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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


London, Thursday, March 3, 1994 



No. 34.526 


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Hosokawa Cabinet Fiasco 
Stymies Trade Reforms 

Prime Minister Retreats on Removing 
A Foe of U.S.-Sought Deregulation 


By James Stemgold 

A/«*- York Tunes Service 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
sotawa s efforts to resolve a bitier trade dis- 
pute with the United States and to revive the 
faltering economy suffered a major setback 
when he said at a midnight press conference 
that he had been forced to abandon a cam- 
paign lo remove a dissident from h is fractious 
inner circle of advisers through a cabinet 
reshuffle. 

It was a startling display of political weak- 
ness, in which Mr. Hosokawa apparently suc- 
cumbed to threats that several parties, includ- 
mg the Socialists, might quit the government 
if he forced out the official and pursued a 
more conservative course. He sought to pm 

Japan expresses worries about die potential 
rerind of Super 301. Page 11. 

the best face on this fiasco by saying he would 
now focus on uniting his government. 

But it was clear that the coalition remans 
so divided between its right and left wings 
that it is unlikely that Mr. Hosokawa will be 
able to formulate the bold economic and 
trade policies he has said are needed. 

The unexpected announcement Wednes- 
day night thus left Mr. Hosokawa in the 
awkward position of not being strong enough 
to force his coalition to pull together behind a 
common set of economic policies, or of being 
able to pot new politicians in place who 
would support his goals. 

The focus of the long rumored cabinet 
reshuffle was Mr. Hosokawa’s bid to remove 
Ids former ally. Masayoshi Takemura, as the 
chief cabinet secretary. Mr. Hosokawa and 
Mr. Takemura, both the heads of small par- 
ties, were once so dose that they agreed to 
merge their parties to push their agenda for 
change. 

But Mr. Takemura has proven more mod- 
erate than Mr. Hosokawa, particularly on the 
critical economic issues facing the govern- 
ment. such as tax reform, stimulating the 
ailing economy and deregulation. He is more 
inclined toward gradual change and achiev- 
ing a consensus. 

For »ngr«n«j Mr. Hosokawa had earlier 
followed the advice -of his key conservative 
strategist and. Mr, Takemura’s main antago- 
nist Ichiro Ozawa, and proposed a xhree-yeai ' 
cut in the income tax and then an even larger 


increase in the national sales tax. The lax 
htcrease infuriated Mr. Takemura and the 
Socialists, the largest partner in the coalition. 
They fought with Mr. Hosokawa and eventu- 
ally forced him to rescind the proposal. 

Mr. Hosokawa was said to have grown 
even angrier when Mr.Takeraura went public 
with his criticisms and lambasted Mr. Ho- 
sokawa's increasingly conservative policies. 

Although he sought to present an image of 
unity, Mr. Hosokawa admitted Wednesday 
night that be had asked Mr. Takemura not to 
join him at the press conference. He also 
implicitly acknowledged how paralyzing the 
squabbling in his coalition has been by sug- 
gesting that, though Mr. Takemura will keep 
his job. he expects the cabinet to be run more 
efficiently. 

“1 was extremely concerned about the faci 
that he had been severely criticized within the 
ruling coalition," Mr. Hosokawa said of Mr. 
Takemura, apparently referring to the anger 
of Mr. Ozawa’s party. 

No mailer how tenuous the situation may 
be. the announcement represented a modest 
victory for Mr. Takemura. 

The chairman of the Democratic Socialist 
Party summed up the viewof Mr. Takemura’s 
supporters when be said be thought that Mr. 
Hosokawa "made a good decision.” 

Nevertheless, Mr. Hosokawa has demon- 
strated that he is more inclined to side with 
Mr. Ozawa than the moderates, and that 
appears likdy to continue. Mr. Ozawa wants 
more serious efforts at deregulating the econ- 
omy and at aiding the dispute with the Unit- 
ed States over reducing Japan's towering 
trade surplus and opening markets for such 
products as cellular telephones, insurance, 
medical equipment and autos and auto parts. 

Mr. Ozawa has long been an advocate of 
maintaining a strong relationship with Wash- 
ington. 

In fact, some here have said that Mr. 
Ozawa is currently negotiating personally 
and in secret with U.S. officials, including 
Ambassador Walter F. Mondale, on creating 
fairer access to Japan’s cellular telephone 
market for Motorola Inc. 

If be succeeds, Mr. Ozawa will have broken 
a deadlock that the government bureaucracy 
was unable to resolve. He also may have 
established himself as a personal policy by- 
pass around the caomeu wwhich he does hot 
sit, directly to the prime minister. 



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Jmior DdayThc Auacmed As 

Palestinians marching Wednesday in Jericho as protests over the Hebron massacre continued. Israefi troops killed at least 2 Arabs. 

For Israeli Jews , a Shock Wave of Doubt 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Pou Service 

JERUSALEM — The Hebron massacre has 
unleashed a wave of profound soul-searching 
among Israeli Jews, who are questioning how 
their democracy, government and society could 
have allowed a Jewish settler. Dr. Baruch Gold- 
stein, to murder Muslims at prayer. 

It seems clear that the massacre has stirred 
new doubts among many Israelis about the 
messianic nationalism that has driven some of 
the most zealous Jewish settlers in the West 
Bank. It also may accelerate Israel's long and 
agonizing debate about the occupation of the 
'West Bank and Gaza Strip and the. 110,000 
settlers who live there. 


Israelis are worried that the massacre will 
trigger a new wave of violence, shattering the 
optimism generated by the peace accord be- 
tween Israel and the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization and plunging the country into crisis 
and a sense of siege. 

But despite the second-guessing and feelings 

Israel daqs dawn on a group of 18 radical 
Jewish settlers. • Israelis brace for revenge 
attacks after the Hebron massacre. Page 2. 

of shame over the murders, many Israelis 
stopped shortof saying that Jewish settlements 
should be evacuated now. as some politicians 
have urged and as Palestinians are demanding. 


Nor do they think that all the settlers should be 
disarmed. And, for now. Israelis seem to be 
holding to the deep polarization between hawks 
and doves that has characterized the country 
for a quarter-century. 

Dr. Goldstein was a militant Jewish extrem- 
ist and disciple of Meir Kahane, the late Ameri- 
can rabbi, who advocated the use of force if 
necessary to assert Jewish hegemony over lands 
to which Jews claimed a biblical heritage. While 
his views are held by only a fraction of the 
settlers, there are many more among the 140 
communities in the West Bank and Gaza Strip 
who share a blend of messianic purpose and 

See ISRAEL, Page 2 


As Worries Grow , the Tide Turns Against Clinton Health Care Plan 


By David S. Broder 
and Richard Morin 

Washington Post Service 

BLUE ASH. Ohio — Short of information 
and worried by growing doubts about the quali- 
ty of the health care they would receive, more 
Americans are swinging against President BUI 
din ton’s plan to remake the country’s medical 
system. 

A new Washington Post-ABC News Poll 
showed that for the first time since the presi- 
dent introduced his proposal, last September, 
more people disapproved than approved of the 
plan. 

The margin was small — 48 percent to 44 


percent — but the trend ran counter to White 
House hopes. 

Eight mat of 10 people surveyed said they fell 
major concent that the quality of their health 
care would decline if Mr. Clinton’s plan became 
law. This figure is significantly higher than last 
fall. 

StilL broad support remained for the major 
goals and principles Mr. Clinton espouses. The 
president also stood out in the public’s mind as 
the one person in Washington who has been 
trying hard to improve health care. 

Mr. Clinton’s problem — as shown in a 
discussion with a dozen Ohio volets — is that 
people say (bey do not understand his plan. 

Opponents, meanwhile, have been able to 


raise serious doubts about it with various adver- 
tisements and arguments. 

Many people said they could not figure out 
whether they or the country would be better off 
if the plan were adopted, but their reaction was 
to be wary of the proposal. 

The uncertainty and lack of information ech- 
oed loudly in the discussion here, and it showed 
up just as strongly in the poll. The number 
saying they knew a lot about the plan has 
climbed only seven points since last fall, and 
three out of four people sciO said they knew 
little or almost nothing about it. 

It was the third time Washington Post report- 
ers had sat down with these Cincinnati area 
residents who first gathered to hear Mr. Clinton 
introduce his plan. The poll’s margin of error 


was plus or minus 3 percent; 1,531 people were 
surveyed in the poll, which was conducted Feb. 
24-27. 

“I just get really aggravated with it.” said 
Cathy Ratliff. 36, a realtor, “because everybody 
thinks there’s something, and nobody has any- 
thing concrete.” 

She has been skeptical of the proposal from 
the beginning. StilL the same frustration was 
expressed by more supportive members of the 
group. 

“He has an idea for a plain.” said Frank 
Duvall, a 62-year-old building engineer. “But 1 
don’t really believe he’s worked out the details.” 

Jamarcus Rucker, 19. who is working as a 
sales clerk to earn money for college, reflected 
the confusing signals coming from Washington. 


“There is a plan,” he said. “Bui win he go 
forward with it? 1 don't think so. I think he's 
going to switch it all around.” 

He added: “It’s just like rolling the dice in 
Vega s. You don’t ever know where it's going to 
land.” 

Terri Hatton. 4J, an office manager, said: “It 
doesn’t seem like it’s going to help in the long 
run to me. There are going to be a lot more 
people losing than gaining.” 

Surveys have consistently shown nearly 
unanimous support for the president's main 
goal of guaranteed health insurance for every 
citizen, and that was true of even the most 

See HEALTH, Page 5 


Kiosk 


Assad's Younger Son 
Cited as Successor 

DAMASCUS (AP) — As Syria memori- 
alized President Hafez Assad's oldest son, 
the nation’s top military leader 
raised the prospect on Wednesday that the 
next son would lake over as the expected 
successor to the president. 

The defense minister. Lieutenant Gen- 
eral Mustafa Tlas, addressed Mr. Assad in 
saying that his younger son. Bashar Assad. 
29, an ophthalmologist, would be “a good 
successor.” Basil Assad died Jan. 21 in an 
automobile aoddeni. 

Metall’s Ex-Chief Is Raided 

Investigators raided and searched the 
FraiStomc of HLW.Sohjrnmdbusch, 
the former chief executive ^ Melallge- 
sdlschafl AG. after the troubled conglom- 

another former executive had broken Ger 
man Jaws. (Page H) 

tenoral How* 

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co me at its opening in Germany- **8® 
The Senate rejected a constitutional re- 
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Od Jtapsuthu BulW® ““'W 
for a separate Zulu kingdom. 

Officials are Hying 

many Americans are infected wimu£ 
AIDS virus. 



Volatility 
Of Markets 
Puts Investors 
In a Frenzy 

Stock Traders Discount 
Signals From Economy 
As They Focus on Rakes 

By Lawrence Malkin 

Internal tonal Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Stock prices around the 
world plunged on Wednesday and then recov- 
ered in a frightening gyration led by interest 
rates and bond prices, and more fundamental 
questions of how they will be affected by the 
governments and central banks of the major 
financial powers. 

Wall Street showed the most striking volatili- 
ty, with the Dow Jones industrials dropping 48 
points within minutes of opening in sympathy 
with German, British and French exchanges 
that had tumbled on fears that the Bundesbank 
would slow down its progress in cutting interest 
rates. 

In Asia, the Tokyo market led Pacific Rim 
markets lower on fears that higher U.S. rates 
would first force up Japanese rates and delay 
recovery, and then attract home American 
money that had been chasing huge gains in the 
emerging markets of Southeast Asia all last 
year. 

The Dow Jones industrial index, itself buffet- 
ed by higher U.S. interest rales and falling bond 
prices since the Federal Reserve tightened poli- 
cy a month ago, moved in tandem with the 
bond market during the rest of the day. slowly 
climbing back as government bond prices re- 
covered. 

The Dow Jones industrial index closed 2231 
points higher on Wednesday, at 3.831.74. The 
Treasury's bellwether 30-year bond also recov- 
ered and was yielding 6.77 percent at the close 
of trading, liule changed from 6.78 percent mi 
Tuesday. 

The day’s events demonstrated conclusively 
that interest rate expectations and their effect 
on bonds were driving stock prices, and not the 
signals from the real economy. At that point, 
however, stock pickers divide on whether the 
present “correction” in stock prices, as the 
market euphemism goes, is finished or will 
continue. 

Traditional analysis, exemplified by major 
strategists at big trading bouses and banks on 
both rides of the Atlantic, is that bond and 
stock markets went somewhat crazy after US. 
interest rates went up and will calm down after 
Wall Street digests a current drop of about 3 to 
4 percenL 

That was the view of Abby Joseph Cohen of 
Goldman. Sachs in New York, who said that 
what was going on was “a hiccup." 

In Frankfurt, Norbert Walter, chief econo- 
mist of Deutsche Bank, said that European 
markets were going through an “extreme over- 
reaction," and that bonds would soon correct 
themselves when traders realized that inflation 
fears were overblown. 

But others replied Lhat there was more to 
come because fundamentals were different this 
time. 

“If you uy to come at this with the usual 
tools of Wall Street — numerical, rigorous, and 
logical — you will miss it,” said Hugh Johnson 
of First Albany Securities. He bad been one of 
several stock-market analysis predicting that 
stock prices would drop when interest rates 
rose. 

Neal Soss, chief economist for CS First Bos- 
ton. pointed out that in the last few years most 

See MARKETS, Page 12 



Bond Sell-Off Raises Fear 
Of a 'Financial Accident’ 


s».«r.- r ‘S 0WF 


Ennt Mvn/TbcAuttdtt<l P*ea 


Sarajevans taking advantage of the cease-fire to get some air Wednesday. UN officiate said that Serbs later violated th e puc e, firing 
grenades at Bosuau positions in the dty. Tliey said Serbs also shelled the town of Breza from just outside toe Sarajevo exclusion zone. 

Muslim-Croat Pact Aims to Isolate Serbs 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribute 

PARIS — The continuing sell-off in Europe- 
an bond and stock markets is raising fears of a 
looming “serious financial accident," analysts 
said Wednesday. 

“This is a crisis,” said Christopher Potts ai 
Banque Indosuez in Paris. “It's a very danger- 
ous situation because markets are dominated 
by fear. We're seeing large-scale, indiscriminate 
selling not related to underlying fundamen- 
tals." 

He was seconded by George Magnus at S. G. 
Warburg in ■London. “There is a certain self- 
feeding momentum about the sell-off which is 
completely impervious to technical and funda- 
mental considerations,” Mr. Magnus said. 

He said the sell-off was no longer a matter of 
speculators’ getting out of the declining market. 

“It’s gone beyond that.” Mr. Magnus said. 
“More traditional institutions are having to 
take defensive action, even if that means only 
not investing. 


“This has the makings of a serious financial 
accident if the uptrend in bond yields does not 
stop fairly soon. We’re already pretty close to 
levels which could unleash far-reaching damag e 
to equity markets.” 

Analysts agreed that the greatest danger 
stems from the spreading contagion of disarray 
from bond markets to share prices. That is 
because falling share prices have a more direct 

See IMPACT, Page 12 


Trib Index 


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1.7095 

Pound 

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1.4895 

Yen 

104.20 

104.55 

FF 

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By Daniel Williams 
and Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Pat Serace 

WASHINGTON — Bosnian Muslim and 
Croatian negotiators have agreed to link their 
war-tom territories under a single flag in Bos- 
nia-Herzegovina, a step aimed at isolating Bos- 
nia’s Serbian faction at peace talks and bring- 
ing Che war in the former Yugoslavia to an end. 

Muslim and Croatian representatives signed 
a detailed political and military document that 
would sei up a two-house legislature, merge the 
warring armies of both Bosnian groups and 
provide for the presidency to switch annually 
from one group to the other. 

The accord was worked out in four days of 
lalks at the State Department and concluded 
with frenetic phone calls from the Croatian 
foreign minister. Mate Granic, to President 
Franco Tudjman in Zagreb, Croatia, and 


“much floor pacing." a department official 
said. 

The document was signed fay Mr. Gramc, 
Krcsimir Zubak, representative of the Bosnian 
Croats, and Haris Silajdzic, Bosnia’s foreign 
minister. No further signatures or ratifications 
are required to put it into effect, a U.S. official 
said . . 

The Muslims and Croats ha ve engaged m 

NATO plans to keep op the pressure in the 
linpacc over Bosraa. Page 5. 

heavy Fighting in recent months, although both 
regard the more powerful Serbs as the main 
enemy. U.S. officials have told the Muslims 
that they need to negotiate and not dream of 
recovering territory by force. Croatia, in turn, 
has been warned by European leaders that it 
faces sanctions if it continues to support the 
Bosnian Croats militarily. 


As a further incentive to join forces, repre- 
sentatives on both sides were told that a new 
Croatia-Bosnia federation might eventually ob- 
tain limited membership in the European 
Union and would be invited to take part in 
NATO’s new Partnership for Peace program, 
which offers military cooperation. 

A U.S. special envoy, Charles E Redman, 
oversaw the talks here, which culminated two 
weeks of diplomacy that broke an apparently 
intractable stalemate. 

“The agreement shows how much can be 
accomplished even after bitter years of vio- 
lence. when two sides sit down to reach an 
understanding.” Secretary of Stale Warren M. 
Christopher said 

In effect, by joining Muslim and Croatian 
sectors the agreement would divide Bosnia into 
two parts —one of Muslims and Croats, one of 
Serbs — rather than the three envisioned in 

See BOSNIA. Page 5 


IPs a Coming Attraction 

Germany Approves Maglev Rail line 


By Brandon Mitehener 

International Herald Tribune 

BONN — Sixty years and 2 billion Deut- 
sche marks after it was first conceived Eu- 
rope's first high-speed, magnetic-levitation 
train was cleared on Wednesday for takeoff. 

The German cabinet gave final approval to 
build the passenger train, known as the 
Transrapid casting aside criticism lhat it is a 
technological and financial gamble. 

An almost giddy Matthias Wissmann, the 
German transport minister, described the 8.9 
billion DM (S5.2 billion) project as lire em- 
bryo of a new age of government and indus- 
trial cooperation that proves “we don’t just 


let high-tech ride to and fro in Germany but 
actually make it go someplace” 

Specifically, the “maglev" train wifi go 
between Berlin and Hamburg, a distance of 
285 kilometers ( 175 miles). It is expected to 
go into operation in about 10 years. 

The train, also called Whispering Arrow, is 
faster and quieter than a normal train be- 
cause its passage involves virtually no fric- 
tion. 

The project's magnetic levitation technol- 
ogy. while still untested commercially, has 
been 60 years in the making A German 
engineer. Hermann Kemper, fust received a 

See TRAIN, Page 5 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 199+ 


** 


Israel Singles Out 
18 Radical Settlers 

Move Fails to Quell Violence 
As Riots Leave 2 Arabs Dead 


By Clyde Haberman 

Ntx York Times Smite 

JERUSALEM — Israel began to 
cany out some of its announced 
tougher measures against radical 
Jewish settlers on Wednesday, or-' 
dering 18 people to stay out of 
specified Arab towns and also re- 
portedly telling some to turn in 
their army-issued rifles. 

But targets of the new. limited 
crackdown, most of them militants 
faithful to anti-Arab preachings of 
Rabbi Metr Kahane. who was as- 
sassinated in New York in 1990. 
said they would defy what they 
called “insane orders." They in- 
cluded Rabbi Kahane' s son. Binya- 
min Zeev Kahane. who said. "This 
is illegal and it is criminal" 

The government moves against 
Jewish extremists did nothing lo 
reduce Palestinian fury over the 
Hebron massacre, in wfuch a settler 
killed dozens of Muslim worshipers 
last week, mowing them down with 
automatic rifle fire as they prayed. 

Rioting erupted and new deaths 
followed almost as soon as the 
army lifted curfews Wednesday on 
the West Bank and Gaza Strip so 
that residents who were bottled up 
all week could buy food. 

Soldiers shot and killed two 
West Bank protesters, one in He- 
bron and one in Jericho, during 
street battles that were described 
by witnesses as uncommonly fierce. 

The violence strongly suggested 
that the rage was not about to sub- 
side quickly. 

That Jericho exploded was espe- 
cially worrisome. Ii is there and in 
Gaza thai Palestinian self-rule is 
supposed lo begin under the agree- 
ment between Israel and the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization. 

The planned start of self-rule has 
been delayed by nearly three 
months, first by disputes over secu- 
rity details and now by the Hebron 
killings, which prompted the PLO 
to suspend negotiations. 

After the latest unrest Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin said Pales- 
tinians would continue to be re- 
stricted indefinitely through cur- 
fews and roadblocks that keep 
them from leaving the territories 
Tor work in Israel. 

He said he wanted to “put a lid" 
on the unrest to reduce the risk of 
revenge attacks on Israelis, which 
many hen; believe are inevitable. 

“I don’t need casualties on the 
Israeli side in addition to the trage- 
dy in Hebron,” Mr. Rabin said. 

In comments on army radio, the 
prime miniMer’s adviser on terror- 
ism urged Israelis authorized to 
carry guns to do so at all times, 
although he warned them against 
becoming trigger-happy. 

■ Oin ton Makes an Appeal 

President Bill Clinton urged Pal- 
estinians on Wednesday not to 
abandon the Middle East peace 
talks, saying that to reject negotia- 
tions would ‘band a victory to the 
extremists,'' new organizations re- 
ported. 

Mr. Clinton told reporters that 
he thought the Palestinians wanted 


to rejoin the talks. He added. Tm 
not resigned to the fact that it won't 
happen." 

Mr. Clinton said Yasser Arafat, 
the PLO chairman, bad indicated 
that be would join the talks in 
Washington but that he was under 
pressure at home not to do so. 

On Capitol Hill. Secretary of 
Slate Warren M. Christopher said 
Palestinians needed not only secu- 
rity assurances but also to “see a 
different future" as well 

He told the Senate appropria- 
tions committee that this meant 
changing "realities on the ground." 
spreading self-rule from Jericho 
and Gaza lo all of the West Bank, 
and withdrawing Israel's military 
forces. 

In addition, Mr. Christopher 
said the Clinton administration 
might support the temporary sta- 
tioning of United Nations observ- 
ers in Jericho and in Gaza. The 
Palestinians are demanding that 
UN troops be deployed throughout 
the West Bank. ( Reuters. AP) 



Palestinians fleeing tear gas fired by Israeli soldiers dining a dash Wednesday in the occupied Gaza Strip. 


P-untt Ss-AgBKi Fmcr-PrMc 


Security Tight as Israelis Await Revenge Attacks 


By Chris Hedges 

jVV* Yuri Time* Service 

JERUSALEM — Israelis, whether horri- 
fied or defensive about the slaughter of Pal- 
estinian worshipers by an Israeli gunman in a 
mosque in the West Bank town of Hebron, 
are bracing themselves for what many fear 
will be revenge attacks by Palestinians. 

“The Arabs will definitely do something 
soon," said Katie Alon. 22. a" college student 
who was shopping in downtown Jerusalem. 
“When things like this happen they get hack 
at us. I listen to the news a lot more. I'm 
careful where I go." 

Israel's senior anti-terrorism official. Yigal 
Pressler, warned Israelis here and abroad on 
Wednesday to be on guard against attacks by 
Arabs. He advised Israelis with gun licenses 
to carry their weapons in Israel and the 
occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. 

The government has forbidden Palestin- 
ians living in the occupied territories to enter 
Israel leaving many businesses short- 
staffed Security has been tightened in hotels 


and malls. School administrators were meet- 
ing with parents Wednesday to discuss secu- 
rity measures. 

The tension is especially high in the occu- 
pied territories, where Jewish settlers now 
travel to and from settlements in heavily 
guarded convoys. Jittery soldiers shot and 
killed a Jewish settler and wounded his wife 
on Tuesday after mistaking them for Pales- 
tinian gunmen. 

Many Israelis expressed a deep sense for 
foreboding about what will happen in the 
wake of the massacre. The attack on Friday, 
carried out by Dr. Baruch Goldstein, an 
immigrant to Israel from New York, left 
scores of dead and wounded. Numerous rad- 
ical Muslim groups in the Arab world, as 
well as the occupied territories, have prom- 
ised to avenge the murders. 

After the murder by Israeli troops of a 
radical Muslim cleric in February 1992 in 
southern Lebanon, the Iranian-backed Hez- 
bollah movement took responsibility for the 
killing of an Israeli security officer in Anka- 
ra. The group also took responsibility for the 


March 1992 bombing of the Israeli Embassy 
in Buenos Aires, which left 39 dead and 250 


people wounded. 

Dr. Goldstein's attack, whether by plan or 
coincidence, took place on the same day as 
the Buenos Aires explosion, according to the 
Jewish calendar. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

French Seize 26 in Legislator’s Death 
But Then Set Free All but 6 of Them 

PARIS (IHT) — French policemen arrested 26 people, including eight 
local politicians, in connection with the slaying of an anti-corruption 
legislator, but released all but six on Wednesday. 

The deputy. Yann Piat, 44, who had sought to convert ihe.casnoat 
Hyeres into a conference center and turn a lucrative residential project 
into a bird sanctuary, was shot and killed in the city on die Mediterranean i 
coast last week, by two men on a motorcycle. 

She had received death threats after campaigning against drug traffick- 
ing and protection rackets. Other deputies said they had been threatened., 
and one said he had a car accident after someone sawed through an axle. 

A public prosecutor said the six suspects still in police . custody were 
being checked against a composite sketch of one at the killers and for 
suspected connections with organized crime. They included a rightist 
politician, Joseph Scrria, die vice president of the local regional council 
whom Mrs. Piat defeated in legislative elections last March. 

Mexico and Rebels Reach Accord 

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS. Mexico (AP) — Rebel and 
government negotiators announced a tentative agreement on Wednesday 
to end a peasant uprising in southern Mexico. 

A rebel spokesman read the list of demands the Zapatista National 
Liberation Army brought to the talks, including calls for democratic 
reforms and improving the lot of poor Indians in southern Chiapas Slate. 

An aide to government's peace envoy, Manuel Camacho Solis, read a 
response promising new attention in the areas of bousing, education, 
health, and employment in the rural communities of the impoverished 
state. He also pledged that the government would soon launch a Large- 
scale program to build roads and health clinics and to bring electricity to 
those communities that inspired the Indian uprising that began Jan. 1. 

Hanoi Reports 'Positive’ U.S. Talks 

HANOI (Combined Dispatches) — Vietnam reported “positive re- 
sults” on Wednesday at the end of three days of talks with the United 
States on finan cial c laims and a timetable for opening diplomatic 
missions. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman said the first round of talks since the 
end of the U.S. economic embargo last month “has ended with positive 
results,” but experts still had to discuss remaining issues in a new round 
lo take place later. 

The negotiations, together with what the U.S. Slate Department called 


will come back to work," said a member of 
the parent’s committee at the kindergarten. 

“Some of them have been loyal employees 
for JO or 20 years. But what do we do? Gan 
we still trust them? Will one of them decide 
to seek revenge on our children?” 

nuu^vuvu.. In a circular put out by the Education _ . , , n| ■ tw l 

Those who have lost family mem beans in a Ministry, teachers were told to devote class LXplOSIVC ( jaUS Cfl PlflS t HI DrUSSClS 
airiwind of attacks and counterattacks of- time to letting students express such emo- ~ „ _ ... . . _ , . , , , 



whirlwind 

ten seem to feel the tragedy most deeply. 

“For me this is very hard, because I blow 
what the people who lost family members are 
going through." said Elisa Ben- Rafael, 
whose husband was killed in the explosion in 
Argentina. “It j& always the wrong people 
who get killed. Nothing is sacred now, it can 
happen to any one, any time." 

Perhaps those most concerned are parents. 
One kindergarten that was holding a meeting 
for parents on Wednesday refused to let a 
reporter sit in on the discussion. Many of the 
anxious parents would be identified only by 
their first names. 

“We have Arab workers who, once the 
closure of the occupied territories is lifted. 


lions as pain, anger and fear that may have 
been generated by the massacre. 

“What makes many of us so anxious is 
that while we believe utere will be an attack, 
we have no idea when, or where it will take 
place," one woman said. 

For the moment most Israelis can do little 
more than wait for the reverberations of the 
Hebron massacre to diminish. 

“Dr. Baruch Goldstein murdered not only 
Palestinians, but Jews." Youssef Lapid wrote 
in an editorial in the newspaper Ma’am. 
‘They are still walking among us. There is no 
doubt now that .Arabs, this very hour, are 
planning revenge. The bloodshed did not 
end in the Cave of the Patriarchs." 


BRUSSELS (Reuters) — A blast that killed six people, partly destroy- 
ing a Brussels apartment building, was caused by an explosive, a spokes- 
man for the Brussels public prosecutor said on Wednesday. 

Traces of explosive bad been found in a fifth-floor apartment where the 
blast occurred on Tuesday. The spokesman denied Belgian newspaper 
reports that the apartments occupier, who died in the blast, was a soldier. 
“He was a former banking agent." be said. 

Le Soir, a Brussels newspaper, quoted neighbors as saying the man. 
identified as Serge Boren x, 51. collected explosives. A police spokesman 
said six people had died and 10 were wounded. 


N.Y. Police Arrest a Lebanese in Shooting of Jews 


The AsiifidieJ Tms 

NEW YORK — The police ar- 
rested a Lebanese man on Wednes- 
day in the drire-by shooting attack 
on a van of Jewish students that left 
one young man brain dead and 
another critically wounded 

The suspecL identified as Ra- 
shad Baz, was arrested in Brooklyn 
less than 24 hours after an attack 
that outraged Jews and generated 
fears of Mideast terrorism in New 
York- 

Police Commissioner William 
Bratton announced the arrest at a 
news conference at City Hall, say- 
ing Mr. Baz. believed io be 28 years 
old. had entered the United States 
in 1984 on a student visa. 


Mr. Bratton said Mr. Baz would 
be charged with 15 counts of at- 
tempted murder, four counts of as- 
sault. and weapons charges. He 
said the police had searched his 
Brooklyn apartment and recovered 
several semi-automatic weapons 
and a bulletproof vest. Officers also 
seized the suspect’s car. 

Mr. Bratton declined to com- 
ment on motivation or whether the 
attack could be linked to the shoot- 
ing Friday in the Israeli-occupied 
West Bank, in which a Jewish set- 
tler from Brooklyn killed dozens of 
Muslim worshipers. Mr. Bratton 
said others were being questioned 
in the bridge attack, although the 
gunman apparently acted alone. 


One victim of the shooting on 
Tuesday, Aaron Halberstam, 20. 
was declared brain dead on 
Wednesday. Mr. Halberstam 
“meets the clinical criteria for brain 
dead," said Dr. Allen Hirschfdd. 

“That means that legally he is 
dead," he said. “But we are con- 
tinuing life support as a result of 
the family’s wishes." 

Mr. Halberstam was in the van 
carrying young Hasidic men from a 
hospital visit Tuesday when a gun- 
man repeatedly fired at them as the 
van entered the Brooklyn Bridge. 

Using two 9mm semiautomatic 
pistols, the gunman pursued the 
van half the length of the bridge, 
firing ai least nine bullets - 


Another student in the van was 
critically wounded, and doctors 
said he might not survive. Two oth- 
ers survival with lesser wounds. 

City officials sought to calm 
fears that the incident was related 
to Middle East tensions. 

The white van was not marked, 
but its occupants wore the black 
hats and sidecurls typical of Hasid- 
ic Jews. 

Rabbi Shmuel Butman, a leader 
of the Lubavitcher sect drew his 
own conclusions. “It seems to us 
this was an act of terrorism." he 
said. 

The Brooklyn Bridge was closed 
for hours after the shooting. Securi- 


ty was tightened at sensitive loca- 
tions. and Lbe FBI and U.S. Justice 
Department were keeping watch. 

The attack occurred as hundreds 
of Lubavitcbers traveled from 
Brooklyn to Manhattan's Eye, Ear 
tod Throat Hospital where' their 
grand rabbi. Menacbem Schneer- 
son, had undergone cataract sur- 
gery. Rabbi Schneereon. 91, and a 
small entourage used another route 
back to Brooklyn. 

The secL one of the largest of 
about 10 Hasidic groups, claims 
about 250.000 members in the 
United States and abroad. Other 
Jewish sources contend that half 
that number would be a generous 
estimate. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Japanese Airlines Seek to Slash Fares 

TOKYO (AFP) — Japan’s leading airlines have applied to cut fares on 
international routes by as much as 55 percent starting in April, in a bid to 
compete with the growing number of travel agents offering discounted 
tickets. 

Japan Air Lines, the nation's largest carrier, said it had applied lo the 
Transport Ministry to reduce return fares to Europe by an average 41 
percent to 152.000 yen ($1,450). At the same time, it is seeking to cut fares 
to Los Angeles and San Fransisco by 38 percent. 

All Nippon Airways, the domestic carrier, is seeking approval to cut 
fares by as much as 55 percent on European routes and an average of 40 
percent on flights to the West Coast of the United States. 

A record number of foreigners visited Britain last year and spent j 
record £9.1 billion ($13.6 billion), up 15 percent from 1992. Provisional 
figures showed there were 19.3 million visitors in 1993 —4 percent higher 
than the year before. f Reuters I 

Travelers have been cancefing Easter trips to brad because of the 
Hebron massacre. The Tourism Ministry decided to postpone a promo- 
tion campaign that was to be started in the coming days in several 
European countries. (AFP) 

Concorde, the supersonic airliner, celebrated its 25th birthday in the air 
Wednesday. The first of the Concordes developed by France and Britain 
made its maiden flight from Toulouse, France, on March 2. 1969. 
Commercial passenger services began in 1976. (Reuters! 


ISRAEL: Massacre Unleashes a Shock Wave of Doubt 


Continued from Page 1 
nationalism. But in the aftermath 
of the killings, it has provoked criti- 
cism. “Their God isn't our God. 
and isn't the God of most of the 
religious public in Israel," Uzi 
Baram, a Labor Party member of 
parliament and the tourism minis- 
ter, said in a newspaper commen- 
tary. “Decisions about the peace 
process and Israel's final borders 
will be based on strategic and secu- 
rity considerations, not according 
to the settlers' map of holy cities.” 

Yaron Ezrahi, a political scien- 
tist and Hebrew University profes- 
sor. said: “There has been a tre- 
mendous blow inflicted on the 
connection between religion and 
nationalism in Israel. Despite the 
fact this man was an extremist the 
connection between religious sym- 
bolism and the massacre confirms 
the worst expectations and doubts 
of the secular community." 

Even among the Jewish settlers, 
questions are being asked about 
whether they should have raised 
alarms earlier about the most mili- 
tant among them. 

“I am sony and deeply dis- 
tressed that the distinctions be- 
tween us and them wasn't made 
earlier," said Vered Noam, who 
lives in the West Bank settlement of 
KTar Adurmm. outside Jerusalem. 
“On the miter fringes of our group, 
there are dangerous elements and 
they cannot be part of us anymore. 


They are far from us morally, spiri- 
tually. religiously, politically and 
ideologically." 

“Are they Zionists? Of course 
not" she added. “But that is hardly 
the question. They are not human. I 
cannot understand them, not as a 
Jew, a Zionist, a human being." 

Shmuel Langer. a Jerusalem 
businessman, said: “This was a 
greater incident than any other, be- 
cause it was in a house' of prayer, 
and because it was so humiliating. 
He shot them in the back, while 
they were bending. They were hum- 
bling themselves to their God. and 
be shot them. I can’t stop thinking 
about that image.” 

Muki Tzur. a leader of the kib- 
butz move menu said. “The group 
to which Goldstein belonged is 
very marginal and unusual in Israe- 
li society, but that is the reason he 
wasn't taken seriously enough. 
How did we not see it? How did we 
not think that such a thing could 
happen?” 

“This is a terrible wound on Is- 
raeli society." he added. “This is 
not between us and the Arabs, it's 
between ourselves, between the 
right and the left, the religious and 
the secular. We have to learn to live 
together and talk together, and I 
don't think we really know how." 

Kinerei Lahad. a 21 -year-old 
university student said: “I can't 
believe that a thing like this could 


happen in our democracy. I was so 
ashamed. I couldn't believe a Jew. 
who knew about the history of the 
Holocaust, could do such a’ thing.” 

"I was really sad. and scared." 
she added. “Especially now, every- 
one was becoming so optimistic. 
My brother is about to go into the 
army, and just a few days ago I was 
thinking how happy I would be 
that he would not have to go to 
Gaza." 

She said she was especially ner- 
vous that the massacre would lead 
to a tide of violence, and because 
there were signs that the Israeli 
.Army, a barometer of die nation's 
sense of security, was confused and 
frayed. The night before, she said, 
army patrols opened fire by acci- 
dent on an Israeli settler driving in 
the West Bank, killing him and 
wounding his wife. 

■ Troops Kill 2 Arabs 

Israeli troops killed at least two 
Arabs on Wednesday when hun- 
dreds of stone-throwing Palestin- 
ians took to the streets of towns in 
the occupied territories, according 
to Arab witnesses and military 
sources quoted by Reuters. 

Palestinians said the violence in 
Hebron, where one Arab youth was 
killed, was more serious than the 
unrest that broke out after the mas- 
sacre there Friday. At least 21 Pal- 
estinians and two Israelis have died 
in clashes since then. 


4 Schindler’s List 9 Offers Germans 6 Sense of Events 9 


By Craig R. Whitney 

,Vet» York Times Sernte 

FRANKFURT — Eight hundred peo- 
ple — diplomats and artists, filmmakers 
and people who had known Oskar 
Schindler when he lived here — came 
solemnly together in the municipal theater 
under the patronage of President Richard 
von Weizsacker to see the German pre- 
miere of an American film many Germans 
thought one of their own should have 
made long ago: “Schindler's List" by Ste- 
ven Spielberg. 

The reactions, at the end were tears, 
stunned silence and a smattering of ap- 
plause that was cut short as if somehow 
out of place. “It needed you to do it,” Mr. 
von Weizsacker told Mr. Spielberg when 
the lights came up. 

Dieter Trautwein. a Protestant minister 
who befriended Mr. Schindler in the 
1960s, said. “On the whole, it succeeded in 
getting across a sense of what those events 
were really like, and posing the most im- 
portant question: Where was everybody 
else?" 

Chancellor Helmut KohL who was in 
Frankfurt on Monday night to honor the 
Rothschild family, did not attend the 
showing on Tuesday night. “I would have 
loved to have bem Kohl's ear," the direc- 
tor said. “There's no hard feelings." 

Each guest was asked to donate 100 
Deutsche marks ($60) to a German charity 
called Against Forgetting to restore a dete- 
riorating memorial at the former Nazi 
concentration camp in Auschwitz, where 


Mr. Schindler's employees would have 
gone to the ovens if he had not saved them 
from the SS. 

One of the guests was Michael Fried- 
mann. a 38-vear-old son of two Schindler 
Jews who is a lawyer in Frankfurt. He saw 
the Aim with his mother. 

“I saw ray parents, and I was crying.” he 
said of the film. "1 saw the millions who 
didn't survive, and I was CTying. I saw the 


T hope a lot of 
Germans, particularly 
young Germans, will 
go see this film, which 
helps as to feel the 
Holocaust." 


Germans who saved some of them, and I 
was crying, and 1 saw the Germans who 
murdered, and I was crying, too. I hope a 
loi of Germans, particularly young Ger- 
mans. will go see this film, which helps us 
to feel the Holocaust." 

His mother. Evgeaia Friedmann, told 
Mr. Spielberg, “I wish you had done the 
film 10 yean earlier, but nobody who sees 
it will ever forget it.” 

The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeiiung. a 
conservative daily, ran a front-page edito- 
rial about tL “All indications are that 


Spielberg's film will move and excite this 
country." it said. “Everybody should see 
this film.” 

But nearly 50 years after the disappear- 
ance of the Nazi death machinery, fear 
was not entirely absent for this occasion. 
Mr. Spielberg.' who was presenting the 
picture on Wednesday in Krakow, the site 
of Oskar Schindler's ceramics factory and 
of many scenes in the film, was worried 
that German right-wing extremists and 
neo-Nazis would try to spoil the German 
opening and asked for light security. 

The city authorities and the U.S. Con- 
sulate, which helped with the arrange- 
ments and with the publicity, complied. 

Toward the end of his life. Mr. 
Schindler lived in a shabby furnished 
room overlooking the Frankfurt railroad 
station, having lost or gambled away 
$100,000 in German government compen- 
sation for the loss of his factoiy. 

He died in a hospital in Hildesheim in 
October 1974. almost unknown except in 
Israel and among those who still called 
themselves Schindler's Jews. Frankfurt 
later named a small street in a housing 
project after him. 

"Schindler’s List” opens across the 
country Thursday, but German critics 
have been previewing il for months. They 
have found few faults. 

Der Spiegel, a weekly news magazine 
that often dismisses anything American, 
especially popular culture, made the movie 
its cover story for its Feb. 21 issue. 

“ ‘Schindler’s List* is great beyond all 


expectations." the article said. “No book, 
no documentation, no film can grasp the 
horror and the incomprehensibility of the 
Holocaust. But ‘Schindler’s List’’ — the 
first great movie that has really taken 
bureaucratically planned and ractory-exe- 
cuted mass murder as its subject — shows 
what il is possible to do: It is possible to 
tell the story.” 

We Zeit, an intellectual weekly, wrote in 
January that there had been many Ger- 
man films about World War II in recent 
years: “Das Boot." about the travails of a 
German submarine crew in the Atlantic, 
and Joseph Viismaier'5 "Stalingrad.” 
which attracted 1.5 million viewers last 
year and gave them a realistic depiction of 
the turning point of the war. 

These films, wrote Andreas Kilb. a re- 
viewer. “show the Germans the way they 
prefer to see themselves: as victims." 

“As long as this is so," he continued, 
“others will have to tell us the story of our 
own history. Steven Spielberg wilj not be 
the lasL" 

Artur Bra uner. a Jewish refugee from 
Poland who settled here alter the war and 
has produced more than 200 movies, has 
said he tried for 18 years to get German 
government backing to produce a film on 
Mr. Schindler, but failed because it was 
not thought to be a financially viable pro- 
ject. 

“A German film about a ‘good’ Nazi 
could be seen by the outride world as self- 
justification." Kann Marquard. director 
of the Berlin film support body. said. 


o 

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Constit 


By Adam Oymer 

New York Times Service 

Washington — The Senate 

has rejected a constitutional 
amendment to require a balanced 
United States budget, killing the 
proposal for at least this year. 

The vote was 63 to 37 late Tues- 
day, leaving the measure four votes 
short of the two-thirds majority re- 
tired for an amendment to the 
itotion. 

The measure, sponsored by Paul 
Simon, Democrat of IRinois. never 
stimulated the grass-roots support 
its backers had hoped for. It failed 

- after intense, skilled opposition by 

Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia 
and George 1. Mitchell of Maine, 
who raised the specter of political, 
economic and constitutional perils. 

And they solidified wavering op- 
ponents by arranging for a vote on 
a much weaker version of a bal- 
anced-budget amendment, which 
was overwhelmingly defeated but 
stiil provided a political comfort 
zone for a few senators. Six sena- 
tors voted for the weaker version. 


Under the amendment, federal 
spending could not exceed income 
unless Congress, by three-fifths 
votes in both houses, agreed to al- 
low a deficit. It would have re- 
quired separate three-fif ths votes to 
increase the national debt, (he ac- 
cumulation of annual deficits. 

House backers insisted that they 
would stdl press for a vote there 
next month, but Mr. Mitchell, the 
Senate majority leader, declared he 
would not bring it up again. “This 
is it," be said. “There is no reason 
in the world to even consider bring- 
ing if back. Under no circum- 
stances over which I have any con- 
trol will this be brought up again, 
this session, this Cbcgrcss, this 
year." 

But Senator Bob Dole of Kansas, 
the Republican leader, said: “It’s 
going to happen. If not this year, 
next year or the next year." 

Mr. Mitchell delivered the clos- 
ing speech against the- proposal, 
saying. “The balanced budget 
amendment now before us is a bold 
example of political posturing." 


- 


Ar POLITICAL NOTES* 


Whitewater Counsel Vows Foster Inquiry 

WASHINGTON — The independent counsel investigating the 
involvement of Bill and Hfllaiy Rodham Climonin an Arkansas real 
estate venture has asked a federal judge to prevent the release of a 
police report on the apparent suicide of Vincent W. Foster Jr., a 
longtime friend of the Clintons and deputy White House counsel at 
the time of his death. , . . 

The counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr., said in a letter introduced in 
federal court in Manhattan that his investigation will indude a 
detailed look at Mr. Foster's death in July. He said that making the 
police report public now would hinder his investigation because 
witnesses’ testimony could be tainted by knowledge erf the report 
Mr. Fiske’s letter was offered in support of a Justice Department 
effort to delay release of the report which The Wall Street Journal 
has sued to obtain. . _. ... . , 

Mr Foster, a boyhood friend of Mr. CUnton m Arkansas and law 
partner of Mrs. Clinton, committed suicide July 20. according to the 
police. YJ) 

U .S. to Curb Chemical Plant Emissions 

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agen cy ha s 
issued a new rule requiring U.S. chemical plants to cut by 88 percent 
the amount of toxic substances they emit mto the air. 

If companies comply fully, the overall reduction m toxic emtsstoos 
nationwide should exceed 506,000 tons a year, according to agency 

^^aby-producL the new regulatkms also wffl ^““^eamount 
of volatile organic compounds — which include the unb “£“* ! 
fuds and evaporated solvents that are the main source of urban smog 

— by a million tons a year, the agency said. .. . ^ . 

“This is the equivalent of taking 38 million cars off tire road 
aboutomtfmmh erf all cars in America," said the agency administra- 
tor, Carol M. Browner. ( ; 

S 5 wo 5 Los es Appeal to High Court_ 

WASHINGTON —Chief Justice William HL Rdmqtnst the 
WASHING! u Wednesday to bar the Senate Select Coro- 

wmk, Mftiisc O ffers ftnU.Crm wijwMire 

~v\m Thi* Clinton administration has issued its 
WAS ^ C ^^striSaS^ou’«w>ut” crime measure, which 

(nr trinlmt feder&l offenSCS. , Vkv PrpcifUmr 


A1 Gore said that Owpro^wtfJ ^convicted for the third mne of 
^measure wottid^h^^ ^ House is hoping 
a violent federal crime to lif P o^^can-sponsored versons, 
that its proposal nin^sin *»■ definition of what 

which include a broader list or ui 

constitutes a “strike* 


institutes ^strike." ^ ^ the White House 

ta '* "• nsver 

meant to be. . . af .Kot narrow band of serious repeat 

itr: -*-**—“ w 

White House p<d«? adviser ~ — 



From Suspicion to Arrest, 7- Year CIA ^Debacle’ 


By Tim Weiner 

Ken- York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The Central Intelli- 
gence Agency first became aware that Al- 
drich Hazen Ames might be a Soviet mole 
nearly seven years ago. but failed to focus on 
evidence pointing at him until last year. 

Recounting the investigation that led to 
Mr, Ames’s being charged with spying for 
Moscow, they said the CIA's investigation of 
a suspected traitor in its ranks rose and fell in 
intensity over the years. 

For instance, they said the agency took 
two years to question him about a 1989 tip 
from one of its own officers that Mr. Ames, 
who is reported to have received as much as 
S2.7 million from the Soviet Union, was 
living far beyond his means. Another year 
passed before the agency tried to verify Mr. 
Ames’s response that his wife had inherited 
money. 

The investigation finally stepped up in 
1992, the officials said, when Mr. Ames was 
so careless as to travel to Venezuela after 
telling his superiors that be was going to 
Colombia to visit his mother-in-law. 

Not until June 1993 did the CIA's inter- 
nal-security officers search Mr. Ames's of- 
fice at the agency. 

■ Court papers made public Tuesday by the 
FBI painted Mr. Ames as a spy wbo grew 
extremely careless, but intelligence and con- 
gressional officials also described the CIA's 
long in-house search to catch him as sloppy 
and hapless. 

“ ‘Unfocused' would be a kind way to put 
it," said Representative Robert G. Torricelli, 
Democrat of New Jersey, a member of the 
House Intelligence Committee. Mr. Torricel- 
li praised the bureau's work on the case in 


recent months, but said. “The CIA’s work 
for the seven preceding years was a debacle." 

Eight of the 10 Soviet and Eastern Europe- 
an agents Mr. Antes is suspected of betraying 
were executed in Moscow between the time 
be first came under investigation and the 
time of his arrest, according to members of 
Congress who have been briefed by senior 
FBI and CIA officers. 

“In all there are 10 executions tied to 
Ames, and most happened during these sev- 

" 'Unfocused’ would be 
a kind way to put it” 

Robert G. Torricelli, 

House Intelligence Committee. 

en years he was under investigation." an 
intelligence official said. 

“These were key people involved in every 
component of the Soviet bureaucracy," in- 
ducting senior intelligence officials and a top 
nuclear weapons expert, he said. 

The search for the mote began in 1986, 
after two intelligence officers at the Soviet 
Embassy in Washington. Valety F. Martinov 
and Sergei M. Motorin, wbo at great risk 
agreed to become double agents for the Unit- 
ed States, were recalled to Moscow, arrested, 
tried and executed by firing squad. 

In addition, they said, the CIA’s most 
important operations against the Soviet 
Union were inexplicably tailing. 

At first the best guess was that the spy 
responsible was Edward Lee Howard, a CIA 
officer who defected to the Soviet Union in 
1985, or Clayton Lonetree. a Marine guard 


convicted of spying from his post at the US. 
Embassy in Moscow, officials said. 

Bui by late 1986 or early 1987, said Robert 
M. Gates, the former director of Central 
Intelligence, the CIA knew it had “a continu- 
ing problem in our operations dealing with 
the Soviet Union that could not be explained 
by Edward Lee Howard or Clayton Lone- 
tree." 

Then, in 1989, the CIA was jolted when 
three more of its most valued Soviet double 
agents disa ppeared, intelligence officials and 
members of Congress said. 

At least 200 CIA officers, including Mr. 
Ames, had access to the information that Mr. 
Mar tinov. Mr. Motorin and the double 
agents who disappeared in 1989 were secret- 
ly working for the United! Stales. All 200 
eventually fell under scrutiny. 

But from 1987 to 1991, when William H. 
W ebster. the former head of the FBI. beaded 
the CIA, the investigation floundered in a 
sea of uncertainty. 

Not until ajoint ClA-FBI task force began 
working on the cases in 1991 did the investi- 
gation gain any momentum. The group nar- 
rowed its number of suspects from 200 to 20 
CIA officers, again including Mr. Ames. 
Still, CIA officers overlooked or ignored im- 
portant facts that could have implicated him, 
intelligence officials and members of Con- 
gress said. 

They said, for example, that a CIA col- 
league voiced suspicion in late 1989 because 
Mr. Ames appeared to have a great deal of 
money for a man who made less than $70,000 
a year. That year, he paid SS40.000 in cash 
for a home in Arlington, Virginia. 

Yet two years passed before Mr. Ames was 
confronted directly with questions about his 


new-found wealth, they said. He explained 
that it was an inheritance from the family of 
his Colombian-born wife. Another year 
passed before the CIA investigated. 

In the three years that passed between the 
initial tip about Mr. Ames's wealth and (he 
failed investigation in Colombia, two high- 
ranking Soviet agents working for the CIA 
— a senior counterintelligence officer and a 
nudear-weapons specialist — disappeared 
and were executed. 

In those years. Mr. Ames was depositing 
at least $278,000 in cash into his personal 
banking accounts, buying a new Jaguar and 
running up thousands of dollars a month in 
credit card charges. 

In this same period, Mr. Ames also passed 
a CIA lie-detector test and retained access to 
highly classified documents about the CIA's 
operations in Moscow, despite being trans- 
ferred to a less sensitive couniernarcotics 
post. 

Not until October 1 992 did be blunder and 
call greater scrutiny on himself. He told his 
superiors that he was going to Bogoti to visit 
his mother-in-law. but instead he traveled to 
Caracas, Venezuela, where be met a Russian 
contact, according to an FBI affidavit. His 
travels were under surveillance. He had left a 
due too large to overtook. 

“That finally intensified the investiga- 
tion," an intelligence official said. 

The 1993 search of his office uncovered 
internal documents about sensitive counter- 
intelligence operations that had nothing to 
do with his cotuternarcotics assignment. 

Within weeks, the FBI was searching 
through the trash outside his house, tapping 
into his computer and watching his every 
move. 


Onto* Cool/TV Fim 

Senators Onin Hatch of Utah, left, and Paid Simon of Illinois talking with reporters after the Senate 
rejected, by a vote of d3 to 37, a constitutional amendment to require a balanced U.S. budget 

Senators Reject Amendment 
To Require Balanced Budget 


He said he knew some members 
fdt a need “for political cover.” 

“I understand the fear some have 
of taking an action contrary to pre- 
vailing public opinion," he said. 

He said later that many in both 
parlies thought the amendment 
was a bad idea but feared for re- 
election. “if this was a secret ballot, 
this amendment would not get a 
majority," he said 

Mr. Dole criticized the adminis- 
tration's opposition to the amend- 
ment, saying, “The bottom line is 
this administration is looking for 
every excuse in the book to spend 
more money than Americans are 
willing to pay for in tax dollars.” 

He said that without the amend- 
ment , the nation would be like a 
family.. “that struggles year after 
year with a growing credit card 
debt because it can never quite 
tighten Its belt enough to pay off 
the principal." 

Its supporters contended that it 
was the only way to force Congress 
and the executive branch to halt 
years and years of deficit spending. 

Mr. Simon said: “There is a day 
of reckoning We ought to stop this 
before we get to the edge of the 
diff." 

Senator William S. Cohen, Re- 
publican of Maine, called deficit 
spending “fiscal child abuse.” 

Senator Sam Nunn, Democrat of 
Georgia, a reluctant supporter, said 
he was loath to put the amendment 
into the Constitution, calling it 
“the worst method proposed for 
eliminating our persistent federal 
deficit" — except for all the failed 
alternatives that bad already been 
tried. 

But he said it was “the only way 
to force Congress and the executive 
branch to face up to the problem." 

Senator Bob Kerrey, Democrat 
of Nebraska, contradicted them, 
saying “The only thing that will 
stop this spending is courage, and 
courage cannot be legislated into 
the Constitution." 

