one bit in his last 28 . . 




. 2. r iS\~ m - 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


AS A WORLD FAM0U5 
SURGEON, DOW THINK 
w THAT'S TOO MANY DOCTORS? 


?/0NLY IF THEY'RE ALL 
: ^N CALL TONIGHT^ 


CALMN AND HOBBES 

^ f HUNT ML ® 

l SOlN&Tti DOl? I Ll 


i « •: . 


WUA.T «£ WE 1 

GOINS IQ DO!? 
UEUL NE.VBJ.SET 
HE CMLOJTCC 
TVS BWlNE- 


SHOULD VtE KT SURPR150), 
UVETVEOiiJUSnaifD 
HERS. W ITSBJ? NAXBt 
MOM MD DAO VOJLD FAIL 
FOR THAT. 


OR MW BE. TUTI WOW EfEN 
NOTICE WE AW DO* 
SM AKflHWB. «UTWNK? 



fortiie Ri 


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fe::'..;:- 





















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SPORTS 


J^TERIVATIOINAL HEKAU, tribune, TUESDAY, JUNE 14> 1994 


Page 17 


■nted Nigi 


®y Christopher Clarev ^ 

JfflsESSffi* - - SBSITs^sssh 

tidy mdouieLn^f^S! L23?*« P 1 ™' ci Si&i 


grounds of the national w- IMas — The thelast five^T £ s P enI 10051 of 

ssffiisssssw 5 ™ 

~-*sr^S“““" ;&=Kk=sss»ssl 


Ro,lte Tournament 

a* 01 * good times svuHWhL Yefcini s muscular narn s. . L __ 


• “W».»TT *“ ««w«aicy. oeroes now, you know " hesairf 

te^WSWBXSS wacwssset 

JajssssssjSBf- £ a w«s , ssE ■*»«>»> 

a^SSSlgpE Sfi^BBusAsS 


peretdy ovwoowded 3tv Oes- 

vhJ Lamb once describe?* ^ ??^ 10r Da- 
. Calcutta and Harlem.” a combination of 

?p5tog ** 

lous nation had eaiher^ Popo- 


ptiasssS 

te to Lagos in 


tuning ambassadors of Africa^ rr^ ““t ^ back to Laras in 

tone for a frimdly^cff A\CS 
prepare for the most important .mnr^f 0 ^ 0 diey were greeted at the 
m-Sr youag ammr^SS P«< by a oowd^ estimated at — ''' 


that more th^n 30 Mjo-ion *? *? Europe 

three-foartK^&P^ f dudin 8 

f enable living ** JESS?.?™ 1 * «ni com- 


tion’s president. /VDacna - “* »■ 

Sd£ 2i£i5Si ES“ *F« o' 


S^ifiS£™S£3P 




■• ■ ‘j . ~ ; 



; rS=f« 

Wbr^rt^r^^ 0 ”- 

■ ih3utef£!ri CaiD ? 0 9 n ^iiK)rable nm to 
“ toe last Worid Cup. the 
Nigerians are widely considered the n mi great 

, ™riS,e^^ ort,on6d “f «««• 

IWOL^Sa 10 ^ tha ^m«-oon in 
l u S u f lm e (Jay-Jay) Okocha, 21 a 
mdGdder who pbp for Ein&ht ftSlrf^ 

“I tiiink the samfinal is within our reach.” 

Mgma^brightest light is vSi^Tfast, 
P^WErfhnO-yrar^Jd who was voted the Afti- 
JSJSS®^ ye ** m 1993. He has 

^ diifercal countries: Ni- 
©ma. Ivory Coast and, most recently, Portugal , 
werehc plawd the last three seasons for SeiS 
^With eight goals, he also was the leading | 
Atan scorer during World Cup quaiifybT 8 

But Nigeria is much more ihSi q S 1 S 3f r 


^ Wes tortof has another 
SwT W L bl ! , . t ^ M NFL tight end in 
“ embarrassmem of 


. He has three top-notch goalkeepers, indud- 

-gS.|Sfib*l5Sl-5!. 

prntigious first division. 

n£SSI :3 a ? ef “ d ^’ *“ Me 0 1 the fim 
W “^citm Europe’s soccer leagues, 
raving home in 1984 after a dispute with the 
Njgenan Football Association and joining Lo- 
^ d ,!i ,eain m Belgium. He laierpFayed 
fo^^Jech 1 and then m France 
*Jhen I left, things were OX in Nigeria and 

s-K^iSr ™ , ‘ ed ,o ^ ^ “« 

But since, economic conditions have deterio- 
ratodconaderaWy, outside interest has soared 
andhfigenan playera have become committed 
mereoujies. They continue to play profession- 
IF* C ° asU Son and 

sewal other African counmes, whfle Wester- 1 

M^fi^^ n T? inopeilin 8 toe flood- ( 
aclmg “ 311 1x1 tonne- r 
between dubs — usually Dutch and 1 
°[ N'geria’s top players. 

1 ° on J represent them and I don’t make d 

money c^f toem,” said Westerhof, who has had B 


iSS?*a«fss 

Ss.“ 3 ®aaas 

J^y ?* Westerhof s players praise him and 
2S® 11 abffities, cJetUtinghSTfnjM- 
ug their re markab le individual talents with a 

^■WSKSKSsf 51 

“The words ‘administration’ and ‘oraaniza- 
UOT^arenot m the Nigerian dictionaj^S- 

But the outspoken coach has not earned 
SJJSJ 1 ® * tospat Yekmi was particularly crii- 
^Jaf ict toe victoiy m Tunisia, accusing Wes- 

K a^tplayaswfaom 


If you don’t want victoiy send m^ 


coacarn Amca — without malting somepower- 
ful allies in Nigena’s pohtical aides P<WW 

dtrached thermal m the 1990 AfriranNation’f 

rJu^Z^ CS ^ lb e r ’ toecooqjlicated and cliar- 
«matic man who has proven an able arcfaheS, 
“Mge jsunininait. After five years in Lagos, 

Jrith?toS? 1^^ maIaria *** radless bante 
with a torpid bureaucracy, he has had enough. 


