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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

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Paris, Wednesday, June 22, 1994 


No. 34.621 




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John GiteL-Apnc Fawtac 


SOLEMN TASK — Pallbearers in Loughin island, Northern Ireland, on Tuesday Protestant paramilitary groups have gradually replaced the Irish Republican Army as 
carrying the caskets of two of six Catholics slain in an attack Saturday on a village pub. the prime killers in the 25-year-old guerrilla conflict over the British province. Page 2. 




Firm Use Genetics to ‘Spike’ Cigarettes? 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

Inro national Herald Tnhiuie 

WASHINGTON — The battle over 
smoking intensified Tuesday ns the na- 
tion's senior food and drug official told 
Congress that a tobacco company was 
mailing cigarettes with a genetically' creat- 
ed ieaf containing double the normal level 
of nicotine. 

The leaf, code-named Y-i. was created 
it an American laboratory, then patented 
in brazil and grown there, said the official. 
David A. Kessler, commissioner of the 
U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 


Dr. Kessler also laid before a congres- 
sional subcommittee evidence that at least 
some U.S. tobacco companies artificially 
enhance nicotine in cigarettes by using ah 
ammonia compound in the leaf-blending 
process. 

The drug commissioner left little doubt 
that he believes cigarette makers “spike" 
their products to maintain a high enough 
level of nicotine to satisfy smokers and 
keep them coming back for more. 

According to some subcommittee mem- 
bers, Dr. Kessler's testimony calls into 
question the veracity of recent sworn testi- 


mony by the chief executives of the major 
U.S. tobacco companies, who told the 
same congressional panel that they did not 
spike their products by manipulating nico- 
tine levels. 

Dr. Kessler is conducting a broad inqui- 
ry of the U.S. tobacco industry to deter- 
mine whether cigarettes convey an addic- 
tive substance — nicotine — and whether 
his agency should regulate cigarettes us a 
drug. He says he could mandate nicotine 
levels, restrict access to cigarettes or fur- 
ther restrict cigarette advertising. 

The tobacco industry is hitting back 


CiUP* W GRANDSTAND 


tSsrassa? 1, Sgaain 1 

In Chicago. Spain took the lead in the 
14th minute on a crossing shot by Jon 
Ardoni Goikoetxea off the far post, but 
Jurgen Klinsmann equalized for the de- 
fending champions shortly after the 
start of the second half. 

4 5 Greece 0 

Gabriel Batistuta scored S3 seconds 
tr.to the match in Fcxboro. Massachu- 
setts. scored again just before halftime, 
then Diego Maradona made it 3-0 with 
a deft shot and Batistuta converted a 
penalty shot for a hat trick as Argentina 
routed Greece in the most lopsided con- 
test thus far in the 1994 finals. 

SJaaSe&a 2 S Saudi Arabia 1 

For more than a half. Saudi Arabia gave 
it- faithful reason enough to dream. 
Then reality returned, as the Dutch 
dorrinaied the last 45 minutes of the 
match in Washington. 

2.UC& of She 3rSsh; Bad 

Two Irish tour groups, about 370 people 


in all, arrived in Boston and Orlando, 
Florida, to find that they did not have 
match tickets and. in Orlando, that they 
didn't even have hotel rooms. The law- 
yer for the London travel agency that 
booked the tours said he hoped a “res- 
cue package” could be arranged; mean- 
while Ireland's prime minister and oth- 
ers were coming to the rescue. 

The Tide Turns in U.S. 

The United States is undergoing a 
transformation, reports Rob Hughes. In 
the opening matcL at which people had 
tickets given to them and their video 
cameras taken away, they scarcely knew 
when to cheer. But now the authentic 
World Cup fans are coming from far 
and wide to roar for their teams. Soccer 
will never colonize .America, may never 
sink its contagious roots there, but it is 
beginning to turn the tide. 

Wednesday's matches: Romania vs. Switzer- 
land, at Pontiac. Michigan, 2005 GMT; United 
States vs. CeXomCia, at Pasadena. California. 
2335 GMT. 

World Cup report: Pages 20 and 27 



Omtel limi It™ 

Gabriel Batistuta, pursued by teammate Fernando Caceres and the Greek team's 
defenders, en route to the first of Ids three goals in Tuesday’s lopsided match. 


Gmtmis to Seek the Public’s Help to Pay Legal Bills 


By Dougjas Jehl 

.Vfv. York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The While House is planning to 
ask thousands of Americans to contribute up to S500 
apiece to help pay the soaring legal bills being accumu- 
lated by President Bill Clinton and his wife, Hillary, 
according tc presidential aides. 

The fund would be the first ever set up by a sitting 
president, and its creation would reflect the degree to 
which the Clintons’ legal troubles in the Whitewater 
matter and a pending sexual harassment suit against Mr. 
Clinton have proven cosily. 

Local experts say the amount the Clintons could 
e-.entua>Iy owe to their lawyers in the two cases could 
easily exceed $2 million. 

A proposal, first reported in this week's editions of the 
Legal Time?, and awaiting the Clintons’ approval, would 



permit only individuals to contribute to the fund and 
would require that their names be disclosed, aides said 
Monday. They said the maximum contribution to be 
allowed would most likely be $500. 

Those standards would be far stricter than those that 
govern the legal defense funds established by members of 
Congress. A member of the House who runs into lezai 
trouble may. for example, solicit contributions of up'io 
$10,000 from political actios committees, labor unions 
and corporations as well as from individuals. 

But White House officials involved in the search for a 
politically acceptable way to help the Clintons pay legal 
bills said they recognized that it was important that The 
Clintons minimiz e the impression that contributions to 
the fund might be used to gain undue influence. 

Although While House lawyers have played a central 
role in drafting arrangements for the fund, presidential 


Kiosk 


aides said that once established, the fund would be 
administered by a private individual outside the White 
House and that administration officials would be barred 
from soliciting contributions. 

Until last month, senior aides bad expressed confi- 
dence that the Clintons could pay their own legal bills, 
perhaps by deferring final payment until Mr. Clinton left 
office, when the couple would be free to accept lucrative 
book contracts. 

But those hopes were dealt a powerful blow with the 
suit filed last month by Paula Corbin Jones, who has 
accused Mr. Clin ion of making an unwanted sexual 
advance in a hold room in 1991 when he was governor of 
Arkansas. To defend himself in that case, Mr. Clinton 
has hired Robert S. Barnett, a well-known Washington 

See CLINTON, Page 3 


with lawsuits and a barrage of advertise- 
ments rebutting the p reliminar y finding s 
of Dr. Kessler and of anti-tobacco mem- 
bers of Congress. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Co. ran full-page advertisements in major 
U.S. newspapers on Tuesday stating; 
“Some politicians want to ban cigarettes. 
Will alcohol be next? Will caffeine be 
next? Will high-fat foods be next?” 

Dr. Kessler, who says cigarettes are far 
more harmful to health than any of those 
substances, on Tuesday mapped out a de- 
tailed investigative trail suggesting that 

See NICOTINE, Page 3 


TKfSr 


Central Banks 




By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — The dollar dipped be- 
low the psychological barrier of 100 yen 
Tuesday and spent the rest of the day 
hovering near that level while the authori- 
ties seemed powerless to do anything 
about reversing this postwar currency low. 

A widening April trade deficit reported 
early in the day weighed on the dollar, but 
the key reasons for the slide were relatively 
low U.S. interest rates and repatriation of 
Japanese assets. 

while the Federal Reserve Board did 
not take any overt action Tuesday, the 
securities markets positioned themselves 
for a rise in short-term interest rates to 
defend! the dollar. That pushed stock prices 
sharply lower and raised yields on U.S. 
bonds. (Page 11) 

As the dollar slid from its opening level 
of 102.16 yen to 99.92 yen late in the 
afternoon in Europe, traders dared the 
central banks to intervene with another 
multibillion dollar action of the sort that 
reversed the dollar’s drop on May 4, when 
the dollar had sunk close to 101 yen. 

But a rescue mission did not materialize, 
in part because international interest rate 
relatkrashipsare different now and give 
central banks far less leverage on the mar- 
ket In May, the Fed stiH had more room, to 
raise rates and the market knew it; the 
central bank added another quarter of a 
percentage point to short- term rates just 
over a week later. At that time Germany 
was lowering interest rates, but the 
Bundesbank has since paused to gauge the 
strength of Germany's incipient recovery. 

. The dollar finished in New York on 
Tuesday at 100.335 yen, down from 101.90 
on Monday. The dollar slipped to 1.5943 
DM from 1.5995, to 1.3425 Swiss francs 
from 1.3493 and to 5.4508 French francs 
from 5.4670. The pound strengthened to 
$1.5415 from $1.5368. 

Talk in the trading rooms was that the 
dollar would slide back against the yen. 
Avinash Persaud of J J*. Morgan predicted 
it would rink to 98 yen fairly quickly, and 
Jeremy Hawkins of the Bank of America in 
London saw it sinking toward “atTeast 95 
yen." 

The Bank of Japan was rumored to be in 
the market buying dollars through the 
Federal Reserve Bank of New York, but it 
has been doing this for months now to 
smooth the yen’s climb. 

All eyes turned to the Fed and will 
continue to be cm its chairman, Alan 
Greenspan, when he delivers his semian- 

See DOLLAR, Page 12 


TPFiTTRTT 




By Andrew Pollack 

Nev York Tones Service ... 

TOKYO — Japan’s economy grew 
at an unexpectedly strong annualized, 
rate of 3.9 percent in the first quarter 
of this year, fueled in part by consum- 
er spending, which provided new evi- 
dence that the long slump here is final- 
ly fading ihw history. 

“The worst period is over," said 
Tsutomu Tanaka, vice minister of the 
Economic Planning Agency, chi Tues- 
day in releasing the figures. However, 
he and many private economists said 
it was too early to proclaim a complete 
recovery.' 

The growth in real gross domestic 
product in the quarter that aided 
March 31 was higher than the 2J> 
percent or so that analysts had been 
predicting. Particularly encouraging, 
economists said, was a relatively ro- 
bust 5.8 percent a^uahz^-iniarease 
in consumer spending, which is -con- . 
ridered the key to any recovery. 

Figures for the March quarter put a 
bright ending on what has otherwise 
been a dismal fiscal year for Japan, 
one in which its economy shrank for 
the first time since fiscal 1974 and 
only the second time since national 
accounting began in 1955. 

For the fiscal year as. whole, gross 
domestic product remained even 
while gross national product, another 
measure of output, dropped 0.1 per- 
cent The economic output figures are 
only one sign of a recovery. An index 
of leading economic indicators an- 
nounced Tuesday was strong and a. 
recent Bank of Japan survey noted an 
improvement in business sentiment. 

4 We keep on getting these positive 
surprises,” said Geoffrey Barker,, 
economist, at Baring. Securities; who 
said there was no doubt the economic . 
slump is-ovet : v ■. -■ ; 

Fueling the recovery, he said, was a 
return by consumers to stores, lured 
by the spread of discounting, which is 
something new to. Japan. Until drop- 
ping in the latest quarter, housing 
starts have also been strong, spurring 
purchases of appliances. An income 
tax cut that is about to take effect 
should give an added spur to con- 

See JAPAN, Page 6 


Progress on Hong Kong, 
But Patten Sticks to Guns 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — After 19 months of 
conflict over proposed democratic reforms 
for Hong Kong, Britain and China report- 
ed sudden progress Tuesday in long- 
stalled discussions over the colony's return 
to Chinese rule in 1997. 

Following upbeat comments on the 
opening day of talks in the Chinsse-British 
Joint liaison Group, the two sides an- 
nounced fresh discussions on financing 
Hong Kong’s new $20 3. billion airport, a 
source of controversy since it was first:, 
planned in 1989. “Progress? Excellent pro- 
gress," Hugh Davies, head of the British 
team at the liaison group, said after the: 
opening session. 

But Hong Kong’s governor, Chris Pat- 
ten, was reserved and reflective in an inter- 
view Tuesday. With China and Britain 
apparently willing to overlook past bitter- 
ness, and with the colony]s legislators very 
likely to endorse his political reformjpack- 
age next week, he ought to be satisfied as 
his second anniversary in the post ap- 
proaches. 

But instead, the populist governor is 
scrambling to assure supporters that his 
political reform victory has lasting rele- 
vance in the face of China’s determination 
to overturn the reforms. He also is trying - 
to persuade critics that London has not 
fought its final battle with Beijing on other 


natters of political principle affectum 
Hong Kong. ™ 

“Our proposals are the best on the ta- 
ble,” Mr. Patten said in the interview. He 
was referring to his last-minute lobb ying 
effort to build support for reforms that wffi 
expand Hong Kong’s electoral base for 
future elections. “No one should harbor 
any suspicions about our determinatibii to 
see them through, unamended. 

- _ Legislators and local analysts agree that 
his opponents do not have enough support 
to block laws thaL will substantially in- 
crease the number of eligible voters for 
elections in 1995 and beyond, r 
But with the Chinese still committed to 
overturning the new system when they 
regain control of Hong Kong, Mr. Parten’s 
opponents wonder if a chill in CMnese- 
Bntiah relations, which put all other signif- 
icant business between them on hold until 
recently, has been worth the bitterness. 
“A t the end of the day we have lost 

mound in terms of cooperation with Qtina 

that had been built up before 1992," said 
Henry Tang, a legislator and member of 
the Liberal Party proposing its own, more 
modest electoral reform proposals . 

However, Mr. Patten remains confident 
that China will ignore. politics in favor of 
resolving a host of economic issues. 

Conciliatory comments last week by 
China’s foreign minister, Qian Qjchen, 
presaged what both delegation leaders de- 

- See<XMLONY,Page6 - 


Graf Is Beaten 




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J 0 .-flan UD U.A.E S.MDirti 

Lescnsn ...USE 1 50 US. Mil. fEur.i SI. 10 


Steffi Graf of Germany, the No. 1 
women’s tennis player and top seed, 
was upset Tuesday by the American 
Lori McNeil in the first round of the 
Wimbledon tournament in England. 

The 7-5. 7-6 (7-5) victory for McNeil, 
unseeded and ranked No. 22 in the 
world, marked the first time in the nis- 
lory of the Grand Slam event that a 
defending women’s champion had lost 
her opening match. (Page 19) 

Ranks Page 5 ‘ 



India’s Bazaar for Cheap Muslim Brides 

By Molly Moore ^ for ®f i tw ? D 2 arT kS® ; jeed, regional manage -of a financial and 

Washington Pan Sence wi tn oi aCT Arab men, one of whom investment firm that sponsors vocational 


CANING AFTERMATH — IVGchael 
Fay leaving Singapore custody Tuesday. 
He said his health was good Page 3. 


By Molly Moore 

Washington Past Service 

HYDERABAD, India — At 16, Na* 
reen was married off to a 59 -year-old xnan 
from the United Arab Emirates who jour- 
neyed to this Muslim city in search of a 
cheap In dian bride. Nasreen cost him 
5161. T 

Three years later, after what . Nasreen 
described as an ordeal of beatings and 
abuse in the Middle East, her husband 
abandoned her and returned to the same 
Hyderabad neighborhood for a new bnde. 

“My life is ruined." Nasreen said on a 
recent morning, sobbing as she sat on the 
floor of her father’s home, clutching her 
10-month-old daughter, - bom ;af ter her 
husband deserted her. Her f other, she said. 


also forced two other sisters into marriages-' 
with older Arab men, one of whom! 
dumped his bride after only eight days and 
divorced herhymail from Oman. 

In recent years, the Old City^of Hyder- 
abad, with its large population -erf poor 
Muslims and centuries-old trading ties . 
with the Middle East, has become a shop- 
ping bazaar for Arab men from Ghlf starts 
seeking docile Muslim brides cheaply. So- : 
dal worker say the fathers are motivated 
by greed.' 1"" *■ " 

The fathers, including Nasrera^argiKi . 
that the marriages afferaneseape from 
poverty -r-for the daughters^ welta& tfj< 
rest of the family. TI. : ; y W™'- ' 

"These girls are caugbi bervwovtbe dev-, , 
0 andT the deep blue sea," said -MIAr Ma-' '. 


almost no^mg ito subsist on. Even the 
most wretched house in the Gulf is hen» 
than tiie slums: of Hyderabad.” &etter 

. The dandestine bride marker u. j 
abadVOld City epitomi^^ eccSf?" 

to families of prospecti^LF ayments 







■ ' ■ «... 

LP 



















Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1994 


** 


Greek Turn at EU Helm Is Marred by Maced 






WORLD BRIEFS 


European officials regard tbe Corfu 
meeting as much as a key to his Likely 
longevity as any pointer toward Euro- 


% AJatt Cowell 

York Tima Service 

W ^ ien Greece took ^u&ajuy <n 
EuroiSfnTi!? tm8 . pre5idenc y of the pean issues. 

CTil--h*~f- u y°q six months ago, offi- “His health is worse than usual and 
tiller ***** their turn at die Corfu will be a test," said a Greek 

mSSSl cfaBn * P Msa SC through 

2SS2S.®S tfac i ? bnd Of Corfu this 


newspaper editor who asked that his 
name not be used, “This will be the 
most trying appearance for him of the 
entire Greek presidency." 

Mr. Papandreou's health has been 
uncertain since heart surgery in 1989 


2* blockading ndfiSgC 
threatening what one 
European official called new instabil- 
ity “ the Balkans and the “nightmare” 
nslc of Bosnia's war spreading south 

Not only that, the failing health 0 f 
Pmne Minister Andreas Papandreou, 
me 75 -year-old leader who taunted the 
_ est m the 1980s with his maverick 
foreign policy, has become such a talk- 
ing point here that some Greeks and 


its nan ***** P®***® appearances since his 

pan " re-election last year after Four years in 
opposition have been carefully paced 
so as to avoid overtaxing him, Greek 
officials said. 

Even so. he was obliged to cancel a 
dinner appointment at one recent Eu- 
ropean gathering in Brussels and has 
avoided the traditional eve-of-summit 
tour of European capitals associated 
with the European Union presidency. 

And the death of close associates, 
including Melina Mercouri, the former 


culture minister, movie star and politi- 
cal activist, has affected him deeply. 
“At Medina's funeral you could almost 
see him asking himself: 'Is it me 
next?’ " a European official remarked. 

Mr. Papandreou's health plays a di- 
rect role in Greek policy since he 
spends much time in reclusive rest at 
his villa on the outskirts of Athens and 
makes decisions only rarely. 

One of them has been on Macedo- 
nia , the small former Yugoslav repub- 
lic cm Greece's northern borders that is 
locked in a dispute with Athens over 
its name, flag, constitution and what 
Greece insists are territorial ambitions. 

Until Mr. Papandreou's Socialists 
came to power last October, his con- 
servative predecessors had been con- 
ducting indirect negotiations under 
United Nations auspices that had been 
expected to lead to direct talks. One of 
the first thing s Mr. Papandreou did 
after taking office was to break off the 
discussions. 


“When you marry the usurpation of 
a Greek name with territorial claims, 
you have a problem," said a Greek 
official closely involved in relations 
with Greece’s northern neighbor. . 

Brushing aside Athens's foreign pol- 
icy establishment, Mr. Papandreou ig- 
nored worries about likely European 
reaction and imposed an economic 
embargo last February, severing oil 
supplies and shipments of raw materi- 


uk ££!3 ot Death Toll at 52 in Chma^UapJ ^ ^ 

" - ‘ “ ' MACAO. (AP) ^The£eato-Wll economic sow 

colkmsc of a s«-5toiy textde * e ^Neighboring P°« u ’ 

of Zhuhai, according .to press reports m 

- ■*? 

Earlier, The China "Daily “ ^gitoafter awe. R was 
the K ■ SuthemChina * 


But there has been a price. ’ 

“The Europeans were . very angry 
and their anger has Lasted," a diplomat 
said. “This was a bolt from the blue. 
Yugoslavia has been such a mess for 
Wertem foreign .policy, and then this 
dedskjn introduced even more desta- 
bilization and the nightmare of war 


Macedonia’s economic lifeline. Court of Justice. seelnno »n n«w that region pursues rapi 


“Various people in the Foreign Min- 
istry had told him of the repercussions 
in the sense of international reaction 
but he went ahead," said a Greek offi- 
cial. 

“In his eyes, the situation was so 
stagnant that it needed a shock. We’ve 
had a salvo of reaction, but at least the 
talks have started again." the official 


Court of Justice, seeking an order that 
Athens lift the embargo. 

But there has been no court ruling 
on the sanctions, no lifting of the em- 
bargo and no indication that Macedo- 
nia is -ready xo change its 'name, as 
Greece wants. 

That, in turn, raises -the question of 
whether Mr. Papandreou's gesture was 
worth the damage it caused .to his 
country's image: - 


Peace Role for Russian Troops? 

Operations in Neighboring States Strain Ties With U.S, 


By Daniel Williams 

Washington Pm Service 

w WASHINGTON — The 
United States and Russia are 
increasingly at odds over Mos- 
cow’s military intervention in 
former Soviet republics on mis- 
sions that Washington has 
come to fear are potential vehi- 
cles for Russian expansion. 

While the United States lakes 
a hand in ensuring the full inde- 
pendence of selected countries 
— especially the Baltic states — 
it has been unw illing to try to 
block Russia from re-estabiish- 
ing strong influence to its west 
and south. 

Tbe United States is particu- 
larly concerned about Russian 
troops in Moldova, Georgia 
and Azerbaijan — all small, 
neighboring states torn by eth- 
nic conflicts. Washington is 
prodding Russia to obtain at 
least some endorsement from 
international organizations for 
these missions. 

The U.S. dilemma was illus- 
trated by an incident during a 
recent visit by the Russian de- 
fense minister. General Pavel S. 
Grachev, to NATO headquar- 
ters in Brussels. 

The general's answer to the 
complaints about Russian 
peacekeeping operations was 
an invitation for any country 
that wished to join with Russia 
in its missions. No NATO 
member replied. 

Russia's policies in the neigh- 
boring nations have prompted a 
sharp public rebuke from the 
administration, which other- 
wise has treated Russia ginger- 
ly. “Although Russia desires 
stability, there have been trou- 
bling aspects to its policy to- 
ward the new republics," Made- 
leine K. .Albright, chief delegate 
to the United Nations, said dur- 
ing a speech at Harvard Univer- 
sity. 

U.S. officials make it clear 
that Russia's cooperation is 
needed on a host of regional 

S roblems, notably Bosnia and 
lorth Korea. Washington is 
unlikely to risk a major conflict 
over unclear activity in what 
Russia calls its “near-abroad,’’ 
they say. 


The Western emphasis on 
maintaining good ties overall 
with Russia will be hi ghli ghted 
this week in Brussels, where 
Russia will join the Partnership 
for Peace, a program of links 
between NATO and its former 
Soviet bloc adversaries. 

[NATO and Russia said 
Tuesday they had reached 
agreement on their future rela- 
tionship, Reuters reported from 
Brussels. This opened the way 
for Moscow to sign the Partner- 
ship Tor Peace. The two sides 
will issue a declaration of prin- 
ciples when Foreign Minister 
Andrei V. Kozyrev arrives to 
sign the Partnership for Peace.] 
Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher will meet with For- 
eign Minister Kozyrev and try 
to persuade him to support 
U.S.-de$igned sanctions against 
North Korea in a dispute over a 
nuclear program. 

For Russia. frontier stability 
and close ties with former Sovi- 
et republics is its highest foreign 
policy priority. 

On a recent visit to Moscow, 
a U.S. special envoy, Jim Col- 


Russians Rack 
New Peace Unit 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — The Rus- 
sian Parliament voted 
Tuesday to approve the dis- 
patch of three battalions of 
troops to serve as a peace- 
keeping unit in the embat- 
tled Georgian province of 
Abkhazia. 

Defense Minister Pavel 
S. Grachev, who lobbied 
hard for approval, said af- 
ter a closed session that the 
foice would be deployed 
once mine-clearing opera- 
tions had been completed, 
in iwo or three days. 

The bulk of the’ force of 
3,000 will be deployed ini- 
tially along the Ingiiri Riv- 
er, General Grachev said. 
Tbe river marks the border 
between Abkhazia and Lhe 
rest of Georgia. 


tins, was told by Dmitri Ryuri- 
kov, a foreign policy adviser to 
President Boris N. Yeltsin, that 
multilateral discussions, debate 
and delay interfered with Mos- 
cow's objective of stabilizing 
ethnic conflicts. 

Administration officials say 
that the West’s resources and 
political will are not up to send- 
ing troops to tangled conflicts 
in places like Georgia and Azer- 
baijan. "We're doing the best 
we can with what’s available," a 
senior U.S. official remarked. 

In the absence of a more ac- 
tive U.S. role, a new East- West 
map is being drawn, in effect, 
with the Baltics leaning west- 
ward, protected by heavy West- 
ern interest in their indepen- 
dence, and the Caucasus and 
Central Asia being tugged to- 
ward Moscow. 

Ukraine, with a large and un- 
happy ethnic Russian popula- 
tion, hangs in an uneasy bal- 
ance. 

U.S. officials predict that 
Russian troops will withdraw 
from the Baltic states of Estonia 
and Latvia by Aug. 31. That 
would complete the pullout 
from the Baltics, occupied by 
the Soviet Union in 1940. The 
officials insist that Russia has 
no designs on Ukraine, despite 
pleas by ethnic Russians who 
want to break away. 

In the Caucasus — the area 
south of Russia between the 
Blade and Caspian seas — Rus- 
sia intervenes aggressively. In 
Georgia, Russian troops took 
the side of insurgents last year, 
only later to back the govern- 
ment of President Eduard A. 
Shevardnadze. In return, Geor- 
gia had to join the Common- 
wealth of Independent States 
and grant three military bases 
to Russia. 

Mr. Shevardnadze asked the 
United Nations, which has dis- 
patched about 100 observers to 
Georgia, to send peacekeeping 
troops to replace the Russians. 

In a meeting early this year. 
President Bill Clinton told Mr. 
Shevardnadze that the the Unit- 
ed States would not back a UN 
mission in a country still in a 
stale of warfare. 



' v. : ; ■' 


Herman n Kinprtrct-' tic Auunol Ptt— 

CHIEFS' POWWOW — Defense Minister Cesare Prevxti of Italy, left, walking with his 
German counterpart, Volker Rube, to Mr. Riibe's office in Bonn on Tuesday for talks. 


Ulster’s New Dynamic of Death 

Protestant Pammilitaries Now Outpace IRA as Killers 


By James Clarity 

.Vpw York rimes Service 

BELFAST — Protestant par- 
amilitaries have gradually re- 


oltc republican paramilitary 
organizations, show that since 
late 1991 the Protestants of the 
Ulster Freedom Fighters and 


placed the Irish Republican’ the Ulster Volunteer Force 
Army as tbe prime killers in tbe have been lolling more 
25-year-old sectarian guerrilla 
war in this Protestant-dominat- 
ed British province. 

British statistics on Northern 
Ireland, which are not chal- 
lenged by either Protestant loy- 
alist forces or the Roman Caih- 


Serbs ’ New Tactic in ‘Cleansing’: Deceit 


By David B. Ottaway 

Washington Post Service 

NOVSKA. Croatia — When 
the Bosnian Serbs came to de- 
port Mujo Talic and his wife, 
their offer was irresistible — 
free bus passage to Croatia, a 
transit visa across that country 
and the promise of a visa to lire 
in Sweden. 

Mr. Talic and most of the 
other 260 residents of the Mus- 
lim village of Bronzani Mai dan 
had been driven from their 
homes in February, taking up 
an uneasy existence as refugees 
in the Serbian stronghold of 
Banja Luka. So they readily 
boarded tbe buses that local 
Serbian authorities made avail- 
able a week ago for what looked 
like a journey to a better life. 


As it turned out, the trip end- 
ed prematurely in a huge tern 
set up by Jordanian peacekeep- 
ing soldiers here in a United 
Nations “protected zone” in 
central Croatia. There were no 
visas to Sweden or transit visas 
through Croatia, which has re- 
fused to take the refugees. 

Only the free bus ride turned 
out to be real. Eight buses, es- 
corted by Banja Luka's Serb 
“commissioner of refugees." 
Rade Bojic, brought 462 refu- 
gees, most of them Muslims, 
over the border. "He brought us 
here and dumped us out," Mr. 
Talic recounted. “He said, ‘go 
to Sweden.’ " 

In their relentless effort to 
create an ethnically pure mini- 
state. the Serbs of northern Bos- 


jua 


ask the butter.. 




_s_. I ■ N ■ C - A • P • O • P - E 

•hot *m 


nia are using the new tactic — 
offers of free transportation 
and false promises of residence 
permits in European countries 
— to remove some of the 50,000 
to 70,000 Muslims and Croats 
estimated to remain there. 

The Serbs “have collected 
them all in the city of Banja 
Luka and said, 'Now. let's get 
rid of them,’ " said Gregory S. 
Autreng, a representative in the 
region for the UN High Com- 
missioner for Refugees. 

By dumping refugees here in 
the UN-protected zones of Cro- 
atia, the Serbs seem to have 
caught the UN refugee agency, 
the International Committee of 
the Red Cross and the Croatian 
government all off guard and 
uncertain of how io respond. 

The UN-protected zones are 
mostly under the control of 
Croatia's rebel Serbs and are 
watched by relatively small UN 
contingents monitoring a truce 


placed people in the three-quar- 
ters of tbe country it controls, 
and will not admit any more, at 
least uniQ it completes a census 
of the estimated 267,000 refu- 
gees from Bosnia. In addition to 
the Bosnians, Croatia shelters 
about 247,000 people displaced 
from the Serbian-held zones. 

“If we let in every large group 
like this one, then thousands 
would come," said Josip Ester- 
ajeher, spokesman for the Cro- 
atian refugee office. He called 
for the United Nations to set up 
its own refugee center in this 
Serbian-held zone, saving, “I 
don’t know what the UN is do- 
ing in Croatia, if it cannot pro- 
vide 500 accommodations for 
Bosnians." 

UN and Croatian officials 
expressed fear lhaL the Bosnian 
Serbs will continue the tactic, 
busing Muslims and Croats to 
Banja Luka from northern Bos- 
nia, A UN official said the 


between the Serbs and the Cro- Serbs were using Banja Luka as 
atian government. a “test case" to see if the UN 

Croatia says it is sheltering refugee agency and Croatia will 
more than a half-million dis- take the refugees. 


in the war, which has claimed 
3,155 dead since 1969. 

Overall the IRA has killed 
more than half of the victims; 
but the Protestants are catching 
up. The police say that in the 
last 14 months they have 
brought 138 charges for para- 
military actions against Protes- 
tant groups and 83 against 
Catholic organizations, mostly 
the IRA. 

On Saturday the Ulster Vol- 
unteer Force fired on a pub 
south of Belfast, killing six 
Catholics as they watched Ire- 
land defeat Italy in a World 
Cup soccer match. The deaths 
brought to 25 the number of 
people killed by Protestant gun- 
ners this year the IRA and an- 
other republican group, the 
Irish National Liberation 
Army, have killed 17. Last year. 
Protestants killed 48. the IRA 
killed 38. British security forces 
have not killed anyone this 
year, nor did they in 1993. 

The reason for the upsurge in 
Protestant violence, according 
to British officials, political 
leaders of both sides, and other 
analysts, is that an increasing 
number of Protestants fed that 
Britain is preparing to abandon 
them, to agree with the Irish 
Republic to the south and with 
Sinn Fean, the IRA's political 
wing, to have this province be- 
come a part of a united Ireland. 

The proof of this, many Prot- 
estants fed. is that Britain 
agr eed to the 1985 British- Irish 
Agreement, which gave Ireland 


a consultant’s role in the affairs 
of the province; and the Down- 
ing Street Declaration, put for- 
ward in December by the Irish 
and British governments. The 
declaration offers Sinn Fein a 
place at a negotiating table in 
return for a renunciation of 
IRA violence and a three- 
month cessation of IRA at- 
tacks. 

Gerry Adams, the Sinn Fern 
President, says be will respond 
formally to the declaration 
within a week or so. 

Paul Arthur, a professor of 
politics at Ulster University in 
Belfast, said of tbe Protestants; 
“They believe that the joint dec- 
laration is a victory for the IRA 
They reason that if IRA vio- 
lence can win, their own vio- 
lence can win.” 

Mr. Adams has blamed the 
increase in Protestant violence 
on Protestant political leaders. 
While some Protestant leaders 
seem to indirectly condone the 
killing, most of them publicly 
condemn it. Jeffrey Donaldson, 
a ranking official of the moder- 
ate Ulster Unionist Party, 
which wants tbe province to re- 
main British but condemns all 
violence, said of the Protestant 
paramilitaries, “they feel IRA 
violence have gained conces- 
sions, so the otuy way to have 
their position considered is to 
go out and murder like the 
IRA” 

Mr. Donaldson noted that in 
recent days calls have increased 
for preventive detention of sus- 
pected terrorists, but that Sir 
Patrick Mayhew, the Northern 
Ireland Secretary, has said he is 
not yet ready to impose such 
internment, which he may do 
under British law. 


tcgiuu puisuta J®F 1U ^ I > 

U.S. Set to Begin Broadcasts to 

WASHINGTON (AFP) —The Sjaies » Snbe milium ! 
broadcasting messages to Haiti riacki^oppo , Tuesl j a v. 

£ It 

bSinwx^imwo weeks from air Force bases in Flonda on 

C Tfamessages would be supporting^^e^^ ^ 
notary regime, which busted President WBertrand 
September!^ 1, and atjpersuading Haitians not to attemp 
to the United States. . 

Rights Group Fanils Danish Police 

COPENHAGEN (Reuters) —Annuity Intemarional strong 
criticized Danish police methods onTuesday in -a rare 
aimed at a Scandinavian democracy- The prepare y 
human rights organization s London headquarters, oted > e 
pies of wHat it characterized as gross police ffl-tnatmeal, and 
called for a commission of inquiry and complete review of pouae 

rf ^ viotencedui- 

- in Copenhagen after a May 1993 referendum on the ^ 

t treaty; and also in & 1 5-mbnth police campaign against > 

hashish dealing in a squatter colony. ; ■ . \J 

The report highlighted shooting by the police wtoaprisjaF*. 
rioters on May Cl993, when 1 1 youths-were wounded by smaU- 
arms fire in the most wolent street unrest in Copenhagen sm« 
World War IL ‘ - * 

Dutcb Qear Psychiatrist in Suicide ; 

THE HAGUE; (Reuters) — Tile Etatch Supreme ^Jed 

Tuesday that ra psychiatrist who 1 helped , a physically .neaitny 
patient conunir suicide will nbt be punished. 

It said the psychiatrist, Boodewijn Chabot, should not facea 
criininal penalty,; despite finding mm. guilty of the offense. The 
ruling will help define the' Emits of a law passed last year that 
made the Netherlands the first country!© draw up legal guidelines 
under which doctors may cany out so-called mercy killings. . 

The Supreme Court said Dr. Cbabot had complied with most of 
these guidelines but had failed to have the patient examined by to 
/ second psychiatrisL Two {owner courts han already cleared Dr. 
Chabot. who gave a fatal dose of sleeping pills to a severely 
depressed butotherwisehealthywoman at.herrequest. ■ • 

Israel ProdsKS.onpdeastRoIe 

JERUSALEM (WP) — Israel urgjeAthe CUnton administration 
Tuesday to get more involved in peace talks with Syria, and Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin renewed a call for the negotiations to he 
moved to a higher level • /. \ 

• In anmterviewwith r<qJ<M^erairomU.S.pabli<^ons, Deputy 
Foreign Minister Yossi BeiEn said nothing further would happen 
in the talk*; with Syria .oyer, the Golan Heights unless Secretary df 
State Warren M. Christopher became more active.; “Without 
. Christopher coating to tbe area and any American in voHernen t. ■ I 
do hot see any development with the Syrians,” he . said. . - ; 

Hosokawa Not f (impIeldyCIe^ln , 

•• TOKY Gf AFP) -"—Former PrimeT4inister Morifearo HbSbk&wa lj 
admitted Tuesday that he was not “completely clean," burdenied. 

he had been directly involved m dubious money deals. 

“I took office last year to clean up Japanese politics, and I w 
not directly involved in the cases," he told a parliament; 
committee investigating financial scandals: “Bat I was also in i 
old-fashioned Japanese politics for more than 20 years. I never 
said I was completely clean.” ' 

Appearing before the lower house budget committee, 
Hosokawa said he had received 100 million yea. (S980JXW) ip 
loans from Tokyo Sagawa Kynitin Co. in 1982, which he had 
repaid. But he acknowledged that he had failed to pay interest Of 
about 30 minion yen in a timely manner to Sagawa, which bad ties 
to senior politicians and underworld syndicates. . * 

New Shelling in South Yemen City r 

ADEN,' Yemen "(Reuters) ~ Guniiers pOTtodcd the ai 
market place and other residential areas or the besieged city dff 
Aden in southern Yemen on Tuesday in the second month of wa i( 
between the north and south. Hospital officials said at Jeast tw* 
people were killed and five wounded and they: appealed fot- 
humanitarian support. - - - . ...- ...... .. *; 

At 7east> 100 people have been killed in Aden in the last weeki. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


French and British Rail Strikes Set j 

LONDON (AFX) —France and Britain face one-day oatiotl 
rail strikes Wednesday, according. to announcements by France 
state rail system and by a British rail workers' union. \ 

In France, workersprotesting planned job cuts were expected 
to strike from 8 F.M. Tuesday until 6 AM. Thursday. Of the main: 
rail lines, only the northern ahd easterii networks are expected to 
operate nonnaljy. In the west, southwest and southeast, only ond 
in three trains will be running, officials said. J ” 

In London, the union saidthe strike by signalmen, the second 
two weeks, will proceed following the breakdown of talks oai 
wages between the union and Rail track management, Verv few'* 
rail services operated during last Wednesday’s strike. J ’ 
The Pont IVeuf. the oldest bridge over the Seine in Park 
bloomed under 32,000 pots of multicolored begonias and 40 1 
ivy plants to usher in the summer on Tuesday. Bathed in buds’ 
granery after two days of work by the Paris-based JaDaW.*’ 
fashion designer Kenzo, the decoration of the bridge cuInunaSdi 

“ pitai ,or tb f£i 

all of its 3,200 rooms by July 1. . otel 10 \ 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1994 


Page 3 


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WKAMMICAS /_ TPKMteglOHMS 

-K®. Set to Curb Benefits to Drug and Alcohol Abusers 


By Spencer Rich 

. . . Washington Past Service 

. WASHINGTON — For the last two 
decades, Americans have been told 
. ihat alcoholism and drug abuse are not 
.just character flaws, as older genera- 
. lions bebeved, but illnesses, deserving 
treatment cm a par with physical ail- 
ments. 

Now, Congress is nearing final ac- 
tion cut a new rule for disability bene- 
fits that some view as a sharp retreat 
'from tins standard. 

Both chambers have voted to cut 
.people off welfare disability rolls and 
.Social Security disability rolls after 36 
months of benefits if their disability, is 
based on alcoholism or drug abuse. 

Whether the recipients were still dis- 
abled would not matter. After 36 
■months, they would be out, according 
to provisions inserted by Senator Wil- 
liam S. Cohen, Republican of Maine, 
and Representative Gerald D. 
Kleczka, Democrat of Wisconsin, in 


Senate and House bills to make the 
Social .Security Administration an in- 
dependent agency. 

The Clinton administration sup- 
ports the cutoff and intends to use any 
savings for its new welfare plan for 
mothers and children. 

“There’s no question this is a big 
turnaround in policy,” said Represen- 
tative Robert T. Maisui, Democrat of 
California. 

“It’s a challenge to the notion that 
alcoholism and drug dependence are 
disabilities,” said Susan Galbraith of 
the Legal Action Center, a public in- 
terest law center. “An arbitrary time 
limit doesn’t fix the problems,” she 
said. 

The move by Mr. Cohan and Mr. 
Kleczka resulted from widespread re- 
ports that thousands of addicts and 
alcoholics — nobody knows the real 
number — are not seeking rehabilita- 
tion while on disability rolls. Instead, 
they reportedly use their federal sup- 


port payments to buy more drugs and 
alcohol, worsening their conditions at 
government expense. 

At present, under both programs, 
people can receive monthly disability 
benefits for alcoholism or drug abuse 
if their problem is so severe that it 
would prevent them from working for 
at least a year or result in death. 

Mr. Cohen cited reports of numer- 
ous abuses. Some addicts have re- 
ceived $15,000 to £20,000 in retroac- 
tive benefits after a long wait for an 
eligibility determination, then used the 
money for drug binges and died. 

A study at a Los Angeles veterans’ 
medical center found that “schizo- 
phrenic cocaine abusers spend nearly 
half of their meager funds, including 
disability income, on drugs and alco- 
hol” 

Mr. Cohen said one woman called 
his office in distress because her broth- 
er, a drug addict, was happy to leant 
that Supplemental Security Income 
would “pay him for his addiction.” 


The General Accounting Office says 
alcoholics and addicts receiving Social 
Security disability payments or wel- 
fare disability payments under the 
Supplemental Security Income pro- 
gram rose from 100,000 in 1989 to 
250,000 today. Recipients draw $1.4 
billion in benefits annually. Half are 
on disabili ty primarily because of their 
addictions, the rest have conditions 
such as mental illness, but also are 
addicted. 

The 1972 Supplemental Security In- 
come law required addicts and alco- 
holics to gel treatment and have their 
benefits paid to a third-party guardian 
to ensure that the money goes for liv- 
ing expenses and not addiction. There 
have been no such requirements for 
Social Security disability recipients. 

The General Accounting Office said 
on June 8 that the Social Security Ad- 
ministration, which administers the 
Supplemental Security Income pro- 
gram, had done such a poor job of 
monitoring these requirements that 


only one-fifth of about 70.000 recipi- 
ents were receiving treatment. 

Advocacy groups and some sub- 
stance abuse experts say they believe a 
36-month limit on benefits does not 
take into account the nature of drug 
and alcohol rehabilitation. 

“The unconditional cutoff does not 
make a great deal of sense," said Roger 
Meyer, a psychiatrist who is vice presi- 
dent and executive dean of George 
Washington University Medical Cen- 
ter in Washington. 

“You're talking about disorders that 
are chronic relapsing disorders.” he 
said: Such problems often take far 
longer than three years to bring under 
control and patients often make pro- 
gress. then sup back. 

Joe Manes of the Bazelou Mental 
Health Law Center called the auto- 
matic cutoff “quite vindictive” and 
said it signaled “that if you can’t get 
cured in three years, we’ve lost interest 
in you.” 


Uigmts 

tffit*: WH? 

CA 


mSMm i 



Health Good, Caned Teen Says 

Fay Leaves Prison Amid Continued U,S.- Singapore Chill 




By Philip Shenon 

New York Tima Service 

SINGAPORE — The American teenager who 
was flogged for vandalizing cars in Singapore 
was released from prison Tuesday even as his 
case continued to chill relations between the 
United States and this wealthy, authoritarian 
city-state. 

“I’m happy to be free, my health is good,” said 
Michael P. Fay, 19, after a meeting at the United 
States Embassy. “I’m looking forward to going 
back to my own country.” 

Although pale and markedly thinner after 
three months in prison, Mr. Fay had no difficulty 
walking from the prison yard despite his four 
lashes of a rattan cane on May 5 — a punish- 
ment, routine in Singapore, that usually leaves 
permanent scars. 

While Mr. Fay offered no details Tuesday 
about the severity of the caning and refused to 
answer questions from reporters, his father said 
in an interview Monday that, despite earlier 
reports from the family’s lawyer that the flogging 


whacked,” said his father, George Fay, an Ohio 
businessman. “Because of the publicity, I tend to 
think that they didn’t want turn lim ping out of 
jail. He can sit, he can walk." 

The case created a trans- Pacific furor after 
President Bill Clinton intervened personally, and 
publicly, to ask that the Singapore government 
spare the rod. 

The decision by the authorities here to go 
forward with the flogging has led to a marked 
deterioration in relations between the United 
States and Singapore, a nation that has long been 
a dose U.S. ally in Southeast Asia. 

Asked how relations with Singapore had been 
affected by the caning, the State Department 
spokesman, Mike McCurry, said Monday in 
Washington: “I think there ‘have been repercus- 
sions, because the fallout from this incident is 
something that becomes a factor in our bilateral 
relations. 

Last month, the U.S. trade representative, 
Mickey Kantor. disclosed that the united States 
had decided to vote against Singapore's bid to be 


* POLITICAL NOTES* 


Nwvea Fraying In Health-Care Debate 

WASHINGTON — Pounding the lectern in front of her, 
Hillary Rodham Clinton told a group of health-care allies that 
passage of a bill with guaranteed health insurance for all 
Americans “is now at risk” and criticized them for promoting 
their own parochial interests ahead of the central goal of 
universal coverage. In a private meeting at the Old Executive 
Office Building with representatives of labor, senior citizens, 
consumers and health care professional groups, Mrs. Clin ion 
firmly reiterated the president’s vow to veto any bill that does 
not guarantee universal coverage, according to participants, 
who described her tone as “fiery.” She asked them to redouble 
their pressure on Congress to pass an acceptable plan. 

The meeting was the first White House admission of the 
seriousness of the administration’s difficulties with Congress 
on the issue. It followed a cabinet-level meeting with Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton in which officials acknowledged they had 
lost control of the health-care debate and agreed to refocus 
their efforts on the bottom Hne. 

“That’s why we’ve narrowed down what we stand for," said 
a cabinet member who attended. 

The prospects for a CKn ton-like health bill had some rough 
going last week when leaders of the pivotal Senate Finance 
Committee told the president they were deadlocked over 
financing universal coverage and offered two alternatives that 
Mr. Chilian later said he did not think would meet his goal. 
On Sunday, the committee’s chairman, Daniel Patrick Moy- 
nihan^ Democrat of New York, said he did not think Congress 
would pass a bill with guaranteed coverage for all ( WP) 


How Gingrich Saved $300 on Insurance 

WASHINGTON — Representative Newt Gingrich, the 
House minority whip, told a national television audience 
Sunday that he pays about $400 a month for his health 
insurance. On Monday, a Gingrich spokesman said the Geor- 
gia Republican pays only about $100 a month. 

The spokesman, Allan Lipsett, said Mr. Gingrich inadver- 
tently gave the $400 figure in trying to remember his monthly 
payroll deductions, “it was not something he had boned up 
on,” Mr. Lipsett said. 

Mr. Gingrich, appearing on an NBC news program, said: 
“I have a Blue Cross plan that I pay for every month as part of 
the federal employees health benefit plan. 

“And we pay, 1 think it’s about $400 a month for ours.” 

Mr. Lipsett said Mr. Gingrich is enrolled in the Bhie Cross 


Doa McTH* Atwicijucd Pro. 



A guard halting people af the gate to the base near Spokane where a gunman killed fora-. 

Away From Politics 


reports irom tne family s lawyer that the flogging had decided to vote against Singapore s bid to be reams ana aepenaenis i 

had been savage, it may have been relatively light host of a prestigious summit meeting next year, program. The program off* 

by the standards of Sineaoore iails. the first meeting of the World Trade Oraaniza- and Blue Cross standard ii 


by the standards of Singapore jails. 

“I do tend to believe that he certainly did not 
get whacked as hard as he could have gotten 


the first meeting of the World Trade Organiza- 
tion, the successor to the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade. 


rates published by the federal plan, enroll ees pay $101.23 a 
month for Blue Cross standard, family coverage. The govern- 
ment pays the balance of the premium, $303.77. 

About 9 million federal workers, members of Congress, 
retirees and dependents are enrolled in the federal health 
program. The program offers more than 300 insurance plans, 
and Blue Cross standard is the most popular, chosen by 1.55 
million enrollees. (WP) 


• A recently discharged airman opened fire • After 
with an assault rifle at the Fairchild Air Force priest, i 
Base medical clinic near Spokane, Washing- Arlingti 
ton, killing four people and wounding 18 faithTfi 
others before he was shot and killed by the behind : 
police. Officials identified the suspect as 14 yean 

a fonnar.«xmjpL *uhe, vh»200 
base who was discharged last month for psy- - Church 
chological rcasons- A psychologist who had “A she 
treated him reportedly was among the shoot- flock," 
ing victims. • - ordaine 

• A fishing boat attempting ta smuggle 126 herds di 
undocumented Chinese migrants to the Unit- . their fle 


ed States was intercepted in the Atlantic off 
Virginia, the Coast Guard said. The boat is 
based in Philadelphia. 

• A school superintendent who was arrested 
for drunken driving while wearing women’s 
dotbihg is bang let go byjhe school board in 
Hamden. Connecticut. The board voted to 
pay David W. Shaw $243,000 in exchange for 
ms resignatkm. Mr . Shaw agreed to drop the 
lawsuits and complaints he filed against the 
board and the town. " 


• After spemfing 34 years as an Episcopal 
priest, the Reverend Allan Hawkins, 60, of 
Arlington, Texas, decided he needed a new 
faith. But he knew it would be hard to leave 
behind the congregation he had led for nearly 
14 years —so fie didn’t Father Hawkins and 
b» 209 jmrishonexs at St Mazy the Virgin 
Church became Cat ho lics earlier this month. 
“A shepherd is somebody who leads the 
flock,” said Father Hawkins, who is to be 
ordained as a Catholic priest June 29. “Shep- 
herds do not say good-bye. They try and take 
(hear flock with them.” 

• Occidental C h emical Corp. has agreed to 
pay $98 million toward the cleanup of Love 
Canal near Buffalo, New York, to end a 
lawsuit with New York state over the toxic 
nightmare that forced hundreds of families to 
leave their homes. The settlement in the 14- 
year-old liability case was reached last week 
by attorneys for Occidental and New York, 
which had sued the company for nearly $700 
mini on in cleanup costs ana other damages. 

Roam, AP 


CUNTON: White House to Ask the Public for Help 


Continued from Page 1 dates say the cumulative legal 
bills have already proved 
lawyer who charges $475 an daunting, 
hour. Supporters of President 


Under current law, the Clin- 
tons, too, have the option of 
using leftover campaign money 
to help pay their legal bills. 
They could also have sought 
discounts in the rates charged 


their personal investments, campaign money as the basis discounts in the 
which are under scrutiny in the ; or ® fun “ “ 1 *J began paying w their lawyers. 