Mr. Byrd said the that “amend- 
ment undermines a basic principle 
underlying our representative de- 
mocracy: the principle of majority 
rale." 

He said that requiring three- 
fifths majorities would be an invi- 
tation to “gridlock and blackmail." 

He also denounced one change 
that had been made in the Simon 
amendment to secure votes — a 
provision that would bar courts 
from issuing any orders to increase 
taxes or cut spending Mr. Byrd 
said that would either prove inef- 
fective. or h would enable the exec- 
utive branch to ignore Congress 
and cut any spending it lied. 


Away From Politics 


• Drivers involved in accidents in which air bags are deployed are 35 
percent less likely to suffer moderate to severe injuries than drivers 
using only seat belts, according to new data. State Farm Insurance Co. 
said a study of 2.818 insurance claims from raid-1989 to mid-1993 
found the safety devices most effective when used with seat belts. 

• The New York Tunes and its executive editor, Max Frankd, are 
winners in the I Oth annual “Best in the Business" awards of the 
American Journalism Review magazine. The winners in 13 print and 
broadcast journalism categories were chosen by readers. 

• Leroy (EMridge) Clearer, a former leader and co-founder of the 
Black Panther Party, has undergone surgery for a hemorrhage in his 
brain. Mr. Oeaver, 58, was in critical condition at Alta Bates 
Medical Center in Berkeley. California, after almost five hours of 
surgery. He apparently fell Q1 while being booked for alleged public 
intoxication, cocaine possession and possession of drug parapherna- 
lia. the police said. It was not known what caused the hemorrhage. 

• A defense attorney's affair with a key prosecution witness has won 
the defendant a new trial after a judge in Washington threw out his 
conviction on drug char ges. Judge Royce Lamberth wrote that the 
defense attorney in the case. Betty Hunter, had a longstanding affair 
with the police officer, Marcello Muzzatti, wbo helped convict James 
Harris of cocaine possession. “The court wonders why Ms. Hunter 
would put herself in the position of cross-examining her lover on the 
witness stand." said Judge Lamberth. 

Rem n. AP. WP. AFP 


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Gun Pledge 
Sought for 
Students 


The Anoaaicd Pros 

WASHINGTON — A nation- 
wide group of public school admin- 
istrators is asking all American sec- 
ondary school students to sign a 
pledge not to bring guns to class 
any more. 

The administrators, the more 
than 40,000 members of the Na- 
tional Association of Secondary 
School Principals, declared that 
firearms and other weapons “are a 
hazard to a safe learning environ- 
ment-” 

The pledges, in the form of con- 
tracts. will be mailed to ail middle 
schools and high schools for the 
students to sign. Parents will be 
asked to keep weapons out of their 
children’s hands. 

More than one in 1 0 teachers and 
nearly one in four students report 
they have been victims of violence 
in or around their schools, accord- 
ing to a 1993 survey by Metropoli- 
tan Life. 

A total of 13 percent of the stu- 
dents said they bad brought a 
weapon to school at least once. 

Under the contract, the student 
agrees “not to bring a gun or any 
weapon to school or to any school 
event” or “carry another person’s 
gun or weapon." If a student sees a 
gun at school he is bound under 
the contract to report iL 

Parents who co-sign the agree- 
ment commit themselves to inform 
teenagers about the dangers of 
weapons and to teach “by persona! 
example.” 


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Page 4 


ENTER jVU IONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 

Spanish Court Rejects 
A Request to Die 

In the first such case heard in 
Spain, a court has rejected (he 
plea of a nearly totally paralyzed 
man to be allowed to die. 

In denying the petition of Ra- 
m6n Sanpedro, 51, who has been 
paralyzed from die neck down 
since a diving accident in 1968. a 
Barcelona court said the lack of 
any law “referring to specific ac- 
tive euthanasia” required it to up- 
hold the penal code, under winch 
helping a person to die is equiva- 
lent to abetting suicide, a crime 
punishable by 6 to 20 years im- 
prisonment. ’ 

Mr. Sanpedro. who was a fish- 
erman before his accident spends 
his days in bed 3t his home in 
Porto 'do Son. near La Coruna, 
reading books or writing poems 
with a pen clenched between his 
teeth. “1 am a head tied to a dead 
body,” he said recently. “A ratio- 
nal' being, mortally injured, 
should not have to wait for the 
end like an animal.** 

The case drew heavy publicity 
in Spain. Television programs re- 



Mm ffashTbc Awewud Press 

TIMES CHANGE — Two of the four faces of London’s Big 

Ben disagreed Tuesday. The dock-works are being renovated. 


ported th3t a majority- of Span- 
iards favored the legalization of 
euthanasia, but groups represent- 
ing the handicapped criticized 
Mr. Sanpedro’s attitude. He said 
he understood their position, but 
added, “All I am asking for is my 
own right to a dignified death." 

Around Europe 

Sentences issued for environ- 
mental offenses in France have 
fallen sharply, and that does not 
mean the laws are suddenly being 
, respected, reports the new French 
daily InfoMatin. From 1984 to 
1 1991. the number of sentences for 
! violations ranging from poaching 
to industrial pollution dropped 30 
percent, according to a Justice 
Ministry survey. 

Jehan de Malafosse, an envi- 
ronmental law professor, said the 
work of “green police" had grown 
far more difficult as poachers and 
other violators display new cre- 
ativity. determination and in 
some cases violence. 

In the Moselle, in Alsace and in 
the woods around Paris, where 
deer and other game are now- 
plea tifuL lone poachers have been 
replaced by well-armed gangs 
ready to run roadblocks or fire on 
the police. Rangers now wear bul- 
let-proof vests and carry powerful 
357 Magnum handguns. 

The gap between law and en- ; 
foreement is likely to widen. As I 


new European laws take effect in 
France, the hunting season for 
many migratory birds will be 
shortened by two mouths. Anger 
over these changes brought 
70,000 hunters to the streets of 
Bordeaux last weekend in a pro- 
test that exceeded its organizers’ 
expectations. 

More than 90 percent of Ger- 
mans are dissatisfied with their 
doctor’s bedside maimer, accord- 
ing to a study of 2,000 patients by 
a Hamburg researcher, Els Ok- 
saar. Over alL 93 percent of pa- 
tients said they were given too 
little time with their doctor; 89 
percent said they received only 
superficial answers to their ques- 
tions: 87 percent said they had 
trouble understanding their phy- 
sician’s explanations, and 78 per- 
cent said their doctor did not 
seem to take them seriously. 

Athens is Weston Europe's 
dirtiest city, followed by Madrid, 
Rome, Brussels, Amsterdam and 
Berlin, according to a new survey 
by the Tidy Britain Group, an 
independent association. Its 
teams spent four days in the cen- 
ter of each city last year, looking 
for cigarette butts, dog excre- 
ment discarded advertising bro- 
chures. graffiti and signs of van- 
dalism. They also measured the 
fullness of garbage receptacles. 
The cleanest city was London, 
followed by Bern' and Paris. 


Only 13 giiis tamed up fora top 
British beauty contest, whose or- 
ganizers had expected as many as 
500. Newspapers suggested that 
the poor turnout — judges nearly 
outnumbered contestants — at 
the first stage of the Miss British 
Isles competition in London 


showed that beauty contests were 
a dying phenomenon. 

So bttie interest did the contest 
arouse, said The Daily Mail, that 
“even the feminists canceled their 
planned protest outside ” 


Brian Knowlton 


Zulu Chief, Changing Signals, 
Renews Separatist Demands 


The Associated Press 

DURBAN. South Africa — The 
Zulu leader. Chid Mangosuthu 
Buthelezi, called again Wednesday 
for a separate Zulu kingdom, a day 
after saying be might end his boy- 
cott of the nation's first all-race 
election in ApriL 

His statement was (he latest of 
the conflicting signals Chief Buthe- 
lezi, head of the Zulu-led Inkatfaa 
Freedom Party, has given in appar- 
ent political brinkmanship intend- 
ed to win concessions from the rival 
African National Congress prior to 

the vote. 

“We need to separate the king- 
dom of KwaZulu from the rest of 
Sooth Africa,” Chief Buthelezi told 
a caucus of the KwaZulu black 
homeland's legislature. 

If the Apnl election proceeds 
without meeting Zulu demands for 
an autonomous state, then "the 
KwaZulu government cannot be 
held responsible for the anger of 
the Zulu nation," he said. 

A boycott by Inkaiha and its 
allies, including pro-apartheid 
whites, would likely increase politi- 
cal violence, which killed more 
than 3.000 blacks last year, and 
could disrupl voting. 

Much of the violence stems from 
a power struggle between Inkatfaa 


and the African National Con- 
gress, the nation’s leading black 
group and likely winner of the 
April vote. 

Chief Buthelezi emerged from a 
meeting Tuesday with Nelson 
Mandela, leader of the ANC, say- 
ing he would consider registering 
for the April 26-28 election in an 
attempt to end political violence. 

In return, the ANC said it would 
support international mediation to 
try to resolve disagreements with 
Inkatha over how much power re- 
gional governments should have in 
a new constitution to take effect 
alter the election. 

Chief Buthelezi and other lead- 
era in the opposition Freedom Alli- 
ance say they fear that the new 
constitution will allow the ANC to 
dominate the first post-apartheid 
government and trample minority 
Tights. They want independent or 
autonomous territories. 

The ANC and President Fre- 
derik W. de Klerk’s government 
have changed the constitution to 
broaden regional powers, but the 
Freedom Alliance groups say they 
need guarantees that an elected 
ANC government would be unable 
to rewrite the document 

If Chief Buthelezi registers for 
the election before Friday, the new 


deadline, he would likely break 
with other alliance members. 

The Conservative Party leader. 
Ferdi Hartzenbetg, head of the 
pro-apartheid white faction, said 
Tuesday that rightist whites would 
set up a white “people's state" this 
weekend. 

Another Freedom Alliance nego- 
tiator, Rowao Cronje of the Bo- 
phutbatswana black homeland, 
said that “Buthelezi must have got 
some hope of a settlement" in his 
meeting with Mr. Mandela, the Jo- 
hannesburg newspaper Business 
Day reported. 

Chief Buthelezi said Tuesday 
that even if Inkatha registered, it 
would reserve the right to boycott 
the vote if its demands for Zulu 
autonomy were not raeL "It leaves 
our options open." he said. 


Nigeria Shuts University 

A fence Ftanct-Preat 

LAGOS — The University of 
Abuja, in the Nigerian capital! has 
been closed indefinitely after riots 
by students demanding' the resigna- 
tion of a university official, news 
organizations reported Wednes- 
day. 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


THE COMMON FUND FOR COMMODITIES 

an international financial institution engaged in tiye financing 
of commodity development prefects on a worldwide basis, seeks: 

1) TREASURY OFFICER (P-4) 

Functions: Under the direct supervision of the Chief Finance Officer, the incumbent of the post will: - Collect 
and analyze financial data, in particular those related to currencies and interest rate movements; • prepare full 
analysis of the financial situation of banks with whom the Fund b dealing; • be responsible for cash management 
and cashier functions by controlling the various bank accounts of the Fund; - process payment following their 
appro* al by the Chief finance Officer. - prepare cash (low projections; - analyze investment proposals and make 
recommendations to the Chief Finance Officer on suitable investments; • invest tfae Fund's resources when 
appropriate; - organize and supervise the activities of the Treasury Section; - coordinate the collection and 
follow up uf subscriptions/contributions from Member States. Essential qualifications/ experience Advanced 
university degree in finance, banking, or equivalent professional qualifications. At least five years of professional 
experience in investment and cash management- Excellent English, both spoken and written. 

Remuneration f tax-free); US$45,271 pj. plus US$ 14,305 (variable post adjustment) - dependent rate 

US$42. 1 30 p a. plus US$ 13.304 (variable post adjustment) - single rate 
Deadline for applications: 21 March 1994 

2) ASSISTANT PROJECT OFFICER (P-3) 

Functions: Reporting directly to the Chief Operations Officer, the Incumbent of the post win be responsible for 
project works, including project monitoring, supervision and analysis. Specifically, he/she wOl be responsible for 
the review and evaluation of procurement, disbursements and accounts/audit procedures under projects, prepare 
regular project monitoring reports, organize project supervision and evaluation missions. Additionally, he/she will 
he required to undertake technical, economic and financial analysis of projects and carry out any other related 
duties as may be required Essential qualified ions/experience: Advanced degree in economics, agricultural 
economics or related fields; excellent English both spoken and written: at least 6 yean of relevant professional 
experience, preferably with international organizations. 

Knowledge of French and/or Spanish is desirable 

Remuneration (tax-free): US$38,014 p a plus I JS$ 12,0 12 (variable post adjustment) - dependent rate 

US$35,520 p.a. plus USS 1 1 .224 (variable post adjustment) - single rate 
Deadline for applications: 31 March 1994. 

* Other benefits of interaatioiul civil service, including relocation, rental subsidy, family allowance, education 
grant and medical insurance contribution. Both positions are offered on the basis of a two-year fixed-term 
contract with possibility of extension. 

* Applications in English accompanied by detailed curriculum vitae, including date nf birth and nationality, 
should he received not later than the dales indicated above and should be addressed to: 

The Managing Director - Common Fund for Commodities 
P-O. BOX 74056 - 1070 BR Amsterdam, The Netherlands 

1 Only candidates with Member States nationality will be considered. 

' Onfv candidates shortlisted for interview will be contacted. 


DEAN 

MANNES COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

The New School for Social Research invites applications and nominations for the position of 
Dean of the Mannes College of Music. 

Founded in 1 916 and located on the West Side of Manhattan, Mannes College of Music offers 
B.M., B.S., B.F.A., and M.M. degrees, as well as a diploma and post-graduate diploma. 
Mannes also offers a preparatory program for students 4 to 18 years of age and an extension 
program for both amateur and professional musicians, it enrolls 365 degree and diploma 
students in College-level programs. The preparatory and extension divisions enroll another 
950 students. 

In an age of mass education, Mannes maintains smalt classes and an intimate atmosphere that 
permits a dose and sustained contactamong students, faculty and administration. At the same 
time, as one of the six academic divisions of the New School, a university known for its deep 
commitment to the arts, Mannes gives its students access to a wide range of courses in the 
liberal arts. 

The Dean reports to the President of the University, works with the Provost and provides 
academic and administrative leadership to the College. Among the desired qualifications are 
eminence In the profession of music, commitment to conservatory training and the programs 
of the College, ability to contribute to the college's intellectual and artistic life, ability to 
represent the College externally and administrative ability. 

Applications and nominations should be sent by April 15, 1994 to: Jonathan F. Fanton, 
President, NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH, 66 West 12th Street New York, 
NY 10011. Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. 

NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH: The Mannes College of Music, Parsons School of 
Design, Eugene Lang College, The New School (Adult Division), Graduate Faculty of Political 
and Soda! Science, and Graduate School of Management and Urban Policy. 


unicef 



United Nations Children's Fund 

The United Nations Children’s Fund, with headquarters in New 
York and offices throughout the world, seeks qualified candidates 
for (he following positions: 

(a) SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR (P-5) 
(b) INTERNAL AUDITOR (P-4) 

New York, USA 

Responsible for reviewing and appraising all operations oi the 
Organization with the purpose nf advising management as (o (he econ- 
omy. efficiency and effectiveness or policies, practices and controls. 

Minimum qualifications: Advanced university degree in accountan- 
cy/business administration, economics or equivalent work experi- 
ence. Knowledge of modem audit technologies (Computer). At least 
eight to ten years progressively responsible experience at the national 
and international levels in financial, operational and management 
auditing work, preferably in commercial and non-profit organizations. 
Working experience in developing countries a definite asset. Fluency 
in English and French or Spanish or Arabic. Willingness to undertake 
extensive travel to developing countries. 

UNICEF. as part of the United Nations common system, oifm com- 
petitive international salaries, benefits and allowances. 

Please send detailed resume, in English, quoting reference (a) VN-EXT- 
940 1 or (b) VN- 93-054 to: Recruitment & Placement Section, 
UNICEF, 3 United Nations Plaza, IH-5F). New York, NY 10017, USA 

Qualified women are encouraged to apply. Applications for this posi- 
tion must be received by March 17, 1994. Acknowledgement will 
only be sent to short-listed candidates under serious consideration. 

UNICEF is a smokeFrce environment 


Thinking 
of changing ? 

A ND READY to act ? Like many other 
executives who have reached the higher echelons, you 
may well find that the career evolution methods you used 
earlier can no longer produce ihe result you seek today. 
Alain Forgeot tn Paris. Louis Dubois in Geneva, and 
their consultants have helped, for the past 10 years, more 
than 8000 top executives such as yourself enhance fheir 
career and, when appropriate, think, mount and conduct 
a sophisticated search or the hidden side of the interna- 
tional market. 

Telephone for a confidential exploratory meeting Wc will 
review your situation and explain if and how we can be 
helpful to you in achieving your particular goals. 


csn 


Forgeot, Weeks 


PERSONAL CAREER CONSULTANTS 

PARIS : 128. RUE DU F8G ST-HONORE - 75008 • TEL: (1) 45 63 35 15 
GENEVE : 9. ROUTE DES JEUNES - 1227 - TEL : 022 342 52 49 
ASSOCIATES OFFICES : LONDON - ZURICH - FRANKFURT 


International Fund for Agricultural Development 
(United Nations) (Rome, Italy) 

Seeks 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIER cp 4 ) 

Ideally (he candidate would be between 35-45 years, fluent in English 
and UaSan with additional language stalls in French, Spanish or Arabic; 
have a degree in Business Administration or equivalent; at least 7 years 
working experience In administrative work, preferably in an International 
organization. 

The successful candidate will carry out duties related to procurement, 
office and buikSng management, and related support services. A good 
knowledge oi procurement and contract procedures, building operations 
and the ability to use computer applications Is desirable. 

IFAD employs carxfrdales from its member stat 
50 different nationalities are I 
ability to work with people 
backgrounds. 

SALARY RANGE FROM: US542.103 lo USS59.031 per annum, plus 
post adjustment Irom U5S10.442 to US$14,640 per annum. 

INITIAL DURATION: 2 years ilxed-temi. 

ENTRY ON DUTY: as soon as poss*ie. 

Please send 2 copies of detailed curriculum vitae in English to: 

Personnel Division 
IFAD 
Via del Seraftco No. 107, 

00142 Rome, Italy 
Fax No, (6) 5043463 

Closing date for application: 24 March 1994 
Only shortlisted candidates will receive an acknowledgement 

APPLICATIONS ROM WOMEN CANDIDATES ARE PARTOULAnV ENCOURAGED 


s from its member stales, currently more than 
are employed. The canmdate must have the 
ople of different nationalities and cultural 





Sales Entrepreneur (Asia) 

Unique opportunity for action- minded, well organised and people 
oriented Top-Sales-Manager wiih proven management 
experience in Direct Selling. 

Your task: Consolidation and development of existing and wdl 
introduced Sal es-Organisa lion in Malaysia. Indonesia, 
Philippines. Hong Kong. Taiwan and Tokyo, with Head office 
in Singapore. 

Your partner: Mulii-Miilirm American Tumpem Company. 

Market-Leader. Compensation scheme and social stares reflects 
the particular importance of ibis management position. 

A ppltcunons are confidentially treated under 

Mr. H. Angennatui. Formel 3. Gartensuasse 21, D 33604 Bielefeld 1 


iniWWIuiaMUBaiwuagPBUuuuKJUuii ^ iiHLii 'M 'ium 


i£33S 


J 


EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 


HIST EKKUnHS GROUP. MC. 

rwrawwid E rapfaw u wit Sptoafirt 

For assBfonce in staffing pxr bams 
we sprncfce m the areas of- finm» 
Artwreng-MfrWwiewg. 
fanrat/Ekporr-Officc Gancd- Armed 
M75 Ni l 91ft Street, 5*rite 800 
Aventura. Rondo 33180 U5JL 
T* PM} 37131 13, Fat [305) W 5173 

EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AJTOBKYS-R/UKRfiri. GERMANY 
American Ca in Conran seeks 
arpj 1 leasing aftomey. Hwnt Geram. 
ter tag term feraorotv iob FAX 
format (212) 4659109 ISA. 


taiomfc 

AoJdbe 


US BANK l nOKBt 
based hi Ftto , a looking (or 
AN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 
i «s operonwi tears. Caddoe 
. be fluent n EngWi, Genrai and 
French, pawn a ptasert 
praon ta y aid wort wefi unde- 
prawn. A pcnM experience in the 
bankff^'tseumes industry would be an 
uummue . Rea* Mnd a hcraMtten 
cover letter. CY $ photo la Bo> 3519. 

I Carter, Frsmct 


IHT. 92521 


MAJWETMG EXECUTE 
KgMji memrted, 
rerarad by mrematond 
HOIRMANACEMDir SOfOa 
mated in Berta and Frans. 
Berne ftu ywr resume id- 
BEtangxtariane 5cHoe DonrnmiMe 
Fas +4?-33Q5M250t 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 
YOUNG H&KHLAOY 

WASHINGTON D.C 
GRADUATE 

2 years bureesj school, 

4 years Sdwol el Inti ServKfc 
Moor; Inf 1 refattons and 
Mddte Eastan 5hrfe. 

Minor: Sporah and 
Latin Ame n oan Stuies. 
hrieclly fluert in Engbh, Spanish, 
Nefen and Arebe. 

Seeks postton in iWl to. «; the Fields of 
lures ond COmumosS- 
3 yrs experience* nemskip, ml everts 
and aeaatve poettan 
Free to travel. 


92521 


Eefrfy 8ai 3536. IHT. 

21 NeuJy Cede*. France 


EUROPEAN RSWSBffATWE 
HgNy eepenenced and succeafa 
American bera ra we* versed m 
European bras mtften. cultwes ad 
adorns seeks (facet assooetton or 
independent consJhng assignments 
fctatufi or long Ignst v»5h American or 
Ewopean firms from bases m Autfno 
and nodheast U.S. Background in fader- 
nettanol tel ec o m m tKatens. farting 
and finance. Herae col or Fax mams 
to 0G! -402222-9768 or WW869QM 


FASMON 10 USB) M NY exp**- 
encerf r devp/produd development, 
marketing, and dstrivtian seeks 
tries' eiwkewig w mj enn l pasrai 
wtfi/esiebbshed tetwn'KOwnn 

firm. Br4 
ra i 

EX-US5* MAMET BEQI7TYE, 28. 

uafc experience wth eafcrt raft 

seeks po stt o n n too or overseas as 

c eieiAart. finance manager, mvest- 

mert. trade, ratal dewt eemei u <md 

• - 43 76 W 78 


itntBNnonn tajjwrs. okpww 

nn. Ik-ingiEd Spansh/Engtsh. WJtag 
i voxel U 5l6-763-5?0r JSA. 


Progra m Officer 


Asia Programs 


\oxv York CUv 


EUSSMI 


Staff member for Tito Ford Foundation to coordinate and support 
the program activities of the foundations six field offices in Asia 
(Bangkok, Beijing, Dhaka, Jakarta. Manila, and New Delhi). 

Dudes include: assisting with program development, organizing 
regional reviews, recruiting program staff and providing 
backstopping sendees for those overseas offices, in addition, the 
Program Officer develops, monitors and evaluates grants made 
from New York in support of the Foundation's programs in the 
Asia region; maintains contact with the Asian studies community 
in the United States and elsewhere and performs such other 
duties as the Regional Director may assign. 

Qualifications include: 

• Knowledge of one or more of the major Asian countries or Sub- 
regions (preferably Southeast or South Asia) and proficiency in 
one of the Asian languages. 

• Five to ten years experience in one or more areas of current 
Foundation program interest (preferably Governance and Public 
Policy, Rights and Social Justice and/or Education and Culture). 

« Prior residence in Asia. 

• Advanced training in the social science. 

• Strong analytical, interpersonal, and communication skills. 

Interested ranriiHarp* should send a C.V. and brief writing sample 
for Position #616 to: Joan C. Carroll, Manager of Employment, 
Human Resource s. 

THE FORD FOUNDATION 

320 East 43rd Street , . 

New York, NY 10017 

The Rnl Fuddu hkn «a0 otthom reg ni rf lo DBF. ertor. rdlgln Minoal origin, agr, fnklrr. 
am t rtn uw PBHMl— lordtetafcy ™*fai" ««■ ""‘"yi " ti-T 


EU'trfrJI! KvnUtontr* of J I'lgWt prtxtuiw ./mi-*7iJ« mth ITf 
icrpH Jtl** frj>cJ “ i /'.I'V, U I IcjoHi i< -W.-.jj. i •*-«('•-,/ 
Pjra!r$ik 

Copyright Paralegal 


vr*?-**— »—v.. 


■ THE POSITION: -La'Ii'ii" Uk ren in twpvtcr wfrtjn 

mutters >uii’ j> eutiptruer juJ htipjtnut ouiu^ "mem... Uni'iuv 
hetvrru tie aptratmf hi Enmpt uud fUnz-up zitb ;bt L S jhJ other 
. (aHHtnes. (ref. I6II/FMF) 

Corporate and 
transaction Paralegal 

■ THE POSITION: Hiitnjwiui’ Allah* i-, /.vw file', nuthr fm-r ... 

rr\ mug stomLirJ farm tmurjcis nnJ agrttmnit' 1 l't dw«r> i jierww 
zil! lv j iq^il pawl of i nutacT for rjrmiis ;yi>np> intent the nw/.mv 
>ni,l ptS pnfitre ,fa :rwrnls for meeting, . f ref. 161 2/FS IF) 

■ THE CANDIDATES: Fur fvth fwitinns. ipKiqc Jegnt >*■ •> ;s»Wr^>/ 
iWllMfr « roftnrtJ. Minimum J fi wars u penru.e iu j legal 
en: iron men:, preferably rub a qooJ kwiafgy ufiopyn*ht and 
trademark mats J»r rhr first potiUan. ( J,nuh,lilc* mud hair ex, -client 
„ral jhJ urn ten , ounuiwii.nion shUs. Iv orgaiirzeJ. vif-stai irrs 
and te.nnpkiytn. KvasdtJgy aftliuhv and rcorj /> n*er*ieg »»/hr./rr 
/• hdff V. English' and finauy m another language it an UtltJBfagt. 

■ Please Vrtte m luihelle DMIGSE or Frederic FOL CtRD mehniPg 
a fitH auTk ultun mac. quoting the nh vjut iefrrem e. at HUBERT 
H.VF PAUdLECAL a rue Paul fLtndre- "Unix [•. \RJs .o- %,-nd a 
/’m on in 42..'ty.o9.n* 




i-sADeR MONDIAL OL' SSCRUTEM ENT 


losordi Fta (331) 43 I 


MARKETING AND SALES Eraattw. 
31, Genrai. bgaea wnh PHD m 

buiinen odmnofiofcon. teeb dvtt 
tagng w ranfl c mu l poartett. 6 ft tn 
iraiEBng and rates enpanraee m 
Fbcfory oJtxrmun mdieiry. Lcrn>- 
OOH. Franck Gennon Wil 

raecoJe rtw «rth rvhrmca to Mrs. 
Dtarich; mn\ 24 07 <4 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


NPL CARES OffORTUNffr 
We are an faVI P2ES5 & ADVBmSNG 
K&Ky seeking soles anufaioKn. 
you an, 

• Between 2& and 30 rears old 
■ Lm tart opperance. 

• be t Item comma ti ot Engfah. French 
and ta»«tedge of Stnh. 

• Dynane, ttrlrrarf, confidert. apfi 
mie, mdeptataitf, seflantattad. 

1 10 tfovd 10 month s a yra 
i ntenled 90fi «• dfiet art 
0M«r«L 

• No wpecera III utas necesarv 

The iob errab ccnfocfi on the hgheS 
tad al ova rhe world and a rword- 
ng uierf 

E you think you haw the drive and ae 
antakws enough to kAe ihe dnlenre. 
ue would Be you fa send us weir CV 
uyrhfr wnh a (eCmi ohatogiaph 
proofriy !w 

e/oNOA 

Mwquet de Cuba^ 21 

28&tfMA&B> 

StiMN 

UVBJN ASSISTANT Bout feLta. 
5orth ot Froete, for nntare vngh 
•own, stable, crim. Ungud Frwrfi/ 
fegkdi, <m drive, olfia wiri, aoeL 
tan upjuuMud (Hh. Kwl — i iri i 
*WBl. itu> Jove das, far immnfare 
eg gjr mert. call bom 9 am to ? nm 
« 314? 22 S2 93 a* lor Atari 


leader Francoii de fa 

K»MATION UNGUSnOUE 
t echo rhe 

RE5P0NSABLE 

PB3AGOGKXK 

BUNGUE ANGUUS/ HANCAS 

Theft 30-35 are Formation supereura. 
Kfeefle npenaa pWagoglgue 
Chrtone. otatwitfi, quotas 
refattortaete. ngueur M lens du seme* 
Minion: au ten du Apartemem 
(TAnglaa. owner une fajurpe de 30 
ETOteneufs. En cantaa permonert o»« 
nm dierts. etaborer de farmonoK 
sptc^raies Garattr par «abe oawn. 
none rojc a la quahte du servu 

Mera d odresser votre asiddcAire en 
prtqsoni ta rel I860 bur (a lettre ef Hr 


20-22 


Waope). 
22 rue Umu 


Aswriaes. 
Armand. ^315 Rom 


JOBOPRonuNme 
RtoOlAMMH ANALYST 

Mrunien of 3 yenrs eipenerve 
on Progress daubme 
Ftoqreu 7 btaufadge ijeriniijlf 
Pkw send yew 0/ 1 * 

MR. fflXAFSM AU 

P.OB 1267. 

Syodt M43I, 

Saudi Arabn 
fm 966-1^481234. 


mhto TRAINER REQUUS lor lanv 

*1 tor nym, massage, tennis. Kr<jwL 
or (faysaolheraoy, Rnita hours 
on nee ta travel Fraods'EngWi 
wskon. Monthly wages SrtH rv + 
Phwo to. Bui 348(riJlT. 63 Lm- 
Aao. Iwidw. WC2 9JH 


USA GLOBAL UNK needs 30 tav 
people for enpoiBon of col too 
phonu lervica lowesl s»orb-i«de 
raws) UK-USA 5029 mnute. BrahL 
USA SJ.60 nwtme. AusrafiolBA 
S034. fib. Moms Phone/ Fa» USA 
575^721847, 

GENERAL POS3T10NS ” 
WANTED 


) rears i 

fluent vi Enofcsh and Cwiu 
knpwtedge at Fiends and ! 
wdqsendei e and fled 
■epresentoiive, enjoys traveAng. 
seeks pasrtan as □ 

COMPANION 
PERSONAL ASSISTANT 
AIL40UN» 

No mrtser where you re bawd, 
oanudei aOsewui offers. 
Eeterences avdldta. (hnuiq-liceflw. 
Gpher 44-134 057 Pobhok*. 

to. Bcu, 0+8021 2*3 idL 


SWISS GENTLEMAN [43.1 
eeria Hnernsnng pasman <n ihe 
Tourist Trade, HoM-8urinM*. Airfare 
or cb Privafa-AnWanU Secretary 
le ntadda fenuty. 

12 yeas eipenence in Icjnsn 
8 rears as PA UuMnavrt 
(Enofah, French, German TiafcxL 
Ratable and risaeei. bcefieni 
references. Cittaed and ipdeswxfanf. 
Wdef/ havefisd wnh strong pevsnofay 
Good orgarrar. 

Cot* refaxitte «mo free ic tiaveL 
Please send Fo» i* + 41 93 35 69 62 


YOUNG, DYNAMIC PSOfESStONAL 
(Amencon fenxta 28) sects chdleng- 
mg w temoiional pastton wnh growifi 
poterttal >n Europe, baed in Zurich 
Shong anrtytical mifaral hodtyound 
•nth rKKagemeM eipenence ana Fla* 
fc» aratn/ty and preseniafiOA Open 
fa (A serious mounts. Tefc +41-1-361 
12 34 ^ 


YOUNG LADY, BIUNGUAL French.' 
Engfab, some Italian, SC business 
English certificate, e*per«nced. «i 
tamslaling X teadtag. seeks serious 
pasnan as anvrte tutor c * general 
awflonf. Abfe to ralocare. Can drive. 
type 8. vA. Tel Fima 133) *>334 bW 
GERMAN WOMAN, flueni En^sh. 
French, hofion. Spanish, riper weed m 
mil ®hst ‘productusn nvnagemenl. 
oegnTOOticii PR u seeking pernyyicnl 
cktar^in^pasi*4)n Fc» France (33! 

AMERICAN*’ FRENCH LADY 2 no 
honakhes. xirid i^.elei -nh en- 
donee m France & USA. espeneneed 
•n buwiess and sales seeks 


Newly 


L Seph- Ba» 3542. iHt. F-^2521 
ly Ceoe>. France. 


TRILINGUAL P.A.. English French- 
Geimcm. same Spot*!* outstanding 
sUb. iwl e^penence. 


arranirahonii 
seeks new d» 
facabon. tek Fans 


povhon. Any 
146 t a X 21 


YANG LADY, ftuen) Russov. Elfish. 
Indonesian, sales & 'lanslabon 
wpenence seeks permanent pwoon. 

TeL UK 8' 420 70ft 

UDUNGUAL WOMAN. F.enc*vEngfr-> 
German. 31. seria rmptoymert timed 
« Far* bceflem pesertat«n. bet** 
mrtmated Tel: Pons [1| 4Q 62 ^1 *S 
AMERICAN, 37 viBA-Engmeenag 
Mcyyjfactonng -r consnwiian e«pe 
raice; seeks position long t> she* t. m 
Europejtaben BtJou 40»17&ZMS US 
EXFBOWCHI EXECUTIVE P.A. young 
lady. 20 ywas m Fas. goes bee 
lance as PA *rth nvfindiiai-’inrl 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

QUAUFtH) SECRETARY. English 
mrther longue wotad by l«1 Also- 
oation tor a temporary 6 month poo 
non Poena ApriL Good educational 
bocbyoyiw, fluent in French, tinned 
wuh Wod Procesnna Retparattie 4 
doarafied wok Bale area. "era. 
Send handwritten oppfaxtton & QJ 
wPh sdoty leqarements t* Ec> 3ST*. 
lri T. 9252) Newly Cedo, France. 
CEO'S SECRETARY fe. Hot wee branch 
of US urDvertfy- prraam. English 
rraher tongue. Ihient Tta&an wurteyi 
and spoken. e«tefleni office ■**. MS- 
DOS windows Werences lecwred. 
Resume to fan. (39 55] 48671) 
SECRETARY WANTS ton l6ih Lois 
Of fypnq 8 hard -ori. Engfcsh moth*- 
torra*. Val office. Good solary. 6a> 
35CIHT. F-92521 Newly Cede* 

SECRETARIES AVAllABLE 

YOUR RU S S IAN secretory n UK 
Ycmna orelfy. lefaaUe 




EDUCATIONAL 
PQsmoMS available 

LANGUAGE SCHOOL in PARK 

weoefaed m Engfah far Fiofesuonais 
x^l ^D TE Adig fa quaifieoshrff 
CW aptotna or (qiwolent f*Mnence. 

■ Huert written & spatan French 

■ RnowWge toe market & busmess 
Comes 

CV & handwritten fane m Bcu 3523 . 
LH.T.. 92521 Newly Cedes, France 

MW^JA urgently seeks espenenced 
guofihed AmerwavEngW! totxherr fa 
Boasy -t- Pons. CcljT) 47 42 Q3 78. 

EXPERIENCED NATIVE OtGUSH 

TW>0 vrth Frendi mtangkiy nil 

Jjgwon in Pont at (lj 69 a 18 18. 

EDUCATIONAI. 

POSITIONS WANTED 

Busi ness School Executiva 

wong poafire as General Mo naget. 
Oeector Cr Partner to *1 no 4 mn 
lenguege icboals. translation 
mitt piesjion centers, vntad idncis 
wfawide. Speoal trtarasi fa Bum & 
eastern Europe I hove S yean 
_en*U»ng schools m U S., 
hwoda. 6ra» S Japan, Ruert m 
tngklh. ton*. Raaaan. Itofayi i 
Spanish. Have U5 & French attzen- 
*«p4 fax. WR. Comes. France 33 93 
38 tQ *0 


PARK. Speuatsed in 

fiw«ss Ercfah. Dual. 
[f4neh (Cunenily 
Tjnsenptemert Sups 
ootfiiiooij/ mtmet-,* 
teoehuig potmen Cor 
tofjfl]4«37 52 12 

















** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 






Pag* 5 


deadline, he . 

other ay , ‘ uki ill*.. 

Hanzn'i^'!' K-n-. 
Pro-apariheid -Jr ?< 
Tuesday ri ^ fu.,;,;- 

W “F^4r, 

weekend. 

'“ :c i 


NATO Will Keep Up the Pressure in Bosnian Airspace 

BV RlClf Afl-inc/in MT 


Another Kr-.- ■ ' ^ ■ 

tutor. Ro-,,: L r’; T ;p'i ut ' 
P&utr.aiMkj;^ V :c "f 


•‘fc. 

H 


pbllthut»n j; ; . L ••'•'] it. 

that -Bull ,' J ^ 

«une hope ... ' 
martins v» > » h ' v r V. 11 ^ r 15 ‘i' : * 

har.nevMir- P 'V.. ' l, ’ r, --c:c 
Day «p.-;'co L " r - 
Crss’' Bl: 1 - 
that e-.c- :• IrW’ 

Woulc rocrt^ i . - 

the ».-{■.• i i 

autcr.oR!'. 1' !‘ J - •- 
our opu-.n- 


By Rick Atkinson ,, M v 

Mutommi ftaf Sftv, (f « 9° Monday, two U.S. Air Force F-16s 

NAPLES - The North Atlantic Tre.iv SX 8 . 1 !?" ° r , lhal NATO pres- 
Organization, baring its fangs after the firai trch f ?*L ®® snian Serbian Jas- 

combataction in ™ n„;,K,' alUC £ fi 5 t “° 3 ^ violating a 

■* •-* * — £ f o u vart^;°“ s ta m 

f the skies over Bosnia in the hone that ihe iwS .l. , . . , 

waning factions there will HnaUy be in- ' ■ e, ~ er ih<i skimusi succeeds » 

dnndated by the abpower above them. 

.. according to senior military officers. 

- v NATO aircraft have nearly doubled the 
daily sorties flown over Bosnia since the 
alliance demanded last month ibai Bosni- 
an Serbs besieging Sarajevo either neutral- 


'11:1V 


.K 


. „ , — . in cow- 

ing the Serbs remains to be seen, officials 
here acknowledged. 

Otherwise, NATO officers maintained a 
studied nonchalance regarding Monday's 
action, evidently to avoid highlighting the 
escalation of U.S. military action and in 
be their ennx or fare ™ ,7” deference to UN desires that NATO avoid 

The average number of flights bv NATO 
warplanes has increased from 30 to 40 
sorties a day to between 60 and 70 and 


. ’h. 
/’Hr 

i 1 ■'* 


those higher numbers are likely to remain 
m effect as part of whai one officer called 
an “adjusr-up phase” of the operation. 


people Monday morn- 
ing.” one NATO officer said. “That's whai 
it comes down to. We regard this as a 
closed case from our standpoint. We don't 
even really care who the pilots of those 


into tactics and motivations of the Bosnian 
Serbs, military officers spent the day por- 
ing over AW ACS computer tapes, pilot 
reports and F-I6 gun camera footage in an 
effort to reconstruct the episode. Although 
the Jastrebs took off from the airfield at 
Banja Luka, a Bosnian Serbian stronghold 
in northwestern Bosnia, intelligence offi- 
cers believe they may originally have come 
from an airfield in Croatia's Serb-held 
Krajina region. 

Detected by an AW ACS aircraft flying 
over Hungary, the six Jastrebs flew south 
at 280 knots shortly after dawn, following a 
riverbed at low level en route to a muni- 
tions plant controlled by the Muslim-led 
Bosnian government. 

The planes failed to respond to radio 
warnings to land, first from the AW ACS, 
then from the F-16 interceptors, although 


China May Abolish 

>y NATO rules of engagement, al- Force’s 510th Fighter Squadron in Aviano. A ffl "fi— T\£ QQl dl /)T| T /» f 1 
Ute Jastrebs tune to execute their “Mavheif ih«.- inn ta!r*a nAtchnr it ennw. / I I v B WVV WvM/f %/%/ 

U.S. Aides Believe 


lowed Ute Jastrebs time to execute their 
bombing run, one officer said. 

NATO officials also reported that a 
team of UN monitoring officers based 
about 20 miles from Banja Luka were pre- 
vented from gening to the Serbian airfield 
cm Monday because their vehicles had bran 
stolen. Officials here suggested that the 
theft might have been intended to ensure 
that any departing and returning planes 
remained unobserved by the monitors. 

Pilots at the NATO air base in Aviano, 
Italy, acknowledged concern that their air- 
craft might be targets for retaliation by 
surfaco-to-air missiles or other ground 
weapons. 

“There’s a feeling that we’ve taken the 
activity one step beyond where it's been 


'Maybe if they can take a potshot at some- 
body, they might give h a try." 

Asked about the hundreds of reported 
violations of the no-fly edict that have 
occurred over Bosnia since Operation 
Deny Flight took effect last April a NATO 
officer in Naples said that virtually all of 
those flights had involved helicopters, pri- 
marily Hips and Gazelles. AH three war- 
ring factions have used helicopters for 
medical evacuation, passenger transport 
and, occasionally, for mili tary purposes. 

■ Russia Read? for NATO link 

Russia has told’ NATO that it will join 
the Partnership for Peace plan for close- 
military links with the allian ce, Reuters 
reported from Brussels, quoting NATO 
sources. 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

Nan York Times Service 

BEIJING — American officials 
believe that China’s leaders are 
considering abolishing the law by 
which they put most political pris- 
oners in jafl, a U.S. official here 
said. 

The official, describing the re- 
sults of a fivetday visit by the State 
Department's assistant secretary 


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ihey got shot down. ... Serbian pilots may not have been tuned to might do the same thing.” said Lieutenant join soon.” a source <32. “We are very ! dSm 

Nevertheless, hoping to glean insights the proper frequency. The warnings, die- Colonel Dusty Rhoades, of the U.S. Air relieved.” He said no date had been set^ ^ d 



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Serb Leader 
Will Feel 
Heat Over 
Bosnia Pact 



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By David B. Ottaway 

Washington Post Service 

BELGRADE — Uie United 
States-brokered agreement be- 
tween Bosnian Muslims and Croats 
to form a single Bosnian entity in 
confederation with Croatia has 
placed the Serbian president, SIo- 
* bodan Milosevic, in a quandary 
about whai to do next in the in- 
creasingly high-stakes end game of 
the Bosnian peace process that now 
involves the United Slates and 
Russia, according to diplomats 
here. 

They said Mr. Milosevic could 
decide io form his own mirror-im- 
age confederation with the self- 
proclaimed Serbian republics in 
Bosnia and Croatia, or he could 
seek a larger arrangement with the 
Croatian president, Franjo Tudj- 
man, bringing in Croatia as well. 

“Milosevic h as got to declare his 
bottom line now,” said a diplomat, 
adding that he felt that the Serbian 
president still wanted to make 
some kind of overall deal with Mr. 
Tudjman over Bosnia. 

The initial official reaction here 
was one of extreme caution to the 
latest developments. The Tanjug 
press agency quoted Serbian diplo- 
mats as saying that it was undear 
what the proposed Croat-Muslim 
federation inside Bosnia, loosely 
linked in a confederation with Cro- 
atia, meant for Serbian interests. 

But the accord has already 
stirred up enormous controversy 
among Sabi an parties, with the 
leader of the opposition coalition. 
Vuk Draskovic, asserting it heralds 
“a new Yalta,” splitting Bosnia be- 
tween Russian and American 
spheres of influence. 

Diplomats said the proposal 
could trigger the “time bomb” of 
Serbian nationalism that Mr. Milo- 
sevic has been sitting on but has 
kept from exploding by not making 
any decisions on the nationalist 
question. 

The sources said the accord 
seemed certain to generate enor- 
mous pressure on Mr. Milosevic 
from Bosnian and Croatian Serbs 
to bold onto all the territories they 
now control, as weO as from his 
own nationalist Serbs. 

The various Serbian groups haw 
beat promoting a scheme to form 
an “association of Sab states,” ap- 
parently a euphemism for the 
much-heralded “greater Serbia” 
that oil Serbs say is their ultimate 
objective. 

The most delicate question now 
for Mr. Milosevic is what to do 
about the Croatian Serbs, who have 
established a self-proclaimed Kra- 
jina republic on the one-quarter of 
Croatian territoiy they occupy. 

The Croatian Sots risk finding 
themselves geographically sur- 
rounded and politically squeezed 
by the proposed new Croat-Mus- 
lim confederation, and are thus 
likely to be particularly anxious to 
wl: shelter inside a greater Serbia. 

Mr. Draskovic, an ardent Serbi- 
an nationalist despite his opposi- 
tion to Mr. Milosevic, predicted 
that Krajina would now definite- 
ly” be lost to Croatia. 

Diplomats and Sab observers 
here said it was far from certain 
that Mr. Milosevic, who has had a 
difficult time controlling the inde- 
pendent-minded Bosnian and Cro- 
atian Serbs, was anxious to take 
Krajina or the Bosnian Serb repub- 
lic into an all-Serb confederation 
under Belgrade's leadership. 



The Awaited Frcu 

A prototype of the magnetic levitation train, projected to travel at 420 kflometers per hour between Berlin and Hamburg. 


TRAIN: Magle v IsaTestof German Support for High Technology 


Continual from Pkge 1 
patent for a “floating train with wheel-less 
cars” in 1934. A prototype was tested at a 
Hamburg transportation fair in 1979. 

For the last 10 years, successive genera- 
tions of prototypes have been cruising a cir- 
cular track through isolated farmlands in 
search of approval 

That approval might never have come if it 
had not been for the intense soul-searching 
that accompanied Germany’s economic and 
psychological crisis after reunification in 
1990. 

Advocates of the project depicted it as an 
innocent victim of a stifling bureaucracy and 
an anti-technology social conspiracy that has 
let countless scientific innovations faD flat in 
Germany even as they prospered fCommer- 
rially abroad. 

Political and scientific critics have ques- 
tioned every aspect of its introduction, from 
the need for such a train, its noise impact and 
the effect on public health of its magnetic 
fields. Many critics, including members of 
the opposition Social Democratic Party that 


hopes to sweep into power in elections later 
this year, remained unconvinced even after 
the cabinet decision and threatened to block 
the project's final legislative approval in the 
upper house of parliament unless industry 
agreed to fit more of the bQL 

With an eye on the opposition, Mr. Wiss- 
mann said the remaining hurdles would be a 
test of whether Germany was a nation capa- 
ble of supporting high-technology or whether 
it would remain “a nation of doubters who 
endanger jobs by their tendency to always 
postpone derisions.” 

He noted that long ago, the Bavarian gov- 
ernment opposed the construction of the 
country’s first conventional rail line between 
Nfimberg and Furth. 

Traveling at 420 kilometers an hour, the 
Transrapid would make the Berlin-Hamburg 


said 


“It will mainly substitute short flights,” 
Wolfram Martmsen, chairman of Sie- 


trip, city center to city center, in less than an 
hour. Thai is “ 


mens Verkehrstechnik, the transportation di- 
vision of the German industrial giant that 
plans to build and operate the train together 
with Tbyssen Henschel Daimler Benz Indus- 
trie AG, the German federal railways and 
Deutsche Lufthansa AG, (he 31 percent 
state-owned airline. 

■ The initial investment wiH cost private in- 
dustry 3 3 billion DM. The government is to 
pay 5.6 billion DM in land-nghts acquisition 
and construction costs for the magnetic track. 

Teams in Japan and the United States are 
also trying to develop magnetic levitation 
technology independently, but are several 
years behind the Germans, who hope 
Wednesday's decision will help give the coun- 
try’s industry a much-needed competitive 


far faster than by automobile, 
conventional rail or airplane (when airport 
access is factored in). The project also calls 
for service to the Eastern German city of 
Schwerin. 


The train's shell wraps around the track 
like a hand poised to pick up a table. It 
levitates and accelerates by means of electro- 
magnets. 



Hails Deal 
To Expand 
EU’s Ranks 


bating whether to drop “counter- 
revolution" as a crime and estab- 
lish new laws that would be 
directed at prohibiting specific acts 
that endanger national security or 
public order. 

During four decades of Commu- 
nist rule, counterrevohiiion has 
been defined broadly in locking up 
people who criticized or challenged 


party authority. 


BOSNIA: Muslim-Croot Accord HEALTH: Worries Are Growing 


Reuters 

BONN — Germany, the largest 
contributor to the European 
Union, on Wednesday hailed the 
successful negotiations this week to 
admit three new members as a his- 
toric step toward a new post-Cold 
War Europe. 

Hopes for Iowa payments to the 
Brussels budget were mixed with a 
vision of brightened security for 
the Continent in the enthusiastic 
German reaction to the agreements 
with the traditionally neutral car 
tiotzs of Austria, Finland and Swe- 
den. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl praised 
the move as “a great event in Euro- 
pean history" and stressed its bene- 
fits for Germany, according to his 
spokesman, Dieter Vogel- 

Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkeh 
who led Germany's delegation at 
the negotiations in Brussels, said he 
was confident that talks on Nor- 
way’s entry into the Union could be 
successfully concluded by the be- 
ginning of next week. 

“Negotiations on the remaining 
problems with the Norwegian fish- 
eries wih continue, and I assume 
that a solution will be found by the 
start of next week,” he said. 

A German diplomat said Bonn, 
which contributes 28 percent of the 
EU budget, had a vital interest in 
seeing more contributors join the 
12-member group. 

He added that he expected Nor- 
way to find a way to join eventual- 
ly. The diplomat said Bonn was 
similarly interested in expanding 
the European Union's stability to 
East European nations. 

With criticism of Europe mount- 
ing on the far right in this German 
election year, politicians here have 
stressed the advantage of having 
more contributors in the bloc. 

Edmund Stoiber. the Bavarian 
state premia whose electorate is 
highly skeptical of European inte- 
gration, welcomed the accords and 
said be hoped Bonn's EU payments 
would fall. 


luman rights groups have long 
advocated such a legal revision as a 
first step toward reform. Enact- 
ment could facilitate the release of 
many of the more than 3,200 politi- 
cal prisoners the Ministry or Justice 
said it was holding last year. 

The US. official could not deter- 
mine whether such legislation was 
being readied for the upcoming ses- 
sion of the National People’s Con- 
gress, but he cited the debate as a 
strong indication that there is a 
new human rights dialogue under 
way within the Chinese leadership. 

In a news conference Wednes- 
day, Mr. Shattuck said China must 
still meet the “overall significant 
progress” in human rights by June 
or lace the loss of its low tariff 
trading privileges In the American 
market. 

“1 think there has been some 
progress, and more is needed,” he 
said. 

But his description of broader 
and deeper discussions with 
lese leaders was decidedly up- 
beat. He said all of the key de- 


mands in Mr. Clinton's May 1993 
executive order cm human rights in 
China are “under discussion and 
under consideration.” 

“1 did not come here to provide a 
scorecard or to otherwise assess a 
particular aspect of progress.” he 
said. “The need for overall, signifi- 
cant progress and a steady direc- 
tion forward on the human rights 
front is what is meant by President 
Clinton's executive order.” 

Preparing the way for a visit next 
week by Secretary of State Warren 
M. Christopher, Mr. Shattuck con- 
firmed that the State Department 
has received a “rough" accounting 
of a list of 235 political prisoners 
first presented to the Chinese Iasi 

October. 

An American official raid it was 
possible to conclude from this ac- 
counting that China has released 60 
of the political prisoners whose 
names were on the list Iasi fall 

In the news conference. Mr. 
Shattuck implied that Chinese and 
American officials were close to an 
agreement that would end the jam- 
ming of Voice of America broad- 
casts into C hina and Lhat such an 
agreement on allocation of the air- 
waves could be signed when Mr. 
Christopher arrives. 

Responding to criticism lhat 
Washington has Tailed to deariv 
define what it means by progress. 
Mr. Shattuck said the Chinese now 
have “a very dear understanding of 
whai precisely is meant” by pro- 
gress in each of the human rights 
categories listed in the president's 
executive order. 

Chinese leaders were said to be 
considering an end to the jamming 
of foreign news broadcasts, tight- 
ening controls on the use of the 
death penalty, making a specific 
commitment to open Chinese pris- 
ons to inspection, and protecting 
freedom oi choice in health pro- 
grams where abortion is recom- 
mended. 


U.K. Admits Linking 
Malaysian Aid to Arms 


Continued from Page I 

earlier peace negotiations. The ac- 
cord fulfills a longtime American 
goal of simplifying the Bosnian 
quandary by isolating the Serbs as 
i he main villain and holdout. If the 
European Union and Russia sup- 
port the arrangement, the Bosnian 
Serbs and their patron Serbia 
would be left as odd players out. 

Peace negotiations among all 
three Bosnian factions are sched- 
uled to resume this month. Al those 
talks, the Serbs will be asked by 
mediators to surrender some con- 
quered territory to the Muslims. 

Any conquered territory not sur- 
rendered by the Serbs would be 
considered in a kind of internation- 
al limbo, still officially regarded as 
part of Bosnia. The objective of 
American and Bosnian negotiators 
is to preclude Serbia's annexation 
of Serbian- held parts of Bosnia, in 
the hope that someday the Bosnian 
Serbs will join the Muslims and 
Croats under the Bosnian flag. 

In addition to uniting Bosnia’s 
Muslims and Croats in a single 
state, the deal reached Tuesday 


would commit this rump republic 
i confederation 


of Bosnia to join in a 


ilOIl 

with neighboring Croatia. The 


5 ia tes would remain independent 
but cooperate militarily and eco- 
nomically. Bosnia and Croatia 
would then expect the United Na- 
tions to lift the embargo on aims 
sales to them, diplomatic sources 
said. 


1 ' 


m OUR REAP ERS IN FRANCE 

f t i 5 never been easier to subscribe 
and save with our newtons*™*- 

Just call us today at 05 437 43/. 