WmSw ^ t 2£ wac *d from the outside," 
“W Pei ^ Jc who want to push me 
out wem to him and promised him a Jot of 

JJf. “Pbtmcy and said he must 
confusion. People are jealous. 
Why? Because it is a white man who brines 

tSSSS ? ^ Md 

Bull lefl them. I am too strong for you. J bring 


* am mo strong tor you. ] 

A Hot Time lor Brazil, and Ite Press 

Compiled by Our Stuff From 


sajiasss: 

is, he mana § es to offer his res- 
tive. adoptive nation the ultimate parting gift. 

i&W&bx 


SIDELINES 

Sampras, Graf Wimbledon Top Seeds 

WIMBLEDON, England fAP) Asenw^od AotiJFr 


Urn MAJBBta/Asca* Fna»fte»« 

press realty took a beating. 


C * ^ Our Staff From Dupouha 

a taste of the heat World Cup 
teams wilTf ace in the finals as it was beating 
H Salvador in its final tuneup ma tch 8 

the team had a hot 

f JifiSf'Sl Zb bo and Rai scored 

Iz „f° V1CU> ^- “ Fresna Ca^ornia, where 
toe game conditions Sunday proved to be 

mwe testing than the oppodtiSL 

to play in tins 
w«ber said coach Carlos Alberto Par- 
reua. It s extremely tiring" 

of the match was played at walking 

P®« onder a scorching sun that madeevon 
watchmg a torrid experience asTnmeS 
c^k 5 ^ 0 ' ,crc£ ^ around 35 centigrade 195 
i S^ lha ^' fc P e | 8 flmc off at I P M. 

I sch^uled start time for Bra- 

g ai s Group B matches in Stanford, which 

ha |^™ lar t5 OU J eh coder, dimate. 

3 rh^ flian ^ fend f r G 6mes polled 1 

ato^ musde in toe first half and is £m^ 

rertain to mss toe opening game against 1 

M June 20. Sf 

Jmpedrffm the first half with a recuirin- < 
grare«ram but team sources said he would 

reajverm tune for the first match. h 

ihJf £ ""^J 85 *" 1 for ns to play in 

start ovct the Russians," said IVreira. “The n 
^^ponam thing in this weather is to 
kep^ possession of the bafl. That is impera- s 

Rai was kqit on toe bench after his disan- *«i 

porn ung performance in last Wednesday^^ 2 


toSh5ff dUraS * «“• brou Sbl bi for 
the last half for an out-of-sorts Mauro Silva. 

He firet set up Zmho’s goal, then scored 

{““?? nrinme with a diving 

header off fiebeto s left-wing cross. 

rJ^S^ Br ? zmaa reporters got into a 
V™* “ front of toe 
w s dresangroom, with punches 
flvm 8 fastcr dian toe players had 

J?C Marct ^. a Globe television reporter 
tojlang to fullback BramSwhm 
a guard grabbed him by the elbow tom 
punched him in the stomach. 


^8 a drint 801 “ake no mistake 
well get water to our boys." 

da^as well as outside New York Otv 
nn^!T^ ddrfm . toKev ^Mbrao will 

gDards “ Detroit al«> scuffled 

With A ftmnfl ar miH Af 1 





HntZi thll w ucaibom Inn 

SSidStaT* 00 (pKStKn aboat who had 




j uiuucu wnaL 

ai^SSs?® 8 ^ sSStP^isaag 

tu- Wa s . t0uched by their solidarity.” n ° r^JOiters. Fans would also have hem 


_ j wuiuujiy, 

hJxS a ^SL?* n Md Pbbce officers who 
bad been caUed m to guard the dressing 
room door said they had been given order! 
not to allow interviews. ^ m 

The Brazihan Football Confederation’s 
K-hSS N 1 S ° n Borses ’ Fresno 

h a ?!! pro ? olers s^d that toe CBF 
had given toe no-mterview order. 

1135 protested the new 
FIFA edict that bans players from receiving 
water or other beverages during games. 

“someone has got to show some common 
sense smd say this is totally realistic,” said 

-PerfoS Jack Chariton. 

Pahaps a FIFA official or two would like 
w try running around in those temperatures 


There Are Signs (a Few) 
Soccer’s Catching On 


g~3Sn5*Sis 

b “ w 

_^«» 0 n¥lSw» S p ta ^ii naste ^ 

• Sweden and Romania tied, 1-1 when 

SS!£ a8i ? COred on a ^yard free IdS 
J™i?da drfenave wall with 15 minutes left 
m ^ on California. 

Kto Ingesson ^ scored off a rebound 

mto toe second ha!f to put Swe- 

, “^ c>rc gating stronger and suonger" 
Ign^on raid. “Our defense is real good. It 
will be real hard to beat us." 


Pf? 


■'W^a mss-'-'- 

sapaKfiSsss* 

most noted by the beat in Oiiando. 

oon tost, 2-1 to the LA. Salsa. 

• Belgium forward Marc Degryse injured 
feffw . but was expected 

Ennfil??" a ? um Morocco on 

The team s coach, Paul Van Himsl, 
received a four-year contract extension 

h«w havcn ’ t been that 

“d* 8° l ,“ to dw World Cup, so whv not 

pTrL? Van Himst, who took over toe 
Red Devils in May 1991. “ 


WanWedon. * munoay for The Anodmed Pkss 

SdTbdd M^ rC A^S a ;k Bo ?S^ £I ’ Jiin Couricr ’ GorSwS “^whai Mayor Sias MayShLS^* 0 11 

j£sss«S?. atiK*— - x.ns£Z^Z 

Brilaji Cyclist Near Derth in Germany S*SS 

9° ma Pr W - British aotacwfe raoTaZn “ ated about sime of Strife 

“ a E52?>2Wrtft w ™=MiclH l ^ 

S35tst#'aS 3Ei ? | c sS'Ssi'S?* SHSh^ - 

For the Record SSESSsS £?kp2n=S 


The IHT World Cup Competition 

Win fabulous raizes 


Tyson Won’t Say He’s Sonj, 
Judge Won’t Cut Sentence 

The Associated Press . 


