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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


At Stake in North Korea: 
Keeping Lid on A- Arms 

CIA Regards Renegade Sale of Weapons 
As Threat to Israel and Possibly Europe 


By Thomas W. Uppman 

Washington Pm Service 

WASHINGTON — The United Stales dis- 
pute with North Korea involves much more 
than the thrust and pany of terse announce- 
ments and daily meetings over the role of a few 
international inspectors at a tiny nuclear reac- 
tor in a poverty-stricken, isolated country. 

The United States is trying to derail a long- 
term, systematic effort by North Korea to de- 
ydop and seD both nuclear weapons and mis- 
sftcs to cany them, according to intelligence 
officials, senior Clinton administration officials 
and independent analysts. 

- Although some critics of the administration 
say the United Slates is overreacting, intelli- 
gence agencies and the Pentagon say North 
Korea’s pattern of behavior over 10 years shows 
that it is seeking to build a major nuclear 
weapons industry. 

. North Korea is building larger atomic reac- 
tors than the one at the center of the current 
dispute. It is constructing plutonium separators 
— - useful Cor nothing except military purposes 
— t^pable of producing enough plutonium for 
at least 10 nudear bombs a year by the end of 
this decade, according to the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency- 

Finally, the country is develop big missiles 
capable of carrying nuclear warheads, and al- 
ready dries a lucrative business selling conven- 
tional missies to other countries, including 
Iren and Syria. 

The CIA. regards the North Korean weapons 
program as a threat not only to Korea's neigh- 
bras in Asia but also to Israel and possibly 
Earope. Robert O. Walpole, deputy director of 
the CIA’s nonproliferation center, says North 
Korea is prepared to sell nudear weapons and 
missflestolran and other Middle Eastern na- 
tions. . • - v 

“North Korea is the world's largest prdifera- 
tor of ballistic nussfles," Mr. Walpole said last 
week at a forum on weapons proliferation spon- 
sored by the American Bar Association. 

He said that ! ‘lrah will probably be the first" 
puchaser of the Nodong miss ile, which North 
Korea tested last year. It has not yet been 
ocprated.'but is believed to be capable of carry- 
ing a nuclear warhead. 

Acquisition of the Nodong, with an estimat- 
ed range of about 600 miles (1,000 kilometers}. 


‘Money Boat* Heads Home 
(But Where’s the Cash?) 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Times Semcr 

NIIGATA, Japan — As the 400-foot liner 
pulled out of the harbor here on Monday morn- 
ing and headed for North Korea, its passengers 
stood cm the deck waving North Korean flags 
and cheering as the anthem “Marshal Kim II 
Sung” Wared across the piers. They had an 
fin d i ffnna: dozens of Japanese police and intelli- 
gence officers, watching through binoculars 
and training video cameras on the whole scene, 
but warily keeping Aar distance. 

For several years the glistening white ship, 
the Mangy eng bong- 92, built with donations 
from Koreans loyal to (he North who hove 
rhade their fortunes in Japan, has plied the Sea 
of Japan three times a month, fra the most 
direct l ink between North Korea and the indus- 
trialized world- Now it is also the symbolic 
centerpiece of the debate over bow to bang Mr. 
Kim and his Communist government to heel 
for it$ defiance of nudear inspectors, a defiance 
that sharpened when North Korea announced 
on Mommy that it was withdrawing as a mem- 
ber of the International Atomic Energy Agen- 
cy.., " ... 

■ American Japanese intelligence officials 
assert that , the Mangyongbong’s cargo includes 
everyttnng North Korea’s leaders most trea- 
sure: 'jmwons of yen in hard currency,. equip- 
ment ahd sparc parts that are desperately need- 


ed since China and Russia virtually cut off their 
old ally, and off-the-shelf technology to sustain 
what has become the world's least-secret covert 
nuclear arms project. 

But if you ask Seo Dok Kun and his wife, 
Mitsuko li, who were preparing to board the 
ship for an overnight voyage, those allegations 
are just pan of a continuing effort to suffocate 
North Korea, where the couple sent thdr young 
son 17 years ago to protea him from discrimi- 
nation against Koreans in Japan. 

“The Americans treat the rest ol Asia like 
their colonies, and they have talked the interna- 
tional community into Korea-bashiag," Mr. 
Seo said. ‘‘Everyone else is doing it only be- 
cause the Americans are doing it.” 

“Look around you,” be added, waving to- 
ward the room fuD of travelers wearing pins 
bearing the likeness of Mr. Kim. “Do these 
people look rich enough to have shopping bags 
full of cash?” 

"This is not about nuclear weapons." he said 
America and Japan have. been dominating Ko- 
rea for over a century, he added, “and this is 
just more of the same;” 

Most of those boarding the ship are Koreans 
living in Japan who,- in brighter days for the 
country that likes to call itself “Paradise on 
Earth,” sent their family members to the North 
Korean capital in hopes that it was truly the 
See CARGO, Page 6 


Sjpnt Deal With Europe 


" ; : ;V: _By Jaoques Neher 

; - • '/S.-£l iamwtianal Herald Tribute . 

~ PAKSt— With their decision ' Tuesday to 
tiflpArM luEUozi stake in Sprint Crap., the 
Frmrirknd.Gerniari telephone monopolies will 
gain a- beachhead into the giant Ua tetecom- 
mmriations market and set the seme for a 
gfcfcaftooot-om with Sprint’s two larger Amer- 
ican rivals* MCI Gbrmnunicatioiis nod AT&T 

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Jdon, though analysts suggest that the alliance 
linking Sprint, France Ttiecom and Deutsche 
- Teldcran may be less motivated by that poten- 
tial new market than by the European phone 
companies’ fear of deregulation, set to arrive by 
1998. 

“European operators are feeding the heal to 
open their markets and compete/* said Evan 
Lanier, tdecoirnramicatiops analyst at Lehman 
Brothers in London. “Unless ycniVc teamed up 
with sranerax^yon become more vulnerable as 
barriers fall. The best way to etimmate your 
potential enemies is to form an alliance with 
■ them.” 

Sprint’s chairman, WEfiam Esrey, said the 
venture should prove “a real concern” for 
AT&T and MCL 

; “This affiance is a very competitive force,” 
Mr. Esrey said. 

. Last June, MCXannounced a similar linkup 
with British Tetocommurricatians PLC calling 
. fra the British carrier to take a 20-percent share 
in the second-largest UK. phraie company for 
S4J hilfitm.-That deal has been held up by 
regulatory problems m (be United States, but a 
green lig™ now is expected in the days ahead. 

AT&T, -Initially rebuffed by the French and 
German operators, is said to be talking to 
UmsoorolW^acraisratiHnirf Dutch, Swedish 
and Swiss phone companies. But the largest 
US. phone company smdit would go U alone if 
the nght partners cooW not be found 

Spimt and its partners predicted that their 
tie-up would win prompt xegdatory dearance, 
but AT&'n m u statemeat. said that UA au- 
thraities dmld condition approval on French 
ami German governments’ opening their tde* 

V^^SeeSPM.PSgefi 


Paris, Wednesday, June 15, 1994 


.... • 




would “double the range of any weapon in 
Iran’s current inventory," Mr. Walpole said. 

A longer-range version of the Nodong still in 
the devdopment stage “could threaten Europe" 
from Iran, Mr. Walpole said. With a reported 
range of more than 800 miles, il would also 
enable Iran to strike Israel. In addition. “North 
Korea has apparently discussed the sale of 
missiles to Libya," be'said. 

The CIA’s assessment is shared by some 
independent observers. "Anybody looking at 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

the infrastructure being developed could rea- 
sonably come to the conclusion” [hat the CIA’s 
views oC North Korea's intentions are correct, 
said Jon B. WoUsthal, senior research analyst at 
the Arms Control Association, a group based in 
Washington that monitors the spread of nucle- 
ar and other weapons. 

“North Korea has no need for plutonium, 
and it has a history of selling ballistic missies to 
Iran and Syria," he said. 

American concerns “don't just relate to 
North Korea" but dial North Korea “could 
become the source of nuclear bombs for any 
country or any suboaiional group with the 
ability to pay," he said 

Mr. Walpole’s presentation — an unusual 
public recounting of sensitive information, re- 
portedly gryen without (he knowledge of the 
CIA's public affairs office — added little to 
what arms control specialists have long be- 
lieved about North Korea's weapons program. 
But in the current environment, it amounted to 
a chilling bill of particulars. 

The larger nuclear sites that North Korea is 
building, Mr. Walpole said would enable 
North Korea to export nudear weapons with- 
out depleting its own arsenal. Pyongyang's mo- 
tive. he said, is the desire to earn hard currency. 
This rebuts the arguments of some Korea ana- 
lysis that Pyongyang is developing weapons — 
or appearing to — mostly as a bargaining chip 
in political negotiations with South Korea and 
the United States. 

The reactor involved in the current inspec- 
tion dispute between North Korea and the 
International Atomic Energy Agency is tiny by 
the standards of U.S. commeraal plants. Its 

See KOREA, Page 6 




. -v. 

■.fsi'pfm* 






















_ ' The Amxuted Rm» 

OAU SUMMIT MEETING — President Nelson Mandela of South Africa lending an ear to Yasser Arafat, the PLO chairman, i 
who was present as an observer at the meeting of the heads of state of the Organization of African Unify in Tonis. Page 7. j 

Cardinals Dive Into the Population Fray 

Big Effort Is Onto Block Abortion, Issue at World Conference 


By Alan Cowell 

Sew York Times Service 

ROME— The cardinals of the Roman Cath- 
olic Church joined a mounting battle Tuesday 
to block proposals for legalized abortion at a 
world conference on population problems 
scheduled for Cairo in September. 

An extraordinary gathering of 114 of the 
world's 139 cardinal; backed an appeal by 
Cardinal John O’C'rno* - f N-v York ;><•■ *iv.* 
Cairo mesung tc avoid becoming ‘cultural tra- 
periafism" legitimizing “abortion on demand, 
sexual promiscuity and distorted notions or the 
family." 

The cardinals had been called to Rome by 
Pope Mm Paul II to discuss preparations for 
Christianity’s third millennium. 

But. in unanimously endorsing Cardinal 
O’Connor’s appeal, they also drew sharper bat- 
tie lines berween American feminists, who see 
the Cairo gathering as a way of elevating the 
status of women around the world, and the 
Pope, who sees the encounter as a perilous 
erosion of values. 


Kiosk 

Fabins Challenges 
Rocard in Defeat 

PARIS (Reuters) — Laurent Fabius, the 
former Socialist prime minister, lashed out. 
Tuesday at his party’s leader, Michel Rocard, 
saying he could no longer be seen as its 
“natural candidate" for the presidency after a 
humiliating defeat in European polls. 

Mr. Rocard has vowed to stay in next 
year’s race to succeed President" Francois 
Mitterrand, a Socialist, but bis European Par- 
liament debacle this past weekend suggests he 
may not be electable, analysts said. The So- 
datisi Party won only 14.5 percent of the 
vote, its worst showing since the IPbOs. 

Whitewater Hearings 

WASHINGTON (AF) — The Senate vot- 
ed Tuesday, 56 to 43, for a Democratic reso- 
lution to begin narrowly focused Whitewater 
hearings by July 29. The hearings are to 
include only those areas that the special 
counsel, Robert B. Fiske Jr., will complete 
during the initial phase of his probe. They 
hearings will not immediately inquire into 
President and Mrs. Clinton's former land 
investment in Arkansas, 


Books 

Crossword 

Weather 


“This conference could be of en> n.t-tu.. value 
to all peoples of the world if it focuses on the 
family — the family, that is. in the traditional 
and natural sense of the word." Cardinal 
O'Connor said. 

But, he added, “The failed social policies of 
many developed couniriw. should not be foisted 
on the world's poor." 

“Neither the Cairo conference nor any other 
forum should lend itself .to cultural imoer.rUism 
cc x- i-ieoN.<gin tiiat .j;c ihc har.ij . f :. V 
in' a self-enclosed universe wherein abortion on 
demand, sexual promiscuity and distorted no- 
tions of the family are proclaimed as human 
rights or proposed as ideals for the young.” the 
cardinal said. 

“The destruction of human life through abor- 
tion will never serve as a gateway to a rational 
and civilized life for the society that practices 
it." he said. 

The cardinal's statement added even more 
weight to the many warnings from the Pope 
about the conference, which figured highly in 
talks here on June 3 between him and President 
Bill Clinton. 


The Vatican's choice of the New York cardi- 
nal to sound the alarm apparently reflected its 
view that much of the language in the confer- 
ence preparatory documents that the church 
finds offensive hails from American feminists. 

The Vatican fears that language in docu- 
ments for the Cairo conference will weaken the 
family as society’s most basic social and moral 
arbiter, lead to abortion on demand and spread 
zkt: ccs-hy ■«.? rent reception — ill in 

direct contravention of church dogma. 

But Vatican officials also nave been caught 
off guard by what they see as feminist language 
whose broadness could be used as a cover for 
the enshrinement is international rulings of 
moral values they do not accept. 

“You could say that it's just a few pages that 
we don’t agree on,” said an official closely 
involved in the Vatican campaign. “Or you 
could say it's the entire document. There are a 
whole series of concepts that are emerging in 
this document and are bang more or less can- 

See VATICAN , Page 6 



Petri* Mokikfe/iuiKf* 


LIGHT ON A DARK PAST — Lithuanians with candles commemorating the 
victims of Stalinism in their country at a ceremony in rite capital, Vilnius, on Tuesday. 


No. 34,615 

Bosnia Arms 
Could Spark 
‘World War,’ 
Russia Says 

Strong Warning Issued 
On Move by Congress 
To lift the Embargo 

By Margaret Shapiro 

Pm Service 

MOSCOW — Foreign Minister Andrei V. 
Kozyrev warned the U.S. Congress on Tuesday 
that its vote to end the arms embargo in Bosnia 
and allow the (handing of weapons to Muslim 
forces could ignite a “new world war." 

In unusually strong language, Mr. Kozyrev 
made it clear that the congressional moves 
could force Russia to respond in kind to the 
detriment of the new, posi-Communisi world 
order. 

“If one great power or both start supporting 
their clients, it would bring the world back to 
the worst years of the Cold War." he said. 

The House of Representatives voted last 
week to join the Senate and instruct President 
Bill Clinloa to end the United Nations- im- 
posed arms embargo of the former Yugoslavia. 
In a letter to Congress. Mr. Clin ton warned that 
the Bosnia peace process would be jeopardized 
if the United States lifted the embargo on its 
own. 

The arms ban was imposed in 1991 and 
ended up tipping the war in favor of the Serbs, 
who controlled much of the heavy weaponry of 
the former Yugoslav Army. The Muslim forces 
had few weapons and have bran unable to 
defend themselves or their territory against 
Bosnian Serbian advances. 

Mr. Kozyrev’s warnings were issued at the 
start of a meeting here with the leader of the 
Bosnian Serbs, Radovan Karadzic, who was in 
Moscow on a private visit to receive a nongov- 
ernmental literary award for his poetry. Russia 
has religious and cultural ties to the Serbs. 

The government, prodded by growing na- 
tionalist sentiment here, has acted as their de- 
fender among the Western powers, who see the 
Serbs as the main viliians in the civil war in the 
former Yugoslavia. The differing views have 
strained relations between the West and Russia, 
which with increasing frequency has sought to 
reassert itself —and its independent positions 
— on the world stage. 

Nonetheless, Russia has grown increasingly 
impatient with the Serbs’ refusal to go along 
with any peace plans, and Mr. Kozvrev stressed 
i uesday that Russia's backing of the Serbs had 
its limits. 

“If you choose peace, you can count on the 
most decisive support from Russia," he said, 
adding that the support would come “even at 
the price of confrontation” with the West. 

“But I want to warn you: There is also 
another choice, which we think leads to war," 
he said. “If you choose war, then forget about 
Russia's support You cannot control 70 per- 
cent of the temtory by force as you do now." 

He told Mr. Karadzic that the Serbs must 
give up much of the land they have conquered 
and accept a UN-brokered peace plan, in which 
the Serbs, who make up 31 percent of Bosnia's 
population, wouid get 49 percent of the land, 
while a Bosnia-Croatian confederation would 
be given S 1 percent. None of the sides have yet 
been willing to sign on to the peace plan. 

Mr. Karadzic, after meeting with Mr. Ko- 
zyrev, said that the Serbs were open to giving up 
land provided that the Serbs received "quality' 
land m exchange for the large “quantity" they 
would be forced to give up. 

Mr. Kozyrev said (hat Russia would not 
press for an end to economic sanctions against 
the Serbs until there were visible moves by them 
toward a peace settlement. 

“We would not lake unilateral steps which 
were not linked to peaceful settlements," he 
said. 

In another sign of Russia’s desire to carve out 
a separate policy line. President Boris N. Yelt- 
sin called again for an interuatioual conference 
to settle the question of North Korea’s refusal 
to allow complete inspection of its nuclear sites. 


The United States is pushing to have the UN 
Security Council meet and lake action, possibly 
imposing sanctions against North Korea. 

The West suspects North Korea of secretly 
developing its nuclear weapons and violating 
nudear conventions to do so. This week North 
Korea, which is ran as perhaps the world’s last 
Stalinist state, dropped out of the International 
Atomic Energy Agency after failing to allow 
inspectors of the IAEA to examine its nuclear 
plants. 


Reuters reported from Moscow: 

President Ydtan has decided to send a Rus- 
sian peacekeeping force into Georgia's Abkha- 
zia Province immediately, the Defense Ministry 
said Thursday, sidestepping Parliament, which 
has ye! to approve full-scale deployment. 

A ministry spokesman said Russian forces 
already deployed in Georgia would be sent into 
the breakaway Black Sea province on Wednes- 
day pending approval by Parliament’s upper 

See BOSNIA , Page 6 


Belgrade Zoo Story: Creativity in a Time of Strife 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Tima Service 

BELGRADE — The Serbian Defense Dog that prowls in a 
prominent cage at the Belgrade zoo is a big beast. Take a wolf, 
add a part as two of Nepalese mastiff, mix in some Doberman 
and a touch of Bosnian sheep dog, and this is what you get It 
has the flanks of a horse ana weighs over 130 pounds. 

“We call the dog Gari," said Vukosav Bqjovic, the director of 
the zoo and Try all accounts the most popular man in this city. 
“He’s well suited to Bosnia.” 

Mr. Bofovic, a jolly mao with & bone-crashing handshake, 
laughed — a big, jolly laugh. The Serbian Defense Dog barked 
— a big, baleful bark. They eyed each other through the bars 
while puppies scampered in the background. 

Bred fra the zoo by aSerb in Bosnia, the dog is an example of 
the deft Serbian nationalist marketing that has helped Mr. 
Bofovic tom the zoo into one of this city’s most admired 
institutions. A wreck a few years ago, the zoo is now prospering. 
andVuk— as the director is universally known — has become 
a Serbian folk hero. 


"I am a man of peace,” he said. “But in difficult times I have 
to use all possible means for marketing, even if it is negative 
marketing. I was brought up on Walt Disney's characters, and 
tike him I give some human characteristics to my animals." 

Mickey Mouse, however, is not what he has in mind. Among 
Mr. Bojovic's animals is the tiger cub that he presented to 
Arkan, the Serbian paramilitary leader whose deeds have led to 
international arrest warrants and accusations that he is a war 
criminal. 

The cub became the symbol of Arkan's Tigers, a paramilitary 
outfit widely known for brutally flushing Muslims out of 
Bosnian towns. 

Bojovic introduced a large tiger called Volga as the former 
Arkan cub and cooed as he stroked the animal's ears. Tigers, he 
said, are his favorite animal 

But a veterinarian at the zoo, Sinisa Nadjsranbati, said 
Arkan’s tiger had in fact died recently, apparently because 
Arkan's troops forgot to vaccinate it between Bosnian and 
Croatian campaigns. 

Crowds are also drawn by a light brown, cuddly looking bear 


called Kninja from the region of Kura, the self-styled capital of 
the Serbian-held Krajina territory in Croatia. It was the mascot 
of another notorious Serbian paramilitary unit, ted by Dragan 
Vasijkovic, an Australian mercenary of Serbian descent known 
as Captain Dragan. 

The effects of Mr. Bojovic's skillful marketing are evident. 
The zoo has a new gate, topped by cages containing Patagonian 
parrots. An aviary for tropical birds is being built Food for the 
animals is plentiful despite trade sanctions, and people throng 
toe impeccably clean paths that axe frequented also by pea- 
cocks and cockerels. 

“This is the best-run company in Belgrade," said Boza 
Mffinkovic, an architect and parrot enthusiast who sometimes 
helps out at the zoo. “Despite the war, despite sanctions, Vuk 
has built everything here." 

In 1986, when Mr. Bojovic took over, toe zoo was a ruin, 
Belgrade residents say. Years of Co mmuni st management had 

See ZOO, Page 6 


aas«"rsr r- # 





Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 15, 1994 


Kohl Rival 
Pressed on 
Left-Green 
Coalition 


Reuters 

BONN — After heavy losses in 
the European Parliament election, 
German Social Democrats put 
pressure on their leader on Tuesday 
to abandon a cautious centrist line 
and attack Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl with clear leftist policies. 

They urged the party leader, Ru- 
dolf Scharping, to drop hopes of 
taking voles from Mr. Kohl's 
Christian Democrats and (heir co- 
alition partners, the liberal Free 
Democrats, and instead commit 
the Social Democrats to a coalition 
with the Greens ahead of the gener- 
al election in October. 

“As things stand, we probably 
should, and want to. get together 
with the Greens.” a Social Demo- 
cratic deputy leader, Wolfgang 
Thierse. said in an interview with 
German television on Tuesday. 

Another deputy leader of the 
party, Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul, 
said the Social Democrats should 
aim for a “social -ecological major- 
ity." 

A member of the parly’s execu- 
tive committee. Rudolf Dressier, 
said: “We need clarity. Our policies 
must be sharpened up, for instance 
on the environment." 

Mr. Scharping has shunned tra- 
ditional Social Democratic policies 
on taxation and public spending, as 
well as clear environmental com- 
mitments, in a bid to win centrist 
votes, and has refused to rule out a 
coalition with the Free Democrats. 

But the results of European Par- 
liament elections on Sunday sug- 
gested that it is the Christian Dem- 
ocrats who have gained from 
disillusionment with the Free Dem- 
ocrats. Even worse for the Social 
Democrats, pollsters said, many of 
the party’s traditional supporters 
either stayed home or backed ihe 
Greens. 

The Social Democrats won 32 
percent of the vole, compared with 
39 percent for the Christian Demo- 
crats. The Free Democrats received 
4 percent, and the Greens had 10 
percent. 

“The SPD conspicuously failed 
to grab votes from the center with 
arguments of economic compe- 
tence," said Klaus-Peter 
Schfippner of the Emend poll. 
“Signs of an economic upturn 
mean voters will not turn away 

from Kohl on those grounds.” 



\. r 3£‘> 



Top Aides 

To Clinton T sr aeli Militar y Accused of Torture 

Cl* 1 TTwi JERUSALEM (Raitas) — 

Shake Up ' 

Their Staffs -S?5SS hSTStSlS- 

meirsiauk ^ 

By Elaine Sriolino ® iwTSpit: 


WORLD BRIEFS 


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By Elaine Sciolino 

Se H- Yor* Turns Senice 

WASHINGTON — Under con- 
tinuing criticism for their perfor- 
mance as makers and articulators 


mance as makers and aracuiaiots true, saw Major ucneret . hd—y* like bum an betas, • n 

sarsJswre 

presidem’s national security adws- a few occasions when sokfiers and policemen wc wro% try. . 

er W. Amhonv Lake, are shaking their behavior." 7 r&V. 


•• * tfenaOcnsuAporr FoocpPibm 

THE STUFF OF HISTORY — A worker making it shine for the opening Tuesday in Bonn of the History Mnseum of the Federal 
Republic of Germany. Among 7,000 items on display in the $70 million museum are pieces of the Berlin Wall and this Trabant car. 


gj Canada Signs Acid Rain Accord With Europeans 


OSLO — European nations and 


bv the year 2005. Other countries, 
including Ireland. Portugal. Be- 


Canada signed a United Nations larus and Hungary, said they would 
accord on Tuesday to curb acid sign soon. The pact aims to reverse 
rain by cutting emissions of sul- a steady build-up of sulphur from 
phur, and vowed to step up efforts acid rain, threatening human 
to reduce other environmental poi- health, wildlife, crops, lakes and 
sons. forests. 

Representatives of 26 countries Delegates also pledged in a state- 
from Canada to Ukraine, including ment to accelerate talks on new 
16 environment ministers, signed measures to curb nitrogen oxides, 
the agreement to curb emissions of including ammonia, and to control 
toxic sulphur by up to £7 percent volatile organic compounds that 


are also major components in acid 
rain. 

About 20 million tons or sulphur 

are emitted over Europe every year, 
mostly by the combustion of coal 
and heavy oils in power stations 
and factories. 

The protocol signed on Tuesday 
replaces a 1985 accord under which 


er, W. Anthony L ake, a re shaking 
g up their own departments- 

Traveling in Istanbul last week. 
Mr. Christopher informed Stephen 
A O rman, the assistant secretary 
of state for European and Canadt- 
jp i • ‘ an affairs and a close friend of the 
^ Clintons’, that Mr. Oman would 
vun* ocnai. Agoxr' Fon^w soon fc* relived of his post, senior 

Eon Mrseum of the Federal administration officials said, 
i Wall and this Trabant car. Richard C Holbrooke, a former 

career Foreign Service officer who 

has been ambassador to Germany 
for onlv eight months, will replace 

uropeans * 

H* »«■ ^° rd individual SStSIwc* 

targets for each country specialist on the National 

Germany is to make the shazpest ^STcountiL Senior White 

House bmciak *e move had 
/els by the year -00.. Sweden. ^ wor fcs for a number of 


High ts Out of Haiti Booked Solid 

SAN JUAN, Paerto Rico (Afi — Wok top 
Clinton announced a commercial air ban orHatu every seat flMKfc-i 
can Airlines flights from Port-an-ftjmce, Haiti s capital was -soM^atfr 
throush June 2vwhen the baa takes effect.. .. - - - ‘ 

A^caii is the only US. 

nnerates a daBv flight between POrt-an-Pna* and Miami 


to New York. Each tt&t has a capacity of267 passengers, jasraxm. 
booked solid from now until the end, an a rsrnne sp okesm an swCr v.*: 

The air ban and a bait to most financial transacmaa^-lfaid.wew}' t • j 
announced Friday, in yet another effort to force die nffi ffre grefate * 
power. Intcraatkjtial hid and trade embargoes were t»^acM|t1|ay-2lvx 


LAGOS (Reuters) — Nigeria’s pro-democracy 


reductions, of 87 percent from 1980 
levels by the year 2005. Sweden. 
Finland, Denmark and Austria 
pledged cuts of 80 percent by the 
year 2000. 

Canada agreed to a 30 percent 


Troops and armed 
though calm remainec 


patrolled fey points in ^te taty; which 




European nations were required lo reduction. The United States did 
curb sulphur emissions by at least not sign, contending that the US. 


30 percent by the end of last year. 
A i most all have met that target. 


Gean Air Act already gives protec- 
tion similar to the cuts planned. 


the Czech Republic next year. southwest woe 

The personnel changes reflect cocoa center, where the police feud tear gas 

UN Makes Progress on Yemen Tfciefe 

and articulating a coherent strategy DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (Reuters) -r^A United Nanen&aigjc 
toward Europe in general and to- ^ Tuesday thmfe had made some progttsai^tr^ig u>b«&era«Mii 
ward Bosnia m particular. fire between the two sides in the ax-weM-oid crvil war jnAemejLi ^r 

Mr. Oxman. a Wall Street lawyer The envoy, I ayhtbr Brahinn, stud that the Ndob and South to 
and investment banker, was a agreed to the formation of a nmltinatkma! mihtary cOTmflttee Jfeat wouJ 
friend of the Clintons’ at V ale Law offioera from both sides as well as foreign: rcprcsciifafivcs! 75; 

School and wns Mr. Christ liber’s committee would oversee a cease-fire. Mr., Brahimtsaid nqgooatior 
executive assistant in the Carter wou i(j next focus on the number of parties tbthe cammktee. ^ 
adminis tration. In Yemen, shelling continued Tuesday cvemn& in and atoend tl 

Mr. Oxman will be offered an southern stronghold of Aden. - v : -~ 

ambassadorship in Europe, but not # 

Wai-Cnmes TVial First, Court Rules 

Christopher and the deputy secre- BORDEAUX — A French court ruled Tuesday thal a former cajria 
iarv of stare. Strobe Talbott with minis ter most be tried on charges of crimes againsi hamanriy before: 
strong support from the WTiite will hear a libel suit he has brought a gainst the author of a book ahpt 
House, concurred that a change him. 

was necessary . The forma minister, Maurice Papon, 83, has tiaiied charges ofhdpin 

“The secreurv is absolutely de- send 1,690 Jews, indoding 223 chiWrra, to their deaths whentewas th 
tennined to get the best people in second-ranking dvil servant in the Bordeaux area during the World Wa 
senior jobs." a senior State Depan- II occupation of France by the Nazis. The last Frenchman to be accuse 
mem official said. of crimes against humanity and not yet tried, he is sum&rho authot 


QOUtjef htslMMse 
ItgjOfl rih fi& : . 




Japanese Publisher Withdraws Book on Hitler 


By Andrew Pollack 

,VfH York Tinun Service 
TOKYO — Reacting to international criti- 
cism. the publisher of a book that extols 
Hitler as a role model for Japanese politicians 
said tuesdav that he would immediately 
cease publication and withdraw the remain- 
ing copies from bookstore shelves. 

"Hitler Election Strategy: A Bible for Cer- 
tain Victory in Modem Elections." urges Jap- 
anese candidates to adopt the Nazi leader's 
tactics, such as liberal use of propaganda, in 
their campaigns. The book, written by a pub- 
lic-relations official in Japans largest politi- 
cal party, was condemned by Jewish groups 
in ihe United States and by' the Israeli gov- 
ernment. 


The book's publisher. Etichi Niimura. said 
he had been asked b> the author. Voshio 
Ogai. to withdraw the book from circulation. 
He said Mr. Ogai might have made the re- 
quest to avoid further embarrassment to his 
employer, the Liberal Democratic Party. 

Mr. Niimura said that neither he nor Mr. 
Ogai had expected the book would provoke j 
negative reaction because it deals only with 
campaign tactics, not with Hitier’i treatment 
of the Jews. 

“I approved the idea and agreed to the 
publication because 1 wasjusL focusing on the 
election scheme theme." Mr. Niimura said. 
"But my understanding was insufficient. I 
was careless, and if people criticize me as 
insensitive. I cannot argue back. Though we 
both did not have any intention of praising 


Hiller, we did not realize the book could hurt 
the feelings of the Israeli people." 

Mr. Niimura 2 iso said be was quitting 
publishing. “1 am 76 years old." he said. 
“This incident has made me think my judg- 
ment has declined." 

Chiyoda Nagata Shobo. Mr. Niimura's 
small company, has published 200 books in 
20 years. 

Ii was not immediately clear what role the 
Liberal Democrats had in forcing the cessa- 
tion of publication. The party governed Ja- 
pan for nearly 40 years until being ousted last 
summer, and it was to help it regain power 
that Mr. Ogai offered his advice. 

Mr. Ogai was said by his office to be 
traveling and could not be reached for com- 
ment. 


DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (Reuters) -r- A yrined NariWRenyby - 
said Tuesday that be had made some jmogres^ihtrjmg tofeofera«a^> ri 
fire between the two sides, in the sa-wtai-oW ravil wstron ' 

The envoy, Lakbdar Brahinn, said that the Noctb and Souih laid - 
agreed to the formation of a m&Itmatkma! nrihimy cOTmutteeriat would, * ’ 
include officers from both sides as wd! as forogff rcpr«cii£afisic£ Tbe ' 
committee would oversee a cease-fire. Mr. : Brahimt said nqgooaoons ^. 
would next focus on the number of parties tbtfae commttee: ; rh-s 

In Yemen, sheHmg continued Tuesday cvcning tn and aroond Ae 
southern stronghold of Aden. ; ’ - v--' '. A' ; :^ 


ask the butler... 


Jan Tinbergen, Dutch Economist, Is Dead 


- ' ^/eweu 

Vlgri itrvtct II a*yl«i«f jem vill It SJ tt 


By Peter Passel! 

AW York Times Service 

Jan Tinbergen, the Dutch econc*- 
mist and Nobel laureate whose 
technical accomplishments and 


question of why industrial output 
fluctuated in nonrandom ways — 
the clastic puzzle of the business 
cycle. 

Mr. Tinbergen first gained 
prominence with his pioneering ef- 


passion for effective public police prominence witn ms pioneenngd- 
have led scime to compare him to lo DUI ^ mathematical moaels 
John Mavnard Kevmes. died June 0 01 how whole eccr.omies work ; — 


at 91. 

News of his death was withheld 


of how whole eccr.otries work — 
more specifically, how shocks like 
harvest failures' or stock market 


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by his family to allow his funeral to ^ashe: ricochet through ar. econo- 
take place without publicity. m 7 10 influence employment, out- 
Mr. ’nnbergen was trained as j pul. and inflation, 
physicist (he received his doctorate His modei ?f the .American econ- 


physicist (he received tus doctorate mocci ?! me .nmencjn eecn- 

from the University of Leyden} but omy. produced for the League of 
switched lo economics iri the late Nations in :933, was the precursor 
1920s. During the early 1930s. he of Lhe giant computer models now 
was a professor of development used to forecast everything from 
planning at the University of Rot- the size of next year’s budget deficit 
terdam and a staff member of the to die exchange rate of the Mexican 
Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics, pw. 

where he applied mathematical One idea generally attributed to 
techniques from the sciences to the Mr. Tinbergen is that governments 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

0 Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Afessage Center 

• Thursday 

International Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

HcralbSeribunc 


must have at least as many inde- 
pendent policy instruments as poli- 
cy targets. For example, if a coun- 
try wishes to control the exchange 
rate of us currency and the rate of 
economic growth it must use a 
minimum of two levers — say. the 
supply of money and the rate of 
deficit spending. 

That notion, while second nature 
io the current generation of econo- 
mists. was a revelation at the time, 
an insight that had eluded the 
greats. 

In 1969. Mr. Tinbergen shared 
the first Nobel Memorial Prize in 
Economic Science with the Norwe- 
gian Ragnar Frisch. .And while his 


was found dead Monday at his 
home here, the police said. 

A police spokesman said Colonel 
Beckwith was found in his bed 
Monday morning by his wife, 
Katherine, after apparently dying 
of natural causes. 

Colonei Beckwith led the April 
24. 1980. Delta Force mission lo 
rescue 52 U.S. hostages m Iran. 
Eight servicemen died in the raid 
after one of the military helicopters 
crashed in the desert. 

Michel Vitold. 79. a Russian- 
born actor and director who over 
four decades helped bring the 
works of France’s best modem 


intellectual force as an economist playwrights to the stage, died of 
was by this lime largely spent, be cancer Tuesday in Paris. 


remained, in the words of James 
Tobin, of Yale, ’’a congenital do- 
gooder/' who used his fame and 
prestige to further the cause of ra- 
tional economic policy in the Third 
World. 

Chflries Beckwith Dies at 65, 
Led Failed Iran Rescue in *80 
AUSTIN, Texas (Reuter) — 
Colonel Charles Beckwith. 65, who 
led the failed 1980 helicopter raid 
to free the U.S. hostages in Iran, 


Igor Youskeritch, 82, a star of the 
American Ballet Theater who was 
acclaimed as one of the century’s 
great classical dancers, died Mon- 
day in New Yorfc 


UN Food Flights 
Halted in Angola 


BORDEAUX — A French court ruled Tuesday tbai a former cabinet 
minister most be tried on charges of arirnes agama htunarifty befcre-iT 
will hear a libel suit he has brought against the autbor of abook about- 
him. ’ v \V 

The former minister, Maurioe Papon. 83, has denied charges oHidpmg . - - 
send 1,690 Jews, indudmg 223 chDdren, to their deaths ^enhe«as the 
second-ranking dv3 servant in the Bordeaux area during the World War. 

II occupation of France by the Nazis. The last Frenchman to be accused 1 / - 
of crimes against humanity and not yet tried, he is String iife author- - 
lawyer Gerard Boulanger for ] millio n francs (5175,000) over afiegi lions - : 
in Mr. Boulanger’s book “Maurice Papon: A FremA Bureaucrat ai . 
Collaboration." - . - • 

Mr. Papon has already won a h'bet suit against a news magazine-over 
the allegations. Mr. Boulanger’s lawyers argued that the Hbd suit could 
not be decided until Mr. Paton’s trial on collaboration charges. ..Hie i ‘ 
Bordeaux court agreed, bn said die case would be reviewed in 90days. 

Tapie to Fight Move to lift Immunity 

PARIS (AFP) — Bernard Tapie pledged Tuesday to, fight demands for C ; 
the lifting of Iris parliamentary immunity over alleged tax evasion, sftefr 
the National Assembly voted to conader the matter on Jime 29 t ; 

Mr. Tapie said Tuesday — three days after bong elected Jo. the';-.- 
European Parliament at the head of his center-left Movement of the 
Radical Left — that he was “determined to fight” the caHs. • -- y - 
Mr. Tapie must give up one of the three legislative mandates beholds ; 
— as member of a regional council, the National Assembly, and Europe- 
an Parliament. He said he would decide within two or three i£ays 
elected post to drop after consultations within ihe party. - : . 

Anti-Gay Italian Loses Election Bid ; 

ROME (Reuters) — Piero Buscaroli, a neofascist candidate forl^' 
European Parliament who said homosexuals should live in concentration -r 
camps, has failed to win a seat, a party spokesman said Tuesday. - ■ 

Mr. Buscaroli. who last month said that homosexuals lead lembleUves 
and “if it were up to me Td send them all to Uve in concentration camps*” ' 
is a member of the National Alliance. He finished sixth on ihe alliance’s . 
list in his constituency in northeastern Italy. • 

An Italian gay-rights leader, Franco GnHini, who had criticized Mr. ’ 
Buscaroli for his comments, also failed to win election to the European' 
Parliament Mr. Grillini ran for the Democratic Party of the left--" “ 


TRAVEL UPDATE 



***** 


HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE 

Smce 1054 

A PRIVILEGED PLACE! 

The only Grand Hotel 
located in the heart of 
Geneva's business 
and shopping center. 
Air conditioned. 

34. quai < 3*rkarakGuJson 
1211 Geneva 3 
TeL (41-22) 311 1344 
Telex: 421550- Fax: 311 1350 


The Associated Press Britain Facing a Rail Strike Tbday ^fg 

HARARE. Zimbabwe — The LONDON (Reuters) — A one-day strike by signal operator? on 
main relief agency in Angola halted s railroads will go ahead on Wednesday and a second will foBow 

all emergency food flights and said on .^ une 22 unless pay talks between unions and managers resume, if 
at least two' Angolan cities were u™* 1 spokeswoman said Tuesday. V-, - 

critically short of food on Tuesday ** 1C nation’s 4,600 signal operators said they would stop work for 24 
as a result hours starting early Wednesday morning after the operator, RaBinA. 

The United Nations World Food „„ ' ' r t 

Program stopped the flights be- A national ran strike <n the Nethestaads entered its second day Tuesday 
cause the UN IT A rebel movement “ dis P. ulc over job cuts renamed unresolved. Passenger trains, inclnd- 
f ailed to dear routine flight plans ^ S!** ?J5r 1,llD ’ . Gcnnan >'. beyond, were at a complete 
over territory it controls, according slaild5tl1 ^ semce ^ widely disrupted. • (Reuters) ■ 
to a spokeswoman. Mercedes Saya- Confusing fi g h ti ng nearly caused a disaster at London’s Gare*% - 
gues. The last air deliveries to last year when a plane landed on a taxiway instead of a runway; ' 

about a million people dependent ' nv “p gators said Tuesday. The report by a Transport Department urat^ 
on food aid were completed Salur- forad ta»way was so brightly lit just before the plane landed ihaci&g?;- 

day. Flights has been scheduled to ^ ^ the Air Malta 737 mistook it for the standby runway they bad- 
resume Monday. been told to use. The plane just missed a parked aircraft. (Rad 'er^ i 

The spokeswoman said food ****** 4ft Lines wB end few trans-Attantic routes effective Smt t£ r - 
stocks in the rebel -encircled cities ^ f-pciiiiiati-Muiiidi, Miami- London, New York-Oslo andNwr; 
or Malanje, 350 kilometers (215 York-Stockhohn. (Raiu$ \ 

miles) southeast of Luanda, and Ten percent of CUna Air Lines (dots ««4 co-pilots wiH be 
Kuito. 670 kilometers southeast of after failing a special performance test foil owing a crash that lafled^SF- 
Luanda. were exhausted Monday, people. Taiwan’s national earner said Tuesday. ■ ' - jjfjtj;: 


as a resulL 

The United Nations World Food 
Program stopped the flights be- 
cause the UNITA rebel movement 
failed to dear routine flight p lans 
over territory it controls, accor ding 
to a spokeswoman, Mercedes Saya- 
gues. The last air deliveries to 
about a million people dependent 
on food aid were completed Salur- 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 1994 


Page 3 


ofT, 


W ZAMericas/ spotlight 

Mexico’s Rebels Take Aim i at Politics-as-Usual I 


POLITICAL NOTES 


j T. ■* -f ;■“** 

■ i : His** 


lenienTruu 

y--*. 

N ,r._ r ; - 


iourt Rule? 


By Tod Robberson 

‘ WMWngKwftwr 5mra> 

MEXICO CITY — Milita rily 
the rebels are insig n ifi c an t, out- 
numbered and outgunned, sur- 
rounded by troops and isolated in 
some of southern Mexico's most 
remote mountain jangle terrain. 

But with deft maneuvering and a 
skillful use of the media, the peas- 
ant-rebel Zapatista National Liber- 
ation Army once a g ai n has forced 
its way to the center of the political 
l-„ j c stage, announcing its ngeefion of a 

**■“(* oOild three-month-old goverruncntpcace 

u“7 \f‘z' ^Wn Pr ?b?r^B3ion assures a highly 

“ m: on public ■ reexamination of issues 

--- ■ ,“*■ that have long troubled Mexico, 

w and that die Zapatistas’ Jan. 1 re- 

- w :a: : v . u,- beffion placed high on the national 

2 z* f r 7T agcndi These are poverty, unero- 
, f^-a^isrs. "Ta-vtr** puoymcnt, bousiog, human rights, 

-••i jrok-is-p education and the widespread im- 

.t. :• -*r»h hC presaion that Mexico’s long-stand- 

;* :r - tf — mty tog political system does not pro- 

- jiicje^uT v® vide full democrat to its citizens, 

‘ • *1 Hus time, moreover, it is hap- 

U- to Wane SLtT^ 21 

■ J v ?*v &-j Under the direction of a masked 

^raurriedtieiui leader known as Subcomandante 
> S 51 * ■ :hnrij* Marcos, the mpstty Mayan Indian 

1 i' ^ Zapatista army is- helping push. 

? r - ‘ •••' Dte xt» a Prestdeni Carlos Salinas de Gortari 

7' * si iaiJS® r and the long-goveming Institution* 

e al Revohmmiajy Party into a reas- 

^ sessment of the way Mexican poli- 

t- c ' lies are conducted 

■ C-V - In answerto the Zapatista upris- 
' ~ ~ ir$ in southern Chiapas state, Mr. 

Salinas has fired at least one senior 
adviser, shaken up Ins cabinet, de- 


clared a unilateral cease-fire and 
ordered reform of the nation's 
fraud-tainted electoral system. 

In March, the president ap- 
proved a 32-point peace proposal 
that offered government funds for 
rural development in Chiapas, 
greater attention to public educa- 
tion and housing, and measures to 
aid human rights abuses against 
the state’s large Mayan popu l atio n. 

But the rebel commander says 
Mr. Salinas has not gone far 
enough; he issued a communique 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

last weekend calling for new nego- 
tiations incorporating “all progres- 
sive forces in the country, with the 
central theme of democracy, liberty 
and justice for all Mexicans.” 

Threatening civil war across the 
nation, Subcomandante Marcos is 
de m andi n g guarantees from Mr. 
Salinas of a clean election in Au- 
gust The only apparent military 
force backing the rebel chief is a 
ragtag team of about 2400 masked 
fighters. Still, the government is 
taking them seriously, possibly be- 
cause of the dramatic impact the 
Zapatistas have had on Mexico's 
poo deal scene. 

The upheaval drew crucial media 
attention away from the incipient 
campaign of Luis DouaJdo Colo- 
bo,Mj. Salinas's heir apparent and 
at the time the presidential candi- 
date of the governing party. A na- 
tionwide debate followed on Mexi- 
co's most serious soda! problems at 
a time when Mr. Colosio, cam- 


paigning on the themes of prosperi- 
ty and development, was Uying to 
capitalize on Mr. Salinas's success- 
es — most notably the Jan. I imple- 
mentation of the North American 
Free Trade Agreement 
In early March, Mr. Cdosio’s 
campaign again was eclipsed when 
a govenuoen (peace envoy, Manuel 
Camacho Sous, concluded talks 
with the Zapatistas and announced 
the administration's peace propos- 
al. Mr. Camacho’s supporters be- 
gan campaigning for him to replace 
Mr. Colosio on die pony ticket, 
leading to a public struggle be- 
tween the two that was resolved 
with a March 22 pad in which Mr. 
Camacho ruled out any presiden- 
tial bid. 


The next day, Mr. Colosio was 
assassinated during a campaign 
Stop in Tijuana. The party s re- 
placement candidate. Ernesto Ze- 
dillo, appears to have inherited the 
same problem that dogged the Co- 
losio campaign: anotherpublic dis- 
cussion of the nation's ms. 

In a campaign speech Sunday 
night, Mr. Zedillo lashed out at the 
government and Zapatistas, declar- 
ing: “We are living a great disap- 
pointment. We were certain that 
the negotiations had been a suc- 
cess, and now the truth is that we 
feel they have been a disaster.” 

Even Mr. Zedillo's competition 
has fallen victim to Zapatista polit- 
ical maneuvering. Last month, the 
leftist opposition candidate Cuauh- 


temoc C&rdenas. who was closely 
following Mr. Zedillo in opinion 
polls, accepted an invitation to 
5pe3k before hundreds of Zapatista 

S : prill as and civilian supporters in 
jungle town of Guadalupe Te- 
peyac. Within minutes of arriving, 
Mr. C&rdcoas was ushered onto a 

S hore Zapatista leaders, in- 
Subeomandante Marcos, 
him about his party’s polit- 
ical shortcomings. 

Since that visit and a lackluster 
performance in a televised debate, 
Mr. Cirdenas has dropped to a 
distant third in opinion pods. In 
some of those polls, Diego Fer- 
nandes de CevaOos of the conserva- 
tive National Action Party is neck- 
and-neck with Mr. Zedillo. 


Police Question O. J. Simpson 

Football Great’s Ex-Wife and a Waiter Are Found Slain 






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Away From Politics 


ftowngiptocathetera attached to his arms inside the death chamber 
at a Texas state prison m Huntsville, 90 miles north of Houston. 

• In a ration dbifty of chastity, more than 1 00,000 Southern Brotist 
youngsters are pledging to abstain from sex until marriage. They 
planned to repeat that vow in a stadium-sized display before the 
137th annu^ meetina of the Sontbern Baptist Convention in Orian- 
do, Florida, this we^. 

• TV Supreme Comt Has ruled that Congress did not violate the 
constitution when it dosed a tax loophole retroactively in 19S7 and 
collected back taxes -ton those who had relied on the original 
provision. The 9-to-Q decision involving an estate tax provision 
ovotumeda l992nilingby a U.S- appeals coart in California, which 
hdd that the retroactive application of the amended provision 
violated the constitutional guarantee of due process of law. 

• Drug pro g rams ate seven times more efficient than law 

enforcement efforts in reducing the use of cocaine and appear to be 
ihemostflffectirometbodofalkaccordfflgtoainajorstuayisauedbY 
the RAND Corporation. Making such, programs available to all 
hemty cocaine itsen would reduce consumption of the drag by a 
third, the study said. 


Reuters. AK NYT. LAT 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES - 0. J. Simp- 
son conferred with his attorney on 
Tuesday amid reports that a blood- 
ied glove was found at the football 
Hall of Farcer's home, matching 
one found near the bodies of his 
former wife and another man. 

Family and friends streamed to 
Mr. Simpson’s home in the suburb 
of Brentwood, a day after he was 
questioned about the deaths of his 
former wife, Nicole Brown Simp- 
son, 35, and Ronald Lyle Gold- 
man, 25. 

“It’s difficult enough with the 
shock that your wife's been mur- 
dered, but to hear that you may be 
accused of it, well, it’s awful,” said 
Mr. Simpson's attorney, Howard 
Weitzman. 

Earlier, the attorney said Mr. 
Simpson “had nothing to do with 
this tragedy. 1 * 

Both the Los Angdts Times and 
the Daily News of Los Angeles 
cited anonymous police sources re- 
porting that a blood-soaked glove 
had bees found at Mr. Simpson’s 
home. 

The Daily News said the dove 
found at Mr. Simpson's home 
matched erne found near the bod- 
ies. The newspaper also reported 
that the victims’ throats had beat 
dashed. 

Mr. Weitzman said he knew 
nothing about the discovery of 
matching , bloody gloves. 

The police declined to confirm or 
deny if they believed Mr. Simpson 
might be involved, but the Los An- 
geles Tunes cited unidentified po- 
lice sources as saying the retired 
football star was under investiga- 
tion in the slayings 


“We are not going to rule anyone 
out,” Commander David Gascon 
of tiie Los Angeles police said ai a 
news conference late Monday 
when asked if Mr. Simpson was 
under suspicion. 

Mr. Simpson. 46, voluntarily re- 
turned from Chicago on Monday 
to answer questions, and for a brief 
time was handcuffed by the police. 

Mr. Weitzman met with Mr. 
Simpson at about 9 A.M. Tuesday, 
and he described the former foot- 
ball great as distraught. 

A passerby discovered Mrs. 
Simpson’s bloody body on Mon- 
day, just minutes after midnight, 
near agate to her West Los Angeles 
condominium. Die police found 
Mr. Goldman's body in shrubbery 
nearby. 

It was unclear when they were 
killed, and the police declined to 
comment on details. But Mr. 
Weitzman said the police estimated 
the killings happened about 11 
P.M. Sunday. 

A coroner’s spokesman, Scott 
Carrier, said “sharp-force injuries” 
that might include stabbing con- 
tributed to the deaths but other 
causes had not been ruled out. Au- 
topsies were planned Tuesday. 

The Simpsons' young son and 
daughter were found asleep and 
unharmed inside their mother's 
home. 

On Monday, the police went to 
Mr. Simpson''? SI .2 million Brent- 
wood estate, two miles (three kilo- 
meters) from (he murder scene. 
Cardboard markers placed by in- 
vestigators in the driveway identi- 
fied small reddish brown stains 
leading up the driveway to a point 
50 feet < 1 5 meters) from the garage. 


Mr. Simpson’s blade Rolls-Royce 

was parked in the driveway. 

A source dose to the case told 
the Los Angeles Times that Mr. 
Simpson's release Monday was “a 
temporary thing.” The source said 
an arrest was being delayed until 
forensic tests were completed. 

Mr. Goldman was t waiter at 
Mezzaluna, a Brentwood restau- 
rant where Mrs. Simpson dined 
Sunday. 

He aid not serve her that night, 
said its owner, Karim SoukL 

“She had dinner here," he said. 
“She called later to see if we found 
her glasses and we found them. He 
might have volunteered to return 
them.” 

Mr. Goldman had been a waiter 
at Mezzaluna about three months, 
Mr. Souki said. 

“The guy was really a great, great 
guy," he said. “Everybody loved 


Wo Consensus on HaaHh Plan 

WASHINGTON — Senate leadere told Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton on Tuesday that there was no 
consensus for any health-care plan on the Senate 
Finance Committee, a panel key to the passage of 
the legislation. 

The committee chairman. Daniel Patrick May- 
nihan. Democrat of New York. said. “We agreed 
that there is not now a majority for any health- 
care reform plan in the Senate Finance Commit- 
tee. that we whl continue to work on a bipartisan 
basis to provide legislation that covers every- 
body." 

“We've got a very intensive work period ahead, 
and we're ready to go." Mr. Moynihan said. 

Mr. Moynihan insisted that Mr. Ginton's 
health -care reform was not dead, saying; “Not at 
all. This a large piece of legislation and some of the 
principles are absolutely essential. Others are ne- 
gotiable, and he knows that." 

Senator Bob Pack wood put it another way. “At 
the moment, all -plans are dead,” he said. “Any- 
body's plan." (APJ 


H«rt lips Ifa Welfare Reform 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri — President G inton 
proposed a scaled-down, S93 billion welfare-re- 
form plan on Tuesday, imposing a two-year life- 
time limit on cash benefits and steering aid recipi- 
ents into the work force. 

“I really believe we have a chance, finally, to 
replace dependence with independence,” Mr. Clin- 
ton said in a speech announcing his program. 
“Today we have to restore faith in the beginning in 
certain basic principles that our forebears took for 
granted: the bond of family, the virtue of commu- 
nity, the dignity of work.’* 
the five-year plan would be paid for largely by 


cutting social prwnms. especially aid to immi- 
grants and the homeless. Subsidies to wealthy 
farmers would be cut for 3 savings of S5O0 million. 
A huge portion of the money — 57 billion — 
would be spent on education, training and day- 
care programs, while SI. 2 billion would be target- 
ed for work programs. 

“If you really want to know what's wrong with 
the welfare system, talk, to the people who are 
stuck in it." Mr. Ginton said. “They want to 
change it more than most people you know — and 
if you give them half a chance they will.” (API 

Quick Vote Sought on Tobacco 

WASHINGTON — Three key congressional 
tobacco foes will try to get a quick House vote on 
legislation that would require the Food and Drug 
Aaminisiraiion to regulate tobacco, but would 
forbid the agency from imposing a total ban on 
cigarettes^ 

Three Democratic Representatives — Richard 
J. Durbin of Illinois. Mike Synar of Oklahoma 
and Ron Wyden of Oregon — in a procedural 
maneuver, said they had asked the Rules Commit- 
tee to allow the amendment to be attached to the 
agriculture appropriations bill in OTder to pul the 
measure on a fast track to a House vote. 

The process Is the same as that used to enable a 
vote on the 1989 smoking ban on domestic air- 
lines. 

(LAT). 

Quote/Unquote ' 

President Ginton, in a toast at a stale dinner for 
the emperor and empress of Japan, quoting the 
Japanese poet Basho: “ 'Nearing autumn's closer 
my neighbor/ how does he live/ 1 wonder.' May 
your majesties' visit provide new answers to that 
question and bring our peoples closer still.”/ WPy 


Neighbors said they had seen 
Mr. Goldman in the past with Mrs. 
Simpson and her children, the Dai- 
ly News reported. 

Mr. Weitzman said his client did 
not know Mr. Goldman. 

Friends said the couple had re- 
cently discussed getting back to- 
gether. Mr. Weitzman said the two 
frequently were together on family 
outings. 

Mr. Simpson, an NBC television 
sports commentator, also has acted 
in movies, including the three “Na- 
ked Gun” comedies. 

In 1989. he allegedly screamed 
“I'll kifi you” as he slapped and 
kicked his wife in a predawn New 
Year’s Day argument He pleaded 
no-contest to wife beating and was 
placed on two years’ probation. 



J ffcrtid AJw/Aactcr France- ftoa* 

President Cfinton offering a toast to Emperor Akihito during a state dinner at the White House. 








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? 5 ft>5 » t *<*“ v- 





Page 4 - 


WEPXESDAY, JUNE 15, 1994 

OPINION 


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North Korea moved a step closer 10 di-o>- 
trous confrontation with the rest of the world 
by announcing cm Monday iLs withdrawal from 
the International Atomic Energy Agency and 
by banning IAEA inspectors from its icmiory. 
It has not yet carried out its threat Two IAEA 
inspectors, along with monitoring cameras, re- 
main at its reactor site, watching recently re- 
moved spent fuel that could be transformed 
into as many as five nuclear bombs, if North 
Korea does expel the inspectors, it could f aiul'.y 
compromise the Clinton administration s ef- 
forts to resolve the nuclear dispute peacefully. 

To keep diplomacy alive, the United State:, 
and its Asian allies must not flinch in the face 
of this and other North Korean pro*, xaiicns. 
Instead they should proceed with their plan to 
ask the United Nations Security Council u- 
enact a sequence of phased sanction? as soon 

as the council’s five permanent members 
reach a consensus on how to do it. 

North Korea's withdrawal announcement 
came in response to Friday's dec wo it by me 

IAEA tosuspcQd most international technic.*.! 

assistance to Pyongyang's nuclear program. 
That IAEA vote, reflecting frustration at 
North Korea's breaches of agency monitoring 
rules, provided a test run for any forthcoming 
UN sanctions resolution. The United State? 
was glad to see that China did noi try to block 
IAEA punishment, raising hope that China 
will also permit Security Council action. 

