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INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Wednesday, June 29, 1994 


No. 34,627 


Refugees 
Overwhelm 
Aid Groups 
In Rwanda 

• By Raymond Bonner 

New York Tuna Service 

CYANIKA, Rwanda — It is almost 
impossible to move through the din yard - 
surrounding the Notre Dame Church in 
this hilltop village, where more than 
40,000 Hutu refugees are jammed into an 
impromptu camp. 

The crying of children mixes with the 
sounds of machetes splitting trees in the 
surrounding hills as men erect more shel- 
ters. 

These Hutu have been on the run from 
the rebel Tutsi army lor more than two 
months, chased from their villages and 


The French Oy a group of nans sad orphans 
from Rwanda to safety in Zaire. Page 4. 


then from the makeshift camps they set 
up along the way. Many have seen family 
members killed. Now, more are dying 
here from malaria, malnutrition and sim- 
ple exhaustion. 

A tiny girt with a vacant stare sucks 
her mother's breast in vain. The girl is 18 
months old, but she has the hands and 
feet of a 3-month-old. She has no 
strength to czy. "I have not eaten since 
„~4~A^y -~ said her mother, Vestine Ba- 


Only in the last few days have interna- 
tional relief agencies reached these refu- 
gees, at the end of a 100-kilometer 
stretch of road from Cyangugu that 
French paratroopers cleared of govern- 
ment miHtiamm 

Since a frenzy of ktDing began here in 
early April, tens of thousands of Rwan- 
dans, most of them members of the Tutsi 
ethnic group, have bear killed. Several 
hundred thousand Rwandans have fled 
into Tanzania, where they have been 
aided by relief organizations. The agen- 
cies fear, that still others forced from 



bA Dtbughuo.'Reuicn 

Displaced Hutu families huddling in an impromptu refugee camp on a hillside in Rwanda as civilians fled increasing violence and spreading ethnic massacres. 


their homes by the war are wandering 
wi thin the country unassisted. 

“The aid agencies have known for a 
long time that a large number of people 
have been lost,” stud James Fennell, of 
CARE International, who visited here 
■Monday. “We knew they were going to 
show up sometime.” 

He said that in two days CARE and 
. the International Committee of the Red 


Cross have found three other villages 
within 40 kilometers of Cyanika, where 
more than 150,000 Hutu refugees have 
gathered, desperate for food and medical 
assistance. 

On Tuesday the French were to begin 
flying over the area in helicopters look- 
ing for more refugee camps. Mr. Fennell 
said. He said he thought at least 250,000 
more refugees were in the area. 


“It is misery,” said Charles Ugirin- 
dege, who beads the Cyanika office of 
Carilas, the Roman Catholic relief agen- 
cy. He said the last food distribution to 
the refugees here was one kilogram of 
beans a person three weeks ago. 

He said his agency had only 900 kilo- 
grams, or less than 2.000 pounds, of 
beans left for the 40.000 refugees here. 
And that food had been intended for 


famine relief. This part of Rwanda has 
been in the midst of a drought. 

In the long brick building that used to 
be the community health center, children 
and women now lie listlessly in one room 
with an operating table and another with 
a dentist's chair. 

At one end of the building, the earth ■ 

See REFUGE, Page 4 ' 



Shock Before Shake - Up: Clinton’s Wajfler Image Worsened 


By David jS. Broder and Richard Morin •• 

S muklkiwupojr^ehice ■. . ■" ^ • T ._ ‘ 

WASHINGTON Oh the eve of President Bill 
Clinton’s dedsion to shake up his staff, increasing 
numbers of Americans .said the president was a mis- 
take-prone leader Tacking in decisiveness and losing 
bis sense of the real problems facing families, accord- 
ing to tike latest Washington Post-ABC News poll. 

~ Although Mr. CHntoii’s overall approval rating held 
steady from a month earlier at 50 percent, the new poll 
confirms that he has lost ground with the public since 
the beginning of the yearon a broad variety of issues. 
Tbe poll also found an upsurge in concern about the 
state of the economy. 


Opinion on- the-overall Clinton health care plan is 
iftcafcaiangjy negative, but these polled say the presi- 
dent is right in seeking a major overhaul of the system 
to require employers to pay most of the bills for 

-Thee heavy bitten fake new wfarin fe tratfon jobs. Page 3. 

everyone’s health insurance. If those polled had their 
way, however, abortion would be dropped from the 
basic benefits package in the plan. 

Mr. CHnton’s overall approval score is 8 or 9 per- 
centage points below where it had stabilized in the 
first three months of 1994. His disapproval level is 44 
percent 


But 55 percent said 'Mr. CHn ton is not a strong and 
decisive leader, np from 44 percent in January. Now 
there arc three people who think he makes more 
mistakes than the average president for every two who 
say he makes fewer. 

A pillar of support for Mr. Clinton — his empathy 
for average Americans — is eroding. In January, 55 
percent said he understands problems of people like 
themselves and 39 percent said he does not Now the 
numbers are 52 percent yes and 46 percent no. 

That may be related to increasing worries about the 
economy. Despite several months of low inflation and 
increasing employment, economic confidence is lower 
than it was last winter. In January and February, the 




WORLD CUP 


Rus«ta . 6 , Cameroon 1 

Striker Oleg Salenko scored five goals to 
lead his team in a romp over Cameroon 
in thur last World Cup Group B match 
on -Tuesday in San Francisco. Russia 
played aggressively and kept the Cam- 
eroon squad off balance for the entire' 
game. Roger Mflla, Cameroon's 42-,. 
year-old veteran "striker, came on as a 
second-half substitute and quickly 
scored his team’s only goal. 

Brad t, Sweden 1 

In Detroit, Brazil and Sweden drew 1-1 
in their World Cup Group'B match here - 
Tuesday. Both advanced to the second . 
round, where Brazil will meet the Unit- 
ed States on Monday at Stanford Stadi- 
um, "v • 

Italy T , Mexico 1 

Mexico secured its place in the last 16 
on Tuesday, coming back after trailing 
to draw JUl with Italy m their Group E 
in Wflyhtng tnn and finishing atop the 
group.. Italy took the lead after 48 min- 
utes through the substitute Damde 
Massard . who had been on the. pitch 
only twp minutes after replacing Pier- 
luigi. Casiraghi. But their celebratipns 


GRANDSTAND 


were short-Iived as the Mexican mid- 
fielder Marcelino Bernal tied the score 
with a perfectly strode shot past the 
goalkeeper Luca MarchegjanL Italy fin- 
ished third in the group and must wait 
to see if will advance to the second 
round. • - ' '• 


No Moro Wtath: U.S. Advwu 

The UJS. team advanced to the second 
round of the World Cup on Tuesday for 
the Inst time in 64 years, despite not 
playing. Tbe Americans advanced be- 
cause they have a better record than 
Italy, the Group E third-place team. 

Irotend O, Norway O 

In East Rutherford, New Jersey, Ireland 
and Norway slugged it out in a 0-0 draw 
on Tuesday, which sent the Irish into 
the second round from Group E and 
condemned Norway to an early exit. 
Ireland finished exactly even with Italy, 
but ended up in second place in the 
group and. went through to the second 
round because of its 1-0 victory over the 
Italians* on June 18. 


WMtmday'* mHimc Morocco va the Nether- 
lands, at OrtaOdo, Florida. 153S GMT; Belgium 
vs. Saudi Arabia. St Washington, 1635 GMT. 
W&to Cup report Pages IS and 19 



tatit • ! - ?*r- afzsaserrTrrx-T^ :■ ___ 

Tim davy Apncc France-Prejic 

Paolo Maldini of Italy, left, and Mexico’s Luis Garcia battling for the ball Tuesday during their matdi in Washington. 


. ■ Kiosk ■ 

Call fora' 

BERLIN (WP)—1 
UJS. Federal Bureau 
mged Europe onTue 
growing epidemic 
crime :by. redirecting 
sources once devoted 
into *- joint c&mpril 
violence and terrorist 

J.S.-Europe War on Grime 

[he director ^ the The FBI chief, Louis J. Freeh, op«ied 

of Investigation * trip to -nine central and castcm Eiiro- 
sdav to combat a pcan countries by proclaiming US. law 
ofuitemafional enforcemeit agencies eager ^to join 
some of the re- forces with then- counterparts abroad in 
to the Cold War fighting organized crime. . ..... 

p drugs. BookR „ iw : Paj eS. 


Kohl Makes History - in His Own Way 


number of people who saw the economy improving 
exceeded, by 9 or 10 percentage points, the number 
who saw it declining. Now, 42 percent say it is getting 
worse and 39 percent better. 

The telephone survey of 1,531 people was taken 
from Thursday through Sunday, when economic news 
was dominated by reports that the dollar was drop- 
ping against the Japanese yen and the Deutsche mark. 

As a result, Mr. Clinton’s approval scores on the 
economy, which had been in positive territory from 
December through May, dipped to 46 percent approv- 
al and 48 percent disapproval in the latest poll. 

The margin of sampling error on the poll is plus or 
minus 3 percentage points overall. 


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100.45 


FF 


5.4105 


5-4245 


By Craig R. Whitney 

Sew York Times Service 

BONN — How the generation of politi- 
cal leaders that runs Germany today views 
the country’s history can now be seen, 
heard, and even touched in a museum that 
was opened here this month by Chancellor 
Hdmut Kohl, who was 15 in 1945. 

Just after becoming chancellor in 1982, 
when the Federal Republic of Germany 
consisted only of west Germany, Mr. 
Kohl suggested putting that view of histo- 
ry on display in a building across from his 
officeL 

But the display does not start when the 
Federal Republic did, in 1949. It begins in 
1945, at the insistence of members of Par- 
liament who voted 570 million in govern- 
ment funds for the museum. So it starts 
with what it calls “the ever-present past” 
— a stark reminder of tbe Holocaust in 
Dachau, Buchenwald, and Auschwitz, the 


devastation spread throughout Europe by 
the Germans, and the rubble that was 
Germany at the end of World War II. 

"Many Germans do not want to deal 
with their own responsibility for the recent 
past, but the burden of the Nazi crimes 
remains with Germany in the present,” 
visitors read as they enter a black marble 
box, a sort of mausoleum with graphic 
video displays of the reality of the concen- 
tration camps. 

“Just seeing the names of the dead roll- 
ing down on the screen was a shock for 
me,” said DanoHimmelrath, a 15-year-old 
high school student from Niederkassel. 
M we knew that Germany lay in ruins after 
the war, but the newsreels made me realize 
just how bad it really was then.” 

Inside the concrete-and-glass building is 
a winding uphill journey on ramps through 
□early 50 years of Gennan history, starting 
from a mockup bombed-out brick ruin. 


The 7,000 objects on display range from 
the trivial — a display of antiquated wash- 
ing machines and appliances from the 
1950s — to the gigantic, a 23-meter (75- 
foot), 62-ton private railroad passenger car 
that' was originally built for Hermann 
Goering and later used by postwar chan- 
cellors from Konrad Adenauer to Willy 
Brandt. 

Along the ramps, visitors walk through 
the fuselage of an American C-47, one of 
the planes that airlifted supplies like coal 
and potatoes to West Berlin during the 
Soviet blockade of the western enclave in 
1948-49, see an original red-and- white 
Coca-Cola dispensing machine, read polit- 
ical campaign posters from five decades, 
and touch an East Gennan Trabant car 
used by people fleeing communism as their 
country was breaking up in 1989. 

Some of the first German reviews have 

See GERMANY, Page 4 


Koreas Agree 
On a Summit 
In the North 
Next Month 

Historic 3-Day Session 
Witt Be the First Since 
Nation Was Split in 1945 

By David E. Sanger 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — The presidents of North 
Korea and South Korea agreed Tuesday to 
a historic three-day summit meeting start- 
ing July 25 in Pyongyang, the North Kore-. 
an capital, the first time the top leaders of 
the two Koreas will talk face-to-face since 
thepeninsula was divided in 1945. 

The agreement for the meeting between 
South Korea's first civilian president in 
more than three decades, Kim Young Sam, 
and North Korea's 82-year old dictator, 
Kim B Sung, came in a remarkably nona- 
crimonious session at the border village of 
P anmnnj om, along the Demilitarized Zone 
where the armistice was declared in the 
Korean War 41 years ago. 

Only three months ago. at the same 
table, a North Korean official was threat- 
ening to turn Seoul, 50 kilometers (30 
miles) to the south, into a “sea of fire” for 
bringing international pressure and the 
threat of sanctions against tbe North for its 
failure to open up its nuclear sites to inter- 
national inspectors. 

Not surprising, many in South Korea 
were deeply suspicious of whether the 
North's suddenly cooperative, friendly be- 
havior was sincere, a result of the new 
openings former President Jimmy Carter 
appeared to have made during his trip to 
Pyongyang on June 18, or whether it is 
merely another ruse to gain time to build a 
fledgling nuclear arsenal. 

The speed with which the two sides 
settled the details of the su mmi t confer- 
ence, with few of tiie angry exchanges that 
usually punctuate such tense discussions, 
suggest that both sides were eager to capi- 
talize on Mr. Carter’s trip. 

For Kim D Sung, now the world’s long- 
est living ruler, it is a political triumph: 
Despite North Korea’s economic fadings, 
the leader of the South will be coming to 
treat him as an equal in his own capital 
For Kim Young Sam. it is an equally 
rich moment There are millions of South 
Koreans with long-lost relatives in the 
North. Also, seeing Seoul's leader in 
Pyongyang will clearly give many hope 
that Asia’s “Berlin Wall” is also falling. 

But both sides were half expecting the 
meeting to become a place for angry po- 
lemics and lectures. With so much at stake, 
closed-circuit television broadcasts of the 
proceeding were piped into the presiden- 
tial mansions in both Seoul ana Pyong- 
yang, suggesting that both Kims may have 
both been watching and listening. 

If the summit meeting is successful, it 
will also redeem Mr. Carter, whose travel 
to Pyongyang this month was a source of 
constant controversy. 

Mr. Carter emerged declaring that the 
“nuclear crisis is over” and that his talks 
with the elder Mr. Kim over two days had 
been a “miracle.” Many of Mr. Carter’s 

See SUMMIT, Page 4 


Is It Revenge? 
Germany Curbs 
British Beef 

By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

Germany moved Tuesday (o impose a 
partial ban on British beef, citing fears of 
infection by “mad cow disease" but touch- 
ing off suspicions it was acting to avenge 
Britain’s action in vetoing hs candidate for 
the presidency of tbe European Commis- 
sion. 

“I think that would be unfortunate in- 
deed.” said the British agriculture mink - 
ter, Gillian Shephard, when it was suggest- 
ed that the Germans might be acting out of 
revenge. 

Germany did not specifically link its 
move with tbe decision of Prime Minister 
John Major to veto the candidacy of Jean- 
Luc Dehaene, the prime minister of Bel- 
gium, to succeed Jacques Delors as com- 
mission president. 

Mr. Dehaene was the favored candidate 
of both Germany and France, but Mr. 
Major said he represented an intervention- 
ist, big-government stance that was not 
acceptable to Britain. 

The Gennan health minister, Horst See- 
hofer, said his government would move 
immediately to block some beef imports. 
The measure has been sent to the Bundes- 
rat, the upper chamber of the Parliament, 
for ratification. 

Officials said the action appeared to be 
mainW symbolic since it will apply only to 
beef from animals more than three years 


old at the time of slaughter or from 
where the disease, bovine spongiform en- 
cephalopathy, had been reported in the 
past four years. In addition, the Gennan 
government is proposing only a six-month 
ban. 

Britain had already agreed not to ship 
meat from cattle in herds where the 
had been reported in the last two years. In 
1988, Britain banned the use of offal in 
cattle and sheep feed, which was thought, 
to be the m a m cause of the disease's 
See EUROPE, Page 4 












Page 2 


Neofascists Stir 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1994 


Croatia and Slovenia 


By David B. Otiaway 

Washington Past Service 
UMAG, Croatia — The way Giu- 
seppe Rota, principal of the Italian 
primary school here tells it, about the 
last thing his small community in sun- 
ny Istria needs is Italy's neofascisis 
defending the cause of the coastal re- 
gion's population. 

“Every time there are elections in 
Italy, they talk about Istria and chang- 
ing the border and the Osimo Treaty.” 
he remarked “But changing the bor- 


that emerged in 1991 from a disinte- 
grating Yugoslavia. 


For Slovenia, the issue has become a 
barrier to becomins: even an associate 


Spokesmen for the Berlusconi gov- member of the European Union. The 


eminent say that there is “no ques- 
U'on'* of changing Italy’s borders. But 


neo-fascists are demanding that Slove- 
nia first resolve the demand of the 


Mr. Fini’s words have sent shudders 30,000 to 40,000 Italians who fled Yu- 
ihrough the newly independent, still goslavia after World War 11 and have 


fragile nations of Croatia and Slove- have claims to property there, 
nia. Caught between the forces of ihree 

The neofascist demands have raised conflicting nationalisms, the Italian 
the specter that ethnic nationalism — minority of Istria is seeking to charter 
which has already split Yugoslavia an independent course to avoid a po- 
tato separate nations and now threat- tentially violent three-wav border con- 


toms union before it was superseded Army. His son is in the Croatian 
by the European Union. armed forces. 

The Istrian Peninsula, a summer Unul 1952. J5? 

playland of Italians. Croatian and were Hahn wring to Mr. Ro^ 
Slovenes, is indeed a special area in - — 

many ways. Sa into Italian and Yugoslav zones. 

With Us walled hilltop towns ^ 250 OCM) Mans in Istria. 

crowned with massive churches, its » _ 

soaring stone bell towers, cypress trees 
dotting the landscape and pastel- 
painted houses, it looks as if it belongs 
to Italy — a combination of Tuscany 
and the Ligurian Riviera. 

It has been a crossroads and melting 


der today? What does that mean? An- ens the two-way partition of Bosnia — ■ flict. 


other war, and we are tired of war.” could spread tolstria's Italian commu- It is advocating a special transna- 
"Fini hasn't come here to talk to us nity and even into Italy itself. tional status for the whole Isuian area 

yet,” he added. What is clear from even a brief tour that it hopes will overcome the *‘nar- 

Ftai is Gianfranco Ftai. leader of of Istria and from talks with Italians in row nationalism” of Italian. Slovenian 
the neofascist National Alliance in Ita- Rijeka. Pula. Umag and Koper across and Croatian extremists and will facili- 
ty, which has re-emerged as a major the Slovenian border is that there is a late the integration of both Croatia 
political force in Italian politics and strong nationalistic revival under way and Slovenia into the European 
has won five posts in Prime Minister among Italians — even though they Union. 

Silvio Berlusconi’s rightist govern- seem to be somewhat confused about “We want a common region of all 
mem. their identity. three parts of Istria’” said Mr. Rout. 


WORLD BKiEf 5 

French House Lifts Tapie 

PARIS 

z£5W253S£ MSS??* 




Bernard Tapie on suspicion oro usu» -rr.'" 

shwksv: sssa±iss£ss& 


Today, Umag’s Italian community Movem 

numbers only 2,700 out of a popula- ^ the victim of epohh 

lion of 10,000; the total of I 80j* ^ ^ would keep yrarkfflg in 

mandating the 


S A a bill; ' > 


Union. 

“We want a common region of all 
three parts of Istria’” said Mr. Rout. 


ment. uieir identity. three parts of Istna said Mr. Rota. 

The alliance has called for a revision For Croatia, the resurgence of the who is also president of the Italian 
of the 1975 Osimo Treaty between Italian minority issue represents an- Union of Croatia and Slovenia. “We 
Italy and Yugoslavia, under which lta- other nightmarish threat to its already respect borders ever if they divide us, 
ly gave up claims to the Istrian coastal fragmented sovereignty. It is now but we want a Benelux status for the 
region south of Trieste. struggling to re-establish authority three areas." Benelux — Belgium. 


ly gave up claims to the Istrian coastal 
region south of Trieste. 


who is also president of the Italian Take Mr. Rota, for example, whose 
Union of Croatia and Slovenia. “We family has lived in Umag, or Umago as 
respect borders even if they divide us, it is still called in Italian, for three 
but we want a Benelux status for the generations. His grandfather served in 


three areas." Benelux — Belgium. 


Today, that area is divided between over one-quarter of Croatia that was Netherlands and Luxembourg — were 


Croatia and Slovenia, two of the states seized by its Serb minority. 


joined ta a special open- borders cus- 


to Italy- a combmauon of Tuscany ^ 3,000 more living just across the h£seat to co'nc®trate^^mfC^.; t ^ 

and the Ligunan Riviera. border in Slovenia. Parliament, to which he was.dected earh«.thismo^i-, : ^ , v^. 

It has been a crossroads and melting But the number of official Italian- raruau*™** •. -;-y 1 .■'-^--r^* 

pot of empires, republics and civiliza- Croatians seems to be growing as more _ L r ‘ ,'to . 

lions for centuries. Romans, Vene- Croatian* born of mixed marriages de- a ilirCOS lUffllS AmI86S "iSfe-l 

tians. French. Italians, Austrians, Yu- Han - themselves Italian. ‘ *. ;, * y&rV 

goslavs and now Croatian and in 1991, 19,283 Italians from 22 Is- HONOLULUJAP) — 

Slovenians have taken turns occupying ^ communities ta both countries mo ny in the Phjhppm« 
it- Spartta elections for Istria’s Ital- victims of human 

Even in oon temporary times, it has Lan communal “assembly.” Last year; damagefrom the estate ^ ^ itiJto - ^ 

gone through a bordering cSnge of the number readied 26,527 from 43 0 f the Pfailipwws. Ml • 

hands. communities. A jury ruled here m l 992 that he was 

Take Mr. Rota, for example, whose The Croatian and Slovenian govern- disappea^^ - - 

family has lived ta Umag, or Umago as ments, though at ov-er tharco^ between 1972 and 1986. ‘ 

it is still called ta Itahan, for taree mon border ta the Adriatic, agreed on the same jury awarded the plamtiffs ■■ 

generations. His grandfather served in one thing — that a transnational body damages, similar to purutiye damages- Arotlaa-^ ^t^L^t Aed-. /:, T 

die array oftiieAustro-Hungarian such as die Italian Union represents a ufcd to begin D« : 12. wfll determine thefflnoifflt^o^^atory. \ 
Empire. His father served in the Italian challenge to both countries sovereign- damages for medicalc^ lost - 

military, and he served ta the Yugoslav ty. Attorneys for the estate nas ^ JU^m^^m awas.";, :-v -- 


Yu- dare themselves Italian. ■ 

and 1991 19^53 Italians from 22 Is- HONOLULU 

•ying irian ^nmumties ta both countries mony in the Philippines later tins jear &om^soayi^. j 


the array of the Austro-Hungarian 
Empire. His father served in the Italian 
military, and he served ta the Yugoslav 



UN Threatens to Strike 
Muslim and Serb Snipers 


damages for medical costs, Jest wages Rad pam aad Buffering- 
Attorneys for thevtatitnssaytas estate hasj$4QQnft»fcta Swiss-- - - v 
bank accounts akmeL The Phffippine govemzDest ^^eekiag lhe - ■ -V 
same money, which it saysMr. Marcos Jooted fmna. ifc^Rasury. ^ -1 


North Yemen Pounds Aden lines 


VJV . 


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Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ZAGREB, Croatia — The 
United Nations special envoy 
in the former Yugoslavia 
warned Tuesday that escalating 
Serb-Muslim fighting is seri- 
ously iradermining the truce in 
Bosnia, and he told the combat- 
ants to stop attacking UN 
peacekeepers or face NATO air 
strikes. 

The envoy, Yasushi Akashi. 
spoke before heading to Brus- 
sels for meetings with officials 
of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization to discuss future 
steps ta the peace process. 

“I am alarmed that this up- 
surge ta fighting threatens the 
prospects for reaching a com- 
prehensive cessation of hostil- 
ities and undermines efforts al- 
ready under way to broker an 
overall political settlement." 
Mr. Akashi said in a statement 

He expressed concern over a 
statement by General Rasim 
Delic. commander of the Mus- 
lim-led Bosnian government 
army, that his troops would 
press ahead with an offensive to 


'■miners ADEN, Yemen (Rjeatera) NorthemY<taKmforc^ battered - : 
J%yM. MJ L/Ui|fva Aden’s defenses on Tuesday in. a frisb bid Went off aita don tnA^i £ 

. some of their southern foes’ key facifitieSi offioals sajd. Living^ ’ • ' 

pie who apparen tty had fled the conditions inside .the port- city alre detsriotatmg^iwith resafentsri--; : 
south slopes of Mount Ozren- trying to dig wells to ease fflfnicreasingly acafe sfaOTtage. 1 
The United Nations says the The focus of the northern assaults is a'cc^stalrioad^ feadrag v^esLv ' r - 

truce has been disregarded from Aden to a suburb called little Aifcnv where^die breakaway^ }\ ' 
mainly by the government side, south’s only oil rerineiy, Adra’s mafcpowerstatioK&Bd affaUtary^..; 

“The Bosnian side is the one complex are Iocated. Northera ttmts; wbichhavc berieged Aden. ^ v 
that has been most hostile to the for dune weeks in an effort to^force > thfeir aouthem foes 
peace process and constantly submission, readied the road on Saturday before- betag pushed. '^ 
breachmg the cease-fire,” said back. • ./ ’•*. V '* 4 - , 

Sir Michael Rose, the British Repeated cease-fire attempts have failed bni southernm stilL’ : 
lieutenant general who com- hope that the United Nations Security Council wIB soon approved. V 
mands the UN peacekeeping measures that will sum the fighting and. allow relief supphefcio^ 
forces ta Bosnia. reach Aden. In New York, diplomats were working out a draft 3 ; -. ,: .V 

“The danger is that they will resolution that calls for a cease-fire and dialogue but which- 4. . 
provoke a massive Serb re- appears to offer little to force an end to the^ghting. 1 ;. 
spouse," he said in Sarajevo be- : . ; : :■ . . 

10 lh ‘ NAT ° Russia Defense Chief Hails NATO Tie ; 

Senior officials of the United MOSCOW (AP) — Defense Minister PaveLS. Grachev h aitetr- 7/ 
Slates, Russia and the Europe- NATO's Partnership for Peace program on Tuesday as a bridge'.^ - 
an Union were meeting in Pans that could lead Russia toward prosperity and integration into the;- 
on Tuesday to finalize a map as international enmmimity. - - 

part of an agreement that would “Russia has understood it is impossible to live m isolation,^ v^ 1 

award 49 percent of Bosnia to General Grachev said at a news txmferenoe here that also waas&'Or 
the Serbs and 51 percent to a attended by General George A Joulwan, NATO^s Supreme Allied r*£- I 
new Croatian-Muslim federa- Commander in Europe. General Grachev said that Russia and the ’ '.I 


n Bosnia. reach Aden. In New York, diplomats were working out a draft 3 ;. j 

: danger is Lhat they will resolution that calls for a cease-fire and dialogue but winch- -!. , 
e a massive Serb re- appears to offer little to force an end to' the .fighting.' 

” he said in Sarajevo be- ' :■ . 

r s “ NAT ° Russia Defense Chief Bails NATO Tie ^ 

>r officials of the United MOSCOW (AP) — Defense Mhuster PaVeLS. Grachev luikd^r 
Russia and the Europe- NATO's Partnership fca - Peace program on Tuesday as a bridger.vfj:;- 
an were meeting in Pans that could lead Russia toward prosperity and integration into the;- V 
sday to finalize a map as international c ommunit y- ■ - t'j-/'-- 

an agreement that would “Russia has understood it is imposrible to five id isolation, ^ ^ 


bon. North Atlantic Treaty Organization had agreed to establish liai-. ? - ] 

Mr. Akashi deplored increas- son offices and hot line telephone links between the Russian;- 1. 
tag threats 10 UN peacekeeping General Staff and Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe^ 

fnrrAC i nrlnHino HpliL. IaiiIunm amvioA m ll/uvwm am. ‘ 


army, that his troops would forces, including “several delib- General Joulwan, who arrived in Moscow on Monday, said* v. 
press ahead with an offensive to crate and serious attacks" by Russia that could have a bigger role to play “given its size, its^v^ 
capture an important supply both Serbian and government interests, its involvement in Europe and the world." But he -also .?fz 
road in north-central Bosnia. forces around Gorazde, where a stressed that R ossa's integration into NATO activities would be -V 

Mr. Akashi said fighting in British soldier was killed by slow and gradual. “Let us rave a way to crawl before we walk and . 
the last week, concentrated sniper fire Sunday night. walk before we run in this relationship,** he said.. • 




■| un (lnpx» A*jlhcc Frjmt frew 

CANINE BEGGAR — A boy in Moscow dropping money into a box on Tuesday for a dog that has been put out to join 
the ranks of beggars in the capital The owners usiudty scrawl a sign saying money is needed to buy f ood for the animals. 


road in north-central Bosnia. 

Mr. Akashi said fighting in 
the last week, concentrated 
mainly ta the Ozren mountain 
region, had increased to virtual- 
ly the same intensity as before 
the start of a monthlong tempo- 
rary truce ta Bosnia on June 10. 

In Geneva, a spokesman for 
the UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees, Ron Redmond, said 
that Bosnian Serbs were seeking 
humanitarian aid for 2.500 peo- 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

Not-So-Private Cellular Phones 
Unwittingly Help Fight Crime 

“Princess Diana coos into her cellular 
telephone to a male friend and pays a 
very public price,” Mike Mills writes ta 
The Washington Post “Colombian drug 
boss Pablo Escobar is shot dead by po- 
lice after they trace his mobile tele- 
phone's radio signal.” And A1 Cowlings, 
the friend of OJ. Simpson, the former 
football star charged with murder, led 
police to their car when he made several 
cellular phone calls during a highway 
chase June 17. 

But you don’t have to be famous to be 
undone by using cellular telephones. The 
police now rank them among their most 
valued crime-fighting tools. Indeed, 
those who monitor privacy issues worry 
that the police may be tempted to do too 
much wireless-phone snooping. 

Cellular telephones can be easily 
tapped by anyone with a police scanner. 
But it is a Federal crime to listen ta on 
them without a court-ordered wiretap 
warrant 

The phones also are excellent homing 


devices. When switched on. they periodi- 
cally signal the network to announce 
their location. 

Cellular phones can also tell the police 
where a suspect has been, since the tele- 
phone company keeps records of all 
calls. 

The privacy of conversations on cellu- 
lar telephones is going to improve soon, 
with the introduction of "digital” wire- 
less telephones. Because they transmit 
and receive ta computer language and 
switch frequencies rapidly, eavesdrop- 
ping is more difficult 

Short Takes 

In more than 80 percent of air acci- 
dents the pilots made mistakes that could 
easily have been prevented, federal in- 
vestigators say. And all too often, the 
mistakes occurred because of poor team- 
work among the crew. In one typical case 
in 1978, The New York Times reports, 
the pilot entered a holding pattern while 
trying to solve a problem with the land- 
tag gear. He was too absorbed too notice 
that the fuel gauges were dropping to 
empty. His two co-pilots failed “to suc- 
cessfully communicate their concern to 
the captain.” The plane crashed, killing 
10 people. Today, pilot training goes 
beyond technical skills. Crews are 
trained to work together. They learn to 


co mmuni cate, to speak their minds, to 
listen to each other and to share in the 
tasks of flying the airplane. 


Revonda Bowen, 17. a mixed-race pu- 
pil who sued her local school for viola- 
tion of her civil rights after a white prin- 
cipal said her parents had made a 
“mistake" in bringing her into the world, 
will receive 525.000 from the Randolph 
County Board of Education in .Alabama. 
The money will be paid by the school 
board's insurer. The principal, Hulond 
Humphries, had said the school prom 
would be canceled if interracial couples 
planned to attend. Miss Bowen, junior 
class president and bead of the prom 
pl annin g committee, has a white father 
and a black mother. The girl asked the 
principal whether her date should be 
white or black. The U.S. Justice Depart- 
ment is trying to get the principal fired. 

Ever hear of Throlf? ThaL Golf Digest 
explains, is "thrown golf." The player, 
instead of propelling the ball with a ciub, 
simply throws, tosses or rolls it from tee 
to cup. The magazine reports that an 82 
by Joe Flynn ta April 1975 is the best 
throlf score ever recorded. He sank his 
final six-foot (1.8-meter) putt by leaning 
over and dropping the ball into the cup. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Ukraine 9 s President 
Wins First Round 


sniper fire Sunday night. walk before we run in this relationship,** he said,. * \t: 

A spokesman quoted Mr. . U- 

Akashi as saying that it was the m T . . n m n ri u ' ' i 

“firm intention’' of the UN Pro- Nigeria DcmOCOCT I aikfi Collapse £ 

ABUJA Nig** (Reuters}- hKgerta’s 
further uJ-mlS! military rulers to discuss democratic transition bin boycotted by 

^ ^ opposition ^ a was adjourned Tuesday almost 
air support to eliminate any bef 0re ; t began. - ' 

alt3CkS "Die conference, the main item on General Sani Abacha’s^ 
personnel in me torce. political agenda, was adjourned for two weeks on its second day' ,; 

l Reuters, A Pi because of inadequate accommodation and other facilities for its; ? ’ 
369 participants. ‘ ' 

The early adjournment was criticized by many delegates, some^r.; 

of whom believe the military, which has ruled the oil-rich Wek- / 

K B * J M- African country most of the time since independence in 1960, as a; 

aY'flfil.fMjflTljTj ploy by the government to prolong its stay ta office. 


ask the butter... 




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Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

KIEV — President Leonid 
M. Kravchuk won the first 
round of Ukraine’s presidential 
ballot, the electoral commission 
announced Tuesday. 

Mr. Kravchuk got 37.72 per- 
cent of the vote against 31-27 
percent for his opponeat. for- 
mer Prime Minister Leonid S. 
Kuchma. 

The two face a runoff round 
on July 10. 

The results revealed a sharp 
regional split ta Ukraine, the 
world's third largest nuclear 
power, with the nationalist 
western regions voting heavily 
for Mr. Kravchuk and the Rus- 
sian populated east favoring 
Mr. Kuchma. 

Mr. Kravchuk was vulnera- 
ble because of Ukraine's dismal 
economy. Since breaking from 
the Soviet Union ta 1991, hy- 
perinflation has ravaged the 
country. The monthly state 
wage is below the equivalent of 
520, about a fifth of Russia's 
average wage. 

President Kravchuk argues 
that market reforms must be 
graduaL But his critics say his 
reforms have been so gradual as 
to be nearly invisible. Elected in 
1991, he was pressured to sub- 
mit to early elections. 


inouna TRAVEL UPDATE -A 

Instead of economics, his ■ ■■??}-.' 

bloodless transition from com- WHO’s (Madelines on 'Safe Food’ > • 

Quinism, and warned that his . ••••• 

rivals’ overtures toward Russia GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization issued nefe::. 
threaten independence and guidelines Tuesday to help millions of tourists avoid disease bugst .- 
could provoke civil war. From 20 percent to half of all people who travel abroad each.-; 

.riSSKEST sssesassissssjsasssa; 

me resentment among the Rus- >boal ^ Malc food been ^oroS co^k^ a£d£ 

SL* s S,t°' ssr Tn Avoid raw f00d -SSM 

Bod °r thsmfect any donbtf d drinking water. 

and says closer links with Rus- ® M ® n leaders at stato-nm Ahtafia called a one-day general, 

sia and other former Soviet re- 1 \ i to P™ t ?U°S^ ts ^y airitae. Alitalia lost Sflj 

publics could stave off econom- l** 1 4 “ft™) “ 1993. The carrier said ta May it 

ic collapse. losing more than a billion lire a day. ;jf?. 

Mr. Kravchuk has been ^ ai^ - 

praised by Western countries brid S« ^ 

for moving to dismantle the nu- wlU ^ “ade free to ail users this? 

clear arst^al Lhal Ukraine in- “ addllJOD Au S**- (Reuutf 

heriled from the Soviet Union. _ KaRwty Boks between France and Italy were re-established 
He has pledged that Ukraine Tuesday m the Maunenne Valley area of the Alps after bema dSU 
will sign the Nuclear Nonprolif- m ? re “ an -f hours by severe storms. Road linVc were restored 

eration Treaty. Monday through the Frejus tunnel one of the main routes. (AffPJ- 

Mr. Kuchma has backed , On Urn car ded^ 

some denuclearization but op- a rerr ^ samng from Gedser to Rostock, Germany, the Danish sea 
poses signing the treaty, saving r 650 ? 6 servi ®f said. It said the fire apparently started ta a truck’ifL 
theWesthaTbeen slow to of fe? few hours ^ lCT midnight, killing the driver. 
financial support. He vows to A powerful storm Tuesday caused Hash flooring and the coDaree 

make Ukraine a more active of buildings m southwest Germany. Threepaople were reiwtS 
member of the Russian-domi- killed in Bad en-Wurttem berg, near the French border rCp ^m 
rated Commonwealth of Inde- A diarrhea outbreak has killed at least seven nmni* a ‘ A 

pendent States and give greater M0 others in the West Java regenc^f PandSl^he’AdSil 
autonomy to Russian-speaking news agency reported Tuesday. It said the chiefnf7S 
regtons. (AFP, AP) service blamed a lack of c leJ water 


ic collapse. 

Mr. Kravchuk has been 
praised by Western countries 
for moving to dismantle the nu- 
clear arsenal that Ukraine in- 
herited from the Soviet Union. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBIHNE, WEDNESDAY, JIHVE 29, 1994 


THE AMERICAS/ 




Ar POLITICAL NOTES* 


Chief of Staff; Wo Job for an Outsider 

WASHINGTON — Marlin Filzwater. the president's 
spokesman in the Reagan and Bush White Houses, has just 
finished a chapter in bis memoirs about the chiefs of staff he 
worked under — starting and ending with James A. Baker 3d. 

One of his conclusions is that Washington insiders have a 
better chance of succeeding as chief of staff than do outsiders. 
"The White House," he said in an interview, “operates on a 
set of rules and principles applicable in no other setting." 

President Bill Clinton has doubtless come to the same 
conclusion. Thomas F. (Mack) McLartv was admired in the 
White House for his congenial nature. But he was a corporate 
executive from Arkansas who knew neither the policy nor the 
players of Washington, and that proved to be his downfall. 

By contrast, few people in Washington and certainly no one 
in the Clinton administration has more of a grasp of the 
intricacies of government policy than Leon E. Panetta. The 
main job description of the budget director is to master the 
details. 

Mr. Clinton would like to dispel the notion around the 
country that the White House is a chaotic operation in which 
decisions are made largely on impulse. And he would like 
someone in charge of the staff who can direct all the energy 
here in the capital toward passing his legislative agenda, 
particularly his health care bul. (NYTj 


A Faltering State Department Welcomes Gergen’s Skills 


Congrew to Start Whitewater Hearings 

WASHINGTON — Henry B. Gonzalez, Democrat of 
Texas and House Banking Committee chairman, will begin 
Whitewater hearings July 26 and call as his first witness 
Robert B. Fiske Jr M the special counsel 

Mr. Gonzalez has been opposed to congressional inquiries 
into the Whitewater investment held jointly by President 
Clinton, Hillary Rodham Clinton, James B. McDougal, own- 
er of a now-failed Arkansas savings and loan, and his former 
wife, Susan. But House leaders decided this month Lhai the 
committee should go ahead. Hearings also are planned by the 
Senate Banking Committee, to be started by July 29. 

The congressional hearings will focus on the so-called 
Washington phase of the Whitewater investigation, and lead- 
ers of hoth houses agreed to wait until Mr. Fiske completed 
his work in that area before beginning. 

Mr. Fiske has promised to tell Congress this week whether 
Whitewater hearings this summer would interfere with his 
investigation. He has said he would release a report this week . 
on the death last summer of Vincent W. Foster Jr., the deputy 
White House counsel (WP) 


Quote / Unquote 


Cathy Busch, Ronald Reagan’s spokeswoman, on an Ital- 
ian doming firm’s advertisement depicting Mr. Reagan as an 
AIDS victim: “Benetton apparently believes thaL offensive- 
ness and bad taste will 
people.” 


its products to the American 
(AP) 


By Daniel Williams 

II'iuAv^.‘im Prat Service 

WASHINGTON — David R. Gergen. ihe 
Clinton administration spin master, is by his own 
admission no foreign policy expert and is going 
to the Slate Department at a time when his role 
in the White House is in decline. 

Still, Secretary of State Warren M. Christo- 
pher welcomed the transfer, top aides said, be- 
cause he believes Mr. Geigen will bolster the 
packaging and presentation of policy both to 
President Bill Clinton and the public ai large, 
and wiB help Mr. Christopher repair his own 
faltering image as shepherd of foreign affairs. 

In a statement, Mr. Christopher welcomed the 
appointment “enthusiastically.” saying Mr. Ger- 
gen “will bring to our discussions at the White 
House a well-honed sense of how this adminis- 
tration can better communicate its foreign policy 
goals to the American people.” 

Aides to Mr. Christopher said the secretary 


was impressed by Mr. Gergen's skills in organiz- 
ing presidential trips abroad and summit 
meetings. 

Yet no one has questioned the administra- 
tion's abilities at crafting spectacles: rather, tor- 
tuous paths in Somalia, Haiti, North Korea, 
Bosnia and elsewhere have thrown doubt on its 
foreign policy skills. When asked about Mr. 
Gergen's contributions to past debates on such 
security issues. State Department officials said 
they did not know what they were. 

in any event, Mr. Christopher has been faced 
recently with a stream of reports suggesting that 
he himself will be out of a job by year's end. He 
has long insisted that his main problem is com- 
munication. and aides said Mr. Gergen offers a 
cure. On Saturday, when Vice President Al Gore 
sounded out Mr. Christopher about accepting 
Mr. Gergen, the secretary was said to have been 
enihused. 

“It will be good to have someone from public 


affairs, communications and politics to be in- 
volved.*' said a State Department official “We 
need a communicator. The press keeps kicking 
the crap out of us, so we need someone." 

Mr. Gergen win keep an office at the White 
House and take part in the so-called “principals" 
meetings of top foreign policy advisers. But he 
will make the State Department home, an official 
said, beca u se he is more friendly with Mr. Chris- 
topher than with the national security adviser, 
W. Anthony Lake. Mr. Clinton met with Mr. 
Lake on Sunday, and got a pledge from him that 
he would cooperate with Mr. Gergen, a senior 
administration official said. 

“I don't pretend to be an expert in all the 
issues of foreign policy,” Mr. Gergen said at the 
news conference Monday where his new job was 
announced But Mr. Gergen said he was eager to 
“bring an extra voice” to policy- makin g. 

Despite the positive vibes emanating from the 
Slate Department, it was hard to avoid the im- 


pression that Mr. Gergen’s new job was a kind of 
going-away present. Mr. Gergen, who was sched- 
uled to leave the adxninistrauon by this fall will 
now stay until the end of the year and then 
probably take a job in academia.' 

With a midterm election coming up, both Mr. 
Gergen and political operatives in the White 
House were uneasy with the lifelong Republi- 
can’s presence, and the Slate Department 
seemed a safe distance from the political center 
of the administration, officials said. 

Mr. Gergen's arrival in the State Department 
coincides with imminent changes in Mr. Christo- 
pher's current information team. The assistant 
secretary of state for public affairs. Thomas E. 
Donilon. will soon be promoted to Mr. Christo- 
pher’s chief of staff, and Michael McCuny, the 
State Department spokesman, will move up to 
lake Mr. Donilon's post while remaining 
spokesman. 


Rivlin: Hawkish on Deficit Panetta : A Veteran Infightei 


By Clay Chandler 

H'ashm^iun Pori Senncc 

WASHINGTON — In tap- 
ping Alice M. Rivlin to succeed 
Leon E. Panetta as his budget 
director. President Bill Clinton 
retains the services of one or the 
nation’s most respected budget 
experts and a nominee virtually 
certain to sail ihrough Con- 
gress. 

White House colleagues, con- 
gressional staffers and private 
analysts Monday bailed the 
choice of Mrs. Rivlin. 63. Mr. 
Paneita’s deputy for the past 
year and a half, and predicted 
she would pick up pretty much 
where her predecessor left off. 

Some, however, saw the pro- 
motions of Mrs. Rivlin and Mr. 
Panetta as tilting the White 
House power balance in favor 
of more deficit reduction in the 
future. Although she has de- 


scribed herself as a “fanatical, 
card-carrying middle-of-the- 
roader,” she has earned a repu- 
tation as Lhe administration's 
fiercest deficit hawk. 

In internal cabinet debates, 
she fought hard for deeper 
spending cuts than those con- 
tained in the five-year. $500 bil- 
lion deficit reduction package 
that the Clinton administration 
and Congress agreed to last 
summer. She argued forcefully 
that the Clinton health reform 
plan should be structured in a 
manner that wouldn't raise the 
federal deficit, battled to reduce 
government subsidies for farm- 
ers and took issue with budget 
gimmicks. 

In the administration and on 
Capitol Hill, some worried that 
Mrs. Rivlin might not be as ef- 
fective in marshaling support 
for Mr. Clinton's budget initia- 


tives in Congress. “The biggest 
difference" between having 
Mrs. Rivlin rather than Mr. Pa- 
netta at the helm of the Office 
or Management and Budget 
will be the director’s relation- 
ship with Congress, said Gary 
Bass, director of OMB Watch, a 
watchdog group. 

Where Mr. Panetta's style is 
avuncular and tight, Mrs. Rivlin 
is dispassionate and analytical 
Although she won high marks 
on Capitol Hill for being tough- 
minded and fair during her ten- 
ure as the first director of the 
Congressional Budget Office, 
from 1975 to 1983, she lacks 
Mr. Panetta's rapport with 
members. Many expect Mrs. 
Rivlin, who congressional 
sources said will be confirmed 
with ease, to offset that weak- 
ness by selecting someone with 
strong ties to Congress as her 


By Neil A. Lewis 

Nm VorA Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — Leon 
Panetta, the man now charged 
with making the White House 
more efficient and focused, 
learned early in his career about 
the power a White House chief 
of staff can wield. 

Mr. Panetta. who began pub- 
lic life as a Republican, was the 
director of civil rights for the 
old Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare in 1969, 
in the early days of Richard 
Nixon’s presidency. 

He sought to deal quickly 
with more than 600 lingering 
school desegregation cases but 
was told bluntly to back off to 
preserve the White House’s 
'’Southern strategy," the effort 
to woo the South from the 
Democrats. 

When Mr. Panetta pressed 


ahead anyway, he was dis- 
missed, largely al the instiga- 
tion of H.R. Haldeman. Mr. 
Nixon's chief of staff. Mr. Pa- 
netta recalled in a 1971 memoir 
titled “Bring Us Together." 

In a markedly different polit- 
ical dimate, Mr. Panetta was 
appointed White House chief of 
staff on Monday, the day be- 
fore his 58th birthday. But the 
job he has assumed still carries 
great authority to enforce ad- 
ministration policy and politi- 
cal consistency. 

“I now have the opportunity 
to help direct the office of the 
presidency and to try to make it 
serve the president in an effec- 
tive and efficient manner." be 
said. 

“It will not be easy. Changes 
wifi be made in consultation 
with the president, but they will 
be made in the spirit of making 


the best use of the talent and 
abilities that are here.” 

Mr. Panetta returned to his 
native California in 1971 to 
practice law, seemingly des- 
tined to do so for the rest of his 
life. 

But in 1976, by then a Demo- 
crat, be ran for Congress and 
won a narrow victory in Cali- 
fornia's rich agricultural belL 

He was returned to the 
House election after election 
with ever- wider margins 

In 1978 he began serving on 
the Budget Committee. For 
four years, until Mr. Clinton 
tapped him in 1992 to be direc- 
tor of the Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget, he was (he 
committee's chairman. 

In that job he demonstrated 
that mastering the details of leg- 
islation and policy can be a 
source of formidable power. 


Away From Politics 


• An American bosinessman who agreed to boy a yacht owned 
by Aristotle Onassis bounced a check for the first payment, an 
organizer of the $22 million sale said. Alexander Blastos, 28, 
announced the purchase of the 325-foot (100-meter) Christina 
from the craft's current owner, the Greek Navy,' earlier this 
year. But Yiamxis Vahaviolos, a Greek lawyer who helped set 
up the sale, said the $220,000 down payment had bounced, 
and “there is also a serious anomaly with the letter of 
guarantee.” 

• Greyhound Bus lines is being sued by seven passengers who 
claim a bus driver in California shouted at passengers to stop 

“The driver first came over the loud speak- 

Ana 
disciplined 

and that a settlement had been offered. 

• The UJS. government produced 994 metric terns of highly 
enriched, weapons-grade uranium between the beginning of 
the nuclear age in 1945 and the end of production in 2992, far 
more *b»m the previous estimate of 700 tons, the Energy 
Department said. The stockpile runs to about 259 tons. 

AP. Reuters, WP 


Canada Prohibits 
Penthouse Comic 
Showing Sadism 

Washington Post Service 

TORONTO — An adult 
comic book published by Pent- 
house magazine cannot be im- 
uted to Canada, officials here 
ive warned, because it depicts 
sexual coercion, violence and 
degrading behavior. 

Customs officials who in- 
spected copies of Penthouse 
Comix 2 told its American pub- 
lisher that the troublesome 
scenes could violate Canada’s 
tough new anti-obscenity stat- 
utes. 

Penthouse said it will explore 
an appeal, but in the meantime 
will not ship the approximately 
10,000 copies bound for Cana'- 
da’s newsstands. 

Canadian bookstores cater- 
ing to women and to homosex- 
uals complain that customs of- 
ficials have seized sexually 
explicit magazines and books. 


U.S. Starts to Worry as Flood Tide of Haitian Refugees Rises 


Washington Post Sen-ire 

ABOARD THE HAMIL- 
TON — U.S. Coast Guard cut- 
ters have picked tip more than 
2,200 Haitian boat refugees in 
days and more were on the way 
Tuesday, raising concerns 
among Clinton administration 
officials that the opening of a 
new refugee processing center 
has set off a dangerous exodus 
from the Caribbean nation. 

Monday alone, cutters such 
as the Hamilton plucked nearly 
1.500 people, many of them 
hungry and dehydrated, from 
rickety sailboats off Haiti As 


many as a dozen more heavily 
laden boats were waiting to be 
relieved of tbeir human cargo, a 
spokesman said. 

Another 785 Haitians were 
picked up from Friday morning 
to Sunday evening. 

On Tuesday, Coast Guard 
planes spotted at least a half- 
dozen more boats leaving Haiti 
at first light. 


“It feels as if they have got all 
these boats and we don’t have 
enough ships,” said Command- 
er Bob Reinin ger, the Hamil- 
ton’s executive officer. “Some 
of the stuff happening here is 
just amazing.” 

Some American officials be- 
lieve that many of the Haitians 
are setting off to sea in the 
hopes of being picked up by the 


Coast Guard. Since June 16, 
under a new policy, all Haitians 
intercepted by the Coast Guard 
have been given a chance to 
seek admission to the United 
States as refugees. 

Before last weekend, the 
Coast Guard had intercepted 
an average of about 50 people a 
day since the United States be- 
gan hearing refugee claims 


aboard the hospital ship Com- 
fort anchored off Kingston, Ja- 
maica. The ship can handle a 
maximum of 1,000 people at a 
time, and in 'Washington ad- 
ministration officials expressed 
concern that the operation 
could soon become overloaded. 

“This is the surge that we had 
to worry about, the influx that 
wamps the system," an admin- 
istration official said. 


$5 Million Platinum Tlieft 

The Associated Pros 
MOSCOW — Thieves using 
skeleton keys broke into 
chemistry institute in St. Peters- 
burg and stole 5 kilograms (I! 
pounds) of i platinum, a news 
agency reported Tuesday. 


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Argentine Republic 
Province of Santa FE 

NOTICE OF INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC BID N° 005 

MINISTRY OF FINANCE 

Provincial Executory Department 
Ministry of Domestic Affairs 
Financial Improvements Program and Economic 
Development of the Argentine Provinces 

Work Execution: 

i Kefuret/oning of the Ur lose Maria Cullen' Hospital. Province ol Santa Fe. Argentina 
Republic 

2 . Rehabilitation ol the Pirvinrial Hospital d the cSy d Rosario, province d Santa Fe. 


i Rdubi&afwn d the CasaHto' Pnwioal Hospital aty d Rosario. Pkww d Sama 
Fe 

torn opening of envelopes. August 16, 1 W at IWJO a.m at the Salon Banco of the 
Government House. MSI 3 de Fetoero st. 1st floor. Province of Santa Fe. Areentme 
Republic. 

1 This province has received a loan tiwn the Banco Irteramericano de Desafidto through 
a Subrogation Covenant wfth (he nadonal government Loan Covenant BID |IDB) N* 01 MIC 
■AR to contribute to pay for the Prwincial Financial improvements Program The province 
d Santa fe will dewu part d these hinds to making payments in acmdanc? with that 
agreed upon m the the art last reared to in ihis Notice. 

2 Works lor (he refonctioning ol the lose Maria Cullen Hospital will consist erf 
demolishing tasks, repairs in general, contraction d several structures, complementary 
Inflallabons. inlets and paving worts in several parts d the prams©. 

3 Works for (he rehabilitation d the Rosario Provincial Hospital will consist d the 
refurbishing d the confinement bulling, maternity and neonddem sectors CrtBtiualwi 
d ihe building d maternity confinement and comptememarv wortsior this Hostel. 

