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INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Loudon, Thursday, June 30, 1994 


No. 34,628 


Prince Charles: Unfaithful, Unlucky, Unabashed 


By Steve Coll 

Washington Part Service 

LONDON — Prince Charles has managed in a single 
day to confess to adultery on national television and 
pilot a royal jeL nose down into a Hebridean peat bog. 

Stepping into a media maelstrom that wayward royals 
of yore never knew, the Prince of Wales made his 
admission of infidelity in an interview with Jonathan 
Dimbiehy, a British television journalist granted access 
to the prince while filming a two-and-a-half-hour docu- 
mentary, “Charles: The Private Man. The Public Role." 
It was broadcast Wednesday nighL 

Asked if he had been faithful to Diana, from whom he 
separated in December 1992, Charles answered, “Yes," 
then paused and said. “Until it became irretrievably 
broken down, us both having tried.” 

The prince did not say, nor was he asked, when this 
perception of his marriage took hold or where it led him. 
He called Camilla Parker Bowles, the married woman 
with whom be has been linked, “a great friend of mine.” 
but only one of “a large number of friends." 


Partisans of Diana, such as her sympathetic biogra- 
pher Andrew Morton, have suggested in print this week 
that Charles effectively opted out of their fairy tale 
marriage very soon after it began. In the documentary. 
Charles denies this. 

The failure of his marriage, be said, “is the last 
possible thing that I ever wanted. I mean. I'm not a total 

idiot It’s not something Lhat I went into, mairiage, 

you know, with the intention of this happening, or in any 
way in a cynical frame of mind. ... 1 have always tried to 
get it right and tried to do the right thing by everybody." 

Overall, the Dirableby documentary is obsequious 
and elaborately flattering. Charles plays games with his 
children, coos at his dogs, tends earnestly to his charities, 
and accepts the small humiliations of his public schedule 
with tireless dignity. 

In between, he speaks with unusual candor and humor 
about why it Is not easy being a prince in an era of 
salacious media coverage and intrusive technology. 

Yet rather than inspiring celebration of his quiet 
achievements, leaked excerpts of his comments have 


only renewed vociferous debate about whether Charles 
is fit to be king. 

Moreover, just before the actual broadcast, the prince 
stole his own headlines when the royal plane he piloted 
Wednesday burst a tire and skidded off the runway on 
the island of Islay, Nobody was hurt. The prince was 
calm. He told reporters: “It is not something 1 recom- 
mend happening all the time. Unfortunately, it did. 

In the documentary, Charles directly addresses the 
lingering questions about his ascension to the British 
throne, including the touchy issue of whether he can 
legally become lung if he divorces Diana- 

Bri tain’s sovereign is the symbolic leader of the 
Church of England. But some senior church officials say 
a divorce would bar him from such a role. 

Divorce, Charles said, is very much in the future. “At 
the moment it’s not a consideration in my mind.” Yet 
should he divorce. “I don't see why it should be an 
impediment” to becoming king. 

Moreover, the prince says that he might like to delink 
See PRINCE, Page 4 



Toazndu Mu 
candidacy on 


fatoesday.in the 


Hong Kong Reform Plans 
Win Approval in Close Vote 

Patten’s Democracy Proposals Adopted 
Despite Some llth-Hour Maneuvering 


By Kevin Murphy 

Imernananal Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Marking the end of 
nearly two years of bitter wrangling be- 
tween Britain and China, Hong Kong's 
legislature on Wednesday narrowly en- 
dorsed Governor Chris Patten's plans to 
make elections more democratic. 

Despite Beijing's vow to overturn the 
reforms and last- minute support by pro- 
China legislators for amendments aimed at 
substantially weakening the proposals, the 
Legislative Council voted, 32' to 24. to 
broaden the voting base for elections in 
1995 and beyond. 

Three Hong Kong government officials 
appointed to the legislature were crucial to 
blocking by one vole — 29 to 28 — a pro- 
business Liberal Party amendment lhat 
would have virtually halted Britain’s last- 
gasp campaign to bolster democracy in the 
colony. 

“It's being resolved by the representa- 
tives of the people cf Hong Kong in the 
open," Mr. Patten said prior to the resolu- 
tion of the debate lhat has divided the local 


community. “It's not being decided in se- 
cret behind closed doors — and I think 
that is a very important step forward for 
Hong Kong." 

The vote came after weeks of intense 
lobbying of independent legislators by Mr. 
Patten and his opponents, who agree with 
Beijing that Britain’s policies break the 
spirit of earlier agreements on Hong 
Kong's 1997 return to China. 

It also capped two years of heightened 
political activism throughout many once- 
quiescent sectors of the community. In- 
creased public debate, the formation of 
new political parties and lobby groups, 
and frequent opinion polling have accom- 
panied Mr. Rat ten’s arrival as Hong 
Kong’s last governor. 

However, while Mr. Patten has de- 
scribed the vote as “one of the most impor- 
tant decisions in Hong Kong's 150-year 
history,” surveys found much community 
apathy and confusion about the details or 
electoral arrangements, whies will see ail 
members in the 60-seat asseiuhi.. chosen 

See COLONY. Page 4 


Poor on the Move in China 

Millions of Peasants Seek Work in Glies 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

Vo* York Times Service 

BEIJING — With his possessions bun- 
dled in plastic and hung from his shoulders 
and his trousers rolled up to beat the heat, 
30-year-old Ren Jun drifted into Beijing 
Iasi week, pari of a migrant ude of 50 
million peasants that is threatening to 
swamp China’s urban landscape. 

To the Communist Party leadership, 
they are the engine of China's inexhaust- 
ible supply of cheap labor, a floating popu- 
lation helping to build the country. 

But they also are becoming a huge and, 
at times/ unstable and easily exploited 
force on the loose, rampant on the fringes 
of China's overcrowded and polluted ur- 
ban centers, where crime, corruption and 
urban unemployment already are threat- 
ening social stability. 


They are easy to spot. Most large cities 
along China's coast have I million to 2 
million migrants living in shantytowns, 
dormitories or in public spaces. At Beij- 
ing's main railroad station, a thousand 
migrant stories an hour pass through the 
green metaJ gates to the cavernous and 
unlighted hall that leads to the concrete 
platforms. 

And vast numbers of laborers like Mr. 
Ren appear each morning in Beijing at an 
impromptu labor market, hoping local 
coal-mine supervisors will pick them to 
work. 

“So far. I ihink it has been a quite 
positive development" said Professor Fan 
Gang, a leading economist at the Chinese 
Academy of Social Sciences. “It has helped 
to transfer wealth from rich to poor areas 

See CHINA, Page 4 


In Italy, Selective Memory 

Neofascists Have a Ball on Cruise Ship 
Where Terrorists Murdered a U.S. Jew 


By .Alan Cowell 

,Vrv York Times Semce 

ROME — Fund-raisers come in various 
forms: Sl,000-a-plate dinners, celebrity 
auctions, sales of hats and balloons and T- 
shirts. ; 

But it lakes a strange soul to charter the 
Achille Laura, the boat from which an 
American Jewish hostage was once pushed 
to his death by Palestinian hijackers. If or a 
fund-raising cruise on behalf of nAvfas- 
cists. 

That however, is what the Italia; Na- 
tional Alliance party, part of Prime > mis- 
ter Silvio Berlusconi's governing coa tien, 
has done, even as it seeks to distance itself 
from its Fascist roots with talk of po ilical 
overtures to Israel and maybe even $ visit 
there by its leader. Gianfranco Fini- ! 

And so. off Sicily on Wednesday, on the 

thir d day or the cruise, more than WXj fare- 
paying passengers, including Mr. Fini him- 
self, pursued what Italian news reports and 
people on board depicted as a frolic of 
gambling, disco-dancing, swimming sun- 


Newsstand Prices 

Bohrair J6.80O Din Malta 35 c. 

Cypr * ..wE’.QC Nigeric-50,00 Naira 
Danmark! 4^00 D.Kr. Norway .....15 N.Kr. 

lieu Rials 

11 fi ^ai«- ;.-B.OO iVcls 

Gibraltar...... elandrR£l.i> 

rzrAAt Qpi^iin m . ■ - -a • 


Gibraltar ...... -£5* J£htflR£1.1 

Greot Britain.*? _ t Arabia 9.00 i 

Egypt Ejf p. soSm Africa r * 

Jordan....*^ fiJODirh 

Kenya..- ,/s.AVi! lEurJSl.U 

Kuwc'r’ •. iLi'rtsabwe. Zin.i2Q.C0 


bathing and televised, big-screen World 
Cup soccer aboard the Achille Lauro. 

Nowhere did the organizers, or the news 
reports, mention the name of Leon Klingh- 
offer, the 69-year-old American who was 
shoved overboard in a wheelchair when the 
cruise liner was hijacked by Palestinian 
terrorists in October 1985. 

To some, it might seem surprising that 
the vessel’s name was not changed after the 
ordeal at sea that made it synonymous 
with terrorism’s worst excesses. 

And to others it might seem odd that the 
National Alliance, built around the neo- 
fascist Italian Social Movement founded 
by Mussolini's supporters after World War 
II", should choose a ship whose name 
evokes the anti-Semitism" that Mr. Fini 
seeks to disavow. 

“It simply didn't stem to occur to any- 
body,” said one neo fascist supporter, who 
spoke in return for anonymity. 

“Yes, unfortunately, it’s the same 
Achille Lauro as the one on which the ugly 
dad was committed.” said Salvatore Sot- 
tile, a National .Alliance spokesman. 

The coincidence had been unfortunate. 
Mr. Fini acknov.lecged in a broadcast in- 
terview before the 12-day cruise began, 
but, he continued: “No offense is Intend- 
ed.” 

Thus, on June 27. the Achiile Lauro set 
sail from Genoa for a voyage that. Mr. Fini 
said, "shows that the right is modern, even 
in its mentality.” 

WdL sort oi. 

From Genoa, the Achille Lauro headed 
See SHIP. Page 4 



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Saudi Arabia 1, Belgium 0 

Saudi Arabia produced one of the big- 
gest upsets of the opening round by 
toppling the previously unbeaten 
Group F favorite, Belgium. 

Saeed Owairan's goal was the most 
spectacular thus far in the tournament, 
scored just five minutes into the match 
when he burst from an unmarked posi- 
tion in his own half to carve open the 
Belgian defense with a spectacular run 
and emphatic shot. 

Saudi .Arabia plays Sweden next in 
the second round; Belgium will meet 
either Germany or the Group D win- 
ner, probably Argentina. 

“I told you we would take second 
place in the group, and here we are. 
delivering what we promised,” said the 
Saudis' coach. Jorge Solan. 


• Kiosk . , 

Ghunnel Delays 
Passenger Service 

PARIS (Reuters,) — The start of pas- 
senger rail services through the Channel 
Tunnel will be delayed until at least late 
September after the operators hit snags 
switching the trains from mainland Eu- 
ropean tracks to British lines. 

An official at the French state railroad 
SNCF, which will run the Eurostar ser- 
vice with its British and Belgian counter- 
parts, said limited passenger services 
would start on the last Sunday of Sep- 
tember at the earliest. 

Services, for selected passengers only, 
had been due to start on Friday with a 
full service bv the autumn. 


Eastern Germany's fanner Communists 
have gained a new credibility. Page 2. 
Germany hinted it was ready to compro- 
mise on EU deadlock. Page 2. 

The U.S. government wants to avoid an . 
all-out ban cn cigarettes. Page 3. 
Handprints on the wall of a Rwanda 
church reveal the terror of Tuisis. Paged. 


"This was not expected by many 
people." 

Netherlands 2, Morocco 1 

Dennis Bergkamp scored his first goal 
of die tournament and set up the win- 
ner in the 78th minute, by Bryan Roy. 
who had been on the field just il 
minutes, as the Netherlands advanced 
to a second-round game with Ireland. 
Morocco, which also lost its two previ- 
ous games, was eliminated. 

Marc Degryse took advantage of a 
wobbly defense and an error by goal- 
keeper Khalil Azmi to score in the 1 1th 
minute and Belgium held on to win the- 
Group F match Sunday in Orlando, 
Florida. 

Brazil Under Pressure 

The Brazilians have proved themselves 


to be the most talented and least pas- j 
sionate contenders of the first round. 

But the pressures are immense, and 
the next game, against the United 
States on the Fourth of July, is qne 
they will never be allowed to. lose. 

A Cut Above the Nest 

Aleri Lalas of the U.S. team — if you - 
don’t recognize the name, you wall his 
hair, orange as a blow-dried sunset — 
has become as famous for his defense 
as for his locks. 

In some quarters of Los Angeles, 
that has led the less.endowed to visit a 
user-friendly hair salon. 

Tburetiay’s match e r Greece vs. Nigeria, .at . 
Foxboro. Massachusetts. 2335 GMT; Argentina 
vs. Bulgaria, in Dallas, 2335 GMT. 

I World Cup report Pages 22 and 23 


: • ’’ ••• ■ ! : 
















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Bridge 
Crossword 
Weather 


Page 5. 
Page 5. 
Page 21. 
Page 24. 


" Down 
2.59 

;r _ 3.667 35 

The Dollar 

raff i~~>- 

DM 

Pound 
Yen ' 


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. i > let B«Wri/7hc AM fliu ial Patfc. 

RESCUE AT SEA — U.S. Coast Guardsmen transferring an infant while 


namo naval base to Haitians who await processing Tor asylum. Page 3; 


1 - Tun CVuj ( Agehce France- Plow " 

Belgian goalkeeper Michel PreucThomme and Saudi forward Hamzah Idrees Saeed Faiatah in a tangJeWednesday 
j during World Cup play in Washington. D.C. 'fifc l-0 victory was the bigge& tqiset iu Saudi Arabia’s soceerhistofy. 


WORLD CUP iVf GRANDSTAND 


As a Socialist 
Is Elected to 
Lead Japan 

Conservative LPPjioins 

h a Deal That Seems 
To Assure Status Quo - 

iByPaulBlustean.; 

. . Washington Post Service ' _ 

•; TOKYO — Japan got its first SodaKst 
prime minister since 194S on Wednesday 
night as Tomrichi Murayama, the Social 
Democratic Party chair m a n , won. a dra- 
matie vote in Parliament with the support, 
of tlM Liberal Democrats. 

. Mr. Murayama received 2(51- votes in a 
nmoff in the lowerJxwsc of Parliament 
agamsf 214 for a conservative candidate, 
former Prime Minister ToshDcFKaifu, ’Mao 
was backed by the multiparty coalition 
fea t had led Japan since August.; ? 

[Mr. Murayania agreed with leaders of 

■ the liberal Demoerais and a third party 
carty Thursday to farm a new cabinel by. 
the end cf the day , Agehce France- Presse 
reported from - Tokyo.- The - three leaders 
met for more than 90 minutes early Thurs- 
day monring to agree on a policy platform 
am<Hig the parties.} : 

The dectkndf a Socialist leadecin busi- 
ness-oriented Japan left observers agape 
and raised questions about , the new gpv- 
emment’s policies' and the potential . for. 
new conflicts with the United States oyer 
-trade and security, issues. :/ . r : . 

Amid the political chants, the yen con- 
tinued its strong run against -the dollar, 

■ risLng lo a new high in trading Wednesday- 


- ^roughout most of Japan’s post-World 
.War II Jnstory tibe Socialists have been a 
inarrihai force, a whipping boy for- the; 
donnnant Liberal: Democrats, who ridi- 
cuted as dangerously leftist its positions — 
mbst of than modified recently— such as 
support lot North Korea and opposition 
loathe UJS.-Japan security affiant®. ■ 

• - Y et, Inmany resprirts, the development 
looked le&3 revqluttoiiaiy:,than a tnuraph 
'. for the status quo, because Jt marked a 
stinging setback for the refotmmovement, 
whict.is aimed at cieafling up Japanese 
pohticsahd i^pemhg tip 0e economy. The- ; 
ntfbFBMSrs, wbo endkl the: liberal Demo- 
crats’ 38-year rei^i lasi August following a 
^series Of . corruption . scandals, .controlled 

unt^^e resagn^^^^tnnlay of Prime 
Ministtx Tsutomu Hata % 

’ Now, the reforiners haye lost out to the 
strange partnership of the Socialists and 
the Liberal Democrats^ Although poles 

S on many issues and divided by four 
les of enmity, the two parties share a 
distaste for manyrefonnprcrocsals and a- 
penchant for pork-barrel politics^ which 
- tends to favor entrenched interests such as 
small shopkeepers and fanners. . , ’ 

Mr. Murayama’s victory does not mean 
reform is dead. Indeed, tl the reformers 
have one big hope, it is lhat the marriage of 
convenience between the liberal Damp-, 
crais arid -the Socialists will -arouse such 
voter disgust that the next election wilt, 
produce an overwhelming win for pro- 
refonn parties. 

But the new 'Socialist-Liberal^ ^Democrat- 
ic alliance, could seriously delay the proh 
gross of reform. A particular fear held by 
many reform advocates is that the. new 
. government will unctonrine tiie landmark 
legislation passed ..this year to revise the 
electoral system, which is aimed at forcing 
politicians to appeal to voters by advanc- 

See JAPAN^Pa^e 4 : . 


This Weekend 

- - - - - By David Hof fman ■ 

■ Htoahiagtofi Pass Service - ■ 

JERUSALEM — in. a surprise move, 

- Yasser Arafat has informed- Israel that he 

- wants: to begin his historic return to the 
Gaza Strip, and Jericho in a few davs - 
Palestinian and Israeli officials said 
Wednesday. 

Nabil Shaaih, the chief PLO negotiator 
with Israel, said in Cairo that he had in- 
formed Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of 
;. Israel of Mr. Arafat’s plans. 

cmf confirm the fact that the chair- 
man wifi be coming on. Safrirday,” Mr 
Rabin's Mokesman, -Oded Bea- Ami, told 

IvtvtciSi} .' " r- . . — 

■ Arafat is scheduled to': visit Presi- 

- Mubarak of Egypt in Cairo on 
H 5 15 cx P« cted to' travel to the 

Kftfan ivtf rt H F iwwMwwt al. a. . 


• • — - t p j Vvili HJ 

cany Mr. -Arafat into Gazn was being 
moved soM Ari^jaear the border, for the 
arrival.- '■ . . 

. fn Lsrad, the' announcement iriesereH 
.rightist, «lb for' .mass demot^S 

‘ -if- Araf ? tj ?bo has been threat 
by some Jewish 

' . Mr- iArafat Vdeciaon came as a siirnn’«e 
Mr. Shaath and other Pales tinian 

bfld declarc d recently that Lie 
would not amve unta July, at the SrW 
due tothssahsfactionover the lack of fi- 
2^ “Jtribudons- from the SSaJ 
ncmal community. - • ■ ■■■ 

They, aist) had said that Mr. ArafaL 

See ARAFAT, Pjige.4 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 


New Credibility for East Germany’s Ex - Communists 


Mgfjiijijfi 


rtf— 

I r v-wK iiini 


'■J 'J t-'irll ; i 8 H l 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Ir'.iri Tinli'f Ji'fllfi 1 

BERLIN — Since the success at the polls 
that former East German Communists en- 
joyed this month, new attention is being fo- 
cused on p3rty leaders and their agenda. 

The party is a mixture of old Communists 
and young punks with spiked hair, unrecon- 
structed Stalinists and reform-minded demo- 
crats. earnest politicians and clandestine ac- 
tivists. They do not always get along well, but 
they have managed to present a uni Led front 
and they show surprising strength at the polls. 

In elections two weeks ago for local offices 
and for seaLs in the European Parliament, the 
former Communists exceeded all predictions, 
emerging as the strongest party in several 
eastern cities and taking 40 percent of the 
vote in East Berlin. And on Sunday, they won 
their biggest victory since unification when 

one of their number. Horst- Dieter Braehmig, 
was elected mayor of Hcyerswerda. 

With 130.000 disciplined members, the 
Democratic Socialists are by Far the largest 
party in Eastern Germany. More than 90 


percent belonged to the East German Com- 
munist Party, and a number were secret po- 
lice officers or informers. 

When Communist rule collapsed in 1990. 
parly members considered abolishing the par- 
ty and founding a new one. Bui they decided 
Simply to change the name, a move that 
encouraged many old members to remain in 
the ranks. 

The party's leading figure, Gregor Gysi. an 
energetic and sharp-tongued member of Par- 
liament. is one important reason for its suc- 
cess. An excellent speaker and favorite guest 
on television talk shows. Mr. Gysi is a" deft 
critic of capitalism and a persuasive defender 
of the view that not everything in East Ger- 
many was so bad. 

A member of tbe party since 1967. Mr. 
Gysi says he and other Communists ‘'should 
have done more” to reform the East German 
system after the emergence of Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev in the Soviet llnion, but he a void > 
condemning the Communist government that 
ruled East Germany. 

From 1990 to 1992. Mr. Gysi was chairman 


Shells Pour 


•its 


of the Democratic Socialists. His successor is 
Lothar Bisky. 52. another longtime Commu- 
nist Parly member, who says he is “between a 
lef l-wing Social Democrat and a reform Com- 
munis!.” 

Hard-liners in the party have formed a 
shadowy faction called the Communist Plat- 
form. which is said to have 20,000 members. 
According to a report by the federal police, 
the CommunisL Platform advocates a “clear 
Marxist- Leninist strategy” and is committed 
to “resistance against capitalist society” and 
“revolutionary violence as a political tool.” 

Tm glad the Communist Platform exists." 
Mr. Bisky said in a recent interview, “ft is 
very active and is an important force. The 
Communist Platform has contributed many 
good perspectives.” 

But Democratic Socialists who serve on 
city and town councils have won a reputation 
as nonsec i ari an activists who work hard to 
resolve local problems. Their example has 
persuaded many people in Eastern Germany 
that the parly is a positive force that has much 

to contribute to the region's development. 


Wm 

■j*t ip 


“Our goal is not the revolutionary over- 
throw of the democratic parliamentary order 
and the building of some kind of dictatorship, 
but rather the true democratization of Ger- 
many,” a party handbook asserts. 

But there are many skeptics. 

“For me, the Democratic Socialists are a 
party that only pretends to be democratic.” 
said Georg Diedericb, a sharp critic of the 
East German government, who served from 
1990 to 1992 as interior minister of the east- 
ern state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomera- 
nia. 

Party leaders like Mr. Gysi strenuously 
deny such charges. 

“I accept the political freedom, the legal 
order and the democratic possibilities that 
this system offers,” Mr. Gysi said. “But I also 
maintain that people in East Germany have 
lost important rights, and that in this society 
there is much social injustice and much that 
needs to be fundamentally changed. Wc are 
not facing tbe global social, ecological and 
cultural challenges that confront us. So for me 
there are still very good reasons to be anti- 
capitalist.” 








a restrainingxjrder that would have Gre^.fo W ttggg, 

embargo during deliberations. Eurapean Umon Sources sai 
court refused, ruling that tbecomnussion failcd tqprov:e hann io^^ 
member state. . . ■ . ; 

Athens banned the’sfeipineni of all goods except- food 
medicine to its landlocked neighbor, 
usurped an ancient name and has designs on 
of the same name. .. . . ■' -OV’iT 

Attackers in Algiers Disrupt Protest Jp. 

ALGIERS (AP) — Explosions and’gusfireWe^esday 
tered a protest march headed by a group opjjcKnJtaboth “gpp; 
government and a Muslim fundamentalist insurgency'. Secim5&gg| 


government and a Muslim fundamrataBst insurgency, -aecun^g -g 
Forces said 64people were wounded. . \\ . ; r . f 

Officials said two of the. victims, gravecoadition 
the attack, blamed by witnesses on a lone attacter_.wno threw 


squares as protesters vowed not to be dissuaded by A'lolenrtt.;^ 
'Hjcre was no chum of responsibility for the; bombings, but 1*1^] 
/eminent blamed it on the fundamentalist militants wagic& a 9r^Tj:- 


,-ADEN, Yemen — Northern 
Yemeni forces made a fresh at- 
tempt to take the southern 
sironghold of Aden on Wednes- 
day. triggering fierce battles on 
the outskirts of the port city, 
according to a statement from 
the defenders. 

Witnesses said the artillery 
bombardment left the building 
ablaze that housed the Foreign 
Ministry. They said rockets and 
shells had poured down on resi- 
dential areas' during the night, 
killing more than j dozen per- 
sons.” 

Southern officials said north- 
ern tanks were rolling toward 
the outskirts of the city, appar- 
ently massing for another at- 
tempt to smash through the de- 
fenses. 

A southern military state- 
ment said northern forces and 
warplanes launched several at- 
tacks on strategic installations, 
including the oil refinery, power 
station and water plant. 

Northern forces have encir- 
cled Aden for more than three 
weeks, shelling the citv of some 
400.000 almost daily.’ 

The latest southern statement 
said many had been killed and 
wounded by the shelling but no 
figures were given. Other south- 
ern officials said more than 300 
people were killed and hun- 
dreds more were wounded in 
Aden in the past week. 

The southern vice president. 
Abdel Rahman Jifri. said 
Wednesday that northern tanks 
were attacking west and north- 
west of the city while other 
forces where approaching Aden 
from the north. 


■ ' ” v 


— I government blamed it on the fundamentalist militants wagifiS ^^r^? 

insurgency that has left 4,000 dead. ;/ ^ __ _ ; _ _ ;• 

Bonn Seeks Police Scatter South Korean Strikers ||| 

SEOUL (AP) — Thousands of police using bulldozers and teajjgTvgi. 
np T1 1 gas stormed sites in two cities of Scmth Korea eariy WKinesoay 

I ft jjrftflK a show of force against illegalwork- stoppages. V^‘ : . __ 

Walls and barricades were cast aside at Knmbo' & Co- 
■ w -r -w- • Kwangju, 250 kilometers (156 miles), south of Seoul; to dispersc^^: 

JL LI Loffi am 

^ in riot gear stormed Daewoo Automotive Components Ltd- 

By Tom Bueride removed abont 300 striking workers; • l.-* 

Bangladesh in Turmwl Over Author ;||p 

Klaus Kink el moved to defuse DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — The police cordoned -off 

the deadlock over tbe European Dhaka on Wednesday to prevent Muslim fundamentalists from^Jpr- 
Commission presidency on clashing with supporters of an author who faces deat£“threats ragpp&j: 
Wednesday by dropping hints having suggested changes in. Islamic laws. 

that Germany would abandon More than 200 people have been injured in stoert ikirini^pe?'^^ 

its candidate. Prime Minister during the last three days. The extremists want Tajsftma NaainldS?^: 
Jean-Luc Dehaene of Belgium, be hanged for her comments about the holy book, theKoran- Tbie ffi flgE 


To Break 
EU Logjam 


w ntaffl tbe damage to Britisb- 

- — ’ ports because of “mad cow” 

mjJi-'Tk- A.«oaMi prr« “We have a great interest in 

LONELY TRAVELERS — Two backpackers had Victoria Station in London largely to themselves Wednesday as a relations with Great Britain not 
one-day strike by signal workers over pay and privatization halted trains for many thousands of commuters and others, being affected by these things,” 


offering a bounty to anyone who killed the wnter* .'.ysigpj 

At least 10,000 police and paramfljtajy troops fanned outaerriss ^^ 
the capital during a nationwide strike called by Muslim , fundar;g§C 
m emalis is. Secular political parties and students ha^yowed-^gH 
resist the Muslims. ' - v':- • V;” 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

China Sets Up Funds to Aid Tourists - 

BEUING (AFP) —China’s leading tourist body has ordereda^^? 
travel agencies to set up special funds to compensate! foreign 
domestic tourists for losses caused by poor management, 

China Daily said Wednesday. 

The China National Tourism Administration said the directive^^* 
was aimed at protecting tourists and upgrading standards. The4v^i 
285 agents offering first-class services — recruiting and arranging^^Si'. 
foreign tour groups — must each set up compensation funds of^lfr 
600,000 yuan ($69,000), the tourism administration said. Second-*ip^ 
class agents hosting foreign viators must establish a 300.000 yuan: 
fund, while third-class operators handling domestic tourists need rWS 


Tapie , Back on Carpet mm Hauled Off 


By Alan Riding 

iVm Y«rk Times Service 

PARIS — As a police opera- 
tion. it went perfectly. Under- 
cover agents ensconced in a 
nearby hotel monitored the sus- 
pect's home for three days until, 
shortly after dawn Wednesday, 
the police woke him up, bun- 
dled him into a car and. amid 
flashing lights and wailing si- 
rens. hauled him before a judge. 

But when it comes to Bernard 
Tapie. a flamboyant French 
businessman and leftist politi- 
cian. nothing is in fact that sim- 
ple. Tne police were acting on 
court orders, but for many 
French his detention was jusl 
another example of the political 


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W'.-'re rv.nh' U ' help you 24 hours a daj’. 

TK CARO THAT GIVES CREDIT 
T0Y0URHEA1TH 


establishment's vendetta 
against him. 

This time, the police acted 
barely 12 hours after the Na- 
tional Assembly bad lifted Mr. 
Tapie's parliamentary immuni- 
ty so that he could answer 
charges of fraud and tax eva- 
sion in two cases involving his 
luxury yacht, Phocea. After ap- 
pearing before Judge Eva Joly. 
he was then released. 

But his legal troubles go Fur- 
ther. He also faces charges or 
defaming a judge and or misap- 
propriating funds from one of 
his companies, while his soccer 
team, Olympique de Marseille, 
was demoted in a match-rigging 
scandal. He was even charged 
Wednesday with insulting the 
police who came to arrest him. 

So far. though, his court bat- 
tles have done nothing to hurt 
his popularity. Now 51 years 
old, his political group won 12 
percent of French voles in elec- 
tions for the European Parlia- 
ment this month. He is also fa- 
vorite to become the next 


vendetta The son of a plumber who The case being investigated 


was brought up in a rough Paris by Judge Joly stems from the 
suburb and worked as a sales- charge that he evaded taxes by 
man and pop singer before dis- registering the Phocea as a mer- 
covering he had a talent for chant vessel owned by one of 
business, his style seems ail the his companies and then also 
more out of place in a political used it as his personal yachL 


ssaagjtta 

HS« iSmi-: .*i) him ■> „ •*„„ Bank mansion at 6.05 A.M_ re- 

SoT w officers lo the po“nt that be 

bnen - vhan ™ 

men! — which affects one in “He was treated like a street 
four young French — be simply urchin or a terrorist.” said Jean- 
declared illegal. Yet he seems to Francois Hory. the president of 
flourish on epithets, apparently Mr. Tapie's Radical Movement 
convinced that attacks by the of the Left. “This is absolutely 
political elite morel;, feed sup- scandalous." complained 
port for him. Noelle Bellone. who heads one 

“They can't insult two and a of Mr. Tapie’s companies. “I 
half million people," Mr. Tapie don’t dispute the judicial pro- 
said Tuesday, referring to those cess, but there are proper ways 
who voted for his Radical of treating people." 

Movement of the Left ticket on But France’s interior minis- 
June 12. He was nonetheless ter, Charles Pasqua. said the po- 
s tripped of his parliamentary lice were merely carrying out 
immunity in two votes — 465 to the judge’s orders. “There were 
10 and 462 to 10 — in the con- noises, name-calling, a little ro- 


be said. 

But the minister in charge of CHlinfl SfftS Tip 
the German chancellory. Frie- ^ 

drich Bohl fueled speculation BEUING (AFP)— Ch 
that the beef ban was in retalia- ^avel agencies to set up s 
bon for the British veto, saying domestic tourists for lot 
he had approved the decision Daily said Wednej 

Monday, just after the summit The China National Tc 
meeting of European Union aimed at protecting 
leaders in Corfu. Greece. J85 agents offering first-c 

The two officials met with 

foreign i journalists here to ex- class *^8 hating fo^g 
plain thor program for the sue- thinl-cLs op 

month German stewardship of - innmn 

the EU. which begins Friday. of 100.000 yuan. 


But the government’s plans 
for initiatives on job creation, 
EU help for Germany's immi- 
gration problems and a greater 
role for the European Parlia- 
ment have been overshadowed 
by the presidency deadlock. 

“It would be more than em- 
barrassing for the European 
Union if we do not come up 
with a candidate.” Mr. Kinkel 
said. Although both men de- 
clined to name names, Mr. Bohl 
said he was “very confident” of 
an agreement by July 15, when 
Germany has called a special 
summit meeting for Brussels. 

Mr. Kinkel said that meeting 
might not be necessary if a con- 
sensus was reached ahead of 
time. He said Britain was within 


M^jor US. akfipes have pot the Jdy 4th weekend mi sateTbr .^ 
travelers who want ro fly betweed Saturday night and Monday 3^ 
within the continental United States. From 6 P.M. Saturday to 
midnight Monday, round-trip tickets will cost $99 for. flights 
less than 500 miles (800 kilometers), $129 for flights up to l.OOO^K- 
miles and $149 for the longest flights. (AP)^M<: 

Swissair will resume flights to Lebanon in September after 
1 1-year break because of the civil war, the airline said Wednesday;^): 
in Zurich. It said there would be two flights a week between'i^ 
Zurich and Beirut. MPttsSK 


Simpson in Better Spiril 
Is Off ‘Suicide Watch’ 


m 


Compiied by Ovr Staff From Dispatches 

LOS ANGELES — O.J. 


mayor of Marseille and he may servative-dominated Assembly, hellion.” he added. “One had to 
even run for president in 1995. Judicial sources said that expect some outrage.” 

The reason that many main- Judge Joly acted quickly after 

stream politicians of both left these votes for fear that Mr. 
and right disapprove of him is Tapie might leave the country t^-c. a 
the very reason for his growing until he acquires fresh immuni- Acro P ous vJiargea 

following — that he is a self- ty from prosecution when the Reuters 

made man and political oulsid- newly elected European Pariia- ATHENS — A Spanish tour- 
er. someone whose blunt Ian- mem meets July 19. The court ist was arrested on Wednesday 
guage and personal charisma impounded his passport and and accused of trying to steal a 
appeals to many young and barred him from leaving France piece of marble from the 
working-class French. for three weeks. Acropolis monument. 


Reuters 

ATHENS — A Spanish lour- 


( Sen-i lor a broefur? from Inremaoonat Health Insurance 
, tonmao - as 


its rights to veto Mr. Dehaene’s Simpson, in jail facing double 
bid to succeed Jacques Ddors murder charges, was taken off a 

3t ^v5 suminit m ^hng. special “suicide watch” on 
We have to accept thau he Wednesday, an official said, 
said. But he indicated Prune Sheriff Sherman Block of Los 


e waten •.$« 

- .;.J?ygsgg 

Mr. Simpson, 46, has pieade^^ 
not guilty to the June 
slayings of his former wife, 
cole Brown Simpson, 35, 
her friend Ronald Goldmaa^^ 
25. He has been jailed withquS?#||; 
bond since June 17. * 

Both sides go back to 


Minister John Major would Angeles Count^d Mr. Sim? ZrZSZ C cV MM 
face heayy pressure lo support a son’s suicide mtch was endS 

new candidate. on ^ a dvice of hLs nsvchiatri« ? n Thursday for a prelumrcK^^H 

.. Mf- KinkeI aPPearedto leave who ^ ^ fon £? fSo^bSu ^ re ' a ^ 


working-class French. 


Acropolis monument. 


*9®' 


Country. 


U.S., Russia and EU Finish Map to Split Bosnia 





Telephone: 

l am m;er£si0d in mformaicjn about- 
□ Hospirat cover only □ Hosprtal and oui-patwnr cover 


International Health Insurance danmark a/s 

P.ilaeiiari".-. DK-12i>> C*ip<.'nha«n K. r.'^nrnark. 
T«-li*phuiic. -IS .CT JS 3i.i 9^ Fax; *45 33 32 25 mi. 


By Roger Cohen 

York Timet Sernor 

PARIS — The United Slates. Russia 
and the European Union have agreed on a 
map for the division of Bosnia designed to 
end the war in the former Yugoslav repub- 
lic, a spokeswoman for the French Foreign 
Ministry said Wednesday. 

The map. the fruit of several months of 
consultation with the warring factions, is 
to be formally approved by Secretary of 
Slate Warren M. Christopher. Foreign 
Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev of Russia and 
European Union ministers in Geneva on 
July 5. 


No details were immediately available 
of the map. the latest in a series of diplo- 
matic attempts to draw lines through the 
ethnic confusion of Bosnia, but it is known 
to offer 51 percent of the territory to a 
federation of Bosnian Muslims and treats 
and 49 percent to the Bosnian Serbs. 

“This plan amounts to a Iasi chance to 
end the war." the spokeswoman said. 
“French troops in the United Nations 
peacekeeping force will not spend another 
winter in Bosnia like the last one." 

France, like other Western nations, has 
grown deeply impatient with the blood- 
shed in Bosnia and is determined to with- 


nC Hr5^rSSiJ^ i i on ibe advice of his psychiatrist, 

ht. kinkel appeared to leave who said die former football 
the door open fora i revived bid player was in much belter spir- 
from Ruud Lubbers, the Dutoh its ^ i{ was no , ongcr 

pnme minister, by praising his that he might try to kill himself, 
acuities. On Tuesday, hours af ter law- 

yers wrangled in court over 

sharing evidence, detectives 
jf- KACni n combed Mr. Simpson’s estate 

1L JLIII M li ra for clues in the slayings of his 

former wife and a male friend. 

. - , The police on Tuesday barri- 

ast part of its contingent if the caded the street around the 
irties shun the latest plan. mansion in the Brentwood 

lha ^ R V S " neighborhood as investigators 


termine if there is enough, 

dence to pot Mr. Simpson 

triaL Miss Clark srnd Tuestiay^v-i 

that it could take as Jong a 

week to present the evidencing,'.' 

that has been compiled 

him in the preliminary hearin gs^# 


draw at least part of its contingent if the 
warring parties shun the latest plan. 

The spokeswoman said that U.S., Rus- 
sian and European diplomats had also 
agreed on a series of responses and punish- 
ments designed lo focus the minds of Serbs 
and Muslims very keenly on the conse- 
quences of pursuing the war. 

Western officials said tbe broad plan 
was that if Serbs accepted the map and the 
Muslim-led Bosnian government rejected 
it, an international trade embargo on Ser- 
bia might be eased. But if the Bosnian 
government said yes and the Serbs no. the 
arms embargo on Bosnia might be lifted. 


for clues in the slayings of his The prediction suggests that?|B£i 
former wife and a male friend, the prosecution will not 
The police on Tuesday barri- bade in making its case 
caded the street around the judge that Mr. Simpson shouldf^ 
mansion in the Brentwood be bound over for trial. j-'Ssp?, 
neighborhood as investigators Prosecutors have eviden®W; 
searched its shrubbery with decided that in the public 
dqgs and a metal detector. A ion battle that underlies ihfe# 
black Bentley was towed from case it is critical to makeriep^ 
the estate, and the police left strong a case as- possible. 
with at least two brown paper . , _ . , „ 

bags of evidence and a shoveL U*’. Times 

Deputy District Attorney Published [Tuesday showed -ihftfc&g: 
Marcia Qark and David CohiL K°Pj? w w> are sympathetic; 
another prosecutor, were at jhe Mf - Sitnj^on outnumber thosg^X 
site, but neither they nor the "^say they are not, 48 perceafe^t 
police would say what evidence 10 41 percent. 
was being sought. (Reuters, AP, WP . 


(Reuters. AP, WP. 



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** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 


THE AMERICAS/ COMPROMISE ON NICOTINE? 


Page 3 


* POLITICAL VOTES tC 


Clinton Legal Fund l» Opti to Lobbyists 


WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton and Ms wife. 



high 

miTfip n annually. 

The fund will not accept contributions from corporations, 
labor unions, political action committees or other organiza- 
tions. The donations and outlays wilJ be reported twice yearly. 

But in a recognition of the fact that lobbyists constitute a 
fertile source of fund-raising, Mr. Clinton will accept contri- 
butions of up to 51,000 annually from the Washington lobby- 
ists whose activities he decried daring the campaign and since 
taking office. 

Mr. Clinton’s advisers had initially considered a contribu- 
tion limit of 5500 bat decided to opt for the higher figure and 
pointed to that amount as the cap placed on campaign 
contributions. 

"The model we were following is the campaign contribu- 
tion law which allows individual contributions,” a senior 
official said Tuesday, explaining the decision not to prohibit 
contributions by lobbyists. “We didn’t feel we should bar 
individuals who choose to give money of their own accord on 
a voluntary basis.” 

The official also pointed to the “impossibility of policing” a 
prohibition cm lobbyist contributions because of the practical 
difficulty of identifying lobbyists. 

Tbe White House press secretary. Dee Dee Myers, said the 
Clintons decided to establish the fund because “it’s in the best 
interest of the country and the president” to have the large 
bills paid, and the Clintons could not afford it on ms 
),000 salary. 

In a statement, the chairmen of the fund. Reverend Theo- 
dore M. Hesburgh and former Attorney General Nicholas de 
B. Katzenbach, said: “No previous president has had to face 
the enormous personal legal expenses confronting President 
Clinton. Whatever the merits or motivations of these proceed- 
ings, we believe it is in the public interest to assist the 
ideal in meeting a financial burden that could otherwise 
him from performing his public responsibilities.” 

(WP) 

Panetta Ota* Bakar am His Role Model 

WASHINGTON — Leon E. Fanetta said he has “full 
authority” as the new chief of staff to carry out changes in 
people and policies in tbe White House, leaving a White 
House staff fearful that the changes might involve them. 

Respondin g to the anxiety those r emarks created within the 
White House, Mr. Panetta and others made the point Tuesday 
that while changes were coming, no individual was currently 
in jeopardy, including the White House press secretary. Dee 
Dee Myers. 

Tbe efforts on behalf of Ms. Myras following some luke- 
warm comments by Mr. Panetta on Monday night illustrate 
tbe difficult path ahead for the new chief of staff — keeping 
the White House focused even as its occupants’ jobs are 
debated and its policies examined. 

Mr. Panetta on Tuesday signaled tbe type of chief of staff 
he intends lobe— naming as a role model James A. Baker 3d. 
Mr. Panetta was referring to Mr. Baker’s first tenure in that 
job, as President Ronald Reagan’s first chief of staff, but not 
Mr. Baker’s second tenure in the post, the final months of the 
Bush adminis tration when he was brought in to rescue Presi- 
dent George Bush’s rinlring presidency. 

Mr. Baker, Mr. Panetta said, “had die full trust and 
confidence of the president and Ire ran a tight ship.” 

Mr. Baker also had a president who allowed hims elf to be 
highly managed, something Mr. Clinton has shown no sign of ' 
emulating . In addition, Mr. Baker woriced to control advice 
that reached Mr. Reagan, forcing most of it to flow through ; 
him. Mr. Ointom has a wealth of- outride advisers, friends, . 
political consultants and ^others, Tbe same is true of Mrs. 
Clinton. _ 

Mr. Panetta, director of the Office of Management and 
Budget, was named by Mr. Clinton on Monday in a major 
White House reorganization aimed at improving its chaotic 
operations. (WP) 


Quote/ Unquote 


J. Marshall Coleman, a former Virgi n ia 
and now an mdepeodeol for the Senate from that stale, 
during atdevised debate with the other candidates, including 
Oliver L. North, the former national security adviser in the 
Reagan administration who was involved in the Iran-contra 
.affair: “I think ethics are ah issue. This is an issue the people 
Virginia need to resolve. I do not think the person to my left 
is semwone we ought to vote for to be in the Senate. He has not 
set the kmd of example we want to set for our young people.” 
• Mr. North, in reply: “Oh come on. From a guy who has 
changed his position more often than anybody I know, you 
ought to get whiplash.” (NYT) 


Federal Agency Maneuvers to Avoid a Ban on Cigarettes 


By Philip J. Hilts 

New York. Tunes Senrtcc 

WASHINGTON — Although the 
Food and Drug Administration may 
eventually declare nicotine a drug, the 
bead of the agency. Dr. David A. 
Kessler, says he hopes to avoid the ban 
on cigarettes that industry executives 
have said they fear he is seeking, and 
that agency law itself might force him 
to impose. 

Leaders ou all sides in the tobacco 
battle, from Dr. Kessler to some indus- 
try executives, including congressional 
proponents and opponents, now pri- 
vately agree that when rhetoric is set 
aside, there may be common ground 
for regulation among them. The ag- 
gressive investigation of nicotine and 
addiction undertaken by the agency in 
tbe last few months, as well as disclo- 
sures in congressional testimony and 
internal company documents, could 
well result in a compromise. 

The agency is still gathering the evi- 


dence necessary to declare nicotine an 
addictive drug. If it comes to such a 
conclusion, its options under tire law 
are limited. 

Unless Congress declares otherwise, 
tbe agency must begin the next step: If 
nicotine is found to be a drug. Food 
and Drug Administration laws require 
that it be found safe, which could not 
be done, before the agency approves it, 
agency officials say. 

But before or after the agency 
reaches a conclusion, Dr. Kessler sug- 
gests, Congress, the industry and the 
agency could come up with alterna- 
tives that could be pm into law, to 
avoid tire stricter regulation that might 
be required by the inflexible agency 
law. 

All rides say that the end point 
should not be to destroy the tobacco 
industry or force the country’s 45 mil- 
lion smokers to get their cigarettes on 
the black market. 

Dr. Kessler has said he does not 


want to ban cigarettes, a sentiment 
echoed by Representative Henry A. 
Wu rman, Democrat of California, 
chairman of the House Energy and 
Co mm erce subcommittee on health 
and the environment and an opponent 
of Mwnlrfwg. 

What most do agree on is that regu- 
lation should include attempts to dis- 
suade teenagers from starting to smoke 
and to make it easier for smokers to 
quit. 

At least one tobacco company exec- 
utive has agreed to a meeting with Mr. 
Waxman to discuss possible regula- 
tion. 

In a telephone interview after his 
recent testimony in Congress, Dr. 
Kessler explained his views. 

'For now, he said, be is defining the 
issue narrowly: Can nicotine be con- 
sidered a drug under agency law? 

Five months ago, in a letter respond- 
ing to anti-smoking groups that had 
petitioned him for action. Dr. Kessler 


said that tbe agency; would be willing 
to consider the nicotine in cigarettes to 
be an addictive drug, and to take regu- 
latory action against tobacco compa- 
nies. 

In 1977, anti-smoking groups had 
filed a similar petition, but because the 
agency did not have extensive evidence 
Of the addictive properties of nicotine 
or a detailed picture of how nicotine 
ads in the brain and body, it was not 
in a position to contradict the indus- 
try’s contention that it sold cigarettes 
for pleasure, not to addict people. 

Until the company documents came 
to light, the agency never expected to 
have evidence that tobacco companies 
considered the question of addiction. 
In the case of at least a few top tobacco 
officials, the documents show them 
'saying frankly that the product they 
sell is addictive. 

Dr. Kessler said that regulation 
might focus on prevention. One possi- 
bility that had been suggested to him. 


Ire said, was setting” a target: for in- 
stance, that five years after the enact- 
ment of a law, the number of teenagers 
starting to smoke must have dropped 

by some percentage. 

If it has not, then methods of re- 
stricting sales and advertising to teen- 
agers might go into effect. 

Other suggestions, he said, include 
the following: 

• Restricting cigarette sales, much 
as alcohol is restricted now in some 
states, to state stores, or perhaps to 
pharmacies. 

• Labeling cigarettes with the actual 
amounts of tar and nicotine that smok- 
ers are likely to get, so smokers could 

'less nicotinized ciga- 


Current labels, experts say, do not 


choose safer or 
rettes. 

experts 

tell consumers what they need to know 
to make this choice. 

• Restricting cigarette advertising 
to avoid the effect, intentional or unin- 
tentional, of encouraging children to 
smoke. 



California Weighs Paddling for Vandalism 


By Eric Bailey 

. . Cor Angeles Times Service 

SACRAMENTO, California — Prod- 
ded by growing public dismay over graffiti, 
a key committee in Cafifomia’s state legis- 
lature has approved a bill allowingjuvemle 
court judges to punish youthful taggers by 
ordering they be whacked up to 10 times 
with a wooden paddle. 

If enacted, the measure would reinsti- 
tnte court-ordered corporal punishment in 
the United States for the first time in more 
than four decades, legal scholars say. 

The Assembly Public Safety Committee 
voted Tuesday, 4 to 1 , for the bill proposed 
by Assemblyman Mickey Conroy, an Or- 
ange County Republican, who was in- 
spired by tire caning in Singapore of an 
American tee n ager, Michael P. Fay, for 
spray-paintijQg cars. 

The bill would allow a judge to order a 
parent to deliver 4 to 10 strokes with a 
wooden paddle in the courtroom. If the 
parent declined or the judge found tbe 


if, a bailiff would do 
the paddling. The paddle would be three- 
quarters of an inch thick, 18 inches long by 
6 inches wide, with a 6-inch handle. 

In addition, the bill would require that 
the names of juvenile offenders who get 
tire paddle be made public, a tactic de- 
signed to heighten humiliation and act as a 
deterrent. 

Mr. Conroy’s measure appeared to face 
long odds in the Public Safety Committee, 
historically a graveyard for Republican 
crime bills. But two Democrats joined with 
two Republicans to push the legislation 
forward 

It must survive another committee bear- 
ing and an Assembly floor vote, where the 
speaker, Willie Brown, has vowed to defeat 
the bUL Governor Pete Wilson has not 
taken a stand on the issue. 

The committee endorsed the measure 
despite vocal opposition from the Ameri- 
can Gvil Liberties Union and other foes, 
who questioned the measure’s constitu- 


tionality and effectiveness while calling 
Mr. Conroy's effort election-year postur- 
ing. 

“The beating of offenders as a form of 
punishment runs contrary to the funda- 
mental notions of decency in our justice 
system,” said Francisco Lobaco, ACLU 
legislative director. “It’s really not the way 
to solve the issue. State sponsored violence 
is not an answer or a solution. I think it's a 
horrible idea.” 

Kathy Dieyfuss, legislative advocate for 
California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, 
described the bill as “court-sanctioned 
child abuse.” 

Mr. Conroy, however, portrayed iris leg- 
islation as a firm way to steer errant youths' 
away from destructive, gang-related activi- 
ties. He also cited the high cost of graffiti 
cleanup and paraded a half dozen experts 
before the committee to provide testimony 
about tbe violent intentions gang members 
sometimes express through graffiti. 


Away From Politics 


• Ptedktkws of solar uttrariolet radiation levels will be in- 
cluded in dally weather forecasts in 58 dries under a U.S. 

'^^^^nospheric Administration 




and the Environmental Protection Agency, will give an out- 
look for the next day’s levels to help people guard against 
overexposure. 

• Ma8 ifcfiray has worsened in -virtually every section of the 
United States instead of rebounding as expected after a 
dismal performance last winter, postal officials acknowledge. 
They had hoped for a 95 percent on-time rate after reorgamz- 
injybe Postal Service, but new spring quarter figures show 

• Scientists wortingter Exxon contended in a federal court in 
Anchorage, Alaska, that except for a few tiny pools of oil. 
Prince William Sound and surrounding marine areas have- 
largely recovered from the 1989 Exxon Valdez ofl spill. 

• BoBce Chief WMeJ WfflSpms of Los Angeles has upheld the 
firing 'of Timothy Wind, one of .the four policemen charged 
widi beating Rodney King, despite a recommendation that, 
the' officer, who was never convicted of wrongdoing, be 
reinstated. 

• Partof tire new federal gm control law has been struck down 
by a radge in Tucson, Arizona, who said h was unconstitu- 
tional for the government to require local police to check the 
backgrounds of .potential handgun buyers. 

. Reuters, WP. AP 


U.S . Revokes Haitian Visas as Exodus Continues 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — In an at- 
tempt to further isolate Haiti 
and its military rulers, the Clin- 
ton administ r a tion on Wednes- 
day revoked the visas of most 
Hai tians hoping to travel to the 
United States. 

The United States also re- 
opened its Guantanamo Bay 
Naval Base in Cuba to the flood 
of Haitians seeking political 
asylum. 

The visa revocations apply to 
all but a small number of Hai- 
tians with special status. Visas 
of those already in the United 
States will not be revoked, but 
their amplications to remain will 
be addressed case by case; offi- 
cials said. 

President Bill Clinton 
banned commercial air traffic 
.between the United States and 
Haiti late last week. 

Tbe Clinton administration 
previously had frozen Haitian 
assets in U.S. banks and 
blocked transfers of funds. 


Officials opened Guantana- 
mo on Tuesday evening after 
thousands of Haitians were 
plucked from boats by Coast 
Guard cutters during five cha- 
otic days. 

The 2,806 fleeing Haitians in- 
tercepted since Friday eclipsed 
the number intercepted during 
all of 1993. 

The new wave of migrants 
were lured to sea by Mr. Clin- 
ton’s decision to give fleeing 
Haitians a chance to apply for 
political asylum for the first 
time since President George 
Bush halted tire practice in 
1992. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Clinton 
urged Haitians to remain at 
home, but White House offi- 
cials said they had little confi- 
dence tha t the numbers would 
subside. 

The Bush administration 
t»yiri the Guant&namo Bay base 
in eastern Cuba as a refugee 
center in 1991 and 1992. 

Haiti’s exiled, elected presi- 


dent, tire Reverend Jean- Ber- 
trand Aristide, has refused re- 
quests to urge Haitians to stay 
home. 

Administration officials 
pressed Father Aristide to make 
such appeals on broadcasts on a 
U.S.-funded radio station 
scheduled to begin operations 
next week. 

■ U.S. Public Opinion Shifts 

While most Americans have 
been opposed to sending U.S. 
troops to restore democratic 


government in Haiti, support 
for the idea may be growing 
now, according to a new Wash- 
ington Post-ABC News poll. 
The Washington Post reported. 

The poll shows a large major- 
ity of Americans question 
whether U.S. vital interests are 
at stake, but 45 percent of those 
interviewed favored military in- 
tervention by the United States 
and its allies to topple Haiti’s 
military regime, compared with 
36 percent a month ago. 

(AP, WP) 


SMALTO 


t' n i s 


William Morgan, Astronomer, Dies at 88 


Francesco 
esr heureux de 
a ses soldes 


- Vie* York Ttinesi Sendee 

' W in-jam Wilson Morgan, 88, 
the astronomer who discovered 

tire spiralstnxtftn^ctf the Milky 

y, died’Of.aheart at- 


■at home in WH- 
ifiicoDsiii. 

Mr; Moran was an, emeritus 
k aiastzooomv at the 


mine distmxteB io remote stars 
, more accurately arid demon- 
strated the existence of super- 


^ a s tronomy at the 

U niv er sity of Qnc&go and for- 
mer director of if* y«kes Ob- 
servatory in Williams Bay, a 
town in southern Wisconsin. : V 
A spedafist ih astronomhaL 
morphology — research into 


tiems— ,Mr. Xorgan .was. c«nr_ 
sidered <are dL tire leading % ; 
tronourersof th» century: 

. He dejti^ dassffication s>«- 

ywm Cnp'iliA knahhlMt nf 


Kaos ua ure royiwwaw 
developed a system to 1 deter- 


ifislnvestigatioens of starlight 
atiri the distances and arrange- 
ment of stare led to tire discov- 
ery that gamed him wide recog- 
. nition in science^ After years of 
observations and . analysis, he 
discovered the broad pattern in 
which the interstellar gas and 
bUHoiiS’bf ttacMjf the -MHlcy^ 
.Way are. arranged. 

. Because the solar system is 
•part of the Milky Way; astrono- 
mere cannot view fi from out* 
side arid so had been unable to 
A dear underetandjng.of its 
He Identified segments 
erf. two spiral Urms similar to 
those obs^ved in die Amto®®- 


da Nebula, and also a probable 
thir d arm. 

W3fiam A. Henry 3d, 44, dra- 
ma critic and senior writer for 
Time ma gawne and winner of a 
Pulitzer Prize for criticism, died 
of a heart attack Tuesday in 
London. 

Ma’motm Sbmnawy, 80, who 

wrote songs for the greatest 
singers in Arabic of his genera- 
tion, died Monday after a two- 
week bout with pneumonia. 

Henry Heydemyk Jr_ 89, pa- 
triarch of tbe American branch 
of the House of Heydenryfc, one 
of the wbdd’s oldest makers of 
fine picture frames, died of a 
heart attack Thursday in Mys- 
tic, Connecticut His strong 


views on how to frame and hang 
a picture are still widely consid- 
ered authoritative. 

Jack Harkness, 75, a British 
grower and breeder of roses and 
an author, died on June 18. He 
lived in Southwold. England, lnij 
his long career, he introduced 
roses with names that were 
sometimes romantic, like 
“ Compassion.” sometimes ex- 
otic. like “Tigris” and some-" 
times aristocratic, like “Mount- 
batten." 

Joan Hasfip, 82, a British au- 
thor known for her biographies 
of Marie Antoinette, Empress 
Elizabeth of Austria and other 
female bluebloods in history, 
died June 19 in BeDosguardo, 
outside Florence. 


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Deadlock Bodes III 
For Health Care Bill 


Dm DfctcrSTbc AnodUfd Pros 


ROOT OF THE PROBLEM — Jess Bolden sitting on a tree that fell across the yard of his home in Huntsville, 
Alabama, after a storm uprooted it this week. The tree roots lifted the back of his automobile up to the top of the carport. 


By Michael Wdsskopf 
and Dana Priest 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
rfuri rman of one of the five con- 
gressional committees with ju- 
risdiction over health care re- 
form has conceded that his 
committee was hopelessly dead- 
locked and unlikely to pass a 

biO. 

“At this point, it would be 
counteaprrxnictive to convene 
the committee, call up legisla- 
tion and consume an enormous 
amount of time and resources 
without any assurance of suc- 
cess," the House Energy and 
Commerce Committee chair- 
man, John D. Diugefl, Demo- 
crat of Michigan, wrote in a 
letter to the House speaker, 
Thomas S. Foley, Democrat of 
Washington. 

The Energy and Commerce 
Committee foundered largely 
cm what has become tire central 
issue in Congress's effort to 
pass health le gislati on: Who 
would pay for insurance that 
would cover all Americans. 

That issue was still in play in 
the Senate, where the Finance 
Committee appeared headed 
toward a compromise that 
would use incentives to per- 
suade employers to buy insur- 
ance for workers. If near-uni- 
versal coverage bad not been 
achieved by a certain date, 
mandatory payments would be 
considered. 