Whitewater case, the Clintons “prases for some of his ■' . . . J , 

had earlier hired David F Ken mdes evcn when he was still in But senior aides made dear 
dall ^arae^about officc But nei ^ CT Mr. Nixon J* ** last month that the 

SmSSSit charges about oor ^ White House pJaved a Clintons had rejected both op- 
an nour. role in establishing the fund, tions as politically untenable 

Although the Clintons re- and it did not begin to provide and belierred they had no other 
ported that their annual income for Mr. Nixon's legal bills until course but to seek outside help 
in 1993 was $293,000, asso- after he left office. in paying their legal bills. 


NICOTINE* Official Refutes Tobacco Industry Claims 


Summitworld in Euro Disneyland 


an nnaniMW M^writ to Euro Disneyland 
JDodJurixU&ssuJent Francois Mitterrand to 
the thaw park near Paris for the first time. 


world!’ because they discovered President 
Mitterrand and President Bush walking 

er/^tlie Euro Disney chairman, Phil]$w 
Bourguimon, said on Europe- 1 radio on 


Mr. Mitterrand dined with George and 
Barbara Bush while the rest of the Bush dan 
sat through “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show" 
at Festival Disney, just outside the park. 

The dinner the Cinderella Inn restau- 
rant at the foot of SlcepingBeauty’s Castle — 
included salad with truffles, lobster, bass, 
lamb, cheese and fruit pastry. The French 
leader left after dinner while the Bush family 
spent the night in the Disneyland Hotel. 

Mi. Mitterrand, who has often defended 
France against perce i ved U.S. cultural impe- 
rialism, has not oeen known as & fan of Euro 


and gran dddto^etoma ^ itylasa Socialist 

it Monday afternoon touting under Laurent Fabius that gave 

attoedons they saw was The wrovri to the project in the 

-a_ _ X a uitf.tn.KA. UHLi-l 70V/3. 


the sprawling park. ■ 

Ammtp the attractions they saw was ^ne 
Mysteries of the Nautilus,” a yet-to-be- 
of the fictional subma- 
rine cf Jnte* Verne’s “20,000 Leagues Under 
the Sea.” ^ - 

Mr. Bush and Mr. Mitterrand, who arrived 
^aterby heficopter, then walked down the 
paafs Mahi Street and drew astonished 
loctei^Mr. Bourguignoo said. 


He had never before been to the theme 
park, which opened in April 1992. “It’s not 
my cup of tea, . he once said. 

But Mr. Botxmtignon said that may have 
changed. “Since last night he has changed his 
mind because he was really surprised by what 
he saw,” he said. 


<)^lmiaiidez 9 Manila Banker, Dies 




r . . '.' . -j Ticj'Uaadaud Prea 
, Jose B. Feman- 

Thti, the 

dcn^FarcfedE. Marcos and 

Corazon- CttAquino, -died of. 
cancer Sunday^- • 

* Mr; Fernandez ^was Tinned 

governor of the Central Bank in 


sr&n writer and literary critic, Hasidic sect, died Sunday in 


Continued from Page 1 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco 
COip. had purposely created a 
high-nicotine leaf through 
crossbreeding and advanced ge- 
netic techniques, shipped the 
seeds to Brazil where plants 
were grown commercially by an 
affiliated company, imported 
the new leaf and blended it into 
some of its brands of cigarettes. 

Tom Fitzgerald, a spokesman 
for Brown & Williamson, which 
is based in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, said Dr. Kessler had “to- 
tally blown this issue out of 
proportion” and made a num- 
ber of factual errors that will be 
“corrected” on Thursday when 
the company chairman. Thom- 
as E Sandefnr Jr„ appears be- 
fore the same committee. 

Mi. Fitzgerald said there was 
nothing secret about Y-i, that it 
was blended into some brands 
to reduce tar and maintain fla- 
vor. Brands containing Y-l bad 
no more nicotine than the ciga- 
rettes they replaced and in some 
cases had reduced nicotine, he 
said. The company recently 
stopped using Y-l because of 
concerns raised by the Food 
and Drug Administration, he 
said. 

Dr. Kessler said he had asked 
the company to produce the re- 
quired federal export permits 
for the tobacco seed- A Kessler 
aide testified that as late as Iasi 
month, company officials had | 


In the scientific community, 
it is weQ known that plant vari- 
eties can be bred with varying 
levels of nicotine, but the high- 
est- nice tine plants have not 
proven to be viable agricultur- 
ally. Dr. Kessler contended that 
the existence of Y-i, a high- 
nicotine plant that is commer- 
cially grown, raised serious 
questions about the industry's 
denial that it manipulated nico- 
tine levels. 

Dr. Kessler also cited a range 
of documents and leaf-blending 
handbooks from other un- 
named companies suggesting 
that ammonia compounds are 
often added to cigarettes as an 
“impact booster" to deliver nic- 
otine more readily to smokers. 

He told a congressional sub- 
committee on health and envi- 


ammonia compounds to ciga- 
rettes.” Dr. Kessler said. “Fur- 
ther. one company’s document 
confirms that the intended pur- 
pose of this practice is to ma- 
nipulate nicotine delivery to the 
smoker.” 

Later, he declared that Y-l 
“represents a dramatic attempt 
to manipulate nicotine.” 

Dr. Kessler said Lhat in re - 1 
cent days, Brown & Williamson , 
had acknowledged using small , 
amounts of the Y-l leaf in some 1 
brands, including Raleigh 
Lights, Viceroy ana Richland 
Lights. Y-l, he said, contains 
6.2 percent nicotine while com- 
mercially grown flue-cured to- 
bacco contains 25 percent to 3 
percent nicotine. 

In March, soon after Dr. 
Kessler announced his tobacco 


ronment: "We now know that a ^essi« announced ms tooacco 
tobacco company commerdallv investigation. Brown & Wfl- 
developed a tobacco plani with hamson removed its Y-l seeds 
twice the nicotine of standard ^ r ?“ a federal laboratory and 
flue-cured tobacco; that several withdrew its application for 
milli on pounds of this high-nic- certification for Y-l, 

otine tobacco are currently *■"- Kessler s^a. 
stored in warehouses; and that Among the documents cited 
rhis tobacco was put into riga- by Dr. Kessler on the ammonia 
relies that have beat sold na- question was one from an na- 
tionwide. named tobacco company that 

“We now understand ihat tested reactions from European 
several tobacco companies add smokers. 


died of heart failure Friday, the Jerusalem. Rabbi Halberstam, . told the Food and Drug Ad- 


Union of Writers said. 


bom to a rabbinical d 


min d, weighty word and a sect 
staunch opponent of totalitar- ers. 

ianism, saia an official obituary 

y gnftd by Prime Minister Vik- 
tor S. Chernomyrdin and other 
prominent people. . — 

Best known for “Chystye j 


dynasty m 

He was a “man of original Romania, led a Hasidic Jewish 
ind. wefehty word” and a sect with thousands of folio w- 


ministration that it did not 
breed high-nicotine plants and 
that using such plants would 
not be “feasible." 


crisis foBovinR - the assassina- 1 Best known for unysiye 
fion of Mrs^Aqinno’s husband, Prady ” a lyncal collection of 
“ — " ‘ Si Aquino Jr. short stones about hfe in Nte- 


His.pxedecessotr Kiwi been ac- cow before World War U, Mr. 
c«si^-%' 7 the:Jntcrnational Nagibin had just finished a nov- 
Monetaiy punSetf padding the el and a collection of short sto- 

• Ties. He also wrote nearly 30 

^^^3editediwith restoring screenplays. 
fiitcriahd^ihi^mlhePhilip-- Terence de Vote White, 82, 
pme . an Irish author and former edi- 


fiitcrnaftjtj^iiu^iniiKPbihp-. 


‘Hewas retained ifitbe post tor jpriday in London. Mr. 
by Mis; Aquino after Mr. Mar- White wrote 26 books, mostly 
cos. fled hi aj»palar prising in nove is and short-story coflec- 
1986r i j v; - tions. He was the literary editor 

: of The Irish Times from 1961 to 

N^aia,jLi^«aiiKntRas- 89. leader of die Klausmburger 


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Page 4 


IV inteknvtioml 

iTcralo^Xfe 


PI HI JMIEI) WITH THK \hn Vi IKK TIMKS iMl Tilt « IMIIM.T # n POST 


The Carter Opening 


Granted, it was not a masterpiece of 
clarity and coordinalion. Bui former Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter and the Clinton ad- 
ministration, which approved his trip- 
appear to have moved the crisis over the 
North Korean nuclear program back to- 
ward the negotiating table. Mr. Carter's 
personal diplomacy, conducted with 
North Korean President Kim II Sung, 
may provide a face-saving way for both 
sides to pull back from confrontation. 

Mr. Carter says he won Mr. Kim's 
consent to freeze his nuclear program in a 
verifiable way while high-level talks are 
resumed between the United States and 
North Korea to resolve the nuclear issue. 
If the specifics of the Korean offer are 
confirmed, it offers a promising route 
toward a deal. The former president also 
won Mr. Kim's assent to a meeting with 
South Korea's president, an offer that the 


L*»ll I 1 rs rVTi 


place, they could further defuse the crisis 
on the Korean Peninsula. 

True, Mr. Carter erred in saying that 
the United States would suspend efforts 
to seek United Nations endorsement of 
sanctions; President Bill Clinton had 
conditioned that suspension on confir- 
mation by North Korea of its nuclear 
freeze. But sanctions would be difficult to 
mount effectively at this point anyway. 
Japan and South Korea, never mind Chi- 
na and Russia, are unlikely to move to 
sanctions while there is a chance for di- 
plomacy. Tough sanctions could bring 
down Japan's coalition government and 
raise risks of war that South Korea does 
not care to run. 

The promises Mr. Carter says he has 
won from North Korea would 'go a long 
way toward meeting conditions set by the 


Fighting Crime in Russia 


To Russia’s staggering burdens add the 
dilemma created by the unbelievable 
growth of crime in the political and eco- 
nomic space formerly contained by state 
power and planning. To live with this 
beast is to succumb to a pervasive lawless- 
ness, beyond anything known in the West, 
that terrorizes the citizenry and business 
and robs them of security and essential 
order. But to fight it in the manner that 
President Boris Yeltsin now proposes is tc 
gamble with the very liberties that Rus- 
sians overturned communism to achieve. 

Mr. Yeltsin would permit 30-day po- 
lice detention, sanction warrantless 
searches and use of the fruits in court, 
and establish regions of "special control" 
by police. Police “excesses" are deemed 
possible but manageable and in any case 
necessary to combat a “mafia" that in 
organization, sophistication and brazen- 
ness already overwhelms an inadequate 
police. Mr. Yeltsin seems to feel that 
popular outrage and helplessness have 
reached critical mass in a country that 
culturally is only loosely bound to de- 
mocracy and "yearns for the iron hand." 
This is the best explanation of how he 
concludes that Russians, despite their 
memory of Stalin, would permit revival 
of a Stalinist police. 


This is a disturbing stand for someone 
whose appeal to and support by democrats 
brought him to power in 1991. By the 
method of his reversal moreover, he in- 
vites, not for the first lime, charges ol 
dictatorship. Once again be proposes tc 
make crucial changes alone, by presiden- 
tial decree. He does so although this lime 
the Parliament was elected under a legiti- 
mate post-Soviet constitution and even 
though the constitutional court that is sup- 
posed to rule on whether he has such 
powers has not yet been established. The 
only encouraging note is that a good many 
Russians in "public life realize the high 
stakes and are prepared to battle for them. 

It is easy for Americans to sit in a 
generally prosperous and relatively law- 
abiding country and to bid others, who 
are in extreme duress, to be faithful to the 
Bill of Rights. But surely Russia doesn't 
need the police of the past. It needs a 
modern police: trained, equipped, hon- 
est, accountable, enforcing up-to-date 
law. internationally connected, support- 
ed by society. Americans will have the 
greatest respect for Russians who can 
balance the pressures generated by a tidal 
crime wave against the bounding princi- 
ples of their frail democracy. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Stop Bashing the Bank 

It is a pity that in so many developing 
nations, the World Bank and the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund are regarded with 
as much enthusiasm as an earthquake. 
How fashionable and convenient it has 
become to blame a nation's shortcomings 
—not just economic, but social and polit- 
ical — on these multilateral institutions. 
The Bank and the IMF are seen as med- 
dlesome busybodies dictating disastrous 
economic policies with a sinister agenda 
to impoverish the Third World. 

In a remarkably candid admission this 
week, the Bank says that its lending poli- 
cies on infrastructure may indeed have 
been flawed. The latest edition of its 
World Development Report lambasts de- 
veloping nations for squandering much 
of the 5200 billion spent each year on 
lavish public works projects, and suggests 
that radical policy changes are needed to 
cut waste. The price of this waste — in 
terms of foregone economic growth and 
lost opportunities for poverty reduction 
and environmental improvement — is 
high and unacceptable, said the Bank's 
president, Lewis Preston. 

This admission is music to the ears of 
the Bank's many detractors. Its long-held 
belief that subsidies on electricity, food 
and transport should be scrapped and 
that user-fees be levied is seen as a shin- 
ing example of its “anti-poor" stance. 
But this is nonsense. 

The introduction of user-fees for essen- 
tial services has a much broader objective. 
The Bank estimates that if users or elec- 
tricity, water and railroads in developing 
nations paid their full cost, governments 
would collect a further $123 billion a year 


in revenues. And making such projects 
more efficient could save $55 billion a year. 

This debate surfaces at a time when 
developing countries have embraced free 
markets. There is the belated recognition 
that state control over infrastructure (and 
the overall economy) stifles growth. The 
buzz word now is privatization, attracting 
foreign capital and improving efficiency. 
For countries that have pursued disastrous 
economic policies for years, reforms will 
be slow and painful. But blaming the 
World Bank doesn't help. 

— Business Times (Singapore). 

Pyongyang’s 'Realistic’ Offer 

J went [to North Korea] in my capacity 
as director of a Carnegie Endowment 
program on arms control and nonprolif- 
eration in East Asia. The North Koreans 
have been talking about negotiating with 
the United States a package solution to 
the nuclear problem. The North Korean 
proposal was clear concerning their will- 
ingness to return to the Nuclear Nonpro- 
liferation Treaty and submit to full in- 
spection of their declared nuclear 
facilities in return for diplomatic recogni- 
tion and an end to the economic embargo 
imposed since the Korean War. I believe 
their offer is serious and specific and 
offers a realistic way to prevent a further 
accumulation of plutonium with a poten- 
tial military application. The pursuit of 
sanctions and other pressure on North 
Korea will only lead to countermeasures 
and would prove counterproductive at 
the very time when we now have evidence 
of a willingness to negotiate seriously. 

— Selig Harrison, quoted 
in The Washington Post. 




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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1994 


PINION 


Clinton administration for holding high- 
level talks with the North. 

One condition has necessarily been 
abandoned. North Korea's abrupt re- 
moval of fuel rods from its reactor at 
Yongbyon barred international inspec- 
tors from their preferred way of deter- 
mining whether the North diverted 
enough spent nuclear fuel in 1989 to yield 
a bomb's worth or more of plutonium. So 
other ways must now be found, a major 
issue For the high-level talks. 

But an even more important condition 
was met when Mr. Kira gave Mr. Carter 
his personal pledge that the inspectors 
could remain at Yongbyon. thus prevent- 
ing diversion of an additional five bombs' 
worth of plutonium. In Lhe meantime. 
North Korea needs to defer loading Lhe 
reactor with new fuel rods that could be 
available for future diversion, an issue that 


Once Washington confirms Lhat a 
freeze is in effect, high-level talks can 
resume and preparations for economic 
sanctions can halt. The United States will 
then seek a verifiable end to the North's 
nuclear program, especially its capacity 
for reprocessing spent fuel, and an end to 
the North's missile exports. 

Pyongyang is seeking a peace treaty 
formally' ending the Korean War and es- 
tablishing diplomatic lies with Washing- 
ton. It also wants the world to give it a less 
proliferation-prone reactor to replace its 
current reactor, a potentially promising 
investment from a security standpoint. 

Mr. Carter was probably premature in 
declaring the Korean crisis over, but his 
intervention may have usefully pointed the 
way toward its eventual resolution. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 



ment." Its goaf :s -o augment the 
of democracies in the world. But that goal 
has yet to translate into policy: all we 
have so far are words of good intentions. 

The gap between aspiration and com- 
mitment was acknowledged recently by 
Anthony Lake, the national security ad- 
viser: “When I woke up every morning 
and look at the headlines and the stories 
and the images on television of these 
conflicts," he said. “I want to work to 
end every conflict. ; want to work to save 
every child out there, and 1 know the 
president does, and I know- the American 
people do. But neither we nor the inter- 
national community have lhe resources 
or the mandate to do so." 

Claiming poverty and scared of quag- 
mire. we Arr.ericari are fearful of doing 
too much but undaunted by the conse- 
quences of doing too little. 

The recent presidential directive on UN 
peacekeeping is so burdened by condi- 
tions that it may be construed as'a virtual 
renunciation of even multilateral military 


vocal critic of overextension — “arro- 
gance'' — of American power. And Mr. 
Clinton's first major encounter with poli- 
tics was the 1972 presidential campaign, 
which featured Senator George McGov- 
ern’s call on America to come borne. 

Voters carried a similar message in 
1992. While some of us backing the Qin- 
t on- Gore ticket may have Imped for an 
activist foreign policy, we understood that 
changing America rather than shaping the 
world had to be Mr. Clinton's priority. 

Two years later, most Americans see 
no dear dang er said therefore no need for 
sustained engagement. Foreign policy 
and national security are rated as a 
source of concern by only 3 permit of 
the public. Congress would no more want 
to see U.S. planes bomb Serbian posi- 
tions in Bosnia than it would finance a 
generous aid program for Ukraine. 

And even if the president were to pro- 
pose the expansion of NATO to include 
deserving states of Central Europe, 
thereby giving content to his notion of 


“democratic enlargement,” the S ena te 
would almost certainly balk. ■ • .- m 
Like his predecessors. President CHa- 
ton could embrace unpopular positions. : 
After all, the American people initially 
did not support the Marshall Plan in the- 
1940s, the deployment of mternaediat©- 
range nuclear missiles in Europe in the. 
1980s or the Gulf War in the 1990s. And 
they had tired of both the Korean War 
and the Vietnam War long before Wash- 
ington was ready to quit 
Mr. Clinton would have to base his 
retire to leadership not on the Soviet 
threat but on the valid if less ominous 
case of economic necessity. He would 
have to explain that only in a stable 
world could America continue to. pros- 




In Asia and Elsewhere, 


j 

judicious exarase ^gt poweri v 

. have to b-efievtij -and 
. believe, that 

^ -..now might vreflctRbfi&e' tos need to .’pjifcftfef 
; unlikely 

f sent policy. mz^d£^ 
r deeds suitsfe^ ^dse ^ 

»-• meraftrm. Hecotdribmed Affis ddmrnoti 


S INGAPORE — Economical- 
ly. the world is breaking up 
from empires and big nation- 
states to small states, provinces 
and city-regions. Small states, 
each with a population of less 
than 10 million, make up two- 
thirds of the members of the 
United Nations. 

Increasingly, it is at the level of 
city-regions that competition for 
human talent and investments 
takes place. This is not to say that 
the nation-state is no longer im- 
portant or that it will disappear. 
However, its power to tax and 
redistribute wealth is weakening 
by the day. Never in history have 
the factors of economic produc- 
tion been so mobile. 

In an age of city-regions. Sin- 
gapore's experience as a city-state 
becomes useful to others, indeed, 
we are somewhat embarrassed by 
the sudden interest »r. Singapore 
by big nations such a* China and 
India and by distant places like 
South Africa. Kazakhstan and 
the new Palestinian state. Their 
interest reflects the increasing 
fragmentation of the world into 
city-regions, each of a size and 
scale comparable to that of Singa- 
pore and its 3 million people. 

China, for example, is now di- 
vided administratively into city- 
regions. each of about' 2 million to 
10 million people. These city-re- 
gions have considerable autono- 
my. Each must solve problems of 
urban planning housing, trans- 
portation, road congestion, educa- 


By George Yeo 

The writer is Singapore's minister for information and the arts. 


tion and policing while attracting 
investments and creating jobs. 

Singapore has become a model 
for them to study, not only our 
successes but our mistakes. As an 
independent city-state, Singapore 
has advantages over city-regions 
that are parts of nation-states. 

The greatest advantage is our 
ability to control the movement 
of people into Singapore. With- 
out this, Singapore would be like 
many other fast-growing cities in 
the Third World, with high crime 
rates, traffic congestion, slums, 
prostitution, drug addiction and 
severe pollution. 

Instead of indiscriminate ur- 
ban drift, we select migrants 
based on talent, income and other 
criteria. In the last two years, for 
every two babies born in Singa- 
pore. we imported one migrant. 

O'er the next few decades, ur- 
banization on an unprecedented 
scale will take place all over .Asia, 
involving more than 2 billion peo- 
ple. The ability of local govern- 
ments to cope with this surge will 
decide which city-regions succeed. 

All over the world, institutions 
that evolved in response to the 
needs of an earlier period of indus- 
trialization arc no longer ade- 
quate. Smaller, more responsive 
units of organization are required. 
A pattern erf competition ana coop- 
eration among erty-regions wzQ ap- 


pear, not unhTc e the pattern in Eu- 
rope before the age of nation-states, 
with international organizations 
like the dd Hanseatic League pro- 
viding loose coordination. 

In this new world, a new bal- 
ance between rights and duties, 
independence and interdepen- 
dence, competition and coopera- 
tion wiH have to be found. The 
ideas of democracy and socialism 
will have to be reinterpreted. 

East Asia will make a major 
contribution to this reinterpreta- 
tion, not because East Asians are 
wiser but because it is in East 
Asia where old institutions have 
been most completely destroyed 
over the last few hundred years. 

Almost 150 years of war and 
revolution have brought untold 
suffering to the region. Yet pre- 
cisely because the destruction has 
been so complete, reconstruction 
has been made much easier. 

With the exception of Japan, 
the countries of East Asia are in a 
relatively youthful phase of de- 
velopment. Institutions are still 
flexible. A can-do spirit, some- 
times bordering on foolhardiness, 
fills the air. 

The disorder and confusion in 
East Asia today are those of or- 
ganic growth, reminiscent of the 
disorder and confusion in the 
United States in the 1 9th century. 
It is in East Asia where radically 


Upholding Old American Principle 


N EW YORK — In Washing- 
ton, some members of Con- 
gress have decided to remain 
faithful to themselves, their con- 
cept of what America means and 
their special constituency. They 
bring fresh air to America. 

For no political gain and at 
some risk, they have chosen to be 
constant to the bounded and bat- 
tered constituency they selected 
for themselves — the prisoners in 
the torture cells of China and 
Tibet and all the other political 
and religious victims cf Beijing. 

At first there were four Dem- 
ocratic members of Congress. 
They introduced legislation to 
override President Bill Clinton’s 
own personal decision. That, of 
course, was to renege on his 
promise to use tariff pressure on 
Beijing to ease repression of dis- 
sidents, priests and workers. 

Then, within hours. 40 more 
members, both parties, signed 
up, and the list grows. They 
know they are taking on the 
power of the presidency, party 
politics and the rich and very 
tough China lobby. 

Under the legislation, Ameri- 
ca would remove the low tariff 
privileges for all products of Chi- 
na’s most varied and strongest 
economic conglomerate — the 
army. Through scores of dummy 
corporations, the Chinese army 
uses soldiers, “volunteers" and 
particularly low-cost labor to 
make and export products rang- 
ing from toys to assault rifles. 

The legislation would also re- 
move low-tariff rates from speci- 
fied products of state-owned en- 
terprises — among them plastics, 
wood articles, footwear, appard. 

Ail told, die tariff increases 
would affect the costs of only $5 
billion of China’s $40 billion 


By A. M. Rosenthal 

exports to the United States. 
Still, and whether they succeed 
or not, these politicians are open- 
ing windows to some refreshing 
reminders of American idealism. 

We need iL Not only has Mr. 
Clinton broken his human rights 
promises on China, but Jimmy 
Carter, strong for human rights 
during his presidency, astonish- 
ingly soils his mission to North 
Korea by some erf the warmest 
praise of a dictator since the 
American adoration of Unde 
Joe Stalin. Has he changed? 

Beijing has not, not at a3L So 
Mr. Clinton's surrender to the 
Chinese government was notice 
that the ad minis tration was can- 
celing human rights as an effec- 
tive part of American policy. 

Now members of Congress 
are crying stop — the United 
States must return to human 
rights as one instrument and 
goal of policy. 

The human rights concept 
simply is that liberty is not just 
the struggle of those who do 
not have it but also of those 
who live within its grace. Ii was 
a reason why America’s name 
was blessed around the world. 

On his human rights record. 
Mr, Clinton encourages what 
the country needs least: cyni- 
cism. He was elected because 
enough Americans saw him as 
an open-heaned democratic 
idealist, the antithesis of life as 
a bottom line. 

So one message of the legis- 
lation is particularly impor- 
tant. The politicians are saying 
that cynicism need not be the 
country’s soul-destroying des- 
tiny. Fresh air, lovely. 


On economics, the sponsors 
of the legislation open other 
windows by dissecting the 
fraudulent argument that the 
United States cannot afford a 
h uman rights policy in China. 

China, they point out. racks 
up a $31 billion sales advantage 
over the United States. The 
Communists did not accomplish 
that through brillian t new mana- 
gerial methods but through im- 
posed low wages and banning of 
unions. Working conditions are 
so bad that police are busy put- 
ting down strikes. How many 
workers have been killed? 

Low wages in China may im- 
prove the balance sheet of some 
U.S. companies, relatively few. 
But tens of thousands of Ameri- 
can workers stand to lose their 
jobs. They are unable to com- 
pete with Chinese wages and 
hours — thank God. 

Written with respect, the 
names of the original sponsors 
of the legislation are: in the 
Senate, George Mitchell, the 
majority leader; and in the 
House, the majority leader, 
Richard A Gephardt; David 
E. Bonior, the majority whip, 
and Nancy Pelosi of San Fran- 
cisco, a strong, steady leader 
for human rights. 

In Congress or out, the hu- 
man rights movement does not 
ask America to dispatch arms or 
armies but to use economics 
and diplomacy to pressure dic- 
tatorships into allowing some 
elemental civil decencies. 

The sponsors of the legisla- 
tion are putting a question to 
Americans: If America cannot 
do that much for the rights of 
humans, then what are we, io 
the world and ourselves? 

The New York Tones. 


new institutional arrangements 
are being tried and where new 
forms of democracy and social- 
ism are evolving. 

Western liberals often sneer 
when East Asians talk about 
Asian forms of democracy. They 
forget that Western democracy it- 
self evolved over many centuries 
and took many different forms. . 

Western democracy today 
faces serious problems. Once ' 
property and education criteria 
are removed, and the vote be- 
comes universal, democracy with- 
out g ro u p sohdaritycan become a-- 
game where wealth is redistribute 
ed from the rich to the poor and 
from the disorganized many to 
the organized few. 

The temptation to borrow from 
future generations who have no 
votes is always strong. No democ-. 
racy can function well without 
strong moral underpinnings sup- 
ported by the entire community. 
Democracies which see only 
rights without obligations eventu- 
ally destroy themselves. 

To work well, democracy 
should get smaller, not bigger. In 
fact, this is the way democracy is 
gradually evolving in China. Over 
the last 15 years, power has been 
steadily devolved to provinces 
and city- regions. limited election 
of local governments has become 
established. This important de- 
velopment is often missed by 
Western observe*. 

Treatment of minorities is an- 
other aspect of an evolving East 
Asian democracy that bears 
watching. In a winner- take-all, 
on c- man-one-vote situation, mi- 
norities must revolt against a 
dominant majority. Other ways 
must be found to ensure fair mi- 
nority representation. 

Singapore created Group Rep- 
resentation Constituencies, which 
forced all major political parties 
to field a multiracial slate of can- 
didates in parliamentary elec- 
tions. In Indonesia, PancasQa de- 
mocracy consciously plays down 
Javanese dominance. In the Asso- 
ciation of Southeast Asian Na- 
tions, considerable importance is 
given to consensus- building. 

I am not saying that Asian 
forms of democracy are superior, 
only that they are evolving in 
way* more suited to East Asia's 
histones and cultures. 

Socialism, too, is evolving in an 
interesting way in Asia. Consider 
the case of Singapore. Is it sotial- 


mg, health and : education. .Barite 
Singapore's 

sdoustY SubpiY-sidc^arid sfiriS5@?': 


ricSoai*0k>s&' 

If 


er. ccEKumpQoa. 

lhe newly rndnssriaKod ccaho? ^ 

lines erf E^st Asia do not 

the samcvrastoanriCTiricisaa te m 


gran learned from fee xafetafe^ 
made In cfe v riopedcq«ritrie&,~ aad&'fc; 

diffe ren t • Thepota^aati^hft 


are s^ Thri^ q£btit; m w^la^gj 
Itude^aad jl corainitn^tto^^^^ j 


liberate^ woric w 
ries through die family. TTiejE^g' 
jective is to strengthen ibc-fain^ 
net, not weafcen.it. r -'J- . • 
Just as denKXOTcy. mus4 : b^v;.; . 
come smaller, socialism must 
get smaller. Socialism w3L neww .T’ 
die, because it springs from thei 1: 
nature of man as a social 
Foe many East Asian socretii^^^ 
is not only the family that is ^6^: 
dalist, it is the extended fanSty^; ; 
and sometimes the entire 
Big business groups in Norat'^ ; 
east Asia —■ Japanese zaibtmv j?;].’ 
and South Korean; cftaebe&^S^;;. 
have always practiced soaafisriPL^. 
witirin the corporation. Socaalfeja^i" : 
works when it strengthens;gpp®^ : i ; ■ 
responsibility.. It is dy5finK^b^.\ - 
when it leads to ' ^ 

spansibility. Singapore has arad- ^ 
ed Westerasodaf securitySj^nto^^ 


the unbreakable communal ■ - 

rice bowk in Maoist 
encourage die “buffet synd 
izt which users pay jiatir 
tafa* all they c**" . 

In East Asia today; 
are still plastic. Major ^ 

meats in danocracy anri soci#^; 
ism are being conducted. ;$p£&r:' 
will succeed, others will faiL. IO ^ 
Western infl u ence had not affe^V^ 

enormous tran&ormatibn 
not have been possible. IiLlhd'/ 
same way, the nse of ind&sti^ ^ - 
Asia wifi eventually havie' 
reaching effects on the restxif 
world, including the.West^i'^.r. ; 

This comment mis addptedffij - 
the International HeraiffiTirdimi^ 
from a speech Thursday : 

gapore conference oh ./ 

industrial Asia . . : : : 

; . - ' : ’. 1 V;= -J 

• ' ■ • ; - ■iS-’CJjOWsZe,., . . i| 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS 
1894; Exit Stage Right 1944; Red 

LONDON — When Mr. Tyrone LONDON — [From. 

Ppww, as the raven-haired hero York edition:] On the thiid*ai$ 

nf th#k nlnv ** t Tm n __ . — I r «*• wt - . - * 


of the play “The Texan,” an- 
nounced before the curtain final- 
ly fell, in accents which seemed to 




vcrsaiy of the Nazi attack oa;tbe;; : 
Soviet Union, the Rod ' Airi&i; 
touched off two more “ ' J 






unspoken wish of a portion, at all 
events, of Ms audience, was that 
he would not “wait upon the or- 
der of his going, but go at oace." 

1919: FKers Knitted 

LONDON - — Gap ^in John Al- 
cock D.S.O. and Lieutenant Ar- 
thur Whitten Brown, who accom- 
plished the first direct flight 
across the Atlantic by aeroplane, 


[-vm P nTTr 


Windsor, where "the King made 

thiwn V niahlr — * -v 




British Empire. The 
new Knights lunched with the 
King and Queen. 


ish and Goman troqps frwn^Sd^ 
viet safl. The first.was 
Lake Onczhskoe and.the secoft 
was between it andLake Ladogfci 
both in regions where.' lire NaB^' 
have made tiieir hardest efforts, fc 
. break the .vital Mtumansk^t^ 
road, over which 
moved to RnRBium- ^ [[i 
The Soviet Information 
in a broadcast 
of the 


Lrti^lu i 


Germans haw btien killed o^cb^ 


three years, against Russia# 
losses of S^,e09 
tured or missing; : 


1 . iej> I a 9 












Somewhere Between Rome and Venice 



** ' 
ndl-a!-. Jir 

hi Is 


W ashington'- 1 From 

the Caribbean to: Korea, 
the gptes of crisis are gusting, 
forcing America again to 
choose. Will it. be Rome, or 
Venice, or a bit of both? 

Any new republic, wrote Ma- 
chiavah, must decide whether to 
expand its dominion by. power, 
like Rome^or to be like Venice, 
located “to some- strong place” 
that protects it as it goes about 
its business, which for Venice 
was business. During America's 
first century, broad oceans and 

E (arid neighbors enabled it to 
e Valerian, in a strong place, 
practicing conundo*. . 

Even then there was an Itch 
to beRomam tdo-^but with a 
difference. America would 
seek, in _ Thomas Jefferson's 
words, “an empire erf liberty,” 
but without becoming imperial. 
It wouId b expand its-sway by the 
spaiWmgexampteontsinslitu- 
nons, and byv&at ibe political 
scientist Gary Schmitt calls Jef- 
ferson’s “strategy of peaceful 
coercion.” It would use its com- 
mercial poweno.punish disre- 
spect for natural rights. 

War, said Jefferson, was “-not 
the best engine for us to resort 
to” because Americans had a 
better one “in our commerce.” 
Thus would America refute 
Frederick the Great’s dictum 
that diplomacy without arms- - 
meats is like music without in- 
struments. Using economic 
power, the United States would 


By George F. Will 

pursue Roman potency with . because they share its bourgeois 
Venetian means. values. But the utter futility 


Venetian means. 

. ‘ Britain, warring with France, of U.S. diplomacy backed only 
would not respect the rights of by commercial threats suggests 
neutral shipping? Jefferson that the North Korean regime 
would use an embargo to make remains unaware of any af /mi- 
lt in Britain’s “interest ... ty with the United States, 
to do what is just.” There is a vital national inter- 

It was not a success. The em- est at stake here. If North Korea 
baigo stirred commercial New demonstrates die impotence of 
England to talk of secession — restraints on nuclear prolifera- 
eat duly noted in Dixie — lion, in IS years there could be 
did not prevent war. IS more nations with nuclear 

ie world has turned over weapons backing their hatreds. 
l since then, and still Araeri- Such is the progress of military 
%ks new ways of tutoring technology over the centuries, 
vayward wo rid. Regarding from an innovation along a river 
i. the Clinton admimstra- in Central Asia to a reactor on 
has declared the restore- the Korean Peninsula. 


and did not prevent war. 15 j 

The world has turned over wea, 
often since then, and still Araeri- Sue! 
ca seeks new ways of tutoring tech 
the wayward world. Regarding fron 
Haiti, the Clinton admimstra- in C 
(ion has declared the restore- die ! 
don of President Jean-Bertrand lx 

Aristide a “vital” U.S. interest, Moc 


In his new “A History of 
Modem Warfare,” John Kee- 


for no better, reason than that, gan 'says that military histori- 
Hwri j* nearby and badly a ns recognize that “the banks 


abused by its government. 

This policy, so far. is Jeffer- 
sonian. Jt is couched solely in 
terms of rights and wrongs, and 
relies on commercial severities. 
However, the policy may be- 
come mildly Ro man. There 
may be a military invasion, if 
being Venetian with commer- 
cial sanctions does not suffice. 

North Korea is a tougher nut 
to crack. The Venetian approach 
assumes that America’s adver- 
saries aspire to be like it, pros- 
pering through commerce. II 


of the Ox us are to warfare what 
Westminster is to parliamenta- 
ry democracy or the Bastille to 
revolutions.” It was on or near 
the Ox us River separating Cen- 
tral Asia from Persia and the 
Middle East that man first 
learned to turn horses into in- 
struments of war. 

This development shaped 
military power and notions of 
martial ethics and valor — until 


that America’s adver- a second great development, 
ire to be like it. pros- gunpowder. That began ' the 
trough commerce. If equalization process. In the age 



that were their aspiration, they erf gunpowder, the nature of 
would already be like America, military materiel mattered 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


. ;rrf v l ! 

'■■■**• ■"> "sjj 1 wj j 

: V* 

/'.■■VcJ f.-rrW,, l 


o Govern 


r -"’ -J.i 

of 33. 

i • •• . r- . i .... J. 

J * ”** ' ** »-•— »i«c. A, 


Remember tbe Russians 

Our Russian allies woe not 
invited to -the D-Day ceremo- 
nies and were barely men- 
tioned. The crucial part played 
by the Red Army in the defeat 
of the Nazi-Fascist war ma- 
chine was forgotten. Without 
the Russian victories at Stalin- 
grad in 1 942,' In the gigantic 
battle at Kursk-Belgorod in 
1947, the string of victories in 
the Ukraine in the winter and 
spring of. 1944; followed by the 


colossal defeat of the Wehr- 
macht in Byelorussia in June 
and July 1944, milli ons more 
Allied soldiers surely would 
have 'died in liberating Europe. 

■ The Red Army offensive 
tore the German central front 
asunder. This contributed to 
- the relatively swift liberation 
of France, and alleviated Al- 
lied losses in the march to the 

* Rhine; I remember this Rus- 
sian advance most vividly as 
it saved my life. The Soviet 

• contribution to the Allies’ suc- 


cess in the liberation of Europe 
from Nazi tyranny should have 
born acknowledged. 

. ALEXANDRE BLUMSTEIN. 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

By not inviting the Russians 10 
the D-Day commemorations, the 
West committed a great diplomatic 
blunder and ignored history. Suc- 
cess in breaching Hiller's Atlantic 
Will would surely .have been im- 
possible if the Sbviefs had not 
pinned down the great bulk — 
qualitatively the best — of Hitler’s 
armies in the East. 


more than the nature of mili- 
tary personnel. 

Nuclear weapons have 
pushed this transformation to 
the point at which North Korea 
can be a crisis for the United 
States in its most Roman 
stance. Roman, that is, in this 
sense: The United States is at- 
tempting to change the behav- 
ior of a nation halfway around 
the world, in order to shape the 
future all over the world. Call 
tbe objective Pax .Americana. 

Well; perhaps not exactly 
pax. The aim is a world of 
merely gunpowder wars — 
wars without the worst weap- 
ons. Ih which regard, it is well 
to remember, as Mr. Keegan 
does, that since Aug. 9. 1945. 
nuclear weapons have killed 
no one. “The 50.000.000 who 
have 1 died Ln war since that 
date have, for the most part, 
been killed by cheap, mass- 
produced weapons and small- 
caliber ammunition, costing 
little more than the transistor 
radios and dry-cell batteries 
that have flooded the world in 
the same period." 

The calculations confronting 
the Clinton administration are 
excruciating precisely because 
North Korea, which says that 
economic sanctions are acts of 
war.'nol alternatives to it. has 
so much gunpowder and so lit- 
tle inclination to act like Amer- 
icans in response to America. 

Washington Post Writers Croup. 


There is another important rea- 
son-the Russians should have been 
invited. Having shed communism, 
and with it their great-power status, 
the Russians of today are in desper- 
ate need not only of material aid 
but of respect and recognition from 
the West — in this case, respect for 
their wartime valor and recognition 
of their vital part in the defeat of 
Nazism. It is a shame the opportu- 
nity for &ch a vital and timely 
gesture was allowed to pass. 

MAH MOOD ELAHI. 

Ottawa. 



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J OHN Grisham’s new novel, education, region of origin or 
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The focus here is on the three 
Klan members. One. Jeremiah 
Dogan, has die money to finance 
these bombing operations. The 
second, Sam Cayhall, drives the 
car, and the third, a sociopath 
named Rolhe Wedge, deals with 
: the exploaves. When.the. bomb 
doesn’t go'off:inr-time,' Cayhall’ 
drives to the scene of the crime, 
gets inured in tbe explosion, is 
arrested, tried twice for murder 
and acquitted twice by a jury of 
his ‘'peers," Ul, white trash. 

Then.years go by! In the ’80s 
Cayhall is trial again, and be- 
cause of a change in tbe climate 
of the times is convicted and 
put on death row. Dogan, the 
money man, under threats from 
the IRS, ratifies against him. 
Wedge, still on the loose, 
threatens to blow up everybody 
if his name is mentioned; so his 
name isn’t mentioned. 

Flash forward another de- 
cade and a half. Up in Chicago 
at a flossy Chicago law firm, an 
idealistic young attorney 
named Adam Hall presses hard 
to take on what’s left of the 
Cayhall case, since h looks as if 
Sam Cayhall has finally run out 

v3& itty O'Shea’s 

1 -'thf mrSH pttr 


of luck. Hall is, of course, Sam’s 
long-lost grandson. Hall’s own 
father, Eddie, has been another 
casualty in this war of hate: 
Eddie was ashamed of Sam. so 
distraught about the results of 
that third trial that he killed 
hunself. 

-- Now, in. an, -effort to cornc.iq, 
terms with all ihe secrets in his 
unfortunate life. Adam goes to 
Mississippi to see if he can avert 
tbe execution of his grandfather. 

The pages just turn and turn 
and turn. Everyone “mumbles” 
instead of “saying” things. Ev- 
eryone “enjoys himself ira- 
menseN” or “thoroughly enjovs 
himself.” 

Scenes get set up and then 
knocked down. The personnel 
manager of the law firm wants 
to get Adam fired. 

But hey! I’m not complain- 
ing! I’m not going to “con- 
front” this author or “torment” 
him! I read him “16 hours a 
day” until I got finished, and I 
“enjoyed myself immensely!” 

Carolyn See’s reviews appear 
regularly in The Washington 
Post 


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The Red Army 9 s D-Day, June 22, 1944 


E DINBURGH — For the Russians in 
World War II the waiting for the 
opening of the second front, the Allies' 
cross-Channel attack — : D-Day — 
seemed endless, to some even futile, giv- 
en previous disappointments. But the 
Tehran Conference at tbe end of 1943 
won Stalin what he had long wanted, a 
firm commitment for an attack in 1944 
with no further ~ifs” or “buts.” 

In May 1944, the Soviet command, 
already made aware of “R date” (Opera- 
tion Overlord), selected June 15-40 io 
launch a massive Soviet offensive, aimed 
this time at the German Army Group 

1944 EASTERN FRONT 1994- 

Center deployed in Byelorussia, at the 
heart of the Soviet-German front. On 13- 
Day itself the usually disgruntled Stalin 
signaled his “joy” at the success of Over- 
lord and revealed that “in keeping with 
the agreement reached at the Tehran 
Conference,” a Soviet offensive would be 
launched “in mid-June along the vital 
sectors of the front." with a general of- 
fensive developing “between late June 
and the end of July." He undertook lo 
keep both President Roosevelt and Prime 
Minister Churchill “posted about die 
course of operations.” 

The huge deception operation con- 
nected with Overlord, the game of cat- 
and-mouse with the German high com- 
mand, also embraced the Soviet-German 
front. In May, one Soviet operation had 
persuaded the German command that 
Romania was a prime Soviet objective. 
Soviet and American naval planners 
busily “studied” a landing on the Roma- 
nian coast, as the Soviet command rein- 
forced and regrouped four fronts ( the I st 
Baltic and 1st, 2d and 3d Byelorussian), 
secretly moving half a milli on men, five 
rifle armies plus tanks, guns and mortars. 

Further to mislead the Germans, Sovi- 
et tank armies remained visibly deployed 
in the southwest, in the Ukraine, even as 
Soviet rail movement shifted armor 
northward, concealed by heavy simulat- 


By John Erickson 

ed (and genuine) traffic moving steadily 
“southward." 

In planning the Soviet offensive, the 
Soviet Genera] Staff had reckoned the 
critical factor to be the state and avail- 
ability of German reserves. An opening 
round on June 10 loosed 4 1 divisions, 800 
tanks and 10.000 guns against the Finns, 
pinning reserves in the north. Anticipat- 
ing a Soviet offensive against Army 
Groups North and South Ukraine, the 
German command directed vital ar- 
mored reserves from the center to these 
army groups where the storm was expect- 
ed to break. It was believed that Army 
Group Center, now stripped of more 
than three-quarters of its 3rmor. would 
pass a relatively quiet summer. 

Field Marshal Ernst Busch, in com- 
mand of Army Group Center, was by no 
means wholly deceived by the Soviets’ 
ruses, noting the arrival of fresh divisions 
from the Crimea. But Hitler's conviction 
that Stalin would drive toward the Roma- 
nian oU fields, so valuable io Germany, 
and strike deeper into the Balkans, if only 
to preempt his Anglo-American allies, 
plus the concentration of Soviet forces in 
the Ukraine and the Crimea, precluded 
serious consideration of a massive Soviet 
attack at tbe center. 

On the morning of June 22. 1944. at 
0400 hours, three years to the day {almost 
to the hour) of the stunning German 
attack in 1941, Operation Barbarossa, 
Marshal Alexander Vasilevskii reported 
to Stalin that the 1st Baltic and 3d Byelo- 
russian Fronts stood ready for action. 
The sky cleared at dawn, disclosing the 
hummocks, dark lines of forest, streams 
and lulls ahead. Precisely at 0500 hours 
Soviet guns opened fire. Heralding a giant 
offensive, with six main thrusts launched 
across a 450-mile (730-kilometer) wide 
front involving 1.245.000 men, 14 com- 
bined-army armies, one tank army. 124 
out of 168 rifle divisions committed to 
the attack, 2,175 tanks supported by 


Prime Minister Churchill to Marshtd Stalin: 


T HIS is the moment for me to tell you 
bow immensely we are all here im- 
pressed with the magnificent advances of 
the Russian armies, which seem, as they 
grow in momentum, to be pulverising the 
German armies which stand between you 
and Warsaw, and afterwards Berlin. Ev- 
ery victory that you gain is watched with 
eager attention here . . . 

The battle is hot in Normandy. The 
June weather has been tiresome. Not 
only did we have a gale on the beaches 
worse than any in the summer-time re- 
cords of many years, but there has been a 
great deal of cloud. Hus denies us the full 
use of our overwhelming air superiority. 


and also helps the flying bombs to get 
through to London. However. I hope that 
July will show an improvemenL 
Meanwhile the hard fighting goes in 
our favour, and although eight Panzer 
divisions are in action against the Brit- 
ish sector we still have a good majority 
of tanks. We have well over three-quar- 
ters of a million British and Americans 
ashore, half and half. The enemy is 
burning and bleeding on every from at 
once, and I agree with you that this must 
go on to the end. 

— Winston Churchill, in a message dated 
July 1, 1944, cited in his account of the 
war’s last year, “ Triumph and Tragedy. ” 


1,355 self-propelled guns. 24,000 guns 
and mortare. four “air armies” with 5.327 
aircraft, plus a further 700 heavy bomb- 
ers of Long-Range Aviation. Owing io a 
time differential from north to south, a 
matter of mete hours but of great signifi- 
cance. the Soviet offensive was staggered, 
with 1st Baltic Front leading off in the 
north, followed by 3d Byelorussian and 
extending to 2d and 1st Byelorussian 
Fronts. The effect was to mislead the 
German command as to the development 
of Soviet operations, lending credence to 
the view that only limited “bolding at- 
tacks" were involved. 

Within 24 hours Field Marshal Busch 
faced the first of a series of critical situa- 
tions as the Red Army began one by one 
to pull down the pillars of the German 
Army Group. By June 25, Soviet pincers 
had closed on Vitebsk, engulfing Colonel 
General Reinhardt's Third Panzer Army. 
Marshal Alexander Vasilevskii signaled: 
“We have information that the fascist 
command has twice sought Hitler's per- 
mission to withdraw from the Vitebsk 
’bag’ . . . but it is not Hitler but we who 
must decide the fate of this concentration 
of troops.” The German garrison in Vi- 
tebsk finally surrendered, leaving 20.000 
dead. The 8.000 who had fought their 
way out were wiped out almost to a man. 

The moment of decision for Army 
Group Center came on the morning of 
June 24, 1944. As Third Panzer was being 
dragged to its doom in the north. 2d 
Byelorussian Front opened an attack on 
the German 4tb Army on June 23. The 
next day Marshall Konstantin Rokossovs- 
kb finally unleashed his powerful 1st Bye- 
lorussian Front to smash in the German 
9th Anny. Now unmistakably the entire 
Army Group Center was under massive, 
sustained, relentless assault. A hurried, 
remarkably indecisive battle conference 
between Field Marshal Busch and Kurt 
Zeitzler. chief of the general staff, in 
Minsk, focused on the situation at Vitebsk 
and a request for reinforcements. All that 
Hitler would authorize was the movement 
of two Panzer divisions. Army Group 
Center was caught in a situation rapidly 
becoming desperate, drenched with Rus- 
sian fire, denied any degree of flexibility 
and bereft of reinforcement. 

On July 2 all hope of extricating the 
encircled 4th and 9th Annies was extin- 
guished The German defensive system 
on the central sector of the Eastern Front 
had cracked wide open, obliterating 25 to 
28 divisions with the loss of 300,000 men. 
The Red Army had achieved its greatest 
single success of the war. visiting on the 
German Army a catastrophe eclipsing 
even that of Stalingrad, quite as decisive 
as the fighting on the Western Front. 

The writer is director of defense studies 
at the University of Edinburgh and author 
of a two-volume history of the Soviet-Ger- 
man war. He contributed this account to 
the International Herald Tribune. 



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BAHAMAS BERMUDA CANNES CAYMAN GENEVA GUERNSEY HONGKONG ISLE OF MAN JERSEY 
LONDON MIAMI NEW YORK SINGAPORE TOKYO URUGUAY ZURICH 
A member of the National Wntminftcr Bank croup 





























Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HER-ALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. JUNE 22, 1994 


Tokyo, Upholding Taboo, . 8 P* - J 
Corrects Hata Over Bomb y ^ |. ^ 

Seve York Times Service _ |™T ' | | 

TOKYO — Backtracking from an embarrassing slip oT the :f . ^ | ■$ 

tongue by Prime Miiuster Tsutomu Hata. the Japanese gt - i i 

ernment tried Tuesday to argue that while it may be oneof the .. . .. : • • ^ * 

world’s technological superpowers. legions ot physiosts 4 

and engineers have no idea how to build an atomic bomb : & X 

Mr. Hata had said that “it is certainly the case that Japan ... ■ • • . 

has the capability to possess nuclear weapons, but has not • ,3 

made them." The comment violated one of Japan s strongest HHS® JBjte : 

nuclear taboos, talking about a national nuclear cap - 
But it was in accord with the ^ews of most outside expem. 