4 worts lor ihe rehabilitation d the Cenlenano Provincial Hospital will consia !o the 
refurbishing d doctors dikes, confinement rooms numbers 1,2,3 and 4. Files sector, 
room 10. basement droulation. and installation ol elevators and the image Diagnosis 
sector d the Ho^rfal 

5 The prcwnce invites these companies d the countries memebeis of the Bid tlDB| 
llmeramencan Development Bankj Interested in participating to submit their lenders by 
the double envelope system lenvetope »: Documents lor Precalification Envekpe 2- 
tonwnic Tends) 

6 Bidding Proposals may be inspected and purchased, and additional information 
ctoanedai aithedliusdihe UCP. 1151 PresideritellfaAy.ahfloMCo^ 

Ceuta 13000) Province d Santa fe. Telephone 54-42-W0436 or 64-42- 500407. TeMax. S4- 
42-560611 bl the 'Dnecodn Cereal de Recursos Fsok y Constnicciones Hosphalarias ' 
MS MA yAS (General Department d Physical resources and Hospital amstruclioftsj, 2<H4 
I” de Mayo Aw ■ Wm Province d Santa Fe Telephone. W-42- 1 WOO bit- 32W5. Telefax 
S4-42-55M2 cj the DIKES sod hem area. %’> Buenos Aires st 3rd floor (2000L city rf 
frearfo. pr-.mnoe of Santa fe Telephone 54-4J2H220 or W4J-2IB77. Tefcfci M-4I- 
242189 dial the Government Ottioe d the Province of Santa Fe in the Federal Capital. 373 
Montevideo St 2 nd flew Telephone 37V457CV457 i/4572, Argentine Republic 
T Trtal Official Budget for this bid is $097664? 66 . divided in the Idkuring watt Wort I 
Refundjonjng of the O lose Maria Cullen Hoptal. Province of Santa fe S3 433 442 30 
Term (eight) 8 months Work 2. Rehabilitation of Ihe Rosario Piwinrial Hospital: 
$y>2 02^1 Tern fourteen 1 14) months. Wort 3. Rehabilitation d the Caflenario 
Pravmaal Hospital dtyd Rosario S3 291 175 86 Term. eighteen t I 6 i months 
8 The ostofthe adding PTOpialsd each wort is $1,000 and it can be purehasedllEP at 
DIKtS-southem area. <*,5 Borons Aires Si 3rd flow 120001 otyd Rosario Tda>hone54- 
4 K' If 339 or W-4 1 -2 13X77 Telefax. 54-4l-242l8« 

« Tenders mil be defiwred at the reception d the MOSPvV 2651 1 de Febrero 5L 1st 
floor. 13000) Province ol Santa fe. Argentine Republic, until die dale aid tone atipubted 
fr* the opening d Tenders 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 


French Fly 35 Nuns, 
And Some Orphans, 
To Safety in Zaire 


Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dispatches. 

GOMA. Zaire — French sol- 
diers flew 35 Western and 
Rwandan nuns to safety in 
Zaire on Tuesday after they had 
been repeatedly threatened and 
harassed during Rwanda's 12 
weeks of civil war. 

It was the first evacuation of 
civilians trapped there since 
French troops entered western 
Rwanda last week on their Op- 
eration Turquoise protection 
mission. 

Thirty nuns, including Bel- 
gians, two Americans, one Brit- 
on and Rwandans, from both 
the Hutu majority and Tutsi 
minority, and five novices were 
airlifted aboard helicopters 
along with eight orphans. 

They were flown to a French 
base here from a convent in the 
western Rwandan town of Ki- 
buye, where they had been 
stranded since killings across 
the country began in April. 

Sister Marie Julian, an Amer- 
ican from Buffalo, New York, 
said the nuns and novices were 
threatened both physically and 
psychologically despite protec- 
tion from government gen- 
darmes. 

They were separated accord- 
ing to whether they were Tutsi 
or Hutu and taken outside and 
told they were going to be 
killed, she told reporters. She 
added that none was tortured 
physically. Most of them were 
too traumatized to talk to re- 
porters. 

“It was the mean people of 
the village, the young ones,’' 
said Sister Emma, a Tutsi. 
“They had machetes and 
clubs.” 

‘They had a list, and now 
and then they'd come to see if 
anyone was hiding with us,” she 
said. “We had to turn people 
over. It was sad but we had to." 

A special forces officer said 
100 paratroopers protected the 
nuns at Kibuye since landing at 
the convent on Friday by heli- 
copter. He added that it was 
decided to evacuate them, since 
the military could not deploy so 
many of its men in one place. 

“We've been watching them 


for three days. You must re- 
member in this situation we are 
visible during the day but any- 
thing can happen during the 
night,” he said. 

“The jungle makes its own 
law in the night,” he added. 

Operation Turquoise, involv- 
ing more than 1,400 troops, re- 
ceived its first medical and food 
aid for refugees in Rwanda 
when a chartered plane flew in 
40 tons from France to Goma. 

Gerard Larome, director of 
an emergency team at the 
French Foreign Ministry, said 
airlift Tuesday was the first of 
10 or 12 in the next week. 

The nuns and novices of the 
order of Sainte Marie in Na- 
mur, Belgium, said they wept 
with joy when the special forces 
troops arrived to secure the area 
from militiamen, who have 
massacred Tutsi refugees hiding 
in churches and schools across 
the coumiy. 

“I think we had protection. I 
think the prefect and the mayor 
and the commander of the gen- 
darmes helped us,” said Sister 
Marie, adding she was not sure 
of exactly how they helped the 
convent “because a lot of that is 
hidden to us.” 

Local officials have either 
largely been unable to control 
marauding gangs of Hutu mili- 
tiamen in government-held ar- 
eas or, according to Tutsi survi- 
vors, helped organize mass 
killings . 

Sister Marie said intruders 
entered the convent at night 
and shouted threats, especially 
a gains t Tutsi nuns and Bel- 
gians, which the government 
accuses of backing die rebels. 

But she added that 27 more 
nuns and novices remained 
trapped at a religious communi- 
ty in southern Rwanda and 
could not reach Kibuye by road 
because of roadblocks. 

The operation was a media 
coup for the French, who alert- 
ed the press 12 hours in advance 
to be at the airport. French re- 
connaissance patrols have been 
having mixed success in Ending 
refugees in daily penetrations 
from Zaire. (Reuters, API 




U.S. Is 
Of Ye: 

Nuclear 

By Michael R. Gordon 

Sew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON y- The-. 

to make jjhitoffluin* ex. .. 



l»r 

0v 

Of 


Whatever . ac«ngeme, 
Washington 

North Korean jnid^rpotenUtt 

to lurch forward -has cast^fe 
shadow over- ibe .coning 


^orS&.tc ■ pats sa Norih 


area's shcstfJpS 
will not have -«££ 



officials of the : International North Korea s oner to freeaet. 

ate. From there, they conduct Geocv^; n:; .= ^ 

inspections to.- make sure that : : MomtojT 

the 8,000 fuel rods the North ^ ^ firsKteyrirf the falfcr 
Koreans have removed .from ^ devoted 4 o’presenia^-^r 

the Yongbyon reactor and ^ ^ 

dumped into a discussions, the tiw safes wiffg 

kept there and not diverted 10 take*. break: They.-witt ieccate.iM 
produce plutonium, a compo- 

nent of nuclear weapons. - cass «id£sTosit»i# 

When the inspectors. are not Mc< ^^ d ded: . ; 
esent, the agency relies- on^ ■? 


The negotiators after the accord Tuesday: Kim Young Sun of North Korea, left, and Lee Hong Koo of South Korea. 

SUMMIT; Leaders of 2 Koreas Agree to Meet in North's Capital on July 25 


Continued from Page 1 

critics suggested that he had 
been naive to accept everything 
Kim II Sung said. 

But others suggest he was 
shrewdly attempting to box In 
the North and make Mr. Kim’s 
aides carry through on whatev- 
er the “Great Leader" declared. 

The leaders of the two Ko- 
reas have talked about a meet- 
ing at intervals since 1972. But 
there is considerable wariness 
on both sides that the meeting 
could turn from a celebration of 
Korean brotherhood to another 
bitter argument between two 
countries still technically at 
war. 

Already there are charges 
that Seoul has caved in to the 
North. Chosun II bo. South Ko- 


agreed to allow the first su mmi t 
meeting to occur in Pyongyang 
rather than some neutral 
ground. 

The July 25 summit will fol- 
low a high-level meeting of 
American and North Korean 
officials in Geneva, starting 
July 8. That meeting, set up by 
Mr. Carter during his three-day 
trip to the North earlier this 
month, will discuss North Ko- 
rea's willingness to open up to 
full nuclear inspection in return 
for a “package deal” of eco- 
nomic and diplomatic incen- 
tives. 

North Korea has agreed to a 
temporary “freeze” on its nu- 
clear development activity 


while the talks are on, including 
the movement of spent fuel rods 
from a nuclear reactor into a 
reprocessing plant, where it 
could make weapon-grade fuel. 

By contrast the goals of the 
North-South summit meeting 
are likely to be more symbolic: 
a step toward national reconcil- 
iation after a half-century of 
bitter conflict. North Korea's 
chief representative at the Tues- 
day meeting, Kim Young Sun, 
said in an opening speech to his 
South Korean counterpart Lee 
Hong Koo, that the meeting 
will bring “bright hopes of re- 
unification in the 1990's.” 

In fact reunification is one 
topic both presidents are ex- 


present »— - j. 

cameras to keep an eye on the 

Stockpiles. . • '.••• ; • 
“Based on our understa ndin g 

at this moment the major, de- : 
men is of the program are fro- 1 
zen,” according to the State De- 
partment spokesman, Mike 


pected to steer gingerly around' McCurry. But the key 
because they have widely differ- not freezing the Neath 


One bf the 

tratioa’s feare 

talks end, thc N(>r^t;KpreanS i&g. 

man TTlClCt fieri "rtntrntr irinrie tn r f- 


their jreproceSsiHg^p&tiT ta — 7J _ ; 
make more plutojarejn.: . Tho/ [ - 
North is aHbwisai£k$ 
thejdutonium! 


•I? - - 


v- 4 -*- 

W' r - ' 

iV *, 

' 

i- ; 1 

vjj" ; 

i 

W j ' 


ic- 


ing views of how it may take 
piarw, and on whose terms. But 
if the discussions turn specific, 
they are likely to focus on the 
December 1991 agreement to 
“denuclearize” the Korean Pen- 
insula and establish far greater 
contacts among the people 

The agreement bans nuclear 
reprocessing facilities on either 
siae, bat the North has built an 
extensive reprocessing plant, 
which it calls a “radio-chemical 
laboratory." 

Agreements on building 
road, rail and electronic links 
between North and South have 
also gone nowhere. 


issue "is . - 

_ Korean 

program in” the near term- It is might even 

the long-term disposition of the be present. 


the rods. 

The rods embody the future 
of tire North’ Korean nuclear. 
If taken to the North 
processing plant, ex- 
perts say. Hie rods could be used 
to produce enough plutonium 
in six months for four .to five 
bombs. 

In an effort to persuade the 
North Koreans to make the 
temporary North Korean freeze 
permanent, the Clinton admin- 
istration is considering, a pack- 



Even as W&sItiogtDn pre- 
pared for tlfc^fal^ 

..planning was x»ntintiing 
dais said Momiay'tliat theU&jji?;. 
Navy was planoing fo send 
minesweepers and an ampltibr-^v^ 
ons vessel from Hawaii to Jart£i£: 
pamtins Wedcaspartof Wa^- V; ^‘J 
mg ton’s ref fort r to quietlX;_^J 
reinforce its mflftary prcsencei^^f - 

•; Given the jptffiticftl "and .ted^J^W 
incsA cKaBeiiges, -experts _ 
sharply divided .about whether. . ^ ' 
the Tmracle” that fanner Presi-.'* 


age of economic aaddiplomatic ^ 

inducements, including an mi- ' <-> 

rial exchange of liaison offices. 

The bS way to cap the ** a genuine to 


gested in an^editoriaJ prepared GERMANY: Kohl Makes History, in His Own Way 

ir»ne th.-vt J w 


for Wednesday’s editions that 
South Korea's president was 
being manipulated by the 
North, and never should have 


REFUGE: Makeshift Camps Are Jammed in Rwanda 


Continued from Page 1 
has been freshly turned. Two 
infants were buried here last 
Tuesday, refugees said. 

“Many others are about to 
die,” said Augustine Ngenda- 
banga, 61, standing on the earth 
at the other end of the health 
center where two of his friends 
were buried last week. They 
died of starvation, he said. 

Mr. Ngendabanga said he 
had fled his village on April 20, 
two weeks after a plane carry- 
ing the country's president, Ju- 
vfenal Habyarimana, crashed 
under suspicious circum- 
stances. unleashing the latest 
and most vicious phase in the 
four-year-old civil war, which 
pits the government, now domi- 
nated by militant Hutu, against 
the Tutsi-led Rwandan Patriot- 
ic Front. He said that rebels 
killed two of his brothers, one 
son and his mother. 

At the first place the villagers 
made a camp, the rebels at- 
tacked again, he said. He said 
they encircled the camp and 


threw a grenade into it. “Many 
people were killed,” he said. 

Others here told similar tales. 
Mrs. Bakamaurera said she had 
fled her village, which is west of 
here, when rebels attacked on 
April 10. 

She said that the Hutu and 
Tutsi groups bad lived together 
in the village, and that they had 
not had any problems until re- 
cently. 

Government paramilitary 
soldiers were guarding the vil- 
lage, Mrs. Bakamaurera said, 
but that they had fled as soon as 
the rebels attacked. She said she 
had seen her husband, mother- 
in-law, and the children of 
many neighbors shot while try- 
ing to flee. 

The villagers who escaped 
stopped In five places during 
the next several wreks, Mrs. Ba- 
kamaurera said. “In all those 
places, the rebels attacked us,” 
she said. 

“We don’t have anything to 
eat," she said The only water is 


faraway, and when the children 
go to fetch it, they are chased 
away by villagers. “They don't 
have enough food to eat them- 
selves." she said. 


Mugabe Pledges 
Economic Shifts 

Reuters 

HARARE, Zimbabwe — 
President Robert Mugabe, fac- 
ing general elections within 10 
months, pledged Tuesday to 
make deep cuts in Zimbabwe’s 
armed forces and budget deficit 
to spur an economy stunted by 
drought and recession. 

In an address to Parliament. 
Mr. Mugabe also said his gov- 
ernment would step up plans to 
forcibly buy farms to resettle 
thousands of landless blacks 
and move to “indigeoize" the 
economy. 

He said he would halve the 
country’s 70,000-strong army to 
about 35.000 within two years. 


Continued from Page 1 

dismissed all this as a “flea- 
market stand.” as Suddeutsche 
Zeitung of Munich called it, a 
national attic, and as history 
from a Kohl's-eye view, cele- 
brating West German economic 
and political achievements in- 
stead of critically examining 
them. 

“We didn't try to present a 
varnished picture,” said Dr. 
Lothar Gall, one of a consor- 
tium of historians who were 
consulted on the assembling of 
the permanent exhibition. 

The Social Democrats, who 
produced Mr. Brandt and his 
successor. Helmut Schmidt, are 
given short shrift. The turbulent 
student movement of the late 
1960s and the leftist terrorism 
of the Red Army Faction in the 
1970s, and its effects on politi- 
cal life, are also skimmed. 


Vatican Names Israel Envoy 

Reuters 

VATICAN CITY —The Ro- 
man Catholic Church an- 
nounced Tuesday that Pope 
John Paul II had named Arch- 
bishop Andrea Cordero Lanza 
di Montezemolo as the Vati- 
can's rust ambassador to Israel. 


The heaviest criticism is 
about the way the museum por- 
trays East Germany, which 
originally was not meant to be 
included at aD. But by the time 
construction of the museum got 
under way in 1990, the Berlin 
Wall had collapsed and the 
Federal Republic was already 
absorbing the east. 

Some assert that the selection 
of objects, including the desk of 
the Communist leader Erich 
Honecker, denigrates the Ger- 
mans who endured or tried to 
make life bearable in East Ger- 
many, relegating it to a sort of 
trash heap of historical kitsch. 

“The multiplicity of objects 
that are exhibited only serves 
the purpose of putting across 
the Federal Republic as the su- 
perior civilization,” said Taz, a 
nonconformist newspaper in 
Berlin. 

To Freimut Duve. a former 
journalist and a member of the 
Social Democratic opposition 
in Parliament, the museum's 
most serious fault is viewing 
history through the prism of the 
Cold War. 

“I object to the misuse of the 
history of the people on the oth- 
er side solely to make the soci- 
ety on tills side look better.” 
Mr. Duve said. “Most of the 
exhibition is an appealing nos- 


talgia trip through history for 
people who grew up in the 
West, but there’s very little 
about what life was actually like 
on the other side. They should 
have just left it out, instead of 
overamplifying it.” 


North Korean program, admin- 
istration officials said, would be 
to procure the rods and take 
them to the United States. An- 
other approach would be- -to 
store them in North Korea in a 
way that would make it hard for 
the material to be quickly di- 
verted, perhaps encasing them 
inconcrete. ■ 




- . Selig .Harrison, a senior assor t 
oate at the Ca r negie Endow- 


ment for Feabe who recentfg ;..^’ 
met with President, Kim II " 
of^Nortb Korea,; h&s 
strenuously .that the North fOs? , 
leans are prepared to 
their nudear weapons ■’ r 

in return far economic 

titicad benefits. ' 


•■A; 


UriN-- 

i r.„ - 
£2* 




EUROPE: Is Bonn’s Beef Ban linked to British Veto? 


* • 



LUC 

beef 


Continued from Page 1 
spread. The British also 
to remove nerves and lym; 
material from slanghi 
before exporting iL 

Despite these measures, Ger- 
many asserts that there is stHl a 
danger of humans contracting a 
form of the disease from eating 
infected meat. Germany im- 
ported 2^00 tons of British 
slaughtered beef in 1992 but 
only a few hundred tons last 
year, the Ministry of Agricul- 
ture in London said. 

British beef exports to the 
rest of Europe also have de- 
clined as a result of the publici- 
ty given to the German fears, 
officials said. 

The dispute over beef has 
been simmering for months. 
The fact that Germany an- 
nounced the ban so quickly af- 


was a retaliatory measure. Mr. -On the other hahdrGetmat^r^^ 
Shephard said that the Ger- takes over the rotating pres .if 
mans had stepped out of hne . demyvof jfcEuro^^ 
over Dehaene andweredo-i tin Friday andfaasia&adfedt 


•s 


ter the dispute over Mr. De- dgn minister, Klaus Kinkel, af- 
haene fed the suspicion that it ter a visit to Paris. 


unless It can resolve leader- r 

ship crisis. Mr. KohlJhas.caBed" . 
a spedaLsunomt meeting <anT 
Jujy 15 to resolve the Bsue. J3e : T" 
said in Bonn thathe was trying^ 
to find a candid ate^acamtabliv^ * 
to all 12 EU’ members. B’ut he;. ; 
did not specifically mention; ^ 
Mr. Dehaeae, and some dipkK; ; 
mats said this implied that hcS. 

. was badring away from the i 

fared German add French 'qidgsfjjf 
didate. - 

. Mr. Kohl saidif was essmtiafS 
to find a successor to 
lore before the new European,,^ 
“As there are 11 countries Parliament meets on July 
against one there is no reason, Although governments proposer 

the candidate for the European^: 
Union’s top executive post, th^i: 
Parliament has ; : resptmribiti^ j 
for formally electing the Can?/; 
mission president 

* * * . ..■C.Ot 


mg so again over theheef ban. 
which he vowed Britain would 
fight. 

Mr. Major would face a re- 
volt within his own Conserva- 
tive Party if he reversed his 
veto, delivered at the European 
Union summit meeting on Cor- 
fu last weekend. But diplomats 
said that Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl, who faces a general elec- 
tion in October, also needed to 
demonstrate that he was stand- 
ing firm against Britain, the odd 
man out in Europe. 


for the time being, to consider 
another candidate than Mr. De- 
haene,” said the German for- 


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Israel and PLO Meet 


^INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 29, 1994 


Page 5 


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Of West Bank Arabs 


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■* - '• 


By Clyde Haberman 

.\w V/irf. 7 Wj Smitf 

GAZA — Israel and the Pal- 
estine Liberation Organization 
took their first, tentative step 
Tuesday toward expanding Pal- 
estinian self-rule throughout 
the occupied territories. 

Both sides insisted that they 
wanted to move swiftly. But Is- 
raeli officials preferred a slower 
approach, saying they wish to 
see first how the Palestinians 
handle themselves in two re- 
gions that have been under their 
control since last month, Lhe 
Gaza Strip and the West Bank 
town of Jericho. 

The verdict on Gaza and Jeri- 
cho is far from in, they added. 

Meeting near the army 
checkpoint separating northern 
Gaza from Israel — an area still 
in Israeli hands despite the mid- 
May, troop withdrawal from the 
strip's Palestinian towns and 
refugee camps — negotiators 
held their first talks on extend- 
ing Palestinian authority to the 
entixe West B ank 

Participants said the fact that 
they had met meant that they 
were ready to move on to the 
next phase of their peace talks: 
Letting Palestinians across the 
territories run their own affairs 
in such fields as health, educa- 
tion, taxation, social welfare 
and tourism. 

“We laid firm ground for the 
continuation of the peace pro- 
cess,” Nabil Shaath, the chief 
PLO negotiator, said in an up- 
beat assessment echoed by his 
Israeli counterpart. Major Gen- 
eral Danny Rothschild. 
Transferring civil authority 


to the I million Palestinians 
throughout the West Bank — a 
procedure labeled “early em- 
powerment” — is a far thornier 
matter than autonomy for Gaza 
and Jericho. While those two 
areas are difficult enough, and 
.ire wildly different in nature 
and the scope of their problems, 
they both have the advantage of 
being relatively isolated and 
self-contained units. 

Once the rest of Lhe West 
Bank lands on the negotiating 
table, however, so do complex 
questions about an intricate 
patchwork of Arab towns and 
Jewish settlements, not to men- 
tion the issue of how far Israel 
feels it can withdraw its soldiers 
from well-populated Palestin- 
ian towns and still provide secu- 
rity for its citizens in the area. 

Moreover, many senior Israe- 
ti officials are far from con- 
vinced that the PLO has proved 
ilsd/ in Gaza and Jericho. And 
so they say they want to move 
cautiously on early empower- 
ment. especially 'as opinion 
polls suggest that a majority of 
Israelis are skeptical about go- 
mg beyond their withdrawal 
from Gaza and Jericho, thus far 
a painless step for them. 

. The several thousand Pales- 
tinian police officers who start- 
ed taking up their posts in mid- 
May get good marks. But there 
is still no effective civil govern- 
ment in Gaza and Jericho, and 
there will not be any until 
Yasser Arafat, the PLO chair- 
man, shows up to finish ap- 
pointing and swearing in the 
Palestinian National Authority 
that is to take charge. 

Mr. Arafat’s likely arrival 


• - .mor is- 

; ■’ ~TL- be* 
’ r rcca: 

•N .'if 


Japan’s Ex-Leaders 
Fail in Surprise Bid 




,.v t . 

TV. iTK. 


to British Ik#: 


i - . ■ ■ - - v- j ■Vf-1.IT. 

-.V •vv-w 

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• •• ._r, fl* 

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J.si' 


By Paul Blustem 

Washington Past Service 

TOKYO — The Liberal 
Democratic Party, which gov- 
erned Japan from 1955 to 1993, 
advanced a desperate ploy to 
regain power on Tuesday" but 
the move failed — for now, at 
least — and Tsutomu Hata, the 
reform-minded prime minister, 
emerged as the clear front-run- 
ner to succeed himself. 

The Liberal j Democratic- 
leadership, hoping to capitalize 
ra Mr. Hata’s forced resigna- 
tion Saturday, offered a surpris- 
ing deal to the Social Demo- 
cratic Party, the Liberal 
Democrats’ longtime enemies 
who currently hold the balance 
of power in parliament: If the 
Socialists would join with the 
Libera] Democrats in forming a 
new government, die Liberal 


the Liberal Democrats, the So- 
cialists responded to the over- 
ture with little more than polite 
thanks, explaining that they 
had agreed to open policy talks 
with Mr. Hata’s coalition in an 
effort to forge a new majority. 

Although the Socialists quit 
Mr. Hata's coalition in April, 
and a number of Socialist law- 
makers favor joining forces 
with the Liberal Democrats 
rather than rg'oining thecoalK 
tion, a majority puis top priori 
ty an blocking a Liberal Demo- 
cratic revival. That sentiment 
significantly heightens Mr. Ha- 
ta’s chances of keeping his job. 

The jockeying for power, par- 
ticularly the Libera] Democrat- 
ic attempt at a marriage of con- 
Sorialists, 


•~1 air 




Democrats would support the 

in, Tn miifhi 


i; 


‘rZrtv'to* 

" poH-5 

ZV'rscJSsW 


Socialists’ chadrman. 

Murayama, for prime minister. 
The offer, was reported to the 


press by Socialist secretary-gen- 
Libo, followii 



«rr^ 


- s, ~ . 

C e 


^ IV ► 


s~a 



era], - Watani Kubo, following 
PMri mgs with Liboal Demo- 
cratic leaders. It raised the bi- 
zarre prospect of the Liberal 
Democrats — conservative, 
pro- busin ess Cold Warriors — 
supporting a prime tninistar 
whose party they had scorned 
for its tar-left positions. 

The maneuver was an ex- 
traordinary gamble aimed at 
driving a stake into the heart of 
Mr. Hata’s governing coalition, 
which unseated the scandal- 
plagued Liberal Democrats last 
August'and has since suffered a 
senes, of setbacks, the latest be- 
ing Mr. Hata’s resignation in 
the face of a no-confidence 

VOtCL 'j', ■ . • 

Urging- the Socialists to join 
with theliberal Democrats was 
Masayoshi Takanura, head of 
the smallNew Harbinger Party, 
who-was-xaice chief coalition 
^xdcerituh but has since turned 
againtf itHe is the poHticaan 
most angsts believe would ul- 
timately become prime minister 
if the 'Socialists and Liberal 
Democrats framed an alliance. 
But in. a. humiliating blow to 


venience with the 

evoked widespread scorn. The 
Yomiuri Shim bun, the nation’s 
largest daily, said in an editorial 
Tuesday that the Liberal Dem- 
ocrats’ wooing of the Socialists 
suggests that “con temporary 
politics suffers from a triple 
dearth of fundamental princi- 
ples of political behavior — set- 
tled convictions, a sense of re- 
sponsibility, and fidelity.” 

The chaotic developments re- 
flect the unsettled state of Japa- 
nese politics following the end 



Mr. Hata, has been riven by 
internal strife over issues such 
as tax reform and Japan's con- 
tribution of soldiers to interna- 
tional peacekeeping efforts. 

Although the Socialists have 
decided to talk with Mr. Hata's 
coalition, there is no guarantee 
the negotiations will be success- 
ful. Among other things, the So- 
cialists strongly oppose a coali- 
tion proposal to raise sales 
taxes. 

Mr. Hata called Tuesday 
night for extending the current 
pa r l i a m entary session beyond 
its scheduled cmd on Wednes- 
day to allow for the selection of 
a new prime minister. 

“It is inconceivable that the 
Diet should end its session be- 
fore a new cabinet has been 
formed,’* he said. 





Indonesia Sentences 20 
Foi Protest of Press Ban 




: 


;V^£. 












TheAssbaacd Press 

JAKARTA — A court sen- 
l^ccd 20 people Tuesday to 
fines orjail rorjoining a protest 
against the government’s ban 
on three publications. 

The 20 were among some 350 
j ournalists,. artists, studen ts and 
human rights activists who 
demonstrated Monday to ac- 
cuse the government of revers- 
ing moves toward greater de- 
mocracy. Police and soldiers 
charged into a group, of 150 
protesters, beating, some with 
rattan rods,- before detaining 
about 60.; ' 

A well-known poet and es- ■ 
sayist, WA Reridra, was among 
15 dfitoujajjts wfao paid fines of 
2,500 .rjnmhs ($1.15) each, to 
avoid jjia oh charges of "staging 
a “parade” without a permit, 
FIve.'pian to appeal to the 
Supreme. Court “because the 


defendants feel not guilty as the 
right to demonstrate is guaran- 
teed by the constitution,” said 
their lawyer, Luhut P&ngari- 
buan. 

The Central Jakarta District 
Court had sentenced 13 of the 
defendants, including Mr. Ren-, 
dra, to three days in jail and 
seven others to five days. 

“We accepted the sentence 
because the judge has recog- 
nized the truth of our idealism,” 
Mr. Ren dra told the court. 

“But he could not do much 
because there is a superior pow- 
er above him,”, he added. 

Protests began last week after 
the government banned the 
weekly magazines Tempo and 
Editor and the weekly tabloid 
Detik for articles that it said 
endangered national stability. 

But police did not move 
against the demonstrators until 
Monday. 



Simpson to Give a Hair Sample 

Match Is Sought With Those Found at Scene 


Rnncn 


c- I-DS ANGELES — A judge ordered OJ 
? “P^de^rosecS Stii 
°[ hair for comparison with hair 

^ “5 discovered at the scene of his 
former wife s murder. 

Robert L. Shapiro, a lawyer for the former 

observe whatever tests were conducted 
Prosecutors disclosed Monday that a' knit can 
mih black curly bam “of Afrioi-^S S 
gin had been found near the bodies of Mr 
Simpson’s former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson" 


? 5 L and Ronald Goldman, 25. Mr. Simpson,' who 

ig his former 


HZ?„' Srae l !L SetUerS S i r 8 *? aaba of the Tempos 

Kt” ^ occupied West Bank on Tuesday. sSSeri have beenbarredf^,” 
Hebron holy site since an Israeli gunned down 29 Palestinians at prayer in February. 


is black, is charged with murdering ^ lwlIi 
wife and her friend Mr. Goldman on June 12 
The authorities want to conduct scientific tests 
of the hair to determine whether it could be Mr. 
Simpson's. In a preliminary hearing set for 
Thursday, a judge win decide whether there is 
enough evidence to order Mr. Simpson, 46 to 
stand trial. 


date continues to be the focus 
of the Middle East's favorite 
guessing game. It was also an 
important pan of another as- 
P«t of the Shaaih-RothschUd 
talks Tuesday, focusing on un- 
finished business in the Gaza- 
Jericho agreement that the two 
sides signed in Cairo on May 4. 

They talked about such Issues 


as the release of remaining Pal- 
estinian prisoners from Israeli 
jails and the prospects for in- 
creas ro& beyond the present 
55,000, the number of permits 
for Palestinians to leave the ter- 
ritories for jobs in Israel. 

But they talked as well about 
speeding up arrangements in 
the Cairo agreement for Pales- 


tinian officers to be stationed at 
border crossings and for Pales- 
tinians to travel freely between 
Gaza and Jericho along desig- 
nated “safe passage" roads that 
cut across Israel. 

Mr. Arafat’s arrival depends 
heavily on clearing up the bor- 
der -crossing and safe-passage 
issues, Mr. Shaath said. 


■ Legal Problems for Both Sides 

Jim Newton and Rebecca Trounson of the Los 
Angeles Times reported 

As prosecutors and defense attorneys sparred 
over evidence in the investigation, both had po- 
tential problems: Prosecutors had yet to discover 
the whereabouts of the murder weapon, while the 
fatho- or Mrs. Simpson challenged an element of 
Mr. Simpson s alibL 

The father, Louis Brown, said his daughter 
had spoken with her mother at about 10 P.mT on 
the night she was murdered, not 1 1 P.M. as a 
coroner’s report on the murder scene indicated 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COULD AFFECT 

YOUR LIFE: 


The disclosure is important because Mr. Simp- 
son's attorneys have argued that be was at home 
at 1 1 P.M.. wailing for a limousine to lake him lo 
lhe airport. If Nicole Simpson was alive at that 
time, it would support Mr. Simpson’s alibi. 

On Monday, one of Mr. Simpson's attorneys. 
F. Lee Bailey, cited the coroner’s report as evi- 
dence of his client's innocence. 

“We learned today from the coroner's report 
that Nicole s mother talked with her at 11 and he 
lives 10 minutes away " Mr. Bailey said. “So 
now you begin to have a problem saving that he 
was at the scene or could have been." He added 
“That is the defense: He was elsewhere." 

But Mrs. Simpson's father disputed the coro- 
ners findings. 

“Her mother called her to talk about her 
reading glasses that had been left behind there " 
said Mr. Brown, 70. He said he was certain the 
call was made about 10 P.M., not the later time. 
Meanwhile, sources said that prosecutors are 

!h?™ f0r T Ur l^i- malchil, S Stoves found at 
the scene and at Mr. Simpson’s home, with blood 
samples and potentially significant hair samples. 
“ u l,. fV located the murder weapon. 

i«r! « - Preliminary hearing approaching, 

legal experts said the authorities' inability to find 
the murder weapon is not likely to be fatal to the 
prosecution i case but does provide Mr. Simpson's 
lawyers with a weakness. F 

Laurie Levenson, a Loyola law school profes- 
sor and former federal prosecutor, said defense 
attorneys could exploit the absence of a weapon 

not S ^rt5hi thal 1116 ^ 3gainSt ^ Simpson is 

Not having the murder weapon “raises ques- 
tions, she said. “In a criminal case, all youhave 
to do is raise a reasonable doubt." 



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PUBLISH Ml WITH THh NKVS YORK T1MKS AND TIIK »4SlllvrT(l% POST 


Quarantine for Serbia 


The U.S. Senate is being asked to join 
the House of Representatives in com- 
manding the president to lift the United 
Nations arms embargo on Bosnia. Such a 
result would have the United States acting 
virtually alone in violation of international 
edict and the pleas of allies. It would make 
Americans alone responsible for the likely 
response — the entry of Serbia's main 
forces into Bosnia. It would finish off what 
prospects remain for the settlement plan 
that the United States, Europe and Russia 
hope to agree on at die Group of Seven 
meeting in Naples next week. 

Disruptive and token-like as lif dug the 
embargo would be, however, it does re- 


spond to the anguish that many Amen- 

iea goveni- 


cans feel. Bosnia's Muslim-k 
ment may not be not wholly blameless, 
but its people have suffered grievously, 
mostly from Serbs. Outsiders who hesi- 
tate to put the means erf self-defense into 
the hands of an abandoned people must 
find something better. 

The American and allied alternative is 
a partition — SI percent for Muslims and 
Croats, 49 percent for Serbs, who now 
hold 70 percent. But even before its 
launchin g , this plan is collapsing No 
military pressure is in hand or in sight to 
peel back Bosnia's Serbs. Bosnian Mus- 
lims mean to fight on, regardless. Even if 
51 -49 were achieved, it would be unjust, 
artificial and temporary. Meanwhile, it 


It’s Up to the President 


An Overdue Shake-Up 


Monday’s staff shake-up at the White 
House was overdue. Things have not 
been working. Apart from the managerial 
foul-ups that have plagued this adminis- 
tration from day one, the White House 
has not yet conveyed clear messages on 
foreign policy and even some domestic 
issues. With health care approaching the 
moment of truth on Capitol Hill, and 
with President Bill Clinton about to em- 
bark on a trip to Europe where his diplo- 
matic credentials are suspect, there was a 
clear need for change. 

But people who have studied this White 
House know that staff shuffles can go only 
so far. Having a well-managed staff re- 
quires a president who wants to live in an 
orderly managerial environment. By most 
accounts, Mr. Clinton still spends a lot of 
time on personnel, political and policy 
minutiae that should be handled two or 
three steps down the ladder. His preoccu- 
pation with details robs the administra- 
tion of focus and continuity. 

Leon Panetta, the new chief of staff, 
commands respect in Congress and will 
ran the staff with a stronger hand than 
Thomas “Mack" McLarty. His successor: 
at the Office of Management and Budget, 
Alice Rivtin, has solid credentials. Mr. 
McLarty shuffles sideways to a White 
House counselor’s job, where his calm 
manner and lifelong bond with the presi- 
dent could make for a better fit. 

David Gergen shuffles out altogether, to 
the Slate Department, where he will serve 
as a special adviser. He was supposed to 
gjve the While House a communications 
strategy. He did apply a few Band-Aids 
before longtime Clinton aides turfed him 
out of the inner circle. The assigning of this 
public relations repairman to State sug- 
gests a troubling bit of self-deception. 


The problems with the administration's 
foreign policy are not so much presen ta- 
tional as substantive, and that means 
getting the president and perhaps a new 
foreign policy team to define what Amer- 
ica’s role in the world ought to be. 

Indeed, getting Mr. Clinton to lock in 
on a handful of big issues and avoid bouts 
of misdirected energy is essential. To lake 
a recent example, we can think of many 
better uses for his demonstrable powers of 
persuasion than popping his cork at radio 
and television evangelists and right-wing 
commentators, as he did last Friday. 

It is easy to understand Mr. Clinton's 
anger: inaccuracies aside, the attacks on 
him and his We from conservative fire- 
brands have been malevolent. Jerry Fal- 
well and Rush Limbaugh are merely the 
worst offenders in a growing universe of 
radio and television personalities whose 
contempt for fairness is matched only by 
their self-righteousness. But whining and 
public self-pity are not presidential-scale 
attributes. People want a chief executive 
who makes demagogues look like pests 
rather than opponents he elevates to his 
own level. Nor did Mr. Clinton help his 
cause by dragging the mainstream press 
into his line of fire and with his ahistorical 


(remember FDR?) complaint that no pres- 
risrorvhasf 


idea t in modem history has been subjected 
to “more violent attacks than I have." 

This is an inefficient use of the White 
House pulpit, especially by a man whose 
greatest single asset is his ability to com- 
municate. The country too seldom hears 
from him in a structured speech like his 
dramatic and effective health care ad- 
dress in 1993. Instead he has been flap- 
ping hither and yon, talking in defensive 
sound bites rather than in broad, themat- 
ic speeches that will build public confi- 
dence in his leadership. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Panetta Is Qualified 


A White House chief of staffs lot, as 
Gilbert and Sullivan would no doubt sing 
today, is not a happy one, and that's 
putting it mildly. When you think of the 
recentnolders of the job, you don't exact- 
ly think of felicitous circumstances. Some, 
like Richard Cheney under Gerald Ford 
and James Baker in the Reagan presiden- 
cy, brought it off. More, though, got in 
trouble, generally for being too imperious 
— high-handed and bigheaded. The rap 
on Thomas McLarty, the president’s 
friend and confidant, whose replacement 
was announced on Monday, was the oppo- 
site: that he was too nice a guy and an 
■unwilling enforcer, and he did not bring 
any Washington experience to the quintes- 
sential Washington job. Mr. McLarty evi- 
dently joined in the finding that be was the 
wrong man for the job. Like George Ste- 
phanopoulos before him, he has now been 
reassigned from an executive function to a 
counselor’s role. As with Mr. Stephar.o- 
poulos, we should not be surprised if Mr. 
McLarty turns out to wield considerably 
more influence in that post. 

Leon Panetta — smart, strong and 
steeped in Washington experience — 
strikes us as a good choice to replace Mr. 
McLarty. He loiows the inside of the Hill 
and the inside of the executive branch as 


well as anybody ever can. If his appoint- 

Hoi 


mem is bad news for those White House 
staffers who have most spectacularly re- 
sisted discipline and shown little self-re- 
straint, so much the belter. Mr. Panel ta’s 


deputy, Alice Rivlin (who, we reveal in the 
spirit of full disclosure, once wrote editori- 
als for The Washington Post) is a superb 
choice to succeed him as director of OMB. 

David Gergen's new role as a kind of 
foreign policy mediator — is that wbat it 
is? — is less dear to us. In much of that 
area, it seems to us, a great deal more 
change titan what can be provided by a 
new mediator is required to straighten 
out the administration's approach to for- 
eign affairs. Still, we at least harbor some 
hope that Mr. Gogen will be able to do a 
little good. At a minimum he should be 
able to help get the various players in the 
administration to sing from the same 
page in the hymnal. But this, of course, is 
not the administration's main problem 
most places where there is trouble. It is 
the song, not the harmonizing among 
administration agencies, that needs work. 

In all these things it is the president 
and not any of his appointees who holds 
the key. Even with a wholly different 
temperament and resume, Mr. McLarty 
probably could not have mastered the 
chief of staffs required job so long as Bill 
Clinton seemed to countenance — and, 
thus, authorize — the unstructured, frag- 
mented, weak-accoun lability, free-form 
professional lifestyle that has marked his 
White House. We do not pine for the 
return of an H. R. Haldeman or John 
Sununu type. But a White House chief of 
staff, and that now means Leon Panetta, 
can only be as efficient as his boss allows 
him to be. It is up to Mr. Clinton. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



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SMSKS 




V 



. Policy for Russia a. 



T fSV 
V t'fT* 


WASHINGTON — Bill Clinton's vis- 

7 us lo Latvia and Poland next week, 


By Zbigniew Brzezinski 


would ratify Slobodan Milosevic’s war 
aim of creating a Greater Serbia by con- 
quest and “ethnic cleansing.” It would 
leave him triumphant and in power. 

Another alternative is offered by David 
Gompert, a Bush administration National 
Security Council aide. Why negotiate a 
bad deal now? he asks in Foreign Affairs 
magazine. Quarantine Serbia, for years if 
necessary, as South Africa was quaran- 
tined until the Milosevic regime yields to a 
democratic government. Keep up the 
trade embargo. Break the regime's infor- 
mation monopoly. Protect Muslim en- 
claves, blue helmets and relief convoys, as 
the United States, the United Nations and 
NATO have repeatedly promised, with air 
power. Prop up vulnerable neighbors like 
Macedonia and Bulgaria. 

The Yugosiav-policy landscape in 
Washington is barren these days. There is 
no energy. Lifting the arms embargo is an 
emotional pop. not a smart policy. Mr. 
Gom pert’s idea requires no new military 
pledges and moots the current danger of 
American participation in keeping a 
shaky 51-49 peace. It builds on an eco- 
nomic embargo and protect-the-enclaves 
commitment already in place. It promises 
less to the aggressors, more to the victims. 
It is more principled and could better 
last. The Clinton administration and 
Congress should think about it. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


as well as his participation in the Group 
of Seven summit meeting in Naples a few 
days later, signal a more comprehensive 
anil strategically coherent U.S. policy to- 
ward the former Soviet bloc. 

Generated by a working alliance be- 
tween the National Security Council and 
the Defense Department, the policy seeks 
to sustain realistic cooperation with Rus- 
sia while also enlarging the scope of Euro- 
pean security. Both the symbolism and the 
substance of the president's trip are likely 
to underline these important themes. 

The emerging strategy recognizes that 
the pcvsi-Conununist transformation in 
Centra! Europe has moved beyond the 
economic phase. The central issue is now 
the region’s relationship to the rest of 
Europe, especially with regard to security. 

This strategy recognizes that in the 
former Soviet Union, a stable and coop- 


A stable and cooperative 
relationship between Russia 
and VI traine is critical to 
the political and economic 
transformation of both. 


erauve relationship between Russia and 
Ukraine is critical to the successful politi- 
cal and economic transformation of both. 

A product or serious debates within 
the administration and outside it the 
new. more realistic V.S. policy seeks to 
consolidate and formalize the new land- 
scape that has arisen since the Soviet 
Union's collapse. Its critical objective 
remains the fashioning of a cooperative 
relationship between the West and Rus- 
sia. but it recognizes that this goal is 
compatible with the progressive deepen- 
ing of Europe's political unity and the 
expansion of its security perimeters. 

Indeed, simultaneously promoting 
friendly links with Russia' and enhanc- 


ing Central Europe’s security is likely to 
prove more productive than concentrat- 
ing on one or the other. 

The schedule for President Qin ton's 
trip has a strategic logic. In Riga he is 
bound to underline American sympa- 
thies for the three small Baltic democra- 
cies — echoing the Scandinavian coun- 
tries, which have become impressively 
committed to the survival of these former 
victims of Stalinist expansion. 

In a remarkable and obviously deliber- 
ate formulation, the Swedish prime min- 
ister recently referred to them as Swe- 
den’s “near abroad,** adding that his 
country would not be indifferent if their 
independence was again threatened 
In affirming U.S. support for the Bal- 
tic republics. President Clinton would 
not be offending the Russians. Except for 
extremists, most Russians accept the sep- 
arate status of these republics. 

Russian troop withdrawals are Kkely to 
be completed on schedule. Even the large 
Russian minorities in Estonia and Latvia 
are developing a stake in the continued 
independence of these countries, given 
their impressive eco nom ic performance. 
In Warsaw Mr. Clinton will face a more 
complex issue. The Foies fear that U.S. 
poiicy toward Central Europe has become 
a function of U.S. policy toward Russia. 
They resent this, and so do the Hungar- 
ians and At the same time, Russia 

has made dear that it opposes expansion 
of NATO to Central Europe. 

The president's visit is unlikely to re- 
solve the issue of Central European 
membership in NATO, even though 
some progress is likely. 

When Russia joined the Partnership 
for Peace last week, the alliance made it 
absolutely clear that Russia did not gain 
a veto on NATO decisions regarding 
membership, while Germany in particu- 
lar has indicated that it favors the expan- 
sion of NATO into the geopolitical no- 
man’s- land between itself and Russia. 
The president will have the opportuni- 


ty to stress two critically important 
Semes. The expansion of NATO is a 
natural process, cfosdy connected with 
the widening of Europe’s unity, and any 
such expansion will reinforce a stable 
relationship with Russia. After all, the 
reconciliation of Central Europe and 
Russia is more likely in a setting of secu- 
rity than in a geopolitical vacuum. 

Mr. Clinton might add that an expand- 
ing NATO would be prepared for a spe- 
cial treaty relationship with Moscow, 


Ukraine’s well-being and to offer aid as 
fang as Kiev ■ 


rjt ; : ^ 


The theme of reconciliation 
wkhneigkbonwillbe 
especially resonant in Warsaw. 


commensurate with Russia’s status as a 
major power and now also a friendly one. 

The theme of reconciliation will be 
especially resonant in Warsaw. The Poles 
are about to observe the 50th anniversary 
of the 1944 Warsaw uprising, which was 

•v « .1 _ . .a £0 i9nirr 


of ‘fighting while the Russians sat pass!' 
on the other side of die Vistula River, 

In contrast with the Normandy events, 
the Poles have wisely invited both the 
German and the Russian leaders, to sym- 
bolize their desire for genuine reconcilia- 
tion. The president will thus have an 
Mwt si-tting to make it clear that recon- 
ciliation and wider security reinforce 
each other and that the United States is 
prepared to clarify the criteria and time 
frames of NATO membership. 

Finally, in Naples, the Group of Seven 
industrial powers is Hkely to address the 
theme that political instability and eco- 
nomic crisis in Ukraine win benefit no 
one. President Boris Yeltsin will be there 
— all to the good, since Western concern 
for Ukraine's future should not be viewed 
as an anti-Russian preo c cup ation. 

A more stable and nonbnpeaial Russia 
is more likely to emerge if there is a stable 
and secure Ukraine. That is why the: 
Group of Seven, and America in parti cu- : 
lar, are preparing to affirm their interest in 


TOOT the : 

presidential ninoff 
KSSent Leonid Kravchuk apd Leomd 
Kuchma, the former 
which has been mandated ty.toe . 

election, the Group of Seven 
the arm of the next preadent to appomr a 
dynamic economic rrfonner as panic 
minister and give bimfuH 
T. In taking flic lead on tins tssue* th® 
2 ton adminis tration -would show an 
at evohition in its thinking, 
signs of greater sensitivity to. 
Central European seennty conce^an 
the increarea emphasis ofl Ukraine are . 
pprj of a larger and welcome adjustment 
in Amcriram^riorities. Ukraine is tro ■ 

ing its iot ^ Ukrainian indepen- ; 

dcncc. Secretary of .State ^tVarren- Chris- 
topher has gone ouC of itis way to J 
emphasize UJS. suppo rt for Ukraine s 
territ orial integrity O& tfe sefl&itive issue .. 
of Crimea. Defense-;Secrctoty ^William j 

Smw tine 1 m Tm-theT- 


v 


*’ .hi- 

nV- 1 




1 

t-: 


i'-u ■ 

. i * r. 
ira* \ * • 


r< 

j* 

til* ■'••• • .’ 

b cr.&“ . 


iT.ii ■ 
v-‘ f.T.ru 


As of tftisyeaij^ud to thefcanKr Soviet 
Union is no longer igaoinig the non* 
Russian. states/Iri fact; abotitnalfbf it is 
now directed to fhetn. 7his major reallo- 
cation nilectstigrowirigrecogmtioD that 
a stable group of nations in-die former 
Soviet Union >s infinitely preferable to a 
renewed -imperial: structure -r indeed, 
that a retnm to'e^ire would probably 
even doom the fetifi uncertain prospects 
for Russian democracy 
At a thrie-wl^ the Clinton administra- 
tion is under assanft for its foreign policy, 
it is good to. fe able to'- welcome the 
mu king s <)f a more realistic mid coherent 
strategy far postCald War Europe: 



The writer soved in the Carter adminis- 
tration as director of the National Security 
Coundland assistant to the president, Na- 
tiorzal Security Affairs. He contributed Ms . t „_ 
comment to The New York Tunes. 


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China Gets the Headlines but Indonesia Compares Favorably 


li: 


AK.\RT A — Where would 
you rather live: in Beijing or 
Jakarta. Wuhan or Medan. Shang- 
hai or Bandung? Probably 90 per- 
cent of foreign investors’ with no 
experience of any of these cities 
would choose a Chinese destina- 
tion. Before they take their leap, 
they might do belter to study the 
actions of overseas Chinese. 

Logic might suggest that with 
the huge investment opportuni- 
ties in China, with the mother- 
land opening up in all directions. 
and with anti-Chinese sentiment 
apparently on the rise in some 
host countries, as evidenced by 
the recent riots in Medan. Indo- 
nesian Chinese would be making 
their way back home. Are they? 

They do visit. Some are work- 
ing on contract in China. Busi- 
nessmen are investing. And. as 
they have always done, they con- 
tinue to hedge their bets with in- 
vestments in the West Australia. 
Singapore and Hong Kong. 

But are they really going home? 


By Philip Bo wring 

This is the first of two articles. 


Some go back to die or be buried, 
but otherwise the answer is a re- 
sounding “no.” Indeed, Indone- 
sia is less concerned about an 
exodus of rich Chinese than an 
influx of poor ones — and also of 
those who answered the national- 
ist call to the motherland in the 
1960s and realized their mistake 
and want to come back. 

One reason why Chinese slay 
here is that they still reckon to be 
able to make more money in a 
familiar Indonesia than an unfa- 
miliar China. But there is more to 
it than thaL Foreign investors 
with horizons beyond 18 months 
should look at some of the rea- 
sons why that may be so. 

The attitudes of families are a 
belter guide to expectations than 
any number of forecasts by num- 
ber-crunching investment bank- 
ers and management consultants. 


The foreign investors may have 
got thing s wrong. 

At present, net capital inflow 
to Indonesia is a mere S3 billion a 
year, roughly one-third multilat- 
eral and two-thirds private, h is 
thus a mere tenth of what is going 
into China, even though the Chi- 
nese “socialist marker' 1 economy 
is only four times as large. 

Various reasons can be found: 
the proximity of capital-surplus, 
trade-oriented Taiwan and Hong 
Kong to the mainland; the recent 
frenetic rate of growth of domestic 
investment; the allegedly stronger 
work ethic and acquisitiveness of 
Chinese culture; fewer restrictions 
on 100 percent foreign ownership 
of some enterprises. 

However, taking a longer view 
gives a different picture. One of 
investors’ principal concerns 
should be ability to repatriate 


profits and capjtaL Indonesia 
abolished foreign exchange con- , 
trols more than a quarter of a 
century ago. Given the size of 
capital flight from China, Bering 
might do well to follow that ex- 
ample, but it now looks likely tha t 
exchange control will still be 
around at the turn of the century . 


mg 


What about growth? The dizzy- 
l performance of China in the 


last three years has overshadowed 
the fact that on a 20-year view, 
Indonesia’s performance has been 
at least a^good. Even more to the 
point, its advance has been re- 
markably stable from year to year, 
with GDP growth seldom under 5 
percent or above 7 percent. It may 
never have had a Maoist forced 
march, nor be driven by the mon- 
ey-making zeal of today^s ex-Com- 
munists. But China’s macroeco- 
nomic managers would do well to 
take some courses in Jakarta. 

For labor-intensive export in- 
dustries tike shoes and toys. Indo- 
nesia may not be quite the taxless 


Joint Rule Could Make Jerusalem a City of Peace 


J ERUSALEM — The political 
leadership of Israel speaks of a 
consensus on the future status of 
Jerusalem, one which represents 
more than 95 percent of the Israe- 
li public. This consensus, defined 
as the Israeli policy, supposedly is 
as follows: All of Jerusalem is 
Israel's eternal, undivided capitaL 
All of it must remain under Israeli 
sovereignty forever. 

1 maintain that this is not real- 
ly the consensus of Israeli opin- 
ion on Jerusalem but is in fact a 
rather narrow view of what 
should be the future of Lhis city. 
The true consensus, as opposed 
to this mythical consensus, can 
be stated as follows, namely that 
all Israelis believe that: 

• Jerusalem must never re- 
turn to the status it bad prior to 
June 1967 — that is. it should 
never again be physically divid- 
ed. It must remain an open city 
with free access throughout its 
boundaries for all. 