Confederation is regarded as a 
kind of glue for the deal because, 
under the accord. Croatia would 
give up claims to territory in Bos- 
nia. 

Officials of the Muslim-led Bos- 
nian government regard a Croat- 
Muslrm union as a necessary first 
step and a palliative for losing terri- 
tory to the Serbs. 

. In the two-chamber parliament 
that would be established under the 
accord, one chamber would be 
elected on the basis of one-dtizen, 
one-vote. Seals m the other would 
be divided among ethnic groups. 
The president, chosen by the upper 
chamber, would choose the prime 
minis ter, who would have to come 
from the other ethnic group. 

Administratively, the country 
would be split into cantons based 
on ethnic makeup, economic po- 
tential and other factors. Some of 
the cantons would be ethnically 
mixed, said Mohammed Sacirbey, 
Bosnia's delegate to the United Na- 
tions. 

The status of the Bosnian capi- 
tal, Sarajevo, which is now split 
militarily between the Muslims and 
Serbs, is still at issue and will have 
to be worked out in lata negotia- 
tions. Mr. Sacirbey said. 

■ Reaction From Karadbric 

Radovan Karadzic, leader of the 
Bosnian Sabs, criticized the Unit- 
ed States on Wednesday for its role 
in brokering the accord, but 
slopped short of condemning the 
deal, Reuters reported from Mos- 
cow. 

“Wecan welcome this agreement 
only if it is not aimed against 
Sabs,” Mr. Karadzic said after 
talks with Russian officials. 


Continued from Page 1 


questioning of these Ohio voters. 
That “every! 


‘everybody is proposing their 
own veisioa of the plan means that 
it’s needed,” said Del Caldwell, 40. 
a training coordmalor. “We know 
that That much has been accom- 
plished.” 

In the poll, large majorities also 
endorsed the requirement that all 
employers provide health insur- 
ance for their workers, full-time or 
part-time, a major feature of the 
Clin ton plan. They also favored 
measures akin to his for controlling 
medical costs and charging higher 
premiums for health plans that 
guarantee a choice of doctors. 

But despite these areas of agree- 
ment, the impressions people had 
of the plan were increasingly nega- 
tive. For example, the ratio saying 
the Clinton plan was better than 
the present system, not worse, de- 
clined from 4-to- ! last September 
to 3-io-2 today. 

said^ theu^own fami^would be 
worse off under the Clinton plan. 
By 51 percent U> 44 percent, they 
said the more they heard about the 
Clinton plan, the less they liked it. 

Given this, it is no surprise then 
that for the first time since the plan 


39 percent to 32 percent margin, 
they said (he ads made them less 
likely to support the proposal. 

The most notable shift from last 
October was Ihe jump from 64 per- 
cent to 80 percem in those wlro said 
a big concern was the fear that the 
quality of their own medical care 
would decline. 


He added, however, that the 
larger pool of EU payments 
“should not be used to boost exist- 
ing programs like the cohesion 
fund or to start new programs.” 

“Austria will be an important 
ally for Bavaria against centralism 
and Eurobureaucracy in the EU,” 
he said. 


By John Damton 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — A huge aid project 
to construct a hydroelectric dam in 
Malaysia has turned into a source 
of grief for the British government, 
leading to a trade boycott from 
Kuala Lumpur and a costly politi- 
cal dispute at home. 

The dispute centers on S346 mil- 
lion in aid — the largest single 
project in the current aid budget — 
that was pledged by the Thatcher 
government in 1989 to construct a 
dam across the Peigau River. 

At the time, the arrangement was 
viewed as part of an ati-out effort, 
including personal negotiations by 
Margaret Thatcher, to end the dis- 
criminatory trade practices im- 
posed by Prime Minister Mahathir 
bin Mohamad shortly after be 
gamed power in 1981. He had pro- 
claimed a policy of “Buy British 
Last” in protest against higher fees 
for Malaysian students in Britain. 

The aid contribution went ahead 
despite repeats from civil service 
experts that the project was too 
costly and that the alternative of 
using gas turbines to generate elec- 
tricity would be more viable. 


Now evidence is emerging to 
suggest that the aid program was 
tied to arms purchases. Malaysia 
has bought British-made frigates 
and Hawk fighter aircraft in a deal 
worth about £1 billion (51.3 bil- 
lion). Until Wednesday, British of- 
ficials have denied that the aid was 
a “sweetener” to win the arms con- 
tracts for British companies. 


In a grueling three hours of testi- 
mony before a parliamentary com- 
mittee on Wednesday, however. 
Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd 
conceded that the aid bad been 


linked to the arms sale, although he 
three- 


said this was true only for a 
month period in 1988'. 


■ Major Accuses Malaysia 
Prime Minister John Major ac- 
cused Malaysia of overreacting by 
banning British companies from 
government contracts, Reuters re- 
ported from London. 


“I don't believe what the Malay- 
sian government has done to Brit- 
ish companies is remotely justi- 
fied ” Mr. Major said on the BBC. 
“1 believe it is short-sighted to have 
acted as they have done.” 


CROSSWORD 


.© New York Times Edited by WiU Shorn. 


ACROSS 

i Honeydew kin 
TFameriess 
tetiow 

*i Crow's feat? 

14 Slurred aver a 
syllable 

is Ring happening 
ib Part ola Hick? 
it College study 
1*157 30‘ 


30 Gerund maker 

21 it's sold in bars 

22 Wrangle 

39 Screech, tor 
one 

25 BU lor Fermi 

2 * Stories 
connector 

27 Bring in the 
crops 

29 In an evil way 

31 Stealthily 


Solution to Puzzle of March 2 


was introduced, a narrow 51 per- 
I Con- 


cent majority said they hoped i 
gross would either make major 
changes in the Clinton plan or not 
pass any of iL 

Pan of the difficulty the plan is 
having may be attributable to the 
advertising camp ai g ns mounted 
against ii by insurance, health care 
and other groups. Almost three out 
of five of those polled said they had 
seat or heard ads on the plan. By a 



S3 Rying Petar 

34 Carry 

35 Type of tiger 

38 Religious sch. 

39 Reflected on 
«i Abandoned 
45 Penny or Loo 

48 See eye to eye 
47 Hertz alternative 
4* Lose (lo) 

49 Way out 

bo Slow down from 
a run 

51 Start of me St. 
tves riddle 

53 Fleur-de 

54 Trtrudad and 
Tobago's 
capital 

58 Exaggerator's 
suffix 

59 Philharmonic 
instrument 

80 Monopoly card 
8f Hog haven 
82 Obscene 
63 Perfumed, in a 
way 


3 Ssspeak like 


DOWN 


1 ArtmaBon frame 

2 Thrina in 
Manila” victor 


4 Arabian Sea 
gulf 

5 Glacier Bay 
sight 

8 Orthodontist's 
org. 

7 Seafood order 
a Scale opening 

8 Jam ingredient 

10 Short range? 

11 One ol the Magi 

12 Lambaste 

13 Light rowboat 
is Skin softener 

22 Baseball's Old 
Professor 

23 El Dorado 
treasure 

24 Travel 

25" Goes By' 

28 KlOSk 
28 Piece of eight 
30 Loses one's 
balance? 

32 Annapolis 
freshman 

35 Mackerellike 
fsh 

36 Spirited steeds 

37 Letterman rival 

39 Swiveled ■ 

40 Drops in the 
mommg 



M By MdwtfSIlrarti 


41 SOUP 8 COOpS 

42 Self-centered 
sort 

43 Snowman of 
song 


44 Cultivating tool 
$0 Option tor 
Hamlet 


si “Ofl the Court' 
author 


52 Stretch over 

54 D.C. figure 

55 TV watchdog 

56 Rocks in a glass 

57 Actor Beatty 



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Page 6 


THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune 


RIBUSHQ) WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Rising Risks in Russia 


Not surprisingly, the rich democracies are 
dow putting some distance between them- 
selves and to cause of economic reform in 
Russia. The release from prison of last fall's 
insurrectionary leaders has severely under- 
cut President Boris Yeltsin. It also undercuts 
the people, in Russia and abroad, who have 
been counting on him to fceqj his country on 
the reform track. The finance ministers of 
the big democracies, meeting last weekend in 
Germany, said coolly that they certainly 
hope Russia manages to stabilize its econo- 
my. If it does, they promised to provide more 
foreign aid. But they made it pretty clear that 
stabilization will have to come first, before 
the aid is delivered. 

For the first year and a half after the col- 
lapse or the Soviet Union, the West was am- 
bivalent on that point. There was much talk, 
at least, about using aid as an instrument to 
enable Russia to stabilize itself and pursue 
reform. That idea has faded as Western gov- 
ernments come to believe that outsiders will 
have little influence over the deep and power- 
ful political changes forming the new Russia. 

Stabilizing the economy would require the 
kind of decisions that only a strong and deter- 
mined government could make — mainly de- 
risions to cut the budget defiriL It in turn is 
responsible for the inflation rate, the most 
visible indicator of internal distress. Once 


again the Russian government promises to 
have its inflation rate down under 10 percent 
a month by the end of the year -—a consider- 
able feat, since it is now well over 20 percent a 
month. But rather than coming down, the 
budget deficit appears to be rising fast 

Conspicuously, the finance ministers 
gathered in Germany did not discuss new aid 
to Russia as they did a year ago. Instead the 
topic was the conditions for the aid promised 
last spring and not yet delivered because of 
the turmoil in Russia. But it is difficult to 
fault the finance ministers. Whatever possi- 
bilities there my have been last year, condi- 
tions in Russia today are not hospitable to 
the hope that Western money can turn the 
course of events. 

Mr. Yeltsin must now direct his attention to 
dealing with the men who led the previous 
parliament into armed rebellion against his 
government The severe drop in tiring condi- 
tions for many Russians and the the fear of an 
utterly unpredictable future are giving these 
.men a significant following. The danger now 
is that Russia's troubles wiU become circular. 
Inflation and widening poverty threaten to 
weaken and distract the Yeltsin government 
making it less capable or to kind of derisive 
leadership that could improve economic per- 
formance and attract foreign help. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


What of Eastern Bosnia? 


Even a month ago, it might not have hap- 
pened. But when NATO spotters caught six 
Serbian warplanes blatantly violating the 
United Nations ban on military flights over 
Bosnia on Monday, they acted U.S. F-16 
fighters pursued them, warned them, and 
when the warnings were ignored, shot four of 
the Serbian planes down. Technically, it was 
the first combat operation ever staged by the 
44-year-old NATO alliance. It will, if nothing 
else, add credibility to future NATO warnings. 

Finally enforcing the flight ban is thus a 
step forward. But it is a relatively modest one 
that could be taken without directly confront- 
ing the international and political complica- 
tions that stand in the way of more decisive 
solutions. The Serbs' advantage in the two- 
year-old fighting does not come from their air 
superiority, but from their overwhelming ad- 
vantage in tanks and heavy guns. 

This crucial difference has been reinforced 
by a perverse UN embargo on arms imports 
that in practice only affects one side — Bos- 
nia's legal government But Britain, France 
and Russia, all with UN vetoes, adamantly 
oppose modifying that embargo so that the 
Bosnians could defend themselves without 
outside involvement And Russia now scans 
intent on blocking any new United Nations 
authorizations for combat even limited ones, 
although it voiced no objection to Monday’s 
air shoot-down, which was based on previous- 
ly granted UN authority. 


The Clinton While House portrays Mon- 
day’s shoot-down as evidence that NATO has 
found the will to back its military threats. But 
this was an unusually easy miliiary problem 
and is not a useful guide to the more compli- 
cated challenges ahead. Even as the F-16s 
blasted their targets, new evidence was emerg- 
ing that Bosnian Sorb forces blatantly defied 
last month's NATO ultimatum on Sarajevo by 
concealing tanks. Those Serbian tanks, hidden 
within the Sarajevo “exclusion zone,” moved 
out this week to join the siege of two other 
government-held cities, Maglaj and Tuzla. 

Effective international policy continues to 
be thwarted by the competing interests of 
major European powers. With Britain, France 
and Russia effectively shielding the Sorbs, and 
the United States doing what it can on behalf 
of the Muslim-led government, the United 
States is now putting pressure on the third 
party to the struggle, the Croats, whose tradi- 
tional protector. Germany, finds it impolitic 
to stand up to the other powers. 

The latest U.S. peace initiative seeks to 
compensate the Bosnian government for some 
of its losses to the Serbs by territorial and 
political concessions from the Croats. That 
does little to ease the pressure oo the Serbian- 
surrounded dues rtf eastern Bosnia where a 
substantial portion of the Muslim population 
still lives, and thus offers scant hope of a 
stable, enforceable peace. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Steady Ahead to Peace 


From the Hebron-inflamed rage of Pales- 
tinians and from the surge of international 
sympathy for them, the hard-pressed Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization seeks support 
for altering the terms of its peace talks with 
Israel Instead of confining talks to the pre- 
viously agreed first-stage issues of Palestin- 
ian autonomy and Israeli withdrawal in 
Gaza and Jericho, the PLO wants to fold in 
second-stage demands for international se- 
curity guarantees for Palestinians through- 
out the occupied territories and for disman- 
tling of aD Jewish settlements. 

Chi the immediate and central consider- 
ation of Palestinian security, the idea of an 
international presence is an evident nonstart- 
er . The right alternative is to hold Israel to a 
viably improved occupation. 

The Hebron massacre brought to a broad 
public a reality well known to Palestinians: A 
good number of the settlers, with the complic- 
ity if not the partnership of the security ser- 
vices, have become a law unto themselves. 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Raimi has now begun a 
change of course by detaining, disarming and 
otherwise restricting suspect individuals. These 
steps are necessary but minimal. The groups 
that harbor Jewish terrorism must be restricted. 
The rights of West Bank and Gaza Palestinians 
most not be subordinated to the special status 


of Israeli settlers. Military and intdligenoe 
practices as a whole must be reviewed. 

But especially after Hebron, many Palestin- 
ians believe that such measures are palliatives 
and that they skirt the real problem, which is 
the very existence of the settlements. Perhaps 
it will come to dismantling, partial or com- 
prehensive; the mauei was already under 
intense debate — a debate now quickening 
—in Israel If withdrawal comes, however, it 
most be by the evolving consent of the two 
parties. It is one thing to expect Israeli occu- 
piers to enforce the law on Jewish as well as 
Palestinian terrorists. But there is no possi- 
ble way settlers could be removed without 
broad Israeli consent There is but one way 
to address this vital matter a political way 
including a dialogue among Israelis and a 
negotiation with Palestinians. 

The United States quickly said that the 
already-agreed rules for Israeli- Palestinian 
peace talks should not be changed. This was 
right It would be foolish to thrust a change of 
format on an Israeli government that is strug- 
gling in an unforgiving domestic context to 
learn from Hebron and to keep the peace talks 
afloat Within those first-stage talks lies an 
early and substantial opportunity to serve 
Palestinian as well as Israeli interests. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Britain and Malaysia 


, It was inevitable that Malayan should have 
reacted angrily to British newspaper allega- 
tions that there was something underhand 
about the deals involving the Pergau dam and 
and the purchase rtf British military equip- 
ment. The British Audit Office may have 
indeed concluded that the Pergau dam would 
not be an economic proposition and should 
not be built. Bat it is for Malaysians to deride. 
The British newspapers have their own politi- 
cal agenda: they want to bring down John 
Major and the Tory government. 

None of this would have bothered Malaysia 
except that in the process the British papers 


began to attack Prime Minister Mahathir bin 
Mohamad personally, without a shred of evi- 
dence. It was too much. But a shut-out of 
British firms from future government con- 
tracts is a very blunt instrument of retaliation 
indeed. It punishes the wrong people. More 
importantly, it dilutes the principles of free 
trade and competition. 

On his part Mr. Major should help to limit 
the damage 10 British industry. Of course, he 
has no control over the British press. He 
should, however, officially disassociate his 
government from these scurrilous reports. It 
may only be a simple symbolic act but it 
might help to break the impasse. 

— Business Times (Singapore). 



International Herald Tribune 

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OPINION 



Neutralise Arid-Peace Extremists 


1 05 ANGELES — It was aa 
/ American emigrant, Dr. Baruch 
Goldstein, who killed dozens of Pal- 
estinians and wounded scores more 
on Friday at the Tomb of the Ratri- 
archs in Hebron, where they had 
gathered to early moraing prayers. 
(Estimates of the death toll contin- 
ued to vary on Wednesday, ranging 
from 30 to 51) He was dehberalety 
trying to destroy not only petyle but 
the hope for an Arab- Israeli peace 
dial the United States has been try- 

1D ^hie latest round of negotiations, 
now endangered, was launched on 
the While House lawn with a hand- 
shake encouraged by a friendly 
nudge from President Bill Clinton. 

to pin down details so tbat^fcn^ 
troop withdrawals and Palestinian 
administration can actually begin in 
the designated areas has repeatedly 
bogged Sown. The predictable result 
was a loss of enthusiasm for the ac- 
cord among both Israelis and Pales- 
tinians, ana a stiffening resolve of 
extremists on both sides to make it 
impossible. These are people so in- 
ured and imbued with the spirit of 
war and hatred that they not only 
fear but hate the idea of peace. 

That is the background of the 
obscene, impious outrage of Hebron 
and its devastating implications. 

The agreement on principles be- 
tween Israeli Prime Minister Yitz- 
hak Rabin and PLO Chair man 
Yasser Arafat was an attempt to 
approach peace step by step, putting 
off the most difficult, contentious 
issues for several years in hopes that 
people would get used to the idea 
and then find compromise easier. 
But Dr. Goldstein has shown that 
the basic question cannot be evaded. 

The fact that he was American- 
born and American-educated is also 
an important part of the back- 
ground, a reminder of the critical 
role the United States and American 


By Flora Lewis 

Jewry have played in the develop- 
ment of Israel from the start. 

There has been a peculiar evolu- 
tion in American emigration to Isra- 
el. To the great disappointment of 
the founding prime minister. David 
Ben-Gurion, only a few American 
Jews chose to resettle and help to 
build the pioneer state, populated 


the Arab lands. But the Americans 
who did go at first were a special 
kind, often professionals with high 
technical denis, usually secular peo- 
ple who did a great deal to establish 
the advanced, modem basis for the 
raw new country. 

That changed after less than a 
generation. The existence of Israel 
gave American Jews a new source of 
pride and confidence, and helped 
them to overcome the prejudice and 
discrimination that they encoun- 
tered at home. There was a resur- 
gence in the American Jewish com- 
munity. It produced both a new 
kind of determination and a new 
kind of emigrant 

Rabbi Meir Kahane. from Brook- 
lyn, was an exemple. He founded 
the Jewish Defense League, a vigi- 
lante group that patrolled Jewish 
neighborhoods and aggressively pro- 
tected traditionally passive ortho- 
dox residents against harassment. 
He developed a philosophy of vio- 
lent militancy, and he went to Israel 
to put h into practice, founding the 
ultranationalist Kach party. 

Under Israel’s electoral system, 
which indulges splinter groups, be 
won a seat in the Knesset. I went to 
see him there one day, to see if he 
was really the rabid, belligerent ex- 
pansionist that his speeches reflect- 
ed. Just afterward, I had an appoint- 
ment with Shimon Feres, foreign 
minister then as now, and when I 
told him I had been talking with 


Rabbi Kahane, he asked in : 

“Why would you want to see 
He’s a mad fascist." 

With me, though. Rabbi Kahane 
had modulated his language. He 
knew how to use euphemisms like 
“transfer" to vril bis idea of forcibly 
driving aD the Arabs out of biblical 
Palestine and claiming it for “Great- 
er IsrariL” But the most chilling 
thing about him was that he spoke 
with an American establishment ac- 
cent, dressed in a conservative busi- 
ness suit (when many Knesset mem- 
bers wore short-sleeved sprat shirts 
and a few used orthodox garb). 
Nothing about his manner betrayed 
his fanaticism. It was all in his ideas. 

Eventually he was declared ineligi- 
ble to the Knesset because of his 
vicious hate-mongcring. He was mur- 
dered in 1990 tty an Arab after mak- 
ing a speech in New York. Devotees 
considered him a martyr, as fellow 
extremists have called Dr. Goldstein. 

Something about America sent a 
disproportionate number of such 
migrants to Israel not builders like 
then- predecessors but religiously ex- 
alted would-be conquerors. 

Although the massacre he perpe- 
trated is not condoned, a split is 
developing among American Jews 
over how to react to the kind of 
export that Dr. Goldstein represent- 
ed. The hard-Iineis say: “Put it in 
context Palestinians are killing 
Jews every day." This is a formula 
to ever more murders. 

It is as important for Israel now as 
outside support has been to its sur- 
vival in the past that Jews in Ameri- 
ca and in the rest of the world sup- 
peat the demand to punish Jewish as 
well as Palestinian terrorists, neu- 
tralize the extremists, and get on 
with the necessary compromise for 
peace. Mr. Rabin spoke of “foreign 
implants,” a reference to Dr. Gold- 
stem and his sympathizers abroad. 
They are IriQers of hope. 

© Flora Lewis. 


Acting Constructively in Bosnia Is in Russia’s National Interest 


By W illiam Pfaff 


P ARIS — NATO has bared its teeth and 
even taken a bite, if only a little one. This 
has opened the airport in besieged Tuzla. The 
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic an- 
nounced the opening only after what were de- 
scribed as extremely difficult discussions at the 
Russian Foreign Ministry. 

This conferring with the Russians alarms 
many in the West. Some interpret Russia's 
decision to send observers lo Tuzla — to assure 
the Serbs that (he airport will not be used for 
military purposes — as another sign that the 
Serbs are correct in claiming that Russia has all 
buiioined die war on Serbia’s side. 

The Serbs want to believe that a new Slavic 
alliance has been created that eventually will 
cause an iron curtain to desoend on a frontier of 
“race" and religion — a division between rivDi- 
zations. Only if there is a new cold war between 
the West and what both the Serbs and the 
Harvard political scientist Samuel Huntington 
identify as “Slavic Orthodox" civilization could 
Belgrade consolidate the “greater Serbia" it has 
conquered during the past two and a half years. 

Professor Huntington, the prophet of new 
world wars between civilizations, advances what 
seems to me an irresponsible and historically 
ignorant argument. But it certainty suits Dr. 
Karadzic, the Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic 


and the Russian nationalist Vladimir Zhiri- 
novsky, all of whom have insisted, with some 
relish, that NATO military intervention in Yugo- 
slavia would bring “the third world war." 

However, Russia’s government does not 
seem to agree. This fact is absolutely funda- 
mental to understanding the present situation. 

The Russian government endorsed NATO's 
decision on Monday to shoot down the Serbian 
aircraft that violated the United Nations “no- 
fly" zone. Russia's special envoy to Yugoslavia 
and deputy foreign minister, Vitali Churkin, 
said that it was those who sent planes into the 
zone who were responsible for what happened. 

He also said Russia wishes to join NATO’s 
“Partnership to Peace." He stated that Russia 
intends to play a responsible role in the Yugoslav 
affair — the' role, as he put it, “of a groat 
sovereign state." It is in Russia's interest to do so. 
It has nothing to gain from any other couise. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky may think that Moscow has 
something to gain from reopening the struggle 
with the West that it derisively lost in 1989, but 
serious people in Moscow know otherwise. More 
important, realities dictate otherwise. Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky is a fantasist as well as a fanatic. 


Russa's economy and industries still are in 
near-anarchical condition, incapable of sustain- 
ing a new straggle against to Western industrial 
world. Russia needs investment and constructive 
integration into world markets. It is unimagin- 
able that it could rebuild its industry in isolation, 
and amid hostility from the West, within any 
time frame relevant to c ur rent policy choices. 

In any case, what has Moscow to gain from a 
break with the West? What benefit lies in allying 
frith a Serbia dominated by nationalist-Cotnmu- 
nist dictatorship? What advantage in being ex- 
ploited by Yugoslavia's Milosevic and Karadzic 
in their own. game, which thus far has served 
simply to min their economies and societies? 

Obviously there are historical ties between 
Russia and Serbia, but Russia's advantage lies in 
brokering peace in Yugoslavia. This already has 
provided Moscow with a gratifying return to 
great power politics and has amounted to a 
useful nationalist affirmation as well: demon- 
strating to the West that Russia henceforth 
should be consulted in Balkan matters. 

Russia is reclaiming recognition as a major 
power — not as an outlaw power, but a respon- 
sible one. Moscow seeks the respect, not the 
enmity, of Washington and the European gov- 
ernments, with whom H must deal and upon 
whom, to a significant extent, it depends to its 


economic and industrial reconstruction. Russia 
wants membership in the Group of Seven, a 
place at the world’s top table, not sordid and 
open-ended Balkan mili tary adventures. 

The current issue of The World Today, the 
journal published by Britain’s Royal Institute of 
International Affairs, includes an important 
analysis of the evolution of Russian foreign poli- 
cy since 1989 by Ned Malcolm, former director 
of the institute's program on the Soviet successor 
slates. He quotes Wtnslon Churchill’s response 
to his own celebrated comment that Russia wasa 
“riddle wrapped in a mystery inride an enigma." 
Churchill went on to say: “But perhaps (here is a 
key. That key is Russian national interest." 

Russian national interest today, as Vi tali 
Churkin says, lies in (he constructive conduct 
expected of a great sovereign stale, earning for it 
the reject and cooperation <rf the community of 
industrial powers that today dominate interna- 
tional society. Russia is finding its feet again, as a 
“normal" power. This is a comphcaied matter, 
and there are serious internal stresses and real 
dangers. But the West does ho favor to Russia, 
nor to itself, by interpreting this search to re- 
establish legitimate national interests and na- 
tional identity as a prospective call to a war. 

International Herald Tribune. 

Lea Angeles Times Syndicate. 


If It’s Russia First in America, Await Second Thoughts in Europe 


I ONDON — To those who thought 
/ that after black night must come 
shining new day, the end of commu- 
nism has brought a thunderous dawn 
of unpleasant surprises. There has 
been the horror of ex- Yugoslavia: the 
rcsurrectioG of a surly nationalist Rus- 
sia; the discovery that turning Com- 
munist economic ruin into free market 
prosperity takes vastly more than a 
quick glance at a capitalist textbook. 

Now add another unpleasant sur- 
prise. The question of how to handle 
the new Russia threatens to open up a 
dangerous gap between America and 
its allies in democratic Europe. 

In recent weeks the CKnton admin- 
istration has moderated its earlier in- 
nocence about Russia. The complex- 
ities of de-communization have been 
more honestly admitted. The proposi- 
tion that Russia and America are nat- 
ural partners in the wold of the 1990s 
has had a shy question mark attached 
to iL Yet the Chnton people's underly- 
ing urge, thrir “Russia fust" instinct, is 
stffl tore. Europeans need to under- 
stand why Bffl Clinton's sort of Ameri- 
can feds this way, because the feeling 
can spell trouble to Europe. 

The basis of the Clintonhe ap- 


By Brian 

proach u> Russia is not just a belief 
that Boris Ydtrin is the best hope to a 
mac or less democratic Russa, and 
that such a Russia wiU be peaceful and 
friendly. It is still just about possible to 
believe those things. But the Clinton 
argument goes further. For the sort of 
American who wishes to limit the ef- 
fort that bis country expends abroad 
— because be wants to concentrate on 
things at borne — a Russia willing to 
cooperate with America has a special 
attraction, which can justify shutting 
American eyes lo the darker side or 
what Russia is and does. 

Russia is a big country that still 
carries a large stick and has a veto in 
the Security CoundL America would 
like Russia s help in dealing with the 
Moammar Gadhafis and Kim n 
Songs and Saddam Husseins, the far- 
flung troublemakers of the global 
scene. In return, it has in the past 
seven or eight months been extraordi- 
narily tolerant about Russia's behav- 
ior in its own neighborhood. 

America did not object when Russia 
used a civil war to renuplant to Rus- 
sian army on Georgian soil It quietly 


Beedham 

watched Russia invite Belarus into a 
new monetary union. It has accepted 
Mr. Yeltsin’s veto on letting to Poles, 
Czechs and Hungarians into NATO, 
and has so Tar put little muscle into the 
proposed alternative, those “partner- 
ships for peace." With barely a cough 
from Washington, Russia's new na- 
tionalists have expanded to defini- 
tion of their “near abroad" to indude 
not only the ex-Soviet Union but 
much of the ex-Warsaw Pact as welL 

It has not been put in so many 
words, but the implied bargain is 
plain. If you Russians are helpful 
about Iraq and North Korea and the 
rest, we Americans will not mind if 
you rebuild your own private zone of 
influence in the area around your 
borders. You have a permit to find 
out whether the Russian empire, so 
recently buried, can be exhumed. 

Europeans see things differently. 
They, too, have an interest in keeping 
the world's wild men under control, 
but it is not so direct as America’s. For 
roost people in Europe, Kim II Sung’s 
nuclear obfuscations and Saddam 
Hussein's twists and- rams still seem 


Read the Numbers About Handguns 


EW YORK — In 1992. hand- 
guns were used in the murders 
of 33 people in Britain. 36 in Swe- 
den, 97 in Switzerland. 128 in Can- 
ada, 13 in Australia, 60 in Japan 
and 13,220 in the United States. 

Those are the latest annual statis- 
tics available. They were released 
on Tuesday by Handgun Control 
Inc. and the Center to Prevent 
Handgun Violence. Here is some 
other information about guns and 
violence in America. 

In 1991, 38,317 people were 
killed by firearms in homicides, sui- 
cides and accidents. That is more 
than 100 people a day. 

A new handgun is produced ev- 
ery 20 seconds. Eveiy year more 
than 24,000 Americans are killed 
with handguns. An average of 14 
children and teenagers are killed 
with gens each day. 

President Bill Clinton, speaking 
in Chicago on Monday, said: “At 
the Cook County Hospital trauma 
unit, from 1987 to 1992, the number 
of admissions for gunshot wounds 
increased from 449 to 1,220 and 
accounted for 70 percent of the 
overall increase in admissions." 

Dr, Mindy Stalter, a pediatric 
surgeon at die University of Chica- 


By Bob Herbert 

go Medical Center, told to presi- 
dent she had treated “a child as 
young as cue month of age who 
received a single gunshot wound to 
the abdomen and died in to oper- 
ating room.” She added: “With 
children, since they don't have to 
same body mass as an adult — and 
we're seeing children being struck 
at dose range in classrooms — a 
simple gunshot wound can do sig- 
nificant damage and damag e multi- 
ple organ systems in thebody. It 
doesn't take a multiple gunshot 
wound to kill a child.” 

On Tuesday, a 9-year-old boy who 
had been out walking his dog in 
Hartford, Connecticut, came tome 
with a loaded Mac-11 submachine 
gun. “Look what I have," he said to 
his stunned father. He had found the 
gun lying next to a snowbank just a 
block from to local high school 

Fifty percent of to children who 
are shot accidentally are shot in their 
own homes; 38 percent in the homes 
of friends or rdlatires. An estimated 
12 minion latchkey children of eto 
mentary -school age have access to 
guns in their homes. 


The leading cause of death for 
both black and white teenage boys 

is gunshot wounds. 

RoseUa Gain b ini, 17, was mur- 
dered in Miami last month while on 
a date with her boyfriend They 
were traveling in his van when an 
angry motorist on to passenger 
side of to vehicle opened fire with 
a 9mm semiautomatic pistol. 

From 1985 to 1989, gun produc- 
tion in to United States increased 
by 42 percent. 

In BushneU, Florida, a first grad- 
er took a loaded handgun to school 
and threatened his teacher with it 

More than 1,000 people wore 
shot to death at work in 1992. 

In 1993, 72 police officers were 
shot to death. Last week, Los Ange- 
les Police Officer Christy Lynn 
Hamilton was shot to death by a 
teenager with an AR-15 semiauto- 
matic rifle: Officer Hamilton died 
just four days af ter her Police Acad- 
emy graduation exercises. The boy 
who killed her, Chris Golly, also 
killed his father and himself. 

The Brady law, requiring a five- 
day waiting period and background 
checks to handgun buyers, lode ef- 
fect on Monday, it won't be enough. 

The New York Times. 



rather remote. But Russia’s “near 
abroad" is Europe’s backyard. The 
Americans, on the other side of to 
Atlantic may think they can afford to 
be relaxed about what Russia gets up 
to in Lbese places. The Europeans, 
rigjhl next door, know they cannot 

Here arc to makings of a serious 
quarrel between Europe and America 
— maybe, if things go wrong, a part- 
ing of to ways. That parting be- 
comes likelier if you believe to other 
argument that some Clin ionites use 
for a Russia-first policy. 

The real usefulness of Russia, say 
these people, is not just to help it can 
give in relatively minor current dis- 
putes like those with North Korea 
and Iraq, it is Russia's value as a 
counterbalance to to Chinese super- 
power that is liable to bunt upon to 
world in the 2010s and 2020s. 

The implications are huge. If this is 
realty what the Clin ionites want Rus- 
sia for, they will not ask fussy ques- 
tions about whether it is a democracy 
or a dictatorship, or whether it treats 
its “near abroad" gently or brutally. 
Democratic Europe will be asked, m 
effect to nestle up to whatever sort of 
Russia events produce. And demo- 
cratic Europe noil not like tins. 

Whether the Russia-first idea 
stands or falls may be decided quite 
soon, perhaps in the next few weeks. 

The claim that the Russians have 
now staked in Bosnia is their most 
ambitious yet. because it carries them 
beyond to boundaries of to old 


Soviet empire. So far their interven- 
tion has been quite usefuL They have 
helped to get the Serbs' guns away 
from Sarajevo, accepted the shooting 
down of four raiding Serbian aircraft, 
and given their blessing to the relief 
of Tuzla. If this continues. Fine: the 
Russians will be helping NATO end 
to war the way NATO wants. 

But it is just as likely that these Fust 
gestures are (he preliminary to a Rus- 
sian policy of helping to Serbs resist 
the son of peace that NATO is seek- 
ing. If that is the Case, a line v® have 
been drawn. What Russia wants will 
be incompatible with what the demo- 
cracies want The Russia-fiisters will 
have to make their choice. 

If to Russians -in effect dictate the 
peace in Bosnia, h will be bard to 
p event them from dictating what 
happens farther north and east. Poles 
and Czechs and Hungarians will know 
that they can no longer hope for NA- 
TO's protection. The Caucasus will 
return to Russian control, right up to 
to border of Turkey. “Partnerships 
to peace” will be another phrase for 
the history books. 

A Russian empire will have risen 
from to grave. From Washington, 
this may look bearable. For Europe- 
ans. a return of Russian power — and 
who will be running Russia two years 
from now? — is a frightening pros- 
pect. The difference between to view 
from afar and to view close up is the 
sort of thing that can break alliances. 

International Herald Tribune. 


m OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Pope’s Message 

ROME — The Pope to-day [March 2] 
gave an audience to to Sacred Col- 
lege, who congratulated him on the 
double anniversary of his birth and 
his coronation. He delivered an allo- 
cation cat the necessity of the Church 
making its influence felt at a time 
when the ideas of honesty, justice, 
authority, liberty and society had 
been overturned. 

1919: NoHurdTerm 

WASHINGTON — President Wil- 
son is not going to seek a third term. 
At least, that is to impression he 
dearly gives to members of the Dem- 
ocratic National Committee. During 
a dinner at the White House on Fi> 
day [Feb. 28] evening, he told them he 
was looking forward to March 1920, 
when he could retire to private life 
and take up (he writing of his history. 
Committee members, during the con- 
ference, brought up the suggestion of 
Mr. Norman E. Mack, former Na- 


tional Chairman, that Mr. Wilson 
should be to party’s candidate in 
1920, The President's disc ussi on of 
the matter was not made with the 
utmost seriousness. 

1944: Fi ghting at Anri n 

ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Al- 
giers — [From our New York edi- 
tion:] In some of the fiercest fighting 
of to campaign in Italy. American 
noops on the Anzio beachhead have 
halted the third major attempt by the 
Germans to throw into the sea the 
Allied forces there. Thus far in the 
battle, which began Tuesday [Feb. 
28} at dawn, the Gormans have put in 
three divisions at a point about mid- 
way between Apriua and Cistema 
and nine miles from the ooasL At one 
juncture they broke through and ad- 
vanced about {1,500 yards. Bui 
counter-attacks regained two-thirds 
of the ground lost, and at noon on 
March 1, according to to latest offi- 
cial announcement, to Americans 
were still pressing back the Germans. 








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At Nuremberg-on-Potomac, 

A Chanting of f Jews, Jews’ 


By Richard Cohen 

W ASfflNGTON — Washington had refuses, Lhe i 

3 S ?re 2 abcrB ***& last week, not sit you 
in an event chjlmgiy evocative of the son chaplain sat 

flings himsd 
Thai then 

ace of about UMO people, at feast half of told lode- 
s' UnivOTil y- ard meeting 
Lest you thmk they were responding to al of certain 

the speaker of the evening Khahd Abdul to repudtat 
Munammad — a man so mad that even seems to mai 
Louis Farrakhan pretended shock — the han'sbigotr 
facts are otherwise. They were led in diation den 
re^wnsive anti-Semitism by a law sru* whites, espo 
dem named Malik Zulu Shabazz, a man Never mind 
we can only hope was bora too late for his morality his 
radcanmg: a pogrom. turning tow: 

“Who caught and killed Nat TuraeiT planatfon fo 

hedwutftitocrowcL The thing ihi 

Jews, most of the audience shouted, juvenile sen! 
“Who controls the Federal Reserve?” not so sad. i 
“Jews.” 


“Y ou’re not af raid to say it, are vou?~ 

“Jews, Jews.” 

“Who controls the media and Holly- 
wood?" 

“Jews." 

“Who has our entertainers, our ath- 
letes, in a vise grip?” 

“Jews.” 

“Am I lying?" 

“No." the crowd yelled. 

But in every instance, including the 
reference to Nat Turner, lying was what 
be was doing 

This account, taken from the notes of 
a Washington Post reporter. Rene San- 
chez, was hardly an isolated outburst. 
Other speakers made similar references. 
Mark Thompson, a leader in the effort 
to gain statehood for the District of 
Columbia, suggested that African- 
Americans junk “We Shall Overcome” 
and replace it with a new anthem: “We 
shall not sdl out to the Jews.” Yet an- 
other speaker, Henry Jacks on-Bey. said 
that Mr. Muhammad had exposed “the 
Euro-, Zionisl-supremadst conspiracy.” 

Howard University, federally funded 
and sometimes called the Harvard of the 
traditionally black colleges, clearly has a 
problem. The Post estimated that two- 
thirds of those in the audience that night 
were students. Howard's dean for stu- 
dent life, Raymond Archer, puts the 
figure ar fewer than half. I say, who 
cares? The fact re mains that several hun- 
dred students acted like extras in a Leni 
Reifenstahl movie. 

Moreover, the student government as- 
sociation that night donated $500 to Mr. 
Khalid — which is to say to the Nation 
of Islam, a white-hating Jew-hating 
gay-hating Catholic-hating group. It is 
son of the United Way of bigotry. 


refuses, the inquisitor says, “lr you will 
not at. you must stand.” To that, the 
chaplmn says, “I will not stand.” and. 
flings himself into his seal. 

That theme — 1 will not do what I am 
told to do — permeates both the How- 
ard meeting and, to a degree, the refus- 
al of certain African-American leaders 
to repudiate Mr. Farrakhan. What 
seems to matter most is not Mr. Farrak- 
han s bigotry but the venue of the repu- 
diation demand. If it comes from 
whites, especially Jews, it gets rejected. 
Never mind right and wrong Forget 
morality, history or the sheer lunacy of 
turning toward anti-Semitism as an ex- 
planation for what ails black America, 
The thing that seems to ma tter most is a 
juvenile sense of manliness. If it were 
not so sad. it would be funny. 

But maybe the saddest aspect of the 
Farrakhan controversy b the degree to 
which the media apply a double stan- 
dard when the bigots happen to be 
black. You can only imagine what would 
have happened had a white university 
had itself a bate night. Page One could 
not have contained the story. Yet How- 
ard's sordid evening was played in the 
next day’s Washington Post at the bot- 
tom of the Metro rage (with not a men- 
tion of Jew-baiting in either the headline 
or first paragraph), and a follow-up sto- 
ry was tucked within the section. The 
reason for this. I think, is a certain 
institutional tone deafness to the au- 
thentic sounds of anti-Semitism and an 
addled version of multiculturalism, in- 
cluding the wrongheaded belief that 
since blades are victims, they cannot 
also be victimizers. 

Of course blacks have been — and 
remain — victims of racism. Bui anti- 
Semitism is not something new. some- 
thing indigenous to America and its pep- 
liar racial troubles. Without equating 
Louis Farrakhan to Adolf Hitler, it is 
nevertheless instructive to point out that 
Weimar-era Germans also considered 
themselves victims. Hitler supplied the 
scapegoat, and soon the victims became 
the victimizers. Only in its particulars is 
that history unique to Germany. The 
Serbs, too, genuinely feel themselves ag- 
grieved. So did the poor whiles of the da 
South, the backbone of the K1 an. It is one 
thin g to explain, quite another to excuse. 

The acceptance or toleration of anti- 
Semitism by a new. college-educated 
generation of black leaders is uot. 
as some would have it. “interesting" 

It is downright chilling 

Louis Farrakhan represents a variant 
of American fascism. His organization is 
authoritarian, his message dead-end dem- 


INTERNATIOISAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 

OPINION 


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Page 7 


Our Bomb Bay Doors Open 
Somewhere Near Cassino 


By Don Allan 




■v.jil 




W MOR£~ 

OwPRM* 

AFTER 

THIS 

MESSAGE.. A 

-n) 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


£aQS 


It is a safe bet that not a single person antnomanan, !us messag: dead-end dem- 
in the Howard audience ever met George agoguery and his dope the bracing nar- 
femarri ffv» Tr.ch.hrtm niavwripht cotic of bate. That Howard University 


Bernard Shaw, the Irish-born playwright 
who died in 1950. But he knew than well. 
In his play “Saint Joan," he has an ex- 
change between the inquisitor and the 
chaplain dirring the trial of Joan of Arc. 
Hie inquisitor orders the chaplain to sit 
down. When the chaplain indignantly 


cotic of hate. That Howard University 
audience, brimming with ignorance and 
led by Pied Pipers of racism, is gang 
down the sucker’s road to nowhere. They 
are not the leaders of tomorrow, they are 
the chumps of yesteryear. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Greece and Macedonia 

Regarding the editorial “Greece Is Out 
of Oner" [Feb. 2Si: 

The editorial states correctly that the 
Former Yugoslav Republic of' Macedo- 
nia is populated by a “Slav majority” 
and a “Muslim minority." Isn't it odd 
that such people should insist on using a 
Greek name for their country? 

The ancient Dorian tribe called Ma- 
lted noi, or “the tali ones” (from Lhe 
Greek word mekos or makos meaning 
length or height) were no “fringe 
Grades.” as the editorial calls them. 
Philip of Macedon did wage a successful 
war against the Greek city-states, but 
this is no proof of his allegedly “fringe" 
Greek identity. Greek fought Greek 
during the entire classical era. 

On the other hand, the Hellenistic 
Empire built by Philip's son Alexander 
the Great brought mainstream Greek 
culture and the Greek language to the 
confines of the known world. 

If the Greekness of the ancient Mac- 
edonians is disputed by some, the 
Greekness of their name is noL On the 
other hand, no one has ever claimed a 
Slav or Albanian-Muslim pedigree font. 

Yonr editorial further suggests that 


the European Union should declare 
Greece uncreditworthy in retribution 
for its recent foreign policy measures. 
This amounts to saying that Greece 
should abide bv the rule that beggars are 
not choosers. Where, pray, is this princi- 
ple mentioned or implied in the Maas- 
tricht treaty? 

The authorities in Skopje should at 
least be urged to delete from their flag 
the symbol of ancient Macedon, the 
Vcrgina Star. Discussions could then 
start in earnest in a mailer of days. 

MARK DRAGOUMIS. 

London. 

Let Skopje accept as its name one that 
opens ways for beuer times in the Bal- 
kans: Central Balkan Republic. In ex- 
change, Greece can persuade the other 
neighboring countries — Albania, Bul- 
garia and Yugoslavia — to guarantee the 
territorial integrity of the new state and 
offer it economic support. 

GEORGE YIANN 1TS10TIS. 

Athens. 

Philip of Macedon and his royal fam- 
ily were proud of their Greek origins. 
His was a purely Greek role. 

It is wrong, indeed barbaric, to take 
the heritage and symbols from another 


nation's history. Muslims and Slavs 
have their own' history in the Balkans, 
which has nothing to do with the Greco- 
Macedonian civiUzation. 

Why then should Greeks have to ac- 
cept the “B alkaniza tion** of their history 
and heritage? 

PYRROUS DAVID. 

Viilefontaine, France. 

One Way of Looking at It 

When are we going to find out that 
Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding 
hatched this plot together to reap maxi- 
mum publicity? 

VIC W 1 LCZUR, 
Alicante. Spain. 


We Can Hardly Wait 

Regarding "The Silliest Winter Sport? 
Moguls Take the Gold" (Sports, Feb. IS) 
by Tot rv Komheiser; 

If it’s “silly” you’re looking for, take a 
good look at curling, which will join the 
Winter Olympics in 1998. 

YURI ROTHENB 0 LER. 

Paris. 


B UGNAUX, Switzerland — Since 
none of my children ever asked me 
“What did you do in the war. Dad?” I 
have decided after 50 years to answer 
the question anyway: “I didn't bomb 
Monte Cassino ” 

My big moment came on the morn- 
ing of Kb. 15, 1944. All that awful 
■winter of the Italian campaign. Allied 
and German armies had been locked in 
a stalemate along the Garigliano and 

MEANWHILE 

Rapido rivers. The Germans held the 
heights, including historic Monte Cas- 
sino. and repeated Allied assaults had 
only soaked its slopes in blood Then, it 
seems, an air force commander man- 
aged to persuade the brass that air 
power could do in a day what mound 
troops had Tailed to do in months. 

So it happened that before dawn on 
that Feb. 15. 1 and 359 other crew mem- 
bers of 36 B-24s of the American 456th 
Bomb Group, 15th Air Force, shivered 
on benches m the bam near Cerignola 
that was our briefing room. An intelli- 
gence officer switched on the projector 
to reveal the target for the day's mission. 
Audible relief greeted its name: Monte 
Cassino. No running the gauntlet down 
“flak alley” over Munich or Wiener 
NcustadL Just a milk run over Italy. 

I don't recall that the briefing o nicer 
said anything about the culturaJ impor- 
tance of the Abbey of Monte Cassino, 
founded by St. Benedict in 529. Such 
considerations never came up at brief- 
ings. The Germans who were dug in 
around the abbey, we were told, blocked 
the way to Rome and a major raid was 
going to blow them off the mountain. 

In the air, as groups from nearby air- 
fields assembled and fell into a line head- 
ing nonhwest, we realized that every 
plane that could fly had been mustered. 
Ahead of us were British Lancasters. To 
avoid overrunning these slower planes, 
our group bad to weave an S-panem. 

Soon a cloud of smoke on a distant 
ridge showed us the first bombers had 
hit the target A few minutes later, as our 
“ST had swung us off to (be right our 
lead plane opened its bomb-hay doors. 
This meant that all planes in our group 
were to do the same, and we did. al- 
though it seemed unusually far from the 
target for starting the bomb run. 

1 should explain that early in the war 
it had been decided that only a few 
aircraft in the lead would carry bomb- 
sigh is. It had been found that when each 
bombardier aimed his own bombs, a 
scattershot pattern resulted. So now the 
whole group watched the lead plane and 
as soon as bombs were seen leaving its 
belly, all bombardiers would flip toggle 
switches to release their bombs. All the 
bombs would thus land where the lead 
bombardier had aimed — supposedly on 
the target The Germans knew this, of 
course, and went after the lead planes. 


As bombardier. 1 asked "Leroy” 
Fitts (that was his nickname: 1 never 
did know bis first name), my navigator, 
whether we had crossed our lines yeL 
He said “No.*’ We were approaching 
Venafro, then in Allied hands. Just be- 
yond and looming over the town was a 
mountain on (op of which was a large 
budding, which looked a bit like the 
abbey, perhaps. But Cassino could be 
seen, burning, about 10 miles (16 kilo- 
meters) to the left. At this point bombs 
fell from the lead plane. 

Leroy Fitts and I profaned the 
Lord’s name. Consternation was evi- 
dently also going on inside the planes 
flying above and alongside ours- Some 
bombardiers dutifuliv salvoed their 
bombs with the lead plane. Others hesi- 
tated, but one by one, irregularly, out 
came the bombs. They exploded ran- 
domly around the building above Ven- 
afro. Ours stayed in their racks and I 
closed the bomb-bay doors as our 
group turned and headed for home. 

On the way back our crew argued over 
the intercom whether we might be in 
deep trouble. Some said we should drop 
the bombs in the Adriatic and pretend 
that we bad bombed with the lead 
plane. Others said it would be danger- 
ous to land with live bombs anyway. 1 
maintain ed it would be safe, and that 
is what we did. 

As soon as we landed, all the crews 
were hustled to a briefing room in an 
uproar. The 456th had bombed a New 
Zealand division headquarters building, 
causing many casualties. Two planes 
had not dropped their bombs, one be- 
cause of a malfunctioning bomb rack; 
the other was ours. 

The Abbey of Monte Cassino was 
demolished by 442 tons of bombs that 
February day. but the Germans were 
not blown off the mountain. They pulled 
out briefly during the bombing and then 
found the ruins an even better defensive 
position. They were only dislodged in 
May by a suicidal charge of Polish in- 
fanuy. who suffered casualties of over 
40 percent in the effort. 

The leader of the planes that bombed 
Venafro, the ostensible “bad guy," was 
our deputy group commander, a West 
Pointer. ATter an investigation, he was 
sent back to the States, hu punishment 
to be safe for the rest of the war. We 
never saw him again. 

It might be thought that because we 
didn't bomb our own side, our crew were 
lhe “good guys " Our reward was to stay 
on, fly more lead positions, and eventu- 
ally get shot down. 1 did get a DFC and 
a couple of Purple Hearts out of it. And 
I had time to reflect on thejustice of this 
as a prisoner of war. Later 1 found 
“Catch-22” to be a very factual booL 

The writer was formerly a journalist 
and a Unicef officer in Beirut, Nairobi 
and Geneva. He contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


ON FAMILIAR TERMS: 

A Journey Across Cultures 

By Donald Keene. Illustrated 
292 pages. $23. Kodansha Inter- 
national. 

Reviewed by Christopher 
Lehmann-Haupt 

A BOUT his experience of 
teaching at Cambridge Uni- 
versity in 1950, Donald Keene tells 
an amusing anecdote that parodies 
his distinguished career as a critic 
of Japanese culture and literature. 
During his second year there he 
was told that if be wished to be 
promoted from assistant lecturer to 
lecturer he would have to teach a 
second Asian language along with 
Japanese, in which he was by this 
time thoroughly expert Was there 
not some other Oriental language 
he might teach? 

“After some thought" he writes 
in his charming memoir, "On Fa- 
miliar Terms: A Journey Across 
Cultures.” “I answered that during 
the war I had learned a little Kore- 
an, mainly from prisoners of war. 
‘Excellent!’ was the response. “No- 
body wiB ever want to study Kore- 
an, and Korean goes well with Jap- 
anese, like Arabic with Persian.’ In 
ihU manner I became the lecturer 
in Japanese and Korean. The next 
summer the Korean War broke ou t 
and in the autumn, when the uni- 
versity year began, I had seven stu- 
dents in my Korean class, most of 

them persons senior to myself." _ 

He concludes, “I really dont 
know how I got through that year, 
but one of lhe students went on to 


By Alan Truscott 

I F a player is in a hospital with a 
major physical problem, it docs 
not follow that he, or she, must gjw 
up the game altogether. He can, tor 
example, read books and maga- 
zines, or solve double-dummy 
problems. If these are not available 
he can construct bridgehands with 

PI M?J? e ^ I Raae ? iir of 

eye. But this did not stop ““5^ 

ino ^ diagramed deaL 

contract, using Gerber tt 
aces and kings. South is gambhng 
onthespadeque^w-lu^^ 
slam bidding methods 
■ * ft at ft lwart lead. South wins 

and counts 12 tricks- The I3lh must 
come from a -diamond 
dummy, so after winning 
heartshe takes the d a £?I 
•dhm«L Now he to* 
diamond, and wouldbeb PP- 
see West discard. Wb« tef 
South ruffs with the five, and Eas 

discards a club. . . West 

SouADOwwortsoullto''^ 

must have J-9-8-7 of inunpa. ana 


BOOKS 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Hiftrud Westermam-Anger- 

hansen, director of the Schntitgen 
Museum in Cologne is reading Pe- 
ter Ustinov’s “ My Russia." 

“I like very much the way he 
looks at Russian histoiy through 
the prism of his family’s own story 
— and brings to it the wit and 
humor we expect of Ustinov.” 

(. Roderick Conway Morris, IHT) 




become a scholar of Korean, and 1 culture. The world turned. Today, 
now think of myself (once in a having taught a generation of Japa- 
whfle) as the father of Korean stud- nese scholars at Columbia and nav- 


ies in Great Britain.” 

More seriously, “On Familiar 
Terms" relates how Keene became 
one of the fathers of Japanese surf- 


ing published dozens of highly 
praised works of criticism in both 
English and Japanese, he has be- 
come unique as a Westerner ac- 


one UW lauius HI jhuuumv Jiuw- , , ‘ ,. .. 

ies in the United States. As an un- cepted by Japan s btanry elite, 
dereraduate ai Columbia Univera- . How Keene attained this posi- 
tv in 1941 he was the only student tion is lold here in engaging prose, 
to sim up for one graduate course Most ironically amusing are theau- 
od the history of Japanese thought, ihor’s wartime wpenenos, winch, 

. . a » v ■ _ i j Hkimip an vinmiliiarv heanno and a 


once told the author over a beer 
that the United States, while it still 
had a monopoly on the atomic 
bomb, should use it on the Soviet 
Union to get rid of Stalin. 

