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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Tuesday, March l, 1994 


No. 34,524 


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NATO’S FIRST SHOTS IN ANGER 




Russia Backs Downing of Jets in Bosnia 


Strong Sign From West 
Of New Aggressive Role 


By John Pomfrei 

Washington Past Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosoia-Herzegovina Like 

die gruesome attack on Sarajevo’s market- 
place three weeks ago, NATO's downing on 
Monday of four Bosnian Serbian warplanes 
is a mflitaiy action that could crucially alter 
the course of the war. 

By proving to the Bosnian Serbs and their 
mentors in Belgrade that “NATO has teeth." 
in the words of Lieutenant General Michael 
Rose, the commander of UN forces in Bos- 
nia, the attack put the Serbs on notice that 
NATO and the United Nations have funda- 
mentally transformed their roles in what used 
to be Yugoslavia. 

Two questions remain. Does the United 
Nations have enough men in Bosnia to earn- 
out the changes? And how will the warring 
parties, especially the Serbs and their foes, 
the Muslims, react? 

UN officials say if the Serbs, who are 
largely seen as the main aggressors in this 
three-sided conflict, accept the novel role 
played by UN forces and the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization, then the downing of the 
four warplanes could provide a jolt to the 
peace process aimed at stopping the 23- 
month battle to divide Bosnia. 

But if Bosnian Serbian forces take issue 
with the UN's more robust interpretation of 
its mission, backed by NATO planes, then 
they have placed themselves on a collision 
course with the international community, 
with potentially dire results for both the 
Serbs and the thousands of lightly armed UN 
soldiers and aid workers in Bosnia. 

For most of the two-year war. the UN 
operation here has tiptoed around the com- 
batants. In Bosnia, its main mission has been 
lo deliver aid 10 the 2.7 trillion people esti- 
mated to rely on handouts’ Jo survive. Despite 
LIN Security Council resolutions approving 
the use of “necessary force’' to deliver aid 
here, UN troops have never sfcqt their way 
through a roadblock. 

Now. undr. ibc leadership of General 
Rose, the most dynamic of the mission’s four 


commanders since it began in July 1992, the 
UN operation has adopted a more aggressive 
stance, announcing, for example, that it 
would no longer seek permission for its aid 
convoys to cross batue lines, but instead 
would notify the warning sides and proceed 
with or without permission. 

NATO, too, took an ambiguous approach 
to flexing its military muscles for the first 
time beyond the territory of its member- 
states when in April 1993 it began prosecut- 
ing a no-flight zone over Bosnia. Since then, 
there have been hundreds of violations, espe- 
cially by helicopters, on all tides. 

Now, in less than a month, NATO has 
issued an ultimatum to the Bosnian Serbs, 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

warning of air strikes if they did not withdraw 
their heavy weapons 20 kilometers from Sara- 
jevo or put them under direct UN control. 
And finally h has shot down violators of the 
no-flight zone. 

The Feb. 9 ultimatum followed an earlier 
military action as significant — albeit more 
shocking — as Monday’s attack: the killing 
of 68 civilians in the shelling of a Sarajevo 
market on Feb. 5. It was that slaughter of 
civilians that prompted NATO to change 
forever the role it was playing in Bosnia. 

“This was a gross miscalculation on the 
part of the Sabs." said a senior Western 
military official involved in the NATO opera- 
tion. “These changes have thrown the Serbs 
seriously off-balance." 

In an interview. General Rose said the 
NATO action Monday would hdp to further 
calm the situation in Sarajevo. 

“This shows that if there's a NATO ultima- 
tum it's not a hollow ultimatum," he said. 
“There’s a dear read across to other NATO 
orders." Hke the one concerning Sanyevo. 

Another unpredictable element is the 
mostly-MusBm army. If it takes the NATO 
attack as a sign that the international com- 

See ATTACK, Page 4 



Allies Say Serb Planes Bombed 


President CHntoo jfccgssing die domting of four Serbian warplanes on Monday. 


Sew York Times Service 

MOSCOW — After weeks of sharp opposi- 
tion to Western military intervention in Bosnia, 
R ussian officials said Monday that they sup- 
ported NATO’s actions in shooting down four 
planes on a bombing raid there earlier in the 
day — tbe first shots fired in anger in the 
alliance’s 45-year history . 

But. clearly juggling competing allegiances. 
Foreign Ministry officials here could not bring 
themselves to join the alliance in placing direct 
blame for the incident on the Bosnian Serbs. 

Tbe North Atlantic Treaty Organization as- 
serted that tbe planes were from tbe Bosnian 
Serbs’ air force and that they were shot down 
after they bombed a Muslim area. 

But in a brief statement, the Russian Foreign 
Ministry said that the identity of the warplanes 
was not known and that the Bosnian Serb 
leadership had denied all responsibility for 
them. 

“Whoever carried out the military sortie over 
Bosnia in violation of the corresponding UN 
Security Council resolutions on a no-fly zone, a 
is they who bear tbe fuD responsibility for what 
happened,” the statement said. It went on to 
note that “these planes could belong to the 
Bosnian Serbs, though their military command 
rejects the possibility 

Moscow has vacillated considerably in its 
role as main defender of (he Serbs, with whom 
they have strong historical ties. Only a week 
ago, Russian officials intervened on behalf of 
tbe West and helped persuade the Bosnian 
Serbs to withdraw their heavy artillery from 
around Sarajevo. 

[Radovan Karadzic, leader of the Bosnian 
Sobs, arrived in Moscow on Monday for talks, 
hours after the incident. “I am here lo ensure 
the peace process. Russia will help ns," Mr. 
Karadzic said, according to Agence France- 
Presse.] 

Russian negotiators, who had scored a singu- 
lar triumph in helping force the withdrawal, 
expressed deep anxiety Monday over the wors- 
ening situation. “We repeatedly warned the 
Serbs, Croats and Muslims against posable 
provocations by field commanders or anyone 
else," a senior Foragn Ministry official told the 
Russian news agency Interfax on Monday. 


EU Warns China on U.K . Trade Be Firm,,' Dissident Tells U.S. 


By Kevin Murphy 

JmemanonaJ Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Reacting to fresh Chinese attacks on 
Britain for its pursuit of democratic reforms in Hong Kong, 
the European Union warned Beijing on Monday that its 
threats to retaliate against British trade risked a wider 
confrontation with the European Union. 

In Beijing for official talks, the EU commissioner in 
charge of external economic relations sad trade policy. Sir 
Leon Brittan, clashed with China's minister for foreign 
trade, Wu Yi, who asserted that British trade success in 
China may depend on the outcome of the political dispute 
that has raged for 17 months over the colony. 

“Any action that discriminated against one member state 
on political grounds would be a very serious matter not just 
for that country but for the EU as a whole," Sir Leon said at 
a joint news conference with Miss Wu. 

“The European Union was founded on the principle of 
solidarity” be said, according lo news agency reports, fol- 


lowing discussions that included the possibility of China’s 
returning to the Genera] Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

When .Miss Wu said that Sir Leon’s concern was under- 
standable since he was British, Sr Leon responded: 

“That has nothing to do with it at alL I speak as a 
commissioner whose task it is to represent the interests of 
the European Union as a whole; and if Madame Wu doesn't 
fully appreciate that, Tm glad to make it dear now." 

Despite Miss Wu’s reply that her comment “was a joke." 
the press conference was ended. 

[Sir Leon said laier he had received assurances that China 
would not punish EU companies, Reuters reported from 
London. “I have had an assurance from the very highest 
level in China saying that there wifl be no discrimination 
against any individual member state of the EU and that it is 
recognized that nondiscrimination is a fundamental princi- 
ple of the GATT,” he was quoted as telling BBC radio.] 

Sir Leon declined to specify countermeasures the Europc- 

See BRITTAN, Page 4 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Pan Service 

BEIJING — Wei Jingsheng, China’s best known dissi- 
dent, has called on President Bill Clinton to toughen the 
U.S. stance on human-rights abuses in China as the United 
States began a new round of talks with Beijing on Monday. 

John Shattuck, assistant secretary of state for human 
rights, met with Mr. Wei on Sunday, the eve of meetings 
with Chinese officials to discuss human-rights issues. 

The U.S. Embassy had no comment on the meeting with 
Mr. Wei, but the dissident told The Associated Press on 
Monday that Mr. Shattuck had asked if he had anything he 
wished to pass along to Mr. Clinton. 

“1 said the U.S. government should be more firm in its 
position,” the outspoken Mr. Wei was quoted as saying, 
“the U.S. government's attitude should be as tough as the 
Chinese.” 

Mr. Shattuck is the highest U.S. official to meet with Mr. 
Wei. 


Kiosk 

Algerian Hijackers 
Surrender in Spain 

ALICANTE, Spain (AFP) -7- Three hi- 
jackers who diverted an Algerian jetliner 
with 127 passengers and crew to this 
southern seaside resort gave up on Mon- 
day and placed themselves in tbe custody 
of Spanish authorities, the police an- 
nounced. 

All passengers and crew were freed from 

the Boeing 727, which bad been surround- 
ed by the police as local officials aided by 
French and Arab interpreters negotiated 
with the hijackers. 

The Spanish news agency Erfc ana 
sources in the Ministry of Transportation 
reported that the hijackers had asked for 
political asylum, but Interior Ministry of- 
f£ials said they could not confirm tins. 
The plane was on a domestic flight from 
Oran in western Algeria to Annaba m tbe 

eastof the country when it was segea. 

Book Review Page J 

Om Pa s e& 


Rabin Cautions Palestinians as Focus Shifts to Talks 




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A Palestinian facing police officers with a hawtful of stones Monday in East Jerusalem as dashes continued after the roostpie kffliflgs- 


By Gyde Haberman 

New York Times Senior 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin warned the Palestinians on Monday not 
to use the Hebron mosque massacre to set 
unrealistic conditions for their return to peace 
talks. 

But in words botb lacerating and relentless, 
he declared murderous settlers in the occupied 
territories to be outcasts, alien to Israel and to 
Judaism. 

Mr. Rabin suggested that, despite Palestinian 
demands, be would take no further measures 

PLO win seek UN backing for demand that 
settlers be tisatmed. Page Z 

a gains t Jewish settlers in tbe occupied territo- 
ries beyond those announced on Sunday, aimed 
at a relatively small group of extremists preach- 
ing die anti-Arab views of the late Rabbi Mear 
Kahane. 

[But Mr. Rabin said he would accept an 
international Chilian presence in the occupied 
Gaza Strip and Jericho in the West Bank. 
Agence France- Presse reported. “We would 
agree to tbe deployment of an international 
presence in tbe Gaza Strip and Jericho,” he told 
representatives of American Jewish organiza- 
tions.! 

Under a toughened new policy, some Jews — 

See ISRAEL, Page 2 


Following his release last fall after nearly IS years in 
prison, Mr. Wei has persisted in speaking out despite repeat- 
ed warnings that he should stop publishing his views over- 
seas and giving interviews to foreign reporters. 

Meanwhile, in a background briefing for American re- 
porters on U-S.-Orinese relations, a senior Chinese Foreign 
Ministry official was asked about Mr. Shat nick’s meeting 
with Mr. Wei. He said that the United States should look at 
the bright side of China’s development and aotjust listen to 
what he described as tbe views of a small minority of its 
malcontents. 

Beijing has set out a hard-line stance on the talks in recent 
weeks by publishing attacks on alleged American hypocrisy 
in making human-rights demands on other na ti o ns while 
ignoring racism, poverty, and other problems at home. 

China’s stance apparently reflects a growing consensus 
among top party leaders that economic concerns top the 

See CHINA. Page 4 


“Now, what we warned against and what we 
feared has happened.’’ 

Craig R. Whitney of The New York Times 
reported earlier from Bonn: 

NATO officials said that two U.S. F-16 fight- 
ers brought down four Bosnian Serbian light- 
attack bombers Monday after the Serbian 
planes attacked a MasBm-comroUed ammuni- 
tion factory in central Bosnia. 

The officials said that the downed planes bad 
been part of a flight of six aircraft encountered 
by a NATO patrol near the Bosnian Serbs’ 

NATO governments say tbe planes committed 
an ‘indisputable violation.' • The jets were 
put of Bosnian Sobs’ 37-plane force. Page 4. 

main air base at Banja Luka on Monday morn- 
ing. The American phots opened fire with heat- 
seeking missiles after twice wanting the air- 
craft, two-seater jets made for the armed forces 
of the former Yugoslavia and known as Galeb, 
to land. Tbe Bosnian Serbs ignored the warn- 
ings. NATO officials raid. 

The other two Bosnian Serbian planes re- 
turned to base and landed safely, military offi- 
cials said. There was no word as 10 tbe fate of 
the crews of the downed jets. 

[In Washington, Pres dent Bill Clinton said 
that “every attempt was made” to avoid shoot- 
ing down the aircraft, Tbe Associated Press 
reported. Mr. Clinton said the downines com- 
plied with the United Nations mandate “to 
chromate tbe prospect tbe war could be earned 
into the air." 

[Prime Minister John Major of Britain, who 
was in Washington on an official visit, endorsed 
the action. “There was no reason for these 
planes to be there,” he said. “They were there 
with hostile intent They were given a warning. 
They declined that warning. They were shot 
down and frankly they could expect nothing 
else.”] 

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization has 
been patrolling the skies over Basnia-Herzego- 
vina since April under tbe authority of a United 
Nations Security Council resolution banning 
all other military flights there. Until Monday, 

See PLANES, Page 4 


Russia Expels 
U.S. Diplomat 
Named as Agent 

By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Past Service 

MOSCOW — Russia on Monday expelled a 
U.S. Embassy official, identified by Russians as 
the CIA station chief, in retaliation for Wash- 
ington's expulsion of a Russian intelligence 
official last week. Russian officials then ex- 
pressed hope that the first espionage flare-up 
since the Cold War would not escalate further. 

Ambassador Thomas R. Pickering confirmed 
Monday that a U.S. official whom he did not 
name, had been ordered to leave. Russian offi- 
cials identified the expelled man as James Mor- 
ris and said he was in charge of intelligence 
here. Mr. Morris, listed officially as an embassy 
counselor, could not be reached for comment. 

In an apparently unrelated move. President 
Boris N. raisin dismissed his domestic intelli- 
gence chief on Monday, heightening the im- 
pression of disarray in his administration in the 
aftermath of the freeing from jail of several of 
his bitter political foes. 

The mutual expulsions stem from the arrest 
last week in Virginia of a top CIA officer. 

Economic rivalry between the Umted States 

and Russia comes to the fore. Page 3. 

Aldrich Hazen Ames, and his wife on charges of 
spying for the Soviet Union and Russia. To 
protest Russia's infiltration of the CIA, Wash- 

der L Lysenko, described as due/ of Russia’s 
intelligence station there. 

Russian officials, including Foreign Minister 
Andrei V. Kozyrev, expressed indignation at 
the expulsion of an official who had openly 
identified himself as being in the intelligence 
business. “In this situation, we are obliged, on 
the basis of mutuality, to declare the CIA 
representative in Moscow persona non grata," 
the Foreign Ministry said in a statement. 

Officiate in the Foreign Ministry and the 
external intelligence service botb said they 
hoped the fight would end there, without fur- 
ther damage to bilateral relations. A presiden- 
tial spokesman said he did not believe Mr. 
Yeltsin was involved in the decision. 

“We are very much upset and regret that it 
happened in the first place and hope that this 
will put a foil stop" to the dispute, said an 

See RUSSIA, Page 4 


White House Bumbling on Foreign Leaders 9 Names Spells Trouble 


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By Alan Friedman 

internattoanl Herald Tnbvne 

PARIS In the ethereal world of high-level diplomacy, 

it’s often the little things that count, like spelling the names 


dear! It is a real frittomisto. They are mixing up our names 
and our titles." 

Given tbe Old World’s obsession with protocol, this is 
not the first time an American government has been 
accused of sloppiness. But the complaints from Europe 


“"T correctly accused of sioppmess. But the comptamis irom cuiupc nusauiKa vw 

° f KTwfdfless than two weeks to gp before President only begin with the problem of misspelled names, which Unlike the other i 

D’lWTJntonis to be the host of a high-profile jobs confer- are contained in a letter and briefing documents sent by Edmond AJphanday, 
Bill Clinton is to De me n»i w * u no for the Midi* GimuL the Is 


Bill Clinton is to be tne nest oi a mgu-piuiuo juds wui«- 
in Detroit, senior European government aides are 
Ambling in private about what they describe as White 
House disarray in making preparations. 

-I don't want to be impolite, said one Italian govern- 
ment official, chuckling, “but this Clinton presidency! Oh 


the White House on Feb. 18 to officials planning for the 
Group of Seven jobs meeting. 

A copy of the White House documents that has beat 
obtained by the International Herald Tribune shows the 
victims of poor spelling are Kenneth Clarke, Britain s 


chancellor of the Exchequer (spelled Clark); Norbert 
Blum, Germany's labor minister (spelled Bloehm); Hero 
Banicci. Italy's Treasury minister (who was called Pietro); 
and Henning Christophersen, Europe’s economics com- 
missioner (spelled Chnstopherson). 

Unlike the other ministers who will go to Detroit 
Edmond Alphandery. the French economics minister, and 
Michel Giraud, the labor minister, had their first names 
lopped off the list entirdv- 

European hackles were raised further because the Clin- 
ton administration, which last year invited G-7 partners to 
attend the meeting, has asked those whose names it has 


misspelled to pay for their own rooms at the Westin Hotel 
Renaissance Center in Detroit. “We were not even told the 
venue would be Detroit until very recently,” moaned a 
German government official. 

“It is all a bit of a mess,” he added. 

If misspelling names and asking guests to pay their own 
way are merely awkward. President Clinton has also 
caused a real flap over protocol by inviting Jacques Delors, 
the European Commission president whose ideas he likes, 
but whose station is well above the ministerial rank of the 

See NAMES, Page 2 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH I, 1994 




Settlers See Mosque Gunman as Martyr 


By Chris Hedges 
ind Joel Greenben 


and Joel Greenberg 

New York Times Service 

KIRYAT ARB A, Israeli-Occupied West 
Bank — On the flight before the massacre' 
that would lead to his death. Baruch Gold- 
stein prayed for the last tune at the dimly lit 
Tomb of the Patriarchs. 

He was there to participate in services 
marking the Jewish holiday of Pimm. But 
when Arab worshipers on the other side of 
the partition in the shrine began to taunt the 
Jews, Dr. Golds ton seemed particularly dis- 
traught, other settlers said. 

“The Arabs were screaming out during our 
prayers that the Jews should be slaughtered," 
said Yehuda Burdman, a settler. “The fact 
that he could not even say his prayers greatly 
upset him. " 

The next morning at about 5, Israeli Army 
.investigators said. Dr. Goldstein walked out 
of his ground-floor apartment dressed in the 
captain’s uniform he wore as an army reserve 
doctor. He carried an Israeli-made Gahl rifle 
and at least four magazines with 35 bullets 
apiece. 

It was the dawn of Pnrim. a raucous holi- 
day celebrating the deliverance of Persian 
Jews from a plot to destroy them in the 5th 


worshipers so he could hit as many people as 
possible. 

“He didn’t say a word." 

Dr. Goldstein loaded a magazine into his 
assault rifle, pot an what witnesses described 
'as protective ear cups to deaden the noise and 
opened fire on the Muslims kneeling in tight 
rows, heads bowed to the ground. He stood 
near the back wall of the mosque, out of 


effect on him," a neighbor said. “He looked 
like a shadow of himself after the Kahane 
murder, but the killing of his friend Morde- 
chai Lapid, who died in his arms in Decem- 
ber, broke him. His ideas became even more 
radical. 


“He always talked of revenge. He was a 
quiet man. hot in his heart he was seething 
with anger." 

Mr. Lapid was ambushed Dec. 6 by Pales- 
tinian gunmen just outside the settlement. 
One of Mr. Lsipid’s sons also died in the 
shooting, and three of his children were 
wounded. 

Dr. Goldstein was one of the first people 
on the scene, but he could not save his friend. 

There was little remorse expressed by the 
settlers in Kiryat Arba for the scores of dead 
Palestinians left sprawled on the floor of the 
mosque. But most bemoaned the death of the- 
doctor — and even defended his attack. 

“This act should not be condemned." said 
Mr. Ben-Yaacov, who immigrated from 
Stony Brook. New York, and converted to 
Judaism. “If none of ns condemn the act, it 
w31 make the Arabs afraid and prevent many 
attacks. 

Matityahu Alansky, a New York native, 
stood outside Dr. tioldstein’s yellow lime- 
stone apartment building, where be had just 
left a letter of condolence for the doctor's 
widow and children. 

He said the doctor had bolstered the spirits 
of many settlers, who fear the government 
will close the settlements as part of the peace 
accord with the Palestine Liberation Organi- 
zation. 

“We are proud of what he did," Mr. 
Alansky said. “He has given us pride as Jews. 
He is a hero. People may have died, but he 
has given life to the country. He has shown us 
that God is with us, that Jews will now fight 
back." 

At a small grocery just yards from Dr. 
Goldstein's apartment, employees were past- 
ing a large sign in Hebrew on the window. 
The men, some carrying automatic weapons, 
stood under a small tarpaulin that protected 
them from the rain. Many wore damp black 
army boots. 

“We wish to express our pain and sorrow at 
the loss of the martyr Dr. Baruch Goldstein," 
tiie sign read. 

The hand-lettered notice likened the death 


'It crushed him to see 
Jews get hurt and no one, 
not even the 
government, ever react,’ 


century B C. and the fierce revenge they took 
against their enemies. Dr. Goldstein's 


against their enemies. Dr. Goldstein's 
friends, as perhaps he hoped they would, 
compared him Sunday to Mordechai, the 
hero of the Purim story. 

The doctor, who was well-known to sol- 
diers and settlers, arrived at the Tomb of the 
Patriarchs at about 5:30, entering through a 
side entrance and passing by soldiers, who 
did not challenge him. He moved swiftly 
toward the door of the mosque, where hun- 
dreds of Arabs were saying their Friday 
morning prayers in observance of Ramadan, 
the Muslim holy month of penance. 

Mohammed Abu Saleh, a guard at the 
mosque door, said that Dr. Goldstein had 
demanded to enter, saying he was the duty 
officer, and that when Mr. Abu Saleh object- 
ed, the doctor knocked him down with the 
butt of his rifle. 

“When I saw him, he was r unning toward 
the hall where everyone was saying prayers," 
said Khatem Kafisha, who had been taking 
off his shoes near the door. “He could have 
shot any one of us who was outside, but it was’ 
dear be only wanted to open fire on the 


range of closed-circuit television cameras 
that are monitored by Israeli soldiers at the 
shrine. 

the doctor fired 111 rounds from three 
and a half magazines, army investigators 
said. 

Worshipers reported hearing long bursts of 
gunfire. Some also said load expfosons 
shook the mosque but Israeli officials said 
there was no evidence that grenades woe 
used. The massacre was over in about two 

minutes. 

Many Jews, who gathered in small groups 
in the d rizzle that drenched Kiryat Axba on 
Sunday, said they shared Dr. Goldstein's an- 
ger and feeling of powerlessness. 

“Until you experience the pain he felt you 
can’t condemn him," said a middle-aged 
woman who lives near the Goldsteins. “It 
crushed him to see Jews get hurt and no one, 
not even the government, ever react. He could 
not stand to see the Jewish people live in their 
own land and yet not be free." 

The inner world of Dr. Goldstein was 
clearly colored by the messianic, often racist 
ran tings of radical Jewish settlers who deny 
Palestinian rights to the occupied territories 
and say the world is bent on exterminating 
the Jews. 

As the doctor's ideological structure began 
to crumble, first with the assassination of the 
radical Rabbi Meir Kahane and then with the 
peace talks with the Palestinians, it cast him 
adrift, neighbors said. And when several 
friends were killed by Palestinians, something 
in him snapped, they said. 

“The murder of Rabbi Kahane had a huge 


of Dr. Goldstein to that of the prophet Elijah, 
who ascended to heaven in a chariot of fire. 


Otnoe 1928 we've served Winston Churchill, 
Alexander of Yugoslavia, Marlene Dietrich 
and many others. 

As of March. 15th, it will be your turn. 


EU Gives 4 Candidates 
More Time for Accord 



Reopening on March 15th. 


^INCEE^&IfS 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — Hie European 
Union indicated a readiness to ex- 
tend membership negotiations with 
Austria. Sweden. Finland and Nor- 
way cm Monday to prevent stale- 
mates over fish, trucking, and other 
issues from splitting the four candi- 
dates. 

Germany effectively lifted the 
declared deadline of midnight 
Monday when Foreign Minister 
Klaus Kinkd said the EU must 
avoid leaving behind Norway ami 
Austria, which have made less pro- 
gress in the talks than Finland and 


Sweden. The Greek European af- 
fairs minister. Theodore Panealos, 


As of March 15th, the Prince de Galles is back to 


its original splendor. During 4 months of 
ovation, each part of this luxurious hotel bail 


renovation, each part of this luxurious hotel built 
in 1928, has been entirely restored by experts. 
We will continue to provide the best service and 
comfort for our guests, whilst maintaining 
the specific charm of the 30's. 


For additional information and for reservations, 
call 47 23 55 11 


fairs minister, Theodore Pangalos, 
warned Sunday that Norway and 
Austria might need several more 
months to reach agreements. 
Greece holds the rotating EU presi- 
dency. 

EU leaders set the Monday 
deadline so the European Parlia- 
ment and the four candidates could 
I ratify the accords in time for EU 
entry on Jan. 1, 1995, but officials 
acknowledge that talks could con- 
tinue as late as March 10 and still 
bold to the ratification timetable. 


The aim Monday was to “get it 
to the point where both tides reach 
the end of their negotiating tether," 
an official said, then allow the can- 
didates to go back to their capitals 
and weigh final compromises. 

There were plenty of sticking 
points on all tides. 

The 12 EU member states failed 
to agree on their bottom line at an 
internal bargaining session early 
Monday. 

Spain's European affairs minis- 
ter, Carlos Westeaadorp. said Ma- 
drid would not back down on its 
demand to maintain existing voting 
rules, which allow as few as three 
countries to block important EU 
initiatives. Most other states, led by 
Germany, want to dilute (he block- 
ing minority, but Prime Minister 


Felipe Gonz&lez wrote to Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl on Monday to 


lor Helmut Kohl on Monday to 
stress that the existing roles were 


“vital" to Spain, a Spanish spokes- 
man said. 


Finland rejected the ElTs offer 
on farm supports as too stingy, 
while Sweden failed to budge the 
EU on its demand to phase in its 
contributions to the EU budget 
over several years. 


PLO Sets Condition 
For Return to Talks 


WORLD BRIEFS 


* f. i 


Ff i 


Unionists to Shun Ulster Peace Talks 


Group to Seek UN’s Support 
For Plea to Disarm Settlers 


Mcndm KaNia'Ayncr Ftmce-Picac 

Foreign Minister Shimon Pores, left, conferring with Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin at a parliamentary debate Monday on the killings. 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

New York Times Service 

BETHLEHEM — Reflecting a 
wave of revulsion that has spread 
among Palestinians in the West 
Bank and Gaza Snip over the mas- 
sacre of Palestinians by a Jewish 
sealer, a senior Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization official said 
Monday that the disarming of mili- 
tant settlers was a condition for the 
return of the PLO to peace talks. 

Yasser Abed Rabbo, the PLO's 
information chief and a senior 
member of the Palestinian negoti- 
ating team said Palestinians were 
launching a campaign to persuade 
members of the United Nations Se- 
curity Counril to bade this de- 
mand. 

The move reflects a conviction 
among the estimated two million 
Palestinians living under Israeli oc- 
cupation that further talk* with Is- 
rael are pointless otherwise. 

[The United States rqected the 
PLO conditions Monday, Reuters 
reported from Washington. The 
State Department spokesman, 
Mike McCurry, said the talks 
should continue on the same basis 
as before.] 

The fact that Dr. Baruch Gold- 
stem, the settler who gunned down 
dozens of worshipers at the Hebron 
mosque Friday, was an American 
citizen was widely pointed out in 
Arab dailies Monday. Many re- 
ports stressed that fundamentalist 
American Jews are flocking to in- 
habit Jewish settlements here, fi- 
nanced by donations from support- 
ers in the United States. The charge 
has inflamed latent anti- American 
sentiment among many Palestin- 
ians. 


‘The a ucstion is no longer to go 
on with tne talks, but to protect the 
Palestinians from the rule of terror 


imposed by Jewish settlers,” Mr. 
Abed Rabbo said in a radio imer- 


Abed Rabbo said in a radio inter- 
view. “This takes precedence over 
anything else." 

The PLO's move to harden its 
stance has been dictated by the 
very real threat that if the organiza- 
tion were to decide to resume talks 
without receiving concessions on 
means of containing provocative 
behavior by Jewish settlers — who 
until Friday openly roamed the 
streets of Hebron in the West Bank 
with their weapons in hand — it 
would lose its following here 

It is also certain that the PLO is 
trying to use the circumstances of 
the massacre and its impact to pull 
the United States batik into the 
peace process on the side of Pales- 
tinians. 

Elias Freq, the mayor of Bethle- 
hem, considered to be among the 
most moderate Palestinians in the 
occupied territories, underlined 


BELFAST (Combined Dispatches) —The Ulster Unionist Party said 
Monday it would cot take any further part in peace talks .among the 
British and Irish governments and the constitutional local parties in 
Northern Ireland. 

Hie announcement said the party would remain out of the talks until 
new political structures were s« up in Northern Ireland. The announce- 
ment was seen as a blow to Prime Minister John Major’s efforts to resume 
the talks as a means of demonstrating to Sinn Fein, the political wing of 
the IRA, that it had lost the initiative in the Ulster derate. 

Sinn Fein, in its annual congress in Dublin over the weekend, failed 
either to accept or reject the British- Irish Joint Declaration on Northern 
Ireland, which offered it a place in negotiations when the IRA renounced 
violence for three months. Britain and Ireland signed a joint peace 
declaration in December seeking to cod the long guerrilla conffici and 
bring the IRA to the negotiating table. (AFP, Reuters) 



pc 


UN Is Told of Iraqi Tteign of Terror’ 


GENEVA (1HT) — In unusually blunt language, a UN human-rights 
monitor, Max van der Steel, accused the regime of Saddam Hussein on 
Monday of a continuing “reign of terror against the people of Iraq, 
replete with “executions, torture, illegal detention, restrictions ou travel 
and press freedom as well as abuse of the rights of women and children." 

At the annual session of the S2-uatkm Commission on Human Rights 
in Geneva, Mr. van der Stoel a former Dutch foreign minister, painted a 
bleak picture of human deprivation, notably in the Kurdish regions of the 
north and the southern marshland, where the government's reclamation 
projects threaten a quarter of a milli on Shiite Iraqis with starvation. 

The report, commissioned by the United Nations a year ago, says the 
Kurdish minority remains subjected to an economic blockade by Bagh- 
dad and survives on international aid, which covers only 7 to 10 percent 
of daily food requirements. 


Danish Government Loses Majority 


Monday the extent of Palestinian 
demands that something be done 


sp eaking at the Tunis headquar- 
ters of the PLO. Mr. Abed Rabbo 
said Palestinian representatives 
will travel to Washington to ex- 
plain the organization’s new posi- 
tion on the disarming of settlers. 
The issue has now been elevated to 
the status of a virtually nonnogotia- 
ble condition for the resolution of 
the 45-year-old Palestiman-Isradi 
conflict. 


demands that something be done 
about settlers’ behavior. 

“Peace in the territories and Jew- 
ish settlements don’t go together," 
be said. 

“These Israeli settler extremists 
are well-known to all who live hoe. 

“These people have for years 
openly called for the expulsion of 
Palestinians from the West Bank," 
he said. 

‘The only way to stop it is to 
take armed settlers out of Arab 
regions. They cannot be allowed to 
stroll about with weapons among 
i manured Palestinians any more. 
Otherwise forget about peace 
talks". 

While moderate Palestinians 
such as Mr. Frcij would continue to 
support the peace process if a com- 
promise was rearmed over disarm- 
ing settlers, the very notion of far- 
ther talks with Israel is met with 
total rejection among militant 
Muslim f undamentalists in He- 
bron, for whom support has dra- 
matically increased after the kQl- 
ing. 


COPENHAGEN (Reuters) — Denmark's Social Democrat-led gov- 
ernment lost its narrow parliamentary majority on Monday when a 
member of one of its coalition partners let her parly to become an 
independent amid the fallout bran a political scandal 
The departure from the Center Democrats party of Benle Juncker, the 
former social affairs minister, left the governing coalition in control of 
maly 89 of the 1 79 seats m parliament. Sue had resigned from her cabinet 
post on Feb. 11 following leaks by her of unsubstantiated allegations of 
sexual misdemeanors by the bead of a cotter for the mentally handi- 


P&riiamentary commentators did not expect her resignation from the 
party to threaten the government’s hold on power, since she pledged on 
Monday to support Prime Minister Foul Nyrup Rasmussen as an 
independent. “I plan to work out a cooperation plan for voting for 
government legislation," she said. Tt won’t be me who forces any 
premature election." 


U.S. Makes a Gesture to North Korea 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is ready to resume 
negotiations with North Korea if international inspection of the Commu- 
nist nation’s nuclear facilities proceeds on schedule, a State Department 
official said Mot day. 

Thomas Hubbard, a deputy assistant secretary of state, said that the 
announcement also would include a decision on a scheduled U-S.-Sowh 
Korean military exercise. It has been widely speculated that if the 
inspections take place the exercise will be canceled. Mr. Hubbard refused 


to say when the negotiations would resume, bat he would not dispute a 
report from South Korea that the date was March 21. 


report from South Korea that the date was March 21. 

Inspectors of the Internationa] Atomic Energy Agency are scheduled 
to amve in Pyongyang on Tuesday. Mr. Hubbard said they expected to 
complete, in about two weeks, their work of de termining whether any 
nuclear material has bom diverted from North Korean reactors. 


ISRAEL: Warning to Palestinians 


Coothmed from Page 1 
unofficial estimates are about 40 
for now — would be stripped of 
their guns, arrested without formal 
charges or barred from the territo- 
ries. In addition, the govonment is 
studying the possibility of outlaw- 
ing the Kach movement and other 
Kahane-inspired groups. Dri Ba- 
ruch Goldstein, the settler who 
gunned down dozens of Muslims as 
they knelt in prayer at a Hebron 
mosque on Friday, was a Kahane 
foDower. 

These steps, however, do not go 
nearly far enough for the Palestine 
Liberation Organization, which is 
under great pressure from enraged 
Palestinians and demands that all 
settlers be disarmed, that flash- 
point settlements like those in and 
around Hebron be dismantled and 
that an international force be sent 
in to protect people in the territo- 
ries. 

But Mr. Rabin, while appealing 
to the PLO to return to the bargain- 
ing table, hinted that there were 
unacceptable conditions, saying 
that Israel has “no intention of 
compromising even one iota" on 
security, including for the roughly 
130,000 settlers. 

Mr. Rabin was supported in this 
Monday by the United States, 
which called on the two sides to 
resume their negotiations in Wash- 
ington based on agreements al- 
ready reached for the start of Pales- 
tinian self-rule. That position 
reflected a concern that if issues 
like removing settlements were to 
be raised now — instead of in sev- 
eral years, as originally planned — 
the outline accord reamed by Israel 
and the PLO in September could 
unravel 

Although the focus was on bow 
to keep the peace talks from falling 
apart, the massacre continued to 
take an emotional toll stoking 
Arab rage in the territories and 
israd proper and prompting many 
Israelis to look deep into their 
souls. 

Revulsion has been keen among 
Israelis over the murders and the 
praise for die killer offered by some 
militan t settlers. It also has not 
been lost on many Israelis that Dr. 
Goldstein, Uka many Kahane disci- 
ples, was an American, from 

Brooklyn, New York- 

Speaking to parliament, Mr. Ra- 
bin captured this widely shared 


spirit, but his words were strikingly 
harsh and unforgiving, He y rih ing 
Dr. Goldstein as a “villainous 
Jew " “a horrible man. " and a 
“Jewish Hamas member" — a ref- 
erence to a militant Islamic group 
that is strong in the territories. 

To him and to those lifa ? trim, 
we say? You are not part of the 
community of Israel" the prime 
minister said. “You are not part of 
the national democratic camp 
which we all belong to in this 
house, and many of the people de- 
spiseyou. You are not partners in 
the Zionist enterprise.” 

“Sensible Judaism spits you ouL 
You placed yourself outside the 
wall of Jewish law. You area shame 
on Zionism and an embarrassment 
to Judaism." 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Access to Mexican Pyramids Blocked 


MEXICO CITY (Reuters) — About 200 vendors were blocking access 
to the majestic ruins of Teotihuacan on the outskirts of Mexico Gty to 


protest new roles barring them from the andent site, the news agency 
Notimex said Sunday. The vendors closed off all five entrances to 


■ A Call to Rescue Talks 

Israel urged Washington on 
Monday to rescue peace talks 
threatened by an Arab walkout 
news agencies reported from Jeru- 
salem. 

U.S. -sponsored peace talks that 
had been scheduled to take place 
Monday in Washington were sus- 


Notimex said Sunday. The vendors closed off all five entrances to 
Teotihnacan since Thursday, preventing visitors and archaeological 
workers from entering, Notimex said. Teotihuacan, believed to have been 
built around A.D. 200, is best known for its tiered Pyramids of the Sun 
and Moon. 

The city, which was destroyed by fire five centuries before the rise of 
the Aztecs, was named Teotihuacan, or City of the Gods, by Aztecs who 
marveled at its grand monuments. Under a plan aimed ar exploring more 
of the eight and a half square miles (22 square kilometers) of the site, 
Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History ordered the 
removal of the vendors, who make a living peddling clay and obsidian 
replicas of ancient artifacts to tourists. More than a million tourists visit 
Teotihuacan each year. 

One of China's biggest ririmes hopes to improve its safety record after 
suffering a crash and a hijacking in the past 15 months. China Southern 
Airlines, which is soon to seek listing on an overseas stock market, will 
invest heavily in raising the quality of its pilots, management and 
installations, an official said Monday. .(Reuters) 

An outbreak of spinal menmgtis has ItiBed at least 28 people in 
Nigeria’s northern Plateau state, state radio said on Monday. It said a 
team of medical experts and 10,000 doses of vaccines had been sent to the 
affected area. (Reuters) 


pended after the Syrian, Lebanese 
and Jordanian delegations with- 


and Jordanian delegations with- 
drew Sunday in solidarity with the 
PLO and returned home for con- 
sultations. In Tunisia, the PLO Ex- 
ecutive Committee said Monday 
that resuming talks with Israel was 
impossible for now because Israd 
had not taken adequate steps to 
curb attacks on Palestinians. 

The PLO derided to send envoys 
to Washington and Moscow to ex- 
plain the Palestinians’ demand for 
the removal of Jewish settlements 
from the occupied territories. 

Earlier Monday. Israels deputy 
foreign minister, Yossi Beilin, 
called the suspension of talks “wor- 
risome." 

The next step should be the 
intervention of the Americans," be 
said. 

Until now. Israd has sought to 
avoid direct U.S. involvement in 
the peace process, while the Pales- 
tinians have pressed for Washing- 
ton to step in. 

Also Monday, Arab sources said 
two Palestinians woe killed in 
dashes with Israeli soldiers in a 
fourth day of bloodshed in the oc- 
cupied West Bank since the 
mosque killings. 

(AP, Reuters, AFP) 


NAMES: Bumbling Spells Trouble 


Continued from Page 1 
other G-7. delegates. At a meeting 
during the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization summit meeting in 
Brussels in January, Mr. Clinton 
praised Mr. Ddors for his White 
Paper on unemployment. He then 
invited Mr. Ddors to Detroit, 
sending aides to the two scheduled 
delegates from Brussels — Eco- 
nomics Commissioner Christo- 
phersen and Employment Com- 
missioner Padraig Flynn — into a 
protocol nightmare. 

The Clinton administration’s 
protocol solution is to invite Mr. 
Ddors as the president's pest on 
the morning ox Monday. March 14, 
and for the European Commission 
chief to then become the guest of 
Vice President A1 Gore. 

Aside from these issues, Europe- 
an officials also note that Washing- 
ion has dropped a plan to include 
business and labor representatives 
at the conference. 

The agenda, which begins with 
an address by Mr. Clinton, in- 
cludes sessions on the world em- 
ployment problem, technology and 
the private sector and labor mar- 
kets and policy. The Detroit meet- 


ing is structured more like a semi- 
nar than a summit meeting, which 
has left some Europeans scratching 
their heads and dismissing the US. 
initiative as what one termed “a 
talking shop.” 

The agenda is vague, and it has 
been revised twice already," noted 
an I talian ministerial aide. 

A White House spokesman, an- 
swering some of the complaints, 
said it was not unreasonable to ask 
G-7 governments to pay Tor their 
hotel rooms. 

“At the NATO summit in Brus- 
sels we paid our own way," he ex- 
plained. He conceded that the 
agenda had changed, but said that 
was simply because “it was refined, 
de pending on who was available to 
speak." As for the misspelled 
names: Tm not going to get into 
that," he said. 

There is at least one consolation 


for some of the stuffier Europeans: 
The reservations office at the 73- 


The reservations office at the 73- 
story Westin Hotel in Detroit says 
it still has plenty of rooms avail- 
able, with prices for a single room 
starting at just S 145-a night. Minis- 
ters beware, however A suite can 
cost up to $1,200. 



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+ POLITIC AI. NOTES ^ 


Echoes of the Part In Harlem Politic* 

offi^f Y n^ K ri;i2, reCCal A ? ys Sf P h0Qe “ ** Bin Harlem 
22S ° f Clt £ Coun 9 lmai1 Adam Clayton Powefl 4ih has been 
rn^g morefirttjuently, and the stream of visitors has considerably 

Mr 52*™? “ ter ™P.5 0ns °™ fron» People offering advice to 

. %££& aStfg?" * ® fe 

•iwndSSina 0 ^;? something he says he is seriously 

w WODjd produce a political battle with passions that 

have smoldered for nearly a quarter-century. It was 24 years ago that 
unseated Nfr. Powell’s father, Adam Clayton Powell Jr.. 

,'!S!!3lMu5ta4£ m “ wfU5 "" “* 1116 aati0,1 ' s 

It woukl also provide Mr. Ranwl with the Orel serious opposition 
be tas faced since that election. Both men are Democrats. 

“iome people think I’m running to pay back Rangel,'* said Mr. 

SS£f^ , ° “ o™ 06 find wth memorabilia of his father, who 
died m 1972. But if I run, it will be because 1 want to bring better 
representation to this district, better accountability and better lead- 
ership." 

. ^ Mr. Powdl runs, the parallels to the earlier race would be 
inescapable. In 1970 Mr. Rangel was a 40-year-old political neo- 
phyte in the State Assembly when he defeated the famous congress- 
man who was 61 at the time, in one of the most bitter elections in 
Harlem 5 history. 

Zn that campaign Mr. Rangel accused Mr. Powell, who had 
previously been the chairman of the House Committee on Education 
and Labor and was still the d ominan t figure in Harlem politics, of 
ncglttting - his district. Before that race, Mr. Powell rarely had 
significant opposition in his 22 years in Congress. 

Now, Miv Rangel, at 63, is a senior member of the House Ways 
. and Means Committee and is one of the most influential members of 
Congress. In the younger Mr. Powell, 31, he would face a relative 
newcomer to the City Council who hopes to capitalize on voters* 
frustration with incumbency and who asserts that the Harlem 
congressman has done little for Ms neighborhood. (NYT) 

Ail the Mews That’s Fit to Print on Perot 

NEW YORK — Ross Perot, according to Micah L. Sifry. may be 
other the catalyst for an important new social movement or “a 
dictator in waiting.” Ether way, Mr. Sifry figures, there ought to be a 
market tor a newsletter about the billionaire and his movement. 

The result: The Perot Periodical, a quarterly that The Columbia 
Journalism Review recently dubbed the classiest of a new crop of 
niche political publications. Others include The Clinton Chro aide, a 
monthly. tantrum agains t the commander in cMef, and Stephanopou- 
letter, the newsletter of the George Stephanopoulos Fan Gub. 

Mr. Sifry is now working on the third issue of The Perot Periodi- 
cal. And in case readers don't get the point, the newsletter with the 
caricature of Mr. Perot as an "albino monkey in a zoo” is not 
authorized by the former presidential candidate. 

Mr. Sifry says the heart of his effort is to chronicle a movement 
• that is being overlooked by major news organizations. He says Mr. 
Perot may have been prematurely declared “washed up" by Wash- 
ington pundits. (NYT) 

Worth Gets « Bude Reception at College 

WASHINGTON — Oliver L North was heckled and repeatedly 
interrupted during a speech at a Maryland college as students 
accused him of lying and being biased against homosexuals. 

Mr. North, the former Reagan administration aide and Iran- 
contra figure who is seeking the Republican nomination for the U.S. 
SinfiM from Virginia, responded politely to the hecklers at the 


Long- Ignored U.S,-Russia Struggle: Economic Rivalry 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Times Servlet 

WASHINGTON — The tension be- 
tween the United States and Russia over 
the war in Bosnia and Russia’s spying in 
Washington has raised the question in the 
minds of many; Just what is the relation- 
ship between America and Russia today? 
Allies? Not exactly. Enemies? Not really. 
Acquaintances? Teat's not it either. 

Across Washington last week, officials, 
diplomats and lawmakers straggled with 
that question as Russia has engaged in 
more and more behavior that seems hostile 
to American interests. 

At stake in the answer is everything from 
S4 billion in American aid to NATO’s 
willingness to accept Moscow into the alli- 
ance one day. 

About all that is clear now is that the 
optimistic post-Cold War consensus in 
Washington about a “partnership'’ be- 
tween Russia and the United States seems 
to be crumbling. 

Even one of the leading advocates of 
American assistance to Russia, Senator 
Richard G. Lugar, Republican of Indiana, 
declared Sunday on an NBC News pro- 
gram: “We have to get over the idea that 
this is a partnership. This is a tough rivalry, 
and that is an important distinction to 
make,” 

The confusion over America’s relation- 
ship with Russia grows out of the false 


assumption that the United States had only 
one conflict with Moscow during the Cola 
War: the ideological struggle between de- 
mocracy and communism. 

That was the struggle that received all 
the attention. But there was another, less 
obvious conflict, which existed before Rus- 
sia became Communist in 1917 and still 
exists today: the natural competition be- 

NE VS ANALYSIS 

tween states — competition for raw materi- 
als, economic wealth and security. 

Russia, which occupying one-seventh of 
the world’s land mass and is the home of 
ISO million people, wQJ always be a vora- 
cious competiior for resource, whether it 
is led by a Jefferson or a Yeltsin. 

It was easy to assume that once Russia 
abandoned communism and moved to- 
ward a free-market democracy, spying 
would end and an era of fraternity would 
begin. But Americans are now {earning 
that after the competition of ideology ends, 
the competition of states survives. 

That is why Alexis de TocqueviUe wrote 
in 1835 that history and geography would 
always make the Russian- American rela- 
tionship complex: “There are now two 
great nations in the world Much, starting 
from different points, seem to be advanc- 
ing toward the same goal: the Russians and 
the Anglo-Americans." 


“America’s conquests are made with 
plowshares, Russia's with the sword.” he 
wrote. “Their point of departure is differ- 
ent and their paths diverse: nevertheless, 
each seems called by some secret desire of 
Providence one day to hold in its hands the 
destinies of half die world." 

The nature of the rivalry in the immedi- 
ate future will depend a great deal on how 
Russia defines itself. Wul Russia define 
itself as a pure democracy, like Britain or 
France, and therefore limit its competition 
with the United States to the economic 
sphere? Or wiB it define itself differently? 

That definition, said Daniel Yergin, an 
economic historian, will depend on the 
outcome of three transitions under way in 
Russia: a transition from Communist dic- 
tatorship to democracy, from a planned 
economy to a free market and from an 
empire to a nation-state. 

AU three of these transitions are incom- 
plete, and none is assured of a happy end- 
ing — as events like the release in Moscow 
on Saturday of hard-liners who plotted the 
overthrow of President Boris N. Yeltsin 
only underscore. 

“Until two and half months ago." Mr. 
Yergin said, “there was a complacency in 
the United States that everything was set- 
tled and behind us, and that wide Russia 
was interesting, at times confusing, it 
didn't really matter much — it was on 
autopilot. 


“But that American consensus has bro- 
ken down, and it is now in need of rethink- 
ing and re-articulation." 

Clearly understanding that Russia is still 
up for grabs. President Bill Clinton, has 
begun to try to bu2d a new consensus 
about relations with Moscow, based on a 
more hard-headed reading of politics there. 

At a news conference on Friday, Mr. 
Clinton said: “What I think is naive is the 
suggestion that we should have ever be- 
lieved for a moment that every event in 
Russia and every speech made by every 
Russian politician in every election of ev- 
ery member of parliament would somehow 
be in a constant straight line toward a goal 
that wc wanted to predetermine. This is not 
black and white; this is gray." 

Mr. Clinton argued that the United 
States should continue giving aid to Russia 
to increase the likelihood that the liberal 
reformers there would won and be the ones 

to define the America- Russia relationship. 

“It is in our national interests to contin- 
ue working with Russia, to lower the nucle- 
ar threshold, to support the development 
of Russia as a peaceful democracy." Mr. 
Clinton said. Virtually all American for- 
eign aid to Russia, he said, is intended to go 
to grass-roots projects to privatize state- 
owned businesses and toward building 
democratic institutions, dismantling nucle- 
ar missiles and helping a market economy 
to take hold in individual cities. 


That is precisely the sort of aid that 
should be continued, he indicated, no mat- 
ter what happens in Moscow. 

But as logical as that view may be, it will 
not be easy to sustain if the drift toward 
nationalism, pan-Slavism and populist 
economics continues apace in Moscow, or 
if more Russian spies are uncovered at the 
CIA. 

That is the kind of drift m sentiment that 
Mr. Clinton now finds himself fighting. 
But the question for Mr. Gin ton is how 
understanding he can afford to be of Mos- 
cow as Russia goes through the painful 
process of defining itself as a state. 

On one hand, he does not want to drive 
Moscow to extremes by being too tough, 
say, by expelling ah Russian intelligence 
agents from Washington. On the other 
hand, being too tolerant, as he may have 
been when Russia intervened this moDib in 
Sarajevo on behalf of the Serbs, can en- 
courage the worst instincts in Moscow. 

Russia's intervention in Bosnia seemed 
to be driven more by a resurgent e thnic 
sympathy for the Serbs than by any sense 
d global responsibility. 

“What I always keep in mind." said 
Representative Tun Leach, Republican of 
Iowa, “is that there is no expert on the 
decline and fall of Co mmunis m No one 
bas been through this. We are all lear ning 
as we go along, and so are the Russian 
people." 


High Court Agrees 
To Rule on Law on 
Child Pornography 



members cheered Ms stance. 

Allowing homosexuals to serve in the military “is destructive of 
the readiness of the armed services," said Mr. North, a forma' 
Marine officer. (WP) 

Ouote/lfpquate- ■ - - 

Prime Minister John Major of B ri tain cm the - shooting down of 
four Bosnian Serbian aircraft: “There was no reason for these planes 

to be there. They were there with hostile intent They were given a 
warning. They declined that warning. They were shot down and 
frankly they could expea nothing eke.” (AP) 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court agreed Monday to de- 
cide whether a federal law ured to 
prosecute people for dealing in 
child pornography violates Tree- 
speech rights. 

Setting the stage for an impor- 
tant ndin g , the coun said it would 
consi der reinstating a California 
man’s conviction for distributing 
sexually explicit videotapes featur- 
ing a 15-year-old girL 

A federal appeals court threw 
out the conviction of a Los Angeles 
pom-shop owner, Rubin Gottes- 
man, and Ms one-year prison sen- 
tence, ruling that the law used to 
prosecute Mm was unconstitution- 
al because it did not require the 
government to prove he knew the 
girl was under 18. 

In seeking Supreme Court re- 
view, administration lawyers said 
the appeals-court ruling thwarted 
efforts to crack down on child par- 
oographera in nine Western states. 

' The justices will hear arguments 
m the case next fall at the earliest. 
Their decision is not expected until 
1995. 

Mr. Gottesman, owner of X-Ci- 
tement Video, was convicted of 
selling more than 100 Trad Lords 


Tug of War Over Health Care 

Proponents of Canadian-Style System Wield Influence 


I . -health policy. 

“Right now, if you read the newspaoeis, you^ 
- it was Cooper versus the president,” Mr. McD 


gdaiifl 

*’■ r .-:e n x1,B 

Minis' 


By Robin Toner 

New York Tima Service 

• WASHINGTON-— If the struggle ova health care 
4s a struggle for the soul of the president and his party, 
Representative James Cooper is yanking in one direc- 

„tion and Jim McDermott is puling in the other. 

Mr. Cooper of Tennessee, young tribune of the New 
.Democrats, urges President Bill Clinton to go daw, to 
'tom away from the lure of big government even if it 
" nyans forsaking the goal of universal coverage. 

• ■Mr. McDennott, an amiable liberal from Seattle, 
■Who was practicing psychiatry while Mr. Cooper was 
still propping at Groton, urges the president to stay 
committed to the goal of universal coverage — not 

- -someday but now — and to recognize that a straight- 
forward government insurance program like Canada’s 
is the best way. w 

Mr. Cooper is very hot in Washington. Mr. McDer- 
mott. and nis cause — the less-lhan-grandiy titled 
• single-payer movement — have been regarded by 
-many as a charming anachronism, the earth shoes of 

’d think 

t cDermott 

’gambles. _ 

iv-15i a recent meeting’ at the WMte House, Mr. 
McDermotl and some of his allies served notice that 
they were stin very much in the game. 

It is, in fact, easy to underestimate the single-payer 
influence in rite House — and wrong. Mr- McDermott 
‘has 90 Democratic co-sponsors for his health-care out 
in the House. Mr. Cooper has 57 in both parties. 

. Supporters of a Canadian-style health system are 
scattered across the Ways and Means Committee, the 
Education and Labor Committee, the Energy ana 
- . -.Commerce Committee, all places where they ra^f nakc 
their influence felt as the legislative process begins. 

; ■ They are the Democratic base for heaJtin^over- 
hauL a sturdy countiaweight to efforts to push Mi. 

they expect Mr. Clinton to Uve up 

to his promise of guaranteeing 
‘Tt’ll be the single-payer people in tbe 
• rtas who will keep universal coverage from being 
'■phased in ova 45 years," said a Democratic strategist 
‘ |§iGipitol H2L a Clinton backer. 


tapes to an undercover Los Angeles 
policeman in 1986. 

Miss Lords was already a well- 
known pornography starlet Mien it 
was discovered in 1986 that she had 
starred in many of her sex films 
when only 15. 

That revelation spurred distribu- 
tors and video dealers, fearful of 
child-pornography prosecutions, to 
pull ha tapes from their shelves, 
cancel orders and remove posters. 
Ihe Adult Ffo and Video Associa- 
tion assessed the damage to its in- 
dnstiy in tbe milli ons of dollars. 

For selling the Trad Lords tapes, 
Mr. Gottesman was sentenced to a 
year in prison and three years pro- 
bation. His business was fined 
$ 100 , 000 . 

But tbe 9th U.S. Grant Court of 
Appals overturned his conviction 
in late 1992. 

The appeals court said a law 
banning distribution, shipping or 
receiving child pornography must 
makft prosecutors prove the defen- 
dant blew that at least one erf the 
performers was under age. . 

The Constitution’s free-speech 
protections require that knowl- 
edge, the appeals court said, and 
the federal law used to prosecute 
Mr. Gottesman does not. 

The law at issue, in part, makes it 
a crime for anyone to “knowingly" 
transport or ship child pornogra- 
phy. The ajmeals court said the law 
was not only aimed at defendants 
who knew the material involved a 
minor, because the word “know- 
ingly” modifies only the terms 
“transports" and "ships." 

In other actions, the justices: 

• Turned down an appeal by 
Jimmy Hoffa’s daughter, who is 
trying to get FBI files about the 
1975 disappearance of the forma 
Teamsters’ Union president. 

• Rejected an effort to have the 
high court use an Einois case to 
decide how far states may go in 
protecting fetal life. 

• Refused to free New York 
from having to comply with federal 
labor law and compensate its state 
police investigators for overtime 
work. 



IbcAaodtudPiTB 

Mourners in La Morelia, Mexico, carrying the remains of three men who disappeared on Jan. 7 during the uprising in Chiapas state. 
Townspeople said they woe taken away by soldiers. The remains were found near tbe town on Feb. 10. Tbe army denies involvement 

Mexico Charts Radical Electoral Reform 


in fact, aha Mr. McDermott's meeting with the 
president and his health advisers last week, tbe con- 

tiim* he* cannot pass any veraajTirthealth reform 
without our votes, and that he is not gong to get our 
votes by amply making more compromises with those 
who do not share Ms basic goal of universal health 
insurance coverage for afl Americans.” 