• Persona] security and securi- 
ty of property must be guaranteed 
for all people in all parts of the 


By Gershon Baskin 


city. No one should have to fear 
getting a knife in his back in any 
part of the dty, and no one should 
have to fear having his car torched 
or other property damaged. 

• The new Jewish neighbor- 
hoods built in East Jerusalem af- 
ter 1967 must remain under Israe- 
li sovereignty. There can be no 
compromise on this. 

• Jewish holy places must re- 
main under Israeli control. (This 
does not include the Haram.) 

Why do I think this is the true 
consensus? To begin with, if Is- 
raelis (and even Jerusalemites) 
were asked to draw a map of 
today's municipal boundaries, 
very few woula be capable of 
completing the task. This sug- 
gests to me that these boundaries 
are not “holy” in anyone's mind. 

Moreover, if Israelis were asked 
to name the 22 neighborhoods of 
Arab East Jerusalem, almost none 
would be able to. If you asked 
Israelis bow many of them have 
visited those Arab neighborhoods. 



the answer would be almost none. 
If you asked how many would be 
interested in visiting than, the an- 
swer would be the same. 

I feel certain that almost all 
Israelis, if asked whether the Jeru- 
salem municipality should invest 
money in developing those Arab 
neighborhoods, would say “no.” 
Certainly that has been the prac- 
tice. Since 1967, the Jerusalem 
municipality has invested next to 
nothing in those neighborhoods. 

Again, ask Israelis if their 
country has any real need (other 
than perhaps security) for con- 
trolling those neighborhoods. 
The answer of most people, I am 
certain, would be “no." 

All of this seems to suggest that 
most Israelis don't really care 
about the Arab parts of East Jeru- 
salem. Rather, most Israelis are 
concerned about the ability of Is- 
rael to maintain its capital in Jeru- 
salem, to have security, to have an 
open Old City with Jewish control 
of Jewish holy places. The status of 
the Arab sections of Jerusalem is 
really of little interest to them. 

1 believe that one of the prima- 
ry steps that must be taken on the 
Israeli side to prepare Jerusalem 
for negotiations is to break down 
the mythical consensus. This can 
be done in several ways. 

First, people must begin to 
speak out on this issue. An exam- 
ple was the recent statement by 
Reuvan Hazak, a former high- 
level Shin Bet official and Jerusa- 
lem dty manager. Appearing on 
Israel televirion several months 
ago, be stated that Jerusalem was 
a divided dty today, that politi- 
cally its future was to remain a 
divided city, and that in fact there 
was nothing to be afraid of in this 
situation. There are senior Labor 
members of the Knesset who hold 
these views as wdL They should 
be encouraged to speak out 

Second, opinion polls should 
ask the public the sort of ques- 
tions I posed above. The poll re- 
sults should be widely published 
because they would, in the end, 
help pave the way for negotia- 
tions over Jerusalem. 

Jerusalem will never be a uni- 
fied dty unless it can be shared. 
The possibility for sharing Jeru- 
salem will be met only when the 
two sides and their leaders cut 


down on the rhetoric that polar- 
izes and instead begin to help the 
public on both sides understand 
the true character of Jerusalem. 

Jerusalem is a dty of two peo- 
ples, both of which claim nation- 
al, historical and religious rights 
to it. Real sharing can be 
achieved only by recognizing the 
political reality that has coasted 
here since 1967. Since the over- 
whelming majority of Israelis real- 
ty care omy about the Jewish parts, 
let's concentrate cm them and rec- 
ognize that the Palestinians today 
are willing to accept rule over only 
their parts erf the dty. 

Jerusalem can stay physically 
united. Infrastructure, economic 
development and some elements 
of planning can be conducted 
jointly. Let Israel rule over Israe- 
li Jerusalem and let Palestine 
rule over Palestinian Jerusalem, 
and Jerusalem will become one 
city living in peace. 


(for now), anything-goes environ-*; >*•] 
ment of Guangdong, with its end-' ;#? 
less supply of migrant workeref ^;. 

. from the interior and less evkient^^ 
concerns for the environment and^.^ 
workers’ rights than here. But en~7'/.?: 
tjy inio the domestic market 
very much easier in Indonesia: 
recent package of radical liberal-^ ‘ 4 
ization measures is opening: up* 
industries and services to 100 per-K 
cent foreign ownership. ■ ":? 

■ Generally, too, Indonesia pre£% r ;J 
seats a much less fragmented 
ketplace than China, and. mare, 
centralized, decision making,', 
which may be more difficult for -; ■■fi 
small businesses but better for’v;;’^ 1 
larger, capital-intensive ones. Cdr^ .,-7 ^ 
ruption remains pervasive, as is-; i’ 
the need for the right political q£ T 
family connections. But arguably^ ;c 
on that score things are improving, 
slowly as corporate and govern-] ■ 
ment affairs come under doser, 
public scrutiny, while in C hina- 
they continue to deteriorate. 

Even with a slower rate of GNPM 
growth, prospects for malting, and^^v 
being able to remit, money frwh " 
the amnestic market are probablyj -.p 
a lot brighter flian m China. ' 

But is not China so much richer; 
than the GNP figures suggest?; ^ 
Yes, according to purchasing;-?;: 
power parity statistics. But sfty# 
too, is Indonesia. The World/* 
Bank's latest data give a PPP per//’ 
capita income of $2,970 for Indoor 
nesia and $1,910 for China. 

Isn't income distibution in InrJ /: 
done&La seriously skewed by 
cal industry and the Jakarta 


ForeiiTi P* 


IWtt'.’V - 

T hi ' 
upon 
u'on'f f. :: 


perK-rv j*.. 




Ag a in , World Bank figures fcaj- v' 
: lowest 


lowest/4(£l: 
3 ulalian ■; 


The writer, international direc- 
tor of the Israel/ Palestine Center 
for Research and Information, 
contributed this comment to The 
Washington Post. 


1990 are tdling. The 
percent of Indonesians 
gets 19.8 percent of the n 
income, compared with 17.4 per* 
cent in “Communist” China. 

Since 1990, China’s income’ ’^ 
distribution has become marked^ . 
fy more skewed by the develop^ 
ment of the ooastd pixMnces^vi . „ 
China emphasizes maty ~ 
tion, public health and £^_ 
ur b a ni z ati on. But the reality is 
after two genarations of “p< — 

government, it has a higher 

cy level (27 percent compared viif# 
22) and much lower tertiary eifefe 
cation enrollment than its south**’; 
em neighbor. Urbanization, 
high®: in Indonesia. 

In major social indicators €&&& ■ 
is ahead only in tife expectancy*:-' U . 
International Herald Tribw^':'?K\ 


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IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEAR S A(3>2 
1894: A Carnot Plot? 


^ ir !Pn ’ s a 
S lift' 00 ave 


NEW YORK — A telegram from 

Montpellier seems to confirm the 
idea that the murder of President 
Carnot may have been the result 
of a plot. A man named Granier 
was heard to say, on Sunday eve- 
ning [June 24], “By this time Car- 
not's account must be settled.” 
Information was given to the po- 
lice and Granier was summoned 
before a magistrate on Wednes- 
day, but on receiving the sum- 
mons he ripped himself up and 
died in a few minutes. 


jn recorded histoiy, would-be 
last. Three minutes after M- <3e> 
menceau had read his brief 
ment, Peace was virtually agtitik:- 
for the Germans had affixedSa^v 
^natures and had returned^': 
their seats, and were cooly earing ' 
about them. Cannons soon® •- 
nounced to the wai ting 'rTfy&t-y- 
sands that peace had come ^ 
nu^bty roar went up. Thes 
ihepeace was coinddent 
the fifth anniversary of tfie afe r ; 
rassmation of Archduke :Fra& : 
Ferdinand at Sarajevo. . 


^EN.CLl 


Sa,m -M an <te 


1919: Versailles Pace Dew ^ ronTk * < *^ 


PARIS — It was a rare privilege 
to witness yesterday's [June 28] 
ceremony at Versailles, when the 
predatory Hun appeared in per- 
son to admit temporary interrup- 
tion in his conquest of Europe, 
and attach his dishonored signa- 
ture to a presumptive undertak- 
ing that his recent invasion of 
France, the twentieth in number 


OBCago — [From out : $js# 
t°f%i®“ ltlon: ] Governor Thqnias 

t uewey, standing tonight f ' 
28] before the Republican: 
tional Convention 
“jnied. him and Governor & 
w- Bndrer as the men for^U-. 
L promised thc d^T: - 
mg delegates that his 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1994 


PINION 


Page 7 


Discuss This Golan Adventure 


EW YORK — This is the 
„ T. for Americans and Is- 
^ t0 slart talking in their 
own countries about whether 
Araencan troops should be sta- 
on Golan Heights. 

■ Tmrt was the opening of a 
tolumn of mine last November, 
j. ibc Clinton administra- 
uon says it expects to send U.S. 
troops to the Heights as part of 
an international force if Syria 
and Israel come to a peace 
agreement. Bui still there has 
P®cn no debate in Congress and 
none scheduled. 

■ There are two issues. The sec- 
ond is whether it is wise to com- 
fliit U.S. troops as peacekeepers 
to the heights, one of the 
world’s more dicey pieces of 
Strategic real estate. But first to 
be decided is whether Congress 
has not only the right but the 
obligation to study the risks and 
benefits beforehand. 

. Israel’s Labor government 
wants peace with Syria quickly. 
Over a few years. Israel would 
turn back the mountain ridge 
and high plateau from which 
Syria fired down on Israeli vil- 
lages for 20 years — until Israel 
captured the Golan in 1967. 

■ The present Israeli govern- 
ment feels that prize of peace is 
worth the risk. Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin believes that 
peace with hard-line Syria could 
open the way to peace with 
many more Muslim countries. 

. The Syrians stall — un willin g 
to give the full diplomatic re- 
cognition Israel demands, even 
for those coveted heigins on the 
road to Damascus. But one day 
President Hafez Assad is likely 
to grab the deal, a bargain. 

! Israel tells him that its politi- 
cal clock is running ouL It will 
hold elections in 1996 and cam- 
paigning will start in 1995. Many 
Israelis oppose giving back the 
heights. The Labor Party wants 
to put the heights controversy 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


behind it by campaign time. 

None or the three govern- 
ments involved wants a con- 
gressional debate about U.S. 
troops. Whatever Mr. Assad 
knows about public discussion 
he detests. And. like most 
American governments, the 
Clinton administration prefers 
to present diplomatic done 
deals before getting involved in 
congressional headaches. 

For the Israeli government, a 
U.S. commitment about troops 
is critical to rounding up Israeli 
voters. So Israeli officials and 
the American Israel Public Af- 
fairs Committee argue hard 
against Senate legislation, ex- 
pected to be introduced this 
week, to order a Defense De- 
partment study before a com- 
mitment is made. 

The report would include as- 
sessments of how large the U.S. 
force might grow, the risks that 
Iranian-paid Holy War military 
groups in Lebanon would target 
American soldiers, possibly 
with secret Syrian approval 
and how long the American 
commitment might last. 

Israeli Laborites see this 
movement for debate as coming 
from Israeli and American op- 
ponents of the current peace 
negotiations. To some extent 
that is true. But it also comes 
from U.S. friends of Israel sim- 
ply concerned about the impact 
on U.S.-Israeli relations if 
American troops take serious 
casualties under a commitment 
made without advance congres- 
sional backing. 

I think Israel should be get- 
ting much more than hand- 
shakes and promissory notes 
from Arab nations in exchange 
for land. But I also think that 
any risks Israelis take for peace 
are essentially up to them. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Foreign Policy Wails 

Regarding the editorial "Be- 
yond the Face-Lift" (June 17): 

The problems attendant 
upon the Clinton administra- 
tion’s foreign policy cannot be 
remedied by a mere shuffling of 
personnel; they are far loo deep 
for that. The problem is cen- 
tered on the Oval Office, and it 
is not so much the president's 
inattention to foreign policy as 
a fundamental lack of under- 
standing of the relation of for- 
eign to domestic policy on the 
one hand, and the imperatives 
of foreign policy on the other. 

Unique among nations. 
America is a guardian power, 
the power of last resort in the 
world today. Understanding 
the full implications of the op- 
portunities which this provides 
for American interests, and the 
responsibilities which we bear 
to the nations of the world as a 
result of it, is central to any 
effective and coherent Ameri- 
can foreign policy today. 

Creating an integrated, prac- 
tical foreign policy framework 
which measures up to these re- 
sponsibilities is the most press- 
ing need of our country. Unless, 
and until. President Bill Clinton 
develops a clear understanding 
of the difference between being 
the governor of the United 
States and the president of a 
guardian power in a difficult 
world. American policy will 
continue to suffer. 

JOHN W. WOOD. 
International Vice Chairman. 
Republicans Abroad. London. 

The Majority Replies 

Regarding America to Clin- 
ton: We Hate You!" (May 23): 

Those who take the trouble to 
read this article will find that the 
evidence supporting the head- 
line’s assertion is described as 
‘‘anecdotal" by the writer herself 
and based largely on an informal 
survey of radio talk shows. As 
the article stated, public support 
for the Clinton presidency, as 
measured by national polls, has 
been “slightly over 50 percent," 

The writer neglects to mention 
that Bill Clinton's approval rat- 
ing over the past six months or 
so has been, on average, higher 
than that of any major Western 
bead of siaLe. 

GEORGE N. CLEMENTS. 

Saint-Mande. France. 

An Atlantic Union 

In response to "Time for an 
American Tilt to Europe ” 
(Thinking Ahead. June 14): 

America needs more than a 
tilt to Europe. And Europe 
needs more than a tilt to Ameri- 
ca. Circumstances dictate im- 
mediate initiatives to expand 
the European Union to em- 
brace the North Atlantic na- 
tions. the United States and 
Canada. Such an Atlantic 
Union would join powerful eco- 
nomic forces with shared moral 
and ethical values. 

STUART SHAW. 

London. 

Expats: No Easy Ride 

Regarding “ Expatriates : Off 
the Gravy Tram" (June 8): 

As the article concedes, the 
necessity of doing time abroad 
ia order" to climb the corporate 
ladder has gone. Today’s reali- 


Essentially — but sending 
U.S. troops to the edgy Golan is 
American business. Recent his- 
tory shows that it is far better 
now for the United States and 
its allies if the American public 
has a good idea of what it is 
getting into. That happened be- 
fore the Gulf War — but not 
before Vie tnam. 

If I were an Israeli. I think I 
would oppose asking for U.S. 
troops. Israel's strength as a 
small ally is that it has not 
asked that foreign lives be put 
at risk for IsraeL Inevitably, the 
payoff for an American detach- 
ment on the heights would be 
loss of Israeli freedom of action 
for the kind of military preemp- 
tion that has helped protect the 
country so far. 

As an American Friend of Is- 
rael, I am queasy about Israel 
becoming more dependent on 
the United Stales. On an issue of 
this importance, congressional 
discussion could clear up legiti- 
mate doubts, or confirm them. 

Israel and Americans who 
oppose congressional consid- 
eration will probably win — a 
bad victory. Today the move- 
ment for debate comes from 
American friends of IsraeL If 
that is blocked, some soon to- 
morrow the demand will come 
From her enemies. 

The New York Times. 



P HILADELPHIA, Mississippi — 
They do not look like heroes. Their 
bodies have settled into the fullness of 
middle age. and some, kids here once 
themselves, brought along their own 
kids. They looked extraordinarily ordi- 
nary, whites from the North, blacks 
from the South who 30 years ago vol- 
unteered for something' called Free- 
dom Summer. Three of them died here, 
but so, too, did Jim Crow. 

The returning volunteers had some 
things to say. The first was that the real 

MEANWHILE 

heroes of Freedom Summer were not 
the 1,000 or so mostly white kids from 
the North who came down to Missis- 
sippi bat the blacks who lived here. 
The second was that, by God. they had 
done what they set out to do. Within a 
year, the Voting Rights Act had been 
passed and the South forever changed. 

The third — weU, sometimes you had 
to listen hard for it. Representative 
John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia, said 
it when, from the steps of the Neshoba 
County courthouse, he memorialized 
“two young Jewish men from New 
York and one young black man from 
Mississippi." He was referring to James 
Chaney’, Michael Sctrwemer and An- 
drew Goodman, who were murdered 
here try the Ku Klux Klan. 

By implication, Mr. Lewis was also 


By Richard Cohen 


referring to the foul direction that, 
some elements of what is left of the 
civil rights movement have taken -i-.a 
bitter separatism and. among some el- 
ements, the easy toleration of racism 
and anti-Semitism. 

Mr. Lewis had fought that 'battle 
once already, only it had been against 
white racism and white anti-Semi- 
tism. After all, it was the stereotypical 
Schwefner that the KJan had been 
after — the “Jew-boy with the 
beard." they called him. On June 21, 
1964, they found him, along with Mr. 
Chaney and Mr. Goodman. 

The bus of the returning volunteers 
was awash with emotion. Rita 
Schwerner Bender. Mr, Schwemer’s 
widow, sat in the back. Andrew Good- 
man’s mother, Carolyn, was several 
rows forward. Thirty "years have pro- 
vided them with some distance, but 
still Carolyn Goodman shuddered 
when she spied Mississippi’s famous 
red clay — the typical shallow grave or 
KJan victims. “The red dirt,” she said 
to no one in particular. 

“What’s the matter?" her seatmate 
asked. “The red dirt,” she repeated. 

Down a row or two sat Joe Morse. 
The onetime seminarian had come 
south from Minnesota in 1963. “Don’t 
let anyone fool you.’’ he said. "None of 


us thought we would get out of here 
alive.” The riders swapped stories of . 
arrests and beatings, of churches . 
: burned and the little tricks of. survival. . 
Mr. Morse remembered studying every 
road, always noting a spot where he 
could turn a car around fast 

There . were never very’ many. of. . 
'them, but theydefined a generation, a 
bunch’ of kids who fought Jim Crow 
and, later, U.S. involvement in the 
Vietnam War. They and their genera- 
tion have become a virtually mythical 
poinrof reference: whites mid blacks 
working. together, a generation fueled 
.on the high-octane “ask not” rhetoric 
of a recently, killed. president, the re- 
verberating voice of Martin Luther 
King and, for some, the manifesto of 
this or that Jef List ideology. 

They left an imprint on the young 
Bill Clinton. They left an imprint on 
many of us. 

Benj amin Chaney, younger brother 
of the martyred James, says things 
haven't changed that much. He said it., 
each time he was called upon to speak. 
From the courthouse steps here, he 
called out, “How many people here are 
from Philadelphia, Mississippi?" He 
repeated his question, but he got noth- 
ing but silence. In the muggy heat, cars 
drove by. slowed to see what was hap- 
pening, but kept on going. 

The challenge now is different, may- 
be harder. Die foe Is- immune to 


marches and 

Chaney’s grave, aloc^ 

Charles Johnson, spoke of Wack^n 
black violenee, drugs and 

He might well have mrauooed 
apathy and resignation; 
tigue and selfishness. In 1964-** 
burned Mr. Johnson’s church. The KJan 
is gone, the church rebuilt- 
a movie would end there, but life ts 
perversely. creative. The fact is, some 
people rhink things are now worse. 

And yet, our bus was led into town by 

. . ■ r Pai-mi mr driven 



by a black sergeant, jciuuic 
banner at the Jackson airport welcomed 
the returning volunteers. This or that 
' blade dectrfofficial popped up tojssue 
a word of welcome, and some ot tne 
returning African-Americans joked 
about Having to sit in the back of the 
chartered bus. Once, that was no joke at 
all. Things have surely changed. ■ 
Generation X, wiuny and self- in- 
volved, may riot be able to understand 
what happened here. But neither. I 
think, can those who disparage the lib- 
eral impulse and who ossify themselves 


.with layers of cynicism. “This was the 
best th ing I did in my life," said Cbar- 
ney Bromberg, now' an official of the 
Anti-Defamation League in New Y ork. 
Once, be simply thought he-could make 
a diffcrenceTlf yoa look around Missis- 
sippi, there's little doubt that he did. 

• The Washington Post: 


2Tv /<> 



rCOMR 


D 


m 




ty is that, thousands of miles 
away from the boardroom, the 
employee is often out of sight 
and out of mind for the in- 
creasingly fewer promotion 
possibilities. Physical absence 
makes it easier for others to 
claim responsibility land bo- 
nuses) for business coups. It is 
also easy to use the distant em- 
ployee as corporate scapegoat. 

By leaving the home employ- 
ment market, an expatriate di- 
minishes his chance to change 
employers and is quickly for- 
gotten by headhunters and in- 
dustry contacts, lessening fur- 
ther opportunities. 

On another point, the truth is 
that the quality of housing is 
abysmal, and the expatriate has 
to choose between bringing his 
own furniture, which rarely fits, 
or living with somebody else’s. 
Limited time is available to find 
a home, and if unfamiliarity or 
desperation results in a poor 
choice, guess who finances the 
subsequent local move? 

! am sure the locals regard 
paid education as a wonderful 
perk, and I do not deny iL But I 
also have to accept my daughter 
being educated at English 
schools with the crazy national 
curriculum and attitudes that are 
Utile changed since the 1950s. 
The high turnover of students 
and staff often makes interna- 
tional schools unacceptable. 

Social life also is very diffi- 
cult. A large proportion of va- 
cation has to be spent visiting 
relatives. But multitudes of 
family occasions, small and 
large, have to be missed because 
short visits are not viable. 

It is difficult for expatriates to 
make friends outside their com- 
munity. Partners of expatriate 
employees, largely female, are 
left in an alien culture and ex- 
pected lo cope without help. Of- 
ten unable to work because they 
cannot get the necessary per- 
mits. they are unable to plan 
their lives. These usually well- 
educated women are not able to 
find volunteer work. 

In short, the quality of life for 
the families of most expatriates 
takes a nosedive, while the cost 
of Uving increases dramatically. 
It would be interesting to see 
how some of the above is quan- 
tified in the cost-of-living indi- 
ces. Meanwhile, the locals look 
on expatriates with envy. 

JUDITH GREENWOOD. 

London. 

The psychological problems 
of living in a foreign environ- 
ment do not cease after two or 
three years. Besides the dispari- 
ties in prices, problems associat- 
ed with not being able to contact 
friends daily or see family in 
times of sickness or other trouble 
would seem to justify allowing 
expatriates a lifestyle a little less 
troubled than at home. 

CHARLES ALLARD Jr. 

London. 

Time Rolls Backward 

Regarding the back-page fea- 
ture "Out of Hibernation, a Pal- 
ace of Zoology " (June 21): , 

How astonishing! Your writ- j 
er has discovered a case of time i 
reversal namely that Georges- j 
Louis Leclen: de Buffon ( 17 G 7 - j 
1788 ) “was appointed director j 
of the botanical garden in 1839 1 
and occupied the post until the j 
eve of the French Revolution.” 

MONROE M. SOLOMKA. : 
Bilbao. Spain. I 



fk INTERNATIONAL ffnp • f 

Iteral o^Sd fcribttnf 


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S B F ■ PARIS BOURSE 


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Each profile includes: head office, 
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company background and major activities, 


recent developments, sales breakdown, 
shareholders, subsidiaries and holdings in 
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financial performance, and recent stock 
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French Company Handbook is 
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STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


Jeffrey Tate 
Debuts Rare 
Paris 'Ring" 


By David Stevens 

Inumatgrai Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — In a heroic ef- 
fort to reverse Wag- 
ner’s mostly painful re- 
lationship with Paris 
toe Theatre du Chatelet and 
Radio France have embarked 
on a staging of the complete 
Ring des Nibelungen” tetral- 
ogy that by mid-November will 
have encompassed five com- 
plete cycles. It is under the mu- 
sical direction of Jeffrey Tate, 
with the Orchestra National de 
France, of which he is the prin- 
cipal guest conductor, and with 
stage direction and desi gns by 
Pierre Strosser. 

This would not be such a big 
deal in London or some Central 
European cities where the 
"Ring" is more or less an annu- 
al event. But the complete cycle 
has not been done by the Paris 
Op 6 ra since 1957. although the 
Nice Opera brought its produc- 
tion to town in 1988. and there 
have been recent cycles in con- 
cert form. 

With the opening “Das 
Rhemgold” on Saturday and 
“Die Walkure’' Sunday the mu- 
sical fulfillment has been high 
indeed, with the Orchestre Na- 
tional (despite some slips in the 
wind sections on the first night) 
and Tate covering themselves 
with distinction. The orches- 
tra's sound is warm and trans- 
parent and Tate’s phrasing of a 
natural and unforced dramatic 
eloquence, resisting all tempta- 
tion to bombast. Nor is there 
any serious weak point in the 
casting, even though many sing- 
ers are taking their roles for the 
first time. 

T ATE, at 51. is tackling 
the full cycle for the 
first time, but as a re- 
petiteur, he worked on 
many cycles at Covent Garden, 
and he assisted Pierre Boulez on 
the now-historic centennial 
Bayreuth “Ring" of 1976-80. 
There is a big difference be- 
tween conducting something 
for the first time, and conduct- 
ing for the first time something 
one has lived with for years. 

Strosser '5 lean and austere 
staging will probably not get 
un anim ous approval, but it is 
thought out and consistent, 
calling on the imagination of 
the audience and relying on the 
score to fill in the blanks. 

Patrice Cauchetier’s cos- 
tumes put the action in the 19th 
century' and the characters in 


their appropriate social condi- 
tions. Symbols are in short sup- 
ply. but there is a luminous ball 
representing the treasure from 
the Rhine, small in the opening 
scene, large when it comes time 
to ransom Freia. The tree 
stands like a large objet d'ari in 
Hunding’s comfortable parlor. 

The single playing area is a 
steeply raked lead-black stage 
serving equally for the nightie- 
ciad maidens at the bcucrn of 
the Rhine and for Wotan and 
family on their heights. Valhal- 
la is no shining castle, but a 
stark wall that rises from the 
stage floor. No rainbow bridge, 
but a narrow door gives sinister 
access to Valhalla for the gods 
at the end of “Rheingold," and 
in “Walkure” the same opening 
admits only a hint of spring. 

But Strosser has his singers 
move a lot, and most of the time 
to dramatic purpose. Erotic ten- 
sion is high at the end of "WaJ- 
kOre” Act 1, although Sieg- 
mund and Sieglinde never come 
close to one another. At the 
be ginnin g of Act 2, Wotan and 
Brunnhilde approvingly watch 
the flight of the sibling-lovers. 
At the end, Brunnhilde consoles 
a demoralized Wotan. rather 
than the reverse, then she disap- 
pears totally in a magic fire rep- 
resented by a huge red wind- 
blown drapery. 

Robert Hale's Wotan was the 
solid pillar around which this 
first naif of the “Ring” re- 
volved, vocally strong and sup- 
ple (despite an announced 
bronchitis), and with an ener- 
getic physical presence that 
wilts as life’s setbacks pile up. 
Karen Huffstodi as Sieglinde. 
Jyriri Niskanen as Siegmund 
and Sabine Hass as Brunnhilde 
took their roles with an assur- 
ance that belied the informa- 
tion that they were role debuts. 
Sergej Koptchak was a Hund- 
ing black of voice and heart, 
and Nadine Denize the impla- 
cable but maternal Fricka. 

In “Rheingold.” Peter Stra- 
ka's cynical and sumptuously 
sung Loge was a real dramatic 
counterweight to Wotan. Elisa- 
beth Meyer-Topsoe was a radi- 
ant Freia. and Erda’s ominous 
warnings were delivered by Kir- 
sten Dolberg, no less convinc- 
ing for her appearance as a kind 
of female vagrant. Franz Josef 
Kapellmann and Peter Keller 
were the Alberich and Mime 
duo. Csaba Airizer and Zeiotes 
Edmund Tolliver the giants. 
Wolfgang Koch and Louis 


Gentife the Donner and Froh. 


Dining Out 


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Eva Johansson as Elsa in “ Lohengrin Clean lyricism with touches of neurotic , dramatic thrust . 

Hopeless Love in a Grim Setting 


tnltmauanal Herald Tribune 

G ENEVA — The scene on the 
stage before any music has 
sounded might be Berlin 1945. 
with listless groups of people in 
scruffy civilian clothes in a bombed-out 
urban landscape. But this is “Lohengrin" 
and the first seine is the king trying to 
recruit troops to face a new threat of war 
from the east. Fat chance. 

It gradually becomes apparent that the 
devastation is more moral than physical 
the effect of a divine appearance on a 
demoralized society, with a love story as 
hopeless as the relationship of Lois Lane 
and Superman/ Clark Kent. 

Robert Carsen. the young Canadian 
stage director who has rapidly made his 
mark in European theaters, tackles Wag- 
ner for the first lime with an active staging 
for one of the most famously static of 
operas, giving the chorus a dramatically 
telling role to go with its musical impor- 
tance. and playing the principals off each 
other in scenes of high tension. 

In Paul Steinberg's grim setting of blast- 
ed bunkers, skeletal buildings and broken 


reinforced concrete, Lohengrin’s magical 
arrival and departure soothed traditional - 
-ists. They might have been conceived for a 
Disney epic, with a swan that moves and 
Lohengrin in glistening armor. 

The second act’s centerpiece, Ortrud vs. 
Elsa, is played and sung for the great 
confrontation it is, while Lohengrin, 
adapting to earthly concerns, has become a 
dynamic politician vigorously working the 
crowds while ignoring his future bride’s 
rapidly developing nervous breakdown. 

Carsen uses the chorus flexibly, some- 
times inventing ceremonies in which 
chorus members replace Elsa’s workaday 
street clothes with a radiant white gown, or 
bring on a bed and make it up. a chastely 
erotic miming of the bridal-chorus. 

In the end, Lohengrin’s moral-boosting 
efforts pay off. The died, demobilized sol- 
diers don their tacky armor for yet another 
campaign. Even Lohengrin’s last minute 
defection as commander-in-chief does not 
seem to discourage them. 

Marilyn Zschau, in her first Ortrud, 
sang powerfuliy and acted with nuanced 
precision, moving from arrogance and 
smug pride to fake humiljty without miss- 


ing a beat — a veritable Lady Macbeth of 
Brabant — while Eva Johansson was a 
radiant blonde Elsa whose clean lyricism 
had touches of neurone, dramatic thrust. 
Symbolically, Elsa throws her coat over 
Ortrud’s shoulder (misguided protective- 
ness), then Ortrud returns the favor (plant- 
ing the seed of doubt). 

Also in a role debut, Thomas Moser was 
a splendid Lohengrin, with an easy and 
glowing lyric tenor that seems made for the 
part, and a stage presence that suited the 
knight of the grail as weD as the politico. 

Hartrmit Welker was the solid, honor- 
able, deeply misguided Tdramnnd; Hans 
Tschammer the king, noble mid upright 
and a bit shabby in an operetta royalty 
uniform ready for the deanets. and Eike 
Wilm Schulte looked like a bank guard and 
like a first sergeant as the herald 
Li an Thielemann conducted vivid- 
ly, buoyantly and lyrically, on the whole 
supplying the platform for a musically 
fulfilling production. Some striking effects 
were achieved in the final oct by distribnt- 
ingsomeof the brass around the balconies. 

David Stevens 


sang like ; 
Christia 


BOOKS 


AMBITION & LOVE 

By Ward Just. 277 pages. 
S22.95. Houghton Mifflin. 

Reviewd by Alice Kaplan 

I T begins as a dassic boy- 
meets-girl story: A recently 
divorced American expatriate 


writer. Hairy Forrest, notices 
an attractive 40ish French 
woman in the Musfe cTOrsay in 
Paris: “I could have named the 
arrondissement she lived in and 
where she bought her shoes and 
where her children went to 
school . . 

Only he’s got it all wrong She 


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introduces herself to him as 
Georgia Whyte, the Georgia 
Whyte he knew bade in Chicago 
who used to go out with ms 
brother, Dean. He vaguely re- 
members having met her, “an 
exotic sexy highbrow from the 
wrong ade of the tracks,” when 
they were young. 

As Hany and Georgia leave 
the museum for a drink he no- 
tices the marks of alcoholic fa- 
tigue in her face. She has become 
a painter, die explains, and will 
go on to tell an initially reluctant 
Harry her life story. Hany. a 
successful novelist who has pub- 
lished a mystery series organized 
by Parisian arroadissements, 
will not become Georgia’s lover 
but instead narrates her turbu- 
lent life as an artist, starting with 
a flashback to the country club 
dance, where Georgia makes 
awkward and grandiose pro- 
nouncements about the empti- 
ness of upper-middle dass Mid- 
western marriage and her 
identity as an artist She is unap- 
pealing and Harry's disdain is 
equally unlikable. 

But Georgia's high artistic 
principles redeem her in Har- 
ry’s eyes. From Chicago, she 
moves to California, the testing 
ground for her artistic ethics. 
Then Georgia flees lurid, tech- 
nicolor California for a lonely 
Paris apartment and increasing 
doses of Calvados. 

The novel is written from 
Harry’s point of view, but Hany, 


LONDON THEATER 



■ r 



Of a Tone Poem 




By Sheridan Motley 

Ita ermatonal Htrali Tribuae- 

L ONDON — “Home" 
(newly ‘.revived at 
Wyndbam’s) has never 

been where say heart 
is, though the first production 
back in 1970 did introduce lis to 
the stunning late-life partner- 
ship of Gielgud and Richard- 
son, by Sir Ralph’s own admis- 
sion the brokers’ men of great 
classical theater. There is now 
an additional hazard, however: 
as with Alan Bennett’s .-.“The. 
Old Country," once you are in 
on the surprise of the setting, 
delivered late in the' first act 
here as there, the play loses 
same of its power to surprise. 

In the Gidgud idle, Paul Ed- 
dington delivers a perfectly poet- 
ic, hcartbreakingly elegiac per- 
formance. Tackling the eccentric 
ghost of Sir Ralph, Richard Bri- 
ers has considerably more diffi- 
culty,. not least because his is an 
infinitely cozier, less edgy or 
threatening rendering. 

The women. (Brenda Bruce 
and Rowena Copper) also seem 
paler shadows of Mona Wash- 
bourne and Dandy Nichols in 
die original and the central 
question still remains of wheth- 
er this is a lament far a dying 
England or simply a play about 
four disconnected old inmates 
of a mental home. • ■ 

Jason Pitt brings moments, of 
Hanger to the only other role, 
which in the original 1 seem to 
recall as a male nurse, rather 
thanjust another inmate. But the 
lesson of this revival is that the 
play does not have the 
tonal strength of die 
gad/ Richardson double-header. 
Pinter’s “No . Man’s Land,” 
which pediaps explains why it 
lias bear seldom seen ur revival 
Defenders of “Home” tend, to 
talk of it as a concerto for^ voices; 
or as a kind of tone poem ;df 
decline and defeat and distance. 
What it larks is any land of real 
dr ama or development. 

David Mamet’s “Glengarry 
Glen Ross” (Donmar- Ware- 
house), back in London for the 
first time since its National pre- 
miere _a decade ago, and again, 
with 'an aH^Ebgfish cast, hcAds 
up better than much of his other 
work. A scattershot, scatologi- 
cal trans-Atlantic treat about 
the selling by crooks to suckers 
of worthless tracts of laud, it is 
for the death 


m- 


a man who thinks and writes by 
arrondissement. is limited. We 
don't understand exactly what 
he does with his attraction to 
Georgia or how he measures his 
shortcomings with respect to 
her. Certainly he’s envious be- 
cause he’s not the suffering artist 
she is. Georgia, however, re- 
mains vivid and singular. 

Long after Georgia has left 
his life, Harry recognizes one of 
her paintings at a dinner party 
where the Parisian hosts display 
their an ostentatiously. “The 
picture,” Harry thinks, "seemed 
to step up to the surreal salute, 
then back away. It was turbu- 
lent, and filled with mystery.” 

The unworthy owners of this 
painting tell Harry their trun- 
cated version of Georgia's sto- 
ry. They think of Georgia as a 
difficult, possessive alcoholic; 
“The wond would be better 
off,” they mutter, “if there were 
no artists, only art-” Harry’s 
early disdain now gives way to 
admiration for Georgia. 

But the collectors' descrip- 
tion isn't that far off, is it? Har- 
ry claims that Georgia’s life is a 
triumph, but he has given too 
vivid a picture of her 
pain, her mistrust of others and 
her isolation. There is a moral- 
ity tale here, but what is it? 


of the American way of life. 

“Attention must be paid,” as 
they said of Willy Loman at his 
funeral but in this death of sev- 
eral salesman. Mamet has seen 
a blade farce about wheeler- 
dealers whose wheels b&ve 
come off, and it has been gfyen 
a suitably hothouse production 
by SamMendes. 

But if Arthur Miller is the 
Ibsen of our times and Tennes- 
see Williams the Chekhov, we 


are left with Mamets resolute 
refusal to offer a moral or em£ 
lional frame. His men, and here 
they are all men, exist in 
own terms only; we are rie^r. 
asked to judge or sympathize-, 
merely to observe their despera-. 
tion: You gotta close a deal- 
because you gotta eat. 

In that sense they are “Guys 
and Dolls” without the music.. 
Philosophers of the spkt-sec- 
ond, a dying breed of 
and hucksters, they hold the 
borderline where the American 
dream of progress and prosper! -, 
ty turns over into the nightmare 
of betrayal and theft and they; 
hold it with all the insecure no-, 
bility of the last cowboys at the; 
last frontier. t 

For those of us who still col- 
lect dialogue from realty temWe 
local stage musicals, “Copaca- 
bana” (Prince of Wales) has 
proved something of a disap-, 
pointment: nothing here to rival 
“These Crusades are spreading 
like wildfire” (“Troubadour”) oc 
“My maid says it’s earthquake 
weather” (“Crest of the Wave”), 
though I guess “All Havana 
awaits you” might just qualify. ; 

In all other reweets, howev- 
er, “Cbpacabamr is a must: a; 
breath takingly, -transflxingly. 
terrible evening in. which noth-' 
ing happens very slowly in the. 
first half and then does so all 
over again in the second. 

I T is billed as“Copacabana 
— the Musical" presum- 
ably to avoid any confix- i 
apn with Copacabana — 

. the Beach, and is written by Bar-; 
ry Manflow — -the Composer, a : 
man with a vast army of matron-; 
ty fans but no discernible talent 
for the theater. 

• There is, however, a spectac- 
- alar, gothic awfulness to a show, 
that seems to have been con-; 
'stnicted ground vague, memo-! 
ries of Carmen Miranda with- 
out the * fruit Heaven alone 
knows how many ostriches died 
to provide the headdresses, or 
how .many more buried their! 
heads in the Hymiouth sand (for 

that is where thisfarxago began) - 

when they first heard the ploL - 
- A high^camp. high-kitsch, 
low-brained saga of a nightclub * 
songwriter (the desperately ea -1 
ger Gary Wilmor) fantasizing, 
himself into a Euro Disneyland; 
pantomime complete with mar! 
rending pirates, this is a show' 
with afl the energy and charm of! 
a dead goldfish. ••• . 

Only Manflow’s millions can' 
explain how it. arrived in the; 
West End, or how long it will- 
survive there, but by the time; 
the setting had moved to what* 
looked like - the- honeymoon; 
suite of the Havana Hilton dur-l 
ing amateur talent night, I be-- 
gan at last to understand Cas-; 
tro’s thoughts on the evils of- 
capitalism: This is the Man - 1 
ilowest of the low. i 


BEST-SELLERS 


He New Yoct Taaes .. . 

This Ks i» ha*cd on r e po r ts fitro more than 
2j000 bookstores rint*jgboBtibcU niicd SiAtes. 
W«±joafct ne not necessarily coraecatwe. 


W**k 


FICTION 


Lag W«to 
Wk mlM 


l THE CHAMBER, by John 
Graham 1 3 


2 THE CELESTINE PROPHE- 
CY. byJames RedGeU 

3 THE CROSSING, by Gonuc 




4 OK, THE PLACES YOU’LL 

CO!, by De Sou* 4 J36 

5 INCA GOLD, by Clive 

Oialcr 3 7 

6 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 

SON COUNTY, by. Robert 
James WaDer 6 98 

7 REMEMBER ME. by -Maty 

HjggtosCbrt 5 9 

8 MISTRESS. BY Amanda 

Qua* 12 2 

9 THE ALIENIST, by Caleb 

Carr 7 II 

IB THE HST OF OOD. by Fiwf- 

crick Foesyih 14 8 

11 WALKING SHADOW, by 

Robert R Parker 13 3 

12 TUNNEL VISION, by Sara 


2 EMBRACED BY THE 

LIGHT. by Betty LEadie with 
Curtis Taylor 

3 D-DAY. JUNE S, (944, by 

Stephen E. Ambrose 

4 STANDING FIRM, by Dan 

5T§£ l B06k OF VIRTUES, 
by WflKam J. Bennett 

6 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 
DEN OF GOOD AND EVIL, 
by John Bcrendt 

7BEYOND PEACE, by Rfch- 
ard N ixon 

8 THE HALDEMAN D1a- 
. RIES. by H. R. Hakfeman _. 

. 9 OLD SONGS IN A NEW 
CAFE, by Robert James Wal- 
ler — 

10 REBA: My Story, by Reba 
McEntm with Tom Carter „ 

11 SAVED BY THE LIGHT, by 
Drama Brinkley with Paul 


59 

3 
6 

27 

16 

*- 

4 


Feny 
12 ALL 


MY OCTOBERS, by 

Mickey Mantle with Mickev 
Hcnkowia 


9 id. 


Alice Kaplan, a professor of 
romance studies and literature at 
Duke University, wrote this for 
The Waskin&on Post. 


Q- SQUARED, by Peter Da- 
vid I 

14 POLITICALLY CORRECT 

BEDTIME STORIES, by 
James Ran Gamer 1 

15 NIGHT PREY, by John San- 
ford — 8 5 

"NONFICTION 

1 THE AGENDA, by Bob 
Woodward r 


13 Lire OF THE PARTY, bv 

14 toUL 5P |K‘®^bv"Th^ 12 

Moors 13 

15 HOW WE DIE. by Sherwjn B. 

. Noland ip 

. . ADVICE, HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

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ROSIE, by Rosie Daley 1 

2 MEN ARE FROM MARS 

WOMEN ARE FROM vf] 
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International Herald Tribune , Wednesday, June 29, 1994 


Page 9 



THE THIS INDEX 1 1 1 .37H 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©. composed of 
280 internationally investable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 

120 


Yen Gives Jolt to Japan 9 s Industry 

Some See It as Good Medicine to Force Reforms 




90 -.i-t ■> r t. -jua 

J F 

■ 1- » 

M 

* t r . : , . > 

A M 

J 

1993 



1994 

1 Aaia/Paciftc 


Europe 

m 

Approx wegtang: 32% 

ES 

Approx, wagtong: 37% 

■ER 

Dose: 132.55 Prav_- 130.85 

50 

BSa 

Close: 11 1.37 Piev.: ri0.05 



m^rrrr 


IIU ■ "!> ■ ■ . " .. a ' /": » *» “ ■ ' ■ - ■ 

9Q 


■f.-V ->v/; 

J F M A M J 


1993 

1994 

1993 

1994 

3 North America 


Latin America 


Approx, weighting: 26% 


Approx, weighling: 5% 

Bi 

Close: 91 37 Prev; 91 83 

150 — ; 

cioski»^piw.: mas 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — With the yen scaling re- 
cord heights and threatening to smother 
Japan's long-awaited economic recovery, 
few dare say iL But a prolonged reces- 
sion and a stronger currency may be the 
best medicine if Japan's economy is to 
postpone the onset of sluggish maturity 
and recapture its youthful vigor. 

The soaring yen, which has achieved 
parity with the U.S. penny several tiroes 
in recent days, is ushering in unseen 
competition to Japanese industries ac- 
customed to a degree of protection at 
home. As a result, manufacturers will 
have no choice but to move more pro- 
duction offshore, mostly to Asia. The 
government also will have to deregulate 
in earnest to help create businesses and 
jobs for workers who are pushed out as 
companies become leaner. 

Some even go so far as to say that 
despite the shrieks from Japanese indus- 
trialists, the latest round of endaka. or 
yen appreciation, is exactly what Japa- 
nese bureaucrats have prescribed, so that 
Japanese industry, finally beginning to 
see light at the end of the "long recession- 
ary tunnel, will not let up on the painful 
process of restructuring. 

“If one is really forced by competition 
or drastic change such as the high yen. 
some impossible things can be 


achieved." said Yotaro Kobayashi, 
chairman and chief executive officer of 
Fuji Xerox Co. “This time the 90-plus 
exchange rate might be able to force 
something magical out of Japanese man- 
ufacturers in terms of changing their 
fundamentals drastically.” 

Despite all the talk of restructuring in 
Japan, most companies have concentrat- 
ed so far on squeezing more from their 
onployees. The more difficult but poten- 
tially more effective solution of reorga- 
nizing traditional work practices and 
sacking millions of employees, who now 
have few places to go, remains untackled. 
But that may change if the Japanese 
currency continues to rise. 

“At the rate of 100 to 105, most Japa- 
nese companies really have been hoping 
that we can somehow balance the chal- 
lenge of maintaining employment while 
meeting the minimum profitability levels 
required by shareholders and others.” 
said Mr. Kobayashi, who is also chair- 
man of the U.S.-Japan Business Council. 
“But the strong yen might force some 
people to the cooclusioD that now there's 
really no question but to go forward, that 
to survive the company must re-establish 
a viable development and manufacturing 
process at home, even at the risk of 
taking drastic action on employment.” 

If so, deregulation, long the govern- 
ment’s mantra and meant as much for 


foreign consumption as for domestic 
constituents, takes on a new imperative 
It will be the only way to create new 
business opportunities that will offset 
the erosion of Japan's manufacturing 
base, provide jobs for displaced workers 
and lower the cost of living to ease the 
pain of transition. On Tuesday, the gov- 
ernment announced a long-awaited 
package of measures targeting the hous- 
ing. communications, distribution and 
financial services industries. But the pro- 
posals were vague and noncommittal. 

Although another bout of endaka- in- 
duced structural change may be good 
medicine for Japan, it may be equally 
bitter for other countries, especially the 
United States. 

A stronger yen gives Japan an extra 
incentive to manufacture more in Asia, 
which offers tower costs for land, labor 
and logistics. It also makes fresh foreign 
investments less expensive and goods 
made abroad cheaper in terms of the yen. 
For the United States, in contrast for- 
eign direct investment becomes more ex- 
pensive and goods produced offshore are 
more expensive, 

“It accelerates a tendency of the Unit- 
ed States to undercommit to Asia and 
accelerates Japan's turn towards Asia," 
said James Abegglen. chairman of Gemi- 

See YEN, Page 10 


Caracas Imposes 
Currency and 
Price Controls 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatcher 

CARACAS — Moving to 
stem Venezuela's most serious 
financial crisis in a decade. 
President Rafael Caldera has 
suspended some constitutional 
rights to impose price and cur- 
rency exchange controls. 

Venezuelan commercial 
banks on Tuesday shut foreign 
exchange markets on orders of 
the central bank until July 6, 
when a system of controls will 
be in place. 

Mr. Caldera, who took office 
in February, pledged during his 
electioa campaign that he 
would not put restrictions on 
financial or economic activity. 

The president, who spoke for 
about 10 minutes flanked by 
the mil if ar y high command, did 
not say how or when his mea- 
sures would be implemented. 

Mr. Caldera’s action allows 
the government to set maxi- 
mum prices for basic products 
such as food and medicine. 

To soften the effects of infla- 
tion. the government will issue 




Hong Kong Disciplines Standard Chartered PLC 


J F 
1993 

Warid Index 


M J 
1994 


J F 
1993 


M J 
1994 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 


A lengthy investigation by the regula- pioyees connected with the misHpftHs 
tory body found that Standard Char- bad left the bank as a result of the SFC 
red Securities had helped create false investigation and the bank’s own audit, 
arket demand for shares of slx IPOs K . t u^ 

iderwritlen by the merchant bank 
andaid Chartered Asia between July 

91 and February 1993 liamson. Standard Chartered s chief oc- 

J ecutive, said in a statement announcing 

The inquiry also found that Standard senior staff changes. “They occured at a 
lartered Securities had provided mis- time when Standard Chartered was 
iding information to the Stock Ex- managed very differently from today. I 
ange of Hong Kong and had tolerated am determined to ensure that the high- 
rious forms of misconduct by its floor est standards attach to the merchant 
iders over several years. banking and slock broking business." 


Via index tracks US dollar values of stocks kv Tokyo, New York. London, and : 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Betgkxn, Braxfl. Canada, CM*. Denmark, Finland, I 
Frms, Germany, Hong Kong, Haly, Mextea, Netheriards, New Zealand. Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo, Now York and [ 
London, tfw Index Is Composed of the 20 top issues In toms d market capitaSzatJon, \ 
OiianrO* ffw fan Hop docks are tracked. 


HONG KONG — Baring teeth few tered Securities bad helped create false 
Hong Kong stock mark et veterans would market demand for shares of slx IPOs 
recognize, the colony’s Securities and Fu- underwritten by the merchant bank 
Hires Commission heavily disciplined two Standard Chartered Asia between July 
local subsidiaries of the' British banking 1991 and February 1993. 


| Industrial Sectors | 


Tub. 

PM 

» 


Tim. 

Ptyy. 

% 


darn 

dma 

etagi 


dam 

dam 

dim* 

Energy 

10784 

ioao6 

-0.11 

Capte Goods 

11285 

11157 

+084 

Ufflffie* 

t1&2t 

116.11 

+181 

TTimi IMh fkh 
nBlHaHnol 

123.47 

12282 

+0.78 

Finance 

117.50 

11585 

+1.42 

Coastsaer Goods 

96.03 

97.72 

+082 


roup Standard Chartered PLC on Tues- 
ay lor misconduct in trading. 


Standard Chanced, Hong Kong s ^gTota^adon to ^ StoTt Ix- 
£ change of Hong Kong and had tolerated 
'SSSLtJ&fiZ, various formsof misconduct by its floor 

SSM, iSe^pS traders over several years. 

Kong brokerage unit. Standard Char- Standard Chartered PLC said Tues- 


Chartered Securities had provided mis- 


by Standard Chartered were the latest in 
a series of actions by the SFC aimed at 
improving the Hong Kong market's 
checkered reputation. 

Regulators have increasingly scruti- 
nized Hong Kong’s financial mar kets 
since the October 1987 collapse that saw 
its stock and futures exchanges dosed for 
several days. Unto recently, though, they 
have found few high-profile offenders. 

In September, the SFC disciplined 
one of Hong Kong’s largest local securi- 
ties houses. Peregrine Brokerage Ltd., 
alone with two of its directors, for mis- 


Satvfca* H5.Q2 114.17 40.74 


12180 11989 4-159 


For more Mutilation about Index, a booldet is avaSabto tree of eftarye. 

Write to Trlb Index, 181 Avenue Chafes de Gaulle, 32521 Notify Cedex. France. 

©International Herald Trkune 


Kong brokerage unit. Standard Char- Standard Chartered PLC said Tues- While the SFC has no statutory au- 
tered Securities, was barred from panic- day that its recently appointed global thority to impose financial penalties, it 
ipating in any initial public offerings investment banking head. John McFar- judged the measures against Hong 
until the same date. lane, would move from London to Hong Kong’s leaders in bringing new compa- 

Analysts said the penalties were the Kong but said the new posting was unre- nies to market and its subsidiaries “an 
strongest yet assessed agaionst an estab- la ted to the sanctions. It also told appropriate response," a spo kesman said 
listed financial firm in the territory. Bloomberg Business News that 19 em- The measures aaainsl IPOs sponsored 


wauHi -’ along with two of its directors, for mis- 

While the SFC has no statutory au- conduct related to share trading in new- 
Lbority to impose financial penalties, it ly listed companies, 
judged the measures against Hong “Any announcement that the market 
Kong’s leaders in bringing Dew compa- is not being rigged is to be welcomed,'' 


nies to market and its subsidiaries “an 
appropriate response,” a spokesman said. 
The measures against IPOs sponsored 


said Clive Weedon, bead of trading and 
research at Asia Equity, of the trend 
towards greater enforcement. 


transportation and food bonds 
to low-income residents, Mr. 
Caldera said. More measures 
will follow, he said. 

Once the envy of its neigh- 
bors because of its rich petro- 
leum reserves. Venezuela has 
been plunged into an economic 
crisis that contrasts sharply 
with the resurgent state of other 
economies in Latin America 
and poses a threat to Venezue- 
la's political and social stability. 

The currency, the bolivar, has 
fallen 41 percent against the 
dollar since April, and inflation 
has risen to 18.7 percent so far 
this year. 

Civil and political rights were 
among six constitutional guar- 
antees suspended by the gov- 
ernment Monday in its effort to 
prevent unrest over new eco- 
nomic measures. Information 
Minister Guillermo Alvarez Ba- 
jarez said. 

“This is a precaution taken to 
prevent public disorder,” which 
could occur in reaction to the 
economic measures, Mr. Ba- 
jarez said. 

“The grave state of our finan- 
cial system, the insistent wave 
of rumors, the speculative 
movements that have tried to 
bring down the bolivar, have 
forced us to take these mea- 
sures,” the president said. 