TSf Awodarerf Anesx w. v-«: ■ ... 

^MMAKAPOLIS - Fenner l^a^weUh, 

J^ 5011 ’ Juynsoned for more than ' Gifford asked hn^T^SnnM v/« t n ♦». 

bqpm rehabifitatKm but has failed to?- hearing askSfOT?\Sii> s mrnwfial 


sin siu MUJ iUW& UUlCU 

bf»m rehabilitation but has faffed to^ - hearing aste3forT^rhn^^t^J“^ OT 
education or job-trrining pn^ram as ^Sbffitation S 

^ ^ S'* toe petition, four dealt with 


u my word.” 

: sentence redaction 


said, she wanied him to ariknowl- 
. ^^ftoathis "couttact, without even admitting' 
y^gaaiMxciisablm^nd I have not heard tlw* " 
has denied raping the woman, mtgr- 
Sgtoutte jndlgc to say hehad admitted in court 
8*3# of bad coodncL" ; 

. > 3H& <&f Sat good behavior, bo could be 

re*»gin May 1995. 

accepted ,the decision with ^paroit res- 
fflSSPfc ;9e : haa’-his arms on the defense take, 
-^a^m th ca d bn ha; hands, when the decagon . 
^ ^tota pq;d^|nd he remained motionless. A 
.^^snentS-Zafa, dqxities led ham from the 
wprirO iHBia^ht^trto back to the Indiana Youth 
c 5?Wv'.;;‘^;r- ■■ ■ 


r^y lu^msoneo. tn tne 

m thepeSon, four dealt with 

BS'&S-? ad “ cvement s. although he 
fafled ahig ^Kxd^mvakncy exam toMardi. 

. «e contmnai taking courses and plans to re- 
take the exam later tins month. 

^Twon’s earfier attests at freedom also failed, 

S2 Appeals refused to set 

ttm free on bond pending his appeal. The same 
court tost August turned down his appeal of the 
conviction, and_ the state and VS. supreme coons 
also refused to hear the twa* 

• - tin. ... . _ 


invol 

^Wintatilie 


e. beauty pageant 

toe Iridnma Black Expo. ■•— one sain snesnuijeneves Tyson is innocent but 
n i < ^0nlamKXiDced her deriaon. Tvsrm gatg^m las been gpod far hm “because it hue 
g ™^to ^l^befaavwl mfclv toward tla contestant bdpcdlmntogrowup." 

had used *1?ad jiKtoiixait." “He’s interested in studying, he’s interested in 

: deputy prosecutor Marit Suffivan v books. He’s interested in malting something of his 
www^wonldTiOTr admit to rape, 'fyson.re- peoncehcgeuout,"shesaid. “As for rape, I don’t 

- boieve there was <a«*h a rhino «r 1. 


- " — Awuuajr S neazmg included a pris- « ^ 3 - 

— W ? num ^ raised Tyson and iJf? 011 *** decorated with smai 
theftffitt^-chanqaims tutor, all of wbammged his I 5“f 1 “d American flags ban* 

■•S*JT2 Ll.' : «o«»toesnoetsof»toSa,3 

^ Cmalfc £wato,who.had been Tyson’s guardian ^ bars are hosting 

and has visited famjwwnl times in prisomraid he I^ t, « featuring Irish bands and 
to rawcomposed He does more thtoVing f OT fiLiP 11 &l10 newspaper has 
imnraff. He doesn’t let other people doit" * “pfipn*** a “Worid Cup Sur- 

^sato^ afll beEevcs Tyson is innocent but . . 

at protMi has been good for him “because it has 


raadena, Gtofornia, is creating an 
"j ale called “Goooooo nal7Tn» ■ 

A couple of California cities 
have taken an a distinctly foreign 
Oavorm the days leading up to toe 
mrath-long tournament, which 
Jacks off Friday. 

•J n D Lo L Galos ’ wbich “ h ps ting 

me Brazihan team, restaurants are 
translating menus into Portuguese 
Md the town’s only theater plans a 
J"£day Brazilian film festival. 
Cmfee is hard to find in the com- 
““uty of 28,000. 

It’s kind of like they’ve become 
our team, too," said Parker Stokes, 
gauhger of the Los Gatos Coffee 
which has ordered 
frwh snrohes of Brazilian coffee 
boauseof surging demand. 

»hr\lP ar !?’ 88,18 “ F^^ob greet 
tne team from Cameroon and 
youngsters parade around town 
with immature flags of the African 
nation. 

JX5S Ne,r M '* mesmerized 
, quest for their first 
Sffef Q?btte in 54 years and 
toe Kmcks bid to win toe NBA 
title, the dry’s ethnic communities 

wodiTcr 1 ® “ died atom thc 

r ta ? aimers ,d« C| orated with small 
Itehmi and AiMrican flags hang 
tof stieets of Manhattan's 
bars are hosting 
I»tia feamtmg Irish bands and 
“e Irish Echo newspaper has 


win laouious prizes. 

TTWW 7 ? be . ch ° sen from 311 official drawing, 
^efirst 16 entries drawn, with at least 6 cotrert 
responses will win one of the prizes listed below, 
<fc*emuned from the order in which they are 

Grand Prize: Two United Airlines business class 
round-mp Europe/New York tickets plus five 

N^ t York° mm0dati0n 3t ^ Smh °P Q Holel ^ 

Five second prizes; Sprint Collector; frame pre- 
paid phone cards in celebration of the World Cup 

hT*'- ^ Cms t 22k § old - diamond ' 
cut. Holier ball pens, from the Signature 

Collection. ^ 

Five fourth prizes: Gold Pfeil men’s wallets. 


