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INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




Paris, Monday, June 20, 1994 


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. 34.619 


WORLD CUP M GRANDSTAND 




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Morocco's goalkeeper, Khalil Azmi, making a save in a losing cause against Belgium. 


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5-®5$SisJ39 t g BSerocco 0 

NJarc Degryse took ud\ antage of a wob- 
j fcr, defense and an error by goalkeeper 
K.:=i:l .Azmi io score in the 11th minute 

i Belgium held on so win the Group F 
•- •-■--ii >'jrc *‘ !r » t'^Mndo. Florida. 

©5 ©aspprgses 

Irsiar.J i, Saiy C: First it was Ray 
Hough to:-, scoring his first goal for Ire- 
land in five years to beat Italy in Lhe 
opening match in East Rutherford. New 
Jersey. Ireland had never before won a 
match in the World Cup finals, having 
| advanced to the 1990 quarterfinals in 
\ Italy on three draws and a shootout. 
Romania 3, Colombia 1: Then it 
•vas Ghevrghe Hagi. who set up two 
j goHi by Florin Raducioiu and scored 
die third him seif as Romania stunned 
Colombia in Pasadena. California. 

Goalkeeper Oscar Cordoba, who had 
replaced the brazen Rene Higuita this 
year, committed two significant miscues 
that led to goals. 

United Stases 1, Switzerland 1: All 
of which followed a surprise, if not an 


upset, when the United States, having 
been thoroughly outplayed, gained a tie 
with Switzerland on Eric Wynalda’s free 
kick Saturday in Pontiac. Michigan. 

“In a nutshell, we played badly and 
go: a point,’* said midfielder John 
Harkes. 

Tragedy Strikes, Too 

Two Protestant gunmen killed six Ro- 
man Catholics and wounded five who 
were watching the Ireland-Italy match 
in a crowded pub in in village of Lough- 
inisland in Northern Ireland. It was the 
worst atrocity in Northern Ireland’s sec- 
tarian violence in eight months. (Page 2) 
• A plane carrying Mexican soccer 
fans to the World Cup crashed while 
trying to land in a heavy fog at Dulles 
International Airport outside Washing- 
ton. D.C., killing all 12 people aboard. 
The victims included three teen-agers, 
three younger children, two men and 
two women. 

Monday's matches: Brazil vs. Russia at Stan- 
ford. California. *05 P.M. EDT; Motherlands vs. 
Saudi Arabia, at Washington. 7:35 P.M. EDT. 
World Cup report Pages 16 and 17 


In Africa , a Mood of Desperation U.S. Awaits 


By John Darnton 

(Vw York Tuna Service 

OUAGADOUGOU. Burkina Faso — 
You don’t have to be a detective to spot the 
decline in living standards in Africa. 

The decline can be seen in the shanty- 
towns surrounding every capital — 
sprawls of humanity in windowless hovels 
amid open sewers and heaps of garbage. 

It can be heard in the lessons sung out in 
ancient school rooms, where enrollments 
are dropping but class sizes swell to 120 
pupils. 

And it can be smelled in fly-infested 
corridors of hospitals where diseases flour- 

First of a series. 

ish, medication is scarce and people are 
turned away or left to suffer because they 
cannot pay for treatmenL 

The countries south of the Sahara, the 
division between black Africa and the 
Arab world, have turned in a decade and 
more of devastaiingly bad economic per- 
formance. 

The economic failure is undercutting a 
drive for political liberalization, raising 
ethnic rivalries to a dangerous level and 
forcing countries to impose inflammatory 
austerity programs, often under the dic- 
tates of Western financial institutions. 

But most of all it is spreading misery. In 
living standards, Africa is falling further 


Assurances by France 

.. France said Sunday that it was at- 
tempting to assure a. Rwandan rebel 
group that intended military interven- 
tion in the country would not be aimed 
ai the rebels. (Page 6) 


behind the rest of the world. It is now the 
only continent where most poor people are 
getting still poorer and where health and 
education are deteriorating. 

As political changes similar to those that 
shook. Eastern Europe and the Soviet 
Union four and five years ago now rever- 
berate in Africa, Africans seem more con- 
cerned about the social and welfare prob- 
lems caused by the economic decline. 
Their views emerged during scores of inter- 
views in the course of a six-week trip 
through nine countries in East. West and 
southern Africa. 

The statistics roll by in a blur. More 
than four million children bom this year 
w31 die before the age of 5. Nearly a third 
of the children are severely malnourished. 
One in three goes without any schooling. 

But it is the individuals who remain 
fixed in memory. One is a baby without a 
name, less than 24 hours old. He was bom 
at the Central Hospital here, brain-dam- 
aged and weighing half of normal 

The mother, her face taut, waits in the 


dusty courtyard. Apparently she did not 
seek prenatal consmtatkni, once free but: 
no more. She did not eat enough. It. is 
common, a doctor says, for women from -, 
the countryside to ait. down on food dur- 
ing pregnancy in hope of an easier deliv- 
ery. 

Dicko Agaly is a 28ryekr<rfd Tuareg" 
from Timbuktu who for years has been 
roaming further 'and Author south to eke 
out a living as a trader Ten months ago his 
lungs Began to adje aad now he is in the 
Central Hospital, ravaged by tuberculosis. 

- Heis losing weight and is too weak to sit - 
up. A friend and fellow tribesman, squat- 
ting by the bedside in a flowing sky-blue 
robe, 31 at ease in a strange big city, has 
been too shy to tell the doctor that Mr. 
Agaly has begun vomiting. He is worried 
that soon the money will run out and there 
will be no hope of keeping him alive. ' 

Tim hospital has no funds to spend on 
medicine so patients must buy their own. 
Medications have just doubled in price- 
one of the many ricochet effects of the 50 
percent devaluation of the French-backed 
currency that. occurred in January 
throughout French-speaking West and 
Central Africa. 

For years, French drug companies have 
resisted introduction of cheaper generic 
drugs here, but this may soon change. 

Michel Ouedraqgo is the father of five. . 
Although he has a job as a civil servant, his 

See AFRICA, Page ? 


Assurances 



U.S.-Ukraine Deal: Boon or Boondoggle? 


By Raymond Bonner 
and James Bennet 

Nw York Tima Service 

KIEV — When an American company 
ventured into Ukraine last year with a deal 
to sell S70 million worth of corn seed, 
herbicides and expensive harvesting equip- 
ment, the move was haded here and in 
Washington as a historic vote or confi- 
dence in this struggling nation and a model 
for cooperation between American busi- 
nesses and former Co mmunis t countries. 

Now, a year later, the deal looks like a 
model of a different sort, an embarrassing 
instance in which American companies 
took advantage of a country in turmoil to 
dispose of poor quality seed that it could 
not sell in the United States and to reap 
large profits. 

“It’s a very black page." said David 
Sweere, chairman of the agriculture com- 
mittee of- the American Chamber of Com- 
merce in Ukraine. “There was a time when 
the Ukrainian fanner held the American 
farmer in very high regard. Now, they have 
lost respect for us because of deals like 
this. 

“Yes, we in the West believe in commer- 


cial gain. But if that is your only goal then 
this is what happens." 

Some Farms planted the seed and got no 
crops. At harvest time, most of the new 
combine harvesters included in the deal 
never moved from their sheds. And while 
the American seed company and brokers 
have been paid, Ukraine is struggling to 
repay the $70 mini on to Citibank, which 
financed the deal. 

If the country fails to repay the money, 
the United Slates Export-Import Bank, 
which guaranteed the loan, will have to 
repay it and the tost will be borne by U.S. 
taxpayers. 

Ukraine, with its rich black soil some of 
the world's best, and a seal shortage, 
seemed like an ideal setting for Zeneca 
Inc., a company in Wilmington, Delaware, 
that was looking for hew markets: 
v. The deal looked just as good to Ukraine. 
The American' products wore supposed to 
allow it to produce a com crop or At least a 
minion tons, which would bring in $70 
million and pay for the seeds .and equip- 
ment in a year. But the seeds that were 
planted yielded only about 10,000 tons of 
corn, according to a Ukrainian audit 


The details on how this happened are 
scarce. But based on the Ukraine audit, ‘ 
Zeneca documents and farmers andoffi- , 
rials in Ukraine and the United States, a 
picture emerges of a deal gone wrong; The '. 
American companies and Ukrainian . offi- 
cials who knew the most, however, de- 
clined to answer many questions, gave an- ■ 
swers that contradicted one another or 
defended the deaL 

“We gave them the best werhad;" said ; 
Karl Sherman, a lawyer for Zeneca, which 
is an- American subsidiary-' of Zeneca 
Group LtcL, of Britain, a large intonation- ' 
al pharmaceutical and agncultural prod- 
ucts company that was part of Imperial 
Chemical Industries He of Britain. - - H /: 

. .-Ian Kaplan, who hripto coordinate the l 
deal through hisintemational ccanmod- : 
ities trading company m Miami, said in V 
telephone interview that the seed sale “was * 
a win-winToreverybody." " • “ • ^ : 

His family’s company, Trans-Chemical 
Carp., received an $300,000 commission, j 
according to a Zeneca document, and a 

See UKRAINE, Page 7 ‘ H 


Carter Says He Bdieves 

Agreemetikfc 

And That'CrisisIs Over * 

By Paul F. Horvhz 

Intenuaional Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — , After high-level 
talks at the White House; Jimmy Carter 
said Sunday that the United States and 
North Korea were in “complete agree- 
ment” on averting a confrontation and 
that a vote on international sanctions was 
being “held in abeyance." 

But the former 'president said a rap- 
prochement would not be possible until 
written assurances wore reedved From. 
President Kim B Sung, of- North Korea’s 
offer to freeze its nuclear program. - 
. The- former president said he would per- 
sonally seek those assnrahets. He said he 
was confident that the North Korean dic- 
tator would “honor all of the commitments 
be made" and that it would be readily 
apparent if there were violations. V _ 

Mr. Carter providto iro fiirtliet iiisight 
into the timing or circumstances of a sumr 
mit meeting that the presidents of North 
and Souih Korea agreed to on Saturday. 

{South Korean officials started prepara- 
tions Sunday. for the sinnmif meeting by 
foraxing a task foreefo make contacts with 


from Seoul} 

, ; Mr. C^rtq' ^ssad-he bdievBd that “we 
have readied complete : agreement between 
ts on the major issues.":clearmg Lhe way 
for early talks- between the United States 

and North Korea. .. . . .. 

“I. personally believe that the crisis is 

over,” he said. -H... _ ..." . 

HU.S. OffKaab^venpmdicauto Sunday 
. of disagreement, rath -Mr. Carter^ ; view; 
and it appeared that av geriume- Ibreak- 
ihrougjh may '? have occurred They 
- pressed satisfaction with M& Garter's dip- 
lomatic; opining, "p'eading.'o^clal 


: ' : If ‘written ^stumM^ are recetyed froiB 
Pyongyang on a freeze ; in iheff program^ 
: United Stares is prepared to .resume 
. drrecttaBcswitb Norm Korea, .which the 

™^Westero*ad^S^to? P roalern 

. See KOREA, Page 7 


Kiosk 


Israeli Jets Attack 
Shiite Muslim Bases 

NABATIYEH, Lebanon (AP) — 
Israeli planes attacked Shiite Muslim 
guerrilla bases in southern Lebanon 
on Sunday. Two jets fired rockets on 
hills surrounding the village of Mlita 
in Apple province, a stronghold of the 
Iranian- backed Hezbollah. 


0 

1 A 


©Egress Gets Into the Disney Civil War 


B> Michael Janofsky 

Ve-« V.v* 7:m«j Senate 

WASHiNGI ON — A festering dispute 
between advocates and foes of a theme 
pari: that the Walt Disney Co. is planning 
;o build near important Civil War battle- 
grounds has spilled out of Virginia and 
into Congress, turning a local spat into a 
nationai debate. 

Largely di the urging of environmental- 
ists end historians who want to protect the 
region from urban sprawl, a bipartisan 
group of 16 House members has intro- 
duced a resolution opposing the park. Dis- 
ney's America, which would be built in 
Prince William County about 35 miles 
wes’ of Washington. .Also, a Senate sub- 


committee has been persuaded to hold a 
hearing, set for Tuesday. 

It remains unclear just how disruptive 
this additional layer of opposition w31 be 
to the S650 million project, scheduled for 
completion in 1998. 

While the House opponents called on 
Disney to build elsewhere and urged feder- 
al agencies to ensure that the development 
complied with laws on air quality, trans- 
portation and historic preservation, their 
action was only a call to arms, not a threat 
of legislation. 

Disney officials say they are not wor- 
ried. 

“I would have thought that 3 we could 
do jomething in a celebratory way, people 


would be enthusiastic,” Michael D. Eisner, 
Disney’s chairman, said in an interview 
last week. 

Many Virginians are enthusiastic, 
among them Governor George Allen, Sen- 
ator John W. Warner and seven of the 
eight members of the Prince W illiam board 
of supervisors. They and thousands of 
county residents see 'the 3,006-acre theme 
park as a boon to development, employ- 
ment and the local tax base. Mr. Allen was 
the driving force behind a $163 million 
bond issue for the project; most of the 
proceeds will pay for improving roads in 
the area. 

Robert Singletary, chai rman and presi- 

See DISNEY, Page 7 



FLOODS IN CHINA — Soldier carrying victims to safetySimday in liuzhou, in Guangxi Provinoe, where 44 people have died. 

Two million troops have been mobilized for refieFwofk n “— i,: — -**■ ,ro *- J * — J “ - 


To Oust Readers 

With today’s issue, the International 
Herald Tribune increases the size of its 
lypsfaec and becomes easier to read (ex- 
} cept for this text, which appears in the 
old typeface as an invitation for compari- 
son;.’ 

TTus old typeface. Times Roman, is 
S.75 points ^rd the height of each line is 
8.35 "points. (As a unit of measure in 
printing, a point equals l/72d of an 
inch.) i ne face is condensed in the Trib’s 
typesetting process, reducing the width 
of" letters and spaces. 

The new typeface is suit Times Roman, 
bus there is fractionally more space 
around letters and words. The characters 
are 9 points and the line height is 9.1 
points. 


An American Hero 5 s Fall Has Admirers Wondering 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra.. .9.00 FF Luxembourg 60 L. Fr 

Antilles ii.20FF Morocco 12 Dh 

CaPi*rocn..l.JGOCF£ Qatar 8.00 Rials 

f. 3 yp* E. P.5000 Reunion. ...1 1.20 FF 

fro nee o.flOFF Scudi Arabia. 9.00 R. 

r=abon 960 CFA Senegal 960 CFA 

Greece... .. .300 Or. Soain 2Q0PTAS 

"al/ " 2.600 Lire Tunisia ....7.000 Din 

i lorv coas* i.iw CFA Turkey ..T.L. 35.000 

Jordon l JD U.A.E GJODirh 

Lebanon .USS 1.50 U.S. Mil. (Eur.) SI. 10 


By Joel Achenbach 

Washington Poll Service 

At a crowning moment of his life, OJ. 
Simpson made a vow. He was being in- 
ducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame 
in 1985, surrounded by other football 
greats. No one could doubt that Mr. Simp- 
son richly deserved enshrinement: he had 
been a brilliant, breathtaking, record- 
breaking runner. Bui Mr. Simpson said to 
the crowd, “You don’t know what it is to 
walk around here. You wonder do you 
belong with this group of guys. 

“I will bve up to the honor of being in 
this hal! and being on your team.’ 

The vow is shattered. OJ. Simpson is 
now an accused killer, under suicide watch 
in police custody. 


ed with the public to “reserve jud gm ent” 
until a court of law decides his fate. 

Every fan of Mr. Simpson’s will be 
struggling to understand how this could 
be. At age 46 he was a man who had rarely 

The roan the jwbfic knerr cmdd not do what he 
b accused of. Page 15 • A celebrity case, bat a 
coDuooG crime. Page 3. 

stumbled. He had dashed through life, just 
as he had dashed through his Hertz televi- 
sion commercials, with flamboyance and 
grace. 

Mr. Simpson's colleagues and team- 
mates and friends seem universally to re- 
vere him. 


Bui his world has been different from 
Something went hideously wrong in the most people’s. He lived like he ran. fast. He 
life of this American idoL The police say was always surrounded by famous friends, 

- - - - - ’ J * — eager fans, limousines, beautiful women, 

parties. Whether such things are relevant 
to this case is unknown. What may be 


Mr. Simpson brutally murdered two peo- 
ple with a knife. They say he stabbed to 
death a young man and cut the throat of 
his former wife, mother of his two young 
children, Lhe ones he would comfort days 
later at her funeral. Mr. Simpson has de- 
nied the charges, and his lawyer has plead- 


more germane is that Mr. Simpson seemed 
obsessively in love with his former wife, 
Nicole Brown Simpson, and, according to 
one friend, turned vengeful in recent weeks 


when she spurned his attempt at reconcili- 
ation. 

In his note, Orenthal James Simpson 
asked America, “Please think of the real 
OJ., not this lost person.” The accused 
murderer signed the note, “Peace and love, 
OJ„" and inside the "O” he had drawn a 
smiley face. 

As a boy, he had had rickets.' He wore 
braces on his legs. The other lads in - the 
hard-bitten housing projects in the Potrero 
Hill neighborhood of San Francisco made 
fun of him. When the braces came off, be 
was left with thin and bowed legs and die 
neighborhood children called him “pcndl- 
pins." 

Mr. Simpson was the second of four 
children. He was raised by his mother, 
Eunice, who worked the graveyard shift at 
Saa Francisco General Hospital He did 
not see much of his father. Jimmie, a bank 
custodian, who separated from his mother 
when O J. was 5. 

One of his friends was Al Cowlings. 
They seemed joined at the hip. They 
played football together at Galileo High 
School and with some other athletes 
formed a social dub called The Superiors. 


Mr. Simpson , 
GtyCoflegi^ and 


into San Frandsco 
-. Cowlings did a year 


later. When Mr. Simpson transferred to 
the University of Southern California, Mr. ' 
Cowlings did, too. Mr. Cowlings followed 
Mr. Simpson to the Buffalo Bills and then 
finally to the San Frandsto 49ers, when - 
the great ruxmbag back was -finishing- his : 
career on aging legs; It was only natural- 
that it would be Mr. Cowlings, the boy^ 
hood chum, whom Mr. Simpson would run .. 
to, and run away, with, when the mighty ’ 
force of the law camp crashing down upon .. 
him Friday. . 

As a teenager, Mr. Simpson got- into 
occasional trouble. He had-.a C-nunus ay- •_ 
wage in school and gangs wercTtlways .a / 
lure; At age 13, be spent a weekend in ti 
detention center after gettinginto a fight;; 

A social worker arranged a. visit frora-the • 

San Francisco Giaim ter fielder Willi£ 

Mays, and Mr. Smf>s<m l8tia' Sffid that 
helped turn him arouiKL..^ 

"I stole — hubca^; >nd 
Simpson has said. “But asatad Iwasrbore - . 

a talker than a doer.^e addect “Someof. q j 

See SIMPSON; Bage 3 










Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL herald TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1994 



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Gain in Germany 

A Vote of Protest in 4 States 


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BERLIN — Among many 
former Communists celebrating 
success at polls in Eastern Ger- 
many, few have more reason to 
do so than Michael Schneider. 

He heads the Democratic So- 
cialist Party, as the former 
Communists are called, m the 
Eastern borough of Trap tow. 

In elections for European 
Parliament representatives, the 
Democratic Socialists won 37 
percent of the votes, makin g 
them the borough’s strongest 

pa &OTs of Democratic Social- 
ists won local offices in the four 
Eastern states in the elections a 
week ago. In all four, the party 
did better than in any election 
since unification of the two 
Germanys in 1990. It took 15 


for which this party is responsi- 
ble,” said Erwin Huber, chair- 
man of the Christian ~ 
Union. . . #i _ 

But Mr. Schnddk .satt the 
voters were supporting his.par- 
ty as a way of showing anger 
over the way unification has 
been handled. 

“We axe being told! that oar 
-economy was all garbage, that 
our education, was all garbage. 


that everything wc had and ev- Yasser Arafat^ 
erything we knew was garbage,” 
he said in an interview. “That 
isn’t hue. With all the problems 
East Germany had, there were 
some good aspects. East Ger- 


jaflare&P 


Jl^ Aiae iaiK»^^ United Nations 

LUANDA, Angola on Sunday amidjj 

sued peace ef forte* Angp* ono overn ineni 

idngmfte nearly 20-year war between 

TA rebels. 
sUN spec 

*7“r the capital to consult omerns «« “-—3 Huafflbo. 

in their central highland i» 

**** woe available on either 

- * * «*■* w *Jto e 

rebe^S Celling the besieged renewed 

the state radioed, and fiuambohas come 

bombing from the government air fonw. 

ERE2 CHECKPOINT: 


| f ISll Jviivuv — ■ - .. _ , 

ECKPOINT, l ^j eo ?^S^ l kSSmizahon, 
raf at, chairman of the Palestine this 

y-Sdmark. visit .to the £** 3 

mourn, and peace negotiations with Iff* 

JreekTa aariorPLO adviser said Sunday. 




The adviser. 


r PLO adviser saia auiiuaj. . - ■ C1 - , n 

;,Nabfl Shaath, said the Joint Secunty Jorcliin 

some good adjects. East Ger- wc ^d meet Monday to discuss Palesnman pd"* ™ ™ Dassage s 
many was an unjust andrepres- Egyptian: border - crossings^ and the opcm^ wou id 

sive stale, but it provided alevd SmSjericho and the Gaza Stop. He also^J^ w ^ 
of social protection that doesn’t resume June 27 on die second phase of the ■JWM? MrShaath 


siresuub, uulhi/iv.*i«~».wi~ ttftu wm Jericho and tne oaza oluh- *«» ntan 

of social protection that doesn’t jesnme June 27 oh die second phase of the f“ 1 ®2° ,y JP Shaath 
erist any more. ' Asked by reporters when Jericho. 

F^MMBESErmMOKHBSHE JSSKSSfciEpi 

* f 4 . . Oninionoois out the Liberal Party cent in Saxony, 20 percent m Germany, like an old photo- expected to draw thousands ofPalestmians from 

COLOMBIA VOTE — Police officers searching voters Sunday at a polling station in Bogota election. Saxony-Anhalt and 25 pwcent y0 u keqp on your bureau.. Bank stfll under Isradi occupation. - 

contender, Ernesto Samper, even with his Conservative rival, Andres Pastrana, in the second round of the preswenuai in Mecklenburg-Western Pom- Maybe tbeydoa’t display the 

^ erania. ohoto the way tV^ imbH tn hut _ 


(Reuters. AP) 


Q & As rn l mnhia Looks to Asia for Trade 


.the Demo- theydorft See iiwhen someone Low-Levd GoDlbatlNoted 111 BoS*U& 

cratic Socialists won moreto ^n« dn& nw.it out of the ^ ^ 


Like several other Latin American na- 
tions, Colombia is looking increasingly to 
countries of the Pacific, rather than the 
Atlantic, for growth. At a meeting in Kuala 
Lumpur of the Pacific Basin Economic 
Council, Juan Manuel Santos. Colombia's 
foreign trade minister, spoke with Michael 
Richardson of the International Herald 
Tribune. 

Q. How much damage has cocaine 
traff icking and organized crime done to 
Colombia? 

A We have suffered more than any 
other country from this scourge. We have 
lost our most promising politicians, our 
most honest judges, our most courageous 
police officers, our best journalists. 

However, this huge sacrifice has only 
strengthened our determination to con- 
tinue the war against narco-terrorism. 

We are winning Lhe battle. The proof 
of this is the defeat of the most powerful 
and dangerous drug syndicate, the Me- 
dellin cartel whose members are all ei- 
ther dead or in jail. 

Q. Has the economy been hit by this 
conflict? 


A Unfortunately. Colombia is better 
known for its problems with drug traf- 
ficking and guerrilla warfare than forits 
economic reform and opening. The 
bright side of the coin is not as well 
recognized, but is much more important. 

Q. Will the outcome of the second 
round of voting in Colombia s presiden- 
tial elections on Sunday change the 
country's free-market policies? 

A. No. Both candidates have strongly 
stated that the economic policy will not 
change. 

Q. What prompted Colombia lo liber- 
alize its economy? 

A In the 1980s, the so-called lost de- 
cade for Latin .America, we had the high- 
est growth in the region. We are the only 
country not to have experienced a single 
year of negative growth in the last half 
century. 

The decision to change our economic 
model came with the realization that the 
old system of import-substitution was no 
longer valid if we were to generate the 
rates of growth needed to Tree us from 
underdevelopment. 

We have turned to international trade 


and investment as the new engines for 
our growth. As a result, we have had to 
diversify the composition of our exports, 
develop new markets for our products 
and seek new suppliers of needed im- 
ports. 

Q. Is that why Colombia is looking to 
East Asia? 

A Historically, we have been an Al- 
lantic-oriented nation, neglecting the Pa- 
cific. Our trade with the Pacific Rim is 
onlv one tenth of that with Lhe Atlantic. 
Tne time has come to close the gap. 

Q. What can Colombia offer in re- 
turn? 

A We have preferential access to over 
60 percent of the world's markets, in- 
cluding the United States and the Euro- 
pean Union. We have lost-cost labor, a 
disciplined work force and abundant 
natural resources. 

Colombia is the second-largest export- 
er of coal in the world and is becoming 
an important oil producer. We recently 
discovered the largest oil field in the 
Western Hemisphere since Prudhoe Bay 
in Alaska. 


JUIWJUCVW. uwmamw* * 

id stomps on it,” in Bosma was largely United Nations 

The Democratic Socialists tan the ma^aij^ea^ 

oahsts hold 14 of the 44 s«Us ^SaSStafM^ae Dane Holloway; The corridor tote Serbian 
on the borough holdings in the east- and west. . .. . 

campai g ne d on localissueSj Another trouble spot was the area round Rlbmca, 

Pte3®*« f01 : (25mKouthwe^Sf Tnzla, said Major Hofloway, of 

tenant against eviTOCHi and to ^ fom full-blown artillery battles, 

protect family garden plots . 

dmatenedbydevd^m. rimi a Executes 3 for^ Toiirist Deaths 

“Since 1990, the Democratic UHIU EAWUTO ^ «» avui-j . . n 

Socialists have shown them- BEIJING (AP) — Hoping to patdx up relations iwjth ^Taiwan, 

. . „ . . a „ rt selves to be a skillful diligent rtrinR on Sunday executed three men charged with robomganu 

Lithuania, Poland, ancL nun ^ . opposition mimWmp 24 Taiwanese tourists, on a Qunese pleasure boat. 

pary have returned^ fojrmer force< - Friedrich Schoriemmer, officiSreparts said. " \ ^ tn 

those a Lutheran clergyman who was ^ nnings on March 31 plunged Onna-Taxvran rdahoos to 
Germany, Aw parlia ‘ a leading dissident in Commu- i^^ievd since thetwosides opened trade and tourism 

countries have renounce ^ fa. a - m 1957. cbfaese officials initiallyfad said that the. tourists 

— - 44 A ._ ■•■iiki'tiitqflt ‘ “ *■ 1 ‘ - lu«t ImI 

commentary. 


cratic Socialists won more tnan comes along, rips 

a third of the votes and emerged frame, throws it on the floor 

as the strongest party. Among and stomps on it’ 
them were two state capitals, 

Potsdam and Schwerin. 

The Democratic Socialists 
seem to have improved their 
chances in voting later this year 
for European Parliament seats. 

They must get 5 percent nation- 
wide or win three head-to-head 

races- ^ 

By voting for the Democratic 
Socialists, Germans in the East 
are following a pattern already 
established elsewhere in for- 
merly Communist Europe. 

Lithuania, Poland, and Hun- 


zt 


\ 


a 


Marxism-Leninism and em- 
braced multiparty democracy. 

After the European Parlia- 
ment elections, leaders of estab- 
lished parties lamented the 
Democratic Socialists’ growing 
popularity. 

“It’s awful that so many peo- 
ple have forgotten the crimes 


. wrote m a ifaw fa 1987. Chinese officials initially baasaia inai uw «iui»u 

‘An important M(W , ^ m accidental fire, bat later charged three suspects. 

reason for their success at the Xinhua press agency said the men were executed Sunday 

,»lbislhatasai«^ofimifr smunciKtfSSldcd by 1,200 pMpIc in Haagdwu, jn 
canon, nsfflwns of people haw ^ stem rvm„ ft ^ they had pleaded, guilty to chwges of 
tost their robbery and murder, and state-nm television said thcy wxe 

homes and Jed like degraded by gunshot In Taiwan, relatives of th^ ^ 

supplicants. ^ not i^sfied because many believe unofficial reports that 

—STEPHEN HN22ER Communist solcfiers were involved in the killin g s - 



DUTY FREE ADVISORY 



I pte have forgotten the cranes — w.., . .. ....-— — 

n i. Police Break Up a Neo-N azi Balfy 

AlKes Bid a Farewell to Berlin Mxt&aga&i 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Sew York Tima Serrtce 

BERLIN — Soldiers from the United States, 
Britain and France have bid a classic military 
farewell to Berlin, the dty their armies entered as 
victors and guarded for nearly half a century. 

Cannons boomed in salute, parachutists 
dropped and helicopters flew in formation Satur- 
day as an estimated 75,000 spectators watched 
the soldiers step smartly through the streets. A 
lone DC-3 represented the planes that took part 
in the Berlin Airlift of 1948-19, when the Soviet 
authorities tried to blockade West Berlin. 

“You and your comrades defended not only 
West Berlin, but all of Europe and the right of its 
people to self-detennination," Mayor Eberhard 
Diepgen told the troops in a farewell address. 
“There can be few examples of a mission so 
peacefully and successfully concluded.” 

The Allied withdrawal from Berlin wiU be 
completed in September, adding a symbolic 
flourish to the end of the Cold War era. Russian 
troops, who were not invited to take part Satur- 
day, will have their own parade in the former 
East Berlin next week. 


aw illegal 

nJlSUAlKU uenrany inf*; — *« v *«**»----- r ““ 

neo-Nazi rally by the Direct Action Central Germany oiganKa- 
tion in the East German town of Ludcenwalde early Sunday, a 

Dnrine the vears when Berlin was divided, police spokesman said. . --- 

about 12,000 AUied troops were stationed here. They seized far-right extremist magazines^ 

No one pretended thatthey alone would be able and a knife and opened mimqmiy over the 
n Soviet attack, but their presence of laws on carrying offe 


11UUUV Ull AVUU WU . 

to fend off a Soviet attack, but then presence 

reassured residents. ... 

Fewer than 3,000 Allied soldiers remain m 
Berlin, and some who took part in the parade 

Saturday were brought in from garrisons m other 

parts of Germany. No heavy weapons were dis- 
played, and the soldiers wore dress uniforms. 

Along the parade route, several young people 
said they had come simply for the spectacle. 
Older Berliners seemed to take the occasion 

more seriously. . , 

“The Allies came as saviors and stayed on as 
protectors,” said Margarethe 7 . ilm a, 77. ‘‘They 
liberated us from one dictatorship and saved us 
from falling under another one.” 

Ceremonies to marie the final withdrawal of 


(a IVIIWV ***«■■ W|T— ■— _ ^ 4 ^ _ ■ ■ ■ 

of laws on carrying offensive^ weapons, the spokesman raid. 

Law officers also found a stolen car and insignia from toe 
banned Nationalist Front group, as wdl as* hell buckle bearing 
the inscription “Front Hefl.” 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Long Island Railroad Strike Settled 

NEW YORK (AFP) — A strike that had paralyzed the Long • i 
Island Railroad has been settled, dcarmg the jgjorwiorc - y 
service by 


Ceremonies to mark the final withdrawal of service by Monday’s rush hour. The chirfm tne 
foreign troops will also be held separately by the Transportation Authraity, Peter Stanglsaid hei bad 
Western nations and the Russians. President the union’s demands T>efore u got baa oat tnere. 
Boris N. Yeltsin of Russia is to visit on Aug ,31, ’ - - 

. . . . T. u: J1I Woet. 


the union saemanas. D«uicnsui. uo** . 

Under the agreement, railroad workers will get a retrwetive pay J 
raise of 8.7 percent for the three-year period tsndn® in DcccmbCT. 
Muuwmmt «9W. tin its demands for union concessions on work 


US$1 38.000 paid out at each 
draw. U.SS 11 Million won so 
far. In the world-famous Abu 
Dhabi Duty Free raffle. Each 
ticket priced at US$138. Just 
1,200 tickets entered in each 
draw. Approximately 6 draws 
every month. Available 
exclusively to passengers 
travelling or transiting through 


Abu Dhabi Airport Moupcation 
immediately py pnorie and by 
mar Money psia in cash by 
banker's cheque or q:rect:y 
m;o l he wnner's tank ascourt. 
US$i i ,000.030 card cash. 
The easy way. 


Abu Dhabi 
Airport Duty Free 


when the last R u ss ian soldier will depart. West- raise nra.< pciHsm iw u» umv- j— *■ — — ^ . 

“ ' ’ i with President Management gave up its demands for muon concessions on work 

^About 1300 conductors, track workers and motormcn stni^/ 
after mid ni g ht Friday when talks in the 214-year dispute broke 
down. Governor Mario Cuomo intervened Saturday, urging boty 
sides to settle because of the inconvenience to commuters. 

Indonesia win not reqmre forei^i toiffi^s to get AIDS-fre 
certificates because that would violate their human nghts, in- 
official Antara news agency said Sunday. Bui it rqported tto 
foreign workers would be required to obtain Indonesian go-veri 
meat certificates proving that they were not infected with th, , 
AIDS virus. (AFP) v 

A PhStanine Airihws strike has been resolved with an agreement 
to raise wages, President Fidel V- Ramos announced Sunday. 

The Associated said a deputy ctuei pouce COD- The Ulster Volunteer Force, (AFP) : 

Dpi FA<?T — Bra cine for stable, Blair Wallace. an outlawed Protestant para- sod air traffic control systems, badly dam-$ 

more vidlnce. the police Two gunmen walked into a a^Sringthe?991 GidfWar, are now fully rebuilt, tte official f 

searched on Sunday for Proles- pub crowded with people gffg f ” SiSSS* * \ZL*v Irani Dress, agency, IN A, quoted a senior aviation official as 
iant gunmen who lolled six Ro- Watching Ireland’s W<xld 6ip f 

man^Scs who were watch- victory over Italy on Saturtey 

me a World Cup soccer match night, and fired at random. Six meters) southeast ot «eu 
nr a ou b people were killed and five The police expressed fear of 

Sm " if . _ XI. . Z-m J A J T« <La niACCt An FnHnV whm 


era troops will leave a week later, - 

Francois Mitterrand of France, Prime Minister 
,-t Berlin next week. John Major of Britain and Vice President A1 

sSskSS tSSssetz:: 

Charlie have already been dismantled. the ceremonies be separate. - 

__ mroTcertificates proving that they wore not info 

6 Catholics Killed in an Ulster Pub A ^^ A idta^bB.b«’^ndA 

to rnief* wsees. President Fidel V- Ramos announce 



ask the butler... 



The way the world s going 


. irwfl :« 7*» 


Tie upsurge in violence fol- 
lows an offer by the British and 
Irish governments on Dec. 15 of 
a role in peace talks for Sinn 
Fein, the . political arm of the 
Irish Republican Anny, if the 
guerrilla group renounced its 
violent campaign against Brit- 
ish rule. 


This Week’s Holidays 

Ranking and government offices wiU be closed or services t 
curtailed In the following countries and their dependencies this * 
week because of national and religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Argentina, Bcnnwla, Cypros- Greece. 

WEDNESDAY ; Croatia, Sri Lanka. SwazOand. 

THURSDAY: Estonia. Latvia, Lmonbouig. | 

FRIDAY: rmwta, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Sweden. Thailand. Venezuela, l 

tot ■; 

SATURDAY: Finland, Mocambiqne, Slovenia, Sweden. 1 

Sources: J P. Morgan, Reuters. 


i ii 


Zeke. 


To call from 



country to country, or back to the US., dial the WorldPhone number of the country you're calling from. 

CUUimy wwuimy, ,« ■ NatartaduCCH 0M22-91-22 SpaintCO 900-99JXM 


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Dennurk'-.C ♦ 

Dominican Republic 
Eitudorv 
Egypt 1 CC* 

of Or", dul 02 tirM.l 
El JiUidurl 
Finland' iC* 

Fiance- CC<* 

Cainbu* 

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Creecc-Cw i»&W.|2ll 

GreiudU-!- 1^00-«+«72I 


J5VS770 

IdS 

i9v-oo-iy 

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illiO-0012 


Guatemala* 

Hail ICC M> 

Honduras* 

HangaryiCC* 

Iceland* 
lieland'CCi 
kraekCO 
UaJyiCO* 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

Ltvaibhle (mm iniwi nujOr 
LiechienMeIn 1 CCi* 
Luxembourg 
Mexico A 
MonacmCCi* 


189 

001-6<W-4-H-1234 

001-AXW74-7000 
OOW4JTOCHH 
999-002 
1-600- ^100 1 
177-130-2727 MiUuiy Bases: 

. 172-1022 
800-*j74-7000 


06-022-91-22 
00 i -800-950- 1022 


OPO01I 
155-0222 
0800-0112 
95-SOO-67-I-7000 
19V -00- 19 


Netherlands' iC* 

Ncffaeriancb AadllealCCM- 
rtoiagualCO • 

lOulslde of Maiugxa. Jul 02 Rrst-J tbb 

- ., .®W9JI2 

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2610-108 

rmrajy* oos-n-aro 

IwuiOutsklc of Lnm. dial 190 fira.1 001-190 
PutoUCO . 

PQnwdiCO 0a-01i-123i 

pSkco too | - W0 f5i!S 

S-m MarinotCCH 172-102- 

SLktorablfclCC , 00-42-000112 

SaSco ’I • -WPMWH 


SpaintCCi 
St. Luda 
Sweden ICO* . 
SwitsrrlnruKCO» 

Trinidad fg Tobago . 
(SPECIAL PHONES ONLY) 
UdKd Ktogdoimco 
lb call dieUS. using BT 
E> call the U4. using MEEO.IRY 
To call anywhete other than the 
Uruguay 

LhS. Virgin Islands' CO 
Vatican ChylCO 
Venezuela-r* 


900-99-00 H 
191-997-00OI 
020-795-922 
155-0222 


0800-89-0222 
0500-890-222 
l^0500-aOO-30i|T 
000-412 
1-800^88-84X10 
1 72-! 022 
800-lIM<« 


Art v. 


e *' c— Lse 'Cur MCI Card.* local icfcphwnc card or call collect-all ai dm «bic low tttr*. 

jiNi £ jv:< j‘.K Mj, ■,.< h. WJ4 ail n^nwueul kwaw Commi 




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Let It Take You Around the World 

FronMCl> : . - 


Impnmr par Offpnnt. 7J me de FEvun&fa 75018 Paris. 














INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1994 


Page 3 


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H‘ 




A Celebrity Suspect, but the Crime Is AH Too Common 


By Tamar Lewin 

New York Timet Sernce 

NEW YORK — While the kilting of 
Nicole Brown Simpson has attracted 
unusual publicity, experts say that if 
nerfonnei' husband, OJ. Simpson, is 
ultimately convicted, the case would 
m an ail-too-common pattern of do- 
mestic violence. 

“Unfortunately, it is not at ail un- 
usual for women to be murdered when 
™y 1 * r Y . to leave a violent relation- 
ship, said Rita Smith, coordinator of 
the National Coalition against Domes- 
tic Violence. “It's a pattern we hear all 
the tuner the repeated violence, the 
repeated calls to the police, die repeat- 
ed attempts at recon cilia tion ” 

Nor is it unusual for the courts to let 
the accused attacker off without jail 
tune, as OJ. Simpson was when he 
pleaded no contest to beating and 
threatening to kiD his wife in 1989. He 
was put on probation, fined $700 and 
ordered to perform community service 
and get psychiatric care. 

In 1992, the latest year for which 
FBI statistics are available, 1,432 of 
the 4,936 murdered women were killed 


by husbands or boyfriends. Experts 
say the female victims of abusive men 
are usually slain after years of batter- 
ing or stalking, and some attempt by 
the woman to end the relationship. 

District Attorney Gil Garcetii said 
Friday that in Los Angeles County 
alone, there is one domestic-violence 
homicide every nine days. 

He expressed a belief that Mr. Simp- 
son had received special treatment af- 
ter die 1989 incident because he was a 
celebrity. Others said the criminal jus- 
tice system is often lenient in cases of 
domestic violence. 

“It doesn't have to be OJ. Simp- 
son,” Ms. Smith said. “It could be Joe 
Jones in Iowa. The system makes all 
kinds of concessions in these cases, it 
gives them the benefit of the doubt, 
over and over. And even when there’s a 
protective order, or an order for coun- 
seling, there isn’t much follow-up. 

“By now, we should know that many 
violent men feel their identity is so 
aligned with the woman’s that if they 
lose them, they can’t exist. Often, they 
kill themselves at the same time ihev 
kill the women.” 


While every state now prohibits 
stalking, which most define as a pat- 
tern of harassing or menacing behav- 
ior, coupled with a threat, the laws are 
mostly new and are enforced only spo- 
radically. 

Although the new stalking laws were 
spurred by the widely publicized mur- 
der of Rebecca Schaeffer, a television 
actress, by a fan who had staked out 
her home, experts say that stalking by 
a stranger is not the rule. 

There are no solid statistics on the 
incidence of stalking, although a new 
category may be added to the national 
crime reports next year to track it. Bui 
experts estimate that three out of four 
stalkers are men who refuse to let their 
wife or girlfriend end the relationship. 

Violence by jealous former hus- 
bands or lovers is not a new problem, 
but it is one that the police bave his- 
torically had little power to prevent. 

Until the new stalking laws were 
enacted, most state? did not provide 
any means for the police to intervene, 
or for a protective order to be issued, 
until violence had erupted. 


Now the police can make arrests 
based solely on a pattern of harass- 
ment. charging either a misdemeanor 
or a felony, depending on the state and 
the circumstances. 

Nonetheless, experts say that the 
system is still a long way from assuring 
the safety of women. 

“We do not have a single profile that 
tells us who is going to be most danger- 
ous,” said David Beatty, director of 
public affairs at the National Victim 
Center in Washington. “We’re still 
educating law-enforcement authorities 
on bow to use these laws. 

“The system has traditionally not 
been anxious to prosecute these cases, 
or has sent the men away with a slap 
on the wrist. I don’t think someone 
engaged in abusive behavior is cured 
by a fine or community service. The 
way to stop the behavior is to stop the 
motivation. They need counseling to 
get to the root of the problem.” 

Experts say that men who become 
obsessed with getting their women 
back will often start with fervent woo- 
ing. 


“Often it starts innocently, with 
apologies and roses and aB kinds of 
promises, but then if that doesn't 
work, there are veiled threats, then 
outright threats, and then it escalates 
to violence,” Mr. Beatty said. “Once a 
man has been violent, it isn’t usually a 
single incident, it usually continues 
ana escalates.” 

Experts on domestic violence say 
the stalking usually stems from intense 
jealousy and the man's sense that it is 
unbearable for the woman to have an 
independent life, or especially be at 
liberty to be involved with someone 
else. 

No matter what the length of the 
relationship, many such men feel they 
have a claim on the woman for all time, 
the experts say. 

Many experts on domestic violence 
tell chilling stories of men staking out 
their former wives or girlfriends, fol- 
lowing them for months or years, hid- 
ing in closets or attics, breaking down 
doors, kilting their pets or smashing 
their belongings, and, eventually, 
shooting or stabbing them. 



■ r- • •- •• ■ 

** . 'GmSdlB&gBt'!. j&L w. ■"*&&& 


Simpson Is Held 
In 'Suicide Watch 9 










ill* 




mm 



Imqrli fc. \ iBjnn Thr Awvulnl Prrv. 

The witfte Ford Bronco carrying OJ. Siu^son heading north on a freeway in Los Angeles, followed by a fleet of police vehicles. 

Live and on TV, the ‘Chase’ Rivets Public 


By Raymond Hernandez 

New York Tims Service 

NEW YORK -r-A white Ford Bronco 
in which O J. Simpson was said to be a 
passenger was eluded across Southern 
California freeways by the California 
Highway patrol and a fleet of television 
dews helicopters after the vehicle was 
located by traeftig calls from its cellular 
phone. " - r ‘ * . 

The unfolding scene was broadcast 
live by aH the television networks, pre- 
empting standard Friday fare and even 
the fifth pame of the National Basketball 
Association's championship playoffs, for 
millions of viewers across the country. 

As the vehicle proceeded north in Or- 
ange County, passing Disneyland and 
heading into Los Angdes and eventually 
to Mr. Simpson's home in tire Brentwood 
section, S was followed by a swarm of 
black-andbwinte patrol cars, which made 
no attempt to stop or hinder it 

Motorists who pulled over to the side 
of the road to let the convoy pass clam- 
bered out of their vehicles to stare at the 
pasting spectacle. 

Some grabbed cameras to photograph 
the scene. Others waved at the Simpson 


vehicle. Overpasses were crowded with 
motorists who bad stopped, and other 
people who had heard on the radio that 
the pursuit was headed in their direction. 

“OJ. appears to be holding a gun to 
his head/' the phone-in show host Larry 
King told CNN viewers at one point, as 
he described the images bang broadcast 
live by a Los “Angeles television station. 
“OJ. Simpson is in the passenger seat, 
apparently with a gun.” 

Carl Williams, who was monitoring 
the police scanners for another Los An- 
geles television station, said: “He de- 
manded that he would not give himself 
up. He’s in the back of the vehicle. He 
has a gun to his head and will hurt 
himself. He is demanding to be taken to 
his mother.” 

The driver. A1 Cowlings, a former 
football teammate of Mr. Simpson's, 
traveled at about 40 miles an hour (65 
kilometers pec hour). 

Earlier in the day, Mr. Simpson van- 
ished after the police in Los Angeles 
charged him with murdering his former 
wife and a friend of hers. Thai, instead 
of turning himself in to the police and 
appearing for a midday arraignment as 


he agreed, he disappeared. His lawyer 
described him as suicidal. 

The chase, which started about 7 P.M. 
about 40 miles south of central Los An- 
geles, came just hours after Mr. Simp- 
son’s lawyer issued a note written by Mr. 
Simpson in which he denied any involve- 
ment in the killings and asked people to 
remember him in better times. ,; ‘ 

“It is an amazing sight.” one television 
commentator said of the pursuit. “On 
the right-hand side, people have pulled 
over.” 

Another reported, “There’s a crowd of 
people on the bridge watching." 

After nearly an hour, with police cruis- 
ers and helicopters following, the vehicle 
got off the freeway at Sunset Boulevard, 
near the Simpson home. 

By 8 P.M., after gliding through resi- 
dential streets, the vehicle pulled into the 
driveway of Mr. Simpson's home, where 
a man walked up to the car before the 
police pulled him away. 

“I t hink the best thing we can do is 
wait and hope this is resolved.” a televi- 
sion commentator said as the vehicle sat 
motionless in the driveway. 

The police then moved in and made 
the arrest. 


Compiled by Ow Suff From Dupaichea 

LOS ANGELES — O.J. 
Simpson, once one of America’s 
best-loved sports heroes, spent 
his second day in solitary con- 
finement Sunday awaiting ar- 
raignment on two murder 
charges. 

Mr. Simpson, who rose from 
a gang-ridden ghetto in San 
Francisco to become a football 
star, film actor and sportscast- 
er, was in a tiny cell in the Los 
Angdes County Jail. 

He was being hdd on a “sui- 
cide watch." bereft of anything 
that he could possibly kill him- 
self with, and under the surveil- 
lance of a guard. 

Mr. Simpson's downfall fol- 
lowed the murders last week of 
his former wife, 35-year-old Ni- 
cole Brown Simpson, and a 
friend, Ronald Goldman, a 
waiter. 

Mr. Simpson. 46, has been 
charged with ihe murders with 
allegations of special circum- 
stances. and if convicted, he 
faces a minimum of 30 years to 
life in prison, and a maximum 
sentence of death under Cali- 
fornia law. 

His trial, according to the 
Los Angeles County district at- 
torney, Gil Garcetii. is months 
away! Because of the serious- 
ness of the charges. Mr. Simp- 
son cannot be freed on bail. 

Although his attorney. Rob- 
ert L. Shapiro, described the 
football superstar as tearful and 
overwrought after a telephone 
conversation with him Saturday 
morning, a sheriffs spokesman 
said he was “fine” and not un- 
der sedation. 

The spokesman. Angie 
McLaughlin, said there was 
“nothing unusual" about Mr. 
Simpson's behavior but said 
that he was being constantly 
monitored because friends and 
his attorney were “worried 
about the possibility of sui- 
cide.” 

Mr. Simpson was taken into 
custody late Friday after lead- 
ing police on an hourlong pur- 


suit over freeways, trailed by 
television crews in helicopters. 
He and his closest friend, A1 
Cowlings, gave themselves up 
in the driveway of Mr. Simp- 
son’s Brentwood mansion. 

Mr. Cowlings was released 
Saturday on $250,000 bail after 
being charged with aiding and 
abetting a fugitive. 

At a news conference Satur- 
day, the Los Angeles police 
chief, Willie Williams, and Mr. 
Garcetti were defensive in re- 
sponding to criticism. 

Mr. Williams called allega- 
tions that Mr. Simpson had re- 
ceived preferential treatment 
because of his status as a celeb- 
rity “one of the dumbest state- 
ments I’ve heard." 

Neither Mr. W illiams nor 
Mr. Garcetti would comment 
substantively on the evidence in 
the case beyond saying the po- 
lice are in possession of a “sub- 
stantial” knife believed to have 
been used in the murders. 

Mr. Williams said Mr. Simp- 
son was the “only one we have 
sufficient evidence to file” mur- 
der charges against in the case, 
and Mr. Garcetti said he was 
confident investigators have 
enough evidence to prove that 
“OJ. Simpson was, ifl fact, the 
person who committed” the 
murders. 

Mr. Garcetti bristled at a sug- 
gestion made at the news con- 
ference that because of mount- 
ing sympathy for Mr. Simpson, 
the prosecution could face diffi- 
culties obtaining a conviction ■ 
for first-degree murder with 
“special circumstances.” which 
provides for the death sentence. 

He said be could understand 
why many people would find it 
difficult to let go of the heroic 
image of Mr. Simpson as a 
sports role model and popular 
public figure. “But do not lose 
sight of (he fact that it is Nicole 
Brown Simpson and Ronald 
Goldman who are the true vic- 
tims. and the relatives of the 
deceased who are the true vic- 
tims.” (Reuters, WP) 


SIMPSON’ American Sports Icon Falls From the Heights in a Murder Case That Has Admirers Wondering 


■ Condoned from Page 1 

the kids I ran around with got 
hooked on narcotics or crime. If 
it hadn't been for football, that 
wotdd .Tiave been roe. What 
could I have done? What 
chance would I have had? I’d 
have been, di gg in g ditches at 
best”:- ‘ 

- No big school was interested 
in yotmg O J., so he went to San 
Francisco Gty College. In two 
seasons he scored 54 touch- 
dawns. Once he scored six in a 
gam* He manag ed to transfer 
to the University of Southern 
California, - 

Today, bis cardinal -an d-gold 
jersey, No- 32, is enshrined 
there inn glass case si Heritage 
HalLHewonthe 1968 Heisman 
Trophy, college football’s inv- 
est individual honor. He was 
the firet jdayer selected in the 
1969 National Football League 
draft, by the Buffalo Bills. 

Mr, Simpson also got an act- 


ing job in “The Towering Infer- 
no/’ He got another role in 
“Capricorn One.” The poor kid 
from the housing projects had 
become a star of both the grid- 
iron and the salver screen. 

And he married. The former 
Marguerite Whitley once de- 
scribed herself as a casualty of 
Mr. Samson’s success. She was 
quoted m the 1976 book “The 
Supowives” as saying that film 
and football had taken her bus- 
band away from her and their 
children. 

Nicole Brown was the home- 
coming princess at Dana HSls 
High School in Southern Cali- 
fornia when she met Mr. Simp- 
son. It was June 1977, and he 
was asuperstar at the height of. 
his career. She was beautiful 
.and barely 18. She and Mr. 
Simpson began dating immedi- 
ately, by her own account. 

Thenext year, O J. began liv- 
ing with Nicole Brown, Miss 
Brown has said. Marguerite 


Simpson filed for divorce in 
1979. 

Athletes have the terrible fate 
of getting old before everyone 
rise. At 30, a running back is 
usually finished. 

Mr. Simpson, though, 
seemed to finesse the transition 
to the next stage of his life. 
When he retired in 1979 after 1 1 
seasons, he already had his act- 
ing career going and he was 
becoming more famous as the 
pitchman for Hertz rental cars. 

Nicole Brown married Mr. 
Simpson on Feb. 2, 1985, and 
their first child. Sydney, was 
born that October. In 1988, 
they had a second child Justin. 
They lived in a well-staffed 
mansion, in Brentwood, and Mr. 
Simpson bought another home 
in Laguna Beach. Hertz paid 
for annual trips to Hawaii 
where Mr. Simpson could pro- 
mote the company. They skied 
at Vail and Aspen. Each had a 
Ferrari. 


Life was sweet for ihe man 
they called the Juice. 