With comprehensive bills al- 
ready approved by one commit- 
tee in the House — tire Educa- 
tion and Labor Committee — 
and by the Labor and Human 
Resources Committee in the 
Senate, health care legislation is 
almost guaranteed a vote on tire 
floor of each chamber. Those 
bills include employer man- 
dates as a principal financing 
mechanism. 

The House Ways and Means 
Committee, tire fifth committee 
with health legislation, 
[completion of work on a 
similar bill Tuesday night. The 
committee cleared a roadblock 
by approving a compromise 
measure that would delay im- 
position of cost controls if 


health trending exceeds certain 
targets. 

But in many ways, Mr. Din- 
gell’s committee and the Senate 
Finance Committee are the 
most rqyresentative of the 
membership of both chambers, 
and are seen as bellwethers of 
what is HkdEy to pass congres- 
sional muster. 

Committee chair men have 
set the July 4 recess as the dead- 
line to finish their work. Once 
all the committees have report- 
ed out their versions of legisla- 
tion, the leadership in both 
chambers hopes to blend them 
into bills for floor debate and 
votes by the full House and 
Senate. 

While the failure of the 
House Energy and Commerce 
will not prevent the House from 
taking up health care legisla- 
tion, it indicates the difficulty 
of agreement on any measure. 


Bank Executive 
Freed in Mexico 
By Kidnappers 

Reuters 

MEXICO CITY — Alfredo 
Harp Hein, a banking executive 
who is one of Mexico’s richest 
men, has been set free by kid- 
nappers who held him hostage 
for more than 100 days. 

Mr. Harp was released in 
southern Mexico City on Tues- 
day, five days after his family 
had agreed to pay a ransom 
thought to be $30 million. 

Mr. Harp, chairman of Bana- 
mex-Acdval, Mexico's largest 
financial group, was kidnapped 
on March 14 while on his way 
to work. 

His seizure, which followed a 
peasant uprising in southern 
Mexico and preceded by only a 
few days tire assassination of 
ruling party presidential candi- 
date Luis Donaldo Colosio, 
sent Mexico financial markets 
plummeting as investors wor- 
ried about the country’s stabil- 
ity 



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pyTERNATIOWAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 




Walls Reveal Terror 
h Rwanda Church 

Bloody Handprints of Tutsi 


By Jonathan C. Randal 

Wultmpm Pot 7 Server 

SHANOI, R wan{ i a - In 
rooms at the Roman 


some 



. along 

awllllii v -- ot her rooms they 
together and run in 
pyramid pattern to the ceilings. 
. J® i LL ew 50,811 rooms, a desul- 
^ort made to scrub 
away the prints, leaving behind 
a Wndshield-wiper smear of 
blotchy brown on the once 
whitewashed walls. In the com- 
munal toilet, one victim’s blood 
is now congealed on the toilet 
scat and wash basin. 

The handprints — of adults 
and children — are the mosL 
gruesome evidence of what peo- 
ple here say was the massacre 
by Hutu militia troops on April 
'8 of hundreds of members of 
the minority Tutsi tribe who 
had taker ref ,e at Shangi’s 
sjnall chuj h cc n pound. 

Most -e iden < of the settle- 
ment 30 <Doj eters down a 
dusty ro riv the provincial 
igu refuse to 
what hap- 


center - 
talk ir 
pened 
But 
other 
■the u 
that I...- 
since a-i; 


prints and 
iest one of 
ass killin gs 
ed Rwanda 
*n Hutu gov- 


ernment k -os and gangs be- 
gan slaugjusnng Tutsis and a 
dormant civil war was rekin- 
dled. 


UN Trucks 
Get Food 
To Tutsi 


Reutcn 

KIGALI. Rwanda — United 
Nations officials, for the first 
time in weeks, got food through 
Wednesday to Tutsi trapped on 
the Rwandan government side 
of the capital. 

Trucks unloaded more than 
seven torts of commcal and 
baby food at the Sainte F amill e 
church complex here, where 
about 1,500 Tutsi are trapped 
close to the battle lines. 

When told the United Na- 
tions had come only to bring 
food and not to evacuate the 
refugees, a young woman 
looked to see whether any Hutu 
soldiers or militia members 
were within earshot and then 
blurted: 

“We have to go! We have to 
go! They come in every day and 
look around. They will come to 
take the men away and kill 
them." 

Rebels of the Rwanda Patri- 
otic Front and government 
.forces agreed to a temporary 
truce so that the convoy, escort- 
ed by UN military observers, 
.could get food to people in the 
church, Hotel Milles Collin es 
and the Tanzanian Embassy. 

But midway through the op- 
eration, rebels began pounding 
the government police barracks 
at Kacyiru with mortar fire, and 
bullets whistled over Sainte Fa- 
mille as the trucks unloaded. 

“This is the first food to get 
across to the Rwandan govern- 
ment side for three weeks." said 
Rafael Lcureiro or the UN 
. World Fo*xi Program. 


ARAFAT: Return Is Imminent 


Continued from Page 1 
would not come until more 
headway had been made to- 
ward Palestinian self-govern- 
ment under the pact signed with 
Israel in May. 

But Palestinians said one rea- 
son for the sudden turnabout 
was pressure from the territo- 
ries, where Mr. Arafat’s ab- 
sence was leading to a growing 
restiveness and unease. “He's 
under pressure from the peo- 
ple" said a Palestinian official 
m Cairo. "They didn’t believe 
the money as an excuse. They 
are saying, ‘What’s happened? 
Why didn’t he come?' " 

Foreign Minister Shimon 
Peres of Israel, in an interview 
to be published Thursday, told 
The Jerusalem Post. "So Tong as 
there is no security problem, we 
should let him come this week, 
why not? I don’t know why ev- 


erybody is making such a big 
deal. What is this? The exodus 
from Egypt?” 

Palestinians were preparing 
for a tumultuous homecoming 
for Mr. Arafat. who has not 
been in the West Bank and 
Gaza Strip since after the 1967 
War in which Israel captured 
the territories from Jordan and 
Egypt. Mr. Arafat has repeated- 
ly delayed his visit since the 
May 4 signing of an agreement 
implementing (he Gaza-Jericho 
accords for Palestinian self- 
rule. 

Previously, Palestinians had 
said Mr. Arafat would go first 
to Jericho, the seat of the sdf- 
rule administration, which is 
still largely unformed. But Mr. 
Shaath said Wednesdav that 
Mr. Arafat would make on! v a 
short visit to Jericho, apparent- 
ly because of security concerns. 


No one seems to know with 
precision — or is willing to say 
— how many Tutsis were shot, 
hacked or beaten to death here 
on that April day. The bodies 
have been disposed of, and no 
one is looking for their remains. 

The 15 Franciscan nuns who 
still live in the compound, all 
Rwandans, acknowledge they 
know what happened, but they 
refuse to give visitors more than 
their gross estimate of the num- 
ber of dead: They say os many 
as 4,000 Tutsis died in the mas- 
sacre of ShangL 

Bishop Thadee Ngihinyurwa 
of the local diocese said that up 
to half of the region’s Tutsi 
population of 55,000 has died in 
the blood lust; included among 
them were most of the 80 priests 
who have been killed through- 
out the country since the ram- 
pages began. 

Only 8,000 of the diocese's 
surviving Tutsis arc accounted 
for in a nearby refugee camp, 
the bishop said But he ex- 
pressed hope that many others 
had escaped to Zaire or are still 
hiding in the bush or were given 
shelter by Hutu friends at the 
risk of their lives. 

At the church compound 
here, Hutus dug a gaping hole 
in the outside brick wall of the 
largest building during their 
April assault, giving them ac- 
cess to the Tutsi refugees within 
who had trusted in the church 
tradition of providing sanctu- 
ary in troubled limes. 

The smaller of its two rooms 
is bullet-pocked, and the plaster 
of one wall was Mown off by a 
hand grenade, uncovering the 
brick below. But most of the 
killing seems to have been done 
by machete, the Hutus’ pre- 
ferred weapon. 

On the wall of another room, 
the pattern of bloody hand- 
prints visible from floor to ceil- 
ing — a virtual diagram of how 
desperate Tutsis stood on each 
other’s shoulders in a vain ef- 
fort to reach the ceiling crawl 
spaces and roof to hide from 
their Hutu killers. 

Similar handprint patterns — 
and dislodged ceiling tiles — 
also are visible in two dozen 
smaller rooms that were once 
the quarters of priests and semi- 
narians. 

In the compound outside, 
two suspect depressions in the 
ground suggest that some bod- 
ies might have been interred 
there, but the climate of fear 
here is still so keen that no one 
seems willing to investigate. 

An eight-man patrol- of the 
United Nations-backed French 
intervention force in Rwanda 
arrived here Tuesday as part of 
its effort to protect civilians and 
ensure delivery of aid. 

The nuns seemed reassured, 
but worry still about what will 
happen if the French leave at 
the end of July, as their opera- 
tional timetable calls Tor. 

At his hilltop residence in 
Cyangugu, Bishop Ngihin- 
yurwa recounted how he had 
been powerless to prevent (be 
murder by Hutus of three T utsi 
priests among five clerics he 
had sought to accompany to 
safety outride the country. 

Noting the violence on the 
con tinea i from Somalia in East 
Africa to Liberia in the west, 
the bishop was not enthusiastic 
about suggestions that African 
troops may replace the French 
as a protective force at the end 
of next month. 



Fabnce ColTiint/ Agencc France- Prt5*E 

SWISS CRASH —Firemen with gas masks inspecting derailed cars of a train in the 1 a i gamn e, Switzerland, station 
on Wednesday. Hundreds were evacuated from their homes in the dty after chemicals were spilled fromthe train. 


CHINA; Peasant Migrants Cram Into Cities to Work on Construction Sites 


Con turned from Page 1 

of the country.” Richard Baum, a political 
science professor at the University of Cali- 
fornia at Los Angeles, calls the mobile 
population "a shock absorber” that can 
flow from one sector of the fast-changing 
economy to another "to cushion the trans- 
formation of the Chinese economy.” 

At the same time, today's migration ex- 
plosion could be the harbinger of an even 
greater one to come, Chinese and Western 
specialists say. 

With an estimated 130 million surplus 
workers in China's farm belt, and a surge 
in population growth that will push that 
number to 200 milli on by the end of the 
decade, the migrants are one of the "X” 
factors of China's future. 

"In five years, this could become a very 
big problem.” Mr. Fan said. 

In March, Agriculture Minister Uu 
Jiang said in the National People’s Con- 
gress that 50 million peasants left their 
farms in 1993 to seek employment in the 
cities, more than double the 24 million 
peasants who set off for the cities in 1992. 


Some estimates put the total "floating 
population” at 70 million to 100 million, 
said Dorothy Solinger, a China scholar at 
the University of California at Irvine, who 
has done extensive research on China's 
migrants. 

She also argues that the migrant prob- 
lem "may not ne as bleak as it is made out 
to sound.” 

"First, they are not all going to the big 
cities,” she said. Many migrants simply 
move off the farms into township enter- 
prises nearby, or even far away, but not 
necessarily clustered in large dries. 

Second, she said, where migrants do 
cluster, crime, not political rebellion, is the 
largest potential worry. She pointed out 
that the mayor oF Zhuhai, the special eco- 
nomic zone adjoining Macao, recently said 
75 percent of the crime in his dty could be 
attributed to migrants. 

But much is simply unknown about the 
size and complexity of China’s migratory 
labor movement, she said. What seems 
undisputed, is that the Pearl River Delta in 
Guangdong Province, formerly known as 
Canton, has the country's largest concen- 


Continued from Page 1 
the British monarchy from the 
Church of England and extend 
the throne’s symbolic leader- 
ship to all religions. 

Rather than assuming the 
traditional title of “Defender of 
the Faith.” the prince said he 
would prefer “Defender of 
Faith” or "Defender of the Di- 
vine.” and he spoke at length 
about the common links be- 
tween all the world's religions. 


Such ideas have left some An- 
glican traditionalists howling 
that the prince is a dangerous 
radical. 

Yet Charles squashed specu- 
lation that he is not interested 
in becoming king and might 
eventually stand aside for his 
eldest son, William, now 12. He 
was asked whether he would 
accept the throne when Queen 
Elizabeth II, his mother, dies, if 
he is alive and healthy. 


“I would certainly 
so,” Charles said. "As far asTm 
concerned, in the ordinary 
course of events, this is what 
would happen.” 

Over the last decade, the 
nince has been overshadowed 
Diana's charisma and more 
recently has been vic timize d, at 
least in the view of the Charles 
camp, by systematic leaks to the 
media that she authorized. The 
Dimbleby Blm is widely de- 


% 


SHIP; In Italy , Selective Memory COLONY; Patten Plan Is Passed 


Continued from Page 1 

for Sicily. Then it is to sail to 
Egypt, where Italian veterans 
who fought for Mussolini in the 
Western Desen and who are 
sailing on the Achille Laura will 
commemorate their fallen com- 
rades at the site of the battle of 
El AJamein. 

Some Italian newspapers 
have called the commemoration 
a neofascist riposte to the D- 
Day celebrations in Normandy. 

The cruise-liner is to return 
by way of the Aegean and will 
anchor at Capri, just before 
President Bill Clinton and oth- 
ers gaLher next week for the G-7 
summit meeting in Naples just 
across the bay. 

Wednesday, said a passenger 
who spoke in return for ano- 
nymity, passengers went ashore 
at the Sicilian port of Siracusa ’ 
and "were given a tour by a 
guide who told us about exces- 
sive African immigration.” 

The passengers are paying 
51.300 to 33.300 each for what 
the National Alliance strategist 
Roberto Iannarilli described as 
an initiative to bring the party 
faithful close to their leader on 
a vacation that will also put 
some funds into the party cof- 
fers. “It will earn hundreds of 
millions of lire for us,” Mr. Ian- 
narilli said. 

The idea seems to have start- 
ed something of a trend: Um- 
berto Bossi. the rambunctious 
Northern League leader, who is 
also a member of the governing 
triumvirate in Rome, plans his 
own slightly more up-market 
cruise with 100 followers on a 
different ship later this month. 


Destination: Greece, Turkey 
and the Black Sea. Ticket price’: 
51,800 to S4.100. 

But Mr. Fini's odyssey 
aboard the Achille Lauro has 
stolen the headlines. 

“Fini wins a million at rou- 
lette." said the state television, 
referring to the Italian sum 
equivalent to about 5600. Mr 
Fini dismissed the report, say- 
ing it was bad luck to discuss 
one's winnings. 

The mood, evidently, was not 
that of October 1985. Then, 
more than 400 people were 
cruising the Mediterranean on 
board the Achille Lauro. 

As it neared Port Said, Egypt, 
after leaving Alexandria, hi- 
jackers from the extremist Pal- 
estine Liberation Front com- 
mandeered the vessel and later 
pushed Mr. Klinghoffer over- 
board as the Achille Lauro 
sailed off Syria. 

Mr. Kh/jgboifer's was the 
only fatality from the hijacking. 


Continued from Page 1 
by direct or indirect election. 
Beijing has vowed to dismantle 
the Legislative Council when it 
regains control of Hong Kang, 
a factor that weighed heavily in 
Wednesday’s marathon debate. 
But Beijing recently decided to 
end its attacks on reforms it has 
vociferously contested since 
Mr. Patten proposed them in 
October 1992. 

After months of deadlock 
China and Britain have re- 
opened negotiations on key in- 
frastructure projects, including 
Hong Kong’s new $20.3 billion 
airport and a host of complex 
issues involved in the transfer 
of sovereignty in three years. 

British and Chinese negotia- 
tors expect to soon strike a deal 
on the transfer of military lands 
that has eluded them for seven 
years. Drafting of an airport 
financing agreement began last 
Friday. 

China first ignored the demo- 


Kim II Sung Sees Progress 


Return 

BEIJING — The official 
Chinese news agency Xinhua 
quoted President Kim II Sung 
as having said Wednesday that 
the crisis over North Korean 
nuclear ambitions had eased in 
the wake of an agreement Tues- 
day for a summit meeting be- 
tween him and the South Kore- 
an president. 

“The situation in the Korean 
Peninsula has been eased and is 
moving in a positive direction,” 


Mr. Kim told a Chinese mili- 
tary delegation, the news agen- 
cy reported. 

The meeting will be the first 
between leaders of the two Ko- 
reas since the peninsula was di- 
vided after World War II. The 
three-day meeting is to start 
July 25 in Pyongyang, the 
North Korean capital. 

The North Korean leader 
briefed the delegation, Xinhua 
said, on preparations for his 
summit meeting next month. 


Socialist as Leader 




an’s 


tration of migrants, an estimated 10 mil- 
lion. 

At least 500,000 of them are child labor- 
ers, Chinese surveys have shown, many of 
them working in sweatshop conditions. 

In Jiangxi Province, the outflow of 
farmers leaped from 200,000 in 1991 to 
more than 3 million last year. 

Shanghai's 13 million residents are now 
supporting 2L5 milli on rural workers at- 
tracted from all over the Yangtze River 
valley to the construction trades at work 
on the city’s mammoth redevelopment 
plan. 

Experts say that as long as China’s eco- 
nomic growth continues to gallop along at 
more than 10 percent a year, this floating 
population is likely to remain relatively 
well employed, prosperous and stable. But 
an economic downturn or recession could 
easily leave the tide of migrants stranded 
and aggrieved. 

“This is the labor of an exploited class,” 
said a long-tenured Western diplomat 
here. “There are no wage laws to protect 
them, and . they can be fired on a whim.” 


PRINCE; Charles Skids Off a Runway and Crashes Into IBs TV Special 


scribed here as (he prince’s cal- 
culated attempt to match Diana 
at her own media game. 

Indeed. Charles himself 
makes reference to this idea 
during the film, when he says 
with exasperation at one point, 
"It’s so difficult though, in this 
day and age, I find, to know 
how to play the media. ... It is 
very hard, I think, to know 
where the balance lies.” 


By StevenBnifl. 

■ Internatimai fferoMTHbtmc 

TOKYO —After decades of 
mutual back-scratching when 
the Liberal Democrats gov- 
erned Japan and held out a cor- 
porate safety met, ; big business 
hart just come around to the 
more laissez-faire ideas es- 
poused by the coalition ’govern- 
meats that took over last July. 

SO the election Wednesday of 
a Socialist as -Japan’s next 
prime minister elicited a degree - 
of shock and apprehension 
from a business community 
fearful that the new, deeply di- 
vided and unstable government 
will freeze — if not roll back 7^ 
economic refonnsiiecded to lift 
Japan ort of recession. 

The election also raised more 
immediate worries that a lack of 
progress in trade talks with the 
United Stales will posh the yen . 
even higher against the dollar, 
tigh tening the stranglehold on 
Japanese exporters, ladeed, the 
Japanese currency-jumped to a 
postwar record and, meanwhile, 

the UJS. trade re pre sentative; - 
Mickey Kan tor, said theincom-; 

mg Ja p anese government might - 

delay progress in the trade, 
talks. . ->• 

“I fed. very uncomfortable, 
very strange,” said Yolaro Ko- 
bayashi, chairman of Figi Xe- 
rox Corp., earlier in the week 
when asked to contemplate To- 
miichi Murayama as prime 
minister. “Bang run by the So- , 
dalists is kind of anti-trend” 

Japanese prime ministers like 
to bear small gifts when meet- 
ing UJL presidents, but Mr. 
Murayama will be largely emp- 
ty-handed when he encounters 
President BUI Groton at - the 
summit meetirigof leading in- 
dustrialized nations next week 
in Naples. 

“Policy differences within 
the coalition aire just too. im- 
mense; we’re unhkdy to see any 
concrete proposals,” said Min- 
eko Sasaki-Smhh, chief econo- 
mist at Morgan Stanley in To- 3 
kyo. 

Mr. Murayama Trill be un- 
able, for instance,- to follow 
through on a pledge' to expand 
Japan's domestic demand ' by 


promising a permanent reduc- 
tion in income taxes. 

■ . The- Socialists have been toe 
stumbling Mock in cutting a 
deal on tax reform. They op- 
pose -plans -to finance the cue 
with higher consumption taxes, 
preferr i ng taxes that are more 
<ffl«rohsTcrthe wealthy. 

; Similarly, Mr. Murayama 
' w3I be unable to make a specif- 
ic pledge to bolster the amount 
. of pubhc worics spending begin- 
ning in 1995. . 

:■ The .only concrete offering 
wfll be the vague and non com- 
: ntittal package of deregulate 11 
measures unvoted on Tuesday. 

The election of Mr. Mur- 
ayama also is likely to scuttle 
any hopes of reaching at least a 
partial agreement osn the testy 
U.S.-Japan framework talks 
that aim to bolster foreign ac- 
cess to Japanese maricets. 

V . A 'derision on the proposals 
by toe prime minister is neccs- 
. saiy, arid that could prove diffi- 
cult Instead, officials will tnr to 
agree on a rough outline, a ^ 0 . r ' 
eign Ministry official said 
Wednesday. 

“ The two govrinments had 
hoped tomtit a deal cm at least, 
one of three priority.areas: gov- 
ernment procurement, insur- 
'. ahcc and autos and auto parts. 

Mr. . Murayama. said he 
' thoug ht- the Americ ans would 
“cHn w unde man ding of the po- 
litical situation in Japan and be. 
*1 enough to wait for the 
to settle.” . 

His government does at least 
hold some experienced politi- 
cians -from. -among Liberal 
: Democrats, the largest group 
within tfaecoalitiotuOne poten- 
tial candidate for finance minis- 
ter; for instance, isRyutaro Ha- 
shhnoto, who formerly held the 
office but resigned due to scan- 
dal several yews ago. 

Tbelibcaral Democrats have 
“guys with deep ties to the bu- 
reaucracy and. the business 
community” saidJesper Roll, 
economist at S^G. Warburg Se- 
curities, “Biif the way back to- 
wards old-style influence-ped- 
dhng'is not seen as the way 
forward, either for the business 
community, the bureaucracy "dr 
financial investors.^ 



ance, 

Discreet Political Profile 


era tic reforms, then resisted 
them with public attacks that 
jarred a nervous local business 
community and prompted 
mini- crashes in the Hong Kong' 
stock market It only agreed to 
discuss the issue with Britain in 
April last year after Mr. Patten 
threatened to push ahead with- 
out its acquiesence. 

The new legislation will not 
make future Hong Kong elec- 
tions fully democratic. Only 20 
of 60 legislators win be directly 
elected. 

Bui toe reforms will end cor- 
porate-only voting in function- 
al constituencies organized 
along trade and professional 
lines by allowing all 2.7 million 
Hong Kong workers a second 
vote in 30 constituencies. 

Mr. Patten’s proposals will 
also require a new Election 
Committee responsible for 
choosing 10 members of the 
.Legislative Council. 

The defeated Liberal Party 
amendments proposed that oc- 
cupational-based constituen- 
cies would have been limited to 
220,000 voters and that the 
Election Committee be drawn 
from four categories of resi- 
dents: industry and commerce, 
profesrionals, workers, and po- 
litical figures. 

“We still think that Patten's 
package is bad fra a smooth 
transition for Hong Kong,” 
said toe Liberal Party chair- 
man, Allen Lee, alter its 
amendment was defeated. 
"What we want is a package 
which would minimize change 
and turbulence, bull can assure 
you his package would create 
very big changes.” 


Reuters . 

TOKYO — No one who has 
watched Japanese television in 
repent months can have failed 
to . notice Tramichi Mura; 
the veteran politician 
Wednesday as toe nation’s first 
Socialist prime minister since 
19481 

IBs distinctive tall, stooping 
figure has been ever-present in 
reports of dm. political tunnoil 
that has shaken Japan since the 
Liberal Democratic Party lost 
its 38-year hold on power last 
July. 

As head of the deeply divided 
Social Democratic Party" since' 
September, Mr. Murayama, 70, 
functioned tor months as a kind 
of unofficial opposition leader 
within the broad ruling coali- 
tion that took over the reins 
from toe liberal Democrats. 

For right months, the Social- 
ists balked at policy initiatives 
from their center-right coalition 
partners, stalled and filibus- 
tered their int ernal meetings 
and pubbdy contested toe ac- 
tions of alliance colleagues. 

Then in April, judging — no 
doubt conrctly — that his exas- 
perated partners were prepar- 
ing to dump him, Mr. - Mnr- 
ayama led the party into 
opposition, stripping Prime 


Minister Tsutomu'Haia of his 

p arliamentar y majority. 

: - In the 21 years he spent in 
Parliament prior . to bosoming 
party , chief, Mr. Murayama 
built up i reputation as a com- 
petent behind-the-scenes medi- 
ator, but seldom took open 
stands an auto divisive policy 
issues as Japan’s defense treaty 
-with toe United Stoles, which 
. Socialist firebrands made it 
their life’s work to battle. 

As the Socialists’ chief parlia- 
mentary negotiator, he look a 
tough stance in g rilling the 
toea-goveming Liberal Demo- 
crats on their United Nations 
peacekeeping operations bill, 
which opened the way for To- 
kyo to send troops overseas for 
the first time since World War 

n. 

The measure- eventually 
passed despite the Socialists* fe- 
rocious opposition. 

“Murayama is an ; Asian- 
style’ politician who doesn’t 
worry about political perfor- 
mances and has no distinct pol- 
icy platform,” Srishiro Fukuda, 
editor in chief of the party 
newspaper Shakai Sktinpo, told 
Kyoao news agency. 

“He is a hannonizer who will 
play a balancing role,” Mr. Fu- 
knda added. 


JAPAN: Reform Goes Into Umbo 


Gantimed from Page 1 
mg. ideas and policies rather 
than trading favors ' and pay- 
offs. - 

The new government is sure 
to be regarded somewhat 
askance by Washington, al- 
though toe White Howe issued 
a statement stating that Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton looks forward 
to working .with Mr. Mur- 
ayama. 

In general, toe new govern- 
ment's posture on trade may 
strain Washington’s patience. 
The Socialists have a history of ’ 


favoring protectionism; they 
were the most .reluctant of any 
major party to drop Japan’s ban 
on imported rice last year. And 
Tokyo now looks less likelv 
than ever to meet Washington's 
dem an d s for a major economic 


~ aHU 

the JJberal' Democrats differ 
sharply on how toe tax system 
should be revamped. 

^ Tensions between the Mur- 
ayama government and the 
CEnlon administration may 
also flare over security issues. 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994- 


Page 5 


BOOKS 


THE DEVIL’S OWN 
WORK 

By Ahm Judd. 1 15 pager. SI7. 
Alfred A. Knopf. 


Reviewed by 
Midbdko Kakutani 


A LOOPING, discursive 
narrative that’s filled with 
mysterious forcsbadovyings- A 
narrator who depicts himself as 
a naive, fuzzy sort of guy, im- 
certain of the truth of the events 
he’s relating. 

Two couples, linked to each 
another by adultery and decep- 
tion. A disturbing series of 
events, culminating in death 
and emotional disorder. 

Each of these elements can be 
found in Ford Madox Ford’s 
famous 1915 novel, “The Good 
Soldier.” Each of them can also 
be found in Alan Add’s new 
novella, “The Devil’s Own 
Work,” a meticulously written 
stray that stands, at once, as a dy 
homage to Ford and as a chilling 
little piece of fiction on its owzl 
Judd, the author of a recent 
biography of Ford (“Ford Ma- 
dox Fqrd,’' Harvard University 
Press), seems to have taken the 
overall structure of his tale from 
Ford’s famous novel, and he 
tries hard to emnlate Ford’s 
fiercely controlled story tellin g 
te chnique. 

Here, however, the similar- 
ities end. Ford’s modernist 


lit. graduates who feed off the 
scraps of London publishing 
and journalism. ** 

Edward wrote some dever re- 
views, published a modest novel, 
and gathered around him an 
aura of integrity and promise. 
His big breakthrough, we’re 
told, came when he published an 
essay debunking the career of a 
novelist named O.M. Tyrrel, the 


so-called “doyen of Eng fefli let- 
bo tor decades “bad 


ters,” who 
squatted like a toad upon the 
summit of literary fashion. ” 

In his essay, Edward argued 
that Tyird had started his career 
off well, but had then suc- 
cumbed to wHlfnl trendiness, 
trading ideas for empty style, 
passion for stale self-absorption. 

The Tyrrel article makes Ed- 
ward an overnight sensation in 
the London literary world. 
What’s more, it earns him an 
intriguing invitation from the re- 
el drive Tyrrel to come visit him 
in his hideaway in the South of 
France. But something strange 
begins to happen to Edward af- 
ter his meeting with TyrrcL Hie 
great man of letters, it seems, has 
mysteriously died shortly after 
their meeting, and his phenome- 
nal success seems to transfer it- 
self magically to Edward. 

Suddenly Edward is churning 
out one novel after another, 
each greeted with mounting 
and popular 


intrigues to 
the seething passions that lurk 
beneath the surface of polite 
society, and in doing so, created 
a. devastating soda! portrait of 
Britain on the brink of Worid 
War L Judd’ s novdla has decid- 
edly more modest ambitions, 
naing a Salti-like sense of the 
macabre to satirize tire literary 
worid and the unreckoned eon- 
sequences of fame. 

*Tlre DewTs Own Work” be- 
gins simply ennuig fr with the 
narrator’s ienrimscexices about 
his college friend Edward, a 
young would-be novelist who 
radiated confidence and drenn. 

“Edward had tire reputation 
of being a hriffiatit talker,” the 
narrator recalls, “yet he was far 
from voluble and I remember 
little of what he actually said. 
Others, 1 know, have found tire 
same and it contributes to the 
increasingly unreal impression 
left by his career and reputa- 
tion, an impression that affects 
even me.” 

During Edward’s eady days 
in London, the narrator tells us, 
there was little to 
him from “tire sboals of 


And yet, the narrator thinks, 
something seems terribly 
wrong. Ova- the years, he no- 
tices disturbing changes in Ed- 
ward’s behavior: a growing 
emotional coldness, a growing 
retreat from the worid, a grow- 
ing reliance on alcohol 

Most sinister of all are the 
changes in Edward’s writing. 
Though each of his books is 
mare successful than the last, 
the narrator notices that they 
have become increasingly in-’ 
consequential and pallid. 

There are moments when the 
narrator's story dips danger- 
ously from the region of melo- 
drama into the territory of 
farce, allowing us to see its bakl 
indebtedness to tire Faust leg- 
end and Wilde’s “Picture of 
Dorian Gray.” 

For the most part, however, 
Judd retains remarkable con- 
trol of his material, playing with 
metaphor, allusion and the 
reader's own shifting expecta- 
tions to produce a wicked little 
book, a bode that’s both a de- 
lightful satire erf literary mores 
and an alarming parable of am- 
bition and ego ran amok. 


Micteko Kakutani is on the- 
staff of The New York Times. 


WHAT THEY'RE SHADIN' 


. • Lotdoade la FaMse, friend 
arid mdse of Yves Saint Lau- 
rent, is reading “ifyrwjV Letters 
and Journals: VoL 1 In My Hot 
Youth: 1798-1810” by Lord 
George Gordon Byron. 

“It’s very human: he’s always 
asking for money and com- 
plautmg about his mum. 1 enjoy 


1 like to be takes into a world. 
Pm an addictive reader.” 

(Christine Joseph, 1ST) 



BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

O K the diagramed deal 
.South and North maneu- 
vered carefully to the best coor 
tract of four hearts and brought 
it home. North was able to lo- 
cate tire heart fit and hint at a 
slain with a cue bid of four 
diamonds without taking tire 
par t nd fthi p out of irs depth. 

South, won the opening 
spade lead with dummy’s ace 
and led the heart long. East 
took his ace and led bis remain- 
mg spade to force a. ruff in the 
d umm y. Sooth cashed the dia- 
mond ace, ruffed a diamond, 
arid ledifre dub jack intending 
to finesse. When West covered 
with the king he -took the ace 
and returned a dub. East took 
the queen, and the position was 
this: 

' . NORTH " ■■ 

• Is* 

*«54- 

• 'EAST . 
•4— • 

. ; - v— 

OQBB54 

• SOUTH • 

*97 

C 10 9 8 - 

o— 

*19 


East led a diamond- Sooth 
raffed with the heart ten. West 
misjudged by discarding a 
spade. 

South led aheart to the queen 
and continued with a dub to 
the ten. He was now safe wheth- 
er or not West raffed with his 
winning heart jack. 


WEST 

4KQJ642 
9 J43 
0 J10 


* K2 


NORTH (D) 

♦ A 

0KQS2 

»AK1 

♦ A 6 5 4 3 

EAST 
♦ 10 9 
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: SOUTH 
*9753 
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North and South were vulnerable. 


WEST 
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Sooth 

West 

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40 

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Pare 

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West led the spade Jdsg. 


See our 

t. Me l ange 


— -1 I— - 

tWBTJr VTB On oMgy 



INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 



Franklin Mint u the world's leading creator of fine quality coDecimbles- Employing 
arcmnd 4,500 people worldwide, the company's HQ ia in Philadelphia. 


Recent restructuring to build a strong European HQ means that die company now needs to 
add to Its European management a 


EUROPEAN CUSTOMER SERVICE 
DIRECTOR 

Based in London 


As one of the world's largest direct response marketers with a presence in 13 co untries in 
Europe, world class customer service is fundamental to Franklin Mbit's business success. 


The quality control and bottom line responsibilify for this across Europe lies with the customer 
facing employees, led, zuotivaiad and energised by the European Customer Service Director. 


With 6 Country Managers reporting in, your responsibility will be to lend their teams 
consistently to produce outstanding results in customer service, taking account of the 

of flip ii| M>i»tinnttl systems. Cultural rijWawmiy and falHlwiPitf TTMpK.. g »tio|m 1 whilst 
increasing productivity and growing the business. 


Reporting to (he Vice-President and General Manager in Europe, you will need to be highly 
analytical, with leading edge customer service experience In a leadership capacity and be 
used to w orkin g in a fast moving, demanding environment European experience and certainly 
fluency in a s ec o n d European language would be an advantage. 


By demonstrating strong leadership aUlla and an astute be 
the planned growth within Europe. (Rah LH/FM/B94) 


i mind, you will contribute to 


In addi ti on, to support the business growth In the German market, the company also 
needs to find a customer service professional, capable of taking charge of the Ifenss 
office: 


COUNTRY MANAGER - 
GERMANY 
Based near Dusseldorf 


The German collectable market is Ukely to show the largest growth potential tor Fkankin Mint 
and therefore this role is crucial to the planned drive to increase market share. 


Reporting to (he European Customer Service Director, your immediate challenge will be to 
establish a leadership position in customer service, m the new office. 


T3ds is a ’hands-on’ role, which will grow in responsibility and scope, depending upon your 
efforts and the penetration of the market as a whole. To achieve this growth within Germany, 
yon will be credible and persuasive when dealing with senior wiaimgwm in the UK and the US. 
Ton will need to demonstrate influencing skills of a high order to gain support and investment 
in the German business through working with the Sales and Marketing teams. 


Tour easterner service experience, combined with your people-management and commercial 
aenm en, wd be key in focusing the operation and so capitalising on the market potential. You 
need to be results driven and capable of working independently, whilst promoting Franklin 
Mini in Germany . 


We expect yon to be energetic and capable of interfacing with largely young, enthusiastic 
front-line staff, fluent in German arid English and have a desire to latn on (his challenge and 
contribute significantly to the future of Frankfn Mint. (Hefc LH/FM/794) 


pn riHwM a “my***" pa rhj > ml aw BXCiting totmu. a Wi n 

to ni n vtiwMi company. 


Applicants, mala ox female, should apply ia English, enclosing a fall Cf and 
details of c ur re n t salary, to Lorraine Home, Mercuxi Urval United, Spencer 
House, 29 Grove toll Hoad, Harrow, Middlesex HA1 3BN. Tel: 081 863 8466. 
Faxf 081 861 1978. Please quote the relevant reference number on all 
c or respondence- 



ENGINEERING AND FINANCIAL 
ADVISORS FOR LA© FOR 




mane 




SECOND H1GWAY IMPROVEMENT: PROJECT 
FINANCED BY WORLD BANK 

■ With World Bank financing the Ministry of Communication, 
Transport, Post and Construction (MCTPC) seeks to recruit two 
Senior Advisors both with min. 1? years relevant post-graduate 

irience. 

ie Project Director a senior highway Engineer with extensive 
garial experience in implementing highway project as Site 
Project Director from the private sector. 

■ The Finanda 1/Accounting Specialist an accounting professional 
with extensive experience in financial and auditing aspects of 
highway projects as Site Administrative and Financial Director of 
the private sector. 

Indications of interest and relevant competence/experience from individuals and 
Contractors to be received by 1st August 1994. Short-listed candidates will 
thereafter receive further information and be reguested to submit detailed proposals 

Ministry of Communication, Transport, Post and Construction 
Director of Communication Department 
Lang Xang Avenue 
P.O. Box 2158 
Vientiane, LAO PDR 
Phone N° InL +856 21 41 45 15 
Fax N° InL +856 21 41 41 23 




V TITAN 


TTTAW EXECUTIVE SEARCH LTD. 


•^MfternfltiqfBl firorbf ^ ^ - 

tiy Ba i pre ^raduale, i 


to the 

in a country of the- 
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attba appropriate. 


' 1 V \ -:V : V 

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40. ExcfilfBHt fern>wlBdge:Erf'. IgiQkeo. french an advantage. 


.n,.. .state .yiST-'-' ; j ■; ■ , /i : v n . ij • rV 

in-industrial Property 




/ 

ICIES 

THE RXO BUSINESS FORUM J 


MANAGEMENT 

PROGRAMME 

COORDINATOR 


CIES, the Food Business 
Forum, is a unique 
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network, str ateg i c ally placed 
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retatters and suppliers. 

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workshops for senior food 
business executives. 


CIES is looking tor a young 
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interested in working with an 
international team involved in 
anticipating change for the food 
business worldwide. 


STRATOS 


The successful candidate will 
be an English rnorber-tongue 
university graduate, with at 
least 5 years work experience 
and will probably already have 
‘developed skills in the areas of 
facilitation, consultancy and 
project management. Fluency 
in at least one other continental 
language will be a requirement. 


Send full CV and salary history to 
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ref. MPC - 39-11 rue de la 
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EXECUTIVE 
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WANTED 


DO YOU MfigBE PflU EHCB) panon 
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Page 6 


THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 . 


OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune More Polls, but What Do The 



PL'BUSHRJ} WITH TIIB NKW VOKK TIMES AND THfi W.ViHlNtnTlN fOST 


On Track With Russia 


Whatever problems he may face else- 
where in foreign affairs. President Bill 
Chilton s Russia policy is yielding sig- 
nificant advances. 

Last week Russia joined NATO’s 
Partnership for Peace, intended to foster 
military cooperation between once taos- 
Ule alliances; Mr. Clinton and President 
Boris Yeltsin agreed to meet in Wash- 
ington in September, the United States 
and Russia signed agreements to build a 
space station together and to have an 
American consortium develop oil and 
gas reserves on Russia’s Sakhalin Island. 
They also made progress on curbing 
nuclear dangers. 

Mr, Clinton is betting that continued 
cooperation will help Russia grow into a 
country that its neighbors can live with. 
To revert to the old Cold War policy of 
contain men i now would only aid "the 
ambitions of nationalists like' Vladimir 
Zhirinovsky, confirming their view of 
the West as an enemy. 

Military ties with Russia are critical. 
The Russian army is going through a 
crisis of confidence brought on by a lost 
war in Afghanistan, a lost empire in 
Easiem Europe and a lost country, the 
Soviet Union. Mix that with loss of mili- 
tary pay and stature, soldiers who are 
returning home with no place to live, 
corruption and draft-dodging, and the 
result is a bitter if not explosive brew. 

The demoralized army at first object- 
ed to joining the NATO venture. It 


could not bear to settle for tbe same 
terms as Latvia, Poland or others in the 
Partnership for Peace. It sought a broad- 
er role more suited to Russia's stature, 
but in the end accepted the same formal 
relationship with NATO as the others, 
along with a pledge of “enhanced dia- 
logue" on matters like Bosnia. If tbe 
military partnership succeeds, it could 
give the Russian army a new sense of 
itself, turning it into a force for peace and 
heading off a second Cold War. 

Brokering the deal on oil and gas 
exploration is the least the United States 
could do to help revitalize Russia's de- 
vastated economy. Building a space sta- 
tion gives gainful employment to Rus- 
sian scientists who otherwise might put 
their skills to dangerous ends. 

American encouragement has been 
decisive in getting Russia and Ukraine 
to pick up the pace of dismantling their 
nuclear arsenals. Last week Russia 
agreed to shut down plutonium produc- 
tion reactors lest the material be stolen 
and sold abroad. 

Mr. Clinton gets little attention or 
credit for his prudent Russia policy. He 
has made few speeches defining and 
defending his quite sensible approach. 
That has left the field open to his detrac- 
tors and allowed the public to focus on 
Somalia, Haiti and Rwanda. But those 
problems are far less important than a 
solid relationship with a healthy Russia. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


No to the ALM Reactor 


Plutonium is dangerous stuff, and 
there ought to be no place for it in 
civilian commerce. But the United 
States is running a research program to 
develop a new kind of reactor — the 
advanced liquid metal, or ALM, reactor 
— that would bum plutonium to gener- 
ate electricity. The idea is that it might 
come in handy some day. But that possi- 
bility is remote. In the meantime, this 
effort sets a bad example for other coun- 
tries and undercuts American efforts to 
prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. 

North Korea, for example, claims that 
its nuclear intentions are entirely peace- 
ful. The evidence strongly suggests oth- 
erwise. But plutonium can be used either 
to generate electricity or to build weap- 
ons. The North Koreans have the capac- 
ity to extract plutonium and, according 
to intelligence estimates, may have 
enough of it for one or two bombs. But if 
the United Slates is working on techno- 
logy to use plutonium for the civilian 
economy, how can it deny other coun- 
tries the opportunity to acquire plutoni- 
um for the same purpose? Once North 
Korea or any other country has plutoni- 
um in a form suitable for fuel, the pluto- 
nium can be easily and quickly diverted 
to other purposes. 

It is not only the fuel that could be 
diverted. An advanced liquid metal re- 


actor, unlike the reactors now in opera- 
tion in America and most other coun- 
tries, could be turned, with little 
difficulty, into a breeder. That is a reactor 
that produces more plutonium than it 
consumes, a nightmare for arms control. 

Supporters of the advanced liquid 
metal reactor argue that the world may 
need energy from plutonium at some 
point in the future. That is an exceeding- 
ly distant prospect. The world currently 
has an enormous oversupply of urani- 
um, a much safer fuel. Even weapons- 
grade uranium can be mixed with other 
isotopes, rendering it useless for bomb- 
making. Not so plutonium. 

Any technology to exploit plutonium, 
even with the best and most pacific of 
intentions, is an open invitation to take 
it into places and uses where tbe interna- 
tional inspectors will have great difficul- 
ty tracking it accurately. The Clinton 
administration is trying to end this re- 
search project, but the project has influ- 
ential supporters in the Senate, which is 
about to vote on an energy appropria- 
tions bill providing $99 million to carry 
it through another year. Killing that 
appropriation would "make it a Little eas- 
ier for the United States to restrain the 
proliferation of nuclear weapons in a 
world that has too many of them. 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Yes, Ban Chemical Arms 


The United State.s Senate will vote 
next month on a global treaty to ban 
chemical weapons, which could sub- 
stantially reduce the chances that U.S. 
troops will ever face a chemically armed 
foe. Opponents would prefer to keep 
chemical arms to deter tbe use of gas by 
others. And a recent revelation that 
Russia may be concealing efforts to de- 
velop advanced chemical weapons has 
fueled doubts about Washington's abili- 
ty to verify compliance. 

The United Slates has not relied on 
chemical weapons as a deterrent in re- 
cent years and it would be imprudent to 
do so now, given its superiority in con- 
ventional arms. Moreover, the United 
States would be a lot more secure with 
the treaty's verification provisions than 
without them. They provide ways to 
detect and stop suspicious activities by 
any state. The Senate would be wise to 
establish a global norm against chemical 
arms and use the treaty to enforce it. 

Chemical weapons are justly stigma- 
tized as insidious and indiscriminate. To 
be militarily decisive, they need to be 
used in massive quantities, posing for- 
midable logistical and delivery difficul- 
ties. Even so, enemy troops can protect 
themselves against gas warfare. 

For these and other reasons. Lhe 
American military has long seen chemi- 
cal weapons as more trouble than they 
are worth, and has not integrated them 
into its doctrines or drills. 

Nor is such a deterrent needed now. 
given American conventional superior- 
ity. It was not necessary to deploy chem- 
ical arms to defeat Iraq, for instance: 
Saddam Hussein refrained from deploy- 
ing chemicals because be feared that 
their use would have led the United 
States to march on Baghdad. 

Since the United Stales in practice has 


not relied on chemical weapons for much 
deterrence, it is right to give them up. But 
that gives it an interest in keeping others 
from acquiring them, and here the treaty 
would be very useful. States that sign it 
must open their plants Lo monitoring to 
assure that they are producing chemicals 
for peaceful purposes. Those that do not 
sign it will be denied exports of chemicals 
that could be fashioned into weapons. 

Of course, verification is no sure 
thing. It is difficult to delect every at- 
tempt to acquire or manufacture chemi- 
cal agents, or even shells and bombs 
useful for terrorist attacks. But Lhe trea- 
ty will certainly make it harder for coun- 
tries to deploy munitions in militarily 
decisive quantities. 

The reports from Russia show why the 
United States is better off with the treaty. 
A scientist who worked on chemical arms 
for many years, Vi] Mirzayanov, has ac- 
cused Russia of concealing efforts to de- 
velop binary weapons. These weapons 
contain two ingredients that are relatively 
harmless if stored and transported sepa- 
rately, but are deadly when combined. 
These ingredients would violate the trea- 
ty, which proscribes all toxic chemicals 
and their precursors, except for industri- 
al, agricultural or other benign uses. Had 
the treaty been in effect when the disclo- 
sure was made, Russia would have been 
required to permit inspection. 

The treaty permits an exception for the 
use of chemical agents for riot control in 
peacekeeping operations, which the Pen- 
tagon favors. But the Senate should be 
punctilious about not widening that ex- 
ception to allow the production or stock- 
piling of such agents for use in war. 

Ratification will help stigmatize chemi- 
cal arms and deter states from acquiring 
them. The Senate's duty seems dear. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



International Herald Tribune 

EST,\BUSHED HBT 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

C.i-Chnirmfn 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Pubtahc' £ Ckuf £»n amr 
JOHN VINOCUR. Exrcvtr.e Editi" £ lift- Prrsdav 

• WALTER WELLS. Mw • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNOfiJR and 

CHARLES MITCHELMORE Dqney Editor* • CARLGEWIKTZ. At»w fcfij.tr 

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W ashington — in “The 

Agenda,” Bob Woodward 
gives us an anecdote about tbe 
brave new world. While President 
Bill Clinton last year was present- 
ing his economic program in a 
speech to Congress, his political 
advisers were conducting an ex- 
periment in Dayton. Ohio. 

They booked up a focus group 
to meters designed to measure the 
positive and negative reactions to 
the president's words. Readings 
were taken every two seconds and 
transmitted by phone to the White 
House Communications Room. 
The idea was to find out which 
phrases, sentences or paragraphs 
^worked” or “didn’t work." The 
information could then be used in 
fashioning speeches, slogans, pro- 
paganda and programs to influ- 
ence the attitudes and political be- 
havior of the American people. 

These methods are common- 
place in the modem era. not only 
in politics but in every major sec- 
tor of society. America’s consumer 
economy is built on polling and 
marketing techniques that probe 
intellects and psyches for clues to 
how people can be motivated with 


By Richard Harwood 


evocative symbols and words to 
choose Brand A over Brand B. 

A great industry populated with 
psychologists, pollsters, mathema - 
ti cians , survey designers, market 
analysts and researchers has arisen 
to meet the needs of politics, com- 
merce, religion, education, lobby- 
ing, philanthropy and so on for 
“scientific" methods to move the 
masses. Btllioiis are spent on these 
activities although their effective- 
ness is much in doubL 

Several advertisers who had 
spent milli ons for television dur- 
ing this year's Super Bowl later 
reported that sales slumped in the 
weeks following the game. 

Whatever “science” was pro- 
duced by the Dayton experiment 
during Mr. Clinton’s economic 
speech was of little help to him. 
The stimulus package he pro- 
posed was defeated in Congress, 
and shortly afterward, Mr. Wood- 
ward tells us, his polling experts 
were telling him that thing s were 
looking very bad. Mr. Clinton was 
perceived as weak. “The mood of 
the coon try had turned bleak ...” 


One assumes that the Clinton- 
ians believed all that Bat; we. 
don't know how many people in 
their poll had the vaguest idea: 
what the stimulus package con- 
tained or what effect it might or-, 
might not have on their lives. 

We don’t know whether this, 
“bleak” mood — if it existed — 
had other causes. We don’t know 
why polls all over, the industrial- 
ized world were reporting at this 
very time that most people were 
dissatisfied. 

A more curious fact is that 
while pollsters were finding these 
high levels of dissatisfaction they 
were also finding that 85 percent 
of Americans were quite satisfied . 
with the way thins were going in 
their own lives. Toe lobbyists and 
interest groups, which journalists 
and politicians often confuse with 
the voice of God, deny this, of 
course. They are paid to whine, 
beg and complain. But they have 
no evidence on their side. 

In the United States, from 80 
to 95 percent of the labor force — 

. depending on tbe job classifica- 


tion — repented very high levels 
of satisfaction .with thdr work. 

... How did Mr. Clinton's pollster 
: -conclude that ^'people had lost a 
sense of possibility?” 1 Their 

■ “bleak” view of things may have 

referred to. nothing more than 
'dews headlines and' their bleak 

■ -new. of Washington politicians, 
.which-is hot necessarily a mark of 
insanity. Journalists constantly 

■ take a bleak: view of politics ana 
government; the Ueaker the story 
the more prize- worthy it becomes. 

Every few weeks lhe Times- 
Mirror Carter for the People Sc 
the Press takes soundings of pop- : 
ular reaction to major news sto- 
ries. In May, the center reported 
that only a' third of Americans ' 
; . Tfcuew that a presidential candi- 
date in Merioowas recently assas-' 
snated; SO percent did not know; 
that North Korea was threaten 1 - 
mg to withdraw from theNudear 
Nonproliferation -Treaty, which : 
has again raised the specter of 
war on the Korean Peninsula.” 

It is fair, .to- say that “public ; 
opinion? exists very spottflyin 
America — if it exists at aD — ' . 
and that “wdU-infonhed” public 


opinion iseven scarcer. .So what- 
do these national polls signify. - v... 

What are they .measurtflg r . 
Whose heads are bemg 
in any meaningful sense? We are ... 
told, for example, . that enme is 
the biggest social issue in Amen- , 
oa. Yet when peoptewere askfida.^ 
few months ago to define the 
biggest problem facing you and . . 
your family," only 4 percent tnea- : ; 
turned few of come or vTOlepo^. , 
Thdrprimary concjon was a lac* ... 
of money to “make ends meet- . 

This is an ejection -year, m?*. 
Americans- will, be deluged with -.^.; 
polls. Every “respectable” tieysr • ' 
paper, magazine and television - v.; 
operation has its own poll, as 
does every .major politician and - 
party, respectable or othenvise.lt. - - . 
would be nice tf just coe time thev'j; 
poll sponsors would 'tell ns what J-: 
and wborthsy are measuring out ' 
there, what the electorate knows ., 
aboal what is going on, and who J 

: is paying attention to it alL .. - 

We would certainly find that . 

■ there is less there than meets the ^. 
eye. We..might find.. that. there, is . ~ 
ik* there at all. . -• 

. 77ie Washington Post. ; 



France Dares to Face the Humanitarian QwMengein Rwanda 


P ARIS — Practically everybody sniffed 
when France decided to risk its sol- 
diers to stop genocidal massacres in 
Rwanda. Hidden self-serving reasons 
were insinuated. Posccolonial and post- 
Cold War indifference is magnified by 
cynicism. A veteran Italian diplomat not- 
ed caustically, “They’re all holding their 
breath hoping to see France fail dramati- 
cally so they can say T told you so.' ” 

But Paris made up its mind that some- 
thing bad to be done, while everybody 
else, including African states, was dither- 
ing, and set about to do it with not only 
precise military p lanning but highly ener- 
getic and skilled diplomacy as well. 

There were plenty of grounds for hold- 
ing back, and one dominant reason for 
taking the plunge. Cardinal Jean-Marie 
L us tiger, the archbishop of Paris, sum- 
marized both. “It's the honor of France 
to try, even though France is the worst 
placed to do it,” be said. “But there's no 
one else. Where are the others?” 

He is righL The world has moved far 
enough toward a sense of common hu- 
manity to make it relatively easy to orga- 
nize relief in cases of natural "disasters, 
floods, earthquakes, famines. It remains 
timid, skeptical, eager not to get involved 


By Flora Lewis 

in man-made disasters, which are the 
major ones these days. 

Both Prime Minister Edouard Baha- 
dur and Foreign Minister Alain Juppe — 
and even Defense Minister Francois Lyo- 
tard, who for evident military reasons 
was the least keen to intervene — gave 
the real motive for the decision. It was 
above all to show that France wants to 
play a rote in the world, that it accepts 
responsibility and cares about Africa, 
which nobody else seems to do. 

If it has been irritating about self- 
assertion in the past, at times narrowly 
dogged in its pursuit of national interest 
(like every other country), France also 
includes in its sense of national interest a 
desire to use its influence and limited 
strength for tbe benefit of others. 

The United States has just announced 
that it is closing some 15 CIA stations 
around Africa. With surprising candor, the 
announcement explained that they were 
never really meant to gather knowledge 
about Afriikn affairs in any case, but were 
primarily to recruit Gold War agents 
among envoys from Co mmunis t states. 


There U an etanient of guilt in the new 
French effort. It is true, as the rebel Tutsi 
Rwandan Patriotic Front pointsoat, that 
France helped arm and train the rampag- 
ing Hutu forces. The United States ap~ ■ 
pears not to be concerned about what use : : 
is made of reportedly huge stocks erf arms: 
that it piled up nearby in Zaire to give, 
clandestine support to Jonas SavimbPs . 
UNTTA army m:the endless Angolan 
civil war. Nobody’s hands are clean. Mil- 
itary “surplus” finds users. 

the Patriotic Front itself, which de-; 
nounced the French move as “aggesskm” 
that it would resist, has came around , to 
welcome the action so long as it is strictly 
h umani tarian and the French don't take 
sides, and leave as they have pledged. 

That is the most difficult of military 
tasks . The presence of outside force does 
affect the tide of battle.' particularly ■ 
where violence is directed above all 
against civilians. Whooshing bade and 
forth across the border, as the French are 
doing to show that they don’t intend to 
encamp themselves* is not an easy way to 
protect refugees. Still, they are making a 
real difference in saving lives. . - 
The crux of the international dflemma 
is that the world has reached a kind of 


halfway principle, concerned when inno- 
cents areslau2itered and yet.unwilling to 
■risk intenrOmon. In theory., it- is the job . 
of the. United Nations to impose peace. 
Butitcan'Llt took France's smgte-mind- 

cd wifl-to get it moving. . . . 

. Neither, however, did France fed that 
. it could act without the 'Umted-Nations. . 
It is still^ '-busily collecting as "many mili- 
tary contributions from . other- countries, ■ 
■ especially in Africa, as it can manage, for 
slides! reasons," Mr. Juppfc said. The 


-Nations has become irreplace- 
able, but it is still paralyzed. 

Tt was France In the first place which 
launched the new idea of! the -'right of 
h umanitarian interference” to save the 
-Kurds in Iraq; the French have the most 
UN- troops in Bosnia, The; concept is- 
dumsy. It does not bong peace, it may 
prolong some wars. But it is an essential 
- Step in the sluggish, faltering effort to give 

some rbality to the noticm. pf :^the inter- . 
nation al community’* and a safer world. 

Somebody has 1 to lead.' It is greatly to. 
Its credit that this time h was France. The 
outoonte -remains to be seen. Itis unlikely 
to be satisfactory, 'At least France dared - 
to accept tbe challenge. V 

.QFkmLewa.-.- ■ ■ .■■■ ? 


Chinese Stay in Indonesia, and Westerners Should Take Note 


' • -is 


.-.3 
. ■ > 

•• • : : i 


J AKARTA — In the compari- 
son of attributes between the 
world’s first and fourth most pop- 
ulous nations, China and Indone- 
sia, China's strengths may also be 
its weaknesses. China has a much 
broader industrial base and its 
best technology, much of it de- 
fense-related. is far ahead of any- 
thing that Indonesia can offer. 
But that does necessarily put it 
ahead of Indonesia, any more 
than space exploits put the Soviet 
Union ahead of Australia? 

The educational system is 
dominated by elitism and politi- 
cal motivation in China to a far 
greater degree than in Indonesia, 
so China has rocket scientists but 
an even weaker middle manage- 
ment capability. This even shows 
up in capital-intensive industries. 

Neither country has much to 
boast about where efficiency of 
steel, petrochemicals and cars is 
concerned Indonesia is cutting 
tariffs and forcing change on 
heavier and slate sectors faster 
than China (or India). Beg Lag’s 
reform policies may look good on 


By Philip Bowring 

This is lhe second of two articles. 


t 


r, but Jakarta’s are more iike- 
• to be carried out, if only because 
administration is more centralized 
and the leadership does not have 
to perform the son of ideological 
contortions necessary in Beijing's 
Zbongnanhai compound. 

Inefficient capital-intensive 
heavy industries are a burden in 
Indonesia but play a relatively 
smaller role than in China. Light 
industry has lagged badly be- 
hind China’s, but agricultural 
performance, whether intensive 
rice growing on Java or estate 
production on other islands, has 
been superior. 

But economic differences are 
perhaps less stark than others. 
The difference between the two 
societies is perhaps best illustrat- 
ed by demographics. 

China has been through govern- 
ment-directed extremes of high 
and low birthrates, so that the age 
distribution (and now sex distribu- 


tion, too) is almost bizarre. Indo- 
nesia has seen a steady reduction 
in its birthrate, which continues. It 
has been achieved by provision of 
family planning services rather 
than by enforced abortions and 
sodal sanctions, as in. China. 

In the medium term, both 
countries face big problems of 
finding jobs for new entrants to 
the urban labor force, but Indo- 
nesia’s long-run demographics 
are healthier — as were the 
means of getting there. 

At almost every institutional 
level other than military power, 
Indonesia has made more pro- 
gress than China since 1949 de- 
spite the latter’s pace of change in 
the past decade. 

