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INTERNATIONAL 





Soccer’s Grand Drama 
Will Open as a Mystery 

The World Cup Begins Today in U.S. 
Before an Ambivalent Home Audience 


By Ian Thomsen 

l/uenuuional Herald Tribune 

CHICAGO — Six years ago, soccer rang 
up the United Slates out or the blue and 
said, “We were thinking of coming for a 
visit." 

"Well, that would be great,” America 
said. An uncomfortable pause from the land 
of importunity, then: “who's coming?" 

‘‘Everybody," soccer said. “AH of the rela- 
tives.” 

“Fine, great," America said, mentally cal- 
culating the income its hospitality might 
earn. “Just let us know when you're coming 
so we can be ready." 

it seems now that neither side realized 
what it was getting into. Soccer goes on 
international holiday every four years — its 
convention is known as the World Cup fin- 
als — but the sport has always visited famil- 
iar places, by invitation. Technically, the 
United States placed a bid to host the 
world's largest non -Olympic tournament; in 
reality, soccer has always wanted to come 
here, to become part of the American cultur- 
al landscape and to share in the riches. 

So as the underdog Bolivians kick off 
Friday afternoon against the defending 
champion Germans in the quintessen daily 
American stadium of the Chicago Bears, the 
!5lh World Cup feels oddly foreign, like 
someone else's idea. The nine American ven- 
ues are prepared to the extent of a major 
convention coining to town — the hotel 
rooms have been blocked off, the welcome 
signs are in place, the American football 
stadiums have been reconfigured to cite 
specifications of their guests — and the 
public is largely ambivalent. According to a 
Harris poll conducted ihree weeks ago. 71 
percent of Americans still don’t realize the 
World Cup is in the United States. 62 per- 
cent don't know what it is and 56 percent 
aren’t interested in watching any of the 52 
matches on television. 

The United States is where many of the 
world's soccer superstars vacation in sum- 


mer, walking the streets in blissful anonym- 
ity. No one expected Americans to suddenly 
rejoice in their presence. Nonetheless, in the 
last few days it has been hard to fathom that 
an hour-long opening ceremony and its en- 
suing match — worthy of 750 million view- 
ers worldwide, three times more than watch 
a Super Bowl — are scheduled to take place 
here. 

One great emotional obstacle is the dis- 
persion of the tournament. Unlike the 1984 
Olympics, which took over Los Angeles, the 
World Cup spans nine cities across 3,000 
miles over 31 days — a period roughly twice 
as long as that of the Olympics. Then there is 
the uniquely American makeup of venues, 
such as Los Angeles. Dallas, Orlando and 
Detroit, cities whose centers are irrelevant, 
which do not have logical meeting points 
from which World Cup fervor might gener- 
ate and spread forth. American communi- 
ties are connected by the automobile and the 
television, and American interest in the 
World Cup ultimately will be gauged by TV 
ratings, which are expected to be modest. 

American competition for the World Cup 
includes the baseball season, in which new 
stars are threatening the game's greatest 
records. Fans figure to care more about the 
National Basketball Association champion- 
ship series, which should be completed next 
week, and even by something as bizarre as 
the double-murder involving the American 
football star. OJ. Simpson, a tragedy whose 
social and cultural implications are proba- 
bly far more en g a g ing to Americans than 
this foreign visitation. 

Soccer organizers hoping for a good start 
can only rejoice in the sudden career change 
of Michael Jordan. Were he still playing 
basketball then his Chicago Bulls surely 
would have taken the place of the New York 
Knicks in the current NBA title chase — and 
that would have left soccer feeling even 
more irrelevant in this dry. on the eve of its 

See CUP, Page 23 


And the Winner Will Be? 


A UVCr 


By Rob Hughes 

Inienuaitmal Herald Tribune 

CHICAGO — Who will win the World 
Cup? .Ask a simple question, and you invite 
a complex answer. 

I can give it to you straight. I can tdl you 
Brazil will rake home the trophy one month 
from today. And old readers of this column 
will know that Hughes always says Brazil — 
and, in five World Cups since 1970, has had 
to come up with excuses as to why the 
greatest soccer nation fell short of expecta- 
tion. 

.As often as not the answer lay in a single 
word: Germany. We find it at Soldier Field, 
the evocatively named stadium here in Chi- 
cago where the Germans get to kick off 
Friday's opening game of the 15th Worid 
Cup by virtue of being, again, champions of 
the sport- 

in essence, soccer has lent itself more over 
the past two decades to Teutonic thorough- 
ness, to denying the opposition, to the phe- 
nomenal grinding willpower of the German 
style ralber than to the beautiful game with 
which Brazil stole our hearts. 

That, of course, is over simplified. Argen- 
tina and Italy, countries being art with cyni- 
cism. grace with destruction, have muscled 
in there, too. The Argentines have won in 
Latin climes, the Italians in Europe, and 
Germany has pounded away with a game 
high on order, high on good passing and 
ru nning techniques, higher still on the belief 
that its sons are born to be soccer winners. 

Maybe it is a touch of the sun, maybe 
Chicago in the high 90s is playing tricks with 
ray judgment, but 1 don’t rate Germany as 
the winner this time around. 

As I march with the throngs toward Sol- 
dier Field, toward a beautiful and evocative 
stadium with its neoclassical colonnades ris- 
ing 100 feet in monument to men sacrificed 
to old wars, I have a good feding that soccer 
is going to recapture some of its faded joy at 
this World Cup. 

I know that is a lonesome view. I know 
history mocks roe. 1 know Brazil is an old 
flame that flatters to deceive. And I know 
those Germans keep on coming, keep on 
working, keep prevailing to the end. 

But this time I am right. As long as soccer 
is a game, as well as a global billion-do liar 
industry, I will see the boys in yellow out- 
play the troops in black and while. If Brazil 





m- s 

I&K >' 

Mrrh-.' i 




Tboous Kjaefc The A* uojieU PW 

Brazil's Paulo Sergio, front and Marrio 
Santos stretching before a practice at 
their camp in Santa Clara, California. 

and Germany cross paths during this 52- 
raalch World Cup. 1 already know that Ro- 
mArio will show the ball to Loihar Matth- 
aus, will flick it over Maltha us’s head, and 
will score like the irreverent magician I be- 
lieve him to be. 

And then we awake. Then reality crowds 
in. Then we have to accept that on virgin 
American territory just as everywhere else 

See PICK, Page 23 


f- ■■■ Up ■ 

: 20.93 

Sg: 3 , 811.34 

The Dollar 

Nan York. 

DM 

Pound 

Yen 

FF 


55 Down 

ffi °- 56% 

111.76 





. MidadJMirAcBecFnaee-PrtSK ' 

GERMAN-ITALLAN BONDS — Prime Minister Sflhrio Berlusconi of Italy being welcomed to Bomi on Thursday by Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl with ntiBtaiy honors. Mr. KoM made no public criticism of Mr. BerinsconTs having neofastiste hi HMfllmetRigeX 


The Bundesbank Paints a Bright Picture 

Eye on Inflation, It Bars Cuts in Key Rates for ‘Some Time 9 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The Bundesbank, in a decidedly 
upbeat assessment, declared Thursday that 
Germany's economic recovery was strengthen- 
ing. At the same lime, the German central bank 
sought to quell inflation fears that have been 
troubling financial markets. 

But the Bundesbank also unsettled the Ger- 
man government bond market because itindL 
rated in June monthly report that- there 
would be no further cuts “for some time" in 
either the discount rote or the Lombard rate, 
two key interest rates. 

The last cut in these rates, a half-point, came 
in mid-May. The statement on Thursday was 
believed ro mean there will be no more cuts 
until at least July 21. when the Bundesbank 
council meets for the last time before its tradi- 
tional four-week summer pause. 

Analysts said the remarks about interest 
rates fueled speculation that after 23 months of 
gradual rate reductions the Bundesbank might 
be preparing to put itsmonetaiy policy on bold. 

Fears of rising inflation, meanwhile, rolled 
through Europe’s financial markets once again 
on Thursday, briefly propelling the dollar to a 


new low for the year and pounding stocks and 
bonds. (Page 11) 

In Paris, tbe Bank of France lowered its 
intervention rate, the leading interest rale, from 
530 percent to 520 percent This put the rate, 
which acts as a Boor on short-term money 
market rates, just 0. 15 percent higher than the 
equivalent German repo rate. 

The cot should have been good news for the 
French bond market, especially as. it was ac- 
coritpahied by figures shewing that the French 
pconomy grew by 03 percent in the first quar- 
ter. The growth rate was weak, but it represent- 
ed the largest quarterly increase in two years, 
and Edmond AJpband&ry, the economics min- 
ister, contended that the pace of France’s recov- 
ery would soon accelerate. 

The French bond market nonetheless 
slumped again Thursday, and long-term inter- 
est rates rose as a result 

Senior European economic policymakers 
have become worried lately that inflation fears 
in the bond market have contributed to the 
soaring level of long-term interest rates, thus 
poring a potential threat to Europe's recovery. 

Mr. Alphandfcry said Thursday that “the real 
economy is performing well and there are no 
risks of inflationary tensions." 


The Bundesbank report also contained lan- 
guage aimed at persuading markets that infla- 
tion was not a problem. : 

It noted that pressure on consumer prices 
had “weakened significantly" and explained 
(hat the recent rise in dallar-deaonrinated com- 
modity prices had been counterbalanced by the 


U^. dollar. . ;■ ‘ - ; 

Another factor contributing to the hwinfla- 
tion outlook in Germany was the moderate size 


Ti imT 

Tryifftigg 

rnnnsi 


Inspectors Can Remain, 
Pyongyang TeBs Canter; 
Clarification Sought 

Compiled by Our Sufi Fnm Dap<achcs 
WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton 
said Thursday that a new North Korean oner 
to resolve the crisis' over its suspected nuclear 
weapons program “could be a promising de* - 
opment" and- that the United States would 
• resume irigb-kwel talks if Pyongyang was now 
ready toTreeae the pro^am- 
Ref erring to former President Jimmy car- 
ter's talk* Thursday in Pyongyang with the 
North Korean president, Kim n Sung. Mr. 
Clinton said, “Today there are reports that the 
North Koreans in discussions with President 
Carter have offered new steps to nlay the 
international community's concerns" about its 
nuclear program: 

Bat Mr. Chh ton appeared skeptical abou l 
assurances made by Mr. Kim during the talks 
with Mr. Carter. “I rdepends on what lhS Kore- 
ans meant by what they actually sad today," 
Mr. Clinton said.; . ' ~ : *y\_- 

*Tf today’s developments mem Nor th Kor ea 

is genuindly and verinaHy prepared tefreezeits 

nuclear program whBe talks go on," he said, 
'?thea we woukLbe wSQiug toresume higWevel 
talks." 

“Our . nation dearly has vital interests on die 

- -Korean Peninsula,'* Me. Clinton said, adding' 
dial the U.S. commitment to Sooth Korea was; ' 
“uasbakeable.*' “•■.••• 

■ Mr. Clinton's comments ewie hours after 
ML Carter reported an ' ap p aren t, concession 
from; Mr.' Kim made dating a. meeting .-fa. 
Pyongyang . . ,„;r. .... ■ ■■ ■■ 

Shortly -before-. Mr* Ofatcm made bis qom- 

- men is, AssistantSecrmiyof State Robert ^-L. 
GaBoco said. “Tbe Uratoti States welcomes 
indications given to President Carter that 
North Korea desires to find . a: constructive 
sofatioff to the very swous issuea between 

1 - North Korea mod tfe international comrauai- ; 

■ ty/v* . / *" v ■. 

' • Mr. GaBiHXl. wfeo act i as' tbeTadmuusira- 
tion’s ctwrtmator idr pdicy on Korea, said 

1 there, would be adequate-basis lb ream* the 
negptiatibioihar Mr.Kim warns* prowled the 

- North Koreans me ready k> tab particular 

■ steps. Mr. Gaflucdpsaid these were: th e -su spen r 


of wageinoteases iiegotia'ied daring '-the 1994 sian of reprocessing of nudearfueL thesufipen- 
wage round, the Bundesbank added. It said son of refueling of Pyongyang's nuclear reac- 
most industrial sectors had approved increases tor, and maintaining . the continuity of 
of around 2 percent for this year, which was inspection safeguards ; • ^7 rj\ 
"significantly lower" than in 1993. “It’s fair to say we looked ai the messaged We 

The report said recessionary tendencies in see possibly soroenew dements in the message, 
the West German economy “appear to have . We win be .exploring the meaning of the mes- 
been overcome” wfafle in eastern regions “the sage through diplomatic channels," Mr.. Gjfl- 


Blood Hormone Discovery 
Seen Aiding Cancer Patients 


By Gina Kolata 

Sere York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — An important blood-form- 
ing hormone that had eluded discovery for 35 
years has been isolated after a heated rare 
among several biotechnology companies. 

The finding is expected to be of direct clinical 
benefit for cancer patients and to create a 
market of a billion dollars a year for the compa- 
ny that wins the patent for making the sub- 
stance. A further consequence is that with the 
new hormone all major components erf blood 
ran now be manipulated, with far-reaching im- 
plications for medicine. 

The new hormone, coiled thrombopoietin, 
induces immature bone marrow cells to develop 
into platelets, the disk-shaped cells that hdp 
blood dot. An obvious clinical use Is to help 
cancer patients regrow their own platelets after 
radiation or chemotherapy, which destroy 
them. At present platelets are restored by trans- 
fusions, requiring large numbers of donors. 

Scientists have searched for a platelet-form- 
ing hormone for many years, yet the pursuit 
was so unavailing that many despaired and 
some even began to doubt that it existed at aH 

Tbe reason for its elusiveness is now dear: 
The hormone is naturally present in such mi- 
nuscule amounts that a mere millionth of a 


gram per day can turn a person's bone marrow 
into a platelet producing factory. 

In four artides published Wednesday fa (he 
British journal Nature, researchers describe 
bow they isolated thrombopoietin and estab- 
lished its role in stimulating platelets. Although 
cHnieaT trials most be conducted to prove that 
the hormone works as expected in patients, 
researchers are highly confident that it w2L Tbe 
companies that won the thrombopoietin tax 
are Genentech in Smith San Francisco. Califor- 
nia, and the ZymoGenetics Corp. of Seattle. 
The companies used different methods to iso- 
late the hormone. .• 

Hematologists were dated This is big, big,” 
said Dr. David GoWe, head of hematologic 
oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer - 
Center in New York. 

Dr. Jerome Groopman. chief of hematology 
at the Deaconess Hospital in Boston, said. 
“This really qualifies, I think, as being a break- 
through-" 

The final stretch of the race to find thrombo- 


Roossy in VUlq'mf, France, near Paris. She 
dis c overed a new receptor protein embedded in.- 
tbe outer membrane of a cell waiting For some 
outride signal like a hormone to which the cell 

See BLOOD, Page 4 


economic uptrend dearly continued fa the first 
few months of this year." 

Data from the Federal Statistics Office 
rixjwed a2.1 percent growth rate in West Ger- 
many in tbe first quarter, but the consensus 
forecast among private sector econonrisfs for 
German economic growth in 1994 is 13 pen- 

See RATES, Page 4 


Kiosk 

France Proposes 
A Rwanda Force 

France is ready to join European and 
African nations fa a “humanitarian" mfli- 
laiy intervention if a pknned United Na- 
tions force does not arrive there soon. The 
foreign minister, Alain Juppi, said any 
intervention would be limited in time ana ' 
aimed protectingdviliara threatened with 
extermination. "We cannot go in alone," 
Mr. Juppt said. He suggested that the 
Western European Union could acninder 
a United Nations mandate. (Page 4)-. 

Move in Congress V 
To Punish Beijing - 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) —With the 
. support of Democratic majority leaders, 
legislation to link human rights conditions 
■*. to China’s trade status with the United 
States was introduced in Congress on 
■Thursday. The Ml would revoke prcferen- 
dal import tariffs for products made or 
' exported by the People’s Liberation Army 
: and products of certain state-owned enter- 


liioci said. . ; - 5 

Mr. Carter said earlier Thursday d^t North 
Korea had agreed to aKow : United. Notions 
inspectors to remain ai. a disputed nuclear in- . 

. suulatkm that U.S. intelligence beeves may be 
part of an xlKcit weapons program. . 

Mr. Carter, who has beat in North Korea for - 
meetings . with -Mr. Kim and other leaders^ srid ... 
in an mterview with CNN, “I 'Look on this 
ccnmutiite&ttfFiesfdenl Kim'IJ.Sifagas tefag -■ : 
a-teiy important and positive step toward tbe .. . 
resolution of this crisis." . \ ' v'. 

North Korea’s refusal to permit outside in- . 
^occtionofitsnucfeaxinstaBationshasresulted- 
in an international -deadlock in which die Unit- 
ed States is asking' flte UNlSecurity Owncil. to. - 
impose sanctions, sranetbing North Korea has 

, ; See KOREA, Page 4 


Crossword 

Books 


Page lft 


Pressure Over 
Sanctions Issue 

. _ . By Lena H- Sim . 

■ Washington PaaService 

.. BELTING — As international pressure 
mounts for sanctions to punish North Korea 
over its. disputed nuclear program, China, 
iNoitn Korea s sole remaining Communist ally 
and malnebonomlc partner, finds itsdf increas- 
ongly- m the hot seat. - 

Begfag wants stability on the Korean Penra- 
sula so it can continue with its economic devel- 
opment program. But China does not want to 

■ssr* ,w, *» a Bood 


^-tnnainprn 
involvement of 


** Coundl fa he 
nnclrar tssueon tbe Korean PenfasSa 


Ttnrv. doea 

1.6322 

1.52 

103.335 

5.5658 


gntew dase 
1.6365 
1.5213 
102.70 
5.584 


Newsstand Prices 

Andorra 9.00 F F Luxembourg 60 L Fr 

Antilles n JO FF Morocco 12 Dh 

Ca meroon ..1.400 CF A Qatar 8.00 Rials 

Egypt E.P-5000 Reunion. ...11.20 FF 

France 9.00FF Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

Gabon 960 C FA Senegal 960 CFA 

Greece JOODr. Spain 2Q0PTAS 

liaiv 2,600 b're Tunisia ....1.000 Din 

Ivor/ Coast .1,120 CFA Turkey ..T.L. 35,000 

Jordan 1 JD UAE 8.50 Dirh 

Lebanon ...U SSI JO U.S. Mil. (Eur.) si.10 


By Martha M. Hamilton 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Imagine a deserted Washington, -riiere 
Capital H31 and expense-account restaurants and movie the- 
aters shut down for months at a time. 

Imagine Florida without Disney World. Houston and Atlan- 
ta without office towers, shopping without enclosed maiLs. 
sports without domed stadiums and a worid without compil- 
ers. .... 

Imagine life without air conditioning. . , 

The question arises now, in late spring, because the heat 0 , 
summer is already upon us. Temperatures were well in«o] “ 
90s Fahrenheit fmid-30s centigrade) on Wednesday in ma* of 
the eastern half of the United States, setting records m New 
York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh. Washington and Green Bay. 
Wisconsin. • 

So air conditioning. It is a mixed blessing, responsible for 
indoor atriums, summer blockbuster movies, nearly year-round 
sessions of Congress and record consumption of electricity. 


It has redrawn the map of commerce by opening hot, humid 
frontiers to business develop menu and has allowed the.con- 
laminzti on-free manufacture of such products as computers 
and drugs. 

1 ; has changed commercial architecture, increased worker 
productivity and created its own large industry. 

Air conditioning is "the most profound technology advance 
of the 20th century," said Richard Gebula^an economist at the 
Georgia Institute of Technology. Withoutit, Florida and Toms 
would be sparsely populated compared with their density 
today, he said. In the 1960s, the net population loss that hag 
been a constant in the South since the Civil War was reversed 


crowding in, attracted by a lower cost of living, lower axes and 
lower operating costs, Mr. Ccbula said. . . | 

“1 don’t know of anything more significBni in terms of 
building Dallas 35 a greax business center, Houston as an oil 
and gas center, Austin as a high-tech carter and_San Antonio as 
a manufartunng- center than -air comfitioning," srid . Ben 
- Barnes, a former heutenant governor of Tem, where the blast- 
furnace force of the awmner heat !$ hard to' describe to those . 
who hare not experienced it'. .''-xy; -i:V / 


depute and relax tensions.” ** TC&oly * the 

enmtentreactedcooQy to an /SaeriS ? 311 80v ‘ 
ai for sanctions a gainst P n ^os- 

■sanctioas outright,' nor did n 9 l . °PP<>se 
content lfae 


Mn addition to diangmg.migratitm pi^ms fa the .United ^ SStiw 

Statcvair conttitiomoghfiS beauroorumt m tireereanon of . later if theSjmi?^ 

smne industries. The manirfaefare dl Computers. fot instance. ^ cooperate 

depends on clean. dtoteH^trolfcd rob^. . - 1. “ : . 


pwaunicaii roused to cnon^tT r««nunist 
*mal.nw dear intent 


’ depends on aeaacumate-cxmirouearocnzz^..-. - - •. 

5 8 ^ “ 7 P™ 11 - “ “W 1980s, Florida ejperancMan. dcctoreata sUa ay72dcgrees and 35 percentfamridHybccause on Monday 
additional 33 percent population increase, and Texas grew. - immi ^ u«O r mgthtaRencv’c 


additional 33 percent population increase, and Texas grew 
nearly 20 percent. 

Once air conditioning made Irving in Sot them and South- 
western states tolerable, both individuals and business came 




Jfjfl UP Vj 









5—' JK- 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 17, 1994 


Breathing Space for Major 

Labor’s Leadership Battle May Be Divisive 


By William E. Schmidt 

New York Time Sr'rw.r 

LONDON — For months. (he biggest question 
in British politics has been whether Prime Minister 
John Major will survive as leader of the Conserva- 
tive Partv, which has been racked by squabbling 
over its plummeting popularity and rifts over Eu- 
ropean policy. 

Now the Labor Party opposition, with the death 
last Thursday of its leader. John Smith, is facing a 
potentially divisive debate of its own. In the next 
few weeks, the party must negotiate the politically 
perilous task of choosing a new chief. 

Since Mr. Smith had taken over as leader two 
years ago. offer the pony's founh consecutive 
defeat in a national election, he had amiably united 
Labor's quarrelsome factions and restored the par- 
ty machine lo fighting trim, precisely when the 
Conservatives have been floundering. 

Earlier this month. Labor battered the govern- 
ing Tories in town and county elections, and polis 
predict even bigger Labor victories in voting next 
month for the European Parliament. 

Last weekend, amid pleas for unity and a sus- 
pension of campaigning until Mr. Smith’s funeral 
this Friday. Labor rivals were quietly lining up 
support within the party. Its rank and file are 
divided between the old-style trade unionists and 
the so-called modernists who want to nudge the 
party more toward the political center. 

Surveys of party members in London newspa- 
pers suggested that the strongest support was 
building for Tony Blair, the party's telegenic 41- 
y ear-old spokesman on domestic affairs. 

Because of his youthful appeal and a willingness 
to address traditional Conservative issues like law 
and order. Mr. Blair is described by his supporters 
as an even more formidable challenger than Mr. 
Smith would have been, especially in areas of 
southern England where Labor has been shut out 
in Ihe last four national ballots. 

The Daily Telegraph, a newspaper thai tradi- 
tionaliv backs Torv candidates, called Mr. Blair 


“the man Conservatives most fear as a future 
leader of the Labor Party." 

But Bill Connor, an official of the shopworkers' 
union and a member of the parly’s executive com- 
mittee, said he was skeptical of Mr. Blair’s commit- 
ment toward trade unions, whose membership still 
makes up the bulk of the party's hard-core political 
and financial support. 

Mr. Blair and Gordon Brown. 43. a former 
television journalist who is a dose friend of Mr. 
Blair’s, are the preferred choices of the party’s 
more moderate wing. On the left, the candidates 
most often mentioned are John Prescott. 55. a 
political brawler and former union offidal: Robin 
Cook. 48. the party spokesman on trade and indus- 
try. and Margaret Beckett. 55. who was Mr. 

Smith’s deputy. 

Under new rules that Mr. Smith helped engineer 
last year to break the hold of block voting by trade 
unions, the new leader will be selected by an 
electoral college. One-third of the delegates will be 
chosen by a ballot of Britain's 4J million trade 
unionists, one-third by a vote of Labor members of 
Parliament, and one-third by the party* s 250.000 
full members. 

There is wide agreement that Labor's loss of Mr. 
Smith may have given Mr. Major some breathing 
space. Lord Howe, a former member of Margaret 
Thatcher's cabinet, said a Labor leadership contest 
would afford “a respite from the rather frenzied 
discussions" over dumping Mr. Major. 

The death of Mr. Smith, felled at 55 by his 
second heart attack in six years, may have helped 
Mr. Major in another way: by casting doubt on the 
fitness of Michael Hesdtine, 61. often cited as his 
chief Conservative challenger. 

Mr. Hesdtine. six years older than Mr. Smith, 
has only recently recovered from a bean attack he 
suffered last year. A member of Mr. Major's cabi- 
net, Mr. Hesdtine sought to allay doubts, telling 
an interviewer, “I would question any suggestion 
that 1 am not 100 percent fit.'' 



Rkln ft<fek'RcMcr> 


Tony Hair, die British Labor Party’s front-runner, leaving Ms London borne on Monday. 


In Break With Past, Some London Bobbies Will Garry Guns 


.Vm >.ii> Time* X.Wi. r 

LONDON — Scotland Yard rewrote 
rules on Monday that have traditionally 
barred police officers from openly carrying 
guns, and for the first lime will send a few 
dozen specially trained bobbies into the 
streets this summer, wearing sidearms in 
hip holsters. 

The change in the arming policy — pro- 
voked by a growing number of violent 
assaults on police officers — will go unno- 
ticed by most resident* and visitors to the 
capital. 

All but a handful of London's uni- 
formed bobbies will continue to walk their 
beats and ride patrols cars without weap- 
ons. as thev have done since the London 


police force was established more than a 
century ago. 

But while the new policy' affects only a 
few pa tail officers, police officials said it 
had a much larger symbolic importance, as 
one more step toward providing bobbies 
with the kinds of weapons they need to 
defend themselves. 

“1 think we all value the traditional im- 
age of the British bobby," said Paul Con- 
don. the superintendent of the Metropoli- 
tan Police Department of London, at a 
news conference. 

"But we have to police the real world, 
and ihe equipment and training must have 
some link with the real world." 

.After having had two officers killed in 


recent months, two others shot and several 
stabbed, Mr. Condon said. “1 am not pre- 
pared to to ask them to carry out their job 
without better protection." 

The change in policy was endorsed by 
government, which announced the new 
measures earlier Monday as a “measured 
response" to the problems facing the po- 
lice. 

But while the Home Secretary, Michael 
Howard, said the move was “an important 
step in providing the police with better 
protection," he also said he believed most 
British police would re main unarmed for 
“a long, long time to come." 

In addition to allowing a handful of 
officers to cany sidearms while on duty. 


Mr. Condon also authorized police officers 
to carry 22-inch-long, nylon riot sticks rou- 
tinely. 

Wooden nightsticks 12 to 14 inches long 
now are the standard issue. 

He also said London police officers 
would test the use of pepper-gas sprays, as 
a way “to disorient" violent subjects, and 
would conduct trials on the feasibility of 
equipping all beat officers with bullet- and 
stab-resistant vests. 

The measures are a result of growing 
pressure from police organizations to allow 
officers to carry belter weapons to defend 
themselves against criminals who are them- 
selves belter armed. 

The new gun policy applies only to what 


German Youth Charged With Leading Anti- Foreigner Riot Go-Ahead 


By Stephen Kinzer 

,\Vw York Timet 5 cr.ice 
BERLIN — Facing sharp criti- 
cism from politicians and human- 
rights leaders, policemen in the 
East German city or Magdeburg 
brought charges Monday against a 
teenager suspected of being the 
ringleader of a riot 3gainst foreign- 
ers there last week. 

Magdeburg’s chief prosecutor. 
Rudolf Jaspers, said the suspect 
was 19 years old and was believed 
to be the leader of a local neo-Nazi 
group with about 80 members. He 
is being charged wirh “an especially 


serious case of disturbing the 
peace.” Mr. Jaspers said. 

Following normal procedure. 
Mr. Jaspers declined to identify the 
suspect. He said investigators 
hoped to bring charges against oth- 
er suspects. 

On Thursday, a gang of about 
150 neo-Nazis, skinheads and other 
thugs chased asylum-seekers, most 
of them from Sierra Leone and Ni- 
geria, through the streets and into a 
caffe owned by a local Turk. 

In the subsequent clash, at least 
four assailants were stabbed by 
Turkish-born cafe employees who 


tried to defend the asylum-seekers. 

After the clash, anti -foreigner 
gan gs roamed the streets for hours 
in search of victims, and there were 
several assaults. The police arrested 
49 suspecis but quickly released all 
except one man. who was being 
sought on an unrelated charge. 
They said they could not identify 
any of the 49 as having been re- 
sponsible for specific crimes. 

Several prominent Germans 
strongly criticized the police for not 
preventing the violence, for failing 
to film it and for quickly releasing 
the suspects. 


“It is horrible, and it is difficult 
for any of us to accept," President 
Richard von Weizsflcker said in a 
broadcast interview. 

“It is hard to understand how, as 
we see from television pictures, 
hoodlums or right-wing extremists 
can charge through the streets 
breaking windows and attacking 
people, and then 50 or more arc 
arrested, but that same night 
they’re all released," he said. "Are 
they supposed to go out the next 
night and do the same thing 
again?" 

The bead of Germany’s principal 


Roy Plunkett, Teflon Inventor, Dies at 83 


.Vw Yttrf. r riwrr Senior 

Roy J. Plunkett. 83. the scientist 
whose accidental invention or Tef- 
lon 50 years ago not only changed 


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GRAMERCY PARK HOTEL 
2Ise Sc. and Lexington Ave- NYC 

Member of U tell International 


the way A men cans cook but also 
helped develop a multibiilion-dol- 
lar plastics industry, died Thursday 
of cancer in Corpus Chris ti. Texas. 

In 1938. Mr. Plunkett was a 
young research chemist in a Du 
Pont Co. laboratory in Deepwater. 
New Jersey, conducting an experi- 
ment on a possible new refrigerant 
when he discovered that be had 
created a new product. 

Mr. Plunkeu recalled later that 
be was looking disappointedly at a 
glob of white, waxy material inside 
a laboratory cylinder, thinking the 
experiment a failure, when he de- 
cided to test the material for prop- 
erties other than refrigeration. He 
found it to be resistant to beat to 
be chemically inert and. belter yet, 
to have very low surface friction, so 
it would not stick to anything. 

Teflon, the trade name for the 
polyieirafluoroethylene resin, was 
to become a household name in 
cooking pans, and three-quarters of 
the pots and pans sold in the Unit- 
ed Slates are now coated with Tef- 
lon or one of its cousins. 

Mr. Plunkeu was awarded a pat- 
ent in 1941 for his invention. 

To subscribe in France j 

juV coll. tcU free, | 

0 5 037 437 | 


The new. nonstick substance also 
revolutionized the plastics industry 
by moving such synthetic materials 
into applications never before be- 
lieved possible. 

Erwin dikes, 56, Publisher 
Of Nonfiction for 25 Years 

NEW YORK (NTT) — Erwin 
A. Glikes, 56, a leading publisher of 
nonfiction books for a quarter-cen- 
tury, whose authors included some 
of the most prestigious figures in 
American intellectual life, died Fri- 
day night of a heart attack. 

Since 1969, when be left a post as 
associate dean of Columbia Col- 
lege, Mr. Glikes, who worked at 
three different publishing compa- 
nies over the years, gamed a reputa- 
tion for a rare talent in contempo- 
rary publishing: making 
commercial successes of serious 
books on public policy, history and 
ideas. 

He was the president and pub- 
lisher of Basic Books for seven 
years in the mid-1970s, the publish- 
er of the trade division at Simon & 
Schuster and, since 1983. the presi- 
dent and publisher of The Free 
Press. 

After the sale of Macmillan Pub- 
lishing Co., the parent of The Free 
Press, to Paramount Communica- 


tions. Mr. Glikes had begun work- 
ing only a few weeks ago at Pen- 
guin U.SA_ where be was to be in 
charge of a new nonfiction divi- 
sion. True North Publishing. 

Among the authors published bv 
Mr. Glikes were George Will. 
Judge Robert Berk and Michael 
Porter, whose “Competitive Ad- 
vantage of Nations" was among his 
early successes. 

EBas Motsoatefi, 70. a longtime 
African National Congress activist 
who was imprisoned by the South 
African government along with 
Nelson Mandela Tor more than two 
decades, died Tuesday in Johan- 
nesburg. 

Sheikh Mohammed Mekfd Na- 
riri, 88. a Moroccan nationalist 
party leader, former cabinet minis- 
ter and leading Muslim scholar, has 
died. 

Helen Lee MeL 63. who starred 
in Hong Kong-made films in the 
1950s and '60s. died of cancer 
Thursday in Portland. Oregon. 

Thuotin Carey. 65. a character 
actor who played in more than 50 
films, ranging from “Paths of Glo- 
ry" and “One-Eyed Jacks" to 1960s 
beach movies, and who often took 
the part of a villain, died Wednes- 
day in Los Angeles after suffering a 
stroke. 


Jewish organization. Ignatz Bubis. 
told a Cologne newspaper, “The 
failure of the police to protect these 
people is scandalous.” 

Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkd 
said Sunday that the government 
“deeply deplores" the Magdeburg 
violence and added. “We now have 
new grounds for shame." 

Several hundred people marched 
through the streets of Magdeburg 
Monday lo show solidarity with 
foreigners, the second such march 
since Thursday. Police camera 
teams filmed both marches, saying 
that thev feared violence. 


Residential Zone 
In Tuzla Is Hit 
By Heavy Sheik 

A genu- Fruiter Prcue 

TUZLA, Bosnia- Herzegovina — 
Two heavy artillery shells hit a resi- 
dential area of the mainly Muslim 
industrial town of Tuzla on Mon- 
day. causing panic witnesses said. 

It was the third consecutive day 
the northeastern Bosnian town had 
been shelled The shells appear to 
have come from Serbian positions 
about 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) to 
the northeast. 

On Wednesday two persons were 
killed and four were injured during 
shelling, prompting local authori- 
ties to close schools. 

Earber. officials of the UN force 
said in Sarajevo that three pieces of 
heavy weaponry bad been sighted 
in a Serbian-controlled neighbor- 
hood in central Sarajevo. The pres- 
ence of the weapons — two mortar 
guns and an anu-aircmf t cannon — 
would violate the 20-kilometer ex- 
clusion zone imposed by the UN. 

In Belgrade, a Russian special 
envoy. Vj tali I. Churkin, emerged 
from a meeting with Slobodan Mi- 
losevic. the Serbian president, to 
say that he would “very soon" rec- 
ommend to UN officials a meeting 
of the warring parties to negotiate 
an end to the'fightm£. 


On Pill for 
Abortions 


WASHINGTON — The 
French abortion pill RU-486 
will be tested in the United 
States under an agreement 
with the manufacturer to do- 
nate its patent rights to a U.S. 
nonprofit organization, it was 
announced Monday. 

Roassel Uclaf, which has re- 
fused to allow the pill to be 
used in the United States be- 
cause of concern about pro-' 
tests by abortion opponents, 
said it had agreed to. donate 
patent rights lo the Population 
CounciL ' 

“After long negotiations 
with the Population Council, 
Roussel Uclaf has agreed to 
the above solution, which 
eliminates its involvement in 
tbe manufacture and distribu- 
tion of RU-486 in the United . 
States," the company said. 

Representative Ron Wyden. 
an Oregon Democrat who has 
been working for testing of 
RU-486 in the United States, 
said that the pQl would be test- 
ed on about 2,000 women for 
several months beginning this 
fall. 

• The tests wiB allow the 1 
Food and Drug Administra- 
tion to determine whether the 
piU is safe for general use. 

He said the piU would be | 
used only up to the seventh 
week of pregnancy. 

The secretary of health and 
human services, Donna E. 
Shalala. said tbe agreement 
had been reached with the en- 
couragement of the Clinton 
administration. 

“This action is an important 
step toward providing tbe 
women of .America access (o 
nonsurgical alternatives to 
pregnancy termination," she 
said. 


WORip B RIEFS 

Food Aid Reaves „ 


woouoiuu. .** sraaswoman iui- ------ . A nude it „ 

Cross said one track carrying 12 ions °f southwest erf 

town of Gitaradia. hfeadquajters of a rump government, 
ghostlike capital Kigali. J- TuesdnV. The RN 

Another truck is-plannedio make the same mp ^ neighboring 
Cross spokeswoman said a surgical team akw tnaoe it 

Bunindi toKabgayusouthwfetof thecapitaL ^ uts j clan. were 

Refugees in Kabeayi. ratnnlY from lhc Ref usees said 

reportef&ing out an existence in subhuniancofl^^^ Q[ ^ps a nu 
that they were Virtually btingtert P n50 r ae J and butchered 

that people were repeatedly puMout of tlwcwnpouna 
by death, squads £rom tbernajor w Hutu tnoe. 

Cease-Fire in Nag^rno-Kai^akh^ ^ 

naiy accord in Moscow for tite';dephyyra em 01 
disputed enclave, the Interfax agency saKSff- . with the en- 

The waning parties, meeting under rouil cease-fire to 

clave’s separatist Armenian autboritics. a^Lf eed 10 . 

come into effect at midnight Tuesday, ihe .wreation within the 

Tbepaniesalso signed a prdirainaiyaccoraL manned by 

conflict zone,- .as of May 24* -of 49 ol * set *?\f , ^Z wea i t h erf Indepen- 
Ruaian,. Armenian, Azerbaijani and other ConS|g™* which is lo 

dent States troops and commanded by .Russians. 'TraRp ® deployment in 
be formalized .Tuesday, also provides for tbe subseqSs^;, . 1 jeTS> 
tbe enclave of a l,800^trongfleace force of common 

Haiti Military Regime Expands Co 3 p 

. . . PpRT-AU-FRJNCE, ; HaitT (AP) - j, Haiti’s^^y-back^ 

orders from the army or its /tew avxEno figurehead. . . . , 

The -developments increased political tension in Haiti, where real 
power has come from, the military 'since the overthrow of the elected 
pretidenutiw Reverend Jean-Benrand Aristide, in 1991. 

The army’s surrogate. EnnlerJonassahu, 81 .-announced that be would 
serve both as provisional president and as prime minister, violating a 


«an mediation withtbe^' 
freed to a total cease-fire to 
r zenev said. ... 


are described as “armed response vehi- 
cles." in which officers who are specially 
trained in firearms use are now aligned 
Currently, there are five such cars on patrol 
in London at any one time; Mr. Condon 
said be would increase the number of these 
patrols to 12 by the summer. . 

At present, the weapons are carried in- 
side a locked metal box in the vehicle,, and 
axe only taken out by the officers when 
they arrive on the scene or an incident, and 
only with the authorization of a senior 
officer. 

Under the new policy, the pobce officers 
will routinely carry six-shot. Smith & Wes- 
son Model 10 revolvers in bip holsters. 

—WILLIAM E. SCHMIDT 


of-stale and goverimreni: He made the decision bydecree. His statement, 
which listed -his cabinet selections, was broadcast on army -controlled 
state news media.* : 

Jakarta Warhs IMam Timor 

JAKARTA (AP) — Indonesia’s foreign minister, expressing hope Tor 
cancellation of- a conference in Manila on East Timor* has warned the 
Philippines not to underestimate hisnation'sdepth.of-feefingon the Issue. 

Foreign Minister Ah Alatas spoke at a news conference Monday after 
meeting withaspedaLenvoy sent by President Fidel V. Ramos of the 
Ph0rppmek;in an attempt to mollify; Indonesian leaders, who have 
.complained .-that. the planned conference interferes in their country's 
internal affairs. ' r ;■ C 4 . ... 

Indonesia annexed the Portuguese colony of East Timor in 1976 and 
considers it its 27th province. A-Timorese resistance movement is fighting 
for its independence: Although the United Nations still, recognizes 
Portugal as East Tuner’s administering power.- Indonesia says East 
Tunors people have decided in favor of integration with'lndonesa. 

Cost of Qiemob^i Closure Is Raised 

KIEV (AP) —Ukrainian of fkaals saidMonday thatli would cost from 
56 bflhoa to 58 bxllion to dose the Chernobyl midear power plant, twice 
their estimate ealOer tins month. ' 

The officials gave the rcrised figures at Kiev’s Borispol airport, upon 
return from the United States, where they discussed nuclear; arms 
agreements and cooversioaprqjccts. The United States and die European 
Union are calling fortbedosorc of the Chernobyl plant because of safety 
concerns. Ukraine has said it cannot afford to shut it down. ' 

Deputy Prime Minister Valeri Shmarov said five reactors would have 
to be buQt to replace the plant, at a cost of 51.5 bdfion. He said 523 
bOlkm would beneededfor safety measures at Chernobyl and more than 
$2 billion to update Ukraine's non-nuclear power sector over the next 
decade: 

Chinese Arrest 3 Labor ^(hganiz^s . 

BEUING (AP)— The police have arrested thro men who were trying 
to organize workers in the sweatshop factories of southern China, a 
Chinese source said Monday. The arrests were the' latest move in a 
government effort to prevent independent action among workers unhap- 
py over soaring prices and the erosion of job security. 

By June 3, President Bill Clinton must decide whether to renew China’s 
low-tariff trade status. Mr. Clinton has said renewal of most-favored- 
naticsi status depends on whether China has improved its human-rights 
record. 

The Chinese source said -the three men were trying to organize an 
in depend enT union in the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone, just across 

»L. r IT- - XT TL-. I— .J - ■ e ■ . 



the border from Hong Koflg. They had pm out two issues of a mimeo- 
graphed underground newsletter that aired worker complaints over low 
pay, farced overtime and unsafe work conditions, and informed workers 
about tows and -relations. protecting their interests. 

TRAVELUPDATE 


Greek Air Controllers Plan Strike 

ATHENS (AP) — Air-traffic controllers in Greek airports announced 
a 48-hour strike beginning Tuesday that would create chaos for thou- 
sands of fans arriving for the European Champions Cup soccer final on 
Wednesday night 

Dimitris Petrissis, an official of the civil aviation union, said Monday 
that about 300 flights were scheduled to arrive late Monday through 
Wednesday hath Italian and Spanish fans for the AC Mflan-Barcelona 
match. 

. Mr. Petrissis said the strike was called to protest legislation before. 
Parliament that would put civil aviation employees under the control of 
tool governors. He said traffic controllers wanted to “remain under the 
jurisdiction of the ministry of communication." 

France's anfine industry faced new troubles Tuesday in a 24-hour strike 
by. Air 'Inlet. The strike arises from the same cause that set Paris and 
London at loggerheads over landing rights last week: French government 
efforts to protect money-losing Air France. It took control of 72 percent 
°t Air^ I nter in 1990 under a pact that forces the company to serve 
unprofitable internal routes and tors it from Air. France’s lucrative 
external routes. Meanwhile, Air Libenfe said Tuesday that it would 
complain to the European Com m ission about problems in obtaining 
access to Heathrow airport (Page 11). 6 

Tbe mail! plots' onion in Moscow has called on Russia’s 40,000 pilots 
to go ou strike starting Wednesday to protest falling safety standards and 
poor reti r e m ent benefits, the union’s leader said Monday. . (AFP) 
Various ptaas to butt a Beriin-Brandenbr.ro InlnTuAMnl A - . . 


.r~-; 

v . ,-r - . 
-^TTA f- 

. "l* 


open m 2004 -were unveiled Wednesday lor public comment, fead k 
stretched dose to its limit, Tanpelhof is used for short flightsfand 
Schoenefdd. in what was East Be n i n , has poor road connections. (.4 Pi 
Iran Air inaugurated a weekly flight , to Alma-Ala in Kazal/ 
Monday, the offidal press agency 1RNA said. • 

Tbe vrorkTs biggest redmhig Buddha will be officially i*' 
Wednesday on a hfll in Sanshui city, 40 kiJpmeten (25 tmf 
Guangzhou, China. Tbe statue is 16 meters (51 feet) high an^ 

(352 feet) long. j 3 


• X’f- r. 

y 

KBS 



To cal! from country to country, or back to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone number of the country you're calling/ ^ 

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BSTEBNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 


Page 3 


THE AMERICAS / 




\ .. r r '•i. 


*%« ‘ 




rr-.’ 


4*£ 


The U.S. Diplomatic Shake-Up 
Puts the Whole Team on Edge 

Foreign-Policy Aides Wondering Who’s Next 


By Elaine Sciolino 

New York Tunes Senate 

WASHINGTON — The French 
are reading with characteristic 
sangfroid, me Ge rmany with ap- 
prehension. And the I talians, in the 

press at least, are wondering 

whether it is happening because the 
din l on administration faded to 
anticipate the strong showing of 
neofascists in Italy’s elections. 

The decision to replace Jennone 
Walker, the White House specialist 
on Europe, and Stephen A. Oxman, 
the assistant secretary of state in 
charge of Europe, also has diplo- 
mats and bureaucrats asking who’s 

next. 

The question is relevant because 
of persistent rumors that President 
Kn Clinton, despite his denials, has 
been thinking of trying to improve 
his foreign-policy performance by 
replacing Secretary of State War- 
ren M. Qiristqpher, or the national 
security adviser, W, Anthony Lake, 
or both of them, after the Novem- 
ber elections. 

Mr. Christopher and Mr. Lake 
have responded to criticism by 
shaking up their own departments. 

Since last fall. Mr. Lake has 
made no secret of his desire to 
replace Ms. Walker. And at the 
State Department, Mr. Christopher 
finally succumbed to the advice of 
those inside and outside the gov- 
ernment who contended that Mr. 


Oxman was intelligent but miscast 
as assistant secretary of state in 
charge of Europe. 

It was not that Ms. Walker or 
Mr. Oxman made terrible policy 
errors, senior officials said. Both 
were well liked, but just not hard- 
edged enough, they said. 

At the White House, the shift 
was executed smoothly. Ms. Walk- 
er was offered a plum ambassador- 
ship to the for m er Czech Republic 
before she was relieved of her du- 
ties. That way, the White House 
could deny that she was bang 
nudged out. 

But it is harder to keep secrets at 
the State Department. Some offi- 
cials knew months ago that Mr. 
Oxman’s dismissal was only a mat- 
ter of time. He was formally told 
only last week and now is said to be 
considering several ambassador- 
ships in Europe. 

The decision has touched off 
even more panic than usual within 
the State Department since Mr. 
Oxman. a friend of Mr. Clinton 
from Yale Law School and Oxford 
University, was regarded as politi- 
cally untouchable. 

Moreover, Mr. Oxman had de- 
veloped a dose relationship with 
Mr. Christopher when he served as 
his executive assistant when Mr. 
Christopher was deputy secretary 
of state in the Carter a dminis tra- 
tion. 


So if he can be replaced, the 
thinking goes, who is safe? 

“We can think this is only pan of 
a reshuffling of the entire system 
that could go all the way up to tbe 
secretary of slate.” a senior Euro- 
pean diplomat wrote in an analysis 
for his foreign ministry. “This is 
not the final change.” 

A senior French official said. 
“This administration isn’t working 
so well so we see that a game is 
continuing to go on to see who will 
end up with tbe losing card.” 

Mr. Oxman will be replaced by 
Richard C- Holbrooke, now am- 
bassador to Germany. A former 
career officer in the Foreign Service 
and assistant secretary of state for 
East Asian and Pacific affairs in 
tbe Carter administration. Mr. 
Holbrooke is widely regarded as a 
bureaucratic black bell with de- 
cades-long connections to other of- 
ficials in tbe Clinton administra- 
tion. 

Working from Bonn, he is said to 
be bettor informed about the inner 
workings of Washington than most 
fellow ambassadors, keeping up to 
date by making calls after mid- 
night. 

But he has been ambassador to 
Germany for only eight months, 
and his departure is said to have set 
the Germans’ teeth on edge. 

“Let's just say there are regrets.” 
a German government official said. 



Sol Ur*wo/Thr N<r» Yurt Time 


HIS BLUE HEAVEN ■— Bill Monroe playing the mandolin in his cabin in Goodtettsufle, Tennessee. Debts forced Mr. Monroe, 
82, regarded as the originator of Muegrass music, to par (he home up for sale. But the owner of the Grand Oie Opry in Nashville, 
Tennessee, where Mr. Monroe has performed for 55 years, bought tbe property and allowed bam to use it for tbe rest of his life. 


Police Await DNA Test in Simpson Case 


By Jim Newton 
" and Josh Meyer 

Vos Angeles Times Senitx 

LOS ANGELES — The blood type of sam- 
ples recovered at the scene of a brutal double 
slaying match that of O. J. Simpson's blood, a 
potentially important piece of evidence in the 
investigation of the killin gs of his former wife 
and a mas she knew, according to Los Angeles 
police sources. 

The former football star’s blood type is dif- 
ferent from those of the two-victims. Nicole 
Brown Simpson and Ronald L. G oldman, a 
source said. 

Even rare blood types are shared by many 
people. A more exact test to determine whether 
tbe DNA in the blood sample matches Mr. 


Simpson’s has not yet been concluded, sources 
added. 

On Thursday, Mr. Simpson attended a pri- 
vate funeral service for his former wife. With 
him were tbe Simpsons’ daughter. Sydney. 9. 
and their 6-year-old sent. Justin. Afterward, 
they joined a procession to the cemetery where 
Mrs. Simpson was buried 

Although sources have said Mr. Simpson is 
the mam suspect in the investigation, the Las 
Angples Police Department has declined to 
confirm those reports, and Mr. Simpson has not 
been arrested or charged with any crime. 

New details emerged about a matching pair 
of gloves. According to police sources, investi- 
gators found two work gloves, one at the scene 
of tbe crime and the other outside Mr. Simp- 


son’s Brentwood mansion. Both had blood on 
them. 

According to one source, the glove at Mr. 
Simpson's home was found outside a side en- 
trance near a trail of blood drippings. 

“That would be inconsistent with what l was 
told." said Howard Weitzroan. who quit as Mr. 
Simpson's lawyer, but remains an adviser. “Be- 
yond lh 2 t, I have no comment.” 

Sources said Mr. Goldman's wounds indicat- 
ed that he fought fiercely when attacked, and 
they said Mr. Simpson was scratched and cut 
when the police interviewed him several hours 
after the crime. 

On Wednesday afternoon, Mr. Simpson 
■went to the O’Connor Laguna Hills Mortuary, 
where ins former wife's oody was being pre- 
pared for burial. 


N.Y.toBeHost 
Of Gay Games 
AndaMarch 

Washington Post Service 

NEW YORK —Even for a 
city that is host to millions of 
tourists annually, that is ac- 
customed to conveationeas 
ranging from Democrats to 
dermatologists, the last half of 
June -will mark an extraordi- 
naiy convergence. 

It begins this weekend, 
Mien more than 10,000 homo- 
sexual athletes from 44 coun- 
tries begin a week of sports 
competition called the Gay 
Games, with closing ceremo- 
nies at Yankee Stadium. 

It continues through a huge 
march on June 26 that wfll 
mark the 25th amriveoaxy of 
the Stonewall riots. In what 
became die defining moment 
of the contemporary gay liber- 
ation movement, ute patrons 
of a bar in New Yodds Green- 
wich. Village fought back 
a°amst a poiiceraid in June 

Organizers estimate that 
500.000 spectators win attend 
tbe' games and that up to 1 
nriffioa people will march. 

The events demonstrate 
berth the emerging dout of ho- 
mCBemals, mid continued ob- 
stacle* The games and the 

Stonewall commemoration 
have both found fewer corpo- 
rate sponsors than fund-rais- 
ers had hoped. 

But gay rights groups suc- 
cessfully lobbied the Justice 
Department to temporarily 
wmvetbeXJ.S. ban on foreign 
visitors infected with the 
AIDS virus to enable them to 
attend the games and foe 
march. And negotiations with 
tbe New York Yankees and, to 
a lesser ertent, with the city, 
bave buoyed tire events’ orga- 
nizers/; 

A total of 31 sports are rep- 
resented. Some events will re- 
semble any other amateur 
.dofflRetition; while othos — 
samfrsex pairs figure skating 
leaps , to mind — win he un- 
precedented.- 


A Cartel Refines Its Drug Trade 

CaU Exports New Products and Mocks Law 


By Douglas Farah 

Washington Pen Service 

BOGOTA — Months after Co- 
lombian authorities eliminated the 
MedelMn cartel that once dominat- 
ed the wodd’s cocaine traffic, the 
rival organization based in the city 
of Cali is moving aggressively to 
trade in new drugs and to Mock 
efforts to prosecute its leaden, ac- 
cording to law enforcement offi- 
cials and other sources. 

The Cali cartel, a loose affili- 
ation of several large drug-traffick- 
ing organizations, a lso is adapting 
its financial strategy to return btl- 
tians of dollars in proceeds to Co- 
lombia, the sources said. 

It has beat six months since Co- 
lombian troops killed Pablo Esco- 
bar Gaviria and finally shattered 
the Medellin cartel, which Ire had 
dominated. But the dumnatian of 
Mr. Escobar, who had fought an 
it-year battle with tbe Cali car- 
has freed it to expand its ex- 
ports. 

Since then, U.S. and Colombian 
authorities acknowledge, Colombi- 
an cocaine has flowed tmdimip- 
ished to the United States, and Co- 
lombian cocaine and heroin traffic 
to Europe is rising sharply. Up to 
1,200 tons of cocaine was shipped 
from the Andes region last year, 
and 85 percent.of it was bandied by ; 
the Can cartel, the authorities esti- 
mate. 

U.S. and Colombian law en- 
forcement officials said the Cab 
cartel has been able to expand its 
tirade because it has the best inieHi- 
gence network in Colombia, and 
because it is especially powerful in 
CaK. 

“Every operation against them 
has been Doamnamsed," said a 
U.S. law enforcement agent. 
“These guys have such an intelli- 
gence nmwork that h is damn near 
impossible for anything of signifi- 


cance to happen in Cali without 
their knowing about iL” 

The Cab traffickers now face lit- 
tle opposition and have even taken 
ova trafficking operations in Me- 
dellin, offering franchises there to 
former Escobar lieutenants in ex- 
change for a share of the profits. 

The CaK cane! leaders are forc- 
ing the survivors of the defeated 
Medellin syndicate to pay remu- 
nerations from their violent con- 


These are people 
with more money 
than God, who 
have such a good 
intelligence 
network, and hire 
the best lawyers.’ 


flicL Tfae-sooalled “war taxes” de- 
manded by Cab amount to S30 
million, and the MedeEin traffick- 
ers also are bring forced to return 
ransoms paid by the Cali groups 
for people kidnapped during their 
battle, sources said. 

Mare worrisome, according to 
U.S. and Colombian judicial 
sources, is that CaU leaders are in- 
sisting that MedeQin traffickers in 
prison in Colombia confess to 
crimes committed by the Cali 
group, thereby undermining prose- 
cutors' cases against tbe Cali lead- 
ers. 

. UiL. officials said lawyers for the 
CaU leaders, working in the United 
States and using the legal discovery 
process, are able to uncover much 
of tire evidence that tbe Drug En- 
forcement Administration and oth- 
er agencies have against their cli- 
ent* 


“To remove legal jeopardy, the 
Cab leadership has a systematic, 
well-ihougbi-ihrough strategy,' - a 
US- official said. “These are peo- 
ple with more money than God, 
who have such a good intelligence 
network and hire ihe best lawyers. 
They ure the discovery process in 
tbe UJS., then find a stalhing horse 
and make a deai so someone con- 
fesses to enough of the crime that 
all evidence against the kingpin dis- 
appears." 

International law enforcemem 
specialists here and in she United 
States said many of the organiza- 
tions are rapidly expanding into 
the production sol just of heroin, 
but of liquid marijuana and syn- 
thetic drugs. 

Liquid marijuana, made by 
squeezing the oil out of marijuana 
plants, is growing in popularity in 
the United States and Europe be- 
cause it can be painted on the out- 
side of normal cigarettes • 

John J. Coleman, the U.S. drug 
agency’s assistant administrator 
for operations, said the Cali organi- 
zations are “masters of marketing' 
and that, while heroin remains a 
relatively small imeresi for the Cali 
organizations, they are moving into 
the European market aggressively. 

In Europe. Mr. Coleman said, 
“they will use the same strategy 
they used in the U.S.. underselling 
the competition to se! as large a 
market share as possible and cut 
the costs of distribution expenses 
by controlling every pan of the 
trade.” 

Because they feci safe in Colom- 
bia. the Cali leaders are moving 
more and more of their wealth back 
here. US. and Colombian officials 
said. But instead of absorbing tbe 
costs — up to 25 percent — of 
laundering and transporting cash 
back to Colombia from the United 
Slates and Europe, the traffickers 
are simply importing goods. 


K.Y. Mayor Is Most Inscr utable 

NEW YORK — Maybe it was the mind-numb- 
ing hea: that had Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani 
briefly iiiinking the emperor and empress of Japan 
were from Italy. 

"You are among friends in New York Cily and 
in America." the mayor fold Emperor Akihito and 
Empress Michiko as he toasted them during a 
dinner at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

"The friendship between Italy . . . Mr. Giu- 
liani started to say as the audience laughed. " ‘Italy? 
Japan and the United Stales." he continued, “is a 
strong and a very deep one. and one that you will 
enhance by your visit throughout the United 
Slates." 

Then Mr. Giuliani uttered .something in Japa- 
nese ihat fell Akihito looking puzzled. Members 
of the emperor’s entourage said they could not 
understand what the mayor had said. 

Governor Mario M. Cuomo said Japan and the 
United States were "two great peoples.” 

"We wish ihe best that can tv wished for be- 
tween friends." hejdded. 

Earlier, the mayor and hi^ wife. Donna Hano- 
ver Giuliani met ;ne emperor and empress in the 
presidential suite of «he Waldorf- Astoria Hold. 