What is most important for now is no; North 
Korea's announcement of its intentions or even 
formal withdrawal from the IAEA. After all. 
North Korea withdrew- from the Nuclear Non- 
proliferation Treaty a year ago only to “suv 
pend” its withdrawal a few months later. The 
most urgent requirement is that North Korea 
allow effective international monitoring of that 
recently removed spent nuclear fuel. Inspectors 
must retain necessary access to the storage site. 
Monitoring cameras must be kept supplied 
with batteries and film without interruption. 
That is the surest way to keep North Korea 
from building new nuclear bombs. 


Until now. the main issue between North 
Korea and the IAEA has been over collecting 
evidence bearing on whether North Korea 
built bombs in the past. Through analysis of 
spent fuel rods and access to nuclear waste 
sites, the IAEA hoped to establish exactly 
how much plutonium North Korea may have 
diverted when the reactor was briefly shut 
down five years ago. The CIA estimates that if 
North Korea had the necessary technology, 
ihat could have been enough for one or two 
nuc*ear bombs. On the other hand, it remains 
possible that the North has not yet buik any. 

The ipeni fuel whose monitoring is now at 
issue contains far more plutonium, perhaps 
enough for five bombs. North Korea's threat 
to disrupt monitoring of this new cache of 
potential bomb fuel, coupled with its warn- 
ings of military reprisals against Japan and 
South Korea, forces the world to think hard 
about the worst case possibility: that North 
Korea Ij not merely seeking diplomatic conces- 
:.;.:ns but wants to’ make nuclear weapons and 

will wage war io protect its ability to do so. 

Pyongyang continues to assert that its nu- 
clear program is peaceful and that the whole 
crisis can be resolved by direct talks with the 
United States. But when the Clinton adminis- 
tration braved domestic criticism to offer such 
talks. North Korea repeatedly answered with 
provocations — “suspending" its adherence 
to the Nonproliferation Treaty, thwarting 
IAEA inspectors, refusing to preserve evi- 
dence and now threatening to quit the IAEA. 

As the world moves toward sanctions, it 
cannot afford to abandon diplomacy. The 
costs of confrontation would be very high. 
Even without war, sanctions could trigger 
collapse of the Northern regime, sending mil- 
lions of refugees over the South Korean and 
Chinese borders and into Japan. The United 
States and its allies must try to use the threat 
of sanctions to push North Korea into a 
diplomatic solution, while preserving continu- 
ous monitoring of that dangerous fuel. 

— THE A EH’ YORK TIMES. 


II Russia Is Democratic 


The United SLates is getting caught up by a 
tricky contradiction in its security pol ; -:y in 
Europe. The American goal is an ever fuller 
integration with the West of the 27 nations 
made up out of the old Soviet empire. But 
whether the goal can be reached depends in 
the first instance on the shape of the emerging 
Russia. A reforming, democratic Moscow 
could become a reliable security partner. But 
a Moscow lurching toward crisis and authori- 
tarianism would necessarily be seen as a men- 
ace. The West has to encourage the one hut 
discourage the other. This is no easy task. 

Take Russia's new- agreement to join the 
fledgling NATO Partnership for Peace, a half- 
way house for military cooperation and crisis 
consultation short of formal alliance member- 
ship. Of the 27 former Soviet or Soviet-con- 
trolled countries. 20 are signing on. Russia 
bad held off, not wanting to accept a status as 
just one of the gang. Instead it asked f«*r 
Partnership plus a "full-blooded strategic re- 
lationship" — a status as first among equals. 
Not just Russia’s pride but its sire and overall 
importance commend such a scheme. But the 
idea has struck many Central Europeans as an 
invitation to restore Soviet-like sway. So Rus- 
sia is not getting a formal unique security 
treaty. It is getting "a framework of strategic 


cooperation.” This is the American way to 
coin Russia into democratic practice and for- 
eign policy responsibility and to calm Central 
Europe's anxieties at the same time. 

In fact, there already is a posl-Cold War 
line running through Europe, although it is 
usually considered good manners not to say 
so. On one side is Russia. On the other is 
everybody else. Ft betrays strategic sense as 
v,e!! as Russian nationalism to pretend that 
Russia i i ju>i another struggling European 
country. It is the one whose foreign and inter- 
nal conduct most afreets the others, h is the 
one which, regardless of how European secu- 
rity is structured, is regarded by the others as 
ji» indefinite threat. Its singularity is defined 
by iic uncertain future evolution. 

This is why the United Stales must keep 
faith with a Europe that sees Partnership and 
passible NATO membership down the road 
as essential insurance against a Russia throw- 
ing i:- weigh; around in Central Europe — the 
way ii already h throwing its weight around 
iv.ith : Western wink) in Transcaucasia and 
Central Asia. It is whv the United States, even 
as it plays its pan in securing Central Europe, 
must remain devoted to advancing democrat- 
ic reform in Russia itself. 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 




While it was an election for the European 
Union's multinational Parliament, the voters 
were mainly focused on the internal politics of 
the Union's 12 member countries. In most of 
them, as in other recent electioas in Europe, 
the mood was sour and the results were frag- 
mented. There was little visible interest in 
continent-wide issues, except perhaps for hos- 
tility here and there to the whole idea of a 
European political union itself. The returns 
ought to tell the politicians that they have 
outrun public support Tor the idea. To keep it 
alive, they are going to have to put much more 
effort into explaining to their voters why it is a 
good and important part of their future. 

Although most voters took this election to 
be an invitation to protest voting, it was 
reassuring that the extremes of right and left 
scored equally poorly. The various denomina- 
tions or ex-Communisls got few votes, and on 
the far right Germany's sinister Republicans 
won no seats at all. Beyond thai, the patterns 
are con trad ictoiy. In Britain, where unem- 
ployment is high but declining, the governing 
Conservatives took a drubbing that further 
endangers Prime Minister John Major's hold 
on his job. In Germany, where unemployment 
is also high but declining, the governing con- 
servatives actually improved i heir vote from 
the last European election five years ago. This 
hinted that Chancellor Helmut Kohl may win 
the national election next fall. 

Despite the lack of enthusiasm among the 
people already in the Union, the Austrians, in 
a separate election, voted 2 to 1 to join. To the 
outsiders it still stands for great prosperity 
and security. The countries to the east are 
pressing with desperate anxiety to get in. 

But the steering mechanism of the New 


Europe has been damaged, and the whole 
enterprise needs to slow down for repairs. 
Only last year the 12 countries adopted the 
ambitious Maastricht treaty, which renamed 
the European Community a Union, strength- 
ened the Parliament and talked expansively of 
a common currency and foreign policy.’ In 
France all the established parties suffered 
severe losses in this election, in part because 
of a highly successful attack on the Maastricht 
treaty itself. The treaty was written and 
pushed forward in haste, with crucial French 
support, to anchor the reunified Germany 
firmly in the West These elections are the 
latest of much evidence that in pressing for 
greater unification the treaty's architects got 
dangerously beyond their constituents’ feel- 
ings about it — perhaps not in Germany, but 
very clearly in France. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 

Other Comment 

Korea: A Short List of Options 

The longer the world anguishes over North 
Korea's nuclear intentions, the worse the out- 
look seems. A nervous world is left with three 
main options. The first is to do an Iraq: an 
American-led surgical strike on the North’s 
nuclear plants. The result would almost cer- 
Lainlv be war. The second option — to do 
nothing — looksjust as bad. Mr. Clinton would 
be adopting a risky ploy covered in arrows that 
all point back to option one. A third ruse is to 
cajole China into firmer action. China supplies 
most of North Korea's imported oO and lood. 

— The Age i Melbourne j. 



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s Hand the East Back to 







W ashington — Out of ^ state? in 

Central and Eastern Europe and the 
former Soviet Union, there are today only 
five — Albania. Armenia, the Czech Repub- 
lic. Estonia and Latvia — in which former 
Communists do not hold power or signifi- 
cantly share in governance. 

The startling political comeback of ex- and 
□eo-Communisis excites little concern in the 
United Slates and Western Europe. Many of 
the new ex-Communisis are viewed as prag- 
matic. go-slow reformers committed to play- 
ing by the rules of the market and of democra- 
cy — a characterization that is more apt in 
some coses than in others. 

Democratic activists in the region do noi 
share the West's lack of concern. 

Those in Ukraine, for example, report a 
palpable shift in the attitudes or the media 
ana among academics since the takeover by 
Socialists and neo-Communists of the coun- 
try's newly elected Parliament. “We are be- 
ginning to see a hardening of positions among 
many Communists who were lying low over 
the last two years.” observes Ilkq Kucheriv. 
director of the Democratic Initiatives polling 
center. "Now they feel much more self- as- 
sured: they are on the offensive." 

And that is legitimate cause for alarm, since 
there is no denying Lbal many self-styled 

reformers were cogs in a system that for 
decades proscribed human rights, suppressed 
religious liberties and crushed opposition. 

Even more worrying is the fact that many of 
the millions who voted for them did so out of a 
nostalgic hope for a return of social and eco- 
nomic security, even if that meant a return to 
authoritarian order. To be sure, the difficult 
transition to a market system could have been 
expected to push millions of disgruntled indus- 
trial workers and pensioners to the left. VVhat 

Pragmatic Eurocrats and 
American consultants recoiled 
at such unifying forces as 
nationalism and religious 
revival, central to the fragile 
rebirth of civil society . 

surprises is that they turned to the old. ex- 
Conununisl left and not to the new social- 
democratic parties. How did this come about? 

First, the West vastly underestimated the 
psychological damage inflicted by decades of 
sialism. Communist* rule destroys the ideas cf 
voluntarism, self-help and eo:<perj(jcn. and 
with them any sense of authentic community. 

It is also now clear that the old Communist 
nomenklatura never really relinquished influ- 
ence over politics and economics, especially 
in the former Soviet Union. Ir. Central Eu- 
rope. where privatization ho? made remark- 
able progress, much of the power of the ex- 
Communists was retained through a tightly 
controlled process of privatization thaL ac- 
companied by rampant corruption, seemed to 
discredit capitalism and economic reform. 


By Adrian Karatnyckv 

The West further underestimated the soli- 
darity of ex-Coramunists who had worked in 
the upper and middle reaches of the party. 
women's, youth and trade union organiza- 
tions. Those potent networks remained intact 
despite confiscation of much party property. 

Central Europe's economic difficulties 
were greatly aggravated by the selfishness of 
the European Union, which denied Eastcra- 
bloc nations what they really wanted: market 
access. The EU covered its protectionism with 
bogus explanations: one sick sheep from Po- 
land was cited as justification for prohibitive 
quotas on all sheep from anywhere. Not sur- 
prisingly. Poland and its neighbors responded 
with duties of their own, hurting the econo- 
mies of both areas — bur plunging Central 
Europe into political turmoil as welL 

Above alL the ex-Coinmunists clawed their 
wav back to power because anti-Communists 
lost their moral voice. Oiganizations like the 
National Endowment for Democracy were 
pushed aside as the big bays from the interna- 
tional financial institutions — the European 
Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 
ihe International Monetary Fund, the World 
Bank — managed the transition to a convert- 
ible currency, and in the process helped make 


airwaves by cold-blooded ccononucsurgeoos. 
the public was encouraged to think .about 
reform exclusively in material terms. 
Detached, pragmatic Eurocrats mid Ameri- 
can consultants recoiled at such unifying 

forces as nationalism and rehgious revival, 
which are central to the fragile rebirth of avu 
society. Instead, nationalism was equated 
with xenophobia and ethnic hatred dan- 
gerous threat to stability that, as tte Jotoict 
Y ugoslavia slaws, is often cynically mobt- 

lized by ex-Commimists. ■ 

Richard Rose, of the University of Strath- 
clyde in Glasgow, has been tracking public 
attitudes toward the transition in most post- 
Soviet Woe countries. He has found that citi- 
zens appreciate the improvements in pphucai 
rights and civil liberties, the fact that they can 
now worship in the church and vote f or ui e 
party of their choice, speak their minds freely 
and choose television shows and newspapers 
that are more truthful and open. 

Yet the democratic revolutionaries who led 
the movement to secure these new nghts 
failed to remind the public of these tangible 
gains. Had they done so, they might have 
withstood the populist and materialist on- 


slaught of the Ct-Ccummmists 

moreriirie for the economic 

"S tills trend be revW? -7 

pcaMun «* & 


nuouie mass 

ihe industrial democracies. 


sum uii. y - - ■. ■ 

dia, democratic edoratton of the 

the dissemination of books am / 
momote respect for political fog-Y-r r, , , 

Hdp should also be greeted to 
dent trade unions that gn« voter to 
csts ofonfcnaiy working people and so Beg ft ; £• 
the rise of pro^bnnnunisi and 
sentiments among those who have 
brunt of the harsh economic tranatton^ - : 

The writer is executive director of i 

time. This ammot w® 1 

Washington Post from a longer ortidelm WP¥J 
appear in the National Review . .... j_- 77:^717 __ 



s. 


Why East Europe 

Bv Branislav Milosevic 


B elgrade — in today’s 

world, the Communist Party 
monopoly of power in East and 
Central Europe has been replaced 
by the rule of party coalitions. 
Former party cadres in these co- 
alitions advocate liberaL social- 
democratic or nationalist ideas. 
Dozens of opposition political 
parties, established with govern- 
ment aid. differ little in respect to 
their political ideas. 

The political assignment of most 
political parties is to challenge the 
ruling pany. often from extrennsi 
positions. The result: constant ten- 
sion between opposition parties 
that do not know precisely what 
they want, and the ruling' pany. 
which cannot, in the long run. pre- 
serve what it wants. 

Such a slate of affairs supports 
voters' belief that the regime's res- 
olute hand is. after all! the best 
assurance of stability. True free- 
dom of political expression and 
organization is perceived 2 s risk. 

The acceptance of an authori- 
tarian regime is an expression of 
the incapacity to make a peaceful 
transition from post-Comrounist 
tc democratic society, l: has be- 
come dear that posi-Communis; 
societies tragically lack not only 
democratic institutions but the 
sense of any need for them as we!’. 


The former Communist re- 
gimes' monopoly of information 
has been redefined. Those Com- 
munists who are still in power have 
laVm over the most powerful me- 
dia, leasing their political adver- 
saries to support or establish the 
so-called independent media. 

It is hard to say that there is no 
freedom of the press in post-Com- 
mumst Serbia and Montenegro, 
but it is even harder to prove that 
anybody benefits from it, apart 
from the regime that allows iL 

Who. then, do the independent 
media serve? 

In ex-Yugoslavia, where owner- 
ship relationships are vague and 
opaque, it is not enough to say that 
the independent media are those 
that the state does not subsidize. 

There are many shareholding 
companies in which the state does 
not formally appear as a share- 
holder but still exerts a strong 
indirect influence. 

It might be said that the first 
condition for independence of the 
media is their senume privatiza- 
tion — though dus does not mean 
that ill privately owned media or- 
ganizations are independent. 

Ir. former Yugoslavia, however, 
the most significant feature prov- 



ing the media's independence is - 
i heir readiness and ability to mock 
ignorance and incompetence of 

the authorities. This, of course, is 
only too easy to do. 

It is much more difficult to be- 
come independent of all the 
mythical images, prejudices and 
half-truths that are interwoven 
here into a fabric of national delu- 
sion promoted as representing the 
highest national interests. 

Tragic experience shows that the 
authoritarian regime is a function 
of a generation’s incapacity to free 
itself from ihe empty phrases, ste- 
reotypes and dxmes of its cultural 
and political heritage. 

One might say that the role of 
the independent media in post- 
Communist society is to enlighten, 
in the original Kantian sense of 
the word. Presenting readers and 
viewers with facts and explaining 
their correlation, independent 
media encourage citizens to use 
their own minds rather than rely 
on the empty phrases of the au- 
thoritarian regime's 


machinery, in trying to u 

the politics that is their destiny. 

In posl-Communist societies, 
authoritarian regimes have sought 
10 broaden the bases of their lepiti- 


ganda macfaiaftryas treasonoriSi’A - 'T 

Financial tad inoral a^Mrt ^ 
that the independent medra 
ceJve from uernocratK ihsti^ - 
dons and cudesin the West, htwS 
ever, is not only ft maim 
farther activity of the . 

dept media, itjsa w^>tofa«qf3 
their authority and stieogtbto^l 
and broadni their Influence- 1 - ^ 

In the isolation in which 
and Montenegro have . 
two years now. the very ewsfipaefe^' 
of the independent media iy a ities-ilc 
sage to resden ^aud vjewbs- diafc 1 ^ 
the derraxratic 
gotten them. Support for the 
pendent media 
meat ht democracy in. these 

Without, this support, the infer j 
pendent media : would be 
person trying, to cross the chaser ' 
between post-Ccmmunist arid " 
open, democratic society,- '*i&: 
nothing to hoW on tp.buLthm air. 

7fa.irrfttr.fr 

director . of „ the iinnfnnw., 4 , 
Borbc odd chairman of ihe Jrtde- 
pendent Media Association of Ok:. 
Federal Republic of Yc$mffna- ;j 
He contributed Ms commeni to the 
International FFcridd Tribune . ' 


Russia Is Looking East With New Interest and a New Flexibility 




M OSCOW — W’hat kind of a neu 
Russia will evolve in the next 
few years and what sort of relations 
will it develop with countries ir, Asia, 
especially its neighbors? 

Russia is at a critical stage of na- 
tionhood. The parliamentary elections 
in December snowed a reawakening of 
national pride and self-respect. As a 
resulL a pro-Western tilt in Russian 
foreign policy in 1 992 and 1°9J is 
being replaced b> a more balanced 
approach to global and regional issues. 

However, there will be no return to 
the policy objectives of the former 
Soviet Union and the means used to 
achieve them. Russia rejects princi- 
ples of internationalism, class soli- 
darity and similar ideological dogmas 
as guidelines for its foreign policy. 

After a period of confusion, a more 
realistic formulation of Russian for- 
eign policy interests is under way in 
Moscow. Very pragmatic approaches 
to issues are being worked out, based 
on the need ro preserve Russian terri- 
torial integrity, protect national eco- 
nomic interests and prevent any direct 
involvement in international conflicts. 

Asia looms increasingly large in 
this review of Russian interests. .After 
the dissolution of the Soviet Union. 
Russia found itself within borders 


Bv Gennadi I. Chnfrin 


that had never existed before. Russia 
also found itself, in effect, closer to 
.Asia, because it lost major seaports in 
the Baltic and Black Seas as well as 
convenient land routes to Europe. 

Trade with Asia has already be- 
come for more important for Russia 
than it was for the Soviet Union. One 
third of total Russian foreign trace is 
w’th Asia-Pacific countries" ic Soviet 
times, it never exceeded 9 percent. 

Russia's growing interests in Asia 
will extend beyond economic ties. 
New- geographical, political, econom- 
ic and security realities in the region 
wiU probably make Russia more asser- 
tive Lhan the Soviet Union was in 
pursuing these interests in some areas. 

fresh challenges to Russian nation- 
al interests and security have emerged 
chiefly in Central .Asia, where disinte- 
gration of the Soviet Union brought 
the emergence of Kazakhstan. Uzbek- 
istan. Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and 
Kyrgyzstan as sovereign states. Eco- 
nomic problems, political instability 
and a revival of Islam gave Muslim 
states, including Turkey. Iran. Paki- 
stan. Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia, a 
window of opportunity to promote 
their own interests in Central Asia. 


Internal difficulties and increasing 
interference in local affairs by seme 
Muslim countries have transformed 
Central .Asia into a source of instabil- 
ity. Russia cannot remain indifferent 
to these developments on its borders. 
Moreover, there is a Russian minor- 
ity of about 10 million people in Cen- 
tral Asia. This fact alone will have an 
important influence on Russian for- 
eign policy in the region. 

_ The Central .Asian republics, al- 
though independent maintain close 
ties with Russia. They are members of 
the Commonwealth of Independent 
States and take par. in its multilateral 
security arrangements. While their 
borders with Russia are transparent, 
their borders with third countries for 
all practical purposes retain the status 
cf a common boundary jointly pa- 
trolled by local and Russian guards. 

These former Soviet republics con- 
tinue to remain a sphere of vital politi- 
cal economic and security interests 
for Russia. It is therefore quite logical 
to ex pea Moscow to promote closer 
ties with these republics ro the point 
of establishing a confederation or 
even a federation with them. 

Another potential challenge to 


The Clintons May Not Mind the Book 

By Frank Rich 


W ASHINGTON — Bob Wood- 
ward is the reporter who 
helped bring down a criminal presi- 
dency. Mike Wallace is the television 
muckraker who nailed a thousand 
malefactors. Put them together on 

television to lift the lid" on Mr. 
Woodward’s book “The Agenda: In- 
side the Clinton While House.” and 
a vast audience has every reason to 
believe that a scandal of Watergate 
proportions is about to explode. 

The two men did all they could to 
further that perception on June 5. 
Both looked solemn. Mr. Wood- 
ward was seen in such tight close- 
ups thaL even his mildest innuendos 
about the Clintons (“The American 
taxpayer has gotten iwo for the 
price of one 1 ') took on the gravity of 
an impeachable offense. 

The viewer was tantalized by- 
shots of Mr. Woodward's vast cache 
of seemingly incriminating tapes — 
containing “deep background” in- 
terviews with confidential sources 
reaching "up to the very top "— and 
a replay of Gennifer Flowers. 

“Are Bill and Hillary Clinton go- 
ing to like this book?” asked Mr. 
Wallace, who then answered. “I 
don't think so.” 

Actually, the Clintons may not 
mind. The book's characterization 
of them is familiar — he can't make 
decisions; she can’t stop making 
them ■— and Mr. Woodward pro- 
vides no new reportage about Gen- 
nifer Flowers or any otheT scandal. 

But ordinary readers, lured into 
anticipating a “Son of All the Presi- 
dent’s Men,” may well be peeved. 
The book, a plodding account of the 
evolution of the Clinton economic 
plan, has its farcical Washington 


snapshots, but it never readies the 
ludicrous heights of the hype sur- 
rounding “The Agenda" itself. 

“At one point Clinton got so 
frustrated he used the F-wond!” ex- 
claimed Mr. Woodward, posing as 
America's oldest living Boy Scout, 
in another promotional television 
interview. WeU, so what? 

To flog this book, be has had to 
turn unexceptional even flattering 
“revelations about the president 
into spuriously shocking sound 
bites that make Mr. Woodward and 
the journalistic profession he so 
prominently represents look more 
disingenuous than his subject. 

Not only does Mr. Clinton cuss, 
Mr. Woodward and his TV hosts 
darkly inform us, but the president 
also loses his temper, tolerates in- 
tellectual prodding by his wife and 
his vice president, thrives on the 
detailed debate of policy, makes 
pragmatic political compromises to 
win congressional votes, and sows 
chaos by refusing to enlist a chief oT 
staff who will stifle dissent. 

If these are crimes, then no doubt 
an ideal president would be an 
ideologically rigid Washington lifer 
who nurses enemies’ lists rather 
than letting off steam, has a golf 
caddy for a vice president and a 
cipher for a spouse, makes policy 
pronouncements from index cards 
written by aides, and is loo arrogant 
to get a bill through Congress. The 
ideal chief of staff? John Sununu. 

Presumably voters turned to the 
Climon-Gore ticket to reject this 
status quo. Mr. Woodward, whose 


own ideology seems to be terminal 
inside- the-Beltway-itis, finds Mr. 
Clinton most wanting when mea- 
suring him against Lloyd Bentsen. 

The president’s indedsiveness is 
indeed a serious flaw. But we hardly 
need “The Agenda” to tell us thaL 
The book's journalistic flaws are 
often more newsworthy. 

The problems begin on the first 
page, where a breezy conversation 
between the Clintons in bed sounds 
fake. (Mrs. Clinton says “Yeah” as 
much as the Beatles.) While the gist 
of the conversation, like much of 
“The Agenda," may be accurate, 
the book's lifelessly reconstructed 
scenes show what can happen when 
a journalist sands down a variety of 
off-the-record accounts to arrive at 
a composite reality. 

Connie Brack’s recent profile of 
Hillary Clinton in The New Yorker 
presents much the same picture of 
the White House that Mr. Wood- 
ward's book does, but because most 
of her sources are named, speak in 
their own voices and own up to 
their sometimes conflicting points 
of view, the Clintons are seen with 
the perspective and depth missing 
in “The Agenda.” 

So prosaic is most of what Mr. 
Woodward’s sources have to say 
that their Deep-Throated anonym- 
ity often seems superfluous — just 
another way to puff up the smoke 
of hot news where there is no fire. 

But at least no one can accuse 
Mr, Woodward of trashing Mr. 
Clinton to serve a covert political 
line as he hypes “The Agenda.” The 
only agenda here, and it’s not very 
well hidden, is sales. 

The New York Tunes. 


Russian national security in Asia is 
connected with unresolved territorial 
disputes. The most acute is the Rus- 
sian-Japanese territorial dispute over 
four islands referred to in Japan as 
the Northern Territories and in Rus- 
sia as the Southern Kurils. The dis- 
pute has a long and painful history, 
and public opinion in the two coun- 
tries appears to be equally uncom- 
promising. That gives official negoti- 
ators little room for flexibility. 

Territorial disputes between Russia 
and China seem to be practically re- 
solved, after the signing of a border 
agreement in Moscow m May 1991. 
There is still disagreement about a few 
small islands near Khabarovsk, but it 
is highly unlikely to d ama ge relations 
between the two countries. More seri- 
ous is the massive influx of illegal 
Chinese immigrants to Russia in the 
past OTiipIe of years. This is already an 
issue in the Russian Parliament and is 
being exploited by various political 
parties. The problem could endanger 
relations between China and Russia. 

The growing spread of nudear, 
biological chemical and other weap- 
ons of mass destruction as well as 
means of their delivery challenges 
Russian security. The most potential- 
ly worrisome cases are in Asia. Be- 
cause Russia regards proliferation of 
nuclear weapons dose to its borders 
as a direct threat to its security, it 
firmly opposes any attenipt by North 
Kona to develop such weapons. How- 
ever, Russia also watches with deep 
concern the accumulation of oversized 
stocks of plutonium in Smith Korea 
and especially in Japan. 

In recent years Soviet and then 
Russian armed forces in the Asia- 
Pacific region have been greatly re- 
duced in size and firepower. They 
have been totally withdrawn from 
Afghanistan and Mongolia. Only a 
token number of Russian military 
personnel remain in Vietnam. 

Russia's Pacific navy and its nucle- 
ar force of 24 submarines equipped 
with long-range ballistic missiles 


form the backbone of Russian armed 
forces in the FarEasL The subm& .. 
tines a re i n tended to act as a nodear, 
deterrent to an* ppsStt&majaf threat r 
to Russian national secority from the 
Northwest Pacific Since thWosdssr 
force is now practically tte.adjjEftR 
f ecu vc deterrent against such threats, 
Russia would find it very diffictih jp 
accept any proposals for a inKfetf- ’ 
free zone in Northeast Asia that it . 
duded coastal Siberia. %?:/■' 

Nonetheless. Foreign Minister An-; 
drei Kozyrev has made it cfe^ 
Moscow's Asia policy will be btacd 
on the understanding that oooomxa- ' 
dictions with any country nr tfc-^tx-- 
gion are irreconcilable. Russia 
consistently work for stable andhaT . 
anced relations will all Asian 
Russian policy will be governed - 
of ah by a desire to deve 1 ' - 
relations with the Asia- 
which is the fastest 
region in the work.. _ . 

Moscow will seek to overcoine3& 
roaming challenges to 
rity on a collective, coordinated^^.' 
sis. In contrast to the politics 
Cold War, Russia's relations^$&.’ 
China and Japan wilt be gtriRXS&l;. 
not by the divisive prindpKsJpy 
power balance bot by unifying 
dples of economic cooperation.^™^’ 

Having ceased to be a superofev& 
Russia has gained flexibility m.dwtr 
ing not only with major Aaa-BtSfic". 
actors but alto with 
smaller countries in the re^cn.^5Ss;-- 
is evident in the development atcfiSfe'; 
relations with members of Ihe AssgCfc- 
ation of Smith East Asian Natiqajii£> 

There is now a. dear view-in-Mo^ 
cow about the pressi n g need' tb jSbs - 
mote vital Russian interests mAisv 
Russia has come out of the coEfrlp 
take an active part in Asian po&&e. :y 

The writer, head of the Soi^af- 
Asia department or the Instkits^ : $- 
Oriental Studies in Moscow, . 

uted this comment to the IniertMtoth. 
al Herald Tribune. ■ 

■ 


IN OUR PAGES! 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS ASSfe 


1894: Duelling in Ruseia 

PARIS — The question of duelling in 
the army has just been sensibly set- 
tled in Russia. The Czar has decreed 
that no dud shah take place in his 
army until a “jury of honor” has 
determined whether or not the meet- 
ing is necessary. If the jury decide in 
the negative the belligerents must ac- 
cept the fiat; if in the affirmative, and 
other of the disputants refuses to 
fight, he shall be expelled from the 
army. It would be a good thing if this 
innovation could be extended to 
duels between civilians. Many of 
them might thus be avoided. 

1919: Color line lifted 

*2*5*1 7~ Fed- 

erauon of Labor Convention at At- 

ImUc City decided yesterday [June 
1 3] to remove the color line wti the 
presidents of the international 
declared that their organizations 
wuld welcome negroes into m^ 
“rsoip on terms of equality. The 


action followed an 
Lacy, a negro, who said th^ til 
gro did not desire social equality 
wanted an opportunity to can 
bread and butter on an eouaStF 
whites. President SamodHaori 

the action as markmg a i 
stone in the history of the . 8 
struggle for equal rights. ; 

1944: DeGaulle fla® 

WTH AMEWcw 

™NCE - [From onr N«r.7! 
f«tion:l General Charles de Sa 
tedff of the French government 
^ Franc* came £e iod*|i 
14] for the first time since, finv 1 

the portion of his'era 
which has been liberated afieT 
of German dominalidfi 
presence in towns and village 
beachhead gave rise 10 heart! 
scraes as the populace rushed 
thor war-battered homes to’j 
a r ranchman who stands a&i 

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Upon the Base They Built, 
A New Allian ce Arises 


By George A. Joulwan 


General ’Joubvan is Supreme Allied 
Cormrumtkr Europe and commander in 
chief of the U.S. European Command. 

\yf ONS. Belgium —As the echoes of 
iTlinoOTiil bugles fade away and 
D-Day veterans depan the hallowed 
beaches of Normandy. Europeans and 
Amaicai\s alike once again confront me 
harsh realities of dealing with an unsta- 
ble and unpredictable world. 

But as we contemplate the horror of 
Bosnia and other trouble spots, we can 
take some solace in the realization that 
the sacrifices of the men and women of 
D-Day have made a difference. 

Despite the difficulties of the hour, 
Europe is unarguable more free than it 
was five decades ago. For tins, we must 
thank the veterans of Operation Overlord 
— for their coinage under fire, their love 
of liberty, their indomitable will and their 
steadfast conmritmenL We must also be 
mindful of the collective efforts of their 
successors — the soldiers, sailors, airmen 
and marines of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization — who stood ihe faithful 
vigil those D-Day veterans began. 

General Dwight Eisenhower knew how 
important allied unity was to victory on 
the battlefield. His skill and leadership 
provided unity of effort and purpose as 
well as unity of command. He also under- 
stood the value of unity in peace. 

After die war, this same spirit of com- 
mon interest and purpose nurtured a his- 
toric partnership among both conquerors 
and vanquished. It was only proper that 
NATO should continue to implement the 
idea born at Normandy SO years ago. Just 
as Churchill referred to Britain’s “finest 
bow.” the allied ideal has become our 
“finest realization.” 

. The. great crusade that began in June 
1 994 continues today. The seeds planted 
on Omaha, Utah, Sword, Gold and Juno 


beaches have produced a great alliance 
— a brotherhood unparalleled in peace 
or war. The mutual trust and confi- 
dence, the shared ideals and values, the 
subordination of national goals for alli- 
ance objectives, and the simple friend- 
ship that binds us so close together find 
their roots in the sands of Normandy. 

Our soldiers won the war, and for the 
next SO years, millions of GIs and allied 
troops followed to preserve the peace in 
Europe. The results of their efforts are 
impressive: The Berlin Wall has fallen, 
the Cold War has ended, communism 
has been defeated and Germany has 
been reunited. These accomplishments 
were achieved not solely by strength of 
arms but by the character of our com- 
mitment. It is the same commitment 
made by tens of thousands of young 
Europeans and Americans SO years ago. 

As the alliance of today lodes to the 
future, we have a unique opportunity. 
We can help build a Europe whole and 
free, democratic and prosperous, from 
the Atlantic to the Urals, we can shape 
a Europe that respects the dignity and 
worth of the individual. 

At the forefront of this effort stands a 
new NATO — an institution adapting to 
the future by building on the rock-solid 
foundation of the past. The new NATO 
is supporting UN Security Council reso- 
lutions in the former Yugoslavia and 
working with the United Nations to end 
that brutal tragedy. 

Wc are reaching out through coopera- 
tion programs to former adversaries; we 
are developing a true Partnership for 
Peace. Moreover, we are adapting our 
command structure to attain the flexibil- 
ity needed to handle new missions as 
well as the collective defense of the alli- 
ance. In so doing, we are building a true 
European security identity within a 
strong trans-Atlantic alliance. As we ap- 



Correct 9 Hypocritical and Irrelevant 


proach the 21st century. NATO remains 
every bit as relevant as it has been for 
more than four decades. 

The veterans we honored at Norman- 
dy made all tins possible. As we look to 
the future, we can learn from the past. 
Their competence inspires us. The trans- 
Atlantie link that Forged victory 50 years 
ago gives our continuing efforts renewed 
vigor and effectiveness. We are. as Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton said at Pointe du Hoc. 
the children of their sacrifices. “Our 


work is far from done," he said. “Sliil 
there are cliffs to scale.” We must not. 
we will not. let that competence, that 
unity and that willingness to sacrifice — 
the legacies of D-Day — falter. 

The world is still a dangerous place. 
In these difficult, uncertain times. 
NATO's mission must continue. As we 
enter the uncharted waters ahead. I am 
reminded of Ike's command 50 years 
ago — “O.K„ let's go!” 

International Herald Tribune. 


W ashington — Poor John 

Crawford. He came to Washington 
on May 12 with the sole intern of promot- 
ing his company. Jaguar Cars Inc. Two 
weeks later he was out or his job as 
Jaguar's rice president for public affairs. 

Silly me. I had the temerity to say that 
Mr. Crawford was not 3 bad sort— that 
he was, in fact, one of the most decent 
public relations people I have known. 
For that I got lots of phone calls from 
black folks questioning my blackness. 

How all of this came about stems 
from a five-second incident in which the 
Australian Mr. Crawford, apparently 
without thinking, pronounced the words 
“biggest nigger in the woodpile.” Offen- 
sive? Well the brouhaha that followed 
arose from something considerably 
more harmful: the current reign of hyp- 
ocritical correctness in America. 

Hypocritically correct people, black 
and white, are more interested in words 
than in deeds, more at ease with symbols 
than with substance. They never let facts 
stand in the way of an execution. 

I knew this, which is why I chose not 
to make a big deal of Mr. Crawford's 
comment — an offensive though unin- 
tended slip for which he later apolo- 
gized. But 1 also knew, from the moment 
it happened, that his goose was cooked. 

h happened at one of those Washing- 
ton luncheons where longues loosen in 
direct proportion to the amount of 
booze consumed. Mr. Crawford was 
playing host to 10 or so auto writers, me 
among them, at a "news backgrounder.” 
He was doing well, fielding many ques- 
tions. buoyant in response. 

But he goofed in talking about the 
auto luxury tax. In trying to explain how 
General Motors was actively supporting 
the lax while masquerading as an oppo- 
nent. he referred to the alleged impostor 
as “the biggest nigger in the woodpile.” 
Although everyone at the table winced, 
it was clear that he didn't understand his 
error, or our shock. He went on talking: 
we continued listening and being polite. 

1 was the only black at Ihe luncheon. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Responsibility to Rwanda 

We have Iran struck by how the Brit- 
ish press has downgraded reporting and 
analysis of the events in Rwanda. The 
news last week of a massacre in the village 
of Nyatama scarcely merited a mention 
in a week when preoccupations lay with 
events 50 years ago. This apathy has 
correctly beta defined as racism. 

We are -convinced that not enough 
attention is paid to two contributing 
factors. The first is the role played by the 
colonial powers, Germany and Belgium, 
in imposing and reinforcing ethnic divi- 
sions betweoa the principal tribes. 

A more direct cause of tension has 
been Rwanda’s rising level of debt, and 
the bitter medicine meted out bv its 
creditors, in particular the World Bank 
and the International Monetary Fund. 

Before the collapse in commodity 


prices in 1988-89. the Rwandan econo- 
my was well-managed. Money was sta- 
ble. inflation and Foreign debt were low. 
and there was little corruption. But a 
collapse in coffee prices drastically al- 
tered Rwanda’s balance of trade. No 
other country experienced a more dras- 
tic decline in its terms of trade. 

The Rwandan govermneni was forced 
to yield to the monetarist dogma im- 
posed by its creditors. Under a structur- 
al adjustment program, government 
spending was cui and with it thousands 
of jobs were lost. Government assets 
were privatized. The Rwandan franc 
was devalued and so the price of import- 
ed goods, medicines in particular, rose 
by up to 67 percent. 

As with other Third World countries, 
the IMF encouraged an increase in ex- 
ports. But the more that such countries 
produce, the lower commodity prices 


fall. This enforced competition beiween 
poor countries forces down prices as 
producers fight in vain for foreign cur- 
rency. The gainers are the rich North. 

As beneficiaries of cheaper coffee 
prices on the one hand, and as recipients 
of substantial transfers of wealth (in the 
form of debt repayments) from poor 
Rwandans, it ill behooves tbe rich North 
to ignore the sufferings of the Rwandans. 
Through multilateral agencies such as the 
World Bank and the IMF. we may be 
largely responsible for that suffering. 

DIANE ABBOTT. 

BERNIE GRANT. 

London. 

The writers are members of the British 
Parliament. 

Invade, for Haiti’s Sake 

Why delay the inevitable? A U.S. in- 


tack to return Jean- Bertrand Aristide to 
power. The forces should leave as soon 
as he succeeds in building a governing 
coalition and an effective police force. 

WILLIAM R. HOLTZ. 

Rappers wiL Switzerland. 


vasion of Haiti to oust the military go\- 
erament and restore the democratically 
elected president to power will accom- 
plish what economic sanctions will nev- 
er do. Economic sanctions only exacer- 
bate the misery of the poor while having 
little effect on the ruling elite. 

An invasion may violate the principle 

of sovereignty but it would sen e to Taking Bearings by North 

defend a greater principle: that all peo- *- ^ * 

pie have basic human rights. The brutal- 
ity inflicted on the Haitians by the mili- 
tary government is well-documented. 

The flood of Haitian refugees to the 
shores of Florida is a testament that 
Haitians are being denied basic rights. 

The United States should issue the 


renegade government an ultimatum that 
it relinquish power by a given date. If 
the government persists in defying the 
world community, then VS. forces 
should launch a quick and powerful ai- 


Regurding "Republican's Ponder 
North's Effect on Party " (June n| by Mi- 
chael Janofsky: 

The very fact that Oliver North dared 
bid for the Republican nomination in 
Virginia is deeply alarming, but his suc- 
cess in obtaining it is compelling proof 
that American politics have become 
completely amoral. Alas, such politics 
no longer surprise us. 

MARJORIE STEELE. 

Antibes. France. 


By Warren Brown 


Afterward, back at the office. J received 
several calk from white colleague, ex- 
pressing anger and embarrassment over 
Mr. Crawford’s remark. Nearly all of the 
callers asked me how 1 felL l responded, 
quite frankly, that 1 felt fine 
Later came a call from Ed Henry, a 
black colleague and friend who serves as 
president of the Washington Automo- 
tive Press Association. Mr. Henry felt 
that he should write Mr. Crawford, in- 
forming him that racial slurs are offen- 
sive. even if no malice was intended. I 

MEANWHILE 

agreed, with the proviso that the matter 
be handled discreetly. 

.As it turned out, Mr. Crawford al- 
ready was in the process of making 
amends, having wrirten a letter to me 
apologizing for his remark and saying 
what everyone aL the luncheon knew — 
that he was in no way uying to offend 
me or any other black person. 

I considered the matter closed — until 
two weeks later when Gannett News 
Service published a story saying that Mr. 
Crawford had apologized for his way- 
ward longue. What happened next was 
pathetically predictable. 

Mr. Crawford’s Jaguar bosses called 
him on the carpet: and their bosses at 
Ford Motor Company, which owns Jag- 
uar. called the Jaguar bosses to gripe. 
None of the bosses told Mr. Crawford 
that he was fired. They just told him to 
do what was best for ihe company. 

When Ford and Jaguar executives 
told me about Mr. Crawford's problems. 

I urged them to go easy on the man. He 
had made a mistake. He meant no harm. 
He had apologized. 

Meanwhile, various media types were 
calling me — hoping, it seemed in ^ome 
cases, that 1 would join the call for Mr. 
Crawford’s resignation. That would have 
bent the easiest thing for roe to do — 
black rage and all that But it would have 
been a fie. .Anyone who has dealt with 
Mr. Crawford' knows he is a straight 
shooter. He had never lied to or misled 
roe in our professional dealings. There 
was no way I could ask for his head. 

But Ford and Jaguar had other con- 
cerns. Theirs is a "highly competitive 
business; image is everything. Mr. 
Crawford's comments thus became a 
“question of corporate governance.” as 
one Ford official put iL Translation: 
Ford didn't want to offend it$ black 
employees. And Jaguar didn’t want to 
offend American blacks, who account 
for about 15 percent of its U.S. sales. 
Mr. Crawford had to go. 

This left me in a curious position — a 
black man supporting a white man 
whose white bosses wanted to force him 
to resign for uttering the word “nigger." 
Lordy! How blacks responded to that 
scenario! I got lots of angry phone calls 
— most of them anonymous — calling 
me “Uncle Tom” and “sellout." At first 
I was angry, but the more calls I re- 
ceived. Lhe more 1 laughed. 


How ridiculous! Jaguar does not have 
one black dealership in the United 
States; and it has precious few blacks in k 
anything approaching executive posi- y 
lions. Yet V have never run across a », 
Hack Jaguar owner who expressed con- i 
cem about the paucity of black Jaguar s 
employees or retailers. 

Blacks complaining about my defense . 
of Mr. Crawford did not want to hear i 
about Jaguar's corporate structure. They 
only wanted Mr. Crawford banished . 
from the organization for saying “nig- \ 
ger." Overlooked was the meaningless- [ 
ness of his dismissal in terms of any gain . 
for the black community. ’ ” , 

Also overlooked was the more salient . 
racial aspect of what transpired at the ' 
Crawford luncheon. I was the only black 
journalist there. That is often the case in . 
ray coverage of the auto industry. The 
presence of so few black journalists is a 
hell of a lot more insulting to me than 
the transient slippage of a racial slur. It 
should be insulting to blacks in general. 

Mr. Crawford’s punishment in no way 
fit his crime. But it fits the way things are 
done in the hvpocritieal-correctness era. 

To those who focused on the Crawford 
case, it did not matter that Jaguar locates 
its U.S. headquarters in affluent Mah- 
wah. New Jersey, where blacks constitute 
a scant 3.6 percent of the population. It 
did not matter that Mr. Crawford apolo- 
gized for publicly using a slur that many 
people, black arid white, use in private. 

He violated the standards of hypocritical 
correctness — the same standards that 
allow some black rap “artists" to get 
away with calling black people “niggers'* 
and black women “bitches.” 

The ethos of hypocritical correctness 
encourages black people to expend ener- 
gy on relatively trivial matters. It permits 
them to operate under the illusion that all 
victims are inherently virtuous because of 
their victimization. How else to explain 
the black caller who said that it was O.K. 
for him to call gays “fags.” or whites 
“honkies.” or Asians “dunks," or Jews 
“Jew boys," as long as he didn’t do so in 
his “professional capacity"? 

By allowing blacks to don (he robe of 
sanctified victimization, hypocritical 
correctness permits many of them to 
cover their eyes to the tree sellouts, the 
true Uncle Toms in their midst — the 
people who shoot down their black 
neighbors on city streets: the African- 
American drug dealers plying their 
deadly trade from the front seats of 
European luxury cars: the absent fathers 
and crack -crazed moms; the young ath- 
letes who think it’s “black" to excel on 
the football field or basketball court but 
who regard it as “while” and somehow 
improper to try for the dean's lisL 
The problem is not John Crawford, 
and the issue is not the word “nigger." 
Black people have hud, and continue to 
hurt, themselves far more than Mr. 
Crawford or any verbal insult intended 
or noL can hurt them. That is not the 
hypocritically correct thing to say. But 
it is the iruth. 


The writer ewers the auto industry for 
The Washington Post. 


BOOKS 


— 


C* 

y.k z :: 


v:i 


— -r./i *’ 

:%5- 
•*-» . 


THE HALDEMAN DIA- 
RIES: Inside the Nixon 
White House 

By H. R. Haldeman. 698 pages. 
$ 27 . 50 . Putnam. 

Reviewed by 
Alan Ehrenhalt 

N OBODY can publish a diary 
without revealing something 
personal The most dubious speci- 
mens ever written — the endless 
radiation of day-to-day minutiae, 
the prolonged exercise in self-pity, 
the collection of fluffy platitudes — 
all of them somehow end up deliv- 
ering autobiographical truth, even 
if the process is. for the most pan, 
inadvertent. 

Thave to confess, though, that a 
couple of hundred pages into “The 
Haldeman Diaries,” I was begin- 
ning to wonder if 1 had found die 
exception. Not that the diaries 
arm’tgpod reading. They are. And 
they are full of secrets, they pene- 
trate the darkest recesses of the 
Nixon White House in a way that 
none of the literally hundreds of 
memoirs Of that a dminis tration has 
ever managed to do. 

It is just that the diaries, cm first 
^ encounter, don't seem to be about 
7 Haldeman: The president’s chief of 
staff gives every impression that he 
regards a diary as merely the contin- 
uation of : a home movie by other 
means. Tie carefully records three- 
bour conversations between him 
and the president in the oval office 
without --(effing us what he himself 


said. He writes about his boss in tbe 
first person: When an entry says 
“Met with the VP today," it doesn’t 
usually mean that Haldeman talked 
to the vice-president, it means that 
the president did. This isabook by a 
witness-narrator. Its main charac- 
ters are Richard M. Nixon and Hen- 
ry Kissinger; Haldeman is the man 
behind the camera. 

Or so it seems for a long time. 
But as the diaries, which stretch 
from January 1969 through April 
1973, proceed, the diarist emerges, 
more by virtue of what is missing 
than what is included. In nearly 700 
pages of reporting, there is not a 
word of boasting or self-justifica- 
tion, not a note of false modesty, 
scarcely a hint of personal criticism 
about anybody, even those who 
richly deserve It 

There is no doubt that Haldeman 
was central to most of the important 
decisions of the administration — 
he made quite a few of them himsdf 
— but if that impresses him. be 
doesn’t show iL He seems perfectly 
content backstage, sometimes liter- 
ally. as during most of the state 
dinners, when be ate in the kitchen 
to make sure the meal proceeded on 
timp This is other the diary of the 
most self-effacing man in modem 
public life, or an image-creating 
worit of unbelievable subtlety. 

In these diaries, Nixon comes 
across as everything his critics ever 
said he was: vengeful egotistical 
petty, bigoted. He says that “never 
in history has there beat an ade- 
quate black nation, and they are 
the only race of which this is true." 


He complains to Billy Graham 
about “the terrible problem arising 
from the total Jewish domination 
of the media." He suggests that 
helicopters be ordered to fly low 
over the Mall to blow oot the can- 
dles of peace demonstrators. 

Kissinger looks even hit as bad: 
vain, paranoid and childish, con- 
vinced that Secretary of State Wil- 
liam Rogers is doing everything but 
poisoning his soup. Kissinger 
thinks Rogers is feeding reporters 
stories about his relationship with 
the actress Jill St. John. He spends 
an entire day pouting when Rogers, 
rather than Kissinger, is invited for 
dinner with Nixon on the presiden- 
tial yacht. 

Haldeman. who died-of cancer 
seven months ago, had to know 
that the release of the diaries would 
be devastating to Nixon’s reputa- 


tion. This is the Nixon that his 
impeccably loyal chier of staff, the 
most discreet man in the White 
House, wanted history to know. He 
just thought we would aj) be better 
off not knowing at the time. 1 can't 
say I disagree with him there. 


Alan Ehrenhalt. executive editor of 
Governing magazine and the auihor 
of "The United States of Ambition." 
wrote this for The Washington Post. 


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By T. R. 

II P. 

SEOUL — American and South 
Korean officials here were working 
hard on Tuesday to deflate any 
suggestion lhai the dispute over 
North Korea's nuclear program 
could or should lead to military 
action. 

Foreign Minister Hin Sung. loo 
called a news conference on Tues- 
day and declared, “There is no rea- 
son to talk or worry about a war on 
the Korean Peninsula." 

“I assure you that everything is 
quite normal." he raid. “Despite all 
the threatening talk from North 
Korea, we see no sign whatsoever 
of imminent hostilities." 

The foreign minister scored to 
be struggling to maintain diplomat- 
ic reserve when asked about a com- 
ment by Senator John 5». McCain 
?d. Republican of Arizona. Mr. 
McCain said Sunday that “military 
air strikes would be called for" if 
cconcmii sanctions against North 
Korra do net work, even though 

this ccuid l.-ad ;n "cncrmou.; car- 
nage" or. the Korean Peninsula. 

“Yes, there are people who advo- 


cate extreme measures." Mr. Han 
raid. Referring to Washington. he 
added. “As long u* the government 
is not buying such views, we can 
continue to maintain a steady 
course." 

In the same vein. South Korea’s 
official information service asked 
foreign countries “to depict accu- 
rately the current national security 
situation" in order to 'preclude un- 
necessary anxiety among the for- 
eign rommuniiv ” 


Western diplomats in Seoul say 
they have been surprised by the 
growing sense of crisis in Washing- 
ton. “Here we sil only 35 miles 
from the DMZ." said one veteran 
observer, referring to the demilita- 
rized zone of the North-South bor- 
der. “and there is much less of a 
feeling of impending crisis here 
than there seems to be in the media 
in the United States." 


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Continued from Page I 

electricity output is five megawatts, 
as opposed to 800 or so in a U.S. 
nuclear plane 

North Korea insist that this re- 
actor was built to generate electric- 
ity. but Mr. Walpole noted that its 
design is inefficient for producing 

electricity but create a relatively 

large amount of plutonium. "We 
believe it was buih for plutonium 
production." he said. 

He said the- CIA thought that 
North Korea hud reprocessed 
enough plutonium from fuel in that 
reactor in 198 3 to make one or 
possibly two nuclear dc-.ico. 

A much larger reactor of the 
>ame design, with jn output of 50 
megawatts is under cons miction at 
North Korea’s Yonanxon nuclear 
complex, according to ‘dr. Walpole 
and oilier analysis. 

Also under construction in 
North Korea is ;• huge building 
believed by the atomic energy 
agency to be a plutonium >ep.i ra- 
tion plant, where irradiated fuel 
from the new reactor could be re- 
processed and ii« piuior.iuni ccn- 
:cnt extracted for use in weapon?., 
according lo David Albright, presi- 
dent of the Washington-ba^d In- 
stitute for Science and Intemation- 

al Securiiv. 


Jim Coles 3d. chief spokesman 
for the il.S. military in Seoul, said: 
“I've been getting some bizarre 
question > from radio stations m 
America. No. we arc not issuing 

flak jacket* to all personnel. No. we 
are not making plans lo evacuate 
civilian dependents. Yes. we are 
prepared for whatever happens. 

but we always try 10 retain that 
stale.” 

South Korean officials did not 
appear seriously alarmed about the 
latest twist in the nuclear dispute: 
North Korea's announcement on 
Monday night that it would with- 
draw from the International Atom- 
ic Energy Agency. 

“The important point i >. they did 
not drop out of the Nuclear Non- 
proliferation Treaty’s inspection 
regime." said Kim Sam Hoon. di- 
rector or nuclear affairs in the For- 
eign Ministry. “To our knowledge, 
they have not yet expelled the two 
IAEA inspectors who are in the 
country, and they have not inter- 
fered with the surveillance cam- 
eras.” 

[At the United Nations in New 
York, however. Pak Gil Yon. 
North Korea's chief delegate, said 
Tuesday that he had officially in- 
formed ihe Untied Stales of his 
country's resignation from the In- 
ternationa! Atomic Energy Agen- 
cy. arid an American official said 
such a letter hjd been received. 
Reuters reported. 

[Mr. Pak told reporters, after 
briefing several Security Council 
members, that North Korea had 
delivered all the proper notification 
about withdrawal from the Vienna- 
based agency to the United States, 
which is a depository state of the 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. 
"It is my understanding that the 
letter you are referring to has been 
received in Washington." the 
American official said. 


[Exactly what tile ■.■.iihJra •••.•) 
means, however, a- in Ji>p::;c. 
American envoys were careful =•■ 
distinguish between withdrawal 
from the UN agency and from the 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. I 

In Seoul, city government iv>uec 
a just-in-case warning that ii mighi 
be wise for household-: io build up 
emergency supplies of food and 
water. And the jittery Scoui stock 
market fell 2 percent «.*n Tuesday. 

Over all. though, the effort on 
was to try io bring foreign views ol 
the situation closer to the essential- 
ly busmesvas-uxual mood in Seoul. 

The national information service 
issued a statement to correct re- 
ports that military reserve* had 
been called up for u special defense 
drill on Wednesday. There will be .» 
drill, the government said, but it "is 
merely one of two regular civil air 
defense drills set for June and Sep- 
tember even year." 

American diplomats ir Seoul 
have been trying to get officials in 
Washington to tone down the rhet- 
oric. The U.S. ambassador. James 

T. Laney. reportedly complained lu 
President Bill Clinton about 
speeches on North Korea by the 
CIA director. R. James Woolscy. 
on grounds that Mr. '■Voolsey was 
exaggerating the nuclear threat. 

There :ire about -H.ihXJ Ameri- 
can civilians in South Korea, the 

U. S. Embassy says, in addition io 
35.000 U.S. military perwr.rel. 
Many of them say ihev are bu.-r!> 
fending off worried calls from rela- 
tives back home. 

George Williams, j chemical 
company executive jnd c<'-ch air- 
man or the Security Comm it tee • •; 
ihe American Chamber of Com- 
merce in Seoul, discounted rep.r'.s 
that U.S. companies were recalling 
personnel from South Korea. 

“1 have no reports at all of any 
companies that arc pulling staff < -in 
of here." he said. 

At leasi one American in S'ush 
Korea is taking the opposiie 
course. The U.S. ambajx-ador b-> 
just flown in his three artmdch’i- 
dren to spend their summer ’• ac.:- 
tion in Seoul. 


' '£->•] . 


j-jbf-' 




■>,; 




CSm Vnan KiifVffiW FfMKT-Prc^ 

mn involved in a civil defers drill in Seoul on Tuesday. The government said it saw “no sign whatsoever of imnanenr hostilities.” 


_L '? 


,.r>. :.p 

1/J ii* 


at 


’Limit of Patience 9 


Bi5; 


I - 


Zhariaaovskv D?cd ? Sul: 


Over Hiller Cossperisys: 

A'i-j-V-; 

MOSCOW — The e-itrenv Ri,- 
sian nationalist Vladimir V. Zhirin- 
ovsky dropped a lib.-i action on 
Tuesday against Yegor T. Gaidar 
for comparing him to HjiSer. 

The lur-Ta'.# “re-- ager.c;. 
quoted officials ai a Mo? cow J>- 
trict court a? saying Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky had withdrawn the luwuii. 
filed afier Mr. Gaidar compared 
him to the “Hitler of ! 0 2 0 " in a 
campaign speech 


By Barry James 

iL-nt!u Trbur.i 

s — A senior North Korean envoy said 
iuescay that b:? country neither pos-essed nor 
•a anted nuclear weapons.' but he rei’ierated that it 
;vjs prepared ;o go to war if necessary to defend 
■.vhat it consider^ to be ii> vital interesis. 

P;l-: Dong Chun, who is ambassador to France, 
-aid hii g-.v. err. merit's statements that it would 
regard the imposition of economic sanctions as “a 
Jecla.ratior. of v.ar" should not be dismissed as 
empty rhetoric. 

We a - ? r.-:-t prepared make any more conces- 
he aid. “We are at the limit oi our pa- 
tience." 

He added ihai North K.'-rea most cenainly 
oL'.'d r'fco; :•:< defend a regime that had been built 
„r with --..-at and our bleed.” 

j: -.oj:c rt '■■tnfj.-ir-ohic." Mr Pak said, 
r.- : jJ:i :*-r u-.' 