The Indonesian banking sys- 
tem , for example, has its s candals 
but has achieved both stability 
and reform. The central bank is in 
control of money supply, and pri- 
vate banks are gradually sup- 


Guys Aren’t Supposed to Bash Dolls 


N EW YORK — Mayor Ru- 
dolph Giuliani of New 
York City, speaking about fam- 
ily violence at a breakfast in 
midtown Manhattan on Tues- 
day. made a startling compari- 
son. He said some of the stories 
of women in flight from abusive 
husbands and boyfriends re- 
minded him of the difficulties 
faced by individuals who had to 
be placed in the witness protec- 
tion program after testifying m 
organized crime cases. 

Once you are in the witness 
protection program there is no 
looking back, said Mr. Giuliani, 
a former U.S. attorney. Prior 
ties to relatives, friends, neigh- 
bors have to be severed. Even 
telephone conversations are for- 
bidden. The danger, the mayor 
explained, is that someone who 
knows your whereabouts can, 
perhaps in all innocence, dis- 
close them to the wrong people. 

Just a few minutes earlier the 
mayor had listened as Ana Maria 
Cintron spoke nervously about 
her experience in leaving a hus- 
band who once had beaten her so 
badly “he knocked me out." Ms. 
Cintron moved seven tiroes but 
her husband always found her. 
Eventually she got help, includ- 
ing permanent bousing, through 
Victim Services. But she had to 
moke an absolute break with 
her past. “They stressed that 
even my father couldn't know 
where I was,” she said. 

In drawing the comparison 
with the witness protection 
program. Mr. Giuliani said he 
hoped to give some idea “of the 
enormity of what these women 
are facing." 

Beating up women in the 


By Bob Herbert 


friendly arena called home is a 
favorite sport of many men, 
most of whom would cringe at 
the idea of going one-on-one 
with, say, your average New 
York cab driver. We are told 
that in the United States a wom- 
an is beaten every 15 or 20 sec- 
onds. A few minutes into Tues- 
day’s breakfast discussion, Lucy 
Friedman, executive director of 
Victim Services, said 120 wom- 
en had been beaten “since we 
arrived here." 

Family violence is not a new 
issue with Mr. Giuliani He can- 
not be accused of jumping on the 
bandwagon now that tbe O.J. 
Simpson case has made battering 
the atrocity of the moment. He 
was onto the issue during last 
year's mayoral campaign, but 
few people paid attention. 

Noting that the cornerstone 
of ins campaign was the fight 
against crime, he said, in an in- 
terview earlier this week; “It 
seemed to me that we would be 
missing the way crime roost of- 
ten occurs for a woman, or very 
often for a child, if we just fo- 
cused on crime in the streets or 
crime in public places. There are 
six or seven more chances for a 
woman or a child to be the vic- 
tim of a crime inside tbe home.” 

Old habits die hard. It has 
long been customary to give tbe 
king of the castle wide latitude 
to act like a lunatic as long as he 
is careful to confine his kicks 
and his karate chops to his wife 
or his gnifriend- 

Mr. Giuliani expresses his 
contempt for that view as fol- 


lows: “A man has no additional 
right to hit someone because 
that someone is his wife or his 
girlfriend than he has to hit 
someone who is a stranger.” 

In other words, punching 
your wife is a crime. This 
straightforward, commonsense 
view of domestic relations is the 
basis of the mayor’s initiative, 
begun in March, to crack down 
on family violence in New 
York. Police officers have been 
instructed to treat batterers as 
criminals, not as regular guys 
who happen to be having a bad 
night. The. mayor said that if 
there was evidence that a crime 
had been committed, an arrest 
was supposed to be made. 

A 24-hour family violence hot 
line (I -800^)2 1 -HOPE), operat- 
ed by Victim Services, was es- 
tablished on June 1. and a fam- 
ily violence specialist has been 
assigned to the emergency room' 
of au city-run hospitals. 

The Police Departmoit, the 
Health Department and the 
courts win share computerized 
records that will make it easier 
to document and track cases of 
family violence. And an intense 
public education campaign will 
get under way in July. 

As important as these steps 
are, none get to the point that 
Mr. Giuliani characterizes as 
the “big challenge.” That has 
to do with how we Americans 
see the role of men in the soci- 
ety, and how wc go about shift- 
ing the culture so that .it is sec- 
ond nature for men to view the 
beating of women as*; in 'the 
mayor s words, ‘‘despicable 
and cowardlyconducL” 

The Sew York Tones. •. . „ 


. lan ring the former state oKgopo- 
. The Jakarta stock marketmay 
lack the papular participation of 
its Chinese counterparts; but is a 
lot more stable, and the accounts 
of its coimmmes have much great- 
er credibility.- '.. 

The legal system leaves much 
to be desired in terms ~of trans- 
parency and independence, and 
many laws heed updating.,But it 
provides a better forum for jus- 
tice and civil litigation than any- 
thing in China. . 

For sure, there are uncertain- 
ties over the. political future as 
groups jockey for position -in the 
belief that thepost-Suhartocra is 
now in sight Racial, regional and 
religious antagonisms do exist 
and possibly class ones, too, and 
have beat known to Mow up sud- 
denly and violently. If things 
come unstuck, the Medan riots 
could be a foretaste; 

But it is much easier to predict 
that a change of leader will not 
lead to major changes in the so- 
cial or ecbnonzic 'Structure here, 
than in Beijing. The succession 
here may be messy, especially if 
President Suharto hangs on to the 
end. But the paramatexs are now 
defined by the institutions. 

Nearly 30 years of Mr. Suhar- 
to’s New Order has goieratedde- 
sirefor a change of personnel but 
has also created a huge constitu- 
ency of people at ' the top and in 
the middle who want mar ginal ; 
not fundamental, adjustments, or 
merely belter access '.to tbe.- 
trough. It is hard to say the same . 
about a China. stiD in transition 
From communism to something 
yet to crystallize. 

Ideology in Indonesia remains 
al a discount. Sodal (although 
not always political) diveraty is 
recognized as necessary for na- 
tional unity. Parliament may as - 
yet be a feeble shadow of Western 
institutions, but it is a lively and. 
open forum compared with Chi- 


na's NationalPeopIe’s Congress. 

Despite the' recent crackdown 
miTempoandotber weeklies, the 
press is free conq>ared with its 
. Chinese countdpak, pressing the 
Kinitsasfarasitdarcs.TheTem- 
po ban was a rude shock, biitonly 
m the context of the luige strides 
~ that press -freedom has made in' 
recent years. : 

^demonstrated mice again the., 
antinguous role of the military, 
which has indicated irritation at 
- the ban. At one level the military 
plays a sdf-consdously direct 
rote in politics and sees itself as . 
the ultimate guardian of unity and 
stability, but in the sense of bal- 
ancing the other forces in the polit- 
ical firmament. The army may in 
practice play that role in future in 
China, but for now it remains the 
strong arm.of the party. 

Despite its .political role, com- 
pared with other forces in East 
Asi tbe Indonesian military is 
small and Hi-equipped. Its worst, 
in East Timor, cam be vicious and. : 
venal "But even there it is open 
and accountable compared with : 
the Chinese army mTlnbet or on 
1 Qiandao Lake.. 

This is a mere sketch compari- 
son of two huge countries. But if. 
a decade franLnow^ China is like- 
Indonesia today, it will have ev- 
ery reason to be satisfied with its 
iwogresa, especially as regards so- 
cial order, cohesion, tolerance : 
. and sense of cultural., identity, of . 
progress without denial of ’the 
feudal past.. .r. 

There arc big problems here, 
and" some have recently boiled • 
over, bat .they are still small com- 
pared with the political strains 
and socjaldisorderm China. The 
comparisons explain, why Chi- 
nese, stay in Indonesia and why 
foragnere, especially; those from - 
the West, may need abetter sense 
irf perspective vi*eii they make 
.their Asian investment datisions. : 

International HeraM Tribune. 


-J 
• -'J 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: TTieDeadly Enemy 

BERLIN — The Post to-day.- 
[June 29] has an article in reply to 
.the one published in the Socialist 
journal Vorwtierts^ _which_ de-_ 
dared that the Republic of 
France was endangered by the 
election of M- Casimir-Ferier as 
President The Post describes An- 
archism as a poisonous growth Of 
the swamp erf international so- 
cialism. Social democracy, the! 
journal . urges, should be combat--, 
ed by all means at the di^osaLof - 
the State, the present-moment be- 
ing favorable for putting an end 
to the deadly enemy of the state. 

1919: TVa^lS^tricted 

WASHINGTON.;— The Stele 
Department has announced that 
tourists wiD- not be permitted .to 
go to France, before- -ncxt ycan 
although business hbtises wul be . 
permitted to' stehd accredited 


?ts to any European country. : 

. 1 P«sent .restrictions will con- 
tmue regarding the return trip, 

. .reace bong most needed for soJ- - 

- diers. Passport restrictions to for- ■ 
;~eign countries other than Ene- - 

land-apd Franoe are being raised. ! 

. 1944: No Complacency 

- [From our 

New YoAeditm-.jThe three top 

s^ y JS£5° rihe " 

States.etpressed concern today 
gune 29] over the effect of the ' 

■; ajaos of the invasion of France 
and ofdhe campaigns in Russia ' 

: and Italy in spreading the notion - - 

-General George C. Marshall 

General ■ 

- H. It. Arnold, chief of the Armv ’ : V J 
Air Fon%& and Admiral Ernest!? -.'-Wd 

^g, grander of 

--State Flea, joined m 4 ' 

..the President asserting 
an atiitode would dday via^\ 










Vp 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 

OPINION 


r °Te? Virginia Doesn’t Need Zhirinovsky 


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Take Nott 




'.. . . 
’S?! 1 


W ASHINGTON — Oliver 
North and Vladimir Zhiri- 
novsky: two names out of the head- 
lines that don't usually connect. But 
the would-be senator from Virginia 
and the Russian chauvinist steam 
along parallel political tracks. They 
pander to frustrated and angry vot- 
ers consumed by an overwhelming 
sense of loss of their country. 

All politics are local, in Up 
O'Neill s overworked phrase. But all 
politics have echoes, too. Mr. 
North's campaign in Virginia can 
help Americans understand the dy- 
namics and appeal of the extreme 
form of nationalism that Mr. Zhiri- 
novsky represents in Russia. 

And despite the enormous differ- 
ences involved, the destructiveness 
of Russia's politics of despair holds 
lessons for Virginians tempted to 
pursue a fantasy political life by 
voting for a man totally unqualified 
in temperament and character to 
serve in Congress. 

They can send Washington a mes- 
sage, and a problem, by electing Mr. 
North. That might seem fitting, and 
fun, to them. But in the guise of 
finding a true form of conservatism, 
Mr. North’s supporters travel a road 
of self-delusion that if unchecked 
ends in Mr. Zhirinovsky’s nihilism 
and neo-imperial ranting *;. 

The two men are two sides of the 
same political coin. They express 
contempt for the established order 
and blame that order for a national 
dftriine that they promise to reverse. 

So do many other politicians, 
from Minneapolis to Manila. But 
something more unites the Marine 
Corps colonel who took the Reagan 
Whi te House for a ride on the wild 
side in the Iran-contra affair and the 
racist, atavistic Russian politician 
who stunned Boris Ydtsinby captur- 
ing 25 percent of the vote in last 
December’s parliamentary elections. 

The separate but similar national- 
isms that both express are raw and 
crude, reeking of claims of manifest 
destiny and divine inspiration. They 
are not amply charlatans. They are 
geopolitical charlatans who would re- 
assert a lost national greatness fay 
intimidating smaiw countries ana 
dominating neighbors. 

That was Mr. North’s style with 
Central America when be was in the 
White House. (Nicaraguans were 
sturdy enough to survive both the 
Sandmislas and Oliver North, an as- 
tonishing accomplishment.) In* the 
name of restoring American great- 
ness, Mr. North would (and did) 
override both nati onal and interna- 
tional law. His brand of nationalism 
justified every action that he took. 

He traduced Congress, lied under 
oath and ultimately Named Ronald 
Reagan for his own fail ores. In such 
deceit his followers find the path to 
the only truth. They delude thean- 


By Jim Hoagland 

selves as thoroughly as do those Rus- 
sians who believe with Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky that using an atomic weapon 
on the Japanese now and reclaiming 
East Germany would restore Russia's 
claim to greatness. 

The surface similarities of their 
constituencies provide a link be- 
tween two men who would deny any 
affinity. Their supporters pursue 
payback politics, demanding com- 
pensation for losses they feeL 

The sense of loss that Mr. Zhiri- 
nvosky manipulates is physical and 
immediate. Russians lost big chunks 
of what they long considered “their” 
country through the breakup of the 
Soviet Union and the precipitous de- 
cline in living standards has fol- 
lowed. Their anger and frustrations 
provide fertile ground for a talented 
demagogue who asserts the right of 
Russian domination in its “near 
abroad,** the former Soviet republics 
that border on Russia. 

It is a long way from that chaotic 
situation to the relatively prosper-' 
ous and settled scene in Virginia. 
But listen to the voices of Mr. 
North’s hard-right supporters and 


The Population Fray 

Regarding “ Cardinals Dive Into 
the Papulation Fray " (June 15): * 

This report on opposition by the 
Roman Catholic c mrwmk to propos- 
als approved in preparatory meetings 
for die International Conference on 
Population and Development lacks 
perspective on contemporary human 
demographic realities. 

Works population today stands at 
S.6 billion. A number of environ- 
mental and agricultural scientists 
contend that our planet has already 
exceeded its carrying capacity. But 
Earth's human numbers continue to 
grow by nearly 100 milli on annually. 
More than 90 percent of this in- 
crease occurs m the developing 
world. Fifty-five countries are cur- 
rently on course to double their pop- 
ulation in 25 years or less. 

For many in these countries, mere 
survival is already a daily struggle. 
Yet the governments of these poor 
countries must double their schools, 
hospitals, employment opportuni- 
ties and all hake services within the 
next quarter of a century, just to 
maintain current living standards. 

When religious leaders express 
vigorous opposition to policies 
aimed at alleviating poverty, hunger 
and malnutrition, at suppression of 
enslavement of women, child aban- 
donment and unemployment, they 
contribute to the disintegration of 


you will hear a similar lone of re- 
sentment over their country break- 
ing up around them. 

Their national loss is not a physical 
one, of course, but a political one. 
Mr. North's supporters see the coun- 
try they grew up in — a country 
opposed to abortion and gay rights, 
a country in favor of school prayer 
and “Main Street” morality — being 
taken away from them by radical 
feminists, gays, liberals, high technol- 
ogy and other un-American forces. 

What Russians lost swiftly and 
geographically, Mr. North's support- 
ers have lost gradually, to the histori- 
cal forces of political and economic 
evolution. Mr. North can no more 
restore those losses than Mr. Zhiri- 
novsky can restore the Soviet empire. 
To believe that they can requires a 
purposeful suspension of disbelief. 

lit their different ways, Mr. North 
and Mr. Zhirinovsky show the dangers 
of an electorate knowingly accepting 
lying from a political leader as the 
center of its belief in him. Mr. North, 
the more familiar figure, helps Ameri- 
cans understand the more distant Mr. 
Zhirinovsky. Virginia’s voters should 
decide that that will be Mr. North's 
final political service to his country. 

The Washington Post. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


the very human and family values 
that they profess to espouse. 

Fortunately, an overwhelming 
majority of the more than 160 dele- 
gations to the preparatory meetings 
appear to support these policies. 
Scant few are expected to buckle 
under the extreme pressure that the 
Vatican is exerting. 

WERNER FORNOS, 
President. 

The Population Institute. 

Washington. 

Religious imperialism is the dan- 
ger that the delegates at the confer- 
ence and people worldwide have to 
recognize and resist 

ANNE F. HERDT. 

Val d’llliez, Switzerland. 

As women throughout the world 
know, pregnancy, birth and moth- 
erhood are extremely complex, 
transformative experiences that en- 
gage the whole person. AU popula- 
tion control policies should be ap- 
proached with caution if not with 
outright skepticism, for by trans- 
forming this complex personal ex- 
perience into a “problem” that 
needs to be solved by so-called ex- 
perts, such grand policies have a 
natural tendency toward exploila- 


experts 


from advanced industrial nations. 

For this reason. I applaud the 
cardinals’ warning against “cultur- 
al imperialism’ at September's 
world conference on population 
problems in Cairo. This warning 
should be sounded loudly, strongly 
and repeatedly. 

PATRICIA DONOHUE 
Feldkirch, Austria. 

Carter to the Rescue? 

Former President Jimmy Carter's 
triumphant return from North Ko- 
rea makes me think how shortsight- 
ed it was of George Bush not to avail 
himself of Mr. Carter’s services after 
Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait. 
Clearly, the Gulf War could have 
been avoided. 

Of course, Iraq would still be in 
possession of Kuwait, and would 
possibly by now have been in posses- 
sion of nuclear weapons. However, 
the United States would have avoid- 
ed the terrible gaffe of insulting Iraq 
and branding its leader as a criminal. 

We should all give thanks that 
Mr. Carter seems to be helping the 
United Stales to avoid those errors 
in the case of North Korea. Or am I 
wrong, and have U.S. actions de- 
scended to the level of imbecility? 

H. THORNTON. 

Hong Kong. 


The Governor to Her Girls: 
Take Charge of Your Life 


By Ann W. Richards 


A Monitor on Minorities 

In my column of June 17 (“Three 
Steps to Tame Tribalism and Unify 
Europe"), the information about 
the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe is out of 
date. In fact, the CSCE has ap- 
pointed a High Commissioner on 
National Minorities, Max van der 
Steel the former Dutch foreign 
minister, and the commission's of- 
fice in The Hague is actively moni- 
toring minority tensions in Eastern 
Europe and elsewhere. 

ARTHUR SCHLESINGER Jr. 

New York. 

The of nee of High Commission- 
er on National Minorities for the 
CSCE was approved by heads of 
state during the July 1992 Helsinki 
summit meeting. Mr. van der Stoel 
has carried out the duties of that 
office very capably since that time. 
Mr. van der Stoel has advised gov- 
ernments and interest groups on 
ways to find concrete solutions to 
the problems of minorities in Alba- 
nia, Estonia, the former Yugoslav 
republic of Macedonia, Greece, 
Hungary, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan. 
Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Ser- 
bia, Slovakia and Ukraine. 

Mr. van der Stoel’s work has been 
among the most effective of the 
CSCE's many pioneering preventive 
diplomacy efforts. His “quiet diplo- 


A USTIN, Texas — You may find 
.tins hard to believe, but your 
governor often Ends herself listen- 
ing to Saturday morning television. 
And I have, on occasion, landed on 
a program »hai is a sort of idealized 
vision of life with the in-crowd in 
high school. 1 noticed that on this 
show the boys are always doing ad- 
venturous, daring kinds of activities. 

MEANWHILE 

And the girls are doing passive 
t hings like having slumber parties, 
gossiping about boys and sucking 
on soda straws. 

By and large, it doesn't seem too 
different from the background noise 
when I was growing up. 

My mother was very concerned 
about what I wore, and determined 
that I would run with the right sort of 
people — not in terms of character, 
but in terms of social position. There 
was a yardstick that was called “what 
other people think of you” — and it 


mfley” was lauded by the German 
foreign minister, Klaus Kink d, and 
the Dutch foreign minister, Pieter 
Koojjmans, in a joint appearance at 
the CSCE in Vienna on May 17. 

The High Commissioner on Na- 
tional Minorities is one of several 
tools used by the CSCE in its search 
for solutions to the complex prob- 
lems of the new Europe. 

SAM W. BROWN Jr„ 
Head of the US. delegation. 
Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe. 

Vienna. 

A Vegetarian Answer 

Regarding the opinion column “A 
Small Price to Pay for Proving Mal- 
thus Wrong" (June 9): 

Jessica Mathews laments man- 
kind’s need to increase global food 
production, yet she merely mentions 
in passing how the Weston appetite 
for meat fuels the tragedy of world 
hunger. The preference for animal- 
source foods perpetuates a global ag- 
ricultural system from which one- 
third of the world’s grain supply is 
fed to animals. Shifting tastes toward 
vegetarian foods could free up much 
land and crops to feed a far greater 
number of people than now. 

DAVID BRONFMAN. 

Toronto. 


was tremendously important lo mea- 
sure up on that yardstick. And I 
suspect that what other people think 
is still a big part of your life. 

In fact, there have been studies 
that show that somewhere around the 
junior high school age, boys and girls 
begin to change more than their hor- 
mone levels. Boys seem to become 
more aggressive and assertive, and 
oris seem to become less confidem in 
the classroom — less likely to speak 
up. In other words, more concerned 
about what others might think than 
about what they might learn. 

The important question you have 
to ask yourself is not “What do I 
warn to be when I grow up?” It is 
“Who am I?" and “What do I want 
to do with my life?” 

You cannot count on Prince 
Charming to make you feel better 
about yourself and lake care of you 
— like some fun-house mirror that 
reflects you at twice your real size. 
Prince Charming may be driving a 
Honda and telling you that you have 
no equal, but that won’t do you 
much good when you’ve got kids 
and a mortgage — and he has a beer 
gut and a wandering eye. 

In the real world, half of all mar- 
riages end in divorce. And more than 
70 percent of divorced women find 
themselves slipping toward poverty. 
The vast majority of American fam- 
ilies are beaded by parents who both 
work or by mothers tiying to rear 
their kids pretty much by themselves. 
The only person you can count on to 
be there when you need help is you. 

If there is one angle thing that 
holds women bade at the higher lev- 
els — that keeps us from being more 
than tokens or exceptions that do 
nothing to break tbe strength of the 
old rules — it is our reluctance to face 
the reality of money. 

In politics, money must be raised. 
You have lo work hard to raise it It is 
no different than getting money for 
a car, or money fora house. Or mon- 
ey to Start your own business. You’ve 
got to be willing to do the heavy 
lifting and tbe dedsioo-making and 
earn or raise the money to do it. ' 

You’ve got to be wiling to take 
charge of your life and responsibil- 
ity for yourself. That is the only way 
you will be able to please yourself in 
the long run, and the only way you 
can be sure you did not cheat your- 
self along the way. 

The writer, governor of Texas, spoke 
on Monday in Austin at the 50th anni- 
versary gathering of Texas Girls State, 
a convention of high school student 
leaders. These excerpts were adapted 
by The New York Tones. 




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■TAUAN FASHION 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


Armani 

At 60: 

He’s No. 1 

Milan Menswear Takes 
Suits Out of Doldrums 


By Suzy Menkes 

Internatinnal Herald Tribune 


M 


I 


ILAN — Giorgio Armani proved 
Wednesday that he is Fashion's 
Forza Italia. The menswear show 
— r that marked his 60ih birthday and 
-inn year in business was a symphony of subtle 
color and an ode to the shapely suit, yet kept to 
the designer’s philosophy of simplicity and com- 
fort. As the silver-haired Armani took his bow 
after a collage of this-is-your-life photos, he 
revived a standing ovation. 

!*? wanted to show something very clean with a 
spirit of serenity — and that men don't have to 
he macho arid virile — they can be poetic: that's 
m y dream," said Armani, who closed the sum- 
mer 1995 menswear season. 

Proof or his commercial clout came earlier, 
when influential store presidents gathered in 
Armani's apartment to toast him as their Nu- 
mero Uno. He is the besi-.sdling menswear de- 
signer in the world. 

Leading retailers included Philip Miller of 
Saks, Burton Tansky of Neiman-Marcus. Kal- 
man Rut tens tein of Bloomingdalcs and Gene 
Pressman of Barneys. Their collective memories 
3° back 20 years to Armani's start-up with his 
late partner Sergio Galleotti. 

“We bought the first collection under a bare 
ughtbulb in a room half the stze or this. Armani 
changed the way we feel about clothes, and he 
deserves all the credit." said Dawn Mello. presi- 
dent of Bergdorf Goodman, whose fashion direc- 
tor. Ellin Saltzman, was fired Monday. 

A RMANI'S innovations were in the 
slithering viscose-mix fabrics and the 
waisted silhouette. Long, soft jackets 
were stripped of collars, or had wide 
lapeU, or a sashed waist. 

Colors, with the accent on silver grays rather 
than beige, were tinged with verdigris or even 
quanz pink. The overall effect, especially for the 
omnipresent tunic-shirts, was ethnic, but that 
gone-native look reduced to just a shadowy print 
or a knobby texture. It was a show true to his 
own image and with a creativity that belies 
Armani’s 60 years. 

The rest of the Milan season has been about 
rescuing the suit from the demolition yard and 
defining a modem way to wear it. 

Dolce & Gabbana’s Sicilian suits — all curvv 
jackets and shirt collars flashed over the lapels — 
caused a ruckus in the Italian press. Corriere 
deDa Sera accused Dolce & Gabbana of being 
inspired by "mafioso” style. Suits in brash color- 
or shiny shantung, jeweled crosses at the open 
necks, diamond bracelets and patent-leather 
shoes, had a witty, spiwy elegance. 

Romeo Gigli, showing between the iron gird- 
ers of an abandoned Pirelli tire factory, played 



"Junk’ DNA May Be Elea 


Mr..« 

A rmani (tin lei and U.S. retailers, front 
top left, civckvisc: Burton Tansky; Philip 
Miller, Down Mello. Kalman Ruttenstein. 

with color, texture and fabric and displayed an 
artist’s eye in his mix of woven checks and stripes 
— each piece seemingly interchangeable. Franco 
Moschino alluded to I talys ethnic minorities in a 
photoprint of African hcai «nd an Indian street 
market scene on bis impeccable double-vented 
jackets ra current trend;. Katharine Hamnett 
had pastel Ingham suits with spread -collared 
shirts and sandals with lacquered toenails. 

Some designers just try too hard to be hip. 
With !ils elegant tailoring.’ VuLntino showed the 
gypsy in bis soles. There were sandals, bandan- 
na;' around the necLv belts jangling with coirs, 
flung-on • hawi-.. shirts hanging loose and even a 
ru*e between the teeth. 

Kriria Uomo was a glam rock trip where 
models g\ rated in iridescent suits or wore ridicu- 
lously rod; mock-sailor rant.. Trussardi had 
chalky pastels, fund sueie, and its signature 
bjiher travel bags. At Femii Club, luxury « sports- 
wear included natural-cob red linens and 
crunchy-lei lured knit.-. Anton;-: Fusco invented 
r.ew luxury fabric:. 5 ike ca.shrr.cr-; cr.d cotton for a 
hlaac-r in bright com!. Oiuur de u Renta's show 
’•Vfdncsdiy had rrJxes of quiet ?:•: in sand 
ard marine. 

-tro demonstrated class aid -crai; v-tth pat- 
terns ar.d weaves industrially made bu-. : king 
like rnann di madre — handmade by 

t ne trends of the sea.-ir-? A. return :i ccvrs — 
bright or pastel — with gray as the new neutral: 
iridescent and shiny pUstic fabrics - : Jesus 
and shir: cellars Spread ove- i.-pe!s. The hard 
news? The return of the sui: vd:h .'lirr.msr pan V 
and body -conscious jacket fir a new generation. 


By Natalie Angler 

jVmr York Tima Scrtiu 

EW YORK — In re- 
cent times, the twisted; 
viscous molecular ce- 
lebrity called DNA has 
been described by any number, 
of lofty metaphors. It is the book 
of life. The master molecule. The 
blueprint for a human being. 

Yet to some researchers who 
consider the whole molecule, 
and not just the individual 
genes arrayed along its chemi- 
cal coils, a few more homespun 
comparisons might better ap- 
ply: DNA as your grandmoth- 
er's attic, for example, or the 
best little flea market in town. 

And still others say human 
DNA should be thought of as a 
son of microscopic ecosystem, 
an invisible habitat teeming 
with competing bits of genetic 
material that often behave like 
benign yet selfish parasites, ut- 
terly indifferent to the needs of 
the human hosL cell in which 
they persist. 

These analogies spring from 
recent explorations of the vast 
regions of the double helix that 
do not serve as recipes for creat- 
ing the body's proteins, regions 
often given the pejorative de- 
scription of junk DNA. 

Of the 3 billion chemical 
building blocks, or bases, that 
make up human DNA. a mere 3 
to 5 percent rate as coding re- 
gions — the genetic instructions 
for generating hormones, colla- 
gen. hemoglobin, endorphins, 
enzymes and all the rest of the 
body's proteinaceous work 
force. That leaves millions of 
bases to account for, sentence 
upon page upon volume of ge- 
netic sequences that on First 


pass do not seem to. say any- 
thing. Gibberish, filler, Styro- 
foam, junk, and all of. it 
crammed into the core or pearly 
every cell of the body. 

But one person's junk may 
be somebody else's treasure. 
Researchers are learning that 
much of this noncoding DNA 
must play essential roles in the 
performance of the genes em- 
bedded in it. 

They have determined that 
certain sequences once thought 
to be unnecessary and thus not 
subject to the same corrective 
forces that keep genes intact 
from one generation to the next 
in fact are highly conserved: 
they have remained pretty 
much the same chemically over 
tens of thousands and in some 
cases millions of years of evolu- 
tion, just as genes often do, 
which means this supposed 
junk must be indispensable to 

the or ganis ms bearing iL 

I N some cases, the junk is 
thought to act as subtle en- 
hancers of genes, turning 
their activity up from a 
murmur to a shout In other 
cases, the junk tells the chromo- 
somes what shape they are sup- 
posed to be as they are flexed 
and pleated into the nucleus of 
thecelL 

Certain regions of junk may 
act as reservoirs of change, al- 
lowing the DNA to be more easi- 
ly shuffled, mutated and rear- 
ranged into novel patterns that 
hasten evolution along. 

Still other noncoding stretch- 
es may be buffers against pre- 
cipitous change, saving rather 
as flak jackets to absorb the 
impact of viruses and other ge- 
netic interlopers that infiltrate 
an animal's chromosomes. 



Without all the extra padding 
to absorb die blows, viruses or 
the bizarre generic sequences 
that bop and skip from one port 
of the chromosome to another 
— mysterious genetic elements 
called transpose ns or jumping 
genes — might land, smack in 
the middle of a crucial gate, 
disrupting its performance: 

The new work appears to jus- 
tify the claims of some propo- 
nents of the Human Genome 
Project, the massive federal ef- 
fort to understand tbe entire 
complement of human DNA, 
that is, the genome. 

While financial pragmatists 
have counseled sticking with de- 
coding tbe tiny regions of the 
genome that contain the 50,000 
to 100,000 genes proper, those 
who wallow m junk insis t that all 
3 billion bases deserve attention. 
They suspect many of the most 
interesting insig hts into h uman 
evolution and large-scale geno- 
mic logic will come from looking 


at the. abundant stuff 'around 
and between thegeoes. - ";-J; • 
“1 don’t believe: in junk 
DNA," said Dr. .Waiter-Gilbert 
of Harvard University. “I'Ve 
long believed that the attitude 
that all - information is cosh 
. tained in .the coding regions; is 
very shortsighted, reflecting a 
protein chemist's bias of- look-: 
in* at DNA.” 

Reporting in the Proceedings 
of the National Academy of 
Sciences, Dr. RoyJ. Britten of 
the California Institute of Tech-, 
□ology, who first described thie. 
existence of junk DNA 26 years 
ago, said that some of the most 
familiar junk. in primate'-DN^. 
has all the signposts of molecu- 
lar. raison d’etre; . 

T HESE sequences, called 
Aid. sequences;; are 
short, repetitive strings 
of about .280 DNA 
bases - apiece, - which .. are scat- 
tered widely- throughout the 
chromosomes of all primates,. 


YflHc limf*; 


including humans. They have 
■ long been viowed as the mean- 
ingless remnants, of an ancient 
impact . event, the insertion of a 
virus-tike bit* of. DNA into a 
; proto-monkey’s- chromosomes 
that: was neveri .tossed out be- 
cause it did no harm, 
r-." - However, Dri .‘Britten pro- 
: poses -.that, whatever their ori- 
-'■jyn,-. the/Alu sequences have_-. 
: since been drafted Into duty by 
'the primate- host; perhaps to 
- serve : as ' subtle -modulators . of 
. ihe genes they are near. 

- v He raid that; the AJu se-. 
qiiaices are' too highly con- . 
served to be explained away as 
useless molecular hobos. 

' “It may be on the edge to 
claim that-Whatt been consid- 
ered the preeminent junk is un- . 
der selective , pressilre and is 
. probably 1 carrying out some ; - 
function," said Dr, Bri (ten in a f 
telephone interview. “Bu 1 1 lake; 
the general position that, if; 
there’s something; .ubiquitous 
around; it-iriU -get'' used. 


Tracing Early Man’s Steps to Upright Walking; 


By Boyce Rensberger 

Hajhmgtw i Past Savtce 


W ASHINGTON — British 
and Dutch scientists have 
found a new kind of skeletal 
evidence that they say sug- 
gests the first bominids to walk on two 
legs were not full-time bipedalists. 

Instead, the researchers contend in 
the journal Nature, creatures such as the 
austral opithcc in cs — including the type 
whose most famous member is nick- 
named "Lucy” — may have divided 
their time between two-legged walking 
on the ground and four-legged climbing 
in trees. 

The researchers are not the first to 


challenge the idea of full-time biped alism 
in the earliest bominids. The slightly 
curved finger bones of the Lucy species, 
for example, have suggested to some that 
she ancUier kind, railed Australopithecus 
afarensis, regularly dim bed in trees like 
apes. But the image of a virtually modern 
form of walking has been powerfully sup- 
ported by the finding of A. afarensis knee 
and hip joints clearly shaped for upright 
posture and the trail of modem-looking 
footprints that a pair of homihids made 
in Tanzanian volcanic ash during the 
time of Lucy. 

The new evidence consists of CT 
scans of the bony remains Of the inner, 
ears of fossil hominids. In life, these 
contained the vestibular canals in which 


fluids moved with changes in posture - tently Fesemblcd those of -inodem hu- 
and that sent signals to the brain to help mans ,were. 'members of the species, 
maintain balance. Thus it is reasonable, - Homo erectns,. tbfe- immediate ancestor 
the researchers argue; that evolutionary " of: Homo sapiens. In contrast, the CT 
changes in normal posture - would be.scans of australomthecines look like 
accompanied by changes in the shape of - 
the canals. ' 

Bernard. Wood, a paleoanthropologist 
atthe University ofLiverpooL. and col- 

. leagues scanned the inner ears of several 9 * .the two specimen. 

fossil hommids mid: compared them- hurpan vbut the otha res^mbled neither 
with those of modem human beings and - 'igroMP/ •/* 'rj- '' . 

modem apes. They Found that the mod- . " . jjr.; Wood and coHeagues conclude 
era groups differ in significant ways; that Homo erectus was tbefirsffuJl-time 
presumably reflecting differences in biped in theThumari family arid that 
posture.* earner species had ‘Tpedmotpr reper- 

Among extinct bominids,. 'the: only loires" tiiat- included upright walking ' 
species in which the inner.ears cbnsis-- and ar boreal dimbipg. 


those of apes. -Arid the inner. ears_of a 
species intermediate between ausualo-. 
pitheemes and Homo erectus — Homo 
- habilis ~ gavewmflictmgresulls-One 
of the two spearrieris ekarriined looked 


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International Herald Tribune, Thursday , June 30, 1994 


Page 9 


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THE TRIB INDEX: 1 1 1 .970 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©. composed of 
280 internationally investable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 

120 = — 



. ' ~ "■mu ii ■in 


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1 Asia/Pacific 


Europe 

H 

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30 

Close: 111.66 Prev-: 11137 




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1993 1984 1993 


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M J 
1994 


North America 


Appta>LWBgttmg:2S% 
Ocsaai .69 Prev^ 9157 


Latin America 


Appro*. Minting: 5% 
CtoSK 1U 22 Prevj 10925 



J- F 
1993 

World Me* 


M J 
1994 


J F 
1993 


M J 
1994 


Tho Mar backs US. dolor rates of stocks be Tokyo, Nw York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia. Austria, Botgtam, BrazU, Canada, Chflo, Danmark, Finland, 
Ran, Germany, Hang Kong, Italy, Marico, Nether la n ds . Now Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Swtbariend and Uamawb. For Tokyo, Now York and 
London, the index is composed of me SO top banco in terms ot moriu* cafida&rabon. 
obtorwbe tho ton top stocks am backed 


; '.■CV.Ir 

| Industrial Sectors | 

. - - J 
’ : j VJT 


MM. 

doaa 

ftov. % 
db» donga 

, 

MM. 

dOM 

Pra* 

dORB 

diuijjH 


Energy 

107.94 

107.94 Until. 

Capital Goods 

112.74 

11235 

+025 

- - - • - •>- 

Uffltas 

119.64 

11821 +121 

Rnrlhfcriafc 

124.16 

12247 

+0.56 

■ . • ■ .!;§ -7 

Prance 

118.19 

117 JO +059 

Consumer Goods 

9827 

98.03 

+024 


Senrices 

11623 

115J» +1.0S 

ISscafeneous 

12290 

121J0 

+0l66 





For imrs information abort the Index, a booklet fe avaiabte free oi charge. 

Write toTrib Index, 181 Avenue ChariesdaGaule.B252i NouSy Codex, France. 

C International Haraki Tribute 


Spending 
Continues 
To Fuel 

U.S. GDP 


Canpdedby Our Stuff From Pispuschn 

WASHINGTON — The 
U.S. economy grew at a healthy 
3.4 percent annual rate in the 
first three months of this year, 
powered by brisk consumer 
spending, me Commerce De- 
partment said Wednesday. 

While it was off considerably 
from the booming 7 percent 
growth rate at the end of last 
year, analysts said the pace of 
expansion was still solid. Many 
said they expected the economy 
to at least duplicate the first 
three months' performance in 
the current quarter, which ends 
Thursday. 

A month ago, the Commerce 
Department estimated that the 
gross domestic product, the to- 
tal value of all goods and ser- 
vices produced in the United 
States, bad risen 3 percent in 
the first quarter of 1994. 
Wednesday’s upward revision 
exceeded most economists’ ex- 
pectations. 

The Commerce Department 
said the upward revision was 
due to an additional $5.6 billion 
in consumer spending and $2.3 
billion in business investment. 
Those increases more than off- 
set a drop in government spend- 
ing and a decline in net exports. 

“It doesn’t fundamentally 
change my view that the 
strength of the economy is dissi- 
pating somewhat,” Christopher 
Probyn of DRI-McGraw Hill, a 
forecasting sendee in Massa- 
chusetts. But he said the up- 
ward revision could signal a 
trend that influences the Feder- 
al Reserve to raise interest rates 

a gain , 

“The speed limit of the econ- 
omy is around 2J> percent. The 
first-quarter figure shows eco- 
nomic growth has become solid. 
It’s background for the Fed to 

See GROWTH, Page 10 


Dollar’s Demise Keeps Markets on Edge 

So Far, Speculators Reap the Benefits Yen Sets Another Record 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The currency 
markets have entered a classic 
game of cat and mouse with 
the world's biggest central 
banks, the likes of which has 
not been seen since the break- 
up of the European currency 
grid nearly a year ago. 

At stoke is the future of the 
dollar's value against the yea, 
the international competitive- 
ness of Japanese industry — 
and potentially huge gains for 
the speculators. 

“Short-term players coming 
into the market in search of 
quick profits have accounted 
for the lion’s share of the trad- 
ing,” said Adrian Cunning- 
ham, a currency economist at 
UBS Ltd. in London. “Institu- 
tional players are still standing 
on the sidelines.” 

So far, the early rounds or 
the game have overwhelming- 
ly gone to the speculators. 
Concerted central bank inter- 
vention in support of the dol- 
lar on Friday produced little 
impact despite the billions of 
dollars thrown into the battle. 
Sporadic intervention by the 
Bank of Japan ever since has 
produced even less of a result 
as the dollar has limped on to 
a series of new post-war lows 
against the yen. 

Despite the ineffectiveness 
of the central banks so far, ana- 
lysts are quick to contrast the 
dollar's slide with the woes of 
the European currency grid in 
1992 and 1993. Thai, the cen- 
tral banks set explicit targets 
for their currencies that they 
were committed to defend. For 
many investors, those targets 
became an easy mark 

In the case of the dollar the 
situation is far less certain. 
Authorities have never com- 
mitted themselves to defend- 
ing a particular level, although 
the century mark for the yen 
was seen by the market as psy- 
chologically crucial. Many 
traders thought that a break of 
that level would produce a 


The Strengthening Yen 

Daily closings of the U S, dollar against the yen,, 
in New York. '. . . ■ 




iijtji ; ; r • v • 




102 1 






;F. ; A. V. ; :\W"- 


,.v- 


dollar rout mirroring that of' 
European currencies when 
they fell through the central 
banks' targets two years ago. 

But so far that hasn’t hap- 
pened. “People were looking 
tor a big move down and in- 
stead we find that the dollar is 
just grinding lower over time,” 
said Andres Drobney, chief 
currency strategist for CS 
First Boston. 

Many analysts attribute the 
surprisingly stately pace of the 
dollar’s descent to the make-up 
of the foreign exchange market 
Most observe that with daily 
trading volumes sdll wdJ below 
average, the market is primarily 
being driven by b anks specu- 
lating on short-term basis for 
their own accounts, and to a 
lesser extent by purely specula- 
tive hedge funds. 

Market insiders stress that 
institutions, players ranging 
from industrial corporations 
to pension funds, remain un- 
convinced that the recent 
gains posted by the yen are for 
real. 


By almost all accounts, if 
those institutions should be- 
come convinced that the dol- 
lar is down to stay, they could 
jump into the market and turn 
its slow decline into a rout “If 
the institutions jump in there 
could be a sharp over-correc- 
tion such as those we saw in. 
Europe after the breakup of 
the currency grid,” one strate- 
gist said. 

Many analysts said that if 
the dollar were to fall below a 
technical support level of 98.30 
yen, a stampede of dollar sell- 
ing would oe triggered. 

Ironically, the relatively 
cautious stance taken by the 
market so far, with no massive 
short selling of the dollar and 
no precipitous falls in its val- 
ue, makes it harder for the 
central banks to do anything 
to arrest its fall 

“Classically central banks 
will succeed in intervening if 
they can catch the market m a 
vulnerable position,” said 
Malcolm Barr, a currency 
strategist with Chemical Bank. 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK —The dollar 
fell to new lows against the 
yen Wednesday in spite of be- 
lated attempts by Treasury 
Secretary Lloyd Bentsen to 
talk it up before next week's 
economic summit meeting. 

The White House, however, 
seemed ready to ride out the 
currency storm, a policy that 
paid off with a slightly stron- 
ger dollar in Europe. 

In confused trading, the 
dollar dropped to a postwar 
low of 99.0a yen in Europe as 
dealers waited for intervention 
to prop up the dollar. When 
the New York market opened 
and the central banks stayed 1 
on the sidelines, the dollar feD 
further still, reaching a low of 
98.550 yen. 

The dollar closed at 98.750 
yen, off from 99.935 yen Tues- 
day, but there was better news 
for the dollar in Europe as it 
gained nearly a pfennig and 
closed at 1.5870 Deutsche 
marks, up from 1.5785 DM 
Tuesday. 

Other financial markets 
took the currency turmoil in 
stride, with the Dow Jones in- 
dustrial average up for most of 
the day but off slightly at the 
end on domestic worries, 
while the Treasury bond mar- 
ket held steady after some ear- 
ly dips. 

Briefing reporters on the 
Group of Seven economic 
summit to be held in Naples 
July 8-10, Mr. Bentsen repeat- 
ed his endorsement of a strong 
dollar and said nothing special 
was planned for the Naples 
meeting on the currency front. 

He said he had been disap- 
pointed by the results of 
Group of Seven intervention 
so far on behalf of the dollar 
but said he had not expected a 
“one-day reaction.” That re- 
mark helped to depress the 
dollar against the yen. 

Mr. Bentsen made his first 
defense of the dollar Tuesday 
night in New York at a For- 


eign Policy Association din- 
ner, when he worried that dol- 
lar gyrations might hurt 
recovery abroad but said they 
had done nothing to shake his 
“confidence in America’s eco- 
nomic recovery.” 

He prefaced this with a dec- 
laration that currency markets 
had long been waiting to hear. 
“We believe a stronger dollar 
is better for our economy and 
belter for the world’s econo- 
my. I know there are people 
who think we have some strat- 
egy in Washington of driving 
down dollars, or using the dol- 
lar as some kind of bargaining 
chip. Let me say clearly — and 
I speak for the entire adminis- 
tration — this is not the case. 
The dollar is not a tool of our 
trade policy. 

“We do care about export-, 
mg more. But we want to 
achieve more exports by help- 
ing American producers, by 
opening markets and by en- 
couraging growth in foreign 
economies, not by devaluing 
our currency.” 

But with last week’s attempt , 
at currency intervention a fail- 
ure and the Federal Reserve 
not expected to raise interest 
rates at Tuesday’s Open Mar- 
ket Committee meeting, it 
seemed that President Bill 
Clinton's hands were lied for 
the time being. 

Inside the White House, 
there was some discussion of 
the president making a strong 
dollar statement at next week- 
end’s Naples summit — and 
perhaps on the worldwide de- 
mand for capital that has 
pushed up interest rates every? 
where. But no decision had yet 
been made. 

Meanwhile, economists in 
the United States were in-, 
creasingly predicting that the 
present currency crisis would 
pass as the recoveries in Japan 
and Europe took hold and 
strengthened interest rates 
there to match the Fed’s re- 

See DOLLAR, Page 10 




7 


USE 



German Banks Feel Heat 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

F RANKFURT — Walter Sdpp be- 
gan to sense something was wrong 
when he noticed that Jflrgen 
Schneider, the flashy real-estate mo- 
gul who recently vanished after stiffing Ger- 
man banks for billions of dollars, had started 
frnishimg the wroughL-iron fence around his 
Kflnjgstem villa in gold leaf. 

“Wien someone starts gQdmg the tips on 
his fence, I can’t consider him a solid busi- 
nessman,” Mr. Seipp, a neighbor of Mr. 
Schnejdcr and chairman of the supervisory 
board of Commerzbank AG, Germany's 
thud largest bank, told his bank’s loan com- 
mittee. 

The results of that observation, a moratori- 
um on new loans to Mr. Schneider, spared 
Commerzbank, which lent him 150 million 
Deutsche marks ($94 million), much of the 
embarrassment that soon swamped its bigger 
crosstown competitor, Deutsche Bank AG, 
which had lent the heavily indebted magnate 
more than l trillion DM. 

It also left Mr. Seipp with the lesson that 
banks should rely less on account ant s and 
consultants and more on common sense. 

“In the end, surveilling loans to a company 
or individual is still more of an an t han a 
science,” the fanner Commejzbarik manage- 
ment board rfiairman said in an interview. 
“What matters most is an instinct tor people.” 


banks alone (Deutsche, Commerzbank and 
Dresdner Bank AG) controlled more than 
8,000 leadership functions in German indus- 
try and other institutions. 

Election-year politics has reinforced a pop- 
ular sen timen t that wield too much 

power and demonstrate too little responsibil- 
ity when checks and balances fail. 

But most German bankers, while admitting 
some mistakes and pledging to tinker with the 
system a Little, generally insist the system is 
healthy and the criticism largely unfounded 
Mr. Sapp, citing recent setbacks, maintained 
that banks are actually “more impotent than 
aH-powerfuL” 

Moreover, whatever power German banks 
used to have has already begun to wane as the 
German financial system adjusts to interna- 
tional competition, he said. 

I n d eed, as the United States and Japan 
seriously contemplate adapting elements of 
the German universal banking system, the 
level of criticism here seems more easily ex- 
plained by social and cultural factors unique 
to Germany than by any fundamental finan- 
cial malaise, marry G erman bankers insist. 

The root causes for German antipathy to 
risk, seldom scru tinize d in an age of financial 
in tematkmaKzation, are legion. 

Mr. Seipp said Germany suffered from an 
“anti-capitalist spirit” that ran deep. “There 
has never bean an intellectual mass in favor of 
capitalism in tins country,” he said, noting 
that the German system is known as a protec- 



Daimler Picks Its Aerospace Chief as Next CEO 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

STUTTGART — Germany’s 
largest industrial concern, 
Daimler-Benz AG, picked a 
company man as its next chief 
executive. 

Daimler’s supervisory board 
announced Wednesday that 
JGrgen E. Schrempp, head of 
the company’s aerospace sub- 
sidiary, would become chair- 
man of its management board 
in May 1995, succeeding Ed- 
zard Reuter, 66, who has led the 
conglomerate since 1 987. 

By choosing Mr. Schrempp, a 
boisterous 49-year-old engi- 
neer, Daimler, best known as 
the manufacturer of Mercedes- 
Benz cars and trucks, is signal- 
ing that it will continue its tra- 
dition of strong leadership. The 
move also represents a desire 
for fresh blood because it ends 
Mr. Reuter’s tenure about sev- 
en months before his contract; 
expires. 

Mr. Schrempp has headed 
the company's aerospace divi- 
sion, Deutsche Aerospace AG, 
since it was founded in 1989. 
He is known as an aggressive, 
outgoing personality who 
makes decisions quickly and is 
willing to take risks, a quality 
not always associated with Ger- 
man chief executives, analysts 
say. 

German media had interpret- 
ed the expected move as a slap 
at Mr. Reuter for the heavy 
losses Daimler has recently 
posted. The news magazine Der 
Spiegel used the headline “A 


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Defeat for the Old Man” on this 
week’s article about him. 

Mr. Reuter’s aim was to form 
an integrated technology com- 
pany, an approach, some add, 
that has helped change the cau- 
tious image of German indus- 
try. 

But Daimler had its worst 
postwar results in 1993, regis- 
tering an operating loss of 3.3 
billion Deutsche martes ($2 bil- 
lion) on worldwide sales of 97.7 
billion DM. It cut its dividend 
for the first time in 25 years and 
is reducing its work force by 20 
percent through 1995. 

As part of Mr. Reuter’s inter- 
national strategy, Daimler- 
Benz in 1993 became the first 
German company to have its 
shares listed on the New York 
Stock Exchange. It is building a 
factory in Alabama, its first in 
the United States, to produce 
sports- utility vehicles. 

At a shareholders’ meeting in 
May, Mr. Reuter said that the 
company had became more ag- 
ile through adapting to the cri- 
sis of the past two years, and 
that sales were improving 
strongly. 

Der Spiegel reported that Mr. 
Schrempp said he would be just 
as happy going to South Africa 
as a 5 1 -a-year economic adviser 
as running the company. “Not' 
bad,” Spiegel commented, “but 
before that, perhaps be will put 
Germany's largest company on 
its feeL 

Mr. Schrempp began his ca- 
reer with Daimler in his home- 


Tatra Will Keep 
1/.S. Management 
Despite Conflict 

Bloomberg Business News 

PRAGUE — A confrontation 
between the troubled Czech 
truck maker Tatra and its U.S. 
management team ended with 
the company's firm backing of 
the American executives. 

But major shareholders of the 
company said the chai rman, the 
former Chrysler vice president 
Gerald Greenwald, must take a 
more limited role if he is chosen 
to head UAL Corp. Mr. Green- 
wald has been named to serve 
as chairman of UAL if an em- 
ployee buyout goes through. 

Tatra’s contract calls for Mr. 
Greenwald and his two part- 
ners, the former International 
Harvester and Ford Motor Co. 
executives Jack Rutherford and 
David Shelby, to manage Tatra 
on a rotating schedule of visits 
to the Czech Republic. 


town of Freiburg im Brcisgau, 
where he apprenticed as a teen- 
age an to mechanic for Mer- 
cedes before beginning his engi- 
neering Studies. 

In 1967, he joined the Daim- 
ler-Benz headquarters in Stutt- 
gart and occupied various mid- 
dle- management positions. Mr. 
Schrempp was also posted twice 
to South Africa to work in Mer- 
cedes-Benz’s operation there. 

In 1982, he was made presi- 
dent of Eudid Inc. in Cleve- 
land, which was then Daimler’s 


heavy-truck subsidiary in the 1 
United States, and returned it 
to profitability. 

When he was named chair- 
man of Deutsche Aerospace in 
1989, Mr. Schrempp was 
charged with integrating an as- 
sortment of newly acquired air- 
craft, aerospace and defense 
technology companies into a 
single cohesive unit. 

Although he had no experi- 
ence in the defense or aerospace 
industries, Mr. Schrempp effec- 
tively dissolved the companies’ 


top management and corporate 
cultures, replacing them with 
his hand-picked executives and 
creating a new corporate identi- 
ty for Deutsche Aerospace. 

Deutsche Aerospace is pan 
of the aircraft-building Airbus 
consortium that includes 
French, British and Spanish 
partners. Its results have been 
hit by declines in commercial 
aircraft sales and by lower de- 
fense budgets that have affected 
its military and space products. 
( Bloomberg, NYT, AP, Reuters ) 


Bundespost Privatization Advances 


The Associated Press 

BONN — A government plan to sell off Ger- 
many’s sprawling postal service, including the 
state tdeoommumcations company, won approval 
Wednesday from the lower house of Parliament. 

, The postal service is Germany’s largest state- 
owned employer. It has three components and 
670,000 employees, twice as large as Germany’s 
armed forces. 

The three components are mail delivery, a 
banking system and the telecommuni canons 
company, called Deutsche Telekom. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s government hopes 
to turn Telekom into a world player in the 
telecommunications market. 

Two weeks ago Telekom announced that it 
and its French counterpart planned to buy a 20 
percent stake in Sprint Corp„ the third-largest 
long-distance carrier in the United States. 


But the privatization plans could still run into 
.trouble. 

The opposition Social Democratic Party voted 
for the privatization in the Bundestag, the lower 
house of Parliament But they vowed to block it 
in the upper house when it comes up for a final 
vote on July 8 if the government does not give 
adequate assurances to save jobs and benefits. 

About 15,000 mail delrveiy workers stayed 
away from their jobs Wednesday to underscore 
their demand for a contract with such guarantees. 

Under the legislation approved by the Bundes- 
tag, private investors could start buying stock in 
ali three branches of the postal service starting 
Jan. 1. 

Telekom and the banking services could be 
totally privatized. The government would hold a 
majority of shares in the mail delivery branch for 
at least five years. 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30,_I994 


market diary 


GROWTH: Consumers Fuel GPD 


Continued from Page 9 
find signs the economy is mov- 
ing ahead," he said. 

The expansion In the last 
three months of 1993 — the 
' largest in a decade — prompted 
l the Fed to raise short-term in- 
; terest rates four times this year 
• to head off inflation. 

Rising interest rates are ex- 
i pected to slow the economy this 


U.S. Stocks 


: year, particularly in the next $ix 
months. 

* The GDP grew at an annual 
| rate of $43.9 billion in January 
j through March, compared with 
’• $873 biHion in the fourth quar- 
; ter of last year, 
i Consumer spending, which 
; accounts for two-thirds of the 
■ nation’s economic activity, rose 
;■ at a $43 billion rate, compared: 
? with $37.3 billion in the fourth 
1 quarter last year. 

! Analysts said much of the 

- spending surge apparently oc- 
! curred in March as winter- wea- 
] ry Americans flocked to restau- 
' rants and shopping malls after 

weeks of virtual hibernation. 

" Despite a more vigorous 
growth estimate, inflation ap- 
peared to remain well in check 
during the first quarter. The im- 

- plicii price deflator measure of 

f in/lminn rrw 91 a 9 ft nerrenf 


inflation rose at a 2.6 percent 
annual rate, the same as esti- 
1 mated a month ago, up from 1.3 
percent in the fourth quarter. 

Business investment grew at 
‘ a sturdy $11. 1 billion annual 
~ rate in the first quarter, better 
than Lhe $9.3 billion rate of in- 
" crease estimated last month. 
' though not as strong as the 
fourth quarter of 1993. when 
investment was expanding at a 
- $30.9 billion rate. (AP, Reuteri 


■ Stock Prices Zig-Zag 

U.S. stocks reversed early 
gains on Wednesday and closed 
slightly lower in spite of a stron- 
ger bond market. Bloomberg 
Business News reported from 
New York. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage fell 239 points to 3,667-03 
after rising as much as 30.76 
points. Losers slightly outpaced 
gainers, and volume on the New 
York Stock Exchange totaled 
263.89 milli on shares, up from 
265.29 million Tuesday. 

Stocks received some encour- 
agement from the U.S. gross 
domestic product report Even 
though first-quarter GDP grew 
more than expected, analysts 
said the data snowed that infla- 
tion remained under control. 

Even so. analysis expected 
gains in stock prices this week 
to be limited by the dollar’s 
weakness and by questions 
about whether the Federal Re- 
serve might raise interest rates 
at its policy-making committee 
meeting in Washington on 
Tuesday. 

The benchmark 30-year U.S. 
Treasury bond's yield rose as 
high as 7.56 percent before set- 
tling back to close at 7.51 per- 
cent, steady from Tuesday. 

In the last hour and a half of 
trading, three computer-gener- 
ated sell programs shaved earli- 
er gains in mayor market index- 
es. according to Birinyi 
Associates Inc. 


Yio Associated Tress 




UAL rose 2ft to 127 ft. The 
$4.9 billion employee buyout 
plan for the parent of United 
Airlines was endorsed late 
Tuesday by a leading adviser to 
institutional shareholders. 


The Dow 


tJaifydtosings of the 
Dow Jones industrial average 



D <1 F 


A M J 
1994 


(HT 


NYSE Most Actives 


VOL 

ttgn 

LOW 

Last 

aig. 

Compaq 5 

38781 

34 %# 

33 

33 V, 

—l 

FruTrail 

34063 

*V: 

J'+s 

4 1 # 

— '.'2 

TeiMev 

38975 

5W. 

55'. a 

56H 

- .1 


27538 

19 

18ki 

18*. 



25078 

51 W 

sav. 

SO'# 


RJRNob 

S5?5 

»'*. 

6 

6 

— 


32501 

471a 

47 

47V» 

- 1-4 


33413 

il*> 

W# 

401# 

—V* 

WalMart 

21337 24% 

74># 

74 V# 

tVi 

OfceDps 

70054 

70’A 

19W 

20 Vi 

t H# 

MicrTcs 

18839 

35 V* 

J4V» 

34*. 



19178 

23 

StF'j 

22 


Pepsic 

18044 

314# 

30'# 

31 



ira 



*># 


Oiryslr 

175*3 

48'<i 



— ' *•* 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open High low Lost Onl 


Indus 367153 370007 SUMS 360.05 —255 
Tram 1 57953 160750 157350 1 60551 +12.13 
LHi 177.17 1+9.41 174.97 178.14 + 1.« 
Comp 1277.08 1287.91 127655 128076 +379 


Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


Industrials 

Transc. 