Mr. Giuliani profuse!/ apologized for how the 
hazy neai had obscured the city’s famous skyline 
alter the royal couple landed Wednesday as part 
of their In-day L'.S. tour The teat is described by 
Japanese officials ay intended to promote goodwill 
between two countries whose economic partner- 
ship is strained by trade disputes. (AP) 


Bed So gagy Stte Tobacco Fades 

WASHINGTON — In a setback for advocates 
of tobacco restrictions. the House Rules Commit- 
tee rejected a plan for j fast-track vote on autho- 
rizing ihe Food and Drug Administration to regu- 
late tobacco products without banning their use. 

The panel refused Wednesday to allow a waiver 
thi» \ ould have permitted the regulatory proposal 
to be offered this week as an amendment to a biil 
providing appropriations lor the Department of 


Agriculture. This means that the proposal to regu- 
late tobacco is probably dead for this year and will 
have to wait uatil the next Congress convenes in 
1995. (UT) 

A Workfare Test Went So-So 

SAN FRANCISCO — An experimental Cali- 
fornia program to get people off welfare and 
working has succeeded in gelling no more than 
half Ihe participants in any one county off the roils 
after two years, a study found. 

Many participants have been unable to find 
jobs, or jobs that pay well enough to take them 
entirely off public assurance. 

President Clinton unveiled a similar, S9.3 billion 
welfare reform plan on Tuesday. 

Under the statewide pilot program GAIN, or 
Greater Avenues for Independence, adopted in 
1988. some recipients of the federal-slate Aid to 
Families with Dependent Children must train for 
jobs and seek work to continue receiving other 
benefits. 

The aiud\.-made public Wednesday, tracked 
33.000 recipients of Aid to Families with Depen- 
dent Children and compared them with a control 
group of people receiving welfare but not enrolled 
in GAIN. 

The six counties studied from 1991 to 1993 cut 
welfare payments an average of 6 percent while 
increasing the participants' income 22 percent 
over three years, compared with the control group. 

“At their best, welfare employment programs 
can substantially increase people’s earnings — and 
return for every dollar the government puts out, 
nearly S3 back," said John Wallace, who led the 
study for Manpower Demonstration Research 
Corp., a New York-based nonprofit research insti- 
tute. [AP) 


Quote/ Unquote 

Emperor Akihito. whose view of New York was 
clouded by a murky hare when his plane landed in 
record brat: "I look forward to seeing the sky- 

) Reuters 1 


Away From Politics 


• Researchers have found evidence that casts seri- 
ous doubt on claims by women that breast im- 
plants lead to various diseases. Comparing Lhe 
cases of 749 women who had implants with the 
records of 1.498 women who had not, researchers 
at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, found 
no increase in the likelihood of developing any of a 
long list of conditions, including various cancers 
and arthritis. 

• After studying traffic jams for two years, a Na- 
tional Research Council panel has decided that the 
best way to curb highway backups is to impose fees 
on commuters who drive at peak hours. 

• Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt has given final 
approval to a plan to reintroduce the endangered 
gray wolf to Yellowstone National Park in Wyo- 


ming and to central Idaho for the first time in 70 
years. Under the program, which was backed by 
environmentalists but opposed by ranchers fearful 
for their livestock, about 30 wolves will initially be 
collared and monitored in Canada. 

• Widespread lightning strikes have sparked fires 
in interior Alaska spruce forests parched by sum- 
mer's hot days and around-the-clock daylight, 
stale and federal officials said. Fire fighters were at 
work trying to control 16 blazes that were consid- 
ered threatening to property or towns. 

• A study of tbe stumps of ancient trees that once 
grew from stream beds and lake bottoms in the 
Sierra Nevada has turned tip new evidence that 
droughts in California can last 100 years or more, 
far longer than the state's official estimates. 

Reuters. UT, AP. iVJT 


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Abortions 
At Lowest 
Level Since 
’79 in U.S. 


By Tamar Lewin 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK ■— The number of 
abortions performed in the United . 
States dropped to 1.529.000 in 
1992, the lowest level since 1979, 
according to a new study. 

And it is not only the number of 
abortions that has fallen. Both the 
percentage of pregnancies ending 
in abortion and the number of 
abortions for every 1.000 women 
ages IS to 44 are at their lowest 
levels since 1976 — three years af- 
ter the Supreme Court, in the case 
of Roe v. Wade, established a con- 
stitutional right to abortion. 

In 1992. according to the study 
by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, 
a nonprofit group that studies re- 
productive issues, 215 percent or 
pregnancies ended in abortion, 
compared with about 30 percent in 
the years from 1979 to 1986. The 
number of abortions for every 
1,000 reproductive-age women was 
25.9, compared with 29 from 1979 
to 1983. 

Stanley K. Henshaw, one of the 
authors of the study, said there 
were many possible explanations 
why fewer women were choosing to 
have abortions, including demo 
graphics, changed attitudes toward 
both single parenting and abortion, 
wider and more effective contra- 
ceptive use and more limited access 
to abortion. 

“In most countries, abortion 
rates rise sharply for several years 
after abortion is legalized, then sta- 
bilize, just as we nave seen in the 
United Slates. Rates then decline 
somewhat, particularly if contra- 
ceptive use improves," Mr. Hen- 
sbaw said. 

“We don’t have data after 1992, 
but my conversations with abor- . 
lion providers indicate that the de- 
cline continues.” 

Tbe study, based on data from ■ 
doctors and institutions that pro- 
vide abortions and from state 
health departments, did not pro- 
vide breakdowns by race or ethnic- - 
ity. 

Mr. Henshaw said some of the 
decline could be attributed to a. 
trend among pregnant, unmarried 
women to keep their babies. 

‘The number of births to uwnar- . 
tied women has increased astound- 
ingly. going up 21 percent between 
1988 and 1991." he said. “In those, 
three years, births to unmarried 
women increased by more than 
200,000. while abortions declined 
by about 60.000.” 

Another contributing factor, the 
study said, is that as the baby- 
boom generation ages, a higher 
proportion of women of reproduc- 
tive age are m the older, less ferule 
years. 

Also, access to abortion bus been 
restricted in recent years by tighter 
laws, and by a shortage of doctors 
and institutions that perform abor- 
tions. 

“Limited access to abortion is 
certainly a factor, but probably nor 
tbe most important one," Mr. Hen- 
shaw said. 

“Abortion services have clearly 
become less available, given the 
smaller and smaller number of 
trained and practicing providers." 
the continuing concentration of 
services in large urban areas and 
provision of services becoming in- 
creasingly fraught with hassles and 
harassment,” he said. 



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jDVTERNATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 



construction on a 

Tormented in Japan. Koreans Say Harrison said- i'fe 

J. y •/ verified bv intern 


Roam 

TOKYO — Children in the 
North Korean co mmuni ty in Japan 
are increasingly suffering attacks 
and harassment as their country's 
suspected nuclear program gains 
more attention, a spokesman said 
Thursday. 

From the start of April to mid- 
June, there were 124 incidents, said 
Pak Kyong Ryol a spokesman for 
the General Association of Korean 
Residents in Japan. 

The association recorded 25 inci- 
dents in April, 45 in May and near- 


ly SO in the first half of June as 
suspicion that North Korea was 
developing nuclear weapons 
reached crisis pioportions. 

Most of the victims were girls, 
recognizable because of traditional 
uniforms that include long, pleated 
skirts called chima. In several cases, 
the dresses were slashed. 

A total of 54 of the incidents 
were violent, including the beating 
of two 15-year-oid boys by a group 
of 20 Japanese boys about the same 
age. 

Children riding the subway have 


been taunted by people who shout 
phrases such as “Go home, Kore- 
ans!" and “Get off the irain!" 

"It's not the work of organized 
groups." Mr. Pak said. “It's just 
that anti-Korean prejudice is 
strongly rooted in some Japanese." 

There are about 700.000 Korean 
residents of Japan, descendants of 
people who came or were forcibly 
brought to work in Japan during 
Tokyo’s colonial rule cm the penin- 
sulafroa) 1910 to 1945. About one- 
third of these are believed to owe 
political allegiance to the North. 


Willing to 
Talk, U.S. 
Expert Says 

By Paul F. Horvitz 

Imemauocd Herald Tribute 

WASHINGTON — North Ko- 
rea is willing lo freeze work on a 
new nuclear reactor and its fuel 
reprocessing plant in return for 
Weston assistance m the peaceful 
uses of nuclear power, according to 
an American expert who met with 
President Kim 11 Sung last week. 

The American, Sdig Harrison, 
reported in Washington on Thurs- 
day on the outlines of a “package 
deaT North Korea is seeking and 
said it provided the basis for an 
immediate easing of the confronta- 
tion between North Korea and the 
United States. 

Mr. Harrison traveled to Pyong- 
yang, the North Korean capital, in 
his rede as director of rite East 
Asian aims control program of the 
Carnegie Endowment for Interna- 
tional Peace. 

In three hours of talks, Mr. Kim 
said his government was willing to 
negotiate a concrete timetable for 
freezing operations at its fuel re- 
processing plant at Yongbyon and 
construction on a nuclear reactor 
due to be completed in 1996. Mr. 
Harrison said. This freeze would be 
verified by international inspec- 
tors, be said 

The timetable would be negotiat- 
ed when North Korea obtains 
binding commitments for the con- 
struction and financing of a mod- 
em. “light-water" reactor at an es- 
timated cost of S2 billion to S3 
billion, Mr. Harrison said. 

Light-water reactors, of the type 
used in the industrialized West, are 
far (ess adaptable to a nuclear 
weapons program than the graph- 
ite-based reactors now in use and 
under construction in North Ko- 
rea. Mr. Harrison said 


SANCTIONS: Pressure Mounting , China Finds Itself in the Hot Seat 

Continued from Page 1 en China credit for working quietly man repeated the metaphor on American officials said t 

i l behind the scenes. Bui Chinese of- Thursday. terpreted Mr. Kozyrev's rein 

sanctions proposal when North 


Korea abruptly withdrew spent 
fuel rods from a nuclear reactor last 
month. 

Despite Beijing's opposition to 
sanctions, C hina also does not 
want to be seen as the only perma- 
nent member of tbe Security Coun- 
cil unwilling to punish North Ko- 
rea. China wants to be seen as a 
major, responsible world power. It 
does not want to be out of step with 
tire rest of the international com- 
munity, analysts say. 

The last time China used its veto 
power in the council was more than 
two decades ago. 

For the Chinese, the major for- 
eign-policy dilemma is finding a 
way to keep the North Korean re- 
gime "from going bottom up in a 
dangerous way" while preventing 
themselves from bong isolated on 
the issue at the United Nations, a 
Western diplomat said 

Some observers say China is in 
the best position to influence North 
Korea. The two countries are 
linked by blood ties from the Kore- 
an War. About 900,000 Chinese 
died fighting for North Korea. 

Exactly what Beijing has done to 
persuade the North to back off its 
confrontational nuclear program is 
not dear. Some diplomats have giv- 


en enma credit tor working quieuy 
behind the scenes. But Chinese of- 
ficials acknowledge their leverage 
with Pyongyang has been undercut 
after China normalized relations 
with South Korea two years ago. 

China is the chief supplier of oil 
and food grains to the North. In 
1993, Chinese exports of coal and 
ofl accounted for 26 percent of the 
S900 mSlion in total bilateral trade. 
One Western diplomat estimated 
that North Korea imports about 25 
percent of its oil from China. But 
some other reports say the figure is 
closer to 75 percent. C hina also 
exports light industry products, 

like clothing . 

By comparison, trade with South 
Korea has mushroomed in the two 
years since relations between Bdj- 
mg and Seoul were normalized. 
Trade between China and South 
Korea last year was S8.3 billion. 

In recent weeks, the Chinese 
seem to have gone out of their way 
to show public support for North 
Korea. During a meeting here last 
week with Choi Kwang, the North 
Korean Army chief of staff. Chi- 
na’s president, Jiang Zemin, said 
the two countries were “friendly 
neighbors as dosely related as lips 
and teeth.” 

The Foreign Ministry spokes- 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

T HE fourth-youngest player 
ever to reach the rank of life 
master in the New York metropoli- 
tan area, and the tenth-youngesi 
anywhere, is Kent Mignocchi, 15, 
of Riverdaie, the Bronx. 

La the diagramed deal he and his 
regular partner, Judy Bianco of 
Manhattan, climbed to six spades, 
a contract with poor chances be- 
cause of the duplication of values 
in the diamond suit A third-round 
splinter jump to four diamonds by 
South, shoving shortness, would 
have made it easier to put on the 
brakes in four spades. 

After a diamond lead. South had 

to assume that the trump queen 
would be finessable. He could ei- 
ther throw hearts on diamonds and 
hope to maneuver three dub tricks, 
or throw dub losers on diamonds 
and hope to manage hearts for one 
loser. Which was the right plan? 

It might seem right to throw 
dubs, and eventually lead the heart 
jack from the dosed hand. This 
succeeds if West has a doubleton 
including the king or queen, or if 
East has a doubleton or singleton 
nine, bat that is about a 20 percent 
shot. Mignocchi as Sooth worked it 
out correctly. 

He took three diamond winners, 
throwing hearts, and picked up 
trumps by finessing against the 


queen. He then led a low dub — it 
would have been an error to play 
the ace — and finessed the ten 
when West played low. He was thus 
able to make three dub (ricks, dis- 
pose of his remaining heart loser, 
and make the slam. This plan offers 
about a 30 percent chance, suc- 
ceeding whenever West's dubs are 
J-x-x, K-J-, K-J-x, or K-J-x-x, In 
the last of these cases it is essential 
lo preserve tbe ace as a re-entry to 
the dosed hand. There is also a 
slight squezze chance if West’s 
dubs are J-x-x-x. 


NORTH 
« I0SS 
9 A87 
O A KQ 

* Q 10 6 5 

EAST 

* Q 6 4 
V Q5 

O J 10 9 3 2 

♦ K 9 2 
SOUTH (D) 

♦ A K 187 
? J 10 6 3 2 


WEST 

♦ 32 
7 K94 

C 87854 

♦ J 7 3 


Neither side was vulnerable. The 


bidding: 

South 

West 

North 

East 

l * 

Pass 

2* 

Pass 

20 

Pass 

2 4 

Pass 

3* 

Pass 

3 0 

Pass 

3 4 

Pass 

A V 

Pass 

fi* 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass- 


West led the diamond eight- 


man repeated the metaphor on 
Thursday. 

Liu Huaqing. vice chairman of 
China's powerful Central Military 
Commission, told the army chief of 
staff that the “profound friend- 
ship" between the two peoples and 
the two armies "should be passed 
on from generation to generation." 

But behind dosed doors, “the 
Chinese were ending sterner mes- 
sages," a diplomat said. 

The some week. China also ab- 
stained from an atomic energy 
agency resolution condemning the 
North and suspending technical 
aid because the North had denied 
access to the agency's inspectors. 
The Chinese have told Western 
diplomats of their concerns about 
stability on the peninsula, and 
about North Korea's international 
obligations. 

■ Moscow Outlines Stand 

Lee Hocksioder of The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Moscow 

The Russian objections to the 
sanctions package were expressed 
by Foreign Minister Andrei V. Ko- 
zyrev, who sounded a theme dial is 
becoming familiar. He said Mos- 
cow would not support what he 
termed “a set of sanctions worked 
out without our cooperation" that 
could “seriously complicate our 
work in the UN Security Council." 

American diplomats, who pre- 
sented Washington’s proposal at 
tbe United Nations on Wednesday, 
said they expected several weeks of 
consultations in preparation for a 
Security Council vole. 


JAMES BALDWINS 
A Biography 

Bv David Leeming. 442 pages. 
525. Knopf. 

Reviewed by 
David Nicholson 

A S David Leeming sees him in 
this new biography, James 
Baldwin was both prophet and 
preacher, driven by a "calling to 
bear witness to the truth." 

This is hardly surprising given his 
background. Born Aug. 2. 1924. in 
Harlem. Baldwin was raised by his 
mother and his stepfather, who' was 
a laborer and storefront preacher. 
At 14, Baldwin himself became a 
preacher, one of the “young minis- 
ters" in a Pentecostal church. He 
discovered his gift for oratory there, 
but he was not saved. Instead, al- 
ready tormented by his emerging 
homosexuality, be was torn, as be 
would be throughout his life, be- 
tween the spirit and the fksh. 

That the young Baldwin eventu- 
ally became a writer was less testi- 
mony to his family's influence than 
to others'. IBs father opposed the 
boy’s love for books and movies. 


American officials said they in- 
terpreted Mr. Kozyrev’s remarks as 
intended at least in part for domes- 
tic political consumption, and not a 
sign of Russian opposition to 
Washington. The Russian foreign 
mini ster ius tried hard to stake out 
a foreign policy independent of 
Washington's and which reflects 
nationalist sentiment at home. 

■ Puzzlement at tbe UN 

Julia Preston of The Washington 
Post reported from the United Na- 
tions in New York: 

U.S. officials were startled and 
bemused by Mr. Kozyrev’s state- 
ment that Russia had not been con- 
sulted on its sanctions plan. The 
draft resolution the United States 
unveiled here Wednesday indudes 
a separate clause devoted to the 
top-level international security 
conference on North Korea which 
was the centerpiece of the Russian 
proposal. 

The United States at first resist- 
ed Russia's conference idea, but 
after a series of meetings with Rus- 
sian officials Washington agreed to 
incorporate it as a reward to 
Pyongyang for starting to cooper- 
ate again with international nuclear 
inspectors. 

The purpose of the conference, 
which would indude leaders from 
North and South Korea, the Unit- 
ed States, Russia and Japan, would 
be to provide Pyongyang new secu- 
rity guarantees in exchange for a 
commitment to the full denuclear- 
ization of the Korean penin. x 


Baldwin grew up bating the man 
before be came to understand that 
the deep sorrow of the Reverend 
David Baldwin's life was that be 
had been “defeated long before he 
died because, at the bottom of his 
heart, he really believed what white 
people said about him.” Fortunate- 
ly he found a series of mentors, first 
0rill2 fBffi) Miller, a leftist forma 
Antioch College student working 
as an intern at Baldwin's elemen- 
tary school She directed tbe sixth- 
grader's first play, discussed Dick- 
ens with him and, with her 
husband, took him to movies. Lat- 
er. in junior high school Countee 
Cullen, the Harlem Renaissance 
poet, “by his very presence 
. . . pointed a way around the 
mentality of despair and proved 
that many roads out of the ghetto 
were possible." 

The most significant influence, 
however, was Beauford Delaney, a 
black painter living in Greenwich 
Village and himself a subject ripe 
for a biography. Baldwin was just 
16 when he met Delaney in 1940. 
For the rest of his life be would 
call him “my principal witness." 
In Delaney. Baldwin found a 


' By Alan Riding 

Sew York rims Service 

PARIS — Responding to domestic criticism 
that it was doing nothing to halt the massacres 
in Rwanda, France said Thursday that it was 
ready to join European and African nations in a 
“humanitarian" military' intervention if a 
planned United Nations force does not arrive 
there soon. 

Foreign Minister Alain Juppi, who will dis- 
cuss the initiative during visits to the Ivory 
Coast and Senegal this weekend, said France 
was already seeking backing for the idea from 
European and African governments. 

“We cannot go in alone.” be told the French 
Senate on Thursday. 

Mr. Juppe said any intervention would be of 
-limited duration" and would aim only to pro- 
tect civilians threatened with extermination 
and would not impose a political solution. He 
suggested that the Western European Union, a 
nine-nation regional defense bloc, could act 
under a United Nations mandate. 

But the plan was immediately denounced by 
the rebel Rwandan Patriotic Front, which has 
accused France of backing the Hutu-dominat- 
ed government. 

“Wc are opposed to French intervention." 
said Jacques Bibozagara, a rebel spokesman in 
Brussels. “They would be intervening to protea 
the torturers." 

Belgium, Rwanda's colonial ruler until 1961. 
also responded skeptically to the proposal. 


lit 


"France took sides much indie than our 
country," the Belgian defense minister, Leo 
Dd croix, said Thursday, “and dial’s why the 
French initiative should be looked at with the 
necessary caution." • ■ 

Despite its ties Jo Rwanda, Belgium was 
shaken by the murder of 10. Belgian soldiers 
serving in a United Nations peace mssknriri 
Rwanda in April and it has since shown no 
appetite for further involvanenL Rwanda’s 
Hutus have also long accused Brasses of favor- 
ing tbemainly TutsLrebds. 

Several African countries, among them Gh* . 
na, Senegal Zimbabwe and Nigeria, have of- 
fered troops to a proposed 5*5W-man United: 
Nations Assistance Mission in Rwanda, but it 
is not certain that they would back, a European- 
led intervention. An African summit meeting 
that eoded in Tunisia an Wednesday focused its 
energies oo obtaining a cease-fire between the 
warring parties. . 

Uganda, widely believed to have helped arm 
the rebels since they begin their guenilfft war in 
1990, said France was “an interested party” 
and its involvement could bring c«oplication&. 
“The offer crates loo late alter over 500 , 000 
innocent people have been kflled,** an aide to 
the Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni, told 
Reuters. 

So far, among African leaders, only Zaire's’ 
president, Mobutu SeseSefco, has backed inter-, 
ventian involving non-African countries if die 
fighting continues. 



“I think that s&i 

. ; after, attending 


after .attending tbe African ^^at- 

: But Ranee, for one. a no* eager -«? 

■ Mr. taMPWjJ tjyS, in 
Frendiiadteri ndrtary ffjg . , Atn fS Vr'auKS- 
da during a Thursday 




if a United Nations p*x 
face cannot be quickly sent to 
Of the 18,000 UnU 

stationed in Somalia could be ttepo>^ 

ScUi/SSnot possible. Mr. Jupp£ wcnt ’ ’JJJj 
Fi^ w^ readyroact with and 

African countries to stop the btooosneo- 

nut s stop lo tlc R^u 
tragedy shoaidbediroarded. 

rnfljtmy source said France coaki sail up to 
1,000 sddias tm 24 houre’ notice. 


COOL: How the Air Conditioner Remade Arnerica BLOOD: 


Continued from Page 1 

the company’s microdectronks di- 
vision 

When air conditioning arrived in 
the workplace, it had a large, mea- 
surable impact cm productivity. 
Surveys showed “business in- 
creases ranging from 20 to 40 per- 
cent on a year-round basis" when 
air conditioning came to such busi- 
nesses as beauty shops, drugstores, 
novelty shops, variety stores, res- 
taurants and holds, an analyst 
wrote in 1949. 

The General Services Adminis- 
tration found in a 1957 study (hat 
productivity in federal government 
offices increased by 9.5 percent 


when air conditioning was in- 
stalled. 

Although there were earlier at- 
tempts dating back to the nrid- 
1800s- to come up with something 
similar, modern air conditioning 
dates to 1902, when Willis Carrier 
invented a mechanical system and 
installed it in a Brooklyn printing 
plant to reduce humidity mat had 
caused printed images to bhir. 

Mr. Gama’s name fra his new 
product wasn’t very catchy, 
though. He called it an “Apparatus 
for Treating Air." 

A Southern engineer named Stu- 
art W. Cramer craned the term “mr 
condi honing" in 1906 fra a similar 
derice that he desgned to control 


humidity in North Gudina textile 
mills. - 

One of the first plaoeamost peo- 
ple encountered air conditioning in - 
its early days was at die movie 
theater. - . - - 

Granman's Metropolitan The- 
ater in Los AngeJes became the first 
air-conditioned theater in 1922, 
and by the late-*^' movie houses 
became Slimmer, havens from the . 
beat. v - ; . 

The chamber- of ihc “House of 
Representatives was air-cradhira- 
ed m 1928. the Senate in 1929 and 
the. White House, tbc Executive Of- 
fice Budding and; the C omm erce 
Department m 1930. 


KOREA: Clinton Cads the Developments ‘Promising 


Continued iron Page 1 

said would amount loan act of war. 

Mr. Carter said that when be 
arrived in Pyongyang the North 
Koreans were set to expel the in- 
spectors sent by the International 
Atomic Energy Agency, a UN 
agency. But be said Mr. Kim bad 
reversed his position and agreed to 
allow the inspectors to remain in 
place. The Korean leader also 
promised to see that surveillance 
instruments were kept in working 
order. 

“President Kim has committed 
himself to maintain ihe inspectors 
on site in the disputed nuclear reac- 
tor and to guarantee that surveil- 


lance equipment would remain in 
order," Mr. Carter said. 

He said North Korea bad addi- 
tional “compromise proposals" 
they were prepared to pursue but 
he had nor studied them in detail 
In Vienna, David Kyd, a spokes- 
man for the atomic energy agency, 
said, “We welcome any indications 
of flexibility on the part of the 
North Koreans." 

Mr. Carter said the North Kore- 
an leader had expressed a desire for 
a nudear-free Korean Peninsula. 

Mr. Carter met with Mr. Kirn for 
three boors Thursday at a presiden- 
tial palace on- tbe outskirts of 
Pyongyang. The two men covered a 


wide range of issues,- but CIS. fears' 
that North Korea is building a nu- ' 
dear arsenal dominated ihe talks. 
Another meeting was scfaeduletifor . 
Friday. • ’ - ’• ' 

The US. government said Mr. 
Cuter, whose trip is. described as 
private, was bearing no fonnaT 
message from tbedmtoa adminis- 
tration. But be was being received 
in North Korea much as an official 
emissary. . 

“The time has come to establidi 
fnO friendship and understanding, 
open trade, exchange of visits and 
full diplomatic rdatioos between 
our two cram tries,” Mr. Carter said. 

(ATP, Reuters, AP) 


Hormone Hunt 

- V, Contk»ed from Page 1 
iweds-tti. ! kespood.;''31te.,ag^ for 
which Dri Wendfiog’s receptor was 
desig ned was unknown, but snee 
she found itm a type of immature 
Wood cell that devdops into either 
ared blood cdl ora plaiclet, several 
scientists guessed it might be the 
receptor that had long been -sought. 
fcTthe pUtdetrSdating hor- 
mone. 

On that basis, they decided to 
use the reeqara to firii p ut the., 
molecule, atednrique that had ne** 

erbef ore succeeded. 

i ' Dr.'Groopman at id that “in the 
two years aacetheidentificatiOD of 
the- receptor.- .this would rank 
. among -the '‘most competitive pro- 
jects iri-Tsoteeimokigir.'*': ■> ’ 

.. “These arerfrigh stakes fra these 
.companies," ire said. “Given the 


oology, tins is a real winner" 

Maik Simoa, ia analyst at Rob- 
ertson Stephens & Co. in San Fran- 
cisco'saul that the world market fra 
thedrug would be Sl bfllion ayeat. 

WhhttetmdwptA^temarolo- 
gistssaid, .'they'' '-have fire- last, re- 
. masting hormone needed to "re- 
plenish blood cells that are 
destroyed by chemotherapy. Sever- 
al yearv 3gp, fire hormone, that re-, 
pteroshes red blood cells was dis- 
covered, followed by those that 
stimulate formation of. the white 
blood cdK Hie way is how dear to 
manipalalc tire thrrc major compo- 
nents of blood 


fk>, . 

|£V;'»y 


RATES: German Economic Recovery Is Strengthening, Bundesbank Says 



Costimed bom Page 1 

cent, the same level that is expected for France. 

Gunther Rexrodt, tbe German economics 
minister, told tbe HandelsWatt newspaper - 
Thursday that Germany's economy could grow 
by 2 percent this year, but analysts said Mr. 
Rexrodl’s forecasts were frequently too opti- 
mistic 

The Bundesbank said in its report that the 
recovery was being led by manufacturing in- 
dustry. It noted that improved exports were 
helping western regions, where the mood 
among corporate executives had become nota- 
bly more confident. 

Id its report, the Bundesbank also offered 
what appeared to be a rebuttal to critics who 
have suggested that in recent months it had 


brushed aside the rapid growth of its M-3 
money supply measure. The M-3 consists of 
cm r ent teak deposits and time deposits up of 
up to four years, and it grew by an annualized 
15.4 percent in April conqjared; with the 
Bundesbank’s 1994 target of from. 4 to. 6 per- 
cent On an annual basis. M-3 growth smee 
June 1993 has been 11 percent. .. 

The Bundesbank, which hopes that rising 
long-term yields will curb M-3 growth by at- 
tracting assets away from short-team deposits, 
insisted that it was foflowing a “pragmatic" 
approach because M-3*s surge had been distort- 
ed by “extraordinary factors." Among these 
have been changes m German tax laws that 
have made it more attractive to brings money 
bade into the country from such overseas ha- 
vens as Luxembourg. 

Tbe German central bank said its so-daQed ‘ 


expanded M-3measure t —whkii includes ntm- 
tenk deposits arid Deutsche marie accounts at 
German bank'subsidiaries outride bf the coun- 
try — hadgrown “coasadcrablynwrcsiowly" 
than the regular M-3 money supply measure. 

Alison Cottr^ a Baode^jenk-mtcber at 
Midland Global Marioets Research in. London, 
dismissed the remarks about the expanded M-3 
measure as what rim termed “a fig feaT fra 
Bundesbank members to hidejbehmd as- they 
seek to explain away the faster titan expected 
growth m-mcmey supply. 

The Time monthly report also said the gov- 
ernment of ChanceDraHdmiuKohlwas likely 
to suffer a public, sector budget deficit of about 
130 bffliOD' Deutsche marks ’ {S80 bffliqn) in 
1994, m tine with the 1993 deficit rtf 135 b01ion 
DM. 


BOOKS 


a Kay Rader, director of the 
American Library in Paris, is read- 
ing: "Thai Mighty Sculpture, Tune “ 
by Marguerite Yourcenar. 

“She fascinates me. I like histo- 
ry, and it's sort of a mixture of 
history and philosophy." 

{{Use Gersten, IHT) 




ITT 


black artist devoted to his work as 
well as something of the father 
figure he sought all his days. Bal- 
dwin was, Leeraing writes, “not 
yet fully aware of tus own homo- 
sexuality or of the demands of Iris 
vocation." Bui Delaney, “himself 
a homosexual a minister's son, 
and an artist, was there as a father 
in art, lo help this younger version 
of hims elf through a crucial pas- 
sage . . - [teaching] his protege 
to react to life as an artist. 

By the time be left lor Paris some 


right yeas lata; on the first of a 
series of journeys into exftc, Baldwin 
possessed tbe themes he would ex- 
plore throughout iris career. There . 
was radar) and his ambivalence to- 
ward his father. There was also Iris 
vision of himself as an outrider, by 
virtue of bdng both an artist and a 
homosexual And there was the 
preacher, driven to force America’s 
attention to the ways racism crip- 
pled both black and "while. These 
themes would fnd an- astonishing 
variety of work — essays, plays, 



pMrte Rica - 
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novels, stories and poems ^ done 
despite chaotic 5vmg conditions, 
failed loveafiimi^rcadezicesin Par-, 
is. New Y«k and Turkey, and com- 
mitments to the rivfl limits and 
Hade power mrawnents. 

Now, seven years after his death 
in 1^7, Baldwin remams, with 
Ralph HlisCai and Amiri Baraka, 
one of the ardietypes of what it is 
to be a bladt mate writer. Tbus it is 
difficult lo criticize lam. Stiff, it: 
must be noted that, while Ijetering 
is ri^br' -in charactainiig ^Baldwin 
as a proobet and preacher, he 
scarcely alludes to the fad that this 
was Baldwin’s failing as well as Ms 
strength as an artist. 

Baldwin began by rejecting the 
kind of protest navel written by 
Richard Wright, prefe r lir^ to bc 
sunply a writer, not “a Negro Writ- 
er. Soon, however, he b^n to see 
art as an agmt for social change. 
The preacher had always been evi-^ 
dent in Baldwin's essays and po- 
lemics; now he never left the pulpit 
fra long in the novels and straies. 

A further irony is that the writer 
whose wodc was so concerned vrith 
love and its power to make white 
Americans understand their funda- 


ACCESSNUMBBtS 


14004774000. 

iw^s-ssr- 

V4004774000 

140IV7S13V7 

*« 0 -W'.‘OW' 

187 . . 

1 xein 

- s - 

.023403414 
-07S-M40W 
00406-1010 ; 
O 8 OWM 1 

••• 0043487-187 - 
-80014877 
0800.14284 


iwatalcrametAmtoblack Ameri- 
cans -was. unable ; to find it in his 
own life. He wanted desperately, 
“to be loved for himself, not as a i 
am or as a brother or as a black 1 
man, btit as a' human being with 
flritand-btood heeds." 

Biographers must enjoy an iriti- 
mate rdatirashro with their sub* 
jects,andit isperiiaps inconcavaUe , 
thm a writer, could create a good ' 
Hograpby cf someone he despises 
In this case the intimacy of the sul> 
jeer-biographer relationship — 
teeming was -Baldwin's secretary 
fra four years and obtained his con- 
sent to write tins biography in 1977 
— seems to have colored the book. 

Theresalt is that there is hardly a 

vrord of criticism here. Leemmg 
mots convinced that every 
oaJdwm wrote is important andl 
will 9 ndure. Perhaps he is rightj 

What seems more likely is dial Bal-I 

dwtn was ia product of a particobui 
t ^ iac ! a niessenger who l 
began by wanting to destroy cer- 



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*Se6 


FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 

O P IN ION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



„ |rif nt ^ yORK 


TIMM ANI* Tllfc INfrT 


Beyond the Face-Lift 


t J?n5v? remams Pfcsidenl Bill Cl in- 

*5* f” <* Eur °pe signaled a new 
toe .administration's troubled foreign 
Jfe J ta thal *8"* the replacing of thS 
™als responsible for Europe could be a 
gooa first step. Richard Holbrooke will take 
ovcr rom Stephen Oxman as an assistant 
Se £ retai 7 °f state. Alexander Vershbow will 
renwe Jennooe Walker at the National Secu- 
nty Council. And a figure yet to be named will 
r^iace Thomas Simons Jr. as coordinator of 
aidprogrants to the former Soviet Union. 

These changes are useful but probably do 
not go far enough to calm the gathering alarm 
over the administration’s foreign policy per- 
formance. Mr. Holbrooke brings intellectual 
aad bureaucratic authority to his new job. Mr. 
Vershbow won high maria as Mr. Osman's 
“fiputy. And Mr. Simons’s replacement could 
re-enetgize a lagging aid effort. 

What worries Americans and foreigners 
alike is (he damage to US. credibility when an 
administration repeatedly fails to stand by 
either its promises or its threats. They are also 
troubled by an inability to focus on priorities 
and a decision- making process that seems to 
go on interminably and then produce only 
split-the-difTerence fudge. 

The problem is not, as often argued, the 
president's lack of attention to foreign policy. 
His grasp of the important global issues is 
impressive. Nor does he lack ability to speak 
effectively, as he demonstrated during the D- 
Day tour. The problem is that he has deliber- 
ately cultivated the impression of a domestic* 
oriented president not personally engaged in 
foreign policy. Thai lade of visible leadership 
has become a major liability, weakening his 
ability to win Congress to his domestic agen- 
da. The example of Jimmy Carter tells us that 


A Boost for Kohl 


The European parliamentary elections re- 
call Winston CburchiQ’s complaint about a 
pudding, that it lacked a theme. 

A swing to the right among voters in the 12- 
nation European Union? Well, yes, except 
that Socialist parties emerged with the most 
seats in the European Parliament: 200 out of 
567. True, Italy’s former Communist Party 
did worse than expected, causing the resigna- 
tion of its leader. But former Communists in 
Eastern Germany did better than expected on 
their old turf, w inning a surprising 40 percent 
in what used to be East Berlin. 

The European Parliament has only limited 
powers and is far from bong the legislative 
seat of a true European Union. But these 
elections offer a useful barometer of political 
shifts. And this poD produced a big and unex- 
pected winner. Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
Germany. Hat could be important not just 
for Europe but for President BQl Ctinton. 

Outside Germany, protest voters punished 
longtime incumbents for failing to end a persis- 
tent recession. But Mr. Kohl's Christian Demo- 
crats bdd their ground, taking 39 percent of the 
vote, some seven points more than the opposi- 
tion Social Democrats. The far-right-wing Re- 
publican Party crumbled, while the Greens, an 
environment parly competing for left-wing 
votes, increased its share to 10 percent 
This was an excellent outcome for Mr. Kohl 


who in October Faces what was supposed to be 
his toughest national contest The luck of rota- 
tion will give the chancellor a further boost — 
in July, Germany assumes the Eun^ean Union 
presidency, mmnfng that ins ample image will 
be d ominating prime time through the cam- 
paign. Thus the most generally underestimated 
eg European leaders seems poised to become 
the Continent's strongest political figure. 

Mr. Kohl's skill as a horse trader will soon 
be tried, at the European Union conference in 
Corfu on June 24 and 25. The main task will 
be finding a successor to Jacques Ddors, “Mr. 
Europe," who beads the Union's Brussels bu- 
reaucracy. The two leading contenders are 
Belgian Prime Minister Jean-Luc Debaenc 
and his Dutch counterpart, Ruud Lubbers. 

Nationalist opposition, especially in Brit- 
ain, has stalled the drive to greater unity. Bui 
if the European Union cannot deepen, it can 
still widen. In a weekend referendum, two 
ont of three Austrians wanted to seek mem- 
bership. which improves odds in Sweden. 
Finland and Norway. Adding new members 
will not resolve arguments over a common 
currency or a common initiative to end the 
slaughter in the Balkans. But new members 
could restore lost vitality to the European 
Union, which still remains discouragingly 
stuck in the lift-off stage. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Nasty Nuclear Mess 


At the heavily polluted sites where the U.S. 
government produced nuclear weapons for 
nearly 50 years, a great cleanup is now under 
way. Nobody can say what it will cost. The 
country has not made up its mind on the 
fundamental issues — how clean these sites 
should be and how fast the job should be done. 
This year the Energy Department wQi spend S6 
billion on this work, with similar outlays sched- 
uled as far ahead as the eye can see. Uneasy 
about these huge costs. Congress asked its 
Congressional Budget Office to take a look. In 
response, the CBO has offered a useful discus- 
sion of the nature of environmental risk. 

In some places it would be safest to do 
nothing for many years, leaving installations 
isolated and guarded until well into the next 
century when radiation levels will have de- 
clined. That is what the Energy Department 
has decided to do with eight reactors at Han- 
ford, Washington, that for decades produced 
plutonium and other ingredients of nuclear 
explosives. To remove the reactor cores and 
dism antle the buildings 75 years from now 
would cost one-third as much, with one-third 
the exposure to radiation of the people doing 
the work, as doing it immediately. 

Sometimes the cleanup creates risks — when, 
for example, bunting dirt to destroy pollutants 
may blow toxic residues into the air. Unless 
hazardous nmterials are likely to leak into the 
atmosphere or water supplies, leaving them 
alone is often worth considering. The CBO 
suggests lhai the Energy Department may of- 
ten be more Ekdy to waste money by moving 
too fast rather than too slowly. In ma ny pla ces 
it has signed agreements with the Environmen- 
tal Protection Agency and slate regulators 
promising action on a timetable. But some- 
times there is no effective technology to cany it 
ouL In those cases it might do beuer to renego- 
tiate the agreements and provide time for the 
development of belter methods. 


Although the nuclear weapons plants have 
reputations for toxic pollution, the CBO cites 
EPA studies concluding that hazardous waste 
sites present less danger to health than many 
more common threats — indoor air pollution 
for one, pesticide residues in food for another. 
The way the federal govemman is currently 
allocating its spending on environmental haz- 
ards is not closely related to the risks as they 
are assessed by the experts it has consulted. 

That raises a question about the annual 
outlay of $6 billion for this nuclear cleanup. It 
is the right figure only if the money is buying 
more health protection than it could if aimed 
at other kinds of pollution. Having spent half 
a century creating the messes at the nuclear 
installations, the country has now committed 
itself to correcting them. But in some of these 
cases it may be wiser and safer as a matter of 
environmental policy to leave them alone for 
another half-century. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


tribune 


— — "| War Drums 

Afraid of Inflation, Unafraid of the Jobless Don’t Rush 


if be allows the perception of ora bring quite 
up to (he job, it could threaten his re-election. 

Neither Warren Christopher as secretary of 
state nor Anthony Lake as national security 
adviser has made any significant impression 
on the international diplomatic and security 
community. They have not articulated a com- 
pelling vision of America’s future place in the 
world. They have failed to generate confi- 
dence at home or abroad that the State De- 
partment or the White House situation room 
are in the hands of people who reach firm, 
reliable decisions and focus Mr, Clinton's 
attention where it ought to be. 

The administration urgently needs to put 
forward a short list of wbac foreign policy 
problems really matter to America today. 
Ticking off the worthy goals of democracy, 
markets and expanding trade and a geograph- 
ical catalogue of Europe. Asia and the Middle 
East will not do. Focusing on key countries 
like Russia, China and Japan and specific 
issues like the World Trade Organization, 
nonproliferation and oil security would. 

The administration also needs to be far 
clearer on what it is prepared to do to resolve 
these problems. It has endlessly debated ibe 
issue of multilateral versus unilateral military 
action. But most of the problems that belong 
on the short list do not lend themselves to 
military approaches. 

The latest staff changes, coming on top of 
the promotion of Strobe Talbott to deputy 
secretary of state, strengthen the Clinton ad- 
ministration’s foreign policy team, but only at 
midlevd posts. These appointees could contrib- 
ute to a fresh start but direction will have to 
come from the president and, probably, from 
new leaden in one or more of the top jobs. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


W ASHINGTON — One man’s job is another 
man’s basis print in the brave new econom- 
ic world of the central bankers. Bong unemployed 
may be bad for you, but cheer up. It cods inflation 
and should be good for the markets. 

That is part of the unspoken (and unspeak- 


Bj Jim HoagJand 


goal to be sought by government but something 
to be opposed at all costs. 

In America, alarm bells now go off when 62 


able) philosophy that lies behind the mampuJa- percent or less of the work force is unemployed, 
tion of interest rates in the world’s leading Indus- in Europe, the central banks’ threshold number 


trial economies in recent months. Because of the 
central bankers' abiding and unbalanced fear of 
inflation, declining unemployment rates have 
become a hair trigger for raising interest rates. 

Even if they have not noticed it, most Ameri- 

Central bankers see a sustained 
decline in unemployment as a 
terrible development . 

cans have recently felt the impact of the jobs- 
interest rate connection as the Federal Reserve 
pushed up rates (measured in “basis points”) 
through tne spring while unemployment moved 
down. The home purchaser’s mortgage payments 
have gone up, and businesses seem to be restrain- 
ing expansion and hiriag, as the Fed desired. 

The relationship is neither totally new nor a 
one-way street. Interest rates are generally lowered 
at times of soaring unemployment in the hope of 
stimulating the economy. Few complain then. 

But two things are new. One is the high level of 
unemployment that needs to be sustained in 
developed economies for Fed Chairman Alan 
Greenspan and his international colleagues to 
feel secure in their jobs and reputations. Second 
is the politicians’ acquiescence in this monetar- 
ist strategy which makes full employment not a 


In Europe, the central banks' threshold number 
is closer to 10 percent. Anything less is a cause 
for gloom in the markets and action by the 
central bankas, who see a sustained decline in 
unemployment as a terrible development: a sig- 
nal that 19706-style inflation is on its way back. 

The bankers and fund managers resemble rid 
generals refighting ibe last war after the battlefield 
Has changed. They build a Maginot Line of high 
long-term interest rates instead of adapting mone- 
tarypoijcy to a world in wind) the greater barriers 
to economic renewal are unemployment and lack 
eg public investment in productive enterprises. 

“This is tilting at windmills.” says the New York 
investment banka Felix Rohatyn. Market heavy- 
weights Eke Mr. Rohatyn, a Democrat, and Pete 
Peterson, a Republican, support the objectives of 
fighting inflation and deficit reduction. But they 
say they have to be coupled with sensible in- 
creased spending for national infrastructure to cut 
both short-term and king-term unemployment. 

American policymakers have in fact moved 
from striving for full employment (in the 1960s 1 
to accepting 4 percent unemployed as a tolerable 
feature of the labor market (in the 1970s) to 
today’s 6 percent threshold with tittle public 
discussion. This hidden assumption about the 
“right” level of unemployment ties Reaganomics 
to OintoiKunics, and links Purl Volcker’s poli- 
cies to those of his successor, Mr. Greenspan. 

“Not long ago, 4 percent growth and 4 percent 
unemployment were not seen as something to 


wbny about," says Mr. Rofcatan. “In recent - 
years* technology, restructuring and foreign 
competition have pot significant downward pres- 
sure on prices and wages. It is Qkgical then to 
change the parameters and meat 3 percent 
growth and 6 percent unemployment as danger 
sgnals forinflation.'* 

Why areihe politicians quiet about this when 
the investment bankets speak out? They seem 
cowed byths success of Ross Perot’s defirit- 
cutting danagoguay and by the dangers of 
seeming soft an inflation. 

The influence: that Mr. Greenspan seems to 
exert on JSJ dinton is one theme of . Bob ■ 
Wood wartfs . timely new book “The Agenda." 
The portrait of President Clinton is a familiar 
Southern one of the responsible populist — his 
heart is with thc.fitik man, but the banker just 
won’t let him do the right thing. So the presi- 
dent reluctantly agrees to put ms first priority - 
on fighting the deficit and inflation instead of 
pushing for the billions in public investment in 
education and other infrastructure projects., 
pledged in Mr 1992 campaign. . : - 

The Economist argued recently that neither 
tite administration nor the book examines the 
premises of that “false dichotomy." The maga- 
zine added, “Not only are deficit reduction and 
big public investments not mutually exclusive: 
the latter ate n tore or less impassible without the 
former,” and “tins brutal truth escapes the politi- 
cal people" around Mr. Clinton. 

Mr. Rohatyn is more succinct “Unless you 
have growth you can not reduce the deficit.” 

Growth is measured in jobs as well as in ■stock 
and bond prices. Low inflation rates purchased 
fay high unemployment will turn out to have 
been a dubious bargain. 

The Washington Post. 


Three Steps to Tame Tribalism and Unify Europe 


N EW YORK — This is a pro- 
blematic moment in the long 
history of Europe. Only a short while 
back, the magic number 1992 
aroused expectations of a vibrant 
new Europe, united, more prosper- 
ous, more undaunted than ever be- 
fore: Today the dream of European 
unity seems more distant than it was 
a decade or two decades ago. 

What has befallen that dream? The 
answer is plain: nationalism. 

Nationalism can work for good or 
ill according to the circumstances. It 
was nationansi resistance that defeat- 
ed (hose, like Napoleon and Hitler, 
who tried to unify Europe by force of 
arms. It is nationalist feeling (hat 
today frustrates leaders whose bene- 
volent vision is to unify Europe by 
shared interest and mutual benefit, 
by persuasion and consent 
Nor has the end of the Cdd War 
helped. The Soviet threat was a po- 
tent factor in the promotion of Euro- 
pean unity. As the threat evaporated, 
so did die fell need to unite against a 
totalitarian energy — or even against 
the savagery unleashed in what once 
was Yugoslavia. Nothing has more 
discredited the vision of European 
unity than Europe’s impotence be- 
fore the Bosnian tragedy. 

As a Yugoslav political scientist 
well said — and who should know 
better? —“minorities are going to be 
an add test for all post-Communist 
societies. With communism all but 
disappearing, tribal instincts are 
coming back" And the hostility of 


eURO p^ 

hQU| e 


By Arthur Schlesinger Jr. 


one tribe toward another is among 
the most andent of human reactions. 

On every side today, in every sec- 
tion of the troubled planet, ethnic 
and religious fanaticism is breaking 
nations. ‘The virus of tribalism,” 
says The Economist, risks “becoming 
the AIDS of international politics — 
lying dormant for years, then Oaring 
up to destroy countries.” 

High technology is shrinking tbe 
globe and overriding traditional 


boundaries. But integrating pressures 
drive people to seek refuge from glob- 
al currents beyond their control and 
understanding. Tbe more people feel 
themselves adrift in a cold, imperson- 
al, anonymous world, the more des- 
perately they embrace some warm, 
familiar , intelligible, protective hu- 
man unit — the more they crave a 
politics of identity. 

Integration and disintegration thus 
are the opposites that feed on each 
other. Tbe more tbe world integrates, 
the more people ding to their own in 
groups increasingly defined in these 
post-ideological days by ethnic and 
reOgious emotions. 

Yugoslavia is only the most mur- 
derous portent of a darkening future. 
What was once tbe Soviet Union con- 
tains 104 distinct nationalities, 22 of 
which have populations of more than 
a milli on. Twenty-five million Rus- 
sians live outside Russia. The Insti- 
tute of Geography of the Russian 
Academy of Sciences tells us that 


there are now more than 160 border 
disputes in tbe ex-Soviet Union. 

Two milli on Hungarians Eve in 
Romania, 700,000 in Slovakia. In 
ah. 30 percent of the Hungarians 
live outside Hungary. And 300,000 
thousand Germans and 200,000 
Ukrainians lire is Poland. Nor is 
Western Europe lacking in ethnic, 
religious and linguistic enmities. 

According to the 1993 UN report 
on refugees, more than one in every 
120 people on the. globe is a refugee. 
It is estimated (hat 25 tmBion people 
will migrate into the EaropeanUwon 
in the next decade, mostly people of 
alien colors, creeds and customs. Xe- 
nophobia and racism are already the 
rising themes in European politics. 

How are democratic societies to 
cope with ethnic, racial and religious 
heterogeneity? 

The United States had the advan- 
tage of settlers who (mostly) came to 
its shores precisely in order to acquire 
a new identity. Citizenship has been 
defined in terms not of ethnic origin 
but of political ideals, however im- 
perfectly we Americans have lived up 
to those ideals. 

We have developed traditions and 
agencies of assimilation. The melting 
pot, though uneven in its workings, 
nas created a new nationality, epluri- 
bus union. As Gunnar Myrdai wrote 
in “An American Dilemma,” his 
great study of race relations in the 
United Stales: "The minority peoples 


nXr- 

•V 1 £ 


,&V 






The Fast-Eiection Europe Get Moving and Lock In Europe’s East = 

. . _ r C? •*> goslavias, tbe 


It is difficult to say whether Europe cranes 
out stronger or weaker from the European 
Parliament elections. The drop in voter partici- 
pation demonstrates that the cheers of Eu- 
rope’s fans are getting weaker. Europe's impo- 
tence in the face of the Yugoslav tragedy, its 
economic decline and tbe spread of unemploy- 
ment have not sufficed to arouse interest The 
new political landscape, in any case, will bring 
a toideocy to give precedence to the advan- 
tages of a wider market, postponing the dead- 
lines for the federal constitution, monetary 
union, common foreign and defense policies, 
die Social Charter and die rights of citizens. 

— II Ciomo ( Milan). 



International Herald Tribune 

| ESTABLISHED 090 

l KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

i t'i-thuimrn 

J RICHARD McCLEAN. 1-uMhJmr & l hirf Etnulivr 

1 JOHN VINOCUR. Ljnvtne MiHv & Vfcr PnrmUw 

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D resden — it wiu take 30 

years to rebuild the Frauen- 
kirefae, the 18th century church that 
was this city’s proudest monument 
until a massive Allied air raid in the 
dosing days of World War U de- 
stroyed practically everything But 
the work has started, stone by num- 
bered stone. 

The decision to restore Dresden to 
the baroque magnificence that 
earned it die name of Florence of the 
North is being carried out Already 
palaces, museums, broad terraces 
alone the stately Elbe begin to 
match the old paintings of the capi- 
tal of Saxony, once one of Europe's 
richest kingdoms. 

This is at ibe heart of what reunifi- 
cation means to Germany, restoring 
the link with the past and with its 
European neighborhood. The Com- 
munist East German regime had fi- 
nally started some reconstruction in 
the 1980s. Bui for a long time it 
deliberately left tire nibble and dam- 
age and built only Stalin-styie atroc- 
ities to mark the break with die past 
and recall the city’s passage of horror. 

As Premier Kiirt Biedoikopf puts it. 
until the collapse of communism the 
Federal Republic was the easternmost 
part of Western Europe. Now “Ger- 
many is the center of the West." That 
is meant psychologically and histori- 
cally as well as geographically. “With a 
Polish Pope, how can it be denied that 
Poland is part of Western Europe?” 

Mr. Biedcnkopf is a West German 
Christian Democratic politician who 
came east to help and is now the most 
popular and successful leader in the 
area. It will take up to another de- 
cade. he thinks, for the “neu Lander" 
of the former East Germany lo be- 


By Flora Lewis 

come competitive with the West. But 
he is optimistic, despite strains and 
resentments on both sides, because 
there is so much help. “Half tbe mon- 
ey we spend in Saxony," he said, 
“comes from the West" There are 
huge pro Wans, but compared with 
the rest of ec-Communist Europe, the 
situation, he said, “is ideal" 

Jan Urban, a former Czech dissi- 
dent. agrees, pointing out that in 
addition to money and guidance, 
what were German Communist lands 
automatically acquired a judicial sys- 
tem and a set of laws to underpin 
transformation to democracy and ibe 
market Tbe other countries have to 
struggle with that 

The lessons of his special experi- 
ence are evident for Mr. Bicdenkopf. 
“The noneconomic factors are the 
most important, and the most diffi- 
cult.” be said. “The one thing you 
can’t speed op is learning. You have to 
transfer knowledge in a way that bol- 
sters people's injured pride and makes 
them feel part of community." 

From this he draws the conviction, 
that at least the Visegrad countries — 
Poland, the r«yh RnpabBc, Slovakia 
and Hungary — most orickly be as- 
sured of inclusion in me European 
Union and of NATO’s concern for 
ibdr security. Otherwise there will be 
tension on Germany’s borders, tor- 
rents of migration, and instability 
that will hurl the whole of Europe. 

In the West, integration could start 
with economics because there was a 
common economic system arid the 
politics were harder to merge- But for 
the lands to tit east it would axsl loo 


much — he estimates 5 to 7 percent of 
the total of Western Europe’s GNF fra- 
a decade — to bring them to a level 
where they could begin to sustain open 
competition. “So it has to start with 
politics," be says, and be is impatient. 

Mr. Biedenkopfs proposal is to 
separate timetables for economic and 
political inclusion in European 
Union, the second modi more rapid 
than the first, for tbe benefit of West 
aswefl as EasL The Easterners should 
be advisory participants in. the big 
1996 European Union conference 
projected by (he Maastricht treaty to 
review European institutions after 
tbe inclusion of Austria and probably 
tbe Scandinavian countries. . 

For the East, this assurance .of pro- 
spective admission would help stabi- 
lize democracy. Dangerous reactions 
of disillusion and frustration art aJ- 
ready appearing in firing nationalism 
and the return of Communist power 
structures. For the, West, it would 
help reach more farsighted, wiser de- 
ciaons on organizing tile future Eu- 
rope th«n are likely to resall from 
interim, tactical measures. 

There is no Question that ibe fall of 
the Berlin. Wall and what It symbol- 
ized is gong to force change in. West- 
ern Europe. Much of its "structure 
arose from the partition of Europe. 


of the United States are fighting for 
status in the larger society; the mi- 
norities of Europe are mainly fighting 
for independence from ft.” 

So there are evident limitations on 
the value for Europeans ofTbe Amer- 
ican experience. I am sore, however, 
that Europe must move beyond the 
idea of etnmc nations — the doctrine 
that citizenship should be based on 
bloodlines rather than on principles. 

Under correal German law, for 
example, people of German extrac- 
tion who have never lived in Germa- 
ny have a bettor legal claim to Ger- 
man citizenship than do people of 
Turkish origin who have lived in Ger- 
many for a couple of gsooatidns. 
Europe must accept the inevitability 
of hete ro geneity — and ihe conse- 
quent need to persuade heteroge- 
neoos peoples to five together in civil- 
ity ana harmony. 

Tbe first necessity is the rote of, 
law. Those who seek citizenship in a 
country can reasonably be caOed on 
to abide faryi the country’s constitution 
and laws. There are persons of ardent 
religious faith who come to a country 
and say that they will obey cmN those 
of the country’s laws that conform to 
their understanding of the Koran or 
some other sacred text. Such indigest- 
ible communities are hard to recon- 
cile with a democratic polity. 

A second necessity is productive 
employment Competition for jobs 
intensifies ethnic and racial hostil- 
ities and feeds mCtical extremism. 
Economic growth will not core ethnic 
prejudices, but it wall mitigate some 
of its worst effects. 

A third necessity is an internation- 
al framework dealing with minority 
rights. A resolution adopted by the 
UN General Assembly m 1970 de- 
clared that the right to sdf-detemu- 
nation should not be applied in a way 
(hat would break up compoate states 
when those states respect human - 
rights. Kit how to assure that re- 
spect? How to strengthen the interna- 
tional machiner y for the protection 
of minorities? 

The Dutch pnmosai for a High 
Commissioner foe Minorities desaves 
more serious ooorideratida than it has 
received from toe Conference on Secu- 
rity and Cooperation in Europe. Oth- 
ers suggest that the existmgEunjpeaii 
Court on Human Rights take on toe 
protection of minorities. 

Robert Badinter, president of 
France’s Constitutional Council, re- 
commends a European Arbitration 
Court. If Hungaiy, for example, filed 
a complaint about the treatment of 
ethnic Hungarians in otha- countries, 
the judges would wotk out a reason- 
able solution and begin to build up 
legal precedents that would in tim e 
amount to a common law for minor- 
ity problems. To avert an age of Yu- 
gostavias, the nationsof Europe must 
create some trans-European means of 
redndng ethnic conflict. . 

If we cannot de-ethmeize the con- 
cept of citizenship, provide jobs and 
develop machinery to protec minor- 
ities, it is hard to see bow the descent ' 
into tribalism can be stopped and the 
dream of European unity revitalized. 

The writer, professor pi the human- 
ities at the City . University of New 
York, contributed this comment to Ihe 
International Herald Tribune. 