A large portion of the Vene- 
zuelan banking system has fall- 
en into slate hands. Inflation in 
May was 52 percent, one of 
Latin America's highest rates. It 
is expected to reach 70 percent 
on an annual basis by the end of 
1994. 

Mr. Caldera said he believed 
the measures would not scare 
off foreign investors. “On the 
contrary, investors need a sta- 
ble currency, need the security 
of knowing that foreign re- 
serves will not dry up," he said. 

The government also will 
seek tighter regulation of com- 
mercial banks. Mr. Caldera 
said. 

(AP, WP, Knighi-Ridder) 



Ad Firms Meet French 101 


By Jacques Neher 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Say fromage! If something 
seems lost in the translation, that 
could be an indication of the chal- 
lenge McDonald’s restaurants wiQ 
face when they try to sell cheeseburgers here 
after France adopts a language law that is 
expected to receive final approval Thursday. 

The law would outlaw advertising that em- 
ploys non-French words such as “cheese,” 
“chewing gum,” “cookie,” and other words 
and expressions that can be accurately trans- 
lated into French. 

In fact, cheeseburgers themselves will have 
to be renamed in fast-food restaurants 
around the country under the lull sponsored 
by Culture Minister Jacoues Toubon. 

“Hamburger is French, but cheeseburger 
isn’t French and can’t be used,” said Yves 
Marek, an adviser to Mr. Toubon and. author 
of the ML “With this law, we’re not trying to 
protect the French language, but ratter pro- 
tect consumers. They should be able to under- 
stand what they are buying.” 

No matter its intent, the law is likely to 
create more work and boost costs for foreign 
companies attempting to sell their goods and 
services in France. Marketers say it would 
dictate a “French exception” for global or 
pan-European ad campaigns tied to E nglis h 
words and expressions. 

The only other country where marketers 
face similar restrictions is Canada, where the 


McDonald’s, with 309 restaurants in 
France that generate about 5 billion francs 
($924 milhonj in sales annually, said it would 
do whatever was necessary to apply the new 
measures. Other American companies, how- 
ever, were openly unhappy. 

“This is bureaucracy gone mad," said Alan 
Vickers, president of Nike France, a subsid- 
iary of the Oregon-based sports shoe maker. 
Mr. Vickers said Nike might have to abandon 
its long-running international advertising slo- 
gan, “Just Do It,” in France, after plowing 70 
million francs into an ad campaign last year 
that used iL 

“This is a costly and unnecessary restric- 
tion that wiU prevent companies from mar- 
keting their products in the most appropriate 
way, and it will impact their plans for pan- 
European campaigns," Mr. Vickers said. 

- Under the legislation, Nike would be able 
to use the slogan, but only if it gives equal 
pro minenc e to a French translation. Special- 
ists say such a translation requirement would 
cause advertisers to abandon their native ex- 
pressions. 

“The requirements on translations will de- 
stroy the esthetics of the advertising.” said 
Christian B lachas, publisher of Comm uni ca- 
tion/ CB News, a French advertising industry 
newspaper. 

Before the draft bill was presented this 
year, Nike moved to protect its media invest- 
ment by registering its slogan as a trademark. 
But Mr. Toubon’s legislation anticipated such 




damped down on commercial use of Engli s h , are trademarked, they must be accompanied 
Even though “cheeseburger” survived intact, by a translation. 


the com pany was prompted to replace its 
Happy Meal with “Joyeux Fes tin" and 
Chicken McNuggets with “McCroquettes.” 


Philippe Sandt, marketing director at Nike 

- See FRANGLAIS, Page 13 


2 Producers 
Curb Sales 
Of Coffee 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Brazil and Co- 
lombia, the world’s two largest 
coffee producers, on Tuesday 
stopped all coffee exports for 
July after a frost damaged as 
much as 30 percent of next 
year’s Brazilian crop. 

Guatemala and El Salvador 
said they intend to keep coffee 
export registrations open. 

Meanwhile, in New York, 
Kraft General Foods Inc. an- 
nounced a 35-cent price in- 
crease for each 1 3 ounces (368,5 
grams) of Maxwell House cof- 
fee, a jump of 15 percent. An 
industry source said British 
consumers could expect to pay 
15 percent more in September. 

A leading official of the In- 
ternational Coffee Organiza- 
tion called for a meeting in Oc- 
tober. “My conviction is that 
we should not have abandoned 
quotas," said Simeon Onchere, 
chair of the ICO council. “Nei- 
ther a sharp rise nor a sharp fall 
in price is good. At the moment 
we are helpless observers." 

In London on Tuesday, the 
price for coffee for delivery in 
September rose $155, to $3,003 
a metric ton. In New York, ara- 
bica coffee for September deliv- 
ery rose 11.35 cents a pound to 
$1.7295. (Reuter.’;, Bloomberg) , 


Banking Clients Have Always Expected 
Outstanding Personal Service. 
Today They Find It With Us. 



ICURRENCY & INTEREST RATESl 


D uring the Renaissance, 
trust .1 advisors helped 
administer the finances 
and protect the interests of private 
individuals. The role demanded 
judgment, commitment and skill. 

Today, client, find that same 
personal service ar Republic 
National Bank. We believe that 
banking is more about people than 
numbers. Ir’s about the shared val- 
ues and common goals that forge 
strong hi »nds between hanker and 


Cross .Rates 

4 X OJA. 

MmtMoafc . xm us wnc 

Braxufl '■ ’ BB 2£2 X5H 
Pronwwt ■ \stn USB - — 
LMMmHo) vm MSB 

tenant uuzr next vm 
au*™ -uwi iamo me 
Hem Vortc Chi ' LSSa uBB 

(puns - ■' sms t«ns un 
Tatoo is is/ • an 

•moats ■■■■ -too umi asm 
Zara -■ "Las usb bh» 

? ECU 121 am isos 

jisoit - tm aritf ism 

■ Oastnta tn Amsterdam. Landau. 

wtoaMHa 

• tr: To bur one pound; or To bur 
OWftaHtr 

OthsrDoOw Vsluss 

l . - . CuirrwKV 


June 26 EurOCUn 

PJP. Uro RFI OJ=. IF. Y« <3 Paata 

UZI 1 UV‘ SUB* LBJS 1 JB- LOT IBIS* DC 

ua ISWtUSH w U9 8» *»• _ 

um UW- tan? USD- ubi lsw- lmh lztot >**""*" « 

mbi iota Msn sub moi istn iwn w.n 

mg ms* 7i* tarn tun ixb* hsu — < montbs 

at a mil ox U7U5 km unto n.w t rear s* 

ium issue row bb libs nsas usu i»» - mmr T . 

_ ”• VtUM 4 BV S 41 »- UW g**”' ^ 

IU IW sus j am tsus — n.w vm «J**nnrv*_u 

asn uni* wns. mm* was ubm* — mm* 

tees uest* «$ am n* — us- msb uner _ . 

4M i«M20 list wan un m» un iasn 

7*2 ro*2j uw era w wns torn utn ami ifttogseatw 

HMw York and Zurids flxtnos tn artier centers; Taranto DtKoonl rate 

Prime rota 

one donor; •: Un/ts of Mfe- no.; not sooted; KAJ not Man * M 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Swiss French 

Dollar D Mark Franc Sierfin* Franc Yen ECU 

1 month i ■*w 5 4 ?VS S ‘.-5 2-5 » 5 -. 5 

3 months «h -5 4 >v 4 5 *vS *u SW 5 ** 3 v. 5 -. 5 r - 

4 months 54 Vfe 4 ft 5 Sft-Sft 5 ft- 5 Vk 2 ft P-s -4 

1 rear 5 fe- 5 *. 5 ft S 1 * 4 *>- 4 ft o+'t S-ftAh. 3 ft Jft 6 - 

Sources: Reuters. Uords Bank. 

MB mMtaW to Interbank deposits at St mutton imntmvm tor smOvatanH 


Ksy Monsy Ratos 

Unttqtf Slates 


Corrance Pars 
SJUr.nna 1*34 
X Kor.anm BdSJO 
Swed. krona 7A363 
Taiwan S 3602 

TtafboM ssa 

Turkish Bra 37217. 
UAEdMam 24727 
Vtnez. boUv. KUO 


Otter Dollar Vsluss „ mi 

SSTSw. £2 SEES S £££-*«* 

terras ™ s 

2gM5 paOihzMir Om. TWtoM 2SM 

g ! *?■-< « MU5 • Pert-asea to. 16125 Turkish dm 37217 

SSSLrSt\.tStdM «« 

^l&inortkn-' cSw MaJor. rtoo. 1396 *09. S 1>3i7 

Fr-wiifd llitsB 

bmw;/V-V jw ut *+* IM" atnouer 'tS *S5 

hkWJStoSB* ' v 1JU3 tf«. 1.54* CtoaSan iiotor 1JW 

beatecto^Mr i’-. ' L5W2 1JI« U«5 4n»«sa»an MBA* WM> 

SBrewMiBte* fAmstcrdaml; t*”™*** 2S 

tMdanlf'Aasnce France Preooe tPdris// Bank WJ Tokyo fToknl. Rrmtt boh, or 
( TC*VFId>; (mFISD( 0. Ottier data from Reuters andAP. 


UnHotf State Close Free. 

fMKDonf nk 3 ft 

Prime rale 714 71 i 

FadaratfanA 4 h 4 * 

8 m—lfl CDs 4.13 403 

Comm, ponar Hi days 4.92 4 J 0 

Mnanlti Trea sm r bH 4.15 Alt 

VytnrTransenrMll S .15 109 

»nar Traaservaete 6.11 403 

5 Hraor Treosory noft 441 6 J 9 

Tssar Treasury ante 692 602 

IPvaor Treasury note 7^4 7.16 

XwTratmrMd 751 7 At 

JHenWLvntoJaaer neodyami 142 341 


Briton 

Bonk base rofe 
Call money 
Mnonlh ioterkaak 
MmW In t er h unk 
6*aaatk Interbank 
1 e-year Sin 
France 

[ u i a rr an Hon rate 
Coil money 
l^meta toerboitk 
Ximotb interbank 
6-nmnJh Mertmtfc 
WTearOAT 


5b 5b 
4ft 100 
iJOO 5 b 
5ft 5ft 
Sft Sft 
844 858 

£J0 520 

5ft Sft 
5.40 5 S 

551 Sft 
545 5 ft 

7J4 754 


Dfteotmt rate 
Catlmeaev 


bcaonthWertHak 
KHwrSGyniiHttod 
Cerweny . 

I u iul ni r B rate 
Coll money 
1-mantfc interbank 
Sawntfa Inhrbeto 
6-nwatf» In terbank 
U-yaa/Sawl 


lft 1ft 
250 Z00 

2ft 2 ft 
2ft 2ft 
2ft 2ft 
4JS 4JS 

400 600 

5.10 540 

550 53)0 

5J» 5» 

550 5JK 
671 7JM 


Sources: Reuters. Btoomoen, Merrill 
L inch. Bank of To* to. Commerrtrank. 
Gtestmetl Mantoou. Credit L v.mnats 

Gold 

AJW. PJi*- Cb'ae 
Zurich 38 S 40 38445 - 0 M 

Lomtan 385.90 3 B 65 i - 2.70 

New York 38750 387.90 + 1 JO 

US dollars per ounce. Lender ottlciol B»- 
tno s: ZurletiandNe w Vert ea«»"P ondetos- 
hV prices; New York Comes tAusustl 
Source: Renton 


client. It’s also about building for 
the future, keeping assets secure 
for the generations to come. 

: This client focus has contrib- 

uted to our leading position in 
private hanking. .As a subsidiary 
of SafVa Republic Holdings S.A. 
and an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part of 
i a global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and more 
than US$50 billion in assets. 

These assets continue to grow 

REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


ASAFRABANft 

Timeless Values. Traditional Strength. 

HEAD OFFfCfc GENEVA 1204 • 2. PLACE DU LAC ■ TEL i022i 705 55 5$ - FOREX: (022i 705 55 50 AMD GENEVA 1ZOI - 2. RUE DR. ALFRED- VINCENT (CORNER 
GUAI DU MGNT-BLANC i BRANCHES: LUGANO 6901 - 1. VIA CANOVA - TEL. (091 1 23 BS 32 - ZURICH 8039 ■ STOCKER STRASSE 37 - TEL. (01) 288 18 18 ‘ 
CUEPNSEY ■ RUE DU PRE - ST PETER PORT • TEL. (461 • 711 761 AFFILIATE REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS; 
0I9R ALTAR ■ GUERNSEY 1 - LONDON • LUXEMBOURG - MILAN ■ M09ITE CARLO - PARIS • SEVERUT HILLS - CAYMAN ISLANDS ■ LOS ANGELES • MEXICO CITY - MIAMI ■ 
MONTREAL ■ NASSAU • NEW YORK ■ BUENOS AIRES ■ CARACAS ' MONTEVIDEO ■ PUHTA DEL ESTE ■ RIO DE JANEIRO - SANTIAGO • BEIRUT • BEUING ■ HONG KWG ■ 

JAKARTA • SINGAPORE * TAIPEI • TOKYO 


substantially, a testament to the 
group’s strong balance sheets, risk- 
averse orien ration and century-old 
heritage. 

All banks in the group are 
locally managed, attuned to the 
language and culture of their cus- 
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that emphasizes lasting relation- 
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values were once the foundation 
of banking. At Republic, they 
have been and always will be. 





Page 10 

market 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29. 1994 


tamings Concern; 

Sink Stock Market 


S&SKSS: 

nJtuZ? m ^makers and fi- 
nanciai service com panies. 

I I- U-S- S tocks 

52“®** are sensitive to swings in 
u* economy and interest rates, 
were among the biggest losers. 

t dc Dow Jones industrial &v- 
erage c losed | 5 86 ^ 

at 3,669.64, while losing issues 
outnumbered gaining ones by a 
V-to-4 ratio on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

"^ e price of the benchmark 
f^year Treasury bond fell 
19/32 point, to 85 4/32, send- 
ing the yield to 7J) percent, up 
7.46 percent Monday. 

The bond market was pres- 
sured by signs that rising rates 
had not slowed housing de- 
roand or hurt consumer confi- 
dence. The Conference Board 
said its U.S. consumer confi- 
dence index had risen in June 
from May, and the government 
said sales of new single-family 
homes spurted an unexpectedly 
strong 42 percent. 

The reports suggested the 
economy was growing quickly 
enough to prompt the Federal 


Reserve Board to raise interest 
rates for a fifth time this year. 
Meanwhile, the Commodity 
Research Bureau's index of 21 
key commodity prices, an infla- 
tion barometer, rose after fall- 
ing on Monday. 

Slocks also suffered from re- 
newed weakness in the dollar, 
which could offer another incen- 
tive for the Fed to raise rates. 

James Kirk, president and 
chief investment officer of Soci- 
ety Asset Management in 
Cleveland, said he thought the 
central bank would raise rates 
□ext week, when its policy-mak- 
ing Federal Open Market Com- 
mittee meets. 

Auto slocks “have seen their 
best days.” Mr. Kirk said, partly 
because the wave of extra in- 
come from mortgage refinanc- 
ings has crested. Ford lost V* to 
58%, Chrysler fell % to 4714. and 
General Motors tumbled 1% to 
50%: all were actively traded. 

GM was further pressured by 
its management shakeup, in 
which G. Richard Wagoner Jr. 
was named president of its 
Norib American operations. 

Among financial-services 
stocks posting losses were Fed- 
eral National Mortgage Associ- 
ation. which slipped % to 84. 
Merrill Lynch, which lost % to 
36, and MBNA, which fell 1% 
to 23 W. f Bloomberg. AP) 


Dollar Loses Ground 
As U.S. Securities Sag 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
fell against most other major 
currencies Tuesday after a spate 
of economic reports raised con- 
cern about inflation and sent 
government bonds lower. 

Currency traders watch the 
bond market's performance to 
see whether investors are still 

Foreign Exchange 

pulling money out of U.S. as- 
sets. Signs of such an exodus 
have helped depress the dollar 
thisyear. 

The U.S. currency closed 
Tuesday at 9S.935 yen, down 
from a close on Monday at 
100.45 yen but in> from an in- 
traday low at 99.90 yen. The 
dollar was also quoted at 1.5785 
Deutsche marks, down from 
1.5830 DM on Monday. 

"There's still a crisis of confi- 
dence in U.S. assets going on,” 
said Marc Cohen, managing di- 
rector at C-Wave Capital Man- 
agement ‘That puts the dollar 
under pressure." 


Bonds posted losses after the 
Commerce Department said 
sales of new homes bad risen 4.2 
percent in May. Many analysts 
had expected a slight drop. 
Bond investors were also un- 
nerved by import prices, which 
climbed 1.1 percent in May. the 
largest increase since October 
1990. the Labor Department 
said. 

"The slump in bonds took 
the shine off the dollar after the 
economic reports,” said Dennis 
Pettit, foreign exchange manag- 
er at Long-Term Credit Bank of 
Japan. 

Dealers said speculation that 
the Group of Seven industrial- 
ized countries might take steps 
next week at their summit to 
shore up the dollar had kept it 
from falling further. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar slipped to 5.4105 French 
francs from 5.4245 francs Mon- 
day and to 1.3275 Swiss francs 
from 1 .3280 francs. The pound 
rose to 51.5525 from 51.3440- 


*x3 Aiiociolcd Press 


Jx»e 2 a | Dow Jones Averages 


Tfie Dow 


BaHy ctasfrgs of the . 

Dow Jones industrial average 

m ' ■ 



m 


D 4 
1993 


M A M J 


Optn HlgB LOW LOW CM. 

! Indus 3M623 X9S23 
' T™ 159921 160695 1584.41 15?3J® — 

! ITH U7B? 17029 17605 177.10 -O.W 
I cwt* 158 228 1285J1 1M80O 1274.17 -SJ3 


Standard A Pew’s indexes 


■ 

I industnois 
1 TrooM. 

UliiifiK 
; Finance 
15PSW 
■SP 100 


High LOW One Cfe’ge 

52229 51AM 519X2 — I JO 
38? JO J8U4 MU? -117 
152.74 151.10 152.12 - 0.17 
<473 460? 4442 — 029 
44R47 44MS 44A07 — L2I 
41578 4102* 41X53 —1X4 


NYSE Indexes 


Ccrnctsiie 
inaush>o% 
Tr^is. 
Utilitv 
P inarm 


High Low Last G»b. 

246.97 M442 74U0 —0X5 
3W32 301.12 302-93 —047 
24X27 340 54 241.44 —475 


! NASDAQ Indexes 


i 

I Composite 
[ todus+Iais 
Barms 
i insurance 
1 Pocnco 
1 TVonje. 


Hies Low LnZJ Olg. 
704.72 *98X4 701.95 —473 
71494 704X7 70632 —441 
746JD 74344 744.14 —9.15 
88738 18144 BAS.05 — 11? 
92412 9I7JS 91829 —70S 
484.03 £80. B0 68100 -1X5 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


P i ci to m 
BM Ai 


CRM 

BM Aril 
ALUMINUM (Hiri Oroffe) 

Deters per metric ton 

Soot 1429 JC 143000 H4MW 1489X0 

Forward 1457X0 145800 1477X0 147B0O 

COPPRR CATHODES IHtgh Grate) 
DcUorspcr MU<n 2414X0 

WMrtt 2380X0 2301X0 VJS0O M33X0 

LEAS 

Dollars per nwrtcfon 

s«t 517X0 519.W 02.00 snoo 

Forwo ft) 53A00 537X0 350X0 551X0 

NICKEL _ 

4145X0 *170X0 

Forward 4*0X0 405000 4240X0 434S0O 

TIN 

s5S BKOWn y^0 O S?3SDQ 5150X0 534000 
Forward 52)001 S150O 54«IX0 5445X0 

ZINC (speckil High Grade) 

ram «U» 964X0 955X0 906X0 


Financial 


Low dole a 08*8 


3-MOHTH STERUMG (LIFFE) 
009X90- pts of HO act 


NYSE Most Actives 


: AMEX Stock Index 



VeL 

Mgti 

LOW 

Last 

Ota. 

Votttnc 

171803 

7i't 

73'.. 

73% 

+ ? J 

Vcworn 

31331 

79 

38% 

2? 

_ 

ForOM 

30794 

59>v 

58% 

59'- • 

— 

DtcrOos 

29776 

70% 

18% 

19% 

—1 

GnAvur 

28804 S2+„ 

S0% 

50% 


Comcoq •, 

27147 

34'S 

31 

XT'* 

- •— 

LOWS', 

76798 33 

31% 

33% 

■ s 

Tel/ltax 

26447 

56 V. 

S5% 

55% 

— Vi 

TrCOOB 

21»33 

i:u 

11V. 

12% 

■ ■ J 

GcnEis 

71J4I 

47 V, 

44% 

47". 

-'"a 

RJRNtaJ 

19060 

6'... 

S’. 

6 

- 1 f 

Maroria s 

18585 

44*) 

44*. 

44% 

— 

Oavsir 

18335 

48 V i 

J7 

47% 

— Vt 

Emon 

17062 

S7V> 

56% 

56% 

__Vi 

IBM 

12007 

Al'V 

60 

61 

-It 


H)9tl LOW LOST dig. 
425 48 472 J4 42367 —ZJ9 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
'lDUtMIHes 
. 10 Ir*ftis>rtal3 


cine 

7706 

942? 

1004} 


! NYSE Diary 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


AA.an s 

novoii 

Oroaes 

Intel 

Ci sc o s 

Vote Jet 

GidLev* 

IDBCms 

3Com 

SI Jude 

AAOs 

EtoAri 

AuraSv 

NnvbNk 

Lotus 


VoL 

t+gh 

LOW 

Last 

a»«. 

42Q34 

S3*. 

S(F% 


— .\i| 

±a1\' 

1*V| 

I5 1 '* 

I6 1 : 

-i% 

■ T f j 

38L 

37W 

38% 

w 1 | 


61 


60% 


Jl£ 

;a 

22% 

23 

— 't 

V7 

16% 

13% 

16% 



16% 

U 

IS% 



V% 

6% 

9% 

-% 

TIT 

49% 


49% 



31 

W-. 

30% 

-2% 

v L’. 

73 

22% 

23%.. 



14 




19945 

9% 

8 



16491 

33 % 

33% 

13' . 


16922 

J9% 

»4% 

35% 

-v. 


I 

I Advanced 
\ Drained 
Unctwnged 
I Tot cl issues 
1 New Hons 
l Now Lews 


772 

1108 

1350 

1054 

707 

457 

283* 

2819 

11 

4 

125 

153 


_ I 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


i 

i 

| Advanced 
i Dcchncd 
UnOTcrtgeO 
I Total issues 

i New Htofn 

j Now Lows 

1 


207 217 

364 354 

251 226 

9S 790 

J 2 

38 4Q 


1 NASDAQ Diary 



VoL Mat! 

Law 

Lost 

cog. 

SPOR 

S3SZ3 44i*‘ S 

44% 

A6»w 

—'■a 

CTievSffs 

26472 8% 

7% 

8% 

-Vi 

£*PLA 

22016 1"<„ 

1% 

IT. 

P*V'|| 

VkJcflwi 

4520 32 

31% 

31% 


Atari 

6445 4"% 

3 

3% 

— -v* 

NY Tim 

S712 23<* 

23% 

23% 

H 

EchoSav 

5356 10% 

10% 

10% 

— 

wttrird 

4891 13% 

12% 

13 


BATS 

41*5 I2»i, 

ir»„ 

12V. 


HanvDcr 

4077 4% 

A*. 

4% 



I Advanced 


■ New Mtsvts 


Com Prev. 
I3*S 1530 
IrtV 1S76 
190B 1934 

5052 5048 

39 34 

175 189 


Market Sales 



rodor 

Pnw. 


4 pjn. 

coos. 

NYSE 

36558 

29476 

Amn 

21*4 

21JTI 

NasOoa 

2*140 

241X3 


Spot Commodities 


Commodify 
Aluminum, lb 
Coftoe. Brio, lb 
Capone electrolytic lb 
Iron FOB. Ion 
i Lead, lb 
l Silver, trav az 
[ Stoei (Kraal, ion 

I li”- lb 
Zinc ib 


Toaar 

0X49 

1X2 

ur 

213J30 

BJ4 

SJ05 

13433 

16157 

04745 


0X57 

1X3 

1.17 

11100 

0J4 

sjd 

1303 

17231 

04781 



94JB 

9436 

94J7 

+ 0X3 


9378 

9173 

9176 

+ 003 

Mar 

93.11 

93X5 

91X8 


Job 

9251 

9243 

?ZX5 

+0X0 


72X8 

91.93 

91.95 

+ 0X5 

Dec 

91X2 

9153 

9156 

+ 004 



9156 

91X8 



91.H 

91J9 

91X9 

+ 007 

Sop 

90.95 

90.90 

9050 



9077 

9073 

9077 



»A2 

9647 

9058 


Jim 

90X4 

90X5 

90X3 

+ 008 


EsL volume: <2X75. Open Inf.: 521.956 
3-MOHTH EURODOLLARS ILIFFE1 
n ramtea - ph of HO ocf 


Sap 

9475 

94.75 

9473 

+ 0X1 

Dec 

M07 

94X5 

WX3 

+0X7 

Mar 

9179 

9378 

9176 

+ 0X4 

J oa 

93X9 

93X9 

93X6 

+ OX4 

SCO 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9123 

+ 0X4 


ESI. volume: 224. Ooen lot.: 5JB6 
3-MOWTH EUROMARKS CLIFPE1 
DM1 MHIoa-Ptiaf 100 act 
S«P 9613 95X9 

Dec 949! 94X7 

Mar 94X5 94X0 

JUS 9430 9423 

Sen 9400 ?193 

Dec 9174 93X4 

MOT 9154 93X5 

Jon 9131 9120 

S+O 9308 92J« 

Dec 9258 9256 

Mar 9275 92x4 

Jea 92J9 7259 _ 

EM. volume: 82.983. Open Ini.: 177.116 
3-MONTH P1B0R fMATIF) 


95.18 +0X1 

9488 —0.01 

94X1 + 001 

9636 -70X4 

93.98 + 0X6 

91X9 +OX4 
*150 +0X7 

9136 +8X6 

9104 +0X6 

92X7 +0.00 

9272 +0X9 

9257 + 0.10 


ffsouium) 

Sop 

-pis of 
9438 

HO pet 
94J3 

as 

+0X7 

Dec 

9419 

94X9 

+ 0.T2 

Mar 

9192 

93X3 

91X9 

+ 013 

Jaa 

9171 

9153 

93X4 

+ 014 

Sep 

93X9 

9134 

9148 

+ 018 

Dec 

9179 

9118 

9136 

+ 0)3 

seat 

9116 

93X5 

9113 

+019 

Jaa 

93X5 

9191 

93X4 

+ 029 


Est volume: 70X56 Open Inf.: 191529. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

BUM - p» a IM OflM pd 
Jn 103-13 102-23 102-19 + 043 

Sep 1024D 100-22 100-30 — 0-H 

Dec N.T. N.T. 99-30 0-11 

EM. volume: 69J83-Open Int: 130071. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND fLIFFEl 
DM 23M00 - Ptl of 100 PCt 
SCR 92XS 92X3 92S2 +027 

Dec VZJX 7TA5 *150 +CLZ7 

Est. volume: 112X81. Open Int.; U&722. 

10- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FP30M08 - pH ef IKpct 
StP 11692 114X4 11630 +0X2 

Dec 115X6 11SX0 115X0 +0X3 

Mcr 11512 114X6 11466 +0X2 

Jon N.T. N.T. N.T. UlKh. 

Est. volume: 228,912 Open lm.; 147X59. 


Industrials 

HfoB Low Lost Settle Ofp* 
GASOIL (IPE) 

US. dolfor* per metric ftm+oto oflM tea 
Jui 15425 15250 I52J0 152J0 —ITS 

Aug 15650 155X0 155X0 15600 —275 

Sep 1SS50 157X0 1S7.00 UTXo —275 

Od 16175 1S9.7S 15975 1S975 —275 


JOB 

FOB 

Mar 

Apr 

MOV 


Htt LOW Lost Settle 07*4 

16275 161X0 161X0 -16TX0 —2X0 
14475 161X0 163X0 163/0 —3X0. 

it&zs \um moo moo -zso 

163X5 16175 16275 18275 —ITS 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 16125 —175 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 15*75 — 1.7S 

N.T. N.T. , N.T. 13650 - 173 


ESI. volume: 11X61. Open ml 93X70 


BRENT CRUDE OIL OPE) ■ 

UXv Itollw* per barrftUpIs ef 1X00 batTtli 


AW 

T7J9 

16.92 

1721 

1721 

+ OI4 

SOU 

1722 

1079 

12X0 

17X9 

+ 0X9 

oct 

17X5 

1*71 

17X0 

T7J» 

+ 006 

Ho* 

17X* 

10X7 

17X4 

1695 

+ 002 

Dk 

1488 

1«4 

ion 

1AW 

+ 0X6 

Jn 

1083 

iSS 

MX3 

loos 

+ 0X5 

Fefl 

1070 

IoX0 

uxo 

uoo 

+ 005 

MW 

16X5 

16X5. 

1065 

1675 

+ 0X5 

AW 

K.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1A70 

+065 


Eft votume; 28X16. DpenlnL U9JCA 


Stock indexes 

Kleb Low dose Cboaoe 
FTSH no (LIPFE7 
(25 per IndeK aohrt 

Sep 793* X 2900X 291 IX UncJL 

Dec VDO 2927X 39200 UK3L 

Est. votume: 15X47. open hit.: 53717. 

CAC 40 (MATIF) 

FF2M per Index pel nt 

JDR 1942X0 1920X0 192400 +13X0 

Jul 1937X0 1917X0 1919X9 +1259 

Aoe 19*1X0 iraxe roxa +13x0 

S«P 19SLD0 1933X5 T¥3fiJK + 12JD 

OK W1X0 197LSJ 1*6250 tlfcflO 

MOT 1999X0 • 1999XO- 1991X0 +13X0 

Est. votume: 4U49. OP8P ktt.: 80X96 
Sources: vat II, assoc tatea Press, 
London ton P/nandoi Futures ExOionoo. 
am Ptfrwnm Gx&tonpe. 


Dividends 


Company Per Amt 

IRREGULAR 

AARP BOI Sfk&Bd . X?S 

AARP Grw&lnco _ X3 

ath»rp«HPl4 - 23*7 

Scuoder CA TxFr > xsj 

Seuddar Inti - IX? 

STOCK 

Nevada E nerw - 5*6 

STOCK SPLIT 
GaatManc Foods 2 tor 1 split. 

INCREASED 


Bay Area Bests 
GoodMar* Foods 
KnNtil RkMer 
Standard Prod 
wash Feu Sav(WA) 


Pay Rec 


6-27 6-30 
6-27 6-38 
9-15 «-30 
6-27 4-35 
4-77 6-30 


7-0 7-15 
7-15 8-1 

7-12 7-20 
7-11 7- 25 
7-14 7-29 


INITIAL 


Bay Apartment 


AmorlFod Ftni 
Amertn Inc 
Amer Mont Inc Pori 
Amor Muni Trm Tr 
Amer Mum Trm II 
Amer Muni Trm III 

Amer OppotMjko 

Amur Sated Port 
AmStrincPort 
Am SlrlncPbrl H 
AmStrincPort III 
Americas inco Tr 
Bawlew Capitol 
Bell Attarrtlc 
Cen FedFtni 
Central Pa Flnl 
Comcast corp A 
Comcast Carp A ml 
CSB Flnl Corp 
HorscoCcrp 
Hipntondor IncFd 
Home Fed Flnl 
Lilly indt A 
Minn MipHIncPort 
MkUlMMlI 
Minn Muni Trm 
Quo Illy Foods 
Rubbermaid me 

Soul Centors Inc 

Scherlnp Piouoli 
West FodSvos PR 
WhrtonRnl 


_ 44 7-7 7-15 


a so 
a 22 
M X725 
M X542 
M XST7 
M .0475 
M XS33 
M X937 
M .1125 
M .1125 
M .1062 
M .1962 

a .is 
a m 

o JUS 
Q .11 
Q X233 

Q ™ 
_ J75 
Q OS 
M .116 
O .16 

a x7 

M X69 
M X492 
M X509 

, xs 

Q .1125 

° I 

Q .10 


7-5 7-13 
7-2B B-16 
7-B 7-27- 
7-8 7-73 
7-0 7-27 
7-8 7-27 
7-8 7-27 
7-5 7-27 
7-8 7-27 
7-8 7-77 
7-1 7-27 
7-9 7-77 
7-8 7-2* 
7-11 8-1 

7-79 9-1 1 
7-72 7-29 
9-2 9-23 
9-2 M3 
7-15 7-29 
7-15 8-15 
7-8 7-27 
7-4 7-15 
9-12 10-3 
7-8 7-27 
7-8 7-Z7 
7-4 7-27 

7- 29 8-19 

8- 12 9-1 

7-15 7-29 

84 8-30 
7-5 7-19 
630 7-15 


Mobil Win Cut Jobs at Chemical Umt 

FAIRFAX Vzrvtnia /Bloomberg) — take ; 


El W1U IMIJVUV fli — , Tuesdav 

FAX Wi^»'(B!oonib^) “p unhand " 

it would shed 2,300jobs at tB Mobil Chemi^i 
second-quarter charge of S3!5 million. -nj-g, - 

The company will take a charge of S93 mdi»n 
f Rs million io<3evaluet eriam 



scconQ-quaner ertarge oi xx i j 5Q . ;nion f or varivius 

The company wUT take a ctoge °f in i* 

restructuring activiti^Sl 85raiflion lQ ^tedv)^ 

exploration mid production division and S3 
some assets in the market departmoit. compaitv said 

In addition to the job cuts at Mobfl Chemj^-tneco 
it would lower the production capacity at »nie o 
plants in an effort lo improve earnings. 

GM Shifts Nortb American Leaders 

WARREN, Michigan (AP) - General . C S P i ^NoS 

ssaM hSS-e^ A** <***>■ 

American unit accounts for more than 60 percent of the P 
ny’s annual revenue. . , 

Mr. Smith said GM’s components operations would operate as 
a separate business unit and named J-P- Battenberg 111 
president GM also made several other organizational change . 

U.S. New-Home Sales Rose in May 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — Sales of new single- family 
homes in the United States rose 4 2 percent in May even as 
mortgage rates were tiring to a two-year high. Gom.merce Depari- 
ment figures showed Tuesday. ... 

Economists had expected the government to report a sligm 
decrease in home sales because of the higher rates. 

Separately, the Conference Board reported that its index oi 
consumer confidence had risen to- 92 in June from 88-9 in May. 
signaling that higher rates had not dampened consumer senti- 
ment. Economists bad expected the index to be flat in June. 

The d}»a show that “the underlying strength in the economy is 
still there and will r emain, " said Darwin Beck, an economist at C^S 
First Boston. •“'Hi gher rates haven't hurt the economy just yet- 


YEN; Soaring Currency Is Seen as Good Medicine for Japanese Industry 


Continued from Page 9 
ni Consulting in Tokyo. “The 
position of the West in Asia is 
diminishing with alarming 
speed.” 

Matsushita Electric Industri- 
al Co., the world's biggest mak- 
er of consumer electronics, is 
typical. It aims to boost foreign 
production from 38 percent of 
foreign sales at the end of 
March to 50 percent by March 
1997. But the Osaka-based 
company, which already manu- 
factures more than $6 billion of 


goods in 14 Asian plants and 
employs 23,000 people in Mar 
laysia alone, is likely to expand 
capacity at its current 14 plants 
in Asia rather than invest in 
new ones. 

For other Asian countries, 
the high yen is a mixed blessing, 
according to C. H. Kwan, se- 
nior economist and head of 
Asian research at the Nomura 
Research Institute. The benefits 
are Japanese investment and 
enhanced competitiveness in 
products in which they compete 


directly with Japanese compa- 
nies, such as shipbuilders in 
South Korea and computer per- 
ipherals makers in Singapore 
and Taiwan. The downside is 
higher import prices for capital 
goods from Japan and rising 
debt-service costs for some 
countries, notably Indonesia, 
that 'have yen-denominated 
debt. 

The big risk for Japan, says 
Richard Koo, senior economist 
at the Nomura Research Insti- 


tute, is that Japan may lack the 
flexible economic structure that 
allowed the United States to 
move manufacturing offshore 
in the 1970s and 1980s and off- 
set the loss with the creation of 
new industries, such as telecom- 
munications and computer 
software. If so, the strong yen 
Trill undermine .Japan's most 
competitive companies in the 
automobile and electronics in- 
dustries while protecting farm- 
ers and other inefficient work- 
ers. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


AflnKo Ftcticb ftrMo Juno 28 
Close Proa. 

Amsterdam 

2-J2 

4150 43JD 

wxe 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF 


! Hold tag 
Aegon 

Ahold 

Atao Nobel 190X0 190 

AMEV _ TOM 




Bols-Wessonon 37.20 


C5M 
D5M 
Elsevier 
FoMter 
Gist-Brocade* 
HBG 
Helneken 
Hoooovens 


45X0 6430 
17468 134J0 
IS1-HJ 15020 
14X0 1S10 
4650 46X0 
290 298 

512X0 210X0 
68J0 67X0 


Hunter Douglas 71x0 
IHC Calami 
Inter Mueller 
inn Nederland 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 

Nadllord 
Oce Grlnien 
Pc* hoed 
Philips 
Pol /gram 
Robece 
Rpdomco 
Rallnco 
Rerenta 

RO/QI Dutch 

Start 
Unilever 

VanOmmervo 
VNU 


71 

36 36.10 
77 JO 77 

75X0 74 JO 
■17.70 46 

4140 tVO 
50 50 JO 
MJO 6510 
73 72X0 
44 43.90 
5060 49.10 
71X0 72.10 
113X0 113 

57.10 57 

II8J0 116X0 
8720 06.70 
188J0 IWAO 
4430 -080 
17950 17* 

48.90 4M0 
169 JO 165 


WonwrVK luwer ifliW 1 COM 
EOE Inch 
Previous 




Brussels 

2545 2560 
7570 >590 
4435 4450 
2170 2190 
4095 4030 
23400 23075 
12300 12125 
2270 2250 
2035 2030 
184 179 

5600 5620 
7370 7320 


AG Fin 

Almanli 

Arbw 

Barca 

BBL 

Bckaert 

CBR 

awe 

CNP 
Cocker 111 
Co beoo 
Coiruyt 
Ddhalxe 
Electro bel 
Elociraftaa 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Glaverbel 
imtnobel 
K.rwietaor* 
rAovone 
Peirofl na 
Power nn 
Rectlcel 
Rovaio Beige 
Sac Gen Banoue 


1340 1348 
5550 5510 
33?5 3465 
1398 1400 
1080 4075 
8830 B960 
4595 *450 
3030 3030 
6449 6*20 
JSIO 1505 
10225 10300 
2870 2850 
480 479 

5070 5030 
1130 B0>0 


Soc Gen Beiglave .2145 .2135 
HIM 
Sotvav 
T Ksenaerlo 
Traci eoe* 

UCB 

Union Mlnlere 
Wagons Llts 


74300 14300 
14200 1 4125 
9740 97?0 
9760 9700 
23750 23700 
2650 2650 
6000 6800 
, „. Stack Index : 7324X9 
■View : 731663 


CtospPrpy. 


Siemens 
Th/SSMl 
Varla 

Vlag 

Volkswagen 
weita 

PAXtade*: 
P ie vl oas ; J57J1 


653&48J0 
292 291 JO 
315 31? 
499X0 493 

359 JO 361 
453X0 450 

475467X0 
930 920 

8X6 


Helsinki 


Amer-YhTy nia 

Enso-Gutzeit 

Huhtamaki 

K.O.P. 

Kvmmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pohlokj 

Repole 

Stockmann 


125 124 

39X0 39.10 
168 1*7 

1070 10X0 
111 110 
163 140 

434 42E 

61 S* 
92 8? JO 
210 215 


HEX Indee : 1S75J7 
previous . 1664J7 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 
Cathay Pacific 
Cneung Kang 
onna Light Pvrr 
Dairy Farm IntT 

Hang Lung Dev 

Hang Seng Baik 

Honderson Land 

HK Air Eng. 

HK China Gas 
HK Electric 

HK Land 
HK Realty Trust 
HSBC Holdings 
HK Snang HUS 
HK Telecomm 
HK Ferrv 
HuUhWhomaoa 
Hrson Dev 
jordtae Math. 

J offline Sir Hid 

Kowloon Malar 
Mon dorln Ortenl 
Miramar How) 

New World Dev 
5HK Props 
51e*ux 

Swire PoCA 
Tcrt Cheung Pm 
TVE 

wnorf Hold 
Wing On Co InU 
Wlnsor Ind. 




34 14 

10X0 18.90 
34X5 33.75 
3? JO 3*50 
10J0 10.40 
1150 12 

4950 50 

1550 3550 
4050 41 

14.70 14X0 
2350 23JO 
19X0 1950 
21 JO 71 JO 
83 8250 
1IU 1160 
14.90 14X0 
13 12X0 
31 75 31 

205C 20X0 
59 sajB 
2*40 29 40 
14J0 74 JO 
10X0 10J0 
21X0 21.90 
21.40 2150 
44XS 44.75 
J JX5 
56 5458 
11X0 1150 
3X8 345 

a.io 27xo 
10X0 11.10 
J1J0 11.10 
867149 


Ofi i cut 
Prevlou 


Frankfurt 

177X0 176 

370 380 

2296 2772 
615 611 
1040 1023 
30350297X0 
345X0 14? 

408 402 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
Allianz Hold 
Altana 
Asko 
BASF 
Buyer 
Bav. Hypo bank 


Bay'verekKbk 43*50 433 

BBC 4M 

BHF Bank 3*0 3*4 

BMW 78* 747 

Cornmerroank 3155030250 
Continental 344J0 06 

Odlmler Benz 72250 714 

snss** m 3 

Deutsche Bonk *77X0 tAt 

Douglas _ 4K„« 

Dtesdner Bonk 
FekJiri treble M 

F Krupp HOOSOh MB TO4 
Hoiwner 331 g? 

H«lkel 5K50 571 


Hochtief 
Heectni 
Hofzmann 
Horton 
IWKA 
Kali Salz 
Kurstodl 
Kaufhal 
KHD 


1013 1C20 
327X0319 50 
092 895 

7CS 310 
37? JW 
73450 W 
580 5*4 

494 473 

145J0 14550 


KHQ iwvmvnM 

Kloeckner werke 149X0 l<UD 


Linde 
Lvtttwnsa 
MAN 

Mg (Wiesmann 

Metairacseli 

Muench Rueck 

Porsche 

Preussag 

PWA 

RWE 

flhelnmetaM 

Senering 


8*7 880 

163177 JO 
288 387 
396.90 393 

19850 201 
28?S 29CT 
780 775 

43743450 
279231X0 
41450 «0 
306 2*3 
9*950 9« 


Johannesburg 

2455 25 

<» ID 
731 230 

33.75 33 JO 
9 NA. 
4153 HA. 
111109X5 
63 6X75 
riJS II 
114 11* 

25 24.75 
27 2750 
5150 SZX 
32X5 19 «< 
4250 4150 
93 93X5 
89 84 

45 45 

34X3 23.75 
1*3 197 

548456 


AECI 
AJloen 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blwoar 
Bull B Is 
De Brers 

Drlefonieln 

Gerw 

GF5A 

Harmony 

High veld sr«( 

Kloof 

NeODank Grp 
Pandtantoln 
Ruvsfaf 
SA Brews 
Si Helm 
Sosal 

Western Deep 


VtS&Z'iSSti 


London 


• DM* Non 
Allied Lmns 
Aria Wiggins 
Argyll Grouo 
ass Bril Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bank Scaitano 

Barclays 

Bass 

SAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
HOC Group 
Beets 
Bowalrr 
pp 

Bril Airways 
Brit Gas 
Brit Sire* 

Bril Telecom 
BTR 

Coble wire 

Cadbury S«h 
C or od en 
Coots Vlvslta 
Comm Union 
Ccurrauids 
ECC Group 
Enterprise OH 
Eurotunnel 
F Isons 


3.9S 

5X9 

25< 

2J4 

5X1 

U4 

4X0 

l.»6 

ss 

4.74 

4.07 

1 . 1 ? 

za 

6X3 

a 

394 

IM 

2X7 

IJ* 

3.73 

354 

4X7 

AH 

2.90 

2.18 

503 

4X5 

3JS 

4.09 

2X8 

158 


197 
553 
14> 
2J1 
5 
193 
452 
1.92 
L23 
491 
1X8 
1.12 
VO 
6.91 
&21 
442 
3.96 
371 
255 
1J2 
172 
157 
4X8 
AI6 
1*5 
21* 
510 
473 
133 
4 H 
177 
1J7 



Close Prwv. 

Forte 

225 

226 

GEC 

2X4 

7X3 

Genl Ace 

5X0 

550 

Glaxo 

5X2 

5X1 

Gram] Mai 

193 

179 

SSU. 

122 

1.72 

4J8 

*41 

GUS 

520 

5X0 


2X4 

2J 1 

Hinsdown 

154 

6.96 

152 

6X8 

ICI 

7X5 

7X4 


4J8 

*35 

Klngflstier 

475 

*80 

Lod broke 

1X7 

156 

Lend Sec 

60? 

5.95 

Lasane 

7X7 


Lastno 

1J9 

1.40 

Legal Ge/t Gw 

A1J 

420 


524 



3.94 

194 

MEPq 

4.11 

*BS 

Nall pcrwW 

424 

4.1* 

NOtWesI 

4.4? 

*48 

NttiWst waier 

455 


Pearson 

e 

6X1 

P&0 

622 


Pllktagron 

1X4 


PowerGen 

4.77 

4X1 

Prwletillol 

2X7 

293 

Rank Ora 

372 

SMI 


5X1 

5J5 

Podlond 

490 

*90 

Reed Inti 

7X8 

/J/ 

Reuters 

4X0 


RMCGrouo 

008 

&■/ 

Rolls Ravce 

170 


Ratamn (mill) 

3X1 

145 


4.18 

*13 

RTZ 

117 

826 

Salnsburv 

197 

196 

Scot Newcas 

5.16 

5.16 

Scot Power 

143 

141 


1.16 



4X0 

*43 

Snell 

6.76 

*28 

Slebe 

527 

S2» 

Smith Nephew 

1X1 


SmlltiKllne B 

199 

194 

Smitn iwm) 

456 

458 

Sun Alliance 

2XS 

2X9 

Tote a Lvle 

4X4 



226 


Thorn E/A! 

1023 

10 JO 

Tomkins 

216 

217 


2X3 


Unilever 

9X2 

9X3 


113 


vodotanc 

450 

470 

war Loan 3% 

4TX9 



6.10 



*96 

5 

'.Til Hams Hogs 

135 

JJ» 

VYllllj Cor roan 

1.45 

1x9 

F.T. 30 Index :_ZB? 30 



r n- rn/ V, 

Dominion Text A 
Donohue A 
MocMIllon Bl 
Nail Bk Canada 
Power Com. 
OuebecTel 

Oucbecnr A 
Quebecer B 
Teleglobe 
Unlva 
VhJectran 
industrials index 
Prevtaos : I74IJ9 


Close Frev. 

71A 7'i 

6"A 6W 
iik. use 
17% 17% 
8 % 8 % 
16*8 l«*i 
19% W% 
16% 16 Vi 
10% 16^ 
18’A 18Vj 
5V. 6 

12% 12% 
1724.12 


Paris 


630 *22 

74* 748 

599 591 

232 228X0 
51* 512 

IIH 1174 
74OJ0 23850 
605 S95 

797 7*4 

1830 1792 
219X0 2I9J0 
102101X0 
US0 1281 
300 290 

387.90 J90 

387 38750 
851 846 

12X5 1L4S 
2242 2214 
442 43850 
535 511 

Lafarge Capoee 3*0 3*6.70 
Leorand 5860 5850 

Lvon. Eau« 520 515 

Oredl IL1 1100 1106 

L.VALH. 862 X47 

Mai ro-H ached e 107X0 ICO 
Michel In B 123 116 

Moulinex 122 127 JO 

Paribas 3S4J0 m*jc 

Pechtaev Inti 152.10 152 

Pernod- Rlcor a 348X0 381.90 
Peugen* 787 778 

Pinoutt Print 841 8*3 

Radlorectailaue 439 *60 

RtvPoufenc A 119.70 11*70 


Accor 
Air LlauWe 
Alcatel Alsthom 
A»0 

Bancalre ICtal 

SIC 

BNP 

Bouvgues 

BSN-GD 

Correfour 

CCF. 

Cerus 

Chargeurs 

Clments Franc 
Otto Med 
Elf-Aaulfalne 
EH-SonofI 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eou* 
Havas 


Raff. Si. LOuiS 

Sdnr Gabain 

s.E.a 

StaGenerole 

Suez 

ThomsorvCSF 

Total 

UAP. 

valeo 


1670 1665 
641 636 

492 499 

564 561 

272.90 26650 
162X0 1 6550 
312J0 309.10 

146X0 747.70 

24950 743 


| CAC 48 lade* : 192176 
Previous : 1911X0 


Madrid 


BBV 

299C 

2?S5 

Bco Centro! Hho. 

25*0 

2*95 

Barca Santander 

46*0 

45*5 

Banesro 

975 

965 

CEPSA 

2965 

2»2S 

DragcCoS 

7150 

7050 

Erxhjsa 

5830 

5*40 

E rcros 

332 

737 

Ibat-urn’o 

OSJ 

937 

Reosal 

3870 

3855 

Taoacaiera 

3465 

3455 

Tetetonlca 

17*5 

1730 

5 E. General index : 30158 
Previous : 296X3 


Milan 

Banco Comm 4725 *7a0 
BovoqI 16115650 

Benetton grgw 25400 25050 


ClTO 

CIR 

Cr*a ltal 
Emcnem 
Fen in 
Fen In Rise 
riot SPA 
Finmeccanica 

CftwroM 

IFI 

Hal c em 
I taiga s 
llarmobiiiar* 

Modlobanco 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RA$ 

Rltmante 
Salpem 


112* 1133 
2541 ZSI0 
2100 2090 

7900 2950 

202S 19*5 
1270 1768 
6*25 6345 
2000 1980 
4|I60*0«CO 

25300 24450 

12430 12**0 
53*5 5260 
*3880 49480 

14905 15000 

1503 1478 

7W> 7 OS, 

*W 4870 
25K70 254SC 

10020 10050 

J970 4OC0 


San Paolo Torino ion* lOCfo 

SIP 4110 4010 

5ME 4015 4CC0 

Sr la 2615 2395 

Standa 77253 ’4750 

SMI M8C 5051 

Toro Ass l Rise 275C0 27450 

MIB Index :1)31 
Preview : im 


Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum 31 '» 31 'v 

Bank Montreal 23o 23 

Bell Canada it*. 45 s 

Bombardier B 18"i l?'3 

CcmBtor 174. 17% 


Sao Paulo 

Banco da BriHli J?X1 4350 


Sanesao 


Brahma 
Cemig 
Efetrobros 

1 Wu banco 

Ugfil 

Portjnatxmema 
Pelrabros 
Souza Cru: 
Tolebrcn 
Teies» 
Usiminas 
vcle Pm Dace 
varla 
Bavesi 
Prevwos : 


T4J* 22 
1SJ3 14X? 
570X1 560 

116 107 

570*65X2 
47S47&9? 
56S 491 

J3UP J7 
253 224 

14000 12786 
102X0 69J0 
34Q 722 

178 141 
275261.97 
243 249 


Singapore 

Cere bos 

cilYDev. 

DBS 

Froser N trove 
Gen ting 
Golden Hone PI 
Haw Par 
Hume i nous tries 
Inchcoae 


_ el 
KL Krpgng 
Lum cnerrg 
Mala ran Bankg 
OCBC foreign 

OU3 

DUE 

SerrAHwang 
Shcngrlla 
SlmeDwDv 
lia foreign 
S^tanrLcnd 
S-nore Press 
Sing Steornsnlp 
5'Dor » Tcteeomm 
Siratis Tracing 

UOH foreign 
UOL 

Siralis Times <nO. 
Previous : 220BJ( 


Atlas Caeca 
Etoctrolin B 
Ericsson 
Esseita-A 
HarxJetsbcnken 
(nvesforB 
Norsk Hydro 
Procardia AF 
Sondvtk B 
SCA-A 
S-E Banken 
SkondlaF 

SKcnSKa 

SKF 

5lora 

TrelleborgBF 

Volvo 

ssssrssy 


Cissa Prev. 