The sports world is full of 
great athletes with giant and 
conspicuous feet of clay. Pete 
Rose was banned from baseball 
for gambling. Mike Tyson is in 
prison for rape. Steve Carlton, 
the great pitcher, gave an anti- 
Semitic interview. Magic John- 
son, although still hugely popu- 
lar, has the AIDS virus io show 
for his admitted promiscuity. 

But Mr. Simpson always re- 
mained unstained. 

But there had been, for any- 
one probing for such a thing, a 
sign that all was not perfect in 
the Simpson universe. 

At 3:30 A.M. on Jan. 1. 1989. 
police raced to the Simpsons' 
Brentwood home after receiv- 
ing an anonymous call. Nicole 
ran out of the bushes shouting. 
“He’s going to kill me, he’s go- 
ing to kill me!" Marks on her 
face indicated she had been 
beaten. 


She said she wonted her hus- 
band arrested. She said police 
had been there eight times and 
had never done anything but 
talk to Mr. Simpson. Thafnight 
he told police it was a “family 
matter" and drove away in hi’s 
Bentley. He later pleaded no 
contest to a battery charge and 
was sentenced to 120 hours of 
community service, a S700 fine 
and ordered to receive pivcliiat- 
ric counseling. 

A city domestic violence ai- 
tomey later said Nicole Simp- 
son told her that “it was only a 
matter of time before he killed 
her.” 

Jn his suicide note. Mr. Simp- 
son not only denied killing his 
former wife but denied doing 
anything wrong in the 1989 in" 
tiaeut. 

But Calvin Hill, one of his 
friends, said. “I’m nor making 
any judgments, but the beatings 
were real." 


Nicole and Mr. Simpson di- 
vorced in 1992. 

But friends have said that he 
was obsessed with Nicole. They 
said he was jealous, and they 
have told the news media that 
even after the Simpsons di- 
vorced he would watch her. 
waiting outside her residence to 
see who was visiting her. 

A family friend told the As- 
sociated Press that his attempts 
to reconcile with her had failed. 
He had become vengeful, the 
friend said. 

“He was telling her girl- 
friends and her that if he ever 
caught her with anyone, he 
would kill her.” the friend said. 

Mr. Hill says about the case, 
“This is a reminder that we all 
are human. There’s still so 
much we don’t know. We’ll 
have to wait ’til the whole thing 
has its day. Find the real an- 
swers about bow it happened. 
It’s sad. Very sad.” 


POLITICAL NOTES* 


Worries Rise Over Health Care Gridlock 

WASHINGTON — As the struggle for health care reform 
enters a critical stage, one of the most powerful pressures on 
Congress is a possibility (hat was simply unthinkable here- 
unto the last few weeks: that there might not be a major 
health care bill this year. 

Such an outcome is still not considered likely, and it is 
dismissed out of hand by Democratic leaders in Congress. 
But lawmakers and lobbyists involved in the struggle are 
increasingly worried about the possibility of gridlock — and 
ultimate legislative collapse — on a health care bill. 

This concern is becoming an important pan of the some- 
times frantic legislative endgame that has begun in recent 
days: the pleas for a compromise from many Democrats and 
some Republicans; the finger-pointing over who is causing 
the impasse; the willingness of many Democrats on the 
House wavs and Means Committee to transcend internal 
disagreements and vote for a measure they do not love just to 
keep the legislative effort alive. 

It is part of the emotional backdrop for the early whip- 
cracking by Democratic leaders, who vowed last week that 
both houses would take up a health core bill even if it meant 
cutting into the August recess. 

Failure to pass a bill before the fall elections is a risk that 
must now be weighed by everyone involved — Democrats, 
Republicans, liberals, conservatives and. perhaps most of all 
the While House — as they decide how much to give in 
bargaining over health care, and when. 

At the moment, for example, the hard line of conservative 
Republicans seems linked to the assumption that President 
Bill Clinton and his fellow Democrats in Congress will be 
blamed by the voters if the health care drive collapses. 

For their part, many Democratic Congressional leaders 
and White House strategists still hold that, in the end. the 
average member of Congress — Democrat or moderate 
Republican — will vote for a major health care bill once it 
comes to the floor because the thought of going home 
without one is too frightening. 

But there is more than one cause for alarm among the 
backers of health care restructuring. All five of the major 
committees involved with this bill have missed self-imposed 
deadlines. Interest groups like ihe National Federation of 
Independent Business have mobilized fears and opposition 
on a scale rarely seen. 

And the Senate Finance Committee, the most critical 
venue for the legislation, meets week after week with few 
signs of significant progress and no hint of a breakthrough. 

(NYT1 ! 

Ex-Govarnor Joins Virginia Senate Race 

RICHMOND. Virginia — Former Governor L. Douglas 
Wilder has officially joined the extraordinary four-man race 
for U.S. Senate in Virginia as an independent, adding his 
savvy campaign skills to what is likely to be one of the most 
contentious congressional races in the country this year. 

Mr. Wilder told 200 supporters in a city park near where he 
grew up, “I don’t want you to vote against anybody and I am 
not running against anybody.” 

But he nonetheless used the occasion to take veiled swipes 
at two of his opponents: Charles S. Robb, the incumbent, 
who is a Democrat, and Oliver L. North, the Iran-contra 
figure and Republican candidate. A former state attorney 
general J- Marshall Coleman, also is running as an indepen- 
dent, 

“For those who lode for the mud and dirt to fly, look 
elsewhere,” said Mr. Wilder, the grandson of slaves who as a 
Democrat became the nation's first elected black governor. 
“I will not stoop to further embarrass the people of our 
commonwealth. It is beneath me.” (WP) 

Quote / Unquote 

. President Clinton in his weekly radio address: “No issue 
poses the need to come together more to deal with the , 
problems we face than does the cancer of crime and violence 
that is eating away at the bonds that unite us as a people.” 

(AP) 


Away From Politics 

• Paintings by the executed mass murderer John Wayne Gacy 
were burned in a bonfire attended by 300 people, including 
family members of nine of his 33 victims, in Naperville, 
Illinois. 

• A German aerospace engineer walked out of Sequoia Na- 
tional Park in California in good condition after being lost for 
six days in ragged terrain without food, park officials said. 
Nearly 100 rescuers on the ground and in helicopters and a 
team of dogs had been searching for Raimund Hilmar Ott- 
mann, 45. But Mr. Ottmann surprised searchers when he 
walked into Buckeye Flat Campground. 

• An engineer at the U5. Bureau of Engrariug and Printing 
was charged with stealing $1.7 million in freshly printed $100 
bills and using the cash to buy a condominium and other 

f ropexty. The authorities were led to Robert P. Schmitt Jr.. 
I, after bank officials in Annai 


31, after bank officials in Annapolis, Maryland, reported that 
he had made repeated cash deposits that were jusi under 
$10,000, the level at which cash transactions must be reported 
to federal officials. 

• Five members of a West Virginia family on a boating trip 
were killed by lightning after they sought shelter from a 
thunderstorm under a tree in Warm Springs, Virginia. 


Haiti Restricts Travel by Foreigners 
AsaU.S. Senator Calls For Invasion 


Reuters 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti 
— The government has im- 
posed new restrictions on for- 
eigners as a visiting U.S. sena- 
tor here was urging military 
invasion to restore democracy. 

Shortly after arriving Satur- 
day in Port-au-Prince, Senator 
Bob Graham, Democrat of 
Florida, issued a call for direct 
military intervention if the ex- 
iled president, the Reverend 
Jean-Bertrand Aristide, was not 
returned to power. 


The interim president, Emile 
Jonassaim, who was installed 
last month by army leaders, 
signed a decree barring foreign- 
ers and Haitians from going 
within two miles (three kilome- 
ters) of the country’s border 
with the Dominican Republic 
or the coastline. 

The new moves are the first 
concrete declarations made 
since Mr. Jonassaint’s govern- 
ment awarded itself special 
powers under a state of emer- 
gency. 


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Page 4 


MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1994 


I N I O N 



It BI.KIied wnil THF NEW IttitK TIMKS \M* T«K 'AWTIIMITIW POST 


Congress and Whitewater 


Senator**?? of * New Y °rk Republican 
SS^? 0nSe M - D>Ama * uniting 
rS » muSl pk ^ envy of 

w4k £ HpaseJ^or the better part of a 

fnre«(?K atC i. D ^ mocrals havc J° ined 
L t0 £fJ l bac k partisan attempts bv 
senator D Amato and his Republican 

5?e WV? 10 gei P° Ulical mileage out of 
“ Whitewater affair. The wrangling is 

tec\ Banking Commit- 

tecspendmg Whitewater probe. 

Hie Republicans complain that the 

w. emei J.V- reacbed aiong party lines, to 
limit public hearings to phases of the 
« hue water probe completed by soecial 
<-cunsef Robert Fiske is to abandon Con- 
&^6ss s constitutional oversight responsi- 
bilities. They also charge that the narrowly 
focusttz probe is a flagrant attempt by 
Leraocrats to go bail for Bill Clinton, 
lhwr passion notwithstanding, the Re- 
publicans charges don't hold much water. 

The terms of the Banking Committee 
probe meet the spirit of a March 17 resolu- 
tion in which the Senate voted 98-0 that 
the hearings should be structured and 
sequenced" in such a manner that they do 
net “interfere with the ongoing investiga- 
tion” of the special counsel. Mr. Fisfce's 
position that Congress should allow the 
special prosecutor to proceed without risk 
of congressional hearings compromising 
cither his work or the grand jury process 
lay at the heart of the resolution, which 


Senate Republicans supported over- 
whelmingly. It is that intent that Senator 
D’ Amato et aJ. are now tiying to annul. 

By the end or this month, the initial 
phases of Mr. Fiske’s probe covering the 
investigation of the death of Vincent Fos- 
ter, the White House deputy counsel, the 
handling of his papers by White House 
officials and Whitewater-related commu- 
nications between White House and Trea- 
sury officials wiU be finished. These are the 
areas to be examined by the Senate Bank- 
ing Committee. Interestingly, without go- 
ing through the Senate's machinations the 
House agreed to impose similar limits on 
its own Banking Committee. To denounce 
the present structure or the sequencing of 
hearings as a cover-up is wrong. 

While the proposed bearings will cover 
events in the Clinton presidency, the Sen- 
ate majority leader has given assurance of 
additional hearings on issues that cover 
the Clintons' political and business lives 
before the White House. It is no abdica- 
tion of Congress's oversight responsibil- 
ity to be mindful of the pitfalls of simul- 
taneous probes. Congress ought to avoid 
hearings that might interfere with prose- 
cutorial efforts to compile a dmis sible evi- 
dence leading to convictions. Iran-contra 
taught that lesson. Why the rush? The 
Clintons aren’t going anywhere. Senate 
Democrats should hold firm. 

— THE WA SH/NGTON POST. 



Disney's America, the planned theme 
park in northern Virginia, has inspired 
something rare in these shallow times: 
impassioned debate among intellectuals 
and a surge of preservationist zeal in the 
Congress. Hooray! It would be a crime 
against the national heritage if the coun- 
try's best historical thinkers and its legis- 
lators slumbered through this desecration 
of historic ground. 

There is a lime when a nation must 
listen to its scholars. A veritable panthe- 
on of historians and writers — C. Vann 
Woodward, John Hope Franklin. James 
McPherson, Shelby Foote, Barbara 
Fields — has formed a group called Pro- 
tect Historic America to oppose Disney's 
plan to build a 3,000-acre park only four 
miles from the Manassas battlefield. 

Twenty members of Congress intro- 
duced a resolution on Thursday objecting 
to the project. Led by Representative 
Michael Andrews. Democrat of Texas, 
they echo these distinguished thinkers in 
rebelling against a state’s right to sell out 
a national treasure. “It’s not just a Virgin- 
ia issue," Mr. Andrews said. We agree. 
Virginia’s Legislature and governor have 
betrayed their state’s tradition as guard- 
ian of the most important collection of 
Colonial, Revolutionary and Civil War 
sites in the nation. 

Listen to C. Vann Woodward on what 
could be lost to the motel-haraburger- 
condo sprawl that would ripple out from 
the park. “This part of northern Virginia 
has soaked up more of the blood, sweat 
and tears of American history than any 
other area of the country. It has bred 
more founding fathers, inspired more 
soaring hopes and ideals and witnessed 
more triumphs and failures, victories and 
lost causes than any other place in the 
country. If such a past can render a soil 
'sacred,’ this sliver is the perfect venue.” 

The congressional resolution affirms 
this sentiment, and calls for Disney to 
find another site. Disney executives, and 
some shortsighted commentators, say 
that since Disney already owns the site, it 
is too late to stop ihem. That is silly. 


Zoning and land-use planning are estab- 
lished functions of government. Disney’s 
ability to close real estate deals does not 
give it Lhe right to develop willy-nilly. 

There are millions of acres "elsewhere 
more appropriate for such a project and 
where Disney can exercise its creative 
freedom. The only limits are its execu- 
tives’ own taste and their threshold of 
embarrassment. But no one should fall for 
the assertion of the Disney chairman, Mi- 
chael Eisner, who was on Capitol Hill on 
Thursday saving that “there is no basis for 
which the federal government should be 
involved” in challenging his plans. 

A little history lesson on what central 
governments rightly do would be helpful 
here. Ulysses S. Grant, who campaigned 
through much of Virginia, created the 
first national park on March 1, 1872. 
Thus the man who saved the Lhiion with 
victories in the field saved Yellowstone 
for the ages by defining the principle that 
Washington must intervene to preserve 
places of unique value to Americans. 

Now the challenge is different. Few 
pristine natural areas are left, but Grant’s 
principle still applies to areas of special 
historical, environmental or scenic value. 
On Tuesday, Senator Dale Bumpers. 
Democrat of Arkansas, chairman of the 
Public Lands Subcommittee, will hold 
hearings on the Disney project He and 
his colleagues should begin the legislative 
work of defining a new designation, the 
National Historic Region, to protect crit- 
ical sites and the areas around them. 

The hour is not too late for Congress 
to bar Disney’s plans to destroy the 
historic countryside where Robot E. 
Lee raised his army. That is the teaching 
of the nation's historians. 

“I sat through many history classes 
where I read some of "their stuff,” Mr. 
Eisner said to The Washington Post of 
these scholars, “and I didn’t learn any- 
thing." So it would seem. The argument 
for federal intervention cannot be made 
any more dearly than Mr. Eisner did 
with those words. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Of D-Day and Historical Fact 

As the D-Day commemoration ap- 
proached. some of my younger colleagues 
wondered what all the fuss was about I 
think perhaps they now know. Hearing 
the veterans tell their stories. America's 
young have time and again expressed not 
only admiration but also something ap- 
proaching shock, as if they hadn’t had a 
clue. And indeed many hadn't. 

A young colleague assigned to write 
5 tones about the D-Day commemo ra- 
tions told me her high school exposure to 
World War II had been limited to the 
Holocaust, Lhe changing role of women 
and the interning of Japanese- Ameri- 
cans. These are aB important subjects, 
but why not also D-Day? 

The answer is that the pedagogical em- 
phasis had shifted from the memoriza- 
tion of “dry facts” to learning “critical 
thinking” fas if the two were somehow 
mutually exclusive). But thinking based 
on what? Opinions without facts are 
plentiful — and worthless. 

In studying the importance of D-Day. 
the critical thinkers of the baby boom 


generation, of Generation X and beyond 
could speculate on the consequences of a 
failed invasion. Consider the Holocaust 
A prolonged war would have meant 
many fewer survivors. 

The failure of D-Day might also have 
bolstered the German armies in the East 
slowing the Russian advance. Some anti- 
communists might have applauded that 
given what turned out to be the postwar 
Iron Curtain, but it would have at least 
delayed the liberation from the murder- 
ous Nazis of many small towns. 

Among them was Volozhin. in what is 
today the Republic of Belarus. There, 
almost all of my maternal European rela- 
tives perished before (he Russians arrived 
in July 1944. It was only then that my 
cousin Simcha Persia and other partisans 
could safely emerge from the nearby for- 
ests into the ruins of the town to try to 
pick up the pieces of their shattered lives. 

The lesson of the D-Day commemora- 
tions is that objective and irrefutable 
facts do exist — and matter, in very 
profound, important and lasting ways. 

— Eugene L. Meyer, commenting 
in The Washington Post. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABUSHED 138? 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
OhCAjiniK'i 

RICHARD McCLEAN. FMnhaA Chief E<f«ri™ 

JOHN VINCXTUR. EJunr A VaxPresukm 

• WALTER WELLS. v.t« FAwv • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERKE KNORR and 
CHARLES MFTCHELMORE. ffcjwv EJii»n • CARLGEWIRTZ. A jctiutc Editor 

* ROBERT J. DONAHUE. FJif * "f:h? EJbekd Poets •JONATHAN GAGE. Busmen and Fmmce Editor 

• RENE BONDY. Dp/»w> PMnhr* JAMES McLEOD. AAvrtttW amw 

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Yes, Integrate Europe ? but Don \ Weaken Its Nations 


P ARIS — The 20th century's most 
original and successful attempt to 
overcome the destructive consequences 
of nationalism is the European Union. 
Nationalism’s domination of recent his- 
tory has provoked three liberal and two 
totalitarian attempts to establish a new 
international order. The totalitarian ones 
were communism Nazism. The liber- 
al ones have been the League of Nations, 
the United Nations and “Europe.” 

The League collapsed. The United Na- 
tions is not in a particularly reassuring 
condition — doing much that is useful 
and admirable but remaining in all large 
matters the creature of the major powers. 

“Europe” promised to be something 
different, but it is in retrogression today. 
There were elections for the European 
Parliament this month, and the most 
strikiog aspect of those elections was the 
absence of any serious European dimen- 
sion. There was no issue of Europe-wide 
interest or Europe- wide discussion. The 
elections settled nothing for Europe. 

These were simply national votes on 
national issues. Turnout was low, a re- 
flection not only of Lhe poverty of the 
debate but of the poweriessness of the 
European ParliamenL which has over- 
sight authority over the Union budget 
but not much else to do. 

The results were of a slight rightward 
shift in the Parliament's composition. 


By William Pfott 

due mainly to the success of Helmut 
Kohl’s Christian Democrats in Germa- 
ny, the collapse of the Socialists in Spain 
and the approval that Silvio Berlusconi 
continues to be accorded in Italy. This 
shift has no European significance. It 
merely reflects domestic political consid- 
erations in the countries concerned. 

The only pan-European issue the ejec- 
tions touched upon was whether Europe 
should become more or less closely inte- 
grated. on the model provided by the 
Maastricht treaty of 1991 On that, the 
outcome was unreadable. There was an 
electoral fiasco for the Tories in Britain, 
despite a high levd of hostility in that 
country to Maastricht's integration goals. 
A new an ti -European -integration move' 
mem was a notable success m France, but 
the established. pro-European forces had 
an overwhelming majority of the votes. 

Of the right-wing parlies frankly hos- 
tile to Europe, the Republicans in Ger- 
many failed to win a single seat The 
Belgian National Front progressed in 
terms of votes cast; the French National 
Front regressed. None of this was for 
other than national political reasons. 

The fact that there still are no pan- 
European parties, campaigns or even 
tangible issues in these European elec- 


tions demonstrates that Europe as such is O? indi- 

not a political entity either m fact or in pohnea! „ ilb 
tbs mindsofEuropean voters Y« ti* 

European leadership m Brussels presses '^^Srent things. Peo- 

on with its program of-integration, in the to be Europwtv. 

apparent belief that a European- nation themselves to be 

can througbthe • or Italian 

enlargement or structures of adnnmsira- 


finnly and distinctively Dutch 
or Spanish or French. 

Tbe genius of the European 
until nowhfiS been that it rapeewd thL 
distinction and division 
™d loyalty. Its error since the Maastricht 
negotiations Has been to aMM Hfanhf 
one should and could supplant the otne. . 
The importance, and endurance or na- 
tional reality has . not beeo respected. 

. - The nation-state has for more than two 
' centuries proved the most effective avaL- 
able instrument by which societies haw 
organized themselves and found security, 
urn dcihvc as u mey are one. ■ and eranomic and 

Thai may seem a tautological defini- : a-iihout at- 

tion, but it is much Uke thai of the 19th concaved uWj?** 
century French scholar, Ernest Renan: th ^ More 

that “wilT makes a nation. A nation als a . 
moral ccmstipnsries&” While the people 
who make up the European Union today 
certainty possess a moral consciousness 
of belonging to European civilization 
and to an Intimate confederation of West 
European liberal nations; they do not 
possess what can be called a national 
consciousness as Europeans. 


tion and cooperation. 

This seems. * very great mistake.- No 
one can quite define what & “nation’* is, 
since it can be so many different things, 
but it is above all a consciousness. 

The most eminent, of contemporary 
British students nf nati o nalism . Hugh 
Seion-Watson, wrote that after a life- 
time of study he was driven to the' con- 
clusion that a nation exists when it has 
first come into existence in the minds of 
a sufficient number of people — when 
they consider themselves to be a nation 
and behave as if they are one. 


_ their individual integrity- 

recently it has become a confused effort 
to replace nationhood and a constructive 
wi th something that has b«n 
n either dearly drfined nor shown to be 
capable of functiobing. The consequence 
is that “Europe” is in a crisis, inviting a 
return of destructive nationaiisms. 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


The North Koreans Wanted a Bomb and Doubtless Now Have It 


W ASHINGTON — I testified 
in open session before the 
U.S. Congress in the spring of 
1992 that the best estimate of the 
American intelligence communi- 
ty was that the North Koreans 
would have a nuclear device with- 
in six to IS months. The worst 
case, I said then, was that they 
already had enough fissionable 
material to make a weapon. 

We are now well beyond the 
time frame of our estimate and it is 
highly probable that North Kore- 
an already has one or two nuclear 
devices. Bluntly put it is too late to 
stop the North Korean bomb. 

Our only option now is to come 
to grips with that reality and try 
to prevent the North from ex- 
panding its nuclear arsenal and 
selling nuclear material, designs 
and even weapons to the highest 
bidders among other rogue states. 
Iran, which has bought North 
Korean ballistic missiles, and 
Libya likely wiD be first in line. 

Diplomatic efforts to date have 
proceeded on the assumption that 
the North Koreans were pursuing 
their nuclear program as a bar- 
gaining chip in order to secure 
economic benefits and diplomat- 
ic recognition for their isolated, 
faltering regime. This assumption 
has been wrong from the start. 

In reality, Kara II Sung has re- 
lentlessly pursued his nuclear 
weapons program, because he be- 
lieves that possessing a bomb is 
the best means to guarantee the 
continued existence of his regime. 
He and his generals believe that 
as long as they have a nuclear 
weapon, other countries cannot 
intimidate them militarily or pres- 
sure them to go down the fateful 
path of liberalization. A nuclear 
capability gives North Korea an 
edge in Asia. It will have to be 
taken into account in its own right, 
not just as a withered appendage 
that will one day revive when 
joined with the South. 

So the carrot- without- the- stick 
strategy of American diplomacy 
has failed There is a myth in the 
United States that if you offer for- 
eign miscreants the hope of pros- 
perity and membership in good 
standing in the family of nations, 
they will abandon whatever ma- 
lign objectives they might have. It 


By Robert Gates 

The writer was CLA director from 1991 to 1993. 


may be true for some, but is not 
not for others — including Iraq 
and North Korea. 

Playing on well-meaning U.S. 
naivete, the North Koreans have 
been stalling for time so that they 
could proceed to develop their 
nuclear capability. Their warm 
reception of former President 
Jimmy Carter is simply a continu- 
ation of manipulation and exploi- 
tation of earnest American good 
intentions, to gain more time and 
forestall American action. 

Three dangers arise from 
North Korea’s likely possession 
of one or more nuclear devices: 

• The most certain danger is 
that the regime wiU sell nuclear 
material equipment, weapons de- 
signs or even a device itself, just 
as it has sold ballistic missiles. 
North Korea is a determined pro- 
liferator-for-cash . 

• Another danger over the 
longer Lerm is that Pyongyang 
will provoke a nuclear arms race 
in Northeast Asia. Among the 
successes of U.S. nonprolifera- 
tion policy over the years was 
persuading Taiwan and South 
Korea to forgo nuclear weapons 
programs. As the North devel- 
ops its nuclear capability further 
and eventually acquires' a credi- 
ble delivery system for the weap- 
ons, it wifi bring great pressure 
on Taiwan, South Korea and 
even Japan to build an equiva- 
lent deterrent. 

• The least likely danger is 
that the North will actually use 
the device in Asia. 

The current proposals being 
pressed in the UN Security 
Councti by the Gimon adminis- 
tration — phased sanctions and 
a voluntary arms trade embargo 
— will have little or no impact. 
Sanctions will not do the trick. 

As Washington comes to grips 
with the reality of a nuclear 
N^rth Korea, the only option 
now available is to stop its arse- 
nal from growing any larger. 

Unless America is willing to 
rapidly deploy forces in a matter 
of weeks, as it did in the buildup 
to the Gulf War. the reprocess- 


ing window wiU close. Once the 
cooled fuel rods have entered the . 
reprocessing plant, a military at- 
tack on that plant would risk at 
least some n ucl ear contamination. 

A unilateral U.S. attack on a 
North Korean reprocessing facili- 
ty would bring opprobrium from 
across the world, especially in 
Asia. In the Gulf War, the West 
had strong Arab allies and a pre- 
existing act of aggression by Iraq. 
Allies in Asia do not seem willing 
logo to war, or watch America do 
so, over what is to them the ab- 
straction of nonproliferation. 

U.S. options are very limited 
and all unpalatable. In terms of 
limiting Pyongyang's arsenal and 
proliferation potential the most 
effective course would be a warn- 
ing to the North not to begin re- 
processing its recently extracted 
nuclear material, a forewarning to 
America’s friends in Asia that it 


will allow no further . _ 

and then destruction of the repro- 
cessing plant if the: North goes 
.ahead. Washington would need to 
do some fast political and mfliiaiy 
preparatory work, thought _ 

u the United States does not 
take this course, and ! believe jt. 
will not, it most fall back on mear 
sures that will be more gestures 
than effective actions. Tins would 
include doing what it should have 
done more than a year ago: rein- 
force U.S- military capabilities in 
South Korea so that the North 
knows that America is not imam- 
dated by the possibility of an at- 
tack and that it has the option of 
striking, in one way or another, if 
they foil to come to terms with 
demands that they build no more 
weapons and sell ho devices or 
their components. 

There is also room for diploma- 
cy, backed by military power, and 
for covert action to blunt North 
Korea’s effort to transfer nuclear 
weapons and technology. 

The odds of any or these ac- 


tions being effective are nor very 
good. But Washington- now has 
few good alternatives, and none 
that stand a chance of stopping 
the North,' otter than hitting the 
reprocessing plant and taking our 
(and “the South’s): chancerwftira 
retaliatory ground attack. 

The lack of credible options at 
this stage should leave a lesson 
for tte.fnturc; Americaonust not 
again . underestimate the inten- 
tions of rogue nations. An Iraq 
or North Korea cannot be ca- 
joled or bribed into abandoning 
policies that offer the means to. 

. maintain or expand their own 
power. They understand only 
strength.: Unless they believe 
that the United States man and 
will use its strength, there is little 
chance of Influencing them. 

A nuclear North Korea is the 
price-paid for this lesson. r . . 

This comment has been adapted 
from a longer article in Sew Per- 
spectives Quarterly distributed by . 
the Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


U.S. Di 



W ASHINGTON — Several 
major flaws in the Clinton 
administration's foreign policy 
are now aligned on one problem. 
There is a lack of coordination as 
attempts are made to come to 
grips with North Korea’s suspect- 
ed program to develop nuclear 
weapons. Credit is sought for re- 
sults before they happen and 
when the responsibility for them 
lies elsewhere. Signals are sent 
that confuse both Americans and 
foreigners. 

In tiying to gain support for 
United Nations sanctions, the 
Clinton administration found in 
its soundings of Security Council 
members that a number of key 
players were unwiSing to go nearty 
as far as the president had hoped. 
In response, the United States said 
it would seek a phased sanctions 
approach or form a sanctions co- 
alition outside the United Nations 
if the Security Council failed to 
pass a sufficiently tough resolu- 
tion on the subject. 

However. America does not 


Worst-Case Scenarios Make Bad Policy 


By Spurgeon M. Keeny Jr. 


W ASHINGTON — As the 
centerpiece of its “counter- 
proliferation” plan, the Clinton 
administration has proposed a 
$25 billion anti-ballistic missile 
system to defend U.S. troops 
abroad and U.S. allies from nu- 
clear attack. The remote chancre 
of such an assault does not merit 
this vast expense, and building 
the system may well weaken the 
global nonproliferation effort. 

To build support for the defense 
system, winch would include 5,000 
land-based anti-ballistic missiles, 
the administration has concocted 
a highly misleading litany of na- 
tional security threats. 

In late 1993, Les Asp in, then 
secretary of defense, set the tone 
with the assertion that “more than 
a score of countries — many of 
them hostile to the United States, 
its friends and allies — now have 
or are developing nuclear, biologi- 
cal and/or chemical weapons and 
lhe means to deliver them.” 

But America's only adversaries 
— other than China and the for- 
mer Soviet republics, which have 
long had the ability to strike the 
United Stales — are Iran, Iraq, 
North Korea, Libya and Syria. 

A defeated Iraq will not be a 
threat for the foreseeable future. 
Only North Korea presents a cur- 
rent threat, and its actions in re- 
cent days continue to show that it 
may well be willing to trade its 
nuclear program for a new eco- 
nomic and political relationship 
with the outside world. 

To add credibility to the notion 
that a few small weak states are a 
major threat, the administration 
has embraced the dubious concept 
of the “undeterrable” state. But 
even fanatical paranoid regimes 


are deterred by the prospect of 
catastrophic consequences. Sad- 
dam Hussein invaded Kuwait be- 
cause he had reason to believe that 
America would not intervene, but 
he refrained from using chemical 
or biological weapons because of 
his fear of the consequences. 

It boggles the mind to think 
that these minor adversaries will 
deter the United States from 
pursing its role in world affairs 
unless the United States has a a 
major new anti-missile system. 

After all America stayed the 
course against the threat of tens 
of thousands of Soviet nuclear 
weapons, even though during 
most of the Cold War there was 
no defense whatsoever against 
ballistic missiles. 

The price of the proposed mis- 
sile system should be measured 
not only in dollars but also in the 
potential damage to the goal of 
nonproliferation. 

To deploy the system, Wash- 
ington would have to drastically 
modify the 1972 Anti-Ballistic 
Missile Treaty. This would create 
a gaping loophole, permitting the 
deployment of systems with sub- 
stantia! strategic capabilities and 
inviting the Russians to deploy 
their own defense system. 

This would undoubtedly pre- 
vent further reductions in strategic 
weapons below the levels required 
by the second START treaty, 
could possibly derail the treaty it- 
self and could dissuade Britain, 
China and France from reducing 
their small strategic arsenals. ^ 

These reactions would be wide- 
ly interpreted as proof that the 
nuclear powers did not intend to 
meet thrif obligations under the 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. 


Moreover, the administration's 
focus on the anti-missile system 
signals that it has concluded that 
the nonproliferation treaty, the re- 
cently completed Chemical Weap- 
ons Convention and quiet diplo- 
macy are ineffective in stemming 
proliferation. These perceptions 
would seriously undercut pro- 
spects for the indefinite extension 
of the nonproliferation treaty. 

Contingency planning is a nec- 
essary military activity, but it 
should be done quietly. Worst- 
case scenarios should not stam- 
pede policy decisions. If the non- 
proliferation regime falters and 
many countries start developing 
nuclear arsenals, there wiU be am- 
ple time to react. 

If the United States is not pre- 
pared to act overseas without a 
shield against remote contingen- 
cies, it should not become in- 
volved in the first place. 

Far more Americans would be 
killed by conventional arms than 
by ballistic mis sile*, and the like- 
lihood that an adversaty would 
use nuclear missiles against U.S. 
troops is extremely remote. 

Money for the Pentagon’s coun- 
terproliferation program could be 
far better spent on the internation- 
al nonproliferation effort and on 
helping the former Soviet states to 
dismantle their nudear weapons. 

What should the world, con- 
clude about U.S. priorities when 
it realizes that over the next 20 
years America's spending on the 
proposed missile system would be 
100 times its begrudging contri- 
bution to the IAEA’s nonprolifer- 
ation inspections? 

The writer is executive -director 
of the Arms Contr^ Association, 
fie contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


Bv William Clark Jr. 


trade or conduct financial trans- 
actions with North Korea. Nor 
does it fty regular flights to the 
oountry or engage in arms or tech- 
nology transfers with it So if a 
sanctions regime is to be applied, 
Washington will have to persuade 
others to take on these tasks. 

Only four countries have any- 
thing approaching significant 
trade or financial relations with 
North Korea — China, Ji 
South Korea and Russia. At 
one of the four, China, is Hkely to 
block any Security Council initia- 
tive or ignore its terms. Russia 
seems reluctant to go along with 
the UJS. proposal saying that it 
was not property consulted. 

Japan is fading to be firm in 
halting cash flows to North Ko- 
rea that reportedly approach $1 
billion a year. Even Smith Korea 
has so far been reluctant to cat off 
trade with the North which nms 9 
to 1 in the South’s favor. One 
wonders then who win form the 
proposed sanctions tradition. 

It will be even mare difficult to 
shut down North Korea's arms 
trade with Iran, -Iraq arid Syria, 
since none of these countries is 
known for its wfflingness to coop- 
erate with the United States. 

At the best of times, America’s 
policy on North Korea would be 
difficult to implement. The Clin- 
ton administration has made the 
chances of success even more re- 
mote by failing to consult its 
sanctions “partners” fully, partic- 
ularly China and Russia. A basic 
rule of diplomacy, ignored atper- 
3, is that failure to consolidate 
support for a multilateral posi- 
tion prior to its announcement 
wiS usually doom the initiative. 

Furthermore, It puts the credi- 
bility of the United Stales on the 
line before the policy has begun 


re solidify. A crediMity gap re- 
sults from the frequent, appear- 
ance of zigs and zags in policy 
course. Perhaps if Bill Clinton 
were to rummage around in the 
White House stemoom, he might 
find the small sign that graced the 
desk of President Roaald Rea- ' 
-gam It read: “It is amazing what 
you can accomplish if you don’t ■ 
. care ^tp gets the crediL”. - { 

Add to these problems the 
confused signals . being sent to 
Pyongyang by Washington. For- 
mer President Jimmy Carter has 
just returned- from- talks with 
Kim fi Sung held with the evi- ' 7 
dent blessing of the Ctinlon ad- r 
ministration. As a- result of the { 
confused and confusing outcome : 
of this visit, would Mr. Kim, to- ; 
sconced in an isolated country < 
and viewing- the world through ! 

-his cull of personality, be wor- • 
tied about sanctions, or would 
, he . think that things were going 
very much in his favor? i 

Taken cumulatively, and espe- 
cially in dealing with such a sen- * 
sitive matter as North Korea's 
nuclear program these failings 
in U.S7 foreign policy coordina- 
tion are dangerous. They weaken / 
chances of udocing Pyongyang ?' 
to accept outside inspections of l 
its nuclear facilities. j 

At the same time, stroking the I 
ego of Kim II Sung encourages 
perceptions that could Jead to x - 4 
serious miscalculation on both 
the North Korean and American * 

sufe. In a poker game every card / 

is important, and this is a very * 
high stakes hand. J / 


- The writer, d former U.S. oxtis- 5 
font secretary of state for East) 
Aidan and. Pacific affairs, is the j 
Japan chair holder at the Center] 
for Strategic and International \ 

™ Washington. He con - 1 
tnbuted this comment to the Inter- \ 
.national Herald Tribune. \ 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894; Cod Over Congo 

BERLIN — I leant from a thor- 
oughly well-informed source that 
the difficulties regarding the Con- 
go question are making the Em- 
peror hesitate about paying his 
projected visit to the English 
Court. His feelings of friendship 
for : England have been so cooled 
by recent events that in his entou- 
rage doubts are expressed that he 
will accept the invitation of his - 
grandmother. 

1919; Serfnan Pligfat 

BELGRADE — InNorthern Ser- 
bia, many families have been 
found by officers of the American 
Relief Administration arid of the 
American Red Cross tiring in sta- 
bles and chicken coops. Their 
homes had been destroyed by the 
advancing or retreating armies. 
Many of the refugees madethar 
way - across Serbia in garments 


f^hloned from burlap ba°s 
which had contained Americ^ 
food sent to their relief. 

1944; Ruling France 

’TjFrom our New 
York French and British 

fr^nciid^egal and diplomatic 
be San. today [June i S ] for ; 
mat negotiations for an aaree 
^ adtaitosirS 
df liberated France. The aaree 
ment sought is modeled on^Ss 

fcorornmenl and the Drov-v* 11 ^ 


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PEOPLE HAVE MORE 
FOW THAN ANYBODY: A 
Centennial Celebration of 
Drawings and Writings by 
James Tburber 

Edited by Michael J. Rosen. Il- 
lustrated. 169 pages . $22.95. 
liar court Brace & Co. 

Reviewed by 
Margo Jefferson 

G rowing up in nai Mid- 
western country amid flal 
Midwestern voices. James Thurber 


at The New Yorker under its found- 
ing editor. Harold Ross, and “Soap- 
land," his New Yorker series on 
radio soap operas. 

Rosen is right 10 say in his intro- 
duction that Thurber’s humor 
“prods and chides" us, that it sends 
up manners but outlasts them to 
get at drives and morals, too. 

But Rosen likes to coo where 
Thurber liked to bite. Why is this 
book called “People Have More 
Fun Than Anybody"? The piece 
these words occur in makes pabu- 
lum of them, with Thurber reason- 
ing that “no animals except the 
human being try to destroy their 


Past Joins Present in Algeria Conflict 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Pierre Sauvage, director of 
“Weapons of the Spirit," a movie 
about the rescue of Jewish children 
from Nazi-occupied France, has 
just read “ Eichmann in My HandsT 
by Peter Z. M alkin. 

“I thought it was profoundly 
moving. To imagine people whose 
families had been victimized by 

this nyin participatin g SO many 

years later m his capture is extraor- 
dinary and very touching." 

(Barry James, IHT 1 



devised a writing style of ostensibly 
flat sentences that managed to keep 
wild events and disorderly senti- 
ments just barely in line. Here be is 
in 1930, age 26, writing a “Brier 
Biography* of hims elf: 

“James Tburber was boro in the 
blowy uplands of Columbus, Ohio, 
in a district known as “the Flats,' 
which, for half of the year, was par- 
tially underwater and during the rest 
of the lime was an outcropping of 
live granite, rising in dry weather to 
a height of 200 feet 

"This condition led to morose- 
ness, skepticism, jumping when 
shots were Hied, membership in a 
silver cornet hand and, finally, a 
system of floating pulley- baskets 
by means of which the Thurber 
family was raised up in and low- 
ered down from the second floor of 
the old family homestead." 

And here he is in 1956, contem- 
plating being put in a mental insti- 
tution or nursing home after “rais- 
ing hell an Third Avenue, breaking 
up Nixon rallies and other subver- 
sive conduct": 

“Right now my dasstffcatkxriza- 
rion chart reads as follows: ‘Sex, 
male. Age, going on 61 Color of 
moods, grayish black. Height, inde- 
terminate because of ducking. Oc- 
cupation, sympathizer with lost or 
unpopular causes." 

Thurber was bora in 1 894, and to 
mark that fact Michael J. Rosen 
has put together “People Have 

More Fun Than Anybody: A Cen- 
tennial Celebration of Writings 
and Drawings by James Thurber." 

But why should a centennial cel- 
ebration be a batch of previously 
uncollected leftovers? This book 
should send fond and curious read- 
ers back to /The Thurber Canri- 
vaL” a much better anthology, and 
to “My Life and Hard Times," a 
memoir filled with farcical, slightly 
ghoulish tall Vales about growing 
up in a famfiyand city that were . 
always trying to be normal and 
always failing. 

Rosen's modest though entertain- 
ing book could also spur publishers 
to do better. What about areal criti- 
cal anthology with Tburber's stories, 
drawings, letters and journalism; ex- 
cerpts from “The Years With Ross," 
his Ihxust-and-pany account of life 


own species, and this in itself 
proves that anybody has more fun 
than people." 

Humorists are like talk show 
hosts and siand-up comics in that 
they always have a ready supply of 
nicks and manners to charm their 
fans. Tburber's supply did include 
ingratiating whimsy and lin guistic 
fussing. But he never uttered a plat- 
itude lute this with a straight face or 
a loving heart 

Tburber's drawings often accom- 
panied his stories, but they ap- 
peared on their own, too. His car- 
toons are filled with hapless 
middle-class people who have dop- 
ing foreheads, receding chins, lots 
of flesh and almost no discernible 
body pans. Their eyes are dots, 
their mouths are lines, their noses 
are beaked or bulbous. 

Once a woman declared that her 
infant son could draw as well as 
Thurber and sent him an example. 
He replied: “Your son can certain- 
ly draw as well as I can. The only 
trouble is he hasn't been through as 
much." 

James Thurber died in 1961, hav- 
ing been through eye problems that 
left him legally blind by the late 
1940s, and alcoholism that left him 
with shredded nerves and black 
rages. 

“I can’t hide anymore behind the 
mask of comedy that I've used aC 
my life." he said toward the end. 
But be had been warning readers 
since the 1933 preface to “My Life 
and Hard Tones" that to call writ- 
ers like himself (or Dorothy Parker 
and Robert Beocbley) humorists 
was to miss “the nature of their 
dilemma and the dilemma of their 
nature. The little wheels of their 
invmtion are sei in motion by the 
damp hand of melancholy." 

. This is best semi in the cartoons 
Rosea selects: the drawings that 
make up “The (Cold) War Between 
the Sexes," and “A Suite of Draw- 
on Matters Psychiatric and 
The writing in this col- 
lection is lively but minor. On the 
whole, Thurber is behaving too well 
here, folding the damp hand of 
melancholy and the high hand of 

wit too neatly in his lap. 

Margo Jefferson is on the staff of 
The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

M RS. DIANA SCHULD of 
Glen Head, Long Island, is 
now the proprietor of one of the 
country’s biggest bridge clubs, the 
Vanderbilt in Lake Success, Long 
Island. Sbe took over the manage- 
ment when hex husband, Frank 
Sdmid, died in January. On the 
diagramed deal she used a transfer 
bid in response to hex partners one 
no-trump opening, and. continued 
to game when her partner showed 
enthusiasm for hearts by jumping 
to three hearts. 

Mrs. Edith Sacks of Manhattan, 
as South, received a club lead and 
captured East’s jack with the ace. It 
was not dear whether tins was a 


faced the possibility of a loser in 
each suit, and made the only play 
that offered the chance of avoiding 
a trump loser: Sbe led the heart 
queen. This was a triumphant suc- 
cess* for itpnmed East’s jack. 

The queen was covered with the 
king , and the ace and jade complet- 
ed an honorable trick. Now she 
chose a saferoad to 10 tricks by 
crossing to the diamond ace, finess- 
ing the heart eight and drawing the 
las tramp. This would have pro- 
duced a. useful overtrick if West 


had indeed led a singleton dub. but 
as it was, South had to lose a spade 
trick, a diamond and a club. 

South could have emerged with 
an overtrick if she had finessed the 
dub ten after taking the heart ace. 
That would have established the 
clubs, preparing for eventual dia- 
mond discards, without giving up 
diamond control. Bui it would also 
have jeopardized the four-heart 
contract, res' West might have been 
able to score two club tuffs. 


NORTH (D) 
402 
P A JO 8 6 5 
4 072 

♦ B 6 3 

EAST 

*87543 

t? J 

0 K 10654 
* J 7 
SOUTH 

♦ K JO 
? Q 4 3 2 
r> A 9 

♦ A K 10 4 2 


WEST 
♦ A J96 
<9 K97 
O J83 
+ Q95 


Neither side was vulnerable. The 


bidding: 

North 

East 

South 

West 

Pass 

Pass 

. IN.T. 

Pass 

2 o . 

Pass 


Pass 

4b 

Paha 

Pass 

Pass 

West led the dub five. 




VtfcJ*)*TW V W* W 


LIVING IN THE U.S.? 

Now Printed in 

NEWARK 

fdr Same Day 
Delivery in key Cities 

'''‘-'IDSUBSQOBEk CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(|N NEW. YORK, CALL 2127523890) 


V>; 


By Jonathan C. Randal 

Washington Pott Service 

ALGIERS — The insurgents of Algeria 
favor butcher knives for L&eir executions. 
They use school children as messengers 
and scouts. Where they can. they ban 
newspapers, cigarettes and liquor. 

On the other side, government security 
forces cordon off neighborhoods, using 
hooded informers to search homes and 
arrest suspects. They kill at random, often 
insisting that the bodies of their victims 
remain m the streets to deter what official- 
ly is condemned as terrorism. 

Algerians, now in the third year of a 
stalemated conflict between a secular re- 
gime fighting for its life and M uslim mili- 
tants determined to set up an Islamic re- 
public, have been here before. As if the 
violence that has claimed some 4,000 lives 
in the last two years was not depressing 
enough, Algerians see in the present 
bloody struggle a mocking remake of their 
glorified war of independence against 
French colonial rule a generation ago. 

For a long time, most Algerians dis- 
missed this comparison a s the wronghead- 
ed and spiteful work of foreigners. Their 
irritation was directed especially at the 
French, who remain a useful whipping boy 
for Algerians 32 years after the war of 
independence ended. 

But now conversations with Algerians 
young and old frequently get steered back 
to the war against France. They often 
contain detailed insights into its various 
phases and how they repeat — or differ 
from — the present violence. 

“We're back in 1955, when extremist 
French settlers and army officers scuttled 


chances of negotiations," an Algerian doc- 
tor in bis 40s contended. 

“No," a younger friend shot back, “it’s 
more the battle of Algiers in 1956-57. when 
the French Army used torture and summa- 
ry executions to stamp out the rebels ins ide 
the capital.” 

Such recall is all the more striking since 
an estimated 65 percent of the population 
is under 20. 

Much of the youthful majority seems fed 
up with the propaganda glorifying the war 


There is a deep-seated 
conviction that ill- 
intentioned 'foreign 
hands 9 have manipulated 
Algeria’s fate and that 
each warring side has 
penetrated the other. 


?„ 


of independence Lhat has been pumped out 
the governing National Liberation 
root. But even if the nationalists’ claims 
of a “million martyrs” killed in that con- 
flict were exaggerated, seemingly every 
family lost relatives, and the price in blood 
remains a vivid collective memory. 

Part and pared of both conflicts is a 
deep-seated conviction that ill-intentioned 
"foreign hands" have always manipulated 
Algeria's fate and that each warring side 
has penetrated the other. Such is the abid- 
ing 40-year-old heritage of the French 


Army’s psychological warfare specialists, 
many of whom came here fresh from les- 
sons learned in communist prisoner-of- 
war camps in Vietnam. 

Just as those French officers sowed 
doubt among Algerian nationalists — 
causing bloody purges of key political 
leaders, officers and entire guerrilla units 
— so the Algerian Army is said to brave 
created similar havoc in ranks of Muslim 
militants. 

Good intelligence work is said to explain 
the security forces' success in eli minating 
successive leaders of (he Armed Islamic 
Group, a radical organization that special- 
izes in urban guernUa operations. These 
army achievements have relieved pressure 
on the less violent Islamic Salvation From, 
with which the security forces still hope to 
negotiate a political settlement. 

■ Rights Activist Is Slain 

77ie New York Times reported from Al- 
giers: 

The president of the Algerian Human 
Rights League, an outspoken critic of both 
sides in Algeria's unrest, has been assassi- 
nated in his office, the police said. 

Witnesses said several armed men had 
shot the victim, Youssef Fathallah, 64, and 
then escaped on Saturday. The police pro- 
vided no immediate information about the 
killers, and no one claimed responsibility. 

Mr. Fathallah, a retired lawyer, was 
elected head of Lhe Human Rights League 
in 1991. The independent association has 
criticized abuses by both sides in the con- 
flict, which began after the government 
canceled an election that Muslim funda- 
mentalists were widely expected to win. 


BaUadur to Youth: 
Tell Me About It 

By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — Alarmed by the disenchanted mood of many 
French young people. Prime Minister Edouard Bahadur has 
devised an unusual way of hying to bridge the generation gap. 
He is asking 9 million youths between the ages of 15 and 25 to 
tell him how they feel about home, school, work and society in 
general. 

A questionnaire is being seat to millions of French homes 
inviting youths to give their reactions — total or partial 
agreement or disagreement — to 58 statements, ranging from 
“I feel comfortable in this society” to “I would like to receive 
more love from my parents.” 

The government, with a presidential election coming up 
next year, hopes the responses will enable it to identify what 
has led so many young French to lose faith in the future. “I 
want youth to express itself so that together we can build 
tomorrow’s France,” Mr. Bahadur said m a letter presenting 
the questionnaire. 

The initiative was born of the display of youthful discon- 
tent in March when tens of thousands of students took to the 
streets complaining lhat they had been betrayed by a law 
allowing employers to pay young people less than the mini- 
mum wage. 

With one in four youths out of work, the government said 
the law would stimulate job creation. Instead, it became the 
catalyst for an outpouring of anger and frustration. After 
three weeks of protests, Mr. Bahadur revoked the Jaw and 
promised to consult young people. 

Their unhappiness with the status quo was evident in 
elections for the European Parliament a week ago. The anti- 
establishment leftist Bernard Tapie beaded an electoral list 
that ran fourth among all French voters, but was the clear 
favorite among men and women 18 to 24. 




& 


WWF World Wide Fund For Nature 

(formerly World Wildlife Fund) 
International Secretariat. 11% Gland. Switzerland. 

Outside the industrialised west, no-one 
has to be told to respect their elders. It's 
simply the way society is organised. 

Which is why WWF - World Wide Fund 
for Nature tries to work with older people in 
the villages of the rainforests. With WWF's 
help, they learn to teach the younger mem- 
bers of their communities about conservation. 

In Kafuc Flats. Zambia, it’s Chief 
Hamusoride (93).' 

Chief Bakarv (78), is our man in Anjavi- 
mihavanana, northern Madagascar. 

In Ban Klong Sai, Thailand, we invoke 
the Venerable Papasro Bhikkhu, seventy- 
three year old chief Buddhist monk. 

This isn’t just expediency, it’s how WWF 
believes conservation projects should be run. 

Before you teach someone, we believe 
you have ro learn from them. 

Wc spend years visiting village after 
village, talking ro the .people, listening to 
them, living with, them, understanding how 
they live their lives. 

Only then arc we able ro gain rhe confi- 
dence of the village elders. 

Once they realise we’re on their side, our 
elderly converts promote conservation with 
a zeal that belies their years. 

“Uncle” Prom (68), another of our Thai 
community leaders, tells us that he frequently 
gets scolded when he starts telling people in 
the market that they should leave the forests 
alone. But he gets results. 

Uncle Prom and his fellow villagers 
recently managed to prevent a new logging 
concession, and set up a community forest 
where tree felling is now forbidden. 

Ninety-three year old Chief Hamusonde 
also makes things happen. 

Income front the Kafue Flats game reserve 
in Zambia is funding a school, a clinic and 
new water boreholes for the local villages. 

In Madagascar, seventy-eight year old 
Chief Bakary’s village makes a profit by 
selling fruit grown in their new free nursery. 

More importantly. Chief Bakary’s village 
now takes fewer trees from the rainforest 
because the nursery can provide firewood 
and poles for construction. 


Not that we don’t believe in catching them 
while they’re young. WWF also organises 
special training courses to help teachers incor 
poratc conservation into the curriculum. 

2u.tum primary teachers in Madagascar 
have already taken part. 

And WWF produce teaching aids as well 
as teachers. 

We commission educational 
factshccts. booklets, posters 
and videos in over twenty 
different languages. 

These arc distri- 
buted to schools 
and colleges 
all over the 
world. 

If you 
can 


help our work with a donation or a legacy 
please write to the membership officer at the 
address opposite. 

You only have to look around you to see 
that the world still has an awful lot to learn 
about conservation. 


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HE’S JUST ABOUT OLD ENOUGH 

FOR OUR TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAMME 

















Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1994 


•••• -- 


Rebuffed by Party 9 
Leader of Socialists 
In France Resigns 


ggP^ 






By Marlise Simons 

New York Tima Service 

PARIS — After a humiliat- 
ing vote of no-confidence by his 
party, Michel Rocard resigned 
Sunday as the leader of the 
French Socialist Party, causing 
further disarray amid France's 
weakened and fractured left. 

Mr. Rocard announced that 
he was stepping down after the 
Socialists' national council re- 
jected his plan to revitalize the 
party following last week's poor 
performance in the elections for 
the European Parliament. 

The Socialists gained less 
than IS percent of the vote, 
their worst result in two de- 
cades. 

The resignation of Mr. Ro- 
card, who was prime minister 
from 1988 to 1991, appeared to 
put an end to the presidential 
aspirations of a moderate poli- 
tician who until recently had 
been seen as the Socialists' most 
likely candidate in nest year's 
elections. 

Party members said that Mr. 
Rocard ’s departure opened the 
door for Jacques Delors, the 
head of the European Union's 
executive commission, who is 
due to step down from his post 
in January. 

Henri Emmanuelli, a former 
president of the National As- 
sembly, was elected to serve as 
interim party leader until the 
Socialists bold their national 
convention in the fall. 