Qiaton 

By Richard Coh^ ° 

TTTASHINCmJN-^^^ 

Msssaggas 

are about to hit the WSS 

of him, the United Stans be 
Bphring in three different P* 3 ** 8 “* 
S-mS: time — and maybe, asm the 
Vietnam War era, in its own streeeas 
wJl , ft is mins credit that America is 
fi gh tin g nowhere yet ' 

Waves: of trigger-ildjfoess come 

and go, sometimes abetted bys PJ® 1 " 
remark or two, but Mr. Qin~ - 
tottjust wafts than out. Now, though. 

' thbwardnunsaregrtWOT&mOT®®?^ 
more porsistenr: something has to ce 
done about -North Korea — a *~ 
quick Something indeed has to be 
done. But what’s tbe rush? 

To most Americans, the Korean 
crisis must be nearly incomprchena- 
ble. What with die IAEA and the 
NFT, fud rods and phitocium, it sug- 
gests a college coarse to be avoided at 
afi costa, Yet America may well be 
going to wapiti Korea. ' 

; If war comes, it will only be after 
toe Qhifo a administra tion has given 
North Korea every chance to get out 
of the box if has got itself into’.' That is 
beca M e no one in Washington knows 
-for sure whin North Korea’s inten- 
tions are. Is Kim II Sung really intent 
• on developing a nudear arsenal and; 
possibly, seflmg those weapons to 
otoer.rogne states Eke Libya or Iraq? 

- If so, war is downthe road apiece^ . 

If, however- North Koreahas blun- 

wDdxhance, w^^to^^ragcits m*- 
dear program fee some economic; 
goodies, it b going to find an attentive 
ear in Washington-. A second Korean 
War, after all, is almost undrinkable. 
-Seoul is within anfflay range of North 
Korea. So, Tor that matter, are many trf ■ 
tbc37,0OO UJ&. mffitaiy paspnnd sta- 
tioned in South Korea. At its nuriK. 
mum, this wcuM be anugJywar. 

Inf act, the stakes are sofaigh- that 
the adnrinisnation is indmed to let 
bygones be bygones. If North Korea 
wants to retain, ambiguity about its . 
.past nudear program, the Oimoa 
adragriitfation is apt gotng to pro- 
lest' What matters js .toe. course. 
North Korea takes in the fuazrt — 
notwfaetoa it has tottwo bombs that 
the CLV says it may have, but wheth- 
er it tests an atooric weapon and tries 
to tfevdop others. Puffing put of the 
Nonprofit eration Treaty Would be a 
teffing: signal, of intentions^, and so 
would removing cameras and otha 
devices by which nuclear programs 
are monitored. These -steps would 

TroaSe^to is the course" that 
North Korea seems to be on. Itseems 
hdWjent on doing — what? No one 
can be sure. The only cotainty is dial 
; it is playing a da^crcms game. It said 
sanctions would be tantamount to 
. war, and tbe Clinton administration 
has promised sanctions, Moreover, an 
Am e ri c an mQftary buildnp is 
consideration. The adnnrustratkm is 
serious about being taken seriously. 

The aditifaustration is following a 
prudent course: Bit . by bit it is m- 
creaang the pressure on North Korea 
without is5mqg toe sort of ulthtia- 
tums that midit be seen as a provoca- 
tion AfteraHTtime »not North Ko- 
rea’s aBy. It is an old^reome, deep 
into ideological senility. Its people 
are impoverished, toe country near 
non: 'Some nrifitary units are not 
combat worthy because the person- 
nel are undernourished, and in cer- 
tain factories managers fear that , 
starving workers will faint and fall c } 
intotoe machinery .They fear the loss 
of the machinery, of course. ’i 

Sooner or later. North Korea will } 
go the way of East Germany and, to . 
toe chagrin of South Korea, ask for a v 


reconciliation ■ — and a handout. In ^ 
the meantime, the United States and * 
other countries must deal with a mad- . - 
dating, if not mad, regime whose V 
intentions are neither dear nor, may- / 
be, rationaL lather way. North Korea 
has to understand that ii simply can-^ 
not have a unclear arms program. ■ 

The worfd, not to mention Bill Oin- 

ton, will not stand for it. y 

A war in the cause of notrprolifei/ • 
ation may well be. unavoidable. Bii 
a war based on ntisunderstandinj, 
and trttgered by exaggerated noV 
uons of national pride ought to be 
avoided at all costs. If Mr. CBntoc- 1 ' 

friP® somc ^ feeling ou] 
the North Korean position, thee it 
ought to have if. What’s the rush ! v 
There s always tune for war. V 

The Washington Post / 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS Afint 


i VO UI& Ulto«fluifliswwy* I#aw~ 1894c Attempt on Crispi - 001 delay of five) 1 

spectjve admission would help stabi- antic o^s givEu to toe Gcrmaxi Govern- 

l£e democracy. Dangerous reactions • n ? cnt “ *>* sufficiently long . . Tr. 

of disillusion and frustration are 3)- r<f toariassmateS- ' dCSi “ f^ Jress «J by tM 

ready appearing in rising nationalism lof by to M e ssma te Si- . pdegalion. a supplementary delav*. 

andtherearaof GraSminist power 

hdp reach m^ fa^biri waerde- shot went wide, thesecood shot also ' '■ ° r N °' #’ 

cisKms on otgamang toe Future Eu- missed ^ ^ before he could fire 1Q4A. i e. J. 

roj*. than are ffiedy to result from - arasfawas made on him from * OWn & SlOnOed : 

intaun, tecucal measures. all sides and he was disarmed. Dur- WITH AMERICAN FORrpc rxV 

There » W yatyutoatlbcfaDof ^ ^ ^ Sgnor Crispi remained FRANCE - [From owmSSv' 
^BahnW^landwtaltgFmbd. He showed no sign of edilioml AmeJicSTf **£} 

aed is gong fol fo«* change mWrah fear butsmtied and said it was noth- paratroopers, overwhelmMT ^ 
era Europe Muchof^^ffucture ^ ^ g**. ^ a pcr{ccl «sdsta«£lodW K 

ovaiktt, showing “Vivt Crispi!" - 

S“£Sr 1919: Allies- Grant Ddar 

This is easier to grasp in Dn»tei PARS -More delay! Ihe Suprane. fightinTai^ units* 
than in Western cities, where tattle Councd again 1 gave W ihe Ger- beachhL^ end of ihJ, 

has changed. Last wok’s European mansyesterdiy^une 16J. An official wHShS^J^lMontebourf ' 
electkms showed no sense of ui^ncy. communication issued late last night terdav in 3 them yea 

That is an aiusioa Europe is at a ^ r Hev had two more days tfo sign ' The 

watershed and it must move on or be ; or j^cfes.fhe Pew* TreatyL TheJpJ- Sauveur into^K W v hlch bought SI 
rent with rrcw upheaval.; .... lowing^ thc.text ofithis oommuni- . Americans tCrr u Placed tij 

* Flora Lewis. cation: “llie German ddegalibn has across th? °f toe « 3 - 


This is easier to grasp m Dresden 
than in Western cities, where tittle 
has changed. Last week’s European 
elections showed Do seme oT urgency. 
T hat is an flluskav Europe is at a 
watershed and it must move on or be 
rent vrtth new upheaval.; 

' Flora Le»v . . 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 


Page 7 


OPINION 


Wfieu Fathers Were Fathe 


rs 


And Tried to Do Their Duty 

B) William Satire. 


H ARPERS FERRY. West Virginia 
— Keep your Ues: nevermind the 
designer polo shins and forget Lhe pho- 
ny-macho perfume. Let me tell vou 
what we fathers want. 

We want our intrinsic author- 
ity back. 

This essential prerogative of father- 
hood has been stolen from us by chil- 
dren who want us to be their friends and 
by those children’s mothers who insist 
on shared pa rental ism. 

Your father is certainly not your ene- 
my but neither; is he on’lv your friend. 
You choose your friends; your father, if 
you are lucky, you have had from the 
start and you are obligated to look up to 
him no. matter how low he may sink. 

He should be friendly — readv to 
help,, willing to ask for help, able to 
share a confidence — but he has an 
unspoken claim on his offspring's re- 
spect that no friend has. 

If your father taught you to call him 


Perhaps nurturing is not 
unnurtural for a man , but 
women are usually better at 
U. Father is better at 
appearing to lay down lhe 
IqtCrOren if Mother in fact 
is the senior partner. 


by his first name, he was a pater too 
famiiias. Whether you choose the formal 
“Father,” the informal “Dad” or 
the breezy “Pbps,” your use of the 
family title is your unmistakable signal 
of filial deference. 

On the other hand, he gets to call you 
whatever he likes, kiddo. 

WhsL about the new parental equali- 
ty? Mother now often brings home the 
bacon, or. at least her fair share of it; 
why shouldn’t she expect Father to 
share chOd-nurturing duties along with 
otheir; household tasks? 

That' Is for "parents to work out be- 
tween themselves, but as far as most kids 
are concerned, the sources of parental 
power, arc nol the same. Motherpower is 
rooted injovc, falherpower in authority. 

lhe ultimate maternal sanction ls, 
“This would break your Mom’s heart." 
The ultimate pa ternal guilt-iraplanter is, 
“Dad will be diktppoimed in you.” 

Perhaps nurturing is not unnurtural 
for a man, hut it’s something women 
are. usually "better at- Father is better 
at appearing to lay down the few, espe- 
cially when a tacit undemanding exists 
that Mother is the senior partner in 
decisions ranging from bedtime to bud- 
geting for kids’ clothes io advice 
on premarital sex. 

Mothers, cops and welfare reformers 
know that Lbe lack of a “father figure" in 


so many broken homes, or single-moth- 
er families, is one big cause of mis- 
directed youth. 

That is why il is good for all of us to 
exhort nubile males to drop the sex-as- 
sport altitude and take up their respon- 
sibilities as fathers. 

What psychological incentive can 
we give young fathers Vo do their duty? 
With all its trials — the nights awake, 
the worries about not spending quality 
lime, adolescent rebellion, the money 
for college — fatherhood is tough 
enough; we don’t have to strip away its 
unique mystique of lifelong respect 

Beyond the pleasures of watching 
their seed miraculously develop, fathers 
who make the family effort need recog- 
nition as “bead" of a household. Fre- 
quent challenges to that authority are 
affirmations, not denials, of its exis- 
tence; occasional obedience also helps. 
- The expectation of paternal authority — 
freely, if grudgingly, given — goes with 
the family territory. 

Lest we forget amid advertising’s din. 
Father’s Day is a sadly empty nine for 
many families. 

Though my father died before 1 was 
old enough to know him, I could rely on 
a strong mother and older brothers for 
familial guidance. 

Because my own son and daughter 
know that my experience with father- 
hood is strictly from the top down, 
they cut me some sentimental slack on 
intrinsic authority. 

That’s because they grasp Lhe way 
the famii/s profound allegiance of 
affection differs from all other forms 
of control. 

Dio Chrysostom, an ancient moral 
preceptor, related a conversation be- 
tween Phihp of Macedon and his young 
son Alexander, who was being instruct- 
ed by Aristotle, and was destined to 
become Alexander the Great, ruler of 
the entire Western world. 

King Philip asked the boy if his hero 
was Achilles, the legendary conqueror. 

The answer was no: “Achilles was 
in subjection to others,” Alexander 
replied, “and went on a military ex- 
pedition with a small force under the 
orders of a foreign general. But 1 would 
submit in no case to the control of any 
kins alive.” 

Exasperated at this affront, Philip 
asked: “And are you not, Alexander, 
under my control?” 

“in no way.” said his son. “for 1 do 
not obey you as a king, but as a father.” 

The New York Times. 





Tho Christian Science Monitor 
Los Angolan Times Syndicate 


Why Can’t We Go Again 
In Real Ships of the Sea? 


By Hans Koning 


P ARIS — It continues to amaze me 
how fast the traditions of the sea 
and of seamanship of the Western 
world have vanished. That whole field 
of lore where courage and self-sacri- 
fice were still tested as in the days 
of chivalry has vanished almost with- 
out a trace. 

On my last Atlantic crossing, on a 
Polish container ship, the captain told 


MEANWHILE 


me how he regretted his boyhood deci- 
sion to go to sea. “If we only had 
known.” be said. 

Yes, freighters and tankers still sail 
the oceans, but with skeleton crews of 
all nationalities who, on their auto- 


mated ships, usually don’t have ot 
i ls 


even need a common language to com- 
municate in except for the barest 
technical terms in English. 

They have turnarounds at ports of a 
few hours only, and spend their off- 
duty time watching videos, mostly 
porno ones where understanding the 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


The World Just Shrugs 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor” and contain the writer’s sig- 
nature. name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject to 
editing. We cannot be responsible for 
the return of unsolicited manuscripts. 


The Holocaust was not the last case of 
widespread murder for ethnic causes. 

The news media, religious and com- 
munity leaders, and sometimes even 
school teachers and parents continue to 
fan hatred based on “differences.” Well- 
meaning social and developmental 
economists, using their only tools, try to 
excuse much of this on the basis of 
poverty, pressures on land and so on. 

The breakup of imperial India with 
(he widespread massacres that followed, 
and the lolling later in Nigeria and Bia- 
fra, may have been partly, faintly, excus- 
able on these grounds. Perhaps they 
came too soon after World War H for 
the so-called collective conscience to 
begin operating properly. 

But years lata- the world was strange- 
ly silent about the massacres of thou- 
sands of ethnic Chinese in Indonesia, 
about the ethnic killings in Sri Lanka, 
about conflicts in Sudan. Uganda. Yu- 
goslavia and now Rwanda (the scene of 
at least three horrific massacres in Lbe 
past). There were “minor” hate cam- 
paigns too. of course, in Israel-Palestine. 
Lebanon, South Africa. Burma and 
parts of the former Soviet Union. Yet 
“religious” radio stations in the Middle 
East and Iran, fascist movements in 
Germany and other parts of Western 


in internal affairs or a country, the dis- 
tance of the suffering lands. 

In ex- Yugoslavia, the exaggerations, 
outright lies and hatred broadcast three 
years ago by Serbian and Croatian radio 
did much to incite violence. 

Nobody, as far as 1 know, tried to tell 
the respective authorities, to tone down 
their broadcasts. Perhaps we should 
seek to jam such broadcasts; surely the 
technology is available. 

This certainly should have been done 
in Rwanda, where Radio Milk Collin es 
and other outlets called for killings. 

And what about our schools? Are the 
importance of the Geneva conventions 
and the Convention oo the Rights of the 
Child being taught? What about respect 
for one’s neighbors? Can we not do 
more to curb violence in the media? Are 
the LIN and other bodies shouting loud- 
ly enough? No? Then brace now for the 
next series of massacres. 


tred of Mr. Clinton, there must be one 
with a “vi secretly” positive altitude to- 
ward him. Why not interview them? 

CHARLES COVELL. 

Helsinki. 


SAMIR S. BAST A 
Geneva. 


Give Clinton a Break 


Europe, and several minority leaders in 
the Unit 


Jnited States still fan the flames of 
“difference” and ethnic hatred. 

We remain too passive in condemning 
the first symptoms of eventual pogroms, 
hiding behind any of a long list of ex- 
cuses: freedom of press, noninterference 


Regarding “America to Clinton: 4V 
Hate You ■ (Go Ahead, Take It Personal - 
h i” t May 23 i: 

Ann Dcvroy describes a "visceral re- 
action” of hatred toward Mr. Clinton in 
America. So consistently does she write 
articles critical of the administration 
that one wonders if the “visceral reac- 
tion” is largely her own. 

Surveys published by The Washing- 
ton Post show that Mr. Clinton’s popu- 
larity’ rating is still above 50 percent, .so 
for every person having a “visceral” h3- 


I write to express disappointment 
with Ann Dewy’s June 9 article rClin- 
ton Walks Oxford’s Halls of Protest”) 
relating to President BCD Clinton's visit 
to Oxford University. This was one of 
the few times this or any other U.S. 

E resident has reached out to Americans 
ring overseas. Yet the article showed 
little evidence of first-hand knowledge; 
for the most part it could have beea 
written beforehand. It says the president 
"looked and sounded exhausted,” and 
well he might have at the end of such 
a travel schedule: but in fact those of us 
who saw him were struck by his vigor 
and good cheer. 

It was an act of political courage on 
the part of the president to come to 
Oxford, and we in the American com- 
munity here appreciate iL 

daniel w. howe. 
Oxford. England. 


could pay $300 or find a suitable sub- 
stitute to fight for him did no! need to 
serve. Many paid for replacements, in- 
cluding two future presidents, Chester 
A. Arthur and Grover Cleveland, as 
well as the fathers of Theodore and 
F ranklin Roosevelt. 

PHILIP BARTLETT. 

Paris. 


I notice that Mr. Clinton shed a tear 
during the Normandy commemora- 
tions. Could he have been thinking of 
the nameless guy who took his place in 
Vietnam? Somehow 1 doubt iL 


JAMES ELLINTHORPE. 
MeQcsham, England. 


Elephantine Subtlety 


Regarding “Peres's Letter on Jerusa- 
lem Does A\ 


Docking the Draft 


With the recent D-Day commemora- 
tion. the fact that President Bill Clin- 
ton avoided military service has been 
brought up again. Perhaps it is worth 
shedding, light on an overlooked his- 
torical footnote. 

During the Civil War. Abraham Lin- 
coln issued the first American draft 
order, in 1863. All men aged 20 to 35 
were eligible. However, anyone who 


Away With * Forever ’ ” (Opin- 
ion, June 14) by William Safire: 

As a speech writer for President Rich- 
ard Nixon, W illiam Safire was. if nol 
inspiring, at least highly inspired. As a 
linguist, his articles are exquisite and 
fascinating. As a Middle East commen- 
tator, he is simplistic, more worried by 
the “step-by-step shrinkage of the state 
of Israel” than disturbed by its elastic 
expansions. He obstinately displays the 
subtlety and delicacy of an elephant in 
a porcelain boutique. 

As for Jerusalem, please advise Mr. 
Safire never to say forever. 

afif safi eh. 

London. 

The writer is the Palestinian general 
delegate to the United Kingdom. 


dialogue is hardly essential. But pas- 
senger travel, now monopolized by the 
jet plane, has vanished and the ro- 
mance of the sea with it. 

Of course there are the cruise ships. 
In April it was announced that the 
London-based P&O line had ordered 
a 100,000-ton ship from an Italian 
dockyard; it will be the biggest pas- 
senger carrier ever. 

Cruises are big business, but they 
have precious little in common with 
sea travel of old. The Associated Press 
release announcing Lhe ship-to-be for 
P&O added that the previous record 
was held by the old Queen Elizabeth, 
at 83,673 tons “the biggest cruise ship 
ever built.” Now, the old Queen Eliza- 
beth was, of course, no cruise ship; she 
and the Queen Mary, and the France 
from Le Havre, ran a weekly service 
for real travelers who had to be some- 
where. And what a fine service it was! 
Slower than planes for sure (442 or 5 
days) but with a chance to catch your 
breath. If you deduct all the time 
spent on aitport hassles, jet lag and 
other worries, it was not that much 
slower than flying. And what a plea- 
sure it was for lovers of tbe sea. 

1 cannot accept that there isn’t room 
anymore for such a service, for one 
weekly ship between Europe and the 
United States, if offered efficiently 
and without frills and for a cost below 
business class in the air. There are 
quite a number of folks around who 
refuse to fly or who suffer the tortures 
of the damned if they have to; but I 
would like to stress the positive rea- 
sons. There is nothing like sitting on a 
deck and watching a moonlit sea or a 
storm-tossed sea; it beats a ton of 
tranquilizers. Arrive by ship, and you 
know where you are. 

Do not believe that cruise ships are 
there to keep the romance of the sea 
alive. Cruise ships are resort hotels, 
seaborne conducted tours, with all the 
comforts of such tours. The new P&O 
will perfectly illustrate this. The de- 
sign pictures show that here trill be a 
ship of unprecedented size, with pre- 
cious little open deck space. 

“Yes. the sun will penetrate the 
decks,” the P&O marketing director 
assured me — but it will be in the 
manner that the sun penetrates a mid- 
dle layer of a New York apartment 
budding. There is an enclosed, sus- 
pended swimming pool. The pifece de 
resistance is the nightclub, which will 
hang over the stern, like a container in 
the process of being unloaded. A tube 
with moving floor will be its access. 

“It will be like being in a space 
ship." the marketing director said. 

Well, who am l to deny that the “Star 
Trek” generation wants just that? I am 
sure it will be a thrill; but, to paraphrase 
old Marshal Foch, “Cest magnifique, 
mais ce n’est pas la mer” 

International Herald Tribune. 


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Touring France’s Great Gardens 

^ . .. . ,>m* can linser in a blue arbor < 


By Jean Rafferty 

P ARIS — It’s June and France is in 
the grip of garden mania. The snip 

of pruning shears and Lhe thud of 
the spade echoes from rooftop Pari- 
sian terraces to chateau parterres. 'With an 
enthusiasm they once reserved for tennis or 
golf. French gardeners- to-be are thronging 
to a host of horticultural fairs. 

The latest one, L’Ari du Jar din. was spread 
over almost 10 acres (four hectares) of the 
Parc de Saint-Cloud on the western edge ol 
Paris and attracted 55.000 visitors. Inspired 
by the Chelsea Garden Show, it featured -0 
model gardens ranging from a minimalist Zen 
design to a farmhouse flower patch complete 
with geese and a goaL Also displayed were the 
wares of 200 nurseries, craftsmen and artists 
and garden furniture and equipment. ^ 

"It’s intoxicating, but it's high lime, sajd 
Jacques Gerard, a fair exhibitor, of the 
green -thumb boom. As owner of the w-acre 
La Fosse botanical park in the Loire V alley, 
he was hoping to attract more visitors to uie 
historical landmark garden his family has 
nurtured and expanded since 1751. 

At the next table, the garden designer 
Pierre Joyaux was showing pictures of toe 
rose garden and four other gardens he is 
restoring at the chateau at Ainay-le-V ieil 
He said that Ainay was one of “a hundred 
projects to restore historic gardens he is 
vrorking on. ‘Tourists are bored just looking 
at the chitelain’s ancestral portraits, he 
says. “The garden is an added attraction. 

There is burgeoning passion for ihepowger. 
or kitchen garden. At the beautifully restored 
17th-century floral and vegetable potager of 
Samt-Jcan-de-Beauregard at Les Uhs. just 
south of Paris, the Vicoratesse de Cure! is 
reaping the benefits. “We have busloads of 
garden lovers from England. America and 
even New Zealand coming to visit - she said. 

In the 17lh century, the fashion for grand 
design began at the top with Louis XIV anu 
his Versailles gardener, Andre Le Notre. Its 
Lhe same today. As a finishing touch to his 
Grand Louvre project. President Francois 
Mitterrand is revamping the Le Notre rede- 
signed Tuileries gardens. With twice as many 


visitors as the Louvre itself, the Tudenes was 
in dire need of rehabilitauon. 

At the launch of the seventh annual govem- 
menl-sponsored “Visit a Garden in France 
campaign. Culture Minister Jacques Toubon 
and Environment Minister Michel Bamier 
inspected the progress of the Tmlenes 30U 
million franc (S35 million) renaissance. The 
results, which should be nouceable by the end 
of the month, are best viewed from I. M. r«i s 
new terrace, which now links the Tuilenes to 
the gardens of the Carrousel. . ....... 

The garden campaign in June is highlight- 
ed bv a number of open days and events in 
many private gardens. A guide to 19U out- 
standing French gardens is available From 
mostFrench tourist offices. One of the most 
amusing exhibitions is of the winners of a 
scarecrow contest at the Potager du Roy. 
Louis XTVs vegetable garden at Versailles. 
Guided tours leave from 6 Rue Hardy at jW 
pjvf. Wednesday through Sunday. 

The French are designing contemporary' 
Parisian parks. Surprising, even perturbing 
to garden classicists, but well worth discov- 
ering, the 19-month-old Parc Andre-Cmoen 
on the south bank of the Seine m the 15th 
arrondissement is an impressive demonstra- 
tion of the new genre. Separated by a foun- 
iain of 120 jets, two giant glass greenhouses, 
punctuated by towering teak-veneered col- 
umns. dominate lhe almost 35-acre park, 
which incorporates 14 gardens. ^ 

What looks grandiose couldn t be more 
visiLor-friendlY. A vast central lawn is open 
for visitors to'walk, sit or recline upon. In slx 
small gardens, each dedicated to a color and a 

ELIS TE7r~ 

■ A Japanese firm has pul out a CD 
called “The Frog Chorus," a concert by 
36 species, alone and together. “We 
first planned to make an insect song CD. 
a sales executive sold Reuter, “but 


Venice ‘Nightlife’? The Trick 

V ENICE It's hard to believe islands off the lstnan coast, 

Lhere is anv citv in the world ip Ac dub. . . - 

without a discotheque, but that's Thcrc is no point 
pretty much the rae wnh Venice, 

For the millions of travelers who pass are two exowafly na™ pS-diso 

through she city each year, nightlife dtwn t w onh dw*ing 

really exisL Perduto and La , ”*7 Lf^vnamed 

Visiting Venice means walking for mostof dutt) i e SfisraicOTdWdways live- 

K? ioucbc.Ui^.yiuuby^ 


Isto 


dnv courtyard off the Fondamenta de k 
Slvasia Vecdria. The name refers toshght 
lvsweet, sheny-type wine£roma|^^ 
islands off the lstnan coast, which is served 
in the dub. . , ■ - 

wordi checking out beforehand: jjaradis? 
pSfoto poi®^ !S 


ssf?-?®-* 




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sense, one can linger in a blue arbor of fra- 
grant wisteria or taste red cherries in season- 
A black garden of deep purple ms and dark 
pines is ringed by brilliant splashes of pink 
rhododendron and flaming azalea. 

Gallic garden fever has even gone indoors, 
in two Pans gallery shows. At Ancunal untd 
July 9. Claude Lalannes aided bronze an 
jewelry’ features a mimosa necklace, lilac 
earrinas ani a silver onion watch. There s 
also a butterfly chair, ana a garden strike in 
her rilded paradise decorates a bedside ta- 
ble. Pierre Passebon's Gaierie du Passage 
spotlights the architect-gardener Mm 
Molizer's sleek furniture designs until June 
IS Celer- stalks inspired the legs or a chaise 
longue, bamboo, a “bouquet'' of lamps, and 
a fountain takes its form from giant gunner a 

leaves from the Amazon. . 

Moltzer will also be opening the gardens 
of his Normand'. Chateau de BiUeul to the 
work of seven contemporary artists Irom the 
end of June throughout the summer 

At another country show, at La jarenne 
Lemot in Clisson near Nantes until SepL 4. 
the 00 laser oops up again as the focus for a 
rare exhibition of waiercolors 01 flowers and 
vece tables from the private archives of the 
Vihnorin seed family. Cleveriy set by the 
Parisian florist Christian Tortu with arrange- 
ment. of fresh flowers, .nuchekes. asparagus 
and melons, two rooms of Pilings 
disappoint onh because one w.shes \ llmonn 
had shown more of its reputed 9.000 docu- 

But the discovers - of La Garenne estate 
and Lhe rown of Clisson. a little piece of Italy 
in Brittanv. is compensation. Back from 
Rome just after the Revolution, the sculptor 
Francois- Fred eric Lemot designed a neo- 
classical Italian villa, rustic farmhouse and 
nark, buvina the ruins of the Clisson chateau 
to safeguard his view. The town rebuilt in a 
similar stvle. A promenade in the park along 
the river Sevre reveals a picturesque grotto, 
two Lemples and “Rousseau's rock, but also 
modem additions, including a large, gansn 
gnome — the very definition of why a gnome 
is persona non grata in the tasteful garden. 


the dav. and for many tounsu 
nieht’s sleep after dinner is all dial’s on their 
minds, not the prospect of clubbingthen^ 
awav Most restaurants call last orders 
Lou'iid 9 P-M- and it is nearly unp«sjle “ 
get a drink in a bar much after 1 1 r.M- 

\sk vour hotel concierge what's on offer 
after-hours, and be wfll lamely 
hotel bar or an excursion to the Piazza San 
Marco for an overpriced cocktail m the 
Caffe Florian. Sitting in a velvet armchair m 
one of the gilded salons of Florian is race, 
but it can't be described as Tutting the 
town." 

There is only one real nightspot in the city 
worth tracking down, the Malvasia Ve c c hta . 
Hidden away behind the Fenioe. Venice’s 
opera house, the club is in the comer of a 


priced cocktails and great fresh pasta. 

You won't hear loud music blaring outside 
the Malvasia Vecchia as wy 

Venice has to be soundproof ed to deter Mtfr 
plaints from the neighbors. St3L as 
Kt the dimly lighted alleyway 
into the Cone Malatma, you will 
yxw’re in the right place, as ttere is usually a 

crowd waiting. 

There is no entrance Tee, but togrtarovmd 
licensing laws the club is officially a cultur- 
al association,” which requires membership. 
If vou’re a foreigner and you bnng your 
passport, however, there is normally no 
problem getting in. 


"Here is no 

tata» gs^af ^ 

reluctant to have his 

passage om .of *he courtyard.y 
straight into a- canal. 

■NUWiTMMi 2» " 

toK Tel: X0.S7S7 ^ 

cocktails 7,000 lire. A J ^ 

x Dorsoduro: TcL 523J 1J- 5 - 1 ~ \-.fj '£‘alM 1 *jz 
paradise Perduto, 2540 

Afisericordia, Omruuepo. Tel 72a5iU. t .^^. 7 .^ : 
John Brumon is a vaUet 

who lives part of die Ume m Yentx. , 


their voices are so high they sound 

unnatural.” No whales, huh? j ean Rafferiv is a Paris-btisea iounuhsi 

who specializes’ in design and lifestyle. 


TEE X 6 / / E f F / 


Barnabo Dalle Mon- 
tagna 

Mario Brenta. Italy. 

A film of stony silences, savage 
landscapes, and wordless, ex- 
pressionless drama. “Barnabo 
Delle Montagne" (Barnabo of 
the Mountains) is based on Dtno 
Buzzati's novel about a moun- 
tain ranger who inexplicably 
flees during a gunfieht with a 
oroup of bandits- Set in the rug- 
ged Dolomite mountains in the 
northeast of Italy. Mario Bren- 
ta's film is full of striking scen- 
ery. imposing, jagged peaks and 
afpine panoramas that are 
strangely claustrophobic and op- 
pressive. Brenta. a student of Er- 
manno Olmi. creates a realistic 
facsimile of the sights, sounds 
and. most of alL the rhythms of 
life in the mountains. Unfortu- 
nately. he fails to emulate OlmT s 
extraordinary capacity to people 
his landscape with tiuee-dimen- 
sional characters. Instead of be- 
ing economical with his dialogue 
—in accordance with the reality 
of mountain life — Bretua is 
downright stingy. .And the film 


suffers for h. Played by Marco 
Pauletti. who is areaWSfe moun- 
tain ranger. Barnabo is neither 
protagonist nor victim, but sim- 
ply an ultimately uninteresting 
-nomr< Despite its spectacular 
photography, and the admirably 
realistic reproduction of the ca- 
dence of Alpine living, Bren ta’s 
film might just as well have been 
a series of still photographs ac- 
companied by the sound of an 
Alpine thunderstorm. 

(Ken Shuiman . 1HT) 

Speed 

Directed bv Jan De BonL 
C.S. 

The summertime no-brainer 
needn’t be entirely without 
brains. It can be as savvy as 
“Speed.” the runaway-bus mov- 
ie that delivers wall-to-wall ac- 
tion. a feat that’s never as easy 
as it seems. This film's dialogue 
isn’t much more literate than a 
bus schedule, but its plotting is 
smart and breathless enough to 
make up for that. “Speed” pre- 
sents a falling elevator, a hi- 
jacked subway train, the above- 


mentioned bus and Jack Traven 
(Keanu Reeves), the Los Ange- 
les Police Department trouble- 
shooter whose business is solv- 
ing such problems. As directed 
with no-frills efficiency by Jm 
De Bont, the rinematograpbor 
on films induding “Die Hard, 
“Basic Instinct" and “Blade 
Rain," “Speed” takes its cue 
from its title. This film’s sole 
objective is to keep moving, 
preferably at a pace that keeps 
the viewer from asking quesr- 

t *° nS ' (Janet Maslin, NYT) 

Lh Roseau* Sauvag«s 

Directed by Andre Techine. 
France. 

Wild reeds bend but do not 
break in the storm. This fable 
from La Fontaine is the central 
itna p- of Andrfe Tfidunfi's new 
movie about growing up in the 
’60s. A country wedding, a boys 
school provindai flirtations and 
frustrations with fallout from 

the Algerian War— the opening 

scenes are set on familiar 
ground, and then the ground 


ffltrfincKe 


doubts about emjtiMg; eggfk;- 


aafly his ssaahty, h*s to«e 
ject is not MaR£,.his di3dh&Jd^ 

J - -I C»rWn 


sexm ji^r«ain n : is witiitsi8Ktll^.>"jfy‘. , 
Henri (FririericConyX 

unwiffing stokniwhoa 
was foroed W leave; 

Henri has Scree 

ties and the making of a fascist^ . 


He flunks hB tests. i^ lh^^ 

. radio riued.to his ears to c 
from home; arid a mA»oftiit;;;^= . 
eye ori ins f4ag ^ nales - 
some Hnd <rf betzayai or ; : 

striictiotk he is, in the wmtfc trfs ; 
teadter.&ot aieedhofaii oj*; 
will not bend, but- break. Andy 
the movK is mme about duoge ^.';^ ’ 
than set ikkas; love arid sex_tiba»-. ^j: : ;. 

TL. U. i a h» mm«G: W' 


put numerous mournful provatr,-^ : 
rial duonidcs focuang 
stalely Cathame Deneuve, has f 
done something smprisa^ Hfr - -r *7 
has «u»de it fifin with'new? faces ■ , 
that looks Hke a S > 

(Jocm Di^ont, EHTl_~ 





7. :1 

t\^: 'im: 

' ' G.r r V' 

7 r: 




PATEK PHILIPPE 

GENEVE 

/fVAlCHVmKt-RS TC LADIES SINCE 1S33 



Ladles’ Golden Ellipse - Ret «WI Watar-realsiant to « m. Yellow gold I R-oaraL 


1 


t 



nd j t Amex to Extend Mileage Plan 


/// i 8 T 8 6 f I B E 




: ■ 

: V, 


■* o |. - i 






By Jacques Neher 

litiemutitmal Hera/d Tribune 

P ARIS — Some 100,000 American 
Express cardholders who reside in 
Europe, the Middle East and Africa, 
but who settle their accounts in dol- 
lars, will be able to join the company’s fre- 
quent-flier program this Tall. 

“We're dotting the i's and crossing the fa 
on the contracts now, and we will be making 
a mailing to our dollar-card customers for the 
program in September," said John Petersen, 
woe president of American Express Travel 
Related Services in London. 

Over the past year, the company has intro- 
duced its Membership Miles program to lo- 
cal-currency customers in Britain, Germany, 


France, Spain and Switzerland, but dollar- 
card holders were not permitted to claim die 
same benefits. 

The program rewards users of the card by 
granting them points corresponding to the 
amount of their expenditures. These points 
can be applied to customer-fidelity programs 
run by participating hotels and airlines. 

The company bad said that airlines and 
hotel chains were initially more interested in 
targeting local-currency cardholders, which 
they viewed as a market segment different 
from dollar-card customers. The company 
also said that it needed time to develop a 
regime acceptable to its partners for conven- 
ing dbUar-points that would be used to pur- 
chase services priced in European currencies. 

Petersen said the scheme for dollar-card 
customers would probably include four air- 


lines and two hotel chains, which he said 
would be named when the promotion is 
launched. 

Sixteen airlines participate in the program 
across Europe, but not one of the largest 
carriers. British Airways. 

Petersen said the company had been 
pleased with the results of the program as it 
has become available to its more than 4 
million cardholders in Europe. In Britain, for 
example, he said 20 percent or Amex card- 
holders had enrolled in the program, and 
these customers have increased expenditures 
on the card — - the company's ultimate goal — 
by 40 to 50 percent. 

The local-currency frequent flier scheme 
will be launched in Italy in September and in 
most other major countries by the end of the 
year, he added. 


Grand Cuisine in a Grand Setting 


- By Patricia Wells 

International He rald Tribune 

R EIMS, France — A little more 
than 10 years ago, Elyane and 
Gerard Boyer transferred their 
Michelin three-star restaurant to a 
stunni n g ISLh-century -style chateau sur- 
rounded by seven hectares of immaculate 
grounds and towering trees. It was part of a 
long Boyer journey, from the family farm in 
the Auvergne to the chalky vineyards of 
Champagne, where Girard's father, Gaston, 
opened a restaurant in 1961. 

In 1983, as the plaster dust was settling 
around the restored bouse, built in 1900 by 

the Pommery family of Champa gn e, fame 
and the restorers packed up their tools for 
the final time, the Boyers entered the home 
that was to become their new hotel and 
restaurant. Elyane gasped: “Formidable! ” 
As she remembers, her husband did not miw 
a beat, correcting hear with one crisp sen- 
tence: “In 10 years, it will be formidable.” 
(He must have remembered French mentor- 
chef Jean Delaveyne's wanting: “It may take 
seven years to be a doctor, but SO years to be 
a chef.”) 

In truth, it didn’t take that long. Boyer's 
food has always had a crisp edge in the 
positive sense, elegant food that matches the 
surroundings, unburdened by all that chichi 
baggage so many country restaurants are 
convinced are de rigueur. And to my mind, 
fins is the most romantic spot in France for a 
weekend idylL 

From the outside, their Hfe looks glamor- 
ous. By their sheer joy in the place, they 
almost convince you that all this was handed 
to them on a salver platter, complete with 
several glasses of vintage Champagne. The 
secret, of course, is always to make it look 
easy and effortless. 


If France has taught me one thing, it’s the 
value of maintenance — or body, mind, and 
soul. The Boyers are fine examples of that, 
for their chflteau sparkles with care, atten- 
tion and love. Each year, two or three of the 
hotel’s 16 rooms are totally refurbished. 
CheT Boyer’s kitchen is a spotless, busy-bee 
network of activity, bis potager, or vegetable 
garden, should be on a garden lovers tour. 
And while the series of elegant dining rooms 
holds a quantity of diners, the Boyers some- 
how manage to make you feel as though 
you're there alone, and the staff only has 
eyes for you. 

If someone asked me where to find a 
prime example of French haute cuisine in 
1994, I’d be sure to put Boyer ou the list, for 
his food reflects the value of classic training, 
experience and maturity. There’s no camou- 
flage here, nothing about his food you can't 
“get-” Yet he does much more than search 
out great produce; fish and poultry and plop 
it on a plate. 

Take his saumon fumi d la minute, an 
artful morsel of salmon filet that is smoked 
and cooked at the same time. Too often, 
smoking overpowers an ingredient, and the 
food ends np tasting of nothing but smoke, 
indigestible at that- But Boyer cooks the 
salmon in a stove-top smoker ever so briefly, 
preserving the moistness and richness of the 
salmon, which is infused with just a hint of 
smoke. The salmon is removed from the 
smoker seconds before it arrives at the table, 
paired with warm, sliced potatoes, which are 
dressed with cream tossed with caviar at the 
last second. 

Equally simple, equally sublime are his 
ultra-fresh Brittany langoustmes split and 
roasted in the shell, glazed with a touch of 
nearly caramelized sauce, paired with a tan- 
gle of vegetables. 

Each of these dishes paired beautifully 
with HugePs 1989 Riesling Tradition, a text- 


book example of an appealing Riesling, a 
crispy, floral wine that is ready for drinking 
now, yet has years to go before it peaks. 

On the red wine from, another lovely 
marriage was made of layer’s 1985 Haules- 
Cdtes-de-Nuits (full of berry-rich fruit and 
balanced acidity) and Boyer’s u of ussy roast 
pigeon. He roasts the young bird to moist, 
pink perfection, separates the juicy breast, 
then envelops the leg in a thin sheet of phyllo 
dough, and roasts iL The result is a multilay- 
ered, multi textured feast- He embellishes 
this with only a few thin stalks of green 
asparagus, so there's no distraction, no com- 
petition for the palate. 

Each week Boyer spotlights a different 
Champagne, and a current offering was Lau- 
rent Pemeris Grand Si tele, a buttery, rich 
full-flavored Champagne that served as a 
brilliant palate-opening aperitif. 

I am an adoring fan of puckery rhubarb 
and found his rhubarb ice cream state-of- 
the-art, a blend of tangy, add. sweet and 
rich. But the accompanying rhubarb tart — 
in which the rhubarb was all but reduced to a 
puree in a shell — was too refined for me. 

Are there other flaws in paradise? Yes. I 
wish restaurants would stop serving white 
toast, which inevitably goes stale (he second it 
leaves the toaster. And with electronic tech- 
nology at such heights, why should diners 
have to be inconvenienced by cumbersome 
electrical cords and switches draped across a 
table, so that a single lamp (which hampers 
your view of fellow diners) can be lighted? 
Fmafly. if I ruled the world, plastic outdoor 
tables would be permanently banned. 

Les Crayeres, Gerard Bayer, 64 Boulevard 
Henry-Vasnier, Reims; tel: 26.S2.80.SO.: fax: 
26.82.6S. 52. Open daily : closed Dec. 23 to 
Jan. 13. Credit cards: American Express, Din- 
ers Chib, Pisa. A la carte, 490 to 630 francs 
per person, including service but not wine: 


Culinary excellence at 
Le Cordon bleu 


iP&n 


* DAILY DEMO’S , l-' A r r Culina ire 

_ ' „ ^ M PARIS - 185 5 

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Lean cuisine: Aug. 30 co Sept. 2 • -1 

• Summer Classes 

Don't miss our special program; Sept 5 to 30 

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Special 5 week program: Nov. 14 to Dec 17 


* Basic Cuisine Certificate 
I n just 5 weeks: Nov. 1 4 to Dec. 17 


cuisine & Pastry Classic Cycle 

■offered 4 rimes a year 



PARIS •• LONDON • 


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(All today for a free school brochure or gift catalogue 
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The Ultimate French Cooking School 

Located in the prestigious Paris Ritz. 

For cooking enthusiasts and professionals. 

All courses are taught in French and English. 

Spedal One-Week Summer Courses 
beginning June 20, 1994: 

Discovering the Provinces of France 
All About Sauces 
All About Fish Cookery 
Summer Entertaining 
Parisian Brasserie and Bis trot Course 
Wine and Cheese in Food 

To receive a 1994 brochure and details, please cedi or urite: 
Hotel Ritz 

15. Race Vcndome, 75041 Paris Cedcx 01, France 
Tel.: (+33 X) 42.60.38.30 - Fax: (+33 1) 40.15-07.65 


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Reaching a half million readers around the 
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Travel is a 
Way of Life 

Shouldn't you too advertise in 

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For information, contact Fred Ronan in Paris 
TeL (1) 46 37 93 91 Fax: (1) 46 37 93 70 
or your local IHT office or representative 


(fisting on page 17) 


BELCHUM 

Ghent 

De Vlaamse Opera, tel- f9i 223-06- 
61. Handel's "Orlando.'' Directed by 
Roben Carsen, concluded oy Paul 
Dombrecht. with Patricia Bar don, 
Lynne Dawson and David Pittsinger. 
June 22 (premiere), 25. 27 and 29. 

BRITAIN 

London 

British Museum, lei: ( 71 ) 323-8525, 
open daily. To Sept. 18. "Beauty and 
the Banknote: Images of Women on 
Paper Money." On the occasion of 
the Bank of England's 300!h anniver- 
sary, the exhibition explores the sig- 
nificance oi images of women on pa- 
per money. Some are blatant 
propaganda, but an enhance the sta- 
tus of the currency, proclaim the 
wealth of a bank or the glory of a 
nation. 

Tate Gallery, tel: (71) 887-8000. 
open daily. To Sept. 4: "R.B. Kitaj: A 
Retrospective." Works by the British 
figurative painter. The exhibition in- 
cludes 60 paintings and 40 drawings 
and pastels done alter Kitaj's arrival 
in England in 1958. The exhibition 
will travel to Los Angeles and New 
York. 

FRANCE 

Bordeaux 

Musde des Beaux- Arts, tel: 56-10- 
17-17, closed Tuesdays. To Aug. 2t: 
"La Peinture 3 Naples au 17e Se- 
cfe." Works by 17th-century Napoli- 
lan painters, including works by Ca- 
ravaggio, the Spanistvbom Ribera 
and Giordano. 

Paris 

Bibiiothdque Historique de la Villa 
de Paris, tel: 44-59-29-70. dosed 
Mondays. To Sept. 25: “Plans de 
Pansdut6eau 1 Be Steele." Maps at 
Paris daring back to the 16th century 
and showing the evolution and trans- 
formations of the oty. 

Grand Palais, tel: 44-13-17-17. 
closed Tuesdays. Continuing/To 
Aug. 28: ‘ ' I mp ression nrsme: Les Ori- 
gines, 1859-1869." Focuses on (he 
influences that led young painters 
such as Monet. Flenoir. Pissarro, Ma- 
net and Degas to Impressionism. 
Opera Comique, tel: 42-96-12-20. 
Gounod's "Romeo ei Juliette." Di- 
rected by Nicolas Joel, conducted by 
Michel Plasson, with Roberto Alagna 
and Nuda Focile. June 24, 26, 28 
and 30. 

Orangerie de Bagatelle, tel: 45-00- 
22-19. June t7 to July 14; "lie Fes- 
tival Chopin a Paris.” Fourteen reci- 
tals illustrating Chopin's various 
styles (scherzos, polonaises, noc- 


turnes) and matching them with simi- 
lar works by other composers such 
as Webern, Rameau and Poulenc 

GERMANY 

Bonn 

Oper der Stadt Bonn, tel: (228) 72- 
Si. A new production of Beethoven's 
"Fidel io." Directed by Peter Escri- 
be rg, conducted by Dennis Russell 
Davies, with Michael Volte, Stephen 
Bronk, Peter Seiffert/Paut Lyon and 
Barbara Daniels. June 18 (pre- 
miere). 20. 26. 28 and 30. 

Essen 

Villa HOgel, lei: (201 1 41-39-81. 
open daily. To Nov. 13: "Pans - 
Bede Epoque 1 880 to 1910: Fascina- 
tion of a World City.” Recalls Parisian 
life as reflected in art and artifacts 
from 1880 to 1910. Includes 700 
paintings, photographs, as well as 
jewelry, silver, glass, furniture and 
fashions of the time. 

Hamburg 

Hamburgische Staatsoper, tel: 
(40) 35-68-454. Verdi's "Aida." Di- 
rected by John Dew, conducted by 
Michael Halasz, with Maria Gulegh- 
ina, Giorgio Lamberii and Livia Bu- 
dai. July 1. 5. 14 and 17. 

Stuttgart 

St aatsth eater Stuttgart tel: (7111 
2-03-20. Wagner's "Die Meistersing- 
er von Nomberg." Directed by Hans 
Neuenfels. conducted by GaOrieie 
Ferro with Wolfgang Probst and 
Matthias Holla. June 19 (premiere). 
22. 26 and July 2. 

ITALY ” 

Venice 

Palazzo Grassi, Id: (41 ) 522-1 375. 
To Nov. 6: “FUnascimento - Da Bru- 
nelleschi a Michetangeto: La Rappre- 
sentazjone dell' A/chitetlura." Fol- 
lowing the rastauration oi Antonio da 
Sangallo's 1539 wood model of the 
Basilica di San Pietro, the exhibition 
brings together all the major special- 
ists in trie field, from Ackermann and 
Frorrvnei to Bruschi and Da Seta, and 
features 30 architectural models built 
during the 15th and 16th centuries. 


JAPAN 

Machida 

Machida City Museum of Graphic 
Arts, tel: (.427) 26-2771. closed 
Mondays. To July 17: "Vision of 
Death from 1500 to 1994." 200 
works depicting the death of human 
beings, with works by European art- 
ists Such as Durer, Goya arid Dela- 
croix and 20th-century Japanese art- 
ists such as Shuzo Takiguchi ano 
Kenji Kitagawa. 

PORTUGAL 

Lisbon 

Teatro NacionaJ de Sao Carlos, lei. 
346-8408. Janacek’s "Vec Makropu- 
los." Directed by Bernard Sobei. 
conducted by Rudolf Krecmer with 
Sophia Larson, Stuart Kale and Va- 
lentin Jar. June 26. 28 and 30. , 

SPAIN l 

Madrid 

Museo del Prado, tei: (91 ) 420-28- 
36. closed Mondays. To Sept. 4: 
"Sebastiano del Piornbo." Various 
paintings and preparatory drawings 
by the 16th-century Spanish pamier 


July 30: "Cloaca Maxima" Contem- 
porary an addressing the themes o) 
waste, water, toilets and sewers, with 
an by Bon an ski, Gilbert & George 
and Gerhard Richter. 

UNITED STATES 

Chicago 

Grant Park Music Festival, ret: 
1 3T2) 819-0614. June IBtoAug. 26: 
Van Ciiburn, accompanied by the 
Grant Park Symphony Orchestra, 
conducted by Leonard STathm will 
open the Festival (June 1 81 . The 36- 
concert season will include perfor- 
mances of Orffs "Carmine Burana." 
and two evenings of selections from 
Leonard Bernstein's works (July 30 
and 31). 


showing his influence on Spanish art- 
ists m tne 1 6th and 17th centuries. 

swrraEWJVNP 

Geneva 

Petit Palais, tei: <22 ) 346-14-33. 
open daily. To end Oct.: "La Famille 
Vue par les Peintres, de Baziile a 
Picasso." A century of paintings rep- 
resenting various aspects of family 
life, with works by Baziile, Valial, Kisl- 
tng, Lhote. Laurencin and Picasso. 
Pulfy/Lausaime 
Musde d'Art Contemporain, tel: 
(21) 729-91-46, open daily. To 
Sept. 25: "Picasso Comemporain." 
More than 80 paintings, sculptures, 
drawings and ceramics created dur- 
ing the last 20 years of the artist's life. 
Zurich 

Museum der Stadtenwasserung, 
tel: 435-5511, dosed Mondays. To , 


Cl IllSi Stti 


On June 19: “Nicolas de Stad." Ho- 
tel de Ville, Paris. 

On June 19: "Robert Mapplethorpe. " 
Fundacib Joan MirO, Barcelona 
On June "Picasso: Die Samm- 
lung Ludwig." Museum des 20. Jh. 
Vienna 

On June 19: “Japomsme in Fash- 
ion.'' National Museum of Modem 
Art, Kyoto. 


On June 19: "Masson and Marta. 
Two Universes." Yokohama Muse- 
um of Art, Yokohama Japan. 

On June 19: "L'Art des Sculpteurs 
Tainos: Chefs-d'Oeuvre des Grandes 
Amities Precdombtennes." Musfie 
du Petit Palais, Paris. 

On June 19: "Kosode Byobu: A Ka- 
leidoscope of Early Modern Kimo- 
nos." National Museum, Kyoto. 


“SUMMER FUN” 

package 


$129'^ Per person 
i per nig,ht.double occupancy 


includes 

• Fully cquipnl standard air- 
conditioned room 

■ Buffo breakfast in ‘La Scab" 
goumx.1 restaurant 

- V.l.P. welcome 

- Fire man rcss on the private 
sand)' beach or by the rooftop pool 

■ Free access to the Fitness Huh 

- All taxes and service charge 

* Ai'allabie June 1st through 
October 3 1st 199-i 

(Except Festivals) 

Daffy single supplement: $85 
Superior room suppletncnf $20 
per roam per n/gbl 

RESERVATIONS 
FRANCE toll free 05 90 75 46 j 
UK toll free 0345 581 595 
USA toll free ia00 221 it 24' I 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


SOUTH ions VAUET 

Cotaae to rent (tnvd? the castle 
garden], 3 bedroomi (5 bfnkj. 

hjupoed fetdmn ord Vruncfry. 
Pnvare garden. Period turntuie. 
F1000 per weelr De fc Touch! 
Te(^«71l503l Fw(33]«a53965 


Summer In France 

BHTANNY, CROZON, mi 2 hoses. | HOUSE K» RENT 30 Hameten north I «W>ARC MQNCEAU-EXCBmONAL | 
ST. TROPEZ. ffth century hstoned I 
iim house. 5 bedrooms, 3 fufl baths, I 
65 hxit dooL Featured 
n§ lime mad. S 
led let 
SUSA 


LOT VAUET Tranquil county rtktob 
o® weB-cquipp ed. so tne with pooh. 


NOBMAMTT. NEAR ETKETAT 

Old Manor to rent Summer "94 or war 
lound. 8 to 12 penom. ejsmfMeii 
comfons, tunny lerroce. large parti, 

ID bm sea Rececnabie r«es. Contact 
owner Tel (33-1) 46 47 54 05 tak 



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Fm: 0O3J/1M2-96JJ -61 

IdeaJlr limed oi the ht-jn .+ Part, a 
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pven avaiiahilitv. valid rivim June 27th thni September 4th, 19041. 

AM iituior Ciwfa Cords Accepted 



HOTEL 




'fo- 56 rue Monsieur Le Prince 
75006 Paris 


:3g§ Tel: III 43.29.10.80 

" Fax: 1 1 ) 43.54.26.90 

*•** 

40 meters from die Luxembourg Gardens, this superb i860 private 
residence has |u$t been transformed Into a charming & elegant hotel. 
Its rooms are built around the interior courtyard garden and are air- 
conditioned and sound-proof, with cable T.V., minibar & private 
number phone. Fax available. Salon bar with fireplace. 

3 Nights. FF I JthO, bed 6 breakfast- 4 Nights, FF 2^00, bed 6 breaktet 

Member of CHATEAUX- HOTELS INDEPENDENTS 


Fga.g'BtfpS*? ■ S^K-ITS-} rP- i ? E’ 1 ?'? 3 ? 3d3536.ti5 Pf «3 i B * re w »■ 

































I 1 
( f 




p 

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Paire 10 



JNTS H NAT TON * !. HERALD TRCBl^VE. FRIDAY, JU>~E 17, 1994 

and Oilier Asian Capitals, Movie Censors Are Alive and Kicking Up 


Fuss 


By William Branigin 

Uiufti<f£ii>'! Po;: L-.Ti.a- 

MANILA — They’re ai ii again. 

When Iasi heard from. Philippine 
movie censors were under siege for de- 
manding cuts in "Schindler’s "List,” ihe 
Academy Award-winning film on the 
Holocaust by Steven Spielberg. Then 
came an upfoal over “The Piano.” the 
jane Campion film that won three Os- 
cars. which the censors in effect banned 
as ‘'immoral.’’ 

Both decisions were eventually over- 


turned amid -o'. King criticism, bui the 
Movie and Tde.'tston Review anJ C!jv 
sification Board, as i he censor.-’ pjnei i> 
officially known. !»j* remained undt- 
lerrcA ’ 

Now it Ins ranned "Belle Ep.-ouc.” 
the Spanish production that "-i-v this 
year's Oscar for best foreign language 
film. The decision has enraged moviego- 
ers anew, offended the Spanish Embassy 
here and created a potentially embar- 
rassing distraction Cora visit to Spain by 
President Fidel V. Ramos. 


Members of Congress are edii-'Tiji- 
i>is have renewed rail- < -''m -• 

aMilion. and a Supreme Court jestte-.’ 
has likened ns ntembtr- to "'•oar -rin- 
sier*. cl ways fearing — *r h'-rme — 
see «i man under the bed.” 

But the Philippine U’lXp are not 
alone. Other censo^hip r-.-ard.- in SoC.h- 
cjst Asia ha’-e also <t:rre.1 eon trovers;, 
lately by imposing cuts <>r nan:- on mov- 
ies that they deemed r.r-T op!;- •w.ual'y. 
but soTneumo poliia.i'ly- inc-vro-i. 
ip Indonesia. ihe world'.- large ? l pre- 


dominantly Muslim coumry. censors 
banned "Schindler's List” this month 
after nearly two months of deliberations, 
.iting what they considered excessive 
■-iolence and nudity. Rut even before the 
fiirn arrived m Indonesia for re'ic-v by 
the censorship board, the Jakarta-based 
Committee for World Muslim Solidarity 
denounced iL sight unseen, as "nothing 
nut Zionist propaganda.” 

A spokesman for the organisation 
added. "From history we can see that the 
jjv» ;ih people were always trying to 


spread their influence through the use of 
media, which they eoatroL” 

Two prominent Indonesian Islamic 
scholars also called for the film to 
banned on grounds that it was intend*} 
to "make the world forget about the 
cruelty of the Jews against the Palestin- 
ians.” 

In Malaysia, a controversy over 
"Schindler's Lisi” embroiled top govern- 
ment officials and eventually eaued tn 
an impasse that kept the picture trom 
being screened. A government censors 


sarsa?ttfS£: 

s«ar«?j£s 

priXe and virtue of a ceruin 

IvlaJavsia reconsidered lire ban. boi 
Ihe rensoniiip board then. demand 
SSeTSu di scenes dqwm*»»ta«e 

^^or^rv.-Dcpmy Horae 


if at a): 


Kra jmmi ifl its enuiw ar not' 

not been shown. . 