83 81 

355 355 
386 398 
106 102 
100 9750 
1*2 Ml 
21921*50 
117 116 

104 101 

1C4 106 
47 4*C3 
109 104 

ISO 146 
136 135 

375 366 

*850 9450 
6*5 664 

1760X2 


Sydney 












Y. V^i 





rl* 


If i-n 










f . 1 - - 




! 1 J. 

w+ • 


* 

| JT-J »T7TrWs*j 














\ . _Jtv.4'Si 



AU orOflartaj pdex 1974X8 
PlOTlMt : 19S7X# 


Tokyo 

Altai Elecir , 51 S« 

Asm CJwrmcnl 731 728 

Aset* Glass 1210 12» 

Bank at Tgkva 1600 1550 

Brssoostate T6= 1500 

Canon 1730 1713 

Casio 1360 1323 

Dal N laden Prim 1920 i BW 

Dolwc Heine 153 1520 

Dcrwa Securilies 1760 17»0 

Fanue 


7X0 7X0 
6X9 6-*0 
11 10.70 
1&5Q 1750 

11x0 17JB 

244 240 
3X2 3X2 
5J0 HO 
SJS 550 
10X0 10 JO 
354 153 
150 1X4 1 
SJS 8J0 [ 

12.99 1260 ) 
5*0 5X51 
855 8X5: 
1120 11 
5.15 5.15 
1X0 1X0 
I13D 12 
7.55 7-0 
15X0 1510 
342 3.76 

142 3J8 

356 353 
12X0 11.90 
217 213 
: 2227 JO 


Stockholm 


AGA 

Asm a 
1 Astra a 


M *2 
5?1 JM 
'51 ISO 


Full BenK 
Full P ha » 

Fujitsu 
Hitagn) 

Hitachi Cable 

Honda 

iw vokads 
rioertu 

jgoan Airlines 
Kallmo _ 

Kanvn Power 
Kawcsczl Sleet 
PUrln Brewery 

r.omclsu 
r.utxxa 
Kyocera 
Mcrsu Elec inds 
Matsu EMC Witt 
Mitsubishi Bk 
MMsubisbl Kasai 

MiTSUtXPD Etas 

MHsuOlsMHcr 

Mitsubishi Corp 
Mitsui and Co 
MHtukoshl 
Mitsumi 
NEC _ 

NGK mnxotars 

NOitoSeewittas 

Nicson Kogoku 

NkwiOJl 
Ntaecn Steal 
Nlaoan Tusen 
Nissan 

Nomura See 

N77 u. , , m, 

OlymcusOPtieoi 1190 1173 
Pioneer 27*0 2700 

mash 
Sanyo Elec 
Share 
SntekKU 

SiunersaOiem 

Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Wem 
Sum) Marine 
Sumltatno Metal 
Todd Cera 
Tales Marin e 

TaktdoChem 

TOK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 

Tokyo Elec Pet 
Taopgn Prlr.'tsg 
Torav l ml 
T cihlca 
■ evata 

V 0WMKJU50C 
a: r ISO. 

UUmi J75 ■- TOUT 


4699 4629 
TUX 2270 
2SD 217D 
H00 W60 
103) TO3D 
935 *30 

1823 1340 
5330 5230 
725 717 

772 92* 

993 Wl 
2630 1600 
410 3*3 

nes ii6s 

965 9S2 

735 716 

9260 70*0 
17* 17*0 
1179 1160 
247C 2650 
515 508 

668 M0 
795 787 
1220 1223 
K2 807 
1C70 TOQO 
mo 1900 
1210 1200 
1060 10*0 
1350 13S9 
loeC 1040 
134 104 

3S3 351 

634 636 

866 SSB 
sao 24io 
844% 3375a 


953 950 

S« 550 
1S30 1B0 
75S 759 

7133 T>53 
6099 59* 
2195 2120 
507 515 

972 HO 
297 m 
690 685 
828 » 
1169 1200 
425 fiS 
545 553 
1260 ISO 
3179 31M 
1500 M95 
748 725 

2375 227S 
-212 VSO 
940 934 


Close Prev. 


Toronto 


AtHiM Price 

16% 

16V» 

Aonlco Eagle 

16% 

16% 

Air Canada 

6% 

6W 

ABjerto Energy 

1W4 

19% 

Am Barrtck Res 

33% 

J3% 

BCE 

44% 

45% 

Bk Nova Scotia 

24% 

24% 

BC Gas 

IP* 

1331 

BC Telecom 

22 

1.1 

Bramalea 

023 

Ptl 

Brunswick 

9% 

9V. 

CAE 

6% 

6% 

Ccrodev 

*90 

4.90 

CIBC 

29»* 

29V» 

Canadian Pqcfflc 

rov? 

20 

Con Tire A 

10Yl 

10% 

Cantor 

17V: 

17% 

Cora 

IBS 

3X0 

CCL indB 

9 

8% 

Dneata* 

*w 

5 

Commco 

20% 

21V. 


J4V» 

10 

24% 

9% 

Dotasco 

10% 

10% 

Dytei A 

179 

076 

Echo Bay Mines 

14V: 

14% 

Eauitv Stiver A 

0« 

0.78 

FCA Inti 

P6 

3% 

Fed ind A 

6% 

6% 

Fletcher Che II A 

16% 

17 

FPI 

5 

5 

Centro _ 

0.46 

0.*5 

Dull Cda ftw 

4X0 

425 

Hoes Inti 

13 

13 

I" Till 

12 

12 

1 1 . 1 _ i 

I4U 

141* 

1 1_' . 1 

19% 

If* 

1 fy~ •- • 1 

36 % 

26% 

imasca 

33 

32% 

Inca 

33'- 

34% 

IPL Energy 


2Ti 

JsnnocA 

IS 

IS 

LOtcrt _ 

21% 

30% 

LoblawCo 

20 

19% 


7% 

7% 


..f 5 

55 

i .'• l ~ ' 

"5 

11% 


ZJ 

1 1 . 

9% 

1% 

Motion A 

20 

20% 

Noma Ind A 

5% 

5% 

Noranda Inc 

23% 

23% 

Noranda Fares) 

11% 

1B% 

Nbrcen Energy 

14 

13% 

.Win Telecom 

38% 

3Pl 

Nova Corp 

10% 

10% 

DthBWO 

19 

19% 

PogurksA 

180 

3% 

Placer Dome 

Wfi 

30 


9% 

9% 


0X5 

0*3 

Rarrack 

17% 

17 

Renaissance 

27% 

2S 

Racers B 

19% 

10% 

Rothmans 

71% 

71'.* 

Rovel Bank Cot 

76% 

»% 

Sceptre Re 

12% 

13% 

Scarfs Hasp 

TV, 

7% 

Seagram 

41% 

41% 

S«rxCcn 

6% 

6% 

» i wmi 

41 

40% 


11% 

11% 


fft* 

3% 

Soutaom 

17% 

1 TA 

Soar Aerospace 

14% 

14% 

States A 

7% 

7% 

TWttmon Energ 

26% 

26% 

Tec*. B 

2Z% 

22% 

Thomson 

14% 

15% 

Toronto ftxivi 

t?ta 


Torjtar B 

a% 

L-J 

Tramoltc ulll 

a% 

152 1 

TrcnsCdaPlee 

16% 

16% 

Triton FWA 

3% 

14% 

US 

Trlmac 

14% 

Trizec A 

023 

0J3 

UrUcorp Energy 

I2S 

1X8 




U.S. FUTURES 


Via A u odtXad Piua 


lin 28 


Zurich 

A dia ltal 8 221 213 

Ahjsulsse B new 6g &C 

BBCBrwnBovB 1170 1170 
CJba Geray B 
CSttaWrnasB 
ElektrowB 
Ftsc Her B 
IntartDscAunt B 
jelmcll B 
Lanai 5 Gyr P 
M u e uW PlCfc B 
Nestle R 
Oerilk.BueM-leR 
Porgesa HkJ B 
Roene Hdg PC 
Sctra RwjOic 
S o ndc Z B 
Schindler B 
Sober PC 
Survelllattee B 
Swfss Bate Cara >8 
Swiss Pelnsur R 

Swissair R 

UBS S 
WlfltartfkjrB 

Zurich Ass B 


980 770 

547 530 

343 B4 
1265 1260 
215) 209D 
K2S E27 
SOQ 770 
421 416 

11a 1182 

IM 125 
ISn 1600 

6370 62 «S 

110 '23 
712 72S 
7520 7500 
U* 363 
1935 1925 
394 381 

575 HO 
770 775 
1174 1145 
70S 70S 

133 1300 


See our 

Arts cmd Antique 

every Salurioy 


Season Scosot 

Wgti Law Oaen 

High 

LOW 

Close 

a« 

OAinf 


Grains 




WHEAT CCBOTl s.ooofv nv+v»- c 





2.96 JW94 3 15 

123 

115 

1!9'A +004 

9.137 



131 



-604% 14,149 

3x5 

109 Dec 94 136 

1*3V» 

136 

3X0 

*604 

23X85 

144% 

12/ MafS 140% 

3X6% 

1« 

3X4% 

*007 

4216 

156% 

116V, May 95 134% 

131 

134% 

3J6 

*004 

87 

147% 

111 Jul 95 134 

127 

134 

124 

*003 

391 








Esi. sales 21X00 Man's. sales it. 70 




Man s ooenim SJxfft on $31 





WHEAT (KBOTl 5a00bum<omunv doWvsPwtsahel 



155 

2.97 JlAfi 127 

134 

127 

131 


6223 

155% 

1029, jep94 126 

135 

126 

JJI<A *007 

11382 

160 

1I2<1D«:94 134 

142", 

124 

3J0Y* 

*004% 

9505 

159% 

12S Mor»S 139 

143 

136% 

140% 


2J8S 

1J6M 

321% 7*™ 95 133% 

133% 

3J3% 

133% 

*008% 

23 

133% 

118% Jul 95 129 

129 

120 

120 

*001% 

149 

Est. soles NA Man's, sales 

7.734 





Man's Open ft 29.172 uo llte 





CORN 

1CBOT) sacoaumlnm 

un-oAnnrtunai 



1165, 

2X1 JWW 252 

259% 

151% 

258 

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140 S<to94 2X5% 

255 

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277 

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249% 

1C 


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157 

250'/, 


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2X8V,Moy 95 256% 


156 

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150 Jul 95 258“. 

2X4 

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2X4 

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JX74 



254 

£5) 


*008 

148 

1*3 

135% Dec 95 2X4% 

2X6% 

2X0% 

2X4’i 

*007% 

4289 










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750 

■ ( 'UP'f 

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647 

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663 

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470 

653 

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657 

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670 

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2J18 

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624 

616 

423 

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1206 

evt JOXOO MOT'J. sates 5*967 




Mon'soprmim Iii^l7 an 







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195.70 

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Est SONS 30500 Mon v solos 25X93 




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r r ■ 

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4673 

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6915 

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66X0 JUO 95 47 10 

67.60 

6640 



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7123 Mar « 



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-005 

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'l l 





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4120 

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PQRKKLLCS (C7*£R> Usb.mwe 



59.31 

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— 100 

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4450 

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mtmm 


HWl 

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Httl 

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CKOB 

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12X0 

6370(5 94 1152 

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1109 

♦ 0.12 66002 

12.10 

9.17«tor95 11X0 

1L4J 

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1206 

1057 May 95 11J8 
1057 JW 95 H JO 

11X0 

1127 

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4267 

1202 

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7,939 

1100 

lUXTOctTS 



1724 


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1100 

lOJBMcr 76 11J0 

T1J0 

1120 

1124 

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E3, sates 24X62 MotaS-Sotaa 52.178 




Mon's open Int 10*280 off 

9589 





COCOA (NC5ci l&rmticfnnMptrkjn 




vu* 

997 Jul 94 7240 

1272 

1241 

7248 


305 

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1020 Sea !V 1275 

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1248 

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1330 

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15*0 

1D77MOT9S 1354 

1348 

054 

1340 

+ 10 

7X39 

1570 

1078 May 95 1380 

1307 

1380 

084 

♦ ID 

1988 

1591 

7225 Jul 95 1405 

UO* 

1405 

1406 

*19 

2297 

nso 

1265 Sep 95 



1426 

+10 

1,748 

1570 

7790 Dec 95 



1459 

*70 

60S 

1542 

1350 Mar 94 



1*0 

♦ HI 

582 

1 Est.sdes I6A Man*6scte 

0023 




1 Mon%ooenM 47,184 off 1120 
ORANGE JUICE (NCT70 UXIta- 

certs pe 

■O- 



1350 a 

8SJ0JMM 8650 

8920 

87 JO 

8920 

+ 125 

3X74 

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71.70 Mw 9* 9640 

9690 

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9690 

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99X5 

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970OMOT 95 70225 

10300 

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♦ UD 


11900 

10500 Jul 75 10450 

M5J» 

10650 


*125 


11150 

10500 Sep 9S 



107.SJ 

+ 1X5 






1B7J0 

*175 


1 CSL sates HA. Mon%.Sate 

3X02 





1 MOT'S open HI 24,749 Off 240 






Metals 




Mi GRADS COPPER (HOAX) ani>..»ni».6 



11170 

74 FO JOT 94 10700 




-i» 


11635 

7620 Jul 94 107 JB 



LO 


7K7S 

76985*0 « KUO 

10870 

l.(.l 

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112.90 

75J5 Dec 94 I SLOT 

10720 

105J0 

10675 

en 

17 _ ■ 1 

HUB 

7690 JOT 95 



10SX5 

—625 

329 

111 J0 

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— 620 

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7XB0M«r9S 10540 

10650 

705X0 

10675 

—620 

PijI 

109.9 

768SMoy93 10650 

MSJO 

10 s n 

10635 

-600 

796 

108X0 

7800 Jul 95 10500 

10600 

10500 

1075 

-300 

730 

71300 

7120 Agg 95 I07XB 

lu 

LZJ 

C 4 J 

—650 

701 

MBA) 


II'-TlI 

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71210 




70645 

—645 

295 








10550 


lam 

103JD 

IQ? W 

-040 

719 

9205 

8850 Junta 





a 

99J0 

4670 Mar 94 




—3X0 


710X0 

97. 10 Aer 94 



10650 

— 4J0 






MOT-soaenM 58023 OB 2SB3 





SILVER (NCMX) SJB0to7.o: 





5460 

5165 Jun W 5760 

S260 

5860 


*50 


5865 

3710 JU 94 5265 


5240 

S29J 


55B0 

5430 Aug 94 






5*65 

3f65Sao« JTLfl 

SBX 

5290 










5440 

4070 JOT 95 





4040 

<165 Mcr 95 5490 

5S7.S 

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*67 




SSLS 

55*0 

S566 

*67 

3245 

6KU) 

4JO0J1X95 5640 

5460 

5440. 

54BL5 


7X68 








4280 

5370CVC9S 5710 






C50 

950 Jot 96 






4180 











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■ | • \ L ™ 



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CSj 

339>teJOTM JS5JJ 

30700 

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545 

38400 

38*XO Jut W 




41500 

341X0 Aug 44 387X0 

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387.70 





f i ] frJ’B 

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4265B 


t'vl 

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41 UX) 

36150 Feb K 39800 


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41700 


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6X94 

42BJB 

341 20 JOT *5 40650 

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41250 

JSSJOAgpIS 40830 

*0820 

40620 




41230 

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412X0 

416X0 

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* 1 JD 

1052 








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*700 

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m ,if I -.ni. 

999 






Food 

COPPEEC ihC 3E> raffw-iwiwc 
laua 6490JUIM 145. KJ 171X8 I44JO 

i’OOC 166*0 I7Z.75 166 M 

l«IS “1806C N UIJO MV J0 141JB 

U660 71901*9-95 

136 S3 SJ3Mnv95 
130X0 S5 j09JuI 95 
12L00 39G0Svp»5 

EU SOVri 14.779 Mp'im* 1*543 
Mp+*flPOtrf 5X713 6H 
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSS TlUOCta-tMtowto 
IU3 9.ISA)tW HAS I1J1 »JS 1 1 XI *0X4 7.1J7 


17DJ0 

17Z9J 

14150 

141.10- 

14250 

142X8 

142X0 


*1055 6" 

*11X5 2AM4 

•6X8 12^4 
*600 7X38 
.0X8 I.U8 
.60 280 
-603 57 


Financial 

US T. BILLS (CMBO umi%.wyiaM 

96X8 94X3SW.94 9SX0 «35 95.19 9619 -007 33X03 

94.16 9623D6CM 94X1 94X6 94X1 9643 — OX* Ixe 

95JSJ 93J8MB-9S WJ4 MJ4 «JI 9453 — OD3 ($5 

EsL volts HA. Mam. sates 4X21 

MortotaiW _3M42 att nt 

SYR. TREASURY (OOD tltiMim-MSRayWn 

110- 195103-17 5*09410440 1S4-0U IED-715 103-356- 135 Ifljn 

lOfcll 101-36 Dec 94 107-316- 135 398 

EM.60HA 4L200 MOT-LICKS 41X54 

ASoriioowi nl IMJB3 uo 1234 
»YH.TREASURr Kaon 

115- 01 Hl-lt Swi94lB*-06 W4-10 I OS- 14 m.19— 29 JSOJOS 

Ita-21 180-35 Dec 94103-06 703-07 MS-19 1B2-31 - 23 3X11 

111- ® too-as Marts 101-26— 33 45 

105-22 99-70 AAltS 101X12.— 23 1 

10l*B6 TflD-2*. 5e*>75 - 108-14- 33 ■ ■ ■ : T 

CJf.BSkX 90X00 UnVaito 83.156 

Mon'S eccunt 236,965 ott *K 

US TREASURY BONDS tCSOT) n*a-w«Me-cin6ZP<awtinB0> 
118-26 (0-17 Sw«HD-aa RMS rar-X QMt. IT 3 64X4 7 

1IM8 91*19 OecMMZ-ta W-14 101-07 101-16— 31 44X79 

116- 30 89-14 Mar 95701-14 101-16 188-70 100-27— X ififl 

115-n 91-11 Jun« IDO-14 1 00-15 WM0 H7L07 — 30 1X33 

113-13 99-80 StP 95 99-79 — 38 186 

HJ-14 98-27 Dec 95 9HB - X 38 

UMi 98-23 Marti 98-21 - X 40 

tt-17 98-V4 J/196 _ 96-09 - 3 13 

Ea.S««S 47CJB8 Man'LSdes 465X06 

hWioawW 416X73 git 3347 
MWOOPALMWOS icscrn sim.ma*wHAS3NnwtB6Mt 
95-17 **-U SeoN TO-01 99-13 89-OJ 89-68 —I Bfl 26,171 
9W7 66-10 18-15 -t06 ^ U 

E^fOec 5400 Men's. nits 10554 
McrtcpenW ' tfclB __up 1366 

EURODOLLARS fCMBO UrMirimHi 
9S57TT 90J6856CW «06t N.790 91X90 MJW —7045X436 

nw 9ll7WO*e« fun MOT 86X08 Qua? — injitnjA 

91580 . 9IL240 LtarfJ 91X10 fXMO 71700 njTB 302,731 

86230 fSJHJlinM 91498 93530. 73.413 9X4» 


Season Soman 

Wgh Law 


anen Hah Law dose Chg Oo.lrtf 


9*520 91 Jig Soc 93 91370 9X2W 93-170 912t0 —90701.944 

94580 91.180 Dec 95 93X40 93X50 92920 93X50 —100140.705 

*4220 (0750 Mar « 92X80 93X00 918*9 92X10 — *0133X38 

93180 . 93780 Jun 96 92X80 92X10 93X00 92XM -90100X85 

ESI. sues ha. Mart, sdes xaon 

Morrjapen int 3JHA0 up- 21878 
BRITI3H POUND (0400 KWoouno- ImanunuoMI 
1J5M 1X4*] Sep 94 15444 IJ532 

15544 1X500 Dvc *4 15423 15530 

1J«0 ■ 1X640 Mar 96 
BA sales NA. Mon's, torn 11X79 
Mon'S open Int 37,906 off 1232 . 



♦84 37X77 

IJ4ta 

*90 

3*2 

1J490 

+92 

17 

uenuftawnwi 


0.77 83 

* 1 34X77 

07138 

• 1 

9X80 

ojom 

♦ 1 

«7 

07054 

+1 

149 

070)0 

♦ 1 



07740 07066SBP94 07180 0J190 i 

07570 0JO38 Dec 94 .A7M9 ATM? i 
87605 OJBJOMortS 
07502 OXTOJuntS 
07160 8065 Sap 9S 

Est. 50(81 NA A6on*A soles 1965 
AMR'S open lie 40J32 UD 406 
CBU4AN MARK (CMOtl Twmt.) Mte«u*hMUOSI 
0X357 05600 Sec 9* 0X31? 0X341 0X280 0X329 *30 83X63 

06353 0J590 Dec 9* 06296 06345 062» 0X335 *J1 2J27 

OJOn 05(80 Jun 95 0X315 0X315 06315 0X3S1 *22 13 

SOpfS - 0X376 *34 [ 

0X355 DSIlOMort* 0X348 -5l HO 

Est. soles NA Mm's, soles 37X56 
Man's enn inf 86X14 up 510 

JAPANESE YW* ICMER) SMrym- 1 PSbnwMdsKioaoMl 
0X181 l30X08H2SepM 0X100)90X10117*1X099800X10065 * 49 DAI 

OXIOI69U»95BDec94 0XIOOS9Un«l4SaX10065D.01G140 *« 3,153 
MK095LBW776Jun9S • 0X10315 *4T IM 

4Un0235DX096BWI<rH8X)D16ni01071flU)H)1MOXHB23 *49 643 

Est sales na Mon's, sows i9X20 

Men's ooen Ir6 66X06 OH 1115 

511 lU FRANC ICM CII ) l » y>one . ii»Wi N ia i e(W 

07599 0X600 S«o *4 07540 07561 07488 07543 ** 48X01 

07603 0X8WDec94 07515 07573 07304 07560 *6 867 

07605 07590 Am 95 07616 *1 5 

07577 07435 Mor 96 07586 *7 12 

Efl.SoKB NA. Man's, seses 11X77 

Man’s open M 49X8S off 1161 


Industrials 


7220 

7030 

71 JO 



7200 

7305 

7100 

7224 

73X5 

7200 

7224 

7640 

2321 

7653 

7630 

7407 

7425 

- 75.90 

769» 

7493 

7155 

72JD 

72X0 

•7125 

7775 

7775 


84X5 5BJDJUIM 

7LS0 77X0 Aug 94 

76X0 5951 OdN 

7755 59.40 Dec 94 

7615 62J0Mar95 

7ILS5 64X0 May 95 

72X0 71X5 Dec 95 

Est totes NA Atan'k.w IM u 
Man's open W otjko off 146 
tSATMOML OWBU ABBtri-crapyi 

57J30 

*40 
57.17 
5750 
5830 
59X0 
025 
5075 
57J0 
51*5 
51X0 
5150 


41 70*4 94 49 JO MbN *9.00 

•SftMj* £■& 

43X0 See 94 5050 51.15 SDX5 

44OTOdM SI *5 52.10 SJX0 

46X0NOV94 S2JS 52.90 . 52.10 
46X0 D*c 94 53.10 , 53XS SUB 
43J5Jont5 5400 54X0 5i*5 

».«Fee95 SX60 54.00 5333 

47X0Mct-95 52X0 52X0 SUO 

47.»Moy95 5070 50X5 50.70 

4679 Am 95 5055 5£L55 5 0J5 

- — 42X5 Jul 95 5040 50X0 5060 

Es. soles 29X70- Mon's, sates 78X91 

Mon's op en mt 132*52 off 250 
UWfTSW^CRUDe OB6SJJ ljODObOL- 
“78 1AMAU094 1694 19J0 1BX7 

1*50 Sep 94 1651 ]a*0- 18J8 

14.65 Oct 94 1130 1650 ILU 

14X2NOV94 1619 1636 .1600 

uraoecM 1610 1628 1750 

14 IP 17X0 
]£*FW9S 17X3 17X3 17X4 
^gWorW 17X5 18X0 1778 

JffSAprJS WJ8 17.96 17X4 

IffiMoytS 17X2 TtM 17J4 
UnJupW 17X2 17X8 1776 

17J * I7 ' BT 
lAMAugfS. • 

TfMLmTS. 17X9 nx* ;.17Xe 
■ nuB . nJU 
MS5S-“ “ ,7J0 

17.I5MOT96 
=3-. 17J2Jun» 

SJJ* 8 Mon-Aiote* 84X70 

Mysopenky yi.v*; or m 
W4EADOSASOUW (NMBQ emeO- 
«L50 44,10 Jul M 3JJ0--SUB- 5750 

4OX0AUB94 SL15 5*41 5250 

43.90 Sep 94 5330 54.15 S25D 

0.1000 94 51X5 BAS 5IJJ 
423SNov94 5650 SH 73 S2A0 
9610 Dec 94 J5JD 55X0 5458 

5050 Jon 95 5650 5630 ita 
5T 10 Feb 95 56* 5655 5450 


49XS 

5615 

50X0 

CTWl 

5250 

SLSO 

asm 

S4X0 

57X0 

50X5 

5055 

-5DX0 


2038 

3433. 

20X9 

20X0 

UJ3 

»X0 

20X6 

19X8 

»53 

70J0 

1BJ8 

M.90 

19X4 

J!- 17 

1433 

2680 

21.15 

n*j 

20*0 


's* 

gl40 

SUB 

ISA* 

S5AQ. 

axo 


BOjoles 36X44 Mon'., saw, 32A96 
taotfsosvsilnl 56566 Off 2554 


1927 
18X6 
1853 
1638 
1628 . 
1621 
IB.M 
1608 
1604 
18X4 
18X6 
1608 
W10 
1612 
1614 

1LU 

18.18 

1&21 

1627 

m s 


53X0 

5*25 

54X5 

SU5 

51.18 

SSXO 

5630 

54X0 


-AW .1X06 
*035 

— 1.11 awe. 

-07H 27X87 
-OX4 4XST 
—0.47 2XS7 

=IS ,J ® 

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*OJl 17777 
'0J1 33,987 

*041 16(80 
*0X6 11X27 
*646 7414 
*021 15X00 
*A» 17X0 

•0J6 5X33 
-0.11 5.165 
♦60S 1X75 
♦OI* 1X20 
-004 


*036 89302 
*030 62X30 
♦619 31X52 
*018 28X44 
*617 32.167 
*617 16X36 
*614 11X24 
+ 614 11.752 
♦614 6050 
*614 9X80 
♦614 19,367 
+616 5X79 

*616 1710 
-0.16 7XS2 
-016 1,720 . 
*616 3X24 
‘0-16 UX(3 . 
♦0.14 

•615 1X94 
♦0-1S 11X15 


*0X1 1(338 

-Ml 38X50 
*674 14142 
♦Oxo 5,234 

♦036 4.500 

i 3,m 
1.191 


Stock indexes 


JAPQOMP.IMDSX (CMBO 

43635Seo9» 449X0 449.70^4150 
4283UDOCJ4 -4SU0 ffla-SS 
«UD A41X5Afcr9J 49690 tWK 449X0 

n»8»Sfy*« 

^ Jun?5 

NA. Mon'S. Stef 4X44 
*W(0P8nW . 3.9K ID a 


447X0 

449X5 

4SLM 


24641 
247 JO 

wajo 

2A70 


-6^196X16 
-=•0510,133 
-2:o 1.9*1 


-1.15 X830 
—‘•IS 105 
-J.10 


Moody's 
Routers 
DJ. Futures 
Com. Rejeon* 


Commodity Indexes 

Close 


1JBU0- 

2H27jS). 

14112 

23149 


Rrevftws 
1JB0X0 ' 
1.99170 
144JJS 
227.77 




: iciS: 


CORNING, New York (AP) —Coming Inc. said Tuesday that 
second-quarter earnings rose 24 percent, helped by. strong sales of 
laboratory testing services and expanding markets for' anti-pollu- 
tion technology arid optical fiber and cable. 

The company earned 51-11:4 million in the three months ended 
June 19, compared with $89.S million a year earlier. Sales rose 22. 
percent, to $1.11 billion. 

Coming said half of the sales gain was. caused. by last year's 
merger of Damon Corp. and Coming's Metpath. subsidiary, which 
created the biggest lab testing business in the United States. 

Price Cuts Deut General Mills Profit 

MINNEAPOLIS (Bloomberg) —General Mills Inc. said Tues- 
day its fourth-quarter earnings were dented by price cuts and the 
elimina tion of coupons for its ready-to-eat cereals. 

The maker of Wheaties and Cheerios cereals posted net income 
of S10SJ million in, the quarto 1 ended May 29, compared with 
$67.5 million a year earner. Revenue rose 7. percent, to $2.14 
billion. . 

The company said its results were preliminary because it may 
have to take a charge for impropieriy treated oats discov ered this 
month. ■ • 

For the Record 

Oay da- Corp^ Ford Motor C<fc and General Motors Corp. have 
formed the Natural Gas Vehicle Technologies Partnership to find 
ways to.make natural gas vehicles cheaper, more convenient for 
drivers and easier to install. . . . (AP) 

Foundation Health Corp. has agreed to acquire CareFlorida 
Health Systems Inc, a privately held company, in a tax-free 
pooling of interests valued at about S250 million. (Knighi-Ridder) 

Morrison Restaxrants Inc. agreed to sell the education, business 
ancHndustry accounts of il£~food-service division to Gardner 
Merchant Ltd. for about $100 million, v (Knighi-Ridder) 

R. H. Macy & Co. has pur off fifing its bankruptcy reorganiza- 
tion plan while the retailer’s board considers a merger proposal 
from Federated Department Stores Inc. (AP) 


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Clarke Raises 
U.K. Growth 
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LONDON — Kenneth 
Clarke, the chancellor of the 
Exchequer, painted a rosy pic- 
ture Tuesday of quickening 
growth and subdued in flation 
but said he would not be stam- 
peded into tax cuts to revive the 
governing Conservative Party's 
political fortunes. 

Mr. Clarke, presenting the 
government's latest forecasts, 
raised the projected growth rate 
for 1994 to 2.75 percent from the 
25 percent on which last No- 

Siemens Setts 
Cardiac Unit 
To St. Jude 

Compiled try Our Staff From Dispatches 

ST. PAUL, Minnesota — Sl 
J ude Medical Inc., the world's 
leading maker of heart valves, 
said Tuesday it would buy Sie- 
mens AG's carriiar. pacemaker 
business for more thaw $500 
million. 

Siemens, the Ger man elec- 
tronics conglomerate, is the 
world's No. 2 maker erf pace- 
makers, after Medtronic Inc. of 
Minneapolis. 

The Siemens unit had sales of 
$350 mSdon last year and em- 
ploys 1,300 people. The acquisi- 
tion would more than double 
St Jude’s annual sales, which 
were $252.6 million in 1993. 
There are 700 employees. 

“It surprises me a Ink It’s a big 
sector for Siemens,” said Thom- 
as Voges, equities analyst at B. 
Metzler secL Sohn & Co. KGaA. 
“It makes sense, though, and 
isn't at all negative.” 

SL-Jude Medical intends to 
expand its activities in heart 
products to offer a full system 
tea: heart surgery, Siemens said. 

St/ Jude Medical said it 
would finance the acquisition 
with a combination of cash and 
bank debt Its board voted to 
discontinue the quarterly divi- 
dend after the transaction 
closes to repay the debt more 
quickly. (AP, Bloomberg) 


vember’s budget was based. In 
1 993, the output of goods and 
services expanded by 2 percent. 

Mr. Clarke also said that the 
underlying rate of inflation this 
year was Ukdy to mm out lower 
than expected, at 25 percent 
instead of 3.25 percent 
“We have quite the best com- 
bination of circumstances 
pointing to sustainable growth 
and low inflation that I can re- 
member for a very long time,” 
Mr. Clarke said. 

Mr. Clarke has been under 
pressure, since the Conservatives 
suffered a serious defeat this 
month in voting for the Europe- 
an Parliament, to court voters by 
unwinding the tax rises he intro- 
duced in November. 

“AD these figures add up to 
very good news,” said David 
Shaw, a Conservative member 
of Parliament «nd vice chair- 
man erf the party's finance com- 
mittee. “He’s now in a position 
to lode at tax reductions.” 

But with British ffwowrint 
markets nervous about govern- 
ment borrowing, Mr. Clarke 
said he would cut taxes only 
when it was safe to do so. 

Although the Treasury scaled 
back its forecast of the budget 
deficit for 1994 by £2 billion (S3 
bnbon), to £36 billion, Mr. 
Clarice said this still represented 
an unacceptably large 5.25 per- 
cent of economic output. 

“We have to demonstrate to 
the public that we do indeed cut 
taxes when we can afford to do 
so, when we have the public 
finances under control, what 
we have exercised the necessary 
constraint on public spending, 
when all the other circum- 
stances make it sensible,” Mr. 
Clarke said. 

In another cautionar y note, 
Mr. Clarice said he could not 
rule out higher interest rates if 
the British economy, now the I 
fastest-growing in Europe, 
looked Eke it might overheat 
“ff I was satisfied that the I 
recovery was becoming too 
strong, so that we bad a risk of 
inflation moving away from the 
government’s target, then I 
would not hesitate to raise in- | 
terest rates under those circum- 
stances,” Mr. Clarice said. 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

Nfw York Times Service 

LONDON — Steve Dickinson and Mike 
Clark hunched before a bank of computer 
screens on the currency-trading floor at Mid- 
land Bank’s global markets division here, 
watching for any sign that the Federal Re- 
serve or the European central banks were 
stepping in. 

The dollar had slumped to another postwar 
low against die yen during overnight trading 
in Tokyo. Nervous European stock markets 
had opened lower. 

A concerted attempt by central banks to 
prop up the dollar had failed Friday. The U.S. 
government’s commitment to strengthening 
the currency remained very much at issue. 

“If the Fed doesn’t come in today, I don’t 
know what will happen,” Mr. Dickinson said 
just after 2 P.M. 

In the end, neither the Fed nor the Europe- 
an banks bought dollars Monday, and the 
American currency continued its decline 
against both the yen and the Deutsche mark. 

Traders, banks, investment firms, multina- 
tional corporations, speculators — all those 
who buy and sell currencies — were again left 
guessing about the dollar and American policy. 

An afternoon spent peering over the shoul- 
ders of Mr. Dickinson and Mr. Clark provid- 
ed a glimpse into the complex combination of 
psychology, expectations and economic fun- 
damentals that drives the currency markets. 

As dealers on Midland's interbank desk, 
they match requests by other banks to buy 
and sell currencies with prices offered by 
Midland's traders. 

Despite large-scale purchases of dollars by 
Japan's central bank earlier in the day as the 
dollar slumped below 100 yen, the Midland 
dealers in London did not expect any action 
from the Europeans at least until the start of 
the business day in New York. 

“Because this is deemed to be an American 
problem, the CBs won't come in until the Fed 
shows its hand,” Mr. Dickinson said. He 
referred to the European central banks. 

The pace of trading was almost languid, 
with bnef flurries of activity. A large-volume 
customer wanted to sell $250 million for 
maita. The dollar was trading around 1.58 
DM at the time. The dealers were able to seO 
$50 nriffion at 15790 DM. 

There were few buyers of dollars. The 
weakness may not be justified by economic 
fundamentals, Mr. Clark said, bat the funda- 
mentals seem to have little relevance. 

All that matters is identifying the prevail- 
ing buying and selling trends ana riding them, 
and right now the trend is clearly downward 
for the dollar, he said. 

“The sizable transactions are people selling 
dollars,” Mr. Clark said. “If every time you 
buy a dollar you lose money, you stop buying 
than after awhile.” 

That process of matching buyer and seller 
and taking speculative positions for the 


bank’s own account- occupies the minds of 
Midland’s traders and dealers. While they are 
by no means unaware of the effects of curren- 
cy instability on the stock and bond markets 
and on national economies, market partici- 
pants give little thought to that while en- 
grossed in the split-second world of the data 
on their screens. 

“At the end of the day, the idea is to make 
money for our shareholders, for the room, for 
our management team, for tbe end-of-year 
bonus,” Mr. Dickinson said. 

Mr. Dickinson and Mr. Clark said that Trea- 
sury Secretary Lloyd Benisen, who over the 


This is not a market that’s 
impressed by central banks 
drawing a line in the sand.’ 

Mike Clark, London currency dealer 

last year bad left traders with tbe impression 
that he favored a weak dollar in relation to the 
yea, might be happy to see the dollar stay weak 
as a way of putting pressure cm Japan. 

“This is not a market that's very impressed 
by central banks drawing a line in the sand,” 
Mr. Clark said. “The U.S. administration 
brought this on themselves.” 

As tbe afternoon wore on, it became appar- 
ent that the Fed was not going to give the 
markets a chance to test its mettle, for this 
day at leasL Tbe key factor, as far as Mid- 
land’s dealers could tcD, was that stock prices 
on Wall Street had been stable in early trad- 
ing, suggesting that the investment markets 
were recovering their equilibrium despite the 
dollar’s slide. 

Tbe Fed may also have been helped when 
the London stock market, Europe’s largest, 
recovered strongly after failing sharply in the 
morning. The Financial Times-Stock Ex- 
change index of 100 shares closed up 23J 
points at 2,899.9. 

“1 think the Fed is probably taking comfort 
from the fact that the Dow is quite steady,” 
Mr. Clark said. “The lack of central bank 
activity and the calm in the equity markets 
adds support to the view that what they’re 
really interested in is stability in the markets 
rather than the absolute value of the dollar.” 

The dollar had been gyrating during the 
afternoon between 1.5810 DM and 15750 
DM, a spread that provided enough margin 
for speculators to bet on tbe ticks up and 
down. But if there was to be large-scale specu- 
lation. Ml. Clark said it would probably come 
still later in the day. 

“The speculators might want to wait until 
Europe has gone home, to foreclose the possi- 
bility of coordinated intervention by the cen- 
tral banks, and then go Fed-huntro&” Mr. 
Dark said. 


- — — — urrtrs 


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NYSE 

Tuesday's Closing . 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on WaB Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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: g You can receive the IKT hand delivered 

Is to your home or office on the day of publication. 

2 % Just call toll-free: 0660-8 1 55 

3 or fax: 06069-175413 

T5 



Page 11 

EUROPE 


2d Quarter 

Compiled bp Otr Staff FramDupauho 
FRANKFURT ■— Adam 
Opel AG, the Ger man subsid- 
iary of General Motors Corp- 
had a large loss in 1993 but was 
profitable in the first quarter of 
1994 and will repeat that feat m 
the second quarter, David Her- 
man, chairman, said Tuesday, 
But the company will have 
difficulty posting a profit for 
the year, Gail Gunderson, the 
chief financial officer, said. 

Qpel last year had a net loss 
of 503 milli on Deutsche marks 
($318 million), after a net profit 
of 259 million DM in 1992, Mr. 
Herman said. 

The company blamed Iasi 
year's loss on a 15 percent drop 
m European car sales, including 
a 19 percent tumble in Germa- 
ny alone. Opel's sales last year 
fell 21 percent, to 23 bilHon DM 
from 29.1 billion. 

Exchange-rate effects re- 
duced income by 360 milli on 
DM last year, particularly 
against the peseta and the Hra, 
which fell sharply after last 
summer’s rearrangement of Eu- 
ropean exchange rates. 

Mr. Gunderson said it would 
be “extremely difficult” for the 
first-half profit this year to off- 
set an anticipated second-half 
loss, because the latter period 
wiD include large investments, 
summer closure costs and the 
traditionally slow sales periods 
of August and late December. 

“Opel is now in a profitable 
situation." Mr. Gunderson 
said. “But the first half of the 
year is traditionally the best 
time for Opel. I doubt that we 
shall remain, profitable for the 
whole of the year." 

Mr. Gunderson declined to 
quantify Opel’s first-half profit, 
which he said was about the 
same as in the year-eaiiier peri- 
od. Comparative figures were 
not available. 

Mr. Herman also said Opel 
had added shifts at its plant in - 
Russdshdm to meet strong de- 
mand for the new version of the 
Omega, which went on sale in 
late ApriL 

Opel is banking on the Ome- 
ga to lift tbe company’s sales 
and market share in Germany, 
Europe’s largest car market 

( Bloomberg, AFP) 



Sources: Reuters, AFP ii*nMMMitfcnUTy>baiic 


Very briefly; 

• Valentino Foti, an Italian businessman who was jailed in Bd- 
gnan on fraud charges along with the chairman of Schneider SA, 
the French electrical engineering company, has been released on 
baiL Didier Pineau-Valendenne, the chairman of Schneider, was 
released on June 7. 


million) in 1993 from £585 million in 1992, but the company 
continues to be plagued by declining demand from electricity 
generators and increased competition. 

• Germany’s world market share will continue to declin e this year 
and next despite the country's economic recovery, the Federation 
of German Employers’ Organizations said. 

• Colouta Konzern AG, the German insurance company, is plan- 
ning a joint venture with General Reinsurance Corn, of the United 
States to talrecn^K5lnischeRtickversidienBig»-Geseflschaft AG. 

• Irish life PLC is baying First Variable Life Insurance Co^ the 
. Boston-based life insurance unit of Monarch life inwiywnrg Co., 
for $51.1 milli on 


• Lagard&re 


the French defense electronics, telecommuni- 


cation and publishing company, expects profit to rise at least 10 
percent this year after posting a net profit of 155 milli on French 
francs ($29 million) last year. 

• McDonald's Corp. has launched a libel suit against a pair of i 
London environmentalists who distributed leaflets that linked the 1 
company’s fast food with cancer, diabetes, heart disease and food 
poisoning. Xam, AFP, Bloomberg 


# BANCA 

COMMEROALE 

UAUANA 

Jdrs stock Company - MKmd OSes h Mn - BBd <** Sad Na fl - Ctum Hnktar lb Z774 
Ttaral of Mtan - Shn Ca0W3ritn LH USOOOyiXlflJO ■ Vqt Item Mm li» fiMBUJOMOO 
Bank snared m tto register of banks and jxmfl of the Baica CommereWe KaSana Group wrtamd 
In Ite ropier of Darting gnfB. 

An Extraordinary Meeting of holders of ratfnaiy shares of Banca 
CcnnmerdaJe ftafiana is called according to the following schedule; at 
the first call, on July 17, 1994 at 9 ajn. in Milan - Via Manzord no. 
6, and, if necessary, at a second call, on J\dy 18, 1994 at the same 
time and place and at a third caO on July 19, 1994, at die same time 
and piace, in order to discuss and vote upon the following 

AGENDA 

1. Proposal to increase the share capital and consequent mocflfica- 
tion of article 5 of the Bjrlaw* 

2. Proposal to grant powers to directors pursuant to articles 2443 
and 2420 ter of fire Gwl Code; consequent m od ifi cation of article 
6 of the Bylaws, 

3. Proposal to merge by acquisition Cbmft Holding SpA, Comrt 
Holding ftafia S.pA, Bn. Comtt SpA., Const Leasing S.pA, 
Banca Skate S.pA, Immobiltere Besana SpA and Immobffiare 
Comet Sri into Banca Commentete haliana; approval of the rele- 
vant merger {tens pursuant to article 2502 of toe CSvil Code; con- 
sequent modification of article 5 erf the By-laws for the increase in 
share capital to be used for the merger by acquisition of Banca 
Sate S.pA and InvnoWliare Besana S.pA. 

4. Proposal for additional modifications to articles'l, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 
12, 22 and 35 of the Byfeus. 

Holders of shares with voting rights are entitled to attend the 
Meeting, regardless if already recorded in the register of share- 
holders, provided they have deposited their shares at least fiue days 
before the date erf toe Meeting at the Bank's counters or at the can- 
ters of Monte Ttoti, in compliance with the provisions of article 4 xrf 
Law No. 1745 of December 29, 1962. 

Shareholders are reminded that they can be represented at the 
Meeting, within the limits of article 2372 of toe Quit Code, by means 
erf a proxy in writing with toe dgnature duly authenticated by a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors, an executive or officer of the Bank, a 
nrtary public or consular authorities. 

The C hairman 
of the Board of Directors 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1994 

Page 13 


s.fe* 




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ASIA/PACIFIC 


Deregulation Plan 
Offered by Hata — 
For His Successor 


Japan ’s Lethal Corporate Hecklers 

'Sokaiya’ Threaten to Disrupt Shareholder Meetings 


by Our Suiff Fnm liispatchr i 

TOKYO — A plan to trans- 
form Japan's markets by cut- 
ting import rules on 279 goods 
and services was offered Tues- 
day by the outgoing prime min- 
ister, Tsutomu Hata, but its ap- 
proval will be up to his 
successor. 

Economists said there was 
little chance the package would 
satisfy UJ5. demands. Ameri- 
can officials said they had not 
studied the report. 

One of the key changes 
would accept foreign testing for 
home-building materials. 

It also would bring Japan's 
standards and testing require- 
ments in line with other major 
trading nations for food prod- 
ucts, pharmaceuticals and med- 
ical devices. 

H would expand the accep- 
tance of foreign test data on 
automobiles, while simplifying 
procedures for imports by using 
computer processing. 

The plan would ease restric- 
tions on issuing commercial pa- 
per and include other measures 
to deregulate securities markets. 

A government spokesman. 
Hiroshi Kumagai, would not 
say by how much the proposed 
rule changes were expected to 
reduce Japan's trade smplus, 
which last year was 559 billion 
with the United States alone. 

Economists said, however, 


that the package was unlikely to 
result in a quick rise in imports. 
They warned that the measures 
represented only one step in a 
process that would take years. 

Satoshi Sbimamoio, an econ- 
omist with MMS International, 
said, “In order to smooth the 
way for deregulation, there has 
to be a stronger government, 
and stronger political parties. 
We have had many proposals, 
but they haven’t been imple- 
mented seriously yet.” He said 
deregulation efforts could also 
be stymied by bureaucrats try- 
ing to reassert themselves. 

The chief economist at S.G. 
Warburg, Jesper Koll. said 
measures to improve competi- 
tion among distributors and to 
increase Lhe housing supply 
were likely to have the largest 
positive impact on economy. 

Approval of the measures 
will have to wait until Parlia- 
ment chooses a successor to Mr. 
Hata, who resigned Saturday 
after two months in office. 

Deregulation was a major 
pledge of Mr. Hata and his pre- 
decessor, Morihiro Hosokawa, 
who took power last August, 
ending 38 years of rule by the 
Liberal Democrats.. 

In the past year, the govern- 
ment has said it will ease or 
scrap import regulations on 781 
items. (AP. AFX) 


By Andrew Pollack 

Vnv York Timer Sen ior 

TOKYO — These are scary times for 
corporate executives in Japan, and not 
just because of the depressed economy 
and the strong yen. 

Consider the case of Jumoro Suzuki, a 
senior managing director for Fuji Photo 
Film Co. The executive answered the 
doorbell of his western Tokyo home one 
evening in February to find a stranger 
who said he had accidentally driven into 
Mr. Suzuki’ s fence. A few minutes later, 
Mr. Suzuki lay dying in his doorway, 
stabbed several times with what the po- 
lice say was a samurai sword. 

Die killer has not been found, but 
there is a widespread assumption here 
that it was the work of gangsters who 
exton money from companies by threat- 
ening to disclose corporate secrets at 
annual shareholder meetings. 

Such gangsters, known as sokaiya* 
have been a fixture of corporate life here 
for decades. Bui Mr. Suzuki ’s murder 
and attacks on several other executives 
have raised fears that the gangsters are 
getting more violent. Anxiety is rising 
now because about 2,000 Japanese com- 
panies will bold their annual meetings 
Wednesday. 

The reason so many companies hold 
their meetings on the same day is to 
spread the sokaiya thin, even though this 
also makes it hard for legitimate share- 
holders to attend more than one meeting. 

“This year the sokaiya are feeling a 
sense of emergency,” said Tsuguharu 
Furjita, a member of an anti-sokaiya task 
force set up by die Tokyo police. “Social- 
ly. they are becoming isolated." 

The police say that as the sokaiya are 
being driven into a comer they are be- 
coming more violent and increasing their 


ties to the yakuza, Japan's organized - 
crime groups. 

Meanwhile, executives are bracing for 
the worst. About 10,000 policemen will 
be dispatched to guard annual meetings 
this year, up 30 percent from last year. 
Already, Tokyo police are providing ex- 
tra security for 130 executives. 

Milsukoshi Ltd., the department-store 
chain, had its chairman sit behind a 
transparent acrylic wall at the company’s 
annual meeting in March. 

“You can't risk your life.’' said Nat- 
suaki Fusano, a senior managing direc- 
tor of Keidanren, Japan's federation of 
economic organizations. Dealing with 


Police say the sokaiya 
are becoming more 
violent and are 
increasing their ties to 
Japan's organized-crime 
groups. 


the sokaiya, be said, has become “a mat- 
ter of violence, not a matter of sincere 
discussion.” 

The chances of anyone being hurt or 
killed are small. At the annual meetings, 
sokaiya rarely do anything more than 
fulminate and occasionally throw a bot- 
tle or two. 

Still, the police are making a big show 
of toughness this year. “It will be like a 
shareholders meeting under curfew," 
said Hideaki Kubori. a lawyer who helps 
companies fij’bt gangsters. 

Last week, in a pre-emptive strike, the 


police arrested several notorious sokaiya. 
One was hauled in on charges of register- 
ing a car under a false name. Another 
was charged with calling up the president 
of a stationery company and idling him 
to beg for his life. 

Sokaiya thrive in Japan because share- 
holders have relatively little say in how a 
company is run and little information 
about corporate matters. Executives 
place a premium on holding an annual 
meeting that runs smoothly and takes no 
more than an hour. 

The sokaiya, who buy shares in a com- 
pany so they can attend the mee ting , take 
advantage of this executive attitude. Un- 
less the company pays them off, they 
threaten to disrupt the meeting by asking 
questions about company blunders, mis- 
use of money or romantic dalliances of 
executives. 

Since a law was enacted in 1982 ban- 
ning payoffs to sokaiya, the number of 
people involved in such activities is esti- 
mated to have shrunk from more than 
7,000 to about 1,200. But it is dear that 
many companies still deal with them. 

Last year, four executives of Kirin 
Brewery Co., Japan's largest beer maker, 
were arrested on suspicion of paying 
about 5300,000 to sokaiya to ensure a 
smooth annual meeting. Last year's meet- 
ing, in fact, lasted a succinct 24 minutes. 

The year before, three executives of 
Iio-Yokado Co., a large retailer, were 
charged with paying more than 5200,000 
to gangsters. Kirin's chairman and Ito- 
Yokado's president resigned, and the 
two highly publicized incidents have 
prompted more companies to sever deal- 
ings with the sokaiya. 

The National Ponce Agency has re- 
cords of 1 8 attacks on executives or their 
families since 1992. 


FRANGLAIS: New French Law Would Outlaw Advertising That Employs Foreign Words Such As ‘Cookie 9 


Continued from Page 9 
France, said the company was 
considering adaptations such as 
“Ta vie est k tor — your life is 
yours — but he said he had not 
found words that delivered the 
underlying message of “em- 
powerment” communicated by 
the En g lish slogan. 

“Our brand values now are 
summarized in these words, 
even if people don’t know what 
they mean," Mr. Sandt said. 

Other American marketers 
also are bracing for the new law. 
IsabeOe ScaHa, head of legal af- 
fairs at Kellogg’s France, said 
the company’s corn flakes 
probably would not be touched 
by the new restrictions, as the 
words describing the American 
cereal had been accepted into 


the French dictionary through 
common usage. But its English 
slogan on the box — “the origi- 
nal and the best” — might well 
have to go, she said. 

Kraft General Foods Groups 
France might also have some 
problems with its market-lead- 
ing Hollywood diewing gum. 
Even though “chewing-gum” 
appears in the French dictio- 
nary and is used commonly, lin- 
guists insist the product should 
be described as “gomme k 
m&cher.” 

Die new law would be even 
tougher on state-owned compa- 
nies, forbidding brands or com- 
pany names to be expressed in 
foreign languages. Renault SA, 
which markets successful utility 
vehicles under the- Traffic-and 


Master brands, would have to 
cease such practices. 

Advertising executives say 
the law may force France Tele- 
com to bang back the accent 
marks over the e’s in “Tele- 
com.” The national phone com- 
pany has spent hundreds of mil- 
lions of francs in recent years to 
show off its accentless logotype 
as part of its effort to show off 
its Internationa] character. 

“We're spending a lot of time 
on stupidity,” said Maurice 


Levy, chairman of Publicis, one 
of France’s largest ad agencies. 
“But then a g ain , this law will 
generate some new business for 
us.“ 

Ad executives predicted mar- 
keters would find creative ways 
to rircumvent the law, perhaps 
choosing to reinvent targeted 
English words as they would be 
spelled in French. “Cookie” 
thus might become, “cou- 
qudlle” 

Mr. L6vy and others suggest- 


ed that the law, which carries 
fines of 20,000 francs for viola- 
tions, would probably not be 
enforced — much as France's 
law against smoking in enclosed 
public places, enacted in 1992 
amid great fanfare, is openly 
ignored in restaurants and sub- 
way stations. 

“It’s true, we’re not particu- 
larly good at enforcing our 
laws, but l fear the authorities 
will try to make a few high- 
profile examples,” Mr. Sandt of 


Nike said. “We’re very visible 
and could be made to pay for 
everyone else.” 

Despite the criticism, Mr. 
Marek claims his legislation 
would be doing marketers a far 
vor. “This will make their com- 
munications much more effec- 
tive,” he said “They may use 
English out of snobbism, and 
don't realize that many con- 
sumers reject iL They’re losing 
customers." 


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fio/tdsps vts/P/r ttfucSr 
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TURKEY 


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Antalya 

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Tel: (242i 2 432 432 
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Singapore ' Tokyo 
Straits Times -. ' Nikkei 225 

• -. 2000 — 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

lass- - - - 


Sly::: ■ 

aw * — FvS : 210 c- •- \ M wow, 


t f run : 

IBM 


’j'FTwTSliiSf-' 

1994 


: «w- 

■Exchange' • Index '*• TuwdayV.-Pitiv;' 

. ' Stow, -jaw* « 

Hong Kong, HarigSdrig > fr 67 i 48 ; .. 