Mr. Rocard took over the 


party leadership last year from 
Laurent Fabius after the Social- 
ists were voted out of office in 
general elections. 

Part of Mr. Rocard's political 


problems in the 14 months 
months since he took over as 
party leader was believed to 
come from his strained relation- 
ship with President Francois 
Mitterrand. 

Before the recent European 
parliamentary elections, which 
serve as a telling thermometer 
for national politics. Mr. Mit- 
terrand was widely believed to 
be encouraging Bernard Tapie, 
a popular rival of Mr. Rocard's. 
Mr Tapie, a maverick Socialist 
milli onaire, formed a splinter 
group that got almost 12 per- 
cent of the left’s ballots. With 
that, be siphoned off significant 
support for Mr. Rocard, above 
all among young Socialist vot- 
ers. 

At the party’s national coun- 
cil meeting on Sunday, Mr. Ro- 
card, sounding tense and terse, 
said: “If what I propose does 
not suit you because you have a 
better solution, choose that 
one." 

After the meeting, several So- 
cialist delegates said there was 
no doubt that the best candi- 
date for next year’s presidential 
elec dons was Mr. Delors. 

Mr. Delors has not declared 
an interest in running for the 
presidency, and said after the 
Socialists' trouncing last week 
that he considered Mr. Rocard 
their natural candidate. 

But for some lime now. Mr. 
Delors has been widely seen as 
the only Socialist with sufficient 
stature to challenge Prime Min- 
ister Eduard Bahadur. The con- 
servative prime minister has not 
declared his candidacy for pres- 
ident. but he has been well 
ahead in the polls. 








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Paris Acts 

To Assure 
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Fiwsb, Gmnany. Hons Kong, Italy, Mnlco, H a B wi iu mt a. Ntn Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore. Spain. Samian. S n ftm i U nd and Vanezude. for Tikyot Mt>« Von and 
London the ntu ts OC KiVOUKI el tm 30 top issues n (snns ct martet cwro.iknnrn 
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For mots information about fte tndec a booklet s arajJai* 1 tree ot charge. 

Writs to Tub index. 181 Avenue Charles de GaiAr. 02531 Nduify Codon, France 


- eratiem “while there is wide- 
: spread support in Africa.” 

French military chiefs met 
' here Sunday to complete plan- 
: rring for possible intervention, 
an army spokesman said. 

Jean -Mich el Marlaud. the 
; French ambassador to Rwanda, 

. whose mission was dosed near- 
: iy two months ago, will try to 
’ persnade leaders of the Rwanda 
■ Patriotic Front that opposes the 
French move, a Foreign Minis- 
; try spokesman said. 

In Kigali, the Rwandan capi- 
; tal, the rebels say they will at- 
tack any peacekeeping troops 
; sent by France, the United Na- 
tions commander said Sunday. 

“The responses I’ve received 
! from the RPF are vay emphat- 
ic," said Mmor General Romeo 
; Dallaire of Canada, referring to 
| the Rwanda Patriotic Front re- 

• bds. “They would consider the 
1 French forces the enemy and 

; target them accordingly." 

But a spokesman said the op- 
! oration would begin only ’when 
i approved by the United Na- 
j lions, where Paris distributed a 

• draft resolution over the week- 
; end, hoping for adoption on 

• Tuesday by the Security Coun- 
: cil 

I A well-informed source said 
I it appeared likely that thejump- 
! ing off point for French troops 
: would be eastern Zaire. 

! French military planners said 
they might have to fight their 
way in and would be equipped 
appropriately. 

The French planners spoke 
of an initial 1, 000-man task 
force of professional soldiers 
with 600 infantrymen backed 
by 400 support troops including 
engineers and crews of helicop- 
ter gunships. 

A second 1,000-man unit 
would be on stand-by, ready to 
move within 24 hours. The 
army has not said which units 
were picked for the mission but 
it has a choice of tough marine, 
para troop and Foreign Legion 
units to choose from. 

France has sought to enlist 
European and African allies in 
the venture, but only Senegal, 
whose army is close to the 
French military, is certain to 
take part, sources said. 

President Fran 901s Mitter- 
rand said Saturday it would 
take “a matter of days and 
hours” for France and its for- 
mer West African colonies to 
send troops to Rwanda, possi- 
bly via Zaire — the only border 
Rwandan government forces 
still control. f Reuters , AFP ) 




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England jwdlb--.; 

: ejae, B gederatn^g a deba&v ym 
v-overtte ^rfS#W,%v '¥£$1 
, dam dat courts have 3^ % 

also questtaned-^e 

Food arid Drug Acfeknfe6a^,v 

ptontsfrom.tfe itafflto 


Compiled ftr Our Su0From DisptScba 

PARIS, — Foreign Minister 
Alain Juppe said Sunday that 
France wanted to persuade the 
Tutsi-dominated Rwandan Pa- 
triotic Front that intended mili- 
tary intervention in Rwanda by 
French troops to bait ethnic 
massacres would not be aimed 
at the rebels. . . 

T want to u nderlin e the fact 
That we are making great efforts 
to convince the RPF that this 
operation is not aimed against 
them,” Mr. Juppe said cm TF1 
television. 

He said Paris was in contact 
with rebel leaders in Rwanda, 
and that other contacts were 
p lanne d with the movement in 

New York and Paris. 

The rebels, who arc winning 
the war against the rival, Hutu- 
dominated government, dis- 
trust France. They say its hands 
are bloodied by support of the 
government of President Juve- 
nal Habyarimana, killed in 
April in aircraft sabotage. 

F earin g action by Paris is de- 
signed to deprive it of victory, 
the Rwandan Patriotic Front 
has said it will respond to 
French intervention by force. 

Mr. Juppe insisted that 
France was neutral He said 
France's move to hah massa- 
cres, which may have claimed 
up to a half- mini on lives could 
take place next week if the 
United Nations Security Coun- 
cil gave the go-ahead. 

He hoped other European 
countries would join, and re- 
called that Senegal had also 


Maxk Twain Butler r 
To Be Memorialized 

George Griffin was Mark 
Twain’s butler for 18 yew®. 
Historians say he was! the 
miration for the character 
of Jim, the runaway slave, in 
“TheAdven tures of Huckifo- 
beny. Finn.” 

Despite his importance to - 
Twain, Griffin’s tiny .third- . 
floor room in die Marie : 
Twain Memorial - in Hart- - 
ford, Connecticut, the au- 
thor’s longtime home.' and 
now a museum, has bear 
filled with a hearing, and 
cooling system. But t ha n k s 
to more than £2OO,O0 QJb.' 
gifts and grants, the hearing 
equipment is being moved ' 
and Griffin’s room- is being 
restored to reflect his Kfe — 
and the life of -blacks: in 
Hartford in the I9tfa cento- ; 


■ how to stop st«»Iec3m®* / ^ 
nri from tehing. mtsdg '* *Msr 
1 : -;yr 

suburban housed Jttw iW- 

Wrfsh,an oririukA^twim] ':^r. 

... .^ 4 W* 1ft Ir-A. qg-. 


■Mink 


Rodbyflfe . ^ 

(be py rriiaal 

certain tenitort-. v5ttpF 4WS.V; 
ivaL^ln the wgd^hrfijM^v' 


commiued itself to join the op- 
erztion “while there is wide- 


1 j. 

Griffin, a former skive, 
worked as a waiter and 
served as a deacon in the 
African Methodist Church. 
As Twain liked » say, ’’He 
came one day to wash the 
windows and stayed {or 18 
years.” He was a friend, con- 
fidant and adviser bn legal, 
and literary matters. Twain 
outlived him by.13 yeais : - 

In an unpublished manu- 
script, Twain describes Grif- 
fin as “shrewd, wse, polite, 
always good-natured, cheer- 
ful to gaiety, honest, reli- 
gious, a cautious truth- 
speaker, devoted friend to 
the family." 

Twain also wrote: u In 
some ways, he was my equal, 
in some others my superior; 
and besides, deep down in 
my interior I know that the 
difference between any two 
of those poor, transient 
thing s called hitman hangs 
was but nricroscbpiq trivial, 
a mere difference 4>etween 
worms.” 


. bis own itfiecfaoa aS ’ 
vah” In the Ssg! 

candhtil challenging^ at 
breeding ^ 

: &m never 

an ofpaque^ 

>iD Ax fei 

f General ■ 

ton’y enlisted strtte: 
l^ortb 

Mul France was.Jccap^rlX'': - ' 
Rosevkh, now 

schoqJ Engfisfe^ ^ 

. teacher: "The Patton I tneW r 
was aristocratic anclj^Btdi^; 
soft-spoken man; wftigng 
Jn^-fnicbed voice,” 'he 
caBs tgll-toe gencral 'ra^v ggS 
riamcdOld Bloodand 
Mr. Rosevkh says: : 


ways u^-th* : 

zen’s anny witu al sorts ^C^; 
pbopte. Efe would 
words calmly, aad'-rinty;; 
when he addressedT^tBkv 
troops wookL his .ytriee^ae;-; 1 
fid fev^er pitch, it seemed sort ;1 
of an act” . 

. . ' ' *- 'j'*; 

The 1988 film 

Hard," featnring Bruce W3- • 
Ms as a.cop^oodEesopNl^^ 
terrorists in a high-rise ; 
buOdixtt, was such a hit that'! 
it has “Spawned a hatch of , 
blatant inritators.” Pat it 
Broeske writes is The New' 
York Times. These mdudr - 
“Chffhanger” descSbed as.; 
“ l tte Hard*. on a 'roouar" 
tain,” “Under Siege'' 
U4 Die Hard* on a battle- 
ship” “Beveify HiBs Cop - 
HI” — “TXe Hard” in, an.; 
amusement park,” “Avar- > 
lanche" — “ ‘bie HanT in a^ 
cabin” and the new fflm. 
“&)eed" — “'DieHaid’ oh ; . 
a Ins.” .... • 

Interottuonoi Herald Tribtate. ■ . 


Short Takes 


A new smdy . of sificone 
breast implants has found no 
evidence that they cause 
connective tissue disease or 
other illnesses. The New 
York Times reports. This is 
the third epidemiological 
study in the United States to 
find no harm from implants, 
leading some experts to say 
that if implants cause any 
disease at all, it most be a 
rare or unusual one. The 
study, published in The New 


Kills 17 , North Say 




Compiled by Our Staff From Ditpauka 

SAN* A, Yemen — The 
northern Yemeni government 
said southern warplanes raided 
a power station in the northern 
coastal dty of Mukha on Sun- 
day, killing 17 people and 
wounding 33 others. 

The raid coincided with sepa- 
rate meetings in Cairo between 
a United Nations envoy, Lakh- 
dar Brahimi, and northern and 
southern delegates. The meet- 
ings were aimed at working out 
arrangements for enforcement 
of a cease-fire in the civil war, 
which began on May 4. 

The northern statement. 


quoting an official source, said 
the raid had come at a time 
when northern fences were re- 
fraining from attacking key 
southern installations that were 
within range of the northern ar- 
tillery. 

Southern officials in Aden 
said that at least 80 people had 
been killed by northern shelling 
there in the last week. 

The north and south have 
agreed to stop fighting, but five 
previous truces have failed 
within hours. 

In Cairo, northern officials 
refused to speak to any team 
representing the breakaway re- 
public of southern Yemen, say- 
ing that this would recognize 
Aden's secession from its four- 
year union with San'a. Southern 


delegates, for their part, insisted :, 
they were in Cairo to represent C 
the newly declared state and 
said the north was staHiog Jotl^ 
time while it continued to bomb's 
bard Aden. : -7>/ ~~f- ~ 

Mr. Brahiini played down the / 
impasse, bnt said he thonghthi&..t 
work in Cairo was over. “Wer> 
didn’t m a nage to- resolve L jjhfe^'; r 
differences in this sesaon^^ he *;* ^ 
said, adding that, "We shqjgd^,: 
get there somehow at sbria?.^ 
stage, yet we are still not t i 

The Repnblic of YemoBK^sifi 
union of the north and scanh, ^I\| 
collapsed amid " feuding ' ! 
tween President AM Abdnllafi ^t l 
Saleh and Ali Salem Baid^fcc^i ; 
southern leader and fonner yice- '"'‘r 
president. 

Northan forces control ‘ - ; 
of the country. They are besieg* v - 
ing Aden cm three sides bnt 7- j 
have met with fierce, reastana, ^;. • 

In a statement broadcast on V 
San'a radio, northou Iea3asj:7 : ! 
said they would delay stonnn® -f7H 
Aden only if an appropriate po%V; ii* 
Ktical solution were found. 

They said it should be basecH ' 
on ending the southern “ri*et'T- 7 ;' 
lion,” holding a dialogue withih \>- 
the framework of the Republic^ 7 
of Yemen and stopping foreign. -7* : 
interference in internal Yemem' 1 ^ 
affairs. ’ 


The north repeatedly has ac- •* 
wsed Saudi Arabia of hetoing":" 
the south with money and m m lv ; .- 

(Reuiers,APJ: 


C imeiTQbijfei Herald Triune 


The Trib Index, the IHT's exclusive 
global equities index, tracks share price movements in all the world's 
major markets and industrial sectors. 

This unique index provides a quick, selective benchmark on the 
state of the world's stock markets and, indirectly, the international 
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It is the only major world equities index to carry a Latin 
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Injury in Car Accident: ; .7 

The Associated firm ' . 

LONDON — Richard Brim- 
son, chairman of the Virgin 
Group, and his family escaped.,. 1 
serious mpny when iheii ear 
overturned at high speed, skid- ' 
ded on its roof and left them 


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happed in :the dark on a bu^y - 
higbway. . _ . • 

Mr. Branson, 43, on Saturday 7. 
praised a policewo man andau- ^ ' . 
other officer who rescued them ' : 
from the wreck, while traffic- 
swerved around them Friday 
fright on the M40 highway west 
°f London, With Mr. Bransom 
were Ins wife and two children 
and a family friend. V V; 


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Clinton Weighs List 
Of Military Opti ons 
For Korea Buildup 


INTERJVATIONAL HERA3LD TRIBUIVE, MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1994 


Plage 7 


By Art Pine 
and Jim Mann 

Las A*gcks Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
'-union administration must 
Oeade soon on how rapidly to 
gra«then U.S. aimed forces in 
South Korea to deter or, if nee- 

a.i£ - invasi<>n *» 

President Bill Clinton and his 
senior national security advis- 
ers are considering a package 
prqpared by Defense Secretary 
wii u a m J. Perry that outlines 
options ranging from a modest 
increase in support uoeps to 
deployment of dozens of addi- 
tional bombers and warships. 

The pressure for new military 
moves has been mounting. Al- 
though Congress generally has 
supported Mr. Clinton’s re- 
sponse to the refusal by North 
Korea to allow inspections of 
its nuclear facilities, some key 
Democrats and Republicans 
have begun to assert publicly 
that be is not doing enough to 
prepare for possible war. 

But offi ciate said any deci- 
sion probably would be delayed 
as the administration tries to 
untangle the results of the trip 
to North Korea by former Pres- 
ident Jimmy Carter. 

Pentagon officials said the 
military package presented to 
Mr. Clinton included these op- 
tions: 

* Sending more militaiy sup- 
port personnel to South Korea 
to make it easier for the services 
to deploy more combat and lo- 
gistical troops to reinforce 
troops now m place, should 
North Korea invade the South. 

• Deploying up to 40 more 
warplanes to the region, indud- 


f F-1 17 radar-evading Stealth 
ters in South Korea and B- 
I on g- range bombers on 
Guam. The navy would send an 
extra aircraft carrier to the area. 
And the army and Marines 
would beef up their forces. 

• Making preparations for 
rapid deployment of substan- 
tial numbers of ground troops 
to the area as reinforcements, if 
war should break oul General 
Gary E. Luck, U.S. commander 
in South Korea, has said he 
would need 400,000 more 
troops, besides the 37,000 
Americans in position now, if 
North Korea were to invade. 

The Pentagon also has been 
taking steps to modernize exist- 
ing forces and bolster supplies 
of spare parts and ammunition. 
Mr. Perry and General John 

M. ShalflcaSbvQi, the rhatrmflTi 

of the Joint Chiefs of Staff , have 
sent Patriot air-defense mi ss iles 
to South Korea, along with ar- 
till cry-locating radar and doz- 
ens of Apache helicopters, in- 
tended to replace a g in g Cobra 
poships that American forces 
had been using . 

Even so, except for the addi- 
tion of the Patriots, (he bulk of 
the U-S. effort has been modest 
and barely visible. 

Senior administration offi- 
cials have said that they have 
kept the effort low-key for two 
reasons: They want to avoid 
provoking the North Koreans, 
who have warned that the mere 
imposition of sanctions might 
set off a war. And they want to 
mollify South Korea, which 
fears that a mobilization wo ul d 
panic the countiy and hurt the 
economy. 



KOREA: Carter Expresses His Optimism on Averting a Confrontation 


• v /• 


i 



A North Korean 


Chiw Yum Koog/Agcacc Fmcc-Pianr 

border guard showing former President Carter 
dynn, the way back to the South at Pammmjom. 


Continued from Page 1 

I nuclear power technology not 
prone to the diversion of fuel 
for weapons use. 

For its part, Washington has 
dropped its insistence that, be- 
fore talks resume. North Korea 
aDow inspections that will re- 
veal past nuclear fuel reprocess- 
ing. The North Korean freeze 
applies to any current or future 
reprocessing. 

In statements Sunday, U.S. 
officials appeared to endorse 
the Carter view, reiterating 
their intention to rapidly pur- 
sue confirmation of Mr. Kim's 
offer through unspecified diplo- 
matic channels. 

Asked about sanctions, a se- 
nior U.S. official said only that 
“consultations” were being pur- 
sued at the United Nations in 
New York. Mr. Carter ex- 
plained that although talks 
were continuing, “the actual 
move to a vote is being held in 
abeyance.” 

With W. Anthony Lake, Mr. 
Clinton's national security ad- 
viser, standing at his side, Mr. 
Carter declared: “As far as Fm 
concerned there are no unan- 
swered questions. What I will 
do is confirm in writing with 
President Kim B Sung our un- 
derstanding with him- HI share 
this with American officials.” 

Responding at (he White 
House, Asa stan t Secretary of 
State Robert L. Gallucd, the 
senior U.S. negotiator on Ko- 
rea, said: “It may well be that 
President Carter has brought 
back something on which we 
can build.” 

The brief statement by Mr. 
Carter and comments in an in- 
terview on CNN provided fur- 
ther evidence that he is continu- 
ing to serve as a crucial 
intermediary between Wash- 
ington and Pyongyang. He end- 
ed a three-day visit to the North 
Korean capital on Friday, say- 
ing he was operating solely as a 
private citizen. 


Mr. Carter met for two hours 
here Sunday with Mr. Gallucd 
and Mr. Lake. He also spoke 
for half an hour by telephone 
with Mr. Clinton at his Camp 
David, Maryland, retreat to 
convey a private message from 
Mr. Kim, the 82-year-old dicta- 
tor of the Communist state. 

■ Meeting Stffl Uncertain 

T.R. Reid of The Washington 
Post reported earlier from Seoul: 


If a summit meeting is held 
— the prospect is snU uncer- 
tain, analysts in Seoul say — it 
would mark a historic new 
chapter in the often-bitter rela- 
tions between two countries 
that share the world's most 
heavily fortified border. 

The summit call did not ad- 
dress the chief dispute between 
Pyongyang and Washington — 
whether North Korea will allow 
sufficient inspection of its nu- 


clear facilities to verify that it 
has not made and is not making 
nuclear arms. 

In Washington, the White 
House issued a statement wel- 
coming “preliminary reports” 
of the results of Mr. Carter's 
trip, but omitting any mention 
of the summit agreement- Offi- 
cials explained that the summit 
was pnmarihr a bilateral issue 
for the two Koreas. 


AFRICA: Spreading Misery as Living Standards Fall 

C o nt i n u e d from Page 1 highest in the world. In less “Agriculture is not just erow- 


salary is being ealen away by an 
inflation rate that is 30 percent 
and rising, touched off by the 
January devaluation. He can- 
not afford school fees of about 
S30, not to mention books. 

“It makes me sad when I 
think of it,” he said, sitting in 
the shade of a two-story build- 
ing opposite the central market. 
“I went to school I always 
thought my children would go 
to school, too. I want them to 
have a good life.” 

Beginning in the early 1980s, 
the economies of most sub-Sa- 
haran countries, dependent for 
the most part on exports of 
commodities like coffee, cocoa 
or copper, went into a tailspin 
as markets crashed in recession. 

Compounding the problem 
was a host of other detriments 
to growth. There was misman- 
agement and corruption, costly 
subsidies aimed at keeping food 
prices low in the volatile cities, 
and declining food production 
and self-sufficiency. Roads and 
power plants began to crumble, 
indebtedness from trade imbal- 
ances grew and repressive polit- 
ical climates and interventionist 
economic policies scared away 
outside investment. 

Above it all was Africa’s 
soaring population growth, at 
3.2 percent a year by far the 


highest in the world. In less 
than 25 years, if it continues, 
nearly 30 African nations will 
double their populations. 

The danger in such growth is 
that economies have to move 
full steam ahead just to avoid 
standing stiQ. And in Africa, 
they hardly moved at all; in the 
1980s, per capita income de- 
clined by almost 2 percent a 
yeax, leaving everyone except a 
tiny elite significantly poorer by 
the end of the decade. 

According to a 1992 report 
by the World Bank, about 220 
million Africans south of the 
Sahara — more than one of 
three — live in “absolute pover- 
ty.” 

In terms of health and food 
production, the 1980s were cat- 
astrophic. Because of war, 
drought and desert encroach- 
ment — combined with damag e 
by policies that worked against 
making farming profitable — 
food production dropped to a 
level 20 percent below 1970. 

The downward trend contin- 
ued into 1993. Per capita grain 
production fell in 18 of the 
poorest African countries last 
year, and by more than 5 per- 
cent in nine of them. 

There is a new sense of vul- 
nerability in the process of get- 
ting food out of the ground and 
to the population centers dur- 
ing times of crisis. 


“Agriculture is not just grow- 
ing food,” said T. J. Adliogton, 
a senior policy and planning 
coordinator with the United 
Nations Food and Agriculture 
Organization. “You’ve got to 
have a market, a way of getting 
it there, infrastructure, support 
services.” 

What higher prices and de- 
clining production mean for 
someone like Marie Kum- 
wanza, a mother of five swad- 
dled in a bright print dress in 
the teeming market in Kinsha- 
sa, Zaire, is straightforward — 
her family eats less. 

“Mostly manioc,” she said, 
referring to an African staple 
low in nutrients. When was the 
last time die fed her family 
meat? She paused to think. 
“Chicken,” she said finally. 
“We had some chicken legs for 
Easter.” 

The other great shadow cast 
across Africa is from AIDS, 
ravaging the continent largely 
through heterosexual contact 

Statisticians are revising pop- 
ulation growth projections 
downward. The most recent fig- 
ures show that of the more than 
14 mini on people around the 
world who nave been infected 
with the HTV virus, about nine 
million of them five in sub-Sa- 
haran Africa. 


DISNEY: Congress Gets Into Disney Civil War Action 


Corifanedl from Page] 

dent of the Welcome Disney 
Committee, a coalition of it 
organizations, hailed the bene- 
fits projected by Disney. 19,000 
permanent jobs, 2,800 con- 
struction jobs, S48 million a 
year in new state taxes and up 
to $12 million for Ftince Wil- 
liam County. 

The project's opponents pre- 
dict that the interest of federal 
lawmakers will dramatically 
widest the focus of debate and 
perhaps force Disney to choose 
another she* ... . 

“To now, these has been no 
detached, o bj ect iv e analysis of 
the project,” said Neil Proto, a 
lawyer representing a group of 
authors and historians oppos- 
ing the project “The facts have 
only come from Virginia and 
Disney. The process now will 
yidd disclosure of the real facts, 
hopefully, early enough to af- 
fect all major derisions made 
about this.” 

With so many of Virginia’s 
political leaders supporting the 
Disaey .plan, winch envisions 
hotels, shops, two golf courses 
and 2,281 residential units, op- 
ponents see federal involve- 
ment as their best and perhaps 
only chance to force Disney to 
btud elsewhere. 


They argue that the park and 
other Disney plans would spur 
so much commercial and resi- 
dential development that traffic 
would choke roads, spoil the air 
quality and overwhelm existing 
neighborhoods. 

And they assert that it would 
endanger what many historians 
consider some of the most hal- 
lowed grounds American his- 
tory. One group has identified 
13 historic towns, 16 Civil War 
battlefields, including Manas- 
sas, and 17 historic districts 
within an hour’s drive of Hay- 
market^ the nearest town. 

In announcing the House res- 
olution, Representative Mi- 
chad A. Andrews, Democrat of 
Texas, who led a fight six years 
ago against development of a 
shopping center near the Ma- 
nassas National Battlefield 
Park, called the Disney project 
“far more than a local issue.” 
He said the impact cm Manas- 
sas and Shenandoah National 
Park “would be devastating.” 

In a letter to Interior Secre- 
tary Bruce Babbitt, Mr. An- 
drews implored that Disney be 
held to regulatory environmen- 
tal s tanda rds, and he urged (hat 
the Interior Department do 
what it can to delay the project 


But given the deliberate pace 
of Washington and the com- 
plexity of the debate, oppo- 
nents say, they are not sure that 
the government can act swiftly 
or forcefully enough to force 
Disney to build elsewhere. 

For the project to be affected, 
they say, lawmakers would have 
to insist that Disney’s plans 
strictly meet the standards of 
federal statutes like the Clean 
Air Act of 1991 and the Inter- 
Modal Surface Transportation 
Efficiency Act of 1991, which 
determines whether a particular 
transportation system is ade- 
quate for the region it serves. 

They also say that the depart- 
ment could determine that the 
project would have negative ef- 
fects on national parklands. 
Mr. Andrews’s letter to Mr. 
Babbitt raises questions about 
plans to widen two roads that 
run through the Manassas bat- 
tlefield park. 

Historians say these are the 
same Toads used by troops dur- 
ing the Civil War, and the fields 
they traverse are virtually un- 
changed from a century ago. 
Widening the roads would 
mean using land that is part of 
the battlegrounds, and that 
could give the Interior Depart- 
ment the right to intercede. 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COULD AFFECT 

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UKRAINE: Was Farm Deal a Boon or Boondoggle? 


Subscribe now Oh 

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cover price 


Caateed from Page 1 
share of the profit from the sale 
of combines. 

The Ukramiah Ministry of 
Finance has conducted an audit 
of the transaction and ordered 
the state prosecutor to invest*? 
gate Zemlya and Lyadi, & quasi- 
' governmental entity that signed 
. the deal, along with Ukraine’s 
Ministry of Agriculture. 

But no one expects the prose- 
cutor to get far. Zemlya and 
Lyudfs rfurimwm is Alexander 
Tkachenko, a powerful politi- 
cian who is deputy speaker in 
Parliament and a hard-line 
C omm u nis t opposed to break- 
ing up collective farms. 

According to a Zeneca in- 
voice, -the company sold 
195,527- bags of com seed to 
Ukraine for $ 1 (^ 999 , 957 . Only 
10 - percent of the seeds were 
suitable for Ukraine’s shorter 
growing season, and more than 


cal said, “We are in business 
and our goal was to make a 
profit. We are not a charitable 
organization.” 


Tkachenko said. 

■ Another big coimxmeiit of 
the deal inwlved 200 combines 
. made , by Deere & Company 
' and JX Case that were sold -to 

- Ukraine for $143,000 each, ac- 

* ,cording4o Zeneca’s invoice and 
the : government audit,' They 

* woe purchased from Deere and 

Case , for about $90,000 each, 
according- to people who 
' worked.-bn the project. 

. The- combines were first. 

* bought by Trans-Chemical in 
' Miami, thmimmafiatefy resold 

- to Zeneca, and then sold to the 
>r Ukrainians. This- allowed 

Trans-C^mical and Zeneca to 
-* share in. a profit estimated at 
$10 miffiap. Mr. Tkachenko 
Said - he was unaware of -the 
markup on the equipment. 

Zeneca refused . to answer 
questions about .the purchase 
and sate of the combines except 
. to confirm that the transaction 
. had been in three steps. 

.. -Ttfr.-Xapfen of -Trans-Cheriu 1 


A perplexing aspect of the 
-deal involved five Jeep Grand 
Cherokees and five Chevrolet 
■ Ijiminn miniv ans. 

Doing business in the former 
Soviet Union routinely requires 
bribes, payoffs and dealings 
with rrimfnfll elements to com- 
- plete a project involving a large 
amount of money. 

. Several Americans on the 
project said the vehicles were 
payoffs to Ukrainians. The 
Zeneca lawyer said the charges 
were “inappropriate specula- 
tion.” He declined to say 
whether Zeneca or Trans- 
Cbemical had purchased the ve- 
hicles. Mr. Kaplan of Trans- 
Chemical said he could not 
remember. 

‘ To steer the project through 
the Ukrainian bureaucracy, 
Trans-Chemical helped set up a 
company in Ukraine known as 
Tkans Agro. According to the 
Ukraine government audit, sev- 
eral of the Jeeps and minivans 
went to Trans Amo. 

Trans Agro’s first managing 
director, Michael Vogel er, said 
in an interview that among 
those who got vehicles were Mr. 
Tkachenko, and Yevgeni bnas, 
another founder of Trans Agro. 

Mr. firms refused to answer 
questions and Mr. Tkachenko 
dismissed the questions about 
the cars as trivial. Mr. Kaplan 
said he was “clueless” as to why 
the- vehicles went to Trans 
Agio. Trans Agro says it has 
none of the cars. 

Mr. Kaplan described Trans 
Agro’s role as providing ser- 
vices for the project, like getting 
the seeds and equipment 
through Ukrainian customs and 
onto the farins. 

Bur Trans Agio did more. It 
also contended with the seamier 
aspects, of -doing business in 


Ukraine. It was, foe example, 
necessary to pay port officials 
$200 for every combine before 
it could be driven out of the 
port, several fanners on the 
project said. 

“There was every day a battle 
over who was charging how 
much for what,” Mr. Kaplan 
said. “That’s why we hired oth- 
er companies, to make it hap- 
pen. And they did.” 

The main company was 
Trans Agro, he said. 

Much of the Zeneca seed was 
developed to be planted in re- 
gions where the growing season 
exceeded 100 days, according to 
farmers who worked last year 
for Zeneca. Ukraine has several 
climatic regions and relatively 
short growing seasons of 90 to 
100 days. 

“They should have come here 
for three years and carried out 
some studies before launching a 
project of this scale; that is the 
way it is done worldwide,” said 
Mr. Sweat, of the American 
Chamber of Commerce, who is 
from a Minnesota farm family. 

Not only were the seeds inap- 
propriate but many were also 
baa, according to American 
farmers sent to Ukraine. Some 
erf the seeds were so moldy it 
appeared they bad been rotting 
in a warehouse. 

The principal test of seed 
quality is germination, mea- 
sured by the percentage of seeds 
in a bag that wiU sprout. Ameri- 
can fanners generally will not 
buy bags erf seeds in which less 
than 92 to 95 percent of the 
seeds show promise of sprout- 
ing. 

A Zeneca official said the 
seeds sent to Ukraine tested at a 
germination rate of 92 percent. 
But an American fanner who 
worked with the seeds said tests 
on one bag indicated that only 
30 percent of the seeds would 
germinate. 


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SoabiSeo 
SEKJun 
Sweden Dc 
Sweden Feb 7ft 

Sweden Jon Aft 

Sweden Mr Bft 

Sweden Mr Aft 

Tokyo Nov Bft 
Tokyo Oct Sft 
Trow TXy No* 3ft 
Vic Pud Jan Bft 
Yak tana Aug 7ft 
YoWwmaJui 1ft 


91 TJft 
03 95ft 
77 104ft 
01 10511 

9fl 9414 
03 *2ft 
« roar+B 
03 87 

23 HD® 
01 10*’* 

00 7S\i 

96 101% 
77 78ft 

01 184% 

« H»% 

76 IMft 

77 107JUO 

02 107ft 
<0 71ft 
M 97% 

78 104% 
77 Tift 

03 97ft 
03 +lft 
02 98ft 
9a Wft 

76 9UM0 

97 Wlft 
91 I0)ft 

77 101ft 

96 101ft 

7« 103k. 

DO 108ft 

e looft 

oi msft 

01 107ft 

96 \m 

01 1MM9 
99 78ft 

82 

02 97ft 

ID VTft 

97 91360 

03 87V 
« 103 
01 lOSft 

98 108ft 
01 106040 

01 105 ft 

» 143ft 

77 Wft 
98 lflBft 

77 77V 

76 100 

75 99Vi 

78 107J970 

97 KVi 
74 ID6010 
03 93ft 
74 103ft 
m 84V 
(O BTft 
03 107V 

02 98ft 

03 91JJ10 



Spd 

Vic 

T ir 

7J2 

+51 

741 

+48 

6J1 

+54 

7*4 

+69 

7.M 

+54 

741 

+47 

?J7 

+60 

782 

+64 

1*1 

+1BS 

7A4 

T46 

6.71 

+5 

645 

+33 

7.16 

+31 

7JI 

+47 

ft 23 

*31 

6.45 

+31 

612 

+X 

754 

+48 

736 

+43 

7*2 

+38 

705 

+45 

7.12 

+28 

750 

+51 

7*5 

+47 

751 

+40 

7J4 

+64 

ra 

+1S 

Kl 

+25 

6J1 

+J7 

647 

+18 

6M 

+29 

624 

+25 

727 

+« 

754 

+47 

7*1 

+46 ' 

775 

+73 

6*9 

+45 

758 

+73 

726 

+S2 

TAB 

+67 

m 

+48 

7.70 

+78 

613 

+41 

714 

+65 

BO0 

+103 

m 

+93 

7J8 

+73 

7J7 

+48 

135 

+47 

434 

+37 

421 

■7 

703 

+4T 

7.12 

+28 

S70 

*4 

177 

-6 

657 

+4* 

«7 

+17 

123 

+42 

7*3 

+M 

6*4 

+32 

7*0 

+41 

7 it 

+46 

7.73 

+70 

759 

+51 

7*5 

+49 


Hsuer Cpr Mat 

P<x» 

rtd 

Spd 

is. 


TBft 

6*1 

+> 

LbPlwntdDt SV 78 

73ft 

•"JM 

+J5 

LbSchGlraprxn ** 

77ft 

197 

+9 


100ft 

Ull 

+» 

LbSriiLurJanx'.y 77 

75ft 

*J7 

-JB 

LDSCfiLu* JUl *H tr 

in 

662 



*7 

4*6 

+10 

Ltd) F|n Jut 61 83 

71ft 

7*1 

+4 r , 

Lkb Fin Mr 5H 7B 

95ft 

6*6 

+17 

LID Fin Oct Aft 07 


749 

f» 


74ft 

7R0 

+67 


99ft 

609 

-24 

Potato 0d xft 7* 

76 

677 

+18 

SBC Cmn Jun tft 77 

IDOft 

6*6 

+17 


103 

637 

+54 

SBC Cmn See ID 9S 

104 1* 

*71 

*46 

SBC Cmn See 7ft 7* 

IBS's 

6*5 

44# 


Kfft 

134 

+53 

Slemen CpXw 1 02 

7TV, 

UB +101 

Sabi lob. Jun 7ft 77 

101 V; 

691 

+56 

UtaFinFeb 02 

108ft 

763 

+60 

Urban Mtg NOvSft «B 

77ft 

7*6 

+77 

Hon Aim Oct S'* 76 

77ft 

658 

+4? 


Banks ft Finance 


Abbey Nall F*b5H 95 

10O 

s*a 

+34 

ADbev Tsv Aug 5% 95 

79% 

5*2 

+n 

Abbey Tsv Apr (It M 

77*50 

6*9 

+61 

Abbey Tsy Jon 5 77 

76ft 

659 

+39 

Abbe-/ Tsy Mayite 01 

92ft 

7.73 

+58 

Abn Amro Mav 3V1 76 

94ft 

652 

+61 

Abn Amro Sec Jft 76 

73ft 

6ft 

*51 

Boy Land Nov 4% 78 

72ft 

61B 

+ 10 

Bov Lndes Feb 6 vg 

77ft 

676 

♦25 

Bk Greece Jun 8ft 77 

100 

612 

+173 

BnpBkMr 5 77 

96% 

634 

+10 

Bno Bk MOY 6 00 

7+ft 

?J1 

+34 

Bite Jan BH 79 

101ft 

5J6 

+25 

Sea 6 77 

97ft 

6«8 

+56 

Oa Parlbro FebTft »4 

101 

4J7 

+ 105 

CncaMav 7ft M 

101ft 

6*1 

+47 

Camnanc Jut 5ft 76 

97ft 

6JS 

+40 

CbtitbanC MOV 7H 77 

101ft 

/JK 

+72 

CanttancScp 7ft 75 

1011. 

609 

+62 

Cr Fancier Jan B 02 

102ft 

7J5 

+52 

Cr Local Aug Bft 75 

107ft 

5X7 

+31 

Cr Local Aar ift 7+ 

94H 

70S 

+28 

Cr Local Fee n, 02 

77H 

7*2 

+47 

Cr Local Mav 5% 75 
Cr Local Nov 5ft 78 

97*50 

74.050 

373 

670 

+33 

Cr Local Oct Xft 76 

96ft 

60S 

-3 

Cr Local Oct BH w 

106% 

7Jt 

+47 

CrLyormJui 7 76 

104 ft 

662 

+4J 

CrLvamJun Bft 78 

105 

724 

+66 

CrSulneJan 4ft 77 

9t% 

653 

*35 

CsLOn Dr Sep Bft SO 

HTD 

7*0 

+52 

DO Fin Jul 6% 96 

100050 

tit 

+11 

Db Fin bn 7% «* 

1C8V. 

7*6 

+53 

DeutJul I 9B 

1 03% 

707 

*47 

DeutSep 7ft VS 

101 ft 

382 

+15 

Dress nov t 08 

B7ft 

£JB 

+73 

Dxl bk Apr TV: 76 

107, 

424 

+36 

DtlHRd 4% 77 

75% 

6*1 

+9 

DStDkJul Bft 76 

HD% 

631 

+r 

ftp B* Jim 7 79 

77ft 

7.13 

+77 

DslbkMT Aft 7# 

100ft 

62 

+42 

Halifax B3 Apr 4ft 76 

77% 

615 

+26 

Halifax Bs Jul SV 75 

97% 

5.7* 

+43 

Helaba nbv 6ft 0B 

85% 

7.7, 

+62 

HeiaMSeo 8 96 

ICO 

648 

+43 

Helaba Inf Feb 6*» W 

100% 

*)S 

+37 

JtwnlncJun 6ft 77 

77% 

653 

*19 

KrwinfiFen t to 

78'f 

154 

*i 

KhvtntlFeb 7ft 07 

TTf 

7*4 

+55 

kiw mil Jun 7ft 75 

103ft 

546 

+39 

Kh, Inti Jun 7 79 

99ft 

7.13 

+30 

kfwimrjiin jft 00 

Mil 

?J7 

+11 

KriylntlMr flft VB 

104ft 

6*7 

+37 

KfwIidlOd 1ft 01 

103 ft 

7*3 

+53 


Global Corporates 


4ft 77 108050 
TOV 
70 V 


77ft 

108ft 

Wft 

74ft 

74ft 

TOOK 

»lft 

78ft 

75V 

Wft 

96050 

Kft 

102ft 

74ft 

04ft 

101ft 

90ft 

77ft 

104ft 

105ft 

18? 

Wfe 

90ft 

704V 

108ft 

104ft 

U4ft 

108ft 


Abb Fin Jun 

am rm Fee «% ft 

Allied Fir Aug Aft 77 
AmaCanSen 7 <a 62 
A me Co Mr 9V 16 
AIT APT Oft 97 
AIT A** Hi 9 b 
AIT Feb Sft 79 
AIT Cara. Jun Oft 76 
Boeara f bi Jul SV 98 
Bast Fin Agg 7 97 

Bast Fin apt 3 01 

Beal Fin Sep 8 94 

Bar Cap apt a » 

Bat Cop Nay 6ft S3 
Bayer Auu Bv 94 
BcllSthTcJun SV 78 
BeilsnTcSep 6ft 06 
BmwLraNov Wk 94 

BmwUiCcMr Aft 04 

BnpSea 6 77 

Booty Pic Jan 7 77 

BP omer Mr 10 7A 
OPamerMr 9% 7? 

Bpco Fin Apr Oft 98 
BrGwIntJui SV 03 
BrGasintSea Bft 79 
Br Gas PIC Mr Oft 97 
Bt Fin Aug Bft 77 
BIFtfiMr Bft 75 
BI Fin NOV 9ft 78 
Bi Fin Sen 7ft ft 
CobfeWircOc Aft 03 
Owung Fin SepSft 98 
Oimo Ree Fcfc Aft 04 
Cblno Pep Nov 4ft 03 
CnuduEIAua «v 03 
OlubuEl Jar 7 97 

Ctaidu El Mr 
dnibu El SCP 
CnuooEJFrb 7 97 

QugaEIMoY 10 7« 

Qmga El Nbv Bft ft 
GMCorpDc Oft 97 
CiboCu-pMr Sft 00 
GbaCorpOd Sft ft 

Cain dm) Nov nt ft 

Mailer Apr 10 99 

Daimler Mav » 

Daimler Oct 8 n 
DortKrati Jan 10V "A 
Dupcml El AH 6ft ft 
DuPont El Apr B 03 
Dvnant El Jun Bft 78 
DuPont Ei Jun 7ft 99 
Ecd 70-2 Nov *ft 75 
El Ca Nx Jul 
EH Lilly Jul 
EIJrwu* Joo 
Emerson 7ft 
EneraieBvJul Sv 00 
Ericsson Od 7ft 74 
EyllOnrwIvMr AH 04 
Euro lima Min 8ft 01 1D7AS0 
EixanMoy Aft » 77ft 


B7ft 

90ft 

B4ft 

83ft 

70ft 

1Q5V 


7 94 ID 1 - 05 Q 

BV 71 IUV 
100ft 
106 
10* l r 

9«V 
94050 
94ft 
1 02 
107V 
<V 74 ID3S50 
I Kft 
105ft 
IMft 
103 
104ft 
101 ft 
104' » 
105 
W- 
97V 
I01*« 
92ft 

urn. 

72' 


7ft 76 
Sft 78 
7 *8 

7ft 90 


Exxon Mr 
Exxon Od 
Exxon SOP 
Foe Nov 
Fcrfl Apr 
Ford Aug 
Ford Jun 
FardMCrFebTft N 
Ford MCr Feb 6ft 78 
Ford M Cr Jan tl 94 
Ford MCr Jun ov 97 
PortttPJnNOv TV «A 


6ft 03 
| 96 

4ft 08 
6ft 03 
fft 96 
9ft BO 
TV 77 


Gee apt 
G eo; Apr 
Gecc Aug 
Gecc Fea 
Gecc Feb 
Gecc Feb 
Gecc Jur 
Gecc Jun 
Gecc Jun 
Gecc Mr 
Gect Mr 
Gecc Mr 
Gecc Mr 
Gecc Mr 
Gecc Nov 
Geccoa 
Gecc Sep 
Gecc Sea 


7ft 97 

svi n 

Oft 08 
Oft ft 
4 *8 

4 04 

4ft 74 
9ft 76 


71V 

103ft 

BSV; 

68V 

104V 

108ft 

I06ft 

104V 

77V 

104ft 

77ft 

101ft 

101V 

TSiy 

871; 

IDO 1 . 

77ft 

B7ft 


7> 


105ft 


4ft »7 I CO 050 

4ft 94 77ft 


5 77 
Sft M 

Sft 77 
4ft 77 

6 51 

4ft ft 
5 


Gecc Drag Nov 4ft 74 
GMAC Oft N 


76ft 
Iffift 
74H 
77V; 
77 V, 
106 
94ft 
94ft 
9Sft 
ft 


Aril +1J 
671 +44 

7.12 +73 
76! +53 
7JS +127 

4.13 16 
673 +17 

681 +U 

4J0 +J 

753 +« 

725 +42 

754 +88 

7JV fITt 

721 +4? 

BJD +110 

6J7 +M 
6.75 +17 
7.91 +« 
UP +57 
801 +78 
7.02 +4} 

6« +7B 

6J2 +64 

7M +07 

726 +71 
7A» +S2 
7J6 +S2 
146 +42 
726 +42 
4JS +50 

7.14 +45 
6JQ +47 
816 +95 

826 +140 
830 +1-I8 
175 +1S5 
7JJ +S7 
422 +52 
6J3 +S0 
7.11 +S2 
A. to +47 
458 +64 
481 +68 
454 +9 

7.14 +30 
488 +20 
A Aft +54 
7JI +71 

6 f> +56 

73+ +56 
4J5 +44 

IJJ +*8 
7M +57 
7.B +53 
7.IB +34 
612 +54 
471 +71 

473 +13 
7J3 +174 

7 JO +77 

72+ +35 

81+ +74 
7 79 +S« 
725 +54 
6l» +2) 
7+4 +B 
706 +«a 
784 +5J 
812 +97 
6J0 +46 
JM +77 
7J7 +74 
620 +73 
723 +72 
42o +87 
470 +4+ 
72V +107 
4X7 +15 
48? +25 
7.85 +5+ 

6 0 , + 2 1 
663 +14 
728 +JJ 
4JB +10 
4J7 +42 
4A7 +14 
UB +11 
4J7 

4 ft +46 

474 +1B 
474 

577 +|0 
7J3 +4* 
403 +2 

6+2 2 
6 .45 +34 
7M +82 


Ixmc 


GMAC. Jul » ft 
GMAC Mr » a ’6 
Grand Inv Jun ? 79 

Guinn Pic Jon 9 ft 
HJ Heins Oci T ‘: ft 
HendFlnDc » "5 

MItKhi Cr &c Fc ft 
Hllotfi.CrJUi tft 9? 
Hllochl Cr Jul si: ft 
Hwcnst Mr Eft C T 
HdKhSt AuO 6 03 

HnUcl EleSeo ?i: ft 
Hokurlk £1 NovB'a ft 
Hofcurik £1 Ocl «‘y 97 
Honda Mir Feb ,! + 97 
ICm Japan Oe 4''.- 57 
Intelsat Aog 7H S2 

JiweisotJan S’- M 
InvetrAb Jen 4 l i 99 
JqICOJuI Hs C 
KansaiEieMr 10 ft 
KomalElcSep^i ft 
F.ooak Aar 7 1 * 97 
Korea El Dc 4ft 03 
Korea El 5 J» +ft "a 
K viKbu Ele Jul oft 03 
KruViu Ep 1U ID ft 
KrlrtTiu Ep 8S7 3ft ft 
MoJllM Xw 4 ft 
Matsu E< Aua 7 1 * 02 
Mens Co Dc 5ft °B 
Me tine Fa Oc 1 TV ft 
MjimnoioJun Aft 97 
MilyubEU Jun 9'y «? 
MUiub Eil Sea Jft 01 
MS Fin Jul 8ft ft 
M15nTe«M0V'*ft « 

Natl Power Dc Aft 03 
Nestle HM/n 5 98 

Nestle HkJ Feb Aft 77 
Nestle Hid Feb 5 77 
Nestle HM Jun r> 93 
Nestle Hid NOV 7ft 76 
Nestle Hid Oct jft « 
Norsk Hvd Apr 8V 97 
Norsk HydOCT 8*. 0! 


NtTDc 
NtTFeb 
NIT JUI 
NlTjgl 
WTMr 

NIT Nov 
NIT Nov 
NlTNOv 


8ft 
6 »! 
»7 


7ft 76 
Aft «7 
9ft 9! 


78 
®ft 01 
Bft 01 


JV DO 


Osaka Gat MoySV 93 
PtuinwCoAur 7ft 97 
Ph+lma Co FeO 9<« « 
PMImaCaJul Sft ft 
Pnlbno Ca Feb AV 97 
PtUlma CD Sea 6ft 
Procter Feb ?ft 
P rucler Jan 
PruFinOa 
Fedfono Us Jul ^ 

Reed Puol Jul ’ 

Reed PuU Jul 9ft 
Roche Xw 
Roche May 2 ; Cl 
PrCaaincJul 7ft 03 
Solmburr Mar 9 -t -A 
SolnsCury Min Pi *8 

Salnyjurr Qcl 7* i K 

SondazD'SMr Aft K 
ScBHJor O/S 5eo J 
ScctWM Jul sft « 
Sdierkig Mir. 7V ft 
Sear i Acer apt 4-* ft 
Scary Euro Am >V *5 
5hiKok Aug 4'. Cl 
SnihokuEllO :0'r ft 
Slemen & '» « 03 

Snee Mr Tv *7 
Soma Mo i 3 
Sanv Con'l Jul 5 
Stuns OH tft 97 

SloDrugw Sft ft 
Sun Hung Nov jft °i 
SwissreUsXw Jv « 
Tea Aug *v »6 
Ten Aug 

Tap Jul Vr 03 

Tflyjian Aug 7ft » 
TMCCAUO 


7d 


Tortoxu Fie iorrv 77 
Tok/o ‘-03 Jul r: 78 
TorDIa Fin DC 6: <6 
Tayeta Fin Jun 4V 76 
Tavoia Fin Mini ft 
To+PlaMe Jun »> 9r 
Tdyoio Me Mr 
unllev Jul 
□filler AUy 

UnlievMr 
Uni'cr w.r 
Ut»es: Jui 


7'i 0+ 
1 ft 
[‘y '3 

I' . 00 
Ift 93 


VottenfoU Jun 6 98 


Vw (nil Aua 
Vw Inti OC 
Wai-Mrt Jun 
Wd-MrrOcl 

Warner L Apr 


0i 
>■, «e 
eft °* 

5’r V 
8ft 7i 


Trice 

rid 

t..,. 

103% 

6VQ 

♦75 

HU*. 

-.74 

■»i 

78-. 

744 

+5! 

104 

tl‘ 


101% 

6*7 

*c 

vr: 

BJ! 

-1*S 

ICOft 

6/S 

-72 

100ft 

6.97 

+*! 

74% 

’U 

*53 

Mere 

6»1 

*6? 

ejft 

7.47 


134% 

673 


104% 

684 

f7? 

9?y 

677 

+5B 

105*. 

7.U 

+93 

"0 

7.15 

+70 

•8V, 

7*4 


77% 

7J6 

+41 

71ft 

I*C 

-n: 

70ft 

J.15 

+w 

105ft 

631 

+51 

105", 

6*4 

+X7 

101ft 

7.1* 

T« 

85% 

17 1 

f ITT 

9,ft 

7*4 

*124 

91ft 

7.74 

-a 

105% 

650 

+77 

104ft 

111 

-%T 

93ft 

7J1 

+?3 

97% 

7.79 

+71 

74% 

665 

-7 

102ft 

1*5 

*-7 

IK 

617 

*3 

105ft 

786 

+72 

104'., 

!£J 

fC 

103ft 

640 

+42 

lam 

6*0 

f.’i 

»% 

7.BS 

+65 

97% 

672 

+31 

79ft 

6*3 

+19 

9&H 

642 

+21 

96ft 

671 

+19 

101% 

634 

*21 

BS 

7.10 

+36 

102% 

y*7 

+99 

iam 

817 

-ill 

104ft 

643 

+47 

»«% 

650 


106ft 

6*3 

+47 

107 

7J9 

*40 

101 

6*5 

+11 

101% 

UJ 

+32 

97ft 

4J1 

+7 

ID7-» 

732 

*52 

75% 

IS* 

+49 

101 

707 

+80 

10!ft 

(UL 


103ft 

67? 

+74 

99ft 

610 

+77 

95% 

TAT 


107ft 

~SP 

+57 

IIOJSD 

7*0 

+67 

top. 

7A* 

+«3 

IGUCfl 

7.U 

+72 

104% 

653 

+53 

106ft 

7*7 

+72 

78% 

?J7 

+J6 

79% 

’*3 

*Jo 

93ft 

115 

+90 

IMft 

*4" 

*57 

94ft 

7.13 


I0S 

4*5 

+r 

76ft 

7*3 


B7ft 


-36 

IDS', 

7*4 

-57 

102 

«jy 

+64 

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44* 

**0 

TO 

5*5 

*4* 

90% 

72i 

-50 

lOTy 

67, 

+&1 

101% 

767 

♦« 

101ft 

7.11 

+87 

102% 

3*5 


7T% 

6*2 

*41 

102', 

6NI 

fh 

IMft 

602 

*!« 

«ift 

IU8 

+133 

a,% 

7.17 

+r. 

104ft 

6« 

*,5 

10SP. 

711 

+47 

70ft 

7*6 

-49 

70'. 

7.«2 

+10£ 

» 

5*3 

+46 

101 ft 

oftS 

♦ 10 

99", 

65* 

*33 

77ft 

58? 

-3 

9*% 

649 

+15 

102% 

681 

+!7 

ft% 

700 

+39 


*13 

■3 

7:% 

LOT 

-U 

7»:y 

673 

+22 

100", 

■>*e 

+a 

%!. 

».% 

+it 

78% 

7.4* 

*j 

102ft 

6 i5 

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Itoft 

0 94 

+41 

lOfl-y 

72* 

*42 

«S 

-n 

+40 

9*' 3 

71, 

+56 

n‘ - 

107 ' 

r1C4 

■OB'. 