At best, they hope that the shea complexity of the 
Clinton plan — with its quasi-governmental insurance 
purchasing pools and its mix of market and regulatory 
forces — will drive new supporters into their ranks. 

Mr. McDennott said: “I think that ultimately the 
president will sign a MB that will be quite a bit 
different from what he produced." 

But will it be more like Mr. Cooper's, or more like 
yourS? 

“More like us," Mr. McDermott asserts. 

“We have this belief m this country that government 
can’t do anything right," he says, “we’ve had 12 years 
of people selling that idea from die WMte House." 

That, in nun, leads to a conviction that a single- 
payer system is “ptrfitkally not doable, " Mr. McDer- 
mott argues, a determination that the administration 
made eariy on. 

The congressman said, “The president has so much 
power to shape public opinion, and he’s so good at it 1 
ihinlt he could have sold single-payer I reafty, honest- 
ly do." 

There have been many versions of single-payer 
systems proposed over the years. The main character- 
istic is mat the government essentially replaces the ^ 

health-insurance companies, dang away with private pCTed*OT* 'the* Texas 'prairi 
insurance premiums, raising taxes and uang them to day even he saw something ! 
pay for medical care. ----- - - L — -~- j — K - 

In Mr. McDermott’s plan, the federal government 
would define the standard benefit package — which 
would include such extensive benefits as long-tom 
nursing-home care — and people would pay for it 
through a payroll deduction. 

Employers would pay 8.4 percent erf payroll — 

«nall employers 4 percent — and employees would 
pay 2.1 percent of wages or salary. 

Mr. McDermott aigues that most people would end 
up saving money undo this plan because it would 
replace what is ctnrentfy paid to insurance companies 
—including huge administrative costs. 


By Tod Robberson 

Washington Post Service 

MEXICO CITY — The government of Presi- 
dent Carlos Salinas de Gmtari has decided to 
embark on a series of radical national political 
reforms before presidential elections in August, 
in response to the peasant rebellion in southern 
Mexico, according to senior government 
sources. 

Although the government said the proposed 
changes woe not the direct result erf peace talks 
under way in Quapas state with the rebel 
Zapatista National Liberation Army, officials 
conceded that the uprising had given a new 
sense of urgency to the agenda for political 
reform. 

Such changes have been a major rebel de- 
mand since the uprising began on Jan. 1 and 
have long bear goals or opposition parties to 
tbe left and the right of the governing Institu- 
tional Revolutionary Party. 

Tbe changes, if carried out as promised, 

would mark a mm or shift in Mexican politics as 

practiced ova 65 years of uninterrupted gover- 
nance by Mr. Salinas’s party, creating the possi- 


bility that tbe August elections could jeopardize 
the party’s hold on power. 

Zn the past, the government frequently has 
promised to end electoral fraud, particularly 
since Mr. Salinas took office in 1988. But it has 
not corrected abuses at the polls by its mili- 
tants. 

The sources, with direct access to Mr. Sali- 
nas’s plans, said he had decided to present a 
package to a special legislative session, possibly 
convening as early as this week. It will include, 
they said, placing international election observ- 
ers at polling stations, giving all political parties 
equal time in the media and putting the Federal 
Electoral Institute under nonpartisan direction. 
The adoption of the package would be almost 
automatic in tbe government-controlled legisla- 
ture. 

Until now, the Electoral Institute, which sets 
election rules and verifies all voting results, has 
been directed by members of the governing 
party apparatus. 

Opposition parties have argued that one- 
party governance ova tbe last six decades has 
made a mockery of Mexican democratic ideals. 

Although non-Mexicans have been allowed 



irregularities 
into account in certifying ejection results. 

“Chiapas was a wake-up call for the govern- 
ment,” said John Bailey, a Georgetown Univer- 
sity political scientist and Mexico specialist. “It 
made them realize they don't control things the 
way they drought they did." 

■ Rebels Deny Peace Is Near 

Maya Indian r&els denied they were dose to 
peace with the government and said they would 
not end their uprising until national democratic 
reforms were carnal out, Reuters reported 
from San Cristobal de las Casas, Mexico. 

The leader who calls Mmself Commander 
Marcos said that peace negotiations with the 
government envoy, Manuel Camacho Solis, 
were still at an early stage and that afl debate 
ova land, electoral and judidal reforms was at 
“a standstill" 

His comments late Sunday night contradict- 
ed an earlier, upbeat report by the mediator in 
the talks, the Roman Catholic bishop of the San 
Cristobal diocese, Samuel Ruiz. 


Texas Cult Verdict: The Jury Faulted Both Sides 


. 


Away From Politics 



iS lawsui/against the prelate on Monday. Stoveri . 
^ Cook. 34 ofPhiladdphia, told a Cincinnati court 

cardinal were unreliable. He said uwse 
nories arose during and after hypnosis. 

p . Blamiug Jews lor Chrfeds dca*. 

l ban. sbS Muslim 

Update people were created of 

^aSn»X l ^ Wlhlh 


of defense to keep felons from buying handguns. 
The dealers, who enjoyed brisk sues in anticipa- 
tion, were quick to criticize newly required, ex- 
panded or reinforced background checks. 
Tfreafening to Mow hhssdf m on a Potomac Riva 

bridge near downtown Washington, a man finally 
surrendered Monday after a six-hour standoff that 
blocked a minor traffic route. Police threw a net 
over Sadiq Abubakar, Nigerian-born, and shoved 
him into a van after he got out of his gray Mercedes 
wfaiL which had been blocking the 14th Street 
Bridge. 

• fy Canaveral grotmd crews began a three-day 
launch countdown for the shuttle Columbia, 
poised to lift off Thursday for two weeks of gar- 
den-variely science and technology research. 

AP, Reuters 


By Sam Howe Verhovek 

New York Tima Service 

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — John 
C. Willis lost his only son, Steven, 
32, an officer with the Federal Bu- 
reau of Alcohol Tobacco and lure- 
arms, one year ago. 

But after months of painful 
searching for ibetruth of what hap- 
rairie that 
appro- 
priate in the mixed verdict ddiv> 
ered by a federal jury in tbe trial of 
11 Branch Davidians accused of 
mnrderinghis son. 

Thejury acquitted all 11 of mur- 
der arid conspiracy, but it found 
seven guilty of tbe lesser but still 
serious charges of m a n sl a ughter or 
illegal weapons possession. Four 
cult member woe completely ac- 
quitted. 

“I certainly think that the most 
guilty, the ring leaders and lieuten- 
ants, died in the flames of that 
compound anyway,” said Mr. Wil- 
lis, who atterided the trial in San 
Antonio. Then, referring to leaders 
of his son's agency, he added, “Peo- 
ple make mistakes. That's bom do- 
cumented." 

At the end of the seven-week 
trial the jury of eight women and 
four men sent an all but unmistak- 
able message that there was signifi- 
cant fault on both ads. 

And it issued a verdict that, far 
from settling once and fox all what 
happened that day, will only deep- 
en some of tbe mysteries of Waco 
and perhaps ensure that the whole 
episode will be revisited in yet an- 
other courtroom. 

Prosecutors have not ruled out 
bringing other char ges against the 
defendants or other members of the 
sect 


Branch Davidians ot survivors of 

those who died in tbe Feb. 28. 1993, 
shoot-out or the fire that destroyed 
tbe compound on April 19 said 
through their lawyers that they 
might bring civil charges against 
tbe government 

And in Washington, an official 
said that the Justice Department 
was still evaluating whether to 
bring c riminal char ges against offi- 
cials at the firearms agency who 
botched die raid and then, accord- 
ing to a review last fall lied and 
covered up evidence while an inves- 
tigation was under way. 

Federal marshals physically 
blocked reporters Saturday from 
approaching the jurors, whose 
names have never been disclosed, 
and no members of thejury volun- 
teered any comments. 

But if their verdict was mixed, it 
seems to have been so for obvious 
reasons. Had it fully accepted die 
prosecution arguments that all the 
Brandi Davidians at the Mount 
Carmel compound in Waco had 
conspired to lay a “murderous am- 


bush" on the agents, h would have trial were not in David Koresb’s 
had abundant reason to find all the ‘ inner circle. 


defendants guilty. 

Had it been swayed by the de- 
fense lawyers’ contention that 
members of a quiet, law-abiding 
religious sect baa acted purely in 
self-defense, afl the Branch Davi- 
dians would have walked out of the 
courthouse. 

Instead, though, even as tbe ver- 
dict was widely seen as more of a 
victory for the defense, both rides 
could properly say afterward that 
they had made a point. 

The veteran prosecutor in the 
case, Ray Jahn, an assistant U5. 
attorney, noted that seven of the 1 1 
defendants had been held to ac- 
count by thejury. And, he said, the 
verdict had demonstrated some- 
thing else: “Tbe place to resolve a 
dispute with a law-enforcement of- 
fjeer is in a courtroom, not at the 
barrel of a gun." 

There were plenty of other ques- 
tions unanswered by this triaL For 
one thing , it was always evid 
that most or afl of the 


And so there was no way to in- 
terpret the verdict as any kind erf 
victory from the grave for David 
Koresh, whom prosecutors com- 
pared to Hitler and Stalin and 
whom various defense lawyers re- 
ferred to as paranoid, delusional or 
evfl. 

Had Koresh ever been put on 
trial for the events of Feb. 28. the. 
verdict concerning him may 
have been mixetL 

He would 
to contend, tor ms 
testimony of one wi 
Branch Da vidian, 
da. She said at U. . 

Koresh had *rjrhis 
“There was 
tation, a b 


who 
the 
have 
[ had federal 
their home 


the 
. forma 
iSchroe- 
that Mr. 
followers, 
to be a confron- 
Mr. Koresh. she 


swers for a key questic 
fired first Feb. 28, 

Branch Davidians 
eventuaflY : 

sSSy&r* 

r rTTi, the compound 

^*j5foTstail«i Aprill9. 
p “5$utside the courtroom, tbe 
cy 8es were still arguing. Chal- 
.[ about his continued descrip- 
of the Branch Davidians’ ac- 
r tion as a “murderous ambush," Mr. 
Jahn, the prosecutor, snapped: 
“It’s a free country. I can say what I 
bdieve." 


added, initial "it you ^ HU 
for Gc/y° u can 1 “ c for G<xL 
Tite, or perhaps even because 
pyre jimmy from 130 witnesses 
jfid the introduction of more than 
T000 pieces of evidence, the trial 
never conclusively provided an- 


Judge Frees LorenaBt itt From Hospital 

- ■ a l — kAanl tUol 


The Associated Press 

MANASSAS, Virginia — A 
judge ordered Loretta Bobbitt re- 
leased from a mental hospital Mon- 
day, five weeks after ha acquittal 
on reason of insanity for cutting off 
ha husband's penis. 

Judge Herman A. Whiseoam 
agreed with a psychiatric 
that Mrs. Bobbitt posed 
to herself or others. 

He ordered that Mi BobbiLl 


receive 
dates i 


requested up- 



The jy4e followed recommen- 
Trom a stale-appointed 
'si who 


itrist and 

Mrs. Bobbitt She was 
i t to hospital immediately after 
Ihe Jan. 21 verdict in the attack on 
ha husband, John. last June. 

Judge Whisenant also said rite 
could not leave Virginia without 
permission of the court and the 


local community service board that 
will supervise ha rehabilitation. 

Mrs. Bobbitt, a native of Ecua- 
dor, had expressed interest in writ- 
ing ha parents in South America. 

Paul B. Ebert, whose office un- 
successfully prosecuted both Bob- 
bitts, said Mrs. Bobbitt could re- 
main under control of the court 
indefinitely 

“I think the court, at least initial- 
ly, ought to have complete control 
ova ha," Mr. Ebert said. 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 


** 


Indisputable Violation,’ NATO Asserts 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

PARIS — NATO’s first brush 
with combat in its 45-year history 
was strongly endorsed Monday by 
its 16 member governments, who 
said that U.S. fighter pilots were 
fully justified in destroying four 
Serbian aircraft that violated the 
no-flight zone over Bosnia-Herze- 
govina. 

Governments in Bonn, London, 
Paris and other European capitals 
declared that the Serbian planes 
committed “an indisputable viola- 
tion” of United Nations resolu- 


tions banning flights by fixed-wing 
aircraft over Bosnian territory. 

“I believe we could not avoid 
enforcement of the UN resolutions 
which have been approved." said 
Prime Minister Edouard BaHadur 
of France: 

A French Foreign Ministry 
spokeswoman said “it was the most 


A hostile reaction by Moscow, 
they said, could have solidified a 
“Slavic solidarity front” that West- 
ern governments have been wary of 
provoking because it could possi- 
bly entangle outside powers in the 
Balkan ethnic conflict. 

While cautious about saying or 
doing anything that could inflame 


serious violation” of the no-flight the fighting, European officials 
zone and required that "the inter- said tney were relieved that 
national community show its re- NATO’s military command had ii- 


solve. 

Officials at NATO headquarters 
in Brussels said they also were grat- 
ified by Russia’s initial resj 

expressing support for the 
mgs. 


naliy vindicated its credibility by 
passing through a baptism of fire. 

As a defensive alliance conceived 
to thwart a Soviet-led invasion of 
Western Europe, NATO forces had 
never, until Monday, takes mill- 


BRTTTAN: China Warned for Threat on U.K. Trade 


Continued from Page 1 
an bloc would take against China if 
Beijing's strategy of opposition to 
electoral reforms in Hong Kong 
included the sin g lin g out of British 
trade interests for retribution. 

But the stance taken by a man 
frequently mentioned as a succes- 
sor to the president of the Europe- 
an Commission, Jacques Delors. if 
tested by C hina, would challenge a 
trend of warming relations between 
Beijing and several of the most 
powerful EU countries. 

Drawn by the prospect of in- 
creased trade and investment op- 
portunities in the booming Chinese 
economy, France and Germany, 
and Italy and Spain to a lesser 
extent, have made significant ef- 
forts to improve ties with China. 

In January, France reversed its 
policy of selling arms to Taiwan, 


which China regards as a renegade 
province, in order to rebuild rela- 
tions with Beijing. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Ger- 
many returned from a state visit to 
Beijing in November 1993 with a 
bundle of deals for German indus- 
try that will total $3 billion if all the 
agreements signed cm that trip 
come to fruition. 

Spain and Italy announced in 


its governor, Chris Patten, to widen 
the voting register for 1995 elec- 
tions to the local legislature, the 
last to be held under British rule. 

In response to Mr. Patten’s deci- 
sion to press forward with electoral 
reforms that China had rqecied in 
lengthy negotiations, Beijing derid- 
ed Monday io release its version of 
the fruitless but secret discussions. 
... “The British side has unilaterally 

December 1990 their intention to. made public the content of the 


renew aid and loans to fhinfl 

Improving political relations 
have been instrumental in an in- 
crease in China-EU trade to $26 
billion last year, 50 percent mare 
than in 1992 according to Miss 
Wu’s statistics. 

During the same period, China 
and Britain have been mired in dis- 
putes about the financing of a new 
airport for the colony and a bid by 


CHINA: Dissident Tells U*S. to Stand Tough on Rights 


Continued from Page 1 

U.S. agenda. Mr. Wei recently pub- 
lished a commentary in the Hong 
Kong-based Eastern Express news- 
paper warning that for Washington 
to retreat on its human-rights de- 
mands would convince the Chinese 
that “the image of the U.S. the 
Communist leadership has peddled 
to them for all of these years is 
correct." 

“The line is that the U.S. govern- 
ment is a rich man’s government 
controlled by capitalists and that 


It's easy to subscribe 
in Belgium 

just calk 0 800 17538 


— like the Japanese — the Ameri- 
cans do not care about violating 
their consciences to make a quick 
buck." 

Mr. Wei, 43, was a leading figure 
in the 1978-79 Democracy Wall 
Movement, which was crushed 
when it seemed to threaten the par- 
ty’s control. 

■ Caribs on TV Dishes 

Beijing published details Mon- 
day of its restrictions on satellite 
television, strictly limiting the orga- 
nizations allowed to install dishes 
and banning most individuals from 
tuning into foreign broadcasts, 
Reuters reported. 

The rules, from the Ministry of 
Radio, Television and Film. were 


lary action in the European theater 
under allied. command. 

The Gulf War and other military 
actions by the United States and 
European governments were con- 
ducted on an ad hoc basis, and 
many experts have questioned 
whether NATO's military com- 
mand is still suited to contempo- 
rary regional conflicts such as the 
Balkan war. 

The alliance's willingness to em- 
ploy force to back up its threats 
was the principal subject of debate 
during the NATO s ummi t confer- 
ence in Brussels last month. 

President Bill Clinton warned his 
peers that unless NATO was pre- 
pared to honor its commitments 
through military action, the credi- 
bility of the alliance would dissi- 
pate. 

Any satisfaction over the down- 
ing. however, was tempered by 
anxiety that it could escalate the 
fighting after the recent lull that 
coincided with NATO’s latest ulti- 
matum. 

In the aftermath of a massacre at 
the Sarajevo market three weeks 
ago, the allies threatened to carry 
out air strikes unless Bosnia’s Serbs 
relaxed their siege of the Bosnian 
capital by turning over their heavy 
artillery to UN control or pulling 
the weapons back to a distance of 
20 kilometers. 

Foreign Minister Douglas Hurd 
of Britain said the downing made 
the frustrating quest for a political 
solution all the more urgent His 
view was echoed in other capitals 
and by the international mediators 
Lad Owen and Tborvald Siolten- 
bexg. 

Their spokesman, John Mills, 
said the incident “should not be 
used by any of the parties to dis- 
tract from the pressing need to ne- 
gotiated a settlement to the conflict 
published in the official People's m Bosnia-Herzegovina.” 


talks, distorting and attacking the 
position of the Chinese ride in an 
attempt to shirk the responsibility 
of sabotaging the talks.** the offi- 
cial press agency Xinhua quoted a 
Foreign Ministry spokesman as 
saying. “The British side deliber- 
ately sabotaged the talks. Hong 
Kong will return to the mother- 
land’s embrace in due time, and no 
one can stop this process.” 




m 

i, 






Th Auoaaied Pits 


A file photo of a G-4 Soper Galeb fight attack warplane, snnflar to the foor shot down Monday over Bosnia by NATO fighters. 

Serbian Super Galebs Are No Match for F- 16 s 


Reuters 

LONDON — The four Galeb aircraft shot 
down Monday by NATO fighters over Bos- 
nia were part of about 37 fixed-wing war- 
planes owned by Bosnian Serbian forces. 

The Bosnian Serbs also possess 37 military 
helicopters, according to the Military Balance 
handbook produced by tbe London-based 
International Institute fa Strategic Studies. 

A Yugoslav-made trainer and ground at- 
tack aircraft, the G-4 Super Galeb, or Seagull, 


can be fitted with 23mm cannons, Aphid air- 
to-air missiles and Maverick air-to-surface 
missiles, as well as standard bombs, cluster 
bombs and rockets. 

But as a subsonic aircraft the Galebs are no 
match fa the American F-16s that shot diem 
down. 

Before tbe old Yugoslavia feU apart, the 
Galeb — which has also been supplied to 
Burma — was made at the Soko factory at 
Mostar, Bosnia. 


The factory closed soon after the outbreak 
of war in April 1992. 

The International Institute of Strategic 
Studies indicated that the Bosnian Serbs’ air 
forces consist of the following: 

About 20 G-4 Super Galeb and Yugoslav- 
R nmmri an built Orao 1 ground attack air- 
craft; 5 Soviet-made MiG-21 and 12 Yugo- 
slav-made Jastreb attack aircraft, and 12 
Soviet-made Mi-8 and 25 Yugariav-made 
SA-341 Gazelle helicopters. 


PLANES: NATO Downs 4 Jets in Bosnia 


Daily. 

The only units allowed to receive 
overseas television via satellite are 
such high-profile public institu- 
tions as financial, media and edu- 
cational organizations that have a 
direct need for the information in 
their work, the rules say. 

Tourist holds must carry a rat- 
* ing of at least two stars before they 
can install dishes. The only residen- 
tial biriMings allowed such installa- 
tions are those built expressly for 
foreigners, the rules say. 

“The implementation details 
prohibit individuals from installing 
and using satellite ground recep- 
tion facilities," the People’s Daily 
said. 


But Mr. Mills said than were no 
plans to summon leaders of Bos- 
nia’s warring factions back to the 
bargaining table in Geneva in the 
absence of any firm agnds that 
the? were prepared to reach a via- 
ble agreement on the partition of 
the country among Sobs, Croats 
and Muslims. 

With the enthusiastic backing of 
the European allies, the United 
Slates and Russia have started to 
take a more assertive role in tbe 
negotiations. But the higher pro- 
files of the U.S; envoy, Charles E 
Redman and his Russian counter- 
part, Vi tali I. Churkin, have not 
brought any discernible progress 
toward an overall peace agreement. 


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Dsatinaed from Page 1 

senior NATO mili tary officers said, the over- 
whelming majority of the violations that 
NATO detected hod been occasional helicopter 
flights by the various rides. 

“This is the first time we’ve seen warplanes 
there," a NATO officer said. “We have not 
taken action before because we didn’t want to 
shoot down a helicopter full of women and 
children on a medical evacuation ni g ht- To- 
day’s is the first significant military violation 
we’ve seen.” 

Alliance officials said they did not need to 
get clearance from UN peacekeeping com- 
manders on tbe ground in Bosnia before autho- 
rizing the F-16s to open fire because they al- 
ready had dial authority under the operation 
enforcing die no-flight ban. Called Operation 
Deny Flight it involves 4,000 ntiUtaxy person- 
nel from 12 allied countries. 

The NATO officer in charge, U.S. A dmir al 
Jeremy M. Boorda of the Allied Forces South- 
ern Europe command in Naples, said that just 
prior to shooting down tbe planes, the flight 
leader of the NATO patrol saw the Bosnian 
Serbian planes “make a bombing maneuver 
and caw explosions on the ground.” Admiral 
Boorda said UN forces on the ground had 
unconfirmed reports that the bombers had hit a 
storage facility and a hospital 

“We hope that this vwll be the final such 
incident in a tragic war," Admiral Boorda said. 
“If it was a test, I think we passed the quiz." 

Other NATO and UN officials in Zagreb, 
Croatia, said that tbe Bosnian Serbian planes 
had bombed a Musfim-conlroHed munitions 


factory at Novi Travnik, about 70 kilometers 
southeast of Banja Luka. 

Both the bombing and NATO’s response 
wore unprecedented m the two-year history of 
the war in Bosnia. 

NATO, the European Union and tbe Euro- 
peans’ mili tary arm, the Western European 
Union, have repeatedly threatened to use force 
if the Bosnian Serbs and, lately, the Croats did 
not stop shelling civilians or preventing the 
flow of UN humanitarian aid. 

NATO issued a 10-day ultimatum on Feb. 10 
warning of air strikes if the Bosnian Serbs did 
not withdraw heavy weapons beyond a 20- 
kDometer zone around the Bosnian capital, 
Sarajevo, or tom those remaining in the zone 
over to UN oontroL After Russia asked the 
Bosnian Sabs to do the same and sent in a 400- 
soldier peacekeeping force, the Serbs complied. 

But the manner in which they did was hardly 
submissive. The Russian entiy into the B osnian 
Sobs’ capital in Pale was more like a triumph. 
Many Bosnian Serbs thought that they, with 
Russian help, had scored a victory against 
NATO, not that the alliance had finally forced 
them to stop the siege of Sarajevo. 

Allied officials defended the attack Monday, 
which was carried out by F-J6s based at Aviano 
Air Base in northern Italy. 

“If the international community and the 
United Nations want to make their desire to 
ensure global security and order credible, they 
cannot avoid using force," said Defense Mini* , 
ter Fabio Fabbri of Italy. 

The German foreign minister, Klaus Kinkd, 
said, “I think if il was the Sea side, it will 
become dear for the participants that it’s sen- 



NYT 


ous when measures agreed by the Security 
Council — in this case tbe > no-fly' zone — are 
infringed.’’ 

But in Russia, the reaction of Vladimir V. 
Zhirinovsky, the extreme nationalist whose par- 
ty fared well in elections last December, was 
more critical 

“NATO is behaving badly,’’ he said. "They 
will have to answer for that'' 

As a precaution against retaliation by the 
Bosnian Serbs, the United Nations halted aid 
flights to Sarajevo and suspended convoys after 
the military action, according to Alemka Li- 
smslri , a spokeswoman for tbe UN High Com- 
missioner for Refugees in Zagreb. 


ATTACK: A Clear Sign From the West of a Transformed Role in Bosnia 


Continued from Page 1 
munity is ready to enter the war on 
the side of the Sarajevo govern- 
ment, that could also jeopardize tbe 
peace process. 

UN officials said the Serbian 
flights Monday, which included tbe 
bombing of a weapons factory out- 
side of Lbe central Bosnian city of 
Travnik, appeared to be part of an 


attempt by Serbian forces to chal- 
lenge NATO’s enforcement of the 
no-flight zone and take advantage 
of the cease-fire around Sarajevo to 
blast their way through three stra- 
tegically important Muslim areas 
in tbe northern half of Bosnia. 

In Sarajevo, officials said Serbi- 
an forces had slowly been chipping 
away at the cease-fire accord — 


lowing than to nut trains from Ser- 
bia to most of tbe major Serb-held 
cities in Bosnia and Croatia, in- 
cluding Knin, the capital of the 
breakaway Serb state m Croatia. 


A British Official Quits The Church of England 


Reuters 

LONDON — Environment 
Minister John Gummer said Mon- 
day that he had quit the Church of 
England in protest against its deci- 
sion to ordain female priests and 
had become a Roman Catholic. 

Mr. Gummer said he had been 
received into tbe Catholic church in 


a special ceremony on Sunday. He 
is the second government minister 
to leave the church, which has also 
been abandoned by more than 100 
priests over the controversial deci- 
sion. The Vatican said last week 
that it had received requests from 
three Anglican bishops and ISO to 
200 priests who wanted to convert. 


employing a time-tested strategy in 
the Balkans of agreeing to every- 
thing in theory, then reneging on 
the ground. 

But the biggest challenge so far 

to the United Nations has been 

Serbian attacks outride of Saraje- 
vo. Over the past weeks, as Saraje- T /uirlnn Arivisps 
vo has enjoyed its first extended U,na0 “ 

period of pe^e rinoe the war be- AthpilS t« Tift Ttfi 
gan, Serbian forces have moved a AlXltSIiS ^ 

substantial amount of their big nyf j . /> i 
guns toward Bihac in the north- !Jl3C6Cl01!l£l vAlTO 
west, Maglq in the north and tbe 
Tnzla region in the northeast. 

UN peacekeeping officials re- 
ported that Serbian forces on the 
Grabez plateau near Bihac were 
blasting that enclave of 300,000 
Muslims, The Serbian goal, accord- 
ing to the officials, is to take a 
railroad link that runs through the 
southern portion of tbe pocket, ad- 


RUSSIA: U.S. Diplomat, Named as Agent, Expelled 


Continued from Page 1 

intelligence service spokesman, 
Yuri Kobaladze. 

Russia further underlined its de- 
sire to put U.S. -Russian relations 
back on track when it issued a 
statement supporting (he downing 
by U.S. fighter planes erf four com- 
bat aircraft violating the United 
Nations designated no-flight zone 
over Bosnia. 

In the past, Russian officials 
have warned against military ac- 
tion they say could escalate tbe 
fighting in the former Yugoslavia, 
but the ministry said Monday the 


destroyed aircraft bore fall respon- 
sibility for violating UN rules. 

No official explanation was giv- 
en of Mr. Yeltsin's dismissal of 
Nikolai M. Golushko, his domestic 
intelligence chief. 

A senior Russian official said the 
move had long been expected, since 
the intelligence service, a successor 
of the KGB, has done a poor job of 
gathering information on Mr. Yelt- 
sin’s political opponents since be- 
fore the uprising against him last 
lalL 

Dissatisfaction may have come 
to a head when Mr. Golushko, 
along with other, top officials. 


failed to block a parliamentary res- 
olution granting amnesty to the 
leaders of the October uprising. 

Despite what one senior official 
said were Mr. Yeltsin's direct or- 
ders to the contrary, those oppo- 
nents walked triumphantly out of 
jail on Saturday. 

Since then, senior officials have 
been squabbling in public about 
who is to blame for the fiasco. 

The whole presidential admin- 
istration is in disarray,” a Western 
diplomat said. 

Mr. Ydtsin earlier had instruct- 
ed Mr. Golushko to completely re- 
organize (he intelligence service. 


Reuters 

ATHENS — Britain, reflecting 
European Lfoion anger with 
Greece, advised Athens on Mon- 
day to lift its trade embargo against 
the former Yugoslav republic of 
Macedonia and to resume talks on 
the two-year-old dispute with its 

neighbor. 

Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd 
said he was expressing the general 
view of Greece's 1 1 EU partners, 
which have condemned Athens 
since it imposed the trade embargo 
on Feb. 16. 

He conveyed the blunt message 
to Foreign Minister Karolos Pa- 
poulias and Defense Minister Ger- 
rasimos Arsenis. He was due to 
meet Prime Minister Andreas Pa- 
pan dreou later. 

“We understand the anxieties 
and concerns of Greece," Mr. Hurd 
said. “They have been expressed to 
us over many months" But he add- 
ed: “They do not in our opinion 
justify the Greek, measures, which 
harm the former Yugoslav republic 
of Macedonia, are. in our view, 
illegal and certainly harm to the 
reputation and authority of 
Greece." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 




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Page 6 


TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 

OPINION 


Reralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NBW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Be Patient with Russia 


Boris Yeltsin's abrupt intervention in Bos- 
nia is seen by unreconstructed Cold Warriors 
in Washington as a dangerous reassertion of 
Russian natio nalis m They suspect that ids 
side deal with the Serbian aggressors is not the 
act of an evenhanded peacemaker but the 
adventurous gambit of an opportunist eager 
to resume a big-brother role in Serbia. They 
argue that the time has come forBfl] Clinton 
to get tough with Moscow and slow his efforts 
to construct a more cooperative relationship. 
This is a prescription for trouble (hat springs 
from a misreading of Russia’s politics. 

it is true that President Yeltsin is under 
pressure from ullranationaiists like Vladimir 
Zhirinovsky. It is also true that he cannot 
easily domesticate renegades from the nrili- 
taiy and the KGB who seek to reassert them- 
selves in Moldova, Georgia and the rest of the 
former Soviet empire. Mr. Yeltsin’s state-of- 
tbe-union speech on Thursday, in which be 
called a “strong” Russia die “real guarantor 
of stability" in the former Soviet Union, also 
seemed to signal a new Russian assertiveness. 

But ins words do not mean that be has 
retreated into chau v inism. He is seeking to 
redefine Russia's role in the world — an effort 
that deserves US. support Punishing him by 
curbing cooperation would only improve the 
political prospects of exactly the wrong people. 

Nationalism is rapidly filling the vacuum of 
values in Russia. There are two competing 
nation alisms — Mr. Zhirinovsky's vengeful va- 
riety and a less primitive brand preached by 
reformers around Mr. Yeltsin. The reformers 
.know that the empire-rebuilders are out to 
destroy democracy and reform. They also 
know that democracy requires a foreign policy 
that Russia’s people can support. They are 
struggling to formulate a new. more defensible 


■ definition of Russia's interests abroad. As that 
Struggle plays out, Washington may have to 
. learn to Eve with a more assertive Russia not 
always in tune with American interests. That is 
preferable to exacerbating a nastier national- 
ism that is directly antagonistic to them. 

Vengeful nationalism does not now com- 
mand wide popular support Many Russians 
prefer to shed the burden of empire. The 
trouble lies with the imperial ambitions of the 
military and the KGB. Perhaps the United 
States can do little about any of this. But it 
needs to look for ways to help Russian re- 
formers tame the ultranational&s. 

The first step is a cool appraisal of what 
Mr. Yeltsin is up to. His modest sortie in 
Bosnia, for example, seems designed to de- 
fuse nationalists who would prefer massive 
intervention on Serbia’s side. Mr. Yeltsin is 
no ally of Serbia’s Slobodan Milosevic, who 
backed the 1991 coup against him. Washing- 
ton may be wary of his support for Serbia, 
but it cannot exclude Moscow from the mak- 
ing of a Bosnia settlement. To isolate Russia 
or treat it like a defeated power would only 
bolster the nastiest of nationalists. 

Moscow’s ties to ex-Soviet republics will be 
slow to dissolve. But blaming Mr. Yeltsin for 
the acts of renegades in Moldova and the 
Caucasus may only hamper his efforts to 
control them. The United States can try, in- 
stead, to engage Russia’s military on every- 
thing from joint peacekeeping to joint plan- 
ning on proliferation. The object would be to 
turn Russia's army into a force for peace, not 
for imperial restoration. 

The virus of nationalism will have to run its 
course in Russia. A mild dose may inoculate it 
against killer strains. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Test for Liberians 


While world attention remains fixed else- 
where, Liberia’s waning factions move closer 
than ever to converting their uneasy peace 
into a more just and lasting accord. Next 
Monday will provide the aetd test That is 
when Liberians demonstrate whether they 
have the capacity to bring their destructive 
four-year civil war to a dose. If plans proceed 
as negotiated, African peacekeeping forces 
will be deployed throughout the country by 
Monday. That is also the day when a transi- 
tional government is to be seated and the 
lifting of arms from the combatants is to start 
AD of this is a necessary prelude to general 
elections now scheduled for Sept. 7. 

Winning Liberian agreement to this calendar 
of events has taken some dong. With much 
international prodding, and with U.S. financial 
support, Liberia's mistrustful leaders are now 
poised to take the final steps toward healing 
their poor country’s national wounds. 

Whether they wiQ stay on track is a major 
gamble. For the last three years, the Liberian 
factions have talked optimistically about the 
peace process — while simultaneously tearing 
their country apart. So whether this fragile 
peace can bold long enough to allow something 
more durable to take its place wiD depend on a 
spirit of magnanimity and a c ommitmen t to 


peace and democratic change that the parties 
have never displayed before. 

One ominous development already threatens 
the agreement. Just as the Liberians seem ready 
to end the fratricide, their Nigerian and Ghana- 
ian neighbors may be losing their willingness to 
be peacekeepers. Hard pressed politically and 
financially, both countries have complained 
about the burden of deploying troops to keep 
Liberia’s guns silent To share the load, Uganda 
and Tanzania have each provided one battalion 
co augment the existing force. The good news is 
that additional peacekeepers help to interna- 
tionalize the peace process. They have been 
added, however, to calm the fears of Nigerian 
domination held by the major combatant, 
Charles Taylor — who arguably is the principal 
reason why Liberia is in rains today. 

Peacekeeping has been largely bankrolled 
by the United States. But the Gotten admin- 
istration, following the pattern of the Bush 
White House, seems shy about taking too 
visible a role in Liberia. For historical reasons, 
and by dint of American indulgence of the 
dreadful Doe regime, few countries have a 
greater claim on American concern than Libe- 
ria. If Liberians are wining to stay the course, 
America should help. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Questions About Clinton 


Bill Clinton and his helpers keep saying that 
they have nothing to hide on Whitewater, so 
some evil gmie most be making them act as if 
they do. The latest affront is the boneheaded 
conclave convened by Deputy Treasury Secre- 
tary Roger Altman to give a “heads up" to 
three White House officials about the Resolu- 
tion Trust Corporation’s inquiry into a savings 
and loan association connected to Mr. and 
Mrs. Clinton. Mr. Altman said he wanted to 
brief Bernard Nussbaum, the White House 
counsel, Harold Ickes, the deputy chief of 
staff, and Margaret Williams, the first lady’s 
chief of staff, on when the statute of limita- 
tions would run out on the RTC investigation 
of Madison Guaranty Savings and Loan. 

That is an interrating question and not 
unrelated to other questions that Republicans 
on the Senate Banking Committee and other 
reasonably curious Americans would like to 
have answered. Here are four. 

• Was Madison Guaranty Savings and 
Loan used to convert Clinton campaign funds 
to personal funds for the then governor? 

• Did a regulator appointed by Governor 
Clinton go easy on Madison because it was 
owned by the Clintons’ political ally, James 
McDougal, who was also the Clintons' busi- 
ness partner in Whitewater Development? 

• Did the Clintons pay the same amount of 
money for their half share of Whitewater that 
Mr. McDougal paid for his? This question is 
important because it bears on whether Mr. 
Clinton, while governor, received gifts or 
claimed undeserved tax deductions in connec- 
tion with Whitewater. 

• Did Mrs. Clinton’s law firm behave 
properly in its dealings with Madison and 
bank regulators? 

Given that such questions are now before a 
special counsel and the RTC a meeting be- 
tween Mr. Altman and top White House aides 
was improper on its face. It could never have 
taken place in a White House that had even a 
rudimentary respect for the commonsense 


rules on conflict of interest. The Clinton team 
has taken the nation back to the sham ethics 
of the early Reagan administration. That 
crowd believed that conflicts of interest could 
not exist since they could not conceive of 
letting any law or rale of propriety interfere 
with tiie political and financial interests c*f the 
president or his buddies. 

The stated reason for this meeting will not 
wash. Information on the statute of limita- 
tions could be bad from the newspapers or a 
brief memo from the RTC legal staff. Senator 
Mouse D’Amato, Republican of New York, 
and Representative Jim Leach. Republican of 
Iowa, therefore have reason to suspect that 
the goal of the meeting was to control political 
damag e or compromise tie RTCs investiga- 
tion. Who knows what the White House has 
learned about the RTC findings? 

In response to bad publicity, Mr. Altman has 
recused himself from the RTC inquiry on 
Whitewater. His RTC deputy should now take 
over all his duties at the agency until a perma- 
nent director is appointed. Senator Donald 
Riegle, the Michigan Democrat who diairs die 
Senate B anking Committee, needs to step up 
his committee's oversight activities. Other 
Democrats like Senator John Keny of Nebras- 
ka need to cease their myopic defense of Mr. 
Clinton on a matter about which neither the 
senator mar the public has been fully informed- 

Opposition leaders are right when they say 
that a Republican White House that so reck- 
lessly meddled in the Justice Department, the 
RTC and other agencies would be shelled with 
endless congressional investigations. It is time 
for the Democratic congressional leaders, 
Thomas Foley and George Mitchell, to try to 
educate this White House about the normal 
protocols of governance. Clinton aides behave 
as if their president has deep deposits of 
public trust In fact, that account was pretty 
slim when Mr. Clinton got to Washington, 
and it is just about tapped out now. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 



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Hostile Settlers Doom the Peace Prospect 


W ASHINGTON — The massacre of more 
than 40 Palestinians in Hebrew on Friday 
underlines the need for lsrad to undo the impact 
of the policy, in effect since 1977, of promoting 
Jewish settlement in the occupied territories. 

Prime Minister Menachem Begin initiated the 
program, reversing the policy of the preceding 
Labor government, which had limited settlement 
in order to preserve the option of trading the 
occupied territories for peace. 

As the architect of a “Greater Israri," Mr. Begin 
calculated that once he bad enough Jews implant- 
ed in these lands, no government could possibly 
rive them back. The current Isradi-PLO negotiat- 
ing deadlock illustrates how effective he was. 
Whatever his reservations about the settlements, 
Mr. Rabin, when he signed on to the peace agree- 
ment last September, was compelled by the politi- 
cal pomo- erf the settlers to preserve the status quo. 

The Oslo agreement requires brad to end the 
rule of the Israeli army in the territories. Yet the 
settlers are totally dependent on the army, dear- 
ly, Israel's pledge to the settlers is incompatible 
with the pieties made to the Palestinians as part 
of an Arab-IsraeH peace. 

The contradiction is the natural consequence 
of the rejection by the settlers of the principle of 
Palestine's partition, which was the basis of the 
United Nations vote in 1947 that created Israel. 
Partition prevailed until the 1967 war, when 
Israel occupied all of Palestine. The Oslo agree- 
ment proposes to restore iL 
The settlers, however, proclaim that all of 
Palestine belongs to the Jews and say they wifi 
resist any Palestinian authority in the territories. 
A Knesset member who supports them has even 
asserted the right to shoot an Arab policeman 
who stops him for a traffic violation. 

The gunman at Hebron, although obviously a 


By Milton Viorst 

madman, emerges from this body of super- 
nationalist ideology. Among the settlers he was 
an extremist, a fanatic — but ideologically he 
was not an anomaly. 

To have a settler community Bvmg at peace 
under Palestinian rale is not in itsdf unimagin- 
able. But as long as the 130,000 living in the 
territories remain sworn enemies of Arab rale, 
they will be an insuperable obstacle to a Palestin- 
ian authority attempting to govern there. 

The massacre in Hebron was not the first 
attempt by the settlers to wreck the transition to 
Palestinian rule by violence. They are the minor 
image of the Palestinian extremists who are also 
committed to destroying (be Oslo accord. 

Israel and the PLO have both accepted an 
Obligation to suppres violence out of concern 
for the security of all the residents of the territo- 
ries. But controlling the settlers may be more 
difficult than protecting them. It appears to be a 
burden that the Oslo accord cannot support 
Surrounded by 2 milli on hostile Arabs, the 
settlements can survive only with the support of 
the army. The settlements themselves are safe 
enough — encircled by barbed wire, guarded by 
watdnowers, patiolkd by sentries. But the settlers 
must leave their homes to go to work or to market, 
and thor children must travel by car or bus to 
school The army patrols the roads and has cov- 
ered them with checkpoints. It has built a network 
of new roads to bypass the Arab population. Yet 
the roads remain an invitation to Arab earrr wrt kn. - 
Increasingiy 1987, when the intifada be- 
gad, the army has defended the settlers with 
aggressive tactics largely rooted in intelligence 
acquired from Arab agents, often 'recruited” by 


torture or extortion. Harsh collective punishment 
— round-the-clock curfews, undercover wimg^ 
hone demolition, imprisonment — has become 
routine. Army raids cm Arab towns and refugee 
camps have kepi Arab society in disarray. 

A few weeks ago, General Ehnd Barah. Israel's 
chief of staff, admitted that the array would find 
it hard to safeguard the settlers if it had to adopt 
gen t ler tactics. As far safeguarding die Arabs, it 
has never had serious tactics at afi. 

What the Palestinians want mare than anything 
dsefnsatheOsloagreaneatis to get the army out 
of their lives. They want the restoration of tran- 
quillity, of “tannalhy, w in the territories. The 
present* of hostile settlers makes this goal unat- 
tainable. It dooms the prospect of real peace. 

The settlers, if they had their choice, would 
expel the Palestinians from the territories com- 
pletely. Fading that, they would preserve anny 
rale forever. The violent nature rtf their move- 
ment contains a threat of civil war, intimidating 
Israelis. It gives them political power far in 
excess of tbor numbers. 

In recent months, Israelis have begun to ac- 
knowledge that they cannot have both the settle- 
ments and puce. Tne tragedy at Hebron empha- 
sizes the point. In the Israeli press and the 
Knesset there is growing talk of incentives to 
entice tbe settlers home. But Mr. Rabin and his 
government have been unwilling to take the 
settlers on. leaving the problem unresolved. 

Most Israelis now agree that the late Mena- 
cbem Begin’s vision of a “Greater Israel” was a 
terrible mistake. But until tbe settlements are 
dismantled, peace remains its hostage. 

The writer is author of “Sandcastles: The Arabs 
in Search of the Modem World." He contributed 
this common to The Washington Past 


Make a Peace That Doesn 9 t Strand Israeli Settlers 


W ASHINGTON —The fanati- 
cal doctor from Brooklyn who 
murdered scores of Muslims at pray- 
er was the best ally of Hezbollah and 
the wont enemy of Jewish settlers in 
Israel’s disputed West Bank. 

Perhaps he thought he was aveng- 
ing tbe Arab massacre of Jews at 
Hebron seven decades ago; or the 
murder of his mentor, the extremist 
Rabbi Mar Knhane, a few 
ago; or killings of a ooople of J 
tis be treated a few weeks ago. 

But his premeditated slaughter of 
innocents was more than vengeance; 
it was. as Russian Foreign Minister 
Andrei Kozyrev called it, “a provo- 
cation" — an imitation to bloody 
reprisal by his Arab feBow warriors 
in what they agree is a “holy war." 

The real conflict is between war- 
makers and peacemakers. Until now. 
terror was the weapon of Arab orga- 
nizations; now, tfianW to the Jewish 
at Hebron and the blood- 
r few who praised his act many 
fess to see a rough balance of 
, and Palestinian terrorists. 

The goal of the war- mak ers is not 
lunatic: each side seeks the expul- 
sion of the other from “its'’ territo- 
ry. The Hebron killer’s Kadi fao- 


By William S afire 


tian wants Arabs driven across the 
Jordan River, while Hamas, Hez- 
bollah and Fatah hawks want Jews 
driven out of tbe West Bank and 
ultimately into the sea. 

The goal of peacemakers should 
be some compromise, allowing 
West Bank Arabs and Jews to live 
together, or at least next to one 
another, with self-rule for each. 

Until recently, the compromise 
in the minds of many moderate 
Israelis, both Labor and Likud, 
was one that ultimately divided the 
disputed territory: the great major- 
ity of land to Palestinians, but with 
Strategic paints now populated by 
130,000 Israeli settlers to help de- 
fend the territorially vulnerable 
and often invaded Israel. 

Thar ha* changed The Rabin- 
Peres government seems to be plan- 
ning to turn the entire West rank 
over to Palestinian rule. That would 
strand Israeli settlers, who believe 
that they five on the land of Israel 
and who were encouraged to settle 
there over decades by a democrati- 
cally elected government 

These settlers are now being de- 


monized as zealots, obstacles to 
peace, for daring to object to bang 
cut off, with the land under their 
homes ceded to a foreign power. This 
demonization was given a boost by 
the Hebron fanatics bloody invita- 
tion to more war. All die embattled 
pioneers, often attacked and neces- 
sarily aimed to protect themselves, 
are today unfairly lumped together 
with tbe extremist faction that wants 
to drive out the Arab residents. 

The government, which failed to 
foresee the extent of the fear that 
would pass through the isolated 
outposts at the prospect of sellout, 
is properly moving to assuage the 
anguish or Palestinians by disarm- 
ing and restricting the extremist fac- 
tions associated with the killer. 

The condolence visit to Hebron by 
President Ezer Wdzman expre s sed 
Ms nation’s sorrow tad shame. 

Tire U.S. government moved' cor- 
rectly to aval victory for the war- 
makers by inviting Palestinians and 
Israelis to Washington for rejuvena- 
tion of tbe talks. This was a conces- 
sion to the PLO, which wants the 
ralkx in Washington; Israel acceded 


immediately, leaving it to the PLO 
to decide men it can come: 

PLO peacemakers cannot help 
but exploit the tragedy in negotia- 
tions; to do otherwise would invite 
attack from Arab war-makeis. That 
is why it ritually called for ‘inter- 
national protection” of Palestinians 
— an Israeli surrender to the United 
Nations Thai Chairman Yasser Ara- 
fat knows is unrealistic. 

More to the point is his call for 
adding “the settlements issue” to 
the current agenda. That topic was 
deliberately postponed in the Oslo 
negotiations; it is diplomalese for 
ideating the Israeli settlers out of 
their homes and making the West 
Bank Jew-free. Is that an overstato- 
ment? Only Sunday, a respected 
Palestinian leader made clear that 
the negotiation would soon boil 
down to “settlements or peace.” 

The peacemakers’ answer to the 

war- make rs — including the f anatic 

bigot who shamed Ms people and 
betrayed Ms religion — should be to 
reject expulsomsm and embrace 
territorial compromise. The horror 
of Hebron must not lead to tbe 
e thnic deanring of the West Bank 
The New York Tones. 


I [13 1 


Money and Politics Mix, in Malaysia as Elsewhere 


H ONG KONG — - Hypooisy, na- 
ivete and grandstanding have 
been ricocheting between London and 
Koala Lumpur, culminating in Fri- 
day’s announcement by the Malaysian 
government that it would boycott Brit- 
ish goods in retaliation for British me- 
dia allegations of payoffs involving 


By Philip Bowring 


At (me level, the dispute is ex- 
tremely petty — of the sort once 
associated with relations between 
former colonial powers and smaller 
African states in the early flush of 
independence. It foDows a similar 
row between Malayria and Australia 
just three months ago after Prime 
Minister Paul Keating described Ms 
Malaysian counterpart, Mahathir bin 
Mohamad, as “recalcitrant'’ in Ms 
attitude against tbe Asia-Pacific Eco- 
nomic Cooperation forum. 

At another level, however, the dis- 
pute with Britain has origins that go 
back 15 years, to the start of the 


Cardan saga involving the various 
misdeeds of a Hong Kong company 
which subsequently wait bust owing 
a billion dollars, the biggest chunk to 
a state-controlled Malaysian bank. 
Bank Bunriputra. Malaysian politi- 
cians as well as Hong Kong bankers, 
lawyers and accountants were benefi- 
ciaries of the scam. 

The Carrian affair, aspects of 
which are still before (he courts, has 
brought credit to neither Malaysia 
nor Britain. Since then a continuing 
series of episodes has shown the per- 
ils of trying to mix business with 
judicial and foreign affairs. 

The latest tiff was sparked by a 
dispute in Britain ova the link be- 
tween aid financing for Malaysia’s 
Pergau hydroelectric project and Ma- 
laysian purchases of British arms 
worth some S1.5 billion. In Britain, 
outrage is expressed that an sad deal 


be linked to an arms sale. In Malaysia 
there is little such alarm, even among 
the opposition; the main issue is 
whether Pergau was a good project. 

“Aid” may be a curious word for 
Britain to apply to Malaysia, which 
owns a car manufacturer when Brit- 
ain does not. Hie vay fact (hat Brit- 
an should offer and Malaysia accept 
“aid” should suggest something dif- 
ferent from, say, British donation of 
vaccine to Rwanda. 

Equally curious is the apparent as- 
sumption by British media and par- 
liamentarians that “aid" is not and 
never should be connected to com- 
mercial advantage. In a truly moral 
world, that would be right, but few 
would accuse the Murdoch or British 
tabloid press of being driven by mor- 
al imperatives. Tbe fact is that aid has 
always been used by most donors far 
political and conmercial as well as 


own letters — relating to the murder 
of a Bank Bumiputra auditor sent 
from Kuala Lumpur to investigate 
thegoingston in Hong Kong. 

The British press, so quick to throw 
allegations against Malaysians, easily 
allowed itsdf to be gagged in failing 
to investigate the Caman cover-ups. 
So although Britain may now cry 
“unfair," and its media claims may 
appear, in Malaysia as elsewhere, to 
have a ring of truth, the British can- 
not d«m any moral high ground. 

Meanwhile, the long and costly 
courtship of the Malaysians by Mar- 

saret Thatcher and the Foreign Of- 


Cl 


has flopped. Although h 
' is quarrel is ' 


is ques- 
Indonesia, 


Britain Should Be Firm 


purely humanitarian 


By Gerald Segal 

L ONDON — What began as a pa- 
* rochial British scandal about 
whether funds for an aid project in 
Malaysia were linked to arms sales 
has become a nasty diplomatic fra- 
cas. Malaysia now says it will not 

approve any more government con- 
tracts with British companies. 

Mahathir bin Mohamad, the Ma- 
laysian prime mmisto*, has a chip on 
his shoulder. ^ The sooner it is knocked 
off, the better relations between East 
Asia and the West will be. 

Mr. Mahathir has reacted angrily 
to suggestions in the British press 
that arms and other business deals 
with Malaysia involved kickbacks. 
*et such allegations have been 
mound for years, and they ring true 
for foreign b usinessmen in many 
Southeast Asian countries. 

Malayans overreaction to the nor- 
mal investigative activities of the 
Western press is similar to its overre- 
action when Pari .Kerning, the Austra- 
lian prime ministft, described Mr. 
Mahathir as “recatatranr for not ai- 
1 fritting the informal frUitiftatin Seattle 
late last year of fcadeis from coon tries 
in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooper- 
ation fomm. Despite Ms repulatimi as 
a political street fighter, Mr. Keating 
essentially capitulated to the Malay- 
aan demand lor an apology. - 
Appeasement does, not pay, for 
clearly Mr. Mahathir is now embold- 
ened to take on a bigger power. 

Britain's initial reaction is soggy. It 
is not surprising that British lams 
with business interests in Malay 
are anxious. But taking out a 
page advertisement in the weekend 
press (hat grovels to Malaysia is 
hardly a dignified way to proceed. 
The Labor opposition has joined in 
the attacks on tbe government rather 
than standing up for the rights of an 
independent press. 

Britain is seeking a behind-the- 


scenes settlement. That is under- 
standable. But the time has come for 
a more robust and candid response. 

Many East Asian officials were pri- 
vately critical of Mr. Mahathir for 
failing to attend the Seattle summit 
and for his previous attaints to sabo- 
tage A PEG These officials could not 
say so publidy, but they were cheering 
for Mr. Keating, hoping, that he would 
cut tbe Malaysian leader down a peg. 

The main reason for Britain to take 
a more robust line has to do with tbe 
debate about a supposed East Asian 
right to deviate from internationally 
recognized covenants when it suits au- 
thoritarian regimes. A free press that 
investigates official malfeasance is a 
core part of a democratic system. Brit- 
ain and the rest of the West should be 
defending that right with gusto. 

Now that the Japanese and South 
Korean press are playing an active 
part in their countries* democratic 
politics, it is hard to argue that a free 
press is not part of Asia’s cultural 
values. Much as Singapore hides be- 
hind such rivihzational arguments 
when it overreacts to critical com- 
ments in the international media, so 
Malaysia is trying to hide the arbi- 
trary actions of its government. 

Britain, whose imports from Ma- 
laysia are nearly 50 per cent higher 
“J® its exports, could respond with 
jaumothreats of a “Buy Malaysian 
[^policy. Kuala Lumpur should 
. international ac- 

^ “28h G ATT ifit nosists in its 

unB Stoat-sanctions against Britain. 

Oplrty establishing a more 
Straightforward basis for dealing 
with Malaysia will Britain put its 
relations with bast Asia o n a stable 
footing for the longer term. 

The writer, a senior the 

International Institute for 
Studies in London end tKufiTT qj -tfie 
Pacific Review, contributed this com- 
ment to the Herald Tribune. 


: has stung Mr. Mahathir into 
retaliation is not tbe debate over Per- 
gau but the suggestion that politi- 
cians, and indeed the ruling party, 
have beat in receipt of large dona- 
tions from British contractors' — and 
not just in relation to Pergau. This 
followed recent allegations in tbe 
Australian media that Canberra’s se- 
cret intelligence service has been 
bribing Malaysian poltirians. 

Mr. Mahathir, seldom averse to a 
fight, seems to have decided that at- 
tack, is the best defense. British media 

have been accused of patronizing and 
col onialis t attitudes, while British 
firms anxious to do business in Ma- 
laysia have been forced to thor knees 
in praise of all thing s Malaysian. 

How well all this plays at bone for 
Mr. Mahathir has yet to be deter- 
mined — but it is Ekdy to bring 
further British media attention to 

British- Malaysian issues. 

The reality b ehind all tins is mat 
money plays an impotant role in Ma- 
laysian politics, as it does cbewh ae. 
political connections ate o ften in- 
volved tn government contract awards 
and the boiefits of privatizations. Ma- 
prefer that things were 

K is a reality that is 

unlikely to be seriously ch all e n ged 
while the countiy prospers. . 

Mr. Mahathir himself hM bCCtt 
among those who decry publicly the 
spread of “money politics.” Stopping 
it is another matter, given Malaysia s 
combination of fast economic growth 
and a need to develop the Malay 
majority as a capital-owning class. 

The British government has fallen 
ova itsdf in an effort to be accom- 
modating. In the early I^80s, Mr. 
Mahathir launched a “Buy British 
Last” campaign ostensibly m protest 
at British increases in foreign student 
lees. To hdp gel back into Malaysian 
favor, the British Foreign Office was 
instrumental in a series of (largely 
successful) efforts in Hong Kong to 
cover up the involvement of some 
Malaysian politicians in the Carrian 

“fair, to the pant of suppressing 

“"Portam evidence — the victim’s 


Mr. Ma- 
hathir says that his quarrd is with the 
media and not tbe government, offi- 
cial relations are halfway back to 
where they woe a decade ago. 

So the episode is damaging to Brit- 
ain. Whether Koala Lumpur’s ac- 
tions do Malaysia any 
tionable. Its neighbors, 

Thailand and Singapore, are averse 
to high-profile rows with friendly 
countries. They said as much at the 
time of the spat with Mr. Keati 
Some Indonesian ministers ope 
refer to Mr. Mahathir’s behavior as 
that of a “mim-Sukarno.” 