The book’s best portraits depict 
the many great Japanese writers 
Keene befriended. Among the most 
memorable are Kobo Abe. a down- 
to-earth man of many parts who 
once won third prize in an interna- 
tional competition Tor the best new 
invention with his simple device for 
changing tires; Yasunari Kawaba- 
ta, the 1968 Nobel laureate in liter- 
ature, who once shared a leisurely 
breakfast with the author while a 
man paced in the garden waiting 
for the latest installment of a serial 
Kawabata was writing for a news- 
paper. and, of course, Yukio Mi- 
shuna, whom Keene considers one 
of the few geniuses be ever knew. 

However, the sun of Keene’s 
prose only shines in certain places. 
What it neglects to reveal is why the 
author grew so attracted to Japanese 
culture. Of his formative years, 
Keene reports only that he grew up 
unhappily in New York City during 
the Depression, with a younger as- 
ter who died as a child and parents 
who eventually divorced. 

Not much more about his back- 
ground is told. 

After four lonely years at Cerium- 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COUID AFFECT 
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on tne History or Japanese uiuuguu — i — -- — , imuappujr m — v 

After Pearl Harbor he learned despite an ummbiary beanng and a Depression, with a younger as- 
that he was among only 50 Ameri- deep commitment to pacifism, he ^ who died as a child and parents 
cans who spoke Japanese, which we 111 through utterly without fear, w j w eventually divorced, 
got him an assignment to the Navy except for the JJJJjr Not much more about his back- 

Japanese Language School at th= imnsfbced on a ships fefc mtth- d i, lold . 

JSivershy of California m Berks- j-g ». After four lonely years at Colunf- 

ley to be named as auuitapreter. toMslnusblfortaaunUatUe y, ^ ^ fltalds al ^ 

When he returned to Columbia af- Iasi second hi stnickihe top oi tne language school in Berkeley 

ter the war. Japan was though, to ^ “> SelSS readiness upS 

^rZtjSy illuminated atnvutg in wanune Honolulu. 
SSSTcoSSfSSASi aresomeofibe people Keene got to ^ he wmes near the end of his 
* know. Like Bertrand Russell, who, book, “There are also memories I 

m Keene remained on his lone- despite later being credited with do not wish to share .of expenences 
,,£lh K “~d of Japanese Lhe slogan -Better red than deaf." 

^ set down on paper, after all, I am 
• ^ dqI ma j c j n g a confession.” 

RR||) (tFi What's important is bow much of 

— 1 Japan be has explained to America 

dV 1 however, a^ghtjaw. 1? -1 !* '£» « HfiftS-' M 


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HUM juuguu^. ‘vvi km 

and fdt his first real happiness upon 
arriving in wartime Honolulu. 

As he writes near the end of his 
book. “There are also memories I 


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Page 8 

HEALTH /SCIENCE 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 199+ 


Bv Lawrence K. Allman 


\in )>■!* rilin’* Sin hi’ 


A TLANTA — Determining hem 
many American'* arc infected 
with llic AinSxiniN is an impre- 
cise science at bcM. But U.S 
health official*, arc trying again, and it 
appear* that the current estimate of one 
million, dating hack in 19X9. will he low- 
ered. 

The 1 9X9 cMiniaic represents the mid- 
point of the range reported h> the Center* 
for Disease Control and Prevention, the 
U.S agency in Atlanta ihai is responsible 
for tracking AIDS. It srr the figure at 
WW.OttO \i* J.2 million . The widely cited one 
million midpoint figure has been attacked 
both as too low and |i mi high, depending on 
the critics point of view. 

The centers phm in make a new estimate 

in July, and in preparation the agency 
invited independent experts 10 meet Iasi 
week io report and review relev am data. 
Although some of their estimates went js 
high as a million, most mused from 
(*00.000 l«» MUl.lHIfl. 


The AIDS Epidemic and Its Sub-Epidemics 


Epidemiologists are debating the scope of the AIDS epidemic, with a wide range of estimates for total 
cases. Different patterns are emerging in different sectors of the epidemic. 


Reported AIDS Cases In Axtadts AIDS Cases bi Adults by Selected Mode of Transmission 


MA)X HOMOSEXUAL 


! HEMOPHfUA 


CONTACT 


il 


1988 1989 1990 1991 19921993 


HETEROSEXUAL CONTACT 


..—■I 


AIDS and not when they became infected 
with the vim>. which is generally a 'ilem 
prc*ce>> that produce'* no symptoms. 

The delay in progression from infection 
to AIDS in adults is. on average, about III 
years, though the number can vary signifi- 
cantly. Thus, the AIDS eases now being 
reported m<Mly reflect transmissions of 
HIV in the early to mid-1980s. 

Dr. James Curran, who cnnrdi nates all 
AIDS activities at the Atlanta centers, said 
a major problem was lack of knowledge 
about who had become infected with the 
virus over the hist five years. 

“We don't know whether the incidence 
of HIV in the United Suites in 1993 was 
different than it was in 1991 or 1989. u nd 
we do not know yet whether the current 
figure exceeds or is Ie» than the number of 
deaths front AIDS." he said. 

Dr. Harold W. JafTe. the centers' leading 
AIM scientist, said there was ample evi- 
dence that the newly infected were differ- 
ent, as a group, from those who were get- 
ting infected 10 years ago and that the 
driving force of t he epidemic was changing. 


The new estimate could have critical 
health, political and economic ramifica- 
tions. For planning purposes, health offi- 
cials need to know where and how many 
new cases of HIV. the virus that causes 
AIDS, are iiXTirring. 

Determining the national trend in HIV 
infections and identifying geographiej I hot 
spots is crucial to making, budgets, devel- 
oping sound public health policy, evaluat- 
ing the success of prevention programs and 
determining research needs and priorities. 

There are various reasons why it has 
been so difficult to nhuin accurate infor- 
mation about HIV. Laws around the Unit- 
ed States preclude testing a person for HIV 
without permission. 

Furthermore, many people at high risk 
refuse to v.ikc pan in household surveys 
because of concerns about protecting con- 
fidentiality and insurance coverage? Pro- 
posals Tor mandatory testing for the virus 
have met with strong resistance from civil 
libertarian', advocacy groups and others. 

Another obstacle to making accurate es- 
timates is (he Tact that the United Stales is 
battling not one hut several AIDS epidem- 
ics. and thev are not behaving in the same 


1988 1089 1990 1991 1992 1993 


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 


(MSECTCSt 


THAHSFUSKttiS 






S EVERAL studies strongly sug- 
gest that the AIDS epidemic may 
have peaked nationally among 
gay men. As of September, the 
latest month for which data are available, 
gay men had accounted for 183.344 of the 
334_344 cases reported in the United Slates 
since the disease was first recognized in 

1981. 

But the transmission of HIV has by no 
means stopped in gay men. Studies in Chi- 
cago and Denver showed that 2.5 percent 
or gay men in their teenage years and early 
20s were becoming infected each year. 

Another study showed that, despite an 
overall decline in new infection rates, many 
young gay men were now becoming infect- 
ed with HIV in Sun Francisco and Berke- 
ley. California: the highest rates are in 
hiack ga' men. 

The question is whether there is enough 
transmission among young gay men to cre- 
ate a second wave of .AIDS (hat would rival 
the one of a decade ago when the figures 
for HIV infection ranged from Hi percent 
to 20 percent a year. 

A federally sponsored national survey of 
childhearing’ women shows that the num- 
ber of HIV infections is rising gradually 
among women in general, but has risen • 
sharply among black women in the South. 

Participants vaij the number of infected 
users or intravenous drugs was probably 
not increases. 


1988 1989 1990 1991 19921993 


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 


1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 


Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 


Changes in AIDS definition in 1993 
resulted in a large increase in reported 
cases: 1993 figures are tor the first 
nine months. 


It* No* Y«it Tuns 


not derdin in®. Meanwhile, or her epidemics, data as they assessed the merits of the 
particularly the one involving black fe- vjrious statistical method* for making the 
male*; in the South, seem to he risina. estimates. 


The various patterns of the epidemics 
add to the complevities of determining how 
many Americans are now infected with 
HIV' and how the number has changed 
over recent veur*. 


“There's no one way todoit that is right.” 
said Dr. Me.idc Morgan, an evpcn with the 
centers, explaining why his team would 
check result' front several method' against 
each other before making an estimate. 


The main epidemic ha' been and 'till 
seems to be jniong white guy males. Bui 
among that group, the incidence of new 
HIV infections seems to he leveling off. if 


Projecting a national mud from small, 
focused studio is a statistical exercise 
fraught with risk. Participants at the meet- 
ing pointed to many gaps in the available 


To health officials, the absolute number 
or HIV infections is less important than the 
trend in Midi figures because it is the 
changeover lime that indicates whether the 


number of new HIV infections is rising or 
falling. 

Ideally, statisticians want to know that 
number each year. But because such data 
are not collected nationally for HIV and no 
national siud\ has encompassed all high- 
risk groups, extrapolations must be made 
from small studies and surveys. 

Calculations from cases of full-fledged 
AIDS can also be helpful. A major prob- 
lem in using AIDS cases, however, is that 
they then reflect the status of the epidemic 
in the xear that individual' became ill with 


Stardom Comes 
To Folic Acid 


Nearly as Deep as 
7 Grand Canyons 


. Support 
4| A vessel 


By Jane E. Brody 

Set* York Tunes Service 


The undersea vehicle that 
nearly grazed the bottom of 
the ocean’s greatest depth 
was launched from a mother 
ship hovering above the 
Marianas Trench. 


EW YORK — Foltc acid, long unheralded even by health 
food enthusiasts, has suddenly been thrust into the nutri- 
tional limelight. A series of recent studies suggest that this 
B vitamin may be a major player in warding off heart 
attacks, strokes and certain common cancers. Even in people not 
now considered deficient in the vitamin, a less than optimal intake 
can double or triple the risk of developing one or more of these killer 
diseases. 

Often called folacin or folate (its biologically active form), folic 


Seven mdes of 
cable controls the two- 
part vessel Kaiko. The 
maneuverable section is 
free from the great 
weight of the cable. 


A Near Record 
For Sea Probe 


By Andrew Pollack 

Ken fur* Times Semce 


' •' ; " •' * . .j 


T OKYO — An unmanned 
Japanese vessel has de- 
scended to the deepest 
spot in the world’s oceans, 
sending back the fim television 
pictures of the Marianas Trench 
nearly 1 1 kilometers below the sur- 
face of the Pacific Ocean. 


acid is already well established as critically important in preventing 
spina bifida and anencephaly, both devastating binh detects of the 
neural tube. 


A nationwide effort is under way urging women to take supplements 
containing folic acid and to increase their intake of folate-nch foods, 
like dark green leafy vegetables, before becoming pregnant as well as 
during the fim months of pregnancy. This is especially important for 
women who have been taking oral contraceptives, which interfere with 
the body’s use of folic acid. The latest available national nutritional 
data, completed in 1988. revealed that half the women of peak 
childbearing age consume less than the recommended dietary allow- 
ance for folic add. which is 180 micrograms a day. Even this level is 
now considered by most experts to be dangerously low. 

Various studies have shown that a relatively small supplement of 
folic add — 400 micrograms a day added to their regular diet — can 
reduce by 60 to 70 percent the risk of infants being bora with neural 
tube defects. These crippling or fatal defects occur in the first six 
weeks of gestation, often before a woman has consulted a physician 
about her pregnancy. 

But now folic add is expected by many to join nutrients like beta- 
carotene and vitamins E and C as a star in the emerging “nutraceuti- 
caT era, as the medicinal use of nutrients is being called. 

Folic acid was discovered in 1941 in green leafy vegetables. Serious 
deficiencies can result in an uncommon blood disorder, megaloblastic 
anemia, which mainly afflicts people with chronic intestinal disorders, 
alcoholics and those taking certain drugs for epilepsy. 

“For decades, people only thought of folate in terras of anemia,” 
said Dr. Joel Mason, a specialist in nutrition and gastroenterology at 
Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. “But in the last two 
years, there has been an explosion of observations indicating that a 
mild defidency — not severe enough to cause anemia — may be 
enough of a defidency to cause all kinds of problems, including heart 
disease, cancer and neural lube defects.” 


Marianas 

Trench 

Igfefc. 

• . . 


But just as it was on the verge of 
landing on the ocean floor on Tues- 
day. the remote-controlled craft 
was forced to abort its mission due 
to an equipment failure. The craft 
apparently fell just short of setting 
a record for the greatest depth 
reached by a manmade vehide. It 
reached a depth of 10.91 1 meters. 
135,797 feet). 


mm 

WEIRS 


That would be only one meter 
short of the depth reached by an 
American manned submersible in 
the Marianas Trench in 1960. 


to Guam for repairs, officials said 

Kaiko, which cost 5.4 billion yen 
(about $50 million) to build, has a 
titanium shell able to withstand 
water pressure as high as eight tons 
per square inch at the bottom of the 
Marianas Trench. 

The undersea probe is controlled 
by a cable that connects it to a 
support ship. It unrolls to a length 
of more than 1 1 kilometers as the 
craft descends. 

Kaiko actually consists of two ve- 
hicles. One is a 5-meter launcher 
that descends roost of the way to the 
bottom and acts as an underwater 
base station. It releases a 3-meter 
roving vehicle that is tethered to die 
launcher by a smaller cable. 

The roving vehide contains sev- 
eral television cameras, a still cam- 
era and robot arms to take samples 
from the ocean floor. 




Source: Japan Utah* Soars* and 
Ta ct n ota gj r Cm&r 




Hr New Yixi fir 


The Japanese vehide. called the 
Kaiko, was the first to venture back 
to that forbidding netherworld and 
the first with modem video and 
sensing equipment. Hence there was 
great disappointment here when the 
mission ran into problems. 

A second day of deep-sea explo- 
ration planned for Wednesday was 
canceled and Kaiko was being taken 


After the launcher had readied a 
depth of about 10.800 meters on 
Tuesday, it released the smaller 
roving vehicle. That vehide got to 
within two meters of the bottom. It 
was rooming around taking pic- 
tures when the video feed to the 
mother ship stopped indicating a 
possible problem in the optical fi- 
ber system that transmits the video 
to the surface. Instead of landing 
on the bottom, Kaiko was hauled 
back to the surface ship. 


Plutonium Menace: How Real Is It? 


By Barry' James 

/ niertHUrvnui Herald Tribune 


38 Million Travelers In 26 Gties 
Turn To WHERE Magazine 
For Directions & Advice 


P ARIS — To many people, plutonium 
is the most demonic substance ever 
made by man. dark, dense and sinis- 
ter like the distant planet for which it 

is named 

A heavy grey metal tinged with yellow, but 
usually found in powder form, plutonium is at 
the heart or every nightmare about nuclear 
proliferation. 

It has been bad: in the news recently with 
reports that Japan is planning to slow down its 
nuclear program, concent about a suspected nu- 
clear weapons program in North Korea and 
France's decision to downgrade its costly Super- 
phenix breeder reactor into a research facility. 

Breeder reactors were devised in the 1970s to 
produce more fuel in the form of plutonium, 
than they burned That's because energy plan- 
ners thought supplies of dl and uranium would 
become scarce, and that there would be an ever 
increasing need of plutonium to feed growing 
energy requirements. 

Back then, the Nobel prize-winner Glenn 



some fear that small quantities — it takes only a 
few kilograms to make a bomb — could be 
stolen or diverted into the hands of a rogue 
state or terrorists. But there is no evidence that 
any plutonium has ever gone astray. .An artide 
by three Soviet investigative reporters in the 
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists concluded 
that stories of nuclear smuggling from the for- 
mer Soviet Union are “global myths.” 

So long as electricity is produced in nuclear 
reactors, there is no way of preventing the pro- 
duction of plutonium. A 500- kilogram (1.100- 
pound) fud element will turn into 480 kilograms 
of uranium 238. 5 kilograms of plutooium and 15 
kilograms of highly radioactive waste. 

The United Stales deals with the problem 
simply by storing the waste from more than 100 
nuclear reactors without recycling il 
To resource-poor countries like France and 


Japan, which recycle their nuclear fuel the U.S. 
solution looks wasteful. France gets 75 percent 


solution looks wasteful. France gets 75 percent 
of its electricity and 30 percent of its total 
energy needs from nuclear reactors. 

“There's three times more energy locked in 
US. nuclear waste than the annual oil produc- 
tion of Kuwait for which we went to war.” said 
Jean Syrota, president of Cogeroa. France's 


and the radioactive waste from the uranium 238. 
The waste is sealed into glass blocks for eventual 
disposal, and the plutonium is mixed in small 
amounts with uranium to produce a mixed-oxide 
fuel that can again be burned in a reactor. 

Mr. Syrota dismissed reports of a huge pluto- 
nium stockpile. Everything produced by Co- 
gema is used either for breeder reactors or for 
mixed-oxide fuel. He said stringent Euroatom 
monitoring ensures that every gram of plutoni- 
um recovered at La Hague is accounted for. 

An official for the International Atomic En- 
ergy Agency in Vienna agreed that reports of 
large plutonium stockpile are exaggerated. 

“There is not a mountain of surplus plutoni- 
um,'' the official said. “But with the combined 
effect of reprocessing plus the likely retirement 
of missiles, there is a potential problem of an 
overhang of plutonium in the near future. 

“It will be a problem in terms of storage, 
security and long-term disposal but we are not 
quite there yet.” 


ULAN FASHION 


U.S. Officials Rethinking Numbers on AIDS 


T 


HE IAEA warns that die construction 
of new mixed-oxide plants may not be 
sufficient to absorb both supplies of 
commercial plutonium and the materi- 


pluionium production in the United Slates 
alone will exceed the value of the world's annu- 


al gold production around the year 2000/ 
But the two oil price shocks in the 1 


just as wasteful. It could cut energy usage by 30 
percent, close all its nuclear plants and still use 


But the two oil price shocks in the !970s 
crimped energy usage and touched off a search 
for alternate energy sources. Uranium is abun- 
dant and cheaper than ever before. And arms 
control agreements will lead to the decommis- 
sioning of about 50.000 warheads over the next 
10 years, releasing an estimated 150 tons of 
plutonium onto already well-supplied markets. 

The metal is only mildly radioactive — a 
sheet of paper will stop its gamma ray emis- 
sions. ft halts up in contact with air. and is 
therefore usually turned into an oxide powder, 
which is more convenient for handling and 
transportation. It is toxic and highly carcino- 
genic if inhaled into the lungs, and is therefore 
processed under extremely rigorous conditions. 

Although plutonium is difficult to make. 


percent, dose all its nuclear plants and still use 
twice as much energy as Western Europe, he 
said. 

Mr. Syrota is convinced that another energy 
crisis is around die comer. He says that the 
question is not whether there will be another oil 
crisis, but when. 

The pattern of worldwide energy consump- 
tion is back to where it was at the time of the 
first oil crisis 20 years ago, he said. 

Ciigema at present commands 90 percent of 
the nuclear reprocessing industry at its sprawl- 
ing plant at Cap La Hague near Cherbourg, hut 
it will soon be joined by Britain and toward the 
end of the century by Japan. Cogema reprocess- 
es fuel from 57 French reactors as well as 
reactors in Germany. Japan. Belgium and Swit- 
zerland. 

In baths of acid, it separates the plutonium 


stockpiling fissile plutonium will therefore be a 
serious technological, political and economic 
problem wdl into the next century. 

The agency has offered to set up and monitor 
international plutonium storage areas. This is 
one solution under active consideration by the 
main nuclear weapons powers — - the United 
States. Britain. France and the Soviet Union — 
which met at IAEA headquarters last weekend 
along with Japan and Germany to discuss the 
problems involved in storing and transporting 
plutonium. 

“It’s not an easy material to pick up and 


— - — ■ -V Y ivn uu tutu 

cany away." said Peter Johnson of the Office of 
Technology Assessment in Washinewn “ftm 


Technology Assessment in Washington. “But 
you only need a small quantity. less than 10 
kilos, to cause a big problem. Our concern is 
that if it is being shipped around the world, 
i here will be opportunities for countries or 
groups to divert it.” 



By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


M ILAN — The unvarnished truth about Gianni Versace 
is that he likes super-sexist clothes: skirts so short that 
they flaunt a pair of designer underpants; puss-in- 
boots that caress the thighs; gilded bra tops with 
maximum uplift. 


have some idea of how the world’s most 'glamorous models with 
swinging pony tails and Lolita ankle socks looked on Versace's 
runway. Inal's right: ridiculous. 

As a Barbarella-styie cartoon stop it was not a bad show. Its 
references were to the’ space age 1960s when tiny A-line skirts, glacial 
colors, kinky boots and the silver-clad Jane Fonda were last in 
fashion. (Well, forget about the swinging ’60s revivals done by other 
designers over the last few sseasons.) 

So it was no fashion news to see the A-line suits in metallic colors 
or an empire dress that was somewhere between Jackie Kennedy and 
a Barbie doll. The surprise was in the fabric gimmick: Everything 
from wool crepe through georgette was laminated to within an inch 
of its life. (And there were not too many inches between the 
miniskirts, midriff cut-outs, fluff-and-sparkle sweaters and boucli 
boleros.) 

What exactly did Versace think he was playing at, sending out a 
show that was more of a joke than a fashion statement? 

“Super sexy — why not!” he said as he and his sister Donatella 
(clad in sugar pink lace baby-doll frillies) hosted a candelit dinner in 
his palazzo after the show. 

The program noies were more explicit: “Detailed research into the 
forms and cuts which have distinguished factory and country work- 
ers' clothes from the Industrial Revolution up to the arrival of the 
overall.” Read that as a super-model bosom overhanging the bib-and- 
brace of a pastel peartized minidress. 

There was an occasional glimpse of the real world in a tailored 
navy car coat with silver buttons and a half belt at the back. Versace, 
after aU. cuts a mean suit and is in the fashion business as well as 
show biz. But a much more typical garment was an empire dress, its 
skirt hobbling the thighs, lacquered the gleaming black of a garbage 
sack. 

Versace’s shows are always slickly produced, with sensational 
lighting and an upbeat spirit. But this one left the impression of a 
glossy and glamorous facade — and nothing much within. 


F RANCO Moschino’s approach could not have been in 
greater contrast There was no upfront fashion show, but a 
great deal of thought and woiic had gone into his new 
collection of eco-friendly clothes. 

“Let’s make respecting nature die latest fashion trend!” he raid. “I 
am very happy and satisfied with this project that I have been 
working on for a year, but it was very, very difficult As a designer, 
the limitations of ecology helped me. It obliged us to change shapes 
and volumes, and Moschino needed a new way.” 

Ecological fashion sounds like a gimmick, ana a flash of the 1 980s' 
Moschino style came in the slogan T-shiris that cried "Nature. 
Couture. Future.” But instead of the familiar bleached white T-shirt, 
this was in rough, beige natural cotton. 

Moschino worked with Italian fabric companies Menta and Rani 
to create fabrics free of polluting dyes. All the stuffing and the foam 
shoulder pads were removed from his signature tailored jackets, 
which were replaced by soft shirt shapes in tweed and silk. 

Going green is a serious business, but Moschino made it fun. with 
buttons, traditionally made from plastic, created instead from Brazil 
nuts that were molded into heart shapes or papier-mache using 
chemical-free glue. Prints included animals, vegetables and minerals 
put under the microscope; a baboon swinging across the back of a 
simple long shift, and a reversible dress with a naturally faded flower 
pattern on one side overlaying brighter florals. 

It was a collection that was both well thought out and food for 
fashion thought. 

A gust of youth blew through the opening of Mila SchOn’s show on 
Wednesday. The stylist Christophe Lemaire from Paris brought 


young tailoring — dusty potpourri pastels for long jackets, pants 
given a feminine curve and this season’s A-line mini, as well as a 
tiered pleated skin for Schon's signature wave print Open-weave 
faggoting added discreet decoration. 

But the show was locked into a conventional fashion mold where 
lights are dimmed and runway shutters closed to announce the 
amval of the cocktail hour (sparkle top with draped blouse and 
narrow pants) or velvet and crepe long evening gowns. However 
much women may want the parameters of fashion defined, this is the 
antithesis of modem dressing, which uses night-for-dav fabrics and 
moves fluidly round the clock. 


H AVE Complice’s designers just gotten on to air miles? The 
show or round-the-worid-in-SOoutfus was supposed to 
celebrate the gorgeous mosaic of ethnic diversity. But 
sending out pell-mell a hammer-and-sickle parka with 
empire dress, Scottish plaid with 7756100 headgear, army camouflage 
pants and Chinese cheongsams did not not make for world unitv or 
even divine chaos. 

r 2)1 } hiS sluff m ° ,hcr ninwavs from the United 

Motors of Benetton through Jean-Paul Gaultier' 

iritSr^ ■S* il ™ :ame 3 10 *P° l Ihe designer trends: 

kilts from John Galliano. Vivienne Westwood and Gaultier; Martin 

Mirgida 5 shearling m the raw: Lolita dresses from Anna Sa. 
(Milan s hot favorite to copy this season). 

& le ^ who are ^ind the Complice show 

m ' 3ry greatcoais < a ™ flea-market 
street style in London) were strong. 

co H ld md ‘I* Red Army looks as a 
reference lo the Communist vs. Fascist standoff in Italy's forthcom- 

shortonnew * r ' nMion of Milan fashion tang 


-LAl : 


ct: , - • 
cam 

iC« - 
















I 




“S 


ADVERTISHMFmt 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 



Page 9 


ADVERTISEMENT 


Germany’s 
Campuses Strive 
Toward a Sense 
Of Purpose 


B n Germany, social 
and otber envi- 
ronmental factors 
are triggering a 
renewed interest in cam- 
pus-style educational insti- 
tutions. 

. As in the rest of the 
world, most people in Ger- 
. many — including parents — 
form their opinions about 
the state. of society through 
newspaper articles and tele- 
vision news broadcasts, 
which have been painting a 

picture - accurate or not - 
of a growing tide of aggres- 
sion in Germany’s schools. 
Perhaps in reac- 
tion, demand 
for admission to 
the • country’s 
' private schools 
remains strong 
even in the 
midst of the re- 


cession. 

“The educa- 
tion provided by 
Germany’s 
Gymnasien is 
still by-and- - 
large good," 
says Hartmut Ferenschild, 
an administrator of Schuie 
Sc hi oss Salem, explaining 
the connection. “It’s many 
of the social developments 
outside the classroom that 
disquiet parents and lead 
them to send their children 
to a nonurban private 
school." 

Mario Lehmann, joint 
headmaster of Schloss 
Torgelow, agrees, ‘it’s not, 
of course, just a flight away 
from a set of problems," he 
says, “but rather a move 
toward ensuring that young 
persons receive certain 
Things that they the par- 
ents - enjoyed as children. 
These include what I call an 
‘intact environment' - an 
environment that features 
nature, not city streets, and a 
sense of purpose, not a fear 
of violence.” 


Parents are 
concerned, 
about 

providing their 
children with a 
healthy 
environment 


Torgelow are opposites. 
Salem is one of the oldest 
and best-known names in 
German education. The pri- 
vate, secondary school 
occupies three sites near the 
Lake of Constance in 
Germany’s southwest cor- 
ner. The Lake of Constance 
area is one of the most 
affluent regions in 
Germany. 

Schloss Torgelow is 
about to become Germany's 
newest school - on August 
28. 1994, it will open its 
doors for the first lime. It is- 
located at the other end of 

Germany, in 

Mecklenburg- 
Western Pome- 
rania’s sparsely 
populated lake 
district. Torge- 
low will report- 
edly be the first 
nonurban pri- 
vate school in 
Germany's new 
states. 

In other ways. 

' they are very 

similar. As their 
names suggest (“Schloss" is 
German for “castle"), they 
both occupy resplendent, 
feudal-style buildings. Their 
campuses are set in two of 
the most unspoiled areas 
this highly urbanized coun- 
try has to offer. Both are 
objects of strong parent 
interest - an interest that is 
at least partially due to the 
appeal of the protecting 
campus. 

“Parents always have a 
mix of motives for sending 
their children to a private 
school," says Mr. 
Ferenschild. “As Salem has 
long been in demand, it’s 
hard to attach a trend to a 
particular motive. But it’s 
obvious that Germany's 
parents are concerned about 
their inability to shape their 
children's daily environ- 
ment, and that concern is 


In some ways, Salem and having positive conse- 



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quences for Germany's pri- 
vate schools.” 

As Mr. Lehmann points 
out, it is not only parents 
and their children who are 
seeking a more attractive 
environment. “We've had a 
gratifying spare of applica- 
tions for admission to our 
school," he says. “This has 
been matched by an equally 
strong interest from teach- 
ers in working at Torgelow. 
They loo want to have a 
chance to build something 
from scratch and to teach in 
a positive environment.” 
But Germany's private 
schools are much more than 


refuges. At Salem, “social 
projects" are an integral 
part of the curriculum. A 
recent project focus has 
been assisting the destitute 
in Russia. 

For related reasons, cam- 
pus-style educational insti- 
tutions are also becoming 
increasingly attractive to 
adult learners, according to 
Thomas Queisser, dean of 
graduate studies at Schiller 
International University, 
Heidelbeig. 

“Adult learners have nei- 
ther the time nor the incli- 
nation to seek long-term 
refuge," he says. “But they 


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Mr. Queisser adds: 
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Many of the adult students 
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This mix of a nonurban 
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of an up-to-date master of 


international management 
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As Lissa Brown, dean at 
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of campus comes with a 
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“This is especially impor- 
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ential environment it will 
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Terry Swartzberg 


This advertising section was produced in its entirety by 
the supplements division of the International Herald Tri- 
bune’s advertising department. • David Hermges is a 
free-lance writer based in Vienna. • Terry Swartzberg is 
a free-lance writer based in Munich. 


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ustria has 
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The oldest, and most 
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on the list is the Diplomatic 
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back to the 18th century), 
which only accepts univer- 
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tional qualifications who 
want to prepare for careers 
in international institutions. 
Connections with the coun- 
tries of Eastern Europe have 
always been close, and 
some scholarships for the 
four-semester course are 
available to citizens of the 
former Soviet bloc. 

The Vienna University of 
Economics and Business 
Administration (known 
simply as WU-Wien) runs a 
15-month MBA program in 
conjunction with the 
University of South Caro- 
lina. The final 
three months are 
spent working 
on the Manage- 
ment Consultan- 
cy Project, with 
hands-on expe- 
rience within the 
administration 
of a major U.S. 
company. 

The Technical 
University of 
Vienna (TU) 
stands behind 
one of the 
newest, and most exciting, 
postgraduate projects. 
Called EURAS (European 
Advanced Studies), this pro- 
gram provides a limited 
number of participants 
(maximum 25 per two- 
semester course) with a 
thorough interdisciplinary 
background in European 
law, business and politics, 
qualifying them as Masters 
of European Advanced 
Studies for top European 
Union posts. 

EURAS is located in 
Lower Austria at the 
Provincial Scientific 
Academy, soon to be given 
the status of the Danube 
University of Krems. 

Also in that riverside city 
(famous as a center of the 


wine trade), in addition to 
the well-established MBA 
Krems Executive Program 
Central Europe, which spe- 
cializes in international 
management, is the 
Austrian seal of ITM, the 
International Institute of 
Tourism and Management 
ITM cooperates with 
Washington State Univer- 
sity to prepare students (in a 
two-year diploma program) 
for the challenges of the 
hospitality industry. 

Special links have been 
established with hotel 
groups in the countries of 
the former Soviet Union, 
including Kazakhstan, as 
well as with the Czech 
Republic. ITM has just 
entered into an arrangement 
with partner institutions in 
Scotland, Spain and France 
(Glasgow Caledonian 
University. La Escuela de 
Turismo de Zaragoza and 
IFTL, Toulouse) to give par- 
ticipants access to the status 
of European Manager of 
Tourism. 

Mainly for young Ame- 
ricans, the Salzburg Interna- 
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provides train- 
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according to the 
U.S. high school 
curriculum as 
well as offering 
'! the challenge of 
the International 
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s The coeduca- 
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Happy recipients of school is housed 
degrees in tourism on the southern 
management. outskirts of 

Salzburg in a 
historic palace building with 
adjoining sports facilities 
and a wooded park. All 
classes are taught in 
English. 

For those (of all ages) 
who want to leam German. 
Campus Austria - an orga- 
nization founded in 
December 1993 and backed 
the Austrian Ministry of 
iucation - offers a cross- 
section of possibi liries 
throughout the country, 
combining language ins- 
truction with everything 
from sports to the arts. A 
particularly enticing "Im- 
perial Course for Exe- 
cutives" is held four times a 
year in Vienna’s Schon- 
brunn Palace. 

David Hermges 




WirtschaftsuniveTsM Wien, Vienna, Austria 
University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA 

International MBA 

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or 

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Was : iiHF&lgrei ch e E |te rn 

i h rec- tier .;.kp nnen: 

Sie ermoglichen ihnen Schuljahre auf Schloft Torgelow. 

Hier erwerben junge Menschen Wissen und die Motivation zu 
guten Leistungen - Weltoffenheit, Kommunikationsfahigkeit 
. und Lebensart, die ihnen spater wichtige Turen dffnen. 

Das Konzept des privaten Intematsgymnasiums baut auf einer 
dreiBigjahrigen Intematserfahrung in Baden-Wurttemberg auf. 
Effizienter Unterricht in Klassen von hdchstens 12 5chulern 
ermdglicht ein hochwertiges Abitur nadi 12 Schuljahren. 
SchloB Torgelow liegt an der Mecklenburgischen Seenplatte, 
in einem Naturschutzparadies direkt am Torgelower See. 
Lassen Sie sich informieren, bei Bedarf auch uber Stipendien. 

tfcA/o/S z 7 otHjfe/(HO 

Yrivales Jnternatsgymnasium • 
ear opS isehemBilaungskonzept 

SchloBallee 9 , 17192 Torgelow bei Waren an der Muntz 
Infotelefon und Fax 0 62 21/16 73 47 


j 







Find out what 
tiie restructuring of 

China’s economy 
really means 

for business. 

Straight from the 

people who wrote it 

The International Herald Tribune and the State 
Commission for Restructuring the Economic Systems of China 
are inviting the world’s business leaders to an unprecedented 
three-day Summit meeting on China’s economic reform. 

Its aim is to foster a dialogue as well as business 
development opportunities at the highest levels amongst the 
leaders of the Chinese government and the global business 
community. 

The Summit, “The Socialist Market Economy of the 
People’s Republic of China, 1994 - 2000: Implications for 
Global Business” will be held in Beijing on May 11th, 12th and 
13th of this year. 

Participating will be the major figures of the 
Government of China as well as key provincial government 
and state industry leaders. It will be a rare opportunity to hear 
and personally meet the people who are driving China’s 
economic direction into the next millennium. 

As you would expect with an event of this stature, it 


will be a closed-door conference and will not be open to the 
general public. 

The International Herald TYibune is inviting a limited 
number of the largest multinational corporations with a stake 
in the future of the Chinese economy to participate as Summit 
Sponsors. There will be 3 levels of sponsorship: Summit, 
Corporate and Supporting. Each will offer a comprehensive 
communications package consisting of conference-related 
benefits and advertising in the International Herald Tribune 
and a leading Chinese-language daily newspaper. The deadline 
for registration is March 15th. 

For a complete information package, please fax 
Mr. Richard McClean, Publisher, at +33 (1) 46372133. Or call 
+33 (1) 46379301. 

The International Herald Tribune China Summit. It will 
prove to be the major business event of 1994 for China, for 
Asia and for the 
companies participating. 


INTERNATIONAL 



Pl'MItHFO mm nor «• ton nws mb TW w*3Hm.-nn nvn 


THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE CHINA SUMMIT. 



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** 



International Herald Tribune, Thursday, March 3, 1994 


Page II 


THE TRIB INDEX: 113 . 

International Hprw TriK., — . _ 


srass^iiSffiL’sg.'sii “sAffasS 

by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1 . 1992 = too P 

120 





100 


,r^:< -{i ■■■ -r'vri 

• : . * 7.; • •. . \ <vf '• .. ' MBIMRREnHfiJ 

.*<•.. yjt-v 

■ “.jJft.iOV ' •'.*1,1'' Cfcv ’} Av: •■••.'.*, ..■• 

~ ^ ..>••• • , .. V.w • *•:•• V -. X !-/. 


90 




o 

1993 


**V***** . * s «**' • ! ^ 'X<f ** •* ,’A •/ 

.. : Vi > 5. .* * •• :* > v */ x 

+£..^.,1 r < ' t •: 7hYi f t Q 'V '•* Max -■' v>- - :■ 

kl n 


a. 

M 

1994 


Asia/Pacitic 


Approx, weighting: 32% 

Ctose: 130.76 Prav.: 13327 


150 

140 

130 

120 


Appro, weighting: 37% 
dose; 110.79 Pro: 112.11 



V 


™ ■ ■■ ? = : ■ 

gQ ■ • ••>• '* '■> ** 


100 




yywr 






o 

1993 


M 

1994 


O 

1993 




F M 
1994 


North America 


Latin America 


Appro waglittng; 26% 

Close: 9535 Piw.: 95.69 





77w rKfcu backs U.S. dotar mines of stocks to Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
A r gentin a . Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazfl, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Finland. 


France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy. Mexico, N et herland s. New Zealand, Nanay, 
len, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New York and 


Singapore, Spain, Sweden, 

London, the index w composed of the 20 top issues In terms of market cnpitab a ti oa 
otherwise the ten top stocks are tracked. 


1 Industrial Sectors ' f 


NwL Pnv. X 

doH do me change 


Wad. 

dan 

Prcv. 

don 

% 

ctaoga 

Energy 

111.31 111.52 -0.19 

Capital Goods 

111.80 

11234 

-1.01 

UfflHes 

122.90 125.77 -228 

Raw Materials 

11633 

118.81 

-2.09 

Finance 

117.42 110.04 -2.10 

Consumer Goods 

99.44 

9932 

-6.08 

Sendees 

121.45 122565 -0.91 

IfisceSaneous 

128.13 

12928 

-039 

For mote nfontiMion about the Index, a booklet to available bee of chatgo. 

Wide to Trib Index. 181 Avenue Charles da GauBe. 92521 NeuitiyCedax, Fiance. 


O International Herald Tribune 


Japan Edgy Over 
Reported Revival 
Of U.S. Trade Law 


By James Stemgold 

New York Tima Service 

TOKYO — The Japanese 
government reacted with a 
(ouch of worry and anger 
Wednesday to reports that 
President Bill Clinton might be 
preparing to enact a trade law 
that would allow him to slap 
sanctions on Japan if it refuses 
to open its markets. 

It was reported in Washing- 
ton that Mr. Clinton has decid- 
ed to renew the measure, known 
as Super 301, which would add 
significantly to bis arsenal of 
weapons to persuade Japan to 
remove what the United States 
says are barriers to the import 
of foreign goods and services. 

This imposing weapon wor- 
ries Japan deeply because it-can 
be used on relatively short no- 
tice, involves a unilateral deci- 
sion and can result in stiff in- 
creases in tariffs on U.S. 
imports of Japanese goods. 

[In Washington, Mr. Clinton 
said he had not “made a final 
decision” ou the Super-301 ex- 
ecutive order but added: 
“We’re trying to open the mar- 
ket," Reuters reported. 

[“Super 301 is an option, but 
no final derision has been 
made," the president’s spokes- 
woman Dee Dee Myers said, 
adding that reports that Mr. 
Clinton had decided to sign the 
executive order were “prema- 
ture.^ 

i.S. Trade Representative 
ickey Kantor told the House 
of Representatives Foreign Af- 
fairs Committee, “We have no 
announcement as of today, but 
we wiU be making announce- 
ments in the near future.”] 

The trade da use lapsed sev- 
eral years ago, to the relief of 
the Japanese. Although the 
measure could be applied to 
any foreign country if revived, 
it is widely regarded as being 
aimed specifically at Japan, 
which had a S59 billion trade 
surplus with the United States 
lasiyear. 

Toe United States and Japan 


said after trade negotiations 
broke down last month that 
they wanted a cooling-off peri- 
od before re-engaging on the 
thorny issues of removing barri- 
ers to foreign products and ser- 
vices in Japan and reducing Ja- 
pan's towering trade surplus. 

But Wednesday's reports 
from Washington were regarded 
by officials toe as an escalation 
of the simmering tensions. Ma- 
sayoshi Takemura, the chief cab- 
inet secretary, called the possi- 
bility of tougher American 
position “unproductive." 

“We strongly urge (he UJ>. 
government to take sensible ac- 
tion," Mr. Takemura said. 

Officials at the Foreign Minis- 
ter and the Ministry of Interna- 
tional Trade and industry also 
said using Super 301 would be a 
grave error. 

“We should not start trade 
wars," an official at the Minis- 
try of International Trade and 
Industry said. “We should not 
change the world trading sys- 
tem into a bunch of unilateral 
measures. Once we start doing 
this we would start going down 
a slippery slope." 

Washington is gambling that 
the threat or sanctions nil] force 
the Japanese to make conces- 
sions. 


Micki 


Tom Buerkle of i he Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune reported 
from Brussels: 

A UJ>. revival of the Super 
301 trade weapon would proba- 
bly provoke an outcry in Eu- 
rope but should not cause any 
imm ediate damage to trans-At- 
lantic trade relations, European 
officials said. 

A spokesman for the Europe- 
an Union's executive commis- 
sion, which handles trade policy 
for its 12 member countries, 
said the bloc opposes Super 301 
because it believes the measure 
“has a tendency to make mar- 
kets clam up rather than pries 
them open.” 


Surge in Ge rman Money Supply 
Jolts European Financial Markets 


Rate Cuts Unlikely Soon Data Add to U.S. Jitters 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

FRANKFURT — A Bundes- 
bank official warned that the pace 
of German interest-rate cuts would 
have to slow as a result of the huge 
rise in money supply the bank re- 
ported Wednesday. 

The Bundesbank said German 
M-3 money supply — a barometer 
of future inflation — leapt 20.6 
percent in January, compared with 
an 8.1 percent jump in December, 
and well beyond expectations of a 
maximum 15 percent expansion. 

Gun tram Palm, a Bundesbank 
council member, confirmed market 
fears that the rapid monetary ex- 
pansion could put German inter- 
est-rate cuts on hold for longer 
than originally believed. 

Mr. Palm said he saw “initially at 
least, no more scope for a further 
cut in central bank interest rates." 

Mr. Palm, president of the cen- 
tral bank in the German state of 
Baden-Wflmemberg. said ii was no 
surprise that the M-3 mosey supply 
in January had expanded outside of 
the Bundesbank's target corridor 
for 1994, which calls for growth of 
4 to 6 percent. 

Exceptional circumstances arti- 
ficially boosted the money supply 
figures for January, the Bundes- 
bank said. These special circum- 
stances included a shift of money 
by foreign-based investment funds 
into Germany following the exten- 
sion of a withholding tax on invest- 
ment income b eginning on Jan. 1. 

Changes in the statistical method 
of measuring M-3 also artificially 
inflated January’s M-3 number, the 
Bundesbank said. 

In addition, the expiration of a 
tax break on the purchase of old 
houses had fueled mortgage lend- 
ing at the end of last year. These 
payments continued to swell M-3 
in January. 

Under the central bank's defini- 
tion, M-3 consists of cash, sghtde- 
posits. time deposits with maturi- 
ties of less than four years and most 
savings deposits. M-3 is seasonally 
adjusted and based on a compari- 
son with the average for the fourth 
quarter of 1993. 

Traditionally, M-3 provides 


clues to the pace of inflation. The 
sharp increase in Germany’s mon- 
ey supply was therefore interpreted 
by European markets as a sign that 
the Bundesbank would not lower 
interest rates to stimulate the Ger- 
man economy anytime soon. 

“It is a catastrophe," said Ger- 
hard Grebe; chief economist at 
Bank Julius B5r in Frankfurt 


The Frankfurt stock market ini- 
tially lost more than 3 percent of its 
value on the news, falling nearly 75 
points to below 2,000 for the first 
time since mid-October. 


The 30-share DAX index later 
steadied, but still ended the day 
126 percent lower at 2,02033. 

On the German bond market 
the March Bund futures contract 
fell as low as 93.75 from 9531 be- 
fore the ann ouncement. But the 


contract rallied in late trading to 
mdes- 


95.45 on hopes that the Bur 
hnnlt would calm markets by an- 
nouncing a reduction in a key mon- 
ey market interest rate on 
Thursday. 


The Bundesbank is not expected 
to cut its discount rate at Thurs- 
day's policy-making council meet- 
ing. It was reduced by a half print 
only two weeks ago, to 535 per- 
cent. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Desperate sell ere 
dumped European bonds Wednes- 
day, causing a morning price rout 
that overflowed into stock markets 
before some lost ground was re- 
gained in late trading. 

Bewildered analysts characterized 
the day as “brutal.” They had ex- 
pected tough sledding as bond 
prices continued to react to unex- 
pectedly strong U.S. economic 
growth numbers released Tuesday 
and to fears of resurgent U.S. infla- 
tion. But what seat markets reeling 
bright and early Wednesday morn- 
ing was bad news from a completely 
unexpected source: Germany. 

“On top of the sell-off in the 
United Slates overnight we got as- 
tonishingly poor Goman money 
numbers," said Peter Lyon, 
strategist for Smith New 
In Germany, Europe's para- 
gon of monetary stability, official 
figures showed a 20.6 percent jump 
in M-3 money supply. 

The burgeoning German money 
supply could give the Bundesbank 
a reason to abandon its policy of 
gradually cutting interest rates, an- 
alysts said. 

Frankfurt’s DAX index lost 2 
percent, closing down 46.72 


dex fell 319 points, or 1 percent, to 
3337.70. 

In France, where interest rates 
closely track German rales, trading 
in bond futures oa the MATIF was 
briefly halted as prices fell by more 
than three points at one stage. 

Volume in the French futures 
exchange's 10-year government 
bond contract — one of Europe's 


Interest-rate concerns sent stocks 
tower to Asia. Plage 15. 


global 

Court 


percent, closing down 46.72 points 
at 2,02033. In London, the Finan- 
cial Times-Stock Exchange 100 in- 



? ,203d 


BOW 

2000 


1990 


\ 

DAX 

m 

~ 

a 

1 


11 



¥ 





I 






toaa" . ; tase.-toor .1700 aaoo 1700 

Sourco: Bloomberg- ■ ' ’ 


most widely traded — hit a record. 
Bonds for March delivery finished 
down 136 prims at 124.38. 

On the Paris bourse, the CAC-40 
index shed 38.46 points, or 1.76 
percent, to 2,144.66. 

The European component of the 
International Herald Tribune 
World Slock Index fdl LIS per- 
cent, to 1 10.79, in late trading. 

Analysts said strong growth in 
the United States may at last have 
put an end to the long bull market 
in bonds. In Europe, where fears of 
inflation still lie deeply buried be- 
neath mountains of idle plant and 
labor market capacity, analysis 
could find little economic rationale 
for steep rises seen in recent days in 
long-term interest rates and the ac- 
companying drop in bond prices. 

One London fund manager 
called the 4 percent real interest 
rates now prevalent across Europe- 
an bond markets “ludicrous.” not- 
ing that this is fully one percentage 
point above normal levels. Ten- 
year interest rates in Germany are 
now nearly a full percentage print 
above December's lows. In Spain 
and in Italy they are nearly 13 per- 
centage Faints higher. 

“It is important to stand bui* 
and to realize that in terms of the 
economic fundamentals in Europe 
nothing has changed," said Peter 
Oppenheimer, an investment strat- 


egist at James Capel & Co. Instead 


lnu .- rrtiiiiHi.il Ht-raU Tntuirw 


blaming fears of inflation, ana- 
lysis and fund managers have 
turned their ire on American hedge 
funds and other highly leveraged 
investors whose massive bets on 
further declines in U.S. rales have 
cost them billions of dollars. 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


New Missionaries in Moscow 


By Alessandra Stanley 

Hew York Times Service 

MOSCOW — “We use mystery guests.” Edward 
L. Roth, a successful motel operator and practicing 
Mennonite from Archbold, Ohio, population 3,440, 
said in explaining his mold business to an advice- 
hungry audience of Russian business people. 

The Russian translator, searc hin g for a word to 
convey that “mystery guests” are people whom 
Mr. Roth hires to check up on motel employees, 
finally settled on “inspectors.” 

But in the audience, Irina V. Korsovskaya, a 


many on 
number of 


any 


manager of the Veli Ross travel company in Mos- 
cow, 1 knew better. “Spies.” she murmured to her 


neighbor. For the first tune in Mr. Roth’s peppy 
“How to Put People Before Profits.” she 


speech, 

smiled approvingly. 

Usually, it is American businessmen who pride 
themselves on bottom-line realism and Russians 
who are viewed as impractical romanpes. 

But; 


at a five-day seminar for would-be entrepre- 
neurs in Russia’s fledgling hospitality industry, 
which was sponsored by the Mennonite Economic 
Develop menl Associates, a nonprofit organization 
that tries to assist small businesses in the develop^ 
ing world, there was an entirely different kmd ot 
cultural clash. 

On Monday, the seminar's opening day, the 
Westerners sprite of bringing God and courtesy 
into the workplace. The 45 Russians feverishly 
exchanged business cards and fax numbers. 

“To be honest, I am not so interested in the 
lectures," whispered Nikolai V. Ognev, deputy 
general director of the Kroppy Co. tounsi bureau 
^Moscow. “I came here to make contacts. 

Ahnost every week.there is soine kmd of buan^ 

c^rmnar going on in Moscow. And OT any day. the 
finer hotdslike the Metropri me ^ 
rorcultants who flock to the former Soviet Union, 


-meaning foundations. 

There are as many missionaries roaming across 
Russia — some 1,000 have come seeking to make 
converts over the last three years. 

Bui it is less common to find Western business- 
men in Russia trying to serve God and Mammon 
at once. 

“This is a mission for us,” explained Randy 
Trover, a Mennonite businessman who manages 
The Amish Kitchen Restaurant in Wflmot, Ohio. 
He, like the six other Canadians and Americans, 
and unlike so many Western consultants, paid his 
own way to the sober, frills-free seminar, which 
was held in a vast, gloomy ballroom of the 10,000- 
room, gloomy IsmaHovo hotel in northeast Mos- 
cow. There are slot machines in the lobby, and no 
Gideon biries in the rooms. 

The Mennonites, like the Amish, are a branch of 
the Anabaptists; they have a 200-year history in 
Russia. Long persecuted by the Communists, few- 
er than 15,000 remain, scattered in remote farming 
settlements in Siberia and Kazakhstan. Many 
North American Mennonites have Russian ances- 
tors. “We don’t expect to receive anything," Mr. 
Trover said. “We want to hdp these people by 
sharing our knowledge.” 


The Russians, who paid $90 to partiopate, were 
owners or managers of small new businesses, most- 
ly in Moscow. But Tatyana A Khramova, manag- 
ing director of the Kanikuly travel agency in 
Tomsk, rode a train for three days from Siberia to 
attend. 


While many practical sessions were scheduled 
on such subjects as how to run a bed and breakfast 
and the do’s and doa’t’s of franch&ng, one lesson 
all of the panelists were determined to share was 

See MISSION, Page 13 


Schimmelbusch’s Home Is Searched 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Investigators on Wednesday raid- 
ed and searched the Frankfurt home of Heinz 
Schimmelbu5ch, the former chief executive of 
Meiallgesellscbafi AG, the troubled German 
trading and metalworking conglomerate, ac- 
cording to the Frankurt prosecutor's office. 

An executive of Metallgesellscbaft, which 
came close to bankruptcy after suffering oil 
futures trading losses of 2.3 billion Deutsche 
marks (S 1 3 billion) meanwhile said the compa- 
ny had asked Frankfurt prosecutors to find out 
if Mr. Schmunelbusch and Mewhard Forster, 
the company's former chief financial officer, 
had broken German laws. 

Mr. Forster’s Frankfurt home was also 
searched on Wednesday. He and Mr. Schim- 
melbusch were fired in December by Ronaldo 
Schmitz, ibe Deutsche Bank director who is 
chairman of the company’s supervisory board. 

Heinrich G&tz, vice chairman of MetaDge- 
sellschaft, said investigators from the Frankfurt 
prosecutor’s office had also searched the com- 
pany’s headquarters building. “We are fully 
cooperating with prosecutors,” he said. “As 
things now stand, there is a likelihood that we 
cannot exclude that both men have violated 
criminal laws. This is up to the prosecutor's 
office to find oul” 


Harald Rieger, general counsel of Metal! ge- 
sellschaft, said he had written Wednesday to the 
prosecutor's office confirming the company’s 
backing fora full criminal probe. 

Last Thursday, Mr. Schmitz told a rowdy 
meeting of Metallgesellschafi shareholders that 
the management led by Mr. Scbimmelbusch 


f We are folly 
cooperating with 
prosecutors.’ 

Heinrich Gdtz, vice 

rhaiwnan of 

MetallgeaeUsehaft. 


had failed to inform the supervisory board 
about the oil futures problems at MG Corp„ 
the New York subsidiary. Mr. Schmitz accused 
the former Metallgesdtofaaft chief of actions 
“so patently harmful to MetaUgesdlschaft that, 
in addition to civil law penalties called for, 
penal measures would not come as a surprise.” 

Hildegard Becker-Toussaim, a Frankfurt 
prosecutor's office spokeswoman, said Wednes- 


day that Mr. Sdnmmelbusch and Mr. Forster 
were being probed for fraud in connection with 
their duties as managers. She said Mr. Scbumnel- 
busch was also suspected of tax evasion. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Schimmdbusch vigor- 
ously repeated his denial that he had withheld 
any information from the Metallgesellschafi 
supervisory board. “I absolutely deny any 
wrongdoing," he said from Philadelphia. “I am 
at a loss to understand what is happening. 1 was 
an executive-board member for 14 years and 
with the company for over 20 years performing 
my duties and trying to contribute to the well- 
being of the company," he said. 

Mr. Schimmdbusch said his lawyer had “in- 
formed the prosecutor's office in Frankfurt in 
writing of our willingness to cooperate in every 
possible way to facilitate the investigation." Mr. 
Schimmdbusch, who has been in the United 
Stales since last weekend, denied that he was 
hiding. “What I am Dying to do is to find a way 


Soros Backs 
Regulation 


to earn expenses for my family. I am trying to 

: imposable 


JiuDd a new buaness, which is almost impossit 
under the circumstances. It is dear that I cannot 
do this in Germany. Therefore, I am traveling 
between Austria and the United States.” 