■*, 


79 

7 |1 

+29 

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**7 

*:9 

102% 

4*5 

-«4 


Isve- 


Mai “-ice 


Spd 

T*j, J bluer & /fa 


Amer ittti a uc 
A mex Bx Dc 
imi mtnjsd 
Austria Jiri 
BP Coo Jun 
2r Gas pic Nov 
Oraetfgy 

CCSB VOV 

Cccep 

Chrti Ny reo 
Cnem nv Feb 
Cnem nv Fea 
Crem nvF« 
CbemNr Feb 
TiemN/FW 
Ger Nv Fed 
Dt Fin Jon 
Denmark Jtup 
Eel See 

EksaartiOa 
Ex 'an Cnv Aua 
Eticn nov 
F sl Fed Feb 
Gecc Mr 
Gecc Jul 
Gen Mills Fug 
Ge" Mills Aug 
ladJun 
toc&Dc 
loot Jun 
:a35 Jun 
ladbDc 
Icdb Jun 
Into Dc 
lodbOc 
lotfjF Dc 
iCrflOG 
I sec Mr 
Italy Mr 
riC.KW 
Mldalelawn Jul 
Mrub Cora Jui 
N Engicn Feb 
NlDSeo 
Pru Realty Jon 
ScibNav 
SBC Cmn Nov 
Sear O'S Jul 
57k Sea 
Slews Jun 
ViCPuWStp 
W tiitmn Fin May 


M +>ft 
uO 42H 


77 71', 

M MV, 


95 

71 lift 


01 60V 

07 34 ft 


09 38 
75 IA 


96 89^ 

97 WH 


7DH 

59ft 


K 55ft 
03 S»ft 


95 263ft 

' 74ft 


W 78ft 

« 98ft 


74 79V 

M 


as 40H 

95 toft 


94 88V; 
04 MV 


13 Hft 

96 88ft 


K 85ft 
98 74ft 


01 6Q 

0! 52ft 


03 <9y 
03 +9V 


86 mm 

32ft 


02 Mft 
97 81ft 


97 70 

W 67ft 


10 MS 
75 93ft 


67V 


9* 72ft 
W 77V 


77 77ft 

98 75Vs 

74 781. 

01 »0ft 

99 68ft 

74 98 


m 

724 +53 
11.41 +SBS 
52+ +31 
5J3 +47 
834 +43 
7J4 +64 
LD8 +41 
IM +62 
173 +77 
4A| +71 
713 +71 
7.71 +93 
802 +78 
804 +08 
826 +97 
n.a 

AM -3 
4.94 +21 
yji +27 
5.47 +74 

TAI +n 
178 +»25 
i40 +40 
4fl7 +11 
815 +98 
891 +94 
4JS +« 
A72 +57 
7.10 +4S 
7JB +49 
TJB +61 
804 +71 
T2B +39 
8/7 +43 

slob +a 

7AS +60 
7 si +ns 

730 Till 

7JIS +56 
13fl -660 
iS +100 
882 +204 
4.91 +71 
728 +43 
861 +86 
6.75 +51 
720 +83 

4.94 +21 
7J5 +24 
7J9 +52 
BA. 


Arise 


fa 


Floating Rate Notes 


iHyyf 8 Mat 


Cfl 

Price Can. 


Ecus 

Bo Dl Sum Act 97 
Be*gium Apr 00 
Belgium May 99 
Bk Greece Apr 97 

Bnl Apr 00 
Bno Aug M 
Cg jon95 
Ccce FebM 
Cr Fancier Apr 9* 

Cr I (glia Jut 97 
Eld Fed 02 
EIDAuaOl 

EI3P0M0T96 
ibspTm Jun Jun 97 
ISvelmer NuvTS 
i Ml. M 05 
Public Pwr Sea 97 
5t-geddlnePeru 


77% 

a to 

99 

020 

99% 

ai9 

Wk 

1J7 

99% 

0J1 

97% 

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KS 

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99% 

ODD 

99% 

043 

TSft 

0.U 

57% 

0.1) 

100 

002 

99% 

79 

& 

»5ft 

0*5 

98% 

0*3 

91 1 

0.71 


Hmc4eA«21 
H me 5a Ju) 30 
Kmc m see 30 
HmelaAug 34 
HtncBiAiigM 
HnucfcJunM 
Kmc RxcexmedAtorSS 
HmcRaJogmUMR# J 
, Homer No l Sa»B 
j Leeds twoc Dec W 
* LeedsBsgeFgbW 
Lawts BSOCMO-M 
LoeduflsocOfitW 
Leglol JV*35 
LBB 1B2 Ml JUl 35 
Menti May 17 
Mews Fund Jul H 
Mlt4alJU)35 
MtclaMorB 
MfcNe.lbMsra 
Milo OCt 23 
MiTCOt323 
.‘All Sen M 
MtgFupdSoyS 
Mto Puna Jul 35 
Mtg Fond Od21 
MtgFunaOctS 

Mtg Fund Aug 23 

NoflamridtOctft 
Nationwide Sea 76 
NgtloBwiagJuiW 

NoMonwlde Jun M 

Natprgv Bs F*d 99 

Natpro* BsMorfc 

NtwZaabdAuo97 

KtiUOctttOdB 

Nsrtbn rage od 94 

RtsidNoltftnrMarU 

ReddFTgpJwtia 

SjTOet JB 

srlMglaMarZI 

Store! Pte DOCS 

TBfliMNalMara 

Temple Nol Jan 29 

TmciOdB 

Tmc7 HavlS 

TmcBDnel* 

T me Sc Asa 31 
TmclOMar 19 
Tmcll Mar 20 
TfPCNodl SeoSewli 
TmcNfiBNovKavM 
Tme NoB3 Apr Apr IS 
TmcNoOiMoyMarlS 
TmcNo05SepS®B 
Tmc No 09 Feb Feo 19 
Tmc Pimfia Aas S 
TmcplSt2 Jul29 
Tmco3Rd4Dd29 
True 4Tn 5 Apt 39 

TmCoSTh 6*0923 
Towi Count JJWM 
woetwBsJonn 
wootw Ecui ttov 95 
Wbotw E«riJun95 

YarlsMreh/sJulfT 


WH 

9 *ft 


Pound Sterling 


^ i 


Dollar Zeros 


Suo 

Mor Price YW Trj» 


Add Aua W 47 0:9 7M +79 ! 

AmerHosoAug 00 62'. 801 +IC3 j 


BiPIcOdM 
JidClnti NDv«4 

Ail Left Jo 1 96 
A'l Leic May 95 
Ail Left Jul 94 
Anglia 9S Jai JanH 
Au'S Fund Apr 96 

BbfcOctW 

9Cbs Apr *3 
BBOs Cct 97 
Bias Jun 95 
Bbbs Jon9J 
B'tnm MJdsSeofS 
0 /hem Mftsnlr Mor 95 
Br.tamio Jun *7 
BrlftnnJsOCTft 
Britannia Feo Feo 9S 

B* jan 9s 
Bn Aug 94 
C BMP, 96 
CffSMW 
Clieit Giau Mcy 95 
Oe Bcncalre Mar *5 
Cr-.i1g2 Jun 16 
CrnsJ 5*0 26 
CrrsJci Mas X 
CmiiAuaP 
Cms4 0ct27 
Cms7c2 Feb 20 
CnisB Jun 28 
CmtVal Mo» 33 
Cmsi: Jun 23 
Cm. j 7a! Fea 28 
Coll Mart Sec Jun 16 
Cun-.oaiv: Sea 95 
Cfr.mari Aug ft 
Domus Mori I Dec <4 
exclusive! Sen IS 
Geica Jot «J 
Grace Mtg Jun 19 
Mali tax Bs nov »: 
Halite, 2 J Sep 96 
Halifax BiSeaH 
Halifax Bs FebM 
Halifax Bi Jul ft 

Hrc: NoCTaFeb <5 

Hm; So Redeem Jul 15 


99ft 

D.9S 

99% 

1.10 

97% 

U6 

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CJO 

997, 

0.94 

99", 

0.13 

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0*3 

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C47 

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Bergen bilAis 47 
BM Ftp Be MPT 99 
BftubeoSmlB „ 
BncbirMoAogn 
BkCMn>0097 
SkOUnaJolR 
Bt Fur Ar Mor 00 
Bk Greece 3Dd 0*c 96 
. Bk Greece Fen 97 
Bk Greece Dec 96 
Bk &W* Mar 03 
Bk Greeoe «arw 
Bk Greece Dec 91 
Bk Ireland Sep® 
BkHNoftfpec* 
BXMOnbl Jof90 
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Abbey TSY Mar W 
Abe MV 90 Morn 
AMU 191 APT 03 
Abdinsysopfll 
Abn Amro Acres 
AM Amro AusOZ 
Abn Amro Re Jld 02 
Advance Bk Jun 79 
Aft Pen* Pern 

Alb PIC Nov 49 
Alb Pie Jul 49 
Alaska Hoc Jut 3t 
Altut Fin Jun 00 
Ames Bk Feb 04 
Am Bks Go Asx 00 
Arc BfcgGD Drew 
Arc Bkg Go Od C2 
An* Bks Go Odd 
AnzBkBGpfebft 
AC Bks GO MST95 
Arc Bks Go FeatS 
AIE BkS Go Aua 94 
ArabBk&aJkEiOO 
AtflnagJul97 
AshikaBa 5«O06 
I AsBt Coer jul 00 
Austria Jen 03 
Austria Dct 02 
Austria Aug 77 
AurllCfi FebC3 
Auxfl Cfl 5ct>C2 
Bo=ffln/s Scott 
S accbe/i NcnrW 
BanestaisMcrw 

Barclay Old Huv <9 
Barclay si Jul tt 
Bar clc*l3 Febfl 
Bcrmo* Bv JOB 01 
Barings BvMerm 
! BctilSa.Wft 
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> Barer Lend Aug C5 
I Baver Land May U 
J Beer Vere Aug 05 
! Sever vereJacG 

) Barer Vere Aug 53 
Btf BnoJBb Jo:f! 

1 BW inn Jur. 01 
! EeiiniiApr99 
Be Nee Ldn Feb 79 
- BchtJPUSnDKfS 
1 Ba D, Rcrr. Jun II 
I BcoCI RomDecW 
I BdDI Rem Augri 

) BaDi Rom July; 
Bdjur.fi 

> 5a Jun w 
I Ba Jul 00 

BaDiNcpDecft 


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BrCatmbFebn 

Broodwcv009» 

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CcxWoAprT? 

Qtn vena Feb9f 
Q»JuMT 

CbaFwSCT • • 

CMIW9 

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CcdMarW 

CctAoglH 

cdNkr« 

CdMayffl 

CeameJualS 

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Christ OB >knr« 
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CBfc Redeem* Aar 47 
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CamilFln ttovCE 


Con«*ofs Haves 
< coma* Ort AM 05 
i C3aaatv*na/n 
' CaatlBkAUPM 
i CrDaNurdOCtW 
I CrFgocter Oefm 
i Cr IWio Junto 
! CrHDtaAngOS 
; Cr rtaiioFenoo 
Crt tafia Jim 77 


liSsssi 

Cr Local AugD2 
, Cr Load Dec 77 
Cr Lyonn 5cpB5 
I Cr Lyon, Mor 03 
f Cr LyonoAugW 
j CrLycnr JoaTS 
! CrLyantJdfS 
> CTLvorxiDecW 
1 CrLvarnJdTB 
' r>lL>lhrt 


Cr Lynns Mar 96 

o- Nan Oct as 

Cr Hail Feb 97 
Cred ItHkSepQ 
CreCcc Os .YCr 97 
crtciaoOsSeptt 
CremtnnBAiwOs 
Crastaest AarQ3 
Cregem Ftn May CO 
1 CsBJBv21Sep*» 
Csfl>Bv22Seg97 
! csftBvAuota 
1 Cs+iaviVoyC3 
i CsftBvMOT49 
Cjfti&rciOcIQS 
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CiH> l os Feb W 
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! DbFin NvOdQ 
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Den Cmake Tr Jun 00 
DiE tfarska Na Ao»x9 
Den Norsks Cl Nov 47 
! DoSenkSasH 
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Km a/ Mar SB - - 
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MotarstoDecO? 

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Malvlnc MOY 03 

Mon GreofeU Pono 
MMFtotMm-77 
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Sales 

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Div Yid urn* Man LOW Cbe Chee ! Stocks 


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ended Friday, June 17. ; Soek * 


Sates 

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BI Inc 
BI5YS 
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_ 1477 1 7'* lift 15ft— I 'A 
_ 1004 13ft 13ft |3ft * ft 


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30 1.4 10415ft 14ft 14ft 

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- AP 3 *’ 38 * ft 

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75 l'-s 
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.. 3518 21ft 19ft 20ft -1 . BPIPvg 

1.7 17523 29ft 27‘6 2Bft - ft | BPhurtW 
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- 34731 29ft 30ft *1 

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_ 1374 14SS 12ft 14'* +1V. 

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_ 298713 12ft 12ft +ft 

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_ S3 13 12ft lift _ 

- *IS 3ft 3ft 3ft 

30 .7 2702 24X6 ZJft 23H— Ift 

_ 1*51 3ft 2», Jft -ft 

- >44 2ft 2ft 2ft — *„ 
_ 712 12ft 10ft 10ft— 1ft 

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AlamoGo Ji 2-2 205 16ft I* lift -ft 

Akmtxc _ 10984 12'* 7ft lW a — I'Vu 

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- 5147 17ft 1« lA'A —ft 

- 8161 26H 25ft 25ft —ft 

3J5 2307 25ft ®4ft 25ft - 
_ 1547 Sft 4ft Sft +ft 
3J> 230 12ft lift 12 +ft 

„ 31 17 74ft IJV, 74 
A 13 18 16ft 18 _ 

_ 3352 5 3ft 5 +1ft 
_ 4762 2'Vi» 2ft 2% + V. 

- 1036 'Vi, ft ft - 

_. 187 8 7ft 7ft —ft 

JJ 739 361* 39 *lft 
-. 1578 10ft 7ft 7ft 

- 3X96 12ft lift lift —ft 

- 45 26 25ft 26 * V, 

3J 27 15 13ft 14ft 

AldCopC 1.20 6.9x3877 17ft 16ft 17Vi + ft 
AfldCop I35o «.i kVO 14ft 13>ft* U —‘A 
AStSColl \ 32c LB XA27 14ft 13ft 13ft —ft 

AtdCoo 580 43 X299I4V 13ft 13ft —ft 

AMO _ 6523 21ft 21ft 21Yu - 

AHdGPt AO 3 A *803 2* 25ft 25ft —ft 

AWHPd Jl* 1J 2505 14ft 13ft 14ft *ft 

7S4 17ft 76ft 16U —ft 

5212ft 12 12ft 

1643 4ft 3ft 4ft -ft 

- 474 4ft 616, 6H/1,— JVy 

._ ZM17S* I Bft 17 

_ 740 3ft 3 3 - 

_ 42*2 2ft T'ft, TVm +*« 

_ 22S9 ft Vu -Vn -ft 

- 1772 2ft ?ft 2ft —ft 

._ 17 ft ft 

_ 2221 IWn 9ft 

- 6658 2ft Ift 

_ 2544 Sft 4ft 

_ uuiife iv„ ift - 

- 1 14 4V, 3ft 3ft 

- *23 7 A'A *H —'A 

. 32357 30V* 2Bft 2Bft— Ift 

- 1077 3* 24 78ft— Ift 

- 1230 15 13ft 15 -ft 

197 5 4ft 5 -ft 

- 177 3ft 3 3ft -ft 

J>«12 25 2Bft 27ft 27ft —ft 


3-* ,4+7 7 *,. 

... 1629 13 ft 12', 12*', 

. 2993 17», 17'. 1B'. 

- 242 Ilk, II It 

.. 931 22'. 21ft 23ft 

M 3743 Sft Jft S 
JJ 1684 I". 3V, J'.Y . .. - - 

. 2061 31 77 31 -1ft BcnSou 

... 7112! IBV, 17 — IftigcPNJ 

7009 (3V 17V, uft - ft ' Boncrec 
... 1377 5ft 4ft 4" i, —ift 
... 83 17 m 1ft 1ft —"i. 

- 176 10ft Bft 7ft -ft 

_ 541 6ft 5ft 6 

53* 5V. 5ft 5ft 


AO ll 


BcndciM 

Banda of 

BS.Soutn 

Bktjrans 

BnkNH 

BankAK 

Bnkuta 

BnkUtot 


JOb 


JO 


JU 


Ariilrol 

AmvestF 

Amvlin 

Aniogic 

AnalvTc 

Analv j 

Ananaei 

Anoren 

AnchBco 

AncBWls 

AnchGin 

AndrGr 

AndvBc 

AnrivTou 

A ndrew s 

Andros 


30 


3A 14 


351 43 47 ft 47 

... 703 4ft 4 4 

... 1534 11 10'--. 10ft —ft BkUTFpf 

- 311 12ft lift 12ft - ft “ 

.7 114721ft 20ft 21ft -ft 
-45779 46ft 44H 45H —ft 
-. 287 Ift lVi 1ft - ft 

24 2747 7ft 7 7H -ft 
1874 7ft 6ft 7ft 

- 334 1ft IV 1ft —ft 

A 7555 16 14ft ISS. —ft 

_ 321 9ft 8ft 7 -ft 

1.1 734 IB 17ft 17W —ft 

12S3 9ft 8 V Bft —ft 
_ 20763 10ft 7ft 7ft —3ft 
883 17ft left 17V. * ft 
115 15ft 15 15ft —ft 
503 17 16ft 17 *ft 
B4ZI7ft 16ft 1*V — V, 

3*5 2ft 2ft 3 ».’ii - Yu 


3J 


Anesfa 

Antec 

Aperius 

Aphton 

ApooEn 


34 


40 


44 


AldHI da 

AldLlte 

AkJWstn 

AJstFfi 

AHtai?ta 

Aloe tie 

AipMic 

AlpMJcwt 

Alpha I 

Alpha I W! 

AlphaBia 

Al priori 

AJoLce 

AJIaGU 

Aflat 

Alteon 

Attorn 

AltRrcc 

Attrons 

Ambar 

AmbrSfr 

Amcor 


Me 3 


ft 

9ft —1ft 
2ft -ft 
5YS +ft 


AmcorFs J4 2J 60221ft 20ft 21 W -ft 
Amnims 40 41 *30315 14ft Mft - 
27882 2V,, Sft 2V, 



W« 

AFPF 

AmFPr 

APTxE 

AFTxE2 

AmeiOn 

AmSvce 

AmBcps 

ABnicr 

Amfiloan 

Am Bldg 

AmBustn 
AmCitv £ 
Aamm 
ACkHVOV 
ACoiaid 5 
ACOnsu 
AmEaala 
ArnEad 


1.60 AJ 6M34S. 23ft 23ft —ft 
146 114 404 9ft Bft 9ft >ft 

JM BJ 14B Aft 6ft 6ft • ft 

75 B.B 424 9ft Ift 8V!i 

Ale _ 6140 71 66 66ft— 3ft 

_ 159 4ft 3ft 4'/n ■ Y„ 

.50 2.7 64 1 0ft 17 17ft .ft 

.72 3JJ 5160 23ft 21ft 23ft -1ft 

- 1106 3ft 3 3 —ft 

.. 34*4 II V 10ft II —ft 

- 577 14ft 13ft I Sft -ft 

S3 16V 14ft 16V -ft 

- ITi 2 ft 2 2 .. 

.16 1-0 257 16ft 15ft 16ft 'Ift 

J4 1.6 ®I1 15ft 13ft 15 -<Va 

.. ..56 Jft 3ft 3ft -ft 

- IS*3 15V I3'Vi, 15V >ft 
J»e 4 1484 10 Bft 0ft -Ift 


.10 


Apiebees 
ApiRecv 
ApdExfr 
ABkno 
AptCcrtm 
AptCott 

Apdtmu 
Andlnovs 
ApUMt i 
AndMIcr 
A pd So 
Apasctwt 
ArtdSta 
ArobSh 
Anvnea 
AraorDra 
Aroar+n 
ArnrNfl 
AixJtCm 
ArchPts 
Ardco 
Arden 
ArdenPtf 
A rmtup g 
AlUlliB & 
ArguG* 
Aroosv 
ArgusPh 
Ariodun 
Aristae * 
ArkBest 
Armor 
AimM s 
ArrtsPh 
ArawFn 

Arowtnl 

Arrow Tm 
Arft Ft 
ArtlstG 
Asanlc 

AscendC 
Aseca 
Ajliwrfh 
Asncm 
AspenBk JO 
AsdBnc 1JB 
AsdCmA 
AsdCmB 
Astecs 
ASOrlaF 
AsfraM 
Astran 
Aslrosy 
AiystTcfi 
AtdC» 

Athena 
Alhev 
AiUnsn 
Atintds 
AHAm 
Atficv 

AHCstAi'r 
AltGutt 
AltSeAir 
AUTefe 
Alrnels 
AtriaSft 

AtriXL 

AtwdOc 
Aueon 
AuraSv 
Auspex 
Autolnf 
Autcoms 

Autnchr 
AufW* 

AutoGa 

Autolmu 
AiiMlna 
Autetots 
Avatcr 
AvUTch 
Aundte 
AztCM 


- 9622 15ft 14V. 14V * ‘Vu 

.9 270 27ft Z7 27'A —ft 
_ 1183 14V, 12ft 12ft— IV. 

53 6 Sft Sft —1ft 

JSe 1.7 2*30 21ft 19ft 21ft -1ft 

t _ 22 1ft 1ft 1ft —ft 

- 6*03 38 34ft 35V.— 2ft 

- 116516ft 15ft 16ft -ft 

- 1137 Sft 4ft 5 — uu 

- TSOI 8 6'/. 6ft —1ft 

- 3588 25ft 23 25 -IV, 

- 2523 4ft 3Y. 3H — V, 
-. 271 15ft 13ft 14ft— IV. 

J0 24 386 13 13 12ft 

- *013 17ft 17 17ft _ 

48 1475844 28 25H 26V. 

.03 .1 J*12 24ft 23 23ft - ft 

.04 J 7364 15ft 13 13ft— Ift 

_ 594 10ft 9ft 9ft —ft 

- 1449 7ft 6ft 7 -ft 
_ 6009 Aft 5V 6ft -ft, 

- 118 ft, ft ft — V„ 
_ 3206 18ft I6V16 V h — l'V„ 

1444 TV 6ft Aft —V 

- 408 33ft 32 22ft— 1 

-47589 42ft 37ft 41V. -IV 


— V 

6 

y. -v„ 

4V _ 

2 ft * ft 


223 Jft 
634 Aft 6 

- 424 9* V 

- 252 5ft 4ft 

- 178 2ft 2 

178516ft 14ft 1* -1 

1J 2754 17ft lift lBft —ft 

- 5106 74 27V 27H — fft 

- 534518ft 17 17ft —ft 

_. 1170 16'A 14 16 Y, -2V 

- 2032 2ft 2V„ 7'A —ft 

.7 521 30ft 28ft 27V, — '/. 

.. SI 47 40 44 —ft 

- I25ZIZ 10ft II — V 

- 40T4 I0W 10'/. I Oft -ft 

.... 34 5 22V 22ft 22V. -2ft 

1.16 4J 342 27ft Z7 27 —ft 

.. 2412 15ft 13ft 14 —IV 

- 341 5 4 XV. _ 

- 4522 7ft Bft 9 —ft 

- *5 4V 4ft 4V, _ 

J 7*57 13 10ft 12 -1ft 

3.0 2402 21ft 21V 21V —i ft 
Z1 370 1 9ft 19 17ft _ 

- 1256 7ft 6ft Aft .ft 

2.J 707 16ft 15ft 15 V— Ift 

4 111 20ft 20 20V —ft 

_ 752 Bft 7V, 7ft —ft 

..24485 17ft 15 V 16 —ft 
1.7 383 6ft Sft » .ft 
.. 1346 8V 7ft 7ft — W„ 
_ Z19215V 14ft 15 — V 

- 353 >!* 7ft 8", ■«, 

..1Q311 9V 7ft Bft— tv,, 
_ 2967 28ft j*V 27ft -ft 
I J 74 17 16 16 —ft 

2.9 489 38 35V 37V -1 

_ 12326 24ft » -m 

- 112 25V, 25 25ft -ft 
_ 4179 14ft I4H 14ft— 1ft 
_ 3755 34ft 33ft 34 -ft 

1J 224 7ft 7 9 

A 104 2ft Jft 2ft —V 
.. 1B3 4ft 4V 4ft - ft 
.. 15512ft lift lift — ft 

.. 6*76 14ft 14 14ft .ft 

^ 10IS BV 7 7 — 1'A 

^ 10 7ft 7'A 7Vl -V 

.. 125510V 7ft 10V, *'/, 
U IW17K f7H 17ft _ 
._ 824 2ft 2 2 —ft 

_ 410 5 4 Vi 4ft - V 

_ 145 4ft 4V 4Y, —ft 

.. 2849 10V 10 10V, _ 

1J 6380 27ft 24ft 25ft— 2ft 
_ IBM 9V 7ft Bft —ft 
_ 27746 38ft 25ft 25ft— IV U 
^ 261515 14 14ft _ 

- 472 6ft Aft *V 

w 44 13ft 12ft 13ft - ft 
.. 914 20V 19ft Z0 +'/n 
..1554* 8*1, 7 V 8ft -V, 
.. 3920 57, 5". Sft —ft 
.. 1146 4 376 3ft 

.. 261 17 ft 15ft 16ft -V, 
.34 U 14 Sft B 8 -ft 
1.0 16439 JJ 47 V 47ft — V 
.. 704 11ft 11 11V _ 

.. BOS 7ft 7'H 7ft 
.. 1322 2+ 27ft 27 -1ft 
_ 15180 30V, 17V 17ft — IV 

- J7 36 35ft 35ft —ft 

« 9116 30ft 28 28ft— Ift 

_ 1707 Sft T*, B —St 
A 156 5ft 4Y. 4V« —V 


.12 

Ala 


36 


J32 


Bankrs s 

BnKFst 

BJcarn 

Barna 

BaitvMJ 

BanvSLZ 

BanyRT 

BanvnSy 

Baron 

Brera 

BaroiBs 

BaretRs 

BsTnBrt 

BsTnA 

BcrePtr 

BaiExat 

BassattF 

BatT«Ji 

BayRidae 

BovVw 

BavQks 

Bayprt s 

BeauOl 

BcOBth 9 

Beebas 

Bel Fuse 

BtHdEUk. 

Belize 

BelIBcp 

BedMic 

BeflSpt 

Benjerrv 

BRranfcR 

Benhcn 

BentOG 

Berk lev 

BerkGs 

Bartud 

BestPwr 

Bestap 

Betti* 

Bio B a 

BjaOTir 

BteRck 

Btn&v 

BiOLogic 

B-QMWst 

BfOMWwIS 

BtaSpecH 

BtoSurt 

ffloFTtar 

Btoclr 

Biocryst 

Bioaen 

Biognwt 

BkJiecf 

Btamag 

Btarrxm- 

Biamet 

Burniira 

DioScrfitv 

S'Qwsno 

Brtspft 

ssa 

BioTcG 

Bi-dCi, 

BirdMd 

Blrtcfir 

BDtHwfc 
BIKH wtA 
BlkHwtB 
Blimpdas 

WKLnu 



.. . >i , CFSBS 

_. 3550 UV 1J 14'. — (CHCHOl 
_. 3250 14V lit, 13'.*— 1'-.. ‘ 

5 8 8 0 

3J'J16S3lft 31 31*. — 

5J 1*18 68", ti'-: «*•, • 1 
I A 72 16 IS'.- I5*J 

3J 4 25 25 25 

.. 184 6*. 5ft 0 — ", 

J?r 1.1 3788 31ft 28 ! ■ 29ft— 2'i 
1.08b 3.4 309 33ft 31ft 21 -ft 
.B0 12 73 J* 2-’ , 24', - * . 

_ 23*773'. 21ft 21+t, —ft 
.94 5.7 23* 16ft 15ft l*ft • ", 

!J4e SA * 73ft 23ft 23ft 
.44 2J 2839 107, 10ft 18’ a -V 
.40 1.4 2628 77 20 

■2*e 1.0 2306 28V 23 1 ', 24ft -3 
24 IJ *771 6ft t* t*', — ft 
.10 IJ *85 BV 7ft 7 ft 
_ 937 10'/, 9ft +>« 

_. «01O", 7ft 10 V -1. 

A0 2J 513 19V 18V. IBV— I 

A0 2.0 673 20'., I?ft 20 —ft 
AO ZB 58323ft 215. 2 IV —ft 
JST 1A25B133V 32 32". -Ift 

_ 57 2V» 2 2 

_ 1875 Ift IV IV 

A0 7.1 305 4ft 4ft 4ft _ 

_ 6149 15ft 14ft 14V —ft 

Ale .1 717 34ft 34V 34ft -V 

.. 78 7ft 7 7 

_. 539 12ft 10 1! —ft 

.. 1311 14ft 13ft 14ft ift 

_ 97 Sft 2 V 2V —ft 

_ 1094 Bft 7ft B —ft 

_ 58 40 V 39 40ft -ft 

_ 2441 BV 0 BV -V 

2 0 034 77ft 28 77 -1 

_ 4117 3V,. 2ft 3V, 

... 47B614H 13ft 14V 
2J 1821 26ft 25V 26 
2J 5813 63ft 62V 62V —ft 
.. 348 4ft 4Vi 4H —1% 

1.7 163 1SV 14ft 14ft —14 

_ 1117* 27 V 37ft aft -V 
_ 47 5 4 Jft JV -H 

- 417 7H 6ft Sft —ft 
15 13 17ft 13ft * V 

224 18ft 17H lift -V 
988 53ft 50 ft 53 +2V„ 

_. 183611 9ft 9V, —ft 
_ 8847 25ft 23". 23ft— 2' , 

_. 3173 18 V 1* ITft -ft 
_ 261 4ft Jft 4 V fft 

_. 4*8 3H Jft Jft - ft 

_ 7270 7ft Aft 7Y„ » V„ 

1.1x2035 42 »ft *0ft -ft 

6.4 26 17V 16ft 17V * ft 

_ 922 15V 14 14ft —ft 

_ 2008 18 17V 17ft -ft 

_ 16811ft II II —ft 

— 123 Sft 5 s>v —ft 

1.4 23311ft 11 V lift — V 
_ 1005 16ft 15V 16ft -IV 

2363 14 105i 131, «ft 

I54IIZV irft [Jft _. 

17 3ft 2ft 2ft — ft 
1"A. I**,. — Vu 
'ft 'ft 

8ft 9ft —I", 

2ft 2Vi —ft 

7 »H 


10 — ■, cnnEne 

IS': I’V Ift • QteSIV * 

10 10 — • CM ? ock 

30V ■ Ottebsi 

_ 41, S' * .. • Chine mo 

1 3 123 39*, J-i. J8»-. . *. i OiUdDrt. 
.. 303* 2i 2’ ; ?J' . . . Ch'noiek 

... JO-4 , S 

... JJ.'S.'2'x — 

._ 4C8 V- ! JV • 

.. 1 = 5 13V I? 12V - 

2 A 121V ?l’ 4 21V 

_ 4} V. 2V — 

25=9 15 13V IS -I 

552 17* .- tS’: if, — 

14 l - " ' —I 

.. M.'.' JV 7' . 2V, — 1 ' 

_ *5 3V 2V 2>. 

... 18i 10"; 7V 1*V 

88 73 411 3J JIV 12V - 

+5 37’.- M Jf.- I 

6ft 
9ft 
29 


17 7947 ::ft 22ft - . Crm 

_ 23?-" 6 ft 6 6ft • ft Carrier 

.. S3’ 5 4ft 4ft • • . CorGctjF 
_ 5848 5 . St JV — , Icrgsm 
. 753 -i, f, t errda 

,.2752 10 16V >6',— 'ft Ce-e’CPS 

_ 2S0“ T". Aft 4». —ft C .ftsrFn 
13! tCft 17 : 13ft 

*0 41 39 37 

32 Jft 3 , 3'. 

41531-1 30ft 31V 

661 9 2 Sft 

96 21" , 23 21*, 

7+7 * 7 .- 

5*14 12V lift 15V 

1241 2 '.,. I % i 3 " , 


40 :.j 


2.7 

30 


6 

8ft 




73." 

131 7» 

829 
100 7 ‘ 

_ 4+; y_ . 

(.lie 43 10 76". J5". Zsft — 7 

.iSe 1.1 Ilia 14' : 13'.. 14 . ft 

_ 1 108 74' . 2?». 24V ■ Ift 
4510 S' J 9'r -ft 


7". — • 


_. 702 l_ 

.. IS8? 6", 
_. 180 12V 

_ 744 0". 

2J7I27.1 73+4 8«. 

. . 524 7ft 

... *52 10 
I-SJe 55 276 7.” ; 
1*1 ' 


31826V 75", 25 s . —ft 
2 lift 17 -ft 


11 ' 


*r>« — V. 

12ft -Y, 


B ■ — ft 
«ft ? — V 

9V 91, —V 
.”»g 2JH —ft 
'»'• -’■= 


OiPtcm 

ChiOiT.; 

Chiron 

ChilOd i 

■ChcCirg 

OvrDrwt 

Owtest 

Oirat 

Chrnrmas 

obep 

Ode* 

Gmu 

CirnFIr 

Cir>8/i,c 

GfW'gi 

Limas 

Oprica 

OrcFn 

Qrelnc 

Cirran 

OrcSv 

Orrus 

Cisco S 

OlFed 

ulalnCpt 

GliBnc 

Qlicastr 

CIzBcp 

CfxBncn 

C.liza+a 

omins 

CfvHW 

CivicBc 

OovEng 


-. B07i2*i 11V 12 V .. 
_ 2740 3V 5 2ft -IV 
_ 8563 3’ V Mft 35", —V 


. 183*8*5', S+'-s 59'..— S 
19 neijgv is": . rv • , 

Jft J"y - 


_ ?C4 7 * . . 

_ 3£ ft 

.. 4779 3ft 

43 70ft 
_ 11300 14 
. 2231 «V 
„ 7+tf.f 


i _• 


134 


.17 



.ISe .5 


A0 


30 


-ISe A 


UO 


.16 


AS J 


_ 2127 2 

- 370 w„ 

i "SSw 

- 672 Hi 

_ MQ 1 

- 776 5H 


' V, 


. - 4'y 5 
-16551 32'A 27ft 30 — 2ft 
_ 451 11V 7ft 10ft— Ift 

_ 4774 3 2 2H —ft 

‘ 2 
4ft 
76. 

sv, 

3 


JO 


_ 437 7ft 

- 1003 6'i 
-10786 10 
... *80 6'k 

- *2 3ft 
-. 4*88 7 V 

- 36 7’A 

_ 155 6ft 
_. 277 ift, 
_. 4077 3U„ 


2ft * ft 
S'* —ft 
7 v x — «■. 

Sft —ft 

3ft -ft 
7 —ft, 
7'lf - IT 
6ft —ft 
ft * V|. 
3 


64* 

*V. 
ft 

. . J» . _ 

269 11V 10ft 10ft —ft 
812 Jft 3ft 3ft -V 
IV IV — ft. 
8ft II 
Yi, t, 

ft 1ft 

Aft 7 

5ft 6 V 

1ft Ift 

ft 


1466 >«„ 
1362 U 
376 ft 
676 1ft 
414 7V 
63 Aft 
1766 1ft 


:1ft 


BlacDv 

BJCJlD 1.06D14 X402 30ft 27ft 30'.x 

Btvtfl _ 22* Aft 5ft 6 

BoatBns 1 3a 33 12328 345", 33ft 33ft —ft 


AS 


A2e 


B 


B8&T 

BG Aero 

DEI El 

BFEitt 

BFSNY 

BGS 

BHA 


Ift 


A0 3 3 

12elJ 


14 5520 31ft 29ft 31ft 
... 3730 7ft Sft 9ft . ft 
IJ MO A 5ft Sft 

7 4 3ft 4 -ft, 
30471ft 20ft 70ft —ft 
308 25 24 25 

207 10ft 9 10 —ft 


BobEvn 

27 





BoctyOr 



Bellinger 



BonTm 



BooVAdill 



Booiea 






Bern) 


Bortnd 

Borror 


_ 

BOSIAC 

*0 

7J 

Bastfic 

Ji 

JJ 

BosIOk* 



Basrrc 



BaxEn A 



BaxEflB 


1 

BraffTwy 



BrdPwtA 



BrtfPwte 



Bl-Ody w 

.68 

t.s 

Brantro 

JO 


BrnfdSv 

Brauns 


Brtcwtg 

Bronca 

JO 

1.6 

vKrooai 

BrentBs 

M 

23 

BrdgF 

JD 

IO 

BrileV 



BraadN 

•02 e 


BrdbdTc 


Bacuin 
Brd Part 


- 

8awv5e> 




•16 

1.7 

SrodcG 


BfoflSt 

MllynBc 


„ 

Srookitn 



Brfclrs® 



ilO+trl 



BroGour 

BfTom 



3rure« 

J4 

JJ 

3rvnMw 

*0 


BucfcAm 




1284 7V* 7 7ft —ft 
743 Ift 1ft Ift fft 
631DH 9H 7*4 —ft 
1073 Bft B Bft 


522 18ft 14V 16ft— Ift 
1720ft 20ft TOft —ft 
237 7ft Bft 7 fft 
114 7ft 8ft 8ft —ft 
149 16ft 1571 16 *ft 


• ft 


20 19ft 12 19ft ♦ 4ft 
5184 ID 9ft 7ft —ft 
2000 11ft IQh 11 f'.Y 
317, , 7>V|. 3 -V„ 

*09 rv,, i*,, m -ift 
230 ntp "ft =y„ f 're 
2540 46V. 44ft 46 V fft 
7*4 16ft 15ft I6H -U>u 
76 ft Y„ Yu — i/ H 

522 4ft 4V„ 4ft fft 


09 19V, 19 19W 

25 10 8ft 10 


W Aft 89ii 6ft 


3ft Jft 


547 7 8 


BV, —ft 
x'0 22 20ft 21 
1424045 39 43ft -3ft 

3971 35V, 34ft 35ft - ft 


Buckle 

Buffets 

BugCrok 


1814 7ft Bft 7ft fft 

,85612ft 12 13ft „ 
187313 lift I2i', fft 
4861 16ft lift I Sft -V, 

5*70 8V 7 V Pf i. —Yi, 

25 32ft 31ft 31ft - 

6 9 BV. 7 • Vi 

371 MV IJV, 14% * ft 

-15705 1 7 V, 17ft 17ft— Ift 

- 81 14ft 14 14 


^jtoene 
Ca [Amp 
CaiBnc 
CdifCul 
CalFnd 
CatMD 
CalMiC 

CotSBk 
CantMT 
Calkin 

Colo way 
Calumet 
CamNtg 
Cambex 
Comb Me 

CammAsh 

ComooEl 

CWirtee 
CWJneA 
CaraJelo 
Can (Da wt 
Can lies 
CannEva 
CannExB 
Canon! 

Canon*. 
CareJar 
Conk* 
Contbry 
Carry Rs 
Conv wt 
CCBT 
CapASC 
CapBriC M 
CapBnpf 1.75 
CapSvus 
CopSw 
C aPtIBc 
CopTms 
Caraustr 
CnnlBnc 
GrdnHff 
CVI5 
CareGp 
CareerFb 
Caroline 
Cronwk 
CarlCm 
CaroFsl 
CorroUB 
CarvPir 
Carver 
Cascde 
Casevss 
CasnCrd 
CasnC wt 
COsAm* 
CwInoOS 
CasAAoas 
CaxHs wt 

Ca&nRsc 
CaslIE s 
CatalSem 
Catalvt 
Cam Bco 
CottiStr 
CatoCps 
CctSo 
CalScwt 
Celadon 
Cctebmc 

Ceftsnal 
cete»s 
Chiav 
CeUGens 
CellPro 
CCT tear 
Cell star 
CdCmA 
OHCmPR 

CelltTci 
Cettrx 
Centeu 
Centrscn 
Can u Be 
■Lancet 
Ctrfink 
Centrbk 
Cen txTI 
Centgrm 
Cantocor 
Center wt 
ClrCOo 
CFtdBk 1.12 
CeoGordn 
OrilNBe 47 
CJerflc 
CJerFnS 
CTr/Woe 
CPoFin 
CftsLfo 
CrtSpm 
ensou 
CntyBC 
CtrvSa 
Cevhin 
Cerdyn 
CertKn 
Comer 
Cerpiev 
Cervearr 

C TwONbTp 
C nalane 
Champ! 5 

OtmpPr 

OtantPM 

Chanln 
OtriflSTt 
ChlFSB 
ChrtFdls 


J6 3J 


- 3670 5ft 

_ 3774 5H 
.. 49* 6 

- 347 Ift 


J7e .7 


30 - 


CstHttn 
Cobanc 5. 
CobroEl 
Cobra 
CocaBtt 
coamsyt 
CodoGn 
Code At 


1.1 3634 18'.: 17V IJV —V _ 

- 3737 7ft T — ft. | aeanH 

- 4422 BV 7'., 7H CkxCdg 

_ 715713ft 12V 12V«— IV 1 Oevtffl 

- 1580 4ft x xx,, . v u t anDr 
277 17ft 17> , 17*-. - ft • atDr pf 
182 5ft Sft 5ft - v ! ainiem s 

■44b 2J 306 1 71,17 19". _ i atnt&S 

_. 8470 72 20ft 21 — ft i CHntrofc. 

_ 4687 24 22 V 231, » j j Oottl 
A0 4.1 331 10ft 9>, 9ft —V I OubCor 

-- -’0 7 . 6* . F, —ft I CnOoBk 

J5e 0.2 437 3'.',, 2'»I, 3%i. - ft CxIBnc 

- 928 2ft 2 IV - I'm I CsfBn pf 

207 35 33 34 V. - 1 

SU'D 5ft -ft. 

4ft 41, r ft 
5ft S'; —ft 
7ft 7ft —V, 

1081 17V 16'. 16ft —ft 
4B511 10 V 11 _ 

583 12 V 13 12 —ft 

8 26ft 25 25 — x. 

2147 23 V 22 V 22 V — V 
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CAPITAL MARKETS 

After the Bubble Bursts, 


By Carl Gewirtz 

Ituemanonal Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — “The bursting of a financial bubble is always 
ugly." observes Sushi! Wadhwani, London-based market 
strategist at Goldman, Sachs & Co. The bubble in question 
was the late 1993 rally in bond prices that drove yields on 
long-term debt in North America and Continental Europe 
to lows not seen in more Lhan 20 years — levels that, in retrospect, 
analysts agree were un sustainably low. 

“Last year,” Mr. Wadhwani said, “speculative money became 
over optimistic about European monetary policy. They thought the 
Bundesbank was likely to ease policy by more than now seems 

likely, and as they got disap- ^ ■ 

gi"' 9 beg “ ******* Fear of inflation 

“Because the proportion of risks h ftfng a self- 
tradins done hv uwiilatw ft 



THE TRIB INDEX 


= International Herald Tribune . 115 
Work! Stock Index, composed 
of 280 internationally investable H* 

stocks from 25 countries, 
compiled by Bloomberg 113 
Business News. 

112 

Week entfing June 17, 
daity closings. 

Jan. 1992 = 100. 1,1 


Asia/Pa cfftc 


World Index 

■ s i. 

% s *( \ / r j • ’ \ • 




Europe 


132 



113 .. . . ■ • ' . Yff . ' 


F M T W T F 

North America Rflll 



Latin America 


-L-l 116 



F M T W T 


F M T W T F 


Industrial Sectors/Weekend close 

«"*« "MM * dS 1 d 

Jam gan« 522 — 525 — 222T 

Energy 11050 11123 -0.30 Capital Goods 114.41115.03 -034 

t1757 1 19.60 -1^6 Ra w Materials 12624126-15 *0 07 

Rwanca 116.96 117.70 -0.63 Consumer Goods 9839 9725 +1.17 

Services 11G-B1 11 7.96 -097 MteceManaous 124.73 123.B2 *0-90 

sEzhs 

o&emise the On top atodcs am tracked. 

: ! o WB i iaflo nat Herald Tribune 


Energy no JO 11123 -0.30 
Utffitte 11757119^0 -158 


CURRENCY RATES 


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encourages Third World governments to pur- 
sue ruthless export-oriented development 
strategies that enrich the elite, while pushing 
low-income inhabitants deeper into poverty. 
Critics on the right say Bank loans crowd out 
private capital and destroy incentives for gov- 
ernments to adopt free-market policies. 

Groups on both sides attack the World 
Bank for propping up authoritarian regimes 
and throwing too much money at grandiose 
infrastructure projects — dams, highways, 
power plants — that have displaced millions 


popted^tbey began liquidating Fear of inflation 

“Because the proportion of risks h efng a self- 
trading done by speculative * ® 

money is higher than in the past, fnVfiBing prophecy, 
we have much more stop-loss ° r 1 _ 

selling than we typically have 
seen and that has meant self-feeding price falls. 

“Those fails, in irnn, change the psychology of conventional 
investors who then think the market is telling them something that 
they have not factored in and you get a change in the perceptions 
about the fundamentals.” 

In the wake of the sell-off in European bond prices, attention has 
focused on large government budget deficits projected for this year. 
Although these are targeted to decline in the next two years, 
projections by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development show that gross public debt by 1995 will have 
increased substantially — to 64 percent of gross domestic product 
in Germany from 49 percent last year, and the average for all of 
Europe will rise to 765 percent of gross domestic product from 67.6 
percent last year. 

For Mr. Wadhwani, this focus on projected deficits is nothing 
more than a rationalization- The projections are no worse than they 
were last year when, bond markets rallied. But rationalization or 
not, he agrees that in the current environment it is becoming 
difficult far governments to finance their deficits. 

Germany, Austria and Spain have recently been forced to cancel 
planned domestic bond offerings, and Britain this week will again 
be selling floating-rate debt rather than fixed-coupon paper to 
comply with the demands of the skittish market. Malcolm Roberts. 
London-based analyst for Union Bank of Switzerland, calculated 
that German government issuance was r unning 45 percent behind 
the year-ago pace and in Britain it is down 58 percent. 

Ironically, the refusal of traditional investors to buy bonds for 

See BONDS, Page 11 


of poor people. 
Environment! 


5' ew ^ ans World Bank Draws Fire 

lippO Babbling Technocrats or Unsung Heros? 

■ pi I Compiled by Our Staff From Dapaicha in HafwiHtng turf than tending to the pool 

WASHINGTON — While the World Bank Leftist critics charge that Bank lendi 

jyj I j „ _ j is accusing developing countries of squander- encourages Third World governments to p 

Weak Outlook ing funds on lavish projects raLher than allevi- sue ruthless export-oriented devdoprm 

.j aitng poverty, a chorus of critics is charging strategies that enrich the elite, while pus hi 

Follows Ftunee the leading institution with hurting the very low-income inhabitants deeper into povei 

^5 poor it was founded to help. Critics on the right say Bank loans crowd i 

Compiled bv Our Staff From Daparcfies By most common measures, living stan- private capital and destroy incentives for gi 

NEW YORK When the dards have improved in the developing world ernments to adopt free-market policies. 

smoke clears from the battle- since the Bank was formed 50 years ago. But Groups on both sides attack the Wo 

field that was the foreign ex- now the Bank — which provides cheap capi- Bank for propping up authoritarian regin 

change market last week deal- ^ ^ technical expertise to developing and throwing too much money at grandic 

ers probably will be left with the countries — is being challenged to show it infrastructure projects — dams, highwa 

impression that further dollar deserves much credit for that progress. power plants — that have displaced millic 

sales are the safest bet “The Bank has done more damage than of poor people. 

The coming together of a good," said Ross Hammond, a spokesman for Environmentalists, meanwhile, allege i 
constellation of events on Fri- 50 Years Is Enough, a coalition of more than Bank has squandered billions on projects tl 

day sent the dollar plunging 50 organizations lobbying for deep reductions have ravaged the Earth’s forests and wildli 

against a variety of European ™ funding to the Bank. The alliance, made up “If some evil genius were to devise the mi 

currencies, and many analysts mosll y of such left-leaning development, en- cost-effective way to provoke large-scale c 

and traders said the currency vironmenlal and religious groups as Oxfam forestation, this would be it,” Bruce Rich 

was likely to weaken further 3 America, Friends of the Earth and Green- lawyer at the Environmental Defense Fur 

A primary reason for the peace USA, charges that Bank policies “up- said of Bank-sponsored projects in Bra 

bleak outlook is the U S cur- 7001 and further impoverish the poor” and Indonesia, Thailand and India, 

renc/s apparent vulnerability “plunder the environment," These attacks come at an awkward time 1 

to even a whiff of bad news. In its annual World Development Report, the Bank, which extended a record $2. 

The dollar’s tumble Friday released Sunday, the Bank acknowledged that billion in loans to more than 100 countr 

was partially caused by a predic- ^ P°° r were not benefiting from many of last year and manages a loan portfolio tot 

tion from a private economist the infrastructure projects it has funded. Bui ing $140 billion, 

that the U S. currency would fall > l placed the blame on the governments of Bank officials say they are moving quid 
10 percent against the mark over developing countries rather than on itself, to address the organization’s problems. T 

the next 18 months. calling for a scaling back of bureaucracies and Bank now allows outsiders greater accc 

Currencies often rise or fall 210 racreux: in privatization. than before to the information officials use 

when central bankers or other Y** 2ls detractors say Bank officials have evaluate new projects, 
government o fficials speak since DOt ^ earne ^ enough, painting a grim picture of “The emphasis everywhere must be less i 

they control monetaiyand eco- a multinational bureaucracy run amok — a cutting ribbons to open new facilities aj 

nomic policy. But the bearish ^etiv^ bloated institution run by overpaid^ bamit ik. « 

outiookTriday came from Gail jargon-babbling technocrats more interested See BANK, Page 11 

Foster, chief economist at the — 

Conference Board, a privately 

funded research group with no g->\ ~%WT* *E 1 A * 

^sStSTSSLo Comcast Wins Cable Auction 

European customers asking 

Sfd win* Thin^ interna- $1.3 Billion Acquisition Makes It No. 3 U.S. Operator 

tional economist at MCM Cur- 1 x 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapaicha 

WASHINGTON —While the World Bank 
is accusing developing countries of squander- 
ing funds on lavish projects rather than allevi- 
ating poverty, a chorus of critics is charging 
the leading institution with hurting the very 
poor it was founded to help. 

By most common measures. Living stan- 
dards have improved in the developing world 
since the Bank was formed 50 years ago. But 
now the Bank — which provides cheap capi- 
tal and technical expertise to developing 
countries — is being challenged to show it 
deserves much credit for that progress. 

“The Bank has done more damage than 
good,” said Ross Hammond, a spokesman for 
50 Years Is Enough, a coalition of more than 
50 organizations lobbying for deep reductions 
in funding to the Bank. The alliance, made up 
mostly of such left-leaning development, en- 
vironmental and religious groups as Oxfam 
America, Friends of the Earth and Green- 
peace USA, charges that Bank policies “up- 
root and further impoverish the poor” and 
“plunder the environment." 

In its annual World Development Report, 
released Sunday, the Bank acknowledged that 
the poor were not benefiting from many of 
the infrastructure projects it has funded. But 
it placed the blame on the governments of 
developing countries rather than on itself, 
calling for a scaling back of bureaucracies and 
an increase in privatization. 

Yet its detractors say Bank officials have 
not learned enough, painting a grim picture of 
a multinational bureaucracy run amok — a 
secretive, bloated institution run by overpaid, 
jargon-babbling technocrats more interested 


Unexpectedly, 
Chairman Quits 
Philip Morris 


By Gina Raxick 

International Herald Tribune 
Michael A. MBes abruptly re- 
signed as chairman and chief ex- 


cess as evidence of the former 
chairman's commitment to the 
re. tobacco sector, 
n. Mr. Roll! would not com- 


ecutive officer of Philip Morris nwm on Philip Morris’s plans 
Cos. and wQl be replaced by two to split itself into food and to- 


long-time executives from the to- b ac p° 


compare 

bacco division of the conglomer- petitor RJR Nabisco Inc., Phil- 
atej the co mp any said f &mHfl y ip Morris has raised the 
“With the resurgence of our possibility of such a move. But 
U.S. tobacco business and the Philip Morris has shelved the 
continued strong growth in in- idea for now. 
terna tional tobacco, it makes “The board decided in May 
to again have a career to take no action for the fore- 
Philip Morris executive in the seeable future and I have noth- 
top job,” Mr. Miles. 53, said. to say beyond that," Mr. 

Mr. Miles, who had headed Ro “Jsaid- 
Kraft when it was acquired by RJR was the first to announce 
Philip Morris in 1988, did not ? possMe split as a way to free 
elaborate on the reason for his *** *°oo operations from the neg- 
resignation. alive influence of the tobacco 

Philip Moms stock has been ™** 011 bs stock price, 
under pressure since early 1993, R. William Murray, 58, will 
when the stock traded at more take over as chairman, while 
than $75 a share. On April 2, Geoffrey C. Bible, 56, was 
1993, shares tumbled 21 per- named president and chief ex- 
cent, or $14,625, to $49.50, after ecutive officer. Mr. Murray 
the company said it was lower- joined Philip Morris's Europe 
ing prices of its market-leading division in 1970, while Mr. Bi- 
Marlboro cigarettes to compete ble had been the executive vice 


ies. Like its com- 


Environmentalists. meanwhile, allege the 
Bank has squandered billions on projects that 
have ravaged the Earth’s forests and wildlife. 
“If some evil genius were to devise the most 
cost-effective way to provoke large-scale de- 
forestation, this would be it,” Bruce Rich, a 
lawyer at the Environmental Defense Fund, 
said of Bank-sponsored projects in Brazil, 
Indonesia, Thailand and India. 