U mines 
Finance 
SP 500 
5P 100 


Higb 

52167 

38779 

15180 

44.92 

449® 

416.75 


LOW Close am 
519.56 51071 +1J» 
38487 38775 +258 
15208 1SL43 + 1J1 
4442 4475 + 073 
44404 44753 +1.54 
41351 41433 + 052 


NYSE Indexes 



»gh 

Low 

Last 

Chg. 

ComposriP 

347.63 

245 J9 

246J3 

+0.93 

Induitriali 

305.17 

30X91 

30X77 

+ 0l84 

Transp. 

243.49 

241.44 

24X00 

“lj* 

utility 

703 JM 

300.95 

20X42 

-1J4 

Finance 

211* 

209 J9 

210.45 

+ 1JM. 


NASDAQ Indexes 


well Low Lost On. 


CompoMp 

Industrial 

Banks 

IrCUTOKfi 

Finance 

Tionsp. 


707.83 70X08 7B386 +171 
71370 709 JQ 70957 + 273 
750J3 74570 74417 +433 
68X77 678.72 BWJSS —672 
922.12 91852 <19.96 +052 
68407 679.66 68201 "041 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


BW Alti 
ALUMINUM (Hlga Grade) 
Dollars per metric to* 

Soot U5U0 1451 DO 

Forward 147850 MUM 

COPPER CATHODES (NM 
Dollar* pm- nwjrtcton 
Spot 235550 ma 

Forward 237 600 2377JD0 

LEAD 

Dpltors pgr mrtrtcjm 
Spot 52400 52500 

Forward 54200 54300 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric ton 
Spol 610000 611000 

Forward 620000 620500 

TIN 

Dollars pgrwolrle loo 

Scat 514000 515000 

Forward 522000 522500 


pra tin g* 

Mt Al 


142900 143000 
145700 145000 
Snide) 


yu/i nn 236140 
23BOOO 238100 


51700 51900 
53600 53700 


394500 595500 
604000 605080 


ZINC ( Special H HA Grade) 
Donors per metric 


512SOO 5)3500 
521080 521580 


SI rar 


ton 

93900 94080 
96400 96500 


93080 93980 
96300 96400 


HM 


Lew LB09 Settle Qre 


Industrials 

i* los) Seme Ch’se 


Mott 

U J?CF:«Tper metric too-Jots of 1 M tan 

T _ .4. M l&n 11 


Jet 


OCT 


1S5JD ia« 

15773 13550 
15930 15750 _ 

16125 16050 161 

I**?; 16155 WX— — m . i.r ■ — 

16530 16375 1650S 16580 + 280 
» HS5J5 14580 16530 15675 +175 
Est. volume: 11149. Open 0>L 11051 


Dee 



BRENT CRUDE OIL ««l 

UJ. aoUan par borraf-lots of LWB barren 


Financial 


Add 

17.45 

17 JO 

i7jn 

17 jn 

— ftjfl 

sS 

1725 

T6JQ 

1481 

MJ1 

—028 

Od 

I7.M 

MJ8 


1672 

—02 

Nov 

17JM 

l&JJS 

1X38 

1647 

—02 

Dec 

K99 

1646 

Ml® 

Ml62 

—new 

Job 

N.T. 

N.T. 

K.T. 

1AS9 


Fee 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

T6J6 

— 824 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1X31 

— BW 

Art 

N.T. 

XT. 

N,T. 

1646 

-UK 


Htttt Lew dose CWtWri 

MHONTH STERLING CLIFFE) 

CSOMH- Ptsoi WPC9 


AMEX Stock Index 


5tp 

9440 

9+34 

901 

+ 001 

Dec 

91 39 

8172 

9177 

+ CLB1 

Mar 

93.12 

93JJ4 

ELIO 

+ 0JD2 

Jn 

9X57 

9241 

SSL® 

+089 

S8P 

?m 

91 J1 

*41 

+ 086 

DK 

9144 

91.53 

+ 005 

Mar 

9U6 

712* 

*134 

+ 006 

Jun 

91.15 

*1* 

91.14 

+ 005 

59P 

9B.M 

90® 

9096 

+ 006 

DK 

9079 

9073 

90® 

+ 803 

.Mar 

Jun 

9043 

9046 

WS4 

90J9 


+ 005 

+ 185 


Eai. volume; Z7522 . OpcrIoL 28JM 


Stock indexes 


NASDAQ Host Actives 



VOL 

High 

Lew 

3pm 

dig. 

rJovoll 

enm 

17V* 

1* ( 5 

1*'V„ 

► 

Csca* 

315*3 

V# 

23*a 

33 ?i 

+ %■ 

Oracle 6 

39735 

38 V* 

37V# 

38 

— 1 j 

Mkslts 

27285 

51 

50?# 

51'/. 

— Vu 

MCI s 

33285 

23%. 

23 Via 

33 

+ *i. 

DSC & 

330+6 20V# 

Ita. 

|9'# 

- v# 

Kan 

215*1 

SIN 

4V V# 

51 

- 1*. 

EtoArt 

315*0 

14'v 

13V# 

14 

- V# 

Intel 

19*45 

MV# 

59 V, 

59'-# 

— Vu 

1 DBCm* 

18*5* 

*'# 

9',, 

*/,. 

- V U 

SrUpB# % 

1781 3 

21 '5 

20+i 

31*.y 

• 1 

DeiiCotr 

17*87 

3 7 *# 

25V, 


— IV* 

SUude 

16*04 

32 '-7 

3taJ 

33 

-P. 

Merisel 

151*5 

8 1 . 

8'y 

BV# 



LCDS s 

144® 

17 

15 

1* 

- 1* 


High LOW Last Chg. 
424.42 <2X55 43X48 +081 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
10 utilities 
10 industrials 


Close 

9777 

<600 

10054 


arm 


— 009 

— 079 

+ 011 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


1346 775 

802 1343 

701 706 

2830 2824 

14 II 

90 125 


AMEX Diary 


Close Prev. 


AMEX Most Actives 


DOLLAR: Yen at Record High 


Continued from Page 9 

cent increases. This would in 
turn free the Fed to tighten a bit 
more later in the year if Lhe U.S. 
economy improves. 

The American Bankers Asso- 
ciation economic advisory com- 
mittee forecast Wednesday that 


Foreign Exchange 


the Fed would add another 
quarter to balf a percentage 
point to short-term interest 
rates by the end of the year, and 
that this would help lift the dol- 
lar back to 105 yen. 

This could happen sooner 
and end the present crisis, said 
Allen Sinai of Lehman Brothers 
Global Economics, if Mr. Gin- 
ton could work out a deal at 
Naples for Japan and Germany 
to cut rates by half a percentage 
point and for the Fed to raise 
them. 


But that would lake a level of 
cooperation that does not seem 
to exist, and in any case, "it isn't 
the end of the world if the yen 
goes to 90 and the mark to 1.50 
to the dollar as long as interest 
rates don’t suddenly spike up 
and kill the recovery,” said Mr. 
Sinai. 

■ Dollar Makes Gains 

The dollar posted moderate 
gains against other European 
currencies. 

It rose to close at 1.3335 
Swiss francs on Wednesday, up 
from a closing rate of 1.3275 
f rancs on Tuesday, and climbed 
to 5.4415 French francs from 
5.4105 francs. The pound slid to 
SI -5458 from $1.5525. 

Dealers said volume was fair- 
ly strong throughout the session 
and that there had been fairly 
heavy selling of the U.S. unit 
whenever it rose toward the lev- 
el of 1.5875 DM. 



VoL 

High 

Law 

Lust 

chs. 

Otc-vWt s 

2*1*4 


?Vi 

S 



ExpLA 

184«3 

l*fc 

IVu 

I'-i. 

— j> u 

Hasbro 

114*3 

79 V. 

28 v# 

39 V. 

- IM. 

Atari 

8793 

3'v,. 

3 

3V„ 

— *'ti 

IniertMg 

5848 2 iv,. 

;u. 

2 «*u 

-Ur. 

hnx>Cp 

5778 

l&U 

15V, 

l*v» 

> *• 

Oinicp 

57*7 

V|, 

Vi 

h 

— Vp 

NY Tim 

4477 

23V# 

23 

33'.', 

+ ’•# 

CbflAHpf 

4318 

24’. 

24>« 

34*# 

—V# 

MSIGTn 

38® 

IJ'i 

19 

19 



Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issue* 
NewHtotn 
New Laws 


293 208 

294 365 

233 749 

KX> B27 

3 


40 


35 


NASDAQ Diary 


Oom Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unction Bed 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


IS73 1365 
14*1 1779 

1995 1908 

5058 9052 

34 29 

183 175 


Spot Commo dt tlom 


Market Sales 

Commodity 

Aluminum, lb 

Today 
n «bi 

Prev. 

0649 

NYSE 

Amesr 

Nasdaq 

In mill lens. 

Today 

4:® 

263LB9 

1BJ* 

245 JS 

Prev. 

com. 

321J87 

27.182 

3*0085 

Coffee. Brat, lb 

Copper electrolytic, lb 

1 Iran FOEL ton 

Lead, lb 

Silver, trov as 

Steel (scrap], ton 

Tin, lb 

Zinc lb 

1J2 

1.15 

211® 

03* 

5285 

134J3 

15167 

IU5U 

1J2 

1.17 

311® 

03* 

5305 

13433 

16157 

04745 


.1 ' Esl. volume: 27,615. Open inf.; 520819. 

, 3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

> SI mNlloa- MS Of IMpd 
I S«a 9449 9469 9449 —004 

Dk 9481 93.W wm -082 

Mar 9374 9372 9X73 — 0)3 

inn 9X43 9X0 9344 —002 

SOP N.T, N.T. 9X3) —083 

Est. volume: 22r Open ini; 5.926. 


3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM1 mWon • pts of 100 pd 


Dec 


Jim 

SOP 

Dec 

Mar 

JIM 


DOC 

Mar 

Jan 


95.13 

9485 

9447 

9475 

9487 

9X78 

9387 

9134 

9X12 

92.91 

9278 

92M 


9589 

9486 

9480 

9433 

9386 

9388 

9147 

9324 

*103 

9289 

9X72 

9289 



Esl. volume: 81.189. Open int.: 879711. 


3-MONTH PIBOR (MAT IF) 
FFJ million - Pts ot TBO pet 


Sap 


Dec 

,Mar 

Jon 


9488 

94.17 

9383 

9X72 

9151 

9X30 

93.13 

9383 


94X2 

94.10 

9X80 

9X61 

9X40 

9X19 

9X02 

9284 


9488 +0J11 

94.17 Unch. 
9033 +0JM 
9370 +-0JQ 

9X49 +0.01 

9X26 Unch. 
9388 — 08S 

9X98 — 086 


Est volume: 53.946. Open lot.: 194662. 
LONG SILT (LIFFE) 

(90860 - PtS « 32nt» of 100 PCt 
SOP 10S-0T 100-24 101-21 +0-23 

Dec 100-19 100-19 100-21 +0-23 

EM. volume: 54811 Open bit.; 11&SK. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM lSOMO - Pis of 100 pet 
SOP 9286 9X19 9X64 + 0.12 

Dec 92.10 _ *1.90 9182 + B.T2 

EM. volume: 117804. Open Ini: 3 151,881. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT IF) 
F F5D8400 - PlS Of HO Pd 


Sep 

11684 

115JQ 

11X50 

+ 020 

Dk 

11530 

114.92 

HUB 

+ 020 

Mar 

1106 

1 1426 

1106 

+020 

Jn 

N.T. 

N.T. 

NT. 

Unch. 


EM. volume: 20061*. Open Ini; 147,900. 


5m our 

Arts and Antiques 
every Saturday 


Hfefe Law 
FTSE 108 (LIFFE) 
os per index paint 

Sop 29678 25098 2S5M +4U 

DK 296fli; rmst ®fl8 -f (78 

Est vatane: UML Opm W- 51SX 
CAC40 (MATIF) 

+ *» 

aSb S iraun IS + K 

Sw 195480 193780 195280 +1680 

Dec 177460 197480 197MB + IXE8 

Mar N.T. N.T. 200780 +U80 

EsL vOtanc: 37,980. Open Wt; 79879. 
Sources: Motif, Associated Press. 
London Inn FMondat Futuna Ex aw sK , 
tan Petroleum E xc ha n ge. 


Dividends 


Company 


Per Amt Pay Dec 
IRREGULAR 


AthmodsPLC x .1610 

Cd Bancor espana x 2*6 

First Fed Sav FL . .10 

Marble Rnl _ Ml 

WPG GwHi& inco _ 87 

■-approx wnt per ADR. 


7-6 M 

7-7 7-27 
<30 7-15 
M 7-29 
6-30 7-1 


Charter Power 
x -corrected Pay date. 


CORRECTION 

X 8275 


H 7-15 


Anded Ftol 


INCREASED 

Q 86 
INITIAL 


7-17 7-29 


Cole Tavlor Ftnl 
First Oak Brook 
Home SovBk FL n 


. 85 


. ata s 


M0 Ml 
7-11 7-22 
7-22 7-29 


REGULAR 
Am AdlRlTmTr 98 M 84 
Carolina First Cp 

CenterWr Energy 

Dtenoy Co 
Ecfdbiinc 
Fkt Fed Ricti 


Frank CA TxFr 
Frank Fed " 


TxFr 

Frank Inco Fd 
Frank NY TxFr 
Frank Prem Ret 
HerbalTfe Inti 

Horizon Bk 
interstate Baker 
Jefferson Bold 
Ludnsian Sav Bk 
Metro MB 
Micron Tech 
Ntasat intf 
Patriot Global Dhr 
Premier Bcsks Cp 

PSBHoM 
Put US GvtlncTr A 
Put Am GvtlncTr A 
WLR Foods 


O 

Q ^ 
O .075 
Q .19 
a sa 

S S 

m jns 
M 868 
Q 


§ iS 


8 T 


.17 

a .12 
o 72 
Q 85 

5.^ 
• S 

M 876 
M 851 

a 8o 


7-0 7-27 
7-15 0-1 

7-22 M 
Ml 8-19 
Ml 7-18 
7-15 7-29 
6-30 7-15 
6-J0 7-15 
+30 MS 
6-30 M5 

6- 29 7-15, 

7- M 64 

7-11 7® 
7-15 0-1 

7-7 7-39 
7-15 6-3 

7-15 7-29 
7-25 6-15 
7-29 8-19 
7-13 7-27 
7-1S 8-1 
Ml 7-24 
7S 7-15, 
7-5 MSI 
7-15 729 


a-ammaf; ppavaMo Id Cw»«Bon toads; m- 


Ui&i 


ustnz Abu maw s cma « t suu ? 
executiyes to cooccal its.fllugal 
The lawsuit, filed in New Ywic. State 
hattan, seeks SlOOjuJto m . 

Saltan Nabyan and other Aw 
destroying the.forni£r.direct(H? 

SM* Zayed was -the controfliBg 
Luxembourg-based concern was ^frut 
throughout me worid in l991 after audits of 

instances of fraud; - - 


Dari Fanuly Sues 

, I ■ HI , ,,nn vr mi: I TK# Daft fntnllircpntrni 


NEW YORK (Bloombag) — The Dari 
scuttle BnaiTf restructuring $49 
filed a lawsuit against the Bank of Brazu, the ctwstry s 
bank, Banco do Braal SA, Bmzffs sta*<^*™** « 
dal bank, and Qfibank. . _ , 

The family, which ’owns. Dart. Contaaier ^—--r 
fourtbdaigest owlitOic,with $1.4 taDion^mbOTd&JC^®^. 
mix of ddjt that BricnKan offidals ^ 

restructuring, which was completed April' 15. . . .. - 
In the mat, rijelfertsariecda fcdfiraljtK^e to ^de^Qci 
accelerate the lepayment of principal on their bOTds. 
a steering cbnnmttec of 19 banks that hdpcdBtaiS 
debt for new. bonds and oithes; securities. . ; * 




to mst i 


NEW YORK (Bkkniil»0 ^Pro^4<3^^ 

General Foods Inc. raised prices Wednesday bh thd^Foigfl»““ 
Maxwdl House Coffee brands, respectivwi after^ffee 
surged in the commodities market this weck~ ■- 

Nestle SA, which makes Nescafe, Tastta^ CayB and 
Bros, brand coffees, said it had nb innmfiate jraffi r ““ 
prices, *Tn our^view ’ifs too early -to inala ariy ^rwed 
Migud Garrotte, a spokesman for Swiss-based gtesUfe . ■ ; . ;* 

A heavy frost hit the main cc^ee-grOwing r^^B ra 
weekend, daraagrug already ailing ciopsC - ' J_\ 

U.S. mutual Fund Sales F^m KIay ^ 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) —Sales of stp^-todind 
mutual funds totaled $35.1 billion m May, dtwriifffpm ^ 
bflfion in April and $37 J2 UHioa in May 1993, ri^ lnvestnae^^S; 
Company Institiito said Wednesday. - ■'... .vVi*'.: 


-id 


The wmtnai food industry’s trade group said: stock fund 
totaled SI9.4 bfflion in May,compared with $22.'*’ wwr '“-"‘ 
and $15.8 bflfion in May 1993. Bond and income _ _ 

$15.6 bflHon in sales, compared vwth $17:9 biffion in April 
$21.5 biHion in May .1993. . 


SEC Approves New Rules od Nasdaqfi^;1 

WASHINGTON (Bloombeg) — The UA Securities and 
change Commisrion approved two rules Wednesday tto 
change the way stocks are traded on the over-tbe^huer m 31 * ' ■ v 
the world’s second-larged equity market by doHatvotoahe. 

One rule is designed to curtail sharp price drop^cikiia 
short-selling in Nasdaq National Market st6cks, wh3e the 
' ibits securities firms from trading ahead of«jst(Hner 
rules were proposed by the National Assptiatjmiof 


ties Dealers, the - sdf-regulatory organization that ihns the 
ci Sept. 6 1 


daq, and go into effect Sept. 6 for an. 1 8-month palot^periodiV/^fe 


BANKS: Germans Level Criticism at Troubled Banking Establishment Blockbuster to Acquire 

FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida ' 

EntertaimaentCacp. and its 70.5 perccnt-owncd 


Coatinued from Page 9 

changes in wealth and quality 
of life that there is an tnclina-i 
tion toward collective security." 
he said, dting the German sys- 
tem of social benefits and re- 
tirement and nursing care in- 
surance. 


Hilmar Kopper, the Deut- 
sche Bank chairman, is one who 
has voiced exasperation: “What 
would banks have to do and not 
do La order to find public fa- 
vorT* he asked shareholders. 


“This is beyond anyone’s pow- 
ers of imagination." 

There are many critics, how- 
ever, who quite specifically 
spell out what it is they want: 

■ Ekkehard Wenger, a pro- 
fessor of business in Wurzburg 
who has won a reputation as a 
gadfly at shareholder meetings 
across Germany, has won 
grudging sympathy from many 
bankers with frequent calls for 
greater disclosure of banks’ 
stakes in industry and of their 
hidden reserves. Currently, 


banks do not have to disclose 
an industrial shareholding un- 
less their stake is greater than 
10 percent, and a new law 
would lower the barrier to 5 
percent 

• The opposition Social 
Democratic Party, which hopes 
to wrest power from Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl’s center-right 
Christian Democratic coalition 
titis fall has proposed 30 specif- 
ic changes in six German laws 
to mandate more transparency 
and greater competition 


• There is growing alarm at 
the fact that around SO patent 
of all German bankruptcies in- 
volve corruption and that the 
culprits are seldom prosecuted. 
Though those responsible are 
generally rained beyond repair, 
Michael Bretz. a spokesman for 
Creditreform, a leading Ger- 
man watchdog on insolvency 
cases, said it was r emarkab le 
that die percentage, although it 
was an estimate, showed no 
signs of shrinking. 


Entertain-j^J 


meet Group Inc. said Wednesday they planned to take cpntrd ^;? - 

vi- •— v +•- _ . vw £ 1 )* VfQiHi 


Vi 


Interactive Entertainment PLQ a maker p£ video games^_. ;‘ 
blockbuster reached an agreement with Virgin Group to buy 55'- fe' 


percent of Virgin Interactive from Richard Branson’s 
Trusts f -- * r.ssi.-*. 


and certain other shareholders, : boosting xte m taesf in: the ; 
viiteo |ame company to 75 percent 
Virgm shareholders vriBlreep 10 peicem ctf Vii^ Jnteractiye^iiJ 
which Blockbuster may also acquire under certain c*rcuim tances- ^i 


DALLAS (AF) Overhead Dpdr tnc^ whiehmakes garag^fe 
doors, said Wednesday it would pay $1S4 miUion tty acquire 
Co^ an Ohio-based maker of garz^e-door opqjcrs. •; . r ~;: 




WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agcntr France Prcue June 2? 

CluoPrav. 


Clow Prnv. 


Amsterdam 


A BN Amro HM 
ACF Hohllng 
Aegon 
Ahold 
Akzo Nobel 
AMEV 

Bols-Wewonen 

C5M 

OSM 

Elsevier 

Fokkrr 

Gist-Brocades 

HBG 

Hoineken 

Hoogovem 

Hunter Douglas 

IHC Colored 

Idler Mueller 

I nil Nederland 

ICLM 

KNP BT 

KPN 

Nedlto*d 

OraGrinlen 

pakhoed 

Philips 

polvoram 

Roiwco 

Rodamca 

Rollncu 

Rorento 

Royal Dulcti 

SOW* 

Unilever 

vanOmmeren 

VNU 

AWtars/Kluwer 

EOE Index : 

previo u s : 38L22 


S8J0 58.10 
4X50 4X50 
92J0 9450 
4460 4460 
IBBJO 19080 
7180 69.W 
36.90 JTJB 
MM 4560 
127 12460 
151 .*0 151.30 
15 14,88 
4680 4650 
295 290 

213 21280 
6950 68J0 
7280 7160 
36.10 36 

78 77 JO 
7440 7X60 
4X40 47.90 
4X20 4X40 
4980 50 

6480 6450 
7X50 73 

43JM 44 
51 50.® 
7X10 71 A0 
11170 11380 
SB 57.10 
11780 118L20 
8650 8780 
18760 18X30 
4X90 44 JO 
IBOJD 17950 
4860 48.90 
16960 16930 
10480 IBX90 


Brussels 

AG Fin 
Almanll 
Arbod 
Barca 
BBL 
Bafcoart 
CBR 
CMH 
CNP 

cockerill 


CfltoeM 
Colruvt 
Domain: 

Electr abet 

EtectraHna 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevoert 
GtaverUel 
Irnmobei 
Kredleibank 
Mowxw 
PelroHna 
Power l ln 
Recti cel 

Ros* Beige 

Sac Gen Banque 8090 8130 
SocGen Belgique 2160 214S 


2555 2545 
7578 7570 
4450 4435 
21B5 2170 
4180 4095 

3SS}?238 

2280 2270 
2030 2033 
180 184 

5630 5600 
7250 7320 
1330 1340 
5570 5550 
H45 33*3 
1396 1398 
4110 4000 
9159 8830 
4550 4595 
3010 3030 
6490 MS 
1580 1510 
10275 10225 
284S 2870 
476 480 

5100 5070 


Siemens 

Throen 

Vorta 

Vetw 

vewe 

Vlog 

Volkswagen 

Wells 


&56JD 653 
29X80 2*2 

316 315 

50X5049960 
35a 35* JO 
46245320 
47X50 475 
935 930 


DAX.Mex : 2046J8 
Pre* low : 7»8» 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtymo 

125 

125 

Enso-Gutzelt 

40J0 39* 

HuhtpmaW 

173 

1*8 

ICO.P. 

11 

1X70 

Kvmmenc 

lit 

HJ 

Metro 

1® 

1*2 

Nokia 

433 

434 

Pdhloio 

65 

61 

Repola 

9120 

92 

Stockmann 

212 

211) 

HEX tode* : Wra.15 
Previous : lout 



Clow Pre*. 


Hong Kong 


Bk East Asia 
Cathay Pacific 
Cheung Kang 
Oilna Light pwr 

Dairy Farm inJI 

Hang Lung Dev 

Hang Seng Bank 

Henderson Land 
HK Ah’ Ena. 

HK China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Land 
HK Realty Trusl 
HSBC Holding* 
HK Sixmo HttS 

hk Telecomm 
HK Ferry 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hyson Dev 
JordtatMoth. 
Jardtne Sir Hid 

Kowtoofi Motor 

Maidaiin Orient 
Miramar Hotel 
Now World Dev 
SHK Proos 
Stekn 
Swire Poc A 
Tai Cheung Pm* 
TVE 

Wharf Hold 
Whig On Co Hill 
iMnsor Ind. 




: 867169 


34 34 

1X90 1088 
3X25 3425 
39 39J0 
1040 1030 
11.90 8! JO 
51 49 JO 
3X50 3X50 
41 4X50 
1460 14.70 
2X10 2150 
1920 1960 
31.10 21 JO 
8250 83 

!!-« 1160 
14-50 14.90 
1X10 13 

31-50 3175 
2060 2X50 
56.50 5* 

2920 2*60 
M I4J0 
1070 1060 
2160 2160 
2180 71.« 
4485 4485 
2.90 
54-531 56 

1160 1160 
X4B X4B 
2X80 28.10 
1060 1060 
11 JO II JO 
B648J1 


14075 14300 
14200 14200 
9650 *740 
9B20 *760 
23950 33750 
2625 2650 

6810 6800 

C^l^exiT^ 


Senna 
Soivay 
Tmsenderio 
Trod dm 
UCB 

Union Mlnlore 
wagons Llls 


Frankfurt 

17517760 
370 370 
2352 2396 
614 615 

m 1040 
ma mw oi 
35534560 

415 408 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
Allianz Hold 
Altana 
Asko 
BASF 
flaw 

Bay. Hypo bank 
Bav Verelrwbfc 44943650 

BBC _ 665 690 

BHF Bonk m 39S 

BMW 7W 781 

Conunenbonk 324315J0 

Continental 24&60246J0 

Daimler Benz 732722Ji 

Deoussa <78-50471 JU 

Dt Babcock 2296022860 

Deutsche Bank <796067760 
Douglas 500 488 

Drestkier Bank 377 370 

FeMmueMf 

F Krunp Hoesch 

Harnener 


Henkel 
HocMIet 
Hoechst 
Hoixnwnn 
Horten 
IWKA 
Kali Soli 
r.arnodi 
Koufhof 
KHD 


302 3C 
208 208 
333 331 

S86588J0 
1025 101? 
12932760 

896 892 
210 206 
372 371 

13513460 
586 580 
508 494 

15260 


Ktoeckner Werka 15X20 14980 


Linar 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesmarm 

Metgllacsetl 

Muench Rueck 

Porsche 

Preusww 

PWA 

EJJVE 

%2%5 n " 


912 Bn 
19260 183 
393 388 
40739X90 
20419*60 

447 437 

240 239 
41&J0 414-50 


S I 306 

l r — 


6196968 


Johannesburg 

AECI 

' Aiken 

Anglo Amer 


24.75 2450 

120 iai 

227 231 

3185 33.75 
885 9 

42 4168 

109 111 

6X25 A2 
11JS 1185 
114 114 

25 25 

27 27 

52 5160 
3260 3265 
4260 4X8Q 
9385 93 

87 89 

45 45 

2485 2485 
197 193 


Barlows 
Blyvaar 
Buftets 
De Beers 
Dr Wont* In 
Gencor 
GFSA 
Hormony 
Hlahveld Steel 
Kloof 

Nedbank Grp 
Randfenteln 
RusPttH 
SA Brews 
51 Helena 
Sasal 

western Deep 


London 


Abbey Nan 
Allied Lvgns 
Aria Wiggins 
Argyll Group 
Ass Brit Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bank Scotland 

Barclays 


BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Booh 
Bowoter 
BP 

Brit Airways 
Brit Gas 
BHtSleel 
Bril Telecom 
BTR 

Coble Wire 
CodburvSch 
Coradon 
Coals Vlvetia 
Comm Union 
Court oulds 
Etc Group 

Enterprise Oil 

Eurotunnel 


465 

561 

164 

238 

564 

869 

461 

1.95 

5J4 

5JO 

199 

1.15 

266 

763 

535 

4.42 

3.«I6 

X76 

265 

140 

175 

152 

4JK 

416 

3 

X17 

566 


366 

X63 

268 


X*5 

569 

264 

136 

561 

B64 

4.48 

1.96 

582 

<94 

462 

1.12 

262 

UC 

588 

4J9 

X94 

368 

257 

IJ6 

173 

254 

467 

<11 

190 

XII 

563 

466 

135 

469 

268 


Flsons 
Forte 
GEC 
Genl Ace 

Glaxo 

Granamei 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlllsdawn 
H5BC Hlags 
ICI 

Inchcape 

Kingfisher 

Lodbroke 

Land 5ec 

Laporte 

Laima 

Legal Gen Grp 
LlOVdS Bonk 
Marks Sp 
ME PC 
Manpower 
Natweet 
NFtiWPt water 

Pearson 

PAO 

Pllklrtekin 

PowerGwi 

Prudential 

RmkOro 

RecfclHCd 

Rctflond 

Reed inti 

Raul era 

RMC Group 

Rolls Royce 

Rommn(unJt) 

Royal Scot 

RTZ 

Salnsbury 
Scot Newcns 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

Siebe 

Smith Nephew 
Smith Kline B 
Smith (WH) 
Son Alliance 
Tote 8> Lyle 
Teseo 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
Uld Bttcultl 
Vodafone 
War Loan 3W 
Wellcome 
Whl thread 
williams Hdgs 
Willis Corraan 


183 

288 

265 

541 

563 

468 

136 

<38 

569 

248 

165 
7XO 
779 
<44 
<91 

166 
682 
787 

143 
481 
538 
196 
485 
435 
466 
<69 
6-02 
6J8 
164 
461 
269 
177 
5-75 
<98 
767 
439 
118 
1.76 
160 
<26 
882 
<07 
582 
366 
1.17 
460 
663 
538 

144 
<07 
<5a 
268 


188 

285 


264 

540 


542 

193 


172 

<38 


5.70 

X*4 


164 

6.96 


745 

<38 


<« 

167 


469 

7-07 

)J9 

<15 

584 

354 

<11 

<24 

<« 

ASS 


682 

164 

<77 

267 

382 

561 


a 


440 

868 

180 

361 

<18 

1)7 

197 

5.16 
343 

1.16 


686 

587 

141 

199 

465 


289 

1X13 

112 

110 

987 

115 

467 

4185 

6.15 

5-07 

137 

143 


X26 

1023 

X16 

203 

962 

113 

460 

4169 

6.10 

<96 

135 

145 


Madrid 


BBV 2975 2990 

Boo Central Hlsp. 2Mo 2548 
Banco Santander 4700 4660 
" " 980 975 


CE 


.Ercros 
ibenlreki 

Rossal 

Tabaoaiera 

Telelonloo 


3050 2965 
2150 2150 
5970 5830 
236 232 

931 951 
3830 3870 
3430 3465 
1770 1765 


30247 


Milan 


Boira Comm 
Bostool 

Benetton group 


8^ 


Cll 

Creditpi 
EntChem 
Fortin 
Ferfin RteP 
Flat SPA 
Flnmoccanica 
Generali 
IFI 

llaloem 

I taigas , 

■talmoblllare 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Plralll 

RAS 

Rlnoscenta 
Salpem 


4660 4725 
1*3 161 

34050 25400 
HIS 1129 

2540 2545 

2800 2100 
25 2900 
Trwn raw 

1315 1270 

6465 6425 
IMS 2S®S 
41700 41100 

25900 253U 

12490 12430 
5345 5345 
43560 43000 
14950 14«5 

1495 1503 
203 2460 
4930 4900 
25550 2SM0 

10020 10020 

4000 3970 


Sm Paokl Torino 10000 10200 

5IP 4060 4110 

SME 3900 4015 

Snla 2510 2415 

Stamm 37500 OTso 

SM 5015 5BH 

Torn ASSt RJsp 27*50 37501 

MI8 tadex : I1N 
Preyknrj ; IU1 


Montreal 


Ateoo Aluminum 31U 3tw 
Bank Montreal Zxv, 21W 

owrawnmn d 
C ambicr 

Casoades 


41*1 44 b 

1»i 18% 
ITU 1716 
7H 7IA 


Close Prev. 


Close Prev. 




Esse He- A 

106 

106 




Handelsbanken 

99 

in 

MacMillan Bl 

I7W 


Investor B 

165 

163 

Natl Bk Canada 



Norsk Hydro 

218 

211 




Procardia af 

116 

11/ 

Quebec Tel 

1916 

19=!# 

Sandvlk B 

108 

101 

Quebecor A 

171# 

161# 

SCA-A 

1® 

im 


17 

1616 

S-E Bmken 

4* 

4 / 

TeteBlobe 

Ita# 


Skondla F 

109 

IUV 




■ Skanska 

14V 

IN) 

Videotron 

12 

12%# 

SKF 

137 

136 

Mtatriafs ImMx 
P reviam : 1724.13 

1723* 

Store 

, Trellebarg BF 
. Volvo 

too 

3*720 

9X50 

675 


Paris 






757 

741 


605 

5W 

Axo 

235.10 


Boncolre (Chi) 

516 

516 

BIC 

uu 

II*. 

BNP 

236® 240 


*06 

605 

BSN-GD 

798 


Correfour 

1820 

IKK 

C.C.F. 

2I9*31VjM 

Cents 

101 

1® 

Choraeurs 

lias 

im 

G merits Franc 

387 

sot 

Chib Med 


a/M 


387 

EH-Sonofl 

855 

851 

Euro OHnay 
Gen. Earn 


IXAS 

2247 


44* 

442 

I melal 

540 

iJJ 

Lafarge Coppee 399® 

m 

Leg rand 

5730 

58*8 

Lron. Eaux 

515 

538 

Oreal IL') 

1094 

11® 

L.VJMJ4. 

866 

062 


109® 107* 

ciGbiiraia 


■ - 

Moulinex 

12X50 

122 

Paribas 

362 3S<70 

PectHney Inti 

153 1SX10 

Pernod- Rica rd 

379*36820 


797 

787 

Pinoutt Print 

852 

841 


478 

479 


123* 119* 

RaH. St. Louis 

1640 

1*70 

Saint Gobatn 

*60 

641 

S.E.B. 

496 

492 

5» Genera ki 

573 

564 

Suffiz 

26120 272.90 

Thotmon-CSF 


Total 

316JD312J0 

UAP. 

14X50 T46® 

Valeo 

3SX40 349 JO 



Sao Paulo 


Banco do Brasil 


Bnwespo 

■n 

FT+-J 

Brade3Co 

1525 1525 

Brahma 

50457001 

Cemla 



Eletrabras 



Itoutxjoco 

465 





Paronopanema 

42 3X10 

Pefrabras 



SaiuaCrw 

142® 140® 

Tetobras 

11120102® 

Tetosn 

898 

840 

Usiminas 

195 


Vole Rla Doce . 

286 


Vortg 

250 

248 


IU83 






AffoersvoerMet : 
Previous : T760JQ 


: 177182 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Boral 

Bougainville 
Coles Myer 
Camatca 
CRA 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 


Magellan 

MIM 


Sydney 

869 868 
194 198 
1764 1822 
3J3 13S 
066 MS. 
480 <15 
5.1* 585 
17.76 1868 
487 462 
166 181 
127 186 
11.16 »5B 
1.95 1.95 
262 X93 
1066 10168 
835 844 
485 <30 
145 X4D 
<28 <19 
267 268 


Nat Aust Bank 
News Carp 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
Pot Dunlap 
Pioneer inti 
Nmndv Poseidon 1.96 161 
OCT Resources. 138 143 
Santos 178 X80 

TNT X23 281 

Western Mining 78a 7JS 
Westoac Banking <44 <34 
Woods We <50 <39 


Airaraan^mingex : 1175.10 


Singapore 


Cerebas 
. _D*v. 

DBS 

Fraser Neove 

Genllng 
GobtenHopePl 

Haw Par 

Hume industries 580 580 

Inchcape 560 585 

Keppel 1X70 I860 

kl Kspong 154 154 

Lum Chang 146 U0 


7 JS 760 
680 640 
1040 II 
1660 1660 
1840 1840 
243 244 
102 am 


Malayan Banftg 840 8J5 
0C8C foreign 1180 12.90 


OUB 

DUE 


SembaiKmg 
Shongrlla 
Slme Darby 
S1A foreign 
Spare Land 

s^ore Press 

SlngSteenraiip 

S We Telecomm U8 342 

strata Trading 1&4 xs* 

UOB foreign 1280 1280 

UOL X16 X17 

tad. : 221841 

revioos : 2227*9 


5.90 
855 85S 
11.10 M80 
880 5.15 
364 360 
1X60 1280 
745 765 
1560 1540 
388 362. 


Stockholm 


AGA 
ASeaA 
Astro A 
Ann Copco 
E lecfrolin B 
Erkssan 



Tokyo 


Akol Electr 
Asahi Chemical 
AsaM Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

Dal Nippon Print 1936 1920 
Dalwa House 1530 1520 
Dahra Securtttes 1770 1760 


513 513 
735 731 
1220 1210 
1560 1600 
1620 1630 
1740 1730 
1340 1360 


4U0 4690 
2270 2300 
2200 2220 
1100 1MB 

nao iota 
935 935 

1790 imo 
5400 5350 
737 736 

715 723 

9*0 9*0 

2660 3630 
414 410 

ii9o liaa 
965 965 

7Z7 730 

74» 72M 


245) 2670 

577 515 

660 668 

7B7 790 


iaao 1020 

I860 1910 
1210 1210 

1050 1040 


Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fuiltsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi CoMC 
Honda 
Ita Yokodo 
llochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kallma 
Konsal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brower* 

Komatsu 
Kutota 

Matsu Elec 1 nos 1776 1780 
Matsu Elec WkS 1140 1170 
Mitsubishi Bk 

Mitsubishi Kasai 

MJfsubfshl Elec 

Mitsubishi Hrv 

Mlbubbtil Carp 1240 1230 
Mitsui and Co 036 822 
Mlfeufcoshl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators . — 

Nlkko Securities 1340 13B 
Nippon Kaqgku U» 1060 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 

NTT 

Olympus Optical J140 1110 
Planear 
Ricoh 

Sanyo Elec 

Share 

SMmaxu 
SMnefsu Chem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
5um!tomo Chem 
SumfModfw 
Sumitomo Melal 
TalseiCare 
Tatsho Marine 
TafcedaChmi 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 

Tokvo Elec Pw 

Toenon Pruning 1480 1500 
Torav Irtd. 745 748 


760 104 
353 353 
636 634 
862 866 
2420 200 


2720 2760 
945 953 
555 560 
1790 1880 
75* 7 S 

2150 2100 
6000 WTO 
2170 2180 
536 SD7 
975 972 
296 297 
683 690 


1180 1160 
4740 425 
540 545 

«S0 1260 
3150 3170 


Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yomahhi Sec 
a.-xMO. 


800 2875 
2200 2210 
939 940 


Close Prev. 


Toronto 


AbHlbt Price 
Amlco Eagle 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Am Barrlck Res 
BCE 

Bk Nova Scotia 
BC Gas 
BC Telecom 
Bramatea 
Brunswick 
.E 


16W 161* : 
lOW 14W i 
6W 6W 
20V# 19% I 
33W 324# I 
45 449# 
251# 247# 
13V# 13*. 

22 Vj 22 
082 083 
99# 9* 

64# 6W 
<95 <90 
29V 29* 


3 Ion Pacific 30V# 20V# | 
an Tire a lit# 10*3 


a 


ra 


CL ind B 
ClrranJox 
Comlnco 
Conwest EjoH 
gSAMq fA 
Dofosco 

Dylr* A 

Ectw Bay Mines 


Equity Silver A 
FCA Inti 


P 

F«a)ndA 


10 17V# . 
385 XBS . 

9 9 ! 

<7» Vk 
2\V# 2IP# 
24 Ik 24V# 

10 10 
18%b 18%fc 
0-77 0JV 
T4%# 14V# 
078 050 
» » 
6M 6%# 


Fletcher Chall A 169# 16%h 


U.S. FUTURES 


Yo *»uu »4ftw 


June 29 


FPI 
Genfre 
GuH Ota Res 
Honlntl _ 

Hernia Old Mines mv 12. 
Hoi linger 14 I4U. - 


5>A 5 

045 flA 
445 4.40 
13 13 


Horsham 
Hutson's Bay 
imasco 
inco 

I PL Energy 
Jarmock 
Latialt 
LobtawCo 
Mackenzie 
MosnaintlA 
Maple Leaf 
Marl time 
Mark Res 
Molson A 
Noma Ind A 
Noratdo Inc 

Noronda Forest 

Novo Corn 
Oshawa 
PDBurtnA 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petralaum 
PWA Core 
Ravrock 
Renolsnnce 
Regers B 


RavaJ BaikCan 
Sceptre Res 
5c»trs Hasp 
Seagram 
Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sherrm Gordon 
SH LSysf eunttse 
Soultam 


stem a 
T alisman Enera 
TeckB 
Thomson 
Toronto Damn 
Too tar b 
T ronsalfa Util 
TrortsCdaPIpe 
Triton Flnl A 
Trimac 
TrlzecA 
Unkbrp Energy 


19W 19W 
269# 26U 1 
3JV# 33 I 
334# 33 V« , 
2BV4 28 Vt , 
I5VS IS 
20V* TOta 
2016 20 

8 7%#j 

57 55 = 

11%# 11 H» 
72Vi 23 • 

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20+i 30 • 

SV# 5V# . 
2 THi 239# . 
11U 111# 
14 14 

389# 381# . 
10^# IM* 
191# T9 
XV. 3JB 
29%h 29W 
9%# 914 | 
X47 04J 
171# 17V# 
281# 279# • 

19%# m# 

73U 71V# 
27V# 269# 

13 121# 
TV# 7V. 
411# 411# 
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«S1# 41 . 

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17V* 1714 I 
14V# 14k# 
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2614 2*1# 
2314 2214 
151# 149# | 


70'A 199# 
739* 23VU • 
14 1314 
169# 161# . 
370 3#* 

14 UVa\ 
083 083 
N.Q. 1881 


Zurich 


AtUOMlIIB »6 221 

Alieutssefinew 641 642 
BBC Brwn Bov B 1173 1170 


CibaGetgy B 
CStMdiMnB 
Ejektraw B 
FScfterB 
intenitocuunt B 
Jeimon b 
L andis Gyr R 
Moevonph* B 
Nestle R 

Oertlk. Buehne R 
n Hid B 
. . _Hda PC 
Safra Republic 
SondnB 
Schindler 8 
Sober pr 
Surveillance B 
SWISS Br* Corp& 
Swiss Ret nsur R 
Swtsooir R 
UBS B 
Winterthur B 


BOS 700 . 

s a 

1310 1265 
2170 2150 
850 625 
MA 800 . 
423 421 
1131 1126 
139 ISO-’, 
1570 1570 
6400 OK 

113 no ' 

708 712 
7500 7550 
865 866 
1955 1905 
399 JW 

773 770 

UN 1174 
NA 705 


Zurich Ass S NA 1325 


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115 

115ft -0J3+ 

6488 

15TJ 

3J2 Septa 3JSVi 

UFA 

123 ft 

324 ft— OJMft 164)10 

165 

3® Dec 94 3J7 

139 V, 

13IV. 

134'a -0JLP4 3441D 

3J4U) 

327 Mor 95 1409: 


139 


4J59 

356 V> 

3.14 V: May 95 



3J4 

-003 

91 

142 V. 

111 Jul 95 119 

124 

119 

123 

—0.01 

406 


Decta 



143 


3 

Esl. sates NA Top's, sates 

IX44I 





Tim's com ir4 5X36* Ofl 1323 








3J5 

257 Jul *4 3JB 

130 

337ft 

3J8'6 — UJ2Vi 

SJ5D 

OJSVi 

3J3K 5ep94 3J8W 

130 V. 

128 

128ft -OJ7V> 11,785 

.340 

HIViDec w 3J5V» 

138 

135ft 

136 ft— OJJIV 

94M 

X57V. 

125 Mor95 3J8 

140 

3J7V1 


XS17 

3MYi 

ITlKMovta 




25 

133%. 

llawJuin 



123 

*0JO 

150 

EsL sates NA Tors soles 

1X909 





Toe's open im »J41 up 6*9 





CORN 

(CBOTl 5-000 Ixi minurium- ddBtaTfci^ 



11615 

141 Jill 94 X53 

2® 

X4* 

24*V#— 111** 39JD4 

1H 1 * 

X40 Sep 94 X49 

X49 

X42ft 

243 


2.77 

2J4V.DK 94 X43W 

X44W 

2J» 


2J2W 

242VSMcr95 XS0W 

X5IV# 

146ft 


IBS 

X48WMOV95 356 

157 

2J2 

X53ft— 0J9ft 

2J31 

XH5Vi 

2® Jul 95 2®V# 

xm 

2J4 

2J*ft-X09'(i 

3J«J 

X70Vi 

IM Sep 95 3®W 

150 ft 

148 

248 

-QJSft 

15* 

X43 

2J5V»Dk95 X43%s 

2.43ft 

m 

241ft— 005 

4,139 

ESL sales NA Tue'vsmes 

91,7® 





Tup'S Open M 23X393 Off 2308198 





SOYBEANS (CBCm unh.nMiun-a»n»l»M 




<72 

6J»ft 




7J5 

638 Aug 94 *® 

<69 

6J7 

6J7V* — X21 

35430 

7.0815 

<17 Sep 94 <53 

<56 

<44 

<4*ft — X2DV- 1X577 

7J7V4 

SJSWNbvM Ml 

<45 

<J3 

<35 

-Oil ft 74465 

7® 

<13 Jon 95 <49 

&®ft 

<«l 

640ft— 023 

<523 

7J5 

<18 Mtvta *54 

<5Sft 

64* 

<46 

-X31 

1907 

7J5Mi 

<21 Mov«<5*y. 

<58 V. 

<49ft 

6® 


2477 

7MVt 

<24 Jul 95 <60 

<63 

6® 

<53 


2J3I 

*50 Vi 


<19 

<1SV# 

<17 

— 006 

1425 

tad. sales NA Tito's, sues 

*2J*9 





Tik's open im 1S<*IB up 10001 





SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT1 lnns-doeoraiwMi 



230® 

18520 Jul 94 195® 

19100 

191® 

ira 


223® 

18SJ0AUB94 194® 

195® 

19X30 

19340 

—5® 19,954 

3«® 

10.10 Sep 94 794® 

194® 

191® 

19X40 

— <30 14403 



19100 


189.90 



209® 

17X88 Dec 94 m® 

192® 

188® 

189® 

—6® 19,101 

307® 


>91® 


189 M 


1,711 

707® 


192® 

19X50 

190® 


3.152 

207® 

1B1®Mov9S 193® 

193® 

19X00 

198® 

-6® 

792 

306® 

182® Jill 95 192® 

192® 

190® 

19X30 



Esl. sales na Tue'xsatas 






Tup's open W T7M7 atf 306 





SOYBEANOg. ICBOT) An 

*n- doacr* per 

aotn. 





2<m 

K53 




3X65 

31.65 Aug 94 2k80 

76.90 

2<S9 

2<*4 




26® 

36® 



19 J4 

2X10 Od 96 26*0 

2M5 

2640 

2X43 

—842 

<903 

3X87 

22® Dec 94 3640 

26® 

Z<16 

*+27 

-036 24,787 

38J5 

72J6 Jon 95 36J5 

1640 

26® 

2X23 

-03* 

2491 

2X30 

2<7dMlor V5 2630 


M.I5 




28® 

2462 MOV 95 36® 


3X16 




37® 

344* Jul 95 2625 





386 

7720 

2S®Auo95 28.15 

2<L5 

axis 

26.15 


37 

Esl. scries NA Turs. scries 

1X537 





Tub's open W 79.753 ofl 1039 






Livestock 




ram n n-nnrni aaniw. 

Ortknn, 





73® 

*145 Aw 94 *135 

6175 

6107 



74.10 

ASJOOdta 67® 

6X10 

67® 




67® Dec 94 6X65 

*9® 

6845 



7425 

67® Feb 95 *175 

&7C0 

6847 

6XW 




M® Are « tax. 

7X12 

*9® 




47® 

66® Jun 95 6X70 

67.15 

*Su70 

*<72 

+BJ7 

779 

67.40 

66® Aug « 



AX45 

— OlOS 

55 

Est. series 14L401 Tup's, aate 

2M1I 




Tue'sopwiim 7# 594 us i less 





PKDBturflf (ffinn 







71.10 Auo 94 73® 

74.10 

73® 

7190 



81 J0 

7T®Stpta 72.90 

7142 

71W 

73 K 

+05) 

2.797 

8US 

70.95 Oct 94 73.05 

7167 

73® 

7340 

+X5J 


88® 

7X40NOVM 7X95 

74® 

7335 

7447 

+OA5 


7130 

72J5Moy9S 



73.10 

-025 

9 

58.95 

72.95 Jan H 74® 

7490 

7447 

74® 

+0® 

591 



71» 

7190 




76J5 

7X45 Aorta 7125 

7135 

7125 

7X35 

>035 

ICO 

Est. sate 1472 TUP'S lei,™ 






Tup’s open Ini MJ34 ofl 272 





HOGS (CMER) 4QJ00P&- c«vtp«r fc. 





553? 

tUDJMta M® 

S<97 

4640 

*6® 

+110 

<577 

534 

44® ADO 94 4540 

4170 

45U5 

4547 

+007 


49J5 

43.75 Od 94 4X70 

cite 

4343 

4X72 



SX® 

4137 OK 94 43® 

43.W 

4175 

4X87 



SO® 

42®Fe*>95 4X55 

42J0 





48® 

40.90 Apr 91 41 JJ 

4X10 

*1.77 




47® 

47® Jun 95 47 JS 

47® 

4X95 

47® 



49® 

46® Jul 95 47® 

4735 

47® 

*7J» 

—025 

75 

46® 

46® Auo 95 46® 

4635 

45® 

45.90 



EsLsries 4®Z Tue'xsates 

<366 





Tub's open ini 34.174 oH S72 





PORK BELLIES (OHU tototeat.- otowk 




37®to3f4 37 JO 

HIS 

37.11 




11.15 

».10Feb95 4X45 

46® 

4155 




saw 

9® Mar 95 4170 

45.70 

4540 

45.® 



n® 

42®Mnyi5 47® 

47.90 

47® 




5Z.00 

37JSJul« 37 JO 

3X45 

37 JO 


-045 


5X25 

4<®AU««$ 



4^til 



16® 

45®Julta 47® 

H® 

47® 

48® 



Esl. sates 1*37 Toe's, scass 

<asB 





TueHonmint 7416 olf 337 







Season Season 
Hoh Law 


Open Halt Low dost Chg Opm 


I LSD 
1X10 
1X06 
1X02 
11.90 
11J0 


■09 OOM TUB 

9.17MCT9S 1 1 Al 
ID-57 MOV *5 1IJ7 
I0J7JUI95 11J3 
ID.57 Oct *5 1183 
HUH Mar 96 1187 


ITJ6 

1141 

11-38 

IU3 

1183 

1187 


11-» 1143 -HUM M.W7 

1IJ2 11J8 TBjm 

1130 1133 — 803 <401 

IU3 1188 —802 1.992 
1182 -002 875 


1133 


Ed. sate 16^84 TiWs. srtes 
Tue~sopenl nt 1 05^97 on 38 83 
COCOA (MCSE) igiMMcim-iw 


1187 1183 -oar 


79 


1466 

999JUIM 

1250 

12SD 

1485 

1030 Septa 

1273 

IBM 

1507 

10*1 OKta 

1220 

ires 

1540 

1077 Mor 95 

1366 

130 

1570 

1078 May 95 

1390 

1390 

1993 

1ZS Jul 95 

WB8 

M0S 

1350 

1265 Sep 95 



IDO 

1390 MCK 

1460 

1460 

1563 

13® Mar 96 




1Z43 1250 +2 291 

1267 1277 —2 34326 

1310 1319 — 1 1X731 

1360 1357 -3 7816 

1381 —8 3.194 

MB3 — 3 2897 

M2J -3 1.T4B 

1456 -3 A04I 


1388 

1408 


1460 


Est. tales 5817 Tub's sales 5J89 
Tup's open Hit 66^96 off «B 
ORANGE JUICE [NCTNJ lUoain^c 


14 


B5J0JUIM 0985 89 JO 

89.05 Sep 94 9385 9X75 

91. 10NOV 94 94.15 9685 

9485 Jon 95 99.15 W8S 
97 A0 Mar 95 laxoa 10200 
9TOON10V95 W OO 10400 
104JDJul95 10600 10600 
10500 Sep 95 
Nov 95 

Est.iales na Tue’i.Mdes 3J01 
Tue'sapenlnt 34JZ7 up 158 


13500 

134J0 

13400 

13X00 

13485 

11485 

11900 

mjD 


8665 
9040 
9340 
9665 
9905 
iai oa 
10600 


•60S — X35 3L284 
9045 -2AS 1X010 
9170 • — X2B 2J«1 
9645 -285 3JZ7 
9905 — 280 1JB1 
101 JO — X50 T26 

nasi -xso 33 
nru® -iso 
■10500 —2.50 


Metals 


MGRADECOPPeR (NCMX) KOiUr 
11*35 


I14J5 

11200 

111J0 

111J0 

11185 

10*40 

10X40 

11180 


7*00 Jan 95 

7300 F* 95 


7685 May 95 


10840 77.1 D Sep W 


11110 

hub 

10X50 

9X85 

99 JO 

11040 


8800 DeC 95 

8BJD Jwt*6 

6X70 Mar 96 

91.70 Apr 96 


Food 


come 1NC3E) SJOOtoL 

-£MKBW1> 




100® 

64® Jul 9* 1«® 

191® 

16*J0 

18X75 

• 1X45 

600 

17X75 

6X50 Sep 94 17X13 

200® 

1*8® 

189 JB 

* 1X90 2X923 

141® 

77.l0DecW 15020 

ISO® 

150® 

1 50® 

1 9® 12419 

13X60 

JXWMnrta 



*50.10 

• 9® 

<015 

136® 

82® Mav 95 



151® 

-9® 

1.10* 

130® 

8100 A4 ta 131® 

in® 

151® 

1RJW 

+9® 

3*4 

125® 

89® seata 



151® 

+9® 

31 

Esi. safes 

15461 Tue^. sates 

1X420 




Tito's open M 514*7 up 849 





SUGAR-WORLD 11 MCSE) iiLMh- ow*i 

HI* 



12® 

9.15 JUlW IT®' 

1141 

1143 

11® 

_ ojp 

4455 


Tun's ocm int 50AH i» 32 
SAVER WCMX) SPaohova. 
5B65 371 JO Jut 94 5250 

5580 MOAugW 

5905 3765 Sep 94 S39J 

597.0 mo Dec 94 537J 

5640 4010 Jan 95 


6065 
6100 
61 SO 
8280 
5750 
61BO 


55*0 


4700 JU *5 
4910 Sep *5 
5390 Dec 95 5740 
5750 Jan 96 
5800 Mar 96 


iVTTt 

■QnCj 

inm 

tais 

8488 

i [>i * <f 

El' 1 *!*.’! 

107® 

+030 34®! 

■ 1 


saxio 

♦are 

7®* 




+ B® 

325 



10545 

+0® 


10540 

105® 

10S.1H 

+035 




rat® 

+0J5 

114 

104® 

IF 

WHO 

+0J5 

m 



10&® 

+XZ5 

AD 

mm* 


raua 

+0JS 

SM 

107.15 

1B7.I5 

10X75 

+8® 


10640 

10X80 

10X40 

+0® 




103® 

+035 




10X88 

+0JS 

*1 



102® 

+X35 




1D4JS 

+8JS 

74 

18,136 




OM&pertm'Df. 