In (he Philippines, ceas** *«' ^ 


In (he Philippine- 

narendy unchastened ™w>kv •/«■> ] 

Uarrll to {ftfllUlf il'^W k Cv-j 


s rmch to ««* 

mand for cuts in “Schindl^vb^ 7 ^ 
Ssors’ board had tan sCmdai ^^W4 
ffew brief bedroom sequence, 

ESKiariTS* ^ ■ ^ 





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(Continued From Page 17) 


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IUB1CH 

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• ’ n M 5 I £ N C £ ’ ■’ 

lorecri e:c:st ssmcs 

r j~' '1Z :-jJa C-ed.: 


i Hellenic 

rTra-nernaiic.-en 
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16 Half ola 
nia'Ceiviis 

B:c& 2 *ay Me 

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ac-ar 

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19 HDlSlSin can 
2i -HaM-oir ever: 
S2H'2aigoritrvc 


sericd 

n na.i e " 

SB 'He-'-y 4 June' 

2 fi Harder, 

2S Hiller s cne 
29 Hone-loan c3ST 
ami 

31 Hite who 

33 hades 

34 Haoils eta sen 
3 ?H 5 * aye 


38 He'T’an’s 

riernns leader 

99 H'aner 

fcr^’Jl DOinM 

40 Hi;nancis 
fOj<n 
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w-aoa'ou n d 
46Hunarec car i 
47 'Hatea ri ‘Cd 


■ ;;;; wi.LAfj - sip ”” 


Sitfuiiun to Puzzle »l June 16 


TO OUR REAPERS IM V35i^S\SA AND 3W SAiZEUF.G 

You can receive the 1HT hand delivered ( 
to your home or office on the day or publication. 
Just cal! toll-free: 0660-315O 
or fax: 06069-W5413 


FRANKFURT 

Ci* 0 *. • ■ ;■ :< Vj 


& AREA 


FtANKrJRT KGlN CUSSaDORF 

ert res i ier 


PARIS BRUSSELS 

viF £st Sr'.'?.. 
tr:l I Zh'/.-r'i -ii: ire: 


LONDON I HEATHROW 

SfA'A* 53 C:iT’ « 9 .X 5 

-.’C. i auECS£ 

AMSTERDAM 3U7TBW.Y Ekt.ti 
S* rv>«. Te! .C'iX-bJ" “C 
Cj?S>: Ci'Ci ^kuc 



49 H | S *5 Diases 
tat sze s 
52 H 3 C>pg’D 

55 cl an 
Austin revel 

a7Husta->do? 
Pan\ D->e 

56 H.-A-. ' ■ 

59 h*cDcs. ,n a wa> 
61 He-.-uD stale? 

S3 Ha'C-neuvi 

TV -style 

64 H-gn in rani- 

65 HClV'S *0--^ ~tr» 

66 Hcl', CCJ-'CJl 


DOWN 


GENEVA - PA2IS 

o e e o o OLvvOyr a o ■ • » 

E i-rr. corr-. “ 4 c j) ?• :»! ccdi 


ciHQOQiicJH aaa 
nmHnnaBmoaanaB 
0ER3QQQ . CU3HISI3I30S 


rsTofNiYj 




«How»e nlers 
scene ptcpetlv 
sHaiassad 
amabty 

6 Heels c^r- as a 

ship 

7 Highly vG'iant 

8 Helium, e g 
b Huge birds 

to H once 

11 Hcspnaldzed 

conail'cn 

12 Humorous King 
14 He--o s piacre 
15 'Ha-per Valley 

p.t.a ' star 
90 Hand MCIV 
23 Hits :tie Spau so 
ro spea*. 
aaHeialdS 
27 HalJ-ot-Famer 
Bants 

30 Kargmaji s 
need 

si Hh-onco s 
■.emcie 

32 Hardly square 

35 HcLisiqn-ic- 
CrrcagoC' 

36 Hatch, e g 
ACb* 

40 -Hoop-Dee 
Deo’ V'CiS! 

41 H«|p 

42 Halves 


47 Hard of hearing 

aaHpwitzerneed 
SO HufK*ng 

si HatfieW.ioa 

McCoy 


53 Kollyv-ood's 

Barbara 

54 H 9 I 0 V 05 UL 
56 High- IT. place 
names 


56 HoARatfiD hiS**t 3 1 ---_ 
eoHawabis . 


( 3 ^..;pnca> 

C/vr , asp tea** 

..-P&o - 







pubw or a -y w a ' 

AV»» r, •»« Jt>wx F.thtrd by HW Shttriz. 


MARKETPLACE 


REAL ESTATE 

lnvestments 


FRB1CH RIVTBJA. In Ihe prsrtu v 
bwc bull on ion Frjri, rroTifitiSfii — 
iior nord *nh ICO tutunaui 
wirti j amenit-c and a health dime. 
FF 118 in-Han. Td'Fm TO] vrftZWi 


\ HAUT-VAJL GOSG3 DU VB?DON : 

[Ux ce Sie-Crco). t-savi-Hh ' -L 
eaar- ciri?or:xle cr-^tn? ■■s'-'rsu-e 
B-EGANT MOOBCN STONE MANOR, 
man ewniOsr. :c mjle-ec 
x-ihuilsngs ujtli .:r.-Sa\J 
lir^erder Seici ide-'l ; o< hoiirt 
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3JAWU72. SPISHHD HOME!! i»«t 
hi-jl, |;.V< net-jhbc-u+oiii tffi 

;-rt i :l<ori - caovnyan. i£UY 
a- -;:r^«n. bekovjryj !c- antacranc 

rjmn..* ii^_fcjri / u*l ■ - t-i :-n- rk-a 

Ce 5 C--e*. c-c QC ; I 'Tryihm; 

.-.■ii-e !■: .*.V F—ncr-ccc JTputeic 
21T- .-•iut-d J&CMr. Scan 


REAL ESTATE 

SERVICES 


; Urqa"m: W< m*m neocr-it-' r 
! TN. (33) 93 40 09 72 (Erv^-s:- : k- 




KRfNrH RTVIKRA 


■ CANADA ■ - PwJeniJ. taiowj 
uni nrnanneri a-aponei r- 
G+von. Narqnat f aal Eslaw Serene ■ 
Tel mWI.W 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


'•CHATEAU ON 1 ! AG^ES , •■ 

Lv-ef; yV'L-r-ii ?vr ? .-,;. -.Tj- 

L;«Tr-e lint.-.:r.i i~T<- C 
room;. I: t-reclsKi :-?nc* MW'. 
vaiihed celt-r;. L m?e-.ir ,-r— , v 
!nrt»en F-aie-r. -nil-.-lr; iws • 

lew--, bill yd. r;u>. !r-^. 
lcl"S fender.! > 

5371.000 V' :-n.. : 

aicce.r. -o-. r .-j- c 

SMM 1 , « 4 B 


CAP rsRRAT 

‘Alt <.ii u 1 50C- Mi.n. >:.ni 
o«efiCictvg -i*» ;nc ■>* nesi c'l 
rie -a- 


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1 :Cv ce- JH a.- nils - 

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Ttl i3j) 92 24 45 33 


GERMANS 


CARIBBEAN 



VILLErRANCHr SUR MBt 

raw teiicamei -'Fa -i* '5 14^ 

if<*Emon (oar-i. m.-Jv Mb 

cama'-ed •vt'I “enoeaxe ; .-.- r»r g 
poal :z~ t- 'Jr ? 

new. j.-i ihe bj> '^n C» Fvi-' 

«ny-. eege >i- q.-C* ••-•'•-• 

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P wolC 2J7 *F 

Tei -:-:i : :c- nr: -t 75 * 


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I 77. r -j 7- J rS-'.. 


NEAR. AIX-awtOVHICE. Piwmol i 


.VI; ; ;r — , z t; ;^er.mj-e 

. . - nvi - . — 


! ;-,o. ..C-.v :: - j.rc: cti=- 

. - ::r z ~ -V-J MO. !-■ 


I NICE >20km; CANNES (10km) 

■'C: “k- 

i ::e* -ees •: - : e->*. '‘--T'' .»i 

i ns •>: r-s :: fv =: -t 


FOR SALE: red evst m Gere- 
El Franch-luM<nbaurg banter, 

2 iejitony. swy V-cr«s. or li 
ooes o! 'rxi. -. be^h.'.. ameSec we 
s' Lrle .l'Jyge. r.-cbcn If 

rain 

One building rvfcH* ktc 
ce-crre K -" r e ;vO e-^ 2nd unit i V 

r-'OTtl. -CP-* r«c-^ (Kc- :• 

:rge 'a: z:-*r~- - “ees ; p 

■s-si - M.e“ ixtrea pr-.-a 
ip=t-. Price: DM. 7 50,000. 
e-air-e; ‘c Frv AC- P'C- 5e> 
Ire- ==■ 


!M, AVENUE H9®f MACTJN ' 
2C 1 i=-~. r ~esss:ne a'big -ipe 
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SSKiE BONAAtY TaC- J-42 85 WOO . 


SVrTTZZRLAND 




16A - AV&WE FOCH 

5 e=.—v_=c — e- ■: » - prk-rj 

-ccr. -je-— > e K"e«r. 

r- se-re V. T 4‘ j: CC 


PANORAMIC VIEW 

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£«.-■ T xn a«er... 67 52 


UNK2UE VILLA ABOVE 

S*<iterfcni bases -3=0 800m_"*un 
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over yur 3*5 Swas Aps: lord McrJ> 
sysens; pvt =c^oded >Nd, elec- 
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bed:wo. 2 ensaie tolhs; neneb 
nmb ie. d dhe- =W*.. 

large trvmg mem cerrleyeted 180 oe- 
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Keren, dam. fau-iarY. 2 Tewels. cam- 
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ST. KITTS, 


WEST INDIES 

20 or MO acre -«ih txoArr:n: 
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: rcnr Sroler eornmisaan qua'wt-sd 

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12121 371-9133 


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Tel |33-i) 45 24 46 35 


re • a-.- «ponrr 
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t ;--» saiL-e Q-raa? hivai* goAn 
• j s-i-r rv«:; k me 
ri ?:«v it *e L-?adi 
=- : V s 1S£5- 


FRENCH RIVIERA 

ROOUSRUN5 - CAP MARTIN 

f .mins a»7- -jn» .•.'T.veJraSe- 

btautiSrd f l»a .7 «-.*»• :i 

srcpi i«;e me-: Sr-e t.’rnde f.- *t-j 


• ST TRQSE ::: -.zrXt v 

, C-Xv a - a cv-c: ;a:r - -'4 w: 

. r=.-. w. Xv T»r Of' 


i • L-J Cu •l-siv.-'O) Lrtlv'i 
fcj!? ii-UUEU SUP MET 
*ir:-?: l >l V ii.Fr.(?-|7;0l l> c a 


«* 

n»*. Cl-rri 31C f. 33ir*sl OT-.C 
5C0-J sq - jT3tr «..:r ; uai 

•V. t .--ce 


• CAP FEtRAT ;.-i: 

.-I; I ’ :-r 3 c-:r: rv • 

v^.; -- •; fC f- 


GRt\T BRITAIN 


CALUAN (VAR). Tf- r^n Cirr,:. I -f_ 1 
j la»* oi 4 C*4«« 3»ir 1 00 
• ape renovoied Kc* t. r-sm-cr. hcv r ‘ 

•Vjlcrnv .J or 72J sen* oc-*-i 

1 hcec-nond locr-on & F R-” C->‘ 

i .rp iMMoatiff T<i i:-r ?-= -•• : 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


BIARRITZ. Oe-mnj 'I- e-. s- cr- 

rege * 1 C '-sf . <l>; ; rn;.! c;> 


BRITTANY - COTE D'ARMOR »«•* 
'EA. wr '.omfc«3tle rl/in a*e:-jr. 
non« r»ft«e ePj VRjn <••*. I' hj 

f:-i, -iif. ;«nr wr“w; peti. lewai 

Wnb > •nrfviui Z .000 ic.m «,mui 2 - 
mgs FOPT4I5HED Pj'SIBLc. a-j fc- 
CTure ior tJetmli Tijl OWNER- (52i 
% 7 i 91 54 Far (3J| 5^ 74 91 90 


*n. WWW r n/pi-M.- ‘i-.cs y- 
isw. li rr.ytf be :otd. ■ i*-;or.: >i. s' 
:of s-neie c*r;o" ousle. Ik -T--' 
2 l?CiI~ - 34 -i 310 12 ; ?• •/Td-'-- 


FT PAUL DEVICE 

4 PARC SAINT PAUL ® 
SL'fSSB 1 “RO , V»CAL- HOUSE da-.; 
I J ‘TrdtWrrr 

;*| r:.- ,-n s-:-)’ Tit :'<0 

o SAINT PAUL > 


FEESTiaCUS PPOPSTY,’ Ledrranr,. 


1 be c.vur-4 

Tol C<? :c *ax :V s j -S C-i 2' 


AIX 04 P2OV04CE CEN7BJ 

z-ptt cr rw,; rvylo » ■-.tv. 

beer oar;. !<• «.-> 


eautcced V.-c-en ?Fi .£40.000 Te '•£•! 
42 27 2* O' ah»r orrn it «- ki 
>S3&. ;HT. '-?25:) Ci- 


FRENCH 2IVIEPA - CANNE5 A re:-.- 
--.-»r . F.tned a li-jli cfcw: 

, :-e-/ycf. '. VTC-Timjm ijpa-in-iH 

i eer.inevM ~>m cl amanen, oieq lih 
: -«i=i s~immmcDC:l Tthiwra • 
I safe Tj U Ter-rs. 3 


PARK ^ AGENCE 

— — i.irtwiNxo "■"> ■ 

INTERNATIONAL 

Le Park pjlx* 

25 A veMt dc h 'jy.n 
n£ '’SftX.' 1 Monie-Ceric. 

Tri-V3 2£ 15 C< Ff: rt IS 35 a 


' HISTORIC COT5WOU) TOWN, '.j,-, 
' ar.-.--:— .r. 2 :e «*: j-s- ,- r 
. --J A-! Te r SbC-foi 


BADamOSI 

. L-.ivn:v: n xt •< iie"Ci « “• = 

; - jr.ee-: /«w — z -ec^-rer 

. i:=r- •- r*>e Us- rtc r> bKen-ioer 

B'tti ■-•■er ner me a: ;* r rra 

: Sra^x-; -cr- 

wri : 3 C -5 JJC- - 4 -r- 
me. :e: eves' ae-j-.-c cys — f 
C-eieef tv :,2 -ac 

LACKNER IrrunobCien 

2 p=-=r 'f y J 4’ '2r. :N« 


16 th, ALBSUC MAGNARD 

EXCFTK 3 NAL 285 19m 

“«5 k.-. acr=e- "e. "M" ? 52 


8th, PLACE HM0 BSKSON. t 

-w-4 f si.- r:cr. ==i. 4=-. hr. » 

••■nervy; iTT rg'« f: A*- 


acnecues. BrocA ana - mj -er l ul ls, nsh 
Bend; asi a undwt t> I5m newBiow, 
273 KVA Boso generator, afl vlAnes. 
esJer greenhteaa ro5 pjnei. «t i5sn 
wteCrt TV ssS, iw-jrasm cod ant. 
pc=3 000 owed. ID tefepwe cer- 
trd and rreroomv Fc» «aecMo J 
hx&er denail 

Fax +4191 668248 Prindpak Only. 


TODAY’S* 


IlOIiDAYS&lRAm 

seghoiv 


Appears on Page 9 . ' 7._ 


'• ' : .1 






fe f 


GERMANY 


s~r rt-e. :c-> nz 

B =f 4 X 3 K ^r-c-. 


42 5 c Ac E 


xn 

P: 




LAKE GENEVA & 


BBUJN LUXURY CITY RJKNSHED 
jparwenfi with weeUy nod- and 
lien service. DM 1543.- nwdHy. fiw 


rTALY 


I LO.NOCFI HI5HSURY 'C m fr,. 
1 V/;:- S--J ; -5jr» 3-- — 1,7-4 car- 
( ckm £12; OtO TS 44 51 '■■■5 4>;; 


JPEKCE 


JMCNT 3090 NJ 

jd-sndd 2 -Kr. 1- b-jAi.r-r, 
iXCijr ICO :am. b c-cj3^k: re* • 

Cefl'-al N>M «d hrrtcur Lir.M bal- 
i.immm- ,r. i-niQw •--•c-ne 
«rd*a uirec' ise nc-m ;*w. e: 
2 mS SJ 

To.h*? rr ;.4 Vife;-. •;>• >X 
r® 4' :i s 52 r ;•> r*i 4 ; ;; -^-ico:- 


,nV„g, a .2£ l ;; r 

, ;; m ;r '.liv s;“i 

I Cvaoer - -r. r. ;• ,;'l > lerce 

j twzr-i 5«r-'-:;i-s 7.1 is rs 

: tV. ?•:■;«■- Tj. £ 3 - 

1 :- 7 z?c:-: v- yx-:. 


MILAN. VTfc. sj- ; 3M ,c ~ 
fcwlc'tvj '0 -r.iniiies -or .-.ztsK \~e 
ipcu oecusfvr -«waen«ci — ca. 'V 
fee-, k sj— w. =-.: m..- 

bae-^-r 31-2 grw -r. 

T-T- " '■* ‘"I- 

rjje. :e:-.:s. - 7 -. ' 

rc.-se. vst "i «i r: 

•>r -Ii ! :--w- jr-I 4 c-:j4; V 
rj r <ni' MWS Ms S.TO 


HEART OF ST-GaMAIPW 3 B-P «5 

• -.C-:-' 

2;e-. w- iww w— - ces- 


1 6th, AV FOCH. 210 sq.m. 

Mc-5 s .-acr 2 k-c-s. r~.sre 
5=rat- rei.l!4r-4;22« 


Sate te teenmo auSwmod, 
air spedabfy since 1975 
Mtod WOPKlTS A CHA1ETS 
[ in MONTMUX VUiARS. 

LE5 DIABtSSTS. GSTAAD, 

, CRANS-MONIANA. VBS0, ete. 
Fwtra Wr. 20 a 000 to 3 S mfa. 
REVAC S A 

! 52 . Menibrfiant, OH -121 1 Garwva 2 
i Tel 4122-734 15 40 . F«tt 734 12 20 


IBerga/nd • onr.; r*A- S; 

■ 23 T! 3^ 30 O' 'wwa(. 


.LViD FOB l*2£ 

.- j -i-; -Vxfed -i-jO 

I Sir- c-r;l W ;j..7l. |;2 

I ape-) ■? rv-sr.; ?-ra • er. 

• f.-t-.or. ; ;.r ; ; | .-; 


EXTRAORDINARY PANORAMA. 

t«isvt ussy, at: ->rrr« :• 
I ri e-r if i • m 


RARE AND EXCSPnCNAt ?a* '• ism 

|Lrr* 5 c-cr- 7 - "OwN^CUW pr-.s:* 
TT*. S 3 -.L* ‘K M -. OflOB Tb^fe.'.. < 


TURKEY 


: -yr. re-— 3 J 4 -i~: l.-sr-e 'et-JCC •«*=■«•: 'ccfe. po-- • 

£• X£ — =“-; v. '•' • ;f £2 4: 

bSr; ■rvwi'Te. »a> - y - lWb, 5PLH<WD -AUreT ATHffif i 

rtgr ir '■•?. rut-. s.^-> c- »o6- ' 
7£ si~ vssst-v-vs. 1 


ic-nt, i ieotoms. central baswn, 
hr=*!hed. mO- es-j-sped. £5- 70.C00. 
Tet —41 s5 25 £2 9e 


MONACO 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


USA 


FSAKSS 


Tishman Speyer 
won’t take credit tor 
creating Utopia. 

Just developing it. 



Tishman Speyer, distinguished American 
developer of Europe's tallest office building, 
The MesseTurm. and the Freidrichsiadt 
Passagen. is proud to present The Water 
Club. 

The Water Club is an exclusive residential 
condominium club being built on the most 
beautiful beach on the west coast of Florida, 
Longboat Key, just minutes from Sarasota. 
Florida. It offers large apartments with expan- 
sive terraces, private elevator entrances to 
each apartment and a magnificem Clubhouse 
on 16 pristine oceanfront acres. 

Residences from 246-485 sq. meters. 
Priced from $545, 000 -$1,950,000 U.S. For 
additional information please contact Tishman 
Speyer in Berlin 0 1 7 -49-30-23 J 49-40 or 
Frankfurt OH -49-69-9754-10 or call direct. 


The VAter Club 


1 245 Gulf of Mexico Drive. Longboat Key, FL 3422 S 
phone | 3 l 3 ) ■383-6444 Fax lS 13 i 383-2500 
The Sunshine Group (Florida* Corp. Erclu^r.e Marketing Con&ultan; 


Auciion -sals ar the Palais -le Jusrice Ce Pn^iS 

MONDAY, JUNE 27, 1344 at 2p.m. 

in one lot 

BUILDING IN PARIS (4th) 

63, rue de la Veneris 

Including EIJILCWNG facrg rlw SMftff. orourrt llocr * J KJ-eys 6utH y, cclla.-s. P>*S a 
a'JlLQ!t)Q i7ih‘o end oi me courtyard, cpour-c floor *■ i ;iorcys ir.n on cellars, and 
2 gift.-vw oolM .C. 1 UG> nnV 

CERTAW PREMISES ARE NEITHER RENTED NOR OCCUPIED 
STARTING PRICE; FF 4,000,000 

Coni.Ki M-liire Serge B FULL ATE. asv>da» lawyer ol aCP CRANRU7- 2HRESTBL 
62. mo hi Fautwrg-Sarnr-Hwrore. T50M PARIS Tel. 1 1 > 49XJ.?S 33 
Maine rvn-Hcnn BONELLO. lawyer. SO. rue Mcnsicui-re-Fn.xe 
75.JM PARIS Tel (1IJ3 26 33.93 -or.-siielcvisil 
TUESDAY. JUNE 21. 1994 Irani 9.30 to II -30 am. 


MONTE CARLO 

ijriqut Dcar^uishid tretheie >.Uj “ 
5 e ledecs'Ttic bc 9 C-e<'-ft "fr- "a 


a lr F=!*v 
V 4 ^ ” t IT 


-:n»- 


NYCErsa 60 s 


9 Soorw 


MS/DON BELLEVUE ccrsncn: ^e- 

r '=m. fee- r s;m. * bed- 
■aems. j--, wc-s, esc sices -o 
XK S-. ■y.ccr. **2'.5CKv Tei 
•Z-*r*- ti-.isi Z 5 c.-: cnees’ 


Auction saDe at the Palais de Justice in Paris 

Thursday, June 30 at 2:30 p.m. 


AN 8-R00M APARTMENT 

Staircase 1 ■ 4th flow ■ right hand 
door. Entry hall with clakroom, large 
salon, ottice, bedroom wilh wardrobe 
and anlechambre, bathroom, riming 
room, 4 other rooms, kitchen with 
pantry 2 independent bathroom, 
cloakroom, cupboards and balcony. 


2 INDIVIDUAL BEDROOMS 

Staircase 2. right mezzanine, each 
with washroom. 

A CELLAR 

Slarcases 2 anti 3, J si basemen), 
left hallway. 

2 PARKING SPACES 

Staircase 3. ramp )c 'S' basemenL 


S 7 ABTIWC PR 8 CR FF 3 jggiggg 


Contact Maitre Dominique LEMA1TRE, lawyer, 

6 rue Saint Philippe du Roule. Paris 8. Tel.: (1) 42 25 78 61. 
ON SITE VISIT: June 17. 21, 27, 1994 trom 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. 


SWTZBLAND 


ipp or i ii i *o*io 


^COMMERCIAL 
INVESTMENT 

Properties.:; 


GENEVA 

SWITZERLAND 


PRIME OFFICE SPACE 473 meie« 
near Hotels, facing park, a lew 
minutes walk Irom oletion. near 
late Furnished or unfurnished. 
Immediately available 
Call Geneva 41 72 ■ 732 28 18. 

No agencies please. 



Luxury Hcfc in very besl location, 
connected with 5-Slar-Hotel. 

■ - rooms, 16-5 sq.m., living/dining 
room, fireplcce. 3 bedrooms, 
2 bertircoms. kilaieri. 

■ 2 r-Krr.s, 32 sq m., living/dining 
room, firflplace, I bedroom, 
i bo'-hroom. kindien 

nor fLrrnishe-d, lonq ieJv 

Facsimile: +41 82-2 15 22 


Looking for 
property in 


jssysssEiLMr^l Switzerland? 


LES TERRASSES DES V1GNES 

Lurjry duple* apart menis built on ihe 

raiurtainsKte fusl abm the Wemaiwtf reson 

ol fJtonlTew Stuwinn panoramic iiews d the 
ao? 5 and Afcs. Pirote lenaceand garden. Fu^ 
equpped kiihen Beva.-?r penrides aaes 3 to 
vSlace ot C^kt.si. Parking 

Price from: sir. S9C,000.- 
ContucL Mary Moloney 
CMG SA 

SftffiGrantfflw- IflcfllfodiWH 
TfL-«l *21»962B0 OO-FacO ♦71.9636013 


PORTUGAL 


■ PitAgois ^000 acre Hjnch 

■ Eicciiori Kigrtwav m 

• Over 1 00 Coastal Pasf urns 

• 12 Homes ft Si mill'*! m Ecju-pmont 

• Caa- Fsotaw 

A.L. Salley Realty 

Tot 71-asm B4S8 USA 
Fav: 713040 885a USA 


Portugal 

PORT WINE REGION 1 


Fcrm ( 1 0 h. 3 ). I toil century Manor 
House !S6S sq.m.), rryupupose uses, 
prottuces bg'n quality Port Wine. 
Sutabte fer Housng and Agri-Tarism 
Pr^ed location. 

-**- ._F« 3 «S 351 . 1 . 4 S 773 I 1 ref: 0 Z 0 _. 4 I 


IlUERXmOiSAL 
RE\L ESTATE 
1VL4RKET PLACE 

appears esorj- FRIDAY 
Tn place and arivcrliscment 
cunlacl >i'ur nearest 
Inlcmatiunai Herald Tribune 
representative or 

Fred Rnnan: 

Tel.; Mf>J7.93.9! 

Fax; -lfiJ7.52.12 


: eve d'Cwci ■ m .1 c 5 -juC mc«cj 

T«L (33) 92 16 90 DO 


PANAMA 


PARIS, 16lh. AV0WE DtYUU. 

Dsdei. 5“ =r£ :+ ’mi [rsr rscrj, 

'<?£: ,-rcesis>n -oc-r, 4 preroews. 

jvr - .au.a , tdr- ooc rrtJQC 900. 

f. 1 0 ~ACe.V.fl;A- 0 £-» 5 T 


Pokrtid 3,000 Sq Ft Condo 

j ..•rl 4 - c-, 5 -wf iwm. 

I No_ -rasrae wered te cre«e ihe 
; wriiecr fcrvfy none - 5 6«*ooms, 
1 5 ec-.-irrti «*ofb»e harto. elegant 
| ewijiivng space, sunsawnal «j 1 hh 
km^en & speOacuiar deni 
I Lfhc Bateny 7 i'Z-€ 9 i- 7 tm 


MAGWWWT WATBWTONT Estate 

2100 acres pn/ar* 125 ace rjond 
beach house *• 2i mle pn»ate 
beach ■*■ 50C aces nrh trees. T At. 
RS. S3.8M. Owr»r. io -33-1-?!c9 
6197 . 


NEUltir SAINT JAMES, rcvnhng 
dcvo>e wng - bedroom. 66 sq.m v 
ar bwu 1 +;i yrsn carten, pcHang. 
T+i: fl] *5 67 47 J7. 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


PARS 17 R) - PLACE WAGRAM 

Unique 2-betfrottn apartment, bnj 

Irving, boaU. hmh floor. 100 sqm 
n an eicefort rajusvrxmart bidding. 
FF275D.OOO. 

PAHS 17 th - PORTE MAILLOT 


ii Cretan apamwtf, 145 klitl. hgh 

t. MceferT bv&inq. FfSj3S0.(X0. 


floor. 


nr. excettenr owwog. fMj 

PARS lfiMi - AVE FOCH , 


7/8 rooms, 240 Mae bg bwjg, ining 
10am, 4 looms, 2 baihroa 


roams, Ki^i flow, 
pnestignu buying SUKfohnat room 


in apltaa FF6J00fl0D 
TeL (33-l| 40 16 47 ‘ ' 


47 Fa. 40 16 47 14 


CHANTlir SECTOR (Beeatl 38 ferns 
Pons. 5 mins RBI, 30 rims ijxsWet on 

1,400 sam. ireed & willed land. 

"MABON DE MWIRT IBth century. 

m stone. 300 sqjn. Trying space, 65 

sqin. teaipnon with enormous foe- 

puoB, 21 StJJn. fined talchen. 5 bed- 
rooms, 3 badvnora, 4 ml ive 

garage, oorapitb <jme«e on garden 

level. 100 sam. terrace hang south. 
Luwriotn fittings. F 2700 . 000 . Tel 
Provinces 4421 9491 Far 4421 9760 . 


WEST OF PAWS - RESIDENTIAL 
15 rains from Etate. owner a-Hs 

M RUBL-MAIMA1SON CENTER 


OfMrtTOlf fl 


ground Hoot Wn private 


-- r POr k - 

hng, 3 bectaome, 2 bcnfoacvtB. 2 «ra 
2 partags. eetor. 


IWoM-nd use posable. FP2,400,000. 

42 58 < 


T* tH 


162 44 


8 th, COURS ALBERT IK 

Owner sells 700 sq.m- apartment 
■+ pmbng ft modi roans. 
Laoe reception crea. 5 bedrooms 
with btfhroomL To be redecorated. 
Tet 111 46 33 67 15 
foe (1)44 07 07 dJ 


16 th -PL MS ETATS UNIS 

4 th Hoof, 390 sq.m.. high aeftngs. 
4 . 

beavHh;l : 


l auKusdna reception vets, 
uhhtl view i bedrooms. 3 baifiv 


Owner To): (?) 45 0 ] 96 99 
Fas ( 1 ) 45 00 54 91 


MARAIS, near MUSEE PICASSO. 
Spooous 2 -hednwm apartmert. 63 
sqtn, 5 th flat*. ti»ge French wm- 

dowc, wooden paqvel. Sunny, qtws, 


lovely cowiyard, plew>4 open 

w. Full 


r UW11JVU, 

view, hd feitden with bakonr. rwv 
oarg». PoLrg possible. FFUWUOQ. 
Ujw fces. Oww tet^l 13 04 70 37 


ci in USA (513) 758 I 


OiAMPS-aYSSS-ETOHf 

Bbgntt ml ifonnwig op grtmem. 5 th 
float, bakony, terwa, 5 room + 
cellar erd nwos room. To be redeem. 
Fr4JOQ.OOO. 

JOHN TAY10B, Tet p) *5 53 25 25 


APARTMB 4 T te HOUftIES .108 s^n 
+ 55 sqJti- fort ate, iptwonj-i -new 
an Porn and Weir suburbs 
rR , 600,000 (bnyH LAf®. WEST 
Of PAHS, h leisure ocftvisics orea, 
650 Q sQjn. witi pennn far IKfowm 
KNaf. TONSTRUCTKX SOf«B- ie< 
m 39 6 B 66 03 te ll) 39 68 59 22 


TROCADHfO. HIGH OAK, 34 s^j. 


audio + btfiea bah. bafcmy- W 
... .. - 75 e 47 f Bme 


14 i“ 36 T 39 tj«w. 47 ! 75 e 47 l 


15th, PORTE DE VERSAILLES. sq.ni. 

?f». south -ver ejipasure. 3 d floor 

kit. at oomfort*. Prcfwtanal use pev 

site 3 rooms. Owner 1 -43502692 am 


PARIS 1 Mb, exceptional luxunoss 
house m exduM elegant location. 

garden, ter- ace parting, alt renewed. 

ready to movc-in. Cat |T| 42 30 73 8 5 


ST. GSUMW DES PRES. Vary high 

dass old buiking, oriainal top Roar 
apotnem, an gaden.Twoe kvma, 2' 
3 bedrooms. Tefrtl 42 22 7b 95 
AVE MONTAIGNE faring Hotel Pfcca, 

tewHy 3 -room flpi. about 80 sq.m Tap 
biAina. Tri- HI 47 20 56 03 mamnen 


PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE IPertMol) 
Dsnessed resakanci demopments foe 


sale Golf, Beachfront ft Busk prefects 
at all itenes of camplehon. 

PROFIT POTENTIAL 


EXAMPLE + 1 ruffian aqm tend 
«Mh pat mill for motor resort, tec 
gotf course, 144 romn hotel. 368 
-rffla -faxBtment unite. 5 year not 
pnaiectud profit US$ 20.3 M31 
10 war 54X7 MB. Price; US* 47M 


Projecn ham USS 1 MBten. 
Resident Rennite airaMe fer £ 

me inv ei tOTi/ e ie uilnmi t poops. K 

dewJoprnsnf grams jwehme posstele. 


Rkbcrd Neebendi Ida 
tieansed Property ConsMhmi 
M J3iljB9 399055 
For p5l) 89 399057 


SPAIN 


UMOUE MVE51M0iTl 
XVTIHfi CENTURY MAN5ION 

Ook to Fignorts, in Spain's most prrw- 
ledged selJmg, combuing the scenic 
beauty of the Northern Costa Brava 
with the snowcapped Pyreneev, the cuF 
mre (Dai's brrrtplax) with an exquarte 
gadronartry (If resnuranh rated * plus 
Bf MidtefaJ. 

Goff (9 AjA coinesj. equeslnan and 
(oert^riawhc tpo rts, etc 

Enjoyable n RS064CE or Ittnv 
tamable to Mi, O OK, CONVA- 
LESCENT HOME. BOARDING 
SCHOOL etc. 

8900 sqm. pneeity. 3000 sqm. mo> 
uon constructed around 1730 and can- 
hnuah presented 3 floors. Ground floor 
recently renovated a restaurant art 
geftery, 2nd floor renovated as main 
Irving qumteq, 7 be d rnews on 550 
sqm m 1910. 3rd floor pcrhcWy reno 
voted oe employees' quarrm Mognifl. 
cent patio and terrace of 180 sqm 
each Prvk. tfnhter. <nmaB. dOOL 
PropeffY _3^AKd at ^^^JOO.OOO. 
PncftUHTJOO.000 We ta owner. 
TBL and FAX: +34 73 45 39 72 


ANDALUSIA ■ ROWA 
bi Ested weo, ercepoonri kxrton over- 
laohng the Tqq Anddusnt furnished 
home, 6 rooms. 2 baths, J wra ces. 
patio, garden F2^00JX)0. U5S35D.000. 

Dwm tel IFonsh 03-11 48 81 86 70 


MADRID HK5H STANDING AREA 230 

sqm. lunry Hal farsefc 3 bertomm, 
2 balhracrm. mod's room, kege 
krtdten. AC poiing in fhe sane bsw- 
*m 24 hours seainly. Tet 1+3*1 T 
3 t 6 11 59 Fm, 1+34) I 319 Bl 15. 
COSTA BRAVA, audb with loggia. 
- sea. PF150 jO O ft Td. Fronce 
after 8pm Far 56335054 


DOUGLAS BUMAN 


CALIFORNIA ESTATE 

Situated b etween Son Dtrao/Los 
Angela in Nor® San Diego County. 

B500 sgft, 7 bedr oom-'9 Sdh, gone- 
room, orfiae. toms court, 6 ajr garage, 
24 haw guardgate, view. 2'i’ oaes. 
Private ft deauttfuf. 10 mmutas to 
worttldaB spa. No smog, no traffic. 
Exception^ votie at 31,48^000 
fcr color brochure contact owners. 

Tel/ tat 619/723-9271 USA 


NYC>' Steps Ofl 5rt 


HOUSE 


VRY SPECIAL MANSIONS 

36 limestone mansion. Recently 
renowied. 12jQOO sq ft 50' bnesione 
mmsioa 77 fits sq ft. 3 T Georjycn 
rnonaan. Other special woperbes by; 

MYSABOfigr 

21 2-891 -7093/Res. 212-772-7587 


DOUGLAS BJJMAN 


JAPANESE 1EMPI£ STYLE HOW 

with quest house. Grooausiy situated 
autede Cafctoga. GATomia Spctoous, 

16 roorro, tenoces, gardero and year 

round stream cm Iff oaes. Views of 




cadence, retreoi 

center or second home. 1 1/2 hours 

from San Franaxq $1.6001)00. 
Cbtf K. Kohmawte 516-267-3299 or 
| wror. 707 942 5862 USA. 

MIOTOWN MANHATTAN CONDO 


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French 

Country 

Properties 




bd 


Friday, June 24 


Par more information, 
or to place an ad, 
caU the JUT in Parts: 


Tel.: (1) 46 37 93 85 
Fax: (l) 46 37 93 70 


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International Herald Tribune, Friday, June 1 7, 1994 


Page 11 



THE TRIB INDEX: 111 

oonT^^ 009 ^ 6 !?^ Tri bune World Slot* Index ©, composed of 
SnKSSS 101 ?^- 1 Investab *s slocks from 25 countries, complied 
by Btoomberg Business News. Jan. 1 1992 = 100. 

120 



| North America 


Latin America | 

Approx Wfflghfing: 26% 
Owe gaga Prac 9332 

0 

222 

Appro. Mightfng: 5* BBBi 

Close: ihmptbvj tiiS4 




m 

Ip 


J F M A 

M J 

J F M A M J 


m 1«S IBM 1983 1994 

M Vftrtlnte 

The ratter trucks U.S. doB&r values at stacks Ik Tokyo, Mm York, London, and 
ArgteiUna, A ua tr o Ba, Awatrta, Mghon, Brad, Canada, Ohio, Onflow*, Hntand, 
Ranee, Oermony, Hong Kong, Maly, Mexico, Nrthori&nda, Nan Zealand, W o nway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden. Srtaa rt and and VdnezoMe. Foe Tokyo, New York and 
London, tfw Index is composed of Oie 20 tap issues In terms of maria* apBa/b oH on. 
oOtovoss Me ton top stocks am bached. 


1 Industrial Sectors 1 


It*. PWL % 

Horn dm change 


its. 

do* 

Pm. 

dm 

% 

dange 

Energy 

110.46 110JM +058 

CapM Goods 

113.79 

11426 

-0.50 

UOUM 

117.1* 118.74 -1.35 

fe* Mari* 

125.49 

12589 

-022 

Finance 

11622 11747 -MB 

Consuner Goode 

97J7 

96.31 

-035 

Services 

116.79 117.12 -028 

lEKefisvnn 

123,51 

124-88 

-1.10 

For mate WoimaBon about the Max, a booklet Is av&able bae a! charge. 

Write to Trib Index, 181 Avenua Charles da Gaufa. 9221 Nobly Codex. Francs. 


O International Herald Tribune 


Japanese 

Surplus 

Narrows 

Gap With U.S. 

Widened in May 

Compiled br Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan's trade sur- 
plus in May dropped to $6.54 bil- 
lion, the Finance Ministry said on 
Thursday, ending a five-month 
trend of rising surpluses. 

The customs-cleared trade sur- 
plus fell from $7.78 billion in May 
1993. 

However, Japan’s politically 
contentious trade surplus with the 
United Slates widened to an unad- 
justed $3.04 billion in May, from 
$2.83 billion a year earlier. 

Meanwhile, American and Japa- 
nese negotiators agreed Thursday 
to delay a decision on whether to 
continue the semiconductor trade 
agreement — one of the most visi- 
ble areas of trade friction — and 
occasional harmony — between the 
nations. 

A U.S. trade official said the 
American ride hoped to continue 
the semiconductor agreement until 
its expiration in July 1996, but Ja- 
pan is still reviewing its position. - 
The high yen helped dampen the 
growth of Japan’s exports by 
boosting the price of goods. 

Exports rose 4 2 percent in May 
to $28.07 billion from a year earli- 
er, while imports climbed 123 per- 
cent to $2134 billion. 

Exports to die United States in- 
creased fay 78 percent to $8.05 bil- 
lion and imports by 7.9 percent to 
$5.01 bflban. 

Imports from Asia were particu- 
larly strong, growing nice as fast 
as imports from the United States 
and the European Union. 

The semiconductor tulles empha- 
sized harmony following an an- 
nouncement earlier in the week 
that foreign semiconductors con- 
tinued to hold more than 20 per- 
cent of Japan’s market in the first 
quarter of 1994. 

Because it sets a 20 percent tar- 
get for market share, the pact is 
seen by the Clinton a dminis tration 
as a model for future “results-ori- 
enled” trade agreements. Many in 
Tokyo fed Washington has unfair- 
ly used the target to browbeat Ja- 
pan- (AP, Reuters) 


Cuba Dressing for Trade 

Latins See U.S. Embargo as Cold War Relic 


By James Brooke 

New York Times Service 

CARTAGENA, Colombia — Tailoring his at- 
tire to a changing foreign policy, President Fidel 
Castro of Cuba bas broken nis 35-year tradition of 
only wearing olive-green military uniforms in pub- 
lic and has appeared at a meeting with Latin 
America’s civilian heads of state here by wearing a 
white cotton guayabera shirt 

“We are all used to the general in olive green, 
and now he is in a guayabera,'’ commented C&ar 
Gaviria Trujillo, Colombia’s president and host to 
the annual Ibero-American summit meeting. “We 
think this represents a good change.” 

Mr. Castro looked slightly ill at ease in bis public 
debut in civilian d cubes, but it is generally as- 
sumed here that he donned (he loose shirt out of 
more than a desire to comply with his Colombian 
hosts' request for informality at this tropical beach 
resort city. 

Gradually emerging from decades of isolation in 
the Americas, Cuba over the last five years has 
tripled Latin America’s slice of its foreign trade, 
from 7 percent in 1990 to 21 percent today. 

With trade and investment growing steadily, 
Latin American leaders are increasingly open in 
their objections to the United States’ 32-year trade 
and diplomatic embargo of the Communist-ruled 
island nation. 

In an indirect slap at MS. policy, the leaders of 19 
Latin American nations ana of Spain and Portugal 
approved a communique calling for ibe elimination 
of unilateral economic and trade boycotts. 

The communique was a victory for Mr. Castro, 
who on Tuesday, as the summit meeting began, 
complained that “no one bas said a word about the 
criminal and unjust blockade that for more than 30 
years has been imposed on my country.” 

But blunt language in support of lifting the 
embargo was beard last week at a meeting in Brazil 
of foreign ministers of member nations of tbe 
Organization of American States. A Panamanian 
diplomat said the 1962 suspension of Cuba from 
the OAS as “a relic of the Cold War.” 


Calls for Cuba’s renun were heard from some of 
the organization’s most powerful members — Bra- 
zil, Canada, Mexico and Venezuela — as well as 
from most of tbe Centra] American republics. 

When the organization’s secretary-general Jo3o 
Clemente Baeaa Soares, received a standing ova- 
tion when he asked, “Hasn't tbe time come to re- 
admit Cuba to tbe Latin American, family?” 

The U.S. ban on business with Cuba costs U.S. 
companies $6 billion a year in lost opportunities, 
according to Representative Charles B. Rangel a 
New York Democrat. 

Mr. Rangel has sponsored a bill to lift ihe trade 
embargo, but President Bill Qmton has shown no 
signs of shifting policy on the issue. 

Meanwhile, companies in other nations are sign- 
ing deals with Cuba. Next week, Canadian offi- 
cials, who have described the U.S. embargo as 
“unhealthy.” are expected to announce a renewal 
of Canadian foreign aid to Cuban nongovernmen- 
tal groups. Aid was suspended in 1978 to protest 
Cuba’s military intervention in Angola. 

As in much of the Americas, Canada’s softer line 
toward Cuba reflects a steady growth in trade and 
investment since the collapse of the Soviet bloc five 
years ago. Last year, 130,000 Canadian tourists 
visited Cuba, accounting for 28 percent of the 
island’s total. 

This week, a Mexican company signed a $13 
billion deal to rehabilitate Cuba's decrepit tele- 
phone system. The deal dwarfs an additional $150 
milli on in Mexican investments that have been 
announced in the 1990s. 

Two weeks ago, Spain, which accounts for a 
quarter of Cuba's 100 joint ventures with foreign 
companies, signed an investment protection treaty 
in Havana. 

“We have been progressively strengthening our 
relations with the rest of Latin America,” Ricardo 
Alarc6n de Quesada, the president of Cuba's Na- 
tional Assembly, said. “There is important Mexican 
investment now. Brazil is buying medicines. Tour- 
ism is increasing, There are concrete opportunities 
for Latin American countries to invests 


Inflation Fears 
Undercut Dollar 
And Hurt Bonds 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Fears of tiring in- 
flation axe again rolled through 
Europe's financial markets on 
Thursday, propelling tbe dollar 
briefly to a new low for tbe year 
and pounding slocks and bonds. 

The dollar briefly feQ below 
1.6280 Deutsche marks, considered 
to be a crucial LeveL In early May. 
when the American currency last 
touched that level it prompted mas- 
sive central bank intervention — 
which was conspicuously absent 
Thursday. 

In spite of tbe dollar's weakness, 
analysts suggested that they would 
be surprised to see any central bank 
intervention. 

They noted that the moves that 
have occurred have come on ex- 
tremely low trading volumes and, 
crucially, that they have not been 
the sort of sharp and disorderly 
movements (hat traditionally gal- 
vanize centra] bankers into action. 

Government bond yields soared 
in Germany and stodcs dunged to 
new lows for the year in France as 
concerns about inflation, due to 
tiring commodity and oil prices, 
led institutional investors to dump 
holdings. 

Stock averages dropped in Italy. 
Spain, tbe Netherlands, Norway, 
and Switzerland. In France, the 
CAC-40 fell 23.58 points to 
1,942.81, its lowest Itvd since last 
July. 

In European bond markets 


where tbe swings have been far 
more volatile, analysts noted that 
they, too. have come on extremely 
low volume: 

Among the benchmark 10-year 
government bond yields, German 
returns rose to 7.13 permit from 
7.02 percent. French yields were up 
to 7.67 percent from 7.49 percent 
and British gilts rose to 8.74 per- 
cent from 8.60 percent. 

Few analysts see any prospect 
for a rebound in the dollar soon. 

“The dollar's downward moves 
are getting more and more sus- 
tained while its rallies are getting 
soggier and soggier,” said Malcolm 
Barr, a currency economist at 
Chemical Bank m London. “Its 
weakness is keeping European 
bond markets on edge:” 

Avinash Persaud, bead of cur- 
rency research at J.P. Morgan in 
London said the UJL currency 
could hit 1.60 DM as soon as the 
end of this month. 

“Its weakness is based on the 
fear that the Federal Reserve has 
monetary policy now set on neutral 
but that neutral is highly inappro- 
priate for an economy growing as 
fast as the United States,” ex- 
plained Mr. Persaud. 

Dollar bulls have been beaten 
into hibernation. At NatWest Mar- 
kets, tbe chief brad and currency 
strategist, Robert Thomas, hazard- 
ed the opinion that the dollar now 

See INFLATION, Page 12 


OPEC Delays Naming New Secretary 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

VIENNA — Ministers of the Or- 
ganization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries on Thursday failed to 
break a political stalemate over the 
choice of a successor to OPEC Sec- 
retary-General Subroto. 

Instead, they made Ihe OPEC 
president and Libya’s oil minister, 
Abdulla Salem Badri, acting OPEC 


secretary-general until their next 
meeting Nov. 16, delegates said. 

The secretary-genera), who is ap- 
pointed for three yams, is chiefly 
responsible for administrating the 
OPEC secretariat in Vienna. He 
often mediates between ministers, 
who set OPEC policy. 

The day-to-day work of running 
the secretariat office in Vienna will 
be handled by OPEC Governor for 


Libya. Ali Fituri, Mr. Subroto said. 

Tbe ministers bad reached a 
deadlock trying to choose between 
Venezuelan and Iranian candi- 
dates. 

Analysts said tbe deadlock re- 
flected old political rivalries be- 
tween Iran, winch sought the job 
for Hossdn Kazempour Ar debill a 
veteran Iranian OPEC delegate 
who is now ambassador in Tokyo, 


Gulf 


and its “moderate” Arab 
neighbors. 

Mr. Subroto is due to step down 
at the end of this month after six 
years of acting as OPEC's ambassa- 
dor worldwide. 

A proposal to change OPEC 
statutes to allow Mr. Subroto to 
stay on temporarily or for a third 
three-year tom wasn’t supported 
unanimously. 




'• MWBtfi': i.ai-ar- 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Many Can Learn From Soviet Downfall 


By Reginald Dale 

imonadontd Herald Tribune 

TT WASHINGTON— Why did the 
% \ / Soviet economy go down the 
drain? Now that Russia is 
T .▼ straggling to become a West- 
ern-style market economy, with tbe aid of its 
former adversaries, the question mi gh t seem 
of only academic interest 
- But there are still plenty of countries that 
can l eam from the Soviet Union’s downfall 
Most obriourfy they include developing na- 
tions stiflfirmly wedded to state mtovention 
and former Communist countries that have 
not completely forsaken their (rid ways — 
tndading Russia itself. 

More surprisingly, according to the au- 
thors of a new analysis published by tbe 
World Bank; they also include France; Aus- 
tria and East Asian higji performers like Sin- 
gapore, South Korea and Japan. 

The main thing these countries are all do- 
ing wrong is retymgfor growth on centrally 
p lanned capital accumulation — buSdzng 
more and more factories — rather than in- 
creasing the productivity of their workers. 
The study is by WHEam Easterly of the 
Weald Bank and Stanley! Fischer of the Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology, soon to- 
booome an IMF deputy man ag in g director. Jt. 
Iboksif Sow t&e Soviet economy turned from 
b«ng“thehope of the future” in the 1 950s to 

the; Indent case of today. 

-GwSbl. the Soviet Union’s size, its high 
levels of investment and education and low 
population growth, its economy should have 
grown stroogly from the 1960s through the . 
1980s, Instead, it was the “most underaduev- 
in the world, developing coun- 
tries - 


Sadty for admirers of Ronald Reagan, the 
study concludes that the increased Soviet 
defense spending provoked by Mr. Reagan’s 
policies was not the straw that broke tlx back 
of the Evil Empire. 

The Afghan war and die Soviet response to 
Mr. Reagan’s Star Wars program caused only 
a relatively snail rise in defense costs. And 
the defense effort throughout tbe period from 
I960 to 1987 contributed only marginally to 
economic decline. 

Other c au ses may have included demoral- 


Tbe key factor was the iaeffi- 
dent way the authorities invest- 
ed in capital equipment 


ization and a breakdown of discipline in tbe 
work force. Tie Soviet Union also had too 
many resources devoted to low-productivity 
agriculture and too few to services and trade: 

But the key factor was the inefficiency of 
capital investment. For all tbe resources the 
Soviets put into factories and machinery,, 
they got relatively fittte out In economic 
jargon, the Soviet Union bad att un usually 
high ratio of capital to output. 

As countries industrialize, they use more 
machines to perform tasks previously done 
by manual labor, enabling workers to become 
more productive. In the West, machines have 
generally replaced labor fairiy efficiently. 
thanks to rapid and flexible technological 
advances. A forklift truck, would be one ex- 
ample, a robot an even more effective one. 

Bor machines were an extraordinarily poor 


substitute for labor in the Soviet Union. The 
Soviet economy seemed to be constrained by 
technology that required almost constant 
proportions: one machine, one worker. 

During the 1950s, when not all workers had 
machines, return on capital was high. Giving a 
machine to a worker without one has a high 
payoff, and the payoff stays high as loag as 
there are workers without machines. 

Eventually, however, all tbe workers will 
have machines, and the return on additional 
machines falls to virtually nothing. What's 
needed is not just another machine but a 
machine pins a computerized inventory and 
distribution system. 

Bat rather than responding to market de- 
mands, Soviet investment came from above. 
Capital goods, like consumer goods, were 
limited to the narrow range of items that 
planners could direct and control — usually 
heavy machinery. 

So why didn’t the planners see what was 
going on in tbe West and wrier robots and 
computes? The planners, says Mr. Easterly, 
had limited information. Factory bosses 
knew more but had no incentive to correct 
their methods. 

But study that’s not what’s happening in 
countries like France and Austria and Japan 
and the Asian tigers? 

Not exactly, says Mr. Easterly. But they ail 
share the Soviet weakness of administratively 
directed investment programs and rising cap- 
ital-io-outpm ratios. 

The bad news for these countries is that 
diminishing returns from capital will eventu- 
ally lead to a slowdown in growth. Tbe good 
news is that, assuming their workers are more 
productive and their technology more varied 
than in the Soviet Union, they should be able 
to avoid the Soviet Union’s drastic fate. 


Ruling Frees European Car Market 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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**frti«etjr‘ JOB ' KMM*dMn 

"■so - Momr-rf** 


Key Money Rstss 


date p rev. firoatt 


Art 

3009 

7J3I 

ms* 

31.13 - 
214MZ 
04725 
UB 
■ 0277V 
1 S 775 


Pars 

in* 

IS 12047 
7M 

PUL pen . to) 
FBUDlWr 3306 

poaen* is*as 
nn.n* 195M0 
smdlrtno i»D. 
Step, t t-S32 


C t rreiiCT Hr* 
s. Afr.md 06392 
S. Kor. ««n OMO 

Swell amn 7X403 
Tahrans Z JSd 

Thai 90 25. tt 

TilUsIllIra 3H4S. 
UAEdirtnin 3473B 
v e n a. mat., mm 


recount rate 

3te 

SYS 

Book bow rate 

sw 

S'* 

PriMMU 

7W 

7V4 

Call maser 


4V. 

FMtentftewtf 

4U 

4 te 

l-montO intertask 

4 *1. 

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402 

403 

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5M) 

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470 

4 tr> 

iMerfaazdt 

s 

s>* 

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WMrTramrr MH 

4flf 

60S 

4.D 

409 

w-wwGm 

France 

IntenrcoMBn rate 

Call (BOOBY 
i-*w» Utertn* 
3-taastfe Interbank 
t-omn totnbaak 

16-war OAT 

L74 

no 

2-VW TTHsonr oote 476 

5-vtar Treustey dots 660 

T+torTWaarr arte W 

ttyearTfeaenroofe its 

SwrlMmiMd - 735 

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504 

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709 

760 

153 

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Ctefrear 



Sfrdav Odor into r 

1J39S6 13MS UBU 
HEL06 10203 10242 


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WnmthMtahan 
I mn-ifti intniTaatr 
1*4Mcr enrenmat band 


Mr Oder JMw . Contone 

.,XSf17. 1JW. UO Can-Man 

Uaa [ton win Joenesew 

r .lJW» U704 1J100 

UArmkzM; tndonmz Bern* 

^ooqo Presses Parts) r Bat* of 7okrt>rS*7u7.-7fr>n» r *— * fr O***** 
din. Ofher dnta&orn fioaHrsondAP. 



l* 

2 

2 

2* 

2D. 

421 

tsa 

5.10 

185 

5 HB 

£05 

7.13 


n& 

3 

It* 

2* 

421 

&Q0 

5JH 

5JQS 

£05 

£05 

urn 


Sources: Reuters. Bloomberg. Morrill 
Lynch. Bonk at Tokyo. CommertOank. 
GmanuoU Montagu. CrCsm Lvormots. 

Gold 



AM. 

PM. 

Ch-se 

zortch 

367.10 

38635 

+ 270 

London 

3S7.10 

38605 

+ 175 

ItewYor* 

Woo 

38750 

— 1J0 

U-S. dollars oar ounce. 

Loooan official fix- 

toes; ZtMTchandNgw York apewag and das. 


km prices: Now York Comes (August > 
Source: Praters. 


Bloomberg Business Neat 

PARIS — The European Court 
of Justice opened the door for low- 
er car prices for consumers, ruling 
Thursday that Peugeot SA cannot 
prohibit its dealers in France from 
buying Peugeols in other countries 
at considerably lower prices and 
reselling them in France. 

The ruling punches a hole in the 
protectionism surrounding Eu- 
rope’s car industry and will help 
erase price discrepancies across Eu- 
rope on consumers’ second-largest 
spending item. 

“Your gui feeling tells you this 
will set pressure on prices to come 
down,” said Philip Ayton. an ana- 
lyst at BZW Barclays de Zoeie 
Wedd. 

Swissair Said 
To Seek Deal 
With Sahena 

AFP- Exit I News 

ZURICH — Swissair refused on 
Thursday to comment on a report 
that it planned to acquire 49.5 per- 
cent of Sabena Belgian World Air- 
lines, including tbe stake held by 
Air France. 

The report was contained in an 
article to be published Friday in 
Cash magazine. Cash said it was 
given access to a “detailed secret 
document” in which Swissair set 
out the strategic importance of 
achieving control of Sabena. 

At no point in the document is 
the Belgian airline mentioned by 
name, the report said, adding that 
the codename “Flair" was used to 
identify Sabena. 

Swissair said it was noi its policy 
to “comment publicly on any pro- 
posals or recommendations" that 
“documents may contain." Repeal- 
ing an announcement made last au- 
tumn. Swissair said it was negotiat- 
ing with a number of European 
airlines — including Sabena — 
about strategic alliances. 

Tbe report in Cash said Swissair 
aimed to acquire a 49.5 percent 
slake in Sabena that would include 
Air France's 37.5 percent share- 
holding. This stake is held by the 
Belgian company Holding Finacta. 
of which .Air France owns 67 per- 

cenL 

It said Swissair aimed to acquire 
a further 12 percent stake in Sa- 
bena currently held by four finance 
companies controlled by the Bel- 
gian government 

Belgian government sources said 
Thursday that the report was plausi- 
ble and that Air France sought to 
“di s e n gage" from the unprofitable 
Sabena. They said Belgium did not 
object to Swissair as a partner as 
long as ihe government owned the 
largest stake. Belgium current iy 
bolds 61.8 percent of Sabena. 


The European Commission this 
month will propose roles that could 
partly unshackle Europe’s 58,000 
car dealers from manufacturers. 

For the past nine years, the com- 
mission has exempted carmakers 
from rules meant to promote a free 
market As a result, all carmakers 
have been able to tefl dealers where 
and what to sell and to largely re- 
strict them from selling more than 
one brand at a time. 

The ruling by the European 
Court of Justice, which upholds a 
lower court decision in December 
1991. allows dealers or middlemen 
in France to buy cars in bulk in 
Other countries, such as Belgium, 
and bring them back to France. 
Before the rulings, Peugeot had 


been able to dictate to its dealers 
the distribution and pricing of Peu- 
geot vehicles. 

Car prices often vary 20 percent 
or more from country to country. 
Much of that has to do with the 
sharp devaluation two years ago of 
the pound, lira and Spanish peseta. 
Thai gave car dealers a big incen- 
tive to go shopping fra bargains in 
those countries and bring the cars 
back to their home markets, where 
they offer lower prices and still 
increase profit margins. 


To subscribe in France 
just enfl, tofl free, 

05437437 


Interest Rates 
Put Pressure 
On Builders 

Tht Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — U.S. 
builders art construction of 
single-family bouses in May 
for the second straight month, 
reflecting apprehension over a 
slowdown in home sales due to 
rising interest rates. 