HERE’S HOW TO ENTER 


Pnn^h h -iT ^ leadm 8 U P to the Worid 
Cup the IHT wiU publish a question in which the 

lkf^ 7 R ^j^ cts vanous outcomes of facets of 
the World Cup. There are 12 questions in all. 

After answering the question each day in the 
coupon provided below, hold your responses and 
^ndttam afl at once to the IHT. JffiSJrf 
6 responses must be postmarked on or before June 
17, 1994 — the World Cup kickoff day. 

Only clippings from the newspaper will be 
accepted Photocopies and faxes do not qualify. 




RULES AND CONDITIONS 


and h ad used “bad judgment” 
'itofiSF : d ‘EF* jr Pttf^tor Mara Suffivan 
riSOSJ? now admit to rape; Tyson. ie- 


JS metodes coupons to toe 
i « Matod casino in Atlantic dry, 
wtucfa Plans to show World Cup 

UJ5L ^ve* 30(1 Wes to songs 
moating teams playing Ireland. 


Ii5**?»bo*n Switzerland 


just cdJ, loll free, 
1555757 



1 ’ !'? dividuaJ coupons will not be accepted. 

Minimum of 6 coupons to qualify 

rfSf* of ^ first “ay the World 

3- Valid only where legal. 

4 - ac ^P ted from Staff and families of 
c HJ®. iH T newspaper, rts agents and subsidiaries. 

Un*y ong'nal coupons will be considered valid 
Photocopies and faxes are not acceptable. 

b ‘ wil1 h® entered into. Proof of 

7 P^S® not be accepted as proof of receipt. 

7. No cash alternative to prizes. 

SSSSSJS^ 1 ' sm ^ forI ftjn " 7,161 ” mpefilion b 

9 ' n n a 0 rS 00 ^ after tfie end of the Worid 

in S P ,f d Pf Jblls ^ ed |n the IHT on Thursday 21 July. 

10. On ^matters, the editor's decision is final. 

‘ S3? iSTS? ^ n9h !i n his discretion to 

or or to waive 

anyrni^ ,n the event of arcumstances outside our 

to SraoSSe^iSlSSmE his t opin '2 1 ' ft desirable 
iu cancel me competition at any stage. 

2 ‘ a nswers containing 

six or more coupons picked at random from all entries 


Group a 

USA 

SWITZERLAND 

COLOMBIA 

ROMANIA 

_ Group R 

brazil 

RUSSIA 
CAMEROON 
SWEDEN 
_ Group c. 

GERMANY 
BOLIVIA 

SPAIN 

KOREA REPUBLIC 
_ Group D 
ARGENTINA 
GREECE 
NIGERIA 
BULGARIA 
— Group E 
ITALY 

fRELAND REPUBLIC 
NORWAY 
MEXICO 
Group F 
BELGIUM 
MOROCCO 
NETHERLANDS 
SAUDI ARABIA 


TODAY’S QUESTION 


How many goals will be scored during the 
duration of the competition? 

Your response: 


Job Tide; 

Company: 

Address: . 

Postal Code: City: 

Country.-^ 

Telephone: . 


lute. 


f , Sfi.5b“l‘5Y 



Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1994 


* 


I 


art buchwald 


Rumor: A 2 - Way Street 



- t veracity. who, my 

iney don t actually want to know audiences keep asking, are we to 
about the media so much as attack believe? if 5 a legitimate beef, and 
uran. Since I am being paid to my answer is, merabeis of the pub- 
speak at their event 1 am the perfect lie should believe whomever they 
target for their hostility. want because it’s no skin off their 

I try lo explain that the media do backs, 
what they do because the public's These are the rules: 
appetite for scandal is insatiable. 1. If a reporter does not stand by 
I tefl them: “If I give you North his or her story he or she will get 



Korea cheating 
on nuclear 
weapons, you 
fall asleep. If I 
offer yon a pho- 
to of Facia 
Jones tearfully 

S how the 

ml of the 
United States 
harassed her, 

your heart beats _ , 

faster and your Budmaid 
hands sweat as you read the papers. 
1 have always maintained that there 
is a two-way street between the 
reader and the grubby press. When 
it comes to good solid rumors you 
people cannot do without us and 
vice versa." 

Just the other day I read that the 
New Yorker magazine — one of 
our most respected publications — 
reported that Hillary Clinton 
planned to succeed her husband 
when he finished his term in office. 
Perhaps it isn’t true, but it’s cer- 
tainly worth buying the New York- 
er for. Naturally, the White House 
denied it So did the source of the 
information, Betsey’ Wright, a for- 
ma* Clinton chief of staff who was 
quoted in the article. 


Despite the denials, a spokesper- 
son for the New Yorker said that 
Connie Bruck is noted for her accu- 
rate reporting and “stands by her 
story.” 

If a reporter writes that some- 


Modern Art in Geneva 

Agave Fnnux-Prtsse 

GENEVA — Geneva's Museum 
of Modern and Contemporary An 
will open at the end of September. 
It will be boused in a converted 
factory and will be managed by a 
private foundation although the 
city authorities invested $14 mil- 
lion in the project. 


into trouble with the bosses. 

2. A source must always deny his 
or her quote if there is any chance 
that it will backfire. 

3. A reader may repeat any story 
be or she reads because everyone 
knows that where there’s smoke 
there’s fire. 

When it comes to covering a 
news item, reporters find that peo- 
ple are not as cooperative as they 
used to be. 

You may note that stories often 
end with, “Mr. Dennis Ratner. the 
lawyer, would not return this re- 
porter's calls." 

The implication being that be- 
cause Ratner did not call back he is 
hiding something, rather than the 
fact that be sees nothing to be 
gained from talking to "The Me- 
dia." I personally believe that all 
reporters’ calls should be answered 
no matter what Rainer is doing. 