The -aid :h-.- United StJic% had invented 

tiv entire -ti'a:.' to ju’-ufy its presence :r. S-.-titb 
Korea. With the So-- tel threat gone, he said. Vi j.h- 
ir.gton had to come up with a new pretext to 
remain on ihe Korean Peninsula and was making 
up a ‘tor 


.'•t 'th Korean aggression. 

nited Slate:- vaw Korea centra:' 
cd : t rater- d imp! an • ini its "s*:- 

->lCit>" ai: Oter \:ll. 

• -^r.er deputy minKier in charge oi 
r- wiih foreign «.our.ir:e.-. said the 
fact that his rv. emment had signed declarations of 
nonar£:ei-:-:r. and denucleari'.ritio' ; with South 


.-sc .'•aid : . ni 
a ha: \~e 
; ir*-.Tai 

M'. Pak. a 
cultural re;.?: 


Korea made a continuing U.S. presence unneces- 
sary. 

Asked why North Korea was the only member 
to pull out of tit-e International Atomic Energy 
Agency. Mr. Pak replied that r. was because North 
Korea ’was no longer prepared to accept a system 
of “two wri|his. and two measures." 

He said the agency had turned a blind eye to 
import an t nuclear programs in Israel and South 
Africa, but in complicity with the United States 
was pulling out all ihe stops to find “a few- grams" 
of plutonium in North Korea. 

The ambassador said the agency's demand to 
inspect wfca; he coiled rwo“con'»-ciaonal" military 
bases was unacceptable, because this would ha\e 
■ed to demands to inspect other bases. 

“We are not prepared to strip aude in from of 
our adversaries. “ he said. 

"The United States knows that we are incapable 
of producing a bomb, economically, technological- 
ly. politically and financially." Nlr. Pak said. “If 
you suppose we have a bomb, ask yourself who 
would we use it on?" 

He added that “it would be suicide” if North 
Korea attacked the United States. China or Japan 
with nuclear weapons. Nor could his government 
contemplate an attack or. South Korea, he said, 
because “they are our compatriots." 

V-"niie affirirtini :ha: North Korea did not hj\e 
r.uciear weapons, he •::e>sec that the country had 
tc be able to defend iyeif against the United States 
and against Japan, which he said was on the 
nuclear threshold arc was attimptina by one 
means or another to »i-enc its influence over the 
Asian reden. 


CARGO: 

Where's the Cash? 

Continued from Page 1 


land of egalitarianism and prosper- 
ity. Humar.-rights groups say that 
manv were tortured and disap- 
peared, or that money hr extorted 
from tberr families to keep them 
alive. 

Whether Mr. Seo is right or not. 
the General .Association of North 
Korean Residents in Japan, a 
group controlled by Pyongyang 
and its main conduit for the $600 
million to SI.S billion it gets from 
Japan each year, took pains to 
show on Monday that the Clinton 
administration is unlikely to find 
much of strategic value below 
decks in this 10, 000-ton ship — ■ at 
least not anymore. 

When Japanese customs officials 
quickly poked through the gym 
bags of 150 students from a Kore- 
an-run junior high school in Ja- 
pan's Aichi Prefecture, on the way 
lo the North on what may be one of 




Truce 
IntU 
War of Woftfe; 








few* 




A gf -H'L- Fnrttt-i'rtar -■- 

HONCJ KONG — 11^ « 
a&te-Ebioslr storm 
cratic reform in Rons' " 

has pastel- aid Beymg- . 
London should rrsaraeda 
eration on other aspects tjfj 
colony's 1997 
China, foreign 
Qiclien w?sqw«w:3^ 

Tuesday.' 

Speaking w 
Qian' lokJ a_ 

the Hong K ong FweratKS-w^*-; 
Trade Unions tnai it .«auis 
to move bn to Pthet-pijeSSJl 
issues, accorfihg to 
from the Chinese. 

Hong Kong me Bo .anuTek 

son. : y-' 

His comments 
weeks before' &e t 
Council is to adopt 
stage of Governor 
ten's {xriitical 
bad triggered a 
CSinese-British . 
the\'-were unveiled in 
1991 - 

China has vowed hri 
Mr. Patten's reforms 

would substanriafly 
franchise, for J99 d 

elcctions—inT997. M _. i 

it has not yd derided 

altfanamt: system." ' - ■ : * 1 " 

China's -io p o _ 

Hoag Kong affairs,^ 
was quota! as siymg-m 
ing that there -wat-aff a 
obstacle in ttsetatei. wfre 
taking pbice . atead of * . _ 
meeting of the Chinese^ British iJ' 
Liaison Grasp.? 
body charged wa 
oat detatkrctf the 1997 
lion. ’■ 






f 






ZOO: 

Not Mickey 




CmM from 

left it with more 
anim^ c 

Vuk dismissed the staff — “idle, -i 
corrupt, stupid people" he vafat^; 
There are now dose to a thousand' , 
animals, compared with 60 
be started. Plans are under ctarie* -: 
for an exp ansi o n . .V.~ 

When a chimpanzee named '. 


* "»< — «• s- 


We take great pleasure 
in announcing the opening 
a Corum boutique 
in the heart of Paris 
1 , Rue de la Paix 


of 


Ail outstanding international collection 
of exclusive watches 


trips, they came up mostly with 
socks, underwear and Japanese rice 
crackers. The resl of 288 passengers 
were laden with bottles of R£my 
Martin and neatly wrapped pack- 
ages from MItsukoshi and Isetan. 
Japanese department stores better 
known for their fabrics than their 
fission technology. 

Most passengers said they were 
bringing' family members rite 
equivalent of about S500, far below 


vised appeal for his recovery, fqF._ 
lowed by a rooftop foray to coax 
the chimp back. • ' - 

When inleraational trade sanc- tiZ 
dons were imposed in 1992. fce ajKi 


pealed for cariots and cabbage and ; 
last wit 


st winter he coaxed monkipal ati- .-t 
thorities into providing a supply of ^ 
hot water for a newborn ’ ‘ 


: f . - ■ 



Continued from Page 1 

.'v’nmunicaivr.- market; \o 
;ame -fearer American 

<-.i w »••■ tae Frenah ar.f 
German u::i::ies. 

"There’s forrething \tr- irezi 
v. her. tdeph-jne •.-OT.paniei -i.-re :r,r 
Frir.cc Fele-eom ar.ti Deytiuhe Te- 
ie:-:om m:r or- .-an r_s -.he 
U.S. : eiecorr.r’.'.: r. • ca • i :• n ; rr e : 
• r.'.t Ve,-p:r.9 :r>T-r me mir-:e:. : 

:l£hiar :i.ir i drum" tire 
cc rr.pir.A i-a:c. 

But Helmut Rjcke. eha-.mar. o: 
Deutsche Telekom. ir>i;teti \r.^: 
Germany « a; already a competi- 
tive market, and Marcel P.ruiei 
head of France Telecom, said zo 
further market- opening measures 
were enrisioned if. France because 
of the European Union's deregula- 
tion plans. 

Sprint said it would use a similar 
argument to persuade U.S. authori- 
ties. 

“Our government officials ha\e 
been very strpp<irtive of .American 
companies' going into internation- 
al markets." Mr. Esrey said. 

In Europe, the deal could be 
challenged by British Telecom be- 
cause it in effect allows French and 
German competition in Britain 
while keeping British Telecom oui 
of the two larges; markets on the 
Continent. A Sprint official said 
this might be sidesiepped because 
Sprint holds the license in Britain 
and not its European partners. 

The preliminary accord an- 
nounced Tuesday calls for the 
French and German operators lo 
jointly take a 20-percent stake in 
Sprint by subscribing to new 
shares, paying a 15-percent premi- 
um over stock market value. At the 
time a final accord is signed — in 
six to 12 months — the European 
companies would pay S47.23 a 
share for 42.9 million shares, and 
then pay up to $51 a share for an 
additional 419 million shares with- 
in two years of the initial invest- 
ment. 


. rjn r 1 n W T 1 equivalent tn «nui»uVi ueiuw 

A Telephone Beachhead the limit of $ 50,000 \n yen that 

4 Japan rarely enforces 

Sorint shores ha - , e traded mostlv 


•MtiksughlusinEa^yliaslaTge- 
ly overcoroetbe cfTeciT?f^aiKriotts. ; 


between 554 and S3S since January . 
Or. luftday. : he d.-sing quote on 
5 P r r. : ; h _re • w as i ? 7 . down SZ.iv? 

Monday's close. 

L r.der the ver.-ure. the German 
and Frer.cn operators, which 
formed ar. mtefnationol alliance 
rolled Alia: rate last year, vo!! corn- 
bare that bi.id.e-. , with Sprjst's ir- 
rerr.atir-ra; forming :: 

cc-r.ir.ur: r-.jt.orr, oi network ser- 
• ice; ic-r ra.-irresr-ej. corirumc; an i 
other phone companies. These :r.- 
■cluae in: ereauc- nal voice, data and 
image rerrices. inrernationol coii- 
ing cards, ar.d eventually, long dis- 
tance services from third countries. 

Officials said the aim was to pro- 
vide a “seamless" global network 
that could transmit voice, data and 
video over single lines. 

The venture would create three 
new companies, still unearned but 
most likely employing the Sprint 
brand name in some way. that 
would divide up the world. The 
company serving Europe would be 
two-thirds owned by the French 
and German carriers, while a com- 
pany focusing on the rest of the 
world would be split 50-50 between 
Sprint and its European partners. 
A third company, to provide tech- 
nical support, would also be half- 
owned by SprinL 

The French and German carriers 
would get up tc* three seats on 
Sprint's board. 

Mr. Esrey said the capital infu- 
sion would be used to reduce 
Sprint's debt — which stands at S5 
billion — and to give it cash to 
pursue other “strategic opportuni- 
ties" such as cable television, which 
he said the company was exploring, 

Sprint in 1993 reported sales of 
$11.4 billion and net earnings of 
5430.6 million before extraordi- 
nary items. Based in Kansas City, 
the ’company employs 50.000 pe>> 
pie. 

Lawrence Malkin in Afen- York 
contributed to ibis article. 


I’m angry about all these lies 
from America." Li Jung Shi, an 
elderly woman from central Japan 
who was dragging her overloaded 
bags toward the ship. “People here 
ore visiting their families or visiting 
their parents' tombs. Who in Japan 
can bring in billions of yen?" 

The answer is owners of pachin- 
ko parlors, the immensely popular 
pinball-like game that has turned 
into an industry jn Japan worth 
lens of billions of dollars. Although 


there are some problems. :Tbe 
raffe died last year; and k hasbeen t 
impossible to iraport a aiew c®e:..' 
Dutch zoological authorities. 
gered by Serbian a^resaon in Sk»f • 
nia, requested the return of ac dbl : 
phant celled Twiggy, leni befbftti 
the, war started. Inbreeding isYat- 

ing a toll becau» exchanges andl" 

purchases have been blocked; q‘. : .v. 





surrounded by .a Serbian 
baby skunk, various 
snakes, some white mice aikf^' 


?ome of that money may travel bv . , . . . . , 

ship, much more of it seems to be c / 00 P' l ^3?ff*S , c ^® T 5 5a ^??l 

transferred by small financial insli- 1 . a . . c ^ n * ^ ^"! al s 
tutions like Ashikaga Bank in a ll: . . ’ 

~ ■ one was supposed to 


Tokyo suburb. Pachinko owners 
number among its best customers, 
and las: year the bank handled $47 
million in trade with North Korea 
and $5 million in transmission of 
funds to families. 

There are 18 banks in Japan au- 
thorized to deal directly with the 
North, and Japanese officials say 
they have no idea how much flows 
through third countries. 

Presumably a lot of the dona- 
tions to North Korea come in the 
form of commodities, and down on 
the docks on Sunday night no one 
would talk about what was con- 
tained in the crates tint forklifts 
were loading into the hold. The 
outside markings suggested the 
contents were mostly food staples. 

For the Japanese, the ship and 
other, less visible commercial imks 


she produces a baby with oiirdsfeA' 
phant. Boy. and that hasn’t 
pened yet" he said. • 

The war affects the zoo 
wavs. too. Among the animals cjS?. 
show are what Mr. Nadjsa mfcBtfcr 
called “four refugees from 
boj zoo." referring to a lion, a bei^V 
a puma and a tiger from a'SerifosU' 
held town in northern Bositisj^^r^ 
has been under Muslim . 

And then there are ibe catn^' 
preen ted to the zoo in better feaS 
by the Libyan leader. M< 

Gadhafi. during a confi 
nonaligned- nations in Belgrade 
They had been given Muslifflr 
names — Nijas for the ■ 

Azra for the female. 

But when a baby camel was-bbSi 
recently, it was given a 


!t\‘ :- 


between cities like this one on the £? me ’ Sredcge. “This-is a 
Sea of Japan and Pyongyang pose a bian cam ^ born cm Serbian 
foreign-policy dilemma, one ihat we weren ’t going to use a SfeBS': 
pits the alliance with the United ^ B^jovip said. 

Slates againsi a history of miser- .“That was a joke," be 
able relations between Japanese ^ j°H.V laugh, 
and the Koreans in their midst. 

Tokyo officials say they do not 


OH 


Continued from Page 1 

vassed in the international commu- 
nity.” 

These, he said, included, ''repro- 
ductive health, reproductive rights, 
sexual health and sexual rights." 
He called these “completely new 
concepts" that “have been written 
in a very small geographic area be- 
tween New York and Washington" 
and that “reflect the life-style men- 
tality of a certain, small region of 
ihe world." 

Even before a three-week prepa- 
ratory conference on the Cairo 
gathering, which took place in New 
York in April, the Pope went to 
great lengths to oppose the confer- 
ence language and proposals, call- 
ing Mr. Ginton to discuss it and 
personally reprimanding the con- 
ference secretory-general. Nafis Su- 
dik. 

Papal envoys have crisscrossed 


the world, seeking to overturn the 
conference language. In March, the 
Pope called in ambassadors accred- 
ited to the Vatican and sent letters 
to the world's heads of state to 
contest the Cairo proposals. 

“Why is the Pope so concerned?" 
said the Vatican official. “The an- 
swer is that this conference is very 
different from previous population 
conferences. It is basically about a 
type of libertine, individualistic 


want to repeat the mistakes they 
made during the Gulf War, when 
they appeared reluctant lo support 
the United Stales. Tney have taken 
pains to say they would join in 
whatever sanctions the United Na- 
tions enacts, within the limits of the 
Japanese Constitution. That would 
include, they say. a cutoff of the 
money. 

But it is a sanction the Japanese 
*?SU C should not be imposed in the 
first wave of UN steps to pul pres- 
sure on North Korea. Instead, it 
should come only after lesser sanc- 
tions have failed. 

“All we want is for America, Ja- 
pan and South Korea 




to 


spreading a bad image about 


stop 


our 


u aid * yo Dok Hyon, a 


_ -_>• .rgy. 

Continued from Vage'l- ^jrO 

chamber to send a 
from outside. 

Abkhaz rebel sectiss'.. 
backed by North Caucasian 
naries and armed bv 
iaiy units, drove Gangian:_„ 
■mem troops out of the provafctf&f 
September after months 
m *r •• . ■■ Vv#& 

Hundreds of people wnriaBef, 
ui the conflict, which ocainetfSfikf 
the Georgian central gotetiHH&C 
sent troops into the 
August 1992 to quell 



iP:p. , _ *■ 

ff£. ' 


tt,- 

Ifc ■ 


»T,,- , • _ 
5; 


k. -- 


Vf* - 1 . -• 




schoolteacher who was sheZ;/ iSSttrf!* qucU 

.he ship Imisf ee ‘ s,aturef °r sn ^f®^; 

Korea. Russia., Federal W 

"I don’t know if North Korea !“ mbcr :^ 


ife-style and it would be the first .. . , v . f . 

lime the United Nations would en- has nuclear weapons he Vole ear ^ er ^his month to 

Hnrci, thi. Itfrf i. .. “Kul I *.»■ . .. liC “tiUCd. rCailM! kv II. 


dorse this life-style. Is it actually 
for the good of every society to dn 
that?" 


As he seeks allies, the Pope has 
won some backing in Europe and 
Latin America, while Islamic coun- 
tries have voiced aversion to the 
conference's emphasis on the 
equality of women, particular^ in 
sexual matters. 


but 1 trust Kitrfll Suns far mori re ? l i? s ‘ ^- v ^ r - Yeltsin todts^^ 
than 1 trust the Americans." 3 ^ u ' scaje P e acekeepfng|pre^? ; 

The Council's deputies 

~ were dissatisfied with the 

2 Ovi! Guards She in Spain 

RtWcrs posed to sending peacefcee 

SIETE AGU.AS. Spain n • s ? a ^ 

Spanish Civil GuarHc _c.. Ln,lc d Nations to accd^f^ 

peaoHkeqiing role in firit 
tiie former Soviet Union. 1 : 


| WO 

“0 UW to.^r£^ shw 











** 



f reedom of the Press 
In Kenyan Spotlight 

Newsmen Pick Jail as Symbol 


By Keith B. Richbuig 

Washington Peat Service 

NAIROBI — Bedan Mbugua 
was waiting in his office when the 
Kenyan police arrived to lake him 
to prison. He had spent the week- 
end praying and exercising, he said, 
and now Mr. Mbugua, chief editor 
of the weekly newspaper People 
was ready for his fate. 

“They have just come.** he said 
as the police arrived during a tele- 
phone interview. "I think I'm 
ready. I did it deliberately. I 
thought about it” He bad decided 
he must go to jail 
Mr. Mbugua initially had been 
ordered to serve five months in 
prison. His crime: Pub lishing an 
artide criticizing a ruling of the 
Kenyan Court of Appeal and im- 
plying that the judges woe bowing 
to political pressure from President 
Daniel arap MoL 
A three-judge panel — including 
two jurists castigated in the offend- 
ing artide — then ordered Mr. 
Mbugua and a reporter, David Ma- 
kali, to publish an apology and pay 
fines totaling nearly S14.000, or go 
to prison. The journalists offered to 
pay the fines and wrote an apology. 
Jut when the judges rejected their 


judges recently sued the Weekend 
Concord for reporting that the jus- 
tices accepted Mercedes-Benz lim- 
ousines from the former president. 

“lust about every country has 
similar cases," said Jonathan 
Moya, a Zimbabwean scholar with 
the Ford Foundation here. “We are 
likely to see more of this before 
things get better." 

Among the hardest hit has been 
the Kenyan press, which just a year 
ago was considered among the live- 
liest, and freest, on the continent. It 
is now one of the most harassed. 

Critics say the new factor in Ke- 
nya's campaign against (he press is 
the use of the legal system, which 
gives the harassment an appear- 
ance of legitimacy. "We respect the 
rule of law,” said David Andere, 
permanent secretary in the Kenyan 
Information Ministry, in a typical 
government defense of the attacks 
against the press. “Everybody is 
saying uphold democratic princi- 
ples — one of the democratic prin- 
ciples is the rule of law." 

"It’s an extremely cynical use of 
the law ” said TJ. Dowling, infor- 
mation officer at the UJS, Embassy 
here. “Their new technique is to 

actually use the courts to harass or 

apology as inadequate and told cripple the alternative press." 
them to rewrite it, the journalists Mr. Dowling said the govern- 
__:j - - - merit's earlier method of dealing 

with critical newspapers and maga- 


said, they chose prison to make a 
symbolic statement on the lack of 
press freedom and the continuing 
harassment of reporters in Kenya. 

“I felt I should go to prison to 
make a statement that we have to 
have an independent judiciary thin 
respects freedom of the press," Mr. 
Mbugua said on the phone just 
before his arrest Monday. “You 
cannot operate under this situa- 
tion. The best thing is just to say 
now enough is enough.” 

Imprisonment might seem ex- 
treme for a journalist publishing 
what many Kenyans and foreign 
diplomats already believe — that 
the judiciary here bends to 
men! wilL But to many 
reporters and politicians, as well as 
foreign diplomats and human 
rights activists, Mr. Mbugua's case 
is the latest step in the erosion of 
press freedom since Mr. Moi and 
his ruling Kenya African National 
Union returned to power in a dis- 
puted election in December 1992. 

Over the last year, as Mr. Moi 
and his party have consolidated 
their grip, journalists have been 
charged with subversion, threat- 
ened with fines and accused of trea- 
son for criticizing the ruling clique. 
The two most prominent opposi- 
tion magazines. Society ana Fi- 
nance, both shut down because of 
government harassment, including 
police impounding copies of the 
magazines and prosecutors tying 
up the afiwbin costly, court cases. 

In 1991 .arid 1992, -as Africa 
seemed set to follov Eastern Eu- 
rope and die fanner Soviet Union 
with its own democratic revolution, 
the emerging press was seen, as one 
of the continent’s brightest hopes 
for change. New newspapers and 
magazines sprang up in Nigeria, 
Kenya and even Zaire, a longtime 
dictatorship. 

But in the last two years, the 
movement appears to have stalled. 
Africa's autocrats have learned that 
in crushing opponents, the first 
step is to keep toe press under strict 
control Across the continent, jour- 
nalists have been jailed, fined, beat- 
en and in some cases killed. 

In Uganda, President Yoweri 
Museveni — who purports to be a 
new-style African democrat — has 
lashed out at reporter who have 
upbraided him, and he is pushing a 
media bill that would license re- 
porters and set up a government 
complaints commission that could 
‘i them. 


zines was usually more heavy- 
handed. “Throughout the cam- 
paign for multiparty democracy, 
the government tried at every turn 
to silence the opposition press 
through extralegal means — police 
acting without warrants, sedition 
cases being brought and never tak- 
en to trial” be said. 

Mr. Mbugua said that by going 
to prison, “we want to have the 
international community focus on 
the need for freedom of the press.” 

Countries such as the United 
States, he said, “give our country so 
much money, but there isn’t much 
money in strengthening institu- 
tions that support democracy ” 





Saudi Envoy Takes On Riyadh 

Pattern of Terror and Corruption Is Alleged 


By Paul Lewis 

Nets- York Tunes Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — A Saudi diplomat who 
until recently served with his coun- 
try’s mission to the United Nations 
is seeking political asylum in the 
United Slates after accusing offi- 
cials of his country of comiplioo, 
terrorism and human rights viola- 
tions. 

In a signed affidavit made avail- 
able to The New York Times, the 
diplomat, Mohammed A. Khiiewi, 
a first secretary, wrote that he was 
in possession of about 14,000 docu- 
ments showing “a history, pattern 
and practice of terrorism and viola- 
tions of human rights which would 
terribly embarrass my country and 
might cause the current regime to 
seek personal retaliation against 
me.” 

The affidavit will be amon 


with his government on May I? 
when be sent a telegram to Saudi 
dignitaries, including Crown 
Prince Abdullah ibn Abdulaziz, ac- 
cusing officials of comiption. mis- 
government and discrimination 
against women. 

The day after the telegram, the 
affidavit said, “a security operative 
for the intelligence service of die 
Saudi Arabian government ap- 
proached me in my home and told 
me to go back to Saudi Arabia or 


The diplomat said 

he had been warned 

that his life would 

be in danger if he 

The affidavit wfll be among the pressed his 
documents that his lawyer, Leon * 

Wildes, said be would include in an aftfnsarinna. 
application for political asylum for 


BK BngaJi'TtK A>Biruied Prey 


About 400 Rwandans, mostly Tutas, wore reunited with relatives in a rebel-held part of Kigali 
after evacuation by die United Nations from biding in the Hutu-controlled part of the capital 

Cease-Fire in Rwanda Is Announced 


Carptkd bp Our Staff From Dispatches 

TUNIS — The two sides in the Rwandan civiJ 
war agreed to an immediate cease-fire Tuesday 
night under pressure from beads of state at the 
summit meeting of the Organization of African 
Unity, the bead of the rebel delegation reported. 

Pasteur Bizimimgu, head of the Rwanda Patriot- 
ic Front delegation hoe, said that he would call on 
his troops to respect the cease-fire immediately. 
The provisional Rwandan government is to do the 
same, he said. 

The deal was reached during a day of meetings 
by a co m mittee of heads of neighboring states, led 
by Zaire and Tanzania, that met separately with 
the rebel and government teams. 

The arrangement did not involve assi gning 
blame for the massacres that followed the death 
April 6 of Rwanda’s president, Juvenal Habyari- 
man a, in a suspicious plane crash. Estimates of 
deaths in the massacres range from 200,000 to 


500,000, most of them members of the Tutsi mi- 
nority killed by militias of the Hutu majority tribe. 

Earlier in Rwanda, a senior UN officer said 
Hutu militiamen abducted up to 40 Tutsi children 
from a church complex in a government-held part 
of Kigali on Tuesday and herded them off to 
almost certain death. The Patriotic Front said it 
would take the event, at least the third of its kind 
this month in Kigali alone, very seriously. 

Also, sources in Bujumbura said that more than 
200 Tutsi refugees had beat slaughtered in a Bu- 
rundi refugee camp by Rwandan Hutus who 
crossed the border. 

President Nelson Mandela of South Africa, 
meanwhile, had separate meetings with two presi- 
dents, Jose Eduardo dos Samos of Angola and 
Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire, in an effort to bring an 
end to the civil war in Angola, which continues 
unabated despite some progress at peace talks in 
Zambia. (AP, Remen, AFP) 


Mr. Khiiewi. 

Such a request is unusual for a 
Saudi official. The United States 
considers Saudi Arabia its closest 
Arab ally and a mayor weapons 
export customer, and Saudi Arabia 
is America's largest oil supplier. 

Mr. Khiiewi, who is now in hid- 
ing with his wife and three children, 
said that he had been warned that 
bis life would be in danger if be 
pressed his accusations and did not 
return home. 

The accusations include finan- 
cial improprieties on the part of 
Saudi diplomats and the surveil- 
lance of American Jewish groups. 

In the interview, Mr. Khiiewi 
also said he had evidence that Sau- 
di Arabia funneled money through 
Jordan to Hamas, an extremist Is- 
lamic group in the Israeli-occupied 
territories, and gave them informa- 
tion on budding bombs. 

The Saudi mission to the United 
Nations referred inquiries to the 
embassy in Washington. Saudi 
Arabia's ambassador to Washing- 
ton, Prince Bandar tbn Sultan, was 
asked to comment but did not re- 
turn the call 

Mr. Khiiewi first brake publicly 


you, your family in Saudi Arabia, 
your wife and kids wfll be lulled.” 

Mr. Khiiewi said the Washing- 
ton embassy had offered to send a 
jet to fly him to Washington for a 
meeting in the Watergate Hotel to 
discuss his accusations. But Mr. 
Khiiewi said he refused, fearing it 
was a plot to force him to return to 
Saudi Arabia. 

He repeated the charges in an- 
other public statement issued on 
June 6 through a London-based 
Saudi opposition movement, the 
Committee for the Defense of Le- 
gitimate Rights in Saudi Arabia. 

Mr. Khiiewi said large sums of 
official money passing through the 
UN mission and the Washington 
embassy were regularly deposited 
in New York banks for several 
months before being transferred, 
and be said the interest was taken 
by members of the staff. 

He said be believed that about 
$40 mil H on had been misappropri- 
ated in this way last year. 

As ah illustration of financial 
Mr. 

produced 


misappropriation, Mr. Khiiewi 
produced letters and documents in 


English that showed that a check 
from the Saudi Arabian Monetajy 
Agency. <n Riyadh, dated Sept. 29, 
1993. for S9.7 million and which 
represented pan of Saudi Arabia's 
UN dues, was used to buy 10 one- 
month “jumbo” certificates of de- 
posit with a leading New York 
bank on Oct IS. 

The letter authorizing purchase 
of the certificates was signed by 
Saudi Arabia's representative at 
the United Nations. Gaafar M Al- 
lagany, but it did not indicate who 
owned the certificates and who was 
the beneficiary of the interest 
earned. 

Another set of English-language 
documents showed that a UN 
check for S2-21 million reimbursing 
Saudi Arabia for the cost of its 
peacekeeping forces in Somalia 
and received on Sept. 28, 1993, was 
used to buy three certificates of 
deposit with a major New York 
bank on OcL 6. Once again, the 
letters were signed by Mr. Alle- 
gany. 

As a condition of the interview, 
Mr. Khiiewi insisted that the 
names of the banks not be dis- 
closed. 

Mr. Khiiewi also produced two 
documents in Arabic printed on 
paper edged in red which he said 
meant that they were classified top 
secret The first he said, was a 
request for information about ac- 
tivities of two organizations — the 
Jewish Defense League and the 
Jewish Defease Organization — 
both of which have their roots in 
the teachings of Rabbi Mar Ka- 
lian e, the militant rabbi who was 
assassinated in New York. 

The second document was the 
mission’s reply that it had under- 
taken electronic surveillance of the 
groups, he said. 

Mr. Khiiewi said he also had 
evidence showing that Saudi Ara- 
bia gave financial help through Jor- 
dan. as well as information about 
making bombs, to the extremist 
Muslim organization Hamas, 
which opposes peace with Israel 
and is a rival of the Palestine Liber- 
ation Organization. He did not 
produce these documents. 


Killer Heat Leaves 
North India Weak 


re facing criminal libel 
that could land l 


Post are 

ItheminjaiL 
In hffgeria, newspapers are routine- 
ly shut down, a ad Supreme Court 

New Doubts 
On Lockerbie 
Confession 

.The Associated Press 

BEIRUT r— Judicial authorities 
sought Tuesday to discredit a claim 
by a Pales tinian terrorist that he- 
blew up Pan Am Flight 103 in 1 988, 
kiffing 270 people. 

The- US. ambassador to Leba- 
non also said he doubted the valid-, 
ity of a courtroom confession on 
Monday by Youssef Sbaaban, 29, 
who is on trial in the assassination 
a? -a Jordanian diplomat in Beirut. 

; Prosecutor General Munif Owei- 
dat asserted that Mr. Sbaaban had 
conftssed to the attadr on the plane 
and the Jhar29 assassuiation to end 
what the .defendant rimmed was 


By Molly Moore 

Washington Past Sendee 

NEW DELHI — For the last 
week, northern India has endured 
its worst heat in a half-century, 
with temperatures that have risen 
to 115 degrees Fahrenheit in the 
city and >21 in the nearby Raja- 
sthan desert (46 and 49 centigrade), 
leaving more titan 400 people dead 
from heat-related fitnesses, causing 
outbreaks of cholera and stomach 
aflmcnls, creating power and water 
shortages and generally malting Hfe 
hellish. 

After one particularly brutal 
night last week when the low tem- 
perature was 93 degrees (34), 18 
people were found dead on the 
streets of New Delhi Near the Ra- 
jasthan town of Dholpcr, an elder- 
ly woman and a 6-year-old girl died 
of beat stroke walking from the 
village bus stand to then- rural hut 

“It’s been a very bad summer,” 
said Vmod Kumar, 25, a construc- 
tion worker who was canning 
bricks on his head. “It is especially 
difficult for laborers. Sometimes 
everything goes ha 2 y before my 
eyes. I get dizzy. I constantly have 
to keep watch on mysdf." For oth- 
ers, the heat has been good for 
business. 

“At first I was sad about all the 
people dying in the heat,” said 
Han, who sens glasses of cod water 
for 25 paises (less than a peony) 
near a busy city marketplace. “But 
when there is such a lot of heat, my 
business goes op” 

On the hottest days, the 26-year- 
old water wallah said, his sales av- 
erage 550 glasses a day. Hari is not 


cashed in on the parched throats of 
residents. Coca-Cola, which is re- 
entering the Indian market after a 
two-decade absence, launched its 
New Delhi sales campaign in the 
midst of the blast-furnace weather 
last week! with billboards declaring. 
“Thank God for the beat wave.” A 
spokesman for Coke said the tim- 
ing of the sales campaign was mere- 
ly a coincidence, but be said the 
weather dearly was helping boost 



confessed 
[evencan- 
fessed to (heXockerine bombing,” 
Mr. Owradat quoted Mr. Shaaban 
assaying v. . > ' - 

Aprosccutoral the trial EGsbam. 
Kabaiaxu. added to the confusion 
by denying that Mr. Shaaban had 
mentioned tbe- bombing of the jet- 
liner truer LodcahiftSocnland, 

Bait reporters covering the trial 
heard Mr.f&aabari say,*Tperson- 

bl^ ^tiMrLockahifrpIane,' 


Deepak Mmbas, 36, a distributor 
for rival PepsiCola, said be had 
been working double shifts for a 

week to med the inaeased demand 

for bottled soft drinks, delivering 
700 cases a day, double his normal 
load. The ricksha men who deliver 
the ice to keep the soft d rink s cool 
akn have been working overtime. 

Qm Prakasfa, 72, pedals more than 
five miles each day with a dozen 25-. ternoon, with the temperature 
pound slabs of ice ceo his cart. He creeping upward, he was snoozing 
said he could not remember a hot- oo the cod white metal surface of 
ter summer. his cart. 


The heat has left most residents 
frustrated and cranky, with fittle 
escape at home or at work. The 
city's overburdened power system 
has collapsed in many neighbor- 
hoods and has worked only sporad- 
ically in others. Local newspapers 
have reported that only half of the 
municipal dectric company's com- 
plaint lines are operating, and even 
those go unanswered most of the 
time. 

City water supplies have run out 
in virtually every neighborhood, 
forcing shun dwellers to drink wa- 
ter haul-pumped from polluted 
wdls and residents of posh neigh- 
borhoods to pay double the gping 
rate for private water tracks to fill 
residential tanks. In many apart- 
ment buildings, residents on the 
upper floors report that they return 
home from work at night to find 
that neighbors on the lower floors 
have already consumed the build- 
ing’s water supply for the day. 

Lack of water has contributed to 
surges in cholera and other gastro- 
intestinal ailments, particularly in 
shun areas where about 30 percent 
of the city’s 10 million people live. 

In Islamabad, the Pakistani capi- 
tal a man was killed and drw»n$ 
injured recently when police fired 
on a crowd protesting water short- 
ages. 

Meteorologists attribute the de- 
bilitating heat to “the absence of 
weather’ in northwestern India — 
meaning that tbe weather systems 
thai cause rain and storms have not 
materialized to block the hot, dry 
winds blowing across India from 
the deserts of Central Asa. 

For those hoping to seek refuge 
by traveling to the cooler dimes of 
tlx: Himalayan foothills in north- 
ern India, there is also bad news: 
Airline officials said ah seats were 
bodied for the neat week and that 
no seats would be available on 
northbound trains for two weeks. 

But there may be a tittle relief yet 
at home. A drizzle here on Sunday 
afternoon drove the temperature 
below 90 for a few hours, prompt- 
ing one daily newspaper to declare 
in a headline: “Deihhtes come out 
to enjoy pleasant weather.” For the 
first time in days, the paper noted, 
residents could be seen stroC' 
around India Gate, one of the ci 
landmarks. 

Even so, Inder Pal 28, who sells 
ice cream from a cart near a busy 
intersection, remains (he en vy of ail 
the vendors on his corner, this af- 


tered ra the triaTs transcript. : 

The* ambassador, Mark 
Hambley^ 'calfed the coofcsaon a 
“great swprifseT and cast doubt on 
itscredil 


accurate mfbazaton,” he said of 
the ' daim pf-' responaMi ty. The 
United! Stefia.Vand, - Britain have; 
chajged two , Libyans with the-av 
uric OB. the j j • 









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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 15, 1994 




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Mol * Fo * Pvne * Fecepdongt - 

WTPNA710N41 BUStfS CB/THS 
F'toi Art. t-h~ YM, NY 10CD) 
Td. :i:-ri4-3535. far. 7I7.71Z-351Q 

CONTACT LB4SES so liWTO d elhered 
overntjh; to yoi r ooorre?. name 
brand sroduc?-. 1K*% aucrorreed 
Please call EUiCtEfC TOi. FRE m 
I to'- 1475-15450 or 39-51 6270 W. 
EMPIRE STATE BLBLD1NG ADORESS 
The mon de-’mguaied address m USA. 
Mat fYtone. r» Tet pij] 73M0T2. 

Fat, pi:) * 04-1125 

RELOCATION Af® BUSIhCSS Senicn 
ir. FrrnVr-jrr area Geranx*., ijj fCA 
td-J - Fod Td -4«tollo7226oc« 
For -iC^ll^lOHl 

BUSINESS TRA\'EL 

1 it.’ Business Chas Freguem Travelers 
to O-ier: i usnrfa Arrca'h*;. i So. 
Aereaca. Save up ic 50%. fte ccv 

S nj rc -esr-oens. Impend C anode 
I- 514-341.727? fa 514-34 1- W8. 


TELECOM. 


Up to 75 % Discount cn 

InlT Busmen. Terse nd, 
IMobMcdts! 


We connect nj> fas. x rT. pOt narr? 
24-HOUR SSTVltE 
Lowed rases to ana n lh* USA. 
Avstrafc* 503*0 Sinmere. W JVJ 
FrvVCt: 50.43?5wdwlcri ML 459 

Gnniy, 50.4C; $pg»: 00293 

Liaenteerv S078a UHSOJW 

Contoe row newest :ep.esenrctK 
TOOAY for Free artvdw n ! Tct'Fgv; 


Nee. nonce ^92"! 3SO -' m 4*s5 
Rons. France (33-1J 4745 5963/ 47*5 2482 
Germany (49K221 293 1&* 

UnemDOwg 552) 424 780 
Sng^cre&SM* T 28-2276937 
Spcm p4-aTi764W 30530 
5wrarWl4IJ 2 78413787 2 730337 
UK fym B9 50 76 
USA [1-303 386 530. 386 6357 

SECURITY AND 
SURVEILLANCE 

BODYGUARD 

OHensve v detenuve protoerve 
solutiors offer ed. |4G7] 632-70*3 USA 


CAPITAL WANTED 

CREATIVE INTBUGS4CE efrer a ' 
woddwjae bench related anine t- 
farmon cv i neNork. For o sers-up 
udie venture c ca taL Plec&e FAX i 
(331 67 75 01 05. thafa. j 

CAPITAL AVAILABLE | 


FWDS AVAILABLE 

FOR 

L£TTdS OF CRS)fT 
a^GMIWWES—.. 

OTHF. ACCb’H&E uOL 1AT3AL 
Broiler's jeraiarop gwrarfeeef 

Mureen ROHM . ■* 
fMANQAL TNSTTTUTK3N 
awwMt, - gafiMM „ 
L f u rrebon by fa 32-2-53* 02 V 
o. 37-2-538 *7 91 
TBEX- 20277 


CAPITAL 

AVAEABLE 

FOR All BUShESS PROJECTS 
Mnmom US S50CMM0 ' No moattoft 

Broker's (OTtBSBOC 0 UtrT 3 »ted 

Meenevw M-LPXK- retd G*- 
RNANOAL MSmUIlON 
Brsweh-BaSUM 

fat 327-534 (C 77 or 32-2-538 *7 91 
ia£X 20777 


PROJECT FINANCE 
V»mjK CAPITAL 

• Miniman US$5CO,QOO 

■ No *toaT»aj 

• Tertr Loens 

• Eqw*y Fm teiee 

■ Broken PimokJ 

Anglo Asaarkan Group Pie 

Fox +44 924 201377 


PRIME BANK 
GUARANI® 

Venture Cqwd &»«® 

fed 6*ae Lot TwreJ™* 8 
4e) fvtsvd oiffOws 

Bfdwn farfeetod 

RBSESBffATWE 
rinnir 1 to ort os bce crn W in 
m the proceamfl <P moe 


MeifiBHtfdfe- 

liSIt'vlS.BvV. SWftJt 


RINDING PROB10K? 

Vertwe Ccpd ■ Eqwly Low* 

Real Estate - Busies 
H ntjcbg . Long T erm _ 
Ccftrfernl Su^joneaGwaroMees 

Ba*±le guawise m seewe fa*9 
for viaM prejees aronged or 

Bcnfiorol Asia 

Comnrbsan toned ody upon FemnQ. 

Bidcr's Gomrmsuit Assured. 


OWWUMTSS wt*** 








portotfcwtofnaBgfa'pAw; 







OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES 

BY LAWYERS 

immigration 

& TRUST EXPERTS 


OFFSHORE TRUSTS. COMPANIES 
BANK INTRODUCTIONS. NOMINEES 
fi ADMINISTRATION BY UK LAWYERS 
BUtMTU mOHVWHTItW f 03 EtCL ANCKSTRONJ* 


■ IB1SB pm res) £165.00 
m ISLE OF MAN £135.00 

■ DELAWARE Lie £495.00 

m JERSEY £395.00 

m B.VX/PANAMA £265.00 


LONDON OFFICE -• 

SCOR p IO HOUSE- 102 SYDNSY STREET," 
• CHELSEA'. LONDON SW2 6NJ. ..-r ;' 

• is- 44-7L352 2274 >.■ 
@44-71 8739688 


Tax-Free US, Corporations 




VS. Attorneys 

lKwne4ii-ircc Nctoili n«r vKDlr -enne m 
iD VI Suit* I'hnrjnTp: >\t (.npklc iBonTtnin-. 
ire offcf RJL5 nUrsn »rfh pboc Sr in xnu 
office totnci> L"> hiok xcmmiv L - >.w;itmi 
in 'ertr j* itnito o-mrlne kpl "ertKrt A 
i*»iaini-e. tnil<uf>n.c hTi' mjrlrl enirr & 
tmnupaiitui riw< irqurR out frer br-jchinr. 
jvjihNc in £nrit>fi i farzun 

Dr. Jut. VUllani A. Wrijjhr 
Attorney at Law 
US I'j'ip- -nii'-n XTi-urn.. Inc. 

LiJO fuirtiurjl Pns-e Suilc *1" 
Sjcntn c mn. Ol.f. imu flMil 

S Fax l USA) 9 1 b ~S3-3005 ~ 


DELAWARE (USA) 
CORPORATIONS 

C/iMliivccnTid'.-ntiil :er.ic* ?-:i*onjblo 
e^t Oil", iii i for free I it 
Z.+MXK ?CC?F.-, LJ-J 
fij 4 J 2-H ’J'tlminC.on 

Cde.-vt. ■4?w , *3' 

VI ,? r.2 'i < 2 e5 : : ? e w:-o*;-87t.i 



fNTERNATIONAL l£ASiNG \ 

(MMBMATB.Y AVAILABLE 

FOB WSANOI4G 
of oerdtse of heavy estOtoem. 
o ir cr eh a. i i ierttcrr and ptenure | 

s tbps, <ntiuar>d red eston. 

Broker i c c r - u r mo- -. ges«He •• 

hr err ir f ov— a hen i 

Metdeun MJ.PJLB. and Ge. 
FINANCIAL INSTmmON 
Brandt - BSJjIUM 

fax- 32-1-554 02 77 & 32-2-533 47 9i 
TELEX 202T7 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 

TO PURCHASE: 

■ Lefcs cf C-odn 

• Bar* G w rf u r r te m 

• 0#ter AaertaWe Cdtoe-toi 

• Bodr e d by TrwoJe Invoton 

THRU MAJOR tNT*L BANKS 

CAPfTAL SUPPORT COUP. 

Ui [714) 757-1070 Fen 757-1270 


IMMSXATE * UNUMOH3 

C cyd efasoie for 
ALL buvnes 

WN U.S. S2 to. K m®c 
1717} 297-7490 (U-i FAX} 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 



FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


PROJECT FBUNCE 
veaus CAPITAL 
Avertable from 
One id B on LL5. DeAon plus 
maytnert term Thrac to Ten yean. 
Tri NT. + 5P554?45y436d7 
FafcWT + 599S43449 
(ST. MAAJTOfl 



LvJirJ 


^T;, . 4Vrfni 


COMMERCIAL & INVESTMENT PR0PEF.T1E: 


fx. In 'iifaMW »ij 


SWorldwide 


Argentina • Belgium • Brazil • Canada 
Chile • Colombia • France • Germany • Mexico ! 
Spain • United Kingdom ■ United States • 

Tel: USA 415-781-7811. ext 32 Brussels: 322-645-1611 ' 


■■rfri 






Lranots Sdreg HL{l|<52t 


- ill i .l. . I It 


& CURRENCIES 


SjnNG GOLD, SWv. pfahnra, non 
ref^trL txwdw, Map, «C. OHera 
I+41& 34656d9 SvSiertand 





COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL REAL ESTATE 


FACULTY OF HIGHER E10 



Sandwiches & Salads 

8,500 Stores Open in 
15 Countries 

Master Franchises 
Available 


‘FAX- INQUIRIES '203-87^^3! 

or write 325 Bic.Drive. j ^‘s 
'-.-V'" Mil ford, C T' 06460 USAu^ 


* HOWTO l.EQM.LY * 
ORT\lNni\LV\T10NAI.lTV 

f>v...u •.'< - .t-:-.- »” -.u: ti.riy.i.-e K* 
cikkt.- - '. r’jmn'.' .’ LI ■ r’PF'-l 1 - 1 ! ■ 
T.V\ F'A'iTT. jrJ ki :■ < Li- . : ■ !r.f- 
JS'J it- ? -"8:i ivui ii-. 

ton'. K> - 1 Yfftin-. T ‘i v . f H I. 
FnriourFRKl BRiX’ltl RE.mdl'Rl- 
\ \i'Y NK'.tS l.tITFR ihji »nihclp 
itLihi jihI •ti’jrc ><iur ni«ni> ^ rile ur 
Snipe Inl'li.ld. R..\ 4:"f. 

r<i(i«!rll-«r l.-oi iiJr 
k-rtiin* Cidr • Hj» • r> - - rr. . v r. 
to - : : ■..•r'l r-,- . . yv 


Master Franchises Available 



Ziebart TidyCar is the recognized brand name for a suc- 
cessful automotive aftermarket business in 41 countries. 

Professionally applied and installed products and services 
for Detailing, Accessories, and Protection are our specialty. 
We meet the strong consumer demand for cars that look 
better and last longer. 

Extensive initial arid on-going training, marketing, adver- 
tising, and technical support is provided. 

Master Franchises are available to qualified individuals or 
companies looking to diversify. For more information, please 
contact 

Ziebart International Corp. 

P.O. Box 1290 • Troy. Ml 48007-1290 USA 
TEL 1-810-58&4100 • FAX: 1 -81 0-588-071 8 


All EQiapmenUFul) Control 

Investment Sl5-S25.000ui: i-jmc, 

T-1 €-63 -2 --2 750 

FAX: 716-691-1766 




Leading US-based manulK-ture: ol 
exclusive hi-tech jurviilUn:e. ni?ni 
optics, airport C- ^pcemmen: 
securin' products forever >i‘ years 
„-*efcs JV panner 10 manuiacrare 
disiribiiie abroad. ’CC5 is one 
■?( the largest £■ be<: known 
companies in the fas: crov.ip-: 
surveillance f> monironru indusuies * 
Fortune 7.la|SLir.c. 

CCS - TEL: 212-557- 50*0 
rat. 2f2-°S'-l276US-L Amt Mr Km?, 
or TEL lOlrl *080257 
FAX I0I7I 029 99 7S. London 
Ann. Mr Han 


OFFSHORE BANKS 

■ Merchant/ comm e r ci al broil. 

• Accepl deposits 

• Class© A licence 

• No quaTificoBon raquiremerth 

■ No ta»cs or treaties 

• Total anonymity 

• Bearer shares O.K. 

■ Nominee dfadors O.K. 

■ Immediate dolrvcry 

• USS 1 5,000 or S 25,000 with a 
trust company 

Call or lax for free detailsl 

Ron Jensen 

London Tel. 71 394 5157 Fax 71 231 9926 
Canada Tel. 604 942 6169 Fax 942 3179 


MAJORCA: FREEHOLD j 
BAR/RESTAURANT 

Units av3il£t>e ;r. Faima Noca. a: me 
entrance - c me n**l: d*vel:ped mul;> 
rmli.cn beach ar-? cymende direct 
acces ti "he :?a:t and r.mr spcits ] 
•* O-i: ,* v. -:r?c-r r.ir.i :.r?renl iza 

=C-n rvrC-SlVATr:?; COLT ACT 

LUIS ZAMORANO CASTRO 

c "in-os - pAjL?E^- :r:iC calvia. 
maj-« rc a »=Aif:. 

ORCA.-- :-A7: ncc-iv?: 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
INSURANCE/REINSURANCE 
COMPANIES OFFSHORE BANKS 
ASSET, INCOME PROTECTION 

62 V«-! r-v-JJl Shod - p-C.-'Jin-J 

orcicss'cra: M-vr:es -r-.s-narianalnr 

‘V C" TiZCJ -* f-.5.n©iS 

ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTEES 

lrFeo'Fs*: Oiuc'is. 
l5KoN.lar. IM1ALS 
Tc- MZ-:?2S5?: 

r*. 

orlnacr. T»: > 7 u 222 tea 
F?f iT'.iSm !5t? 


BfiOKORARY 

C©NiSl.fl. 

General 

with cB its orhleg^s 
Outstanding oopert unify- 
for high pvo^le people. 

Only one genuine accreditation 
per country :TJSA 51 


Infer Finance Consult 
P.O. Box 2, CH-B262 Ramsen 
or Fax ++49-773 1 -22865 



NiveHes-Iftre (Brussels-Belgium) 

exceptionnal estate of 

"The CHATEAU-GOLF de la TOURNETTE" 

By recort cf £ tune K rrs fen-wn; r^i ?stz;e nas aean sold taucPcn 
sale Qv Notary Jtar-Paji 5S.Gf.OV -TTUE er Nrtarv James DUPOrrr tn 
BPUSSELS.. under me tuseenstve — narjon of 3Dsence or nig her Did: 

lot 1. "The Chateau-Golf de la Tournette" made 
of two 18 hole Golf Courses 

j :: £ 2 s r: r f. m z~-=-er: Z ma 

rt-s::r-«. — 2 -s-;- r. — :i-:. -. : . :*r_. :;'5‘ s.~c -,az~. fid&ii 

Sold for the price of 70,000,000 BEF. 

lot 2. Iffre: parcel of land - crossing of the rue 
de Baudemont and rue de la Tournette". 

t:o • i : s* :r : :s ::: j 3 : ' 2 Erra • 

Sold for the price of 850,000 BEF. 

lot 3. set of Equipements immovable by 
destination and assigned to the maintenance 
and the running of the Golf (list to be obtained 
at the Notaire's offices) 

Sold for the prhe of 1 , 100,000 BEF. 

jrranc3rr~-:.*:..r-r-:_'s 2 ','5 "-za-crarrcftns or? 

to-iff. =a'- ::rs • =:'i~ ■ c?sr-:e aarvruipjre :or.e vmn 

•.aatii : J z-z L;r:.-^-e zzr; occusaucn. moumes 

2 : me Near* j 

Bank guaranrr cf 5C.c:c 2CC 5EF :: :? craai^ec at the moment of Higher WL 

=cr visits: a.- acacrare": :r . • j e,-,- ;= iTmipcier r.oan3i - 

rn.n ^ Tt 

Art 1SS2 SElgian Procedure taae. each cerson has the right to make a 
higher t«l within is ca/s cf me sale 

For information, 

Notaire Jean-Foul MIGN0N • Phone 32/67/64.84.19 - 
Fax: 32/67/64.81.26 

Notaire Jales DUPONT - Phone: 32/2/513.89.55 - Fax: 
32/2/513.97.18 


PUBLIC AUCTION - ON SITE - Avenue de la Cooptation In LOUDUN ~ 

THURSDAY , JUNE 23 1994 at 3 iOO PM. 7 
Foilwing compulsory Bquktatton ol COPRO VAL. CHAMPf-OwON , '.i 
and CERCLE DU POITOU 

MUSHROOM CANNERY 

Main ITEMS 

2 7URRATI irtmrtang tries. eaOt ircHlSng stainless washing vd ' 

wftnaaion tattles, one hawteg 2 TURATTl TAS 20 1 5i05 trtwrwo and 1 
TURATT1 TA8 20 B6/1 IS tnmnros. Bitd tfe other hawteg 2 TURATT1 
TASU 15745 trimmers one TURATTl TASU 20Q5tcmmers. hotel scrap 
separaUK . STARTMG PRICE - FF 50 SOO 

STORK pome-qtraWy csBaration Una, including elevator, com screen-sorter and lAber^ 
conveyor bell . STAHTWC PRICE : F.F. 20000. 

STORK double sleepngfcookinp fino. tnduOng m anprop^emvw witfi _ - 
etevaior. steeper with tub. Impregnation lank, *KrfV rawy oooking aspeuabn and coote*. 
cortml cabmel common to bodi m d ortic a l 6nes : 

STARTING PRICE : F.F. 2 500 000 - PnmequaBy ea&ration un» : ’ 
STARTING PRICE : F.F. 40 000. Hexed cattrahon and TURATTl sScw : 
STARTING rPOCE : F.F. 5 000 

4.0001 cookor. sCcct wijh cooing system - Three type 1.351 650 dm3 . 
STEFBFLOW BAHRIQUAND BURxdavm with nrfntrwn cons* cabinet. 
insiaVed 1 985. onte type - 1.351 500 On3 aotadavs. IristaSed TS9Q. Juice uni FRiCO : 
FRANCE GRENCO freeser- Cannhg Snes -«5 can-sae. 

4T4 sfae. ta size -2 column devalora equlped wtt v&ratffTg boo* *wdare, . 

2 BtMARK etevators for stamp vats. 4 TLB4RAT1 vtvsOon. tEbtes, mesl . 
detector. 2 FEMIA Iype-F73fi1 canning units. 2ZJLU and BELUM 3T30 
and 30130 ladle type canning unils, 3 gas prehealers, steam prohecteer. 
BAFIRIOUAND cralmg laWe. cralmg irfA. 2 type-404 head ANGELUS ’ 
crimpers. B-row name stenfirer 

Paiietsrfig ■ Pallet type conveyers FEREM8AL accrotuilatan tables. SMART paEettziera. 

Bamquand decreter FEREMBALS Sffli 4i4._ . 

V? depaneicers. revolving tables, emotycan conveyors - a tehe&ng enes revolving •jiWbs'. 
DUVIVIER labeling machine. DUVMER tx>«-packmg machine: SOLO 
GEPAC and SEPACK box closure uiws. SERVIN taatfeig ureL bar-code 
tabefaj machnes AL PACK. SERVIN and OUEST CONDtRONNSMENT - - 
hght - packmg machme - STEAM9LOC bodere. camrressws. etc 

Futt intofmaUroi and detailed fats avafcte at tha otBee. RSIS VIEWABLE 
on aha In LoudOn : Wed 22nd 2.-00- 8.-0Opm and Thu. 10:00- 12.-00 
am. The following days : auction of office oqtApamanL tools, 

H4M7LNG EQUPEMEN7 

Maine fsabeffe CHEVALIER Comm. Pnseur Aucmmer - HOTEL dm VENTES ' 
22, bd du Grand-Ced B6000 POITIERS - FRANCE 

Tel : (331 49 37.80 82 - Fax 153) a9.37.i33s ' ' 


r- RHINEIIECK, NY - 
PRIME CORNER LOCATION 
7.5 VACANT ACHES 

95 mites Bonh of N.Y.C. ai imerceetkw of 
Highways 9 & 9G. Price upon request. 

Pirate repli ir Bo* IX-llS 
c/a International Herald Tribune 
S30 Third Avenue. 3th Floor 
New York. NY 1P0 22 USA 


OFFSHORE WORLDWIDE 
Ready made companies (shells) 

• full management 

• address services 

Fm f m t ar t 

INTERCOMPANY MANAGEMENT 
P.O. Be* 1 60 . 9493 Manren 
Y 5 I 5 , Licdncnstctn 
TT 9 Fax: 41-75-373 4062 
IL «r if:9 


YOU SAW THIS AD. 

So did uearty lull a rnfflioo potential 
invesuxs worldwide looking for new 
investment opport u nities. 
ShouUn V you place 
your brarnas message in lire 

CNTERNATfONAL HERALD TMBIINP 


CITIZENSHIP 


lax Tree, English speaking Cninmon- 
wealth county (not Antigua). Principals 
or their lawyers only, place ronlart: 

Maritime International Ltd. 
F.O. Box 1302. 43C Reddiffe Street, 
St John's Antigua, West Indies. 
Fax: (809) 452-2718. 


PAN EUROPEAN 
HOTEL SALE 

Hotels with and without management contracts 



Boarding Scfioof 

Womaiufy Chateau . 109 + bti 
10 classrooms, gym. chapetr . 
10 acres. £260000. . ■ 

Tel.: U.K. 71 259 2772 


ESCORTS & 


S||ir 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


NEW VKXEI* Escort Sarvka 
ZURICH ’ PARE 
Credit crodi neeapted. 

Fer ZUKH «* 577 / 83 83 XL 
ORiar city Did mil +35-2-494297 


BELGRAVIA 
ORCHIDS 

LOM)ON PARS ESCMTAGGNCY 
CRHRT CARDS ACCEPTED 

UK 071 589 5237 London Brazilian Escort 

Sen** 071 724 5597/91 - credit ctutfe 


exoutsnt escorts senna 
LoraoN <pi 935 453i'08eo r^us 


MILAN - MIA ESCORT A GUBX 

sama 865439 ok 0330234392 


LllLvrH 


GENEVA AU1ANCE •• 
hart Sflnn and Travel. MuMnaual 
Tet 022 / 311 07 24. 