Neighbors also wony that politi- 
cally inspired trade boycotts are just 
(he kind of anti-GATT behavior that 
Western countries like to seize 
to justify new trade restrictions. 
a week ago, Leon Brittan, the Euro- 
pean commissioner for trade, warned 
China that trade threats against Brit- 
ain over Hong Kong could frustrate 
its GATT application. A conciliatory 
British government is unlikely to use 
stub phrases in the Malaysian con- 
text, and few in Malaysia seem to 
want escalation of the affair, but 
there are loose cannons on both tides. 

International Herald Tribune. 


A Fund 
For Russia 
In Bosnia 

By Anthony Lewis 

1 QNDON — “The road to any so- 
/ lntion in Bosnia now runs 
through Moscow ” A senior diplomat 
in London thus summed 19 the dra- 
matically changed landscape faced 
by Western governments Hying to 
design an end to the Bosnian conflict. 

when Russia intervened two 
weeks ago, offering a hand to the 
Serbs, it became an essential player in 
the diplomatic game, with Boris Yelt- 
sin personally involved. That sharply 
limits what the United States and the 
Europeans can do on their own. Bui 
it also offers an urgent opportunity 
for Russian- American action. 

An example of the new restraints 
on the West is the outlook for further 
NATO air strike threats, like the one 
that helped move Ser bian guns back 
from Sarajevo. Their purpose might be 
to aid the Serbian shelling of other 
Bosnian government enclaves, to re- 
open the Ttizla airport or to stop mili- 
tary traffic from Serbia and Croatia. 

But now that Russia is involved, 
can such NATO air action be a seri- 
ous possibility? NATO members are 
highly mi Kra y to want 10 risk an 
even more dangerous conflict. And 
threats that will not be carried out 
are worse than useless. 

The irony is that, in the events of 
the last two weeks, tbe Serbs have 
aided up winners. The Bosnian gov- 
ernment hoped that it was finally 
getting a protective arm from 
NATO, but the symbolic protection 
that Russia has extended to the 
Sobs is more measmgfuL 


cantly affects the tine qua non ot any 
overall peace settlement achieved by 
tenitonal division of Bosnia: getting 
the Sobs to withdraw from enough 
of the temtoiy they have seized — 70 
percent of (lie country — to make 
possible a viable if rump Bosnia. 

The United States is now trying to 
broker a cease-fire between the Mus- 
lim-dominated Bosnian forces and 
the Croats — and a political plan for 
a Bosnian-Croatian confederation. 

Those would be important steps if 
they actually worked, although one 
has to be skeptical that they can after 
such brutality as the Croatian savag- 
ing of Muslim civilians in Mostar. 

But if the Bosnian-Croatian plan 
does succeed, there will still be the 
terrible problem of the Bosnian gov- 
ernment enclaves in the east and 
west. No Bo snian state would be via- 
ble, or its borders peaceful if some of 
its territory nnnsisted of islands sur- 
rounded by hostile Serbian forces. 

Diplomats have hoped that Bosni- 
an Serb leaders would give up enough 
land to fink the government territo- 
ries. But how can the Serbs be per- 
suaded to do that if Russia is effec- 
tively protecting them from Western 
pressure? The answer can nbw proba- 
bly lie only in agreement between the 
Yeltsin government and the West 
And “the West” really means the 
United States, because Bosnia has 
shown again bow dependent the Eu- 
ropeans are on U-S. leadership. 

It is a strange situation. Here is a 
Russian state m desperate economic 
and political trouble, its presidaK 
unable to prevent a grant of amnesty 
to men who tried to overthrow him. 
Yet that Russia is in a position to 
help shape, or block, any resolution 
of the Bosnian conflict 

If there is to be a peace that has a 
chance of bolding, Washington and 
Moscow have to agree broadly on tbe 
terms. Then the United States would 
have to sell them to the Bosnian gov- 
ernment, Russia to tbe Serbs. 

Such a joint demarche is the new 
opportunity, and it is a serious one. 
In the past, Russian diplomats have 
been cooperative and well informed 
on tbe Bosnian situation. President 
Yeltsin’s rail for a Moscow confer- 
ence on Bosnia, which has drawn a 
lukewarm Western response, might 
in fact have possibilities. The risk is 
that domestic political pressure on 
Mr. Yeltsin — from the rise of Slav 
nationalism — may now make him 
lean too far toward the Sabs. But 
President Bill Clinton would have 
some leverage to produce a modestly 
decent result for the Bosnian victims. 

Sanctions on Serbia are a powerful 
leva. After the CIA mole affair and 
congressional anger at Russia. Mr. 
Yeltsin has reasons to want to look 
cooperative. Bnt there will be no 
chance of success unless Mr. Clinton 
has a firm policy, knows his objec- 
tives and is committed to than. More 
of the wavering that marked Ins past 
positions on Bosnia — the confusion 
between aggressors and victims, the 
empty postures — would be fatal. 

The American president faces a 
classic, difficult challenge in foreign 
policy. With attention and commit- 
ment, be can meet it 

The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Rowdy Parisians 

PARIS — Paris students are keeping 
up their reputation for turbulence. 
After hissing M. Caro and M. Lar- 
roumet, they have now hissed M. 
Brunetifere. What does this mean? 
Some say it means there are too many 
ladies at M, Brunettere’s lectures. 
Such a reason says little for the tradi- 
tions of French gallantry. Whatever 
may be the reason, the Sor bonne is 
once mare in an uproar. Fifteen years 
ago things were totally different. 
There was a good deal less noise, and 
a good deal more work done. 

1919: About the League 

WASHINGTON —Since the United 
States declared war against Germa- 
ny, no official event has aroused such 
interest as that called forth by the 
dinner at the White House on 
Wednesday night [Feb. 26] to the 
members of the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee and the House For- 
eign Affairs Committee to the 


League of Nations with PresuJent Wil- 
son. There was a free interchange of 
views, and President Wilson was ques- 
tioned freely. On the salgect of sover- 
eignty, President Wilson said that, in 
his opinion, the United States would 

relinquish some of its sovaoguty.but 

that other nations in the league would 
make a similar surrender. 

1944; Victory in Burma 

NEW DELHI — [From our New 
York edition;] The Allies have scored 
thor first major victory in Burma by 
destroying a special force of 8,000 
Japanese m two weeks of confused 
fighting in the dusty, choking jungle 
of the Arakan sector, north of Akyab. 
the Southeast Asia Allied Command 
announced tonight [Feb. 271 It said 
the Japanese woe “gradually driven 
back, hemmed in, split up. hunted 
and killed. Most, with their accus- 
tomed tenacity, fought to the death- 
Some, battered and wounded, cs- 
_ i the jungle to the south. 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 

OPINION ! 




Page 


Russia Fails, Again, to Escape the Totalitarian Trap 

"\ yfOSCOW — The political re. 




and 


SOVE® 


tma cfNa^,^ 

views, ano rr^-;, % -.. 
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1944 ; Victory >" 

NEW DELHI - 

Yffiedjnwv.i 


V 

- / 


M OSCOW — The political re* 
arrangement in Russia that 
began wjp the government re- 
shuffling\of mid-1992 has come 
to an end. The departure of the 
cabinet’s leading economic and 
political reformers last month 
erased all doubts. 

Until then, despite reactionary 
successes in the December parlia- 
mentaiy elections, it was possible 
to believe that the necessary re* 
forms would continue, even if only 
in half-measupes. Bui now it js 
dear that there, will be no reforms, 
not even bad ones, 

Under die guise of social wel- 
fare policies, a planned economy 
will be re-established. Its execu- 
tors will be Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin and his allies. 

President Boris Yeltsin has 
become merely.' decorative. If re- 
form is . to come, the work will be 
dime by others. 

Andre Kozyrev, holding on as 
foreign minister, will further leant 
how to talk tough foreign policy to 
out-Zhirinovsky the fascist parlia- 
mentarian 'Vladimir Zhirinovsky. 

The West win continue to insist 
that Mr. Yeltsin represents democ- 
racy. Russia, instead of moving 
along the axis of time, will continue 
spinning in the Westem-vs.-Slavic 
aide codified in Russian thought 
by Pyotr Chaadayev in the early 
19th century. This tension promises 
further conflicts like the failed coup 
of August 1991 and the forced shut- 
down of parliament last October. 

. The Zhirinovsky victory resulted 
from the failure of reforms, but it 
indicated something broader about 
Russian society. It suggested cultur- 
al forces that fie beyond the endur- 


By Yuri N. Afanasyev 

ria^kxx. 11 t C rrT l ^ ^*1 Mr- Zhirincwsky's success cannot 
Sure^A^^n < £ SenUa, y* be seen as the onslaught of a 
iapS^luuS^tpub- Plague- al^ough such a 

lie awareness ^V 3, pu T «»«. In the short term, he 

tional and myitolS’lle'S “ ** ta 01 tbc fafl,lra 


of reform in Russian history. 

The reform movement is now 
nothing but rhetoric. We are left 
with a growing gap between the 
authorities and society, a loss of 
social welfare, a predatory enrich- 
ment of the nomenklatura through 
the conversion of power and con- 


concessions before bailing out Mr. 
Yeltsin by storming parliament. 

The day after the insurrection 
ended, Mr. Yeltsin convened a Se- 
curity Council meeting that had 
only one item on the agenda: anew 
military doctrine that expanded 
Russia s security interests through- 
out the territory of the former Sovi- 
et Union and rescinded the “no first 
use** nuclear weapons pledge. 

This move was initiated even be- 
fore fires were put out and before 
the dead were buried. 

Recent actions by the govern- 


uonal predominated, with pagan 
and Christian concepts and ideals 
People lived and acted, led not bv 
rason but by superstition. Thar 
xnwdora was confined by intellectu- 
al limitations and habits. 

After 1917 an additional con- 
sjrauri on freedom was imposed, 
this time the allegedly rational ide- — 1111 1 ■— — ■ ■ 

^doSfMTSd^rfteeio- bbq^cUmiuwthattheniwMbenoreform. 

Apfo^WMmyniUbere^tamhedunder 
Russia, pat legacy is the main rea- some other guise. Boris Yeltsin? Mere decoration. 

son for the sense of lost — or rather ° 

never acauired — Russian identity “ 


and the deformed perception of the 
surrounding world as a threat. 

Russia has not escaped totalitar- 
ianism, before or since 1917. be- 
cause it has never had a civil society. 
The state monopolized every activi- 
ty; no autonomous society existed 
apart from its all-pervasive scope. 

The same vicious trap, guaran- 
teeing self-replication or the sys- 
tem, was first delineated in the 
mid-19lh century by the revolu- 
tionary populist Nikolai Cbemy- 
shevsky. Surveying ihe Russian 
Empire and its prospects, be wrote 
that “an omnipotent state means 
subjects deprived of initiative." 
Reforms, be they Peter the Great’s 
or Nikita Khrushchev’s, did not 
spring open the trap, but merely 
modernized the system to preserve 
and strengthen the regime. 


Dec lions into wealth, and a shift in 
power toward Mr. Zhirinovsky. 

The military-industrial com- 
plex and the neo-Soviet elites of 
the nomenklatura are likely to 
grow stronger — resulting in an 
authoritarian regime, today head- 
ed by Mr. Yeltsin, tomorrow by 
someone else. Political power is 
already under outside control, 
hidden and duplicitous. 

It has become evident that the 
real winner in the October 1993 
showdown between Mr. Yeltsin 
and the parliament was the mili- 
tary-industrial complex, acting in 
unison with the bureaucracy. 

At the time, the events of Octo- 
ber were seen as a victory of de- 
mocracy, a removal of obstacles on 
the pain to reform. It now appears 
that the military exacted certain 



raent confirm that the military, 
whicb had lost some power under 
Mikhail Gorbacbev, now has even 
greater influence. There are no 
more vows to reduce the armed 
forces by two-thirds. Mr. Yeltsin 
is photographed with a machine 
gun in hand and assures Russians 
that there will be no more conces- 
sions to the West. 

Military pressure bas forced Mr. 
Yeltsin to reverse himself on acqui- 
escing to Central and Eastern Euro- 
pean countries seeking NATO 
membership. The new military doc- 
trine of asserting interests in the 
“near abroad” is fueling more bla- 
tant attempts to subordinate former 
Soviet republics. The idea is to re- 
establish the countries of the former 
socialist camp as buffers between 
Russia and die “far abroad.” 

The policy is jeopardizing mil- 
lions or people in Eastern Europe 
and Central Asia, who thought they 
were free of Moscow's control 
Under the guise of protecting 
Russian-speaking peoples. Russia is 
supporting “national liberation” 
movements in countries that seek 
independence. Sometimes the direct 
participation of Russian troops is 
camouflaged and presented to the 
world as a peacekeeping mission in 
an interethnic conflict. 

Russia bas shown an unwilling- 
ness to remove its remaining 
troops from Moldova; in Georgia, 
it supported the Abkhazian sepa- 
ratists, then salvaged President 
Eduard Shevardnadze's central 
government only after be paid the 
price of joining the Common- 
wealth of Independent States. 

In Centra] Aria, Russia contin- 
ues to wage an undeclared war 
with unstated aims. It is riding 
with a reactionary regime in Ta- 
jikistan that is ruthlessly crushing 
free thought and democracy. 

Russia wants to hide behind the 
flags of several countries, just as 
the Soviet Union did during the 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Loose Confederation 

Regarding “No Use Making 
Scapegoats of die Mediators" {Let- 
ters, Feb. 18) from John Mills: 

As spokesman for the Interna- 
tiona] Conference on the Former 
Yugoslavia, John Mills may find it 
dimculi to accept criticism of Lord 
David Owen and Thorvald Stol- 
tenberg. But the criticism offered 
by Charles K Fairbanks Jr. (Opin- 
ion, Feb. 17) is valid. Mr. Fairbanks 
is absolutely right to say that the 
Owen-Stoltenbarg plan “has be- 
come an effort to force the victims 
to give public legitimacy to the 
verdict of force and terror.” 

Both the Vance-Owen and the 
Owen-Stoltenberg plans would 
have legitimated “ethnic cleans- 
ing" by allowing the Serbs to retain 
lands they have conquered by 
force. Such prodding of the Mus- 
lims to accept the dismemberment 
of their land is unacceptable. The 
present Owen-Stoltenberg plan 
would deal a mortal blow to the 
very foundation of international 
law, whicb rejects territorial gains 
by force. Moreover, the partition 
of an ethnically mixed state like 
Bosnia would be tantamount^ to 
encouraging “ethnic cle ansin g.” 

Mr. Fairbanks is absolutely right 
to suggest that the Bosnians should 
be allowed to cany on their strug- 
gle until a more just peace can be 
achieved. However, the interna- 
tional community can try to find a 
formula which will respect Bos- 
nia’s territorial integrity — the 
main Muslim demand — while al- 
lowing Bosnian Serbs to retain the 
imk to their compatriots in Serbia. 

This can be achieved only 
through some form of confedera- 
tion between Bosnia and Serbia. 
This would not be a return to the 
status quo ante of a highly central- 
ized Serb-dominated Yugoslavia, 
but a much looser confederation 
which would allow Bosnia to retain 
a large degree of autonomy ana 
I feature a federal parliament 


Extremists on all sides of the con- 
flirt would gain support 
The only way for foreign mili- 
tary intervention to resolve any of 
the territorial disputes in Bosnia 
would be to completely and perma- 
nently subdue at least one of the 
warring factions. This would re- 
quire a large-scale military opera- 
tion that no Western government is 
prepared to support. * 

Dropping bombs on any of the 
warring factions in ex-Yugoslavia 
would not dimmish their will to 
fighL Most combatants on aD sides 
tend to fight near their homes. 
They are primarily motivated by 
fear and are often prepared to die 
defending their land. 

The Bosnian Muslim demand 
for more territory is morally inde- 
fensible. The unilateral declaration 
of independence in 1992 by the 
Muslim-led Bosnian 


fought against the Ustashe, would 
not have allowed Croatia's centu- 
ries-old symbol to be used as part of 
the Communist iconography. 

JOHN P. KRAUIC. 

New York. 


good. The world must turn its at- 
tention to more productive are- 
nas, and quickly. 

WILLIAM E MANKIN. 
Global Forest Policy Project. 

Washington. 


Zlata’s Hopes and Fears Untimely Ski Deaths 

Regarding "Skiing Deaths Since 
yP59”fSporw, Jan. 31): 

Two notable American skiers of 


In response to ("From a Child’s 
Fen, a Sarajevo War Diary, ” Fea- 
tures, Jan. 7): 

My 13-year-old daughter and I 
were very touched by “The Diary 
of Zlata Filipovic." She revealed 
the hopes, fears and optimism that 
only a child can express. Thank 
goodness she and her family are 
safe in France. We can only pray 
for the others left behind. 

J. NAY1D. 

RoQe, Switzerland. 


iTAUtfuuj — govern- 

ment” was illegitimate, undemo- Which Way Will It Cnt? 
era lie and illegal. Sluice then, the 
Bosnian Muslim leaders have con- 
sistently refused to negotiate in 
good faith with the elected repre- 


sentatives of the Bosnian Serbs. 
They have instead lobbied continu- 
ously for foreign military interven- 
tion, risking innocent lives. 

Western governments must pul 
p ressur e on the Bosnian Muslim 
leaders, as well as the Croats and 
Serbs, to negotiate a peace settle- 
ment as soon as possible. 

NEVEN LEZAIC. 

London. 

The Checkerboard 

Regarding " Checkered History ” 
(Letters, Jan. 19): 

George Tmtor stales that Cro- 
atia’s checkerboard coat of arms 
was last widely used by the Nazi- 
allied Ustashe stale in World War 
H But from 1945 to the fall of the 
Communists in 1990, the checker- 
board coat or arms was an integral 
paft of the coat of arms of the 
Socialist Republic of Croatia. As 
sudi, the alleged Ustashe symbol 
was found on every public building 


Regarding the report “ Forest 
Preservation Is Agreed On at UN” 
(Business/ Finance, Jan. 24): 

To label the International Tropi- 
cal Timber Agreement a “forest 
preservation” agreement is like la- 
beling a nuclear missile a “peace- 
keeper.” Depending on how the 
instruments are used, lbe effect 
could well be the opposite. 

The original Tropical Timber 
Agreement of 1983 was a hybrid: a 
fairly conventional commodity 
trade agreement with a few environ- 
mental provisions tacked on. it was 
an interesting tool with promise, 
and the countries that signed it as 
well as environmental organizations 
had high expectations for iL Ten 
years later, the environmental 
groups have seem most of those 
expectations dashed. 


an opportunity for significant re- 
tooling as well as for ending the 
discriminatory focus on tropical 
timber only. Regrettably, the nego- 
tiator failed on almost every ccxmt. 
On some they even lost ground. 

The new agreement therefore 


during Communist 
school report cards. 

Tbe Ustashe’s symbol was the 
letter “U," not Croatia's coat of 

amis. Otherwise, the Partisans, who 


could delay the achievement of 
sustainable forest management in 
the world. Based on the accord's 
track record, the prognosis is not 



J*e Aofcttsf: s -.-v v . 

{htSetfhett! ASjJ ; : 

jjmaataas d tcMy^jL. ,/ 

^ Japanese* 8 *]; u- ^ 

tack, haw#® u ‘ *;,r. 

Some. •SSL'^-.:- 1 ' 

caped through tte--' - 

Aft* saffitndcssu. 


with well-defined powers. i~Croatia and practically every is likely to be little bettor than 

The pause in the shelling of Sa- bJjc document issued in Croatia the public-relations tool its pre- 
raevo should be used as a starting % oriflf , communist rule, even decessorhadbecome. Atworst.it 
point in the healing process and an 
eventual reconciliation between 
Bosnia’s principal communities. 
mahmood elahl 
O ltawa. 


Press for Peace 

Regarding columns on the Feb. 22 
arid Feb. 23 Opinion pages: 

A.M. Rosenthal is right- Wil- 
liam Safire and Anthony are 
The Bosnian conflict can 
only be reSolved by ofigpwuoa 
not by bombing the Serbs orhftmg 
the Yugoslav arms embargo in ia 
vor of the Bosnian Mushms. 
•Although .air strikes cooMP^ 
vide some immediate 
certain situations, their «»*£ 
quences would be dreadful. 
sals against foreigners would bring 
humanitarian aid convoys t . 
halL The peace process would end. 



the past come to mind, although 
their untimely deaths did not occur 
as a direct result of competition. 
Jimmy Griffith was a bright hope in 
the '52 Olympics. I happened to be 
in Alia, Utah, when he broke a leg 
in a training run, and I was among 
those who helped bring him on a 
toboggan into the lodge. We were 
stunned to hear a day or two later 
that he had died in the hospital from 
a blood dot released in the accident. 

Another is Buddy Werner. He 
had just finished competing in the 
'64 Olympics in Innsbruck. We 
Americans were proud and pleased 
to see him nrixing happily with his 
fellow Olympians from various 
countries in the final parade. What 
a shock to leamjust days later that 
he was caught in an avalanche in 
Cdeaina, Switzerland, and perished 
along with several other skiers. 

WARD C. WILLIAMS. 

Vaud, Switzerland. 

A Name of One’s Own 

Regarding ” Inman the Selfless 
Need Not Do Us This Big Favor” 
(Opinion, Dec. 25): 

W illiam Satire asks of President 
Bill Clinton's luckless nominee for 
defense secretary “bow a grown 
man could go through life calling 
himself Bobby.” It's simple- Bobby 
is Mr. Inman 's legal name. Not 
Robert. Bobby. 

In the South, where Mr. Inman 
comes from, children’s nicknames 
are commonly used as l&al names. 
This is the land of the RiBy Joes 
and the Tun Bobs. 

Sometimes it is worse. My college 
roommate's husband had no first 
name, only initials. He had a terri- 
ble time ex plaining to people that 
C. E didn’t stand For anything. 

A high school classmate of mine 
(and this was not in the South) had 
the name George. Fine. Except 
that his last name was also George. 

Somehow, Bobby, C. E. George 
and the rest should have been pro- 
tected from their parents’ mischief. 
Why not have “provisional” names? 
These would be the names your 
parents give you, to be used through 
childhood. But when you grow up 
and the time comes, say, to apply 
for your first drivers License, the 
form could include a box to indicate 
that “I wish to change my first 
name.” You would simply fill in the 
new fust name of your choosing. 
That way, if be didn't want to. a 
grown man would not have to go 
through life calling himself Bobby. 

DONNA EVLETH. 

Paris. 


invasion of Czechoslovakia in 
1968. The oratory is different, but 
the motives are the same: Russia's 
mieresi in a major uranium mine in 
Tajikistan, an aviation plant in 
Georgia, military plants in Mol- 
dova and the Black Sea coast and 
fleet in Crimea. 

Russia’s multipronged involve- 
ment ia the near abroad is proba- 
bly a manifestation of a hope to 
restore the empire. 

It is one thing when Commu- 
nists rally to demand restoration of 
the Soviet Union and another 
when that is the official position of 
ihe “reformist” Russian govern- 
ment. Taken at face value, the ac- 
tions suggest that the 10-year war 
in Afghanistan laugh l the current 
leaders nothing. 

Today, people are again dying 
throughout tbe Commonwealth of 
Independent States, and if things 
continue, the lives of thousands of 
Russians at home and abroad will 
be ai risk. 

Imperial ambitions will bring 
Russia to total ruin. The Soviet 
empire collapsed because it could 
not support so many territories, 
and all attempts to revive that poli- 
cy are doomed to fail. 

The prospect of a return to the 
so-called planned economy is 
equally disastrous. Russia's age- 
old penchant for subordinating 
economic considerations to de- 
mands for control by political lead- 
ers is again at workL 
The economy remains a pre- 
modem, artificial construct depen- 
dent on the state life-support system 
and incapable of surviving by mar- 
ket-driven decisions. 

Today the super-monopoly of 
the state determines the gross na- 
tional product. Central p lannin g 
and distribution agencies have 
changed nam es but not functions. 

Ministries and institutions now 
call themselves “bolding compa- 
nies” and “concerns,” but still sup- 
press all market-one rued competi- 
tion. The central bank has taken on 
distribution functions. It distrib- 
utes finances at the federal level, 
which is essentially the same as 
distributing resources and plan- 
ning the volume of production. On 
the regional level, distribution is 
controlled by the local nomenkla- 
tura. In fact, such distribution is 
the main work of all government 
administration at all levels. 

The 400 or so monopolistic gov- 
ern ment agencies in various 
branches of industry all require 
subsidies. At their initiative new 
duties are being imposed on airi- 
cultural and industrial goods, elim- 
inating competition, expanding 
opportunities for price increases 
and creating hothouse conditions 
for incompetent administrators. 
Pseudo-commercial banks now 


They’re AU After Zakarim 9 s Soul 

By Paul Spencer Sochaczewski 


M INYAMBOU, Indonesia — When the Bap- 
tist missionaries in this isolated valley in 
Irian Java on the western half of the island of New 
Guinea asked for contributions to build a new 
church, Zakarias chipped in with the most valuable 
thing he could find — a bird-of-paradise skin. 

To the early Portuguese and Dutch explorers, the 
bird represented a form of holy salvation. The skins 
they were offered bad neither legs nor wings, so tbe 

MEANWHILE 

Europeans theorized that the creatures most have 
tpent their lives in the heavens. 

The irony of buying his way into heaven with 
u bird of paradise did not occur to Zakarias. But 
he does recognize that there are many authorities 
after his souL 

Zakarias showed me chunky gray caterpillars that 
nature conservationists encourage him to raise. 
These wifi become gaudy, yellow-and-black swallow- 
tailed butterflies. When sold to collectors, they will 
earn him a few dollars each. 

To the conservatioaists, the butterfly venture is a 
small part of a much broader attempt to preserve 
the world’s remaining stands of tropical rain forest. 
They figure that only when local people get some 
tangible benefit wifi they cooperate in conserva- 
tion. The quid pro quo in this case is that Zakarar- 
ias agrees to help manage and safeguard the nearby 
Arfak Mountains nature reserve. 

It is a kind of religioa. Zakarias has agreed to 
change his behavior in expectation of future reward. 
“Do not clear land for farms in the nature reserve,” 
the conservation commandments say. “Respect the 
national park boundaries and enter not therein ex- 
cept to hum deer with a bow and arrow. And don't 
even think of killing that bird of paradise.” 
Zakarias, like most of us, is mortal. In presen ting 


(me of the birds to the church, perhaps he was 
■seeking to play one religion off against another. 

There are a number of powerful forces at work 
trying to win his allegiance and mold his behavior. 
Tbe Indonesian government, which is controlled 
from Jakarta on the central island of Java, wants to 
make Zakarias a loyal citizen. Protestant preachers 
want to Christianize him. and in so doing add his 
leuor voice to the Sunday choir. 

Industrialists whose companies manufacture 
everything from hair shampoo to jogging shoes 
want to consumerize Zakarias, by making mm feel 
the need for things the Irianese have not needed 
before. Conservationists want to “empower" Za- 
karias, to give him a voice in saving nature — so 
long as it coincides with the way the experts think 
nature works best. 

The four “religions” of church, nationalism, 
business and conservation have achieved signifi- 
cant results in Irian Jaya. For example, some Chris- 
tian missionaries, notably the Catholics, have 
helped to stop cannibalisin and infanticide, have 
established schools and clinics, and have promoted 
water-supply and gardening projects. 

But the conversions are not necessarily deep. 
While many Irianese profess to be Christian in one 
form or another, it is not uncommon for them to 
believe that sitting in church will result in immunity 
from sickness and that forgetting to shut one's eyes 
during prayers will lead to blindness. 

Clearly the soul is a complicated organ. The day I 
was leaving Minyambou, I sought out Zakarias" to 
say goodbye. He admired my watch. Seeing that I 
wasn't about to give it to him. be offered me a trade: 
my Casio for a bird-of-paradise skin. 

I said a prayer for all of us. 

The writer is head of creative development at 
WWF-World Wide Fund for Nature in Switzerland 
and a professional associate at the East-West Center 
in Honolulu, Hawaii. He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


prevail; they merely redistribute 
state finances and do not depend 
on deposits from people or enter- 
prises. Fear of competition has led 
to a ban on foreign banks. 

Agriculture remains in a terrible 
state; not because of a lack of 
equipment, hid or money, but be- 
cause of new relations among pro- 
ducers, consumers and the state. 

A gigantic monopoly, Agroprom, 
is tbe main brake on the develop- 
ment of agricultural production, the 
introduction of private land owner- 
ship and the formation of private 
farms or voluntary collectives. Peas- 
ants of the collective farms still 
turn in produce and receive goods 
in return. The archaic communal 
system of the Russian village, com- 
bined with Agroprom’s socialist 
practices, has become an insur- 
mountable obstacle to reform. 

The powerful agricultural lobby 
mil continue to demand incredible 
subsidies from the state treasury. 

Unlike Western subsidies, Rus- 
sian subsidies go not to farmers but 
to Agroprom, a system without 
analogy in any developed country. 

A truly democratic government 


should be thinking of ways to get 
out of the economy, leaving the 
state only indirect instruments 
of regulation — taxes, credits, cus- 
toms duties. 

But everything suggests that the 
leaders of the powerful economic 
structures will remain active and 
determine tbe political and eco- 
nomic life of modem Russia. Now 
is not the first lime reforms have 
been halted not only by the evil 
intentions of those in power but by 
powerful soda] forces. 

Three such forces predominate 
in Russia. In production, the driv- 
ing force is the mnitary-industrial 
complex. Its primary interest is re- 
ceiving additional payments from 
the state budgeL 

The second force is the collective 
peasantry — debased, used to a 
parasitic life style, thievery and 
shoddy work, supported by the 

r ian bosses. Their only hope is 
the stale. 

The third force is the bureau- 
cracy, 20 million corrupt clerks 
who seek additional opportunities 
for bribes and who form the black 
market. The three forces are 


aligned against the market econo- 
my and democracy. 

The great poet Osip Mandelstam 
coined a phrase for the events in 
Russia in October 1917: “the noise 
of tbe times” — something not very 
clear, bard to distinguish, but pow- 
erful agitating and frightening. 

Today a struggle for power is 
under way. One order is leaving and 
another lias yet to arrive. The noise 
of the times again resounds. What 
will its echo bring this time? Wifl life 
in Russia find a new balance? 

Russia's economic, social and 
political conditions again speak of 
the enormous difficulties of escap- 
ing the vicious circle. 

The state still reigns supreme, 
and the people have yet to show the 
political will to take" a more direct 
road to democracy. 

The writer, a historian, is rector of 
the Russian State University for ttie 
Humanities and a former deputy in 
the U.S.S.R. Congress. This article, 
translated by Antonina Bouis, was 
adapted by The New York Times 
from the March/ April '94 issue of 
Foreign Affairs. 


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International Herald Tribune 
Tuesday ; March /, /W 
Page 8 



* 




Bad Taste Raised to Art Form 


By Suzy Menkes 

Inlemananal Herald Tribune 


M ilan — wdi guess 

who is Italy’s new 
fashion muse? Tonya 
Harding? And even 
she might not turn up on ice in a 
fake leopard crotch-high skating 
skin, fluffy sweater with snow- 
flake sequins, knee-high nylons and 
‘ gilded stiletto heels. 

Those were some of the classier 
looks sent out by Gianni Versace 
for his junior hues. The riot of 
dashing plaids and fake fur, metal- 
lic silver miniskirts and takes on 


MILAN FASHION 

Jackie Kennedy empire shift dress- 
es gave the world's most glamorous 
supermodels the allure of Las Ve- 
gas Keno girls. 

“It's not me, it’s Donatella, die 
brings such an injection of young 
blood," said Versace, crediting the 
show to his sister, who came out 
with him on the shiny white and 
gilded runway of the show tent 
erected at the rear of his palazzo. 

Elevating bad taste to an art 
form is something new for mini- 
malist Milan. But it is a comment 
on the opening shows of the au- 
tumn/ winter season that Versace’s 
Versus and Istanle collections. For 
all their tackiness and vulgarity, 
were the hottest things in town. 

As the international collections 
get under way, there is a sense that 
Italian fashion is losing ground to 
Paris — literally, in the case of 
Rifat Ozbek, who moved his show 
at the 1 1 th hour to the French capi- 
tal In spite of the Versus razzma- 
tazz. the essence of I talian high 
fashion is more than ever upscale 
luxury, impeccable tailoring and 
inventive fabrics. The dothes cany 
customer clout, which is why store 
presidents and buyers flood into 
Milan. Yet the creative edge of Ital- 
ian fashion seems blunted. 

Take Dolce & Gabbana. Aban- 
doning gimmicks and tricks, on 
Sunday the designer duo sent out a 
good dean show, rooted in man- 
nish tailoring softened with fluffy 
mohair, boudfe or velvet Their run- 
way star was no longer Madonna, 
but Isabella Rossellini in early mid- 
dle age. Offer any fashion-con- 
scious woman the simple pantsuits, 
neat A-line skirts or long slim 
dresses in cocktails of fabric and 
she would pounce on the entire 
collection. Tne buyers were salivat- 
ing at the sight of a show that 
reflected what today’s customer 
wants and bridged the credibility 
gap between the runway and the 
real world. 

AD the fashion dements were 
there, shown with a modem atti- 
tude, A slim herringbone tweed coat 
was worn with a jaunty hat and a 
brief skirt in fake fur or fine tweed 
wrapped over pants below a 
cropped sweater. Silver finger rings 
and pointed- toe, high-heel shoes 
made for sleek, modem styling. 
Faced with such a show, it seems 
churlish to complain that where Sle- 
fano Gabbana and Domenico Dolce 
once made fashion happen, now 
they just make fine dothes. 

It was the same story on Monday 
at Bybias, what nice dothes just 
kept on coming. Take a sweep of 
maxi coat, sling it over a cropped 
sweater, a tiny A-line skirt, pale 
tights and knee high boots. Make it 
in silver (Milan’s new discovery. 


Designs by Versace, top, Gucci, left, Dolce <Sc Gabbana. 


but already last year’s trend). Then 
make it in cream. And navy. And 
pead gray. And in mixes of differ- 
ent soft fabrics. The same treat- 
ment was given to short coats, long 
cmdigan jackets and the masenhn- 
c/ feminine pantsuits with cropped 
vest over loose blouse. Change the 
colors, or the fabric, but don’t take 
any risks, except with the space-age 
silver sportswear and a fluty skui 
with tiered pleats. As an exercise in 
softening up trim Italian tailoring, 
it was fine. But the show — right 


down to its not-quite-punk-wigs — 
never took off. 

Bat maybe that is better than 
trying to go hip. Guccfs classics 
were revved up with neckties, pale 
panty hose and Mflan's favorite 
minOrills, not to mention a new 
stiletto-heeled Gucci loafer. And 
foiget natural country colors. Or- 
ange, pink and green flashed out 
for pi ace- mat skirts, cropped 
sweaters and big fluffy sweaters. 

This wacky, tacky, trashy look is 
the hot thing with fashion stylists. 


But what is kit for Gucd to distort 
its image so that a perfectly propor- 
tioned cloud-gray cashmere sweat- 
er is worn by a model dressed to 
look like Lolita on speed? Occa- 
sionally, a good sporty piece was 
left wed alone: a deep-pile alpaca 
coat frith a beaver collar or a sim- 
ple tattersall pantsuit, with culled 
trousers, clearing the ankle, as the 
new classic. Ultra-long jackets with 
minuscule skirts underneath, leath- 
er tricked out with sports logos and 
backpacks with Gucci's signature 
bar-and-bit or bamboo handle 
seemed like a rerun of Chanel's 
takes on streetwise urban style. 

Because the Milan season kicks 
off with designers’ secondary lines, 
the early shows seem like a warm- 
up for the real action later in the 
week. Gianfranco Fenfe stopped by 
his Studio 0001 line, for the indus- 
trial giant Marzotto, to check out 
his sophisticated collection of tai- 
lored pantsuits in windowpane 
checks for day and coral and sunset 
colors for night. 

Valentino — who long since 
moved his show to Paris — showed 
his Oliver tine in Milan. A sure 
hand produced tactile velvet jack- 
ets ana tweed frock coats as wdl as 
deep-pile cabled cardigans and an 
el want, tailored, long camel coat. 
Below the waist, the silhouette 
seemed hazy, with a filmy chiff on 
skirt or floating pants in ombre 
colors fudging the skirt problem. 

Hie schocdgiri look — pleated 
minikilts, gray flannel jackets and 
mixes of plaid — was done with 
conviction by Anna Sui, the Ameri- 
can designer who is consultant to 
Iceberg's Cento per Cento line. For 
Katharine Hamnett, it was the 
Tonya Harding lock again: micro 
miniskir ts in shin y plastic, black 
law panties pecking under gray 
flann el shorts and teeny-tiny kilts 
— all shown with knee-high nylon 
socks and teetering stilettos. Ham- 
nett had the fluffy sweaters that are 
a strong trend. 

Knits can bring a new softness to 
regular collections. 

M issoni sent out the 
current trends, from 
a paneled, flirty 
short skirt to the 
minishif t dress, in its signature pat- 
terned knits, shown with matching 
hose. The best of the rainbow coali- 
tion was when a long coat in this 
season's rich jewel patterns were 
married with something simple. 
Patterned velvets, although not new, 
made a nice evening statement. 

The strength of Italy is also about 
the material worid. Etro’s inimitable 
plays on texture and print this sea- 
son inrfridad nendagtirfll prints OH 
alk or wool gauze, paisley patterns 
for soft cape coats, and changmg-of- 
the-gnard prints to go with a mili- 
tary theme. At Mario Valentino, 
skin games brought soft sheading 
coats with unstructured collars, Mo- 
roccan scroll embroidery or origami 
cutouts on leather as decoration, 
and the ultimate in understated 
chic: suede with a hairy surface 
made to look like tweed. 

The most succinct fashion state- 
ment came from Antonio Fusco. 
His luxurious fabrics were made 
into simple pantsuits or coats as 
soft as a bathrobe, with nothing 
flashy, fancy or tricksy. While most 
shows ran half an hour late and are 
45 minutes long, this was summed 
up in 30 pieces and shown in 15 
minutes, causing Joan Kaner of 
Neunan-Marcus to exclaim: “They 
should all be as fast as that!" 


□uuupfaa Mmr 

New Renaissance’s dollar-bill and newspaper ball gown, left, and Helen Storey’s hipster plaid pants and tailcoat. 

Whimsy Meets Arts and Crafts 


International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Naomi Campbell sa- 
shayed down the runway — the bod- 
ice of her ball gown made from $100 
bills molded in plastic, the petaled 
skirt from overlapping sheets of a financial 
newspaper, 

It was a fashion take on power, money and 
glamour by a wacky British group called The 
New Renaissance. And this work of art, loving- 
ly handcrafted into fashion ephemera, seemed 
to sum up the London shows, which opened the 
international collections for the autumn/ win ter 

LONDON FASHION ■ 

season. London was whimsical, charming, 
mildly intriguing — but a world away from big 
bucks fashion. 

London’s young designers, almost entirely 
art college graduates, are staging an arts and 
crafts movement not so different from that of a 
century ago. Just as William Morris and his pals 
rejected the industrial revolution, so the young 
of the 1990s are turning their back on main- 
stream ready-to-wear fashion. 

There was Abe Hamilton, with appliqued silk 
flowers sewn by hand on long dresses m gauzy 
fabrics and dusty fin -de-si fede mauve and dove- 
gray colors. At liberty, the London store, just- 
out-of-coDegp kids showed creations sprouting 
bleached mohair and gargoyles of rubber. 

Then there were the feathers: caked in clay 
by Alexander McQueen, one of the hot new 
hopefuls; naughty featherspeeking from pant- 
ies at New Renaissance: forty marabou cuffs 
from Bella Freud; and a feathered neck piece in 
the feminisi-torned-feminine clothes by Helen 
Storey. 

“I think there is a shift away from the street 
style that British designers are known for," said 
Hamilton. 32, who trained as a painter. “It is all 
about beautiful clothes in lovely fabrics — 
fashion to fed sexy, sensual and very femi- 
nine." 

The fashion message from the London shows 
was for pants and starts slung low on the hips. 


the better to flash the flesh below a high- 
cropped sweater. (Navds will be on show next 
winter.) 

There was also a move toward the 
line, with Betty Jackson’s thin belts 
jackets high above the waist and John Rocha's 
weird silhouette of high-waisted flared dress in 
bulky tweed. Rocha’s mmi boleros, cropped 
above the host, were a more successful way of 
changing proportions. 

London's forceful knitwear brought clothes- 
for-real to the runway. The news was fluffy 
mohair knits and rugged oatmeal wool. The 
cream of the cropped sweaters came from Ro- 
cha and from Paul Costelloe, whose collection 
of flecied knits mixed with hub tweeds 
brought grown-up dothes to the runway. Jack- 
son also produced knits with a sportswear feel, 
but mixed them in a funky way with low-slung 
jeans or crinoline miniskirts. 

Many London designers are still in the mel- 
ancholic romantic mood that has suffused the 
international underground and produces long, 
dark dreamy dothes. Sonja No nail’s show, with 
the title “Chiaroscuro " was lyrical in that mi- 
nor key, with long, dark sweaters shrouding the 
body mid mixes of textures in black fabrics. 

Storey gave a new romance with a hard edge 
to her collection, with its flower-patterned 
pantsuits, overlaid with transparent plastic, and 
plaids with a sexy kick. 

London’s tailors with a young spirit indude 
Freud, with fresh pink and blue colors, suits 
with flared skirts and knitted outfits. Edina 
Ronay sent out a cheery, upbeat collection 
touching on current trends, from fluffy sweat- 
ers to A-line skirts and space-age silver. 

McQueen’s claim to fame is that he trained at 
a Savfle Row tailor where he made jackets for 
Prince Charles. His show had the wacky spirit 
expected from young London — sweaters with 
a two-lane highway of mesh revealing the bo- 
soms and the new hipster pants slung so low 
that they revealed whai can best be described as 
posterior cleavage. 

Harvey Nichols did its best to hdp British 


fashion’s great shoots. The store staged two 
runway shows, which included long-line but- 
ton-decorated tailoring from Sotmentag Mulli- 
gan (designer duos are a big London thug) and 
Copperwheat Blundell’s messes in mixes of 
fabric, like a knit or velvet top with a woolen 
skirt. 

A N interesting group of designers 
showing in London at the Sl Chris- 
topher's Place shopping precinct 
featured Emma Hope’s dainty shoes 
and Whitaker Malem’s seductive leather cor- 
sets. Many of the young designers will go on to 
show in Paris, while other established British 
designers did not take part in London’s three- 
day event Jean Muir will wait to show in mid- 
March. Helen O’Hagan, viewing London shows 
for Saks Fifth Avenue, praised Behille Sassoon 
and other evening-wear designers who did not 
show on the runway. 

Tomasz Slarzewski, with short perky suits 
and sleek cocktail outfits in crushed velvet was 
the only representative of the Princess Diana 
designer brigade that was once the mainstay of 
London style. 

Hie British Fashion Council under its new 
chairman. Clinton Silver, made a valiant effort 
to get the London Fashion Week together, but 
the leaders of the pack have upped and gone. 
Katharine Hamnett shows in Milan; Rifat Oz- 
bek, Vivienne Westwood, and John Galliano, 
with a capsule collection, will be in Paris. 

London's fashion savior was Vidal Sassoon, 
a crimper who rose to fame along with London 
fashion in the swinging ’60s. He went abroad to 
build his global empire, bat seemed genuinely 
delighted to put something back into his native 
city. 

“I love the freshness and the energy," said 
Sassoon, who viewed the shows with bis wife, 
Rhode “The fashion schools are very good and 
turn out excellent young people, but there is no 
government sponsorship. It made enormous 
sense for us to hdp." 

Suzy Menkes 


BOOKS 


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SANDCASTLES: 

The Arabs in Search of the 
Modern World 

By Milton Viorst. 414 Pages. 
$25. Knopf. 


Reviewed by 
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I N his important new bode. Mil- 
ton Viorst, the author of “Sands 
of Sorrow,' " a sensitive and deeply 
moving historical account of the 



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Palestinian- Israeli conflict, aims at a 
larger goal: apoitrahof theconlem- 
poraiy Arab world as experienced in 
several visits be made over the past 
few years. His intention is not a 
scholarly or a systematic work, but 
rather a weaving together of impres- 
sions and insights of a society that 
he has come to know wdl and to- 
ward which he dearly harbors much 
sympathy and goodwill 

“Sandcastles" is composed of sev- 
eral well-knit pieces originally writ- 
ten for The New Yorker over the last 
decade and a half. It is divided into 
nine chapters, eight of which are 
devoted to seven Arab countries — 
Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Ku- 
wait, Jordan, including Palestine 
(only Iraq is given an additional 


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chapter at the end). Two important 
regions of the Arab worid, the Ara- 
bian peninsula and the Arab Ma- 
ghreb (North Africa), are not in- 
cluded, whDe Turkey, a non-Arab 
Middle Eastern country is. The peri- 
od covered is that of the 1980s into 
the 1990s, with brief forays into the 
recent past to explain various events 
and developments. 

Viorst quotes effectively and at 
length political figures, intellectu- 
als, women, religious leaders and 
ordinary people. In a postscript, 
which brings the narrative up to the 
aftermath of the signing of the I s- 
radi-PLO agreement at the White 
House last September, he provides 
several fresh interviews reflecting 
Palestinian and Arab reactions to 
the breakthrough achieved by se- 
cret negotiations between the Israe- 
lis and the Palestinians. 

The image implicit in the title, 
“Sandcastles," underscores the so- 
cial and political fragility of the 
contemporaiy Arab world. It is a 
weak and divided world composed 
of essentially unstable nation- 
states, ruled by “tyrants and secret 
police and corrupt bureaucracies," 
and states that “have repeatedly 
failed in diplomacy and war." 

Viorel defines Arab col rare as 

3 ireindustriai” and “defensive," 
ways “falling back on old ways in 
response to new challenges." It is a 
confused and feckless culture, 
hopelessly tom between its two op- 
posing forces of “secular despo- 
tism" and “religious fanaticism.” 

Viarat here is pointing to a pecu- 
liar sociopolitical malaise, true not 
only of Arab and Muslim coun- 
tries, but of most neopatriareha! 


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• Kirk Peterson, director of the 
Hartford Ballet, is reading “Strang- 
er in a Strange Land , " by Robert A. 
H einlcrn 

“It’s a book about perception 
and it's very peculiar: a Martian 
who conies to Earth and wonders 
whether the grass is affected when 
he steps on it [ read it to remove 
myself from the realities of what 
Tra doing." 

(Lawrence Malkin, IHT) 



MllrtlUlU 


societies in the Third World — 
transitional societies, no longer 
genuinely traditional nor yet truly 
modem, caught up in the debilitat- 
ing and often paralyzing contradic- 
tions of inherited tradition and 
overpowering modernity. In the 
Arab countries, frustrations of in- 
dependence (arbitrariness of pow- 
er, official corruption, rampant im- 
miserization) and Hu milia tion at 
the hands of the West (the United 
Slates) and Israel (the disposses- 
sion of the Palestinians, the pillage 
of oil resources, the invasion and 
destruction of Iraq) have contribut- 
ed over the last few decides to the 
deep polarization Viorst refers to 
between secularism and Islam. 

But two paints need to be under- 
scored here. The first is that the 
phenomenon of Islamic fundamen- 
talism is not, despite all appear- 
ances, an all-inclusive, monolithic 
movement impelled by mindless 
hatred of the West and committed 
to total violence, but a highly di- 
verse movement composed of dis- 
parate groups with different atti- 
tudes and goals, ranging from 
liberal, nonviolent reform to the 
establishment of (he Islamic state 
by force. Similarly, the secularist 
movement is not to be confused 
with “despotic" secular regimes, 
but must more accurately be seen 
as the rising democratic movement, 
composed of human-rights and 
democratic-freedoms activists. 


feminists, environmentalists, for- 
mer members of Arab nationalist 
and other doctrinal political par- 
ties, opposed both to authoritarian 
governments, as well as to funda- 
mentalist totalitarianism. 

Compared to Islamic fundamen- 
talism. the secular, democratic op- 
position movement in the Arab 
world has received little attention 
in the Weston press; when consid- 
ered. its potential to forestall a fun- 
damentals takeover and to liber- 
alize political life is consistently 
underrated. But the realization is 
beginning to dawn that this move- 
ment may be the last hope of arriv- 
ing at some kind of accommoda- 
tion with Islamic fundamentalism 
in the Arab world, not through sup- 
pression and violence, but through 
dialogue with nonviolent groups 
within the Islamic movement. 

Viorst is not unaware of most of 
these considerations, but his lively 
approach does not lend itself to 
incorporating them in the dry ana- 
lytical style of the cultural histori- 
an. That very approach of his, how- 
ever, adds to, rather than detracts 
from, the tone of this fine, compas- 
sionate and compelling book. 

Hisham Sharabi. a professor of 
history at Georgetown University 
and chairman of the Center for Poli- 
cy Analysis on Palestine in Washing- 
ton. wrote this for The Washington 
Past. . 


By Robert Byrne 

V LADIMIR KRAMNIK faced 
Leonid Yudasin in the Inter- 
national Chess Federation’s elimi- 
nation matches. In Game I of their 
match, the thrust 5~e5 defines a 
Sicilian Defense variation that has 
lately been named after the con- 
temporary Russian grandmaster 
Yevgeni Sveshnikov for his study 
and adoption of it, although it was 
played as early as the mid-19lh 
century. In (he main line, 6 Ndb5 
d6 7 Bg5 a6 8 Na3 b5 9 Bf6 gf 10 
Nd5. Black yields control of the d5 
square for the sake of obtaining the 
bishop-pair plus later counterat- 
tack in the center with _J5. Since 
Black has been successful with this, 
Yudasin chose the calmer offshoot 
with 7 Nd5 Nd5 8 ed, which gives 
up the plan of occupying d5 with a 
piece. 

The strategy is then trans- 
formed: White will try to capitalize 
on his queenside pawn majority 
and Black will aim for an attack on 
the opposite flank. Kramnik chose 
the more aggressive 8...Nc7 and 
9...Nf5 in preference to 8._Nd8 and 
9._Nbd7, which passively looks to- 
ward making the thematic c4 and 
c5 difficult to achieve. The idea is 


KHAMWt/BLXCX 


SICILIAN DEFENSE 



Position after 24 Re 3 

that 9 c4 fails to guard the d4 
square, which will later produce a 
nice black knight outposi 
The trouble with 9 a4 Nf5 10 c3, 
is that White is renouncing the c4. 
c5 attack. Instead. Yudasin devel- 


White 

Black 

Whitt 

Black 

Yndasta 

Kramnik 

Yudasin 

Kramnik 

1 M 

cS 

10 BeS 

Re5 

2 NO 

Nc« 

17 Radi 

MW 

3 to 

od 

IB Khl 

g) 

4 Ndl 

NO 

19 Rgl 

S Nc3 

eS 

20 Bb4 

21 Roe! 


8 NdM 

<K 

Df| 

7 NdS 

NdS 

21 Odfi 

NI5 

Bed 

Ne7 

23 Qc7 

C3 

9 »* 

n a 

24 Re3 

S3 

10 C3 


25 NdS 

11 Bel 

12 00 

Is 

Rtf 

20 NO 

28 gw 

fee 

H DM 

ri 

29 (Jbe 

16 

15 BI4 

BeS 

SOM 

QdS 



31 Resigns 


oped piece pressure against the d6 
pawn with 13 Qb3 and 14 Qb4. 

Rather than play 14 a6 15 Na3. 

which sets up the chance for lb Nc4 
and 17 Nb6 for White, or resort to 
the defensive 14_.Bf8. Kramnik 
went on with 14...e4! just waiting to 
get his hands on 15 g4? by 15._Be5! 
16 gf Qh4 16 f4 ef 17 Rf3 Qh2 18 
Kfl Bf5 19 Be3 (or 19 Rf5 Bg3!) 
Bg3! 20 Rg3 Qg3 21 Bf2 Qh3 22 
Kel Re2L 23 Ke2 Qd3 24 Kel Re8 
25 Be3 Qc3 followed by mate. 

After 15 Bf4 Be5 16 Be5 Re5 17 
Radi, Kramnik fueled his attack 
with 17_.Nh4! ready to deal with 
18 Qd6 bv 18«Qg5 19 g3 Bb3 20 
Rfel Ng2 21 Refl Ne3! 22 fe Qe3 
23 Rf2 Rf5. Also, 18 Nd6 a5! 19 
Qc5 Qg5 20 g3 Bg4! 21 gh sets up 
Bf3 22 hg Rg5 mate. 

Yudasin tried to secure his king 
with 18 Khl Qg5 19 Rgi Bg4 20 
Bg4 Qg4 21 Rdel Qf4 before taking 
the loose pawn with 22 Qd6, but 
Kramnik struck with 22™Nf5 23 
Qc7 e3! and after 24 Re3, he let fly 
with the killing 24„Qe3! 

Yudasin could not accept the 
queen sacrifice with 25 fe because 
of 25...Ng3! 26 hg Rh5 male. Hav- 
ing lost a rook, he should have 
resigned on the spot, but possibly 
piqued, he continued on to 
3Q._Qd5 before giving up. 


To our renders in Austria 

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New Heights for Gambling in Nepal 

By John Ward Anderson while shin with a diamond ring A New Delhi sociologist. Achic tract rnmmMAiMMniiw 


ring A New Delhi sociologist, Ashis tract foreign exchange 10 the coun- 
flpfamg on one hand, the portly Nandy, said poor people often are uy. Nepal Recreation Centers, the 
Mr. Tuttle looked slightly out of avid gamblers “because it gives company that runs the casinos* 
place at a small, stained eating ta- theca a false sense of a chance of a pays a SI million per year royalty 
ble in the Casino Anna. With red lifetime to remedy their situation.” to (he government, which also takes 
velvet cumins draping a cavernous He also noted that experts estimate 35 percent of the pretax profits, 
hall and rock music steering over as much as 40 percent of the Indian according, to Mr. Tuule. 
the sound system, the ambiance economy is underground, meaning He said the business is highly 
wasdefinitely Third World kitsch, that many not-so-poor Indians dependent on tourism, which was 
“This is not a great casino. It's have millions of un taxed blade down 30 percent in Nepal last year, 
nAf * w ' * r — , “ -aiket rupees to wager. largely because of the worldwide 

“They can’t put it m the bank or recession. 

~ J " T ~ J ~ ; While some Nepalese fed they 

should be allowed to gamble as 
well, others said the ban was neces- 
sary because Nepalese are among 
the poorest people in the world, 
with a per capita annual income of 
$170. 

Nonetheless, judging from atten- 
dance at the casinos one recent Sat- 
urday night, many Nepaiis manag e 
to sneak in. 

“I come here when I consume 
whiskey and I'm drunk," said Ma- 

_ . _ hesh Agarawal, a Nepalese ply- 

cc.” becomes devalued and they bunt it wood dealer who visits the caswos 

At the other end of the spectrum up” by gambling, Mr. Nandy said.' about twice a month. Mr. Agarawal 
the Casino Royale, which opened The casinos are also a late-night said that since he is of Indian heri- 
ne months ago in the ballroom of attraction for foreign tourists who lage and does not have the facial 
150-year-old palace. are not used to the early hours kepi features common to many Nepalis, 

Nepalese are prohibited from in Katmandu, which shuts down he gmerafly is not challenged when 
anbKng at the casinos, which ca- around 10 PJvf. entering a casino, 

r primarily to Indian business- “This time of night, it’s the only “A man must be intoxicated, 
en who live in or visit Katmandu place you find open,” said Daniel then it doesn't matter what face be 
id to trekkers from around the Roth, 30, an American who was has,” Mr. Agarawal said. “The casi- 
>rld who generally spend a few playing the slot machines in the nos always welcome people who 
iys in the capital before and after Casino Royale early one morning, have money in their pocket.” 
miring trips in the Himalayas. “1 came in with $7 an hour and a 


massive expansion of gambling acknowledged “But one 
parlors m the capital of a country know as a gambler: If you’ 
belter known for high mmmtat^t 


This is not a great casino. It’s not eyen a 
good casino. But one thing I know as a 
gambler: II you’re a class C horse, you 
don’t run in a class A race.’ 

R.D. Tuttle, entrepreneur 


MOG c 1^.“ rD f rc Psychological than commanding officer. 1 
~ F f r dse - General Thomas Montg 

most i WerC u5 e 80 far * securit y h® 5 001 deterio- monitor Somalia and in 

mostreirftj and powerful symbols rated markedly. Political negotia- Mogadishu, until about 

SJfiilfaJrSS V 1 ***'*' ta i dons between warring claai arc either from a ship or ft 
t ***** continuing, but so is ubiquitous boring Kenya, officials i 

reoomiauBance behcopters are be- banditry and looting. There are fre- The roughly 2,000 N 
mg rapidly and neatly packaged to qnent firefighis in the streets, and ships off the coast will 
. . Somalis walk about carrying AK- remain until some lime i 

m r0W ^ “} e P?* 1 ^ 47 assault rifles and rocket-pro- Aside from the ubiqt 

on the transport ship hkeThanks- pelled grenades. 

giving turkeys, every inch shrink- On Simdav American I 

wranrwvi hv mm,., . . Amen^n ^ 


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bi Luxemburg 
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Emperor’s Brother 
Dies in China at 87 


of the last Qing emperor and one of months. 