His comments last week were prompted b .v questioning 
during parliamentary debate on the Nuclear Nonprolifera- 
lion Treaty, which is up for renewal next year- 
On Tuesday the Foreign Ministry released a statement. . - .■ . 

“It is true that Japan has highly advanced technology for -~r ' J- 

the peaceful use or nuclear energy. However, mere possesion 
of high-level nuclear technology and scientific technology 
does not signify the capability of producing nuclear weapons. 

Japan does not have any expertise or experience m Pacing 

nuclear weapons. This means that Japan does not South Korean tourists peenn 

capability to produce them." j 

BRIBES; A Bustling Marriage Trade in Hyderabad 

„ , in ihn The middlemen assem 




tit 


By U.S. to Confirm 
Assurances to Cart« 


■ •'* ,\v r d 




> i -w.r 




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South Korean tourist, peering through telescopes at North Korean territon from a sightseeing point 


Yon 

along the DeuriEtanzed Zwb. 


JAPAN: New Sign of a Recovery 


Continued from Page 1 
begun supplying their young 
girls to organized bridal rack- 
ets. 

“Even cycle rickshaw drivers 
ask for 10.000 rupees dowry — 
more than an entire year s sala- 
ry.” said Sultan Jahan Baquri. 
who heads the Mahila Welfare 
Society of Andhra Pradesh 
state. "That amount is about 
S330. 

For many years, the bride 
business flourished in the ser- 
pentine streets of the Old City, 
invisible to the outside world. 
But three years ago the practice 
was exposed when a night at- 
tendant discovered a frail 12- 
year-old girl named .Am sen a 
crying on an airliner bound for 
the Middle East. Ameena told 
the night attendant that her fa- 
ther had forced her to marry the 
portlv 60-year-old Saudi Arabi- 
an sitting next to her. The atten- 
dant reported ii and the ease 
made headlines. 

Since then. Indian govern- 
ment officials have lightened 
emigration checks at interna- 
tional airports, and private so- 
cial organizations have begun 
more than a dozen programs to 
educate and irain poor Muslim 
girls in the Old City, hoping to 
give them financial alternatives 
to forced marriages. But social 
workers and government offi- 
cials have discovered that the 
problem is far more difficult to 
curb than they anticipated. 

•They accuse me of playing 
with their girls’ lives." said Ba- 
quri. whose women's aid society 
opened one of the first voca- 


tional Lraining programs m the The middlemen assemble 
old quarter. ”Thev say I'm photograph albums of girls — 
sumdina in the way of prosper- many as young as 13 — mat 
rv^anda good life. they show to the steady stream 

tv ana a goou of bride-seekers. The customers 

No one is more outer than ^ w the chosen girls 

Ameena s father. Badruddin. . . a j s cut. usually 

about 50. who earns less than a ^ middleman 50 per- 

a d % A cS- « nt ° f ihe p rice - ' vcdd i ng 

nckshaw and has eight erm r reau entlv occurs within a dav 
dren. When Ameena was res- trequenuy occ 

cued, the government put her in or 

a foster home and threatened to while some of the men whisk 
jail Her parents. The flight at- lheir brides back , c t h e Middle 
tend an 1 “ruined an otherwise £ ast ^ increasingly many take 
perfect and success fu l mar- ^ gb-is 10 nearby hotels for a 
riage." he said. “She knows days of xx and t hen aban- 
nothing about us, our family. d them, 
our laws. But she spoiled my 

daughter’s chances for a good Because Islam allows a man 
life." to have more than one wife. 

Hyderabad's ties with the many Muslims, such as the man 
Middle East date back centu- from Shaijah in the Lnnea 
ries to when its rulers recruited Arab Emirates wno marTieu 
horsemen and soldiers of the Nasreen. return to the Old City 
Gulf kingdoms for their armies, several limes to find new bnde>. 

During the oil and gas boom j many local Muslim re- 
ef the early 1970s, Arabs took jj - ous boards, which must ap- 
iheir brides to the Middle East ve aJ | Muslim marriages, are 
and often found jobs for their accomp iices in the unions, par- 
relatives. At the same time. dcularlv those involving girls as 
thousands of Indians and Pakj- | voun „ 35 12 or 13. Although 
stanis began flocking to the i aw prohibits child mar- 

Middle East in search of a bet- ■ vounc Muslim airls usu- 


a uviwi. w r' . 

riages, young Muslim girls usu- 
ter life. ally a p pe ar before the boards 

Today the strip known as wearing the robes and veils re- 
Barkhas, the Urdu derivative of quired of Muslim women in this 
barracks, is best known as the conservative community any 
center of the bride trade in Old time they leave their homes. 
Hyderabad. Middlemen work- 

in'g out of back rooms of shops “Few people have buih ver- 
that line the main road through uficates. said Mr. Maje«.d of 
Barkhas comb surrounding the Islamic financial orgumza- 
slums, getting to know families lion. “The father aavs the girl is 
that have fallen on especially 21. The girl is behind a veil 
hard times and have young TJere s no foolproof f.° 

2; rls check the veracity of the age. 


Patten Is Firm 

Continued from Page 1 
scribed Tuesday as good pros- 
pects for progress in talks on 
the transfer of military base 
lards, international treaty obli- 
gations and other details of the 
1997 handover. 

While welcoming progress m 
the talks, several of Mr. Patten s 
traditional supporters in the 
electoral reform debate have 
be c un to question Britain's 
commitment to other issues. 

Now that Britain has proven 
iis determination to promote 
democracv in its last major col- 
one. Mr. Paiien's critics believe 
he" is less committed to efforts 
10 bolster human rights that 
have more resonance in loca 
terms than in the international 
arena- 

Legislators sav that muen- 
needed measures to establish a 
Human Rights Commission 
ar.d approve anti-discrimina- 
tion and freedom of informa- 
tion legislation has been 
blocked by a governor reluctant 
10 anger China, now that eco- 
nomic talks are again on track. 

“If Mr. Patten continues 10 
>ee himself as the champion of 
democracv and human rights, 
he has to’ keep fighting.” said 
Christine Loh. a legislator. “I 
hope a lack of human nghti 
protection is not the price we 
have to pay not to offend Chi- 
na.” . . . 

Mr. Patten rejects such criti- 
cism and says he is determined 
to concentrate on being “the 
> mavor of Hong Kong.” or focus 
on local issues in coming years. 


Continued from Page 1 s 
sumption. Government spend- < 

in° also grew in the quarter. The 
one sector of the economy dial I 
continues to lag is capital 

spending by corporations, 
which fell at an annual rate ot 
3.8 percent in the quarter. 
Manv companies are still m the 
process of cutting costs that be- 
came bloated during Japans 
boom in the late 1980s. 

Because of weak capital 
spending, and because the 
s iron a ven will make it hard for 
Japan to mount its usual export 
drive, even the economists who 
believe a recovery is under way 
project growth of only 1 percent 
to 2 percent this year. That is 
far less than Japan is accus- 
tomed to, though such a growth 
rate might become more com- 
monplace as Japan's economy 
matures. . , 

Others are not so quickie 
declare the recession over. “Tne 
direction is a little bit upward 
from the bottom.” said Maseru 
Takaei. chief economist at the 
Fuji "Research Institute. “But 
we must see whether the Japa- 
nese economy can sustain the 
growth.” 

” Japan's economy often grows 
sirongl v in the March Quarter 
because that is the end of the 
fiscal year. Last year the gross 
domestic product grew at a .o 
percent annualized rate in the 
March quarter, only to shrink 
bv 2.1 percent in the quarter 
that ended last June. 

Economists also point out 
that there are many factors that 
threaten to derail any recovery - , 
chief among them being the 


strong ven. On Tuesday, the 

dolla? dosed at 102.15 yen in 

Tokyo trading, down 0.43 yen 
from Monday's close. _ 

Political uncertainty is also a 
threat. Bv the end of this 
month, one or more opposition 
parties might bring a no-confi- 
dence motion against Prime 
Minister Tsutomu Hata, whose 
coalition government does not 
command a majority in Parlia- 
ment. If the vote succeeds, it 
will force the cabinet to resign 
or new elections to be held- 

Worried about a “political 
vacuum,” the leaders of Japan s 
four main business lobbying or- 
ganizations on Tuesday issued a 
statement saying that an early 
dissolution of Parliament and 
snap elections “should be 
avoided at all costs. . 

A breakdown again of trade 
talks with the United States 
could put more upward pres- 
sure on the yen- But there is 
some hope of getting an agree- 
ment in some sectors, such as 
Japan's government procure- 
ment of medical and telecom- 
munications equipment, by 
next month’s Group of Seven 
meeting in Naples. 

The recent rise in interest 
■ rates could also dampen 
: growth. The rise in Japanese 
, rates and fears that the U.S. 
i Federal Reserve Board will 
: agtin raise interest rates con- 
; tributed to a sell-off on the To- 
r kvo Stock Exchange Tuesday. 

'The Nikkei average of 225 
i stocks fell 338.87 points, or 1.6 
t percent, to 20.813.16, the first 
. close below 21.000 in two 
: weeks. 


By MichadR-Gordon 

Yfw York Toner Service 

WASHINGTON — ■ 
wariness <w fomper 
Jinimy Carter's; talks m North 
Korea, the Clinton administra- 
tion is trying ..-to biiild on * us 

efforts by proposing^ new 

round of high-level talks. ■ . . 

. in a letter sent Monday, Rob- 
ert L. Gallucd, assistant .secre- 
tary of .state and pphcy ccKH^ 
aator on North Korea,? asked 
the North Koreans to confirm 
that they were willing totree^.. 
their nuclear program, -as Mc- 
Carter reported. Mr. Carter had^ 
meetings last wedc. m lyong- ; 
yang witirPreswtart Kim. 11 
Sung. 

If the North Koresra con- 
firm their willingness to impose 
a freeze, the letter said,- talks. 

Should be be held promptiy. se- 
nior administration officials 
said. 


tration, lijL- tSSa&n&M, 

opemi^Tr^«?> r | 
.Oto'dtploflwcy- ... 

the Amaicansand 

abs will take 


; hk Cfimon 


Thoogt They .have yt\ roje-. 
spond to the letter, tee Not* . 
Koreans . announced '-Tuesday . 
that they were extending - u» 
visas of the internationalmoni- 
tors in Norte Korea-Th^ac-. 
tioa followed President Knas. 
promise to Mr. Carter that h® 
wSdnoL expel tee UmredNa- -. 
dons monitors, sent .10. 

Korea by the International 
Atomic Energy Agency; • 

In proposing that tails be 
held soon, the administration is 
trying to get an eariy gauge of 
tee North’s intentions .and pre- 
vent Pyongyang from engaging 
in delaying tactics. 

“We have followed up Presi- 
dent Carter’s statements to me : 
and letter of understanding 
with a communication to tee 
Norte Koreans," President BUI 
Clinton told reporters Tuesday. 

“And we expect and hope to 
hear back within a couple or 
days about whether President 
Carter’s unders tanding of what 
they said is correct-” 

Mr. Gallucd has flown to 
Europe with Secretary of State 
Warren M. Christopher and is 
planning to go to Vienna, to 
meet with officials at the atomic 
| energy agency. 

A C lin,nn ^minis tration of- 
i fidal said that there were no 
I immeteate plans for Mr. Gal- 
t lued to meet with the North 
, Korean ambassador to the 
agency, but another official said 


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**- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JI»NE 22, 1994 


Page 7 


Africa’s Move to Political Freedom Liberates Ethnic Hatred as Well 


By John Dam ton 

New York Time r Service 

NAIROBI — Despiie economic col- 
lapse, countries are proclaiming democra- 
cy throughout Africa. With a raft of elec- 
tions and sometimes a multitude of parties, 
their governments are beginning to toler- 
ate a once forbidden sound — that of the 
political opponent. 

Already tbe drive for political rights has 
consigned tbe archetypal autocrat — the 
“president for life" who rules with a fly 
whisk and the secret police — to the same 
graveyard as apartheid, African socialism 
and the ships mat brought the fi rst Euro- 
pean colonizers 500 years ago. 

But what Ees ahead is uncertain. The 
trend toward reform is not uniform and 
certainly not universal 

Most ominously, there are signs that in 
some countries political liberalization may 
be widening ethnic cleavages. These rival- 
ries could grow to spark secession or lead 
to the kind of tribal massacres convulsing 
Rwanda. 

A more open political process can lay 
ban: ethnic tensions that have long sim- 
mered under tbe dictator's boot. Having 
several political parties may mean that 
they will take on ethnic identities. And 
underneath all the rallies and hoopla of a 
campaign, there is the danger that groups 
may jostle for control or that a ruling 
minority will sense the risk of being turned 
out of power and resort to violence. 

A rise in ethnic tension, while part of the 
worldwide explosion of claims of sover- 
eignty and self-determination in the post- 
Cold War era, is particularly dangerous in 
Africa, where the boundaries inherited 
from colonialism do not match areas in- 
habited by ethnic groups. 

The political ferment has unquestion- 
ably led to new freedoms. More than half 
of the 48 countries south of the Sahara 
have hdd or promised multiparty elec- 
tions. 


Fifteen years ago. only two — Nigeria 
and Kenya — could be said (o have had 
influential and independent newspapers. 
Now most have them. Groups to monitor 
human rights have sprung up everywhere, 
even in repressive countries like Zaire. 

Africans welcome these changes. They 
are glad to wave good-bye to the old world 
of one-man rule. It ended symbolically 
several weeks ago when Hastings Kamuzu 
Banda, the last surviving independence 
leader, shuffled off Malawi's stage, turned 

Last of a series 

out by voters after running the country like 
a private preserve for 30 years. 

But conversations with scores of Afri- 
cans in the course of a six-week visit to 
nine countries suggest that these changes 
are only a first step. Genuine democracy, 
they say, has yet to arrive in most coun- 
tries. 

In some it has been stymied by the old 
power elite or hijacked by a new one. In 
others, the opposition is so fragmented 
that it is too ineffectual for the system to 
function. De facto single-party rule returns 
by default. 

“They say the newspapers are free, but j 
minister can still put a journalist in jail." 
said Halidou Ouedraogo, president of the 
Burkina Faso Movement for the Rights of 
Man. 'They say the courts are indepen-, 
dent, but there are always pressures from 
behind the scenes. We still don't have real 
participation of the people at a grass-roots 
level. 

"Take Rwanda and Burundi. Both 
signed the International Convention for 
Protection and Defense or Human Rights. 
But look at tbe massacres. The gap be- 
tween a piece of paper and what is reality 
can be frightening, truly frightening." 

Significantly, the continent's political 
reform is proceeding under a giant ques- 
tion mark because it coincides with a 


downward economic plunge. Throughout 
the 1980s and into the 1990$ the vast 
majority of the countries — with a few 
exceptions like diamond-producing Bo- 
tswana — experienced negative per-capita 
growth. 

This means that these nations are ex- 
perimenting with bold new political ideas 
and structures at a time when living Stan- 
dards are dropping, health and education 
are declining and the people are conse- 
quently most prone to strikes, demonstra- 
tions and the appeals of demagogues. 

It is not lost on the experts that the 
country that has made the most economic 
progress, according to the World Bank, is 
Ghana and that it did so during the decade 
when it was under the tight military rule of 
Flight Lieutenant Jerry Rawlings, who has 
since won election as president. Authori- 
tarian rule makes it more possible to im- 
pose the stringent measures that the inter- 
national financial institutions demand. 

And what is sound economically may 
clash with what is politically sensible. At 
the stroke of a pen in January* the value of 
the French-backed currency called the 
CFA franc was cut in half. It was a move 
that most financial experts felt was long 
overdue, but overnight it destabilized 14 
countries in West and CeDtraJ Africa. 

The imaginations of Africans every- 
where, it is clear, have been seized by two 
seismic events in recent months. One is the 
election of President Nelson Mandela in 
South Africa. It was not just that Mr. 
Mandela triumphed in the last redoubt of 
white minority rule. It was that he wel- 
comed his former foes. Frederik W. de 
Klerk and Chief Mangosutbu G. Buthe- 
Jffii. into his administration with open 
arms, providing an object lesson in the 
value of tolerating the opposition as a form 
of good, stable, even shrewd government. 

The other is Rwanda. To the outside ‘ 
world, the tribal massacres there were an 
inexplicable horror, an atavistic replaying 


French Send Troops to Rwandan Border 


Corroded by (hr Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — An advance ream of French 
troops has arrived at the Zairian border 
airfield of Goma to prepare for a 
planned military intervention in Rwan- 
da, a military spokesman said Tuesday. 

The United Nations Security Council 
was preparing to consider France's pro- 
posal to send a force into Rwanda in 
reaction to the slaughter of hundreds of 
thousands of people since April 

The UN secretary-general, Butros Bu- 
tros Ghali, has urged the Security Coun- 
cfl to consider the plan. He said the 
French troops could help calm the situa- 
tion until a larger UN force was raised. 

Meanwhile, UN military observers 
from Senegal. Congo and Togo said they 
would leave Kigali on Wednesday after 
receiving threats over France’s planned 


intervention, UN sources said Tuesday. 
More than 40 observers will quit the 
Rwandan capital, the sources said. 

The conditions for French troops to 
intervene indude that their camps must 
be in Zaire and they] must not carry out 
operations deep into Rwanda, Prime 
Minister Edouard Bahadur was quoted 
as saying on Tuesday. 

Mr. Bahadur reportedly told members 
of his Gaullist party that the intervention 
must be authorized by the United Na- 
tions, end with the arrival of UN forces 
and not last more than a few weeks. 

In Brussels, the nine-member Western 
European Union said some member 
states were ready to contribute to the 
French plan, but only if the UN Security 
Council approved it and African states 
took part in the mission. 


“We have some 20 people at Goma 
airfield who arrived yesterday." the 
French military spokesman said. “They 
are acting as scouts to study the viability 
of itineraries and runways." 

Asked if more French troops had 
flown to other areas neighboring Rwan- 
da, the spokesman said: “It is probable 
that troops are beginning to regroup in 
Bangui but I cannot confirm this.'' Ban- 
gui is the capital of Central African Re- 
public. 

Rebels shelled Kigali on Tuesday, try- 
ing to gain ground before the arrival of 
foreign troops, who they believe will 
back the government The rebels have 
captured about two-thirds of the coun- 
try, including pans of Kigali. 

(Remen, AP, AFP ) 


of ancient hatreds. But to many Africans, 
there is another troubling aspect. 

The slaughter of Tutsi by Hutu repre- 
sents what can happen wtien there is a 
dangerous brew and the lid is lifted off too 
quickly, Lfaey say. It is an example or re- 
form-minded change under the prodding 
of Western countries gone horribly wrong. 

Some assert that the West shares the 
blame by pushing for a democratic form of 
government that would inevitably mean 
power-sharing between the Tutsis. who 
bad a privileged position during colonial 
days, and the more numerous Hutus. who 
were beginning to control Lhe army. 

Jonathan Moyo. a political scientist now 
working for the’ Ford Foundation in Nai- 
robi. drew' a parallel between Rwanda and 
while-ruled South Africa. 

"The cruelty of the system of oppression 
is the same." he said. "When you set one 
group above another and close all channels 
of political expression, you sow the seeds 
of eruption further down the line. 

"The difference is. South Africa under- 
went a process of managed change." he 
said. "It started in 1986. If they had sud- 
denly lifted the lid off back then, people 
would have been slaughtering each other 
too. That’s what happened in Rwanda — it 
was too much, too quickly for a system 
that had been totally closed." 

Everywhere, the point is the same: Afri- 
ca cannot just transplant foreign models, 
like the parliamentary system, and hope it 
will take root in native soil. 

"It's a mistake to copy Western democ- 
racies because it’s artificial." observed 
Cyril Goungounga, an engineer and na- 
tional assembly deputy in Burkina Faso. 
“Look at the O.S. You elect a president. 
He's in office for four years, eight years. 
Then he’s oul That's what the constitution 
says. 


“We have a constitution too." he said. 
"But it doesn't work. It’s just a piece of 
paper. Because we have two civilizations 
here. The Western one on top where every- 
thing is fine and differences are submerged 
in talk of national unity. And a parallel 
one underneath, an African one where 
ethnic groups are a reality.” 

The “reality" is readily apparent when it 
reaches the point of armed conflict. For 
decades, the conventional wisdom was that 
Africa was the scene of so many wars 

because the superpowers were fighting 
each other through their client states. But 
now that the superpowers have withdrawn 
their sponsorship, many of the conflicts 
are continuing. The reason, experts say, is 
that they have a strong ethnic component. 

In some countries. like Liberia and So- 
malia. ethnic turmoil came in the wake of 
victories by insurgents. In others, like An- 
gola and the southern Sudan, ideological 
differences have largely dropped away and 
the contending factions are becoming 
more sharply defined by ethnicitv or reli- 
gion. 

What’s more, new outbreaks of tribal 
violence and “ethnic cleansing” are erupt- 
ing in backwaters where foreigners rarely 
venture to tell tbe outside world about it — 
places like eastern Zaire, northern Ghana, 
and the north of Mali and Niger. 

Togo is a prime example of a country 
where the step toward democracy proved 
inflammatory. For years President Gnas- 
singbfc Eyadema based his dictatorial rule 
upon his own group, the Kabye from the 
north. Through clever manipulation, he 
has managed to cling to power through 
two elections by splintering and out-foxing 
the opposition, based largely upon south- 
ern tribes like tbe Ewe. Now his dictator- 
ship still reigns, and ethnic strife is so high 


that several hundred thousand people have 
fled to neighboring countries. 

Two countries are in fact experimenting 
with new political systems to try to over- 
come the legacy of ethnicity. 

One is Uganda, where President Yoweri 
Museveni, who came to power as head of u 
rebel military group in 1986. is deeply 
conscious of the country's agony of the last 
23 years. The despotic regimes of both Idi 
Amin and Milton Obote' were thinly dis- 
guised masks for tit-for-tat ethnic subjuga- 
tion and slaughter. 

The 50-year-old president argues that 

multiparty’ systems were created by indus- 
trial societies and fit them because they 
tend to divide along fluid lines of class. But 
in pre-industrial Africa, countries split ver- 
tically, along rigid tribal lines, and so com- 
peting parties can lead to group warfare. 

His broadly based National Resistance 
Movement suspended party politics and 
instead is trying to promulgate a system 
for grass roots participation through “na- 
tional resistance councils.” 

It claims to be a sort of grand coalition, 
through critics charge it is a one-party state 
by another name. Voting was held in 
March to elect a constituent assembly. The 
delegates are largely movement supporters 
and may well decide to try the new system 
for fiveyeais and then hold a referendum. 

The opposite approach is unfolding in 
Ethiopia, where ihe Marxist dictator. 
Mrngistu Haile Mariam, was overthrown 
in 1991. Ethiopia has long been an uneasy 
assemblage of regions dominated by dis- 
tinct groups and under the sway of the 
Amhara in the center. In the’ north (he 
Eritreans successfully prosecuted a 30-year 
war and became die only secessionist 
movement to achieve an independent state 
in Africa. 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TKliSUfSE, 












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0 L-pcatcdly bruised 
and buttered. the 
Japanese econo- 
my has taken its 
share of licks over the past 
months. Cost cutting, job 
cuts and overseas produc- 
tion shifts have added up u» 
reduced corporaie and con- 
sumer confidence across die 
board. 

While Bank of Japan 
Governor Yasushi Mieno 
claims the economy remains 
in a "delicate" perii^. some 
market watchers believ e die 
recession reached bottom 
during the October- Decem- 
ber quarter. "Because it is u 
different type of recovery . 
most people arc reluctant to 
be upbeaL" says Je.sper Koll. 
chief economist at S.G. 
Warburg Securities Japan i. 
"What we are seeing is a 
supply-side recovery rather 
than a pickup in domestic 
demand." 

Several key indicators do 
indeed bode well for the 
economy. Housing starts 
have repeatedly topped 1.5 
million units per month, 
while the notion's three 
largest home builder>. saw 
increased sales and profits in 
fiscal 1993. The majority of 
this growth is linked to de- 
clining mortgage rates and 
an increase in loans issued 
by the government-run 
Housing Finance Corpora- 
tion. Unfortunately, the 
number of home loans is- 
sued by private interests has 
actually fallen compared 
with last year's level. 

Other govemmew-Ied in- 
tervention is also kicking in. 
Aceordinc to Construction 


Ministry figures, public- 
works spending in March 
rose ft7.8 percent over the 
same month a year ago: this 
was the second consecutive 
month of \ ear-on-year in- 
crease. The jump is directly 
linked to the. third supple- 


sumer prices by 3 percent to 
4 percent. With any luck, 
pent-up demand will be re- 
leased as prices continue to 
fall. The big question, how- 
ever. is when this will hap- 
pen. So far. shell-shocked 
consumers remain wary. 


Consumer spending: cure 
for what ails Japan? 


me man budget approved in 
February, which earmarked 
1.9 trillion yen iSIS.3 bil- 
lion) for public- works pro- 
jects. 

The government is also 
counting on a ft trillion yen 
ta\ cut to boost consumer 
-pending in the third quarter, 
which in turn could increase 
gross- national -product 
growth by another 0.7 per- 
cent. It is anyone's guess as 
to whin skittish taxpayers 
will do with the rebate. If 
consumer confidence and 
job prospects remain low, 
many people may choose to 
bank the money, hurting 
chances for a rebound this 
year. Furthermore, the Fi- 
nance Ministry’s near-neu- 
rotic fear of deficit spending 
may force lawmakers to link 
the’ tax cut to a proposed 4- 
perccnt ri<e in the consump- 
tion tax. thereby offsetting 
any gains. 

E'- en so. consumer spend- 
ing remains the best 
prospective panacea for 
what ails Japan. Although 

income growth has re- 
mained ai j fairly Hal I per- 
cent. the lengthy recession 
has helped push down con- 


This advertising section was produced in its entirety by 
the supplements division of ihe Imemaiional Herald Tri- 
bune's advertising department. • Robert Carroll is an 
American writer bu»cd in Tokyo. • Janet Purdy Levaux is 
a free-lance writer based in Osaka. 


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Of course, any increase in 
consumer spending would 
also help nudge up corporate 
capital outlays. Presaging a 
resurgence, private-sector 
machinery orders topped 
9.46 billion yen in March, a 
10.3-perceru monthly gain. 
"Year-on-year advertising 
expenditures are also up." 


says Warburg’s Mr. KolL “it 
is a great indicator of corpo- 
rate expansion.^ 

A recent Ministry of Inter- 
national Trade and Industry 
survey says that businesses 
will increase fiscal 1 994 
capita] investment to 16.94 
trillion yen, a 1.1 -percent in- 
crease over the previous 
year. Because of the limited 
size of the increase, howev- 
er, its impact is unpre- 
dictable. 

Despite these positive 
prospects, dark clouds stiU 
loom over several key sec- 
tors. The banking industry 
remains clogged with real- 
esiate -linked bad debt. An- 
other problem is unemploy- 
ment. Last year, the ranks of 
the unemployed rose by 
520,000. and the figure 



Key indicators bode weff for Japan, bt* “ —-■■■££ 

reached a six-year high in help streamline the cco^^-^ 
February; Currently set at. my. . _ . owiottf 

2,8 percent, unemployment T 
figures are expected to reach the horizon, many 
3.4pHcent byS^aid of the 

year, following heavy cuts wtfl be able j?*^*J* ■* .-I** 
in the manufacturing sector, steady A 1 -' 

In die long haul, however, growth until thejeffl^ua , 
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been obliged to cut costs, 
hotels have followed suit 
and arc now offering rea- 
sonable rates and new ser- 
vices. 

The airline-ticket distri- ' 
button system has been 
undergoing some liberal- 
ization. This means that 
individual customers have 
an easier time purchasing 
iow-priced tickets. Tickets 
for Che shmkonsen* or bul- 
let tram, can be purchased • 
tough some travel agen- . 
cies at discount prices. 

The expansion in busi- .. 
ness that accompanied the 
bubble years of economic ' 
boom, from the late- 1 980$ 
to J99!,'s|wived iremea-, 
dous. inyesBfaeni in hotels', 
and tesoftsacross Japan, 


esred in getting the most 
value tor their money. 

The Okura Act City Ho- 
rei HamaraatsuV for in- 
stance, is due to open In 
October. The project is 
part of Hamamatsu’s plans 
to open an international 


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STAGE '/ 'ENTERTAINMENT 


International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday , June 22, 1994 
Page 9 



- i 


Greenaway’s Other Viewfinders 


By John Rockwell 

'Vw York Tunes Service 

G ENEVA — Peter Greenaway'S 
films, strict, formal, erotic and 
cruel, are often so bursting with 
ideas and props and fabrics and 
extras that they threaten to explode from 
the screen. 

Now they have, in a 100-piece piece, 
100-day outdoor installation here called 
“The Stairs: Location.” 

Greenaway’s films have a true touch of 
the megalomaniacs! In his latest, “The 
Baby of Macon,” which ends with a ri tua l- 
ized rape to the death of a woman by an 
entire regiment, he used 4,000 extras. And 
this for a supposedly low-budget art-film. 

In 1986, after his relatively successful 
“Belly of an Architect,” he contemplated a 
three-screen. 24-hour extravaganza called 
‘The Stairs” that would have included the 
re-creation of a lost Baroque ceiling dense 


a lost Monteverdi opera. 

Stalling in 1990, Greenaway has be- 
come increasingly devoted to art installa- 
tions in museums and cities, as well as to 
CD-ROMs, I max films and live opera. 

And all this without giving up on films 
Most of the nonfilm projects are filmed or 
videotaped. And Greenaway is now pre- 
paring to shoot another feature, “The Pil- 
low-Book,” in Hon§ Kong. Based on a 
medieval Japanese diary, it depicts shared 
erotic pleasure derived from writing on a 
woman’s body. This combines, as Greena- 
way put it deadpan, “the pleasure of litera- 
ture and the pleasure of the flesh.” 

Greenaway’s first opera production, a 
world premiere of Louis Andriessen’s 
“Rosa” in Amsterdam in November, has 
yet to be seen. Projected as the first of 10 
new operas by 10 different composers, it 
may also be Ins last. 

“1 haven't been too encouraged so far,” 
he grumbled over lunch here recently. 

What is visible axe his gargantuan an 
installations, of which “The Stairs: Loca- 


tion,” on view here through July 31. is his 
first outdoor project and his most promi- 
nent and impressive thus far. 

The project consists primarily of 100 
sentinel-like white objects dotted about 
downtown. As one walks about the city, 
the view of yet another familiar shape, 
somewhere between a monument, a tomb- 
stone, a urinal and a Schmoo, awakens a 
sense of welcoming familiarity. Each ob- 
ject contains a set of stairs. From the top 


The filmmaker’s vast 
stairway project is the first 
of 10 installations. 


of each — Greenaway, as verbally ornate 
as he is visually ornate, calls them “modest 
positions of privilege” — the viewer can 


view of one tiny pan of the cityscape. 

This peephole is, of course, exactly like a 
filmmaker's viewfinder. Greenaway has 
scouted 100 still-life film locations, and lets 
passersby — or pilgrims clutching their 
“Stairs” guide-maps — share his vision. 

But the light changes with weather and 
time of day; many of the sites are illumi- 
nated at night. There is a flow, a flexibility 
to the experience, which reminds Greena- 
way of his own pleasure* in making films 
and his own discontent in watching them. 

The indoor exhibition, in Geneva's Mu- 
seum of Art and History, is astonishing all 
by itself and carries the artist’s themes still 
further. 

One hundred metal helmets gleam in 
shifting light Sculptured busts are framed 
by hanging wooden rectangles. Numbers 
are projected on the floors and walls, 
counted out in English and French. It is a 
magic fun house of cinematic theatricality. 

Greenaway was trained as a painter but 
soon fell eagerly into film, to which he has 
devoted himself for nearly 30 years. He 


returned to the an world in a big way in 
1990. when he was invited to organize an 
exhibition using works from a collection in 
Rotterdam. These he mixed with live 
nudes in glass cases and presented in a 
kind of filmic sequence. 

In 1991 came “100 Objects to Represent 

the World.” an idiosyncratic assortment of 
items in Vienna meant as a highbrow par- 
ody of the Voyager spacecraft's preten- 
sions to summarize (he planet Earth's 
achievements in a single time capsule. 

In 1992 there was “Flying Out of This 
World” at the Louvre, which had actually 
been the first museum to ask him to orga- 
nize a show; when he couldn’t fit it into his 
schedule. Jacques Derrida was invited in- 
stead. In 1993 Greenaway had exhibitions 
in Cardiff and Swansea. Wales, in Britain 
and at the Venice Biennale. 

Now it’s Geneva's turn, although start- 
ing Monday it was also supposed to be 
Rome’s. Greenaway had prepared a 


Popolo. That project was canceled Sunday, 
apparently on political grounds, by die 
Ministry or Cultural Artifacts. 

“The Stairs” here in Geneva is not mere- 
ly a single exhibition — Greenaway 
doesn’t think that small — but the first of 
10 100-day exhibitions in 10 cities. Gree- 
naway loves numbers, as in bis film 
“Drowning by Numbers.” and especially 
multiples of 10. 

For him, numbers are an “organizing 
principles” although others might call them 
a formalist fetish. The entire sequence is to 
end in New York with “The Stairs: illu- 
sion,” a project that is to involve, in his 
words, “huge light-structures, with a tower 
as big as the Chrysler building.” 

In between are to come themes like 
“Audience.” “The Frame,” “Acting.” 
“Properties,” “Text” and “Time,” in cities 
including Tokyo, Warsaw, Munich and 
Barcelona. London is conspicuously not 
on the list; Greenaway, though born in 
Wales in 1942, says he feels utterly alienat- 
ed from the British capital. 


The Confession of a Country Fan 


By Lena Williams . 

1 /few York Tines Service 

N EW YORK — I heard that 
Reba McEn tire’s new album, 
“Read My Mind,” shot to No. 5 
on the Bmboard chart the first 
weekend of its release. 

Well, she got my $1 1.95. 
rm a 40-something blade woman who 
spent her youth in Washington, bp-sync- 
ing to the Supremos and slow dancing to 
the Temptations. Now I often come home 
to my Manhattan apartment and put on 


er me a fan of country music. So there. 
Deal with it 

; Fqejnostof my adult life, J wa^a^doset- 
country music fan. Fd hide my Waylon 
Jennings and Willie Nelson attu ning be- 
tween the dnsty, pyschedelic rock. Td lis- 
ten to Dolly Partem on my earphones, 
singing along softly, afraid my neighbors 
might mistake my imitation twang for a 
ay for help. Td enter a music store, look- 
ing over oqt shoulder in search of familiar 
faces and flip through the rhythm-and- 
blues section for about five minutes before 
sneaking off to the country aisle where Fd 
surreptitiously grab a Travis Tritt tape off 
the rack and make a beeline for the shor- 
test cashier’s Hue. 

Just when Td reached for my credit 
carded spot a tall, dark, handsome type 
in an 'Armani suit standing behind me with 
apuzzled look. What’s he going to think? 
“The sister seems down, but what’s she 
doing with that Dwight Yoakum CD?” 

So now I'm publicly coming out of the 
closet and proclaiming my affection for 
country perennials tike McEn tire. 


When I told a friend I was preparing this 
confessional, he offered a word of caution: 
“No self-respecting black person would 
ever admit to that m public.” 

I thought about his comment. As a child 
growing np in the 1 950s, in a predominant- 
ly black community, I wasn’t allowed to 
play country-and-westeni music in my 
house. Blacks weren’t supposed to like 
country — or classical for that matter — 
but that’s another stray. 

Blacks’ contribution to American music 
was in jazz, blues and funk. Country music 
was dismissed as poor white folks’ blues 

nnrl Unfit rnni nnr /tf f Ua T T«i« 4 ofJ 


States that symbolized prejudice and racial 
bigotry. Even mainstream white America 
viewed counpy as lower cjass jind less 
Hearable, often poking Tun at its twangy 
chords and bcflyadnng sentiments. 


B UT I was always a cowgirl at 
heart. I liked country's wfld side; 
its down-home, aw-shucks musi- 
cians with the yodel in their voices 
and the angst in their lyrics. 1 saw an 
honesty in country and its universal tales 
of love lost and found. Besides, the South 
didn’t have a monopoly on racial hatred, 
and counpy artists, like everybody else, 
were stealing black music, so why should I 
hold it against country? 

And while snickering at country, white 
America also demonstrated a similar cul- 
tural backwardness toward black music, 
be it gospel, ragtime or the blues. So I 
allowed country to enter my heart and my 
mind, in spite of its faults. Indeed, when 
prodded, some blacks who rejected coun- 
try conceded that there was a spirituality 
that resounded in the music and that in its 


heartfelt sentiment, country was a lot like 
blues. 

The 1980s saw country (western was 
dropped, much to my chagrin) become 
mainstream. Suddenly there was country 
at the Copa and at Town Hall. WYNY- 
FM radio in New York now claims the 
largest audience of any country station, 
with more than a million listeners. Dolly 
Parton and Kenny Rogers became movie 
stars. Garth Brooks became an American 
phenomenon. 

Wall Street investment bankers bough! 
cowboy boots and hats and learned to do 


like Patti LaBelle and Lyle Lovett and 
Natalie Cole and McEn tire now sing duets 
and clearly admire one another's music. 

Perhaps the nation's acceptance of coun- 
try has something to do with an evolution- 
ary change in the music. Country has got 
edge. It has acquired an attitude. Women's 
voices have been given strength. Oh. the 
hardship and misery is still there. But the 
stuff about “standing by your man** has 
changed to a more assertive posture. 

In “I Won’t Stand in Line,” a song on 
Me Entire’s new album, she makes it clear 
to a skirt-charing lover that “Fd do almost 
anything just to make you mine, bui I 
won’t stand in line." That line alone makes 
me think of Aretha Franklin’s “Respect-” 

One other thing: I don’t like sad song*. 
I’ve cried enough for a lifetime. Country 
makes me laugh, always has. 

Maybe because it never took itself so seri- 
ously. 

Well, it’s off my chest, and it feels good. 

I will no longer make excuses for my 
musical tastes. 



Carole Hannan as Princess Margaret in Sue Townsends ” The Queen and I . " 

A Satire With Only One Joke 


By Sheridan Morlev 

Intenwiwna! licrj/J Tribune 

L ONDON — Sue Townsend's 
“The Queen and I” (Royal Court) 
is a staging by Max' Stafford- 
Dark *s new Out of Joint road 
company of her best-seller from a couple of 
years ago about what would happen to the 
royal family were they condemned by a new 
republican government to live in HeU Close, 
an inner-dly housing estate with less than 
its fair share of modem conveniences. 

This was always a painfully thin idea, 
sufficient for a 20-minute satirical sketch 
on television but very overexposed on 
stage and at play length. Some of the 
character sketches work welt enough: as 
you’d expect, both the queen and the 
queen mother adapt resourcefully to their 
new surroundings, while Philip takes re- 
sentfully to his bed and Charles drifts off 
to the nearest organic allotment. Princess 
Diana suffers badly from a lack of local 
designer boutiques. 

The problem here is that a small cast 
(which also double* in a revival of Jim 
Cartwright’s “Road” I is required to play 
all the royal family and all their neighbors, 
so most of their energies are taken up with 
rapid costume and accent changes. 

Toby Sal am an does a wonderfully close 


dog Prince of Wales but the rest of an agile 
cast settle for more thumbnail sketches 
and are constantly brought up against 
Townsend’s inability to give them any- 
thing resembling a plot. As with her equal- 
ly best-selling and staged “Diary of Adrian 
Mole.” she can create characters but not 
action, and once she has wondered how 
each of the royals would adapt to a life on 

LONDON THEATER 

the very fringe of the welfare state it is 
clear that her one-joke satire has nowhere 
to go but rapidly do wnhill 

Something is stirring down in old Ten- 
nessee! Williams, that is): amazingly we in 
London have only once before been intro- 
duced to Alexandra del Largo, the Princess 
Kosraonopolis who dominates his “Sweet 
Bird of Youth.” On that occasion, at the 
Haymarket, she was Lauren Bacall: now. 
in Richard Eyre's stunning new produc- 
tion for the National, she is Care Higgins. 

In the gallery of Williams's great, doomed 
and ravaged heroines, the princess has al- 
ways been a curious mix of Lady Macbeth 
and the Lady of the Camellias, to which rich 
mix Higgins adds a fair dash of Geopatra. 

But there has always been rather more 
here than a blazingiy powerful star turn. 
“Sweet Bird" was Williams’s most outspo- 


the heart of his writing. Through this 
sprawling saga of insides out, Eyre and his 
company tread a sure path, faltering only 
at the last when a waiter’s brief promise of 
escape (drawn from an earlier draft) is 
allowed to precede the final castration- 
cnicifixion. 

As the local boss’s daughter, Emma 
Amos is rather more Tunbridge Wells than 
the Gulf Coast in her accent and manner, 
but Richard Pasco cruelly suggests the mas- 
sive evfl of the old South. 

This is in even.' sense of the word a truly 
terrible play, but it has a haunting majesty 
and still aches to be made into a musical. 

The first “Hamlet” in the 60-year history 
of the Open Air Theatre in Regent’s Park is 
a briskly efficient canter through a text 
that the director Tim Pigott-Smith has 
reduced by about 90 minutes to a bare two- 
and-a-half hours. 

A production with flares, if not great 
flair, it benefits hugely from Tanya McCal- 
lin’s steel-wall setting and a mesmeric title 
performance from D amian Lewis, only a 
couple of years out of drama school yet 
powerful enough as night falls across Elsi- 
nore and he sets out across the battlements 
in pursuit of his murderous uncle. 

Verse-speaking still has to contend with 
planes Hying overhead, but on a clear night 
that moment (usually around the end of 
Act 4) when the natural tight gives way to 
the arc lamps is as truly magical as it gets. 


New Life for Schnitzler’s 6 Journalists 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

Inicniauma/ UeruU Tribune 


P ARIS — Jorge Lavelli. a the- 
ater director of prodigious repute, 
has been selecting contemporary 
drama for audiences at the The- 
atre National de la Colline for six seasons. 
* Currently, he is staging Arthur 
Schnitzler's “Les Journal istes.” 

Bom in Argentina. Lavelli entered uni- 
versity in Buenos Aires in the 1^50$ as a 
student of politico) Science, but switched 
to drama and received a grant to study 
theater in Paris. There he decided that h£s 
metier was staging and not performing. 
He made his dehui with “The Mar- 


riage,” by the Polish writer Witold 
Gombrowicz and the play won first prize 
in a competition for young theater 
troupes. From then on Lavelli has staged 
playwrights from Eugene O’Neill to 
Claudel and has ventured into opera. 

In 1988 Lavelli was named adminis- 
trator of TheStre National de laColIine. 
which is devoted to international mod- 
em drama offering plenty of variety, 
including some obscure pieces. “Les 
Joumatistes” is a case in point. It was 
popular with German-speaking audi- 
ences before World War I, but was hard- 
ly ever seen after that 

The production is a dazzling extrava- 
ganza that has a strain of a Gilbert libretto 


composed for a Savoy opera. The plot 
centers around two Viennese newspapers 
— one with a liberal point of view and the 
other conservative — that were engaged in 
a squabble with two opposing journalists 
attacking each other’s politics in print. 

The public believes that for honor's 
sake the two journalists must duel. How- 
ever, the fact is that there is only one 
journalist — an ambitious and clever 
young reporter who writes in both ga- 
zettes under false names. 

All the characters are well-played, 
with superb performances by Michel Au- 
mont as the spiderish count and Marc 
Citti as the reporter. 


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THE TRIB INDEX: 110 . 49 © 

SSTJJSS He 5 a,c ? Tribune World stock Index ©. composed of 
2»HS«^. inv Ml*ta stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1. 1992 = 100. 

120 


v: ;>Va^ 

f .■■ » B 'i' * ■ — . . . *■■■#■ ,< ,, lP i v'/ ;v^ ^ ^ ^ ¥ ‘ . 




1 ‘I ■/■ 


| Asia/Pacific 


Europe 

MB 

Approx, wigrting: 32% 

Close: 131.44 Piw.: 131.19 
>0 


Approx neJatamj: 37% 

Otose: 109X6 Prevj 109.35 

ESw 


. •* ?0 


1993 

1994 

■ North America 

Approx weighting: 26% 


QoSK 92.15 Pibvj 02.70 

150 — 

mBm 


Latin America 


Appro*, weighting: 5% 
Ctea- 11M0PIWJ 113J4 



J F 
ins 

I World Index 


M J 
199ft 


J F 
1993 


The Mat tracks US. dollar values at stocks tv Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argondra. AustraSa. Austria Belgium, Brad, Canada, CWo, Denmark, Finland, 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kong, tHy. Iftndoo, Netherlands, Now Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. Far Tokyo. New Yak end \ 
London, me Max Is corrposed at km SO lap Issues in (arms at marital capkaSzaUon, 
otherwise too tan top slocks are tracked. 


Industrial Sectors 


Toe: Pnw. % Ida. nee. X 

dot dose change dat dot ditge 

Energy 1Q&50 10&79 -1.17 CapMQocde 111.75 11&89 -1.01 

grow 115.16 118JI0 -122 H wMetete 12358 123,93 -028 

Finance 115.49 115.13 +0.30 Consumr Goods 37.64 87.64 Uncti. 

Sernas 114.70 1153 -0.77 MwaUmwm 122A1 12336 -0J7 

For mare inform a tion about the index, a booklet h ava&Ue free of charge. 

Write to Trto Index, 1B1 Avenue Charles de GeuBe. 92521 NeuSyCedex. France. 

efaMmaiDnal Herald Tribune 


Breakup 

At Philip 

Morris 

Reviewed 


Compiled by Our Sufi From Diqrauha 

NEW YORK — The new 
leaders of Philip Morris Cos. 
said Tuesday they would re-ex- 
amine splitting the conglomer- 
ate into separate tobacco and 
food companies but pledged 
mainly to look at other ways to 
raise the value of shares. 

The sew chairman. R. Wil- 
liam Murray, and Geoffrey C. 
Bible, the new chief executive, 
said they would review expand- 
ed stock buybacks, increased 
dividends or strategic acquisi- 
tions to raise the company's 
stock price. 

It was their Hrst meeting with 
reporters since the company 
named them Sunday to succeed 
Michael Miles, who resigned 
unexpectedly after nearly three 
years in the top posts at the $61 
billion consumer packaged 
goods company. 

They also offered the first 
public explanation of the Philip 
Morris board’s decision last 
month against proceeding with 
a breakup at this time. 

Mr. Murray said the board 
decided against proceeding 
with a breakup at this point 
because it was not dear there 
would be any meaningful or en- 
during i m provement in what 
the stock was worth to share- 
holders. 

In addition, Philip Morris 
general counsel and board 
member Murray Bring said the 
board recognized the splitup 
would be challenged in court 

While the company thought 
it would be upheld, he said the 
board didn’t want to see such a 
large transaction tied up in 
court for a protracted time. 

Mr. Murray said the compa- 
ny could re-examine the issue 
when it meets next month with 
a group of large shareholders 
who have urged a breakup of 
the company. 

{Bloomberg, AP) 


Leaving the Nest in Japan 

Fujitsu Searches for Entrepreneurs 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Fujitsu Ltd., struggling to es- 
cape its conservative corporate harness and 
compete more nimbly in the high technology 
arena, is asking its best and brightest to quit 
and set up their own companies, 
if they do, Fiijiisu will provide up to half 


making the founder very rich. If the venture 
fails, all bets are off. 

The idea is that new ventures are more 
likely to succeed if the entrepreneur works 
outside the parent organization, pursuing a 
high-risk strategy in hopes of high returns. 
Similar tactics have been tried by U.S. com- 
panies, most notably Apple Computer Inc., 
whose employees spawned General Magic, 
the California concern whose software is ex- 
pected to play a major role in multimedia 
applications. Apple itself began as a start-up. 
going from a two-man show to a Fortune 500 
company in just six years. 

But the move is unusual for a big Japanese 
company such as Fujitsu, which each year 
over the past decades has recruited hundreds 
of Japan's best, in part because it offers se- 
cure lifetime employment. In asking the most 
entrepreneurial to go it alone, Fujitsu is ac- 
knowledging that an organizational hierarchy 
designed to foster discipline and loyalty, 
highly effective when Japan was playing 
catch-up with the West, has its limitations 
now that the country must compete through 
innovation and speed. 

“In terms of technology and human re- 
sources, Fujitsu's a super company, but they 
need radical organizational innovation. 1 ' said 
Seaichiro Yonekura, an associate professor at 


Hitotsubashi University's Institute of Busi- 
ness Research. “This is a good first step, but 
only the first step.” 

Next month, when the plan begins. Fujitsu 
hopes to approve five 10 10 projects, most 
likely in areas related to multimedia. Already, 
more than 200 of Fujitsu's 68.000 employees 
have shown interest in the program, which 
was announced Monday, the 59th anniversa- 
ry of the company’s founding. 

Other Japanese companies, equally deep in 
talented but stifled employees and advanced 
but unexploited technologies, may emulate 
Fujitsu's approach. But not until Japan un- 
dertakes deeper deregulation of its capital 
mar kets and corporate laws will the world's 
biggest creditor country be able to exploit 
venture capitalism to the extent seal in the 
United States. 

The biggest obstacle is strict Finance Minis- 
try criteria for listing shares on Japan’s stock 
markets. Designed to protect investors from 
losses, the regulations mean that it often takes 
nearly two decades before a new venture can 
go public, depriving potential investors of 
quick returns and a big incentive to risk capital. 

The result is that investments in start-up 
companies in Japan are dominated by a hand- 
ful of big companies, themselves controlled 
by large, conservative concerns mainly in 
banking, insurance and securities. Start-ups 
often struggle for years before capital be- 
comes available. “Large banks and securities 
companies have money, but they don't know 
how to foster the entrepreneurial mindset,” 
Mr. Yonekura said. 

Another problem is the prohibition cm the 
set-up of joint-stock holding companies, dat- 
ing back to 1947, which businesses are lobby- 
ing to have overturned. 


Flames of Dollar Engulf Blue Chips 


Corrpikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Stocks and 
bonds extended their losses 
with another sharp drop Tues- 
day as the dollar slumped to a 
historic low against the yen and 
fears mounted about higher 
U.S. interest rates. 

“The dollar was the spark 
that started the fire," said 
Christie McClellan, head trader 
at Robertson, Stephens & Co. 
in San Francisco. 