UNITED KINGDOM 

* THE CARLTON HOTEL 
Bournemouth - 70 rooms. 

* MIRAMAR HOTEL 

Bournemouth - 1’,9 hkuds. 

* THE MARINE HOTEL 

Snlannbe - 5 1 moms. 

* HOLIDAY INN 
Cambridge - 109 mums, 
city centre. 

* RAMADA HOTEL 
Reading - 196 ronm>. 
town centre. 


tS33SM£j 

■ifl 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 
Sena ■ WorkMe 
M 212-765^896 New York, USA 
Major Craft Cxair AaxfSed 


ANGBS OF SWITZBUAND 

Estort ServrCE 

Zurich Bote, Bams, Lur*m«, 
Gmm, louMin*. ate. 
177/43 48 47 er 077/43 46 7( 


FACE IRC 

WORUWflDE ESCORT AGMCY 

TH.- UK 081 694 XSQ[6l NESf* 
RL iJX 0956 371159 


PEACHK 

(OMXM ESCORT SERVICE 
(71 938 2641 


CHBSEA ESCORT 5BWCE 
51 BeajdxiiBRQW. London SWi 
Tel 584 6513 


GENEVA*PARIS 

prtfiy Woman Eseon Serace 321 99 trl 


■'iirti.-lili.L’Trr : 










SPAIN 

i k TORREgUEBRADA 
HOTEL & CASINO 
C'i>n Del Sol - 350 rooms, 
casino with Irccncc and 
convention centre. 

★ HOTEL EL RODEO 
Marbclln - 100 rooms, 
centre of MarbeUa. 

★ CORRAL EJO GARDENS 
HOTEL 

Canary Islands - 124 unils. 
aparthotel In FUerteve nliir a, 

★ LA MARQHESA GOLF CLUB 
AND DEVELOPMENT LAND 

I S hole coH course and club 
house. Ivilcl slle and resident la] 
derclopmcnl land. 


PORTUGAL 

* HOTEL MONTE MURO 
Castro Dalre - SO rooms, 
ncvrtv built. 


FRANCE 

* GARDEN BEACH 
HOTEL 

• luan les Fins. Ciile 
d'A/.ur - 174 rooms, 
beachfront Itulel. 


,T - 3OT ^ \'i i re. ■ 1 :i 1 ,-v : tj 


fca " i ' ■ 






ly. ' I ’ l. 'ITT rt.V 


Ir LA MARQHESA GOLF CLUB AUSTRIA 
AND DEVELOPMENT LAND * HOTEL HOPFGARTEN 
INTERNATIONAL JS hole coif course and club Sitzbufael Alps 

Blrmingfium - I'Jl rooms. house Iv.le) slip and residential 33 rtoms - ski and 

city centre. dcvclopmcni land. summer resort. 

Sealed bids due July 28th 1994 
For further lnlomiaUon und n free property caLdogue No. 6019 


FAX: 44 (Oj 81 665 5641 

Sending -our name, company; ^ 'address-aiid t-rltihonc number 


BROKER COOPERATION 

1YF7 FAILED INPOf^MATION PACKAGES AVAILABLE 



Fob- investment information 


Read THE MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday in the IHT 


KENNEDY-W I L S O N 


■ • — rr 


GBEV A - PARS 

I • • • • • GtAMOUR • ••• • 
Emrt aqctitY 3*6 00 89 Cm£f eanlt 


INTERNATIONAL 

REAL F S TAT h MARKETING AND 
INVESTMENT HANKING SERVICES 
5 Princes Gate. KniMhL^];.rld^e. London SWT IQJ T el- 44 tm hi cc 
mmcp STAITlS . = KINGDOM • AUSTRAUA . Hl »r. Kog- EUROP, 


telecommunications 




INTERNATIONAL 
PHONE CALLS ' 

Now you can call the lLS. 
and save as much as 65%. 
compared to local pbxn6. 
companies. Save up to SQfc 
off the major Credit Cast 
DIRECT services. ^ 
Pay less than U.S. rates on 
overseas calls. - - ~v 
Call from hotels, home dr v 
office. Itemized billing* - 


Ai 




COMMERCIAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 
REAL ESTATE;: 

appears every . ; 
WEDNESDAY:^ v 

To place and adverfee®?^ 
please contact ywr aeai«f 
LH.T. office ra*’ 
representative orcaliPiufe 

Fred Ronan: 

Tel.: to7.93it : ? 
Fax: 4637^3.70^ 


1 Crf*»S»J 






































vr* 0 **, 

ADQgg. 


*“<SSV5IP^ 


'- •_■-■ -."J ' 




'■?»*•*'-. M f v > 


N=V* 

?? J?*? IN PARIS 


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Woodstock II: 
Dylan’s Turn? 


International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday , June 15, 1994 
Page 9 



By Jacques Steinberg 

New ") ork Times Service 


N ew \ ork — Two 

months before the 
Woodstock aiver-aaoi- 
versaiy festival in Sau- 
gerties. New York, the concert’s 
promoters have announced their 
lineup of performers. 

The eclectic list runs from the 
Woodstock alum Joe Cocker to the 
heavy-metal band Metallica, Trout 
the 62-year-old Johnny Cash to the 
rap group Cypress Hill, whose lead 
singer wasn’t even bom when the 
original festival took place. 

The promoters also said that Bob 
Dylan, who missed the first festi- 
val, was planning to be there this 
time around. Dylan’s generation is 
represented elsewhere on the roster 
of Woodstock *94: Santana and 
Crosby, Stills and Nash, both at the 
first Woodstock, are also scheduled 
to perform. 

But this Woodstock is being 
heavijy marketed toward teenagers 
and twen tysome things. The show, 
scheduled for Aug. 13 and 14, will 
be dominated bv acts that came of 
age long after 1969, including Nine 
Inch Nails. Arrested Development, 
Red Hot Chfli Peppers, Porno for 
Pyros and Spin Doctors. Other per- 
formers wffl include Aerosmith, Pe- 
ter Gabriel Melissa Etheridge, the 
Allman Brothers Band, the Neville 
Brothers and Timmy Cliff. 

The promoters — Mike Lang, 
John Roberts and Jod Rosenman 
Of Woodstock Ventures — also an- 
nounced an elaborate plan to sell 
all tickets in advance, by telephone, 
and to transport most coocertgoers 
to and from the festival site by an 
armada of buses. 

The original organizers, who are 
promoting Woodstock *94 in part- 
nership with the giant entertain- 
ment company Polygram, said they 
hoped to avoid the logistical ?n a gs 
of the first festival Ultimately, 
most of the 500,000 or so people 


who showed up were allowed in 
free because ticket sellers could not 
handle the crush. 

While the listed ticket price of 
the original Woodstock was 518 a 
person for “three days of pease and 
music,'' this one will charge each ' 
concertgoer 5135 for “two more 
days of peace and music ” 

But the promoters contend that 
the price is a bargain compared with 
the top tickets for recast concerts by 
Barbra Streisand, whose New York 
concern were priced at $350 for the 
best seats, ana the Eagles, who have 
fetched more than SI 00 in some 
cities on that current tour. 

T HE promoters have ex- 
clusive rights to the fam- 
ous name. But they were 
unsuccessful in their bid 
to stage Woodstock "94 on the origi- 
nal site, Max Yasgur’s farm in 
Bethel, 50 miles (80 kilometers) 
souihwesL Another promoter, Sd 
Bernstein, is trying to develop his 
own festival. Bethel *94, on the Ya&- 
gur farm for the same weekend, but 
his effort has been slowed by local 
officials’ questions about his finan- 
cial backing. (There have also been 
rumblings erf yet another festival 
called Freedomfest *94, that report- 
edly would be free and held near the 
original site.) 

To encourage coocertgoers to use 
mass transit to Saugerlies, the first 


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New Life for Dying Swan 

In Australia, Meryl Tankard Ignites Dance Revival 


By David Galloway 


Tankard got a grant to stay on for 
two weeks and look at the work of 


W 


i -v-X ••• 


UPPERTAL. Ger- va ^ European companje^ 
many — On the When she amved m Wuppenal. 
morning after Paul f* kft at the train srn- 

Kea tine's victorv in vm * utienmng to move cw after the 
performance. Then she met a fellow 


last year' s Australian national dec- 


AusmiliamamembaoftheBausch 

family struck a relaxed pose for tar J?-!!? y 

photographers. The P.M.’Uaugh- ^ ™ 

ters both sported T-shirts prompt- monung. when she 

mg the Adelaide-based Australian vaM , 

Dmk* Theatre, of which thrir the Wuppertal^ Dance ^ter 


mother is an energetic patron. was rebcarsmg “Macbeth,’’ Pina 
Yet there wasSoreEaS simple 
boosterism involved. Even before 
thrry won their own political celeb- W "2? r£i 
rity. the Keatings £rc dedicated Jfg "SjKi *£ 
fans of the dancer-choreographer EFL'fL 
Meryl Tankard, who earlylast year 
became the fourth artistic director from Bai 

of die ADT in its 25-year history, dlunonary production of 
Id recent seasons the company 
had seemed to be limping toward " 

box-office oblivion, and Tankard ^ Qn J 

thought twice about abandoning dliu 

her own small but innovative hyiam* Tanl-a, 
troupe in Canberra to revive Ade- Ullage* 1 ctllKH j 
laide’s dying swan. Then, with der- m ictr^cs nf tin 
vish-like energy, she recruited 10 . CIJt 

new dancers, evolved a repertoire fiorpni/mifoitc 
and forged a high-flying ensemble. ™Uipu OUi % 

And fly they did, in the first major 

work Tankard choreographed for r , 

Adelaide, with tbe^ncm sus- ■ &istL 

pended from ropes above the stage, n ? fcr 10 

arching and twisting in furious pat- * , ^ en 1 Bausc j] 

terns ficoncervablem the gra^- ^. Thn f raon ? 

bound realms of classical dance. ter negotjating, a leave of ; 

“Furioso" confinned Tankard’s Tankard was bac 

repuiatioo as Australia’s leading -“"wngat tbe ver 

conlemporarY cboreographa - . and ^ l ^ en be ® an V> «» 
it brought h« a gracing shower mlernauonalreputanon 

of awards. An mutation w partici- woHcs f ^ mos ; e 

pate in Germany's International ?“ tfac . ba ° s of ^ 

Dance Festival swm foUowed. unprovisauons, which si 


with charier bus tickets from 30 East 
Coast cities, including New York, 
Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore and 
Ri chmond, Virginia, the promoters 
$akL The tickets, which vnB include 
an as yet undetermined fare for bus 
travel were to go on sale Wednes- 
day through Ticketnoster. 

Tickets for those traveling by car 
are tentatively scheduled to go on 
sale on June 26, also through Tick- 
etmaster. No cars will be permitted 
near the site, the promoters said, 
but shuttle buses to the concert util] 
be provided from 17 parking lots 
across the Hudson Valley. 




of being surmised. “Then she said. 
‘Get faster! raster!' And 1 did!" 

Later that day. Tankard took 
part in a classical exercise class. 
Then she was asked to try some of 
the movements from Bausch’s rev- 
olutionary production of “Le Sarre 


In idiom and 
image * Tankard is a 
mistress of the 


-m n 




T HE choreographer has 
recently presented three 
of her works, including a 
bravura solo piece enti- 
tled "Two Feet." as part of a dance 
jubilee exploring modern idioms, 
“From Isadora to Pina." For 37- 
y ear-old Meryl Tankard, who from 
1978 to 1984 was a principal per- 
former with Pina Bausdi's Wup- 
pertal Dance Theater, it was a tri- 
umphant homecoming. 

Running, jumping or standing 
still Tankard’s mercurial presence 
riveted an audience's attention. 
Within seconds she metamorphosed 
from waif to harridan, from victim 
to victimizer. from diva to dumb- 
bell. She could radiate a fragile, clas- 
sic beauty or a Minnie Mouse perki- 
ness. Following a performance in 
Rome, FeUtni came backstage to 
compliment her acting skills, and 


A fter six years with Pina Bauseh. Meryl Tankard returned to her balletic origins. 


Sobol’s Very German Tale of the Holocaust 


D USSELDORF — The Israeli playwright Josh- 
ua Sobol's works are much performed in Ger- 
many. His approach to the Holocaust, an 
ironic and shocking mixture of entertainment 
and horror, has pedaps made more accessible for many 
Germans a history whose treatments are often drenched 

with morality, .. _ 1 

His latest play, “Sditoer Tom” (Handsome Tom), tells ; 
a very German story: Three generations of German Jews 
are forced to deal with Germany and its 20th-century 
history — three generations of false assumptions about 
the duties of the state toward them. 

The play is based an fact Martin Fmkdjpnen. respect- 
able businessman and decorated veteran of tbe Goman 
Army, escaped from Nazi Germany to Karlsbad, Czecho- 
slovakia; when the Germans marched into the Sudetenland, 
he moved cm to Prague. When they marched into league, be 
was taken to the^ Thexeaenstadt concentration camp, where 
he was kOksi His son Hans escaped from Prague; Iwt failed 
to reach the United States and ended op in Shanghai where 
he died in the Jewish ghetto set up by the Japanese occupi- 
ers. His son Peter returned to Germany and became a 
journalist. When he discovered the name of his grandfa- 
ther's mmderer in 1988, he tried to get the Goman prosecu- 
tor to being charges, but “it was not deemed to be in the 
stale's interest" to fdlow up the case any further. 

Peter Fmkelgruen’s bode “Haus Deutschland,” on 
which the play is based, interweaves the stories of Martin, 
Hans and Peter, together with the detective story of how 
Peter researched the murder. In the play, the focus is 


By Michael Lawton 


ua Sobol's works are much performed in Ger- 
many. IBs approach to the Holocaust, an 


narrowed to Prague on the one hand and the hunt for 
justice on tbe other. And another story emerges: the story 
of the three non-Jewish women who accompany the thro; 
Jewish men through their sufferings. Martin’s wife. Anna, 
is imprisoned at Auschwitz but survives: Hans's wife, Esu. 
follows her husband to Shanghai and returns after his 
death a physically and emotionally broken woman, and 
Peter's wife: Genrud, supports him as. with increasing 
obsession, be beals against the wall of couon barring that 
"{feces him' as he tries to win justice.- ’ 

Justice would seem easy to achieve — Peter has done all 
the work: He’s gathered witnesses, he’s researched the 
prosecutor’s own files to discover that the state already 
knew in 1979 that tbe SS man Anton Mafloih killed “an 
old Jew” in Tberesienstadt in 1941 But nothing happens. 

Sobol enacts this “nothing" by repeatedly returning to 
Mafloth’s interrogation by the public prosecutor. Malloth 
is in the hospital and the public prosecutor is a friendly 
young fellow; be sits beside the invalid, patiently asking 
one question after another, clearly not wanting to bother 
the pom dd man more than necessary. That the answers 
say nothing doesn’t seem to worry him. Malloth falls 
asleep from time to time; there are long silences. 

MaJloth’s story is one of uprootedness. He was bora in 
South Tirol; changing borders in Europe had made him in 
turn Austrian, Italian, German, once more Italian, and 
then German again. Finally be^ was extradited to Germany 
from Italy. For Iran, returning to Germany is a homecom- 
ing, although he has scarcely ever lived here. .And unlike 
the Fmkdgruens. Maflotb (played by Rudolf Brand with a 
mixture of frail bravado and cunning stupidity) enjoys the 
full protection of the state, from which, as a citizen, he 


cannot be extradited to Czechoslovakia. When he arrives 
in handcuffs, he’sjust an old man. insecure as to how he’ll 
be received; by the end. he is able to wear his SS uniform 
once more. 

The production by Bnmo Klimek at tbe Schauspiel 
Dusseldorf brings out the emotion and the commitment 
that link tbe three generations of Fmkelgruens even across 
the boundaries of death. But the addition of an Eastern 
European Jewish element to their characterization is mis- 
leading. When non-Jewish Anna first appears singing a 
Yiddish song, it tells us nothing about her. and nothing 
about the thoroughly German Jewish family she has mar- 
ried inta The production assumes that Jews have to fulfill 
cmain exotic stereotypes that have nothing to do with the 
tragedy of the Fmkdgruens: There was nothing foreign 
about them. 

Nevertheless, the play remains a powerful work, with a 
strong political message about the willingness of Germa- 
ny’s judicial system to confront its Nazi past. While the 
Fmkdgruens are denied justice by their homeland. MaJ- 
loth finds his homeland offers him a safe womb to return 
to at the end of a long life. 

The real Malloth is still alive: every now and again, the 
old man can be seen walking with his stick in a suburb of 
Munich. But The justice minister of the state of Nonh- 
Rhine-Westphalia has reopened the case. 

There are further performances on Saturday. Sunday 
and June 23 and 24. The production will return on Sept. 24. 

Michael Lawton is a free-lance writer based in Germanv. 


du Prin temps” — “gestures I bad 
□ever made before in my life. And 
when 1 finished, Bauseh said. ‘1U 
take you.’ ” Three months later, af- 
ter negotiating a leave of absence in 
Sydney, Tankard was back in Wup- 
pertal arriving at tbe very moment 
when Bauseh began to establish an 
international reputation 

Bauseh works almost exclusively 
on the basis of her dancers' free 
improvisations, which she shapes 
and contextualizes. As Tankard's 
own self-confidence grew, she con- 
tributed more and more to the store 
of raw materials from which new 
works evolved. The two were ideal- 
ly matched: Bausch's Teutonic in- 
trospection and Tankard’s irre- 
pressible energy, her chutzpah. 
With 1980, one of die most success- 
ful Wuppertal productions. Tan- 
kard’s input was so substantial that 
the piece might almost be seen as a 
collaboration. 

The dancer's monologues about 
travel, mountains and wide-open 
spaces seem in retrospect to docu- 
ment a homesickness for Australia 
of which she was unaware at the 
time. 

Before leaving the Wuppertal 
Dance Theater, Tankard collabo- 
rated on one further piece, 
“Walzer,” in which her vignette of 
a hysterica] housewife demonstrat- 
ing the virtues of various fly-killing 


compliment her acting skills, and rngtne virtues of various Uy- killing 
“Sydney on the Wupper,” one of devices amounted to a one-woman 
two films in which she starred while sbow in miniature. It regularly 
living in Germany, won gold at the brought the house down. 

Beriin Film Festival Reflecting on When the Bauseh company did 


joined ibem in Los Angeles, to open 
the cultural program for the Olym- 
pic Games. Her one- woman show, 
“Traveling Light." was meanwhile 
featured at both the Edinburgh and 
Spoleto festivals, and she choreo- 
graphed “Death in Venice” for the 
Australian Opera Company. Then, 
after nearly a decade of free-lancing. 
Tankard became director of her own 
company in Canberra. In four short 
years, she seemed to pour her collec- 
tive experience in to 10 major works. 

For “Songs of Mara.” which may 
well be her most powerful work to 
date, she created a sensuous, archa- 
ic choreography to traditional Ro- 
manian songs of mourning and cel- 
ebration performed by Mara Kiek. 
The real surprise of the piece is that 
the dancers all sing, as well in the 
resonant, open-throat style that 
Kiek taught them. 

In her hunger for idiom and im- 
age, Tankard has become a mis- 
tress of the serendipitous. An exhi- 
bition of Egyptian art or Celtic 
jewelry, a collection of 19tb-ceatu- 
ry dolls, a fragment of Australian 
history: All become grist for the 
creative mill Together with the 
French-born photographer Rtgis 
t ansae. Tankard also continues to 
explore new staging techniques. 

Next month, rehearsals begin for 
a postmodern adaptation of “Sleep- 
ing Beauty," for which tbe company 
will learn to tap-dance. “1 want that 
piece to express joy,” Tankard says, 
“and in afl my work as a dancer that 
was never an objective. There al- 
ways had to be a reason to dance, 
and tbe training I had was lull of 
pain, denial, obstacles. At ballet 
school I used to get fined 20 cents if 
a strand of hair slipped out of my 
chignon. For this ‘Sleeping Beauty' I 
want a beautiful pastel set, with 
bluebirds flying overhead, and the 
dance sequences will be gifts of love 
for the lonely, sleeping princess." 

There is little danger that Tchai- 
kovsky would recognize Tankard's 
reworking of the classic material 
even less danger that she will sub- 
mit her troupe to the toe-sboed 
tortures she dramatizes in “Two 
Feet” Yet it is no coincidence that 
she is remraing now. at the peak of 
her career, to her own balletic ori- 
gins. Perhaps, after all she had to 
reject conventional notions of 
dance in order to reinvent them. 

David Galloway is an an critic 
and free-lance curator based in 
Wuppenal, Germany. 


cfjhenaton 


tbe period of her work with Bauseh. guest performances in Sydney in 
Tankard sums it up with a single 1983, Tankard realized her own 


word: “Miraculous!" 

Before joining the W uppertal en- 


y earning for “the fresh, original en- 
agy erf Australia — the openness 


semble. Tankard had pursued a and also the vulnerability ." A year 
classical on-your-toes career, which later, she returned to choreograph 
she parodies in “Two Fed.” Bom “Echo Point, " in which she tried to 
in Darwin, she started dance les- summarize those feelings in a col- 
sons at the age of 8. after her hyper- lage-tike work that persuaded her 
active antics had repeatedly that dancing alone would never sat- 
prompted her mother’s friends to isfy her creative drive. Determined 
intone ominously. “If you don’t to strike out on her own, she took 
take this child to dance class- whatever work came along, 
es . . . ." Tankard double-timed After the self-consciousness and 
through high school completing overseriousness of the German cul- 
her diploma at 16, meanwhile tural scene. Tankard reveled in the 
squeezing a six-year ballet course irreverent humor and anything- 
into six months. Then, as a member goes mentality she encountered m 
of the chorus of the Sydney Ballet, Aostralia. 


rite often found herself wondering 
what the fuss bad been all about 


While shaping a new career. Tan- 
kard regularly returned to Europe 


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* * 



International Herald Tribune ; Wednesday, June 15, 1994 


Page 11 



THE TRIB INDEX: 112.6401 

120 ■ 



J F 
1999 

World Index 

The ktdnx hacks U.S. dollar rates of stocks In: Tokyo, New York, London, and 
Argmntoa, AintmBa. Austria. Belgium, Brazil, Canada, CMe, Denmark, Finland, 
Frame, Gennany, Hong Kong, My. Moxfco. Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland end Venezuela. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, the index ts composed of the 20 fop Issues In terms of market caodaffraten. 
otherwise me ten top stocks are tracked. 


1 Sectors- 1 


Tot Prev. * 


Tl*. 

PlVV. 

% 


dott dote ctaogt 


cbm 

dw 

dm* 

Energy 

110.75 mSS 40.66 

Capita! Goods 

11422 

115.46 

-0.47 

UtfflfeB 

11928 11956 -023 

Rnltatatab 

125.62 

126.64 

-021 

Finance 

117-85 11825 -034 

Consumer Goods 

9820 

9749 

40.73 

Services 

11732 117.41 40.09 

Hbcetonsoui 

123.78 

123.57 

40.18 

For more information about the index, a booklet & available free of charae. 


W«e to T* Index. 181 /venue Charles de Gaufe; 92527 NeuttyCedta. fiance. 


© International Herald Tribune 


EU Sees 
Hope for 
Steel Plan 

Italian Closures 
May Receive Aid 

By Tom BuerkJe 

hucmanona/ Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission’s restructuring plan 
Tor the steel industry, declared 
dead by die plan’s chief architect 
last month, is on the verge of win- 
ning a new lease on life, commis- 
sion officials said Tuesday. 

Industry Commissioner Martin 
B&ngemann and Competition 
Commissioner Karel Van Miert 
will urge the full 17-member Euro- 
pean Union executive body on 
Wednesday to bend its rules on 
sled subsidies to allow the Italian 
government to give private pro- 
ducers 4 IS milli on European cur- 
rency units (5481 million) to fi- 
nance plant shutdowns, officials 
said. 

“We have to have a flexible in- 
terpretation of the steel code on 
subsidies,’* one commission offi- 
cial said. 

The Italian cuts are essentia] to 
the plan, amounting to nearly a 
third of the overall capacity- re- 
duction goal of 19 million tons, 
and aides to the two commission- 
ers expressed optimism that the 
commission would approve the 
subsidies. 

Mr. Van Miert declared the plan 
dead four weeks ago after the com- 
mission rejected Italy’s subsidy re- 
quest. 

Sir Leon Britton, the trade com- 
missioner, argued that the subsidies 
would break EU law by financing 
partial company shutdowns and 
could trigger new dumping com- 
plaints by U.S. steelmakers. 

The aides said several factors 
pointed to a reversal. Officials say 
they have tightened legal require- 
ments to make sure Italian produc- 
ers definitively scrap plants rather 
than selling them elsewhere in Eu- 
rope and to ensure that do state aid 
wul be diverted to subsidize other 
sted facilities. 

About half of the 415 million 
Ecus of aid is earmarked for com- 
panies that plan to shut only part of 

See STEEL, Page 13 


Delta Clips Global Wings 

European Flights and Airbuses Are Cut 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ATLANTA — Delia Air Lines said Tuesday it 
would cut back its service across the Atlantic and 
remove 13 Airbus A-310 aircraft from its fleet in 
an effort to trim expenses and return the company 
to profitability. 

The move win leave Delta, the third-largest carri- 
er in the IXS., without any Airbus planes. Analysis 
said the cuts would generate major savings, blit it 
amounted to a failure by Delta m Europe. 

Delta had little visibility in the European market 
before it bought Pan American's extensive net- 
work in 1991. Then, recession and industry overca- 
pacity produced huge losses. 

The changes are part of Delta's goal of lowering 
operating costs by about 52 billion by the end of 
the June 1997 quarter. 

“They’ve done this several times," said Nick 
Heymann, an aerospace analyst at NatWesi Secu- 
rities in New York, referring to the route reduc- 
tions. He said Delta was essentially giving up. 

Mr. Heynmnn said the "mantle of being the 
largest U.S. carrier to Europe” had been a tremen- 
dous burden, partly because Della bad bought the 
routes just when European economies became 
mired in recession. 

Delta contended that its European strategy was 
headed for success. “We are on track in our pro- 
gram to make the trans-Atlantic operation profit- 
able," said Ronald Allen, Delta’s chairman. “Our 
costs are coming down, and bookings for the next 
several months indicate continued load factor im- 
provements over last year." 

Hie cuts in service are the latest for Delta this 
year on European service and will trim by 2 1 percent 
the number of weekly trans-Atlantic nights. 

On Monday, the Atlanta-based airline said it 
would cut 2*500 technical jobs, pan of a plan to 
slash as many as 15,000. 

Delta said Tuesday it would discontinue service 
to Oslo and Stockholm in September and would 


shelve its Cincinnati-Miimch and Miami-London 
flights this autumn. 

Despite this. Delta said it still offered more ser- 
vice across the North Atlantic than any other U.S. 
carrier — 231 weekly flights to 34 destinations. 

Delta has advertised aggressively in Europe and 
made agreements with some European airlines io 
coordinate flights. It has purchased $150 million of 
seats on Virgin Atlantic Airways to get a toehold at 
Heathrow Airport in London. 

And yeL in the past three years. Delta has lost 
nearly SI 3 billion overall. The company does not 
break out European losses. Some analysts estimate 
. that 60 percent of Delta's losses could be attribut- 
ed to international routes. 

The carrier said it would ground four Airbus A- 
310-200 and nine Airbus A-310-300 aircraft. The 
timing of this move has not been decided. 

A Delta spokesman, Todd Clay, said the deci- 
sion to drop all Airbus planes was “purely eco- 
nomics. no politics.” 

A spokesman for Airbus said new buyers or 
lessors for the 13 planes would depend on the 
market- “There are some signs of traffic improving 
in various markets, including the U.S.." he said. 
“We certainly do see continuing long-term de- 
mand for planes of this size.” 

The A-310 typically seats 220 passengers. The 
planes are comparable in size and range to Boeing 
767 s. Airbus, based in Toulouse, France, is the 
world’s second-largest producer of large civilian 
aircraft after Boeing. 

The Airbus partners are France's Aerospatiale 
SA. British Aerospace PLC; Deutsche Aerospace 
Airbus, a unit of Germany's Daimler-Benz AG, 
and Spain’s Construed ernes AeronAuticas SA. 

Delta said despite die 21 percent fewer weekly 
trans-Atlantic flights, it would maintain “service 

See DELTA, Page 12 


Markets Cheer 
Modest Rise in 
U.S. Inflation 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Americans’ 
cost of tiring rose by a modest 0.2 
percent in May. restrained by rail- 
ing gasoline prices and the largest 
drop in airline fares in a quarter 
century, the Labor Department 
said Tuesday. 

The core rate of the consumer 
price index, excluding volatile food 
and energy costs, increased a mod- 
erate 03 percent, a further sign that 
inflation remained under control. 

The news buoyed the bond mar- 
kets. which had been jarred on 
Monday by sign $ of inflation in 
Europe, and boosted share prices. 
The yield on the benchmark 30- 
year U.S. Treasury bond sank to 
730 percent on Tuesday from 7.35 
percent on Monday, while Europe- 
an bond markets also recovered 
lost ground. 

U.S. Treasury Secretary Lloyd 
Bensen said be expected inflation 
this year to be below 3 percent 
despite lingering inflation fears in 
financial markets. 

“Rising rates are a wony if they 
threaten to choke off investment, 
but I don’t see that at this level," 
which is still low by historical stan- 
dards, Mr. Bentsen said in the pre- 
pared text of remarks to be deliv- 
ered to a businessmen's conference. 

The Labor Department said that 
the consumer price index had risen 
at an annual rate of 23 percent, 
compared with a rise of 3.2 percent 


for the first five months of 1993 
and 2.7 percent for all of last year. 

In another sign that the economy 
was not overheating, the Com- 
merce Department said retail sales 
declined 02 percent in May as car 
sales slumped for the second con- 
secutive month. 

The report was in line with econ- 
omists* expectations. A shortage of 
new models at car dealers held sales 
back during the month, they said 

The Labor Department also re- 
ported Tuesday that average week- 
ly earnings, adjusted for inflation, 
increased 1 percent in May, tile 
biggest rise since January. They 
had risen by 0.4 percent in April. 

The consumer price report indi- 
cates “inflation is still tomorrow’s 
problem and not today’s." said 
Robert Ded crick, chief economist 
at Northern Trust in Chicago. 
“There's just the slightest him" of a 
faster inflation rate in the statistics. 

Mr. Dederick said, citing higher 
clothing and medical costs. 

“It’s as expected and it looks like 
a good number.” said John Silvia, 
chief economist at Kemper Finan- 
cial Services. “This has to be a 
positive for bonds because ii 
doesn't give the big negative factor 
some were looking for.” 

“Inflation is pleasantly low in 
this phase of the business cycle.” 

See INFLATION, Page 12 _ 


Met Life and Travelers to Merge in Health Care 


By Michael Quint 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Co. and Travelers 
Inc. announced agreements Tues- 
day to merge their health care busi- 
nesses and for Met Life to buy 
Travelers’ group life and related 
businesses. 

The companies said the merger 
of their health care businesses 
would create America’s largest 
health care company, with about 1 3 
million customers. Although that 
business currently is spread thinly 


across the country, the companies 
hope that by combining their cus- 
tomers they can begin approaching 
in many markets the 15 percent 
share tnat other managed health 
care companies have needed to 
earn a good profit 

“This would create an entity that 
by its sheer size will be a strong 
player in many different markets," 
said Larry Mayewski, a senior vice 
president for A. M. Best & Co., an 
insurance rating firm. 

For Travelers, which has faced 
close scrutiny of its new manage- 


ment team since it was acquired by 
Primerica last year, the venture is a 
way to eventually leave the health 
care business. In negotiations with 
Met Life. Travelers executives have 
insisted on the right to sell their 
stock in the new company soon. 

The new venture will be owned 
equally by Met Life and Travelers. 
Met Life, which has more custom- 
ers and a more profitable business 
to contribute, win provide only 
S280 million of capital, while Trav- 
elers will contribute $370 million. 
Much of the Travelers contribution 


will come from selling Met Life its 
group insurance and related busi- 
nesses, such as disability insurance, 
for $350 million. 

A key dement in the business 
plan of the new company is the 

E h of the managed health care 
ess. 

The venture is the latest of several 
realignments in the health care busi- 
ness as companies seek partners that 
will improve their competitive posi- 
tion or abandon businesses where 
they lack size or expertise. 


■ 2 in Florida Sue Met Life 

Met Life was sued by two former 
heads of its southwest Florida re- 
gion, who allege they were fired so 
the company could conceal the ex- 
tent of a sales fraud, Bloomberg 
New Service reported from Tampa. 
Florida. 

Officials of Met Life declined to 
comment. 

The former regional managers, 
Dennis Schneider and William Lal- 
ta, charge the company with defa- 
mation and racketeering. 


MEDIA MARKETS 


Selling British Newspapers Like Soap 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Rupert Murdoch is 
again rewriting the rules of British 
newspaper publishing. Thirteen 
years after he look over the venera- 
ble Tunes and quickly crushed the once all- 
powerful newspaper unions, he has chal- 
lenged accepted wisdom again. 

This time Mr. Murdoch has thumbed bis 
nose at those who said that loyalty among 
readers could not be bought with price cots. 
He slashed the price of The Times and, to the 
horror of his rivals, has sat back and watched 
the newspaper’s circulation mushroom. 

“If you had asked me a year ago if such a 
thing woe posable, I would have said no" 


said David Owen, circulation director at the 
Guardian and Observer newspapers, one of 
Tour groups of daily and Sunday publications 
competing across Britain. 

it was one year ago that Mr. Murdoch's 
down-market tabloid the Son slashed its cov- 
er price from 25 to 20 pence (38 U5. cents to 
30 cents). At the time, observers wee qnick to 
point out that among the so-called labs, 
where reader loyalty has never been high, 
such a ploy just might work as long as the 
price difference could be maintained. 

For the newspapers collectively known as 
the “qualities,” however, the notion of a read- 
er of The Guardian, which is left of center. 
L defecting to the rightist Daily Telepraph for a 
savings of a few pence — or anything else for 
that matter — was nothing short of apostasy. 

- But in spite of the conventional wisdom, 
the ploy worked. Since The Times cut its 
price from 48 peace to 30 pence, B ritain ’s 
once-sk&Eest quality paper has seen its circu- 


lation not simply stop its long downtrend but 
jump. In May it stood at 517,575, up 42 
percent from a year earlier. 

While newspaper publishers around the 
world scrutinize Mr. Murdoch’s latest revolu- 
tion with a mixture of admiration and fore- 
boding, his British competitors have woken 
up to a harsh new world. 

The shift in their thinking was fully evident 
last month when the largest of the qualities. 


Mr. Mnrdoch thumbed 
his nose at those who said 
loyalty among readers 
could not be bought with 
price cuts. 


the Daily Telegraph, launched a price war of 
its own. It effectively slashed the price of its 
Sunday edition by nearly 20 percent by offer- 
ing readers coupons that enabled them to buy 
both weekend editions for £1. 

This time, others quickly followed suit 
While the qualities defensively bloody 
tbdr bottom lines with tit-for-tat price cats 
on the weekends, the cuts taken by the week- 
day editions of The Tunes sau on unan- 
swered. Mr. Owai of The Guardian acknowl- 
edged that Mr. Murdoch had proven that 
cutting prices could pay off but admitted he 
was loathe to follow suiL 
In fact, tiie Times's price cut is thought to 
be costing Mr. Murdoch’s News Internation- 


al £10 million a year in forgone revenue. That 
is not much, however, compared with the 
estimated £30 million to £40 million a year 
lost from the Sun’s price discount on what is 
now a circulation of 4 million copies, up a 
whopping 700,000 in a year. 

What worries the rivals of The Times is 
that the paper has been so successful in 
boosting droilation that higher advertising 
revenue could more than offset those sales 
losses, a bad omen for those hoping for an 
early truce in the pricing hostilities. 

Louise Barton, an analyst with Henderson 
Crosthwaite, said that while the economic 
recovery in Britain had boosted newspaper 
ad lineage by an average of 12 percent in 
April from a year earlier, The Times saw 
gains of two and a half times that average. 

While the price war has proven financially 
painful for all the quality newspapers, what 
has hurt even more is wliai it has boldly said 
about the supposed uniqueness of their offer- 
ings. Reader loyalty has been tested and 
found wanting. 

In part, some observers suggest that the 
current similarity between newspapers may 
merely reflect the fact that newspapers have 
become no less prey to trends and sudden 
shifts than any other consumer product 

A la s d air MacLeod, the marketing manager 
for Tunes Newspapers, for instance, com- 
pared the cost of the current price war with 
the current battle r aging in Europe between 
Unilever Group and Procter & Gamble Co. 
over high-performance laundry soap. 

“The provision of any consumer product is 
an expensive business,” he said. It was jusi 
that no one had dared to realize how much of 
a business it had become. 


CURRENCY A INTEREST RATES 


Crows Rates . 

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Eurocurrency Deposits 

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London official He- 


Banking Clients Have Always Expected 
Outstanding Personal Service. 
Today They Find It With Us. 



D uring the Renaissance, 
misted advisors helped 
administer the finances 
and protect the interests of private 
individuals. The role demanded 
judgment, commitment and skill. 

Today, clients find that same 
personal service at Republic 
National Bank. We believe that 
banking is more about people than 
numbers. Its about the shared val- 
ues and common ^oals that forge 
strong Kinds between banker and 


client. It’s also about building for 
the foture, keeping assets secure 
for the generations to come. 

This client focus has contrib- 
uted to our leading position in 
private banking. As a subsidiary 
of Safra Republic Holdings S.A. 
and an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part of 
a global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and more 
than US$50 billion in assets. 
These assets continue to grow 


substantially, a testament to the 
• group's strong balance sheets, risk- 
averse orientation and century-old 
heritage. 

All banks in the group are 
locally managed, attuned to the 
language and culture of their cus- 
tomers. They share a philosophy 
that emphasizes lasting relation- 
ships and mutual mist. Those 
values were once the foundation 
of banking. At Republic, they 
have been and always will be. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


A SAFRA BANK 

TIMELESS VALUES. TRADITIONAL STRENGTH. 


HUD office; GENEVA \20C2. PLACE DU LAC * TEL. (022i 70S 55 55 -FOREX: i022i 705 55 50 AND GENEVA 1201-2, RUE DR. ALFRED- VINCENT (CORNER 
OUA| DU M0NT-BLANC> BRANCHES. LUGANO 6901 - I, VIA CANOVA • TEL. f 09 1 1 23 S5 32 - ZUrtICH 0039 - STOCKER ST RAS5E 37 - TEL. (Oil 28B 18 18 ' 
GUERNSEY - RUE DU PfiE - ST. PETER PORT ' TEL. (481; 7M 761 AFFILIATE: REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS: 
GIBRALTAR - GUERNSEY - LONDON ' LUXEMBOURG - MILAN - MONTE CARLO • PARIS ' BEVERLY HILLS - CAYMAN ISLANDS • LOS ANGELES - MEXICO CITY - MIAMI • 
MONTPEAL • NASSAU • NEW YORK • BUENOS AIRES ' CARACAS • MONTEVIDEO • PUNTA DEL ESTE - RIO DE JANEIRO • SANTIAGO - BEIRUT • BEUING • HONG KONG - 

JAKARTA - SINGAPORE • TAIPEI - TOKYO 


*p'g8.g‘B d ?'g'? ’ |*b , «?-?si* ad3B3«.dSP? «: i fig-fa*- 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JVSE 15. 1994 


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Page 12 


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I Dow Jones Averages 


Daily closings of the 

Dow Jonas industrial average 

4000 


Blot vnhert; Bur/ruii V t n i 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
little changed Tuesday against oth- 
er major currencies, rebounding 
from early losses after a govern- 
ment report showing that inflation 
was still subdued spurred a rally in 
U.S. bonds. 

Speculation that the Federal Re- 
serve and other central bank are 

Foreign Exchange 

poised to shore up the dollar if it 
Tails any further also helped the 
dollar recover front its early swoon. 

“The rally in bonds gave the dol- 
lar some support. 1 ' said Earl John- 
son. foreign exchange adviser ai 
Harris Trust & Savings Bank in 
Chicago. “When there's demand 
for Treasury bond.?, there's de- 
mand for dollars." 

Bonds rallied for the first time in 
three days after the Labor Depart- 
ment said consumer prices rose a 
smaller-ihan-e.xpected 0.2 percent 
in May. indicating the economic 
expansion in the U.S. has not 
sparked a surge in inflation, the 
bond market’s nemesis 

The dollar was quoted at 1.6462 
Deutsche marks at the close, little 


changed from 1.6457 DM on Mon- 
day. ii fell as low as 1.6412 DM 
before bonds rose. The dollar also 
was quoted al 102.73 yen. down 
slight!)' from 102 SO yen. at 5.6145 
French francs, compared with 
5.6120 francs, and at 1.3^71 Swiss 
francs, up from 1.3867. The pound 
rose to SI. 5 1 94 from SI. 52 16. 

The benchmark 30-year Trea- 
sury bond rose half a point, push- 
ing the yield down to 7.30 percent 
from 7.36 percent Monday. 

“If bonds had tanked today. the 
dollar would have been in real trou- 
ble." said Win Thin, international 
economist at MCM Cur- 
rency Watch. a market consulting 
firm! 

The dollar fell in European trad- 
ing amid growing speculation that 
central bankers in Germany and 
Japan are under less procure to 
lower interest rates now that their 
countries' economies are .showing 

signs of imp rovemc n i . 

'At the same time, fewer traders 
expect the Federal Resene to raise 
irienssi rates again soon, given the 
mounting evidence that U.S. oci- 
nomie growth may be .-low me. 
That view was underscored by 
Tuesdav's report that May retail 
sales fell 0.2 screen i. 



3500 • 


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-1995 


M A M J 
1994 


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IS' 12 14- 3? 136 59 lari* -0 37 
1315.7! 1377.25 »JIJ Si 1327 4'. • >130 


Standard £ Poor's Indexes 


1 Hlon La* Clou Cnve 

1 inouslfials 536 1? 5JX32 53404 -+-4J* 

Tranw, 401.23 373.15 jMaJ V 129 

■ Utilities 15803 157.71 15t« + 0 70 

Finance s'lQ 4?..Bt 44*4 +-0JM 

SP SW *4X51 ii* 10 -'6127 3-7 

SP J0O K'D SUM 427M ~1X 


NYSE indexes 


| MYSE SBost Actives 


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•1.46 


I Slow Jones Sond Averages 


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10 LniUies 

10 insvsirlcls 


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EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 

Close 

Bid Aik 
ALUMINUM [HIM Gredet 

Dollars wr metric ion 

Spot 14TUQ u'<« 

For word uiMO i**SJ0 

COPPER CATHODES lH-ph 
Dollars per metric io n 
Soot 23*3 M Z395M 

Forword 2J0®.OO 2*1C.M 

LEAD 

DoUpn per metric ion 
Spot 53L5S 53j.Ce 

Farwcd 55150 S52.DO 

NICKEL 

Donors aer metric Jon 
Spot -250.se asnoo 

Forward M75Q0 6*80.00 

TIN 

Denars Per mclrlclon 
Sbdi 5420 DO 5*73.30 

Can, era 54®5.W 3T«.» 

ZINC ISuecml Hl«th Grade) 
Dollars W ffle Jl{ c ' Dn ^ „ 
Spot WtiO *K.S0 

Fofwart ItWOO 1HMQ 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


13** JO W2LK 
14Z?00 U77JT3 
Graae) 

TSTjOB 23FIDQ 
3411 JO 2412X0 


57000 530. 03 
540.20 5*7 M 


iJiJOC 435SM 
6475 30 HJflOJJD 


5625 DO 5435X0 
5750 M 5710 » 


*o 6.K WK 
*t.0C ”2J2 


industrials 

Lost Sefftc CA'P* 


Hlon Lo* 

!S£SSUSw -5« "»«*■?, 

;Jul 

.Aim 
Sen 

oa 

NOV 
Dec 
. Jon 
Feb 

1 Mar 

Ect. v3ii.-Rie;&4lt 


*15CJC 14* JO 15125 1SWS + J-* 

H ss JSi ?s§ : 1 

-rlfl !5aXS 157.00 157 00 * 1^ 

ifijS 1&S JSM0 M l)f 5 

161^5 160JS BW 

1S NX 'NX 1 N^ S S 

i£&jn \s£0Q ‘5100 158.00 158410 
joentnr. 6*794 


Financial 

Mien Law Close Change 

J.MONTH5TERLING ILIFFE) 

IHKW)« - ott of 100 pd 
Jun 
See 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
See 
Dec 
MW 
Jun 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 


9405 

9*22 

3404 

+ 2^3 

9*06 

9*2* 

940s 

*■ L&6 

93,73 

®308 

9172 

t [L0* 

WjQ5 

9108 

«1W 

+ M4 

9149 

9Z24 

9 

- C.I2 

91.97 

•1.74 

®1.®7 

■+C.IC 

9t r 

9104 

9107 

-013 

9108 

31 31 

*107 

■+3.U 

91.08 

W01 

®14)S 

■*•0.1; 

BOW 

fllJB 

«C04 

+-G.11 

«0l63 

90 J® 

WAS 

■+0.H 

91309 

=0.75 

9029 

1-0.1 1 

e: TSaX. Osen 

ml.: s3J.I66 


Stock Indexes 

High Low aose Chanee 
FTSE JM ILIFFE) 

03 per index p«i« , _ n 

Jim -«4JX 2WVL0 3039 J) 8-2BO 

5S ^SJ 30C5.0 3051 J 

ffie vt N.T. 3DAUt +28X 

Es*. volume: 35-IE5. Coen mt.: MJ64. 
CAC40 (MATIF3 

®r^j in 
i fi»ag5 3lii 

Mr 2W5-i>2 3W- 113 7)5X00 

Kim r.-M VC-V. JlSCCiOletf PrMS. 

l.S*Cbn J.irv F.-n arKiAl A&tvre s £*CMt>06. 

Tnl 1 FeirsUUK i iTWf. 


Dividends 


J-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFEJ 
II million - pts of 100 pet 


Sep 

96.92 

9401 

9409 

Dec 

94X5 

74.10 

9421 

Mar 

94JJT 

7197 

93.99 

Jun 

73.70 

9170 

9309 

Sen 

N T. 

NT. 

93. *£ 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


HYS5 D3arv 


Coadiiued from Page 1! 

Mr. Bemsen added, pointing to the 
Mav consumer price data. 

‘■rTif course. Wall Si reef ha.* a 
funny way of reacting h ■ numbers." 
he added’. “If 1 understood the fi- 
nancial markets. 1 wouldn't he 
Treasury Secretary. I'd be on my 
yacht.” 

Before the Tuesday report, ccon- 

U.S. Stocks 

orn/su had widely amici paled an 
increase of 0.3 percent in both the 
total consumer price index and the 
core rate for May. 

By category, energy cosl- de- 
creased J percent in May us castv 
line prices fell 1.8 percent, the larg- 
est decline since last June. 
Transportation costs fell 0.4 per- 
cent and airline fares dropped 5.4 
percent, the largesi decline since 

January 1969. 

Food and beverage costs, mean- 
while. rose 0.3 percent last month, 
reflecting the largest increase in 
vegetable prices in a year. Medical 
care costs and clothing costs both 
increased 0.4 percent, housing costs 
rose 0.7 percent and new car prices 
climbed 0.3 percent. 

The optimism on Monday con- 
trasted with the market reaction on 
Friday to a government report 
showing that the core rale of the 
producer price index had risen by a 
larger-lhan-expected 0.4 percent’ in 


,4 Moderate Rise 

Mav as wholesale car jn-i i-’-batvo 
priest edged higher. 

1 8 I< ■orr.t'cr?. fo:: «ip - RiJJci 

2 Shares? al — 1 2-Month Kish 

Stocks rose on a broad from on 
to a two-jnd-j'h.iif-monrh high as 
investors embraced the latest infla- 
tion report ai a harbinger of -table 
interest rates. Bloomberg Business 
News reported from New York. 

“Inflation is not the problem 
that the bond market has pcrceiv cd 
if to be." said Dale Tills, manager 
of institutional equities trading at 
Charles Schwab Corp. 'Tt s still 
running at a fairly reasonable 
rate." 

U.S. slocks reached their highest 
level since March 24 as the Dow 
Jones indu«iria) average climbed 
31.71 point* to 3.814.-53. Gainer- 
outnumbered lovers 6 to 5 jt vol- 
ume rose to 2S'<.- £ million shares 
from 243.4 million shares Monday. 

Shares of auto and semiconduc- 
tor companies led the advance in 
slocks as investors placed bets that 
second-quarter earnings would be 
better than previously expected. 

'Ford jumped 2N to M 1- *. Chr .fr- 
ier rose l ‘« to 49;i. and General 
Motors surged I h to 55 X Besides 
optimism that people will buy more 
cars, shares of automakers got a 
boost after Salomon Brothers 
raised ils estimates for Ford's and 
Chrvsler's second-quarter earnings. 


IC-B Cm s 

i ml'.Ti** 

, MnTlH 

! vvoiifli i 
i inlel 
NfwWrM 

i Pra-.-Pi 

: -VViman. 

i OiCs 
J Oi ado ■> 

I F-MORl 

i 4rr>.-r&: 

I 

I 


VoL Hiqh LOW 

IJISO? It*': * ^ 

S5HOTV ^ 73 *> 
5103* J': 
lo8!7 5J', 

34777 7bv. 

341 14 ol • i 
)lo5i 13' 

24:l» 15* j 


*1^ 

TOTOI 5* , 
700S0 <3 
TOO!* 71 

I*.-,-- 34'. 
19718 13'. 
18*47 7*. 


57' ! 

60 

i; 

ii 


C-.-rimi-c 

Tafaf-.'iuoi 
HfA Hrtri 
NO - Ltw.; 


Case Prev. 

ISST lUt 
374 103- 

-0* >22 
7133 7576 


EM. volume: 330 Oooti -ai : SM. 


3-MONTH EUROMARKS (MFFEi 
DM! mlilisn - Bis Of 100 


11’ 


-j__— 

- - i AEHEX Diary 


5eo 

Dec 

Mcr 

Jun 

Sep 

Dec 

Mcr 

Jun 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 


15 07 
44.B9 
«.4l 
*4^6 
»3.*5 
*3.70 
KJO 
9112 
93.13 
■•LVj 
**B1 
*7.71 


94.** 
*4 .75 
54 J I 

*4.11 

*1C 

*2J8 

*3J* 

*2^3 

*3.07 

*3.»7 

“2.s2 


AR1SX Ktosrt Actiires 


1 l 

dose 

Prew. 

• . 1 ia-'-svsed 

317 

:»6 

1 Dtd.tu.-a 



I i.incnan».-d 

'il 



879 

91a 

1 H.n ns 

73 

r ■ 

lav. 


20 


*JJT 
*4J7 
*4 63 

*424 

<CJ4 
93.75 
♦ISO 
=ai3 
92 11 

*2S4 
M JS 
11 • I “5= 


«4 4* 
*42* 

»*£s 

*2 41 
*L1' 


-acs 

-at" 

■00a 

•cos 


-175 

-ICo 

— 5J4 
-5-CS4 
-BS1 
-0.C2 
--srr 

■Jncr. 

— :.-Dj 

— 1C1 

— :j: 


Campon* f«- ajw p« Ree ! 

IRREGULAR 

. as *-tt mo 1 

. .10 6-13 6-30 

_ .45 6-13 6-33 . 

. JO 7-1 Mj 

45 4-13 4-3® 
C65 7-1 7-29 

_ .17 4-77 4-30 . 

. J7! 4-33 7-11 

SO 7-1 7-15 I 


DeoMltors Bcs'cn 
Estsi-Voic# Eoinss 
Eatpr ven c iCu7j£i 
Ector VcrScnS E> 
Ea'n von SecF-ctuc 
Eciw VQnie S!*Fa 
V.eiroocK'sn Ri’v 
P.lff-.m ReaiBkSt-rs 
Vcice sa-itfe-sE ’Ci 


251 


-0X3 

- j 
-27< 


JtgcB wi 

VoL 

16422 

Hiah 

70* ■ ■ 

Low 

Las: S19. 

E+PLA 

15.9+0 

I-... 

| 

1 ‘ ; • . 


13819 

6‘ . 

r. 

f ' j * . 

ChtrSn s 

J’M 

,?> v 

Ifr 1 

I" 1 4 • 1 ' 6 



l*-.. 

In 1 * 

■ c .. 




31 

11' —'I 

■-•kKvvlF 

4847 


5' r 

7 ■ ' * 

inmate# w 

4)78 

*>J* 


•v . \'* 

Ttf/Aler 

3135 

IS’. 

14', 


tITNC :"i 

1827 





; FiASDAG Diary 



Case 

Prov. 


SS64 



:s3i 

1593 | 


it;: 

I95S 1 


5034 

5031 . 




n-wLoas 




Esi. volume: 145,860. Caer 

3-MONTH PI90R IMA7IFI 
FF5 million - oh of 100 pci 
Sen »4J7 «j.« 

Dec 542T5 *-\T 

Mar *4.03 ?j.j4 

Jan *171 *1 aJ 

Sen *3J4 *2J6 

Dec *3.21 =2.13 

Mar =2.67 *i»: 

Jun OZSS *3.E2 «^E7 - - Z*1 

Ell. voionre: U.TTS. 2 m<i ir*. . it 77s. 

LONG GILT ILIFFEI 

fSOMO ■ Off a 37-101 Of IX PCI 

Jun ICI-JS 150-27 *Jl-y -C-W 

s«p 100-a *«-m 1»-:I -C-7® 

Sec N.T. H.T. V* IS — 0-4'- 

Ssf. voiKm*: 78.252. ioen :25 *:■! 


STOCK SPLIT 
EA Enainec-.ns 3*0-7 sniil. 

INCREASED 
Orcj,: c.r.Sir; G 

REGULAR 

Cnetsea C-C* ?M'i Q 

CfiSSCl N3Ti yes 2 

Eaton w’fri Ccp E *c“ a 

Eaten VoeBntn 1 

Ea ton '.'arMu-i e c « 

£*^icnce F’>n3 O 

Genovese DrujStrs G 

^ec'm Ecu Frees O 

‘■.evsione Cusisc Si V 

*:**stcne Cairo*! 3? Q 

»:ertl3rvs CvfMC 51 G 

YE 1 A in; a 

Ssl*C3V 5e-vs C 

CMinnuai: 9-pavueie in CanaOlan tanas: 
morlhir: u-auarterlY.' s-semMuinuol 


405 

6-30 

7-tS 

.46 

6-30 

7-15 

0K 

7-IS 

8-15 

tC 

6-13 

6-30 

JB 

6-13 

6-30 

X5i 

7.1 

7-IS 

.70 

4-:s 

►30 

06 

>-33 

7-7 

2*5 

6-30 

7-r? 

.ro 

6-2* 

7-0 

03 

6-0* 

7-6 

.07 

6-7* 

7-6 

06 

6-25 

7.15 

M 

4-2? 

►J? 


m- , 


Spot Commodities 


i Marvel SaSes 


i 

Today 

P rev. 

1 

4:u 

tors. 


Dire 

:>2Jj 


i®j: 

16.25 

! riasdoa 

2SJ.3' 

215.11 


in millions. 


• Commoeiiv 
1 Aluminum, lb 
. Ccf.'n. Brci. It 
■ Coaner ele.:lriji«:. 
i !ronFC3. fon 
Lecd. it 
Sliver. lro> 0; 
fitvl Iscspi. :cn 

i Tin. It 

' line, is 


c. IP 


ToCov 

0447 

1.1a 

1.14 

21:30 
c:s 
sj?s 
Ii 4 33 
:.73o 
7A5I6 


Prrv. 
CA3 a 


GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND tLlFr E) 
DM 2S04M0 - Pfs of 1 DO Pet 
Sep *340 * I S4 97T5 — 7 23 

Dee "Ul *1J0 51.75 —Z.Z3 

Esl. volume: irj^ia. Qaen ini.: * iJS.'st 


1-ir 1 15-YEAR FRENCH GOV. 30N0S l MAT IF; 


I.Ij 
21 j.CD , 
cat! 

52&T 

i-.n, 

jrraj 

aar-9 


FF5Q0AW 
Sep 
Dec 
mo- 
Jun 


Ms ei WO pci 
: i5j6 t!-*a; 

lujc 114J: 
mss nisi 
n.t. v r. 


Es:. vclume: 2I34S7. Coer' 


ii** -c.:: 

liaoa ~7.22 
Has* - 2-27 
-V T . 2 -.CT. 
1 ". KUO. 


. 

tie:. 7' >s:crif:n. rsnaniul 

V'Zt. 