That’s why we have a First 
Amendment. 

□ 

Frankly, I don't know which side 
I am ext when it comes to defending 
“The Media.” Everyone has a job 
to do, although the critics believe 
we have gone too far when it in- 
volves interfering in the private 
lives of public people. I have no 
misgivings about passing on a ru- 
mor I heard at a dinner party con- 
cerning an intriguing dalliance. If it 
comes back to me in less chan three 
days I know that I've got a hot one 
and I can go public with iL 

If, on the other hand, the rumor 
dies somewhere over Columbus, 
Ohio, I will refuse to print it As I 
write this, the New Yorker’s “Hilla- 
ry Clinton for President" rumor is 
now up in a balloon high over the 
Grand Canyon. 1 suspect that it 
will return with a few extra rumors 
attached to it and will be ripe for 
further dissemination. 

Should I choose to use it and it is 
adamantly denied by Mrs. Clin- 
ton’s spokesperson. I, obviously, 
will stand by my story. 


Smoke Signals From 



By Leslie Kaufman 

Washing//** Past Service 

W ASHINGTON — As chief spokes- 
man for the tobacco industry, Nick 
Naylor enjoys his notoriety. Seated next 10 
a Hollywood producer on a cross-country 
plane ride, he is quickly recognized. 

The indignant producer sneers righ- 
teously: “I know a lot of people who died 
of lung cancer. Good people." 

Naylor is unfazed. “No bad people?" 
Naylor, the protagonist of Christopher 
Buckley’s new comic novel “Thank You 
for Smoking," may hype a dark drug, but 
he has panache, wit and a radar for hypoc- 
risy. In this he resembles Ins creator, a 
former smoker himself. 

Buckley, the 4 1 -year-old editor of 
Forbes FYI and the only child of the 
conservative editor, author and television 
personality William F. Buckley Jr. and 
socialite Pat Buckley, is basking these days 
in the naughtiness of his newest wort. 

“Smoking” takes aim at Washington’s 
lobbying industiy, along with a lot of the 
city’s pieties and sacred institutions. Buck- 
ley is tickled that the book party his pub- 
lisher held for him featured smoke ma- 
chines. cigarette girls and gas masks for 
health freaks. 

“It’s the most politically incorrect party 
this year," he said. Inside the Ritz-Carlton 
in Washington, leggy cigarette girls in 
fishnet stockings and bustiers handed out 
free packs of Duttons and USAs, the band 
played “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes," 
“Great Balls of Fire” and “Puff the Magic 
Dragon,” and the menu featured — what 
else — a gourmet assortment of smoked 
deli cades. 

“Smoking" is not Buckley’s first at- 
tempt at political lampoonery.’ After work- 
ing briefly as a speech writer m 1981 for the 
then Vice President George Bush, he wrote 
“The White House Mess," a s end-up of 
self-serving, kiss-and-tell White House 
memoirs. It turned out to be a hnge hit, 
coincidentally sharing the best-seller list 
with “High Jinx,” a spy novel by his fa- 
ther. 

“People say he’s been incredibly lucky 
with the timing of this book." says Chris- 
topher Hhchins. the liberal commentator 
for Vanity Fair, referring to a spate of 
recent controversies involving the ciga- 
rette industry. “But I say people don't get 
lucky like that. He was early in noticing 
the return of the Prohibition-era mental- 
ity." 

There are already plenty of senous types 
in Washington who wish Buckley’s comic 
imagination weren't so fertile, hi the fall of 
1991, Forbes FYI — Buckle/s quarterly 
lifestyle supplement to the business maga- 
zine — reported that the cash-strapped 
Russian government was taking extreme 



toy fdl stifled. “From ’6£ to 1970 — 
Woodstock, the *68 convention, the assas- 
anstions, the Summer of Love, Haight- 
- Ashbury, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, 
all theconoentrated gorgwsness that the . 

I was in study halt with monks," be says 
with mode bitterness. 

■ Graduated at 17, he longed for adven- 
•tme With Ins father's hdp.be got a$2C-a- 
. week, deckhand job on -a _ freighter, where > 

>halPiive& He. acqufod^tattoo on. hU 
biceps of a large grecacagle, a memento of 
a very drunken night ia Hong Kong. He 

had a second tattoo on the outside of his 

saluting hand: It read “{Expletive] off." 
But that was removed, wife a scalpel. - 


After school, he launched a charmed 
writing career. He-became ajxot£gi'of- 
NewYoric magazine’s editor, QayFelker, 


and then became 
quire at the age of 25. At 


• : ^ -r 
- - v -»> . 


cditorofEs- 
be quit and 
. this time criss- 
crossing the Atlantic for 78 days and tak- 
ing notes that eventually became bis first 
and 'only nonfiction work, “Steaming to 
Bamboos.” The book, though well re-, 
viewed, was only a modenRe financial suc- 



The celebrated inventor of the V.I. Lenin coffee table. 


MMad WHurawcBThc Wttfmp o n Pott 


measures to gamer foreign exchange: the 
embalmed corpse of V.I. Lenin himself 
was going on the auction block. 

The item was easily identifiable as a 
hoax in FYI; it was juxtaposed with a 
photo of socialites using the glass-encased 
father of Soviet communism as a coffee 
table. The caption read: “The ultimate 
convocation piece — and m i nimal main- 
tenance." 

But to ABCs “World News Tonight 
With Peter Jennings." which received a 
press release on the FYI “exclusive," it 


seemed real enough. The show rushed it 
onto the air without checking the facts. 
Later, an embarrassed Jennings was. not 
amused. “Some days it is great, to be 
alive," Buckley said. 