Last week in Vienna, Mr. Schimmdbusch 
claimed he was the victim of “an orchestrated 
attack on my credibility” and pledged to defend 
his reputation “in the courts. 


Compiled by Our Staff Front Duputches 

BONN — George Soros, the 
financier, said Wednesday that 
it would be legitimate for cen- 
tral banks to consider regulat- 
ing giant hedge funds, such a< 
his own, which wield enormous 
power on financial markets. 

The Bank of England and 
the Federal Reserve Board plan 
to take a closer look at the 
exposure banks have to the 
funds, which take leveraged po- 
sitions in Financial markets, fol- 
lowing recent heavy losses. 

“I feel that there is an innate 
instability in unregulated mar- 
kets,” Mr. Soros said. 

Rumors that some New 
York banks had suffered losses 
from their hedge fund clients 
drove down the prices of their 
bonds Wednesday- Bankers 
Trust specifically issued a deni- 
al it had suffered losses. 

(Reuters. IHT) 


Board Accepts Bid for Independent 


Compiled by Our Stiff/ From Dsyauhes 
LONDON — The battle for the 
British daily The Independent ap- 
peared on Wednesday to have been 
won by Mirror Group Newspapers 
PLC, after The Independent’s di- 
rectors accepted a sweetened take- 
over offer. 

The directors of Newspaper 


Publishing PLC, which owns The 
Independent and The Independent 


on Sunday, said they were advising 
filers to accept the Mirror 



CURRENCY A INTEREST RATES 


shareholi 

consortium's revised offer because 
it could “best establish the long- 
term viability” of Newspaper Pub- 
lishing and preserve “the editorial 
freedom of its titles.” 

The board’s recommendation 
was the latest development in a 
takeover battle for the troubled 
publisher between the Mirror-led 


which must determine whether it is 
thepublic interest 

The president of the Board of 
Trade, Michael Heseliine, can 
waive takeover rules if the bidder 
can prove an urgent need. The con- 
sortium believes it has such a case 
because of the rocky state of the 
Independent's finances. 

The Mirror-led group issued a 
revised offer including a cash elec- 
tion of 355 pence (S5.33) per share, 
valuing Newspaper Publishing at 


Crass Rates 


Amstantam 


Frankfurt 
i to) 


2491 

52U 

25» 


DM- 

l.nw 

30J0 


BJ=. 


* 

HUS 
35.1225 

lint 

IM 

OMJJ ».XB 
Man liBUO MM5 

BwrortlM VMto 

tato arts uo 

TkJcyo HUS 15157 

Taranto ISH 

Zurtcft U»2 MB? 

I ECU MJH 47WJ 

1SDR I# ^ 

rtpftite. tn Amsterdam. London. New ... M . . . 

?Sbs.— * “■ - 


ISA 

JZ3U 

nut 

uu 

MOW 

il.u 


urn 

1JJW 

UN* 


March 2 
Sj:. Yen a Poets 

uxr Utt* MttS Utt* 

MSI 0J4BJ 25» HJ»* 

4US- ].1M UUI* USD UUI* 

SLA 11371 UU6 UW »■* 

um Witt Hue- w» — 

use 1L5S1 w 

gn SJ02 IWB us* UB2B 

iuii in« SAWS’ 4Zffl LD7* 

2J74* 77J1 

im » HW51 UW‘ — 0SS7- 

WS‘ U7»* UK* i«er 

UM 117375 IflM W.I7* 

ZflWS UiJJ* 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


March 2 


fjs. ura D-FI 
|J2M um ’ — 
tD 465 1 B 745 ' 1 U 525 
■205 U®*' W" 

252057 USB 
XW UB5 ‘ £2 
W.l° — “t? 

MB UK* *2 

asm* msj 

77.91 Ulfl *44 

03331 UflO' 

U 05 * 

4 * U 1 U» 

■ uU 7J74.98 2ASD 

“ and Zurich. «" T *“ S/ Tamto 


Dollar D-Mark 


Swiss 

Franc 


1 month 
SlDORflB 
i months 
1 rear 




9M, 

S^nrSV* 


4VSHU 

■MV* 

3*r4fct 


Stalina 

SIVSW. 

5-5*8 

5ltr5% 


Preach 

Franc 


Yen 


ECU 


6W4 A. 
«Vfe-6U 
jVrilk 
536*6 


2*>r2 

2*L-2*L 

2*1-2*. 

2W.-2W 


6 ’n*6 *» 

4W'» 
6 V6K 

(S'** 1 * 


Sources; Reuters. UoyOs Bank. 

Oates aotXcabhr to interbank deposits of St mauanmfnbmm toreoutvalantL 


group and Tony O'Reifly’s Irish £74.7 million (SI 12 million dol- 
newspaper chain. Independent tors)* 

Newspapers PLC. The Mirror consortium launched 

Analysts cautioned that al- ^ takeover bid on Feb. 4, 
though the Minor bid had the sup- offering 250 pence per share, which 
port of Newspaper Publishing’s vaIued Newspaper Publishing at 
takeover committee, it wasn't cer- £55 million, but this was viewed by 
tain the bid would succeed. the Newspaper Pu bli s hin g board as 

“The Mirror Group consortium bmOanL Later in the month it 

still has to convince Newspaper 350 P “5 C *** 

Publishing’s shareholders to take share or £73.7 million pounds. 


JM74 
4»J * 


Key Money Rates 


OUBflOhto 

Other Dollar Values 

Coroner PW* Onvener 

Ararat woo (UWI 
AodroLS I .*205 

Aaur.saa. 11*953 

Brazfl ctuz . I4L40 
QtKK yuan SJBW 
OKhkernna 7>S7 
OatfsA krone 4*7 
Etontnaod XV 
Ftomorkko 53515 


©reek***- 
Mom Kono* 

H«w. W 0 ' 

InflJanrw** 

loda. ronton 

Iridic 
Israeli sfieK. 

KnwofflUM* «£• 

Mntoy.rim- 27,55 


Perl 

mmO 

77275 

1037 
3135 
71 UM 
06*77 
2.W5 
0777S 


Currency 

Mex.oeso 
N. Zealand I 
Mon*, to** 
PUL MM 
Ptunutr 

perLCfcndo 
RnK-roWe 
Saudi rivet 

SMB.S 


POTS 

1174 

T3S75 

73945 

ZM0 

21«1 

174.70 

M77to 

J7497 

1378 


Currency Per* 

S. Afr.ram) 34 54 
5. KOT.WM 80430 
SMKLknMK &0U2 
Taiwan t 2447 
Thai MU 2532 
Tarkfc* Hra 18977. 
UAE uream 3 St 
Vwez-boOv. Ill JOB 


United Stolen 
Diseoaurnte 
Prime rale 
Federal ftmdi 
SmMfeCDs 
Canal, paper 188 dan 
3-month Treasury Mil 

1- rew Tnowrr HU 

2- roar Treasury note 

5-year Treaaarv nolt 
7-r*ar Treasury note 
Ift-vear Treasury note 
tt-year Treasury band 


. Close Prev. 
3jD0 100 
6 jOO 
330 
314 
190 
244 
192 
433 
£50 
£86 
539 
£78 


Merrill Lynch 38 day Ready asset 275 


430 

3*4 

115 

3JB 

140 

355 

430 

£74 

558 

428 

438 

235 


Britain 

Bank base rale 
Call money 
l-orath IntwMAlt 
S^noath interbank 
tmontti iaterhaak 
18-rear Gilt 
Pnmce 

Interveahoanite 
CaD money 
Vaioam Interbank 
Xmonth latefOank 
tmoatti Interbank 
18-rear OAT 


5V. 

5>A 

5J» 

5b 

5h 

5b 

5V> 

Sfo 

4.12 

jh 

7.13 

7j09 

4.10 

410 

IPts 


S*. 

6 hi 

5V* 

ih 

6.12 

Ah 

£29 

457 


P l K H unt rule 
Cali money 
1 -month h rt artnmK 
3-rneam tatertak 
tenant* hderfcai* 


Forw ar d Bates 

Conner *w»7 

PwedSterHnv 
Donat mark 

Uut m f n n e I* 4 ® 9 


68-dav 

1.4909 

13055 

14305 


VHUN 

14893 

13082 

14304 


Currency 
r„— oun ootior 
Japanese roo 


today 

13537 

10333 


sfrdav FMtov 
13538 13542 
10238 10253 


toararei ,NG Bank i-J — ^ “ 
Aasw FranetPreaof^, ;wuWrs and AP 
creeontoii m*f (SOF). other <»® 


QtmoKrctaie ttottano 

(Bnese»hdana> * cmaao 


Urear Government band 
owmany 

Lombard rate 

Call money 
XBHth totertwtft 

jmoeth interbank 
t-moett i nt erba nk 


184 

2* 

2th 

2* 

2Vk 

194 


IK 

2ik 

24k 

214 

2VS. 

339 


Sources: Routers. Btoomberv, Merrill 
Lunch. Bank ot Tokyo, Commersban*. 
t^nenwsh Montagu. Credit Lyonnais. 


up the offer ” said Anthony de Lar- 
rinaga, media analyst at Panmure 
Gordon Ltd., “and O’Reilly still 
has a major stake.” 

Mr. O’Reilly scooped up 24.9 
percent of Newspaper Publishing 
shares on Feb. 4 ana has agreed to 
purchase another 5 percent, subject 
to regulatory approval 

The Mirror-led consortium, 
which already owns 47. 1 percent of 
Newspaper Publishing, includes 


The consortium said Wednesday 
in a statement: 

“We are delighted that the inde- 
pendent directors of Newspaper 
Publishing have now recommend- 
ed the consortium's offer and we 
lode forward to resolving the un- 
certain situation for The Indepen- 
dent and The Independent on Sun- 
day as quickly as possible.” 

Under the new takeover terms, 
the Italian and Spanish publishers 
who spearheaded a cash rescue of 


IftreorBuMl 


4% 

4U 

4.15 

555 

530 

441 


*44 

4>4 

4lW 

550 

5J0 

4.16 


Qold 

UM. 

Zurich HA 

ipwinn iul 

NewYoric 37750 

u£. dollars ner ounce- London otftdot ft*- 

im; Zorich and NewYoric opening and Clos- 
ing Prtcesi New York Can wx tAnrtti 
Source: Reuters. 


PM. 

177.15 

37655 

378.90 


arte 
— 525 
-US 

_ Q?1 


the publishers of the Spanish daily Newspaper Publishing in Novem- 
B Pais, the Iiajian daily La Re- ber 1990 will havevoting control 
pubblica and The Independents Mirror Group Newspapers wffl 
founder and editor. Andreas Whit- have from 25 to 30 percent of the 

company and Mr. Whiuam-Smiih 


lam-Smith. 

A spokesman for the consortium 
said be was optimistic that bid 
would be cleared by the Monopo- 
lies and Mergers Commission, 


and other founders of The Inde- 
pendent will see their stake shrink 
from 10 to 3 


AFP. Bloomberg AP) 



RANfA 

COMMERC3ALE 

ITALIANA 


A JM-Stak Cmps* w# RbjshbI «a ti Ken. toy ■ 5. ftsa Sab ■ Fitod a Wa n to Begat 

d Co^ms had bn to Cdifl a Wan ■ Cqtt Sm L i.OSfljnimoOO ■ Sbfctt) teme L JSJOIUFjODC 
Banca Comm* Uaa (kw - tobi ftgao d Bartong Gnups Ntt JflEJ 


All Holders of Common Stock of Banca Commercial Italians 
(herein after, the "Bank”) are invited to attend the Ordinary and 
Extraordinary General Meeting at 10 a.m.. on 12th March 
1994. m Milan. Piazza BeJgfoioso 1 and. if necessary- for a sec- 
ond meeting on 15th March 1994, al the same time and place, to 

consider and act upon the following 


Agenda 


Onfinary Part 

- Presentation of Balance Sheet at 31st December 1993. Board of 
Directors' management Report. Auditors' Report and related re- 
solutions. 

- Any other business. 

Extraordinary Part 

- Proposal for merger of "ASTRA IMMOBILIARE Sri - Milan' and 
"Cl.TRE $ri - Milan" with the Banca Commercials Italiana SpA. 
Determination of merger conditions and formalities. Relevant 
resolutions and delegation of powers. 


Holders of Common Stock entitled to vote may attend the 
General Meeting provided that they herue deposited their shares at 
any Branch of the Bank or at Monte TrtoU SpA at least five days 
before the date of the General Meeting, in accordance with the 
provision of Art. 4 of Law No. 1745 of 29th December 1962. 
This condition also concerns all Shareholders who are already reg- 
istered at the Shareholders book. 


Shareholders may arrange to be represented at the Sharehol- 
ders' Meeting - In compliance with the provisions of an. 2372 of 
the Civil Code - by means of an ordinary proxy statement with sig- 
nature authenticated by a Member of the Board, a Bank Director 
or Official, a Notary or a Consular Aulhority. 


The Chairman 
of the Board of Directors 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 


** 


MARKET DIARY 


Europ 
Keep 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dopaidta 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
slipped against the Deutsche mark 
and yen after a jump in German 
money-supply growth spurred sen- 
timent that European interest rates 
were not likely to come down soon. 

The US. currency dosed in New 
York at 1 .7050 DM, compared with 

Foreign Exchange 

1.7095 Tuesday, and at 104.200 yen. 
compared with 104.550. 

Although (be Bundesbank attrib- 
uted most of the surge in its M-3 
money aggregate to special factors, 
dealers saw The 20.6 percent jump as 
a sign the German rates will not be 
lowered in the near term. 

"This strong growth in M-3 has 
been holding up the Bundesbank 
all along,*' one analyst said. 

Reports that the U.S. govern- 
ment was considering reviving a 
rule calked Super 301 , which would 
allow it to slap Japan with stiff 
penalties for blocking US. trade, 
kept the dollar under pressure 
against the yen. 


e Rate Talk 
s Dollar Down 


President Bill Clin ton said no de- 
cision had been made on the contro- 
versial trade issue, but many dealers 
were skeptical of the situation. 

The dollar has been sensitive to 
developments in the trade dispute 
between the United States and Ja- 
pan because of prevailing senti- 
ment that the U-S. government en- 
dorses a stronger yen as a method 
of reducing Japan's trade surplus. 
A strong yen makes Japanese 
goods expensive for U.S. consum- 
ers and makes UJ5. goods cheap for 
Japanese consumers. 

But U.S. Trade Representative 
Mickey Kan lor said the govern- 
ment’s trade policy has had no ef- 
fect on the yen’s level and he played 
down the risk of a “tit-for-tat” 
trade war with Japan. 


The dollar slipped to 5.8020 
French francs from 5.8185 Tuesday 
and to 1.4310 Swiss francs from 
1.4385. The pound strengthened to 
$1.4964 from SI. 4895. 

( Reuters, AFX, Knight-Ridder) 


MARKETS: Interest-Rate Fears 


Continued from Page I 

banks declined to lend to business 
in a credit crunch, “so they loaned 
cheap cash to each other, and peo- 
jle borrowed money to buy 


pie oor 
bonds.” 


“When the Fed raised interest 
rates.” he said, “people who owned 
bonds on this leveraged basis de- 
cided they didn't want to borrow 

HY.Stocka 

money to hold them more, so we 
now are in the process of redistrib- 
uting bonds from leveraged to un- 
leveraged buyers. It's lie a fire 

sale.” 

What Mr. Soss was describing 
was the in-and-out movements of 
hedge funds that borrowed heavily 
to plunge into European bond mar- 
kets and then balled out, leaving 
huge vacuums, like George Soros' 
Quantum Fund, and many Wall 
Street funds less known to the pub- 
lic 

“It will take lime to redistribute 
these bonds at prices people are 
willing to pay, and this has very 
iiule to do with supposedly rational 
fundamentals in the economy,” 
Mr. Soss said. “Stock markets, who 
are the tail on this dog, will have to 
wait until prices meet market lev- 
els." 

This unwinding has also affected 
currency markets which had ex- 
pected the dollar to strengthen 
against the Japanese yen as the 
U3. economy improved and were 
caught short when the Clinton ad- 
ministration adopted a tough trade 


strategy against Japan, sending the 
dollar down against the yen. 

But this put the a dminis tration's 
policies in direct contradiction to 
the Fed. because a weaker dollar 
may mean more inflation, winch is 
exactly what the Fed is trying to 
prevent with higher rates. It left 
markets troubled, confused, and 
distrustful of government, said Mr. 
Johnson. 

“We are the world’s largest debt- 
or and Japan is the largest creditor, 
and you can't hold up the world's 
investors with this kind of political 
gamesmanship.’’ said Robert Fal- 
coner of Aubrey Jones & Ox, a 
Wall Street bond house. 

He pointed out that although 30- 
year bond yields at first rose only 
about 10 basis points — or 10 hun- 
dredths of a percentage point — to 
6.41 percent m the two weeks after 
the Fed's change of direction on 
Feb. 4, they climbed almost 40 ba- 
sis points in the next fortnight, ac- 
celerating immediately after Feb. 
1 1 when trade talks in Washington 
reached an impasse. 


Va> Auadotod Prau 


March? 


The Dow 



S O H.O J. F U 
•1998 . 1994 


IHT 


NYSE Most Actives 


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Dow Jonas Averages 


Open Wrt Law Lost Cbg. 

Indus 37512? 38324? 37S&76 3831 Jt +ZL51 
Trans 17290S 174003 1717J1 1731.06-l<77 
UH 208.01 2M.90 306.96 311 A* «Ul 
Comp 13514? 137440 13S201 137XS* .2.12 


Standard A Poor's Indoses 


HMi Low cuae arot 
Industrials 5413 535.90 5443 +OS5 

Trtmso. 4213 4153 «H33 —13 

Utilities 16113 159 M 1423 +1.14 

Flnanco 433 423 <3.15—03 

SPOT 4643 457.67 46441 +037 

SP IDO <3226 42527 <3017 +046 


NYSE Indexes 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


awe 


High LfiW Prttr.CfeM 


917 

93D 

941 

IUL 

lUL 

iul 


Hah Low LOW On. 

Composite 35741 25440 25747 —034 

tadusfnols 31845 31173 317.93 -032 

Transp. 266.99 34X59 265.78 —141 

Utility H7.7B 21*03 21744 *1.04 

Knew 7)243 30054 21055 -1.48 


NASDAQ Indexes 


M Lw lot Os. 


Composite 

mdustrtts 

Bonks 

Insurance 

FtnancB 

Tronso. 

Telecom 


1823 

82541 

685.10 

91648 

88249 

79069 

1713 


77X25 7823 —546 
8113 82541 —445 
681.15 68249 —7.79 
90942 91&48 -001 
8783 8813 -849 
784.17 790.12 —53 
133 17141 —iH 


AMEX Stock Index 


Food 

COCOA ILCE1 

Storing per nMtrle ten-lets oil ■ teas 
Mar B9T 894 898 BW 895 

Mar 910 911 918 m 916 

JOI 92 922 929 92H 927 

Sep 932 933 941 932 *40 

MC 945 947 954 M5 IUL 

Mar 960 962 967 961 ruj. 

Mar 970 974 975 975 iul 

Est. volume: iul 
COFFEE (LCE) 

Dalian per metric ton-tots ot 5 roes 
Mar 1,197 1400 1417 1300 1410 1412 

Mot U10 14U 1432 1,310 1422 148 

Jttf 1410 1411 1433 14W 1419 14ZI 

Sep 1410 1415 1430 1415 1422 1423 

Not 142? 1423 1435 1423 lift. 1420 

Jan T48I 1422 149 1419 HA 1427 

Mar 1415 1420 1435 1431 NA 1427 

Est volume: iul 

HM Low Clou CMoe 
WHITE SUGAR IMattO 
Qattarc per Metric (wrists of a ton 

32740 32540 w« 32600 — 850 
32300 XTIJB 3213 32300 — 040 
301 JO 30850 30800 30Z5D— U0 
N.T. N.T. 29600 SKUJ0 — 2J0 
N.T. N.T. 29650 299 50 — 140 
or N.T. N.T. 296J0 30800 — 280 
Est. volume: 1417. Open InL: 12410. 


May 

AW 

OCt 


Metals 


prevtous 
Bid At 


High Low urn Oig. 
469.96 IH m 46*23 — XM 


Dow Jone* Bond A 


! utilities 
Industrials 


10114 

101.63 

10446 


C V90 
—026 

— 0.15 

— 837 


Market Sales 


AMEX Most Actives 



VOL High 

Law 

LPtf 

On. 

ExpLA 

114*40 Ito 

to 

Ito 

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EchoBay 

SPDR 

7*11 l?Vk 
5755 4*u/ u 

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NYSE Diary 



Oase 

7B3 

Vwc. 

716 

Declined 

1407 



500 

610 


3770 


NewhBghs 

73 


New Lows 

1*0 



AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Decfaned 
Uncharged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New lows 


185 

452 

205 

842 

7 

31 


229 

378 

237 

834 

12 

22 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 


Talcd issues 
New Highs 
New lows 


ion 

2081 

1636 

4809 

57 

117 


1187 

1801 

1818 

4804 

94 

100 


NYSE 4 pjn. volume 36U3B0O8 

NYSE nrev. cons, dose 371425480 

Amo* 4 *m. volume 25.lsi.iw 

A/naxprev. cons, close 20478600 

NASDAQ 4 ML volume 398.928000 

NASDAQ arev. 4 am. volume 307408400 


Close 

Bid Ask 
ALUMINUM (KWh Grade) 

□odan per metric tea 
Spat 12A5Q 3249.31 12885Q MSUB 

Forward 1272J0 127100 130640 130740 

COPPER CATHODES (HM Grade) 

Dollars per metric too 
spot 184950 185050 154540 184680 

Forward 187280 187250 186940 187800 

LEAD 

Dollars per metric too 

soot 4490 Afl >0O 4«_50 4S65D 

Sward 46100 46440 47000 471 JO 

Dot iars per metric tan 

Spat cram say; nn owfnn 5815J0 

Forward 566000 568SJ0 5BSSJ0 584540 

TIN 

Dollars per metric tan 

Soot 533000 534090 54 KUO S415J0 

Forward 537000 538008 544500 545800 

ZINC (Special High Grade) 

Dolors per metric tan 

Scot 935J0 936JD 945JS 946J0 

Forward 95150 954J0 96150 96400 


N.Y.S.E. Odd-Lot Trading 


Buy 

sale* 

Short* 

997,431 

1,65X590 

137,112 

91+499 

1A53J61 

79J8G 

940736 

94SL2SB 

1450717 

1J32.194 

54775 

169450 

961J44 

1+10753 

41453 


Mar. 1 
Feb. V 
Feb. 23 
Feb- 24 
Feb. 23 

•/ncfuOedtn the sates Huures. 


SAP 100 Index Option* 


March 2 
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Corn: total MLffc DM eem bit 3UI0 
tads: total veLsm.- Mel aeenlot HUB 
Source: CBOE. 


Spot ComnMxUtles 


Commodty 
Aluminum, lb 
caHee.BrtxL.Ri 
C opper e ta ctrotvltc. lb 
Iran FOB, ton 
Leod, ID 
Sliver, troy az 
Steel (scrap), Ian 
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IUL 

870 

09775 

21300 

834 

504 

13303 

■u. 

84496 


0585 
870 
a .9745 
21300 
034 
5 l34 
13X33 


84539 


To Our Readers 

London International Financial 
Futures Exchange prices were not 
available for this edition because of 
problems at the source. We regret 
the inconvenience. 


To our readers in Austria 

It's never boon easier 
to subscribe and save. 
hdcaB toll-free: 

0660-8155 
or fcuc 06069-175413 


Industrials 

HU Low Lost sow* cwm 
GASOIL (IPE) 

UJ. doltan pv metric ton+ois ot tao tons 
Mar 14X75 14850 Ml 35 14100 +825 

Apt M1O0 14008 14850 1405Q +105 

Mar 14000 13923 17920 13900 +833 

Jim 14859 14800 14800 14809 +QJ5 

Jol 14225 14200 1422$ 1482$ +875 

Aafi N.T. N.T. N.T. 14L5D +100 

■SfP I46J5 M6JS 14675 U6J5 +100 

Oct 14900 MMB 14900 MBS +875 

MOV 1 31 75 15X50 151 JO 15X75 +108 

DM 15X75 15X50 15X50 15135 +835 

•fan 15525 1S4J5 15<7S 15X75 + XD0 

FB8 15525 154.73 15473 13*20 +875 

Est vetume: 9799. Open im. 128916 

BRENT CBU08 OILUPE) 

ILS.donan per bmrel-fats of UM barreb 
Aar 1X71 I3L53 1X50 1X60 +OB3 

MW 1185 1345 1349 

-tad 1197 1315 1X92 

M 102 KOI MOI 

Ap* 14,19 14.15 14.15 

SW 1428 U28 108 

oa N.T. N.T. N.T. 

7*OV N.T. N.T. N.T. 


N.T. N.T. N.T. 


1308 —OBI 
T3J6 —tun 
1401 +801 
14.15 +802 
U33 +803 
MOV —003 
1406 —801 
1422 -801 


Est. vakmo: 27213 . Open In*. 38T74 


Dividends 


Compa n y 


Par Amt Pay 
IRREGULAR 

3-18 


Glaxo HoMtoes x 0323 

i-awanwntNrADZ 

INCREASED 
MMICoS Q 04 

Son DtefioGGE. Q 28 

REDUCED 

Twtta Total Return M 

INITIAL 

CasevGenStrn - 02 

REGULAR 


Ml 

3-10 


+15 

4.15 


07 3-11 >24 


AUmorkaProp 

Am Coo Bd Fd 
AmCoP F«HMIg A. 
AmCoB FnflMtaB, 
AmCop GvSeCur 
AmCop TexMunSec 
BWI P Hold A. 

Bk Novo Scottag 
Bk United Fin A. 
Bowmor Instrum 
Sowne&Ca 
Devon Energy 
EMC Insur 
FCBFtad 
Fldeiitv Nti Fin 
FSl Mississippi 
Firmer Fin 
KemperHglneo 
Kemper Mu 111 Mkl 
Kemper Muni men 
Kemper Strut Muni 
MF5 Chorter 
MFSGvMkt 
MFS lntermed 
MFSMulftMlt 
MFSMUhl Inca 
MFS Sod Voter 
PS Business A. 
portners Pf Yld A. 
Partner Pf Yta ir. 
Parmer PI 111, 
Patriot Prm Dv 1 
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PubStaraee vi. 
Pubs tra vn. 
Pub5travin. 
PutiStra IX. 
PubSttfiX. 

PubStra XI. 
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PubStrg XIV. 
PubStra XIX. 
pubstraxv. 
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Pubstraxvn. 
PubStra xvr ip. 
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Resource Mis 
Rural Bk Cdog 
20tti Century Ind 
20tfl century Ind 


Q 04 
Q 283 
M 0423 
M 0345 
M OSS 
M 045 

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29 4-5 

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Q 075 
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3-21 

3-15 

3-18 

>15 

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3-31 

M3 


_ 075 3-31 

Q 29 >14 
M 075 >15 
M OB 3-15 
M 0725 >15 
M 068 >15 
M 065 >15 
M 044. >15 
M 046 >15 
M 047 >15 
M 058 >15 
M .7375 >15 
Q AO >31 
Q 24 Ml 
O 25 3-31 
Q 21 >31 
M 0667 >13 
Q Ol >11 
M 048 >10 
Q A3 >15 
Q 25 >31 
Q 28 >31 
Q 22 Ml 
Q 29 Ml 
Q 25 >31 
0 24 >31 

Q 21 3-31 
0 24 Ml 

Q .10 >31 
G 25 Ml 
Q 27 Ml 
a 25 >31 
Q 24 Ml 
O .V >31 
M 26 >15 
■29 +25 5-21 
Q .16 >16 
O .16 >19 


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Ml 

Ml 

Ml 

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Ml 

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Ml 

Ml 

3-30 

3-31 

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Ml 

Ml 

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U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


U.S. to Fund Semiconductor Center 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) —Vice President A1 Gore said Wednesday 
the U-S. government would spend tens of mflbons of dollars to help 
American companies “develop the computer chips of 21st century.’" 

Mr. Gore spoke at a ceremony at which it was announced that the 
government would provide S50 million over five years to help establish a 
center for the simulation and modeling of semiconductor materials, 
manufacturing processes and chip design. Hie $ 1 00 mOtion center will be 
set up by the Department of Energy and the semiconductor industry, 
which wlB pick up the other half of the cost. Energy Secretary Hazel R. 
O’Leary said. 

Commerce Secretary Ron Brown said the goveromentwouJd also seek ■ 
funding for a S25 million, five-year National Semiconductor Metrology y 
Program to bdp the industry meet challeng e s, in c lu din g developing small 
measuring took. 

• Motorola Inc. said Wednesday that Parsytec GmbH of Germany 
would employ the PowerPC microprocessor, marking the drip's first use 
in massively paralld processing systems. PowerPC was jointly developed 
by Motorola. International Business Machines Corp. and Apple Com- 
puter Inc. 

The chip is being used by Apple. IBM, Canon Inc. and some Taiwanese 
computer manufacturers for systems ranging from notebooks to worksta- 
tions. Parsytec will use tire PowerPC 601 in the design of its PowerX- 
plorer line of systems. A massively parallel processing system relies on the 
division of computing tasks among many low-cost processors to complete 
sets of very complex instructions. 

New-Home Sales Plunged in January 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new homes in the United Slates 
plunged 20.1 percent in January, the steepest decline in nearly 14 years, 
the government said Wednesday. 

In a separate report, the Commerce Department said tire UB. mer- 
chandise trade deficit shot up 37.9 percent, to S132J bQtion in 1993, the 
largest deficit since a SI59.6 billion gap in 1987. Both UB. imports and 
exports increased, compared with 1992, bat imports jumped 10 percent, 
to $589.2 biSion, while exports rose only 4 percent, to S456.8 billion. 


froaaoal; hotiM la cnnndli i n bob) at- 
mourn y; a rni c a tarty; H —M OOON 


To subscribe in Franco 

just call, toU free, 

05 437437 


said that sdles of new homes totaled 695.000 at a seasonally adjusted 
annual rate, down from a revised 8701000 in December, when rales 
jumped 13 percent The January decline was blamed on bad weather and 
rising interest rates. The Northeast posted the only gain. Nationwide, tire 
decline was the largest since sales fell 21.9 percent in April 1980. 

Ford Motor to Cut Its Use of Platinum 

DEARBORN, Michigan (Bloomberg) - Ford Motor Co. said Wednes- 
day it would increase use of a catalytic converter that employs only 
palladium and no platinum, helping set off a drop in platinum price s. 

Ford developed the palladium-only catalyst wim Engelhard Corp. and 
Johnson Mathhey Co. It said it would use palladium-only converters in 
emissioos-control systems of some 1995 model medium-duty trucks and 
1996 model rear-drive large cars. 

Platinum for April delivery fell as low as S385-80 an ounce before 
recovering to $391.90 an ounce, downSI .60. About 40 percent of demand 
for platinum comes from the auto industry worldwide. P alladi um prices 
rose following the announcement, but then ended lower, falling SI 20. to 
$ 1 34.90 an ounce. 

For the Record 

General Motors Corp. and the United Auto Workers union reached 
tentative agreement Wednesday on a new labor contract at GM*s Okla- 
homa City assembly plant for Buick Century and Okismobile Ciena mid- 
sized cars, about one hour before a deadline set by the union that could 
have sent 4,500 workers out on strike. (Bloomberg) 

Time Warner Inc.’s Time Warner Cable unit announced a six-month 
delay in testing In Orlando. Florida, of interactive television services like 
movies-on -demand and home shopping. The test in 4,000 homes was to 
have begun in April, but Time Warner said that the in-home hardware 
and the software needed were not ready. { AP ) 


IMPACT: Panicky SeBrOff in European Bonds Raises Fear Among Analysts of a p Serious Financial Accident 9 


Continued from Page l 
effect on individual perceptions of 
wealth than declining bond prices. 

The bond market tends to be 
dominated by professional institu- 
tional investors and, bonds, regard- 
less of how low they trade, are 
redeemed at face value. 

“Declines in equity prices," said 
Jan Loeys at J. P. Morgan in Lon- 
don, “have a direct effect on wealth 
and can impact on growth.” 


What is needed now “to dispel 
fear and re-establish confidence,” 
said Mr. Magnus, is the steadying 
hand of central banks. “They have 
a role to play.” he added, by cutting 
interest rates. 

Dealers reported that the partial 
late recoyeiy in bond prices, which 
helped lift stock prices off their 
lows, was a result of discreet pur- 
chases by British, French, Italian 
and Spanish officials. 


But as the upset touched off by 
news of a huge increase in German 
money-supply growth in January, 
which was widely interpreted as 
further reducing prospects of lower 
European interest rates, only a co- 
ordinated cut in rates led by Ger- 
many frill calm the markets, ana- 
lysts said. 

Fear about Goman intentions 
were fueled by comments from 
Gudntram Palm, a member of the 


Bundesbank's central council and 
president of the Baden-Wurttem- 
berg centra] bank, who said be cur- 
rently saw “do room for further 
cuts in central bank interest rates." 

Nevertheless, Norbert Walter at 
Deutsche Bank in Frankfurt, said 
the Bundesbank's emphasis on the 
extraordinary reasons fueling the 
money-supply growth, indicated 
that “it is willing and will try to 


reduce rales despite the unfavor- 
able numbers." 

“As I see it, we wffl have a lower 
rate next week,” Mr. Waiter said. 

Germany's important money- 
market rate was cm on Tuesday by 
a thin three bass points, to 5.97 
percent from 6 percent 

Mr. Walter noted that “the more 
the Deutsche mark improves, the 
greater the possibility for a larger 
cut" in rates next week. 


The mark appreciated virtually 
across the board Wednesday. The 
dollar traded as low as 1.6950 DM, 
but recovered in New York later in 
the day, rising to 1.7050. down a 
tad from the previous dose of 
1.7095 DM. 

For Mr. Potts, the “most strik- 
ing” aspect of the crisis in Europe- 
an financial markets “is the ab- 
surdly pessimistic view” on how 


low short-term interest rates are 
beaded. 

Markets are currently anticipat- 
ing a level of 5.3 percent for the 
year-end low in German short-term 
rates rather than the 4 percent he 
and many other analysts say they 
believe is more likely." 

To shift the psychology of the 
market, to restore confidence, we 
need some tangible official signal." 
Mr. Potts said. “The ball is now in 
the court of the Bundesbank." 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agones Fima taesM Monti 2 


Amsterdam 

6500 


ABN Amro HU 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
AhoW 
Akzo 
AMEV 

DSM 
Elsevier 
Fokkar 
GisLBrocadas 
HBG 
Holnefcen 
HooDOvans 

Hunter Douglas 
IHC Calami 
Intar Mueiler 
lnll Nederland 
KLM 
KNP BT 
Medllovd 
Oce Grlnten 
Poklioed 
Ptilllp* 

Pol vg ram 
RoboCo 
Rodrnnoo 
ROikKO 
Roretita 
Royal Dutch 
Stark 
Unilever 
Vondmmaren 
VNU 

Waltare/Kluaw 115.10 

mema* 


67 
57 

9870 9850 
49 JO 5840 
20X60 71860 
7660 70 

4120 4320 
7050 7320 
10760 11020 
170 18020 
20J0 2120 
53 54.10 
28560 28750 
224.10 22870 
5890 6000 
06 0800 
4100 4X40 
85 JV 87 

81 JO 82» 
4840 48J0 
4560 45.10 
69 JO 71 
7560 70 

51.10 5450 
46 47 JO 

76.90 77.10 
134J0 12620 

6100 6200 
1 27 JO 1292B 
94J0 9670 
201.40 204.10 
4090 42 

210.70 21390 

47.90 4V.70 
170 10120 

1W 


Brussels 


Acec-UM 

AG Fin 

Arbed 

Bar oo 

Bckaert 

Cackerlii 

Cabeoa 

Oeltaba 
E learo Del 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevaert 
Kredtetoank 
PtlroNno 
Powertln 
Royal Betae 
BaeGen" 
SocGfln 
Safina 
Sotvov 
Trodrtel 
UCB 


2570 2625 
2770 2880 
4340 4400 
22W 2370 
24000 349S0 
174 178 

3630 5630 
1412 1452 
6250 6460 
1550 1620 
4270 4300 
9480 9640 
7310 7410 
10125 IQZ75 
3785 3323 
5730 5920 
8330 BOW 
UB 2700 7790 
14900 15200 
14550 1477S 
10625 11175 
23975 2*375 




Frankfurt 



AEG 

Allianz HoM 
Aiiana 
Asko 
BASF 
Bayer 

Bon’. Hvpobank 
Bay veretnsBk 
BBC 

BHF Bank 

BMW 

Commerctxmfc 337 JO 34X50 
Continental 
Daimler Benz 
Drouwa 
Dl BaOcnck 

Deutsche Bank 
DouoWS _ _ 

OresdnerBank 385J0 401 

FeUtmveMe B4J0 331 
F KrwsHoescfl 17440 150 
Haraaner 330 330 

Henkel 685 614 

Hachik* loan 1071 

Hoecnji swjDa&K 

HoUmom 940 963 

Horten 225 231 

IWKA 37638250 

Kail Sdz 149 jo IS? 

Karutaffi 532 544 

Kawma< 443471 JO 

KHD 131134JTO 

Ktaeekner werke 129 129 
Linde M5W7.31 

LvntKWM 1685)17150 

MAN 42042X50 

Maanesmann 483 4)9 

Metallacsdl 
Muenai Rueck 
P«rsef>* 

PreuBioa 
PWA 
RWE 

Rhelnmetall 
Satie ring 

set 

Siemens 
Thywen 
Varfo 
veha 
VEW 
Vlag 

voikswoaen 
Walla 


107 JO I94J0 
3340 3370 
079 890 

461 474 

238 22b 
426 443 
31332X50 
1015 1041 
392 TO 
670 JO 670 
25? 253 

351 362 

461J0 474 
358 350 
47740700 
43KW434.5B 
795 000 

;2|2U2 


Helsinki 

Amer-YMvma 
Enso-Gutaelt 
Huhtomafcl 
KLOlP. 

Kymmone 
Metro 
Nokia 
Pohtoia 
Repoia 
Stockmann 

MS&SMP 


155 150 

43 4X20 
214 222 

13 1X2D 
124 126 

225 234 

332 315 

96 100 

107 108 

308 299 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Ask! 33 3X75 

Calhar Poeltic 12J0 122B 
Cheung Kong 42J0 43J0 
China Light Pwr 41 JO 4X73 
Dairy Farm Inn 11.90 1X40 
Haoa Luna Dow 1X40 14 

Hang Seng Bank 57 6? 

Henderson Lana 46J0 47J5 
HK Air Ena. 46 46 

HK China Gas 1800 I960 
HK Electric 2450 2400 
HK Land 2450 25 

HK Realty Trust 2X60 2410 
HSBC Hokfings 102 108 
HKShOTOHtlS I2J0 1X60 
HK Telecomm 14J0 MOO 
HK Ferry 1070 11.10 

Hutch Whampoa 33 3*25 
HnuDn 2840 2 i 

jantlne Math. 6450 66 

Jardlne Str Hid 20 3875 
Kowloon Motor 15J0 16.10 
Mandarin Orient 1890 11 OS 
Miramar Hotel 23.90 2420 
New WWW Dew 3175 3250 
SHK Props 56J0 58 

5MUX 405 4.90 

Swire PdC A 53 5450 

Tai aieung Pros lljo 1Z<0 
TVE 159 165 

Whorl Hold JOJO 31 
Wing On Co Inti NA NA 
Wlnsor Ind. TX70 13 
Hone Sena Index : 907701 
Prevtaas : 1S148J6 


Johannesburg 

AECI 

OStoA 


Anglo Amer 

Bartows 

Blyuoor 

Butteb 

De Beers 

Drietantoln 

Gencor 

GFSA 

Harmony 

Htahweid Steel 

Kloof 

HtttaarAGro 

Randfontela 

Rusotat 

SA Brens 
St Helm 

Steal 
Wefltom 
Western Deep 



IN 190 


London 


Abbey Non 

490 

490 

AIIM Lvora 
Ario wigglra 
Argyll Croup 

<22 

246 

MB 

<30 

2J1 

149 

Ass Bril Foods 

5.56 

554 

BAA 

10.16 

10.13 

BA* 

490 

49B 

Bank Scotland 

XW 

XI* 

Barclays 

5-30 

5J5 

Bass 

126 

517 

BAT 

4J0 

*43 

BET 

IJ3 

1J0 

Blue Circle 

1*5 

X42 

BOCGnus 

7215 

7j0* 

Boots 

<27 

SJO 

Bowaier 

495 

50* 

BP 

X52 

X59 

Brit Airways 

<30 

<39 

Brit Gas 

3.15 

119 

Brit Steel 
BritTeteasn 

IJ* 

435 

1J0 

<31 

8TR 

X55 

X61 1 

Cable Wire 

<56 

<57 

Cadburv Sch 

<99 

<99 

Canaan 

<03 

<83 

Coats vlyeUa 

ZJB 

240 

Comm Union 

<11 

<06 

Cowrtauids 

UB 

507 

ECC Group 

<W 

5 

Enterprise Oil 

<21 

43*1 

Eurgluimet 

540 

535 

FUOM 

1J9 

136 

Fono 

243 

240 

GEC 

110 

X12 

Gen-i Acc 

*40 

<48 

Glaxo 

<J3 

*J5 

Grand Mat 

<01 

4*9 

GRE 

106 

X10 

Guinness 

118 

510 

GUS 

5.9? 

595 

Horaon 

220 

274 

Hinsdown 

IT) 

1-73 

HSBC HMas 

US 

097 

ICI 

131 

748 



Clare Prev. 


544 

543 

Kingfisher 

585 

IBS 

LadtBbke 

200 

211 

Land Sec 

7J05 

7.17 

Laportc 

8.10 

025 

Lasmo 

12* 

120 

Legal Gen Grp 

5 

492 


500 

590 

Marts So 

410 

422 

MEPC 

<95 

506 

Natl Power 

<00 

490 

NatWest 

<92 

403 

NthWst Water 

536 

552 

Pearson 

645 

57V 

P0iO 

<87 

6JB 

Pllktagtafl 

PawerGen 

133 

570 

1.92 

575 

Prudanttat 

124 

333 

RankOrg 

1074 

WJ2 

Retflgnd 

548 

507 

Reed Inti 

0.95 

903 


19 J6 

W9S 

RMC Group 

9J3 

92? 

Rolls Ruycb 

148 

140 

Rathmn (unit) 

<17 

<15 

Ravai Scot 

<41 

<52 

RT2 

044 


Sainsburv 

341 

1*0 

Scat Newaas 

546 

553 

Scot Power 

412 

<1* 


1.19 

121 

Severn Trent 

547 

576 

Shell 

7 

709 

State 

197 

<05 

Smith Nephew 

147 

147 

SmltMCIineB 

X92 

197 

Smith (WH) 

Sun Alliance 

504 

50/ 

342 

X4U 

Tata & Lvle 

42* 

423 


2J6 

224 

Thom EMI 

1007 

1000 

Tomkins 

251 

253 

TSB Group 

240 

244 

Uni lever 

11.10 

11.18 

utd Biscuits 

346 

343 

Vodafone 

507 

*07, 

War Loon 3Vk 

*400 

40*3 

Wellcome 

*43 

<54 

Whitbread 

543 

552 

Williams Hitas 

092 

193 

Willis Corruon 

2.17 

XI* 


Madrid 

BBV 3200 3245 

Bco Canfrot Htap. 2755 2820 

Banco Santander 6520 6720 

CEPSA 2900 3000 

Dragodas 2325 2355 

Endesa 7210 7330 

Ercros 156 154 

Iberdrola I 1015 1030 

Repsol 4430 4530 

T abaca tera 3950 4050 

Teletontaa 1835 ION 

^geranmtax: 31816 


Milan 

Banco Comm 6034 6020 
Boston! 

Benetton group 
Ck» 


ikm my 
23110 25920 
702 483 

2095 2138 
2502 TtiS 
2350 2560 
1773 1020 
791 810 

4650 4700 
1705 1735 
38330 3920) 
17605 17760 
11635 11690 
3199 5250 
37000 37390 

1480015150 

1118 1132 
2275 ?334 
4110 4115 
34700 25010 
9600 9840 
3140 3SS 
Sen Paolo Torino 10650 10925 
SIP 3945 4QJ0 

3MH 3625 3701 

Sola 1850 1015 

Simula 340N33798 

SUM . 430 4440 

ToroAssi Rbp 26400 27330 


CIR 

CrwHttl 
Enichem 
Ferfln 
Ferfln Rlss 

gr^tmea 

Generali 

IFI 

Unicom 

Uataes 

ItatmoWflore 

Mediobanca 

Montadtaan 

Oitvetll 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rkxnceme 
Setoetn 


M1B 




m2 


Montreal 


Alctoi Alumlrum 3IW 30 
Bank Montreal 28fa 29U 
Bell Canada 
Bombardier B 
Combtor 
rntaitin 
Dominion Text A 
Donohue A 


MocMIlltai Bt 
Natl Bk Conoco 
Power Com. 
Quebec Tel 
QuebewA 
Quebecor B 
Tgksloba 

Unlva 

Vfdeatron 


48 Vi 4 8V. 

2me 20 
20V. 21 

TVt 7Vt 
7H TVi 
26W 26Vr 
2» S3 
KM IIP* 
32 2148 
2? 2216 
» 

20 20 

am Ji 
616 6 w 

2Nk 30 

ix : ian Ji 


Paris 


Accor 689 709 

Air Ltoulde 807 ais 

Alcatel Alsthom 69? 709 

AXO 1420 1472 

Bancolre (del 619 636 

BiC 


1310 1315 


4010 4025 
271 27840 
14870 142 

1375 1395 


BNP 

SSZSF 

Camraur 
CCF. 

Cerus 
Charaeurs 

Omenta Franc 381 JM 
aubMed 371 373 

Eit-Ajuitatne 40060 488 

Eh-Sanafl 1002 1031 

EuraOtoer XL« 3350 
Gen. Earn 2619 2&10 
Havas 447 461.10 

i metal _ 646 659 

LotargeCappee 45850 45750 
Legrond 5560 5748 

Lvon. eoux 553 568 

Oreol (L-) -1190 1242 

L.VJILH. 3823 3092 

Mnlra-Htw+iette 1S3 156 

MJdltiln B 24600 25870 
Moulinex 135.40 136 

Paribas 503 513 

Pecninev Infl 187 i»i 
Pernod- RJ cord 400 4O2J0 
Peugeot 843 *34 

Printernps (Au) 935 950 

Rodlotechniaua 510 527 

Rt»-PoutencA 13450 137J1 
Raff. Sf. Louis 1640 1680 
Redoute fLo) 881 900 

Saint Gobaln 660 663 

SPH 570 585 

5te Generale 696 782 

Suez 326 334 

ThcmswvCSF 152JD 186 

Total 387 331 

UAP. 18L70 192J50 

Valeo 1395 1462 


Sao Paulo 

Bonce do Brasil 14J0 13 

Banespo 852 445 

Brodesai 10 10J0 

BrtXuaa 161 . 165 

Porsncponemo 1120 ujo 
P etrobras 112 112 

Tetotros 2940 3860 

Vole Rio Doce 7D Tt 
Varhj too 109.90 


Singapore 

Cerebos 8 S.W 

City Dev. 6J5 L70 

Das 11 JO .n 

FiroerNaoue 10 

Gentlno 17.10 1778 

Goktan Hope PI 208 2JB 

How Por 3M 3M 

Hume Industries 50S US 

incneeM £65 £75 

10JO 1840 
X12 124 

— 103 109 

MokmmBcnks 025 9J0 

1X60 1160 

SJU 005 
728 700 
1X10 1X70 
SOO SOO 
302 170 
720 705 
7j48 70S 
MOO 1408 
890 806 


KLKepeng 
Lum Cheng 


OCBC 
OUB 
QUE 

Sembawcng 
Shanarfio 

Stale Darbv 
SIA 

Spore Land 
Store Press 

Stag Steamship . 

Store Teieaxnm 164 306 

Strolls Trading 306 306 

UOB 1890 JOJO 

DDL 224 Z2I 

: 330449 


Stockholm 


AGA 
Assa A 
AstraA 
Atta Copco 
Etadrahm B 
Ericsson 
Esseita-A 
delstonkw 
Investor B 
Norsk Htono 
Procardia AF 
SandvHi B 

SCA-A 

S-E Banfeen 

SkandiaF 

Sfeanska 

SKF 

Slara 

TretieboroBF 

Volvo 


436 438 
551 Sfl 
176 178 

461 460 

304 396 

340 345 
116 HQ 
in 1(0 
107 191 
25636X50 
133 139 

128 129 

140 141 

60 61J0 
167 171 

202 206 
142 140 

«Q 434 
a 86 

639 649 

175843 


Sydney 


*08 *.*4 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 

Bare) 

BouoaJnvHle 
Coles Myer 
Comalco 
CRA 
CSR 
Dunlap 
Fosters 8m 
Goodman Field 
iCi Austral ki 
Maoellan 
MIM 

Nat At0t Balk 
News Corp 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 

Pioneer Inn 

Nmndv Posetaon 215 X22 
OCT fMSOUTCM 1J1 1J8 

Santos 4 4JM 

TNT XT4 2j? 

Western Mining 6J5 7J0 
Westnoc Banking <90 <94 
Waadside <82 <05 

WaSTMT" 81 " 


17J0 17 JO 
<5 <50 
89? 1 

<95 <96 
<72 <73 
17.12 17J4 
<99 5 

540 5X3 
1J4 136 
1J7 1 JO 
1840 18*6 
220 210 
206 IN 
113* 11.96 
9.90 10 

<15 
X49 3J3 
116 122 


Tokyo 


Akal Electr 
Asahl Chemical 
AsrtU Gloss 
Bank ol Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

r rrkirt 

Dal Nippon Print 
Dolwa House 
Dai wa Securities 
Fanuc 
Full BO* 

Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 
Honda 

!to VokoOo 

Itochu , 

Japan Airlines 
kallma 
Kausal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Etocinds 
Matsu Elec Wta 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kaset 
Mttatoishl Elec 
Milsublshi Hev 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
MitsukosM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK insulaton 
Nlkko securities 
Nippon Kepoku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura 5ac 
NTT 

Olympus Opticsl 


Ricoh 
Sanyo Elec 
Sharp 
5hlmazu 
Shlnefsu Chetn 
Sows 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Owm 
Swni Marine 
Sumitomo MetaJ 
Taisel Carp 
Talsho Marine 
Takeda cnem 
■TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Efec Pw 
TopoanPrimtog 
Torav Ind. 

Tosh too 
Toyota , 
YamgicM Sec 
a:xKQ. 

NWteJ225:jW*5 
Previous : 2»2i7 


455 452 
699 714 
1170 1160 
1500 1630 
1540 1540 
1660 1700 
1270 132D 
1870 1930 
1670 1700 
1720 1010 
*270 4360 
2240 2320 
2470 2SJC 
1010 1030 
944 997 

806 BSD 
1740 1700 
5890 60*0 
698 *98 

650 
9*5 975 
2890 2910 
360 3*5 

1190 123? 
060 889 

*4* *43 

6710 *830 
1740 1770 
1190 1218 
2840 2370 
446 461 

588 600 

701 715 

1050 1070 
770 770 

930 940 

2060 2100 
1000 ION 
1030 1100 

1000 1030 

sS £ 

59! 604 

846 860 

2330 2390 
947BO 97900 

W7B 1080 
2610 2700 
741 787 

480 a 
1690 1730 
465 487 

2120 2N0 
61K MO 0 
3140 ZUO 

800 N3 

279 284 

693 70* 
821 854 

1240 1M 
4510 <590 
*55 *75 

1200 13S0 
3430 3490 
1340 1390 
661 

765 780 

2020 2050 

801 9Q2 


Toronto 


AbHiM Price 
ii»E«to 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Am Barrlck Res 
BCE 

Bk Nava Santa 
BC Gas 
BC Telecom 
BF Really Hds 
Bramaltg 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Camdpv 
C1BC 


17 17 

15* 15H 
6to 6% 
I9Vtj 19ta 
32W m 
40VJ 4M 
SOW 30% 
16 16 
2SW 2» 
nm nm 
043 0* 
** rvt 
6 6w 

<00 +N 
34VS 345V 


Canadian Poctflc 
Can Peckers 
Can Tire A 
Center 
Cara 

CCL ind B 
Clrwplex 
Comlnco 
ComvestExpl 
Dan bon Min B 

Dtekens on Min A 
Dofasco 
DvtaxA 
Echo Bay Mines 
Equity Silver A 
FCA inn 
Fed ind A 
Fletcher Oiall A 
FPl 
Gen tra 
GddCorp 
Gulf Cda Res 
Hees inti 
Hemlo GW Mines 
Hck I inner 


Hudson's Bay 


Inoo 
intarprov pipe 
Jarmock 
Labatt 
LabtawCo 
Mackenzie 
Magna intIA 
Maritime 


MacLeon Hunter 
MobonA 
Noma ind A 
Noranda Inc 


Norcen Energy 
Nthem Telecom 
Novo corp 
OStlOWD 
Pogurin A 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petroleum 
PWA Corp 
Rayroc* 


Rogers 0 
Rothmans 
Royal Bcxik Can 
Sceptre Res 
Scoffs Hosp 
S eooi um 
Sears Can 
Shell Con 
Sherri n Gordon 
SHL Systemnse 
Southard 
Sear Aerospace 
Sta toPA 
Talisman Energ 
Teck B 


Toronto Domn 
Torstar B 
Trortsalta Util 
TransCda Pips 
Triton Ftnl A 
Trtmoc 
Trliec A 
Unicorn Energy 

rSS&'TSWF 2 * 


221k 72* 
129k 13 

12te 12V, 
SPA « 
<30 <U 

9 Vi Nk 
3J5 <03 
191k 19*k 
TP* 22W 
024 025 
OH 6Vj 

34 23M 
876 879 
1698 171k 
873 896 
360 3AC 
7ta 7W 
7SF6 TO* 
J <90 
836 860 
*Vk 9W 
4J5 4J5 
1SW 14K 
12W 12H 
144k M4k 
18V, IffV. 
3IW 31U 
399k 39H 
3398 32^ 
329k 33W 
209k 2DW 
2Z9» 229k 
239k 23*k 
II 11 
6699 66 Vt 
24N 3 4% 
016 0te 
169k Wk 
249k 2596 
69k 696 

2596 2S96 
1396 139k 
1496 IS 
4096 4096 
996 796 

2296 ZJVr 

X30 XX 

3116 3296 
91k 99k 

124 19, 

179k to 
269k 279k 
2146 211k 
84 83 

2996 2*96 
1396 1396 
B'A “ 
3716 

796 ... 