These attacks comeat an awkward time for 
the Bank, which extended a record $23.7 
billion in loans to more than 100 countries 
last year and manages a loan portfolio total- 
ing $140 billion. 

Bank officials say they are moving quickly 
to address the organization’s problems. The 
Bank now allows outsiders greater access 
than before to the information officials use to 
evaluate new projects. 

“The emphasis everywhere must be less on 
cutting ribbons to open new facilities and 

See BANK, Page 11 


with cheaper brands. 


president for the company's 


The stock has languished worldwide tobacco division, 
near that level since then, fin- Mr. Miles became president 
ishing Friday at $50375, down and chief executive of Kraft in 


Comcast Wins Cable Auction 


123 cents. 


1982 and retained that position 


John Reed, chairman of Citi- after Philip Morris acquired the 
coip and of the compensation company in 1988. He was ap- 
committee of Philip Morris’s pointed as chairman of the par- 
board, said the Mr. Miles's de- em company on SepL 1, 1991. 


rision was personal 


Philip Morris's earnings 


rencyWatch, a consulting firm. 

The timing of the forecast 
added to the confusion. Ms. 
Foster's comments crossed 
newswires just as the dollar was 
falling through 1.6270 DM, an 
important level for people who 
trade based on technical analy- 
sis of exchange rates, said Ben 
Morden, an analyst at IDEA, a 
consulting firm. Breaking 
through that level means the 
dollar's slide is likely to contin- 
ue, Mr. Morden said. 

That the dollar fell so far at 
least partially on comments 
from a nongovernment econo- 
mist shows that the beleaguered 
currency is weaker than many 
traders had thought 
“This shows that the dollar is 
very vulnerable,” said Tom 
Hutchinson, director of capital 

See DOLLAR, Page 11 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dtyudta Other companies that report- “The acquisition allows us to 

nun a rvci nut a r* edly bid for the systems were increase our presence in three of 
«.i r* cj ■r? ra I Continental Cab'levision of the top 15 television markets.” 

cast Corp. said Sunday it had Boston and a joint venture be- The sale to Comcast will rive 
agreed to buy the cable tdevi- t ween Tele-Communications the company more than 3.5 mil- 
sion operations of Maclean Inc. and Knight-Ridder Inc. lion subscribers and place it 
° , Canada * or Maclean Hunter''; cable and behind Tele-Co mmimi ca- 

***»?*• 9 l ^ ast relared WaSf tadude Sr tions Inc. which has 10 million 

the third-largest cable television subscribers, and Tune Warner 

company m the United Stales. RoriS Inc, wfehhaa 7 million. Co * k 

Comcastscaihparchase. w ^ e i( h combined n^edto inveabou' 3 mil- 
from Maclean s parent, Rogers eefi nm »,..»»»« bon subscribers when its acqin- 

Communications Inc. of Toron- ’ customers. ation is completed, 

to, comes two weeks after Cox “Wc are very pleased to have The transaction is subject to 


Communications Inc. of Toron- * sition is completed, 

to, comes two weeks after Cox “Wc are very pleased to have The transaction is subject to 
Enterprises Inc. agreed to ac- opportunity to expand our governmental and other approv- 
quire the cable TV unit of c^ble operations through (his as well as regula- 

Times Mirror Co. in a $2.3 bfl- significant transaction with tory approval for Rogers’s ac- 
tion deal. RCI, Brian L. Roberts, Com- quisitioo of Maclean Hunter. 

Rogers put the systems up for cast president Comcast provides cellular 

auction in part to reduce debt “For some time, we have con- telephone services to more than 


auction in part to reduce debt “For some time, we have con- 
associated with its takeover of sidered Maclean Hunter's sys- 
Maclean Hunter, which is ex- terns to be a logical strategic 
peeled to be completed later extension of Comcast’s cable 


this year. 


business," Mr. Roberts said. 


Financial Vulture Cashes In 



By Jacques Neher 

Inlemaumal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Four years after closing 
down Quadrex Securities, one of London's 
biggest individually owned securities houses, 
Gary Klesch is collecting a new reputation as 
Europe's financial garbage collector. With the 
Continent coming out of recession, he has got 
plenty of garbage to pick through. 

While Europe’s traditional bankers tend to 
hold their noses when pre- 
sented with problem loans, 
assets in bankruptcy or 
soured real estate, Kiesch 
& Co. sniffs out a market 

“In Europe today, 
bankruptcy is a dirty 
word, lute it was in the 
United States 25 years 

X " said Mr. Klesch, an American financier 
arrived in Europe 15 years ago. “When a 


who arrived in Europe o years ago. When a 
company is in trouble, the white-shoe banks 
in London and Paris run. The last thing they 
want is to be associated with it. It will be years 
before they realize that bankruptcy, spelled 
another way, is opportunity." 

Mr. Klesch got his first taste for the bank- 
ruptcy business 20 years ago, when he headed 
the restructuring of Penn Central Railroad as 
director of capital markets policy at the U.S. 
Treasury. 

He came to Europe in 1 978, directing Mid- 
dle East operations for Smith Barney, Harris 
Upham & Co. in Paris, then became president 
of Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. in London two 
years later. He left in 1982 to set up Quadrex 
Holdings, which he built into an amalg am of 
20 industrial and financial companies. Flag- 
ship of the group was Quadrex Securities, 
which specialized in Eurobond trading and 
money-broking. 

Quadrex was wound down by 1990, a victim 
of the decline in the bond market. The compa- 
ny also got bogged down in a suit by British & 
Commonwealth Holdings PLC, which charged 
that Quadrex had reneged on an agreement to 
acquire the wholesale brokerage division of 
Mercantile House Holdings, which B&C 
bought in. 1987. B&C collapsed in 1990. In 
Apm, a commercial court ruled against Qua- 
drex , but the case is being appealed. 

With a brash Wall Street style rarely seen in 
Europe, Mr. KJesch’s 17-employee boutique 
has made a name by diving into some of the 
highest-profile financial disasters in Europe, 
such as Euro Disney SCA, Eurotunnel. Heron 
International NV and DAF NV. In die case 
of Heron, a conglomerate, and DAF, the 
truckmaker, he has expended considerable 
efforts in fighting to ensure that bondholders 
were not cut out of tbeir due. 

The son of a professional boxer and raised in 
the inner city of Cleveland, Mr. Klesch. 47. 
pulls no punches in evaluating Europe's “val- 
ue-impaired assets” for its target customers: 
so-called vulture investment funds in America. 

For example; the company’s 27-page re- 
search report on Eurotunnel in April carried 


the headline: “Please Sir, can I have some 
more money?" The report predicted that the 
operator of the tunnel linking England and 
France would not be able to meet its revenue 
targets, would not be able to pay dividends 
for at least 10 years and would be forced to go 
through a financial restructuring in a few 
years. 

Mr. Klesch says it is such tough- talking 
research that sets his boutique apart from the 
big European securities houses, which he 
claims are beholden — through investment- 
banking relationships — to the very compa- 
nies they set out to judge. 

“We’re independent, and can afford to take 
aggressive stances," he said. 

Subjects of Mr. KJesch's research do not 
always see it the same way. 

“Klesch is in business to create a market in 
distressed debt, and his reports are designed 
to encourage that market.” said Graham Cor- 
bett, chief financial officer of Eurotunnel. “It 
can hardly be expected that the issuers of the 
debt concerned are going to particularly ap- 
preciate his efforts.” 

A financial manager at Euro Disney, how- 
ever, called Mr. KJesch’s research on that 
company “pretty thorough 1 ' and “respect- 
able." 

The head of a Wall Street investment fund 
called Mr. Klesch “a good broker” but said 
boutiques face formidable competition from 
the larger, well -capitalized financial institu- 
tions that also have targeted the distressed 
debt market. 

“When you do a trade with Citibank, you 
know its backed by Citibank, and not a syndi- 
cate involving 17 different investors that a 
boutique has put together,” the fund manager 
said. 

In addition to brokering trades, Klesch & 
Co. puis together various investment pools 
with limi ted partners to lake positions in the 
assets involved. Mr. Klesch said such invest- 
ment pools now total $250 million. 

As a broker, Mr. KJesch's company pockets 
a fee of 0.25 percent to 1 percent of the 
amount trading hands. He said the operation 
has been “profitable from the start," and that 
the growth of business has averaged 40 per- 
cent a year, but he would not reveal actual 
fees or earnings. 

The company, he said, was capitalized with 
some $50 million in profit that Mr. Klesch 
realized through Quadrex Holdings, now just 
a shell. 

Mr. Klesch, who employed 150 people at 
the peak of his Quadrex days, said he had no 
desire to build another such institution. He 
now farms out the legal and accounting work, 
concentrating in-house “gray matter” on 
finding value in what others consider dam- 
aged goods. 

“I'm interested in ideas,” he said. “Ideas 
aren't something that can be arbitraged 
away.” 

Articles in this series appear every other 
Monday. 


tory approval for Rogers’s ac- 
quisition of Maclean Hunter. 

Comcast provides cellular 
telephone services to more than 
7.4 million people in the north- 
eastern United States in addi- 
tion to cable operations. It has 
invested in cable programming, 
telecommunication and inter- 
national cable systems. 

Rogers Communications has 
interests in cellular telephone 
services and other wireless com- 
munications networks. 

The MacLean Hunter auc- 
tion, comes at a time when the 
pattern of acquisitions is chang- 
ing from that of earlier take- 
overs. Instead of telephone 
companies competing to pur- 
chase cable systems outside 
their territories, cable compa- 
nies are buying each other up as 
they brace for competition from 
phone companies. 

(Reuters, AP, NYT) 


The resignation was not re- jumped 59 percent in the first 
lated to recent complaints quarter of 1994, to $1.17 billion, 
against tobacco companies, whfle revenue rose 2 percent, to 
said Nicholas M. Rofii, a $1530 billion. But the 1993 
spokesman for Philip Morris in quarter included a one- time ac- 
New York. He pointed to Mr. counting charge that made the 
Miles's rote in deciding to cut 1994 results look more favor- 
cigarette prices to revive busi- able. 


USX Decision Likely 
To Limit Steel Prices 

Compiled by Oiir Staff From Dapaicha 

PITTSBURGH — USX-U.S. Steel Group, the largest Amer- 
ican sled maker, said it would not raise carbon steel prices for 
the third time this year, despite heavy demand and a competi- 
tor’s move last week to increase prices by $20 a ton in October. 

Don Herring, a spokesman for USX Corp- U.S. Steel’s 
parent, said Friday the steel producer would not match the 3 
percent price increase announced last week by Ohio-based AK 
Steel Coip-i the sixth-largest American steelmaker. 

Analysts said the decision by USX-U.S. Steel, would make 
it difficult for AK Steel's price rise to stick. 

AK Steel was formerly Armco Steel Co., a joint venture of 
Arcnco Inc. and Kawasaki Steel Corp- It became a public 
company earlier this year, with Kawasaki maintainin g a 20 
percent stake and Armco keeping 4 percent. 

Despite the strongest market in 15 years because of the U.S. 
economy’s recovery and a boom in auto production, analysts 
predicted that a third round of base price increases was 
unlikely without USX’s participation. 

USX-U.S. Steel and its rivals previously raised their prices 
for fiat-rolled carbon sheet products by about 3 percent in 
January and an additional 2 percent effective next month. Flat- 
rolled carbon sheet is used for auto bodies and appliances. 

But USX’s decision not to raise prices lessens the chances the 
next four largest producers — Bethlehem Steel Corp., LTV 
Corp., National Steel Corp- and Inland Steel Industries — 
would follow AK Sled’s lead. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Patent Ruling a Blow for Hughes 


By Keith Bradsher 

New York Tones Service 

WASHINGTON — A feder- 
al judge has ruled Hughes Air- 
craft Co. is entitled to only a 
small fraction of the S3 billion 
in royalties and back interest it 
had sought from the U.S. gov- 
ernment in a 21-year legal dis- 
pute over a satellite-technology 
patent. 

The decision late Friday was a 
setback for General Motors 
Corp., tins parent company of 
Hughes, and could prevent the 
wave of patent claims against the 
government that patent special- 
ists had predicted if Hughes had 
won a larger settlement 

Hughes estimated the deci- 
sion would be worth $1 14 mil- 
lion, and said it had not decided 
whether to appeal the ruling. 

“It’s still $ 1 14 million — it's a 
good-sized sum,” said Richard 
Dore, a spokesman for Hughes. 

The U.S. Court of Federal 
Claims had ruled last year that 
(he government owed Hughes 


royalties for having used the was appropriate, and welcomed 
technology for steering satel- the ruling. “It’s really the rate 
lites over the past 25 years. that is supported by the evi- 
But the court decided Friday dence — it’s still a lot of mon- 
that Hughes was entitled to roy- ey,” said Vito J. DiPietro, a se- 
al ty payments of only 1 percent nior Justice Department lawyer 
of the value of 81 government who worked on the case, 
satellites that used the disputed 

technology, rather than the 15 ■ Saturn Union Shuns Plan 
percent that Hughes sought. Workers at GM’s Saturn 
Hughes was not entitled to* plant in Tennessee on Saturday 
more money because it offered rejected a union proposal to 
to license the patent to other study a spin-off or employee 
com p anies in the 1970s for less buyout of the s mall automaker, 
than 3 percent of the value of Reuters reported from Detroit, 
satellites, the court ruled. „ , , 


It awarded back interest ac- 


Thc vote was a defeat for 


At anuucu Udwi Of .1 . 

cording to a method proposed Be , nnet ; ^ P re ^ dent °* 
a tiie local autoworkers union, 

who bad suggested the idea two 
interest rate applied by the In- mont hs aeote raise cashtocs- 
temal Reunite Sexv.ce to ova- p^thelrestart antomaker. 
due tax rebates. Hughes ealeu- F 

lated that the verdict was worth Richard LeFauve, the presj- 
nearly $36 milli on, plus $78 dent of Saturn, said the compa- 
minion in back interest; the ny would like to expand output 
Justice Department did not tty the end of the decade to 
have an imm ediate estimate. 500,000 cars a year from 322,000 
Government lawyers had ar- now. However, such a move 
gued that a royalty of 1 percent would cost about $600 milli on. 


Krupp Reorganizes Its Steel Sectors 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatcher 

ESSEN, Germany — Fried. 


as independent units under the 
parent company. 

The conglomerate’s tinplate 


Krupp AG Hoesch-Krupp is and packaging steel business 
turning sections of its steel busi- win be brought into a joint ven- 
□ess into independent units in a ture to be formed with Thyssen 
bid to improve its market pos- AG, Krupp said, 
tion, the company said Sunday. Krupp AG said the reorgani- 
zation was aimed at improving 
The supervisory board of its competitive position. 

Krupp Hoesch Stahl AG, the Earlier this year, the compa- 
company’s steel unit, during an ay said the impact of its restruc- 
extraordinary meeting of its su- hiring measures would give it a 
pervisory board decided to di- “dearly better result" this year 
vest its fiat steel, heavy special after a net loss of 590 million 
sections and long-rolled steel Deutsche marks ($360 million) 
activities. They are to be set up last year. 


The company’s steel sector 
posted a loss of 780 minion DM 
last year. (Bloomberg Reuters) 

■ YW Profits Seen 

Volkswagen AG will show a 
consolidated profit of 100 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks in the sec- 
ond quarter, the company’s 
chairman, Ferdinand Pilch said 
in the latest edition of Focus 
magazine, Reuters reported 
from Frankfurt. VW posted a 
group net loss of 355 million 
DM a year earlier. 


/ 









Page 10 

MUTUAL FUNDS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 20. 1994 


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ARK Finds: , WjhWul of JI —.13' MumcA 14" -13 C-elctiA c *.?0 - .01 iFFBEa I0J€ -05 

CooGrn 10.10 —OS! AmOwtti 9J5 — XN Ca:OrBl 14.75 USGo-rto -.99 _Q4 FFB7IJ IQcl-lC 

Grtnco n IW6 — 05 . AHerilffn 1.18— Of GvInBI 129? — .10 TreasAo 9.J7 — 07 , FFTWFwnds: 

Income 9 tJ — .04 . Amer Natl Funds: GwtnBI U41 — .05 . TxUSAp 12.16 — .04 US Start 9 95 

ASM ft! n 9.83 - .01 Gnjwtn 4.20 . incGrBtt 15.15 —M TrlnsAp 11.0' — 03 , WW Hcfl9 °^2 — O' 

AVESTA: Income 7140 - .09 WIU'ncB I 1i.7| — !4 T.lnlAp 10J9 — 02 • '.V.V F >iilrt 9 j- — 07 

Balanced 17.04 -.04: Trrtter 15.37 — Oi .CarMUe. nl I 00 — 01 T.Pai o i At —.07 FMB Funds: 

EaGro IBJ4 -.17'APlGrtan 1224 • .04 cappietlo Rushmare: DimensiQnalFdi: ■ Dr. EC e HJ° ■ 0; 

Eamcam 18^3 -.05 AmPertatm: ermc-rn it.iq — .0* USLm 13 T 4 0>.€l m 1 ■<?; 

Income 1540— XJ7; Bond 9J7 — 04 Gr/rttr 11.60— 01 USSmi 843-01 InlGCe 

Accessor Funds: Equity H36 - 03 CaooielUU S 73 — 14 Ujfl-iCn 1140 InlC-l ee S— 93 

InlFrln n 11.57 — 06 inlBd 1024 —02 capstone Group: Jatwnn 7895 -69 :.t,TFp 10 — 06 

AccMnna 11.76 —.04 ' IntmTiF 10 43 FrindSW 15 .'3 -07 UK n 23:7 - K , f.l,TF I 10]:— 0o 

5tillntF» 11.94 _ AmLfllFo n 70.05 — 30 Ovflnc 4 30 Cort n ISI’ — 10 FPA Funds; 

Acornln 15.77 — &4 1 AmwvMul I 7 35 MeORs I’ 41 —2: DFARlEsltO*) — 01 Capil 1*35—74 

AcmFd 13.07 — II ■ Arxjl»7CMTGv9 73 — 02' NZJana 1173 F.'dn '01 It -07 .'Jvertnc 10,-:— 0- 

AdsnCoP 21X17 -.06 Anolr'icn 12.07 -.07. Njaocn *33 - 12 GlSd 97J5— 1.07 Parmnl 13*5 - L 

AdvCBaJ p 10.13 — J)3 I AnOiCaP I 19.99 -II US Trend 1290 -.93 Go/tn 100 sJ —V Rerun 2109— €5 

AdvCPela 9.67 —.10 lAquila Funds: ; Cardinal Family: intCv 106.64 —45 Fcirmrn li P — 71 

Advnt Ad van): ; AITF 10.33 — 10; A’^gGIh 9 43 — 01 InrlHB.M II. '2—04 Fasaono n 17 95 • 1 1 

Gcvlnp 9.07 — 06 1 CO TF 10.27 — x>9 Balanced 9*r -05 LCaaint 1 2 50 — 0-- Federated Fundu 

Gwlhna 16 49 -.04 HI TF 11J5 —09 . Poru \JS1 -JJi PaoRim lo '3 oa . irmSSpn 9*6 

HV Bd o 8.91 -.01: K> TF 10.43 —.07 ■ Govn3b>,a 8.15—02 USLuVal '0 21 —O' Arm IP '■ ti 

Inca np 1151 — JM • luyinTF 962 — .10 CanlCa • 12.93 — 09 USSmVaUM* -.03. E«cnFan ’I °5 • 4: 

MuBdNat 9-44 —.17 ORTF 1043 — .08 ,CamegOHTE9.S6 — 02 □odne&Cax: . P,«l5n ia3S — 01 

Spclnp I9J0 -XM: T/FUT 950 — 13 ■ CnKBIA 15.42—05 Bclan nr 45.99 —35' FSTIIsn 6.79 

Aetna Advisor: Aquinas Fund: iCnKBIB ISJB — .06 Inccmen. II 10 — J5 FGPOn 2:01-13 

Aetna t 1041 - 01 • Baoncen 9J9 — .03 . CenlEaGC n *54 . SiccKn. 54.35 -.12 FHrTn r9i • i'l 

Bmdt 9.77 — X33 ! Earner, 9.74 —.02 , CeotFSInC n 10.02 _ DomSocol 12 ?6 — Oi FiTiSn 9.95 — 03 

Grfncxm 1 10.96 -XM Fxincn 9.P — .07 , CentumG c 0.75 -0* Dreman Funds: FIT 55s 995—?? 

inner I 11.19 —.07 Arch Funds: CnfrvSnr n 23 «, — 1 i Conlm 13.3’ - O' Fs-grlin I0J3 

TaxFree 9.42 _ Bai 9 77 * .02 , OlCooeC IH3 -.03 HiRtn 1600 — 0* FsrthrJS pl(J JJ 

AefnaSeled: 1 EmGrtti M 43 — .10 cnesGriti 12.80 —.15 SmCPVolnir.lS • « FiTn 25 ’0 • l: 

Aetna n 1053 - M Co.-loro 9 95 —07 Q^estni lij.ij -X DreWus: F'.TI 55 p *.:« 

AwonGrn 8 50 — .04 , Groinc 13X16 -.06 OiiCMrtwnlJX K - 19 ABcrdn 139*— 09. GnmalS n 10 - Os 

Bond n 9.79 —Ml MoTF 11.19 — .12 iChuUUGrln U24 — 04 Aorecns 14J9 — ql , GnmaSa 10.39 —1)0 


IFOnnmn^r- -j Lnaf SPi5 

Bdonn, A91 — SgmtaARtW* - 2 ■'*. U-' 

sm. 5-SI'S: --/V* 


—31; STGfcB 8J2-^M: CopCtn WW— 35 WnJ TDB5 —SI 

10 1 Dewlap R2W9.— A* ' _ at W*£5fM"« ’ 

1, imifi n in. 04 — ii 1 EnMkKMJf — 21- Nwik n _ hlTFBi ■*» ■*.“ - ' 

U ■ S&r SSKruK-jae ssnwggwM;^ „i 


=S 3SBi.Rsqn .>=-••• 

Tg: Sts:, IfflziS Bg^;B;.,tagg-.SS38 . :v 

:2ffi‘ffiSHW=B S3? Mill iSB**3S52. ' * 


5ffc.-.:*‘nii)6s - d? :-'.-.i;r.ns;.:i — if -V.N TE c 5.24 - 04 AsTAJiSx IM7 -^5 .•.'JtfCsBi V.9 — SS >5t=Aa ?J5 . : PerfHebt* KM 


3— AS LfSAlTir r2082--x SS'SK?’ Kai ‘ UfiliwAR 

— JJ9 LtdTrmTHkM — JO Gvttrt&A *7.* „ ■ ufiBl . 


V.utlp I2_2G 


EmVJctA n.a 


F, c ir. c in IC63 UiCcr" 1.5;-.^ fiYTEo 5.1" -.05 Em,VA73 J1JS4 
-0.3-4' n c 13 — at CAM Funds »Je*Oa 13.95 - JS3 GfcEoBntifc 

In: in.: 1 n 9 21 — r ,i 5<95C> iSotO-142 OfiOP 5 ii — 06 G>oSaCnl6A8 


. _ ._ =B: SRK 1 iwas 

3 VCtEar "C 41 - MmsTApia.JJ— .18. GUMS. K»— ffl MWkprt JiM — « 2?TS«n —.JJ |« . Epos 


PrecrAto aji -jo gsEoa 

;9=iT-::i Brogresp 6.T3 -.31 GeFxa 

45: Select C 8.92—06 G'tFxA 

-.'3 71— Cl StOCKP 19.46 . GvtAT 


Sirlnct 6.04 —XU 

5rrST: .99 


- — Vtrxn 11 v< -4B IU SST * 1 1 J-Tr - LCBWEI ,*6» -4,/' row won pi y ■ ■ ■ -- a ygMPSWmi ■ -s.ji.jM 

Stocirp wje GviAJ 1192 — XJ7 ' L0if«st3rt?es - -TtftBt it X -JOS Vtucr 1A48 -*06 PradntWtnMfe J STGMn ~X > . a3St * «K -J3 

StriCTi 1364 -n intFlA 1U8 — jQ5 MimKSn 13.16 — XS V=!ue9 7SS - PortaJHw tost Acfflctn TBLg +J11 1 TjfHT n T1 Jl -sJO i SmC^ frS m '■ jSm.711 vY:,:l - 

StrE;: 9.4a . ifPSnt 3.16 -.03 tte rtS»rn : ‘.K NewJSao !1JZ -! &fcwJnW«-.». Sdn . 1US . Vatue n 1W3.-« : AtfnSTo fM'USl ^ ^ 4.-; I .. 

r.'.uniBCA Tl C9 — 16 PI343 -.X ttedcsGrow: Bandit 9J& — XM GttiSBiB II -54 — Dl j_ Zerg>B 0p 1L44 — J8 5> ^ 1 ** 1 l rr , 1 A56eStn — j>7 I - i- 

SrrCacA 1C.43 — Zi AVrdi=r. - 24_£2 —Z3 ‘Cc>str. SISS — .O - Baudyn 15-Q — J1 ; mcame tn 9Jp —.05 ' SwWBt*^ ; Amman .L».— AB il3 — ^t* *i 


Jacwn n 28 95 - 69 :.tiTF S 
UK n 23 77 • 07 , r.t,TF I 

Cert n I S I " — 10 FPA Funds: 
DEARIE; SI to *<l —01 Capil 

Fiifln 'Oi it • 07 .'Jvwinc 


Gruvrth 10 J7 -.06 US Gov 10 J7 _ 07 ' CHiOOTP 14.44—04 
Grwinco 10.97 - .04 ; Armstna n B.S2 - .01 ! Clipper n 49 05 — 19 
InitGrn lljl — .01 ' AHaniaGrpIl 03 . cohmai Funds: 


Aorecns I4J« — 1)1 ! GnmOOa 104* — Do U:i:ncr o ■*:'— uo w: 154' — *.; H.riine 6 82 LeetRe-n "ZfJ—Tl :r*Eqa ’ i -2* '■'_34»i:2' 1 —S3 PeeOit 

e SSerAII n I2JS — .114 FiqfSSc 10.35—01 .A TF 3 17 2" — 1’ inllP 1 1 4? — '5 'ndtnco nsll 71 -34 LevuMasott: i.'IVli 7 22 —I" TKFr;-. - 0.71 — JT 


'--3r£ri:2’ — £3 PpccftTBa 9J2 -JU IncmAp* ATI — J)7' InftA. 


nuim yji -jdj hdimik mi -m ' aiwt. 14J4 — u06 ! 5tnCapit<26C * XQ . — r— A 

twm UJ6 -JD1' WvAp 7JS *XJ1 inno rtsi — OA , n r wii FtMtite: - \ — « • - • i.SJ 

tf£no4 ua — -ti MntnAp 873— JU ; LATxA 817—08 A£Mb» 1QXD - j iS Sat W 11Jg '• •i : Wa 
AAUsriP 17C] —Of McTjrtl f.tl -4-ilf I-'-MbsTmA 7M —JU I AmUa«-'»JB--=^t Tttd^cn '-'•.u&£ 

ert oro iOPO»Fdc MtTsRp 896 -J81 MDTXA —80 J • AsloPaen».Yt —84 i Wx3«n _*5 ;c 
BGCcr.e VM—B MuniAp 882 -XB‘ IVUTxA 151 -J«i OnSIk * It. J3 * M , *WSWn«£ t- & i . 


rta« —b3 


upper n 49 05 —19 Sained 137*— 03 ir.'.Tii i.j.v, — es F>r4V»r i — Ci 

atomai Funds: CalT^ n 14 65 — 12 Mi^rap 10 67 — 03 First Omaha: 

inteqio I7X -07 Cat Ini r. IJJI — X).* MAGSi n- 10 09 - C3 Eas.'. !'.*t 3’ 


SmCoGT 10.07 - .03 ‘ Altai Funds: . int&ji o I7X -0? Cat Ini n i3-’i — XJ7 r.iAGSi n* 10 09 — C3 Eas.'. I'.*: 

Aluer Funds: Coivtuni 10.93 — oa co'TEA 7 1; — D7 Ct in: n 1309 — W .‘UCiSJn* 180’ — 05 F-s.'r.ct : 

Growth > 19.33 —.16; CAms 10X13-04' ConTE A 7X —03 Drevfui 17 80 - 04 M“.sin. loot- —.04 ilF.ir.r J.-; 


-'races :::• ■ C* m-cow n 12JO — 33 irnKLiD 927 - .55 vjiV_-A '3J6 —22 L-rGrEa r. :CJ5 — X3 FewCaaA 

JaP3i-3r=.?: ■ ?9 'r SOr.n 1627—20 GC^PsTpi 2^2 — 1J _s!A.~A ’.‘AC — J 7 intSJS - PAMtsrlO 

l;i a-t-.c. Le>v.-en 2' 44 — Gvimorp iCK — C- v."-A ti: —22 Se.=a- 92S — P ut aww 

LJ-rrr-ay " =CTflC5 n :eJ2 - .02 h,>ijp» !4J7 — " Vi-.W :5 -i £— CsG'rt’iC 3 - BeCsPC 


tncGrr UA8 - 03 , GjTjk 9.93 — 05 FedSec 10 3J — Oo EcEnnc M3'- ?e l.'.triSSn< 10 04 — 23 F=C>. Aj: p f i J - °z:rB 

MidCoGrtllJ] — .11 : Groinc 1356— .01 FLTEA 7J2 — 0" Ftlnm I3JI — D7 M.j,Coc II ’2 FR W-Qs e ■' J». — 04 £Pj'Ap 

SmCopI 70.27 — .46 I NcMuni 10.95 — 09 : PurwA * e« — 07 GW44 nc 1J.47 — 05 mcaa n 1 1 4c — > First Pr.onrw; Vz‘B 1 2 i' —'5 ”«.m “74 — -e rpiiNrno X£2 —X vrv.-t —, T ; AA_^T 9J7 —£Z '.OGrtr. 9-53 — Ca 

AKanceCase BBS T Funds' iVwniAp<l7 76 - 01 GnCA 13.24 — 10 OhnTcrm 10.20 - 01 Esu :.T- n 1 '. 4.' T..4.X 1:22 — :* “c'Rt-: I MO —56 T.FrrJ s : i-T' —35 »pcA "j: - ;; i;3c<4 94’ — — STFICm 9.30 

Aliancep 6.73 -05| BalTrn 9.87—01 HiYldA «.:0 GMBep 14 -2 — 10 UtGorfn 9:2—11*- F-air;“- ' — Ci 1 3' — 7’ '.T-r-cvt ns ~ 12 — 2« TerPetr^ T2 it — 1 ; PA VA '22 —.7! :2* -= a 9.73 —.7* STFl i r 92C 

Bolon o 13-94 —.01 GrolrtCT n II 14 -.01 incomes p 621 — 33 GN 1 a !9 67 — U ST7.9T Si d 10 70 — Cl UAV?. Alrwe ': : i — '.'t..n i 7' — 15 •. c T r rs '£.94 —.34 "15—^ j .* 9“ —22 Perm taT Foods: 

BolanBI <4-35 -.10 intOd^Tn «J5 — 04 mtOrA 10.24 -ii GNncr 1633 03 jBF An if JO FirsiUmcn: .VUaB .o'Ea ? 2 36 — 05 LexmgtwGrp; Iz.'A ‘.i'Z — 7! G.r-si 3JT -J6 Perr.Pt n 188'. -M 

BondAp 12.83 — .17. MClntTB n 9 91 — OS .viAT.A 7.64—0* G*:nOo 7 1029 . 03 FUeRv Advisor csiTn. Go boll, Funds: if. ~*Z .40 ' i.H — 7» C-.fc:-. tjjt -.’I S-D.A *2 ” -.73 -csrv - - 9jr — 2e TB^n 6SA6 -05 

CnsMnv 10AT — 04- siGovTn 9.74-01 Ml TE A 4 8’ —.Os insMunitpl’ :] — li . EoPC-P 7! 24 ■ ,:•« acil . 1 ’4 - r Ar>:= 'i' • " ,;:-;:Fcrc ii“ - J: ZSr *.Ia3 — J: ~C-a= = 24 — Jf -.•s— eA ?J3 — JJ vBcrJn 543: -J2 

CoBdBP -.ID BE A Funds /ANTE A 7 05 -06 intern n I5«0-P« EaPincsIii! >5 ^ ■ i’.’-JJ .\rrz 3PM Instil: C-NVA- **®i -U ’e~A i ii - 74 ~= -sA 9^s —js RerTCGn 12 97 —-3* 

CdBOC P 1782 — 13 ' EMkEf 71 4j — .17 NoiPnA »t: 60 - 04 mserEc i is ii — 09 C-lnIP.r.c 1 : 06 15 F.i-iia. C r .icir ' • 7‘ “onen *47—45 G-saeii '.423 - 2* TX/AA "AS — " ~ ~Z~ 1 S6 — * mtSsFurtS 64’ —M 

CSatR 'J-I* — S* 'TtlEd 9^a — .07 N,TEA 6*6 — OS .J’l—O* ,io. Inc 9.21 -C2 F-.-Tr.. »*5— U' . .*; Cr.srs.'d r.!2 08- £2 -k«" i‘1 • JE tViirii LJT - ."9 -C'.-G-'A "4: 5 Phoendr Series 

uCGvtBP B'B? -34 SigFjIno 6.03 _ .1 ^tea 7.16-C’ .VAir:n ■£ C? — 10 GnvCppp.'SJI - P» H.Gd7FBp:-j46— 0‘ >■:?! :;i -!i =m q .v,EdK05 - O’ C--'*'*;r te;' . Ad =•£ :-3— :* .PdGrT :’AJ . ,;3 BcjcnFa 1539 —S'. 

,JbSAD IIJ4 -.02 U5CF*ln 1489— .12 smSIK P I-J5-?' V.A Td. Ho O’ — 13 HI Mu a 1 1 So - O' H^:<TF : •: 4- — ” C*"^. r :i4 • 1 r’Ec** n 1C !’ — J: 'rr.r. ‘172— T i."!F -l r Vcvei r. Finds' CoTT*EO li.S — S3 


.i86«;aw; 


Boron d 1134 —.01 GroincT n 1 1 14 -.Cl inrorr^A p A21 — 33 GN 1 p !9 67 — .16 ST/.9T Si d 10 70 — Cl L!d.V ?■- 

BolanBI 435 -.10 intGd*T n >J5 — 04 mtOrA 10.24 -ii GNncr 16 3: Ql jBF An UJO Fir5tUnn:n: 

BondAp 12.83 — .12. r/CInfTe n 9 91 — Oi .‘AATwA 7.64—0* G*:nOa r 1029 -03 FldeRv Advisor caiTn. 

Cnstvlnv 10A7 — 04 SiGovTn 9.74—01 Ml TEA 6 8’— Os mtMur no I’ 73 _ t j . EctPGP '“’4 ■ ,*■* Bci “ t. ■ 



Count p 17.16—0! intlEa 19^3 —.09 
GCGvtBP 8.82 -J4 SlgF.lnp 16.03 —.15 
>3lbSA a HJ4 -.02 U5CF*ln 1489— .12 


GrtVTAD 7.g — 05 p/ASnDun 9.75 - 01 r,rilricA 6*9-23 V. jrfia n - 1C H.rldon |1 4* . J.- .V-rfc' r . : :.|f. ; ir 5 ri — " " =crdn * ’2 — 7: J'C-r.-r s -4 


Gcr/rBp 7.93 — .05 BJBGlAp I1J0 — .15 T.E* a d 13 22 — I- 

'4ovtC c 7.92 — .05 BJBiEaA P M.I3 — 35 . TtlnsA p 9 04 — ?« 


Groinc P 2.34 - .01 BNT Hamilton: USGfA* I1 79 - -75 '.VLCr 2J 'I 

GwIhC 20 6» - 12 Ealnc n ID -73 - 05 |j5Gv A *44—2? - 

GwfhF p 24 ’7 • 14 inTGovf 9^48 — 05 , i:,|i c II 99 — IE 

GwtnS r 20.66 -1? ri> T6n ICC3 — 05 catebi 7 :: — 07 

GrlncB D 7J2 Babsan Group; — TE B ' ' 35 — •••j 

GrinvB l».59 -01 B-jr.dLn 132—81 F».i5cB: 10JJ — j* 


lT» np II jl — C5 '_»uTEI 10 C* — 7' t ■ Color, Funav 


*t*r Td. -1 :« I? .. 


I.59 -01 Bond L r* 132—81 Fe>]5cB : 10J4 —Of 


In/AAp 9 69 — .»6 Bond 5 n 9.77 — C3 


Ins/AuB 9 69 — .1’ Emerpjn T7 06 - 17 FuncBN 8-*3 — 0 J 
insMCo 9.49— .16" Enron it a? ■ 03 Gi£aB» I7 IJ— cj 


13 

hi :a,j o 

iho 

<C 

H. T Id on 

ii Jr. 

US 

ir c- 



■_l<2 TEC 

ii,’*: 1 


Ltoiap 

WiS 

C5 

'-1UTEI 

inr+ 

' ? 


1.’ 0*1 

<0 

ZT F, d 

»>. 


3lro:Oc L' 

: t 


-idelilv Inslilut: 

01 

cqPi:.| n 

.’1 0 

v.. 

EaPIlo^ 

15 ^4 

>>; 

<Zri:G. 

« if 

Cl 

LIB'rr 


0J 

Ftdeiilv Invm: 


I-.-O-tirC - Zi S:5.: 


•-•■G-er Ir-.t^G -:5— 7i 5e*E rv n 50 *; — y Jits 


71 Jackson National: 


C--i'rcr lee •.— Ad RE :-3— :• .s-dGrT :• AJ ..-.3 

•fir. '193— X Amy ’ If — 21 VuveenFoads- 
£'C-r-*r 9-4 1IV5* "Ai-:* CA -; I2J 

S:5.: i.>i -G5 Bc= ' it ZAW !;.25 — C» 

Sits » s4 - T* £ci. 3: .147 -T: -.'.Z- '3 73 -JM 

T= Bd n '375-1: Ce'.'.-3- "J* I- Ti' -a 

A«oi’. 'i:3 -r ia-ab u:-;j 


BrdcnFa 1SJ2» — USGvA a 1 2J5M — BJ 
CatTkE O 13.: 5 —Tl U*0A p 9.16 —.14 


TFHVA 14J0— .11 ; CAQTiiA SSt— Off STTBond 0*7* — M3 ;" ■»»»« '£!* 

TFHYBt UjO — .11-! SCTxA 7JB— -iffl. 5TMuin RJI —04 . PAwsn ItLBB— I - ' 

TFInBI 14J5— 14! USGvtAp 6.77 —OS) Tdtatn , 13J4 •■* M ' 5PEl»t 

USCvAo 18SI —03' HiVBcWp fctir-iOl ISurt Am wScofdJt ; • i SPGolOr T^in I e,;T 


3 — 4 5 i ■•’ii. r i: os — i4 Liberty Femuy. :c^C2 * — :: •«— » ■ 2 ■ 2 —74 rGras 9.49 

-n :tm, -. rr.E. Ar~Ld** uv» c=h = ' • n . ;; va-.*' sso-w -RGrei pae _ 

£o:*T • T ?9- 1J« — " Zs-yA r»::a- y-.ZGS • k -:■. V. .1 — -5 m ’L46— M 


: 4 — ; Janus Fund: 


Es.-:A= t:jt -3’ 


Ed'.'rr.. : — 37 rc'-oncrd r : 724 — 2» £a"*;C 1 r. — U :-y,= r 'iis 


• - 14 5i « ^ - 72 Vyre. A a 1L3 -.11 


V-.T19P '136 - .11 


c:9’:, p ir; — 'J • Vun "54* — ’ 


E---6-I- j: ■ H..r;gs . y £.■:£• -.4 37 rs ::ss -a StxkFa 1:57 -3« DvrtrBi ti8« — 07 swuoionx 5S.« -.97 .1 

c M -.£. -teii — r» w.,s9sc: -74 =«:•.:=: *-c - :a -~z* tt=3 a ta*.*— .11 ■ &xvBr has — xniseuoosenisertm: . * ' 

— 5? •r-.Sf’ '! '! - ~ ’.'.'S' 59'— :-.t :;:.'-C5 r erl»yo ?5“ • J3I GeoBl 1X44 —85 Grtnom 1801 _ JT, 


WFTGg t W 
RPFOI -\m 
RPFDr . i/J 






EqdPlr Wtt'.tJJ j r.i 


l : ’ 4> _ _r Ct—*— :■ '" T — ?’ 


ICATA I2A8-I6: C3cDevc 77 5J -.'0 s^-ncenl’e: . {,; 

MullCAB UM- M BT: Com^k n c '% V 

MINBP 10 03 -12 Inst AstM n 9 63 - oi F^ISn V-fc 

MuOHCP 9.« - Is InstEdC n'D5a . t * r 


15 X -01 O.-Mvirl 1 : 45 ■ 0-' 

-.•n~=A 1111 -o: DeM'O.n 26 71 • 10 


L 4’ v 'c :» — .n 'n:n : C : : — 74 

’.'C'c J i >4—02 Mur.ini'i *: li - 


JSSCi-Fdn t!43 Ci TFbond."J3 :-E=E: 4> — _X cc— «• r: ViTWRBd 

9—^ .rp^aodper I4 j 6 JSG<r. « *52-3?* 5 .'h 2 'CiT — 7e v»-.”r Ij: - '; PBuranGra: 

I -35 JRIC-8 973 —05 Uhl » 13 ’6 - 1C L«rA-£ ;i^i -Z* r 9&r APSH! 

Is: John Hancock: l.TMFi Jo 9.51 —C ’.'AVi ■ ICJT _ '. ' -..*.■■»*. lie: — 13 ASS IV 

6-C* CATS' •! 40_.es Trma 9*9 O' W.V.B ' r.SE •>■?!■*--- :»87 • X3 AUS l-A 
C' >4.2 ' *54 Cl Lindner Funds: '.*.B' '236 -is Olmoc Trust AcHJSIV 


YrTiRSdllO -.04 MuruBt 881 —09 
iferrmGm SM -.09 


Gratncn iflAf — ill , TartTffld 9 J2 — ^4 . Income ,,9175— . 
M*TEUin*M -XM Ten ip CCtCrame } Owl '. TdM — » ' v'-T 
TEdlWn 0.95 — JIB I AmerTrr 13L41 — m / .HTTbP* 77» ALW 4 
knvmu/Fdt-lPvecl: , copacc ii7l -.11 ; ShfGvmn 981. _ 


5 54 Ci Lindner Funds: 


-74 £•:«?*? UJ* — 04 Bu:«v,jr‘ r- 7 15 C? VrinsB: E-d.yrOeC n'4 '0 • .34 ARS l 


699 -fll TkExBI 


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RcrrFd ax2365 • .02 ; Value 2899 — X» Skyfew Funds 1 IntMu 1X96 —M ! Growth ifu- 'li .*. 
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Bond n 9.45 — XD CoTFIfl n 9 J2 -U7 rttlEq 

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InJISIkn 1X75 -J2 EqGr&n 12X13 -XM MtaS 

MITFBdn 9J4 — JJ9 EurBdn 10 JO *.10 Mwvr 

SmCOGrnl3J8 * XJ4 GNMA n 10JS — ,06 SrnGrs 

TFIntBdnl820 — X1S Goldlnn 12-79 -A5 SrnVol 

{nbussadVlWA: IncGran 1A69 -XM ytlRir, 


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AmhassadarRet A: inoTron 

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Grwfh I2ZM —M NITFLn 
InfBond 9^8 — XJ3 STTreas 
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SmCoGr 1128 -J04 TnrTOOQ, 
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Amcor* Vintage: Tarwio i 

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D’.TTArtiot n< EKrwTrin 0 40 HC I PrhTnna n I? 40 *.50 rnntoR 19 1C— ” rjTtn mm » X — I.W 


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CorpBdApo35 — XU Ca Mu n 13J6 — X19 Value n 1113 ♦ li MATxF 

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™“ rnnen; CTTxF t 1813 —.13 Fldefity Safaris: Frank Bn finum- 

\jM ‘.04 Eamta IU4 -17 AJrr ^14X2 -JJ9 P SGFft G p^7l 


TOTWI D 25.13 —34 
TxFrB? 937 -XI7 
TxFrAp 9 a8 — -07 


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J2-.ll Timep 1476 -.16! ST Bondn 10.1 3 _ Tm RTrn 936 -J4 THGAp 1175 -37 HrYIdB 739 _ aStSSn 180$ ZTnl' f \ 


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Gwttilnn 7833 _ Divlnp 1878 — « ApprSt 11 JK ♦ XJ2 L^rnn” !S^S 'll 10-07 __ 

Hmdn 840-31 Gnnrthp leJ» — XU CaMuBf 1464 — S USGuSiTnS:^ “ 1 35 70-11 ^37 ‘ 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 


(Continued From Page 12) 


•"•■Bcussas SANWC’ 

Eicon Senece 

T*L 02X343.19.18 

• ■ • LONDON t HEATHKJW * 

EMMA * ESCORT • SBMCE 
M06UE 0831 510060 


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MuNCAO 11J1 —39 1 HIVIdn 1031 —32 
MiMTA p 1856 — .10 I ottSC n 1630 —XM 


□B)fT CABS ACCEPTED 


Service 077 734 5597/91 ■ endt anb 


UK 071 589 5237 


TOKYO EXECUTIVE 

Escnrt Service. Go* a*(k 
TW, 03-34797170 


Tefe KB 3436-459$. 

•• PWB5 - B8UXH1FS — 
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Esoort asency 346 00 89 credl arts 


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ESCORT & GO BE AGENCT. 


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Compiled by Laurence Desvilettes 






Ivsuer 

Amount 

(mUtons) 

Mat 

p*. 

Price 

end 

week 

Tenna 

Floating Rate Note. 

Guangdong 
Enterprises hokfings 

$150 

1999 

2 

100 

— 

Oww fr^wreh L)bo«. Ncneollebto. FenODOto. INomuro b*\) 

SfeoncEncMska 
Ensldldo Bonlcen 

$300 

1997 

3/16 

99526 

• — 

Over 3-momh Libor. Nonccfable. Foss 0.1875%. (Morgan 
Stanley Im'L} 

Sparatessen Bikuben 

$100 

2004 

m 

100 

— 

Interest wdl b* 1W over 3-monih Libor until 2001. thereofter 3 
over. Keoffnaed at 99. Feet 172% Denominations S1005DO. 
(Owrieol Invejrtmert Bank.] 

first Private financinq 

NbrT 

£64 

2021 

035 

100 

— 

Into rest wifi be 035 over 3-mtxirh Libor untd 1999. thereafter 
070 mar. Aka £11 nutton at notes paying IM over Liter. 
Fees not dtetoed Denonanorioni £100500. (Boring Brothers 
W1J 

European Investment 
Banlc 

m. 300.000 

1999 

16 

99.95 

— 

Onr 3-momh Ubor. Maxunum interest Noncofioble. 

Fees 030%. (toituio Boncono San Paolo tfi Torino.] 

nwMteupon* 

Austria 

$600 

1996 

6 

101525 

10055 

RaoHerad at 100325. Noncnfcfok. Foes tVWL (Goldmor. 
Sachs Ml) 

Belgium 

$500 

1999 

7 

99795 

10055 MoncoBaUe. Fees QJ2SK- Denosnnoiiaro 510500. (UBS.} 

Argentina 

DM500 

1997 

8 

99.975 



Rsoftered ot 98.80. Noncofiitet. tees IWt (Deuttehe Bank.) 

General Bedrie 
Capitd Corp. 

DM250 

1999 

6% 

10252 

— 

EooffWed at 9977. Ncmcaflobto. Fees TAIL Gwas Bank 
Corp] 

European Investment 
Bank 

£100 

1999 

6 

92344 

— 

Reoffered at 90519. Nanealottle. Fungible with outttandng 
■sue, rosing total amour* to £500 mOion. Fees IM*. (Bardays 
de Zoeto Wedd.) 

Abbey National 
Treasury Services 

m. 150,000 

1999 

10.20 

101.045 

9950 

CoBofah at par in 1996. Few ItHL (Ondbo Hafiana) 

CrecCop Overseas 
Bank 

H1200/XW 

2001 

IQtt 

100 jo 

— 

Exchangeabh, in 1998 into a Boating rate note paying M ewer 
6-monrh Libor. NoneaBafale. Fees 1 N%. pstitwp Bcneorio Sow 
Paolo d Torino.) 

Nederkmdse 
Jnvesterings voor 

OnfwfldffifirjgsJanden 

Df 250 

2003 

714 

100.80 

98.90 

Reofferod ot 100)4. NoncaKabh). Feet 1%. (RabobonL| 

DSL Bank 

V 15,000 

1996 


100.188 






Japan Airlines 

Y 10,000 

2000 

4 

10114 

— 

NoncaBabk. Fee* 1K%. Denominations 10 mi Son yen. (LTCB 
W*l) 

Mitsubishi Materials 

Y 10,000 

1998 

3 % 

100 

— 

NoncoOeUe. Fines 0225%. (Mitsubishi Trust httl] 

Ontario 

Y 100,000 

2001 

4jo 

9950 

9950 

Setwamuany. Noncatfoble. Fees 050%. (Oorwa EuropeJ 

S8AB 

y 10,000 

1996 

3 

100.19 

— 

Noaadable. Feu 0.15%. (Nomura Inti) 

Treasury Corp. of 
Victoria 

Y 50,000 

1998 

2 

100)4 

— 

Interest wS be 2% until 1996, thereafter 0X5 ewer 6-month 
Libor. Noncollobie. Feu 025%. (NDcJw Europe.) 

Equltr-Ufikod 

Far Eastern 
Department Stores 

$100 

2001 

3 

100 

— 

Nonmflnblo. Convertible at eri expected 5 to 10% premiunv. 
Fees 2W%. Terms to be s*l June 22. IBorings Ml) 

Pireffi 

[TL 306^00- 

1998 

5 

10127 


Noncafiabla. Convertible at 2585 fire per sfarae- Fees 259%, 
(Paribas Capital Markets.} 


NEW YORK — U.S. credit markets are 



omists and analysts said. 

While most economists said they did not 
expea the Federal Reserve Board to raise 

UA CREDIT MARKETS 

interest rates immediately, a number of 
Fed watchers said the central bank could 
not afford to ignore the seemingly unstop- 
pable rise in commodities prices. 

Persistent weakness in the dollar also 
should be worrying members of the policy 
making Federal Open Market Committee 
as they prepare for their semiannual two- 
day meeting set for July 5-6, analysts said. 

‘The Fed is bound to be upset at the 
dollar drop, and to have some concern 
about commodity prices,” said Robert 
Bannon, an analyst at the consulting firm 
IDEA. 

The Fed is scheduled to release its so- 
called Tan Book report on regional eco- 


nomic conditions for most of May and 
part of June on Wednesday, and the mar- 
ket will be closely scanning the data for 
any signs of inflation. 

The report carries somewhat more 
weight than usual since it was prepared for 
the FOMC meeting and comes before the 

lamlimniwl H wrnphn y.Ha n) l» n 5 address 

to Congress by Alan Greenspan, chairman 
of the Federal Reserve Board. 

Inflation at the producer and consumer 
levels has been fauiy well contained this 
year, but it is not showing signs of heading 
lower either, Mr. Bannon said, mainly be- 
cause long-depressed energy prices are 
moving higher. 

The outlook for a fifth Fed rate tighten- 
ing this year has shifted back and forth in 
recent weeks. In late May, a majority of 
analysts expected the Fed to move again; 
then, lackluster economic data for May led 
many to think the Fed would wait and see 
how the economy responded to a tighter 
policy. 

But the Fed may not have the luxury to 
wait much longer now that the dollar is 
weakening to the point of threatening the 


stability of U.S. assets and capital markets. 

“The dollar and the long bond have 
played off each other lately, with each ride 
thinking the other one is the driving force,” 
Mr. Bannon said. 

Rising prices and a falling dollar is a 
lethal combination because it “smells like 
inflation,” said James Hale, senior fixed- 
income strategist at MMS International in 
San Francisco. 

That combination. already has mirm a 
TOIL Last week, the yield on the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond rose 14 basis 
points, or about 2.1 percent, to finish Fri- 
day at 7.45 percent. 

The yield was 6.3 percent before the Fed 
began raising rates in February. On May 
11, the bond's yield reached 7.66 percent, 
the highest since November 1992. The re- 
cord low yield is 5.77 percent, reached on 
Oct. 15. 

Chances that bonds will rally are slim 
because people are taking advantage of 
any upticks in bond prices to sell their 
holdings, said Ray Goodlier at IDS Finan- 
cial Services in Minneapolis. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg 


BONDS; After the Fatt, Inflation Fear Feeds on Itself 

Continued from Page 9 


fear that a synchronized eco- 
nomic recovery will fuel infla- 
tion risks being a self-fulfilling 
prophecy. 