'-:r.TRw -r rr?: c:x: fJ'iVhsd h: 

•- 1 - 

;.;f ••: SL'+f.-s-i is emain 


— r y.-.^y. Ir:mu-!Cfl2) Hsa)d 

T: :;-i 

i: _* - jt£. -'ivIcJinj t+£ I'sitsd 

5 : f ' 7 

ir;-;:. ir.i •: ;jrs::i«te 


7 ' : r. w*r» t tiwW is 




rs -i? rr-^rr.t--,',. , 

•> - m . 3l 

SS.4-J1: 'or ■yUzr.rrp af iot 


IS Routes in Europe Are Cut Back and Airbus Fleet Is Grounded 


Continued from Page 11 

to almost all n\arket> from alter- 
nate gateways or via code-.=hare 
flights." 

Delia stock was up 12.5 cent.' 
Tuesday at Sds.75 on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

The airline launched an aggres- 
sive restructuring ir. April lhai cen- 
ters on sharply reducing it> cot per 
available seat mile to "5 cents from 
the current levels of q .2n cents. 
The culs are just the latest in a 


flood to sweep the C. .S. airline in- 
dustr-. which ha.' lo.st more than 
$12 billion since !'W. 

Continental Airlines hai intre*- 
ducvd a no-frills short-haul service: 
UAL Corp. has proposed an em- 
ployee buy-ouL and Trans World 
Airlines Iric. and Northv.es: Airlmes 
have turned their companies over to 
workers in exchange for wage con- 
cessions. 


any cuts is the future must core 
from its workers. 

■ VS Air ResSnicturiDS 

USAir Group inc. announced a 
long-awaited restructuring that the 
airline hopes will cut 5! biibcr. 
from costs within three years. 
Bloc-mbers, Business News report- 
ed from New York. 


cd 


USAir plans to cut scout 517: 
AMR Corp.. which has ground- million in cons from its airline op- 
j planes and cut capacity, has said erations this vear as part of the 


jaraer rian. which concludes in 
I9yfc. 

'A’i-ji same of the industry's 
highest costs. USAir has been hit 
hu’rd on its East Coast routes by 
fvsnptfiiics from Conimemai and 
other low-cost carriers. 

USAir said the plan Included job 
cuts, productive aircraft use. iaven- 
tery tnar.aaercem and subccntract- 
Lnc air mail and air cargo services. 
Additional details were not imme- 
diate! •• available. 

,-BK- There. ATT Reuters) 


iTT/at tw ct »*4t 

|Tai1il^toHeadUiiilolNe*®'« r !L 

i NEW YORK (Bloomberg! — N '^_^ r ^ r h^esuius Tuesday by 

; iassETura Brass - - « -« 

! nbc 

■ 1 980s New World also plans to buy Mr. Tartikofrs utdepeno 

: percent stake- The agreement calls, for 
i arions of as many as 12 of its television stations u - l •' 

J commercial networks. 

j EDS to Operate Huge Xerox Netw ork 

■ STAMFORD, Connecticut (AFX) ~ 

! awarded a 1 0-year. S3^ billion contract to Etectrcwnc Daa > 

! to operate a worldwide computer and td^m^can^neio. ^ 

[ Xerox said the agreement was believed to be tire largsJ «.ontm- - 
! contract of its kind and the first on a global scale: _ . -- 

| About .1,700 Xerox employees and contractor ?“ ' ' d y 

| transfer to EDS control in five.stages between June *? hJ ibe-eno . 

Multimedia OfieringbV Padsard Bell 

WESTLAKE V1LLAGL California (Reuters) - Padard Bell, Jhe 
second-!^ supplier Z 


family of mn MwiftSn personal computers based on/fettiam and 
based processors and designed for the home office or fanulv uk*. ^ 

It said the systems, known as Spectria. *iU come: bundreu witr. * ■ 
software titles, including 11 in compact disefo^au The line «jw 
available in August, with pricing to be established by individual reuilen*. 

It said the new system was designed to integrate the external periphery 

compoawu into one requiring virtually no setting op- 

Weight Watchers Pulls Down Heinz 

PITTSBURGH (Bloomberg) — HJ. Heinz Co. capped a disappoint- 
ing second half Tuesday by posting sharply tower fourth-quarter 
from operations because of a heavy decline in Weight Watchers. ssnstnE 
SiarKist tuna sales and higher taxes. . .... 

Although net income in the quarter ending April 27 was S 1 2v». • nuHvcm. 
compared with S69.7 million a year ago, Heinz. had its second coasecutivc 
weak quarter because last v ear’s fourth-quarter results included a restruc- 
turing charge of SI 17 million for aggressive cosl-oitrina and layoff? that 
were supposed w boost profits from food products. 

Phillips Orders Cray Supercomputer ^ 

EAGAN. Minnesota fBloomberg) —Phillips Petroleum Xo. ordered a 
Cray Research Inc. supercomputer for oil exploration. Cray Reseurctr 
said' Tuesday. \- 

A 125-processor T3D massively parallel processing system is a new“ 
type or supercomputer that tackles problems differentiy, a Cray spokes- 
man said. Tte new sy start solves problems by dividing them mio - 
hundreds or thousands of pieces, rather than tackling them sequentially. . 

In Texas, meanwhile. Convex Computer Corp. unveiled its C4 series of 
supercomputers, the fourth generation of its main line, as it seeks ib add - 
customers and restore profit. The Associated Press reported. The compa.- ; 
ny's new supercomputers can execute more than I billion calculations a , 
second on a single processor. 

Aluminum Reaches 33-Month High . . 

LON DON (.AFP) — Aluminum continued to soar T utfsday. lifting to 4 •' 
33-month high as dealers said the metal was. finally , experiencing a- 
turnaround after a long period of oversupplv. 

It closed S15 higher at S 1.44150 a ton. rising also as tiw complex row 
with firmer copper. ? 

“The tide is turning for aluminum." said William . Adams, research - 
analyst at Rudolf Wolff. “As long as smelters do not naoege on their; 
cutback announcements, the fundamentals should continue to improve**: 

For the Record 

CIGNA International, a division of CIGNA Corp- said it would offer 
insurance and risk-management information to multinational companies 
seeking lo do business in China. The service will offer information on 
policy underwriting guidelines for insuring property, casualty, energy and 
marine exposures in China. CIGNA opened an office in Beijing in March. 

R. H. Macy & Ca said it expected continued improvement from plans : 
to lower expenses and improve merchandising efforts. Mncy's reported a 
ihird-quaiier net loss of S357J million after special iiemsL narrower than 
the S228 million loss in the year-earlier quarter. Macy's earnings are likely 
to be a key factor in its bid to emerge from bankruptcy as. an independent 
company. 


> 




Aij*ntc none* 9 'Hx Jinn 1 4 
OowPrev. 


Via KurtrCtil f-m 


See t:r S eson 


-fcoh Low dose Oia Cm lnt 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACr Holdlnv 
Aeuon 
Anold 
AkJO Nobel 
e-MEV 

Sois-Wwsancn 

CSM 

DSM 

Elwrwler 

Foffer 

Gist- Broca del 

HBG 

Hvineken 

Kooaovem 

Hurler Douglas 

IHC Catand 

Inter Mueller 

Inn Nederland 

KLM 

KNP BT 

Nedllovd 

Oce Grlnten 

Poklwed 

PhlllK 

Potygram 

Robeca 

Rooomco 
Rollnco 
RorenlO 
Roval Dirt CO 
Stork 

Unlever 
Van Om meren 
VNU 

WolterVKlwwer 


m ease 

44 J0 44.90 
96.»0 »7.10 
46J0 46.70 
209 JK) 207.90 

72.60 73 JO 
38J0 MJ0 
6SJ0 64.90 

131 JO 13110 
I6OJ20 1k5J0 
1 5 JO I5.9C 
4040 48.60 
XM 321 
21 6 JO 218.70 

n.10 njo 

74 74 

36.40 37 
B2 81 JO 

7B.J0 78.90 

51.60 S0JO 
4650 47J0 

69.40 70 JO 
T^JO 73.20 
4&40 ABO 
52J0 52.40 

75 76J0 
119 119.90 

5850 59 

12150 122 

68-50 8920 
19030 197 JO 
47 47JD 
J9140 IPO.P0 
52 5250 
174J20 174.2) 
112 111.10 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

Almanll 

Arbed 

Barca 

BBL 

Befcert 

CBR 

CMB 

CNF 

Cocker III 

Cofcwpa 

Colrurl 

Oelftaloe 

Elecl rebel 

Elecirafino 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Glover bel 

Iminotnl 
Kredlelbanh 
Mauve 
Pel rufl rw 
Powerfln 
Recticai 
Rovole Beige 
Soc Gen Banaue 


2735 7750 
7710 7760 
4650 4660 
2250 2200 
4195 4180 
24650 25000 
12525 17675 
7400 2400 
21M 2150 
IIP 157 

WO J940 

7S20 7590 
1358 1344 
5770 5760 
3730 3725 
1545 1555 
4460 4450 
9100 9200 
4700 4710 
XWO 3170 
6630 6630 
IS» 1 580 
10475 10500 
3150 3180 
508 508 

5230 5210 
8290 K80 


SocGen Beloloue 2305 2295 


Suflna 
Salvav 
Tessenderto 
Tract ebei 
UCB 

union Minlere 
Woganv Lite 


15325 15350 
15050 15075 
10275 703SD 

9800 9950 

24200 24450 
7670 2670 
6900 6990 


Current Slack index : 759152 

Proton : 7ti7jn 




— 




Frankfurt 


Alllad Lyons 
Aria Wlyglns 

5.75 

2.76 

5*7 

7.72 

AEG 

17140 

177 

Argyll Grouo 

2.45 

2A* 



2*44 


5.1B 



638 

640 

BAA 

940 

902 

Aska 

1010 

1050 

BAe 

465 

400 

BASF 

30000306.10 

Sank Scotland 

108 

104 


35400 


Barclays 

LSI 

508 





01-1 

504 






BBC 

685 

710 

BET 

100 

102 

BHF Bank 

IB 

396 


202 

7JIA 

BMW 




700 

721 

Carnmantfank 

324 JO 

X/ 


532 

105* 

Canthienlal 

74100 

247 


409 

401 

Daimler Benz 





1.90 

DaaukWi 


502 


3.94 

XVI 

Dl Babcock 

22S0D 

237 


209 

jjy 

Deutsche Bonk 

7355074100 

Bril Steel 

106 

106 


555 

568 


172 

300 

Dresdner Bonk 

37738000 

8TR 

306 

30* 

Fektmuehle 

347 

346 

Co Me Wire 

Wi' w 

4.39 

F Kruno Hoescn 





4.45 

Haraencr 

340 

331 



302 

Henkel 

60500 

608 

Coats Vlvella 

X37 

2J,' 

Hocntlel 

1074 

1082 


5.15 

510 

Hoedtst 

OTA) 3*100 

Court autets 

S.I5 

5.H 


890 

891 

ECC Group 

300 

055 


223 

228 

Enterprise Oil 

192 

4.02 

IWKA 

385 

386 

Eurotunnel 

302 

308 


143 

I4S 

Pisans 

1.47 

149 

Karitnm 

616 

622 

Forte 

X3S 

203 

k mil riot 


523 

SEC 

29B 

34C 


13300136 30 

Servi Acc 

5.49 

545 

KioeekiwWprft* 145 

150 

O)o*o 

064 

5J4I 

Linde 

»3 

918 

Grand Mel 

405 

4.19 


18? 

191 

SHE 

1.79 

I./S 

MAN 

392 

J9fl 


470 

4.71 

ANjnnesmotwi 

4260043600 

SUS 

501 

50B 

Mstailaesell 

2:1 

211 

Hanson 

203 

201 


77® 

2770 


1A4 


Porsche 

763 

780 

lH-tMlir-RBS 

702 

7.11 

Preussog 

43100 

426 

ICI 

7.90 

7.97 

PWA 

226 

zn 

incncaoc 

407 


RWE 

433*3800 

K l nail she r 

5.18 


RhelnmetaU 

320 

324 

Ladbrake 

1.63 


5c henna 

1054 

1073 

Lana Sec 

605 


SEL 






Siemens 

67X6069000 

Lostno 

144 

1.47 


Close Ptbv. 


Thrssen 
vann 
Vein 
VEW 
Mag 

Voik5waoen 
Welin 
Dim Index : 207670 
Prevtoji : iiKJ?. 
FA2 index : 72L6B 
Previous : B«4.« 


Z7327oJ0 
314 JO 314 
5105051680 
387 380 

466J0 477 
447 457 

>55 970 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtymo 

Enso-Guteeil 

Hutilamam 

Map. 

Kymmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

Ponlola 

Rep-ala 

Stockmann 


124 12B 

38 37 M 
171 174 

ID JO 10.70 
109 Hi 
165 166 

395 400 

HE 79 
84-50 8680 
207 215 


HEX index : 1457 53 
Previous ; 1691.24 


Johannesburg 


AECI 

2500 2500 

A/decft 

123 

120 

Anglo Amer 

247 

21* 

Bar lows 

38.75 

XI 

Biyvoor 

9 

NA. 

BuHels 

4705 

4600 

D* Beers 

1180011400 

Drletoniebi 

6300 


Gen cor 

11.90 

1? 

GF5A 

11850 

Hi 

Harmony 

25 2400 

Highveia sieel 

29 2800 

Kloal 

55 

5200 

HadbanV Gre 

31 

30 

RanOtoniem 

42 4875 


9705 


SA Brews 

96 

*5.50 

SI Helena 

44 

43 

Sasal 

2505 2505 

Western Deep 

180 

176 

Composite Index : 5757.17 
previous : $nxu 


Market Closed 
The Hong Kong 
stock market was 
closed Tuesday for a 
holiday. 


London 


Close Pf»». 


Legal <Jori Grn 
Ltavds Bank 
Marks Sp 
MEPC 
Nol'l Power 
tiatwesi 
Nlhwsl Water 
Pearson 
PAD 
P liking Ion 
PowerGen 
PrixJenMal 
Rantr Oro 
Reck Iff Col 
Red land 
Reed mu 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rove* 
Rattimn i unlit 
Royal Seal 
RTZ 

Salnsburr 
5col Newcos 
Seal Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

Stehe 

Smith Nephew 
Smith Kline B 
Smith (WH> 
Sun Alliance 
Tens 6 Lvte 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
unt Biscuits 

Vodafone 

War Loan jvj 
W ellcome 

whttbreaa 
Wllffams Hdgs 
Willis Corraon 


1-47 

567 

4.13 
04 
*40 
AM 

4.96 
6.16 
64k> 
1.77 
4.9P 
2.9? 

3.V4 

5.S5 

4.91 
8.17 
4J3 
157 

1.96 
4.09 
4JM 
BA7 
3.90 
5.20 
0.72 
Ol 
5J6 

7.13 
5J2 
1J2 
4JJ7 

4.92 
3J3 
4.04 
122 


4J7 

5.74 

4J» 

4JG 

445 

4J8 

4J9 

6.17 

6J9 

147 

4JU 

2.9ft 

194 

SJU 

5.02 
BOS 
4J9 
til 
1.93 
402 
4.04 
8J9 
185 
532 
3J9 

I 

7.02 
5.70 
I JO 
3.97 
■4.93 
118 
4.08 
333 


1069 10.86 

124 231 


219 

1008 

332 

5.0fi 


230 

9.97 

ai9 

5J» 


41.00 JIDfl 
5.95 5.90 


5J9 

157 

1J4 


543 

151 

154 


F.T. 38 Index : 2397.00 


F,T-5^ 

Previous : 381640 


Madrid 


BBV 3135 3140 

Bco cenlrol Hlso. 28J0 7840 
°cnca Santander 5070 5010 


Baneslo 
CEPSA 
□rooadas 
Endesa 
Ercras 
Iberdrola 

Remo l 

Tabaca lera 
Telefonica 


1055 1D5S 
3330 3310 
2255 2245 
6350 6210 
269 234 

1000 7010 
4185 4)B0 
3825 3930 
I860 1820 


SJS. General index : 320.13 
Previous : 323 


Milan 


Banco Comm 
aastoai 

Benetton or out* 

Clan 

ClR 

Cred I tel 
Enlcnem 
Ferlln 
Fernn RIsP 
Ftal SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Generali 
IFI 

itelcem 

ualsas 

ItalmoOlUare 

Medteoanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

has 

Rlnoscente 
Saleem 


5100 sosa 
165 170 

25650 25800 
1096 1097 
2530 26>5 
2150 2228 
2970 3045 
1970 3135 
1703 1265 

6500 6640 

1950 1990 
43100 43600 

25200 25700 

14970 15360 
5360 $750 
44500 45550 

15400 15000 
1419 1403 
2540 3540 
SOW 5270 

28400 28200 

10850 10830 
3900 3975 


San Paolo Torino 10010 10125 


SIP 
SME 
Snia 
Stands 
Stef 

Tara Aui Risp 
M iB Index ■ 1140 
Previous : u» 


439$ 4450 
3970 1975 
2510 2500 

38000 37000 

5435 5460 
29900 29850 


Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 37% 334, 

Bank Montreal 531*, 

Bell Canada 47t« 474* 

Bombardier B 21«fe 71*4 

Combtor Igi-, |gi« 

Cascades 8 e 

Dominion Tex’ A i*u 6V 

Donohue* iih nu- 

MocMUtan Bi ie'6 iH96 

Natl 8k Canada £ii rvi 

Power Corp. 2W$r 2pv, 

Quebec Tnl 70 TOW 

Qvebecor A 171k 18 

Quehecar B J77« 13 

Tetealobe 18 ft ib>h 

Univa 4U. 6 'a 

i/ideotron 121* i2i> 

Jotfvstriols index .- 1873LM 
Previous : 1863J8 


Close Prw. 


Paris 


Accor 470 465 

Air Uaulde 772 77i 

Alcalel Aisthom 609 630 

Axa 257 Js 255 

Boncalre ICIe) 544 540 

BIC 


BNP 

Bouvoues 

B5N-GD 

Correfour 

C.CF. 

Cents 
Charaeurs 
Cl men 15 Franc 
Chib Med 
Ell-Aaullalne 
Elf-Sanail 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eoux 
Havas 
imetel 


1255 1266 
24050 74120 
624 629 

838 826 

1863 1833 
225 225 

tlDJfl 109.40 
1-W0 1390 

3W 302.10 
417 417 

40040 401-38 
824 837 

35JI0 33.90 

2340 2235 
43SA0 421J0 
540 543 


La tore* Coppee 409.10 *OB 

Learand 6200 6020 

Lyon. Ecu, 522 521 

OreallL - ) 1145 10*4 

L.v.Mj-1. am 872 

Matra-HsKiielta IUjo imjTs 
M lcheiln B 229 JO 729 JQ 
Moullno* 137 141 

Paribas XTRJO 372J0 

Pechlnev InM 15Z20 141 JO 
Pernod- Rlcard 374 jb jzi 
P eupeol 82* 323 

Pinnult Print B88 874 

Raflotecnnlaue 468J0 463.1Q 
Rh-PoutencA 134B0 131iia 


Raft. St. Louis 
Saint Gabaln 
S.E.B. 

Sie Generate 
Sue* 

Thomsan-CSF 
Total 
UAP. 

Valeo 
CAC n Index: 1F79J3 
Previous : 1777AA 


1619 1632 

633 643 

$22 515 

MB 60$ 
mao 29X50 
145 ?4»J0 
3TOJ0 31BJQ 

147.90 146-6® 

255 240.10 


Sao Paulo 


Banco do SrcsJl 

3700 3900 




BradascD 

14 

7305 

Brahma 



Camlo 



EtelroOras 

433 

471) 

Itoubanca 

*15.01 

410 

1 Ltehf 

505 

*vn 

Fonmaiianemu 

*1 

*000 

Patnabras 



Sauza Cruz 


Tete&ras 



Telesp 


715 

Usiminas 



Vale Rio Doce 

230 W 

277 

Varlo 

230 

230 

Bovespa Index : 301 n 
Previous : 2MH 


Singapore 


Cere bos 

9.15 

840 




DBS 

1100 

1100 

Fraser Neove 

IX Ml 

1840 

Gen llnfl 



Golden Hob-o PI 

X5S 

X5 ft 

Haw Par 


300 

Hume industries 

54tD 

545 

incncroe 

501 

S0t 

hepoel 

11 

10.5T- 

KLKspono 

308 

13S 

LumCiumo 

143 

101 

Malayan Bon+g 



iOCBC foreign 

1300 

1300 

OUB 

600 


OUE 



Sembovremg 

11.10 

1100 

Shonarim 

J.1J 

ijn 

Sima Darav 

3.9B 

3.94 

51 A fordsn 

1700 

12.50 

SWe Land 

700 


ST»re Press 

16 10 

«*.in 

Sing Steamship 

4.12 

4.17 

5 tore Telecomm 

JUS 

3.4* 

SI rolls Trading 

170 

176 

UOB foreign 

11 80 

17 

U0L 

117 

205 

Strolls Times inn. 

:ZZ7E08 

Preview ; 229S.92 




Stockholm 


AGA 
Asm A 
Astra A 
JKWCOPCH 
Elect rolu* a 
Ericsson 
E He- A 
HandeJsoonlien 
Iwesior B 
Norsk Hvdro 
Procardia af 
5andvikB 

SCA-A 
S-E Banken 
Skardla F 
Skansta 
SKF 
Store 

Treiieborg BF 
Volvo 


347 350 

594 593 

164 l&S 

93J0 95 

378 374 

390 38? 
118 117 
97 m 
180 178 

272 225 JO 

125 126 
7)3 11) 
no 113 

4V 49 
113 112 

165 170 

134 136 

399 395 
113 110 
738 742 


Atte ^ revo erldMj 18S1.14 


j Cl dm Dr ev 

I Sydney 


Amcor 

9ji0 

9 S3 

AN2 

4.1.) 

J.OB 

BHP 

18.711 

18.64 

Boral 

300 

350 

Bauoaln,-llle 

(IBS 

007 

Coles Mve* 



Comal co 

502 

138 

CRA 

169s 

IB.®-* 

CSR 

4.87 

408 

Fosters Brew 

111 

1.14 

Goodman Field 

IJ4 

107 

ICI Ausiralio 

10.96 

11.08 

Magellan 

1.90 

2 

MIM 

302 

3.15 

NatAust Bank 

H.J4 

11.12 

News Cara 

9413 


Nine Nelwark 

*.n 

4.72 

N Broken Hill 


309 

Poc Dunlao 

407 

407 

Pioneer int'l 

Z9» 

101 

Nrmjdv Poseidon 

205 

X2S 

OCT Resources 

1.45 

14J 

Santos 

190 

305 

TNT 

242 

240 

Western Mining 

840 

814 

WhsIdoc Bonki ns 

444 

441 

Woodslde 

448 

440 

All ordinaries Index : 297648 
Previous : 794940 

j Tokyo 


Afcal Electr 

5T5 


Asa hi Chemical 

«l 



1280 


Bon* of Tok/a 

1640 


Brtdaesione 

1680 

1780 

1690 

1000 

Casio 

1350 

1340 

Dal Nippon Prim 


2020 

Daiwj House 

1570 

1570 

Datwa Securities 

1840 

I860 

Fonuc 

4/40 



2340 

ESI 


3370 

2260 

Fulltsu 

1140 

1170 

Hllathl 

1090 

1110 

Hltacni Coble 

*33 



19*1 

1910 

Ho Vo* ado 

5260 

£350 

Itochu 

7*3 

756 


/J4 

725 


978 

975 


2620 

2630 


415 

470 

1 1 ji 



Komatsu 

985 

988 

Kubota 

.48 

742 


■WHO 

WlfJ 

Matsu Elec Inds 

l®10 

1920 

fi *j ' » j /< TV 

<160 

1160 

1 | [.'T| J!i _ 1 xBH 

77*0 

2760 


524 

525 


/on 

707 

Will ► W- Snl 

an 

828 

Mitsubishi Co ro 

1710 

1230 

Mitsui and Co 

83/ 

839 

Mftsuiiashf 

1070 

1100 

Mitsumi 

2010 

2000 


1260 

1390 

NGK Insulators 



Nlkko Secwlhes 

1480 

1420 




t'JIPBOfS Gil 

776 


Nlpoan Sieel 

J 66 

J70 

Nippon Yusan 



Nissan 



Nomura Sec 

7490 


NTT 


OivmiBus Obi leal 



Pioneer 

2960 

3020 

Ricoh 




m 

588 

Shorn 

1830 

I860 

Shlmcau 

763 

770 

Shlrtelsu Chem 



Swir 

j.W.I 

r.y^I 1 





527 

536 

Sl/rrrl Mvrlrrv 


WJ 

Sumitomo Metal 

,102 

303 

Talwl Cora 

Ail 

697 

Taisho .Marine 

883 

880 

Toheda Che® 

n?0 


TDk. 

4910 

tzl 

TeUln 

554 

565 



1340 

Tokyo ElcC P» 

3190 

no 

Town Priming 

1550 

1540 

Torov Ind. 

764 

760 

Toshiba 

840 


Tcvolo 

2150 

2160 

vamoichi Sec 
a.- M 10a 

789 

99B 

Nikkei 225 : 2135* 
Preylqin : J1S53 
Tool* index : 1793 
Previous ; 1713 



Toronto 


A&tfKrf Price 

TI-w- 

17 

Agnico Eogie 

16 "k 

161*6 

Air Canada 

6tei 

b% 

Alberta Energy 

71 % 

21*1j 

Am Borriek Sm 

33% 

32^ 

BCE 

cm 

47te 

Bk Nova ScoOa 

£ 

25W 

BCGas 

14'S 

BC Telecom 

24»k 

24W 

Brornglea 

006 

006 

Brunswick 

lOVk 

lOte 

CAE 

tf* 

6% 


5 

5 

CIBC 

28 It 

79% 

Canadian Pacific 

ro 3 *. 

I0H 


Close Prev. 


Lcn Tire - 

Cantor 

Cora 

CCL tad B 
Cineotex 
Camlnco 
Conwes! E»oi 
CSA Mot A 
C'pfcsco 
Drier a 

Echo Bov Mines 
Eoulhr Sliver A 
FCA Inll 
Fed Ino A 
Fletcher ChaiiA 
FPI 
Gentra 
Gull Cda Res 
Bees Inti 


1 1- » 
is=n 
tit 
9 

4.95 

23 

23 

II 1 -* 

21 

15 

aso 

N. Q. 
t*, 

17^ 

Tk 

O. 46 
4.40 
<3Sh 


Hem io GW Mines T2 'a 


Holllnser 
Horsham 
Hudson's Bar 
imasco 
Inco 

Jannock 
Labati 
Loblaw Co 
Mackenzie 
Moana iretl A 
Mania Loaf 
Maritime 
Mar* Res 
Molsan A 
Nome ind A 
Noronda Inc 
Noranda Forest 
Moreen Enemy 
Nttin TelecDm 
Nava Coro 
O shown 
Paaurln A 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petroleum 
PWACorp 
Hayrack 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 
Rothmans 
Roval Bank Can 
Sceptre Res 
Scott's HOSP 
Seacram 
Sears Can 
Shell can 
Sherrttl Gordon 
SHL Svstemhse 
Soutftam 
Soar Aerospace 
Stetca A 
Talisman Enera 
Teck B 
Thomson 
Toronto Damn 
Torstar B 
Transatla U1|| 
TrarrsCda Plee 
Trlion Flnl A 
Trlmac 
TrlzecA 
Unieorp Energy 
TSE 300 Index : 419X40 
Previous : 430680 


16'» 

1914 

28 

341* 

35V: 

15 1 *! 

JT*t 

23 

8V, 

60% 

JI9i 

25V* 

4!: 

22% 

5% 

25% 

)2'A 

l«* 

421t 

N. O. 
20’* 
3*0 
30V: 
I0M» 

O. 48 
17W 

ma 

71 

27 

IP* 

BT* 

43 

* 2Tk 
ll*k 

w* 

i«te 
.16 
BW 
27 4* 
244m 
1W. 
2flAk 
231k 

14l„ 

174k 

4-30 

ISvs 

0J5 

1.45 


Ills 

10 

4JJJ 

S T k 

c 

22% 

23 

111 * 

»'* 

085 

141. 

0J0 

t'l 
171= 
SV 
0.48 
J’-t 
13*. 
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15H. 
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28 
346. 
36 >, 
1516 
21 '. 
22 % 
9% 
58 
12 
TJ*. 
BNs 

r** 

5i 
25k. 
12U| 
14’i 
42 1* 

201 * 

3J5 

29k, 

10’k 

0J0 

17\. 

2«k 

1FW 

73 

7TW 

136* 

B 1 *. 

43 

TVr 

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9W 

18*6 

159k 

77* 

27V. 

25 

15 5 * 

21 

239* 

14V, 

179* 

4.35 

15V; 

0J2 

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:3FJg'*f WfiZ 
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12.02 

11.91 


11.94 

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>7493 


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11.98 

1191 

ll.«l 


■0.03 4.111 
-003 1.526 
-0.03 729 

-8K 49 


Grains 

WHEAT ICSOT, 9=.r:xe-e.rfr 


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1159 

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msoii 

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1413 

1443 

1415 

1429 

10425 

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1458 

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1470 

1470 

1477 

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Zurich 


Adia mu B 
Alusulsse B new 
BBC Bran Bov B 
ClbaGetevB 
CS Holdings B 
Elektraw B 
Fischer B 
Inrerdlsaiunt B 
Jdmoll B 
Landis Gvr R 
Moevencick B 
NesHe R 

Oerllk, Buehrle R 
Peraesa Hid b 
R oche Hda PC 
5afro Republic 
Sana os B 
Schindler B 
Sutler PC 
Surveillance B 
Swiss Bnk Carp b 
5wKs Roinsur R 
Swissair R 
UBS B 

Winlartitur 8 
Zurich Ass B 
SBS Index : 96682 
Previous : 96173 


235 228 

675 677 

1211 1212 
SS5 BS5 
575 581 

374 379 

1355 1360 
2350 2390 
850 870 

858 860 

450 450 

1187 1181 
143 142 

1630 1620 
6768 6760 
124 1 24 JO 
750 740 

8150 8100 
925 935 
2030 2080 
400 406 

592 596 

77S 787 
1302 1306 
920 735 

1373 1380 



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243 Dec®5 

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X55». 

zs* 

235 

-tCO'i 

3.973 

III® JAW Sep 74 

11100 11140 108.90 

iiai5 


5041- Jui 94 

607 1 : 

692": 


*.99*:_0 00>4 

tF 164 

108.10 

TIM Mar 95 

10800 

108 30 

10600 

107 J5 

—14)0 

2.232 

608 

Aug 74 


6.99'; 

* BI 

608 -0 0: 

19.179 

104-30 

7605 May 95 1074)0 

107.00 

105.00 

10605 

-4105 

/tv 

6.1/ 

Sep 74 


1.80 

6« 

676'. -3.01' < 

5.5*3 

105-50 

TBJBJLI95 




10505 

—005 

752 

505'. 

■MnvV4 

tub! 

6.70 

608 


un 1 

11100 

7500 Aug 9j 

109 

10900 

10900 

IIQJB 

-103 

578 

6.13 

Jan 75 

e/Tll 

*75 

6/3' 

601’ : -XC1», 


in JO 





10A9S 

-000 


6 18 

Mar 95 

673 

ft 

4 49 

6.'6’ . -003', 

X444 

9120 

7500 Oa®S 




10900 

— 105 



MOV 75 6.75 

*.» 

<■?! 

l’B’j -a07>. 

1066 

7J4W 

..0SNav®5 




109 00 

—1X5 





6W: 




iOlW 



104.10 

10250 





6.78 

407 

403 

404': -iCV, 

1 *11 

97.35 

tom jon Vi 


1 04.0S 

—025 

41 


Esi. sates NA won's, sates 49 .dll 

Men's open ini 245,110 up 641 
SOYBEANS ICRCm i4vn,n«nv*- Wiiji ihranpfi 
7 JD 
7.JJ 
7 J 8 S 
75TS 

6.9TV, 

7 xe% 

7 02 '* 

7JI3 
AJOVj 

ESI. sales NA Mon's, soles 58 J 75 
IWm'sopeninl 151.634 up 361 $ 

SOYBEAN MEAL ICBOT) 100 nm- uotoscer iw 
moo IHJO >J| 94 MOJO 201 JO 19 BJC ZRJ0 

72100 11$ DO Aug 94 200.00 'All JO M 2Q04A • 0 JO 

2 ULD 0 imoscpw 199.00 201.00 197 A 0 mu -too 

2 MJU nauoOa 9 j moo 700.00 19420 m.fo -o^o 

707 JO 17 B.WDec 94 I'M JO l« 8 Jta 114 90 1 « 9.00 - 0.90 

781 JO ITBJOJarr 95 IP’JW l «70 175 JO 19 J 70 - 1.00 

70150 181 JO fAar 95 19*00 19990 1 VM 199.90 - 0.90 

701.00 1 61.00 Mav 95 I 7 JJ 0 1993c 19450 I 99 J 0 -120 

19 * JO 18100 ji 4 95 I 97 JO 197 JO 1 77 JO 1*7 JC -OJO 

EM sales NA Mon's. soles 25,000 
Man's aoMidU 

SOYBEAN OIL lCBOTl_ *0.000 *, .. m, v „ 100 m. 


1 C' 9 C 
10140 
IS. JO 


:I75D*C94 1CW JO 109.90 I© JO 10465 
76.70 Jan 45 107 JS >07 J5 107 JS 108J0 
71»Pett« IVM I©.® 107 J » 1B7J1 


-1.40 521 

-US 32,158 

— 1 AD I6J088 
— 1J0 6J99 
—1.15 249 

—1.10 &l 


99 JO 
94J0 


1 03.90 


23. 580 
17 658 
11.061 
5.757 

i 8 .ua 
UH 
1 739 

419 

388 


XJO 

3065 

»J4 

?9J4 

56.87 

78.55 

7430 

78.05 

77.BS 

25X0 


21 55 A'l 94 27U 2777 
21A5AU0 94 27.64 27.77 


2' Ji 77.49 — OJi 
"J7 i7J8 -0.19 


72.X? Sep M 77 50 ?7A$ 77.J7 17 JB — 0 IT 

22. ID Oct W ?7 20 77 35 77.15 7>.I2 -Oil 

Tl 00 [>C 94 J4B5 77 00 2*75 24 78 —0.1? 

71e5Jtxi9$ MM 74te 2*70 36 Tl —018 

34.10Mor9$ 3s JO 76 8S 7s *0 ?663 —0.17 

74A5MQV9S 2,75 267S Tx. V . 76J5 —0.10 

* “ 3* 50 3*_i6 ajO 

76U - 


2465 JllJ 95 I# 50 

2$JB0Aua 95 MJS 

Esi. sates NA Men's, sales 19, an 
Mont open >ni 


OS 

rtso 7*jo — ajs 


2 1 AM 
15.778 
10.943 
8.748 
21.868 
19J5 
7.184 
1.036 
2 75 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICMERI *um a-. ■ (cmp-ii 
7527 6730 Jun 44 64 M 6110 64J0 

62.1SAU0 94 64.75 64J0 Bl4i 

65.70 Od 94 6750 67 50 66 7; 

67 JO Dec W 68J5 *8J5 67 90 

47.90 Feb 9$ *9.]0 tflV 18 TO 

69.40 Apr 95 70 55 70.55 teOS 

66.90 Jun 9S 67 68 47.M 67J5 

Esi. soles I3J0I Mans sales 17.906 

Men's open ird 71.*4| eh J841 
FESPEB CATTLE (CMERI <0.000 6-- * anb 
8X00 71.1DAH94 7XM 7X10 ?X25 

7U0ieo94 72J7 22.4J 73 jo 

nj0OO96 7250 7150 7180 

TZaINdvW JUS 7X60 J3J0 

7195 Jen *6 7410 7410 7150 

1 ISStKr 96 7150 7150 7180 

_ 7U5Apr46 710S 73.15 72.90 

Est. sales Itti Mon's, sates xoto 
Man's open Ini 14.183 OH 49S 
HOGS ICMERI JOJxn ■>, - mm. vyr ie 
5423 45J0Jun94 48.10 4835 47 JB 

4530JUI96 48.05 45.10 47Ji 

445DAUq94 47A5 47® <705 

414500 94 44.60 4460 445)0 

CLOS DCC 94 «4 J5 44J5 44flJ 

4X10Feb9j 54® *4« 44 00 

W0 Apr K 025 4125 -3?. 92 

47.40JU19S 4850 48J0 4* A) 

___ 4720 Jut 75 4 8.72 48.72 48jja 

Est. soles 5,9*9 MonrxwiM 1XJ54 
M/n'ivoenin 3!Ufc7 ali 1)45 
PQRKBEUJE5 (OABR) ABHft-wiuw 
62M 39JDXK94 42® 43.® 40.40 

38.75 Aua 94 J1J5 4U5 403» 

39.18 Feb 95 47.75 47.® 47 45 

3L60MOT 95 
4166 May 95 
MJuUS 

49.75 AU0 95 

Esl HUM 2.163 Man's, sales 3.288 
Mm's open W 8,251 ip 61 


7187 
74.10 
74J0 
74JS 
75 10 
71 JO 


»ua 

sU5 

88.00 

W9S 

8035 

7645 


5537 

S3® 

493S 

50-50 

S380 

AX 
51 JO 
494)0 


59 JO 
61.15 
40.90 
6lJ» 

sun 

SLH 


we 


6. 5*4 

4* JO 

-000 26.715 

*7 j: 

—O0S 14.713 

6S47 

-005 10.586 

6930 

-OJi 

7.771 

70® 

— 005 

3.296 

67 JS 

-0® 

616 

S~lb 

7X72 

-003 

6.986 

73.17 

-0J1 

J.J77 

7707 

—OJi 

X7W 

-122 

-OJS 

(.re 

7175 

-an 

614 

Tj.lS 

-0.25 

54 

"1® 

-Ojy 

8} 

*L07 

-0 45 

24387 

J?J7 

-003 

B.6W 

*’A5 

— 6 67 

8068 

«J7 

-AM 

4.277 

4405 

-005 

3.225 

44 1? 

-008 

7SS 

4103 

-015 

Al." 

4800 

-0.25 

735 

4040 

—OJO 


h 

4100 

-04/ 

<1.1 <6 

41.02 

-003 

3J7* 

4/00 

— *105 

*n 

■nao 

-a 05 

37 

47.95 


33 

17 

50 70 


5030 


} 


Food 


COFFEE C tNCSE) irjmtoi 

- Crtil! Rri ft. 



14500 

64.90 Jui 94 IXN 

1CJ0 

i 36.10 

IJ805 

-0.15 12 548 

141.10 

6X00 Sep 94 I57JO 

14290 

■ 3560 

irw 

•OAl 21.998 

1370S 

77.10DtC« 13400 

I1U0 

1335 a 

13400 

600 12,216 

13448) 

76.90 Mor 95 I31J5 

13105 

11000 

131.05 

1 LOO 7.540 

13305 

1200 May 95 130.15 

1)0 15 

13000 

130.15 

-6® i.qis 

1MJH 

85 48) Jui® 5 129.15 

12915 

197.15 

129.15 

-6.04 123 

12SJB 

W4»yp®5 



128 15 

-64N 31 

Esl. soles 

1XB75 Mon's sates 'A 7 ** 



Mptffinl b3tp*n UP w 




SUGAR-WORLD 11 (HCSc) lljJWtet- nnKpnr m 


1X60 

9,15 Jui 94 13-3-1 

1209 

1X25 

!?j7 

•0.01 33.343 

1200 

9070094 1204 

1201 

1X33 

12*5 

■0M4 70.600 

1X10 

®.l /6flar 95 11.77 

1205 

11. *4 

12 05 

■aw 2L960 


6170 Mar 96 

91.10 Apr 96 10565 10565 1DL65 10645 

Esi sates 1X0® Mon's salts 10.7*3 
Mon 1 ; cpenvit 63J40 up 316 
SILVER (NOAJQ SJQOr-a, u.-c*rri iwtray ol 
568.0 51 5J Jun 94 538.1 

5MJ 37143 All 94 541.0 542J 5390 $392 

Aug-M 5410 54X0 5*Xo 142.1 

J76J5ep94 54641 J47J 5M.Q 5*19 

380 0 Die 94 5510 555.0 550 5 55U 

4010 Jan 95 55X9 

4165 Mar 95 5615 5615 560J SS9.1 

4t&0A6av' 95 5*44 


5*0J 

597 a 

5640 
■040 
606 5 
•1X0 
61X0 
6390 
5710 
6180 


4300Jul 95 570.1 

49X0 Sep 95 sasj 565-5 58SJ 5760 

539 0 Dec 95 5880 S8&0 587.0 Mil 

5750 Jan 96 588.1 

5800 Mar 96 S9S.0 

Esl. sates 144)00 Mon's, sates 22.022 
Mon sooen int 12SJ726 up 1*77 
PLATINUM (NMER) llm OL-daXorsonSmoi. 
437® 357 JX Jut 94 484® 48500 40X07 40240 

435.® 36S0OOd44 40700 *0700 4Q5.® 4D6J0 

■C9 JO 374® Jan 95 409J0 409® «9jo «8.4Q 

438.® 3904)0 Apr 95 4111® 410® 410.® 410J0 

Esi.wtes 2.218 Mon'xsaes 1,782 

Mon's open W 21S62 otf 25 

GOLD INCMXJ 10Q mn az.- ooMa,s per ip-t, cu. 

417 JO 37940 Jun 94 38610 38440 38Z0D 384 JD 

386® 386® Jul 94 334% 

4 J50O 341-50 AUB 94 38660 3*700 38JJ0 38640 

1IJS ?£!52?!. 4 . 3S-" J?- 00 M9 -i» 38940 

«6ig 343® Dec 96 362.70 3*3J0 39100 392 -So 

411® 36X40 Feb 95 39X90 39620 395.40 39X90 

4TOJW 40000 4®S 39900 

428 JO 46/ JO Jun 45 40X90 

412® TBOJQAuo 95 407.® VI X *07 X W/ J 

41130 410. 2Q '30 95 SS 

%% 41178 4.XJ0 4, WO 414| 

. *W 9o 43X« 

Eft jotes 174)00 Mon's, sales 19,852 
Men sappnint \7>X2 up 2866 


-OJS 

— 00 ) 


+ XB 

*07 76171 
*07 

*07 16217 

*0.7 17.S72 
*0J 72 

♦07 5010 
-07 3.236 

♦ 0.7 1J03 

*07 *35 

*07 1083 
*07 1 

♦ 07 3 


*040 12084 
*OJO 80W 
*070 1.185 
•OJO 1.194 


+0® 850 

+ 000 

♦CJO 73.141 
*000 5.178 
•OBQ 24.304 
*000 5J34 
♦0.80 0395 
+070 7,733 
*070 1,129 
♦OJO I4K2 
+0.70 6592 
•on j® 
+ 060 20 


\,Ut 

a 

10 


Financial 

it mOTIon- m dIIMkj. 

* S - ?8 ' i5 - S3 9 S- 7 B 9503 +005 6.977 

2ffS 7iJS ? S-40 45 J8 95J8 *04)9 18.39" 

9i05 n«E£S« 4480 «■“ «■« -OLIO 7JI* 

^SOteS Irak's SC64SS s.972 ‘ 0 ■ ,, 

M<m 5 open inf 34J5J ofl )M 

EJ votes na Mon's, vies 450I8 
'■'9"swen ; m an tsn 

JK5°!1 »«s 6 JJnaj at IMHO 

JjJ-Jt IB7-I8 JulVJ 104-00 1X6- U 106® 106-1? - id UtWl 

fJJ"5! I°S-W IWJ6 1 05-13 * 17 19X54) 

’1*51 J W-1? 1W® 104-15 + • ^ 

.11-07 100-05 660-95 103-52 - 

IW-22 *9.30 Jun *5 ; 

Esl, sates NA Mon's, sates f.56* 

ASon's Open ini 264.950 oH 853 

s« RV SWTC.s'iirTO,‘ri''"SB' 1 

118-36 90-12 Sep 9* 103-29 105-01 IICLM iSf A - SWHl 

118-08 91-19 Dec 94103-11 VU-ID lttj® 104-01 

» t?2 Hill ^i 5102 ' 22 ,03 - 2 l 102-21 1D3-U 

il^-19 98-15 Jun H jin.v 

V s •»-» So»*S SlS 

1 13- 1* V8-V Dee 95 TmS 

114- 06 98-23 Mcr 9ft 101-lS 

&u. sates NA MerftjtJle* XX 735 
Mon * own mi 410.710 utt 4428 

a w , Jr* ”» ™ 5 ,aM 

snflTO®-^- 

®8 &8 SIS %% 33S IS 


2 2 314.705 

Z7 36446 

3 10,4 

S 1 ' 1K 

£ ,w 

S 23 

22 *0 


22 19089 


Oil® 

9UB0 

«..-30 

*40» 


‘ 90 435 JIB 
*90385435 
'"omzso 

• 150309,051 
"130 193 739 


»4JW tllHCKtl 9X!X PX2*. »?l» 9X330 • >3? 136.5*1 
94.230 9aj5aMtr» 9xaao *3J» 933® 9xno .isoueji! 

Esl. soles 708 4T? Mon '6 sales 2ES 

Man's ooen HT 1M1.W up 36-05 

BRITISH POUNO ICMERI t t oa.-tmx.te.3KJ 

1 . 52 10 1 . 4 S«Seo» IJ 193 iJ72{ 1 J 1 M 1 *174 -8 36606 

1 J 1 ® 1 0500 Dr* W 1.5154 — 8 ‘ 24 *. 

IJ170 1064O6<V>r96 151*0 —A 'S I 

Est. sane 9 All Mon’6 tom 22.88: 

Mon's ooen mt i» 4527 ' ' - 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBt) to '•temnvahsSIXWt ■ 

aim 8.7ii3jui94 o.rwo otwo otis id« -is U 2 . 

17740 0.7Q68 Sep W 0J204 C-TTli C.TITJ 3.7192 —15 2777! r- 

X7670 dJIOBOecM 071*9 Crt*? 0*140 0 775S — » Wffi 

a.'6as o.TtraJNyjr *5 o.tijt on?: }.*«+» — i; sH'-- 

0X140 07D66Sep9S 0.7060 0 70® r 7t£i 0 >C6S — :® . . 30- . 
Est. sates 9.Z75 Mon's soles iZSX 
Man's own inJ *1717 ah S8J 

GERMAN MARX ICMERI ivnav.iK+xn'aiKW • • 

00133 0-5607 Jun 94 04)100 0.6130 06103 BWM -» iS 

06101 05600S6P«1 061)71 OjiCIM 04064 0*076 +7 6UB6',' 

04105 0.55W D*e W 04078 0609: OiCTl 06JT* -l lSl'" 

&..&UJ0 0.50-10 Mar 96 0 4CS4 ' -9 • 656 '■ 

Est. sates 17,435 Mon's, sates 7*431 

Man's anen int 15J45 up 871 • 1 • ¥ . 

JAPANESE YEN ICMER) s «- «n- ;««*«». «LOoa»t 
fl.«!^.O(»8nJim94O0T|B7eootJC31iaiMt(JO.O:WI6 -It; 

O0100I KUMB942SWW a«B75fflJC983a0.®976DB.IB97M - 14 St7» -r 

Q0IOO7OOLO9®5L25Dec 94 D.009B5D). 00989734)098500. 305862 -ft' t0»‘. 
0010129 OimaaMar «6 D.OO993N0O9; 5® JK993X 007934 -14 356. 

Ed. sates 23.67? Aian s sates 31.93 ""7. 

Mon's open int 80J1I ott 394J - - 

SWISS FRANC ICMERI spot fgne- : te<rny, *P6 rtl •' ■ 

0JI74 O S?® Jun 9* 07271 rv. 

0J22S a4600Sep«4 0731! 3.72K 0 7205 C/I’t -? 3MST", • • 

0J3T3 06885 Dec 96 07244 Q.735? 17217 0J3S7 +6 : ft* - 

Alar 94 07266 ' *3 VcV 

Esl. toes 17435 A6on'6 Sikes 30*15 • 

Alton's open ml S3J99 uo 7050 ' I 


Industrials 


7X40 

•840 

77.15 

7800 

784*0 

78.70 

74J0 


COTTON 3 (NCTN) SOXOo k,- owls ow Bv 
M45 58J»Jul94 60.10 60-50 79.72 79 Jf 

7X40 Aug 96 78 JO TflJO 71 JO TL2S 
59 J1 Oct 94 77 65 77 83 T7.t* 77 J4 

59.48 Dec 94 7640 7 A*S ’4.10 76472 

«JgMor« 77.70 770Q 76.95 76.94 

6400 May 95 77 JO TgJiO 77J0 77 JO 

70J0Jul95 784)0 75LB 38.00 7745 

. 7100 Oa 95 74-50 7JJ0 ’4J0 7165 

ES.toes BJU AAan's. sales 7009 
Mans ooen M jijw up 727 

OIL IMMER1 AVOnt-CffriDegd 

^370 48.15 mjg 47.93 

5540 4X70 Auo *4 4&J0 4a 60 AOS Jani 

SiSSs 1 ^? 2- 20 ®- 35 « a, S AM 
USS 09 - ®- ,D “JO S'- 0 " 50-73 
5 !-® 51 -» a, 5 n 13 

4600 Dec 94 5100 P-7fl 5100 5X03 

a*g sim sxio 52.43 

47. 9S Red 95 SXB0 5200 9>*« 043 

S-SOMor’S 5100 5100 SM0 51.63 

*105 Apr 95 


57.17 
57 JO 
5X30 
59.00 
47 ?4 

a. 75 

57 JO 
44 m 
51J0 
51.® 
5006 
*945 
50J5 
5200 
52.90 
5X70 


50L60 


*74? 4905 4905 *.*» 

46J9 Jun 95 


4X68 


50 “ »■* 

47 40 Aue 95 50*8 

*80SSep9S 51 J8 

5X0OOa»5 SJJB 

52.90 Nuv 95 SXB0 

if-- 53 70 Dec 75 ?rS 

BI toes 25463 A/ton's, sates T7J5D 
HASHlSI.. ) X5J03 afl 1652 
^^ SW ^X t ^ OE , tfM£al '4W«A-aaner s* 

i is- 79 l8J « >*■« 

J4JS Aug 94 18.10 18J0 1805 1BJ0 

1450 jeo94 1700 184)0 1700 1790 

;®*5oo9i i-07 , 5# \y£ 

1*82 Now 94 1705 17 ±* 17J4 


2X78 

30L78 

2078 

20.73 

VUfl 

20 ® 

1745 

1900 

MIA4 

1908 

1703 

2X30 

1773 

1890 

1904 

19.17 

1777 

2XU 


-04)-.ja3at ; - 
-4175 £- 

_a<n 4j»:.. 

—063-28XM' r 
— 0 75- 3061s, 
-C73 1022 - 
-0.W- .31 r 

-aw.;. aty\ 

+X291U98* - 
-OX* 19037. 

• 02* 3X95. - 
+00* 9077w - 

+074-9054. 

+ ft2* ^egrr 
*024 1»_- 
+0A1 LSJ'.! 
. 004 -10®. ' 

• 021 2.TP' 

+a»rtW'.' 
+0L34 

♦ax ‘5M 

-0414. -l: 

+M4 . %■ 

+B04.-'-V-- 


*aw n0OT . 

-a 15 7906X„ 
• XT6 4W60- 
+ 0.13 5“ 


I414^« l7 -“ 17 ® 17 « 

5iiS+f ln,S ,7 -® ,,JB 17-45 17 47 

tt'SI^Se .'I-S ,7 ' 47 17 ' 4S T705 

I 7 -® ,7 -» 17 45 1705 

'SJSADr 95 17 J2 17 JJ 17.47 1 }jo 

IS.69MOV95 1703 1707 1709 17.49 

aSK’m H-? ,7 - M 17 ' SJ )1Si 

lLa5Ajt95 17J5 17.43 17JSS If AS 

j 74S , 7^4 174S 

I 7 -? ' 77 ° 17 -w ”79 

17i?22.« 774 ,7J < 1-7* >774 

l 7J3 l?JS UJS 

,7 - 7 ‘ ,? 04 1704 1704 


SlllfU? ';S ,W *wi sates 944277 
Aon lawn rt 411098 08 (to 

«wi£o w 94 85 §3 SIS SJ5 

«.905eo»4 sits a® piJ 

».I0 a" 50« SD0 

4Li5Hwl4 49 M *i9 U 1 JU nr m an 

*S« IS §3) aSS a” 

^ , ^^ Q i'?77 1 S3,[ “ ** 

Mcrr.gpon jn 57,939 ^ 5^ 


6000 

60410 

s*m 

9X75 

4P.7J 

5 *® 

£110 

5X75 


-0(B31.«7’ 
*OflSl*Sg‘. 
♦OMIOWJ^. 
+ao* . 

-+Q4B 9,M2. 

rgs 5 ^: 

-JUR XHF- 
*0J)7;8jg«n- 
+AII7 T0BV 

+a».n0SS/ 


-02*37011 . 

:3»- 

•aa.-aB: 

+0»;lg*. 

*079 . 1* 


Stock Indexes 

ss"(S« ,c s g.-i. «, 

*87.10 jtlj IS 4 ?* 4 “ JB 464.1S 

469.15 «1*s2£m S-II *<J» *MJ5 

% 46a ” m- 

s Kjss^Slprw 

%% 3S£%»M8SS93 


■ran« 

+UB1'' 


UBS 


+139^50. 
+us^» 
• ur c< 

-nr 


Commodity indexes 

Woody's c “>« 

<? ® UterS An-K'Sj 

OJ.Potures 

^om- Research 


rVȣ-. 

vmx-z 

..•MAX 

.3KST 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 1994 


Y '\ V*. 


■tv 


v or:s 




-"dBeD 


*’*'« H*fsoz 


■ I 




puier 


until Hiah 



Page IS 

EUROPE 


Enterprise Raises 
Hostile Takeover 
Offer for Lasmo 


***** by Oar Sutf From Dispatch* 

wt~PSPSF r Enterprise Oil 
PLC raised its hostile takeover of- 

{« f fL La ^?£ LC on Tuesda J' 10 

165 pence (SZ5I) a share from 150 
poice, claiming this was the final 
oner, oat Chairman Rudolph Ag- 
new of Lasmo said it r emain ed “in- 
adequate.'* 

Analysts said a successful mke- 
° 1 ver wotM make the new company 
the world's latest independent oB 
exploration company and the 
fowtb- largest British oil company. 

The new bid also failed to excite 
investors. Although Lasmo’s shares 
opened at 153 pence, up 6, they 
ttosed at 144, down 3. Enterprise 
shares feD 10 to 393. 

“It’s a weak hand for Enterprise, 
and if the bid goes through, there 
will be a diluting effect for its 
shareholders said John Toalster 
an analyst with Strauss Turnbull 
Securities. 

Mr. Toalster said that in his view 
the price was too high. Other ana- 
lysts were less sure, citing the com- 

plenty of the offer and recent suc- 
cesses in exploration by Lasmo in 
Algeria. 

Enterprise said that ns bid val- 
ued Lasmo at £1.59 billion and 
represented a premium of 12 per- 
cent over Lasmo’s closing share 
price on Monday. The offer re- 
mains open until July 1. 

The increasingly bitter takeover 
battle was further intensified as 
Enterprise said that Lasmo’s de- 
fense document “bears all the hati - 
marks of the same old Lasmo, over- 
pptumsttc claims in place of a 
rational case for independence.” 


Lasmo "s board has produced no 
convincing arguments for contin- 
ued independence,” said Graham 
Hearne, chairman and chief execu- 
tive of Enterprise. 

After launching its initial bid on 
April 28, Enterprise said on June 1 
lhat it controlled 0.72 percent of 
Lasmo 's ordinary capital. 

Lasmo improved its results 
sharply last year but still reported a 
net loss of £131 million on sales 
that rose by 9 percent, to £678 
million. 

Enterprise's profit rose 9 per- 
cent. to £94.7 million, in 1993 in 
spite of weak oil prices. Sales rose 4 
percent, to £546.1 million. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) 

■ UX Retail Sales Rise 

Britons are still spending despite 
sharp rises in personal taxes in 
April, a top retail survey released 
on Tuesday said, according to a 
Reuters dispatch from London. 

The Confederation of British In- 
dustry's latest survey showed retail 
sales were higher in Mav than a 
year earlier, with further increases 
expected. 

“There's no discernible sign yet, 
either in our survey or from talking 
to our members, that consumers 
have been pul off by the increases 
in lax that came through in their 
pay packets at the end of April," 
said Nigel Whittaker, a confedera- 
tion official 

Mr. Whittaker said consumers 
were still cautious after getting into 
too much debt in the late 1980s, but 
he said it was too soon to gauge the 
specific impact of the tax rises. 


Young, but Growing Fast 

Real Estate Investment Trusts Eye Europe 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

LONDON — The National Association of Real 
Estate Investment Trusts has crossed the Atlantic 
for a tour of Europe's financial centers in a bid to 
attract pounds, francs and Deutsche marks into 
the $42 billion U.S. enterprise. 

Mark Decker, the association's chief executive, 
denies sug ge stions that he is courting European 
investors to make up for a slowing flow of U.S. 
funds into real estate investment trusis. 