3896 38>k 
11 '6 1116 
Wt 99k 

10 I7W 
It 10V. 
6* Mk 

2BJ6 7896 
24 Vk 349i 
17V6 17V, 
22 22 
24(6 2SVi 
15** 1596 
IF* 19(6 
425 <15 
16V, 

8e 
l 


096 

30 

796 


17 

087 

OLN 


Zurich 


B60 

635 


Adta inti B 216 729 

Aluwlsse B new 627 639 

BBC Orwn Bov B 1015 1044 
QbaGglpy B 
cs Holdings B 
Etafcfniw B 
Fischer B 
interaiscounl B 
J tl mall B 
LandlsGvr R 
Leu HUB 
MtovenAlek fl 
Nestle R 

Oerilk. BuehrteR 
P oro es a Hid B 
Roche H<>9 PC 
Satro Republic 
Santa B ^ 

Schindler B 
Suitor PC 
Surveillance 8 


Swiss Bn* Cant B 
Swiss ReirHurR 
Swtesclr R 
UBS 8 

WtatarthurB 
Zurich AS9B 

mtzm* 


616 
3710 
1215 1235 
2270 2350 
015 820 

935 951 
NA NA 
423 <35 
1230 1360 
Ml 147 
1500 ISOS 
0)00 6893 
144 1*2 

3760 3810 
7400 7300 
910 923 
1930 1980 
444 434 

<00 636 

730 009 

1362 1333 
700 732 
1390 1430 


U.S. FUTURES 

Vn Aaodtoed Pren 


Mw*h2 


Season Season 
Ugh Law 


Open HWi Low Oase Os Op mi 


Grains 

WHEAT tOOn ItobunMiun-tenB 
1949s JOT MOrW 1C 1*4 >6 147 

172 1D0 May 94 144*6 1.4S'* 143 Vi 

XS* IN juf 94 U49; 13*96 133 

L57V. 107 Sep 94 135V, 2J6V, US'* 

165 3JJ9 Deck* 143 V, 144 14) 

1569, X53 Ntor 93 

147H XU JU9S 

Est. soles 10.000 Tile’s soles 18336 
Tip's ooen 'm *1.24* ail 05 
WHEAT CABOT) Mk/nMnvTv. 

192 199 Mar 94 3Jt 158V, 3J6 

179V, 2S8 Atoy 94 3.-Q 14*6, >43 

XS5 257 J494 «'<■ X34 132V. 

LS5S 102 h Sep M 13* 235 U3* 

140 1179, Dec 94 W 141 Ml 

3J3<« X43'-».Wr95 

EsLstfei HA. Toe’s. toes X8S5 
Tue’jgoenW 27,930 pH 872 
CORN (CBOT) SAMeun+tnwTv Mars mtr o> 

1119* 7 37V. MOT 94 1B4VS 2JBSV. 2.83. 

1I4S. mnVir«l!3W 2.94 JW1- 

116V, 241 JU94 3.N 29696 293 It 

zn'i 240V,5eo»4 213 2J79S 7.BOV. 

173 >6 136V Dec 9J 748V, 2 UP:, 267'i 

179W 153 V> Mar 95 274*6 ITS 1 -. ITJVi 

1X3 173 May 95 

l«r. 174>AJi4 9S 741 181 ‘6 ITT** 

2589k 151 Dec*S 2JJ*i 2J4 2J3 

EV. iotas 4X000 Tue’s- sales 5*872 
Tue-sopenrt 379408 up 1153 
SOYBEA76 (CBOT) UMaimnwmv. Ju 4a n 
744 549 6. Mw 94 6.71 *41 V» 6.73'* 

741 5.924/^94 4,549, 4JS6V, tflO'* 

740 5.94V9 Jul94 *J7 449'*, L83 

7J5 620 Aug T4 <79": 641 674W 

649 Vk <17 Sap 94 <63 <65 <43 

7471k 5J5*kNOv94 <50 A 33 447V, 

<70 <16VkJwi9S <54VJ 647V, <53 

673'k <42 Mar 73 <40'a <42 64BV, 

<73 <47*kJUI9S 463Vk <45 442 

ISO 1 -, 341 V, Nov 95 <73' | <24 623 

EsI. safes 45J00 Tue'vuXes W.22* 

Toe’s ooen <m 137209 up 1070 
SOY BEAN MEAL I CBOT) >■ tons- aftn nor 
23740 IH3J0Mar94 Ml. 70 M2M 19140 

22740 15540 May 94 191*0 193.70 172Jtl 

230J0 1924D Jul 94 19X» 19440 19X70 

22X00 1 91 40 Aug 94 19240 19350 Vrt.K 

710J0 11940 Sap 94 19140 19IJ0 191.00 

20400 1B7.10C*J94 18940 1N40 18940 

70900 <40 Dec 94 18*30 19040 1B9J0 

HOJO 18640 ton 95 189 « 19850 18940 

mjQ 191 90 Mar 93 1B9J0 —040 

EsI. sates 28000 Tu+s. sales X335 

Tup’s open M M.973 up 1139 
SOYBEAN OB. (CBOT) ejaevaataHriMu 
3875 JU3Mor94 ■« 2849 1847 TOM 

to 45 2140 Moy 94 26.90 2B.95 2*49 7643 

TtX 21434AM 28.88 76SS 2«J7 7645 

79 JO 71 <5 Aug 94 2S4S 2840 2815 2815 

3 22405cpM 7745 27.90 7745 2748 
2745 22.1900 94 2743 2745 2490 K« 

2640 8 90 Dec 94 Jtffl M40 J<20 2423 

2645 2243 Jon 95 7*J3 76XS 2610 26.10 

as. is 25.S0MCT-9S 2608 

2<X 2i20May9S 2540 

EsL sales K000 Tue’s.satas 17,06* 

T lie’s open in* 109.039 up 1713 


buUW 
14? -(LOT ■- 2.31* 
34+6 -03XF* 1<466 
134 V, -041 17427 

UP* X9*ft 

344 -801 1971 

347 -0JB1 J 

137 36 


158’* tOilT** 4408 
X4* -044 9437 

13* *041 ’A 10420 

3.34* -aOff*. 2J04 
341 -L01 1411 

143 Vr -041 50 


743 V, -0.0114 104M 
ifl -0026.130,972 

744 — 0 02*6 105483 
741’— ftOI'6 73436 
L48'6— OOOlk 51972 
2J4'6 -00056 3477 

27* -am 29* 

Z90«,_aOOW 993 
2J4 * 04071 4*1 


UJ47 

61.740 

4<9*9 

7.136 

X71I 

25.177 

1.951 

355 

263 

913 


6J6’ 5-002 
641'. -003'.* 
<83*6-0435, 
<?6Vk-003 
<62 -041 
<to 16—041 
<53 -041 ’k 
<5BW — OJl’.’i 
642 —041 
<23* j -041 


19870 

1*110 

19240 

19060 

11940 

1(840 


I92JD -040 6JS 
19X10 -0« 31.7J1 
040 14J41 
060 7429 
0.90 1232 
0.70 2419 
050 8449 
030 938 

11 


—043 9446 
-041 JB4S3 
—045 v.ia 
—037 <874 
—030 <9* 
—022 <8*7 
-026 12457 
— 023 1.517 
—012 44 

— OIQ 2 


Tootgrpodertin Audrio 
ITiimrhewieaitar 
to hCmo^h and nt 
MalkHte 
06608155 
whs 06069- 1 754 1 3 


Livestock 

CATTLE ICMBR) «4DO«n.- uWnvt 
8275 7340 Apr 84 7«JC t«5 76.17 

7110 71454x184 7453 7470 7445 

7X47 70J0AUB94 7X33 73-40 7110 

74JJ0 71070094 7173 7172 73J0 

700 7243 Dec 94 74D0 7440 7190 

7445 7340 Feb 95 7178 TITS 7145 

75.10 7130 Apr 95 

Est sate* 12 jm Tue's. sotas 18454 
Tke’IOPCnint 63,943 UD 90? 

CATTLE (CMER) se.n3te.-cwm, 
79 42 Mar 94 1140 51.90 *167 

79 JO Aar 94 81.00 81.17 8025 

78. 70 May 84 80.75 FC.93 BJO 

79 JS Ago 94 HAS 8140 SI AO 
7»J0Sep94 8140 8145 r.10 
79J0 Del N 80.7? 8045 flOTp 
77.45 NOV tJ 81 JO 01.52 SI 43 
W 00 ton 96 RL65 HL65 8047 
191 TueX<as 700 
Tue’i BPCn W 11231 oft 83 

1 (CASES) lUIBIn.animB 

3827 Apr 94 48N 4197 4117 
45 71 Junk* 5*55 5i*6 S192 

4530JUI94 5442 5402 5137 

Aug 94 52.47 1X50 5145 

416000 94 «A0 440 4US 

4135 Dec 94 *9.15 40.15 48410 

« 30 Pet) *3 4915 49AJ 4945 
an Apr 95 47 to 4740 47 JO 

J1J0Jun9S SI. 10 5IJ5 51.10 

Est. sales 11.139 TW’LSOM 5.2*7 
Tue’sapenw 3?.2ia m 299 
PORK BELLIES (CMER) saesete-cannewi 
6090 3840 Mar 94 5575 5175 54J5 

485018109 94 5<« 

39.30 AH 94 57.0C 

4240 Aug 94 54JD 
39.10 FM, 98 59 JO 
59X5 War 95 
6125 Mar 95 

?.93i Toe's, soiej 2A32 


02S 37.960 
an TO KJ 

Oil 12.I7B 
71*7 — QJM 9.918 
7X97 — 4LQS XOS5 

QJ08 812 
S9 


7642 

7442 

7X25 


7145 

7441 


6(43 —a 12 X592 
81677 -0.15 2443 

3X70 —0.12 2457 
B1J7 —023 XIII 
8125 — 0’2 369 

8042 —0.13 485 

I1J2 -0.10 159 

8048 -O10 10 


51.50 


6140 
6800 
39 JO 
♦1.15 
59 JS 

EsL 


4822 

5447 

5X47 

51.8? 

4017 

4948 

4*4* 

4740 

5122 


-4178 15457 
-043 L4M 
-0J5 X1« 
-OSS 3494 
—023 1480 
—030 1230 
— a IS 279 
-020 68 


56.95 56.10 

5720 3620 

SL5D 5445 
89.97 5*40 


5142 -oa 6*6 

SLtS -090 SJU 
57.00 —AS 730 
5*45 -OA 4*3 
59.97 ,02? II 

6000 I 

6140 1 


Toe’s open ini e.on up id 


Food 


COFFEE C (NCSE1 J uaate- 

wnparft. 


907S 

6120 Mar 94 

7540 

753) 

JU0 

MJO 

90.10 

OJSMork* 7700 

7725 

7520 

7515 

87.50 

*9.90 Jul 91 

7050 

7060 

76.90 

77 JS 

MJO 

68J0 Sep 9* 

7905 

7905 

70.10 

7010 

9! DO 

77I0DK94 

01.15 

81.15 

8000 

8000 

87 JO 

7090 Mar 95 

BIBO 

■100 

noo 

8000 

ISJS 

0OJ8Mov95 




8108 

HOD 

IS 00 Jul 95 




8208 

Est.aam 

1847s Tub’s. sc*n 

4063 



TuetoOPCPrt 47.14* 

alt 



SUGAR -WORLD 11 (NCSE) 


-035 1,001 
—OS 294*8 
-OM 7.398 
—055 54B 
—065 3,136 
—075 149 
-068 77 

—4145 I 


1 Season season 


““ 




High 

Low Open 

Hah 

LOW 

Oose 

Otg 

Oo.lnt 

1125 

030 May W 1121 

1101 

n*t 

1177 

-001 6X331 

1111 

9.15 Jul 9J 11.91 

11.81 

II-BS 

11.95 

-001 28.123 

1146 

9420CI94 11-54 

1106 

1107 

11 JO 

-008 2JJ10 

1157 

9.17Mar9S 11-35 

I1J7 

1108 

1103 

-005 

7J93 

1141 

10J7MOV9S H-32 

11-32 

1102 

1IJ0 

—002 

949 

I1J» 

10^ Jul 95 



IIJO 

-002 

7*5 

1122 

1057 Oct 95 1108 

11-30 

IIJO 

1177 


258 

E». soles 12277 TUB'S, staas 2057* 




1 Tue'sepemnt 12<01* up 

605 





1 COCOA (NCSE) Wmrtnc rtxn-»3«f 

•on 




U95 

953 Mur 94 1133 

1144 

1128 

1115 

-3 

532 

1360 

97BMoy94 1149 

1160 

1143 

I1S3 

-1 38-167 

1365 

999 Jul M 1169 

1183 

11*7 

1177 

• 1 17.142 

1377 

1020 Sep 94 1193 

1205 

lira 

1202 


7.027 

130 

1041 Dec 91 1225 

1235 

1225 

1233 


<448 

1382 

1077 Mir 95 1760 

1265 

1260 

12*2 

-1 

9.701 

1200 

1 1 1 1 Mcy 95 



1286 


SJX 

1403 

1225 J4 95 



!»6 

‘1 

X*6 

1358 

127SSep»i 



1325 

-} 

mi 

IM 

11* Dec 95 



1358 

•10 

2 

Est spies <57? Toe'S, safes 8,135 





Tub’s apon VO 89.713 up 2824 





ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) lAOOOta- 

cmKDTTlB 



13425 

SOSDMa-M 107.91] 

W9 AC 

I87.K 

10L65 

*2.15 

IJIB 

13500 

8800 Mav 94 1 1025 

11X50 

108.9S 

11100 

»X40 

8075 

moo 

13X59 Jul 94 11100 

IK7S 

11100 

11175 

•1.70 

<505 

13*50 

10i»Sep94 115.75 

11<* 

115.K 

11600 

-Ui 

1036 

I3<00 

10800 Nov 94 II6JC 

ll<75 

11675 

11600 

-IJ5 

1.134 

13200 

11050 Jan 9 5 117 JO 

117.90 

117 JO 

117.90 

*090 


12*25 

10*00 Mar 95 



11190 

• MO 

62 

Est.yges NA Toe’s satas 

3 Mt 





| Tub's oma rt 10,93* up 390 






Metals 




HI GRADE COPPER (NCMXI MOM -crasowfc. 



107 J0 

7X00 Mar 94 85.75 

07 JO 

8550 

8705 

-1JD 

<788 

KUO 

74 JO Anr 94 8*90 

8<90 

8*90 

07.10 


1020 


73-60 Mar 94 8600 

8700 

05*0 

8775 

- 1 35 

CJ10 

69 JO 

7<mjun94 



8775 

+ 1 25 


102.95 

7420 Jul 94 6*10 

» JO 

8500 

87 JO 

• 175 

7,907 

10X30 

7490 S« 94 86.05 

07 JO 

8600 

8745 

*1.15 

X52» 

101.90 

7L750ec94 8* 70 

07A5 

■6*5 

■70S 

*1.15 

3J<5 

8920 

76.90 Jen 95 



»UW 

-uo 


99 JM 

7300 Feb 95 



88.15 



•920 

62. 70 Mar 95 <7 JO 

87 JO 

87 JO 

BUD 

• 100 

1J1I 

8700 

7605 May 95 



BUS 

■ 0.9S 

479 

W.90 

780OJU19S BOW 


8010 

890S 

•0.95 

417 

88.70 




87 J5 

.170 


9058 

79.WSBP9J 



•9.45 


281 

sua 

7520 OQ9S 



07 JS 

• 1.10 


8830 

77.75 Npv 95 



87.70 

•1 15 

179 

9BJ0 

8030 Dec 95 PSD 

8916 

89.00 

9005 

-095 

1*4 


Jivite 



9040 

•0.9S 


Eg.gMs J.jiin Tue*s.saws 

6X70 





Tub's open rt S9.722 oH 5® 





sn.vB 

(NCMXI UDOmu 




55 <5 



5K0 

577* 


3,257 

S36J 

5300 Apr 94 5190 

5190 

519.0 

5280 

-02 


5555 


5315 

5110 

530.7 

-02 66,982 

5610 

3710 JU 84 5280 

5370 

5220 

045 

• 02 1*615 

S61J 

3765 Sea 94 5350 

539 J 

5710 

5315 

-07 

3018 

5710 

3800 Dec 94 538J 

54*0 

5340 

54*3 


8.755 


4010 Jan 95 



54SJ 




416-5 War 95 *480 

5500 

544.0 




5840 

4180 May 95 



S5U 



5950 

4200 All 95 5W0 

5M0 

5*40 

5610 


111 

ft 

4930SCP95 



5649 

•OJ 


5820 

53»0Oee95 



57X3 


835 


Jm94 



570 

•OJ 


Eg. sales 2*000 Tub’s, sales 24I5J 




Tub’s open In, 107,979 oh 1853 





PLATINUM (NMERJ sertrw.-cMarsewta.vn. 






t ’ 1 




35700 JU 94 39000 

J*3J0 

E31 

J920O 


3069 

40050 

36100 Od 94 39100 

JMJO 

38100 

17X10 

-1AJ 

1073 

41000 

37400 Jante 39400 

39*00 

L. f .; J 

LT1 


477 

4)100 

JKUOAprtS 39000 

39200 


39460 

-MO 

477 

ESLsrtcs NA Tueto. soles 

2AU 





1 Tub’s actanrt 194 W o H 214 





GOLD 

NOuQ Mh«gGL'dDtoiDw 





39820 

J74J0MOT94 37600 

376JO 

37600 

37700 

—050 


41050 

33520 Apr 9* 17725 

mnan 

37*00 

f * ■ 

—060 71970 


Mav 94 







33900 Jun 94 377*0 

38170 




41100 

141 JO Aug 94 381 JO 

30138 

37970 

t 7 «r ■ 



41700 

3*4000394 J8130 

J1U0 

JB70O 

jiiao 

-030 

<100 

47ft. V0 

ttUftDccW W3J 

fSn 

383 VO 

•wm 

—030 12785 

41100 

363J0Feb95 38700 

38700 

38700 

181.10 



41700 

36*50 Apr 95 *7 -SO 

3WS0 

mao 




428-58 

3*100 Jun 95 39*00 

39600 

39680 

38670 

-030 


41X50 

3B8J8AU0 95 



39960 



41330 




’ - r ‘ M 

-070 


42908 

40200 Doc 95 40400 

40400 

40*00 

L'-li ■ 

-070 

L179 


37.711 





1 Tub’s Open W I4B260 IP 3296 






Season Season 
HMi Low 


9SJ70 

85.1® 

9*990 

9<730 

9<S20 

9*3® 


Chg Op.kii 
361488 
-10367.948 
-30243405 
-® 187+7* 
-30148.179 
-J01 1 5.912 


Open htgh Low Oose 

902405*094 91270 95AM 95.290 95270 

«.7I0Dec94 9*950 95410 94460 M.9S0 

90240 Mar 95 KT® 94410 9*680 91*750 

90710 ton 93 9*470 74J60 9*440 «JI0 

91210Sep9S 94270 94250 94241 942M 

91. 100 Dec 95 M420 9*170 944® 94040 

ES. soles 768.730 Tuc*S- soles 743400 
T ub’s ap on in! 2475.703 up 55710 
BRITISH POUND (CMER) lwrnM-liwit««gui\ 

1-5384 140®Mar«4 1.4888 14892 l.«50 I49H ‘70 35,9*2 

1-5150 14474 Junto 1.4854 14950 14854 14913 -70 12476 

14890 1 4440 Sep W 14880 -76 452 

14950 14100 Dec to 1.4858 -90 12 

Ed. sales Smb Tub's, tales 19.230 
Tub's open ini 41502 up 2144 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) terrier- ImMrgwisauaal 


OJJ712 

07371 Mar 94 07414 

07414 

07363 

0.7391 

—10 34013 

07805 

07365 Jun 94 

07303 

0703 

07357 

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—12 11.773 

07740 

07345 5s>W 

07375 

07304 

07357 

07328 

-15 

723 

07670 

0.731 5Dec 94 

07368 

0-7370 

0.7350 

07371 

-18 

575 

07605 

0.7365 Mor« 




073*1 

-26 

379 

07522 

07374 Jun9S 




07351 

-34 

13 


Est. sates H-533 Tup’s, sates 1X209 
Tup's open ini 46.975 up 738 
GERMAN MAR* (CMER) iwnwt- l aoimrauan 10144)1 
06205 0560 Mw 94 OSS** QJNB 05235 05863 -l«11UT) 

04133 0-5607 Junto P3810 05070 0400 05832 -14 l<257 

04065 0-5600 Sep to 05830 05837 05811 05812 -14 860 

05790 05SWDecto 0580? -14 74 

Est. sotas S740S Tub’s, sales 51993 
Tup’s open tat 1354X7 up 11SS 

JAPANESE YEN 1 CMER I lorim. ipgjiuuKtllMlBi 
O00993CO€0B80ONto’*4 0 0095660.0097Ma0«549a.l)09eto -35 87.924 

0009to50008B71JimtoOI»9616a0087450JJ086l5000«43 -38 9.9P 

OJOWWUXRMJSepW OOD97750009B0504096950009692 -60 987 

a0W69tB-0C9635De£ 94 04W749 - 43 IJ 

Est. sales 4I.2W Tub’s sales 7IJI6 
Tue*S«PRI M 98J53 B« 454 
SWI5S FRANC f CMER I Iwhis-IPMUAUM! 

07195 EL6500 Mar to 0*956 02027 16922 0 6984 -» 44.712 

0 7070 0 6590 Jury 94 0-6944 02023 06935 06901 -27 7,5*6 

07080 06MOSep« 0699S OTIBO 06980 06987 -27 82 

EsI. sates 79.279 Toe’s, sales 7*. 074 
Tue’SOPCfi int SL4W UP 1164 


Industrials 

-- -- 1 (NCTN) SO«OOte-cw«sp~>. 
7965 55.62 Mar to 7X00 7080 

77.80 5767 Mavto 71.70 7080 

8015 SBJOJulto 79.10 7925 

7050 SilOOto 7X05 7525 

72.69 5968 Dec 94 7228 72-51 

7X35 62J0Mor95 7X20 7330 

7170 6*00 May 95 7180 7XSO 

7 <00 70-50 JuIVS 74 00 74 00 

Esi. scan NA Tub's. sots 1930 
Tue’saPenM 57.528 up 243 
HEATING OIL (NMBt) LMH ampe 


Financial 

UST.BBJJ (CMER) iii nm oe-pbiwipa 

to.97 9*. II Mar 94 *6-55 KJS 94» 9<SJ -002 <570 

9676 9<l4Jun»4 *6.14 M.IJ to.14 96.17 - 002 25^92 

tea 9SJ350PU 9&S3 9SJ9 SM7 9SJ4 -OOI SJ37 

9110 9X40 DK 94 85J0 9152 9 140 9SJ0 -OJO? 7.940 

Est.sokJ 11.753 Twe'oam 1U50 

Toe’S Boon W 40639 all 443 

5YR. TREASURY (CBOT) ligwem-ptssnapiHM 
IMHM84B Mor 94109-06 109-12 108-27 109-06 100228 

117- 05 KfrlQ Juntoioo- 1*5 108-195 100-025 108-14 127.9M 

H0-195M7-3I 5ep 74107-1 15 107-2* 107-115 107-20— 01 43* 

Esi.sdK ID4J00 Tup’s, saes 90*89 

Tub’s open tat 23BJ04 UP 14228 

HfiLTHE W IWX (CBOTJ tUktoRB-mSmhenM 
116-09 100-00 Mar 841 ID- 10 110-16 108-26 110-01— 01 1J9J39 

115-71 108-17 Junto 109-17 108-19 108-10 108-11 iSjSI 

115-01 108-15 ScpM IDB-09 108-24 100-02 108-10— 01 2416 

11+21 100-14 Dec M 107-18 108-03 107-10 107-38 - 01 72 

111-07 108-88 Mpr9S IQ7-I4 — 01 2 

EH.wdn 14<771 Tun's, sales 200.860. 

Tub’s open rt 792,400 UP 12759 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) Hi+llgig PimitaU IBOPdi 
130-31 90-00 Mar Mill-00 111-14 1 104B lll-OS POk UOTO 
119-39 ?l-06 Jun 94 109-J8 II Ml 100-27 110-07 . « »J26 

118- 38 90-W toPM HP-03 109- 13 108-10 109-06 . 06 3L581 

1)8-00 91-19 DecMieo-a? lae-zs ia7-« 108-71 - u 2341* 

11+70 103-01 Mar 95107-04 108-00 107-04 107-30 » D6 1+47 

I1>I9 98-15 ton 95 107-DB . M « 

1I>1S 108-08 Sen 95 106-70 ■ D4 M 

113- Id I0+2S DOC 95 104-02 . S S 

ESI sales 775JOO Toe’s, solo 71?,II7 

Ti ers opm lw 448^71 UP 6W7 

MUWDPM.0OKBS (CBOT) im,iMp-n!*Bi<uieg K 
«5-77 88-00 Mar 94 97-21 97-14 97-00 97-11 — 7II9JB4 

into 96- IS 9+37 PS- 3 1 M-IJ _ 19 iJSfi 

Ea.saes 15.008 Toe's, sales isjsi 

T ub’s ocen mi 31.170 uo 178 

EUHOOOI I ABS (CMCIU UnMnwneiOK, 

’Ll* kMtak to 148 9* STB to.1® to.150 3J9.9S5 

95890 90400 Jun to 9£tl0 95.750 95665 9X770 647,411 


5075 
S7J0 
5000 
S73M 
55*0 
57.17 
57 JO 


5075 
57 JO 
55 00 


422)5 Apr to 4622} *<09 

42J0MOV94 4430 K20 

4X60 Junto 4*00 *<00 

*X20Jul94 4*30 «35 

4*35 AugH *5-00 45JS 
45.40 Sep to 4625 46.33 

46450(2 94 47X5 47 JO 

47 *5 New W 48 IS 4035 
MJ0DK9* 49 JO 4935 
4125 Jan 95 48J5 49.9S 

49.45 Pet, 95 SCUD SOHO 
0.40MOT95 49 JQ 4920 
47.10 Apr 95 «J0 4830 

47.40 May «5 
402)0 ton 9S 
4922 Jul 95 


77.00 

7700 

— UB 

854 

7698 

76.98 

-200 26.037 

7748 

7707 

-1.89 12.117 

7475 

7475 

-0*4 

202) 

71 J) 

7102 

—are 10.705 

7191 

72JD 

-0.60 

385 

734 0 

7X25 

-0JS 


7*00 

7X50 

-065 


tm pec oca 



45.15 

45.74 

■ 018 ffl.658 

4X50 

4XB1 

- OOQ 43/71 

4X55 

4X71 

■ OIO 26.7J 4 

4470 

44.26 

■0 03 l*.3e0 

45 . td 

4X01 

■DO 

4.455 

4*10 

4*06 

•003 

<9*8 

4770 

4704 

■0.03 

4J77 

401 J 

4801 

-1)03 

3.416 

4970 

ta.96 

-003 

6.7*3 

4905 

«J6 

■003 

L367 

soon 

497* 

-003 

4*70 

48J6 

-003 

J T 7 

4050 

4761 

-003 

3TO 


47 J6 

-OIQ 



47 J6 

•003 



4706 

-003 



U OS Apr to 1*82 
1 <30 Mav 94 14 97 
14JS Junto 1S08 
l<83Ju>94 1529 

1 567 Aug to IJJ0 
1 138 Sep 94 1568 

15.5400 9J 15 70 
1571 Nov 94 1594 
ISBDDecM 1<30 
KID Jan 95 l <26 
lft25FctJ95 1<4D 
'<25 MOT 95 I <68 
1641 *Br95 1*6* 
1 <70 May 95 I <00 
l<65Jutl95 t<9S 
1725 Dec 95 IJJ0 


1420 1*0 

14.97 I <70 
15.15 l<98 
1033 15.10 

15.50 ISJ9 
150 15J4 

1X82 1525 

1598 1187 
16J0 KIM 
16J1 KJ3 
l«3 105 

1W8 I6JD 
1*40 1**0 

I <80 1<8D 

1695 1<95 

1730 17 JO 


Bohan s«.bU 

K7I -OO5I1I05* 

14 <5 - 021 60474 

1X01 —4)02 62.154 

15 It —404 to. 1 09 

15*0 —0213 14.770 

15.54 -009 10418 

1575 -007 IDS* 
1582 _0.ll 8.M* 

16 04 -0 10 20 J6J 

1*73 —0 09 <9te 

I <35 —013 8.183 
16 50 -41? .’841 
KM —0277 7A4* 
1680 —OQ7 3 165 
16.95 -002 l’4F0 
172B —005 


UMLEAOroGASOC-taea (NMBt) 

W-50 4X85 Apr 94 462H 4010 45J0 


6130 

61.00 

*050 

4000 

5400 

MIS 

*800 


*4 70 Mav to 4U5 
4525 Junto 47 JM 
45 75 Jul to 4J.10 
4175 Aug <4 47.10 

« 85 Sep to d6.o5 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 




Swissair Buys 29 Airbuses 
t For European Expansion 

.’’ OlvinJufia J},™ _ 


■’ Bloomberg Business Sens 

ZURICH— Swissair is boosting findina* ™ l “ may *“ VB lrouble ,l ^ctss 10 European markets, 
its fleet to strengthen capacity in STcSt . That is necessary because the Swiss 

\ Europe, but analysts note that' the c E l ? &a *“ “V 8<*d voted in 1992 not to join the Euro- 
■ J aiiiine faces mounting problems in K 7? « e 5? u lho HS *.* P“ n Economic Area, an extension 

its Continental base. ftnancially solid, said Pascal Hein- ortheEU. 

Swissair said it would spend 235 ZuS^l have a The latesl Swiss rererendura to 

biffion francs ($2 bUlioKrl? k^fM^SlSr 55 £*,"?* 

Airbus aircraft to upgrade its short- Mr. Loepfe said the new aircraft fro ^ o 0 ^ 4, ^ J red hostJlty .. to ' 
to medium-haul fleet. Its last order would beSnoed Swiu^d m surrounding 

totaled 26 aircraft in 1990. bination of waa^SsiS- B "°^S dy 

It also said that it would phase in cash, loans and bond ^.iT SS5S dd!l5”' " 
the new planes quickly, with a de- Swissair said it would invest 4.6 P^S^.o oeae yea. 

livery period from early 1995 to francs between IQ94 and . . “certainly doesn tease our po- 


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It also said that it would phase in 
the new planes quickly, with a de- 
livery period from early 1995 to 
mid- 1997, and that it would review 
its long-haul fleet. 

“We want to widen our bases in 
-Europe," said Otto Loepfe. Swis- 
sair's chief executive. 

Swissair was left isolated when 
the Alcazar project, a planned four- 
way tie-up of European airlines, 
collapsed in November. That isola- 
tion deepened last month, when the 
Swiss voted to ban European 
Union truck traffic in the Alps, 
angering EU neighbors. 

Anslysts widely believe that 
Swissair requires a European pan- 


> -.7- “ AMU 11 "uuiu uivqi t.g ilf4 ■ ■ , , . 

billion francs between 1994 and 11 certainly doesn t ease our po- 
1998. which, added to debt repay- s, . t,0rt ’ safd Mr of ^ Ai ' 
mems of 500 million francs, will P me lruck batL 


lead to total expenditure of 5.1 bil- 
lion francs in that period. 


“The specific problem for Swis- 
sair is the ‘no’ to the EEA and the 


— ... ^ ‘V uiw ojiu 

“It's simply a forward-looking yta’ to the Alpine Initiative said 
strategy that shows the belief in the Mr. Heinzelmann of Bonk Leu, re- 
growth poteniiaL" said Susanne f erring to the economic area and 
Borer, the Swissair analyst at Bank the truck ban. 

Vontobel in Zurich. r * j - — *•■ ~ • 


Delta Air Lines, which Swissair 


But analysis said that it was an supported as its U.S. partner dur- 
mvestmem in a future that is not ing the Alcazar talks, is now intent 
ye L f , 1 , . „ on tying up deals with a host of 

Mr. Loepfe said Swissair faced other European airlines, including 
difficulty building up its European Sabena of Belgium and Malev of 
business, especially since it is wait- Hungary. More arrangements are 
ing for the European Union to give in the offing, said Delta. 


Peugeot Does Not See 1994 Loss 


Bloomberg Business .Vmr 

PARIS — Jacques Calveu the chairman of PSA 
Peugeot ChroSn SA, said Wednesday that Europe's 
third- largest car company would not do any worse 
than breaking even this year after a substantial loss in 
J993. 

“The second half of last year will be much less bad 
than the first, and the trend will continue this year." 
Mr. Calvet said. “We should become profitable for all 
of 1994. 1 can't say if well be a bit better than break- 
even or noL” 

PSA has said it would cut its first-half losses thanks 
to productivity gains and the success of its new. high- 
margin Citroen Xantia. 

PSA lost 1.12 billion French francs ($194 million) 


during the fast half of last year, and analysts have 
projected a full-year loss of about 1.5 billion francs. 

Despite the expected improvement, Mr. Calvet 
played down the effect of the rise of 1 1.2 percent in 
French auto sales during the first two months of this 
year. This is due to a very weak two-month period in 
1993 which saw sales drop 30 percent from 1992. In 
addition, a rise oT 8.2 percent in February sales is due 
to a government premium of 5,000 francs, matched by 
most carmakers, when a car 10 years old or more is 
turned in for a new one. 

PSA's French sales in February rose 22 percent 
from a year ago. but like other carmakers, the sale of 
its small, low-margin cars were the most affected by 
the government premium and rebates. 


MISSION: West Advises Moscow A Virgin Venture 

Co mbin ed from Page 9 said. “It’s easy for me to sav that I With • Ha Smith 


Combined from Page 9 

that money alone cannot buy hap- 
piness. 

“How many friends did you lose 
after you gained your list mil- 
lion?" is bow Aleksandr S. Zai- 
chenko, put it Mr. Zaichenko is the 
president of the Moscow-based As- 
sociation of Christians in Business 
in Russia, co-sponsor of the semi- 
nar. 

A former economics adviser to 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev during per- 
estroika (he was secretly baptized _ 
in his bathtub in the 1970s), Mr. ‘ 
Zaichenko is also the founder of 
Moscow's Gub for Fair and Ethi- 
cal Bus ness. He conceded that 
membership there was select, given 
the sometimes fast and loose ethics 
ruling Russian business today. “We 
try to find a moral approach to 
business." he explained wryly. "But 
that is not the way it is working 
here actually." 

Most Moscow eateries, for ex- 
ample. do not exactly live up to the 
principles set by Mr. Trover’s 
Amish Door Restaurant. Mr. Tro- 
ver planned to speak on “How to 
Effectively Run a Restaurant" at 
the session on Friday, but brought 
notes on protection money, cash 
skimming and bribes. 

“Restaurants here are the abso- 
lute symbol of corruption in our 
society,” Mr. Zaichenko said, add- 
ing that criminal gangs control 
most restaurants in urban Russia. 
"They are horrible, evil, full of nou- 
veaux riches,” he said. “1 try 10 
avoid going to them." 

There were other areas of confu- 
sion. Thrainn Kristjansson of Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba, runs three theme 
restaurants. The fluent, BBC-ac- 
cenied Russian translator ran into 
difficulty explaining the mock-me- 
dieval theme of Mr. Kristjansson's 
Round Table reslauranu pro- 
nouncing it to be a “seminar-on- 

ented" eatery. 

When Mr. Roth said he offered 
his motel guests free papers, mean- 
ing newspapers, the translator said 
he gave them free toilet paper. 

When Mr. Roth was asked about 
how he rebuked bad employees, he 
recommended a positive approach. 
“We talk to them discreetly in pri- 
vate. then we try to find something 
they excel at like maybe they smile 
real good." The translator rendered 
that as, “Maybe the employee 
smiles too much, and the guests 
don’t like iL” 

The power of positive thinking 
did not inspire all participants. 

“Yes, of course, be polite to cus- 
tomer" Olga V. Kartashova, pres- 
ident of visit, a tourism agency in 
Yaroslavl, said. "That is obvious. 
But for us today, there are so many 
more important issues - bke ob- 
taining visas, t or transport when 
there is none." 

Vernon Wiebe. owner of the Pru- 
dent Travel & Tours company in 
Hfllsbora Kansas, wappeds^p 
talk with Russian tout 
over a lunch of meat balls and nee. 

Russia, he learned, is not qtute 
Cke Kansas. “U » hpj J° JgE 

how to talk to them. Mr. Wiebe 


said. “It’s easy for me to say that I 
started with just a shoe box and 
built a business." 

The Dale Carnegie spirit did not 
filter down to the staff of the Ismai- 
lovo hold. Instead, Christopher 
Shore, the young, fresh-faced Mos- 
cow-based representative of the 
Mennonite organization, got a les- 
son in bow paid hospitality can 
sometimes falter even in the new 
Russia. 

“I just can’t believe they don't 
have a sound system," he ex- 


have a sound system," he ex- 
claimed after politely reasoning 
with a coolly indifferent hotel man- 


.4 genre France- Prase 

LONDON — W. H. Smith 
Group PLC and Virgin Retail Ltd. 
announced on Wednesday the 
merger of their video and record 
outlets. Virgin Megastore and Our 
Price. 

The new business, Virgin Retail 
Ltd, will operate 305 Our Price 
stores and 24 Virgin megastores in 
Britain and Ireland 

Virgin's chairman, Richard 
Branson, will be president of the 
venture, which will be owned 75 
percent by W. H. Smith and 25 
percent by Virgin. (AFP, Reuters) 


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Page 13 

EUROPE 


Balladur Rejects 
Challenge to New 
Youth-Wage Plan 


PARIS — Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur on Wednes- 
day refused to back down on a 
□ew low wage for young worit- 
ers, while trade unions and stu- 
dents prepared to challenge the 
government's handling of re- 
cord French oneznpJoymenL 
Mr. Balladur, facing revived 
opposition from the left and a 
fresh challenge to his authority 
from the streets, defended a 
1 ower- than - minimum wage for 
youth-training contracts in a 
testy opinion column in the dai- 
ly newspaper Le Monde. 

“Lei's leave sterile debates 
and false promises aside," he 
wrote, rejecting union and op- 
position charges that the sub- 
minimum wage undermined a 
fundamental social right. 

Forced to back down in re- 
cent months by violent protests 
by Air France workers and fish- 
ermen and in a battle over pri- 
vate schools, the prime minister 
vowed not to retreat this time. 

“The government will not 
waver from the policies it has 
set: to reform French society so 
everyone can have a place in il" 
The new wage, authorized 
under a law passed by the con- 
servative-dominated parlia- 
ment last year, allows compa- 
nies to pay young people aged 
16 to 25 between 30 and 80 
percent of the minimum wage 
in exchange for tr aining. 

The minimum wage stands at 
5.886 francs ($1,017) a month 
for a 39-hour week and is ad- 
justed to offset inflation. 

Two decrees published last 


week putting the new wage into 
force raised an outcry from trade 
unionists and opposition politi- 
cians, who said the prime minis- 
ter was handing companies a gift 
at the expense of workers. 

A poll in the newspaper Info- 
Matin showed (hat 55 percent of 
the French oppose the lower 
wage while 36 percent support iL 

In the clamor, some officials 
suggested that the decrees might 
be adjusted to appease critics. A 
student union leader who met 
aides to Mr. Balladur said the 
government might extend the 
period, currently six months, 
during which a young person has 
to be out of a job More being 
.eligible for (he lower wage. 

Officials said the government 
might also stiffen the training 
requirement that companies 
must meet. 

But on the broader issue, Mr. 
Balladur stood firm, saying the 
measures gave youth a “real 
chance to enter the workplace.” 

Union leaders were set to 
hold a meeting with Mr. Baha- 
dur on Thursday that is shaping 
up as a clash over the wage 
issue. At the same time, stu- 
denis plan to demonstrate in 
Paris against the decrees. 

At stake could be Mr. Baha- 
dur's credibility and political 
standing as the matter goes to 
the heart of bis policies and con- 
cerns the country’s most press- 
ing problem, unemployment, 
which stands at a record 33 ruO- 
Hon people, or 112 percent. 


Botched 
BCG Case 
Dropped 

Roam 

LONDON —liquidators of the 
Bank of Credit & Commerce Inter- 
national which was dosed by 
banking regulators in 1991, have 
been forced to drop a law suit 
against a bank executive because of 
an embarrassing case of mistaken 
identity, legal sources said Wednes- 
day. 

According to court documents, 
liquidators dropped a case in De- 
cember 1993 that they had filed in 
June 1992 against Basheer 
Chow dry, the former head of oper- 
ations for BCC1 in Britain. The suit 
sought unspecified damages for 
conspiracy to defraud the BCCI 
from 1984 to 1991 and alleged that 
Mr. Cbowdry had covered up 
losses and bad debts it BCG. 

But the legal sources said the 
liquidators had to drop the case 
against Mr. Chowdiy because it 
was linked to a suit filed in 1992 
against Saleem Siddiql BCG's for- 
mer internal audit chief. The liqui- 
dators admitted having used inap- 
propriate evidence in uiat case. 

The Bank of England and regu- 
lators in other countries closed 
BCCI's worldwide operations in 
what turned into the world's big- 
gest case of financial fraud. Liqui- 
dators from Touche Ross, an ac- 
counting firm appointed by the 
court, later discovered a staggering 
SI 2 billion “black hole" in missing 
assets at BCCI. 

Liquidators were forced to drop 
the case against Mr. Siddiqi be- 
cause the key evidence, a letter 
written to an “S. Siddiqi" turned 
out not to refer to the defendant 

The sources said (he liquidators 
also misinterpreted a letter written 
in 1990 to Mr. Cbowdry, which 
they also used as crucial evidence in 
their case. 


Fr^cfurt 

DAX; ■ 


London ■’ 

; FjSE-1 OH indest ■ ~ . :jCAG 40' 





. ■■•MIR . . . 

(rider ;■ 

•: '.?)(> ' \:r \ : <i .;?/ ?;■ 


” WtoJftosd^fcrav;; 

-OWi. .■•.■SbSe. 


>'toSpi*sft' 2.53L3Q • 2,535:50 . ./ 4U7 

' iciwlon ^'y • TOE 100 3 t 237,70 ; 3 ^ 7 O. 6 O- - 1 ^ 

•jtotfrftt -- . .. ^General Index 325-16 .338,75 -3.iF 


Parte ; J.CAC4Q. . 
Stockholm * AlfaBtevaeriden 

Vtenria.' • • ' Stock Index 

'Zurich'.'.'.'-.' ses 
■/...■■ — 

Sources : Reuters, AFP 


. 2,144.66 • 2, v r83.12 -1.76 

. U50B2 i.TBaSa -1.78 

: 481.18 ' ' -488.87 .1.59- 

• 973J35. '• .597:83 :2.45 


Lmenurima] Herald Tnbune 


Very brief ys 

• Italy reported a bade surplus of 27 trillion lire (SI6.04 billion) in tbe 
first 1 1 months of 1993 and figures for the entire year are expected to 
show a surplus of 30 trillion lire, the country's first surplus since World 
War II. 

• Vickers PLC, the industrial conglomerate that has streamlined its 
operations, reported pretax profit in 1993 of £323 million ($47. 9 million), 
following a loss in 1992 of £36.6 million. 

■ Hanson PLC said it sold its 50 percent stake in North Texas Cement Co. 
for $54 million. 

• Trenhandanstalt said that Rha SpA has committed itself to invest 1.1 
billion Deutsche marks ($647 million) in EKO State A fc. a steelmaker in 
Eastern Germany that the Italian concern is taking over. 

• Fhnpar SpA, a holding company in the hotel business, said it would not 
underwrite a capital increase in Gba SpA, its luxury hotel chain. 

• Union Bank of Switzerland said i! has made an offer to take over 
Regiobank beider Basel, a regional bank. 

• Akzo Nobel NV said it had bought the phosphorus operations of 

Chemie GmbH of Germany. Bloomberg, Reuters, AP. Knight- Bidder, AFX 



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1“ * 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 




Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


U.S. Rate Fears 
Burden Stocks 
On Pacific Rim 


Foreigners Cool to Seoul 

'Whimsical’ Rules Rile Companies 


'A 1 1 


r ,-g 

• A 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Slock prices across 
the Pacific Rim look a healing 
Wednesday from fears thai the 
United States would raise interest 
rates, which could draw foreign 
funds out of the region as investors 
chase higher yields. 

News Tuesday that the VS. 
economy grew 7 J. percent in the 
fourth quarter of 1993 increase 
speculation that the Federal Re- 
serve Board would be forced to 
raise rates to combat inflation. 

That would have troubling con- 
sequences for the bourses in the 
Asia-Pacific region, which attract- 
ed millions of dollars in foreign 
money during sharp rallies in 1993. 
Markets in Malaysia, Thailand and 
the Philippines are particularly vul- 
nerable because of their heavy de- 
pendence on foreign funds. In 


Tokyo Guidelines 
Let City Books 
Into Securities 

Compiled by Otir Staff From Dispaidta 

TOKYO — The Ministry of Fi- 
nance unveiled guidelines on 
Wednesday that would allow com- 
mercial banks to enter the securi- 
ties business starting in July. 

The guidelines, worked out as a 
compromise between the city banks 
and the securities industry, allow 
Asahi Bank Ltd. to launch a securi- 
ties subsidiary in July, ministry offi- 
cials said. Asahi is die dghih-largesl 
□tv bank, ranked by assets. 

Jn November, die ministry may 
perrrat Japan’s top six city banks — 
Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank Ltd, Sumi- 
tomo Bank Ltd, Samra Ranfr Ltd. 
Sakura Bank Ltd, Mitsubishi Bank 
Ltd. and Fuji Bank Ltd. — to enter 
the securities business, the officials 
said 

Tokai Bank Ltd and Hokkaido 
Takoshoku Bank Ltd are likely to 
launch securities arms in March 
1995, they added Two other city 
banks wiU be given permission later, 
the officials said Daiwa Bank Ltd 
has already eniered the field, taking 
control of Cosmo Securities Co. in a 
bailout in August The Bank of To- 
kyo, meanwhile, wants to concen- 
trate on its trust hanking business 
before expanding into new areas, 
the officials said 


Hong Kong, meanwhile, the local 
currency is pegged to the dollar, so 
interest rates must shadow those in 
the United States. 

“A rise in rates just makes equity 
investment less attractive as people 
start looking at alternatives." said 
Iain Pickett, vice president at DBS 
Securities Hong Kong. 

In Tokyo, the Nikkei Stock Aver- 
age finished down 471.85 points, or 
2 percent, at 19.744.77, amid con- 
cerns that a three-year cycle of fall- 
ing interest rates iD Japan may be 
coming to an end 

Expectations for the Bank of Ja- 
pan to lower its discount rale, now 
at a historic low of 1.75 percent, are 
fading, thanks to the turbocharged 
UB. economy. 

Lower interest rates help Japa- 
nese companies by making it easier 
for them to borrow money for capi- 
tal investments and to handle exist- 
ing debL 

in Hong Kong, the Hang Seng 
Index closed down 270.93 points, 
at 9,877.43, for a 3 percent loss on 
the day and the first close below 
10,000 since Dec. 15. 

“Interest-rate jitters prompted 
many overseas institutional inves- 
tors to reduce the weighting of Hong 
Kong stocks in their portfolios." 
said Simon Chin, a director of Gti- 
bank Global Asset Management. 

Hong Kong investors have rea- 
son to be nervous. The Hang Seng 
index plunged 6 percent on Feb. 7. 
the Monday after the Fed signaled 
a quarter-point increase in its fed- 
eral fund rate, which is the rale 
banks charge each other for loans. 

Elsewhere m the Pacific Rim. the 
Australian All Ordinaries Index 
closed down 27.70 points at 
Z 154.0, a I percent loss. Singa- 
pore's Straits Times Index lost 1 
percent, closing down 29.19 points 
at 2,284.49. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 

■ Philippine Bourses Merge 

The Manila and Makati stock 
markets are being combined into a 
single Philippine Stock Exchange, 
Reuters reported from Manila. 

The merger of the two exchanges 
will be phased in from Friday 
through March 18, Fidel V. Ramos, 
the president of the Philippines, 
said Wednesday. The individual li- 
censes of the two exchanges will be 
canceled as of Friday. 

While two separate trading 
floors will be maintained, the com- 
puter systems of the exchanges 
have been linked to ensure a single 


The Associated Press 

SEOUL — When McDonald's Corp. in Korea 
decided last year to offer a “Happy MeaT spatial 
for children — an inexpensive toy with the pur- 
chase of a burger, fries and soft dnnk — it turned 
into something of an unhappy affair. 

The fast-food chain's executives were grilled by 
government regulators who demanded to know 
why they were trying to push children to spend 
more money. 

“We went in and showed them nutritional infor- 
mation and explained that we weren't telling kids 
to eat fast food every day. but to have a balanced 
diet and have fun sometimes with eating," said 
Y.P. Kim, a McDonald's marketer. “And we 
worked it out." 

But not every foreign company is willing — or 

able — to go to such lengths to cope with a 
business climate widely perceived as fundamental- 
ly unwelcoming to outsiders. 

Despite recent efforts by the government of 
President Kim Young Sam to make South Korea 
an easier place to do business, many foreign con- 
cerns are opting ouL 

Big American companies that have nude major 
cuts or abandoned the market altogether in the last 
few years include Atlantic Richfield Co., Bristol- 
Myers Squibb Co„ General Motors Corp., John- 
son & Johnson, international Business Machines 
Coro, and Digital Equipment Corp. 

“South Korea has a long, long history of being 
somewhat unfriendly to foreign businesses," said 
Daniel Gram, first secretary for economic affairs 
at the U.S. Embassy in Seoul. “I think they're 
trying to overcome it. but the question is whether 
they can do enough, and do it fast enough." 

New foreign investment rose to SI. 04 billion in 
1993 from $895 million the previous year, but both 
years were down sharply from S1.4 billion in 1991. 
Moreover, growth in foreign involvement in ser- 
vice industries helped mask increasing flight by 
manufacturing companies. 

“All in all it's a trend of disinvestment," said 
Anne Lowell, an analyst at Baring Securities Ltd. 

Battle-weary business executives, speaking pri- 
vately, use words like “whimsical'' and “infuriat- 
ing" when discussing regulations and taxes. 

They complain about an entrenched bureaucra- 
cy, point to cultural differences and language bar- 
riers, and gripe over government efforts to dampen 
consumption. 

But one factor they do not cite as a chill on 


business activity is North Korea's standoff with 
the international community over its refusal to 
allow nuclear inspections. 

“lt*s a big question mark for the future, but I 
don't think it’s the top priority." said Mr. Grant. 
“There are so many other problems." 

Some companies' cutbacks in South Korea re- 
flect changes in the East Asian regional economy. 
With the country no longer a low-wage haven, 
manufacturers searing to cut production costs are 
moving to places like China and Indonesia. 

Business leaders say South Korean officials 

sometimes undercut their own efforts to attract 

General Motors, Johnson & 
Johnson and IBM have cat 
back or left altogether. 

foreigners. European companies, for example, are 

fighting Seoul's efforts to collect retroactive lax 
penalties. 

“This is no small amount of money, and it’s 
very, very questionable under these accords." said 
Friedrich Honigmann, a German chemical-com- 
pany president. 

Another hindrance is the government's periodic 
austerity campaign, which discourages consump- 
tion of foreign goods. Taxpayers are required to 
state the make of their cars on tax returns, and in 
the past Koreans who acknowledged owning for- 
eign-made vehicles were often targeted for audits. 

Foreign executives and diplomats are urging the 
government to ease restrictions on promotions and 
discounting, make the tax system more equitable, 
enforce intellectual-property laws and liberalize 
rules on stock purchases by foreigners. 

The government, in turn, argues it has already 
set major changes in motion' 

"We're doing a lot," said Park Pyong Hwan, 
deputy director of the Finance Ministry's foreign- 
investment policy division. He cited moves to 
allow belter foreign access to financing, ease rules 
on land acquisition, provide incentives for high- 
tech companies and assist in labor mediation. 

McDonald's has yet to profit from five years of 
operations here, but is adding 15 restaurants to its 
existing 24. In a symbolic but important step, the 
chain is adding foods like kimehi. the spicy pickled 
cabbage thaL is nearly a national icon, to its menu. 


Tax Cuts 
Unveiled by 
Hong Kong 

Bloomberg Business Neva 

HONG KONG — In a surprise 
move, the government cm Wednes- 
day announced plans to cat individ- 
ual and corporate income tax rates 
for the fiscal year beginning April 1. 
and it projected a budget surplus 
and steadily mounting cash reserves. 

A surplus of 15.1 billion Hong 
Kong dollars ($1.9 billion) is ex- 
pected for the current fiscal year, 
while financial reserves are expect- 
ed to be 136.1 bQlion dollars. Fi- 
nancial Secretary Hamish Mac) cod 
said in his annual budget speech. 

“I forecast that we shall add 7.7 
billion dollars to our fiscal reserves 
in 1994-95." be said 

With government revenues swol- 
len by soaring real estate prices and 
booming stock trading, Mr. Mac- 
leod said the corporate tax rate 
would be cut to 16.5 percent from 
17.5 percent, while the top margin- 
al individual tax rate would drop to 
20 percent from 25 percent and the 
individual allowance increased 28 
percent, to 72,000 dollars. 

He also announced that Hong 
Kong's airport departure tax would 




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NZSE-40. 