China’s final links to its imperial He was the author of more than 
past, died of prostate cancer Mon- 25 books, many poking fun at the 
day. pretenses of wealthy expatriates or 

Bora in Bening in 1907, Pu lie recounting hisyears as a university 
grew up in the final years of the P ro J fes ^L in ChrntL His books to- 
ning Imperial Court, which main- dlude Tic Ljst Media (1932), 
ffiT^toUn^itlost “Monies and [Ponies’* (1941) and a 

control of the country. ^ ^ 

He was the chief playmate for his Sotfs Gymnasium (1982)- 

brother, the boy emperor Pu Yl He ,fk° was a world-renowned 
who was deposed atche ige of 6 by *}. 00 ^ t SL^Sh°^ JP* 8 *5 
the Nationdirtrevolurionof 1911. ^ “f 
The imperial brothers, along 

with legiorEof retainers andasp^ &r wj ho« y ^tors 

dal sraff of eunuchs and concu- *“ch as ChurchiU irnd Pnnce 
bines, renamed toB«pig*s For- Charles, and forged friendships 

hidden City for a fuS?3 years StasES? 

cut off from the world. JiJt a 

Their life of inflexible ritual 

York University to be used fOT in- 
Fnrtim , -juu Tanan's m- temaDonal seminars. Another of 

vJSSShithSJSn930s. 

and PuYi was briefly made emper- Bntisb tasutuj* 
or of the puppet state of Mancfau- Leopold Koflr, cW, 


VfW P - 

Ratfsr 
whiifc 
ar.-' r n 
3K 

went «r~ 


WifCN ‘ 
Kff 3 it > ■ 
B - l-V 

a Bc3 

After 1' 

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the ion*.’ P- J 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 





















U • Baton Lira; IF- Luxembourg Fr anc s ; 

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GLOBAL FUNBOKANAGEMENT 

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Which Way are the Markets Moving? 

THE EXPERTS DEBATE THE TRENDS • BOLDER GRAND HOTEL • ZURICH ■ MARCH 23 & 24 * 1994 

HcralbSSributtc 


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Page 11 


VERTISING SECTION 


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§P®^1 njuly 12,1990, 
W 1 Lafarge Cop- 
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and privatization proceeds. 
These figures are impres- 
sively large - and incom- 
plete. They refer only to the 
initial investments by non- 
German companies under 
the Treuhand's jurisdiction, 
and do not include the fol- 
low up, side-by-side or 
greenfield investments that 
often follow the privatiza- 
tion process. 

Nor do they include, as 
Treuhandan stall President 
Birgit Breuel points out, 
“indirect investment" in the 
region - investments made 
by international companies 
via their German sub- 
sidiaries. 

All this investment has 
been characterized by great 
diversity of activities and 
investors. 

As a rule, outside invest- 
ment in any particular coun- 
try is lopsided, concentrat- 
ed on a limited number 
quick-return areas: raw ma- 
terials extraction, import- 
export and real estate. 

The opposite trend is de- 
veloping in Germany's new 
states. Mecklenburg- West- 
ern Pomerania is a good ex- 
ample. According to the lat- 


est and by no means com- 
plete count, this relatively 
rural, sparsely populated 
state has attracted 133 ma- 
jor investors from 14 coun- 
tries. These foreigners are 
involved in literally every 
aspect of business life in the 
state. 

A Guatemalan company 
forwards ocean-bound 
freight from the Port of Ro- 
stock. One of its neighbors 
is an Icelandic-owned fish- 
ing operation. 

Thirty-five kilometers to 
the south, in the town of 
Glisrrow. a Greek-run kit- 
chen furnishings and fit- 
tings manufacturer. Yianni 
Sy stema/Mecklenbu rg-Kii - 
chen Gustrow GmbH, has 
become one of the rising 
stars in Eastern Germany's 
business scene. 

France's Gervaise 
Danone produces yogurt in 
child-sized containers in 
Hagenow; Switzerland's 
NestlS, baby food in 
Malliss/Conow. Other 
items produced by the 
state's “foreigners" range 
from ships (Kvaemer’s 
works in Wamemunde) and 
sugar (Danisco's refineiy in 
Anklam) to CDs (a Swiss- 
owned company in Witten- 



Bnsiness and leisure travelers are welcome in Germany's new stares (left): a new economy is being built up throughout the region (right). 


burg), potable tap water (the 
French-led Eurawasser in 
Rostock), advanced phar- 
maceuticals (Swedish- 
owned MTN Medizin- 
technik in Neubrandenbuig) 
and recycled plastics 
(Aquarius, a Dutch-owned 
company, located in Fried- 
land). 

The individual companies 
are as heterogeneous as the 
corporate sector they com- 
prise. Konstantinos Chrys- 
santhakopoulos. Yianni' s 
chairman, describes the 
communication with Man- 
aging Director Peter Bobzin 
as “a little bit choppy, but 
effective." This is not par- 
ticularly surprising, since 
the executives communi- 
cate in neither Greek nor 
German, their respective 


native languages, but in 
English. 

11115 heterogeneity ex- 
tends far beyond means of 
communication. Mr. Chrys- 
santhakopolous came ro 
Gustrow with a detailed 
knowledge of Europe’s fur- 
niture and financial mar- 
kets. and virtually no ac- 
quaintance with local oper- 
ating conditions. His mix of 
experience and inexperi- 
ence neatly complemented 
that of the senior managers 
at Mecklenburg-Kuchen 
Gustrow GmbH, the com- 
pany he acquired from the 
Treuhandan stall in Decem- 
ber 1992. 

Peter Bobzin's team had 
already done some valuable 
preliminary work in reorga- 
nizing the company's prod- 


uct and production lines and 
distribution system. “Our 
new investor brought us 
some key things we had 
been missing - the money 
and expertise ro take on 
world markets," says Mr. 
Bobzin. 

A simple factor explains 
why these companies are so 
polyglot: thanks to the 
Treuhandanstalt’s indefati- 
gable. worldwide privatiza- 
tion marketing activities, 
the investment process has 
been speeded up by a factor 
of ten. A decade or more 
generally elapses between a 
company's initial founding 
of a foreign outlet and its fi~ 
nal upgrading into a full- 
fledged production opera- 
tion. Items emerging from 
this facility are often “im- 


ports'* - internationally 
proven products manufac- 
tured for local markets. 

During this decade, local 
managers have been 
schooled in Lhe ways and 
languages of their interna- 
tional parent companies: in- 
ternational executives have 
attended language schools 
and “multicultural manage- 
ment methods" courses. 

The new owners of for- 
mer Treuhand companies, 
however, are “instant in- 
vestors.” Their orientation 
period was denominated in 
minutes and days, not 
months or years. There was 
no phasing-in of operations. 
Existing businesses had to 
be kept in operation while 
new technologies were in- 
troduced and new products 


developed. “A yours, mine, 
ours approach" is how an 
Italian investor recently de- 
scribed the multicultural 
operating style emerging at 
his company’s East Berlin- 
based pharmaceuticals sub- 
sidiary. 

All in all, it has been an 
exciting, if not always easy, 
time. non-German investors 
report. “The challenge of 
living up to my agreements 
with the Treuhand while 
meeting the expectations of 
my investors back home, 
and at the same time doing 
business in a new environ- 
ment, has been quite mem- 
orable.” says Otto Sflberg, 
chairman of the board of 
Kvaemer Wamow Werft, 
the Rostock-based Norwe- 
gian-East German hybrid. 


A GROWING NON-GERMAN PRESENCE IN GERMANY'S NEW STATES 


State-of-the-Art Chips: Thesys 


rrofeS 


\T 



Forelgn-led privatizations 


Inv. funds committed 
On billions of 
Deutsche marks) 


Jobs guaranteed 
On thousands) 






••• 



*•' • ■ ■ •»••»•»• . • . •'.V'* V ' .. •P. /»</%. > I' •' ' 

!. -e'jf r:* • "7 •v.v Lr-v •* " 


Successful Shipbuilding: Kvaerner 


any observers 
j m in 1990 and 

P % # B early 1991 di- 

faMaJ vided Eastern 
Germany’s economy into 
three types of sectors as 
the dimensions of its re- 
structuring needs became 
apparent: “easy,’' “diffi- 
cult” and “impossible" to 
privatize. 

The shipbuilding sector, 
located on Mecklenburg- 
Western Pomerania’s Baltic 
coast, made everyone’s 
“impossible” list. The rea- 


But in August 1991. a 
group of business execu- 
tives from the Kvaemer 
group arrived in Mecklen- 
burg-Western Pomerania. 
Kvaemer. Norway's largest 
privately owned company, 
had recently made a major 
move into shipbuilding 
from its traditional focus on 
power generation, mechani- 
cal engineering and paper 
production. Within the short 
space of three years. 
Kvaemer had become one 
of the world’s largest - and 


Wamemunde. “Our compa- 
ny had been looking for an 
on -market base in Central 
Europe for some time,’* he 
says, “and the invitation 
from the Treuhandanstalt 
and the state government of 
Mecklenburg-Western Po- 
merania came at the right 
moment." 

In October 1991, after 
considering another ship- 
yard, Kvaemer selected the 
Wamow yards in 
Wamemunde, Rostock's 
port. Wamow had a long 



V 


I&.-T. * 


.... t:v,- 

- “ " T-"- . ' • 


’v V r W 




Shipbuilding in Mecklenburg- 

soning: world markets were 
slutted with .ships, and even 
Richly efficient, ultramod- 
ern shipyards «n Western 
Europe were registering 
losses, so who would want 
to acquire these massive, 
outdated yards . 


Western Pomerania: a long history of successful projects. 

most profitable - ship- and honorable past - some 
bu iiders. 360 deep-sea ships had 

According to Otto So- been built there since 1957. 
berg chairman of the board In January 1992, Kvaer- 
of management of Kvaemer ner began negotiating with 
Wamow Werft. there was the Treuhandanstalt. After a 
no secret about why generous package of debt 
Kvaemer had come to and environmental-liability- 


assumption funds had been 
put together by the agency, 
the state of Mecklenburg- 
Western Pomerania and the 
federal government, the 
transfer of the company's 
ownership was finalized in 
October 1992. 

“Anywhere 1 look, all I 
see is a construction site,” 
says Mr. Soberg. This con- 
struction activity, which be- 
gan in the summer of 1993. 
involves the revamping of 
80 percent of the facilities 
on the 900,000 square me- 
ter (9.6 million square foot) 
site. 

The heart of the “new” 
Wamow shipyards will be a 
state-of-the-art partially 
covered dry dock, 320 me- 
ters long. All told, Kvaemer 
has allocated some 500 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks 
($285.7 million) to the pro- 
ject. 

While all this is going on. 
ships are still being built in 
Wamow's “old” yards, 
which are currently pro- 
cessing orders for seven 
vessels. 

“Our timetable calls for 
production in the new ship- 
yards to begin in 1 995 and 
our first ships ro be com- 
pleted in April 1996” says 
Mr. Soberg, adding: “And 
as we’ve met every dead- 
line up until now, 1 can’t see 
any reason why we won't 
make this final one. We'll 
be bringing out advanced- 
model ships: a double- 
hulled tanker, a large-sized 
bulk carrier, a container car- 
rier and an LPG [liquid pe- 
troleum gas] carrier.'' 


hesys is a model 
company, with 
model products 
and model 
management. Its first 
commercial product, 
“TbeVideo,” has just been 
introduced to the multi- 
media market. 

TheVideo is a chip that 
equips PCs with low-cost 
video display and process- 
ing capacities. It has already 
been hailed as "one of 
I994’s can’t-miss products" 
by German trade papers. 

In November, the compa- 
ny's managing directors, 
Hans-Jurgen Straub and 
Claudio Loddo. were 
awarded Forbes Germany’s 
prize for management 
excellence in Germany's 
new states. 

The Erfurt-based compa- 
ny is a role model in anoth- 
er way. It provides an ex- 
ample of how private-sector 
know-how and public-sec- 
tor support, international 
outreach and home-grown 
talents can be fused into a 
single entity. Chip manufac- 
turer LSI Logic, headquar- 
tered in Milpitas. California, 
holds a 19.8 percent stake in 
Thesys' equity. The rest is 
owned by Landesbank 
Hessen-Thuringen. a public- 
sector bank, on behalf of the 
state of Thuringia. 

The history of Thesys’ 
privatization also serves as a 
model - a model of unwa- 
vering perseverance in the 
face of many obstacles. It 
took several attempts by the 
Treuhandanstalt and the 
slate of Thuringia in addi- 


tion to a change in the 
world’s electronics markets 
and two and a half years of 
patient funding to put 
Thesys Gesellschaft fQr 
Mikroelektronik mbH (its 
full name) together. 

Supporting the current 
growth in the global chip 
market - production is to 
rise by 10 percent this year 
- is a greatly increased 
demand for new-gene ration 
smart-cards and mobile tele- 
phone systems. 

In 1990, there was a glut 
of chips on the market, and 
Western producers were let- 
ting Asian companies domi- 
nate the sector. Even such 
well-established American 
market-makers as Intel and 
Motorola were losing 
ground. A new European 
producer, especially one in 
East Germany, was the last 
thing in which the world 
market was interested. 

In early 1990, Claudio 
Loddo. then general manag- 
er for Europe/Intemational 
of LSI Logic, was ap- 
proached by representatives 
of PTC GmbH, as Thesys 
was known then. “They 
wanted to purchase some 
items from us," says Mr. 
Loddo, a 44-year-old native 
of Sardinia. “I went to Er- 
ftirt, looked ar their facilities 
and was impressed by what 
1 saw." 

Erfurt had been a prime 
site of East Germany’s lav- 
ishly expensive venture into 
chip manufacturing. In an 
effort to preserve this ven- 
ture’s legacy - a stock of 
advanced capital goods and 


technical skills - the gov- 
ernment of the new state of 
Thuringia and the 
Treuhandanstalt were gen- 
erously funding PTC’s 
upgrading. 

Early in the privatization 
phase, the region's econom- 


Loddo - had a clear percep- 
tion of its market niche: 
high-value-added ASICs 
(application specific inte- 
grated circuits) using propri- 
etary designs. In 1993. 
Thesys recorded a turnover 
of 30 million Deutsche 






A vision of the future: this company concentrates on chips. 


ic authorities deemed the 
saving of Eastern 
Germany's microelectronics 
industry a “must." Thesys 
was one of the final prod- 
ucts of their efforts to pro- 
mote the industry's growth. 

On October 22, 1993. the 
new company launched 
operations. Its management 
- which now included the 
recently recruited Mr. 


marks ($17.1 million). 

“It was a year of reorga- 
nizing and .getting started? In 
the face of fierce competi- 
tion, we secured 40 differ- 
ent chip-design develop- 
ment orders in 1993. This 
year is when we really take 
on international markets," 
says Mr. Loddo. who fore- 
casts a doubling in sales for 
1994. 


- Until recently, power supply 
was a closed shop in 
countries, a no-go sector forfor- 
eign companies. The European 
Union has been striving to break: 
Tap these cfe facto monopolies for 
toe last decade. • 

• On December 8, 1 993, an. impor- 
tant breakthrough was achieved. 
M1BRAC (Mitteldeutsehe Braun- : 
fcohtengeselJschaft mbH) -was priva- 
tized. Located in southern Saxony- 
Anhafi. MIBRAG is one of- Eastern • 
Germany‘s iwo largest suppliers of 
lignite, and operates three industrial - 


power ptecas. MIBRAG’s new own- 
ers are an An^^Anterk^ consar- : 
tiiim comprised of NR0 JGnergy 
(one .qftoe United :5tare$’25 largest 
power-plant, operators), PowerGen 
(one of tfae'tfohed Kingdom’ s -two- 
recertify privafesdelecmcity suppli- 
ers.) and the Morris Knudsen . 


ca) aid power engineering compa* 

The consortium is to spendU bil- 
lion Deutsche marks <$?42& : mif- 
lton):iwer the next iG years to mod- 
ernize mining operations and outfit 


toe power plants with state-of-the- 
art scrubbers and' other emission-, 
reducing equipmentAt feast' % JOG. 
jobs will also be created, • 

The clean-tip factor is. in one .' 
sense, toe crux of the deaf. .Lignite is 
.abundant in Germany's new states* 
and -has long been a - source of 
employment, power - and- pollution. 
Thanks tothkiKivaiK^equ^ment. 
which reduces noxious emissions by 
' 50 percent to 95 percent (depending 
caute poHutant). lignite will contin- 
ue tofwi power piants ond the focal 
economy. 


Thisadvertising section 


don was produced in its entirety by t be; supplement* division of the inusTiajic^ a£ * verl ^?: 
















Page 12 


Germany’s new states are mov- 
ing in the right direction. Powered 
by the collective and individual 
efforts of the region’s residents, 
eastern Germany’s economic struc- 
tures are being transformed. One 
major part of this transformation 
has been effected by the Treuhand- 
anstalt, which has privatized thou- 
sands of centrally-controlled eco- 
nomic units since summer, 1990, 
when the agency launched its main 
operative phase. Before the ultimate 
goal of creating a functional free 
market economy in Germany’s new 
states has been achieved, many 
obstacles have to be overcome. The 
region’s companies are still con- 
tending with slumps in their tradi- 
tional markets in both eastern and 
western Europe. The companies 
themselves are undergoing the 
rigors of top to bottom revampings 
of their production facilities and 
operating technologies. Carrying 
this out has involved the highest 
degree of toil and personal sacrifice. 
Many persons have been con- 
fronted with the loss of their jobs 
and with corresponding periods of 
unemployment, others with the 
challenge of learning a new profes- 
sion. Despite this, one fact remains 
of central pertinence: the transfor- 
mation has gotten off to a solid start. 
The region’s newly-recreated eco- 
nomy is generating products and 
services well capable of competing 
successfully on international mar- 
kets. This fact is documented by the 
figures for sales made by the 
region’s individual economic sec- 
tors. The worst is over for eastern 
Germany’s economy, a time of 
growth is at hand. 

Focus on: 

TLG and property 

The Treuhandanstalt has the 
world’s largest portfolio of real 
estate. This portfolio is managed 
by the TLG, a Treuhandanstalt 
subsidiary, and comprises every- 
thing from downtown la sites to 
exurban business properties with 
quick access to divided highways 
and rail lines. The TLG’s portfolio 
also includes palaces, lakeside 
plots and properties on the Baltic 
Sea. For the innovative investor, 
the TLG has something special 
to offer: “Amerika”, 28 acres of 
riverfront property featuring an 
historic textile mill and related 
facilities and grounds. 

A full-service provider, the TLG 
is headquartered in Berlin and 
maintains offices in all five of 
Germany’s newstates.These offices 
are staffed by professionals with 
an in-depth knowledge of local 
real-estate markets. 

Compensation packages were 
provided to those experiencing - a 
sadlyunavoidable -loss of theirjobs. 
Both these packages and job-crea- 
tion programs were often made 
possible by large expenditures of 
Treuhandanstalt funds. Despite all 
the changes taking place in the 
region’s companies, they have never 
stopped investing in the future and 
in tomorrow’s human capital. Some 
6.8 % of all persons working at the 
region’s companies are trainees - an 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 


* 



average exceeding those in western 
Germany. 

The industrial sector in Ger- 
many’s new states has registered a 
further rise in output. Companies 
privatized by the Treuhandanstalt 
over the past three years have 
played a major role in causing this 
“marked increase in the level of 
industrial activity in the new states", 
as it is being termed by leading 
German economic institutes. This 
industrial sector is not only growing 
in both size, but also in sophisti- 
cation. One prominent example: 
plans are being finalized to produce 
ultra-high performance chips in 
Saxony. Siemens intends to capi- 
talize on the Dresden region’s years 
of experience in manufacturing 
advanced electronic components 
when undertaking these production 
activities. The Treuhandanstalt has 
helped sustain the area’s manufac- 
turers during their time of transi- 
tion. 

Other prominent example of the 
region’s companies taking on highly 
competitive world markets is in 
Thuringia, where Carl Zeiss Jena 
and its associates have developed 
new ranges of optical and micro- 
electronic products and sensoric 
instruments. Underpinning this 
new start is a new operational pro- 
ductivity in the companies involved. 

Another example is in Mecklen- 
burg-Western Pomerania’s ship- 
building sector, long a traditional 
activity on the Baltic coast. New- 
comers to ranks of the state’s ship- 
builders (but by no means to the 
international shipbuilding market) 
are Kyaemer, the Norwegian com- 
pany, and Hanse Holding, part of 
the Bremer Vulkan group. 

EKO is a steel-manufacturing 
company located in Eisenhiitten- 
stadt, Brandenburg. Its future has 
just been resolved. Italy’s Riva 
group will acquire a majority stake 
in EKO and will manage its oper- 
ations. 

The new states’ industrial trans- 
formation has been especially 
pronounced in Saxony-Anhalt’s 
“Chemical Triangle”, which is lo- 
cated between the cities of Halle 
and Merseburg. One of the facilities 
issuing from this sweeping change 
is a new refinery located in Leuna 
and belonging to France’s Elf- 
Aquitaine. 

These are just a few of the 47,000 
privatizations already facilitated by 
the Treuhandanstalt. 

As of January, 1994, the Treu- 
handanstalt’s portfolio contained 
less than 300 companies still seek- 
ing private-sector ownership. This 
relatively small number does not, 
however, by any means indicate that 
the agency is running out of things 
to do. 

Quite the opposite. The Treuhand- 
Liegenschaftsgesellschaft mbH 
(TLG) is the agency’s highly-active 
real estate arm. One of the factors 
boosting the growth of a broad- 
based corporate sector in Ger- 
many’s new states has been the 
corresponding rapid development 
of its real estate market. The TLG 
and its partner companies have 
played - and are playing - a major 
role in creating and farther develop- 
ing this market. 



Privatization: the path to a private sector 

14,000 


10,000 


5.000 


1,000 


In 1990, the Treuhandanstalt assumed the responsibility for more than 8,000 economic 
units, which had formed part of East Germany’s centrally planned economy. Through 
deconcentration and split-offs, some 13,000 independently-run companies were created. 
As of the beginning of 1994, some 300 companies were still awaiting privatization. 



The Treuhandanstalt’s balance sheets 
in 1990/91 and in 1992 

DM 

opening balance 
sheet 1.7.90 

corrected 
opening balance 
sheet 1.7.90 

balance 
as of 
31.12.91 

balance 
as of 

31. 12. 92 

ASSETS 

in DM 

in DM 

in DM 

in DM 

A. Property transferred to theTreuhand under the Trusteeship 

million 

million 

million 

million 

Act (“Treahandgesetz") and the German- German 





Agreement on Unification (“Einigungsvertrag”) 





I. Equity held 

78,909 

77,836 

45368 

33,004 

II. Mining property 

1,387 

U88 

982 

466 

HI. Agricultural land and forestry properties 

16,063 

15,959 

15,310 

14,661 

IV. Other non -financial assets 

5,772 

6,053 

5331 

5328 

V. Claims against Treuhand companies 





claims arising from liabilities for equalization 





accruing in accordance with § 25 DM BilG 





(Germany’s law on balance sheets) 

6,177 

5,544 

2,712 

954 

loans to partners 

5,667 

8,250 

8.366 

8,669 

B. Other assets held by the Treuhand 





I. Fixed assets 





Intangible assets 



4 

4 

Tangible fixed assets 



63 

84 

Financial assets 



0 

501 

II. Current assets 





Goods on band 

213 

213 



Receivables and other assets 





a. Due from privatization agreements 



5,832 

3,910 

b. Due from Treuhand companies 



80 

416 

c. Due from affiliated companies 



2 

98 

d. Other assets 

25 

25 

688 ■ 

1349 

Securities 




1 856 

checks, cash on hand and at banking institutions 

18 

18 

301 

247 

C. Accruals and deferrals 



0 

186 

D. Deficit 

209,291 

235,015 

246385 

250318 

Sum totals 

323322 

350301 

331,824 

321^51 . 


Id upswing 



i 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 




Page 13 I 


(east): 

uhadanstalt has 

t thieourse 


e sector 



w .r 


be pr-* -I 



An upswing in production 


■ 

jBjfl 



H 



coBstmction 


basic and 
producers’ goods 


50% 


1990 ' 1991 1 1992 ' 1993 

This is a graphical presentation of the net industrial production in Germany's new 
states. The point of reference (100%) is July - December, 1990. As the chart indicates, 
the individual sectors have experienced divergent paths of development. The con- 
struction sector is growing explosively; the region’s capital goods producers are still 
suffering from the crumbling of markets in eastern Europe. 


ttt 1 -: 




W 

>59 

»* 


H4 


»> 


2$ 

it 




DM 

corrected 

balance 

balance 


opening balance 

opening balance 

as of 

as of 


sheet 1.7.90 

sheet 1.7. 90 

31.12.91 

31.12.92 

LIABILITIES 

in DM 

in DM 

in DM 

in DM 


million 

million 

million 

million 

A. Reserves 





I. Reserves constituted to provide for the restructuring 





of properties held 





for financial expenditures resulting from recapitalization 

30,573 

38,292 

24,709 

15385 

for reorganization and for privatization, including 

165,805 

190,007 

161,558 

131,669 

liquidation and settlement 

for assignment of assets to municipal and regional 

18,918 

17,720 

11,369 

6356 

authorities and to original owners (reprivatization) 

II Reserves constituted to provide for transfer 

0981 

9,992 



and compensation claims 

9,992 

10,771 

HI. Rennes providing for commitments to compensate 





for loss of property value, constituted according to 
Gerinany’s law on property 

14,950 

10,400 

10399 

9,646 

IV Reserves providing for commitment to make interest 

17,535 

15,233 

14,098 

6,450 

payments to the credit settlement fund 

V. Reserves for pension payments and similar obligations 

VL Other reserves 

6,504 

5,784 

10 

5392 

17 

5362 

B. liabilities 




17,038 

I. Loans . . 

II Liabilities to credit-dispensing insulations 
portion attributable to liabilities assumed 
in Liabilities arising front privatirationagieenienls 

39,893 

44,440 

74,401 

49,922 

96,838 

56,682 



3 

111 

£ Sea arising trim, privets deBvemd and 



56 

90 

services rendered 



V ' HESS cto£To7 common arising 

“24 DM BAG (Germany’s law on balances) 

14,546 

1,817 

17,029 

1,404 

15,534 

3315 

15,076 

5,459 

jsssr.— — 

6 

1,082 

115 

1376 

VIL O titer liabilities 



92 

r_ Accruals and deferrals — 




Sum totals — 

323,522 

350301 

331,824 

321,851 


The Bodenverwertungs- und Ver- 
waltungsgesellschaft (BWG) is 
charged with a dminis tering the 
agency’s portfolio of 3.7 milli on 
acres of agricultural land and 2 
million acres of woods. In financial 
year 1992/93, the BWG concluded 
9,412 lease agreements; for 1993/94, 
more than 6,700. 

The Treuhandanstalt’s contract 
management department is also 
quite busy managing its nearly 

30,000 “charges”. The department’s 
job is to ensure that the agency’s 
contractual partners adhere to these 
agreements. On a contract by con- 
tract basis, the department super- 
vises compliance with such items 
as number of jobs guaranteed and 
investment commitments. All told, 
the Treuhandanstalt’s contracts 
now involve DM 45 billion in pro- 
ceeds from privatization, guaran- 
tees of 1.5 million jobs and commit- 
ments to invest DM 180 billion. 

Another of the Treuhandanstalt’s 
major, ongoing responsibilities is 
returning property expropriated by 
the East German government to the 
region’s districts and large-sized 
cities. To date, local governments 
have placed 76,978 applications for 
the return of such items as airports, 
street car lines, daycare centers and 
sports facilities. Of those applica- 
tions, more than 31,000 have already 
been processed and resolved. 

An onerous responsibility 
remains the administration of the 
“special property” formerly in the 
possession of the “Commercial 
Coordination” department of the 
East German security forces and of 
that previously owned by the coun- 
try’s Communist party and related 
organizations. This responsibility 
has an especially vexing dimension. 
These assets, presumably worth bil- 
lions of marks, must be first tracked 
down. 

Three thousand companies had 
reached the point where their 
reorganization and recapitalization 
was no longer possible. These com- 
panies had to be closed down. 
However, by selling individual 
operations or assets, liquidators 
employed by the Treuhand have 
been successful in securing more 
than one third of all jobs at these 
companies. The majority of these 
liquidations won’t be concluded 
within the immediate future. 

When its companies have been 
privatized, the story of the “Treu- 
handanstalt” - in its present form - 
will come to an end. Its objective 
was and remains to put itself out of 
business. The Treuhandanstalt has 
submitted proposals to Germany’s 
law-makers on ways to restructure 
the agency’s operations in the post- 
privatization phase. Now it’s up to 
the law-makers to decide. 

This transition of operations has 
been scheduled for the end of 1994. 
The Treuhandanstalt will bequeath 
a sound financial situation to its suc- 
cessors. Balance sheets have been 
compiled and audited, reserves 
have been formed for future even- 
tualities. Money spent bythe agency 
went to secure jobs and the future of 
the Treuhandanstalt’s companies. 

In doing this, the Treuhand- 
anstalt COUld not avoid making 
mistakes. District attorneys are 


currently prosecuting a number of 
cases. These will then be brought 
for resolution in courts of law. The 
Treuhandanstalt is actively support- 
ing the prosecuting authorities in 
their efforts to combat this form of 
white-collar crime. 


The TLG in facts 
and figures 

- The TLG currently has some 

70,000 properties in its port- 
folio. 

- 980 persons are employed at its 
headquarters and at its fifteen 
offices. 

The track record 1991 to 1993 
Some 25,400 properties have 
been privatized, resulting in 
proceeds of DM 14 billion, invest- 
ment commitments of DM 39 
billion and the guaranteeing of 

240,000 jobs. 


A broadly-based private and pub- 
lic sector coalition is currently pro- 
moting purchases of products and 
services from Germany’s new states. 
Participating in this program is one 
way to assist the persons in Ger- 
many’s new states in their efforts 
to transform their economic system. 


Your questions for the 
Treuhandanstalt. 


Fax your queries to 
(+49-30) 31541033. 


I I would like more information on 

[ CD the Treuhandanstalt’s entire 
range of activities 

HD the Treuhandanstalt’s 
finances 

□ companies still awaiting 
privatization 

HD the sales campaign on behalf 
of companies in Germany’s 
new states 

HD TLG and property 

HD business opportunities 

provided by the region’s small 
and medium-sized companies 


. Our address: 

, Treuhandanstalt 
I Public Relations 
I Detlev-Rohwedder-Haus 
| Leipziger Strasse 5-7 
| D-10100 Berlin 

L 


J 


Treuhandanstalt 









Page 14 



k Donwr 


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26ft 

9 A GtanCR 


2JJ 

1/ 

21 

8 

17W lOftGJcWatr 



26 

5 

IBM 

19ft 15WGtatttt 

30 

61 

26 

230 

17 


34 


17ft 14ft GK&ml n 
3ft 2 Govideo 
17ft 8ftGidStorn 
1 ftGkTFld 
IS fiftGtdSam* 
30ft25ftGorfitiP5 -72 
14ft lav* Graham 
3ft 1VU Grange 
7ft 4 Stem 
22ft TftGrvvUie 
33ft 13ftGrS*nec 
6ftl"' B GrctnB 
411*, 2ftGHCdag 
3ft iftGHCdapr 
4ft SftGuUUb 
I2V, AftGuncfe 

7 ftviHAL 
9 4ft Halifax 

10ft 7V,HalEP 
3ft I HalIRty 
9 SftHMsev 
Tft 5ftHamotl 
16ft 13ft HmpUl 

8 SftHonoOr 
7ft ZftHonvDir 

“/„ VaHOTWtB 

lift, WnHarkan 
5 2ftHartyn 

9 Sft Harold 
Zlft 2ftHtr*ort 

lft ftiHaruirv 
40 V* 29ft Hasbro 
Sft 2 Wh Hash wt 
34*424 Hireling 
4ft PftHOhOl 
17ft 7fttflthMors JO 
13ft VmHHHPto 
S ft lftHBtlAm 
Bft 3V«HdnWr 
Tft ift-HeflanM 
21 Vb ftHelmR* 

121* 69* Hernia 
22ft TftHngMd 
2ft lftHaJco 
38 ft 25ft HoHyCb 
1 7ft lift HmeOH 
IT SUHondo 
15ft 9 Hoopt-0 
3ft 1 HousBio 
18ft lOftHovnEn 
13ft SftHawMk 
16ft TftHudGn 


_ _ 188 

— T9 TO 

~ _ 43 

_ _ 121 

_ 15 202 

2 A 18 136 

- 33 63 

_ _ 347 

_ 36 52 

- 26 274 

- _ 373 

_ _ 28 

- - 613 

- - 21 
_ _ 2 

- 32 133 
_ _ 190 

_ 2J 14 10 

JOalaO 16 47 

- - 354 
~ - 186 

.84 r 132 _ 13 

zjaeisj is 

- 125 155 

_ 39 407 
_ _ roi 
-. 138 590 
_ 12 33 

J7I11J 20 58 

- - 147 
„ _ 1 

28 J 16 254® 


M 


12 _ 
_ 6 
12 IS 


- - 34 

29t 42—31 

_ - 1481 

- - 26 
20a - - 34S 

- - 399 
25e1X3 B 1 
JO M 9 29 


- _ 11 
22 23 85 

- - 10 
_ 18 222 
_ _ 193 
_ _ 5 


18ft 9ft 10 ‘ft 
16ft 16ft 16ft —ft 
5ft 5ft 5V* ‘ft 
29ft 281* 29ft —ft 
Sft 4ft Sft ‘ft 
4ft 4 4ft ‘ft 
18 17ft 18 *ft 

!S* 'f • — 

2ft Zft 
>Vu >Vm - 
12ft 12ft ‘ft 
25ft 26 +M 
7ft 8 ♦'* 

16ft 16ft —ft 
16ft 16ft —ft 
14ft 15ft 
2ft Zft— ft 
15 15ft ‘ft 
ft. ft ‘ft 
TOft 10ft — ft 
27 27ft ‘ft 
12ft 12ft • 

Tf* T*t „ 
6%* 6ft ♦!* 
10'/. 10ft —ft 
27ft 27ft 
lft lift, _ 
3** 3ft, ‘ft, 
2Wu Tft. _. 
44* 4ft - 
TV, 7ft _ 
PVi, 21* ‘ft, 
84* 8ft ‘V* 
7ft 8 

I'ft, 2ft +V B 
3<ft, 3ft —ft 
Bft 64* ‘ft 
13ft 13ft - 
5ft Aft ‘ft 
«V* 64* „ 

ft ft TSt 

4ft 4V* _ 

Tft 7ft —ft 

3 3ft ‘ft 
ft ft _ 

J4ft 35ft ‘ft 

4 4ft ‘ft 

34 34 ‘M 

Sft 3ft - 
17ft 17ft _ 

Wu 1 ‘ft* 

Bft Bft —ft 
«k, «A. «ft 


15ft 

3ft 

15ft 

4* 

10ft 

274* 

13ft 

Zft 

6ft 

10ft 

27ft 

% 

7ft 

24* 

8ft 

8 

W, 


JO 


Bft 

I3H 

6ft 

Bft 

1% 

ft 

ft 

35ft 

4ft 

34 

4ft 

174* 

1V„ 

3V„ 

6ft 

4ft 

lft 

Tft 

19 

19* 

29'/, 

12ft 

Tft 

12ft 

3ft 

13ft 

74* 

16ft 


Tft Tft ‘ft 
18ft 184* —ft 
lft 1ft - 
28ft 29ft ‘ft 
124M 12ft ‘ft 
7ft Tft _ 
12ft 12ft ‘ft 
3ft 3ft ‘ft 
13 13 —ft 

Tft 74* *ft 
16V* 16ft —ft 


7ft 4ft, tCH 
19ft 15ft KHpt 
5ft 3 fCNBkt 
12ft 7ft LG 1 
Tft, IV, Went lx 

16ft Bftlmnffly 

39 339*lmpOnO 
5ft 2ft Incxtar 
lift 7ftlncyten 
lift 9WlnetMlct 
lft VulrrtDtt 
14ft 9ftlnslran 
2Sft 5ftlntaicm 

2ft IftintibSys 
6ft 29*hTCJPd 
Bft 3Vj,lnt*rtHo 
22 ft iftwtrman 
21 4* 10ft Intoun g 
Bft 3ft InFnY wt 
l¥u ftlntMovte 
7 ’a 25*intMur 
4ft IftlntPwr 
Tft 3ft IRIS 
Bft 4 RnTThr 
Tft SftlriThrel 
7ft 4V,lntxlGC 
2ft ftlntmrstm 
ft Vuintrsy W> 

16ft TftlnfPty o 
371*21 tvaxCp 
19 BftJonBsS! 

2V„ ftJelronic 
13 9 JOWM 

24* lft Joule 
12ft 7ftKVPhBn 
12ft TftKVPhAn 
6H SftKdUftW 
31ft 15ft Kuans S 
12ft fftKeNNv 
23ft lOftKelyOG 
154* TftKatema 
6ft ZV^KeyEng 
5V, 39*KinarK 
234*!lt*iaror 
10ft SftKteVut 
n* 6 KosrEp 
Wu 2ftKgaEwtwf 
12ft 3ftL» Ind 
WJ *LoBtn 
20ft 7ft Lancer 
17ft 16ftUmdaur 
4ft 3 LndtPc 
lift 3 lais 
94* A Line 
7V, sftLstTeeh 
2 VgLsrTcwr 
7ft 3ftl_qwfG 
7ft sftLeattiF n 
jft IVgLeePtr 

« «WUhAMGH*l94 

Bft 1 LbrlCn 

lift TftLumS 
ISVilOftLita 
2*1*21 LynchC 


_ 2 

422 

64* 

1.75 93 - 

98 

IBM 

.15 12 _ 

40 

4% 

_ 925 

382 

10 


AO 

3V* 

M A3 Z 

11 

low 

IJO - - 

x560 

34W 

_. 199 

47 

3U 


411 

low 

Die J - 

123 

10ft 

_ 41 

4 

.K“ 

.TOO 1.1 29 

24 

m* 


412 

2046 

_ _ 

27 

2M 


9 

3ft 

_ _ 

3*3S 

5M 

Jlt 1.9 Bt 

AST 

lAft 


754 

13W 

- - 

712 

396 

h 

I _ 

539 

_ 13 

92 

3% 


43 

5 

M. IK 

79 

6U 

u. n 

2 

5% 

- 14 

323 U7W 

_ 15 

566 

l'Vu 
u ft. 

— — 

295 1 

.100 - - 

37 

15W 

J4 .1 35 

3055 

351* 

- 13 

614 

61* 

_ 11 

67 

IM 

JO 5J 9 

91 

lift 

- 13 

1 

lft 

_ 

35 

10W 

M0 — 

45 

10 

,18e 3J 13 

9 

SM 

_ 25 

92 

29 ft 

JO ts 11 

10 

10 

IJO UJ 51 

678 

111* 


14 

TOft 

” 12 

67 

SV* 

_ 21 

1 

4Vh 

- 35 

596 

22M 

_ 45 

81 

5M | 

_ 61 

109 

7W 


6 V* 64* ‘ft 
JB IBM - 
4ft 4Vu 4ft ‘ft 
10 9U Tft —ft 
— 3ft, jy« 

10ft 10V* —ft 
344* 34ft ‘ft 
3fti W. _ 
10W I Oft ‘ft 
104* 104* —ft 

iSSS** 

204* 23ft —»* 
2 2 — W 

34* 34* - 

4*4 5 *¥u 


34* 3Vu— V* 
ft ft— Vu 
6ft Bft —ft 
3ft 3ft —ft 
SVi, 4Wu — V u 

6 6 —ft 
Sft Sft — 'A 

7 71* *4* 
1ft lift, ‘ft 

ft ft ‘ft, 
ISft ]5ft - 
34ft 35ft ‘ft 
Bft Bft -ft 
IV, lft— Vu 


9ft 18' 

9W 10 ‘ft 
5V* 5ft ‘ft 


S Sft 


■iv. 


M 


M 


20 


7ft 7ft - 

_ _ 10 3ft 3ft 3ft ‘ft 

.7 ID 243 9 Oft 9 

_ 12 162 lft lVu lft ‘ft 

_ 28 ST 17ft 17ft 17ft —ft 

6J 16 R 14ft 14ft Mft —ft 

_ _ 16 3ft 3V* 34* _ 

_ 8 139 n* Tft 74* _ 

_ IB 37 7 7 7 —ft 

_ 35 23 * SW 6 _ 

- _ 198 lft lft 1 Vu —ft 

_ _ 38 3ft 3ft 3W ‘ft 

_ _ 2 6 6 6 

T2 lft 1% lift, -V* 

62 _ 28 Cft 43ft 43ft ‘1 

6.9 _ 338 33ft 33 ft 33ft ‘4* 
7ft 7ft, 7ft— Vu 
_ _ ft ft, Vu—Vu 

12 14 199 ITft 17ft 17ft —ft 


- 338 

- 1613 

- 57 

14 199 
_ 100 
33 108 
_ 45 

16 46 

17 89 
8 10 


ft, ft, Yn - 
19ft 19ft 19ft —ft 
Sft 54* 5ft * Vi 
12ft 12ft 12ft ‘ft 
14ft 13ft 13ft —ft 
25ft 2*ft 24ft -ft 


4ft SftMGSUp 

iw feMcuin 


- - x332 

- - 390 


3Vu 

ftl 


34* 3V h ‘ft 
ft W _ 


HWi Lew Slack 


piv vid PE mot High LawLgrBslOi*ge 


JO 9.1 _ 


:: : ,3 1 
_ 19 


JS 42 


? s 


P/ u ftMIPPr 

fS 6 ftEi£ 

sssasssr i« a ’i 

12 5 MamHrv 

1^ 8ftSSS/Tube 

10ft SV, McRae B 
164* TftMedcR 
14ft SMiMedeva 
314*18 AtaSo 
20ft 3ftMaSaLs 
4V* lftMMRAn 
PA HMdcara 
54* XftMediq 
54* SftMedftpf 

a 34*MentHln 
MWMrchGp 
59* 7ftMercAlr 
2ft VuMercAwt 
24* 4*MerPI4 
4tvu2>VuMerP6pr 
S'/, 3 MorP7pt 
Bft 44WMLHK Wt 
4 S MLUSTwt 
5ft 4 MLDMPWl 
13ft 6 Mormic 
164* TftMetPro 
18ft llftMetrScs 
13ft 9'AMebbk 
91* 4 MicnAnr 
20ft 15ft MMABc 


95 1V U lft 1V W ‘Vu 

3 64* Bft 64* -V* 

232 14'“ IM* 13% —ft 
26ft 26ft 26ft ‘4* 
7 Bft 7 

» » »• 


- . 8ft ‘ft 

69 384* 37ft 374* —V* 

Xl? 84* 8ft 84* ‘ft 

1 8ft Sft Bft - 

... 260 13W 124* 13 —ft 

J8e 8J 3 1202 9ft 

M 12 27 73 26ft 



•w — 

124* 13 — M 
Bft TV* ‘4* 
26 26ft —ft 

4 34* 4 * 4* 

2ft 2W 2ft _ 

ft 4 V “ 4% ‘Vu 
3ft 34* 3ft - 
64* 5ft 64* +4* 
16ft IBft 14ft —ft 
Sft 5ft 54* ‘ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft ‘ft 
lft lft lft ‘Vu 
4ft 4ft 44* „ 

5 5 S ‘Vu 

44* 4ft 44* _ 

54* 54* 54* 

444 4ft 44* — 

114* lift lift —V, 

144* 14ft 144* +44 

92 17 16ft 16ft +44 

3 12ft 12ft 12ft ‘ft 

79 8 7ft 8 ‘ft 

51 20ft 1944 1 944 —ft 

9ft 10 +1* 

2ft M4. ‘ft, 


JO 14 10 
25b 1.7 22 
M 34 8 
JO u 10 

„ JO a XO IS . 

II BftMidRiyn 26e 2J - MB 10 

4H IMMkHby _ 7 173 3 r 

Tft 6 MOwLdn _ _ 12 7 7 7 ‘ft 

ISM MftMkmMun J3 IS - 7 15V* 15ft 15ft ‘ft 

a 59 MonPpTA 4 JO U - ZAO 65W 65 65 ‘lft 

9M 54uMooaA _ 13 101 7ft 7 ft 7ft ‘ft 

I2V, 7MMcnaB _ 22 17UI2W 12ft 12ft ‘4* 

ISft TWMMed „ 13 48 14ft 14 TOft ‘ft 

3 IftMoianF „ _ 297 2Vu 2ft 2Vu ‘Vu 

Bft AftMSHK WI96 _ - 27D Aft Aft 6ft _ 

lift TftMunibr JAa 5J - S3 10ft 10ft 10ft — Vi, 

lift TftMunvst 20a 7.1 _ 103* 9»* 94* .91* +ft 

154* lJWMunAZ n J7a 42 - 21 14ft TOft TOft —ft 

25ftl9ftAAtw1ni .18 A 17 38 22H 22ft H’A — ft 

.Me 3J 170 10 19Vi 194* lf'A ‘ft 

„ _ 403 8ft 7ft 71* —ft 

_ _ 217 9ft 94* Tft —ft 

.. _ 21 4Vu 4ft 4ft — Vu 

_ T3 886 64* 44* AM - 

_ _ 221 4ft Aft 4ft ‘ft 

JO 11 16 13V 2544 25W 25ft ‘V. 

_ _ 20A 4ft 44* AMu * Vu 
JOB J - 11 27ft 27ft 27ft ‘ft 

_ 38 1B0 11 10ft I Oft — ft 
_ 17 6 9 9 9 —ft 

23W1A MYBCPS JOb 42 9 11 in* '»H Ifft — ft 

124*11 NYTB 74 U - 1 lift lift lift ‘ft 

31 ft 22ft NY Tim Ji M 72 2297 ffl 27ft 28 ‘ft 

8ft J'/.NkWsA - 13 20* Sft 4ft 5ft ‘ft 

75* 4WNId!tsC - 11 78 4ft Aft 4ft ‘ft 

4ft OftNotstCm 280 73 IS 114 3ft » .?* 

17W 10M Nortsti JO _ ~ 35 11 101* 11 _ 

lift 8 Nam .100 1-0 7 2 10ft 105* TOft ‘ft 

~ 57 Aft Aft Bft ‘ft 

23 HU lift lift — W 
33 SttdS'/. 8ft — ft 

J6e 23 10 160 2ft 2ftft 2ft ‘V* 

6 4V* 6 V* Bft —ft 

33 13W 12ft 124* —ft 
77 12ftdl7ft 12ft —ft 
15 13ft 13W 13ft 

171 144* 14ft TOM ‘ft 
242 72ft 12ft 124* _ 

7 13ft 134* 131* _ 

52 14ft 141* 14ft - 
23 13ft 13 13 —ft 

5 12ft 12ft 12ft _ 
23 124*0125* 12ft —ft 
B 14ft 14ft 14ft _ 

9 12M 124* 13M „ 

1 13ft 13ft 13ft ‘ft 
5 13ft 134* 13ft —ft 
51 13 124* !2h —ft 

IB 13ft 13ft 134* ‘ft 


21ft 16ft NFC 
lift SMNTNCbm 
lift BftNVR 
54* 3'ANVR wt 
11 6W NOdars 
124» 244 Mantel: 
30ft MkNHlfC 
54* 3'JNtPatnt 
SOU 19ft NtIRITv 
TOft 35*NatAlt 
10 ft TftNMxAr 


20 2.4 - 


JSO 6.1 - 


Bft 3ft NA Recy 
12ft 7ft NA Voce 
13ft BftNCdOg 
34* 3ftNthnTch 
7ft JftNumac 

15'J124*NCAP1 n 

T55*T2ViNCAP17n JT 5J - 
15ft 12MNFLPI n 25 52 - 

15ftl4ftNGAPIn 24 521- 

T5ftl2UNMOPI2n JB 5J - 
l*V*13 NvMIP2n 24 52 — 
15V* 13 NMOPTO 21 4.9 — 
15'*12ftNNJPan 23 5J - 
13ft 12HNNYM1 26 6.1 - 
15ft 12ft NNYPtn 24 5.9 - 

16 13UNVOHPI 7B5J- 
15ft lZftNOHPD n J8 SJ _ 
ISft 12ft NPAPO n 26 SJ - 
T5ft T3ftNvT3(Pt J3a 62 - 
15ft 12ft NVAP12,, JS 5J ... 
16V* 13 NuuWAn 24 52 - 


MMH 


TOM 6 Odfclop 
4tVuHV H OBr1en _ 

124* BftOSUIIwn 28 22 

32ft 22 OfaJMl 24 J 

7M IVuCXSWnwt 
34* 2WOnsiteEn 
I Oft SMOranan 
30ft 11 ft Orients 20 0 J 

13ft TftOndHB 70 « 

74i 3Wu PLC Svs 

1^2 itwRsc J8a 5J 
65ft 56ft PdEnnffl 4-40 7-5 

68 56 Pd&i ptC 4J0 7 J 
23ft 20 ft PG&XA 1J0 62 

211*184* PG&B 6.9 

ITft 17ft PG54C 125 6.9 
19ft 17ft PGEpfD 125 6.9 
19ft 164* PGEptG MO 7.1 
184* 154*PGEpfH 1.13 7.0 

I7M ISViPGEafl UP 7J 
39ft 26ft PGEWM 1.96 7.1 

SViZAftPGEptO 100 72 
26ft 25 PGEpfQ IJU 72 
26ft 24ft PGEoftJ U* 6.9 
26V* 24ft PGEbfX 
IBft W.4 PDCGHn 
1DM BftPacWtf _ 

Bft 2V> PoaeAm 
lift 4 PWHKwr - 

•WTWuPWHKMVI 
5ft 4ftPWHK30wl _ 

54* 3MPWHK3O0Wt „ 

reft BftPWSPMidn _ 

0 rVi,PWUSDwt - 

15ft 13ft PWWn -7T zi 

4ft2*Vi,PamHW - 

TOft lift PcrPM .960 7.0 
14 liftPnrPO lJOa 62 
.1 13 BarPO 1 JOallJ 
285* TOftPegGId .lOe J 

45M34 PwwiTr _ 

304*22 PenRE MO 7J 

7ft AftRencb 20 3-5 

25ft 3 1 PemCpt 112 U 
4V* 2ft Refers „ - 

«ft 17 ptweat M8 8.0 

85ft3ZftPnLD 240 J 
EM 2'%PWWLOS 
Sft HuPhxNH 
39W30 PtutuRs - 

5 iVuPScoPo - 

36ft 94 PdDsm .90 XO 
39 175* Partway JOb M 
JAM 14ft PJttwy A JO 1 J 
13ft SftPMRsc -- 

25ft 9ftRy©e«w -12 J 

3ft AftRvRA _ _ _. 

385* 23ft Rabin s SJO 7J> 
7ft ftPotvan 
TO SMPartSyi - 

154* 4 PratHtt 


_ 70 

_ 38 

14 80 
_ 901 

- 1453 

_ 9 

_ 622 
7 1 

TO 18 

- 93 

- 33 

18 40 

_ 220 

- Z150 

_ 33 

- 4 

- 2 

- I 

- 33 

- 25 

- 22 

- 29 

- I» 

._ 33 

- 13 

- 96 

... 04 

_ 266 

- 5 

- 306 

- 179 
_ 560 

- 323 

_ 47 

_ 55 

_ 38 

11 136 
1* 13 

15 51 
TO 1 
65 2239 
67 X 

9 35 

13 72 

- 4 

- * 3 

■5 ,J S 

- 13 

41 I 
24 1 

22 158 

- 185 
32 1118 

* S 
TO B8 
_ 7S 

- 267 

- 7 


lift 10 lift +ft 

2 IWu 1 'Vu — Vu 

94* 94* 94* _ 

32ft 31ft 31ft ‘ft 
2ft 2ft 24* —ft 
2ft d 24* 2ft —ft 
TOV* 9ft Tft +W 
24ft 24ft 21ft —ft 
lift lift lift — U 
6 5U 5M — V* 
3W 3 Sft _ 
ISft !5U 15ft ‘ft 
» 59 5» —lft 

414* 41 ft 41ft ‘lft 
Zlft Zlft 21ft ‘ft 
1PM 19ft 19U - 

15 IB 18 ‘ft 
18 IB 18 

17 16ft 17 ‘ft 

16 TO TO ‘ft 

15Vi 15V4 15ft t’A 
27ft 27 27ft ‘ft 
27ft 274* 27ft ‘V* 
25ft 254* 25ft ‘ft 
25ft 25ft 25Vj ‘ft 
24ft 244* 24ft - 
18ft IBft IBft ‘ft 
Tft Tft Tft _ 
4ft Aft Aft —ft 
8V* Bft 8V, ‘ V* 
5 44* Aft —ft 

Sft SW 5TO —ft 
3ft d 3ft 3ft ‘ft 
Tft 94* 9ft ‘ft 
3V4 m 3ft —ft 
134* 13V& 13U _ 

3 2<Vu 2*Vu — V* 

13ft 134* 134* - 

ISft 144* 15 ‘ft 
TOft 14ft TOft _ 
19ft 19ft 19ft ‘ft 
40H 40ft 404* ‘ft 
TOft 24ft 244* —ft 

5ft Sft 544 + ft 
22ft 224* 224* —ft 
34* 34* 3M ‘ft 

23ft 23ft 23ft -ft 
72ft 71ft 714* ‘ft 
2Wu 24* lft — *u 
4ft Aft 44* ‘4* 
Bft 33ft 33ft - 
3ft 3ft, 34* - 

SOW 301* 301* -tft 
37 37 37 — Vk 

341* 341* 34ft ‘ft 
64* 6V* Aft ‘V* 
MU 23ft 34ft —ft 
7ft 7ft 71* ‘V* 
3AM 35ft 36 _ 

A Sft Sft ‘ft 
I2U 12ft 17ft — ft 

4 5ft Sft —V* 


High Low Stock 


a* 

PW Yld PE W0s Urti Low Latest Ch*ge 


28ft lSVftPratLm 

7ft. ftPresd A 
4>ft, IftPrcCotn 
44* TViPrbrmEnt 

7*1 4V*FTOPCT 
3>ft, 2 Prvatia 
ZiuiTMPirvEna 

a S34*PSC0lpt 
lTftPbStA 
17ft 13ft Pb«7 
30 15 POST* 
20U15 Pb3»9 
18ft 13ft PbSt 10 
1844 12ft PbSI 11 
18M 13V, PbSI 17 
18ftl3VMPbSn4 
15V>10V*PbSil5 
16 9ftPb5tl7 
15U lOVAPbsns 
12U 6ftPb5SI9 
TOft 9UPbSI20 
161* lOftPutnCA 
134* lZMPIGIMn 
15 17ftPlGMT3r 
15\*14MPiAHY 
IBM, lSUQuebcor 
7 TftRBW 
31ft 10 RH'Ent 
23ft 3V*RXMd( 
33 X3Vi Raocn 
144* 8 RaUPns 

lift 7 Rauch 1 

29 23 RedLn 
6U lftRedaw 


JO 3J 17 144 »V* I. 