The Dow Jones industrial in- 
dex closed 33.93 points weaker 


at 3,707.97, bringing losses for 
the last three trading sessions to 
103.37 points. 

At one point, the index was 
down about 55.49 points, trig- 
gering the New York Stock Ex- 
change’s so-called circuit- 
breakers that limit stock-index 
arbitrage for the first time since 
May 6. 

“The overriding concern is 
the weakness of the dollar," 
said Joseph DeMarco, head of 
equity trading at HSBC Asset 
Management, a unit of Hong- 


kong & Shanghai Bank. 
"There’s a fear of stagflation, 
with little to no growth plus 
inflation, and that’s the worst of 
all possible worlds for the stock 
market. The market is waiting 
for some guidance, some direc- 
tion from the Fed, and it’s not 
coming." 

Bonds also plummeted, as 
the yield on the 30-year U.S. 
Treasury bond rose as high as 
7.53 percent and closed at 7.49 

See MARKET, Page 12 


U.S. Trade Gap 
Grows, Adding 
To Dollar Stress 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The 
U.S. trade deficit widened in 
April to $8.40 billion, the gov- 
ernment said Tuesday, putting 
more pressure on the shaky dol- 
lar. 

The Commerce Department 
said the April deficit in goods 
and services was up 22 percent 
from the March imbalance of 
$6.87 billion as imports of mer- 
chandise climbed to a record 
high while American exports 
fell sharply. 

In a second trade report the 
government said the deficit on 
the current account for the Jan- 
uary-March quarter was $31.9 
billion, the worst showing for 
this trade measurement since 
late 1988. 

The current account is con- 
sidered the broadest measure of 
U.S. trade because it includes 
not only tirade in goods and 
services, which are in the 
monthly trade report, but also 
investment flows and U.S. for- 
eign aid payments. 

In the April trade report, U.S. 
goods exports fell by SI .77 bil- 
lion, reflecting large declines in 
the sale of gold, telecommunica- 
tions equipment and computers. 

Private economists had been 
looking for a deterioration in 
the deficit to around $7.7 bil- 
lion. Analysts said the worse- 
than-expected performance fur- 
ther waghed on the U.S. dollar, 
which has been f alling sharply 
in recent days against the Deut- 
sche mark and the yen. 

As usual, America’s largest 
deficit was with Japan, an im- 
balance of $5.48 billion in 
April, down slightly from the 
March figure. 

After Japan, the United 
States suffered its second-larg- 
est deficit with China, a trade 
gap of $1 .79 billion. The United 
States had a $1.09 billion deficit 
in trade with Canada, its largest 
trading partner. 

For the year, the deficit in 
goods is running at an annual 


rate of $133.5 billion, putting 
the United States on track to 
suffer its worst trade imbalance 
since a record $152. 1 billion im- 
balance in 1987. 

Economists said that U.S. 
manufacturers were being bat- 
tered by recessions in Europe 
and Japan, two big export mar- 
kets, while U.S. consumers and 
businesses were buying record 
amounts of imports as the 
American economy improves. 


Tietmeyer 
Downplays 
M-3 Fears 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BONN — Hans Tietmeyer, 
president of the Bundesbank, 
said Tuesday that the bank had 
found “no reason to see that a 
firm connection exists” be- 
tween M-3 money supply 
growth and inflation. 

Analysts have widely as- ■ 
sumed that a connection existed 
and have been unsettled by . 
months of double-digit in- 
creases in M-3. • 

The Bundesbank announced 
Tuesday that the M-3 money 
supply had risen at aonuaHrarf . 
rate of 13.7 percent in May, 
according to provisional fig- ! 
ures. The Bundesbank’s target • 
range for the rise in M-3 in 1994 ' 
is between 4 to 6 percent ! 

Even though Mr. Tietmeyer 
said the bank had not yet estab- ’ 
lished a linn connection be- , 
tween M-3 growth and infla- • 
tion, he said the bank was * 
“thoroughly analyzing die con- • 
nection.” He said the bank > 
would mak e public its findings • 
at a July 2 1 meeting of the cen- : 
tral bank council. 

(AFX, Knight-Ridder) . 


In Mideast, Ads Still Follow the Flag 


By Daniel TiUes 

International Herald Tribune 

P EACE in the Middle East took 
several small steps with the re- 
cent transfer of political control 
from Israeli to Palestinian au- 
thority in Jericho and the Gaza Strip. 
Yet for multinational advertising agen- 
das and their advertisers, it will be busi- 
ness as nsiial. 

Given the Arab boycott against Israel 
most multinational consumer goods 
companies doing business in the Middle 
East have felt required to “nail their flag 
to one mast or the other," in the words of 
one London-based advertising executive. 

Moreover, there appears to be little 
immediate interest on the part of these 
international companies to target the 
roughly 1-5 million potential consumers 
in Gaza and Jericho. 

Such companies as PepsiCo opened 
offices and distributed their products in 
either the Israeli or Arab market — n ot 
both — although the majority of compa- 
■ tries opted for the Arab region given its 
far larger potential market size. 

Other marketers, including M&M 
Mara and Procter & Gamble, haw no 
offices in Israel They have turned mar- 
keting somersaults to make their prod- 
ucts available in both regions which 
they have managed to do, although both 
com pani es declined to explain how. 

Agencies go where clients go, be it 
Eastern Europe, Asia or, today. South 
Africa. This has held to Form m the Arab 
market, as advertising networks such as 
Saatchi & Saatchi, J. Walter Thompson, 
Euro RSCG and McCann-Erickson have 


established owned or affiliated pan-Ara- 
bian networks to service their clients in 
the region. 

For Israel however, agencies have 
been loathe to open affiliated offices 
there despite the fact that more foreign- 
based clients have, for all practical pur- 
poses, begun defying the boycott and 


Companies have opened 
offices and distributed 
their products in either 
the Israeli or Arab market 
— not both. 


started doing business, and advertising, 
in the country over the past five years. 
- “We don’t want to upset the apple 
cart,” said this same London ad execu- 
tive, refaring to the agency’s increasing- 
ly important business and financial rela- 
tionship with its pan-Arabian partners. 

Most large ad agency networks have 
made contact with independent Israeli 
agencies to arrange service for their cli- 
ents: agencies such as Tamir-Cohen in 
Tel Aviv, which manages British Airways 
on behalf of Saatchi & Saatchi, or Gitam, 
also in Tel Aviv, wind) bandies the Pepsi 
account for the BBDO ad agency. 

None of the large agency networks 
interviewed hold equity or dare consider 
putting their name cm the door next to 
these Israeli names. Some, including 
Saatchi, allow these Israeli agencies to 


work simultaneously with competitive 
advertising networks, an arrangement 
inconceivable outside the Middle East. 

Information is never relayed 10 Israel 
via their Arab-network agencies, nor vice 
versa. Away from the region, the de- 
mands can relax. A DDB Needham 
Worldwide managers conference in Ber- 
muda recently had representatives from 
both its Arab affiliates and its Israeli 
contact Bing Linial 

The Leo Burnett advertising agency 
has had a relationship with the Tel Aviv 
agency May-Tal for about five years to 
service Philip Morris Cos. It is run from 
Burnett’s Greek office, while the Arab 
affiliates use another line of communica- 
tion to company headquarters in Chica- 
go, said Kerry Rubie, Burnett president 
for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. 
“We don’t want to disturb the status 
quo ” he said. 

The changes in political control in 
Gaza and Jericho also have done little to 
provoke even moderate interest. Priori- 
ties lie elsewhere. 

“No clients have asked about it yet. 
it’s too early, things are changing so 
quickly," explained David Fearniey. ex- 
ecutive vice president for DDB Need- 
ham Europe in Paris. “And other new 
markets. South Africa, for instance, are 
more exciting and interesting to our cli- 
ents. It’s better developed in terms of 
population and infrastructure." 

There are exceptions. Ad Pro, a small 
OgQvy & Mather affiliate in Amman, 
Jordan, is setting up an office in Ramal- 
lah, outside Jerusalem on the West Bank, 
a 30-minute drive from Amman 


Crass Ratos 

v .. [ qju. F.F. Ura ftFI fcF. * p - 

■ - ... v. .i* jti 1 n 07 B3B9 MW* H«B* CB* 

liSs UW wn- 

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: *atre*.s . USD 5K Non*. taw* MB* 

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BraflOTO.. was. 2 I 4 &C 2 pellrtuolr 227W. 

. .’,ONh> 1**1 Partem* MM# 

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r. - bowk***** ; .... 

• . Swte.frwc la* 3 * Bonce Commercial iratlano 


June 2i 

Eurociffrency Deposits 




June 21 

YM CS 
L77J- 1JBS 

Paolo 

U«. 


Dollar 

D-Mart 

Swiss 

Franc 

SterlhiB 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

LEM AW 

uni* use 

MB* 

UB5S- 

1 month 

4V. -4ft 

49WS ft 

4 *w4 ft 

4ft-5 

5U-SVI 

2-2ft 


ISIS ion 

29U» 

3 months 

4VWft 

4ftr5 ft 

4VW*fc 

5-5ft 

Sft-Sft 

2 '~-2 ft 


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— 

i months 

4ft-5 

4>ft4h 

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6 ‘-4 


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— na owl 
u** — w 
uni* ism urn* 
out* tout vfm 
ton m«i 
ttter centers: Toronto 

not quoted f *A; not 


Owitner Per* 
s. Air. rood l»5 
S. Ksr. won . #0710 
SmLkrono 7JT78 
Taiwan# 27 iU 

TteiMM 25.12 

TOrkttiUrn 30951 
UABdfetm 1£727 
vtaeL w4». iTTM 


Sources: Router* Uords Bank. 

Kates towBaSde to Interbank deposits of SI mttHon mbilmum tor equivalent!. 


OMNdW MW* - Ttmt >■»»' .... 

Swtafrwc L2S “ 1350 , __ (BnaS&tlt Bonce Cammerxiaie iratlano 

saurcet: ifb Bank ^ {Tokro > ; newt Bane of anode 

I Wkmli Atones From Ft*** ^^ReutwrsatdAF. 

{Torordtth- IMF fStW- Otner data from 


Ksy Money Rates 


DtaCSKd rate 3<6 

prim rote 7W 

Rrterol foods 4 ft 

CDs 199 

Comm.MMriaidm 472 

smooth Traoxny bill 4.18 

Wear Tranonr Dill 4.98 

5-Vtar Treasarr aoie SS7 

5-rear Treasury net* US 

7-roor Treasury note US 

10-rear Treasury ante 7 JO 

80-jrear Trcannr band l.et 

Memo LmcbSMar Ready asset 158 

*55* 

Dtsceoirtrate H* 

CaUaanry 2X0 

wnnutta MWbank 2 ft 

J-raoath Werbanfc 2ft 

tmatti tatertanl 2ft 

W-ytar Government bead 4J0 

German 

Lo m b ar d rate 6X0 

CflH rawer Mg 

T-moalb mtwbulc 5X5 

mhoHi Interbank 5X5 

tmoafti Merbaafe 5X5 

IWoor Band 7Z4 


S'-’. 5ft 

Coil maim 4ft 5X0 

l-maatn bilar&anli 5X0 4ft 

S-moatb hrtcrboab 5ft 5ft 

4-manlb Intorbaali SVi is 

If-Toar OUt 9X1 8.M 

Prance 

l a ianmlloa rtnc 520 5J6 

coll maim 5 'ft 5 

I4naalb interbank 5 *. S 

34nontti faetarbnnk 5 ft 5ft 

wmntti talerbank 5ft 5 ft 

IS- rear OAT 7.»2 7.87 

Sources: Routers. Bioomoero Merritt 
Lynch. Bank of Tokvo. Cominc«eanfc. 
Groonwelt Montam-' Creott L ronnai*. 



AM. 

PM. 

Ch'ee 

Zurich 

3SMS 

390.75 

- 1X0 

London 

389.95 

39030 

+ 1.00 

New Yurt 

39140 

39eJ0 

+ 5.40 


UA dollars per annex. London official tl.%- 
brgs: Zurktt and New York eoentnp and cros- 
Inp prices; Mew York Corner tAugustl 
Source: Reuters 


Banking Clients Have Always Expected 
Outstanding Personal Service. 
Today They Find It With Us. 


* •A.,'. . 

■ 1 




■ . -ft ■ . 

• \ '■ 


r.lv’.V 




:• m. 

- '?"*£!!%> 





D uring the Renaissance, 
misted advisors helped 
adminisrer the finances 
and protect the inrerests of private 
individuals. The role demanded 
judgment, commitment and skill. 

Today, clients find that same 
personal service at Republic 
National Bank. We believe that 
banking is more about people than 
numbers. Irs about the shared val- 
ues and common goals that forge 
strong bonds between banker and 


client. Its also about building for 
the future, keeping assets secure 
for the generations to come, 
r This client focus has contrib- 
uted to our leading position in 
private banking. As a subsidiary 
of Satra Republic Holdings S.A. 
and an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part of 
i a global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and more 
than US$50 billion in assets. 

These assets continue to grow 

REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


a Satra bank 

Timeless Values. Traditional strength. 

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MONTREAL - NASSAU - NEW IORK - BUENOS AIRES - CARACAS ■ MONTEVIDEO - PUNT* DEL ESTE - RiO DE JANEIRO • SANTIAGO - BEIRUT - BEUING ■ HONG KONG ' 

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substantially, a testament to the 
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values were once the foundation 
of banking. At Republic, they 
have been and always will be. 








Page 12 


MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY; JUNE 22, 1994 


MARKET; Dollar Sparks a Fire 


\ ia luewti 


Continued from Page II 
percent, up from a closing 
quote of 7.46 percent on Mon’ 
day. Gold rose to a high for the 
year of S397.90 an ounce before 
settling back to S396.30 in late 
trading. 

The technology sector was hit 
especially hard after Lotus De- 
velopment’s shares plunged 2S 
percent to 37. alter the software 
company warned that secnnd- 

U.S. Stocks 

quarter earnings would be dis- 
appointing. 

The decline helped spur 
losses for Microsoft, off ft at 
52%, Computer Associates, off 
I ft to 38%, and BMC software, 
down 1ft to 46**. 

Lotus said revenue would be 
lower because of delays in in- 
troducing an updated version or 
a spreadsheet program. 

The concerns about Lotus 
earnings had a broader effect 
because hopes for a rally in the 
market have recently been tied 
to the current round of corpo- 
rate earnings. 

The software company said 
revenue would be lower because 
of delays in the introduction of 
its popular 1-2-3 spreadsheet 
program. 

Ed Gillis, Lotus chief finan- 
cial officer, also conceded that 
demand for the company's 
business applications had 
slowed, partly because of new 


products from iu rival Micro- 
soft. 

Mr. Gillis said Lotus was at 
the beginning of a new product 
cycle with the new version of 1- 
2-3 introduced on Monday and 
named Release 5. while Micro- 
soft is enjoying the full momen- 
tum of sales from a new version 
of .Microsoft Excel introduced 
earlier this year. 

Lotus executives said Mon- 
day that the shortfall was a one- 
time glitch and that revenue 
would be boosted by Release 5. 

Some analysts, however, said 
that Lotus faced bigger prob- 
lems in its application software 
business. Many said Release 5 
would not give a major boost in 
sales because it was not a major 
overhaul of the existing prod- 
uct. 

■ Broad Market Slump 

In addition to the slump in 




Daily clcsings of the 
Dovj Jones industrial average 


| Dow Jones Averages 

Open Hl,h Low LcS Qia. 

I hovi yzs tr 3741.90 j&aj ji 370a 3341 
I Tran-. i«:o? iaisjs 

I Uhl ISO-W 1:0.14 ITJ* 17867 —134 
I Co-i-o 13-.J.50 I JSt.-J 138“ 75 11*1.43 —15.11 

1 Standard & Poor’s indexes 

Hign Low Ctose CITK 
tnduslrlcls 57*.*r 53103 53133 — 484 
TranSB. 3*5.71 370.1 B 3*0. 7D - 101 

Utilities 1S5J1 15155 154.23 - 1J8 

Fincnca 415* 44J9 4587 —053 

SP iW 45SOT 44*43 451J4 — 4.U 

5P 100 4J1JB 4U.16 417.48 —1*0 


NYSE Indexes 


| High Low Lost Cho. 

I Composite 7SI60 548.74 34*.ll —33* 

Indtfiiriols 30*.J1 »144 306.83 -2 J9 

. T Pame . 344.4) 344.47 345 It —143 

I 305."8 70107 703.77 —Tin 

finonco JIS.C5 31? 13 312.64 — Z61 


0 J F M A M J 

1 993 1994 


NYSE Most Actives 


the blue chips, the weakness in 


Vat 

High 

LOW 

Las! 

018- 

the broader market was reflect- 

RJPNOD 

575B6 

6 

5^4 

i''rn 

- 1 a 

ed bv the fall of the Nasdaq 

LdmPCNi 

•>WEI i 

45103 

4”. 

30 : .j 

45'.. 

3r. 

— i>-j 
— 1-: 

composite index, which fell 

WM' T C 

iu?a 

S» J 6 

vs >* 

SP< 

- 1 

10.06 points to 708.79. 

►. marl 
GnAloir 

30257 

XOdl 

16". 

5: - .i 

is% 

si ! ’i 

id'a 

52 

—Me 

Software, electric equipment. 

, OwyMr 

Fcrd-M 

77 49? 

47 

Wr 

4o*a 

— \ 

electric utility, auto and oil 
stocks fueled "the broad market 

IEA\ 

.VaiMari 

r.Vneh 

•4516 

27142 

71362 

«?'.■ 

24'; 

31*. 

60'. 

a - , 

70’. 

6l '•! 

5?'* 

-'•7 

decline. 

T« UK-. 

E.*AC > 

1*354 

I4 ! * 

14 

t-: 1 j 

'* 

Volume was quoted in late 


19I2J 


M-. 

31’» 

— 


NASDAQ Indexes 


H«n Low Last Ox. 

Camwiil^ 'IJ.40 ’06 48 708 7* — 10.56 
inn-.lrds 775*4 717.43 71*34—1040 

Sorts '55. » 750.01 750.68 — 7.W 

Ir.-.yrgncc *11 JO *0147 *03 08—1033 

F.PV5-17C *33 83 *25-74 CJ7.QS 

Trcrsp. SSa.01 687.15 68 7J7 -0.49 


AMEX Stock Index 


High Low Laid Ora. 

4.Vs 71 -J31XE7 43IB7 — 1 ~r 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 

Metals 

Close P re vio us 

Bid Art Bi d Art 

ALUMINUM (H*h Crude] 

DoUon oer metric ton 
Soot 144*10 144150 1444J3 1 44150 

| ^Ort 147450 147100 WSX 

1 COPPER CATHODES (Htaft Grade! 

Donors per metric ton 

1 Sool 34TM0 2«W> «a30 2439.50 

Forward mth^i 343333 343am 30980 

LEAD 

54600 5C3Q 

Forworn 55100 55SJ0 564JB S64.55 

NICKEL 

Forward 64*ft» MO U* 65CMC 

TIN 

Dollon per mrtrtctoo 
Soot 557808 556030 55*0.00 540C30 

Forward 565530 566100 567050 5668H 

ZINC (5pkr> 1 Htofi GTWfci 
Dollars per metr i c tea 

Spot *e»3D *70-50 **100 9*600 

Forward W10Q '°'5J0 10800 IBSIJO 


Financial 

HU Low Close Cbooee 
3-MOHTH STERLING (LIFFE) 

booms -p* of too pc> 



Higt Low Lost Senie OU 

Mn> ICS 16630 1(719 M7JB IfKK 

SS UffS IPS -MS 

5 ShSMBSS 

JS? 

»St N T 7LT. N.T. 16L58 -850 

Est volume: MJM. Op*iw. awe 

£? 17j! ”f* «7-M ™ —aw 

6 r*A H S3 H=3 

Dec »7^ 17* 5713 17.01 —033 

1 I ftt 88 M=K 

S 3 £5 S8 h=» 

££. volume: 43J75 . Own w - 136 * <3 ‘ 


Microsoft Ends Dispute widi Stew 

REDMOND. Washington Cgp. 

the small maker crf^^co , ^>ressib«t.aM|«^6 

PU Under the agreement. Microsoft, the ^i»gr sTari&aff softwatt 
maker, said il would 
months for copying, 
for the two compam 
sion patents overtfeuextiiyeyeaB; 

Microstrft said fc. weald matem* -» 


J f- Vi-. - 

^ n ; f i -fny t ■ - 


Stock Indexes 

HtoH LOW One Onwe 
FFSEtMILIFFE] 

BSperMexpotor 

Sn 2M2JJ 5TOfl 293ail -355 

Dk N.T. NLT. W<7 9 -3 SJ 

Ext. volume: M339. OpbiTbL. 58891. 


for future 


Striki 




stfiaiifTr 




MOT 9102 *338 9195 -W 

JOB 9236 9223 9229 -056 

Sep 91(4 91.71 91.76 — 0X8 

DOC 91 J? 91.26 *132 — CJ7 

MOT 91.10 *095 91.B2 —006 

JM *183 9076 9061 — OC7 

5«p *C6S *056 *042 — CHS 

Dec 9848 5834 58*3 -OCS 

Mar 9827 9814 9025 —05! 

Jon 9009 e*.9S 9009 +813 

Es). volume: 4tA31. Osen InL: 51Ea&L 
JFMONTH EURODOLLARS I LIFFE} 

SI mllllofl - Pft of ISO pet 



", FRBB per index point 




JW100 

766580 

HJ74J0 

*j*a 

— 10! JbI 

imxo 

iMUa 

I860 JO 

92JS 

-OSS AW 

N.T. 

N.T. 

uwjje 

923? 

-136 : Sep 

irz5u 

1&3JX 

ibsldd 


— ora ' Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

T915.SO 

91 J2 

— CJ7 Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

194230 






Ssoren: Man*. Aftociinea Press. 
, Loftaen inn Ptnondal Ftmxws £xaxm «r. 
rnn Petretesn Ex cr s xs e. 


DhrldMids 


S«p 

9484 

9484 

9484 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

to io 

Mar 

9186 

9186 

7184 

Job 

9156 

9156 

7154 

See 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9331 


TOBcnai 
>0 UXUlles 
10 InOuftrlOlS 


*804 —806 

«4A« —8177 

101 3* —0.11 


Est. volume: 91. Ooen int.: 1637. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE! 
DMl mlliiea • pcs oflBO pa 


trading at 293.69 million shares, 
up from 229.14 million shares 
on Monday. About seven 1 
shares fell for every three that 
rose on the Big Board. 

(Bloomberg. API 


NASDAQ Most Actives i WYSE piaf y 


DOLLAR: Currency Hits 100 Yes i 


VoL High Low Ls^t 
l?aS'* J* ■ i5». 3' 

57° J6 15 14 14-.. 

56*88 58' j i'> . 55 

S3 787 53'. J: 5.'S 

43300 *' • I !'• 

JO'J) 41' i J* 40 : 
MTS 35'* 34 JS'« 

74*14 J3'.- Jl'. . 


Continued from Page 1 
nuaJ Humphrey- Hawkins ad- 
dress on the state of the econo- 
my to Congress on Wednesday. 
Congress will be pressing him 
for a commitment not to raise 
rates any more lest the Fed 
clobber the already moderating 
U.S. recovery- As a matter of 

principle. Mr. Greenspan is un- 
likely to limit the Fed's maneu- 

Forefgn Exchange 

vering by giving such a commit- 
ment. but if he did. he would 
clobber the dollar instead. 

Fed officials at an economic 
conference sponsored by the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Bos- 
ton said that while the central 
bank could not ignore the value 
of the dollar, it was unlikely »c* 
raise rates just to try to stabilize 
the currency. Thty also said 
they were puzzled by the dol- 
lar’s decline, which implied that 
they therefore had no obvious 
strategy for braking it. 

Other political factors also 
count in the market. Wall Street 
dealers have been unimpressed 
by President Bill Clinton’s flip- 
flops on foreign policy and are 
now seeing his principal domes- 
tic initiative on health care be- 
ing blunted in Congress. The 


currency market also has never 
forgotten Treasury - Secretary 
Lloyd Bemsen’s initial policy of 
talking down the dollar to cut 
the American trade deficit with 
Japan and is still reluctant to 
believe this is no longer U.S. 
policy. 

■ Tietmeyer on Inflation 

Hans Tietmever. president of 
the Bundesbank, said investors 
have overreacted to fears of in- 
flation. Bloomberg Business 
News reported from Bonn. 

He said the risk of inflation 
in the United Slates was not 
that high and that fears of infla- 
tion could themselves be a dan- 
ger. 

“The ri»e in interest rates was 
a reaction, probably an overre- 
aciion. to improved growth ex- 
pectations. and in some coun- 
tries to inflation fears." Mr. 
Tietmeyer said. 

“I can't see a crisis of the 
financial system.” he said. 
"There are individual errors, 
but no systematic crisis." 

The central banker said the 
scope for the Bundesbank to 
affect capital market move- 
ments was limited. “Monetary 
policy cannot and must not ful- 
fill all the expectations of the 
market."’ he said. 


*P*rt. * 740«a 17' J 

MCI S 22S*i 73’. 

OiFooa 21WUJ .3 1 j 

LDDS*. 51533 IS'. 

4pp<cC ;i5ij j 

IC BCn. •. mjs ■>* 

TolCrna 18*45 .’I ' « 


AMEX Most Actives 


4e.:'«K 
[ O-'c'inofl 
j Uncnonocc 
I To-'.v iSUifS 

I Nwi 

J NO Lew*. 

- - 

I AMEX Diary 


1 

I O— rlmoe 

iir.c?-omce 

J Total ■ sww 
No*.- Hejrv, 

! Nr* Lows 


SO* 4*5 
l.-J* 1748 

59* 592 

2847 2955 

15 

l<72 83 


174 174 
430 3*3 
2S7 719 
821 .’84 


Scp 

9566 

9561 

95l34 

' StXtL 

Dec 

7441 

*476 

*478 

Unai. 

Mor 

94J0 

94OT 

9466 

-*-0JI 

Jun 

94.10 

V4JB 

9405 

—cl: 

Scp 

917* 

9167 

9174 

— ao: 

Dec 

9151 

9263 

*266 

— cx: 

Mar 

9132 

9125 

9326 

— LC7 

Jun 

93.70 

9i06 

93J35 

-CU3 

Scp 

9U9 

9282 

9284 

— 034 

Dec 

*167 

*U3 

*146 

—031 

Mar 

9153 

9265 

9265 

— asz 

Jan 

*2J2 

9229 

V229 

— sxs 


Par- Ann Par Rec 
IRREGULAR 

Aw. Frfl FroFOl - H 

Amis<UV.rglnv36 - -Jg £2 

An tadMtsto* 83 - ^ £5 fl-39 

COB RtvInvTE I - -22 

to RrylnvTE U - Wg |'2 

Cot JBylrv 7E III - •« 

Cenhirv Shi Tr - JJ . . «* 

asordcl.v^-i Inc - 5*$5 t'JI' 

Coons?l REfT - ^ 

U£sa Ot*sW r a T* - 

PenrJon Be» RtY Tr - -DC* 7 6-39 7-15 

CORRECTION 

PIW.CC Ccatitn VTO C81 *' 3S 7 M 

Camsctee arrovKL 

STOCK 

PBootesHsie - *°* 7- is 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
TaStrffticx 25 ‘c T 

OMITTED 

Freenrf MiVm Ci! 

INITIAL 

PaociasBksIne - -16 MO 7-15 

INCREASED 

Centre' rnS Bca 5 .1225 6-3S 7-12 



VoL 

Hcgb 

Low 

Lasl 

-XT i NASDAQ Diary 



CievLH s 

3'3 1’ 


- 

- . 

— ' • l 




U5fd 



J 

•” j ^QsQnCiM 

IDT 

1035 

'.'■OCB f.< 


39 : 

30 


, | Ci^irtc 

2173 

22W 




11 


. : U"c*vjng-*1 


18W3 

AmOTU 

5*°4 




> . Trial n-zun 

50SJ 

50f1 






’ 1 Hijh-, 

33 

4* 

HJCrn 


?«7. 


• ;■ « 

. . % 1 !iov. Lows 



l-a-Cp 

4*M 

Urn 

■ S 1 • 

• 6 . 

1 




Spot Commodities 


Est. volume: 99J03 Coen int.. 

3-MONTH PI BOR (MAT1F) 

FF5 million . Bfe of TOO PC 

Sep 94J3 94-2: 9423 —822 

' Dec nn *833 *104 — La: 

MCr 9157 9146 9346 —223 

; Jon Q» 9113 *2.12 —824 

Sec 9150 9Z26 72E£ -OZ 

DK *234 9240 7240 —222 

Mar 9156 WJS 9142 -Jui 

JOT 713* *123 9122 *-13: 

J Ell. volume: 3P2M. Open in?.: I*7.*1T. 

LONG GILT (UFFC1 
! awne-pttextoteof iMpa 
Jun 1«MK 99-11 99-14 

I Sea 98-3I 97-13 73-C7 — :-IT 

Dec N.T. N.T. 97-C7 -5-” 

I Est. volume: t!S47. Open int: 131^4. 

GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 

; DM 2SL0W - pts Of 1B0 ad 
SOP 9073 9000 92J8 -233 

Dec »57 PJ* 8947 *521 

| ESI. volume: 122 WtOoeMiT: 16V5L 
| 10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF59M09 - PtS Of I0B PC7 
1 sea him nzos 11130 —cm 

dcc nit 6 112-24 ;i:.43 —054 

Mar 110.94 17074 11040 —25* 

Jan N.T. N.T. N 7. Uicn. 

E«. volume: 16*365. Open InL: 13*.»*6. 


PEORIA," Iffinois (AP).rf Ca 
nirnnkjmhped abeadcrfaumoa : 

Tuesday, 

man agenda t in two 

Caterpillar, .the yforKTs 
meat, envoys ueaiiyB,W _ 
three PeorifFarea plaais fnd.^ow to 
walkouts! 

The rest of Caterpillar’s^ JA^Jsaoa 
Tennessee, Colooiifc'aaff Pec 
union said the Mrike would . , 

about 90 

members. : ■ 'i'vl ■ W. i'Jft*’ 

The.dispute betweea the/TinkJojEW, 
simmering ance contact ta lk s' 
limited sbike Nov.4,i991 


i 'l- ' 

£ S-VT-nT' 


Settlement 




BUFFALO, New York (AP) 

Tuesday agreed to pay S9B milli 
Canal to end a lawsuit with New 

nightmare, that forced hundreds. ol. . 

The settlement in &cl4-year^d tSstffcwwth&SBed 
for Ocddeatal and-tie staie; whki^hsii-SBed^^fe-i^ 
nearly $700 m3hon m Ttd 

company's corporate predaessw/fRK^t^X^ratfeals iftRxtfksr 


itTTVJ. v j:rrrn i i. a . 


,T i : * m i ,y f 1 (Mt k’ . ’J- > 1 1 ki * * * »■ ■ ' -ul 


re.t cf CatH 
S&t sencorp 
at —Bf t Into S vs 


G MS M 7-21 r. 

Q -33 7-1 7-25 

Q £5 6-30 7-29 


Market Sales 


nvse 

Ame > 
Nowloo 
In millions. 


j Commodlly 
) Aluminum. 10 

| Callec. Brar_ id 
Copd-t eiectrol , tic. 1C 
I Iron FOB. (On 
| L»ao. ib 
Silver, irov er 
I Steel (seres), ton 
l Tin. is 


Industrials 


HtoB Low UN seffto Oioe 
GASOIL (IPE) 

US Milan per metric tortots at lOO loos 
Jul 1S9i» 157 JO 15BJD 15&5C —ZK 

Aug 16125 15S-75 16075 INLS2 — : ~ 

SOT 16175 16170 16125 1(125 — 115 

O a 16575 16175 16550 ’s5J0 -125 


REGULAR 

Ai. 1 r_K Q 545 7-6 1-14 

Atn IseMTolCH BS Hi .17 400 «-» 

Cmtuss: Bank G -3 •-£ 7-3. 

2XA :rc 3V5 O 77 »-» 7-1* 

CoJOT>3» Hi Inc M J55 5-3 »-i5 

Cstorual tnler H. M 75£ 6C3 7-15 

Fecerci Proer S3 O 75 5-31 7-i5 

Frank Ada RE IlK -.1625 6-30 7-1S 
Freak RE >K - -1SS a-X 7-M 

Frart Set RE Inc - .10 6-30 7-15 

Goo e a i«i... to Q B 7 6-73 7-7 

HeKnood Snmr pm O X 6-30 3- is 

f e te fiae fr i CT Inc C 24 7.J 7-1 J 

L.RS3ln Sen Bk Q <5 7-» 7-E 

.'AcAmur Glen Rty O J6 7-11 7-2D 

MM' Ces C £t 6-33 7-15 

tox j M s ier Tel a 2025 ms bi 

SK=T-Br^oOt3o a a* 7-15 7-2* 

SmwOT! ErUera O JH 7-15 7-2* 

TCA CsilleTV G .11 7-6 7-3B 

UsiOtmCc O J7 ?-i2 8-1 

Djemal. 9-parable to canaSan hams; m- 
momtitr; c- uuui te i ty; s-sentLonoael 


IK' >>a < N’ of r‘ 1 i ff. ? < j: I * ! . 


to 1953. 

The U.S 

along with me cocapanYs cxmnl^^ 
eminent, the city erf Niagara Falkland 

pending are lawsuits filed oy PDO-forabor J L 

health problems they blame on TO^ obmac^Da^a 

Whiti 

CHICAGO^ (Bloomberg) — Whitman jCbirjfc 
directors had aothoffeed mauageiiKm to: 
common shares, or ZS'pereeat ca the- j 
outstanding, in (^en-market or private 
The soft-drink botder and consumer 
the shares would be used for employee 
incentive pragmas. - ' ' - ' ’ " w 

Whitman has bou_ 

authorized in a 1993 repurchase program. 




Motoi 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS. BEflbis 


j; hi Ub dM i J; U n 

I > !®A- 


'tZ\ fS } ■ : ; 




P^G, Vowing Asset Sale, Wins EU Approval lor Deal 


rrr.~i jrivvn 


W.vmN-f; Busmen V 4 -h « 

BRUSSELS — The European Commis- 
sion cleared Procter & Gamble Co.’s pur- 
chase of Vereinigtc Papierwerke Schicke- 
danz AG on Tuesday after the consumer- 
products company agreed to dispose of 
one of the target’s subsidiaries. 

The approval came after Procter &. 
Gamble agreed to sell Schickedanzs Ca- 
melia tampon and sanitary -towel business 
to a third company. Competition Commis- 
sioner Karel van M’rert said. 


The commission also reserved the right 
to oppose potential buyers of Camelia if 
the European Union’s executive body does 
not think they will ensure sufficient com- 
petition with "P&G in the German market. 

The commission was notified of the 
merger in December and just a few weeks 
ago was ready to take the unusual step of 
blocking iu Mr. van Mien said. “At the 
Iasi minute, the company offered the solu- 
tion to disinvest in Camelia.” he said. 

By selling Camelia, the merged compa- 


ny’s share of the market in feminine-hy- 
giene products would be reduced to 35 5 
percent from 60 percent in Germany. It 
would still nave a "9 percent market share 
Ln the product in Spain, how ever, the com- 
missioner said. P&G s main competitor in 
Germany is Johnson & Johnson, which has 
a 13.4 percent share. 

Women in Germanv and Spain are loyal 
to their preferred form of protection and 
brand, which makes it virtually impossible 
for new brands to enter the market. 


Beijing Telecommunication AdmmistraiiOn awa 
pany a contract to supply digital e q uip ment iar 
which. relay radio waves between cdWar pfaohc^t^ 
phones. In addition, the Shanghai Post and TdecogtWnm^t^^^ 
Administration gave the wmpany a contract tb 
ing analog. Motorola system.; . 


| I iTz p~i 1:% t 


Liberty Relinquishes 'QY€T|Sciiiqi£' 

ENGLEWOOD, Colorado. (BloOTibergj ^- 
Corp. relinquished' its partial oontrof of QVC Netwt«:k 
avoid potential antitrust-issues' ar^ ^ tbe cabl^teie^aB'TOfet^i^ 
sector, a L” 

Liberty, 

Inc., a cab 


3 M i VrX « I n 1 1 1(1 W \ • W. I > t Ci 






CtaM Prev. 

Allas Copco 

87 

87 JO 

Elect ralu< B 

350 

348 

1 ErICSion 

390 

389 

! Eiselle-A 

103 

103 

Handel OTOnXen 

*4 

9X50 

Investor B 

trt 

16* 

Norsk Hydro 

7I43I4J0 

Procardia AF 

118 

11* 

5ondvlk fi 

107 

107 

SC A- A 

105 

105 

S-E Barten 

45.90 45J0 

skondtaF 

9* JO 

** 

Skonrto 

150 

153 

5KP 

137 

l« 

5tora 

365 

367 

Trelleborg BF 

104 

105 

Volvo 

676 

680 


Sydney 

Amcor 9.10 9.16 

ANZ 3.78 3.91 

BHP 1134 la50 

Bqrol 330 3J8 

BouoolnwIlHj 088 088 

Botn Mrer 4jn 435 

Comataj 530 535 

CRA 17.92 1122 

C3R 4L6I 4J1 

Fosters Brew 1JJ7 1 JT7 

Goodman Field U3 136 

ICI Auslralla 10B6 10.92 

wooelkm l.*2 l.*i 

MIM 33)5 3JJ7 

Nat Awl Bonk 1048 1048 

NewsOJro 8.32 L56 

Nine Network 4.13 4J9 

N Broken HIM 142 147 

Poc Dunlop 120 L24 

Pioneer inn 177 177 

Nmndv Poseidon 117 122 

QCT Resources 1^9 1J2 

Sontos 19* 1*8 

TNT 125 138 

Western Mlnfns 8.16 128 

Westpoc Banking 4.16 04 

woodstoe 4J7 4.76 

^ss!sv^r :imM 


Tokyo 


AknlElectr 520 530 

Asatri Chemical 745 77B 

Asahl Glass 1240 1770 

Sort of Tokyo 1550 1580 

Brldeestane 1640 1650 

Conan 1750 17B0 

Caste 1150 1370 

Dal Nippon Prtnl 18*0 1*40 

Dolwo House 1520 1540 

Da hw Securities 1770 17*0 


Carrml Stock Index : 74 1 717 
Pmrfaos : 7*4181 

Frankfurt 

AEG T74J0I73JO 

Aleofel SEL 3*3 383 

Allianz Hold 2303 2281 
Allana 6W604JO 

Apta 987J0 985 

BASF 29450 290 

Baver 343J0341^0 

Boy. Hvoo bank 405 400 
BavVereirtsM 436 428 

BBC 670 675 

BHF Bank 385 386 

BMW 7 62 747 

Commerzbank 305 312 

Continental 235.50 230 
Daimler Benz 7065D 694 
Deoussa 477 478 

□I Babcock 219J0 716 

Deuteche Bank 6*1506*3.50 
Ctougta 534 515 

Dresdncr Bam iso 350 
FeWmwehl* 305 300 

F KruppHoesch 207J0 207 


AECI 

Aitecti 

Anglo Amer 

Barlows 

Blyveor 

Buffels 

D»Bt»n 

Driefonteln 
Gen oar 
GF5A 
Harmony 


25 36 

121 121 
733 23* 

35 35.50 
9 NA 
48 48 

112 116 
47.50 68 

12 1110 
123 127 

25 2550 


Harpener 

Henkel 

Bochlfef 

Heecftst 

t i oit in ci iu i 

H«i*n 

IWKA 

Kali Salz 

Korstodt 

K ou tool 

KHD 


32* 330 
582 58150 
1005 1028 
321.70 322 

870 BSD 

215 714 

353 357 

136 132 

587 580 
491489.50 
113131 JO 


K teeckner Werfce 134 133 

Linde 856 655 

Lufthansa 173.70 i»3 

MAN I93J0388JO 

Man nes m onn 387 391 

Metailgcaell 207 205 

Muendi Rueck 2860 2770 

Porsche 756 745 

Preussao 42* JO 432 

PWA 225 226 

RWE 403 JO 40350 

Rhalrwnrlall 305 300 

Scherfng *84*7*50 | 


Htanveld Sheet 77.50 a 

Kloof 57,25 59 

Nedtxmk Gns 3175 34 

Ro nd fontofn 44JD 412s 

Rian tat 99 103 

5A Brews *2JB 94JD 

SI Helena NA *3 

Sasof 25 2SJ0 

western Ono 1*4 

Comp osite index : 577174 
Pr e v te rt : 576U2 


London 

AbDev Non <04 

Allied Lyons Sa7 

Alio Wlaalns 159 

Arovll Group Z40 

As&Brlt Foods 5JB4 

BAA 9317 

BAs 460 

Bank Scotland IJM 

Barclays 5J2 

Bass SB? 

SSI 

BET 1.12 

Blue Circle 248 

BOC Group 7.0* 

Boots £23 

Bowater 437 

BP 199 

Brit Airways 181 

Bril Gas 255 

Brit steel 136 

BH* Telecom 344 

BTR 358 

Coble Wire 432 

Codburv5ct» 432 

Caradon 240 

Coats viveiia in 

Comm Union 5.12 

Cqurtoukfs 4.91 

ECC Group 119 

Enterprise Oil 4.19 

Eurotunnel 17* 

FI «ms 138 


BBV 3990 3000 

B°0 Ce ntral Hls p. 2630 2685 

Banco Santander 470Q 4775 

*7* 1000 

CEPSA 2*20 2890 

Droaodas 3040 3060 

Endeso 5760 5*40 

Ercros 731 233 

Iberdrola *25 *21 

ROTSOI 3630 3390 

Tqtjocotern 3305 3475 

Telefonica 17to ms 


= > 1 .,, 


Banco Conim 
Bastogi 

Beneltgn group 

Cloa 

CIR 

Crea ita> 
EnJchetn 
Ferfln 
Ferfln Rl» 

Hal SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Generali 
IPI 

Itataem 

llalm 

ItalmaMllare 

Medlaoanca 

Montedison 

OllveHi 

Pirelli 

ftA5 

Rinoscenle 

Sctoem 

San Paata Torino 

SIP 

SME 

Snlo 

Stqndo 

SM 

Toro A3si Rbp 


S ao Paulo 

Banco do Brasil 43 4IJ0 

Bffliespa 20J0 1**5 

Brodesco 15J0 1530 

Bnhma S65 565 

Cetnto 104JO 107.99 

Efetrobros 465 514 

ilaubonco 475 «9o 

Light £20 540 

Paranapanema 38 40 

Petnobrw 33 250 

Spurn Cruz 13350 13350 

T»lebras 87J0 W 

Telesp 7*5 815 

Uslmlncs 2/7 Ho 

Vata Rla Dace Ml 254*0 

Varta 225 235 

Borespa in dex : J1276 
Previous : 32278 


Faroe 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fulitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 


4620 4640 
2290 2300 
2210 7260 
1120 1140 
1040 1060 
695 889 

JtaYokado 5120 si n 

Itochu 726 736 

Jopiai Airlines 730 73* 

Kaflma 960 971 

Konso) Power 2570 25*0 

Kawasaki Steel 2** «M 

Kirin Brewery 1150 1170 

Komatsu 941 955 

Kub9ta 712 725 

Kyoc era 6980 Ttuc 

Motsu Elec lnds 1810 I860 
Matsu Elec Wks 1150 1150 
Mifniblshl Bk 7660 3680 
M IsublsfU KaseJ 520 52* 
M iRjblstil Elec 680 694 

Mitsublstil Hev 771 782 

MJhuWsh 1 Com 1170 1190 
Mitsui ana Co 797 007 

Mtaukoshl 1050 1040 

Mitsumi 1960 1720 

NEC 1240 1 770 

NGK insulators 1060 1090 
NJKfco Securities 1350 1360 
Ntaaon Kppakv 1040 1070 
Nippon 011 758 733 

Nippon 5teel 350 3S1 

Nippon Yusen 631 656 

Nissan 865 884 

Nomura Sec Wio 2460 

NTT 8380a 8430a 

Otvmpus Optical 1150 1200 

Pioneer 7*40 2970 

Hcah 973 *90 

Sanyo Elec 568 S83 

Sharp 1780 1830 

Stllmazu 762 769 

sninetsu Chem 2240 OX 

Sony 6160 »onn 

Sumitomo Bk 2070 7100 

Sumitomo Owe 588 536 

5uml Marine 935 *** 

Sumitomo Metal 298 Ml 

Ta sel Carp Ml 692 

Taisho Marine 820 BSD 

TakedaChem 1180 1200 

TDK 4810 4850 

Tallin 548 576 

Tokyo Marine 1280 1300 

Tokyo Elec Pw 3090 3160 


SXF.iJff* 


Montreal 

Atesn Aluminum 31 ta 31V 

Bank Monlreal 22V 2ZW 

Bell Canada «5V. 4Ssu 

Bombardier B 19*, l**k 

Combi dt 184. is*k 


Singapore 

city Dev. 6.*0 6*0 

DBS 11 D.10 

FroserNeove ibjo 18J0 
Genjllto 18JJC 18.90 

Golden Hope PI 2.4* 251 
How Par 3.18 3.U 

H ttato In dustries S.15 5J0 
inoxnae 5 JO 54* 

KdPPel 10JO 11.10 

KL KOPOBB 164 170 

Lum Chong l jq 148 

Malayan Bvtka 8J5 8.70 
OCBC toretan ijjo 1130 

OUB 6J15 6.10 

OUE 8J0 8A0 

Sentoawong II JO II JO 

Shangrlla 5JD SJ5 

Sime Darby 3J8 4 

51 A foretan 12.10 1220 

SUere Lend 7.45 755 

Sucre Press . 1550 1580 

SkiB Steamship 3J8 188 

suore Telecomm 140 3J0 
srralls Trodlng lu 376 

UOB toretan 12ja tZ30 

UOL 5,21 220 


7460 3680 
520 529 

680 694 

771 782 


1050 1040 
1960 1920 
1240 1270 


TSE 300 Index : 4M7J0 
Previous -. 481050 

Zurich 

Ad la Inti B 231 J n 

Alusutsse B new 648 653 
BBC Bnm Bov B 1180 1181 
CB» Geiuy B BIS sio 
« ttotoliw* B 318 Sll 
Elektrow B 346 354 

FlsriwB 1340 1350 


Interdtseount B 21J0 &25 


Jelmolia 
Landis Gyr R 
Moevenpick B 
Nestle ft 


825 no 
25 792 
5§ 440 

iga 1095 


0er1lk.Buehrle R 128 12s 


PareesoHidB i6io 1610 

griieHdO PC 6360 6300 

S tore R epublic 125 123 

Sandaz B 731 7K 

Schindler B 7450 7800 

Sober PC 880 Ion 

finance B 1*30 1900 

5wjnBnk CorpB 773 M 

Swt» Relnsur R 537 tu 

Swissair R 735 765 

UBS B 1077 ion 

Winterthur B 660 680 

Zurich An B 1272 12711 


iwvueiKPw 30*0 3160 ■ — - - — — 

Taepon Priming 1450 1480 IrnloS? ml* 2 
T«m m wn iu I • ■■■■»•■ - 


755 70S 
1077 1077 

<00 «o 

1372 1270 





77.10 

3744 

7783 

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27.17 


27 0l> 

27 Je 

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7.10 





1685 

77 17 



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635 

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2620 

2645 

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16.943 






Stockholm 


63 63 
574 574 
151 151 


BBT* 

Toyota 

YamaidilSec 

arxHU. 

^W-lii 464 


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820 838 

7170 £00 
♦50 977 


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just coll, toll free, 

05437437 


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7JJ7 tiJO Jun 94 6L60 647! 61*5 

73*7 4115 Aug *4 63.40 6415 6332 

7414 6SJ0OU94 67J0 57.97 t,m 

74.50 673JDee« 68.75 «J2 6BJ5 

7LZ5 47.90 Fctits a JO 69.1 j 69 40 

75. IQ 6SJ0Apr*S 7065 7**3 :CLi5 

71 JO 66.90 JOT » 67.*0 <7.90 67 75 

Est.sdes u.Rn Mon's. sobs, i6J3t 
Wn'sepenW 76J«* up 1978 
FEEDER CATTLE l CMS? I SAWm-im,, 
8100 71.10 Are 9< 73J5 T85 7104 

81 JO 71J05ep*4 72.75 735® njO 

8U5 7D.9SCa« 77J0 TLX 72J5 

BU0 7U0N6w« 7185 7446 7150 

7170 72J5 May *5 7X50 71« T22S 

80.95 72.95 JOT H 7495 7i05 74JS 

aaa 72 jsmot96 7400 74111 -tits 

7L85 7L4£ Aorta 

Est soles 2-422 Mon-xstoes 2406 - 
Man's aeenM I4L744 off 140 
HOGS KMERJ 

5437 4630 Junto 4440 «60 479g 

5137 4130 Jul 94 «JD 4830 S7J0 

KL40 4450 Aug 94 47JQ 47 50 44*5 

49J5 <2.45 Od 94 44.45 4445 4L3C 

5050 4105 DK 94 46 50 4450 440? 

9U0 C. 10 Feb *5 44 IS 4425 43J0 

48*0 0*0 Apr 95 42.90 <1*0 4175 

SI JO U .*3 Ain 95 4410 44J0 4735 

I9JK 47 30 Jul *S 47 JS *00 47 JQ 

Eri. sates SJ9I ManL ««B 7 JJT 
MOT'S Open M 26-714 up 477 
PORK BELLIES (CMERI xuwita-ejw,^ » 
UJJD 39J0JUI94 4110 44J7 BUS 

59 JO 3875 Aug 94 4230 065 47 JO 

6M5 29. 10 Feb 95 *4$ 4**0 48Ji , 

<8*0 3860 Mv *5 

61*0 4240 May *5 49*0 S0L4Z 49.00 

5200 JCJO J^ 1 95 50*0 50 00 50 00 

503* 49JSAW** 

Ea.sdes 1JI6 Man’s, wte <J4i 
MyVsoeenint 7.91B Off 211 


COFFSC (HCSE) ir.iine*.'OTn.Mb 
uS VwjUlto 129.75 134.S0 129.U 

ItZto dJOSeoto 13UD 136*0 IBJO 

14*0 77. 10 Dec *4 131 JO 13125 131.10 

13660 78.90 Mw *5 13000 131 10 130*0 

13458 82JOMay*5 T79J0 131.70 179 JO 
130*0 8100 JM 95 

12100 89*0 S*p *J _ _ 1IM 

Est. sates 15360 Mot's sates 14.9M 
Nkxi'socon nt So JH off ttt 
SUGAR-PDRLDII (NC5E1 IIJJOOP^- 
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17*0 940UM 12*4 1218 *J? 