■.{L227JGg ■ ■ -.£27020 

"juitV". i.t;994,94 - • 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


Very briefly: 


ImcnuDoeal Herald Tribune 


Kong's airpon departure lax would -CRALtd. the largsst minreg company in Anstreb, nearly doubled its 
becutio 50 dollars from 150 dollars. net In 1993. earning 806.7 million Australian dollars (S575 million). 
_ compared with 411.4 million in 1992. 

The corporate tax cut is meant to , , . . , 

enhance the colony's attractiveness • Taiwan agreed to sign an accord with the United States to protect 
as a regional business center, Mr. patent allowing patent-holders to extend their rights for two to five 
McLeod said. Soaring real estate after first registering a product. 

costs have begun to erode Hong • Taiwan loosened its curbs on investing in Gbnu another notch, allowing 
Kong's competitiveness with sura its companies to invest in producing auto parts in China in order to meet 
alternative centers as Singapore. inc reasing competition. 


costs have begun to erode Hong • Taiwan loosened its 
Kong's competitiveness with sura its companies to inve 
alternative centers as Singapore. inc reasing competith 

He forecast a robust 5J percent • Virgin Group LtiL, the largest recorded music retailer in Britain, mil 
growth rate in gross domestic prod- open Virgin Megastores in Soutb Korea through a joint venture with 
uct, the same as in 1993-94. The Saehan Media Corp. 
value of the colony’s trade is opect- . Coca-Cola Co. sign 
ed to nse 17 percent, he added bottlme canaciiv in 


• Coca-Cola Co. signed an agreement with Swire Pacific Ltd. to increase 
bottling capacity in Hong Kong and China, including building new 


Traders on the Hong Kong stock bottling plants in China, 
exc h a n ge, however, shrugged off the M Vie tnam Steel Corp. will build two steel rolling mills at a cost of more 
tax cuts and the upbeat forecasts, than jjqq million in partnership with Japanese and South Korean 
The Hang Seng index feQ 270.93 companies, increasing Vietnamese steel production capacity by 440.000 
poults, or 3 percent, to 9,877.43. on metnetons 

worries about rising interest rates. Bloomberg, afp. Reuters 


Taiwan Rethinks Part of China Steel Sale 


( Bloomberg Reuters) price for each share traded. 


Compiled fa- Our Staff From Dispatches 

TAIPEI — The government is on 
Steel Corp. Taiwan's largest inte- 

grated steel company, analysts and tiollars, <87 after the issue 
officials said Wednesday. «*“«*• have until 

y March 22 to pay for the new shares. 

The government had planned to “We are afraid that many buyers 
offer 150 million shares in the in the offer will not pay up for the 
state-run company to investors in shares, making it a failure and fore- 
Taiwan, following up an offering of ing underwriters to absorb the un- 


360 million shares that was placed 
Tuesday. 


sold shares." said Lai Tsai-fa, a 
director of the Commission forNa- 


But the offering Tuesday.*™ tional Corporations. 


NYSE 

Wednesday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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Benjamin Chen, an analyst with 
Baring Securities, said applicants 
to the China Steel sale might end 
up buying 70 percent or fewer of 
the 360 million shares, which would 
be a poor result. 

Taiwan had planned 10 sell 22 
percent of China Steel by the end of 
June, bringing the state's stake w 
. slightly above 50 percent. At the 
stock’s current domestic price, the 
sales would raise about 34.8 billion 
dollars. 

Bui after the poor reception of 
Tuesday's issue, the government 
may sell most of its next tranche in 
the company to overseas investors 
and cancel the portion earmarked 


for the domestic market, according 
to a published report. 

Analysis were originaily bullish 
about the sales. Bui the stock mar- 
ket's recent slide and the plunge 
Tuesday in China Steel shares has 
changed sentiment greatly. 

Some analysts said they expected 
the government to scale back the 
size of its offering, even if it con- 
fines sales to foreign investors. 

Analysts also said the success or 
failure of the China Steel sale 
would affect several other privati- 
zations planned for the first half of 
1994. including sales of stock in 
Taiwan Machinery Manufacturing 
Corp. and China Petrochemical 
Development Corp. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Airline Regulation Eased 
As India Bolsters Market 


Compiled br Our Stuff From Dtspatcha 

NEW DELHI — India has 
given its two state-run airlines 
more autonomy while also le- 
galizing increasingly popular 
private air carriers. 

Although private carriers 
have been operating in the 
country for more than four 
years, they were not considered 
legal entities and were not al- 
lowed to prim flight schedules 
under the Air Corporation Act 
of 1952. Parliament rescinded 
that law on Tuesday. 

“In our advertisements we 
could only say breakfast flight, 
tea time Tight or dinner flight," 
said Syed Riaz Haider, an execu- 


tive of East-West Airlines, the 
largest private earner. “Now we 
can bravely give the schedule." 

Under new regulations, the 
state airlines, Air-lndia and In- 
dian Airlines, will be allowed to 
sell shares to the public and 
raise capital from the market 
The government also said with- 
out elaborating that some oper- 
ating controls would be eased. 

Most private carriers fly rewer 
than five jets, compared with the 
55-jet fleet of Indian Airlines, 
but many passengers prefer 
them because their on-time per- 
formance and service are better. 

(AP. Reuters f 


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Mnoyoucan mflflie 
ILS. and xaoe a andi at 
6596 ampmed fa loocdplwno 
urtpanun. SAVE UP T050% 
wAa ntefer CmB Card 
DffiECT SaniOK. hqr hoi 
tiro OS. originallnfl rate 


REAL ESTATE 

^PORSAIE^ 

PARIS & SUBURBS 


17* CENTURY HOUSE, I how from 
tans, 180 sqm. 3 bedroom* lags 
cdtic. About 4 ohm, adiard. bik» 
bke. border fared Odeora. ItlJ M 
TeL HI 42 56 04 36 Frani <2560537 


PLACE VBMXXME owner sefis, wo* 
ksainouj oportwrt. Tafaphone Pbrfa 
PI -83 61 W 96. 

SWITZERLAND 



REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGENT N PARIS 
Tet (1) 47.20.30.05 


Lot in boip you) Salad a lowly 
aparfamL Lake Genova, So u lhxn 
area m modntaina. AHracthw 
orimt. Corephfo confidant*. Soon 
Rntndol Ws 41-21-329 00 49. 


■only AGENCE CHAMPS H.YSBES 


sp e aofea « Furmhed apomnenE. 
resdertml oeas, 3 month, and more. 


Fax 41-21-329 00 52. 


HONGKONG 
COMPANB US (350 

Openda your no tax or 
low <ox w— tro y from Da 
bodnass centre of Alia 


4066. Peregnne Toner, bppo Centre, 


BUSINESS TRAVEL 


Tel: (1) 42 25 32 25 

Fax (1) 45 63 37 09 

74 champs arses 

CLARIDGE 

FOR I wax OR MORE high dess 
studo. 2 or 3-roora op alm ena. FUU.Y 
EQUHTB). IMMHJlA iE REjSVATIONS 
Tab Ml 44 13 33 33 

...... To i®ir .... * - I 

Hidpcta quo Ur o partnaano. aS 
iizea. Pore and ufagjita. CaStAIE 
MRICeS Tel: p) 46 U B2 11. Fa* 
[1147 72 30 96 

raocAoaa (IM). Lutum* aiOo 

on ganien, far 3 or 4 months: F7JQ00. 

3 rooms. ne»4y redone. . 

kdehen. Shod or long lemr roDOD. I 
Td: 11147 235314. 

7fii - OfiSAY MUSEUM - dwang 50 
k^xl 24oom fan very weL sunny. , 


Today's 

EVTBWATTOm 


Appears on 
Page 4 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

PBSIHE SBtVKES, Td: Pm 33/1-46 
24426Z Houxteepen, moes d. 
| mB^gwemeaea.coata. dwuflem-. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 



AUTO RENTALS 


KBIT HUM DERGt AUTO 
WfflCDC: FF 515 
fftOAI OFFS - 7 DATS: ff 1000 
PARS TEL (1) 45 87 27 04 

LEGAL SERVICES 


^ iSeolDee. F6,«0- Tet 1-4070 65 M 

1 S' QNTKAL FURW5HHJ APARTMBIT5 

to Onent/AismriafAhKnSNa. 4 5o. p_— . anUk 


No onHoalr ta buy. 

CoB tore hofan, home or office. 
Itemhad bffln a- AJ rSgfad- 
Cd or Fox far Uf i »jLn« 


Amonm. Save up to 50X, No aw- 
pais, no nestridiore. Irnpenat Condo 
M 5163417227 Fob 514^ 1-7998. 

CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


HMDS AVAILABLE 
TO PURCHASE: 

■ ItStersaf Crrcfe 
* Bonfc GuooOea 


Ponucri charm, American a e wfanfe. 

ffiST NST Td/Foa 33-1-42 50 96 22. 

I Alfa, FOOL dnrming 3-roam flat, 
sunny, modem (undue. FfiJHXL Tet 
PI 42 5629 96 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 



LOW COST FLIGHTS 


MS JACOB, ST. GBWUUN DB PRES . , 

2 room, blduw, botbroow, fc efface, P ART RIGHTS at bwed fare loony 
beans, we. F7/00 per month. From SI 

la AoritTetni 40 51 09 9a _ «ws» doss. 7d FT Peru 014755.1113 


ikallbacK 


Teh 1/206-284-8600 
Fox: 1/206*282-6666 

4l7 2nd Avenue Wait 

SmM% Wo. 98119 USA 


SPENDING TOO MUCH O N fl t f 
DOfTTADVBmSZ 
BECOME NEW5 Y0UB8FI 


THRU MAJOR INTL BANKS 

CAPfTAL SUPPORT COUP. 

ILS. (714) 757-1070 Fox 757-1270 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 



70 68 48 M U 13W 14 

03 „ 33 3SM B3W BDV. BIW — W 

2.76 rj ID 183 36W 36W 369. - S 

Jf AB .. 170 6 5> W* — W 

_ IJ II 10W MW -W 

.1* 17 439 17 ( II J* « — W 

“ I SC 1# law MW -Ai 

_ Aj Vr 1,3 t'#u 

^ _ 10021 lltf a IMS JBW — w 

4JI »5 - »7 4JWd 44 44’,— IW 

_ in 481 4W 3W 4 _ 

_ m lSi tow jo aw — w 

.. * 115 2*W S6W 36W — W 

_ a MW nw nw — w 

n* j 59 2038 17W IbW I7W — W 

in 2 J M SlK «Ti 4SW M -IW 

92 66 <4 100 14W 13 14 — W 


unutfwpere* 

rrfflss® 

2»W laWYPFSen 
39>i, awYonEnst 
1 41 w Bw VttVin 
IW wzamto 
79* ewZHnei 
SW 76W Jenaean 
ii*i av* JartlhE 

39 v* 71', Zanriti 
■ 7WZMVX 
law IJW Zero _ 
jaw aiiZwesiRn 
39W SwZunw, 


W»w«e, lejecertenm wiwni, and Appew in rft popon, nu^roes md 
Servxes, 4 oHered by ueernanoruAy on TV as regsfar & ofajedbe new*, 
wponenced nwJhlngueJ European p tQint yog, produO, company or ser- 
busmen mwo 9 #r. on a leamar «r m o na*d, baUnxU ofaiedtee 

KS.X'TSS.”^ SSASZSXliSl 

wbaetyaionAeairMilbolaa 


WVEST IN HAWAO. Red Estate 
D evdopanO Corporation has an 
unnual inresmete opportunity *«th 
EawroUe retunn Avadabfa tema ore 
!•» yeav 520^ minman. Cal » 
hn. Tet 006465(950 Fat 800669- 
1228 USA. 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


1 DO ,43 ■ 

JB KU . 
.40 17 ft 


_ JJ 102 MV. 14V, 144. _ 


JB 3.1 13 JM 

1.17c 18-37, ll*J 

.98 9J, _ 3803 WWd 


TH 7W 7W - " 
144* MW 14W 

iWa'iii is •- 


‘-riiJidAi. — wie get yai on 6 k air with a lead one SWBTWNT OPPCSTUNmf 47-toan 

OttUraaADBUSINK FWANCT ^rearta .coverage w* ere of our 2« tagvff hSfrf MoA wrth pod, 
amdafate far any wofcfa pidacls pxtneii bi Europe I u_ rr - jz ™ m t ond roof tap cor?.an- 

wrMwte ta* bnef lynopas m DEUTSCHE AUSLAN&S PRESSE S'toSTSor raonwISlWO 
Enafah to Caporde Advances. 44- AGENTU8 DAPA Ltd. Srt,d»4 BrKrt ontoe Wl wdi 

_ "7^3! 300 OuptefajiT^ 66 me dm Qaira Bvntastam. o^qt far 12 ’rSre. It rteressed axv 

0FF5HO8E COMMNES Fw free « IM-lt 4435 71 14 tact A Booth, Bnfefcsmem Eeafay, 

hradaire or advkn Tet tmfan Fox (33-1 J 42 89 OS 97 Matsdes Bfaa.. 566 Sai And- 


SPECIAL HEADING 

MARCH 11, 1994 

To pbee your classified ad or For more information: 

Contact the LHT in PARIS 
TeL- (35-1) 46 37 93 85 - Fax.- (33-1) 46 37 93 70 
OR YOUR LOCAL I.H.T. OFFICE 
OR REPRESENTATIVE 


autdafaie far any vmfaie prqndi 
•rakfeMfe. Fa* brief synopns m 
Bngfah to Capacte fawn, 44- 
271^1300 Quote Rd. Tl 
OFF5HOEE COMVNES Fa free 
brochure or advice Tet London 

44 01 741 1224 Fox 44 81 748 6558 


bar, restaxatf and roof tap amen- 
ide to 4th floor d roam. 8u» 1990 
with about 8 itan on lease Wl woh 
ophan for 12 more. If rtereaed con- 
tact A Booth, Bnfefcsmem Realty, 
Dona Mercedes Bfa®., 584 San And- 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 


NASDAQ 

Wednesday ’s Prices 

NASDAQ prices as of 4 pjn. New York time. 
This list compiled by the AP, consists of the 1.000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


UiWrth Sis 

YfijULAwSMt Drv vm PE MSB 


H4h LnwLn»BOYHe 


niton s* 

HtftUmSOCfc Dw YU PE nos LVHiautOVK 


itMorni 
High Low Stadt 


i si t* k" 


■fh 


on yu pe lOBs Won LowUYesCh'ga 


? 


2A 24% 

au a 

J3 5 * ISS 

S T« 
US p 

l?ft 

!S£ p 

{SS 14^ 

79% 18% 
16ft 15% 

ft* as 

ir && 

18% IB 

» ft 

33% 3?ft 

2?% ss 
V« %'* 

ig% 9% 
13 12% 

12 11% 

£* s* 

p as 

76 25% 

21% 20% 
5% 5% 

12 % 12% 

p |K 

as 8 * 

21 ' i 70 % 
21 % 20% 
~'<i 18% 






of 1JS 43 


22% 

3ft 

sa 

33% 

227 IB 

fjj 

33a i?w 
32S livid 
295 29% 
781 70% 
ISO SS'l 
24% 
48% 
31% 


i 


i 

TIT 


3% 32 1ft 


r*rS 


SR :«s 

18% 18% 18% — % 


70% —% 
12 % — % 


m&\sm 


i n u a 


m 


tt> 


Ala 2'j 4? 


2.3 a 


PoS ?»«&-» 


.68 11 I 


« 3» 


1.16 33 


f 7flf(V 


w 'm 

S* S’* -S 
11% ir« ,% 


££?r .16 ? 


dt S 







Wednesday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere, via The Associated Press 



9% BlYAJMSlr 
3SV> 14% ALC 
11 95 .AM(imn 
I ft. ftAMInwt 
14*. 7%AMC 
24ft23ftAMCPf 
5 % ARC 

2a % 34 'Ja ARM F pf 

r;„ i« u asr 

75% 63% ATT F0 
8% 2% AckCom 
Sft JWAoneU 
3ft 1% Action 
6% 4 AdmRsc 
4% 2%AdvFin 
14% fftAduMog 
7% 7»AdvM«jT 
5% 3%AdwPIM 
3% 2%Aerosan 
16% WuAlrWot 
24 IBftAirExs 
4% ftAircoo 
7% SY.AIcvnco 
10% SftAUaW 


42 49 — 84 
32 841 
_. .. 1146 
_ ... 96 

„ 16 32 

-. - 631 
... 71 172 

.23* 133 “ 70 

2.69* d.l _ 52 

- 48 157 


_ 13 13 

-20 « 

r = i 

... 8 27 

- 60 8? 
.9 14 ice 
_ IB 41 
_ 7 12 

- 15 2 


18% 16 AHaaenn J6e 2.1 _ 


1% >9* Alfin _ _ 35 

17% 6%AJKRit1 - 3 27 

11% 8 AllouH ... 14 84 

3% 1% Ainu wrtB _ 76 

6% 2%Alpnoln _. _ 103 

12% 6%AtanGr _ _ 266 

11% 6% AttoGng _ _ 50 

64 53% Alcoa pf JJ5 40 _ Z550 

8% 4ftAmdfH _ 

1ft* ftAmtuiti - 

16ftlS%AJft«»2 1J5 1X3 _ 
UftlSftABKCT 133 iB B 
49% 23% AmBrtr .15 J IS 
1'Vi, 1 AE«p( .. 

14% 4Y.AIM64 ASelS.1 II 
16% 12% AIM 85 1.32 SB 10 

14% 11 % AIM 84 n J2e 2J _ 

15 11% AIM 88 n .15* 1.1 _. 

23% 14% AM nr A M 3J 981 
24% !4%AIWzeB A* 121013 
14% 10% AmPog n ... „ 

9% 7%ARE!nvn SO 10.3 ... 

15% 9 AResIr 1J0O1X8 7 

9% 3%A5ciE _ 

4% 2ftAmSfrd _ _ 

5 7 ATocJiC ... 12 

13% 7% Arnpol _ 68 

2% ift Ampai wt „ _ 

■4ft IVAitwrI J6 7A 8 

53% 5% Andrea s —111 

4% IftAngMfg _. _ 

15% VaAngPar i« Me _ 

5% 3'v u Anutm _. 15 

12 5%Aproonn 
11% 5%ArkRst _ 16 

3% ‘ViArmlm .. - 

10 SftArrowA _. 17 

12% SUArtWfe „ 32 

4% 2%AWrofc _ 30 

1% ’jAstrt wt - _ 

12% % Atari _ 

6% 4% Aflanlis ,03e J 9 

3% 'ii, Allas. w» „ _ 

18% 7%Audvo» — 13 

5 l%Au76 _ -. 

14% 6 AlirorEI _ 2A 


- 349 

1^5 113 _ 12 

131 U I 2 

.15 J IS 2 
-. ._ 52! 
ASelS.1 1) 56 

l.r BB 10 91 

J2* 2J _ 120 
.15* 1.1 _. 67 

.64 3J 981 36 

M 121013 I 
... _ 1031 
■80 lost ... 25 
IJOalXB 7 SI 
_ 46 

- _ 30 

... 12 55 

- 68 794 
- 16 

J6 JA 8 2 

-111 194 

- 279 
4 50c _ 6 

-. 15 31 
_. - 183 

- 16 2 

.. - 16 
-. 17 62 

~ 32 64 

- 30 60 

- _ J 

_ -. - 1361 

A3e J 9 59 

_ _ 5 

- 13 146 

_ -. 470 

_ 2* 357 


■% 8% 
35 32 

10% 10V, 
1 Wh 
10 % 10 % 
22% 1)21% 
3% 3Y U 
25% 25 

H*h 1% 

66% 64% 
7% 7% 

J'A 3% 

2'/i, 2% 

4% 4% 

3% 3 

12V. 13% 
IV U IV« 
3'Vu 3% 
2 % 2 % 
10 % 10 % 
21 % > 1 % 
3% 3% 

6% 6% 
10% 10% 
17 16% 

1“% 1% 
8% 8% 
10% 10 
2 % 2 % 
4% 3% 

7% 6% 

6% 6% 

63 60% 

5% 5% 

•'/i* % 

12 V. 12% 
22% 22% 
43% 43% 

1% P. - * 

*»■ 4V„ 

15% 15 
13% 13 
13% 13 
19% 19% 
20V. 20% 
12% 1 1 
7% 7% 

10% 10% 
3H 3% 
3% 3 

3% 3% 

10% 10% 
!'»» TA% 
13% 13% 
23% 22 
W* 3% 
1% 1% 
5% S% 
10V. 10% 
9% 9% 

1%. I ’.’ii 

9W 9 
7% 7% 

3% 3% 

15 % 

6% 6% 
6 6 
7% 24^ 

1S% 14% 
1 W 1 % 
8 TV, 


8 % - 
34%. 1% 
10% — % 
1 *% 
10 % — % 
22% — % 

*■-! 
1% _ 
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7% — % 
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14% —9. 



1 S 01 Fin - 9 482 

4 7HCIM .830104 _ m 

* 3% CM! Cp _ 94 199 

W l*'wCST6nl .... 96 

>10 CVBFn J20 2J 9 7 

• 3%CVDPr»tl _ .. 113 

. »nCXR _ ._ 155 

79%C(6>>V5n . 1178 


16%CaOeAs 30 .9 *7 57 

f ’U CdjPTClp .. 10 

h p* Cation n _ - 449 


5% 5% 5% ■ vci 

8 % 8 B — % 

9 8% 8% _% 

2'.u 1% 2 —Yu 

US 11%1M»— % 

4% 4% 4% -% 

lVi 1 1% 

62% 60% 61% — 2 
72% n 22 — % 
1% 1% 1% 

2*i. 2% 7% — % 


IVj AiitDI Ind 
6% 2%DRCA 
3 l%Dc4cplx>n 
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8% 4%DanlHd 

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1 Vi yyt uurarom 
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7% SUDeSc 
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4'A 2%DiaoB 

6% 2%DCHMAS 
7’.'. 2%DdcMS0 
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9% 6% Dimark 5 

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4% 2%Ducttn 
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17 Estop 
25 E<JiBFn» 

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132*.inEmp 
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17% FiaPui 

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MFrkSpwt 


- - 50 % 

- - 80 3% 

- - 44 2% 

_ - 16 IV™ 


'% '% — V» 
3V6 386 * % 
2 f —Vu 


- — 16 ■*» 'vi. vu — n 

_ 59 35 7% 7 7% — % 

- 31 135 2% 2% 7%— Vo 

_ 24 152 6V6 6 6% _ 

_ - 3089 6% 4% *%-!% 

- - 497 3% 2% 3 ♦% 

- 35 1 6% 6% 6% — V. 

ASI A « 201 10% 10 10% — % 

-Itft 23 16 64 7% 6% 7 — % 

_ 9 14 3>1% 3* Vi* 3 Wu — % 

-06b J 20 <86 20% 19% 20% * I 
_ !6 16 3V> 3% 3% —'A 

- - 22 5 49, 5 — % 

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- 33 297 21 Vi* 2% 2% — % 

- 29 345 17% 17 17% — % 

- 26 831 9% tV, 8% — % 

- t IH H » N - 

. _ . - »8 15 6% 6% 6% — % 

1-2 10.0 20 13% 13% 13% - 

02 23 19 138 15 (114% 14% — % 

■“ S.9 - a 9% 9% 9% - 

49a 7J) _ 233 10% « 9% 9% — % 

■80 SJ _ SI 10V» 10% 10% — % 

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- 7 35 3% 3% 3% *% 

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„ - - 17 2V» 2% IVt — Ui 

74 U ! 47 20 19% 19% _ 

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>-72 BJ994 111 19% 19% 19% _ 

7-75 4.3 68 41% 40% — % 

■07 A 408 7411 12% 12 12% — % 

.28 1.9 13 57 IS 14% 14% — % 

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- - 213 »» n. 9»— % 

- _ .31 3% 37/i* 3% _ 

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- ... 22 31% »%M»— H 

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A0e 6.7 - 101 9% 9 9 — % 

. — .-86 3864 3U/I. 3V» 306. ^ 'A 

»X i4 78 27% 26% Z7V4 

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_ - 1249 15% 14% 1SV1 ♦% 

- X40 I3%dl4% 15% — % 
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11% 31% -% 

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■««* 4JJ _ 60 108 17% "Jfc _ 

- - <Yl* 4% «/,*— V U 

300 a N *2 J5 It 

M 14 U 10 10 10 I 

32 “ 2® 18% 18 * 18% T% 

:« ,-£ iS l* 5* J* 

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M*x 2 ')$ ">£ "S'JSt* 

un .1 S ’5 37% 37% — % 

3-20 44 32 xlD 69% 49 a % 

.16* 1,3 _ 1847 l?S 11% I?* Ijl 

LOB HL2 mm 2019 IM JQ'A 1£VH Vv 

.10 1A 9 161 7H »£ SS “S 

'j « *35% 135 135% -% 

■°® 8 3 a * 8 % 8 % — «4 

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10% 574 

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1% % 

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7% 3%, 
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13% 

18% 

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9% 

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7% W.ICH 

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16% 8%impHh- 
39 32%lmo04a 
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5% 2%lmsW 

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14% 9%|nsirw 
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2% 1 % InttaSvS 
6% JHmCfPti 


6% 2%UCfP«l 

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22'/. 4%imnrion 

21%lO%lrKMn« 

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i«5 

37% 21 luaxCo 
15% BWJodvn 

19 4% JonSefl 

2%. %jetrortc 

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2% IWJoul* 
61%27%Jw>MDt 
12% TAtCVPlkAn 
6% 3%KpvfHW 
31% 15% Keanes 
23%10%KetvOG l 
l» 9%KeMm 
6% ZftiKeyeno 
5% 3%K3em 
5%.3%Kinark 


_ 2 1608 
1.75 94 - 17* 

.15 2.9 _ 256 
-913 84 

- .. 51 

.48 4.9 — 4 

1J0 _ _ SB7 

jar 3.1 _ io 
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- - 78 

41 e .1 - 220 
.120 1.1 78 S 

- _ 899 

: IS 

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THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


1. Where do you usually obtain your copies of the 
Internationa] Herald Tribune? 

subscription delivered to your home [~T1,„ 
subscription delivered to your office - personal subscription Q 

- circulated copy [ 71 
buy regularly from newsagent / newsstand Q 
buy occasionally from newsagent / newsstand Q 
friend or colleague's copy |~H 
airline / hotel copy Q 

2a. How often do you usually read or look at the IHT? 

5-6 days a week Q l-2daysaweek Q« 

3-4 days a week Q Less 0 ft en than once a we ek Q 

2b. Where do you usually read or look at the IHT? 

(Please check all that apply) 

At home Q Traveling abroad I 7lm B 

At work Q Elsewhere [~TI 

Traveling to and from work Q 

3a. Does your spouse/partner read your copy of the IHT? 

" ■ Yes □ . ... . No □„ 

3b. And how many people in tota l, exc luding yourself; 
usually read your copy of the IHT? 

One □ Three Q Five or more □ H5l 

Two n Four Q No one else Q 


8. In the last 12 months, approximately how many nights 
have you spent in hotels on business? 

None Q 8 - 14 n 30 - 49 Q 7 5 or more n, 
1-7 □ 15-29 □ 50-74 Q 

9. In the last 12 months, how many times have you rented a 
car (for business or personal reasons, at home or abroad)? 

Not rented Q 3-6 rentals Q 1 5 rentals or more Hi. 

\ - 2 rentals □ 7 - 14rentaJs Q 

10. Please indicate whether you have done either of the 

following in the past 12 months: 

FOR PERSONAL FOR BUSINESS 
REASONS REASONS 

Flown in a privately chartered aeroplane Q 1~71 

Used your company's private aeroplane Q |~"J fMW| 

1 la. Please indicate whether you own any of the following 
companies' calling cards, excluding pre-paid telephone i 
cards. ( Please check all that apply) 

AT&T □ MCI □ Sprint 

Other Do not own one Qj^Tskiptocm: 

lib. How many times, on your last business trip outside 
your own country, did you use your calling card? 

None □ Twice Q 6-9 times Q*, 

Once Q 3-5 times Q 10 or more times Q 


ABOUT YOU 


12a. Of which country (or countries) are you a citizen? 

(Write in) 

12b. In which country are you currently resident? ( Write in) 

HI-42) 

j4Wfl 

12c. For how long have you been living in your present 
country of residence? 

Less than 6 months Q 1-2 years Q 5 - 10 years [~7L , 
6-12 months Q 2-5years Q l0or ^J| Q 


6-12 months Q 

13. Are you? 

14. What is your age? 

Under 25 Q 
25-34 Q 


Male □ Female Q«, 


35-44 □ 55 - 64 dm 

45 - 54 Q 65 or over Q 


4. How interested would you b e in r eading a lengthier, *75,000 to $99,999 LJ $251 

magazine-type article in the IHT? $100,000 to $149,999 Q 

Very interested □ Quite interested □ Not very interested □„* ^ gnn „ a) mcome in own currency (write 


15. What is the highest educational level you attained? 

Doctorate/ i — i University degree/' equivalent , — i 
higher university degree L_J professional qualification L2W 

MBA Q Secondary or high school Q] 

16. Into which of the following groups does your pre-tax 
annual household income from all sources fall? 

(Check in US$ or write in your own currency) 

Up to US $50,000 □ $150,000 to $199,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 □ $200,000 to $249,999 Q 

$75,000 to $99,999 □ $250,000 to $499,999 Q 

$100,000 to $149,999 □ $500,000 or more □ 


TRAVEL 


5. Approximately how many business air trips did you 
make in the last 12 months? (Count a round trip as one). 

None Q 3 - 5 Q 10 “ 19 Cl 35+ Q*n 

j_2[] 6-9 Q 20-34 [jJ IF NONE 4P k $KJP TO Q8 

6. To which of the following destinations did you fly on 
business in the last 12 months? 

EUROPE THE AMERICAS 

Luxenlijouig □«. USA □«. Indonesia CL 

France Q Canada U China j_J 

Latin America □ 


China f~TI 
Australia I 71 

New Zealand Q 
Other Asia/Pacific Q 

MIDDLE EAST □ 
AFRICA □ 

ELSEWHERE |~7| 


Germany ^2 Latin America U Australia |_jJ 

Italy □ New Zealand □ 

Spain 3] AS 1 A/PACIFIC Other Asia-Pacific | 71 
Switzerland 22 Hong Kong Q MIDDLE EAST | 71 

Netherlands Q □ pn 

Scandinavia / r ~ 1 Japan Q AFRICA U 

BritiSes □ Taiwa " □ El^VHERE □ 

Russia CL 71,ai,and R 

Other Eastern pi Malaysia |_J 

E uropean Countries La 

7a. For business trips, which class of air travel do you 

9 for for 

usually use . trips long-haul trips 

t up to four hours) (Over four hours) 

First Class __l ©I □ as, 

Business Class 

Economy _a 

No such trips 1_J Lil 

7 b do you belong to an airline’s executive/freqoent 

fUer dub? Yes □ No □ --sorTOOs ,, 

7c. If yes, which one(s) do you mainly use? 

(Please write in) ^ • 


17a. How many cars are there in your household, 
including any company cars? 

Nocar Q One Q Two Q Threeormore Qw 

17b. What do you estimate to be the current cost of your 
main car, if purchased new (to the same specification)? 

Under US $ 15,000 □ $40,000 to under $75,000 

$15,000 to under $25,000 Q $75,000 or more Q 

$25,000 to under $40,000 □ 

18. Which, if any, of these cards do you use? 

(Please check as many as apply) j 

Access^Eurocard/Mastercard (Gold) Q Diners Club 

Access/E urocard/Mastercard Q Visa Gold/Premier I b1 

American Express GolcLTlatinum Q Visa/Carte Bleue Q 
American Express Green Q None of these Q 

19a. Which, if any, of the following types of investment do 
yon or members of your household have? 

Stocks and Shares Qj , af * Life Assurance Policies 


Bonds Q 

Government Securities l~] 

Investment funds (including | I 
Mutual Funds/Unit Trusts ) 

Private Pension Plans Q 


Derivative Products Q 
Gold/Precious Metals |~7| 

Real Estate (excluding | — . 
main residence) lA 
Collectibles fait antiques, r-i 
coins, stamps, etc.) LjJ 

Other [2 


19b. What is the approximate total value of the above and 
any other investments (excluding your main home) 
owned by you and members of your household (in US $)? 

Under US $50,000 Q $500,000 to under $ 1 million Qa 
$50,000 to under $100,000 Q S 1 million to under $5 million Q 
$100,000 to under $250,000 Q US $5 million or more Q 
$250,000 to under $500,000 Q 


charidesshouMbenefU fromyour 

• ; a: v ; ' ■ 




A U.S. DOLLAR FROM YOU TO A CHARITY 






YOUR OCCUPATION 


20. Are you . . . ? 

Woricing full-time [2 Student Q Not in a paid occupation Q 
Working part-time Q Retired Q Other Q 

If you are not working full-time or part-time, please skip to bottom of page. 

21. What is the principal activity of the organisation for 


which you work? 
Primary/Public Utilities \2\m 
Manufacturing/Engineering [~T1 
Wholesale/Retail [2 
Financial Services \2 
Other Business Services Q 

22. What is your job status? 

Proprietor/Partner \2\m 
Chairman/ i — i 


Education 
Legal Q 
Medical \2 

Government/ ( — i 
Diplomatic Service i— ^ 

Other (Write in) [ si 


22. What is your job status? Legal Practitioner Q, 

Proprietor/Partner \ A m , — , 

Omirman/ 1— 1 Medical Practitioner □ 

Chief Executive/President L^J Scientist/Researcher/ 1 1 

Managing Director/ r — 1 Technologist 

General Manager 1 — aJ Academic | j 

Other Senior Management Q Teacher |~T1 

Middle Management □ Senior Government^Qfficer/ Q 

Executive Q Other (Please give details) Q 
Self Employed/ I I ^ 

Independent Consultant ... 

23. For which, if any, of the goods and services listed below 
are you wholly or partly responsible for company decisions 
to purchase or lease, or to appoint or change a supplier? 

(Please check as many as apply) 

COMPUTERS/SOFTWARE Pi- 

Network Systems Q Corporate Financial Services \2*a* 
PCs/Desktop Computers/WPs Q Fund Management |~~J 

Laptop Computers Q Foreign Exchange 

Computer Peripherals Q Insurance Services |~~«1 

Software/Software Services Q Company Credit Cards Q 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Facsimile Equipment □ Legal Services □ 

Teiecommunications n Management Convey g 
Systems or Equipment U ^ Recruitment Q 

°™ R S5 Q Man^mentTtainingCoutsesQ. 

Company Aircraft □ C ° mpany TlaVel □ 

Company Vehicles Q Conferences/Exhibitions U 

Plant and Equipment □ PR/Marketing/ I — | 

Scientific Instruments □ Advertising/Market Research ^ 
Raw Materials Q Courier/Freight Services Q 

Business Premises/ 1 ? Information Services \2 

dustnal Site Selection I— zi _ . w 1 — 1 

Data Management [ 7 | 

TNANCIAL SERVICES 1 — 1 

Draupstir. Ranking I H None of these | — aJ I 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


Business Premises/ 1 — 1 
Industrial Site Selection L_d 

FINANCIAL SERVICES 

Domestic Banking Q 

International Banking Q 


24. Does your company operate outside the country in 
which you are currently based? Yes Q No \2m 

25. How many people does your company employ . . . 

Under 10 10-49 50-249 250-999 1000-4999 5000+ 

a>m o y f“ce^ □□□□□□» 
b) worldwide? □ □ □ □ □ D iet, 

26a. Which of the following international activities do you 
carry out in the course of your work? 

I purchase goods/services from I j I manage the company , » 

suppliers in other countries 1— ^ finances at an international level I — alt** 

international operations I— d None of these |_J 

26b. In which of the following countries/regions are you 
involved in the course of your work? Africa I I 

I Ll\7tlH 


Western Europe 
Other Europe 
USA /Canada Q 
Latin America Q 
Middle East [~] 


Japan □ 
South East Asia [~] 
Other Asia | 71 
Australia/New Zealand fTI 
None of these \2 





■MM-. 




7!.. 7 


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FOLD IN SEQUENCE 

First fold to Fourth fold. 
Then tuck Flap B into Flap A 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 




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T 'HE International Herald 
Tribune has donated around 
$65,000 to charity, on behalf 
of our readers, in connection 
with periodic reader studies 
like this one. 

P LEASE help us continue 
this important program by 
completing and forwarding 
the questionnaire on the 
reverse side of this sheet. 

Our warmest thanks for 
your help. 


t 








lai Herald 
mated around 
V. on behalf 
connexion 
ier studies 


s continue 
progruni b\ 
^nvardina 
on the 
is sheet, 
hanks :> 


ABC INVESTMENT* SERVICES CO (E Cj 
M mm-BataonPO 3WLFx 533042 Ti smi 

ijiABC Putures Funfl Lid. j ivfr 

nr ABC tatorruc Fund IE C t i 
mABC Global Recovery Fd. i 
AWMAMRO bam it M. Box jfj, Amsterdam 

w Columbia Saeurutes — fi 

b Tram Eurem Fund F1_ fi SgS 

wTrom Europe Funds, 3 

ffAlwto _FI 

AW FUND MANAGEMENT LM ** 

d AIG Amer gn Trial — « Znrn 

wAIG Qotanccd WorW Fd s 

■VAiGEurocu Fund Pic Eai iSnE! 

■r AIG EuTOSmotlCO FdP|c_S in&uj 

■Mttlfi fitffgr Fit Mr « 

w AIG Jbmbi ft"* t Muni 

1* AIG Latin America Fd Pic J, 1 u 

w AIG MUicurrency Bd Fd Pics £■£; 

w AIG South Cost Asia Fd s 26S*£» 

d KHdt Uta Fund _Etu 9?? 

d UBZ Euro-Optimizer Fund. Ecu ijVo 

tf UBZ Liquidity Fum E S , 12 SS 

d UBZ Uauklttv Fund DM DM jawS 

a UBZ Uouldttv Fund Ecu__Ecu IjTSi 

d UBZ UfluMUv Funa SF. 5 F 3jg2 

ALFRED BERG 

d Alfred 8 ere Worden — < 1SJJB 

Alfred Berg Sim ,,JD 

tf Far East — 1 lun 

d German, — — — dm m£ 

i 22S — * 175*1 

d Netherlands _ p i ^7“ 

ti Norm America _s tiSj! 

5 Sr* 1 " - 

tf ■" ■ f BOO* 

ALPHA FUND MANAGEMENT, LTD 
49 Por-Uj-Vllle M, Hamilton, HMI1 fiermufki 

» AW» Atia Hedoei Frt ZJ| jt j5£5 

otAWn Eurwe Fd | jqn3U_Ecu jwS 
fflftlsM Futures Fd (Jan Ju _j SJE 

m Alpha GW Pro Trn rl 7 2,a * 

m Alpha Global Fd I Jar 31 1 _% lauia 

,BAtoWH«teFd(Jan3ll^ ’Sli® 

mAMio Japan Spec I jan 311^ 2^2 

a Alpha Latin Amer uem ]]|j i.fSS 

m Alpha Podfic Fd Uan 31j_5 Son 

m Alpha SAM * 

m Alpha Short Fd I Jan 31) c 

( Jan31 IB ib£o 

mAMw TlDdaie Fd (Jan Jijj 
rnAtono Worthington I Jan jj ts {SI 

mBuch-Alano EurHdo Jan ji.ecu 15*01 

aiCurr-Alsta Him Cr Jan 31 jt“ mss 

flifilobatvesl Value (Feb lil_s 149*4 E 

w Keisel Japan Fund i-m, E 

ai Hemisphere Neutral Jan 31 J i&a« 

m Latimiest Value tJaaSt )__s iwm5 

mHidiAini Aurelia (Jan an _s 107.77 

mPoctf RIM Ope BVI Feb28_S IIZME 

sirRJngoen Ian Fund (Jan 3t| s BAM 

mSogr mri Fa uan an < lirj? 

mSrtus Inn Fd (Jan 31 1 s unri 

ARRAL ASSOCIATES LTD 
* Arral American Ouoni Fd_s l i h 

wArref Asian Fund « 398.91 

b Arral Inti Hedge Fund s 2»l* 

BAILU Place Vendwnc, Tiger pus 

en intermarkel Fund 1 «* >= 

1 totem ll Convert EMs ff ap yjj 

I Inferatfl InH Bds , 9 ami 

r InteratBOMI Conver1lbles_s xtIuS 

lidennarAel Multicurrency FuM 

">2°® A _FF 2411. IB 

m ami a . lii i. 

m fln« r v S3W1i)0 

d BBL Invest America S Y7a*2 

d BBL Invest BeJolHiYi n c irtri/v , 


d BBL Invest For EaS. 

d BBL Invest Asia _s 47457 

d BBL Invest Latin Amer _j «ji 4 

d BBL Invest UK | 2579? 

d BBL Renla Fd loll. - | e 019400 

d Potfimoninl ■ p 2M2UOO 

d Renta Cast) MAedhcm BEF BF 12319041a 

rf Renta Cash 5-Medium DEMOM ms*: 

d Renta CasBBMedlum USDS 521 137 

d BBL (LJ inv GokJmines LF 137.97 

d BBL (LI Invest Europe. LF 1472700 

d BBL (LI inv Euro-lmma LF 11*1740 

d BBL (L) Invest World. LF 38491a 

BANOUE BELGE ASSET MGMT FUND 
Share Distributor Guernsey (Ml 724414 
w Inti Equity Fund (S*covj_s 1Z7) 

w Inti Band Fund (Slcav) t 144B 

■r Dollar Zone fid FdlSicovM 1232 

* Stirling Eoulty FdlSIcovi^ Ui4 

IV Slerflng Bd Fd ISknv) l 1433 

iv Asia PdcHIc Reoton Fd S 1L«9 

BAMQUE INDOSUEZ 

«v The Drogan Fund slcav J 17743 

m Japan Gtd Fd A (2S/02/94I-5 1244s 

m Japan Gfa Fd B Oa/m/UiS WJ2 

m Dual Futures Fd Cl A Units S 130.15 

m Dual Futures Fd a CUnttsS 11944 

m Max ima Fut.FdSer. 1 CL AS 13023 

mMaximo FuL Fd Ser. 1 Cl BS 1172S2 

m Maxima Ful. Fd Ser. 2 CL CS 104439 

m Maxima FuL Fd Ser. 2 C3.DS iM.Mi 

m indosuez Curr. a A UnUs_S 101944 

mlndOHMZ Cun. Cl B Units S VU34 

vt IPNA-3 S 43SJ30 

d ISA Asian Growth Fund, S 1273 

a ISA Japan Peg. Growtn Fd.Y 92448 

d ISA Paonc GaM Fund s 19A3 

d ISA Aslan Income Fund s Ills 

d indosuez Kona Fund- i 1U1 

iv Shanghai Fund S 1118 

w Himoiavon Fund - - « 2844 

w Monika Fund S 2404 

w Mnlocco Fund J »91 

tvSMm Fund S 4044 

d indosuez Hong Kens Fund_s 54 . mo 

d Oriental Venture Tract a S8J95 

d North American Trust____s 37J9D 

dSnaoa&Molav Trust S 39 JW 

d Pacific Trust HKS 3AZ1D 

d Tasman Find I &JPB 

d Jarnn Fund * 17JBS 

vManaaed Trust S 3H_51D 

d Japan warrant Fund s OS7 

d WarMurtdeGrawtn Find s 447 

» Inaasuez High Yld Bd Fd AS 1(043 
iv indosuez High YldBdFdB 4 11045 

a Maxi France FF 54i4.ni 

■v Maxi France M FF 5EU5 

BAMQUE SCANDINAVE A LUXEMBOURG 
BSS UNIVERSAL FUND CSICAV) 

d Eurasec ECU A (Dhr|_ .Ecu 1100300 ! 

d Eurasec ECU B (CoPI- — Ecu 1504300 

d Intehsec USD A tnivj S 7U7a 

a intelsec USD B ICapl _^S • 7XXG* 

d mtetoond USD A IDiv> 8 I7J143 

d Inlettond USD B (Coal S 2W3CC 

a Fmnsec Global FM A (Phrl FM 24R18M 
d Fiimsec Global FM B ICanlFM 24B1M4 
d IntefOand FRF A |Dlv>^ — FF m44D 

d Intel bond FRF B (Cop) FF 153J7D4 

d Far East USD A (Olvl S 2WB48 

d For East USD B (Cap) S 77.1147 

d JOPOn JPY A iDivl — Y 11474171 

d Japan jpy B (Cop) Y 11474171 

a Parsec FRF B (Cool FF 1340M5 

d Latin America USD A (OfvIS 2S4T4S 
d Latin America USD BICaols 2S4ias 
d north America USD A (Div)s 144949 

d Norm Amer USD BICan) _S 1449» 

BANQUE SCANDINAVE EN SUiSSE-GENEVA 

» imePaod CW — — SF SA28 

I* Intelsec Qtl SF 229J7 

M SavisStund Oit SF 17*51 

BANOUE 5CS ALLIANCE-CREDIT B AN K- 

(4122)344-191. Geneva 

» PleiodeMcHti AmEaolllesA 1B5JN 

nr Pletode Europe EouUies — Ecu « JUO 

■r Pietedc Asia PaeHJc Ea — s »2S , 

n PleiaOe Enviranmenl E<j — 5 92*9 

IV Pleiaar Dollar Bands — — % I01J9 

w Pletode ECU Bands —Ecu 10171 

iv Pletode FF Bonds— — — FF tt*37 

w Pletode Euro Conv Sands _SF «.?fl | 

iv Pletode Dollar Reserve 5 10030 , 

iv Pletode ECU Reserve — —Ecu WAS 

nr Pletode SF Reserve SF 0 -33 

•r PWcde FF Reserve FF 10128 

BARCLAYS INTL FUND MANAGERS 
Hang Kang. Tel: I8HI 82*1900 

d China (PRCJ — * 1SS 

d Hong Kona } , 

d indonesio. > 

d Japan * 

a Korea _ — — S 12.987 ! 

d Malaysia * 

d Philippine*. — J 

d Singapore-. - » 

tf Tnoland — s 

d South East Asia 5 

B DO GROUP OF FUNDS i 

i* BDD USSCasn Fund S 

urBDD Ecu Cash Fwd— Ear 6W175 I 

■r BOD Swiss Franc Cash SF SEAto i 

iv BDD Ini. Bond Fund-USS— S 5J».17 ' 

w BDD int. Bond Fund Ecu —Ecu 72HJ1 i 

v BDD N American EcniiiYFd* 50020 

w BDD European Ewntv FundEcu , 

/uBDD Aston Eaujty FiFJd — J ISSi'S 

m BDD US Small Cap Fimtf _5 1WM4 

iv EuraOnanaere Fued Inc — FF 1H01.W 

» Eurafin Multl-Cv Bd Fd — FF 9W-S2 

BEUNVE5T MGMT (GSY) LTD 

* Beunvest-Sra n l » '3E-S 

ivBellnvesf-GloDol — J '“'"2 

wBelln vest- Israel — } 

wBrfbivesMMtWuid— — J 

* Beftowsi- Superior J 108X22 

BHP LUXEMBOURG 

INTER CASH _ 

l France Monetoire FF 

I France Secwiie FF itwa* 

l inter cash DM DM 

t inter Cash Ecu. Eci 

i infer Cash GBP £ HES 

/ Inter Cash USD » 

f inter Cash Yen Y ' 45,05 

INTEROPTIMUM 

mMultldtvisesDM DM ^ 

-POP PF 1585122 

nr ECU EaJ ,1SU1 

INTER STHATEGIE 

■?* *— * FF SS 

- France . - — — ' mm 

» Europe do Nord — -J;.. -£->%, 

wEuraoedu Centre gj* *0,72 

wEwweduSud. Ecu ^ 

v Janon — ■ ■ — . iioo.90 

w Amer iquedu Nord J 181753 

nr Sud-Est Astoliwe * 5«1* 

wGtoOcg r* 

BUCHANAN FUNOLI8MTED 

A Bank al Bermixw Lid. MW &>***> 

I Global Hedge USD- * 

I Gtooai Hedge GBP J 

t Eurtcwi S AWanhc ( 

I PocHrc r-r- 5 


/ Emergmo Marked— -r—rj 
















V. IM T 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 


ADVERDSEMEWT — 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


! tlpiu , o- a 


March 2, 1SS4 


ft l ntxl l nni itoFEn d by hmdn fated. Mai —at vafae miBtn fiimf — ■applied by tha tod* Bwed urfth ft* nxeepUtm at —n quol— b»m un teoun t eion«. 

! "*Bnto*«jnAolilnfcjteba»toBpyofQB«RptianniappBad:|d)"d«Rj!(wl-we«klyi(bJ-bt««lily;flJt*rlniBhtly (every two nmniu); (r) - ravdorty, (t) - twiev wwMyi (m) - RWtfMy. 


F INMANAGEMENT S A -LU9M W DJ1/71WH1 

to Delta Premium Corn S 1177 DO 

FOKUS BANK A&4R4ISS 
wscenfandslim Growth R1J 1.13 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID! 