Analysts said rising rales will 
curb activity far the rest of the 
year. The benchmark 30-year 
Treasury brad yield has risen 
from 6.4 percent at the start of 
the year to more than 73 per- 
cent 

The Commerce Department 
said housing starts rose 2.6 
percent in May, to a seasonally 
adjusted 1J1 million annual 
rate, bat the growth was en- 
tirety in apartment buildings. 

Single-family starts, which 
represent 80 percent of hous- 
ing construction, slipped 0.5 
percent, to a 1.20 miOion rate. 
They had fallen 5 percent in 
April 

Sepa ra tely, the Labor De- 
partment said tiie number of 
Americans filing first-time 
claims fra unemployment ben- 
efits fell by 1 1,000 last week to 
a seasonally adjusted 348.000, 
lowest in nearly two months. 


M. 

BlancpaiN 



Tourfcllton 


Since 1735 there has 

NEVER BEEN A QUARTZ BlANCPAIN WATCH. 

And THERE NEVER WILL BE. 

* 

H 

TORIER 

J&W&M.CM &W4Tri<t.$ 


Fgg.g'S'Fg’* ’ WP- 3 d 3 5 3 B.d SPT W l s Jr r e tf “1 r K « 











\ ^ J" ;"-. i.-s^ . AII9M 


i l 


1 E 
1 s 
‘ ( 


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i^ige 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 


iARKET DIARY 


Market Advances 
In Hesitant Trade 


Compiled by Our Skiff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Stocks ended a 
lackluster day Thursday with a 
jump near the close that was tied to 
Friday's expirations of options and 
futures. 

Uncertainty about inflation kept 
the market off balance in light irad- 
ng much of the day. but in the last 
■alf-hour, more investors started 
positioning their holdings for the 
"triple witching hour." the quarter- 


lies. Stocks 


•y simultaneous expiration of stock 
iplions and stock index futures 
t.nd options. 

The Dow Jones industrial index 
ose 20.93 points, to 3.790.41. eras- 
ag most of the 24.42 loss on 
Wednesday. Gainers only slightly 
outnumbered losers and volume 
■:ased to 254,89 million shares on 
Thursday from 269.72 million 
shares from Wednesday. 

Share prices were also jostled by 
bond prices, which initially moved 
down and later rallied as traders 
weighed new U.S. economic data. 
Reports early in the session gave a 
pessimistic view of inflation, but 
the outlook later on was more opti- 
mistic. The yield on the 30-year 
U.S. Treasuiy bond closed at 7.36 
percent, down from 7 J9 percent on 
Wednesday. 

The Commerce Department said 


early in the day that U.S. housing 
starts rose 2.6 percent in May de- 
spite relatively high mortgage rates 
that had restrained construction a 
month earlier. 

A separate Labor Department 
repon snowed first-tirae claims for 
unemployment benefits dropped to 
the lowest level in nearly two 
months, fanni ng inflation fears 
that had arisen on Wednesday due 
to a surge in prices of grains, crude 
oil and other commodities. 

But the inflation jitters eased as 
commodity prices pulled back. The 
Commodity Research Bureau’s in- 
dex. a popular inflation gauge, de- 
clined after advancing by an un- 
usually large amount Wednesday. 

Exxon rose l 1 * to 58% after fall- 
ing 5% over the first three days of 
the week. Goldman Sachs added 
the stock to its “recommended” list 
after the decline, which began 
when a federal jury decided Mon- 
day that the company acted reck- 
lessly in the nation's largest oil spill 
five years ago in Alaska. 

The oil sector was broadly stron- 
ger as the price of crude neared a 
12 -month high. 

Hasbro feU 3 to 28%. The toy 
maker's shares opened 10 percent 
lower as the company said it ex- 
pects second-quarter’ revenue to 
fall as much as 15 percent from a 
year ago and wipe out its earnings 
for the period. f AP. BloombergJ 


INFLATION: Dollar Undercut 


Continued from Page 11 
at least seems to be at the bottom of 
its trading range. 

“But people have been saying 
that for quite some time and they 
have not been seen as being very 
clever," he added. 

Analysts see two problems with 
the dollar. 

• They fear that American inter- 
est rates are beaded up, and point 
cut that that has dried up the de- 


this time has lagged far behind the 
world's other traditional safe haven 
currency, the Swiss franc. 

In New York, the dollar steadied 
off its lowest levels as support 
points held, particularly against the 
mark and Swiss franc, causing 
dealers and funds to take profits on 
short-dollar positions, dealers said. 

The dollar continued to be un- 
dermined by perceptions that rela- 
tive weakness in the U.S. economy 


ASJccioMd Preu- 


The Dow 


Daily dosings of the 
Dow Jones industrial average 



B J F M' A M J 
1993 • . • 19M 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own hkiH lm Lost Chg. 


inous ir?5is JOiUJ Jtsjjj jomxj -70.ro 
T-ans I6J-U1 !«' <5 1<X3 30 1661X5 - 25*0 
util !&?! I6AI4 1M 68 IW.95 — 1JI 
Como U17 54 1270.77 1317.79 1328.97 -9*3 


Stendard & Poor's Indexes 


Industrials 
Tran to. 
Utilities 
Finance 
SP 500 
SPlOQ 


Ht9h Low Clare Ch'oo 
537.06 534*9 £1746 +2.19 
41.10 3*647 4140 +4.14 
157 J2 15*48 157X2 +0.10 
<4.76 44 J7 —0.19 

0.93 <59.80 461.9] + 1J3 
42SX9 <78.71 +3.19 


NYSE Indexes 


High Low Lost Qm. 


Comowlc 

industrial 

Tronso. 

Utility 

Finance 


254 9? 253 M 754.99 -0.85 
313.54 31 1 .50 313.56 -1.67 
35197 20 09 251.97 - 2J3 
208 0J 207. S3 208.70 — 0.'J 
319 55 H8*9 218.93 —0.40 


NASDAQ Indexes 


HIT 


NYSE Most Actives 



VoL 

Man 

LOW 

LOSt 

019. 

Hanson 

111517 

19 V. 

10 

19% 


Exxon 

40481 

sait 

57% 

58% 

-1% 

SFPGldn 

34771 

ure 

14*1 

14% 


Enlorav 

31706 

366', 

26"+ 

36% 

—7% 

iniCcme 

79122 » 

19% 

19% 

— % 

RJHNi* 

27970 

51k 

3% 

5% 

- Vi 

GnMair 

36303 

54% 

53*u 

50% 

— % 

TrtMex 

23771 

59% 

58% 

59% 

-% 

Mkrrcs 

7TB73 33*6 

34% 

35 


PeuslC 

01376 

33% 

31% 

31% 


Camaoas 

71173 

3Kb 

33*< 

34 

—Hz 

GcnEis 

18468 

47% 

47% 

47% 

-% 

PhiUWr 

17BST 

5T% 

30% 

SO% 

-% 

US Sura 

17708 

74'.. 

72". 

73'. 

- 1 % 

Kmorl 

16306 

15% 

15% 

15% 

- 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


APwrCvs 
Micstt & 
NotrBi s 
Chinoln i 
Novel) 
Cotrcos 
AST 

IDS Cm S 

Intel 

AiWleC 

MCI s 

Oracles 

3Com 

ascos 

LDOSs 


vol. 

Utah 

Low 

Lost 

OlB. 

75383 

19 

17% 

18V. 

-1 

30004 

s*v. 

53 V.- 

53fi, 

— 1 rt'|| 

27701 

0% 

7 1 i 


- ’■ 

05730 

4% 

J 

*>.'. 

1.4 

74364 

16% 

15% 

I6l* 

... 

34549 

14'. 

13% 

li'a 

— H 

03252 

IS 

13*4 

14 

— l 1 t 

308M 

9% 

9 

?% 

» 1 i 

70)30 

60% 

60 

60's 

—“, A 

19309 

07k-j 

36% 

76% 

—Vu 

19040 

34% 

n% 

Jl'/„ 

1 i’l0 

IBOOB 

37V, 

36% 

37% 

— — * *8 

17357 

46% 

44% 

45’i 


17036 

23 

74V, 

24'"., 

1 , A 

isn* 

16% 

15% 

>5% 

a* 


Foreign Exchange 


may delay further tightenine by the 
Fed 


mand for U.S. bonds and the dol- 
lars to pay for them. 

• Secondly, foreign exchange 
traders continue to fear Lhat Wash- 
ington Is still prepared to use a 
weak dollar to put pressure on the 
Japanese government to reduce its 
massive trade surplus. 

Any failure of the current round 
of trade talks that are due to reach 
some conclusion by the time of the 


Naples summit meeting of the 


Group of Seven in early July could 
send the dollar crashing from its 
present 103 yen to the dollar level 
through the 100 yen level, analysts 

Not even the threai of a military 
confrontation with North Korea 
has been sufficient to push the dol- 
lar higher. 

Normally the beneficiary of any 
iocalled flight to safety, the dollar 


and not produce the interest 
rate differentials investors had ex- 
pected. 

European nations, on the other 
hand, are experiencing solid 
growth as they come out of reces- 
sion, leading investors to conclude 
that the easing cycle on the conti- 
nent has been slowed or even fin- 
ished. 

Dealers said they are still wary or 
new developments on the Korean 
peninsula, and this market concern 
has been the primary reason for the 
dollar's strength against the yen. 

The dollar closed at 1.6322 DM. 
down from 1.6359 DM Wedne$- 
day.^and at 103.335 yea, up from 

The British pound was at 
S 1 .5200. down from $1.5212 on 
Wednesday. The dollar weakened 
to 1.3708 Swiss francs from 1.3722 
and to 5.5658 French francs from 
5.5540. 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoL 

HWl 

Lew 

Lesi 

aig. 

HOtbro 

4014) 

79V. 

2B’> 

28% 

— Vw 

ExnLA 

75ff 

I'm 

1% 

v<„ 

te. 

Viac wtC 

7029 

1% 

l*n 

1% 

■ T j 

Nabors 

4985 

7 

6% 

7 

- 1 « 

vfaanrf 

4876 

4% 

i"4 

6% 

— '7 

EChoBov 

4471 

101. 

10% 

10% 

— ' | 

VtacB 

4299 

31 

30% 

31 

- 

TumB B 

4278 

19% 

19 

19% 

- 1 A 

Vlaflw 

4206 

30% 

2*M. 

J0% 

- *■ 

CheyShs 

3915 

17% 

16V, 

16% 



Httft Low Lest an. 


Composite 7X4.84 733*4 7K.74 —I.IO 

Industrials 7*5X3 744.43 745.19 — 058 

Honks 761.94 759.54 761.94 -0.14 

insurance 72142 91735 97148 - 1SH 

Finance 951.45 ,J, - W ,50i0 ~ 2ja 

Tronso. 699.91 £4*(S 696,83 — J.1I 


AMEX Stock Index 


High Low Las Ora. 
*41 43 «071l 441.77 —0.50 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


70 Bond* 

10 Utilities 
10 industrials 


Close 

«&S7 

9JA8 

10166 


Cir’se 
+ 0.12 
+ 002 
+ 021 


NYSE Diary 


Osh PTtv, 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Twal issues 
New+fgns 
New lows 


IISJ 


9*7 

1168 

7J4 

49B 

7644 

2816 

44 

39 

43 

35 


AMEX Diary 


Ctass Prev. 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 
Total issues 
Hew Highs 
New lows 


303 363 

306 KM 

723 299 

632 32o 

IB 19 

18 IO 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


Oosa Ptav. 
1439 1587 

1601 1529 

2X3 1925 

SQ43 5W1 
68 116 
107 100 


Market Sales 



Today 

Prev. 


4 Rjn. 

cans. 

NYSE 

254X5 

J27JJ99 

Annex 

18X1 

18786 

Naidaa 

22747 

2*5392 


Spot Commodities 


Commodify 
Aluminum, lb 
Coflee. Brer. 10 
Cooper eledrolrltc. ID 
iron FOB. ion 
Lead, It) 

Silver, trov ea 
Sirei (scrap), ion 
Tin, lb 
Zinc, lb 


Today 

0443 

1.1B 

1.15 

21X00 

OJe 

5465 

1W.33 

3.7538 

04733 


Prev. 

0637 

1.18 

1.16 

71X00 

0J6 

5305 

134-33 

3.7729 

04?®* 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Close 

Bid Ask 
ALUMINUM tHloh Grade) 
Dalian per 

Soot 1416t!0 14TJ.M 

ES?K d HCATHODe5®« 

Forward 741 7X0 241000 

LEAD 

Idjgnpermtmcfi 

FSimra 5RX0 *5100 

NICKEL , . „ 

Forword WW W *485X0 

TIN 

^Mnpern^jw. 
zfMKpedor H WHO rode) 

Oounn. per 

Forward IOOOW 10KM 


Previous 
Bid ASk 




Law 


CMOM 


I4SMV 1404 30 
143X50 T434X0 
Grad*) 


3377.00 337X00 
239500 239600 


CAC 40 (MAT1F1 

F , ~1§fis8 sss m 

& H H ssss 

StR mt 1 071 30 --t-ZLSO 

Ev !*t: «- t - 

EsLuamme: 30391. Oaw tot; «7K 


52X50 521 JO 
538*0 535^0 


EB.W3IUTOC. 

inti Petroleum Exchange. 


634X00 63SM3C 
*441X0 644X00 


556000 557000 
16*000 565100 


Industrials 

High low LfiSt soft* orwe 


974410 97X00 

mjn 1600 M 


Financial 


High Lew Close Change 
3JKONTH STERLING fUFFE) 


Jdl 

*» 

tlP 

oa 

N«rr 

CM 

Jon 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 


igu» 15X00 157 J5 JS7J5 +A» 
{ro® ufijjo 159 JO ISMS 


M SI 


M 1^5 + ss 

pr ^ ^ S ^ 

E*!.yolwme-21.MB. Ocwi W. «&*< 


tSOMOO ■ pt» W 100 PCt 

sea 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 

scp 

Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
S«P 


DK 

Mar 

Jun 


94.4) 
9X85 
9116 
915* 
92.00 
9IJ7 
91JS 
n sa 

90J5 

9063 

9Q40 

9023 


94J3 
9X34 
910* 
9241 
9136 
91J9 
VI JB 
9041 
9066 
9047 
9023 
9012 


9445 —012 

9176 — B.1B 

9107 -020 
9246 — BJ22 
91.95 — 021 
91J0 — 022 

91.18 -023 
9095 —024 

9074 —024 

90J5E -0.17 

903* —019 

9M9 —ora 


I 

I BHEJfT CgUO EO'L l lP ^ 


abb 

Sea 

oa 

NOV 


pjjn 

94X9 

9*89 

94.17 

94.16 

9*16 

9195 

9195 

9191 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9X62 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9140 


95JH —ax i 
94J1 —041* 

94J3 —006 

94.14 -aw 
93X4 —0X9 

93X7 —017 

9341 —axe 
9119 —0X9 

6X01 — oxa 
9X76 —0.15 

9X6* —014 


Esf. volume: 79X36. Open Int; * 550X37. 
VMONTH EURODOLLARS tLIFFEJ 
si million -ots of 100 pci 
5et> 

Dee 
Her 
Jim 

Up •*. a. ..... - — - 

Est. volume: 170 Open Int: 5481 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS tLIFPE) 
dm i miniMi ■ gfs of ire get 
Sap 95X6 9000 

Mgr ^ 

B ^ as 

Dec 9342 9156 

Mar 9343 9X37 

Jun 9X31 9X15 

DK 6X05 92X0 

Mar 92-Afl 7T&5 

jan 92X2 9X51 9248 — 0.W 

Est. volume: 118X58. Ooen Ini.: 87&9A1 
3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF) 

FF5 million - ptl Of IBS PCI 
sea 9449 9443 9443 —0X9 

Dec 9*26 94.16 94.17 —0.13 

Mar 9194 6X8* 9X85 —115 

Jon 9X50 9148 9150 — aii 

Sep 9129 9122 9X21 —0.16 

Dec 9SJ7 72-99 »100 -X17 

Mar 6X90 92JB 6X70 —MB 

Jun >169 9X60 62-60 -020 

E si. volume: 72.149. Open bn. : 174X47. 
LONG OILT (LIFFE) 

00X00 - PN A 32nds Of 100 pet 
Jan 101 -10 100-23 101415 —0-23 

Sep 100-11 99-10 99.K -o-ffi 

Dec N.T. NT. 98-29 -C-3 

Est. volume: 67,281. Ooen mt.: 13.104, 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
dm mm - Pt* of IBS PCI 
Sep 9148 90X0 9127 —0X3 

Dec 90J0 90.40 9064 —043 

Esi. volume: 209411 Ooen Int: U2J9C. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. EONDS (MATIFI 


i « BS M 

- IS l*S m3 wS +«■» 

Est. volume: 33,12*. open int. 126423 

him Low Lost 5et1I* Ore* 


Jon 

Feu 

MOT 

Apr 


Dividends 


Falcon Products 
Gold Fields SA 
Granite St Bkshra 
JHancoc* Into 
jHancock lnv 
Merifrust FeaSov 
Pcdftc GuH 


Par Aral Pay 
IRREGULAR 

- JUS 7-1 


401 6-24 

XB 6-27 
- JO 6-24 

. 42 6-24 

. .10 7-1 

. 39 7-35 


7- 15 

8 - 11 
7-7 


6- 30 

7- 11 

8- 15 


Washington MuTlnv 


_ X4 6-17 6-70 


XrOPPrax onrnouot Per ADR. 

STOCK SPLIT 

CapocltKJS Incl tor 10 raven* sallL 
INCREASED 

PeoptesHohj Q 24 6-24 

INITIAL 

_ JO 6-30 
. JM 6-20 

REGULAR 






uudcnvrmog and oenvau^a 
as asset secmitiaation, be said- 

Scripps 

NEW fOKX (AP) — In *o?®® 

H.W. Scripps Co. saki T lnlIS<ia A ] +S 

Baltimore. Phoenix, Amona.awlTMpa.1.- . - . 

in a 1 0-year station affibaaOT ^ ^ ABC 

ABC, CBS and NBC t- - . \ 

Loral Pension „ 

NEW YORK (Rmien) —Lora) c ^* p -^ aid 

diswunl to the market price oa June 
purchase were agreed. 



:atS36adiaiRx" 




07 inaust 
Fst Family Bk 


7-15 

74 


FFSOaOOO - PN Of 1M act 

11X96 114X2 —1X8 


SCP 11444 11X96 ---- 

Dec 11340 11118 11X12 —1X8 

Mar 11X56 11246 112X2 —1XS 

Jun N.T. N.T. N.T. Uncn. 

Est. volume: 79&88X Ooen lm.: OlASX 


Stock Indexes 


High 

FTSE 100 (LIFFE) 
(25 ner Index point 

LOW 

ante 

Change 

Jun 3Q35X 

3013.0 

39215 

-165 

Sep 30*5.0 

3324X 

3535X 

— 19X 

Dec N.T. 

N.T. 

30*15 

— 185 


Am Can Cocnstk 
Am Cm Ea inco 

AmCaoCTB 

Am Coo Harbor 
Castle cv 
Central MrtnaPwr 
ConenASirer 
Donaher Cam 
Enron Uaulas 
Ftdeiltv NaH Flni 
Fst Fin Bcstn Polk 
SBC Boncora 

Hudson Foods A 

Insttyform East 
Kimball Inti dB 
Ubertv Term 99 
Liau) Box Carp 
Measure* Coro 
H e we ar Inc 
Northoay Fm 
Old Second Braicsrp 
Perkins Family 
Reikjbie Ulna OA 
5ei toman Ottv 
S*( roman Select 
Share® Med Srs 
Singer Ca 

Souttiestn Mdt Gas 
Taubman Cits 


■nf ra» 

ini fTTTvTTWuyj 

Urrtv Natl 8k B Tr 



Est. volume: 3XS87. Ocen bit.: 61X0. 


cMRoasl; g-garatte hi Canadian Amis; 
monthly; o-qgartertv; s^eaiHHtmri 



OUR READERS 


MIAMI (Bloomberg) — Florida West Airijnes fef 
chief executive resigned from the trended cargo earner, coa^aetetg 
bo mfriiftining of top manfl^ement. . ■ . . 

The carrier said Thursday that Maniy Jbsqjfr had res^ied ta^tioto-^ f 
other outside business interests,” effective immediately. " ^ ^ 

James Hefden brand, vice preademt, will serve a& mterim cfakx^ecB^. ^ . 
live until Richard Haberly, the new presdent. adds theGEG - 

audited financial statements are Ska with the Securities and ttcatage ^ : - 
Commission. The company is interviewmg cawfidate fot^BnKian. ^ ' 


■ j* 

i 


IN GREAT BRITAIN 


It's 


never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Just call toll-free: 


* g — — 7 . A-l — &■; 

NEW YORK (Reuter) —Apple Computer ba. said Thursday tha I0B : ' 
software application programs developed specifically for its sen 
Macintosh family of personal computers were being dripped. • 
The applications represou a range of software ^cat^cxies, 
publishing, education, multimedia, technical markets and entertainmentr^ 
Apple said. . 

Honda American Reports Rise 

TORRANCE, California (AFP) — The Japanese automaker Hotrdt v .. 
was the top exporter of North American-made cars in the fira qaarter'cC .?>. 
1994, an industry group said Thursday. ’..... 

The American Automobile Manufacturers Assoaatkxi&nd tbarAinen^ 


can Honda exports rose 51 pocem from the 1993 quarter, ® 24377 
The association said the vehicles made at Honda's plants in Ohio! atittf 


0 800 89 5965 


Ontario, r^nnda, have become top sdlera in Japan ^d-Emope: ; -v, - 

For the Record 


Maersk Air of Denmark has placed eight firm orders for Boeing 737s / 
and hopes to buy an additional six planes, the SeattiCrb^sed aerospace 
company said. The order from Maersfc Air is worth between ^78 raflfion 
and S332 ouDion, not including options. ..... ' ^ (4?) 

Woofwortfa Owp. ptais to open 479 speaafty ^oras in Chief 
Executive Officer WiBiam Lavin said at the company’s annual meeting. 

. f2?A*i!ii^iergJ 1 


i -• 
( 

i : 


. u*: 
i * 

i - 


4 


. 2**i 

I r- 


^@RLO STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Season Season 
-figii ijw 


Hhgh Low Close OiQ OpJnt 


Agence Firawe Prvsw June 16 

Clare Prav. 


| fla Ai l o om ed P/n» 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
Ahold 
Akio Nobel 
AMEV 

Bols-W reson on 

CSM 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Fokker 

Gl5l-Brooodre 

HBG 

Hefnefcen 

Hnogovens 


59 JO 


SO 


96.10 96JS0 
4&S8 47.10 

206.70 209 J3 
71 JO 7X10 

39.10 3M0 
6540 6620 


SEL 

Siemens 

Thy seen 

Vorta 

Veba 

VEW 

Vloo 

Volkswagen 

wwia 

□AX Index. 


1200 12740 
1652D 


16240 
15.70 15X0 
47.10 4ai0 

ha si 

27940 21X31 
71 JO 71.70 


Hunter Douglas 73.70 7*J0 


1HC Caland 
Inter Mueller 
Infl Nederland 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 
Nrdlknto 
Oce Grtnfen 
PokhOed 
Philips 
Polvorom 
P.obeco 
Rodatnoo 
Rallnco 
Ror onto 
Royal Dutch 
Stark 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VNU 


36.ro 3tm 
EO B2 
77 JO 7B. 70 

50.10 5140 
4SlW 47 
49J0 50.10 

67.10 6BJ0 

73 74 

*7.40 4SJ0 
5140 5240 
7120 76 

11X40 119.10 
5840 5840 
12IL50 121 JO 
0840 BBJD 
19B30 19X90 
46.70 47.10 
191JO 19X00 
50X0 51X0 
17X50 17450 


Amer-YMvma 

Enso-Gutzelt 

Huntamakl 

K.O. P. 

Kymmene 

Me Ira 

Nokia 

Pah lola 

Repola 

Stoctanonn 


WotterVKluwer 10940 1HJB 


previous : 


Brussels 


Almanll 

Artwd 

Boreo 

BBL 

Bekaert 

CBR 

CMS 

CNP 

CoGkerlll 

Cabepa 

CoJruvt 

Detaaize 

Electrabel 

Elect raltaa 

GBL. 

Gevaert 

Ctaverbel 

IfflmoM 

Kredletbonk 

Mmraw 

Pelroflna 

Powerfln 

Reaicel 

Rayale Betoe 

Soc Gen Banaue 


7690 7700 
ASM 4600 
2190 2180 
6S3S 4170 
25000 25125 
12300 12400 
2348 WOO 
2150 2150 
183 186 
57*0 5850 
7570 7560 
1356 1364 

5740 5770 
3725 3725 
4410 »40 
¥128 9120 
4700 4800 
3000 3745 
6650 6740 
1570 1575 
10400 10500 
3050 JlflS 
502 502 

5140 5210 
8260 8260 


SocGenBMalaue 2 M® Z274 


Sot l no 
5 oJwjv 

Tessenderte 
Trade del 
UCB 

Union Min I ere 
WOOonsLHs 


15100 1532S 
15025 151 00 
1 0)00 1 0275 
9880 9880 
24100 24175 
2650 X65 
7010 NA. 


Frankfurt 

AEG 174JS0 176 

Allianz Hold 2396 2 m 

Altana 62067750 

ASkO HUB 1023 

BASF 299 302 

Bayer 354J0 356 

Bay. Hypo bank 42742750 
Bay Vereinsbk 
B6C 

BHF Bank 
BMW 


455 459 

660 670 
39039350 
776 783 
325 327 

239 241 

727 732 


Conti 

Daimler Benz 

OeauSOO 485 480 

Df Babcock 719X0 224 

Deutsche Bank 733X07*050 
Oouatas 540 S50 

Dnodiwr Bank 380 381 

FeidmueMe 305 297 

F Knigp Hoescl) 2142163 
Harpener 328 340 


Henkel 

Hochtlel 

Hwcftst 

Hatzmam 


IWKA 
xolisatz 
Karst adt 
Kaufliaf 
KMD 

Ktoeakner Wert* 
Linde 
Luflhanaa 
MAN 

Mamesmann 
Mataltoeseii 
Muendi Ruedt 
Porsche 
Prelaw® 

PWA 
RWE 

Rhelnmeigll 


4QX945D5D 
297 NA 


dose Prey. 


-JM 380 
661.1066950 
200 50 283 JO 
306 310 

49X50 S07A0 
378 382 

461.50 464 

450 452 

916 «5 


F. 

Previous 




Helsinki 


124 126 


39^ 39 JO 




178 172 

11 10X0 
1W 110 
169 169 

406 *00 

67 68 

8SJ0 8650 
215 210 


Prr*len: 


Hong Kong 

35 3550 
11.10 11 


Bk East Asia 
Pacific 
, Kona 

Ina Light Pwr . 

jinr Farm Inn iojo iojq 
H ang Lung Dev 13 1130 


37 
41 JS 


Hang Seng Bank 
Siendstrson 


Land 


HK Air Eng. 

loGas 


5250 5350 
3850 4QJ5 
42 4X50 
15JD 15A0 

24.10 34.10 
20J0 TDM 

22 22J0 
85 85 

12 1X10 

15.10 15.10 
1X80 13X0 


HK China . 

HK Electric 
HK Land 
HK Realty Trust 
HSBC twangs 
HK Shang Hits 
HK Telecomm 
HK Ferry 
Hutch Whomnoa 31-75 30 

Hyson Dev 20.70 2140 

Jardbie Math. 

Jortflne sir Hid 

Kowloon Motor 
Mandarin Orlenl 10.90 11 

Miramar Hotat 21 JO 2150 
New WarW Dev 
5HK Proas 
Slelux^ 

Swire Poe A 
To! Cheung Pros 11.90 11X0 
TVE . 159 XSD 

Wharf Hold 29 JO 29.90 
Wing On Co Inti 11 JO 114a 
Wlnsor ind. 1150 11J0 
Hcre^ta^:^ 


5850 57 
29 JO 2950 
KM 1450 


23X0 24 JO 
4775 4950 
3 JO 3J8 
99 59 


Johannesburg 

AECI 
Aifech 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Biyvoar 
Battels 
De Bens 
DrlefdnMn 
Genov 
GF5A 


HtahveM Start 
Kloof 

Nedbank Grp 
Randtantafn 
RuJPtaf 
5A Br 


5A BitoWS 
St Helena 
ISasol 

western Deep 


2350 26 

123 m 

342 244 

30 3850 
9 9 

48 47 

11&50 118 
6550 64 

UJO 11X0 
11811850 
KJO 24.50 
2750 28 

5550 5*JS 
33 33 

4350 41 

99 9750 
95 95JS 
44 44 

2&3S 2525 
187 179 


Composite index : 
Pnrefaas : B37JH 


; 57677* 


London 


Abbey Natl 

*23 

*28 

Allied Lyons 

in 

573 

Aria Worths 

V2 

274 

Arewi Group 

252 


AnBitt Foods 

US 

S.1B 

BAA 

0J9 

9J5 

BA* 

4X5 

472 

Bank Scotland 

1X7 

1X8 

Barclays 

5X4 

839 

BBSS 

115 

520 

BAT 

*10 

*14 

BET 

1.16 

1.18 

Blue Circle 

176 

2J2 

BOC Group 

7J3 

7X3 

Boats 

5J3 

uo 

Bowatnr 

*53 

449 

BP 

*06 

*05 

Brit Airway* 

3X7 

4 

Brit Gas 

0 XB 

172 

Brit Start 

136 

U6 

Brff Telecom 

173 

172 

BTR 

Itf 

3X5 

Cable Wire 

*32 

440 

Cadbury Sen 

*44 

440 

CeatsVIvelki 

113 

2X3 

117 

U4 

Comm union 

5.17 

lie 

Caurtoulds 

5X5 

5X8 

ECCGrot* 

123 

151 

Enterprise Oil 

4 

190 

Eurohmnrt 

105 

m 



Close Prev. 


1*4 

149 


ZJt 

ZJ6 

GEC 

3X2 

3,B7 


5*8 

550 

Glaxo 

579 

5X6 

Grand Met 

422 

428 

GRE 

1.74 

1X3 


4X4 

4*8 

GUS 

SJS 

5.77 

Hanson 

HlUsdown 

2.52 

1*3 

«s 

HSBC Hides 

778 

722 

ICf 

77 6 

7XO 


4J9 

4*3 


5X3 

512 

Lodbroke 

1X2 

1*4 

Land 5ee 

676 

S 


7X2 


140 

1.+3 

Lego) Gen Gre 

*38 

*43 

Lloyds Bank 

857 

5*8 


*11 

*11 

MEM 

423 

*27 

Natl Purer 

*30 

*32 

Notwcrt 

*76 

*72 


4AS 

4X3 


623 

620 

P&O 

629 

640 

Pllklngtan 

177 

179 

PowerGen 

4.92 

*W 


3 

0X8 

RonkOrg . 

3X9 

3X8 

Rackitt Cal 

5X41656 



15W 

Redland 

*68 

*91 

Rood mu 

815 

819 

Reuters 

420 

*76 

RMC Group 

814 

846 


7X9 

1X8 

Rath rim limit) 

4 

*06 

Koval Scot 

*23 

411 

1 II ■ 

855 

870 


4X1 

3X6 


5.18 

5.15 


3*2 

3*4 

1 

1.18 

121 


5.10 

7.13 

520 

7.12 


545 

1X1 

5X2 

7-5? 

SmlthKIlne n 

*18 

*19 

Smith fWH) 

*87 

4X1 


113 

327 

Tate * Lyle 

4JU 

*J» 


JM 

7.19 

Thorn EMI 

10X2 

10X2 

Tomkins 

228 

228 


224 

123 


10X9 

10X8 

UW Biscuits 

325 

326 


5.10 

5.12 


41 

4147 


6X8 

6.17 

Whitbread 

5X0 

541 

Williams Hdgs 

3X2 

3X4 

Willis Carraon 

1X4 

1X5 


| Madrid 


BBV 

3060 

3125 

BCD Central HISP. 

2710 

2745 

Banco SanfoKter 



Banesto 

1055 

1B®1 

CEPSA 

3100 

TWO 


2090 

2190 

Enddsci 

8W0 

6730 

Era-os 

255 

255 

Iberdrola 

966 

973 

M 

Tabocaiera 

4000 

3600 

41)3 

Tatetonlca 

iwa 

1050 

^SSZWS? 

i: 811X9 


Milan 



Son Paolo Torino )CW 9980 
SIP 4U0 4255 

SME 3945 3930 

Snln 2330 2390 

Stand* 3TO00 38000 

Slat 5130 5228 

Taro Assl Rise Z7*00 30300 




Montreal 

ft^PAtomlnum 32W 339a 

Bonk Montre ai 23» 23 

BrtlOmto 42W 47H 

Bamtnrdtar B 20n 209k 


Close Prev 


Oomblor 
C ascade s 
Demlnton Text A 
Donohue A 
MocMlIkm Bl 
Nall Bk Canada 
Power Carp. 
Quebec Tel 

QvctxKOrA 

Quabecor B 
Teteoiobe 
Unlva 
VMeptran 
Industries Index : 
Previous : 1IKUS 


18*9 18*9 
79b Ttb 
tf*b 6ta 
119b Ills 
171 m 18 

8*b IPS 
20 V. 2tm 
20 'l 30 

173* J74r 
179b 18 

18'A 181b 

6*k *«. 

Il’ra m 
184882 


Paris 


Accor 
Air LhAlM* 
Alcatel AWhom 
Axa 

Bancalre fCle) 
BIC 
BNP 



672 673 

759 769 

592 599 

242 252 

529 52* 

1229 1250 

243 2*3 

597 404 

821 TO 
1817 1846 

25?J® 223 

106 108.10 
1360 1415 


iigevrs 

Clments Franc 309X0 304.10 

g lub Med 453 417 

11-AOUiloJne 39250 396JP 
tll-5anofl 829 832 

Euro Disney 3S.IS WG 
Gen. Eaux Z2*9 mbo 

Havas 416.10 42020 

I metal 551 5*3 

Lafarge Cappee 3985D40*jo 

Lagrand 6020 6000 

Lyon. Eaux NA Ji* 

Oreal ILT HOB 1117 

L.VJAK . TO M0 
Matra-HacheHe HH.ro 1 IOJ10 
Mlchelin B 224 226 

Moulinex 13*50 1WJQ 

ParitXtt 36950 37140 

Ptchlney Int) WSfs 151 
Peraod-Ricord jriM WtM 
Peugeot 802 816 

Pinout) Print 884 889 

Rodtofechfllaue 46750 .4*5 
Rh- Poulenc A 130 13150 
Raft. St. Louis 
Satfit Gobaln 

S-E-S- 

SteGenerale 
Suez 


j Sydney 



9.1 B 

9.40 

ANZ 

*12 

*)6 

BHP 

18*8 

1BX8 

enrol 

346 

345 

QouBQlnvJIta 

0X8 

aro 

CctaMm 

*39 

*43 

Carnal co 

Sto 

5X5 

CRA 

1842 

18X4 

C5R 

4X1 

4X4 

Fosters Brow 

1X8 

I 10 


U6 

121 

ICI Australia 

11 

II 

Magellan 

1.90 

1.90 

MIM 

3X7 

117 




News Core 

WO 

9X3 

Nine network 

449 

*71 

N Broken HIM 

3X0 

3X6 

PaC Dunlop 

*18 

*23 


7.90 

794 

Nmndv Paiffiftlan 

227 

228 


1X5 

146 

Santos 

3X8 

3X6 

TNT 

241 

242 

Western Mining 

846 

84< 


442 

444 

Woocblde 

*49 

*50 



1585 1*02 
629 62V 

516 513 

5TO *01 
28450 28* 


Thomson-CSF 160.90 163 

Total 314X011950 

UJLP. 14250 145 


Valeo 


250 24X40 




Saopaulo 


Banco do Brasil 40 39.99 
Banespa 18X0 lfl.10 


Bradesoo 

Brahma 

Cemlg 

Eletrobtxa 


1450 M50 
5S5 56 

165 158 
482499.98 

. . _ 43S.0B48R08 

Light 508 512 

Paranapanema 40 4050 

Pe fntorg* 229 234 

Souza Cruz 1350011300 

Telebras IUJ0 B6 

TtlelB 785 775 

Usiminas 257 zu 

Vale RID Doce 228X9 233 

vans 234 234 




Singapore 


Cerebas 
CIfy Dev, 

DB5 

Fraser weave 


Fraser N 
Gen tins 
GoWen Hope Pi 
Haw Par 


8.10 E25 
7AS 755 

1130 11J0 
18.90 1M0 
1BJ0 1850 
258 259 

3.10 112 


Hume Industries SJ8 55S 


In cheap* 

Report 
KLKepona 
Lumctiomi 
Malayan Banka 870 UO 
OCBC foreign 1130 1170 


S5S 5X0 
11-20 11 
354 144 
159 159 


0U8 

CUE 

Sembowomi 
Starsflla 
Sima Darby 
SIA foreign 
5Vore Land 
Fpore Press 
StogSfeaiTaAto 


6.15 625 
845 855 
NA NA 
540 SJO 
406 40* 
12 12J0 
750 750 
15.90 16 

378 4. 10 


Square Trtttwnm 348 3J* 

Straffs Trading 180 160 

UOB tareton 1230 12H 

UOL 219 220 


Stockholm 

AGA 346 347 

AMOA 597 600 

«£oA 5M 164 

AJfOjCOPtt 95 W50 

Electrolux B 376 381 

Ericsson 396 401 


OoMPrev. 


bncRe-A 
HonOetstxinken 
Investor B 
Norsk Hvdro 
Procardia AF 
Sandvlk B 
SCA-A 
S-E Banken 
SkancHa F 
Skanska 
SKF 
Store 

TrrMrtwrg BF 
Volvo 

AHaersvaertden ; 1B39J1 
Previuus : 186656 


in 11* 

95 97 JO 
17B 181 

22250 934 

121 1?4 

IIJ 114 
108 110 
4750 48X0 
109 113 

165 165 

139 139 

388 394 

109 112 

717 736 


Tokyo 


Afcul Etectr 
Asahl Chemical 
AMhl Ghns 
'Bank of Tokyo 
Brtdetolone 
Canon 
Casta 

Dal Nippon Print 
DglMKouM 
Dahra Securities 
Fanuc . 

Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi _ 

Hitachi Cable 
Honda 
itavakaao 
Itochu , 

Japan Airlines 
Kajima 
Korea! Power 


Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Bm 


Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec bids 
Matsu Elec Wk» 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kasel 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Core 
MHsufandGo 
Mltsukoshl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NlMco Securities 
Nippon Kagaku 


J19 J10 
788 780 

1290 12TO 
1620 1640 
1450 7470 

IBM 1790 

1378 1340 
1950 1960 
1560 1570 
1820 1820 
4740 4800 

2330 Z320 

1140 1130 

ion ion 

925 930 

1920 1900 
51 BO 5160 
73S 738 

737 737 

1000 984 

2620 joss 

406 412 

1209 1200 
973 983 

740 747 

6920 6900 
1670 IB80 
1170 1160 
274Q mo 
532 526 
693 691 

797 798 

1190 1200 


Nippon Oil 
Start 


Nippon 

Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 

Otvmaus Optical 
Pioneer 
Ricoh 
Semva Eire 
Shorn 


1080 NPO 
I960 1980 
1780 1260 
1070 1070 
1350 1370 

1110 mo 

772 766 
360 363 
660 651 

872 87! 
2450 8470 
84800 8600a 


1200 1190 
3010 2980 


. them 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo am 
Suml Marine 


30 

987 901 
595 584 

I860 1850 

m 766 


Sumitomo Metal 
TaJsrtCori 


‘start Cere 
Talsha Marine 
TokedoChem 

Trtlln 

TdKW Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toppcn Printing 
Terav Ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yainsteftl See 
KlW 


6310 63» 
2160 2160 
2* ns 

2M 296 

SS S7 

1190 1180 
4930 48N 
564 556 

1350 1350 
3190 3200 
1480 1510 
765 758 
847 147 

2170 2170 
toz 904 


Cto»« Prev. 


Toronto 


Abltibl Price 

*7 

17 

Aon Ico Eagle 




6% 

e-'-s 

Alberta Energy 

ilte 

21% 

Am Borricfc Res 

33% 

JJ% 

BCE 

41 


Bk Nava Salla 

M 

24 

BCGos 


14% 

BC Telecom 

23 

23% 


023 

024 

Brunswick 

1C 

■0 

6% 

Cam dev 

CIBC 

*91) 

29% 

5% 

28% 

Canadian PacWc 


20% 

Can Tire A 

lllk 

11V, 


17% 

■ 8 


3.9.5 

A 

CCL Ind B 

7 

9 


5V« 

*90 


m. 

22% 

Conwest ExdI 

34% 

23% 

CSAMgl a 

ll'A 

111* 


20 Vi 

20V, 


0X2 

0X5 


14% 

14% 

Eaultv Silver A 
FCA inn 

0X2 

3X0 

m 

Fed ind A 

6% 

6% 

Fletcher Chall A 

17% 

17% 

FPI 

5Vj 

5% 

Gen tra 

047 

047 

Gull Cda Res 

13% 

& 


12 

NJ2. 

Hall toner 

16 

16% 

Horsham 

I94fc 

19% 

Hudson's Bav 

27% 

V* 


34Vb 

34% 

inco 

15% 

35% 




Laban 

21% 

21 U, 


21% 

21% 

Mackenzie 

B 

8% 

Magna inti A 

40% 

60% 

Maple Leaf 

12 

11% 

Maritime 

25 

25 


ffW 

8% 

Malum A 

21% 

22% 

Noma Ind A 

5>A 

5 

Narnnda Inc 

25 

25% 

Noranda Forest 

12 

12% 

Marten Energy 

14% 

14% 

Nthn Telecom 

42% 

43% 


11% 

11% 


19% 

to 

Pagurlrs A 

3% 

*55 

Placar Dame 

30VS 

31% 

Poco Petroleum 

10% 

10% 

PWA Cbrp 

044 

046 

RaYTOCk 

17% 

17% 

Renaissance 

29% 

29% 


19% 

19% 


67 


Roroi Bcoik Can 

76% 

26% 

Scoptro Res 
Scon's Haw 

13% 

B 

13% 


42% 

47% 


7% 


Shell Can 

42% 

43'* 

Shcrritl Gordon 

))% 

lltl 1 

SHL Svstemlne 

9 

914 

Southern 

17% 

18% 

Soar AerasDace 

15 

13% 

States A _ 

8 

8 

Tallsmai Encro 

27% 

27% 

TeckB 

24 

24% 

Thwman 

15% 

15% 


20% 

ansi 

Tarstar B 

74 

7454 

Transatta Util 

14% 

14% 

TronsCdo Pipe 

17% 

17% 

Triton FlnlA 

*15 

4’A 

Trimoc 

15% 

15% 

Trlzec A 

0X1 

0X4 

Unkorv Energy 

1 3J 

US 



Zurich 


Adi® Inti B 

326 


AhrautoreBnew 
BBC Brwn Bav B 

672 

1705 

674 

1317 

ObaGdloy B 

844 

MO 

C5 Holdings B 
Efektrqw B 

550 

369 

565 

373 

Fischer B 

1350 

1375 

IrterdJsown? 8 

2390 

2350 

Jrtmoii b 

835 

035 

UmdbGyr R 

820 

445 

845 

460 

Nestte J? 

1145 

1160 

,n.i 

142 

Iff 


1620 

1620 

Roche Hdg PC 

AtSXl 

6740 

Saha Republic 

120 

m 

Satdoz B 

745 

746 

Schindler a 

moo 

8100 

Softer PC 

917 

936 

Surartilonce B 

2010 

2030 

Swiss BnkCoraB 

385 

395 

Swiss Re) nsurR 

M5 

381 

SwtuairR 

767 

777 

UBSB 

1140 

1174 

Winterthur B 

700 

717 

Zurich Ass B 

NA 

7359 

K&BSliW 



See our 

Education D ir ect ory 
every Tuesday 


Season 

t-Tsn 

i season 

Low Caen 

-ink 

Lev. 

Case 

08 

OBJ- 


Grains 




WHEAT ICBOT) j.xo.-u>-v 




3J6 

2.96 Jul 54 j .1] ; 

Iff 

127 

ur. 

— C.3£ . 

22X64 

*57'., 

3X2 SecM 1« 

130 

*39 

iff 1 * 

— 0«». 

’3*12 

*65 

3X7 Dec 94 It! 

i*: 

JT 

154’-. 

-0.M: 

22*3: 

Jruf 

Ur trxr 75 1*3 

JX4'j 

*51': 

1£7’. 

-CJ£ 

7.786 

*3*1, 

ilt )Mcy95 



3*8 

— 1?7 

66 

JAP-ii 

111 Jui95 3 43 

1*1 

3JE 

3 JO 

-ia 



Dec 95 



3*9 

-o.c 


EB. suits 2*000 Wed's, sries 163*6 




Wed sateninl 61X9! ua i**8 





WHEAT OCBOT) SMttvWfc'nwn-collCTiDprSrtfid 



355 

197 Jul ta 149 

3.49 

3*1 

143% 

— 0.04% 

12*7! 

US't 

1X2’': Sep 94 UH. 

151*. 

3*2 

l44V.-fl.G4H 

7X67 

2*0 

112V, Dec 94 1 to 

130 

330 

1511.— mail 

6*3! 

159% 

325 MGT9S 150% 

330% 

UI’.. 

131%-C.QS>b 

1XW 

144% 







*33% 

3X2% Jul 95 



129".;— 0-05^4 








Wed-sown im 27409 up «5 





CORN 




116% 

2*1 Jul 94 JX4 

284 

178 

3-81 ’ft 

-0X1*« B8.JE0 

*92 V, 

2*0% Sep 94 3J9 

179% 

2J4 

176% 


2J4W 

2J6%D«ta 174% 

275 



2X0 

2*TaMar95 179 




2.0 

233 MuvM 2*4 





ZMV. 

154 Jul 95 2X3% 

2XT% 

7X0 



2*7 

235 Sea 95 2.70 

2 to 

2*7 

2*7% —0LE0% 


2*1 v« 

2*3 Dec 95 2*0% 

161% 

238% 

238*4—0,00*1. 


Gd.satas 90X00 Wecrvsales B*ITB 




Wed's open im 253X3 up 

10055 





SOYBEANS ICBOT] 5 OOQtM rrvntoTiim^ dodcin (vrtDMtfTOH 


7to 

524% Jul 94 7.13 

7.14 



7X5 

428 Aua94 7X9 

7.11 



7.00% 

*17 Sreta 7X2 

7X2 





7X7% 

435% Nov 74 i3A 

1«% 

176 

6X0 


*97% 

113 Jew 95 198% 

198% 

182 



7X2’A 

118 MarH 7.02 

7X2 

6X8 



7X2V1 

121 May 95 7X2% 

7.02% 

189 

190% -JUD 

1*00 

7JM 

424 Jul 95 7JM 

7X4 

*ro% 






6*0 

6X9 




Est. sates 75X00 Wed's, sates 70.173 




Wed's ooen tat I54.S7S up 

3791 





SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 




230X0 

10520 Jul 94 207X0 

m,w 

20230 

20*30 


223X0 

lOSXOAugta 20730 

209 00 

2B1X0 



210X0 

I83,!0 3»M 297.00 

209X0 

70120 

20490 


207 J» 

180X0 Oct 94 207X0 

3730 

yr/ui 

203*0 



20900 

178X0 Dec 94 704X0 

200X0 

20130 



20630 

178X0 Jen 95 20630 

20&JD 

20130 

20230 



35730 

7*1.00 Mar 9S 20730 

207 to 

asz-50 

mw 




101X0 Mav 96 20630 

20630 


WI.V 



20550 

1 B2JU J* 95 20430 

20100 

ZB30 

20150 

-230 


Est. seta 26X00 Wed's, safes 32,701 




Wed'S open W 05X93 UP 5577 





SOYBEAN OA. ICBOT) xunu-BfaMW in) to. 



30X2 

0135 Jul 94 28X5 

28to 

2777 



30*5 

71 J* Aug 94 78.10 

2B.lt 

2775 



30X4 

22*0 SOP 94 28JH 

28X8 

2773 

07X0 


79X4 


27 J5 

27*3 

2730 



28X7 

22X0DeC« 27*5 

2735 

27.12 

2772 



28X5 

22. 6$ Jon 9S 27*0 

27*0 

77.10 

27,15 


XIM 

28X0 

2*70 Mar 95 2725 

27 JO 

27X5 

27X5 


2X57 

28X5 

24*2 May 95 2725 

2/35 

2195 

07X3 

—0X2 


27X5 

2465 Jul 95 27X0 

2705 

3190 

3195 

_ oja 

305 



2*90 





Ed. sales 20.000 wed's, sates 19344 




WaTs open mr *4,189 uo 126 






Livestock 




CATTLE ICMBCI Amin. 





7127 


65*0 

64X5 


-0X8 

*233 

73X7 

68 15 Aug M 6*30 

4*U 

6ffE 

6*15 

-030 33.997 

7*10 

4528 Oct W 6777 

60.12 

67*2 

67.70 


7*30 

67 20 Dec 94 69X0 

69.15 

66X0 

69X2 


7425 

67 .90 Feb 95 69X5 

70X0 

6930 

6933 

+0.12 


75.10 

69*0 AW « roxs 

Tito 

70X5 

7X97 

•-(147 

1163 

71 JD 

6*90 Jun 95 6825 

M 95 

67JO 

67.90 


623 

Est. sates NA. Wed’S, srtes 

14X54 





wed's open U 7I,9» in B37 





FEEDS? CATTLE (CMERJ 

51109 b».- eermi 

W ft. 



BUD 

Tl.lOAugta 72J0 

7195 

7135 

T2.7S 

+031 

6,961 


71X0 Septa 72X0 

7230 

71*5 

72*0 

+IL22 

2*69 

81X5 

70.950094 72X5 

7147 

7170 

TUB 

•0X3 

7 7ft9 . 


72*0 Nov 94 71X0 

7X60 

72X5 

7135 

+OX3 

1.71 IJ 


7225 May «5 



72*0 

+0X0 


80.93 

7235 Jon H 74X0 

7*40 

7190 

7*55 

-035 

5M 

Bias 

7235 Mot % 7125 

/IS 1 

/!» 

r.i.v 

+ 065 

67 

7485 

72*5 Apr 96 



7130 

+0.10 

» 

EsLsntas 7X15 Wed’s, soles 

1 IMS 





wetfso tmM 1*176 141 » 





HOGS (0443*1 Aneu-aneHrb. 





56X7 

d5J0 Junta 48X5 

*9.10 

68.15 

48.92 

+ 0*7 

1X22 

5137 

4130 Jui 94 4*0 

*9X0 

48.17 

<8X7 

+BJB 

8379 

St40 

4*S0Aoff« 47XS 

aw 

J7J2 

4732 

+BJ? 

8X86 

97.75 

42*5 0 0 94 4*75 

44.95 

4430 

4470 

+0X0 

4X8) 

9L5D 

fftlSDec94 4437 

44JH 

41£Q 

4*77 

+0X7 

12*4 

nm 

ffJOFearo 4*17 

4*60 

6*10 

4*17 


781 


40.9eAarn 020 

4US 

4X00 

48X0 


415 

5130 

47*0 Jun 9S 48*7 

4BJQ 

4840 

«*2 

—0X3 

7£ 

49X0 

4720 Jul 95 4*75 

4U0 

48X5 


-on 


Esi. sate SM Wstfisste 

i 4349 





Wed's ooen kit 27413 Or 41 





PORK BELLIES (CMER) «.ooa cs -mm o» ex 



62X0 

39toJu<<M 4230 

4*20 

43*0 

4*20 

+2X0 


5930 

3875AUBM -CXO 


42JKJ 

43X7 

+2X0 

xm 

11.15 

37.10 R* 95 48*2 

486Q 

47.90 

ffifiO 

+0X0 

09 





47X0 


37 

61X0 

4Z*0May95 



9BJ0 

♦ 073 

32 

5100 

SOSO Jul 95 



sun 

+070 

12 

5025 

49J5Aug95 



50X0 


2 

Est.srtes 2409 Wed's, sates 

i 3,142 





WsTsopenin) BJAS up 3C 






! me 

l IL3* 

« 1 zoo 
i r.ro 
! 1X0 


12X4 

1101 

HJM 

11X7 


11.97 

1195 

11X4 

11X7 


12X3 

11.99 

11.95 

11X7 

11X7 


Food 


IC (NCSE1 944lx-anbnr6 
64.ro Jui 94 141 jd Mum into 
68J058P 94 142X0 14250 13L73 
77. 10 Deck* 13935 HUM 01X0 
78X0 MOT 9J 136X0 136X3 12BJS 
B25DMOV9S 134J0 U4J0 13858 
8SB0JUI9S 
.. _ 09.00 Sep 95 

Et*. tam 14493 Wad's. Kies 13X03 
wad-sapanim S7.100 up 156 
SUGAR-WDRLPH (NCSO IIUtohL-aMBi 
I2.M 9.15X494 I2J9 12-43 1129 

1240 4X20d94 1U8 11*4 1233 


14550 
14290 
137 JS 
136X0 
13123 
IJUD 
125X0 


11345 

134X0 

I3IJ5 

128X5 

127X0 

12650 

12550 


— 4X0 2SJ21 
—MO 12556 
-MO 7JB3 
-440 ixm 

—LB 135 

-430 a 


1240 

1241 


*0X7 SJM 
72301 


9 . 17 MCT 95 11.90 
V 357 Mov 9 S 11.97 
iU7Ju'9i rr.w 
10570 c: 9 S 11 X 7 
13 X 8 Mo -96 

Es*. sales 11.201 WWs. soles 16 J 05 
wed’s open tat 136 J 95 off 117 
COCOA INCSEJ iD/rvr~<:«x>v- |p*f fon 
1*66 99 VAJI «4 1393 1399 1345 

) 029 Srp 94 ICO 1426 1305 

10*1 DecW 1457 1461 104 

1071 Mar 95 1483 IrtD 1456 

1378 Alov 95 1507 1510 1490 

1 225 Jul 9 j 
1765 Sep 95 
1290 Dec 75 

1350 Mar 96 

16 X 48 wed's, iotas 15 . 74 ] 
Wed'sopefiinr 72 J 4 TI up 9 ii 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) lunmv-cmHrf'k 
135 X 0 9255 X 494 9 JJ 5 95 J 0 88 X 0 B 9 J 0 

95.63 Sea 94 9 BX 5 98.90 93.43 9145 

96 J 5 NOV 94 10 a\O 10025 95.10 9510 

97 JO Jan 9 S 10200 10200 97 X 0 97 JO 

99 J 5 MOT 95 10400 104 X 0 94.70 94 JO 

ioatoMav9s lotto lotto io*jo nxuo 

103.00 AO 93 107 X 0 107 X 0 107 JO 10230 

111 JO Sep 95 10300 1 O 3 X 0 105 X 0 M 3 J 0 
Nov 95 1 0170 

ESI. SOU 3 X 00 WWs. sales 2,797 
Wed'S Open tot 23/07 up 313 


*0X1 27X58 
*0X1 4,747 
*0X1 M7T 

—am 80S 
—0X3 4 9 


1*83 
ISC 
1» 

15TO 
!593 
13to 
15TO 
1428 
Est. sales 


130 

1393 

1433 

1443 

140 

158* 

1554 

1557 


—34 5^98 
—1* 37,5X7 
—IS 11.273 
-14 8X53 
— 14 1909 
— M 2,346 
—14 1,170 
—14 1377 
—14 


114 JO 
13*00 
132X0 
13L25 
114X5 
119.00 
Hlto 


-430 7/M0 
—5X0 9/W3 
— VOQ 1,903 
— MO 3,123 
— 4X0 IXB2 
— 5X0 50 

— 3X0 
-5X0 
—5X0 


Metals 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) ILOWOi-cot. per B. 

into 74wjunw into nijo in.00 mxs 

74J0JUM 110X0 11IJ5 109.95 HUB 

74.90 Sep 9* 110.95 111.95 110.1Q ill JO 

75J5DflC« IOBJO 110.10 10OSD 109.90 

76.90 Jan 95 109X5 

53X0 F«b « 109.10 

7100 Mar 9S IOBJO 1009 107.10 IBS.ro 

76X5Mav95 107 JO 107 JO >07X0 107 JO 

78X0JUI9S 106.95 

7530 Alia 95 11070 111.20 11070 111X0 

79. 10 Sep 9S 105X0 103X0 10SXO 10420 

7530 Oct 9S 11070 

77JSNov9S 11038 

B8JS0DK9S 10480 104X0 1 04X0 10550 

8030 Jon 96 10S30 

CJMtoH 105 7 J 

91.10 Apr 96 10530 

Ed. sales MX00 Wed's, sales 12J8S 
WWlapenW 62X88 up 2S5 
SILVER (NCMX) iowrnww.- arts per n»« 


nun 

111x0 

5119 JO 
108X0 
107X0 
10530 
107X0 
10530 
lllto 
unto 

9220 

92X0 

104.10 

92X5 

PUD 

10565 


*0X5 
+ 1X0 29,320 
+ 1X0 18X05 
+ 1X0 7 XU 

♦ 1X0 282 

♦ 1.10 89 

+1.10 2.1* 

+ 1.10 736 

+1X5 749 

+ 1X0 581 

+ 1X0 583 

+1X0 273 

+ 1X5 307 

+ 1X0 749 

+ 1X0 41 

+ 1X0 

♦ 1.10 34 


m n 
SUJ 
5525 
swx 
597X 
3&4X 
404X 
4045 
610X 
4150 
4250 
57 SX 
4IBX 


551X 

SS3X 


BIX 


531 X 
544X 


S4U 

S57X 


S77J 

572J 

5B7J 


5650 

572J 

945 


5*5.1 

5440 

5449 

5509 

5503 

540X 

3643 

571J 

577J 

5834 

5926 

S9S4 

6024 


! 48482 


—42 22X20 
—42 17,974 
—42 » 

—41 5X40 
—46 13*1 
—59 1,202 
— SX 439 
—M 2 JJB4 
-48 1 
-40 3 


5155 Jun 94 
371 A Aj 19* 

S43XAU0M 
SKSSeoM SS7J 
3MXDCC94 566X 
*1.0 Jen 95 

41 45 Mar 95 S76X 
41 OX May 95 5725 
42QXJUI9S 3075 
493XSep95 
S39XDec95 
3750 Jan *6 
3B00Mor96 

Ed. MM 27X00 WWs. SUMS 46to3 
Wed's Open JW 125,132 140 Z>5 
PLATINUM (HMER) MtonL-Oe tai tobwa. 