1210 *.17 MOT to 1175 11*3 1170 


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«« 95 JC 9%J* 9iB0 -Jlin icec 

*M *131 9125 9127 IflM 21M 

*6.10 *4fflD«:*4 *468 *46* *463 **66 HU» Bjfi 

«JS *198 Mar *5 *43* «4« *435 MJB IftIO Lot 

Ea. sales NA Mans soles 46*1 
Mon' s omn rt 35.749 up 656 

S YK. TREASURY ICBOT) lHDjBrp*fl.phi22nikaliaDd 
112-05103-075 JunWlB-fl7S 105-09 l04-295-10*-3l5- 10 2Z271 
1KM95HB-12 SoP« 104-10 104-11 103-31 104-00 17 ISTtoC 

104- 18 101 -Jt Dec *4 103-10 103-13 103-0* 101-09- 12s V m 

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Man's ooen in I80J74 off 4110 

IB YR. TREASURY ICHOTi naojm»w «i * &g,j 

115- 21 los-ie Jur, 94 105- It 105-19 105-01 KB-04 — l” *» «,■ 

*15-0* 101-18 58PM 100-09 101-11 103-23 103-27— 5 mm 

114- 21 106-25 DecM163-4< 103-06 102-25 TO^_ J 

111-07 100-05 Motto 101-31 — 5 « 

105- 73 99-20 Jot 95 lSl^7 — s *2 

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US TREASURY BONDS 1CBOT] 

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118-26 90-17 Sep to 102-38 103-01 1 nS ItolllZ s -J'S] 

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116- 20 99-14 Mar 95101-15 101-16 HD-36 101-0* IS 

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415J0 41130 *460 1.169 


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Bi.M Oat NA Man's, sates nja, <0160 
WJ» 241 jb S ec 94 


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Moodirs , Clrae 

Rtoriers 132930 

DJ. Futures 2308ffl 

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0 83 1^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1994 


Greece Announces 
Five-Year Plan to 


For Milan Bourse , a New Setback 


Converge With EU 


Omvikdbf Our Staff Fnm Duptudta 

ATHENS — The govern- 
ment unveiled a live-year plan 
Tuesday aimed at bringing the 
country’s economy into line 
with terms of the Maastricht 
Treaty on European monetary 

iminn " 


The plan included pledges of 
state spending and improved 
growth rates. 


inflation down by five percent- 
age points, encouraging hopes 
for a single-digit figure by the 
end of the year. 

Mr. Papantoniou said, how- 
ever. that Greece's public debt 
of some 30 trillion drachmas 
(SI 24 billion.) would pose a 
greater challenge, A reduction 
from the current level, which is 


In announcing the plan. Eco- 
nomics Minister Yannos Pa- 
pantoniou said that the Greek 
economy required “radical han- 
dling,” a phrase possibly in- 
tended to forestall EU criticism 
that Athens is lagging in its ef- 
forts to bring the economy up 
to the EU average on perfor- 
mance. 


equivalent to 106 percent of 
gross domestic product, to the 


Greek share prices edged up 
0.4 percent in light trading, and 
dealers said investors were ap- 
parently waiting to see how the 
plan would be implemented. 

The minister did not give any 
figures on expected growth 
rates by the end of the rive-year 
period. Gross domestic product 
is estimated to grow 1 percent 
this year. 


gross domestic product, to the 
Maastricht Treaty's target, of 60 
percent would be “unrealistic” 
in the next rive years, he said. 

He also confirmed the gov- 
ernment's goal of privatizing as 
much as 25 percent of the state- 
owned Public Power Corn, as 
well as a yet -undetermined por- 
tion of Public Oil Corp. 

Revenue from the equity of- 
fering, he said, could reach ISO 
billion drachmas this year. 

Meanwhile, the European 
Commission has set out tough 
conditions before Greece can 
write off some $2 billion in 
debts run up by the state carrier 
Olympic Airways. Transport 
Minister loannis Haralambous 
said. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MILAN — The decision by Medio- 
banca SpA to delay its capital Increase 
indefinitely because of the fall in its 
share price stands as yei another nega- 
tive for the Milan stock exchange, ana- 
lysts said. 

It is impossible to predict when the 
bank will relaunch the rights issue. This 
depends on the performance of the slock 
exchange, although July and September 
were mentioned as possible dates. 

After the bourse closed Monday, Me- 
diobanca stud it was postponing the is- 
sue, which had been due Tuesday. 

Mediobanca noted that the Mibiel in- 
dex had fallen 17 percent since April 29, 
when its board derided on the issue of 
100 million shares with warrants, which 


was aimed at broadening its shareholder 
base and raising funds for investment, 
particularly in the Italian privatization 
program. 

An analyst at KJeinwon Benson. En- 
rico Ponzone, said Mediobanca had no 
choice. “The market is taking everything 
negatively at the moment, so this will just 
add to the already gloomv picture,” he 
said. 

Mr. Ponzone said that while the move 
would clearly limit Mediobanca’s ability 
to participate in the privatization pro- 
gram. “if the bourse stays like this, the 
program will be in difficulty anyway.” 

An analyst at Intereuropa SIM. Luca 
Comi, said the delay could be viewed by 
foreign investors, as Mediobanca is piv- 
otal in Italian finance, but be added that 
investors were already wary because of 


political uncertainty and the budget defi- 
cit. 


Mediobanca shares stood at 18.650 
lire ($11.75) when the issue was an- 
nounced April 29, but by Monday’s close 
they had slid to 14,550, below the issue 
price of 15,000. 

A large number of issues from many 
companies, including Mediobanca, was 
one of the reasons for the market slide. 
The main reason, however, was the fear 
of rising inflation. 

Mediobanca's issue would have re- 
duced the stake held by a controlling 
shareholders’ group to about 41 percent 
from 50 percent. The issue was under- 
written, but Mediobanca had hoped to 
attract new shareholders. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 


French Court Lifts Ban on Pathe Sale 


But he said Greece's inflation 
rate, which at 10.8 percent is the 
highest in the EU, was expected 
to fall to 3 percent by 1999 
under the plan. 

Over the past year, the gov- 
ernment has managed to bring 


He said the commission was 
pressing Olympic to immedi- 
ately give up its exclusive right 
for ground handling at Greek 
airports and its exclusive right 
to serve the Greek islands from 
Athens. 

(Knight-Bidder, Reuters) 


Agenn Franct-Prase 

PARIS — A local adminis- 
trative court has overturned a 
government order that had pre- 
vented the Italian businessman 
Gian Carlo Parretti from buy- 
ing the French film producer 
and distributor Pathe Cinema. 

The court ruled in a decision 
dated Feb. 16 that the order, 
which dated from June 1990, 
was beyond the government’s 
legitimate power. But the deci- 
sion was not served on France's 
Budget Ministry until this 
month. 

The economics and finance 
minis ter at the time, Pierre Ber- 
egovoy. who later became 
prime minister and who com- 


mitted suicide last year, decided 
to block the planned purchase 
of 52 percent of Paihe Cinema 
by Path6 France Holding, head- 
ed by Mr. Parretti. because of 
an alleged lack of financial 
transparency in connection 
with Mr. Parretti’5 projects. He 
also cited court cases against 
the businessman. 

But the Paris Administrative 
Court ruled that the minister 
was not entitled to oppose the 
deal because, at ibe time of the 
decision, Mr. Parreui’s record 
did not contain any criminal 
convictions. It said that Mr. 
Parretti had “only been con- 
demned, in a verdict against 
which he appealed.” by an Ital- 


ian court for fraudulent bank- 
ruptcy. 

It said that neither that ver- 
dict nor information in a parlia- 
mentary report on money- laun- 
dering nor news articles at the 
time on the acquisition plan 
“were of such nature as to snow 
that the plan for acquiring a 
majority stake by Pathfc France 
Holding entailed disturbance of 
public order or a threat justify- 
ing the delay ordered by a min- 
ister." 

In Italy, Mr. Parretti called it 
“the first piece of good news for 
years,” a source close to the 
family said. He quoted Mr. Par- 
retti as adding, “I’ve always had 
faith in French justice, despite 


NYSE 


KMoMtl 
High Lear Stad> 


9& 

D* Yld PE IflOi 


Lew Lores) Ctr m Htti! 


a* 

ov vid pe ins 


Low Latest Oree 


Tuesday’s doting 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Waff Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


(Continued) 


UMonm 
Hon Low Sock 


5b 

Dhr Yid PE tons 



-tot J it 


w a 8 

ill 





One-Time Charges Flatten 
Bottom Line at Elektrowatt 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dispatches 


ZURICH — Elektrowatt AG said Tuesday that currency ef- 
fects and a one-time charge held profit fiat in the six-month period 
to March, despite a 6 percent increase in sales. 

The electricity conglomerate said consolidated net profit for the 
period was 120 milli on Swiss francs ($89 million), compared with 
1 19 million francs in the comparable year-earlier period, while 
sales reached 2.48 bilion francs. 

Elektrowatt said nei income was harmed by currency fluctua- 
tions and a nonrecurring write-off of 153 million francs for a real 
estate and construction project in the its engineering division. 

One-time income of 14 million francs was received from Ger- 
many's Treuhand privatization agency for Elekuowatt's former 


slake in ThO ringer EJektrizitats-Lieferungsgesellschaft in the peri- 
od. it said. ( Bloomberg. AFX ) 


( Bloomberg, 


emPORTFOUOS 


49, Boulevard Prince Henri, 
L-l 724 Luxembourg 


Kfferlivc July 23rrl. I9*>4-. (Arlintr lb) of the Management 
Regulations ^ill l*r aiumd'-il to allow the Kinenjing Asian Markets 
Kquitv GtifNirlfolto to inif-rt in China. India and Vietnam. 


Prior to ibis dale, unitholder* may rrqm*sl redemption of their 
holding? free of charge (other than the usual admimr-lralivc rests). 


The revised Sales Proapeetus dated July 1994 will reflect this change. 

Gti portfolios SA. 


DREYFUS AMERICA FUND 


SiCAV 

2, Boulevard Royal 
L-2953 Luxembourg 

R.C Uumobonrg B-22S72 


Notice is hereby given to the si lore holders, that the 

ANNl'AI. GENERAL MEETING 

of sliarehulders of DREYFUS AMERICA FUND will be held at the 
company's registered office, 69, route (TEsrh. L-2953 Luxembourg, 
on July "I, 1994 at 2/H) pan. with the following agenda: 

1. Submission of the Report of the Board of Directors and of 
the Auditor: 

2. Approval of the Statements of Net Assets and or tbe 
Statement of Operations for the year ended as id February 28, 
1994: 

3. rUhodinD oTdii irsiits 
4 IKnrharge to the Director*; 

5. Statutory ^pobitments; 

6l IMbcrllaneous. 

The shareholders an- advised that no quorum b required for the 


i tie snarenoldi-rs an- aavrscu trial no quorum r> required lor the 
items nn the agenda of the Annual General Meeting and that 
decisions wifi be taken on a simple majority of the shares present 
or rvpn'sented at die Meeting with no restricts ms. 

in order In attend the annual general meeting, the owners of 
bearer shares will have to deposit their shares five clear day* 
before the meeting at Che registered office of the company or with: 


BANQUE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG 
2, Boulevard Royal 
L - 2953 LUXEMBOURG 


THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


CALLING ONE FOREIGN COUNTRY 

R O M ANOTHER IS NO 


COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


COUNTRIES 


SECRET 


WITH THESE SIMPLE ACCESS 



AFRICA 

M«vn 

taiAMikav 

AMERICAS 

A-geMina 

Srl-zr |HoWi| 

b-.-'ifj [PIT pa. ctisf-t • 

ttiaai 

Canada — 

ChUo 

Cokmbfa - Engliih 
Colombia - Spanish 

Cm*J ftca * 
tE'jO&.t « 

ftSolmdul T 

Gua'-mala » 

A 

Me.'Oj 

Wkorpsun 

ft.HU 

Pwta liu - 
U-S.A, ~ 

Ui. Yi^n Ulnrit - 

Uiucro, 

■ tnul.j. 
Ven-aHo L-torJ J 


csrni. 

0400-99-0001 


■‘flTj .it? 
or. ?.'\ a 

J -800-877-8000 
00*0017 
■S80-I30-010 
910-130-110 


ASIA 

AmmScnn Samoa 

Australia 

AuctraHa 

China 

Hang Kaog 

Henq Kang 3 

India ♦ 

Indanvtia 


Karoo W 
Kama: 

Kama ♦ 

(Corea t 

Mu,.-* ' 

Malayan ♦ 

H .. ■-itt-ii 

thilippinn inn canons only? 
Philippine! I Phi Com I 
Philippine* inert 
Saipan 

Tinian and Kola *L 


1-400477-8060 
1400-8 77-4000 
1-400477-8000 

■r. j i > 
j»>< mi (, 
f.f. mi I 


CARIBBEAN 


*33-1000 
oM-ssn.it 
1-800481477 
108-13 
800-187 7 
Oil 

000137 

001-801-15 

cm* i/i 

009-16 

5SO-FOHE 

0036-13 

SSO-DlAl 

iSKC Cl 
8000016 
Oi". » 
10VO1 
1 03411 
105-16 
O 54333 
1-335-0333 
■OAl 133.1’’ 

0086-14-0377 

■<>; »<■ !.’ C" 


l “W 2ru> ’ 

1 -800-389-71 1 1 


Barbados .3 
fci-raj 1 
Krttish Vapln tsL 5 
Dominican BopuMc A 

JbmanM V- 

NrdNi* la"* Annum » 
SLLodaA 
j> L,-:o 

t-mdsd 5 T jbapoo 

EUROPE 

tudiis + 

Belgium + 

Bulgaria A 

»SJ 

Cim*I»pwbIk + 
Denmark * 

Finland * 

Franco + 

Ocrmany + 

Omasa r 
Hungary V+ 

Iceland *U 

Ireland * 

Italy* 

UachlMiftlmn 4 
Lhhuanla . 

Monaco 4 
Nelberlandi 4 
Nantay 4 
Poland 4 


Page 13 




Frankfurt 

DAK 


London : 
FTSE1G0 index 



1- .. ‘3100 



CAC4a 

.. m ~ — 


Tj/f'-nr i 


'..aw *3 

■■ ■1900 : . ; . ^L r ; ~ V 
■s wjjf*p v ji' rsnr 


Exeftariga . : : .'■Jricfe* ' ' ■ 


Arngtertbun 
Brussels *'.:»■ 


.Cliww -A. ;C|osq 
. 376^9 . " ■582.84 




bWldori : V-;; 
Madrid 'C. A . 


:FA2 • ; 

HE)C'- - Tl" 

FTSEIOO- ” ■ 

— i 

General Index ' 


762.89 

4^64^8. 


'#,'9^82^ +0-73' 
7Gi,n ■ -^ja; 
iJG&JQ* -1.04 ■ 
2,334.60 7 ■ -OJST 
2.971.10 .: *1-04 ' 

! aw33T ” r 535 . 

1,084-tX> ■ • 

Ji9Q3J34 ■ -0,64 
#,7742# -0.14 

44822 ■ ■ -1.26- 
908.74 . •■^.01 

Inffmaiional Herald Tribune 


2r9403®'. 
301.18 ; 


' CAC 40 




the serious campaign of libel 
against me.” 

Mr. Panetti. according to the 
source, said tbe court had or- 
dered an immediate refund of 
the 14 million French franc ($3 
million) fine he had to pay. 

In 1989, Mr. Parretti tried, in 
an alliance with Max Theret lo- 
ves tissement, to seize full con- 
trol of Path& Cinema, of which 
his Pathfc France Holding al- 
ready owned 48 percent. He 
wanted to buy the other 52 per- 
cent from Rivaud Group, but 
the French Economics and Fi- 
nance Ministry vetoed the deaL 

Tbe French group Chargeurs 
finally won Path6 Cinema. 


JSfririthotnH. 
' Vten'iw “‘n- 

Sources: Reuters, 


Stocktndey^' 

ses :V 


jyTmfff #,77a2# 
443LS6 . ■ 448^2 • 
90aS2 '- '908.74 . 


2.971.10 

287-05 

1,084.00 

I^9Q3jQ4 


Very briefly: 


• Wofters Kfuwer NV, one of the three leading Dutch publishers, 
will acquire a 70 percent stake in family-owned Austrian specialist 
publisher Bohmano, but it did not say how much it would pay. 


• Banque Nationale de Paris, France's second-largest commercial 
bank, said it had bought US. derivatives trading company Cooper 
Neff in a move that would double its presence in options trading. 


• Unilever NV said Dutch sales of Onto Power had been harmed 
by Procter & Gamble Co.’s claim that the manganese ingredient it 
contained damaged fabrics, but ii added that sales were beginning 
to pick up. It refused to give sales figures. 


» Air Products & Chemicals Inc. plans to launch a public offer to 
acquire the 75 percent of Carbaros Metfficos SA of Spain that it 
does not already own, Ronald Suflam, the vice president of the 
U.S. company, was quoted as saying. 


• The European Union's trade deficit with the rest of the world 
shrank last year to 1.4 billion European Currency Units (S1.7 
billion) from 51.5 billion ECUs in 1992, mainly because of falling 
deficits in the first three quarters of last year, the EU statistics 
agency, Eurostat, reported. 

• Denmark posted a first-quarter current account surplus of 7.2 
billion kroner ($1 billion), after a surplus of 5J billion in the 
fourth quarter of 1993, the National Statistical Bureau reported. 

• Roche Hofcfing AG's S53 billion bid for Syntex Corp. has been 
cleared by antitrust authorities at the European Commission 
because the pharmaceutical company would face competition in 
the European market The Federal Trade Commission is still 
examining the offer. 

■ French consumer prices edged up 0.2 percent in May, compared 
with the previous month, and rose 1.7 percent over the past 12 
months, tiie national statistics institute INSEE reported. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22. 1994 


i»M«vV5 




Tuesday's 4 p.m. 

This list compiled iy ihe A P. consists of the i.MO 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value K is 
undated twee a year 


■ '•■Pi 

I' 1 -' ■■ * v - :• >; v -va^|§ 





ffi4Xm4J?F4Z?/5£P 

that the International 
Herald Tribune cannot be 
held responsible for loss or 
damages incurred as a re- 
sult of transactions stem- 
ming from advertisements 
which appear in our paper. 
It k therefore recommend- 
ed that readars make ap- 
propriate inquiries before 
sending any money or en- 
tering into any binding 
commitments. 


PERSONALS 


AN UfGANT YOUNG LADY 

Falrji ouyn. ta» -s-cc.ce v w 
raw:, seebr-j pets-wl ci.-sn- " 
dc tmrt-cn (Eu-cp*. USA Udde :='l. 
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ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. i 


VIENNA. AU57TIA. TtJ 7:;.3SrC 
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i 

I MYKONOS, hn os O'Ms ari 
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j «jn. veromfva. 1.100 Sh m. land. 

Grader with high stone wall. } Trge 
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I tff% ?l Dicwrr, USSJ50 00C' Tel YS 
I 1-23K2S2 Fe. 20*i*324’62 , 


NEAR CHANTILLY wjvMiji r<-.> 
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d'niivjs i •cc“fn>-. o<u-: 

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zwnti Imryivnix) (I I *1* '*:■ ■ J 

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. in 40 33 14 33 

1 SWrrZKRLAND 


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Sole to foreigners m thanzed 

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select FROPEtfe « CHALETS 
m MONTSEUX. VIUAn5 
LES 5IA3lEaETS. GST^aD. 
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Ftotr. SFr. 200.000 ts 3.5 trua 
9=V AC S A 

s:. Vor.it-lllcit. Ct- 121 I Gone VC 2 
Tel 4152-7:4 15 40. Fc* '34 ” 20 

R£\L ESTATE ' 

TO RENT/SH.ARE 

PARIS aRFA Fl'RNISMt'D 


rttOPERUES 

Friday* June 24 

/ n /»;• i/v .•;/.■■■ • rnuil;- •>!. 

•r /■. /*/«.v »f/.‘ if./. t</// i7't IHTfn Fit ns: 

Td.: ( I ) -id 3" 93 8=i 
r:ix: ( I ) ^6 3" c ‘3 ™«» 


/wawrf carlo 

IE GRAND LARGE ffertvwW. wped, 
? 3 beefroevn nrarttwnr t?X *j.ir. en- 
ftrdy lYeroroW Inatv fen eve. (ooazi. 
sea »vw. 7 ucxe room zrd ? pai- 
mg spaces iH 15 } " 

AAGEDI 

’.'5 Be ties Mtriu iWC®flRV .Mcwewi 
Td 33-92 165<>5? ftw 33-9350 l a rt 


PARIS & SL'BURBS 


Sth, COl&S ALBERT 1BR 

Ownei sets 700 sq,m. aporrmeri 
■r pcrVng 8 m«h' room. 
Large recevnon nee, 5 bedroom 
with bartv tvum To be redecorated 
701:11)44 33 67 15 
Fm: (1) 44 07 07 63 


PARIS 

"BETTR THAN A HOTEL" 


S'' '.if- .) 

Intornallonal 

OffEK YOU !! 

QUALITY APART M&1T5 
• Linur/ fumetied 
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* Special rates fo> long nays 
• h ham of “the 5«n«” 

8 Close to the Etflti Tower 
and ‘"TroraJero" Squ«»e 
Pnom starting at U3S700 per weak 
For farther inramwtim 6 raservation 
ad 1-4525 9501. Fax 1-4288 2991 


MONTAIGNE, 95 sq.m. 

V'i-c* ti’ trier, • f-r-s 
decaann dqi'i rg. ril.Ki ik' 

FRANCOIS m (Near). 

l-i-SJ* iS iom 

CCfe-iT«i:"i T i' **5 £9 02 52 
or rzs (i; 4* 65 44 13 


PARIS LA C5FENSE 1 
RESIDENCE CAP.TEL 


Td 132-T ' 41 25 16 lo 
fa. 1 23-1) -=1 25 16 15 


AGENCE CHAMPS EYSffi 

:zrC ■“ 

i;i^ " ~ :n-»i ^.r-i r-y-. 

Td: [J] 42 25 32 25 

ha (1) 45 M 37 09 


74 CHAMPS arSEES 

CU^IDGE 

FOR 1 WHK OR MORE V.gh dms 

irjdn?. 2 o« ’-reevn asijiimenv FULLr 
Sijm^fcD 1V.VEDIATE RES?VaT10N9 
T«l: (11 44 13 33 33 


5!h, CHARMING r.-wee m.s«. 

I z~:\. -{•? . bi~c--» i 

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. 16th. VIEW ON SBNE new rv 

l crrrtr-r Imrg - i Morocm. 

: - i.y.< m; 

STC= FDX'NG ABOUT A ROOF. 

.;e*. L:---* "»**r 

£tn. FACING ELY 553. :s: : -e-e 
-.-re; --.ere : -I>? '- 
: :-. ‘t i'. - 

PARIS *.RFA lAR-RMSHED 

RUE Cr LA FONTAINE. "-I m- 

. xr. :;"3: “SyM \f-.i 

! -7 4~ -;r am c ; v, 

(7th], AV3WE D= SUFKtBf. .*: . 

I ;**.h*. "X cc- : •. 

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- - rc-r- -I W - 

% 03 -4 

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* ! -jgti :i^. 6-~ tocm. 5 beccc-: 5 
i ec"? 3 -z : .liow 2«K >3- 
I eiclosee icnc Swimnnj eii!. 
i pci' rsrtn ?ei *2 k~70 0*. 

j Paris 2nc - map place dss 

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CAuSfoEB 0 *"* F °*" 1Ba * 

wCo nsnder Emer. Groudh I iZsX 

w Coflander F-AbiI 5 14546 

iv Callander F-Amirkv. *< ]?« rv 

vCdlmdK F-5uanMn pm 91121* 

w Crtion rfer f -us Heoftn Cores 57.08 

* cm Kinder Svrise Growiti__5F litis 

CAMPBBLL (BERMUDATlTD 
wGlbf Institutional 13 June I J 93843 

CAM ADIAM IN TERNATIONAL GROUP 
d Cl Canadian Growth Fd. cj *i» 

a Cl Mnrttl tnerimn Fd r« iii 

0 Cl Pastfle Fund r* 

I) Cl ObM) Flint . <■» l et 

2 £! f mwaMq rfcaw Fd c* »J)I 

tfGEnnumi Fk n Ul 

rf Canada Guar.Maitsaae Fd a IMI 


CAPITAL INTERN ATIONAL 

wCnclial inti Fund^^^H 

wCoclwu italic « 


13AM 

*425 


-FF 

_FF 


n Abta GU prp Trad MOV 1 
mAMia Gtobol FcMMavJi I — 
mAteho hedse Fd (May 31|_S 
ffllHe Jam Seex tAar 30) _J 
mAUta Latin Artier 1 Apr 30 1 A 
mAlcta Poefflc Fd iMayrtl Jt 
IB AW SAM - e 

irAUw Shan Fd (Mov 31) s 

tnAUn ShNT Fta inc/Mar 313 

mAUn TUidole Fd (May 31) 3 

m AlrtM Wtorttrinaton Wm Ills 
m aucd-AWw EurMds Moy 3< Eca 
ni GMotveat v«w {May Jl) J 
w MelM Japan Fend Y 

mMemnahere Neutral May 31* 

tn Udln*ey vntue (Mov 31 J_S 
mNIOiAnpi Aurrilo (May 31 j J 
mPoclt RIMOwiBVl JunMJ 
m FMneoen mn Fund/May 31 J 

mSaoe Inti Fd (May 31 1 s 

m solus inn Fd IMavin : 

ARRAL ASSOCIATES LTD 

w Arrtd Amerten Quant Fd_I 

ivArroJ Aston Fun d S 

*r Arr« inn Hedse Fund I 

BAIL n Piece veadome. 7SMI Parts 

mlaterraartcai Fund S 

/ Interaftl Converl Bds FF 

interpNi mn Bds s 

r llderpin OOU CanuertttUes-S 
Iptymtemei Multtanriln cy Fund 
melon A FF 

jncm-nB __ t 

m Cults C . y 

BANK BRUSSELS LAMBERT 03-1) SO 2DD 


DIM 
25147 
3QU0 
9 3M 
ntLTT 
42IJU 

2B&m 

Z7SA0 

41074 
121 A 1 
ttif 
1 10.47 
17195 
IDE. 15 
1S2JB 
12SJ0 
17301 
tom 
WJB 
17199 
303J4E 
97^ 
111J7 
107. 12 

U42 

374AI 

31023 

57353 
7790. 12 


CHEMICAL IRELAND FUND ADMIMISTRA 
353-1 U 13«3 

m Korea 2151 Century Invt s ; » 

w The reflow Sea invtCo s 1020 

Cl NOAM BRAZIL FUND 
d Ctndani EmiHv Fund — 

dOnean Battrced Fond 

CITIBANK (LUXEMBOURG) 5A. 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


1 by hmda Baud. Not mot wUm quo 


tqr Hie Finds Bated wMi ttw uceapUea of ■ 


lha HMfglBel eymboM tn cB ca U fcaq u a na s of quotaHom m m iHiF (dl- dMhr. fta| ■ mm My; (b| • BLowaBity; (I) lortMshtfr [ r f ‘-if M- 


EliROPA FUNC 

d American Eaulty Fund. 
d Amertcmi Option Funa_ 
i* Asian Eaultv Fd. 


Idu 

BJD 

Mai 

25444 

1*477 

127.19 

11191 


wEureaean Eaulir Fd i 

EVEREST CAPITAL <N9| 2R ZZM 

at Evernt Capital I nil LM X I3&.9S 

FIOELITY INTI IMV. SERVICES (Lin) 

0 Discovery Fund S 7001 

d For East Raw-. I M.10 

d FhLAmer, Assets l*M7 

d FM. Amer. Vofuei iv S iijvmsb 

d Frantu Fund — .1 1555 

0 Global Ind Fund 3 19.02 

d GtoljG’ Sc t:-clltn> Funa__J 7307 

a Hrw Eurmr Fund I I3J4 

d Orient Funa .A IJ6B1 

d jpecial Crowrn Fund S *1*7 

a worm *■■"<« * tisoj 

F HUMAN AGEME NT SA-LMono<4121 7239312) 

*v DelW Premlom Coro 5 lajttt) 

FOKUS BANK AJL 472 428 $55 
w StaaLtnnds Inti Gnwtn Fd J 
FOREIGN K COLONIAL E MERC MKTS LTt 


d EuruuoutL. 


uus 

25*1 

IIQJ6 

guinness Flight int'l accum fd 

a Dtutscnemark Money DM 89AM 

d US Dollar Money .. I 38533 

d US Dollar Hwh Yd Sand S 24. W 

d Inn Balanced Grin 1 25.9« 

HASENBICHLER ASSET MANGT teMUH. 

w HaientHtMcr Cam AG 1 6VOJK. 

wHaienMenier com Inc— S 12L29 

~ Haiwmvhm D.U . t 13905 

-AFFT 1. 1471 00 

HDF FlMANCE.TdI33-))WU*3LF0X«aMMSS 
■vMlinHh'mOFi.v nn. CC 1277.14 

nr Monnmma Cniteonce FF M7IUS 

w- MonUnvini Opn iniies FF 178SA1 

■vMmSnvesi EmeroGrmmi.FF 1330.9 a 

IV Monamvnf Fufum FF 122558 

HEPTAGON FUND KV UBmiSBSSl 

/ Heptaoan QLB Fund 5 0994 

NA 




d attaivest CJatU Band, 
d Oilmen FGP USD. 
d Cltlmesl FGP ECU. 
d OtlnveD Setactar. 


.Ecu 


d OHcnrrmcte USD % 

d aucurrendes Deal- dm 

d CBlcurreacics GBP— t 

a OUcurrencta Yen ■ Y 

d atlnprt NA. Eadty S 

d atlport com. Euro Eaudv^Eai 

0 ailMin UK Equity £ 

d Cltluorl French EquHy FF 

2 £iL tDor ' German Eaulty DM 

d Otfoori japan Equity v 

d atlpon 1APEC _ r 
0 attoorl gamer — A 


K35M 

22SJ5 

51T87W 


d Citlcon HA I Bend- 

0 Ortpon Euro Bond 

d M onanea Currency Fund. 
ernaANK (PARIS) 5A 

IV OH 94 Cop GW 

/ cm GW Allan MkfsFd 

CJTITRUST 

wuss Equities 

p US 3 Money Markai 

WUSlBanaS 

lean hind 


-Ecu 


97J3 

120BM 

1229.96 

1414*4 

163471 

14222 

16231 

1240000 

22938 

TOM 

134U9 

I329A8 

08*7 

509430 

22SJ8 

18455 

15439 

14555 

K3J1 

972401 


a BHL Invest America . 

d BBL Invest Betotum—. 
d BBL Invest Far East— 

d BBL invest Asia 

d BBL invest Latin Amer. 

d BBL Invest UK 

a BBL Renta Fd mtl 

d Patrhnailoi. 


d Renta Cdsh S-Medfam BEFBF 
d Renta Cadi S-Medhm DEMDM 
d Renta Caw SMedJum USD I 
d BBL (LI Inv Goldmines— S 

d BBL (L> Invest Europe LF 

rf BBL (L) Inv Euro-lmma LF 

d BBL (U) Invest World— LF 
BANOUE BELSE ASSET MBMT FUND 

Share Otstrtfcrtar Gueroey (Ml TUOA 

m Inrt Equity Fund (Stcuv) I 

er Int’l Bond Fund tSknv] S 

w Dollar Zone Bd RJ 1 Siam) J 
ir Asm Pnctflc Reohm Fd _ LS 
iv Indta « 

w Star hob Bd Fd (StamT^ld 
BANOUE (NDOSUEZ 
w Tho Draoon Fund Slcov — 5 
m Japan GW Fd A OT/BS/wj j 
m Japan GM Fd B (31/D5/94U 
mDunl Futures Fd a A Unites 
m Duet Futures Fd a C Unites 
mMaxtam Put Fd Ser. 1 a AS 
mMmtlmn Fut Fd Ser. 1 a BS 
ra Maxima Fat FdSer.2a.CS i 

m Maximo Flit FdSer. 3d DI 1 

mlndosuez Curr. Cl A Unite S 

m Indowee Ourr. f 
ivlPNA-3. 


48820 

1717636 

3899400 

62444 

53039 

TTlLf. 

yw/iff 
2031400 
120041 J» 
3011*8 
51*440 
ISAM 
13539JW 
101*530 
3*3*30 


(nonperformance phi 

iv The Good Earth Fund S 

CQMGEST (334)447075 II 
iv Comoest Asia. 




lEurooe- 

FUND | 


conBMBI 

0 WAM GMxd ItadaeHi 
b WAM mil Bd Hedge Fd 
CONCERTO LI M/ TED 

I w NAV J] MOV 


-SF 


COWER ASSET MANAGEMENT 
COwen Entrrprbe Fund K.V. 

vCkmAShs 3 

NCtassBShS S 

CREDIT AGRICOLE 

INDEXIS 

a Index Is USA/UP 500 t 

d hKksctoJwon/NHckei— ' Y 

d Index)* G BrettFTSE t 

d Indexte Fronra/CAC <8 FF 

a Index Is C.T. FF 

MOHAXIS 

d Court Terme USD. 
d Court Term* DEM 
d Court Terme jpy. 
d Court Terme GBP 
d Court Tenne FRF 
if Cdurt Terme ESP 



.Ecu 


I B Units S 


0 ISA AslMi Growth Fund 3 

d ISA Jcman Rea Growth Fdjr 
d ISA Podfic Gold Fund___s 
if ISAAftm Income Fund — S 
d Induua Korea Fund S 

‘ I Fund. 


Shanriial Fut 

Mwmakrran F 

w Manna Fund 


Fuad. 


iv Malacca FOnfl. 


wStam Fund- « 

d indesm Hang KmiB FumLJ 

d Orteptal Venture Trust i 

d North American Trust $ 

d Smew & Malay Trust. f 

d PadflcTrwi ; ; hks 

i Fund— i 


d Court Terme ECU 
M05AIS 
d Actions Inti Dlverslftees— FF 
d Actions HtrdAmerlcalwn J 
d Actions Japonotses _Y 

d Arflom AmXnKr-i . I 

if AcftansAHamcndes DM 

d Acttons Francotata. 
if Actions Em ft Part. 

d Actions ItanwmiK 

d Actions Bassin PacHlque I 

d ObBa mn Diversineea — ft 
d ObOg Jtont-Amerlcnlnes— _ S 
d OMta Jopon>ises_— _y 

d ObBa Anokdses 1 

a ObUBAUemandts. 


d ObBa Em 4 Pori 

d ObDD Convert, tatem. FF 

d court Terme Ecu . . _ Fa 

d Court Terme USD i 

d Court Terme FRF FF 


259 >4277 
16*5909 

17.01848 

144157411 

15.10116 

njnzi 

127537 

120553 

106950 

98*71 

9358 


109494 

167795 


1154 

1894.19 

128* 

14ia 

11437 

1*38 

3891 

22M.65 

\1XI 

Taw 

29*855 

1991 

13406 

2334 

175420 

1123 

»a 

11634 

3552.99 

3478336 

an 

i 

1854 

229ia 

13a 

38.97 

146*) 

261153 

14*31 

2207 

17a 

14222 


d TUBftBI 

d JaponFi 


Fund. 


vUmmUTmI 4 

d Gartmore Japan mirram_S 

iv indasuez Htati YW Bd FdAJ 
UMaSMZHttiYM MFdl 


... . COMMERCIAL DP FRANCE 

d Elysoes Maaetdre FF 90257a 

d San Acttcnsli USD B S 1187a 

CREDIT SUISSE 

d Band Vidor " 
d Bond Valor. 

If Band Vo*or Yen. 


-US- Dollar. 

• D-Mark dm 


wirmuwz 

6 MaxIEw — 

“rSSBETB 



934B3C0 
588852 
478 931 
957 

SUJ55E-OCNKVA 
7SB2 
SF 21*4* 

SF 16*24 

dit bank- 

10255 
mi9 
9*1* 
9X73 
98.U 
10S20 
10477 
91.1B 
10873 
1B3M 
HGJ9 
M3L» 


d Bond Valor [Starting. 
d Convert Valor SM. 


-SF 


d Convert VMor US - DoUor _J 

d Convert Valor C Sterling c 

d CSF I— nwHmiM « 

d Actions Sulssea SF 

d Credh SmO+MM dm ; 

d EuropoV ' 


ssr. 


Hong Kona. Tel: IBS) 

d Odna (PRC). 

0 Hons Kara — 

’ Indonesia 


s.r 608 


d 1 

g^S- 

i 


12816 

12894 

10413 

TX737 

25338 

2*955 

11198 

3*331 

33.44* 



Tel : London on *2B 1231 
d Araenllnfan Invest Co Slcov* 

d Brazilian invest CoSkajv i 

a CMamSlon Invest Co Slcav-1 

d Indian Invest Co Slcov 3 

d Latin Amer Extra Yield FdS 
d Latin America income Co -5 
d Latu American invest Cn_» 

d Mexican Invest Co Slcov i 

d Peruvian Invest Co Slcov $ 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 
PA. Bax TOOL Hamilton. Bermuda 

mFMG Global (31 Mov) S 

mFMG N. Amer. 1)1 May) 5 

mFMG Europe (31 May) I 

mFMG EMC MKT (II Mov]_S 

m FMG Q 131 Mar) * 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 
w Conceals Forex Fund— s 
GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

i* Gala Hedge 11 s 

w Gala Hedge III S 

wGdaSwtH Franc Fd SF 

wGAIAFx. 


m Gala Guaranteed Q. I _ 

mGalo Gunronfeed Cl. II 

GARTMORE INDOSUEZ FUNDS WM/M 
Tel; (352J 46 54 M 470 
Fn» . 057) 46 54 23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 
d OEM Pon d n lliil 

d DlverOond .Dtt2*a_ 

d Dollar Bond DU2J4_ 

d European Bd DIs t.16 _ 

d French Franc_Drt KL07. 

d Gtahal Band D«IM _ 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 
d ASEAN. 


2*81 

2825 

1*71 

11*2 

1006*1 

9.99 

HUB 

3876 

1*27 


1852 

11*7 

9-45 

1800 

12148 

12*4 

47a 

10*59 

8436 

8X27 


d Asia Pacific- 


d Coaltnenial Europe— 
0 DevewolnB Markets. 
d France. 


d Gemumy. 


d NomtAinertca- 
dSwtb... . 

d united K t i m ta uv - 
RESERVE FUNDS 

d DEM Db5A33_ 

d Dollar 015 2891-. 

d FrenO) Franc 

d Yen Reserve. 


-DM 

oJts 

JF 

*01 

JS 

263 

-Ecu 

U7 

-FF 

1271 

J 

261 

J 

*47 

J 

46C 

.Ecu 

162 

J 

4J7 

JF 

MUSI 

_DM 

5J9 

4 

242 

-Y 

29500 

JS 

248 

SF 

301 

4 

140 

-DM 

*307 

S 

2.166 

FF 

12_7f 

Y 

287.9 


DEF1NOR FUNDS 
Londen:7i-4994l 7lAeneva:fl-2}735S30 

w ScoiHsh World Fund t -utupu 

w State SI. Amertaxi I 34.97 

GENESEE FUND Lid 

w IAI Genesee Eaule 5 MUS 

w IBi Genesee short I 6&M 

w (C) Genewo Oamrturdty 3 1578) 

iv(F) Genesee Non-EauDy S 14*19 

GEOLOUOS 

.ECU 166583 
SF W29J09 


r II Stralghl BandB 

w II Porlflc Band B „ 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
11 Altai SlJDaugtatJ of Ntan 464^426037 


wGAMerfco- 


ivGAM Artritraoe- 


■v GAM ASEAN, 
w GAM AdShml 
wGAMBtgton - 
nGAM-CoralU Mlnnotonta— S 

w GAM Combined DM 

w GAM Cross-Market I 

wGAM Euroaear S 

w GAM France— —rF 


w GAM Fronc-voL. 

WGAMGAMCO 

iv gam High Yield. 
IV GAM East Asia- 
wGAM Jaxm. 


-SF 


w Gam Money Mk)s USL— i 

d Do sterttng t 

d Do Swiss Franc- 


d Da DautBChemari DM 

d On Yen Y 

w gam Aiwcmed Min -fb i 

wGAM Emera MMsMKt-Fd-s 

w GAM Mib- Europe USS. S 

IV GAM MlfFEurape DM DM 

w GAM Mitt-Global USS. 3 

IV OAM MNMJS 


m GAM Trading DM_ 
wGAM Trading USS. 


l Overseas. 


m GAM PWHIC 

w GAM Relative value % 

w GAM Selection s 

smaflB 

W jAW 


d C5 ECU Bond Al 
d CS Eco Band BH 
d C5GuM«i BondAl 
d a Guidon Bond 
tf CSHHpononertaEdA 
d CS Hfcptxto ibartaHNi 
d Cs Prime Band AHH 
d CS Prime Bond ■■ 
dOEwoMA^ 

if C5Fbced I EcoSXta^l 
dS Swiss Franc Bond a^H 
dCSSwfn Franc Band B — SF 

d CS Bond Fd Lire A/B Ut 

d CS Bund Fu pesetas a/b Ptas 

d CS Germany FMAmtata 
d CS Gerinoiw HN8H 
d CS Euro Blue Ch*w A 
d CS Euro Blue Cuba b| 
dCSShort-T.BaodSA| 
d a Start-T.BandsB^HH 
d S Short-T. Band DM a__Dm 



“■a r™**™"**^**] iaassa«gt=f“ 

uMam Hse DadusOuh. 4471*384008 I d cs Money Mortal Fd DM — DM 
I Bond— — - — * ia» 




_ Imrestmente, 
«v GAM Value. 

wr 


iWhiteltam. 
i worldwide- 


BandUSSOrd s 

” ! USSSoecW J 

Ml GAM 



<59.18 

399a 

42833 

27092 

329a 

10254 

12980 

107.98 

fUB 

177580 

y*Lt9 

21425 

15849 

70943 

921*7 

iota 

102.10 

101.70 

10239 

1003*00 

16230 

16381 

127.16 

127JU 

17575 

12X55 

16*23 

160J# 

94185 

10731 

61831 

71188 

13099 


07528 

17945 

19403 

67880 

14*42 

18445 

IMU3 

14*1400 

11771 

15530 

is?a 

149.13 

335a 


KISS REGISTERED FUNDS 4M-422 2t36 
oensffttsae TOCH 003*2uricn 


HERMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda. 18091295 4000. Lux : (353)404 *4*1 
Final Prices 

m Hermes Ewaaaan Fund— Ecu 
m Hermes Hariri American FdS 
m Herme s Aston Fund. 


m Hermes Emerg Mkfs FmxLS 

m Hermes sira'evtes Fund 5 

m Hermes Neutral Fund— I 

m Hermes Global Fund I 

m Hermes Band Fund Ecu 


34181 
59227 
38124 
171 JO 
69*67 

lisa 

644JB 

176124 

107.94 

415a 


CANADIAN DOLLS R PORTFOLIO 
0 Careoorv a. «v 

d Cairoorv B CS 

CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 
a Class A-l « 

a Clmc 2.7 « 

d ciaw a« s 

a Class b-3.. 


9*1 

1880 

9.97 


4yi W-twtaa unUn M- maathly. 

0 RO Money Plus F 8 S IMbt 

d HG Money Phis F DM DM 111-9? 

d BG Money PhaFSF 2SF h)7J» 

Mere Rabece see Aimteranm Stacks 
ROTWCHILD^OUPBDMONDDE) 


INCOME PORTFOLIO 
d Class A. 
d CiauB. 


dPacHInvtl 


DEUTSCHE IVMRr. PORTFOLIO 

e Caieaory a Lbyi 

d Coiraarr B- ,_em 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO 1DMI 

d ClimA.I . . * |4>U 

d Cln« A.S e Hn 

d Class B-1 S 1*04 

oacrsse-; — — s isa 


wADrreCnn TrSntan^SiF^F 


EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (U») 

a Class A-l DM 

d Class A ? DM 

a Class * 

dCtas? B-? S 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 
d Category A -i 


m Hermes Starting Fd 

m Hermes Geld Fund 

INCOME PARTNERS (ASIA) LIMITED 
iv Aslan Fixed income Fd—S HUBS 

INTER INVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
UeBMnd Bermuda. Tel : NX 29S 4aoe 
mHidae Hue 6 Conserve Fd_s 948 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
l Bd Royal 1-7449 Luxcmhaurg 

■vEiPWWSodE Ecu 91 a 

INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 

d Amertque OuNmd S 1BBJ7 

a Europe ConKnonlase—DM 101 J? 

d Extreme Orient AnahnoxonAS 10057 

O Fmnrm ec 50*05 

d mme- I H 10305200 

d Zone Asknique— ____Y ipnia 

INVESCO INTL LTD, POE 771 Jersey 
Tec 44 534 73114 
d Maximum Income Fund. 

d Starling Mngd PHI 

d Pioneer Markets 


d OKcean Global Srroten/ 
d Asto Super Grantti 
d Nippon Warrant . 

d Asia Tiger Warrwit 

d European w uiran l Fund, 
d GM N.W. 1994. 


PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 

a American Growth 1 

d American EnMrnosa S 

a Asm Tiger Growth 1 

a Dollar Reserve- 


d European Gnwrth—_—S 
d European Enterprise —S 
d Global Emerging Markets-* 

d Global Growfb. S 

d Nippon Enterprise— —i 

d NlrxxMl Growth S 

d UK Growth- 


d Sterling Reserve t 

d North American Warrant— S 

d Greater Chino Qpps 3 

ITALFORTUNE INTL FUNDS 
•y Class A lAggr. Growth ItoLIS 

w Class B (Global Equity), 4 

iv Claw C iGtoftr Bondi s 

■v Class DIEcu Bond). 


0.9300 

2.IIM' 

5.9000 
175100 
7*4000 

17000 

*5088 

2.9000 
94500 

*un 

vjooo 

11.7200 

52900 

5-1400 

*2<W 

B-WOO 

54400 

*3500 

5*200 

52000 

*3400 

77800 

8256000 

1T.9* 

II JM 
10.94 


JARDINE FLEMING . GPO Box 1 1448 Hg Kg 

d JF ASEAN Trust- 3 5X73 

d JF For East wml Tr S 7*42 

d JF Global torn. Tr S K08 

d JF Hong Kong Trust S wm 

d JF Japan Sm. Co Tr.__Y 5554880 

d JF Jamm Trust Y 1374100 

d JF Malaysia Inra .. s 7*65 

d JF Poemc Inr.Tt s 1L2S 

dJFThanand Trust S j6.0x 

JOHN GOVETT MART (LOJAJ LTD 
Tel: 4*624 - 62 94 20 
iv Gavett Ntan. Futures . 
wGavrtNHBn.Fut.ua 
w Gavett 1 Gear. Curr. 


d Calegorr B 

US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d Category A 


YEN I 

d Careen nr A- 


Ul 

10.19 

10.12 

1542 

isa 


wPrlChMtanee5wlssFd SF 

b PrlemPlv Fd-Eurepe £.t 

b Prteoullv FiFHehtefla SF 

b PrlMUlTv Fd- Latin Am— » 

O Prlbood Fund E at Ec 

o Prtaend Fuad usd t 

O PrtbOM FdHY Emer HinJ 

■vsotecuve invest SA j 

B Source » 

w US Bond Plus t 

w Vorwahis Ecu 


MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

1 Class A 1 21.77 

0 Class B I 21 J4 

US FEDE PAL SECURITIES PTFL 

d Class A s 

d Class B S 

MERRILL LYNCH 
EQUITY ? CONVERTIBLE SERIES 
BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 
0 firm A S MJ] 

0 Cless 3 S 145* 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

0 Class A S 14J1 

d Cm " 4 1180 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL I USS) 

d T.Uvrt a « 

d rmu n « 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

rf ClaasA — . S 1042 

d Ctass 8 ,J 9a 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

d Class A S | 

d Class E % I 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

d Class A S f 

0 Class B * 1 

WORLD NATUPAL RESOURCES PTFL 

dCtassA S 11J1 

d Class B S 1141 


ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DEI 
OTHER FUNDS 
d Askr/Japan Emcrg. GnowniS 

wEwtt Eur Parm inv Tsf Ear 

w Eirrpp Stnntg Irrvestm ta^Ecu 
b Integral Futures. 


*151 

unibb 

IOOAS4 

1033773 

250441 

linn 

96004 

113*95 

118963 

105436 

13*129 

116463 

11*720 

11S92S 

341 jas 
1821*48 
938429 
198*37 


1742550 

133941 

RHlSK 

96044 

192.137 

16*999 

84* 

272556 

8122144 

53J1.®9 


DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

a Class A 

d Class B 


I5JI 

1548 

152 

*57 

BS 


MERRILL LYNCH INC S PORTFOLIO 

a Class A * 

d Class R s 

a Class c s 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN tNC PORT 

d Mexican Inc S nit Cl A 1 97} 

d Mer:m lues PHI Cl B S 977 

d Mevfcsn inc Peso PHI Ci A5 B70 

d Mexican me Peso pwi Ci bb asa 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
iv Momentum Nave liter Perl-J 92a 

m Momentum Rolnhow Fd I 11749 

mMomenlum RxR R.U S 8377 

m Momentum Stock master —5 15646 

MORVAL V0NWILLER ASSET MGT Co 


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SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 

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w Republic GAM America S 1(193 

w tap GAM Em MHS Global 5 13743 

w Rat GAM Em Mkte Lai Ami nils 

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w Republic lm Am Aflac s #8.74 

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w Republic LM Am BraBt S 10*70 

w Republic Lot Am Mexico— S leiTS 

w Republic Lot Am Venez. i 9153 

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SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 
mCWnmonder Fund- . . S 101.029 

m Explorer Fund— ___5 1O4JA0 

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5-E-BANKEN FUND 

d Europe in c-- . — 1 055 

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d Global Inc s un 

0 UakcmedM Inc 5 050 

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d miiio mt. 


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■vGaveftl Glbi BaL Hdae- 
JULIUS BAER GROUP 
9 taMw hruut 
d Canbar. 