53DJ) 521 J 325.1 




52X0 

—44 



S26J 

5794 

—44 73453 

54X0 

5360 

537.1 

-40 20393 



5384 

-xn 

32 

549.0 

54X0 

545J 

—44 


S50J 


55X6 

—44 

X572 

4WO 

59.0 

S54J 

—40 

2.912 

S61J 





STM 

SOJI 

571 J 

—44 

LOW 


Est.iales 38000 Tue's.5 


SX7B3 


Tim's open M 12L877 ofi 2717 
PLATMUM (HM0O airarcL-Mtnnr 
43700 3S7 00 Jul « 39800 399 JD 3970 


40500 3&U0OCIM 402JO 403.90 40100 

429.50 374flOJrei*5 40608 40680 «600 

«X0O 39000 Are- 93 40900 40900 40900 

EP.mes NA Tim's. soles <307 
Tim's Oden int 32J29 ofl 378 
GOLD (NCMX) MOinwae-oalkniiermnraz. 
38600 38600 Jui 94 

41500 341 JO Aug 94 38650 387 JO 3SSJ0 

41700 34*00 Od 94 38X50 390JO 38U0 

42650 34L00DCC 94 39X50 39X50 39140 

41100 3A3JDFeb9S 

41700 364JDAPTV5 

428-50 36180 JUn 95 

41X50 SaOJOAUOfS 

41X30 410800095 

*7*00 400 JD Dec 95 41500 415JU 41100 

424L50 4TX50 Fab 96 

43600 42630 Apr 96 

Est.sdes 2S4M Tim's. scOas 30J77 
TUPS open W 14*851 off 61H 


*100 X2M 


♦1.10 
+ 140 1832 
+140 L325 


39610 
399 JO 


MO 

41100 

41500 

419.10 


—180 

—140 74868 
—148 5,921 
—140 35832 
— 140 7JM 
-140 5,6*3 
—140 MJ.197 
—140 1414 
-140 14R 
—140 5.153 
-140 888 

—140 410 


Financial 


MSI 

U 

9 

1 


UST.BRJ-S ICHBQ simnw-Htorwepa 

9688 9841 Sap 94 95.14 9SJ0 95.16 9517 —002 31,957 

96.10 $4J5DecM 94-58 9444 M_5# 9*42 8460 

'“*.«■»}*»« fCO MS NX NJ -Ml 969 
Est. idea 3,15* TUB'S. bc4rj 38SS 
Tue'sapenlnt 31894 off mb 

SYR. TREASURY (CBOD ugjBprVyobittngeiBaai 

110- 195102-13 Sap 94 103-26 103-31 K23-323 HD-2K+ 03 164,140 

ID*- 1 8 Ml -54 Dec 94 1 83-01 103-045 103-00 1(0-045+ 05 M 

Ed.uiK NA. Toe's, ados 4X614 

Tim s Boon m l 179835 up 3663 

If ^ Y iinnertn-Hs&aMsnlMBecI 

115-01 101-18 ScpM HU-19 103-30 HU-15 ICG- 24 + 06 mm 

114- 31 100-25 Dec 94 102-20 (02-31 102-20 IK-26 t " 

111- 09 100-05 Mar 95101-25 101-31 101-25 fOI-31 t 

105-22 99-20 JunfS 101-M ni-07 101-04 101-07 + 

101-06 10ILM Sap 95 100-17 100-79 100-17 100-19 + 

Est. SaHB NA Toe's. soUs 91,104 
TuCsaoenM jojjb up 313* 

US TREASURY BONDS (CSOT1 ata-uiuBmi4 ai i i aiM#ai 
;►» W-12 tapot 109-09 102-26 101-31 IB-17 + I » 361410 

118-08 91-19 DK 94HH-I7 102-01 101-08 HI I -35 + - 

S"! 4 «»«lin-4J4 1 01-11 100-20 101-03 + 

115- 19 90-15 Jim 95 100-U + 

•13-15 99-00 Sep 95 99-28 t 

113- 14 98-27 Dec 95 99-n + 

114- 06 98-23 Mcr96 , 

*0-17 90-14 Junta 90-17 t 

Est lotos NA TUT5SOIM 4HUS6 
TiWicpenk* 412J77 alt 3701 
JWMCMPALBONDS (ONTO »l« l «i n d B *i*»03»imqi 
98-17 06-13 Septa 89-10 09-33 80-24 BF10 t 

98-27 88-10 Dec 94 88-22 * 

fftldes NA Tufisam 113* 

Ws Open tot 3<45B up 268 
EURODOUAKS (ON si miotn <uitmspct 
9U70 taJ60Sep94 MJIB 94730 74470 94490 

*0.710 Dec *4 94820 9404 9X970 94480 
10.240 Mor 93 9X730 fflJTB. 91600 9X740 
9X710 An 95 91400 91660 93800 93840 
9IJ1DSa95 91100 7X240 9X170 9JJ10 
91.180DK 95 9X930 9X01! 7X9W 9X970 
90.730 Mk 96 9X8*0 9X960 921880 9X930 


V 


«M1 

wn 

U26 

IM 


13 


IM 

W 2X439 
09 11 


91110 


94730 


*<280 

94230 


-38450,116 
414409 
+1030026 
+ 10221473 

+ 10*02447 

+3)1*1410 
♦ M 131 ,900 


Season Season 
Htoti low 


Own Hum Low, Gtaeo Cho OftW, -> 


9X180 9X780 Junta 9X790 92860 9X790.. 9X830 + 7ntm ,*y - 

Est s«e* 368.779 Tue-urfes <23797 . • •; .c?- 1. 

Tup's opwimt X531865 ud ®*s .. 

BRITISH POUND (CMCR) s «r *«*■»• t uUHOunnams- : ; .s:, - 

1JB60 18*40 Sep M 1JW0 IJJ44 1J42S L5442 -4* 3fW». . ; / 


irao <7205 *n JWtfsi-.:-; 

.'OJlfiT-'ATMT- +2X1481?*— 
0J115 07122 - +S8. UT.X ■ 


18500 Decta !JS» IJ51B IJ422 1J436 
1ja» T.46«Mar9fi~ 1J452 —SB 

Est. tales 11888 Tup's. »*» 9JM ' . 

Tito'S OPtolW 39,103 W 1T77 -- -■-■ 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (06DI} tpercto-IntaieaiMilbOdm * 

0J780 OJQBSepta 0J190 07216 

07670 ' 0.7836 DKSU B7MS 07570 

87605 QjnOMarOS 07125 0712s 

87322 04990 Jun95 8780 07880 07887. 87879 

07168 U4M5 Septa 07036. 

Est soles £145 Tub's, sates 34*8 
Tub's open im 40US1 UP TI9 

(CMER) sowmark- l BOk# Mitel fMOM 

OJtaa QJ600SBPM OJlta 04HO BjOU 84318 —19 BMC . 

04353 0J59ODBCM 0631) 84338 (LOD7 06317 -U V 

06315 0J»Jan« • (SAW — 16, . 

Sep 95 'iU3a 

06355 0J8TOMir96 . 043*1 -47 

En.iatoi <1792 TUP’S, smes 344*9 -,;t 

YUS'# open #8 9X044 UP 5233 ■ _ ■ 


435 09 rt: 

+»- '.artr.f..- 


IBl.-f A 


JAPANESE YEN (C6AER) Suer yen- 1 MrawprtMMQIOOr 

ojim i3ub8W2Sbp 9 * Qjno 8 «uii 02 i»Miin*a.aMBiM +ui i 

BjDI0145DJ)i»S2SDK*l DJJMWDaOMM60JnDiai*U102BS 4(45: MK&^> J 
QiV: a9au»7776jun 95 aaiMZft0104SajntWB(KniJ667 +152 ,1 

ooiazmoaHBHAar MOAmuajorossDjmuajnaon - + i*r *sazr-= 

Est soles <1738 Toe's. s«0es 22310 ■■ >' . 

TtortraonM 6SJ91 W J<5^ 


» rnr MwlNH untotoiemei 


87589 08400 SepH 07536 0759 0X09 .07513 
07603 86885 DK 94 07546 07358 07515 07532 -SO ■ TBOS-V ; 
07605 97598 JNm 95 . 117310 -K'-.SV:^ 

OJSn 07*35Mor96 87339 87380 07589' 07399. -J7. 

Ed. sates 19J1S- Tup’s. sales 1X079 . 

TUe'stsitn tot 51427 up J1S) 


Industrials 


COTTON! (NCTNJ juntos.- cm writ 
BUS 5U0JulM 71 JO - 7X00 7065 ' 7065 
77J»AuoW 7X90 7X90 . 7X90 7U0 


7BJD 
7RA8 
77 JS 
78.15 
7X55 
71781 
7470 
7X80 


59J!OCl« 7XJ1_ IM 0 7135 71.3 


5948 DK 91 08 3X98 71 M 

<250 Mar 95 1X58 . 7195 7295.“ TUB 


SMoy 95 7(21 ' 7470 7278; 7155 
I Jul H 7X18 ■ 7SJ0 ' 7486-- 74® 


TOlSSJuI 

7L80OCI95 72J0 72J0 7154 7X36 
- 71 .65 Dec 95 7175 7130 -7175- -7135 

E*t sates HMD TWtxsales 15.900 
TUP^retoiH 464*1 Off 5SS 


57 JO 


57.17 
57 JO 
5130 
59 JO 
6X25 
5875 


41J8JUI94 4970 SUB 49J0 

4270 AW 91 -30J8- J0J3 “ «JB 
43J0Sa>M 5070 5145 5070 

44900094 5160 5X20 5X25 

MJONwM 5X45 5SJ0 5XK 

4XB0DK94 5345 5290. 5XM 

437SJBJS5 54.00 5440 5135 

«95FK95 500 5430 ’5375 


57 JO 47 JO Mar 95 5X00 S.00 SUB 

55® CJSAwta 

5U5 47^0 May *5 

51 jW <679 Junta 

5170 47JSJol« . 

5175 4740 Aug 95 

S0J5 4B455sp« ‘ 

SUB 52*0095 

5X90 5290NUVK 

SMS SUD Dk 95 

EM-srtes NA tub's. sates 297*4 
Tte'ac psplnf 13X09J off 760 
LIGHT SWBETOniDG fNMER) 1 J 60 . . 
ZL7X K35Aug9* W» W JS UTS 

1458 Sep 94 It® UJB IMS 

I <65 Oct 94 1848 1835 IXH. 

1482 N(W 94 1831 Hi 19J0- 

l<*3DeCW 1X17 W3B- TJSV 
15.15 Join 1XU 1X14 1730 


0'^ 

vj- 


rJ 3 " 


L» ,, i U 


jrv fc -‘ .. 




cc^;.r 

H‘% !i 


!>L ; * >» 

-A--: i '• 

of ‘ ;s 

£yy 
fur. ■':•••' 
ai3!i-' " - 
cii!:-' 1 '- ' 
Eni-:' 
ear::--' 

He r 

fi 

it'll.'- 

d 

of:, r-itf^; 
raV+rr T 1 . 


Oca* 
er-r:' t.; 
ha)i -■ ■ 
chio: 

Uu • 


Wt 


Heirs:** - 


Is 


ji, ; :: - 






1;-. : 


if* r’ 




13078 
2073 
12069 
20 ® 
1X53 
1 1940 
2066 
19J8 
1 1973 
28® 
1BJ8 
1898 
1*94 
19.17 
18® 
28® 
21.15 
17J7 


IMBFebH 1X0* 18.12- |>J4 


1542 Mix 95 18® . 10® . . 

1 £55 Apr 95 1735 17® . 1772 
1569 MOV 9S 17* 18® 1772 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 


Page 11 


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Ford-Werke 
Expects Return 
To Profitability 


Crest: Not the New Wave? 


Krupp Sees 
Break-Even 


FrwiWurt 

DAX 


Loudon ■ ", 
FTSe loq'lncte* 


Parts . 

CAC4Q 


London’s System Faces Competition Result for 

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LONDON — The slock exchange here is market makers and the stock exchange. / % 1 1 A| 

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Compiled In- Our Staff From Dispatches 

COLOGNE — Ford-Werke 
A G, the German unit of Ford 
Motor Co., on Wednesday fore- 
cast a 10 percent rise in sales 
and a return to profit this year, 
helped by strong sales of its 15- 
month-old Mondeo midsized 
model. 

Albert Caspers, the chief ex- 
ecutive of Ford-Werke, said the 
company made a "considerable 
profit" in the first half of 1994, 
which should ensure a profit for 
the full year. 

Ford-Werke predicted sales 
would rise to 23 billion Deut- 
sche marks (S14 billion) from 
21.2 billion DM last year. First- 
half sales rose 9 percent, to 12 
billion DM, and unit sales rose 
15 percent, to 538,000 vehicles. 

"Ford-Werke has achieved 
the turnaround," Mr. Caspers 
said. “It is driving out of the 
trough and gaining speed." 

Last year, Ford-Werke cut its 
net loss to 132 million DM, from 
469.3 mill ion DM in 1992. Mr. 
Caspers said the loss had been 
caused by putting aside 300 mil- 
lion DM against the possibility 


of a further downturn in the Eu- 
ropean car industry. 

The Mondeo. which will be 
built and sold in the United 
States this year as the Ford 
Coutour and Mercury Mys- 
tique, was launched in the 
spring of 1993 as Ford's first 
"global car," a model that could 
be sold around the world with 
only minor styling adjustments 
to suit regional tastes. 

In the first half of this year, 
Mondeo accounted for 230,000 
of the 538,000 cars Ford sold in 
Europe. 

Claes Goransson, the chief 
financial officer at Ford-Werke, 
also reiterated Ford Motor Co. 
statements that the company 
was discussing closer coopera- 
tion with Mazda Motor Corp., 
the only major Japanese car- 
maker without production fa- 
cilities in Europe. Ford owns 25 
percent of Mazda. 

Ford-Werke also will cut 300 
jobs by year-end, bringing the 
work force to 43,500, Mr. Gor- 
ansson said. Last year the com- 
pany cut nearly 4,000 jobs. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 


Audi Sees Smaller Loss 
As Export Sales Rise 


Conpded by Oar Siafj From Dispatches 

INGOLSTADT, Germany 
—Audi AG, the luxury car unit 
of Volkswagen AG, said 
Wednesday its pretax loss in the 
first half of 1994 would be 93 
mihinn Deutsche marks ($59 
million), less than half the 198 
million DM loss in the year- 
earlier pesiod. 

Herbert Demel, the president 
of Audi, said the company 
could break even for the whole 
of 1994 as restructuring paid 
off. The company posted an 89 
minio n DM loss for all of 1993. 

"The financial situation con- 
tinues to be sohd and has consid- 
erably improved from the first 
half of 1993,” Erich Schmitt, 
chief financial officer, said. 

The company said sales in 
the first half rose 3.6 percent, to 


63 billion DM, while produc- 
tion rose 2.7 percent, to 175,700 
units. 

Saks in Germany fell 10 per- 
cent, but foreign sales rose near- 
ly 25 percent, the company said. 
Saks m Europe outside Germa- 
ny rose 14.7 percent, to 84,000. 

The share of the German 
market held by Audi feQ to 4.6 
percent from 5.5 percent in the 
first half of 1994. 

The number of vehicles deliv- 
ered in the first half fell 2.6 
percent from the first half of 
last year, to 190,300. 

Mr. Demel said Audi would 
take over management of its 
own distribution network by 
the end of 1994 u> respond to 
customer needs more quickly. 

(Bloomberg, AFP) 


Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — The slock exchange here is 
preparing to celebrate the start of an electron- 
ic system called Crest that will settle transac- 
tions in 10 days instead of two or three weeks. 

Taking the edge off the party, though, is 
this: Crest was developed by outsiders, and it 
will be slower than the settlement programs 
already in place on the Paris and Frankfurt 
exchanges, which want to replace London as 
Europe’s largest stock market. 

Eight years after the "Big Bang" in which 
Britain's financial markets were deregulated, 
the pace of global financial c han ge and ad- 
vances in computer technology threaten to 
unde rmin e London's slock exchange. 

The Big Bang was accompanied by (he 
introduction of SEAQ, or Stock Exchange 
Automated Quota dons, an electronic com- 
puter system that replaced floor trading. 

SEAQ also opened opportunities for com- 
panies to provide faster and more sophisticat- 
ed tools for buying and selling shares. 

But the evidence suggests that the London 
Stock Exchange, which has managed the Lon- 
don market for three centuries, has not been 
able to keep up with the change. 

Fifteen months ago, the exchange aban- 
doned its own ambitious electronic settlement 
project, called Taurus, after an investment of 
£400 million ($619 million). 

Hie exchange’s new system. Crest, which 
was developed by the Bank of England, will 
not match the five-day settlement process 
that is to be used in Paris and Frankfurt 
before the end of the year. 

Also by that time, the Amsterdam Stock 
Exchange is scheduled to introduce a comput- 
er-based trading system designed expressly to 
recover business from London. 

Meanwhile, Nasdaq, the New York-based 
computerized exchange, is seeking a partner 
to establish a screen-based trading system for 
shares in small and midsized European com- 
panies. But London has rebuffed the U.S. 
exchange. 

As if all that were not enough, a small 
British computer company, Tradepoint Fi- 
nancial Networks PLC, is introducing an eq- 
uity trading network to operate in direct com- 
petition to the one run by the London 
exchange. The launch date for the open, easy- 
to-use network, which investors can reach via 
personal computers, is July 18. 

“Tradepoml has brought to London a North 
American technology known as the ‘fourth 
market,' r> John Packet!, an analyst with the 
brokerage concern T. Hoare & Co., said. 

Until now, the London stock market has 
been dominated by market makers, who ef- 
fectively decide share prices by publishing on 
the SEAQ system the prices at which they are 
prepared to buy and sell. 

Since SEAQ’s introduction, investors have, 
depended cm the system for stock pricing and* 


have thus been under the control of London's 
market makers and the stock exchange. 

Tradepoint brings to the London market a 
parallel stock trading network outside the 
exchange’s control. 

Tradepoint, which raised 7.3 milli on Cana- 
dian dollars ($5 million) in an initial public 
offering on the Vancouver Stock Exchange in 
March 1993, aims to have SO customers at its 
launch date and between 300 and 500 within 
five years. 

Its attraction is the provision of an auction- 
driven market. Tradepoint is. in effect, a large 
order book into which users submit their bids 
and offers anonymously. The computer sys- 
tem executes orders automatically. It does not 


The new system will be 
slower than existing 
programs in Paris and 
Frankfort, which aim to 
replace London as Europe’s 
largest stock market. 


rely on prices posted by market makers, in- 
stead finding a midpoint price for a trade by 
matching the bid and offer prices tendered by 
buyers and sellers. 

Because the SEAQ price is also quoted on 
computer screens, its users can still place 
trades through SEAQ if it offers a better deal. 

Tradepoint is less expensive than SEAQ. It 
will charge commissions of 0.1 percent of a 
trade’s value, about half the co mmis sion 
charged by traditional market makers. Like 
SEAQ, it will operate 24 hours a day. 

One of the chief selling points for the Tra- 
depoint system is that it provides liquidity for 
stocks that do not often trade. 

In recessionary times, market makers like 
S.G. Warburg, Barclays de Zoete Wedd, 
Nat West Securities and UBS Ltd. have pulled 
out of the business of making markets in some 
small -company stocks. 

This has been exacerbated by a stock ex- 
change plan to merge the U nlisted Securities 
Market, the main market for s mall company 
stocks, with the main stock index in 1996. 
After that, many smaller companies would 
not be able to obtain a stock exchange listing 
in London. 

Competition to the traditional exchanges 
from these companies has the blessing of 
regulators eager to continue down the path of 
deregulation. 

"These new markets are dearly bringing 
benefits to investors and providing healthy 
competition to traditional exchanges,” said' 
Jonathan Agnew, former chief executive of* 
Kieinwort Benson Group PLC. 





Bloomberg Business News 

DORTMUND, Germany — 
The steelmaker Fried. Krupp 
AG Hoesch-Krupp said 
Wednesday it would have a 
mud) narrower operating loss 
for the first half of 1994 and 
forecast it would break even for 
theyear. 

Tne company said its first- 
half loss would be 50 million 
Deutsche marks ($32 million), 
compared with 320 million DM 
for the first sue months of 1993. 

In the first five months of the 
year, the sted and machinery 
concern said, sales were up 5 
percent from the corresponding 
period last year, while new or- 
ders rose 12 percent. It did not 
release exact figures. 

Krupp’s net loss more than 
.doubled in 1993, to 589 million 
DM from 250 milli on DM in 
1992, as its steel division had an 
operating loss of 780 million 
DM. 

"The course of business in 
the first few months of the cur- 
rent year gives grounds for cau- 
tious optimism," Krupp's chief 
executive, Gerhard Cromme, 
told shareholders at the annual 
meeting. 

Analysis said improved re- 
sults would depend on the com- 
pany’s ability to continue what 
Mr. Cromme called its “adjust- 
ments," which last year meant 
cutting its work force by 10,000. 
tojnst over 78,000. 

Mr. Cromme also told share- 
holders the company’s priority 
was a "rapid" restoration of the 
dividend, which has not been 
paid since 1992. To achieve this, 
he said, the company must re- 
store its troubled steel unit to 
profitability. 

As well as falling steel prices 
and weak demand, Krupp last 
year had to cope with the costs 
and organizational challenge of 
forging a angle unit from the 
steel operations of the former 
Friedrich Krupp GmbH and 
Hoesch AG. which merged in 
December 1992. 

Last year, 76 percent of 
Krupp's sales were made in 
Weston Europe. This month, 
the company announced that it 
would reorganize parts of its 
steel business. 


exchange " ■ /index 
' Amsterdam 

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London 

Ijondwq 


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777452' 

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= -.CA04O. 


: index. 


^ Zurich. SBS 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 


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m 1^76 " +CUS: 

"••p.4 5£3* .rrrt 

SK-/--SSa3* • +Q.5S: 

bncTMUona] Herald Tr^Kmc 


Very briefly; 

• E2f Sanofi plans to sefl the medical imaging segment of Stating 
Winthrop, which it bought last week from Eastman Kodak Co_, to 
Hafshmd Ny corned AS for $450 million. 

• Enterprise 00 PLC intends to buy as much as 10 percent of 
Lasmo PLCs shares, in a move toward taking control of Lasmo. 

• EniGhem SpA, the Italian state-owned chemical company, said 
its losses narrowed in the first four months of 1994 amid a 7.2 
percent increase in revenue and a 10 percent decrease in costs. 

• Montedison SpA’s profit before taxes and financing charges was 
33 percent higher in the first five months of this year than a year 
earlier. The company had a net loss of 1.37 trillion lire ($870 
milli on) for all of 1993. 

• De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd.’s Central Selling Organiza- 
tion said sales of rough diamo nds in the first six months of 1994 
rose 1 3 percent from the comparable year-earlier period, to $2.58 
bilEon. Sales were up 42 percent from the last half of 1993. 

• The Bundesbank lowered its securities repurchase rate to 4.96 
percent from 5.00 percent last week and drained 2.8 billion 
Deutsche marks ($2 billion) from the banking system. 

Bhomberg, Reuters, AFX. AFP, AP 

Charter PLC to Acquire Esab 

Compiled be Otr Staff From Dispatcher percent of the voting Stock. 

LONDON — The industrial Charter also announced a 
group Charter PLC said new share issue of 1.1 billion 
Wednesday it would buy Esab kronor. 

AB of Sweden, one of the Charters share price jumped 
world’s largest welding equip- 7.5 percent in London after the 
ment manufacturers, for 3.1 bfl- announcement, 
lion kronor ($408 million). Charter’s bid, valued at the 

The board of Frafr h a«; voted equivalent of 345 kronor a 
to accept the offer, as has In- share, was 21 percent more than 
centive AB, which owns 43 per- the market price. Charter said, 
cent of the share capital and 49 (Bloomberg, AFP) 


II Monti 
ttgftLowSta* 


Kv Yld re 101b HMi low luted Orne 


Wd nirta y'i Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 



Den Danske Bank Changes Its Mind About Baltica Sale 


Bloomberg Business News 

COPENHAGEN (Bloomberg) — Den 
Danske Bank AS has suspended the sale of 
its controlling stake in Denmark’s largest 
insurer, Baltica Forsikring AS, in a move 
that could herald the largest-ever financial 
conglomerate in Denmark. 

Den Danske Bank said Wednesday it 
had temporarily dropped the idea of sell- 


ing its 32 percent stake in Baltica and bank to acquire the option was that the 
acquired an option to buy 23 percent of the move would give it control over the possi- 
insurance company — becoming effective- tile sale of Baltica. 
ly the parent company of Baltica. Baltica Forakring in 1993 had a- net 

On top of the 55 percent it thereby profit of 25 million kroner ($4 million), 
controlled, it would also control Baltica Den Danske Bank, Denmark’s largest 
Farakring’s holding of 27.7 percent of its banking group, posted profit of 2.4 billion 
own shares. kroner for 1993 and had total loans of 179 

Peter Straarup, group director of Den billion kroner and total assets of 356 bQ- 
D anafcc Bank, said the main reason for the lion at the end of 1993. 


A L S T H O M 


At the General Shareholders 1 Meeting of Alcatel Alsthom, 
the Paris based telecommunications energy and transport 
equipment group, held oo June 23, 1994, Pierre Suard, 
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, made the following 
remarks regarding the group's future and upcoming challenges: 


Ordinary and Extraordinary 
Shareholders' 

Meeting of June 23, 1994 


"As I stated last January. 1994 will be another difficult year, 
based on our sales expectations for the German and Italian 
markets, and the general impact of economic conditions on the 
group's activities. Looking at the volume of orders booked in 
the first months of 1994 and our commitment to maintaining 
high levels of research and development expenditures, we 
continue to forecast net income of 10-20% below the 1993 level." 
"This forecast announcement - which I felt was necessary in 
fairness to our shareholders - had a sharp impact on our share- 
price. The market primarily focused on estimated 1994 earnings 
while discounting the positive long-term outlook I had also 
mentioned. Since then, the stock price has remained depressed, 
under the added pressure of morose market sentiment over 
interest rate prospects. In addition, recent press commentary 
on the group has undoubtedly put further pressure on the share 
price." While noting that the Alcatel CIT case was still in 
litigation, Pierre Suard firmly denied allegations that the group 
had engaged in over-billing, issued false invoices, or maintained 
double accounting systems. 

The Chairman reported on the resolution adopted by the Board 
of Directors regarding this matter at its meeting on June 21, 1994. 
The Board of Directors deplored die attacks on the group's 
Alcatel CU subsidiary and its management arising from court 
findings regarding wrong doings by two of its employees. 

The two employees made certain accusations against Alcatel CIT. 
The Board of Directors noted that the company had provided 
evidences to the court which totally disprove these charges. 
Finally, die Board of Directors unanimously reaffirmed its 
confidence in its Chairman, Pierre Suard and rejected 
accusations against him as unfounded. 


The Chairman continued: '1 am sure that the good faith 
of our actions will eventually prevail. Nor will these stories 
deter us from pursuing our objectives. We wiD continue to focus 
our efforts on building fee group and preparing its future." 

"We stand at a critical time, where we must address 
the technological, commercial and geographic challenges that 
are fundamentally transforming our business environment" 
Among these major transformations. Pierre Suard emphasized 
the importance of current technological changes: 

"New technologies are emerging simultaneously, for the first 
time in history of telecommunications, in aD of the group's main 
areas: mobile communications, synchronous transmissions, 
broadband switching and multimedia; and also in gas turbines 
and high speed trains in energy and transport activities. 
Accompanying and contributing to these developments is 
intense competition among operators, reflecting widespread 
deregulation." 

Tt is for these reasons that Alcatel Alsthom is committed to a 
strategy of high research and development expenditures and 
extensive restructuring programs, maintaining a strong focus 
on objectives feat will ensure the group's long term success." 
The Chairman also underscored another major change, 
concerning geographical markets. 

"Markets outside of Europe offer tremendous growth potential 
in aD our areas of activity. It is also a feet that our activities in 
Europe are currently slowing down somewhat, particularly in 
tiie public telecommunications market Our European and in 
particular, French subsidiaries have been successful in entering 
new export markets, where their notable competitiveness has 
helped win significant orders. A large proportion of exports is 
directed toward the Chinese market. Alcatel Alsthom is also 
building a strong base for future growth in fee rest of Asia and 
the Pacific Rim, another emerging market whose population 
and market potential is equivalent to that of China." 

The General Shareholder's Meeting approved Alcatel Alsthom's 
1 993 financial statements and all proposed resolutions. 
Consolidated net income, net of minority interests, 
was FF 73. billion in 1993, unchanged from 1992. 

The General Shareholders Meeting also approved fee parent 
company accounts and a dividend per share of FF 15.00 
(net of "avoir fiscal" tax credit of FF 7.50). up from FF 14.50 
for 1992. From June 27 to July 22, 1994, shareholders may elect 
to take the dividend in the form of new shares based on a price ' 
of FF 534 per share. Cash dividends will be paid on 
July 29, 1994. 

Finally, the General Shareholders 1 Meeting approved 
the appointment of Jacques Friedmann to fee Board. 


Alcatel Alsthom contact: 

Media: Tel 33 (1) 40 76 12 03 - Fax 33 (1) 40 76 14 13 • Investors: Tel 33 (1) 40 76 10 68 - Fax 33 (1) 40 76 14 05 
























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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 


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Page 13 


ASIA/ PACIFIC 


Strong Yen 
Threatens Steel 
Sales to China 


Taiwan Seeks a Higher Profile 

But Old Ways Hinder Its Growth as a Business Center 


Investor’ 


Agmce France- Pmse 

TOKYO — Talks between 
Japanese steelmakers and Chi- 
nese importers have broken 
down, leaving the world’s big- 
gest producers threatened with 
loss of the world's most popu- 
lous market, industry execu- 
tives said Wednesday. 

The loss of Chinese business 
would be a severe blow to Japa- 
nese steelmakers already hit by 
the surging yen because China 
absorbs a major share of Japa- 
nese steel exports. 

A spokesman for Nippon 
Steel Corp. said biannual talks 
with Chinese importers bad 
broken down for the first time 
in 20 years, because of differ- 
ences over prices. 

Japanese steelmakers are 
pushing for steep price in- 
creases for ordinary steel prod- 
ucts to reflect the stronger yen 
and tight world supplies. But 
Chinese negotiators are refus- 
ing the spokesman said. 

The two sides also failed to 
reach agreement on the quanti- 
ty of ordinary steel shipments 
to China in die next six months, 
he said. 

Japanese steel industry exec- 
utives who have been in Beijing 
since mid-May are scheduled to 
return to Tokyo next week, 
where they will probably wail 
for an approach from China. 

Japan exported $2.96 billion 
of steel to China in the year 
ended in March, an 82 percent 
increase from the previous year. 

On top of the threat of losing 


the Chinese business, Japan 
faces suffer competition from 
South Korea, which has eaten 
into Japanese companies’ mar- 
ket share. 

Even some Japanese ship- 
yards and carmakers have said 
they would use small quantities 
of Korean steel. 

According to the newspaper 
Yoraiuri Smmbun, some mak- 
ers of electronic goods are con- 
sidering doing the same, after 
Korean makers undercut the 
lowest Japanese prices by 20 
percent. Sharp Corp. has con- 
firmed that it is among these 
companies. 

Hie Japanese steel industry is 
already running deep losses, 
with the live largest steelmakers 
having recently announced pre- 
tax losses totaling more than SI 
billion for the year that ended 
March 31. 


By Kevin Murphy 

International HeraU Tribune 

TAIPEI — Increasingly assertive in in- 
ternational trade and investment. Taiwan 
is campaigning to throw off its diplomatic 
isolation and transform itself into a re- 
gional center for business and finance. 

Senior officials are being pushed to- 
ward new industrial policies by several 
forces: their government's bid to join the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, 
a feared exodus of Taiwan-based multina- 
tional companies and a growing interest 
among foreign corporations in basing 
themselves in China rather than here. 

But without dramaiic changes to old 


"With or without reunification with Chi- 
na or a crisis in Hong Kong in 1997. we 
have to be prepared for greater competi- 
tion in the region.” 

Wildly escalating property costs and 
the uncertainty engendered by Hong 
Kong's return to Beijing rule in 1997 
could prompt executives there to consid- 
er Taiwan an alternative, analysts say. A 
highly-educated work force with strong 
cultural and family links with China are 
strong attractions, loo. 

“It’s very logical for us to be positioned 
here.” said Gene Carione. president of 


continuing ban on direct communica- 
tions, transport and most investments in 
China remain obstacles for foreign com- 
panies based in Taiwan. 

“Change will require major changes in 
Taiwan's administrative and financial 
structure as well as a complete overhaul 
of its mainland China policy,” said a 
Western diplomat who ins isted on ano- 
nymity. “Tne more one looks at it. the 
more problems appear.” 

An independent anal ysis carried out 
by foreign consultants commissioned by 
Taiwan’s government has brought the 
size of tbe task into dearer focus. 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

13000 

rv\ 
10000 1 \ 
9000 r' 
MOO 


J F M A M J 
1834 


Singapore 

Straits Times 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

2500 

22000 

3«0| A 

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2300 JW 

2 w»q (vyW 

2200 * V r * 

19000 M* * 

2100 W 

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1994 

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Exchange 


Hang Kong 
Singapore 

Sydney 

Tokyo 


Hang Seng 
Straits Times 

~Afl Ordinaries 
Nikkei 225 


Wednesday Prev 
Close Close Chang 

8.64031 8.673.49 -0.38 

2£1&41 2,227.60 -0.41 

1.975.10 1,974,40 +004 

20,481-00 20,639.23 077 

1.010.11 1.005.92 +032 

1,272.77 1 ,252.93 +1.58 

933.96 923.61 +1.12 

5,903,15 5374.58 +1.00 

2,731.49 2,740.72 -0-34 

457.34 462.41 -1.10 

138227 1379.11 +CU6 

t ,977.73 1,994.85 -0.85 


% 

Change 

-0.38 


policies that have guarded Taiwan's 
business interests and helped its econo- 


business interests and helped its econo- 
my prosper, foreign business executives 


and analysts say, Taiwan’s goals will 
remain elusive at besL 


■ Industrial Output Falls 

Industrial production in Ja- 
pan was 0.8 percent lower in 
May than it was in April and 1 .4 
percent lower than in May 
1993, the Ministry of Interna- 
tional Trade and Industry said 
Wednesday. 

It was the second consecutive 
monthly fall in the ministry’s 
index of mining and manufac- 
turing output, after a 1.9 per- 
cent drop in April and an in- 
crease of 4.6 percent in March, 
ministry officials said. 

The minis try forecast that in- 
dustrial output in June would 
rise by 1.9 percent from May. 


remain elusive at besL 

Creating a regional business center 
without air or snipping links to China 
and with light restrictions on visas to the 
mainland — the legacies of 45 years of 
political confrontation — will require 
some imagination. 

But Taipei appears determined. While 
it remains concerned that China will 
meddle in its affairs, it now appears to be 
placing less emphasis on trying to limit 
investment flows from Taiwan to Lhe 
mainland, focusing instead on how to 
benefit from them. 

“It’s not an option for us; it’s a neces- 
sity," Jason Hu. a senior government 
spokesman, said of the campaign to es- 
tablish Taiwan as a regional center to 
rival Hong Kong and Singapore. 

Taiwan's mounting wealth, its heavy 
industry and technology, as well as its 
pro ximi ty to China’s central coast com- 
bine to make such a proposition feasible, 
at least in theory. 

“We have to upgrade ourselves and be 
ready for the next century." said Mr. Hu. 


Creating a regional 
business center without 
air or shipping links to 
China and with tight 
restrictions on visas to 
the mainlan d will require 
some imagination. 


Texas instruments Taiwan Ltd, one of 15 
corporations to have signed letters of in- 
tent with the Ministry of Economic Af- 
fairs that indicate a willingness to consid- 
er upgrading operations in Taiwan and 
using the island as a regional base. 

“Taiwan is clearly Lbe information 
technology center for the region.” Mr. 
Carione said. Texas Instruments Inc. 
now manages its area operations from 
Taiwan, 25 years after building its first 
manufacturing plant here. “Its manufac- 
turers are spreading their business 
throughout Asia, and it is well positioned 
to benefit from China's growth.” 


But tight controls on capital flows, a 
restrictive bureaucratic tradition and a 


A report by McKinsey & Co. found 
several major areas in need of substantial 
improvement, among them infrastruc- 
ture, industrial production costs and 
openness of major economic develop- 
ment projects and investment for expa- 
triate Chinese and foreigners. 

Taiwan’s Institute of Economic Re- 
search is more specific. It says the gov- 
ernment must solve 69 major problems 
by revising a tangle of 284 sets of regula- 
tions if it is serious about its goals. 

■ But bureaucratic streamlining may be 
simple compared with making decisions 
about improving direct links with China, 
the core of domestic debate about Tai- 
wan's political future. 

“There appears to be a consensus 
among the foreign-based companies op- 
erating here that the aim is a legitimate 
aim," said Claude Haberer. Taiwan 
manager for Banque National de Paris 
and executive director of the European 
Council of Commerce and Trade. 

“We know the political price Taiwan 
must pay, but if it wants to be regarded 
as an international business center there 
are some insurmountable obstacles the 
government must tackle. If no decisions 
are taken, it will be too late anyway. 
China itself is changing very quickly." 


Kuala Lumpur Composite 
Bangkok SET~ 

Seoul Composite J 


Seoul Composite Stock 83336 

Taipei Weighted Price - 5^83.15 

.Manila PSE 2,731.43 

Jakarta Stock Index 457.34 

New Zealand NZSE-40 1,98227 

Bombay National index 1,977.79 

Sources: Rculers. AFP 


127227 


+1.58 

+ 1.12 

+LQQ 

-0-34 
- 1.10 • 
+016 
-6.85 


iHicmuirroal HuraM Tnhunr 


Very briefly: 


• Mitsui & CO, tbe Japanese trading company, said it would 
produce mini-compact discs in a S15 million joint venture with 


What Draws Crowds in China Today? The Beijing Car Show 


Los Angeles Times Serna? 

BEIJING — They came by 
bicycle and on foot, in rickety 
overcrowded buses and in boxy 
yellow shared taxi vans that' 
Bering residents call miandi, 
which means “bread loaves." 

Only a privileged few came 
by private car to China’s Inter- 
national Automotive Industry 
Exhibition, which ended here 
Wednesday after record-break- 
ing attendance that sponsors 
said reflected China’s new pas- 
sion for the automobile. 


The love affair with the car is 
all the more remarkable be- 
cause only a handful of Chinese 
own cars. 

Only 1 percent of the 500,000 
passenger cars sold in China 


passenger cars sold m China 
last year went to private buyers. 
In keeping with tne Chinese so- 
cialist system, most were 
bought by state-owned compa- 
nies or work units — although 
critics of the system say govern- 
ment officials often regard the 
publicly purchased cars as their 
personal vehicles. 


But after several years of rap- 
id economic growth in China, 
the formerly impossible dream 
of owning a car has inched clos- 
er to reality for many Chinese, 
particularly in major cities and 
the affluent coastal area. Tbe 
government has predicted that 
China would produce more 
than 3 million vehicles by the 
turn of the century and that 
many would end up in private 
hands. 

“What is different this year, is 
that the Chinese customer is 


more and more recognizing that 
a car is not a dream anymore." 
said Hans-Jorg Gedutin, the 
chief Beijing representative for 
Bayerische Motoren Werke AG. 
“Everyone is malting their own 
calculation about how long it 
will take before they have a car." 

The sudden emergence of 
even a distant possibility of 
owning a car has unleashed a 
passion here that rivals mass 
political movements of the not- 
so-distanr past. 

Car posters are a favorite 


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wall hanging among teenagers. 
Driving lessons have become a 
rage even in earless families. 
Car magazines have proliferat- 
ed. Thousands of car aficiona- 
dos, many of whom have never 
ridden in a private vehicle, 
poured into the show’s exhibi- 
tion center to gawk at the best 
from the rest of the world, in- 
cluding the Big Three U.S. com- 
panies and first-lime exhibitors 
from South Korea. 

The rush to collect leaflets 
from exhibitors, often simply 
lists of technical details, is part 
of a new hobby among young 
Chinese, who now memorize 
and recite facts about various 
vehicles. 

At the General Motots Corp. 
exhibit, which featured a Cadil- 
lac stretch limousine and Chi- 
nese models wearing miniskirts 
tied at the waist with American 
flags, a woman narrowly avert- 
ed being pushed over a protec- 


tive railing by one frenzied 
group seeking pamphlets on the 
GM line of cars. 


produce mini-compact discs in a S15 million joint venture with 
several local companies; the new company. Xenus Inc., will be 
launched in July. 

■ A PhiEppine, South African and Taman consortium is to pur- 
chase British Steel PLCs mothballed Ravenscraig plant in Scot- 
land and transfer it to the Philippines at a cost of $1.2 billion, a 

S okesman for the Philippines-based steel concern F. Jacinto 
roup said. 

• Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. said its first helicopter built 
solely with Japanese technology would make a test flight before 
the end of Lhe year: Mitsubishi previously developed helicopters 
with UB.-based Sikorsky Inc. 

• Comsat Corpu, the U.S. communications concern, bought k 16.8 
percent stake in Philippine Global Co mmuni cations Inc. for $42 
million, tbe companies said. 

■ AT&T Corp. and Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. forged 
an alliance with a state agency to build and run telephone facilities 
in Subic Bay. 

• Tatung Co, Taiwan's largest maker of electrical appliances, said 
it expected a 60 percent jump in net profit for 1994, to 5.63 billion 
Taiwan dollars ($209 million). 

• Singapore food and beverage company Yeo Hiap Seng Lid 
canceled an agreement to sell its 40 percent stake in a Malaysian 
subsidiary to Arab-Malaysian Corp. 

AFP, Reuters. AFX, Bloomberg 


In all, 397 foreign automotive 
and parts companies and more 
than 500 Chinese companies 
had exhibits at the show. 


Participants ranged from Chi- 
na First Automobile Group, 
maker of the Red Flag limousine 
that used to be favored by Chair- 
man Mao Zedong, to Kingsman 
Ltd., a Hong Kong company 
that specializes in gold-plated 
grills and hood ornaments. 

The foreign companies said 
they had come mainly to estab- 
lish a presence for the day when 
the Chinese auto market takes 
off. “This is a show that is not 
going to result in any immedi- 
ate sales,” one American exhib- 
itor said. “China's market is not 
yet at that point But China is a 
huge potential market, and no 
one can afford not to be here." 


All Nippon Air Predicts Loss 


A genet France- Presse 

TOKYO — All Nippon Air- 
ways Co., Japan's largest do- 
mestic airline, said Wednesday 
that the weak economy was 
likely to cause its loss to widen 
to 7 billion yen ($70 million) in 
the year ending in March 1995. 

The airline had a group loss 
of 5.08 billion yen in tbe year to 
March 1994, as the recession 
slowed travel demand, and the 
company said it expected those 
conditions to continue. 


group sales would rise to 898 
billion yen in the current year 
after falling 3.6 percent, to 857 
billion yen, in 1 993-94. 

“Under the circumstances, 
demand for flights remained 
stagnant,” the airline said. 


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“It’s not easy for airline com- 
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severe conditions are expected 
to continue for the time being.'’ 

The airline forecast that 













































Page 14- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 


NASDAQ 

Wednesday's 4 p.m. 

This Iisj compiled by the AP. consists ol the t .000 
most traded securities in terms ol dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


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U: 



Wednesday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reneci 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 



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. , e»' 


Advertising spmnM 


i^South Korea has symbolized 
' robust economic development 
Sftsince it first began posting 
f double-digit growth rates in the 
jtnfd-1980s . Because of structural 
^problems and. a global recession , 
j^pweyer, the economy has only 
i^jhacently regained momentum 
ffter three years of sluggish 
growth. Today , hopes are high In 
^eoui for a prolonged economic 
Recovery based on strengthening 
fbmesttc demand and exports. 



ADVERTISING SECTION 




‘ ’'***• 

C.**: - v *. ■ 


..... • , 

V 




v. 

... ^ 


- ‘ - 


* 

* * 



• - 

' 'v : '- : 

■J . 


■ 


; *• ■ "■ 

' • 


Trade Prospects Brighten as Reforms Give Economy a Second Wind 


A lthough Sooth Korea enjoyed large trade surplus- 
es and averaged 13 percent growth rates in the 
mid-1980s, exports first began to sputter in late 
1989, when it became apparent that the country 
could no longer compete by making labor-intensive, low- 
tech goods for export. Labor strife and rising wages had 
stripped South Korea of the comparative advantage it once 
enjoyed, and developing nations in Southeast Asia and Chi- 
na began pricing Seoul out of die marketplace. 

In addition, because they failed to invest enough in re- 
search and development. South Korean companies were 
finding it hard to compete against advanced nations in the 
production of more value-added, high-technology exports. 
Hey tried to plug the gap by importing technology from na- 
tions like Japan. Skyrocketing royalty fees and a growing re- 
luctance by Japan to part with its technology, however, left 
Seoul pinned between Asia’s developing and advanced na- 
tions. 

Although these are still concerns. South Korea’s econom- 
ic prospects have brightened recently. The nation’s exports 
have been boosted by the appreciation of the Japanese yen, 
while domestic demand has improved. In addition, the busi- 
ness: sector has been aided by President Kim Young Sam’s 
efforts to decrease red tape and fight corporate corruption. 


The South Korean economy grew at an inflation-adjusted 
8.8. percent in the first quarter of the year compared with 
same period in 1993. the second-highest quarterly growth in 
two and a half years. A sharp increase in corporate facility 
investment and exports of merchandise propelled the higher- 
than-expected growth, according to the Bank of Korea. 

Investment in equipment and plants expanded 20.2 per- 
cent in the first three months of the year, the highest growth 
since the first quarter of 1988. Manufacturing industries ag- 
gressively expanded their facilities investments on expecta- 
tions that the economy will continue to stay strong through- 
out tire remainder of the year. 

In addition, exports jumped 9.8 percent in the first quarter, 
to $19.95 billion, thanks to the continued appreciation of the 
_ yen and economic recoveries taking place in the United 
" States and Europe, two of South Korea’s most important ex- 
port markets. Gross domestic product grew 9. 1 percent dur- 
ing the first three months of the year compared with the 
same period in 1993. 

Perhaps most important, the recovery has been accompa- 
nied by a structural shift in die economy from labor-inten- 
sive light industry to more advanced heavy industries like 
petrochemicals, shipbuilding, heavy equipment and auto 
manufacturing, according to economists. 


Although external and internal economic factors have 
played a large part in corporate Korea’s rebound. President 
Kim has also earned high marks for bis aggressive economic 
reforms since taking office in February 1993. As a result, an- 
alysts expect that South Korea could be poised for a second 
economic take-off once Mr. Kim’s vision of a “New Econo- 
my” is in place. 

These plans are based on two underlying principles. First, 
the government is scaling back its control over the economy 
and promoting the autonomy of the public sector. Second, it 
is stressing that individuals should be rewanted according to 
their efforts. In the past, collusion between government and 
big business led to unfair competition. 

As a result. Mr. Kim has undertaken a program of a ad- 
ministrative deregulation. A though the government bureau- 
cracy has shied away from relaxing its grip on the economy 
in the past, most analyse in Seoul think that die current ad- 
ministration has made significant progress toward realizing 
its ambitious plans. Mr. Kim’s surprise enactment of a real- 
name financial transaction system last year and his moves to 
deregulate interest rates are proof of his determination, they 
say. 

Corporations have taken the cue and are pushing to inter- 
nationalize their operations and put more emphasis on prof- 


itability and efficiency. ‘Everyone has been talking about 
business innovation and structural change, so competitive- 
ness has increased as a result,*' says Lim Dong Sung, presi- 
dent of the Samsung Economic Research Institute in Seoul. 
“The new economy has put emphasis on strengthening com- 
petition in an open world.” 

Nevertheless, problems remain. While Western countries 
have had hundreds of years to develop theft economies. 
South Korea’s economic growth did not become significant 
until less than 40 years ago. Given this relatively short peri- 
od of development, it is only natural that the economy 
should have growing pains, analysts point out 

For some, die development of new technologies seems the 
easiest way to strengthen South Korea's economic competi- 
tiveness once it loses the temporary advantage it is now en- 
joying because of yen appreciation. There may be no easy 
answers, however, says Kim Kak-choong, chairman of 
Kyungbang Limited. ‘Technology is the result of a period of 
hard work; it is no miracle,” Mr. Kim says. “No matter how 
flexible you are, you cannot change overnight” 

With its current economic upturn, however. South Korea 
seems to have bought itself more time to complete its rapid 
transition from a poor, war-shattered country to one of the 
world’s most important trading nations. 



















Page 16 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


INTERNATIONAL 




Active Investment Strategy 
Focuses on Targets in Asia 


W ooing foreign 
investors is a 
key part of 
South Korea's 
drive to globalize its econo- 
my. In the meantime, many 
South Korean companies 
have shown themselves ea- 
ger to set up shop overseas. 

During the mid-1980s, the 
South Korean government 
discouraged outward foreign 
direct investment (FDI). 
Economic planners were 
concerned about unemploy- 
ment, the current account 
deficit and a hollowing out 
of the local manufacturing 
base. When companies did 
go overseas, it was largely to 
circumvent trade barriers, 
set up marketing channels in 
export markets or pursue 
technology transfer 
This began to change by 
the late '80s, when bureau- 
crats had no choice but to 
loosen the leash on South 
Korean companies eager to 
pursue outward FDI. Since 
1986, high land prices, labor 
strife and rapid wage in- 
creases have outpaced pro- 
ductivity, forcing many of 
South Korea’s labor-inten- 
sive. low-tech manufactur- 
ers to move overseas. In- 
creased competition has 
forced them to look to the 
less-developed nations of 
Asia. Central America and 
Eastern Europe for cheaper 
labor. 

As a result, the second 
type of South Korea's FDI - 
projects in advanced nations 
in North America and Eu- 
rope - has lost promif cnee. 
Faced with the dilTic-ulti .*n of 
hc ; r 2 :i fr-: .• :nr 

in unlamiliiii. overseas mar- 
kets, South Korea's trade-re- 
lated outward investment in 


advanced markets has run 
into problems. This is a dis- 
advantage for a country that 
is still completing the transi- 
tion from labor-intensive 
manufacturer to more high- 
tech. international competi- 
tion. 

In 1987. there were 91 
cases of outward FDI 
amounting to $409 million, 
mostly involving trade and 


Small and medium 
companies are 
looking overseas 


natural-resource-reiated pro- 
jects. That number climbed 
steadily over the next seven 
years, to a cumulative total 
of 3.909 cases worth almost 
$7.4 billion as of February 
1994. During this time, in- 
vestment in developed na- 
tions became evenly divided 
between manufacturing and 
trade, while that in develop- 
ing nations was concentrated 
in manufacturing. 

Historically, most of out- 
ward FDI has gone to North 
America i40 percent) and 
Southeast Asia (38 percent t. 
while Europe’s portion has 
increased to 10 percent be- 
cause of South Korea's ef- 
forts to diversify its markets. 
Outward FDI stalled in 
1991. after the current ac- 
count balance slipped into 
the red the previous year. It 
jumped up 54 percent last 
year, however, to 1.050 cas- 
es worth 1.8 billion, com- 
pared with *32 case** worth 
$1.2 billion in !9«2. 

This increase has been ac- 
companied by an increased 


emphasis on Asia in recent 
years. South Korea's manu- 
facturing investment in Asia 
is centered on labor-inten- 
sive products such as tex- 
tiles. footwear, consumer 
electronics and electrical 
equipment. 

During 1993, in terms of 
value. 50 percent of the ap- 
proved outward FDI cases 
approved went to Asia, up 
from 48 percent in 1992. In- 
vestment in China, which 
started only in 1989, already 
amounts to $309 million, 
making that country the sec- 
ond-largest receiver of 
South Korea's overseas in- 
vestment in Asia after In- 
donesia. 'This pattern 
should accelerate in the fu- 
ture as the chaebol begin to 
follow the small and medi- 
uni-sized companies into 
China." says Kim Si-joong. 
a research fellow at the Ko- 
rea Institute for International 
Economic Policy. 

South Korea's outward 
FDI has recently become 
characterized by smaller, 
more numerous investments 
in Asia, largely made by 
smaller companies in search 
of cheap labor. In 1 993. 8 1 .S 
percent of South Korea's 
outgoing FDI was made by 
such companies, up from 
78.9 percent in 1992. “Dur- 
ing the mid-1980s, most 
overseas foreign direct in- 
vestment was made by large 
firms, but this has shifted to 
small and medium-sized 
companies since then, and is 
expected to continue." says 
Bae Chong Ryel. a research 
fellow at the Export Import 
Bank of Korea. 

Significantly, ihe average 
amount of South Korea's 
outward FDI per project 





This advertising section was produced in its entirety by the supplements division of the 
International Herald Tribune's advertising department. • It was written by Terrence 
Kieman, a writer based in Seoul. • Photos courtesy of the South Korean Embassy. 



prog ram fas caiL^ ovEEB^-mveStOfefo * 

of late, analysts say flat , the - . 

bourse,. direct jbreign mvestment- has li^ ins^ged sijee /. 
the marfa*M yas partially liberalized in?Januaty 1992. Author 


Exploring new markets is part of the recent evolution in foreign direct investment 


stood at only $1.36 million 
at 1986. This figure in- 
creased to $2.10 million in 
1992, but slipped down to 
SI. 99 million last year. The 
small average amount of in- 
vestment per project reflects 
that many of them are asso- 
ciated with labor-intensive 
and assembly -oriented prod- 
ucts." says Lee Hon-gue. a 
research fellow at the Korea 
Development Institute in 
Seoul. This has resulted in a 
much larger number of low - 
er-priced investment cases 
centered. on Asia, especially 
in recenfcyears. 

Analysis say this trend 
will fe-spurred by the prob- 
lems^South Korean manu- 
facturers are experiencing in 
more developed markets. 
One well-publicized exam- 
ple of this was Hyundai Mo- 


tor's decision last year to 
halt its plans to manufacture 
mid-sized cars in Canada for 
export to the U.S. market. 
Similarly, several South Ko- 
rean electronics manufactur- 
ers are having second 
thoughts about their manu- 
facturing and assembly op- 
erations in the United States. 
“They have shown that they 
are much more comfortable 
moving operations into 
Southeast Asia and Eastern 
Europe than North .America 
and Mexico." says Bruce 
Gonyea. an electronics ana- 
lyst at Daewoo Securities in 
Seoul. 

Part of the dynamic at 
work here is that South Ko- 
rean companies are unfamil- 
iar w ith the idea of global- 
ization and often treat their 
foreign subsidiaries merely 


total o utstanding shares ;-liy any i^gte'cbn^a^. and only 8 
percent .of the' ‘nation’s steel and ftfectrrc -ppwsr' bompames. 

The c ? ni ’ 

nutted to gradually raising theToreignm^ 




. • -.rf V ,-tr ....... 

... ' ? 

and foreign Irokerage frouseS aps^ 
fd the country in. order to jgirafeof.in-; 

vestors interested in- the 4 L^^]^EaDnQg Gakn^J$ v {;;: V 

Established in 1962 withonly^ the ;■{ 

KSE caught fire in December l9S5. coiri^^g.wdfr the > 
growth spurt South Korea enjoyed during ti»latei j980s. •- 


during the eari^l990M»weva£‘- 
drums and failed attempts bribe t 


as assemblers of products 
originating back in Korea. 
This approach ignores ad- 
vantages available in foreign 
markets and often saddles 
foreign subsidiaries with the 
sluggish competitiveness of 
operations back home, ana- 
lysts say. 

Most important, corporate 
South Korea needs to retool 
its idea of what globalization 
means and how FDI can be 
used to obtain it, says Mr. 
Bae. “A transition is needed 
in the behavior of Korean 
firms, from passive FDI 
strategies geared toward get- 
ting around trade barriers or 
taking advantage of lower 
factor costs, to active FDI 
strategies aimed at exploring 
new markets, sourcing new 
technology or establishing 
global networking,” he says. 


investment. The market 

on August 12, 1 992, down ^piwceht-feomits p^fc^Sr vj. 

- The Seoul stock rmrke^ isbaifc iaihs fi^lIfc^d^yEdw- -.^ 
ever, thanks to strong foreign interest; ^ 

ic outlook, market hqukHty.andvaslty n^roy ^t^ porate ~ 


dex would reach a new aU-thh&.bi^fciy'the } 

Ironically, a drop in tire market iiKtex m trod'JotifehaS in- 
creased hopeamong foreign invcstois tel 
will soon be expanding the foreign investment Thrifts that 
have constrained them since Jannary l99Z TherchraalT lCEl 
percent limit on foreign o wner ship has bdeRihoarly ^ 


reached their linritsTong ago. Thedropratbe iudcx ^’cansed 
by jitters about North Kona’s nuclear program — prompt ed 
tire Ministry of Finance to announce that it wiU incjea^e the '• 
foreign investmeotlimitssoaner tfaanexpected. ^ 
Foreign investors were cheered by an ^mourK^trentfidm;; 
Minister of Finance Hong Jae-hyong onJase.12 iKat tfae - 
government will raise the exchange’s foreigH%ivdslmeHf * 
ceiling from its current 10 percent lumt-fo a teveTra^mg ' 
from 1 3 percent to 1 5 percent by. the fink half of ridxfcyeacTt; j 
was the first time that Mr. Honghad publicly ^kaj abottt 
the limit raise, which was slated to happen Spmdnae before.;-: 
the end of 1995. The announcement was welcdpaed by ftxrV * 
ra'gn investors, who would like to gain more exposure 'toihe- 
market given that they are typicaliy longreriri-^^ 
are in no huny to cash in their shares. - •> ;■ • 



Ssangyong : Reliability in a vari 


•ic.. .ipCJXLC?' 


>xvw 



A corporation's survival depends on its reputation for 
reliability. 

Ssangyong has a 55-year history’ of reliability. 

Partners in more than 120 countries depend on 
Ssangyong and we’re doing our best to meet their 
needs. 


Ssangyong's reputation in the fields of international 
trade, engineering and construction, automobiles, 
cement, oil refining, investment and securities, heavy- 
industries and machinery, paper, insurance, shipping 
and information systems has resulted in total sales of 
US$14.5 billion in 1993. 


Our capital and technical cooperation with 
Mercedes-Benz, the capital venture with Saudi 
Arabia's Aramco and the construction of over 7,000 
deluxe hotel guest rooms in the Pacific Rim are just a 
few’ examples of our successful partnerships. 


These days, when reliable business partners are hard 
to find, you need a corporation that builds reliability 
in a variety of business circles. ’ 

Mfere looking forward to talking business with you. 


SsangVChsig 

International Trade, Engineering & Construction. Automobiles. Cement. Oil Refining. Investment & Securities, Heavy Industries « Machinery, Paper. Insurance. Computers -C.P.0. Bo* 409. Seoul. Korea * Phone. (822) 2700155-8, 270-8130 * Fax: (822) 273-0981,2734297, 274^896 • Tetac TW1NDRA K24270, K 28215 K2844? 


U 9 I 









*ide(v 


s 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 



outh Korea’s 
economy is back 
on the’ growth 
track, and the na- 
tion’s large business groups 
- or chaebol - are leading 
the charge. In characteristic 
fashion, the chaebol are ag- 


busincss lines, and. although 
critics would like to see 


them become more special- 
ized. the chaebol seem intent 
on making everything from 
"chips to ships.” 

The chaebol - South Ko- 
rea's 30 largest business 
conglomerates - are typical- 
ly owned and controlled by a 
single entrepreneur and his 
famik. The conglomerates 
were set up in the 1960s 


when the government autho- 
rized leading businessmen 
with good track records to 
launch ventures in industries 
targeted for development. 
The groups were given pref- 
erential treatment by the 
government and quicldy be- 


pecis to spend $5.5 billion 
on plant expansion and new 
technology, an increase of 
about 120 percent over last 
year. Daewoo and Samsung 
are planning investment in- 
creases of 44 percent and 2! 
rcent respectively. Ana- 


Business Briefs 


: * The Korea High-Speed Rail Authority and GEC 
Alsthom signed a contract in Seoul on June 14 that 
made the Ffanco-Brirish company the official supplier 
of high-speed Pains and core technology for the con- 
struction of the Seoul -Pusan high-speed rail system. 
■ Park' Yoo-kwang. the rail authority’s top administra- 
tor j and Pierce Bilgor, chief executive officer of GEC 
Alsthom, manufacturer of France's high-speed train, 
signed die more than 1, (XX)- page contract, ending 
eight months of tough bilateral negotiations in which 
South Korea was promised extensive technology 
* transfer at reasonable prices. The contract calls for the 
. ■ completion of the Seotrt-Pusan high-speed rail system 
‘ by 2001. : 

■: - .• South Korea’s urban -workers earned 13.1 percent 
. ■ more in the first quarter of 1994 than they did during 
. t be same period a year earlier, but-ended up spending 
- more .©f.it-on their cars and dining out. the National 
.’ - Statistical Office (NSO) announced June 18. The 


monthly income of urban wage-earning households 

•.• averaged l i6l mfiHoft won ($ 2,0001 in the first- three 
moftths of this year, compared with 1.42 million wish . 
■ , ^ l993.1nSadpTiTrKlju^ed.»oconK grew 9-2 percent,- ‘ 
tattspesrding-iRcreaBed.at a faster pace of 133 percent. N 
frpnxi rmllioa wanto 1,22 mt^on won a month over 
/• jdfcciajd penocMn parhcular. money spem on buying y, 
■•f ahd xnaitrt^njng. faroily .cars jumped by 30.3 percent • . 

outgrew by 30.3 percent,' the report: 

. .• • .■ : v ' . 

y ‘TOttJwe Wi visiting American AutomobtfeMao- 


Mr. Card said at a Seoul jp res& < 
4^ in opening die South \ 

„ -'mat tfe/nega&ve. 