437X0 357 XQ All 94 407X0 409X0 *020 *5X0 140 11.989 

435X0 368X0 Od 94 41150 412X0 *6X0 «S40 J ’ 

i”to 41150 4I1JD 41040 

4,100 

up 1412 

tata (NCMX) Wfrarn. toOnieriTWA 

41 7 -» 38720 *5J0 385X0 

386X0 Jul 94 3B6.10 

34TtoAU0M 389X0 389J0 386.40 38750 

J*400Ocf« 392.* 3915® W0 

3g«DS»* 391,0 3KJ0 393A0 

3taJ0Feb9S J97 Jin 1.4D LH, 

3*4.50 Apr 95 40250 *9 to 40250 400X0 — 1* TtS 

361 to An 95 *5X0 *600 «BX0 4006 -IM TJH 

4B7 .ro -1J0 1J77 

411J0 — TJO 

«w 

- ■* w 

*2170 — 130 20 


— 1J0 9,570 
— 1-70 1X70 
—1.70 1.114 


660 


415X0 

417X3 

42650 

411X0 

417.00 


-I* 

—1X0 
—150 71501 
-TJO 5.184 
— 1]X0 24587 


*1130 

*1130 

429X0 

<2450 


38050 Aug 9S 
410toCW9S 
*050 Doc 23 
41 250 Feb 76 
Apr 9( 

Est. Saks 23X00 Wed's saba 39.99* 
WUcTsapenUr 139574 up sn 


Financial 


UST.BLL5 (CMOS) 

967* 95X6 Jun 94 9581 

J648 9*57 Sep 94 95J7 

9610 MJSDecM 9471 

95X5 9X98 MB 9S 9454 

Ed.KSes NA Wed's sates 


PtaaMOOw, 
9SX3 95X0 
9SJ9 95J3 
9473 WJB 
WJ» 94J4 
5tQ 


95X3 

95J7 

M77 

9454 


+048 4fng 
*0.03 20276 
+<UM 7523 
+0« 1537 


Wed's open bit 34,173 uP 563 

S c,OT9 sxnJMix+v PbiSMunnn 

112^5103-075 JUT M 105-11 10S-21 105-09 105-21 * 05 «■„ 

liMPIS - !? SwMlOMJW-a* 104-115104-335+ « imaS 
16*-)BI01-SADee 94104-005 104-005 103-31 1O6X0S+ JO u 
Ed. site NA Wed's, sates sun* “ 

Wed's open W 1B9.W on sts^ 

10 VO. TREASURY (CROT) tinterti-wsaMiHiggaH 
)ff-» J“?M10S-ap 104-05 705-15 706-0* + W 


■8,317 

1JU 

43 

9 


115-01 101-18 Septa 104-3* 105-00 104-10 1M-J? * 

114- 21 100-23 Doc 9* 103-20 WHO 103-14 103-29 e 

!it£ ¥»M1 02-36 103-04 102-22 103-0] t 

105-22 99-20 Jlm9S 102-11 + 

Est. iotas NA WWLHSas 105x73 
wed's Open M 259X22 011 2790 
US TREASURY BONDS {CBOD 

11M9 91-01 An W 104-14 U4-3S 103-29 iSSs fn ^nSf. 
118-26 90-12 Septa 103-16 >03-30 102-30 103-27 + 11 

118-00 91-19 OOCH 102-38 W3-S 102^® 1»S ♦ 0 

716-20 99-14 Mar *5102-01 702-19 101-22 102- 17 t « "Em 

115- 19 98-15 API 93 101-13 101-31 101-0* 101-30 + 09 mS 

" '■ 101-10 ♦ 00 ‘ill 

HUMS » 07 23 

100-15 + 06 m 


112- is ro-oa Sep 95 

113- 14 98-27 DOC 95 

114- 04 90-23 Marta 

Est. wtai NA Wed'S. Mtes 4*1.902 


wetT5tgniw.4ijb.ta 6 1* 4 


mwrtPAI BOMBS 

104-07 S7-06 An 94 93-26 93-02 92-JO 92-26 — 
9W7 86*13 Sep 9*91-12 91-19 90-20 91-15 t 
OccMW-27 90-07 90-10 90-10 
Est. tote* NA wefftsaks 65*4 
Wad's ooen ms AUMO up 118 
BBtauCUARS (CMSR) » 


9.710 

SUM 


otiMwf 


96570 9O5WSC0H MX80 MAS 94ATO 969* 
95.100 10J10Dec94 94.1* 96250 94.130 94.7* 
9LS80 90J« Mar 95 93JM0 MXIO 93X00 93'l 


Season Season 
High Low 


Oran HW> Low Close Chg Csac 


96730 

94JB0 

BUBO 

94220 

9X180 


-10711X59 
+60196572- * 
.‘ + 301*0*7“ -' 
+«T3M» - 

(+«!»■> 


07670 

R7«0 

07502 

671*0 


91710 An 95 93430 93720 9X580 91700 
TUIOStoH 9X430 9X*W 91370 93.470 
91.1817 DK 95 «Sto0 S3L2W «M7 nXB 
VQTSOMarH 9X151 93.198 9X99B 9X180 
93X30 Jlin 16 91X50 «X80 5B.97U OfflD 
Est safes NA Wwfs.s»* 7*9720 
Wptf^o pqnirt Id UB up 7856 
BRITISH FOUND (CMERI sooteouod- 1 PoWa-wabuMBOJ 
14220 1X4* Sep 91 LSTOB 1X220 L5UO ItoW. -44 38A*- ,-. 

ljn» 1X500 Dec 94 1J1» 1JB» 1J3* 1 SHt —1* Z» . - 

1J170 1A40WTM ItoSD - —to.. ,K 

Est. sales NA Wt tsoba 23,3*8 

Wed’s anwiM 33.77* alt 17125 • : 

CAKAMANDOLLAK fCMEB) storOta lBde4Mudb,f3Xn ...' 

077*0 07068 Septa 07165 D7U6 CUTW I171S0 +532*9 - 

07038 Dec 94 0JW1 07123 03074 07118 +3. 

07170 Mar 95 0LTO47 03DBS 0200 0)080 ' +2 .-SM 

OX990JUA9S 07011 OTMB 07015 87030 -3 Hr. 

0700058095 049*5 0JCUS 0496S OrtW " -4 .-■-*+ ' 

Bt. sales NA Wwfi nates 30X59 - 

«Wt open M Ttost Ot 72U-- 
GBOMNMARK <CMSQ ipewrt-iKMtoMipmr ' 

0X1)4 OJSSOOSraW OXWO 06136 0X098 «W - +13 69*41^ 

8411* 05500 Dec 94 06114 6X131 0610 04)26 + 13 L2B - 

Ojawa otoWAnro ft*io +1T ® 

04070 OUaiOMcrN - • 0*B4' 

Es»- sates NA Wed's, sates rKV*75._ 

Wwrsopenlnl 70,993 aB 6KJJ. 

JAPANESE YEN fCMBQ ipvvw-iMtenblsja 
un«n»j»s0*sep94 tu»»M* Jowo*tt i OoP2i8x affa 
0Xl00700JW525OeCM B0CBB1 500098200.002793000981* 

ojnsnsaiwmAJunK . • iffM) 

MIO125BXO96OOMcirfdllXOM6OBXO0nBaXOniOaX(n886- 
Est. sales NA WrtTs. wJes 3025 
ytod|s open Int 56to1 Off TOSS- .. 

5WK3PRAM2 iGUER) SwrlWwo-tpOtaiwb baton -A.'. 

0^05 04600 Septa 0739B OTTO 0794 07304. *A*H>6 

0)316 04885 Dec 96 07309. 07323 07295 0731* +4 7*5 + 

Jun 9s 0.7355- r+j-'-rs-. 

__ Mo- 9C . .87332 .- «U 

Esl soles NA WwT*. totes 38.145- J 

wetrs open int 44X27 ad mm 


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77.15 

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TT-lfflAunM 79.13 ■ 

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*2toM»9S 71X0 78.15 77 JS 77X0 +im S4I7^- 

MXOMarW 7*.I0 7840 38» 7820‘ +023T W*S>- 

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Wed's apai int 51X4* off 700 
HEATING tM. INMER) anH-Mtei 
4U0AH94 SUB 51X5 50X0 

QJOAugta SUM 51.43 MAS 

SE5KU S-* ttw 3* 

44X00094 3220 3230 

Jf'SSS - ? 1 rajo 53jo ssjo 

5440 s*25 58« 

*225 A«l 95 5810 . 5*to 

4735 Fob 95 5U0 5130 5440 

0X0 Mar 95 3880 p«n cin 


57.17 
57 JO 
38J0 
59 XO 
6235 
98TO 
5740 
55X0 


314 


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5046 

4145 


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58*6 
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SOB' — 030. 

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CL 05 Apr 95 5245 5245 52.10 M — nto :U?J 

51X5 J)to 500 Sto 

oxsirtta - ~ ^ 51 ■“ 



JSIjP Hi? S ^3*- 

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2078 

2878 

0873 

12049 


1043 

1940 


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1430 Sea 94 1645 
14450094 1843 

MX2NOV94 1823 

1493 Dec 94 1830 

15.15 Jan 95 18X0 
lUBFebVS 18JD 
1142 93 | bob 
1545 Apr 95 1«S 

J»«WH 18X0 
1173 An 93 1806 
16X3 Jul 95 18X9 

1112 

IfMSta’M 18X0 
16400a 95 1819 

17.15 NautS - 
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]7toJun» .. 

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«.»septa aro 
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ffTSNgvta SOTS 

51.10Fbb9S 54S2 

"■ OWL 


road's Open Int 88127 off fu* 





Stock Indexes 


661.95 40X0 461 U whik 

igtss as 

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F8 S.S'S^'E’? ' 











































































Page 1 1' 


NYSE 

Thursday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not retiecl 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


1 * Month 
H-nn Lew Ssafr_ 


p,» Vie PE l«- Huh Lj»Lg-.-J Ch , UC 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FR IDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 

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Exchange your corporate culture 
for a much more colourful kind 


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One where real bulls lock 
horns in trials of strength. Where 
flickering screens are filled with 
shadow puppets. And where the 
best buys in the market 
are fresh lobsters. 

Southern Thailand. 

A fascinating blend 
of exotic cultures 
and the wonders 
of nature. 

Explore the 
bustling southern capital of Hat Yai 
and the picturesque resort of 
Songkhla. Or escape from the 
madding crowd to the coconut 
islands of Samui and Panghan - 
they're as close to earthly paradise 
as you can possibly get. 

Then of course there's Phuket, 
playground of the international set. 


Here the pleasures of sun. sea and 
sand are complemented by 
luxurious accommodation. 

fine dining and a fabulous 
array of watersports. 

So leave the 
demands of the 
office behind for a 
while, and lose 
yourself in 
a completely 
different world. 


3 




>73-' 




-«* 


.-JS 




For more information . 
see your travel agent today, 
or fax the Tourism Authority 
of Thailand on (562) 224 6221- 

iJsrin<?ilna 

THAILAND 

DISCOVER //’«.* TREASURES 
aft i KINGDOM 


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Continued on Page IS 


ISLMfT 


















** 


IINTEKNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY nmnr 17> 1994 



Page 15 


Demand for 3i Shares 
Reflects British Growth 


EUROPE 


LONDON — With Rririei. ■ 
TOtore apparently b?t « 
Jar counnys economic rec£™ 
Bamg Brothers & Co. saidTh^.' 
day that more than 300,000 pSe 
todi registeed for shares beKrf! 
fa«d m 3i Group PLC by to^fi^. 

of busme» on ^ednesdiy. 

Borrows, a director of the 
Barings PLC unit, said, “This is a 

^.n^berofregistraa^iL 
w Iwd anuapaied at the outset, 
and we bebeve that it is probabhr 
the hugest number of regSraffi 

SoHE?* 

He deadline few fMfcfmnn r M 
toe offer is Monday, and to^rice 

utobe announced Wednesday It 

SJES^JjfJ 0 ** P ri «d at about £3 
a 12 percent discount to toe 
cofflpan/s net asset value 
For investors, 3i shares will P ro- 

3 ^ htDion invesi- 
mmt ponfoho of ^ 

a^compames at a time toe 
economy is improving. 

Over the past decade, that portfo- 
lio has posted an annual return of 


about 16 percent. -Now is a good 
*“* be in this business.” said 
Hug h Mum ford. m a na g ing director 
“S«tra Investment Trust, the 
£cuu million venture-capital trust 
toat is currently Britain’s largest. 
TJur fortunes depend on toe for- 
tunes of the economy.” 

Tbe long-delayed sale of 3i is 
likely to value it at £1.5 billion and 
concern, 

now owned by the Bank of England 

and leading commercial banks, 
among Britain’s 100 largest public 
companies. 

By sdhng about 40 percent of 3i 
to other investors, its owners wO) be 
able to reafize part of their invest- 
n»m and position 3i as an indepen- 
dent company free of event he ap- 

P earan ce of government meddling. 
While 3i will not raise any cash 

from the sale, the move will give toe 

««npany sometoixig its executives 
desperately want: the tax advantage 
of an investment trust, toe British 
equivalent of a closed-end mutual 
fund. Trusts arc exempt from capi- 
tax. (Bloomberg. AFX) 


Good Tidings for Barings 

Ba*ik Fattens Up on Emerging Markets 

Bv Fritr Incm » ... ° “ 


Investor’s Europe 


Prankfurtis 
DAX-V" 


;i Eloriaori; 


By Erik Ipsen 

international Herald Tribute 

LONDON — Nearly two cen- 
times after tbe firm of Barings 
underwrote toe U.S. purchase of 
the Louisiana Territory, toe Brit- 
ish merchant bank has rediscov- 
ered its affection for doing busi- 
Kssin what are today called 
emerging markets. 

The spreads on (hat business 
are not as good as they were in 
1803, when Barings was able to 
coake more than $2 million on an 
511 mfllioo transaction for toe 
ikdgling United Slates. 

But the fundamentals remain 
reassuringly constant. 

“If you talk to our archivisi he 
will tell yon what is happening 
here now is precisely what was 
happening at Barings in toe 19th 
century,” said Andrew Tuckey, 
deputy chairman of Barings 
PLC, Britain's oldest merchant 
bant In Britain, toe merchant 


Peter Norris, chief executive at 
Barings Securities Ltd., the 
Ann's emerging- market broker- 
age arm, acknowledges that 
share trading volumes in toe 
emerging markets have plum- 
meted 60 percent to 70 percent 
this year, but be insists toat his 
faith in those markets remains 

unslmlr-^ 

“Our strategy says that relative 

economic growth in toe werid will 
be weighted toward the newer 
“anomies," be said. “We see that 
as mcontrovertible." 

While trading volumes have 
shriveled, Mr. Norris notes 


being 


^Whatis 
happening now is 
precisely what 
was happe ning at 


oant in Britain, the merchant r 6 

bankers provide long-term credit Barings in the 
and SUDOOTt trade , - . ° 


Russia Will Raise 
Belarus’s Oil Bill 

I jSSSSSSSS 


and support trade. 

At Barings toe manying of ex- 
cess capital from the developed 
world to investment opportuni- 
ties in capital-starved, emerging- 
market economies was re-res tart- 
ed 10 years ago. after a lapse of 
many decades. 

Today it has emerged not only 


jwl _v_ nan UCUQ- 

£L£ Maras wnrid prices Separately. President Boris N 
“[Jf in an attempt to stimulate 

wP* J*™ *• *“* forc « n mvestmentm Russia, has 
a bld t0 force Belarus agreed to exempt prodtMsimport- 
its anrency with Russia ed mto toe country and purchased 

w «tern and international 

St to fitve toe Russian cen- The decree also exempts from 

J® “«* J® ^ mdustrial^lmS 

that vac mmnrt/vl n. .... 


■ — ~ — “vauwiiij RgMK 

ranency m toe zone, and Moscow 
had moved to force toe issue. 

The analysts said that Russia 
had also timed its decision to inDu- 
ence toe coming presidential elec- 
tions m Belarus. 


year under contracts conduded be- 
fore Jan. 1, 1993. 


In another development, a con- 

sortuun of oil companies may soon 

.The CIs Cooperation Ministry * develop ofl and gas 

and that Russia had been supply! *"“*■ PP^Tfrra 

mg Belarus with fuel at domestic offiaals 

Russian prices on the strength of * .wL * U ’ S ’ 9 {5aBls m Wash- 
prchminaiy ruble zone aer^snf member said. 


absorbmg toe largest slice of its 
capital, bat as a quasi-religion. 

Oddly enough, toe doyen of 
British merchant banks has no 
presence in toe British equity 
markets, while h uneasily finds 
itself perched on toe crest of a 
mige new wave of investment 

pouring into commies from Chi- 
na to toe Czech Republic. 

“Barings made the right call 
on that,” said John Tyce, a bank- 
ing analyst at Sodito Ctenfcrale, 
who predicted years of strong 
e*nrings growth, based in large 
measure on strength in toe grow- 
ing markets of developing na- 
tions. 


I9th century.’ 

Andrew Tuckey, 
deputy chairman 

Barings has nonetheless found 
plenty of work bringing new is- 
sues to toe market. 

So far Ihis year it has raised 
hundreds of millions of dollars 
for companies ranging from a 
Chilean cement manufacturer to 
a Korean glass company 
With Offices in 17 emerging 
countries and a research staff 
that regularly walks away with 
top honors in various polls of 
fund managers. Barings manag- 
ers find themselves sitting atop a 
hose they had not intended to 
ride. 

“I get worried when people say 
that we are turning completely 
into an emerging-markets 
house." said Mr. Tuckey, who 
denied toat other parts of toe 
company, such as corporate fi- 
nance and its $45 billion fund- 


managemem arm. are 
starved of resources. 

Mr. Tuckey says, for instance, 
toat Barings now has a large in- 
vestment in toe world's biggest 
financial market, toe United 
States. 

In 199 1, in a deal valued at I7B 
million. Barings snapped up a 40 
percent stake in the venerable 
investment banking firm of Dil- 
lon, Read & Co. in an effort to 
bolster its trans-Atlantic corpo- 
rate finance business. 

The timing of that move, 
which came at toe bottom of tbe 
cycle for American investment 
banks, in retrospect has won rave 
reviews. Last year, Dillon posted 
its best earnings ever. 

Still, it is Barings's unusually 
heavy emphasis on eme rgin g 
markets toat has enabled the 
firm, owned by a family charity, 
to produce results that stand out.’ 
Chns Smith, an analyst with Bar- 
clays de Zoete Wedd, termed the 
1993 pretax profit of £100 mil 
lion “astounding*’ 

Although Barings is hardly toe 
largest or toe best-known bank 
to knock on toe doors of emeig- 
ing nations’ ministries, it is the 
only one that can come to toe 
task armed with documents 
showing an involvement stretch- 
ing deep into toe 19to century. 

“We find history is extremely 
effective in developing relation- 
ships,” Mr. Tuckey said. “We’ve 
got letters from their prime min- 
isters and central bank heads go- 
ing back 100 years that are voy 
useful in re-establishing relation- 
ships.” 

For all of Barings’s rekindled 
optimism about emerging mar , 
kets and its eagerness lo exploit 
old connections, there is one as- 
pect of toe firm’s historv that 
gets short shrifL 
In 1890 Barings went busL In 
toe wake of disastrous Inane in 
Argentina, toe Bank of England 
had to step in with a rescue. 


Balsam 
Sows More 
Discord 

Arisen 

FRANKFURT — The collapse 
of Balsam AG, toe maker of arhlet- 
*c surfaces, has wrought divisions 
witom the usually cozy world of 
German fin an ce, pitting the conn- 
tty’s powerful ban irt against the 
domestic insurance industry. 

At toe center of the battle is a 
refusal by Germany’s two largest 
insurance groups to bail out toe 
export financing group Procedo 
toe main victim of alleged fraud at 
Balsam worth about 1.7 billion 
Deutsche marks ($1 billion). 

Banks and insurers are competi- 
tors in tbe field of financial ser- 
vices, but they also traditionally 
work closely together, often as 
power brokers in toe boardrooms 
oF large German corporations in 
which they hold stakes. 

“The relationship between toe 
banks and toe insurers will not be 

toe same as it was before," said one 

hanker closdy involved with toe 
Balsam affair. 

Balsam, which was Precedes 
hugest chent, applied for bank- 
ruptcy Friday. 

, G^^ny’s banks are owed some 
1.75 billion DM by Procedo, which 
toed for protection from creditors 

this week in the wake of tbe Balsam 

collapse. The collapse triggered a 
dispute between Procodo’s bank 
lenders and shareholders about 
how it could be rescued. 

Those shareholders include AD- 

toe world’s largest ransuranS ^ Prediction for toe 

Traditionally in Germany, firms ^ 

^ discrcet h would its first Polish unit through a 

behind closed doors, with share- Jat will automotive glass made by a leading Polish ^Ls 

holders and creditors dividing the com P an y to Flat Ante Poland and otoCTcompanies. 
costs. 

Reuten. Bloomberg. AFX 



It 

8 

te 

1- 

*s 

■n 

i- 

dt 

ie 


'1 


wmes: Hates, AFP ' " 


Very briefly; 


m • aru «B le bawetn 

FnSSSJ rfTS?.* 1 " 1 * **■ 2 European ice cream market, have 
remove freezers 11131 were tosutiled in shews by 
Mare to sell Mars ice cream products. Unilever has 40 percent of the 
Danish ice cream market, and Mars has about 4 percent. 

• Royal Ahold NV, toe Dutch food retailer, said its net profit in the first 
quarter rose 15 percent, to 1 10J million guilders ($60 million), as a result 
of^gy^ger income from supermarkets in Portugal and favorable 

- - * . ti •. t . 


' — ivuooia lu DCiaiUS 

under inleigovemmental agree- 
““*5 the moment 75,600 ru- 
bles ($3% including value-added 

To ewr readers m hue 

ft’s never been easier Id subscribe 
and saw with our now 
to! free service. 

JuriaJ us today at 

054374J7. 


— - ■■ — luiucnuais- 

tff Viktor S. Chernomyrdin a t 
whidi a Sa khali n Island project 
will be a topic of discussion, ac- 
cording to a Marathon Oil Co. 
spokesman. 


Group Buys French Magazini 


AFP-Exiel News 

«-» plc - pjaassasMat 

poKesmaiL n mnifay.it la d agrad io acqmrt lhai ihey arc expeaed lo be mm 

7- ur - — - — ■» P-o-. nc 
toe production-shanng contract a farther lOtitJeT^V^T^ The company said it would fi- said they represented quality addi- 

Si^ a J^ fon ^ tbegroup nitc^am Sr 914 SSfS ,w^S^!^5^ f,0m ® ds t‘ uons loEMAFs existing Imsincss 
stfll needs Russian Parliament ap- 00 mg resources, including commined &» — ; 

pnmd. (516 2 ixtDhonj. _ bank facilities. 


would, on a combined basis, rank 
third in size in toe French consum- 
er magazine industry, with a mar- 
ket share of some 10 percent He 


(Knight-Ridder, Reuters) 


Tbe purchases will be made in 
separate agreements and are sob- 


NYSE 

^•bteslndude the nationwide prices up to 
Sfreetand do not reflect 
tete trades elsewhere. Via TheAaoockOedPmsa 


The EMAP chairman. Sir John 
Hoskyns, said toe acquisitions 


13 Mm*! 
mah Low Stock 



in France, including its joint ven- 
ture with Bayard Presse. 

EMAP said toe French economy 
was showing signs of recovery. 

French Packager 
Of Cosmetics and 
U.S. Firm Join Up 

Blmmberg Businas News 

PARIS — The packaging com- 
pany CaraaudMetalbox SA said 
Thursday it was merging its cos- 
metics packaging activities with 
those of Wheaton Inc. of the Unit- 
ed Slates in a venture that would 
form toe world's largest cosmetics 
packaging company. 

Wheaton, a family-owned, non- 
quoted company based in MihriUe, 
New Jersey, has an nua l sales of 
about $460 million. The new com- 
pany, to be named Wheaton Inter- 
national, would have annual sales 
of about 5 billion French francs i 
($877 million) and hejointly owned 
by CaraaudMetalbox and Whea- 
ton. 

“The core reason for toe merger 
is toe complementarity of toe two 
companies." Arnaud Fayet, the 
bead of CarnaudMeial box’s health 
and beauty unit, said ar a news 
briefing. 

The merger, which would not af- 
fect 1994 earnings per share, is ex- 
pected to be completed bv toe au- 
tumn. 

Wheaton and CaraaudMetalbox 
both count Estee Lauder, Avon 
Products Inc. and Procter & Gam- 
ble Co. among their diems. 


ITALJANA PETROL! 

LAND FOR SALE IN LA SPEZIA 

IP Italiana Petrol! S.pA - Headquarters in Piazza della Vittoria, Genova. Italy 

^noMas thr 1 r 22 : 5 -!'"! n - fU " y Pa itl - n reg ' stered at ^ Court of Genoa 
atno. 4385 of trie Companies Register Fiscal Code 00269080107 

The^mpary teeput on MleanareaofapproxSZmoOsq/nits.siliiatBdin 

"^Pontevivo. To this purpose IP would appreciate receivinq and 

evaluating offers of purchase. Previously a Refinery site, thetend^i^v 
subject to a re-efevetopment plan. , iano is now 

to all existing easement 

tomety tan and shall be 

Pi^ctive buyers are requested to state their identity or the identity oftheir 

Requests for information to be addressed to 

IP Ita Berta PetroS 

Direzkme Programmazione e Sviluppo 
Piazza deUa Vrttoria,! - 16121 Genova 


by registered letter and by the 15th July 1994. 


r^S^ me 'l L™* 0pen to P ub,ic safe (ex article 1336 of the Italian 
advertisement carries no obligation or liability on behalf of 
IP Iteliana Petroli S.pA in connection with the said advert. IP reserves the 
ngh to evaluate each offer on its merit The text crisis iSThSJS 
published in Italian for publication on Italian newspapers and wifi have 
priority on this version. This advert and the selling procedure are in 
accordance with the Italian Law. e are m 


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China to Reopen 
Doors in 1996 to 
Foreign Carmakers 


: Compiled* Our SutfFmn Duptutha 

BEIJING — China said Thuis- 
i jay that it would end its freeze on 
•-oragn auto plants in 1996 and that 
- pnomywouid be panted to maou- 
iaenum agreeing in the meantime 
o establish pans plants. 

Ye Ong, vice chairman of the 
tote Planning Commission, said 
■ hree large conglomerates, based 

a existing joint-venture producers 
p China, would account for most 
ales in the domestic market by the 
'ad of the century. 


It Acts on 
Copyrights 

- Agence France- Freest 
BEIJING — China published a 
' indent defense of its intellectual- 
property safeguards on Thursday 
it a dear bid to ward off U.S. 
: tction over copyright infringeroenL 
Its action came two weeks ahead 
>f the June 30 deadline set by the 
United States for China to lake 
iffective measures to combat viola- 
ions of American patents and 
topyrights or face retaliation. 

At the end of April, Washington 
labeled China as one of the worst 
violators of U.S. copyrights, along 
with Argentina and India. 

The U.S. software pant Micro- 
soft Corp. complained that piracy 
in China had cost it $20 billion. An 
official Chinese research institute 
was fined only $250 after it was 
found guilty of making holograms 
with which to pirate Microsoft op- 
erating systems. 

"The problem was. and still is. 
that China can't police this thing, 
and there are an increasing number 
of copyright mfringsments, especial- 
ly in the south, that are simply not 
bong dealt with,” one lawyer said. 

Even Deng Rong, the daughter 
of senior leader Deng Xiaoping, 
has complained in court that copies 
of the book she wrote about her 
father’s life had been printed with- 
out authorization. 


To subscribe in Switzerland 

juit call, loll free, 

155 57 57 


He left the door open to new 
entrants. “Approval will depend on 
the speed of China’s economic 
growth, the level of auto output at 
that time and the conditions offered 
by the foreign parties." he said. 

Foreign automakers already pro- 
ducing in China include Volks- 
wagen AG of Germany. Peugeot 
SA and Citroen SA of France, Dai- 
hatsu Motor Co. and Suzuki Motor 
Co. of Japan and Chrysler Corp. of 
the United States. 

Mr. Ye said China's auto indus- 
try. with more than 1 20 plants, was 
inefficient and needed to be reorga- 
nized into large groups. He said 
China would consolidate those 
automakers into three globally 
competitive giants and three sec- 
ondary manufacturers by 1997. 

The Volkswagen joint venture in 
Shanghai, a Citroen venture at 
Shiyan and northeast China’s 
sprawling First Automobile 
Works, also linked with Volks- 
wagen, were mentioned for the first 
category. 

likely candidates for the second 
category are Chrysler’s Jeep Chero- 
kee factory in Beijing, Peugeot’s 
Guangzhou plant and Daihatsu 's 
plant in Tianjin. 

China's auto market is small, 
with domestic production in 1993 
of \3 million units, up 23 percent 
from 1992. Official imports last 
year totaled 3 10,461 vehicles, up 48 
percent over 1993. and thousands 
more were smuggled in. 

With the economy growing at 
more than 10 percent a year, many 
foreign producers say this may be 
the last great undeveloped car mar- 
ket 

The government's model plant is 
its Shanghai factory. It made 
100.000 Santana passenger cars in 
1993, nine times its 1990 output, 
and the cars had a local content 
rate of 81.47 percent double the 
rale in 1990. The Santana retails for 
about 160.000 yuan ($18,000). 

Mr. Ye said joint-venture makers 
would receive preferential treat- 
ment once their local-content rates 
reached a certain level 

( Reuters. Knight-Ridder) 


China’s industrial output grew at 
a yearly 17.3 percent in May, down 
slightly from the rate in April, Reu- 
ters reported from Beijing. 

The April-May surge in produc- 
tion is due to the easing of credit 
controls by the government, which 
in torn has led to a rise in capital 
investment, state economists said. 


Vietnam: Banking Thinks Small 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

HANOI — Caught between traditional 
savers’ distrust and a creaking financial sys- 
tem, small new banks such as Vietnam Mari- 
time Commercial Stock Bank nonetheless are 
putting the squeeze on the state institutions 
now dominating the market. 

Founded less than three years ago. Hai- 
phong-based Maritime Bank — with six pow- 
erful state-backed business groups and a for 
eign investment fund among its shareholders 
— is becoming a catalyst to a transition in 
banking. 

“We understand the innovations that will 
take place in Vietnamese banking," said Tran 
Huu Bach, a director of Maritime Bank. "We 
understand the transition to a market econo- 
my and that privatization is the future." 

When it abandoned a centrally managed 
economic system in 1989, Vietnam soon real- 
ized it needed a new financial system to 
match its embrace of the market economy. 
Banking since Hanoi won control of the for- 
mer South Vietnam in 197S had become con- 
solidated into a monolithic system with the 
State Bank of Vietnam assuming control of 
most domestic financial business. 

In 1990, Hanoi introduced far-reaching 
reforms that separated the state bank from a 
commercial rpje, instead giving it responsibil- 
ity for conducting monetary policy and regu- 
lating a more complex financial system. 

In encouraging a more competitive finan- 
cial environment, four dominant government 
banks were given autonomy and instructed to 
prepare themselves for life in a market where 
foreign and domestic private banks covet 
their business. 

“In competition, banks improve them- 
selves,” said Nguyen Van De. chairman of 
Yietcombank. the state-owned bank that lost 


its near monopoly on foreign currency loans 
and transactions but responded by computer- 
izing its branches, offering new services and 
issuing credit card*. “If we don’t, other banks 
wflL" 

“Some joint stock banks have met with 
settlement difficulties," said Mr. De. who 
expects the competition to prompt a consoli- 
dation among the smaller banks. “But we 
have grown stronger over time." 

A recent World Bank study predicted an 
important role for private banks in Vietnam. 
“in many respects the Vietnamese reforms are 
bolder and more enlightened than in other 
socialist economies in transition." it said. 

“Because they are demand-driven and 
managed by compact, highly motivated 
teams, they will be innovators and have a 
disproportionate impact on the development 
of banking in the country." said the World 
Bank study of the joint stock banks, which 
now number about 40. 

“Their market share of loans and deposits 
is not that significant now, but they have 
tremendous potential,” said Richard Martin, 
general manager in Vietnam for ANZ Bank, 
of Australia. 

“They are allowed to deal with people we 
are not," said Mr. Martin, who was one of the 
first foreign bankers to come to Vietnam. 
“They are catering to the needs of an emerg- 
ing mercantile class.” 

Starting out with 40 billion dong ($4 mil- 
lion) in authorized share capital in 1991 and 
none of the bad or doubtful debts now plagu- 
ing their state-owned rivals, Maritime Bank 
will have tripled in size if the government 
gives the expected final approval to its capital 
expansion plans this year. 

“They can go into a sector of the market 
foreign banks can’t really afford to pursue, 
deals worth less than $500,000.” said Martin 


Adams, managing director of Vietnam Fund 
LlcL, a S5Q million fund that has invested 
about S2.4 million in the bank. 

“They also can be much more flexible in 
the collateral they take.” he said. “They can 
take property deeds, which foreign banks are 
reluctant to hold, and they have a warehouse 
to store Honda motorbikes as collateral." 

But arranging loans — often on behalf of 
powerful shareholders that include govern- 
ment-owned shipping, insurance and gar- 
ment-trading companies, Vietnam Aviation 
and the director-general of post and telecom- 
munications — has proven easier than devel- 
oping a consumer bank. 

Traditionally wary of banks, the average 
Vietnamese saver favors high-yield govern- 
ment bonds or just tucking the money under 
the mattress. Mobilizing domestic savings is 
an acknowledged challenge for Vietnam, 
which says it needs $50 billion to modernize 
its economy by the turn of the century. 

To raise further expansion funds, Mari time 
Bank must intensify efforts to lure retail 
customers into its six banks around the coun- 
try, all linked by a modem computer system 
that is the envy of rivals. 

“We are the first bank to dare to publish 
our balance sheet,” said Mr. Bach, who is 
stressing staff training and service as part of 
its effort to gain customer confidence. 

Maritime Bank's good reputation has se- 
cured it deals with larger international banks 
such as ANZ to help finance a $3 milli on 
crane for the port of Ho Chi Minh City and to 
develop a leasing business with at least two 
other banks ana the Vietnam Fund. 

While it is one of the most promising 
candidates for a listing on a new stock ex- 
change that Vietnam plans to open next year. 
Maritime Bank also hopes to develop a stock- 
broker business for the future. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — All Nippon Airways 
Co. of Japan and Delta Air Lines 
Inc. of the United States an- 
nounced Thursday that they had 
agreed to discuss a wide-ranging 
business alliance, which could be 
the fust such deal between a Japa- 
nese and a U.S. airline. 

ANA, which has the largest do- 
mestic flight network in Japan, and 
Delta, the third-iargesi airline in 
the United States, envisage cooper- 
ation in passenger and freight ser- 
vices. flight schedule coordination, 
enhancement of computer reserva- 
tion systems, participation in each 
airline’s frequent-flyer program 
and possible code sharing, they 
said. 

The airlines said their letter of 
intent would serve to promote mu- 
tual communication and coopera- 
tion that could lead to a marketing 
and business relationship in the 
United States and Japan. 

Delta's president, chairman and 


ce 


chief executive officer, Ronald W. 
Allot, said the fink would combine 
Delta’s extensive U.S. network 
with ANA’s services in Asia. 

“Both airlines expect to expand 
revenue-generating opportunities, 
while reducing costs through more 
efficient use of our resources.” Mr. 
Allen said. 

The implementation of the 
agreement is expected to begin this 
autumn. 

ANA’s cunent operations in the 
United States are limited to New 
York, Washington and Los Ange- 
les. 

In the past few months. Atlanta- 
based Delta, which is in the midst 
of a plan to reduce costs and return 
to profitability, has sought to bal- , 
ance cuts of direct services by forg- 
ing partnerships wiLh other airlines. 

Delta is planning to slash ann ual 
costs by S2 billion by 1997. This 
week, Delia said it would fire 2,500 
engineering and maintenance 


workers, part of a plan to drop as 
many as 15,000 positions. 

The airline on Tuesday cut four 
international routes and said it 
would ground its fleet of 13 Airbus 
aircraft. 

In a separate development, ANA 
reportedly has canceled an order 
for five Airbus A-340 aircraft val- 
ued at 3 billion French francs($538 
million) from Airbus Industrie. 

I AFP. AFX. Bloomberg. 

Knight -Bidder) 

■ Mazda and Ford in Talks 

Mazda Motor Corp. said Thurs- 
day it had restarted negotiations to 


TO OUR REAPERS IN LUXEMBOURG 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Just call toll-free: 

0 800 2703 


Hong Kona . Singapore Tokyo 

Hang Seng * . • Straits Timed ' Nikkei 225' 

r — ~ * , — - 22000 r 

iaog v> ' : ~ ■ aieoo— ~ ~ 

2300- • fifty* 

10000 * fe-- — ' tsooo-j . 

m — .. .21®-— isoqbA— — 


M PM 

1994 


Exchange'': . * h«fex' : :i '- ,■■■*■ ,■ Thursday -Pm. ■ ■ % 

'• .■ •;-4 'i •• Ctoae . .■•Ctofer .'Change 

Hongkong. ; .Hang Seng- ' . 3.02&92 ■ 9,149.52 . '^1.38 . 

Singapore , straits - 2*287.34 £286251 ^ \+Q.04 

-Sydney ;. W ""A S&tiiiSfp = ' ‘ ^ 

TtAyo'. . ; '• N&ket 22S : T ;21,38?ip 21283*00. +0.40 

. Koala Urcnpur " Goroposlte " . / ■ A 1,03ZJ59 ’ ! ■ 1,02835 . +.0J53 

Bangkok. ' ^ SET. 1,384.44 ,1.359.53 . +0.36 


Tafpet ■ -.W. 

Manila .. '■ « 

: Jakarta' '"St 

htew’2eaiand 

Bombay^ 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 


■ WeightetJPrtob. 6 ;1 49-64 ■ 8,113,70 +059 


'rPSE, • ' 2^1*56 . 2,921.87 -0*18 

V \NZS£-4B' ’T . 2,100;B9 '+0.14. 

• National .tncfex . 1,976.05 1,97555' +0.08 


lnicmaikHul Herald Tribune 


jointly produce cars in Europe with 
Ford Motor Co. because of signs of 
a strengthening economy in Eu- 
rope, The Associated Press report- 
ed. 

Mazda. Japan's founh-largest 
automaker, and Ford scrapped 
plans to build cars together in Eu- 
rope in March 1993 after the two 
could not reach an agreement. 

But financially beleaguered 
Mazda, which is 24.54 percent- 
owned by Ford, accepted three 
more Ford officials as directors in 
its management in December 1993 
in a move to upgrade the coopera- 
tion between the companies. 


Very briefly: 

The French and German telecommunications alliance with U.S. company 
Sprint Corp. will eventually embrace an Asian partner, most likely Japan, 
the president of France Telecom (Japan) said. 

• Bank of Tokyo Ltd. said it and eight other Japanese banks would extend 
$1.99 billion in financing to Viacom loc. to help pay for its acquisition of 
502 percent of Paramount Conmumi cations Inc. 

• Fosters Brewing Group Ltd. of Austratia said it signed a nationwide 
distribution pact for Germany with Holsteo Brauerei AG. 

• Daewoo Group, one c* South Korea’s largest conglomerates, has signed 
an agreement with the Chinese state firm CeroOfood to exchange cars for 
grain or other agricultural commodities, a Daewoo executive said. 

• Thailand’s consumer price index rose 1 . 1 percent in May from April and 
5.1 percent from May 1993, the Commerce Ministry said The wholesale 
index in May was flat from April but up 3 percent from a year earlier. 

• Australia's biggest company. Broken H31 Proprietary Co„ said it filed its 
defense against a writ alleging environmental damage from its Ok Tedi 
copper mine in Papua New Guinea, where landowners are seeking 
compensation for damage allegedly caused by mining waste being 
pumped into nearby rivers. 

• Asian Development Bank loans slipped nearly 50 percent, to $3622 

nriHion, in the first three months of 1994. while technical assistance grants 
rose 46 percent, the bank said. AFP. AFX. Knight Bidder 


Jakarta Sees Investment Rise 


JAKARTA — Indonesia expects the value of foreign investment 
approvals to bounce back this year to exceed $10 billion after a 22 percent 
drop in 1993. the Arnara news agency said Thursday. 

The drop in foreign investment approvals last year’ to 58 billion, added 
to Indonesia's economic woes, which included low world oil prices and 
$90 billion m foreign debt. 

An official said that approvals for the first five months of the year hud 
lopped $5 billion. Jakarta took several steps this month to ease curbs on 
foreign investment. 


Watchdog Agency Concerned by Foodkmd Bid 


Corroded by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

MELBOURNE — Australian regulators 
said Thursday that they were concerned about 
the New Zealand entrepreneur Graeme Hart’s 
takeover bid for Australian wholesaler Food- 
land Associated LuL, which could transform 
the face of retailing in both countries. 

New Zealand's Rank Commercial LuL, 
owned by Mr. Hart, announced a $365 mfllion 
bid for Foodland Wednesday, saying it intend- 
ed to spOil the group’s Australian and New 
Zealand operations if successfuL Under the 
plan. Coles Myer Ltd. would have an option to 
boy Foocflands extensive Australian wholesale 
grocery and retail operation. 

Allan Fds, chairman of the Trade Practices 


Commission, said he was concerned that com- 
petition might suffer if (his happened. A major 
problem for Mr. Fels, however, is an Australian 
court decision last year that prevented Davids 
IML, the largest Australian independent food 
wholesaler, from taking over the wholesaler 
QIW Retailers Ltd. 

That decision hinged on a ruling that food 
wholesaling in the state of Queensland was a 
separate market from food retailing in the same 
state. Extending that logic, the Australian 
courts would have no problems with Coles 
Myer buying Foodland. 

Analysts forecast that a successful bid would 
lift Coles Myers grocery-market share in West- 
ern Australia from 24 percent to 75 percent and 


increase its overall Australian market share 
from 22 percent to about 25 percent 

Foodland shareholders have already balked 
at the offer price of 527 Australian dollars 
($3.85) a share, pushing the price up to 5.51 
Australian dollars on Thursday, a gain of 76 
cents. 

Hie continued existence of independent gro- 
cers in Australia wiD also be in question. Twen- 
ty years ago, independents controlled more 
than 60 percent of Australian grocery sales, but 
now they have less than 30 percent. 

It also casts a cloud over the listing on the 
Australian Stock Exchange on Friday of Da- 
vids, which has about 1 1 percent of the grocery 
market. (AFP, Bloomberg I 


In Greece 
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advertising section 


^TZHN VriON \L HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JI NE 17, 1994 


ADVERTislNCjJl^ 


jibs# 

$'W&" "S vSP'I 

■ -gsr 

'■ ■>• ■■ W'jit -'- . ->*•¥»• il/SSwiK 


i he island nation’s origins go 
back to 874 AD, when Iceland's 
first settlers arrived from 
Norway. Long a commonwealth, 
Iceland came under Norway’s 


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and later that of Denmark. 

On June 17, 1944, Iceland 
proclaimed its independence as 
a republic. In the 50 years since, 
the country has made its mark 
on world trade, tourism and 
international affairs. 


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Rising 


Exports Give MciEiN i jm to Economy 


tier <>e\ en f'l^t %ear;> 
V. " ■»« caused b> declining 

J. 7 V ^ cmches of cod. falling 

i? i&Ej >cafood prices overseas 

and ihe recession in Western indus- 
trial nation's. Iceland's economy 

1 .nee a 2 a in possesses the tools lor 
erov. th. 

"Based on '■'■hat is known about 
ptv 'p--ci-> lor fish catches over the 
ned few \ear»." says Thordtir Frid- 
jor.'snn. managing director of the 
National Economic Institute, "a re- 
tain ir. modest growth appears likels 
tor j -i' J5 and frey ond.” 

Seal c % . pons, which brought in 
Si. I hit !■• >n last year, or nearly S<» 
percent of merchandise e\purt cam- 
lives, are rising again on ihe strength 
ot'hea-.v catches'. >f capelin and red- 
jlai. Inluiliop has fallen to less than 

2 Percent. The trade balance is in 
equilibrium, and real interest rates 
are d>wvn significantly. While unem- 
ployment has crept up to 5.5 percent 
and foreign debt rose to 55.8 percent 


of aross domestic product las; year, 
tile- outlook lor the medium term i- 

cneouraeing. 

The bTggesi el.aliengc in the ongo- 
ing recovery is 'trengihcning the 
ocean cod stock. ( »l the seven oi so 
main ground fish species caught and 


y ; li. the economy should ride out 
,p7 v , 0 ch patch. "We shouldn't fo- 
..us ioo much .>n the adverse eltecis 
,.r ;■. r c .Ji>.-;i“ti in ihe cod quota, 
comments Mar Fiisson. head ol Icc- 
I.iivJ’s ri'hcries Investment Fund. 
“This \- ;he sole example ofsignift- 


Pc r t !: ■ i. '< • ; i i <- ' /'■- / > iks 
just lihoVi' ihtlt f’i'r: 'JiUh’ti StilliS 


processed for export, last year's 
catch of 25'M.Ki<‘ tons canted 
million alone. O'. erfi shine. h« «v. e e. 
has caused quota' !*• he sltohed : 
this level from 3 u n.' ’<«' ions in l" : '‘ 
In the meantime, pikes . -n loivic 
seafood market* h.ivt. declined 2 
percent in real term*. Combined, m 
two trend.* have cost file cointr 
8280 million annually, or a quart, 
of last year's revenue from -cab'" 
expons. 


- entraeiion in the fleet's allow - 
e.-ich. Most other specie? are in 
l_- g....J condition. In my view, 
vering economies in the L .S.. 
and mainland Europe, our nta- 
-a.ii!:> panners. will see a rise in 
cjs >r prime-qual’ty 'Catood. 
ia-viiv fish has earned a repula- 
v overseas for high quality." 

,.:s- year's heavy" l.«^-miliion-ion 
food ..aieh allowed Lhe economy 
sanially compensate iV.r le?s cv\j 


- -or-, - 

- <* !• *• "*** ^ 





and lower prices by stepping up pro- 
duction in other species. Total 
seafood expons grew 1 1.4 percent 
over 1992 to 635.000 ton? ot 
processed and fresh whitetish. 
shrimp, fish meal and oil. Export 
revenues still fell by nearly one- 
tenth. but the contraction in nationai 
income dampened imports of con- 
sumer goods and made the current 
account favorable for the first lime 
since I9$o. 

The two other legs of the ecor.o- 
mv. energy -intensive industry and 
tourism, have also gathered strength. 
Improving economies in Europe and 
the United States helped mar.utac- 
tcrcJ exports .chietly aluminum anc 
r'errosilicon • rise to 5 1 6M million, to 
account for nearly 20 percent or 
merchandise export earnings. A 
record 158.0i>> foreign visitors also 
spent 8220 million in foreign curren- 

C * ni until » •/? pits*' ! 9 


Iceland - 
A Motivated 
Choice! 


1 1 ne :'»*■? r.-.oriv -r.: 
There * no place :!i»e I ceuro 
it';.. iu v. jnt c I'.imI citcr.ee 
of scene. 

Hut spring*, r.t ajev tic 
glaocrs. rhundcring " cter- 
tjlls and a land richly lit with 
colours ■ day and night: 

.Ml this v\ irhin easy reich 
of the city and and its hrst 
class hotels and excellent 
conference facilities. 

For information call: 

Iceland +354 1 62 60 70, 
Fax +354 1 6260 73. 


■;E^1 


Icel and Convent ion 
A-Inceniive Bureau 


y*; - . 


The Road to Independence 



The first Vikina settlers arrived in Ice- 
land in 874. From then until 1262, Ice- 
land was an independent country. This 
was the eolden aae of Icelandic history, 
when the Sagas were written the 
world's oldest parliament - the Althing 
- was founded and Erik the Red discov- 
ered Greenland and his son Leif discov- 
ered America. , t L . _ , 

Tne eolden age ended when the teua- 
ina Icelandic chieftains swore allegiance 
to the king of Norway in i 262. This alle- 
giance was transferred to Denmark 
when the Danish and Norwegian monar- 
chies were unified in 138/. 

In the I6ih century. Denmark en- 
forced a trade monopoly that lasted until 
1787. This, combined with ‘epidemics, 
famine, volcanic eruptions and earth- 
quakes. neariv wiped out the Icelandic 
population. By the 18th century’, the 
peculation w as 35.000, hall that of the 
i2ih cer.turv. 

The struggle for independence jTom 
Denmark started in 1S30. In 1845. the 
.Althing was re-established with limited 
powerc. and in 19 IS Iceland gained in- 
terna! self-govemmenL 
Iceland's key strategic position rn the 


North Atlantic led to its wartime occu- 
pation. first by -British and then ^by 
ATnerican iroops: During the Cold %var r 


r,yj t. 

■''*5 ; 7 O. -' 


*: • ^ • j 




. S '- 


The mrtgsv^irxianifst^ setters, \ 

it became host to thc U.S. Air Force 
Base at Keflavik, which protected the •' 
vital North Atianr.c sea lane's. m tha 

Greenland-Iceiand-Britaht'Gap.- 

Iceland sained de facto jodependehcc,, 
from Denmark with tne Nazi occupation 
of Denmark in 1940. In 1944. 97.4 ’pcij 
cent of the population voted in faypraf ; 
full independence. An independent fe-- 
public was declared on June l7 r .1944,.’ 
and the history of modem Iceland be- 
gan. Thomas S. Aanfas. 


The View From Iceland: 
An Evolution in Identity 


\rr - TS ifiy years into its 
{■■r '"-J life as an inde- 
:.~ T /: • pendent nation. 

; v.i; Iceland finds ii- 
>elf facing some very diffi- 
cult quesuons regarding its 
future, questions that have 
not had to be raised before 
•and to which no one really 
know? the answers. 

Should Iceland look west, 
toward the United States'.’ 
East toward the European 
Union? Or perhaps both, or 
neither? Until recently, this 
was not a problem. Iceland's 
strategic position during the 
Cold War period placed it 
firmly in the midst of the At- 
lantic Alliance, and the 
question of where it be- 
longed never arose. Satisfac- 
tory trade agreements with 
both the United States and 
the European Community 
provided a smooth flow of 
the main export product - 
seafood in all imaginable 
varieties - into those main 
markets. Culturally, though, 
the ties were strongest with 
the Nordic neighbors with 
which Iceland shares a com- 
mon history and. since the 
1 960s. a common labor and 
social market as well. 

Now this is all history. 
The threat that highlighted 
Iceland's strategic impor- 
tance has radically dimin- 


ished. The European focus 
has shifted from the Atlantic 
toward the center o* the 
Continent, and the American 
focus toward the Pacific 
Rim. Left alone in the mid- 
dle is a small island nation 
that now has to re-evaiuate 
its position. Even its closest 
Nordic relatives are now 
speeding into the European 
Union, a path that Iceland 
has not yet been willing to 
tread. 

To understand the Ice- 

Shoidd Iceland 
look west or east? 
Perhaps both, 
or neither? 


landic hesitation about EU- 
membership. one has to un- 
derstand the mentality of the 
nation. Traditionally wary of 
big entities and outside in- 
fluence (like so many other 
island nations), the Ice- 
landers have always been re- 
luctant to join international 
bodies, especially those that 
might have a say in their in- 
ternal affairs. NATO mem- 
bership was never uncon- 
tented. and there was a fierce 
political debate before Ice- 
land joined the European 


Free Trade Association jn 
the lute '60s. Memories cif ; - 
the "unequal treaty" made. . 
with Norway in 1262 are 
still e v oked when modern . 
international treaties are dis- 
cussed. 

Centuries of isolation th 
the Atlantic have preserved 
a culture, including the old 
Norse language, that in 
many respects is unique. To 
lose "this would be to lose the. ;- 
national identity, arid a sraafl.^; 
nation is sensitive to foreign.- 
influence in the rnodefn - 
w orld of multimedia. - 

In fact. European integral 
lion not only represeius'if;* 
cultural threat, but also of 
fers a wealth of possibilities. 
In an ever-more environ- • 
mentally concerned world,; 
Icl land has a lot to offer. Ili. : 
unspoiled nature and clean... 
air have made tourism one 
of the country’s main indus- ■ 
tries. In agriculture, organic ; 
farming R and has been ■ 
standard practice for cen- ■ 
turies. and below die ground 
enormous resources of pure 
drinking water are to be 
found. Human resources are :. 
also vast with a high general 
level of skill and education, 
not least in the fishing sec- 
tor. Iceland is probably the 

Continued im page 19 


ImIjoJ. mom «.«■*• hlunJ. nut" until" U«r o>h e r. A„ htuuJ M.,gic. Mmng 

lV l,.um a crisp, clean, environment. A beautiful island bom >o recently, ami s lill #iriu u birth i» »ff->h.Tc. 

/hut its nnnfue i okauic landscape lakes von buck t<> the hefnniinp nine. 



COiviS "O 3CELAMS5 - the island with its "in/ central 
hcatiu «. where the scenery is alive, the wildlife is 




‘■-.eri'Jtra 



1 delightful uml lhe clittured people, long known for 


..'•5^-. ( J ,.,; r hn<mtalilv. will welcome wn. entertain you and 

accommodate you in comfort. ICELAND - u.nt'll ciijvY a fascinating experience. 


f f 3 * \ ICELANDIC TOURIST BOARD 
Hold office in III I and 


ICELANDAIR 



Tul.. S54-1-27-I8K 
Fsiv. 354- 1 -6247-1 41 


„ y - 3 55 ! V E 7A55S3 HOUSES W/SL3SSH5SS "C’JSS CLAC 15 S T 3 12 71 S A >i G ~:ViG 



The Presidential Folder 


m commemo ration 


Tlie historical background is 
described and historical sites 
illustrated with splendid photo- 
graphs -as well as modem day 
Iceland. 

Furthermore the Presidental 
folder contains curricula vitae 
of the four Presidents of Iceland ■ 
since 1944. Four new postage 
stamps carry their images. The 
Folder contains wo sheets of die 
stamps plus individual copies of 
each stamp. One sheet is mint, 
the other is with a first day 
cancellation. 


Price pt copy only amounts to 
EKR 1.450,- OISS 22.-, GBP 14 
The edition is veiy limited. 




■•v. . ; i 



W&j: 1 


!«Vv*riJ?3 i 


Please direct your order to: 

Frxmerkjdsalan/Postpihil ' 

P.O. Box 8445, IS-128Reytjayife vP 
Phone (354) 1-636052, Tax (354) 

-) Personal checks and Accos/Eurocani as WI ai! 
Visa accepted. Please give full details. ■ : ; i*y 






1 




. .jT. +\ A 


• •- 

. . VA.'- *n 
-•>•£•■*.* ••• J 
££&'* ’• -’; 



^y>* • 4 - : -:/£^tSl 

.®;a^x^c-s 4 _r;v ^ 

Energy Resources: 
Of Clean Power to 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


H celand has an es- 
timated 50.000 
GWh/year of 
dean, renewable, 
inexpensive hydroelectric 
and geothermal energy - 
enough to supply Switzer- 
land with its annual electric- 
ity requirements. 

Only 10 percent has been 
harnessed. Recently, Gaidar 
Ingvaxsson, managing direc- 
tor of MIL, the Icelandic En- 
ergy Marketing Unit, an 
agency of the National Pow- 
er Company and the Min- 


istry of Industry, spoke 
about the country’s energy 
resources. 

Is the energy-generating 
infrastructure in place to 
supply new ventures with 
power at short notice? 

At present, there are 1,000 
GWh/year of energy in the 
system that are not being 
used, enough to accommo- 
date ferro-alloys facilities, 
electrochemical plants, etc. 
This is available today. As 
far as larger power users 
such as primary aluminum 


Rising Exports 


. —Continued from page 18 

cy to make tourism the sec- 
ond-biggest industry after 
seafood. Together w’ith the 
stronger performance in the 
seafood sector, overall ex- 
pats of goods and services 
rose 6.1 percent in volume 
last year to push GDP up 0.8 
percent following a 3.4 per- 
. centfalloff in 1992. 

Though a marginal de- 
cline in GDP is expected in 
1994 because 
of further cuts 
in the cod quo- 
ta, a 0.8 percent 
■ rise in export 
volume is fore- 
cast “The im- 
proving inter- 
national econo- 
my will see Ice- 
land's GDP 
grow 1 to2per- 
cent annually 
over 1995-96, ^nds Pi 
and 2 to 3 per- Fmr&ogadoi 
cent after that,” 
predicts the NETs Mr. Frid- 
jonsson. 

Iceland’s 265,000 inhabi- 
tants still maintain one of the 
world's highest living stan- 
dards. The World Bank At- 
las 1994 reported per capita 
income of $23,670 for 1992, 
just ahead of the figure for 
the United States and sev- 
enfh-higbest among industri- 
alized nations. As in many 
other West European coun- 
tries, universal health care 
and education are provided, 
and a tightly woven web of 
social services and state sup- 
port helps offset high taxes 
and living expenses. Thanks 
to its geographical isolation 
and comparatively little 
heavy industry, Iceland has 
probably the cleanest air and 
water in Europe, and popu- 
lation density on the 


1 03,000 square kilometer is- 
land is only 2.4 inhabitants 
per square kilometer.. 