“We are right on track with last year, when we 
had 141 new REIT offerings, raising over SIR 
billion," Mr. Decker said during a trip to London. 
Amsterdam, Paris, Frankfurt. Zurich and Geneva. 

“Id the last two years we have raised more 
money than in the first 30 years.” he said. "REITs 
have raised S7 billion this year through about 60 
offerings, so we anticipate being close to or a little 
ahead of last year.** 

A relatively young industry. REITs are only just 
seeing the growth (he founders expected when they 
were created by the US. Congress in 1960. 

A REIT is a corporation or trust that combines 
capital from many investors to acquire or provide 
financing for ai) forms of real estate. REITs general- 
ly do not pay corporate income tax, and they must 
pay 95 percent of net income to investors. U nlike a 
partnership, it cannot pass on losses to investors. 

Industry growth, initially slow, has recently 
been explosive. 


Two years ago, the total market capitalization of 
REITs was $9 5 billion, according to Mr. Decker. 
Today, the industry has a market capitalization of 
S42 billion, with assets of $60 billion. Like proper- 
ty companies, the shares trade at a discount to 
asset value. 

While this still represents only 2 percent of the 
commercial real-estate market in the United 
States. Mr. Decker said he expected “to grow 30 
times our own size” over the next two decades and 
to have a market capitalization of between $100 
billion and $200 billion by 2000. 

Along with growth has come change. Mr. Deck- 
er says the REITs of the 1970s were highly lever- 
aged, with 54 of debt for every SI of equity. 
Frequently, they lent to developers for highly risky 
projects. “Not too dissimilar to the savings- an d- 
loan debade we had in the 1980s," he said. 

The newer REITs have a debt-to-equity ratio of 
Mol and own and operate properties, lending a 
degree of stability to the industry. 

About 50 percent of the REIT stock is held by 
private or retail investors, with institutions holding 
the other 50 percent. Recently, pension funds, 
which had shied away from REITs, have decided 
that they are worthy investments. A decision early 
this year by the Californian Public Employees 
Retirement System to invest in REITs was a water- 
shed event for the industry. Mr. Decker says. 


Procedo Follows Balsam’s Free Fall 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — The German 
financing group Procedo GmbH 
teetered on the brink of bankruptcy’ 
Tuesday after its main shareholder 
said it would not step in to bear a 
greater share of Procedo's huge 
fosses. 

Procedo faces losses of around 
1.6 billion Deutsche marks (5974 


Michelin Expands French Job Cuts 


Bloomberg Business News 

PARIS — Compagnie G6ndraJe des Et a blis se- 
men ts Michelin SCA, the world’s largest tire- 
maker, said Tuesday it would eliminate an addi- 
tional 1,170 jobs in France by. the end of 1995. 

A year ago, Micbdin said it would cut 5,000 
positions out of 30,000 in France through early 
retirement, increased use of part-timers and em- 
ployee buyouts. 

The latest call for more cuts in the work force 
did not surprise analysts, who said the move was 
not a response to the current slump in European 
car and truck sales. 


Instead, they pointed out. the company is mov- 
ing ahead with a long-term restructuring plan and 
Deeds fewer workers as it equips its production 
facilities with state-of-the-art technology. 

u lf they want to install more efficient produc- 
tion, they'll have to keep catting.” said Gerard 
Ewenczyk, an analyst at Paribas- SAFE in Paris. 

“This is pari of their long-term plan to continue 
to reduce labor costs and centralize operations.” he 
said. 

The changes are part of a worldwide strategy to 
eliminate 10,000 oat of 125,000 jobs and reduce 
a nnual operating costs by 3.5 bfflion francs ($622 
million) by mid- 1 995. 


million) following die collapse of 
its single most important diem. 
Balsam AG. the sports surfaces 
manufacturer whose four-man 
board was arrested on suspicion of 
fraud last week. 

Procedo’s main shareholder, the 
credit-risk firm All gem cine Kredii- 
verachcrung AG, said it had told 
the firm's bonk creditors il was not 
prepared to assume responsibility 
for any Procedo losses other than 
its own. 

Bankers said this move meant 
Procedo would have to follow Bal- 
sam in filing for bankruptcy. 

“This means the end for Pro- 
cedo.” one banker said. “There is 
no sign that bankruptcy can be 


avoided now." Balsam filed for 
bankruptcy Friday. 

Procedo’s creditor banks had 
earlier called on AKV, which is 
owned by two of Germany's largest 
insurance companies, to play a 
larger role in rescuing Procedo than 
it originally offered in proposals 
made last week. 

At a meeting Wednesday, the 
AKV chairman, Hubert Beuter, 
proposed that Procedo's creditor 
banks forgive 100 percent of their 
loans to Procedo. AKV would refi- 
nance Procedo and in return for 
their contribution creditor banks 
would receive notes promising 
them returns once Procedo's for- 
tunes improved. 


Abu Dhabi 
Sentences 
BCQ Chiefs 

Reuters 

ABU DHABI — A court here 
sentenced 12 key Bank of Credit & 
Commerce International figures to 
jail Tuesday for their roles in the 
scandal that led to the bank's col- 
lapse in 1991 and ordered them to 
pay 59 billion in civil damages. 

Agha Hassan Abedi, 71, the 
bank’s founder, was sentenced to 
eight years in prison, and the for- 
mer chief executive, Mohammed 

Swaleh Naqvi, received 14 years — 
bath sentences being banded down 
in the defendants* absence. 

The 10 defendants still in Abu 
Dhabi appeared in suits and ties, 
some or them smoking and chatting 
as they waited for the court session. 
They had pleaded not guilty to 
criminal charges including dissi- 
pating funds, forging documents, 
concealing deficits and losses, and 
approving false loans. 

One of them, Iqbal Rizvi, was 
found not guilty. The other nine 
plus Ziauddin Akbar, who is serv- 
ing a six-year sentence in Britain on 
related charges, were given sen- 
tences of three to six years. 

The verdicts came in the biggest 
case to stem from the bank’s forced 
closure. Appeals are allowed. 

Mr. Abedi, who is confined to a 
wheelchair in his native Pakistan, 
started BCCI in 1972. The bank 
succeeded in spanning the globe 
but was shut down in 1991 after 
allegations of fraud. Billions of dol- 
lars were lost by creditors and de- 
positors. 

Courts and liquidators are still 
trying to settle the affair in several 
countries. 

Abu Dhabi's ruler and his family 
held, together with the govern- 
ment's Abu Dhabi Investment Au- 
thority, 77.4 percent of BCCI. 

Mr. Naqvi, 59, who was Mr. 
Abedi's right-hand man, had at- 
tended all the bearings since the 
trial started in October but was 
handed over to US. authorities in 
May to stand trial there. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt , v V' London ■■■.■■ ■<>- 

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Sources: Reuters. AFP imemu'mal Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• The European ComnnssioD said it had cleared the planned acquisition 
by Banco de Santander SA of a 73.45 percent stake in Banco EspafioJ de 
Cr&fito SA from Fondo de Garautia de Depdtitas. 

• Siemens AG said its KWH power engineering division won an order 
worth “almost 1 billion Deutsche marks” (5608 million) from Britsh 
power generator National Power PIC. 

• credit Lyonnais, the French state bank, was hit by a 24-hour strike by 
workers protesting 3,800 job cuts planned in the next three years. 

• Greek consumer prices rose 0.8 percent in May, bringing the annual 
inflation rate to 11 percent, compared with 10.4 percent in April and 10.2 
percent in March, official figures showed. 

• Lineas Abets de Espafla Iberia hopes to reduce its stake in Argentine 
State-run airline Aerofineas Argentines to 30 percent from its current 85 
percent, Joan Saez, the vice chairman, said. 

• Spain’s unemployment rate feD to 17.4 percent in May from 17.8 percent 
in ApriL as the namber of jobless fell 57,021 to 2,679,410, the Labor 
MmistrysauL 

• The Czech Republic's unemployment rale dropped in May to 3.1 
percent from 3.3 percent in April, a Labor Ministry official said. 

• Danzas AG said it has sold its 51 percent shareholding in Swiss inland 

waterway freighters Rbenusche Gfflenanst&lagsgruppe to Container De- 
pot AG. (AFP, AFX, Bloomberg) 


STEEL: Controversial EU Restructuring on Verge of Renewed Backing 


TOOURREADB51NVEVEY/MOWTRR1XAREA 

Hand-delivery of ihe IHT 
is now available on day of publication. 

155 57 57 


Just call toll-free r 1 55 57 57 


Continued from Page II 

their operations. Current EU rules 
allow aid to go only for complete 
company shutdowns. 

Prospects for success also will be 
boosted by the presence of Mr. 
Bangemann, who was absent when 
the commission turned down the 
Italian subsidies last month, and 
the fact that there will be no tomor- 


row in the event of a second rejec- 
tion. Unlike last month, when the 
subsidy proposal was poorly pre- 
pared, commissioners now are fully 
aware that the restructuring plain 
itself is at stake, one official said. 

Aides to Sir Leon said many of 
his concerns had been addressed, 
but it was not yet dear if he was 
ready to drop his opposition. 

The steel plan is one of the com- 


mission's most ambitious efforts to 
restructure an ailing industry, 
promising more than 1 bilHon Ecus 
to help companies shut excess 
plants and lay off more th an 50,000 
workers. 

The plan has been delayed for 
neatly a year by disputes over 
whether private steelmakers and 
state-owned producers should bear 
the brunt of the cutbacks. 


Approval of the subsidies will not 
guarantee success. The commission 
stiD would have to persuade EU 
industry ministers, who will meet in 
Luxembourg next Wednesday, to 
amend their decision to ban state 
subsidies after this year. 

The commission also wDl need to 
get European industry to come for- 
ward with 2 million tons or more of 
additional cutbacks. 


Pechiney Sees Lower Profit 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatch* 

PARIS — The French packaging 
company Pechiney International 
SA said Tuesday it expected its 
first-half profit to decline from last 
year’s 439 million francs ($78 mil- 
lion) before improving from the 
second half onward. Chairman 
Jean Gandois said at the annual 
shareholders meeting that higher 
costs and higher U.S. interest rates 
would contribute to the decline. 

(AFX Bloomberg) 


NYSE 

Tuesday's dosing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing an Waff Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. VJa The Associated Press 


(Continued) 


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LNTERNATIONAL HER.LLD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JL7VE 15, 1994 

— ADVERTISEMENT * ^ 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

. .4 . . A — LmU 


June 14, 1994 


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BOND PORTFOLIOS 

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d GAfft (CHI Mondial- SF teS.16 

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x GAM Americana Acc DM 

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GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: 1 809] 295-4000 Fax : (M91J9S-6180 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 
x (A) Original Investment — I I00J2 

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x tFl G7 Currency * 

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x (L) Global Financial —S 10080 

x JWH WORLDWIDE FND-S IftOO 

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mFFM ini Bd Progr-CHF Q J5F 9*48 

GOLDMAN SACHS 

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GS EQUITY FUNDS SICAV 
x GS Euro Small Ct»> Port— S 

x GS Global Equity * H-78 

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xGS US Small Can Port S 

GOTTE* FUND MANAGEMENT 
w G. Swop Fund —Ecu U4T83 
GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 
x Granite Capital Equity— S 05778 

x Granite CcrHial Mkt Neulrais D.M51 

x Granite Cooltar Martooa*— S 07700 

GT ASSET MANAGEMENT (IRELAND} LTD 
Tel: (44 ) 71-710 4567 

tf GT Asean Fd A Shares— 5 77.11 

d GT Asean Fd B Shares S 77.72 

tf GT Aski Fund A Shores 8 2481 

tf GT Asia Fund B atones * 

d GT AsJon Small Comn A Sh8 1983 

d GT Allan Smalt Comp B ShS 1941 

d GT Australia Fd A Shcriw — l 3113 

d GT Australia Fd B Stores— S 3340 

tf GT Austr. Small Co A Sh — S 
d GT Auslr. Small Co B Sh— S 
tf GT Berry Japan Fd A Sh— S 
d GT Berrv Jaaan Fd B Sh — S 

d GT Band Fd A Shares—* 
d GT Bono Fd B Shares — S 
d GT Bia ft Ao Sciences A SfUS 
d GT BIO ft Ap Science B Sh Jl 

d GT Dollar Fund A Sh * 

d GT Dollar Fund B Sh 5 

fl GT Emerging Mkts A Sh— 5 
fl GT Emerging Mkts B Sh — 5 
d GT Em Mkt Small Ca A Sh -I 
d GT Em MH Small Co B Sh J 
x GT Euro Small Ca Fd A Sh J 
w GT Euro Small Co Fd B Sh J 
d GT Hong Kong Fd a Shams* 
tf GT Hong Kang Fd B Shams 
if GT Honshu Pathfinder A Sh* 119S 

if GT Honshu Pathfinder B ShS 
x GT Jap QTC Stocks Fd A ShS 
xGTJaoOTC Slocks FdBShl 
x GT Jaa Small Ca Fd A Sh_J 
x GTJod Small Co Fd B Sh_* 

x G.T. Latin America Fd * 2189 

fl GT Slralegtc Bd Ffl A Sh — * 
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tf GT Telecomm. Fa A Stem* 
tf GT Telecomm. Fd B Shares* 
r GT TechrolOBY Fund A Sh J 
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GT MANAGEMENT PLC [«71 7H4S 67) 
r fl G.T. Blot ecn/ Health Fund—* 20.14 

L tf G.T.Deu«dfit»fdFund * 1168 

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d G.T. investment Fund 5 JSSI 

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fl Euro 5iort Fund =:u 

tf US Slort Fund ? !•; 

A Padllc 5100 ruW. i P 

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fl See cl cl Swiss Stccv CF - 

tf jt»»an 5loc« Fund — y ikti 

d Germoi Sloe* runa_ D '® 

tf Korean Slack 'Fund * ^ 

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fl DM cash Fund DM -S 

d ECU Cash Fund Ecu .27 

if Sterllna Cash Funa { J 

d Dollar Cash Fund— — —5 . !*r 

tf French Fran: Cosr., ^rr •' 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

mkey Global Hedge J f, 

a’Sc'Si ih 


m k.1 AJia Pacific fc Ltd * 1 * '2 

KIDDER. PEABODY 

fl Chesesecke Fund Lid S 

fl III Funa Lie — 

b mn Gucrcnteea Fund J -;1 1* 

a Siooenenge ' ,ai — ' 

LEHMAN BROTHERS ... 

d Aslan Dragon Fort Nv a — j ---c 

tf Aslan Dragon Perl NVB—S *■»; 

A Global Advhars i Nv *— s JLjJ 

a Global Affnsors II N. 9—5 ;3J3 

e Global Advisors Port Nv » J CS 

fl Gtobol Advisers Pori Sv B5 1.4. 

d Lehman Cur Adv. A B 

tf Premier Futures Adv A.B-S 

LIPPO INVESTMENTS 

21. F LIdpo Tower Centre 3* Queenswsr.Hy. 

Ttl 18521 Sol 6fflS Fa* (W2t 5 s * B3E8 

h Java Funa — 

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x 1DR Money Market Fa S l*5s 

x USD Money Mortei Fd — ; 

x Indonesian Growth Fd S 30.C 

w Aslan Gro win Fond 5 iiisv 

x Aslan Warrant Fund—— J 3i ’ 

LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT (152) MS 4CT. ^ 

x AnteteKi Fund * 

x LG Aslan Smaller Cos Fa _S "3571 

x LG India Fund Ltd S 1A30 

x LG Japan Fd 5 10 05 

LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS) Ltd 
Llovds Americas Portfolio (3091 3228711 
x Balanced Moderate Risk rOS 95* 

LOMBARD. ODIER ft CIE - GROUP 
OBLIFLEX LTD (Cl> 

fl MulilairrencY— * 0^6. 

tf Dal lor Medium Term J 24.8* 

tf Dollar Long Term S 203; 

tf Japanese Yen Y 47H 00 

tf Pound Sterling c -aj! 

d Deutsche Mark DM 1.8. 

tf Dutch Florin F I ’®-t' 

tf HY Eurocurrencies Ecu *JH 

tf Swiss Franc. S F il» 

tf US Dollar 5hort Term 5 1287 

d HY Euro Curr Dhrld Pay — Ecu "48 

tf Swiss Mulllcurrencr — SF 1673 

tf European Curr enev Eni Z2J* 

tf Belgian Franc BF 13647 

fl Convertible. — * .JJ®® 

tf French Franc- FF 15JB7 

tf Swiss MuilhDlviaefid SF *.« 

fl Swta Franc Short-Term — SF 106.95 

d Canadian Dollar CS J341 

tf Dutch Florin Multi Fl 1581 

tf Swiss Franc Dlvid Pov SF 1072 

tf CAD MulltaiT. Div — cs "84 

tf jwediierranet»i Curr SF lOJ; 

a Convertibles S F 9.95 

MALABAR CAP MGMT ( Bermuda) LTD 


! raNC=DE.V -DM WaJ 

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117*: ! OOEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 

»»'0 i ::GrMver.srSfJ.5r.«n.'.»FE4*p-P , *2»5 

c Oaer Eursseon DM 

131.15 -Ode. Eurswcn S 1-.3* 

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•ij®S > OeevEuroG-nSrer-ec — • 5* 71 

OT » OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
lOIJO Wtllrams Hs*jse. Mtsm.ltoei NMH Bemruac 
9530 Tel: SM 292-lplE Fc> . SO* 295-D05 

TGiOC » Fliisbur. Group— S j—fls 

257(16 w Olympic Secur tie SF SF tetx 

II73M x Olvmp.c Stsrs Emera VAtsl 
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w y.-mciuGI Sec inc PI i* — * J-” 

252 C*3 xW.ncn.GI Sec Irt P' tCl — S 9.J5 

14625 wWincrLHitlg inr-Madiwn-EDi JifM- 

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; Eocif* Pe- Ecu * 

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s Bsna inn Acc s 

e Bond imT inc * 

tf Bart Europe *cc * 

tf Bert surge® inc J 

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ff Etfrt Sweden :ne 5ek 

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if Bert DcncruS a« * 

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3 Curr. US ZlUcr -J 

ff Curr Sweoar Kroner -Sek 

SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP 
SCG5LUA FUND t£Fi 
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w SF Barbs C F-cnce ff 

a SF Berts E OH ! 

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- iF Berts- 1 Belgium — 3 C 

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"37.30 I xsvmcncsier T-wllchS— — * 

Dli I OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 

1aS:i1 I 73 Frtffi: S; Hom.iisnJemiutfC SiF2*5 


m Malabar Inti Fund - . -5 1855 

MAN INTEHNATIONAL FUTURES 
mMItrt Limited ■ Ordinary — S 4XM 

m Mint Limited- income S TJW 

m Mint Gld Ltd - Suet Issue— S 278Q 

lllMtnt Gtd Ltd ■ Nuv 2002— S 22.0 

ffiMhit Gtd Lid ■ Dec 1994 S 18.18 

rnMhft Gld Ltd - Aug 1**S J 15.15 

mMhfl Gld Currenctes— _ — S IJS 

mMItrt Gtd Currencies .3001 — * 780 

m Mint SP Res LWIBNP) 5 I0IJ7 

m Athena Gld Futures J 1334 

m Athena Gld Currencies. * 

m Albert Gta Flmmciahs lnc_S 16S9 

m Athena Gld FmancJols Cod .5 11.97 

m AHL Capital Mk ts Fd S I17B 

mAHL Commociltv Fund 5 lB-« 

m AHL Currency Fund— S ».T2 

mAHL Real TtmeTroaFd — S 10^ 

mAHL Gtd Real Time Trd — S 038 

mAHL GW cap Mark Ltd— _5 1086 

m Mao Guaranteed l99*Lld_S 880 

mMop Lewrageo Pecpy. Ltd A ".37 

m MAP Guaranteed 2®)0 1 J&30 

mMlnl G GL Fin XU3 -1 ,*83 

m Mim Plus Gld 2KU S 1083 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Front St Hamilton Bermuda 009)772 *7B* 
w Maritime Ml I -Sector iud_s 1000.3* 

wMoriHme Glbl Bela Series -8 BU87 

w Maritime Gtbl De«a Series 3 78*^ 

wMortflmeGIMTou Series — S 792.77 

MATTHeWS INTERNATIONAL MCT 
EMERGING ASIAN ST RATEGI E5 FUND 
mCKns A— ■ 3 

tf Class B — —S IITJN 

PACIFIC CONV STRATEGIES FD LTD 

iTI ClbSS A S 97-5 

dClasB S 97.49 

MAVERICK (CAYMAN! (10*1 WW942 

m Maverick Fd 1 1SU763 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD 

m The Corsair Fund Lid S 112.17 

ME ES PIERSON 

Rokln 55. 1012kk. Amsterdam 1 20-521 "SB) 
xAslaPac. Growth Fd N.V. _5 *1.73 

x Aslan Capllal Holdings 5 6131 


I ur i IWM puny H 

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FACTUAL . 

tf Eleroifr =undL!5 5 26 5, 

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PARIBAS-GROUP 

* Lu«gr 5 ... 

C Porvesl USA 3 5, ^3. 

tf Porvesl Joocn E * =-J,. 

d “ar-vest As‘c PocH B S .3. 

tf Porvesl Europe B_ Ecu 5 

fl Parvest Hoi land B Fl ,138. 

ff Porvest Francs B FF .31. 

d Porvesl Ger irony B DM «*. 

tf Pcrvest GWi- Dollar B I 17 4 ° 

fl Porvesl OBI FDM B DM IT2 

tf Porvesl Dbl 1-Ten B Y 16311- 

if Parvesl Obll-Guklen 9 Fl 15*6 

tf Parvesl dull- Prone B FF 19*0. 

d Parvest OWi-Ster B 1 15* 

fl Porvrsf ODU-Ecu B Ecu 130 

d Porvesl OblLBelu* B LF 17DW 

fl Parvesl S-T Dollar B 5 120 

A Parvesl S-T Europe 9 Ecu 131 

fl Parvest S-T DEM B DM 5*6 

fl Parvest S-T FRF B FF 1B26 

H Parvest S-T Bet Plus B BF 105*7 

fl Parvesl Global B LF 

fl Parvesl Ini Bond B 5 21 

fl Parvest Dbil-UraB- ur 538517 

a Parvesl im EoutMes B * 1" 

fl Parvesl UK B — I 89 

fl Parvest USD Plus 8 S *8 

fl Porvesl S-T CHF B SF H2 

fl Parvesl OoU-Cttrmda b CJ lie 

tf Parvest OWPDKKB DKK 938 

PERMAL GROUP . _ 

I Drakkar Growth N.V 5 27J9 

/ Emerging Mkts HkJgs * ,8S1 

I EuraMIrlEcu) Ltd — —Ecu 1637 
f FX, Financials ft Futures _5 94t 

/ investment H Mgs N.V * ]» 

f Media ft Communications— S 1013 

I NoscnlUd _J 1838 

PICTET ft CIE -GROUP 

x P.C.F UK Val (Lin) -t *8 

w PX.F Germaval (Lux) DM « 

x P.CF Noramvat I Lux l * M 

w P.CF Vallber (Lux) Ptos 9751 

x P.CF Vail lain I Lux) Ul 1*71*4 

x P.CF voltranw (Lu»l FF 1245 

w P.U.F. Valbond SFR (Lux) JF 2B1 

x P.U.F. Vulbond USD ILuxU 221 

xP.U.F. Valbond Ecu lLux)_Eai 181 

x P.U.F. Volbontf FRF (Lux).FF 95t 

i w P.U.F. Valbond GBP (Luvl-S 9i 

1 xP.U.F. Valbond DEM (Lux) DM 291 

I x P.U.F. USS Bd Ptfl !Luxl_* 10DB« 

i x P.U.F. Model Fd Feu 125 

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Foreign Investment 
In China Declines 


PNTERJNA'nOISAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 1994 


Singapore Firm Back, in Triumph 


Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupatchn 

BEIJING — New foreign invest- 
ment, which has been a key dement 
driving China’s economic boom, 
plunged 50 percent in the first 
quarter because of new tax policies 
and government efforts to avoid 
oyemeatnig the economy, an offi- 
a&l newspaper said Tuesday. 

The fall is a major reversal of two 
years of soaring investment since 
**“8 X»?Pfcs. China’s leader, in 
early 1992 sparked a boom bring- 
ing annual growth rates of 13 per- 
cent. 

“Asian euphoria about China is 
waning,^ a Western specialist on 
foreign investment said. “Taiwan 
and Hong Kong companies seem to 
be more realistic now.” 

According to the State Adminis- 
tration for Industry and Com- 
merce, the number of newly estab- 
lished foreign-funded enterprises 
tumbled 44 percent to 10.739 m the 
first quarter from a year earlier, the 
Qrina Dally reported. 

Re gi stered capital also slumped 
50 percent in the period, according 
to the agency’s statistics. But no 
actual totals were reported. 

"You would expea investment 
to go in cycles with the economy.” a 
diplomat said. “Last year was the 
pea k of die economic cycle, so it's 
not surprising that it’s also the peak 
of the investment cycle.” 

Economists said worries about a 

possible economic downturn jg 

China and uncertainty about the 
new tax system had prompted some 
companies to take a wait-and-see 


Seoul Shares 
Are Eroded 
By Tensions 

CaapitedbyOurSutff From Dispatches 

- SEOUL — Growing ten- 
sions over North Korea's nu- 
clear plans sent the Seoul 
stock market reding, but econ- 
omists and officials said Tues- 
day the crisis may encourage 
powerful South Korean 
unions to be more flexible. 

The crisis also depressed 
market sentiment in Japan. 

North Korea’s announce- 
ment Monday that it was with- 
drawing from the Internation- 
al Atomic Energy Agency 
triggered a sefl-off in Seoul's 
stock market, which until 
Tuesday had seemed almost 
immune to the Pyongyang sa- 
ber-rattling. The Composite 
Index fell 2.11 percent, to end 
in 903.72. 

'■ "ft would be meaningless to. 
try w find jotter factors than 
the nuclear fuss to explain the ' 


attitude. In addition, such coun- 
tries as India, Indonesia and Viet- 
nam were now attracting some 
Asian investors away. 

For two consecutive years, China 
has led the world in economic 
growth. 

Last year, when the economy ex- 
panded by 13.4 percent, foreign in- 
vestment was at a record level, with 
new agreements signed promising 
foreign capital of 5122.7 billion, up 
77 percent from 1992. 

foreign capital actually utilized 
during the year rose 92 percent, to 
536.77 billion. 

But China is paying the price. 
Inflation is running at 23 percent a 
year in major cities, alarming Com- 
munist Party officials, who rear so- 
da] turmoil. 

The government said Tuesday 
that inflation in China, r unning at 
19.5 percent in April, would ease in 
the second half of the year, the 
offidal Economic Daily reported. 
The government's target is to bring 
inflation to single-dipt levels for 
the whole year, u said. But govern- 
ment efforts to slow the economy, 
control inflation and reform ibe 
fiscal structure have made China 
less attractive to foreign investors, 
officials said. 

“The introduction of a new tax- 
ation system, which cuts down 
preferential tax treatment for for- 
eign-funded ventures, is a major 
factor affecting new foreign invest- 
ment,” said Hoc Lin, bead of the 
Enterprise Registration Depart- 
meat of the State Administration 
for Industry and Commerce. 

Other new policies, such as can- 
celing duty-free importing of cars by 
foreign-funded companies, also 
clamped down on the “round-trip 
capital” plan under winch Chinese 
companies sent money to offshore 
affiliates that then invested in China 
to gain from preferential policies. 

"The rapid growth of foreign- ; 
funded firms in the past two years 
saw some unhealthy practices,” the 
China Daily said. (Reuters, AFP, \ 
Bloomberg) i 


Bloomberg Busmen Sews 

SINGAPORE — Creative Technology 
Ltd.'s new listing in Singapore is a vindica- 
tion for the world’s leading maker of comput- 
er sound boards. 

Two years ago, when it sold its first sbares 
to the public, it went to the United States to 
raise funds. Executives apparently felt that 
nobody in Singapore would understand what 
a high;tech start-up was all about. Now it is 
returning to list its stock at home and is 
receiving a hero’s welcome. 

"Creative is the most promising of all the 
electronics and technology companies in Sin- 
gapore.” said Timothy Wong, an analyst at 
Vickers Balias Investment Research. “It's got 
a dominant market share to a fast-growing 
industry." 

When the company offered 2.4 million 
shares for sale in Singapore, it received appli- 
cations for more than 10 million. The stock 
starts trading Wednesday on the exchange's 
main board. 

The demand for shares is not surprising. 
Creative Technology has become the nation's 
model company. Its global sales grew from 
524.8 million m 1991 to 5291. 7 million in 
1993, and the company’s products have be- 
come the international standard for sound 
production on personal computers. 


It wasn’t like this back in 1992. 

-There hardly was a multimedia market- 
place,” K-S. Chay. the company's president 
and chief operating officer, said in an inter- 
view last year. "It was considered an up-and- 
coming marketplace, but nobody really knew 
the potential." 

In an interview Monday, he said that to 
1992 Singapore bad few small technology 
companies and that Creative Technology was 
worried that it would “take the stock market 
a while to understand” such a phenomenon. 

When it was time to go public. Creative 
Technology snubbed the local exchange and 
turned to the Nasdaq exchange to the United 
States, a market loaded with high-tech com- 
panies. At the time, Singapore's exchange 
was dominated by government-linked giants 
such as shipyards and Singapore Airlines. • 

The company’s Sound Blaster sound 
boards, which let personal computers pro- 
duce high-quality digital sound, were catch- 
ing on in the US. market. And unlike Singa- 
pore, Wall Street had plenty of analysts 
familiar with technology stocks, todutfrug 
those to the multimedia market. 

Singapore has changed. Its government is 
working to turn it into a technology and 

telecommunications bub for Asia, and its 
electronics manufacturing sector grew 26 per- 


cent in 1993. compared with 11 percent to 
1 992. Electronics accounted for 46 percent of 
the nation’s manufacturing output last year. 

Mr. Chay says the company should get 
some credit for changing the local scene. 

“Our story helped the local market to un- 
derstand that a Singapore company can actu- 
ally survive and grow and prosper to a high- 
tech market,” he said. 

Breaking ground for the local industry has 
also aided competitors. The local marker's 
new-found interest to high technology has led 
to a spate of public offerings by Singapore- 
based electronics companies. 

Mr. Chay grants that one of the reasons for 
Creative Technology's new listing is the Sin- 
gapore market’s willingness to pay more for 
stock. “The current stock-market condition 
to Singapore, especially m the electronics 
sector, is quite encouraging,” he said. 

The company sold the Singapore shares for 
25.80 Singapore dollars (US$16.85,) each, a 
discount on Monday's closing price of 
SIS. 1 875 on Nasdaq. 

The price represents a prospective price-to- 
earntogs ratio of about 14. so it is "not 
unreasonable" to think that the slock could 
rise to about 18 to 20 times earnings to 
Singapore trading, said Richard Armstrong, 
research head at Barclays de Zoeie Wedd. 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 
13W0 — i : — 

10000 1 V . 


Singapore 
Straits "Times 


2200 

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Tokyo 

Nikkei £25 



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Imenatjoral Herald Tribune 


Japanese Firms to Bid in Indonesia 


/tgmcp Frana-Preue 

TOKYO— Nippon Telegraph & 
Telephone Corp., Itochu Corp. and 
Sumitomo Corp- pton to bid jointly 
fora 52 billion telecommunications 

S ' set in Indonesia, company offi- 
said Tuesday. 

NTT and the two trading bouses 
are also calling on local companies! 
including the Salim conglomerate, 
to join the Japanese companies to an 
international tender offer scheduled 
for August, Itochu officials said. 

Under a five-year plan to build 5 
million telecommunications lines, 
the Indonesian government is to 
allow several international groups 
to install a total of 2 million lines. 

The government has already 
placed an order with the state tele- 
communications operator, Teleko- 


munikasi Indonesia, to buQd the 
first 3 million lines. 

submit d^cumem^lor^the lender 
by the end of June, the officials 
said The Indonesian government is 
expected to announce the result as 
early as December. 

Groups that win the order will be 
to charge of constructing, manag- 
ing and repairing the telecommuni- 
cations lines until they can collect 
their investment. 

NTT is already involved in a 
similar project to Thailand 

■ Jakarta to Show Plane 

Indonesia will invite 15 Asia- Pa- 
cific leaders lo witness the rofl-oul 
of its turboprop commercial airlin- 
er on Nov. 17, Reuters reported 
from Jakarta. 


The debut of the N-250 proto- 
type of the medium-range 70-seat 
commuter aircraft is scheduled to 
coincide with a summit meeting in 
Indonesia of the Aria-Pacific Eco- 
nomic Cooperation forum. Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton and heads of state 
or government from China, Japan. 
Australia, Chile. Taiwan, Malaysia 
and New Zealand are among those 
expected to attend. 

Djoko Sartono, head of the N- 
250 program at state-run Industri 
Pesawat Terbang Nusantara. said 
each N-250 would cost $13.5 mil- 
lion. 

Officials of the state-run compa- 
ny have said the N-250 may also be 
assembled at three U.S. sites, in 
Alabama, Kansas and Arizona. 


Japan Carmakers 
Retrench on Pay 

Agence France- Prcsse 

TOKYO — Several Japanese 
automakers said Tuesday they had 
frozen starting salaries at tost year’s 
level to try to cope with the indus- 
try’s sales slowdown. 

Toyota Motor Corp., Nissan 
Motor Co. and Mazda Motor 
Corp. said they had frozen monthly 
starting salaries, now a tittle less 
than 200,000 yen ($1,900), during 
spring labor negotiations. An exec- 
utive of Honda Motor Co. said 
Honda had increased its starting 
salary a nominal 500 yen, to 
197,500 yen. 

News reports said that eight ma- 
jor Japanese life insurance compa- 
nies also planned to freeze salaries 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


Very briefly: 


• Japan's machinery orders plunged to April to their lowest level since 
October, reflecting a reluctance among cash-strapped companies to 
invest in new equipment. 

• HSST Development Coipu, an affiliate of Japan Airlines, agreed to join 
a 5700 million magnetic-levitation railway project to Brazil. 

■ The Pfaffippines had a first-quarter surplus to its balance of payments of 
$616 miDton, down 4.6 percent from than the year-earlier period. 

• Japan's crude steel production fell 5. 1 percent to 8 .5 million metric tons 
from the year-earlier level 

• Old Electric Co. said it would move 45 percent of its printer and 
facsimile production to Thailand by the end of 1996 as part of a cost- 
cutting effort 

• Nissan Motor Co. is considering several options for restructuring its 
truck manufacturing venture in India with the Mritindra group. 

• Industrial and business leaders expressed support for a holding compa- 
ny to narrow the trade gap between Taiwan and Japan. 

■ A Chinese company wants to set up a steel mill in the Malaysian state of 

Sarawak that would have a production capacity of about 5 million metric 
tons yearly. AFP. AFX. Bloomberg 


Kantor Lauds Japan Over Chips 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 




of Hanshm Securities srid. 

In Tokyo, stocks were 
bruised, but brokers said the 
underiytog sentiment was still 
positive. 

Disappointing April ma- 
chinery orders and a strong 
yon cambered with the tension 
over 'Nath Korea to halt the 
Tokyo market's rally. • 

(AJP. Reuters, AFP) 


ADVERTISEMENT 


T?!7!TTP!T!17FTOf! 


Ike tmderaigoed aO TK H mces that Xer- 
ox: Corporation has decided to termi- 
nal* Ibe Deposit Agree me nt. Hidden 
of CDIU of Xem Corportfloa are 
reqoaied lo deliver their CDite to (he 
office of the imdendcned and give 
instructions for the delivery of the 
underlying ahara to a cwtodun in 
die United Stales of America. The 
withdrawal charges of AjD-C. are for 
the Com p an y hot costs of the deposit 
of the snares with the custodian have 
to be home by (be CDR-taoMec - 

■ AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 


Amsterdam, 6 Jane 199A 


Kmght-Ridder 

WASHINGTON — The foreign 
share of the Japanese computer- 
chip market was 20.7 percent to the 
first quarter, unchanged from the 
previous quarter, Mickey Kantor, 
the US. trade representative, said 
Tuesday. 

Mr. Kantor said the United 
States was pleased that the figure 
had remained above 20 percent for 
two consecutive quarters, but he 
said the government believed that , 
US. ..and ocher foreign, companies, 
conWcaptrire even more of the Jap- 
anese market. 

Under a 1991 agreement, the , 
United States expects a sustained 
foreign market share of at least 20 
percent of Japanese purchases of . 
computer chips. I 

Die chips are miniature ctrcnils 
used to run computers and other 
electronic products. American 
companies had long complained 
that Japanese trade bankas largely 


ADVERTISEMENT 


excluded foreign chip manufactur- 
ers. 

“U.S. companies have made tre- 
mendous efforts over the past sever- 
al years to take advantage of the 
opportunities provided under the ar- 
rangement aim to build long-term 
relationships with Japanese custom- 
ers," Mr. Kan lor said. "While these 
efforts are dearly paying off. we 


believe that there is still neat poten- 
tial for further progress.* 

Meanwhile, “framework’* trade 
Uriks to Japan on automobiles and 
auto parts are likely be extended 
unto Wednesday, an official of the 
Ministry of International Trade 
and Industry sard. 

Die talks originally were sched- 
uled for two days. 


JiVGERSOLL-KAflD COMPANY 

(CDRa) 

Die undersigned announces that as 
from 22 June 1994 at Kas-Assotia- 
tie N.V, Sptadraat 172, Amster da m, 
dir. cpn. no, 86 of the CDRa 
bgenoO-Rud Conpaar each 
raw, 5 shares will be payable with 
Dus. L30 neU, (<&t. per rec. dale 
1 8.05. 94s gross $ 0,175 p. sh.) after 
deduction of 15% USA-lax. $ 8,131 
- Dfls. 0,24 per CDR. Div. era. 
belonging to mnmddaU of The 
Netherlands will be paid after 
deduction of an additional 15% 
USA-lax (*= S 0,131 - Dfls. &M) 
with Dfls. LQ6 act. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N-V. 
Amsterdam, 9 Jane 1994. 


IFDC JAPAN FUND 

Soriete d’lnvestissement a Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 2, boulevard Royal 
L - 2953 LUXEMBOURG 
R.C. Luxembourg B -2 1694 

Notice is hereby given to the shareholders, that the 

Annual General Meeting 

of shareholders of IFDC JAPAN FUND, will be held at the 
company’s head office, 69. route d'Esch, L-2953 Luxembourg, 
on June 34th. 1994 at 3.00 p.rn. with the following agenda: 

1. Submission of the Reports of the Board of Directors and of 
the Independent Auditor, 

2. Approval of the Statements of Assets and Liabilities and of 
the Statements of Operations for the year ended as at March 
31st, 1994; Appropriation of the results. 

3. Discharge of tbe Directors; 

4. Statutory appointments ; 

5. Miscellaneous, 

The shareholders are advised that no quorum is required for 
tbe items on tbe agenda of tbe Annual General Meeting and 
that decisions win be taken on a simple majority of the shares 
present or represented at the Meeting. 

In order to attend the meeting of IFDC JAPAN FUND the 
owners of bearer sbares will have to deposit their shares five 
clear days before the meeting at the registered office of the 
Company or with Banque Internationale d Luxembourg. 

The Board of Directors 


READERS ARE ADVBB) 

that the Intoroatipaal 
Herald Tribune cannot be 
beUretpantfole for ton or 
dmoget incurred at o re- 
mit of hmacUortt stem- 
ming ham advert is ement* 
which appear in our paper. 
It it there fo re recommend- 
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E , wefe Spxidte m wow S 
. can 6 off-tcad rebides. 
fAfc 510/73WI92 
QMomo, USA 


AUTO SHIPPING 


SAVE ON CAB 5HFPMGL AMBCO. 
KrSjbssti 2, Antwerp fld^um. To/ltom 
US, Africa. HwAf fc-’b sdina. Free 
hotel 71 W 3 /SUIX h 232-6353 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 


EUROPE 

RANCEW«:fteb, 

TA:m4S37WBi 
Free [1| 46 37 93 TOL 

CSMANT.AUSnHA&CBtiaAL 

BJROffcFirettei 

7^(0691726755 

FwP691727310. 

SWIttEBtANDcMk 
TeLjWn 72830 21. 

For 1021)728 30 91. 

UNTIHJ ICKaXJfrb tendon. 

Id (071)8364802 
?630D9. 

Ter (071)2402^4. 


NORTH AMERICA 
WWTOBC 
Ty.:J2I37»389a 
^*6^^572-7212 

Free (2 1 21 7558785 
AgA/PAOFK: 
HONGKONG: 
Td.B52)9222-nB8. 
Tefc* 61170 HTHX. 
Fwiaaa 9222-iitio. 

SNSAPORE: 

W. 2236478. 

Fm: fog 224 1566. 

Ver. 28749 HI 5N. 


V a S’? rc<c4 R-p | T B VT « Y 3mod o-oa t* ? e-wl I « ~ 
















































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 1994 



ASDAQ 


lJMnnln 

H W» U» 5WC* _ 
16',-a 10 CAlWw" 
33% la'/jCTEC 


D ;„ yifl PE 100s Kian UawLdlg-.lOl'Ty Hr>" i-9* W 

is/ low m 10^% •"% B!'?I. , 'E9S!S?? 1 ■ a "' 

■ ■'■ 16 75'/, 75V, ISM ... 73V> >3 vPi»!N , » , „„ 

" f? 26B 10 9* IS, 


• 13 pc 100) Hlgn Looi-tma'Cn'ac 


RM8* . 

■_bwLWC»»D» 0 HltfiLmrSWOL 


v ia PE U» ^ v * 

i rrsrs a 


liaUriM ItwmnrS** 
U-JT aS*i2*K?2 


• “W IVBPT ^ ,Tm. is.. 7T. 


.1 13 732 33% S. »;■ 
. B6B 23'-; 23’* S', 


1 '' 


S " 


Tuesday’s 4 fun. 

This list compiled by the AP. eonsis* oi the 1,000 
most traded securities m terms of dollar value. >t is 
updated twice a year. 


17% iWFilBsmi 
«a' , S3 Firjier 
77' * »’• .Fiiaiwl 


lflV| 4 CACI _ __ r‘ - im I rn 1T1.'. 77 ', e l™’*! - *•’* IB 1 I ■ 

32Vj 2S"e£oiffivS 1.50o 5 j IS > 7" j\ M 7*j -h TT'-jH FiieNCT 

li i KsCovre - - ,0$ ,$** , 3 .,J ijw ... 17% 6%giBim 

IKTiSSBF :■ « » ft. SR a- 

a-»w 8 i» n '? i sr i? 

87 59'ACcmwil -fj 0 -? fl *1? lii , 1TI<7 17'<j — v, 31’, 73' 7 PCwnC 

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71 li'.coreeriji - T? in.' In to • ’-. MWHWFihw: 

1 4 1,, a'':Corejine 


Pfai MB M '* $ ». {gS “ 

IB 1 '* 7 -.Rgartfi . I,,* 

a*.? Ei'SEE!. ‘ 4 % Iw b% s% - ■! 


.. 95! BM B% 9% — ■■ 

>* « ” 5 $ I)': i&sr 

Jl !i 'l J>6 3; 33% 33** - 


BtmuwSBC* ^ - 1 . — ' ti % »2*» *%*■- 

itSUsPe-SE •» .* igaST-ir 1 



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l r * i*a *!:* s% —ft 


23% 17%: 


73 IO'-, 10. to 



• = * ^ ™ _w 

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slHEl r =s 


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IB'. 4",MONi . 37 545 16> j&V: 14^ 

WM.ii ABC Rail ... ... ^ iT” ^ 

TP IS AST Bid — U S77 22 21 'j 22 

IJi.ACCCS' .120 1 10 12’m J4 


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53 13MAST - _ 3S16 IS 5 .* ISM 1SW 

7r ,17MAbtrc''H _ |1 421J '’M '8 'J- 

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34'473 , ;CH«lral 
36M wViC&IPro 
mv. 4>v Ceiiiiar 

giia'-gsgsft* 

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43 l?V.CWlIUrm 

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cai 75>'« a^: !5V? — « 

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.. 479 20 'T 20 IO 

- ... 14 I0M 10 ■ isr* , ■ 

•• 19 479 321. 22 72 ' ; - 

- 4777 12M 12 U’’ *1* 


23 9' ■. AOODtC 5 - 19 **S 

76’ 2 10 A«tOhb - • ’ff" 'SftS'Si 

~ -1 - 19% ArSoSv .16 .5 20 143 3i AV 

37 'iC iA^Ss .20 -2 25®" 3 f 1 . 7 l 


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a-i^fasa* 14 '.i 1 11 is. «!-. ms igs is 3 5 i 3 r 3 ?. t-.'. 


37 IS'.AOOneis .m J *5= *7.. : , 

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46 s sls'iAdvonio T JO J }J *e ffl gij 

y-oassr ■” - '* is fra K -■ 

16W, 7'.. Agreeoa .108 .« .- «« ]!•’ i, .i 1 - 

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MW iwtFEwn .. 3% 3 3* 

611,38'jAKlC l.»4e 3.0 .. Sffl S * 56 s * 

7IW IWiAlonlec - ,■* S t« U milMI, 

aw i63VAlbank 1 7 I? J3I ?? Vt ' 1 - 

B^!3?aSS* -■ 3?SS 26". 2SM S'i -V 

-K '? ?5S ?5-. iffl :S 


isw B'ipirtTiai -oj 

25 miCnrtnF :■ .» 
15 4SCneetirei 
24W I3'-'Q , CSCK 5 
19 H Chios i 
SO'/.V ‘ Oiiocnm 
7*.j JWCTIiOSTc 


!.4 9 911 2V-> aju K-" - ' 
31 M? St, S’* 6 ' » — . 
" w 7i3 W* I6’i J6'« 

19 (416 1?!. 'It. 1!‘ J “ 1 

" 31 1?49 3S v_ -It 

. 1413 4‘, 4W 4;„ 

■■a as r5 ,j tf^g;-r 


70"i I 1 *.®! 

73 ■(7'^PP'Ki 

41V, T; ,QT1 

27 3’:Oale. 

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l*i. i 10’ iGOMfiiCS 

;j ijmoocP* 

743. l7V.Gol-?KKlO 

i;v, s'.CkiiwvFn 


m 


as «?«*•- 


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lAUi.B^syneran 


- : sw .ts is; ISS 


is PlgiS 

i’ 4 «* ra »r 




i»*« r’.kAwum 

MW iwttrfcwn 


ilW3BW3Vnc 
II M IWiAlonlec 
aw ltAvAlbonv 
19’.J lOWAKblas 
34"; I 3'. 4 Aldus 


^ 'wssr ■" - agas’&Rs 
,p*!S!sa» - 2,« r ,n ? 

16 7'.,AinS«ni .. '$ 1 ^ M »« J 

BWellhMdSit M 14 7 » 75W »W 


32''.7IM.A1VJW1S Ml !■« 1 *° I 77,: 7 !?• 

21 W 1-1 AlldHIOq ~ S .** V « 

24' . l'.VAIpUpl - ■■ £J?,_.7 *3 ioi* lO'W. ■ 

JS--1I AlonoBla - - 2«13yial0 -10 ^ 

39W 14% Altera - n ui? ??),! n*. 

Ka« fl-^S^lLlP 

!•? g J gjo ^ i3M 


6'-:4Hllhco» 
5 J", I4(. .MS 

17% 6'.-,AM«£ 

27 14'-. AmWVD5oi 

30W I«'iAP4BCvs 
23<i 15V i AmRes.a 
TT'-'i ?2* i AmSupr 
J7 17ViAmtOle 
I4W 9%6Trawl 
1 f ■ 9 AmerCa7- 
76 W 1 64. Amlcd 
S2 II Amoen 
IS S Arnr.on s 


■" IQ ‘384 7'-« 6', i 1 '. 

_ K 903 u2V * 23M 23 W 
15 '.77 ?:• >W 9*. 

I _ SOB 1SW M'. 14V 

34 5ET7 20 W l’W M 

_ V 633 19V. IBM 1|M 

_ „ S3 30 T 79 I* - 

n? ii ms, so’* 

z ,D *5 'I h 

■*» ’! tZ,oi2i Si'i fl? ^ 

IO Mk 7' T 7', a 7'* 


nuun SmSes .» " s '! M 15,! !S 


i »' t iissAncnBcp 
I7", lOMAncrrSm 
J?'. ■ 17 V. ArUrn, s 
71% 13 4n»« 
30' , ii-. Amu: 

45' .2T Appiec 


lD8 _ « ia» M% 14% 54*, 

701 M I1W 13." 

' a ffl H 34% 3i ,- i 

9 317 16% 15% 16 

■ _. 4'5 W‘« 23 •$'* 

M 1.8 ..13768 27% 26WI7V.. 


45' .72 Applet SS.! t3vI 24'. 

77'.l2%APfSOUS .02 .1 JS 54. .4.. 73 2^ 

ff'sssaap 1 M - J S t L 

% 3?;:»1 S - 3?;i 45% S', 


35 1 2 V. ArtM^vH - 36 xri 24 

'» I?! -‘'S50P ■ ill -"% 2? 27% . 


31' , 26'-’. Aro^io 
34 13'.. Aryoiif 


J4 u--.»rBO>r -J t , 

15% fl'.^iffflesl .04 J II lf« '3, 
22 16 Armor .44 3 0 70 7 34 7i; 


16 4.2 B 127 IT', 27 37% 

.. 47 047 lit, 14% 15 

04 J II 1003 17'-, ■}% 13'v: ■ 

JS Til 30 2'34 21% 71% ?!% 


Su S-.tAmMl 3 I.T 16 34 14% .9 IV . 

W'.-. 5%?rhir_ - 'i,- ft i 


ftr. V.^r*. r a tTTj »% bw „? 

~3' I i7*.AiCOnB ,4? 15% 15% 

.... n aciiu-. _ 14 14] 16 1 '2 1 

M%!7%A«EriaF - V ** ii* H ‘ 3=** 

13-", 7-l% APScAir .37 1J IB 411 " 3- 1 li, 


6W 3% Cmnin 

7' . ? .Cmpan 

54 7%CmpDl 1 .10 

12-1 5WCDVJW8 

40% 21 compuwr 

17% b Cam vers 
7% 3«,CcdCani 
33% l^'iConcEFS 
IS": 9 Cone Mia „ 
54‘-; aWConPaP 1.28 

22 13 Con no 

77% 14 -Coors B AD 
534.21' : SpievPn 
up . a* nCoovic* 

IB 4 C'jrTner 

21 ‘i 13% CurCotiF 

54' ,36 Cordis 
->S 7i.CorelCP5 
?b Il'.Corimoa 
I a% 6'.Curc*Cr- 
3 ?% is'.cojicps oa 

53% ?4’,Ci>vnir. 
3’%7T%CrfcrBrl M 
19.» B%CrTcnL» 

28 10 CredSrs 

27' ; 15'»CrdAcpS 
331. BViCrosCom 
39'.M%CullnFr « 
S5J . J9‘ : Cumf Pa 83 
26 1 7 C Listen 

23 10 C.B-ieD 

12% £' ;C'Un'jS 
41% IB' iff* Co 
a%IO Crri; 

a 1 -. 4 „Cvr:R> 





27-., 11 ATmc/5 
V6‘ : l6‘ . AuEon 
TV., J'eAuraSr 
14' . 4%AuS<>0« 
41 X. 27 AutMK 
34% J j% Au>o>nd 
29' . lT'-vAunrai s 
Jl'3,'6 AridTO! 


.. 32 ITM I7V, 17 77‘. 

33 ra cow i9>, row 

_ _ 77-T3 ff't. 

_. li 176 JW 5% 5% 

46 1.0 TO 1661 97V. IBM J9'. : 

.. 20 757 IB". S»W JB% 

_ 50 2177 19". M ir W> 

_. 19 1772 30". a%7V-.. 


J2 1 5 DF4P 
7% y.OnAPl 
36% 14 DSC s 
78 I3“. DiG ini 



T 251005* 21% 10% 71 = 
JSe .9 16 161 27% 26% 77 


13».7I 1HOPCP 


%%i?%0SPbo ' -. W ]S|* If* z% 15% s'.'muLg 

31 ; Ccmor4 . IB MJ 13 i 1- ' k U * ]j, 4 

46-,23 > *B0<kC .II« j 38 1131 45% 4J« 44 * I * I2",imono 


17 |J Dot so, 

J?'., H' iDojwin 
27 15 DovnsnA 

20 . J'iCJovRur 

»' :a%D«Vrr 

24% 13 DOCS Out 


15 658 >6% 16% 16% 

.92 3 4 17 M 2b% 36 26% - " 

38 171 l*’ - » 'S’ 1 * '6% 

IB 750 171, 16 17% -f; 

.. IB 3872 IS’/, 24% 75 -% 

1 16 SI J4% 13 »4 -% 

I IS a 17 ' . 12 . ii - • 


vssstBSk 

i-ssms 1 

- « m iJSS a* im -»£i^v|£* 

.. 24 2027 14 >6 14 1Mb *Jb 23 9 VldOCS. 

3 74 2W 2046 19Vj JO 1 * *» m TC’bViewla 

j 174 ISMUDW 32V, 32% - A • vStaS 

44 IS S’! 12% 13 W -W lii oiAVtSr 

L3 9 1951 »% »» * h 61* a^WtMSd 

. 31 in MVS ?3t> 23' 'i 9WVmortc 




t * S: 

- - 9-m im sa gu'ia;;.: :^- 


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ii 

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jn 1,1 a ; 




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30 8 DIoMiC 

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2 S’-j MWDonkenv 

32'-. lJViDovarm 

15", lO' .DrasB 


7tHk ll'alnlel wls 
a 12' . inldEI 


... 2764 14*. 14‘t 14W 


14% I'lMwtlmg 


_. - 1263 c% 


::: -■ ’8? li" I?? i2**"—' ts% SwiSKS* 

:: is 203 33% 33, ‘n -% 12% 

_ 100 904 15 14'.e IS -% 5?%36%iniflHlt 

.0 26 17BI 25 74 j-JJ* - %» 23% H Inlertm 

_. 15 2541 24 * 24Vb34 > j'.inirleat 

,1 MO ??;; Sis i< -% l-.Slggi 


^ 11 *1$?S ^ ^ 

~ 3 708 37% 3SV> 37 -l}i 

I M 3041 26W 25W 26 V. -W 


3« U» 
3S 36 ‘ 
17% MW 


~ » m US 17W 17% &VtgS 


_ is iyji 17V1 17W 1 r« - «2*|*2 

- ,7 i ^i! n*wd£ psx 



I 

I j} 5 i»'S »■ 
L ^ »5 

I d : . I,3i DM, 




.-VR 'f" 


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- m 4 51b 6 - I 31VW23y*WdOfW> 


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1Mb U _ 3Mb 10V*W8tCOI 

JSb^tS 1 @]»SB 


% I7 %ST VX<3 

MV.Snw.Ga 


„ 43 
„ 16 
.148 A - 


5S a3-£ <S' 
■»?*» 
. 5 “'® 




" «! ifcic.--’ ; t r.-Piffi* - * 1 9 1 £ 


IDbb tVb 

36 % — >A 



MW 7’.E*adrt< 
34",2l'.E*ar 

19% 1 2% EWln 5 


V. 15% - 

19 3402 16 1S% liW — Jl TS-iioWKnaru 

•" =1 S fe HOIPTI* fcinS 

ts 5381 2SW 34% ?4% *■* I 


66% 27 ExpScn' 

22% 10'* EiO»rP 


I 1% IJ 1 i“ — 

_ 16 4299 «% B": M, - % 
_ .. 2224 20’, 19% 20' . — 1 


_ .. ZT24 10% 19% - 
” 9 55J 14% 14 14'.— • 


■i$ 8 &r. = l-l i? IS ^ ! iiH 

w'e’-.OmM ™ 33 3135 16% »*’•: 16% *'•* ; a>t3to' 

!5ir*gsa.. /.ii a% wiS- 


tiffs- bffl 


_. 279 MB 
_ 18 11370 


3V 39. — % 
'6% 16% — '•« 



-• - MW V4 

xS ft 30^ sSi 2^1* 


_% 55% 14% 

_'A ^MbnS 

rlVb »W35Vb 

i§ 3rs% 
sajS 
Pfc 


: IS||!I® ■ 



" 2t , 5oS 17 J 
_ 36 as? ii’* i 

- T'S' ^ J 

10 nO T4% t 

■“ &> 1 


/i ii ii 1830 22V. 21% 

.10b J ia«53 11 ton, 

_ 13 5K 22% 20% 


.ua-. 




AMEX 


Tuesday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
lata trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 



i,».iiw:in.B».,’.irm-JI 


_ ... 52 1 iVh 1 —Vu 

zz ff vvi: 


_ 33 75 

z™. 


6% 4V, 6W *V» 

#/ii 3% 3V|j +S» 
4W 4Vu 4W -W 


2Vu 

6 % 

2% 

16% 

lVWNTlR 
4% Hdfi 
Btb 
16% 

9% 

22% 

4 V, 


a* 2 a 7 

.431 5J IB 
.12 S 26 


„ „ 65 IVudT'A lVta— 9>. 