'Mr: Card.' 


1 • •*•&* ij’JVi. •* • 1 -’**-■ *- ■■■■»■? ■ uV* ■ *-*-* *>-V— 


Since that time, the 
biggest chaebol - such as 
Samsung, Hyundai and Dae- 
woo - have built worldwide 
reputations and have been 
largely responsible for the 
country’s rapid development 
and prodigious exports. 
Now that the economy has 
rebounded from a three-year 
slowdown, the chaebol are 
looking to expand their 
dominance even further. 

The number of companies 
affiliated with the top 30 
chaebol increased to 616 as 
or April I from a year earli- 
er, according to South Ko- 
rea’s Fair Trade Commis- 
sion. Each chaebol was in- 
volved in an average of 19.1 
business lines last year, 
compared with 103 in 1992 
and 17.9 in 1991. 

The top five chaebol clear- 
ly dominate the rest. The 
turnover of the five biggest - 
Hyundai. Samsung, Dae- 
woo, Lucky-Goldstar and 
Sunkyong - .accounted for 
66.3 percent of the turnover 
of the top 30 chaebol. Not 
surprisingly, the big are 
looking to get even bigger. 

For example. Samsung, 
which has been oriented to- 
ward light industry in the 
past, is now emphasizing 
heavy industries like ship- 
building, construction, 
petrochemicals and aero- 
space. Meanwhile. Hyundai, 
which made a name for itself 
as a carmaker and ship- 
builder, is moving into areas 
like the retail business, ship- 
ping and (he information in- 
dustry. 

In order to complete these 
expansion plans, the chaebol 
have stepped up their invest- 
ments this year. Hyundai ex- 


chaebol will continue to 
grow rapidly, given that the 
South Korean economy is 
expected to center more and 
more around capital-inten- 
sive industries. 

The chaebol will also con- 
tinue to benefit from their 
ability to secure the best 
manpower and gather infor- 
mation on foreign markets. 
“The chaebol - especially 
the top live - have so much 
more in the way of human 
resources, something that is 
the main engine for a com- 
pany's growth," says Kim 
Kycong Won, senior econo- 
mist at the Samsung Eco- 
nomic Research Institute in 
Seoul. 

The last great frontier for 
the chaebol is the banking 
sector, an area of the econo- 
my they have been prevent- 
ed front having a strong 
sway over because of fear 
that they would use the 
banks as their own “private 
safes." Most analysts say it 
is unlikely that the chaebol 
will gain much influence 
over South Korea's banks in 
the near future. 

Since assuming office in 
February 1993, the Kim 
Young Sara administration 
has been allowing the busi- 
ness sector much more free- 
dom. Government regula- 
tions have been trimmed, 
and fears about a possible 
increase in “chaebol bash- 
ing” have come to naught. 
Instead, the chaebol have 
been called upon to interna- 
tionalize and upgrade their 
operations in order to help 
South Korea prepare for the 
opening of the market. The 
chaebol are expanding and 


becoming more competitive 
as a result, analysts say. 



Manufacturers of electronic goods am working on mom sophisticated products. 


Electronics’ Technological Leap 


O nly a few years ago, South 
Korea's electronics makers 
were largely dependent on 
the export of unsophisticat- 
ed consumer electronics such as low- 
grade VCRs and microwave ovens. 
The industry has made a technological 
leap to more sophisticated products, 
however, and is now the world's 
largest producer of DRAM semicon- 
ductors and is aiming to master new 
technologies like high-definition televi- 
sion. 

The industry is comprised of about 
90 companies that produce a whole 
range of consumer electronics, indus- 
trial electronics and integrated circuits 
as well as parts and components. It is 
dominated by four major companies 
owned by the nation’s top business 
groups: Samsung. Goldstar. Daewoo 
and Hyundai. Samsung stands head 
and shoulders above the rest in terms of 
technology and market share. 

South Korea is the largest producer 
of color TVs in the world and the 
largest maker of microwave ovens, 
with around 10 percent of the global 
market. It also controls 30 percent of 
the world VCR market, is the world's 


largest producer of color picture tubes 
and the second- largest monitor maker. 

Prospects for the industry’s future 
export success are bright, according to 
analysts. 

“I am very optimistic about the fu- 
ture. considering the industry’s 35.5 
percent increase in sales during the first 
half of this year," says Woo Young- 
moo. an electronics industry analyst at 
Daewoo Securities in Seoul. ’The con- 
tinued strength of the yen and the do- 
mestic economic recovery are the two 
main reasons for this." 

South Korea’s electronics exports 
were worth $22.2 billion last year, up 
7.5 percent from 1992, while its do- 
mestic sales grew 13.5 percent, to 
$10.8 billion. Both total sales and ex- 
ports are expected to grow by about 9 
percent this year. 

South Korean electronics makers are 
set to benefit from the economic recov- 
ery taking hold in their major export 
markets in the United States and Eu- 
rope. The industry’s growing interna- 
tionalization and the movement of pro- 
duction facilities offshore will make 
them more competitive, and the in- 
creasing demand for computerization 


both at home and abroad should also 
help them. 

Negative factors, however, include 
growing trade restrictions, pressure to 
liberalize the domestic market and 
stricter enforcement of intellectual 
property rights. Most important, Seoul 
needs to break its dependence on for- 
eign technology and parts, especially in 
regard to Japan. 

“Korea is far too heavily dependent 
on the Japanese electronics industry', 
especially when it comes to purls and 
components.” says Mr. Woo. About 60 
percent of South Korea's imported 
electronics pans and components come 
from Japan. Since this has resulted in 
high royalty payments to the Japanese, 
South Korea’s price competitiveness 
has been hurt Seoul is trying to reduce 
this dependence by arranging technolo- 
gy transfer deals with Russia and push- 
ing local R&D projects. 

The success of this strategy is crucial 
for the country's plans to compete in 
the information age by becoming a 
leading manufacturer of products like 
advanced semiconductors, liquid crys- 
tal displays and high-definition televi- 


Why We Are Happy To Acknowledge That 
There Will Always Be Someone Ahead Of Us. 


At Lucky-Goldstar, customer satisfaction 


is our absolute priority. 


In order to ensure peerless, consistent quality. 


every single Lucky-Goldstar product is scrutinised 


down to the smallest detail. 


From the largest communications satellite to the 


tiniest electrical component in our High Definition 
Televisions (HDTVte), e ver ything is checked. 


Angthen re- checked. 

This commitment to excellence has led to us having 
a presence in all comers of the world. 


In over 120 countries, our customers can 


rely on complete sati sfa c tio n in the fields of 
chemistry, electronics, trade, finance. 


construction and public service. 


At Lucky-Goldstar we are happy to acknowledge that 
there will always be someone ahead of us. 


Because that someone is you. 


ISLUCKYGOLDSIAR 


Invest i ng Our Past In The Future 













rage io 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 


ADVERTISING SECTION 














Automobile Sales Up Both at Home and Abroad 


'■**.■.■■■ "'Vv\') *'■<% *•*"•• - .-i. ■" 


1 yfe 



outh Korea's au- 
tomakers have 
come a Jong way 
since Hyundai 
Motor first made a name for 
the industry by exporting 
low-priced cars overseas in 
rhe 1980s. The nation's sev- 
en auto manufacturers are 
pumping up their production 


capacity, diversifying their 
export markets and develop- 
ing a slew of new models for 
both domestic and overseas 
consumers. 

At the end of this year, the 
industry's production capac- 
ity will hit 3.1 million units, 
and it is expected to grow by 
10 percent to 12 percent 


over the next several years. 
The so-called “Big Three" 
auto manufacturers - 
Hyundai Motor, Kia Motors 
and Daewoo Motor - ac- 
count for about 80 percent of 
the industry's annual pro- 
duction capacity. 

The industry plans to 
spend $20 billion by the turn 


of the century in order to in- 
crease its domestic produc- 
tion capacity by over 50 per- 
cent, to 4.6 million units. 
This will place South Korea 
among the world's top five 
auto producers. It was 
ranked seventh in 1992 and 
is expected to come in sixth 
this year. 


An Encouraging Outlook for Trade 


. South Korea has emerged from . a three-year slump in ; tt$b^ ; .aad electromes seoors aaie expea^ m jead exr- 
exports, and; hopes are high in .Seoul tfcivfe?. tedatiy is ' port growth this .yeaL while less-advanced exports idee 
back on the way to repeating the hapressivd export sac- textile? are seeing their ecorwmib importance decrease, 
cess h enjoyed in die 1980s. • . a . For Che firsi faur months of the year, exports rose. JO.?.. , 



Overseas Trade 1 Association. 

5<?uih Korea saw its international comptfmveness sfe ' '.'sbi 
during- the late 1980s because of labor strife and large 
wage increases. As a result, it lost Us comparative advan- 
tage in labor-intensive industries and ceded market share 
to China and Southeast Asian countries, h soon fought 
back, however, by shifting toward .more vaftte-added, 
technology-intensive exports while rnovisg labor-inten- 
sive light industries overseas. . 

. ' ‘In cutter to remain competitive a? a 'major exporter, 

Korea needs to gain access . to cheaper labor, lower inter- 
.esr rates and lower technology development costs,** says 
Paris Su-WJwn. president of Lucky -Goldstar International 
Corp. “As a result, Korean companies need to promote 
internationalization and push for the globalization of their 
economy." 

Although the transition is far freon complete, the mat- 


strength of the Japanese yen. especially : tn -sectors where-- 
they compete head-to-head with. Japanese preducts like ;■ 
iron and steel, automobiles, ‘^upbuilding. sehuconduaciJS- 
and 


ofortunarely. . the streogth of the yen can -also be sr 


. add components.” says Lee D\im Ho* director of tire Ass& < 
division at the Ministry of Trade Industry & Energy fa 
Seoul. Another weary is increased protectionism in South 
Korea's overseas markets. Trade'officials are highly criti-. • 
-cal of anti-dumping tariffs levied against them and .are- 
concerned that the inauguration of the Work! Trade Orga- « 
nization next year could stirtzp new trade disputes. 


“The automakers are get- 
ting ready for strong export 
growth - especially in Asia, 
Latin America and Eastern 
Europe - as well as a boom- 
ing domestic market,” says 
Don Lee, an auto industry 
analyst at the Seoul branch 
office of Barclays de Zoete 
Wedd Securities. 

The industry exported 
638,647 units in 1993, up 40 
percent, led by Hyundai Mo- 
tor, which held a command- 
ing 55 percent of the market. 
This strong growth was 
boosted by the appreciation 
of the Japanese yen, which 
gives South Korean cars a 
price advantage of 10 per- 


. % *< ;; a. 

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/> 


SSDBSi 


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cent abroad. The emergence 


of China as a major market 
was also a positive factor. 
Exports to China during die 
first nine months of last year 
amounted to $459 milli on, 
outpacing sales to the United 
States, which totaled $436 
million. 

On the domestic side of 
the equation, double-digit 
demand is expected for the 
next few years as a result of 
economic recovery and the 
need to replace the large 
number of cars bought in the 
late 1980s. 

The industry sold 1.4 mil- 
lion units in the domestic 
market last year, an increase 
of 13-2 percent and equal to 
70 percent of total sales. The 
market is expected to stay 





\ ;: MW 


iSc";' 


South Korean auto mates are ready to take bn woridcompeiiSon. ,,-j ^ 


stroog considering Korea's 
low car density of 8.3 per- 
sons per vehicle, compared 
with 1_3 persons in the Unit- 
ed States and 2.1 in Japan. 

Commercial vehicles as 
well. as sports/utility vehi- 
cles axe expected to continue 
enjoying strong sales 
growth, while demand for 
subcompacts will be helped 
by major facelifts of existing 
models. New models such as 
Kia’s Avella, Daewoo’s Ci- 
cero and Hyundai’s Accent 


yrai.^. 

have been well-received in- 
the local market*. . ism 7 
The amomaJrers know thai The 7 ^ 
they have to move bey opd :•! 7 foxKC/fts qya 
the ■ success, they, have .ea-- by: iteeasii^ reae^ch ^f- 1 .; 
joyed selling low-priced ttew^qpfheiffi a^^i^ting^ 
snbcompacts, however,. and'- iQowWri 
become more sophisticated. ging belxmd^Tte^^^t OT - 
This concern, has been mag- 'a^jpeaccedt-? 

nified by the opening of the age <rf s^^ S£ 0 OT^ 2.37 
domestic auto market to for- ~ ■percebt'in J 992,^u^feora 
eign competition as' well as ' l , 68 -.ipea:cent Jn . J-99 1, -but :i 
the growing sopMstication > J?tiU fm^ I6v^3ti]^i3J26; :: 


iSi-- 

fSp-S.-.:- 


■ is . ■' 

- *#• - _ 






of local consumers. Ho.w .-' pentei^t in- Jar 



TECHNOLOGY THAT 
WORKS FOR LIFE 




Through commitment, 
innovation and an emphasis 
on total quality, 

Samsung has became one 
of the world's fastest 
growing technology resources. 
Samsung is not only on 
the forefront of electronics, 
but has received world- 
wide recognition for advances 
in engineering as well. 

Below are just a few examples 
of how Samsung quality 
and technology are working 
for everyone. 

For more, write C.P.O. Box 1580, 
Seoul, Korea 
Phone (02) 724-0177 
Fax (02) 724-0198 


well the industry, adapts will; ■ iperpeht m SuwUmtfid.-$fes^ ;v 

19941s ‘Visit 


55S5\V^K 









ELECTRONICS 


199-gram cellular phone 

High-deflnltion TV 

64M DRAM semiconductors 


Notebook PC 


Home service robot 


ENGINEERING 


Offshore oil and gas platform 
Aerospace 


Dozers, excavators and loaders 


Chemicals 


Double-hull oil tankers 


<t‘ 1994 The Samsung Group 


SOMETHING 


WE DON'T 



f— I AV E T t-t E 


TECHNOLOGY 


TO MAKI 



he land once 
known as the 
“Hermit King- 
dom” has opened 
its arms wide to the world 
during “Visit Korea Year 
1994.” The event, which is 
attracting foreign travelers 
through a variety of incen- 
tives and special events, will 
introduce millions of visitors 
to the unique charms of 
South Korea. 

In commemoration of the 
600th anniversary of Seoul’s 
founding as rhe capital of 
Korea, the South Korean 
government has launched 
the Visit Korea program and 
organized a variety of color- 
ful festivals and enticing 
events on a much larger 
scale than usual. 

A number of culrural festi- 
vals. international competi- 
tions. musical performances 
and other events have been 
taking place throughout the 
capital eitv of Seoul, around 
its mountainous countryside 
and along its island-studded 
coastline. 

During the summer 
months, for example, visi- 
tors can participate in the 
’94 Cheju International 
Triathlon Championship on 
Chejudo Island, a pristine, 
once-volcanic island off the 
nation's southern coast that 
is often referred to as “Ko- 
rea’s Hawaii.” Back in 
Seoul, various parades, ex- 
hibitions and folk-art perfor- 
mances will take place 
throughout the city, and es- 
pecially along the Han Riv- 
er. which flows through the 
center of the capital city. 

Of course, visitors can 
also enjoy activities that are 
always available in South 
Korea. They can visit an- 
cient palaces, shop in 
Seoul's underground ar- 
cades. climb spectacular 
mountain ranges or sample 
the spicy, colorful local cui- 
sine. 

Visitors can also take ad- 
vantage of “Bonus Korea,” 
an incentive program set up 
by the Korea National 
Tourism Corporation 
(KNTC) that is offering for- 
eigners and overseas Kore- 
ans 5 percent to 50 percent 
discounts in 222 establish- 
ments, including airlines, 
trains, hotels, restaurants 
and department stores. The 

KNTC has distributed 
500.000 Bonus Korea book- 
lets with detachable coupons 
that can be used to obtain an 
array of discounts. 

Local hotels are offering 
reduced room rates and spe- 
cial package programs, and 
department stores are offer- 
ing discounts. Foreign visi- 
tors can save up to 15 per- 
cent on department-store 
duty-free irems and 10 per- 
cent to 30 percent on hotel 
stays longer than two days. 
About 1 00. 000 hotel rooms 
have been built for Visit Ko- 
rea Year, and local hotels 
have upgraded their facili- 
ties. Meanwhile, Korean Air 
and Asiana Airlines, the na- 


tion's two flag carriers; ate otb ; 
giving foreign visitors 10 ^ 

percent to 50 percent dis^ 

counts on domestic^ airfares. ces^ 7 rs ^^-C'hwig JaerOt^- *- 
Not surprisingly, the. Visit ^ chairman b^ihe'-Wesnia' 
Korea Year program has Chbsim^otej-ibSbcmL A:>3 
also helped to boost the local ; • big factor nr tfe prpmotion'sl 
tourism industry. The has been acfengein *^ 

KNTC' expects 4 million- how Kprearis w 
foreign visitors to come to rfaeaikte. V v ;: 

Korea in 1994 and spend a ’ v ~L:In the pa^ibnrism : ;was^ i:t 
total of $4.2 billion.. Many V widely seen, as a^wastefiiff r’frjj 
Japanese tourists have made’ ; npnesstiiUial.iiid^t^^ -'V' 
the short trip to Korea be- government pi aimer s anb ;; 
cause of an easing of visa re- • the public. The. service see- ’;/ 
strietions. and. arrivals from tor suffered. as a. result. ,VEs£t?« 
North America-.and Europe ' Korea Year, h<ywever, fias -** 

been accohTpanied by a : 5hift ' 

• in pwblte p^ceptions Abdar ~ 
easing of government re- ; 
strietions. As a result, t&f.f 
looks as though South Korol. 7 .; 
will -become a tourist destir 
nation of some sig^uficande. 
.-according to, analysts. • 

Hue Visit Korea; Year pror 
gram 'has also benefited 
from a recent abound in tbe -jv ’ 
economy and tur’incxease mOi" 
"Judging by the strong in-“^ rthe nutpbe^^' in.tem^tronal 
crease in the number* of- , business travel ers,^rsi ti Bg 
guests staying, with us and*-' SeptitV . ; . 7 a 


ane also improving. 

Although critics were not 
very optimistic about the 
program prior to its stairt in 
January, tourism showed a 
healthy increase efihing fee 
first four months of fee- year, 
when visitor arrivals in- 
creased 18.7 percent over 
the same period in' 1993, and 
tourist receipts grew by 10JZf 
percent 





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0 Etysees Monciafre FF W343J7 

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The conference, 


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INTERNATIONAL HER.\LD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 


ADVERTISEMENT' 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Juim 29, 1994 


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w Capital Holla SA j 44.19 

CDC INTERNATIONAL 

n CEP Court Trrme FF 17521027 

»Gf i Long Terme- — FF 1S1729L90 

OJEMICAL IRELAND FUND ADMINISTRA- 
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JT.I2F Yrtlow Sea lavt Co S 1043 

CINDAM BRAZIL FUND 

0 Ondam EauHv Fund S 1144941 

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0 Clltpon uk EauHy • 13049 

0 CHteort French Eou«y_— FF >329.14 

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FOCUS MNK AX. m 431 555 
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FOREIGN fi COLONIAL EMBRQ MKTS LTD 
Ttt : London an 929 1234 
0 Argentinian liwes Co SlcnvS IU) 

0 Brazilian Inveal Co Slcav_S 27X3 

0 CMamUan Invest Co Hoav.S 1*71 

0 Indian Invest Co Slenv S 1143 

0 Latin Amer Extra Yield Fd S 9.9182 

0 Latin America income Co_s ifiao 

0 Laim Amertam invest Co_x sxv 

0 Mexican Inval Co Sfaw I 3*XS 

0 Peruvian Invest Co 5lcav_s 15X7 

FUND MARKETING GROUP IBID) 

PXJ. Box 2091, Hamilton. Bermuda 

nlFMG Global iJlMov) S 13X7 

a FMG IL Amer. (31 May] s 1047 

mFMG Europe (31 Mavl S 1052 

fflFMO EMGMKT (31 Moyl-S 11.97 

mFMG Q 131 Mavl S 945 

PX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 
iv Concepts Forex Fund— S 1082 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

■v Gala Hedge II I 142X2 

■v Gala Hedge Ul 5 1599 

iv Gala Swiss Franc Fd SF 47.91 

■V GAIA ft S 10*59 

mGalaGuaronieedCt. i t 9431 

mGaiaGuarernMdCi.ll S 8527 

GARTMORE INDOSUEZ FUNDS WU/9* 
TM: (352)495424 470 
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BOND PORTFOLIOS 

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0 Dtuertxmd DH247 5F 101 

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d French Franc D)5 10.15. FF me? 

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EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

0 ASEAN I BJN 

0 Asia Pocilic -5 433 

d Continental Europe Ecu 1J9 

0 DewetaPkia Mertets S 19* 


0 France FF 1047 

0 Germany DM 52* 

0 mtaroHam u * 240 

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0 Untied Kingdom 1 149 

RESERVE FUNDS 

0 DENI DIs 5440 DM A3IS 

d Dollar Dh 20*3- S 2.140 

0 French Franc FF 1281 

0 Yen Reserve Y 2888 

GEFINOR FUNDS 

Londan:71-499 41 7l^eneva:4l-22 73S 35 30 

w Scottish World FuMf S 451X733 

w State si. Amer I con s WL97 

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iv (Bi Genesee Snort s mm 

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IV (Fl Genesee Nan-E<VlHV — Jl 142AI 

BED LOGOS 

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GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
II Altai SLDeueta6.l0l Man 44404429037 

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w GAM Emero Mkts MM-Fd 5 

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wGAM Mitt- Europe DM DM 

wGAMMIH-GHbal USS 5 

wGAMMHHIS S 

wGAM Trading DM DM 125.13 

wGAM Trading USS S 195X7 

wGAM Overseas S 162X9 

wGAM Pacific S 93U4 

wGAM Relative Value S 1B7X1 

WGAM selection S 614J4 

wGAMSbmapare/Maiaysia-S 7 d**b 

w GAM 5F Special Bond. SF 129A3 

wGAM Tnlie ■ ■ ■ — S 325*7 

WGAM ILS. S IW.99 

w GAMat investments S 89889 

wGAMVMUO S 11199 

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wGAM WsrMwkfc S 47U4 

wGAM Band USS Ord s 143.91 

wGAM Band USSSoectal S 18427 

WGAM Band SF SF 9*41 

w GAM Band Yen Y 1461A00 

WGAM Band DM DM 119*2 

WGAM Bond E I 153*7 

W GAM CSpedal Bond ' 135*6 

w GAM Universal uss. * lsoxa 

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SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 4-1-422 2*2* 
MulKabocttstniste 173XH BIOLZaridi 

0 GAMICH) Eutok SF 91X2 

tf GAM (CHI Mondial SF 1*249 

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SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

13S East 57lh Street NY 100222129884200 

wGAMEunme 9 1*80 

wGAM Global S 15881 

iv GAM International 5 200*3 

wGAM North America S 85*8 

wGAM Pacific Basin % 19154 

IRISH REGISTERED UCITS 

Eor Wort Terrnc&Dubiln Z 3SJ-1-060-630 

wGAM Americano Acc DM EL27 

w GAM Eurepa ACC DM 12*17 

wGAM Orient Acc DM 158.93 

wGAM Tokyo ACC DM 19232 

wGAM Total Band DM Acc — DM 1904 

W GAM UlH venal DM ACC DM 175X9 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda : [909] 295-4000 Fax: (BD?) 295*180 


JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 
w (At Original Investment — S 
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1 Ywi Flnandal- 


w (HI Yen Financial S 

w (J) Diversified Rsk Adi I 

w(K) Inti Currency 8. Brvid—S 

w (L) Global Financial 1 

W JWH WORLDWIDE FND—I 


GLOBAL FUTURES 91 OPTIONS S WAV 


rnFPM IM Bd Prepr-CHF a JF 
GOLDMAN SACltf 


w OS Ad] Rate Mori. Fdll — S 9X3 

mGSdoboi Currency S 123182 

W 65 Wtorld Band Fund S. IdlS 

w GS World Inane Fund S 948 

GS EQUITY FUNDS 5JCAV 

wGS Euro Small Cap Port DM 9150 

wGS Globed Eaullv 1 IUS 

w GS US Cep Growth Port — % «A3 

iv GS US Small Cop Port s 9*1 

W OS Alfa Portfolio I 9*8 

OOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 

iv G Simp Fund — —Ecu 1 15503 ■ 

GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 

w Granite Capital E unity S DX348 

wGranitoCapiWMkt Neutrals 0X476 

m Grontrv Capital Morftwue — S 0.7487 

GT ASSET MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 
Tel: (44) 71 -7W 45 47 

d GT Asean Fd A Shares * 

0GTAiaonFdB Shares i 

d GT Asia Fund A Shares S 

0 GT Asia FwW B 5hares S 

0 GT Aslan Smalt camp A 5h* 

0 GT Aslan Small Como SSh* 

0 GT Australia Fd A (haras— S 
0 GT Australia Fd B Shaies-S 
0VGT Austr. smrtl CO A Sh — S 27. 

0 GTAusir.SmotiCoBsn — % 27. 

0 GT Berry Japan Fd A Sh — 3 
0GTBSTTV Japan FdB 5ll — S 

0GT Band FdA Shares i 

0 GT Bond Fd B Stares S 

0 GT Bio fiAa Sciences A SILS 
0 GT Dio fi Ap sciences B SIU 

0 GT Donor Fund ASh 1 

0 GT DoUnr Fund fl Sh S 

0 GT Emerging Mkts A Si* — 1 
0 GT Emerging MBs B Sh— 4 
0 GT Em Mlt Small Co A Sh J 
0 GT Em MM Small Co B Sh J 
wGT Euro Small Co Fd A Sh J 
w GT EOT Small Co Fd B SIU 
0 GT Hang Kang Fd A Stares* 

0 GT Hana Kong Fd B Shares 1 
0 GT Honshu Pathfinder a ShS 
0 GT Honshu Pathfind e r B ShS 
wGT Job OT C Stocks Fd A ShS 
w DT Jap OTC Slacks Fd B ShS 
w GT Jap Small Co Fd A 5h— s 
w GT Jap Small Co Fd B Sh_J 

w &.T. Lathi America Fd S 

d G T Strategic Bd FdA Sh__* 

0 GT Strategic BdFdBSh_J 
0 GT Tefacomm. Fd A SharesS 


0 GT Tefacomm. Fd B Shares* 
r GT Tsdawtaav Fond A Sh J 


r GT Tedmatotry Fund B ShJ 

GT MANAGEMENT PLC 144 71 77945971 

0 G.T. BlatertvHcami Fund-* 1*47 

0 G.T. Deutschland Fund. * 12*9 

0G.T. Europe Fund s 4U4 

>8T. Global Smad CoFd — 5 29.54 

0 G.T. Investment Ftrnd S 24*5 

wG.T, Korea Fund — S ,5X3 

w G.T. Newfv Ind I Countr Fd_S *2.81 

wG.T. US Small Companies S 23*1 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

# GCM Globe) Set Eb. 3 187*1 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MHGRS (BmevlLM 
GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 

0 Mo nooed Currency » 3949 

0 Gtobal Baal S 3587 

0 Gtobal High hncame Bana-J 21*9 

0 GUI AC Bond — — X H)*9 




I 0 Eura Hloh Inc. Bond t 31*7 

d Global Eaullv * 9047 

d American Blue Cnia—S 2**9 

0 Jenon and Portf Ic—S 13081 

i 0 UK l 2485 

0 European l 111.15 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL ACCUM FD 

d Doutsenemom Money DM 99 JM 

d US Doika Monev S 3SJ99 

0 US Dollar High Ya Band S 21*4 

0 inn Botonced Grin S 3*49 

HASENBICHLER ASSET MAMGTQaSJMH. 

w HasMiOKhier Cam AG — S 7417*0 

wMcrcemldiMr Cam me— * 13189 

■ Hasentueiuer Dhi_— S 15442 

WAFFT S 190489 

HDF FINANCE.Tel(33-l)M74443LFax 40714453 

■vMendbivesI Europe FF 12415$ 

w Mona invest crotssonce — ff T3SL70 

w Mend Inveai Off inllos ff 12*5.12 

w MondlmeU Emm Growth JF 1299X3 

wMondlnvest Futures FF 1279M 

HEPTAGON FUND NV (599M15SSS) 
t Heptagon Qlb Fund™ S 99.94 

m HCPtogon CMO Fund SNA 7040 

HERMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 


Bermuda : (109)795 400B. Lux: (3S2H04 44 41 
Final Prices 

m Hermes Emnean Fund Ecu 3*1*1 

mHermes North American Fdj 292X7 

m Hermes Aslan Fund . S 381*4 

m Hermes Emero Mfcls Fund* 1 21X8 

m Hermes Slratealm Fund . 3 *94*7 

m Her mm Neutral Fund— S >13X9 

mHermes Global Fund 3 *44*2 

mHarmesBand Fund— Ecu 129UH 

m Hermes Surfing Fa C nw.w 

| mHormas Gold Fund » 41532 

INCOME PARTNERS (A5UU UMITED 
w Aston Fixed i naxneFd— 3 104U 

INTER INVEST [BERMUDA) LTD 
CJo Bank of Bermuda. Tel : 809 29S 4800 
j m Hedge Hag A Conserve FdJ 9*9 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
2. Bd Rural. L-2449 Luxembourg 

— Crw vwiF C F ri i MM 

INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 

d Amerlqiie du Nord 5 I00J» 

d Europe Cam men tale, DM 1014? 

0 Extreme Orient AnglosaxMiAS 100*6 

0 France FF sou* 

0 Italle Ul 19223980 

d Zone Astotlaue f 19014*0 

INVESCO urrn. LTD, FOB 271. Jersey 
Tel: 44 534 7)114 

d Maximum income Fund—* 0.94Q9 ■ 

0 Sterling Mnod Ptfi ( 2.1)79 

d Pioneer Manets c 58J79 

d Okcraan Global Strategy i UXtSB 

0 Aida Super Growth S 24.1700 

0 Nippon warron) Fund 3 2*900 

0 Asia Tiger Warronl—J 4*100 

0 European warrant Fund s txiui 

0 Gld N.W. 1994 - 1 9*500 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 
0 American Growth— — 5 6 .1400 

0 American Enterprise S bxmo 

0 Asia Tiger Growth * 11*900 

0 Dollar Reserve S 5X900 

0 European Growth i S.15D0 

0 European Enterprise —5 9X900 

0 Global Emerging Markets J UMfl 

0 Global Growm S 5*900 

0 Nippon Enterprise 5 84560 

0 Nippon Growth J 5*400 

0 UK Growth.. i 58900 

d SterUno Reserve £ 

0 North American warrant _* 4.1700 

0 Greater CMkoOpps —5 7.1900 

ITALFORTUNE INTL. FUNDS 
wCKCBAIAsar. Growth I ML)S 00412*0 

wCtass B I Global Equlrvt—X 11.7V 

w Class C (Global Band) 3 1186 

w Class D (Ecu Band) Ecu 1888 

JAROIHE FLEMING, GPO BOX 11*41 Hg Kl 

0 J F ASEAN Trust S 51X3 

0 JF For East Wmt Tr * 21JB 

0 JF Gtobal Gonv. Tr 3 13.97 

0 JF Hana Kona Trust 1 I7J2 

0 JFJOP0«lSm.Co Tr. Y 54576*0 

0 JF Japan Trust— -Y 1328780 

d JF Malaysia Trust S 23*7 

0 JF Pocfflc me. Tr. 5 n.N 

0 JF Thailand Trusi s 3456 


JOHN GOVETT MAIfT (IDJVL) LTD 
Tel: 44*24 - 62 94 20 


Tel: 44*34 - 627420 

wGavetTMan. Futures ( 

wGavett Man. Fut. USS S 

w Govetl S Gear. Curr— I 

wGovett 5 GIW Bat Hdge s 

JULIU5BAER GROUP 

d Baertxmd — 5F 

0 Con bar . .. 5F 

O Eautaaer America s 

0 Eeuibaer Europe SF 

0 SFR ■ BAER SF 

0 Slack bar SF 

0 Sertssbar SF 

0 I ku.nwr - « 

0 Europe Band Fund Ecu 

d Dollar Band Fund 1 

0 Auilro Band Fund as 

0 Swiss Bond Fund 5F 

d DM Band Fund DM 

0 Convert Bona Fund JF 

0 Gtobal Band Fund DM 

ti Euro Slack Fund Ecu 

0 US Stack Fund i 

a Pacific Stock Fund— S 

0 Swiss Stock Fund SF 

0 SaeckH Swiss Stock SF 

0 Japan Stack Fund Y 

d German Stock Fund DM 

0 Korean Slock Fund— S 

0 Swfsa Franc Com sf 

0 DM Cash Fund DM 

0 ECU Co* Fund Ecu 

d Sterling Cash Fund 1 

0 Dollar Cash Fund * 

0 French Franc Cash ff 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 


niKiv Gtobal Heage— s 25080 

m Key Hedge Fund inc-~ s 148X5 

Kl PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

mKI Asia PartficFd Ltd S 1U2 

KIDDER, PEABODY 

b Chesapeake Fund Ud— S 29B7.W 

8 1)1 Fund Lid S 114100 

b inti Guaranteed Fund 1 1324.19 


b inti Guaranteed Fund 1 1 324.18 

b Stonehenge Lid 9 1492*1 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 28TO6/W 
0 Aston Dragon Port NV A 9X7 

a Asian Dragon Part NV B — S 9X9 

0 Global Advbarsil NVA — 1 10X5 

d Gtobal A0visareil NV B S 10X5 

0 Gtobal Advisors Part NV AJ 1923 

0 Global Advisors Part NV BJ 10.17 

0 Lehman Cur Adv. A/B S 7.92 

0 Premier Futures Adv A/B J 9.99 

UPPO INVESTMENTS 
74/FUppo Tower Centre, 8? Queen s wnvJfK 
Tei (852 1 867 9888 Foj 18521 5999388 

W Java Fund 1 9X8 

i* Anon Fixed Inc Fd S 981 

wIDR Money Market Fd 1 12*0 

w USD Monev Market Fd — 5 hub 

w Indonesian Growth Fd S 19,98 

w Aslan Growth Fund 3 10X3 

» Aslan Wle iuiiI Fund S 6X3 

LLOYD GEORGE MMGMT <BS2] M5 4433 

w Antenna Fund — — . 5 )9*2 

n LG Aston Smaller Cos Fd S 192280 

w LG IndlO Fund Ltd— J 1559 

■V LG Japan Fa S 1083 

LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS) Lid 
Lloyds Americas Formula (0091 222-8711 
w Balanced Moderate Risk FD8 948 

LOMBARD, OD IE R B. Cl E ■ GROUP 
OBUFLEX LTD (Cl) 

0 Multicurrency $ 32X4 

d Dollar Medium Term S 24X2 

d Daitor Long Tnnm S 20.13 

0 jiMonese Yen .Y *945*0 

0 Pound Storting 1 2 a32 

d Deutsche Mark dm I7ao 

d Dutch Florin Fl 18X4 

0 HY Euro Currencies Ecu ISX7 

d 5wta Franc SF 1109 

d US Dollar Short Term 3 12J7 

d HY Euro Curr (MvMPay Ecu 1121 

0 Swiss Multicurrency SF 14*5 

0 European Currency Ecu 22.15 

d Ortolan Franc BF 134.97 

d Convert HMe S 1*81 

d French Franc FF 157.77 

0 Swls* MuHFDMdend SF 9*6 

0 Swlse Franc Short- Term _SF 107.12 

0 Canodlm Dollar C5 1383 

0 Dutch Florin Mufti Fl 14*2 

0 Swiss Franc CHvM Pav—_JF 10*0 

d CAD MuHlcUf.tHv O 12.19 

0 Mediterranean Curr SF I0J9 

d Convertibles SF 9.72 


MALABAR CAP MOMT l Bermuda) LTD 

mMakXVH Inti Fund. — I 3 10.95 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 
m Mint Limited -Orcfinary — s 41*1 

mMlnl Umtted- Income S 1389 

mlVUnr Gld Lid- Spec Issue -J 27X0 

ITT Min! Gta Ltd -Nov 2002 i 22 83 

mMInt Gtn Ud - Dec 19W S mo 

rn Mbit Gld Lid -Aug 1995 i 15.15 

vnMInt Gta Currencies. —J 785 

mMlnl Gld Currencies 2001 — S 740 

mMlnl So Res l_M (BNP). 3 101X7 

m Athena Gta Futures * I3J4 

m Athena GW Currencies S B.K 

mAbiena Gld FUwnoah Iiul_S 1059 

m Athena Gta Finandtrts Coo* 11.97 

m AHL Capital Mkts Fd_ — 1 htb 

raAHL CammadHY Fund 1 1045 

mAHL Currency Fund 5 9.1: 

mAHL Real Time Trad Fd 5 10X7 

mAHL GTO Real Tim, Trd I 10J8 

mAHL GW Cop Mark Ltd * 1DX9 

m Mon Gubranleed 1*9* LW_s S*0 

mMap Leveraged Recav.Lid* 11X7 

m MAP Guaranteed 2000 S 10 JO 

mMInt GGL Fin 2003 3 6*3 

mMlnr Plus Gld 2003 s 1083 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Front SI Hamilton Bermuda (809)292 9789 
w Maritime Mil-Sector i Lid J 98681 

iv Marttime Glfal Beta Series-* 81*29 

w Maritime Gib! Delta Senes* 700*3 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MOT 
EMERGING ASI AH STRATEGIES FUND 

m Class A S 117X6 

0 Ctas B _s 11383 

PACIFIC CONV STRATEGIES FD LTD 

mClassA — S 97*3 

0 CktoS B * 95X9 

MAVERICK (CAYMAN) 18091 949-7942 

m Maverick Fa f 151.1743 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD 
m The Corsair Fund lm 3 7485 


MEESPIER50N 

Rokln 55. 1012kk. Amsterdam (20-571 11B8I 


w Asia Poc. Growth Fd N.V. _* 

w Askm Capital HokJinBa 1 

w Asm SutoCtian Fd N.V Fl 

w DP Amer. Growth Fd N.V. J 

w EMS Otfohore Fd N.V. Fl 

w Europe Growth Fund N.V. -Fl 

» Japan Diversified Fund I 

w Leveraged Cap Hold 1 

w Tokyo Pac. HMd. N.V S 

MERRILL LYNCH 

0 Dollar Assets Portfolio * 

0 Prime Rate Portfolio s 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TEPM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

a Class A S 

0 Class B i 


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MERRILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SCRIES 

AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

0 Calmer* A AS 17*4 

0 Category B AS 17X8 

CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A CS 13*1 

0 Category B cs 1139 

CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

0 Class A-l 3 9X9 

0 Class A-7 S 9.99 

0 Class B-1 S 9X9 

I a Ckm B-2 S 9X0 

DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 

0 Category A DM 13*0 

i 0 Category B.. J>M 1248 

EUROPEAN BONO PORTFOLIO (DM) 

d Class A-l S 1412 

»r>~ »-9 * 15*9 

0 Class B l- S 14.12 

0 Class B-2 S 1SJJ 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (USS1 

0 Class A-l— DM 9*1 

0 Class A 2 J3M 18X1 

0 Class B-1 S 9*1 

0 Class B-2 I 10.15 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

0 Category a c 13*4 

0 Category n i 15X9 

US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
0 Category A l 1151 

d Category B * 13.M 

YEN PORTFOLIO 

d Category A V 129* 

0 Category B Y 1262 

MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

0CMB4 1 21*1 

q Ctnts B 3 2127 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 
0 CIOSS A S 9X4 

0 Class B — * 9*3 

MERRILL LYNCH 

EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIE5 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A S 14*5 

d Class B * 1480 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

0 CSo-54 A S 1489 

0 Class B. 1 13*8 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL IU5SI 

0 Class A I 1BX7 

0 Ctas B S 1DX0 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A S 1028 

0 Gloss B S 9X1 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

a Class A S 13*4 

0 Class B 1 13.16 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A S 14*2 

0 Class B S 14.12 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 
0 Class A S 11*2 

0 Class B „J 11.13 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A S 15*0 

0 Class B S 15.17 

MERRILL LYNCH INC I PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A 8 8X3 

0 Class B,—. — 3 8X3 

d Class C 3 8X3 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 
0 Emerging Mkts Class A . — S 

0 Emerging Mkls Class B s 

0 Mexican Inc S Ptfl Cl A S 9.74 

0 Mexican Inc 5 Ptfi O 8 I 9X3 

0 Mexican Inc Peso Ptfl Cl A X 8*4 

0 Mexlcoi Inc Peso PHI Cl B 5 8*4 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
iv Momentum Kavelller Peru 8619 

m Momentum RainDaw Fd — I 11789 

m Momentum RxR R.U S 82X7 

m Momentum Stackmarter 1 156*4 

MORVAL VONW1LLER ASSET M6T Ce 

janitor Trternm 5 9-34 

w Wlllerfurxfc-Willerbond Cool 15*8 

■v Wlllerhmds-Winer&ond Ear Ecu 12X3 

w wuiertvndvWlDereg Eur Ecu 1387 

m WUIerfunds-WUierM Italy-Lit 1318788 

w Winertunds-Wlllerea HA 1 18*9 

MULT1MANAGGR N.V. 
w Cash Enhancement * 8XS 

w Emerging Markets Fd s 21.18 

w European Growth Fd .Ecu 14*7 

w Hedge Fund 5 12X9 

w Joponese Fund Y 877 

ur Market Neutral 3 9*1 

w World Bond Fund Ecu 12*0 

NICHOLAS- APPLEGATE CAPITAL MOT 

nr N A Flexible Growth Fd 3 142.19 

IV NA Hedge Fund— 5 135*6 

NOMURA INTL. (HONG KONG) LTD 

d Nomura Jakarta Fund 8 8X5 

NORIT CURRENCY FUND 

mNCF USD 3 820.95 

mNCFDEM- DM 895*9 

mNCF CHF SF 9209 

mNCF FRF FF 44»Sl! 

m NCF JPY _Y 82*9580 

mNCF BEF BF 27933*0 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grwenar SfAdn WIX 9F E**-7W99 2998 


d Odey European DM 134. 

wQdey ftwkp » I XL 

m Obey Eurap Grawtn Inc DM 135. 

w Odev Euroa Growth Acc— DM 139) 

tv Odev Euro Grth Ster Inc — t 54 

wOdey Eure Grth Star Acc— C 54j 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
wfiilams House. Hamilton HMH. Bermuda 
Tel: 809 292-101 B Far: 809295-2305 

w Flnshnn, 4m.m S 224 

w Otvmola Secur lie SF SF 198) 

w Olympia Stars Emera Mkts S 902, 

iv Wtach. Eastern Dragon— J 17: 


w Winch. Frontier -J 

w Winch. Fut. Olympia 5iar_S 


» p.U.t. Emera Mkts iluo_* il 

vP.U.T, Eur. Oppart (Lml Ecu h 

b P.U.T. Gtaixd Value ILUa) -Ecu li 
Hr PJJ.T. Euravol f Lu» I — — Ecu T 

d PidlH Vutsulue iCHI SF 9r 

minil Small Cop (IOM) S 41 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
CJO Pa Bax 1100. Grand Cayman 
Fax: TO®) 9494)993 

m Premier U5 Eaultv Fund — S IF 

m Premier Inti Eg Fund * 13 

in Premier Sovereign Bd Fd_S 71 

m Premier Global Bd Fa S 14 

m Premier Total Return Fa _JS 10' 

Pl/TNAM 

d Emerging Him Sc. Trust — J 
nr Putnam Em. into. Sc. Trust* 
d Putnam Gleb. High Growth* I 

d Putnam Hton Inc. Gnma Fas 

0 Putnam InTI Fund— S ! 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

w Asian Development S . 

nr Emenfina Growth Fd N.V. J 1- 

w Quanium Fund N.V % 174 

wQuortum Industrial— J II 

w Quantum Realty Trust — J >< 

ht Quantum UK Realty Fund_I l 

nr Quasar InTI Fund N.V S 11 

tr Quota Fund N.V., - * U 

REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

iv Naw Korea Growth Fd s 

nr Nava Lot Pacific In* Co — J 

w Pacific Arbiirage Co S 

at RJ_ Country Wmt Fd S 

d Regenl Gibi Am Gnn Fd — 4 
0 Regeni Gibi Euro Grtn Fd_4 

0 Regent GIM ind Grth M i 

0 Regenl Glbl J0P Grth Fd — 3 
0 Regenl Glbl Pocll Basin — S 

0 Regent GIM Reserve s 

0 Regenl Glbl Resources S 

0 Pegenl Glbl Tiger * X 

0 Regent Glbl UK Grin Fd — 5 1. 

w Reaenl Moghul Fd Ltd 1 


SSSSKESi 


w undervalued Assets Ser I _» tiXS 

ROB ECO OROUP 

POB 973X8M AZ Rbtterdcro.(31t»ZHI224 

tf RG America Fund Fl 13080 

0 RG Europe Fund _F1 123*0 

0 RG Pgelfic Fund n 142*0 

0 RG Ptvtrenle Fund .. . Fl 5340 

d RG Manev Ptas F Fl Fl 114*1 

0 RG Money Plus FI I 104.17 

0 RG Money Plus FDM DM 112*8 

0 RG Money Plus F 5F SF W7X3 

More Rc&eco see Amsterdam Stacks 
ROTHSCHILD (OROUP EDMOND DE) 
IN-HOUSE FUNDS 

w Asian Capitol Holdings Fa_* *189 

w Datwo LCF RemseniM Bd_s 1021*1 

wDalwaLCFRemscaEa % 1003.17 

w Force Cosh Trandton CHF JF tlOMXB 

w Leveraged Cpp HotafaosZIs 59*4 

w Pri Challenge Swiss Fd SF 109599 

b Prieauttr FtFEuraae Ecu inx*3 

O Prfapulty Fd+letvelto SF 105*29 

O P rt ecemv FdJjlh i Am S ^ 1 1*129 

0 PrttWjd^Fe my Em gMMsJ U5JS 

-ilk Band Pto . _ 'I 92084* 

w VOrtOPlUl Ecu 105699 

ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
OTHER FUNDS 

0 AMO/Jami Emerg. Growth* 17.19130 

w Esprit Eur Porta Inv Tat. Ecu 1316X1 

wEuroaStrateglnvestm fd-JEcu ld&JSO 

a integral Futures s MUM 

b Optigcst Gtobal Fd General DM 187X71 

b Option) Gtobal Fix Income DM 1*2*4 

0 Pocfflc Ntes Field I 813 

w Peroral DroMtar Grth NV_S 272559 

) S el ection Hori zo n FF 8110672 

s victotre Artono s 3031X9 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (CJ) LTD 

mNemrod Leveraged HW s 840.15 

SAFDIE GROUP/KEY ADVISORS LTD 
in Key Dlveretfled Iik Fd LUL* 11*9599 
SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 

le Republic GAM J 

w Republic GAM America. s 

w Rep GAM Em Mkts Global js 
W Rep GAM Em Mkts Lai Ami 
w Reeu&ne G am Europe CHFSF 
w Republic GAM Europe USS* 
w Republic GAM Grwth CHF JF 

w Republic GAM Growth t i 

w Republic GAM Growth USS* 
w RtPUbltc GAM Ocoortunfty 1 

w Republic GAM PocHIe I 

w Republic Gnsev Dot inc s 

m Republic Gnsev Eur Inc dm 

w Republic Lot Am Alloc % 

iv Republic Led Am Argent. _J 

er Republic Lot Am Brazil S 

W Republic Lot Am Mexico— 3 

w Republic Lor Am Ven«z. l 

iv Rap Solomon Strategies— S 
SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 

fnCommcndrrFund S 101829 

or Explorer Fund 3 HUS) 

SKAND1NAV1 SKA EHSKILDA BANKS N 
S-E-BANKEN FUND 

0 Eutopo Inc S (LM 

0 FtarranOsternlnc 3 195 

0 Global Inc S 1*1 

0 Ltacamedet Inc S 087 

0 Van den Inc S 183 

d Japan Inc Y 9981 

dMliteinc s BM 

tf Svetloe Inc _Jek 9*4 

0 Nardarnerliia inc_ * 0.9? 

0 TekrvUogi Inc. S BW 

0 Sverige Rantetsna Inc 5ek 1UJ 

SK AND I PONDS 

0 Equity mn Acc S 17.12 

0 Equity mn IfK I 13X3 

a Equity Global S 1*4 

0 Equity Nat. Resources S 1X3 

d Equity Jauon Y 111*8 

0 Equity Nordic S 1.55 

0 Equity U.K. t 1*4 

0 Equity Continental Europe J 1*7 

0 Equity Mediterranean s 1*1 

0 Equity North Amcrlm . * 1X1 

0 Equity Far East I 4*5 

0 mil Emerging Markeb * 1*0 

0 Band Inti Acc 1 12*4 

0 Bond inn Inc S 7*1 

0 Band Europe Acc 8 1*2 

tf Band Europe Inc 1 1*0 

0 Band Sweden Acc Sek 16*1 

0 Band Sweden Inc Sets 10*2 

0 Bond DEM Acc DM 1*6 

0 Band DEM Inc DM 8.93 

0 Bond Dollar US Acc S 1X9 

0 Bant Dollar us Inc 3 i.os 

0 Carr. US Dollar S 1 Jt 

0 Curr. Swedfch Kronor Stic 12*5 

SOCIETE GENERA LE GROUP 
SOGELUX FUND ISF) 

w SF Bonds A U JA S 1615 

erSF Bondi B Germxiy DM 31X* 

w 5F Bants C France FF 12649 

nr SF Bants E&a E 11X9 

» SF Bands F Japan Y 2387 

Hr SF Bonds G Europe Ecu 17*9 


TSMPLETDM WJWIDE INVESTMENTS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 

a Class A-l S 12*3 

0 Pan A-7 .. 1 1673 

0 Clan A- 3 s 14*4 

0 Class B-1 3 12X0 

0 Clan B-2 S 169 

INCOME PORTFOLIO 

0 Clots A S 9X2 

0 Cle» B S 9.44 

THORNTON INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 

33 Queen SfiLondan EC4R I AX 871 2493800 

0 Pocll mwt Fd SA C - t 1489 

0 Pactf Invt FOSADM DM 3451 

0 Eastern Crusodw Field 1 12.14 

0 Thor. Util Dragons Fd LM J 37*5 

0 Thornton Orbed Inc Fd Ltd S 2677 

0 Thonrtm Tloe/ Fd LM. S 38.99 

0 Monooed Selection S »S7 

iv Jakarta S 13.99 

0 Korea S 16 l26 

NEW TIGER S£L FUND 

d Hana Kong s 4**2 

0 Japan S 19X5 

d Philippines S *1*4 

0 ThaDand S 2Q41 

0 Malaysia S 20.18 

a tedene sla * 7X4 

OUSSUauMHy S 1029 

0 China S 1480 

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SWI 



Page 19 


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inte rnatio na l 

Re mAmatf 

Every Thursday 
Gxitad 
Philip Oma 


(33 1)44 3793 36 
Fax; 

(33 1)46 37 93 70 
or your nearest 
HT office 
or representative 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 



OIL & MONEY 


For farther information 
on the conference , please contact: 


London ■ October 17 & IS 


Brenda Hagerty 


International Herald Tribune 


*9 f 6 tMUMWAM raqt * 4 

The Oil Daily Group 


63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71) 836 0717 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30* 1994 






SPORTS 








Wi 


‘■m 




‘.-•■ir- ?:•«? ... 




Not-So-Meek A’s 
Win 6th in Row 


Gooden., Golden Boy of Mets, Suspe 


By Jennifer Frey 

iV«up York Tuna StTfUY 


The Associated Pres 

A couple of weeks ago, when 
everyone was ridiculing the 
■ Oakland Athletics for their 19- 
43 record, the wise guys were 
saying the A’s would probably 
win the super-weak American 
League West anyway. 

Maybe the wise guys were 

right 

. Oakland got another out- 
standing pitching performance 
from Bobby Witu a two-hitter 
for his second straight shutout 


AL ROUNDUP 


and beat the visiting California 
Angels, 3-0, Tuesday nighL 
It was the sixth straight for 
the Athletics, who suddenly 
find themselves only four 
games .out of first in the West 
and only one game behind the 
Angels and Seattle Mariners, 
tied for second. 

“We’ve got a little something 
going, no doubt about it” said 
their manager, Tony LaRussa. 

Oakland, with a "14-4 record 
since June 10, is still 14 games 
under .500, but the first-place 
Texas Rangers are only 34-40. 

Witt who pitched a one-hit- 
ler against Kansas City in his 
last start has not allowed a run 
in IS innings this season against 
the Angels. He walked two and 
struck out five. 

Tim Salmon had both hits for 
California, singles in the second 
and seventh innin gs. 

The A’s scored twice in the 
fifth, when Brent Gales walked 
with one out and Mike Bordick 
tripled into the right-field cor- 
ner. Bordick scored on a single 
by Scott Brosius. 

Yankees 10, Red Sox 4: New 
York, the only team hotter than 
the A's, won its seventh straight 
oy scoring 10 consecutive runs 
in Boston. 

Daryl Boston had three 
RBIs, while Bemie W illiams , 
■Jim Leyritz and Luis Polonia 
each drove in two for the Yan- 
kees, who faave won 9 of 11. 


The Red Sox manager. Butch 
Hobson, had to be restrained by 
two of his players after shoving 
an umpire three times during an 
argument. He likely will be sus- 
pended. 

Indians 9, Orioles 8 : G eve- 
land, playing at home, blew an 
8-5 lead in the top of the ninth, 
but Albert Belie hit his 21st 
homer in the bottom of the in- 
ning to beat Baltimore. 

Belle, who had three hits, 
drove an 0 -and-I pitch from 
Alan Mills into the stands in 
right-center for his 21 st home 
run. It was the third Lime this 
season that Belle had won a 
game at Jacobs Field with his 
final swing — twice with home 
runs and once with a two-run 
single. As a team, the Indians 
have won nine home games this 
year in their last at-bal. 

Royals 4, White Sox 3: David 
Cone won his 1 1 th game of the 
season as Kansas City survived 
a bases-loaded threat in the 
ninth and ended host Chicago's 
six-game winning streak. 

Jeff Montgomery got Julio 
Franco to ground out to first 
with the bases loaded and two 
outs in the ninth. Mike Macfar- 
lane had two RBIs for the 
Royals. 

Brewers 6 . Blue Jays 4: Greg 
Vaughn and Dave Nilsson 
broke open a close game with 
back-to-back homers off Dave 
Stewart as Milwaukee handed 
visiting Toronto a 10th straight 
loss — its longest such streak 
since dropping 12 straight in 
1981. 

Rangers 10, Twins 4: Jose 
Canseco singled in the tie- 
breaking run before Rusty 
Greer hit a three-run homer in a 
seventh inning that gave visit- 
ing Texas its victory over Min- 
nesota. 

Mariners 6 , Tigers 4: Edgar 
Martinez bit a i wo- ran homer 
and singled in a run. helping 
host Seattle beat Detroit and 
end a five-game losing streak. 


NEW YORK — Dwight Gooden, 
the final link to the 1 Q 86 World Se- 
ries champion New York Mets and 
the franchise's glory days of the 
1980s, has been suspended from ma- 
jor league baseball for 60 days with- 
out pay for a second violation of the 
commissioner's drug policy. 

According to a highly placed per- 
son in major league baseball. Goo- 
den failed two random drug tests 
administered as part of an aftercare 
program in which he had been en- 
rolled since his first drug-related sus- 
pension from baseball in 1987. 

At that time. Gooden underwent 
treatment at the Smilhers Cemer in 
New York Citv for cocaine abuse. 


The darling of the organization 
since he won the National League 
Rookie of the Year Award in 1984. 
then the Cy Young as the league's 
best pitcher in 1985, Gooden re- 
turned from his rehabilitation in 
mid-season 1987. 


For seven years* be had passed 
random drug tests administered by 
the commissioner's office as fre- 
quently as two to three times per 
week. He bad also rebuilt his reputa- 
tion both on and off the baseball 
field and, despite injuries and a sub- 
par pitching record the past few sea- 
sons. was widely considered to be the 
heart and soul of the Mets. 


Gooden was not present at Shea 
Stadium on Tuesday night when the 
Mets played the St. Louis Cardinals. 


In a statement released by the team, 
he said: “I have been suspended for 
breaking the rules of my aftercare 
program. Fm truly Sony it happened 
I want to apologize to the dnb, my 
teammates, and the people of New 
York City. 1 want to thank everyone 
for their past support 

“I will be bade stronger and better. 

I want to earn your respect back.” 

Gooden's teammates, members of 
the Mets 1 organization, his friends 
and even his father, Dan Gooden, 
said Tuesday that they had seen no 
signs of a relapse and were stunned 

Doctors involved with the case and 
lawyers representing both the play- 
ers' association and the owners’ Flay- 
er Relations Committee met June 23 
to discuss Gooden’s status. 