_ B8 m l*v„ 

40 17 12 11 61* 

_ _ 32 

= - *s 

JB 4J 29 199 


« 19 +M 
lft ‘Vu 
6ft Aft ‘ft 
2 l»Vu 1'Vw— Vu 
44* 4ft Aft -W 
3 3 3 ‘ft 

1 lift lift lift - 
6'J 6 Aft _ 


.17 

SJ 

14 

23 3M, 

31* 

3Vu 


L04 

4.9 

TO 17M 

I/ft 

I/ft 

— M 

4J5 

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250 59 

59 

59 -1 

IJO 

7.9 

TO 

11 224* 

22M 

22M 


l.TOl 

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11 

33 16ft 

15W 

TOft 

+ M 

I.TBi 



SUiTO'A 

20 

20 

‘ft 

IJA 

yj» 


3 IT'M 

I/M 

17M 

—ft 




8 1AM 

16 V, 

IAW 


IJ6 

BJ 

14 

15 14ft 

lift 

ISM 


IJO 

7J 

12 

28 15W 

ISM 

1 ■ 

—ft 

IJA 

BJ 

TO 

13 16W 

IAW 

||y.i 

‘ft 

IJOl 

7.0 

13 

10 141c, 

Mil 



IJWC 

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20 

10 I3W 

TOM 

If 


J8 

6-6 

18 

26 TOM 

13 

73M 

‘ft 

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X* 

52 

5 10W 

iaw 

10W 








■00 

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50 15M 

ISM 

lift 

-W 




32 13M 

TOft 

TOft 


sin 

J 


4 12W 

TOW 

TOft 

—ft 

53c 

aa 


20 TOW 

l*M 

144* 

—ft 

JO 



9 14% 

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TOW 

♦ ft 




27 AM 

AM 

AM 

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■M 

11 

-82 27ft 

26ft 

26 V* 

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12 

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mu Vid PE IPOs High Low Latest OToe 


M 1 J 20 

J4 J 68 
Jda 3J — 


_ 59 

— 925 
_ 58 
_ 35 

- A3 
_ 40 

.150 lJ _ 


_ _ mu™ Hi —w 

_ _ 130 30 » *ft 

_ 6 3 lift lift lift - 

JJ7 Ji? 3 Bft Bft Bft _ 

2J0 8J 36 20 27V* 27ft 27ft +M 

112 5 55 


13ft BftRedEng, ,14b 1.1 8 19 12ft 12V* 12ft — M 

TOftllMRadEnipf 71 3J - 2 TOV* TO'A TOft - 

9Bftl8V>Reaa» JA XO 20 51 28ft 28U 28ft _ 

IBft 7ftR0flHlt _ 19 1009U19 17V* TSft 

13ft 4 Rattvn _ - M Aft Aft 4W ‘V* 

SVS ’VuRePGWB - _ 197 3ft Sft 3ft —ft 

13ft 10ft Rsrttn 1J0 12J 10 139 13ft lift 12ft 

_ 4*5 lft lft 1 91, — Vu 

-134 84 2>/i Zft ZiVu _ 

_ - 37 7 7 7 

_ - 35 2 IWi, T'Vu— Vu 

- — 52 2M 2ft 2ft ‘ft 

- - 26 13'« 13 13W 


3ft atuRstlnt 
3Vu llfi* ” 


RcpTch 
7ft SftRevMn 
2ft, lURICtiton 
AW IWRIedel 
lift TMFHaalB 
Tft Aft Riser 


5ft Hft, Roodmst 
29ft 12ft Robots 
1 ft, Ronnie 
7 3V u RovolOe 
3ft 1 Rymoc 


_ _ 343 u vu 

_ 18 448 4ft 
- 13 S3 274* 
_ _ 3 *V„ 

„ - 4240 d»/u 
.040 3J - 49 lft 


Tft 9V* „ 

4 Aft ‘ft 
27 27ft —ft 
> *Vu - 
4V, 44* - 

IVu IV* ‘Vu 


Aft 3 SBMInd 
8% 4M5CBCD 
42ft 35ft SJW X10 

4Vh ft SOI Ind 
15ft 2W5PIB 
ITftllHSPIPh J6 
21ft 13ft SaooCmn 
1BU TftSnhGrun » - _ 

lft ftSahaGpf - - 

W ftSakitwl - _ 

lift msdimi JI U 9 
58ft 45 StfAABGN rS.18 68 _ 


- - 3 3*Vu 3'Vu 3*44, — Vu 

_ _ 41 A Sft 6 _ 

13 11 31 394* 39ft 39ft —ft 

- 39 414 3V« 3 34*— Vu 

_ _ 134 Aft Bft 6ft _ 

IA 15 449 19ft 18V* ISft ‘ft 

— H 15ft IS ISft _ 

31 lift lift 11V* _ 

IBS TO4, lft lVa _ 

3S Vu ft, ft. _ 


_ 95 


t, ,u vu 

15W 15ft 15ft ♦ W 
. _ 41 464, 45ft 46W‘ lft 

7A _. 122 33ft 33 33ft ‘ft 


67 _ 


_ _ 421 281* 271* 28ft 
- _ !» W, "■ 


_ - 10 


.16 

UO 

JO 


M 


M 13 
J 9 
IA 35 


- 33 


J 13 
JO 12.9 1 


1J 18 


40ft31US(4OECn 2.53 
85ft 75M5aB4WPn 4-01 
17H 64*ScW4Kwt96 - _ 
B4M74ftSolM5PTnl9T 69 _ . . 

34W 28ft SalORCL n2J0 69 - 228 33W 33 
29ft 2SVi SatSNPL n 
AVuSWuSaffWb _ 

134* 10ft Soman 1.00a 03 10 
lft MSanCarn 
14ftl3ftSOgopfA 1.00 7J> - 

14ft 12 SDgOpfC -88 7.1 _ 

26M 25ft SDga TOH 4 

7ft 4ft Sandy .12 11 11 6 

13ft AftSAAanSJc - - 2 

44 30 ft Shorn, 

12ft SftScaptre 
17V* lift Schott 
257 174 SbdCo 
154* 9 seta 
Aft IVSSemPck 
Zft lVuSemtch 
Bft 5ftSarenptn 

7ft 3ftSarv*Da 
94* SftSLBEurwl 
6ft IVuSMUMWt 
Tft IHShefldMd 

24ftllV*atltCm 
81* 34*ShwdGo 
Aft 3 Shagen 
304*1 lft soms 
Aft TftSffCO 
AW AftSbnwio 
12M 3ft5kXFaup 
394*19 SmhhAs 
40 lBMSmntlA 

lift 10ft SmtBbi 

ISUTOWSmtBmM J5o SJ 
7ft Zft Sonnet 
l«ftl4ftXBJptB IJO 
IB TOftSCEdPlC 1.06 
19M Itfft SCEd pfE 1.19 
944*20 SCEdpfG 1.4? 

100M98ftSCEd pCK 7J8 
27 25 SCEdpfP M4 
36ft 16M SoUOl 
5ftPVuSeor1d, 

7ft 5ftSpoOim 
Sft 2ftSptSuowt 
Tft 4 S>a« 

48Vi,43VeSPDR 
10V* 5 STorrlH 
37V* 25ft Stepan 
15ft Sft5forflsl 
7W 5 StvGpA 
Bft JVIStvGoe 
7ft 4U5WPr 

lift 3ft Strother 

17M 4ftStVteVM* 
lift Sft Sulcus 
TOft 10ft SuntfTK 
3'u TWSwOy 
3ft 2 ft Sunt* 

6ft 2ft5unr*r 
151* 8 Sundwn 
3h lftSunEngy _ _ 

lift 2ft«BunJr _ _ 

ISft SftSunstote - - 

29ft 1 Bft Sunder pf 175 13J „ 

l9W12U5uprSni J2 2J 14 
7 TWSuprmlAd lJMt - 10 
Zft WSUDinwT _ - 

2W WSupInun - 

6 5 SEhKpwl 

13ft 71* TIE 

dft 11* Til 
Tft 2WTSXCB 
TOM 9ft Tasty 
5ft 3 v* Team 
TOft BftTecOpS 
TOM 23 Tacfen 
lift 6WT1 


TejesPw 
21 l3UTWnR 


14 85ft Sift B5V, -V* 

62 12ft 12'A 12ft —ft 

2? SIM 80ft 81M ‘lft 

MV* ‘ft 
. 28ft ‘ ft 
. .. 3** 31V* _ 

57 12 lift 13 ‘ft 

"I II ‘Vu 
21 14ft 14 TOft +ft 

3 12ft 12ft 12ft —ft 
25ft 25ft 25ft —ft 

Sft 5ft Sft 

_ _ 7ft Tft 7ft _ 

JOo U 20 106 41V* 41ft 41'M - 

41 10ft 10ft 10ft _ 

23 16 16 16 ‘V* 

4 204 19S 202 *9 

66 14ft TOV* TOV* —V, 
86 4ft 3U 3ft —ft 

320 24* 2 2ft ‘ft 

15 6ft 6 A — ft 

7ft 7V* Tft „ 

192 7M Tft 7M _ 
101 Aft 44* Aft —4* 
509 Bft B 8V, _ 

81 Zlft 21 21ft ‘ft 

63 Bft Bft Bft _ 
13 Sft 3ft 3ft ‘Vi, 

20 B7 28V* 27 28ft ‘lft 
_ 25 u 4W 44* Aft —ft 

- 131 Bft 6 Bft «W 

2 7W Tft 7V* ‘ft 

- 5 37U 3AM JAM V, 

At 1J 18 109 37ft 361* 361* 

Ma SJ _ 327 111* 11 11 Him 

S T 8? ,iVs -v, 

5Y, Sft Sft ‘ft 

27 13Wdl3ft 131* —ft 
15 15 14M IS 

23 17 IBM 17 ‘ V4 

15 TOft I0W TOM —ft 

3 101W IDlMlOlft Z 
9 25M 25V, Mft _ 

331 341* TOM TOft - 4* 

186 W 5 5ft - 

*> AV* Bft 6ft 

2 4W AM 4V4 — Vu 

- 5 41* 4ft 4ft —ft 

«0 1J 32W 4h/. 4«* 

— 67 41 9 8M HU _iT 

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... 13 21? lift 11 MM Tft 

- g 2 W W AM ‘W 

« ifi “ S 5W R R 

- 27 1363 TV, ?U 74; + yj 

~ ,u S5 ’i* 4 -v* 

™ mk 

1 12 77 ft: K? ^ 

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... 13 118 13'/, 13ft |3ft 

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?S Ttv, Mft fflft ^ 

14V, 14W —ft 
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SM S’.'. Sft — v“ 

JS ?*• _ 

«V* 3>Vi, 4ft ‘Vu 

5 41* 5 

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I Tft Tft 9V« ~ 

M TOft 33ft 34ft 4.jj; 

■?tS iS {if! J 1 ' 7 ' — 4i 

J 143 251 TOft 14V* Mft ‘ft 


7A - 

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J4 


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39 27M Teleflex 
57 JAMTelDtn 

18 UHTempGU 
2% lftTenera 
7W SWTexBiun 

13 SftTexMor 

19 8W Thermos 
22V* BWThmOdS 
16V* BMThmRb 
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lift TftThrmPw 
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1ft, VuThrmwd 
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Bft AlftTWAvta - _ 

5 2 TWA p> „ _ 

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7ft 4'ATrt-Lilen - _ 

2ft 1 TriLilewt — _ 

IIM BftTrkJex _ 34 

3W ZVuTdnlwcn _ _ 

10W TWTrpAGTSn J2e 3J -. 
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29M lTWTumBA J7 J B6 
29W 19ft TumB B J7 J 85 
13 AM Turn rC — 34 


IBS 38M 
759 45W 
29 1«M 
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BA7 10ft 
1683 13 
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1 15V* 
207 32ft 
94 Sft 

1 Sft 
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128 1 5V. 
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303 U55M 
114 3 

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2300 86ft 
2190 100ft 
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691 Sft 
402 15ft 
3659 Zft 
1030 fA 
79 2>Vu 
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100 2ft 
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44ft 45ft ‘lft 
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15ft 15ft _ 
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TOft TOft — W 
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ISM TOft VOVMN2 J30 SJ 
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29ft ISM VkteCe M 17 


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6M 7M ‘W 
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5M Sft _. 
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BM Bft — W 
27ft 27U —ft 
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19ft 19ft ♦« 
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TOft TOM ‘ft 
TOft TOft —ft 
10M 10M — W 
TOW 171* 
lift 14ft _. 
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TOft T4W — W 
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7W 7M *ft 
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271* 2BM-1M 
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74ft I4W _ 
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15 15 ‘ft 
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1 


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21M 7W wash Tc 
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27M ZOftWorltvi 
11 ft 4MXytron 
19ft 16ft Zteolsr 


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Soles Azures ore unofficial, 
me previous 52 weeks plus the u_ 
iratMuB dov. where a mm or stack dhridand emw xiftB” ” 
we hos Smm pgtd. tta veart «0frtowrdft«™ 
DJvloyn^etiiownior the new stock orW. unHM rtM«?y g 
ra * r ? Of d ividends are onnuet dbbweemewta bwtd eit 
the 101051 declaration, 
a —dividend also exTrats). 
r ~ S ™W | -^ lB ° t dividend plus stock dlvkfend. 
c ,“7 ikkJidatlno dividend, 
dd— colled, 
d — new yearly 'aw. 

2—&2K25 f 1? ?aredar paU In precedfns 12 mrvbW. 

a — dividend in Canadian hmd&,euMecMoi5%naiwe9ldeno 
m. 

! “ SiyHSS “««■ BPflt-OR or stack dfvtdood.^^ 

this year, omitted, defenred, or 00 V***' 

token atitrtwtjUvWendmeoflng. 

or paid this yw, an acoimwaHw 
JSR»*llfid1yk>ends In arrears. _ j— 

with the ston of tmuna. 

tSe" n t -! Wy d elivery. 

Stott' dl ln prec * 3lrnr 12 m6nW ' 

DlvWon<} Oeolns with daft of spilt, 
t-dlvldend paid In stock In preceding TOmonltftesIWn^ 
^^«Si?hfeh! <18 ™ 1 w “- iteW6uaon dat *- 

y t — trading hallefl. . _ 

dertta rSIw!S!SL , SJ? 1x,wa,,to ^ MlnD IfStSsncorfr 
own* Bonkruptcv Aef,er securitftsoswmedftr®® 0 ^ 

«l— when distributed. ... 

— when Issued. 

"W— w]»h warrants. . J 

xj^exunvMend or ex-Hgtife. 

V— 1^SiiSK-? rrB " H - ••••:. 

v^m^dlvwenu ana sain in fell, 
i-wfesbifuii. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 


8. In the last 12 months, approximately how many night s 
have you spent in hotels on business? 

None [j] 8 - 14 Q 30-49 [~] 75 or more [~X , ? 

1-7 □ 15-29 □ 50 - 74 Q 

9. In the last 12 months, how many times have you rented a 
car (for business or personal reasons, at home or abroad)? 

Not rented Q 3 - 6 rentals Q] 15 rentals or more HL 
1 -2 rentals [D 7 - 14 rentals Q 

10. Please indicate whether you have done either of the 

following in the past 12 months: J 

FOR PERSONAL FOR BUSINESS 1 
REASONS REASONS ^ 

Flown in a privately chartered aeroplane Q [~ ~gl m» j 

Used your company's private aeroplane Q Q ^ _ 

11a. Please indicate whether you own any of the following ' 
companies' calling cards, excluding pre-paid telephone 
cards. (Please check all that apply) 

AT&T □ MCI □ Sprint Q* 

Other Q Do not own one | ^h^Tskiptoq.iz 

lib. How many times, on your last business trip outside 






A U.S. DOLLAR FROM YOU TO A CHARITY 




VOI R OCCUPATION 


20. Are you ... ? 

Woriring full-time Q Student Q Not in a paid occupation fTL 
Woridng part-time Q Retired [^] Other |~~J 

If you are not ^vorking full-time or part-time, please skip to bottom of page. 

21. What is the principal activity of the organisation for 


which you work? 
Primary/Public Utilities 
Manufecturmg/Engineermg Q 
Wholesale/Retail I 71 
Financial Services Q 
Other Business Services Q 


''Ol- AND THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI VE 


1. Where do you usually obtain your copies of the 
International Herald Tribune? 


your own country, did you use your calling card? 

C i - . f — i , ^ . r— , 22. What is your job status? 

T^ceQ 6-9tn.es GU Propnir/Partner [ 

Once [J 3-5 times (_J 10 or more times [_jj Chairman/ r 


ABOUT ^ Ol 


subscnption delivered to your home Qnm 12a. Of which country (or countries) are you a citizen? 


subscription delivered to your office — personal subscription ) J 

- circulated copy fTI 
buy regularly from newsagent /newsstand | 71 
buy occasionally from newsagent / newsstand |~T1 
friend or colleague’s copy |~TI 
airline / hotel copy Q 

2a. How often do you usually read or look at the IHT? 

5-6 days a week □ l-2daysaweek □« 

3-4 days a week Q often than once a week Q 

2b. Where do you usually read or look at the IHT? 

(Please check all that apply) 

At home Q Traveling abroad | 71na«i 

At work □ Elsewhere □ 

Traveling to and from woik Q 

3 a. Does your spouse/partner read your copy of the IHT? 

Yes'S' ” " -' No j 2 Imt 

3b. And how many people In tota l, exc luding yourself, 
usually read your copy of the IHT? 

One d Three Q Five or more □« 

Two Q Four Q) No one else Q 

4. How interested would you b e in r eading a lengthier, 
magazine-type article in the IHT? 


(Write in) gg 

12b. In which country are you currently resident? (Write in) 

f*M2) 



12c. For how long have you been living in your present 
country of residence? 

Less than 6 months Q 1-2 years Q 5-10 years Q* 
6-12 months Q 2-5 years □ 10or ^? □ 


13. Are you? 

14. What is your age? 

Under 25 □ 
25-34 Q 


Male □ Female Q„ 

35 - 44 □ 55-64 GU 

45 - 54 Q 65 or over Gl 


Education Q* 

Legal Q 

Medical GI 
Government/ i — ] 
Diplomatic Service 1— ^ 

Other (Write in) []7] 


22. What IS your job status? Legal Practitioner H- 

Proprietor/Partner 

re^rmW r i Medical Practitioner (_J 

ChiefExecutive/President I — 2 J Scientist/Researcher/ i — i 

Managing Director i — i Technologist LjJ 

General Manager Ld Academic | J 

Other Senior Management Q Teacher Q 

Middle Management Q Senior GoveminemOffic^/ Q 

_ Executi ^e □ Other (Please ghe details) Q 
Self Employed/ rn L - tJ 

Independent Consultant *— d 

23. For which, if any, of the goods and services listed below 
are yon wholly or partly responsible for company decisions 
to purchase or lease, or to appoint or change a supplier? 

(Please check as many as apply) 

COMPUTERS/SOFTWARE <si» 

Network Systems Q Corporate Financial Services 


15. What is the highest educational level you attained? 

Doctorate/ i — i University degree/ equivalent i — i 
higher university degree L_d professional qualification LaU 

MBA Q Secondary or high school Q 

16. Into which of the following groups does your pre-tax 
annual household income from all sources fall? 

( Check in US$ or write in your own currency) 

Up to US $50,000 □ $150,000 to $199,999 QU 

$50,000 to $74,999 □ $200,000 to $249,999 Q 

$75,000 to $99,999 □ $250,000 to $499,999 Q 


PCs/Desktop Computers/WPs \~j 
Laptop Computers |~] 
Computer Peripherals 
Software/Software Services 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
Facsimile Equipment [~] 

Telecommunications j — i 
Systems or Equipment 1 — zl 


Fund Management Q 
Foreign Exchange f~] 
Insurance Services 
Company Credit Cards Q 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

Legal Services Q 
Management Consultancy i — i 


magazin e-type article in the IHT? $100,000 to $149,999 □ $500,000 or more Q 

Very interested □ Quite interested Q Not very interested Q, a annual income in own currency (yrite in) 


TRAVEL 


5. Approximately how many business air trips did yon 
make in the last 12 months? (Count a round trip as one). 

None □ 3-5 Qjj 10 ■ 10 35+ Gjjtm 

1-2 □ 6-9 Q 20-34 Q ifnone^kiptoqs 

6. To which of the following destinations did you fly on 
business in the last 12 months? 

EUROPE THE AMERICAS 

GU USA GU Indonesia GL 


Telecommunications i-, Management Lonsumrn^ n 

Systems or Equipment 1— J ^ I — I 

Executive Recruitment | J 

OT ™ R pto“^ □ Management Training Courses □ 

Company Aircraft Q Company Travel |_J 

Company Vehicles □ Conferencesffixhibitions U 

Plant and Equipment □ PRAfarketing/ (— | 

Scientific Instruments Q Advertising/Market Research L_d 
Raw Materials Q Courier/Freight Services Q 

t j Business Premises/ i i Information Services Q 

Industrial Site Selection l_ zJ . , i — , 

Data Management | 7 | 
FINANCIAL SERVICES i — i 

Domestic Banking j 8 [ None of these I — 

International Banking Q 


17a. How many cars are there in your household, 
including any company cars? 


vt i — i _ r— I . _ r — | _ i — | 24. Does your company operate outside the country in 

No car LjJ One [J Two LlI Three or more which you are currently based? Yes [T) No Q 


Belehm/ j — i 
Luxembourg Lil( 

France Q 

Germany Q 

Italy Q 

Spain n 

Switzerland Q 

Netherlands Q 


Canada Q 
Latin America □ 


China |~T1 
Australia [~7| 
New Zealand |~TI 
Other Asia/Pacific |~~7I 

MIDDLE EAST Q 
AFRICA □ 
ELSEWHERE |~b! 


Spain |^J ASIA/PACIFIC Other Asia/Pacific |_ 

Switzerland Q Hong Kong ^ MIDDLE EAST [[ 

Netherlands Q Sin CT ore Q 

Scandinavia/ I — I Japan \~\ AFRICA [_ 

Finland 1 — fiJ _ . — i r- 

British Isles Q Taiwan LJ elsewhere L 

Russia Q m □ 

Other Eastern r“] Malaysia J 

European Countri es I — zJ 

7a. For business trips, which class of air travel do you 

ii for for 

usuauy use. sh 0 R j. HA ul trips long-haul trip 

(Up to four hours) (Over four hours) 

First Class 31m Ora 

Business Class ] Lzj 

Economy Q 

No such trips Q Q 


17b. What do yon estimate to be the current cost of your 
main car, if purchased new (to the same specification)? 

Under US $ 1 5,000 □ $40,000 to under $75,000 Qsi, 

$15,000 to under $25,000 Q $75,000 or more Q 

$25,000 to under $40,000 Q 

18. Which, if any, of these cards do you use? 

(Please check as many as apply) 

Access/Eurocard/Mastercard (Gold) Q Diners Club 1 Hmn 

Access/Eurocard/Mastercard Q Visa Gold/Premier Q ’ 
American Express Gold/Platinum Q Visa/Caite Blene Q 
American Express Green Q None of these fTI 

19a. Which, if any, of the following types of investment do 
you or members of your household have? 

Stocks and Shares Life Assurance Policies HL , 


FOR 

LONG-HAUL TRIPS 
(Over four hours) 

do; 

□ 

□ 

□ 


Bonds n 

Government Securities 

Investment funds (including I I 
Mutual Funds/Unit Trusts ) 

Private Pension Plans Q 


Derivative Products [~ 7 | 

Gold/Precious Metals Q 

Real Estate (excluding i — i 
main residence) I <( 
Collectibles (art, antiques, [— i 
coins, stands, etc.) L sj 

Other Q 


25. How many people does your company employ . . . 

. . Under 10 1049 50-249 250-999 10004999 5000+ 

a)m B □□□□□□, 

b) worldwide? □ □ □ □ □ 

26a. Which of the following international activities do you 
carry out in the course of your work? 

I purchase goods/services from j — | I manage the company i , 

suppliers in other countries 1— ri finances at an international level I — aJis 

I influence strategic decisions 1 ^ ^ □ 

about the company's n mtemationafly ^ 

international operations L-zJ None of these Q 

26b. In which of the following countries/regions are you 
involved in the course of your work? Africa 

Western Europe QU> Japan Q 

Other Europe Q South East Asia Q 

USA /Canada Q Other Asia Q 

Latin America Q Australia/New Zealand Q 
Middle East Q None of these Q 


7b Do you belong to an airline's executive/frequent 
flier dub? Yes □ No □ " 

7c. If yes, which one(s) do you mainly use? 

(Please write in) 


19b. What is the approximate total value of the above and 
any other investments (excluding your main home) 
owned by you and members of your household (in US $)? 

Under US $50,000 □ $500,000 to under $1 million fsk 
$50,000 to under $100,000 Q SI million to under $5 million 
$ 100,000 to under $250,000 Q US $5 million or more Q 
$250,000 to under $500,000 Q 






I 

i 




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Then tuck Flap B into Flap A 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE' 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW tOUC TIMES tiw THE WASHINGTON TOST 


T 'HE International Herald 
Tribune has donated aror 


1 Tribune has donated around 
$65,000 to charity, on behalf 
of our readers, in connection 
with periodic reader studies 
like this one. 


P LEASE help us continue 
this imnortant nroeram b 


1 this important program by 
completing and forwarding 
the questionnaire on the 
reverse side of this sheet. 

Our warmest thanks for 
your help. 


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thanks for 



THE TRIB INDEX: 115.5211 

by Bloomberg BusineJKs C0rnp,l8d 

T9fl ^ 




AsiaiPaciHc 


Appnut weighting: 32% 
Close: 13151 Prevj 13053 


Apprax. weighting: 37% 
CkBK 11453 Prevj 11137 




SOND JF SONDJ 
1093 1994 1993 



North America 


Approx weighing: 26% 
Oosa 96.16 Pibvj 9123 


Latin America 


Appro*, weighting: 5% 
Close: 13751 Prov. 134.72 




s o 

1893 

Worid Index 


S 0 
1933 


The Index tracks US. dollar values e/ stocks Ik Tokyo, New York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium. Brazil. Canada. CMa. Denmark, Finland, 
France, Germany, Hong Kong, fiaty, Mostea, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Vananala. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, the Max la com p osed ot the 20 top Issues to terms tit market capitalization, 
otherwise the tan top stocks are tmcke& 


Industrial Sectors 


Pnw, % 
doss change 


Energy 112.45 11152 -ri.74 CapM Gooch 11142 11£38 «0.93 

Wfflies 126:01 12459 +1.55 Rwlhtehh 120.24 119.06 -*033 

Bmw» 12137 120.13 +153 Coraumor Goods 10132 99B7 -i0.4S 

Sendees 12451 1ZL60 +1.15 WsWueow 13122 12854 +1.77 

For mom bdotmaBon abort the index, a booklet is wabble free ot chmge. 

Write to Tribtodex. 181 Avenue Chariesde Barth. 92521 NeuHyCedex, Fiance. 

C Inter na tional Herald Trfeune 


**S£S^-r^*vy 


Wharf, 

STAR TV 

Part Ways 

Murdoch Network 

Recasts Its Ties 

Complied hv Our Staff From Dispatches 

HONG KONG - STAR TV, 
Rupen Murdoch's Asian saielllie 
network, said Monday that it was 
abandoning a disputed arrange- 
ment to supply pay-television pro- 
gramming to Hong Kong's first ca- 
ble company. 

STAR TV said it had “reluctant- 
ly come to the conclusion” it could 
not press on with a contentious 
deal that it initiated in June 1993 to 
feed four premium channels to 
Wharf Cable Ltd. 

“We are hopeful that by taking 
this action, the whole issue will be 
looked at in a less contentious man- 
ner 1 " said Gary Davey, STAR TV’s 
new chief executive. “It is very un- 
fortunate that the Hong Kong pub- 
lic wiD not now be the fust recipi- 
ents of our new pay services.’' 

Wharf Cable has argued that it 
had no binding agreement with 
STAR TV for the pay channels, 
and it announced on Jan. 14 that it 
would go to the courts in a bid to 
prove its case. 

STAR TV, meanwhile, kept 
feeding the pay TV channels —two 
for movies, one for children and 
one for business — to Wharf Cable. 

The dispute did not affect five 
services carried by STAR TV that 
were offered to Wharf Cable, in- 
cluding MTV Asia and BBC World 
Service Television. 

Analysts said that relations be- 
tween the two companies had bro- 
ken down over questions about the 
quality of STAR TV's program- 
ming as well as its demand for an 
exclusive agreement that the 
broadcaster would supply non- 
Chinese programs. 

“Wharf was not pleased with the 
quality or the exclusive conduit far 
non-Chinese programs," said Don- 
ald Keyset, a media analyst with 
Credit Lyonnais (Securities). 

News Carp., which is controlled 
by Mr. Murdoch, acquired 63.6 
percent of STAR TV in July for 
$525 million, while Wharf Cable 
was launched by one of Hong 
Kong’s biggest companies. Wharf 
(Holdings) Ltd. 

(Bloomberg AFP) 



SfSi.. 

Ajj fegsg’s 

SV** r-T-T*. 'Mb? 


International Herald Tribune, Tuesday?, March I t 1994 


Fed Turns to Psychology 

Intuition Plays a Larger Role in Rates 





i 


By Keitb Bradsher 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON —The Fed- 
eral Reserve Board, having 
dropped its reliance on the mon- 
ey-supply figures that made mar- 
kets soar or swoon in the 1980s, 
is increasingly basing interest- 
rate decisions on an approach 
best summed up as banket's in- 
tuition. 

When the Fed’s chairman, 
Alan Greenspan, gave his semi- 
annual testimony before Con- 
gress a week ago, the only section 
of his written testimony that he 
did not bother to read aloud con- 
cerned money-supply measures 
such as M-2, which represents 
the total of cash, checking ac- 
counts, savings accounts, certifi- 
cates of deposit of less than 
$100,000 ana several other Finan- 
cial instruments. 

Top Fed officials said they 
were putting greater weight on 
economic indicators ran g in g from 
the price of gpki and the output of 
factories to personal anecdotes. 

They are also paying more at- 
tention to human psychology: 
notably investors' expectations 
of inflation, an area that has long 
exasperated economists who use 
computer models to predict in- 
flation. 

“I get a fed for what I think is 
going on based on the informa- 
tion — not only the anecdotal 


information in the press and the 
statistical information assem- 
bled and compiled by the staff 
here, but also from the general 
tone of the markets,” said John 
P. La Ware, a Fed governor, who 
added that he also looked at fig- 

Tm probably 
least sensitive to 
the money 
figures because I 
don’t know what 
they mean 
anymore.’ 

John P. LaWare, a 
Fed governor. 

ures on housing starts, employ- 
ment and bank loans. “I'm prob- 
ably least sensitive to the monqr 
figures because I don’t know 
what they mean anymore." 

In looking at so many econom- 
ic indications at the same rirru», 
Fed officials in effect rely on edu- 
cated hunches of what they 
should do, rather than following 
dictates of computer models or a 
couple of key indicators. 

“Policy has become more intu- 
itive over the last year,” said Da- 


vid M. Jones, a longtime Fed 
watcher at Aubrey G. Lanston & 
Co. of New Yak. 

The main reason has to do 
with the discrepancy between 
what happens with the money 
supply and what happens in the 
economy. That is partly a result 
of the enormous growth of mutu- 
al funds, which are left out of the 
main money-supply measures. 

“I came on believing what I 
had been taught — and taught as 
a professor — which was M-2,” 
said Lawrence B : Lindsey, a Fed 
governor and former Harvard 
economics professor. “I don’t 
think I can use it anymore.” 

In place of money-supply fig- 
ures, he said, “we look at a whole 
raft of variables — we ignore 
nothing and focus on nothing.” 

To be sure. Fed officials are 
not flying the economy by the 
seat of their pants. Like many 

E e economists, some Fed of- 
5 tart with computer mod- 
els that assume that various indi- 
cators will signal inflation with 
the same lags as in the past. For 
example; rising inflation rates 
have tended to follow increases 
in the money supply. 

But having concluded that 
such historical patterns are not 
always valid, red officials are 
revising computer models to fit 

See FED, Page 17 


An Emerging-Market Wizard 


By Saul Haiuell 

N ew York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — In 1988, Nico- 
las Rohatyn asked J. P. Morgan & 
Co. to bring him back from Tokyo 
to run its small Latin American 
debt department that sold the de- 
faulted loans that Morgan and oth- 
er banks had made to developing 
countries. 

Today, that department has 
branched out to include emerging 
markets in Asia and Eastern Europe 
as well as in Latin America. And it 
has grown from seven people to 200, 
who now underwrite, trade and seO 
securities, as weD as loans. 

Few areas of the financ i al world 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 

Britain’s Head-in-the-Sand Diplomacy 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — It is a sad quirk of 
history that the closer Britain gets to Unking 
itself to the Continent via the Channel Tun- 
nel (he more insular it seems to become. 

The governing Conservative Party is cur- 
rently gong through extraordinary contor- 
tions to avoid being tarred with the slightest 
trace of Europeanism in the campaign for this 
summer’s European Pariimentaxy elections 
— to the extent that one cabinet minister has 
even said the Conservatives’ Euro-campaign 
will be based on “keeping Britain British." 

Much of the country’s political and intel- 
lectual elite has surrendered to a stultifying 
nihilism towards Europe. But Prime Minis t er 
John Major, in Washington this week to 
mend fences with President Bill Clinton, will 
be deluding Hims elf if he t hinks the U.S. 
relationship can provide an alternative. 

Mr. Major is, by British standards, moder- 
ately pro-European. He was courageous in 

S i c hin p the Maastricht Treaty on European 
nion through Parliament last summer. 
But, like many of his compatriots, he re- 
gards “vision” as a drily word. He is the 
ultimate short-term think er. As President Jac- 
ques Deiors of the European Commission has 
aptly observed, Mr. Major’s views on Europe 
are mari-ad by an “intellectual vac uum .” 

Britain's contribution to the EU is now 
almost entirely negative. The past 18 months 
have seen a limp and sdf -centered British 
Presidency; the pound’s ejection from the 
European Monetary System's exchange-rate 
m echanism; British threats to create a Euro- 
pean crisis if the Uruguay Round failed; 
patronizing British lectures on the idiocy of 
the Continentals' attempts at monetary 


muon; and constant bad blood over Britain’s 
opt-out from the Union's social policy. 

The only European ideas that are not at- 
tacked from London are those that Britain 
hopes will further sabotage the cause of closer 
integration — notably the admission of new 
member states in Northern, Central and 
Easton Europe; British policies and British 
officials are now widely distrusted in Brus- 
sels. 

Yet, astonishingly, British leaders claim 
that their view of Europe’s future has tri- 

Agtonishingly, British 
leaders claim their view of 
Europe’s future has 
triumphed. That is wishful 
thinking . 

innphcd. Thanks to the unpopularity of the 
Maastricht treaty, the rise of European na- 
tionalism, currency crises and recession, Brit- 
ain now believes that the Continent has come 
round to its own long-held view, that there 
will never be a United States of Europe, but 
rather a loose association of nation-states in a 
glorified free-trade area. 

That is wishful thinking. Britain is once 
a g ain hiding its bead in the sand, just as it did 
when it stayed out of the fledgling Common 
Market in the 1950s, on the grounds that the 
Continentals' knavish tricks would not work 
and that Britain was better off sticking to its 
traditional ties with the English-speaking 
world. 

Now Britain's ostrich posture has led h to 
the fallacious conclusion that because the EU 


is currently in trouble it win never integrate 
further. 

It is by no means a foregone conclusion 
that the EtFs further enlargement will water 
the Union down to suit British tastes. The 
British may be surprised by the federalist 
aspirations of new members in Central and 
Eastern Europe — and by the extent to which 
a bigger union will overwhelm the national 
sovereignty of individual states. 

Moves to economic and monetary union 
may have slowed, but they are not dead. Busi- 
ness, which has long been a powerful motor of 
European integration, still wants a common 
currency. The Continental visionaries wbom 
Britain so despises have not given up. 

But the English-speaking option is not 
available any more. The importance of the 
Commonwealth is fast fading, and the United 
States wants to see Britain more, not less, 
involved in Europe. Britain would actually 
increase its influence in Washington if it 
played a more constructive role in European 
integration. 

Washington would prefer to deal with a 
European Union that speaks with one voice; 
failing that, it is likely to continue to pay 
more attention to Bonn and to Paris than to 
London. 

Dean Achesou's much- resen ted comment 
— that Britain had lost an empire but not yet 
found a role — is truer than ever. Maybe 
Britain does not want a role — maybe it is 
just too tired. 

But if it does, that role can only be in 
Europe. And it should be obvious that nega- 
tive, nationalist attitudes are not the best way 
to find it. Much better to accept that the 
sceptered island days are over for good — 
and make the most of the CbunneL 


are as hot as the emerging markets, 
and Morgan’s department is one of 
the largest and most successful on 
Wall Street —as well as rate of the 
most profitable units at Morgan. 

The department's revenue in the 

Sti Lanka's exchange shows snail 

can be good. Page 19. 

last three months of 1993 was about 
$200 milli on, Judah Kraushaar, a 
Merrill Lynch & Co. analyst, said. 
That would surpass the total trading 
revalue of all but three Amoican 
banks. Mr. Rohatyn, 33, is said to be 
among Morgan's best-paid execu- 
tives, with an annual bonus wdl in 
excess of 51 milli on 


Page 15 


Dollar Tumbles 
On View Rates 
Will Not Rise 


“There are a lot of good firms 
getting into this business, but J.P. 
Morgan, along with Salomon Broth- 
ers, stands above the rest,” said Rob 
Citrone, the manager of Fidelity’s 
New Markets Income fund, which 
has more than $400 milli on invested 
in emerging-market bonds. 

Mr. Rohatyn's greatest accom- 
plishment was to foresee the explo- 
sion of investor interest in the 
emerging markets. 

Using the bank's penchant for 
taking large trading positions, Mr. 
Rohatyn was able to offer the li- 
quidity demanded by early specu- 
lative investors. Thai, as tradition- 

See ROHATYN, Page 17 


Compiled by' Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK —The dollar tum- 
bled on Monday, the victim of a 
new perception that U.S. interest 
rates are not beading higher and of 
fallout from the weekend meeting 
of finance officials of the Group of 
Seven industrial countries. Bundes- 
bank hints of stable German inter- 
est rates added to the dollar's woes. 

The US. currency tumbled to 
1.7042 Deutsche marks, a two- 
month low, compared with 1.71 10 
Friday. The dollar also slumped to 
104.585 yen, from 104.800. 

The dollar started its slide when 
a private-sector survey showed in- 
flationary pressures in the United 
States were subdued, lessening 
chances for an interest-rate rise 
that would increase the dollar’s at- 
tractiveness to investors. 

The jprices-paid component of 
the Chicago Association of Pur- 
chasing Management's February 
index dropped, even though the 
overall index climbed. 

The index is considered a barom- 
eter of manufacturing activity. 

Prospects for an increase in U.S. 
rates were further dashed by Law- 
rence Lindsey, a Federal Reserve 
governor, who said the central bank 
might not have to raise interest rates 
soon to keep U.S. inflation at bay. 

Mr. Lindsey's comments were 
seen as an attempt to calm the 
markets, which are looking for the 
next Fed move after the central 
bank pushed up interest rates on 
Feb. 4 for the first time in five 
years, 

“Markets are being jawboned 
into some kind of order after the 
Fed hiked interest rates.” said lan 
Amstad, economist at Bankers 
Trust 

The dollar fell further on com- 
ments from Bundesbank President 
Hans Tietmeyer, who said Germa- 
ny's money-supply figures should 
not be used as inflation signals and 
that caution must prevail when 
foredating monetary policy. 

The comments unsettled traders 
awaiting this week's German M-3 
money-supply report, said David 
Solm, an analyst with Toronto Do- 
minion New York. Dealers “took 
this to mean the German M-3 wiE 


be On the high side and therefore 
the Bundesbank has less cause to 
ease" its credit policy at its council 
meeting Thursday, he said. 

The Bundesbank's decision to re- 
turn to variable interest rates on its 
money-market operations also 
drew investors to the mark in favor 
of the dollar. While the move theo- 
retically allows money market rates 

See DOLLAR, Page 16 

MCI Buys Into 
Wireless Firm 
For$l Billion 

By Edmund L. Andrews 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — In a move 
that will speed the rivalry in wire- 
less telephone communications, 
MCI Communications Corp. said 
Monday it would invest $ I J billion 
in a fast-growing competitor to cel- 
lular telephone operators called 
Nextd Communications Inc. 

MCL which wiD buy 17 percent of 
Nexid, will market that firm’s range 
of digital wireless telephone and 
paging services under its own brand 
name and mil package them with its 
existing long-distance service. 

Tbe new alliance shores up MCTs 
one glaring weakness in the commu- 
nications market, which had been 
the absence of a wireless capability 
to match that of American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co.’s pending 
purchase of McCaw Cellular Com- 
munications Inc. for $126 billion. 

NexteL based in Rutherford, 
New Jersey, is still a start-up in 
comparison with McCaw, which is 
the country’s biggest cellular tele- 
phone operator. But Nextd ac- 
quired radio licenses from Motor- 
ola Inc. that put it in a position to 
reach about 95 percent of the U.S. 
population. 

The new money from MCI will 
be used to construct networks in 
more than a dozen big metropoli- 
tan areas. 


Quite simply the Royal Oak, 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


M 

iUDEMARS PlGUET 

The master watchmaker. 


Cross Ratos 

S C DM. 

Amsterdam MSB 1.128 

bunts 3UB» BJ8B S95 

. Frankfort L71M ISO? 

London fa) l* MJH 

Madrid WAG WSl MP 

iuaa ucam i sms mis 

NwYarktU — 

' Parts U09 M*S 3SS 

Tikyo 18UB USJ» Ml 

Toronto 12B MOW BUB 

Zirlcft 1065 2.1171 

1 ECU Milt 

1SDR UW3 Mfl MW* 


(LEW MW * 


Feb. 28 

Eurocurrancy Deposits 




Feb. 26 

Yen O 

Peseta 




SWISS 


Preach 



1842- 14» 

iji* 


Dollar 

D Mark 

Prone 

Sterltna 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

139*5 JOB 
M41B* L27 

Has* 

UJB4* 

1 monte 


MNb 

4VWV. 

SyrSVh 

HMNe 

TflrVft 

Uw6Va 

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20421 

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SVePA 


4 Mr* 

ShH 

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ram* tores 

— 

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55W% 

SIMM, 

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2ter2 Vk 

(Nadfk 

1620 USUI 

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4SW5H. 

5VWPA 

5>«r5^ 

7'U-Vto 

STM 


Ports UB9 IMS IW — 

Tokyo IMS USJ* Ml ® 

Taranto 132 MOW OHS OSX V 

Zorich L065 2.1171 11364 U 

1ECU 1.WI U» U® {“ £ 

ISM raw Mfl UW* lU4S u 

Closings In Amsterdam, London, New Yori 

’^T^burone sound; b: To but one 
available. 

Other Dollar Values 

CwrancY Per* J*™" £££ 

Arwu. peso awn G nakdroc. 

AoareLS uom 10 2S 

AoUr.icNL isasa Humtorwt 

Mai a. 42M8 2146^ 

OfannyK*. B£8J <*£"*** DJttl 

CncftkoTHM M7 IfM* 

jtoaWikraM W13S ££ 

Etrar. pound 337 * u “ a<n j*“ r EL* 

Fin. markka 5S517 MOkJT.riOS. 


emc mhjB 1-97B 3SSS IAOV »»» 

"U *22. JS Mffl 4*2 s*8- OB 4.IHS* 

uit SUM 2M2 IMS SM SMH 

1M1 • flJW MB* IMt uw« — un- 

S Sms* E£ S* ijjw* ubn U22* 

4*15 VMS UW M® 1310 “ 

(.INS MUS ***** unB 1 * S3 ® 4 

Sew Ybrk and Zurich, flxtop* In other cadem Toronto 

one dorian Onus of W0; N.Q.: not quota*; HA.! not 


Sources: /teuton. Uovtis Bank. 

fbdaapsriaOUe to tolertaik deposits of t! aMton mtobnum (oreauMmU 


tCZWkmd* 
Norw. kn»» 
PMLPCSO 
Ponm ziofy 
pari, escudo 
tea. ruble 
Saudi rtyfll 
S1M-S 


Currency I 
5. Allr. rand 
S.Kor.wM 
Swed. krona 
Tatum s 
TMbcdd 
TOrldffi Ura 
IMEdb-ham 
venez. boftr. 


F or war d Rates iww ***** 

MU auto* ***** SSSSdonur W*W riM*7 

E2SU* ^ ifi ££££ 101 ” ,04 “ ,0M- 

.ftSbuiT 111 MW un4 «_** (ervssels)r Bonco CommerxWt m/tow 

Sources; i»G Bonk r <*w irokrol; Royal Bonk of Corona 

ttorianj; Asence Franco Frasscf^^ aeuiarsondAP. 

OtaoritaUMF /SORJ. Oner data tram Reurnm 


Kay Henay Rates 

United Statu dose 

Dfscomtnde 100 

mmtrate 650 

Federal funds 3% 

SmnatliCIH ITS 

Comm, paper M dan ISO 

Montti Trecwnr MB 135 

^nor Treasury Mil 352 

s-vear Treasury note 4 M 

S-vear Treasury min 557 

7-year Treasury mm 5L73 

toner Treasury note 6.13 

toner Tneasery bead 656 

Merrill Lynch today Ready ooMf nA 


Discount rate 
Con money 
l-maatti Interbank 
3-anam latortxuit 
t-mantti interbank 
»yMn- Government hand 
Germany 
Lombard rote 
Coll money 
l-montti lut ertwnk 
T^noattt latertwak 
6-manPi imertwek 
MMmor Bead 


VHnte 

Bank base rate 
fin money 
1-montti brtsrtmk 
3-moath Interbank 
taioatti taferbaak 
toyearGHt 


S* 5V. 
550 P* 
SVa S*> 
SVa 5tt , 
5 th 5V. 
6.72 751 


In te rvention rate 650 620 

Coflnwaey J* 

Vmooth tetertwnk 6% ** 

Smooth hfcrbMk M 4* 

6-maadi interbank 5* 650 

H-yoarOAT 6-13 624 

Sourced.' Reuters, Bloomberg, Merrill 
Lynch, Bank a! Tokyo, Commerxbonk, 
Greermell Montagu, Credit Lvoonats. 



AM. 

PM. 

Ck'se 

Zorich 

nn. 

38150 

+ 250 

London 

38075 

381 JS 

+ 260 

1 

I 

38150 

vwqi 

+ 270 


US. dorian nor ounce. London oHtdat itr- 
Inos; Zurich OM New York epenlnp and cktt- 
topprfcev Hew York Comes (AorM 
Source: Reuters. 


For inTivnutinn anti i^iiali^uc. pIc-.Lsc write* u>- 
Ainkucirs Pipuet il Ctc .S.A.. I.VhH Ll* IlmsMis, SwiiAitjnd. 
Tot. -l! 21 .11 KlX 4l ft-rt 4- I I 


An octagonal sted 
portlmle wurtil by 
dqht white gold bolts: 
the most striking feature 
. of the exclusive 
^Sv Royal Oak design. 





Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 


.** 


MARKET DIARY 


Blue-Chip Cains 
Go Up in Smoke 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — A slide in to- 
bacco stocks pulled the Dow Jones 
industrial average down in a late 
slide Monday, but other market 
gauges closed with modest gains. 

The Dow closed down 6.76 
points at 3,832.02. The index was 

H.Y. Stocks 

hit by a slide in Philip Morris, 
which lost to 55%, after the 
federal government said it had evi- 
dence the tobacco companies delib- 
erately put enough nicotine in ciga- 
rettes to keep smokers addicted. 

The broader market was able to 
bold its gains, with advancers edging 
dediners by a 2-to-l ratio on the 
New York Stock Exchange in active 
volume of 25621 million shares. 

Philip Morris and the rival RJR 
Nabisco, which slipped % to 6%, 
topped the New York Stock Ex- 
change's most-active list because the 
Food and Drug A dmin istration's 
findings could be legal grounds for 
the government to reclassify ciga- 
rettes as drugs and ban them from 
the American marketplace. 

Philip Morris, the world’s largest 
tobacco company, disputed the 
FDA’s contention. The company 
said nothing in processing tobacco 
or making cigarettes increases the 
nicotine content. 

Wall Street analysts raised doubts 
about whether the FDA would get 
regulatory control of the cigarette 
industry. ‘They tried something like 
this back in the ’20s and called it 
Prohibition.*' said Anthony 
Hiischler, chief investment officer of 
Brandywine Asset Management 


“Maybe we have some folks today 
in Washington that think they can 
change human behavior.’' 

The broad market and Treasury 
bond prices rose as concerns about 
rising interest rates were shoved to 
the back burner. 

Comments from a Federal Re- 
serve governor and a regional pur- 
chasing managers survey showing 
inflation in check eased fears that 
U.S. interest rates were headed for 
an imminent climb. Rate jitters had 
driven stock and bond prices down 
last week. 

The benchmark 30-year Trea- 
sury bond rose 20/32, to 94 24/32, 
with the yield slipping to 6.66 per- 
cent from 6.71 percent Friday. 

The broad stock market was un- 
derpinned by bargain-hunting after 
last week’s drop. Heavy industrial 
and auto stocks found favor, with 
Ford rising % to 62% in active trad- 
ing. General Motors also found its 
way onto the most-active listed but 
finished unchanged at 58%. 

Kmart added % to 19% in active 
trading despite reporting a loss in 
the fourth quarter. Investors fo- 
cused on Lhe reason for the loss, 
which was to close smaller stores 
and drop its Pay Less Drug and 
PACE membership warehouse 
businesses. 

In Nasdaq trading, MCI Com- 
munications gained y» to 27% to 
lead the most-active list MCI an- 
nounced a SI. 3 billion investment 
in Nortel one of the nation's larg- 
est mobile radio companies. Nextei 
Communications was the second- 
most-active over- thocounter stock, 
rising 5% to 43%. 

(Bloomberg, Knight-Ridder, AP) 


DOLLAR: Tumbles on Rate View 


Continued from Page IS 
to fall below the 6.0 percent they 
had been fixed at since mid-No- 
vember, it may actually result in 
the rate rising, traders said. 

They noted that the current 
lightness of the money market 

Foreign Exchange 

could cause banks to bid high to 
ensure they receive necessary 
funds. 

Sentiment that the lack of an 
agreement on exchange rates over 
the weekend by G-7 finance offi- 
cials could allow the yen to rise also 
burdened the dollar, said Win 
Thin, an analyst with MCM Cur- 
rency Watch. The inaction suggests 
that Japan remains isolated on the 
issue, and that the other nations are 
content to back the U.S. stance in 
seeking a higher yen to offset trade 
imbalances, he said. 

The lack of a statement from G-7 
members decrying currency volatil- 
ity as undesirable, which typically 
emerges from such meetings, also 
was taken by traders to mean that 


the U.S. -Japan trade deadlock re- 
mains a problem. 

Amy Smith, an analyst with the 
IDEA advisory firm, said technical 
factors also could kick in favoring 
the yen. “Market attention is un- 
doubtedly focused on the yen. with 
technical traders now looking for 
the yen to appreciate against the 
dollar to I02J0 in the short term,” 
she said 

Analysis said the dollar's weak- 
ness could continue through the 
week because economic data due 
out are expected to be on the shaky 
side, reflecting severe winter weath- 
er in much of the United States in 
January and the California earth- 
quake. Employment data for Janu- 
ary are due Friday. 

Some position-squaring on the 
last trading day of the month also 
weighed on tire dollar. The U.S. 
currency slipped to 5.7905 French 
francs, from 5.8100 Friday, and 
was stable against the Swiss franc 
at 1.4259. 

The pound, however, slipped to 
S1.4855 from SI. 4885. 
(Knight-Ridder, Bloomberg, AFX) 





DTT 


NYSE Most Actives 


VOL Htoh 

LOW 

Last 

Chg. 

RJR Nab 


6V, 

6% 

— % 

PMMr 

41559 57% 

45% 

Ufa 

-2% 


29100 19% 

1B% 

19% 

+ Vi 


27428 15% 

14% 

15% 

- % 



*7% 

*7% 

—1 


2*383 33% 

STM 

32% 

+ % 

Zenith E 

25207 13% 

12M 

13 


GnMarr 

BTTfTP™ 

SB% 

58% 


BloCkE 

U- ■ 1 ' r 

26% 

26% 

+ % 

FedrOS 


23% 

24 

— % 



75% 

76’« 

• Ui 

SduPacn 

19420 21% 

20% 

21% 

+ % 



62 


+ % 

ColHCA 


41% 

43 

-2% 

cocoa 

17410 43% 

42% 

42% 



NASDAQ Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Ifigh Low Lmt Chg. 

mOU5 3348J4 3BS228 3833X7 3832X5 -4.74 
Trans 1765. IB 1769X0 1759X9 176231 -022 
Uffl ,209.33 510,72 20M1 21045 +204 
Comp 1383JB 1385.86 1379.91 13KL57 -044 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


High Low Close COte 
Industrials S49JM 54638 54*49 + 1X1 
Tramp. <HUH 42648 42545 — g si 

Utilities 1*2.94 141J6 11225* + 0X0 

FlOPrtce 44 JS 4190 43.71 — Ml 

5PS00 4*9.14 44*07 4*7.14 + 1X7 

5P100 436.15 433232 4317* +044 


NYSE Indexes 


Htth Law Lem Chg, 

composite 26004 2565? 259223 -04* 

industrials 32 un 31194 31975 -081 

Transp. 27081 26947 369 JO —a 14 

uratrv 71 8X9 21649 217.71 -1JB2 

Finance 21 456 21344 21181 -0224 


NASDAQ Indexes 


HMi tm Lai an. 


Composite 

Industrials 

Oartcs 

Insurance 

Flnwice 

Troup. 

Telecom 


791.78 787 JO 79178 
83433 828.91 83433 
690229 687 46 69029 
92871 923.53 92B71 
89041 88*42 89041 
79*54 789.13 79654 


-8X0 
-8.61 
-3.03 
- *44 
-4.94 
-748 


175.22 17343 17445 -3.Q5 


AMEX Stock Index 


Mah Low Last am. 
471219 4*745 471 214 . X8V 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 

10 Utilities 
10 Industrials 


Close 

10343 

101.78 

10548 


Cb-ge 

— 825 

— 0J1 

— 020 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Close High Law Prgv.Ctac 


Mor 

BBS 

890 

B9S 

885 

901 

Alar 

909 

910 

919 

909 

92* 

Jul 

922 

922 

9W 

922 

93* 

SOP 

934 

935 

940 

934 

950 


Food 

Stari?i& pwmrtrk: tan-Jot* of 18 »w 

903 
927 
938 
930 

Esf. volume: *.128 
COFFEE (LCE) 

Dollars per metric HHHots of 9 mu 

1.19* 1.197 IXIS 1.190 )SY! 1.218 
Mar 
JHl 
Sop 

NOV 

Jw . . 

Mar N.Q. 1X15 N.T. 

Est. volume: 4J58 
High LOW 
WHITE SUGAR (Motif) 

Dollars per metnc tm -lots of SO tan 

MOV 324J00 31650 32300 MiM + ISb 

Aim 321 JO JT7J0 319j00 320IB + 150 

00 30*00 30100 381X0 + I JO 

DOC N.T. N.T. 297 M 299X0 + 110 

Mar N.T. N.T. 29*XQ 298X0 + 0J0 

Est. volume: 439. Open Int.: 11492. 


ims taw uae ijem uk 

1X14 12ZIB 1330 ljio 132 1.234 

1218 1222 1 1-229 MIB 1.232 1^4 

N.Q. 1.20 1532 14J7 1533 1337 

NJ3. 1222 12229 1,215 (ML IUL 

N.T. — — 


Close 


CDVe 


Metals 


Previous 
8M Ask 


Market Sales 



VOL 

Mgb 

Low 

Last 

Chg. 


rrn 

27’* 

26% 

27% 

+ % 

Garanr 

ICa 

Vu 

Vp 

Vn 

_ 

NextelCm 

42184 44% 



+ 5H 



l%* 

l*« 


+ U« 



24% 

23% 

23% 




26V, 

25% 

25% 




3% 

2% 

3% 

+v» 


24917 69% 

68 





20% 

19% 



NwCmwt 

71798 

% 

.9% 

% 

_ 


20009 20% 

20% 




25% 

2*% 





24% 

23% 

23% 




83 

81 

82% 

+ 1Vj 

Artsft 

17290 

20% 

18% 

19% 



NYSE Diary 


dan Prev. 





Declined 

73* 

M3 

Unchanged 

572 

628 

Total issues 

27 SB 

2740 

New Hums 

87 

47 

New Laws 

47 

77 


2*7440400 

■PJ9S80B 


NYSE 4 pjn. volume ... 

NYSE urev. cons, dose 329, _ 

Ames 4 putt, volume 16486,960 

Amfue prev. cona. dose 1&824000 

NASDAQ 4 pjn. volume 252X40X00 

NASDAQ prev. 4 pjn. volume 785448400 


N.Y.S.E. Odd-Lot Trading 


Buy Sales Short* 
FetJ.25 96*736 1450717 56275 

Feb. 24 945X58 1.933.19* 169450 

Fob. 33 96)544 >410,752 41433 

Feb. 22 1417.916 14*4455 14401 

Fob. 18 1X46X7* 1J29.Ua 37299 


SAP 100 Index Options 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 

DecHned 

Unchanged 

Tow issues 

NewHtohs 
New Lows 


Close Prev. 

38* 281 

234 2*4 

218 341 

838 816 

20 11 

11 14 


NASDAQ Diary 



aou 

Prev. 


2054 

1404 

Dadlnad 

1132 

1385 

Unchanged 

1620 

1814 

Totte issues 

4BSI6 

4603 

New Highs 

120 

9a 

New Laws 

48 

61 


Strike 
Price Mo- 

Colft-Lasff 

Apr May Jem 

Mar 

Feb. 25 

Psts-Lxaf 

A or May Jo* 

JK 

— 

— 



mm 

1* 

to 



385 









to 






jn 



_ 



_ 

1* 

r 

_ 

_ 

395 







mm 

4 

1% 

m 



400 



14 

_ 

__ 

tv 

1% 

Ito 


<85 





_ 


Ik 

is 

Ih 


410 

75 



311- 



*1 

2% 

at 

4 

415 

2DVj 

_ 

_ 



Ih 

m 

5% 


430 

15 

1BV, 

Vf. 