Maintaining this high liv- 
ing standard will require Ice- 
landers to continue to care- 
fully manage harvests of 
seafood stocks in home wa- 
ters. Further development of 
tourism and energy-inten- 
sive industry is also a. key 
goal, as is forging stronger 
economic links with Europe. 
Iceland is a member of the 
18-nation Eu- 
ropean Eco- 
nomic Area 
(EEA), estab- 
lished in Janu- 
ary, which has 
abolished or 
greatly re- 
duced tariffs 
on most pro- 
cessed seafood 
products sold 

Iceland's President Vigdis {? _£“ r °Pf* n 
pt„. . hi. . i iiH, Union coun- 

Bn******- tries. This step 

is doubly im- 
portant as the EU absorbs 60 
percent of the country’s 
seafood expats. 

The establishment of the 
EEA has also meant liberal- 
ization of laws on foreign in- 
vestment and capital move- 
ments. It is hoped that the 
changes will help diversify 
the economy by attracting 
more foreign business, espe- 
cially larger industrial plants 
such as the Swiss-owned 
ISAL aluminum smelter 
outside the capital of Reyk- 
javik. 

One of only two energy- 
intensive factories in Ice- 
land, the smelter is the cor- 
nerstone of the country’s 
manufacturing sector and 
has enabled it to develop 
large reserves of hydroelec- 
tric and geothermal energy. 

James Wesne&ki 


NATIONAL GALLERY 
OFICELAND 

tidebam fifty yen of national 
i ndep end e nce with 

THE CRUCIBLE 1939-1944 

an otfaBaiioa wbiefa fbeucs on fbo da- 
. rdopnot tflwhadt cobra temg 
tintfpenod. Opaanf boon: Drity 
omeptMendnra fan 1 X 00 - 18 X 30 . 
AddmKM uJ c ju »c K* g7. Royfcjarifc. 
«L9f-6M 000 



June-July 1994 
OpenWeahasdavs 
14.00-1&00 
Gotuy Second floor MfeNton Space 
Mam*av37-BOK4C2-I01 Bayldavl 
7aL3&MMM'fbEt3SU-6nM0 


Hafmrbotg Is an bislituie of 
culture and line arts in 
Hafaifj&dur, a few kilaewrcs south 
of Reykjavik. Kotating cxh&ftoas in 
the institutes galleries including both 
foreign and Icelandic artists, as we& 
2 * works from the pennanert 
The insilifuie also boss 
frequent ooocens and there te a cafe 
that serves refrejhmems *0 day. The 
galleries are open from 12.00 to 
1&00 every day. oreq* Tuesdays. 


34. HafmafjGrar 






Th. I*1 mW D. - »-y — lW 
I..WUW t***- 

,g' ■— «— 

, — ■ — J *-» ■ «— i 
rmtf - famwM -truH— V ■ 


¥ 

nJNhROUNARSlOOUR 

. ktJujJri.r{ I-" 11 ' 1 

MV H-w* ' 


Plenty 

Spare 


smellers are concerned, sev- 
eral hydropower projects 
have been designed and en- 
gineered and are in place, 
ready to go. The National 
Power Company has consid- 
erably shortened the lead 
time needed to build hydro- 
stations by having numerous 
projects in various stages of 
development. Two have al- 
ready been put out for ten- 
der. and bids received. 

Oil prices are at a low. 
Can Iceland's green energy 
compete? What about trans- 
port costs and tariffs? 

For the typical large user 
of 10MW and 7,000 hours 
annual utilization, electricity 
prices in Iceland are among 
the lowest in the world. Our 
estimated cost price for pri- 
mary power for new projects 
is 20 mills per KWh; sec- 
ondary power costs less. We 
are prepared to work out 
flexible, tailor-made long- 
term contracts with large 
power users, as we have 
done with the ISAL smelter 
and Icelandic Alloys Ltd. It 
may surprise many people 
that transporting finished 
products to Rotterdam and 
other North Sea ports takes 
only three to four days, and 
Iceland’s membership in the 
European Economic Area 
means tariff-free access for 
products to the huge Euro- 
pean market. 


v. v -- * .'.V ' - . . ^ H - '• . . 

• Yi rv * \ >:>•.; f 1 WU 

v-Y % . V •, 

' ;l1 •• ' \, ■ A: :H r •> 

'• -Vv. ' • ftjfe-iv • • 


Fresh Winds Blow 
In Banking Sector 



Geoth er mal energy heats Iceland’s houses as weft as bathers in the Blue Lagoon. 


Should foreign industries 
consider hydropower in the 
context of the coming energy 
tax in Europe? 

Yes. Hydropower stations 
are a source of nonpolluting 
power. They are capital-in- 
tensive, which means users 
can count on steady supplies 
at steady prices, both today 
and in the foreseeable fu- 
ture. Iceland also offers a 
politically stable environ- 
ment and plenty of green- 


field sites and harbor facili- 
ties. 

Talks are under way with 
Scottish Hydro, Hamburger 
Elektrizitdt and the Dutch- 
Icekmdic Icenet group on a 
potential undersea cable 
linkup that would transmit 
8,000 GWh/year of electrici- 
ty to Europe within the next 
two decades. Given the 
country’s present produc- 
tion capacity, won’t this 
strain its abilitv to accom- 


modate other new ventures? 

If the delayed start-up 
agreement for the Atlantal 
primary aluminum smelter 
were signed tomorrow, we 
would be ready to go right 
into the field and start work 
on a new power station and 
to accelerate engineering 
work on the next wave of 
power stations so as to be 
ready to serve other in- 
vestors. 

Interview by J.W. 


An Evolution in Iceland's Identity 


Continued from page 18 

only European country 
where fishing is a highly 
profitable business venture, 
not a subsidized part of the 
agricultural sector. There is 
a growing sense that Ice- 
landers really have nothing 
to fear from Europe and that 
its cultural uniqueness might 
prove to be the nation’s ulti- 
mate strength. 

The dependence on fish- 
ing and fish processing, al- 
though making the economy 
extremely cyclical and cme- 
dimensional, has brought a 
high level of prosperity and 
enabled the Icelanders to 
build up a modern society 
with a high standard of liv- 
ing in less than half a centu- 
ry. Fish, as a matter of fact, 
also represents the main ob- 
stacle to Iceland's member- 
ship in die European Union. 
The European principle of 
pooling resources is some- 


thing Icelanders find diffi- 
cult to accept - not because 
they are particularly un-Eu- 
ropean or egocentric, but be- 
cause no other European na- 
tion is as dependent on any 
one resource as Iceland is on 
fish. Without fish, the island 
of Iceland would be unin- 
habitable. Fish represent not 
just an economic issue, but 
are also, alongside the lan- 
guage. at the core of the na- 
tional identity. 

Icelanders realize that iso- 
lationism would be the least 
suitable solution to their 
dilemma. A nation that is to- 
tally dependent on exports 
for its economic survival 
and on a close and unre- 
stricted contact with other 
cultures for its intellectual 
and mental survival cannot 
close its doors on the outside 
world. 

Although it is situated be- 
tween America and Europe, 
there is really no question as 


to where Iceland belongs. It 
is a European nation with an 
old European culture, even 
if it has a strain of the Amer- 
ican frontier society. Europe 
is also Iceland’s most im- 
portant trading partner and 
will probably be even more 
so with the advent of the Eu- 
ropean Economic Area. The 
American market is also of 
vital importance, and most 
Icelanders feel that econom- 
ic and political ties with ihe 
United States must be 
strengthened, not weakened, 
in spite of closer contact 
with the European Union. 

Will Iceland ever be a 
member of the EU? At the 
moment the Icelandic stance 
is: Let's wait and see how 
things develop. Through the 
EEA, it is part of the com- 
mon market, without being 
part of the political structure 
of the Union. Time will tell 
if that is sufficient or if clos- 
er contact will prove neces- 


sary. If all other EFT A 
countries join the EU, at 
least some rearrangements 
will have to be made. 

Very likely, the fate of 
Norway - another great fish- 
ing nation - will be decisive 
for the European future of 
Iceland. If Norway decides 
to stay outside the Union, 
Iceland will definitely do the 
same. If Norway joins, its 
experience with the Euro- 
pean fishing policy will 
have a great impact on 
whether Iceland eventually 
follows SUIL 

Steingrimur Sigurgeirsson 


he rush to take 
advantage of 
cross-border op- 
portunities of- 
fered by the European Eco- 
nomic Area has yet to see 
non-nationals moving into 
Iceland’s newly liberalized 
banking sector. With strong 
equity positions and a large 
stake in financial sideline 
services. Iceland's four 
commercial and 33 savings 
banks have a <-i—iiiiii—iiitiiiiiii 
firm grip on . 

the borne mar- 

Market- JP* ' 

leading Visa home 

and Eurocard 

are jointly 
owned by tbe banks, and 
debit cards are making a 
quick entrance. Landsbanki, 
the country's largest com- 
mercial bank, and Islands- 
banki pic. operate securities 
firms Lands bref and VLB re- 
spectively. while Bunadar- 
banki and the 33 savings 
banks own Kaupthing. De- 
spite the thaw in regulations 
on foreign investment and 
capital movements brought 
about by the EEA, Swedish- 
held Skandia is the sole for- 
eign player to enter the secu- 
rities field. 

For foreign banks and oth- 
er financial-services firms, 
this means that finding and 
filling a gap in the competi- 
tion will prove tough. But 
fresh winds are definitely on 
the way. *T don’t expect for- 
eign banks to set up branch- 
es here in the near term,” 
says Ttyggvi Pals son. man- 
aging director of Islandsban- 
ki pic. “You don’t need 
brick and mortar to provide 
services. Increasing compe- 
tition will come about, how- 
ever, from Icelanders invest- 
ing abroad and generally do- 


A firm 
grip on the 
home market 



THC tlDWT DlOTIMO RC9WMMIT OTUHCD 
M HIE WHITT OP RKBM AM) «LL ITS 


KM «GeBR«J10M& AND MROIMHION 
wone i is, i > «auM9L no. i ss* i ) 27773 


ing more business with for- 
eign financial institutions.” 

Iceland's banks have been 
quick to implement Bank for 
International Settlements 
regulations and other inter- 
national operating norms 
now standard in the new Eu- 
ropean mega- market. They 
have also matured into full- 
service outlets offering fi- 
nancial consultancy prod- 
ucts, electronic banking and 
_ IM-llplM _ -ll--i telephone and 
computer ac- 
rm cess options 

72 the f° r businesses 

and individu- 
narket als. “Gradual 

----- — liberalization 

of Iceland’s 
banking sector and capital 
movements has seen cus- 
tomer services become com- 
parable with those offered 
abroad,” says Mr. Palsson. 

While domestic banks 
shore up their position at 
home, the half-century-old 
republic has begun to chart a 
new course abroad. A regu- 
lar borrower in international 
markets, Iceland this year 
came out with a debut issue 
in tbe U.S. public bond mar- 
ket. 'The republic's $200 
million Yankee bond issue 
in die U.S. market last Feb- 
ruary was highly success- 
ful,” comments Birgir Islei- 
fur Gunnarsson, c hairman of 
the Board of Governors of 
the Central Bank of Iceland, 
adding that the JF. Morgan- 
led issue of 10-year bonds 
was received warmly by 
over 30 U.S. investors. 

Moody's and Standard & 
Poor’s rate it A2 and A re- 
spectively. and the issue has 
traded favorably in the sec- 
ondary market - a clear sign 
of confidence in the bonds 
as well as in Iceland’s econ- 
omy. J.W. 


Kaffilist 

Spanish bar 
Tapes - Long Drinks 
Cappudno - Cocktails 
Klapparstigur26 
Reykjavik 
Tel.: 625059 


£T 


Icelandic 

Eiderdown 


THE ONLY OVERNIGHT EXPRESS 
SERVICE IN ICELAND 



For supplies call: 
Atlantic Trading, 
Luxembourg 
Tel: (352) 78 72 09 
or Fax: (352) 78 70 77 


Faxafen 9 IS-10B Reykjavik 
Tel: 689822 Fax :689865 


This advertising section was produced in its entirety by the supplements division of the 
International Herald Tribune’s advertising department. • Thomas S. Arms is a foreign 
affairs writer based in London. • Steingrimur Sigurgeirsson is on the staff of the news- 
paper Morgunbladid in Reykjavik. • James Wesneski is a free-lance writer based in 
Reykjavik. 



Republic of Iceland 

U.S. $ 350,000,000 

Euro-Commercial Paper Programme 
Established 1985 - Rated Al/Pl 

Deafgrs 

Citibank international pic. 

Enskilda Corporate, 
Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken 

J.P. Morgan 
Securities Ltd. 





e 

by Quality 

The Fisheries Investment Fund of Iceland 

Iceland's economic development this century has gone hand-in-hand with 
the development of its fishing and fish processing industries, which rank with 
the mast dynamic in the world. 

The fisheries sector in Iceland maintains its lead through the unrivalled 
quality of its products, which are harvested from pure nature using the most 
sophisticated technology available today. 

Rskveidasjodur islands, The Fisheries Investment Fund of Iceland, is the 
main provider of long-term capital for Iceland's modern fishing and fish 
processing industries, and has played a vital role in the development of 
quality seafood production ever since its establishment in 1305. 


P 


FISK.VEIDASJOOUR. ISLANDS 

SudurlandsbrauU 155 Reykjavik Iceland Tel: 354-1-8^100 Fax:354-1-889993 


B.A-38 I sa A K 3 | rf* Jj ,5*^ ijj tftf# , frRJrR Jl A 










The Pure Products 
Of a Clean Land 


H anning in Iceland 
is nearly as diffi- 
cult as the coun- 
try's name sug- 
gests. But despite a lack of 
arable soil, geographical iso- 
lation and overemphasis on 
production of lamb and beef 
products, unique possibili- 
ties are opening up for the 
sector. 

Iceland is in a good posi- 
tion to declare itself the first 
organic-farming country in 
the world, a '’move that 
would make a lot of sense 
for the industry and the na- 
tion as a whole," says Bald- 
en Jonsson, consultant to 
the Icelandic Agricultural 
Information Service. “Use 
of growth-inducing hor- 
mones is nonexistent, and 
our farmers apply artificial 
fertilizers to grassland ex- 
tremely sparingly. Com- 
pared with other nations' 
output. Icelandic products 
have been shown to be con- 
siderably purer. And while 
we can't compete pricewise 
with mass agriculture, our 
small production potential is 
well-suited for filling high- 
quality niche markets that 
supply health-conscious 
consumers." 

Other factors have com- 
bined to make Iceland's en- 
vironment and agricultural 
products some of the purest 
found anywhere. Heavy in- 
dustry is next to nil. and the 
utilization of geothermal 
and hydroelectric energy for 
space heating and power 
keeps pollution to minute 
levels. With roughly half of 
the .265.000 Icelanders liv- 
ing in the greater Rey kja\ ik 


% 


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area, much open pasture i* 
available for livestock - 
mainly sheep and beef or 
dairy cows - to graze freely. 

During the" summer 
months, newborn Icelandic 
lambs graze in the moun- 
tains on thyme, ling and 
wildflowers. with the four- 
to-five -month-old animals 
reaching 14.5 kilogrums <52 
pounds! by the time they are 
driven from the wilderness 
in the autumn. 

Annual production levels 
of lamb and beef are S.000 
and 5.400 Ions respectively, 
but what the industry lacks 
in volume it makes up for in 
quality. Recently. U.S. 
health authorities certified 
both meats as free from hor- 
mone implants, antibiotic*, 
pesticides and herbicides, a 
distinction that has opened 
up tangible export opportu- 
nities. " 

Meat sales company 
Kaupsyslan. which is work- 
ing on exports of beef and 
lamb to the United States in 
eonjunciion with the Associ- 
ation of Beef Cow Farmers, 
is producing Icelandic beef 
for a large American health- 
food chain, 

"The lack of industry and 
negligible pollution have a 
definite effect on our prod- 
ucts." says the company's 
managing director. Erlendur 
Gardarsson. “According to 
our information, other pro- 
ducers in the U.S. and some 
in New Zealand can supply- 
meats sold as free of hor- 
mones and antibiotics. buL 
as far as we know, cannot 
use the second half of our 
statement on the absence of 







Icelandic lamb is free of hormones, antibiotics and pesticides. 


pesticides and herbicides. 
Icelandic meat is perhaps the 
purest you'll find any- 
where." 

Mr. Gardarsson points out 
that Icelandic Iamb and beef 
have both been shown to 
contain beneficial Omega-3 
fatty acids, which combat 
heart and coronary disease. 
“And the taste of our lean 


lamb and beef is exception- 
al. The latter product beat 
out all comers at a presti- 
gious *taste-ofF at New 
York's Waldorf Astoria last 
year - we wen? voted ahead 
of the favored American en- 
trants." 

Dairy products also figure 
heavily in the national diet 
and in farm production. 


\\\\ The Reykjavik 

Kjarvalsstadir \ l Zt Lin 

Kjarv jlsMjJir houses 3 aepurute collections: the Art 00111*01100 of the 
Cuv 1*1 Reykjavik, the Architectural Museum, ibe Erro Museum and 
:fie Kjarv.il Museum and forms part of the Reykjavik Municipal 
Museum which also includes Asmundur 
Svein«.v>n Sculpture- Museum. 

Hours: 10 00- 18.00 ever} day. Admission tsk. 300 
2 1 Maj - 1 7 Julv. Reykjavik An Festival 
S ULPTURE SUirPLtURE/SCLT»LTURE 
Contemporary Icelandic An 

2! Mas. Asmundur Sseinsson Sculpture Museum 
ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN 
A joint Exhibition of the works b> 

A-mundur Swcinsson and Kristinn E Hrafnsson 

JU Julv- 1 J September, Kjarvalsstadir 
JOHANNES S. KJARVAL 1 1885-1972) 

Unique Drawing & Oil Paintings 

5 November-23 October. Kjarvjfcstadir 
ERRO S DONATION 

tn addition to all ibis, then: will be a number of lectures 
on an &. architecture. The Reykjavik Municipal An 
Museum is also organizing various exhibitions 
at other museums and galleries, both locally and abroad. 

Kjarvakstadir. The Reykjavik Municipal Art Museum, 
Fldkagda. 105 Reykjavik 
Tei.: <*) I ) 261 3 1/261 3 1 - Fax: «9l ) 626 191. 





L o "3ft? ; our plant where there is 

Power in plenty 
without 
pollution 


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ranula^yr-nc ivsvwh* p/LtMD SvISf il'.V 
*<5tico-3. Po# er Ccripar.-. 




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.•r h ICELANDIC ENERGY MARKETING UNIT 

S' Ve-.rn C ! M&vr/ ir<j E'vrgs inj me r*fPOnji “wm C .-r-;*- , 

*T3 -SWIC To it- I-SXIS; Pj» 3^a • 1 • eS6^£ Tb<« CSSJ >5 


Industry: Rbh Is Stoj. King, 
But Other Sfx.tors Expand 


which includes some potato 
and turnip crops but is other- 
wise inhibited by a short 
growing season and cool 
year-round temperatures. 
Butter, cream, cheese and 
milk varieties are free of 
preservatives, and skyr. a 
traditional whey -like food 
eaten since Iceland's settle- 
ment 1.100 years ago. re- 
mains a perennial favorite, 
plain or with milk or cream, 
sugar and fruit. 

Iceland's abundant geo- 
thermal energy allows flow- 
ers, cucumbers, tomatoes 
and green peppers to be 
grown in greenhouses 
around the country. As with 
other domestic agriculture, 
these products are grown 
without resorting to pesti- 
cides and herbicides. 

"We hope to be able to 
benefit in the future by de- 
veloping further exports of 
lamb and beef from our 
small-scale meat-producing 
industry.” says Brynjolfur 
Sandholt. chief veterinary 
officer. “We feel that Ice- 
land has definite market po- 
tential that can be realized 
by catering to health-con- 
scious consumers who pre- 
fer foods raised and grown 
by farming methods that are 
not on the intensive scale 
found in other countries, but 
rather along natural, organic 
lines.” J.W. 


8 triad of .industries' supports die 
bulk of Iceland’s 36 billion annu- 
al economy: fishing and seafood 
processing, tourism and power- 
intensive manufacturing. Efforts to expand, 
the role of the last two are gaining ground.-, 
but a rough 55-15-10 split in national export 
e amines means that catching, processing 
and selling seafood remain Iceland’s core in- : 
dustrial activities. 

TYoduction and export of seafood are the . 
driving force behind the economy,” says Jon 
Asbergsson,' managing director of the Trade 
Council of Iceland, - \ - 

The Central Bank reports that seafood 
sales garnered Icdand Sl. I bUtion in 1993, 
or 79 percent of total merchandise: export 
earnings. Measured by volume’, sales of 
processed and fresh items rose 1 1 J percent 
oxer 1992, to 635,000 tons, on the strength, 
of a 1 .6S-million^ton haul of capelin, 
eroundfish, shrimp and other species. 

"" Improved fishing technology has. enabled 
catches to rise to'the point where any. in- 
crease is unlikely. Fish tracking devices, 
huge nets and tbe'abflity to.. process catches 
at sea mean the fleet can now scoop up more r 
than ocean stocks are able to replenish. . 

The challenge posed by limited seafood 
stocks is being met in a number of ways. In 
addition to a quota-based system of fisheries ■ 
management, which has kept stocks in gen- ’ 
erally healthy condition, previously under- 
utilized species - sea urchin, deep-sea red- 
fish, ling and tusk - are being harvested. 
New processing technology is also helping 
to boost yields of what is caught, and has be- 
come an export sector in its own right. . . 

“In my opinion, Iceland's fishing industry : 
is a world leader in technology, and I base; 
my view on having done business -with the 
industry in over 30 countries,” says Geir AV 
Gunnlaugsson, managing director of weigh- . 
ing and processing specialists Marel. 
Morel's onboard digital scales for fishing 
vessels have won a large share of the global 
market, while its' grading equipment has 
been shipped to buyers in the U.S. poultry 
and pork industries. 

Improving the way seafood is filleted* 
weighed, salted or otherwise handled is- 
complemented by the use of insulated fish 
tubs, which keep catches fresh until process- 
ing begins. Experiments carried out by Ice- 


landic fisheries Laboratories are also allow- 
ins exporters to increase the keeping nn ^. 
frcLiSr fillets and who|e fish byreplacin^ 
air in plastic packaging with carbon-diox 

squeeze mbie from limited ocean -seal 
stocks is the move to step up , 

value-added' products. A tuII 65 percent 
'the $800 'million groundfish catch, last year 
was processed into frozen fish products. 

The latter figure could be much higher. 
GunhflnMarKristjansson of Iceland Seatooa 
International, the country’s second-largest 
seafood sale* organization, provides an indi- 
cation of -what is at stake. “Specially 
processed items sach as retail-packed natur- 
al portions and breaded fillets earn our mem- 
ber producers 52 percent more per kilogram 
than the same fish would have:fetehed as 
frozen block or other traditional items." 

Outside, the fishing industry; efforts arc 
being made to diversity the economic base 
by attracting othef inaustries from abroad - 
especially power-intensive" ventures^ Ac- 
cordirtg-io the National: Power Company, 
economically exploitable reserves of hydro- 
electric ’and geothermal energy total some 
50.000G WWyear; Ofthis total, at mere 10 
.percent has b^n b£qiiessed. ’ r • - 

■A. modicum of success in attraefing "for- 
eign energy; users has already -been achieved. 
The ISAL aluminum smelter? wholly owned 
by Switzerland's, 'Alusms^-Lonza, exported 
94, 152 tons of ingots and rolling stabs worth 
$120 million "last year. and. it-is the single- 
largest industrial energy consuiiKr- .The ice- 
landic Alk|ys fenosflicdn: smelter^so uses 
hydroelectric energy fo power ks. furtwees. 
. . A recovery in ihe alununum. iitdu&lry may 
see metals concerns Aniax, Hoogc^chs and 


land. The Ice landic Energy Marketing Unit," 
Scottish Hydro, Hamburger Elektrizitat and 
the Dutcb-Icelandic ; Ice net £rgup are dis- 
cussing the feasibility of a super-loug: under- 
sea cable .between" east Iceland and Europe 
that would, relay £.000 GWh/year of .clean 
power to end users. . • 

- Iceland’s; other industries ^ ^inclode woolen 
goods, tanned skins, farmed salnfon. spring- 
water and other items that eaihed a conti 
bined $45 million Iasi year. ; . . J.W. 


And the View From Europe 


O n Iceland’s 50th 
birthday* the rest 
of Western Eu- 
rope views the 
isolated North European is- 
land with a mixture of re- 
spect and concern - respect 
for all that it has achieved 
and concern that the Ice- 
landers’ innate conservatism 
may impede changes neces- 
sary for continued success. 

In the space of just 50 
years and with a population 
of only 250.000, Iceland has 
transformed itself from little 


more than a nationof subsis- 
tence farmers into^a modem 
20thHcenrury state. 

This has been achieved by 
harnessing the Icelandic 
people’s fierce nationalism 
and their incredible capacity 
for hard Work - as well as 
through high tariffs, high 
taxes, heaVy :govemment 
spending and the nanowly 
focused exploitation of the 
country’s major natural re- 
source - fish. " 

The concern for. Iceland's 
future centers on the fact that 


Lauga-As 

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nhe one & onh^ Emoy t. 
Addon: laigowg 20 b, V£2 84 10. 


fish, stocks axe declining be- 
cause of overfishing: fr» 

; 1983, the annual cad quota 
was 40&QOG tons. In 1994; 
the quota is 165.000 tons. 

Iceland's strategic : planr 
ners recognize the heki to 
break away from the fishf 
" based economy and are bop^ 
ing to exploit the island’s 
geostrategic position: be- 
tween North America and 
Northern Europe id become 
an offshore manufacturing 
platfonn foc.boti» uiaifets. 
Aitractingthe foragnrcapital 
needed will involve opening 
up the Icelandic economy • , 
with lower, tariffs, lower cor- 
porate’ arid personaJtaxes, a 
devaluation of tbe_ krona; 
lower salaries and subsidies. 

At the start of this year, 
Iceland gmned "additional ac- 
cess to the markets of the 
^ European Union as a me ru- 
ber of the Eurcqjean Eco- 
nomic Area, and it h^ roade 
approaches to the. United 
States about acceding io 
! NAFTA. 

;• At the same time as they 
seek closer relationships, 
however,, the Icelanders are 
retaining a definite aloof- 
ness. Alone among the 
EFTA countries, Iceland has 
until now rejected the Idea 
of membership in the £U, 
out- Of fear that it would 
open its territorial waters to 
European trawlers. - 

Another important ele- 
ment in the planners’ vision 
is Iceland's enormous poten- 
tial for the production of hy- 
droelectric and geothermal 
energy. These visions are 
being opposed by a vocifer- 
ous enviroranehtalist lobby 
. whose goal is tp protect one 
erf- the most .unspoiled land- 
scapes; m the Western world, 
by the powerful fishing lob- 
by concerned about the 
transfer ^ of capital resources., 
aad by powerful nationalis- 
tic forces worried about a di- 
lution of national sovereign- 

Thomas S. Anns 



Financial Institutions Have Supported Today’s Supplement on Iceland 


ISLAN DSBAN K ! 

islandsbanki hf. 

International Department 
Armuli 7. 155 Reykjavik, Iceland 
Tei: (354) - 1 - 608500 
Telefax: (354) - 1 - 687784 


BUNADARBANKl 

Islands 

THE ASfilCULTUBAL BANK OF ICELAND 

5455 Rcy*tav& Iceland 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 





Deserts, Rivers. Glaciers and Geysers 




ADVERTISING SECTION 


ith 5220 million 
in foreign-ex- 
change earnings 
in 1 993, Ice- 
. land s tourism industry is 
the second-largest sector of 
the economy after fishing 
and fish processing - and by 
far the most dynamic one. 
According to the Iceland 
■Tourist Board, visitor totals 
increased 1 1 percent, to 
;i58„000, last year, and the 
numbers could get even 
larger in 1994, the 50th an- 
niversary of the country's 
independence. 

"We’ve had healthy jump 
in foreign arrivals during the 
first five months of this 
year,” says the director of 
the Iceland Tourist Board, 
Magnus Oddsson. “Most 
noticeable is -the rise in 
tourists coming in during the 


off season, outside the heavy 
summer months.” 

Mr. Oddsson notes that 
while Iceland still remains 
relatively unknown in com- 
parison to other European 
vacation spots, most visitors 
are surprised to learn how 
modem the small Nordic 
country is. 

“It's important to spread 
the word that Iceland has 
built up a well-developed 
tourist infrastructure. Our 
transport and communica- 
tions networks are on a par 
with the best that other 
countries have to offer,” he 
says. 

Of course, Iceland’s 
unique landscape and natur- 
al environment are the draw- 
ing points for most visitors. 
Only 15 million years old, 
the country is a geological 


newcomer that owes rolling 
fields of lava, deserts of 
black sand, natural hot 
springs and erupting geysers 
to the volcanically active 
Mid-Atlantic Ridge it sits 
atop. The beautiful canyon 
that runs through Thingveilir 
National Park, site of fie an- 
cient Icelandic parliament, is 
the meeting point of two of 
the Earth’s tectonic plates. 

Gulf Stream waters keep 
the climate warmer than 
might be expected, though 
Iceland's location just south 
of the Arctic Circle has left it 
cold enough to preserve the 
Ice Age glaciers that cover 
1 1 percent of its surface area 
— most notable is Vatna- 
jokull. Europe’s largest ice 
cap. Volcanoes and giant 
waterfalls, carved out by 
glacial movement and rag- 


U 









Pony-trekking is a relaxed, human-scale ivay to explore the country 's natural wonders. 

50th Anniversary Stamps 


ing rivers, complete the 
spectacle. 

Icelandair. the national 
carrier, can lake a great deal 
of credit for putting the 
country squarely on the 
tourist map. "Icelandair is 
the only private domestic 
entity actively promoting 
and advertising fie country 
in the foreign travel press 
and newspapers.” says the 
company's president and 
chief executive officer, Sig- 
urdur Helgason. 

Since starting -up in 1937, 
the flag carrier has brought 
millions of European and 
American visitors to Ke- 
flavik International Airport 
for vacation stays or a quick 
stopover before proceeding 
to destinations in the United 
States and Europe. "Ice- 
landair pioneered low-fare 
trans-Atlantic flights and 
was the only airline to 
emerge from the competi- 
tion still intact.” Mr. Helga- 
son says, adding that Ice- 
landair' s foreign-exchange 
earnings account for roughly 
half of the 12 percent to 13 
percent contribution tourism 
makes to Iceland's annual 
gross domestic product. 

Some 1 million passen- 
gers flew die airline in 1993. 
"About 80 to 90 percent of 
the foreign travelers we fly 
specifically to Iceland come 
here on vacation,'’ Mr. Hel- 
gason says, adding that Ice- 
landair has one of the 
youngest international fleets 
in the world. 

Among the airline's more 
recent efforts to spread the 
word on Iceland as a vaca- 
tion and stopover destination 
is a $ 1 5 million advertising 
campaign carried out in con- 
junction with government 
agencies, targeting potential 
visitors in Germany, France, 
Sweden, Britain and the 
United States, the largest na- 
tional groups visiting the 
country on a yearly basis. 

While tourist totals are en- 
couraging, increased con- 


H hose fortunate 
enough to .be in 
Iceland today can 
take advantage of 
first-day cancellations of 
commemorative stamps at a 
special temporary post of- 
fice in Thingveilir, - where 
President Vigdfs Finnbo- 
gadoltir, currently serving 
her fourth term, will speak, at 
50th-anniversary celebra- 
tions. 

To mark the anniversary 
of the Republic of Iceland 
on June 17, the Post and 
Telecommunications Ad- 
ministration has issued a 
special commemorative 
sheet of four stamps depict- 
ing Iceland’s presidents | 
throughout the country’s : 
half-century of indepen- I 
deuce. The set is available 
separately or as part of a 


limited-edition folder con- 
taining the individual stamps 
plus two sheets: one mint 
and one bearing a June 17 
first-day cancellation from 
Thingveilir, site of the an- 
cient Icelandic parliament. 

The folder also features 
stunning photography and 
brief write-ups on fie presi- 
dents and various aspects of 
national life. Two three-lan- 
guage versions are offered: 
Icelandic-English- French 
and Icelandic-Danisb-Ger- 
man. (Visitors who happen 
to be in the capital and who 
are interested in plumbing 
the secrets of the Icelandic 


language can turn to Nftms- 
flokkar for summer cours- 
es.) 

For collectors overseas, 
the Post and Telecommuni- 
cations Administration of- 
fers quick delivery' via its 
EMS service, while the Ice- 
land affiliate of DHL World- 
wide Express, which offers 
overnight express service to 
Iceland, will also rush the 
sheet and the presidential 
folder to any destination. 
■The ordinary postal service 
also offers daily air connec- 
tions that guarantee delivery 
to most countries within a 
few days. J.W. 


All available Iceland Books 
All bodts on Iceland available 
Iceland’s leading bookseller 
Ve ship all over (he world 
Esc 354-1-8“ 2b+STeG 354-1135 a 
Aatanmi is- Reykjavik 


^ Evnumdssoo 




Hotel Orb is only some 45 km from Reykjavik. 

Close to Ore dty Out stm distant enough to 
escape its bustle and bustle. ideally located for 
excursions to South & West-Iceland. 


HOTEL ODK 



All Land Arrangements 
Nationwide 


Farm Holidays 
Around Iceland 
Tel: 354-1-02 36 40/42 43 
Fax: 354-1-62 36 44 


RENT A OAR 


fyfraikAtipottRefterU: 
Sffun5. Re/tgarii 
7 eL- + 35 M-OH 13 ta 35*4 423550 

Telex. 2331 


If you are a person concerned about your health 
and a lower of juicy good tasting steaks 
then we have good news for you 





Beef and Lamb. Something Very Special. 

y /-: - . — The dean background ——————— 

A -La uu*™, ,he Arctic Circle where heavy industry is next to none. Where energy 
waterfalls and hot springs and almost 90* of the nation's 
^Sh^^-ooaiity food products. This northern looanon maiM die use of pesuetdes 
mn wviarv In addition; thp use of hormones as a (iced additive is strictly 
landed fresh warer are unique in purity which makes the agricultural 
SkE Sa Meat with a combination of fine texiureand tenders ong.naung 
W Natural fodder such as highland grass, wildflowers and herbs. 

. — — ■ The taste : 

Wuuthorof dus advertisement gave up tbe struggle of describing the flavor of Icelandic beef 

V.Y v ; - - and lamb. His only suggestion: 


•t, o( \[\\ H TOT VS I J 1 1 IQ BKlJL.v UL 


in presenting these nrnqrie prodoots inyonraree please contact us. 
•-> i ICELAND. Tel: i354;-l-611812. Telefax: (354>I-61 183-.. 


ED AllS hf. 

DIAMONDS OF ICELAND 
P.O. Box 1111 
IS - 121 Reykjavik . Iceland 
Tel : 354 1 655412 
Fax: 354 1 665411 


TRADE COUNCIL 
OF ICELAND 

UnwnWBMB 

■«u.uc MUQ 4 oQ *sc» mn 
leoAi# 

Ta. *3M)i in 
■•1 tytai 1 





V,** 



Str&tygeotogk&foanatkxisatLateMyvatn. 


vend on and incentive traffic 
has helped make Iceland a 
year-round destination. In 
Reykjavik, five first-class 
hotels, including Ice- 
landair’ s Hotel Esja and Ho- 
tel Loftleidir - now mem- 
bers of the Scandic family - 
offer 721 bedrooms and ful- 
ly equipped conference and 
banqueting facilities. The 
Post and 'Telecommunica- 
tions Administration pro- 
vides reliable international 
direct links for telephone, 
fax and dam networks, while 
a multitude of restaurants to 
suit all tastes and budgets, 
shops, cafes and nightclubs 
offer leisure-time pursuits. 

Incentive groups com- 
monly combine business 
with pleasure by taking ad- 
vantage of the stunning 
landscape. Last year. Coin- 
treau Re my Deutschland 
launched a major advertising 
campaign with a banquet 
held at 1.875 meters above 
sea level on Vatnajokull 
glacier. The country’s varied 
landscape is also providing a 
refreshingly different back- 
drop in television spots for 
everything from Japanese 
cars to Scottish beer. 

Arsaell Hardarson. man- 
aging director of the Con- 
vention and Incentive Bu- 
reau, says that media promo- 
tion focusing on Iceland’s 
natural environment and 
modem conference facilities 
are to be thanked for the rise 
in convention and incentive 
guests. Advertising has cen- 


tered on trade magazines in 
Germany and Britain, and 
the CIB participates in exhi- 
bitions and invites key con- 
ference planners and incen- 
tive professionals to the 
country. 

“There are many encour- 
aging signs," Mr. Hardarson 
says. “In the U.K_ for exam- 
ple, we’re now beginning to 
experience tangible results 
from a promotional cam- 
paign conducted by Ice- 
landair and the Iceland 
Tourist Board, which has led 
both to increased coverage 
of the country in local media 
and a significant rise in die 
□umber of inquiries received 
from travel operators and 
conference planners. 

’’There is a huge amount 
of interest in Iceland abroad, 
and since the introduction 
last June of Icelandair' s tri- 
angular, twice-daily Ke- 
flavik -Copenhagen-Ham- 
burg service, the country is 
more accessible than ever. 
Iceland is just two to three 
hours by air from the Conti- 
nent, so meeting here no 
longer means three days 
away from home.” 

To convention and incen- 
tive travelers and other visi- 
tors it may mean a dip in 
natural hot springs, snow- 
mobile trips up Vatnajokull. 
a jeep safari to Thingveilir 
National Park, pony trek- 
king on tbe Icelandic horse, 
lunch in an ice cave or sim- 
pler pleasures such as coffee 
after the opera. J.W. 



KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

me Transatlantic 
let 1st tn Iceland 


Midway between America and Europe, there’s a nestfol 
of comforts at Iceland’s Keflavik International Airport 
and its srylish new Leifor Eiriksson passenger terminal. 
Named after ! ci! ihe Lucky, the first Transatlantic 
traveler, rhu terminal enjoys a reputation for its wide 
•.election of duty-free merchandise and moderate prices 


- and it’s tbe only place in Europe offering dury-ftee 
shopping for arrivals as well as departures. Besides the 
familiar international range of products you’ll find 
distinctive Icelandic arts St crafts. Comfortable, 
reliable, friendly and efficient: ihc Leifor Eiriksson 
terminal is a luefcv break for Transatlantic travelers. 


KEFLAVIK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT - ICELAND 

Anf* n Offices • 235 Keflavik Airpon • kcUnd • TeL • Fax •»?5s-].5o6lu 



bring you w* 

I some or nature's best 

B4 Kt'Urfk Inirnuuonil Airpon - 'Phone-. »154 - 2 • 50 4 SO 

Four decades of 
quality construction 

Iceland Prime Co n t r a c tor 

Hoc! rffior 1PC 25 Kdhvik Uebnl 

Td *Vfc-M OX> Fa* *.**246215 


Wail till you get to Iceland and make 

GIGANTIC SAVINGS 

at the Keflavik Duty-Free Store 

DUTYFREE 

KEFlAViK AIRPORT - ICELAND 

Keflavik Contractors 

Fbr quality work 

Tel. +354-2-14055 Fax:+354-2-57260 


i'djrtvirh 

Mpse 

Ti*n«Kra) 






















*<<c“aa»a»'p-oTio»Hc: 


Pace 22 


PSTER N ATIO\ A L HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 






Olajuwon to Tie 
Rockets at 2-2 




For Indians, No. 14 
In a Row at Home 



By Clifton Brown 

Sew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Whatever ii look, 
the Nerw York K/iieks were willing to 
do- 
lt took Charles Oakley grabbing 20 
rebounds and blocking out the pain ol 
hi s sore left ankle. It look another 
classy point-guard performance by 
Derek Harper, who scored 21 points, 
made five 3-po inters and played ihe 
entire second half. It look the leader- 

NBA FINAL 

ship of John Surks, who scored 10 of 
New York's last 13 points. 6 on two 3- 
point baskets is the final four minutes. 
And it look five Knicks reaching dou- 
ble figures to offset the onslaught of 
Hakeem Olajuwon. who played his 
most dominant game of the series and 
scored 22 of his 32 points in the second 
half. 

Tying ihe Basketball National Bas- 
ketball Association championship se- 
ries. 2-2. the Knicks outlasted the 
Houston Rockets. 91-82. in a game 
they had to have to avoid falling far 
behind in the best-of-seven series. 

But the Knicks played with aban- 
don. not fear, racing to a 17-2 lead, 
then regrouping after the Rockets 
stormed back to take a 6-point lead 
late in the third quarter. 

3oth reams left the building think- 
ing about Game 5. Friday night in 
Madison Square Garden. 

“Right now, we're one win aw\iy a: 
home 'from playing for the title.” said 
the Knicks' coach. Pat Riley. “That in 
itself is motivation enough.” 


The Rockets' biggest concern was 
the condition of Robert Horry, the 
starting small forward who left Game 
4 late in the third quarter after hi.* 
back and both wrists were bruised on a 
flagrant foul by Anthony Mason. 

The injury' occurred as Horry tried 
to dunk over Mason on a drive to the 
basket. His status for Game 5 was 
questionable. 

While Otis Thorpe. Houston’s pow- 
er forward, called the play “uncalled 
for.” Horry said: “It u as jusl one of 
these things that happens. I went in to 
dunk and he fouled me hard.” 

The Knicks prevailed because they 
made the bigger plays down ihe 
stretch, particularly Harper and 
Starks. Patrick Ewing had an erratic 
game, finishing with Jb prcBt* and 1? 
rebounds. >r»d foming out vith 1:13 
left. Bui Starks and Harper refused te- 
le: the Knicks fall apart. 

“I believe :he play of the guards will 
determine which ream will win." 
Starks said. 

With the score tied at “2 with 5:4“ 
to go. the Knicks went or. a 5-0 run 
and never traded again. The closes i 
the Rockets got after that was 35-82 
when Olajuw on made two free throw - 
with 1:13 lefl after Ewing fouled out. 
But Starks answered with two free 
throws with 52.5 seconds to play, and 
the Rockets never scored again." 

If Starks *j« correct cboui tlfc 
guards, the Rockets may have prob- 
lems. Kennv Smith, their stoning point 
guard, continued to play badly with just 
2 points. .And Sam CassdJ. the backup 
rookie pom: guard who was outstand- 
ing in Game 5. made « *nly 5 of 1 1 shots, 
finishing with 10 points." 










Bb i -a S& If ’ r ’ 


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Tt. Gin 4;.-w 

Patrick Ewing, who later fouled out. ran afoul of Hakeem Olajuwon. left, and Kenny Smith. 

V.— Johnsca. l— 3r>» «. S-C O a*., 1 hr*— e u»rwa. Santiago t4i. Aubcit tS'. s:. 


*• ^ziaEftSE&Asx- • *&&&&&&& 




The Expos Stay Mo% 
But So Do the Braves 


The .1sso:u:e,i Press 

The Montreal Expos are 12-2 so 
far in June, yet they have gained 
only Hi games in "the standing* 
over those last 15 days. The reason: 
the Atlanta Braves" are in-5 over 
the same span and still have a two- 
game lead in the NL East. 

Montreal completed a three- 
game sweep of the visiting Piits- 

-NXRQINDUP 

burgh Pirates with a 13-2 victory 
Wednesday, having won the first 
two games ry 10-2 and 12-7. 

“’.V-Ve «r.( a Jot r.f guys really 
swinging it." said the manager. Fe- 
iipe Alci'u. 

The Expos had 15 hits, and Ker. 
Hi!', became the second 10-game 
winner in the league. Darrin 
Fletcher had four RBI?. Marquis 
Grissom went 2-for-4 and scored 
three trines. Moises Aloe was 3-for- 
4 with his llih homer and Wil 
Cordero and rookie Cliff Floyd 
also drove in two runs apiece. 

Braves 4, Rockies 0: Dave Jus- 
tice hit two bases-empty homers 
aad drove in three runs in Atlanta 
as John Smoltz won his third 
straight game. Visiting Colorado 


has now lost f? of fC games to 
Atlanta. 

Mets l. Philiro 0: John Franc*'* 
tied Dave Rj&hewi nr rn, v -t -ave, 
by a left-handcu relief pitcher, get- 
ting his 252c as Toad Hundley 
drove in a run with a sixth-inning 
single that beat Philadelphia in 
New York. 

Reds 4. Dodt*sr* 2: Hal Morris. 
the second-leading hitter in the 
league at .3H. drove ir. the tying 
and go-ahead runs as Cincinnati 
won in Lo* Angc!e». 

Astros 7. Giants 2: Luis Gonza- 
lez drove in three runs and Ken 
Ca mi nit; two win'd Doug Drubck 
scattered eight nits in his league- 
leading fifth complete game a> 
Houston ■von ir. San Francisco. 

Cubs 5. Padres 0: Chicago got 
four unearned run? as ;t won in San 
Diego. 

Murfiih 13. Cardinals 3: Greg 
Cclbmnn drove in four run:, and 
Jeff Corine went 4-fur-6 vilL three 
RB!s as Florida won an Si. Louis. 


To subscribe in Germany 

just call, loll free, 

0120 3-1 05 35 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Eo»! SIlilMS 

W L PC. 
rlcm York ;? *f ia- 

Sallirnorc 31 Z: - - 

Bosion 7i :s 

D*rroii r. x s't 

Tarcnu * " 4 '3 

Ce-.irji o.vliin 

CteweiorJ Jj .« «' 

M.nn«3oia > r 5-1 

Oilcauc :j .*• 

Kansas Cllr XJ ZC SZi 

Milwaukee S :5 iwi 

;v-f( OMi'On 

Texas :i 3.’ H2 

Senile :: Jt s.i 

Cahiom.v r y> y? 

Ooklcnd ;i i m . T.* 


Tht Associated Press 

On the day the Cleveland Indi- 
ans announced that they had al- 
ready sold enough rickets to set an 
attendance record, Jim Thome gave 
the fans another reason to keep 
coming to Jacobs Field. 

He homered with one out in the 
13th ioning on Wednesday night, 
and the Indians beat the Toronto 

alroundup 

Blue Jays. 4-3, for their 14tb 
straight victory at home 

That is the longest such streak m 
the majors since Boston won 24 in a 
row at Fenway Park in 1988. 

Cleveland overcame a 3-0 deficit 
in the eighth, then went on to win 
for the eighth time in nine extra- 
inning game s this year. They were 
2-12 in extra innings last season. 

The Indians had oca won 14 
straight home games since I9S4. 
The team record is 16 consecutive 
home wins, set in 1951 at Qevdaad 
Stadium. 

“This is one of my most dramatic 
times in pro ball — winning a 
game , being in first place,” Thome 
said. “We keep rattling back. 
Thai’s what first-place teams have 
to do.” 

During the day. the Indians said 
they had sold 2.63 million tickets 
for their first season at Jacobs 
Field. That insures dial they wifi 
break the team attendance record 
of 2,620.627. set in 1948, the last 
year they won the World Series. 

Orioles 8, Yankees 4: Chris 
HoOes hit 2 sacrifice By th at put 
Baltimore, playing at home, ahead 
during a five-run rally in the eighth 
that beat first-place flew York. 


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NATIONAL LEAGUE 
ECSI S.viS.or, 

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Atlanta 
VdnlAHl 
Honda 
Phi la ae i A Ufa 
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Oncmr.oii 
Houslcn 
Si. Loui*. 
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Chicago 

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Wednesday's Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Seattle 911 DM 107—5 u a 

Texas 000 090 079— J 7 0 

Johnson. Do v<s ;«) ood Alison; Brovwi. Hot- 
cvcuH 19). Hcwe" i?) and Raorigue:. 


;ui'*rs (■!'. rpj— .Mnta't. V-oc* X.. 

r-.-t*. ,3*. Ec.::n. taaser ill.. 

sr* va-A ;o-; o« otd — t i a 

bali’ir.or- 2 k 0W U«— 9 15 0 

lOttm. F :H id jiavir- .|. .••ic*ncn 
Scrrrrtiei £. jna •_* -.-r Vt-r °tr'7 
vj«s if vs. :z L—.Vfc* - 

nicn.;.'_nS'.— £s- irirre 1:» .4 .hone* •'< 
Torania M2 XC C90 3« J— 3 *1 I 

Clervlzne KO an .32 £3) 1—3 7! ! 
115 irnmoil 

Sfoii>eir.».'c. V. »•••:(. cr-; i»:. Casiilio t e : 
Hall HC* 5*r* cn= Bc'Srz M w* 
°ign* 1 10). L«.ii3c<s: ■ ?C» V«c H*‘ B.-0 iA- 
I ana- *-■<«:: 5<-o« 0 -:.«Rs— CK- 

.elc*-3. KlrS, <7 '’lern? 

Grrro.- 021 010 :«»— j T 5 

MtMstMK 19! nr J9s— Ii 1! I 

#92.-9. f:zv:~ s’ 5.ce»cr lei ona 
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~ <’:•••: 10 it,: r 2 - -i? .Vtjmcn 
w— v-.ac.A*.- h*»— r'eioc? tie -e- 
*. ■I'.j.j',... 3.sSi w ''Zi 
CalRe.-n.s J1J 0« «|i— 3 ' 3 

Kansas C‘n> l). Jtl Del — ! ; : 

.Vocreno. 2VIC-19' -i . --'.'nets •*< 

MLMt’ l ; : 2 -: ^as-ria- ■ T^.-.-..r 1 = r ; ab- 
sior S'«*e, |3 V .-«s:r*.f. rn- vac- 

/orient l-Z L— Ltl/rTJ. 7- 

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OofclanS :tti OU H4-T ‘.5 i 

OC09i> ■£■ 151 300 — 5 » t 

Pt.n Lcise- ; i* ..i!u s- Hs-tnm-'j 
Ac ro '5 c:i -3 c «• r-c n -.a 

Ds.-iis •• • a'c . . 

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St. Laois OH 0CO 075— 7 7 0 

Momewi- Dronman 1 B'.. Lewis 1 ** end Sen- 
hooo. Suicim-. Everwera 'Sj. P.Paariiie: 
(6). NLPere: IV. VVu-en, i«j ano Posnosi. 
•VtcC-riH w— fAor-.em. '■&. L— Su.'cJiKr. J- 


Hn rcr* C33 CO! COX — 2 7 a 

.Vjt.y/ililtrrs. Anoerser. ISi :rc Dc- *or.; 
BJsnes. P-an— >ei and Hvrdwr. 
w— Ezines. -- « L-vty/.«ia«. 

s-r— Frcrva 1 ; 0 i. 

Colorado CC0 CJ0 009— c t 0 

Atlanta :oo lo: km t e 

i-crns. Mar-;: i?i.V"'t :!! sreShesffer; 
Smsttz. Stariar. |»:. 9mn3,in •*; ar*c Z Br • 
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Piitssoroh CIO 3)0 eao— j 10 i 

Mowrefsi SI3 101 Er— ' 13 15 0 

Weiner. Eel-ori Ui.VJcWi ‘f- VjWi'lc 
Pence: arc Parr K-.r.-: *s«nr. t-.s 
Fleraner See— — ; *■— .— /.agree. 
4 5 S*— «e-*ry . |.. HR— Vjmrec . Aiou :i;;. 
Co-.ci.meti ooc 120 ion—* i o 

Lcs Aaoeiss O'. I KO «C0— 2 7 2 

Pc®et.-.3rcm , 2* i‘ vcZcxr stSut 
■Jsvnc'7* .'oicss •.!!«« p>c=c .V— s.sao-.t.; 
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Cfticoca 013 *30 oe— £ 7 t 

Sar. 3 1990 etc CX MO-O T 3 

t-s:-:9. Puss:**' Sc-j»-s*a's 5. -nst' 

it.CRdVViM.U. ST. ;-;r* ~7?3'3 -Si Vft. 
Sf.'iB/cne Aiir-.i-- .V— j— w — *;. 
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Japanese Leagues 

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Hircsb'/ra :) 2 ° 0 

Thunder i Pesuifs 
/cnwirl 2, Konshin I 
Ycfcuit 4. Chun.cn- I 
Yoroncma 4. Hitfliina 2 


TRursdors Resorts 
S9-6*.- S Lotte 0 
Ori* 1 Kintetsu 2 

NBA Finals 

WEDNCSDATTS RESULT 
Sortes :Md 2-2 

Mocston M n 28 2T— «2 

New Tort If 71 B Jt— 71 

Hcuston: Horry 3-9 M 19. Thorne 4-7 1-3 9. 
Cni-Mil )•■« 44 JZ Mcxwell 5-13 W U 
.^.S»T.»1»5-rM4 «ja*9« J-ltM la eileft^M 
0. Herrera 1 -3 3-2 5. Sul ton) t-3 1-3 A Totals 31 - 
75 i4-ie CL 

New T Ort ; OaWe*- « M 10. CAnltt* 5-1 5 M 
'L Ew^rs t-2BM 16. Harper 7-15M 2). Storks 
O-'i A-S 29. Mason 1-4 0-1 2. Banner VI 04 Z 
Ar.fnc.-ir >4 34 ATotols 2546 14-21 fl. 

J- Point 9oalS— Houston 6-20 IHorrv 3-5. 
•YjuweU Z-6. Euiioro 1-3. Cassell I -4. /csmitti 
3-:>- New York S-17 (Hcmer 5-10. SlorXs 2-5. 
CSniifh 0-:. Aninon/ 0-1). Fooled a at — Ewlrta. 
ReaourOs— Houston 43 (Tharoe 10). New 
•trr. oO (Sexier 2CI. Assists - Ho us t on 17 
Cesse'l Si. New rork 31 IHorcer £). Total 
frills- H ou slcn 2~. New York 23 Tedtoical- 
fc— .icrpsr. New York Hlegoi defense. Fto- 
crert taut— A*«on. 

• " , - . ' • Ii- 

9A5ERALL 
American Ltone 

BAltivoRE— S igned Tommy Doris, In- 
Pelder-. and assigned him la AIDanv. SAL. 

CALIFORNIA— TrodeO Dwtohf Smith, out- 
fielder. to Baltimore lor player named later. 
Activated Re* Hudler. infietder. tram 15day 
disasied list. Designated Bruce DoaM. otrf- 


HoSes had two hits and 
two runs, and Cluis Sabo homo™* 
Twins 7, Red Sox 5: Kent H rbek 

hi I a iw^nm homer in the fnsLand 

Shan e Mack homcred in a thr«- 

ran thin! as visiting Minnea^a 

its seventh in a iow and sent Boston 

to its seventh straight loss. - 
Hie Red Sox have 
straight at Fenway ddjOJ&n 
they also lost nine straightath^ 
jn 1991, not since 1927 have^bey- 
lost 10 scaight at Fenway FaA* 

AMetel, Whitt SmSRubm 

Sena hit a three-run homer as 
Oakland rallied for four runs m the 
ninth to win in Chicago. Sierra had 
five RBls in the game. 

Royals 4, Angels 3: Jose Lind hit 
a sacrifice fly with one out in the 
nin th atiri Kansas Gt)" beat VlSlling 
Calif cania, which had tied it m the 
top of inning on Bo Jackson s- dou- 
ble and Spike Owen's single. 

Brewers 11, Tigers 7: Greg 
- Vaughn homcred ana brer drove to 
a run that led to a seveo-nm sixth 
with which Milwaukee beat visiting 
Detroit. Cecil Fielder and Junior 
Fdix homcred for the Tigers who, 
at 21 straight games, are four short 
of the major league record set by 
the 1941 Yankees. 

Griffey Hits 29th 

The Associated Press 

ARLINGTON, Texas — Ken 
Griffey Jr. hh bis major league- 
leading 29th homer as the Seattle 
Mariners beat die Texas Rangers, 
5-2, with Randy Johnson staking 
out 12 in his sixth straight victory. 

Griffey homcred four tunes in 
the three-game series. He has hit 19 
home nms against tbeRangers, his 
most against any team. 


Bolder, tor o a lu nail. UcaMd Dam Bu- 
ford wMlaMcr, from RodMSfer# IL. 
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-AsrMd to term* 

wBhOo1*JuUicTCinrooafcJo!to Ambrose, and 

Jeromy GriffWv.artdiara; Dawto Beardon 
and wUBam Moor*, shertsum end Jerry 
WUHckarjoutfleldor. BaaWd eootract of Dm 
Hawfif. autfMder# (roai NasbvRb AA. Op- 
Uaaod OtRMdo Sans. knfWdar, lo NasIMIIa. 

CLEVELAND— Signed Chip Glass, out- 
fMdor. to mlnor-taagac u a utr o il . AcRvatod . 
Omar VtzaueL S wri Mta k (ton iMw dls- 
abtad UtL Ootloned BIN Worts. Pitcher, to 
cuartotto. ii- 

MILWAUKEE— ActhmOetf - Kevftr SeNkgr. 
biftektor, from 15-day HUM IbL Oatiancd 
toff OrKta. toflaMBT. to New Orleans. AA. 

SEATTLE— flecoiled Jeft DarwftLpRcter. 
from Cataarv. PCI- OMtanod To nt IjovoiM^ 
(Bflelder. to Catoary- 
TEXA5 — Called up Jofut Dettmer. vttdmr. 
from Okhmomo city* AA. Signed J o hn P owo l L' 
pWcher; AsM Orttz, sharstop; and Edward 
Comeaux, outfielder. 

TORONTO— Bought contractor DaveTUgtV " 
■KL promt, from KMxvtlM. SI- OMlemd 
Aaron $roaU,Pi1tl«r, to Syracuse, ll_ Put AJ 
Loltor. pitcher, on lSaav disabled list. Re- 
called Woody Williams, pitcher, from' Syro- 
cuso. Signed Michael Zoverstowk. rttotwr, 
and Katilapo Vma. outfielder. 