- Joe McUvaine, the Mels’ 1 generaF: 
manager, c onfirme d Tuesd^ that ^ 
the cnganizatkm had been informed 
as long as. 10 days ago that Gooden 
was under investigatwtr by the com- . 
inissionei's offiefc : 1 


Tuesday, stands to fe$I,2B, r ll£: 

When speaking in eaiiy ApnKtrf 
the relapse of Darryl Strawberry, "Hs’ 
friend and former teammate, ; Gdo- 
den acknowledged that he sdn .wasj 
challenged each antfevay-daybJ-tBe? 
temptation of drugs. • 

“Everyday, myself, I stills doh’t- 
take it for granted,'" he said 
aware of it everyday. What 'hdps 
keep me strong is knowing nogpod 
came out of it m my life. Wh«i you ' 
go through difficult times, gct dowti 
For . whatever, reasons, temptations 


:ccmb SctBnt gpi'&< 

’ ’ to.fiud tbebaBnce ln yparhfe. Foftxsj 

jSur! Kfe; r V ’ ’• 

. . - In ;the final ye&M * 3 ive-year_, ? 

-■ toot tract, Gooden had4x»d fntscrai- 

■ which. foro^Sito m&roore than 

. fiye wee&oLa-.seffiro^^^ l 

wascager'^ .1* 

v.-rJ4bw/.hc 2°*-— 

Ztfac^Mgs^^in dti ^scasg n -f-Mcfl- ^ 

'wmfefenoe Tuesday-^and^realisti- ^ 
oaUy,xtml d JutvtmadeTas fast ap- % 
pcaranqe jri a Me&gnqifem; . • - Si; 
ry’^ssdd,' mote, than ^anything,"; 7 J 


said John Bused one ^of Cfooden $-■ 







^ -» ■ 7 * \ N ; . • 



. .w» 

Sv#’ : 


‘*Lt* 

/<■ t • 





w 



Valenzuela’s Ba ckhand Gpwi 


The Associated Prea third on Gary Sheffield's angle 

Fernando Valenzuela sur- andscoredan Jeff Conmc'isao- 
prised everyone but himsdf riflee Oy/ . T :V , : ?• J J r/J 

with an impressive return to the " Valenzuela, who went . K-fO 
major leagues. last year wiflirj^ Bdlttedare; 

“A lot of us didn't think he Oriokx, got the biggest cheer of 
could throw that hard,” Benito the night wheu bc hit a two^out 
Santiago said after his Florida double to right m the fif& A. 
Marlins beat the Phillies, 2-1. crowd of 47,027.— 12389_mote 
on Jerry Browne’s ninth-inning than the. teams drew (her night 
sacrifice fly Tuesday night in • 

Philadelphia- ^ t V - 

Valenzuela, in six Innings, al- NLBfflJNDUP 

lowed ax hits and one unearned •- • r 




•foc-one rm^arid £o*dero s bdr?^ - . 
gled fcarMotttr«al-sl6th 
^■Walker had iri 


run, walking two and striking before — ■ ffllttl Yeterans Stadi- 
out one. am with its tmpiovtiu. 1 V 


Valenzuela, 33. who was The Phillies' catcher, Dairen 


;£aist: game badb':f&m a Fcxu^fi:'^ 
Astr6si 3: ' 

; Sandcrsiuthis 13th homer. aud'^jyJ 
two dotdjtes and BretBooue 
two fihs and ^twb. k&Is 

Houston lostii^ar jthe 

;• •• ' * 

fied ; W^fie 




pitching for Jalisco erf the Mod- Daulton, ah All-Star the past 
can League before signing with two seasons, was hit by two fouK 


can League before signing with two seasons, was hit by twoToul 
the Pbillies on Friday, said he balls during- the game and had 


: befbre July Wi&!hiS;St&, . - 

Afike" Ka 2 za ijcipferai , for 


felt “a little exdted when he his right clavicle broken. He. 
first took the mound, but other- will be out six weeks, r. '■ 


Fianrodo.; 






m&i 


wise, “It was a normal game for Expos 8 , Braves 7: Wfl Cor- 
me. I don’t think it’s anything dero’s RBI ringle capped a two- 
new to me. I have been doing run rally in the math- with 
this for many years.” winch Montreal handed visiting 

Florida scored its only run Atlanta its fourth straight loss 


linst him in the third after and closed to ft half-game of the' 
nek Carr reached base when NL£ast leader. ' 

first baseman John Kruk Rondefl White opened thein--' 


Smith’s j 

Inokea dein;the:-sevchtli > 

St Louis added^r nmsinH^^- 

dghth to Winin Ndy 

Cris/S: JB ria£t£l. ; 


T.’m Mihaldi • Aficncc Francc-PiO'c 

The throw that got by first baseman John Kruk set up the only run off Valenzuela. 


dropped Mariano Duncan’s ning against Steve Bedrosiarr 
throw on a ground ball to third, with a single. Moises AJou 


Carr stole second, moved to walked, Larry Walker singled 


in the m^Gts and^Don Slauglfitj^ % 
alsohpcoCTed ^ ; 


in ddcagoC ^ 


4 he game-wmrimg run 


•.y 




Major Lon gue Stentflngs 


S>. Louis 
Pimtruroh 
Ql 10000 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DWMoa 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

. New York 

46 

27 

530 

— 

Baltimore 

42 

32 

560 

4W 

Boston 

37 

37 

500 

*Vi 

DOtraH 

36 

38 

486 

low 

Toronto 

31 

43 

419 

1SW 


Centra) Dhrtskm 



Ctovatand 

43 

29 

597 

— 

Chicago 

41 

32 

562 

2W 

Kansas CHy 

40 

35 

533 

4W 

Minnesota 

39 

35 

527 

5 

Milwaukee 

36 

39 

480 

8W 


WcstDivtsian 



Texas 

34 

40 

459 

— 

California 

33 

45 

423 

3 

Seattle 

32 

«4 

42T 

3 

r Oakland 

31 

45 

408 

4 


Las Anodes 
Colorado 
San Francisco 
San Diego 


38 30 
37 37 
31 n 

west Division 

39 37 

30 41 
33 44 

30 47 


Tuesday’s Line Scores 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EOS! Division 


j. 

W L 

Pet. 

GB 

Atlanta 

46 a 

522 

— 

Montreal 

46 29 

413 

W 

‘ PhMadctohki 

38 38 

500 

9 

Ftorlda 

36 40 

474 

11 

1 New York 

33 43 

434 

14 

r 

Central Dhrtsioa 



' Chidnnati 

44 31 

587 

— 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
DOtraH 000 001 010-4 7 0 

Sconw Ml MO 301-0 12 o 

Doiiertv. Gardiner (7> and Toll lelon; Boslo. 
Rlsler (71, Avoid HI ond Wilson, w— Rlsiev. o- 
4. L — Doherty, 6-4. Sv— Ayala [101. HRs— De- 
trolt. Ptilllhn HU. Seattle. EMartlnei (71. 
Botthnora 002 000 I0S— 0 16 t 

aevehmt Ml 400 211 — i 13 0 

Rtwdcs. Wllikjntson (SI, Poole (SI. Mills (*} 
ond Holies; Grtmsiev,Lilllquist(9j.Piunk (V) 
and Alomar. W— Plunk, 6 -1 L— Mills. 7<L 
HRs— Baltimore. Hammonds IS). ChnnNand. 
Romlrez (131. Maldonado (S). Esohnxm (||, 
Bode (211. 

NOW Tort 103 420 MO— 1ft 14 1 

Boston 22ft 10ft MO-4 I 1 

Perez. Poll Wand Stanley; Minchev, Tru- 
ce* (4), Ballev IS). Valdez (7). Fauns (0). 
Russell 19) and Berrytillf. W— Perez. 64. 
L— MbietWY, 14- HRs— NY. Polar I a (i). Ve- 
larde (5). Boston. Valentin (4). Berryhlll (41. 
Kansas air IN M MI-4 6 0 

Chicago DM 101 Ml— 2 12 ft 


Cone. PfchorxJo (7). Mmlwmtry |«l and 
McFarlane; Alvarez. AAcCasklll («) and Kar 
kovlce. W— Corot. \1< L— Alvarez. 9-1 
Sv— Monloomerv (13). 

Tokos 3M lift 506— is 14 1 

Minnesota 000 M2 100- 6 0 4 

Falordo. Smith (7). Henke (» and Orttzr Pu- 
Hdo. Stevens (SI, WIKIS (7),Golhr1e 17). Camp- 
bell (71 and Walbeck. W— RUarda 34. L-Sie- 
ven&2-Z5v— Henke (51. HRs— Texas, Gonzalez 
( KI.Greer (4).Mlnnesola, Hrbek (5). Lei us 1 1 1 1. 
OKI tarn la MO MM WMi 2 1 

Oakland 900 021 00*— 3 8 0 

Lenvrich.Stwinger m and Myers: Wilt and 
Nemo rut W-Wllt. 6-7. L— Ldtwlch, 34. 
Toronto 300 Ml 000-4 a ft 

Milwaukee 1M JJ* 0Ix-6 13 1 

Stewart. Castillo (6 1 and Borders; Miranda, 
Mercedes (4). Henry (61, Orosco (8). Fetters 
(9) and Surhotf. W— Mercedes. 14. 
L— Slewarl, 5-7. Sis— Fetters 18). HRs — Mil- 
waukee. Vaughn (18). Nilsson (9), jaho (9). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
PlttdwndJ 90S MB 100—6 8 3 

Ctikngo ftin 110 mi — 5 14 2 

Ueoer, Dewey (7), Manzanillo (7). Pena (9) 
and SMuahl; Morgan, Otto (7). Bui linger 181 
and Wilkins, w— Ueoer, 4-2. L— Morgan, 14. 
Sv— Pena W. HRs — PMiaburoh, Hunter 19). 
Staughf (21. CMcoao. Hill (4). Roberson (4). 
San Diego 025 lot ooo— 9 ia I 

Colorado DM 438 01*— 10 14 3 

First Game 

Campbell. Brocoll (4). Elltotl (7) ond 
B .Johnson; Pa In ter, Moore (3). Holmes (5). 


S.Reed (6). MJMuna: (7), B.Rutfln (9) ana 
Sheotter. W— MLMunoz. 3-1. L— EllloH, 0-1. 
Sv — B. Ruffin ( II). HRs — San Diego. T.Gwvrm 
(9), D.Bell (91. E.WtlUams (21, Nieves (I). 
Colorado. Galarraoa (22). H Johnson (71. 
San Diego 1M DM ooo tg — 19 J4 e 

Colorado 000 DIB ooo to— 3 8 4 

Second Game (II Inirtnas) 

Benes. Hoffman (4), P Martinez (11) and 
Ausmiis; Harkev, Munoz (81. Walton (91. Ruf- 
fin (ID). Harris III). Moore (ID. Holttws fill 
and Glrardl. w— HoHman. 34. l— H orrh. 3-9. 
Ctoclnnatl 200 200 Ml— 5 10 8 

Houston— 808 2M 100-3 1ft 0 

Smiley, Carrasco ( 7), Brantley (9| and Dor- 
soft. Toubemee (9); Swindell, Edens (8). 
Powell (9). Veres (9), Hammer 191 and Euse- 
bio. W— Smiley, 74. I Swindell. 54. 

Sv— Brantley (8). HPs— Clnedlrmotl. Sanders 
(13). Houston, Eusebio (41. 

St Louts Dlft DM 304—8 12 1 

New York oil im oob— 6 10 2 

Tefcsberrv. Homan l7i.Murahv (D. Porez 
19), Rodriguez (9), Aracha (9) and McGrfff; 
Remllnger. Mason (0). Manzanillo (*) ond 
Hundley. W— Tewksbury, 9 7. L — Retnlfnoer. 
0-Z Sv— Arodw (0). HRs— Si. Louis, Jordan 
(4). New York. Brogno 111. Vizcaino (3). 

Atlanta M3 008 1B1— 7 18 1 

Montreal 120 dm 032-8 14 0 

Gtavlne, Slanlon IBJ.mc M ichael (81, Bedro- 
slan (9) and O-Brlen; Rue ter. Heredia (3). 
Scott (7). Rotas (9). w — Ruins, 3- 2. L—Bedro- 
slan. 0-1. HRs— Atlanta Klesko (14). Montre- 
al, Cordero (91. 


FtortdO Ml OOB 001-2 10 ft 

Pbfladetuhlo IN on oao-i to i 

Weathers. Mull s (71, Non 19) and Santiago; 
Valenzuela Stocumb (7), Ouantrlll (9), Bor- 
land (91 ond Daulton, Pratt (9). W—MuNs. Ht, 
L— Quantrlll. 2-1. Sv— Non (7). 

Son PramSsoo BID lftl ISO— « s ft 

Los Angeles M0 051 0Q*-7 11 ■ 

Hickman, Berta tsj. Frev (7), Monteteaw 
(71 text Manwarlng; H e n ti lte i and Piazza. 
W — Hershiser,6< L— Hlckerson. 2-7. HRs— San 
Frwidsca Williams (m Bonds (20), Bmztnger 
3 (71. LA, Mondesi (12), Piazza (19). 


. and ^ 

ced’ssm^ - : V T ^;' ^ 

' : ‘ P&ns XU: Sbdkfe j; 


The Michael Jordan Watch 


TUESDAY'S GAME; Jordon was 240r-3 
with an RBI single ond a double In Birming- 
ham's 54 win over the Memphis Chicks. He 
walked In then rst, and had a doubts and later 
scored an a oassed ball In Ibe fifth Inning. He 
hada RBI single and sloiesecond in the slxfh; 
grounded Into a Holder* choice in the eighth 
Inning. Jordan had three Put outs In right Held. 

SEASON TO DATE : Jordan Is batting xa 
(53-far-au) with 24 nms,12doubles,one triple. 
20 RBIs. 28 walks, 71 strikeouts and 20 stolen 
bases In 32 attempts. He has 123 outouts. three 
assists and eight errors In tight HeUL 


OwnlcfH 32 31 0 508 

Yafcutt 31 31 8 500 

Yo ko h am a 30 32 0 .484 

Honsfibi 28 36 8 438 

Hiroshima 24 35 0 MI 

WMoesdort Basalts 
Hanshhi 12. Yomtorl 4 
awnhW 7, Hrttttkna 1 
Yokohama 8, Yokldt 3 

Padflc League 
W L T Pet 
Salbu 39 22 0 439 

Dalai 34 28 0 548 

Orix 34 29 0 540 

Lotte 39 34 0 460 

Kintetsu 26 35 1 426 

Nippon Horn 25 39 1 491 


Salbu 

Dalai 

Orix 

Lotte 

Kintetsu 

Nippon Mom 


PCL OB 
439 — 

548 5W 
540 6 

460 11 

426 13 
■391 ISW 


wednesdoy"s Resoils 
Lotto 5. Soibu 4 
Orix 12. Kintetsu 4 
Nlpoan Ham 6, Dolel 4 


Central League 

w L T PCI. GB 
42 22 0 556 - 


A meric an Lcow 

MINNESOTA— Put Pat Meares, sh or t s top, 
on T 5-day disabled list, r et re ad hie June 23. 
Recal led Dermv Hock Mg. shortstop, (ram Sait 
Lake City. PCL. 

TORONTO— Signed John Graver, Pttchor. 
and Michael Starnse, 2nd basentai. Sent Dan- 
ny Cox, pitcher, to Dunedin. F5L tor a 30-day 
rehoMtnatton assignment. 


FLORIDA— Signed Brian M co dows.pHtt>- 
er. Recalled GnegO'HaflanPLcaKtmMtiflekt 
#r, tram Portland, EL. Sent Kurt MJHer.nflrt- 
or, to E dmont on , PCL. 

PHI LADELPH IA— Sunt Mika Williams. 
ptt O t M , to Scra n ton- WBkes^Banra,iL. Bought . 
cont i u u t of re ruondo Vatonmia; pitder. 

SAN OiEGO- : nAUfvntiNfI>(iugBRiaolLiiHictF 
or, tram lfrdoy dNaUed UtL CaBod up Nptvto 
Nlavw. ou tlle id Bi . rtoi Las Veoas. P CL OMto- 
nand ajl Smr. Mtcher, for asMoment.. 

SAN FRANOSCO— Put Bill SwtR, PHriNr.an 
15day disabled Rst, retroactive Juno M. Rs- 
called Bred Brink. pitcher, from Phoenix, PCL 
BASKETBALL 

Naflaaal BaskeBMfl Awdotta 

BOSTON— Stoned Do* Brawn, guard, to 
multiyear contract extension. 

CHICAGO— Named Jimmy Rodgers assis- 
tant coach. 

GOLDEN STATES— Chris Webber, tor- 
word. has sxsrdaed option on co n t rac t, mak- 
ing Mm i a rt i cl ed tree agent 

NJ. MET S Named Butch Beard coach. 

PHILADELPHIA— Clarence Wenttwr- 
spoon, forworn Iws exorcised option an eon- 
bud, making Mm restricted tree agent 
FOOTBALL 

National Football Lemma t 

GREEN BAY — Signed Dexter McHotth 
fullback and Keo Coleman. linebacker, 
PHILADELPHIA Si gn e d Bract WaUcer^a- - 
tensive tackle, to three Wear enati ucis and 
Michael ZonScA safely, to Wear contract 


. of ia dauWd^riw^^ai^K 
Dante 

cri mfidd ang|c 

umingof tl^ first game .axppcd ; ^ 
Orforado’s txmiebadc brim 
8-0 deficit after four insing^ Z . 
Kncb-bitta- Howard JoteisGD^:^ . 

. grand siam in a sx-nm- /o 6 i^ ^ - : 
followed Andrea 1 Galairaga^J ; - f • ■ 
two-run hom£x, Jns 22d, . 

got the Rodries on. the boardT : 

In the second game, Melwiri . 
Nieves hit a pinch RBI siQgte Z 
fflid Tony-Gwyiin a 
single intheUth.A wfldpitcii^-': 
and a hit batsmen aJlowed #ffe^ -- 
more rtms;. arid thnw. mnte ' v • 
scored when pitcher Darieri’ — j 
H olmes and dwttstop 'fWar: 
Weiss made crrors ont , .Brad^i .- 
Aosmus's bases-loaded ^ . ' 

er. up the middle: .. - 


ttec :-s2u 




SlSTiT!*: 

is Sea Y/fk 

cainiuw ,-h; i 


.DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 




CALVIN AND HOBBES 



OKAY, I TIEP MY OU)M 
v SHOES. ..NOW WHAT? 



N0UJ, V0U CAN UlALX. OR 
RUN, OR JUMR OR. P 0 
ANYTHING YOU WANT.. 


YOU MEAN I DON'T HAVE 
JO GET PERMISSION? > 


GARFIELD 

C OPIE IS THRILL EP 
7 TO SEE ME 





-N 

HEUfl? J 


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1 .. . 



CALVIN, 

IS THIS 

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CRIED W 
OK? 
THIS 1SNT 
CALVIN. 



CALVIN. I’VE / 
GW WORK TD { 
DO. Hi SEE \ 
WHEN 1 A 
GET HONE. . 
OK? <aQQ081£. 


WMT/ BO 
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AK1CSWB 
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PHOOEf." THIS’ SECRET; -1- :f 

HWrm sivef ishard ~~J$ vj 

<5ET USB) TO.^J^ : 



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f OK AM, WE'S 

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WIZARD of ID 


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SPORTS 


Barkley to Play 
For NBA’s Suns 
Another Season 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1994 


Page 21 


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TSf j4BK»urf Prt« 

PHOENIX — Th anks to teammate 
Danny Ajngc, Charles Barkley win be back 
with the Phoenix Suns of the National 
Basketball Association this fall 

Barkley says he is committed to rehabili- 
tating ins ailing back and mil return for at 
least one more season. He said Ainge had 
talked fr™ mu of retiring while the two 
played in a golf tournament last weekend 
m Toronto. 

“He kept challenging me, telling me. Tf 
you do everything you’re supposed to do, 
you can be good again.’ " Barkley said at a 
news conference Tuesday that drew almost 
as much attention as the league's draft on 
Wednesday night “I wanted to change my 
mind" about retiring, be said, “but I 
couldn't do it myself. I wanted somebody 
to talk me into coming back. I want to 
yhank Ainge for staying on my case.*' 

Bartley, 31, said he planned to start July 
15 on an eight-week rehabilitation pro- 
gram developed by a California bade spe- 
cialist and recommended by the golfing 
great Jack Niddaus. 

“My body needs a complete overhaul,” 
he said. “I don’t think TU ever be pain-free 
a gain ... but the bottom line is I’m going 
to do the work it takes. I know 1 can do iL 1 
Can do anything I put my mind to. This is a 
big challenge for me — a challenge to my 
pride — and I’ve never backed down from 
a challenge.” 

Barkley, an eight-time All-Star, admits 
he has never been known for his diligence 
in the off-season or in the training room 
before. 

“Up until the Olympics” in 1992, “I 
□ever touched a basketball during the sum- 
mer,” he said. “I don’t believe m playing 
basketball during the summer. I don't be- 
lieve in working out duringthe summer. If 
you’ve been through an NBA season, you 
get physically and mentally exhausted. 

“But I wasn’t happy with the way last 
yflimn ended. I don’t want to be. remem- 
bered temping around. That’s why I want 
to play ajgain. I want my last season to be 
fun.” . , 

• Golden State forward Chris Webber, 
the lop pick in last year's draft and the 
leagocsrookie of the year, has exercised a 
contract -option that will make him a re- 
stricted free agent on July 1. . 

His 15-year, 574.4 million contract con- 
tains a danse that allows him to become a 
restricted free agent. Having exercised the 
option, he. may field offers from other 
teams beginning Friday: •. 

Under league rules, the Warriors have 
15 days to match any such offer and re- 

signtbepoww^orw&rd. • - 

• The NBA Flayers Association won the 

- - fir s t round in its off - ooart battle^witb-ti^— 
league.^ '• 7 

UJSL District Court Judge John F. 
Keenan, acting on the places antitrust 
suit, granted a temporary restraining order 
in New York preventing the signing erf any 
contracts between teams and players until . 
the NBA can show cause at a hearing on 
July ft. • 

The union, filed suit Monday against the 
league and its 27 teams, contending that 
the . draft, the salary cap and the right of 
first refcsal are illegal under antitrust laws. 

That was in response to a smt by the 
league, which sought to extend terms of the 
collective bargaining agreement that ex- 
pired last Thursday. 



Sampras to Face Martin in Semis, 
Becker Will Take On Ivanisevic 


0*^ 



•TWj 




By Leonard Shapiro 

Washmgtor Ptm Service 

WIMBLEDON, England — 
After Piete Sampras Sad just 
broken Michael Chang’s serve 
in the third game of the second 
set, a bellowed request from a 
man in the crowd resounded 
Wednesday around Wimble- 
don’s Centre Court: “Come on, 
Pete, give him a break!” 

But for Michael Chang on 
this crisp and sunny afternoon 
of four men’s quarterfinal 
matches, there were no breaks, 
there was no chance against the 
world’s top-ranked player, a 
m an everyone says is now play- 
ing at a level above all the rest 
Never was that more obvious 
than during Sampras's precise 
and very nearly perfect 6-4, 6- 1, 
6-3 defeat of ms old friend and 
lon g- time foe. 

“There was a moment there 
today where everything just 
really clocked,” Sampras said. 
“I don’t fed like 1 was in a zone, 
but I was getting there. Today’s 
tennis was pretty much flawless 
on my side. I didn’t give him a 
chance to get into his game.” 

Sampras, the 22-year-old de- 
fending champion, will now 
take a winning streak of 15 
straight sets into bis semifinal 
match Friday against fellow 
American Todd Martin, a 6-3, 
6-2, 3-6, 5-7, 7-5 winner over 
Wayne Ferreira of South Africa 
in the day’s longest match, 3 


horns and 4 minutes. Martin, a 
quarterfinalist a year ago, has 
never been this far at Wimble- 
don and lost in straight sets to 
Sampras in the final of the Aus- 
tralian Open in January. 

For Boris Becker, the three- 
time Wimbledon champion, it 
was another victory ana anoth- 
er day of controversy after his 
7-6 (7-5), 6-4. 6-3 triumph over 
a polite but perturbed Christian 
Bttgstrom of Sweden on Court 

, In the other semifinal. 
Becker, the seventh seed, wifl 
face Croatia’s Goran Ivanisevic, 
a 7-6 (7-3), 7-6 (7-3). 6-4 winner 
over a fellow lefthander, the 
serve-and-voDey specialist Guy 
Forget of France. Ivanisevic, the 
fourth seed, had 29 aces and Us 
serve was docked at 136 miles 
(85 kilo meters) an hour, believed 
to be a record speed since the 
men's tour began keeping re- 
cords in 1990. 

Bergstrom was upset that 
Becker raised his and 
called one of the Swedes’ shots 
out at set point in the first set, 
causing Bergstrom to hit his own 
forehand volley into the net. The 
ball had not bees called out by 
the dmir Of the Knifeman ana 
Becker actually returned it, rais- 
ing his aim after he hit the shot 
bade Bergstrom said he instinc- 
tively stopped playing when he 
heard Becker cry out, then net- 
ted his forehand return. 


Becker won the point and the 
set and Bergstrom argued to no 
avail with with the umpire. “I 
asked him if he’s allowed to do 
that, to call the ball out and 
stop play,” Bergstrom said. “He 
said it was allowed. ... I was a 
little bit disturbed.” 

Bergstrom also was not hap- 
py with Becker’s delaying tac- 
tics later while the Swede was 
trying to serve. This came a day 
after Becker's fourth-round op- 
ponent, Andr ei Medvedev of 
Ukraine, had complained that 
Becker had used a similar tactic 
against him as Medvedev was 
serving with a 4-2 lead in the 
fifth seL After the ball left Med- 
vedev’s racket. Becker raised his 
hand to si gnal he was not ready, 
and the chair ordered Medve- 
dev to serve again. 

Becker was fined 51,000 this 
week for having his trainer give 
him treatment after he left the 
court for a toilet break during a 
match against Javier Frana of 
Argentina on Saturday. Frana, 
several other players and the 
NBC commentator John McEn- 
roe, a three-time champion at 
Wimbledon, said Becker should 
have been disqualified from the 
tournament for that 

“If you’re good enough, win 
without cheating,” Medvedev 
complained on Tuesday. 

Bergstrom said Wednesday 
that he “wouldn’t go so far as 
’cheating,’ but in every match. 


Due C«uttln/Thc AlBflMtd Prta 

Pete Sampras(above) quick-stepped by Michael Chang, 6-4, 6- 1, 6-3, to reach 
the men’s semifinals in just I hour, 51 minutes. As Boris Becker (left) went all 
out to win the last 12 points in beating Christian Bergstrom, 7-6 (7-5), 6-4, 6-3, 
he caused more controversy — while his wife, Barixara, watched anxiously. 




■ > I-.-:- • 4; jgrtpisL- 


Frank Lemdurdi/Actncc F ranee- Prcar 


n t”*. ■ • z '* *. v*. 


G3 ABaV/Tbe 



■ - ■ 7 .. - Fi wir aow L . ' Czech Star Taken 3d in Topsy-Turvy NHL Draft 

T. Florida. Ed JovonawkL d. Windsor (OHU. 1 Mokrtn. OlM Tvofdovsfcv. d. Krylla 1 ml mi 


* ; 


3owtoMltaKow.l Ottawa Rad* BohfccvLaaveflas UHL). 4 Edmonton (from Winnipeg). 
Jam' Boratanom c. NIOMre Fatts (OHU. 5, Hartford, Jafl OtMfl, c Goal oh (OHL). 6. 
Edmonton. Bran Smyth. hKMoose Jaw (WHU. 7. Uo Anartaj, Jarnfe Starr. ftOwam Sound 
IOHU. XTamn Bay, Jam Warner, hr, Portland. (WHU. 9. Maw Vorh lalondoni (from 
Quabac). Brett LMoa.ni, Kimfon (OHU.1&WaaUnBfan Oram QuabacairoMh Toronto). 
Nolan BawnoarhMr. (k KsrrdeaM. (WHU. li. SanJada, Jafl FtMilKpc. neadn (WHLl.iZ 
Ouahac (from Maw' Yortt Idondarsl-Woda Botak. d, Soafcotaoa (WHLI. 

U. VanaxjHar, Mcttias Ohlwid. d, PHeo Drvfaion LsWwJ#a.T4 CWcom, Etfian Moreau, iw, 
HtOBOfORato (OHL). UaV to l U radoaX lawM riqMVainoy.rw, Cato Moscow. 16. Toronto 
(from WoMnatM), eric FtefHRNbs, CWenriterf IQMMLL 17. SuftoiA Wayna Primoau, c 
Oarans Saand (OHU. IK Montreal. Brad Broom, <L North Bay (OHU. », Cdoonr. Chrlo 
Olneraaibhr, Brandon {WHLI. » D«dJa«. Jam BoUcrW, D^MIeMsan (CCHA).2l. Boston, 
E«MWWalxMiw.a^UtaMLPornHMHURoMl%ZLOual»c(fromTorenfo),JaHreyKMlty,<L 
Ofl<oBcjM in orW<U5HS>aWl.g.Pairofrr'V<mGoMloya»ty,d.Oy n cinoMtw c ow.»a,PHl» 
twrWLCJrtWrtto. c.Soortit (WHU.H. Maw Jcraey. VoWre Shoriflonow, rw.Sotevor. Russia 
at Maw York ftansert Don Ooutlcr, a Saurt «a Mario (OHU. 

... SECOND ROU1KI1 . 

V. Florida RMT HMwrenar, alsemimom <WHU, 2t AnoMm. Johtn Oerittoon.c.HV7)- 
JankoolnsrSwoden. 27. Ottawa StmUov Hadw.d,BodaIovioa,CMch RaoubliaMWInmpoa 
Daren QuM,d, SaoWa (WHU. at Florida (from Hartford!. Jason PodoUon. rw-a Spokana 
(WHLI. 3t Edmontorii MHto Wort. Net StroMord Jr. & 33. LM Anooled. Molt JoMson, fw, 
PotertMriMoh (OHU.M Tainpo Bair. CoBln Ctoutlcr, ft Braidoa (WHU. 3i Quebec, J«*af 
Morhae, JMoyaQnKh RfltwDlla3t Ftarlda (from PhUodrtpWoLRvon Johnson, evTnundar 
Bay (USHUja^an JnsaAnoolMIkiitar^. UMnovJtMaw York WondaraJoKM HoHantd. 

KamlooM(WHL}.3KvanCQuwar.Robb Garden. aPoaMlI RtMr.Jr.A.4acMoaM.J«ni-Y«ts 

LaromcJK B ws art (QMJHL). -n. woahbwion, Scott Charrey, Iw, North Boy (OHLI. c. 
VcBM0OMr(fram Sf. LouMI. bom SOBtefinnl.a Portland (WMLMXBiifHla Corn* fcttnvc. 
Moosa jaw (WHLJ.-4*. MOntreoL Jom Theodore, a St Joan IQMJHL). A Caloary, Dimitri 
RafcvfcfcuL DynomolMoseow. at, DnBoa, Lae Jtnmon, a North Bay (OHU. *7, Boston, Daniel 
GMKOKtNrlJMal (QMJHU- 4K -Toronto, Saw Haooarty.tw, DatroH (OHL). 49, Detroit, 
MoHdau'Dandeoaun. rw. Sharhreokn (QMJHU.SK Ptttrtwrotv RJ chord Pare, a Mlevllta 
' (OHLIJt Mow Jareey.Pa»r!fcEllaaf,fClodne^iariiRapi*llfcJa, New Yore RanoaraRiidBtf 
Vardfc « stovnrr BratWovo. 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

. HARTFORD, Connecticut 
— Aimed with the first choice 
in the National Hockey 
League’s entry draft, the Flori- 
da Panthers passed over Radek 
Book, the Czech center ranked 
No. 1 by the league’s Central 
Scouting Department, and in- 
stead chose Ed Jovanovski, a 
Canadian whose 18th birthday 
fell cm Sunday. 

Jovanovski, a defenseman 
who played last season for the 
Windsor Spitfires of the Ontar- 
io Hockey League, was ranked 
third by the scouts. 

The second team to pick, the 
Anaheim Mighty Ducks, also 
passed over Bonk in favor of 
Oleg Tverdovsky. a defenseman 
from Donetsk Ukraine, who 
has beeai an ace for the Moscow 1 


team Kiylja Sovelov since he 
was 14. 

Bock ended up the third 
choice in Tuesday night’s first 
two rounds of the draft, select- 
ed by the Ottawa Senators. 
Playing in North America for 
the first time last season, hehad 
87 points in 76 games for the 
Las Vegas Thunder of the Inter- 
national Hockey League and 
was tabbed a canT-miss pros- 
pect in the pros. 

“To tell you the truth, I was 
shocked,” Jovanovski said. 

When Jamie Storr from the 
Canadian major junior ranks 
was taken No. 7 by the Los 
Angeles Kings, it was the high- 
est pick for a goalie since Tom 
Barrasso was the No. 5 choice 
by Buffalo in 1983. 

The draft, also had some 


CROSSWORD 


wheeling and dealing involving 
such major names as Toronto 
left wing Wendel Clark and 
Quebec center Mats Sundin. 

Hie Maple Leafs sent Clark, 
their captain; Sylvain Lefebvre, 
Landon Wilson and their 22d 
pick to the Nordiques for Sun- 
din. Garth Butcher, Todd War- 
riner and Quebec’s No. 10 pick 

But the Maple Leafs never 
got to use that pick because the 
New York Islanders drafted 
ahead of them thanks to anoth- 
er deal with Quebec and got the 
player the Maple Leafs wanted, 
Brett Lindros, the younger 
brother of Philadelphia center 
Eric Lindros. 

The Islanders had acquired 
the No. 9 selection in a deal that 
sent defenseman Uwe Krupp to 
Quebec for center Ron Sutter. 

With Lindros gone, the Ma- 
ple Leafs gave the No. 10 pick 


to Washington in a trade for 
Mike Ridley. 

With it, Washington selected 


• The new owners of the 
Hartford Whalers said that 


wire IL Tranxiuiguiu bhcueu Holmgren would relin- 

Canadian juniors defenseman qui^h hjg role as general manag- 
Nolan Baumgartner from Kam- a A.~A 


loops of the WHL 
Edmonton, with two of the 


er and return as head coach for 
next season. The announce- 
ment came after the NHL 


first six picks, didn't trade ei- board of governors approved 
ther. With Nos. 4 and 6, respec- the $47 J million sale of the 
tively, the Oilers selected two franchise to a group from the 
forwards from the C a na d i an Compuware Corp. 
major junior ranks, Jason Bon- „ , . . . .. „„ . 

signore of Niagara Falls of the Holmgren, lured as the Whal- 

OuLario Hockey League and ears coach in June 1992 under 
Ryan Smyth of Moos? Jaw of ? e former orow. Richjtfd Gor- 
tbc Weston Hockey League. Jon, was 30-63-8 m 101 games 
«= a. j ° , before stepping down last No- 
Forward Alexander Khar la- afWaVlI-2 start At 

moy, son of the former Russian ^ time, be indicated he was 
Red Army star Valen Kharla- disappointed with the lacklus- 
tnov, was taken 1 5th by Wash- ^ rff ort of D f his players 


the Western Hockey League. 

Forward Alexander Kharla- 
mov, son of the former Russian 
Red Army star Valeri Kharla- 
mov, was taken 15th by Wash- 
ington. 


and handed over the coaching 


The draft’s f inal nine rounds reins to Pierre McGuire, whom 
were to be completed Wednes- Holmgren discharged last 


month. 


(NYT, AP) 


there is a little psychological 
war, and you do what you have 
to do and what is best for you to 
win a match. Sometimes, it's a 
little disturbing.” 

Becker said he has a perfectly 
dear conscience and dismissed 
what be described as “all these 
silly questions.” Instead he 
wanted to talk about his having 
advanced to the semifinals for 
the second straight year. 

And Bergstrom’s complaint 
at the end of the first set? 

“We bad a long rally and he 
was at the net,” Becker said. 
“He smashed it and 1 thought 
he smashed it long. . . . The um- 
pire and the linesman didn't 
think so and he missed his fore- 
hand volley. That was it. It's an 
unfortunate play at set point.” 

"But everything is going so 
fast and you don't have time to 
react, you just do it by instinct.” 
he said. "You know. I want to 
make one thing clear. I don't 
like what’s going on for the past 
two or three days. I’ve been 
doing the same things for the 
last 10 years. All of a sudden 
this is not supposed to be fair. 

"rm within the rules,” he 
said. “Everybody has their way 
of doing things on the court. . :. 
Maybe the main reason thejy 
speak up is because they lost.* 

Sampras's way of doing 
things against Chang was tp 
never allow him in the match. 
Though he managed to get only 
half his first serves in, Chang 
was able to win only 17 points 
on Sampras’s serve all day. sev- 
en in the first two sets. j 

"Pete’s at the moment whese 
I think he’s reached the pe k Of 
his career,” Chang said re pect- 
fully. “A couple of years agp, 
you could definitely say he wft 
weak in quite a few areas. Cer- 
tain parts would crac. under 
pressure or fail him in tight 
spots. He’s changed that” ! 

Sampras was able to do it all 
on Wednesday. If Chang initi- 
ated a rally, Sampras would hit 
the ball back harder and move 
his foe from one side of the 
court to the other, constantly 
keeping Htm off balance. On the 
rare occasions that Chang came 
up to the net Sampras’s passing 
shots were ringing past his ears. 
When Chang did chase-down 
and return -the shots,, he found 
Sampras waiting at the net 

Chang’s -best chance to- gel- 
back into the match came when 
he traded 3-1 in the third set on 
Sampras serve. The game ini- 
tially got to deuce on one of 
Sampras's three double faults. 
Twice more after Sampras took 
the advantage. Chang managed 
to get back to deuce. 

But then Chang hit a topspin 
forehand return of serve deep, 
and Sampras unloaded a big 
first serve (hat Chang hit weak- 
ly toward the neL The ball just 
hit the lop of the cord and trick- 
led over, but Sampras was right 
there to take it on the bounce 
and put away his own angled 
shot for the game and a 4-1 
lead. 

At that point, the actor Jack 
Nicholson, who bad been 
watching most of the match, 
left Centre Court, knowing full 
well that Chang no longer had a 
chance. About 15 minutes later, 
it was all over, an hour and 51 
minutes of sublime play by the 
world’s top-ranked player. 

“There ware times when 1 feft 
anything I hit was going to be a 
drop volley winner or a good 
volley,” Sampras said. “If 
there’s one thing I didn’t do 
well today, it was serve, which is 
my best &ol But that’s kind of 
nitpicking a little.” 


MEN'S DOUBLES, QUARTERFINALS 
Grant Connell, Canada end Patrick Gat- 
brantt (2), USLOeL La) Bate, soutti Africa, 
and Brett Steven. New Zealand. 7-* 17-3), 7-4 
(7-3). 6-2; More Gort iw, Germany, mi Yov- 
oamr KcrfotaHcuv (14), Rinata, det Tom Nib. 
son. Netherlands, mid Cyril So* (6). Czech 
Republic « IB-1M. WW.H 
WOMENS DOUBLES, QUARTERFINALS 
Nicole Arendt. US. and Kristine Radford. 
Australia del. Natalia Medvodeva Ukraine 
and Larisa Nellaiid m. Latvia 2-6. 6-1 6-1; 
Manwi BaUearat. NethartandA and Nurttna 
Novrottfava (41 UJ. dot Inoeihe Drleiwi s, 
MethertaiKlhfandMaloMwrte. Croatia 6-1 6-2. 

























“S' 



PORTS 




■ ' ■'■■* ; p'*- — 




( ••rnfitrJ hi- Our Staff From Dispatcher 

MEXICO CITY — Rampaging youths 
smashed car windows, beat one man to 
death and marred a giant celebration for 
Mexico’s advance in World Cup play. 

Another man died from injuries sus- 
tained when he fell off the roof of a hi- 
jacked bus and at leasi 80 people were 
injured. 16 of them seriously. 

The street fiestas, with scattered out- 
bursts of violence, erupted minutes after 
the 1-1 tie Tuesday with Italy that clinched 
Mexico's second-round berth in the tour- 
nament. 

One group of about 100 youths, many of 
them apparently drunk, roamed near 
downtown, smashing windows and looting 
a liquor store. 

“We foreigners were very frightened," 
said Elisa Alvarez, 49, of Sao Paulo, as she 
helped a friend reach the Mexican Red 
Cross hospital. 

"People were hilling other people with 
bottles and sticks and running all about." 
she added. 

On the fringes of a throng of Mexicans 
feverishly waving flags and dancing to ma- 
riachi music, bands of shirtless youths at- 
tacked people, hijacked city buses and 
smashed shop windows. 


Past nightfall, bloodied victims arrived 
at the Red Cross hospital emergency en- 
trance every few minutes in ambulances. 

Worried relatives at the hospital peered 
through the grimy white emergency room 
doors as doctors worked on victims with 
injuries — from gashes caused by flying 
rocks to broken bones, and other injuries 
sustained in fistfights. 

Downtown, a man was beaten uncon- 
scious by a gang of about 20 youths, then 
fatally wounded with a powerful firecrack- 
er was left to explode beside his head. 

A second man beaten by the gang as 
hundreds of people watched in horror was 
reported in serious condition. 

At least 80 people were injured, accord- 
ing to Lhe Red Cross. Sixteen had to be 
hospitalized, and most of the rest were 
given first aid on the spot and allowed to 
go home. 

On Friday, at least 1 18 people were 
injured during clashes that followed Mexi- 
co’s victory over Ireland in First-round 
play. But while hundreds of riot police 
stayed away Tuesday, the lack of security 
allowed vandals to roam with impunity. 

“Viva Mexico! Mexico, Mexico rah "rah 
rah!" the crowd roared as brief case- toting 
businessmen joined high school students 


OF WORLD CUP GAMES, RESULTS, STANDINGS 


FIRST ROUND 

Tinea pants a named tor a net •on 
>- Advanced to second round 

GROUP A 


ai Pontiac. Mieti. 
BrazB 1. Sweden 1. In 

GROUP C 


•-Rcimarta 
i-Smrzeriana 
* -Unued S«a«s 
Colombia 


T OP GA Pis 
0 5 S 6 


0 2 
1 2 
2 I 


Saturday June 18 

Ai Pontiac, Mien. 

Switzerland i . UmlM Staiet 1 . tie 
At Pasadena, CoV. 

Romania J. Colombia i 

Wednesday June 22 
At Poniiac. Mien 

Switzerland 4. Romania \ 

ai Pasadena. Coni. 

United Slates 2. Colombia 1 

Sunday June 26 
Ai Pasadena. CaH. 

Romania i. United Slaws 0 

At Stanford. CaM. 

Colombia 2. Switzerland Cl 
GROUP B 

W L T GF GA Pit 


W 

x-Gannony 2 

x-Spain 1 

South Korea 0 

Boftma 0 

Friday June 17 

At Chicago 
Germany I. BoHvtoO 

At Dados 
Spain 2. South Korea 2, Ha 

Tuesday June 21 
At Chicago 

Germany 1. Spain I. tie 

Thursday June 23 
At FoxOoto, Maes 
South Korea U, Boawa, o. tie 
Monday Jine 27 
Ai Chicago 
Span 3, BonviH 1 

AiOattas 

Germany 3. South Korea 2. 

GROUP D 


L T GF GA PU 

0 15 3 7 

6 
4 


At 

Argentina vs. Bulgaria. 2335 GMT 
GROUP E 

* L T GF GA Pis 


1 


A 5 
5 2 
4 1 


x-Urudco 1113 

x-ireianl 1112 

x-Boty 1112 

1111 

Saturday June 18 

At East Rutherford. NJ. 
Ireland 1. Italy 0 

Sunday June 19 
At Washington 
Norway 1. Mexico 0 

Thursday June 23 
At East Rutherford, NJ. 
Italy 1. Norway 0 

Friday June 24 
At Orlando. Fla. 
Mexico 2, Ireland 1 

Tuesday June 28 

At E88t Rutherford, NJ. 
Ireland 0, Norway 0. He 

Ai Washington 
Italy l .Mexico l. He 


3 4 

2 4 

2 4 

1 4 


x-Srazil 

i-Svrttdfn 

Russia 

Cameroon 


Sunday June 18 

Ai Pasadena. Cant 
Cameroon 2. Sweden 2. tie 

Monday June 20 
AT Sian karts. Caiii. 
Brazil 2. Russia 0 

Friday June 24 
Ai Stanford. Cdif. 
Brazil 3. Cameroon o 

at Pontiac. Mich 
Sweden 3 Rusaa 1 

Tuesday June 28 
AI Stanford. Calif 
Russia 5. Cameroon l 


x- Argentina 
Ngana 
Bulgaria 
Greece 


T GF GA PM 

o b i e 


1 i o 

1 1 o 

0 2 0 

Tuesday June 21 

AtFoxboro, Mass. 
Argentina 4, Greece 0 

At Dallas 

Nigeria 3. Bulgaria 0 

Saturday June 2S 
At Foxtxro. Mess. 
Argentina 2. Nigeria 1 

Sunday June 26 
At Chicago 
Bulgaria 4. Greece □ 

Thursday June 30 
A] Foxtxxo, Mass. 
Greece vs. N^ena. 2335 GMT 


2 3 

3 3 

a o 


x-Natnanands 
x-Sejdi Arabia 
x-Bolglum 
Morocco 


GROUP F 
W L 

2 1 
2 r 


T GF GA Pt* 

o 4 3 a 


3 fi 
1 6 
5 0 


The Official Sprint World Cup 
Information Line 

Call 

+ 1 + 177 + 230 + 4348 * 

for daily updates on scores , players and 
game recaps 



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WorldCupiiSAW |p 

Calls will be billed standard LDD rates 
• In Italy, dial +1+21 1-230-4348 



Sunday June 18 

Af Orlando, Fla 
Belgium 1 . Morocco 0 

Monday June 2D 

Ai Washington 
Netherlands 2, Saudi Arabia 1 
Saturday June 25 
At Orlando. Ra. 

Belgium 1. Netherlands O 

At East Rutherford. NJ. 

Saudi Arabia 2, Morocco i 

Wednesday Jwe 29 
At Orlando. Fla 
Netherlands 2, Morocco 1 

At Washington 
Saudi Arabia 1. Belgium 0 

SECOND ROUND 

Saturday Juty 2 
Game 37 

AI Chicago 

Germary vs. Group B or F ttad ptaee, I ne QMT 
Gama 38 
Ai Washington 

Switzerland v& Spain. 2035 GMT 
Sunday July 3 
Game 39 

At Mob 

Group F second place w Sweden, l7Ug GMT 

Com 40 

Af Pasadena, Caiii. 

Romania va. Holy or D Wrd place. 2035 GMT 
Monday July 4 
Gant 41 
Ai Orlando. Fla 

Group F winnar *& inland, 1605 GMT 


For Brazil, the Pressure 




Eu.smr CurciJ 'Agcil* Fraikir-Pieu 

Kennel Andersson (rear), kicking the ball by Maura Silva, surprised Brazil by putting Sweden ahead in the 24th minute. 

led, Scores Injured in Mexico City 


in black leather jackets and mothers push- 
ing baby strollers. 

But as drunkenness increased, so did the 
violence. 

Tm from a country of 3 million people 
and this looks like Lhere are 3 milli on 
people on this street." said a New Zealand 
schoolteacher, Steve Tonnies. “It does get 
a little intimidating." 

• Boisterous fans celebrating Mexico's 
victory clashed again with police in the 
central business district of Huntington 
Park, near Los Angeles. 

Several businesses were looted, police 
said, but there was no immediate estimate 
of damage. A 3-year-old girl was hit with a 
bottle and several officers suffered minor 
bruises, police said. There was no word on 
the girl’s condition. 

At one point, more than 100 revelers, 
mostly young men, ransacked a fireworks 
stand, quickly overcoming employees who 
tried to prevent the plunder. Ecstatic loot- 
ers ran off with armfuls of July 4th fire- 
works, some of which were quickly lit and 
thrown at police. 

Authorities said arrests numbered no 
more than a dozen, as their priority was to 
disperse the crowd- (A P. LATi 


International Herald Tribune 

PONTIAC, Michigan — The mixed 
zone in the basement is where the perform- 
ers and their critics meet, separated by a 
low steel barrier and the misunderstand- 
ings of language. Entrapped there by a 
modem Homeric monster — multi-armed, 
-legged, -leased, -microphoned — the Bra- 
zilian manager, Carlos Alberto Parreira, 
appeared to be pleading for his life. 

He was smirking in a very cool sort of 
way, the way they teach you in the movies, 
but his arms were moving like he was 
riding a unicycle along a tightrope over a 
pit of crocodiles, so he basically was plead- 
ing. Even though his team: 

1 ) Had just won its World Cup group; 

2) Remains favored to win the final on 
July 17; 

3) Gets to return to its home base of San 
Frandsco to play the vastly inferior U.S. 
team on July 4. 

Unhappily, ail of this had resulted from 
a 1-1 draw with Sweden on Tuesday. The 
Swedes were altogether happy, for at home 
they recall Brazil’s 5-2 victory over host 
Sweden in the 1958 World Cup final, the 
co min g out of the 17-year-o!d Pete. Tues- 
day’s i^aw clinched second place for Swe- 
den in Group B and a second-round 
match with Saudi Arabia, which can not be 
taken lightly after it stunned Belgium on 
Wednesday. 

Parreira responded to the Swedes' 
ness by accusing them of playing for 
draw. The Swedes said they had played to 
win. and it's hard to argue with them since 
they did score the first goal, on a long high 
cross chested down by Kennet Andersson in 
the 24th minute. On the first bounce he toed 
it high to the far comer, past Claudio Taf- 
farri, the goalkeeper who hadn’t allowed 
anything past Him in the first two games. 

It came as a huge shock, even though 
Sweden ( without its leading striker, Marten 
Dahlin. suspended for yellow cards) had 
been threatening to knock down the arro- 
gant favorites from the beginning. The 
B razilians have felt loo much at home in 
this country — even in the hideous Silver- 
dome, where the light is artificial, the air as 
fresh as on an overnight flight; where the 
Brazilian drum-beating and whistling 
thumped off the roof and combined with 
the latent humidity to make the 76, 000- 
seat arena feel like an engine room in the 
belly of an overworked snip. 

The Brazilians have proved themselves 
to be the most talented and least passion- 
ate contenders of the first round. They 
deserve credit for keeping their beads amid 
the overwhelming demands at home, but 




then they began treating the ball like .a 
priceless breakable. They held it, moved it 

from riace to place to hide it, but nevw did. 

any thing with it. They didn't even shoot it 
until the 19th minute, when the ball rolled 
off Dunga’s shin into the aims at goal- 
keeper Thomas RavellL As far Rai, Bra- 
zil's captain was so transparent that Par- 
reira had no choice but to withdraw him in. 
the second half. , • 

Meanwhile, the Swedes ware knocking 


U5. team took note of that) and suencmg: 
the yellow-and-grcen audience until only 
the drumbeat could be heard In the 45th 

min ute, Thomas BrOlio'S CORteT WHS bunt- 
ed by Patrik Andersson within breath of 
the far post — and if the ball hadn’t tied 
Jmn up, the Swedes would have led by 2-0 
ai the half, which might have been the best 
thing for the Brazilians. 

The game seems so easy for .them. At 
halftime they decided to score, and 83 ' 
seconds lata: Rom&rio was poking the ball 
ahead of him lik e a balloon — poke and 
chase, poke and chase — which would 
have seemed like the simplest titty. in die. 
world if not for the four defenders desper- 
ately trying to prevent him from poking it 
behind Ravdh. “Fantastic, 1 ' Kennet An- 
dersson would say. ‘Tie shoots when the 
goalie doesn’t think he’s going to shoot” 

Brazil maintained interest for another 
20 Tiitnntes, as Romfirio, whose charisma is 
unmatched in tins tournament, delighted 
in being a pest. Had this been the second 
round, maybe Sweden’s goal would not 
have held up. As it was, Brazil needed only 
the draw to win the group, while Sweden 
— understanding that it had nothing to 
lose now that Cameroon was crumbling in 
San Frandsco — wanted to play for the 
victory but simply couldn’t, not for a long 
thne- 

“It almost was a friendly,” Parreira said 
in the mixed zone afterward. “It was only a 
matter of deciding the first-place team and 
the second-place team, no more than that." 

Here is what gives the Americans the 
slightest bit of hope of pulling off a July 4 
upset greater than what they did to Eng- 
land 44 years ago. Sweden wasn’t able to 
put three passes together in the second 
half, its control was practically zero, at one 
point Patrik Andersson was beading di- 
rectly to Romano in front of goal — but 
Romano wasted that one — and for aQ 
that Ravelli saw only two world-class 
chances: a kick save one-on-one against 
Rom&rio in the 54th minute, and in the 
85th minute a diving rescue of Bebeto’s 
free kick. Midway through the second half. 


the crowd began tdefcant jjryain for 
alrio, the 17-year-dd -who sewed 54 !?»:&£ 

• in Cnaxiro r sfirst 54 games! . 

" The Swedes were able tottfcn outung^., 
the finals«minutes,A^ 
chances to steal a victor^oaralong 
volley from substitute, iiakan 
- Kennet Andersson’s gtonqng he ader, 
wide, both fierce- . . .v „ ' 

“Fm proud of my players, said Ttwmw ^ 
Svensson, the Swedish coach.- *T must 
nrit that Brazil is a very strong team* 
veryskillfalplayers; BofFin pleased 40 s®*® 
that my playersplayed very hard, and-f.|^ 

; don’t think Brazil created- that ma &/■$*■■■ 
Chances anyway - " . r - : ‘ 

J'And that wax what Parretca was l ernq ^_g 
mc plam m the. mEced'.zbne, where esOTj^v- 
tumor is cut out and~ocajpuwdr .no maiter^i 
hnw small or benign. The country kcpftfc Sft 
coined when Brazil p&ays .top; defenfflve&^Jj: 
and so hedaimedthatins team bad played- v - 
to win — when it hadn't, not really. Ey 
. thing PUriiara docs is.ra^ with 
1970 cham pion ofPd^Rivelino andC«^. 
los Alberta He romplained about -the-^v. 

- ^^hd^CTnaner field msida - the 

. that every opponent and seekst/;.^ 

to counterattAdk BrazB.; The Americwk^ JV 
will play that way for sure, _ - • 

"Tbeir group yias- vary toa&r ParreaaV ; S^_ 
said of the Unked States. bad doubis.at ^p^ 
the begmning that they would qualify, 
they had a beautiful game - against Jthe^V * 
Swiss, a good game against Colombia, and ; -! . 
they didn’t deserve s! ah to lose against ~: k\ 
Rranania.” - . .. 

He was fighting already —^ fighting 
team’s overoonfidence; fighting the pub%~ '.T “ 
overreaction. The pressures are immense,— ? 
and the next game is anethey waft never be:'.T'^ 
allowed to lo^Thoso t»h be the hardest- ■;!-? 
games to wm, especially , against if the v£-'. 
opponent plays passionately. . ' 


*!• 

0’ 

VP- 
v£ • 

fr*; 

i 


Hi- 


Arts&Artioues 


Fred Roodn 

• TeL::, 

(33 1)46379391 

fcDC 

{331)46379370 
or yciur nearest - 
IHT office .;:/', 
or repre s e n tat i ve ' 


ft? 


Li; 


JK" 

St- 


Ri-i; 


3^, 


AI StantoRl. Calif. 

BncU «& Unoea Stttaa. I93S GMT 
Tuesday July 5 

Gaow 43 

At Fwboro. Mean. 

GraupDwlnnernLU)rDrFthH duos. 170SGMT 


At East Ruthorfonl, MJ. 

Mexico *& Group O aacond ptacs, 2Q3S GMT 

QUARTERFINALS 

Saturday July 9 


At Foxboro. Masa 

Garn43 amnarra. Gama 38 wmner, 1GQS GUT 


Ai Dallas 

Gama4i«lnnarro Gama 42 mto*. 1035 GMT 


Sunday July 10 
Gama 47 

Ai Earn Rumenom, NJ. 

Gama 44 winnw vb Game 37 winnar. 1605 GMT 
Gama 48 
Ai Stanford. Call 

Gama 38 winnar va Game 40 winner, 1835 GMT 

SEMIFINALS 

Wednesday July 13 
At East Rutharforo, NJ. 

Qoma47 wtnrarvo. Game 45 wtnrw. 20C6 GMT 
At Pnadana Canf. 

Gama 4S winnar va Gana 4B winnar. 2335 GMT 

THIRD PLACE 

Saturday July IB 
At Paaaaana. Ca»f. 

SemfOnai losers, 1995 GMT 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

Sunday July 17 

A] Pasaoana. Coni. 

Samtfnal wtonaro. 1835 GMT 

WEDNESDAYS RESULTS 
Saudi ArttMa 1, Betotom 8 
Scorer: Soeed Owolran 15th) 

He thartoods l Morocco 1 
Scorers: Netherlands - Dennis BergkamD 
(43dl.Brvon Rnv CTStm/Marocco-HosaanNo- 
der (471M. 

Referee: Alberta Teloda (Peru) 

Yellow cards: Morocco - Hasson Nader 
M2d). Tahar el-Ktnlel (i4tti), Abdetmalid 
Bouvboub (23fft), LarW HabaW I28tiil. Aziz 
Samaal 141st); Netfiertonds - Jon women 
130th). Ronald Koeman (79fli) 

TUESDAY'S RE5ULTS 
Russia t, Cameroon I 
Scorers: Russia — Oles Satenkn (lAttsaist, 
45 tn penalty. 73d and 75lti). Dmllrr Rodchenko 
(8 »id); C om er Don — Roger Mllta (47fh). 
Referee: Jamal Sharif livrtal. 

Yellow cards: Russia — Valery Karpin 
I57ni>, Dimrrv Khlastov (Bath), Yuri Niki- 
forov (90tti); Cameroon — Andre Kano— 
Blvick 1 13th). Jocques SonuoO (45lh). 

Brnzfl i. Sweaen I 

Scorers: Sweden — Kennel Andersson 
I23d>; Brazil — Pomarto |<7lh). 

Referee: Sandor Puhl iHimgarv). 

Yellow cords: Brazil — Aldalr lesrti); Swe- 
den — Hafcon Mild (851111. 

After Tuesday's Games 
4 — Olea Salenka Russia 
4 — Jurpen Klinsmann, Germany. 

3 — Gabriel Batistuta Argentina; Martin 
Dahlin, Sweden; Romdrto. Brazil. 

2 - Food Am In, Saudi Arabia; Kennel Ar*- 
denaan. Sweaen; Georun Bre?y, Switzer- 
land; Jose Cominero, Spain; Claudia Canlv- 
ala. Aroentfna; LuK Garda, Mexico; Juon 

Antonio Golkorlxea Ssaln; Gheorofie Hogl, 
Romania; HonBMvung Bo. South Korea : Flo- 
rin Roducwiu, Romania; Hristo sioichkow. 
Bulaarfa; Attoira Valencia. Colombia. 