“ 11 144 4% 4V, 4% —VS 

Li 7 47 10 9% 10. ■*% 

J IB 61 0% BV, JW — W 

S 26 482 a% 23 , 23% *■% 

_ 15 13 4% 4Vu Mi. ... 

_ _ 1592 1% 1% !'« *»» 












39 4 3Wii 3% —Vi. 

1D3 IBVl 17% 17% +V* 

65 BW 8% 8% _ 

132 1% 1W W» -■> 

29 9% 9% 9% — W 


H 20 

I 

40 14 . 
_ 10 


U ■ JV4 la IJ T 

11 9% *'A »%— > 

77 9% 9% 95b -% 


60 64) _ 70 IO 9W TO *% 

_ 10 49 5 4% 5 +W 

_ 79 9 W 8% 9W *% 

_ _ 51 1% l"/n l'Vi, ... 

76 13 11 123U23W 71% 23% * 1% 

4* 2.9 14 25 16 15% 15% *% 


1.75 5A _ 99 35% 34% asy. -% 

JJJ jb 73 7S2T 10% 10% 10% _ 

JO 26 10 39 12 dll% 11% — % 


_ 30 491 37 
_ _ 71 22 


23 2 % 2W 2V* — v u 

57 7% 7% 7% — % 

122 2V, 2% 2 V, 

491 37 36% 36% -'.4 

71 22 21V, 71% .. 

7 77 % Z7'» 27% — % 

IB U9% 9% 9% *■ % 


■4fle 14 u 
1.50 5.2 _ 


2J0 IL2 S 
1A0 I4J _. 
1.60 14A _ 
A80 4.9 .. 


60 O 16 
J8e 4.1 10 
J8« 16 11 


146 3% 3Vu 3"., — 

93 8% sw aw „. 

29 28% 28% 28% —V. 

639 15% 15% 15% 

10 B% H% 8% 

5 4>4 4 '.4 4% +% 

479 10% 10 10W — ’.* 

241 16 15% 16 *-% 

6 15% 15V* 15% - 

16 II 11 11 

21 11 % 11 11 —** 

16 >3% >3% 13% ♦% 

“? ffi '4 1 ft S 5 'Ji 

•J a 


J2 2 JO 12 334 16 dlS% 14. *"* 

_ — 15962 19u F7 u l'b -W 

1.9 12 32 34« 34V, 34'A _% 


10 39 5% 5'4 5% r% 

„ 24 aw BVi B% _ 

10 116 Z»V, 26V* 27 W — % 

_ 2 73% 73% 73% -V* 

_ 12 14 V, 14*'i 14 '4 _ 

_ $T3 IOW 10% 10% - ". 


JIB 2.9 _ S13 IOW 10% 10W « % 

.99 9J - 1473 10%10"7ul0'Vi. ■% 
.10 MB 73 7'A 7% 7% —lb 


.10 1*4 B 

WH'I 


^ 1 

1.14 M 13 
JO 2J0 20 
J! U 3S 


19W14 CFXCp 
7',, 4% CM Fin 
8Vs 7WCIM 
9", a CM) Cp 

3% I'.oCSTEnt 
13'', lO'eCVB Fn 
S’-b IWCVDPnn 
l’W v»CXP 


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„ a 33 3w 5% sw 

84eioj .aim a 

. 15 149 6% 4% 4% 

.. T 170 1W I/., 1W 

J2D 2J 10 7 12% 12% 12% 

_ 149 2V„ 2 !V., 

_ 78 lVu IW IW 

. „, 104 SOW 49W49W- 
.20 B 7 3] 24 W 73% 23% 

.. ... > I'VT, I'W, l'V„ 


J5 10.4 
JO I0J3 71 
.40 9 A 41 


2 ISW 15% ISVj _ 
B6 r* 7% 7W 

216 23% 23% 23% _. 

4 5 5 5 _. 

9 17% 17'/, 17% —ft 

6 I5W 25% 25% — '.a 
86 31% 36% 30% — 1% 

Z50 104 104 104 —9 

7 34% 36W 36% —'4 

1401 49 48 % 49 -'A 

41 2 2 2 

12 JW 2W 2% ._ 

77 6% 6'm BV* — % 

33 5 % 5 5 — % 

SO 4% 4 Vi 4% —Vi* 

20 2% <12% 2% 

6 % ’« _ 


7% 3 SBMIrid 
7% 4Vi SC Bcp 
10% 5%SFM 
42%39V,3jW J 110 
4>/|, iVnSOl ind 
Town spjPn J4 


86 6% 6, 6% — % 
406 4% 4% 4% - 
MullVb 10% 11 +% 

z,\ “sS 

& 'MM 'Vkdi 

« 14% 13% law —ft 

5 45% 45W 45% *■% 

45 n & ww*-* 

16UB9 88% B9. + ft 

111 34% 34 34% _ 

4 40 40_ 40 *% 

a 26% a* 2SW 

3 13 12% 12% +% 

5 11% ifjb 11% +tb 

5 11% il% ll'A +'A 

ISO 89% tfl9% BV%— 1% 

30 23% 23% 23% — % 

9 5% 5% SJb — % 

104 10V, 10’A 10% — % 


19% 11 SPlPn J4b IJ 
18W 6. SonGgm s ... _ 
1 % WSahoC Df J 45 I fi 3 
'Vi, w Saint wt 
14%io%53erris *40 2.9 

4oib23%^M^? i53 loj 

16% 111*5000 rtA IJM 7-8 
lS'iilOW^OOPtB .90 7.9 

14% IOW 5000 PlC j88 7.B 

misl i 7 ! h 


I Z 


IOW AVjSMonBk 
*7Vi 3 WuiaS!3c 

iiss.ui^* 

220 173 SMCp 
15% 9% Sales 


]% lbWSofntch 

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Barcelona 






Economic Recovery Is Seen 

Family Firms Are Resilient Even in a Slump 




By Ana Westley 

B ARCELONA— Barcelona barely had lime 
to bask in the glory of the 1992 summer 
Olympic Games before economic recession 
settled in. With the party over and bills to 
pay, Uie aty woke up to a steady trickle of industrial 
companies closing down or drastically scaling back. 

But signs of economic recovery are now undeni- 
able. and this Mediterranean city famed Tor its local 
ingenuity and adaptability stands poised to take the 
bet advantage of a new cycle of economic growth. Its 
industry is leaner and more efficient than before and 
the service and trade sectors are growing rapidly. 

Unlike other cities in Spain, Barcelona has an 
unusual economic fabric that has 
both advantage and. disadvan- 
tages for adapting to swings in 
economic cycles. On the one The DO^rM 
band, (be economy is fueled by . 
thousands of small to medium- bllies hit ] 
sized family-run companies that . 
make up roughly 50 percent of the industrial 

city’s gross domestic product — a 

far greater proportion than the 
15 percent of GDP that these companies account for 
nationally.' Most of Spain's largest family-run multi- 
nationals are concentrated in Barcelona. 

On the other hand, the city and its outskirts are 
also home to large multinational companies that have 
felt' the effects of the recession. The trickle of 
closures threatened to become a flood last fan with 
the crisis at the Zona Franca plant of Volkswagen 
AG’s Spanish unit. Seat. Its closure could trigger a 
chain : reaction or component industry closures. 

• Negotiations between the German parent compa- 
ny and the regional Catalonian government continue, 
but the future of Barcelona's Zona Franca industrial 
park as a center for the once-thriving automobile 
industry looks bleak 

With more than 30 patent of Barcelona's GDP 
coming from the industrial sector — a percentage 
slightly higher than in other Spanish cities — thepost- 
Otympic -blues have hit Barcelona especially hard. 
While the nation's GDP shrank 1 percent in 1993, 
estimate for the contraction in Barcelona's GDP last 
year vary from 1.1 percent to steeper 1.8 percent. 
Nevertheless, unemployment in the city, at about 1 1 
percent, is well below the staggering national level of 
17 percent, and similar to that of other European cities. 
Experts fed that this is due in part to the fact that the 
dty began restructuring its industry earlier than others 
did —it began more than a decade ago. 

Recovery is expected to be slightly faster than the 
national average because of Barcelona's high concen- 
tration of export-oriented companies. These compa- 
nies are already noticing a pick-up in orders, thanks 
in part to several currency devaluations last year. 
Visualizing a more promising future in the trade and 
service areas, and encouraged by the successful fi- 


The post-Olympic 
blues hit hard in the 
industrial sector. 


nanongof the Olympic Gaines infrastructure. Barce- 
lona has organized new billion-doUar projects that 
aim to convert the city into a bustling trade center for 
southern Europe. 

The dry is hoping to build on a long entrepreneur- 
ial tradition. According to the Barcelona Confedera- 
tion of Small- and Medium-Sized Companies, there 
are more than 200,000 such companies in the city and 
outskirts, of which some 35,000 are industrial compa- 
nies. “We have thousands of companies that have 
become specialized in some peculiar market niche.” 
said Agusti Conujoch, president of the confedera- 
tion. 

“The future is still promising for these companies 
because the tendency of multinationals now is to 
subcontract, subcontract, subcontract, rather than 
maintain fully integrated opera- 
— lions.'’ he noted. While large cor- 

. po ratio os such as Volkswagen 

ympiC close down production centers 

f i and lay off workers, other small 

rd 111 tne ■ companies may find new oppor- 
. (unities. 

iCIOr. “Large family-cun companies 

have more incentive to resist hard 

times and have a more agile deci- 
sion-making process,’' said Manuel Blasco, interna- 
tional marketing director of Nutrexpa, a leading 
Spanish food conglomerate based m Barcelona. 
Nutrexpa, which is family-owned and managed, has 
barely noticed the recession. “We have been busy 
setting up companies in Latin America, China, and 
Eastern Europe,'' Mr. Blasco said. 

Other food sector family-run companies with 
heavy exports and foreign subsidiaries, such as 
Chupa-chups SA, a lollipop maker, and the food 
conglomerate Borges SA , are also not complaining 
Antonio Plug, the general manager of Puig per- 
fumes, recently announced plans to build a new 
cosmetics plant in Barcelona to meet heavy export 
demands. 

There are some clouds on the horizon, however. 
Experts warn that the traditional family company 
in Barcelona, long the city's lifeline, faces handicaps 
due to a punitive fiscal system that taxes inheritance 
and succession rights out of proportion to the norm 
in the rest of Europe. According to the Barcelona- 
based Family Business Institute, inheritance tax in 
Spain is. 25 percent, compared with a 1 percent 
average in the European Union. 

“Here we also have a so-called succession rights 
tax; that doesn’t even exist in other countries or is 
spread out over as long as 20 years,” said Santiago 
Gonzalez of the institute. For a company worth" 1 
bflHon pesetas {$7.25 million), the succession tax 
amounts to 400 million pesetas, according to Mr. 
GonzdJez. 

“This policy encourages companies to sell out to a 
multinational instead of turning the company over to 

Continued on Page 18 



The dobs Factor 


*• 3 Unemployment rates in percent. 

24% 


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’87 ’88 '89 ’90 ’91 ’92 ’93 • 

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( Barcelona and its Metropolitan Area ■ 

81111 



Population 

Total area 
Km 2 

Density 

InWKm 2 

*GDP 

‘Income * * 
per capita ; - 

Barcelona 

1.643.642 

'99 ; 

18.590 

'3.898 

2,208 v. 

Metropolitan Area 2,961 .019 

m -. . 

5.058 

8,720 

2,174 •> 

Catalonia 

6,059,494 

31,830 • 

190 

12,183 

2,002 


Spain 


38.872.268 ' 604,760-' 77 60,334- 1,548 * 


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Special to the Herald Tribune 

B arcelona — Pointing to 
blocks of dirty, dockside ware- 
houses. ramshackle mechanical 
repair shops, miles of train tracks 
and rows of cheap urban housing. Mayor 
PasquaJ MaragaJI of Barcelona once as- 
sured a group of reporters. “All this will be 
tom down and we will build a new residen- 
tial area, a new beachfront, a new marina, 
new hotels . . . " With a sweep of his arm. 
he explained the details while the cynical 
reporters poked each others' rib.-. Such an 
ambitious project was considered an im- 
possible dream. 

To the rest of Spain’s amazement and to 
Barcelona's credit, ail the biUion-doUar in- 
frastructure plans were finished on sched- 
ule for the 1992 summer Olympics. At a 
total cost of over $5.8 billion, the grimy 
seafront was transformed into the Olympic 
Village, a landscaped beachfront, a marina 
and other facilities. Beltways were laid, 
sophisticated telecommunications towers 






were installed, whole neighborhoods got 
face-lifts, sports stadiums were built, and 
even the most skeptical bad to acknowl- 
edge that Barcelona had indeed pulled it 
off. 

Two years later Mr. MaragaB calls the 
Games “pan of history.” Today, he is busy 
promoting Barcelona, the capital of 
Spain's northeastern region of Catalonia, 
as the “Gateway to South Europe.” with 
another series of giant infrastructure plans 
that he believes will again transform this 
industrious and creative city into a major 
Mediterranean commercial renter. 

With local and regional funding from 
private and public sources. Barcelona 
plans several billion-doUar projects that 
are expected to create up to 1 00.000 jobs. 
They include a $3.26 billion Delta Plan 
project to create a shipping and rail distri- 
bution center, the construction of a high- 
speed train station and a railroad to the 
French border, new trade centers and doz- 
ens of urban renewal projects. 


Mr. Mara gal] now envisions Barcelona 
in the 21 st century at the center of a Medi- 
terranean Latin Arch, an area encompass- 
ing southwestern France and northeastern 
Spain with a population of over 15 million 
people covering six major cities. They are: 
Montpellier, Barcelona, Palma, Valencia, 
Saragossa and Toulouse. Some see the Lat- 
in Arch reaching into northern Italy as 
well, 

“Barcelona has not adopted a self-satis- 
fied complacency after the success of the 
Games.” said Joan Oos, deputy mayor of 
Barcelona’s Gty CounciJ. “Thering roads, 
the telecommunications infrastructure 
. . . they are no more than a starting 
point,” he stated. “Both the City Council, 
the Catalonian and Spanish governments, 
and private companies are demonstrating 
with investments that they believe in Bar- 
celona's potential for economic growth." 

With a portfolio packed with scores of 
major projects and maps. Mr. Gos asks 
disbelievers. “What other European cities 


lnlirin.il> *ul Hi-rdt J 1 nhuih- 

are remodeling or transforming over a 
thousand hectares of city landscape?” And 
few doubt that Barcelona will be able to 
pull it off again. 

By far the most ambitious project is the 
master Delta Plan Europori project, which 
wifi convert the city's Llobregal River della 
into a giant seaport logistical center linked 
to a network of highways, railroads and an 
enlarged Barcelona airport. This delta 
area, dubbed the Logistical Activities 
Zone, will include operations such as com- 
puterized inventory control, quality con- 
trol, packaging, ana administrative areas. 

Transportation connections are to be 
improved, including the further expansion 
of the airport, and the harbor, which ranks 
in recent years as the Mediterranean’s larg- 
est seaport in container traffic. New high- 
ways and railroads will also be built to 
facilitate freight transportation to Europe, 
and the city’s telecommunications network 

Continued on Page 18 


*.• < ~ v I r. 3 ,-^ 












SSHii 





THE HEART OF BARCELONA 

ANCIENT. WARM. INTIMATE 

WINDING MEDIEVAL STREETS. NOBLE GOTHIC 
HOUSES. IMPRESS 1 VE CHURCHES. PICTURESQUE 
- AND BUSY MARKETS. LIVELY MEDITERRANEAN 
SQUARES. QUAINT SHOPS AND SECLUDED CAFES- 
OUTSTANDING CULTURAL AND ART SITES. 

' A SEA-SCENTED ATMOSPHERE. 

PEOPLE? GENUINE. BARCELONESE. 


WE PROMOTE TRADE 


through the Zona Franca free 
port with its spacious 
distribution area, topflight 
warehouses and state of the 
art logistic systems. 


- IS* 


m 


Mm 


fl£s$l 


:tk ' “ « 

:-V: 




C0NS0RCI DE LA ZONA FRANCA DE BARCELONA 

Corrar 60, num. 421, sector A Poligon Industrial Zona Franca 

08040 Barcelona 

Tel 263 81 11 Fax 336 48 14 


? ’ S'F’S ‘P- 3t5 5 3 &tf5 P ? 






. _ fit 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. JUNE 15, 1994 


Barcelona ! A Special Report 


Old and New Redefined by Olympics 


] 


ARCELONA — The 
corrcci phrase io start 
the day in Barcelona is 
'"bon Jia." That's dis- 
tinct from buenos duty because this 
proud city is the capital of Catalo- 
nia. a region where the language of 
choice is Catalan. You hear it in 
ihe cafes and bartis and read it on 
the menus and street signs. Manv 
here view the rest of Spain as a 
different country. 

It is often said that Barcelona is 
the least “Spanish" city in the na- 
tion and the most “"European." 
Barcelonans love being able to 
drive to the French border in just 
-■= hours. Even closer are their 
beloved ski resorts and mountain 
hideaways in the Pyrenees and 
beach homes on the rugged north- 
ern Costa Brava. 

The bustling seaport has been a 
magnet for travelers ever since 
Hamilcar Barca stopped by from 
Carthage around 230 B.C. to 
found the city. The shadowy and 
curvy narrow streets of the Gothic 


Quarter, anchored by ihe cathe- 
dral, are testimony to Barcelona's 
medieval glory as seal of the Cata- 
lan mercantile empire that 
stretched across the Mediterra- 
nean. A second golden period oc- 
curred early this century and is 
embodied by the flamboyant 
modernist {Art Nouveau 1 archi- 
tecture of Antonio Gaudi. seen 
along the chic Passeie de Gracia 
and in his unfinished Sagrada Fa- 
fliilia (Holy Family! church. 

Barcelona's latest heyday came 
with the 1992 Summer Olympics. 
The city opened to the sea again 
with a massive urban renewal pro- 
gram that has left a thriving recre- 
ational port at the foot of two new 
skyscrapers. World-renowned ar- 
chitects designed sports facilities 
on MontjuTc hill and leading con- 
temporary artists left sculptures 
adorning public plazas around 
town. 

The Ramblas promenade from 
the Platp de Catalunya to the Co- 
lumbus statue at the wharf is the 


Escuela de 

Idiomas 

Language School 

Spanish for Foreigners in Barcelona 


Intensives 

80 hours 

20 hours a week 

Superintensrves 

80 hours 


40 hours a week 

Professional 

60 hours 

Communication 

6 hours a week 


Every Term 


Small groups. Attention to individual needs. 
Housing. 


For more mlormation please contact: 

Secretaria 
Tel. >34) 3 280 51 61 
Fa/ (34) 3 204 81 05 


ESADE, editicio 3 
Ctra. d'Esplugues. 92-96 



traditional nerve center of the city 
(even for pickpockets). But to see 
the old and new Barcelona in 
about an hour's walk, start on Pas- 
5 cig de Gracia at the corner of 
Arago. In the first block before 
Consell de Cent street are several 
modernist structures. Then walk 
toward (he Pia^a de Catalunya, 
cross it to ihe Ramblas. and head 
toward the sea. 

Barcelonans cat very well and 
there are countless place* to stop 
for a snack. Traditional favorites 
include Catalan pa amh hmiiqud 
— fresh tomato squeezed into j 
slice of bread and topped with a 
drizzle of olive oil — or boti/urra 
(Catalan sausage I . 

MUST SEE: 

Sagrada Fanufia church. It has 
become the city's symbol. For a 
true thrill, climb the narrow stairs 
up the church lower. (Corner of 
Proven^ and Sardenya streets/ 

The refurbished wharf. There 
are places to have a drink and boat 
rides on the harbor. (Wharf is par- 
allel to the Passeig de Cokwn. near 
the Columbus statue.) 
RECOMMENDED DINING: 

Restaurants Casa CalveL Gaudi 
designed the building. orginaJly 
ihe home of a textile family. The 
restaurant opened in April 1*594 
and serves Catalan -Mediterra- 
nean food, with an equal emphasis 
on fish and meat. Cosed Sundays 
and holidays. About S26 per per- 
son. (Casp. 28. Tel: 412-4012) 


Cafe Te\tiL An all-day. (10 
A.M. to midnight) informal re- 
spite in the Gothic Quarter, near 
the Picasso museum. Salads, sand- 
wiches and desserts. About 511 
per person. Closed Monday. 
(Montcada. 12, at the entrance to 
the Te.xtil museum. Tel: 268- 
259$). 

NIGHTLIFE: 

La Item. A new nightclub that 
opens at II P.M. Uve perfor- 
mances (pop. boogie, soul, come- 
dy) at midnight. At 2 A.M~ the 
dancing begins, to recorded pop 
and golden-oldies music. A quiet 
respite is La Luna bar in the same 
complex. Closed Sunday. Shows: 
Sit. including first drink (Aribau. 
230. Tel: 4) 40595.) 

Olympic Port cafes. A variety of 
lively places to enjoy an outdoor 
drink, overlooking the Olympic 
port. .A short taxi ride or a long 
walk from the Columbus statue at 
the base of the Ramblas. 

THIS SUMMER: 

The city's annual summer 
“Grec" festival runs from June 27 
to July 31. There are a dozen ven- 
ues. "including the traditional 
Greek amphitheater on MontjuTc 
hill. Van Monison ( June 301, Mil- 
ion Nascimemo (July 21 ) and nu- 
merous Spanish and Catalan art- 
ists will perform. Check local 
listings. 

A) Goodman 







Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu before and after the devastating fire in January. 

From Ashes of Opera House, a 



By A! Goodman 





Sagrada FamHla* ' 
****** 

£ Barcelona 


University 




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“ Information 

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• Museum-- '.V,. 


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Cathedral. . -• l • 

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The Nei* Yort. Times 





A permanent event. The national 
and international conventions, 
congresses and symposia taking 
place at the Fira de Barcelona 
prove it Professionals and visitors 
from the most diverse sectors 
rendezvous in Barcelona, city of 
business, meetings and events. 



Come where 

EVERYTHING IS POSSIBLE 


B ARCELONA — On the day the Li- 
ceu opera burned last Jan. 31. Barce- 
lona soprano Montserrat Caballe 
abruptly postponed a recording en- 
gagement in London, the city's mayor rushed 
bade from a business trip in' Switzerland and 
King Juan Carlos contacted local officials to 
express his concern. 

By ail accounts, the Gran Teatre del Liceu is 
qo ordinary opera house. Beloved at home as a 
symbol of Catalan culture, the rest of Spain 
views it either with affection as the nations top 
lyric hall or with jealousy for outshining other 
cultural landmarks like cathedrals. 

Catalonia’s political and cultural leaders 
vowed to rebuild the gilded, neoclassical opera 
house, even as the gutted 2,700-seat theater still 
smoldered after a spark from a workmans 
blowtorch started the blaze. 

“Memories don’t bum. No one can sweep 
aside in one fdl swoop 150 years of opera from 
thistity." Ms. Caballe proclaimed, in a rallying 
cry for those who rate the Liceu among the 
world's great opera bouses. 

Looking at the Liceu from the outside, little 
seems amiss. The opera house's main facade 
escaped the blaze, along with the music conser- 
vatory and English-styk gentlemen's club that 
share the front of the budding. 

But inside on a recent morning, opera pa- 
trons lined up in the main foyer to claim 
refunds, wind blew through the open-air shell 
of what had been the six-level theater, and a 
bulldozer moved huge piles of charred debris. 

Officials hope to reopen the theater by 1997, 
in time for its 150lh anniversary. The Liceu 
earlier bounced back from a fire in 1861 and 
reopened within a year. Reconstruction will 
take longer this time due to more complicated 
expansion plans and stricter building codes, 
said architect Xavier Fabre. 


“The Liceu is a distinguishing element in 
Barcelona's image, like the Barcelona soccer 
dub or the 1992 Summer Olympics. The city 
can’t be the capital of &»ii> so it expresses its 
identity in other ways/ explained Liuis. Per- 
manyer, a journalist and author who knows the 
city wdL 

Enrico Caruso sang there in 1902: Maria. 
Call as in 1959. Diaghilev's Ballet Russes 
graced the stage in 1917, with Nijinsky. Rich- 
ard' Strauss and Stravinsky conducted there: 
Picasso and Dali once worked as Liceu set 
designer. 

The Liceu managed to instill pride in Barce- 
lona’s general public, even though many could 
not afford tickets to the lavish performances. 
Thousands of people crowded the Ramblas 
promenade last Jan. 31 to watch the midday 
fire and some wept openly. . 

Within days or the fire, two banks, a newspa- 
per and (he Catalan TV station began collect- 
ing funds to rebuild the Liceu. The powerful 
chairman of Banco Santander flew irr from 
Madrid with a check for -100 million pesetas 
($735,000), and total donarionshave since in- 
creased to 540 million pesetas. 

The drive to resurrect the Liceu also acceler- 
ated moves to make' the Uceu less elitist ' 
Until recently, the theater was owned by 400 
private individuals, many of them descendants, 
of the founding Catalan" bourgeoisie who nur- 
tured Uceu to fame. They controlled the best 
seats in the house, which were handed down . 
Trom generation to generation. 

But during the past 15 years, the opera had 
faced financial difficulties. .. 

Facing possble.closureduetosieepproduc- 
lion and operating costs, the owners in 1980 
accepted as management partners a consor- 
tium of government institutions, in exchange 
for public funds. . , 

The government consortium has helped get 
the theater on sounder financial footing, and 
also increased the number of performances for 


. each opera so that more people could see the 
productions. In ;a. further opening, advance 
tickets can' now be . purchased, and recetveu , 
...from hank automatic teller machi nes- through- 
out Catalonia.. . . , 

' But the theater still .suffered from inade- 
quate safety features — '.like enough fire exits 
— and from a sraaH backstage that made jt 
difficult to quickly change productions. A $3U 
■ million expansion plait approved before the 
fire aimed to solve those problems. -.. 

Now with the cost of rebuilding the theater 
. thrown in. the .price tag oould easUy dotible. 

N OT everyone. approves of the re- 
building: The expansion plan re- 
quires the. demolition of . various 
old buildings adjacent to the Liceu. 
The neighbors have protested- loudly for. fear 
they will not be fairly compeosatfed. And na- 
tional political leaders were accused of pam- 
pering the Liceu with' public funds. - at /the 
expense of Segovia's Roman aqueduct; and 
Burgos's Gothic cathedral, which also need, 
'major repairs. In response., (bcf. Ltoeu sent- iU 
orchestra and choir to the Burgos cathedral Tor 
a benefit concert, and Queen Sofia attended to 
help smooth ruffled feathers. - 
Id April, ihe 400 owners voted to cede the 
building and a SI 5 million fire insurance policy 
to the government, -a plan .that was ‘formally 
approved last week. I t marks the first rime that" 
the Liceu has been a public: institution not 
-counting its brief naUontdizatitnrby the anti- 
Franco Catalan government- during the ciriT 
- war-from 1936-1939. = ■': 

• But under the agreement: the; 400 families 
.will get to keep control, of many of the best 
seats in the house. Noteven d spectacular fire 
or new public ownership could alter that slice 
of tradition. • .. 

.4 L GOODMAN reparisfnm Spedn for CNN. 


V' 



Small Companies Provide Economic Resilience 


Fira de Barcelona 


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Continued from Page 17 

the next generation at the optimum momenL". 
added Mr. Contijoch. 

Pedro Nueoo, an economics professoral the 
Barcelona private university IESE, warned 
that “an infinity of Catalonian entrepreneurs 
who created and developed companies have 
sold them off and are now living off investment 
portfolios.” Few. he added, started up other 
companies. 

“What is worse is that the future of these 
companies is more fragile under a multination- 
al," he said. An international company would 
be more likely to shift production to other sites 
that offer better market conditions, or dose 
down local production when recession strikes, 
he said. 


Small companies are also hard hi t by Spain's 
rigid labor legislation. TbeSpanisb .Parliament 
recently approved a bill to make die labor 
market somewhat more flexible with-part-time 
contracts and apprenticeships, but small-busi- 
ness owners still complain they are severely 
hampered compared with their European com- 
petitors. • •. ’ - — • . ■ 

As for the giant multi nationals in Barcelona, 
Jordi Pujol president of the Catalonian region- 
al government, recently oomplainedabout “the 
defeatist atmosphere.” which he claimed “does 
not respond to reality.” He boasted that for- 
eign investment in Catalonia continues to 
grow, and that multinationals already installed 
are pouring in new investments for new instal- . 
lations. 

Sixty percent of Japanese investment is con- 


- centrated in Barcelona" arid its indusirialisub- 
urbs. Japanese investors elsewhere in ; Spmn 
have announced plaits -'for '_plaht '.closures dr 
scale backs, but Japanese mMallations have 
survived Tdatividy intact in Baitekma. Barce- 
kma’s “Nissan . factory lecently reached an 
^reernent wiifr worker^fQJLa mbility plan. : 

“TIk Japanese like its;” said ’a -city offirial. 

' “Thqr feel at hoise here because wetoo are. an 
industrious and creative people,” be added.- 

Joah CIds,.AiputYriiayor, said: “Historical- 
ly. /Barcelona has mways fenced tninvard. be- 
yond its borders and across the seas,” He 
visualizes the city as a prosperous trade center 
of the 21st century.. • . . . 


AKA WESTLEY writes from Spain for The 
New York Tunes. .• . . 


Modernized City Plans Another Transformation 


Coo tin ued from Page 17 

will again be expanded to handle 
increased communications traffic. 

City planners hope that when 
the E»elta Plan is completed in 10 
years, it will make Barcelona a 
more efficient and timesaving port 
destination for Europe than Rot- 
terdam and other Northern Euro- 
pean ports, especially for Asian 
and Pacific trade via ihe Suez Ca- 
nal 


Also included in Lhe Gateway 
plan is a new high-speed train' sta- 
tion that will link Barcelona to 
France and the rest <rf Europe. The 
new station in the now densely 
populated Sant Andreu-Sagrera 
area is part of another giant urban 
renewal project with the creation 
of new parks, new roads, the con- 
struction of some 5,000 residential 
apartments and offices, and an- 
other industrial zone. 

But this is not oil In addition to 


A w« - city bej<h nvrr fire kilometres U*%. 


The mat a logistics centre of the 
.WeJiierrjntiia and Southern Europe. 


Snrntl city in the u oriJ for 
congress organisation. 

/ 

/ 


A city for business, 
for eulh. -e, far success. 


A thousand hectares of 
land andtr Jeithpmtnt. 



new centre 


Doctors and clinics of 
international standing. 


Organiser of the t992 
Olympic Carnes. - 


VirlJ famous dntgntn, 
jrf hit rets and fashion designers. 



LO N A 


Five ttnttersiitti. 150.000 
university Undents. 


Gaudi. Picauo, R<mants>l»s architecture, 
the Gothic Quarter, the Ramblas. 


Southern Europe 


In Northern Spun: Borcrlcm- Capital 
of Cuakmta. Barcelona organised the 1992 
Olympic Gomes, whose unprecedented 
success Jcmoo sna gd dr management skills 
uad entrepreneurial spirit of the ricy. 

. Baitdoru is now one of the roost aotaaive 
cities in Europe, with a magniScent range of 
available properly, a renovated cominunkanoo 
network, a solid university cradi non. 
roprtrphr designers, a n<± cultural and anistk 
htritaj^r, «Uld » long hisiwy of industry, trade 
ood enc r cp i e nc ut^ip- If you are chinking about 
seranp up an industry w want to establish a 
darribunon centre, if you are planning ro 
organise a cengicss or arc scckii^ the best 
office centre. Baicekxu is che Ideal pioce- 

Gne ifi a call and w« will eei) you ahooclc. 

Barcelona is waiting for you. 

(34 3) 4 1 ri 93 36 - LM 3) 4 16 93 37 


9 

BARCELONA 

More/ h a si' Ever 


- -•.■••-tf' ' . 


tite new World Trade Center in the 
remodeled old port scheduled for 
completion next year. Barcelona is 
aiming to outrank Madrid as fa- . 
rorcd location for trade fairs, con- 
ventions, and congresses, with the 
extensicNi of the International - 
Fairgrounds in the Pedrosa indus- 
trial complex just outride Barcelo- 
na. The $36.2 million project is 
called MontjuTc 2 named ^ after the 
fairgrounds in Montjulc near the 
site of sexrral Olympic sports in- 
stallations and is due to open next 
year. . . /. . 

Barcelona now hosts 30 percent ' 
of all trade fairs add conventions 
bdd-tn Spain, up 10 percent from 
last year, and it is the favored* 
location for international faixs-'in: 
Spain. -• ' - 


.. The old- port area, known as 
Port Veil, wfll continue to be reno- 
vated with more office and leisure 
inriallations . along with several 
other urban renewal and real es- 
tate/ projects. Despite the reces~ 
sioh, more than 70 percent of the 
three, apartment complexes built 
to house the Olympic athletes, per- 
sonnel and sedulity ccmungenis 
have been sold; 

-Proud of-his city and pet pro- 
jects, Mr. Clos modestly credited 
private investors, the Spanish cen- 
tral government arid the Catalo- 
nian government lor. “having 
faith" in the future of Barcelona. 
“We, at the City Council, are only 
acting as midwivtis for'this pro- 
cess," be Saul .. 

. Ana Westley 




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0 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 1994 


Page 19 


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Barcelona/ A Special Report 


Building Better Businesses 

Great Expectations for cat American MBA Program 


By Conrad de Aenfle 




T HE opening next month of the University 
or Chicago's prestigious executive MBA 
program in Barcelona will enhance the 
prestige of the city as well, civic leaders say. 
The presence of an institution whose name carries 
considerable weight is bound to bring Barcelona 
closer to its goal of being a leading international 
business center, they say. 

“Barcelona has always been the flagship of Spain’s 
connection with Europe; now with the open market, 
we want to improve on that,” explained Joan Gos, 
the deputy mayor for economic affairs. “We want to 
stress the Amoican connection, 
and the school is a good way." 

The university describes the 
program as the fust executive-lev- 
el master of business administra- 
tion coarse in Europe run by a 
leading American business school 
that is not affiliated with a local 
institution. It will be taught by the 
same faculty that conducts classes 
in Chicago, something that is “a 
good attraction in terms of mix- 
ing cultures,” Mr. Gos remarked. 

“We’re very interested in how the 
experiment goes on.” 

The program is open only to 
students with at least a decade of 
(professional experience. It in- 
dudes 14 weeks of class work 
stretched out over 18 months, re- 
flecting the fact that the partici- 
pants already weak for a living 
and would not be able to get away 

for one or two long blocks of time. 

“Very few of these people are 

to lea>e for a fun-time program,” said 
I Ang&nieux, managing director of the Barce- 
lona school "They don't like to cut off contact and 
then come back" to their offices, be added. 

Each course module will last one to two weeks. 
During the second summer, the Barcelona students 
will speed two weeks in Chicago and their counter- 
parts m. Chicago will travel to Spain. 

The first class, due to start in the middle of July, 
wifi indude about 80 students from around the 
world, but mostly Europe, Mr. Angfeiieux said. 
Among the more distant points of origin are China, 
the United Arab Emirates, Ivory Coast and the 
United States. 

Although other 115. universities offer executive 
MBA programs outside the United States, Chicago’s 
pr o gram is rare in that it is being operated without a 
local partner. Typical international MBA programs 
share faculty and classroom space with a local uni- 
versity. 

There are several universities in Barcelona, includ- 
ing four public institntioos and three private ones. 
The collective student body is large but insular. The 
city conncfi estimates that all but 2,700 of the 150,000 
students are Spaniards. 

Two of the private universities offer advanced 
baseless degrees: the Institute for Graduate Business 
Studies and the Graduate School of Business Admin- 
istration and Management. 

ESADE, as the second is known, was founded in 
1958 by a group of Catalan business owners. The 
city’s business c ommuni ty also played an early and 
’ rificant rde in luring the University of Chicago, 
(first contact between Barcelona and the univejsi- 



*We want to stress 
the American 
connection, and the 
school is a good way.’ 


ty was made a few years ago by businessmen who put 
the city forward as a possible site for the program, 
said Robin Hogarth, deputy dean of Chicago's Grad 
uaie School of Business. 

The people in Barcelona made us fed more wel- 
come than anywhere else,” Mr. Hogarth remarked. 
“They have tried to be very nice to us to encourage us 
to come. We have been very wdl received both by the 
mayor (rf Barcelona and the president of the Genera- 
litat,” the Catalan regional government. 

Mr. Gos said municipal and regional authorities 
provided no financial incentives to bring the program 
to the city, only that “we had several contacts and 
finally convinced them the best thing was for them to 
be in Barcelona." 

A more concrete bit of persua- 
sion was the offer by Corporation 
Bancaria de Espana SA, a large 
bank bolding company partly 
owned by the Spanish govern- 
ment, to provide a building for 
(he university’s use for at least the 
next 10 years. 

Mr. Hogarth said Argentaria, 
as the company is better known, 
was totally refurbishing the build- 
ing to the university’s specifica- 
tions; all that will remain is its 
facade. Chicago is paying rent for 
the facility at what Mr. Hogarth 
described as “an attractive rate." 

Many other factors went into 
the choice of Barcelona, which 
was made after extensive market 
research by the univeraty’s team 
Of consultants, including inter- 
views with executives at more 
than 100 European companies. 

“Our original thought was that 
the best place would be some- 
where in Germany” Mr. Hogarth said. A logical 
choice, considering th«* country's leadership in con- 
tinental European finance and industry. 

But logic was laid low by a carious reverse-provin- 
cialism: "In Germany itself, some pnmptmig s t o ld us 
that if we were going to ran an international pro- 
gram, it shouldn't be m Germany because Germans 
wouldn't see it as international,” be explained. 


matxAx&m 


w 


’ HILE civic leaders may hope that hav- 
ing a world-class MBA program in their 
city will help to elevate Barcelona to the 
big leagues as a business center, one of 
the city’s biggest attractions is that it is still relatively 
smalL A key dement in Chicago’s decision was that 
the airport is just half an hour from the city, Mr. 
Angfaueux said, one of several factors that make 
Barcelona more user-friendly than larger metropo- 
lises. 

“I’m not sure that Paris would have been as practi- 
cal as Barcelona," be said. "First you have io go from 
Roissy to downtown, then there may not be enough 
hotels nearby” 

The Argentaria building is a 15-minute walk from 
the center of old Barcelona, and so there are many 
hotels nearby for the students, he added, including a 
number that had been refurbished for the 1992 
Olympics. 


CONRAD DE AENLLE writes about economics caul 
finance pom Paris. 



Among projects funded by La Caixa Foundation, the “Amazonia” exhibition at the science museum, left, and an AIDS research laboratory. 

Foundation’s Agenda: From Art to Fighting AIDS 


By A1 Goodman 


ARCELONA —High school student Tania Gar- 
da saw firsthand the destructive power of AIDS 
when an affable grocer in her neighborhood 
steadily lost weight and died from the disease last 


B 

year. 

But she did not really understand the pernicious work- 
ings of AIDS and how to fight it until a book on the illness 
reached her classroom through Barcelona’s La Caixa Foun- 
dation, which has given away one million copies of the 
paperback in Spun. 

The book was written under the supervision of the 
leading French AIDS researcher Luc Montagnier. Its dis- 
tribution broke ground for La Caixa Foundation — tradi- 
tionally am-minded — and helped alter the course of the 
volatile AIDS debate in the Catalonia region, which has 
been hard-hit by the disease. 

“La Caixa’s pioneering outlook broke through the fear of 
tins subject In Catalonia, from the health standpoint and 
from an ideological point of view concerning matrimonial 
sex," said Antonio Goni, principal of the San Juan Bosco 
school which is now using the book in classrooms for 
students older than 13. 

Tania, 16, said she has learned from the book bow AIDS 
can cause “a normal person to deteriorate. It’s very serious 
physically and psychologically.” 

Another student, 15-year-old Elena Bravo, added. “You 
have to be careful." 

The AIDS theme could not be more timely for La Caixa 
Foundation, linked to the savings bank La Caixa, one of 
Spain's largest financial institutions. 

Spain has one of Europe’s most serious AIDS problems 
and is ranked second only to the United Stales in 1992 in 
AIDS cases per million inhabitants, according to the World 
Health Organization. 

By the end of 1993, Spain had recorded 21,205 cases of 
AIDS and ranked 10th worldwide in total cases, the Span- 
ish government reported. The region of Catalonia, La 
Caixa’s home base, accounts for about a fourth of tbe 
Spanish AIDS patients. 

The 64-page book, “AIDS. Tbe Facts, the Hope," em- 
ploys text, color graphics and illustrations to explore the 


subject. The WHO and the European Commission have 
given it the seal of approval. La Caixa Foundation spon- 
sored its translation into Spanish and Catalan, and distrib- 
uted copies through the savings bank's branch offices and 
directly to schools and other institutions, starting last year. 

Also in 1993, the La Caixa Foundation join of with an 
AIDS foundation to install a research laboratory at a 
Barcelona- area hospitaL The laboratoty is studying new 
pharmaceutical treatments for patients, in conjunction with 
centers abroad. 

La Caixa Foundation will pay about S575.000 for the 
laboratory through 1995. 

Tbe effort to combat AIDS is part of a gradual broaden- 
ing of tbe foundation's traditionally cultural portfolio, 
which still represents most of its activity. Tbe nonprofit 


While La Caixa is broadening the 
foundation’s work, most of its 
activity is still cultural. 


foundation started in 1991 when two Barcelona-based 
savings banks merged. Each bank previously operated a 
separate foundation. 

La Caixa — led by Juan Antonio Samaranch, who is also 
president of the International Olympic Committee — reex- 
amined its financial plans and the newly merged founda- 
tion did tbe same. The directors decided to expand into 
campaigns on AIDS and on the environment. 

The foundation aims to serve the public. It can’t avoid 
the most important topics of the day.” said Alessandro 
Allemandi. a foundation spokesman. 

On tbe environ mental front, tbe foundation has spent SI 
million to mount the exhibition "Amazonia, Tbe Last 
Paradise,” its biggest investment ever for a single science- 
reiated show, said Jordi Vfves, bead of expositions at the 
foundation's Science Museum in Barcelona. 

“Amazonia” opened in July 1993 and will continue 


through the aid of 1994 at the hands-on science museum, 
which is especially popular with schoolchildren. 

One year in tbe making, the "Amazonia” exhibit goes 
beyond tbe standard message about the rain forest being a 
key source of oxygen to emphasize the region’s importance 
for biological diversity and potential pharmaceutical cures. 
Mr. Vives explained. A smaller "Amazonia" show is tour- 


tie museum also features a permanent exhibit called 
“Living Planet” that focuses on the natural sciences to 
investigate living matter and the human species. The pre- 
sentation aims to introduce young museumgoers to basic 
environmental concepts, he added. 

Tbe foundation is also involved in other programs on the 
environment outside the museum, though its roots are in 
arts and anisic with a variety of activities offered in 60 
cultural centers and exhibition halls. 

The flagship in Catalonia is the foundation's Barcelona 
cultural center in a structure completed in 1900 when 
Catalonia's modernist, art nouveau architecture movement 
was in full swing. The building originally was home to a 
Barcelona industrialist, and was declared a historical mon- 
ument in 1979. the same year that a cultural center opened 
there. 

L OCATED at Passeag de Sant Joan, 108, the 
building itself easily can distract attention from 
the artwork on display inside. Stained-glass win- 
dows and intricate gnllwork on the main patio 
give a sense of undulation. The stairway’s marble columns 
are lopped with modernist gargoyles. 

More than 100,000 visitors attended events at tbe Barce- 
lona cultural center in 1993, many of them children. 

A recent exhibition featured New York artist Charles 
Simonds’s small-scale day interpretations of native peo- 
ples’ dwellings. At a workshop, children were trying to 
imitate the tiny bricks seen in some of Mr. Simonds’s art. 

A new multimedia library upstairs at the center includes 
bodes, music and CD-ROMs for research. 

In 1993, the foundation had an operating budget of S67 
million. It also operates 115 libraries, nearly 70 senior 
citizen's centers and a handful of schools, including the San 
Juan Bosco school, where Tania Garcia was learning about 
AIDS. 


INBARGLONA, 

ENTREPRENEURS CAN CARRY 
OUT THEIR BUSINESS PROJECTS. 



Entrepreneurs having a business project find in 
Barcelona Activa the support they need to put inro 
practice their plans. 

Barcelona Activa provides ail those elements 
needed to start up their company successfully 
during the first years of activity. 

• Premises. 

• Training. 

• Management advice. 

• Information. 

• Infrastructure and administrative services. 

• Financial support ... 

More than 300 businesses and 2.000 jobs have been 
created in Barcelona as a result of the services given 
by Barcelona Activa. 





THE MOST 
DISTINCTIVE ASPECT 
OF BARCELONA 
IS NEITHER 0IR6 
NOR GAUDI, BUT 

PUBLIC MARKETS. 


In other European cities, the old public 
Markets, tire huge structures from the age 
of steel architecture, entered a crisis 
around the 1960's. In Barcelona, not only 
do they maintain an extraordinary vitality, 
but they are truly a driving force behind 
commerce. 

Old markets provide the most uptodate 
services, and the newly built ones, with 
their ultramodern architecture, continue to 
offer the charm of Mediterranean markets; 
the freshest produce in an atmosphere 


which is positively alive, dealing with the 
citizens with the human touch they deserve. 

A trading area of 170,000 nf and over 
10,000 establishments with a clear aim: to 
be faithful to a tradition, which could be the 
great new trend for the XXI century. 

If you come to Barcelona, apart from 
seeing the works of Miro and Gaudi, visit 
our markets. 

You'll see a great deal of history, a great 
deal of tradition and, above all, a great deal 
of future. 


XCbVohk) 


Mercats de Barcelona 


Institut 

dc Mercats de Barcelona 



*'8 IT B’T-T % 9 Sd5 5 3 a.* P ? « I R js’ *?■ o «/»-■* r h 00 S- 









Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE- WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 1994 



One More Time, Rangers vs. The Hex, for the Cup 


By Dave Sell 

Washington Past Sen ice 

NEW YORK — With a cardboard box 
as a display case. David Torres stood at the 
comer of the New York Stock Exchange 
building the other day, selling knock-off T- 
5hjrts that celebrate what the city hopes 
will be the New York Rangers' first Sunlev 
Cup in 54 veara. 

”1 sold more last week, but the Rangers 
lost two games and now people have 
doubts.” Torres said. “l*vc beer, selling 
them for $5. ff they lose, HI probably sell 
them two or three for 55.” 

There was a lot on the line — tangible 
and emotional — on Tuesday night when 
the Rangers played the Vancouver Ca- 
nucks in Game 7 of the National Hockey 
League finals at Madison Square Garden. 

Not u»)z);e baseball's Red Sox. Cubs and 
White Sox, the Rangers are supposedly 
cursed. The Rangers have won the Stanley 


Cup three times, but not since 1940, and 
never on home ice. 

“It’s hard to believe it's taken this long to 
wm another," Clint Smith, one of seven 
surviving members of that team, said re- 
cently in Vancouver. There was little fan- 
fare about the Rangers' victory at the time. 
Joe DiMaggio was starring in the Bronx, 
war was being waged in Europe and the 
hockey team was overshadowed. 

“They gave us a bit of champagne before 
the first game that fall.” Smith said. Trou- 
ble. the theory goes, came in the next two 
years. During the 1940-41 season, the 
Rangers’ owner. Colonel John R. Kilpat- 
rick. burned the mortgage to the old Gar- 
den in the Stanley Cup. In later years, some 
piayers' dogs have eaten from the Cup. and 
it has been to the bottom of Mono Le- 
mieux’s pool. But in the fatalistic eyes of 
Ranger fans. Kilpatrick is responsible for 
one of the hexes by desecrating the Cup. 


Tbe other reason for the curse involves 
the New- York Americans, who were the 
first hockey team playing in the Garden. 
Then Garden management formed its own 
team, the Rangers. Management gave fa- 
vored status to the Rangers, and the .Amer- 
icans were forced out of business after the 
1941-42 season. 

Red Dutton’s family owned the .Ameri- 
cans, and he was general manager and 
coach. When he was later dented a chance to 
restart the Franchise according to icgend.lv; 
put a curse on the Rangers, saying they 
would not win again in his lifetime- Dutton 
stuck around for 88 years, dying m 1 98" 

Events in recent days have not eased 
fears among fans. The Rangers took a 3-1 
lead in the four-of-seven-game series, then 
botched a chance to clinch in Game 5 at 
home and then in Game 6 Saturday in 
Vancouver. 

As the on-ice fortunes waned, a furor has 


built over whether the Rangers' coach. 
Mike Keenan, is angling for a job as coach 
or genera] manage r or both with the De- 
troit Red Wings. But because this job is not 
finished and the prize is seen as slipping 
away, Keenan was equated with Benedict 
Arnold in a New York Post column. 

' Yes. 1 can deny the rumors one more 
time,’' Keenan said at practice on Monday. 
“In fact, it has gotten to the point of being 
ridiculous. I am not a?ing to Detroit. I am 
the coach of the New York Rangers. I 
signed a five-year contract when f came 
here. That meant a five-year duration, if 
not more." 

Whatever the long-term future holds, 
some fans were assuming tbe worst would 
occur Tuesday night. Others thought there 
would be an emptiness if they did win. 

“In a sick wav, it's almost better if they 
lose," said Matthew Kramer, who has driv- 
en a cab for 1 9 years. "If they win, what are 


people going to talk about? Next year? 
Who cares about next-year." 

Bob Gutkowski is president of Madison 
Square Garden, so he has been watching 
both the Rangers and the Knicks, who lost 
Game 3 of the NBA Finals here Sunday 
night, further adding to the city’s angst 
‘The best roller-coaster ride I’ve ever 
been on," Gutkowski said of the amazing 
extended spring of winter sports. 

“My personal feeling before Game 5 was 
that it was a great opportunity," Gut- 
kowski said. "But the las time I looked, it 
lakes four games to win a series. If you take 
your eye off the ball, you get caugbL There 
was such great expectations and hoopla, 
which was understandable," 

"If somebody came to me at the begin- 
ning of ihe year and offered me the oppor- 
tunity to have Game 7 of the Stanley Cup 
finals at Madison Square Garden, 1 cer- 
tainly would have taken it," he said. "This 
is what it’s all about, so here we go" 


Of Politics, Tennis 


Canseco’s 3 Homers ! 
Ton Griffey’s Slam 


The AniMMUed Press 

Ai if there were any lingering 
doubts, Jose Canseco showed Ken 
Griffey Jr. and everyone else at The 
Ballpark that he is’ still Jose Can- 
seco. 

Canseco hit three homers and 
drove in a career-high eight runs on 
Monday night and the Texas Rang- 

AL ROUNDUP 

ers — despite Griffey’s grand slam 
and career-best six RBIs — - 
trounced the Seattle Mariners. 17-9. 

Canseco went 5-for-6 and set a 
team record with 14 total bases. He 
also hit a 480-foot home run. the 
longest m Arlington since the 
Rangers began measuring dis- 
tances in I9S7. 

The power show — his homers 
traveled a total of 1.232 feet — gave 
Canseco home runs. 62 RBIs 
and a .318 average, along with 12 
stolen bases. Not bad, considering 
that many thought Canseco was 
finished lost summer after he hurt 
his elbow trying to pitch and 
missed most of the season. 

“This makes me much more ex- 
cited.” he said “It means all the 
work in the off-season has paid 
off.” 

Canseco matched his career-high 
for homers in a game. He hit three 
for Oakland against the Blue Jays 
at Exhibition Stadium in 1988. the 
year he became the only major lea- 
guer ever to hit 40 homers and steal 
40 bases in the same season. 

Canseco hit a two-run homer in 
tbe first inning, a three-run shot in 
the third and a solo drive in the 
seventh. He also had RBI singles in 
the second and fifth innings. 

He had a chance to tic the major 
league record of four homers in a 

J ams, but struck out in the eighth, 
uan Gonzalez and Ivan Rodriguez 
hit consecutive homers later in the 
inning. 

Grift cy connected in the sixth 
inning lor hi % 2«uh home run of the 
season and his liMh career slam. 
He added a two-run single in the 
seventh. 

Texas had 22 hits, tying a team 
record for a nine-inning game. 
Greg Hibbard 1 1-4) was lagged for 
10 run?, and I’hitsin three innings. 
Indians 7, Blue Jays 3: Cleveland 


won its 12th in a row at Jacobs 
Field, and Mark Clark won his 
sixth straight decision. 

The Indians' home winning 
streak is their longest since a 13- 
game run in 1965 at Cleveland Sta- 
dium. The Indians remained tied 
with Chicago for first place in the 
AL Central; this is the latest they 
have been in first since July S, 1974. 

White Sox 1. Athletics 0: Jason 
Bere struck out a career-high 14 
and allowed only two hits in eight 
innings os Chicago won at home. 

Bere worked around six walks. 
Terry Steinbach had a pair of lead- 
off singles for Qaklana. 

The White Sox scored in the fifth 
when Lance Johnson led off with a 
triple against Bobby Witt (4-7) and 
Tim Raines singled with two outs. 

Yankees 3, Orioles 1: Melido Pe- 
rez stopped Baltimore on six sin- 
gles in eight innings, and New York 
stopped the Orioles’ four-game 
winning streak. 

Perez retired 13 straight batters 
in the middle innings as the Yan- 
kees won the opener of a four-game 
series at Camden Yards. 

Don Mattingly broke a scoreless 
tie with an RBI single in the fifth 
against Sid Fernandez (34). Dan- 
ny TartabulJ and Benue Williams 
singled home runs in the seventh. 

Royals 12, Angels 7: Hubie 
Brooks, pinch-hitting, connected 
for his eighth career grand slam, 
capping a seven-run rally in the 
eighth led Kansas City over visiting 
California. 

Brooks, baiting for David How- 
ard, hit the Royals’ first pineb-hit 
slam since George Brett in 1980. 
Gary Gaetti added a two-run single 
during Kansas City’s biggest in- 
ning of the season. 

Twins 5, Red Sox 2: Chip Hale 
went 3-fo r-3 and extended his hit- 
ting streak to eight as Minnesota 
beat Boston at Fenway Park. 

Mo Vaughn of the Red Sox left 
the game in the third inning after 
being hil below the right elbow by a 
pitch from Jim Deshaies (3-6). The 
next inning, Roger Clemens (6-3) hit 
Hale with a pitch, and both teams 
were warned against further trouble. 

The Twins won their fifth in a 
row, with Rick Aguilera getting his 
1 3th save. The Red Sox lost their 
fifth straight. 



Uf Htyaa/tyKaFnKr-Pmw 

The Indians’ Kenny Lofton diving in vain for Roberto Aiomtfs fly baH But dwelaiid stopped Toronto, winning its 12th straight game. 

Expos’ Fassero Drops Ball and No-Hitler 


The Aznoaied Pros 

The name with which the Montreal Expos 
had so much trouble three years ago nearly 
went into their record book. 

Jeff Fassero, a converted reliever who wa-- 
thnist into the storting rotation last season, lost 
a no-hitter with two outs in the ninth inning on 

ML ROUNDUP 

Monday night when he failed to catch Carlos 
Garda’s line drive in the Expos’ 10-2 victory 
over the Pittsburgh Pirates. 

When Fassero arrived at spring training in 
1991 as a non-invitee, he gained quick notoriety 
by allowing a base hit to Atlanta's Nick Esasky. 
who was returning after a one-year layoff be- 
cause of vertigo. 

But Montreal newspapers referred to the 
unknown left-hander as cither “Ralph Foz- 
zaro" or “Jeff Fazzero." 

After dominating the Pirates for 8*i innings. 
Fassero had a 1-2 count when Garcia hit a 
waist-high drive back to the mound. Fassero 
stuck out his glove to the right side, but the bail 
bounced out and rolled toward third base. 

Fassero (54) quickly recovered and mads a 
strong throw to first baseman Randy Milligan, 


but Garcia dived head-first and barely beat the 
play. 

“It was just soft enough for me to misplay it," 
Fassero said. “I just closed my glove too soon." 

The crowd of 17,236 gave Fassero a big 
ovation. Still needing one out for bis first shut- 
out in 29 major league starts. Fassero lost that, 
too, when Jay Bell homered. 

Tt’r heart-breaking because once you get 
that far and see all the zeroes on the board, you 
want to go for it, because it’s something you'll 
probably never gel another chance at," Fassero 
said. 

Mets4, Phfflies 3: In New York, Bret Saber- 
hagra pitched five-hit ball for seven innings. 

Saberhagen has won three erf his last four 
decisions. Josias Manzanillo struck out the side 
in the eighth, and John Franco pitched a shaky 
ninth for his 15th save and the 251st of his 
career, one shy of Dave Righetti's record for 
saves by a left-hander. 

Rockies 7, Braves 2: In Atlanta, a former 
Brave pitcher, Marvin Freeman, helped Colora- 
do end its 16-game losing streak against the 
Braves. The Braves had been tbe only club tbe 
Rockies, in their second season, had never de- 


feated. Atlanta went 13-0 against them last 
season and had won the first three games this 
season. 