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dS« 


a Uarribaer- 


% 

_SF 


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_Ecu 

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UNION BAHCAIRE ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
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w Mourtiwts Cbmhmitd. 

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w Quonllnvest 9J. 
w Sttinlivvea — 
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wUrsinvest. 


UNION BAHCAIRE ASSET MOT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL, LUXEMBOURG 

to UBAM S Bond „S 

to UBAM DEM Bond DM 

to UBAM Emerging Growth _S 

to UBAM FRF Band FF 

to UBAM Germmi* _ n il 


249043 1 
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r Inn 

d interfimd SA 

d nut Network Inwt. 
d Investa DwS. 


w Japan Padnc Fuad — 
m Japan Selection Asses- 

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wKMGtabbL 


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w Korea Grawth Trust * 
w La Fayette HokSngi Ud S 

b Lb Fayetir Regutor Growths 

m Ln Jolla w* Grth Fa L« s 

b Loterman: Offshore Strut _s 

to Leal Slcov s 

m Leu Performance Fd s 

wLF International. 


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er Lux fund. 


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toMIMuitFSfroicgy- 


-SF 


to MJCtnodon Offshore. N.V. 

m Master Cm* Hedge Fd 
nr Matterhorn Offshore ~ 
w MB E Japan Fund 


-LF 


-Ecu 


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UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND/IHTRAG 
tf Amen cc 

a Bond-tnvest 
d Brlt-lrwesi 

d Canoe 

d Coovrrf-lnvest 
d D-Mark- invest 
d Del lor -invest— 
d E nerate- Invest 
d Escac 



d Eurh. 


*95 


m NCF DEM. 
mNCF CHF _ 
(PNCF FRF- 

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m NCF BEF. 


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.Y 

_BF 


82*95 

8*589 

95*79 

446*80 

33695J0 

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d Bond OEM Acc. 

d Band DEM Inc 

d Bond Dollar US Acc. 
d Band Dollar US lnc_ 
d Curr. us Dollar. 


d Hehrettnvest 

C ttaltand-invest. 
d Hoc. 


mMcGMnK Gtobol (Mov Hi_3 

mMCM Ini Limited S 

wMinemtum Intermikinal—S 
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m Altanentun GuiM Ltd s 

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wMuttttutvres FF 

d New Millennium Fut. Ltd —s 

d HewbanL Debenturas S 

mHMT Aslan SeL PorttD»D-_S 

w Noble Partners Inti Ltd l 

m N5P PJ.T, LM S 

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m Opteoa Overseas Partners _S 

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to Panda FlmdPIc- 


ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
?1 Grosvener SILrbi WIX 9FE44-71^*29»8 


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to Oder European—— ___ 8 

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h Oder Europ Growth Acc — DM 

»* Oder EuroGrtnsterinc t 

to CVK i E i>ra Grin SlerAcc— 1 
OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL INC 


13153 

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139a 

14079 

MM 

sun 


d Curr. Swedish Knmar Sek 

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w SF BcndSAUSA & 

toSF Bands B Germany DM 

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Mlltams House Homlltan HMll, Bermuda 
297181? Fo«: 809 794-2305 


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to Finsbury Group 


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> Japan Hew Genoro (ton t 

iMatay&al 


to North America. 
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to Podfic Fund. 

w iBtenwrtonal Bond. 

tv Eurapa Fond. 

to Hong K019. 


w Globed H^BE 
iv Latin AmerfcnJ 

to Currency Fix:-, ■ 

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DM TOM I 

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w Winch. Hlog inti Ser D.— .Fcu 

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to LG Japan Fd $ HUB 

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rf Jopanese Yen. 


Future* Fund S 

_ Hmo Global Fund -J 

i* Optima Penata Fit Ltd— 4 

to Optima Short Fund Jt 

- -■ ■ Fd Lid S 

~ FUNDS 

rf Oraittx Hecim sTemnr Fd-S 
d CirWte. Jnoan Small C cn Fdl 

0 Orblit . NDhircl Fes fc CS 

FACTUAL 

d fuMVK- S 

o :r.twirrFio>3L*a i 

rf Slur High yield Fd LW 5 

PARI8AS-GR0UP 

m ( into s 

tf Porvesi USA B, 


_Y 

J 

-Ecu 


tf Fteund Sterling — 

d Deutsche Mart 

d Dutch Florin 

d HY Eurp Currencles- 
d Swiss Franc- 


rf US Dollar Shan Term, 
rf HY Euro Curr Dhnd Po 
d Swtas MplitairrencY— 
d European Currency — 

d Belgtan Franc — 

d Convertible 

d French Franc. 


rf Swiss Muhmhiidmd — 
rf Swiss Franc Shon-Tenn. 
d Cancdlret Dollar. 


d Dutch Florin Multi __ 
d SwIm Franc Divld Ptfr 

rf CAD MulUCUT. Dtv 

d Med t rerrcnecn Curr 

d ConverfHdes- 


FdS 

943 

-GROUP 


s 

3224 

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:4.73 

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Y 

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154* 

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lira 

s 

1289 

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nos 

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1c67 

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13*27 

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15475 

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941 

— 4F 

I07JG 

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13 II 

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144! 

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_n 

11.78 


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MALABAR CAP MGMT (Bermodo) LTD 


m Malabar tort I 

man INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 
mMAit Limited ■ Ordinary — j 

mMinf Umlied ■ income s 

m Mint GtdLJd- Spec tsur_S 

mMlm Gld Ltd-No* 2002 S 

mMlnlGM LW- D«c 1994 S 

mM'm Gtd Ltd -Aug JS 

in MM Gtd CuiTencto^ S 

m Mliri GM Currencies 7001 — % 

mM IntSpResUd(BNP) 5 

m Athena Gtd Futures 

rn Athena GW Curreadn S 

m Athena GW Fwonacls IncJ 
m Athena Gld Financials Car i 

rn A HL COpItol MUs Fd 5 

m AHL Commodirv Fund S 

m AHL Currency Fund. 


1*95 

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27a 
22.43 
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d Porv« Asia Pool B_ 
d Pqrvesl Europe B 

d Pori-est Hcliand B 

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J ParvMI Gernyri > B 

d Porvesi Gbti-Do'lDT s . 

d Pcrsesi OMI-OM B 

J harvest Obti-ren b 

J Porvesi Ool I- Gulden a 
d Porvesi OWL Franc B_ 

d Porvesi OtHFSlcr B 

tf Parvasi Obit-Ecu B — 
tf Porvesi OMFBriuv B_ 
d Porvesi 5-T Dollar b . 

O Por/esl S-T Eurooe B. 

tf Porvesi S-T DEM B 

d Porvesf S-T Fp.F B 

tf Porvesi 5-f Ser B BF 

rf Pcrves! Gtobol b LF 

d Parvtrt ini Bond 3 jt 

a Porvesi otxHJra B Lit 

rf Porvesi lm Equities B S 

rf Porvesi Ur: B. 


d Pcrvesi USD Pigs B — 

i F5r*esl5-TCHFa 

rf Porvesi Obti-Ccnoaa B_ 

rf Porvesi ODlf-DKK S 

PERMAL GROUP 

I Drakkar Growth N V 

' emerging MkWH Was— 
/ EuroMlr recui Lfd. 


.CJ 

.DAK 


Fa, f incnclats * Futures J 

Investment Hldgs N.v 5 

i MecLJ & Communlcallons^S 
r llnsral L:a _ _ | 

PICTET & CIE • GROUP 

w P CF UK Vd (LUX) 1 

w P.CF Germovol (Luv) — D* 

** P.C.F Noramvoi ILu»l A 

wPX-F VoiioerfLiP) Pf 

w P.CF VolHcliO ILuxl L« 


mAHL Real Time Trad Fe — S 

in AHL Gtd Real Time Trfl S 

mAHL GM Cba Mark Lid S 

ihMop Guaranteed 1 f*6 LW_S 
m Mop Leveraged Recov. Ltd j 

01 MAP Guaranteed 2tm S 

m Mint G GL Fin 2DT S 

m Mint Plus Gld 7903 — 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
78 From St Hamilton Bermuda [809)292 7737 
to Maritime MR-Sector I Lld -5 997 al 

to Maritime Gib! Beta Series-S 824 j; 

to Maritime GBK Delta Series J 79CJP 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MGT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUNC 

at Class A i ln.^ 

dCtesB— S lilii 

PACIFIC CONV STRATEGIES FD LTD 

oiOgosA 5 *:a 

cf Class B S 97 J* 

MAVERICK (CAYMAN) (889) 949-7943 

/» Maverick Fd S ISI.rtoJ 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD 

m The Corsair Fund lm S 112.17 

64EESPIER50N 

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to Asia Poc. Growth Fd N.V. — J 42JK? 

to Asian Cpplfal HoUings s 41 Jl 

» Aslai Selection Fd N.v FI 10.75 

w DP Amw. Growth Fd N.V. -s 354! 

w EM5 Oftsnpre Fd N.V FI '0241 

w Europe Growth Funo n.v. _fi &3U 

to Japan Dtverslfted Fund — S 55J1 

w L e verage d Cop hold s 40.01 

w Tokyo Poc. Hold. N.V I 2o*M 

MERRILL LYNCH 

tf DoUnr AfiseaPorHtHta 6 LY 

tf Prime Rote Porholto a )*D0 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A S 842 

a Class B » e.« 

MERRILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SSRIE5 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

rf Category A AS IC.11 

tf Category B„ 


9.94 
17.90 
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13.18 
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779 
959 

55809 

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25*4775 

4185721 

12*4342 

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174X01 

185742 

160582a 

157X77 

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12*49 

14919a 

12147 

131.79 
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768*80 

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11052 

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253.12 

18240 

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18044 

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14543 
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630 JO 
48*64 


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toSF Eo. P Growth Countries J 

to SFEq.0 Gold Mines S 

to SFEa-R World WMg S 

to SF Short Term S Frorcu—FF 

MDITICA^ET MANAGEMENT INC 

MBrmtl S 165a 

iM DtvereMed S 132.15 

to SAM/McGorr Hedoe S 11117 

wSAMOpportuntty S 12172 

wSAMrtmrte . f 9*01 

wSAM strotegy 5 114a 

(h Alpha SAM S 111A1 

toGSAMCrenwalte— -Jl 33508 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

YlSR European S 101.63 

m%B AxImi - , f 10138 

ib5R International s 10274 

5YEHSKA HANDELSBANKEN SJL 
146 Bd cte la Petrusse, L-2330 Luxembourg 
ft 5HB Bond Fund— . — l 5*19 
to Svensim SeLFd Amer Sh— s 
to guensko Sri. Fd Germany -4 
toSwensfcg Set Fd inti BdSnj 
toEvenskoseLFtf mnsh — s 
toSvanakoSri. Fdjooon— Y 
1 Svenko SeL Fd Mltt-Mkt_J5ei 

toSveraka 54 Fd Nordic SEK 

to Swenska SeL Fd Podf 5D — S 
iv Svenska Sri. Fd Swed 0<fc_Sek 
* Sjmnsko SeL Fd Sylvia 5*> -Ecu 
SWISS BANK CORF. 

tf SBC IM Index Fund SF 

tf SBC Equity PNt-Alistfltfta-A* 
tf SBC Equity PtfFGanodo — a 
d SBC Equity Pm-Euraae — Ecu 

tf SBC Eq PtB-Hethertands Fl 

d SBC Govern Bd A/B S S 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-Ausf r S A as 

d SBC Bend PtB-Aurir S B — As 

rf SBC Bond Pm-CciU a C* 

rf SBC Bond Ptfl-CoivS B CS 

d SBC Bone PtlVDM A DM 

rf SBC Bond PttHJMB DM 

rf SBC BondPttFOwtCI) & A_FI 
rf SBC Bond Ptfl-Outch Gl B_FI 

d SBC Band Ptfl-Ecu A Ecu 

rf SBC Band Ptfl-Eai B Ecu 

SBC Band PtILFF A FF 

SBC Band PtB-FF B_ FF 

SBC Band PtfLPfo* A/B Pins 

SBC Bond Pffl-Stertlnc A _£ 

SBC Bond PtfWteritng 0 _4 
SBC Band PorUofio-SF A — SF 
rf SBC Bond Portlollp-SF B — SF 
rf SBC Bond PttWISS A_ — S 

d SBC Bond PHI-U5S B S 

tf SBC Bond Pffl-ven A — Y 

rf SBC Bono PHI- Yen B Y 

d 5BCMMP-AS AS 

d SBC MMF ■ PFB. ... BF 

d 5BCMMF Con4 CS 

d SBC DM Short-Term A DM 

d SBC DM Short- Term B_ — DM 
d SBC MMF - Dutch G - Fl 
tf SBC MMF -Ecu —.Ecu 


a ubs America udma SF 

rf UBS America Ldt Ina s 

a UBS Asia New Horizon SF 

d UBS ASo New Horizon 5 

tf UBS Small C. Europe $F 

d UBS Small C_ Europe, DM 

d UB5 Part Inv SF R inc SF 

tf UBS Port Inv SFR Can G_SF 
a UBS Pari Inv Ecu Inc— -SF 

d UBS Pori Inv Ecu inc Ecu 

d UBS Port inv Ecu Con G. SF 

rf UBS Part Inv Ecu Cap G Ecu 

d UBS Port Inv USS Inc 5 

rf UBS Port Inv USS Inc SF 

rf UBS Port inv USS Cc» G SF 

d UBS Port Inv USS Cap G_1 
tf UBS Port Inv DM I n r- I F 

d UBS Port Inv DM Inc DM 

rf UBS Pori inv DM Cop G SF 

a UBS Port inv DM Cap G— DM 

d Ycn-Jnwst Y 

d UBS MM InvesMJSS 5 

tf UBS MM lnve»t-tSl— _t 

rf UB5 MM invest-Ecu. Mca 

d UBS MM Invest- Yen _y 

a UBSMMInvest-UI— Ut 

0 UBS MM Inwssl-SFR A SF 

rf UBS MM Iiwest-SFR T SF 

rf UES MM lnve5W=F FF 

d UBS MM Iiwe$t-HFL Fl 

tf UBS MM jnvesl-Cqn*— CS 


m Pombav Oversea ud . 

m Portuguese 5moller Co S 

m Pri mo Capital Fund Lid _S 
m Prime Muift- Invest . 
mPrlmeo Fund— 


2279.18 

37.92 

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181.16 

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117*12 
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100.155 
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19*76 
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92062 
5383 
9971 
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lia 

11247 

88X23 


rf PraflrentSA. 


DM 


w Pyramid lm FdCorp— s 

rf RAD Inf. Inv. Fd S 

I Inti Fund Lid S 

nm Investment N.V S 

l Ricinovesl FundB S 

w RM Futures FundSicov a 

Inti Equity Ecu 

tmt Fixed Ecu 

d Sanyo Kl* Spate Fd S 

1 


m Savoy Fund Ltd- 

dSCI > )fed!!^ALu 


Smltor Guar. Curr Fd- — 5 
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live Fut. Ptfl LW * 

ifUa e 

air Mufti fund LM— I 
■ f (609)921-6595 S 

wv Wridtad Sec-s 

wt Wridtad spec* 

' intemaftonof SA a Sh _l 

'internattanalSABSh S 



MM Invest-BFR 

snort Term inv-DM DM 



rf Ul 
d UL. 

3 UBS. Band Inv-Ecu - . 

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tf UBS Bond I nv-SF fi- 
rf UBS Band inv-DM. 
tf UBS Bond InvUSl 

rf UB5 Bond Imr-FF 

rf UBS Bond Inv-Can S 

d UB5 Bond Inv-Lrt 

a UBS BJ-USl Extra Yietd— S 
rf UB5 Fix Term imMJU *4 _J 

if UBS Fl* Term invest M c 

rf UBS Fix Term Inv-SFR «_SF 
tf UBS FU Term lnv-OM96_J3M 
d UBS Fl* Term inv-Ecu VA_Ecu 

rf UBS FF* Term mv-FF 96 FF 

tf DBS E0 lnv- Europe A— DM 

d UBS ea Inv-Eurepc T — PM 

rf USS Ed inv-S Cep USA Jt 

rf UB5 Port I Fix Ire 1SFR)_SF 
rf UBS Port I Fix Inc iDMI —DM 
rf UBS Port I Fix Inc (ECU I —ECU 
rf UBS Port I Fix Inc (U55I_S 

rf UBS Cop lnv-90/10 5FR SF 

d UBS Coa Inv-BVlO USS s 

0 UBS C«P InvWID Germ — DM 
WORLDFOLiO MUTUAL FUNDS 
rf S Dolrv Income. 



to The Jaguar Fund N.V. . 


rf The M"A*R*S Fd Slcov A— J 

.■R-SFtfStawL-JDM 


d DM Dalty income. 

d S Bond ir.amw 

d Non • 5 9M& 

0 Global Ben* 

d Global Schmccd— 
d Global Eauifies. 


JDM 


rf JS Conservative Equities j 

rf US Agre3slve Equities— » 

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0 Pacific 6 qainn 5 

rf Natural Resources _* 


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way 
99.91 y 
99J9V 
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wT henaM-M 
m Tiber Sewc I 
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rf The M*A*'.. _ . 

mThe Seychelles Fd Ltd 

mTtta Smart Bond LW SF 

mThe Smart said LM— _4 
1 M-M Futures — — JS 
IHOMNVBU— 3 
1 JW-FUSIcav-JI 
ft Tokyo (OTC) Fund Slcov _J 

to Trims Global Invt Ltd 5 

rf Transpacific Fund Y 

w Trinity Futures Fd Ltd S 

mTriMtadil X 

mTriumph 11 — * 

m Triumph '» — * 

mTriumph IV. 


d SBC MMF-E3 
rf SBC MMF • FF. 
tf SBC MMF- Lit. 


-Esc 

-FF 

Ul 


Pfc 


rf SBC MMF- Flos 

d SBC M6AF - SriUlltag 

rf 5BC MMF - SlBfUng— t 

rf SBC MMF ■ 5F SF 

tf SBC MMF - US ■ Dollar. 8 

rf 53CMMF- l/St'rl I 

tf SBC MMF- Yen- 


Other Funds 

w Aawotosanc* Slcov . 

to Aetlf taance Slcov 

» Ad (future* Ltd — 
w AcHsmhon 5larv___ 
w Actives! Int’l Slcov — 
w AdHolde- 


-FF 

-I 


m AdvorereJ Lalhi Fo Ud_ 
m Advanced PocHk Steal— 

to Advanced Strategies LM- 

w AIG Taiwan Fund. 


w P.C.FV01 trance iLu'l— FF 
wPU.F. Vcloond oFP (Lux) -SF 
to P.U.V. Valtond USD (Lux) J 
iv P.U.F. Voibontf Ecu lLuj((_Eai 
» P.U r. v-Olbond FRF ILuxi. FF 
i» P.U.F. valoona GBP (Luii-i 
to P.U.F Valbond DEM (Lux) DM 
to P.U.F. US S Ba Ptll <Lu» 1—1 

w P.U.F Moaei Fi Ecu 

to-PJl.F. Pldlle SF 

to F.U.T, Emyrg (VlrtL ILui)_S 
w P.U.T. Elt. r n oert (Luc —Ecu 
ft F.U.T. Global Value ILuxi _Ecu 

irPu.T. curvvai iLuii Ecu 

tf Pictei Voteuisse 'CH»_ SF 

m Inti smell Can 1 IOM) 1 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
fa PC. Eo* tun. Grand Coyrian 
Fax: (809: W9-099J 

m Prerri 1 i J .f US Envoy Funo J 1 19272 

m Premier tnr* Ea Fund J. 1307a 

m Premier 'jo.-ere-gn Bd Ftf_S 797.44 

m PrtirUtT GiaSol BC FC i 145*75 

m F rentier Trial Return Fc _ X 1019a 

PUTNAM. 

d Emerging Him Sc. Tru>i s 1547 

* Rumen 1 Em. into. Sc TrusiS 1579 

d Pirtncm Giob High Grawih.i le.9B 

d PuincnKlghincGriMAFas 877 

d Putnam rmi Find S 15.15 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

to Aston Development i 9SB4 

» Emerging Growth Fd N.V.-3 18067 

v/ Quantum Fund N.V _s 1/50477 

to Quantum Intfuarlol S 10*48 

w Quantum Realty Trust 5 14*37 

wQucnfum UK Knit/ Fund_i 11X21 

«r Quasar inrt Fund N.V S 157.92 

to Quota Funa N.V. 5 16174 

REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

w New Roreo Growth Fo s 1X44 

to Novo LC! POCIIIc lltv CO S 4.801 

re PociPc Arhiiroge Cs S 967 

01R.L Country Wnm Fa S 2S2JS 

d Reaem Glbi Am Grth Fa s 

d ReaenlGIDI Euro Grth F=_S 

rf Reaenl GIM mil Grib id 1 

tf Regent GlDl Jap Grit! Fa 

d Reaenl Glo> Podl Basin 5 

d Reaenl Glbi Reserve s 

a Reaem GW Resources. ; 

d Regent Glbi Tiger 5 


rf SBC G HO- Ptfl SF Grid SF 

tf SBC Glbi- Fill Ecu Grth— Ecu 

rf sec GiW-Ptfl USD Grth I 

tf SBC G ax -Ptfl SF Yld A SF 

d 59C GHX-Pffl SF Yld B 5F 

rf SBC GIW-PMI Ecu Yld A Ecu 

d SBC cay- Ptfl Ecu Yld B. — Ecu 

d SBC Glbl-Ptfl USD Yld A S 

rf SBC GlW-Ptfl USD Yld B — S 
d SBC GIM- Ptfl SF Inc A__5F 

0 SBC GtW-Ptfl 5F Inc B SF 

d SBC GiCX-PHl Ecu Inc A— Ecu 

tf SBC Glbi- Ptfl Ecu Inc B Ecu 

rf SBC GtW-Ptfl USD Wc A — S 
a SBC Gat- Ptfl USD Inc B _i 
d SBC Glbi PHLDM Growth -DM 

0 SBC GIU PtB-DM Yld B DM 

d SBC Glbi Ptfl-OM Inc B— DM 

d SBCEmeroinoMorkrts i 

d SBC Small « Mia Gan S«-SF 
d Amerfaovalar « 

d Anute Valor. r 

d AslaPortlolla- 


toAtexanora GIM invest Fa 1-5 
m Anno rnvestmmil^—— _j 
w Aqullo irternoHonal Fund_S 

w ArtitfLn Investment— — S 

w Argus Fund Batreiced SF 

to Argus Fund Bond SF 


d Turauotee Fund s 

iv Ttaaerfv Brown Infl SFR_SF 

m Tweedy Browne Inti n.v. S 

w Tweedy Browne av. Cl A S 

rf UftaFutures——— FF 

d UboFuturei Dothr 5 

f Ultimo Growth Fd Ltd— — s 

d umbrella Debt Fund LM I 

d Umbrella Fund Ltd — — . — s 

» Uni Bond Fund Ecu 

w Uni capital Allemapne DM 

w uni Capital Canwtfbfes Ecu 

to UnJ-GloOa! State DEM DM 

w Uni-Global State Ecu Ecu 

W Uni-Global Slcov FRF FF 

to Unl-Gkibal Slate F5 SF 

to Uni -Global Slcov USD- 7 

rf UnlCD Equity Fund .DM 

d Units Inv. Fimd DM 

m Uni trades CHF JF 

m Unlfrodes CHF Reg. 
tUnttrades FRF . 

ilMirodes USD. 
toUrwi Inti Ltd. 
mVoWane- 


01 Victor Futures Fund S 

b Voyager investments Pk 5 

w Vulture 1 m * 

in Writes Wilder inti Fd s 

to Wilier . 


rf A5I0 Oceania Fund, 
w ASS iGurnoU AG 


-DM 


mAasoctalitf Investors Inc.— S 
0 Athene Fund LW_ 
wATONlikri Fund. 


to Banzai Hedged Growth Fd J 

w Beckman ini Cap Acc. 

toBEM International LM 

tf akuben-Mmnl EEF - 

rf Blrcmar OM Fd iCoymanis 
Gk)bo(( Bahamas I S 


d Bieaniir 

to Brae Internohonal. 
tf CC 


-FF 


to Wilier South Eori 

wwmantxfltaelrtl 

d Win Global Fd Bd. Ptfl Ecu 

d Win Global Fd Ea Ptfl Ea) 

a wm Gtobol Fd (US Ptfl 5F 

0 World Balanced Fund 5Jt_J 

at Worldwide Limited — 1 

w WPG Forber D^eas Part_S 

iBWWCaottal GrtttRf Ltd S 

m Young — — SF 

mZepbvr Hedge Fund S 

fnZwetg Infl lm S 


mCol Euro Leverage Fd LM J 
m Capitol Assured Indio Fd_i 

d CB Germai Index Fund DM 

teCervln Grawth Fund— S 


tf Convert Bond Selection, 
tf D-Mark Bond 5etedion. 
rf Dollar Bond Selection— 
rf Ecu Bond Selection— 
rf Florin Band Selection 

rf FranceValor 

d GermontaValar 
a GoMPortltdh) 
d ibertaVbiar 

tf ml Valor 

d JOpanPorttol 

tf Star Itag Bond Selecllon. . 
tf S*. Foreign Band Selection JF 

tf Swiss valor SF 

rf Universal Bond Selection— SF 

tf Universal Fund SF 

tf Yon Bond Selection. Y 

tf SBC Glob DM B —DM 

d SBC Ecu n — Fe.. 

d SBC GiobSFR B SF 

rf SBC Glob USS B. 


n) Chilton |ntl (BVI) Ltd. 
w Citadel Limited 
d CM USA 


JF 



toCMJ InvesHnenl Fund S 

01 Columbus Holdings S 

m Concorde in* Fund — * 

w Condvest Actions Inti BF 

to CanKvest Obfl Belux CT BF 


w Convert. Fd Inrt A( 

to Convert Fd Infl 8 Carts—5 
m Crcflg Drill Coo ... . s 

m Criscnt Aslan Hedse Mov 31S 

mCRM Futures Fund Lid i 

iv Cumber intlfLV S 

w Curr. Conceal WM S 

d D. witnr WM wide ivi Tst_s 

to D.G.C c 

d Dolwa Japan Fund _.Y 

d DB Argentina Bd Fd_ 


d Reaem Gibi on Grm Fa s 

w Reaem Magnui Fd LM 5 

m Proem Pacific Hda Fd — 1 
>v Regent Sri Lanka Fd. 


*1239 
3J5S8 
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1227* 
44695 
2-175? 
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tf 5BC Dvn Floor CHF 95 SF 

TEMPLETON GLOBAL STRATEGY SICAV 


d Global Growth 

tf DM Global Growth. 


d Smaller Companies- 
d Amer linn 


tf Emfroteg Markets- 

tf Glottal Batancetf 

d GkJjel Income- 



■y L.Tdervaued Assets Ser 1 s 

ROBE CO GROUP 
POB *734000 AZ Rotterdcm.131110 2241234 
a RG America Fund - pi 13170 

a ft a Cunw Funo Fl lliDd 

d PG PocitJe Fund. Fl 14*00 

d PG DKlreme Futxl_ Fl si 

rf PGMonir PtasF FL. Fl 11463 


d DM Global Bond- 
d Ten Globe* Bond 
d Emerging Mkte Fix inc . 

d U 5 Government— 

a Haven. 


JF 


d USS Liquid Reserve 

tf DEM Lieaki Rnserve— DM 

T EMPLE TOW W.WIDE INVESTMENTS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 

rf Class A-l J 

d Class A-2 S 


1243 

1345 

T2J8 

1*91 

1*71 

1423 

1*12 

9.93 

1169 

1817 

180*02 

IL92 

940 

1*91 

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1*01 




DBSC / Nofln Bond Fund— S 

w Derivative Asset Alloc S 

' Dreyfus America Fund — S 

DVT Performance Fd S 

m Dynasty Fund S 

w Eos Overseas Fund LM S 

i Elite World Fund LM SF 

Eml Brig. U*d- Plus A— BF 

Em; Beta tad. Plus B — BF 

Eml France Ind. Phis a. FF 

eml France Ind. PlusB FF 

Eml Garm. inn PtusA DM 

£mi Germ. me. Plus B DM 

Eml Neth. Index Plus A Fl 

Eml Nem. index Plus B- n 

Eml Snota md. Plus A P» 

Eml 5oaln lad. Plus B Pta 

Eml UK Index Plus A c 

eml Ua Index Plus B t 

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'Tflf UV INTERNATIONAL Afl 

lleralo^^^^nbunc. 

PWLKmm WITH TW W* Tux*. TIME. AND Tttfc HVOUMCTIte yosr 





























Pajjc 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1994 


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■ Car Jfr ^)ft0wL»a>6fW 


Tuesday's Closing 

Taeies include tne nationwide puces up to 
the closma on Wai: Street ana ao no: reflect 
laie trades eisewnere. Via Ths Assoc-steo Pres 


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IMPORT/EXPORT 


USffi LfVI sot s +■ 

=~*r :■:*■ .'i 1 . r i'-3:-* ■*: 

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GRADE A RECYCUD JEANS I 17 YEARS SEIUNG IN U.S.A 

A os'la i icr Hi" >.■■ . , !»>■<: ' vijC-. •: --•: * 

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Container Leads Avcdcble SCOTCH WHISKY SUWUTS : : 

eiEC' - vfi m :- ~ 

GATEWAY 70 THE ORIENT zm*r tgfti 

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MANUFACTURES i rxDD^DTrelS^TTrc 

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USED LEVI SANS A*fe ad- C-r*nal ! ^SOjtmpNaMp MSGER5 - 

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CFBHORE COMPANIES JPjf t • j Snd ITWVa DOCJM^FTS !• -: 
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Moody’s Is Positive 
On News Corp. 


SYDNEY — News Corp. ap- 
pears set to expand without the 
debt problems that nearly sank 
the global media group in 1990, 
Moody's Investors Service Inc. 
said in-arepdrt Tuesday. 

The report is considered a 
signi fi cant approval for News 
Corp. Chairman Rupert Mur- 
doch’s current - expansion in 
global television broadcasting. 


Bal, just shy of investment 
grade, from Ba2. 

But further upgrades “could 
be tempered by aggressive In- 
vestment strategies," Moody’s 
said. 

News Corp.’s . long-term 
strategy, according to Moody’s, 
is to oe a dominant global 
broadcasting company, with in- 
terests in the production and 
distribution of news and enter- 


but it warned that further ac- taimnent programming, 
quisittons and asset sales may “However, book, magazine 
create some risk in die intense- and newspaper publishing cur- 
diate term. • • rently accounts for the bulk of 

“The. outlook for News operating income," the report 


Coip.’s debt ratings is positive, 
based on our expectation that 
the company’s debt protection 
measurements will continue to 
improve as cash flow in- 
creases, "the New York-based 
ratings agency said. 

Moody’s expects growth in 
News Corp.’s broadcasting and 
film entertainment businesses 
to underpin continued un- 


said. 

As a result. News Corp. may 
grow by selling selected non- 
core assets over the longer term, 
while acquiring further global 
broadcasting assets, Moody’s 
said, adding that Mr. Murdoch 
may resume an aggressive debt- 
financed expansion to do 

Total debt of News Corp., 
which is 3Z6 percent-owned by 


provements in cash flow, allow- the Murdoch family stood at 
mg the company to cut its debt 10.4 billion Aust ralian dollars 
leverage, - (57.7 billion) at the end of its 

In October, Moody’s upgrad- 1993 financial year, which end- 
ed the company’s senior debt to ed June 30. 


Australia Predicts Rise 
In Commodity Prices 


SYDNEY — World-commodity prices should rise 7 percent in 
the year starting July 1» * government report said Tuesday. 

The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Econom- 
ics said demand for raw materials was increasing because of 
stronger economies in Western Europe and the United States. 

Among global economies, recovery in the United States is more 
advanced than in other member countries of the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation .and Development, indmitng Australia, 
the report said. ■ : 

“Economic recovery in Europe remains very gradual, although 
prospects have brightened slightly in recent months," said Brian 
Fisher, executive director of the agriculture-agency. 

Prices for wool, aluminum, base metals, cotton and sugar are 
forecast to remain buoyant or increase, while prices for dairy 
products, coal and iron should fall, the agency’s report said. 

Little qhangeis expected iir energy prices. - 

“Hhs ccmfinns earner views that commodity prices bottomed in 
the September-December quarter of 1993-94, Mr, Fisher said, 
executive director of the agency. 

The report predicted the value of Australian commodity ex- 
ports overall would .rise 2 percent, .to 49.4 billion Australian 
dollars (S37 biULcm). Australia’s economy is heavily dependent on 
commodity exporting, which accounted for 65 percent of the 
country's total exports last year. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


The Jeep That Roared 

For Detroit, Some Cracks in Japan Market 


By Andrew Pollack 

- New York Tima Service 

TOKYO — - After years of 
being derided as overpriced, 
defect -prone gas guzzlers, 
something unexpected is hap- 
pening tO'American cars m 
Japan. . : ' 

■ - They are starting to win 
consumer acceptance. 

. Sales in Japan of cars made 
in the United-States by Ford 
Motor Co., General Motors 
Co. and Chrysler Coro, more 
than doubled in the first five 
months of 1994, compared 
with a year earlier, even as 
overall car sales fell. 

The gains follow a 37 per- 
cent increase in' imports to 
Japan by the American Big 
Three in 1993. 

Even after that jump, 
though, Detroit’s sales figures 
in Japan remain puny, and it 
will be many years before 
they have an impact on 
America’s $20 billion trade 
deficit in automobiles. 

The Big Three expect to 
seQ about 35,000 cars in Ja- 
pan this year, compared with 
19,335 last year, giving them 
a market share of a little less 
than 1 percent. Japanese 
companies export nearly 1.5 
million passenger cars to the 
United States. 

“The consumer’s mental 
banier started to melt late last 
year” said Konen Suzuki 
president of Ford Japan. 

An additional factor ii«s 
been the rise of the yen, which 
has reduced prices of imports 


in Japan. In May, imports 
held a record 8.6 percent of 
the Japanese market. 

Detroit has also helped it- 
self by introducing models 
better suited to the market 
and by aggressive advertising. 

Chrysler’s sales have more 
than quadrupled this year af- 
ter the introduction last year 
of a Jeep Cherokee with the 
steering wheel on the right; 


'The consumer's 
mental barrier 
started to melt 
late last year.' 

Konen Suzuki, 
president of Ford 
japan 


Japanese motorists drive on 
the left side of the road. 

Ford expected to sell 2^>00 
Mustangs in Japan this year, 
but it appears to have reached 
that total in the first two 
months. 

But U.S. government and 
industry officials say sales of 
American cars are still far be- 
low what they would be if the 
Japanese market were truly 
open. 

And American auto execu- 
tives “are as adamant as ever 
that they want a results-ori- 
ented agreement" in the trade 
talks between the two coun- 


tries, said Jeffrey E. Garten, 
chief U.S. negotiator on auto- 
mobile trade. 

Washington has asked 
goals be set for an increase in 
the number of Japanese deal- 
ers selling foreign cars. U.S. 
officials say that dealers who 
sell Japanese cars do not 
readily take on foreign mod- 
els, because of their financial 
ties to Japanese manufactur- 
ers. 

While German cars still 
vastly outsell vehicles from 
the United States, the Ameri- 
cans are gaining. 

Even now, however, U.S. 
companies are not in the mar- 
ket mainstream. Eighty per- 
cent of the cars sold in Japan 
have engines smaller than two 
liters (125 cubic inches). No 
U.S. cars are sold in that cate- 
gory in Japan, and right-hand 
drive cars are still scarce. 

Ford has been the most ag- 
gressive and owns its dealer 
network. With television 
commercials this year, Ford 
expects sales to triple to 
15.000. 

Chrysler’s spurt in sales 
has come exclusively from the 
Jeep. Honda Motor Co., 
which sells the Jeep through 
its dealers, minutely inspects 
each vehicle, and cars can be 
rejected because of tiny 
scratches. 

Chrysler expects to sell 

13,000 vehicles this year, 
more than doable last year's 
total. 


Tokyo Faces Tough Goal on Auto Parts 




New York Tima Service 

TOKYO — Japan’s automakers will have 
difficulty meeting their voluntary goal of buy- 
ing $19 billion of American automobile parts 
in the current fiscal year, industry officials 
said Tuesday after the release of new figures. 

The Japanese manufacturers bought $ 1 5.54 
billion- of American parts in the year that 
ended in March, a gam of 14 percent from a 
year earlier. The year before, purchases in- 
creased 30 percent 

•To achieve the $19 billion goal in the year 
that aids in March 1995, purchases win have 
to rise 22 percent It is “a very delicate situa- 
tion. right now,** said Taktsmi Oue, a spokes- 
man for the Japanese auto industry. 


; ■ . y- ..V •.-■vi.-vsi- & »«f .y • - .•'• 


Japanese manufacturers adopted what they 
called a voluntary plan in 1992, when Presi- 
dent George Bush visited Japan. 

In connection with the current U.S.-Japa- 
nese trade negotiations, leading Japanese 
automakers recently announced new plans 
for increasing foreign parts purchases beyond 
the current year, but Washington has called 
those plans insufficient. 

The $19 billion figure is the sum of two 
separate goals: importing $4 bflHan of Ameri- 
can-made parts and buying $15 billion of 
parts for use in Japanese factories in the 
United States. 


3 Affiliates 
Of Hyundai 
Apply for 
Listings 

Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatcher 

SEOUL — Three affiliates of 
the Hyundai group, anticipat- 
ing an improvement in relations 
with the South Korean govern- 
ment. applied Tuesday to regis- 
ter their shares on Seoul’s over- 
the-counter market. 

A group spokesman said 
Hyundai Heavy Industries Go- 
Hyundai Housing Sc Industrial 
Development Co. and Hyundai 
Elevator Co. had submitted ap- 
plications to the Korea Securi- 
ties Dealers’ Association 
through lead managers. 

Hyundai’s applications for 
listings in 1992 and 1993 were 
turned down, a move that in- 
dustry analysts attributed to 
strained relations between 
Hyundai and the government 
after Chung Ju Yung, the 
founder of Hyundai, entered 
politics in early 1992 and cam- 
paigned for the presidency 
against the eventual winner. 
President Kim Young Sam. 

To try to repair relations, Mr. 
Chung has kept a low profile 
and announced last month he 
was leaving Hyundai's manage- 
ment. 

Officials at securities firms 
managing the issues said that 
listing prices of the three com- 
panies would be set at about 

35.000 won ($43) for Hyundai 
Heavy Industry and at about 

22.000 won for the other two. 
Paid-in capital of the three 

companies would total 297.8 
billion won, adding to the cur- 
rent total capital of 224 trillion 
won of the 220 companies on 
the over-the-counter market. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 

■ Isuzu’s Optimism Grows 
Isuzu Motors Ltd. raised its 
forecast of parent current profit 
to 2 billion yen ($20 million) in 
the year ending Oct. 31, citing 
cost-cutting measures and an 
improvement in demand, Reu- 
ters reported from Tokyo. 

Isuzu’s previous forecast, in 
December, was for a profit of l 
billion yen. In the preceding 
year, the company had a loss of 
10.2 billion yen. " 


Hoag Kong ' • • Singapore / \ Jok*o \= ; 

HangSe% . ‘ \ StraSsThties ; r NfW<ei:225; 


. ,y •' HR*/, V 

'HongKow:'^ tfeflffgfeng ~U36 

Singapore • ! ' Strate.inmiiMS i ;. • ’ 2&n&r V. 2 . 28450 : .'> 0.99 '; 

■ .. ■, - . g .iii trt .i -f; .ij W ii ', A i. - . Wu . - I,.. ’my , ; 


.tape*; -. tv? 

— ~ v - ■ nt , i . j , ; ,. ' — i - .i &tr* UiL 

i ‘ i Y^ i»« j« i W ii nM > A<M t jO i > »»i»««.| A «.««i»i / i.i 'rt »« M i» n iii u i n >ii r i / i n il unfff ii V •• ••••!* & 

Sources: Reuters., AFP Interna dom) Herald Tribune 


Very brfefflys 

• Dresdner Bank AG applied for banking licenses in Shenzhen and 

Guangzhou, nihw 

• Japanese corporate assets declined 0.6 percent in value in the 
year to March, marking the first year-to-year decline in 20 years. 

• Japan will limit the emergency import of rice to the 2^45,000 
metric tons already contracted. The country began importing rice 
because of a severe shortage in domestic production. 

■ Korean Air plans to issue 6,050,000 new shares by September 
through an offering to employees and a rights issue to existing 
shareholders; the price of toe issue has not been decided 


through an offering to employees and a rights issue to existing 
shareholders; the price of the issue has not been decided 

• China hopes to attract more than $7 billion in foreign investment 
in its telecommunications industry over the next six years. 

• Broken Hffl Pty.’s Australian crude steel production rose 15 
percent in the year to May from the previous year, while its crude 
oO output slipped 4 percent and its coal production fell 8 percent. 

• Sega Enterprises Ltd, Nippon Colombia Co. and the California- 
based company Integrated Systems Inc. are joining forces to 
develop a new karaoke system. aFx. afp. Knight- RuMer. Reuters 


Shenzhen to Expand f B’ List 

AFP-Extei News 

HONG KONG — The Shenzhen Stock Exchange said Tuesday 
it planned to list new class-B shares, issues reserved for foreign 
investors, this year in an attempt to attract new investment. 

Yu Gupgang, deputy president of the Shenzhen exchange, said in 
Hong Kong that the plan included listing as many as six major 
Chinese companies involved in infrastructure projects or the energy 
or transportation industries on the B-share market this year. 

Shenzhen has 20 B-share issues listed, and the Shanghai Stock 
Exchange has 28. Chinese investors can only buy A shares. 









Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HE RALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1994 


SPORTS 

Streaking Tribe r 

The Associated pr&, the first inning and later hit a 

fwMntiiI ,eV io a ? d fresh foul fly into the upper deck in 

in r i, straight victory right. Travis Fryman missed 
th- mana Sed to keep getting an opposite-field homer 
e uetroit Tigers in theirs. to right when his drive was a 
The Indians, while beating few feet foul, 
the Tigers, 7-1, Monday night, Nagy gave up one run and 
ended Detroit's streak of 25 five hits in seven innings. In his 
games with a home run. 

“I didn't know too much AL ROUNDUP 

about their home run deal,” 

winning pitcher Charles Nagy previous two starts in Tiger Sta- 
saii “I heard about it. But I dium, he was 0-2 with a 14.63 
didn’t know how many games, ERA. 

or anything like that." “My memories of this place 


ers 


Eddie Murray drove in four 
runs and Sandy Alomar ho- 
mered as Cleveland extended it 
winning streak to 10, Lhe club's 
longest since 19S6. Detroit 
wound up tied with the 1941 
New York Yankees for the 
longest homer streak in major 
league history. 

“We didn't beat the record,” 
Lou Whitaker said. “But. hey. 
we joined some good compa- 
ny.” 

Whitaker hit a fly ball to the 
warning track in center field in 


The A aoaated Pros 

Doug Drabek is not the same 
pitcher, and the Houston As- 
tros are not the same team as a 
year ago. Not by a long stretch. 

The Astros, one of baseball's 
biggest disappointments last 
season, won for the first time in 
eight games in Colorado and 
Drabek got his 10th victory in 
the Astros’ 5-4 triumph over the 
Rockies on Monday night. 

Jeff Bagwell and Scott Ser- 
vais each hit two-run homers as 
the Astros became the last NL 
team to win at Mile High Stadi- 
um. 

The victory moved the Astros 
within percentage points of the 
NL Central -leading Cincinnati 
Reds. 


“My memories of this place 
haven't been too fond," he said. 
“I’ve been knocked around 
pretty good here." 

Red Sox 4, Blue Jays 1: Joe 
Hesketh pitched seven shutout 
i nnin gs and John Valentin ho- 
mered in Toronto as Boston 
ended its 11 -game skid, that 
team's longest since 1932. 

Andre Dawson was twice hit 
by pitches from Todd Slottle- 
myre. He threw the ball back 
past Stolllemyre the first time, 
then took a couple of steps to- 
ward the mound the next time 


as plavers swarmed onto the 

field. ' . . . 

Stottkmyre, who was qected, 
threw a couple of water coolers 
onto the field and Toronto 
manager Cito Gaston later was 

^ Miners 5, Angels 0; Randy 
Johnson, giving up only three 
singles while sinking out it. 
pitched his fourth shutout in six 
starts as visiting Seattle beat 
California. 

Johnson won his seventh 
straight, with his 74lh victory 
for Lhe Mariners tying a team 
record set bv Mark Langston. 

Jay Buhner and Keith Mitch- 
ell homered for Seattle. 

Yankees 7, Twins 5: Pinch- 
hitter Daryl Boston hit Rick 
Aguilera’s first pitch for a three- 
run homer in the eighth, lifting 
New York over visiting Minne- 
sota. , _ 

Kirby Puckett and Dave 
Winfield homered in the sixth, 
helping the Twins take a 5-2 
lead. 

The Yankees scored twice in 
iti<i seventh, then took advan- 


tage of a mistake by second 
baseman Chuck Knoblauch in 
the eighth. Knoblauch made a 
late throw and failed to get a 
forceouL and the prolonged in- 
ning gave Boston, hitting for 
Mike Gallego. a chance to bat 
with two outs. 

Brewers 6, Orioles 5: Greg 
Vaughn and Dave Nilsson hit 
two-run homers in the first and 
Milwaukee hung on to win in 
Baltimore. 

Bill Wegman (5-0) won de- 
spite allowing four runs in 5 1-3 
innings. He was 4-14 during an 
injury-interrupted 1993. 
Graeme Lloyd pitched two per- 
fect innings for his third save. 

Vauehn, who homered in his 
last two at-bats Sunday in New 
York, connected against Jamie 
Moyer. Harold Baines and Bra- 
dy Anderson homered for the 
Orioles. 

Rangers 12. White Sox 6: 
Jose Canseco, Juan Gonzalez 
and Ivan Rodriguez homered as 
Texas romped in Chicago and 
halted a six-game losing streak. 


Colorado 


"This isn’t last year any- 
more,” Bagwell said. “This is a 
different team. You can see that 
just from our record.” 

Drabek, the 1990 Cy Young 
Award winner struggle to a 9- 

NL ROUNDUP 

18 record last season, his first 
with the Astros. Now 10-3. he 
has become the ace the Astros 
had hoped for when they signed 
him as a free agent. 

Drabek benefited from two 
double plays after the Rockies 
had gotten the leadoff batter 
aboard in the fifth and seventh. 
He allowed four runs, three 
earned, and nine hits in 7Vj in- 
nings. 


Braves 7, Mets 3: David Jus- 
tice homered following consec- 
utive singles by Ryan Klesko 
and Fred McGriff in the fourth 
in Atlanta to overcome New 
York's 2-0 lead. 

Bobby Bonilla got two of 
New York's five hits. 

Expos 8, Cardinals 4: Larry 
Walker and Wil Cordero each 
got four hits and homered in a 
five-run seventh in St. Louis as 
Montreal rallied. 

Walker led off the seventh 
with his 10th homer to make it 
4-4. One out later, Cordero hit 
his seventh homer into the left- 
field seats. 

The Expos, who have hit 26 
home runs in June, got 1 8 hits in 


ending a three-game losing 
streak. The Cardinals have lost 
six in a row. 

Dodgers 3. Padres 2: Tim 
Walloon's three-run homer with 
two outs in the eighth in San 
Diego gave Los Angeles its 
sixth straight victory against the 
Padres. 

Trailing 2-0. Brett Butler 
walked with one out in" the 
eighth. One out later, Mike Pi- 
azza walked. Wallach hit the 
next pitch, from Joey Hamilton, 
over the left-field fence for his 
17th homer. 

The Padres' Bip Roberts 
went 3-for-4 with an RBI to 
extend his hitting streak to 23 
games, the longest in the NL 
this season. 



Els’s Open 


„* , 


- ' • . . . . ' t * ■ * 

Sr jar. Cahill Abpkv Franuc-Prtvvr 

Loren Roberts after missing a par putt on the second sudden-death 
playoff hole. Ernie Ek then made Ws to snatch the U.S. Open title. 


SCOREBOARD 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

East Division 

W L Pet. 
Now 'fork «0 27 .srr 

Baltimore 3 : 30 352 

Detroit 34 B 307 

Boston 33 M A*3 

Toronto 31 34 .443 

Central Division 

Cleveland 41 25 321 

Minnesota 37 30 35. 

Chicago 35 31 330 

Kansas Cltv * 32 3>zr 

Milwaukee 32 34 -471 

west Division 

Texas 32 30 .471 

Seattle *38 .*« 

Californio 30 41 .423 

Oakland 25 43 J48 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 

Ulanta u “j ^ 

Montreal 4! 27 303 

Philadelphia 35 34 307 

Florida » * -f* 

Now York 32 37 

Central Division 

Cincinnati 38 » 3s7 

Houston 39 30 345 

St. LOUIS 33 34 -«3 

Pittsburgh 31 34 .463 

Chicago 27 * 

west Division 

Las Angeles 34 5 

Colorado 31 * -JJ? 

San Francisco *> J ~ 

San Diego 2 * 43 377 


Atlanta 
Montreal 
Philadelphia 
Florida 
New York 

Cincinnati 
Houston 
St. Louis 
Pittsburgh 
Chicago 


Monday's Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cleveland 211 9,1 I*- 7 * J 

Detroit 010 808 888-1 s 1 

Nagv. Plunk t8» and S. Alomar; Moore. S. 
Davis <71, Cadorei <71. Groom <9i and Tettle- 
Ion. W — Noov. 4-1 L — Moore, 7-6. HR Cleve- 
land, s. Alomar <71. 

Boston 888 003 001—4 5 8 

Toronto 808 088 801-1 5 2 

Hesketh, Russell 18 ). Fosses i»> and Berry 
hill; 5toitlemvre.W. Williams (81, RltAettl (91 
rod Borders. W— Hesketh. 4-4. L — Stottle- 
mvre, 5-4. $v— Fassas 111. HR— Boston. Jn. 
Valentin <31. 

Minnesota 810 813 00B-5 12 • 

New York 888 110 23*-* 18 0 

Erickson. Guthrie <71. Willi* <81. Aguilera 
island Wolbeck; J.Abboft.Poll • tl ' wk *™® n 
18) and Stanley. w-Wlckman. >2. L-wlllls. 
1-ZHRs— New York. Boston 14); Minnesota 
Pucketi 111). Winfield <71. 