* — Phlllpoe Albert, Belgium; John Aldrtdge, 
Ireland; Sami Jatwr. Saudi Arabia: Daniel 
AmokachL Nigeria; EmmanualAmunlkc.Nl. 
wrla; Dina Baguio. Mol y; Marcel too BemnL 
Mexico; Daniel BodmlDrv.BuHurla; Babeto, 
Brazil: Tomas Brolln. Sweden: Sleahane 
aiopulwi, Switzerland; Mohammed 
CharxxJL Morocco; Marc Degrvsse. Bel- 
0lwn; David Embb Cameroon; Herman Go- 
vlrtaCotombla; JosepGuonflola. Spain; Rav 
HowjMoft irenrnd; Hwang Sun Hang, South 
Korea; Whn Jonk, Nefhorlands; Adrian 
Knun, Switzerland; Iordan Letaikov, Bulgar- 
ia; Raaer Uuno, Sweden; HaroM Lora no. Co- 
tarnbta; Diego Maradona Araentlna: Dan- 
leteMassoro, Itohr; RooerMllla Cameroon; 
Franeolse Omom Blyk*. Cameroon,- Daniel 
P*N«seu. Romania; Dmitri Rodchenko, Rus- 
*la,' Ral, Brazil; Karlheinz Rledla Germany ; 
KleM RekdaL Norway; Julia Salinas. Spain; 
Erwin Sdnctiez. Bolltfto; MOrdo Santas, Bra- 
zil; Sea Jung Won. South Korea; Samson Sie- 
sta. Nigeria; Ernie Stewart. US.; Alain Sutler. 
Switzerland; Gaston TaumenL NrtherKmds; 
Eric Wynakta, UA: RcrZikfl Yeklni, Nigeria. 
Own GaoB-Anaes Esxttaar. CoiomtM (for Ui4 



1. i 


Tbp f)nyy/ /\||^ | tir^ T* fi ifrCA. iY^c 

Danide Massaro, colliding with Mexico’s Juan de Dios Ramirez, has made a habit of coming in and scoring qs;iddy^ 

Massaro , theMan Who Has Saved Italy 


By George Vecsey 

.Vthv York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Daniele Massaro 
was not even listed in the Italian team 
guide last December. There were 43 
names, all the way from Albertini to 
Zenga. but between Marchegiani and 
Mussi, there was just a tiny white space. 

But Massaro saved so many games for 
AC Milan team Iasi season that he forced 
himself upon the national squad. Tuesday, 
he came off the bench at halftime and 
quickly scored. Mexico would soon tie the 
game. 1-1, and win the so-called Group of 
Death and advance to Giants Stadium 
next Tuesday. And Italy, by finis hing 
third, had to wait several hours until Cam- 
eroon had lost to Russia, 6-1. 

But Massaro had saved Italy from the 
immediate prospect of going home. There 
is an unpleasant history of Italian teams 
being reviled after premature exits from 
World Cups. There is also a grand tradi- 
tion of Italian players emerging as heroes. 
In 1982, Italy played poorly in the first 
round, but along came Paolo Rossi to take 
that team to the championship- Then in 
1990, a marginal player named Salvatore 
(Toto) Scbillad came off Lhe bench to 
score six goals in the World Cup. 

“Who will be the next Toto?" Italy 
asked as the national team's coach, Arrigo. 
Sacchi, convened more than 70 players for 
his squad. Meanwhile, Massaro was hav- 
ing the year of his life, despite playing 
behind all the expensive players for rich 
and powerful AC Milan. 

So Massaro waited usually with the five 
substitutes on the bench. Bui then he be- 
gan to develop this knack of coming off the 
bench in the second half. He would be sent 
into the game in the 65th or 70tb min ute. 
Milan won the championship as Massaro 
scored 1 1 goals, seven either tying or win- 
ning the game. Sacchi, who once coached 


Milan, finally called his old player up to 
the national squad in May. 

“If at the start of the season you had told 
me I was going to the World Cup, I would 
have said you were crazy," Massaro said 
recently. 

Asked about the Schiilad factor, Mas- 
saro said “I don't know if I will be the new 
Schiilad, but I certainly consider myself 
lucky to be part of this group.” 

He said he would be perfectly happy to 
begin the game on the bench. 

“Whether I play 25 or 45 minutes isn't 
important,” Massaro said. 

He watched the first half Tuesday, as 
Italy knew it would almost surely be out of 
the World Cup if it lost, and would be in 
bad shape in a scoreless tie. At halftime, 
while the grounds keepers were picking 
bits of litter off the field, Massaro jogged 
and stretched his 33-year-old body. 

He replaced Pierluigi Casiraghi, and 
seven minntes into the half, Massaro took 


a pass from Dcmctrio Albertini, stoppedkf^-. 
with his chest, let it drop at his right toot.""-.- 
and maneuvered it on a low angle tcrji&i 
left, into the goaL For the rest 
second half, Massaro was the most cner- ” 
getic Italian player on the field. ; 

“He played well, and not only vrifh the, 
goal,” said Roberto Baggio, recen tly'bori- ~ 
ored as the best player m the world. • 

Because Italy had to await develop- 
ments in otter ■groups, the. Italians dared 
not celebrate. They looked fairly grim, as : 
they filed to their bus, but at least they had 
avoided an immediate return to Italy; and 
a sense of national disgrace. 

Massaro was one oftwo players called 
to the postgamc drug-testing room, 'and 
afterward to speak to reporters. The e*pla-V 
nation given: He wanted to say hello to his ' 
wife. For this quiet and dependable for- 
ward, who had scored a clutch goal in: the 
biggest sports tournament in the world, 
that sounded about right. . 




emptied by Oar Staff From Dapatdm 

The market women in the capital of 
Yaounde were about the only cheerful 
people in the country after Cameroon’s 6-1 
loss to Russia. And they jokingly told 
reporters they had a cooking pot ready for 
Henri Michel, the team’s French coach. 

“We advise him to go straight home to 
France,” said one woman. 

• Goalie Choi In Young will not soon 
forget the 3-2 loss to Germany that elimi- 
nated South Korea. 

“I am finished as a national player, no 
more for Korea,” he said from the team’s 
hold in Grapevine, Texas. “I am not com- 
fortable any more, the three goals wifi 
haunt me forever ” 

• Wally Yip, who runs a dry cleaning 


business in . Me tain e, Louisiana, ha$:a .- , 
chance to forget about stained sweaters ' 
and rumpled dresses for the rest of his tifa: 

selected at random by lhe”- 
Gfllette Co. to take part in a contest at the" 
Rose Bow! on July 4. If he kicks a so&jef * 
ball 15 yards through a four-foot \ 
opening, he wins SI nnOkxL ...... 

“Andy Warhol said that everyone gets' 
ms^ 15 minutes of fame and my time has 
arrived,” Yq> said. 

• Greece’s coach, ADcetas Panagddiii 7 ; 
Md he likely wiil qurt and , return to liVem-. 

the United States. 

“I a two-year contract that rads m ' 
July, the former U5. national team coach' . . 
said. “I might come back here. Thi&isniy W 
second country.” ^ 


tSif* 














INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTES, THURSDAY , JUNE 30, 1994 


Pag* 


23 


% ffi 0 .#% iri 

Ow vp?f rj 




Belch Move to 2d Round 



Rnmi 

ORLANDO. Florida — The Neth- 
erlands -■'^P 1 bio ihe second round 
of the World Cup with a 2-1 win over 
Morocco > n the steamy heat of the 
Citrui. stadium on Wednesday. 

Brvan Roy. who had been on the 
field for only 1 1 minutes, netted the 
winner in the 78 th minute, gratefully 
snapping up the chance provided by 
Dennis frrgkamp, who had crossed 
from the left- 

Bergkarup bad put the Netherlands 
into the lead two minutes before the 
interval but Dutch joy was short-lived, 
Hassan N^der fired Morocco level 
within two minutes or the restart. 

P-.-ter -.on Vossen. one of four 
changes in the Dutch starting lineup 
fron- the one beaten 1-0 by Belgium 
last .Saturday, evaded two "tackles on 
the . :ft near the comer flag and cut 
into the Moroccan box. 

TT.: suiter touched the bail on to 
Berg!. amp. who had little room to ma- 
neuver but managed to squeeze a 
close- -ange left-foot shot into the far 
com-;- of the net to goalkeeper Za- 
karic \iacuis left. 

M occo started the second half 
with only 10 men and it took a minute 
for midfielder Mustapba Hadji to set 
on the field. 

But once there, Hadji immediately 
justified the switch. Within 60 sec- 
onds of his arrival he gathered a long 
ball on the right and centered for 
Nader in the box to tuck away the 
equalizer with the Dutch defense at 
sea. 

Five Moroccan players were 
booked in the first half as their re- 
vamped team, showing five changes 
from their last starting lineup, fought 


to prevent a third successive World 
Cup loss after defeats by Belgium and 
Saudi .Arabia. 

With Belgium losing 1-0 to Saudi 
Arabia in Washington, the Dutch fin- 
ished atop group F by virtue of their 
own 2-1 victory over ihe Saudis, with 
whom they shared the final tally of six 
points and a 4-3 goal difference* It was 
superior to that of previously unbeat- 
en Belgium. 

The Dutch will meet Ireland in Or- 
lando in the second round on Mon- 
day. 

Thus the Dutch are still seeking the 
supreme prize after finishing as run- 
ners-up in 1974 and 1978. 

The veteran Dutch midfielder Jan 
Wouters will miss the clash with Ire- 
land after receiving his second book- 
ing of the tournament for fouling Na- 
der in the 30th min ing. 

The Dutch endured many anxious 
moments against the unfortunate Mo- 
roccans, who leave without a point. 

The speedy Moroccan forwards, 
with an entirely revamped front three, 
frequently threatened on the break. 

Nader might have put them ahead 
in the 16th minute but his shot was 
deflected just outside Dutch goalkeep- 
er Ed de Goev’s right post. 

.Ahmed Bahja also came close, while 
de Goey did well to turn a fierce long- 
range shot from Racbid Daoutii. a 
second-half substitute, around his 
post in the 67th min ute. 

Aron Winter, replacing the disap- 
pointing Frank Rjjkaard in the start- 
ing lineup. threatened in the 23d min- 
ute and had an effort from a Roy 
cross in the 71st turned away for a 
corner. 




. ’ Trc. *r . r sc i zc 

Doug Mifc'Tbc Associated I 

Saeed Owairan, with the most spectacular goal yet seen at this World Gqp, gave Saudi Arabia a 1-0 lead over Belgium. 


Russia’s Salenko Breaks Goal Record, and Cameroon’s Heart 


By Jay Privman 

Sew >ierifc Times Serncc 

PALO ALTO. California — The only 
way Cameroon had a chance of advancing 
to ihe second round in the World Cup was 
to beat P,us$ia by at least three goals. 

By the time Oleg Salenko had finished, 
Cameroon wasn't even close. 

Salenko set a World Cup record with 
five goals as Russia pounded a disorga- 
nized and dispirited Cameroon squad. 6-1, 
in a Group B match Tuesday at Stanford 
Stadium. That vaulted the Russians over 
Cameroon into third place in the group 
and gave them a slim chance to advance to 
the second round. They need help from 
teams in other groups and probably won’t 
know until Thursday. Cameroon, though, 
is definitely beading home. 

Salenko. who plays for Valencia in the 
Spanish league, was a reserve in Russia's 
opening loss to Brazil. He then got his 
first World Cup start in the next game, 
scoring Russia’s only goal in a 3-1 loss to 
Sweden. 


Aided by a porous Cameroon defense 
that regularly allowed outnumbered at- 
tacks. he scored five times, with three goals 
in the first half, to break the previous 
single-game record held by nine players. 
The most recent one to achieve a four-goal 
game was Emilio Butragueno of Spain, 
against Denmark in 1986”in Mexico. 

“I didn't even know what the old record 
was,” Salenko said afterward. “I only 
realized it when the public address an- 
nouncer announced it on the loudspeak- 
er." 

But with little understanding of English, 
even then he wasn’t sure. 

“Record, what record?" Salenko had 
asked as he left the field. 

Cameroon, wfacx-uccicni charm made 

it the surprise team of the 1990 World Cup, 
was dragged down this year by backbiting, 
off-field politics, and constant on-field 
bickering, but the Indomitable Lions, with 
a loss and a tie, coming into Tuesday's 
game, still had a chance to advance to ihe 
next round. 


Instead. they made the Russians look 
like one of the tournament favorites in- 
stead of a team known chiefly for a plod- 
ding style that had produced one goal in 
two games. Cameroon's defense was too 
far forward for the entire game, and Cam- 
eroon's goalkeeper. Jacques Songo'o, 
could not stop the relentless Russian at- 
tack. 

Songo’o is considered Cameroon’s 
third-best goalkeeper, and he was surpris- 
ingly inserted Tuesday over the second- 
stringer, Thomas Nkono. Cameroon’s best 
goalkeeper, Joseph-Antoine Bell, quit the 
team on Sunday after leading a player 
revolt over the weekend. Cam eroon’s play- 
ers have complained that funds promised 
by their soccer federation 'were slow in 
arriving. 

The turmoil obviously carried onto the 
field Tuesday. Cameroon's defenders were 
out of position all afternoon, and Songo'o 
spent most of the first half arguing with his 
defensemen over their positioning. 


Salenko scored Russia's first five goals. 
His first goal came after a scramble m the 
penalty box in the 16th minute. The ball 
sqnirted back to Salenko near the 18-yard 
mark, and he fired a shot past Songo'o. 

Salenko next scored off an indirect free 
kick in the 41st minute. As Cameroon's 
players argued the awarding of the kick, 
Russia's Igor Korneiev put the ball in 
play. Korneiev advanced the ball to Ilya 
Tsymbalar, who looked up to find himself 
and Salenko bearing down on Songo’o on 
a two-on-none breakaway. With the 
Cameroon players pleading futileiy for 
offsides, Tsymbalar fed the ball to Sa- 
lenko, who then smacked it past a diving 
Songo'o. 

Just moments before halftime, Salenko 
was awarded a penalty kick when be was 
tackled in the penalty box. When the 
referee, Jamal al Sharif, spotted the balL 
Songo’o walked over and petulantly 
kicked it away, incurring a yellow card. 
Once the ball was reset. Salenko charged 
forward and tapped it to his right as 


Songo’o, trying to anticipate the shot, 
dived the wrong way. - - 

Roger Nfilla, Cameroon’s 42-year-old 
wonder, scored in the 47th minute to *naif<» 
it 3-1, but then Salenko scored twice within 
a two-minute span to put Russia up by 5- 1. 
In the 72d minute, Salenko fired in a 15-. 
meter (50-foot) shot from the center of the 
field. And in the 74th minu te. Salenko beat 
Songo’o to aioose ball at the side of the net 
and chipped a shot over the Cameroon’s 
goalkeeper and into the net ' 

Dmitri Radchenko, who scored Russia’s 
final goal, in the 8 2d mm ate, said: “He was 
just able to take advantage of. all the right 
moments.” 

• The players to score four goals in- a 
World-Cup .game were- 

Enulm Blltraeui 
bio, 

1958; San dor Kocsis, Hungary, 1954; Juan 
Schiaffino, Uruguay, 1950; Adenrir, Bra- 
zil, 1950; Ernest Wfllimowski, Poland, 
1938; Leonidas, BrazO, 1938; Gustav Wel- 
ters trom. Sweden, 1938. 



For U.S* Team , Lulas Delivers on Personality and Defense 


By Jere Longman 

Sov )Vvt Times Semce 

PASADENA. California — If you don’t 
recognize the name. Alexi Lalas, you will 
.ecognize the hair. Orange as a blow-dried 
sunset. A cascading tangle of curls. The 
man looks like a heavy metal Ronald Mc- 
Donald. A goatee hangs from his chin like 
a whisk broom. Any longer, it would need 
its own grounds crew. 

“I have employed a full-time staff of 
highiy trained professionals to keep it 
clean.” LaJas joked on a recent afternoon 
at the Rose Bowl. 

He has the most visible face, or at least 
head, on the U.S. team. Like Carlos Val- 
derrama. the fright-wig midfielder from 
Colombia, he has spawned a cull following 
of fans who come to games dressed in 
carrot tops and goatees. Lalas even keeps a 
set of backup hair himself. 

Coach Bora Milutinovic made him shear 
his iocki ■.■hen Lalas joined the U.S. team 
in 1991. Ljlis keeps the sharings in a bag 
under the sink in the bathroom. 

“It reminds me of a bunch of things, 
things 1 had to do to get here." he said. 

Until the World Cup began, many peo- 
ple thougnt Lalas was a media creation, a 
sort of marketing Frankenstein, whose free 
spirit, wit and guitar-piaving, poetry -writ- 
ing. Slurpee-drinking, retro-hippie, prep- 
stsr-from-hell persona would provide 


amusing attention, if nci solid defense, for 
the U.S. team. Sure, be could get on televi- 
sion. but could he get the Americans to the 
second round of the World Cup? 

A central defender of limited skills. La- 
las sometimes body checks as if he were 
playing ice hockey back in prep school. 
Finesse is not his game. Brains and deter- 
mination and hard work are. “The wiz- 
ard.” teammate Marcel o Balboa calls him. 
adding, “He's the professor.” 

In the W'orld Cup finals Lalas has, with 
considerable support from Balboa and 
others, shut out two of the world's most 
dangerous strikers, Stephan? Chapuisat of 
Switzerland and Faustino Asprilla of Co- 
lombia. So dispirited was Asprilla that he 
was benched at halftime of the unexpected 
2-1 loss to the United States. 

A few weeks ago, few would have pre- 
dicted that Lalas. at age 24. would become 
as famous for his defense as h:*- hair. Dur- 
ing an exhibition agamic Saudi Arabia, 
Hank Steinbrecher. executive director of 
the U.S. Soccer Federation, said the po- 
rous American defense reminded him of 
Swiss cheese. 

“You definitely fuel off the negative 
stuff.” Lalas said. If people think be is 
simply a marketing creation, he said. 
“Tough; 1st them come and mee; me. My 
number is listed." 

“There was a time when i let it briber 


me.” he added- “Then I met some of the 
people who wrote it and I said. ’Damn, 
they're not worth iu’ People were writing 
bad stuff, but at least they were writing 
about iL It's important to have the opin- 
ions expressed — this guy can’t play, this 
guy is good. It's crucial to’tbe development 
of the sport." 

Nothing was more crucial to the devel- 
opment of American soccer than the vic- 
tory over Colombia. Lalas responded with 
a primeval scream that seemed to exorcise 
the World Cup frustrations of the past 44 
years, in which the Americans had not won 
a game or the world’s respect. The victory 
was incredible, historical, even ’’very 
cool." Lolas said. Bul he added in a mo- 
ment of perspective, it was no miracle. 

“A miracle is a baby surviving a plane 
crash," he said. 

If not. then it was highly improbable. 
For the .Americans as a team and for Lalas 
personally. He grew- up in suburban De- 
troit and lived for several years in Greece. 
His mother is a writer, and he lived without 
a television in Greece or an innate passion 
for soccer in the United States. He played 
the piano, taught himself the guitar, read 
voraciously, began to write poetry. Where 
many kids begin playing soccer at 4 or 5, 
Lalas said he" entered his first org anize d 
league when he was 10 or 1 1. 

“It was just starting to be a cool sport to 


play,” he said. “Before then, the people 
who played were dorks or people who 
couldn’t play footbalL" 

Whatever sport he attempted, the 6- 
foot, 3-inch, 195-pound Lalas found even- 
tual success. He led his high school team in 
suburban Detroit to a state championship 
in ice hockey and was named Michigan’s 
1987 player of the year in soccer. He took 
Rutgers to the NCAA soccer champion- 
ship game in 1990 and was named die 
national college player of the year. He also 
made two brief appeirances with the U.S. 
national team in 1990. but attended the 
World Cup as a spectator. 

“1 was with some kids from high school, 
chasing women, drinking beer, hanging 
out and seeing soccer.” Lalas said. “I 
watched the U.S. play Austria, with my 
face pointed, and it never occurred to me 
that I could possibly be out there." 

Milutinovic look over as coach of the 
U.S. team in 1991. and though he made 
Lalas cut ins hair, he never cut him from the 
team, appreciating his hard work and en- 
thusiasm, however ungainly it was at times. 

“There are definitely guys with more 
skill in their pinkie than I will have in my 
entire life," Lalas said. “As a professional 
athlete, you have to analyze your ability 
and you can't overextend it. I concentrate 
cm marking my man, winning balls and 
pushing them to the people who can do 


something with it Everyone knows his 
role. No one goes crazy.” 

An appreciative Milutinovic has al- 
lowed Lalas to grow his hair again. He 
even has shown up in clubs to watch Lalas 
perform with his band. The Gypsies, even 
if he doesn't understand or like what he 
hears. 

“Bora doesn't like the music, but he 
respects it and that’s important,'' Lalas 
said. “I’ll have to do a Frank Sinatra song’ 
for Bora to like it In Spanish.” 

Music is what defines him. Lalas said, 
not his hair, not even soccer. He has pro- 
duced a CD titled “Woodland.'’ ana be 
carries his guitar with him on the road. For 
now, though, a soccer wave is cresting in 
the United States and Lalas is hanging 10. 
He nearly scored twice against Colombia, 
once on a header off a comer kick, a 
second time os a goal that was disallowed 
because he was ruled offside. No matter. 
Lalas said. History will inflate his accom- 
plishment. 

“I’ll be 80 and some punk reporter will 
come up to me and say. ‘Hey didn't you 
play in that great game back in ~94T And 
I'll say, ‘Sure, Irid’ and Fll embellish every- 
thing. IU tell him I dribbled through half 
the team and won the game, by myself.” 


his 


By then, his hair might be gone, but not 
loopy humor. 


Group Favorite 
To . 

•• _ CoKfxbiby (hr Sttff From Dispatches 

. ■ WASHINGTON'^- Saudi Arabia pro- 
duced one of the biggest .upsets of the 
openingtound of the Worid Cup finals on 
. Wednesday when it toppled Belgium, the 
previously unbeaten Group F favoriie. 1-0. 

. The goal came only five minutes into the 

match when Saeed Owairan burst from an 
unmarked position in his own- half to carv e 
open theBdgian rear guard with a spectac- 
ular run and emphatic shot. 

; The_sk3Iful, attacking midfielder accel- 
erated past Dirk Medved, swerved wide of 
Michd De.Wblf,. left Rudy Smidis in his 
wake, and thundered a using right-foot 
shot past the startled goalkeeper. Michel 
Ereud’hooime, as .Philippe Albert lunged 
desperately. 

.. It was the. fust goal conceded by Bel- 
gium in the tournament and it was a goal 
worthy of winning any game. Belgium, 
which' had afready qualified after succes- 
sive. 1-0 victories over! Morocco and the 
Netherlands, finished third in the group 
after the Dutch and the Saudis. 

The Saudis' will go to Dallas -to piny 
Sweden on Sunday. The Belgians will play 
either Germany on Saturday -at Chicago or 
the Group D winner on Tuesday in Fox- 
boro, Massachusetts, in the second round. 

The victory was the most famous in 
Saudi Arabia's soccer history and came 
against a Belgian team so confident before 
the game that four leading. players; three 
with yellow cards received earlier in the 
• tournament, were rested. 

For Belgium, it was a huge disappoint- 
ment . as. Coach Paul , Van Himst had 
pinned his hopes on avoiding defeat to win 
‘ the fpoup and stay in Orlando. But the 

- Belgians missed a series of- chances after 
dominating much’ of the game. - 

“The team would have expected a point 
today,- and they’re very disappointed not 
to do that,” Van Himst said.- “The turning 
point was the goal that was given aw ay.. 

“Today we played against a very dan- 
. gerbus side, especially on the counterat- 
tack.”.- 

“I told you we- would take second place 
in the group, and here we are. delivering 
what we promised,” said the Saudis' coach. 
Jorge Solan. “This was not expected by 
many people.” 

The Saudis used a counterattack offense 
to perfection, springing several -players 
free. Van Himst sent in Luc Nilis in the 

- first b&lf omfrJusip. weberin the seConuto 
add offensive punch! . 

The Belgians had tbie majority of pos- 
session time in the first half, but no scor- 
ing chances until Van Himst replaced 
forward Marc Degryse with Nilis in the 
24th minute. 

Three minutes later Marc Wilmots 
fanned on a shot at a wide open net mid 
Nilis sent a shot just wide of the right post 
in the 29th. 

The Belgians created far more chances 
in the second half, but still were whistled at 
by their fans in the partisan crowd. The 
Saudis appeared to try the same tactic that 
. failed against the Dutch. They often wast- 
ed time and also drew whistles from the 
crowd. 

But this time there were no breakdowns 
in defense, despite the scoring chances by 
the Belgians. ( Retuers, Ari 

Irish: $2 MQlion 

Reiaerr 

DUBLIN — Ireland’s team has gotten 
another $] million bonus for reaching 
the second round of the World Cup. 

Jack Charlton’s players doubled the S 1 
million bonus already earned by qualify- 
ing for the finds when they finished 
second in Group E with the: 0-0 draw 
against Norway on Tuesday. 

The bonuses will be split among the 22 
players on a scale based on the number 
of appearances. - • -.- - 
“we can still just about afford to pay 
our fines to FIFA now!” said the Foot- 
ball Association of Ireland's president. 
Michael Hyland. • 

The FAI and Ireland's manager. Jack 
Chariton, were fined nearly $1 5,000 each 
last week for “unsporting and ill -man- 
nered conduct.” 


Conncto Sebatetto. a fan of 
the Italian team, found 
that he could keep his head 
during the din of the crowd 
at Washington's RFK Stadi- 
um that was attending his 
team’s match against 
Mexi co. 


I Uj *:1 * 1 : P.Tve 



A Hairy Tale , or, How to Get a 





By Norman Chad 

txr 4 r: fries Tims Ser.nv 

LOS ANGELES — These are the hap- 
py days and nights of Alexi Lolas: inter- 
national soccer star, crowd favorite, rock- 
and-roll guitarist, free spirit; frequent- 
flier miles from here to Kong Kong; fame, 
fortune and females. 

His Hfe is better than mine. 

It most be the hair. 

I derided to get that hair. 

In the soccer world of late, coiffeurs 
have passed corner kicks oc the minds of 
many players. Hair-wise, World Cup ’94 
makes Woodstock >9 look like boot 
camp. The locks are flowing. often uncon- 
trollably. Basketball players are shaving 
their heads; soccer stars are reshaping 
their beads. It’S a revolution brewing up 
:here, and snee these fellas seem to get all 
the adulation and at ten don. I figured I 
might as well get 3 cut of the action, so to 
ipeak. 

.Alas, there so many options on 
what type of look 1 “ughi adopt to become 
worshiped worfd-^de. 

;-^-j I considered the stylish Roberto Baggio 
of Iialv, with his brilliantly braided pony- 
tail. I considered Speedy U.S. striker Cobi 
Jones, whose dreadlocks nap around like 
* mop on Methcdrine. I considered 
'•iickaj-baefc U.S. goalkeeper Tony 


Meola. 1 considered guys with modified 
Mohawks and Jericurls. 

But it came down to the glow-iiwhe- 
park boys of summer the swirling, blond 
Afro of Colombian midfielder Carlos Val- 
derrama or the roguish, orange head of 
U.S. defender Lalas. 

I leaned to Vaidenama. 

(Have you seen this guy? When Valder- 
r ama goes out, his hair gets to where he’s 
going about five nannies before be does. 
How does he get his hair that way? You’ve 
got to figure the barber says, “So, bow’d 
you like it today?” and Valderrama an- 
swers, “Well let’s push the envelope a 
little — let’s go for a 26-inch circumfer- 
ence today”) 

But when Valderrama ran into Lalas. 
the result was United States 2, Colombia 
1. A week ago. folks were buying V alder - 
rams wigs for S 10; now they're using them 
as scouring pads. And, bey. I'm a front- 
runner, too. 

I, Alexi. 

The problem was, bow do I get from 
here to there? I have a history of bad 
haircuts, from flattops and crew cuts to 
Andalusian swirls and Psyche knots to 
bohemian bobs and swirl bobs and Flem- 
ish bobs and chignon bobs and contour 
bobs and coquette bobs. My hair doesn’t 
get styled, it gets stormed. I once -had 
bangs that were banned in 42 states. 

Over the years f have found out that 


there is a fine line between “hair salon" 
and "lawn service.” 

Pan of the problem is my horrendous 
eyesight — once I’ve sat down in the chair 
and taken off my glasses, beauticians can 
turn me into a fit poodle before I realize 
it. 

So I went to this place named Hairtech 
on Beverly Boulevard, a user-friendly sa- 
lon and home of the fabulous Regina 
Jackson. Regina has a fabulous touch; 
Hairtech is the only salon I’ve ever walked 
out of in which neighborhood kids don’t 
immediately start throning rocks at me. 

Irsat down in Chair No. 1. (I always gel 
Chair No. 1, right by the window, .because 
it drums up business when paparazzi 
walking along the street see me made the 
salon.) - - • 

1 told Regina I wanted- to become a 
Lalas look-alike. I handed her several 
photos of Lalas. 

She looked at the photos and she looked 
at me. 

She Then told me in a, very polite fashion „ 
— and Tm paraphrasing here — that she 
would do the best she could with the 

material with which she had to work. 

Now, I had not yet taken off my glasses, 
sol could clearly see that she had the look 
Marcus Wdby, M.D„ used to have just 
before telling someone that a family mrix>< 
ber waso t going -to pull through. 

I look- my glasses off and closed mv . 


eyes. .1 counted sweepers and clicked mv 
heels together three times. 1 softly 
chanted, “FIFA, FIFA, FIFA,” under my 
breath. 1 felt her hands in my Kiir — jj 
briefly recalled for me -the onlv highlight 
of- my senior prom — and I suddenly felt 
iny head acting like it had a mind of its 


uitui H&JCHJOUS CUSIC 

_ ifled .that. I. had Regina and i 
No. 1; • 

Time passed. Then Regina gently 
hand on my shoulder and asked, 
what do' you .think?* 

I opened my eyes to a new- wor 
Alexi Lalas’ world. 

Evea wthout my glasses. I coul 
that I had the haLr. I Had the look, 
the goatee. . 

I had that World Cup feeling. 

1 even wanted to exchange my shin 

O' 

It was a remarkable resemblance 
and I, particularly considering how 
more well-developed my timer \ 

(hanto. WewSE!Ll 23 wd 

was ^ suddenly getting an ' 

red card asied April 16 m 
against Moldova, 


u.s 


i IT ■[. j . ; ; ' 


f.'- . . . 7 

.vjf. Jb’i-iiv' . 







Page 24 


ART BUCHWALD 


Vacation One-Liners 



W ASHINGTON -J is that 
lime of year when you are 
preparing to go on vacation and 
you want to impress strangers 
who you will meet. As a service 
to readers I am providing one- 

liners. that will 

get everyone’s 
attention at a 
cocktail party 
or cookout. 

“OUie Worth 
may have lied 
to a lot of peo- 
ple but he. never 
lied to me . " 

"I always & 
get confused Bitch waid 

over whether 

North Korea makes the Hyun- 
dai automobile and South Ko- 
rea makes the atomic bomb, or 
vice versa." 

“Would anyone like to buy a 
semi-automatic pistol without 
waiting seven days?" 

“I'd rather have Hillary Clin- 
ton running the country than 
Barbra Streisand." 

"Just after I have given ti- a 
politician '? election campaign 
•hev ask me to contribute tv a 
defense fund to fight his indict- 
ment. ” 


1 Monet, 1 Manet 
Sold m London 

Reutvn 

L ONDON — Paintings by 
Claude Monet anci 
Edouard Manet were sold by 
Sotheby’s for 57.5 million and 
S6.3 miliion, respectively. 

Monet's “Poplars on the 
Banks of L’Epte” went for 
£4.841.500 tS7.4?. million) after 
a tense telephone- bidding duel 
between two pri'.ate collectors 
curing the sale Tuesday eve- 
ning. 

A study for Manet’s “Bar at 
the Folies-Bergere.” in which a 
barmaid in a low-cut dress 
stands pensively in front of a 
mirror, reached £4,401,500 
(S6.8 million). 

Tne prices were well below 
the rec-j'J“ for both artists 
reached :.i: i 5 8‘Js. 


“Some of my best friends are 
secondary' smokers." 

“If you have to ask what BUI 
Clinton’s health plan will cost, 
you can't afford it.” 

“My son was given four 
strokes of the cane in Singapore 
for running a red light and now 
he's worth 52 million." 

“ I'd rather have a White 
House aide borrow a helicopter 
to play golf than waste the tax- 
payers' money on welfare moth- 
ers. “ 

“My daughter cheated on her 
Naval Academy engineering ex- 
ams and is now in charge of 
repairing nuclear subs." 

“Tourist-wise, Chernobyl is 
overrated.” 

“Nobody likes human rights' 
violations but if we make a big 
deal about what’s going on in 
C hina. Americans will never be 
able to buy a pair of running 
shoes for $4.60 again.” 

" The only reason the United 
States is so powerful in the Far 
East is that President Clinton 
jogy and the Emperor of Japan 
strolls." 

"Oprah calls me up every 

morning and asks me what she 
should eat for lunch." 

“I just got an autographed 
copy of Dan Quayle’s book and 
everyone says that I made a hel- 
luva investment.” 

“Every time I read that the 
Hubble telescope has discovered 
another black hole in the universe 
/ want to throw up. ” 

“1 got out of the commodities 
market the same time Hillary 
Clinton got in.” 

“I say that when it comes to 
buying a new car you can’t have 
too many air bags.” 

“We’d rather be a dysfunc- 
tional family than eat breakfast 
together.” 

“My brother George used to be 
on Rostenkowski's payroll but 
when they asked him to do some 
work he quiz. " 

"More brilliant business ca- 
reers have been destroyed by 
spraying nicotine on tobacco 
leaves than by sexually harass- 
ins women who amoKe. ’ 



Comeback for ‘Britten’s Ba 


SiilSSIBit® 





By John Rockwell 

Nat York Times Service 

S NA P£, England— At 9; 15 Satur- 
day morning, Sheila Colvin and 
her box-office staff broke out a bottle 
of Champagne. Ticket sales through 
Friday night, two days before the end 
of this year's Aldeburgh Festival, had 
met the projected figure, meaning that 
the budget would be in the black. 

The Aldeburgh Festival maintains 
its offices in that charming seaside 
town, the site of Benjamin Britten's 
opera “Peter Grimes, ’’ but it now scat- 
ters its performances all over East 
Anglia. 

Since 1967 its principal home has 
been the Snape Mailings Concert Hall 
here in the even tinier town of Snape. 
a few miles up the Aide River from 
Aldeburgh. 

In 1969 a Ore burned down the hall 
and it had to be rebuilt. Both the 1 967 
opening and the 1970 reopening were 
presided over by Queen Elizabeth II. 

The queen graced this seemingly 
modest little June festival — die 
Snape Mailings hall seats only S30 
people — because the .Aldeburgh Fes- 
tival was founded by Britten, the 
county’s most famous composer, and 
his companion, the tenor Peter Pears. 

Among its once-revolving band of 
artistic directors have been such nota- 
bles as Mstislav RosLropovich and 
Murray Perahia. But after Britten’s 
death in 1976. notable names meant a 
loss of focus, or at least so some people 
feared. “This was Britten's BayTeuth. 
and it would be stupid to say it wasn’t” 
said the composer Oliver Knussen. 

Knussen is one of Aideburgh's two 
executive artistic directors now, along 
with Lhe conductor and Britten spe- 
cialist Steuari Bedford. 

By all accounts. Lhe festival has 
found its way under their regime. The 
watershed year was 1989. after Pera- 
hia had departed and Knussen and 
Bedford became solely responsible for 
the artistic direction and Colvin had 
just arrived as administrative director. 

She also directs the Aldeburgh 
Foundation's year-round perfor- 
mances at the Snape Mailings hall. 

"Aldeburgh has triumphantly rein- 
vented itself for the 1990s, after a 
moribund decade following Benjamin 
Britten’s death.” said the London 
newspaper The Independent. 

Although they appreciate friendly 
responses, Knussen and Colvin try to 
portray the evolution of the festival as 
iess revolutionary than that. 



Afthopgh Knussen says 


WUUWW H" j r-TC 

underlying “thread," as 
to can it, at AkW>urgh.thtt _ 
been the testy relationship: between 
Britten and Stravinsky, few of. whose 
late works had been heard here. 


.-■* * ? ''I*-* 

•teuton Finer ftr The Xew York Tract 

The composer Oliver Knussen, one of the Aldeburgh festival directors. 


Still, it seems clear that there was 
indeed a loss of direction for a while, 
and that the festival now has a clearer 
idea of itself. For example, when 
Knussen became an AJdeburgh artis- 
tic director in 1 983, he was one of 10. 
".After Britten's death, the center of 
the festival fell out,” Knussen said. 
"Pears was not a strong artistic voice 
like BritLen. He tended to accommo- 
date people: hence 10 artistic direc- 
tors. Two directors is fine, three or 
four is O. KL, but more is managing by 
co mmi ttee” 

While there was always a healthy 
dose of Britten, powerful performers 
like Rostropovich and Perahia tended 


to tilt the festival toward more conven- 
tional repertory and to blur its image: 
For a while, Rostropovich even fol- 
lowed the official program s with a July 
festival of his own in Snape Mai tings. 

The decision of the foundation to 
concentrate the direction in the hands 
of Knussen, Bedford and Colvin has 
meant a re-emphasis not just on Brit- 
ten but also m contemporary music in 
general. There is usually a weU-known 
composer in residence and a angle 
concer t devoted to a less-well-known 
composer. This year, that forum went 
to Bayan Northoott, and Knussen 
joked that he had a dead composer in 
residence, meaning Stravinsky. 


festival, on- Jane 10, Knussen conduct- 
ed Stravinsky’s “Flood,” andlBedfard 
Jed W) staged perfonnanees ■ 

tea’s “Nqytf s Ftodde” last week. ?- 

there were lots of smaBer late wbds' 
by Stravinsky, along with aeoncertcn 
June 1 8; again conducted by Knussen, ' 
that offered the Brittm Seraaadfr -fe 
tenor, ham and strings and ^Sbwin-> : 
sky’s knotty, feaacT r 

and “R«jukm Cantkk&r . 

lhe London. Snfometta appears at 
Aidebuzgh almost every year, 4End so ’ 
does one iof the big Lti^njorehes-^ 
eras; this year h was the BBC Syiqpbo-. 

. ny for ihe opening .■concert.’;.-';.; 

Emanuel Ax gave a pano^iedtak ' 
Otherwise, however, F^rfotmers tcnd 
to conte from 

or to be worthy- artists ane or two; 
notches below tbe top i^ 
level represented by Rostropovich 
and Perahia.' i 

“The biggest problem we’ve Sadr 
since Murray left is to convince people 
of that caliber that this is agreat pitied 
to come to,” Knussen sa«L was 
terrific to lave Peter Sedcba here last : 
year. If s difficult to g$t people who 
can fin Carnegie Hall to come out hoe , 
and play in a bam. Even though it’s 
really one of the great concert halls of 

Aldeburgh mil celebrate its . 50 th'- 

anniversary in 1997. A new opera is io 
be ctmmnstioned for the occasion* 
and all three parables, which are ; 
chamber operas in scale, axe to be 
prerested in sequence. Although Brit- 
ten’s “Midsummer Night’s Dream” 
and “Death in Venice” were first done 
here, tile modest size of die local Halls 
and churches means modest box-of- . 
fioe revenue* and the festival doesn't 
feel it can afford the major Britten 
operas now. 

Colvin said the budget tins June 
was $375,000, with the box office ac- 
counting for $240,000; it was when 
that figure was met that they broke 
out the Champag ne. Britten’s estate 
makes up a “handsome” share of the 
aitnnal deficit — she wouldn't say 
exactly how much — with corporate 
and private sponsors filling in the dif- 
ference. 










Vipu^-ztv £^-£dst&buti|g any 

Tafcytffik Btrf ^reviviiFpress 

paay's -pm^-ownet Bryce 
~%vwfco- Mcfe'ftepbotos, - 
ki&fr&r -Group 
v;v _. *Mb3l' p«toted. 

mNo^mhoLT-AJ'kiiess 

wffi-cdnmbWe toward “Duma’s J 
. said, bat 

rttetfflnotDd 1 ‘iius. 

pfidted 
dedoff 

■after a tlreWe^'ss&n die 


west c Accord- 
ing to iBuckiag3ham Palace, no 

;cde: ‘ v 



have 

rto an iudrfHiite ban cm 


and Gaby CQoeqBtiou auii the - 
other actorS iavolved in Iasi - 
" week’s -Manila : FUnir Festival 
awards scandal, vX - . 

.3-;.-: - : -b'. ipi:; S- <•.- ■ 

Buha Streisand set aside 
4,000 tickets loiter Madison 
Square Garden shows for ■ Rye; 
selecthbnprdk / wgmfeatitins 
.to sdlior 51^00: apiece. Yet 
only the Gay Men's Health Gi- . 
sis was able ea sel 1 iG. entire 
afiotmem ofi,000qickets. Nev- 
erthdess, each of .thcse organl- 
zations beoefitedfroCHke tick- 
ets: Planned' -Parenthood 
repcffted a hetof S390ii000 after 
e?roenses, and the Envaranrieo- ' 
taf Defense Fund said it made 
more than $500,000- .7 
... J D;,-; ' 

. * Dare Powers, 82, is stiaipiug 
down as. curator 

Kennedy library in Beaton af^ 

ter': 



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It t -1 

* 

> 77 - 

16 6« 

•j 

’.Varv,., 

»r so 

H -61 

X 

2 - 3-94 

1681 

s 


2* Pi 

16 61 

; 

> 3-86 

IB-ijo 

5 

Oceania 

"\rZ - -'•re i 

\ :.C 7 

b <3 

rc 

1 J 5 S 

b'-O 

■sh 

si” 

" * Uw 

9.28 


ir-ts 

11/52 

5 



V..-.' 

jsiweam 

North America 

Bheienng heal will continue 
this weekend Imm the &ouih- 
«n fiacJ-ie* to the Mississip- 
pi Biwer Valley. Chicago io 
Detroit will have seasonably 
■«aiip weaiher Frida; Hot 
'.veaiher will develop over ttte 
."■eel-end Heavy rams -mil 
develop over southern 
Bmish i^oluinbia ano south - 
*m Aibena this 


curops 

Warsaw through Vienna and 
Home will bo m the irudst ot 
a heal wave into the wee* - 
end. Much cooler weather 
will move into northwest 
Europe over the weekend. 
Ram wiB fall, heavy ar times, 
hem Dublm to Manchester. 
Pans may nave a thunder - 
stem Friday, rhe end 
win be cooler with showers. 


Asia 

neat and humidity 
will continue Irom Hong 
Kong 15 Shanghai Friday mto 
the weekend There is very 
little hope for any cooling 
rams through at leas; Sun- 
day. Scattered heavy down- 
pours -.’ill! 1 oil on a path 
through the ceniral Philip- 
pines to cental Vietnam lale 
this week 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Bant 

Cite 

Damascus 

Jeiusjlem 

Liner 

Br/aJi 


Todflj 
Hie*l u— 
C/F GIF 
2S^4 iJ.TI 
3B-1S 

:a-a2 -c-ss 
2 " BO ir« 

181100 17 *2 
-JJ'iOr 2T*jr, 


Tomofrm* 
Hign Lob W 
Off CJT 
3C.W K.7I s 

k ■■as :t 70 5 

Jl«fl i7i«; s 
rs-fl2 :8 &j s 
iS'Ut'JOrtSa 1 
40.i<M^4r p s -s 


Today 

Hign Lob W ffigh Lob W 

CIF OF OF OF 

BuenwAaes I2.’53 205 in )i*6 206 pc 

'fracas 3108 21(70 pc 31* 32/71 pc 

urns 19«6 16*1 S 1*«6 16/61 pc 

MeocoOv 25777 1J/55 Sh 35/77 13/55 *h 

dedarwia H..70 17«3 pc 24.75 '8*4 pc 

Sanw.jo 9.‘4fl -im pc 1203 1/34 b 


Legend: S-Surmy. pc parity 
sn-snow. (-M. W-Wailhei 


cloud-/. c-douCy. stvshdiMTS. l-trunMams. i-raai. si-sxw tkvrios. 

All maps, fa recasts and data pravhM by Accu-Weatlwr, Inc. -y 1994 


Asia 


Today 


To 





Low 






C/F 

OF 


OF 

OF 


Ban*** 

32.89 

24.75 

511 

33*1 

25/77 c 

Be/imri 

31 88 

23/73 

1 

31 B8 

21/70 pc 

Monghong 

32.89 

27/80 

pc 

32 Ml 

ST/BO 

sh 

Uank) 

34"n 

2S/T7 

pc 

I 

33-91 

?! 71 

1 

•*i- IJ0i™ 

35.85 

in -82 

36-37 

28*2 pc 

S~am 

«i.TW 

7171 

art 

29*4 

28/71 

01 

£■:=.■:?& 

36.97 

26.79 

£ 

SJ.-S1 

S4/7S 

1 

Sngapcid 

31 IBB 

K/77 

pc 

32/89 

25/77 

di 

Tape. 

32-89 

26.79 

pc 

32*8 

26/79 pc 

To»yo 

28/79 

19*6 

PC 

27*0 

21/70 pc 

Africa 

A1JKI5 

23/82 

20(66 

s 

26/82 

21/70 pc 

C«» Tooin 

15/59 

6/43 

PC 

18*4 

11/52 

PC 

Casablanca 

2S/&4 

19/66 

a 

2B*4 

20*8 


Harare 


T0.-50 

| 

23/73 

1 1/52 



29*4 

23/73 

DC. 

sa*4 

24.-75 


l/alTTHH 

2271 

10-50 

« 

22.71 

12*3 

PC 

Tuns 

29/84 

*8-64 

6 

31.88 

19-68 

pc 

North America 

Andwa* 

2T.70 

10/50 

s 

19/66 

9/48 

« 

Adanu 

32«fl 

21/70 


31 *a 

21-70 


Boston 

28-82 

18/64 

Eh 

27.-80 

19.-S6 

cc 

Cutaqo 

27/Btl 

16*1 

B 

39*4 

17.62 

PC 

Derw 

35« 

17.B3 

4 

38*7 

17*3 

B 

Mred 

2B/BT 

16*1 

c 

26/82 

17/62 


HonaMu 

28/82 

22.71 

PC 

29B4 

23/73 

DC 

HwtKn 

35/95 

23 73 


38/97 

26/73 

s 

Ln AngoV^ 

32-09 

2170 

a 

30.-88 

18*4 

* 

ULur. 

32«9 

24-75 

1 

31.60 

Z5-77 


bWTOQBoas 

27/80 

16*4 

1 

29*4 

1B*4 


Mon»M 

2475 

13*5 

T 

24/75 

12/53 * 

fteasau 

31*8 

24/75 

pc 32*9 

24/75 


How York 

3D/86 

31*8 

1 

30*6 

21/70 


Phoem 

43009 30.86 

% 

44/111 31.118 

& 

San Fran. 

22/71 

11/52 

5 

21/70 

13.66 

s 

Sauna 

22.71 

11/52 


10*0 

1Z-53 

a\ 

Torortc 

Z4.75 

1S/59-W1 

26/79 

13/56 


WtoWngwn 

32/85 

21/70 

1 

33-91 

22/71 

PC 


SATURDAY 



• ,'L?y.:;-Vv- c'-'. -vp. •"» 

- • ' • • r ' V\- 


SUNDAY /-'-^ 


Europe and Mddle East 


Europe and Midtfl* East 


i -V - 

sniittateiwrtfad- 

*eamr- 


Locatloa 

Wanner 

High 

Low 

Water 

wave 

Wind 

Location 

: Weather-.--- 

Wgh - ; Urn - 

Waiar' 

~Wavt> 

-'Whid ; 



Temp. 

Temp. 

Temp. 

Height* 

Speed 


.’ > 

Tempi; Temp. 


Htfghtm 

rgfmmt 



OF 

OF 

OF 

(Metree) 

(M») 



-JOF ... OF. 

W: 

. 8Habet) 

•: 

Camas 

Sumy 

29/84 

20/68 

2271 

1-2 

NW 

15430 

Carnes 

- sunny • • 

30^5. 21/70 

2271 • 

-i-8 

1WW 1&25" 

Deauville 

doudy 

25/77 

15/59 

15156 

1-2 

w 

15-30 

Oeauvflie 

• partly suwy— 

zmtr, -i®Bt - 

T6/6T - 


-ytsvr 15 «rr. 

Rfenini 

sunny 

31/88 

24/75 

23,73 

1-2 

SE 

15-25 

FUr»M 

sunny 

,37/88 - •, 


.1*2 

9E- 15-30- 

Malaga 

sunny 

33.-91 

2A75 

2373 

1-2 

SSE 

15-25 

Malaga 

sunny 

,33ffl1 -23/73 

2271 

t-2. 

• S . 1530. 

Cagfari 

sunny 

3t.B8 

2373 

23/73 

1-2 

Sfc 

15-25 

CogCan 

any • 

32/89 £4/75 

23/73 

t-Z 

SSE 15-3Q 

Faro 

cloudy 

22/71 

15-59 

21/70 

1-2 

SW 

15-30 

Faro 

pertly sunny 

24/75 T4/57. 

2170 

. 1*. 

■'NW 15-25 

Piraeus 

sunny 

32/39 

2373 

23/73 

1-2 

NE 

15-25 

PiraouB 

sunny 

32/B9 2373 

-2373 

- 

.ME . 1525 


sunny 

32,-69 

24/75 

23.73 

1-2 

NE 

10-20 

Corfu 

suraw 

■ 32/89 2373 

2373 

1-2 

‘NE 1525 

Bnghdon 

showers 

22,71 

14.-57 

1559 

1-2 

WNW 15-30 

Brighton 

doura and sin 

2475 13/55 

15/59 

- i-2 

NW 15-30 


showers 

2271 

13-55 

15^9 

1-2 

sw 

1530 

Ostsnd 

ahossant 

2373 14/57 

15/59 

1-2 

NW 15.25. 

Sctievon Ingen 

showers 

23/73 

14/57 

14/57 

1-2 

Sb 

1525 

Schamntngan 

Ghoeats 

'2475 1559 

14/57 

: - J-2 

W '15450-.' 

Sytt 

thundsrelorms 

25.1/ 

1651 

1355 

1-2 

St 

1525 

Sy» 

showers 

2373 14/57 

13/55 

1,-ti 

SW 15-30 

Izmir 

sunny 

34.-33 

2373 

3373 

1-2 

Nt 

1530 

Izmir 

aunny 

34/93 2373 

2373 

f-a 

NE . 2D-35_ : 

Tel Aviv 

sunny 

32-89 

22-71 

22/71 

1-2 

N 

1525 

Tel Aviv 

omny 

31/88 2271 

2271 . 

i-ti 

_.NNW '15-30 - 

Caribbean and West Atlantic 







Caribbean and West Atlantic 



.. : 


Barbados 

clouds and sun 

32.B9 

26-79 

2652 

1-2 

ESE 

2535 

Barbados 

ahnsafs 

31/88 2579 

28/82 

• 1-ti 

.ENE 30^6-- : 

Kingston 

sunny 

33-31 

24-75 

28/82 

1-2 

b 

2540 

Kingston 

douebandsm 

32/89 2475 

2692 

. 1-2 

:E 8Ch«r 

SL Thomas 

partly sunny 

34/93 

24.75 

2682 

T-2 

E 

2535 

SLThomaa 

showers 

33ffl1 2475 

28/82 

.‘i-e 

,E 30-45 ■" 

Ham it on 

partly sunny 

3i-se 

2579 

27/80 

1-2 

SE 

20-35 

raMfinan 

partly sunny 

31«8 2879 - 

27/80 

:1r2 

-.-SE 20-35 




Asla/Pacfflc 

Penang 

Phuket 

Bali 

Cabu 


Stirahama 

HonOtdu 


Asls/Psctfic 


showers 

31/08 

24/75 

30/88 

1 

SW 

15-25 

Penang 

Ihmderatoinn 

31/88 

2475 

30/86 

t 

showers 

32/89 

2475 

29/84 

1 

SW 

15-25 

Dhiinnl 

rTJwBX 

partly sunny 

33/91 

2475 

29/84 . 

T 

partly sunny 

32/89 

2271 

28/82 

1 

sw 

12-25 

BaS 

party sunny 

32/89 

2373 

28/82 


showers 

33/91 

2475 

31/38 

1 

E 

15-30 

Cebu 

party aunny 

83/Bi 

2577 

31/88 

.1 

sunny 

17452 

9/48 

18654 

1-2 

VAR 

10-20 

Paftn Beach. Aus. 

portly sunny 

19696 

11/52 

16/84 

1-2 

showers 

13/55 

9/48 

17/62 

1^ 

NW 

30-50 

Bay of (stands, NZ 

doudy 

13/55 

ana 

17/62 

. 23 

sunny 

28/82 

2271 

2373 

1 

S 

18-35 

SNrahama 

sum 

29/54 

2271 

2373 

- 1 .- 

partly sinny 

28/84 

2373 

2679 

1-3 

E 

20-35 

Honolulu 

down and sun 

28/84 

2373 

2879 

1-3 


,.SW 15-25 
SW 1 SS5, 


SW 

E 


ia 

12-32- 


SW 30-60 
SW 30-SO 
S .. 15^0; 
E 2035 


in a world without borders, time zones 
or language barriers. 


ADS’ Access Numbers. 

How to can around the world \ - "t S -. 

L Using the chart bekjw, Sod the country you are raflfag from. . 

2. Dial the cofrespooduig/OST Access Number. ’I' 

3. An AIXT English-speaking Operator or voice pretax will ask for the phone number you wish to caB or oonnecryou ora 

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To recdveyrair free wallet card of Access Numbers, iuSt dial tbeaccess number of 

the country you're hi and ask for Oustomer Service. 


COUNTRY accessnumber country access number country access number 




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convenient Access Numbers on your right 


AT&T 


4fef 




ASIA 

Maly- 

172-1011 

Brazil 

: 0000010 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 

Lieditens/ein* 

15500-11 

C&fle 

00*0312 

China, rac**« 10811 

13thnafl4fl* 

8*196 

Columbia 

980-11-0010 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg 

0-8000111 

Costa Rka*a' 

114 

Bong Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia. F.YJL of 990004288 

Ecuador* 

119 . 

India* 

000-117 

Malta* 

0800-890-110 

HSatadorV 

• ... m-- 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco* 

19*0011 

Guatemala* 

• 190 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Netherlands* 

06022-9111 

Guyana*** 

165 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 

Honduras** 

123 

Korea** 

11* 

Poland**** 

0*0104800111 

Modcoiu 

95-8CXM624240 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

Portugal* 

05017-1-286 

Nicaragua (Managua) 174 

New Zealand 

000-911 

(tomanfa 

010004288 

Panama* 

' 109 • ; 

Philippines* 

105-U 

Smda*tU<Hco«) 

155-5042 

Peru* . 

191 ' 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

gonkbL 

0042000101 

Suriname 

156 r 

Singapore 

800-01 11-111,.' 

Spain* 

9009900-11 

Uruguay 

'.. 000440' r - 

Sri Lanka 

430430 

Sweden* 

020-795011 


80011-120 J_- 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

SwltinlMd* 

15500-11 

CARIBBEAN ■' 

Thailand* 

001^991-1111 . 

UK. 

0500090011 

•Bahama* 

* I0OM72-2881 r - 


EUROPE 

Ukraine!* 

8*100-11 

Bermuda* 

• 1-800072-2881 

Armenia** 

8*14111 

MIDDUEEAST 

BdriabVJ. 

. 1000072-2881 • v 

Austria-- 

022-9034)11 

Bahrain 

800001 

Cayman Islands 

1000072-2881 -T- 

Belgium* 

0800-100-10 

Cyprus* 

080-90010 

Grenada* 

10000720881 -V 

Bulgaria 

00-18000010 

lend 

177-100-2727 

Haiti* 

OO10OO072 D 28aJ:.--. : e : -L . 

Croatia** 

9M8-0011 

Kuwait 

800-288 

Jamaica** 

0000072-2881. ■ > 

Czech Rep 

00-420-00101 

Lebanon CBdrnO 

426001 

Nerb-Amfl 

001000072-2881 - - - 

Denmark* 

9001-0010 

Qatar 

0800011-77 

ScKtas/Nevis 

10000723881.;:. 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

Saudi Arabia 

-1-80040— 

AFRICA 4 

France 

19*0011 

Ttnfcey* 

00000-12277 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

i- 5100200* s ; 

Germany 

• 01304)010 

UAE.* 

800-121 

Gabon* 

- 00*001 

Greece* 

00^00-1311 

AMERICAS 

Gambia* 

OOIU^- 

Hmigjpy* 

OOA-8OO011U 

Argentina* 

001-800-200-1111 

Kenya* 

• 0800-1Q ; . • 

Iceland*! 

999001 

Belize* 

555 

Liberia 

797-797 - V 

Ireland 

1-800-550-000 

Bolivia* 

O0OO-U12 

Sooth Africa 

0000090123 .1 


J 


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pn*^a « ii ^tap»^(allio8ba> , faiiicreih4n75‘XXji«rta.trtduAiaibOBe **CoBencatHuo<6v prooc. 

abflradlnb«djbo*c >— FubBcn/uu ict 

| Wori dOauutn- prtccsgo»ttwto/ , 4nfC3AI>bta , a<e<plotJiaAatc»Bl champ * Not iva&fclhm 

cj^ joonifcaayi-vmaitoana. Not roBv^Ubie&ran all areas, 

USAPtmf SeivtoB K mOatSr from all Hit coi b pim BibU i lvw e 

twtwi- ^«'™*P^t*^o a jy. l ^aw^>«w«rafaritadraie 

Mmt . . .. a .'~ w 


cpbOM require depott of et*i or pbau<aad(brdblttac. 


Oaunixr Soufcjfiefliiniuagc*fcm!y. 


^jJ>^^cTO^i*c*pj«Qfcoliiorphi»iec2rdldrtfc4|ont DUIOlCHaHHlI ^ »C«a»«H»^ia <l iMi;.B lrn n? i m i f .