George Magnus at S.O. War- 
burg & Co. in London said he 
worried that an increasing de- 
mand for capital around the 
wodd at a time when nonbank 
investors were withdrawing 
from bond markets was forcing 
First World governments to 
rely increasingly on banks to 
take up new debt A perfect 
example is Britan's upcoming 
floating-rate note — paper that 
ideally suits the needs of banks. 


banks untouched. “Increasing 
recourse to banks is equivalent 
to printing money,” says Mr. 
Magnus. “Nonbank investors 
are right to be skittish and are 
justified in demanding a greater 
risk premium” in the pricing of 


. - The search for a dearipg level 
— where noubanks resume pur- 
chases — r is still going on, and 
in the meantime mere has been 
an unnerving increase in so- 
called real yields, the amount 
left after subtracting for expect- 
ed inflation. 

Mr. Roberts calculates that 
“real 10-year yields stand near 8 
percent m Sweden and Canada, 


mg, implying real yields should 
be rising. But real yields in ex- 
cess of S percent are damned 
high and represent excellent 
value.” 

Nonetheless, with only two 
weeks remaining until the end 
of the second quarter, analysts 
expea the selling pressure to 
remain high. 

Christopher Potts at Banque 
Indosuez in Paris looks to a 
recovery in the U.S. market to 
set a better tone for Europe. A 
slowdown in U JS. growth and 
evidence that inflationary pres- 
sures are contained will be good 
for world bond markets, he 
said. 

But at J. P. Morgan & Gx, 
where analysts were fax ahead 
of the crowd in predicting rapid 


Mr. Magnns.said that 47 pa- - * 

coxtof Gcarm^spublic-secH 5 ’ ..l;. 
tor ddbt issuance last year was ‘ ^ vrds ' , T „ . 

sold domestically and - that P™ ™ thelnstonc noxroof XSS. growth and nsmg official 
banks accounted for 41 percent. 3 pacent to 4 percent, and Mr. mteresi ^ rates, the view is that 
With nonresidents this^*rli- U S- ^tes areno t 

quidatmg positions and non- K® 8 ?* * doca ’ havm § nmdt impact and that 

bank domes& investors on &®S£2SSS&3‘ searo^qu^ is look- 

strike, Mr. Magnus said he as- gj? directly and wa their ef- mg “very strong. Morgan ana- 
• - - - - lects on economies. 

For Gordon Johns, a Lon 
don-based analyst for Kemper 
Financial Services, bond mar- 
kets are in a “tug of war.” 

“We’re at appoint in the busi- 
ness cyde.whexe fundamentals 
are not favorable for bonds: 
from banks leaves World growth and world de- 
power of non- maud for investment is increas- 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, June 20 - June 25 


A scMdUto Of BUS imaft’s economic and 
financial events. compUM for tha tntama- 
tional Handd Tribune by Bloomberg Busf- 
noss News. 


Asia-Pacific 


Tokyo Bank of Japan Governor YmusN 
Mono gfve* speech at Japan Press Club. 

Europe 


■O nmwTi AuMraUon houa- 
<no finance CHUa to April. Forecast RM 
of about 2 percent 

Hoos Kong TMKMfay seminar on Suc- 
cessful Negotiations In CNra sp onsored 
by the American Clumber of Commoroa. 
Eamtaoe sspwtod Greet CNno Had- 
Inga. Starflle Hofcfinga 
■ Jun* 21 Hang Kong May consum- 
er price Index. 

Tokyo Ire WoK. assistant U-S. trade rep- 
rasentstta for Japan and China, holds 
IVKMlay talks with Japanese officials on 
the insurance industry. 
a W to g l BB May osemaled new housing 
units in New Zealand. 

• Jm 22 Canberra Australian nwv 
car regwratlom for May. Forecast Down 
about 4 nareanL 

Sydney Rnartce Mlrrlstor Kim Beasley of 
Australia to address American Cha.-.*er 
of Commerce on U-S.-AustraBan reta- 
ttots. 

Hang Kong Trading stares of can marv- 
utacturor Slnocan Holdings begins fol- 
hwrtng to inWalpubBc otter ot 200 relWon 
stuns at 1.70 Hong Kong dollars each. 
Tokyo U.S. and Japan two-day tapes on 
government procurement of medical 
technology. 

Tokyo Charfine Barsfietsky, deputy U.S 
trade representative, attends meetings on 
progress of (remeworfc trade tatk& 
Eamtags apaetol Aaean Resources. 
Huey Tal Intomaflonal. Yaohan Food Pro- 
cessing A Trading. Yaohan Hongkong 
Corp.. Yaohan International Caterers, 
Yaohan international Hokfings. 
a Jane 22 Sydney Westpac Bank 
iedOng economic IrxScator lor April, 
Hong Kong April retail sates figures- 
Haag Kong Hong Kang's Fkwnctel Sec- 
retary Hamlsh Macteod rospoak at a Brit- 
ish Chamber of Commerce lurtchaon. 
Tokyo Aprs household spending sur- 
vey 

Tokyo Shares in Fuji Denki Kogyo of- 
toed over Die counter. 

Eamtaga opecM China Fund. 

• Am* 24 IMbourae Australian 
Treasurer Ralph VWHs addresses herald 
& Weekly Timas lunch on the economy. 
Syrewy Australian Treasurer Ralph wn- 
hs gtvea e ddie au at Australian Bankers 
Asaodason annual dinner. , . 


Frankfurt May AM money supply Iroro 
fourth-quarter base. Forecast Up 14 per- 
cent m month. 

Frankfuit April trade balance and cur* 
rani account Forecast 6.0 bMlon Deut- 
sche mark trade stupkn. ZObdflon DM 
current account defiett. 

Madrid May trade balance. Forecast 
l&J) Nflon-pesaa surplus. 

HaWnkf May bade balance. Forecast 
3JS UUon markka surplus. 

Cbm May trade breanoa. Forecast 0.7 
trimon-fire surplus in month. 

Rom April producer price Index. Fore- 
cast Up 3-1 percent m year. 

Brussels June consumer price Index. 
Forecast Unchanged m month, up 2.8 
percent In year. 

a June 20 Copen ha gen May con- 
sumer price Index. Forecast Up 0.B per- 
cent In month, up 2.0 percent In year. 
Goths Bundesbank President Hans 
Tletmayer addresses management con- 
gress on European Monetary Union. 
London May LM money supply . Fore- 
cast Up 0.5 person! m month, up 55 
percent In year. 

Stockholm May trade batanca. Fore- 
cast &2 ballon kronor surplus. 

British Steel. 

■ 21 Boon Bundesbank ProoF 
dant Hans Tistmoyor a dd means Attanffli- 
Bruscko society. 

D i uis sls European Commission Presi- 
dent Jacques Dei ore gives press confer- 
ence. 

Brussels Weekly mooting ot European 
Commissioners to discuss state aU and 
margin. Decision seen on Procter & 
Gamble purchase ot varerngts Papier- 
werto ScNctedanz. 

Paris Final May consumer price Index. 
Foreca st Expected to confirm provisional 
1.7 percent riae. 

Paris May Musing starts. Forecast Rim 
since Feb. expected lo continue. 

» June 22 London May 4 minutes 
from Bank ot Engimd monetary m oo ts ig 
with Chancellor Kenneth Clarke released. 
Luxembourg European Union Industry 
ministers meet to discuss steel rescue 

plan. 

Paris May household consumption. 
Forec ast Up 0.7 percent. 

Mim m M fc.. April industrial production. 
Stockholm March current account. 

F ore ca s t 70p million Kroner surplus- 


■ Jmm 22 Amsterdam April Industri- 
al production. 

A mi t ar dam February foreign bads sta- 
ttsdea. 

Potsdam German Bundwbwk amuss 
mee tin g outside of Berlin. 

June C8i monthly trends re 


Earafngs ospodMI Southern Ektorla 
■ Jew 24 London ist-quarter gross 
domestic product Forecast Up 0.7 per- 
cant In quarter, iv 25 parcent fai year. 
Lo n do n Hna-quarter balance ot pay- 
ments. Forecast JL2 baBori-pounddafiefl. 
Corfu T«ro-day Ewapaan Union sum- 
mit. Successor to European Commission 
President Jacques Dekara lo be chosea 
MHsn Ooa Hotels SpA sharaholdere 
meeting which should reveal the identity 
and mtsn t lorts ot atiarahokttra In the ho- 
tel company. 

•Jam 22 MBm State-owned Isfifuw 
Naztonrfe Assicuraztovs announces 
share price. 


• Jsmzo SaoPisdo inflation for tits 
second week of June. Outtodc Up tram 
4558 percent 

/■\ 

/ \ 





Brad Snck mariwts to dose early be- 
cause Braai pbga Russia in World Cup. 
Cmcee President RatettJ Caldera ex- 
pected to pubBsh the authorization for a 
special bond Issue to ban out night banks 
seized by (he government 
Ottawa April retail trade report. 

Ilrai Fnroctoco Next Computer Inc. 
holds Its Nextstap Expo on ob|ecH>riant- 
sd computing baaed on Next Computer 
technology. Through June 23. 

Earning* n qmfw l American Greet- 
ings, Cabletron Systems, Hunt Manufac- 
turing. Rtfs Aid. 

m June 21 WM l Uugt pe The Treasury 
Department reports MSy budgeL 
W ashing ton Tha commerce Depart- 
ment reports April mertmandHo trade and 


flra»-quar»r current account balance. 
Ottawa April i n tenHUtomfl trade report. 
Ottawa April whoJeeaia bads report. 
Now York Bankruptcy court to rule on 
requert by lawyers, Bcxauntarei and fi- 
nancial advisers tor the RJt Macy & Cot 
bankruptcy care to- SSA7 ntiBlon m tee* 
to the throe month period ended April 3a 
Brasd* Economy Minister Rubens FW- 
cupero to gtre second of five Msvtsed 
Spee ch es before the country's new cur- 
rency, the nut, enters cfrcufalion July 7. 
R oetoi ta . ttajkod Food & Drug Ad- 
mbtistrattoVs Drug Dtacovary Subcom- 
mittee Meeting ot the National Task Force 
■ Jana 22 Warfdngtoi Tha Federal 
Reserve System releases Its eo-caiied Ten 
Book report on economic conations. 
W H i fci gk on Alan Greenspan, chsbman 
of the Federal Reserve Board, taedfies on 
ntonsiiaiypQBcybetoa five House Budget 
Committee. 

Kansas City, Uo. The Mtoouri Gamtog 
Commission wB consider granting a B- 
cenae to Argoey Gaming Co. for a river- 
boat casino near Kansas City. 
Mkwpoff* Piper Jafbsy btc. hokte a 

threenlay conmanca teaturing prasanta- 
fionsby more than 180 comparfiasindud- 
fng Beat Buy Co, BufMa Inc, Ceridtan 
Corp, Dayton Hudtton Carpi and Educa- 
tion Alternatives tnc. 

Washington The Caneda-U A Business 
Association hoett two-day contoranoe on 
trade. 

PWladakpMs Ftoeanblulh Intoma ti onat 
hosts “New Directions in Twer man- 
agement conference. 

Earning* txpwctadH.B. Fuller, HER 
Block. 

• Jus 23 WaaMngtoa The Com- 
merce department reports May durable 
gopriff orders. 

Ottawa April international securities 
transactions. 

Santiago Index of monthly economic 
acbvtty tor April and the trade balance to 
May. Outlook: Economic growth seen at 
about 3A percanL 

Prase* Economy MWstar Rubens RJ- 
cuparo to ghm third of live tetoneed 
speeches before Bie country's new cu r- 
rancy, the raaL enure ebeutoton July 1 . 

• Jm» Wa B W BBtow Tho Federal 
Rasenrn reports May bank credit. 

Maxtor C*jr foTlatiort rata for the first 
two weeks of June. Outlook: Up between 
02 percent and 0.4 percent 

Brazil stock markets re ctoee oariy at 
250 P.ML, as Brazil plays Cameroon In 
World Cup. 

Ct* va li d American Greetings Corp. 
holda Its annual BharatwWera mee t i n g. 


Merrill 
To Lend 
Own Funds 

Bloomberg Burlneta News 

NEW YORK — Merrill 
Lynch & Co, the biggest U.S. 
securities firm, said it would 
start putting up its own capital 
to make bank Joans. 

The finn said Friday it had 
hired three bankers from 
Chemical Banking Corp.’s loan 
syndication business to lead a 
group that mil make loans and 

syndicate them, or sell parts of 

the loans to other lenders. 

Merrill, which refused to pro- 
vide details of its plans, had re- 
duced its lending business after 
loans it made to clients’ 

acquisitions soured in 1989. Bad 
Joans contributed to the firm’s 
S213 mQ&on loss that year. 

A spokesman said that Mer- 
rill wanted to expand its lend- 
ing business to provide “one- 
stop shopping” to clients who 
might also want to sefl stocks, 
bonds or arrange takeovers. 

Merrill Lynch had $5J bil- 
lion of stockholders equity at 
the end of last year. 

Merrill's announcement fol- 
lows a similar move by CS First 
Boston, whose syndicated loan 
business win be financed by its 
affiliate, Credit Suisse, Switzer- 
land's largest bank. 

Euromarts 
A* a Glance 

Eurobond Yields 


IIS. s> ton tom 
USSmtom 
UJL Si mtt tan* 


Mire lire 
DattiaroM 


Jm. 17 Jun.H VrMMi Yrlsw 

im 

747 

744 

621 

7 M 

747 

7.17 

5AS 

iM 

647 

641 

m 

US 

*59 

165 

646 

7.W 

703 

7.19 

547 

m 

172 

743 

741 

7JB 

7M 

756 

620 

m 

182 

9JB 

7 SA 

7J0 

743 

7 M 

5JB 

730 

7J4 

7JD 

531 

un 

ire 

831 

ta 

BBS 

are 

US 

647 

137 

7M 

B5B 

537 

Hi 

177 

431 

247 


ECU a — torn 
ECU, mdm term 
COB.S 
Am. I 
Hll 


Soiree: Luxembourg Stock exchange. 


Wookly Solos 


Jun. 16 


ran 

ecr 

Total 


CmM 

s 

MJBO 
UB 


Earadnr 
ftonl S tat 

ism unit UM5M 

- I VI JO MM 


- ob iwm treat 
3J3M0 IMIMUfMJe SJOIM 
U54JB 2JXJOI5J77M MP7JB 


Cadet EwrwMr 

72BMB 1VJ3U0 3U57.1B 2MWJQ 
40 At SBM UBOJS 

lawn utooaunuo LOUD 

OTXM 1LSMM TUM VXOM 
2UM4B XMftUB 393930 flJSOD 


Camri 
Fm 
ECP 
TOM 

Source: Euro&ear, Cartel. 


Libor Ratew 


Jun. 17 


itnanlk 

tanrih 

fretoadt 

ULI 

tS/14 

49716 

4% 

DWKtonrt 

5 

s 

31/16 

Pound iHrtkia 

4LW16 

Sto 

5fc 

French tonne 

5to 

5» 

5to 

ECU 

A 

575716 

4 

Yen 

5to 

IVIi 

15716 


Sources: Lib we i BonK nevtmra. 


snmed domestic banks had 
been obliged to take an. evext- 
laxgpr share ofnew offerings. 

That is potentially inflation- 
ary. Borrowing from nonbanks 
represents a transfer, of spend- 
ing power to the government. 



the spen 


up, most likely 
(rf a new series of 
increases foOowmg the rise of 
\25 percentage points in the 
overnight rate, to 4 25 percent, 
between February and May 
that ignited the current crisis in 
bond markets. 


Swiss Bank Said 
To Have Large 


BANK: Hurting or Helping? 

-. rnnfwwwd fm*n Page 9 cases, as was the tdqihoiie sys- 

■ _ iem in Mexico and the power 0 _ 

- sysfMn in CMre. It itecoinmcsna- CfHTenCV LOSS 
dhties ddiver the mteoted ser- ^ tbat g OVCTm nent T owned ^ 

iKAfings such as peats be leased 
to the. private sector. 

Rut the Bank's critics say that 
these ideas may not be radical 
enough, 

: '"The Bank’s continued fund- 


RCCI Executives 
Moved to Jail 
From Plush Club 

Compiled by Oar Stiff From Dispatches 

ABU DHABI — Nine former 
executives of the Bank of Credit 
and Commerce International 
have been moved to a jaD here to 
serve sentences for their role in 
the scandal tbat led to the bank's 
collapse in 1991, a government 
official said Sunday. 

The official said they were 


5— .fwjjfjj 


vices,” said Lewis T. Preston, 
thepreadent of the Bank. 

The Baidr’s repOTt^sa id that 

Uc^vocks projects around the 
worid,aJMffion people m devd- 
oping Countries lack dean war 
ter apd two bdHon lack dectrio- 
ity. the poor — intended 

targets®? mostpublic works — 
get tite^'wea^: service and pay 
the prices. 

“C3vba.- this mixed pofor- 
Maa^I&mwaaaits in mvest- 
mcnt“ fflad operation are rc^ 

It reoqm^^d^i a free mar- 
ket-styte jgveriiaul of public 
proje^ai^Eidiii running than 
jesses, ituptovia$ 
. giving users a 
say in t^s,^y enterprises are 

The 'Mfc'iso said utilities 
shoiti^^tsi^iHivatized in some 


Reuters 


missal of alternative approach- 
es has played a large part in 
shotting out many of the 
world’s poor from adequate in- 
frastructure services,” the 50 
Years is Enough group said. 

'* U.SL lawmakers are reristing 
' PreddentBfll CBnton’s request 
for big increases in funding far 
the U.S.-dominated BanV Un- 
less the Batik does a better job 
of disclosing information about 
its lendhig practices, “well just 
have to start cutting off the 
money,” said Representative 
Barney Frank,- Democrat of 
Massachusetts. 

- (WP, Reuters) . 


ZURICH, June 18 (Reuters) 
- Swiss Bank Corp. was report- 
ed on Saturday to have lost 100 
million Swiss francs ($73 mil- 
lion) in a currency deal, but the 
bank said it was too early to 
talk of losses. 

Swiss state radio said it had 
learned from Zurich foreign ex- 
change dealers that the loss 
came from a transaction with 
art unnamed Turkish bank after 
SBC dealers exceeded credit 
limits. 

“It’s premature to speak of 
losses,” SBC spokesman Bern- 
hard Stettler said. 

SBC said last Monday it had 
fired six foreign exchange deal- 
ers for “serious offenses against 
the bank’s internal regulations 
and grave neglect of leadship, 
supervisory and control tasks.” 


DOLLAR: 

Outlook Weak 

Continued from Page 9 

markets at MMS International. 

But Neil Mackinon, a Lon- 
don-based analyst for Citicorp, 
told the Internationa] Herald 
Tribune that Ms. Fosler was 
“known to be a dollar bear." 

Marc Chandler, money man- 
ager with Ezra Zask Associates, 
predicted the dollar would con- taken Saturday to al-Wathba 
soli date tins week as traders re- central prison from the luxnri- 
a ssfts s economic f undamentals, cu 5 Abo Dhabi Police Club, 

UJS. trade data for April are where they had been held since 
due Thursday, and dollar bears shortly after the bank was dosed 
have pinned much of their aigu- down in July 1991. 
meat on the burgeoning trade The nine were sentenced to 
deficit with Japan. Mr. Chan- between three and six years in 
dler said that made a bearish 
trade figure a must in order to 
press the dollar any lower. 

The U.S. government, in 
public at least, was unruffled by 
the dollar's slide late Friday. 

Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bent- 
sen predicted the dollar would 
stabilize in coming months be- 
cause “the underlying funda- 
mentals are excdlenL” He add- 
ed that “inflation is low, and 
the numbers are the best I've 
seen in 20 years.” 

But many traders were not so 
confident. 

“If the dollar falls bdow 1 .60 
marts, I would give up on it 
getting any stronger this year ” 
said Earl Johnson, a foreign- 
exchange adviser at Harris 
Trust A Savings Bank in Chica- 
go ■ “If it falls that far, it’s not 
coming back.” 

( Knight-Ridder, Bloomberg] 


prison by an Abu Dhabi court 
on Tuesday after it found them 
guilty of fraud, embezzlement 
and other offenses that led to the 
dosure of BCCL 
The nine were among 13 
BCCI executives Abu Dhabi put 
on trial in October 1993. 

(Reuters, AFP) 



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Oiv YM S ^HWi L*- Qse Cnpe I 


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JcfTS^n 

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jaftnsmA 
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Jonel A 

jonssu 

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JunoLr 

JuSlFFWCt 

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HD Vest 

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HEIMn 

HFPnc 

HPSC 

HSRsc 

HUBCD 


_. 299 a tvi ni 

_ i av» 4 % 6 s * 

.14 J 10618 31 Vi T™* 31 Vw 

- 557 21 19% 19% 

_ 90 4% 3% J% 

- Stf % % % 

_ 638 5% 5% SH 

.50 1.9 557 24% 24% 24% 

- 929 T^u 3% 3W, 

_ 222 22 31 21% 

Mall 447 21'. 20% 21% 

.13 .9 37 15 13% 15 

... 1243 Mi 4% 4% 


f-STAT 
I BAH 
ICO Inc 
ICO of 
tco5 
ICUAtefl 
IDBCms 
■ DEC 
iaari-tii 
I EC Be 
I PR 
IGLab 
IGEN 
iHOPCn 
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... 2*4514% 15% 16% 
-. 121 3% 3 3 

- 4937 4% 5% 5V, 
1.49 1.0 <399 21 20% 21 

„ 44*8 4% 4 4% 

„ 1034 13% 12% 13% 


280277 10% 

7% 

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*% 







9010 31% 29% 29% 

— 1 




17% 

— 1% 


142 9 

7% 

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— % 


48 & 





342 W i 

7% 

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780232% 29% 32 

•I'-i 


358 3'V„ 

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2473 4% 

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4 




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Saies 

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_ 157 I % 

.. 3B3S12 1 '. 1 
Jfl S *8741 ■ 

M il con% • 

Z 81 14 I 
_ 5341 15% 1 
.. 743 Ifl'i 
- 3332 10 

. 2534 1%. 

_ 174 24 

_ 3471 24 ! 

,jb .9 ja 27% : 
_ 272 13V. 1 
_ 27813% 

.10 .9 1413 11% I 

.. 384 7% 
1J0 48 405 25V. ! 

f lIKiS?! 

... 738 4% 

.16 U 3117 12% 1 


4473 2% l'kii 1*% — **n 
245 25% 23% 21*.— 1% 
40 7l%20v R 20Vn— lr/v 


_ 2448 4% 4% 4% ■ 
_ 107 » 7% 7% 

_ 9J1 | V a 1 1 

_ 129 3% 2% 3% 

_ 89 7V» 7 7 

_ 101 1«% IV, 1% 

M7L i 'JSSsf^a* 

140 4A 145 20*. 20% 20V, 


J&JSn 

JBflsS 

JLG 

JMCGe 

JPE 

JSB Fn 

Joofl 

JockHwr 

JocoEH-c 

Jccbsn 

JoCOrC wt 
jocorCrn 

Jomesnm 

Jasmine 

Jasons 


_ 6709 14% 
_ 244 6% 

.10 J 3302 33% 
071- 497 3% 
_ 10911% 

.44 ZA 341124% 

- 750 ? 

- IS If 

- 277 8% 

JO 3.5 X1S2 14% 
2 615 
_ 844 14*4 

■12e U 413 8 
_ 124 2% 

- 344 11% 


12% 12V.- 
5% 595 
31 32% 

3% 3% 
10% 11% 
25% 24% 

io% 10% 

1% ft 

S% 4V5 
13V. 13%- 
7% 7% 
2 % 2 % 
10 10% 





ft V” 




Last Week’s Markets 


AU nouns an asof dago of trading PrUtar 

Stock Indexes 

UntfMStotas June 17 June 10 CTtV* 
DJ Indus. 277646 177345 + 00814 


DJ UHL 18251 

DJ Tram. 165240 T ' 

SSP10Q C4JB7 . 

S & P 500 " 45845 

S&PInd ■ 53301 
NYSE Co 25128 

BrPcm 

FTSE 100 . 302250 


June 10 Cbfc 
177345 + 008% 
186.13 —154% 
150826 +274% 
42*05 Unm.% 
-68 jS7 —005% 
53232 +0.11% 
2SX» —8.12% 

3AZ.90 —106%. 
141490 —174% 


Nikkei 22s 21503. 2U9S, +051. % 

Oceania 

DAX 205072 ' 2.13308 —186% 

WewKwe 

Hans Sens 9,11196 • 9.111.16 +003% : 
World 

MSCIP 62060 62060 Unch.% ' 

Works Index From ftorgan Skadar Capital Hid. 


Money Ratos ... 

u n btdW id w • June 17 ' June- 10 
Discount rate , ’Jlj . '• 3 V » 

Prime rtrte ’>*£ . ?i h 

r=*Ser«3 tond».rc0e _ ( 4 Wf ' V. ** 
- Josson : . r ’ r - t/v v “5 ?i7' *. • 
DIscoanT •; -■ • '.’Ifc'-" ~.W 

Coll rnarwY - ..2 .1 15/16 

3-moniti mtertwnk . . 3T/15 . .y 9 

Oeowenr * 

LomBord- J . MB’. i0O 

CMfmonier-.' V : i - 5W 

3-moofhlnterljank .508, '..HO 

we- . ' ■ -. ■ “Il 

Bank base rote - 5Mr . . liv 

Caitrainev * *Va 

3-monffi (PttrtMMfc. _ «*:• • - 
Com - ■ ' June T7 June W are* 

UmdonPAV rues 3K7M 35305 +155% 


m 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 






,rr^ 





Patricia Wells, the International Herald Tribune's award-winning 
restaurant critic, revisited each of the more than 300 restaurants, bistros, 
patisseries, salons de the and cafes, for this third edition of her popular 
guide, in her search, she discovered 100 exciting new places that have 
made it into this entertaining and useful book. 

The critics raved about the first editions: 'To walk the streets of Paris 
- without deadline or curfew - stalking everything wonderful to eat.. Ifs 
the dream of every one of us in love with food. And Patricia Wells has 
done it.... No serious hedonist should go to Paris without it” 

- Gael Greene, New York Magazine, 

“...it is impossible to read it and not want to be in Paris. Now." 

- Lois Dwan, The Los Angeles Times, 

“...one of the best guides in English. And, mon Dieu. it was done by an 
American. There will be consternation in high places." 

- Frank Prial, The NgMY York Tunes. 


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Pn.^js Peter TurrWey/Rapho 


“The Food Lover's Guide to Paris." in a completely revised and updated 
third edition, includes Patricia Wells’ lively critical commentary, 
anecdotes, history and local lore. A great gift idea Paperback. 408 
pages, with photographs throughout 

Published by Workman Publishing (New York) and available by mail 
from the International Herald Trtoune. 

i” Please send me copies of FOOD LOVER’S GUIDE TO PARlS.Third Edition. 

J at U.K. £1 0.50 (U.S. SI -*.95) each, plus postage per copy: Europe £2.50: North 
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O N 


CVTEKNATIOISAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1904 


Pag« 13 


A Y 


SPORTS 

Pierce, Gting Family Strife, 
Withdraws From Wimbledon 


New York Tunes Serna 

LONDON — The French Open 
finalist Mary Pierce, apparently still 
plagued by family strife, has an- 
nounced that her long-awaited Wim- 
debut has been canceled. 

For reasons far beyond my con- 
*»c decided not to participate 
“P the most prestigious and tradi- 
t*onal tournament in the world," the 
19-year-old Pierce explained in the 
ftatement she released after a meet- 
ing with officials of the All England 
C3ub on Saturday afternoon at Wim- 
bledon, where play begins Monday. 

“Please accept the facts: Both my 
mother and I have reviewed all the 
clhu j ins tances, and without a doubt 
they clearly indicate that my absence 
and withdrawal would serve the best 
interests to the championships, the 


fans, and to my mother, brother and 
myself." 

Pierce did not directly attribute 
her withdrawal to the implied threat 
from her estranged father, Jim, that 
he planned to don a disguise »nrf 
gain entrance to the Wimbledon 


Jim Pierce has been banned from 
the tennis circuit, and from his 
daughter's entourage, since he was 
gected from the 1993 French Open 
after disrupting her third-round 
match. 

Tracy Austin, the teenage prodigy 
of the 1970s, has also pulled out of 
Wimbledon because of an injury to 
her right shoulder. 


Not So Sweet: Navratilova’s Long Good-Bye 


By Robin Finn 

Mew York Times Service 

EASTBOURNE, England — Careering 
across the English countryside with a friend's 
foundling mongrel in the passenger seat and 
yet another loss in the rear-view mirror, Mar- 
tina Navratilova, a classic herself as well as 
an avid reader of the genre, couldn’t help 
remembering something Shakespeare once 
said about parting being such sweet sorrow. 

If that’s true, then why, wondered the 37- 
year-old Wimbledon diva, has her much- 
ballyhooed leave-taking of tennis this year 
been packed with sorrow and absolutely de- 
void of sweetness? 

Her latest devastation, a very premature 
quarterfinal exit in Eastbourne considering 
her 1 1 titles here, sent her racing through a 
blur of tears into the locker room to accuse 
herself of perhaps bong greedy and playing 
one year too many. She calmed down when 
her companion, Danda Jaroljmek, suggested 
it was better to play one year too many than 
one year too few. 


But even that didn't solve her most press- 
ing problem: With Eastbourne a bust and 
t lineup sessions with the previous week's 
practice partners, Steffi Graf and Jim Couri- 
er, no longer possible, bow could she suffi- 
ciently mead her splintered confidence in 
time to turn in an edifying two weeks at 
Wimbledon — which begins Monday — on 
her 2 2d and final visit? 

Navratilova, having won Wimbledon, that 
grandest validator of the Grand Slam quar- 
tet, a record nine limes in 21 appearances, 
feels it only honest to admit ‘‘it wfll take a 
miracle" to reign supreme at her most cher- 
ished venue one last time. 

If she, great Grand Slam war horse that 
she is, comes out of the gate at Wimbledon 
like the hobbled horse who stumbled in the 
first round of the French Open last month, 
Navratilova thinks she may put herself out to 
pasture six months ahead of schedule. 

Tm nervous, how else can I fed?" she 
said, with ice on her racquet wrist but no fire 
in the disturbingly lukewarm arsenal of shots 
that’s threatening to turn her swan song into 


a swoon. “I may have nothing left after 
Wimbledon. Tm putting everything into it 
because I know if I save anything, I won’t 
win, and if I do well, maybe I’ll have the 
energy to get through the rest of the year." 

And what if she doesn't do well at Wim- 
bledon, the tournament this vegetarian calk 
“the meat” of her year? 

‘Xosing makes you unhappy, and if I keep 
losing, whaL’s the point in playing the rest of 
the year; it’s just too painful^ she said in her 
first admission that her plan to play a full 
1994 schedule could be in jeopardy. 

“My hope is high; my expectation is zero," 
said Navratilova, humble words from a 
champion with 18 Grand Slam singles 
crowns among her record 168 singles titles, a 
champion who, despite being twice the age of 
many of her opponents, continues to be 
ranked fourth over all 

“I have to deal with my fear of failure; there 
is no failure for me at Wimbledon,” she said, 
seizing cm her latest mantra from BQEe Jean 
King, her mentor who was summoned by 


Navratilova's coach, Craig Kardon, for a Sat- 
urday consultation and practice session. 

It’s not that Navratilova believes she can’t 
win a 10th Wiznbledon title; it is her fondest 
wish to reach the final and meet Graf there, a 
nonsecret she shared with the top-ranked 
Graf when they practiced in London. Keep- 
ing herself afloat through the previous ax 
rounds is what worries Navratilova. 

“I thought this year would be different than 
last year, that I’d enjoy it more because I 
wouldn’t have to worry about having anything 
left for later,” she said. “But Bnh'e Jean told 
me it was going to be exactly the opposite. It’s 
very and. It’s very unkind. And win or lose, 
it’s very exhausting. It’s like feeding you’re 
always going against the wind. Some days it’s 
a struggle just to make myself play.” 

But at Wimbledon, that special spot where 
every year she purloins a few blades of Cen- 
ter Court grass and pockets them for good 
luck, Navratilova won’t have trouble finding 
the motivation to play. Or to win. 

Tm hoping to lose myself in the atmo- 
sphere,” she said. 


SCOREBOARD 


5 : *T . -fc.-T ; I 

6 .--A*'. - 3-"' ■ 


— '• 1 

— V’~l> 

■tinueo un jjj 1 


Rates 



irobrasy Semis 
WXSIEAiSfAlS 
AGENT iNMES 
,*! 47.20 30-05 

ii'Tflfvitt ~ -V 

OttMA* 3! *3. '• 

JTr, ■ . « 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Edit Division 



W 

L 

PI3. 

GB 

New York 

39 

2A 

.600 


Borttmore 

37 

28 

S69 

2 

Detroit 

31 

32 

JOB 

6 

Boston 

37 

33 

M2 

7 

Toronto 

31 

34 

.477 

B 


Central Dfvtshn 



Cleveland 

39 

25 

909 

_ 

Minnesota 

34 

29 

J54 

3ta 

Chicago 

34 

30 

.531 

5 

Kansas CHy 

34 

32 

-515 

6 

Milwaukee 

30 

3A 

955 

10 


West Dhriskw 



Texas 

31 

35 

970 

— 

Seattle 

29 

37 - 

939 

2 

California 

30 

39 

931 

2Vh 

Oakland 

24 

43 

-35B 

719 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East OhNstoe 




W 

L 

Pci. 

GB 

Attcnto 

43 

22 

942 



Montreal 

« 

24 

904 

3V, 

Florida 

34 

34 

J00 

UM 

pniladsipiita 

34 

34 

J00 

10ta 

New York 

31 

34 

943 

u 


Centred Mvblae 



Houston 

38 

29 

sa 



Ctodnnatl 

37 

29 

-561 

Vi 

St. Louis 

33 

32 

JOB 

A 

Pittsburgh 

30 

34 

955 

7V, 

Chicago 

24 

39 

900 

11 


West Division 



Las Angeles 

34 

33 

JD7 



Colorado 

31 

36 

993 

3 

Son Frond sco 

30 

38 

941 

4» 

San Diego 

2S 

42 

jxn 

9 


Friday’s line Scores 

r ' AMERICAN LEAGUE 

BartM IN m Nt-I . I tr 

aevntaed M3 in NM n ■ 

Minchey, Howard (3), Trike* W.Fvstaa (01 
and BenryhM; DeJAarltoax. Shorn (9) and Alo- 


mar. W— OcMantaKi K L— NUnetwv. 0 - 2 . 
MJhmafcM MZ Ml MM 11 • 

Hew York mo om an— i 3 1 

EMred and Harper; KomtenlecU. Pall (5). 
Stem «» ana Stanley. W— EMred, 7-7. 
L— JCanMenfeckL *3. HRs— AUrwaukee, Nits- 
sen 171. New York, Stanley IB). 

Toronto BSD IM BOB - 7 H B 

DMran an in mm b i 

Stewart, Castillo (6), Hall (91 and Banter*; 
Doherty, Gardiner M), Davis (4), Boever (9) 
and Krwter. Flaherty (7). W— Stewart H. 
L— Gordina-, 3-1. Sv— Hall (SI. HRs— Toronto. 
Mol Mur (BJ. Detroit. Felix (11). 

Minnesota BN 891 Ml— 2 ■ 1 

Bawmere M2 MB Ux-f U • 

Tanonl, Merrlmon (51, Pulido u> and Wat- 
Mdc; McDonald and Hollea. W— McDonald, 
W-4. L— Tapani. 50. HR— Minnesota. Mock 
(VI. Baltimore, Gomes (9). 

Seattle 0M 191 099— a 9 0 

Kansas City BH BOO BBS— 1 5 B 

Fleming (7). Ayala (9) and Wllson; 
CUMh Pichardo U) and Mo ctart one. 

W— Fleming, 4 ^_l— C one, KJ-3. HRs— Seattle, 
EMartlmz (5). Griffey (39). 

Conromto BH BH 0U- a B • 

CMcooo IN DOT BID— 3 9 1 

Andersen, Butcher m. Patterson (9) and 
Turner, Daknandro (7), Fabreoas (9); AJvo- 
m Hernandez (9| and Karkavlce.W— Ander- 
son. 5-1. L— Hernandez. I-X Sv— Patterson (1). 
HR— ancoao, Thomas (23). 

Oakland 891 019 3H-« 9 1 

Texas M3 100 005—3 9 • 

Van Papeei. Briscoe (B), EckereJer (9) and 
SMnboch; Falarda, Henke |7), WhllesMe IB) 
and Rodrtaun. w— Van Paitaei, 3-5. L— Fo- 
Wrdo.2-1 Sv— Eckersley (9). HRs— Oakland. 
Javier 2 (9|. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
New York 928 B29 119-5 7 2 

Florida 113 910 Ota-5 B 2 

Smith. Gann <&) am Handley; weattwr*. 
Jefksat (I). Men (8) and Safflaso. 
W— Weathers.7*. L— amMn.3-7. Sv— Hen IS). 
HRs— New York, Banllla (11). Florida. Ahhatt 
(7). Coftrunn (2). 

detadl ON « 012-9 » 9 

ABonta IN BN TBS-4 12 1 

Hansoa McEfray (7>. Carrasco (B), Brad- 
ley (V) and Taubensee; GJWaddux, Stanton 
(B). Bednwton (H,MeMhtae( (9) and Laeez, 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


CTBrten (fl.W-McMicMeL3M.L- Brarttev. 
4a HR- Atla nta Blauser (2). 

PMhMWkdda HD 101 869— IB 1C • 

Montreal MB BN no— « 11 2 

Btafcte, Carter U), Andersen 15). Quontritl 
U),Slocun» (B). Janes (B) and Daunon; Ruder. 
Hsrsdhi (tirRom (7). Wtdteland (8). Show (8) 
and Fteteher, Soehr (ty. w— QuantniL 20. 
Lr-WotManaM Sv-Janes n>). HR3-PMI0- 
(Uphki, Hatcher ID. Montreal, Ak» (12). 
P HMi ei y k BN BB1 HO— 7 16 I 

SL Loeix 2B0 BN m— 4 9 t 

Lleber. Wanner (9), Mevrzanma (f), AJ^ena 
(f) and Parrtrtt; Tewksbury, Eversaerd «). 
Habvan (7), Rottisun (B). Pornz (9> and Pav 
nazzL W— Deter. 3-2 (.-Tewksbury, 84 
Sv— AJ’ena (3). 

Heastan BN BN 209-4 5 B 

San Diets 911 tie ODn-3 11 1 

SwindeU, Powell (T). Edna »t end Euee- 
Mo; Benes. H off man (9) and Ausmua. 
W— Bones, Sf. L— Swindell, 54. Sv— Hoffman 
(II). HR— San Dkms E. Williams (1). 
Chicago IN IN M»— 1 a 2 

SOB Fmdm 291 M9 Ex — 4 19 9 

BuUimr, Otto (5). Olffl (B) mid Wllkkw; 
Swift, Beck (9) endMonworbiB. W— Swift, 54. 
L— Buffingnr, 22 

Colorado IN 923 001—13 U t 

Las Ai w ei es IN on OOP- 5 IT 9 

Painter. Bhrir (4) and (Hranfi; Hershlser, 
McDowett (S), Valdez (B).Seanez (7). DreHarf 
(9) and Plana, CaXomandoz (8>. 
W— Painter, V2 L — Herstdser. 3-*. Sv— Blair 
(2). HRs-Celorado, Gattema (2B). Ham 
(7). Las Angeles, Piazza (14). 

Saturday's Une Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
•tattoo ON 9H Ml— 4 I • 

Cleveland IN 003 «x— B 13 2 

Clemens, Valdez (7). Fossa (7) and Borry- 
IHII; dark. Plank (5). Mm (9) and Pena 
W— Plunk. 5-2. L— Clemens, 0-4. HR»-Cteve- 
tand, Boerga (10), Belle (IB). 

Mlhewkee 092 IN 999-4 9 2 

New York 2N m ta-i 19 2 

ignartak. Orosco (5), Navarns M) and 
Harper; Perez, Hitchcock 17 ), iMcfcman (7) 
and Leyrttz. W— Perez. 52 L— Orosco, i-j. 
Sv-Wldanan (5). HR-N.Y- TariatMU (12). 


Sam 

on, via ioos Hkn Low ate am 


CaUtarala N3 9N 909-4 7 « 

Chicago 191 091 090— 3 t 1 

Langston, MLeller (7), Gndw (9) and 
CTurnar; Bent. DeLeon IB) and Karkarice. 
W— Langston, 44. L-Bere. B-2 Sv-G roht 
(11). HRs — can lorn la, Hudler (5). Chicago; 
Thomas (24). 

Seaffle 0M on B93-3 7 0 

Kansas atv 091 ON 909-1 12 B 

Hibbard, MJ(IU (B). Ayala (9) and D.WIh 
son; Mltocfcl.Meacham (8), Montgomery (9), 
Brewer (9) and Mocfortraie. w-MJflll, 1-0, 
1 — Montgomery. l-l Sv— Ayala (9). 
Minnesota 101 ON 229— 5 9 I 

BaMom 030 920 42S— 11 U 2 

Deshates. Stevens (Sl.Casian (71 .willb (7). 
Guthrie (7) and Parks; S.Fcroandez. Ektv 
harn (7). Poole (9). Mills (9) and Holies. 
W — S-Femandaz. 44. L— Deshoies. 3-7. 
HRs— Mlmeeata, Knobtauch 14). Baltimore, 
CRtoken (B), Holies (IB), Hutoff (2). 
TaraalD 290 ON ON 99-5 It 9 

Detroit Oil OH 210 91-4 B 1 

(H tantags) 

H entgetv RMhettl (9). w.wiiliams (9) and 
Borders. Knorr (11); WeJtx iwinem on (9), 
Boevw HD and Teftleton, Kreuter 19). W^-Bo- 
over, 54L L— WJVUIIoma, l-Z HRs— Detroit. 
Tetftotan (12), Trammell (5). CGomez (7). 
Oakland lit 111 OOS-11 15 9 

Texas 93B 131 9)2-10 11 1 

B. Wirt. Toy lor (5). Henman IS), Acre (7), 
Briscoe (B), Raves (9) and Stelnbach ; BJfurst. 
D-SmHti (4). Homed (7), Carpenter (9), Henke 
tv> and 1 -Rodriguez. W— Briscoe, 22 L-Car- 
penter. 21 Sv— Reyes ( I). HRs-ONcland, Ber- 
roa (8). Stetobaeh IB). Tun Palmer 2 (B). 
W.ciork no), I. Rodriguez (7). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Chicago 380 HO 002—4 7 1 

5a Fr aachc o 901 3N 009-4 2 3 

A. Young. Bautista (7). Plesac(BI.Myers(fl 
and WHklns; VanLandlngham, Gomez (5), 
Mantetoane (A), Hkkerson (7), Burba (9) and 
Manwarlrta Je-Reed (7). W— piesac. 21 
l^— Hkkerson, 54. Sv— Myers 114). HR-Cht- 
caoa GJHII1 (3). 

ChKUnaH 3N BN 534—16 20 9 

Afknta ON m boo— o 4 o 

Smiley, CorroKO (B), F u t u ono (9) and Dor 
sett; Gtavlne, Wohlers (7). Olson (8). BleleriU 
(9)cndJJjn>ez.W— Smllev,5-&.L— Glavlne.7-7. 
HRs-Ondnnatl. RJandera (121. Dorset! (4). 


PkltaaetpMB in M2 10V-8 15 S 

Montreal Bll tie BM-4 B 0 

DnJacksoa Ouartlrfil (7), D Jones (9) and 

Doulton; WMta, Henry (2),Henjdlo (A), Shaw 

(7) and Webster. W-OaJoekson, 9-1. 
L— White, l-l. 

New York 203 IN 113— u U • 

Ftortda 911 ON W9-3 B 2 

Saberhasen, Union (2), Mason (7). J-Man- 
zonliia («) and Hundtev; Rams Mulls (4). Fru- 
ser (B) and SenHaga W— Untan, A4. D-ftapp, 
42.HRS— New York, Hundley 2 H2>.SeaUl (10). 
Ptrtsharah ON ON 009-9 A 0 

St. Louis BN ON Bta-9 19 9 

Neagie. Minar <A) . Ballard <71 and Parrish i 
WOtsaAracha (A). Murphy (9) and Pagnaazl. 
W— Arpcha4-3.L—N eagle, A-5. HR — SL Louis, 
Poonazzl U). 

Houston BN MB MB— 4 9 I 

Son Diego boi bn Me — i j l 

Reynolds. Hampton IB), Veres (8), Hudefc 
(9) and Senrab; CamPbed. Sager (5). Mauser 
(Al. Tabaka (7). Elliott (9) and Bjohnson. 
W— Reynolds. 44. L— Campbell, 0-1. 
HRs— Houston, Bagwell (19). Camlnhl (141. 
5an Diego, Bjohnson (It. 

Colorado 9N 114 BB9-9 17 • 

Las Angeles 991 BB2 N9-3 11 1 

Freeman. Moore (A). Harkov (7), SJteed 

(8) , MMunaz 19) and Glrardl; ILMarllnez. 
Valdez IA). BBorae ca>. McDowell IA), 
5eanez (Bj and Piazza CaHemandez (9). 
W— Freeman. M. L— RMardnaz, 94 
HR— Cotorada Freemen (1). 

TTie Mtcfiaef Jordan Watch 

FRIDAYS GAME : Jordon went 1-3 with a 
single 1o rlgM ffeld In the second Innlna as Ihe 
Birmingham Barons beat the Knoxville Smo- 
kies 21. Jordan scared In the second toning 
when Ken Coleman hit Into a fielders choice. 

SATURDAY'S GAME: Jordan went 95 and 
reached first base on o Knoxville error In Ihe 
fourth toning as Knoxville Deal Birmingham 
144 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan Is batting -2D5 
(48-tor-»4> wflh7! runs. I0doubiea,one triple, 
20 RSIs. 21 wanks. A3 strikeouts end 15 stolen 
boxes In 25 otfempts. He has 103 pulouti, one 
assist and seven errors In rlgM field. 


Central League 


Yomlurl 

Mr 

34 

L 

20 

T 

D 

Pet 

943 

GB 

Chunldil 

28 

27 

0 

909 

7to 

Yakult 

27 

29 

0 

9B2 

9 

Yokohama 

26 

29 

0 

973 

Wi 

Hanshln 

26 

30 

0 

964 

10 

Hlnnhima 

23 

30 

0 

933 

12 


satantavk Resorts 
Yamhirl 1. YtfuiH 0 
Yokohama vs. HonsMn, up a, rain 
Chun Ictil vs. Hiroshima ppcL rain 
Sunday's Resorts 
Yakult 4 Yam tori 3 
ChuikM 7. Hiroshima 2 
HMiti 4. Yokohama j 



w 

L 

T 

Pet 

GB 

Settw 

34 

20 

0 

943 



Dale! 

32 

24 

0 

971 

4 

Orix 

30 

25 

0 

J45 


Lotte 

27 

29 

0 

9B7 

9 

Nippon Ham 

72 

35 

1 

JN 

14W, 

Ktotolsu 

70 

34 

1 

J73 

15 


Saturday^ Resorts 
Lotte 4 Data 2 
Kintetsu 3, Nippon Horn 0 

Senators Resorts 
5eRxj vs. Orix, ppd, rain 
Lotto w Do tel, pad, rain 
Kintetsu vs. Nippon Ham, pad, rato 


Ij&efCfCET; 


SECOND TEST 
Enahnd v*. New ZaatoDd 
Third Day, S Uterituy , In Loatfon 
New ZeakPid first Inntogs: 476 
England first Innings: 2H1 (121 avers) 
Fourth Day, Swday 
Scoreboard at lea: 

New Zeatondseaxid tonlnas: 1A94 (57 avers) 


MANCHESTER OPEN 


Wayne Ferreira (1). South Africa, def. Jo- 
son Stoltenbera (51.Australta.94.94: Patrick 


Sotos 

Dhr ym ujos tfati cow as* Oh 


Rotter 12), Australia, def. M Novacek, 
Czech Republic. 9-7 (5-7), 7-4 (75). 7-4 (75). 
Final 

Rafter def. Ferreira, 74 (7-51, 74 (7-41 
EASTBOURNE TOURNAMENT 
Women's singles Semifinals 
Undo Harvey-Wild. J . SLdeL Natalia Zver- 
eva |4), Belarus, 64,75; MarecBth McGrath, 
U4. def. Yayuk BcauU, Indonesia 44, 7-5. 
Final 

McGrath tat. Homey-Wild. 9-2, 94. 

ATP TOURNAMENT 
IB St Poertt*, Aas’io 
Mens Stogies, SemlflnoH 

Thomas Muster (l), Austria def. Frantdseo 

Rais, Spain, 74 (7-3), 94; Tomas Carbonefl 
(fl). Spain, del Haw Dasedoi (4). Czech Re- 
PUbHc, 1-5 44, 9-1 

Real 

Muster def. CarhanelL 44, 92, 44 
HALLE GRAND PR1X 
la Halle, O urma i y 
Men's Singles a emlflm ta 
Magnus Laresan (BLSwedwvdet Yevgeny 
KalelnUaw («. Russia. 24 (7-3). 74 (7-2); 
Michael Sikh (1). Germany, deL WoUy Mo- 
sur, Australia, 64 74 (7-3). 

Final 

Sikh def. unson. 94 *4 91 


AUTO RACING 


Le Mans 24-Hour Race 

Final results ofM-bour race ea UA-Wlome- 
ter (BANnHe) coarse, In Le Mans, Primce: 

1, Doutr -Porsche 960LM, Yarn** Dolmas, 
From; Hurley Harwood, VLS.; MnaroBcAdl, 
I kdy, 344 laps, 344 taps, T9SJkph (1714 >.4A7!L4 
kUameteta 090744 mfla) ; l Toyota Eddie 
irvlna, Britain; Mnuro Martini, Italy; Jeff 
Kraxnaft. UJ5, M3 tops; X Dauer-Parsche 
96QLM. Hans Stuck. Germany; Dan Sullivan, 
VS.; Thierry Boutaen, Belgium, 343 tops; < 
Toyota Sieve Andskar. Sweden; Georges 
Fooche. South Africa; Lionel Rovert. France; 
32B; X Nissan 3NZX, Steve MI ben. U4J John- 
ny O’Camali, U5. John Marian, U.S. 317. 

A, Kramer-Porsche. Derek Bell, Britain; 


RoWn Dcnovcn Britain, Jurgen Lasrtsi Ger- 
monViSlAi' 7, Courage- Porsch e 02, Jem Lou- 
to Ricci, France; Andv Evans. USj PhH OJc- 
zyk, Betarium, 318; & Porsche 911 RSR. 
Dorn toque Dupay, Fraice; Jesus Porvta 
Snato; Carlos Patau MalM, Spain. 307; 9, 
Porsche RSR, Enzo Cotdernrl, Switzerland. 
Ulllan Bryner, Switzerland; Federico Mas- 
trapletra, Italy. 299; n, Kanrad-Porache RSR, 
Patrick Husman, Germany; Cornells Euser, 
Germany; Motfczz Tamila. Slovenia; 2K 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Finals 


FRIDAYS RESULT 
Now York leods scries 3-2 . 
Houston 21 16 M 23—84 

New York 22 26 13 39-91 

Houston: Harry 2-V4 VI 7, Thome 4-1*24 H. 
Otolvwm 12-21 2-227. Maxwel 3-1) V2I, ILSmllh 
24 l-l 6, Herrera 54 l-lll, Cassell 2423 6, Elio t- 
3 2-2 & Jent 0-1 99 0. Totals 3341 12-16 BL 
New York: Oakley 34 44 iaC5mHh V7 94 
A, Ewtag 1 1-21 2-m Harper 913 M K Staks 
.7-14 44 19. Mason 911 54 17, Davis 0-1 94 a 
Anthony 04 B-OB, Williams 0-00-00. Totals 34- 
79 7V2f 91. 

J-POtot goafs— Houston 918 (Horry 24, 
Otah/won VI. ICS ml th \-X Ella 1-2. Maxwell 1- 
K Jent 0-l,Cass«n 9-2), New YarfcM ( Ewfew V 
1, Starks 14. CSmlth 0-1, Anftvwy 0-1. Horper 
0-2). Foaled auf-CasselL Rebounds— Hous- 
ton 48 (Thorpe 13). New York 57 (Ewing 12). 
Assists— Houston M (Horry A), Hew York 22 
(Harper 7). Total louts H ou s t o n 21, Now 
York 19. Technicals— Maxwell, Mason, 
Starks. Flagrant tout Horry. A— 1 9.741 


RUGBY 


RUGBY UNION 
Watss 2X Fill B 
New Zealand XV 25, France 33 

FIRST RUGBY UNION TEST 
Saturday's Resort 
Aastrafto 23, itatY 20 


Soles I 

Kv YW inwHtoh Use Che Chge [ Stocks 


Safes 

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.14 II 197 B 7V, TV, — VA 

-OBe A 13415 14 14 —1 

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1732 914 9 9 — 14 

318 10 IA 944 9M —’A 
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*“i'-*'KTO?TSW¥| 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1994 


O N D A Y 




SPORTS 




. v-"-£v 


Cleveland Takes 18th Straight at Home 


77ic Associated Press 

Jack Morris got his 250th ca- 
reer victory and the Cleveland 
Indians woo their 1 8th straight 
home game Sunday, coming 
from behind to beat the skid- 
ding Boston Red Sox 6-5. 