Milwaukee m m 000-4 12 1 

Baltimore 101 021 000—5 8 0 

weaman, Orosco (•), J. Mercedes <71. Lloyd 
(9) ond Horaer; Moyer. Elchhom <51. Mills 
<91 ond Halles. W — Wegman, Wk L— Moyer. 2- 
5. Sv — Llovd. <31. H Rs— Bo lllmore. By. Ander- 
son <71. Baines U0»; Mllwmmee. G. Vaughn 
(15). Nilsson <B). 

Texas “1 •»“» » I 

Chicago 8M 1*3 288- 6 11 0 

Brawn. D. Smith <61. Whiteside 1 7>, Honey- 
cutt |71. Henke 181. Coraentrr <91 and Rodrr 
guez; J. McDowell. Cook 18). Da Johnson <81. 
Assenmocher <81. DeLeon (81. R. Hernandez 
<91 and La Vail lore. KorkavK* <81. w— Honey- 
cutt, 1-2- L— On. Johnson. 1-1. HRs— Chicago. 
Thomas <2Si: Texas, Conseco i20). J. Gonza- 
lez <91. 1. Rodriguez <8>. 


Seattle 802 828 014-8 * J 

California DM 000 IM-0 3 0 

r. Johnson and D. Wilson; Mograne. M. 
Utter <91 and C. Turner and Dalesandm i9). 
W— R. Johnson. W. I — Mograne. 2-4. 
HRs— Seattle. Buhner <131. WMIlcheJl <31. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
New York 801 180 #10-3 S 1 

Atlanta 000 320 20x— 7 12 * 

B.Janes, Mason <6),MJWoddu* (B> and Stin- 
nett; Merck er. McMichael <81 end J. Looez. 
W-Mercker, 4-1. L— B. Jones. 7-6. HRs-At- 
tanta. Tarosco <51, Justice (HI; New York. 
Bonilla (12). Bogar <1). 

Montreal 800 IN 584-8 18 0 

SL LOUIS 018 030 000-4 8 1 

Pj. Martinez. Shaw (61. Rolas (7) and D. 
Fletcher; Sutclttfe. Eversgerd <6t. Hottvan 
141 . Murphy 171, M. Peres (7). R. Rodriguez 
(B) and PognazzL W-Show. 4-2. L-Murphv. 
20- Sv— Rolas (111. HRs— St. Louis. Whllen 
t»>; Montreal. L. Walker (10). Cordero 17) 

LOS Angeles 000 804 830—3 8 1 

son Diego oil 000 B08-Z 8 8 

Ke. Gross. Td. Worrell (8) and Piazza, Her 
nande: (81: Hamilton. Elliott (9iand Auvnvs. 
w— Ke. Gross. 44. L — Hamilton, 3-2. Sv — Ta 
Worrell (4). 

Houston 822 Ml 880-5 9 3 

Colorado 101 «80 020-4 10 3 

Drabek. Veres (8). Hudefc <9> and Servals: 
Gr. Harris. S. Reed |7>. Blair (BI.B. Ruttin <«) 
and GlranB. W— Drabek. MKL L— Gr. Harris. 

>7. sv— Hudek HI). HPs— Houston. Bagwell 

120), Servals <6). 


Nashville. He was caught stealing once ond 
made two pul outs In right field. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan Is batting .207 
<49- tor-237) with 20 runs. 11 doubles. one triple. 
25 RBts.23walks.63 strikeouts ond 15 stolen 
bases In 2* attempts. He has 105 putouts, one 

tKsist mid seven errors in right Hold. 

Japanese Leagues 






Central Lcagoe 


w 

L 

T 

Ft*.- * 

GB 

37 

20 

8 

.643 

— 

a 

28 

8 

580 

BVj 

28 

29 

0 

.491 

9 

27 

29 

0 

M3 

9'.*a 

24 

31 

0 

454 

It 

22 

31 

0 

415 

13 

Tuesday's Results 




Yomluri 

Chunidil 

Yakut) 

Yokohama 

Hanshln 

Hiroshima 


Yomluri 6. Hiroshima 5 
Yokohama 7. Chunlchi 2 
Yak'ill 3, Hanshln 2 

Pacific Leagoe 
W L T 
Selbu 37 20 0 

Dalel 32 25 0 

Orix 31 25 0 

Lotte 27 30 0 

KMIetSU 21 M 1 

Nippon Horn 22 36 1 

Tuesday's Results 
Selbu X Nippon Ham 1 
Ktnlelsu 7. Dalel 6 
Orix 4, Lotte 0 


PCt. GB 

449 — 

-S6I 5 

.554 5V: 

474 10 

J82 15 

J7? 15\i 


U0J. servais w. -j w, Y -ye;? 

The Michael Jordan Watch 


MONDAYS GAME; Jordon went l-tor-3 
with a double and ran scored In a 5-4 loss to 


RUGBY UNION 
Argcnilno 16. United States 11 


BASEBALL 
American League 

CALIFORNIA— Sent Jorae Fabregas. 
catcher, to Vancouver. PCL. Activated Greg 
Myers, eataser. from iSflav disabled INI. 
National League 

N.Y. METS— Put David Seoul. 1st baseman. 
mT5-doy disabled list. Recalled Rico Brogno. 

.Isj. 0 oseraon.frpm Nortcjk, I L. Signed |<ev«o 

. Mbnlev. pitcher, ond Daniel Engle, catcher, 
and assigned them to GCL Mots. 

PHILADELPHIA— Put Lorry Andersen, 
gllcher.cn 1>day disabled INI. Recalled Tobv 
Borland, pitcher, trom SeranWt-WIlkes 
Barra, il. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 
LOS ANGELES— signed Ernest Jones, line- 
boefcer. . .. 

PHILADELPHIA— Re-signed Vaughn He- 
bron. running bach. Signed Marvin Goodwin, 
saletv. ond Rran McCoy, linebacker. 

HOCKEY 

Notional Mocker League 
DETROIT— Named Ken Holland assUlonl 
general manager. 

MONTREAL— S«neC Paulin Bordeleau to 
2Year contract extension as head couch of 
Fredericton, AHL. 

COLLEGE 

HOCKEY EAST— Dana Hennigar. supervi- 
sor ol otf idols, resigned. 

NCAA— Put Arliona Stale's football pra- 
gram on probation tor 1 reor tor recruiting 
viokillons. 

ALBRIGHT— Nomed SollrAMliierothlei- 
icdl rector and Kevin Klesel assodate athW ic 
director. 


AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL— Named 
Art Wilkins football coach. 

BALL ST.— Named Jotelte L«w women's 
assistant -basketball coach. 

BLOOMS BURG — Named Kathy Gdlor 
women's basketball coach. 

CAL ST. FULLERTON — Named. Kellev 
Hail women's tint asslstoni basketball -zooch 
and necnililng coordinator. 

EAST CA ROL1 NA— Named Lew HHI men's 
assistant basketball coo^t, ..... ■ 

FAIRLEIGH OICKINSON^ExYeidtd 6on- 

Iroa of Sharon Manning Bevelry. women's 
basketball coach, through 1997. 

HARTFORD— Named Jennifer Heppcl as- 
sistant athletics director for Institutional 
compliance Moe Morhordl. baseball MOCh, 
resigned. 

OHIO WESLE YA N— Named Cynthia Holli- 
day volleyball coach. 

PEPPERDINE— Andy LOPet bcoeboH 
coach, resigned so he can lake game pasfflatt 
at Florida. 

ROLLINS— Named Sandro Carter women's 
volleyball and softball coach. 

SAN DIEGO. ST.— Bob MondevIBe. men's 
asslstoni basketball coach, resigned lo lake 
simitar position at Pepporthne. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Nomed John Bautista 
assistant baseboii coach. . 

WASHINGTON ST.— Named Lisa Gazley, 
soccer coach. 


v!i» . . f i V '-J r 

SECOND TEST 

England vs. New Zeatand, Final Day 
Monday, bi Louden 
England 2d Innings; 254-8 
Match was tied, 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


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By Dave Anderson . 

Slew Tcei Times Stmce . . 

AKMONT, Pennsylvania — ^ duint^ 

trophy now, the best golf^- U,th * 

Slates no longer produces u»e 

emphasis on best. . - . ' „ . . ■ t f^r decades 

Once upon a SSSw Tom Watson ana 

of Ben Hogan, Ja ft.^S u tt i | rn ^tf^dominated the major 
Lee Trevino at tb^ fowfin gofers b-'* 

tournaments. Bui not ncw^For Uie nrei 
won the Masters and the Open in riie > - Au2U siC 

Josfe Maria Olazabai of 5 pamu^re rou gh To ^ 

National and Ernie Eb scrambled «.i of wrowu ? ■ 

Loren Rodens at 3:oTer ? pflr74 af-, • ,? 

ter 18 Jholes of their playoff wth. y 

Colin Montgomerie- on Monday. Poi nt . ^ — 

35 ’ 

foot par puti lipped oul - - ... . 

Both Els Mid Robem parred into lhe 

win his first major championship- . ; • . 

As if the Masters-Open sweep were ^ ^Jbaa^smg^nou^i 
for American golf, a different foreign golfer has now wpn six l ! 
the last eight major championships. The c^r four > 

Norman ofAiKTOlia in the British Open andBembard Longer ot 
last year, vSmm# VSttSSl 
PGASampionship and Nick Faldo of ; England in. the Bntisb 

C^>en in 1992. , • J:. ' 

The only Americans to interrupt the foragn do^aUOTjvere 
Paul Azfoier in Iasi yc&s c^ions^ and Lee Janzen m 
last year’s Open. : . . . - - 

Azinger, recovering from lymphoma m1£s 
to defend his PGA.dtle, but Janzenmiss«i the cut mOatoini- 
Fred Couples, who was'off' the PG A Tour for thiw mon fos 

recently: with an - afling 'back,- .aaid. Azxpger .ane the oidy_ 
JSoicans listed among the JO top; goffp^ m the Sony world 
rankings. Couples ranks fifth. Aringpr eighth. 

Tl UT THE SPECTER of Hs winning -the Open at age 24 is 
D particularly gallirig to American g<^PeopIeWidered.which 
toulS^year-old would win a major first, or. Phil Mickdson, . 

the left-hander- From San Piegowiththe sw^mg^-ing-Nov., 
they know. With a 297 at Oalyndnt diat mchidwl a 79 nj his. Jastj 
round, Mickdson finished in a tie for 47th. 

1 Els is not a fluke champion- In^arjy sport, anybody this good 
this young is sddom a fluke. . . . ... . - 

In the last half century, only , two younger golfers have won the 
' Open —Jack Nicklaus in 1 962 at age 22; Jerry Pate ra 197tntage 
23. Nicklaus turned' out to be merelythe'.besr^olfer who ever 
lived. Pate might have' won more raajors if not KK a oainagea 
d wrisL . , 

EIs’s arrival ai Oakmdnt also coincided with a.passingiof the 

* torch. At 64, Palmer definitely Speared in Ms last Open, and at 

* 54. Nicklaus. may have. . ' .. .... ; 

IV All the applause at Oakmont foir Palmer and N icklaus. as well 
*» as for Tom Watson and Hale Irwitv was another example of the 
■* sorry state of American golf. Except-.for. Roberts, md Curas 
gtnmge, who missed lhe 

I ’ were no other Americans in the finnL Certainly no young Ameri- 
cans. Of the top 38 finishers, only four. Americans were sunder 30: 
5 . Clark Dennis and Mike Springer: both 28, and Jim McGovern 
S and Scott Verplank, both 29. : r . . - . 

„ No wonder some small American flags were waved -for Robe rts 

in what began as the playoff from heBL ln a sudden-death format, 
|M Els wmild have been eliminated Jby his bogey ^ cm ; t be first hole 
m and Robots, the 38-year-old touringrpro from Memphis, would 
t* have won on the 342-yard second holc with a: bogey 5 when 
^ Montgomerie tookd a 6 aftcr twri chopped chip-shots. .. 
te In the . British Open playoff- format of fetor, or . five Jwles, 
w depending oh thef outing of dtecourse.. Roberts also would have 
won. But ibis was an 1 8-iole playoff, 3s it. should be in the world s 
v ' most prestigious geif tournaments. -= - - 

“I still like this format,” Robots said. “It’s the truest, fairest 
| way to settle; a championship.”' .- | 

and Moutgo^rie. who shc^^, -the same $141,827^6: 

“The prize for this tournampnt is tiiat trqphyr. he said. 

But now that trophy; win be on display in South Afnca. 


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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1994 


Page 19 


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Some fans weren't bothered by the rain Tuesday. Bat the weather troubled Steffi Graf, who was upset by Lori McNefl. 


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Finally, Who WantstheNBATideMore? 


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By WQliam. C. Rhoden 

Afcw York Tima Senkx 

HOUSTON — Coaches always talk 
about victory going to the team that 
“wants it more.” But what happens 
when two teams of equal strength*, 
equal desire — and who are equally 
hungry for victory . — meet in the final 
game of a dose series? 

• We’re about to find cut 
After a nine-mouth rfitwh up the 
steepestof mountains, the Houston 
Rockets and New Ycak Knicics wiB 
play for the National Basketball Asso- 
ciation's championship Wednesday 
night at the Summit 
The hopes, aspirations and even, the 
pride of two cities has came down to a 
seventh mid deciding game between 
two teams who have weathered criti- 
cism and .earned grudging, but new- 
fcuhd respect 

. •' Houston has" proven' to he a lot, 
tougher physically than everyone 
thought; the Kxndcs a more ingenious 
mam than many imagined. 

So now the NBA cfcmnriouship 
comes down to a test of wills. Who 
wants it more? " 

TbeKrticks’ coach, Pat Riley, said: 
“Both teams want it desperately. It’s 
really not about who wants h more 
than somebody else. It’s who is in 
position, who makes the plays.” 


Charles Oakley said the team that 
wants it the most will leave the most of 
itself on the floor. 

“You don’t want to say after the 
game 1 should have dope this,’ or 1 
should have done that’ If s die sev- 
enth game, you want to leave it on the 
court.” 

But after practice one day, Derek 
Harper, the Knidcs’ veteran point 
guard, suggested that the series may 
go not to winch team wanted it more 
but to the team that deserves it. 

“Til go out on a limb and say that 
this basketball ream deserves it more,” 
he said. 

“We have guys on our team who 
have paid their dues, have been 
through the ups and downs of the 
NBA?* Harper added. “Houston has a 
young basketball team; take agny Kke 
Sam Cassell* a young. player who has a 
lot of time to play. 1 think our years 
are numbered here as far as trying to 
really win a championship.” 

Patrick Ewing played on mediocre 
teams for the cairly part of his career. 
Harper was rescuediroan purgatory in 
January after IV seasons in Dallas. 
Starks and Anthony Mason were 
saved from the horrible uncertainly of 
the Continental Basketball Associa- 
tion. 

On the other hand, Houston's Ha- 


keem Olajuwon made the finals once 
— losing to Boston in 1986 — and 
hasn't come dose since. 

And for all of Harper’s faith in 
young Cassell's bright future, Cassdl, 
bom on Baltimore’s East Side, knows 
all to well about the fragility of life. 
His friend, hero and fellow Dunbar 
High alumni, Reggie Lewis, collapsed 
and died in the prime of life Like so 
many other young people who have 
witnessed dozens of murders before 
their 18th birthdays, the present is 
often mare reliable than the future. 

“I may not get hoe again,” Cassdl 
said earlier in the series. 

Who wants it more, Houston or 
New York? 

Houston desperately wants to shed 
its Choke City image by winning the 
first professional championship in the 
city's history. New York has seen its 
share of championships; now it wants 
to become the first city to win the 
hockey and basketball championships 
in the same year. 

Before now, both teams could only 
smril a championship. Now they both 
can see it: The trophy is in the house. 

Houston quietly began preparing 
for a victory celebration last week and 
stepped up efforts after the Rockets 
victory on Sunday. But dty officials 
might want to ask Rangers Ians about 
die folly of open pre-planning. 


True, Houston, the team, has histo- 
ry on its side — 19 straight seventh 
games have been won by the home 
team. But Houston, the city, has histo- 
ry against it, a parade of teams that 
approached the pinnacle of success 
only to wilL 

In spirit, the Kmicks will enter the 
arena much like Mike Tyson entered 
the ring: no socks, no robe. Just shoes. 

f loves and an indomitable will After 
06 games, critics continue to lam- 
baste the Knicks; only a victory on 
Wednesday will win converts. 

Will these seven games be remem- 
bered as a “classic” series? Probably 
noL There have been no defining mo- 
ments, hke Kareem Abdul-Jabbar hit- 
ting a sky hook with three seconds left 
as Milwaukee defeated Boston in dou- 
ble overtime of Game 6 in 1974. Or 
Michael Jordan's riveting perfor- 
mance in last years decisive game. 

All that these teams have provided 
is quarter after quarter oE hard-nosed, 
gjve it-everything-you’ve-got basket- 
ball And if the game boils down to a 
test of wills, not blunders. New York 
will prevail 

“Ttople say this is not great theater 
or it doesn’t have the drama of other 
finals” Rdey said, “but they’re not 
feeling what players and coaches are 
feding. There’s enough drama and 
theater in here to last us a lifetime.” 


McNeil Upsets Graf 
At Rainy Wimbledon 


iilill 


By Steve Coll 

Washington Post Strwtn 

WIMBLEDON. England — 
It was that sort of day: gusiy, 
dark and ominous, ripe for the 
unusual Whipping wind set car 
alarms squawking all around 
the All England Club’s grounds 
and carried perfect shots out of 
bounds. And on Centre Court, 
Lori McNeil upset Steffi Graf, 
the defending women’s champi- 
on and world No. 1, 7-5, 7-6, in 
Wimbledon’s first round. 

It was the first time in Wim- 
bledon history that a defending 
women’s champion had lost her 
opening match, and the first 
tune since 1962 that a top wom- 
en’s seed fell so early. It was 
also Grafs second straight de- 
feat. following her loss to Mary 
Pierce in the French Open semi- 
finals, the first tune that had 
happened since 1985, when she 
was 15. 

A 20-year tour veteran from 
the United States, ranked 22d 
in the world, McNeil 30, held 
her composure and her slashing 
serve through two rain delays, a 
nerve-jangling second-set tie- 
breaker and a gathering cre- 
scendo of grandstand excite- 
ment Graf played erratically; 
she double-faulted to lose the 
first set blew an easy smash 
during the tiebreaker and fol- 
lowed that up with another 
double fault 

“I didn’t fed very comfort- 
able the whole game through, 
and not very confident at all” 
Graf said. “My strokes were on 
and off, my serves were on and 
off, so it was difficult for me to 
get a good feding, really.” 

McNeil has beaten Graf be- 
fore — once, in a 1992 first- 
round match at the Virginia 
Slims championship. But her 
career has been up and down. 

McNeil said she came into 
Wimbledon thinking that to re- 
peat her previous triumph over 
Graf, she needed to stay in- 
tensely focused cm each point 
and to volley as often as possi- 
ble to Grafs backhand side. It 
worked. 

“My concentration was real- 
ly good and I felt that I was 
serving well especially in the 
first set,” McNeil said. The 
wind was swirling. What, was 
easy became difficult. I was 
making the right choices and 
the right shots 

She opened the match with a 
steady strong serve and estab- 
lished herself at the net while 
Graf flayed the ball wide and 
long, occasionally stopping to 
stare at the sky as if in search of 
explanation from the winds. 

The pair exchanged service 
breaks and then each set the 
other back on her heels with 
overpowering serves, knotting 


the set ax five games each. Bui 
the skies opened for what would 
be the first of two rain delays, 
each more than an hour. 

After the first delay, Graf 
looked even more rusty than 
before, piling up unforced er- 
rors untiu she handed the first to 
McNefl with a double fault. 

With momentum as well as 
the breeze behind her at the 
start of the second set. McNeil 
suddenly became tentative, and 
Graf revived to punish her with 
crisp passing shots and emphat- 
ic smashes. Serving in the third 
game, McNeil offered Graf 
weak lobs and volleys of the 
sort she did not dare present in 
the first set; within minutes her 
serve was broken and Graf had 
a three games to one lead. 

But along her painfully delib- 
erate, circling walks between 
points, McNeil mustered 
enough concentration to hold 
save in a tight fifth game be- 
fore rain intervened again. 

When the pair reemerged in 
the dank twilight, Graf snapped 
again to life, nailing first serves 
consistently for the first time in 
the match and returning low 
and hard. Yet McNeil when 
others mi gh t well have folded, 
hung on just enough. The proof 
of her tenacity came in the 
ninth game of that second set, 
when trailing three games to 
five, she retrieved a set point 
from Graf by serving an ace. 

From there the ovations 
gathered volume steadily as 
McNeil won Lhe next two 
games, volleying past Grafs 
backhand side several times 
and forcing the champion to 
whiff at a deftly arched lob. But 
in the 12th game, three points 


from defeat, Graf steadied and 
recovered, forcing the tie- 
breaker. 

McNeil raised her game 
again at the second tiebreaking 
point; face-to-face with Graf at 
the net, she leaped instinctively 
at a volley to her feet and 
knocked it over Grafs shoulder 
for a winner. 

“It wasn’t acrobatic,’’ 
McNeil said afterward. “I was 
just trying to defend myself a 
little.” 

Then Graf collapsed. She 
dumped an easy overhand 
smash into the net to concede 
one point and double faulted on 
the next, falling behind, four 
points to three. Appropriately, 
McNeil volleyed past Graf for 
the match winner. 

McNeil played down any talk 
of a triumphal march from here 
to the final One match at z 
time, she said. 

“I feel now that I'm matur- 
ing,” she said, “I’m really ma- 
ture as a person off the court, 
and I think that’s helped me on 
the court. And I think 1 keep 
thinp in proper perspective 

now.” 

Indeed. McNeil is not the 
only mature player to benefit 
from Grafs fall; Martina Nav- 
ratilova’s sentimental bid for a 
10th angles title in her farewell 
tournament now looks more 
plausible. 

In the men's draw, only a 
handful of matches involving 
seeded players were completed 
before dark. Ninth seed Andrei 
Medvedev of Ukraine beat Hai- 
ti’s Ronald Agenor, 6-4, 5-7, 6-3, 
6-2. No. 14 Marc Rosset defeat- 
ed David Witt, 6-2, 6-4 and 7-6. 


Results From, Wimbledon 


MEN'S SINGLES 

OOvler Deiifttre. France, itef. Rodoiphe Gil- 
bert. Franco, 6-2, 7-& 7-5; Kenny TTiome, US, 
def. Jim GrabbU.SL.S-Z retired; Jonas BiwU- 
rnon. Sweden, doi Mark Prtehey, Britain, 6-1 

6- l.MwMbW;Woyne Ferreira SootaAfricn, 
def. Moortcio Hadad. Cntombta. 64 3* 7- 1, 6- 
3; Marcea Ondrnka. South Africa, del. v.iu ei 
NovDcnk. Czech Republic. 7-6 (10-SI. M, 7*. 

Korstan Broach. Germany, def. Jonathan 
Start. U.S- 6-1 *4. 34. 66. M; More Roraet 
(14), Switzerland, def. David Witt, IIXHK 

7- 6 (7-2); Richard Frombera, Australia det. 
Hendrik Dreekmwm. Germany. 6-4, 6-7 (Ml I. 
*£.*4.6-3: Andrei Medvedev »). Ukraine, 
def. Ronald Apenur, Haiti. 6-4, 5-7. 6a 6-2; 
Brad Gilbert. ILS* def. Kami Kueora Slova- 
kia M. >4 (7-4), 44. 6-2. 

WOMEN'S SINGLES 
Conditto Martinez (3). Spain, det Rene 
Simmon- Alter. Canada. 6-1.63: Lindsay Dav- 
enport 19), U A. def. Julie Ha tart. France, 61. 
66; taee Gcr ra ctiotaBui. ATMntlno. def. Dcb- 
tde Graham. US. 63, 61; Tessa Price. Scuff* 
Africa det Andrea Simonova. Czech Repub- 
lic 61 7Si Lori so Neffand. Latvia det Ka- 
trina Adame. US, 6a 63. 

Itatr o L wraea Cz e ch ita e nhHr. dH. Helen 
KelesL Canada. 7-6 (661.62; Ftorenda Labaf. 
AratnttaadeLSablne Hpdc (lSl.Gennany.6 
X66.64; Alexia Dechauma-Boiieret, Franca 
det Kyoto N oaa ta i fc a Japan. 6& 7*; Mori- 
mtne WerGH. U4L.de>. Bettina Futeo-VllleJla. 
Annina 62, 5-7. 62; Maadalena Maleeva 
(161, Botaarta, def. Shaun Stafford, U-&.67 te- 
ll. 6Z 64. 


Nana M/yosl. Japan, det Lisa Raymond. 
US- 4-6, 74 66; Anna SmaNmova lereeLdef. 
EuOefllaMontokova. Russia. 6644.7-5; Yam 
Komta Joaxbdef. Petra Beserow, Germany, 
60.61; Jenny By me, Australia, dal. Janette 
Husarovo,Shwalcla6&60; Lari McNeil. US. 
det Steffi Graf (11. Germany, 7-5, 7-6 (7-5): 
Maria Jom Gakfana. Arvantlno. def. Beafe 
RrinstoiSer, Austria. 7-6 [641. 7-5: Mermfilft 
McGrath. US. def. Julie PuiUn. BrttaJrv 6-2,6 
4. Ante Huber (12). Germany, del Jo Durte. 
Britain. 7-462; Kimberly Pa. US. def. Mor- 
teta Kocftfa. Germany. 62. 64; Caroline 
KuMman US. def. Karine Quentrcc. France. 
M, 7-& 64: Arantxa Santoez VKWla CO. 
Spotodef. Katerina Malaeva, Buteoria61.6 
2 ; Rachel McQotBatv Australia, del. Patty 
Fendfck. US. 6i 24. 6-1 

SUSPENDED MATCHES 
Meate Stevtea 

Patrick Rafter. Australia, vs. Jomte Mor- 
aan. Australia. 64, 67, 64 
Alexcndor Mnmz.Germany,v& Thomas Mus- 
lor. Austria. 67, 7-t (7-31. 67 17-9).64; Laur- 
ence Ttoeman, Itat y. vo. V evmny Koteinnwr 
(>57. Russia. 67, 74 (Ml. 67. 7-6 (74). 7-7; 
Wally Masur. Australia, vs. Aim Antanitsch, 
Austria 61. 6Z 34; Alex Corratfa. Spain, vs. 
Henri Lsconta, France. 66 *4, 7-6 74 (66). 
Women's Staples 

Pam Shrtvsr.us. vs. Amy Frazier. US. 67 
1 4-7), 62. 6-A; Gabrieta Sabattnl Ob). Argenti- 
na vs. JudJ tn Wtasner. Austria, 2-6, 64; Eliza- 
beth Smyfle. Australia vs. Kristie Boaserf, 
Netherlands. 4-6 6-4; Mma Enda. Japan, vs. 
NaftUta Zvereva IS), Belarus, 64, 64. 









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Yachts: Sleeker, Faster, More Dangerous 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


By Barbara Lloyd 

Narjork Tbn aSenia -' 
NEW YORK *— A ceotmy 
ago, when sailing,' vessels woe. 
made largely of wood, salora 
watched fbr leaks. But aboard 
models boats, most of which 
are boih'of synthetics and plas- 
tics, crews face a xnotrehiffldknis 
threat; Weakened hulls., that, 
start Hexing Kke the rides of a' 
child’sswimming pooL 

Most satiors ot the 14 boats 

in the 32,000-nxfle (51,710-kdo- 
meterl Whitbread Round the 
WofJd Race experienced ^ tins 
phenomenon with varying do- ' 

tire weaken^ftnte 
cansedtrboat to withdraw from 
the; race; which ended last 
mon t h . But questions are being 
asked about; whether theprob- 
lemcan Jbe corrected, orrattlt 
er the Emits of safety are being 
pushed by boats that are too i 
flimsy, - ’•* . :■ 

The^ Whitbread fleet included 
10 Whitbread 60s, a new'dass 
for. the 1993-94 race, and fotro . 
older 8C^o«(25-riwt«r) m*r 
yachts. 

Otin Stephens, an expert on . 
boating , safety , who has de- 


signed more than 2^00 yachts, 
including ax successful Ameri- 
ca’s Cup contenders, questions 
the. seaworthiness of the Whit- 
bread 60s. 

"If a boat is to stay afloat, it 
win stay in one piece and keep 
the water out,” Stephens said. 
"Tt seems to me that the most 
important tiring is its strength.” 

-In yacht design, there is al- 
ways an~“ignonmce factor,” he 


Bruce Farr and Associates of 
Annapolis, Maryland, appear 
to have found a flaw in one of 
their building materials. 

When the sides of a boat start 
flexing, crews must improvise. 
That usually means shoring up 
the weak section from the in- 
side. Some crew members tore 
apart their bunks, salvaging bed 
pipe frames to brace the interior 
walls of the boat. 


.Die Whitbread race this year was called 
the "delamination derby” because of a 
problem with one of the hull materials in 
ih# Whitbread 60s. 


said, aHuding to the unknown 
effects of evolving technology. 
."The Tratferials change all the 
time, and the way; they’re put 
' together mai-es a difference.” 

: Although he was not in- 
. vcitvedin the Whitbread, Iris as- 
sessment may be on target. 
^Most of the Whitbread 60s suf- 
fered extensive hull deteriora- 
tion. 

. : Yacht designers, including 
Russell Bowler, a partner with 


The crew of the 60-foot Span- 
ish sailboat, Galicia *93 Pescan- 
ova, cut off the cad of the spin- 
naker pole, batted it up agamst 
the flexing part of the null and 
secured the pole with a bread 
board and flying pan. 

~Xt’s very alarming when 
you’re. actually looking at it,” 
said Bowler, referring to the 
boat* s bulging interior. 

While Bowler did not sail in 
the latte, he listened to many 


W&jitsa MoorerReniatch 

: V. J' V V^AaodaedFras- 

W®^^EvanderHolytedd is witting 
another shot at the title. 

• “Godsrifl fisd a way,” Hoiyfidd trfd 1 be 
A ftant « 'T/xiiW. D l_r^rtr.«tTtntUJIl on Monday, t 


rt fltwa -7- 7- rr™ ■ 

wanttopic^rmhealed. 

Hciyfekl 3i , he had made the decision 

Samrdav aa a Houston restaurant- whm two 


Saturday in: a Houston restaurant; 

fans aitoJhfailCTV^WL: He saidhefdt fine. 

; Wof tom 

yda ttxT n FtoNfield saut "And it rest tat 
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died^fr Ven&i«4e and ;a bote betw^ his 
«-T. A--> -• L.1.1.^. .H6lnrBlO hit WBA 


TPTTflTI + 


Kedl Ulvang’s Body Found 

OSLO (AP) — Olympic siding star Vegard 
Ulvang expressed relief Tuesday that the body of 
his TTwsmng older brother had been found. 

. Ketil Ulvang disappeared OcL 13 in a sudden 
snow storm whflejoggingin die mountains near 
his arctic hometown of Kwkenes. He was wear- 
ing light clothing and had so survival equip- 
ment; his body was spotted by an army helicop- 
ter this week in a small lake, about eight 
kilometers -(five miles) off the path he was 
following.. 


Fur the Record 


'Tw pisyed en it fot a Ira^g tnnc, md^ 

wi|iiio 9-.111 ", r • 


Ron Gnat, rdeased by the Atlanta Braves in 
Marti after brealong his 1^ in a dirt-bike acd- 
dent, signed a two-year contract with the Cincin- 
nati Reds: ' (AP) 

The Jnfiaaa Department of CorrectioD said it 
was investigating allegations that several agency 
officials accepted payments for preferential 
treatment for boxer Mrke Tysoo. . (AP) 

; Lome Hubibiw , was coach of the 

NHL’s New York Islanders. (NYT) 


tales of woe. He is the structural 
engineering expert for Farr, 
which has designed seven of the 
10 Whitbread 60s. 

The Whitbread boats were 
remarkably close in speed. 
Some of the yachts often stayed 
wi thin sight of each other for 
days, causing their crews to 
push even harder. Under these 
conditions, Stephens said, no 
boat is strong enough. 

The Whitbread race this year 
was bong called the “del anima- 
tion derby” because of a prob- 
lem with one of the hull materi- 
als in the Whitbread 60s. There 
also were hull problems with 
several of the maxi-yachts, but 
experts axe focusing only on the 
60s, the one design that will be 
allowed in the next race, in 
1997-98. 

Their hulls are built like a 
sandwich, with hard inner and 
outer shells that cover a foam 
core. The shells are made of 
fiberglass and Kevlar, a strong 
synthetic material used in bul- 
letproof vests, and are bonded 
to foam made of pvc, a polyvi- 
nyl chloride plastic. The combi- 
nation cuts down on weight, 
which helps increase speed 

In ddamination, the inner or 
outer shell separates from the 
foam, winch can cause a boat’s 
rides to flex. 

However, in the current rash j 
of trouble, ddammation is not 
the culprit, Bowler said Rather, 
the ti ering is bang caused by 
cracks in the foam core. The 
pvc, used mainly for refrigera- 
tion, is not up to the standards 
of more expensive marine mate- 
rials, he smd 

“I think that the boats have 
proved that a core material of 
that density is not quite up to 
the job,” said Bowler. “It 
doesn’t have the quality control 
it should have.” 

In the case of the British 
yacht Reebok, formerly Dol- 
phin & Youth, a flexing prob- 
lem in the hull was not as seri- 
ous as first appeared said Paul 
Vernon, the project manager. 

The boat fell off the ride of a 
wave while sailing to Fort Lau- 
derdale, Florida, and the im- 
pact caused a six-foot crack in 
the hull's interior. 


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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY , JUNE. 22, 1994 


** 





K .'tc: 

• v> - v£ 


By William Gildea 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — For more than a 
half, Saudi Arabia gave its faithful reason 
enough to dream, creating tantalizing vi- 
sions of a shocking upset by taking a one- 
goal lead against die Netherlands. 

Then reality returned, as the Dutch 
dominated the last 45 minutes to win. 2-1, 
on Monday night 

The stellar veterans Frank Rrjkaard and 
Whs Jonk worked the midfield like pis- 
tons, brin ging back the ball and control- 
ling play each time the tiring Saudis sallied 
forth in hopes of a second goaL Jonk, a 6- 
foot (1.82-meter), 170-pound f75-kilo- 
gram) veteran with the Intern azi on ale club 
of Milan, drove home the equalizer 
straight on from 20 meters in the 50th 

minute 

Gaston Taumenu who came on at right 
forward in the second half, headed the 
winner into an empty net in the 87th min- 
ute as the Saudi goalkeeper, Mohammed 
Daeyea, got caught out too far. It was one 
of the few mistakes he made. 

Taument, at 23 one of the rising young 
Dutch players with only mm years of inter- 
national experience, stood perfectly still 
and grasped his long hair as he realized his 
achievement. 

Jorge Solan, the Saudi team's Argentine 
coach, had it right when he said, “If we bad 
a little more experience, we could have 
competed with them more." Q early, the 
Saudis were not intimidated. They raced in 
and took the first shot and scored in the 
19th minute on a short header by the 


midfielder Fuad Amin .off -a free kick by . 
Saeed Owairan. 

"Saudis score, Saudis score,'’ came the 
cry from the crowd of 52^35. That may 
have been the number of tickets sold, but 
at least 2,000 upper-deck seats remained 
empty. Most were the least-expensive end- 
zone seats. A World Cup official said that 
he could not explain the vacant seats. 

The Saudis had the fans dreaming of an 
upset reminiscent of the UJ5. defeat of 
England in 1950. Bookmakers in Las Ve- 
gas and abroad have rated the Saudis.any- 
wherc from 250-to-I to 500- to- 1 to win the 
Cup. And hare they were outfacing the 
Dutch, and, to boot, the so-called Desert 
Fete, Majed Abdullah, was putting on a 
priceless exhibition. 

Once, die Dutch had to grab Abdullah's 
shin to stop him. Another time, Abdullah, 
dancing and dribbling, kept the ball from 
two Dutch players only to slip as he dosed 
on the goal The Dutch could find neither 
the Desert Pete nor their game. 

"Everybody though 1 Holland was j 
to a party tonight” said So lari. "But t 
got complicated for them. Undou b tedly, 
Holland is a great team with a great future. 
As in every world Cup, teams are testing 
ftg other and exploring their limits." 

Butthe Dutch jarred the. Saudis, who 
frequently were knocked to the ground 
One rime, d uring a prolonged period with 
a Saudi player stretched out, Rijkaaid re- 
minded the referee to make certain he was 
keeping track of injury time even though it 
was early in the game; the Dutch , were 
rattled. But in the extra time of the first 
half, Abdullah limped off, unable to con- . 


tinue because of a knee injury The 

has slowed him. iriermi-' 1 ’ 

Dutch gathered theffl £ Iv !L Exuberance 
siem, and came on M U ° 
shown initially by Saudi Arabia- 

Finally, the .Dui^ wok 
space in -the Saudi defense. -p Hy 

veterans asserted 

Rjgkaard - the only one £®^fe a Ui L 

the great tnumvirate wrth Ruu^ h 
who quit the team m a dispute wuu 
Dick Advocaat, and Maeo Vw ed 

kept off the squad by injury. Stro 
Ronald Koeman began takmsl^,^ 
lodu to the flash- of cameras, and 
Bergkamp , though not brilliant, was m 
active in. the second balf- 

"Wehaddm^tyccraLroUi^^ g®* 
in the first 30- minutes,” saidAdvot^- 
“After that, . we began - creating our 
chances. In the second half, we ouipla> w 
the Arabians. We were much more agpw- 
sive. That was the difference.” The Dutch 
said they tried to talk themselves into 
hot being overorofident, but the forward 
Bryan Roy indicated that it had been ui m- 
cuh. “We in saying, ‘Don't underesti- 
mate the Saudis^. "Don't underestimate 

than.' ” 

“Fm very disappointed,” said. Amin, 
“blit we played with style. . We are very 
proud to be m the World Cup. It is good 
[or us arid good for Saudi Arabia:” 


l 


Said Benjkamp, “We were shocked after 
- their goal, but we needed to be shocked a 
little to play better ” Both he and the 
Dutch fans expected better Hu n gs, for 
good reason, as the first round continues. 












Brazilians Sway Past Static Russians, 2-0 


• > . i’ \ 

• _ > j.v.'.., .0] 


• -''if. 

• ' * i* 



By Jere Longman 

New York Tima Service 

PALO ALTO, California —The beating 
of the samba drums never stopped, nor did 
the Brazilian team lose for a second its 
jubilant, fluid rhythm in do minating Rus- 
sia, 2-0, in its World Cup opener. 

Brazil, a pre tournament favorite, domi- 
nated the match with its intricate passing 
relentless scoring threats and predatory 
defense. The two goals could have easily 
become eight 

But on a majestic, breezy Monday after- 
noon at Stanford Stadium, a half-volley by 
RomSrio, the arrogant striker, and a penal- 
ty kick by Rai, the disparaged midfielder, 
were more than sufficient. 

“At no moment did I fed we were 
threatened," said Carlos Alberto Parreira, 
Brazil’s coach. 

The stadium swayed like a giant field of 
sunflowers, pulsating with the green-an ti- 
mid shirts and flags of the world's most 
Familiar and celebratory fans. An expec- 
tant crowd of 81,061 showed up, and Bra- 
zil did not disappoint. The rush of scoring 
chances began in the seventh minute, and 
Russia fell into immediate retreat, 

Brazil toyed with its opponent as Rai 
played air-traffic controller in midfield to 
launch Rom&rio and Bebeto, as Leonardo 
made menacing runs from his defensive 
position at left back and as Mauro Silva 
stood in the recessed midfield and inter- 
cepted what few passes the Russians could 
string together. 

Russia, playing for the first time as an 
independent nation, had its road to the 


World Cup rutted by a player rebeDkm 
against Coach Pavel Sadyrin. - - ' " 

The Russians opened their tournament 
without enthusiasm or conviction, lacking 
speed and purpose. They dropped 10 men 
into defense and attempted to counterat- ■ 
tack, but their actions were tentative and 
futile. 

It did not help that defender Viktor 
Gnopko was unavailable, haring been sus- 
pended for the opener after receiving a red 
card in his team’s final qualifying match:' 

“The Russians really did everythingpos- 
sible to make life difficult for us,” Parreira 
said. “They tried to counterattack, but 
Brazil was very careful in making sure that 
it would not be caught up in that kind of 
ploy.” 

This initial match was met with tense 
anticipation in Brazil, a country that is 
always expected to win the World Cup but 
has suffered a drought for the last five 
tournaments, spanning 24 years. 

This team had been rent with distrac- 
tion. In May, Romtirio’s father was kid- 
napped. Last week, Bebeto’ s pregnant wife 
was robbed at gunpoint. The midfield was 
unsettled, and Rai came under relentless 
criticism for his lack of form. 

Demanding journalists were clamoring 
for three strikers instead of two; 400 Bra- 
zilian reporters and photographers chroni- 
cle every game, every practice, every 
turned ankle, every personnel decision, ev- 
ery rumor. They scuffled with security 
guards after Brazil’s final exhibition when 
sacred post-game interviews were not al- 
lowed, and they will be satisfied by noth- 


less than Brazes fourth World Cup 


“A lot is eagsected, but we have absorbed 
the expectations,” Rai said. ... 

^Haying confidently fromthe beginning, 
Brazil got its first goal in the 27th minute 
off a corner kick. Bebeto launched a high 
: kick from the Jeft oonxer and Rai jumped 
for a header, freezing the' Russian goal- 
keeper Dmitri Kharine. 

1 Rom&rio sidestepped his defender, Vla- 
dislav Ternavsky and, just as the ball hit 
the turf, half-volleyed it into the lower 
right comer of the net. \ 

-Russia played more assertively. early in 
the second naif until Rom&rio made a 
dangerous run in the 53d minute and was 
taken down in the penalty area by Ter- 
navsky. The same- dung hapaened-in the 
first half, but the referee, An-Yan lim Kee 
Chon of Mauritius, somehow missed the 
foul. This time, he rightly awarded Brazil a 
penalty kick. 

Rai stood nonchalantly, hands on his 
hips, then punched the ball into the lower 
right comer of the goal as Kharine leaned 
the other way. Brazil went tip 2-0, and 
Russia went down lor the count. ^ 

“It was a decisive moment in the 
match,” Rai said “If I miss, it would, really 
have motivated Russia. If I convert: it 
could take all the confidence out of them.” 

He ccmverted, and the celebration was . 
on. 

“It was a pood game, given the high level 
of expectations," Rai said. T expect, the 
team wiQ.be more liberated and free-fiow- , 
ing in upcoming games.” 


ith a bicycle kick, the Saudi defender Ahmed Jameel Madani, top, cleared the ball from the goal area m his team's 2-1 loss to the FIFA RciCCtS Ir&ldTlcl ^8 PIgCL fOT JFotCT Bffitlks 
stheriamk The striker Majed Abdullah, his teammate, missed a shot in front of the plunging Dutch goalkeeper Ed De Goej. J J 


Of WORLD CUP GAMES, RESULTS, STANDINGS 


FIRST ROUND 

Al’h/res GMT 

"-ica marc pc sx j inctoy 

GROUP A 


3>TiJPIC 
TV* ■arc 

unites Sums 
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Germany 

Scum 

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GROUP C 

W L T OF OA Pta 

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0 0 12 2 1 


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ai PnnliJC. l-hcr 
or.o : L'ni- ra Sums 1 '■>? 

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Wednesday Jur» 22 

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P.vr&iiO .1 ; .iWri Jnc. 2K S GVT 
a- <»as.!Ctna. Cav.i 

vo'on:', 'Jmiwc 'S’iict Ti-'f GIST 

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pjst = f - ■■ : ^ - •; 

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CoTr.erooi^ irfe-St' 1 - ’ re 

Word ay June SO 

Siar'er; Cs''’ 

6: M.’ 2. 0 

Pridi'jf June 24 

c: Z-.ji'-zre 

ofai' 1 -5 5'Jdt OwT 

Wien 

ry ■; fiesta "220 G'.'T 
Tusoday Juns 22 

A: i’jn'er: C3'» 

‘j*- 5 ' 

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B-ai> .a 'j— wr 


Friday, Juno 17 
ArC w cuga 
Gem-.jfv '. Bolivia 0 

a: Dallas 
SMin r. Sou oi Korea 2. ha 

Tuesday June 21 

AI Grecago 

Gvrmjiy vs 3 Min. 2C05 GUT 

Thursday June 23 
Al ForLCO. Mass 

Scum Korea vs sonvn 2335 GMT 
Monday June 27 
a: Cmca go 
Qohviava Soan. 2005 GMT 
At Caras 

Swmany vs So/tti Korea. 2005 GMT 
STOOP D 


GROUP E 

W L T 
Iraand 1 C 0 

Norway 1 0 Q 

Raly 0 10 

Mauco 0 i 0 

Saturday. June 18 
Al Easi HutrwloM. n j 
bound i. haty 0 

Sunday June 19 
ai W a ahmgion 

Norway 1 MarucoO 

TTiuraday June 23 
Ai East RumorTort N.J 
Italy va. Norway, 2005 GMT 

Friday June 24 
AiOnardo. Fla 
Mexico vs. Ireland, iKKGMT 
Tuesday June 2B 

Ai Easl Rutherford, x J 
IraLand vs. Norway 163SQMT 
Ai Wosnoigion 
Italy vs. Ms'ico. I63S GMT 
GROUP F 


Cr SA Ptt 

l 0 3 

1 0 3 

0 » 0 
0 i C 


A/genima 

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’ityrr-a 

Gnwee 


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4 0 3 


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NemerUnos 
Saudi Araou, 

Morocco 


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1 0 3 

Z I 3 
1 2 9 

0 i 0 


Tuesday, June 21 
A| FjibOTO. ‘^eSB 
A.-'jeri- na * -3reece 0 

61 Dallas 

'agW'ars au^ar-A. 2335 GMT 

Saturday June 25 
At Foiooro. Mass 

Argenima vs. Iwgana. 2M5 GTAT 

Sunday June 28 

Ai Onego 

5uigan»v3 Giwce, 16KGMT 
Thursday June 30 
At FcntWO. MOSS 
G'e«e vs ritgana 2335 GMT 
AiDbBAS 

Argnnhna vs Bulgaria. 2335 QMT 


The Official Sprint World Cup 
I nformation Line 

Call 

+1+177+230+4348* 

for daily updates on scores, players and 
game recaps 

-d&i 

Sprint 

Call-, v. ill he hilled standard 1150 rales 

• Il.rJv. Ji. J - 1 *2 1 1 - 230- J 1JX 


Sunday. June 19 
ai Gnanco Re 
Belgium 1. Morocco 0 

Monday June 20 
At Wash mg tori 
Netherlands 2. Saudi A/auia 1 
Saturday June 25 
Ai Ortandc. Fla 

Belgium vs Nethatianas. 1635 G61T 
AI East Rutherford NJ 
Saudi Arabia vs. Morocco. 1635 GMT 
Wednesday June 2S 
At Ortonao. FI*. 

Morocco vs. Netherlands. 1 635 Gl/T 
Al Waahirvjion 

Brignini vs Saudi Aracw. 1435 GMT 

SECOND ROUND 

Saturday July 2 
Same J7 
At Chicago 

Grouo C winner »s Grdua 6 fl or F 8-rs mace 
1705 GMT 

GimH 

Al Vi OOhlTrgllir. 

Grouo A .ww ota.je vs. G'>rD C second 
place. 2-J35 GMT 

Sunday July 3 
Game 39 
ai Danas 

Group F tectiM 01 jeo vs. Cmuo 3 Mtonc 
OXB 1705 GMT 

Gam* 63 

as Paaaaena Gaul 

Grain * ■mn.-iar n. Grous C DvE Ih'Rl 31 ese 
JCQSGM7 

Monday July 4 
Game 41 

as Orlande Fij 

Group f winner vs Grtxro € »eane pU«. 1 fcCi 
GMT 

Gome 4S 

aiStanlora C^ii 

Group Bwnr^rveGfouo A Ccr C mna pac« 
IMS GMT 

Tuesday July 5 
0 mm 43 

A - “C»K)rO Miss. 


Grout) □ winne. n. Group B. E or F lhirO place. 
1 70S GMT 

Gama 04 

A: Ear Rutherford. N.J. 

GrOuO E winner .3. Group D sacond plase. 2035 
nj/T 

QUARTERFINALS 

Saturday July B 
Game 45 

ai Fcimro. Mass 

Gaina*3wrnrervs Gemo 3S wmoer. 1635 GMT 

Game 46 

as Dams 

Ga.no 41 wiinaTvs Game AS wmnar. 1935 GMT 
Sunday July 10 
Gama 47 

A: Sail Hulherfort. NJ 

G«r« 44 wrnar vs Gene 37 mnmor . 1 605 GMT 
Game 48 

Ai SlaniSro. Calif. 

Giit« 33 wiim tc v» Game «j winner. IKS GMT 

SEMIFINALS 

Wednesday July 13 

Ai Easi Rutnertwc N j 

G*na sT winner vb Game 45 winner. 2005 GMT 
A; Pasadana. Can* 

G4*m so winner vs. Game *6 wumar. 2335 GMT 

THIRD PLACE 

Saturday July IB 
At Pasadena. Can 
Semitinai 133S GMT 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

Sunday July 17 

A: Pasaoona. CaW 
Semi Inal winners. 1935 GMT 


Reuters 

DALLAS — FIFA has dismissed as 
over-reaction Irish complaints that World 
Cup players were not getting enough water 
to drink during games and said Ireland’s 
coach. Jack Charlton, should concentrate 
instead on his coaching. 

The world soccer body also rejected 
Charlton’s suggestions that there should 
be regular drink breaks because of the 
sweltering conditions in many games, say- 
ing play already stopped enough for the 


placers to take water. 


rlton said on Monday that his team 
would lodge a formal complaint with 
FIFA that World Cup players risked seri- 
ous dehydration problems unless action 
was taken immediately. 

He said the Irish striker Tommy Coyne 
had been ill due to dehydration after Ire- 
land's 1-0 victory over Italy in New Jersey 
on Saturday. An Irish official sent to the 
far touchUne with bottles of water had 
been prevented from approaching the 
pitch by security guards, Charlton said at 
his team's base In Orlando, Florida. 