Buckley recalls being a lonely kid. At 13 
be was stripped off to Portsmouth Abbey, 
an elite New England boarding school that 
be describes as a grim place where boys 
“were taught that virtue was knowing the 
meaning of daiique (Latin for “in a nut- 
shell") and that Hell was reaL” 

The education was first-dass, but Buck- 


Then, without any 1 
he was hired by Busn lO write s p ee c hes . 
Through the job he met Ms wife; Lucy 
the daughter of Donald Gregg, 
i*s national security advisec, and gath- 
ered material for “The White House 
Mess." His second novel, "Wet Work," a 
belabored thriller, followed in 1990. When 
it failed to sdL Buckley says, he “almost 
went brake." As hick would have it, Mal- 
colm Forbes Sr. cafied soan after aml 
offered him his present ! incentive gig (he 
admits to a salary mfeakntfax digits) as 
editor of FYL ^ ‘ 
v Christopher Buckley wantetofeake it 
- dear that he has gpttoi evea^r one of his 

never oo^made a cajj on . 

yon get kind of angry at aD the nonsense., 
yon see in the paper and oh TYj-Bucktey ; 
says. “Particolany, the hypocrisy. .So I _■ 
thought. Til write a bootabout institu- 
tional hypocrisy in American life; a serious' 
indictment of America.’ And- fen J 
thought, ‘Snoooore.’ And I ended tqrwrit- _ 
rug this instead, which is reallyahp^thai, 7 
but better.” 


aspires to be a serious social critic-^Every 
satirist has a seriouspomi,” sayuheNew 
Republic’s Leon meSdtier J *?lns isri'Cf-. "T 
just play. It is supposed to in 
think- Think on the beach, qrbalf5e^nitr 
tie, but think." • . ""V.V 


people 


2 MacArthur Grants Go 

Jbjwet Saxophonists 

Two innovath-e jazz swophoa- 
theny Braxton — wcrc am Sriu. 

I™ bfte 

E.VA^omdauoa Cd^ar.; 

■Kiwa«d 13^,000. 

ton, 49, was *raricd_wOMW£ 

Among the ofem reonvmg awards 

"Site 'Fmre-Wta* Boy, 

dem of the Wde Big 

Craw Agency. Menton*. SZ 73 .(XK). Acm- 

enne Jtfch, 65. pext and ejjgjj 

S374.000; totoat 


i 

\ 


-SoSphTs340J»0: 

fSJtSS&SSffi fdS 

assess * agS 

So, CnmtKxfian cotatral txtpaasr ““ 
supporter, S275 ,000. ■ 

n 

. “Passion," fee Stephen Sood- 
beha-James Lteane collaboration, 
swept tfefereet»awairis for new 
musicals ai fee 48th annual Tony 
'Awards; winning for best musical, 

! for best original score (Sondhdm). 
amFbcst- bodcfLapine). TTieshow 
woo aJourth award, with Donna 

Murphy taldrig bome the prize for 

best actress m a mnscaL “Feres- 
trbikaT Part2*of Teay MmerV 

AIDS ^ic, “AjQgds in America, 

ridaro^tod fee wmfc ' that - Part F 
last year, wirmlng Kusiraer 
fee- : best :pl»y award. The play’s 
lead, Stephen Spindla, won for 
besLleafing actor in a play. Dtoaa 

IBs worn as best stress in a blay 

; toner role in “Medea," and Boyd 
.GkiaesAftxi as best actonh a musi- 
cal forhisjJart in “She Loves Me.” 

*•' Tbe'actoif Hdund Piyor, 53. has 
’[tWeati. «y : fec least — 
reported thelfeeftbf S450.000 in' 
cash from his home ncar Los Ang e-.- 
te, Endori pcKce^said Pryor no- 
ticed fee toss last AiWpst, but only 
iwwhad rtportcd it-They said they 
' > rfid riot Jqiriw a^reason for fee de- 
jay, itut ^ totFaboised a 

Td nrifet ass istani yriid^worked for 


i 




i 

3 

■». 



WEATHER 


crossword ?i ; : 


Europe 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. 



High Low ir 
OF OF 
26*77 18/G* • 
21 no 13«6 ■ 
20«« 13AS I 
27/BO 19*0 I 
25/77 16*4 ■ 
a/79 14*7 pc 