Boston has lost 11 straight 
games — its longest losing 
streak since 1932 — and is two 
games under .500 exactly one 
month after being 13 games 
over .500. 

Cleveland’s streak at Jacobs 
Field is the best in the majors 
since Boston won a record 24 
straight at Fenway Park in 
1988. The Indians, who have 
not lost at home since May 1, 
have won nine in a row overall 
to take over first place in the AL 
Central with the best record in 
the American League. 

Morris improved to 5-0 over 
his last eight starts since he 
shaved his trademark mustache 
to change his luck. He allowed 
1 1 hits in seven innings, striking 
out six and walking one. Derek 
Lilliquist pitched 1 '.6 innings of 
hilless relief and Paul Shuev 
finished the game for his fifth 
save. 


The Indians trailed until the 
seventh, when they scored twice 
off Greg Harris on an RBI dou- 
ble by Kenny Lofton and Omar 
Vizquel's second RBf single of 
the game. 

Tigers 3, Blue Jays 1: The 
Detroit Tigers tied a major 
league record by hitting a home 
run in their 25th straight game 
in a home victory over Toronto. 

Mickey Tettleton hit the 
homer, an upper-deck shot 
leading off the second, to tie the 
record set by the 1941 New 
York Yankees. Detroit leads 
the majors with 102 home runs. 

Greg Gohr pitched into the 
eighth inning in the second start 
of his career, and the Tigers 
scored single runs in the first 
three innin gs. The Blue Jays fin- 
ished 1-5 on their six-game road 
trip. 

White Sox 7, Angels 0: In 
Chicago, Scott Sanderson had a 
no-hitter through 6 rs innings 
and finished with a three-hitter 
as Chicago snapped a five-game 
losing streak. 

Sanderson retired the first 13 
batters he faced before walking 
Bo Jackson with one out in the 


fifth. He lost the no-hit ICT when 
Chili Davis doubled down the 
left field line in the seventh. 

Twins 10, Orioles 4: After 
going without a home run in 
498 career at-bats. Pal Mores 
hit two as Minnesota routed the 
Orioles in Baltimore. 

Meares' first homer, a two- 
run shot to left, gave the Twins 


AL ROUNDUP 


the lead for good and highlight- 
ed a six-run third. He also had a 
solo homer in the eighth to give 
the Twins a 7-4 lead. 

Brewers 10. Yankees 7: In 
New York. Kevin Seitzer drove 
in three runs. Greg Vaughn ho- 
mered twice and Matt Mieske 
hit a two-iun homer for Mil- 
waukee. 

■ / n Saturdays games: 

Tigers 6 . Blue Jays 5: In De- 
troit. .Man Trammell. Chris Go- 
mez and Mickey Tettleton ho- 
mered for the Tigers, moving 
them within one — to 24 — of 
the major league record for con- 
secutive games with home runs, 
and later won in the 11 th on 
Alan Trammell's single. 


John Olerud drove in four 
runs for Toronto. 

Indians 8 . Red Sox 2: Geve- 
land set a team record with its 
I7ih straight home victory, as 
Albert Belle hit a liebreaking 
home run off Roger Clemens in 
the sixth inning. The Red Sox 
lost their 10 th straight game, 
tying their longest skid since 
they dropped 1 1 in a row in 
1 932. They've had four 1 0*game 
losing streaks since then. 

Yankees 4. Brewers 2: Danny 
TanabuU’s 469-fool (150-me- 
ten homer broke a slxLh-inning 
lie for the victory. New York 
ended a five-game home losing 
streak and broke Milwaukee’s 
four-game win streak. 

Angels 4, White Sox 3: In 
Chicago. Rex Hudler. who re- 
placed injured Jim Edmonds in 
the second inning, hit a two-run 
homer that won it for Califor- 
nia. Edm onds bruised his right 
shoulder diving for Norbeno 
Martin's double in the first. He 
is listed as day-to-day. 

Mariners 3. Royals 1: lino 
Martinez hit a two-run double 
in Seattle’s three-run ninth in 


Kansas City. Missouri. The 
Mariners, held to four hits over 
eight innin gs by Bob Miladri 
and Rusty Meacham, got a 
leadoff double from Ken Grif- 
fey Jr. in the ninth off Jeff 
Montgomery. 

Jay Buhner drew a walk and 
was replaced by pinch runner 
Rich Amaral. After Edgar Mar- 
tinez sacrificed, Tino Martinez 
doubled into the comer in right 
to make it 2-1. Reggie Jeffer- 
son's RBI single put Seattle 
ahead, 3-1. 

Orioles 11, Twins 6 : In Balti- 
more. Chris Holies, Tim Holett 
and Cal Ripken homer, and the 
Orioles withstood three homers 
by Minnesota. 

Just before the game. 27 peo- 
ple were transported to area 
hospitals with min or injuries — 
cuts, bruises and sprains — af- 
ter an escalator at the Camden 
Yards ballpark jammed and 
sent the riders sprawling down 
on top of one another. 

Athletics 11. Rangers 10: In 
Arlington. Texas, Terry Stein- 
bach’s three-run homer capped 
a five-run Oakland ninth. 





Ifeere’flwi frft lp 1 , 

.TtemmsA'. 

irafin j 

during**? vie |®fei : 

Toronto Blue Jays. .. j ‘ 

; . Mickey Tetttewn i ?: 

upper-deck s*p$ s ** 

oSCto tie thCTficpriJ pgvJ ; ? 

New York Yank^-Dclje^ife gp: j • 
nugorswiih *Sg|} | 

The 'homer,, infe gfe’ 1 j 

came off Juan. ! 

lowed 15 'this year; jg|K: . 

last season. f - | - 


Enc RaboirTbr 

raAngR^Hffl,whotBtatiiree-nmbonier,gotaliugfnHn 

teammate Mark Grace after the Cubs beat the Giants. 


■ After mne stnogm 
recbrds'bri.&e road, flifc Bhie 
9-23 dnstfeasoit •• ' '• Mgr 

• Kfen Griffey Jr. 
tie’s 5^1 Wtory over 
Friday 

er. Maiis’s'iecd-a ' ; p»ocr.'o#3S?^® ffe 

tie Sfe 

formost hcsneitii&tbrougfc,-^ 

Ruth hit 30 is* 1928 andagamHt‘T?^ |Sp 

... .. V 


Reds Hit 4 Hon iers to Rout Braves Again 


The Associated Pros 

The Cincinnati Reds hit a 
team-record four home runs in 
the first inning and routed the 
Atlanta Braves on Sunday for 
the second straight day, 12-4. 

The Braves, with the lowest 
ERA and best record in the ma- 
jors. were pounded 1 6-0 Satur- 
day night by Cincinnati. The 
Reds got 20 hits in that game, 
and got 20 more Sunday, in- 
cluding homers by Hal Morris. 
Kevin MitchelJ, Jeff Branson 
and Eddie Taubensee in a sev- 
en-run first inning. 

Cincinnati scored 33 runs 
and had 50 hits in the three- 
game series in Atlanta. The 
Braves won the opener 6-5 Fri- 
day, then absorbed its most- 
lopsided loss in 16 years Satur- 
day. 

The Reds battered John 
Smoltz for eight hits in the first 

i nnin g 

Deion Sanders — who had 
two hits in the innin g — led off 
the game with a single, took 
second on an errant pickoff 


throw by Smoltz and scored on 
Barry Larkin’s single. Morris 
then hit his fourth home run of 
the season and Kevin Mitchell 
followed wih his 18th. 

Smoltz retired Tony Fernan- 
dez on a popup before Reggie 
Sanders singled and Branson 
followed with his second homer 
of the year. Taubensee hit his 
second home run of the season 
and Cincinnati's first-ever four- 
homer innin g. 

Pirates 3, Cardinals 2: Zane 
Smith maintained his recent 
mastery over the Sl Louis and 
Orlando Merced and Jeff King 
hit consecutive home runs in 
the seventh inning in Pitts- 
burgh’s victory in St. Louis. 

Smith worked seven innings 
in 98-degree heat and allowed a 
run on eight hits with a walk 
and two strikeouts. Since join- 
ing the Pirates in September 
1990, Smith is 5-2 with a 1.1S 
ERA against the Cardinals, 
with four of the victories at 
Busch Stadium. 

He had been coming off his 


shortest outing of the year, last- 
ing 3 2-3 innings and allowing 
five runs at Montreal June 14. 

■ In Saturday's games: 

Reds 16, Braves 0: Cincinnati 
sent the Braves to their worst 
loss in nearly 16 years as Reggie 
Sanders and Brian Dorseu ho- 
mered in Atlanta. Atlanta lost 


homer right-handed in ihe sev- 
enth. He has 12 home runs, one 
more than his previous career 
best in 1993. 


NL ROUNDUP 


by the second-biggest margin in 
its history. The Braves lost 19-0 
to Montreal on July 30. 1978. 

Barry Larkin who scored 
three runs, and B«l Boone, 
who drove in three, each had 
four hits. The Reds had 20 hits, 
their most since July 27. 1991. 

Mets 11, Martins 3: Todd 
Hundley hit two home runs and 
improved his lifetime average 
against Florida to .136. as New 
York banged out 20 hits in Mi- 
ami. Hundley was 4-for-41 
against the Marlins before he 
hit a three-run homer left-hand- 
ed in the third inning and a solo 


Phillies 8 . Expos 4: In Mon- 
treaL Danny Jackson drove in 
five runs and won his fourth 
straight decision for Philadel- 
phia. Jackson, a career .122 hit- 
ter with 17 RBIs entering the 
game, hit a bases-loaded triple 
in the second i nnin g and a two- 
run double in the sixth. 


Cubs 6 . Giants 4: Glenallen 
Hill drove in a career- high five 
runs in San Francisco and 
broke a ninih-inning tie with a 
two-run double. Four Chicago 
pitchers combined on a two- 
hitter. holding the Giants hit- 
less after the fourth. 


Cardinals 9. Pirates 0: Tom 
Pagnozzi’s second career grand 
slam highlighted a six-run sixth 
in St. Louis, Missouri. The vic- 
tory helped the Cardinals snap 
a four-game losing streak and 
prevented Pittsburgh from win- 


ning three straight road games 
for' Ihe first time this season. 

Pittsburgh starter Denny 
N eagle and .Allen Watson were 
both pitching shutouts when a 
thunderstorm halted play for 
1:50 in the bottom of the fifth. 

Astros 6 . Padres 1: In San 
Diego. Ken Caminiti drove in 
three runs and Jeff Bagwell 
went 3-for-3 with two RBIs for 
Houston. San Diego's Bip Rob- 
erts extended his hitting streak 
to 21 games, the National 
League high this season. 

Rockies' 9, Dodgers 3: Mar- 
vin Freeman won his fourth 
straight derision and hit his 
first major league homer as Col- 
orado won its sixth straight at 
Dodger Stadium. 

Joe Girardi tied career highs 
with four hits and three RBIs to 
help pull the second-place Rock- 
ies within three games of the 
Dodgers in the National League 
WesL A year ago. the expansion 
Rockies were 22 games out of 
first place after 67 games. 




1 

1 :T f-v’rj' 

mi 

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IWUUO wcic -- foiuw vui V. ■ .. ^Jeh^nnfc/.l j f fc c j 

first place after 67 games. Hakeem Olajuwon under heavy pressure from Patrick Erring in the Jzflh game of 

Knicks Take 3-2 Lead to Houston s 


By Clifton Brown 

Vf»r Yr-rk Times Service 

HOUSTON — If the Knicks 
could win Sunday night. New 
York would have a National 
Basketball Association champi- 
onship to go with its National 
Hockey League title. 

Taking a 3-2 lead in the NBA 
final series, the Knicks defeated 
the Houston Rockets. 91-84. on 
Friday night in Game 5 in Mad- 
ison Square Garden. 

The Knicks could win their 
first championship since 1973 
by taking Game 6 of the four- 
of-seven series here Sunday 
night Should they lose, the de- 
risive Game 7 is to be be played 
here Wednesday nighL 

The Knicks’ victory came 
hours after the hockey’s Rang- 
ers celebrated their Stanley Cup 
championship with a Manhat- 
tan parade. 

If the Knicks have their way, 
there will be another parade in 
New York very soon. 

“It seems like we’ve been at 
this forever,” said the Knicks * 
coach, Pat Riley, reflecting on 
the championship quest “We 
started the season at midnight 
on Oct. 6 . We wanted to be the 
first team to hit the floor in ’93 
and, hopefully, the last team to 
leave it in ’94. Right now, we’re 
on the brink of doing what 
we’ve dreamt about” 

Patrick Ewing had 25 points, 
13 rebounds and 8 blocks, 
which tied an NBA final record. 
Hakeem Olajuwon led the 
Rockets writh 27 points. 

Trailing by 80-78 with three 
minutes to play, the Knicks ran 
off seven consecutive points. 
John Starks started the run with 
a pressure shot a three- point 


jumper over Venton Maxwell 
from in from of the Knicks’ 
bench that gave New York an 
81-80 lead. 

There was plenty of time on 
the shot dock, but Starks did 
not hesitate, shooting over 
Maxwell before he was ready to 
defend. 

Then New York made anoth- 
er defensive stand. After Kenny 
Smith missed a jumper. Carl 


NBA FINAL 


Herrera grabbed the offensive 
rebound in the lane and tried to 
put in a layup. But Ewing 
blocked iL 

The ball went to Starks, who 
passed to Derek Harper streak- 
ing downcoun. Smith grabbed 
Harper for the foul with 1 min- 
ute 50 seconds left, and Harper 
made both free throws to give 
New York an 83-80 lead. 

After a tough New York de- 
fensive stand again, Robert 
Horry missed entirely with a 
three-point shot as Anthony 
Mason ran at him. Charles 
Oakley saved the ball going out 
of bounds and passed to Starks, 
who found Anthony Mason 
streaking down the court for a 
dunk, to give New York an 85- 
80 lead with 1:25 left 

Then after Horry made just 
one of two free throws. Starks 
made two more foul shots with 
57.3 seconds to play to give 
New York an 87-81 lead. After 
Olajuwon missed a jumper, the 
rebound was tied up, but the 
Knicks won the jump ball and 
the Rockets were finished. 

With the Knicks tr ailing 79 . 
78 with 314 minutes left, Derek 
Harper had a chance to give 


New York the lead, but he 
missed a 20-foot jumper. The 
Rockets called timeout. If the 
Knicks lost this game, they 
would have a hard time sleep^ 
ing, having blowing a 13-point 
lead in the third quarter. 

When play resumed. Max- 
well drove to the basket and 
was fouled by Starks with 3:13 
left. Maxwell made the first fool 
shot, but he missed the second, 
leaving Houston with a two- 
point lead. After Ewing missed 
a 14-foot jumper over Olaj- 
wuon. Houston had a chance to 
go ahead by four, but Harper 
made a key defensive play. 

As Smith drove to the basket. 
Harper knocked the ball from 
Smith’s hands. Smith reached 
down and recovered the loose 
ball, but his right foot was out 


of bounds, giving the ball back 
to New York, and setting up the 
Knicks’ final surge. 

“Once again they outplayed 
us,” said Maxwell of the 
Knicks’ guards. “You have to 
give them credit. They’re play- 
ing well right now and we’re 
not. We’re struggling. I feel like 
that’s the difference in the ball- 
games." 

Olajuwon, who had eight 
turnovers despite making an as- 
sortment of shots from all an- 
gles, refused to criticize his 
teammates. 

.^ c !FF f team,” Olajuwon 
said. I don’t separate the 
guards or the forwards from the 
<»nter. I made mistakes, and 
that s the nature of the game. 
We have to settle down and 
regroup.” 

The most physical half of the 
scries had eaded with the 


-’I &t 

Knicks leading, 48^37. Ha^-cTS ^T 
nearly came to blows for _the^V 
first lime in the series. wfeeaL^S- 
Anthony Mason had to be 
strained from going after aS- 
Olajtrwon with49.9 secondslMl? 
in the half. Cjefe 

The incident began whip Jg 
Olajuwon tried to make 
post move on : Mason 
Olajuwon swung the ball acrcas^v' 
his body, he hit Mason squarri||HC 
in the mouth with an eUxwCgf*' 
While the contact looked accf^\, 
dental, it jarred Mason aadlsrfpt T 
fell hard to the floor. When 

§ >t up. he was looking.?#^, 
lajuwon. ’ . 

Players from both sitfe^J- 
rushed toward Mason, as 
came face to face 
Olajuwon. Smartly. 01ajuw6i$£v 
turned his back and ’ 

Mason, who was called forbbife^L 
a personal foul and a t echpMBttffi y 
fouL 

Then, 13 seconds later, litei 1 

son was in the middle of arioUfcSVs J 

er skirmish. After talring’a 

pass, he drove for a layup. wira^ 

Robert Horry chasing a 

behind. Horry was the pfaye&’V 

that Mason fouled in Game MgjF 

causing Houy to lose fais baf^ L 

ance in midair and fall heavQgo/^ 

to the floor on his tail bone. Thisj&'--. 

was Horry’s chance for 

back. . -.. 5 ®. 

He went for the ball, but gq£££s 

a piece of Mason's arm. However, •- ' 

er, with the tone of the gan^p 1 : 

getting more violent by the mo^ - 

mem, Horry was caBed fofin^-’ 

flagrant foul. Mason got ■ 

and cahnly walked to the freee: 

throw line. If the Rockets want‘d . . 

ed to play physical basketbafl££. 

the Knicks were more than wiBra ' • 

“g- '.'SJti&rZ. 

- ^ • . 



1 % \ 





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M O N d a y 

sports 

Simpson’s Fans Face 
The Unimaginable 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1994 


Page 15 


®y Tony Komheiser because we knew that, in truth, he was 

xr gracefnL As a TV sideline reporter (and 

\a/ A ^ n r N V r °N —.Even after nearly even now, 15 years after the end of his 
a weeae of reading it over and over in career, he looked so good, like all you had 
uie p®ea, swing that footage of him to do was ha nd him the football and 
being handcuffed over and over on TV, nobody would catch him), the camera 
hearing he was the prime suspect over would zoom in on Mm, and he would be 
and over on radio, it doesn’t smk in. It smiling that great smile of his, the one 
is unbelievable, unimaginable, un- we’ve seen at USC and Buffalo and run- 
™ nfea ™ c that OJ. Simpson could have "Mg through airports, OJ.’s wide, satis- 

committed murder. fed smile, and good laugh* as if nobody 

Not someone as successful and ode- owned a better life than be did. 
brated and admired as OJ. But we didn’t reaDy know him, did we? 

latest turns; that OJ. ran away, left We couldn’t have loved him if we 
ooMdd what sounded ominously fike a thought these charges were true, 
s made note, and the extraordinary, mes- We all have secrets. We all have limits. 
jBgozjng convoy — something like the We an have points at which we can no 
Spraber g movi e “Sugariand Express" — longer hold on. You think you know 
of AI Cowlings’s white Bronco being somebody because you sit next to Mm in 
trailed by a phalanx of police cars for 50 a locker room or you see him on TV, or 
miles (SO kilometers) on a Los Angeles yon live on his block. But you don’t know 
■ all of ham. 

Vantage People win talk about the dark side of 

Point OJ. Simpson now, the times he beat his 


we’ve seen at USC and Buffalo and run- 
ning through airports, OJ.’s wide, sads- 
fea smile, and good laugh, as if nobody 
owned a better life than he did. 

But we didn’t reaDy know him. did we? 

We couldn’t have loved him if we 
thought these charges were true;. 

We all have secrets. We all have limits. 
We all have points at which we can no 
longer hold on. You think you know 
somebody because you sit next to him in 
a locker room or you see him on TV, or 
yon live on his block. But yon don’t know 
all of him. 

People wiD talk about the dark side of 
O J. Simpson now, the times he beat his 
wife. And wife-beating is a terrible thing . 



Els, Montgomery, 
Roberts in Playoff 


. - , . , But it is short of murder. They win say 

3? ** a “""H® OJ. is a violent man, trained in a Violent 
feast of onlookers all the way up to his n,,t 


,??* U £ game. But there are thousands of f ootbaU 

players, and they haven’t been charged 
and said to be holding a gun to his head with murder 
“ {Q ^ ie &*> whole, unreal scenario more Hnw mold thi «9 


bizarre. 

People such as O J. don’t c ommit mur- 
der and £0 on the lam — except cm TV. 
Scriptwriters make that stuff . up. It 
doesn’t actually happen in real life. 

We have seen his sweet face for 25 
years now, growing serenely more hand- 
some and pleasant every time he went on 
camera. Now they throw this new spin at 


with murder. 

How could anybody do this? 

How could he do this? 

These crimes are so hideous, so seem- 
ingly obsessive that no amount of pop 
psychology will let us reconcile them. 
Obsession and passion are combustible 
together; they’re the chemicals you mix in 
high-school lab, and they Wow up and 
shatter the glass you stirred than in. 


and stabbing a mail repeatedly to death 
— acts of such furious violence they scare 
us to contemplate. Moreover, he had fled. 


church and mow their lawns and work in 
come home and shoot their wives and 


And this is so incompatible with our “EEL™™ jT\ a , wtve i an T a 
comfortable view offtJ fhai ir aniw children, and nobody ever knows why. It 



M. Don’t let them faU too. SgH .” 50 P leased »“» bdn * 

We shouldn’t do it, of course. But 

^ it nK»rtal,lovd. They 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

OAKMONT. Pennsylvania — South 
Africa’s Ernie Els, Scotland’s Colin Mont- 
gomerie said Loren Roberts finished tied 
for the lead Sunday after the final round of 
the 94th U-S. Open golf championship. 

The three wifi compete Monday in an 
18-hole playoff to determine a winner. A 
victory by Ete or Montgomerie would be 
the first by a non-U JS. golfer since 1981 
and only the fourth by an international 
player since 1927. 

Montgomerie lugged his chunky frame 
through the sweltering heat at Oakmont 
Country Club and made three birdies on 
the front nine to take the lead halfway 
through Sunday’s final round of the U.S. 
Open. 

The Scotsman was 7 under par after 63 
holes, one stroke ahead of third-round 
leader Ernie Els of South Africa and Loren 
Roberts going to the final nine boles. 

If the 30-year-old Montgomerie can 
hold on, he will be the first foreign player 
to win the Open since Australian David 
Graham in 1981, and only the fourth since 
1927. 

Montgomerie started the day at 4 under, 
three strokes behind Els, but turned the 
front nine in 33 to Els’ 37. Roberts also 
started the round at 4 under and shot 34, 2 
under par. 

Curtis Strange was at 5 under after 63 
holes. New Zealander Frank Nobilo was 4 
under. Tom Watson, Steve Pate and Clark 
D ennis were 2 under heading to the final 
nine boles, along with Hale Irwin, whose 


ly hurt by a doable bogey on the fifth hole. 

No one among the earlier finishers man- 
aged to do better than par for 72 holes. 
Duffy Waldorf was in the clubhouse with 
that score. 

Els got a break on the first bole when he 
drove into the deep left rough but was 
given a free drop because a TV tower 
obstructed his shot He managed to get it 
on the green but three-putted from about 
40 feet for a bogey. He got that stroke back 
with a birdie on the par-5 fourth hole and 
made pars until he bogeyed the pax-3 
eighth bole when be drove into the rough. 


Hs of Sooth Africa watched the ball after pmting on No. 3, which be only paired. SgSbES StedSKfiTiSS 

Third-Round Scores From the U.S. Open Golf Tournament 


become part of . our fantdy somehow, 
though ire never even meet .them. 

When Magic said he fad the AIDS 


stand cm the podium and dryly call him, 
“Mr. Simpson, tire suspect,” .or “Mr. 
Simpson, the accused,” or “Mr. Simpson, 


awc » without reverence, it makes me ao- 
cept that this Mr. Simpson may have 
cnle these awful dimes. 

When Iris attorneys and friends call 
S SSSnS ? 1 . J md Mm though^Lfeel themytbology. 

sad too for OJ. . . ; v - . * r . IseehhnlafSr&Kfe.IseelAnMS- 

A T THE SAME IJME wc fed be- ing loose for those signature touchdowns 
trayed by Mm for fleeing with all tint won the Henman, I see Mm going 
we’ve invested emotionafly in him over over 2,000 yards, in the snow against the 
the years. We build them up too high. Jets, I see him hurdling through the air- 
they have to let us down. In a way we port in the Hertz commercials, I see Mm 
never let our star athletes become whole there on the siddzne in the NBC blazer, 
people. We want them always there like snriHng that mountainous smile. When I 
we knew them once, running up the far hear Mm called “OJ.,” I cannot think 
sideline, cutting batik across the middle, that he might be a monster seizing the 
dasbumMyap^nooirela^ngagkiveon mother of his children — and stabbing 
them. The Juice we all knw couldn’t dp her repeatedly to death, 
what he’s accused : of. He was a Don Sunday was Fathcc’s Day in the United 

among men, a great and brave runner States, a day when children should be 
with gukkrilyer moves, a self-effacing with their dad. Who was going to go to 
man who gjaivti credit to the linemen who those beautiful children, to 9-year-old 
blocked forhim. -Sydney and 6-year-old Justin Simpson, 

In movies, particularly of late, betook and say to them; Your mother is dead, 
the pratfalls that were aQ the funnier and your father is accused of kiUmg her? 


PtaTCdcMttie&M-yard, par-71 06-33) Oafc- 
nwit Country Ckflt coarse In Pennsylvania: 

Emit Els 6677-44-206 
Frank N0bJk> 69-7148—206 
Tom Watscn 68-7348—209 
Loren Roberts 764944—2)7 
tkjie Irwin 694971 — 209 
Colin Montaomrle 7745-73—209 
3tw» Lwmv 71-77-66— no 
Curtis straw 70-71770— Z10 
sitve Fate 7446-71 — 311 
Gran Norman 77-7749—211 
Jot* Cook 7345-73—211 
Junta Osakl JD-7349—212 
Fred Couples 72-7749-212 
dark Donahs 71-71-70—212 
Writ Triplett 70-71-71— 212 
J6tf Stenxm 7249-72—213 
Bnu Faxon 7349-77—213 
Dovfcl Edmnb 7J4575-213 
Mamcrt 714075-214 
S6*n Baflesteras 73-72-70— 31< 

Scott Hod! 72-73-70— 274 
Bremen Jobe 72-7448—714 
B« Crmstaw 7V74-70— 215 
Daffv Waldorf 7448-73-215 
Jkn McGovern 7349-74-215 
entp Beck 73-73-70—216 
Tom Kite 73-71-73—214 
Jack NIckMus 69-71777— 21 J 
Bunhare Lanswr 72-73-73-217 
Gordon Brand. Jr. 73-71-73— 217 
tomle dements 73-71-73— 217 
crate Potty 7348-71—277 
FUtton Alton 73-70-74-217 
Jim Furyk 7449-74—317 
Scott vernkmk 70-72-73-717 
PWI MIckdnn 73-70-13— JIB 
Tun Lebmon 7743-73—218 
Fred Funk 74-71-74—219 


Wovne Levi 76-70-73—219 
Peter Baker 73-73-73-219 
Don WolMwIti 71-73-73-219 
Mike Surinam - 74-72-73-219 
Sun Torrance 72-71-76—219 
Jim Guiasner. Jr. 7448-77—319 
Bradley Hushes 71-72-77—220 
Fran Quinn. Jr. 75-72-73—220 
Scott Simmon 74-73-73—220 
Dow Marlin 76-70-74—220 
Davis Love III 74-77-74—220 
Hunt! Rarer III 72-71-77—320 
David Benmnlo 73-72-76—221 
Fuzzy Zoeller 7670-76—222 
Michael Emery 74-73-75—222 
Emiyn Aubrey 724*41— 222 
Mark Camovale 75-72-76—223 
Steven Richardson 74-73-76—223 
OHn Browne 74-73-77—224 
Tim Dimlavey 7670-70—224 
Rocso Mediate 76-70-1^-225 
Tommy Armour ill 73-73-79—223 
NUChaet Smith 74-73-78—225 
Paul Gorans 74-72-79—225 
Ed Human Ik 767341—227 
Dove Rummelb 71-7442—227 


FAILED TO QUALIFY 
Hallme Meteum 71-77—148 
Brad Brvani 7672—148 
Ken Green 7672-148 
Owls Perry 78-70—148 
Mark Brooks 75-73—148 
Loo JUtzen 77-71—148 
John MahoHev 73-70— 1« 

Larry Nelson 73-73—148 
Jay How 75-73—148 
Hick Price 76-72—148 
HKk Fcldo 73-73-148 
Mark O'Meara 73-76—148 


Mark QMcDvecQMa 77-77—148 
Bill BrtltWl 7672-148 
Mark Wurtz 7V77— 148 
Stephen Ftosch 7674—148 
Erick Jahraan 77-72—149 
Payne Stewart 7675—149 
Wayne Grady 7574—149 
Billy Mayfair 7673—149 
M»e HuUrert 7675-149 
OaWt pyosl 72-77— U9 
Larry Mize 77-72—149 
Jimmy Groan 7675—149 
Baker. MOddera 75-74—149 
Michael Bradley 74-75— n? 
Mike Sufflvan 75-74—149 
Harry Taylor 7673—149 
Mark Lye 73-76— M9 
o-Buddy Alexander 75-74—149 
Jay Don Blake 79-70—149 
Bob Tway 7671—149 
John Adams 75-75—150 
Joso Marta OkrzaDat 7674—150 
Joaklm Haeoaman 77-73— ISO 
Brent Sluder 7674—190 
PUD StankowdU 73-75— ISO 
John Stacey 70-73—157 
Gton Day 73-76—157 
Sam Rondo tail 7677-157 
Jim Thorpe 71-80-151 
Rk* Feta 7673-151 
Costanttno Rocea 77-74—751 
Jacob Ferenc 7V76-15I 
Robert Friend 78-73-151 
Massy Kuramato 79-72—151 
DmrM Oartn 7677-151 
Robert Gamez 7673—151 
Andy North 7673—151 
Corey Povtn 7673—151 
Tim Simmon 79-73—152 
John Huston 7676—152 
Ian Waosnam 77-73-19 


Crate Stadier 7674-152 
John Mono 77-73-19 
Trevor Dodds 77-75-152 
Gil Morean 79-73—19 
Todd B onr uiu or 7677—153 
Darren Clark* 7675— «3 
Nolan Henke 75-78—153 
Marty Sctttane 7479—153 
Willy Bvndlz 7974—153 
Howard T Witty 7675—153 
MBt* Small 77-76—151 
Arden Knoll 8676—153 
Morfc-fMelte 8076— 154 
Brian Crete 7681-154 
Mick SON 7676—154 
John Dafy 81-73—154 
Mark MMka 80-74—154 
PJL HQCWai III 7676—153 
Brian Kunm 79-76— ISf 
o-Dukr Dotdier 7677— IS 
Freak ucklilty 79-76-155 
Mike Grant 80-76-156 
Chris Haartow 82-74—156 
Gary Haltaere 7678-756 
a-Jahn Harris 7677— 156 
Ian Bakor- Finch 83-74—157 
a-Ruxfy Sareder B2-7S— 157 
Johnny Milter #1-76-157 
Arnold Palmer 77-81— iff 
Doug l a* DuChateau 7676-15 
Bart Bryuit 7682—158 
Packard Dcwm 81-0—158 
Javier Santaez 7680—159 
Mark Mason B3-7F-IM 
a-Crate Barlow 8680—160 
Thomas Gamer 7681 — 140 
SCOlt MecSIn 7682—161 
o-Joev Ferrari 82-79—161 
Michael Weeks 83-83— 166 
Michael Alton 77-82— OQ 
David Lumtattun 80-WD 


He averted disaster on the ninth hole 
when he drove into the same dry ditch he 
hit into on No. I. This tune there was no 
free drop. He fussed with several stances 
before slashing the ball out beautifully. 
But he Mt his approach into the greeosiae 
trap and only saved par with a magnificent 
sand shot 

But by then Mon tgomgerie’s birdie on 
the hole hadjgiven him the lead. 

Strange, winner of the Open in 1988 and 
*89, ended a run of throe consecutive bird- 
ies with a 3-footer on the 195-yard sixth 
hole. It moved him to 6 under par and put 
him in a tie for the lead with Els at the 
time. 

But Strange gave a stroke back when he 
hit a greenade bunker at the pax-3 eighth 
hole, blasted out long and two-putted for 
as bogey. He turned the front nine in 34. 

Montgomerie played a steady frontside 
with seven pars and birdies on Nos. 5. 7 
and 9. 

The Scot qualified for the European tour 
in 1987 when he turned pro after working 
in the same biscuit factory with his father. 

He has won six times in Europe, includ- 
ing once this year. He missed the cut at the 
Masters this year and was ninth at the 
Players Championship. He was 33rd in last 
year’s Open. 

In the 1992 Open, Montgomerie ap- 
peared to be in good shape sitting in the 
clubhouse at Pebble Beach while Tom Kite 
was on the seventh bole, playing in brutal 
wind. But Kite shot one of the great bad- 
weather rounds ever and Montgomerie 


Els, who won't be 25 until October, 
hasn't been around long, but has already 
shown that he is at his best in the biggest 
tournaments, finishing in the top 1 0 in four 
of Iris last five major championships. 

He came onto the European tour in 
1992, the same year he swept the South 
African Open, Masters and PGA the first 
time that had been done since Gary Player 
did it in 1979. 

“Ernie has the power and perfection you 
seldom find in a kid,” Player said of his 
countxyxnute. 

He also finished tied for fifth in the 
British Open that year at age 22. 

Els’ game matured long before be filled 
out his 6-foot-3, 200-pound frame. The kid 
whose father built him a putting green in 
the backyard and who has a dog named 
Hogan was a scratch amateur at 14 and 
was South African amateur champion at 
16. 

In 1993, he was in the top 10 in seven of 
the 17 tournaments he entered and tiedfor 
sixth at the British Open. 

M Earlier, The Washington Pan report- 
ed: 

On another steamy, suffocating after- 
noon of golf in the U.S. Open oven, Jack 
Nicldaus finally played a round more suit- 
ed to a man his age. 

While the proud old lion was staggering 
to 77 in the second round on Saturday, 
younger tigers were clawing their way to- 
ward the top of a multinational leader 
board. 

Propelled by birdies on his first two 
boles and an eagle at the 560-yard 4th, Els 
had plenty of sizzle himself on this nrid-90s 
day, tying an Open record with a front 
nine of 6-under-par 30 on iris way to a 
round of 66. 

One of America’s best graybeard hopes, 
three-time Open champion Hate Irwin, 49, 
got himself to 6-undcr through 17 holes, 
only to double-bogey the 18th for an even- 
par round of 71 that left him at 4-under. 


















Pace 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. JUNE 20, 1994 



A Y 


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V y '£&£ 




> -h n tv®. ^ m -<r*v ^ 

111 si H & 


JllLS. 


By Lisa Diliman 

Lw .4 «»«•/« 77/i ir; 5m in- 

PASADENA California — Goalkeeper 
Oscar Cordoba was not supposed 10 cause 
hearts to pound wildly or faces to flush 
among Colombian soccer fans. No, this 
was no clone of the brazen Rene Higuiia. 
who would cockilv saunter out 20 yards 
from his goal and flirt with danger. 

But on Saturday, the normally reliable 
COrdoba caused Higuila-like reactions 
from the huge Colombian contingent 
among the crowd of 91.S56. He committed 
two significant miscues that led to goals, 
and Romania stunned Colombia. 3-1. in 
the first World Cup game to be played at 
the Rose Bowl. 

The Romanian forward Florin Radu- 
cioiu scored twice and the often brilliant 
midfielder Gheorghe Hagi had a hand in 
every goal, scoring once and setting up 
both of Raducioiu’s goals. Bogdan Stelea. 
the goalkeeper, was nearly flawless, stoo- 
ping 18 shots, including a point-blank ef- 
fort by midfielder Fredy Eusebio Rincon 
from six yards out in the 23d minute with 
Romania ahead, 1-0. 

For the moment, one of the pre- World 
Cup favorites. Colombia, is looking less 
than formidable, ranking last in Group A. 
It plays the United Stales at the Rose Bow! 
on Wednesday. 

“We made mistakes we ha\en‘: made 
before," Coach Francisco Maturana said. 
"We were pressured and maybe a little 
overwhelmed by being ir. the World Cup. 
It was a good experience for us. a wake-up 
call.” 

‘‘Too much individualism by our players 
contributed to the defeat." be said. "We 
showed a lack of mobility in the midfield, a 
lack of coherence in the defense and a 


disconnected offense, especially in the sec- 
ond naif. 

“We still played well in the first half, but 
in the second half we fell apart." 

Hagi, who briefly left the game in the firsi 
half with an injured left leg. referred to the 
pretoumament hype about Colombia. 

“Colombia should not forget Romania 
has good players." he said. 

Anghel lordanescu. the Romanian coach, 
praised his team for its intelligent attack, 
but its tenacious and compact defense was 
the key. Colombia was permitted to pass the 
ball around at will in the non threatening 
pans of :he field, but the Romanians 
opened with a 5-3-2 alignment and. holding 
a 2-1 lead, switched to a 6-1-2 in the both 
minute, when defender Tibor Sclymo re- 
placed midfieider Hie Dumitreseu. 

Additionally. Colombia's >i:tr forward. 
FausUne Asprilia. could not wm to go 
anywhere in the second half without seeing 
the shadow of defender Darnel Prod an or 
feel a tug on his sliirl. And the plrivmaking 
midfielder Carlos Valderrama was a non- 
factor save for a few showy first-half moves. 

Although Colombia had near complete 
control of the ball in the opening i5 min- 
utes. Hagi seemingly burst out of nov- here 
and created his magic to set up P.adu- 
cioiu’s first goal in the 16ih minute. 

Hagi launched a 25-yard pas* and Rudu- 
cioiu threaded through Lhe maze of defend- 
ers and cut over, beating Cordoba with a 
shot inside the right post to make it 5-0. 

Cordoba had a scare in the 24Ui minute 
with a long-range Hagi shot. but he was 
able to tip Tt away. There was do such luck 
in the 34ih minute, when Hagi converted 
what almost looked like a short punt, a 
looping shot from an angle off the !e!i 


fionk. Caught •: ut rf position, there was no 
wav Cordoba could move back and Hagi's 
shot went inji:>t ;n?ide the right post and 
slight!}, under the bar. 

"Everybody made ^ misiake.” Cordoba 
said of H-izi’s goal, “h was a team mis- 
take." 


rillinglv. Hagi was not on the field 
when Colombia scored its only goal to cut 
Romania's lead n 2-1. After gelling fouled 
b% Gabriel Jaime Gomez in the 41st min- 
uie. Haai left the field on a motorized cart. 
He returned after Colombian forward AI- 
dolfo Valencia scored off a headeT in Lhe 
43d minute when defender Wilson Perez 
sliced a pinpoint corner kick from the left 
side. 

Stelea had no chance on the goal. For his 
part, he thought the biggest play of the 
*3me was Itis save or. Rincon in the nrst 
half, “i idi had that not happened, lhe 
same would turned differently," Stelea 


Or. the final aoa!. which came in the 
S?lh minute. e.V. Crindoha could noi 
blame anyone else. Cordoba came out and 
rrjipia’-ci '.f.e bJ: looking as if he had 
taken hi- eye it because of concern 
about j rvierMiC colii don with Rudueioiu. 
Rdduci’oiu Jrihblcd around him and 
punched the bait into an open net. 

Maturana defended h.?s goalkeeper — 
son of — when asked whether there would 
be z change for Wednesday's game. 

not." Nluturana said. “Al- 
though -eday '•■ game requires analysis.” 

Sor: of the same vay everyone in Co- 
.‘OiT/bij i:a> been .malycing Higuiia 's per- 
formance in ihe 1°90 World Cup. Four 
••ear? bier, little seems to have changed for 
Co'Cm'-ian v ever «'or.s. 



^ ' 


Carlos Valderrama, Colombia's captain, center. 


”. r - • 1; 


J.S. and Switzerland Swelter to a 1-1 Draw That Nobody 


if-. 


By Jere Longman 

.Ye h- York Times Service 

PONTIAC, Michigan — This was sup- 
posed to be the spark that started a soccer 
brushfire. the United Slates opening the 
World Cup with a victory and opening the 
eyes of the American public. 

Well, neither did the United States win 

on Saturday nor convert many nonbeliev- 
ers in the’ first World Cup game ever 
played indoors. Bui considering they were 
thoroughly outplayed in the midfield, their 
star forward. Eric Wynalda. was suffering 
from an allergic reaction, and they ran out 
of gas when the temperature reached 106 
degrees (41 degrees Celsius) on the floor of 
the un-air-conditioned Pontiac Silver- 
dome, the Americans could have done a lot 
worse than a 1-1 draw with Switzerland. 

"In a nutshell, we played badly and got a 
point." said midfielder John Harkes. 

A tie is worth a point, and the last time 
Lhe United Stales accumulated any points 


in the World Cup was 1950. Four years 
ago, the Americans lost, 5-1. to Czechoslo- 
vakia in the opener: Saturday's draw must 
be considered an improvement. Whether it 
is enough of an improvement to advance 
beyond group play against Switzerland. 
Colombia, and Romania is another matter. 

“We're still alive." said Bora Milutino- 
vie. the Serb who coaches the .Americans. 

.Alive, yes, bui barely, thanks to a splen- 
did free kick by Wynalda to tie the score in 
the final minute before halftime. 

Still, the Americans need a first- round 
victory to join the 15 other teams that will 
advance to the single-elimination portion 
of the tournament. Realistically, Switzer- 
land figured to be their best chance for a 
victory- Colombia, one of the tournament 
favorites, appears to be out of the Ameri- 
cans’ league. That leaves Romania, an im- 
petuous team loaded with talent and Lhe 
ability to self-destruct. 


"We came here hoping to get 3 points.” 
said defender Alexi Lalas. referring to lhe 
standing. "We're not happy with the result, 
but there’s nothing we car. "do about it now. 
I ‘.'nought we played well at times, but we 
played defense much loo much." 

in :ne 45 ih minute, just before the firs: 
half drilled into injur.- :ime. Harkes made 
a threatening run c*n the dribble and was 
tackled by Swiss midfielder Ciri Sforza. 
setting up’ a free kick Tor the Americans. 
Wynalda was selected even though he had 
awakened Friday morning covered with 
hive*. apparently having suffered an aller- 
gic rezciion to something he ate. 

"i had reactions like this when 1 was a 
kid to certain foods." Wynalda said. “I was 
really feeling fatigued."" 

Team doctors gave him allergy medi- 
cine. but Wynalda slept little Friday night. 
His hands and !tg.% were red and swollen 
on Saturday, and he said he felt itchy and 
numb. He Vomited before the game, and 


there was some question as to whether he 
would play. 

“But this is the World Cup," Wynalda 
said. “No way I wasn’t going to play." 

The free kick was set up from 28 yards, 
and Wynalda hit a wicked shot that kept 
hooking and sinking away from the Swiss 
goalie Marco Pascolo. No one blamed Pas- 
col o. He could do nothing. This was a 
perfect shot, and the ball nicked the under- 
side of the crossbar as it found its w'ay into 
the net to tie the score at 1-1. 

Four years ago, an impetuous Wynalda 
had been ejected from the World Cup 
opener for shoving a nettlesome Czech 
player named LubomirMoravcik. But sea- 
soning in Germany's Bundesliga has given 
him self-assurance and. more important, 
self-control. 

“I was almost in disbelief.” Wynaida 
said of his goal. “It was the greatest goal of 
my life." 


For the Swiss, the goal was something 
else. 

"A stone through the heart,” said de- 
fender Dominique Heir. 

The Swiss had taken a 1-0 lead only five 
minutes earlier when the American mid- 
fiedler Thomas Dooley brought down 
Alain Suiter just outside the penalty area. 
A tackle from behind can lead to a red card 
and automatic ejection at this World Cup. 
but Referee Francisco Lamolina of Argen- 
tina gave Dooley the benefit of the doubt. 

A free lack was set. up from 19 yards, 
and Georges Bregy put a shot over a disor- 
ganized American wall, past a screened 
Tony Meola, the U.S. goalkeeper. The de- 
fensive wall had aligned itself only 6 yards 
from the ball, instead of .the required 10, 
and when the Americans were forced to 
push bade, they fell out of alignment. At 
that point, Meola screamed at his team- 
mates, but in the humid din of 73,425 
spectators they could not hear him. 


four yards away," sahl^Qla^WKjl^wipf * 
flat-faxedly. 

field! one goal appeairtd.tb fee 

a Swiss vjeteny. The ^Amenca^^Cqok&T- 

bold onto the baft, so tbcre”was»&.<wW] 

tadoubt that the Svfes conld hold bc*^tt 

lead. Then 

thing. ■ , • • ■> ; r 

"It was dmara^zing*” ) 

Roy Hodgson. :v S 




Ah non *- 6l ‘ 

Roy Hodgson. •__> . 

Defensively, Atexi 

Balboa smothered ^StephtoO .Chap^te^ 
the Swiss-star, to prervenl anotba: scpreAt 
didn’t hurt, ether, da^Tbe 
forward, Adrian JCaup, sat . ont wzdtvaa 
ankle-injury. ' y ’ ; ' ^ / ri.SMSS- 

Finally, cahSuste^ : 

nudity, both teams sim^yfried tolioM m i 
for a draw. “■ '3 .V ~ - 



-.srr.- . 




' '.'"'ii:. -■ 


XT'*- _■ v 

.iv '■* 


South Korea Pulls Out a Tie 






f f Ws ■■■: 






/■m 


By Elliott Almond 

ts* -I Kpcle-. Time-. Ser.rf 

DALLAS — In a match filled with 
controversy, intrigue, and a dramatic 
comeback. South Korea cid not wait long 
to stun the soccer world or. a steamy eve- 
ning in Texas. 


kick that deflected off the feet of Spanish 
defenders in front of the goal. The re- 
bounding bail caught goalkeeper Jos4 


' •.'•si;-.-.: 


Cahizares by surprise. 

Although it diu not reap any benefits for 
a long time. South Korea's resurrection 
began in the 26th minute after a controver- 
sial call by the referee, Peter Mikkelsen.of 
Denmark. Miguel Nadal was ejected after 
stopping a scoring threat by Ko Jeong 
Woon just outside the penalty area. 

Nadal, Spain’s captain and perhaps its 
most versatile midfielder, made a hard 
sliding tackle, but it was questionable 
whether it was a professional foul, a penal- 
ty committed deliberately to stop a striker 
from getting a clear run on the goal. Such a 
foul results in immediate ejection. 

“The red card slowed down the pace of 
the game and strategies had to be 
changed," said Juan Goikoetxea, a Span- 
ish midfielder. 

With Nadal’s absence. Spain lost its 
presence for the rest of the first half. But 
spectacular goals in the 5 1st and 56th min - 
utes renewed Spain’s verve, despite playing 
a man short. 

The first goal came from forward Julio 
Salinas and some fancy footwork from 
Spain's midfielders. Jose Luis Caminero, a 
second-half substitute, set up the goal by 
beating the South Korean defense inside 







: y : :M 












Playing with a man advantage from the 
26th minute cn. the underrated Korea 
turned a seemingly devastating defeat into 
a surprising draw, tying Spain. 2-2, before 
562247 at the Cotton Bowl on Friday, the 
first day of the World Cup. 

In a most improbable first-round game. 
Spain once again enhanced its unenviable 
reputation as a World Cup underachiever. 
It was South Korea’s second draw in nine 
Cup matches, the first since it lied Bulgaria 
in 1986. The South Koreans have never 
won in this tournament, but by earning a 
point in Group C on Friday, they have a 
good chance of advancing to the second 
round for the first lime. 

Spain, meanwhile, expecting to cruise 
into the second round, needs to regroup. 

Spain's demise came about slowly and 
painfully with temperatures in the 90s (30s 
centigrade), melting the undermanned 
team in the closing minutes. Spain's fa- 
tigued and weakened defenders gave up 
two goals when their legs could no longer 
keep up with the pressing Koreans. 

Seo Jung Won. a veteran of the 1990 
World Cup and the '92 Barcelona Olympic 
Games, tied the score in extra time after 
Hong Myung Bo beat a Spanish defender 
and passed to his unmarked teammate 
inside the penally area. 

Hong scored minutes earlier on a free 


the penalty area. He sent a nice pass to 
Goikoetxea, whose crossing pass went to a 
sliding Salinas in front of the goal 
Inspired by that score, Spain went on 
the offensive and pressured the Koreans. 
Finally, Salinas broke free and tried a nice 
shot that was saved by goalkeeper Choi In 
Young. But Salinas got the ball back and. 


shot again. It was blocked, imt Oai-pen? 
got the rebound and dribidbd to hisrigaL’ 
He tried two hard blasts that totdctedm, 
then crossed it to Goikoetxea after opagoF ; 
ling the second rebound, Goikoeteed took 
the high bad and headed it in behusd;$e 
outstretched arms of .Choi • 

Coach Javier Clemente figured theg^ac 
was in hand and replaced Salinas #*?®; 
minutes later with rehpe Mifiambres, * 
younger player whose expertise is defense 
It was a sound move, until Ferohsdq 
Hierro suffered a shght lta imw 
76th minute and sat downier five 
before returning The once dorxnant Sbhn} 
Korea suddenly came to lift. ■ 

"In the list IS minutes* with Feraahdo 
injured, the team just lost its streak*; 
Clemente said. . - • 

It was enough to.&ve Korea a fxx^rr 
“We figured we were down two atfcte, 
let’s go out and at tack,” Seo said, 
have we got to lose?" 

As it turned exit, nothing 
Gemente said his team was empUfi?:; 
drained from the experience. Spam-ns® 
but one forward in its defense-mmded far- 
mat and usually has little trouble hwl 
big leads. . 

’They’re demoralized because 
won,” he said. “They are a bit dowi£a3& ■ 
stunned. - --< - ' ■;'•>•*<{ ‘ 

Oemente said losing Nadal changed^* 
color of the match. - - ; . 

"Playing with 10 men is very 
said. “At the end we wtae tremendously 
tired. We couldn’t keep the Korean^ 
because we simply couldn’t bear liKf pres- 
sure any more. - 


h - - 


Par 


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iii J’.*: 1 

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Hong Myung Bo of South Korea leaping over the Spanish midfielder Luis Enrique Martinez; the teams played to a 2-2 tie. 


ivaie Ji 


The A ut Kittled Press 


CHANTILLY, Virginia — A plane 
carrying Mexican soccer fans to the 
World Cup crashed while approaching 
Dulles International Airport in heavy 
fog Saturday, killing all 12 people 
aboard. 

Carl Vogt, chairman of the National 
Transportation Safety Board, said the jet 
missed one approach to Lhe airport and 
was attempting a second when it went 
down in a heavily wooded area on air- 
port property. 

"There’s no one alive,” Vogt said. 

A makeshift morgue was set up nearby 


and the bodies were to be transported to 
a Virginia medical examiner’s facility in 
northern Virginia, police spokesmen 
said. 

Jos£ Henonin. a spokesman for the 
private, commercial chartering company 
TaESA in Mexico City, said the plane 
was an Executive Leaijet with two crew- 
men and 10 passengers. He said the pas- 
sengers were headed to Washington for 
World Cup soccer. 

He said the plane left Mexico City on 
Friday evening and made a three-hour 
fueling stop in New Orleans. Dulles Air- 
port is west of Washington. 


Henonin said the plane was chartered 
for 51.500 by ios£ Luis Garza Hemdn- 
dez. owner of a private financial compa- 
ny. to take his family to Washington for 
the Mexico Norway game Sunday. 

The Mexican Embassy in Washington 
said the victims included three teen- 
agers. three younger children, two men 
and two women. 


Police and rescue workers with dogs 
combed Lhe wreckage area, about four 
miles south of the airport’s main termi- 
nal. Bulldozers had to be brought in to 
clear a path for rescue teams. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

The British bookmakers Lad- 
brokes made Ireland a 16 -to-l 
bet Sunday to win the World 
Cup after its 1-0 victory over 
Italy. The Irish up from 25-1, 
while Italy went from 5-1 to 8-1. 

Germany and Brazil re- 
mained the co-favorites at 3-1. 

The United States went from 
80-1 to 125-1 despite tying 
Switzerland. 

Spain bad been the best 
backed team in the Cup, having 
moved from 22-1 early last 
week to 16-1, while Saudi Ara- 
bia remained at 500-1. with a 
lone wager of £10 placed on it. 

Many Irish fans backed their 
team at 5-1 to beat the Italians, 
while shrewder ones got 9-1 
about a 1-0 scoreline. 

A spokesman for the book- 
maker Hills said on Sunday: 
u We alone have a £1 million 
liability on the Irish winning." 

• Italy was in a slate of 
mourning Sunday. 

The loss at the hands of a 
team Italy had beaten in their 
last six meetings made banner 
headlines in most newspapers, 


which slepped up pressure on 
the Italian team coach, Arrigo 
SacchL 

The streets of Rome emptied 
shortly before the match began 
on Saturday night and re- 
mained deserted after it ended. 

“Everyone is staying at home 
to cry.” said one restaurant 
waiter, who had been watching 
the match outside on a small 
pocket television between serv- 
ing courses. 

On the Mediterranean island 
of Capri, the holiday spirit 
evaporated soon after Ireland's 
12th minute goal. 

Only foreigners uninterested 
in the sport were to be seen on 
the streets, which fell unusually 
silent for a Saturday evening. 

in Milan, the home of league 
champion AC Milan, the city 
was stunned. 