I#ulluuul LiaaD# 

ATLANTA-Signed Darrin Ebert, oBcfMr; 
Gus Kennedy and OwtgM Lords, autflaiders; 
Sadie) Suarez and Angel Espoda. h iBeMers. 
and Colby weaver and Adam Midlen, catcher*. 

CHICAGO CUB 1 B o ught flontracf of Mike 
iMaksudton.cotdiar-lst baMmavfram unva. 
AA. 

FLORIDA— Recalled Terry M ol hews. 
Pitcher. Ram Edmonton, PCL Optioned Russ 
Mormon. Is) baseman, to Ettranton. 


EadMlSk 


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bounded tato lhe ; eariy 4^^|c ^ 

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SECOND TEST 
engtaed K. Mem Zealand 
F*r*f Day, Thursday/ In Leaden 
Sun es of tool 

Near Zealand first Innings: M0-4 is overs 1 


Every Tuesday . ] 

Cortact c. 

Fred RancHt ■ 

. TdL:- • v. ' ,.. -'* 

{33 1} 46379391;. . 

foe'. ' 

(33 1)46379370. y 

or your nearest 

IHT office y : 

or representedve /: 


’$* | *= 
“•Vf firr 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


C ALMN AND HOBBES 




















SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 


Page 23 


SCHEDULE CUP: For Act I, a Mystery 


% 


'« -.~r, *«asj 




■ - , 


FIRST ROUND 

AMjtma Besom Standmi lime 
1?raapafrtt«MnfadforaricK)fy 
GROUP A 

W L T GFGt p, 

caumte o o o a a 0 

RoaanH D o o o o a 

SMMrttnd 0 o o o o o 

IMM State 0 0 0 o Q o 

Sttodty, June 18 
At Ponte. uohL 

3K4tzertond v*. Unttatf StoMa, lias #jn. 

At Panama, CaUL 

OOtaobiaw. Romania. 7.35 pun. 

June 22 


At 


irr-ijw. 

\ -cir-Ti ' 
-***4 ! 


...-.j 

■ r.: 


“* 'Ch 




- ..-J -- 

iT ~ ^ 

. ■ “■ ! " r ;coaj 

v'^i* 


.* -Vy'iars f 

>*XIKe' 




Romania vs. SMtzertand. 4:05 p m 
At Pasadana. CaBf. 

CotomMo w. iteotf Sterna. 735 pm. 
Snoday June 26 
. At Pasadena. Cam 
Roman* wl (MM State, 4*5 PJB . 

AlStanloid, CaM. 
Ssatnriarmva.CotamteMSp.nl. 
GROUPS 

W L T GF M Pt. 
Bnri 0 0 0 0 0 o 

Cameroon 0 0 0 0 a o 

Russia 0 0 o o 0 o 

Sweden 0 0 0 0 0 q 

Sunday, June 19 
At Pasadena, CafiL 
Cnhmhm. Sweden, 73S pjn. 

Monday June 20 

At Stanford. Cam. 
tazflM. Russia. -MS pun. 

Friday Juna 24 
Ai Stanford. Cam. 

BtazBvft. Cameroon, 4.05 o ra. 

At Pontiac, Ucti. 

O aad en wt Russia. 735 p-nv. 

Tu esday June 28 
At Stanford. Ca«. 

RueUm vs. Cameroon, MS pm. 

At Ponttac. Mich. 

Bmd vs- Sweden. 405 fun. 

. GROW C 

W L T OF QA Pts 
BoBvto 0 D 0 0 0 0 

Germany 0 0 0 0 o 0 

South Korea 0 0 D D 0 0 

Spdn 0 0 0 0 0 0 

Friday, June 17 
n Chicago 

Garnmny ra. Boftvte. ao9 pun. 


Continued from Page 1 

®ost important match to daw in 
this country. 

. No one can say that FIFA, the 
international soccer federation, 
twsu t tried to adapt to American 
ways. The first round wiD pair only 
eight teams from the tournament 
by the end of June — but with a 
nue change that awards imiw 
J ree points for a victory, FIFA is 
hoping to avoid the draws that 
brought 1990’s first round in Italy 

to a standstill. Referees have been 
upgraded to avoid the embairass- 
ments inflicted by unruly Argenti- 
na that summer. 

The U.S. Soccer Federation has 
not fulfilled its promise to start a 
major professional soccer league in 
the year preceding this tournament, 
which would have satisfied FIFA’s 
cvougwijtic World Cup goal of 
converting, the United States into a 
true soccer nation. Again, the over- 
riding feeling here is me of ambiv- 
alence. Though ticket snafus 
threaten to prevent this World Cup 
from becoming the first to be sold 
out, a record majority of its 3.6 
million tickets have already been 
purchased, two-thirds of them by 
Americans. Americans are ambi- 
tious with big events because this 
country understands bow to exploit 


played in antiseptic environments 
surrounded by giant video screens 
and glassed-in luxury boxes. 

The greatest myth of American 


rt is that, since the tainting of 
lie Chi- 


1919 World Series by the 
cago “Black Sox,” the games have 
been pure. Indeed, the U.S. sports 
leagues have successfully instilled 
the myth that such a conspiracy 
would be impossible to carry out 
because it would have to involve 
too many players. If Americans 
take to international soccer, it wiD 
be interesting to see how they react 
to revelations that the world's most 
popular sport is afflicted with brib- 
ery and match-fixing, infected by 
politicians and supported by fans 
whose win -at-all -costs mentality 
might weD blow away the Ameri- 
cans’ self-perceived ambitions. 

The greatest factor in the World 
Cup’s success might be the U.S. 
team itself. Brazil remains the only 
country to win on a foreign conti- 
nent, having seized the 1958 title 
from host Sweden. This statistic 
may energize Mexico, but it is irrel- 
evant to the United States, which 
hasn’t won a match since that upset 
of England 44 years ago. It didn’t 
return to the finals until 1990, when 
it was outscorcd by 8-2 in three 
matches. 1 is voy appearance in Ita- 
ly was shepherd eel by FIFA, which 


Brazil Favored 
By Oddsmakers 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The British 
bookmaker Coral is listing 
Brazil as the 3-1 favorite to 
win the World Clip, followed 
by Germany (7-2), the Nether- 
lands and Italy (6-!), Colom- 
bia (9-1 ) and Argentina (10- 1 ). 

U.S. oddsmakers have Bra- 
zil and Germany the co-favor- 
ites at 4-1. followed by Italy at 
5-1, then Colombia and Ar- 
gentina at 7-1. Ireland is listed 
as 75-1 among U.S. bettors. 

Coral said Thursday that 
betting on the 52-match con- 
test could reach £30 million 
(S45 million}, 10 percent more 
than the 1990 World Cup in 
Italy, although England, Scot- 
land and Wales failed to quali- 
fy 


Many of the bets bad been 
on Ireland, whose odds had 
been cut from 50-1 to 28-1. 
Nigeria had also bear popular 
with bettors, going from 150-1 
to 33-1 in recent days. 


Germany’s 6 Reasons Not to Win 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

CHICAGO — If the Germans are favored by 
some to win the World Cup. it’s for the same six 
reasons that others expect than to fail Those 
six reasons are 30 years of age or older, and 
among them are Lothar Matthaus, Andreas 
Brehme, Rudi Voller and Guido BucbwakL 
The defending champion Germans are seek- 
ing to become tire first nation to win four World 
- Cups as weD as the first to play in four consecu- 
tive finals. The tournament will revolve around 
them beginning with the opening match here 
Friday at Soldier Field against Bolivia, which 
has been outscored by 16-0 in three previous 


“We realize the players don't need to train at 
•They need to . 


World Cup ma tches 
it German) 


_ West Germany won the tournament three 
times, in 1954, *74 and ’90. The host Americans, 
fighting an inferiority complex, will be happy to 
know that West Germany's Buodeshga wasn’t 
formed until 1962. The Germans aren't bogged 
down with tradition, maintainin g a fresh effi- 
ciency — and now a united Germany comes to 
the World Cup finals for the first time in 56 
years. 

Yet Germany’s biggest fear is not its rival 
Brazil, but age- Beni Vogts, a defendw along- 
side Franz Beckenbauer on the 1974 champi- 
ons, and now trying to recreate Beckenbauer’s 
managerial victory of 1990, has reacted to the 
ongoing Midwestern beat wave by canceling 
morning practices on Tuesday and Wednesday. 


all,” Vogts said. “They need to recharge their 
batteries and that proved to be more valuable.’ 

A wise move, it nonetheless affirms the Ger- 
man concerns. Unable to come up with a new. 
young striker, Vests retained the 34-year-old 
V5Der, who retired after suffering a broken arm 
during the 1992 European Champi onship s 

Brehme, the 33-year-old defender who con- 
verted the winning penalty shot in the last 
World Cup, was also called out of retirement 
despite his loss of speed Hie 33-year-old Ger- 
man engine, Mat thins, has proven fully recov- 
ered from major knee surgery two years ago, 
but the next month will make greater demands 
than these players knew in their youth. 

Summer beat is a fact of every World Cup. 
Temperatures in the low 30s celsras (upward of 
90 degrees Fahrenheit) and excessive humidity 
will follow Germany through its second game 
here a g a inst Spain on Tuesday, and then four 
days later in Dallas against South Korea. The 
opponents are not so much the concern as is toe 
wear and tear going into the knockout rounds 
of July, when a weary favorite would become 
vulnerable. 


tins,” said defender Thomas Berthold “We are 
in great condition. We take great pride in that.” 

The only other concern is the problems up 
front, which led to the recalling of Voller — but 
even this has been answered by JQrgen Klins- 
mann’s recent return to form. Otherwise, the 
Germans appear as firmly in control as ever. 
Their personnel have remain^ constant over 
the last four years, but no new rival has stepped 
forward Vogu has rated Brazil as the favorite, 
but there is a wariness among his players that 
their greatest rival will be the team that grows 
hot over the next two weeks, effectively rising 
out of nowhere. 


Beckenbauer has wished that Germany could 
have strengthened itself in the qualifying 
rounds, rather than earning an automatic place 
as defending champion in the 24-team final. 
Criticisms of Vogts following Germany’s sur- 
prise European Championship defeat to Den- 
mark have been washed away by Germany’s 
success beginning with the U.S. Cup last sum- 
mer against Brazil, England and the United 
States, and extending through friendlies this 
spring. 


“I don’t think we can go full-out for 90 
minutes,” said Vogts, retitmga refrain com- 
mon among other coaches. ‘‘We're going to 
have to alter our game a little.” 

“Eight years ago in Mexico it was hotter than 


The Bolivians upset Brazil, 2-0, eariy in qual- 
ifying— but that was in the high altitude of La 
Paz. No such advantage exists lor them here, 
although both sides will recall Argentina's stun- 
ning opening defeat to Cameroon four years 
aga 


the big score. A lot of people are 

jinking up to make a lot of money Mcrico for falsifying toepalpom 


At 


— • -’*1 


— • - x l 

* 7 _ V ^ 




dues fion 

directory 


Sl>dn vs. Sou* Korea. 735 pan. 

Tuesday Jum 21 
At Chicago 

Germany raSpdn. 4:05 pjn. 

Thursday June 23 

At Foabora, Mase. 

South Kona vx Bohvta. 738 |un_ 

Monday June 27 

«Chka«o 

BoMe n Spain. 4-05 pm 
At Dellas 

Germany va. South Korea. 4:05 psi 
GROUP D 

W l T GF GA Pie 
Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 

ButQgna O 0 O 0 0 0 

Graeco O o 0 0 0 o 

Nigeria 0 0 0 0 0 0 

Tuesday, June 21 
At Foxboro. Mass. 

Argentina vx. Greece, 1235 pjm 
AlDeflee 

Nigeria m. Bulgaria. 7:30 run. 

Saturday June 25 
AIFOxboro, Mesa. 

Aigxnana ra fdgerta. pm 
Sunday June 26 
At Chicago 

Bulgaria wt Greece. 1235 pm. 

Thursday Jwa 30 
At {=ubato, Man. 

Graace v*. Nigeria. 73S pan. 

At Danes 

Argentine va. Suigeria, 7135 pm 
GROUP E 

W L TVttn 

Italy 0 0 0 0 0 0 

I retard 0 0 0 0-0 0 

Mexico O O 0 0 0 O 

Monte OOOOOO 

Sshmtay.'JuneTB 
At EMf Rutherford. NJ. 

My ve. hated, *05 pus. 

Sunday Juno 19 
At Washington 
Norway vx Mute *05 pm 

Thursday June 23 
AI East Rutherford, NJ. 

My vx. Norway, *05 pm 

Friday June 24 
At Orlando, Ha. 

Mexico va. Ireland, 1233 pm 
Tueaday June 28 
At Ea* Rutherford, NJ. 

Intend >«. Norway. 1235 pm. 


in the next month, and when the 
final match has been played July 17 
in the Rose Bowl outside Los Ang- 
les, they can go onto other ven- 
tures. 

Starting another new American 
soccer league — after several have 
failed already — will require more 
discipline for less immediate grati- 
fication. There is good reason to be 


of ; 


skeptical that an ambitious league 
will so 


soon lake off here, considering 
that die World Cup sponsors have 


•? 


My va ttem 1235 pm 
GROUP F 

W L T GF GA Pt* 
Brigham 'OOOOOO 

Morocco - OOOOOO 

Nat hri te da OOOOOO 

Saudi Arabia OOOOOO 

Sunday, Jibs IB 
AtOrteto, FM. 

Botgtura n. Morocco, 1235 pm 
Monday Jtao 20 
At Washington 

Nribadanda v». -Saudi Arabia. 735 pm. 
Saturday Jims 25 
AtOrtanda Fta. 

Britfuanx. Nritwtanda. 1235 pm 
.. AtEridRuthartari.NJ. 

Saofi Anton* Morocco, 1235 pm 
WMtaaday JuwjM 
At Orlando. Ra. 

Morocco wx. NBBMriarte 1238 pm. 

. . : KWaaMnetta 

Bteunw Saudi Ante 1235 pm 


introduce them to the Ameri- 
can public, as they would in base- 
ball, basketball or American foot- 
ball. The World Dip is being 
promoted as a sort of wodd’s Fair, 
with soccer merely the vehicle for 
what is perceived here as a cultural 
festival Unless the public ex- 
presses a willingness to support the 
game beyond tins one-time event, it 
is easy to imagine the league eva- 
porating in the months after the 
World Cup has packed up and 
gone away. 

Trying to implant the grass roots 
of soccer via something as over- 
whelming as the World Cup pre- 
sents yet another conundrum. In 
recent years, American fans who 
attend football or basketball games 
have been urged to become part of 
a TV show, cheering and perform- 
ing “the wave” for the sake of the 
larger audience watching at home. 
Now. in effect, afl of toe United 
Suites has become rare ‘stage to be' 
viewed by the rest of the worid. 
Under these nmque circumsvances, 
Americans* reaction to soccer fig- 
ures to be cooqriic&ted. They know 
how to act at a baseball game, but 
their satisfaction with the World 
Cup might depend upon the quality 
of their own performances as fans 
for the sake of the larger, more 
sophisticated audiences watching 
in Asia, Africa and Europe. In oth- 
er words, if Americans fed they are 
being ridiculed for being naive or 
ignorant of this sport — a sport 
they never demanded in the first 
place — then it only reasons that 
soccer won’t take here. 

The job might have been ampler 
had current ambitions coalesced 
here in 193Q, when the United 
States was among the 13 contes- 
tants in the first Worid Cup, in 
Uruguay, or even in 1950, when the 
UiL team shocked England's, 1-0, 
in the greatest of World Cup up- 
sets. But professional sport was an 
immature business then, while the 
ensuing four decades have seat h 
become a rather dispassionate ex- 
tension of advertising virtues. 


ih players. 

No rare expects the U.S. team to 
win, but its survival into July is an 
absolute necessity. No host nation 
has ever lost in the first round. The 
United Stales might not receive 
typical host support when it plays 
its last two matches in the Rose 
Bowl where the Latino popula- 
tions from Loo Angeles likely will 
prefer to root against the Ameri- 
cans. The bigger issue is the reac- 
tion of the players themselves. 
With the future erf their sport sud- 
denly on their shoulders, the crowd 
of 76,000 cheering them on Satur- 
agmnst Switzerland in Pontiac, 
may ignite them, or it 
may just as easily paralyze them. 
Half the starters do not play for 
chibs internationally. Not so long 
age, a crowd of 10,000 was a big 
crowd. Having never faced pres- 
sure anything like this, it is impos- 
sible to say how they wiD react. 

It all makes for a huge, dean 
slate. If the American fans are ig- 
norant of the players and their 
teams, that’s just as weTL To them, 
a match between Bolivia and South 
Korea will be just as interesting as 
the rivalry between Belgium and 
the Netherlands. Most of the ex- 
perts figure to be wrong in their 
predictions. Germany and Brazil 
may he the favorites, but they hold 
that title by reputation. Maradona 
is an old man now. New stars are 
going to be created over the next 
month, created by the land of Hol- 
lywood. It is as wide-open as any 
Worid Cup in recent memory, 
which already makes it distinctly 
American. 



Vogts: Just 'Like in 1990’ 


Cmpiied bf Our Sufi Fran Dispatches 

CHICAGO — “We want to start like in 
1990,” said Germany’s coach, Berti Vogts. 
“We want to gain that momentum in the 
opening game that will take us through the 
rest of the tournament.” 


At Soldier Field on Friday, the winners 
four years ago in Rome will encounter Boliv- 
ia, a team the Germans know only from 
video tapes, and steamy weather that wiD 
sap the strength of the players. 

The match will kick off the month-long 
52-game Worid Cup extravaganza. A billion 
people watching worldwide on television 
and a seD-oot crowd of 63,117 at the 72- 
y ear-old stadium on the shore of Lake Mich- 
igan wiD hope new FIFA rules wfll make the 
g { ame exciting, rather than some dull cau- 
tious openers in some recent Worid Cups. 

The Germans are seeking to become the 
first team to win four World Cup titles and 
the first to repeat as champion since Brazil 
in 1962. 


Bolivia is making its first appearance in 
Worid Cup finals since 1950. It has never 
won a game, it has never scored a goal in 
three matches while conceding 16 goals. 

That was a long time ago, however. 

“It mil be tough to score a goal against 
Bolivia,” Vogts said. “They have a good 
defense. They beat Brazil they knocked out 


TtnaaCtrat/Agnu Franec^Prcm 

A Hong Kong bus passing a billboard announcing the match time on Friday. 


Uruguay, a great soccer nation.” 
“Out! 


; greatest mistake would be to under- 
estimate Bolivia,” he continued. “My play- 


ers know that we have to take than serious- 
ly, we’ll leave carelessness in our hotel.” 

Bolivia’s one major doubt concerned star 
forward Marco Etcbeverry, who has not 
played a game since breaking his left leg 

Coach Xavier Azkargorta said he would 
not decide until shortly before the match 
whether to field bis most mfine&tial player, 
but Etcbeverry said he thought be would 
play against the Germans. 

“I’m almost there,” be said. “I'm 
anxious to play. I have taken care of _ „ 
and I have done what I was told to do.’ 

• Erik Thorstvedt returned to Norway’s 
goal after a two-day break in which be rested 
his tendinitis inflamed shoulder, but the 
scrimmage was so uneven that they stopped 
counting the goals with Tltorstvedt's side 
ahead, 5-1, against Lbe other half of the 
Norwegian team, which was mimicking the 
style of Mexico, Norway’s first opponent on 
Sunday. 

Thorstvedt played more than half the 
game, made a few easy saves and aflowed the 
one goal on a hard shot. 

• Josip Weber continued to an«» for 
Belgium, scoring a hat-trick during a 6-0 
victory over the U.S. Olympic squad. 

• Russian team officials said that U.S. 
authorities had granted visas fra players’ 
wives and other members of the delegation. 

On Tuesday, they accused U.S. immigra- 
tion authorities of delaying the entry visas 
for 12 members of their delegation, mostly 
players' and coaches' wives. (AP, Reuters) 


■ 7 Franchises Awarded 

Seven franchises were awarded 
fra the proposed soccer league that 
is meant to be a World Cup legacy. 
The New York Times reported. 

Flay in Major League Soccer, as 
the new league is called, is to begin 
m April 1995, but the league has yet 
to award 5 of its 12 franchises. It 
has also not signed any players, ra 
named any investors or sponsors 
beyond a joint television venture 
with ABC Sports, ESPN and 
ESPN2. 

Franchises were awarded to New 
Jersey, Long Island, Los Angeles, 
Boston, Washington, Columbus, 
Ohio, and San Jose, California. 
Five more teams will be an- 
nounced, with Aug. 1 as a target 
date, Alan Rotheuberg, the new 
league's commissioner, said. 

Initially, investors in the league, 
were asked to contribute S10 mil- 
lion; now the asking price is $5 


million. A capitalization project of 
S100 million was announced by 
Rothenberg last December 
Wednesday, he said the league 
could begin operations with $50 
million in capital 

At first, 10.000 season-ticket 
holders were projected for each of 
the 12 franchises. That forecast has 
been reduced to 3,000 to 4,000 in 
most cities. 

It is the goal of league officials to 
have the league operate in small 
stadiums designed for soccer, not 
oversized football stadiums. 


Ails & Antiques 

Every Saturday 
Contact 
Fred Ronan 
Tel: 

[33 1)463793 91 
foe 

[331)46 37 93 70 

or your nearest 
IHT office 
ra representative 


PICK: By Next Month, Brazil Will be the World’s New Soccer Champion 


Cemtaned from Page 1 

on earth, : anly those prepared to 
i run with ihft Germans, ana zfceri to 
dare to fiborate flamboyance, will 
beat themT - 

■ Nevertheless, I am quie serious 
in forecasting a i j»*m triumph this 
summer. The temperatures, espe- 
cialfy dpwa m Orlando, Dallas, 
Washington arid New York, are 
pushing : /up toward 100 degrees 
Fahrenheit. The humidity dings, 
the lack of -oxygen is more than a 
myth. - K 

In suefara efimate; the tempo can- 
not. Tor 90^ minutes, for seven 
games jp 28 days, be Earopean. 


So, when we scan Soldier Field 
on Friday, we wfll see nine mem- 
bers of the 2990 winning German 
team alter on the pitch of on the 
bench. Guido Bnchwald, also 33, 
has quit tbe BondesHga for the rela- 
tive quiet pastures of the Japanese 
J-League, rat he is still Bert’s Boy 
in the national defease. 

And in attack, maybe used spar- 
ingly, is Rudi Vfifler, as cunning 
and as stealthy as Fagm’s pick- 
pockets but now past his 34th 
birthday and far past the time he 
considered his sefl-by-date to have 
expired. 

On Friday, Germany meets Bo- 
lrvia , » kind of Brazil in miniature, 


again, longer in the tooth this time, 


and likely to play second fiddle to 
a Work 


^s^a^ctes^s^be^d hld ^ atijiynd ^bo r whidi^ 


Nigeria as a Worid Cup force. 

But Bolivia, at heart more Brazil- 
ian than the Brazilians, will sadly 
miss Marco Eicheverrey, the player 
fra whom thousands prayed in a 
stadium last November when he 
needed serious knee surgery . Etche- 
verrey is here; he has the beloved 
No. lOjersey made famous by Pete, 
but even he senses that the miracle 
is beyond him, that be needed just a 
couple more weeks than tbe World 
Cnp schedule allows. 

Without his hypnotic left foot, 
and with some graying old war 
horses of its own, Bolivia regroups 


will have _ 
others halve 



to spare when 
' toward mo- 


.*6 '• 


aDydeftetod to a Worid^> ^k^^^«atin0 1, ^- 
ft(«rffio:tairepaid as qualifying match last season. BoHv- 
t® as Germans unfailingly do ^ aisa Sy of faith, a nation which 

built its soccer team out of the 
remarkable academy of Tahuidri, a 
school in Santa Cruz that plucks 
children off the streets, offers them 
the drug of the sport and, from 
journey* that have brought home 
youth cups from eyery port in die 
Worid, has now the nucleus of a 



, But Xari hatgcmg to give way. 1 
looks* flJcGepnan squad for Sra- 
dfcr Refit'TlKsreare too many old 
sohfetsjTtfatihSiis is 33 now, he 
atiamjts: ro be what he is not, a 
. Bcckjm frg nfrfr.figun* of the defense 
was at his best, 
*' i ?iSj5fepoweri ; til arrogant nrid- 

^ Any^wto_faiows the sport ac- 
leader Matth- 
^^m^fciytlour summers ago. 
Htoy ,JdsS,kBow that age wearies 
condemn, that 
surgery and 
pf awrireness in the 
‘ Wie behind his defense is a 


How vibrantly Bolivia stole 
show at Wednesday’s Worid Cup 
parade. There, in a two-hour pro- 
fession designed to welcome the 
1 90 nations to whom football is we 
game, tbe parade grew into a mag- 
juficentiy disheveled street party, 

an outpouring of Chicago’s wide 
ethnic divarity. 

Bolivia danced through it with 
almost intoxicating joy at partid- 


chez. A 
Michel 
his nickname. 

Good play ere? Good Latin 
en? Brazil I keep saying, has 
and has more of them at a ripe 
young age than other contenders. 

Argentina wfll probably be a 
competiti ve f orce again, but with 
changed FIFA rules, with an au- 
thoritative crackdown on orga- 
nized thuggery, Diego Maradona 
and his pals wffl have to mend their 


ways, perform with personality 
transplants; to stay the course. 

They have undoubted skiD if 
only they wiD trust in it. But the 
, most unbridled skill in this 
ition belongs to Colombia, 
fee is a team openly dedaring 
itself as the antidote to a national 
association with drags and crime. 
Here, in the embodiment of Carlos 
Valderrama, the erotically styled 
captain; of Freddy Rinata, the shy. 
rangy, explosive winger, of Faus- 
tina AspriDa the unpredictable 
striker, the Colombians possess 
forces as free and as fickle as the 
wind. 

Colombia can win it Colombia 
can beat Brazil. But we are entering 
a tournament that takes athletes to 
the limits of their talent their stam- 
ina, their nerve and their know- 
how. The one thing Colombia lacks 
is a track record for consistency, a 
game plan to string together seven 
peak performances. Or, rather, the 
experience to hold back that peak, 
to conserve some of the running 
and the effort, to slowly to release 
the Higgler erf their talents. 

Therefore, with bean and mind, 
tbe winner will be Brazil. I told you 
it was a simple matter. 

Soft Stakes a tn Ihractf cf The Times. 




W^b^sLm nadmiUing he has 
-kcaBed'tfltfe players from sdf-nn- 
g^^fea^:*bec«ae even at 
better than the 


did to Argentina in ihe 

1990 Worid Cup opening is anoth- 


er matter- 

Tbea, the Cameroonians sprang 
Africa’s, “surprise-” They are here 


TO OUR READERS 


IN LUXEMBOURG 

It's never been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 

Just call toll-free 

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The IHT Worid Cup Competition 

Win fabulous prizes. 


Winners will be chosen from an official drawing. 
The first 16 entries drawn, with at least 6 correct 
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Grand Prize: Two United Airlines business class 
round-trip Europe/New \brk tickets plus five 
nights accommodation at the Stanhope Hotel in 
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Five second prizes: Sprint Collectors frame pre- 
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Five third prizes: AT Cross, 22k gold, diamond 
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After answering the question each day in the 
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if*.. 




Group A 


USA 

SWITZERLAND 

COLOMBIA 

ROMANIA 

Group B 


BRAZIL 

RUSSIA 

CAMEROON 

SWEDEN 

Group C 


GERMANY 

BOLIVIA 

SPAIN 

KOREA REPUBLIC 
Group D 


ARGENTINA 

GREECE 

NIGERIA 

BULGARIA 

Group E 


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IRELAND REPUBLIC 
NORWAY 
MEXICO 

Group F 


BELGIUM 
MOROCCO 
NETHERLANDS 
SAUDI ARABIA 


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TODAY’S QUESTION 




5. 


6 . 


Individual coupons will not be accepted. 

Minimum of 6 coupons to qualify. 

Cut-off date is postmarks of the first day of the World 
Cup — June 17, 1994. 

Valid only where legal. 

Entries will not be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, its agents and subsidiaries. 

Only original coupons will be considered valid. 
Photocopies and faxes are not acceptable. 

No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
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No cash alternative to prizes. 

In some countries, the law forbids participation in tins 
competition for prize awards. However, in these 
countries, you can still play for fun. The competition is 
void where illegal. 

Winners will be drawn on day after the end of the World 
Cup and published in the IHT on Thursday 21 July. 

10. On all matters, the editor's decision is final. 

11 . The Editor reserves the right in his absolute discretion to 
disqualify any entry, competitor or nominee, or to waive 
any rules in the event of circumstances outside our 
control arising which, in his opinion, makes it desirable 
to cancel the competition at any stage. 

12. The winners will be the first correct answers containing 
six or more coupons picked at random from all entries. 


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INTER NATIONAL 


. v- •• 


to 

d- 

i” 

>s 

»n 

V 

tit 

is 


• - 

— ifixaV--" i — i ~ r ~ ~ - 


FI' a Stef'S 1 ? • |¥b-9-?st adsssawsp? 








Pa ge 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1994 


OBSERVER 

Anecdotal Awareness 


By Russell Baker 
VXMSHINGTON — The car ra- 
t ? clio was saying. “Public 

5325* 15 bu »s." I had to 
with an orange traffic light just 
then, so nussed the rest of ihe bulle- 
tin and by the time Td finished the 
decision-making process the 
5® n «»zttneister had moved on lo 
dysfunctional families.” 
(1 JjWic awareness is building,” 
Decision-making process.” “Dys- 
functional families.” Why do peo- 

SES **!“ ^ especially on radio 
una television, though also in news- 
papers, magazines and my very 
own house, to be honest 

□ 

kj_the first place, I don't believe 
public awareness is building. May- 
u® it is, but for each piece of evi- 
dence suggesting that public aware- 
ness is budding there is an equal 
and opposite piece suggesting that 
public awareness is crumbling, 

I suspect there may not even be 
any public awareness, either build- 
ing, crumbling or just sitting 
around passively minding its own 
business. This is based on observa- 
tion of the few dozen people i see 
now and then. 

If you want to know whai 
glazed -over eyes look like, ask any 
of these people about public aware- 
ness. These glazed-over eyes, of 
course, are “only anecdotal evi- 
dence," another mess of wordage 
that’s highly fashionable with the 
big-talk crowd these days. 

Economists, I believe, coined 
“only anecdotal evidence” to shrug 
off tales of individual human mis- 
ery that threaten to spoil their sta- 
tistical pictures of general and 
abundant happiness. 

“Only anecdotal evidence.” ft is 
such a depress ingly governmental 
way or voicing contempt for peo- 
ple. Government in all its vastness 
can no longer visualize each person 
out here as an individual caught in 
his own singular anecdote of a life. 
It can see us only as numbers on 
statistical printouts. 

□ 

As I guided the car masterfully 
through traffic, headed for my 
laundry-and-drv-cleaning estab- 
lishment. I chided myself for be- 
coming sentimental about the indi- 
vidual in his struggle against 
statistical oblivion. 1 have always 
been loosofL "Soft-nosed” is what 
the old hard-nosed, brilliant crowd 


in Washington called me in the old 
davs. Just recently an obscure jour- 
nal dismissed me as a tribune of 
“soft liberalism." 

Am I a man or a pillow? This 
sentimental distaste for being a sta- 
tistic must be abandoned. I must 
learn not only to “talk the talk," as 
street kids say. but also to “walk 
the walk." 

And who was 1 to sneer at those 
who say “Public awareness is build- 
ing"? Perhaps there really was a 
fresh set of statistics proving con- 
clusively, at least until the next set 
of statistics comes in, that public 
awareness is indeed building. 

Could these statistics. I won- 
dered, be collated in the vast Public 
Awareness Building? And what in 
the world did “collated” mean any- 
how? How do you collate a statistic? 
Is it done with a digital coUater? 
How many megabetz does it take? 
How much RAM. ROM. RUM 
does the typical collation require? 


“Steady, man, steady,” I cau- 
tioned myself as I pulled onto the 
2,000-acre Steaming Asphalt Shop- 
ping MalL “You’re losing it again, 
you're going irritable, human- 
. . . soft, soft as a feather mat- 
tress." 

Getting a grip on myself was 
essential, because any minute now 
1 would have to confront the dry- 
cleaner. That meant being ready to 
walk the walk, for be could be an 
arrogant devil when my white shin 
was not ready on time, as it often 
wasn't when I needed it for a spe- 
cial evening, as 1 did this day. 

I would have to be prepared to 
give him a good tongue-lashing, 
make him promise never to fail me 
again and see him bow with respect 
for my anger. In short, this was no 
time for soft nose or soft liberalism. 
1 must be ready to walk the walk. 

Stepping from the car. f braced 
for the encounter by talking the talk 
and said, sotto voce, “Public aware- 
ness is budding." Also, “spiritual 
fulfillment,” “raised consciousness,” 
“dysfunctional," “the countercul- 
ture” and “gender-neutral.” 

The dry-cleaner was all smiles. 
“Your white shin is ready this 
lime,” he said, handing it to me. I 
accepted it, very unhappily, be- 
cause I knew- it was only anecdotal 
evidence. 

JVnr for* Tima Struct 


Jimmy Scott, 

By Mike Zwerin 

Intenudkjtu! Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Warning! Although this story has a happy 
ending il gets pretty grim along the way, “Jimmy 
Scott had soul wav back when people weren't using the 
word.” Ray Charles said. Scott’s clear and caressing coun- 
tertenor voice has influenced Msuno^Gaye. Nancy Wil- 
son. Stevie Wonder and Frankie Valli. Admirers include 
Bill Cosbv and Liza Minndli. 

He was born in Geveland in 1925: at first doctors 
thought he was stillborn, tangled in his umbilical cord. He 
was encouraged to sing by his mother. Justine, a church 
pianist who died in an automobile accident when he was 
13. In the mid-IWOs he toured the South and Midwest' 
with the contortionist Estelle (Caidoniai Young's tent 
show- He befriended the comedian Redd Foxx and singer 
Big Mavbelle. The boxer Joe Louis arranged for the 22- 
year-old Scott’s first New York City engagement, at the 
Baby Grand in Harlem. He had talent, important friends 
and luck. He was about to lose the luck for most of his life. 

Billed as Little Jimmy Scott (he never grew tail or lost 
his falsetto}, he recorded a handful of rides with Lionel 
Hampton in 194S. including his first hit: “Everybody’s 
Somebody's Fool.” Quincy Jones, who played trumpet 
with Hampton, said: “Jimmy had a very emotional soul- 
penetrating style. He’d put me on my knees, give me goose 
bumps. Jimmy used to tear my heart apart every night.” 

During his First (short-lived) solo career in the early 
1950s, Scou recorded the standard “The Masquerade Is 
Over.” Mostly he sang about broken hearts, pleading for 
love with a choirboy voice. A friend said: “His voice acted 
on women like an aphrodisiac.” He was tiny and fragile. 
lite a frail child. “What bugged me.” Scott said, “was 
having cats pick aL you because you look, young — like 
you're some kind of woman or something.” It is said that 
prostitutes showered him with silver dollars. 

His solo sortie ended, when, according to his record 
company Wo: “Unpaid for his efforts, a discouraged Scou 
turned his back on the music business.” It would not be 
the last time he got ripped and turned off. 

Tight-fisted moguls cast his beautifully expressive voice 
to sing juvenile rock ’n* roll songs. They buried it under 
boorish strings. When he complained about one-sided 
contracts, be was blacklisted as a troublemaker. His high 
voice and soft looks, the qualities that made him special, 
brought him hassles offstage. His personal life was a mess. 
He would v anis h for mouths and then suddenly reappear. 
He carried a pistol for several years. 

In 1962 Scott was signed by Ray Charles to record for 
his Tangerine Records. He cut one album. “Falling in 
Love Is Wonderful.” with Charles on piano. It was highly 
touted, but Savoy Records said he was still under contract 
and threatened to sue: The album was not released. His 
official bio describes what happened next: “A heartbro- 
ken Scott returned lo his native Cleveland to live the next 
20 years in virtual obscurity." 

In Geveland, he found his estranged father in a bad 
mood. “Jimmy Scott, come over here.” he’d veil to him in 
some bar. “You ain’t mohui'. I still run you, boy.’’ Scott 
says he never understood why his father would “bulldoze” 
him like that Obscurity in Geveland can be more than 
just virtual. 

We were in his record company’s office earlier this year. 
He looks his age; 68, but is at the' same time — 1 search for 
the adjective — buggable. Like a shy boy. I had beard him 
ring several nights earlier in La ViRa club. He was the talk 



‘"Little'' Jimmy Scott: He had the soul, the talent and die lode, but then the lock rad out. 


or the town that week. I had my doubts. The French 
appeared once more to be congratulating themselves on 
“discovering” an African- American artist rejected by his 
native country. Was it a show-biz bustle? The bottom line 
is, of course, his ha unting voice, which speaks foritsdf. 

The way he makes a song his own by laying bade on 
both the beat and the lyrics reminds yon of Billie Holiday. 
He has more control over his interpretation than ever, 
building tension with bdievabifity and slow tempi His 
new album, “All the Way” (Sire), is a big budget produc- 
tion (arran ge ments by Johnny Mandel). He’s on the road 
a gain respected again. There are rave reviews everywhere. 

About aging and all those years of frustration, he says: 
“People tmnk of entertainers as living exciting fives with 
limns and easy sex and aO that They get it wrong. You’re 
human. You just want some sort of comfort and accep- 
tance. I like to relate to people. I’m from a big family, for 
me being alone was awful. That really got to me, that 
lonely t hing I’ve been on reserve so long. Now maybe 1 
can enjoy life, al least part of it,” 

Current word of mouth has it that this time around 
Scott is getting an on-the-Ievef legal deal, if that’s not an 
oxymoron. Anyway he's proving there’s hope after life. It 
can still happen. 

During those 20 virtually obscure years, be made several 
albums that went unnoticed and/or unrdeased. In the 
early 1980s he was working as a shipping derk for Shera- 
ton Holds. He drove forklifts and stacked inventory. 


When he' got hurt on the job, nothing serious, it was 
reassessment time. 

He was “tired of going from chick to chick. I’m a 
homebody, I need to have that Hide place of my own.” He 
had recently married his longtime friend, Eariine, they 
were happy, he wanted desperately to preserve tbeir rda- 
tiooship. Eariine encouraged him lo go bade into' show 
business. They moved from Cleveland to East Orange, 
New Jersey, and he began wo rking the same sort pf boozy 
joints he worked 30 years earlier. • * 

Emmy McDonough's long profile in the Village Voice 


in 1988 helped pave the way for Scott’s comeback. “Night 
after night, " he wrote; “I'd traipse to Harlem or Newark 
and there would be Jimmy, always looting elegant ur his 
black tux, those long hands immaculately manicured. 
He’d stag every song as if it were hi s Iasi”: . . 

Old friends who had become successful — R&B singer 
Ruth Brown., the actor Joe Pesd and the. songwritine' 
legend Doc Fomus (who has since died) — encouraged 
him. The word was spread. People began to pay attention. 
They asked; “Oh, isn't he thegoy who used to.be called, 
‘Little* Jimmy Scott?~ ; 

The album “All the Way” was released in 1992. when 
Scott was 66. “I've always thought that aging is nothing 
but a numbers game," he said. “It’s bow you react to the^ 
numbers that makes the difference." . 

Jimmy Scott: Monday, Rouen, France; June 29, 30, Paris 
(New Mormngk July 1 , 2, Vienne, France; July 5, Vienna; 
July 8. Nice Jazz 'Festival- July JO. Stockholm. . 


people __ 

japan Cites 5 IFuine* 

For Arts Achievement* 
The wirujes of tlw 
nrimn awards for 

architect Charles Correa. T« 
awards were announced 
York by Rymo Sepma* tiw 
man of the Japan Art AssoaahoB. 
win* coDfas the awards, and el 
rid RodrefeSer Jr. the event * h*J 
winner .will- receive at**! 1 
S 150,000 and a modal to be prcsem- 
edin the fall by the Jspaaeseunpen- 
al family in Tokya. 

Four nidailis aiicr iftaor erupwd 
over the decirion to pay the radio 
talk show host Rush Umbaugb Si 

nnJJkm ro uxn Honda: change Jince, 

stagnant sales arid a national boy- 
cott have put the squeeze on tnc 
stale’s CHros Commissioo ro fire the 
. outspoken conservative- The coro- 
missoai meets next month to consid- 
er renewal of Limbaugh’s contract 
The boycott of Florida orange jtnee 
— labeled the “Flush Rush” cam- 
paign —was organized by the Na- 
tional Organization for Women. 

_ D 

. Peter GshrieFs plans Fra a' 10- 
hour peace concert on the border 
between Israel and Egypt have been 
stymied. The British rock star was to 
perform Saturday with Israeli and 
Arab musicians and Lon -.Reed at 
Tabs,, but then Egypt barred the 
concert, citing security reasons. Ga* . 
briefs agents say they win try to 
move it to the Israeli port of -EuaL 
□ 

The Italian pom star Boas (Go- 
dolma) StaDer, facing arrest ra New 
York in a custody battle with her 
■ husband, the artist Jeffrey Komis, 
says she’s in Italy Irving " like a fugi- 
tive" with her 18-mofltb-dd son. A 

- judge issued an attest warrant for 
her after she disappeared with little 
Ludwig MaxsaSao Koons. . 

□ • 

- . Call Mm “Fops": The singer Lio- 
ud Ridfcand girlfriend Diane Al- 
exander are the paresis of a baby 
boy, MBes Brockman Richie. 


1NTERNAHONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

.- Appoxa on Pages 9. 10 A' IT 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


Alqin* 

Aimtentvn 

Ankara 

Mm 


Forecast (or Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


BurlSDTK 

Copw*agpn 

CoaloMSol 

Duxn 

Etfntugh 

Howes 

Frankfurt 

G 4 MM 

Hrturid 

IttanfeJ 

L» Palma, 

Luton 

Union 

Matod 

MSan 

Horoa 

Miner. 

Nh 

Cato 

Pafcna 

Pom 

F*J>jun 

RajiNpw* 

Bom* 

Swckhoen 

Skaatowg 

Toftm 

Vror* 

Vienna 

Vlanam 

Zunch 

Oceania 


Today 
High Lota 
OF OF 
7271 14,5- 
16*4 II. <52 
23-73 T0.-50 
1**2 17, «2 
2BIB2 19. *6 
23 m «rS3 
It.*! 3 

19,-66 11.-53 
3sm 1355 
15/59 7.44 

76 '7* 17.152 
18*0 9-46 

16.-61 10*0 
37*0 13.55 
34/75 13,-53 
34/75 1356 
IJ.-55 7/44 

76/79 T7*T 
25/77 1B.-54 
31/70 1550 
21/70 1 1*2 
29*4 14*7 
37*0 14/57 
24/75 13/55 
IBW4 10*0 
26/79 16*1 
13*5 7/44 

37*0 20.60 
24/75 12/53 
16*1 0/46 

12*3 0/46 

30*2 14-57 
14*7 6.'43 

14.57 5/41 

23/71 12*3 

12.55 7/44 
Xr9 17*2 

19.56 12.53 

16*1 3/37 

22.71 1152 


16*1 10/60 pc 15-53 1050 V. 
17*2 O.'40 ps 18«4 17.50 pc 



H^Kong 


Jctsie-am 


l/nscasornMf 

CM 


I Unseosooaby 
Hoi 


North America 

The core ot the heat wave 
will shilt slightly to the west 
this weekend. The comer of 
me honest weather will be 
near Chicago and Si. Lous 
this weekend Scattered 
thunderstorms will br.ng 
some icmoorsry relict from 
the heal lo parts ol the 
Northeast over Ihe woekend. 


Europe 

Rain wH soak southwestern 
Norway tram time to tone 
Ih® weekend. Paris to Lon- 
don will have dry. gradually 
warmer weather. Hot weath- 
er over pads ol Spam and 
southern France this week- 
end "rifl spread toward the 
Alps and Italy by Monday 
Southeast Europe will have 
sunny, warm weather. 


Asia 

A slow moving storm will 
dump heavy rams cn south- 
ern Japan Ih® weekend As 
ihe warm, motst at nOes up 
and over the central moun- 
lams ot Japan, torrar.ua! 
downpours and (lash Roods 
are a passibthiY Seoul will 
be dry and pleasan this 
weekend Manila will be very 
warm wkh stray showers 


High Low W Wgtl Low W 
OF OF OF OF 
33/51 24/75 «i 33*1 36/76 pc 
34/M 31/70 1 34/33 21/70 pc 
30*6 27*0 I 30*6 37*0 PC 
33*1 25/77 I 33*1 24/75 pc 
43/tor 20*2 f 42/107 26*2 pG 
Him 18*4 9 27*0 16*1 sh 
26*5 21/70 ih 27*0 21. TO pc 
33*1 24/75 pc 32*0 24/75 pc 
32*9 24/75 I 36*6 21*3 pc 
28/79 17«? pc 28-79 IB/64 sh 


Al»cr> 77*0 
Cap- Tow, 12*1 
CautXra 23.73 
Him* 24/75 
Lsgo* 31*8 

Nmb 22 m 

Tub 29*4 


19.™ pc 77*0 
307 pc 13*5 
13*5 • 3373 
13*3 I 2475 
23/73 * 31*8 
13.55 pc 22/71 
19*6 9 33*1 


North America 

AndonQ* 20*8 1 


Middle East 


High Low W M*i Low W 

C/F VF OF OF 

31*6 34.75 9 31/88 24/75 9 

33.59 14*7 9 31*0 19*6 9 

315" 14*7 9 30*6 16*1 a 

29.64 1654 i 29*4 18*4 ■ 

41/1062271 ■ 38/16021/70 ■ 
42/107 36.79 9 42/1072670 9 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

MS* Law W Low w 

Wf OF OF GIF 
BuemaAlra 14*7 3.57 in '2 53 C -43 c 

Caracas 30*6 19*6 pc 30*6 20-68 pc 

Uno 10*4 18*1 C I 9-56 1551 pc 

Mono, Cry 2475 12*3 pc 2475 12/89 pC 

RodsJamn* 7679 16*4 pc 26-79 1956 ye 

Sartwja 1 l*P 2/35 U-S 7 6 *3 pc 


Legend: s sumy. oe wroy doudy. cc/oudv. an-showers. l-fentesisrrai r-ram 51 -snor CuiAk. 
VbWTJi. Men. W-WcaHet. AO nup9. fera cs s ti and dm provided toy Accu-Weather. Inc- 2 1954 


Chcogo 

E 3 err.PT 

Dewa 
HoncSAl 
Haunwi 
La» Anprtas 
Mum 

Urvw^atS 

UcnroJ 

Nratau 

rw*7oA 

Phosna 
San Fran 
SeaSM 

VLu/rn^cn 


29*8 11*2 
32*9 21-70 
29.54 17*2 
33.71 21/70 
31*8 14*7 
34.53 ?1.70 
31 W 2373 
33-51 23-73 
2679 17*2 
32*9 24/75 
27*0 16*1 
30*6 14*7 
3Q56 3/73 
32*9 24.76 
42/107 27*0 
20*8 11*2 
19*6 11A2 
32*9 13*5 
37/96 K79 


pc 19*6 10*0 pc 
1 31*8 22/71 Mi 

• 29*4 17*2 pc 

I 30*8 17/62 pc 
9 34*3 15-59 • 

S 29*4 17*7 pc 
pc 29*4 33.73 pc 
pc 34*93 3/73 pc 
pc 27*0 16*1 pc 
I 31*8 73,73 pc 
I 27*0 17*2 VC 
pC 30*6 18*4 pc 
pc 31*8 24/75 pc 
pc 38*7 23/73 pc 
s 42/107 28.52 a 
9 22/71 11*2 9 
c 19*6 11*2 ch 
pe 31*8 19*6 pc 
pc 77*8 24/75 pc 


SATURDAY 


Europe and Ifiddle East 


Location 

Weather 

High 

Low 

Water 

mm 

wind 



Tamp. 

Temp. 

Tamp. 

Heights 

Speed 



’ OF 

CtF 

OF 

(Kata) 

Prph) 

Cannes 

clouds and sun 

25/77 

16*1 

21/70 

1-2 

SE 

10 - 20 . 

DeauvAe 

clouds and sun 

20m 

12/53 

15/59 

. 1-2 

WNW 15-30 

Rmtni 

sunny 

26/79 

16/61 . 

19*6 

1-2 

W 

15-30 

Maiage 

ctouas and sun 

3086 

18*6 

19*6 

1-2 

N 

12-22 

Cagha/i 

surmy 

27 /BO 

17*2 

21/70 

1-2 

WWW 12-22 

Faro 

showers 

21/70 

12*3 

ia«4 

14 

W 

15-30 

Piraeus 

sunny 

3086 

19*6 

19*6 

1 -Z 

w- 

12-22 

Corfu 

sunny 

28/82 

16*4 

22/71 

1-2 

MW 

10-20 

Bngtnon 

bouts and sun 

21.70 

SMB 

13*5 

1-2 

WNW 15-30 

OsSbihj 

clouds and sun 

18»4 

12*3 

12*3 

1-2 

NW 

15-30 

Schevenmen 

clouds and sun 

17/62 

11/52 

12*3 

1-2 

NW 

20-35 

Sy 8 

cloudy 

10 /BI 

10*0 

12*3 

1-2 

NW 

15-30 

Izmir 

sunny 

29184 

19*8 

20*8 

1-2 

NW 

12-22 

Tel Aviv 

sunny 

30/88 

20*8 

21/70 

1-2 

N 

15-25 

Caribbean and Wat Atlantic 







Ba/bedos 

doudtendsiai 

31/88 

27*0 

26/82 

1-2 

E 

2030 

Kingston 

Sumy 

33 /BI 

25/77 

28 /B 2 

tn 

E 

25-35 

Sl Thom as 

showers 

32/89 

26/79 

23*2 

1-2 

E 

25-35 

HamAon 

do lids and sun 

30/86 

22/71 

27/80 

1-2 

E . 

20-35 

Asia/Pacific 








Penang 

partly sunny 

32/89 

2V79 

30*6 

O-’l 

sw 

15-25 

Ptn*« 

showers 

33/91 

26/79 

29*4 

0-1 . 

sw 

15-25 

Bafi 

partly surmy 

33®1 

2679 

28*2 

0-1 

sw 

12-25 

Cebu 

thunderstorms 

33/91 

24/75 

31 /B 8 

0-1 

ESE 

10-20 

Palm Beacri. Aus 

parity sunny 

1 W 

10*0 

18*8 

12 

V/NW 30-45 

Bay o 1 Islands. NZ 

douds and sun 

18*4 

10*0 

19*8 

0-1 

WNW 

16-35 

Slwahama 

doudy 

27*0 

21/70 

21/70 

1*2 

ESE 

20-35 

Honolulu 

showers 

28*4 

23/73 

2679 

2-3 

E 

20-35 


SUNDAY 


AltaracaB* am data crowded 
by Aecu-WtaeSwctrcr-ratM- 


Europe and Middle East 

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Low Me 

Teas*. TMfiL 

cm of 


Cannes 

Deauvite - 

Rimini 

Malaga 

Cagterl 

Fa 10 

Piraeus 

Corfu 

Brighton 

OsJend 

Schevenaigvi 

Syfl 

Izmir 

TelAwv 


sunny . .. 
sunny 

.'sumy. . 
sunny 
sunny 

. clouds and sun 
sonny 
sunny, 
sunny 
sunny 

clouds and sun 
clouds and am 
suvty 
sunny 


. Wind 
..Speed’ 

: . ' 

BE ' 12-22 
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Cartbtaen and West Atlantic 

Barbados sxweis 31«8 

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Ham* on ' • ■ partly stmy 3086 . 


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22/71 

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wsw 12-25 

28 * 4 . 

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20*8 

1 -? 

WNW 

10-20 

29 / 84 . 

19*6 ‘ 

22/71 ' 

■ 1-2 •-: 

NW 

1525 

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12*3 

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12 -■ 

NW 

20-35 

20*8 

14*7 

12*3 

1-2 - 

NW 

18-35 

19/66 

12*3 

12*3 : 

1-2 - 

NW 

20-35 

20*8 

13*5 

12*3 

i-a 

NW 

20-40 

30*6 

19*6 

20*8 

1-2 

NW 

15-25 

. 31/88 

21/70 

10*0 

1-2 

N . 

15-30 


1-2 E- -- 35 

0- 1 ’ • c E .- -25-35. 

1 - 2 . E 22-30 

'W; E' • 2 G -35 


AetWParffle ’ 

Penang 
Phuket 
Bai . 

Cebu 

PaterBeaeh, Aua 
Bey ol Islands. NZ 
Shoahama 
Honolulu 


dundemonns - 
tiundarotoens 
clouds and son 

aoudcandnfi- 

sunny. 

showers 

doudsandsun 


2679 

30*8 

M 

SW 

15-25 

28/79 

29*4 

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SW'- 

1525 

2679 

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12-25 

24/75 

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12-22 

7744 . 

18*4 . 

--14 . 

w 

40-55 

9 M 8 

19*6 - 

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1525 

22/71 

21 / 70 . 

.-.14 . 

SE. 

30-50 

23/73 

28/79 ; 

-14 

.. E . . 

20-35 


S ravel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


83b ■ JM3Tjb5 ftztzpgg 


t „|, nwi m.nf ! Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

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AT&T 


•? .'OiJT 


AOS' Access Numbers 
Hovv- to cuD around the wraltL •' 

!. LlslngthechanbeluTv. Bud the ccxirttr> jXHi are cullmg from. ~ 

1 Dial the conwqpondins AIE3r Access Number . ' 

3 •'/i Englisb-speaJdng Opwurw or *nlcc prompt wdi ask for the pbaic number you wish to call or conned you to a 

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COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NU MBER 


Australia 

China, P8Co»+ 

Guam 

Bong Kong 

Irafia4 

Indonesia* 

Japan* 

Korea 

KoreaAA 

Malaysia* 

New Zealand 
Philippines* 
Saipan* 

SinpipTit? 

briUwka 

Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


- Italy* 172-1011 Brail 

1-800-881-011 Liechtenstein* 155-00 -11 chile 

T0S11 Lithuania* 8*lg6 Columbia 

018-872 Luxe mbourg - . -. 0-800-0111 CcstaRica*w 

800-1111 Macedonia, F.TJL of 9!^800-€288 ~ Ecuafor 
000-117 Malta* - ■ - 0800-850-110 ElSah-adw** 


000-117 Malta* 
001 - 801-10 Monaco* 


EUROPE 


Armenia— 

Austri a **** ~ 

Bcjgjnm* 

Bulgaria 

Croatia** 

Czech Bep 

Denmark* 

Hniand" 

Prance 

G ermany 

Gr eece* 

Hungary* 

[celand*a 

Ireland 


-0059-m Ptohertands* 06-022-9111 Guyana** 

009-11 Norway 800-190-11 Honduras’* 

: - 11* Poland-*- . ; CUOlO-480-0111 Mkucoaaa 

8000011 Portnga F : • 05017^1-2 88 NJcaraga 

' ' 000-911 Romania 01 -800-4288 Panama* 

105-13 Rnssia-tMofioow) 15^5042 Peru* 

235-2872 Slovakia 00420110101 Sndaamc 

80M11I-11! Spain* ,■ -9G0-99-01M1 Uruguay 

■ 430-rijtQ - Sweden- . . 020-795-611 Yeneaueh 

0080-1 0288-0 Switzerland* 15 5-00-11 ~ ~~ 

0019-991-nU - VX. . ' 0500-89-001 1 ' fcfiSoS 

E ttfcralne* - • I 84.100-11 Bermuda* 

8*3.4111 MIDDLE EAST . . , Bridsh.VX 

022-9054111 Bahrain ■ • ".-gocKKH Cayman Is 

0800-100-10 Cypr us " ' ■ ' ■ 080-90010 Grenada* 

00-18 000010 Israe l - * 177-100-2 727 Haiti* . 

99-3 8-OOH Kuwait . ' * SOO-288 Jamaica** 

00- 4 2000101 Lebano n (Being). ’ 426-801 Nwh Am 

8001-0010 Qatar ; - - 080(H)n.-77 ' St-IQns/I* 

9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia . . • .1-800-10 7 7 

!9ifc<011-'- -lbri pe y*-'4: * * -00300-12277 Egypt* (C 

0 130-0010 ' BAE* • ■ • 800-121 Gabon* 

00800-1311 • ' - .AMERICAS- • : Gambia* 

00^80081111 Aqttt uinai.; QQ1-8QQ-200-11U Kenya- 

999-OOt ' Bdize* 5% : tlberia 

1- 800550^100 Bolivti* jV - ' . (F8Q0-H12 : SoofhAfr, 


: 000-8010 

155-00-11 Chile 1 0 0 a-0312 

8^196 Coiumfaia ' 98Q- 11-0QIQ 

O-SOOfttU . Costa Rica*w : ' "T 

99-800-4288 ~ Ecuador . . 

OSW-890-110 HSatvadorti ' . ;cny 

196-0011 Qtta t SG * ■ ' Jcj,i 

06-022-9111 Guyana*** ^ 7 

800-190-11 HooduraS** ^ 

-010-4800111 MexicoAaA 95^00-^62-4 210 

0501 7-1-288 Nk3traa n afM ann }jiKl) 7 ^74 

. .01-8004288 Panama ! 17^ 

1555042 - L ~ 

00-420-00101 fti rinanw 7 : 

.•90P:99-tX>-ll Uruguay ~ • . Jxi-toio 

020-795-611 Veoczuefcrw •"sCKUJ-iai 

^5500-11 CARIBBEA N 

B a h «™s . 1 -800-872-^T 


109 

10] 

156 

00-0410 


■ ■■'800-00 1 Cabman Islands 

■ _. 080-90010 Grenada* 
177-100-2727 Haiti* . ~ 

SOO-288 Jamaica** 
42&801 W eflL Aroii 

0WtH)n.-77 ' SL iOns/Nevis 

• ,1-soo-io ' : 5 


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800-121 . Gabon* 

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0-800-1112 : SonfliAfrtea r 


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