Singapore Strait® Times ' ' ' £227.6(1 


'Chart# 


; j'.S,00SL5a \*D.34- 

A;%iA9 


2^40,72; ' ■ 5 *>42 ■ 

InenBirmul Herald Tribune 


Kuete Lumpur Composite ', ' 
Bangkok . SET ’ /. 


Manila : . ' PSE , 

Jakarta " ./StopR Index,* -. 
New Zealand : . NZSE -40 
■ Bombay .. • NaWnai.fi^t ■ 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 

Very briefly: 


• ansa, faced with growing unrest among workers fearing unem- 
ployment, is preparing measures to protect job security and 
working conditions, according to an official news report. 

• Benng’s first attempt at competitive bidding for share s listed on 
stock exchanges in Shanghai and Shenzhen was only a mixed 
success, according to local reports; the bidding was designed to 
replace a lottery system. 

• China's president, Jiang called for reforms to improve 

the poor performance of many state-owned companies but ruled 
out selling off the companies, the official People’s Daily reported. 

• Die Chinese prime minister, Li Peng, said measures to cool the 
country's overheating domestic economy were succeeding. “Die 
growth rate has been slowed down, inflation is also leveling off, 
the economic situation is very good,” Mr. ii said at a news 
conference before leaving on a European tour. 

• DDI Coqx, Japan’s second-largest telephone company, said it 
would launch a venture in July, DDI Pocket Telephone Inc., 
aimed at providing digital portable telephone service. 

• Singapore Airlines Ltd. announced a joint-venture agreement 
with Tata Group to operate a domestic airline in India; pending 
government approval, the airline would be operating by 1995. 

• Taiwan would open public projects to international bidders 
immediately after becoming a member of GATT, economic offi- 
cials said; Taiwan applied to join the world trade body in 1990. 

• Japanese retail stores said sales in May were down from year- 
earlier levels for the 24th month in a row as consumer spending 
remain ed sluggish. 

• Japan's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was unchanged 
in May from the previous month at Z8 percent. 

AP. Reuters, Bloomberg. AFP 

International 

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Marketplace 

• Monday 

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• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

International Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 


Plus over 300 headings in international Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Oma m Paris: 
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SSSsJSS H^in . I.;,,-.; 














Pape 14- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1994 


■m* 


■r 



NASDAQ 

Tuesday’s 4 p.m. 

This list compiled by the AP, consists ol the 1.000 
most traded securities in terms ol dollar value it is 
updated twice a year 


17 Month 
High Low Slock 


Sb 

Oiv Yld PE I0(h Hjon LowLtneaOi W 


1BV. XY.AAOHk 
TOW 12 ABC Roil 
30 15 ABT BIO 
7d!i?2’.iACCCp 
24 SftACSEns 
46ft30%AOCTC 
44 JB'.iACCTd 
17!'i 1 1 Mi AES cnn 


.14 97Q 14 >■ 14 |4l. — "5 

_ _ 1003 17* 17'. « 17% — '••• 

... 14 174 !lft Jl", lift 

.ISO .9 0 258 13*4 IJ 13'. 

135 13 i?'-j 13 % 

_ 33 B5 37 J*.'- 34’ * -?•* 

-. 11 34T7 41 ft r>': 40ft I 'l 

_ .. 1273 1 1 To lift II'-. —■* 


73W 18 AESCos 481 34 IB 553 19 18% IS" 


.18 


26V. 19% A v. Sled 
32 % 1 5V* APS Mid 
ISft 6ftASK 

13 I3Vj AST 
29% I4Vi AbbevH 
31 ft li’VAcJolms 
27*<a 13 AcmeMet 
30% I ’A Adel 
15% TftAOOCLD 

22% IQWAdgptc i 
ia Adeipnn 
37% 28 AdnSv 
34% 14% AdobeS s JO 
12% 4ftAdvPro 
11% 4%AdvTT» 

44% 74% Advonfd s JO 
38% 24% AdvonlB s 74 
15 7*AgncyR 

14% 8% Aon ICO O 

18% 7V.Agoum 
14% 1% AjrMalh 
6lft39ft Akzo 
21 ft ?%Akmie-: 

23% 17 Abank. 

19% 12 Aidnas 
34% 13% Aldus 
28% 73 Ala.BId 
19% 8% AJiasR 
3% lku AOAScm 

14 7% AlionPll 
18 7%AinSemi 
37 V, 22ft AIliedGp 
22%13%AlldHldg 
J4% IftAlphdl 
35% 7%AlohaBla 
39! I 18 •/. Altera 
74% 9% Affront 


_. ._ 431 25 74’-. 25 

_ 15 45 19 ! "« 1«'» l« - 

_ ... 66 13*4 13 I J'.j “'■» 

9427 14% l Fa 14* 

_ 9 779 15% 147* 15'-. .i, 

_ 17 8487 1 4' i 15' ; 1 8'-. '•» 

_ 13 81 23'-. »•* 23'.- 

.. M 217 8% 3'-. Bft — « 

48 54 7 99 8% B‘* 01. — * 

... IS 7975 l*'« >5% >4 n -»« 

_. - 341 13% 17'.; U'-J — % 

_ „ 34% 

J 23 6598 27 % 25% 27 • 1% 

_ .. 175 5% 5'ii rn-Vff 

„ -. 8Q4 4% 4'1 4% . 

6 16 528 34 % 32% 31 — K« 

.8 16 1586 31! 1 ; 30 30% -% 

... IS 2573 17 11% l<% — in 

.I0e .8 _ MO 17 11% 17 

. 210 I He 10>-i I0* i • '■! 

... 458 3% 7% 3 W 

lJ4e 3J ... 164 53’-. 53% Si* -ft 

_ ... 706 13% IT'-e 13% 

.40 IJ 13 235 22 ft 77% 77% — V- 

... 30 813 Ic’i 15 15% -'•» 

_ 13 817 76", 25' 


i?r.V»>pi 

High Low* Cli X* 


Sts 

D>v VW PE IKK High LewLWCSICh’ge 


... 24 
_ ... 1J 

.. .. 84 

.. 14 894 

IJOe 5.8112 ISA 
_ ... 491 

.. _ 2074 

_ 39 430 

. 20 1 374 

... 14 1360 
Tie .7 46 » 

.16 2.1 15 57 

12 7 40 762 

_. _. 95 

_ ... 225 

_ ... «45 

.08 .7 1 5 659 

- 8 $B4 

_ 22 423 
.. 4 3279 

... 1 85? 

... 11 591 

.14 1.4 14 2121 

_ XW 


.88 3.4 18 2SS 25% 25 ' 25*. - % 
... 19 2»1« 


12% lO'i IOVj— I 
... M 831 ?>'•:: T‘n 7'- 

„ 1S34 10 91. 4*1 - ' i 

... 15 70 II 10% 11 

M 73 7 AS 2f*i 25 35% - 

_ g 145 14% 13% 14% 

_. _ 745 2% lft 1-* 

- ...1040 10 8% 10 I'.i 

_ 13 7294 78% 77’. 28*1 • 1% 

. ... U 217 1 4 '.-4 13% 14 _ 

92 35". AmerOn Jle _. 102 77U 43 61 t-J I'* 

304* 21 % ABnir J1 3-1 8 3S6 72'. 3I*» 27'* 

22% l3*AOasVov 16 U) 45 789 14% 16 16% 

JJ lOWACoNoid 74 IJ I? 24£. 13% 12’-: 13' 


21% ISftAmPrshl 

34V.25%AGrcel* 

24% 4% AHIInCC S 
25% 14% AMS 
17 % 4ft AMedE 
22 12' . AmMhSat 

30% 14% APwrCv s 
23% IS’/jAmRmia 
39% 22% AmSupr 

37 17 AmTete 

14% IftATravel 
16% 9 AmerOs 
Tbft UliAntfod 
S3 31 Amgen 
15 5 Amrions 

33% 1 1 AmlcnCo .08 
16% HWAnchBcp 
17% 10% AnchGm 
39 Vi 17% Andrew i 
21% 13 Andros 
30% 18% Anlec 
40% 22 AcdeC 
18% »%AplSous 
25% II ApletMCS JM 
25 73% And Doll 

33 HWApdlUOVi 
52 26% AnldMI s 


_. 34 1403 21% 10% 20% -% 

56 1.9 It 3766 29% 7?'.i '* 

_ 10 H 6'; 6‘e 61'..—'. 

._ 71 6 23*. 23 % 73*. ... 

_ 13 455 8% 8 a — *■ 

... 95 13 ir'-r 1J% . 

_ 2EI0191 |7l, 16% 16": — 

_ 1Q100B3 21’. 20% 71'b • J" 

_ _ 90 26-: 25’ : 2*'-i - 

. _ 277 18% 17% 18%-!% 

_ 10 195 13% 13% '3% -% 

... — bO 10'-> »' 1 10' - % 

JOB 1.0 19 131 30% !■>% 20% 

.- 1610717 44% 4J% 43% 

- 19 42 BV. 7--. 8 — *1. 

.7 li 70S6 13'. 12'. 12% — ». 

_. 9 tlj 15% 14% 15% • 

_ 147 12 10% ll'-i ■ % 

_ 27 1249 36% 35 35% -. 

_ 10 663 18% l'% 13 

_ _ 3B0 23% 72" ; 23 - 

48 I.B . 155)6 77'. 75'-. 26’ j % 

40 3471 14% Id 14% — % 

.3 25 1147 12". 12 17% — 1 'll 

69 18% 17% 18% -% 

- 38 J98 22 % 2D 1 . 21*. 


21 V*> 15V; ArborDrg J4 1-3 21 78 19 


_ 2311411 43% 42 4JW-I'ii, 


25 12*tA/t»rHI 
19 lOWAixMCm 
15% 76 % AmoGo 
33'e HViMWV 
15*6 BtVArVJBeSI 
22 16% Armor 

22 W15W Arnolds 
24% SWArtsU 
13". 6'eAshwrth 
46 21 % AsoclTI 

34'/. lV%A5dCmA 
33% lBWAsaCmB 
20% II Astecs 
34*6 27% A5lorioF 
38 V. 21% Arise Air 
29W 11 Almel 5 
26% lB'/.AuBOT 
9*;„ 4%AurooV 
14% 4HAUSKI 
61*. 37 Autodc 
34'. 23*t AuMnd 

79!. 14ViAutoro> S 
31% 16 AvrtJTcn 


l?' 


19 • =-« 


- 23 763 19% IB’ : 19 

„ „ 36 U*. 14% 14*. — % 

1.16 4J 8 90 7*% 27 27% -i. 

- 48 561 IS". 14- , 15% ■ -■ 

2)4 J I.’ 529 1716 12 17"- I - •'» 

.64 3.0 20 28 21 70% 21 • % 

M 2.1 It 1067 19*. 19 19 — % 

_ 20 95SJ 15*. 14 I4-: „ 

... 30 925 8!^ 7% 8% 

... 31 1541 77 % 25*. 27 1’ . 
_122i 57 35 2J% 74*. -% 
_ 1225 4 74' I 74' r 34* . • 'b 

_ 12 99 1J>. 1J!, I3*„ -!■ 

.. 93.7 Jl'. 31": 31% — % 

J2 IJ 15 7867 23 21*. 21*. — % 

„ 38 2101 24% 23*. 24% • ' 

- r 3786 20% 18% 19% - % 

_ ... 1B945 9*. 8 8'.'.. ■ ' 

14 99* 5'.* 4% 5 — 1 . 

48 1 0 19 596 49% 48*. 49% ■ % 

... 19 357 77 76' . 26% — ' : 

_ 41 6393 17% 15 I5%— 1:-„ 

_ 26 4364 26' : 35% Jf ■ 1 


B-C 


34*4 28% BB&T 1J)8 

35% aWBHCFns .08 

24% 16 BISYS 
71 41*6 BMC S1I 

30% 9C.BMCWIS 
37% 15 BWIP 40 

79*6 BllBcbog? 

25% 15% Baker J M 

24 lOWBalvGm 
32% 26 l .BanPonc 1.00 
78 57%BcOnepfC350 
45% <9%BncGalic 32 r 
24% IT*. Banctec 
20*kl2WBkSoulti 
38% 39% Banta 
26% 13 BanvnSv 
38 23% Bereft 
16"i 9hBarelRs 
7 2%BaiTech 
65'/. 43 BavBVs 

a v. 6 V. BellAAic 
% 21% BellS CD 
9*» JWBenlOG 
48 32 Berkley 
26 13 Bertud 
29% 14' A BeilPwr 


J7 

Me 


S M.25V.L 

% 8% Blame] 

25V. 1 7% BaoVJLViU 
27% 13 Boamlwn 
23% B% Borina 

14% OVaBoxEn B 
15% 4%BrtteV 
S2V.11 Brdbirrc 
99!i3T%anWSI 
21% 9%BroCOur 
1 7 Vi 10'iBrTom 
12% 7% Brunos 
27% 16 Buffers 


.16 


3J 10 1387 
Jl 6 8773 
_ 65 207 
_ 71 4441 
- IS 1601 
2J 101 3609 
_. IB 471 
J II 761 
_. ... 476 
3.2 10 IJ 
5A _ 6 

,1 'ff? 

2.4 II 164Q 
1A It 174 

- 128 1317 

.1 24 82 

_ 33 401 

_ £44 

14 IS 1709 
-. 41 3561 
... 16 263 
_ 19 B4 
... 21 2424 
_ ... 572 
u it 3a 
_ 22 74 

13 15 8 

_ 37 8773 
_ 17 2675 
_ _ 7237 
4.0 10 IBM 
1-3 18 568 
_ 29 75 

- 33 674 
_ -. 0703 
_ 154 2221 
_ 30 7321 

- 90 866 
... - 230 
... _ 520 
_ 48 4548 
.. _ 7M 
-377 1000 

3J 14 1004 
_ 26 2104 


31* a 30% 
9*. aa*. 
20% 20% 
45% 44 
20*. 191-j 

17% 17% 

10 % 

IB* j 
IJ': 

31*. 

62 


78*a 

19'; 

18 "; 

32'r 

14*. 

13% 

16". 

3'. 

60'. 


18% 

12 *. 

31'. 

62 

2»*. 


18* 
lfl 1 u 
31% 
14 

37‘-i 
1 S*'. 


10* I 

24 

7 

38 

IJ’i 

16 

II 

29'. 


57 1 

79 2B 
S4"S S3' 
10% 

24*. 

71. 

39 
14’. 

16* I 

11 % 

31' j 
10 % 10 '. 
2*9 2\. 

II "i 31 
21'j 71*9 
22V. 2U. 
16% IS% 
10 9% 

36% 34 
«'. 8% 
9% d 8*. 
10*. 9% 

19', 18 


45* 

12 

15 

7% 

18! i 


42*9 

11% 

14% 

7% 

17'-, 


30% 

9% ■ V, 
70’ . — ' . 
45’-. -*a 
70% _ 

10% — % 
lfi% -% 

12’i — % 

31% — % 
47% 

28 — % 
rj; , 

IB'. •% 
32’: - % 
14% _" 4 
33*i 

if. — * 

K'.r — % 
28'. —% 
S3*. % 

10% - % 
24 — ' i 

7*., 

r* -*■ 

14% 

16% _ 
m — 

BS-? 
3?% :?5 
21% - % 
22V. _ 

16 * % 
9% — 
34 V.— I'., 
V • • 1 % 
9 - 'a 

10 

18% —H 
45*4 
I1>. — 
14% —'a 
7% • <<• 
18' » -% 


AMEX 

Tuesday’s Closing 

T8btes include the nationwide pnees up to 
the closing on Wail Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 Mcnffi 
Utah Low Siocv 


Si 

Div YU PE 100s 


HUh LowLniesiOi ge 


, BWALC 
14Va 9'AAMC 
25W 20*. AMC pf 
5 IV, .ARC 
4Vi lWARIHId 
26*922 ARM F pf 

8*9 4 AckCom 
5 3*9 AoneU 

31A4 lWAcfton 
6*9 4 AcfenRsc 
6*9 2WAdvFin 
1519 JWAdvMoa 
4*9 WAcfuMedT 
10**, 3*9AdMd pf 
5*9 2 AdvPhal 
3% 2WAefDSOn 
16*9 7 V. AlTWof 
419 IVeAlrcoa 
7% siSAIamai 
5V, 3V,AierTOn 

8 . Via/UertCwt 
16 AHobgri n ' 
749 Vi.Alfin 
17*9 4*9 ABdR-J, 
11*9 a*9AJIOuH 
<r% 3 AJcTroln 
11 449AlpiriGr 
64 56 Ak»ap< i 
799 4*9 Arndtif 
1 Vi« VjAmhltli 
15*9 »*9AFstP2 

70% 16*. APART 
25% 18% ABV CT 
S4% 27ViAmBih 
l'Vu 1 %AE»pl 
14*9 MAIM 84 
16V9 13*9 AIM B5 
1419 1 119 AIM 86 n 
15. 11 % AIM 88 n 
18*9 IIVaAunUsf 5 
22 49 1419 AMzaA 
)4V. 6*9 AmPagn 
9*9 6VjA«Elnyn 
15 9 AResfr 

6 ZWASciE 
5 29 U ATeShC 
13*9 7*9Ampal 
2% 'AAmpalwf 
14*9 9*4Amwesi 
46*9 9Va Andrea 
M fWAnaMlg 
6> MAnuhco 
14W 5*9AprDsnn 
4*9 MArld4 
11*9 7 ArfcRst 
10 6 ArrowA 

12% 4*9Amym 
4*9 2*9 Asfrofc 
12% 7V U Atari 
7V9 4% Affcerfis 
"6. %AI»CM 
3 >V h 1 Arias wf 
18*9 tVsAudvot 
4'9 *uAu*B 
919 6 AurorEl 
219 Z'-'uAZCOn 


43 57 .. k 

_. 24 572 
-14 3 

U5 7.0 _ 22 

_ 26 41 

_ _ 9 

2J8 10.1 _. 5 

_J3e 9j _ 75 

Uieti _ 44 

_ 15 147 

:<» 2 
_. 14 2 

_ 17 64 

... _ 67 

_ _ 44 

_ _. 21 

- - 303 
-63 

... 3790 
_. SO 2 
_ 17 27 

- _ 54 

” 75 

-. 12 
4 56 

12 180 
_ 48 

... 119 
...ZlISO 
- 1261 
1 
2 


8*9 8 

29 2S"» 

12*. 12% 
25 24% 

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31ft 29% 31V* -2ft 
18ft 18 18ft -ft 
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7ft Aft Aft —ft 
18ft 18ft 18ft -ft 
12ft lift 12% - ft 
75ft 25% 25ft - % 
14 13 13% —V* 

14 13% T3t -ft 
27ft 3% 2S% —ft 
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20% 19V* 20 — T 

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li Month 
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20% 6 PunrTc 
25 7 Anm 

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30ft 79ft 30ft -ft 
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18* 18* — * 

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17* 18% — * 
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12 Month 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29. 1994 


Page 15 


-oroin Minnetonka. 

jsr&rrc 

wwOias^Krtri. 

GAM EuropcOT- _ 

GAM France 

Frcnc-wK 

GAMCO 

High Yield 

East Asia 

■ JqpQ ft 

Money Mils USS 

Do Sierlina- 

Do Swiss Prune 



ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


June 28, 1994 


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£UE£5.8? iST F " d i IF 41 tf US Donor Mon., S 3*5*3 

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£.«HS57r=£ijfl5i‘?!5 >5lr l 1 " B . HASENB1CHLER ASSET MANOT OvuObH. 

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v 5^L'T? f - 1, ? T >J t<,y -StRVlCEl UA <* tknenbKnlef Com Inc S U1J8 

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4 FlMUr Fint , »TJ5 E.UTOPT fh 13 

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5 RniJrS'S? f UOQ 5 .i?5 n> Mondlnvert Fufum FF «J 

2 rZ=21fX~ — — } 'JA* HEPTAGON FUND NV 1399*413833) 

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Trt: London 671 *a izm 
0 Aroo n flnlon invert Go Staavt 2 , 

0 Brerilton Irnnl Co Slcav_5 2 

0 ONomirfon Invert CoStoov-S Ii 

tf Indian invert ceSk»v__A 11 

0 LBtlBAwrt EA0O Yield F0S 9.? 

0 Urttn America Income Ca_i U 

0 Lottn Americ a n Hwert Co-J i 

0 Mexican invert Co Skuv_s 3l 

d Pwnn/icr) Irrvesl Co 5kxrv i 1 < 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 

PJD. Bex 3ML HaffiUton. Bermuda 

mFMGGtotwl (3) May) S 13 

in FMG N. Amer. JSl May) s K 

mFMG Europe 1» Mav) s W 

m FMG EMG MKT (31 Moy)_S 11 

mFMG Q (31 Mav < 
FX CONCCPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 
ip Concepts Fomx Fund__s Id 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

urGdo Hedse II ! 143 

h Gala Hedge HI S ii 

» Goto 5«t53 Franc FB SF 47 

w GAIA FX S IM 

rnGolo G u ara n tee d CL l t 8« 

mGataGuoronteedCJ.il s aa 

GA0TMORE IND0SUE2 FUNDS 37/M/M 
T0IS(353 I 44 54X470 
FQX.M3S3J46MZ) 

BOND PORTFOLIOS 

0 DEM Bond DftttS DM 6 . 

rfWvertwnd DfeilAO 5F 3. 

a DoMarBond Ditz^s s z 

0 Epropeon Bd Dis 1.17 Ecu 1. 

0 Franc* Fronc_DH IB. 10 FF 12 

d Gtobol fiend Dll 7.17 S Z 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

a ASEAH A B. 

0 AstaPottOC J A 

d OnUnentoi Europe Ecu ). 

a Dev rt oplna MoHcM s 3 

0 Fnw— - _ ce 10 . 

tf Germany DM 5: 


0 ASEAH S *24 

0 AstaPodtlC S 4J4 

0 Catllnentoi Europe ecu us 

a DfVlIopIfiB MorLrtl S 3*3 

0 Fnw— _ _ CC I (US 

0 Germany DM 5JB 

0 • 2JB 

0 W v 2L4J7Q 

0 North Aroertco S 2 JO 

0 Switzerland, . . jf X54 

0 United Kingdom c 1X3 

RESERVE FUNDS 

0 Donor zSS 

0 French Fronc FF 1281 

0 Yon R nerve ______ Y aan 

GEFIMOR FUNDS 

London 171X91 41 7LGenevo:<v 22 735 55 38 

wScDtttsti World Fund S 4539733 

w State Si. American. s 34*97 

GENESEE FUND Ud 

w (A) Genesee Eoaie S 14145 

w IB) Genesee Short 3 6*44 

iv (C)GerasM Opportunity _s 1S7R3 

5^ , t oSS c °' i0O ' e,M,¥ - a 

wli sirotthi BandB Ecu 106436 

Nil Poctflc Bond B SF 1 39184 

SET 6IAHAGEMEHT 

FUNDS 

II AIM StOougkBj at Mon 4AM44Z4037 

ir GAMorlca S 

irffiwi nnwimi i 

iv GAM ASEAN % 


„ mHetmes AiKxi Fund S 381 J4 

ntHortnes Emero MXfs Fitku IJ 120 

m Hermes Sirotegies Fund — 3 69467 

■ffl m Hermes Neulrol Fund_ S IU26 

JJjfi fnHmrnes Gtaeol Fund _5 64482 

inm n»H*rm« Bond Fund Ecu 126IR4 

'JO? m Hermes Sterling Fo x 1S7.S4 

s?'2 *" Hermes COM Fund. S 4IJJ2 

?4fi7 INCOME PARTNERS (ASIA) LIMITED 

■537 m Aston Flied Income Fd S KUT0 

INTERINVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/o Bonk of Bermuda Tel : 8 M 795 4000 
11^ m Hedge Hog * Conserve M-& til 

0 47 INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
}053 1 Bd Rbym, L-2449 Lvxemnouni 

1 l.w ir Europe Sud E Ecu HM 

•X5 INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 

, „ _ 0 Amort aue du Nord S 10U4 

KUO 0 Eurnoe Corllnenlole___DM ID1A5 

. 0 Extreme Orten I AnglosoxonAS HX363 

I47ffl 0 France FF 59444 

ISM 0 nolle l_H KttlKJX) 

d Zcnr ^sloi loue y 1NXLOO 

JNVESCO I NTT. LTD, POB Z7L JOTMv 
8406 Trt: 44514 73114 

8177 0 m opfmwn Income Fund C D.M 0 S * 

« 0 Sterling Mngd PtH t 2.1170 

0 PWwriMrtrfr r jj 770 

0 Otosan Gloool Strategy 5 17X200 

.„ 0 Ailo Super Growth 5 341790 

0 Nippon Wtprart Fund i U9X 

0 Asm Tiger Worrwu s 4jioo 

f H 0 European warnmt Fine I Z9709 

0 GW N.W. 19M S 9*500 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 

0 American Growth $ 6.1400 

0 Amort cor enterprise S *»2B0 

834 0 Asia Tiger Growl* J% Ili60fl 

<-» 0 Dollar Reserve 5 SJ900 


0 European Growth i 5.1500 

0 European EWertvIse J 42906 

0 Gtobol Emergbio Martels J *8500 

0 GlDBOl Growth t 54400 

0 Ntopon Enterprise S *4560 

fl Hi»Crt Growl* S SJttO 

0 UK Growth __i *0900 

0 Sterling Reserve ~i 

0 North American warrant _S 41790 

0 Greeter anna Oops S 7.1900 

ITALFORTUNE INTI- FUNDS 
wCtassA lAggr. Growth itaLIS 0041100 

w Class B [GumxjI Eauttvl— S 113* 

WCKBS C IGtoboJ Bon0) S TUB 

W Class D (Ecu Bond) Ecu 10J6 

JAfiDINE FLEMING «GPO Box 11443 Ho KB 


Allocated IMtl'Fd — _J 
Emerg Mkts MIIFFd _s 

MJIt-Eurspe USS S 

Mltt-E Drupe DM DM 

Wtt-GtaOaJ USI S 

MIH-US S 

TrodlnB DM DM 12*13 

Trading US S 16*97 

Overseas s !6i7V 

Pacific S 93136 

RetoHve Value S 107.91 

Selection — j 61*31 

i Singapore/ Mafoyjio JS 70*98 

SFSoeSolfiorW SF 129X3 

Tvrfw S 325X7 

1 S 199.1* 

Investments 5 89064 

Dfc* S 129 JO 

WMteawm s 19*44 

Worldwide S 47L24 

Band USS Drd S 143m 

Band USS Special S 18427 

Band SF SF 9941 

Band Yen V 1461*00 

Bond t E 153X7 

TSpoctai Band. C 135X6 

Jolversai USS S 13)30 

-..CpawoiltH S 33190 

JED FUNDS 41-K422 2624 
WXCH JCOLZurta, 

GAM l Of) Europe SF 91J7 

GAM (CH) MondlaU- SF 16294 

GAM (CH) Padflc SF 287 Jf 

REGISTERED FUNDS 
1 57Hl Street XiY 1002291 2-8M42Q0 

Bnjge S 8*64 

wwiOWW S 151X9 

. Udorna H onul 1 2DL10 

North Americn S 8*67 

'tadflc Basin S 111.13 

EGISTERED UC1T5 
TenocftDuwin 2. 3S3-l-€74(W30 

Atnertan Aa: dm *127 

Europe Aa: OM 12*17 

wr— WrtdAcc DM 15B93 

TOtyoAcc DM 18*32 

TOHM Band DM Ac r DM 10431 

__ Universal DM Acc — DM 175 l7» 

TAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
29S4000 Fax: (001) 2W6180 
STRATEGIES LTD 
.> OrtBlnoi Invahnoflt — S 10312 

<w> Hnandaf & Metals - t 157.47 

D) Global DfvorsHled _S 11441 

(Fl G7 Currency S NLfl 

(Hi Y«1 FlnancM S 16281 

(j) Diversified Rsk AdT S 121x0 

(K) (nil Currency 8, Bond— I 12*46 

(U Gtotxri Financial — .S 10227 

™n-t WORLDWIDE FND _S 19X2 

FUTURES I OPTIONS SICAV 
rfBdProgr<HFa_SF 94X6 

t. Fd II S 191 

ICY S 1 2 3*82 

World Bond Fund 5 10.13 

World Income Fund i 9X8 

DUfTY FUNDS SICAV 

Euro Small Cap Port — DM 91SJ 

GlaDOl Equity 8 IL2S 

- -Ctrt Growth Pori _3 983 

SmaB CaaPort., — _J 981 

i ParHoflO S 9.77 

BIND MANAGEMENT 

Fono Ecu 115583 ■ 

CAPITAL HITL GROUP 

iBdtal EBUtty S 09348 

imitei WGIMidrais 09476 

^apttal Mortgagees 07487 

r MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 
H-7104S67 


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5 F Special Bond SF 


WMWtiani I 

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Bond USS Drd % 

Sand USS Special S 

BondSF SF 

Bond Yen Y 

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F‘wn SmaB Co Fd B 5h_S 

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NAGEMENT PLC (M 71 TIMS 47) 
Blotech/Hearttl Fund-S lftXI 

Fund— 3 TZ66 

I S 48X1 

- I Co Fd J J9A 

laMofanm Fund s 2*m 

Korea Fund 8 5-73 

Newtv Ind Counlr Fd— S 4281 

ion Comoonles— S 2381 

CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

et Srt. Fa i 107J1 

rD MNGR5 IGanr) LM 
GLBL STRATEGY FD 

S 39X4 

nd s 

0i Income Band_-S 21.97 

S>d 1 i;xi 

Mali utc. Band 1 2183 


0 JF ASEAN Trusl S 51 JO 

0JF For East WrtHTr _S 2*H 

0 JF Global conv Tr S 1*91 

0 JF Hong Kong Trust S 17XS 

0 JF Japan Sm. Ca Tr Y 53535 JQ 

0 JF Jopot Trust _Y 111 1 580 

0 JF MotoYSld Trusl _S nn 

0 JF Podhe mc.Tr Jt HJ7 

0 JF Tnaltond Trust I 34X4 

JOHN BOV ETT MAtfT (U3MJ LTD 
Trt; 44X84 - 62 94 20 

wGovett Man. Futurn* r 1296 

wGavrtt6tan.Fut.USS S *77 

wGovottsGear.Cvrr S 12.73 

wGavenSGtbl BaL Hdge S 1*9020 

JUUUS BAER GROUP 

0 Boerbond SF 

0 Conbar SF 17S1JD 

0 Eoutooer America S 239*oi 

0 Equttoer Europe, JF I5D4.16 

0SFR-BAEP SF 1097X4 

0 5 too bar SF 233181 

0 Swtssoar __SF 

0 Lloutooer S 216780 

0 Europe Bond Fund Ecu 

0 Oct tor BarrJ furd S 

0 Austro Band Fund AS 125380 

0 Swiss Bond Fund SF 

0 DM Bond Fund DM 

0 Convert Boiil Fund SF 

0 G local Bond Fund ... .DM 

0 Euro Sloe* Fund Ecu 

rf US Slock Fund S 

0 Pacific Stack Fund. i 

d Swiss Stack Fund SF 

d Special Swfca Stack SF 

0 Japan Slock Fund Y 

0 German Stack Fund DM 

d Koreon Stack Fund ___S 

d Swiss Franc Cosh SF 

0 DM Cash Fund D M I26UB 

rf ECU Cash Fund F ro 127108 

0 Sterling Cash Fund C IIDXM 

d Dal lor Cosh Fund 5 1645X0 

d French Franc Cash FF 111480 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

otKev Global H6dge____4 25880 

mKer Hedge Fund Inc S 1M35 

Kl PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

MKI Asia Pacific Fd Ltd S 11.12 

KIDDER. PEABODY 

b Chesapeake Fund Ltd J 2887.10 

bill Fund Lid i 1143.00 

b Ion Guaranteed Fond I 132418 

b Stonehenge LIB i 1682X1 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 22/04/ M 

0 Allan Dragon Port NV A s 9 as 

0 A9km Drogan Port NV B — S 9X4 

0 Global Advisors II NV A s I *30 

0 Gkfflal Advisers II NVB % 1038 

0 Global Advtaors Port NV A_S 1*24 

0 Global Advisors Port NV bjs 1*11 

0 Lehman Cur A0V. A/B S 7.9J 

a Premier Futaros A0v A/BJ 1081 

UPPO INVESTMENTS 
24/F Ltapo Tower Centre, M QueenswoyJiK 
Trt 1852) 867 4881 Far 1852) S96 BM 

w Java Fund % 9J3 

wA^oon Fired Inc Fd * ixn 

wiDR Money Mdrtel Fd Ji 12x0 

w USD Atanev Market Fd J 1*9 

w Indonesian Growth Fd s ll.li 

w Asian Growth Fund _S 1*23 

w Aslan Wiarrant Fund — J *23 

LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT 1852 ) 845 MU 

a- Antenna Fund S 1*82 

w V.G AUcm SmoMet Cos F8_S 115220 

WLG Irefla Fund Lta 5 liM 

w LG Jopot F d S 1085 

LLOYDS BANK INTL I BAHAMAS) LM 
Lloyds Amert cm Portfolio (BOD 12i«7Tl 
w Bo lanced Maderote Rhk FdS 1X6 

LOMBARD. ODIER B CIE - GROUP 
OBL1FLEX LTD (CIS 

0 Multicurrency J 33L53 

0 Dollar Medium Term _s jrjj 

0 Doflor Long Term S 19.97 

d Japonese Ynr_ — Y 4961J5Q 

0 Pound Sterflna t 2481 

0 Deutsche Mark DM I7xl 

d Ck/tth Florin Fl 1839 

0 HY Eino Currencies -Ecu 15x3 

tfS JS 1 P^ rone — — SF llll 

0 US Dollar Short Term i 12J8 

0 HY Euro Cur r Dlvld Pay Ecu 11.12 

0 Swiss MuNkanreney SF 14X6 

0 European Currency Ecu 2ZD8 

0 Brtotan Franc BF 13U2 

0 riww Mw « I4JS 

0 French Franc FF 15*76 

0 Swiss Mum-DIvtaem 5F 9X2 

0 Swiss Franc Short-Term SF 107.10 

0 CttWdtan Dollar CS 12.99 

a Dutch Florin Mgftl Fl 1418 

d Swiss Franc Dlvld Par SF 1*63 

d CAD MulUcnr. Dlv C5 1287 

0 Medltarronetm Curr 5F i*ji 

a Con vert teles . , jf Ut 

MALABAR CAP MGMT ( Bermuda I LTD 

mWotoor Inti Fund S 1*95 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 

mNHnt Llmlled- Ordinary 5 43X8 

m Mini Limited -income s I3JH 

mMinj C-ta LM -Spec issue _S 2789 

mMIntGid Ltd -NOV 2002 s 21X3 

mMlrrl GW Ltd • D0C 1994 I 1110 

/7> Mint G Id LW -AUQ 1995 S 1*15 

m Mini Gtd Currencies S 7X5 

mMlnr GW Currencies 20£n_s 7x0 

mMWSpResLtd (BNP) S UP 97 

m Amors GM Futures I 1134 

mAflteno Gid Currencies s *95 

mAltwno Gtd Flnmdals lnc__5 10J9 

m Athena Gtd Financials Cop J 11.97 

m AML Capital Mkts Fd 5 1178 

mAHL Commodity Fund S 10X5 

m AML Currency Fund i 9.17 

mAHL Red Time Trod Fa S 1*27 

mAHLGM Real Time TnJ S 1083 

mAHL CM Coo Mark LW S 1086 

mwp Guaranteed 1996 Ltd__X *80 

m M op Leveraged Hecov. Ltd X 1197 

raMAP Guaranteed 2000 S 1030 

mftUnlGGL Fin 2063 S 683 

mMlnl Phis Gid 2003 — . — S 1*03 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Front 51 Homdton Bermuda 1109)2929789 
w Moritime Ml i-Sertor I Ltd 8 98881 

w Mar Mime G1W Beta Series-* 81991 

» Mprllirna Gtei Delta Serlesx 78*83 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MOT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

mrirrwA- 4 ||7^ 

6 CtoEs B 1 11493 

PACIFIC CONV STRATEGIES FD LTD 

m Class A t 97X3 

0 Class B S 95X4 

MAVERICK I CAY MAN I 1881) Mf-7942 

m Maverle* Fd % Ui.1743 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD 

ml he Cora*rFiBidLW _S 7*85 

MEESP1ERSON 

RofclnSv 1612k* AmslenjOTi (20-571 11881 

H Asia POC Growl n Fd N.V i 4*79 

w Aslan Capital Hoktlnas S 6lJ» 

wAsKsi Srteaion Fd N.v Fl 94X3 

Hr DP Amer. Growth Fd N V._S 33 JC 

w EMS Offshore Fd N.V Fl 102X6 

I HfEurote Growth Fund n.v. _fi 6iXJ 

w Japan Diversified Fund 1 6599 

wLovertraed Cob Hold — —i 59x4 

w Tokyo Pac Hold. N.V 1 25*61 

MERRILL LTNCH 

0 Dollar Assets PorttaJ I o 5 180 I 

0 Prune Rate Portfolio s Nun 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM ! 

WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

0 ClassA S 898 | 

0 Class B 6 *38 I 


Franca; FL- Dutch Borin; 


**- Amsterdam exchange; 

pubBcation; r bid pne* 


MERRILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 

AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A _AS 1787 

0 Category B AS 17J3 

CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A Cs 11X3 

0 Category » 1389 

CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

0 DOSS A- 1 S 9X0 

0 Class 4-1 ■ 9.9* 

gCMSkB-l — _1 9X0 

OCiossM S 9.12 

OEUT5CHE MARK PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A dm 1381 

0 Category B DM 12X6 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO I DM) 

d rw—w-i -- - 14X1 

0 Cum a. 2 S >5X2 

aaoosB-i j i4.il 

0 CUBS A-9 « 1*2? 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO IU581 

0 Dan A-l DM 999 

0CUSSA-2 DM 1091 

0 CUSS B-l S 1J9 

0 CUBS B-l— s 1*13 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 
0 CcdtaoryA - i*M 

d Category B t 1*27 

US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

a Category A I 1351 

0 Category B S 1115 

YEN PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A Y 1299 

a Category B - Y 1268 

MULTI CURRENCY BONO RTF* 

0 ruwmX S 21X6 

0 Class B S 2197 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

a DMA S 993 

0 Ckss B S 992 

MERRILL LYNCH 

EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

w ri^MA s 1457 

a enss B S 1193 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

0 CtoUA S 1412 

a Class B S 1*71 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (US) 

d CtassA S 1*31 

0 Class B S 1*33 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

d Clan A S 1*23 

0 Oo5S B S 9X8 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 Claw A s 1178 

0 CKKS B S 1399 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 
0 Class A « 1490 

0 Class B S T481 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

dCIraA S I IX* 

tf Class B S 11.19 

DRAGON PORT FOLK) 

0 Class A S 13X1 

0 Class B S 1*18 

MERRILL LYNCH INC S PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A S 8X0 

0 Ooss B 3 1X0 

0 Class C S *48 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

0 Mufcm Inc 3 Pin a A 3 992 

d Mftxltrai IncSPHlUB 5 992 

0 Men icon Inc Peso Ptfl Cl A J *64 

0 MeaksnlncPesoPlflCIBS *84 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
w> Momentum dowdier Perf_l 8*19 

m Momentum RoMaw Fd — S 1)789 

m Momentum Rx ft R.U S 82.77 

m Momentum Stockmaaer S 15*66 

MORVAL VONWI LL£R ASSET MGT Ca 

ir Wilier Trtecam S 99k 

ir WHIerfunds-WlOerWnd Caps 15X8 

wWlUertunds-WUtertwnd EurEcu 1293 

wWlllertiinds-wnierea Eor_Eeu 1387 

m Wlllerfunds-WlllerM Italy -Lit 0187.00 

w WTIIertunds- WUIorea na S 1*89 

MULTI M A MAQ ER MCV. 

wCosh Enhoncemenl 3 *15 

ir Emerging Marketi ftl-ZZZs 21.18 

w European Grovrin Fd Ecu 14X7 

w Hedge Fund 3 12J9 . 

wJroanese Fund Y 677 ! 

ir Market Neutral S 9X1 I 

w World Bor*) Fund Eoi 11X8 1 

NICHOLAS- APPLEGATE CAPITAL MBT 
■V N A Flexible Growth F d . s 142.19 

w NA Hedge Fund S 13*44 

NOMURA INTI. (HONG KONG) LTD 

0 Nomura Jakarta Fund J *95 

NOR IT CURRENCY FUND 

mNCFUSD S 82*95 

mNCFOEM DM B9SX9 

fflNCF CHF SF 93479 

mNCFFRF FF 4460JC 

mNCFJPY _Y 8269580 

MNCF0EF BF 2703380 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grasvenor SLLdn WfX 9FEX4-71 -499 2918 

0 Odey Eureaeat DM 13457 

wOdey Eurocean s 138x5 

wOdeyEuroa Growth I nc_DM 135J6 

wDdevEureo Growth A« DM 13688 

wOdov EoroGrthSler Inc 1 3*77 

wOdey Euro GrthSter Acc _I 5497 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
Wlltanw Haase, Hamilton HMU, Bormuda 
Trt: 809 792-1011 F«n;M9 295-2305 

w Finsbury Group S 21497 

IV Olymata Securtte SF — SF 16801 

w CJyiftpfci Star? Emerg AMtsS 902 x 2 

w Winch. Eastern Dr agon ___s 1791 

wwlnrtl. Frontier 3 26*71 

w Winch. Put. Otymaki Star _s 15755 

w Winch. Gt Sec Inc PI (A) S *91 

tv Winch. Gl Sec Inc PMC) 3 9.15 

tvWincTLHktg Inti Madison— Ecu 149*08 

w winch. H tag Inn SerD Ecu T760JM 

w Winch. HUg inHSer F_ Ecu 1747JS 

wwtncSLHMg Oty Star Hedges 10S271 

IV Winch. Reser.MulTLGvBdLS 1*04 

w W i nc h ester Thoftand S 3*48 

OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front $1. Hamilton. Bermuda 189 295-8651 
w Optima Emerald Fd Ltd — 3 1081 


ftoaeco group 

POB 97X3000 A2 R o ttetdUiuXJI >10 2M1224 

0 RG AmerrCO Fund Fl 13180 

0 RG Euraae Frata R 123J9 

0 RG PaalK Fund Fl M380 

0 RG Dlvi rente Funa n 5X20 

0 RG ktaner Phis F Fl Fl 11481 

d RG Money Plus P 3 3 10*16 

a RG Mm, Plus F DM DM 11X36 

a RG MOW, Plus F SF SF 1117-71 

MaroBcBocosev Ams tenaa n Stocks 
ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DEI 
IN-HOUSE FUNDS 

w Astan Csoltai Hoktlnas Fd_S 6189 

•v DOtwo LCF Rothschild Bd_S 102151 

wDolrro LCF RathsOi Eo S 1DB3.T7 

iv Force Cam TrodHion CHF-SF xa*43e 

vLriOMl « 259481 

w Loverttaod Cop Hotatags 3 99X4 

-nMWwr «e 943-18 

■rPHChaUenao Swiss Fd SF 109S99 

b Prteouttv F a- Europe Ecu 11*943 

b PrioouRy FdJtetertlo SF 105X26 

b Pr tenuity Fd-Lntia Am l 13*129 

e Prteend Fond Ecu Ecu 11*663 

» Prtbond Fund usd s liana 

0 Prteand Fd HY Emcr MJtAA 11SP2S 

wSM*«tve invest SA S 341905 

D « 1*31648 

w US Bond PIUS 3 92084* 

wVorkaNuS Ecu 103656 

ROTHKm^JGROUPEDMONDOE) 

0 Asia/ Japan Emerg. Growths 1780SSD 

w Esortt Eur Porta Inv TM Ecu 131*31 

w Eurt» Sirota iswosunta —Ecu icu» 

b Integral Futures——! 98*84 

0 OpTKfesi Global Fd General DM 1H7J71 

» Qpttoest Gktert Fte inenmeDM 167X64 

0 PocHIc Nlea FixxS 3 *14 

wPermot Drofckor Grth NV— 3 2725J6 

1 Selection Hgrfaon FF nn*72 

b VlctalreArtane 3 50319* 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT ICJ) LTD 

mNvmroa Lxvnroovd HW 3 B4D.15 

SAFOIE BROUPrtCEY ADVISORS LTD 
mK«y Diversified IncFd Ltd-3 1159399 

SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 

iv Republic GAM S 

w Republic GAM Anwrlcti— 3 t)4J» 

W Rea GAM Em Mkts GtabOl Jt 137X3 

wReo GAM Em MM3 Lai AXIS 11*71 

■v Pcoubilc GAM Euraav CHFSF 11192 

nr R ecobi tc GAM Europe USS-t 
iv Republic GAM Grwth CHF-SF 

» Republic GAM Growth 4 t W*50 

w Republic GAM Growth USS5 14995 

wRBPUQDc GAM Opportunity S 11L73 

w Republic GAM PocHIc S )S*C3 

w Repute Ic Gasov Dai Inc S 

w Restate k Groev Eur loc_DM 
iv Ropubl Ic Lot Am AMoc— 3 
«v Republic Let Am Argent _S . 

wRaouteicUd Am Brazil 3 10481 

nr Republic Lot Am Medea— 1 101.15 

w Republic Lot Am Venez. s 9*93 


m Rep Salomon Strategies 3 

SANTANDER HEW WORLD (NV. 


SANTANDER HEW \ 
m C omman de r Fund 
mEsptorrr Fund 


SKANDINAVKKA ENSK1LDA PAN KEN 
5-E-BANKEN FUND 

0 Eurooo Inc S *M 

6 Rorron Ostem Inc J *95 

0 Global tnc 3 1 JD 

0 Lokranedei Inc 3 084 

0 Vorkten Inc S 182 

d Japan Inc — Y 9*52 

0 MHfc lnc_ I *95 

d Sverige Inc Sek 954 

0 Nardomrrtka ine S *91 

0 Teknotosl Inc 3 *97 

0 Sverige Rame iond Inc Sak 1*52 

SKANDIFONDS 

0 Eautty Infl acc_ 3 1696 

0 Euultv loll me. 5 13X2 

0 Eouitv Global 3 l J 2 

0 Eauffv Nat. Resoorons 3 184 

d EwXiy Japan Y 11*38 

0 Eouuy Nordic 3 183 

d Eouity U K — C 1X3 

d Eoulty Continental Europe J 1X3 

d Eouttv Mediterranean 5 LOO 

0 Eoutty North Amerteo 5 189 

0 EquHv Far East 5 4X2 

d iitfl EmerglTS Markets i UD 

0 Bond Inn Acc 3 12 x 2 

d Bond Inn Inc 5 7X0 

0 Bend Europe Acc 3 1X2 

0 Bond Europe Inc 3 180 

0 Bond Sweden Acc Sek 1*47 

0 Bond Sweden Inc Sek 1*34 

0 Bond DEM ACC DM U 6 

0 Bond DEM Inc __DM *94 

0 Bond Dollar US Acc 3 )J9 

a Bond Dollar US Inc s uh 

0 Curr. US Dollar * 1 54 

0 Curr. Swedteh Kroner ..5ek 12X4 

SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP 
SOGELUX FUND I5F) 

m SF Beads A USA S 1*13 

iv SF Bands B German* DM 3187 

w SF Bands C France FF 12290 

hr SF Bands E &B C 1 134 

■vSF Bonds F JOP4BI Y 2365 

iv SF Bands G Europe. Ecu 1733 

■v SF Bands H World Wide s 1791 

wSF Bends JBeWum BF 79980 

wSF Ea K North America S 1495 

wSF EO.L WE grope ECU 15X4 

wSF Ea-M Pocffic Basin y 1487 

w£F Eg. P Growth CaunlrtesS 1734 

iv SF E«i Q Gold Mines 5 32X1 

wSFEaR World Wide 3 1SX3 

«rSF Short Term SFrance_FF T7U909 

hr 5F Short Term T Fnr Fm 1444 

SOSITIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

IV SAM Bradf. ? 1 e .11 

iv SAM Diversified S 132X4 

iv SAAI/McGarr Hedge s HBJfi 

wrSAM Opportunity 3 121.18 

iv SAM Or octe. 3 9*14 

w SAM Strategy $ 114.11 

m Alpha SAM s 12*74 

ivGSAM CompajJte — 5 33390 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

mSR Eurncwaa S 181 J8 

m5R Asian 3 10592 

mSRInterntelon ol S 1043* 

SYtteSKA HANDELSBAHKEN 3A. 

146 Bd de la Pefrone, L- 2 D 0 Lusembawg 

b 5HB Band Fund S 5*19 

■vSvenska Set Fd Araor Sb 3 1*21 

w Svensko 5eL Fd Germany _S 1*34 

w Svenska Set Fd Inn Bd Sh J 12J3 

w Sveraka SoL Fd UlH Sh S 59.13 

wSvanskoSeLFdJoprai Y <*02 

■ySvenskaSeL FdMTO-Mkt — Sek 11285 

w Svensko Sef Fd Nordic SEK 9285 

wSwenskaSd.FdPodf Sh—J 798 

iv Svensko ScL Fd Swed Bd3_Sek 138219 

w Svensko SeL Fd Sylvia Sh_Ecu 11495 
SWISS BANK COUP. 

0 SBC 160 Index Fund SF 

0 SBC Equity Pin- Australia— AS 

0 SBC Eatery PlfrCanado CS 

0 SBC Equity Pm-Eurepo Ecu 

0 SBC £q Pffl-NeTt*rtand*_FI 

0 SBC Govern Bd A/B* J 

0 SBC BondPtfl-AUStrSA AS 

0 SBC Bond Ptft-AOStr S B AS 

d SBC Band PttVConSA a 

0 SBC Band Ptfl-CanJ B a 

0 SBC Bond PW-OM A DM 

0 SBC Bond PtfHJM B DM 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-DuMi G. A Fl 

0 SBC Bond PtfWJutch a B_P 1 

0 SBC Bend Pm- Ecu A Ecu 

0 SBC Band PtfFEcu B —Ecu 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-FF A FF 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-FF B FF 

0 SBC Band PHI-Plas A/B Ptas 

0 SBC Band Ptfl-Sftrllng A_l 

0 SBC Bond PtfHHOrAne B t 

0 SBC Bond PorttaHteSF A — SF 

0 SBC Bond Partfolto-SF B SF 

d SBC Bo re) m-uss A S 

0 SBC Bend PtfHJSJ B 3 

0 SBC Bond PUT- Yen A Y 

0 SBC Bata pm-Yrti B Y 

0 SBCMMF-A3 AS 

0 SBCMMF-BFR BF 

0 SBC MMF - ConS CS 

0 SBC DM Short-Term A DM 

0 SBC DM Short-Term B DM 

d SBC MMF- Dutch G. Fl 

0 SBC MMF - Ecu ECU 


w Optimo Futures Fund 3 T7XI 

w Optimo Global Fond 3 1117 

■v Dpi I mo Poriailo Fd LM ■ 3 994 

w Oo I Imo Short Fund 3 7X9 

“■ The Ptahnum Fd Ltd S 99* 

ORBITEX OROUP OF FUNDS 

d OrtXtax AstaPac Fd * 5.71 1 J 

0 OrtJlte* Growth Fd 3 *7467 

0 arbiter Heatth 4 Envtr Fd J 4.7740 

0 DrblteiJopwi Small Cop FdS 5.1S4D 

d Ortetek Notural Has Fd — CS 141110 

FACTUAL 

0 Eternity Fund Ltd 3 21*5351 

0 Irtiniry Fund Ud— _S 3679837 

m - ,8 “ 

0 Porvast U5A B, s 

0 Pcrvest Japan B— ,Y 

0 Ponresl Asia Pod f B S 

d Pervert Europe B Ecu 

d Pervert Holland B Fl 

0 Porvert France B FF 

0 Porvert Germoiv B DM 

0 Pervert Otel-OoJkir B J 

0 Pervert Obll-OM B DM 

a Porvast DoiFYen b Y 

0 Pervert ObfJ-Gtitaan a fi 

0 Porvert Obll-Franc B FF 

0 ftmrest Obft-ster B— c 

0 Porvert WkFEoj B Ecu 

fl Porvert Octl-Beiw B_ — _lf 

0 Porvert S-T Dollar B 1 

0 Porvert S-T Europe B Ecu 

0 Porvert S-T DEM B DM 

0 Porvert S-T FRF b ff 

0 Porvert S-T Bet PUra a -BF 

0 Porvert Gtaod B lf 

a Porvesl lot Bond B 1 

d Porvert OblHJroB. III 

0 Porvasi tat Eateries B S 

0 Porvert UK B 1 

0 Porvert USD Plus B i 9L38 

0 Porvert S-T CHF B SF 2SUB 

0 Porvert DCJl-Canoda b a 18*43 

0 Porvert Obll-OKKB — DKK 921X8 

PERNUU. GROUP 

1 Drafckar Growth N.V 3 269983 

f Emerging MdsHIdsa i 88*52 

f EuroMJr (Ecu) Lid Ecu 162434 

/ FtCFlnonctalsS Futurrs—J 949J1 

/ Investment Hldga N.V > T301X6 

I Media & CommunlcatloM-S 1DQ276 

f Nosed Ud 6 1885.84 

PICT ETA CIE -GROUP 

WP.CF UK VoJ (Uo) c 59 J4 

tvP.CFGefhXJvaf (Ui») DM 90X3 

WP.C.F Noronrva) ILu*l i 2*16 

wP.C-F Vaitaer (Lum_ Ptas 99JOO 

wP.CF Volltella (LUk) Ut 1123*680 

w P.C.F Vatfrance (Lusl FF lleU2 

1vP.UJ.V0taon0 5FRiU0i)-SF 281-73 

** P.lt.F. Vofeond USD (Lu»)-S 22609 

w P.U.F. Vataond Ecu (Lwi)-En 177.U 

» P.U.F. Valbond FRF (Luxl.FF 971.16 

w P.U.F. Valbond GSP ILUA)-t 9133 

hf P.U^. Valbond DEM I Lux) DM 28493 

WP.U.F. USSBdPfttlUnr) — I 9986880 

w PD-F, Model Fd — Ecu 11*78 

w P.U.F. Fldlle SF 49)35 

w P.U.T. EmeroMMi (Lux)_s 185X5 

IV P.U.T. Eur. Oooort (Lux) —Ecu 14381 

O P.U.T. Global Value (Lux) -Ecu 15391 

w P.U.T. Eurovte (Lux) Ecu 2149* 

0 Plate! VaNulsvt ICH) SF 633-55 

minll Small Coo (IQM) 3 486X4 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
eta P.O. Box 110* Grind Carman 
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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1994 


SPORTS 


Navratilova Gains Semis, Along With McNeil, Fernandez and M 


I.:*?*# 


The Associated Press 

WIMBLEDON, England — 
Martina Navratilova, pursuing a 
10th title in her 22d and final 
Wimbledon appearance, strained 
back after losing the first set 
Tuesday to beat Jana Novotna 
and reach the semifinals. 