Today 

High Lam W 

OF OF 

20/79 10/01 ■ 

26/79 12/53 • 

2 IV 12*3 1 

29*4 10*1 9 

23/73 17*2 4 

23/73 14*7 I 

23/73 R/4fl pc 10*4 7M4 

20/79 11/52 ■ 20*0 11/52 9 

24/75 10*1 Bh 26/79 1309 pc 

24/75 7/44 g 10*1 6M1 |h 

CoouCMSd 27*0 16*4 a 27/BO 20*8 4 

DuUn 21/70 7/44 g 20*8 11152 ■ 

EdWjurgh 16*9 0/40 a 10*1 10*0 pc 

Ftoanc* 21/70 16/99 oh 26/79 1S/S9 pc 

FrarkfU! 23/73 11*2 pc 19*0 8/46 g 

6flW 22/71 14*7 pc 24/76 14*7 g 

HahMd 19*0 11*2 pc 15*9 5 Ml pc 

bCXfilU 28*2 17*2 a 20*2 17*2 I 

LttPafcnu 24/75 10*0 a 24/75 19*0 a 

LtaOon 25/77 16*1 a 2S/7T 17*2 a 

Landed 23/73 10*0 a 21/70 12*3 a 

Madid 27*0 13*5 1 28*2 16*1 a 

MSui 23/73 17*2 ah 20*2 17*2 9 

Uomxm 19*6 12*3 * 20/68 11*2 pc 

Minch 20*0 12*3 ah 22/71 10*0 ■ 

to 22/77 17*2 po 24/75 17*2 a 

Oato 19*0 SMI a 14/57 3*7 c 

Palma 22/71 18/64 a 24/75 19*6 a 

Pana 27*0 13*5 a 24/75 13*5 a 

Pragua 21/78 12*3 pc 20*0 9/40 pc 

n ai q aii* 11*2 7/44 e 13/55 OMO pc 

Rear# 21/70 16*9 3h 20/79 18*1 pc 

a Patmeug 21/70 11*2 c 21/70 307 pc 

ascWiafen 21/70 9/46 9 12*3 307 C 

SaaMnurg 2303 13/9 pc 24/75 12*3 a 

TaPnr 20*9 12*3 pc 16*1 6M3 pc 

Vartcc 23 m 19*0 *h 2809 1B*4 pc 

Vienna 21/70 14/57 Ml 22/71 13*5 pc 

Warn* 23/73 9/40 pc 22/71 8/43 pc 

Zunch 22/71 1305 ah 24/75 12*3 a 

Oceania 



North America 

Hoi neaiher will cover a 
large area of the United 
Slates falef this weak. The 
hot air win buM inio Chicago 
and Da trail as wD as Dellas. 
Sr. Lou*. Allan io and Pitts- 
burgh. h w* also turn hoi in 
Washington, D.C.. Phltadet- 
ptua and New York C0y by 
Thuraday. 


Europe 

After a few days of mild 
weather. U will turn much 
cooler later ihta week across 
Scandinavia. Showers In 
Oslo and Stockholm will 
ftittonipany the return of cool 
air. Heal will begin to buHd 
Ns week across the western 
half of the Mediterranean 
Sea. London and Parts will 
be mM with some sun. 


Asia 

Bain will be common later 
this week from the Korean 
peninsula to Japan. There 
will be some heavy down- 
pours in Seoul and Tokyo 
Wednesday. Hong Kong wffl 
have clouds and (mked sun 
end a shower or two. There 
will be b few showers in 
Shanghai. Pelting will be 
partly to mostly sunny. 


Asia 


Tortar 


Tummimt 


Htgti 

Low 

W 

Weft 

Low W 


Or 

OF 


OF 

OF 

rUnnt rX 

33/91 

2475 

| 

33*1 

2679 pc 

Bt#nQ 

sm 

16*6 


34*3 

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(fcnpKarg 

sores 

27*0 

1 

30*6 

2079 sh 

Umia 

33.'! 1 

74/75 

1 

33, VI 

2476 1 

Mn(M< 

38/ ICO 30 « 

1 

40/134 33*6 1 

Seoul 

28*2 

16*1 

D 

20*2 

17*2 pc 

STwnshal 

27*0 

2170 

PC 29*2 

2170 pc 


32*3 

2271 



2373 PC 


31*8 

2475 

l 

31/88 

2373 pc 

Tokyo 

2475 

18*4 

1 

2079 

16*4 pc 

Africa 

Al3ta. 

2373 

17*2 

■ 

2475 

16*4 pc 

Capo T ora 

2170 

SMB 

■ 

2271 

11/52 pc 

C4Mt*PX3 

2473 

14<57 

• 

2373 

17*2 pc 


2271 

9/48 


2475 

11&2 pc 


30*8 

2373 


30*8 

2475 I 

/tout, 

20*8 

12/53 

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22/71 

12*3 pc 

Tutt 

2271 

14/57 

pc 2577 

16*1 ■ 

North America 


ACROSS 

i Mercury or Mars 
4 Good old boy 
BDouble-c/ossar 
14 1979 tilni 
“Norma— — * 
is W.W. I battle 
site 

t« Pom me de 

/French potato) 
17 Modem bank 
'employee*: 

• Abbr. 

l«" in Venice* 


ia Feefcng regret 
20 Night 

photographer's 
work, with "a*? 
23 Common 
connectors 
84 Bother 

23 Wears weft 
27 Kind oi budget 
22 Dustin, in 
'Midnight 
Cowboy* 

33 Actress Ward of 
"Sisters' 


Solution to Puzzle of Jane 13 

AlRlDl 


ISlClAlT] 


Days 


Middle East 


Latin America 





Tomorrow 



Today 


Tomcrow 


Wflh Low 

W 

Wph Low 

W 


Mo*> 

Low 



LOW W 


OF OF 


OF OF 



OF 

OF 


OF 

CS 

BwnJ 

29*4 2170 


30*6 2271 


Botnos Alroa 

16*1 

7/44 


17*2 

0/46 Ih 

Cm 

37*5 19*6 


37/95 2271 


CWK39 

29*4 

2271 


29*4 

2271 pc 


23*1 15/59 


31*8 16*1 


Uma 

19*0 

IB/61 

9 

16*6 

16*1 pc 

Jmjoalsni 

27*0 17*2 


20*2 10*4 


MWcoQly 

2373 

13*5 

1 

257/ 

13*5 pc 


■42/107 19*0 


43/1092271 


KoMJmn 29/84 

18*4 


30*0 

10*4 PC 

»*«* 

41/100 2271 


41/1082271 



15*9 

3.37 

pc 

14*7 

3*7 pc 


Deta4 

Hono/iPi 

HwMcn 

LogAngMas 


Auckland 

Sidnay 


15/59 9 M0 

10*4 11*2 


10*1 10/50 ah 
19/90 10*0 pc 


Legend: i- sunny, pc -pamy cloudy, c-doudy. avdwwera. i-mundentenrs. r-reh. sf-snow Oartes. 
wwno*. Hoo. w^MeaPtw. AB forocaaia and data provided by Accu-Waethar, he. Cl 894 


23/73 13*6 a 22/71 12«53 pc 
33*1 21/78 pc 33*1 271 pc 
2B*Z 18*4 c 20*4 10*6 pc 
32*9 22.71 pc 32*3 2271 pc 
31*8 12*3 pc 31*0 13*5 a 
22*9 21-70 pc 33*1 23*0 pc 
29*4 22-71 pc 29*4 2373 pc 
31*9 2373 1 32*9 24/75 pc 

2C73 17*2 pc 2577 17/62 pc 
32 *3 2679 pc 32*9 2679 1 
29*4 17*2 I 29*4 17*2 pc 
2475 13SS 1 28*2 14/57 pc 