The tooting of car horns that 
is the mark of any major foot- 
ball engagement died down 
within minutes of Ray Hought- 
on’s winner. 

Italian newspapers on Sun- 
day did not spare their scorn. 

“Italy makes its debut among 


the whistles," ran a front-page 
headline across eight columns 
in B Giomo. 

The Turin- based La Stamps 
said the team’s World Cup de- 
but was nothing less than a 
“legendary Fiasco.” 

• Dubliners defied a pub 
strike to celebrate their team’s 
victory with a staggering street 
party that continued into the 

mfIi, — r 0 l 


early hours of Sunday. 
‘There’ll be a lot 


“There’ll be a lot of sore 
heads and not many healthy 
ones, said a Dublin policeman 
watching two men in shorts, 
green football shirts and Statue 
of Liberty hats totter by. 

No incidents were reported 
ui a good-natured scramble to 
find an open pub after bar staff 
from the MANDATE trade 
union voted to go on strike on 
the most important day in the 
national calendar since the last 
World Cup in 1990. 

That scramble started about 
midday as people sought out an 
open pub. Police said many 
people were in their bar-side 
seats by mid-afternoon to make 
sure of a seat near a television 


for the match which, kicfea&sffi 
hours later. -/ 

• Iranian viewers were; ^ 
prised to see spectators 
winter coats during j&e/jfrsC 
World Cup march play'^d r j sfe ; 
day in the' sweltering hSsfr fci 
Chicago. ' ; . 

For the first , : 

Islamic revolution in 197Sy&. 
mans were able to wafeh 4b* 
telecasts of World 
But "un-lslamic scrac^fep^- 
spectators were appaiisitifc#. 
placed with pre-record&Jdot' 
age of fans weanhcSaSats* 


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. The . aim was., apparaltlyt® ; 
avoid showing women mxeyfed- -i 

ing clothes, ■ 

• Two fans at Chicag<2sS0l- . 
to Field had to bea^^l 
return balls. Jddced incd'i-d 1 ^ 
stands during the qp$mn£ 
match between Germanyrahd 
Bolivia. - 

The spectators ■ 

Jey were supposed to giwlhe . 
balls back, since basebalTishs 
me allowed to kecp any vha^ 
that stray into tW srimdS- 

(At, ReutergrAf?} 




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SPORTS 




Lucky Houghton Makes It a Grand Day for Irish 




;r’ > 

■ I V* 






:>nuni^is won' 


By Ian Thomsen 

ImemananaJ Herald Tribune 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New Jer- 
sey — The Irish might have felt unset- 
tled as their team bus pulled off the 
highway toward Giants Stadium, 
where the Italians would be awaiting, 
where down below, everyone says, the 
body of Jimmy Hoffa lies sleeping. 
The humidity was practi call y suffocat- 
ing and the surroundings looked lik e 
one steaming toxic swamp, as the bus 
pulled into a parking lot occupied by 
tho us a nds and thniisand s and thou- 
sands of waving Irish. 

They nrighl have been shouting sur- 
prise. 

This might very well have been Ire- 
land. 

Inside the stadium, at least twice as 
large as Lansdowne Road in Dublin, 
woo all the people who dreamed of 
oomi ng. They all came. Some came 
from New York and some came from 
Boston but they all came from Ireland 
on this Saturday. Ray Houghton 
scored the only goal and he described 
it later in his Scottish brogue, but Ray 
Houghton is Irish — by his fathers 
Irish blood — and there’s no sense in 
fretting launching points when blood 
and spirit are all that matter. They 
might have boarded the team bus in a 
foreign country, but now they were 
getting off in die country where they 
never lose. 

“I was expecting 10,000 to 12,000 
Irish here,” marveled the Irish manag- 
. er. Jack Charlton, who always ex- 


presses a bit of fatherly pride even if he 
was born and raised and capped in 
England. He thought about the 30,000 
people who made his life easier; or 
perhaps they were 60.000. with some 
seats going for $700 or more. He said, 
“They must have spent fortunes on 
tickets.” 

Ireland never had won a match in 
the World Cup finals (having ad- 
vanced to the 1990 quarterfinals on 
three draws and a shootout), but it 
won 1-0 against a country seeking its 
fourth World Cop tide. The superior 
Italians had only to sing their game at 
the tops of their lungs and Ireland 
would have no chance. The superior 
Italians were mutes. The opening whis- 
tle set off a green and white trembling 
roar, and 11 seconds into the match 
Steve Staunton fed that roar with a 
missile well wide of the Italian goal. It 
bad no chance but that was not the 
point. 

The goal came in the i 2th minute via 
the sternest Italian defender. Franco 
Barest: it bounced off his head like an 
acorn falling from a tree. This one time 
he wasn’t sure whether to nod it to a 
teammate or drop it at Ms own feet, 
and next thing he knew he was in 
Ireland chasing Houghton — die same 
Ray Houghton whose goal in the 1988 
upset of England had got this ball 
rolling. Before then no (me had much 
cared about soccer in Ireland. Now 
Houghton was Tunning to his left out- 
side of the box at die behest of 50,000 
groupies, the ball bouncing nicely with 


thanks to Baresi. The goalkeeper was 
too far out and Houghton’s wrong- 
footed shot had the topspin properties 
of a volley. The place sounded like it 
was blowing up — has any soccer sta- 
dium in the U.S. ever sounded like 
this? — as the Italians came to realize 
that Baresi, their most dependable as- 
set, had been violated. 

“He tries that shot in practice all the 
lime and I’ve never seen him make it," 
Charlton said of Houghton. 

Isn’t it just like them — denigra ting 
themselves but really laughing at their 
uppity opponents? They watched the 
I talian*: perform all of the beautiful 
bides, then beat them to every loose 
balL For instance: Roberto Baggio of 
Italy is a most beautiful player, snaring 
himself with surroimdmg teammates 
tike light through a prism, but for all of 
his grace Italy went the Erst 18 min- 
utes without getting off a shot. Anigo 
Sacchi, who as the coach of Italy has 
developed none of the spine so appar- 
ent in Charlton’s reign, had begun by 
sacrificing his strength, dropping one 
of his strikers back into midfield and 
effectively isolating Baggio up front. 
Baggio drew out beautiful passes 
which his teammates cl umsil y could 
not convert; nor could they arrange 
similar opportunities for him. You 
should have seen the glares be threw at 
Giuseppe Signori, his fellow striker. 

Of ail die 24 World Cup finalists, 
none had received more attention from 
the American press than the Italians 
and their Baggio. They had been as- 


signed to New York, where they could 
expect to be supported by a huge Ital- 
ian population while Baggio fulfilled 
his stardom. But it seems now that the 
I talians have lost their faith. That is 
the only way to explain the difference 
between Italian brilliance and Irish in- 
spiration. 

The Irish are elderly, which should 
have put them at further risk in the 
surly heat Paul McGrath is 34, and he 
should not have been able to eventual- 
ly swallow up Baggio’s passing and 
shooting lanes. At the receiving end of 
the long bail, no true replacement has 
been found for Niall Quinn, the Irish 
striker whose knee was shredded 
months ago — and yet the Irish could 
have scored at least twice more. 

They lead you through stages of be- 
lief. At first there was the idea that one 
goal could not stand up against Bag- 
gio, but that thought was disrupted by 
back-passes to goalkeeper Packie Bon- 
ner whenever possible. In the second 
half Sacchi inserted Daniele Massaro, 
the leading scorer at AC Milan this 
year, and tne attack was revived for 25 
minutes in the Irish zone. But nothing 
was ever built there. Every once in a 
while an Irishman would let go of a 

S balloon and everyone in the sta- 
would absently watch it drifting 
across the unused Italian half of the 
field; while on the sidelines Jack 
Chariton stood in a white baseball cap 
and tie, holding out boules of water to 
bis players. 

Chariton works hard for them, and 


they play for him and for their public, 
which rewards the players and keeps 
them hones L So in the 72d minute, 
when you might have thought of them 
as the same cynical Irish who played 
not to lose four years ago, the Italian 
crossbar was suddenly rattled by John 
Sheridan from Roy Keane, and five 
minutes later Andy Townsend’s twirl- 
ing corner header to the far post was 
stopped only by the outstretched hand 
of the goalkeeper Gianluca Pagliuca. 

They should be too old, but they are 
in fact better than ever, with victories 
in the last two months against Germa- 
ny, the Netherlands and now tins win, 
which “has to be one of the best results 
in football,” Chariton would say, after 
he had seen two misguided Irishmen 
run onto the field. They were tackled 
face down into the grass and hand- 
cuffed by New Jersey police who no 
doubt feared the thrift of hooligan- 
ism. 

“The police were only doing their 
job,” Charlton said, “but they should 
remember these were only fans who 
were excited, not people who were go- 
ing to run on and assassinate anyone.” 

The cheering turned into a low, 
moaning boo at this sight of force, and 
then it turned into a cheer a gain For 
here came Jack Chariton, leaning 
down into the fray to make sure his 
supporters, however misguided, had 
not been hurt. They walked off the 
field together, Charlton’s arm around 
the others' shoulder — friends, it 
seems now, for life. 


Belgium Strikes 
Early, Then Holds 
Morocco Off, 1-0 


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Riy Houghton (center, left photo) watching Ms shot Oat was enough to win it for Ireland, 1-0, over the Italy. Marc De&yse (right) head the ball past Khalil Azmi to give Belgium its victory . 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ORLANDO, Florida — Bel- 
gium scored on its first open 
chance Sunday, then was saved 
twice by the crossbar as it beat 
Morocco, 1-0. 

In a later match in Washing- 
ton, Norway’s Kjetil Rekdal 
opened the scoring in the 84th 
minute to beat Mexico, 1-0, in a 
Group E match. 

Hoping for an early goal to 
make play easier in the searing 
heat, Belgium went ahead in the 
] 1th minute as forward Luc Ni- 
lis (Tossed the ball into the pen- 
alty box from the right side and 
Marc Degiyse capitalized on 
the hesitation of goalkeeper 
Khalil Azmi to head it over the 
goalie from six meters out. 

“My timing was great. But 
the ’keeper came out too late,” 
said Degjyse, all of 1.72-meters 
(5 feet, 8 inches) tati. 

Morocco was then lucky not 
to fall farther behind when Jo- 
sip Weber's downward header 
from Rudi Smidts’ left-wing 
cross was prevented from going 
into the net when it hit team- 
mate Fjizo Scifo. 

But while Morocco threat- 
ened often, it just as often had 
bad luck. 

In the 41st minute, playmak- 
er Muslapha Hadji chested a 
ball down for Mohamed 
Chaouch. but his volley from 16 
meters hit the crossbar. 

In the 69th minute, Ahmed 
ja, fresh from the bench, 
[e a powerful run on the 
right and found Chaouch open 
in the penalty area. Morocco's 
lone striker headed the ball 
strongly, but was slopped by a 
sterling save from Michel 
Preud’homme, who pushed the 
ball onto the crossbar. 

“It was a world-class save,” 
said Belgium’s coach. Paul Van 
Himst. “But also, we have to 
thank the heavens.” 

So did Preud'homme. “I was 
looking at die ball hilling the 
crossbar and thinking. ’Why 
don’t you come back into my 
arms,’ ” he said. “The ball did.” 

“We lost but I fed that a tie 
would have been more fair” 
Morocco's coach. Abdellah 
Blinda, said. “We have two 
more games to lode forward to. 
Life doesn’t slop with Bel- 
gium.” 

The other Group F teams, 
the Netherlands and Saudi Ara- 
bia, play each other Monday in 
Washington. John de Wolf was 
forced out of the Dutch lineup 
Sunday after tearing his right 
calf muscle. 

In the second half, Belgium 
often slowed the pace to a walk 
in heat that peaked at more 
than 37 degrees centigrade ( 100 
Fahrenheit) on the pitch. 

“The conditions were horren- 


dous,” said Van HimsL “We’re 
absolutely soaked.” 

When the pressure increased 
early in that half with shots 
from Chaonch and midfielder 

Rachid Daoudi, Van Himst 
turned conservative, replacing 
'Ntiis with defender Marc Em- 
mers. Playmaker Scifo was of- 
ten seen helping out to ease the 
pressure. 

But Belgium could have put 
the match away in the opening 
half, when Ntiis and fellow for- 
ward Weber squandered several 
chances. 

In the 21st minute, Weber 
and Scifo fell over each other 
trying to head in a cross, and on 
the stroke of half time Weber 
and Ntiis became tangled when 
they had most of the defense 
and the goalkeeper beaten. 

Three minutes from time, 
Azmi was carried off on a 
stretcher after charging out of 
his area and smashing into the 
advancing Weber. It was a 
sending-off offense but the ref- 
eree, Jose Torres of Colombia, 
had already blown his whistle 
for offside. 

Zakaria Alaoui came on for 
the closing moments. 

“The first game is always 
tough, but Tm delighted that we 
won,” Van Hims t said. “I can 
guarantee we’re going to cele- 
brate tonight 

“Obviously, the Netherlands 
are going to be very different, 
but we’U see how our players 
recover afterwards.” 

•In Belgium, one person was 
shot and wounded when cele- 
brations of that country's vic- 
tory turned violent police said. 

They said the shooting took 
place in the southern Belgian 
town of Verviers when fighting 
broke out between Belgian and 
Moroccan soccer fans. 

A police spokesman said the 
wounded person was not in a 
serious condition and that the 
situation was under control. 

Celebrations began in good 
humor in Brussels with Belgian 
and Moroccan soccer fans min- 
gling in jubilant scenes. But 
pioice later said there had been 
some fighting between rival 
fans. 

The area around Brussels his- 
toric Grand’PIace was sealed 
off by police afterward, Belgian 
radio said. It quoted Brussels 
Mayor Freddy Thielemans as 
saying the fights had been 
caused by a few troublemakers. 

Some 500 policemen were 
called up to monitor the World 
Cup festivities in Brussels, 
where some of the 200,000 Mo- 
roccans residing in Belgium 
live. 

(AP, Reuters, AFP) 


Parking Lot 18: A Major Melting Pot cmehpab of world cup games, results, stamm mcs 


v.,. f*ej 


•V: 

.„.k ■ 


J 31 


, . \\i_- 

- 


By Joe Sexton 

New York Times Service 

EAST RUTHERFORD, 
New Jersey — The spiritual epi- 
center of multiculturalism 
-moved to paring lot No. 18. 
There were Irish, Italians, un- 
apologetie capitalists, and taD- 
' gate anarchists. The state police 
drove squad cars through the 
-heat ana hailstorms of soccer 

_ balls. National flags were raised 

over cars and the international 
tug of tdevision had people 
. dunboagiioto their trunks to 
stare at tninisareens protected 
-V^from the jam’s glare. 

The melting pot mi gh t never 
have quite boded like this be- 
.icae, 

“It’s a. shame the rest of the 
,countfy hasn't figured out this 
is what’s happening,” said Jeff 
DeLuca, a soccer referee from 
Phfladdrplna- 

*' DeEuca, wearing an “Italia” 
shirt, managed to make it np the 
— turnpike without injuring Ms 
„ passenger, a man named Mike 
Moran wht 


_ r who wore a different set 
of tricolors across his chest 
• 'They joined thousands of oth- 
| ess who ‘made their way to the 
"Meadcrwlands for. Saturday af- 
’ tornqon’s Wpjid Cup be- 
tween bbfatiid and Italy. 

. And flitriday’s first bit of 
combatrrbfflAgrcmnded some- 
.>* & ‘ -what comically by a blaring 

r> * ' - :h • ' puhKc-addiess- system playing 

. “Ifsa SmanTyortd” — was the 
su WeLfight far national control 
ofparitinglhtNo.TB-TrishflagS 
; dominated' certain quadrants, 
" Italian - flags others. Arid then 
■' tberewerethe modest footholds 
‘ gained by. accidental insurgents 
such as the Colombians. 

“Hey. we got our tickets in a 
'..lottey,” saiq Francisco Rodri- 

- ’ g^^ vdipggtdiscaeetly wthhis 

-VBiphswdL “Colombia wound 
. ■ up in- Los Angeles. We wound 
'<up hcati, Bm irs a global sport 
And this is « qbcc in a lifetime 

.chance.” .. V ........ 

- Most everyone seemed to be 

- making the most of the chance. . 
.--Souvenir steads were overflow- 
ing with traffic in tongues and 



. Bob Sras/Agose Fobcc-Ptbm 

WboopiE^ it iqi in the parking lot before the Imh-Itahan match. 


-f.TJ'-'- 




doflars, the only apparent re- 
striction posted on notices 
around the parking lot: “No 



■ - *** Zb ** ' 
- \ 

- 

.‘i-j “if’ 

-- L'*' ’ J 

- ..j - l • / ^ 

+ r " ' ^ -fl' 4 

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in setting area.” 

Informal soccer matches were 
played nonstop, with the 
thoughtful alteration of the 
rules to allow the ball to be 
touched by hands if it was in 
danger of knocking over a beer 

- There was even the adjoining 
parking Jot presence of a park 
named Amusements of Ameri- 
ca for the use of fans after the 
game. Hey, what’s more Ameri- 
can to offer the visitors from 
Capri and KBlarney than rides 
on the Gravitron? The schedule 
for the night included racing 
pigs and hypnotists. 

- The great magnetic attrac- 
tion, though, was soccer, and 
there was a sense of both vindi- 
cation and excitement that was 
as palpable as the beat off the 
'ashpait. People who adored the 
sport were authentically 
thrilled. People who could man- 


age a faint connection to the 
country of their forebear’s ori- 
gins looked quite comfortable 
in their role as momentary luna- 
tics. 

“I’m American but made 
with Irish parts,” said Bob Do- 
cherty of Kearny, New Jersey. 

Docherty stood in a circle of 
people from Kearny, the town 
whore three of the players on 
the American national team 
played their formative soccer. 
There were veterans of every 
Cosmos game in the circle, as 
well as recent converts. They 
loved soccer’s moment in the 
sun, even if it was 95 degrees (34 
degrees edrius). 

x Look, this, the World Cup 
might never happen again in the 
United states,’ 1 Richard Henry 
said. “But it’s not as if this is the 
first time this place has turned 
into a scene like this over soc- 
cer. In Kearny, we can’t get 
away from soccer.” 

Certainly no one was looking 
to escape from the sport's hold 


on Saturday. Willie McArdJe, a 
native of Dublin who works in 
London, employed a secret net- 
work of connections and clan- 
destine payments to secure tick- 
ets months ago. 

“And that was just to get 
them from my brother,” McAr- 
dle said. 

The process of procurement 
was rather more straightfor- 
ward for Donato DiLeo. He 
paid $250 apiece for a pair of 
premier tickets Saturday morn- 
ing. 

“That was a bargain,” said 
DiLeo, standing around a bar- 
becue grQL 

“Luck of the Irish," said 
Luigi QuagHa 

Ah, irony, along with wine, 
whiskey and the easy wisdom 
that comes with enough of both, 
was in rich supply in parking lot 
18. 

“We wfll win or we will lose,” 
said Quaglia. “But we wiD defi- 
nitely eal better than the Irish." 

All triumphs, then, had 
meaning as the game came clos- 
er. An Irish soccer club was able 
to hang its banner at one end of 
the lot, not minding a bit that it 
was hung over a latrine. Frank 
Sinatra, his voice pouring out of 
opened car doors, held his own 
against the bagpipes. The Irish, 
who worried about the heat's 
effect on their team, waged a 
brave, weaponless war against 
the sun. But you jump in the 
melting pot and you can get 
burned. 

Cruising through the good- 
will and carcinogenic fallout 
from Italian sausage burning 
everywhere was the New Jersey 
State Police. One squad car, 
Hied with three officers who 
would only identify themselves 
as “grunts,” inched its way 
through children and adult de- 
bates. 

“No problem,” said the grunt 
who was driving. “A good 
crowd.” 

And so nor a bad start to 
some ethnic conflict the whole 
world can gel enthusiastic 
about 


FIRST ROUND 

AP Bmos Eastern Standard rime 
Tlwaa points mmrtlad tor a notary 

GROUP A 

W L T GF GA Pta 
Romania 10 0 3 13 

Switzerland 0 0 1111 

Unrtauswea 0 0 i i i i 

Colombia Otoi 30 

Saturday, June ts 

Ai Pontiac, Men 

Switzerland I. Urn rod Slams I. tie 
At Pesadene. CtU. 

Romania 3. OMomMal 

Wednesday June 22 
« Pontiac. Mu* 

Romania vs. Swazertand. A OS p m 
At Pasadena. Cant. 

Colombia v*. United Slates, 7 36 p.m. 

Sunday June 26 

AI Pasadena. Cert. 

Romania v*. Untied Slates. 4:05 p.m. 

At Sian tom. can 
Swtaenand w. Colombia, 4:05 pm 


Brazil 

Cameroon 

Russia 


GROUP B 

W L T 


GF GAPS 

0 0 0 


&mday. Juie 19 
Ai Pasadena. Cairf 
Cameroon vs. Sued 7 SB p.m 
Monday June 20 
4t Stanford, Cabr. 

Brazil vs Russia. 4:06 pm 

Friday June 24 
Aj Stanford, CAW 
Brazil vs Cameroon, 405 p m. 

AlRondac. uich. 

Sweden vs Russia. 705 p.m 
Tuesday June 28 
At Stanford. Cafrf 
Rueaia vs Cameroon. 4-OS pm 
ai Pontiac. Micb. 

Brazlvs Sweden. 4:05 p.m 

GROUP C 

w l r of a* pb 

Germany 10 0 10 3 

SoufliKorea 0 0 12 3 1 

Spun 0 0 12 2 1 

BaMa 0 10 0 10 

Friday. June 17 
AI Chicago 
Germany 1. Boliwaa 

At Dados 

spam 2. south Korea 2. He 

Tuesday June 21 
At Chicago 
Germany vs. Spain. AOS p.m 

Thursday June 23 
AI Foaboro. Mass 
South Korea vs Bobwia, 7:35 pm 
Monday Jim 27 

Ai Chicago 

BoBma vs spam. 4 as P nv 
AI Dallas 

Germany ». South Korea. 4 05 p m 
GROUP D 

W L 


Sakiiday June 25 
AI Fosboro. Maes 
Argentina vs Ntgeda. 405 p.m. 

Sunday June 26 
At emcago 

Bulgaria vs Greece. 1235 pm. 

Thursday June 30 
AtFoxboro, Mass 
Greece vs. Algeria. 7 35 pm 
At Dellas 

Argentina vs Bulgaria. 735 pm 
GROUP E 

W L T GF GA PH 
Ireland 10 0 10 3 

Mexico O O 0 O D 0 

Norway 0 0 0 0 0 0 

Iteh 0 10 0 10 

Saturday. June 18 
At East Rumarfora. NJ. 

Ireland 1. Italy 0 

Sunday June 19 
At Wash in g ton 
Norway vs. Me x ico . 435 pm 

Thursday June 23 

At East Rutherford, NJ. 
rtaty vs Norway. 4 <15 p.m. 

Friday June 24 
At Orlando, Fla. 

Mexico vs. Man. 1235 pm. 

Tuesday June 28 

At East Rutherford. NJ. 

Ireland vs Norway. 12:35 pm 
At Washington 
Italy vs. Marco. 1235 pm 

GROUP F 

W L T GF GA Pie 
0 10 3 

0 
0 
0 


Group FwCnar vs Group Beacond glace, 1205 
pm 

At Stan tad. CaUt. 

Group B winner vs Group A. c or p thm placet 
535pm. 

Tuesday July 5 

Game 43 

At Porboro. Mass 

Group D winner vs. Group B, E er F Wra place. 
105 pm 

Game 44 

At East Rutherford. NJ. 

Group E wfrmar vs Group D second place, 435 
pm 

QUARTERFINALS 

Saturday Jidy 9 
Game AS 

At FoxDaro. Mass. 

Game 43 winner vs. Game 39 winner. 1235 pm. 


Belgium 


Seudi Anuta 
Morocco 


0 0 
0 0 
1 0 


1 0 
a o 
o o 
0 1 

Sunday. Jiaw 19 

At Orlando. Fla 
Belgium I, Morocco 0 

Monday June 20 
ai Washington 

NePwriandevs Saudi Arabia, 736 pm 
Safoaduy June 25 
At Orlando, Fla. 

Belgium vs Netherlands 1235 pm. 

At East R u tnerfora. Nj. 

Snail Arabia vs Morocco, 1235 pm 

We dnesday Jwie 29 

At Orlando. F7s 

Morocco vs Netherlands, 1235 p.m. 
AtWeMingion 

Belgium vs Saud Arabia. 1235 pm. 


SECOND ROUND 
Saturday July 2 

Game 37 
A l Chicago 

GrtxipC winner vs Group A. Bor Fthkd place, I 

1.05 p.m 


Ai 

Game 41 winner vs Gama 42 winner. 335 pm. 
Simday July 10 

Qwei 47 

AI Earn Rutherford. NJ. 

Game 44 wmar vs Gama 37 winner. 1236 p.m. 

Game 4* 

At Stanford, Can. 

Game 39 winner va Gama 40 winner. 335 pm 

SEMIFINALS 

Wednesday Jidy 13 
At Eaa Ruthartoid, NJ. 

Game 47 winner vs Game 45 Manner, 435 p m. 
A! Pasadena, Can. 

Game 48 winner vs Game 46 wkmer. 7:35 pm. 

THIRD PLACE 

Saturday July 16 
M Pasadena, Cafit. 

Semifinal loan. 335 pm 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

Swday July 17 
Ai PBsadana. CdH. 

Semifinal winners. 335 pm 


Weekend Match Results 

Beiglmn 1, Mor o cco 0 
Scorer: Marc Deenrae mthj 
Referee: Jose Torres Cadeno (Colombia) 
Yellow cords: Belgium — Georges Gran 
(Sard). JoeJp Weber £901 h); Morocco-, now 
redine Novbet (»tn). Roettid Daoudi (S8ftiJ 

Romania & Colombia I 
Scorers: Romania — Florin Roduclohi 
(16th and B9ltil. Gheorphe Hoof (34th); Co- 
lombia — AdoHo Valencia (43rd). 

Referee: Jamal shorn (Syria). 

Yellow cards: Colombia — Lute Herrera 
(36th). Carlos Vahferramo 153rd). Lewiel Al- 
varez f7D1h); Romania — Florin RodudDki 
(39). 

Irrtand L Italy 0 
Scorer: Rtrr Houghton llllh). 

Relerea: Mario Von Der Ende (Nether- 
lands). 

Yellow cards: Ireland— Terry Phelan IX), 
Tommy Coyne (X), Denis Irwin (81). 
SwtoertaMl V iMteO Stales l 
Scorers: Swilzerlml — Georoes Bregv 
(39lh); United Slates — Erie Wynalda (45th). 

Referee: Fnmctsco Oscar Lamolino (Ar- 
eendno). 

Yellow cards. Swinentux) — DomVnhiue 
Herr (28lh), Nestor Subiot (B8lh); United 
Stales — John Homes noth). 

Spain 2. soeth Korea 2 
Scorers: Spain — Julia Salinas (Slstt. Juan 
GdkaeTxea (S6ih>; South Korea HengMvone 
Bo (84th), 5oe Jura Won (90th). 

Referee: Peter MikXeteen (Denmark). 
Yellow cords: Spain— Luis Enrique I24lh), 
Jose Camlnero (72d); South Korea— Kim Joo 
Sung (37tfl). ChoJ Young II (alstt. 

Red cord: Sootn — Miguel Angel Nodal 
(26th). 

Germnay 1, Bolivia 1 
Scorer; Jurgen Klinsmann tooth). 
Referee: Arturo Brfalo Carter 1 Mexico) 
Yellow cords: Germany — Jurgen Kohler 
(7IM, Anareas Mailer (54th); Bolivia — Er- 
win Sanchez (37th), Julio Cesar BaldTvtoso 
(40th). cartas Bocla («7ttil. 

Red card: Bolivia — Marco Etdwverrv 
(82d). 


Al Washington 

Gioup A second plage ve. Group C second | 
piece, 4-35 p m. 

Sunday July 3 


The Official Sprint World Cup 
Information Line 

Call 

+ 1 + 177 + 230 + 4348 * 

for daily updates on scores y players and 
game recaps 


Aigeniina 

Bulgaria 

Graece 

Nigeria 


D a 
o o 
0 0 
0 0 


CT GA Pts 

0 0 0 


Tuesday. Juno 21 

As Foxboro. Mass 
Argent™ vs. Greece. 1235 pm 
aidnus 

Nigeria v&. Bulgaria. 7.35 pm. 


At Dallas 

Group F second place va, Group B eacona | 
place. I 05 p m 

One 40 

Ai Pasadena. Calif. 

Grup A winner vs. Group C. D or E third place. 
4:35 pm 

Monday July 4 
Game 41 

A) Oriando. Fl& 



Sprint 


Mferft/CopUSAM 


Calls will be billed standard IDD rales 
■ in Italy, dial +1+21 1-2304348 










Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HE RALD TRI BUNE. MONDAY , JXJNE 


A Modem Tradition: 


enter 


By Suzy Menkes 

L lnlfmaiifmal HrrdU Tnbune 

?^ D ?N : — it Is what the British 
. . ^ desirable residence" — two 
-i-”? , ‘ 8* 1 ; a n °Me arched doorwav. 
classical colonnades, all inspired by 
the master architect Sir Christopher 
.y ren. The house stands knee-high to 
■ ^ c r ealor * P a wd Linley, who is sbow- 
Jitg how this classy humidor opens its 
facade to store cigars. 

is famous Tor three things: for 
having the queen as an aunt," as his 
mother. Princess Margaret, once fam- 
ously expressed it: for marrying Iasi 

sasaffistr®] 

Ah tn\‘tisioihil feriei ■— 
tibniit people for whnm frift v'-s. I 

»ri le i t a way of afe gEd < '/ - 

year the classy, aristocratic Serena 
Stanhope, and for carving a serious, 
successful career out of wood. 

His commitment to the carpentry 
business he set up nine years ago can 
be seen in the airy store filled with 
intricately inlayed furniture and 
sculpted objects. And in the trium- 
phant tour of America he has just 
done with the 25 limited-edition hu- 
midors be made for Alfred Dunhili. 
The dollhouse-size boxes, selling at 
£9300 apiece, were a sellout in New 
York and went on to three more 
American cities and to Hong Kong. 
At last month's London launch, even 
Princess Diana, who supposedly 
banned smokers from her home at 
Kensington Palace, turned out to sup- 
port her estranged husband's cousin. 

Linley. 33. has succeeded in tapping 
into traditional British taste while giv- 
ing his furniture and objects a veneer of 
modernity. 

“I am not really a ‘trend’ person," 
he says, explaining that his instinct is 
to take references from the past and 
make “shapes that please people." 

That does not mean making repro- 
duction furniture, but designing ob- 
jects based on the architectural princi- 
ples of the past that are shown in the 
linear waiercoJors that are part of each 
private commission, t They have includ- 
ed a table for the boardroom of New 
York's Metropolitan Museum). In 
1993, Linley published a book about 


Europe 


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classical furniture that celebrates the 
symmetry and harmony of the great 
tradition. 

Bui he emphasizes the importance 
to his own business of his role as 
designer and team leader to the 20 
craftsmen in his workshops in 
Gloucestershire and 15 independent 
specialists. 

"What I have tried to do is to get the 
message across with a design point of 
view," he says. “You can make a beau- 
tiful piece of furniture, but if the de- 
sign doesn't work it is a waste of 
craftsmanship." 

His fascination with wood started 
when he was a 15-year-old pupil at the 
art-conscious school his parents chose 
for him. While preparing for a wood- 
work exam, he made a walnut box that 
his grandmother, the Queen Mother, 
now “keeps cigars in." He began to 
appreciate the complexity of joinery, 
the mitering, dovetailing, the “work- 
shop leases." the pleasure of “things 
going perfectly together." 

Marquetry and complex inlay have 
become the benchmarks of David Lin- 
ley Furniture at the shop on Pimlico 
Road in London. A classic console 
table might be inlaid with woods that 
sound as though they have been felled 
in some enchanted forest: burr ash. 
macassar ebony, solid oak and syca- 
more. The same tactile appeal and 
refined taste is applied to gift objects 
like wooden candlesticks selling at 
£35, lamp bases or a S 10 carved egg, 

"Wood as a material is easily under- 
stood — it is basically a tree diopped 
up." says Linley. "You can take people 
miles away, but the more urban we get 
wood is still a material that everybody 
knows from inside themselves. People 
have a natural affinity to wood. It is not 
cold, it is warm. It has feel appeal — 
unlike metal or plastic." 

The Dunhili humidors are three-di- 
mensional homages to five classical 
masters who shaped the history of Eng- 
lish architecture: Inigo Jones, who fa- 
vored Renaissance classicism; the Pal- 
ladian exponent William Kent: 
Augustus Pugin, the founding father of 
the Victorian Gothic revival and cre- 
ator of the Houses of Parliament; John 
Soane, whose soaring arches inspired 
London's landmark red telephone ki- 


WEATHER 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



language 


Down in 


dui4i'phrr M-wr 

David Linley and the “Pugin" box, inspired by the Houses of Parliament 


osks. and Christopher Wren, who de- 
signed St. Paul"* Cathedral. 

Each box ha* a smaller offspring, 
selling at £1.500. which uses a motif (a 
classic urn, a Gothic window or 
moulding) borrowed from Lhe origi- 
nal The project, which took just a 
year to complete, dovetails the artistic. 
upper-cTUM image of Linley with the 
origins of Dunhili as a smoker's para- 
dise. 

Linley is inevitably accused of trad- 
ing on the royal connection that he says 
he has “always tried to ignore." He 
calls his mother, who would keep his 
furniture in the hall of her palace apart- 
ments in his early days, “one of our 
best salespersons." 

He also praises his father, Lord 
Snowdon, for "starting it all off.” 

Unlev studied woodcraft under the 


direction of John Makepeace, Bri tarn’s 
premier furniture designer. What might 
have seemed a whimsical career choice 
in the yuppie 1980s, now seems pre- 
scient and part of a burgeoning interest 
in craft in England, not unlike the late 
Victorian movement. 

“But the Arts and CraTls revival of 
100 years ago was based on a dislike of 
industrial mechanization and a less 
than worldly outlook on life." says 
Linley. 

Linley is modest about the claim, 
expressed by the aesthete Sir Roy 
Strong, that the meticulously crafted 
furniture will be “the antiques of to- 
morrow." He admits to “the same pro- 
cesses that have been used for hun- 
dreds of years" and says that 
“hopefully" his own creations will be 
around m 200 years. 


By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON In David Ignatius's bone- 1 
dulling new post-Gold War suspense novel, 
"The Bank of Fear,” one character in the search ’ 
for Saddam Hussein's hidden, wealth is a comput- 
er guru. “Her idea offon," the reader isiold, “was 
roaming the Internet bulletin boards and flonunz 
people die didn’t like." . 

Tne author, an editor steeped in the lore of the 
Middle East, has evidently; spent l ong hours in 
the company of creative haAersTesea mrfiing (he 
techniques of computir-directed heists; Among 
that set of nervous netties, flaming is ahot word.' 

Though some hackers claim the verb (aid its 
noun, floatage) was craned in the eariy 1970s, the 
earliest use on the Dialog retrieval system is from 
a June 1987, issue of. PC Week; “The quickness of 
response available with &maD may lead xofkrm-L 
mg,” Robert Kelley noted, “where people impul- 
sively react to a message and Send unceti sored, 
emotionally laden and. often, derogatory ret urn . 
messages — a practice that is almost non-eris-; 
tent in paper writing.” ..... 

The earliest Nexis citation, from MacWeek in 
June 1989, reinforces the hurried connotation: 
“E-mail sent in anger, and usually in haste, is . 
called flaming” 

We’ve all written a furious letter, looked it 
over, then decided not to send it at attL Writing 
unsent' letters is a fine way to ventilate hot 
feelings without triggering nuclear exchanges, 
but it requires the planned use of “snail mail.*' . 

The net set has no such fail-safe system. “Rap: ■ 
id-fire wordmeisters often prefer to amnnunicate 
via E-maiL" Stephen WHbcrs wrote in The Minne- 
apolis Star, Tribune recently, . . and their in-. : 
flammatorv messages have been nicknamed 
Hame mail' ” He later identified one letter to., 
himself as tire “most searing flame maiL'’ which, 
catted him a “sdf-servtng arrogant windbag." 

The word is in dobal use, as befits the net- 
work. In Britain, Clancy Sisal in The Guardian 
observes the "heady frontier freedom that. is. 
remarkably democratic if you don't mind brush: 
mg elbows with the unseen post-pubescent sixth-/ 
formers . . . and the flame-out artists who spe - 
cialize in joyful adolescent invective." (Flame- 
out, a 1950 term for jet engine failure, preceded . 
the hacker verb to flame by two decades,) .. .... : 

- “Netiquette frowns on flaming " .says Jack 
Cushman of The New York Times, my kt-houso 
Internet expert. He equates the use of all capital 
letters (sometimes used in flaming) with shout- 
ing. and finds it the sign of the clueless ixewWe. 
one new to the net. Another bread) of netiquetter. 
excessive cross- posting, asking for information 
in a number of forums, which sometimes brings a 
naming response. And before asking a baric 
question, the polite nettie “FAQ-checks"; that’s 
looking up “Frequently Asked Questions" be- 
fore posting a query. It’s computer communica- 
tions courtesy, and Judith Martin — Miss Man- 


ners — had better do a column v n 
cybeiboor flama her ol “* f ritut*n« or 

Far be it from inverts y* 

during the weefc-todeciy lhe u^oi ^ .. papi ., 

ltave to admit that had M aJ- 


word Type “blithering idiot 
automancally freezes, whiter As. the 

to voice asks, “Do you nally '""I ]!er 1( . 

Ghost of Hamlet’s father said. Lea'- ™ 

hc&vcQa 1 

. When an ol d word gets summarily execww»- 

this department pays its resp . .. ^ 
“Pm going to miss the word telegrtfy 

the New York .Turn Stot* 

business copy chief. The word was . , c 

French teltgrophe in 1794. denotmga wm P \ g 
apparatus, a manual signaling device. • .. 

Greek for. “far” and graph * in Greek tor 

^The co-inventor of the aautica! Hag 
dubbed it the tadiygraphe, from the Gree. 
“rapid,” but a French diplomat smoothly -t 
named it tdligraphe, presumably because - 
other word was too tachy- . r 

The first electromagnetic telegrapn was as- 
signed by Samud F. B. Morse, whose first puwic 

— Ralhmnre iin 


4 J.Ma VI UatUMW 

The exdutig technical word was adopted 
part of the, name. of . a forward-looking American 
corporation in 1885. The American Telephone 
and .-Telegraph Corp. soon became known '<& 
.“American Td - ana TtiL,” which was further 
dipped to its initials "“AT&T." 

lhe infpnnal shortening of the old nomencla- 
ture was not good enough for the 1990s board of 
directors. Although telephone is still a live word. 
telegraph was getting a little hoary. 

“While over the years the name; achieved u 
^distinctive place in the annals of corporate 
; ArnCTica,” the with-it directors recently wrote to 
stockholders, “it is also associated with old ways 
.anil outdated technologies. Despite some feel- ; 
in g s of nostalgia”- ^r- witii Samuel F. Bl Morse 
.vainly tapping out an SOS from his grave — 
“the boani^bdieves-lt is appicpriaie at this tiine- 
to adopt as the company's name the initials 
AT&T.^. Stockholders were, assured that “the 
new name— AT&T Corp.,— will shed, the dated 
imagery associated 'with the pasL’ T 

Kev. York Times Sernce 

INTERlXATiONAL l 

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22/71 1437 pc M.75 20*66 ■ 
23*73 14/57 • 22/71 14/57 * 
26*® 14 «7 pc 32.88 1B*66 9 
28*82 1B«4 > 29*4 19*06 ■ 
17/62 13*55 * 23*73 8/48 ill 
23.73 13*56 pc 23/73 13« a 
26/78 18*84 i 27*80 18*W • 
23.73 11*52 pc 22*71 11*52 * 
27 U0 21 TO ■ 27*80 22*71 1 
25*77 IS5a pc 24/75 18*6* » 
D/73 11152 pc 23/73 12*53 a 
11*52 a ce s>i 12*53 6*<3 pc 
30.86 19 56 a 33TM IB/M ah 
17/92 1*350 * 21/70 8*46 * 

16*81 9*48 c 19*56 11*52 pc 

26*77 15.59 ah 26*73 «■» a 
14*57 1050 Sh 19*66 12*53 pc 
28/82 1986 a 28/82 19.86 a 
24.78 :6*59 I 2373 14.57 pc 
19*66 a <46 pc 23*73 12*M pc 
2**75 14*57 I 25*77 11.6? a 


North America 
Hat weather win occur from 
New Yorfi City to Washing- 
ton. O.C.. Tuesday through 
Thursday, and i wi* be qu*e 
humid aa «*b>I. Hoi and 
muggy weaiher Is also In 
store far Detroit and Chica- 
go. although iheie will be a 
Ihundersform or two. 7Tmn- 
dersiomis will ba common M 
Hou«on 


Europe 

Days will ba guile warm, and 
by Thursday even hot, with 
much sunshine in such oties 
as Paris. Brussels. Amaw- 
dam. Hamburg and Berlin 
From London lo 09lo. 
Copenhagen and Stockholm, 
a few showers wfll pass: die 
wind nil be wfresning. My 
wHi have spotty ra»«: Spam 
will turn hoL 


Asia 

East Asia wilt, as usual m 
mid-June, be muggy w*ih 
some rain. Downpours m 
east China Tuesday should 
spread lo Korea and souih- 
wesl Japan Wetkiesdav m 
Tokyo U win ram a .'ew ‘mi as 
In hot Steamy south China. 
Hong Kong. Taiwan and Sin- 
gapore, showers will be 
infrequent yei heavy 


AlQ*r» 29*84 

Cups Term 13*55 

GaMblanc* 25*77 

Horan 21/70 

Upw 29*84 

Nairobi 21/70 

Tunis 37/58 


21/70 s 28*82 2t/70 ■ 

4*39 pc 14*S7 7*44 oe 

16*81 s 24.75 2086 pc 

10*50 PC Z9/73 11,52 pc 

23/73 pc 29/84 24/75 pc 

11152 pc 22/71 12/53 pc 

2271 s 38*87 20*58 S 


ACROSS 

i Send 
s Exchange 
9 Polite lorm of 
address 

13 Actor Calhoun 
»4 Make — —for 
(argue in 
support aft 
is Ray of 
Hollywood 
16 This puzzle's 
mystery subject 
1 * ‘The Joy Luck 
Club’ author 

20 Fuzzy 

21 Rule 


22 Yield 

23 Dubbed one 

24 J951 movie with 
16-Across 

31 Sfumbie 

32 River to the 
Caspian 

33 Veterans Day 
mo 

39 Daly of Gypsy- 
36 Compeution for 
Gerafdo 

3»Tng function 
39 Wynken. 
Bfynken and 


Middle East 


High in W M0i Low W 

OF C/F OF OF 

am ri/70 » ».»4 ziro pc 
33*91 17.83 1 JS/95 20*56 » 
28*82 14*5? 4 29*84 15*59 ■ 
26*79 18/51 1 27/80 17,' B2 9 

37*90 17*63 a 38/100 1B*84 a 

47/107 2373 » 42/107 73/73 a 


Latin America 

Today tomorrow 

fflgb Low W HUfh Low W 
OF OF erf C/F 

BuorwtAw 9*48 Hi 17 £3 6 45 pc 

Cameos 31-98 25*77 * Ji« 2577 i 

Lana 1B/8« 16<81 s 19*56 '5 81 PC 

Mason Cay 24.75 13*55 * 25 77 1255 * 

RkxMJaroOc 29*84 19-88 a 75*77 HM pt 
Saintepo U.-52 4*39 rc * 4.57 5 . 4 ; , 


18*61 9/48 sti 15-59 3*40 pc 
IB*W 10-50 pc 19« 11*62 pc 


Lcoomt SHHJnny. pcn*rty dowdy. C doudy . sh-fliwws. l-nunaomtoms. r^r. d-s-ww 
sn^rxw. wee. w-Weaihw All map*, loracaata and dan provided by Accu-Weasher. Inc. : 1W4 


North America 


Anchorage 

Altana 

Boston 

■Threnao 

Cltnm 

Detort 

HsnaUu 

HciaW 

L01 

Mttrra 

Unmapcb 

Mort-va* 

Mtosa-j 

Ihm/VorV 

91-5W* 

San Ann 
Saaithr 

Tc^KO 

'.iMheai 


18*84 12*53 
32» 21/78 
77/80 18/61 
37-89 21/70 
29-84 15*59 
31*68 20*88 
29*4 34.-79 
33-91 22/71 
28-82 17/82 
33*91 24/75 
33/91 21/70 
12/53 
31.88 24/75 
3086 I9*W 
41.106 20*82 
2088 1263 
77.80 1293 
3088 14/S7 
32 89 21*70 


1 B «6 11«2 pc 
PC 34«7 22-71 re 
a 23/73 17.52 pc 
1 3ifln 19*W pc 
I 31-86 19 59 pc 
t 31*88 19« pc 
pc 29-84 23*73 pc 
1 3381 23/73 pc 
pe 26/79 17*82 PC 
pc 3283 24/75 Ml 

I 31*88 1HJ64 pc 

cc 24*75 12*53 4#r 
a 32.59 24/76 • 
pc 3381 21*70 pc 
c 40*10* 298* pc 
pc 21*70 12*53 pc 
a 35*77 13/53 pc 
PC 26*79 14.57 PC 
pc 3887 32*71 pc 


Solution 10 PuzzJf of June 1 7 


GJ0EK3HI anaaia 
HnoamraQ nnnaaiaa 
EHHaasE iDQEJiaciaa 
eosq DiHiiiaiD anna 
QEiH QomniinEa ana 
0 Qa aam aaa 

Hiasaii Eina aanaa 

00cian aaaaa 
auQDti dam □□□□□ 
sqs aaa asm 
HQQ aaBQQQQ C3Eia 
QCBUJQ QE3Q1HU niUQ'3 
ULDDUJQQLJ HUUDlDUa 

uHHuasy Qaaaaiiia 
aausa iraiaau 


40 They’re 
sometimes wild 

41 Earth mover 

4a 1957 movie with 
16-Across 
4 7 Thumbnail 
sketch 

40 16-Across’s’ 
’Cat on — Tin 
’Root 

4» £tagfire piece 
5a County north of 
San Francisco 
64 Neighbor of hnd. 
67 1946 movie with 
16-Across 

ao" known 

then what . . ." 
61 Cancel 
aa "A" code word 
63 Greek portico 
84 Use eptos 
66 Half a fortnight 
DOWN 

1 Stew 

2 ■Damn 
Yankees’ 
saductrese 

3 Green tend 

4 A flair 

5 Play’s start 

6 Ha coined the 
term 

‘horsepower* 

7 Pallid 

8 Caress 


9 M-G-M’s Louis 
8 and others 
to* — -know is ‘ 
what .. " 

11 &ck as — — 
ia Dawn 
14 Put up with 

17 NovetistWaugh 

18 Disney mermaid 

22 Horn, tor one * 

23 Iranian chief, 
once" •■* ’ 

24 Leber abbr/ - - 
28 Richard of . 

’Bustm' Loose" 

26 Newswoman 
EHerbee ; 

27 Tend to 

2b Refrain syllable 

2 5 Confederacy’s 
opponent 

ao Three trios 
34 Exceedingly 
sa Eight: Prefix' ■ 

37 Through 

38 Latched 

40 Law professor. 
Hill 

<3 Airline to Spain 
44 Outpouring of 
gossip 
48 Bit of tell 
weather 
4« Miss O’Neill. 

4e Publisher 
Adolph 


soStoOQ .-8* Man or Ely ‘ e g ^ Travel <ab*3.it> 

6i Defense meafts. JP '• saifi-Acrosff’s 1 


52 Diner's guide 

sa Frr St-cta5S v " 


Father' . • 
sa Plumber 's 
. concern 


• *7 IfrAcross’sr' 
'TheLartTimci 
'-—Pans’ 




noil by Bmm Sim Gefisn 

© New York Times Edited by Will Shortz. 



Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


zfflST Access Numbers 
How tocafl around the world. 

I Using the chan bekw, find the country you are cafllngfroin. . • 

1 Dial the corresponding /OSS’ Access Number.. - 1-.' 

3. -An XUS’ EngUsii-spealdng Operator or voice prampc will ask for rtje j^ione number you wish to call or connect you ro a 
customer service representative. 

To receive your free waUet cjhx! of AKPs Access Numbers, iiist cflal the access number of 

the country' yotlieio and ask for CtistomerSenloe i 

COUNTRY ACXJ5SS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER i 


Australia 

C33Jna,PRO*» 

Guam 

HOQgKODR 

likBaw 

Indonesia* 

jap3ti* 

Korea 

KoreaxA 

Malaysia* 

New Zealand 
Phmpptoes* 
Saipan* 
Singapore 

Sn Lanka 

Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


ASIA inly- 172-1011 Brazil 

I -800-881-011 Uecbtensfebi* . 155-00-11 Oille 

10811 jjjjijgaS? ’ 8 a 196 Colnmbia 

018rB72 Luxembourg . • — .0-000-01)1 - Costa Jtica*a 

aOO-1111 Macedonia, F.Y-R- of 9Q-80O4288 Ecuador* 


EUROPE 


000-117 Mater - . 

001-803-10 Monaco* 

0039-111 Nedieriands* 
009-11 Norway 

11* Poiaod T w~ . 
800-0011 PortngaT . •- 

000-911 Romania • •• • 

105-11 Rpnabi— (Moscow) 

Z3S-Z872 Slovakia 

6Q0-0111-I11 Spain* 

430-130 Sweden* 

0080-10288-0 Swteeriand* 

0019-991-1111 U-K. 

; Ukraine* 


OQO-803Q . 
OOa-0312 
- 980-11-0010 

IK 

m 

iv* 

16- 

l£: 

95-800-1 


■ 1 .1 

I 

|rj 


. • 0800-aKMlQ . El Salvador** “ 

19*-00H Guatemala' ~ ' 

• . OfrOZ2^lll Guyana*** ! “ " 

: 800-190-11 . Hcmduraa> — '~ 

0*0164866111 Mexico aaa' ~ 

05017-1-288 . Nicaragua (Managua) ~ 

~~ * 01-800-428 8 - P an a m an • - ~ 

155- 5042 Peari • — 

.00-420-00101 Surlwatne ^ ; 

900-99-0 0-11 Uruguay ^ ' ttui 

020-795-611 Venezuela** - ^MilTr 

155^0-11 CARIBBEAN ~~ 

° ,Q0 ~ 8 ^ 0011 Baha ™» """ 1-800^72^ 




_ i_nnnmr,„*T | Imagineaworid where you can call coiinin'i-T'crJuntn’ a? easily as you can from home. And 

^ reach lhe US. directly from over 1 25 countries. Converse v.ith someone who doesn't speak your 

g3b language . since it's translated instantly. Call your dienes at 3 a.m. knowing they'll get the message in 

your voice at a more polite hour. .■MI this is now p. -ssible TsniJi .-‘OKT 1 
> 'a jq these services, dial the .XTCT Access Numwr of the country you're in and you’ll get ail the 

help you need. With these Access Numbers and your ART Calling Card, international calling has never been easier, 
if >XPU don’t have an AM* Calling Card or you’d like more information on AUT global sen ices, just call us using tiie 

convenient Access .Numbers on your right 


AT&T 


Armenia** 
Austria*"* 
Belgium* 
Bulgaria ~~ 
Croatia** 
Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

Finland!* 

France 

Germany 

Greece" 

Hungary 

Icriajttfa 

Ireland 


•*14111 MIDDLE EAST British V.L 

022-9094)11 Bahrain 80 tH)0j ■ Cayman islan. 

0800-100-10 Cvpnis* 080-90010 Grenada* 

00-18000010 Israel „ . 177-100-2727 . HiiitF 

996»00ll Kira-uj ■ .. 80 0-J88 Jamaica^ — " 

0042000101 Lebanon CBcicat) 426 -801 Neth. A^ tq ~ 

SOOi aiO - Qatar '' 0800-0 11^7. sTsSNevis 

9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 1-8 00-10 ~ ~ — ~T 

19J.-001X Tax fay 00-600-12 Z77 Egypt- 

0130-0010 VJiJL- 8(0-12 1 Gabon* 

00 - 800-1311 AMERICAS ~ Gambia- 

opA-aco-omr Aigamna* • ansao-aoty-im - Kenya- 

9994«1 Beto* 555 Liberia 

1-800-550-000 Bdh-fa* ■ 0^00-1112 : Sooth Africa 


8 *100-11 - Bermuda* 


kST British V.L 

800-001 - Cayman islands 
080-9 0010 1 Grenada* 
177-100-2727 . • Hate* “ 

800-2 88 Jamaica** 

426-801 Neth-A^tfl 

08004) 11-77. StKins/N'evk- 

~ “ ~~a 

00-800-12277 Egypt* (Gabo) 
8(0*121 Gabon* 


i-Mpyj-A - 

t-goo^af . 

OOl^BtXui-T. a 

T 0~800-g*2.^ 

-W1-80QU872.^ ^ 

r'aao-frz^ 

AFRKA ' ~? 

CZZT^ 



— 






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