But FIFA's general secretary, Scpp Blat- 
ter, said players were entitled to take drinks 
on all rides of the pitch providing that it did 
not interfere with play. He said that if. 
security officials intervened on Saturday, it 
must have been a misunderstanding. 

“There is no question of players not 
being allowed to drink," he said. “We 
don’t want to have any influence on the 
health of players. But we don’t want bot- 
tles thrown onto the pitch.” 

He said no other team had complained. 

“The Irish seem to overdo tins," he said. 
“They were complaining about drinks be? 
fore the tournament had even started. 
Charlton should perhaps attach more im- 
portance to his second game than to details 
which have been taken care of." 

Charlton said be expected the heat and 
humidity to be worse for Friday’s game 
with Mexico in Orlando. 

After the Italy match, Chariton said, 
Coyne had to be carried on and off the . 
plane bringing his team back to Florida. 



• H*c« Doyt/Tlr ABooaird Pro* 

Coach Jack Chariton, left, hi Orlando, 
Florida, where he says Ins Irish players will 
face dehydration problems against Mexico. 


New Balls, Old Problems for Goalkeepers 


Match Results 


Netnerionds 2. ScunS Arabia 1 
Scoron: Neirisrtends — Mlm Jonk (50tti). 
Gallon Tollmen! fS7lhl: Saudi Arabia — 
Fcca Amm until. 

Refrree: Monurt vesro Dios (Spoinj. 
Yellow core,: Nemenonos — uirien «n 
Gat»el 127th 1. Fran* de Boer USItil; Saudi 
Arafija — AMultan So left Dossil rath). Mo- 
narameo Abdul Je*od omFuadAirdn uaay 
Brasil X RoMW S 

Scorer: Renwne iTTtni.Ral ism. P enalty). 
Referee AnYcnLimiuwairaiMouritiut). 
Yellow cor as: »vsUo — Vuri NlkHerav 
(MM). Gmifr! Uileatov 1 asm I, Dmitri Kuzn*t- 
Wv LTWi). 

Arg e ntina *. Greece 9 
Scorers: Geeriei flenstvra it, ** ana W). 
Owao Maraaare (601 
Referee: Arturo Anode, lUAl 
Yellow ceres: Argentina— Feman*i Case- 
n» i4l]: Greece — Panawws T»»uftWe» 
12SI. Sfeiles A/lonom 154? 


Goal Scorers 


After maKDM played Maaday 
S — Florin vqierlu Rodudalu, Rorearto. 

1 — JuTOon Kliiwmaiw. Germany :JuiloSa- 
lliss end JonAntfenlCeikaeiKfo Saaln; Mono 
Mrtms Bo and See Jww wea Soutn Kona; 
Georon Brew. SwtMertond; Erie Wymnoa 
UJ.: fi’OYHausfilon. iretand.'GheorfflwHosi,' 
Romanian Atwlhj Jme Valencia. Cotomtrta; 
Mere Dearvje, BeWum: KleHl Rekdai. Nar- 
v«av. Roaer Liura and Marlin Dahlln. Swe- 
den; David Em De and Franato Omani 
Bivick. Cameroon; Romadoond Rai. Brazil; 
‘Aim; Jen* and Gaston Taument, Nether- 
lands, fwk Amin. ScuO Arabia. 


The AuodaieJ Press 

ORLANDO, Florida — It's four days 
into the 1994 World Cup and goalkeepers 
have brought both min and glory. 

In short, it’s business as usual. 

It took Michel Preud’homine a split sec- 
ond and a bit of luck lo produce a world- 
class save to secure Belgium’s 1-0 victory 
over Morocco. Romania's Bogdan Stdca 
and Ireland’s Fat Bonner had to be great 
throughout their games to give their na- 
tions upset victories. 

But when it comes to Colombia's Oscar 
Eduardo Cdrdoba or Carlos Leonel 
Trucco of Bolivia or Mohammed Daeyea 
of Saudi Arabia, it’s a bit embarrassing. 

“Some lose the match for you some win 
the match for you,” the Belgian coach. 
Paul Van Himsi, said of goalkeepers so far 
in the tournament. 

With most of the World Cup attention 
focused an pi ay makers and strikers, goal- 
keepers have Men the keys in the success 
of most teams. 

When Belgium was slowly breaking un- 
der Morocco’s pressure. Preud’homme 
turned it around Striker Mohammed 
Chaouch had an open header in the penal- 
ty area and made clean contact, sending 
the ball sailing toward the comer. 

But a quick reaction from Preud'homme 
tipped the hail off the crossbar. 


“I was looking at the ball hitting the 
crossbar and thinking, ‘Why don’t you 
come back into my arms.’ ” 

It did. 

“It was a world-class save and that's 
why we have him,” said Van Himsi. 

Preud'homme was the hero, but immedi- 
ately came out to protect bis less fortunate 
colleagues : — and criticized the balL 
The World Cup is uang new balls', and 
while it helps the forwards, the tighter, 
swifter balls make goalkeeping trickier. 

To make soccer' more exciting, with 
more goals, the Tiew . ball has a glossier 
surface that cuts air resistance, allowing it 
to go up to IS percent faster. A special 
layer of foam inside makes the shots even 
more powerful. 

“Look at Hagi’s goal,” said Freud-" 
*homme, referring to Gheorghe Hagi’s goal 
in the 3-1 defeat of Colombia, 

From the right ride; Hagi kicked the ball 
— a fluke cross or a briBinnt lob — and rt 
sailed into the net over Cbrdoba, who had 
committed to intercepting a crossing pass. 

“The ball curls early on and suddenly it : 
stops," Preud’hominesaid. “If it starts that 
way, it has to continue that way. The flight . 
of the ball fooled n»" - - 

Ctifboda refused to take the full blame 
for Morocco^. loss.. 


“I don’t think 1 can be considered the 
sole responsible person,’’ he said. “The 
team has always celebrated success togeth- 
er. Why not defeat?” ^ 

The .Saudis, would be tempted to blame 
Deayea, except that he was under siege for 
much of Lhe game- Monday night and made 
a half-dozen difficult saves.' 

““Played a lob and left the net 
tmguarded, however; Gaston TatanJi 
^home a header-to give the DuiTtSi 

None of the errors in soccer are so hla 
taut as a goalkeeper's. "esooia- 

Just ask Trucco: He had been solid in 
goal for the first hour in the opening eaiie 
jjgainst Germany, but totatiySelfSS 
deep pass from Lothar Matthaus. He ^ 
caught out of the net, missed the ball w 
the striker Jurgen Ktasmann oSy 
tap the ball into the empty ml 1 

b.§£‘fc 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1994 


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SPORTS WORLD 

Argentina Arises on Batistuta’s 3 Goals, a Dash of the Old Maradona 



By Ian Thomsen 

- - International Herald Tribune 

FOXBORO, Massachusetts The 

pressure was lifted from Diego Maradona 
m tig s second minute of Argentina's 4-0 
victory over Greece, which had 


® ~ MU ““ '-up, auu me 

Grades were as starstruck as the specta- 
tors- . . 

. But for a good half he seemed merely the 
smoke, the exhaust of this building victory. 
In that second minute, teammate Gabriel 
Batistuta burst ahead down the right side, 
with Claudio Caniggia open on the left, 
and Maradona peripherally in their wake. 
Selfishly, perhaps, Batistuta maintained 
possession until cornered by the goalkeep- 
er and his lone defender. Then be smug- 
gled theball in through the crack between 
them, and it became Maradona’s job to 
seek him out for a hug like a good mate. 

All the time he was just setting us up. 

Not that you couldn’t have predicted 
what would come. You wondered how 


many lives Maradona ultimately could 
conjure — the weight that has come on and 
vanished, Suing his face and sagging under 
his chin; the swelling of bis rib cage; the 
earring and the jewelry that bounced 
around his neck with each strut around the 
American referee. The month just under- 
way has to represent his last soccer life. 
Immediately the first game was practically 
relieved of any doubt, which freed him 
from the forever responsibility of inspiring 
Argentina. He could simply be hims elf — 
which is to say, the inflated caricature he 
has become. Par exactly one hour he ful- 
filled that role, on the first cool, rainy day 
of this American tournament; for exactly 
one hour he was ugliness personified. 

It was as though he had his own agenda 
There were nine Argentines pressing for- 
ward, chasing. And there was Maradona. 

The ball came to him and the game came to 
a stop. His black hair was cut short and 
apparently moussed — from a distance he 
had the appearance of a new Marine rein- 
vented by boot camp, which is the impres- 
sion he would like us to take from this 


But, Mostly , He’s Ugliness Personified as re^afagly, ^hich ^dnrn 1 ^^^ goal 

2,°m ma ~ 

blue w 

and danced around trim, at the mere flick- 
ing of his flicking left foot. 


latest comeback — and he would get the 
ball and automatically begin to stutter 
over it, as if waiting for the magic to take 
over, as if expecting the old motor to kick 
in and whisk him down to the goal against 
1 986 England. Then a moment later he was 
on his face or his back, writhing. 

For 60 minutes you were wishing he had 
stayed put in Argentina, in his rocking 
chair by the door with that air rifle across 
his lap. This was no farewell for the game’s 
greatest player short of Pete. Every step 
was traced or anticipated by a Greek mid- 
fielder, Panagiotis Tsaiouchidis. Mara- 
dona wore dark blue with white trim, and 
the Greek wore those colors in reverse. He 
was as big as the shadow cast by Mara- 
dona’s spotlight — a shadow thaL is the 
tangible baggage of all his demises and 
comebacks — and whenever the ball came 
the shadow eventually found itself tackling 


and standing over Maradona. Partially 
Maradona was going down because he 
wanted to, to gain sympathy from the ref 
to be used as a weapon; partially he 
couldn't get away the way he used to; 
ultimately he seemed to carry his own 
agenda. 

A yellow card eventually was handed to 
Tsaiouchidis, much as a parent will yeO at 
one son to keep brothers from fighting. In 
between Maradona provided a few 
glimpses of the 60th minute to come — the 
ball spinning at him off Batistuta’s back- 
heel like a wheel flying off of a crashing 
car, it was casually sidefooted out of the air 
by Maradona wide to Diego Simeon e, 
whose cross amounted to nothing. But in 
thousands of Argen tine heads it struck the 
chords of a song 18 years old, as old as 
Maradona’s international career inclu- 
sive of one world championship in 1986 



Turning to face them as he walked off 
the field at halftime; he raised his arms 
clapped twice. A thousand people raised 
their arms and clapped until he had disap- 
peared. 

By then Batistuta had scored again, set 
up m the 45th minute from penalty dis- 
tance by the run of Fernando Redondo. 
Batistuta was on his way to a hat-trick, 
secured with a penalty in the 90th minute. 
He should have have been the star; they 
should have been singing his name. But 
Maradona is an mbw chant, an eternal 
echo. The 15-month ban for drug use, the 
whoring and reckless driving, the “hand of 
God” goal in 1986 and the lesser but no- 
less-obvious handball against the Rus sians 
in 1990 — ah of these self-destructions 


seemed to be purged once again from the 
thousands of his devotees who sounded 
like 10 times their number when the dock 
struck its 60th minute. 

It was a lateral ball from Redondo, a 
handshake of a pass, and suddenly Mara- 
dona was alone at the top of the box. Alone 
— he had evaded Ms shadow as only Mara- 
dona can, if just for a moment — that's aD 
it takes, that’s all he’s got. He dashed a few 
steps to his left as three defenders dosed in 
and he hooked the ball in between two of 
them, behind the slamming door of the 
goalkeeper’s dive. And he ran off the field 
screaming into the face of the camera, 
which is Ms blessing and his bane. 

Now it is obvious what Argentina can 
do, after just one game. It seems likely to 
win its group and remain here, outside of 
Boston, for the second round, providing 
future opponents with this question: Is it 
better to justify Maradona’s legend with a 
shadow, fleeing the likes of Batistuta? Or 
is it more dangerous to leave Maradona 
alone, seeing how he revived hims elf in an 
instant? 


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The defender Ricardo Rocha, left, hauling down the Russian midfielder Omar Tetradze during Brazil's victory at Stanford Stadium. Diego Maradona, right, spent most of his first match of the l 


: being grounded by the Greek midfielder Panagiotis Tsaiouchidis (6). 



•-.fl— i.r'i 


, America Catches On to the World’s Game 


imemaUaud Hertdd Tribune 

W ASHINGTON —Soccer wili nev- 
er colonize America, may never 
sink it's contagious roots here, but it is 

1 " i. ..... tL. -Uitinmi 



-ien^ ^ v - 

a goal, and none importing hooligan- 
ism. Qmckerthan we expected, the host 
is feeling more comfortable staging rite 
premier event of a game addictive to the 
rest of the world. - 
As America relaxes, the pulse quick- 
ens. Out on die Pacific Coast, Brazil 
Mings the beat of .it's drum to Silicon 
Valley. Thousands flock to its pfcdnpip- 
er rhythm, to follow the ballet of it’s 
training as wdl as the majesty of the 2-0 ■ 
victory against Russia. 

Brazil sore still looks like the champi- 
on to me. -But on the East Coast, it is 
Mand and Mexico that , awaken im- 
mensd ^thxnc-prideand support. 

network television has even bb- 
fording World Cop parity with 
"$ame&_ 

has plenty of time. During the 
weeks, the last smart-aleck 
. . may stop ridiculing soccer 
cBchb that.it is half a sport 
half the anatomy. 

_ould come . 6tit of their air- 
M dess. They should witness 
the Brazilian, or even Wim 
Dutchman, both of. whom 
rised and stimulated. 'ihe- 
touch, deft but sharp'. be^ 
(imagin ation of afl around Mm, 

' the goal g ains t Russia; 



three touches, three uncanny variations 
of balance, brought Mm die penalty for 
Brazil to score a second time. 

Jack has none of Romdrio’s joy or 
mischief. But he struck a goal against 
Sandi Arabia in Washington that was a 
manufacturer’s dream. 

More than 25 yards out, he strode the 
ball with the outside of his right shoe. It 
flew straight, then veered beyond the 
agility of me Saudi goalkeeper, Moham- 
med Daeyea. Maybe that goal, bringing 
Sandi Arabia down to earth after it had 
led for half the game, unnerved Daeyea. 


Rob 

Hughes 


So, like several other matches, this 
had a sting in the tsul as concealed as an 
Agatha Christie plot. The Saudis took it 
with dignity, but the late swerve on 
Jonh’s shot that began the downfall 
adds weight to the dmm that this ball is 
lighter than before and gathers 10 per- 
cent more pace in flight 

In any case, there has occurred a 
transformation from the opening 
match, wMcb attracted corporate Amer- 
ica. People at that game had tickets 
given to than and video cameras^ taken 
away. They scarcely knew when to 
cheer. But now the an then tic World 
, Cup fans are coining from Mr and wide 
to roar cm their teams. 

Surprisingly quick, the noose of para- 
noia is loosaiMg. In Washington on 
Sunday, the police deprived customers 


of water containers; at the same venue 
24 hours later, the cops allowed Dutch 
supporters to bring musical instruments 
and banners into the stadium. 

Meanwhile, Dallas, one of two venues 
that had ignored FIFA’s pleas not to 
cage in decent fans, actually took down 
the wire fencing. Television had re- 
quested it, but one fence down is the 
beginning of removal of barriers to ac- 
cepting the sport. 

Now it is up to die fans to behave, 
and, I trust they wffl. 

Accuse me of romanticism if you 
must. I plead guilty. Without romance 
the game is nothing. Without the child- 
like fantasy of RomArio and his kind, 1 
would not cross a 10-lane American 
Mghw&y to watch the games. 

But romance is neither blind nor deaf . 
Romirio can also be a spiv. Recently, be 
negotiated a regular column far a Dutch 
newspaper; he then tried to double his 
fee, suggesting his price was $25,0000 
not 25,000 guuders. 

No way, stud the newspaper. Ro- 
m&rio pleaded that he would give the 
money to the poor, and when that failed 
to open the purse, he winked and of- 
fered the writer 10 percent 

How RomArio needs the cash. Barce- 
lona pays Mm more than $1 million a 
year, yet on traveling down the moun- 
tain from Brazil's limning retreat above 
Rio de Janeiro, he spotted a block of 
apartments that he would like to buy. In 


real estate as in accumulating goals, 
RomArio de Souza Faria is an all-or- 
nothing kind of guy. 

If he fails to turn Americans on to 
soccer, maybe Jorge Campos can. do it. 
Campos is paid to stop goals. He is 
Numero Uno among Mexico's 80 million 
soccer aficionados, but at times be 
would rather be doing something else. 

He excels as a surfer, which is under- 
standable in a young man born in Aca- 
pulco. He said the other day that waves 
taught him that life's biggest rewards 
come with risk. Consequently, he takes 
inordinate risk in front of the goal And 
he hankers also to score, just as he once 
did as a forward, and just as he almost 
did in creating two goals for Mexico in 
the Gol d Cu p last year. Mexico is now 
fighting FIFA to try to use the new law 
that allows teams a third substitute, if 
they have to change their goalkeeper. 
The idea, according to Mexico’s cun- 
ning coach, Miguel Mejia Baron, is to 
legitimately use the law so that, in these 
fierce temperatures, Mexico can deploy 
Campos as an extra attacker, bringing 
on a substitute goalkeeper. 

Campos would not wear his lurid flu- 
orescent yellow jersey, but a regular 
team shirt bearing his number. "1 decide 
whether Jorge plays goalkeeper or for- 
ward,” insists die coach. “FIFA should 
encourage multifaceted athletes like 
him, not try to limit them. No one here 
is trying to’ dodge the rules.” You beL 

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The Associated Pros 

\ -p- With senior jrish.qjtticaajs trying 
^^^-JdCiqp'ticiets for * gtWflf country-- 
men- apparently abandoned by a British travel 
K= - s r - -me relief was offered Tuesday morning 
ob^ Kraft, who owns tbe Ncw England 
sad Foxboro Stadium, and Lieutenant 
pPaul fgfliKOT saidThey would take 79 
VtricV fans to the Argon tma-Greece 
* 'iqj transportation and ticket 

-^aHaghan, from Athlone, Ireland, 

1 ins friends are hppmg toeventuany 
^ y involving Irdaad. •. 

i viriHg nf offersrpoprnig in from 
5 Said. “Ifs typkal of Irish bospi- 
from the Insh people here id 

y- have come forwrod and. are. 

rAlbert Reynolds, in Boston on 
^Monday after tquringan Iririi 
finanaal district that, 
have tiuvambassador aud the consol genoal (for 
Boston^ Urying to fadp these folks.. And we ve 
spdari to thc Irish ambassador: to England 

. 

" cr Trir ■ t& Sportex travel agency m 

^Sf Be bOped that a “resene packaae , 

^gaine-riekets could be arranged within 

icgotiations takirig place all day. 
iafe care of the holds and the 
s” SaidBaMer Batni- ' 
lions mud $1,800 each for Sportex 
Troundtrip transportation 
" soccer ven- 




ues in New Jersey and Orlando, Florida, and 
tickets to Ireland’s games against Italy, Mexico 
and Norway. 

A group of 79 arrived in Boston eo route to 
New Yrak on Thursday, but after they checked 
into their, hotel in nearby Saugus, their tour 
guides disappeared. 

The group was left without tickets to Satur- 
day’s game against Italy, transportation to the 
Meadowlands in East Rutherford, New Jersey,, 
where the game was played, or tickets to later’ 
matches in Orlando and back in the 
Meadcnrfand& 

Anotbergroup of about 300 fans flew directly 
to Odando, but found that not even hotel rooms 
had been booked for them. A. benefactor later 
flew the group to New York and held a lottery 
for 179 tickets to the match between Ireland and 
.Italy.. 

■ Both groups have return airfare to Ireland, but 
the Irish government is tzying to replace parts of 
the tour package that they Tost, or else ensure 
that their money is returned. 

Sportex “has given assurances to compensate 
or make good oh their commitments,” said 
Conor O’Riwdan, the Irish counsel general in 
Boston. . 

' fiatto, the Spartex lawyer, refused to say what 
went wnmg with the two tours. He avoid not say 
whether the people who met the groups at the 
airports were Sportex employees or impostors 

^TTiis is the first tine something like this has 
happened,’' Battu said. 

He said he was negotiating with airlines, hotel 
chains and 'World Cup officials in an effort to 
fulfill Sportex’s commitments. 




Enc Thf Pin. 

Spectators at the Brazfl-Russia match, as at ocher venues, being 
searched by seewity officers before entering the stadium. 


WORLD CUP WRAP-UP 


Compiled hr Oar Staff From Dispatches 

Two Romanians and a Swede 
in Michigan for World Cop 
matches have been killed in sep- 
arate traffic accidents. 

At 6:30 P.M. Sunday, Gri- 
gore Constantinescu, 46, and 
Duxnitni Costacbe, 40, of Ro- 
mania were killed when the 
driver of their van lost control 
and the veMele rolled over. 
They were part of a seven-mem- 
ber dance troupe heading for 
Troy in suburban Detroit. The 
troupe planned to perform at a 
Romanian Orthodox Church, 
then attend the Romania-Swit- 
zeriand match Wednesday. 

Of the other five, one was 
treated and released from Foote 
Hospital in Jackson, one was in 
serious condition and three in 
fair condition, state police said. 

They said the van hit the me- 
dian, then the driver lost con- 
trol while trying to steer back 
onto the highway. 

Jackson County Sheriffs of- 
ficials said Hans NikJaus Thali 
of Sweden had been killed at 
about midnight Saturday when 
his car struck two others. Thali 
was driving east in the west- 
bound lane of Interstate 94 near 
Jackson. The police said they 
were investigating whether he 
may have beoi lost or confused. 

The driver and passengers in 
one car that Thali Mt were un- 
hurt The driver of the second 
car remained in a hospital in 
fair condition. 

• Dublin’s bar employees vot- 
ed Tuesday to end the strike that 
threatened to ruin the country’s 
enjoyment of Ireland's World 
Cup campaign in America. 


The barworkers* union, 
MANDATE, which closed 
many pubs Saturday night 
when Ireland played Italy, said 
it had won a pay increase before 
Ireland’s second match, against 
Mexico, on Friday. 

“Ireland's victory on Saturday 
helped ns greatly to put pressure 
on the employers,” said Maurice 
Sheehan of MANDATE 

• Die injury report: 

The Italian midfielder Alber- 
igo Evani pulled a calf muscle 
in practice and appeared to be 
out of action for the next few 
weeks. Attacker Giuseppe Si-, 
gnori was being treated for an 
injured hamstring and re- 
mained uncertain for Thurs- 
day’s match against Norway. 
Roberto Baggio, with a nagging 
Achilles tendon injury, is to 
play only if fully recovered. 

Kevin Moran, Ireland’s 38- 
year-dd defender, trained for 
the first time since pulling a 
hamstring two weeks ago. “1 
cannot be considered for the 
game with Mexico on Friday 
but 1 envisage no problems if 
required for the Norway fix- 
ture” he said of the June 28 
game. 

In Antwerp, Belgium, the 
Dutch striker Marco van Bas- 
ten, forced out of the Cup by Ms 
injured ankle, said he feared 
that his playing days could be 
over after being told he needed 
another operation. His doctor 
said the new operation would 
delay van Basten’s return to 
competition by at least another 
six months. 

Claudio Reyna's right ham- 
string remained painful and the 


U.S. midfielder was question- 
able for Wednesday’s match 
against Colombia. 

Eric Wynalda was still both- 
ered by a rash, but most team 
officials thought he would play. 
Doctors still had not figured 
out what was causing the rash, 
but said it might be an aHeraic 
reaction to food, compounded 
by nerves. 

• The French soccer legend 
Michel Platini is in Washington 
to watch the matches at RFK 
Stadium. That is news to some 
UJS. volunteers who are new to 
the game. 

Sunday morning, Platini 
phoned the Cup command cen- 
ter asking to be picked up and 
driven to the match between 
Norway and Mexico. But most 
of the volunteer workers, who 
are driving scores of dignitaries 
around town, asked why they 
bad to pick up a French woman 
and bnng her to RFK. At least 
until a volunteer from Turkey, 
Yavuz Boray, overheard. “IT1 
take her,” he said with a straight 
face. 

“Fm a player, a coach, a soc- 
cer junkie,” Boray said a day 
later, still laughing about it. “Of 
course I jumped at the chance 
to meet Mm. He gave me two 
free tickets for the Mexico-Nor- 
way game.” 

• A temporary ban on guns 
and liquor was announced in 
heavily armed Colombia, with 
Radio Caracol reporting that 
people are prohibited from car- 
rying their guns four hours be- 
fore each match that Colombia 
plays, and two hours afterward. 

(AP. Reuters, AFP, WP) 


For TV: Boom Times and Busts 


Cooftied by Our Stag From Dapardta 

ROTTERDAM — A record three million 
Dutch television viewers, out of a population 
of IS million, watched the Netherlands open 
its campaign, with many people arriving at 
work late and tired on Tuesday morning."" 

One in every 10 children aged between 6 
and 10 sat up into die small hours to cheer on 
their national imm, Dutch state television 
figures showed. 

The previous record Dutch television audi- 
ence for a sporting event televised at night 
was in -1988, when 1.7 million viewers 
watched the 1,5 00- roe ter speed skating finals 
at the Calgary Winter Olympics. 

In good news for FIFA and the U.S. orga- 
nizers, television ratings for the opening 
match were more than three times better than 
those fra- the 1990 World Cup opener. 

Frida/s game between Germany and Bo- 
livia received a 22 rating on ESPN and was 
viewed to 139 million homes, Nielsen Media 
Research said Monday. 

Dial’s three times more than ESPN's usual 
rating in that lime period and three times 


more than the 0.6 for the 1990 opener on 
TNT. 

ESPN can reach 63.1 million households. 
TNT could reach 46 million in 1990. 

Saturday’s 1-1 tie between the United 
States and Switzerland earned an overnight 
rating of 5.8 in major U.S. markets and beat 
the U3. Open golf tournament, which got a 
5.0 overnight later in the day. 

“These ratings are ver y e xciting for all of 
us.”said Joseph Blatter, FIFA’s general secre- 
tary. 

In Macao, Lo Chon-yin collapsed Sunday 
while saving customers in Ms coffee shop, 
according to news reports quoting Ms wife. 

_ She said Lo, 37, had stayed up two straight 
nights to watch World Cup matches live on 
television after working all day. 

And in Bangladesh, angry fans who had 
their telecast lopped off by a power cut at- 
tacked the local electricity company. 

A large police contingent had deployed 
around the offices in the southern district of 
Barisal, the Daily Star reported Tuesday. 

(AP, Reuters, AFP) 


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Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Honesty and Taxes 

By Russell 

N EW YORK: o CT onl y discussion ever beard of 

tative Dime" Rc P resen ' tajun 5 10 P a y for a vasl program 
now under Kosteokowski, guaranteeing health care for ev- 
emhinp ® clmcnt for ev- cry citizen, including the 35 or 
to wash tho m °P er y failing 45 or 50 million who at present 
tub is the °r Ut *bc bath- bad no health insurance at all. 
this catmirvT^r j ^gressman The number varied frequently. 
Whiff, , nee< “ ?°re of. depending on which lobby was 
SevS,!* to 3^ bonest. cooking the books. 

forced! before the □ 

xorces of jaw and decenev 

bought him low, Rostenkowsk. . In mosl of lhe ^ of die 
S P°^ the only thorouehlv hon- industrialized world national 

CSt ninwl i uwu- 


word that has been spoken 
50 far on the health-care bill. 

u taxes.” Iraprov- 
tnfi health care was going to cost 
money, he said, 
said, meant “taxes.” 

ri JrS w “ outrageous viola- 
oon of practically everything ev- 
erybody’ in Washington stands 
tor o n health care, which is the 
Panaple that you really can fool 

all of the people aU of the time as 

long as everybody in town a gr ees 
to connive in the trick. 

On health care the trick was 
easier than usual because the 
people everybody was out to fool 
w^e m on the scam: they were 
absolutely hellbent on fboline 
Uiem sdves_ The anti-iax mov£ 
mmt which has the country in its 
pythonic coils thrives on the 
sudcer*s belief that you can, too, 
get something for nothing. 

□ 

Everybody wanted to believe 
this about the health-care pro- 
gram, and the Clinton people 
encouraged the delusion. How 
wonderful it sounded the night 
the president stood before Con- 
gress and showed that little 
health-care card, which would 
bring everybody all the medical 
marvels just for the flashing. 

And the beauty part! No 
mention of a price. Of taxes. 

Oh. sure, there might be a lax 
on cigarettes, but smokers were 
hardly even Americans any- 
more. With their vile sidestream 
smoke, they deserved to be 
taxed. 

Not an alcohol tax. however. 
That had been mentioned, but 
the booze lobby had moved 
quickly to douse the idea. Politi- 
cians couldn't be allowed to treat 
drinkers as brutally as smokers. 

And that was pretty much the 


health-care standards are light 
years ahead of ours, and the 
price of maintaining them is 
heavy, heavy taxation. 

Most Americans who had 
traveled abroad knew this but 
preferred not to draw the logi- 
cal conclusion, which was that 
bringing our standards up to 
par with the rest of the industri- 
al world would mean — “No. 
no! Say it ain’t so, Joe!” 

Joe, of course, could say yes, 
it was so. all right. You couldn't 
get that great European-style 
health care for nothing. 
“There’s no free lunch, and 
there's no free heart attack.” he 
could say. being just a guy 
named Joe. 

Bill, however, couldn’t. As 
nominal leader of a great peo- 
ple who froth at the mouth the 
instant anybody say’s “taxes,” 
Bill could only talk bookkeep- 
ing mumbo-jumbo about how 
eventually cutting the present 
national cost of health care 
would in the long run. one of 
these days . . . and so forth. 

□ 

This hypocrisy brings us to 
the present deadlock, the Clin- 
ton people having decided that 
maybe the inevitable tax could 
be disguised by asking business- 
es to buy the insurance and pass 
the cost along — a hidden tax. of 
course — to its tax-hating work- 
ers and tax-hating consumer. 

Rostenkowski, then chair- 
man of the Ways and Means 
Committee, home of/ice of tax 
law. spoke the unspeakable 
truth two or three weeks before 
he was indicted. “Taxes,” he 
said. Now he is indicted, and 
lost, the one honest man in a 
conspiracy of quacks. 

New York Times Serncv 


After Cold War: Defector as Rip Van Winkle 

mmmm 


B 


By Marc Fisher 

H'sshingicfi Fat Service 

OSTON — Stephen Wechsler arrived at Kenne- 

dy Airport in New York after a very long time 

away from home. He feared the worst. “You'll get 
some new clothes — stripes, prison stripes!” his 
brother had warned. “You'll have a heart attack as 
soon as you land." his son said. 

But it was time. Forty-two years. The better part 
of a life, a heavy price to pay for a teenage philo- 
sophical tryst. a young man’s righteousness, the 
intoxication of ideology. Wechsler. a New York City 
boy who dreamed of justice and found it in an 
intellectual love affair with communism, was a de- 
fector coming home. He had been East Germany’s 
Mr. U. S. A. — the link between the walled-off 
Germans and the frightening superpower an ocean 
and a world away. Now the one-eyed man in the 
kingdom of the blind was finally going to see the 
country he had spent four decades describing. 

So scary was this return that Wechsler had stayed 
behind in Germany for nearly five years after the fall 
of the Berlin Wafl. Finally, the moment of truth: 
Wechsler and his wife, Renate. an East German who 
had never before crossed an ocean, waited on the 
parked plane, waited until all the other passengers 
had left, wailed for the MPs who were supposed to 
pick them up. 

No one came. 

Stephen and Renate ventured off the plane and 
saw Five clean-cut people in civilian clothes. They 
were smiling and unarmed, so friendly that surely 
they could not be waiting for the return of a deserter 
who had spent decades in opposition to his home- 
land's politics. But the friendly types were indeed 
from Fort Dix. New Jersey, dispatched to collect 
Private Wechsler and bring him in for processing, 
42 years after be bad waded across a river into 
Seme t-con trolled Austria. 

The Army escorts whisked the Wechslers past cus- 
toms and immigration. Everyone was all smiles. At 
Fort Dix. the Army asked Wechsler to sign waivers 
promising that he did noL want a trial about his 
defection, that he would not sue the Army for back 
pay or extra benefits, and that he did not insist on 
physical and psychological exams. Then he was asked 
to sign a document in which he recognized the Army 
might not necessarily grant him an honorable dis- 
charge. 

Wechsler couldn’t believe it Honorable discharge! 
He looked up at the men and women in uniform and 
said, “Um. after all, I did desert” They smiled at him, 
and one gingerly asked if perhaps he might be willing 
to speak to a couple of men from military intelligence. 
Here it comes, Wechsler thought East Germany 
hasn’t existed for five years now, he said, and I never 
knew any secrets. But he agreed to see the agents. 
They were smiling too. dressed in civvies. Could he 
help them with the whereabouts of other Americans 
who had disappeared into East Germany? He could. 
Mostly, they were old Reds who had long since died. 

Everyone laughed and smiled, and one young lieu- 
tenant said oh yes. die had heard of McCartbyism. 
but she didn't know much about it She could, howev- 



Ma Mono* (or The Watbagioa fta» 

Wechsler, a former Q, found a different America. 

er, help them buy some Kentucky Fried Chicken and 
get them a bus into New York City. 

New Army. Wechsler thought New country too? 

In 1952, a very bad lime to be a left-wing radical in 
the United States, the Army determined that Private 
Wechsler had lied when he signed his loyalty oath. At 
the icy apex of the country's McCarthyist chill, 
Wechsler had tried to hide his past as a campus 
co mmunis t at Dalton and Fieidston, two of New 
York’s left-leaning elite high schools, and at Harvard. 

Wechsler knew bis government would not take 
kindly to this. When he finally got the letter from the 
military prosecutors who discovered that he had been 
a member of allegedly un-American organizations, 
groups such as American Youth for Democracy and 
the Southern Negro Youth Conference, Wechsler 
panicked and fled into the East Bloc. 

For the next 37 years, he would be stuck in East 
Ge rman y A Soviet officer gave Wechsler a new name, 
Victor Grossman, which he never particularly liked. 
Wechsler /Grossman became probably the only pa- 
son ever to hold undergraduate degrees from both 
Harvard and Karl Marx University in Leipzig. 

After spending several years in a small town near 
the Czech border, where* the East Germans stored 
defectors they didn't know what to do with, Wechsler 
married a German woman. They have two sons, a 
journalist and a movie theater manager. Wechslers 
children speak only passable English, much to the 
disappointment of their father, who always main- 
tained close ties to his U. S. family. His mother visited 


him often, and his broths was i constant source of 
clippings and other tidbits of Americana. The brother 
fives in Sootland.. . • 

W echsler nevergave uphope thai he mighr one day , 
return. He worked on a newsletter that detailed the ‘ 
role old Naas still played in West Germany, and later 
wrote propa^nda : commentaries for East German 
radio. Bnt eventually he settled into the role of East 
Germany’s token American, publishing gentle, nos- 
talgic books about the American folk muse tradition 
and his own teenage hitehhflcmgjaunt across the. 
Great Plains. 

The Amsicans spumed him because he had joined 
the Communist Party U.S.A^ but the East German 
communists never completely accepted hun. The East 
Germans & Wechsler organize a Paul Robeson Ar- 
chive in Beriin, but the party never admitted him. 
Party bosses said he was “too undisciplined.” : 

In 1989, when the B erlin Wall burst open and East - 
Germany collapsed, Wechsler put out feelers to 
Washington, and word came from the Pentagon that 
the policy was to release people like Wechsler. unless 
there were espionage or cnminal charges pending. 

But like so many survivors of McCmthyistn. 
Wechsler could not bring hims elf to trust, the govern- 
ment that . had once sought to punish him for. Iris 
beliefs. What finally drew hfrn out Memorial . Day 
weekend was .another kind of fear, that of . his own' 
mortality. He was invited to his 45th reunion at. 
Harvard. There would be a 50th, he knew, but would 
he make it? He was 66. and it was time to go home. 

Rip van Wechsler in America: robins and blue jays 
singing each morning of a world bom new, blades and 
whites walking up Broadway holding bands, a Har- 
vard campus where Asians, blacks ana Latinos make 
up more than a third of the student body. Thai and 
Mexican restaurants in the New York neighborhood 
Stephen Wechsler knew as entirely Jewish. 

Sounds “and sights- assaulted -Wechsler. “Stephen 
had never danced like this with me in Germany,” 
Renate said after a clambake and a night in a "New- 
port, Rhode Island, ballroom with Stephen and his 
reunited Harvard classmates. “It was like flying. They 
had a special, name. for this dance. What was it? 
Jibber? Jib?” It was the jitterbug, and Stephen had 
remembered it the way a boy recalls iris pitching 
motion each spring. “He’s a completely new man,” his 
wife said. “I never saw this side of him.” . 

Renate has been moved to tears of joy. here, bat she 
hasn’t let Stephen see her crying. Sbe is overwhelmed 
by the smiling faces, people who insist op being called 
by their first names, invitations from Stephen's rela- 
tives and old classmates, the interest Americans show 
in her well-bemg. e - • 

Stephen is more rircumspect. He admits to waves 
of nostalgia, to emotions swollen by the very sight of 
ethnic restaurants and wooden houses. New Br- 
and's shingles and New York’s skyscrapers. But 
echsler hedges. He’s suspicious of American infor- 
mality and bnstles when a bank Idler addresses him 
as Stephen. The United States looks tax and happy, . 
there’s so much color, so many shops, but “I haven’t 
been to the shuns yet I haven’t seen the other side yet. 
Well see.” . ; . 




PEOPLE 

George Michael hi**' 

In Cose Against Son?' 

Pop star £ 

lostfcs court .baulet? 
leased from b* 

-tract with Stony Corp. 

SSE-sS s£ 

Sony issued a siatenKattj^V; 
“Wc have great respecl k 
G eorae Michael and bis artotf>- 
andtook forward to conanum^ 
our relationship with 
chad’s lawyers had aiffxo dia . 
the contract was restrictive ar.a 
ereedy and that it couM run •- 
to 15 more years. Michael conic 
face legal fees of $45 estim. 

Sylvester StaBooe and Ma- 
donna are getting together on 
" the same ride of a neaghbornooc 
dispute- The pair wants to build 
• a guardhouse ax lhe entrance to 
their street in. a trendy Miami 
neighborhood. Stallone has _ of- 
fered to pay for the construction. 
but some nearby residents ere 
annoyed at the idea. 

- Irwin E. Bloom, a former fi- 
nancial adviser to the late Dons 
Duke says the tobacco heiress 
may have been murdered, and 
hnc asked a Manhattan court to 
let him file objections to her S 1.2 
billion wBL Bloom was removed 
as co-executor and co-trustee of 
Duke's wzUin 1992 fonmknown 
reasons. Duke died last Oct.. 28 
at age 80; Bloom said, her body 
* k was-’ cremated with unusual 
haste” A lawyer for the execu- 
tors of the estate said in court 
papers that Bloom’s allegation 5 
were “preposterous.” 

; O 

A repon of a Beaties reunion 
was true, it seems, but out . of 
date. A spokesman for Paid 
.McCartney confirmed that 
McCartney, George Harrison 
and Ringo Stair did record lo- 
in London — but. in 


, not three weeks ago. as 

reported in the Daily Express. 


& 




r*2S 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pogea f 4. 1ft. 10- 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 



»Bh 

Low 

W 


Low 



OF 

OF 


OF 

Cff 


Algarve 


19«Q 

% 

29*4 

21/70 

s 

Amtienlan 

21/70 

13/55 


21 /TO 

11*2 

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An*om 

2B.H2 

11/52 

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27*0 

13/55 


Alftam 

29<B4 

20/66 

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29*4 

21/70 


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rrm 

18*4 

a 

29*2 

31/70 

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Belgrade 

28 82 

17/62 


31 -W 

18*4 

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24/75 

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19-66 

940 

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BhjmHs 

24/75 

13*5 


23/73 

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30/M 

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10*34 


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21/70 

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17*7 

0/46 

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CosuDwSei 

31 W 

22/71 

a 

30*6 

73/73 

* 

Dubin 

18/54 

7/44 


10/86 

11*2 

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EdHnrgh 

15/59 

6/46 

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16*1 

11*2 

pc 

RdTBOCO 

28/82 

17*2 


30-06 

21/70 

a 

Fmrttul 

24/^ 

13.55 

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22/71 

12*3 

a 

Genova 

26/79 

17*2 


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» 

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12/53 

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18.01 

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28/KZ 

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25/77 

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27*0 

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26/79 

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lfl/61 

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16/84 

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pc 

17*2 

9'40 

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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weaiher. Asia 



JoWream 

North America 

The West, including Denver. 
Phoenix and Salt Lake City, 
will have hoi weather later 
this week. The East wlH be 
warm and hum kf with scat- 
tered rains. Orlando to Hous- 
ton wfl be seasonably warm 
and humid with scattered 
thunderstorms. Toronto will 
have mainly dry, cool neaih- 


Europe 

Central Europe will be sunny 
and warm Thursday Into Fri- 
day. Showers end cooling 
wil reach London and Pans 
Saturday Warmer weather 
will overspread eastern 
Europe by lhe weekend. 
Oslo to Stockholm will be 
wndy and cool Wednesday. 
Madrid to Bono will have hot 
weather late ths week 


Asia 

Warm weather over south- 
eastern China >aic tins week 
will expand northward 
toward Seoul and Nagasaki 
The warm and dry weather 
aver southeastern China will 
be a welcome change from 
the Hooding reins of last 
week. Heavy rains win wet 
north-central China and Pie 
northern Philippines 


Middle East 


Latin America 


BflInJ 

Calm 

DwnHClW 


Wy*rih 


Today 
Wah Um 
OF Of 
30 IK 21 ho a 
37/98 »«■ s 
31*0 14 47 a 
20.-B2 I7*C a 

4i nos ji/hj a 

41/100 27*80 ■ 


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31/88 22/71 pc 
30/10021/70 a 
33/91 15/81 a 
29/84 18/54 a 
43/10921/70 a 
41/10624/75 • 


Today To 

Nigh Lear W Wfltl Low W 
CJF OF OF OF 

QuenosAom 8/46 0/32 a H/52 3/37 pc 
Caracas 3I« 2475 pc 31 (88 26/77 pc 

Uma 18/S4 18/BI i 19/88 HPB1 pc 

Mexico C4y 24/75 1355 pc 26/73 14/fi7 I 

RfadaJaneta 2S/T7 IS» sft 25-77 T8-«4 pc 

SwiOago 10/50 2/33 pc 14/57 2735 a 


Legend: s-nmy. pc-paniy cloudy, c-doudy. sn-srwera. Mhunderetorms. r-rah. sl-snw tarries, 
srvanow. Uce. W-Weamer. AO map*, foie ca ete end tfete provided by Accu-Weether, me. * 1994 


Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow . 


High 

Low 

W 

Wgh 

Low 

W 


OF 

C/F 


OF 

OF 


Bangtoh 

33*1 

25/77 

1 

39/91 

2 S/79 

>h 


29*4 

20*8 

1 

31*8 

21/70 pc 

Hang Kong 

30*8 

20/79 

sh 

31/98 

20/79 


Mama 

33*1 

25/77 

| 

33*1 

34/75 

i 

New Delhi 

43/109 31*8 

a 

42/107 30*6 pc 

Seoul 

28/79 

19*6 

rti 2T*o 

18*4 

ah 

Shanghai 

29.-02 

24/75 

oh 

29*4 

23/73 pc 


32*9 

20/79 


32*8 

28/79 1 

TakW 

32*9 

24.75 


32*8 

23.73 

DC 

To*yc 

27V90 

rS*4 


27*0 

30*9 

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Africa 

Alpena 

26/79 

19*8 

a 

27*0 

22/71 

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Cape Town 

Caeafatorca 

18*1 

8/43 

pc 

10*4 

7/44 

ah 

28*2 

18*4 

a 

27/80 

19*0 


Harare 

21/70 

11*2 

pc U/73 

11/53 

DC 


29*4 

23/73 ah 29/94 

24/75 pc 

Itor-rtf 

20*8 

11*2 

pc 22/71 

12<5J pc 

Turaa 

27*0 

17*2 

t 

20*2 

20*8 

pc 

North America 

Archer age 

19*0 

11/52 

c 

21/70 

11/52 

P= 

Artaraa 

33*1 

21/70 

t 

32*9 

21/70 tx 

Bcwen 

32*8 

16*4 

9 

32*9 

18*4 

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Cheago 

30*8 

10*4 

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31*0 

18(04 

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bmwr 

31*8 

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39*4 

15/59 

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30*8 

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31.-98 

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««**/ 

76.82 

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33/73 


Houwon 

33*1 

23/73 

1 

34*3 

24/75 

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Lm Angetoi 

31*8 

17*2 

PC 

77*0 

17*2 



33*1 

24/75 

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33*1 

26/79 


Urruipefii 

29*2 

17*2 

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28/84 

17*2 


Uoniranl 

24/75 

12/53 

ah 

28/79 

14/57 


Naaaeu 

31*8 

24/79 

pc 32*9 

24/75 

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NewYcrfi 

32*9 

21/70 

9 

31*8 

20*6 


Phrenh 

42/10/29/94 

9 

43/107 29*4 

• 

San Fran. 

204S8 

11*2 


21/70 

13*5 


S«We 

20/79 

13/55 


27/90 

13/55 


Toronto 

29/79 

12*3 

pc 27*0 

14*7 



32*8 

21/70 

• 

34*3 

22/71 

PC 


ACROSS 

1 Entertain from 
house to house 
8 Sirs' 

counterparts 

IS Horse show 
locales 

14 Slow musical 
pieces 

18 Kind ot license 
dr justice 

17 Measles variety 

laW.W. II German 
bomber 

19 ‘From the 

ot Montezuma* 


21 Pascal's law 

22 Part of H R.H. 

23 Fixed, as a 
gauge 

25 Reposed 
28 Iris's place 

28 Chichi 

29 Place tor 
belt-t/ghtemng 

30 Flooring ot 
marble chips 

32 Ibsen play 

33 Singer Lame 

34 Kind of suit 
aa Strait of Dover 

port 


Solution to Puzzle of June 21 



38 Women's 
wide-legged 
pants 

42 -garde 

43 District 

44 Orient 
4s Shower 

attention (on) 
48 Jeans 

48 Third- • 

millennium year 

4f Along 

Little Dogies* 

80 Gist 
Si Drum 

accompanying 
a fife 

S3 Academy 
Award category 
55 Strainers 
87 Quietus 
saPfucfc. as 
eyebrows 
as Juicer 
go Iris with a 
fragrant 
rootstock 

DOWN 

1 Prisoner 

2 Alarm, e.g. 

3 Stink 

4 Like some beer 


9 My- — . 

Vietnam 
8 ‘A Christmas 
Carol' specter 

7 Not lor kiddies 

8 Small flatfishes 
• Questionnaire 

info 

to 'Pizarro Seizing 
the Inca of 
’ Peru* artist 
■ri Rec/tal singer 
13 Sonata's third 
movement, 
often 

is Louisiana II 
18 Folded up 
20 Respecting 
24 Demolishes - 
29 Founder of 
Taoism 
27 Esoteric 

29 Avast, on land 
ai Got off 

32 Robot, in . 
Jewish legend 

34 Most like the 

Marx Brothers 

35 Sponged 

38 Dodger 
srTreOts 

30 Singer Uly 

39 Africa’s 
fourth -longest 
river 



48 Stupid 
4? Beef cattle 
50 Where Anna ■ 
Leonowens 


Earty American - Leonov 
publisher Peter taught 


92 Affirm 

54 Japanese dnnk 
iuw.tt II baffle 



Pom* *y MiMr s.i 

© Nov York Tunes Edited by Will Shortz. 


it 




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COUNTRY 

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ASIA 

Italy* 

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Brazil • 

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Australia 

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Liechtenstein* 

155-00-11 

Chile 

. . 00*-O312 

China. PKO»« 

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8*196 

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980-11-0010 

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018-672 

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800-1111 

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lib 

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000-117 

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0800090-110 

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19*-0011 

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190 

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0039- n 3 

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009-11 

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800-190-11 

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123 

Korea** 

11* 

Poland** •* 

0*010480*0111 

Mexico*** 

95-800^62 


Malaysia* 


800-0011 Portugal" 


New Zealand 


000-911 Romania 


05017-1-288 Nicaragua (Managua) 


01-8004288 P anama. 


Philippines* 


105-11 Ruasta~(Moscow) 


155-5042 Peru* 


174 

109 


Saipan* 


235-2872 Slovakia 


0042000101 Suriname 


191 


Slngzpom 

80001 11-111 

Spain • 

90099 -00-11 

Uruguay . 

00-0410 

Sri Lanka 

■130-136 

Sweden* 

020-795-611 

Venezuela 

80-01 1-120 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Switzerland* 

19300-11 

CARIBBEAN 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1U1 

UA. 

0500-89-0011 

thhninw 

1-800-872-2881 


EUROPE 

Ukraine* 

8*100-11 

Bermuda* 

1-800-872-2881 

Armenia-* 

8*14113 

MIDDLE EAST 

British VJ. 

1-800-872-2881 

Austria—* 

022-903-011 

Bahrain 

600001 

Cayman Islands 

1-800-872-2381 

Belgium* 

0800-300-30 

Cyprus 

06090010 

Grenada* 

I-W0-872-2S81 

Bulgaria 

00-18000010 

Israd. 

177-100-2727 

Haiti* . 

001-800-cr72-iftfri 

Croatia" • 

99-38-0011 

Kuwait 

SB-288 

Jamaica* 

.- 0-800^72-2881 

Czech Bep 

0042000101 

Lebanon (Being) 

426-801 

Nctta-AmO. 

001-B00-872-23BO 

Denmark* 

6001-0010 

Qatar 

0800-011-77 

St Kitts/Nevis 

!-800-fr2-2Sfil 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

Saudi Arabia 

1-800-10 

. AFRICA 

France 

19a-00il 

Tnritey* 

00-800-1Z277 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

510-0200 

Germany 

01300010 

U.aJ?* 

- 800-121 



Greece* 

00-800-1311 

AMERICAS 

fiamlih- 

_ 00111 

Icetoid** 

999-001 

Bet ire* 

555 

uberia 

0800-10 

797-797 

Ireland 

1-800-550-000 

Bolivia* 

0-800*1112 

Soudi Africa 

0-80099012^ 


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