31*8 24.75 pc 32.90 2475 a 
33.31 23.-73 pc 34*3 23/73 pc 
42.1O7J670 a 40/1042679 a 
2170 1142 ■ 20*8 13A % 
1C.E1 3-V0 ah 10*4 9/48 ih 

27/86 -1407 pc 30*0 18*1 PC 
34*93 2373 pc 35*7 2373 pc 


□□as 

□□HID OH00 OaSETO 
□ODD □HQC1 QHHI3Q 

BassasQaansaQa 



34 Best 
36 Like an inept 
photographer's 
. subject? 

» Christina's dad 

40 Snoctp Doggy 
Dogg songs 

41 Ploys 

42 Indy and 
Daytona . 

45 Classified 
48 Sleep stage: 
Abbr. 

«7 Family member 
4a Phoiojoumat- 
ists’ choices? 
54 * — — P’aradiso* 
(1968 film) 
sa Catalyst 
57 Mining area 

50’ of robins 

m her hair' 
so Sen , Calif. 

00 Chemicar suffix 

01 Mill, to a cent 

oa Embellish 
*3 Guinea 

DOWN 

1 FaL in France - 
avow 

a Floor model 
4 Owing to 
s Defeats 
simps 


7 One ot tHe ■ 

. March stetere ; 
aNetman Arthur 

• Rood, in Roma* 
loReflex . 

. messenger 
91 Compose- Satie 
12 Prince Valiant's 

• son ' - 

is Fraternity party 

staple 

~2l 'Jerusalem • 

• Delivered* port 
22 Lame . 

25 Author Esquhret 

26 Greek ' ; 

27 Computer 
sounds 

28 Swiss range - 
26 Trigger. • . 
so Fumbled . 

.31 Grades below . 

the curve ' - * • 
22 Surf sound' 1 
33 Open carriage 
36 Chaplin 
persona' 
37Sh8dow-v 
surname?; 

38 -fruttf - 

<3 One erf the ' 
Gallos - 
44 Affluence I.'."- 
« Spoiler 
47 Vinegar Prefix. . 


46 Brtt&h gun '- 
4* lady of Spun 
60 "Ho^f moiyl V 


^otOrirratricteif 





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language, since it’s translated instantly. Gill your clients at 3 a-m. knowing they'll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All ihis is now possible with AES r - 

To use these services, dial the ABET Access Number of the coumn- you're in and you’ll get all the 
help you need. With these Access Numbers and your AIKT Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ABcT Calling Card or you’d like more information on ABET global senices, jusr call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NLS4BER COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA. 

Italy* 

172-1011 BrazQ J 

000-8010 

AisoaUa 

1-8004381-011 

Uedueoreefti* 

15900-11 Chile 

OOa-0312 

China, PROww 10811 

rlttinnn|g. 

8 a 196 Cotmnbh 

980-11-0010 

Guam 

018-872 


OOOtWlll CcwaHca*n 

114 

Hong Kong 

• 800-1111 

Macedonia, T.YJL of 990004288 Ecuadcff* 

• jig 

India* 

000-117 

Mala* ' 

0800890-110- QSolvadn*h 

190 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco* 

19±OQH Guatemala* - 

’ 190 

Japan' 

0Q3W11 

Netberiands* 

06-022-9111 Gny»»r* *■ 

“ ’ 165 

Korea 

009-11 

Woiway 

800 - 190-11 Honduras’* -. 

. 123 

Komu 

11 * 

Ptdand'* - ; 

.0*010480-0111 Wnlmi*. 

-. -95-800-462-4240 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

Portugat* . 

05017-1-288 - Wcrngm (Managua) it* 

New Zealand 

• 000-911 

llamiBh 

01-8004288 Panamas 

.109 

Philippines* 

105-11 

KmlatUreaw) 

155-5042 Peru* 

191 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

SbraUa 

' 004204)0101 r Suriname 

146 

Singapore 

800-0111-111 


900-951-00-11 Uruguay 

00-0410 

Sn Lanka 

430430 

Sweden* 

020-79WU Venezuela** 

‘ •' * ‘804)11-120 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Snto/ej-land* 

155-00-11 CAVliwiPAISf 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1111 

XUJL ' 

0580890011 Bahamas 

-1-800-872-2881 


EUROPE 

tScndnC 

■ .8*100-11 - Bennodx* 

1-800-872-MW1 

Armenia** 

8*14111 

MEDDLE EAST BrirLsb VJ. 

■ l-800872-»Sh 

Austria**** 

022-903-011 

Bahrain 

800-001- Cayman Islands 

1-SOO-872.JBR1 

Beigiunr 

0800:100-10 

cyptus* - 

• - 080^0010 Gfenada* ' •• •' 

. 1-800-872-2881 

Bulgaria 

00-18000010 

tend 

177=100-2727 Hari* 

wn-«WW72.2RRa 

Croatia** 

9038-0011 

Kuwait 

- SQQ-2BS .Jamaicr- „ 

. 5 0-800-872.2881 

Czech Rep 

00-420-00101 

Lebanon (Seirm) 

426-801- NedLAnta 

W1-900-S72.28B1 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Qatar •••', •' 

0600011-77 StKlns/Nertr - 

i 1-600^72-2881 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

Saudi Arabia . 

1 - 800 - 10 - AFRICA r. 

Ecance 

-19*4)011 

Turkey* 

00-900-12277 EgypCfCriro) 

- 510-0200 

Germany 

01300010 

UAE.* 

800-121 Gabon* 

■' ’ *■■ . OOa-OOI 

Greece* 

00-800-1311 

- AMERICAS ' Ganfeter . - 


Hungary* 

OQa-600-01111 

Aigeotina*- 

001-800-200-11U „Kenja* 



' 999-001 

Belize*- 

' 555 Jiberia .... 


Ireland 

- 1-800-550000 

Bofflttf. 

. . JMOO-HU ; .Spoth Africa — 

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