The fourth-seeded Navrati- 
lova ran off nine straight games 
after the first set en route to a 5- 
7, 6-0, 6-1 victory over No. 5 
Novotna, the woman who beat 
her in straight sets in the semifi- 
nals last year. 

Unseeded Lori McNeil and 
Gigi Fernandez also advanced, 
but the possibility of four 
Americans reaching the semifi- 
nals was thwarted when Lind- 
say Davenport lost in three sets 
to Spain's Conchita Martinez. 

The 18-year-old Davenport 
saved a match point at 2-5 in 
the second set and won a tie- 
breaker to force a third set, but 
the third-seeded Martinez re- 
gained command to complete a 
6-2, 6-7 (7-4), 6-3 victory. 

Tuesday Results 

MEN'S SINGLES. FOURTH ROUND 
Guy Fennel. France, def. Jeremy Botes. 
Britain. 2-6. 61. 6-3. 61; Boris Becker (7|, 
Germany, del. Andrei Mcdveoev (*), Ukraine, 
67 (67), 7-5. 7-6 (7-3), 67 167). M, 
WOMEN'S SINGLES. QUARTERFINALS 
Lori McNeil, U£~d*t. Larisa N el land. Lai 
via. 63, 64; Martina Navratilova (4). U J-tfet. 
Jana Novotna (S).Czedi Repubflc.67.e-a 61; 
Conctilta Martinez <31. Spain, def. Ltndsov 
Davenport (9), US- 62. 67 167). 63; Glgi 
r ecnondci. 1)5, del. Zina Gantson- Jackson 
(13), U5. 6L 64. 


On the hottest day of the 
tournament, with temperatures 
reaching 105 degrees (40 centi- 
grade) on Centre Court. 
McNeil reached the semifinals 
for the first time by beating 
Larisa Neiland, 6-3, 6-4. 

Fernandez, known more as a 
doubles specialist, overcame a 
hamstring injury to beat Zina 
Garrison- Jackson, 6-4. 6-4. Fer- 
nandez had her left thigh 
strapped by a trainer near (he 
end of the second set, and al- 
though she was clearly in pain, 
managed to close out the 
match. 

In Thursday’s semifinals. 
Navratilova will play Fernan- 
dez and Martinez will face 
McNeil. 

In men's play, the three-time 
champion Boris Becker reached 
the quarterfinals by winning the 
fifth set of a suspended match 
against Andrei Medvedev. 

Novotna seemed in com- 
mand after she saved a set point 
in the ninth game of the fust set 
with an ace, broke Navratilova 
for a 6-5 lead and then served 
out the set in the next game. 

But the 37-year-old Navrati- 
lova dominated completely the 
rest of the way — serving and 
volleying with authority, hitting 
superb serve returns and keep- 
ing the charging Novotna at 
bay with passing shots. 

Navratilova was up 3-0 in the 
final set before Novotna finally 
held serve for 3-1 . Novotna bad 


Williams Confirms 
Mansell’s Return in 
French Grand Prix 


The Associated Press 

BRANDS HATCH. England 
— The former world champion 
Nigel Mansell will return to 
Formula One racing at the 
French Grand Prix on Sunday, 
it was confirmed Tuesday. 

In front of thousands of spec- 
tators at Brands Hatch, ManseU 
marked his return to Formula 
One driving by spinning on his 
first lap of tests for the Wil- 
li ams-Renault team. 

His former team announced 
his return for this weekend's 
Magny-Coure race, and nearly 
5,000 spectators flocked to a 
sun-soaked Brands Hatch cir- 
cuit to see him in a Formula 
One car for the first time since 
he won the world championship 
in November 1992. 

The winner of 30 Grands 
■Prix, he will partner Damon 
Hill in what Mansell said would 
be only a “guest appearance.” 

Since Ayrton Senna's death 
at the San Marino Grand Prix 
on May I. Williams has been 
talking with Mansell to try to 
get him back from LndyCar rac- 
ing, in which be won ihe world 
title last year in his first season. 

There was speculation Man- 
sell would also be available to 


drive in the European. Japanese 
and Australian Grands Prix. 
the last three races of the sea- 
son. No IndyCar events conflict 
with those races, so his partici- 
pation would not interfere with 
his obligations to the Newman- 
Haas IndyCar team. 

“I must add caution to every- 
one getting excited,” he said. 
“It's just one appearance, and 
well all just have to wait and 
see after that. Newman-Haas 
has given the Williams team 
permission for me to compete 
this weekend, so comeback is a 
strong statement. Lei’s say 
we’ve just been lent by New- 
man Haas." 

The deal was reported to be 
worth 5 1 million, but. in a refer- 
ence to Senna. Mansell said 
there were greater motivations 
behind his return. 

“We must all remind our- 
selves very sadly, since I started 
my career in the late '70s. I have 
a lot of personal friends who 
have passed away doing this 
job,” he said. “The motivation 
is not for money. You draw 
your own conclusions, but I 
think the most precious thing in 
life is life, and this game is not 
something to be played with.” 


four break points in the nexL 
game, but Navratilova saved 
each one and held. 

“That was huge," Navrati- 
lova said. “We could still be out 
there if I hadn't won that 
game.” 

On match point. Navratilova 
won in typical fashion — fol- 
lowing her serve to net, punch- 
ing a forehand volley, then end- 
ing the contest with a backhand 
volley into the comer. 

“She started to return so well 
there was nothing 1 could do," 
Novotna said. “She was just 
playing really, really well, much 
better than she did against me 
last year. Martina believes more 
in herself than last year. I’m 
sure she can [win the title].’' 

ft's the 1 7th time in her ca- 
reer that Navratilova has 
reached the Wimbledon semifi- 
nals. After her victory, British 
bookmakers installed her as the 
10-1 1 favorite for the title. 

Navratilova compared her 
run here to the U.S. Open in 
1991, when Jimmy Connors 
reached the semifinals at age 39 
and she got to the final. 

“Here it is three years later 
and I’m still running for iL“ she 
said. “It’s pretty amazing. It’* 
fun to be in the middle of it. I'm 
loving it.” 

Asked whether she felt as 
though she were in a dream. 
Navratilova said: “This is reali- 
ty. not a dream. I'm living it." 
McNeil, playing a classic 


serve-and -volley game, reached 
the semifinals of a Grand Slam 
tournament for only the second 
time in her career. She got to the 
semis at the U.S. Open in 1987. 

“I’m not surprised.” said the 
30-year-old. who upset top- 
seeded Steffi Graf in the first 
round. “1 fought very hard. It’s 
a great feeling. It represents a 
lot of hard work for me.” 

It's the first time in Wimble- 
don history' that the top two 
women's seeds failed to reach 
the quarters. The 19S1 U.S. 
Open was the last Grand Slam 
tournament where neither the 
No. 1 or No. 2 seed played in 
the final. 

The men's quarterfinals are 
set for Wednesday: Pete Sam- 
pras vs. Michael thong. Todd 
Martin v$. Wayne Ferreira; 
Goran Ivanisevic vs. Guy For- 
get; and Becker vs. Christian 
Bergstrom of Sweden. 

The seventh-seeded Becker 
completed a 6-7 (7-5). 7-5. 7-6 
(7-3). 6-7 (7-3). 7-5 victory over 
No. 9 Medvedev. The match 
had been suspended by dark- 
ness Monday night at 1-1 in the 
fifth set. Becker went down a 
break at 2-4. 0-30. but came 
back and broke for the match in 
the 1 2th game. 

“He had his chance but he 
just didn’t attack it right,” 
Becker said. “He stood back. 
He let me come in on him and 
that's a mistake when it’s 
crunch time." 















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Martina Navratilova, nine-time Wimbledon champ, battled back Tuesday from a first-set loss 


Heisman Winner’s Choice : NBA 


By Charlie Nobles 

,Vr» York Times Service 

ORLANDO. Florida — Regardless of 
which team selects him in the National 
Basketball Association draft, one thing 
appears certain about Charlie Ward: The 
Heisman Trophy winner is ready to make 
his living wearing shorts and sneakers. 

“Football is my last choice right now.” 
the point guard and self-described ex- 
quarterback said here last weekend, af ter 
working out for the Orlando Magic. “I’m 
a basketball player.” 

Ward, a 6-foot. 175-pounder ( 1.82 me- 
ters. 80 kilograms), comes into the draft 
Wednesday as something of a mystery 
inasmuch as basketball has shared his 
sports calendar with football. He aver- 
aged 10.5 points and 4.9 assists last sea- 
son, but played in only 16 games after 
helping Florida State to a national foot- 
ball championship. 

This is known: 

• He has distinctive jumping ability. 
Of the 40 players at the Phoenix Desert 
Classic predraft camp in late April, he 
had the best vertical jump: 31.5 inches 
(80.4 centimeters). 

• He is a court leader, so much >o that 
North Carolina's coach. Dean Smith, 
rushed to tell him, ”1 really love the way 
you play,” after Ward guided FSU to an 
upset at Carolina in lus junior season. 
And the Indiana Pacers' general manag- 
er. Donnie Walsh, said. “He has a pres- 
ence about him you just can't teach.” 

• He has character. Religious and 
soft-spoken, he freely gives of his time to 
charities and worthy causes. He resisted 
an offer to be included in that infamous 
S6,000-pius shopping spree by FSU foot- 
ball players last fall at a Tallahassee 


sporting goods store that may land the 
university on probation. 

There are those who believe his exem- 
plary work ethic will enable him to im- 
prove dramatically once he devotes his 
year-round efforts to basketball. 

“The question everyone is asking is, 
'How good can he be if he directs his 
attention to basketball?’” said Orlan- 
do's coach. Brian Hill. 

Ward believes the improvement will 
be striking. He likens himself to the 
Phoenix point guard Kevin Johnson, 
who was a substitute before becoming an 
All-Star. 

“Hopefully, one day my game can 
look like his.” Ward said softly. 

Actually, to hear him talk, it is simply 
a matter of time. “Once you practice, you 
can do whatever you want.’’ Ward said. 
“You can do anything.” 

Ward has worked out in recent weeks 
for five NBA teams with draft picks in the 
bottom one-third of the first round. Be- 
sides Orlando, which has the 27th and 
31st selections, they include Denver 
(drafting 19th), Chicago (21st). San Anto- 
nio (22d) and the Knicks (24th and 26ih>. 
Monday, he wrapped up the auditions in 
Atlanta (25th). 

The Magic doesn’t seem to be holding 
its breath Lhat he will still be around 
when its turn comes on Wednesday. He’s 
a very talented point guard, and there are 
teams ahead of us with some obvious 
needs.'’ said John Gabriel, the Magic's 
vice president of basketball operations. 

In the practice with Orlando. Ward 
was assigned to work against Anfernee 
Hardaway, a 6-fooL 8-inch (2.04 meter) 
guard who is one of the Magic's best 
players. Afterward, Hardaway said, “I 


knew he was good, bat I didn't know he 
was this good,” 

Ward has immersed Wnwlf in basket- 
ball after being passed over in the Nation- 
al Football League draft. Teams in that 
league were reportedly worried about his 
size and the specter of basketball as his 
first option. But anytime a H eisman Tro- 
phy winner is ignored, it sends shock 
waves. 

Ward doesn’t have much to say on the 
subject, at least publicly. “It’s just part of 
life.” he said, offering no more. 

The NFL snub grew more absurd ear- 
ly this month when the Yankees drafted 
him in the 18th round of the baseball 
draft. Ward hasn’t played baseball since 
he was a high school center fielder in 
ThomasviUe, Georgia. 

“Anything about me and baseball has 
to be mentioned with the idea that I 
haven’t played in so long.” he said. “In 
baseball, you can make a lot of money.- ■ 
but you have to start on ground level” 

Ward seemed amiable to the notion of 
playing for the Knicks. 

“They have a great team.” he said of 
Pat Riley's squad. “If they stay together, 
they can be right there again next season. 
Their coach is speciaL” 

And now they wait for Wednesday’s 
show-and-reli on Ward’s future. Anyone 
who cares to pul much import on the 
sentiments of Pat Kennedy, his Florida 
State basketball coach, will likely take 
Ward before first round’s end. 

“There is no doubt in my min d that he 
can become a classic, backup point 
guard to start out his career in the NBA” 
Kennedy said. “And with a 12-month-a- 
year commitment to basketball, he could 
really play in that league.” 


Hampsten to Miss Tour de France % 

PARIS (AFP) — Andy Hampsten of die UintocLStatcs ac d the£ ' 
Motorola team, forced out of the Tout tie Frimce^ T^iesday , : ^ 
following a t raining fall ■■■;'' -'■> • 

Hampsten win miss Sunday's start, Ieampg 


hopes. Hampsten, who finished fourth in the Tpurin 1987,&ttd 
1992, fell last week and injured his knee: ^ 

Daly Disqualified lor Score Errors 5 , _ ; i 

CROMWELL, Connecticut (AP) — John Daly 
fied from the Greater Hartford Open for.sigpih^aft ; incmto?;^^:- 
scorecard after the final round of the tournaraen Clhe PGA 
The card for Sunday’s final round, which was kept byh£s 
playing partner, Clark Dennis, read that Daly had a 3 -at No. 
wfaen he actually had a bogey 4 v said Leslie Smadiuos^ 
cations assistant for the PGA “Clark wrote down the wrong 
score, but it’s stiff John’s responsibility to check the cardliefQre 
signs it,” she said on Monday. - 'L,-, . . . ‘ 

Daly signed for a 5-over-par 75 and a 278 total (hatwas wbirfii . 
$11,520 fora tie for 22d. He left before tournament officials could W.J 




Beard Is Picked to Be Nets’ Coach * S 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New Jcisey (AP) 
returned to the New Jersey Nets on Tuesday as $enr;'{iew. tteadV.’^lt’ 
coach, replacing Chuck Daly, who resigned aftCT the National; ; 
Basketball Association dub’s quick exit from the playoffs.. v 'jVj >r.7 

Beard has spent the past four seasons as the coach at Howard ' -' 1 
University, where he had a 45-69 record. A former Nets assistant - 
coach, he led the Bisons to an NCAA Tournament berth in f 9^ul: ; 
only the second in the school's history: ; ■ * ’ . . ' .. 

Beard, 47, was a Nets assistant coach under Reed in flas 1 988-8?^? 


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the third year in a row they failed to get out of the -firetjopadic - 
was 88-76 in two seasons. ' '* • l ' 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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inin, 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1994 


Page 17 


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Expo Challenge 
Begins With 
Defeat of Braves 


The Associated Press 

Olympic Stadium was nearly 
full, the Expos had their best 
pitcher on the mound and Mon- 
treal was ready to begins chal- 
lenge for first place in the Na- 
tional Le agu e East. 

The Expos and more than 
45 , 000 'fans — the largest crowd 
since Opening Day — didn’t go 
home disappointed, 

Ken Hill outpitched Greg 
Maddux and became the Na- 
tional League’s first 11-game 
winner in a 7-2 victory over the 
Braves on Monday night that 

NL ROUNDUP 

pulled the Expos within 114 
games of Atlanta. It’s the clos- 
est Montreal has been to Erst 
place since May 29. 

‘The kids were prepared for 
battle,” said manager Felipe 
AIou of his team. “What we 
showed tonight was nothing 
new. This team just doesn't get 
the credit it deserves.” 

But they did get a chance to 
end the; three-game series in 
first place for the first time all 
season. To do so, they’ll need 
victories Tuesday against Tom 
Glftvine and Wednesday 
against John Smoltz. 

HH1 worked 716 innings and 
allowed four lots and six walks 
while striking out three. Mad- 
dux, loser of nis last two starts 
and winless in three, gave up 
five runs on nine hits in wi 


T feel I can pitch with any- 
body, andl showed it tonight,” 
said H3L “Maddux is a great 
pitcher and he kept his team in 
them But so did L” 

Montreal broke the game 
open in the seventh on Wfl Cor- 
dero’s bases^oaded sacrifice fly 
and CUff Floyd's three-run 
homer. The Expos added two. 
runs in the eighth on Tim 
Spehr’s RBI doable and WH 
Cordero’s bases-loaded walk. 

“This series isn't going to 
make or break us,” H2B said, 
“but it gives us an opportunity 
to cany on some momentum.” 

Possibly enough momentum 
to knock Atlanta out of Erst 
place for thc'first time all sea- " 
son. Montreal has been in sec- 
ond place all but one day since 
April 26. 

“They hit better than us, they 
pitched better than us, and they 
played better than us,” Fred 
McGriff said- “That’s why they 
won.” 

Giants 3, Dodgers Ts In their 
first, game at Dodger Stadium 
since a 12-1 defeat on the final 
day of the 1993 season eliminat- 
ed them from the division race, 
the San Francisco moved with- 
in 5% games of first-place Los 
Angeks.-;. 

The “injury-plagued Bud 


Black, making his second start 
since August, pitched seven 
scoreless innings and allowed 
just three hits. The Giants got 
their runs on Royce Clayton’s 
bases-loaded, two-run single in 
the first inning and Dave Marti- 
nez’s run-scoring groundout in 
the third. 

Astras 7, Reds ft At the As- 
trodome, Craig Biggio lined an 
RJBI single to the wall in the 
Iltb to pull the Astros within 
2 Vi games of the first-place 
Reds in the NL Central Divi- 
sion. 

Cmcrnnaii rallied with a pair 
of two-run homers in the ninth 
to tie the game, but Houston 
refused to give up. 

“It kind of took the wind out 
us,” said Houston’s Luis Gon- 
zalez, who had three bits and 
two RBIs. “But we came bade 
A win is a win, especially 
against these guys.” 

Cardinals 9, Mets & In New 
York, Gregg Jefferies tied the 
game with a ninth-inning dou- 
ble and an error by shortstop 
Jose Vizcaino allowed the win- 
ning ran to score. 

St. Lotus’s rally ruined a 
great comeback by New York, 
which scored seven runs — five 
unearned — with two out in the 
seventh to take an 8-7 lead. 
John Franco blew his fifth save 

Rodrig^^frriied 1V6 ywrring s 
for the victory. 

Phffies 5, Martins 1: Shawn 
Beside scattered six hits in his 
first complete game in four 
years and Jim Eisenreicb hit a 
two-run triple as Philadelp hia 
won at home. 

Boslrie struck out four and 
allowed only one runner past 
first base for his second career 
oomptate game. The Phillies 
jumped out to a 4-0 lead in the 
first and knocked out Florida’s 
Kurt Miller an inning later. 

Rockies Rates 7: In 
Denver, Dante Bichette hit two 
long home runs, including a 
grand sla m in the ei ghth, and 
Colorado had 17 bits. Bichette 
tied a dnb record with five 
RBIs, and Vinny CastOla and , 
Eric Young also bomered for J 
Colorado. San TDiegdrfttff 15 ' 
runners on base. 

David Nied got the victory 1 
and improved to 4-0 lifetime ; 
against the Padres. Andy Ashby 
hid his three-game winning 
streak snapped. 

Gabs 2, Pirates 1: Sammy So- 
sa’s shallow sacrifice fly in the 
eighth in Chicago ended Pitts- 
burgh’ s six-game winning 
streak. Sosa’s pop fly was 
caught in short center by sec- 
ond baseman Carlos Garda, ; 
whose momentum carried him 
farther into the outfidd. Kevin 
Roberson bardy beat the throw ! 
home. 





Mart PtidKpvA&nW Frantc-Pravc 


The Mets 1 Bobby Bonilla, right, was forced out at second by the Cards* Luis Alicea. 

SCOREBOARD 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEA04JE 
EnlDMM 

W L Pdf. 
NewYqrt 45 V MS 

Baltimore 42 31 475 

Boston 37 36 407 

Detroit 3* 37 xn 

Toronto 31 42 4S 

Centra* DMsttn 

Ctevetontf 42 39 sn 

Chicago 41 31 469 

M i nnesota » 34 £34 

KaneaeCdv 3* 35 -S27 

MltwaoMo . 25 - 39 473 

WNfltDMsM 

Texas 33 40 432 

CalHornla 33 44 Ml 

Seattle 31 44 413 

Oakkmd 30 43 ah 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EastDhtaioo 



W 

L 

Pt*. 

GB 

Attanla 

46 

27 

■630 

— 

Moat real 

45 

29 

40* 

IV* 

mtadetahla 

38 

37 

407 

9 

Ftarioa 

35 

4B 

M 7 

12 

New York 

33 42 

Central DtrWon 

440 

14 

andnnafr 

43 

31 

-581 

— 

Houston 

41 

34 

447 

zva 

St Louts 

37 

36 

407 

SYi 

PHLsbatWi 

36 

37 

-493 

6to 

Chtonaa 

31 <1 

WfctfDMsloa 

*31 

n 

Las Angeles 

38 

37 

407 

— 

Qdoraoio 

35 

40 

Mf 

8 

SmFranctoco 

33 

43 

JOB 

5Vi 

San Diego 

29 

46 

-387 

9 


Monday’s Line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
New York MI no ms m o 

Boston MO MO 180-1 4 1 

IC*v. WWcmon (») and Staley; sete. Fos. 
sob (7), votdez (9), Howard (9) and Rowland. 
W-Key, iz-l L— Seta. *4. HR— Boston. Coo- 
per cm. 

Kama* CRT M U «e— 2 S 0 
M mmwata mm no eee— i 5 2 

Canaan. Meochom IV, Brewer If), Mont- 
Bomery (9) and Motfanme; Tananl and Wtd- 
hedt W— Cordon, 04. L-Tmwnl. ML 
5w — Montgomery |12). HR— Minnesota. 
Leto* (10). 

BaHImore 011 040 BW-9 11 1 

e n t w i n ed: eee mi IM-4 13 2 

McDonald. TjBoltOn IS), Mills CB). Lts3mim 
l*) and Tadkatlj Moor. Mem 10) ana LAJo- 
mar.W— TBoltavl-1. L — Ncaiy.a-4.Sv — LeA- 
milti (Ml. HR*— Baltimore, Balnea (12), 
Tockell III. 

Toronto OM IN 000— I 4 S 

Milwaukee M2 120 OOk-S 13 • 

AXotTer. Careen (4), W.WHIknns If) and 
Ban! am EMredondSureoH.W— EldreA9-7. 
L— AXelfer. 3d. 

Detroit 3M m NO— 11 * 1 

Seattle ON in 400-. 1 2 1 

Belcher, Boevor (9) and To Melon Ffonertv 
(8); Ftamlno, MJHin (4) and Haselman. 
W— Mdwr.M. (j-Etomlna. S-10. HRs— Oe- 
rrolt, Phillips (101. Tattle Ion (Ml. 

CaMareia wo e» eeo- 2 7 3 

oakkmd in mo 02»— ie 14 o 

BaAnderson, lLeffem (2), BuKher 151, 
BJ’otterson (f) and CTureer. Oafemndro 
(0); Van Pound, Acre (8), Horsnxm |?) and 
Stein bach, Hemond (»>. tv— Van Poopd, 4-L 
Lr-BnAiMtermn. ml hrs— O akland, iLHen- 
dereon (4), Berrea (W. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
PlttS hw a B OM NO 010-1 5 2 

Cklcom 010 0M 01*— 2 5 0 

Cooke. Bottom If), White ID and ParrMh; 
Bank*. Myers (f> and Parent. W— Banks, 8-4. 
L— Ballard. 1-L Sv— Myers (14). hr— P ltts- 
ouralb Hunter (SI. 

Mkmta DM in 313-2 3 1 

Montreal 1 M 0 M 42x— 7 11 o 

C Maddux. Bedraslon (7), Olson ( 8 ), 
wohlere m and JXJwez; KJtlli. Rolas Ml. 
Wettel nnd (V) and DiPleldier, Spetir (81. 
W— tCHDI, 11 * L-GMOddux, 104. 

HR— Montreal, Ftovd (3). 

SLLMIS >01 MO 40-9 12 3 

MW Tom Oil ON 7*3-8 M 2 

on vores. Hativan (7), RJftxklBuez(7!,Afi>- 
ehn m and TMcCrlff, Pasnazzt (»)? P Antth, 
XManmndlo (71, Mason (Oj, Franco (91 and 
Hundley. W— R.Rodrtvuez,>Z L— Franco. 1- 
4.Sy— Aroctxj (7),HRs—5t. Louts. Lankford 2 
(151. New York. Kent (121. 

Florida 0 M we Me—] 4 • 

Philadelphia NO ON iex— 5 t § 

Miller. Mathews (31. Mutts (71. Harvey (■) 
and Santiogo; Basfcle and Oaultnn. w— Bos- 
klA *4. L— Miller. 1-3. HRs— Florida Shd- 
flrld (151. Phltadetahta, Morandtal < 11 . 


Key Picks Up 12th Victory 

Yankees 9 Pitcher Maws Dawn Red Sox to Lead the Majors 


The Associated Press 

Maybe Jimmy Key didn't 
have a career year lan season 
after alL Maybe he was just 
wanning up for this season. 

The American League’s best 
pitcher won his llth straight 
decision and became baseball's 
first 22-game winner Monday 
night in Boston, stopping the 
Red Sox on six hits over eight 
innings as the New York Yan- 
kees won, 5-1. 

*Tve never had a streak like 
this, where everything falls for 
me,” said Key, whose only loss 
cause April 9 in his second start. 
“Whether I pitch good or bad, I 
find a way to win and the team 
finds a way to win for me.” 

Key lowered his BRA to a 
tidy 3.01. In a season and a half 
with the Yankees, he is is 30-7 
with a 3.00 ERA 

His 11-game winning streak 
is the longest in a single season 
by a Yankees pitcher since Ron 
Guidry won 12 straight in 1985. 
Bob wickman, who pitched a 
perfect ninth, won II straight 
games spanning the 1992 and 
1993 seasons. 

Among Key’s admirers Man- 
day night was Aaron Sele, one 
of the brightest young pitchers 
in the league and Key’s oppo- 
nent on the mound. 

“Key makes the hitter hit his 
pitch, and a young guy like me 
learns a lot watching Mm,” said 
Sele, who has lost twice to Key 
this season. 

Mike Gallcgo drove in two 
runs with a sacrifice fly and a 
single, Luis Polonia had a run- 
scoring bunt and Wade Boggs 
doubled home a run for New 
York, which won its sixth 
straight 

New York’s last run scored 
when Rich Rowland, the Red 
Sox catcher, threw the ball into 


So* Frooctao 931 IN M*-» 7 • 
Lai Austin M3 SM DM— 3 4 3 

Block. Beck (I) oM Mamaring, Jc-Rood 
(|);Can«om,5erei«(B).Daal (3) andPte- 
20 . W— Block. 1« L^-Candtotti 54 9v— Back 
(14). HR— Lot Anselm. Piazza (111. 

The Mlchart Jordan Watch 

MONDAY? GAME: Jordan was T4or4 
with oskisie hi BlmiinshDin's34 win over the 
Memph is ewchs. He struck oat swlnahw In 
the second: walked in the RWu stole mcohi 
and third and taler scored. Jordan Bled out to 
carter Held bi the stxlh. He started up the 
middle in the eighth, etalo second and later 
scored: and struck out swinalna ki the ninth 
looms. Jordon had one patout In rtaM Held. 

SEASON TO DATE-. Jordan » baiting -W* 
(5i4or-2M) wnt*23rura,11 doubles, one Irl Me. 
25 RBIs. 27 walks. 71 straeowle eexlIVsioian 
bases In 30 attempts. Me has T20 cutouts, two 
assists and etatrt errors In Hgta field. 

Japanese Leagues 


San Dtega 201 *» *n— 7 15 1 


W 

L 

T 

Pet 

GB 

Cetarwto 32* 011 Hx— n 17 1 

Yamlurl 

42 

21 

0 

40 


Ashbv, Mauser (7), Tabaka (7), Sager (7). 

Yokuti 

31 

30 

0 

JOB 

» 

P-AAftarttaez (8) and Auamuv tiled. 

OwnlcM 

31 

31 

0 

400 

TO* 

AAJHunor (6). Holmes (6). a Ruffin (BI.Sl Reed 

Yokohama 

29 

32 

0 

MS 

12 

(») and GlrnrdL W— Nied. 7-4. L— Ashby, 36. 

Hanshln 

27 

36 

0 

M9 

15 

HRs— Son Diego. D.BNI (8). Colorado. 

Hiroshima 

34 

34 

0 

X14 

TO 

E-Young (5). Bldwite 2 (201. Costilla (31. 
CtOCtanatl (10 MO KM 60-4 9 • 

Haestan 3*1 IM im 81—7 M 0 

(11 loalags) 

Taesdcnrt Results 

Yum tort 4 , Hanshln 3 

Hiroshima 4. Ownlchl 1 

Yolruti vs. Yokohama, pat, rata 


Henson. J.Ruffln t5), DeLucta (7), JJBnmi- 
tay (91 aad Too Dense*; Kile, Hamglun (71, 


Pacific Leans 
W L T 

Pet. 

SB 

Hutak (9), Powell (9). To Junes (10) and Ser- 

SaftM 

39 

21 

0 

■450 



vo l*. EmsMo ( 111 . W— TaJanes. 3-3 

Date! 

34 

27 

0 

JS7 

5» 

L— J.Brontley. H. HRs— Cincinnati. Morris 

OrW 

33 

29 

0 

432 

7 

(5), Tcxjbensee 2 (61. Houston, Bagwati 134). 

Latte 

28 

34 

0 

.453 

12 


left field on a double steal by 
Gerald Williams and Randy 

Velarde. 

Scott Cooper hit his 13th 
homer in the seventh for Bos- 
ton’s only ran. 

The Red Sox' only real threat 
came in the sixth, and Key 
stuffed that, too. Vaughn and 
Andre Dawson hit consecutive 
singles with one out and the 
next batter, lefty-hitting Mike 
Greenwefl, bit a shot up the 
middle. 

Key gloved it on one hop, 
turned and threw to second for 

AL ROUNDUP 

the Start Of an TnnTng- jtq ding 
double play. He walked off 
pumping his fists in triumph. 

“I usually don’t show a lot of 
emotion, but I thought that was 
the play of the game,” he said. 
“Mike hits me well. I was just 
happy I made a good pitch and 
made a good play.” 

Boston has lost 10 straight at 
home. 

Brewers 5, Blue Jays 1: In 
Milwaukee, Toronto was no 
match for Gal Eldred, who seat 
the Blue Jays to their ninth con- 
secutive loss with his third 
straight complete game. 

Eldred allowed six hits, giv- 
ing opponents only 12 hits in 
his last three starts, to win for 
the fifth time this month. He 
also extended the Blue Jays’ los- 
ing streak, making it the longest 
for the two-time defending 
World Series champions’ since 
they dropped 12 in a row in 

Tigers 11, Mariners 1: In Se- 
attle, Mickey Tettleton hit a 
grand slam and drove in five 
runs and Tim Belcher stymied 
Seattle cm two hits for eight 
innings as Detroit ended its los- 


Ktatetsu tt 31 ! a 13 

Ntaaon Horn 24 39 i Jti I4to 

Tumor's RMutii 
DOM 5. Nippon Ham 1 
Kintetsu 7. Orix 4 
Setba vs. Latiappd. rata 


BASEBALL 
American Leagaa 

BALTIMORE— Pul SM Fornandm, pitcher, 
an ISGbv MiM list, rcftraadlv* to Juno W. 
RscaUed Arthur Rhodes, pitdwr. from Roctv 
■sfor, IL. 

Boston— Rataascd Gres Harris, pitcher. 
RocaUttl ConrBallev. utteher. (rom PawtuCk- 
•*,((-. . ... 

CLEVE LAND— Pul Paul ShasY,P(lchor,an 
IWav disabled list. Uncalled Chad Oueo. 
pit Char, front Chartatts. tl_ 

TEXAS— H rmUn nc d Roger pavHk. pitch- 
er. to Oklahoma City. AA. CaHad up Brian 
Bohmon. pttchor, ham Oklahoma aty. 

League 

HOUSTON Re called Brian Hunter, aut- 
fleMer.froni Tucsoa PCI- Sent Mike Simms. 
oulflRldor. Id Tucaavi. 

LOS ANGELES— Qpltanad Jose Offermafl, 
•horMiak to ABwauannnt. PCL Reamed Ra- 
fael BounrtaaL short M op. from Alhuauenwe. 

SAN DIEGO— Rscaltad Melvin Nieves, out- j 
neUor.framLasVoaoA PCL. Ophonod Kerry I 
Taylor, pffetwr. to Las Vegas. 

BASKETBALL 

NaNom! Basfcefbalt AHoclaftoa 

&ANANTOMIO— Named R.C Buford scout 
FOOTBALL 

NattaMd FoottnD Loagwe 

LA. RAIDERS— Slgnod Stare Hendrick- 
son. Dnebackor. 

TAMPA BAY— Waived Jo* Kino, safely, 
and Bruce Retmerv guce-cL 


ing streak at four and extended 
the Mariners’ skid to five 
games. 

Belcher who took a perfect 
game into the sixth, gave up just 
one unearned run. Dave Flem- 
ing allowed right runs in 3V6 
innings. 

Royals 2, Twins 1: In Minne- 
apolis, Tom Gordon and three 
relievers made two unearned 
runs stand up as Kansas City 
bested Kevin Tapani and Min- 
nesota. Gordon allowed five 
hits, including Scott Leuis’s 
10th homer, in 7K innings and 
struck out eight to win tor the 
fifth time in six decisions. 

A three-base rrdscue by cen- 
ter fielder Alex Cole ana Ta- 
pani’s two-base throwing error 
set up both runs in the sixth. 
Vince Coleman drove in the 
winner with his ninth triple. 

Athletics 10, Angeb 2: Rick- 
ey Henderson had three hits, 
including a homer, and reached 
base in all five plate appear- 
ances in Oakland, California. 
Henderson, Stan Javier, Ruben 
Sierra and Geronimo Berroa 
drove in two runs apiece for the 
A’s, who won their fifth 
straight. 

Henderson broke a 2-for-15 
chimp with a single leading off 
the first and scored the A’s first 
run, hit an RBI double in a 
four-run second; and hit his 
fourth home run, a solo shot, in 
the third. 

Orioles 7, Indians 6: In 
Cleveland, Jeff Tackett led off 
the eighth with his first home 
run in two years and Baltimore 
handed Cleveland its third 
home loss in a row. 

Tackett, a career J215 hitter, 
hit Charles Nagy’s first pitch for 
his first homer since June 30, 
1992. Harold Bained also ho- 
nored, his 12th, for Baltimore. 


LOS ANGELES — Traded Jim Pock, ito- 
ta nssm an . to Ottawa lor lutura eonsknr- 
attom. Named John Perplcti assistant coach. 
Bfffdtre Aug- 1. 

PITTSBURGH— Sleaod Klelt SamuebEan. 
defmsemon. 

VANCOUVER— Sonsd Shawn Antaskl, left 
wring, to multiyear m nt roU - 

WASHINGTON— Extandad contract of Jim 
SdmntoM, coach, ffunugfr IWM7 season. 
Signed Kettti Al lain and Tod Button, assistant 
coaches, to hrear c on tract s . 

COLLEGE 

NORTH ATLANTIC CONFERENCE— N- 
amed GB Chapman president; Rkfc Fam- 
ham vice president; and Edgar Johnson ml 
Baroara Kuoaar directorem-tonm. 

ARKANSAS— Named Kit Kyta women’s as- 

tiltpftf Ilmhri fiftH rtwvh 

BINGHAMTON— Named Sheryl Sousa as- 
sociate director at aihfetka. 

NEVADA— Ntanad Curt Kraft women's 
crosscowitry and track coach. 

RUTGERS— Named Pat Jordan wanimti 
golf coach. 

ST.MARY’S.CAUFj-lorrvMOrtlac.asiO- 
dote athtafle dlroctor. resigned. 

TEXAS — Mike Adam*, wide receiver. wDI 
takca 4Gday wove of ahMncs from the ham. 
Suspended Jonattm Hlrtersan, Itasbartar. 
Indefinitely. 


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MESSAGE 

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Appears 

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rfxsomis 


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' ' hmim m and hwav 
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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1994 



Compiled hy Our Sniff Firm Dispatches 

DALLAS — Germany had 
so raucb lo prove that maybe, 
just maybe, it was too much for 
the defending World Cup 
champions. 

After two mediocre games 
that had everyone from Bonn to 
Berlin in a tizzy, Germany's 
players, coaches and federation 
officials were hoping for a 
breakthrough in their final first- 
round match against South Ko- 
rea. 

And for 45 minutes the magic 
returned on a torrid Texas af- 
ternoon. Then, almost as quick- 
ly. it disappeared before almost 
64,000 spectators at the Cotton 
Bowl. 

Just like that. 

Germany won. 3-2, in one of 

the World Cup tournament's 

most entertaining games so far. 
but it was South Korea that 
received most of the accolades 
after a grueling duel in the sun. 

Remarkably. Korea rallied 
from a 3-0 deficit and turned 
the powerful Germans into a 
team sitting on the precipice. 

"We must admit, we are pret- 
ty lucky to have won this 
game," said Berti Vogts, Ger- 
many’s coach. 

That they were. After taking 
a commanding lead in the first 
37 minutes, the Germans col- 
lapsed on a day when tempera- 
tures reached almost 120 de- 
grees Fahrenheit {4y degrees 
centigrade) on the field. Fifty 
spectators were treated for heat 
exhaustion; 12 of Lhem were 
hospitalized and released. 

Although Germany finished 
first in Group C with the vic- 
tory. it was feeling the heat af- 
terward. 

The South Koreans, who 
were eliminated after two ties 
and a loss, were frustrated but 
had reason to be proud. They 
had rallied to tie Spain in the 
final six minutes, then had tied 
Bolivia before gaining the soc- 
cer world's attention Monday 
with their indomitable spiriL. 

“We didn't anticipate they 
could play all 45 minutes of the 
second half,” said Andreas 
Brehme, one of the only Ger- 
man defenders who bad a satis- 
factory game. 



By Tony Kdmhriser 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — Fire Bora! That's right, 
can hi™ Or cane him. Whatever. Bora, no- 


GOD HF HIT THE POSTF HARKES .-j 

ms’ ^ooooosarriTn” -Ttoe ■gLg&l 

game 

scora, abborra. . the parents?;-^'' 

“S* * ■ bose slow - ,t 

Too much par-lay is how. We beat Colombia mg hiatoM ispam,' 
and tgogo^o ogie all night long, 

Vantage 
Point 






anybnei you tlfinkjie t^cpmehackfKj^^ 
atlHewas onthe grtkmd for 20 
__ not W~ " ^ - — W * KS - 

f . .AT.g^.... . ....... 

rfiakermid Marceto Atfbpa" were 
i shoving at.eacb p&er,aftn;;ffaikes got Jgig?, - 


you 

Lalas’s hair got 
like that? (Talk 
about a time 
waip. This guy , 

looks like he's been living mder a rock m an oqdsiTrs 
Oregon rain forest— that ’60s, emaciated, brofrn '■■ TT TWA * ] 
rice jogger look.) r . ‘ . 

We were too lackadaisical. We didn’t, have and snowng 
any oomph; oomph being a traditional softer 

term. We didn’t have any strategy. 1 don’t think *^-«u y ^ . 

I’ve ever seen an American team quite as vui- Dexonay dlbWCTid and Dson 
ncrablc to the classic flank attack, or to over- Marcdo Bajboa any id^ 

lanping fullbacks. 1 mean, everybody in the Iike,^does he work on hw head^^by^Slammn^* ^ ,, 
world knows Romania is a counterattack team. Ins fBcemtqAadepgnew «>|W1 
Exactly who was marking Petrescu? And how/,:,-..’! And whafs^the deal 
could we not funnel the pitch against Florin AJanRotiKC 
Pnmea? - GaroettL 

I blame Bora. Getting Costa Rica to the sec- /here. ' l ;:-- '.-V 

ond round in 1990 doesn’t cut any ice now, pal . i So where do we stana? 


And what’s with walking off the field a few (Must yoo the 

minutes before the first half ends? Is it too much team? A real joiinialis£ 

journalist wouldn't haVeridden;'a‘40Toot 
that said ™Skibs Bandwagon”: ^.^be^way. : 


\{ 


> ~ ' 


Si 


to ask dial you coach die WHOLE game? 


Jurgen Klins m ann after scoring the first of his two goals in Dallas. Germany needed both to edge South Korea, 3-2. 


lud PtewrThe Awodnod Pros 


Hwang Sun Hong, who 
scored his team’s first goal in 
the 52d minute after catching 
the goalkeeper Bodo Illgner out 
of position, said, “We became 
physically superior in the sec- 
ond half.” 

Germany already was getting 
harsh criticism from the news 
media at home before the 
match. And few in the German 
media were about to let up after 
the team barely held on in the 
final 30 minutes, when the Ko- 
reans had three solid scoring 
opportunities blocked by 
Illgner. 

“Embarrassing win!” the Co-- 
logne tabloid Express said. “Af- 
ter fatal mistakes in defense, the 
match became more and more 
of a cliff-hanger.'' 

Munich's Abendzeitung pa- 
per was no more charitable, and 
said a repeat showing would not 
get the team past the next 
round. “Soitv — if Berti’s team 


plays like this, they can pack 
their bags," it said. ' 

“At first I think my players 
were intimidated by the Ger- 
man team, and this helped them 
score their three goals.” Kim 
Ho, South Korea’s coach, said 
after the game. “We knew if we 
just went out and played our 
game, we could come back.” 

But then their confidence 
grew as German players slowed 
to a jog in the second half. In a 
surprising move. Kim replaced 
the goalkeeper and captain, 
Choi In Young, with Lee Won 
Jae. to start the second half, but 
the risky move worked. 

“My first concern was to 
win,'’ Kim said. “If that means 
taking out the team captain, 
then 1 will take out the team 
captain." 

Once they realized they could 
attack the German defense, tar- 
geting Stefan Ef fen berg, who 
was playing for the Injured 


WORLD CUP GAMES, RESULTS, STANDINGS 


FIRST ROUND 

Allbmes GMT 

Three pants aworood tor a nctory 

GROUP A 

W L T GF GA Pb 
*-Romama 2 i o 5 5 a 

x-Swtewland 1 115 4 4 

United S la loa 1113 3 4 

Coten&a 12 0 4 5 3 

■ •advanced ro second round 
Saturday Juno 13 
M Pontiac. Mich 

Switzerland 1. United States 1 no 
At Pasadena. CaM 
Romania 3. Colombia i 

Wednesday June 22 
AT Poniioc. Mien 
Switzerland 4. Romania 1 

at Pasodene. Can; 

Ufhue aisles 3. Colombia i 

Sunday Juno 25 

A 1 P<3O0*ma Cali i 

Romania 1. Umrea Sales 0 

Ai Slanted. Cam. 

Colombia?. Switzerland D 

GROUP B 

W L T CF GA Pis 

j-9ra;ii 2 0 0 5 0 6 

Sweden 10 15 3 4 

Cameroon 0 112 5 1 

Russo 0 2 0 1 5 0 

* -advanced to second round. 

Sunday June 19 
at Pasadena, Cabi 
Cameroon 2, Sweden 2. Ue 

Monday June 20 

AI Slanted. CaM. 

Braze 2. Russia 0 

Friday June 24 
Ai Si anlord. CaM 
Brazil 3. Cameroon 0 

AI Pontiac, Mich. 

Sweden 3, Russia 

Tuesday June 2B 
Ai Slanted. Caul 
Russia n Cameroon. 2005 GMT 
At Pontiac. Mch. 

Brazil vs Sweden. 2005 GMT 
GROUP C 

W L T GF GA PU 
•-Germany 2 0 15 3 7 

K-Span 1 0 2 6 4 5 

Soutn Korea 012452 
Bolivia 0 2 1 141 

•-advanced 10 second round. 

Friday June 17 
Ai Chicago 
Germany 1. Bofana 0 

At Dallas 
Spain 2. South Korea 2. lie 

Tuesday June 21 
Al Chicago 

Germany 1. Span 1. se 

Thursday June 23 
Ai rotboro. Moss 
South Korea 0, BoAvia. 0. ue 

Monday June 27 
At Chicago 
Spain a. Bolivia i 

A: Caalas 

Germany 3. South Korea 2 

GROUP D 

W L T OF GA Pts 
•-Argentina 2 0 0 6 1 6 

Nigeria 1 1 0 4 2 3 

Bulgaria 1 1 0 4 3 3 

Greece 0 2 0 0 6 0 

i-aairancgd to second round 
Tuesday June 21 
At Fo<coro. Moss 
Argentina 4, Greece O 


AT Dellas 

Nigeria 3. Bulgaria 0 

Saturday June 25 
AT Foxboro. M*sa. 

Argentina 2. Nigeria 1 

Sunday June 26 
At Chicago 
Bulgaria 4. Greece 0 

Thursday June 30 
AT Fovboro. Mass. 

Greece vs Nagena. 5335 GMT 
At Dallas 

Argentina vs. Bulgaria. 2335 GMT 

GROUP e 

w L T GP GA Pts 

*- MeMCO 1113 3 4 

•■Ireland i 1 1 2 2 4 

Italy 1112 2 4 

Nsrwav 111114 

■ -advanced to second round. 
Saturday, June 18 
At Eas Huttierforo, n J 
Ireland 1. Italy 0 

Sunday June 19 
AI Washington 
Norway 1. UrUttOO 

Thursday June 23 
At East Ruthertam. NJ. 

Holy 1. Norway 0 

Friday Jum 24 
At Orlando. Fla. 

Mexico 2. Ireland 1 

Tuesday June 28 
AtEasi Rutherford. N.J. 

Ireland 0. Norway 0 

Al Washington 
Italy 1. Mexico 1 


Monday July 4 
Game 41 

Al Orlando. Fla 

Group F winner vs. Group E second place, 1605 
GMT 

Game 42 

At Stanford. Cam. 

Group B winner vs Group A. C or D third place. 
1935 GMT 

Tuesday July 5 

Qmi 43 
At Foxboro. Mess 

Group D winner vx Group 8. E cr F third place. 
1705 GMT 


•-Belgium 
Saudi Arabia 
Netnenanat. 
Morocco 


GROUP F 

W L T GF GA Pta 

2 0 0 2 0 6 

1 1 0 3 3 3 

1 1 0 2 2 3 

0 2 0 1 3 0 

•-advanced to second round. 
Sunday June 19 
At Orlando. Fla. 

Belgium i . Morocco 0 

Monday June 20 
At Washington 
Nethertarids 2_ Saudi Arabia 1 
Saturday June 25 
At Orlando. Fla. 

Belgium 1 . Netherlands 0 

At East Rurherted. N.J. 

Saudi Arabia 2. Morocco 1 

Wednesday June 29 
At Orlando. Fla 

Morocco vs Netherlands. 1B35 GMT 
Ai Washington 

Belgium vs Saudi Arabia 1635 GUT 

SECOND ROUND 

Saturday July 2 

Gone 37 
Al Chicago 

Germany vs Giouo A. 0 or F third place. 1705 
GMT 

Gome 38 
Al Wellington 

Switzerland vs Spam. 2035 GMT 

Sunday July 3 


Al Dallas 

Group ~ second place vs Group B second 
piece. 1705 GMT 

Game 40 

Al Pasadena, Caul 

Romania vs Group C. Dor Ethnd place. 2035 
GMT 


The Official Sprint World Cup 

Information Line 

Call 

+ 1 + 177 + 230 + 4348 * 

for daily updates on scores, players and 
game recaps 


Sprint 

Wwiiicu^mm 

Calls u-ill be hilled standard IDD rales 
♦ In lialv, dial +1+21 1-2.MM34S 


Al East Rutherford. N J 

Group E winner vs Group Oeecond place. 5035 
GMT 

QUARTERFINALS 

Saturday July S 
Gama 45 
A| Foxboro. Mass 

Game 43 winner vs. Game 38 winner. 1 605 GMT 
Gain 46 
Al Dallas 

Game 41 winner vs. Game 42 wlnn v. 1 935 GMT 

Sunday July 10 
Game 47 

Al East Rutherford. NJ. 

Gome 44 winner ve. Game 37 winner. 1 805 GMT 
Game 48 
Ai Stan lord. Cam. 

Gama 39 winner ve. Game 40 winner. 1935 GMT 

SEMIFINALS 

Wednesday July 13 

THIRD PLACE 

Saturday July 16 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

Sunday Jtriy 17 

Match Results 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 
Germany X South Korea 2 
Scorers; Germany — Jurgen Klinsmann 
112th. JTthl. Karlheinz Rledle lltth); South 
Korea — H wan o Sun Hong (5301, Hong M rung 
Bo (63d). 

Referee; Joel Quinlag (France*. 

Yellow cards: Germany — Andreas 
Brehme (24th). Jurgen Klinsmann (20th), Ste- 
fan E Honb er g !4STh); South Karoo — Choi 
Young II (89th). 

Spain 1 Bolivia 1 

Scorers: Spain — Joseo Guardlolo t)9ih. 
penalty), Jos« Luis Cominero (tom. 7) si); 
Bolivia — Erwin Sanchez (47th). 

Referee; Rodrigo Baflllta l Cost o Rico). 
Yellow cards: Spam— Albert Ferrer (44th). 
Jose Cominero (90th). 

Italy 1, Mexico l 

Scorers: Italy — Dcnlele Mossaro (48lh); 
Mexleo — Morcellno Bernal (SSliri 
Referee; FrancJicn Lomollna (Argentina). 
Yellow cards: Italy — Demetrlo Albert ini 
(31a); Mental — Joaauln del Olmo (25lh). 
Luis Garcia (63dl. Alberto Garcia (4Stn). 
Ireland & Norway 0 
Referee: Jose Torres (Colombia). 

Yellow cards: Ireland — Rev Keane I3dl. 
Rov Heuohlon OOfhl.Gory Kellv (84th); Nor- 
way — Gaeran Soenoin (37th), Erland John- 
son (45>h). 

Goal Scorers 

After matches m ov e d Monday 
4 — Jurgen Klinsmann. Germany, 

3 — Gabriel Batistuta Argentina; Marlin 
Dohlln. Sweden. 

3 — Florin RoducJeiu. Romania; Jose Camln- 
era. Spain; Jan Galkaelxea. Spain; Gheorgnc 
Hag), Romania; Georges Bregy. Switzer land; 
Adolfo Valencia. Colombia; Luis Garda. 
Mexico; Romgrta Brazil; Fuad Amin. Soudf 
Arabia; Claudio Cantggla. Argentina; Hrlsio 
Stallchfcov. Bulgaria; Hong Myung Bo, South 
Korea. 

1 — Julio Salinas. Sec in: Hwang Sun Hang, 
South Korea; Sea Jung Won. South Korea; 
Eric Wynolda. U.5.. Rav Hough Ion. Ireland; 
More Degryse. Belgium; Kletli Rehdol. Nor 
woy; Roger Liung, Sweden; David Emoe. 
Cameroon; Francois Omom Blylr. Comer- 
eon; RaL Brazil, wim Junk. Nemerfancfe; 
Gasfon Toumeni, Nether lands: D^pa Mara- 
dona. Argentina: Rasnm* veMnl, Nigeria: 
Daniel Amokadri, Nigeria; Emmanuel 
A mu nike, Nigeria, a lain Sutler. SwUzenana: 
Stapnane Chaeutsaf, Switzerland; Adnon 
Knup, Switzerland: Ernie Stewart, u.S. Dina 
Bogota. Italy; John Aldrldae. Ireland; Be- 
bota, Brazil; MOrcu Santas. Brazil; Oleg So- 
lenka Russia; Tomas Brolln, Sweden: Sami 
Jitter. Saudi Arabia; Philippe Albert, Beh 
glum; Manommed Che ouch, Morocco; Sam- 
son Slasta. Nigeria; Iordan Lelchkav. Bulgar- 
ia; Daflld Borlmirov. Bulgaria; Daniel 
Pofmcu. Rormxila; John Lozara Colombia; 
H erman Gavlrta. Colombia: Kanneinz Rle- 
dle. Germany, Erwin SAnchez. Bolivia; Jason 
Guordlola Spain. 