Gants 5, Astros 4: In San Francisco, Matt 
Williams hit bis NL-Ieading 23d homer, and 
William VanLandingbam and three relievers 
combined on an eight-bitter. 

The Giants, wbo totaled five runs in being 
swept by Son Diego Iasi weekend, also got a 
home run from Todd Benzinger in ending a 
four-game losing streak. 

Cardbiafc 2, Martins I; In St Louis, Tom 
Pagnozzi singled in Ray Lankford with one out 
in the ninth, handing the Martins their sixth 
loss in seven games. 

Lankford doubled with one out off Robb 
Hen. and Mark Whiten drew an intentional 
walk. Pagnozzi hit a liner to shallow right that 
scored Lankford when Gary Sheffield was un- 
able to moke a shoestring catch. 

Dodgers 5, Reds 4; in Los Angeles, Ramon 
Martinez woo his sixth straight dec is io n with 
eight strong innings. Martinez allowed eight 
hits, struck out eight and walked three before 
leaving after 126 pitches. The right-hander is 6- 
0 in 11 starts after dropping his first two outings 
this season. 


ie: 


By Ian Thomsen , . . 

International HenU Tribme , 

PARIS— What sounds like a . 
movie. Is in fact the story of; 
Heather MacLacblan’s life. She 
was a college student from 
Montreal, v acatio n i n g in Paris 
for two weeks; when she heard 

of an emergency job-openmg in ■ 

professional tennis.- She never 
did graduate from college, arid 
15 yean years later she is a 
candidate to become the first 
commissioner of women's ten- . 
nis — which fa the least of it, so 
far as gossip fa conoeowiL 
The talk lately -has been 
about her unntiBeiif marriage. . • 
“With these things, you just 
never know,” she .said one 
f pnmj n g recently during tbe 
French Open, she shrugged 


French Open. She shrugged 
with tbe sort of mock amaze- - 
meat that is universal even 
when one/s fianefc does not hap- 
pen to be the U.S. Senate ma- 
jority leader and Hkdy future 
commissioner ofhasebalL 

The c^ipte met last year ai-- 
tbe U.S. Open. Senator George 
J. Mitchell, Democrat of 
Maine, was the guest, ironical- 
ly, of the Romanian sports pro- 
moter and Ion Dnac. . 

with whom MacLachlan works’ 
and with whom she had ended a. 
long relationship in 1991 

“He was rust a guest at the 
UJS. Open/ said MacLachlan, - 
35. "Everyone was congregat- 
ing, and l was introduced to 
him. I was in Washinmou on ■ 
business not long after that and 
we were able to get together." 

MacLachlan .jives in New 
York, but “we’ve realty made . 
an effort to work around each 
other’s schedule," she said. 
Within aevn monfiu, ibqr an- 
nounced their engagement. 
Ihey wiB be manioTai the end 
of the year, in what promises to 
be a hectic winter. 

Mitchell, 60, who accompa- 
nied his flancie to Paris lot . 
meetings with Prime Minister. 
Edouard R aflfidtif, among oth- 
ers, is leaving the Senate when 
his term enos in January, and 
Major League Baseball is re- 
portedly anxious to hire him as. 
commissioner. 

By the end erf the year, wom- 
en’s tennis hopes to have ap- 
pointed its first comnussioaer. 
By early 1995, then, this newly- 
wed MUcheDs could well be- 
come the First Couple o! pro- 
fessional sports. 

“It's such a hypothetical 
thing," MacLachlan said. "He 
hasal made any dedaicu and 
neither have L Neither of : us 
have bear asked. He says very 
candidly he has not been of- 
fered the job and if he fa, he will 
consider it at that time.” 

As for her, she said: ‘There , 
are a lot of people involved and 
lots of talk going on about what 
the position mould become. 
There are conversations that 
have been going on for. a long 
time; I haven’t been offered the 
position. They're not at that 
pteceydto offer it to anyone;;’ 


They might be ready to make a 

decision tomorrow, they ““SJ 11 
not be ready for rot months- 
And 1 haven’t made up ng 
mind as to whether I would 
wantiL" , . 

r The WTA chief exocuovc of- 
ficer, Gerard Smith, plans to 
ream July I but has agreed to 
stay -on as aconsuhant through 
the year. The Women’s Tenors 
CounciL which governs the 
WTA Tour, is negotiating to 
have the. three entities of wom- 
en’s professional tennis -—play ■ 
aa, tour events and the Interna- 
tional Tennis Federation . — 
overseen by core chief executive 
for the first time. Anne Person 
Worcester, the counters manag- 
ing director, said this hire 
would be “historic" because it 
should reduce the infighting 
that has ^prevented womens 
tennis . from . responding to its 

m ^e*want to hire the best 
person, ^ she said. “If it’s a 
wonnrL .thaft wonderful. But 
■’we are looking for someone 
with wry.sptsteal qualities." 

V Someone like MacLachlan? 

“There are no front-run- 
ners,” &e said. “We are still 
developing the-postipn and . 
character specifications. " 

■ It is widdy thought that Ma- 
cLachlan is — or snould be — 
the /ront-runnef, given her 
tr aining with Tiriac, who as a 
• promoter and manager is with- 
out peer. It is also suggested 
that she may later the made pull 
to seize controTof women’s ten- 
nis, given that tire spent most of 
her careteinthemen's game. 

She was vacationing in Paris 
in 1980 when she heard the 
AT£ needed, to replace an at* 
dem on sack leave. She filled 
- the poet tanporarily arid ended 
up staying Tor two years, && 
pattering players to tour events. 

& 19B2, she went to the 
Volvo; Grand Ebox, the men’s 
tmirat the time, where she was 
in charge of European promo- 
tions and media relations. This 
was followed by a two-year 
stint in 1984-85 with Interna- 
tional Management Group . in 
London as the first woman 
agent of men players. 

Subcontracted out- by JMG 
to work on the promotions of 
the Davis Cupfinai in Germany . 
m 1985, sto began working with 
Tiriac, but die declined to say 
when their romance began.. 

Now she fa looking like a can- 
didate^ suggesting that tennis 
seek ideas from all sources 
while daimmgf rom hertxpcri- 
ame that players . — despite 
their reputations — usually give 
their tost efforts. ' 

' 4 “A lot of people maybe 
wouldn't want to get involved in 
the job when thorns don’t teem 
to to going so wtel tor women's 
temris^ sbesaid. “I like the idea 
that there’s a lot of room for 
improvement, and the - idea of 
bemg involved and taking teimfa 
into, the tint century." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNES DAY, JUNE 15, 1994 Page ‘ 

SPORTS 

For Referees , the Heat’s On 64 Years of History Before the Last Frontier 

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International Herald Tribune 

C HICAGO Sports in America can sound like a 
synonym for pressure. Chicago right now does 
not have a tolof Umeforihe problems of Germany, a 
World Cup champion trying to get noticed and trying 
to sleep and prepare for Friday's opening game in a 
dunate that swings from steamy beat to hailstones the 
Size of golf balls. 

Freak weather, and the unfamiliar round-ball game, 
is m hue behind 
Chicago’s claim n«i. 
that it was here, 2°** 
right here in a Hughes 

downtown hotel, 

tl»t O. J. Simpson came in the hour that his former 
wife and a restaurant waiter were apparently mur- 
dered at her home in California 
After O. Jj, top of the news is Mike Tyson, looking a 
dejected soul after the decision that his claims to new 
religious passivity are not reason enough to commute 
hisprisan sentence for rape. 

Then, way before they talk about soccer, the good 
folk ten you how stunned they are that Ryne Sand- 
berg. the favorite son of the Chicago Cubs, has hung 
up his baseball bat, called time on 2,133 hits, and says 
be has lost the desire to work through the last two 

years or take the last 515 million of the Cubs’ money. 

No wonder those German soccerpJayers flew into 
O’Hare Airport almost unnoticed. They walked a red 
carpet, but the lone guy reaching out to them was a 
sponsor's agent han di ng them a sponsor’s hat. 

You would be wrong to think there is no pressure 
yet on World Cup performers. For the heat was on 
Tuesday in Dallas, where the 25th team of this World 
Cup had expected a make-or-break workout to decide 
whether they were fit for the World Cup of their lives. 

In humidity that turns body weight to water, the 
referees, flown in from five continents, were set to 
undertake the Cooper tesi — repeat 50-meter sprints 
in less than 7J seconds, 200 meters in less than 32 
seconds, and a 12-minute run in which they Md to 
cover 2,700 meters. 

W HO SAYS FIFA is without compassion? The 
word was that any of the 24 chosen referees who 
failed the test, taken in heat rising toward 100 degrees 
Fahrenheit (38 centigrade), would be on the first flight 
home. But Monday, after the FIFA referees’ commit- 
tee took advice from the medical committee, the test 
(which aB refs and linesmen passed in Dallas in 
March) was abandoned. 

Instead, the officials were given a physical workout 
simply designed to insure that none was harboring an 
irgury that might jeopardize his World Cup. None 
was, so all are up and running for the finals 
The relief was culpable. But who are they, these men 
who risk vilification, whose actions are subjected to 
trial by video, whose duty asjudge and jury to some of 
the world’s prima donna millionaires fetch a single 
World Cup payment erf 520,000? 

Typical of the breed is Philip Don, a headmaster at 
a school near London, who recently worked, with only 
four days’ notice, the Champions’ Cop final in Athens 
between AC Milan and Barcelona. 

He has trained, this scholarly man, like an astronaut 
for the summer of *94. Hours on a mountain bike, 
three-hour stints in a sauna to prepare heart and lungs 
and mind to the insufferable humidity, yesns on call 
like a doctor to referee any match, anywhere. 

Don must, surely, have sacrificed the headmaster's 
credo of never n egfectm g his schoolworic. But he is as 
zealous about soccer as FIFA demands. 

Worid Cup USA is his mission, shared, competed 
for, among 23 worldly referees. Each covets the pnma- 


cle, the final match, and each knows the experience 
four years ago of Edgar do Codesa] Mendez, the Mexi- 
can doctor, who was called a cheat by Prcsidem Carlos 
Saul Menem of Argentina for sending off two Argen- 
tine fouiers and awarding Germany the penalty that 
won the Cup. 

Philip Don is far from a man alone in willing the 
same degree of scrutiny upon his actions. Other In- 
clude Kurt RothJisbeiger, Switzerland, teacher; Al- 
berto Tejada Noriega, Peru, surgeon; Arturo Brizio 
Carter, Mexico, lawyer; Pierluigi Pairetto, Italy, veter- 
inary surgeon; An Yan Urn Kee Chong. Mauritius, 
customs officer; Arturo A. Angeles, U.S., engineer. 

And so on and on. Drawn heavily from reaching, 

from business and computer industries, these 24 men 
have mostly sedentary occupations and subject their 
public lives to explosive match arbitration while some- 
times running 13 kilometers a game. 

I wish them well, knowing that over the next month 
they will draw from me and millions of others criticism 
just or unjust. They may be masochists, but the only 
critics they fear are Sqm Blatter, general secretary of 
FIFA and zealot of refereeing standards, and Paolo 
Casariu, the Italian former World Cup referee who 
helps FIFA determine bow and why refereeing must 
change with the times. 

T HE DAYS of the friendly aging gentleman refer- 
ees are aver,” declared Casariu three years ago. 


J. ees are over,” declared Casariu three years ago. 
“What we need now are athletes whose running poten- 
tial and intensive movement are comparable to those 
of the players themselves.” 

To that end, the age of refereeing is coming down. 
The average age cf this year's officials is 39.9, and rest 
assured the percentage point below 40 is calculated. 

So are the new rules, or new application of existing 
rules, by which FIFA is determined the cheats and the 
thugs will not demean this World Cup as they did the 
last Feigning injuiy? Punishable by the yellow card. 
Tackling from behind? A red card. 

Tune wasting? Outlawed. Having water bottles 
strewn onto the playing surface? Forbidden. If a 
player or a referee wants water he must go to the 
sideline. 

It is not inhuman, though bringing the World Cup 
to the United States, where the temperatures are as 
disparate as the time zones, just may be. Those same 
referees who will be billeted in Dallas must cross the 
time zones, must suffer the vagaries of a noon kickoff 
in steamy Orlando or an evening match in balmy 
Boston or San Francisco. 

But on the whole, and conceding that it is players 
and coaches who have dulled the game, Bla tier's rule is 
as necessary as it is authoritarian. 

“It’s up to FIFA to control football," he says. “We 
cannot stand back and let cheats run this game. We 
cannot control the players, but the one area we can. we 
most control are the referees.” 

Boy are they doing that. 

Rot> Hvgfts h oh rtf oofi cf The Tana. 

m Mexican to Officiate Opening Match 

Arturo Brizio Carter of Mexico, a 38-year-old law- 
yer, will referee the op ening World Dip match be- 
tween the defending champion Germany and Bolivia 
in Chicago on Friday, Agence France- Presse reported. 

The Australians Gordon Dunster and Eugene Braz- 
zalc will be the linesmen, FIFA’s referees’ committee 
said Tuesday when it named the first-round officials. 

The referee of the last World Cup match, the 1990 
final between Germany and Argentina, was also a 
Mexican, Edgardo Codesal Mendez. He sent oft a 
player for the first time in a final, in fact, he sent off 
two: Argentina's Pedro Monzon and Gustavo DezottL 


By Jere Longman 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — In 1904. FIFA 
soccer's world governing body, 
hdd its first meeting, in Paris, and 
reserved the right to bold a world 
championship. Not that FIFA 
wanted to rush into anything; it 
would be 26 more years before the 
Worid Cup was bom. 

By 1930, soccer bad grown un- 
comfortable with the Olympic in- 
sistence on amateurism. The sport 
needed a worldwide showcase for 
its best professional players. Since 
Uruguay was 

WorldCup jfjf, 
USA94 week boat nips 








1VJ 




Wimbledon Draw 
Tough for Graf 

WIMBLEDON, England (AF) 
— Top-seeded Steffi Graf wfll have 
a potentially dangerous first-round 
match a gains t Lori McNeil when 
she opens the defense of her Wim- 
bledon title. 

The Graf-McNdl matchup was 
the most intriguing pair that 
emerged from Tuesday’s draw for 
the tournament that begins Mon- 
day. McNdl ranked No. 20 in the 
wndd, is a serve-and-volley expert 
who won the Wimbledon wannup 
to urname nt in Birmingham last 
Sunday, Martina Navratilova, 
playing in hex last Wimbledon, was 
drawn Jd the opposite half from 
Graf and will face British wild card 
Odire Taylor in the first round. 

In thamen’s field, Pete Sampras 
wiB open the defense of his title 
against fellow American Jared 
Palmer. The toughest challenge for 
Sampras could come in the senufi- 
nalvnihere Ik is projected to face 
third-seeded Stefan Edbo& a two- 
time champion. Second-seeded Mi- 
ebad Stka^ the 1991 champion, 
opens against a qualifier. 

Tottenham Fined 


Italy Opts for a Milan Defense 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

Italy will field AC Milan’s re- 
cord-breaking hade lour in Satur- 
day’s World Cup opener with Ire- 
land, Coach Anigo Sacdu said 
Tuesday ai the Italian team’s prac- 
tice sight in New Jersey. 

“Paolo Maldini will train today 
and as long as there are no prob- 
lems he wifi play against Ireland," 
Sacchi said. 

Maldini missed last weekend’s 
friendly against Costa Rica with a 
thigh strain and was replaced by 
Antonio Benarrivo of Parma, who 
can play on either flank. 

Sacchi said that veteran Maura 
Tassotti would keep the right-back 
position, lining np with Ins Milan 
teammates Franco Baresi, Alessan- 
dro Costacurta and MaldmL 

Milan set a record last season by 
conceding only 15 goals in 34 
r flatrfm* on the way to their third 
successive Italian league title. 

Tassotti won the first cf his five 
Italian caps in October 1992, be- 
consng at 32 Italy’s oldest debu- 
tanL. The Italian defense has a defi- 
nite gray tinge about it — with 
Tassotti and Baresi both now 34. 

The indurion of both Roberto 
Donation! arid Daniele Massaro 
would bring the numbo~ of players 


from Milan, ihe European champi- 
on. to seven — the back four and 
Demetrio Attwtmi being the citbera. 

Sacchi refused to say whether he 
would settle for a draw on Satur- 
day. 

“If we deserve a draw on the day 
and that is what we get then it’ll be 
fine by me,’ he said. 

• Roy Wegerte, the most experi- 
enced forward on the U.S. team, 
said he would not stan Saturday in 
the Americans’ opener against 
Switzerland. 

Wegerie, 30, was injured Jan 8 
and hid three arthroscopic opera- 
tions on his right knee inis spring, 
the last on April 15. He hasn’t 
played a full game since Jan. 3. 

The U.S. coach, Bora Mtiutino- 
vic, wonldn’l say wheiher he 
thought Wegprle was fit enough to 
play a full game, bur Wegerie 
thought be was. 

“1 think 1 can, and 1 want to 
play,” he said Monday. “But that’s 
what Bora’s decided to do.” 

Wegerie, who has two goals in 17 
international appearances, said 
MOutmovic informed him of the 
derision three or four days ago. 

“He said he wants to use me in the 
second 45 minutes,” Wegprle said. 


• Hie Nigerian team finally ar- 
rived in the United States on Tues- 
day, 10 hours late after their 18- 
bour flight was delayed by visa 
problems in Lagos. 

Their Dutch coach. Clemens 
Westcrbof, sent the players straight 
to bed at the team’s bold outside 
Dallas, 30 hoars after they had be- 
gun their journey. The flight was 
delayed in Nigeria because Nigeri- 
an Airways did not have the neces- 
sary clearance papers for the plane 
or visas for the crew. 

Nigeria opens its Cup campaign 
against Bulgaria on June 21. 

• President BQl Clinton, Chan- 
cellor Hdmut Kohl of Germany 
and President Gonzalo Sanchez de 
Lazado of Bolivia will attend the 


LONDON (Renters) — The 
Football Association on Tuesday 
inmosed a repwd fine of £600,000 
(5900,000) taLondon’s Tottenham 
Hotspur socen -team over irregular 
^flnentx to players in the late 

The FA iso said Tottenham 
Hotspur yrindti. not be allowed to 
rake partia the FA Cup in the next 
season, and it pdjaiized the club 12 
points Jorthe Tjett Premier League 


SCOREBOARD 


BASEBALL 


Winning Jockey 


» rl 
' ..A.- 


ASCOT; England (Reuters) — 
Michael inrBithi-f q d e iltwfi winners 
at Royal Ascot on Tuesday, but 
Quines for two days. 

Knanfc won the opening Queen 
Anne Stakes by a neck on 3-1 fa- 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DMtfHI 

W L Pd. 

New York MM MO 

BaHInon 34 36 -5 St 

Boston 32 a -533 

Detroit 31 » J17 

Toronto 30 31 .492 

Control Dtvtston 

qiiwTi ‘ 34 25 SI 6 

CWvetond 34 3S J74 

Minnesota 34 27 .557 

Kansas City . 32 » 

MlhMWtCM 27 34 M3 

Wost Division 

Texas 31 3 B JM 

Steam 25 36 -4H 

Californio 26 33 .406 

Oakland- W 61 -3B6- 

HATTONAL LEAGUE 
Cast Division 


y - intheSLTames’s Pal^eSi^esand 

. romded# off. with Ashon head 

y\ rictoiy,<ai*oyA (7-2) in. the King 

Edward -Vg Slakes. 

y to.tjtestewaids'decided be had 

been tpo.Tard xm Grand Lodge, 

. jgmj} hiywfppfrani above shoulder 
v T 1 i* hagbLandbarrtd brio from riding ' 
on June^Av;; ...' - 

For^be Record 

d(^LnaB-4Q, whoresignedAS 

:■£ i.- EQBCh rf tbfr Narinn;il Basketball 

~ - • AssoriatiaaV San Aetotdo Spurs 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Atlanta 

39 

21- 

MB 

.. — 

Montroal 

39 

24 

.613 

z 

PhnodUpMa 

31 

33 

.484 

TO 

Florida 

30 

33 

JOS 

10M, 

Nwp.VarK 

29 33 

CwrtraJ Dlvttoro 

MS 

11 

Ondanati 

35 

27 

-546 

— 

Houston 

34 

29 

JM 

1 

SL tools 

32 

SB 

sa 

2 

Fmatoarah 


39 

Ml 

4VS 

Chicago 

- 73 37 

HMMDMriaa 

3S3 

11 

Las Angola 

33 

30 

iSM 

— 

Colorado 

29 

331 

M 8 

to 

SanFrandsca 

29 

34 

Ata 

4 

SonDtooo 

S 

39 

m 

W 


; seacral nianager irf the Phfladri- 


Monday’s Une Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
ToroMa 6M . Bit «N~S » 1 

Ctmt'r— • • M M «*— ? » 6 

CmsttrTImSn OI ontf .Bortarsi tVLCJnr*. 

. LHttculst ISLMMO tttrShuev «l one SAte- 
an r. W-^WOort, S-t l^-Conwtt, 0 * 1 . 

HR»— Toronto. Corlvr 04). Oevetond, Brito 
n*>, Romtroz (11)-'' 

OakMOd M M MM 3 1 

amo«D . me ro mo-1 • « 

B.WM onrf Stetabadu B«W feHamartez 


(9) and Karkovk*. W-Bcro.8-1. L— &Wttt.<- 
7. 9v— iLHerouxtoz. ID. 

AUmaota Ml 021 MO— 5 12 1 

Boston 1M IPO ON— 3 II t 

Dntotos. Costa (7). Wfllh CD.Gutnrte m. 
AouHoro »> ond Wotbeck; Ctometts. K-Rvon 
m. Howard <91 and BenvMlL W— Doohatas. 
34 L-dcrans, 6-3. 5v— Asultora 113). 
ColHorria 191 010 lot— 7 U i 

Kanos City BN 913 »*— U 9 1 

Umorion. Daoson IB), BJrttoroon (9) and 
Fdbrmw MHockL Pkfwnki C7J ond Mactar- 
tane. W— Pfehunto, VI L— Ocoson. 1-4. 
HRs— CoHfornia. Salmon (14), DSmMi U). 
Kansas Cny, Brooks m. 

NOW York 009 0» 399-3 11 9 

somaon oob bob bbi— i 9 i 

Porab Howe (9). WTcfcman (9) ond Lovrttr; 
SJoimairitk, MO Is <71. Poole 19). EtoMiom 
«) and Hollos. W— Peru. *-3. L-S-Fenwn- 
dnz. 3-4 Sv-Mflckincn (4). 

5aatUe 099 ass 319- ? U o 

Tom 296 Ml 330-17 8 1 

Hibbard. Cmtimlnas (4), Darwin (6), Gas- 
save <91 and D-WUson. Haxrtman IB); 
BJturst, WMtaride {41. Olhror (7). Howell (7). 

COOtorterta)andLRadrlBu*x.W--BJHurst.a- 

1. L— Hibbard. 1-4 HRs— SOOtHe, OrlHey Jr 
(34). Texas. Canseco 3 (W). XGonzaie* 19). 
LRoOrtauoz (6). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Houston 039 000 999-4 I 1 

San fruu cis co IW 330 oo w-s M i 

RevnoKts. Edens (6), Powrii 17), Veres (7) 
and Eusebio; Van umBngbom, Burt* (71, 
Jadaoa (9), Beck (9) ond Monwcrlna 
W— Vai Landtoritain. 24L L — Reynolds. 3-3. 
Sw— Bock (13). HRs— Houston, Cedcno (61. 
San Franctsca, Beutnser E4L WlWwns (23). 
OtfonOO «• m 639-7 It 1 

Atlanta DM OM 919-2 10 9 

Froeman, SJRend (8). BJtaffln <9) and Glr- 
ardW Glavfne, Oban (8), Kriock) (9) ond 
DTSrttn. W — F r eemo n . 4-T. u-OMvtne. 7-9. 
HRs— Altanta Klesko 110), QTBrien W. 
PttnadetpMfl 999 BM HW 9 2 

New York 001 Ml 01 *h-4 7 » 

WosL Andersen ML Ouantrtll (7) and Daul- 
foRi Ssfceftewon. JJtamanflte (01, Fronco 
l*J and SHnatk Mundtov <91- W— Sabertw- 
oen, 7* L— West, 2d. Se— Fronco (15L 
PttMmti 0M 199 093- 2 2 2 

Montreal MB 944 Ota-W It 0 

Neagte, WSto (51. BoHonJ (71. RManzndllO 
It) on) SkwgM; FasowwShdw l» ml Web- 
ster. W-Fwsero. 5-4 L— Neaole. 4-7. 
HRs-PHMwroh. JJW1 (7).AtantroaI. Crteom 
(4), L Walker (9). MUMan (2), Wettfcr (2). 


in Chicago between Germany, the 
defe nding champion, and Bolivia. 

• According io a Harris Poll re- 
leased Monday, 71 percent of 
Americans surveyed still do not 
know \he 1994 World Cup is being 
played in the Uni Led Slates. Fifty- 
six percent said they were not inter- 
ested in watching any games on 
television and 65 percent are not 
interested in attending a game. | 
Only 38 percent know the louma- , 
meat involves soccer. (AP, Rewersl 


Florida SOD BOB *01—1 9 0 

SL U»ll 690 091 MV- 1 6 1 

Rapp, Non (9) ond Santiago; Watson. Ho- 
bvon (71. Arocha (71, M.P«rsz (9) and Poo- , 
nazzL W— fAPerex. M. L— Non. 3-4 
HR— Florida Bamerto (4). i 

CMmH an BM 939-4 9 9 I 

Los Aooales 991 193 om— s h i 

Schourek. jarvts IS), Fortuora io). Car- 
rasco (7) aid Dorset!; RMorflnu, TcLWor- 
roil (9) and Piazza W— RJUartlnnz. 6-2. 
L— Jervis. Q-LSv—Td. Worrell (31-HRs— Cln- 
dmctL SChawrit (i). LA. Piazza (131. 

The Michael Jordan Watch 

MONDAY'S GAME : Jorto went O-tor-4 *n 
a 4-3 loss to NostwlllA. He hod three ground- 
oatoanda ItnMuL Drionslvriv, ho mode one 
putoat in rtaht Held 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan is battlna M 
(45- for- 71 8) with 14 runs, nine doubles, one 
triple. 24 RB Is, 20 wafks, » strikeouts and 15 
statan bases in 25 attempts. He has K witouts. 
one assist ana sbi errors m riphi nrid. 


Pet. GB 

AH — 

J 10 ret 

A91 9 

m 9to 

MU 10 

AM 12 


PCt GB 

MCI — 

JB5 3 

^19 4h 

M 1 VIS 

AO 2 11 

375 14 


Central Leasee 
W L T 
Yamhiri 34 19 0 

awrichi 36 25 0 

Yokrtt 25 37 0 

Yokohama 24 27 0 

HonsMn 24 39 0 

Hiroshima 20 28 0 

T u esday** Resatts 
YomlUri 7. HansMn 4 
Oiurtcw X Yokuft 2 
Yokohama 13, Hlreshima 1 

Pacffie League 
W L T 
SeftO 34 19 0 

Detol 31 22 0 

Orix 37 25 0 

Lotte 25 27 0 

Nippon Ham 22 33 l 

Kintetsu 17 32 i 

Tuesday's Results 
*-««* 3, sriaul 
Nippon Ham J. DoltH 2 
Orix 4 Klrtetsu 7 




Uruguay pre- 
t were tne Ar- 


for the teams 

from Europe 

and build a 
100,000-seat sta- 
dium, it was 
^ awarded the in- 
augural World 
CuponibelOOth 
anniversary of its independence. 

The first World Cup was the 
most successful for the United 
States, which reached the semifi- 
nals of the 13- team tournament be- 
fore losing to Argentina in a 6-1 
rouL In ihe final, Uruguay pre- 
vailed, 2-1. So upset were tne Ar- 
gentine fans that they pelted the 
Uruguayan Embassy in Buenos 
Aires with rocks. 

The host nation won again when 
the tournament moved to Rome in 
1934. Benito Mussolini attended 
the final, a 2-1 Italian victory over 
Czechoslovakia, and he used the 
success as a Fascist propaganda 
tool mud) the way Hiller would 
use the 1936 Summer Olympics. 

Italy won its second consecutive 
Cup in France in 1938 under Coach 
Vittorio Pozzo. But World War II 
was fast approaching, and Austria 
had to withdraw at the last minute 
because it no longer existed, having 
been annexed by Germany. 

The World Cup was not played 
again until 1950, when Brazil was 
the host and the Americans pulled 
off one of the greatest upsets in 
soccer history with a 1-0 victory 
over England. Even today, it is de- 
bated whether the lone goal, scored 
by Joe Gaetjens, was a deliberate 
header or an accidental glance off 
Gaetjens’s ear as he scrambled to 
duck a shot by his teammate Wal- 
ter Bahr. Another huge upset fol- 
lowed in the final, when Uruguay 
stunned Brazil 2-1. 

Television came to the Cup in 
1954, when Germany won the first 
of its three titles with a 3-2 victory 
over Hungary in (be rain in Bern. 





essaaBsav •*» 

Mm Mmmi/Agcncr Frano-Plt** 

A relaxed Diego Maradona during a break in Argentina’s practice in Wellesley, Massachus etts. In 
1986 in Mexico, Maradona made Cop history with his infamous “hand of GotT goal against England. 


In 1958 is Sweden, in Brazil’s 
third game of the tournament. 
Coach Vicente Feda unveiled an 
agile 1 7-vear-old forward named 
Me. He would score the lone goal 
in a 1-0 victoiy over Wales in the 
quarterfinals, then add a pair of 
goals in the final a 5-2 defeat of 
Sweden, as Brazilian fans danced a 
samba to celebrate the first of the 
country’s three titles. 

Peie was a legend by the time the 
1962 tournament approached in 


Chile. But in Brazil's second game, 
a 0-0 draw with Czechoslovakia, be 
tore a thigh muscle and was lost for 
the rest of the tournament. Brazil 
still had exceptional talent and won 
its second Qip with a 3-1 victoiy 
over Czechoslovakia in the final 
In 1966, soccer returned to its 
roots when the Cup arrived in Eng- 
land. Just before the tournament, 
though, the solid-gold trophy was 
stolen from a public exhibition. It 
was finally located in a suburban 


London trash heap, sniffed out by a 
dog named Pickles. When Italy was 
diminated by a shocking 1-0 loss to 
North Korea, the Azzuni arrived 
home to be pelted with rotten fruit 
and vegetables. The trophy re- 
mained in England upon a 4-2 vic- 
tory over Germany, as Geoff Hurst 
scored the first hat trick in a Worid 
Ciro final 

Pde had threatened not to play 
in Mexico in 1970 after a foul dur- 
ing the 1966 Cup, but he relented 


and Brazil wot its third title with a 
style of joyful attack. The Jules 
Runet championship trophy once 
rescued by a mongrel was then per- 
manently retired. 

By the 1974 Cup in Germany, 
PeI6 had retired from the Brazilian 
team, so the sport needed a new 
trophy and a new superstar. Poli- 
tics interfered during (be qualifying 
tournament when the Soviet Union 
refused to attend a playoff in Chile 
after its Marxist president Salva- 
dor Allende, was overthrown and 
killed; Chile was thus left with the 
ludicrous sight of its team kicking 
the ball into an empty net in an 
empty stadium to qualify. Germa- 
ny, with Franz Beckenbauer and 
Boti Vogts, the current national 
coach, in the lineup, prevailed. 2-1, 
over the Netherlands and its star, 
Johann Cruyff, in the final 

Preparations for the 1978 tour- 
nament in Argentina seemed in 
doubt, first with the Peronist gov- 
ernment's sclerotic approach to 
providing the necessary infrastruc- 
ture, and later, when leftist guerril- 
las assassinated General Omar Ac- 
tis, the chief or ganize r, as he drove 
to his inaugural news conference. 
The rebels vowed not to interrupt . 
the Cup, though, and Argentina 
joined Brazil and Uruguay among 
the South American soccer elite 
with a 3-1 victory over the Nether- 
lands in the final. 

The 1982 World Cup moved to 
Spain, where the field increased to 
24 teams from 16, and Argentine 
introduced a 21 -year-old star 
named Diego Maradona. The ’82 
Cup was marked by scandal in the 
first round as Germany and Aus- 
tria allegedly colluded on a 1-0 
German victory that allowed both 
teams to advance to the second 
round at the expense of Algeria, 
which was diminated. Germany 
readied the title game before it lost 
to Italy, 3-!. 

In 1986, Maradona dominated 
the tournament in Mexico as Argen- 
tina won its second Cup. Agamst 
England, he scored one of the most 
infamous goals in Worid Cup histo- 
ry. using his hand to punch the ball 
inio the net and later attributing the 
score to “the hand of God." 

Four years later in Italy, Argenti- 
na again advanced to the final but 
with a cynical defensive style that 
served os a symbol for a bleak, 
inelegant tournament, in which 
scoring plummeted to a record low 
of 2*2 goals a game. Germany won 
fora third time, 1-0 in the final 

And now, cm Friday, the Worid 
Cup comes to the United States, 
which like space to the time travel- 
ers on television’s “Star Trek,” is 
the final frontier. 


The IHT World Cup Competition 

Win fabulous prizes. SMggilSSlH 




WORLD CUP WARM UP 
SwMen 1. Romania i 


Winners will be chosen from an official drawing. 
The first 16 entries drawn, with at least 6 correct 
responses, will win one of the prizes listed below, 
determined from the order in which they are 
drawn. 

Grand Prize: Two United Airlines business class 
round-trip Europe/New York tickets plus five 
nights accommodation at the Stanhope Hotel in 
New York. 

Five second prizes: Sprint Collectors frame pre- 
paid phone cards in celebration of the World Cup. 
Five third prizes: AT Cross, 22k gold, diamond 
cut Roller ball pens, from the Signature 
Collection. 

Five fourth prizes: Gold Pfeil men’s wallets. 


HERE’S HOW TO ENTER 


For each of the 12 days leading up to the Worid 
Cup, the IHT will publish a question in which the 
response predicts various outcomes of facets of 
the World Cup. There are 12 questions in all. 

After answering the question each day in the 
coupon provided below, hold your responses and 
send them all at once to the IHT. A minimum of 
6 responses must be postmarked on or before June 
17. 1994 — the World Cup kickoff day. 

Only clippings from the newspaper will be 
accepted. Photocopies and faxes do not qualify. 


RULES AND CONDITIONS 


1 . Individual coupons will not be accepted. 

Minimum of 6 coupons to qualify. 

2. Cut-off date is postmarks of trie first day of file World 
Cup — June 17, 1994. 

3. Valid only where legal. 

4. Entries will not be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, its agents and subsidiaries. 

5. Only original coupons will be considered valid. 
Photocopies and faxes are not acceptable. 

6. No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
postage will not be accepted as proof of receipt. 

7. No cash alternative to prizes. 

8. In some countries, the law forbids participation in this 
competition for prize awards. However, in these 
countries, you can still play for fun. The competition is 
void where illegal. 

9. Winners will be drawn on day after the end of the World 
Cup and published in the IHT on Thursday 21 July. 

10. On all matters, the editor’s decision is final. 

11 . The Editor reserves the right in his absolute discretion to 
disqualify any entry, competitor or nominee, or to waive 
any roles in the event of circumstances outside our 
control arising which, in his opinion, makes it desirable 
to cancel the competition at any stage. 

12. The winners will be the first correct answers containing 
six or more coupons picked at random from all entries. 


h* *#»* Y \ J* \ 

; V ?>, A' ■/ 

. * ..r -s'’ •* v 


Group A 
USA 

SWITZERLAND 

COLOMBIA 

ROMANIA 

Group B 
BRAZIL 
RUSSIA 
CAMEROON 
SWEDEN 

Group C 

GERMANY 

BOLIVIA 

SPAIN 

KOREA REPUBLIC 
Group D 
ARGENTINA 
GREECE 
NIGERIA 
BULGARIA 

Group E 
ITALY 

IRELAND REPUBLIC 
NORWAY 
MEXICO 

Group F 

BELGIUM 
MOROCCO 
NETHERLANDS 
SAUDI ARABIA 


TODAY’S QUESTION 


' >'(<* /</ • , s * . •x 

^ A '• ’ A 4 A l/' '*)»» 

i! 


From which team will the top goal scorer come 
from? 


Your response:. 


Job Title: - 

Company: 

Address: , _ _ _ . 

Postal Code: City: 

Crainny: 

Telephone: 10J1S 

Send responses io: IHT World Cup Competition. International Herald 
Tribune, 181 Avenue Chnrievde-GauUe, ^252 1 Neuilly Cedex, France. 

-Tt ICTHIKHIUNAL m 4 


• ■ |V. 


8 8.^6*? 5Y ’ 1 T S’?*? 54 ? afioBB&tfSPT I S *■ ro »-irh » s 






.k ^ J&**sB**r * J - ' 


Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 1994 


»r ■ 


I 


( • I 
l . ! 


OBSERVER 


Mathematics of Golf 


By Russell Baker 

W ASHINGTON — Now that 
all humanity has voiced its 
outrage about the White House peo- 
ple wfao took a military helicopter to 
the golf course, let’s get serious: 
why did this trip cost $13,129,66? 

That’s how much the golfers are 
said to have been charged for the 
outing. Golfers who regularly lake 
helicopters when they head for the 
course say the White House players 
were wildly overcharged. 

Around New York, for instance, 
you can helicopter from the Wall 
Street pad out to any of the good 
courses in North Jersey’s stockbro- 
ker belt for about $650. Throw in 
another S150 for, say. three hours 
of waiting time at $50 per hour and 
maybe $100 for landing fees, and 
the cost comes to about $900. 

We are talking about travel with 
private companies in business to 
make a profit. Since the helicopter 
used by the White House golfers was 
owned by the government, a non- 
profit institution, you'd think the 
cost might be, oh, 20 percent lower, 
which would bring it down to $720. 
□ 

So why were the White House 
golfers charged some S 12,409.66 
more than the private sector would 
have billed them for their now-fam- 
ous trip to Frederick, Maryland. 

Did die government take advan- 
tage of the cries of public outrage 
to gouge its own people for some- 
thing like $12,0007 
Efforts to persuade the White 
House to cough up an itemized bill 
have so far been futile, probably 
because the While House bureau- 
cracy is just as baffled as I am 
about how prices for personalized 
Pentagon services are computed. 

Since the Pentagon is the com- 
puter, one is tempted to play the 
wise guy and say that it charged 
5720 for the service and $12,409.66 
for the cost overrun. 

More likely, though, the buge 
difference between the private sec- 
tor’s $900 charge and the military’s 
$13,129.66 reflects a huge differ- 
ence in the quality of helicopter 
travel being provided. 

□ 

I'm guessing a bit here, but I'll bet 
the helicopter served up when the 
White House phones is just about 
the most marvelous helicopter un- 
limited amounts of money can buy. 


As if that weren't enough, for the 
gplf run a second helicopter — sort 
of a buddy copter to the passenger 
vehicle — was sent along. The non- 
government traveler by contrast gets 
only one helicopter and that one. 
yoti can be sure, looks like the Tooo- 
erville Trolley compared with the 
one taking presidential men aloft. 

I suppose we are to assume that 
this breathtaking golfer’s transport 
charge reflects the average after- 
noon’s cost of using all machines of 
this breed and vintage in all their 
various jobs. How else compute the 
cost to the golfers? 

If so. this is one mighty expensive 
piece of machraety, but of course we 
all expea incredible expense when 
talking about the grandeur of our 
astonishing war machinery. Price is 
no issue with this stuff. 

□ 

The cost of operating all these 
machines in a typical afternoon for 
the length of time the golfers used 
the pricey helicopter must stagger 
even secretaries of defense if they 
ever dunk of it, which they proba- 
bly struggle mightily not to. 

Thinking of their cost is even 
more alarming than watching the 
taxi meter while trying to go cross- 
town in New York’s rush-hour traf- 1 
fic. In this enormous routine daily 
spending orgy the cost of carrying a 
few golfers to Frederick is laugh- 
ably trivial, except to the golfer 
confronted with the bill. 

It is the great attention paid last 
week to D-Day that has me dwell- 
ing on these immensely costly me- 
chanical marvels. Watching black- 
and-white film showing what 
Americans were like 50 years ago 
reminded me not only of bow poor 
we were, how unchic our wardrobes 
were and how ill-decorated our 
houses, but also of how inexpen- 
sive, unfancy and not very special 
our machines were. 

German machines were superior 
in almost every category, yet not 
good enough against a people so at 
home with the ToonerviUe Trolley 
that they could quickly convert 
hundreds of thousands of them 
into weapons which, as the song 
goes, made tyranny tremble. 

Those old-timers were on to 
something important, and we don’t 
even know anymore what it was. 
We have machines that cost 
SI 3,000 per afternoon. 

Sr*~ York Tuna Service 



By Bernard Weinraub 

Sew York Times Service 

L OS ANGELES — The phone keeps 
ringing in the cramped office of Jan 
De Boot, the director of “Speed.’" the first 
sleeper hit of the summer season. 

Executives at 20th Century Fox, which 
produced the action thriller, keep calling 
the first-time director to read him flatter- 
ing newspaper and magazine reviews that 
leave him amazed. Close friends, like the 
filmmaker Paul Verhoeven, who warned 
De Bone early on that “Speed” seemed too 
technically difficult and ambitious, call to 
express delight that be ignored their advice 
to forget the project 
And — in the sweetest irony of all for the 
50-year-old De Bont — top studio execu- 
tives all over town are calling to offer future 
big-budget action projects after telling him 
as recently as two weeks ago that he was too 
inexperienced to make such films. 

“That’s the weird thing about Holly- 
wood." De Boni said. “Your life can 
change in a day. Your life can change in 
two hours. People see a movie, and two 
hours later you can be at the top. Or at the 
bottom." 

De Bont. a Dutch-born cinematogra- 
pher whose credits include “Die Hard." 
“Lethal Weapon 3" and “The Hum for 
Red October.” is now savoring his sudden 
arrival at the top of the director’s list. 

“Speed” opened over the last weekend 
as the top box-office attraction. 

The film, almost two hours of nonstop 
action, pits Keanu Reeves as a Los Ange- 
les policeman on a SWAT detail, against a 
sociopath (played by Dennis Hopper) who 
has wired a city bus to explode if, after 
reaching highway speed, it goes less than 
50 miles (80 kilometers) an hour. Also in 
the cast are Sandra Bullock, as a passenger 
who ends up driving the bus. and Jeff 
Daniels as Reeves's buddy. The movie was 
written by Graham Yost, with uncredited 
assistance by Joss Wbedon. 

Executives at 20th Century Fox ac- 
knowledge that “Speed” caught them by 
surprise, and the fum was initially viewed 
as only a conventional action movie for 
s umm er audiences. At best, they hoped it 
would recoup its $30 million cost 
The first hint that “Speed" might prove 
to be an unexpected hit came in April when 
an early version was shown at a theater in 
suburban Pasadena. “They began applaud- 
ing after the Gist scene,” De Boot recalled. 
“1 thought, ‘l don't believe this.’ The studio 
people bad Lctk) me it was going to be a 
small action movie. They were totally over- 
whelmed by the nonstop applauding.” 

A second screening was hastily set up in 
Long Beach. “It went even better,” said 
De Bom. “It was a dream come true — to 
make a movie that the audience loves.” 


Director Jan De Bont, left with Keanu Reeves, mi (he set. 


At that point, the studio told De Bont to 
rush completion of the film, and spent 
more than Si million on seven -days-a- 
week overtime. 

In advancing the release to June, 20th 
Century Fox sought to beat the competi- 
tion of such action films as Metro GokJ- 
wyn Mayer's “Blown Away.” starring Jeff 
Bridges and Tommy Lee Jones, which 
opens on July 1. Now. however, “Speed” 
may even compete with the studio's big- 
gest action film of the year, “True Lies,” 
starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and di- 
rected by James Cameron. That film, 
which may have cost more than $100 mil- 
lion, opens on July 15. 

Like many successful cinematogra- 
phers, who often feel undervalued and 
underpaid, De Bont had long sought to 
torn to directing. 

“A lot of cinematographers get frustrat- 
ed," he said. “The studios often give 
young directors an experienced cinema- 
tographer in the hope that he can help the 
guy make a good movie. And let me tell 
you they do a lot of the work and some- 
s (ike i 


lor sjot 
of the 


movie. 


control of a good part 
“Then they get frustrated because if a 
movie does well or gets great reviews, Che 
director gets all the credit, and the cinema- 


tographer is left out in the cold. It's frus- 
trating; it happens often,” 

Although some cinematographers have 
become masterly directors, among them 
Ridley Scott and Stanley Kubrick (De 
Boot’s idol), many others nave not been as 
successful “Some of the movies are very 
beautiful to look at, but the stories don’t 
go anywhere,'’ said De Bont. “They tend 
to pay a lot more attention to the visual 
side, but audiences don’t really care about 
how pretty your picture is.” 

What audiences care about, be said, are 
rich emotions, action and events and ac- 
tors they can identify with. The fact that 
“Speed” takes place in a city bus, with 
mostly average-looking passengers, inten- 
sifies the film's drama. 

“It's aE I hope, very identifiable," said 
De Boat “Keanu Reeves looks vulnerable. 
At one point be breaks down. He doesn’t 
have muscles like Stallone. He doesn’t do 
incredible stuzds or shoot up whole build- 
ings. You can identify with, him." 

Although he was reared in the Nether- 
lands and spent his early career (with his 
dose friend, Verhoeven) malting mostly 
avant-garde films, De Bont has lived in 
Los Angeles since 1968. He is married to 
Trish Reeves, a producer of television 
commercials, and has two young children,. 


lUfaanl Forms 


De Bont, who made his name as a cine- 
matographer an such films as “FlatEners," ‘ 
“Ruthless People," “Black Rain” and; 
“The Jewel of iheNHe." is known, as a 
craftsman whose photographic styte. al- 
tbough not immediately recognizable, is: 
dean, straightforward and vivid.' 

“I love movies like ‘Hunt for the Red 
October,’ because it was about subma- 
rines, and 1 made the submarine almost an ’ 
actor. Like the submarine wasihe star of . 
the movie.” 

’The same applies to the bus in 
‘Speed,’ "be said. “It’s like a monster that 1 
you have to control. And the autfience is 
like a passenger on that bus." - 
De Boat said that, aside from Kubrick, 
be had teamed the most as a filmmaker 
watching Alfred Hitchcock’s movies. But : 
be added that directors of action movies 
and thrillers. Eke “Speed” are often under- 
valued as craftsmen. "" i. • •• ■ 

“It’s as if you compared “Sleepless in 
Seattle’ to this movie,'” he said. “It’s 400 
percent more work in tins kind tCfihn. It’s 
tmiHi more complicated on the actors. To 
ken your focus, to keep cbntlnuify. to 
make the filar credible, -'to add humor, to. 
get the action right — look how many 
people. try and fafi.” - 


prnPLE 



TheRwrdStroigto 

■ Notso.Bartw».S»«^gjS^! 

hermoslwcatvMl 

Tor a While living 

do not sn m W— l* tour- 
rooms." At a dinner 

tart- ftwer 

despite the media reports. 

1 : H wasn't long ago ttot 
GaiAcre and controversy s 0 ™*" 

tobeone. But in Wghj^w* * 
other day, she was the pj^£, ^ 
serenity. fcouM i t be tfc 
her boyfriend Lyle Tmdue^g. 
liVa' feeling w t^ 31 
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desolate hows and toe happy f* ,ufS 
are happier*” die says. 

D 

^ Prince Antoew ivffl relinquish h* 
rote'as.a minesweroer 
to bccomescoior pilot of the larged 
helicopter squadron , in Europe, u* 
British Ministry of Defense has an- 
■notmeed. Andrew; who sewed 
helicopter pitot during toe 
FaDdands War. will take up UK 
ent position based at Port- 
land,. in February. 

- V E 

- Just call Varna White M-O-M 
She gave birth Saturday to a toy 
named Nicholas, the first child for 
the 37-yearold hostess of 
of Fortune;" who is married to res- 
taurateur George Santo Pietro. 4.. 

■ - '? ; □ 

'Words 'of wisdom from Jan® 
Fomta- Tn a commencement address 
at tiie ! F-whtm Willard School in 
Troy, New Yotk, Fonda — a 1955, 
. graduate of the school — said, “I 
you do your life right, you fl““ 
stop- growing up, you never 
thou’." In a poetic wrap-up, 
actress quoted the English philt 
pher Alfred North Whitebd 
‘‘When younnderstand all abou j 
son ana 1 ail about toe atmospl 
and, all about , the rotation erf j 
earth, -yon 'may still miss the 
mice <rf toe 

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WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Toto 


Tomorrow 


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17/62 

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21/70 

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26*79 

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34/75 

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Wmw 

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15/59 

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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. 



jfinoMm 

North America 

Much o( (ha United States 
east of Die Rockies wff have 
hot weather later this week. 
The core of Ole heat wave 
wii extend from St Louis to 
Philadelphia. Hot weather 
will extend northward 
through Toronto and Ottawa 
as well. Heavy thunder- 
storms will pound the north- 
ern Plans. 


Europe 

Temperatures wii average 
weB below normal later this 
week Iron Oslo and Stock- 
holm on eastward through 
Si Petersburg. At the same 
time Madrid through Rome 
wiB be sunny to partly doudy 
and warm. Warm weather 
will extend northward from 
Parts through London later 
tHsweek. 


Asia 

Ram will linger along the 
southeastern coast of C*wia 
late this week. North central 
China, including me Beijing 
area, wii be sunny and hot. 
Worm weather will spread 
eastward across Seoul and 
Tokyo later this week. The 
southwestern RnJppaies vnll 
have heavy rains while the 
northeast has hoi weather. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


BWIX 

Caao 

Damascus 

Jmusolcm 

Linor 

ReraUh 


Today 
High Low 
C/F CIF 
29/04 20160 
3605 17162 
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27/90 19*1 
43109 21/70 
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OF OF 
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20/79 13/55 « 
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srvsnow. MW. W-WeaBier AH map*, hxvcacta and data provided by Accu-W«ather. Inc. 1994 


Asia 


Tartar 


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Uarife 

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33*91 

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NwWi 

41*108 29-84 


42(107 31^0 pc 

Saoi 

23*04 

17*3 


30/88 

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seta 

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20.02 22 m pc 


32*03 

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pc 32/09 

22 /n 1 

Te-spi 

30*88 

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23*73 6ft 

Tphyo 

25/77 

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25/77 

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Africa 


25*77 

10*4 

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28/79 

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22/71 

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CaaaPUra 

23/73 

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21/70 

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Layoa 

30/86 

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Tv«j 

24/75 

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An/nagr 

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12*53 


19*0 

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ACarla 

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3S*9b 

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27*» 

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32/89 

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ACROSS 

f Jerk 

6 Netman Kriek 

11 Peek 

12 Even (with) 

14 Bristles 

15 Symbol of 
somberness, in 
poetry 

17 Passbook amt. 

18 Nota winner 
zo Tell (on) 


21 Fishes by 
dangling the 
bait on the 
water 

M Meadow! ands 
hockey player 

24 Lasso - 

25 ■ — - or lose 

»r 

27 Jure ho no ree 

28 Farm worker 
28 Xerxes ruled 

here 

21 Directional sign 
si Bank burglars 



Solution to Prade of Jure 14 


b anasa asaaa 

□ Bsaaa atanaa 

□msaaaaniQaaaa 

□□as aaa 

□□naaaaa 


Qaaas BQaa aai 
BaaHQDmBaaaamaa 
DQO Baas G3GH3B3 

□□HBaaaa □□aaa 
□□□ □□□a 


H O TIE LBA|G|E|NIT«PJl 


aaosa aaa 

EiQQBED □□Sliia □□□ 


88 Packaging 
material 

28 Informational 
sign 

29 Topped 

42 Take at 

osDusseldort 

dessert 

48 White House 
restgneeof 
f9S8 

48 Team finisher. 

47 Stertos' output 

48 Dulty colored 
so Author Kesey 
51 Indiana town . 

near South 
Bend 

53 French city 
where Henry IV 
was bom 
»4 Diane and Ruth 
SB Portray, as 
historical events 
58 Outbuilding 

58 More 

80 ’Following the 
Equator" author 
si Bridge seats 

DOWN 

f Cautionary sign 
2 Nat In France 


aTheaterorg. . 

4 Bum . " 

8 Interfered (with) 
8 Spur-of-the- 
moment tr^s 

7 Magic’s 
Sftaquitfe 

8 "Bird on a Wire- 
actress 

• Meet 

IQ Cautionary sign 

11 Bribe, 
informally . 

13 ‘Grim’ one 

14 Make sense _ 

18 Forever, to 

Keats 

ifl Racetrack 
22 "Yes. sir," in. 

Seville 
24 Switched 
according to . 
plan 

28 Packed dosety 
28P!udcauke 
30 Muslim 
honorific 

32 Schwarz 

*4 Thinks over 

36 Difficult matters 

37 Bony ' 

3a Pram night 
transport 


eastern and -4TCubaop«tri<* . ^ saSigmokf 

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41 Cpmingput . 48 Mebfe measure. *• *sGoOfltxutse 
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ABET Access Numbers. 

How tocaD around the world. 

1 L'sing the chartbdow. find the country you are calling from. 
i Dull lire ctwrespondtas AKT Access Number. 

3 AI^Englbh-speakiog Operator ot voice prompt w-Ql^ for ibe phone ouraber you wishtocaflwconnectLycju to a 

customer srfrviee represemadve. 

To receive your free wallet card erf AKSnsAcccssNunfljeis, just dSafthc access nuntoeroT 

toe country >xxi'rcinand ask for Customer Service. r ~ ‘ 


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Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


Imagine a world where you cart call country to country as easily as you can from home And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak tout 
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your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AIScD 

To use these services, dial the ART Access Number of the country you're in and you’ll get all the 
help you need. With these Access Numbers and your AIKT Calling Card international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ARsET Calling Card or you’d like more information on JW global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 




COUTVTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY 

'ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA. 

Italy- 

■ . 17Z-10I1 Brazil 

000-8010 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 

UwhtauBgliV 

155-00-11. Chile 

00* -0312 

China. PRC*** 

10811 

Tfthmnfa. 

8*256 Cotambia 

980-11-0010 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg • 

oaXMnil> CostaRicam 

114 

Hoag Kong 

800-2211 

Macedonia. P.YJL of 996004288 EtUadCK* 

110 

>p*H»« 

000-117 

Malta* 

. ©00-890-110 SSatvatkarii -■ 

190 

Inrione^ta* 

002*892-20 

Monaco* 

29*-001Z Guatemala* - 

190 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Netherlands* 

06-022-9111 Guyana*** . 

- ’ 169 

Korea 

009-22 

Norway - 

800-290-21 Honduras^ 

123 

Kora** 

12* 

Prfandr#** 

0*0104800121' ~ Mexico*** 

95-800462-4240 

Malaysia' 

8000022 

Portt*aT 

05027*2-288 JBrrugna (Mamijpi,) 

\ew Zealand 

. 000-911 

BAnHWht 

01-8004288 Pariamaa 


Philippines’ 

205-12 

2Euaeia*TMoacow7 ... - • 155-5042 PenT 


SaljKur 

235-2872 

Slovakia 

0042000101 Suriname 

136 

Singapore 

8004)12] -31 1 

Spain* 

90O9WXMJ . Uruguay 

00-0410 

Sri tanka 

430-430 

wvcoar . . 

020-795-611 Venezuela - ■ 

80-011-1 7n 

Taiwan* 

0060-10288-0 

SwiCEcriandT 

15500-11 4!AMntKP*|v 

Thailand* 

0019-991- J in 

tOL 

0500890011 WaKacnwff 


EUROPE - - 

Ukraine* . 

8*200-12 Bermuda* . 

1-800-87 1 lam 

Armmla* 

R.1411V 

MIDDLE BAST BrtrishVl- 


Austria—’ 

022-903-011 

Babiain 

8DO-0O2 Caymaa Islands 



0800-100-10 

Cyprus* 

- 08090010 - Grenada* 


Bulgaria 

00-1800^010 

had 

1 177-1003727 Haiti* -■ ’ 


Croatia** 

99-380011 

Kuwait 

,800-288. Jaxnaica** - - 


Czech Rep - 

00-42000102 

tdanontBrina) 

426-801 Netfa. Aradl 


Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Qatar . 

- 0800011-77 StKttls/Nei* 

1-80ij-r*o.->ooi 

Phdaodr 

9800-100-10 

Saucfi Arabia ~ 

- l-bUO-lO .- AFRIT*- 

France 

19*0011 

. Turkey- 

00-800-12277 Egypt* (Cairo) 


Geras ay 

0X300010 

-UA&V 

•800-121 Gabon* 


Greece* 

00-800*1311 

AftffiWCAS rGaotOar 


Hungary* 

00*60001112 

AiB/smbn* .... 

001-800200-2121 - S»?a*- 


[celand*a 

999001 

Bdlae* r 

.■.••55?- Ubefia ' “ 


Ireland 

1-800^50000 


■ . (MOCMllZ r South Africa 

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