Ih 

n 

6% 

Ito 

425 

11% 

14 


— 

Ft 

5% 

71k 


430 

7% 

Wt 

I] 


3% 

Ms 

♦to 

iito 

435 

4V, 

7% 

n 



Ft 

Ik. 

life 


448 

z« 

« 

7 

9 

PA 

M 

iito 

15% 

<45 

« 

Vs 

A. 



IT* 

in* 

_ 


450 

% 

11* 

H 


17% 

10 

av> 



*55 


% 

1% 

— 

— 

a 

— 

— 


Close 

Bid Ask 
ALUMINUM [Hie* Grade? 

Dal tors per metric tun 
Spat J2BB5D 139250 129200 129400 

Forward 1 311 131200 1 31 400 1315X0 

COPPER CATHODES (Hlotl Grade) 

Dollars per metric ton 

Soot IBftOOO 18*100 186440 186600 

Forward 188329 1884.00 1*7X0 1688.00 

LEAD 

Doilara per metric ran 

Soot 47140 47240 47440 47SJ0 

Forward 485.00 48600 48600 48900 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric ton 
Spot 58*500 587000 58*000 587000 

Forward 591500 592000 592000 592500 

TIN 

Dollars per metric tor 

Spat 5445X0 5450.00 5470X0 548000 

Forward 548000 5485.00 549000 549500 

zinc (Special Hloh Grade) 

Dollars per metric ton 

Spat 947 JM 94900 95650 95650 

Forward 96500 *6700 97300 97400 


HIM 

GASOIL UPE) 


Industrials 

Lost seme orae 


LOW 


U 5. del tar* per metric fen-Wi ot i« wn* 
Mar 14150 14000 140JD MOJO + LOO 

140 J5 1 vsa Sun 1^000 + |-g 

14025 139 JO 13923 139J0 + 125 

14075 1400 14025 I40» + 1X0 

14225 1*200 14225 14225 + 1X0 

N.T. N.T. N.T. UL73 +W5 

14700 146J0 14*50 14425 + 1X0 

149 J5 14950 14* JO 149.75 + 1X0 

N.T. N.T. N.T 15200 +125 

15400 15325 15400 15400 +1J0 

15425 15450 15423 13*25 +I2| 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 15*25 +125 


Apr 

MOV 

Jim 

Jol 

AUB 

Sep 

00 

Nov 

Dec 

Jan 

Feb 


Est. volume: HUB*. Open Hit. 122256 


BRENT CRUDE OIL UPE) 

US. dollars per barreHM* ot 1XSQ barrels 
Apr 1306 1327 1326 1325 — 0,12 

May 1328 1148 U5fl 1149 -08? 

Jan 119S 1164 1305 1305 -DOS 

Jot 1409 1171 1321 U2l -021 

Aug 1426 1150 TIM 1190 -W5 

5eo N.T. N.T. N.T. M23 +0JB 

O0 N.T. N.T. N.T. 1400 — 0X6 

NOV 1400 14X0 14X0 1400 -005 

DOC MJS 1455 MJ5 1455 —020 

Est. volume: 3X106 ■ Open bit. 138250 


Stock Indexes 

FTSE IN (LIFFE) 

12 s per index poW 

Mar 3327.0 32820 33190 +510 

Job 33325 33013 33325 +S2D 

5«P N.T. N.T. 33510 + 520 

E st. volume: 14082. Own ini.-. 75098. 
Sources: Reuters. Motif, Associated Press. 
Loncton mn Financial Futures Exchange, 

tuft Petroleum Exchange. 


Spot Commodities 


Financial 

High Low Close Change 
3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 
SSMOM-ptsol 1« pci 


Mar 

94X3 

9*81 

94X3 

-1-0X4 



sn 

Jan 

Se« 

94.92 

9679 

94X7 

9*70 

9*79 

+0X9 
+ 0.12 

* -revised payable d ale. 


Dec 

9*65 

9*57 

9*64 

+011 

ii.reBj.ccr. 

Mar 

94*0 

94.32 

9*40 

+ 015 

imireBr 

•memo* 



9*10 


9*10 

+ 0.16 


Q 

.15 

Sea 

9179 

93J3 

93X0 

+ 01* 


8 

0*5 

Dec 

9150 

9145 

9151 

+ 0.13 

Fst Natl BncP 

19 

Mar 

9323 

9120 

9126 

+ 076 


0 

03 

Jun 

93X1 

9298 

9103 

+ 015 

U1Q Bkshrs Inc 

Q 

J* 


Est. volume: 5322*. Open Int.: 442222. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS L LIFFE) 

ST million - pts of 108 p0 


Mar 

9624 

9623 

9624 

+ 002 

Jun 

95X6 

95X4 

95X5 

+ 002 

Sep 

95X2 

95X2 

95J54 

+ 0X4 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

95.15 

+ 0X5 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9*95 

+0X5 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9*70 

+ 004 

sop 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9*49 

+ 005 


m to 
445 K 
Coni: total voL 10U5J: total 
PMi; trial vaL iuu laM open 


1 S - - - - 


open H. 421274 
Wt 34161* 


Price DecM Dec 95 DecN DecN DkB DecM 
lift - - - to - - 

35 — — — 4* — — 

37VI—- — H.1L- 

m - - - ih - 2 w 

- - - Hft- 

45 1*1 — — J - - 

«U S - - - - - 

Cate: total vsl&th.-MI open HL2*a 
Puis: toraf voi. 1353.- total odm tot. Ml 489 


-ptSOf IMP0 



9*25 

9*18 

9*20 

+ 0X1 

9*6* 

9460 

9*62 

+ 0X2 

94X9 

94X3 

94JA 

+ 005 

94.99 

94X9 

9*94 

+ 0X7 

95X5 

9*99 

95X3 

+ 0.11 

9*95 

9*88 

9493 

+ 010 

9*81 

9*72 

9*77 

+ 008 

9464 

9*50 

94X3 

+ O10 

9*52 

9464 

9*52 

+ OII 

9*41 

94X5 

9*39 

+ 011 


Est. volume: 14a Omm int. : 14647. 

3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM1 — 

Mar 
Jon 
5ep 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 

Jen . 

Est. volume: 169213. Open hit.: 1004.993. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

08000 - pts A Stads of IN P0 
Mar 173-23 113-02 113-1* +0-22 

Jun 112-28 11248 112-22 +0-2! 

SOP N.T. N.T. 111-2* +0-21 

Est volume: HU, 959. Open Int.: 1930*1 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 250000 -Pts Of IN P0 
Mar 97 JO 9663 96.93 + 064 

Jun 96.90 9635 *665 +065 

SOP 9673 963* 9652 +0*4 

Est. volume: 209042 Open Int.: 274,177. 


C om modity 
Aluminum, id 
Cbffee. Brcte.Hi 
Cooper rtearotyttc. m 
Iran FOB, tan 
Lead, ib 
Sirvwvtroyaz 
Steel (scrap), Ian 
Tin, lb 
Zinc Ib 


Uos 

Today 

Prev. 

0585 

0587 




0985 

71100 

211X0 

034 

034 

SJ1 

621 

14000 

13133 

1*4*3 

364*3 

04623 

04559 


Dhrfdands 


Company 


Per Amt Par Rec 
CORRECTION 


Wesfcarp Inc 


Q SOS 


4-1 
H 

_ - 4-1 

>8 3-18 


3-1 


REDUCED 

0 JR 3-18 


Ameriano Bren 
American Precision 
Bandog Inc 
FNB Carp 
Former Bros 
Flltertek 
Intercfianae Fin 
JLG Indus! 

Kent ExpMM Ea 
Kent Fixed Inca 
Kent Index Eg 
K ent Ltd Matur 
Kent Value PhtsEa 
LSB Bncshrs SC 
MosonDlxen Bncshr 
Nthn Telecom 
snmtCorp 
Storage Prop 
TJ Inti 
Tredegar Ind 
TrustCa Bk NY. 


Q .15 
Q 31* 
Q .175 
Q sn 
Q JO 
Q .045 
Q .175 
. SOS 
M .0075 
m m 
M J175 
m sn 

M JJ225 
Q .17 
O 32 
O J» 
Q m 

_ sn 
Q MS 
Q .06 
Q -25 


STOCK 


3-18 +1 

3-25 +13 
Ml +20 
3-TO 3-ii 
+15 5-2 

5-2 5-1* 
Ml +20 
3-15 +1 

2-25 3+ 

2-25 3+ 

2-25 3+ 

2-25 3-4 

2-25 34 

2- 28 3-15 
34 3-15 

3- 11 331 

3-11 3-18 
331 +15 
3-25 +20 
3-18 +1 

34 +T 


+1 


Fsi SvgsBk NJ - 10% 3-15 

Noel Group X 2-28 2-28 

■-distribution 0 .17543 shares of Beldlna He- 
min wav for-each share held, 
a-annoat; o-payoMe In Canadian hinds; m- 
maatblr; o-aowtertr; s-semi-anmial 


If .Sv/AT THE CLOSE 


Viacom Net Surges on MTV Profit 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) —Viacom Inc., paced by a strong perfor- 
mance from its MTV cable channel, said that its fourth-quarter earnings 
had more than doubled. 



the year before. _ 

Viacom, which is set to acquire Paramount Communications Inc. for 
about $9.8 billion next month, said .the driving force bdrind the year’s 
growth was MTV, which recorded a 39 percent jump in earnings. 

Bollinger Buys Chicago Sun-Times 

CHICAGO (AP) — The Chicago Sun-Tunes, the llth-lar 
daily newspaper, will be acquired by a unit of HoDingier Ino, a I 
media company, for about $180 million, HoIImger said Monday. 

Under an agreement to dose by March 31, a subsidiary of American 
Publishing Co. will acquire all outstanding stock of the Son-Times Co. 
American is Hollinger’s U.S. division and HoDinger also has papers in 
Canaria, the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and Israel 
The agreement includes 60 weekly and biweekly papers in the Chicago 

lid. The Sun-Times said 


area published by the Sun-Times, Hoflinger saic 

management at the newspaper will remain in place after the sale and there 
are “no plans for significant staff reductions.’* 1 •; 

Natural Disasters Trim AetnaProfil 

HARTFORD, Connecticut (AP) — Aetna Life &- Casualty Co. said 
Monday it expected first-quarter earnings to be reduced by about $120 
milli on as a result of losses from the Los Angeles earthquake and recent 
winter steams. 

Aetna estimated its losses from (he recent earthquake would reach $80 
milli on, after reinsurance and taxes, with a total of about 2^00 claims. 
The company also said it expected to receive about 31,000 claim* from a 
series of winter storms that struck between Jan. 6 and Feb. 12, with losses 
of about $40 million, after reinsurance and taxes. 

Kmart Suffers Loss for 4th Quarter 


CHICAGO (Combined Dispatches) — Kmart Corp. reported Monday 
a fourth-quarter loss of $615 million from continuing operations as the 
company embarked on an aggressive program of restructuring. 

A year earlier it had posted a gain of $501 million. * 

In January, the company announced a pretax restructuring charge of 
$135 billion, or $862 million after taxes, to cover expenses associated 
with store closures, modernization programs and other nonrecurring, 
items. (Knight-Ridder, Bloomberg). 

H&R Block Reports 3d-Quarter Loss ; 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (Combined Dispatches) —H&R Block Inc.' 
reported Monday a third-quarter loss from continuing operations of| 
$17.9 million. It blamed its tax services unit which lost more money in> 
the current quarter than it did a year ago. • 

In the same quarter a year earlier, Block had posted a profit from 
operations of $5.69 milli on. . 

Block said pretax earnings at CompuServe Imx, its communications' 
and information subsidiary, had risen 54 percent to $29 J milli on. Block! 
said CompuServe’s on-line service now has 1.7 million members world- 1 
wide, including 100,000 in Europe. It said the firm is acquiring 60.00C( 
new members for its on-line service each month. ( Reuters , Bloomberg), 

FortheRecord 

Whittle Communications said it was suspending its television program-' 
ming for doctors* waiting rooms. At least 150 of Whittle's 1,100 employ-, 
ees are to be laid off. The service has never been profitable. (APy 

Pratt & Lambert Int, looking to broaden its distribution channels, said 
it would acquire United Coatings Inc; for about S108 mQlion. in — *■ 1 
stock and assumed debt- (Bk 


German Strikes Spread to Transport Sector 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — Around 50.000 public-sector 
workers disrupted transport services in Germany 
on Monday as industrial unrest spread beyond the 
metal-working industry. 

Germany's largest public-service union, the 
OeTV, said 30,000 workers had taken part in the 
action in Germany’s most populous state of North 
Rhine-Westphalia alone. 


“The willingness to strike is greater than in 
previous years,” an OeTV official. Dieter Weber, 
said in Cologne. 

Bus and train drivers walked off their jobs for 
several hours during the morning, makin g thou- 
sands of commuters late for work. 

The action, against employers' calls for a wage 
freeze and benefit cuts, was the latest in a series of 
disputes over pay and job security to hit Germany. 


Bonn Warns France’s Elf Weekend Box OfWeo 

Reuters 

BONN — Germany warned the 
French energy company Elf Aqui- 
taine on Monday that it could face 
huge claims for damage and that 
its image would suffer if did not 
honor a contract to build an oil 
refinery in Eastern Germany! 




The Associated Press J 

LOS ANGELES — “On Deadly Ground” continued to top the* 
weekend box office, earning an estimated S6.5 million. Following are the 
Top 1 0 moneymakers based on Friday ticket sales and estimated sales ftVr 
Saturday and Sunday. 


Forimwrimanf infeemaion 

read TWMOfCf REPORT 

every ScJurday h lhe HT 


1. “On Deadly Graumf ' 

2. "Ace Ventura, Pet Detective" 

3. "Sugar Hill" 

"4. "Blue Chios - 

5. "Blank Check" 

6 "Reality Bites" 

7. "Mrs. Ooulrtflre" 

& "Schindler's UsT 
9. "8 Seconds" 

10. -My Fattier lhe Hera" 


(Warner Brothers) 
{Warner Brothers) 

t Twentieth Century-Fox) 
l Par am ount) - - 

( Watt Disney) 

( universal ) 

( Twentieth Century-Fax) 
(Universal) 

(New Line Cinema) 
{Touchstone Pictures) 


MJ million 
5*4 million 
SSJ million 
•" Mammon' 
S4 million 
ELS million 
S2B5 mflllon 
*28 million 
0.7 million 
*2J million 



.-rt- ; , v .j" ' • 

‘'i 

rr'S’“ . - 

■ 

...v- . -i " 


" • 

•i 

dp*'/* ■* 


-r 

c . _ - 

■ill--". 


. $Banke« 

jtfroblem 


T-5U- 

’ ' 

i . j . .. - • 

« • 

£ * ' ' : ■’ 

fir l' ' 

nrV ; - - 

s:^‘ 
ff r_: " - 
j=i-- '■'* 

ft"-'’ 
Mr- -1 . - 
iizl-" 


wm\ j 


fc!7 : VV 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Afleno t France Pratw Feb. 78 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HM 
acf Holding 

Aeoon 
Ahold 
A kzo 
AMEV 

Bols-Wesmen 
CSM 
DSM 
Elsevier 
Fo**er 
G Hi -Brocades 
HBG 
Heine ken 
Haooavens 


*0.90 *070 
58J0 57 

WJO 97.70 
BUM 50 JO 
7I3J0 211 

7010 78 

44.16 42 

74J0 73.10 
T11J0 109.10 
110.90 17050 
2170 ITJO 
5370 5240 

287 JO 28650 

232 99*50 
*090 59.40 


Hunter Douglas 8970 87 J» 


IHC Co land 
Inter Mueller 
Inti Nederland 
KLM 
KNP BT 

NrHlloiH 

Oce GrlnTen 
Pokhoed 
Philips 
Pohraram 
Rabeco 
Radamco 
Rallnco 
Ranvrto 
Roval Dulcn 
Slork 
Unilever 
Von Ommtren 
VNU 


43.70 4280 

8770 87 

8610 8630 
4620 47 JK) 
45JMI 

72.90 7230 

7020 77 JO 

55JO 5560 

47 JO 46 
7750 73J0 
12690 12640 
*210 *230 

129 JO 128.90 

9770 9680 

204.70 201 JO 
4270 4150 

215.90 21370 

49 JO 48J0 
18150 1*4 


Wollers/Kluwer 119.10 117J0 


Brussels 


Acec-UM 
AG Fin 

Arbod 
Barca 
Befcaeri 
Cockerlll 
code aa 
Delhalie 
Elecfrabel 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevaerl 
Kreeiolbonk 
Petr an™ 
Pawerfln 
Royal Boise 
Soc Gen Banaue 


2*30 2*15 
NA 2*40 
4100 4130 
2370 2400 
24700 24550 
17* 177 

56*0 5*50 
HA 1418 
6470 6400 
1550 1540 
4295 4275 
9520 9280 
7*50 7430 
10300 10175 
3350 3310 
5780 5*00 
8450 B4AQ 


Soc Gen Belgique 2785 27*0 

Soflna 15150 14875 

Solway 14850 14450 

Troctebel 11250 I1C30 

UCB NA 24300 


Frankfurt 

AEG 1*7 1*5 

Allianz Hold 2550 2530 
Altana A14J0 *37 

AskO <060 1039 

BASF 29870 293 

Bayer 3*4.10357.10 

Bay. HvDO bank 451 450 
Bay verelnsbk 499J0 soo 
BBC 470 475 

BHF Bank 438J0 440 

BMW 831 821 JO 

Commerzbarac 344J0 348 

Continental 264J0 2*0 
Daimler Benz 
Denma 

. Ot Babcock 

Deutsche Bank 
Douglas 
Dresdner Bank 
Feld mutate 
F Kruno Hoesth 


Haraoner 
Henkel 
Hochtief 
11000191 
Holzmarm 
Horten 
IIWKA 
Kail Sail 
Kandadt 
Koufhaf 
KHD 

KtoecknerWerke 130 129 


812 807 JO 
514 501 

24670 242 
80S 808.10 
551 54* 

406 409 JO 
334J0 330 

1*3 183 

333339 JO 
*12 405 
1090 1090 
306 29* 
977 975 
230230J0 
38X50 388 

152 151 

54* 537 

47* 4*4 
1347013270 


Unde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Momeimaart 

MeiaifaeKii 

Muench Rued* 

Porsche 

Proussoo 

PWA 

RWE 

RiMinmotall 

Schertna 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thyssen 

Varia 

Veba 

VEW 

Vtog 

Volkswagen 

Wei la 


MLSI 8SB 
* 17517230 
42SJ0 418 

4,5 

189 JO 11620 
3370 3350 
873 8*9 
47ZJ0 471 
22*22670 
45244970 
320 322 

1092 1047 
391 381 
uajo*7?Jo 
255 252 

359 349 

481 478 

348 348 
484 479 JO 
440 440 
802 80S 


On e e Prev. 


Helsinki 


Amor-YMyma 

Enso-Gutzell 

Hutitamakl 

KXXP. 

Kymmens 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pohlola 

Renola 

Stockmann 


155 151 
4140 43.40 
219 215 
1190 1380 
127 129 

228 215 

310 309 
100 98 

112 113 
300 299 


HEX Index |J879J* 
Prevlom : 187* 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 37 3475 

Calhav Pacific 11 JO 

Cheung Kang 44J0 4275 
Chino Llgfrt Pwr 41.25 41 

Dairy Farm InTI 1270 1170 
Hano Lung Dev 16 1570 
Hana Seng Bar* *9 6750 
Henderson Land 4875 4475 
HK Air Ena. 4650 46 

HK China Gas 2030 19J0 
HK Electric 7470 2370 
HK Land 2660 2570 

HK Realty Trust 24J0 23J0 
HSBC Holdings 114 ill 
hk Shang Hha 1270 1241 
HK Tetecomm 1450 14 JO 
HK Ferry 1130 10.90 

Hutch Whamnoa 34.75 33 

HvsanDev wm 2570 
Jardlne Math. 67 JO 6450 
Jardlna Sir Hid 3075 30 

Kawkxm Motor 1610 1610 
Mandarin Orlem 11.40 IftSQ 
Miramar Hold 2470 2140 
New World Dev 32.75 JITS 
SHK Proas 59 JO 5650 
Stelux 5L05 498 

Swire PdC A 5550 S3 
Tp I Cheung Pros 1370 12J0 
TVE 3J0 150 

Wharf Hold 3150 30 

wing On lull itjo 1270 
Wlnsorlnd. I2J0 1150 
Hang Seng Index : 1091078 
Provloai : 1010870 


Johannesburg 

AECI 
Attach 
Anglo Amer 
Borlows 
Blvvoor 
Buffets 
De Been 
Drlefontetn 
Gencor 
G FSA 

Harmony 

Hlghveld Steel 
Kloof 

Nedbank Grp 
Randfartteln 
Russia! 

SA Brews 
SI Helena 
Sasol 
WelKom 

deep 

J 4855.1* 


20 

20 

9175 9150 

193 

190 

Z7J5 2725 

8 

0 

48X0 

4* 

103 

99 

57X0 

51 

8A0 

030 

94X0 

93 

2* 

» 

17X0 

IB 

46X0 4150 

26X0 

36 

39X0 

39 

83 

B2 

82 

83 

42 

41 

22 

22 

NJL 

42 

185X0 

IBB 


London 

ADbcv Nan 603 
Anted Lyons 
Aria Wiaglns 
Argyll Group 


US 

274 

2J5 


Ass Brit Foods 650 


BAA 
BAe 
Bank Scotland 
Bard ays 
Bass 
BAT 
BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boats 
Bowoter 
BP 

Brti Airways 
Bril Gas 
Brit steel 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Cable Wire 
CotfaurvSdi 
Ca radon 
Coals VI yd I a 
Communion 
CaurteuWs 
ECCGrauo 
Enterprise oil 
Eurotunnel 

F Isons 
Forte 
GEC 

Own acc 

Gkuo 

Grand Mel 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlllsdawn 

HSBC Hides 

ICI 


10.10 

577 

2.19 

SJ3 

577 

4J2 

U1 

3JC’ 

7.18 

645 

5.10 

3J7 

4J3 

372 

1.44 

473 

3J7 

470 

5»4 

477 

lift 

6» 

870 

498 

428 

STS 

IT* 

2JB 

370 

447 

678 

482 

Zl* 

ST* 

602 

3.77 

1.74 

970 

761 


5JB 

614 

287 

247 

SJ2 

9J» 

693 

Z15 

579 

528 

477 

141 
343 
693 
57* 
688 
343 
445 
118 

142 

478 
3JB 
4*1 
105 
402 
2JB 
628 
4.92 
675 
422 
572 
177 
357 
370 
631 
68* 
470 
7.11 
572 
69/ 
278 
173 
9J6 
7J5 



Clo»e Prev. 


5X8 


Kingfisher 

600 

5X3 

Lod broke 

2X6 

2XS 

Land Sec 

7J2 

7.14 

Laporte 

617 

620 

utsmo 

1-30 

127 

Legal Gen Grp 

*95 

*92 

Lloyds Bank 

600 

6X8 

Marks Sp 

*25 

*19 

MEPC 

5X8 

492 

Nan Power 

*93 

*00 

NatWest 

5X2 

*98 

NthWst Water 

SSI 

5X7 

Pearson 

7X0 

*90 

PB.O 

679 


Pllklmtan 

193 

195 

PowerGen 

5X0 

5X5 

Prudential 

123 

324 

Rank Ora 

1094 

1170 

RecklttCoi 

695 

687 

Redtond 

5193 

682 

Read Inti 

9X7 

892 

Reuters 

BUD 

19.98 

RMC Group 

9-58 

9X5 

Rolls Royer 

190 


Rathmn (unit) 

*35 

4X4 

Ravel Scot 

4X2 

4X5 

RTZ 

OSS 

834 

5abisbury 

3X8 

1*0 

Scot Newa» 

5X9 

5X3 

Seat Power 

*18 


Seors _ 

123 

1.10 

Severn Trent 

677 

67* 

Shell 

7.10 

7X0 

Slebo 

615 

6X7 

Smith Nephew 

1X8 

1X7 

Smith Kline B 

4X2 

*00 

Smith (WHI 

617 

5X8 

Sun Alliance 

3X6 

3X0 

Tate & Lyle 

*24 


Tesca 

229 


Thorn EMI 

10.92 

10.93 

Tomkins 

2X1 

161 

T5B Group 

2X5 

2X7 

lint lover 

11X0 

1127 

UW Biscuits 

3X3 

13* 

Vodafone 

602 

5X2 

War Loan 3Vi 

49XA 


Wellcome 



Whitbread 

565 


WllUomsHdos 

193 

191 

Willis Cor roan 

220 

224 




Madrid 

BBV 3340 3340 

Bca Central Hbo. 29WJ 2615 

Banai Santander 6sas 
CEPSA XI 0 3015 

Drooodos 2445 2400 

E ndesa 7338 7300 

Enxas 152 157 

merdraro 1 l®S5 1050 

Rgpwl . 4560 4550 

JS3S5S 0 ^ tSS 

h&fSZQlSF*- 33 ** 


Milan 


Banco Comm 
Bostagi 

Benetl on group 


w 


CM 

Credltal 
Enlchem 
Ferfln 
Ferfln (Hsu 
SPA 

. . JteGcanica 
General) 

IF=I 

Uoloem 

[tala as 

Italmoblllare 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnoscgnte 
Sdtcem 


6045 9903 
87 BUS 
29990 26000 

*65 MB 
2115 SB?? 
2*42 2626 

2410 2300 

1834 1785 
81650 815 

4758 4790 
1755 1741 
39*80 39720 
1B12S 11150 

11880 11815 

5360 5345 
3?*S8 37700 
15240 15340 
114* 1125 
2338 2315 
4270 4275 
25600 25300 
9990 9950 
3180 315* 


son Paolo Torino 10800 18*50 


SIP 
SME 
Srtta 
Sianda 
Slot 

Toro Assi Rtsn 
MIB index : 1052 
prev loos : 1838 


4145 4142 
3770 3697 
1070 18*1 
TK Oi 33800 
4550 4537 
28100 27910 


Montreal 


Alcan Alum Ihum 
Bonk Montreal 
Bell Canada 
Bombardier B 
Comb lor 
Cascades 
Dominion Text A 
Donohue a 
M acMillan Bl 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Cara 
Quebec T0 
OuebecorA 
QuebecarS 
Teteoiobe 
unjvo 
Videolrgrt 
indo* trials Index , 
Previous : 1863*7 


32 31% 
29VS 29% 
48% 48% 
20Ui 20 
71% 20% 
7% 7% 
7% 7% 
24 Vi 2* 

23% 22% 
10% 10% 
22 30% 
22 21 % 
2Q 19% 
19% 19% 
20% 20% 
7 ** 
30% 29% 
<889.13 


Ckwe Prev 


Parts 


Accor 723 710 

Air Uauida 842 816 

Alcatel Alstham 723 714 


Axa 
Banadra fCte) 
BIC 
BNP 

ISKSS" 

Carrafour 

CC.F. 

Cents 
Chanjeurs 
aments Franc 
Club Med 


1 526 1469 
645 635 

1335 1320 
2727024770 
727 720 

943 908 

4130 3996 
27570 275J0 

143JB 141 JO 

1424 1410 
383 381 
378 3*4 


EH-Aqulfafne 4119a 411 

Elf-Sanofl 10*1 104* 

Eure Disney 34 JO 3120 

Gen. Eaux 2*4* 2*33 

Havas 472 444 

I metal *59 *33 

Lafarge Cappee 441.7045670 
Lesrand 57*0 54*0 

Lynn. Eaux 581 574 

Or»ot (L’l 1285 1246 

L.VJAH. 3982 3915 

Matro-Kachetle 159 1S9 
Mlchelin B 758-50 250.40 
Moulinex 138*0 129 

Paribas 521 518 

Pech Inev inti 197 199 JO 

Pernod-Ricanl 414*0 4 10 
Peugeot 852 832 

Print emus (Au> 904 979 

RatBoteehnlque 527 52s 

Rh-Poulenc A 141 JO 139*0 


Raff. 5t. Louis 
Redouie (La) 
Saint Gobaln 
S.E.B. 

Ste Generate 
Suez 


1*80 1*72 
905 912 
684 *81 
592 585 
715 705 
345 337 JO 


Thomsan-CSF 197 JO 194 


Total 

UA.P. 

Valeo 


326 320 

19870 19870 
1455 1440 




Sao Paulo 


13J0 12J0 
845 SJO 
10*0 11-00 
160160 JO 
13 13J0 
10710X00 
2840 2840 
77 72JD 
10010800 

Bov^hfagi: 10S3I 
Hrevtous . nun 


Banco do Brasil 

Banespa 

Bradesca 

Brahma 

Paranctaonema 

Pelrabras 

Tetobras 

Vale R la Dace 

Varia 


Singapore 

Cerebos 615 820 

City Dev. 690 7JH 

DBS 11.90 12 

Fraser Necrve 1BJD ibjo 

Gentlng 17.90 is 

Golden Hope PI 3JM 3JM 

How Par 3A4 3J* 

Hum* Industries 570 5L05 

HKhcage 5JS» 690 

Kaooel 1870 1899 

KL Kmna X2* 174 

Lum Chare , 1.95 1.95 

Malayan Bonks 9 970 

OCBC 11*0 13*9 

OUU 883 8J0 

OUE 7 JO 8 

fambswong 1X10 Tl*o 

snmorita 5JS 5*5 

SI me Darby s® ras 

SJA 7J5 7 JO 

5 ‘pore Land 7.15 7.10 

fwrt Press 1450 1450 

Stag Steamship 3J* 192 

Steare Telecomm 1*4 3*4 

Hrafts Trading 186 18* 

uos 1880 10*0 

UOL 272 277 

SSfio 


Stockholm 


AGA 
Asea a 
A stra a 
A llas Copco 
E lectrolux B 
§ri«wx> 
Essdte-A 
Handelsbanken 
Investor B 
Norsk Hydro 
Procardia AF 
Sandwtk a 
5CA-A 
5-E Banker) 

Skundla F 
Skanska 
SKF 
Store 

Tretleboro BF 
VONO 

Affperivhfcrtden t 
previews : 17*1,87 


447 452 

557 552 
182 111 
470 450 
398 390 
349 3tt 
12* 123 
122 123 
193 193 
2*4 VO 

141 141 
>29 130 

142 10 

*3 *4 

173 173 
208 209 
149 148 
444 449 

87 83 

*54 at 
17947a 


Oast Prev. 


Sydney 


Can Packers 

13 

12% 

Amcor 

998 

9X7 


47% 

ANZ 

4X9 

62: 


4X0 

BHP 

l/.VB 

17.74 


«% 

Boral 

Bougainville 

4X6 

09* 

4X3 

OL90 

CJnariex 

PH 

Coles Myer 

494 

*89 


t-tti 

COma lea 

4JV 

*Ji 

Denison Min B 

024 

CRA 

1/60 

17XS 


7 

CSR 

*91 

4X2 


34% 

Dunlap 

4X7 

522 


029 

Fosters Brew 

127 

124 


1/4* 

Goodincm Field 

1X4 

1X4 


1 

ICI Australia 

1020 

iaxd 


360 

Magellan 

110 

2.10 


ou. 

MIM 

184 

2/8 

Fletcher Chall A 

20% 

Nat Aust Bank 

11.94 

I1-/B 

FPI 

4 

News Cora 

I0A* 

9.75 


047 

Nine NehwirK 

616 

608 


9% 

N Broken Hill 

142 

360 


460 

Pioneer Inn 

107 

3 


14% 

Nmndv Poseidon 

2X0 

210 


12% 

OCT Resources 

1X2 

1X2 



Santas 

195 

3X9 


18% 

TNT 

225 

22* 


31% 

Western Mining 

7.14 

/X4 


40% 

Westpac Banking 

4X6 

*94 


33 

Woods kle 

421 

*17 

Intern rov pipe 


All wrdl ■arVesJndex : 2100.10 

Jainock 

Labott 






233* 




Modcenxle _ 

lita 


Tokyo 


Akal Electr 
Asahl OietnlcaJ 
Asatu doss 
Bonk 0 Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

Casio 

Dai Nippon Print 1930 1910 
Dalwa House WM 1 m 
Datwa Securities TBOO 1740 
Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fulilsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 
Honda 
Ito Yokado 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kalina 
K ansa I Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 

Komclmi 

Kubota 
Kvocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 1780 1750 
Matsu EteC WltS 1190 1190 
Mitsubishi Bk 2880 3850 
Mitsubishi Kaset 463 456 


440 450 

499 692 

1150 1130 

1610 1560 

1510 1440 

1710 Kk50 

1300 1340 


4400 4300 
2330 3280 
3560 2640 
1040 1040 
950 937 

833 828 

1750 1720 
5940 5750 
*94 *98 

*30 42S 

950 958 

2890 2050 
3M 358 
1231 T2IS 
888 870 

*50 *54 

*930 *930 


597 580 

707 TO! 


930 912 

2140 2080 
10W 1W0 
IBS® 1060 


Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Corp 1100 109® 
Mitsui and Co 7*9 755 
Mllsukashl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 

NIkko Securities ISM) 1320 
Nippon Kogaku 977 980 

Nippon CHI 746 J39 

Nippon Steel 352 349 

Nippon Yusen 621 597 

Nissan 853 M 

Nomura Sec 2380 2328. 
NTT 97600 9520a 

Olymnus Optical HOT 107D 


Pioneer 
Ricoh 
Sanyo EteC 
Sharp 
Shlmazu 
Shlnctsu Chem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Cham 
Suml Marine 

Sumitomo Metal 
Toteel Cora 
Tateho Marine 
Takedadtem 
TDK 
Teijin 

Tokyo Marine 

Tokyo Elec Pw 

Toapan Printing 1390 13*0 
Toravlnd. *52 MI 

Toshiba 
Tovota 

Vatnaldil Sec 
0; x m 

Nikkei 221 ■ 19997 
Tray taos,: 1 9803 

pro* wes : 1*10 


2720 2710 
795 789 
488 486 

1750 1720 

*92 m 

2150 2140 
*400 *370 
2178 2150 
429 429 
90S US 

301 281 

*93 689 

8*8 89 
1288 1250 

4530 4460 
469 4*2 

T-KH 1340 
3470 3400 


773 75* 
3020 1990 
899 883 


Toronto 


AbMBl Price 

sr<2^? e 

□Lt 

Bk Neva Scotia 
BCCas 
SC Telecom 
|F neatly Hds 
Bromoteo 
Hrimswtak 

Camdev 

CISC 


17 lft% 
14% 15V5 
m 

19% 19% 
ay* 33% 
«% 48% 
31% 30% 
16 ISVi 
25% 25V> 
am ao2 

045 0*3 
9% Wi 
* 5% 

4.90 4.95 
14% 14 


CtoMPrav. 
Canodlan Pacific 23% 23% 

12 % 
47 
416 
9% 

4 


4.95 


Maritime 
Mark Res 
MocLean Hunter 
MaJsan A 
Noma Ind A 
Noronda Inc . 
Noranda ForeSl 
Norcen Energy 
Nihern Telecom 
Nova Carp 
Oshawa 
Paourln A 
Placer Dame 
Paco Petroleum 
PWACotp 
R ayradi 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 
Rothmans 
Royal Bank Con 
Sceptre Res 
S cott’s Ha ro 
Seagram 
Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sherrlft Gordon 
SHLSvstemhse 
Sauthom 

sUT 8 " 8 

Talisman Energ 
Tecfc B 

Thomson News 
Taranto Domn 
Torstar B 
TraisaRa Util 
TransCda Pine 
Triton Flnl A 
Trirnac 
TitKCA 
Uni corp Energy 
TSE 3 08 
Previous : 


25 24% 
8% BU 
1«% I* 
21 25% 
6*k 6% 

3* 25 

13% 13 

15 14% 
40% 
91* 9% 
23 22% 
140 370 
329% 321k 
9V5 9% 

1 % 1 % 
18 18 
27Vtj 27% 
21% 21% 
85 88% 
30% 29% 
13% 14 

B% B 
38% 38 Vt 
7% 7% 

38% 38% 
11 % 11 % 
9% 9% 
18% 17% 
18% 18% 
8% 8% 
28% 28% 
M% 24 
17% 16% 
22 % 22 % 
25% 25% 
15% 15% 
19% 19% 
4.10 4.10 
17% 16% 

as* mo 
aw ojo 


Zurich 

Adlo inti B 235 232 

Alusulsse B new 444 623 

BBC Brwn HovB 1950 1053 
Clbp.GefaY B 871 880 

CS Holdings B *38 <74 
EtektrewB 3820 3820 
Fischer B 
Interdbcouni B 
Jotimm b 
L andis Gw R 

Leu HUB 
Moevenpiek B 
Nestle R 

OerUk. Buehrio R 
Pargesa Hid B 

Roche Hdg PC 

Solra Republic 
SanaozB 

Schindler B 
Sulnr pc 
S unieli lance B 
Swiss Bn k Corp B 
Swiss Remsur R 
Swissair R 
UBS B 

Winterthur B 
Zurich Ass B 


SSJfeSRMfib 


1235 1240 

2350 2180 

810 825 

955 958 

NA *00 
430 425 

1383 1298 
15215650 
15M 1510 
7000 7020 
143 M2 
3B90 3900 

7400 7400 

932 914 

1980 1990 
450 4*5 
*35 *40 
815 810 
1364 1413 

748 743 

14*5 1480 


To our readers bi Austria 


>t n&y been ooitor 
to tubioibc and xml 
A ntcol loKrwr 
06608155 
or b>c 06069 - 1754 13 


U.S. FUTURES 


Via AsMidated P«eH 


Season Season 
Ugh Low 


□gen hOgh Law aese Chg Op.w 


Grains 

WHEAT (CHOT) SkabmWOninpiMnpeWsiiil 
194% 100 MarM 148 140 140 342Vl-OJJ7yj W 

3J2 3J0 May 94 344 348 142% 345%-0JM% Til 

SJA 2.9* M94 376% 338 132% 135 -01)3% 174 

157% xa? 5ep94 378 3L39% 135% 137 — OOH 24 

1*5 1» Dec 94 34* 347% 343% 1449,-483% 14 

156% 152 Mar 95 347%-OOS 

342% 111 Jill 95 135 375% 373% 133%-0J4% 

Est. sides 154)00 Fit's, soles 12,146 

Frr'i open int OJIS off 1344 

WHEAT IKBOT) s4eobumnu»im-eoaimn,binli*i 

IK 2J8 MarM 13314 15H 151 3JS -601% 67 

179% 198 MOV94 145 145 340 141% -0.04% 9.2 

135 2J7 JUM 37* 376 132 13H4-OJDV4 104 

155% KSWSeptU 136% 136% 373% 374 -084 24 

160 112% Dec W 340 340 379% 379%-0JI*% 9 

153% 143%Ma-9S 142% -874% 

Est. sates NA. FWs.sda 7425 

Fn"j op en W 2 9,W2 alt SR 

CORN (COOT) UHNnsPwn.MenH'MN, 

171% 272%«ta-94 273% 286 2S3, 2JB% 4001% MB 

116V. 278% MOV 94 190% 2.94 190% 2.93% *0(0 12111 

3.1*% 24) J494 2.94 2J«% 193% 196% *0X1% 1007 

192% 240% Sep 94 2J0% 272% 2J0 271% +070% 22,9 

273% 736% Dec 94 2J7 1*9 1*4% lS7%-0Jn% 527 

179% 2-53% Mor 95 173 173 173 173%-OJOW 12 

182 173 May 95 __ 279% 3 

273% 174%jm95 279 270% 179 270 J 

158% 151 DecM 151 154% 242 19%-0J0% X 

Est. tales 66000 Frt's.sates 947*4 
Pet'S awn Int 326929 off B0DI 
SOYBEANS ICBOT) 54Mlwn4f*Tiuin-dAnMrBuSh« 

7J4 " ‘ 

7J1 
7J0 
77S 
*79% 

747% 

670 
673% 

673 
650% 


579% Mar 94 679 


6*2 *73 — 0X2 


544%7494 687% 609V 
628 Aug 94 672 *83 

617 5*p«4 6*4% 667 

555% Nov 94 652 654 MOW OJW— JBJV 

616% Jan 75 LSI 658% 6J4% 655%-ftOlV 

*42 Mir 95 6*1% 6*3 659% «*l -0X1 

442%Jul*5 644 665 6*2 6*4 *071 

571% Nov 95 622 625 622 625 *0X1 

Est. sales 55X00 RTs-sries 58J36 
nrsoaenirt 160.990 otf 1310 
SOYHCaNMEAL (CBOT) m«»awni«n 
237 JO lB5JOMor94 19060 I94JM 19240 19280 —1.11 

23100 1*550 MOV M 17450 19480 19380 W140 — IJ 

230.00 19X00 JuJ 74 195 JO WJJ0 J9X» 1«X0 -IJ 

2Z18Q 191 JO AU0 94 19X30 19440 19110 19270 — 1JI 

210X0 !B9405ep94 19380 19X20 191 JO 173.S0 

206X0 187.100094 171 JO 19110 WOJO 190J0 — 1 JO 2781 

209X0 



18650 Jvi 95 190X0 

17160 

T1»J0 

109 JO 

-0X0 

M 









ZUM) Frfs. steel 

34X11 





RTlapcnM R7J18 all 1234 











206* 

28X5 

—064 I7JZ 



29X8 

2824 

392 

-0X4 3623! 


21X5.MH 28X0 

2898 

267? 

28.90 

-0X3 36X9* 



2850 







27.90 











633 



26J5 




26X4 


2622 













2590 Mov 95 1*60 

2600 

2690 

2590 




18X00 Frfs.«4es 

32X04 





Firs open int 106255 UP 1993 






Livestock 

CATTLE CCMER) 4MHn-eBtinrk 
0175 7X20 Apr 94 7695 77.15 J67| J7.I0 

75.10 71 J5 Jun 94 7695 7X07 760 TAW 

71® 78JOAU094 7X55 7145 H47 710 

74X0 71J7O094 7185 7195 TUB 7182 

7430 72JH D« 94 7195 7410 J3J2 74X5 

7425 73.00 Feb 9S 73JS 7175 7175 njs 

7S.18 73J0APT95 74J1 

Est. 0*5 HUM Rfs. sates 17,185 
FiTl open lot 84X88 wt 1* 

FEEDER CATTLE (OAHU >uaou.*amsiwto 
BUS TVJJMnrW 8121 B133 82-W O-® 

8X00 79JDA0TW 1140 040 JIJO 81^ 

1440 TUDMayW 81.13 81 JO 8UJ JJW 

8100 »JSAuo94 C.1S B.I5 Jl« ttW 

8)45 79 JO Sep 94 81 JD HI JO JJJS 82 

81 J3 79J0009I 81 JO BUB 81X0 JJ.17 

■M 7745NgvM 81 JO 

79^3019* 80.75 KUO 6075 8045 

EA sales VI FITS, steas 1X61 
FrftOPfnK 1W» mp a 
HOGS (CMEH) «MI4-4MHrb 
51.72 39J7Ar9* 49J0 

5627 4X77 Jun 94 SXO 550 5t£ 5495 

5X37 45J0MW 5LO MXO *4* S4g 

nig 4635 All* 94 5160 52X0 E140 52X0 

ATS SS5394 40 «» «l 

SUO 45.30 D« 94 49J0 4940 49X5 49 JS 

sin 48J0Ftb9s «.75 nn wjs 

4U0 40X0 Apr 95 41X0 4080 48X0 0X0 

51 JO 51.004F1 95 SUJ 

Est. sates 4JA2 FrTs. sates 2,98* 

FiTs open Ini 3U89 jg 7? 

PORK BELLES (CMBU "“W-"?**® M 
*0.90 3840 Mar 94 5615 £X0 5190 

*1J0 4UJ0MW8* 57 JO 58.10 MSB 57.92 

*2X0 39J0JU9M 57 JO 5645 5670 5827 

59 JO 42XOAU094 SSJS 56*0 5*47 5U0 

*1.15 39.WF0195 59X0 »J1 S9J5 59* 

59 J5 S9JSMar« 

60JS flUSMavTS «■» 

Est.satos 2.976 Fn'istees 2.281 

Ftfs open Int 9,J» up 


+6IJ 37.90* 
—0.03 21,175 
-0.18 12J37 
-All 9X35 
—0X7 2X07 
+0.10 811 
57 


+0X5 17C 

+610 ue 
2X92 
2. HD 
—0X5 360 

-ate 490 
160 
9 


-037 14430 

-022 Bjm 

-ojo sxn 

+613 2J06 
+ 0JB 1467 
+645 IJ07 
224 

— 0JD <7 
+0X2 3 


+ 193 1X02 
+010 5J03 
+ 0J5 2JM 
+668 45* 

-610 15 

+075 1 

+075 1 


1 Season Season 






HW 

Low Op*n 

rtoh 

Low 

Ctose 

Chg 

Opilrt 

8 11X4 

650 Feb 94 11.10 

1150 

11.10 

11X6 

+0X2 

3X98 




llXt 

11X0 

+617 62X42 


9.15Jte94 1199 


UJI 

11X1 

+ 619 26X31 

rt 11-0 

9X20094 1IXD 

11X1 

HXi 

11X4 

+611 71X18 

11X7 

9.17 Mar 95 11 J! 

11X1 

ux: 

11X9 

+0.U 

6761 

11X2 

18X7 May 95 |)J8 

11X1 

11x1 

11X1 

+6K 

942 

- 11-35 

10X7 Jul 95 1U* 

11X7 

10 

11X7 

nrw 

795 

11X2 

10X70095 



11X6 



Est. sides 11328 Frt-S. rates 12X53 




| FtTi open int 122X56 off 1160 





7 COCOA (NCSQ lOmratetene-lnr 

cn 




6 1495 

9S3MO-M 1128 

1130 

112* 

1122 

— 14 

553 

9 13*8 

978 MOV 74 1145 

1147 

113* 

1139 

— I3 3**4 

0 1365 

999 MM 1169 

1170 

1161 

IMS 

—10 16X34 

I 1377 

1820 Sep 94 1193 

1193 

UK 

1109 

—IB 

7X40 

2 }» 

1041 DecM 1224 

1225 

121* 

1219 

—II 

6X93 

1 1382 

1077MCT95 1253 

1255 

1253 

1240 

—13 

9X55 

1«0 

1111 May 95 1270 

1277 

1270 

1272 

—4 

6719 

1407 

1225 Jut 95 



1292 

—4 

2486 

USD 

1275 Sep 95 



1311 

—4 

481 


One 95 1349 

1140 

1340 

1335 

—5 


1 Ete. soles 5X51 FiTvaoles 

8X16 





1 FrrsapBiM px * 4 aft 1305 





1 ORANGE JUICE (NCTM ISAM t, 



4 13425 

8*X0iUarW 10*25 

10640 

1017! 

10*30 

+638 

2738 

) 135X0 

89X0 May 94 107 JO 

108X1 

106X0 

W7A5 

+ 0X5 

7X25 








13*50 

10*50 Sep 94 112X0 

11138 

11240 

112X0 

—610 

1X0 

13*00 

10*00 May 94 HJJ5 


11X50 

11650 

-0X0 

1.107 

13260 

10350 Jan 95 11575 



11695 

— UAS 

1X97 

1 13425 

106X0 Mar 95 11650 

11650 

1)650 

11650 


53 

1 Est. sates *ffl» Ftfs-steM 

3.775 





[ FrPiOPMlnf 18X58 Off 259 






Metals 




HI GRADE COFFER (NCMX) XWM0 

bk- cans per a. 



1 107 JO 

7600 Mv 94 86.20 



1630 

+0X5 

9,950 







976 

HEJB 

73X0 May M 064? 

87X0 

8620 

86X5 

+0X5 32X00 I 

89JB 

7*10 Jun 94 8640 

1640 

8640 

0670 

+680 

841 

1 10295 

7*20 Jul ti B&60 

27X5 

1640 

0675 

+075 

8X07 

> 10331 

7*90 S+pM 1655 

8695 

86VS 

8695 

+0J5 

3334 

I0IJ0 

7 ITS Dec 94 |7X0 

87X0 

07.15 

87X5 

+075 

1700 

89 JO 

76X0 Jan 95 



87 JO 

+075 


9960 

73X0 Feb 95 



87X5 









1X10 

1760 

7685 MOV 95 8640 

BLC 

0640 

■820 

+075 

4T3 


78JRJUI95 BBXS 

8845 

B645 

8855 

+ 073 

359 

(670 

75X0 Aug 95 



B605 

+075 


90X0 

79, Kl Sep 95 0690 

89.95 

8690 

1690 

+075 

209 

auo 

71200095 



87.10 

+0J0 


8630 

77 J5 NOv 95 



0X0 

+07S 


9Q50 

1150 Dec 95 



»A0 

+075 

77 







Fifs open tot 43X78 dt on 






SR.VS 

(NCMX) UBrm* 

-otrtBpKi-nwm. 



5565 

36*XMar94 12*5 

537X 

52*5 

536* 

+ 13X18X84 

.436.4 

5ma AnrM 



5363 

+ 121 

1 

5565 

371X5* / 94 529X 

5395 

529.Q 

S39X 

+ IU9J21 


371XJUIH 533X 

54*0 

533.0 

5467 

+ 128 14X22 

5615 

37*5 Sep 9* 533X 

5460 

535X 

546* 

+ T2X 

3X00 





SS2J 



54*0 

401 X Jon 95 



553X 

+ 129 


572X 

41 65 Mar 95 55*0 


55*0 

558X 

+ 13X 

IXM 

5640 

4160 May 93 3660 


5660 

5*27 

+ 120 

1.939 

5960 

420JJUI95 5660 

5660 

5660 

5S7J 

+ 110 


550X 

49X0 Sep 95 



5720 

♦ 130 


5620 

539XDMK 



579.1 

+ 111 

783 

Ete.scto* 34X00 Frt-Litee* 

41X7* 





| FrTs open tot 114X81 Off 1554 











377X0 




42880 

357 JO Jul 94 39650 

39690 

39650 

3964 

+ 600 

1X54 

40*50 

368000094 39*90 

ML40 

396X0 

39670 

+ 600 

913 

410X0 

374X0 Jan 95 399X0 

199X0 

399X0 

399.10 

+600 

460 

401X0 

310X0 Apr 95 400X0 

dOQJOO 

400X0 

399X0 

+670 

237 

Est. rates 0496 FrrLstees 






FtrsapenH 19680 Off 496 






GOLD 

NCMX) I00»nror-l»*e.. .- 





39630 

37650 Marta 37600 

raxo 

jaxo 


+280 

3 : 

41050 

D5J0AW94 381X0 

83X0 

381X0 


+120 76X45 








417X0 

339X0 Jun 94 3EL7Q 

m w 

3B3JQ 



41600 

34150 A I/O 94 207X0 

87X0 

3*740 


+ 270 5X27 • 

417X0 

38*00 OdW 390X0 

mxo 

ifUJW 


+ 270 *104 

065) 

34100 Dec 94 39120 

9180 

191X0 



411X0 

3*150 Fte>9S 39*38 39600 

19*30 



417.00 

3A4J0Apr«S 




+ 270 


4UD 

3*1X0 Jun 95 




: 





1 



HUO 

410X00095 




1 

JVQJA 

402X0 Dec 95 40950 409X0 

09X0 

0680 


1 Est. sten 26000 f-ri*s.sdas 

21155 




1 

1 F7V5 open int 147X88 UP 1JM 




E 


Food 

GOFFSEC (NC5E) V4Olfi>k-0P«!l>+rte. 


9075 ~ 6UDMor« 7S3D 

HUD 6125 May 94 77 JO 

87 JO *4X0X494 7660 

(8J0 t&JDSapU 0X0 

91X0 77.I0D«« 040 

87 JO 7810 Mar 95 BU0 

B5J5 82J0 MoyH B.9 

*600 85X0 Jill 95 . 

EslsMcs WJ85 Fit's. s«s« 6405 
Ff i'S open It* 47X1* U P 237 
SUGAR-WORLD 11 INC5EI ULOTM PriH 


7540 7610 
77.60 76XS 
7885 77^ 

KB 

SiS 


KLU 


74J0 
764) 
77 JO 
79JS 

80 JO 

81 JO 
BUS 
83X0 


-1J5 1.1*4 
-145 30X87 
-1J0 7,198 
-IJ8 4,972 
—1.10 3X70 
-695 1X25 
-690 41 

—075 1 


+0X1 9X18 
run 34X15 
+0X3 5452 
+0X3 2X93 


Financial 

UST.BU5 (CMBU tliMten-MsteUBeel. 

9611 MarM 9660 9641 9659 MAO 

9676 MU Jun 94 tui 9629 9625 96M 

9640 95.71 Sep 94 969* 9199 919* 95.98 

9610 ISJSDecW 96*6 95J6 95*1 95*4 

ESLUttB 6607 FtfLUMS 7.123 
FrTs open tot 41,9*0 tel 997 
SYR.TREA5UIY (OOT) tUMHuti-itisjHiiiiinM 
113-055109-15 Mar 9809-105 109-29 109- IK 109.27+ 095 136773 
117-05 108-74 Jun 94 109-26 IJMS 108-26 M9-02S * 07 >9X60 
U0+I9SH7-31 Sep *4 108-07 108-09 UB-87 108-09 * 09 06 

Est.satos 86X09 ftfLstee* Tim 
FrTs Otwi int 2BX69 up 2217 
II YR. TREASURY (CBOT) stnUMenn-teskltodietioaiM] 


116-09 108-00 Mir Ml RI-25 Til-88 110-25 111-0 + 12 

115+31 H8-19 Jun M 109-29 110-11 109-21 110X6 * 11 

115-01 W-40 Septa 109-11 109-17 109-87 109-14+ II 

114-71 100-14 DeeMlOO-n 1 OB-74 Mt-21 104-26 + |l 

111-07 108-09 MOT 95 10610 « 1] 

Est. 9te01 96944 Fri-LStees 1,127.186 
Frrsapenmi 271JI4 on 6IM 

US TREASURY BONB5 (OOT) rwnns ntiftltoaiutlDOuLU 

120-31 90-00 Mar Ml 11-21 112-16 111.21 112-13 +S SS? 
tl+M n-0 6 Junta (10-B 111-14 118-21 111-11 + M -- 

118-16 90.13 Septa IB9-S4 HM7 109-24 1 »-I 3 + £ 

II4-0B 91-19 DbcM 109-19 109-30 109-1] 109-30 + 22 

11+70 TO -09 Mor 95106-27 109-07 10+24 107-0/ , n 

11+19 9+15 Jun 45 10+11 . S 

11M5 108-06 5a>95 107-31 + n 

11+14 106-25 DCC 95 107-13 + S 

EH- stees 140X00 Ftfs. stees 431JC 
FrrsoDenM 442J33 tel 2710 

MUNCmU. BONDS (CBOT) SIwtabtoMwt.BlMt.iiHpci 
18+22 99411 MW M99JJ8 99-19 99-R »9-U . U JLB4 

104-07 9+03 Junta 9+07 98-21 98-04 9+10 + 13 JsS 

Eat. sates 4X00 Ptfistees 6979 ,J 

Frf”S oiten M 39J45 UP 937 
eUKK>OUA» (CMCRJ 

96340 9X31 Mv 94 96230 96250 962ID M220 ■ 10324X77 

9X40 Aet 94 95X40 96690 95X30 95M .tSK 

*6550 9X36 Sep 94 95J30 *5J70 96510 VSJ30 ‘XB5X86 


177,299 

95X04 

1005 

74 

I 


W65B9 

34X38 

23X65 

903 

0 

12 


Season Season 
W Law 


Open Ugh Law dose On OpJni 


95.160 

96950 

9671D 

96500 

96240 


-+40M9XH 
+40241X80 
+40186199 
+40147X49 
+ 50111151 


6X5* 
—4 666 

—4 574 

-7 J7B 
-9 13 


9X71 DecM 95.130 96160 96110 9&140 
9X24 Mv 95 96930 94X10 96920 *6*40 
9X71Jun9S 96490 96730 96*70 96700 
9.131 S4P 95 96400 94J20 94450 94X10 
9.111 Dec 95 94230 96200 96200 96240 
Ettstees NA RfAitee* *19X74 
FrTs Open ins 2X36212 l*> 7541 
BRITISH POUND (CMER) SpvpomS-1 poternuMi 
1J304 1X000MO-94 1X882 1X888 1482+ 1.4456 

IJ150 14474 Jun V4 1X800 14840 14760 14406 

1X950 1.«Se»W 1X770 

1X950 IXJBflOacW 1X744 

Est. sates 16J05 Fri'S.Wtes 16X7T 
Ftri open Int 41X91 08 1157 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) spertfr-l pMVMMPtOteOI 
0X712 0J371MWM 0L7413 07414 0738* 07395 -5 36.71 

07805 073*5X41 94 87404 07420 07381 87S0 

O7740 07345 SsPM 073M 

07670 07315 DOC 94 07395 07395 07380 07381 

07105 07375 MOT 95 87375 

07322 07374 JiXI 95 07370 

Est. sides 8X24 Ftfv sates 16329 
Fri'sooenW *6799 op 3820 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) Spar marh- 1 ptenraoutsi 16X091 
0*205 (65642 MiT 94 85846 05879 05122 DJB64 +19122X40 

8*133 0J607Jtetta 03415 85B49 0.5790 OJBM +19 11X66 

0X0*5 OJiMOScpM 05799 05810 0X740 0JB14 +20 445 

03790 a35WDecM_ 0X804 *20 7* 

FH sates 48X52 Fft's.stees 51748 
Frt*s open Inf 136X67 an an 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 1 w nrv- 1 snu ru» 10 000001 , 

0X0993QlXaBaillMrW0X09590aX09623ai»9S5aO0D9565 + 13 0X84 

fljm91SUR801 Jun 94 0X99*270X096510X099)50X09*0) 
OX09900JJKIS742SWJM 0X09*900X09*930009670X09*48 
0X0969BUBM3SDeC94 0X09698 

ESI. soles 21.926 IWt stew 21717 
FVfsopenW 9*797 off 134 
SWISS FRANC (CMER) lwkw-1 pgM MMPMLM 
07195 OASDOMOrM 02002 DTDS CL6V72 07013 

07D7D 0X590JIH1ta 0*998 07025 0*976 07009 

07000 0*600 Sep 94 07020 07023 06990 07014 

Est sales 23743 Errs, rates 27X08 
FrfsapenW 51.113 up 31*1 


11 *,9*6 

-10 930 

+ 5 13 


♦9 45J57 
11 5.791 
11 J7 


Industrials 


55*2 Mar 94 79X0 79X3 70.15 

57X7MHVM 79 JO 79J5 70S5 

5030 Jul 94 1970 79X0 79X5 

S9J10ct« 75,15 7115 76*5 

59X0 DeC 94 72JD 72J5 72.15 

62X0 Mer 95 73X0 72X0 72.93 

*4X0 May 95 73*0 73*0 73*0 

70X0 Ail 73 


7615 

79X0 

+615 

1X86 

7655 

79 J* 


79X5 

7972 

+ 0J7 11.797 

7*95 

75X1 

-QJB 

2X41 

7215 

7229 


7295 

73X0 








7*05 

-610 



6650 

4175 Feb 94 

5075 

51X0 

49X0 

50X8 

+ 0*0 13X46 

5875 

428SAW-94 

45X0 

46X0 

4475 

44X9 

—0X4 46X37 


42J0MOV94 4290 

4*45 

41X0 

4X14 



4240 Jun 94 






9X0 

4120 JW« 

4*65 

4*7D 

4*35 

4254 



44X6 Aug n 




4*29 

-6M 



4640 SepH 


46X0 

46X0 

4634 

-0X4 


57 JO 

+* 45 Oct 93 

44X1 

47X5 

47X0 

46X4 



58X0 

47X5 Nov 94 




■OJ9 

— HM 


59.00 

4640 DecM 

49X0 

49.40 

49X0 

4124 

-Ota 


1223 

412SJtei9S 

5600 

56 DO 





5875 

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Reuters 1J92.70 1.793X+. 