Thomas Strunz. (he South Ko- 
reans became the aggressors. It 
looked like a team of seasoned 
veterans compared with the 
Germans. 

“We got them going with our 
mistakes." Vogts said. 

Although it was a memorable 
effort. South Korea Mill leave 
the United Slates without its 
first World Cup victory in four 
appearances. 

“We had a good chance, and 
we feel bad,” Hwang said. 

Almost as bad as the Ger- 
mans feel. 

It was a frustrating. faLigu- 
ing day despite the play of Jur- 
gen Klinsmann, who scored 
two goals, one of them the 
Cup's best so far. In the 22th 
minute, he took a pass from 


left-footed shot inside the goal 
posL 

On Klinsmann 's second gO&L 
and fourth of the tournament, 
he controlled a looping cross 
from the right and made a pow- 
erful shot. The ball slipped 
through Choi's hands on the 
way into the net. 

Still, Klinsmann was not in a 
celebratory mood afterward. 

“We were not mentally 
fresh." he said of the second- 
half collapse, “and it was hard 
for us to pick up speed." 

Lothar Matthaus, the team's 
captain, was more contrite, say- 
ing, “We are a little bit arro- 
gant. so this was the result." 

The victory ensured Germa- 
ny of playing’in the single-elim- 
ination second-round on July 2 


Thomas Hassler on the right in Chicago, with its opponent 
side and, with his back to the yet to be decided. And whether 
net. controlled the ball with his Germany finds its form is any- 
right foot. In a brilliant move, one's guess. 


he then hooked a waist-high 


vou're firing a coach? Classic flank attack, mV; DoH^Mson to fiius^tms'ctMUin 
Aunt Gertrude. You wouldn’t know a flank ^ looks liter w^^e/si vaa 
attack from a flank steak. And please don’t jalk >• bocause Group C steeps yw 
about “Tunneling the pitch" against Florin ^ hard to imagine., Buigapa 
Prunea, which you obviously made up. C^mcroon beating Russia. 

I didn’t mean anything bad. As you know,- orawms? oi io*s_ - - 

Fm a convert, I love the World Cup^ was just sbSting ev£t ia 

trying to emulate foreign senbes. When 
Italy lost to Ireland, the Itahan writes “ 

• Hie indications are well get BraziL 'nns isa^t "^ 

: .hide Jar.: us^ ; 'E^.i§ | 


their team was a disgrace and an embarrass- 
ment to the country. I figured that’s the way 
you’re supposed to write about the World Cup. 

I don't want to fire Bora. Who in his right mind 
would criticize the coach who led the United 
States to its greatest soccer moment ever? 1 
simply want him to be less enigmatic. And 
enough with the aviator glasses and the Buffalo 
Springfield haircut already. 

You know what they say in soccer: Life’s a . . .. . 

pitch, then you die. So ^ me congnttulate B^a. & 

Ah, Romania. The Carpathian Curtain de- you today with die wends of Fernando .Qavyo>>' ‘ 
scends. I watched every commercial-free minute (one of our many players who is as American. 
of iL The logos in the upper left corner didn’t apple pie, bat may not- be the boy next door^e'. ; 
bother me (Though shortly before the half 1 had unless you live in Uruguay), who Mined into a’TY?^- 
an uncontrollable urge to buy a Snickers bar and wunm aftw t h e - iwn p u tw yu al gia^iiMr.rjol^Kr ''. 
charge it to my GM Master Card.) But I have bia, and safl to Mr. and Mrs. 
some questions about the tdecast ca, “All of yon who said we ccsild^dtma ' ' 

When John Harkes’s shot hit the goal post, you wbo said wc wouldn't 

U “OHMI- ‘ ~ — * 


awing Duke, Brazfi is so 
need one name tob^i us. 



But getting to the second romid' is -a ] 

y y n m p ltshmmi 


(LAT. Reuters. WPj how could Roger Twibell not shout. 


you can just eat iL That's righVe^it^ 





fa’-'- . 

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fre** 1- ’,., , 

a'--. 

I:*:;-;:, 

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; 

cmj^ p : “’r' 

■Jiti •“ 

Jesse>- l " 

ewb . . 
lmi - 

sped e -" n: "7 

natrer: J"- • 
iha: 

JitienK + ; 

Bu: • 

cuulit.T-’v '• 
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Meti. ' - 
ftJi !>i ' r ' : 
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Ro'rino 3-&fc 
ond -sl:.. ° *' 
jadK '•••• 
ona roir. J i*i 

u-i i.vr 'T. 



Ends as 



Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

CHICAGO — What began 
last year at 12,000 feet in La Paz 
has ended on considerably low- 
er ground for the Bolivians. 

The good news for all those 
who instinctively lean toward 
the underdog was that Xabier 
Azkargorta's suspension-de- 
pleted team finally got its first 
goal in a World Cup finals on 
Monday. 

The bad news was that Spain 
got three goals — two of mem 
from the midfielder Jos6 Luis 
Caminero — along with Group 
Cs second and only other spot 
in the second round. 

The Spaniards, who managed 
two ties and a victory in their 
three group matches, will meet 
Switzerland, the second-place 
finisher in Group A, on July 2 
in Washington. 

The Bolivians, who earned 
their only point with a score- 
less tie against South Korea, 
will head home with the knowl- 
edge that it all might have last-, 
ed longer if their star midfield- 
er, Marco Etcheverry, had not 
been red-carded after just 
three minutes in the opening 
match against Germany and 
forced to miss the rest of the 
tournament. 

“Sure we are sad today be- 
cause we haven’t qualified for 

« 4.1.. 




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Spain got its first goal 
19th minute -oh' a ^praaliy4at% ; 
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Bolivian midfielder Cari«&^ 
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minutes later; Spain’s 
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round;” the attacking 
fielder Erwin S&hchez, 
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absence, fired a shot from^5K-V 
feet (15 meters): that defied® 
off the Spanish_drfender/ J 
into the upper-right corner^ 
the goal. It was Bolivia’s 
goal in six matches spat 
three World Cup finals ( 

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Spain s Jose Luis Caminero, right, charging past Bolivia’s Vladimir Soria in Chicago. 


Wanted: Home for World Cup Sod 


The Associated Press 

PONTIAC, Michigan — They came, they 
played and the grass survived. 

But now there is 90,000 square feel (8,100 
square meters) of Kentucky bluegrass that 
needs a good home. The turf was developed 
by Michigan Stale University researchers for 
World Cup games played indoors at the Pon- 
tiac Silverdome. 

World Cup officials said Monday that they 
would like to give the grass to Detroit or 
Pontiac. The grass has to be out of the Silver- 
dome by Friday so workers can prepare for a 
convention on Sunday of 50,000 Jehovah’s 
Witnesses. 

“We’re looking for an angel to move iC 
said Jim Duggan, executive director of the 
Michigan World Cup Host Committee. 


“If we can’t find someone, we’ve got about 
12 individuals or businesses who want to buy 
it,” he added. 

Pontiac would like to have the grass, but 
does not have a place to plant it by Friday. 
Detroit has room on Belle Isle, but* does not 
have anyone to move it. 

If the sod goes up for individual sale — at a 
price of about 7 cents a square foot — Dug- 
gan said he would buy some. 

“My lawn’s not good, but I'd love to have 
some World Cup grass in ray from yard," he 
said. 

The last World Cup game at the Silver- 
dome was being played Tuesday, with Brazil 
facing Sweden in their final Group B match. 


. .u. Caminero put an end toW:' : 

the second round,” Azkargorta Puny m the- 71st minute, wjt+i . 
said, “but at the same time, we in 8 ^ second-goal off a®Hr' 

through ball from the def«uli+ 
Albert Ferrer.' 

Caminero, grateful as he 
wondered about the Boft 
strategy. 

“Yes, I do believe TrtipjW!. 
was hit in such a hard way i£ft£y 
he lost some of his conc»(!ti&s : -l 
tion and physical abiiity^W ' 
said. M I do believe a goaBseeptip’- 
ia that condition should bc&r : 
placed.”. : 


arc very proud because we 
qualified for the World Cup 
and we played the best we 
could.” 

Spain had Bolivia surround-; 
ed with talent, but somehow 
managed to make the game 
closer than it deserved to be. 
Then, in what can only be de- 
scribed as an act of foolishness, 
midfielder Caminero picked up 
a second yellow card in second- 
half extra time after fouling the 
Bolivian defender Juan Manuel 
Pefia about 50 meters away 
from the action. 

Despite its wealth of talent 
and a rich soccer tradition, 
Spain has yet to reach great 
heights in any World Cup. In 
eight previous appearances in 
the finals, it has never made it- 
past the quarterfinals. 

. And though Monday’s, 3-1 
victory looked impressive' on 
paper, the truth is that the 
Spaniards struggled for much 
of the match against a clearly 
inferior opponent and will have 
to improve quickly if they are to 
set a new national standard. 

“1 believe we could have 
played better today, but to 
qualify was the main objective,” 
said Coach Javier Clemente. 


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scold him. • 

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have done that,” Caminerbsw^ 
of his heart-to-heart wiihT3e^ 
mente after the match. 
dumb play. Obviously, rdjdS$?- 
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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL 



'•$£ 





TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 29, 1994 


Pflge 19 






ico and Ireland Advance to 2d Round, Italy Put On 


1-1 Draw Drops Italians 
To 3d, With Mexicans No. 1 


■ y Cu V Mb >Ov Staff FrrmDapauhe 
, WASHINGTON — Marce- 
*. “ no Bernal's perfect shot saved 
| uc against Italy that sent 
Mexico to the World Cup’s sec- 
? ond round Tuesday, while the 
Italians were left to await their 
; fate. 

j Bernal's 58th-minute goal 
i wip«3 out Italy’s lead from 
< Daniele Massaro 11 minutes 
earlier. 

Mexico’s scoring — a high of 
three goals — lifted it to the top 
of Group E. in which all four 
teams finished tied on points 
and with even goal differential. 

Ireland also advanced by fin- 
ishing second ahead of Italy. 
Both teams had a 2-2 goal dif- 
ferential but under the rules, 
Ireland's 1-0 victory in their 
head- to- bead match was deci- 
sive. 

Italy must await the outcome 
of other groups before knowing 
whether it will advance as one 
of the four best third-place 
teams. 

Norway, which tied Ireland 
0-0 on Tuesday at Giants Stadi- 
um in East Rutherford, New 
Jersey, was eliminated with 1-1 
goals. 

Both Italy and Mexico knew 
that a defeat would probably 
spell elimination from the tour- 
nament and it was no surprise 
that the game was tense and 
littered with stoppages. 

But only three players were 
cautioned by Argentine refer- 
eee Antonio La Molina. 

Mexico's Joaquin del Olmo 
was the first man to be shown 
the yellow card for a foul on 
Roberto Baggio. It was his sec- 
ond caution of the tournament 
and be will miss Mexico's sec- 
ond round game. 

His teammate Luis Garcia 
was also cautioned, for en- 
croaching at a comer, while De- 
metrio Albertini was shown the 
yellow card for Italy for a foul 
on Alberto Garcia Aspe. 

Italy needed a victory at 
l Robert F. Kennedy Stadium to 
be sure of pursuing its cam- 
f - paign for a record fourth World 
l Cup victory. But it never looked 

! - a champion against a Mexican 
squad that w35 largely its equaL 
“On a scale of one to 10, we 
played 10.” said the Italian 
midfielder Nicola Beni. “We 
gave everything. We have been 
improving. We played a good 
match." 

“We still have optimal 
chances of advancing," said the 
I talian soccer federation presi- 
dent, Antonio Matanese. 
Mexico, which reached the 


quarterfinals when it hosted the 
tournament in 1970 and 1986, 
next faces Group JD’s rvanerup 
— most likely Nigeria. 

“We knew the Italians were 
going to press hard and in fact 
they came close to scoring more 
than the one goal” Bernal said. 
“But we were able to muster the 
class and courage for the win" 

With Mexico mainly seeking 
to control the ball early on, the 
Italians had trouble taking con- 
trol of the game. Giuseppe Si- 
gnori and Berti spoiled two 
scoring chances inside 20 min- 
utes. 

Signori failed to get full force 
on a bicycle kick alone in the 
goalmouth in the 27th and the 
Mexican goalkeeper. Jorge 
Campos, made the save. 

Luca Marchegiani, replacing 
Italy’s suspended No. J keeper. 
GianLuca Pagliuca, kept Iialv 
from falling behind in the 41st 
when he pushed a left-footed 
blast from Garcia Aspe over the 
bar. 

Italy's best first-half chance 
came seconds before halftime 
when Baggio duped the Mexi- 
can offside trap with a through 
ball to Berti, but Campos 
rushed out in time to deflect 
Berti's foot- tip shot. 

Baggio, who has been fight- 
ing an inflamed Achilles ten- 
don, showed only occasional 
flashes of the brilliance that got 
him voted 1993 player of the 
year. 

Italy also was missing its vet- 
eran sweeper Franco Barest out 
with a knee injury. 

Massaro added punch and 
broke open the game two min- 
utes after halftime, shortly after 
replacing Pierluigi Casiraghi in 
the second half. 

The 33-year-old forward 
chested down a Demetrio AJ- 
bertioi lob in the penalty area 
and sent a crossing shot past 
Campos into the far side of the 
net. 

Mexico replied when Carlos 
HennosiUo tucked a short pass 
past a retreating Signori and 
Bernal slammed a perfectly an- 

f jed shot past Marchegiani’s 
ingertips into the lower goal 
comer. 

Signori squeezed off a shot 
inside the area in the 69ih but 
Mexico's defense cleared when 
Campos let the ball bounce off 
his chest. 

Berti came close to putting 
Italy through near the end, but 
his header from near the penal- 
ty spot was not enough to over- 
come Campos’s diving save. 

(AP. Reuters) 



Irish and Norway Tie, 0-0, 
In Battle of the Long-Shots 


Drag MlUvThc A-socLucd Pros 

Italy's Paolo Makfini charging frith the ball past Mexican defenders on Tuesday in Washington; they played to a 1-1 tie. 




m 







8(4) SdrnngS Agrac Ftjmx-Prcwc 

Norway's Erik Mykland squeezing between Ireland's Roy Keane, left, and John Sheridan during the (W) draw Tuesday. 


CmpSedby Oar. Suff Fnm.&spwte* 

EAST RUTHERFORD. 

New Jersey— Ireland and Nor- 
way slugged it out in a CM) draw 
on Tuesday in the World Cop. 
finals, which sent the Irish into 
the second round from Group E 
and condemned Norway to an 
early exit ... 

The 1-1 draw between Italy 
and Mexico left all four teams 
in Group E deadlocked ai four 
points from' three matches and 
also, even qngoaldifferentiaL ; 

Mexico finished - atop the 
group thanks to the three goals 
netted during the .Gist round, 
and Norway finished last as it 
had scored the fewest goals. Ire- 
land finished exactly even witfr 
Italy, but ended up in second 
place in the group and went 
through to the second round 
because of its 1-0 victory over 
the Italians on Jane 18. 

The meeting of die long-ball 
exponents Norway and Ireland 
was an untidy affair, with the 
attacking limitations of. both 
sidesmnch irr evidence. 

Norway almost scored in the 
75th minute, when striker . 
Goran Sarioth’s shot bounced 
off the tap of the bar after a 
huge scramble in from' of the- 
Irish goal - !?. ‘ 

Pat' Boxmer, the Irish goal- 
keeper, taking his record tally 
of international selections to 7ft, 
displayed a steady nerve and 
good handling as the Norwe- 
gians drove in a sales of long 
shots in the frantic closing min- 
utes. . 

. The massive Irish contingent 
in the crowd celebrated as Ire- 
land reached the seoond round 
for the second World Cup in a 
row, while Norway, in its first 
finals since 1938, had to pre- 
pare to leave. • ■ . 

At the end of the game, the 
Irish fans chanted “We want 
Jack, we want Jack,” calling for ’ 
Coach Jack Charlton to appear 
00 the field.; 

Chariton had . watched . the 
game - from ' high up in the 
stands, . forced to sit away from 
die bench by FTFA,soccerV 
world governing body, _ as a 
punishment for yelling at offi- 
cials at the previous game, 
against Mexico. . 

He finally emerged to huge 
cheers about 20 minutes after 
tbe final whistle, waving to the 
Irish fans. “ 

Ireland will now goto Orlan- 
do, Florida, to play the winner 
of Group F. Charlton had r 
wanted to avoid the beat of 
Florida but be is sure to settle 


for that rather than a ticket 
home. ’ 

- Ireland’s Steve Staunton 
tried to get the get the game off 

to a spectacular start by fiimga 
left-footed r free kick from wide 
on the right straight at goal. .The 
ball sailed weD over the top- . 

The game had just entered 
the third minute when the yel- 
low card came out for. the- first 
time. Jos& Torres, the Colons bt- 
an referee, showed it -to Irish 
-midfielder Roy Keane for a 
challenge of Norway's Enk 
Mykland. He later showed it to 
Ireland’s Ray Houghton and 
Norway’s" Sorioth. 

. The veteran striker John Al- 
dridge produced a moment of 
brilliance in the 11th minute to 
set -up a chance for Ireland. 
The 35-Year-old striker neatly 
chipped" the ball over his mark- 
er and scot over a -center that 
Stiglnge Bjomebye headed be- 
hind for a corner with Jason 
McAtefcr waiting to strike. 

With both teams famed for 
long-ball tactics, it was expect- 
ed to be a .crunching clash of 
two teams with identical styles. 
But Ireland played the ball 
neatly tq : feet instead of beads 
and played better in the first 
half. - 

The trouble was, it didn't cre- 
ate Tnin-h danger to the heart of 
the Norwegian defense. . 

-Three -minutes into; the sec- 
ond half, Norway finally gave 
Bonner something to do. Paul 
McGrath, made a rare mistake 
with a weak clearance to Mykr 
land, whose low drive was saved 
by the diving keeper. 

But Ireland started to create 
more danger at the other end. - 

McAteer sent John Sheridan 
raiding down the right and his 
: shot on goal was intercepted by 
Bjomebye. 

Then Andy Townsend curled 
in a cross from the left and 
Aldridge efimbed above Rone 
Bratseth only to head wide from 
six meters." I "... 

Iceland sent on David Kelly 
for his World Cop debut in" the 
67th minute to replace bis fel- 
low striker Aldridge, land 'Lars 
Bohinen went hi for Norway m 
placc'of Oyvind Leonbsrdst n- 

Kj'etiT Refcdal who scored' 
Norway’s winner a gains t Mexi- 
co,, tested Bonner with a low 
shot that the goalkeeper com- 
fortably saved and then Sorioth 
birat McGrath and powered in a 
low drive that Bonner held easi- 
ly.- (Reuters, AP) 


wciRkP cup wrap-up Americans Split by Discord Over Suspension of Harkes 


Compt/ed h Our Staff From Dispatches 

9 The English midfielder 
ul Gascoigne hopes to return 
soccer by Christmas, nine 
■nths after breaking his right 
his Italian club. Lazio, said 
jsdav. 

jascoigne had surgery in 
idon in early April to repair 
break sustained during a 
zio training session. A club 
okesman said Gascoigne 
zould have tests on the leg in 
Jritain on Monday and join his 
.eammaies on a training trip to 
Switzerland from July 15. 

“The doctors have said it will 
be January before be can play, 
but Gascoigne says he plans to 
be back by Christmas." the 
spokesman said. 

' He said Gascoigne was al- 
ready swimming daily and do- 
ing cycling exercises to 
streaigthen the leg. The tests 
Monday will show whether he 
can move on to more strenuous 
activities. 

Gascoigne moved to Lazio 
from Tottenham Hotspur for 
$10 million in 1992. His move 
to Lazio was delayed by a year 
after a serious knee injury in the 
1991 English FA Cup Final. 

c The Swedish striker Martin 
Dahlin has rejected an offer 
from Everion of the English 
Premier League and signed a 
new contract with Borussia 
Monehen glad bach in Germany, 
the Swedish daily Expressen re- 
ported Tuesday. 

■’ll was the most difficult de- 
cision of my life," Expressen 
quoted him” as saying. "I’m 
staying in Germany.” 

Dahlin, who has scored three 
goals in two World Cup games, 
signed a two-year contract with 
the team late last year, but it 
had a clause allowing him to 
leave between June 1 and July 
1. He said he had given Everton 
a preliminary agreement on 
Monday in a telephone call 
from Detroit, where he is with 
Sweden’s World Cup squad, 
but had changed his mind and 
signed with Borussia a few 
hours later. 

E,. pres sen said Dahlin's re- 
negotiated salary with the Ger- 
man club would be 3 million 
kronor (5395,000) a year. He 
said Everton had offered him 5 
million kronor. 

• The match between the 
United States and Romania re- 
ceived a 7.8 overnight rating in 


29 major markets, putting it on 
track to be the most-watched 
soccer game ever in the United 
States. 

The Americans' 1-0 loss, tele- 
vised by the ABC network, ap- 
pears likely to eclipse the record 
6.6 rating for the 1982 World 
Cup final between Italy and 
West Germany, also televised 
by ABC. 

The d umbers did not include 
those watching on the Spanish- 
language Universion network. 

• U.S. soccer officials will al- 
low the Los Angeles Salsa to 
play in the Mexican pro league 
□ext season. 

The U.S. Soccer Federation 
voted, 10 to 8 with three absten- 
tions, to allow the American 
Professional Soccer League 
club to join Mexico's 14-team 1- 
A division when play starts in 
August. It approved the plan 
over the objections of Alan 
Rothenberg, the federation 
president and World Cup orga- 
nizing chairman. 

The team, which has played 
several Mexican and World 
Cup teams, will also remain in 
the American league, using a 
35-player reserve pool as need- 
ed in Lhe six weeks when sched- 
ules overlap. The one-year ap- 
proval extended U.S. football's 
civil war between Rothen berg's 
planned Major League Soccer 
and the APSL os’er which will 
be the nation's premier league. 

Rothenberg has named Los 
Angeles as one of 12 cities that 
will have MLS teams. 

• Dino Zoff. Lazio's coach 
and the captain of Italy’s vic- 
torious 1982 World Cup" squad. 

was formally named president 
of the first division club on 
Tuesday. 

The club's board unanimous- 
ly appointed Zoff at a meeting. 
His appointment was first an- 
nounced in March. 

Lazio’s owner. Sergio Crag- 
notli, who has been president 
until now, will retain a post on 
the board. Zoff. one c<f the all- 
time great goalkeepers, has 
coached the Roman team for 
the past four seasons. 

• The French international 
Basile Soli signed a three-year 
contract with Glasgow Rang- 
ers. the Scottish champion, for 
£2.7 million (54.17 million! on 
Tuesday. 

(Reuters, AP. AFPi 


By Steve Berkowitz 

Washington Peat Service 

DANA POINT. California 
— The U.S. Soccer Federation 
and the U.S. national team, 
which for years have worked at 
being taken seriously, were red- 
faced as they tried "to sort out 
midfielder John Harkes's one- 
game suspension for receiving 
two yellow-card cautions in the 
first round of the World Cup. 

Federation officials appealed 
the action through FIFA, soc- 
cer's governing body. But the 
appeal was summarily dis- 
missed. 

The defender Alexi Lai as 
blasted Federation officials for 
failing to understand and com- 
municate to players the tourna- 
ment’s rules regarding suspen- 
sions for an accumulation of 
two yellow cards in separate 
first-round games. And Harkes 
continued to complain about 
the second yeiiow card, which 
he received Sunday during the 
1-0 loss to Romania at the Rose 
Bowl in the final first-round 
match for both teams. 

The loss prevented the Unit- 
ed Slates from finishing first or 
second in its first-round group. 
Group A. and thus clinching a 
berth in the second round. But 
the United States remained in 
position to advance as one of 
the top four third-place finish- 
ers. and on Tuesday nigh; it 
found a berth in the second 
round as a result of the two 
games in Group E. 

Even though the United 
Slates did advance to the sec- 
ond round, where single-elimi- 
nation play begins and the 
Americans are likely to play ei- 
ther Sweden or Brazil. Harkes 
wifi not be allowed to piay in 
that match. 

He received his first yellow 
card during the opening U.S. 
first-round match against Swit- 
zerland for an overly aggressive 
tackle. He drew the second yel- 
low card Sunday for delaying 
play whiie Romania’s 
Gneorghe Hagi was attempting 
to take a free kick. 

Hagi repeatedly complained 
to the Dutch referee. Mario Van 
Der Endc. that Harkes and U.S. 
midfielder Mike Sorber were 
cot standing the requisite 1C 
yards from the free kick. 
Harkes and Sorber appeared to 
have beer, -.tandina where Van 
Der Ende initially had instruct- 


ed them; a dispute ensued and 
Harkes received the yellow 
cord. 

U.S. soccer officials, includ- 
ing Coach Bora Mflutinovic 
and. initially. FIFA’s on-site 
spokesman. Keith Cooper, were 
confused about the impact of 
Harkes’s second yellow card. 

But the tournament's appli- 
cable rule was established and 
communicated to the national 
federations of all 24 teams by 
FIFA in mid-December. Any 
player who receives two yellow 
cards in separate first-round 
games is suspended Tor his 
team's next game, whether that 
game is in the first round or the 
second round. 

The confusion came from FI- 
FA’s decision to allow players 
who receive only one yellow 
card during Lhe first round to 
begin the second round with 
clean records. 

U.5. officials erroneously be- 
lieved — and apparently told 
the U.S. players — efrat yellow 
cards received in first-round 
play would not, under any cir- 
cumstances, result in suspen- 
sion for a second-round game. 

“The burden ends right 
here,” Bill NuttalL the U.S. gen- 
eral manager, said “If the play- 
ers are misinformed, it’s myself 
and the ceachiDg staff. That's 
where the burden lies.” 

“This is thoroughly embar- 
rassing to all of us/' Lolas said. 
“At the very least, you should 
know the rules of the tourna- 
ment you're playing in. I was 
out there thinking if I got a 
yellow card, nothing would 
happen. 

“We’ve tried so hard to prove 
to the rest of the world that 
we’ve gained experience and 
dial we’re so much better at 
playing soccer. And then we do 
something ...” 

He didn't finish the sentence. 

Harkes said that had he 
known the rule, he would have 
suggested that Milutinovic not 
play him Sunday. But he said 
that knowing that he would be 
suspended if he received a sec- 
ond yellow card would have 
made no difference in his ac- 
tions Sunday. 

“For me to get a yellow card 
for standing in the wall is ridic- 
ulous,'' said Harkes. who ques- 
tioned whv only be was given a 
yellow card when Sorber had 
been standing next to bun. 




s'WW . - rJ 




mm 








(>&hrid Bwin/A^cucf Fffticc'Piwc 

Defender Alexi Lalas criticized U.S. Soccer Federation officials for failing to understand the nde on yellow cards. 


Germany Drops 
Effenberg After 
Obscene Gesture 

Reuters 

CHICAGO — Coach Berti 
Vogts dismissed Stefan Effen- 
berg From the German soccer 
team on Tuesday for making an 
obscene gesture to the crowd 
during a match and said the 
midfielder's international ca- 
reer was over. 

Vogts told Effenberg u> pack 
his bags and leave the team ho- 
tel near Chicago after he ges- 
tured to German fans during 
the 3-2 victory over South Ko- 
rea in Dallas cm Monday. 

“It was the last straw.** Vogts 
said. ‘T will not allow a player 
to make an obscene gesture like 
that to the crowd. I told him in a 
talk this morning that he would 
not play for Germany at this 
World Cup. He accepted that 
and left the hotel 

"As far as I am concerned 
Effenberg is over as an interna- 
tional player.'* 

Asked whether he would 
think about picking the versatile 
but controversial player again, 
Vegts said: “Not before 2006.” 


In Rwanda, Still Time for Soccer 

Gnus Fall Silent in Kigali During Televised Matches 


Jhe Associated Press- 

KIGALI, Rwanda — Jean 
Claude N van thud stole the 
soccer ball arid with a deft 
kick sent it skidding between 
piles of clothes that serve as 
goal markers at a refugee 
camp in Rwanda. 

“Goal!" shouted the 14- 
year-old, celebrating a respite 
from a life lived within the 
confines of a cyclone fence. 

Soldiers, too, lake time out 


st populs 
the world. Guns and mortar 
batteries in embattled Kigali 
fall silent when World Cup 
soccer is broadcast on televi- 


“I wonder if both sides 
aren't doing the same thing,” 
said Major General Romeo 
Dallaire of Canada, the com- 
mander of the UN forces in 
Rwanda, "powering up gen- 
erators and watching football 
instead of fighting for awhile. 


We could use more of that in 
Kigali" 

At the Meridien Hotel 
where United Nations sol- 
diers, refu g ees and j oumalists 
stay, jubuarit cries boom 
when a favorite team scores 
during the tournament. The 
tie to homes far away and 
distraction from the horror of 
war are prolonged by mom- 
ing- after play-by-play ana- 
lyses. 

More than 200,000 Rwan- 
dans have died m die rivilwar 
since April 6. • 

Untroubled by the fighting 
around them, the boys at King 
Faisal Hospitalrefugee camp 
mmrie thrir sports idols and" 
anxiously seek news., about 
tbrir .favorite team competing 
in the Woitt Cup — Nigeria, 
which lost 2-1 u> Argentina on 
Saturday! ' \ 

The boys playpn mangy : 
grass. Augustin Niyibili, !3, 


wears men's boxer shorts held 
by a belt on bis skinny hips: 
Some play in bare feet; one 
kicks and the ball goes in one 
direction, his too 1 big shoe in 
another. 

The ragtag, five-a-side 
teams play well, fairing and 
dodging, coaxing the. ball to- 
ward makeshift goals. . 

“We like to be out of 
a*ool we can play soccer all 
or the tnne," said Alexis Nsa- 
bnnana, 16 , the goalkeeper. 

e * er ywliere love 
football, said Geny McCar- 
thy. a Unicef representative 
in Rwanda and an enthusias- 
hc supporter of Ireland’s soc- 
cer team. 

. “Football is the one thing 
that has united the people of 
Ireland, so I can understand 
that the children of Africa 
jjnt their team to win, too” 
McCarthy said. 




e JSa&ias. 






IJpg 


I tJ 9 * 




Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1994 


OBSERVER 


1 Oth-Inning Stretch 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — You warn 
to know about baseball. I'll 
tell you about baseball. Hank 
and me, father and son. It's 
baseball bring? us together. 

Thirteen times a year we drive 
160 miles for baseball. That’s 80 
miles to Baltimore, 80 miles 
back. Thirteen times 160 miles 
makes 2,080 miles we drive every 
summer. Just for baseball. Fa- 
ther and son. Driving to and 
from Baltimore. Together. 

Thirteen limes we park the 
car at $5 per park. Makes $65. 
Thirteen tunes we sit in our $ 14 
seats way out in right field. 
That’s $364 for seats, plus $65 
to park, makes $429. 

The parking is of the way- 
out-in-nght-field type too. You 
can tell Hank feds — well, 
“ashamed' isn't quite the right 
word — maybe “disappointed" 
is closer to what Hank feels. 

Feels disappointed in his 
dad. I don’t know how you 
know this, because Hank is 
good at keeping his feelings un- 
der deep cover. Maybe Hank 
doesn’t feel disappointed. May- 
be the old man is imagining 
feelings his son might have, 
based on the feelings he — 
Hank’s father — would have if 
he were a son accompanying his 
own father to these 13 games. 

He’d feel — no, not “disap- 
pointed” in the old man. that 
wasn't the right word either. 
He’d feel “embarrassed." The 
old fellow was shelling out 
$429. and for what? Seats way 
out in right held. Parking space 
too. Way out in parking-lot 
right field. 

□ 

What I'd be thinking if I were 
Hank would be this: “The old 
man can’t cut the mustard, else 
he wouldn’t settle for way-out- 
in-right-field treatment” 
Baseball It brings you to- 
gether. Father and son. “Isn't it 
great to be out at the old ball 
game. Dad?” 

“I don't care if I never get 
back. Hank!” cries Dad, then 
wishes he hadn't. Never gelling 
back from a Baltimore Orioles 
game has become an ala rmin g 


possibility of late. Games had 
become longer and longer. 

After one five-and-a-half- 
hour game Hank and 1. father 
and son. had come perilously 
dose to complete honesty with 
each other about our feelings 
toward baseball. Only a father 
could take the lead, however. 

So, “Hereafter.” I said. "let's 
make it a rule that we will leave 
the game, no matter what, and 
head home after they’ve played 
three hours.” 

Hank's quick agreement — 
“Three hours is long enough” 
— was jolting. Could the lad 
possibly dislike baseball? Had I 
somehow failed to imbue him 
with an essential American love 
of the game, no matter how 
long it lasted? 

It crossed my mind that may- 
be he thought I was in deep 
financial trouble and that this 
bad stifled the cry for suste- 
nance in his throat, for the ball- 
park price of peanuts and 
Cracker Jack for two could 
wipe out a $10 bill. 

□ 

The 80-mile drive home after 
the game tests our character as 
football is said to test character, 
and this is hard to take. 

Sometimes it was an ordeal, 
but at least you didn't have to 
listen to grown men talking 
drivel the way you did when 
football was going on. 

Anyhow, driving 80 miles in 
the middle of the eight is heavy 
going when you’ve been up 
since 530 A. M., Hank’s get- 
ting-up hour, but he insists on 
doing the driving anyhow. Says 
he likes to drive and isn't really 
f allin g asleep at the wheel, but I 
lmow what he’s thinking. 

“Can't risk my life letting the 
old man drive at this hour of the 
night. At his age, probably blind 
as a bat. Reflexes all shot too.” 

I know what he's think ing. It's 
what I'd be thinking if I were 
Hank. Worse than that, he 
knows I know what he's think- 
ing, but both of us have too 
much character to speak these 
thoughts. Baseball doesn't build 
that character. It just brings you 
together. Father and son. 

Ne* York Times Smut 


True Wit? Doubts on Algonquin 



By William Grimes 

.Vin York Tima Sen at 

N EW YORK — Seventy-five years ago this 
month — no one knows the precise date — the 
feast of wit known as the Algonquin Round Table 
got under way. 

Time has only heightened its allure. Throughout 
June, the Algonquin Hotel has been celebrating the 
patrons whose lunchtime gatherings made the hotel 
a byword for wit and sophistication. It has even 
renamed one of its rooms the Round Table Suite and 
filled it with Round Table memorabilia. 

“Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle,” a film about 
Dorothy Parker and Robert Benchley. set in the 
Round Table milieu, will reach movie screens in the 
fall. And in late August. Parker will be canonized 
with a spiffy Modem Library edition of her poems 
and stories. 

For three-quarters of a century, legends of the 
fabulous lunchtime conversation spun by the likes of 
Benchley, Parker, George S. Kaufman. Marc Connel- 
ly and Heywood Broun have fizzed like liny Cham- 
pagne bubbles, intoxicating the public mind. The talk, 
as one of Alexander Woollcott's biographers put it, 
was “brisk and airy and sprinkled with bons mots." 

There's just one problem. The historical record, and 
the less than enthralled commentary of many Round 
Table contemporaries, suggests a scandalous thought'- 
The Round Table really wasn’t all that funny. 

The members were. No one would argue that 
Parker’s stories. Bench ley's sketches and movie 
shorts, Kaufman and Connelly's plays and movie 
scripts were not grade-A American humor. But the 
Round Table itself was a different matter. 

“I spent a good deal of time researching this, and 
my sense is that it wasn't funny at all” said James R. 
Gaines, the managing editor of Time magazine and 
the author of “Wit’s End.” a history of the Round 
Table. “It was very competitive, which made it son 
of unfunny. I certainly would not have wanted to 
have lunch with them.” 

Even in the group’s heyday, the 1920s. critics 
complained that the Round Tablers showed a flair 
for self-promotion, back scratching and logrolling 
that dwarfed the combined literary talent of the 
group. The hilarity seemed a little forced, the jokes 
more than a bit calculated. 

One occasional visitor to the Round Table said 
that it took him five lunches to steer the conversa- 
tion to primitive man. thereby allowing him to 
launch a “smartie." Alas, it has not survived. 

Alan Rudolph, the director and screenwriter of 
“Mrs. Parker” and a fan of the group, does concede 
that some members used cheat sheets for their one- 
liners, and that Broun would bring his son to feed 
him straight lines. 

How funny was it? There’s room for serious 
doubt. After alL this was the group that originally 
called itself the Luigi Board, after their waiter, and 
whose evening poker club was called the Young 
Men's Upper West Side Thanatopsis Literary and 
Inside Straight Club. 

In a sprightly moment, someone asked Franklin 




-. program 

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reports say * 
name any. . _ , 

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however: 


Buckmg&am Pak&sfcd . 




Jennifer Jason Leigh (right) as Dorothy Parker in the film version. 


v-Jm RtnWpb 


P. A dams to use “meretricious” in a sentence. Ad- 
ams, whose popular newspaper column “The Con- 
ning Tower” puffed the Round Table incessantly, 
was quick to reply, but “Meretricious and a Happy 
New Year” is not exactly Oscar Wilde caliber. 

H. L- Mencken, who often stayed at the Algon- 
quin, called the group “literati of the third, fourth 
and fifth rate.” He loathed them. “He thought that 
they were silly and not true wits and more interested 
in publicity than in serious artistic accomplish- 
ment,” said Jonathan Yardley, the editor of Menck- 
en's “My Life as Author and Editor.” 

“And he was right.” 

Mencken’s judgment seems mild compared to 
Kaufman's dismissal of the group, and he was a 
member. He called them “a motley and nondescript 
bunch of people who wanted to eat lunch, and that’ s 
about alL” 

Edmund Wilson also found Benchley, Parker and 
company less than scintillating. Unfortunately for 
them he recorded some choice specimens of Round 
Table humor, which, he noted sourly, seemed devot- 
ed to awful near-puns. Connelly’s play “Honduras” 
was panned as “the big Honduran ce contest” 
Parker delighted the group by bending the name 
Hiawatha into “Hiawatha nice girl until I met you.” 

Wilson, of course, disapproved of the group. But 
even admirers provide pretty damning evidence. “The 
Algonquin Wits.” a kind of Round Table joke book 


published in 1968, makes very depressmgteadmg. It’s 
unlikely thatanyone wfco labors through its376 pages 1 
will run the risk of actually laughing out loud. 

A cold examination of the record shows that the : 
famous Round Table gems tend/ to fall into two 
categories: written rather than spoken lines, .and 
quips whose provenance seems shaky -at best. y-- : 

It has never been dear whether Benchfey- or.-' 
Woollcott, if anyone, said. “Fve got tfc get oiit of . 
these wet clothes and into' a dry mar tini. " According. 
to legend, Claire Booth Luce said to Pmk«L, as the- ; 
two prepared to enter a door, “age before beauty.” \ 
As she swept by. Parker was supposed: to bave. ' 
replied, “Pearls before swine.” - ■■:■■■■■: i 

Luce denied that the encounter ever tobk piaCc. - •. 
and John Keats, a Parker biographer, agreed that the 
zinger, like other trademark Round Table jokesi 
probably originated well outside the confines of thd r j 
Algonquin Hold and became attached to a member 
of the group because it seemed tike the son of thing/ \ 
that a Round Tabler might say. "v 

There was one subject, however, that did inspire*- 
something tike real humor, with malice afore- -' 
thought, among the members of the circle, and that. 
was the Round Table itself. “I interviewed Marc : 
Connelly, and be got off a couple of goodiines,” said 
Gaines. “I asked if he remembered when th&Rbuhd ~ 
Table finally ended, and he said it would be like ; 
remembering falling asleep.” 


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WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 



Europe 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 





Tomorrow 


High 

Low 

W 

High 

LOW 

W 


OF 

CIF 


CIF 

CIF 



!9f94 

Kiri, 

s 

JO/05 

21/70 

* 


21 170 

13/» 


21/70 

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Artata 

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12/53 

9 

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pc 

ABmi 

34/93 

22/71 

* 

32*89 

27.71 

I 


29/W 

21/7D 

s 

29/84 

2170 

9 

B^ad, 

34/93 

22/71 


34/93 

2170 > 

Etnto 

3I/BH 

18*4 

1 

26*79 

16/01 


Bros sob 

23/73 

9/40 


24/75 

1«*>51 

■sh 

Pudar*« 

35/96 

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3«/93 

2271 

9 


»/79 

14/S7 

1 

23*73 

15/59 

ih 

CosuCMSd 33/SI 

23/73 

s 

37199 

23*73 S 

Di*4n 

17/02 

9/48 


19/66 

7144 

9h 

Ednburgh 

14/57 

11/52 

sh 

17*2 

9/48 

1 

rVrencc 

29/84 

21/70 


32*89 

19/66 s 

FranMui 

JOW 

21/70 

1 

24*75 

18*1 


Cmrin 

29 *4 

18164 

V 

27183 

15*59 

ft 

Hnbmlu 

22/ 71 

14/57 

DC 

23*73 

15*59 

* 


31 /Wl 

18/64 

5 

29/04 

21/70 


Lw Palmas 

26/79 

15/0*5 

5 

26/79 

2170 S 

Lebon 

7719} 

17/62 

PC 

27/80 

19/66 


London 

24/75 

12/53 

s 

22/71 

10.50 


Mm*kJ 

39/57 

15/66 

ft 

35/95 

20*08 


MBan 

32/99 

22/71 


33/91 

22/71 



21/70 

10 /Kl 


24/75 

13/55 


M’fPC/i 

29/84 

1762 


28/87 

16*61 


f*ce 

27/BO 

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28*02 

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Oslo 

21/70 

9/48 

Sh 21/70 

14*7 


Palma 

71193 

22/71 

a 

27/80 

2271 


Pare: 


13/55 

pc 

27/83 

16*61 


Pw>* 

J0/B6 

19*66 

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27/80 

17/62 



14»S7 

B'46 


14*57 

8M8 

c 

R>w 

29/81 

19*66 


32*99 

20*60 

s 

SI P«ientug 26/77 

12*53 


27*80 

14*57 

sh 

StncUntm 

27/00 

14/57 

9 

23/73 

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S&Bd«7l4T| 

31 m 

17«2 

ft 

29/84 

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Vmoa 

29/04 

23/73 

PC 

31/08 

2271 

ft 

Vicrww 

29/84 

20/88 


29*84 

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ft 

War vm 

33/91 

17/62 

PC 

31/86 

18*4 


Zm* 

31/08 

10*4 

pc 

2 9«4 

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AucUand 

T4/57 

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14/57 

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18/61 

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I7«2 

10/50 

a 



Jndinm 

North America 

Blistering heal will continue 
Thursday inlo the weekend 
throughout most ol rhe 
south western United Siaies 
Cities that wilt remain unusu- 
ally hot include Dallas. Aibu- 
querQue. Phoenix and Las 
Vegas. Thunderstorms will 
soak the Great Lakes legion, 
while the Southeast writ he 
warm and hianid. 


Europe 

Warsaw through Vienna and 
Rome will be m the midst ol 
a heat wave fare this week. 
Much cooler weather will 
move ir.io (he British Isles, 
where ram win las. heavy at 
i*n«. Thursday mig Friday. 
Pans may have a ihunder- 
Stoim Thursday, then cooler 
weather and a tew showers 
are possible Friday 


Asia 

Extreme heat and humidity 
will make any type of out- 
door activity uncomfortable 
irom Hong konq ;o Shanghai 
late this week. LgcaRy heavy 
rains will Icilow a oath 
through the central Philip- 
pines to northern Vietnam 
late this week. Thunder- 
storms will occur Irom north- 
ern Korea to northern Japan. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


8*«w 

Cairo 

Dxubob 

Jmsxlem 

Luxor 

(Sywh 


Today 
High Low 
OF CIF 
2a.'B2 51.70 
33 rat 18AM 
24775 IJ« 
24/75 1*«1 
37m USI6I 
43/109 27 /SO 


High Low W 
OF OF 
r»w 5170 pc 
J4.S3 19/66 s 
u/57 pc 
27faU 17/62 pc 
39/10018/64 s 
39/102 24/75 9 


Today To 

Hgh Low W High Low w 
OF OF CIF C/F 

KJonoaAaas 16*1 3-77 pc 1J/5E- 409 c 

Carcu 9VW 21/70 pc JIOB 22/71 pc 

Uma 19/168 18«B1 s 19/W i«/61 pt 

MmoCAy 24/75 13/55 pc 24.75 13/55 th 

KodeJamho 24/75 17/62 pc 24/75 18*64 pc 

Santiago 9/48 -1/31 pc 9/48 -2/29 pc 


Legend: s-nauw. pc -partly douJy. c-doudy. *-showBT 5 . Hhunoerswnns. r-ran. 0-snow Humes, 
sn-snow. wee. W -Weather. AB maps, lorecasts and data prawded by Accu-Weathor. toe. e 


•51994 


Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow 


High 

Low 

W 

High 

Low W 


CIF 

C/F 


C/F 

OF 


33*91 

3679 

1 

33*91 

2679 t 

B **' g 

33*91 

24.75 

1 

32*89 

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32*89 

27*80 

PC 

32*89 

27*80 pc 

Monk 

33*91 

25*77 

9/1 

32*99 

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Newt*c9« 

38*97 

20*82 

pc 

37/90 

28*02 pc 

Smi4 

30*96 

2271 

1 

31488 

227| | 

S/wv^ru 

31*88 

2679 

pc 

31*88 

2679 pc 


31/88 

25*77 

pc 

32*89 

3475 pe 

Ti«*i 

34.-93 

2679 

pc 

34*93 

27/80 oc 

Tokyo 

2674 

2170 1 

28*82 

2170 pc 

Africa 


28*9L> 

MM 

ft 

28*82 

2271 pc 

CapoToan 

9/40 

4*39 

c 

16/61 

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Casettoxa 

X« 

20-W 

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»*« 

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Hama 

2170 

1050 

r 

2373 

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La^ci 

29*04 

23/73 pc 29/84 

2475 pc 

Haacto 

22*71 

9.48 

ft 

2271 

12*53 pc 

Tun*, 

29-94 

18*4 

a 

29*04 

19/86 pc 

North America 

Anchorage 

17/62 

IKK 

pc 

19*66 

12*53 pc 

Altarra 

J3/91 

2371 

s 

33/91 

2170 pc 

Senior 

29*84 

19 86 

«h 

28.82 

17*62 I 

Cteago 

2679 

1881 

PC 

2577 

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Oom* 

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9 

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IVao* 

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29/04 

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P« 

29.04 

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Huston 

38/07 

2373 

9 

37/98 

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Los Angetes 

3**93 

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33/91 

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Morn 

32/89 

25*77 

1 

33*91 

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itoiroM** 

2879 

16/61 

PC 

2079 

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UoWroal 

2475 

13/» 

St\ 

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Nassau 

31*88 

24 75 

PC 

32 09 

2475 pe 

NcwYort 

30/86 

2271 

fth 

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47/116 31/80 

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45/11331/88 5 

San Fran 

23/73 

13<55 

a 

22/71 

12/53 s 

Soto 

2373 

11*52 

PC 

21/70 

12/53 pc 

Toronto 

24/75 

13/55 

»h 

3475 

15*50 pc 

Waaffepsn 

32/89 

2271 

pc 

32/89 

2170 pc 


ACROSS 

i Twain character 
7 To the extent 
that 

14 Lacking nothing 

15 Closet 

IB Blinker 

17 Art of arguing 

19 Traditional 
areas of 
knowledge 

20 Defraud 

ai High-paying 
easy job 


22 Geraint’s love 

23 *— Johnny’* 

24 Pad of an 
equine family 
tree 

25 Room with an 
easy chair 

26 Become 
entrenched 

27 Aviv 

28 Football team 
30 Part of 

eicpemer.t 

plans 

32 Eqg on 


Solution to Puzzle of June 28 


13330 



33 Fuzzy fruit 
35 Holds back 
35 Accolade 

40 Conflict 

41 Negotiations 

42 D C summer 
rhne 

45 Flag 

47 Wall decoration 

48 Blackthorn fruit 

49 Derive (from) 

50 Thin 

51 Sign ot hie 

52 Table 

54 Rodeo rope 

55 One on a 
walkout 

56 Repay 

57 Hobo's garb 

53 Business news 


DOWN 

1 Prepared 
potatoes 

2 -Who'll 
volunteer?* 


3 Of the same 
mother 

4 Stacked 

s Goddess of 
. discord 

6 Danger signal 

7 Unlined tablet 
• Hot 

9 Kith and kin 

10 Live ' 

11 On/off routes 

12 Nimbteness 

13 Ties down 

18 Refine 
20 Procreate 
23 Busy place 

26 Socialist 
Eugene 
2s Amateur 

aoTemble 

31 Fit out 

33 Czar-era 
bourgeois 

34 Sorts 

35 Food that's 
hole-some? 


_ ' . . vv.t: _ :-.v-U: T.v Lffi-- • 

t to® 1 ;-' 


36 Most acidic 

37 Short melody: 

38 Breadwinners 

39 Commotion 


41 Merchant ; T .. 

43 Medicinal : -. .'- : 4 * 18 tore'c««ittol!fe*. 
■ ( amount;:; . :,.j i#t r Blacktoo r- 

44 Be indecisive, ^ : 


notion . 48 Brainy; !-. .- .. »4Estape r ’ : 

'"""Ti 



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sgcca* 

Wficc.:- " 
fckiK 

air» 

V '.X-, ’ •*• - 
•' - - : 
8 c’M: •* 
ErfasL-’j 


1 1 Poor o 

iioij, oi 


3'. .-. 


© New York Times Edited irt WiU ShorK- J 


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China, PROw* 

10811 

Lithuania* 

8*196 

/Vitomhh 

980-11-0010 



Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg 

0-800011! 

Costa Rica*u 

114'7- 


4.-’ 

HongKoog 

800-1111 

Macedonia, F.YJL of 99-800-4288 

Ecuador* 

■ V 119 



India* 

000-117 

Maha’ 

0800-890-110 

H Salvador*" 

190 - 

'. -hi 

Wscists 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco* 

19*0011 

Guatemala* 

190 

- b 

Japan" 

0039-111 

Netherlands* 

06-022-9111 

Guyana*** 

i65 : 


fre Terr 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 

Honduras*! 

• 123' ■ 


Korea** 

11- 

Poland-**- 

0*010-4804)111 

Mesfco**A 

95^00462-4240 . 


Malaysia* 

800-0011 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

Nicaragua (Manana) 174 

- *3 

S'. 

t ; Ct 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Romania 

01-8004288 

Panama! 

■ 10? * ‘ 


Philippines' 

105-11 

Russia**(Mosoow) 

155-5042 

Peru* 

19! - 


[y^-^scr. 

:iJ lsanc 

y.c . 

sc 

j,';- . “*e beat 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Slovakia 

0042000101 


156 

Singapore 

8000111-111 

Spain* 

900-99-QO-U 

Uruguay 

004>110 - 


Sri Lanka 

430-430 

Sweden* 

020-795-611 

Venezuela*! 

• 80-011-13) ^ 

-r.T- v’. 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Switzerland- 

155-00-11 



Thailand* 

0019-991-1 111 

UJC. 

0500090011 

B/llMnw 

1-800-872-2881 r 

ii- V L 

EUROPE 

Ukraine* 

8*100-11 

Bermuda* 

1-800-872-2881 

-jT" . ^ 


Armenia*’ 

8*14111 

MIDDLE EAST 

British VX 

. 1-800-872-2881. - 'v 

\ n • 
_ • 

Austria—** 

022-903-011 

Bahrain 

800001 

Cayman Islands 

- 1-S00-B72-2881 . ; ■' 


- •-'« oa be 

Rflghun* 

0800-100-10 

Cyprus* 

00>90010 

Grenada* 

1-800-872-2881 


Bulgaria 

00-1SXW010 

Israel 

177-100-2727 

Haid* 

001-800-972-2884 v .; 


Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

Kuwait 

aXf-288 

Jamaicr** 

O-800r872-2881 " 

m. , ' ^ 

arf . v - part. 

Czech Rep 

0042000101 

Lebanon (Beirut) 

426-801 

Neth. Antil - 

001-8«W2-2881 

: A. 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Qatar 

0800-011-77 

Sl Klas/Nevis 

1-800^72-2887 “v 

7/i‘ ' to 


Finland- 

9800-10010 

Saudi Arabia 

1-800-10 

AFRICA - .1 

*J" ^ 


France 

19A-0011 

Turkey' 

00-800-12277 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

5104)200 


rf "4 

Germany 

01300010 

U-AJL* 

800-121 

Gabon* 

oo*-ooi '■ 

’ '* 

Greece* 

00800-1311 

AMERICAS 

fiamfila* 

00121 ■ 

•- .'■ , 4c l v uuw ** 

Hungary* 

00*00001111 

Argentina* 

001-800-200-111 1 

Kenya* 

0800-10- - 


r.r, 

Iceland* ■ 

999-001 

Belize* 

555 

Liberia 

797-797 - 


Ireland 

' 1-800550000 

Bolivia* 

0-800-1112 

SomhA&Jca 

(W0ft994>123 




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