0J. Futures I4SJ2 M5xl 

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ijzauon : d ** unemployed to a record 3 J1 (Reuters, Bloomberg 


U.K. Drug Firm Down , but Not Out 

Analysts Say Worst of Wellcome’s Bad News Has Come Out 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Timet Service 

LONDON — Even by the standards of the 
pharmaceutical industry, which has been buf- 
feted by efforts in the United States and 
around the world to redo in medical costs. 
Wd iconic PLC has been a dismal investment 
of late. 

But now there arc signs that the worst of a 
long spell of bad news may be past for die 
British company, which is best known for 
Zovirax, a medication for herpes, and AZT, 
the AIDS-fighting drug it sells under the 
brand name Retrovir. 

Moreover, with the slock trading at ex- 
tremely low levels compared with other phar- 
maceutical companies, analysts are again rec- 
ommending it to investors who can stomach 
short-ierra volatility in the hope of a long- 
term gain. 

Wdkome dosed Monday at 653 pence 
($9.73) in London, up 1 1 pence on the day. The 
stock had peaked two years ago at 1,158 pence 
and has plummeted since then despite the 
booming equity market, although it is up from 
its low last fall of 604 pence. The Wellcome 
Trust, a British medical foundation, owns 344 
million shares, about 40 percent of ihc compa- 
ny-The trust sold 270 million shares in July 
1992, giving up majority control and the stock 
has been weak since the sale was announced. 

Sales of AZT con dime to decline, in pan 
because of a study last year that cast doubt on 
the drug's ability to help patients with the virus 
that causes AIDS in the early stages of the 


disease. But evidence of renewed strength in 
sales of Zovirax in the United States is under- 
pinning the belief among many analysis that 
the stock can recover. 

Zovirax is Wellcome’s biggest -selling prod- 
uct, accounting for 43 percent of its prescrip- 
tion-drag revenue in 1993. It dominates the 
market for treatment of hopes and related 
conditions, and sales have grown at an annual 

BVreRNATIONAL STOCKS 

compound rate of 37 percent since 1985, ac- 
cording to Salomon Brothers Inc. 

The rate of growth, however, slipped in the 
second half of WeBcome's most recent finan- 
cial year, which ended Aug. 31. After growing 
about 15 percent in the first six months of the 
year, the rate slowed to 7 percent in the follow- 
ing six months. 

The company blamed the slowdown on one- 
time anomalies, including a reduction of in- 
ventories by wholesalers. But with the drug’s 
patents scheduled to expire in coining years 
and with a competitive drug, Fanrvir, being 
introduced by Smithklinc Beecham PLC the 
slowdown made investors that much more 
nervous about the company’s prospects. 

But now Zovirax safes appear to be re- 
bounding, according to Duncan Moore, an 
analyst at Morgan Stanley & Co. in London. 
Sales over the last three months in the United 
States, the biggest market, have risen about 20 
percent, compared with the corresponding pe- 
riod a year earlier, Mr. Moore said, citing data 
on prescriptions provided by IMS, a drug-sales 


tracking senate of Dun & Bradstreet Carp. 

The company confirmed that Zovirax sales 
seemed to be rebounding in the United 
States, although it cautioned that pricing 
pressures might limit the gain* in Europe. 

“Wdlcame has been the worst -performing 
of the major UJC drug stocks in a sector that 
itself has been the worst perfor min g in the 
U.K. market throughout 1993," a Morgan 
Stanley report said. "There now appears to be 
some evidence that the picture is improving, 
however, and that the next change in estimates 
win be up rather than down, based on what 
appears to be improving Zovirax sales.” 

Noting that Welcome’s stock price is low 
relative to its earnings, when compared with 
other pharmaceutical slocks, the report said 
“the stock locks wefl oversold and should 
perform positively in a sector that is unlikely to 
show any upward movement in the first half of 
the year ” 

Peter Laing, Salomon Brothers' London- 
based analyst, said the “threats to WeDcome 
have been exaggerated." Mr. Laing estimated 
Wdkome should be able to maintain annual 
revenue growth of around 13 percent until 
1997. Per-share earnings could grow 12 per- 
cent and dividends by 15 percent annually 
during the period, he said. 

But the biggest unknown for Zovirax is 
whether the United Stares will allow the drug 
to be sold in nonprescriptian forms. A move 
from prescription to over-the-counter sales 
could bring large sales increases. A decision 
from the Food and Dmg Administration could 
come within a year. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt London ■ 

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Sources: Reuters, AFP 

Imenuiional Herald Tnbune 

Very briefly: 




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SE Banken Turns Profit 
As Problem Loans Shrink 


Compiled bp Our Sufi From Dispatches 

STOCKHOLM — Skandin- 
aviska EmlriMa Banken said its 
1993 operating profit was 357 
million kronor ($45 millian), a 
reversal from a loss of 5J7 bil- 
lion kronor m 1992. 

The commercial bank’s loan 
losses in 1993 totaled 10.1 bfl- 
lion kronor, down from 11.1 
bQlioa kronor in 1992. The 
bank’s problem loans, on which 
no intdest or ins tall m enu have 
been paid for at least two 
months, fell 35 percent, to 16.9 
bflbon kronor. 

The largest individual loan- 
loss write-offs were to the real 
estate concerns GuQstedt, with 
600 million kronor, and Coro- 


nado, with 436 min i nn The 
bank also wrote off a 507 mil- 
lion kronor loan to Gamlesta- 
den, a finance company. 

The bank said profits before 
loan losses improved each quar- 
ter, with net interest income 
jumping 49 percent, to 9.78 bil- 
lion, mostly because of in- 
creased demand for-credit from 
consumers cnahing in on falling 
interest rates. 

Income from commissions 
and fees rose 1 1 percent, to 6.82 
billion kronor, lifted by in- 
creased profits cm trading in se- 
curities. 

The bank said its expenses 
were largely unchanged from 

1992 * (Reuters, AFX) 


U.S. Courts Gorman and Swiss Firms 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The United 
States is sweet-talking 20 German 
and as many Swiss companies, in- 
duding several big banks, about list- 
ing their shares on the New York 
Stock Exchange 

Arthur Levitt, chair man of the 
U.S. Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission, said Monday that the SEC 
was actively courting German and 
other big foreign companies with- 
out listings in New York. 

He added that both sides were 
showing flexibility on key issues in- 
volving financial disclosures. "More 
and more of the companies I talk to 
are beginning to move their stan- 
dards closer to something we regard 
as internationally acceptable," he 
said, calling Goman and Swiss 
ties the slowest to change. 
i SEC is willing to simplify hs 


lures and be flex- 
ible “up to the point or disclosure,” 
which is fundamental lo ensuring 
fair play for individual investors, 
he said 

His statements came amid grow- 
ing calls for greater professionalism 
in German capital markets, includ- 
ing the establishment of a federal 
securities watchdog agency and 
concentration of trading activities 
in Frankfurt, the country’s finan- 
cial capital 

They also reflected the activism of 
the new U.S. ambassador to Germa- 
ny, Richard Holbrooke, who said be 
was determined to help German 
companies overcome “solvable ob- 
stacles” and achieve greater access 
to US. investment capital. 

There are currently 594 foreign 
companies listed on the New York 
Stock Exchange, but only one from 
Germany ana none from Switzer- 
land 


Daimler-Benz AG, the __ 
German company, became the! 
to list its shares on the New York 
Stock Exchange Iasi October. Oth- 
er German and Swiss companies 
have so far resisted SEC demands 
that they lay bare their substantial 
hidden reserves, according to UJS. 
accounting standards. 

Fred Irwin, president of the 
American Chamber of Commerce 
in Germany, said Ge rman corpora- 
tions are Increasingly looking to 
U.S. capital markets not only to 
raise capital for expansion, but also 
as a means of boosting thetr profile 
in the North Amencan market 
Studies show that foreign compa- 
nies that list in the United States 
also seD more of their products 
there, he said 

Mr. Levitt did not name any of 
the companies with which be was 
talking, but representatives of 


Hoechst AG. RWE AG, BASF 

AG, Degussa AG, Agiv AG and 
Volkswagen AG were in a lun- 
cheon audience. 

Many German and Swiss com- 
panies are confused about the atti- 
tude of the commission, seeing it as 
a “regulatory bully" rather than a 
“referee." he said 

He described the climate of his 
discussions with Ger man compa- 
nies as a “process of accommoda- 
tion" rather than a breakthrough. 
“A lot of this is attitude," he said 

Local banking and stock-ex- 
change officials routinely lament 
the lack of an “equities culture" in 
Germany along the lines of that in 
the United States and other coun- 
tries. One in every four U.S. house- 
holds, or more than 50 million 
Americans, owns slocks. Risk- 
averse Germans tend to prefer in- 
vestments in bonds. 


with French and British i 
i) in 1993, up 30 percent from 


> Saab Automobile SA posted a lass of 1J7 billion kronor ( 
in 1993, narrowing from a loss erf 2.63 billion in 1992; the 
automaker expects to show a profit in 1994. 

• IBM France plans to turn 2,000 full-time jobs into part-tune positions 
by the end of the year, the move is pan of a restructuring that involves 
3,000 job cuts ana is designed to save 580 million francs (5100 million). 

■ WJL South Group PLC confirmed it was discussing a venture combin- 
ing its Our Price stores with Virgin Group PLCs British and Irish retail 
businesses. 

• Serna Group, a 
earned a net £17.9 million (5271 
£13.8 million earned in 1992. 

• Taylor Woodrow PLC the British construction and real estate conglom- 
erate, is buying Heron International NY's home-building, business for 
£30.8 million. 

AFP. AFX. Bloomberg 


PolyGram Capitalizes on Motown 

said operating profit in the United 
Stales, where the entertainment 
conglomerate bought Motown Re- 
cords Inc. last year, doubled It 
refused to say how much Motown 
contributed to sales and profit. 

Overall, sales rose 12 percent, to 
7.42 billion guilders. 

PolyGram said pop music reve- 
nue, winch accounted for 69 percent 
of total sales, rose 13 percent 

(Bloomberg, AP, AFX) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

AMSTERDAM — Boosted by 
rising U.S. income. PolyGram NV 
said Monday its net profit rose 21 
percent to 614 million guilders 
($321 million). 

The profit was higher than ana- 
lysts had expected and PdyGram's 
shares rose 430 guilders, to 77.80. 
The company plans to raise its divi- 
dend to 75 Dutch cents a share from 
65. 

PolyGram, which is 75 percent 
owned bv Philips Electronics NV, 


ROHATYN: /. P. Morgan Executive Makes the WorUFs Emerging Markets His Home Turf 


Continued from Page 15 

* al investors became interested, Mr. 
Roh&tyu offered them the numb- 




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other Morgan trademark. 

Morgan’s historical weakness in 
underwriting has caused Mr. Roha- 
tyn’s unit to lose its early lead in 
that area. But as investor demand 
shifts again from securities denom- 
inated in dollars to those in local 
currencies, Mr. Rribatyn hopes that- 
Morgan’s longstanding operations 
in many developing countries mil 
ag»m give h an advantage over its 
5 — competition along Wall 


Throughout the turmoil of the 
last five years, even competitors 
qedit Mr. Rbhatyn with wielding a 
cool hand in a hot market 
l Mr. Robatyn’s rise reflects a shift 
in the balance of power on Wall 
Street In the 1980s, the hottest 
careers were the risk arbitrageurs 
and merger specialists. Now the 
most lucrative and fastest-growing 
Adds are the complex worlds erf 
options and other financial deriva- 
tives »nH the emerging markets. 


Mr. Rohatyn is also representa- 
tive of J.P. Morgan’s ■ profound 
transformation from a commercial 
bank lo a securities firm. During 
the last decade, tins most blue- 
blooded of American banks has 
systematically pushed aside a gen- 
eration of middle-aged executives 
trained: in the now-dediiiing an of 
lending- Instead of hiring financial 
advisers mid traders from Wall 
Street, as other commercial banks 
have done, Morgan has grown a 
new. generation of securities execu- 
tives, recruited straight out of col- 
lege and indoctrinated in its sober 
culture. 

■ Nicolas Rohatyn is very much in 
the Morgan mold, a focused and 
intense manager who shuns the 
bravado and swagger erf so many 
Wall Street traders. Unlike bis 
flamboyant father, FeHx Rohatyn, 
the meiger master of Lazard Frcres 
& Co. and the fanner chairman of 
New York Gt/s Municipal Assis- 
tance Coro., the younger Mr. Ro 
hatyn mam rams a deadly serious 
tone and a low profile. 

He tries to play down the impor- 


tance to his career of Ms youth — 
and his patrimony. “The market 
does not reward we for bong my 
father’s son," he said. “It wasn’t like 
I was brought into an existing struc- 
ture and vaulted to the top. When I 
started we had seven people.” 

. Morgan, more than most firms, 
anticipated bow the market would 
change, with its leading players 
eventually mutual funds and pen- 
son funds instead of speculative 
hedge funds and rich Latm Ameri- 
cans. Morgan has been among the 
first to provide these new investors 
with tire sort of detailed research 
reports they are accustomed to in 
other markets. 

Where Morgan may be at a dis- 
advantage, however, is in under- 
writing securities issues fra Latin 
American companies. Until recent- 
ly, Morgan and other banks have 
been prohibited by the federal gov- 
ernment from underwriting securi- 
ties. 

Last year, the bankers who ban- 
died stock issues in Mr. Rohatyn’s 
department were combined with 
Morgan’s stock-underwriting divi- 


sion. Mr. Rohatyn conceded that 
his group needed to pay more at- 
tention to new issues, but Morgan 
remains a powerful force in re- 
search on mid trading of existing 
bonds, as wdl as in the market fra 
nonperfrainiug bank loans. 

Still, for Mr. Rohatyn and the 
emerging-markets business, recent 
months have been a triumphal 
time. The pubUdw surrounding the 
North American Free Trade Agrec- 
ment, which is seen as cementing 
economic development in Mexico, 
helped raise investor activity in 
emerging markets securities to re- 
cord volumes last year. Total trad- 
ing volume is estimated to have 
reached about $13 trillion in 1993, 
doable that of a year earlier. Mor- 
gan said its volume more than tri- 
pled last year, though it would not 
disclose specific figures. 

Morgan, in fact, is among the 
first companies to take advantage 
of the trade pact, applying to open 
a branch in Mexico City, which it 
was not allowed to do before the 
agreement’s passage. Mr. Rohatyn 
plans to send 12 people to die 


branch to trade pesos and Mexican 
securities. The treaty is also expect- 
ed to lead to an upgrade of Mexi- 
can securities this year, opening the 
markets to a new class of more 
conservative investors. 

StiD, the success of emerging mar- 
kets is drawing new rivals and, thus, 
shrinking profit margins. So Mor- 
gan and other companies are look- 
ing for new frontiers in such coun- 
tries as Poland and Peru that were 
virtually given up as economic de- 
serts a few years ago. It also is 
searching for trading opportunities 
in Vietnam, South Africa, and even 
Cuba fra its proprietary trading 
book. 

Of course, the new markets can be 
more profitable than established 
sectors because they are riskier. Yet 
Morgan may not be able to profit 
from one of the biggest risks: the 
possibility that interest in emerging 
markets will fade. Sorpe people wor- 
ry that many bull markets in Latin 
America and Asia have been driven 
by investor interest rather than fun- 
damentals, and that this bubble will 
burst. 


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FED: Banker’s Intuition Fills in for Figures When Officials Weigh Interest-Rate Decisions 




C r u - ■ • 

aiw' - 

c*‘ «•* • 


Conthmed from Page 15 

. their assump tions about how the 
-sconomy works now. They then 
r*un the new models to see bow the 
changes affect the models’ predic- 
tions of future inflation. 

Such an approach may seem very 
orderly. But it all depends on the 
Fed official's guess of how past 
statistical relationships have 
dmnp»pi a guess that is based on a 
lifetime of experience. 

. Many monetarist economists in 
aewtamia believe that money-sup- 
ply figure remain valuable. They 
ortidze Mr. Greenspan for focus- 
ing cm a succession of economic 
indicators in public testimony. 

“It’s a veiy dangerous game to 
play, to drag out whatever indica- 
tor is pointing in the right direc- 
tion," said Wffliam Poole, , a mone- 
tarist at Blown University often 


cited as a possible future Republi- 
can nominee to the Fed. 

But Mr. Greenspan appears un- 
moved. The Fed’s monetary-policy 
committee “will continue to moni- 
tor the behavior of money-supply 
measures for evidence about un- 
derlying economic and financial 
developments more generally, but 
it will still have to base its assess- 
ments regarding appropriate policy 
actions on a wide variety of eco- 
nomic indicators," according to 
Mr. Greenspan’s written, but un- 
read, testimony last week. 

The most important consider- 
ation for the Fed these days ap- 
pears to be investors’ expectations 
of jnflRti oc. which are reflected to 
some extent in long-term interest 
rates and commodity prices. 

Short-term changes m prices 
r depend on how much slack is 

ble in the economy to accom- 


modate surges in demand, but over 
the longer haul, “the rate erf price 
chang e depends crucially on price 
expectations, and not on the degree 
of slack," Mr. Greenspan told the 
Joint Economic Committee of 
Congress on Jan. 31. 

Long-term interest rates tend to 
vary with these expectations. And 
the success of the Fed's interest rate 
policy, Mr. Greenspan said last 
week, should be judged by whether 
it holds down these long-term rales. 

The Fed has no direct control 
over long-term rates but does con- 
trol short-tom rales. In theory, it 
can puB down long-term rates by 
pushing up short-term rates. 

The Fed pushed up rates for 

ovennghtloans between banks by a 

quarter of a percentage point on 
Feb. 4. Long-term rales, however, 
have risen by more than a third of a 
percentage point since then. This 


has surprised and dismayed Fed 
officials. 

“I had thought that a move by us 
at that time would be more likely to 
stabilize or maybe even bring down 
the long- term rate," Mr. LaWare 
said. 

Mr. Greenspan said the rise in 
long-term rates did not reflect the 
Fed’s move on short-term rates. In- 
stead, he said, long-term rates rose 
because of subsequent economic 
reports that investors misinterpret- 
ed as signs that the strong econom- 
ic growth in the fourth quarter of 
last year would continue this year 
and rekindle inflation. 

Many Wall Street analysts say 
the Fed now focuses overwhelm- 
ingly on prices for gold and other 
commodities in setting short-term 
interest rates. Mr. Greenspan 
seemed to lend support fra this 
view Tuesday, when he told the 


House Banking Committee that 
gold prices woe “a very good indi- 
cator' of future inflation. 

But other Fed officials 
see little use for gold as an 
of inflation. “If that’s what the 
chairman believes, that’s fine — it's 
not my view that gold forms a key 
or centra] variable," Mr. Lindsey 
said. 


Claims Against 

THE 

United States 
Government 


PACE AND ROSE 

ATTORNEVaANOeeUNSGLORS 

WJWHIW7TON O.c 

(202) TTfvzeoa 

PARIS 
44.3810 41 
LOB ANGELES 
l3US) CT7-2AOO 


The 3rd Annual 

Investing in the Americas® 1994/ 

Invirtiendo en las Americas® 1994 

Mining Investment in Latin America 
Sheraton Bal Harboor Resort, Bal Harbour, Florida, April 12-14, 1994 
Including Investing in a Greener Earth , April 15, 1994 

Latin American mineral resource production ( exclusive of oil and gas) exceeds 
US$26 Billion annually. The sector equipment purchases exceed US$2 Billion 
annually, with commuted investment at over US$5 Billion yearly into the next 
century. Find out NOW where the region wdl be in a few years, register early. 

A Few of the Program Highlights 


One Continent, One Hemisphere and 
One World: The Future of Latin 
America Sally Shelton, former Ambassador 
to Barbados and Grenada, Senior Fellow 
and Adjunct Professor at Georgetown 
University (Washington D.C.) 

The Sun Shines on Latin America: A 
Forecast on tbe Investment CUmate 
Amy Gassman, Vice President, Investment 
Research Goldman Sachs & Co. (NY), 
Gerald A. Rothstein, Managing Director, 
Oppenheimer & Co., Inc. (NY) 

Selecting tbe Right Strategy For Your 
Company in Latin America Jay Taylor, 
Exploration Manager, Placer Dome 
(Santiago) 


Canadian Exploration: A Way to 
Invest in tbe Emerging Latin 
American Markets Philip Martin, 
Partner and Mining Analyst, Gordon 
Capital Corp. (Toronto) 

Privatization: Tbe End of Corruption 
in South America Pedro Deutsch, 
Partner, Price Waterhouse (Santiago) 
Under wr it in g Mining-related Risks 
- Mitigating country and currency risk 
with U.S. Export-Import Bank, OPIC 
(Overseas Private Irwestmerit Corp.), ZFC, 
World Bank, EBRD, and other public 
arid private insurers. Robin Wade, 
Managing Director, Political Risks 
Division, Lloyds broker Colburn, French 
and Kneen Ltd. (London) 


Project Finance Workshop and Privatization Workshop 

Speakers: William F. White, Pres., IBK Capital Corp. (Toronto); Pierre Chenand, VP, Corporate 
Development, Cambior, Inc. (Montreal); Minh Thu Dao-Huy, E.V.P, EBK Captial Corp. (Toronto); 
Gerald P. McCarvill, Pres, and CEO, Repadre Capital Corp.; Raul Otero, Chairman of the Board, 
Minero Peru; Lance S. Tigerr, Sr. VP, Business Development and Treas., Noranda Minerals, Inc. 
(Toronto); Thomas Gorman, CF.O. and Treas., CAMECO Corp.; Herrick K. Lidstone, member, 
Brenman Raskin & Friedlob 

Mining Ministers* Forum The following ministers will lead roundtable discussions 
about projects offered for foreign investment, new mining regulations, and codes: 

Dr. Angel E. Maza, Argentina; Dr. Jaime Villalobos Sanjlnes, Bolivia; Honourable Shelley 
Martel, Ontario, Canada; Ing. Alejandro Hales, Chile; Dr. Guido Nule Amin, Colombia; Ing. 
Marcos Portal, Cuba; Ing. Gerakl Maiten Ellis, Dominican Republic; Francisco Acosta 
Coloma, Ecuador; Coy Roache, Jamaica; Ricardo A. Fabrega, Panama; Ing. Daniel Hokama 
Tokashiqui, Peru; F.R. Demon, Suriname; Dr. Gustavo Cersosimo Michel ini, Uruguay 


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HSBC Profit 
Surges 48%, 

Led by Asia 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


They 9 re Bullish in Sri Lanka 

Tiny Stock Exchange Winning Respect 


By Kevin Murphy 

„ International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — HSBC Hold- 
ings PLC the parent company of 
HongKong & Shanghai Banking 
Corp., said Monday its profit 
singed 48percent last year, to £1.81 
billion (S3 bOlion). But it warned 
that 1994 could be more: difficult in 
key growth areas. 

Led by strong growth in its tradi- 
tional Asian markets; a £468 mil- 
jion — or 75 percent — increasein 
■trading profit; and a successful in- 
tegration of Midland Bank, which 
it took over in 1992, the 1993 re- 
sults exceeded expectations of the 
company and most analysts. 

“As we look ahead, we expea 
our business to benefit from con- 
tinued growth in Asian economies 
■and recovery in the UJC and 
UJL," said Sir William Purves, 
chairman of HSBC Holdings, with 
£206 billion in assets that make it 
one erf the world's largest banks. 

“However, with interest rates at 
or near the bottom of the cycle, it is 
unlikely that conditions in the 
.Treasury and capital markets in 
1994 wil] be as favorable as those in 
1993" Sir William said. 

The company earned 59 percent 


jiiWMg 


P^Bli ii i M 


dex. The Asia- Pacific region con- 
tributed 75 percent to the overall 
result 

The Americas, where the compa- 
ny owns Marine Midland Bank and 
uie Hongkong Bank of Canada, 
remained an unprofitable area. 

The overall results helped pull 
the Hang Seng index up 309.0 
POmts, or 3.07 percent Monday. 

The stock market bad been pum- 
melled recently by concern about 
nsng U.S. interest rates and a dis- 
pute between Britain and China 
over the pace of democratic reform. 

John Gray, chairman of the lo- 
cally incorporated Hongkong Bank 
that oversees most Asian opera- 
tions, voiced some caution about 
the risks inherent in the local prop- 
erty boom. 

But the situation has not reached 
dangerous levels seen in previous 
boom-bust cycles. 

“If you look at key measures such 
as the affordability ratio, it is at a 
much lower level than 1 9S2, the start 
of the last property crash," Mr. 
Gray said, referring to the propor- 
tion of household income required 
to cover mortgage payments. 

“I’m reasonably comfortable 
with size and quality mix of the 
bank’s loan portfolio," he said. 
“It’s not something I lose too much 
sleep over, but it is something that 
needs to be watched closely." 


By Edward A. Gargan 

.V< h- York Tima Service 

Hidden in the Indian Ocean like a verdant 
dollop dripping from the southern coast of tropical 
India, Sri Lanka has lingered in geographical and 
economic obscurity. 

It is a land that lures European tourists, is 
fighting a vicious but relatively contained civil war, 
and has quietly managed to attract interest from 
foreign investors and financial institutions. 

Since the b anning of the year, the Colombo 
Stock Exchange — tiny by global standards, to be 
sure — has soared. Before last week, it had been 
outperforming markets in every other country ex- 
cept Brazil. Then, on Wednesday, the Sri Lankan 
all-shares index hit an all-time high of 1 ,373.48 and 
the market became the world’s leading gainer for 
the year. The market has risen more than 350 
points in three months. 

Political stability, winch appears to have been 
enhanced following the assassination of the former 
president last May, and the most sustained eco- 
nomic growth in South Asia have made Sri Lanka a 
lucrative investment with considerable potential, 
according to many analysts. 

"A lot of investors are coming into the market," 
said Thilan Wijesinghe, director of research at Asia 
Stock Brokers Pvt., a brokerage in Colombo. “We 
saw the first Sri Lankan country fund last year,” be 
said in reference to the Regent Sri Lankan Fund 
Ltd, managed in Hong Kong. “It raised a total of 
S25.6 million in November and one reason for the 
rise in the market was that the fund was investing. 
And then a lot of retail investors got into the 
market.” 

Far freer than the regional markets in India, 
particularly Bombay's, and in Karachi, the Colom- 
bo ex chang e has prospered in a wnall , and until 
now unnoticed, fashion. 

Gone forever, it seems, are the controls and state 
ownership that characterized the socialist policies 


of the 1970s. Foreign investment in manufactur- 
ing, once discouraged, is now wooed; and with a 
literacy rate approaching 90 percent, Sri Lanka has 
the most educated workers in South Aria. 

Still, the country is tiny and the Colombo ex- 
change has one of the smallest capitalizations of 
eme rging market exchanges in the world, about 
S3.6 billion, up from $1.8 billion in December. 

But as Mano Titawella, manager of research at 
HDF Securities Pvt., a Colombo investment firm, 
pul it, "Daily trading volume is now at S8 million. 
It’s small by any other standard, but in December 
it was $2 minion.” 

Such tiny turnover leads many analysts to ignore 
Sri Lanka. A few foreign analysts, however, believe 
that Sri Lanka, if not yet of age, is rapidly warrant- 
ing attention. Nigel RendeU, a market strategist at 
James Capd & Co., dies “a fairly stable political 
environment, fairly strong growth — 6 percent 
GDP growth is the minimu m this year if rhiny 
hold together. There is also the possibility that if 
they manage to son out the war with the Tamils 
growth could be in double digits." The T amils are 
the ethnically-based, northern rebel movement. 

In Colombo, brokers and analysts are confident 
that there is no way to go but up. Mr. Wijesinghe 
even believes Sri Lanka’s size works to its advan- 
tage. “Our smallness in itself proved to be an 
advantage, " he said. “Fund managers might have 
2, 3, 4 million in the Sri Lankan market. So people 
leave their money here instead of moving it out like 
happened in Bangkok or Kuala Lumpur. And new 
money was coming in." 

Foreign analysts said Sri Lanka was vmoving 
forward faster than other markets in South Asia. 

“From a foreign perspective," Mr. RendeU of 
James Capd said, “We like the manufacturing 
sector. We like the construction sector. The service 
sector also seems to be growing, and the tourist 
sector is booming.” 


Indian Tax Cut 
To Aid Growth 

Reuters 

NEW DELHI — India on 
Monday cut corporate taxes, 
import duties and interest 
rates to spur sluggish industri- 
al growth and bolster its eco- 
nomic reform program. 

Finance Minister Manmo - 
han Singh, architect of the 
country’s year liberalization 

program, cut the minimum 

lending rale by one percentage 
pant, to 14 percent, and re- 
duced corporate taxes for Indi- 
an companies to 40 percent 
from more than 50 po-cenL 

Mir. Singh said thaT because 
of strong currency inflows into 
India, the coontiy would repay 
early $1.4 hillioa owed to the 
' International Monetary Fund. 


China Admits ’94 Targets Hard to Meet 


Mgence Frortce-Presse 

BEUING — China’s growth and 
inflation targets for 1994 may turn 
out to be unachievable “ideals," the 


for 1994 inflation and of 9 percent kepi ahead of inflation, with real dement business has not been af- 
for gross domestic product growth increases of 10.2 percent in cities, fected by unification, Mr. Wang 
were “only ideals." to 2,337 yuan, and 3.2 percent in said, adding that hard-currency 

General Zhang said the main rural areas, to 921 yuan. 


earners, mainly foreign trade firms. 


State Statistical Bureau said Mon- problems facing the economy were However, he acknowledged, rap- had sold all their foreign exchange 
day, as it released data showing the steep price rises, excessive fixed-as- idly increasing prices had “led to certificates to the bank ; n line with 
country’s rapid but inflationary set investment and bottlenecks the decline of living standards in state regulations. 


growth last year. - 
China's gross domestic product 
grew 13.4 percent last year, to 3.14 


caused by the failure of public works 
to meet deman ds of high growth. 
Investment in fixed assets 


bhc works some households.” 

growth. Direct foreign investment con- 


China unified its exchange rate on 


turned to soar, with $110.9 billion Jan. 1. replacing a two-tier system 


trillion yuan ($361 billion), the jumped 50.6 percent last year, over contracted, up 90.7 percent, and that involved an official rate far low- 
higbest rate since 1985, while in- 1992, to 1.18 trillion yuan. The $25.76 bfflion used, up 130 percent, er than that obtainable cm its for- 


dustrial output totaled 1.41 trillion 
yuan, up 21.1 percent from 1992, 
according to the statistics bureau 
director. General Zhang Sai. 

Warning that a dramatic drop in 


amount of money in circulation 
soared 353 percent, to 5863 billion 
yuan, fueling retail price increases 
of 13 percent nationally. 

The cost of living rose 14.7 per- 


growth — like that accompanying cent nationwide, with the rate for 
the three-year austerity drive the 35 biggest cities at 19.6 percent. 


launched in 1988 too coal the econ- 
omy — would have harmful effects, 
Genera] Zhang said government 
targets of a maximum 10 percent 


compared with 13.7 percent in the 
countryside, the bureau said. 

But General Zhang noted that 
per capita income had on the whole 


the bureau said. 

■ Exchange-Rate Success 
The Bank of China's president. 
WangXnebing, said the unification 
of China's exchange rale had been 
successful and there would be no 
major changes in the yuan rate for 
the foreseeable future, AFP-Extd 
News reported. 

The bank’s foreign exchange set- 


eign-exchange swap markets. 


Key Japan 
Indexes 
Show Gains 

Bhondxrg Business Sevs 

TOKYO — Numbers released 
Monday may portend some relief 
for the Japanese economy, but offi- 
cials are wary of predicting that 
recovery is under way. 

What they say without hesitation 
is that recovery’ when it does come, 
is not going to be spectacular. 

Output from Japan's crucial 
manufacturing sector rose a sea- 
sonally adjusted 0.9 percent in Jan- 
uary. the Ministry of International 
Trade and Industry said. 

Average household spending 
rose 0.4 percent in December, ana 
housing starts — the crnly consis- 
tently strong indicator recently — 
surged 20.7 percent in January. 

“All the numbers released today 
were s hunger than expected," Chris 
Calderwood. economist at Barclays 
de Zoete Wedd, said. “It's too early 

to rule out a relapse, but it's entirely 
plausible that October and Novem- 
ber may have been the trough." 

The increase in industrial out- 
put, while small, may mean that the 
manufacturing industry began to 
turn around in October, when pro- 
duction fell a record 53 percent. 
January’s rise followed a 22 per- 
cent increase in November and a 
1.9 percent drop in December. It 
appears that industrial production 
hit its bottom in October. 

This is encouraging for the econ- 
omy because recovery wifi only 
come to Japan if its core industrial 
sector revives significantly. 

MIT1 forecast that production 
would increase for the next two 
months at least. It said it expected 
production to improve 2.6 percent 
in February and 3.4 percent in 
March. That would put production 
for the first quarter in positive ter- 
ritory for the first time in a year. 

Koichi Yoshimoto. a ministry 
official said that it was still too 
early to say whether Japan's fac- 
tories were rebounding. 

“The sign that it coaid have bot- 
tomed out will have to wait until 
next month, when April's forecast 
comes out.” he said. 

Companies often increase pro- 
duction during February and 
March to window-dress figures in 
their accounting books for the end 
of the fiscal year in March. 


HongKong 

Hang Seng - • 


^TdlQfor. : 




> v.i fifcv : w -. v : ;^SSk. • *»»§■:. 

Exchange ^ ..pJwwasu-tfwPtwj 

Tolnre /; V 
BangkoK 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


I menu bona] Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 

• Sinsegj Mobile, a unit of Pohaug Inn & Steel AG, will lead a 
consortium to develop South Korea's second cellular phone network. 

• Hong Kong registered a trade surplus of $222.3 milli on in January, 
reflecting its booming trade with China. Exports grew 29 percent while 
imports rose 27 percent 

• Krafitanstalt far Wkderanfban, a mple-A-raled German borrower, 
delayed a $200 million, five-year bond to Asian investors, dealing a 
setback to the dragon bond market which caters to Asian investors 
outside of Japan. 

• Vietnam will replace 15 airliners at a cost of $1 billion in the next few 
years and needs more than $300 million to upgrade three airports, a civil 
aviation official said. 

• Vietnam’s official news agency said that licensed foreign investment in 
the city erf Hanoi doubled to $1 .4 billion in 1993, the sixth year after the 
country allowed such investment. 

• Esso Production Malaysia Inc. the Malaysian exploration and produc- 
tion subsidiary of Exxon Corp^ said it has discovered oil and gas at a site 
in the South China Sea. 

• Woodside Petroleum Ltd. of Australia said it would slash its work force 
by 25 percent because of low oil prices and a shift oat of the construction 
phase al its offshore natural gas project. 

• NEC Corp. is considering plans to manufacture work stations and other 
computer equipment in Gnma in a joint venture with Shanghai Quwg- 
jiang (Holdings) LtnL, the parent of a local telecommunications company. 

• Suntory LtiL, Japan’s top whiskey distiller, said its pretax earnings feD 5 

percent, to 93 billion yen ($873 rmllion), in 1993 ana cited lower sales of 
distilled liquor, beer and wine. afp. afx. Bloon*^ AP 


CURRENCY AND CAPITA! MARKET SERVICES 



Monday’s Ckwino 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wail Street mid do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 



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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 


* 


SPORTS 


Minnesota Hands Indiana 
Worst Loss in 89 Years 


The Associated Press 
Bob Knight didn’t throw or kick 
anything. He didn’t rant or rave. 

He knew it wouldn’t have done 
any good. 

No. 12 Indiana suffered its worst 
loss in Knight’s 22 years as the 
university’s basketball coach when 
the Hoosiers were pummel ed, 106- 
56, by No. 20 Minnesota in a na- 
tionally televised game in Minne- 
apolis on Sunday. 

Although showing remarkable 
restraint. Tot him, Knight did occa- 
sionally wince, slump or put a hand 
over his eyes. 

In diana hadn’t seen anything 
like it in 89 years, not since a 66-12 
defeat at Ohio State on March 12, 
1905. 

“The game was over after about 
10 minutes.” Knight said. “They 
did the things they are capable of. 
There are some things that hap- 
pened early in the game that just 

elimin ated us.” 

Knight's worst previous loss at 
Indiana was an 83-52 defeat at 
Michigan in 1986. 

The Hoosiers (17-6 overall, 10-4 
Big Ten) bad a three-game winning 
streak ended, while the Gophers 
(19-9, 9-6) halted their two-game 
losing streak quite easily. 

Indiana trailed, 25-19, with 
10:07 left in the half, then unrav- 
eled. Minnesota launched runs of 
13-0 and 1 5-3 eu route to scoring 3 1 
of the final 36 points of the period 
j for a 56-24 lead. 

“Nobody can predict a game like 
! this,” said Randy Carter, a Minne- 
sota forward, who scored 10 points. 
“But we got beat by 46 at Bloo- 
mington once and and that always 
stuck in the back of our minds.” 

Voshon Lenard had a career- 
high 35 points on 13-of-I7 shoot- 
ing. The Gophers set a school re- 
cord with 32 assists, made 11 3- 
poin t shots —another team high — 
and shot 64 percent in their biggest 
Big Ten victory. Six Minnesota 
players scored in double figures. 

the second half was no better for 
the Hoosiers. Minnesota opened 
with consecutive dunks, by Lenard 
and David Grimm, then sank five 
quick 3-pointers. 

Damon Bailey scored 10 of Indi- 
ana's first 12 points, but finished 
with just 13 and sat out the second 
half. He was the only Hoosier in 
double figures. 

No. 2 Duke 59, No. 8 Temple 47: 
In Durham, North Carolina, senior 
swingman Grant Hfl] became the 
third member of Duke's back-to- 
back national championship teams 
to have his jersey retired, then got 

13 points, 8 rebounds and 8 assists 
as the Blue Devils won their 88th 
consecutive game at home against a 
nonoonference opponent. 

A “33" jersey was presented be- 
fore the game to H3L the eighth 
baskeLball player in school history 
to receive the honor. The other 
members of the 1991 and *92 cham- 
pionship teams with their numbers 
retired are Bobby Huxley and 
Christian Laettner. 

Antonio Lang had 16 for Duke 
(21-3), which won its fourth 
straight. 

Temple (20-6), which closed its 
regular season with consecutive 
losses, was led by Derrick Battle's 

14 points. 

No. 7 Kentucky 80, Georgia 39: 
The Wildcats (22-5, 11-3 South- 


eastern Conference) , playing at 
home, ran off 18 straight points to 
open the second half, 14 off nine 
consecutive turnovers by Georgia 
(12-14, 6-8). 

That avengpd a 94-90 overtime 
loss at Georgia and put Kentucky 
into a first-place tie with Florida in 
the SEC Eastern Division. Those 
teams play Wednesday night in 
Lexington, 

For the game. Kentucky scored 
46 points off 29 turnovers by the 


CQILEGE BASKETBALL 

Bulldogs. Tony Delk led Kentucky 
with 22 points, while Shandon An- 
derson had 15 for Georgia. 

George Washington 77, No. 11 
Massachusetts 66: Yinka Dare and 
Kwame Evans scored 24 points 
apiece and host George Washing- 
ton (16-9, 8-7 Atlantic 10) kept 
alive its NCAA tournament hopes 
with its seventh straight victory. 
Massachusetts (23-6, 13-2) had 
won four in a row. 

No. 18 Syracuse 82, St John's 
81: Lawrence Mo ten scored 24 
points, sinking two free throws 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Alton HC Division 



W L 

PCt 

GB 

New York 

34 19 

.655 

— 

Ortando 

33 20 

823 

2 

Mtomi 

29 25 

-537 

6V, 

New Jersey 

28 24 

.519 

Tfi 

Boston 

20 35 

344 

16 

Ptdladelptifa 

20 35 

344 

16 

Wasblnatan 

16 99 

_251 

20 


Cartrat Dlvtsfoa 



Atlanta 

38 16 

ZIM 

— 

Chicago 

37 17 

885 

1 

Cleveland 

31 24 

364 

7 to 

Indiana 

28 25 

328 

Wi 

Citartatte 

23 30 

<34 

1416 

i 

i 

i 

14 39 

391 

22V, 

Detroit 

13 41 

-241 

25 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 



Mkfwesf Dhrisloe 




W L 

Pet 

GB 

Houston 

38 14 

J31 

— 

San Antonio 

40 16 

JU 

— 

Utah 

37 19 

M\ 

3 

Denver 

27 28 

jrn 

12V, 

Minnesota 

16 37 

302 

22V, 

Dallas 

8 48 

.143 

32 


Pacific DM Is loa 



Seattle 

39 14 

-736 

_ 

Phoenix 

36 17 

jsn 

3 

Portland 

34 21 

418 

6 

Golden Slate 

31 23 

-574 

Bto 

LA Lakers 

28 33 

377 

W 

Sacramento 

19 35 

352 

20V, 

LA dippers 

18 35 

340 

21 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 


Charlotte 24 21 31 27—143 

Orlando is XI 27 27-114 

C: Brickowskl 7-14 MB a Curry IT-71 (M) 24. 
O: O’Neal M6 W 21, Andersen MS 2-2 18. 
Rebounds— Charlotte 41 I HawMn 81. Orlan- 
do a (O-Naai 11). Assisi*— Charlotte 29 (Bo- 
dies |). Orlando 23 (Hardaway V). 

GoidM State 24 24 23 27 — W0 

Minnesota 24 34 IS 27— TOT 

G : Webber 13-29 44 32. Sprewell 8-24 4-8 23. 
M: Smith 5-11 10-10 21, Rider 0-14 88 25. Re- 
boondo-GaWen State 58 (Webber 16). Minne- 
sota 54 (Brawn 7], Assists— Golden State 27 
(Jotimon 10). Minnesota 30 (SntHh 9). 
DeMac 23 n 23 »— 90 

New Jersey 23 29 32 33—117 

D: Mashbum 11-20 5-11 32. Jackson 7-17 1-2 
15.NJ.: Morris 12-160-0 27. Edward* 4-11 3-3 T7. 
Rebound*— Oaf las 5B (Mosnburn Ml. New Jer- 
sey 55 (Coleman 101. Assists— Dallas 21 (Le- 
ver. Harris 5). New Jersey 24 (Anderson 9). 
New York 14 12 22 IS— 78 

Phoenix 24 19 28 27-92 

N.Y.; Ewtng 9-23 11-13 29. Shirks 8-15 M 11 
P: Johnson 9-23 11-13 29, Cebaltoe 7-14 2-4 14. 
Rebou nd* New York 51 (Ewtng 17), Phoenix 
42 (Cebailos 12). Assist*— New York 21 
(Horner 7).Phoenlx71 (Barkloy.Green. John- 
son MO lerlc. Miller 3). 

Seattle 35 31 32 34-132 

LA. Clippers 34 35 24 31—118 

S: Kemp7-ll 13-1 9 27, Gill 10-1 8 3-3 23. Payton 
10-200421. LA.: Wilkins 11-31 12-12 34, Harper 
8-14 48 27. Rebo end*— Seattle 55 (Kemp 14), 


with 21 seconds left in Madison 
Square Garden, as Syracuse (19-5, 
1 1-5) took over second {dace in the 
Big East, a half-game ahead of 
Georgetown and a game in front of 
Boston College. Connecticut has 
clinched the regular-season tide at 
14-1 

It was the fourth loss in a row for 
SL John's (11-14, 5-11), but the 
Redmen made it dose by rallying 
from a 12-point halftime deficit. 
Charles Mini end had 24 of his 28 
points in the second half for the 
Redmen. 

No- 22 Marquette 70, DePaid 62: 
Senior Fun McDvaine, who helped 
Marquette reconstruct its oace- 
proud basketball program, led the 
Warriors (20-7, 10-2) to their first 
Great Midwest Conference title by 
scoring 23 points and blocking six 
shots m Milwaukee. 

DePaul (15-9, 3-7), which lost for 
the fifth straight time to Marquette, 
was led by reserve guard Belefia 
Parks, who had 14 pants. 

The Warriors posted their first 
consecutive 20-victory seasons 
since 1981-82. 


Los Angelea 42 (VOught 13). Assist*— Seattle 
28 (Payton 81, Las Angctes 31 (Jackson 12). 
Boston M 23 24 25- 97 

LA. Lokars 24 3) 34 29—140 

B: Fox 8-11 14 19. Douglas 7-9 4-i 18. LA.: 
Ohioc 13-24 20 2& TTrrecrff 12-21 2-2 25.Be- 
boonds— Bostons) ( Parish 10). Los AngrinC 
COIvoc 13). Assist* — Boston 25 (Douglas 8). 
Los Annates 37 (Van Exei 12). 

Denver 19 38 25 33- 97 

Portland 31 17 31 24— 104 

D: Abdul- Rout 11-21 4-4 28. Rogers 7-1200 18. 
P: Strickland 8-13 28 19. praxler 8-14 4-11 22. 
Rebouwts— oenvor 54 (EMs. Miitombo 11). 
Portland 50 (Bu. Williams 11). Atalsti Ptit- 
ver 20 (Pack 7). Portland 3) (Strickland 12). 

Major College Scores 

EAST 

Cantslus 86, Iona 83 
Dartmouth 72. Cornell 49 
Delaware 41, New Hampshire 59 
Georgs Washington 77, Massachusetts 44 
Loyola, McL 81. Fairfield 73 
Maine 79, Drsxel 71 OT 
Mt mhatta n in, Niagara SB 
Siena 71, SL Peter's 44 
Syracuse 82, SL John's 81 
SOUTH 

AltL-BlrmtaBham BO, CS HarttwMge <3 
Duke 59, Temple 47 
Kentucky 80, Georgia 59 

MIDWEST 

Illinois 74. Wisconsin 45 
Marquette 70. DePaul 62 
Minnesota 104, Indiana 54 
Ohio U. CL Toledo 79 
S. Illinois 14 Illinois St. 73 
SOUTHWEST 

Southern Math. 44 Texas ASM 57 

The AP Top 25 


The loo 35 teams in nw college basketball 
poll with ffrat-place votes in Paranlliese! re- 
cord thrown Fed 37, total points based an 35 
paints for a fhsl piuie vote ffraagli one pal at 
for a 25tb-Ptace vote, aod previous ranking: 



Recent 

Pts 

PVS 

1. Arkansas (59) 

2M 

1419 

1 

2. Duke (1) 

21-3 

1413 

2 

L Michigan (3) 

20-4 

1449 

2 

4. Connecticut (1) 

24-3 

1375 

5 

5. North Carolina (1) 

t3S 

1347 

4 

6. Missouri 

22-2 

1345 

6 

7. Kentucky 

22-5 

1,187 

7 

8. Arizona 

2W 

1.171 

9 

9. Purdue 

2X4 

1349 

14 

ia Louisville 

22-4 

1328 

13 

11. Massoehusetts 

236 

897 

11 

12. Temple 

204 

B49 


IX Kansas 

224 

841 

10 

14 Syracuse 

19-5 

786 

18 

IX UCLA 

194 

445 

15 

16; Saint Louis 

22-3 

405 

19 

17. Indiana 

174 

577 

12 

IX Minnesota 

19-9 

528 

20 

19. Florida 

22-5 

502 

16 

20. California 

194 

494 

17 

21. Oklahoma SI. 

20-7 

336 

24 

22. Marauetta 

20-7 

288 

22 

23. Boston College 

1941 

92 

21 

24. AlapBlrmlfiobam 

204 

72 


25L Penn 

21-2 

7B 

— 


SCOREBOARD 



Tas> Rune/Agnxr Fnnst>?me 

The Magic’s ShaqtriDe O’Neal was whacked on the knee, hit the Hornets hurt more by game’s end. 


'Rookie’ Wilkins 



ashing Debut ' 


The Associated Press 

It might have been a storybook 
debut for Dominique Wilkins save 
for the fact that the Seattle Supcr- 
Sonics and the Los Angeles Clip- 
pers are on different pages. 

The Sonics broke a tie with 
Houston for die best record in the 
National Basketball Association 
with a 122-1 18 victory Sunday over 
the Clippers, who are in Iasi place 
in the Pacific Division. 

Shawn Kemp had 27 poults and 
14 rebounds. Kendall Gill scored 
23 points and Gary Payton 21 as 
Seattle overcame Wilkins’ 34 
points in his fust NBA game in a 
uniform other than that of the At- 
lanta Hawks. Ron Harper made his 
first eight shots — five of them 3- 
pointers — and finished with 27 
points for the Clippers. 

Tm glad be got off on the right 
foot like that” Loy Vaught, a for- 
ward for the Clippers, said of Wil- 
kins, who was traded for Danny 
Manning on Thursday. 

Wilkins was initially unhappy 
about leaving the fust-place Hawks 
for the last-place team Clippers, 
but he did his best to make a good 
first impression. 


' “Life is full of changes, anC 
you've got to make the bet of the 
chan ge s," he said. “Actually, • I 
think this change was the best for 
my career. I really believe that. 
Sometimes, when you're in a place 
for so long, they don’t appreciate 
you as much because they see you 
all the time. Sometimes a change 
may enhanc e your career." 

The Clippers, who tied a chib 
record with seven 3-point baskets, 


NBA HIGHLIGHTS , 

led by 93-84 in the third quarter 
before toe Sonics rallied with a 144 
run for a 98-97 lead at the end of 
the period. 

The lead changed hands six 
times in toe fourth quarter before 
Detlef Schrempfs 3-pointer put Se- 
attle ahead 114-113 with 3:18 left. 

The Clippers had a chance to he 
in toe final seconds, but Kemp re- 
bounded Mark Jackson’s 3-point 
attempt with 4.8 seconds left and 
made one of two free throws to 
complete the scoring. 

Trail Blazers 104, Nuggets 97: 
Portland won its sixth straight and 
handed Denver its 20th defeat in 28 
road outings as Clyde Drexler 
scored 22 points and Rod Strick- 
land had 19 points and 12 assists. 



NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Afiootfc Division 



Vt 

L 

T Pts GF GA 

ny Rangers 

39 

18 

4 

82 

217 

142 

New Jersey 

32 

20 

9 

73 

218 

149 

Washington 

31 

24 

6 

48 

200 

115 

PhikxleiPhto 

29 

30 

4 

42 

223 

239 

Florida 

24 

2S 

10 

42 

172 

171 

NY islanders 

24 

29 

6 

58 

207 

197 

Tampa Bay 

33 

33 

8 

54 

148 

1M 

Northeast DIvHton 




Boston 

23 

19 

11 

77 

210 

175 

Montreal 

33 

22 

8 

74 211 

171 

Pittsburgh 

30 

20 

12 

72 

222 

220 

Buffalo 

31 

24 

7 

49 211 

171 

Quebec 

24 

33 

5 

53 

200 

ZT5 

Hertford 

21 

35 

7 

49 

177 

214 

Ottuwu 

ia 

45 

8 

28 

154 

290 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


CoBfro) Dtvtston 



w 

L 

T Pts GF GA 

Detroit 

37 

20 

S 

79 

273 

211 

Taranto 

33 

19 

11 

77 209 

179 

Dallas 

34 

21 

8 

74 

223 

194 

St. Louis 

32 

22 

8 

72 234 201 

Chicago 

29 

27 

7 

45 

189 

177 

Winnipeg 

17 

40 

7 

41 

187 244 


Pacific Dlvtsfoa 




Catoary 

32 

22 

10 

74 

233 

197 

Vancouver 

30 

21 

3 

43 

205 

199 

San Jose 

22 

30 

11 

55 

175 

209 

Anaheim 

24 

35 

5 

53 

1B0 

197 

Las Angeles 

21 

33 

8 

50 

224 

244 

Cdwwitun 

17 

30 

10 

44 

198 

239 


SUNDAY’S RESULTS 
Boston 3 1 v— 4 

Chicago 8 8 8-8 

First Ported: BGweenev 4 (Rata, Oates); 
(sti)B-Sturnpcl 4 (Murray). Second Period: B- 
N*eiy4S (Date! Reid). Third ported: B-Naoiv 
44 (Oates. Kvorfofewv). (op). stats on goal: B 
(an Beifeur) 94-13-38. C (on Casey) 7-4-7-00 

Waswngtoa 113-8 

Hertford • 1 0-1 

Second Ported: H-Smyth 3 (Janssens. Cun- 
nevwortti). TWnl Parted: WKfones 17 (Cato. 
Bun-Mgo); W-RkHey 21 (Haletier, Johan*- 
■on); w-Cate 10 (Pivonka Millar). Sturts oa 
goal: W (on Burke) 134-10-31. H (on 
Beau are) P-7-5-21. 

Quebec 0 • 3-9 

N.Y. IriaxUn 3 0 2-5 

FSraf Ported: H.Y.-MCI rails 18 (Datoamo. 
Green); N.Y.-Acton 2 (Malay. Vufcota); N.Y,- 
Turgton 23 (Mrtokhov). Third Farted: 0-5*- 
moo 3 (WOlanJa)i N.Y.-Fomiro 13 (Hogue. 
Flaftoy); Q-LO Potato a (Gusarov); N.Y.-Ho- 
Buo27 (Laettence). (an). Shots m goal: Q (on 
Hoxtall) 9-7-17-33. N.Y. (an Plsef) 12-9-7—28. 
Tampa Bay 8 2 8-8 

E dmo n to n 1 2 0-8 

First Petted: E-Podoln 2 (Pearson. McAnv 
mand)5ocood Period: T-Golfont2,E-Podefn3 
(McAmmond, Pearson); E-Pearson 13 
(McAmmomL Podeln); T-D(Moto t (Cato, 
Grattan). Shots oa goto: T (on Ronfnrd) 15-13- 
7-85. E (on PUPPO) I0-1J-3—24. 



ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Chefaaa 4. Tottenham 3 
standings: Manchester United, 48; Block- 
burn. 41; Arsenal, 51; Newcastle, 48; Liver- 
pool. 47; Leeds, 44; Aston VHIa 45; Sheffield 
Wednesday and Norwich, 44; Q u aon o Park 
Ha n ga r s. 39; Coventry, 38; West Ham, 37; 
Ipswfdi and Wimbledon. 36; Everton.33; Tot- 
tenham and Southampton, 30; Chelsea and 
Maxtefltr City. 29; Oldham, 24; Sheffield 
United raid Swindon. 23. 

LEAGUE CUP 
Semifliiats. Second Leg 
Aslan Villa X Tranmere 1 
ASP reaate scare 4-4; Aston villa won 5-4 on 
penalties 

GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
wotten sO w M 2, VfB Latazto 2 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Ataianta 1, Juventus 3 
Genoa Z Lecce 0 
AC Milan 2. Poagta 1 
Napoli 1, Cagliari 2 
Parma Z Crentonese 1 
Piacen z a t. Latte 2 
Rama 0. Sara n derta I 
Torino Z Internazlonate 0 
Udlnese Z Ragglana 1. (nl 
Standlegs— AC Milan. 40; Juventus and 
Sampdaria, 34; Parma 33; Lazla.31; Torino, 
27; Internaztonale, 26; Foggta, Napoli and 
Cagliari. 29; Rama and Placenta 22; Cre- 
monesa. Genoa and Udlnese, 21; Ragglana 
18: Ataianta. 14; Lacca 9. 



BASEBALL 
American Leagae 

BALTIMORE— Arced to terms with Brad 
Penmngtan and Armando Benitez, Pilchers, 
and Alex Ochoa, outfielder. an 1-voar con- 
tracts. 

BOSTON— Asreed la terms with NoteMirv 
chey and Cory Bailey, pltdier! on l-var con- 
tracts. Announced 1-year agr eem e n t to have 
their Florida League affiliate play at Ed 
Smith stadium In Sarasota Purchased con- 
Fractaf Matt Stairs, out He Ider, from Pawtuck- 
et at 1 J_ Assigned Brian Conroy, pltcfter. out- 
right to Pawtucket and Invited Mm to earing 
training as a no o-rn star p layer. 

CALIFORNIA — Agreed la terms wl Hi Mark 
Lang s to n . Pitcher, on 3-yoar contract exten- 
sion through 1997; wttti Lee Guetterman, 
Pitcher, an mlnor-toague contract; and with 
Saitt Lewis, pitcher, on 1-yaar cont ra ct. 
Aaraed to terms with Damien Easley, infieta- 
er. on 1 -year contract. 

DETROIT— Agraedte terms with Scott Liv- 
ingstone. 3d baseman, and John Doherty, 
pitcher, on 1 -yaar contracts. 

MILWAUKEE— Aoraad to terms with John 
Jidto, 1st baseman, and Tray O'Leary, out- 
fielder, an 1 -year contracts. 

TEXA S Ag r ee d to terms with JeH Frye, 
Inf (elder, and Donald Harm autfteteer. an 1- 
year contracts. Agreed to terms wttti Dean 
Polmor, 3d baseman, and Ivan Rodriguez, 
catcher, on 1 -year contract! 

Nattonoi League 

ATLANTA— Agreed fa terms wttti Mark 
Wohlers, pitcher, on 1-year co n trod . 


CHICAGO CUBS— Agreed to (arms Jim 
Buinrser and Turk Wendell, Pitchers, an 1- 
year controd! 

COLORADO— Extended contract of Dan 
Bavtor. manager, through the 1995 season. 
LOS ANG ELES— Agreed to terms with Eric 

Karra! 1st baseman, on 3-vear contract and 
with Mika Sharpened. InfMder, an minor- 

MONTREAL— Agreed to terms wttti Reid 
Cornelius. Brian Looney. Bill Rhiav and Jeff 
Show. Pitcher! and John Vender Wal and 
Tyrone Woods, outfielder, on 1-year contract! 
Stoned Jeff Gardner. InflsMer, and Randy 
Krraner, pitcher, to contracts with Ottawa of 
1L. invited Heath Havnes, pitcher, to siring 
training as non-raster ptover. 

N.Y. mets— A greed to tanns with Joe 
Kmak, catcher, an 1-yaar co n t ra c t . Agreed to 
terms with Anthony Young and Bobbv Janes, 
pitcher! aid Araan Ledesma and Butch Hus- 
key. Infle teer! on 1 -vear co n tra cts . 

PHILADELPHIA— Agreed to terms with 
Todd Pratt catdwr; Wes Chamberlain, out- 
fielder ; and HeattidW$!oamn>,p1td»r,on 1- 
year co n tract s . 

SAN DIEGO— Agreed to terms wttti Andy 
A sh bv und Jam Martinez , pitchers and Archl 
OonfroccoandMeMn N lavas, o u metaers. on 
l-year contract! Agreed to terms with Derek 
Belt, outfielder, on i-vear c o ntract. Agreed to 
terms with Derek BelL outfielder, and RIckv 
Gutterrmz. shortstop, on 1-veer contracts and 
Trevor Hoffman, pitcher, on 3year c o ntrac L 
SAN FRANCISC O Agreed to terms with Pol 
' Gomez, pitcher, an 0 minor -league co n tract 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 
NBA— Fined Reggie Miller. inAxia guard, 
and Anthony B owl ! Ortanda guarft StfOP ter 
lighting and SczXt Sdle*.Ortando guard. 25B0 tor 
tedvtag bench durtag fight ta game an Fete 21 
ATLANTA— Traded Domintoue Wilkins, 
forward, and caidtftonol 1 st -round draft pick 
ta 1994 or 1995 to LA. Clippers ter Damv 
Manning, forwar d . 

■ • CHARLOTTE— Signed Marty Coaton. coo- 
ler, too controa far remainder of reason and 
Tim Kempton. ce n t e r, la 2d ldday c a nt rocL 
CHICAGO— Activated Toni Kukoc, guard- 
forwaro, from Mured list. Put Bill Cart- 
wright center, an Inlured list. 

CLEVELAND— Put Larry None! forward, 
an Inlured M. Activated Joy Gukflnger. cen- 
ter. from Inlured list. 

DENVER— Stoned Jim Farmer, naan), to 
2d M-day cantrocL 

INDIANA— Activated Pooh Rtoiardeon, 
guard, from Inlured list. Put Scott Hasten 
center- f orward, on Inlured list. 

LA. CLIPPERS— Signed Charles Outlaw, 
forward, to 20 lO-dctv co ntract. 

LA. LAKERS— Put Antonio Harvey, tor- 
ward. on Inlured list. 

MILWAUKEE— Traded Frank Brickowskl, 
farwardcenier.to awrtotic hr MlkaGffllnskt, 
center, and mxg tt u nol 1996 ishraumt DR*. 
Traded Den Schoye! center, to LA. Lakere tar 
c o ndWtonoi i m 2 a round draff pick. 

MINNESOTA— Traded Luc Longiev. cen- 
ter. to Oikooo tor Stacey Kina center. 

NEW JERSEY— Stoned Derek* Coleman, 
forward, to 4-y#or contract. 

ORLANDO— Waived Todd Lktrtt guard. 
Activated Larry Krystkowlak, tormard, 
from Inlured llsL 


PHILADELPHIA— Stoned Bill Edward! 
forward, to 10-day contract Pvt Shown Brad- 
ley. center, an Inlured llsL 
PHOENI X — Named Brian Cslangeto vice 
president and assistant general mcnoger. Ac- 
tivated Jerrad Mustaf. forward, from Injured 
list. Waived Joe Courtney, forward. 

UTAH— Traded Jeff Motor*. guard, to Phil- 
adelphia tor Jeff Hornacek and Sean Green, 
guards. 



Scor es otter S an daY sfl aai round of the dtrs 
1.1 mmaa Bale* Invttotte u a l at caBtomto 
golf tournameat to La JoHo: 

248 Craig Stadter 47 67 48 44 

249 Steve Lowery 47 48 44 48 
270 Phil Mlcfceiscn 48 49 49 44 

272 Hal Sutton 48 48 67 49 

273 Mar* Canwvofe 47 49 70 47 

274 Robin Freeman 68 47 71 <8 
274 Bob Estes 7D 47 47 70 

274 KMc Triplett 71 43 48 72 

275 Mark Calcavecetifa 49 72 49 45 
275 Paul Gaydos 48 70 7D 47 
275 Doug Marital 45 73 48 49 

275 Lemle dements 44 49 48 72 

276 Tam Lehman 48 70 47 7) 

276 Rennie Block 45 48 49 74 

277 Scott Simpson 70 70 70 47 
277 Bob Lohr 49 47 71 70 
277 Tom Byram 70 44 71 72 

277 David Tam 65 65 72 75 

278 Ed Dougherty 44 70 73 49 
278 Run Cochran <7 72 48 71 
278 Glen Day 48 47 72 71 
278 Payne Stewart 70 44 48 74 



EVERT CUP 
In Indian Wells, CalHerato 
Women's SUtotos Final 

Steffi Oral (1), Germany, def. Amanda 
Center (4), South Africa. 641. 6-4. 

DooMes Final 

Lindsay Davenport, United States, and Uso 
Raymond, Untied State! def. Manon Boife- 
arnf, Netherlands, and Helena Sukova, Czech 
Republic (21. t-Z 6* * 

MUVEEN ARIZONA CHAMPIONSHIPS 
la Scottsdale, a rbooa 
M en * singles Final 

Andre Agassi (51. United State! CM Lull 
Matter. Brazil, 64. 6-3. 

DooMes Final 

Jan AaelL Sweden, and Ken Ftach. United 
State! def. Alex O-Brtea United State! and 
Sondon Staff! Australia 641 64. 

MEXICAN TENNIS OPEN 
la Mexico City, Mexico 
Final 

Thomas Muster (11). Austriadef. Roberto 
JabatL Brazil. 6-3. 4-1. 



THIRD TEST 

Faklstaa n. Hew Zaotond. Final Day 
Monday, ta Chrisfcborcfc, New Zealand 
New Zealand 3d tamings: 3265 
New Zeotond won by five wickets. Pakistan 
wan series 2-1. 


Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf led ail 
scorers with 28 points and rookie 
Rodney Rogers had 18. with four 3- 
poini udd goals, for the Nuggets. 

Buck Williams bad 12 points and 
II rebounds for the Blazers, but 
with 9:38 left be was elbowed in the 
mouth by Denver center Dikembe 
Mutombo, who was called for a 
flagrant fouL Williams required 
five stitches in his lower lip and did 
not return to the game. 

Lakers 100, Celtics 97: Los An- 
geles extended Boston’s franchise- 
record losing streak to 12 games 
behind Vlade Di vac’s 28 points, his 
13 rebounds and his short teak 
shot with 25 seconds left. 

Sims 92, Kmcks 78: After AO- 
Star forwards Charles Barkley and 
Charles Oakley were ejected, Kevin 
Johnson took over in the fourth 
quarter as Phoenix won its ninth 
straight at home and handed New 
York its fourth consecutive loss.! 

With 43 seconds left in the first 
half. Barkley slapped Oakley, wljo 
missed a swing in response, result- 
ing in the ejection of both playeis. 

Johnson finished with 29 points 
and Patrick Ewing hit 29 points 
and 17 rebounds for New York, 
which shot just 36 percent from the 
field. The Kmcks now lead the At- • 
lantic Division by two games over ' 
Orlando after having a 7 Vi-game 
advantage on Feb. 6. 

Magjc 114, Hornets 103: Sha- 
qirille O’Neal shook off a sore knee 
to finish with 21 points, 11 re- 
bounds and five blocks as Orlando 
wot its seventh straight by defeat- 
ing Charlotte. 

The loss was the fifth straight 
and 13th in 14 games for the visit- 
ing Hornets, who were led by Dell 
Cuny with 26 points. 

‘f imberwobes 107, Warriors 100: 
Minnesota snapped a five-game 
losing streak behind Isaiah Riderts 
25 points. Visiting Golden State, 
despite Chris Webber 32 points 
and 16 rebounds, lost its third 
straight game after winning six in a 
row. 


DENNIS The menace 



"AUWCriS BE C4AEFUC WHBV yOl/fS D{R0ttV<G 5NDWMUS 
AT A SIRL.tbU COULD MtSSWOVOTADOG.* 


THAT SCMUUtet (HMD ONE 


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ona «nt u aacfi souani n km 
kuonkivymn 


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PEANUTS 



TELL MY TEACHER TO 0RINS 

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SHE SAID 15 IT ALL RI6HT 


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THE CLA55 TO OUR HOUSE 


TO BRINS THE PRJNClRAL.TQO, 


BEEN PRETTY; k 


tow, and we can study 

mu 

AND ALL THE MEMBERS 


V CROWDED.. / i 





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BLONDIE 


PONT FCWSET TD7 I'LL TIE 
PICK UP THE FISHIA STRING 
ON VOUH \~~r ABOUND 
BAY HOME ) ( MY FIN6ER 
TON16HT V > TO HELP ME 



[TIME TO GO HOME... NOW, 

WHAT WAS I SUPPOSED 

TO VO? OH YES, I HAWE 

A NOTE IN MY POCKET 




BEETLE BAILEY 



DOONESBURY 


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WWD01 WHY THE 
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tWCWTBi. 
THIS IS AM 
TH-UBPTH stcw, 
BECAUSE IT^ GOT 
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TD TVE CHART 



WIZARD of ID 



REX MORGAN 






















Wilkins 

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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1994 








Page 21 


The Olympic Games: Not Just Surviving but Better Than Ever 

d., t <n t7 


rarings, in the United Stales and elsewhere, 
what we didn't expect, what we should have 


St**™**, when Nm. 
for so long, die\ dn J - rc,n J' 
yon as much ^ 
the time Som Use ,I,fl * 
may enhance w lrT,Cs al 

w? reeT 

record withs«in ki^a- 


wSfU'didn-r 11111 ^ Sl t les 

changes. ” h<> ‘ne ,r it lEHAMMFR "h,* , _ what we dtdn t expect, what we should have 

think this chanp?' 0 "-W ^L'Ohihptcs is thauhey are almosfimrv^ Kpc f e t!! as ***“ ^ wholc mini - series “1**- 
EJ-r^rSn^ da** 7 becam. irrelevant, as most TV shows 

Steins: A ’£a£ 5 ‘ r sai s «- sr - js,^ *>*-* s** 

you as much b2 d ° n ' api .• Basically, you hST^nya KZStP 0 !?* Ate Tonya 

aHlhetime s^ U5e, "?te - You had the U.S. Olympic <WriS om- "WK 

mav enhance ? 0nUfllr nes a ? tecting Nancy Kerrieanlike a nanm? P w _ n , on *** 01 yrap'« part. Nancy finished 

issfei! mmm 

Vantage JL ^lew in buried by the judgS. 

KJ2 1 o in :h7tu> Point T ? e , coimmt - , in either case fed it happen. If either of 

~ B tees powers them had produced a charisma worthy of their 

jjm Tor a 9S-07 | e j “ *>4, ; - - of judg- hype— and the one who came closest to doing 

the period. 31 die* ^ L JjJSihi nobod ^ ‘"M* ^yhody, that was Tonya; wasn't it great how slrewas 

The lead th n ' bu 25? dy ' , . . ■He 10 ^op ciyng the moment the jndges 

times in the fou*r ?CJ ^8 became tdevwon allowed her two minutes to tie her shoelace? 

Dcilef Schrem nf " ^-ntrt “ d c F dil ? ,e ~ *en the judges might have been swayed 

title ahead 7i?iV-‘ p,,,ni fr ft. < S. Ven by *?“ 61110 UonaD y- hi fact, the Olympics proved it 

The rii-*-- 4 " l ' 1 1? • ^““°te C ^ d “ edaLTbeywerclhe *** bigger than the both of them, as if we ever 

n ihe fi-T.!! 1 * 1 ' hdJ J than, c bcst ^ Ux X. ^ , thc ? Ier 1145 *y®£ known, urt- should have doubted that. For Nancy to skate 
. sec, , nu ; . Jf* aware as they dearly were of the irony they the way she did that first night was the mak- 

M L ark .SErt MS^ 1 act J llke ■g ors » w “ch is mgs of a champion. But theTonya flak had 

Htanpi wnfe 4 s ** -* diffiraU to find these days. They were like deigned to make her more than an Olympic 
nade one of u„ , " EEzabeth Taylor and Richard Burton that champion— had Nancy won the gold medal 

complete the:^.,. nriU ®‘w „w*y- . . she would have become a huee idol for an 


led bv 93-84 
Wore the Sonic, liS 
nm for a 93-07 u a ied *i|f 
the period. 

. The lead t h n - , 
t™« in the fouri^ 
Dcilef Schremof . ? k 

aide ahead 1 14 - ] i: 

. ^cu PPCT>hdJ ;" ^ 

m the final secin , 
hounded Mark T J , , hu ' W 
™*rpi wuh 4 ^*5 

made one of 
complete the . nri [ fcc %». 

Trail Bhzerv iru % 


meat So } 
and every 



n 


i 

AqtNcdM|IUB)A|mcrFtMecAw 

On to Nagano: A Japanese princess was part of the ceremonies dosing the Games in Norway. 


ing pressures seemed to limit her, allowing a the sight of Jansen holding his baby daughter. 
16-year-old without mother or father to dance They began as a sideshow, but it is difficult to 
past her as if Kerrigan was standing scxH imagine now that the Games can ever be 

In an era when people are stru ggling u> better than they were here, 
handle overwhelming amounts of informa- Last September, the International Olympic 
don, reducing some important messages to the Committee came dangerously dose to award- 
level of static, and when the people in charge ing the 2000 Summer Games to Beijing. Could 
of the world's most symbolic event are tempt- the Chinese have been trusted to Promote the 
ed by more money than Pierre de Couberdn Olympic ideals with the purity of the Nome* 
ever could have imagined 100 years ago, the gian approach? Or would the Olympics. them- 
Olympics are stillabout the most basic of sdveshavc again survived whatever foul mes- 
human glories. sage its transient caretakers ascribed to it? 

The drama going in was a matter ofjealoosy The Olympics will reappear in three sum* 
and frustration. The stage of the Olympics mers. Atlanta cannot match the culture and 
gave ii perspective. When h was all over, the history of its two Europeanpredccessors, Bar- 
Olympics decided that Tonya was No. 8 and cdona and LiBehammer. The first example of 
irrelevant, and that Nancy would have to Atlanta’s approach was its unveiling of the 
prove herself same than the victim of a knee most cynical mascot the Olympics has ever 
injury. Standing above them both was Oksana known, its only strength being the chameleon 
Baiui, who ha$ overcome the loss the two most abflity to scB soft drinks and copy machines. 


important people in her Hfc, and in the end 
only her anthem was played. 


Will the next opening ceremony become 
nothing more valid than an extended Super 


It was about Band, and Dan Jansen skating Bowl halftim e show, espousing the American 
his last race to wadi away the others, and Dream with the hope that it will convince you 
Johann Olav Koss setting world records and to buy more Coca Cola? In the fresh memory of 

In an era when those in charge of the world’s most symbolic event are £**&.'££ 

tempted by more money than Pierre de Coubertin ever could have heanedly. win or lose, without denig ra ti n g the that the performances themselves will survive 

. . J . J I , . , - _ . those from the rest of the world. Every day Atlanta perfectly. Any damage Atlanta might 

imagined, the Olympics are StiU about the most basic OJ human glones. was sunny, it seemed, and at the dosing cere- do win only harm Atlanta. Thai seems to be the 
mony on Sunday the biggest response went to moral surviving Tonya & Nancy. 

Lillehammer, Again, 
Is the Sleepy Town 
That It Once Was 

Compiled by Our Staff From Pupwcte • Peter Mueller, the former 

Olympic medalist whom Lilleham- 
LILLEHAMMER —This quiet mer speed-skating winners Dan 
town was getting ready Monday to Jansen and Bonnie Blair had insist- 


ciazerv ru , 
Portland won it, 

Banded Denver 

road ouun&s neons' 

scored 2: pom,. 

•sad had !<> pt. lnli 

Mahmoud Vm u i r- J 
“orers with . 

Rodney Rogers had t muf''** *' 

pomt field gC'ils. V 

BuckWtlham.h.drr^ 

11 rebounds f.w the * 

™»U, b> DemanZS^ 
Mulomho. »h„ • 

flagTin; f^i Uli | |J ““ 

noirtiun :,<:.i eJlme 
.Lakerv 100. Cdricv «7- U s 

*£?***« ^ i& ' 

Ef m ' m - Mri ‘ jk ll He* 

V rrrv “. cn , 0> hb sh»n bz 
shi»t uj:h : .■« seconds ,cft. ‘ 


* . . . , , she would have become a huge idol for an 

As expected, it produced record television outrageously wrong reason — and the confin- 


Many Thanks 
To the Many 
Class Acts 


By Tony Komheaser 

' Washington Post Service 

L illehammer — G nus, aitius, fortius: 

Swifter, higher, stronger. And now: Cel- 
sius: Colder. 



gclcs cu--,]/* if , - ^ - As we wave goodbye lo Norway, let us re- 

rCLO rs , ■' ’•’ ri • 'fadE member to thank the people who made these 
behind V! i V- A A three weeks such fun. 

13 refunds Let us thank our Norwegian hosts for the 

shm uj-h ' < . \ ^ ^ .‘onparaBeled salmon, for the dependable trans- 

• * - . *o...>na> left. porta tkra, for their unfailing graciousness and, 
Kidck» T8: \fia i . most of all for the plentiful hoi water. 
ri“ hirkle\; i Let us remember the greatness of the ath- 

, ’"rteiret.ied.Kf • letes, such as Norway’s Viking god, Johann 

^rt i .- the fow — ....... Olav Koss. 

P-»«r;\ won ns k "Vantano Vh The Boss is 

- me j.nd hjntkcV 2?"* ^ not only the 

'° rf - : ■■■■j'i.-,^oii«un\eli* roini I greatest long 

\\ 4- - . - J, ] . , distance speed 

half B “ 'skater in the world — three races, three golds, 

2^5" three world records —but he's also donated all 

£ : "l ' his winnings to the Olympic Aid charity bene- 

“ ‘ " " ‘ ''fiting young war victims in Bosnia and other 

Jonnso.7 : "..•r.cj -.out^po® -rava^d lands, 
tad Pjtncl. t":'; hi y pm * Koss stands out over the long hanL So do 
ico 1" rerou.'.d- Vorf. both the Swedish and Canadian hockey teams, 

•■Rich sho:>>: 3: ;?:sz;f;mik -foH of heroes, for one the neatest games of 
ie!d. The Kn-irk: * * t Jibe .■!/■/ . ,aD time. NifQr Oksana BaiuL The degant Rns- 
ant!-. Dr. i? to a b> > lines .jw^-aan pair of Ekaterina Gordeeva and Sergd 
>r;andc jJ;er h j • 7i • '■ : pmt -Grinkov. Gass acts Brian Bohano, Torvill and 
avamasr .-n Feb " Dean, and the incouq»rable Katarina Witt. The 

Ma-ic 114. Hume* Wfc Sfc - dmDient Tpmba. Nancy Kem^n, for standmg 
sissilTo-v^: -h. ,-k on t -vtebe im to mordmate pressme. And Dan Jansen, with 

. . .t •>) n.uru II rr the sweetest momeni of all a world recOTd and a 

; • gold medal in his BnalOhfimac race. Because of 

T “ " .i. da» hismany years of hard tack and his persever- 

1 ! ' ’ 1 ance, Jansen is the most bdoved of aD Winter 

r — “ . ... . CSympians; the day after he won the 1,000, 

■ ns . " r ' r .sticking out of the snow on the E-6 highway to- 

re ; "'.' r , Hamm- were three lovingly hand-lettered signs 
7£ H.rr.e:- -Aho were feat simply said: “Dan." 

Vr. p^ .7:- Among other things (Nancy, Tonya) these 

limbrrwohn. it;'’. WjiitorW Games will be remembered for being environ- 
j it'W* ‘mentally correct They were offidally named 
■i-e !■:«/* 1-^itRide 'The Green Games." One corollary to this 
i \ ..-j-j <j- icc St* ■ environmental frenzywas the peqpetual glaze of 

esA-.- Cbr * V\ vm^i :2 ps« 'iceon the sidewalks and roads. The Norwegians 
“7 it-* tit Won’* use rock salt which may etylain why 

;h . ..'^5.7^: A.r.':ni>t' o: ‘evoy fifth person you saw was hobbling around 

_ ~ " an crutches, having taken a flop on the ice. 

And now a few words about the dosing 
— ’’ceremony. Kept than short Good- Additionally, 
there was a ceremony to introduce Nagano, 
_ ' ’Japan, as the next Winter Olympic dty, and a 

. .«•"=- j | snowdrop as the official emblem, roerr Snowlcts, 

• •- . J : • those cute hole owls, are the official Nagano 

\\ J 4 r - I 1 mascots, a much better choice than the prepos- 

[j- spjT 4»t I ! terras Izzy, the official Atlanta mascot evoyone 

— ‘ 1 V. ! ■ knows tha t the Atlanta mascots, in the roint erf 

^ ) Haakrai and Kristm, should be Ted and Jane. 

i * One moment that gave me pause was when 

j?*. r , j. Ilheybrought in the oqpedition team. Sx people 

Z>_ -ff-. ■ and 40 huskies are on their way to Nagano on 

-7^ 'Nature’s own terms," using skis, sleds and sails. 
~3sC^-> 'VLa V*-* \ They are expected to arrive in 18 months. To 
? ’"i vrtnch we «in only say: Better them than us. 

^ xr And goodnight, Tonya, wherever you are. 


TTTTm^ 


Magic 114. Hume* Mk Sfc 

juiile O’Vtfj: off iVwhc 

. :’i 2 1 p.'irv !l rr 

1 j".: : "i*e -* 0 tidic 

ht •-•'-.•nr. straight f;. ia* 

ni s. r._:.v!:s 

The •*'>' v -.i> the iiftti rtmd 
r.d : , ;- r I- :^ir* f. -r the 
7£ Hr rr.e: • •* it-.- •* err iru ly 

Jimhcrwol'i^ "jinwsl® 

!:-ne<:a .-rarrrL j 

-r.!rc l.^rhRtde- 
\:or.i O-icc Si* 
e%r::c Chr ? 

"C rr7.‘ - r.".o* ^ 


.?£i. **’" *'= 
r . ;i 




I ("4, 

Hh-M x “ •vtivvfewsBli 



daze off again. 


ed on haring as their coach, is quit- 


The 16-day party that Lilleham- tmg as coach of the US. team be- 
mer and all of Norway had worked cause of problems with “people in 


five years to arranges at a cost of positions of power." 
about $1 billion had ended and the w lt’s just a thing they have with 
guests were going home. me," he said in an interview with 

There was still a buzz of activity, jbe Milwaukee Sen tin eL “Tf I say 
Mostly people moving out, packing Iffi ‘V . "8^, J* * 
up. dosing down or on a frantic blade. 

lasi-ntoe search for souvenirs. Jf 1 

uu . , . _ . things, he said. People m posi- 

lt was the taggest experience of Q f aren't hdping the 
nty Hfe, and it was sad to see it ^ p m tired of dealing 

end, said handyman Asbjorn 

o^a n^i street rtrn^that haH Mudler, 39, was hired as the 
lock on a mam street store that had Qf ^ u & 0]ympic t^ 

be ^R^ ted -ii ) Ki ^ fDCS ’ three years ago at the insistence of 
^ , i W ^S# 00dt0haveSOme Jansen. Blairrad other skaters who 
peace, he added. practiced in Milwaukee. 

Some of the temporary restan- • Surya Bonaly, the French fig- 
rants opened to feed crowds of ure skater, and Alain CHletti, her 
100.000 were gone, while street latest coach, are parting ways after 
crews had worked overnight to another disappointing Olympics, 
change road signs, hdping to put the French Skating Federation an- 
Lillehammer back to what it had newmred 
been: a quiet, picture-book town of GBeiti showed up at competi- 


! v-* ■- ' ; 

f ’ t v; *A.v 

♦ ' • ' ? v * ... ; ^ r *.•'* 

-b ■' *«>«: .C/ : . * v ' 

tA. •• /. -• A-r r- : -'.T V 




' - , v ■ -A 
.-••• » w * t - - *>f® ^ 


* Kmtuu n Miym/RnKn 

As fireworks exploded over the ceremonies dosing the 17th Winter Games, thousands of spectators further fit up the stadium in UDehammer with flashlights. 

This Is a Sport So Hot, It Has Truly Dark Sides 


UDehammer back to what it had newmred 
been: a quiet, picture-book town of GBeiti showed up at competi- 
23,000 that has drawn tourists, art- tions with Bonaly, but most of her 
tats and writers for a century. training was imndlad by her moth- 
The crowds that had packed er« who is not a recognized trainer. 
Storgata, (he main street lmwl by Bonaly came in fourth in the com- 


By George Vecsey 

New York Tima Service 

H AMAR —Don’t ask me about the figure-skating 
judging. 1 don’t understand it Don’t ask roe about 
the scoring. I hated math when I was in school. Don't 
ask me about the jumps. I can’t tell one from the other. 

Fortunatdy for me, we subscribe to a private check- 
list of the skaters’ routines, including music changes and 
jumps. The checklist says, “2:15. West Side Story. 
Doable Axel-Double Toe Loop,” and if the skater is 
- - carding around in her 

gh own private Odessa at 

Vantage ^ ^ moaeati j 

Point | We. “No combo." 

It's a lot more com- 
plicated than a 6-4-3 doable play. Pm a general sports 
columnist who doesn’t claim expertise in figure skating, 
but I do know it’s hot. 

I know Oksana Baiui deserved the gold medaL 1 know 
some Nancy Kerrigan loyalists wfil say she was jobbed, 
but I will quote you two authorities — William Blake: 
“The tygers of wrath are wiser than the horses of 
instruction.” And former Supreme Court Justice Potter 
Stewart: “I know it when I see it" 

The tyger from Odessa won it I knew it when I saw it 
Fm no expert but I am a junkie. The best event in 
Calgary in 1988 — better than a dozen Super Bowls — 
was Katarina Witt holding off Liz Manley, with Debi 


Thomas wandering around in a romantic haze, with 
Midori I to leaping like the Doctor J of Japan. 

But this year was even wilder. Pm afraid my most 
enduring image of the 1994 Winter Games will be 
Tanya Harding, her face coming apart breaking down 
on the ice as if from collective national disbelief, be- 
trayed by her laces. Harding personified our worst 
ni ghtmar e, fee Old Broken Shoelace Dream. Hus sport 
is so hot it has truly dark rides. 

1 know 1 signed up for fee national championships in 
Detroit without an inkling there would be any knee 
whacking. I made sure I was here in Hamar for the 
Winter Games because it was going to be the best sports 
story for February of 1994, and I didn’t even ask my 
paper for a bonus for going. 

I have even been known to buy skating tickets for my 
wife, who was tooting Oksana Baiui two years agp. 
Figure skating is very big wife women, which accounts 
for the television ratings and makes it easier for me to 
cover feta event without feeling like Humbert Humbert 
wife a word processor. 

My position used to be that I didn’t know if it's a 
sport, like soccer or tennis, or a spectacle like profes- 
sional wrestling or fee arcus, but Tve changed my tune. 
It’s a sport 

This was reinforced fee day we were watching prac- 
tice and we heard this sickening s m a ck . Two young 
women had run into each other, and were reeling to fee 


: England Ru^»y Manager Resigning 

! LONDON (Reuters) —Geoff Cooke said Monday he will 



ffil 

ju To 

Pfflip 


3 T 



l .lfe20-yeaw)ld rookie from South 

: r%bm Ho threw the ball nos.’ rid He Dodge* *- 

; Usorda. - 

. iFor the Record 

✓ ' 'TheTomr of C 3*B Flirtation 

eight-month search for a new sponsor, the Bn ycung (Rgutm) 

St 22. the British-^^" 

• ^ Boring Fede^on 

• Chicago to pass Toronto s Dave Anareycou* 

$ * for the NHL’s tfM****^ 1 ^ ^ Steve Lowery by one stroke 

.v ; C^SwB«rshol6-imder-par66W Dwa ' ^ ^ for ^ feghest 

:infeelufc* Invitational in San D^aLowery 
y. , SmriLin more than five yea« on l0 fee NFL’s Pro Bowl 
; Oiris Hinton, d* guard coot™. «nh 


: .rid ***J2tZ?£££ 

■ ; over S15 mi.Uon , >-. (AP) 

A 


Endeavor Leads 
Merit, as hUrum 
Closes Amid Ice 

The Aisodalai Press 

SOUTHAMPTON, Eng- 
land — New Zealand Endeav- 
or, which regained the lead 
from Merit Cup of Switzer- 
land over the weekend, held a 
lead of 27 nautical mfles Mon- 
day as the fleet dodged ice- 
bergs on fee fourth leg of the 
Whitbread ’Round the World 
Race. 

In third place — and dosing 
in on fee two Mari leaders — 
was fee Whitbread 60 yacht 
Inlrurn Jostitia. 

The European entry was 45 
miles behind Endeavor, but 
was traveling at a faster speed 
thanks to its position as the 
southernmost boat in fee fleet 

“We are very concerned 
about fee iceberg situation." 
Intruxn Justitia’s navigator. 
Mated van Triest, said from 
fee boaL 

“Some are so small they are 
impossible to see during fee 
night but large enough to 
break the rodder." 

The leading boats are in fee 
southern Pacific Ocean, some 
3,000 miles from fee fourth 
leg’s finish at Punta del Esle, 
Uruguay. They are expected to 
arrive there about March 10. 


ice. There was some doubt whether Baiui would be able 
to skate in the finals the next night, but I happened to sit 
near fee ABC broadcaster. Donna de Varona, fee for- 
mer Olympic swimming champion. 

Baiui would skate, de Varona said. How did she 
know? Athletes at Band's level are used to performing 
wife pain, de Varona said, reciting chapter and verse of 
fee times she and her teammates went out and swam 
wife open wounds or deferred appendicitis. 

The prospect of this beautiful child bring deprived of 
her chance for a medal — after all the losses in her life — 
touched me fee way opera never does. And the next day, 
when Oksana Baiui skated ethereally onto the ice. I 
located de Varona on press row and I stage-whispered, 
“You were right." 

The finals reminded us why every network saves the 
women for last — weekends, prime time, big numbers, 
big bucks. This is fee one spon in which the women are 
the best. I hear CBS is toying wife the idea of four 
Grand Slam events, spread over 16 weeks. I'd locate fee 
Grand Slam in Tokyo, St. Petersburg, Paris and New 
York or LA. Think big. 

I hope they wouldn't insult the viewers* intelligence 
by doling out snippets of competition wife gobs of 
canned interviews. The world is ready for more and 
more figure skating. And don’t forget fee practices. In 
this strange, exotic and compelling sport, you never 
know. 




Games," said Unni Worum, 56. 
who was poshing her grandchildren 
in a stroller. 

But. she added: “It was wonder- 
ful" 


19th century buildings, had raced- petition, after winning her fourth 
ed, allowing locals to once ag^in European title, 
have the room to push baby car- GileUi had been named Bonaly” s 
riages along the sidewalks. coach in 1992, following her break- 

s gsggwfia 

Bat. she added: “ll was wooder- 

Kon U.S. viewers, according to pre- 
• In Lake Buena Vista, Florida, linrinary network figures. 

Nancy Kerrigan questioned the This was down from fee record- 
judging of fee figure skating com- setting 126.5 million that gathered 
petition in tririch Oksana Baiui fe front of their sets Wednesday 
won the gold medaL night to watch Act 1 of fee Har- 

Wearing her silver medal, Kerri- ding-Kenigan Face-Off. But when 
gan was paraded before thousands all the votes are in, CBS said, Fri- 
of cheering fans at Disney World, day will stand as fee second-biggest 
She is under contract to the Walt Olympics viewing night ever. 
Disney Co. and ABC to perform on CB§ said the skatin g finals pro- 
tdeviaon, make a Disney movie, duced fee highest-rated Friday for 
participate in Disney's Easter and any network in television history, 
Christmas parades and do com- wife fee prdmrinary 30-city Nid- 

sen rating of 43.9 far outdistancing 
“I know the judges are supposed fee 352 national rating earned on a 
to deduct for errors, and rm not Friday by both an episode of 


quite sure they did that because I ABCs “Winds of War" (in 1983) 
was flawless,- 7 * Kerrigan said after and fee “Who Shot JJL?" episode 
fee parade. “Oksana, although of CBS’s “Dallas" in 1980. 
she’s a great skate* and real nice to Each ratings point represents 
watch ... did have a couple of 942,000 TV homes. A share is the 
m ista k es." percentage of sets in use at the time 

“They’re supposed to take off of fee broadcast 
points for that, Kerrigan added. (AP, WP) 


“They’re supposed to take off of fee broadcast 
Dints for that, Kerrigan added. 


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A U.S. Secret: 
The World Cup 
Is Coming Soon 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Four 
months before the first World 
Cup in the United States, 4 of 
5 Americans don't even know 
the soccer wiD be played in 
their country. 

A Harris Poll released Sun- 
day raid only 20 percent of 
Americans realize fee world’s 
most-watched sports event 
will be played in the United 
States — but up from 13 per- 
cent in a s imilar PoB in Octo- 
ber — and just 18 percent are 
awareit will be played in 1994. 
Only 25 percent know the 
World Cup involves soccer. 

Fifty-three percent of 
Americans said they aren't in- 
terested in watching a World 
Cup game ou television, and 
62 percent said they have no 
interest in attending one of fee 
games 

The survey of 1,252 adults 
was conducted from Feb. 2-6 
and has an error margin of 3 
percent. 

Soccer officials Iasi wedt ex- 
pressed approval for the job 
they’ve done in promoting fee 
World Cup, which will be 
played in nine cities from June 
17-JuIy 17. 





Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, MARCH 1. 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


Watching People Talk 


W ASHINGTON — People 
who work in the daytime 
don't know what they’re missing mi 
television. U took a mammoth 
snowstorm to make me realize what 
people are watching these days. 

Talk shows are replacing soap 
operas, and the subjects range 
from, “Wives who nm away with 
their children’s school-bus drivers" 
to “Teenagers who live with their 
parents . but 
haven't talked to 
them in five 




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Lisbon 

London 

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years. 

I was clicking 
along the chan- 
nels when I saw 
a talk-show host 
with a micro- 
phone say: “To- 
day we will dis- 
cuss mothers 
who prefer pets Buchw “« 
to their children. Joiniog our panel 
are mothers who have decided to 
devote whatever psychic energy 
they have to their French poodles, 
and children who feel tiaat they 
have been ignored by their parents 
whenever they ran out of movie 
money. First of all. Mrs. Davidson, 
what made you love animals more 
than your own children?" 

She replied: “I find that every 
time I want to hug my daughter she 
says. ‘Do we have to do the moLher 


Lisbon as the Capital 
Of European Culture 

.-tgoicf France- Prase 

LISBON — President Mario 
Soares inaugurated Lisbon's year 
as Europe's cultural capita) with 3 
series of events highlighted by a 
concert by the London Symphony 
Orchestra, conducted by George 
Solti. 

Plays, concerts, opera, dance, 
films, exhibitions and conferences 
are planned for the “Lisbon 94" 
program. Vitor Constanrio, a for- 
mer head of the Socialist Party and 
former governor of the Bank of 
Portugal said the events aimed to 
"to project Lisbon, and therefore 
Portugal, in its cultural role in a 
European context." 

Lisbon's yearlong cultural reign 
began Saturday with the "Lisbon 
nonstop” initiative, with 27 bom 
and discos open all night until 
10:00 A.M. Sunday. 


bit again? 1 When I pet my dog he 
wags his tad and barks. I’m getting 
more stroking out of Alonzo.” 

O 

Wanda, sitting next to her moth- 
er, said: “Ever snce I was a child 
my mother brushed the dog's hair 
before mine. Is it any wonder that 
l*m on this show?” 

"Thank you both. And now Mrs. 
Claxton, you have a cat” 

“Yes, I have a beautiful Siamese 
and three daughters. If I had my 
way, I would have three cats and 
one daughter." 

“Your daughters, who are sitting 
next to you, maintain that you 
speak softly to the cat but use a big 
stick when you talk to them." 

That cat doesn't give me any 
back talk the way my daughters 
do" 

One of the daughters said, Tm 
allergic to cats." 

Mrs. Claxton retorted, “You just 
say that because I won’t allow you 
to bring boys up to your bedroom." 

Another daughter said. “You sit 
there with the cat on your lap and 
pet it and whisper dungs like, “If 
you are not a good cat you will 
wind up like one of my daugh- 
ters.’ " 

“O.K., let's take some calls. Spo- 
kane, Washington." 

"T hank you very much. I have a 
different situation in that my son 
and his dog are constantly ganging 
up on me. 1 don’t like the dog and 
he knows it. My son says that if I 
don’t like the dog 1 don’t have to 
stay in the bouse. I pointed out that 
it was my house and he responded. 
’In that case Fm going to hire a 
lawyer.’ " 

“ Thank you very much. Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida.” 



Douglas Coupland at his Washington book party: 

“Everything just blurts out of me. I don’t calculate anything.” 


A Michael Jackson Hit: 
The Singing Witness 












Tom AOo/Thc Waftm&Kn Am 


‘Life After God’ and the Prophet of Cliche 


Court testimony as a hot new- 
video? Yes, when the witness is 
Michael Jackson, testifying in a re- 
cent copyright fight. On a 50-min- 
ute cassette of his appearance in^ 
federal court on Feb. 14. the pop 1 * 
star snaps his fingers and sings bits 
of hits “Dangerous" and "BOlic 
Jean,” The ILS. District Court 
Denver has sold about 50 copies, a t,— ■ , 
a cost of $15, and more orders are 
streaming in, a clerk said. “We have 
not copyrighted this." the clerk 
said. “It's a public record.” In aS40 
millio n lawsuit, a Denver songwrit- 
er had accused Jackson of stealing 
“Dangerous" from a demo tape. 

The jury cleared Jackson. 

□ 

“Smoking/No Smoking," a com- 
edy directed by Alain Resnais, won 
France’s 1 994 Cfear award for best 
f ilm, and Resnais was named best 
director and Pierre Anfiti, who 
starred in the Him, was named best 
actor. Juliette Binoche won the best 
actress award for her role in 
Krzysztof KiesIowskFs “Bleu." The 
prize for best foreign film went to 
The Piano," directed by Jane 
Campion of New Zealand. 

□ 




\P 


I# * ^ : 


•Pi U» = 


"I would like to ask the first 
mother if she and her daughter ever 


sought counseling over the dog.” 

Mrs. Davidson answered: “We 
were willing to do it, but the dog 
wouldn't go. Alonzo feels that it's 
our problem, not his." 

"Thank you. Fort Lauderdale. 
We have on the line Dr. Flauber- 
man. who specializes in dysfunc- 
tional pets m dysfunctional fam- 
ilies. Dr. Flauberman, what is your 
solution to the problem when a 
parent spends more time with her 
pet that she does with her chil- 
dren?" 

“Goldfish." 


By Roxanne Roberts 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — The twentyso- 
methings are searching for God. 
And their prophet wears army boots laced 
halfway up, but never tied all the way. 
“One could — but one doesn't." explained 
Douglas Coupland, str ugg ling to define 
the nuances of Generation X chic. 

Every generation has its mission. This 
one spends its time contemplating spiritu- 
al truth and sartorial sins. Saints be 
praised — and grunge is passfe- 
At least that was the word one night at 
the Canadian Embassy, where young and 
not-so-young Washington intellectuals 
threw a book party for Coupland, the 32- 
year-old author of the newly released 
“Life After Clod.” In 1991. his best-selling 
first novel, “Generation X: Tales of an 
Accelerated Culture," made him the won- 
der boy of postmodern ennui Now he’s 
being compared to Salinger and Heming- 
way — until the next baby genius pops up. 
And so The New Republic, to which Cou- 
pland is a regular contributor, swept out 
its aristocracy — including the editor. An- 
drew Sullivan, the executive editor. David 
Shipley and his wife, the writer Naomi 


Wolf — and a hundred Washington Xers 
lusting for their turn in the spotlight. 

“One of the great characteristics of 
Generation X is its incredible ability to 
market itsdf," said Richard Blow, 29, 
managing editor of the newly Fevived Re- 
gard/ tTs magazine. “And Doug Coupland 
both writes about that and practices that." 

No, insisted Coupland: “Everything 
just blurts out of me. I don’t calculate 
anything. I’ve never, ever done that. Ever.” 

Blow smiled at his friend. “Say Doug 
has an incredible ability to coincide with 
the Zeitgeist," 

There are 41 milli on Americans bom 
between 1961 and 1971, raised on reruns 
of The Brady Bunch," eager to read any- 
thing by someone who understands that 
everything’s a cliche, everything has been 
done before 

Coupland understands. 

He used to be wry and world-weary, but 
now Coupland is mi the search for Greater 
Meaning, sort of a New Age thing without 
mantras. “You Are the First Generation 
Raised Without Religion," proclaims the 
cover of the pint-size book. His publisher, 
Pocket Books, printed more than 50,000 
copies, “life After God" is now on the San 


Francisco Chronicle’s best-seOer list. “He’s 


very Bay Area." said a spokesman. 
For a any who nets uo around i 


For a gay who gets up around noon 
every day. Coupland gets a lot done when 
he’s not wairJnng for God. Besides con- 
tributing to The New Republic and The 
New York Times Op-Ed page, he's flack- 
ing the book with a series of 30-second 
‘interstitials" on MTV and, Andy War- 
hol-like, eschewing celebrity while collect- 
ing celebrities as friends. A section of the 
book is dedicated to REM lad singer and 
new pal Michael Stipe because, as he told 
Eile magazine, “REM was one of the few 


things that didn’t suck about the ’80s." 
Two years ago, I lode ‘Generation X 


Two years ago, I took ‘Generation X* 
to the beach assuming it was going to be 
awful," said Sullivan, who just turned 30. 
“It was such an individual voice and so 
great, I immediately called him up and 
said, ‘You should write for us.'" 

The voice of his generation has his hair 
cut short on the sides, jug ears, a thin 
mustache and beard. Fm* his book party, 
the Vancouver native wore Canadian 
Army boots and a custom-made Sunday 
formal suit of the Hutterites, a religious 
sect known for its simplicity. 

His religion? 


“Just call me a Freeway Bradyist," he 
told the audience. Later he was asked to 
elaborate. “We dr earn of being infinite, we 
dream of resolution, we dream to give our 
hearts away," he said. 

Perhaps Generation Xers understood 
immedia tely, but a slightly confused thir- 
tysomedung reporter had to ask Coupland 
to deconstruct his answer. “Freeways are 
implicitly infinite, TV is implicitly half- 
hour resolution-oriented, and transcen- 
dence means giving yourself away." 

“My New resolution this year is to learn 
how to affect a British accent," be told the 
crowd. The crowd was appropriately ap- 
preciative, even those who couldn't tell 
whether Coopland was serious. 

Finely toned to the use of irony, the 
Xers understand — bat just don't call 
them twenty something sheep. 

“1 wouldn't want anyone to speak for 
me," said Sam Fleming, 26. a health-care 
reimbursement consultant and motorcycle 
racer. Tm a very self-actualized person." 

This Generation X thing is entirely 
constructed by people in their 40s who 
became addicted to the idea of a genera- 
tion," said Sullivan. “And I hope it dies 
with than." 


Even freezing water doesn’t ruf- 
fle Arnold Schwarzenegger. He 
spent about two hours in a wet suit, 
jumping in and out of freezing wa- 
ter at Salve Regina University, in 
Newport, Rhode Island, for the 
opening sequence of True Lies." 
bis latest film. “It's always tough, 
but whatever job you have, if you 
love it, then it’s OJL," be said. 


Britain's National Caller 
ting a rare self-portrait of 


at £1.75 milli on ($239 million), the 
government said. The Department 
of National Heritage said the paint- 
ing was being given to the museum 
in Leu of £1.11 million inheritance 
taxes owed by the estate of the late 
Marquess of Cbohnonddqy. who 
died in 1990. Completed sometime 
before 1760, the portrait “is Lbe only 
known family group of the artist. Ins 
wife and elder daughter." the gov- 
ernment said. 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages 4 & 19 




WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Weafher. 


hr S® 


Tod*/ Tm 

Mgb Low W Mgh 
OF OF or 






B4*V 

Ear* 

HswDeW 

Seoul 

3 *j>ghai 


ACROSS 

1 Break down 
grammatically 
s Items in a still 
Me 

ii Braincase 


ao Not give 

21 Mediocre 

22 Argued 


37 Hint to solving 
the eight 
italicized clues 


Jetstream 


UmHaamfaiy 

Hot 


13“ Fables' 

15 Considers bond 
values again 

la Reduce lo 
ashes 

1# Fred's sister 


2« Loudon vllle. 

N.Y.. campus 
25 Classical name 
m medicine 


27 Sprinted 

28 “ Believer' 


(Monkees hit) 
31 Bam topper 


North America 
Heavy rains in the South- 
eastern stales at midweek 
will move northward along 
the East Coast Thursday. 
Philadelphia through New 
York City will be near the 
boundary between heavy 
snow io the west and heavy 
rain (o lf» east The central 
Plains will have dry, mild 
weather later this week 


Europe 

Northwest Europe will be 
stormy late this week wRh 
frequent heavy rains from 
Ireland to Scotland. London 


to Parts wtfl a nty have a few 
showers. Much of Scandi- 


showers. Much of Scandi- 
navia wfl remain cold with a 
bit oi snow and ice from Oslo 
lo Stockholm. Southern 
Europe will tie sunny with 
Spring Ike warmth. 


Asia 

Tokyo will have seasonable 
weather late this weak. 
Showers a re possible later 
Thursday or Friday. Sapporo 
will have snow or snow 
showers late (hie week. 
Seoul and Betykig wfll have 
some sun. Shanghai will 
have clouds and ran at mid- 
week. Rain wffl also dampen 
the northeastern Pttfippinea. 


Mtfan 

CapeTowi 


Speed wagon 


32 Football squad 
28 Court ruling 


Solution to Putzle of FA. 28 


North America 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Todar Tnwiw/ 

H0> Lo* W Mgh lorn W 

of cr .of e w 

20*0 n /52 s 21/70 14*7 a 


Today Tumuiww 

MV to* W High Low W 
OF OF CJF QF 


Detn 8 
Honoluki 
Houston 
Los Angola 


22/71 8146 » 23/73 13155 » 

15*9 409 s 17*2 8/48 S 


18*1 7/44 s 17*2 11*2 4 

25/77 307 s 28*2 9/48 ■ 


22/71 7«4 ■ 23/73 10*0 s 


OF OF OF OF 
BuneoAkoo 25/77 16*1 pc 25/77 18*4 1 

Caracas 29*4 19188 s 29*4 1B*5 pc 

lima 28/79 21/70 pc Z7W0 21/70 pc 

MncoOty 23/73 8/48 pe 23/73 8/46 pc 

RfodsJoatO 35*5 28/79 pe 35/95 28/79 pc 

SwWogo 30*6 M/57 s */» 14/57 a 


* s-nmy, pc-pa/Sy cloudy, c-doudy, Sh- s h ows , Mundarstonra. r-ren, si-snow Antes. 

*, Hca. W-Wraffwr. AH mww, forecasts wid data provktod by Aceu-Wemher. he. 0 185* 


Torerto 

Vfeshnpm 


1-19/-2 pe 
’ 8/43 r 
' -3/77 pc 
i -307 pc 
I 0*2 s 
l -6/24 pc 

> 21/70 pc 
I 6*3 pc 

I 10*0 I 
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I 20*8 V 
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anna raaan aaaa 

EEECJS aHHO □HQH3 

□a ms 00 a ana □□□□ 
Baaaa maaaaaa 
□□□□ Sanaa 
□nmnaaa □□□□□ 
□EBQ anas naaaa 

HH0 Q3QQ0 

□asss aaaa anaa 
Sanaa onaaaaa 
□aaaa anna 
anaaaaa aaaaa 
□□□a uauaanaaaa 
aaaa aaaa uuaaa 
□□□□ aaao aaual 


38 Jima 

40 Ignite 

42 Plane or 
dynamic 
precede/ 

43 Actress Ryan 

44 Deteriorate 

45 Curses 

47 Sprockets Irnker 

so Reps/ 
counterparts 

51 Riding whip 

55 Natural gait 

56 Emily, to 
Charlotte 

57 Madrid 
attraction 

56 Kind of lot 

eoZebralike 

62 March 
laboriously 

63 Paired nuclides 

64 Catch suddenly 

65 Harvests 


1 Trims 

2 Kind of 
recording 


3 Passage 
ceremony 

4 Cash's ~A Boy 

Named " 

5 Printers' widths 

6 Set the 
standard lor 

7 Architect 
Saannen 

s Chemical suffix 

•Lettuce variety 

10 Bowling save 

11 Tomorrow: Lat 

12 Try again 

14 Laurel or Musial 

17 Wetlands 
watchdog 

19 Deserters 

22 Venus, for one 

23 River to the 
Laptev Sea 

24 Game fish 

26 SO’s singer 
Frankie' 

27 Supplies wrtti 
better weapons 

28 Kind 

29 tai 

(cocktail) 

ao Cereal bristle 

33 Robust energy 

34 Pronoun In a 
cofe? 

35 Norfolk ale 


.0 New York Tunes Edited bv Will Shortz, 



V' A - 




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. - J . V •. 


t- _ 


Pun** by □. J. Uslotl 


36 20 r quires so More extreme S7 Swift sailing 

41 Evaporated 52 Mustard plants boat 

46 Act niggardly 53 53]^ Sea se B-F connection- 

47 Actor Gulager reader 60 Salutation tar 

48 Emcee 54 Pea places Edmund Hillary . 

4» Copycats 56 Long account ei Half a fly 


• • 


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COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
ASIA/PACIFIC 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Australia 

0014-881-011 

Guam 

018672 

Hong JSong 

808-1111 

India* 

008117 

Indonesia*' 

001601-10 

Korea 

009-11 

Korea** 

11* 

New Zealand 

, IRiTIIm ■! . r 

000911 

105-11 


iwtod 1-800-350-000 

172-1011 

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Mata' 0800-690-110 

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Bofaad**- 0*010-4800111 

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ttrmnmf a 01-6004288 

155-50*2 

Slovakia OO42PQQ101 

Spain 900-99-00-11 

SwcdC a* 020-795-6X1 

a w to /lm d- 155-OO-H 

ttK- P50MM011 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bahrain 800-001 

Cyprus- OB0-90010i 

toad 177-100-2727 

Kuwait 600-288 

Lebanon (Being) 42fr«l 

Saudi Arabia ■ 1-800-jQO 

Ttabcy- 00800-12277 * 

AMERICAS 

Argentina* ftBjOMOjMlll 

Bdfae* " 555 

Bolivia- 0600-1111 

Brazil 000-8010 

Chfle OOa-031? 


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Poland***- 

Portugal* 


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Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


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Armrnfa** 

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Hd£fum* 

Bulf^risi 

Crogfar* 

Czech Hep 
D enm a r k* 

Frmooc 

Gqnumy 

Grecoc* 

Bimgiu y* 

Ice land* ■ 


Z35-2872 : 

ftXHHll-111 

43(H30 

0080-102886 

OOIM 9 M 111 

EUROPE 

8*14111 

0Z2-9Q5O11 

Q7H-J 1-0010 

OO-MWOQIO 

99-38-0011 

0042800101 

8001-0010 

9800-100-10 

194-0011 

0130-0010 

088081311 

00* -800-01111 

999-001 


agBrt***<Moacpw) 

Slpvakte 

Spain 

ftrafea* 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

Colombia 98811-0010 

■ Costa Rka*M ]]4 

Ecuador 119 

B Salvador* 190 

■ Gimemab* 190 

Goymar* 165 

Honduras*a 123- 

Me a ckxtAAA 95-8084624248 


■ *4- _ 1 . 

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•••• 




Wkangw(lhwgiM) 

Panama* 

Peru* 

Suriname 

Uruguay 

Veneruria- 


174 

109 

m 

156 

080410 

80 - 011-120 








r-.ntfc r 
f-Ha ; 


CAWMban 

1-808872-2881 

■ Bermuda* 1-600372-2881 

BrMahv J- 1-800672-2881 , 

Cayman Islands 1-800-872-2881 

Gvotadir 1-600672-2881 

001-900972-2883 

Jamaica** 880O672-288l | 

Ncth.Amfl 001-608872-2881 

■ SLKtea/Nerifi 1-600872-2881 

AFRICA 

Egypt* (C*iro) 5iO620Q 

OOk-OOl- 

00111 

Kgayg* 080018 

797-797 

Malawi** 101-1992 


510-0200 


Aft T 


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© 1994 ARET 


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