PA Bax 2001. Hamilton. Bermuda 

mFMG Gtobol (31 Jan) f 1559 

* FMG N. Amer. (31 Jim) 5 1251 

m F*G Europe 01 Jonl l 1155 

mFMG EMG MKT (31 janU 1174 

in FMG O (31 Am I * TIjJJ 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 

nr Concepts Forex Fund S 1079 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

-Goto Hedge II S 14447 

nr Goto Hedge III.. ..S 1753 

w Goto Swiss Franc Fd SF 5259 

to GAIA F» .— « ULS 

mGoktOuamntnda.1 S 8444 

roGoia Guaranteed CL ii-^-A Mm 

GASTMORE INDOSUEZ FUNDS (1/82/91 
Tel: 1352) 44 5(34 49 
Fax : (32) 465*23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

tf DEM Bend LHsSjW DM 452 

tf Divertsond__JD*s254 SF 120 

d Dollar Buna— Dis 259— _S 249 

a European Bd_Dis 151 Ecu 152 

d FrentJi Frar w B i, UI W C P 114* 

tf Global B0htt_Dt3 219 S 247 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

tf ASEAN S 9.15 

tf A3h> Pacific S 4.97 

tf Cantlneidat Europe Ecu 150 

a DewHocMna Martels. S 474 

d Franem PC ,J2, 

tf Gernxxiy DM 554 

tf Internet long] . . s 2J0 

tf Japan Y 27750 

tf Monti Amedeo s 171 

tf Switzerlan d- x s 193 

tf United Kingdom l 154 

RESERVE FUNDS 

d DEM _DUt54 DM A1W 

d Dollar _DU2« S 2.147 

d FrCfKJ) Fran* pc 1258 

d Yen Reserve v 2845 

GEFINOR FUNDS 

LoMn : 071-4994171. Geneva : 41-223SS5X) 

iv East Investment Fund S 74748 

iv Scottish world Fund S 4715H2 

iv Si air SL American— _J 34297 

GENESEE Pt/ND LM 

to (A) Gtoiesee Eoafe s 13453 

to (BJ Genesee Short % 6549 

to (C) Genesee Ooporturvly—J 15743 

w (FI Genesee Mon-Eaulty i M554 

GEO LOGOS 

toll Straiohl Bond B Ecu 105443 

w II Paclttc Bond B SF 143340 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 

OFFSHORE FUNDS 

II AIIM4 StOouglDSJ Of Mon 4442*^4007 

wGAMcriCn 3 44214 

to GAM Artrttroge S 391.77 

to GAM ASEAN S 47754 

to GAM Australia S 22219 

to GAM Boston S inn 

mGAAMCorglll Minnetonka—* 18434 

to GAM Combkied DM 13957 

iv GAM Cross-Martel S 10248 

to GAM European S 9354 

to GAM France FF 2887M 

to GAM Frunc-vof SF 273.17 

to GAM GAMCO * 21856 

to GAM High Yield S 16234 

iv GAM East Asia Inc * 74240 

to GAM Japan. S 84957 

to ISAM Money 4ttttU5S 3 10037 

tf Da Sterling l 10058 

tf Do Swiss Fmr r _ S F 100x1 

tf Do DeulsdMmork DM 10051 

tf Do Yen Y lMiloo 

to GAM AJtocmw MitFFd J 18154 

w GAM Emerg MkH Mltt-Fd -S 1*130 

to GAM Mm- Europe USS 8 U755 

to GAM MJIFEuroee DM DM 14754 

toGAMMAFG4o(x)(USS S 19459 

to GAM Market Neutral S 11954 

to GAM Trading DM DM 13949 

to GAM Trading USS J 17203 

» GAM Overseas. _* 19437 

iv GAM Pacific * 90444 

to GAM Selection --* 489.12 

to GAM SJfWOPcrr,'h*o kjmia _S 72748 

w GAM SF Surdof Bend SF 13357 

to GAM T /Che S 3S732 

to GAM U5. S 20953 

toGAMul Investments S 81039 

to GAM Value S 13408 

w GAM Whitethorn S 19038 

to GAM WBrldwide S 47254 

w GAM Band USS Ord S 14S58 

w GAM Bond USS Special S 20751 

to GAM Sand 5F 5F [0440 

to GAM Band Yen Y 143440 

to GAM Bond DM DM 121.94 

to GAM Bond C l 14751 

to GAM t Special Bend C 1494S 

to GAM Universal USS S 142.13 

■vGSAM Comaoslte S 3S735 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1-422 2426 
Muhtebocfwtrajse 17XCH BCJLZwtcJi 

d GAM (CHI America SF 159452 

tf GAM (CHI Europe -5F 10CL22 

tf GAM l CHI Mondial SF 179158 

tf GAM (CHI Pacific SF 293218 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

135 East 57rd StreeLNY 1002221 2-SB-4200 

toGAMEoiaoe 1 9008 

toGAM Global S I53AS 

iv GAM Wetnat toua i — > 28157 

to GAM North America 5 8857 

w GAM Pacific Basin S 19151 

IRISH REGISTERED UCITS 
Eartsfort TenuceDublin 2 353-I-4760-630 

to GAM America na Ace DM 9441 

toGAM Europe Acc DM 13*85 

iv GAM Orient Acc DM 14544 

ir GAM Tokyo ACC DM 17259 

to GAM Total Bond DM Act — DM 11152 

to GAM Universal DM Acc — DM 11439 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: (809) 295-4000 Fax: (8091 295*183 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 

to (Cl FTranOcw *. Metals S 13953 

to rot KT Global S 97 72 

to IF) G7 Currency — S 8451 

to(K) Y«n Financial J 14754 

to (J) Dtecmried Rsk Adi S 11443 

« (K) Inti Carrencv 2 Bond— 8 10959 

to JWH WORLDWIDE FND-JI 1750 

GLOBAL FUTURES 2 OPTIONS SICAV 
rnFFMIntBOPror-CHFCl-SF 108.09 

GOLDMAN SACKS 

ivGSAdl Rate Mart. Fd II S 9.94 

mG5 Global Currency.. 3 12S257 

to GS Global Equity S I2.« 

w GS World Band Fund. S 1272 

to GS world Inane Fund S 1854 

GOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 

to&SvmpFnorf , Feu 12KL40 

GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 

to GranUe Capital Eauttv S 15550 

toGroniTpCaclfcl/AM Keutrotl 104117 

to Granite Catwoi Mortgpge-5 131** 

GT ASSET MANAGEMENT I IRELAND) LTD 
Tel : 1441 71 - 7184547 

d GT Aston Fa A Shares S 8*5* 

d GT Asean Fd B Shares S 875* i 

ff GT Asia Fund A amres 8 

tf GT Ada Fund B Shares S 2*16 

tf GT Astern Small Comp A Sh5 2059 

tf GT Aslan Small Comp B Stvs 21.15 

tf GT Australia Fd a Snares— J 34.12 

tf GT Australia FdBShores_S 3434 

d GT Ausfr. Smafi Co A 5h S 2945 

tf GTAusIr.SmaHCoBSh — S 385 

tf GT Berry Japan Fd A Sh — S 2454 

d GT Berrv Japan Fd B sn — S 2437 

tfGT Bond Fd A Shares S 

tf GT Bond Fd 8 Shares S 1950 

tf GT Dollar Fund A 5h S 3SJ9 

tf GT DoUbt Fund B Sit S 3555 

tf GT Emerging Mfcts A 3h_ S 2152 

d GT Eroenrtng Mkts B Stl — i 3185 

tf GT £m Mkt Small Co A ShX 
tf GT Em M*T Small Co B Sh -S 
to GT Euro Stnad CO Fd A Sh-S JL3I I 

toGTEureSmaOCoFd-BShJS 4241 I 

tf GT Hong Kong Fd A Shares S 
tf GT Hong Kong FtfBSheresS 8145 I 

tf GT Honsho Pathfinder a ShS 
tfGT Honshu Pathfinder BShS 15M 

to GT Joo OTC Stocks Fd A ShS 1342 

w GT JaO OTC Stocks Fd B StlS 1149 

to GT Joe Small Co Fd A Sh — S 1552 

w GT Joo Small Co Fd B Sh— S 14J» 

to G.T. Latin America Fd * 2553 

tf GT Strategic Bd Fd A Sh— s 
tfGT Siratwc fid Fd 6 5h — 1 
tf GTTeteamwi FdASharesS 15*2 

ff GT Telecomm. Fd S SnaresS 1554 

r GT Teamafogv Fund A Sn_S Si4i 

r gt Technology Fum 8 Sh_s S545 

OT MANAGEMENT PLC [44 71 710 45 471 
tf G.T. Biotech/HraNh Fund_S 2480 

d G.T. Deutschland Fund S 1254 

tf G.T. EllTOM Fund — S 51.85 

IV G.T. Global Smofl CO Fd — S 7930 

tf G.T. Inves tment Fund S 7L15 

ir G.T. Korea Fund 5 488 

wG.T.Newty IndCountr Fd_S 4858 

w G.T. US Smofl ComocMtes— S 2484 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

f GCM Global Set. Ea. * HIM 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MNGR5 (Grney) LM 

guinness flight glbl strategy fd 
tf Monoged Currency. 1 -* 39^5 

tf Gtaeal Bond — * £•£ 

d GUnl Won Income BCnd-S ZU7 

tf Gilt B C Btmtf 0 1151 

tf Eora High Int Bond — £ 2180 

tf Global Equity S 9438 

d American Blue CNp S 29 j» 

tf JaumcndPociflc - 5 125J1 

tf 3 ^2758 

GUINNESS FLIGHT ItTH. ACCUM FD 

tf Deutscnernark Money— DM B2079 

tf US Dollar Money — — S »179 

tf USDoHorHtghYdBand — S 25l74 

tf lan Balanced Grth S 3UI 

HASBNBlCffLER ASSET MANGT GevmbH. 

w HasenbhMer Com AG » 4BEJ0 

pr HasenbfcWer Com Inc \ J Jfil 

toHasen&khter Div } 

toAFFT 3> 190289 

HEPTAGON FUND NY UWM1S55S) 

f Heptagon QLB Fund J IBM 

mHeatogon CMO Fund J __ IBM# 

HERMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 

Bermudo : («»)295 4992 Lux : WSW484 44 *1 

Final Prides 

m Hermes Eureoecn Fund— -Ecu 
m Hermes North American FdS 


m Hermes Neutral Fund I 1 19.11 

m Hermes Global Fgnd— 5 7D2J1 

m Hermes Bend Fund- Ecu 131*24 

rn Hermes Sterling Fd l 7 153)9 

m Hermes Gold Fung,. ■ A 43954 

INCOME PARTNERS (ASIA) LIMITED 

w Aslan Fixed Marne Fd 5 KXiJ* 

INTERINVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/o Bio* oi Bermuda. Tef : 869 29S 9000 
m Hedge Hog & Conserve Fd J HUE 

INTERNAnONAL ASSETS FUND 
2. Bd RavPl, L-2449 Luxembourg 

■v Europe Sud E — eoi 10211 

international momt income fund 

a Amerioue du Nord s 10080 

a Europe Centinemole— DM 10209 

0 iioue lH wx&w 

d 2am Asotigir Y IHOUC 

IHYE5CO urn. LTD, FOB 271. Jersey 
Tel: 44 04 73114 

a Maximum income Fund r 1MB 

d sterling Mnga Phi s 2JU9 

a Pioneer mumo^, c 4*9«o 

ff Okoson Global Strategy s 17.7700 ■ 

d Asia Super Growth 5 mao 

, tf Nippon Worroni Fund S 2.4600 

tf Aria Tiger Worroni— —S 52900 

tf European warrant Fund -5 \m» 

ff Gtd M.W. 1994 S 9A100 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 

tf American Growth S 21MQ 

0 Amer Jam Enterprise 5 100709 

tf Aria Tiger Growth * 12.1200 

tf Dollar Reserve l 12506 

tf European Growth * 51400 

tf European Enter or He S 6- <500 

tf Globa) Emerging Markets 9.9790 

a Global Growtn 5 SMdO 

tf Nippon Enterprise s 7.B9U 

tf Nippon Growth—. 5 5.1900 

tf UK Growth—. t 54080 

tf Sterling Reserve l 

d North American Warrant — 5 58790 

a Grocter Chino Onps 9 84499 

ITALFORTUNE ItTTL. FUNDS 

to Class A 1 Agar. Growth itoLIS 7*52*80 

w Class B (GkXrt Eoulty) 3 1183 

to C lass C [GfobaJ Bond) 5 1181 

to Class D (ECU BOMI ECU 11.13 

JARDI NE FLEMING , GPO BOX 11441 Ifg Kg 

tf JF ASEAN Trust S 6248 

tf JF For Eosi Wml Tr. S 3789 

tf JFGJot»rC0nv.Tr 5 \SM 

tfJFHeog Kong Trail S 31.73 

a JF Japan Sm. Co Tr Y 5136500 

tf JF JOPtHI Trust Y 1344080 

tf JF Malaysia Trust S 2959 

tf JF Padftc Inc Tr $ 1385 

ff JF Thai land Trust 5 3748 

JOHN GOVETT 44ANT (LDJAJ LTD 
T«4: 44424 - 479420 

to Gaven Man. Futures — t 1141 

■> Gavett Men. Fid. USS s 9 jb 

to Govett i Geer. Curr t 1129 

to Govetts Glbl Bat Hdoe S 118780 

JULIUS BAER GROUP 
d Baerband SF 


tf Fnntoto _ *c 

tf Eoulboer America S 

tf Eoulboer Europe SF 

tf SF R - BAER SF 

a Stock bar SF 

tf Swissbor SF 

tf Uoulboer S 

tf Europe Bond Fund Ecu 

tf Dollar Bond Fund * 

tf Austro Bond Fund AS 

tf Swiss Bond Funfl . . J» P 

tf DM Bcrxf Fund DM 

a Convert Band Fund SF 

tf Global Band Fwv) DM 

0 Euro Stock Fund Ecu 

d US Stock Fund S 

tf Pacific Slock Fond S 

tf Swiss Stock Funa SF 

a SpeooJ Swiss Stock jf 

a Jaoon Stock Fund Y 

tf German Stack Fund OM 

d Korean Slock Fund i 

tf Swls& Franc Cash SF 

tf DM Cash Fund DM 

tf ECU Cash Fund Ecu 

tf Sterling Cosh Fund..__. f 

d Dollar Cash Fund S 

d French Franc Cosh FF 

to Muhiadvbsor Forex FO 8 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

m Key Gtabol Hedge s 18957 

m Key Hedge Fund me S 14787 

otKev Hedge Investments — S I45.fi 

KIDDER. PEABODY 

b Owaaneake Fund Ltd S 349055 

bill Fund Ltd 5 109100 

b IntT Guaranteed Fund S 123*20 

b Stonebow Ltd S 14*511 

LATIN AMERICAN SECURITIES 
Tel : London 071 428 1234 
tf Argentinian invest Co sienvs 27.1* 

tf Brazilian Inveri Co Slcav _s 3445 

iv Colombian Invest Co Sicav-S 14.13 

to Latin Amer Extra YWtf Fd S 1 18933 
tf Latin America Income CO—S 1082 

tf Latin American invest Co-8 1281 

tf Mexican Invest Co Sicov_JI 4459 

to Peruvian Invest Co S Of r—S 1114 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 
tf Aslan Dragon Part NV A — S 1117 

ff ASior Drogan Port NV B S 10.17 

ff Globa] Advisors II NV A 5 

a Global Advisors II NV B 8 

tf Global Advisors Pori NV AJ 1185 

47 Gtata! Advisors Port NVB-S 1)50 

0 Lehman Cur Adv. A/B S 8X7 

tf Premier Futures Adv A-’B_S »A7 

LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
24/F Lhmo Toner Centre. 8* OucenstoovXK 
Tel |852> 8474889 Fax IB52 ) 99*0388 

toJovoFund S I18S 

to Asean Fixed ine Fd —8 98* 

to IDR Money Market Fd S 12JI 

to USD Monev Martel Fd S 1044 

to Irxxxwsfon Growth Fd — ■ 8 2110 

to Asian Growth Fund 5 I3J0 

w Asian Warrant Fund 5 9.11 

LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT (859) MS 401 

« Am moo Fund — s -(142 

to LG Asian Smaller Cos Fd — S 2E846J 

to LG inaio Fund LM 8 1524 

LOMBARD. ODIER A CIE ■ GROUP 
OBL1FLEX LTD (CO 

tf Multicurrency 8 3192 

a Dollar Medium Term S 2584 

tf DoRor Long Terra— S 7184 

tf Japanese Yen Y *93780 

a Pounds ter ug t 2887 

tf Deutsche Mcrk DM 1884 

tf Dutch Flartfl FI 1955 

tf HY Euro Currencies Ecu 1785 

tf Swiss Franc 5F U51 

a US DoBar Snort Term S 1184 

a HY Euro Curr Dh*d Pay — Ecu 1108 

tf Swiss TUUUttatfrencr SF 1780 

tf Eurooean Currency —Ecu 2355 

tf Belgian Fronc BF UOjM 

tf CotwanSbte 5 1589 

tf French Fronc FF 1442* 

tf Swiss Muin-oividem) SF iu) 

tf Swiss Franc Shor |-Term— SF 165.9* 

tf Cangdlmi Dehor CS 1450 

tf Dutch Florin Multi FI 1597 

tf Swiss Franc DMd Pav SF It 05 

tf CAD MuMair. CHv CS 1159 

tf Mediterranean Curr SF 1152 

tf Convertibles SF 1034 




ff ■ Reach Franc*: FL- DUeh Rarin; 

n/L-NaAvaiSSinc.- 


0 Ciass B-I^ 5 ijxj 

0 at sc b-: : 1 l2S 

EUROPEAN BONO PORTFOLIO fUSSt 
tf Class A-1 dm |oju 

tf Cfoss a- 7 r-»* 1084 

a CkvxH i « !aS* 

tf Class B*2 1 10*1 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

tf Cqlegory A . C 1*84 

tf Category B : ijji 

US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

tf Category A— s 1189 

tf Category R- - 1 13** 

YEN POPTFOLtO 

tf Category A y 13*7 

dCnteora-vB. v 1*5 

MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

tf Class A s 2187 

tf cioss a ._ c 2tj» 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

tfCtawA _S 982 

tfOossB e injj 

MERRILL LYNCH 

EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

rfCtesA S 14J4 

d Goss 0 * US) 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

tf Class A _. , s 1484 

d Class B s 1458 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (USSt 

tfOassA — 5 16*1 

tf Class B , - s t084 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

tf CUrtt A * tftE 

tf Class B « 9*8 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

tfOassA s 1484 

rf Class B 5 1139 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A * 1751 

d Class a .... S 16.91 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

tf Class A * III* 

d Class B - — . — S 1151 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

d Class A——, S 1185 

d Class B S 1*44 

MERRILL LYNCH INC S PORTFOLIO 

tfOassA— — s 9J7 

tf Class B S 927 

tf Qass C - - « *27 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

tf Mexican inc S Pin Ci a S lots 

tf Mexican Inc S Ptfl Cj B s 10*2 

tf Mexican Inc Peso Pm Cl A 8 983 

tf Mexican Inc Peso Ptfl Cl B 8 983 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
to Momenium Novell ler Pert_S 10131 

mMomenhen Rolnban Fd S txne? 

mMomentum R*R R.U S *51* 

MORVAL VOMWILLER ASSET MGT Co 
wWIUertunas WMierDond Caps 1558 

w Wilier! undvWlHerbona Eur Ecu 1176 

iv Wlnertunds-Wlltef eg Eur Ecu 1453 

toWlllertunds-WHIereg Italy —Lit 1322880 
iv Wllterf unds-WiHcreg NA — S 1188 

MULTIMANAGER N.V. 

to Cmh Enhancement S 1045 

iv Emerging Markets Fd S tax 

w Eurooean Growth Fd ECU 1*50 

w Hedge Fund 5 13JS 

iv Japanese Fund Y B64 

iv Market Neutral S 1188 

w World Band Fund Ecu 1350 

NICHOLAS* PPLEG ATE CAPITAL MGT 

to NA Flexible Growth Fd 8 1518729 

iv NA Hedge Fund. S 13*81 

NOMURA INTL. {HONG KONG) LTD 

tf Nomura Jokcrta Fund s B8S 

NOR1T CURRENCY FUND 

mNCFUSD S 82(195 

mltCFDEM DM 89589 

aiNCFCHF SF 924 79 

mNCFFRF FF 446680 

mNCF JPY .Y 82*9580 

mMCF BEF BF 2703100 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grosvenor StJ-dn Wtx 9FEA4-71-499 2998 

tf Odev Eurooean— DM 174*3 

to Odey Eurooean—.. S 

to Odev Eur 00 Growth Inc DM 1418* 

to Odev Euroo Growth Aa—OM 162.15 

■r Odey Euro Grth Ster Inc £ *199 

iv Odev Euro Grth Ster Acc— £ *343 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL INC 
Williams House. Hamilton HMU, Bermuda 
Tef: 889 292-lOtl Fax: 809295-2305 

w Finsbury Group I 22281 

w Olympia Securtie SF SF 17351 

■r Olympia Stars Emerg Mkts I 1(0488 

to Winch. Eastern Dragon 8 1881 

to Which. From ler s 31150 

to Winch. Fut. Olympia Stv — S 14881 

to Which. Gt Sec Inc PI {Al I 887 

ie Winch. Gl See Inc Pi (Cl S 9.10 

to Winch. HMg (nil Madlson_Ecu 144423 

to winch. Hldfl mri Ser D Ecu 1724.70 

to Winch. Hlda int i Ser F Ecu >70988 

w Winch. HUM OivSior Hedges 123040 

to Which Reser. Mulll Gv BdJ 21.91 

toWMdMSter ThaBond S 3251 

OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front SI, Hammon.BermudO 109 295-8658 

■v Opllmo Emerald Fa Ltd S 1085 

■v DpiIido Fund — S 1 845 

wOotlmo Futures Fimtf— 8 1787 

toOpilma &V»ol Fund . -5 I486 

to Optima Pericolo Fa LM S 1081 

w Optima Short Fund S 4J4 

FACTUAL 

tf Eternity Fund LM S 318 HW 

tf infinity Fund LX) S 50*9*45 

tf Star High Yield Fd Ltd S 1328315 

PARIBAS-GROUP 

w Luxor S 056 

tf Parvesl USA B_ S 25.10 

a Parvesl Janon .Y 589480 

d Parvesl Asia PccH B S 77.9! 

d Parvesl Europe B Ecu 27J* 

tf Parvesl Holland B FI M050 

tf Parvesl France B FF 1354.13 

tf Porvest German, B DM 60844 

0 Parvesl Obli-Dolkto B . -- 8 1831.11 

tf Parvesl ODH-OM B DM 1*2313 

iTPdrvest Ob»l-Yen B Y IOM7 00 

tf Parvesl Obll-Gukteo B FI 145187 

tf Porvest Obll-Fronc B FF 21 1389 

d Porvest ODb-Ster B _£ 17D57 

tf Porvest Klil-Ecu B Ecu 1-083 

tf Parvesl OblLBeluxB — LF 1724880 

tf Porvest 5-T Dollar B S 11981 

a Parvesl S-T Europe B Ecu 13009 

tf Porvest S-T D6MB DM S«5S 

tf Porvest S-T FRF B FF 1804.1* 

0 Porvest 5-T Bet Plus B BF 10*5480 

tf Porvest Global B LF BO4980 

d Porvest Int Band B S 218* 

tf Porvest Obll-Uro B Lit S47488JW 

tf Parvesl Int Eoulttes B S 11188 

PERMAL GROUP 

f Commodities Ltd 5 10*584 

t Drafckor Growth N.V .—3 3048 M j 

1 Emeramg Mfcfs Hfdgs S VES54 1 

t eUTOMU-lEOUlLM Ecu 1841.12 

I investment hums 6LV« 4 14ISJ! 

I Media 8. Corrmunu.altam._I 11:386 

7 Noscol Ltd S 17922’ 

PICTET B CIE - GROUP 

w P.C.F UK Val (Lux) £ 4832 

nr P.CF Germavol iLox) DM 95J* 

to PjCF Noramvol (Lux) S 2*48 

to R.GF VOltoer (Lax) PtOS 1062100 

to P.CF Valitaiia ILux) LM 113H80D 

to P.CF Voltronce ILux) FF 13*187 

to P.U.F. Valbond SFR ILuxl .SF 30183 

w P.U.F. Valbono USO 1 Lux 1 8 23849 

to P.U.F. VOlOand Ecv ILu»l_Ecu 19277 

toP.U.F. VOtecndFRF (Luxl-FF 100827 

to P.U.F. VOSXXia GBP I Lu* l.I 9**2 

iv P.U.F. Vanxwd DEM (Lux) DM 30381 

to P.U.F. US S Bd Ptfl ( Lua> S >0352880 

to P.U.F. Model Fd Ea. 13482 

to P.U.T. Emerg Mkts (Lux)— 8 ? 081 

wP.U.T. Eur.OPPOrtILuxi— Ecu 1S582 

0 P U.T. GJooal Value iluxUcu 15455 

w P.u.T. Eurovat (Lu*) Ecv 23L67 

d Pictet VateuKte (CHI SF 69385 

mlntl Small COP UOM) JS 49*8* 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
c/o PO. Box 1100. Grand Covmon 
Fax: (809)9*9-0992 

m Premier US Eautir Fund — S 134083 

m Premier Eq Risk Mgf Fd— 8 >2*0J* 

m Premier mil Ea Fund— 8 138789 

m Premier Soveraipn Bd Fd— S 152171 

m Premier Global Bd Fd S 1518*} 

mPremiw Total Return Fd S >32277 

PUTNAM 

tf Emergno Hlth 5c Trust S 41.93 

w PutnomEm.lnta.se Trust* 4892 

tf Putnam Glob. High Growth 5 1827 

tf Pufnam High me GNMA Fdl 8.** 

tf Putnom Inn Fund S 1587 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 
w Emerging Growth Fd N.V.-5 29183 

e. Qiranlurn Fund N.V. 1 2108783 

w Quantum Realty Trust S 134.71 

• Quantum UK Reottv Fund-C 10194 

to Quasar HUT Fund N.V. — — S 2)301 

1* Quota Fund N.V. S 71180 

QUARRY MANAGEMENT LTD 
Telephone :8D*-*W«S0 

Facsimile : BCP-gW-SM 

d Atlas Arbitrage Fa Ltd S *829 

d Hesperis Fund Ltd S >06.90 

d Mend km Hedge Fd Ltd s/s S 1018* 

tf Zenith Fund Ltd Vs S 8*62 

REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

to New Korea Growth Fd S 1280 

iv Pacific Arattrage Co s 9*2 

* Regent Leveraged Ful Fd— S 81 78 

tf Regent Glbl Am Grth Fd — s *2831 

d Regent Glbl Euro Grin Fd-S 48562 

tf Regent Glbl Resources S 22951 

tf Regent GIM utH Grth w — 1 2J909 

d Regent GW jo p Gnn Fd — s lim 

rf Regenf GW PacW Borin — * 42174 

tf Regent Glbl Reserve 8 3-107* 

tf Regent GW Tiger. s 3306T 

tf Regent Glbl UK Grth Fd — s > *890 

mR.L Country wmt Fd 5 2*923 

to Undecvoh*d Assets Ser 1 — S 1134 

tf Regent Sri Lonko Fd S , 1**1 

m Peoem Pacific Hd* Fd S UU177 

ROBECO CROUP 

FOB 9713000 AZ Roft*rdom.(3i)M 32*1224 

tf PG America Fund Fi >5080 

d RG Eitftme Fond -FI 13380 

d RG Padfic Fund Fl 1#.« 

a PG Dlvirenle Fund — Fl 5428 

tf RG wonev PIUS F FL -Fr 11282 

d RG Money Plus F S— S 

tf Rw Money Plus F dm .dm 11027 

d RG Money Plus F SP SF 10685 

More Robeco see Amsierdom 5fogo 
ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
IN-HOUSE FUND5 

to AstaiCwItal Holdings Fd-S 4583 


to Dahn LCF Rothschild Bd_S 101111 

to Dolan ICFRoftechEo 5 114*5) 

to Force Cosh TradMoo CHF _5F 10303* 

to Lei com s 244242 

w Leveraged Cap Holdings 4112 

0 PriOWteAg* Stotts Fd SF 1 15X44 

6 Prleouitv Ffl-Eurase Eca 128444 

D PrieeullY Fd-Helmrtfl SF U88S7 

b Prleouttv Fd-Lutin Am— S 155854 

b Pribond Fund Ecu— «_ Ecv 127*73 

O Pribond Fund USD - S 114357 

O Pribond Fd HY EmerMkisS 119*28 

to Selective inveri 5A J 379*44 

b 5ouece $ I9*7*N) 

■rUS Bend Plus S 1015358 

w VarkMus Ecu 117231 

ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
OTHER FUNDS 

tf Asta/Jwan Emerg. Growths IZ5S7M 

to Esorit Eur Portn inv Tst Ecu 144981 

w Euroa Sirmeg Irrverim M_Ecu 18*480 

b Integral Futures— —S 98873 

bOpHgestGteboiFd General dm m l 01 
b OpUgest Global Fix I name DM 17542S 

tf Pacific Nles Fund s 945 

w Per mol drakkar Growth N VS 3M837 

t Selection Horfcoo — .FF ttORU 

b Victoire Arlene S 513X7* 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (C.I1 LTD 

m Nemred Lewnmed Hid s 97881 

5AFDI E OROUP/XEY ADVISORS LTD 
m Kev Diversified tec Fd LfeLS 118*862 
SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 

1* Reoubllc GAM S 15089 

to RenibliC GAM Americo__J 12482 

to Rep GAM Em AM Is GlotKri-S 15581 

to Rm GAM Em Mkts Lai AmS 12480 

w Republic GAM Europe SF _SF 13)45 

m. Renubllc GAM Europe USSJ5 1)545 

to Republic GAM Grwth CHF JF 11587 

to Republic GAM Growth t t 1094* 

iv Republic GAM Growth USS 5 16532 

w Republic GAM Opportunity 5 1 Jt.U 

to Reoufelic GAM PoeiHe S 157J7 

ir Republic Greer Ool Inc s M*3 

■> Republic Gnsev Eur Inc DM 10.61 

to Republic Lai Am Alloc S 10738 

iv Republic Lot Am Afwm s 1042* 

w RemdNic Lot Am Brazil s 111)5 

ir Republic Lai Am Mexico S 18538 

w Renubllc Lai Am Venez. s 161*1 

w Peo Salomon Strut Fd Lid S 9X74 

SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 
m fam u li u ni t— Fund » 10SJ71 

or Explorer Fund s ijijsi 

SKANDI NAVI SKA EHSKILDA BANKEN 
S-E-BANKEKFUND 

d FilTECn Inr - * 181 

tf F I orron ostem Inc S 188 

tf Gtoooi inc S 185 

tf Lokomedel inr . — .1 >86 

tf vortden me % >87 

tf Japan inc y me 

a Millo Ine — S 186 

rf Sverige inc Sefc 1CL7S 

tf Nordomeriko Inc s 183 

tf Tekitaiogi me S 1.12 

tf Svenge Rantetand lnc^_-Sek 1040 
SKANDI FONDS 

tf Eauttv mn Acc s 1730 

d Eautty inti "V S 14.19 

tf Equity Gbool S 1*2 

tf Eaulty Not. Resources— S 139 

tf Eautty japan Y 11117 

tf Eouity Nordic — S IjD 

tf Eaultv U.K. I 1*5 

tf Equity csniinenni Eurooe j 131 

tf EaurTy Mediterranean J 180 

tf taultv Norm America s 2.17 

tf Eauily Far Et&t s 4.9* 

tf lan Emerging Markets S 1*1 

tf Bond Inll Acc S 12*0 

d Bond inM Inc S 730 

tf Bond Euroae Aoc 5 139 

tf Bond Europe Inc < 0.98 

tf Bond Sweden Acc Sefc 173* 

tf Bond Sweden Inc Sek 11.14 

d Bond DEM Acc DM 139 

tf Bond DEM inc DM 036 

a Bond Daiiaf US Acc — s 1*3 

tf Bond Dollar US IRC S >88 

tf Curr. US Dollar S 1*5 

tf Curr. Swedish Kranor. Sek 1230 

SOCJ ETE GENERA LE GROUP 
SOGELUX FUND ISF) 

to SF BOndS A U-5A S 16*6 

to SF Bonds B Gerrrxny DM 32-M 

ir SF Bond* C France FF 13332 

■v SF Band* E GJL c 1239 

toSF Bonds F Josixi Y 23*5 

•v SF Bunas 6 Europe —F ra 18.14 

iv SF Bonds H World Wio* s 1883 

to SF Bonds J Belgium BF 83800 

toSF Ea K North America— S 1874 

» SF Ea I to Furnw . Feu 1*91 

toSF Ea-MPodflc Brain Y 1403 

to SF EtL P Growth Countries* IBM 

wSF Eq.0 Gold MtaM s 3330 

wSF EO.R World Wide- S 16.13 

w SF Shin Term 5 Fronce._FF 1*88375 

w SF Short Term T Eur ECU 1635 

50 DITIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

to SAM Brazil 8 20**4 

■v SAM Diversified- — 1 13*47 

IV SAMlMcGarr Hedge S 11349 

iv SAM Opportunity S 12874 

toSAM strategy S 12ZX9 

njAloho SAM S 13332 

v GSAM Composite S 357.75 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

oiSR European. 5 9*43 

/» SR Asian S >01.23 

mSR International. - * 97*7 

SVENSKA HANDELSBANKEN SA. 

14* Bd ae la Pel raise. L-2330 Luxembourg 

bSHB Bond Fund S 5633 

to Sveraka seL Fa Amer Sh — S 1537 

w SvenskoSeLFd Germany _t 10.97 

IV Svenslco Sal. Fd mri Bo Sh-S 12J9 

to Svemka SeL Fd mn Sh — s *080 

iv Svenska Set. Fd Jooan Y *QS 

to Svenykg Sel Fd Mlli-Mkl _Sck 117*8 
w Sveneko Sel. Fd Poclf Sh_S 7.«8 

w Svensko SeL Fd Swed Bdi_Sefc 1*4231 
to Svenyka Set Fd Svlvta Sh_Ecu IS3IJS 
SWISS BANK CORP. 

tf SBC 108 index Fund SF >S12j» 

rf SBC Eamlv Ptfl- * uriraHa— AS 22489 

tf SBC Eouity PHFConodo CS 22*80 

d SBC Equity PI H- Eurooe Ecu 21080 

tf SBC Ea Pttl-Melher lands — Fl 40180 

tf SBC Govern Bd ArB S S 1008.97 

tf SBC Bond PIIFAusIrS A — AS M5J0 

rfSBCBondPHFAuCtrSa AS 12538 

tf SBC Bond PttKmSA CS 117J5 

tf SBC Bond RIIICOASB—— CS 13384 

a SBC Bond PtiFDM A DM 172J4 

d SBC Bond PtihOM B DM KL4I 

0 SBC Bond PMFOutcn G. A_FI >7348 

tf SBC Bond PtlLOutch G. B_FI 1B4J3 

d SBC Bona Pfii-Ecu A — ...Ecu 11781 

tf SBC Bond Ptll-EeuB Ecu 13105 

tf SBC Bond PIH-F F A FF 61085 

tf SBC Bend PMFFFB FF 6»58£ 

tf SBC Bond PTC F1« A.'B — PtO* WfflJT 

tf SBC Bond PNM Ic.-Mng A __l 5385 

tf SBC Bund Pill-Fteriing B E *34* 

tf SBC Bom Porttoha-SF O SF 1I57JB 

tf SBC Band Porttalio-SFB — SF 1417*3 

tf SBC Bona Plff-VJSS A S >073* 

tf SEC Bond Ptfl-USS B_ S 11170 

tf SBC Bond Pin-Yen A — V 11870630 

ff SBC Band Ptfl-Yen B Y 11575780 

tf SBC MMF - AS, —AS 428*94 

tf 5BC MMF - BFR. BF 1I1XHJ0 

tf SBC MMF -ConS CS 466239 

d SBC DM Short-Term A DM 101942 

tf SBC DM Short-Term B DM 131877 

d SBC MMF -Dutch G Fl 732448 

d SBC MMF - Ecu ——Ecu 37393* 

tf SBC MMF ESC Esc 448S94J& 

tf SBC MMF • FF FF 2496025 

tf SBC MMF - Lit Ul S314419JN 

ff SBC MMF- PiBS PtU 3409389 

tf SBC MMF - Scnllllrro AS 3175855 

0 SBC MMF -Sterling 1 281043 

d SBC MMF - SF 5F 587077 

tf SBC MMF - US - Dirttar S 721*89 

tf SBCMMF -USS/II S 2«J80 

tf SBC MMF - Yen V 6M281O0 

tf SBC Glbl-PTH SF Grfh SF 1218121 

d SBC GlW-Pttf Ecu Grth Ecu 13*37 

tf SBC Gfcrt-Pttl USD Grth...* 1210*9 

tf SBC GIW-PTfISF Yltf A SF 1131*5 

tf SBC Gftil-PIflSF YldB SF 123*2* 

tf SBC Glbl Ptfl Ecv Yld A— Ecu 125009 

d SBC &fcX-P1N Ecu YM B Ecu 1277*9 

tf SBC GlbLPtll USD Yld A _* W96.71 

tf SBC GlbJ-Ptfl USD YW B — S 120*30 

tf SBC GIM-Ptfl SF inc A SF 1103.71 

d SBC Gib I- Ptfl SF Inc B SF 112253 

tf SBC Gtol-PTil Ecu inc A Ecu 11*75* 

rf SBC GfcX Ptf! Ecu IncB ECU 1188*3 

rf 5BC Gl&t-Ptil USD Inc A — S M289S 

rf SBC &K4 Pill USD IOC B 1 1051*2 

d SBC Gtai Pttt-DM Growth— DM 112832 

d SBC GIOI PHHW Yld A/B -DM 1083*4 

tf SBC G1H Ptfl- DM Inc A/B-DM 104036 

tf SBC EmergiriB Markets — S 1224,4* 

d SSCSmohiMldCnw-Sw-SF 5080 

tf Amer l co Valor 3S13S 

0 AnotoVaKrr 1 23731 

tf Asia Portfolio S »»A2 

tf Convert Bond Selection SF 113*4 

tf OMarx Bona Selection DM 1173* 

rf Doltor Bond Select tan. —5 13889 

rf Ecu Band Select ion— —Ecu 184*4 

rf Florin Bond Selection Fl TO8* 

tf FranceVattr FF 2181.77 

tf GermaruaVaUv DM 52181 

tf GoW Portfolio S 381M 

tf IbCTtaVOfcX PtO 638008 

tf UalVoUr — Ul 455467.00 

tf Jooon Port talk) — Y 2573580 

9 Sterling Bond Selection HB38 
tf Sw. Foreign Bond Selection3F 11189 

tf Swiss valor SF »S25 

tf Vnhieml Bond Selection — SF 79S0 . 

tf umverKtf Fund SF 123*4 * I 

tf Yen Bond Selection Y 11KTL08 j 

TEMPLETON W.WI DE INVESTMENTS j 

GROWTH PORTFOLIO ! 

tf CtassA-1 S 1176 I 

tfCtoMA I 5 17.15 

dClb*5A3 S >531 

tf Class B-l. — S 133* 

tf a aw a-7 s iLTi 

INCOME PORTFOLIO 

0 CkaaA -5 10.10 

tf CkwB 5 981 

THORNTON MANAGEMENT LTD 

tf PocH I mil Fd SA £ C 1584 

tf Pocif Invt Fd SA DM DM 40.11 

tf Eostera Crusader Fund S 1S53 

d Thor. Lffff Ofwons Fd LM-S 4437 

tf Thornton Orienl IOC Fd Ltd 5 2ft2S 

tfThorntan Tiger FdLM S 5534 

rf Managed Select Ion 5 208 


d Korea .... .S 1534 

NEW TIGER 51: L FUND 
tf HongKWIQ — — ~Jt 4285 

tf Japan — 5 1139 

a Philippine* s 7HSo 

tf TTialtand — * 21*5 

tf Maiavsia s 24.70 

tf Indonesia. J HUB 

tf USS Liquidity, — 1 tt.17 

tf OiMa * 1944 

tf SlnsOPore 1 2194 

THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 

tf Eaultv Income Jt 1286 

rf EoultY Growtn s U40 

rf LkjuWitv„ S 1880 

UEB8RSEEBANK Zorich 

tf S ■ Fond— -SF 125219 

tf E - Fond. SF 67441 

tfj- Field SF 39229 

ff M - Funa SF 130635 

rf UBZ Euro- Income Fund — 5P HUB 

tf UBZ world income Fund — Ecu 5460 

rf UBZ Goto Fund 5 13234 

tf UBZ Nippon Convert .SF 1*6*7 

rf Asia Growth Convert 5FR«5F 138590 
rf Aria Growth Convert USS-J 125633 

rf UflZ AM -Band Fund JDM 18537 

d UBZ D - Fund DM 189*4 

rf UBZ Swta* E«u«Y Find— SF 11736 

tf UBZ American Ea Fund__s 9874 

tf UBZ S- Bond Fund J 9981 

UNION RANCAIRE ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL^ NASSAU 

wArtfellnveai— - — - S 2445661 

— .imIiimJ * 127037 3 

toBQMfln * 121241 x 

to 8ecfc Invest S 139244 1 

toBrachnori . S 1066.11 1 


WDtavesI JS 26*734 

IPDlnvestAsiaS 3 12M.14 

to Dtavesl inti Fix Inc Strut— 5 98112 

toJogUtvcU. — S 207172 

toLorqntnvest 8 96544 

toMonrinuest S 132180 

iv Martin rori S 132322 

to Mourlnveri S 3861.97 

toMourinvestCominaled— _S 105429 

toMourtavesi Ecu. . — Feu 178687 

w Pulsar S 2241.15 

w Pulsar Overty —8 28RL99 

to Oucrt Invest S 3784*2 

to Quortflnvesi 93 S ISSUE 

to » « 341943 

to Turf Invest 5 1 15180 

toll reinvest 5 44335 

UNION BAMCAIRE ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL, LUXEMBOURG 

to UBAM S Bond— S 118878 

W UBAM DEM Band DM 112811 

w UBAM Emerging Growth ^5 10(845 

to UBAM FRF Bond FF 5543.1* 

to UBAM Germany DM 118*45 

to UBAM Global land Ecu 142800 

toUBAM Japan Y 10019*5 

to UBAM Sterling Bond 1 

to UBAM Sth Poeif 8 Aria S 224*1 

to UBAM U5 Equities S 129230 

UNION SANK OF SWITZERLAHD/INTRAG 

d Amro — -5F *725 

rf Bond-Invert SF 64*0 

tf Brtt-invesi 5F islsOv 

rf Canoe SF 8475y 

tf Conven-InvKt _5F 15870 v 

tf D-Mark- mvesi DM 2T246y 

rf Dollar inveri S 11723 v 

rf Energie-lnveri SF 11150 r 

tf EtnaC SF 183*0 v 

tf f.ml SF 3*9 JUy 

tf Fonso _SF 33100 V 

tf Francit 5F 22200 v 

tf Germoc SF 251 JO v 

rf Globtnves! SF 121*0 V 

ff Gold-invesi SF 267 JO v 

tf Gulden-Invest Fl 28SJ0v 

rf Helvrf Invest SF 10520 y 

rf Hoi land- inveri SF 33450 v 

tf HOC SF 154*6 y 

d Japan- Inveri SF 27100 y 

d Poe It I C- Invest SF 50400 v 

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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 


SPORTS 


Spurs’ Odd Mix Makes Winning Formula 


By Jay Privman 

Sete York Times Service 

SAN ANTONIO. Texas — The ascension 
of the San Antonio Spurs to one of the 
National Basketball Association's top teams 
has coincided with the spectacular play of 
David Robinson, the abstinence-preaching,, 
shoe-selling, slam-dunking center who is the 
league's second-leading scorer and. perhaps, 
its best all-round player. 

In the last two months, the Spurs have 
won 25 of 29 games, including 14 of their last 
16, and were 40- 16— third best in the league 
— entering Wednesday night's game at 
home against Utah. 

But this transformation has not been sud- 
den.' Rather, it began 14 months ago when 
John Lucas took over as coach, and it was 
energized in October, when the Spurs traded 
Sean Elliott to Detroit for Dennis Rodman, 
the league's best rebounder and cheerleader 
—and its most notorious hair stylist. 

Beyond them, it is hardly a spectacular 
supporting casL The starting guards. Willie 
Anderson and Vinny Del Negro, are role 
players. They combine for an average of 20 
points per game. 

A starting forward. Dale Ellis, bad worn 
out his welcome in Seattle, and the career of 
Lloyd Daniels, a reserve forward, was nearly 
waylaid by problems with drugs. 

The other reserves include such aging vet- 
erans as Antoine Carr. Eric (Sleepy) Floyd 
and Terry Cummings, and J. R. 'Reid, a 
college star who has bun a disappointment 
as a pro. 

This then is San Antonio, the hottest team 
in the league. And one of the oddest. 

"That's an understatement, that we're an 


odd collection of people," Robinson said a$ 
he surveyed the locker room after a 126-1 10 
victory against rite Lakers in Los Angeles 
last week. "Bui the thing is, these guys genu- 
inely root for each other. We’re not the most 
talented team, but we use that talent to play 
with a lot of enthusiasm.’' 

Lucas is the master chef. A former player, 
he runs a substance-abuse treatment center 
in Houston and has brought the interperson- 
al skills honed as a counselor to the Spurs, 
who are 79-38 since he became coach. 

"He allows players to be themselves.'' 
Robinson said. “That’s one of the keys in 
this league. You’ve got to be more than a 
dictator. He’s got a good fed for it, for 


Rodman's arrival changed the responsi- 
bilities of the Spurs, most notably those of 
Robinson. No longer does Robinson have to 
do all the rebounding, as well as scoring. 
Rodman parks himself at the baseline, which 
frees Robinson to move about the court 
Robinson is one of the quickest centers in 
the game, yet has a deadly outside shot, a 
combination that is difficult to defend. 
Leave Robinson alone, and he will pop from 
15 feet (5 meters). Come out to challenge, 
and Robinson can blow right by. 

"Instead of compromising David for the 
good of the team, we’ve compromised the 
team for the good of David." Lucas said. 
Robinson is averaging 28.5 points per 


Then he got rolling. “Shaq is not the man. 
man because the NBA wants him i 


The transformation has not been sadden. Rather, it 
began 14 months ago when John Lucas became coach. 


getting guys to really perform, h comes from 
his heart He wants you to do wdl. and he 
cares enough to be there." 

Lucas bore in on each player’s psyche. He 
saw a need to challenge Robinson to raise 
the level of his game and for the Spurs to 
think of Robinson as the best player in the 
league. Lucas saw through Rodman's dyed 
blond hair, tattoos and the clear Phantom of 
the Opera-type mask be wears, and discov- 
ered a team leader. 

“1 don't think ( could coach this team any 
other way.” Lucas said “You don’t want 
Dennis to be something he isn't. You’ve got 
to adjust to make him happy. You've gOL to 
make sure the hoops he'll jump through will 
help himself and the team." 


game, second only to Shaquille O'Neal. At 
this point last year. Robinson was averaging 
23.3 points per game. He also is third best in 
the league in blocked shots, averaging 3.43 
per game, and is 15th in rebounds, with 10.3 
per game. 

On Feb. 17 against Detroit. Robinson had 
a rare quadruple-double (34 points. 10 re- 
bounds, 10 assists. 10 blocks), and be has 
had four triple-doubles tins year, all of 
which makes him a leading candidate for the 
league's most valuable player. Rodman says 
the MVP talk should be brief. 

"No question about it: David is the 
MVP." said Rodman. 

“I'll take second runner-up. though." he 
added laughing. 


He’s the man because the NBA wants him to 
be die man. but before you can be the man, 
you've got to be the man.” 

Such doggerel is typical of Rodman, who 
seems to exist in his own world during 
games. He spends those two-plus hours of 
game time ctaatting with opposing players, 
fans and himself, and cajoling teammates. 
Every few moments, Rodman locks in on a 
rebound like a heat-seeking missile. Rodman 
is averaging a league- leading 17.9 rebounds 
per game. O’Neal is second with I2J. 

“I’ve been around a lot of guys and 
learned a lot, especially the Olympics and 
All-Star teams, but I’ve learned as much 
about winning from Dennis as anyone.” 
Robinson said 

Will that winning translate to success in 
the playofTs? The Spurs are notorious for 
being eariy-round casualties. Last year, the 
Spurs made it to the Western Conference 
semifinals, where they lost to Phoenix. To 
advance further this year, they will rely on 
Robinson and Rodman, and a back-break- 
ing defense that is the second best in the 
league to the Knicks. 

“We’re already seeing some playoff-type 
looks from other teams.” Lucas said “Get- 
ting by those hurdles now will make us 


NCAA,BCA Hoosiers Rebound 
Hold Talks j \ft er 50-Point Loss 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Black 
Coaches Association and the 
NCAA, with an assist from federal 
mediators, have finally began talk- 
ing to each other, although no one 
would say what was discussed 

"The parties had a frank ex- 
change of views and planned to 
schedule another session to contin- 
ue the talks," Ron Tomalis of the 
Justice Department's Community 
Relations Service, which is mediat- 
ing the dispute, said after Tuesday 
night's 2^-hour conference call. 

The NCAA and the BCA rwice 
tried to meet face to face but were 
unable to do so because of the 
Olympics and scheduling conflicts. 


Bob 


The Associated Press 
Knight was selective 


in 


■whom he talked to, and ins playew College LeOuBTS 

were not talking at all after No. 17 £?_ ^ M 

Indiana rebounded from a 50-point 
loss to Minnesota two days earlier 
with an 82-77 victory over visiting 
Illinois. 

"The Indiana players and coach- 
es won't be available,” Gregg El- 
kin, Indiana's assistant sports vn- 


COLLECE BASKETBALL 


better when the playoffs come.’ 
s have the 


The Spurs have the right mix for a strong 
playoff run: good outside shooting, a strong 
inside game, a patient half-court offense and 
stifling defense. 

“1 definitely fed we’re playing as well as 
anyone.” Robinson said. “Yeah, we’ve got 
an odd assortment of people, and Dennis 
sure adds another card to the table. I 
wouldn't want to change iu though." 


The coaches threatened in Janu- 
ary to disrupt Division l-A games 
to proiest higher academic eligibil- 
ity standards and reduced scholar- 
ships. 

However, the threat was with- 
drawn after the 40-member Con- 
gressional Black advised the coach- 
es against disrupting the season 
and intervened to get the Justice 
Department involved. 

Tomalis declined to say when the 
two sides would try to talk again, 
and whether it would be inperson 
or by conference calL He said both 
sides and the mediators agreed to 
not comment on the various dis- 
putes. 


New Lineup, If Not Players, 
Ends Knicks’ Losing Streak 






The A ssocimed Press 

The New York Knicks lost most 
of their Adamic Division lead in 
February. March brought a new 
lineup and the end of a four-game 
losing streak. 

Coach Pat Riley’s three new 
starters missed 10 of 18 shots and 
scored just 17 points, but the bot- 


NBA HIGHLIGHTS 


tom line was a 100-88 victory Tues- 
day night in Sacramento. 

"It’s nice to shake the doldrums 
with a win." said Riley, whose team 
outre bounded Sacramento. 54-32 
“Our rebounding paid off. We got 
the shots when we needed them." 

Patrick Ewing, one of two hold- 
over starters in the revamped line- 
up. had 28 points and tied his sea- 
son high with 21 rebounds. 

Riley started Anthony Bonner, 
Derek Harper and Hubert Davis in 
. place of Charles Smith, John Starks 
and Greg Anthony. 

But Anthony, averaging 4.8 
points on 28 percent shooting his 
previous seven games, came off the 
bench with 18 points. He led New 
York’s 46-9 advantage over Sacra- 
mento's reserves. 

"There's so much depth on this 
team,” said Anthony, who started 
the previous 36 games. “I wanted to 
be more aggressive and penetrate 
and not worry about mistakes ” 

New York, which saw a 7^-game 
lead over Orlando cut to two in 
February, did not take control 
against the Kings until the fourth 
quarter, but then used a 13-3 run to 
build an 86-74 edge with 5:24 left. 

Milch Richmond scored 29 
points for the Kings, who had a 


five-game home winning streak 
snapped. They have beaten the 
Knicks only once in 10 games dur- 
ing the last five seasons. 

SuperSonics 112, Hornets 96: 
Seattle improved its home record to 
22-3 and handed Charlotte its 14th 
loss in 15 games as Kendall Gill 
and Gary Payton scored 21 and 2D 
points, respectively. 

Warriors 114. Clippers 109: 
Chris Webber celebrated his 2 1st 
birthday with 26 points and 18 re- 
bounds. and Lalrell Sprewell 
scored 27 points, while Golden 


NBA Leaders 


SCORING 


G 

FG 

FT 

Pis 

Avg 

CTNeal. OrL S3 

623 

277 

1523 

2*7 

Robinson, SJV. 54 

539 

45B 

15*0 

2 as 

Otoluwon. Hou. S3 

575 

253 

1406 

2*5 

K-Molone. Utah 57 

533 

350 

142* 

2sa 

Ewing. N.Y. 53 

507 

300 

1316 

248 

Wilkins. AtL-LAC 50 

441 

3*7 

1230 

246 

Richmond. 5oc_ so 

415 

2*1 

11*6 

23 J 

Monina LAC-AIL 43 

414 

174 

TOM 

2U 

5prew»IL G.S. 54 

413 

252 

1175 

2LB 

Pitmen. Chi. 45 

384 

173 

969 

21 J 

REBOUNDING 



G 

OH Def 

T«l 

An 

Rodman, SA. 55 

no 

6*3 

9*3 

17.9 

O’Neal. On 53 

233 

430 

662 

115 

Mulombo. Den. 55 

19* 

478 

676 

123 

Oakley, n.y. ss 

256 

420 

676 

12J 

Olaluwan. Hou. S3 

157 

4*1 

638 

120 

Coleman. Nj. 49 

Ifll 

389 

570 

11.6 

KNVatone.Utah 57 

16* 

487 

656 

T1S 

Grpni, oil. 47 

211 

327 

538 

11.4 

Willis. All. S3 

717 

386 

603 

114 

Ewing, N.V. 53 

147 

43* 

5*5 

HjO 

ASSISTS 






G 

No 

Stockton, Utah 

57 

730 

Bowes. Char. 

49 

509 

Blaylock, All. 

S3 

505 

K. Anderson. Nj. 

54 

50* 

Douglas. Bos. 

5* 

476 

Strickland. Port. 

55 

465 

Jackson. LAC 

S3 

44* 

M. Williams, Minn. 

47 

393 

Price, ciev. 

SS 

454 

K. Johnson. Plwe. 

38 

JO* 


Av« 

128 

504 

9-5 

9J 

as 

BJ 

BJ 

03 

BJ 

01 


State outscored Los Angeles by 17- 
5 in the final four minutes. 

Dominique Wilkins, in his sec- 
ond game for the Clippers, led all 
scorers with 29 points. 

Rockets 97. Magic 85: Houston 
snapped Orlando's seven-game 
winning streak behind Hakeem 
Olajuwon’s 26 points and six 
blocked shots. 

Olajuwon got help from Otis 
Thorpe, with 19 rebounds, and 
rookie Sam Cassell, who scored all 
of his 16 points in the second half. 

Anfemee Hardaway and Dermis 
Scott each scored 21 points for the 
Magic, winless in seven games at 
The Summit. The NBA’s leading 
scorer. Shaquille. O’Neal was held 
to 19 points on 8-for-l9 shooting. 

Heat 110, Bucks 102: Miami 
went five games over the 300 mark 
for the first lime in franchise histo- 
ry. defeating Milwaukee behind 
Glen Rice’s 25 points and Grant 
Long's season-high 22. 

The Heat, in their sixth season, 
are 30-25 after matching a season- 
high with their fifth straight vic- 
tory. 

Pacers 106 Trail Blazers <M: Rik 
Smits got 24 points and 13 re- 
bounds. for his fifth straight game 
with double figures in both, as In- 
diana beat Portland for its eighth 
consecutive victory at home. 

Hawks 102, Timberwobes 99: 
Danny Manning, in his debut in 
Atlanta, made a 12-foot jumper 
with eight seconds left to salvage a 
victory over Minnesota. 

Ma nn i ng and Stacey Augrooo 
each scored 21 points, and Mookie 
Blaylock had 14 points, 10 assists 
and 8 steals, while Christian Laettner 
got 21 points for Minnesota. 



formation director, told the press 
after Tuesday night’s game. 

But Knight did give ESPN an 
interview and talked of his school's 
worst loss in 89 years, in which he 
benched four starters for more than 
half the game. 

That had led to a lot second- 
guessing. 

"Sometimes you lose the battle 
to win the war.” he lold ESPN. 
"We bad no chance so what differ- 
ence does it make to try and make a 
comeback and push everybody to 
the gQls. Bailey was side and run 
down and he asked to come out of 
the game.” 

“So many people are supposed 
to know so much.” Knight said. 
To paraphrase Winston Churchdi, 
‘Never have so many thought they 
knew so much and knew so little.’ 
We accomplished tonight exactly 
what we tned to do oa Sunday.” 

Damon Bailey and Alan Hen- 
derson, two of the starters botched 
Sunday, led the Hoosiers as they 
extended the nation’s longest home 
winning streak to 43 games. 



SCORING 




Q TFOJFG 

FT 

WSA9J 

Rdbtnsn. Prdue 

JR 

285 

54 

1M 

7*2 2U 

reader, HC 

JR 

W 

» 

201 

738 240 

Scales. Seuttin 

SR 

278 

fl 

137 

mvj 

Benton, Vermeil 

SO 

1M 

61 

207 

856 27 J 

Neale. Col* 

JR 

231 

*9 

159 

710 27J 

King. WCoro 

JR 

237 

30 

193 

887 264 

Domes, UMKC 

SR 

W 

70 1W 7X 26.1 

Buchanan. Mraf 

SR 

235 

41 

165 

876 2*4 

Trent. Ohio 

SO 

252 

3 

18* 

898 25J 

Janes. AFA 

JR 

1*0 

64 

162 

586 255 

Marshall, UCun 

JR 

256 

33 

166 

710 284 

Smith, Nelli 

SR 

314 

52 

120 

400 255 

Lightfbai, Ida 

SR 

222 

61 

94 

5*9 250 

Tolbert, Detrt 

SR 

209 

55 

158 

433 149 

OemerrrmSmo 

SR 

305 

77 

M 

<35 MA 

KuboL nw La 

SR 

ZJ6 

1 

159 

43! 243 

Murray, Cal 

JR 

217 

39 

134 

607 243 

Rogers. Terms* 

SR 

248 

a 

156 

855 3*3 

Giltesote. UTEP 

JR 

198 

S3 

181 

430 242 

Reeves. Art* 

SR 

3*5 

72 

16J 

845 219 


REBOUNDING 


Bailey, who had 22 points, made 
all 12 of his 


his free throws as Indiana 
marte the lUini pay for fouling. In- 
diana (18-6, 1 1-4 Big Ten) made 26 
of 31 free throws, compare! to 8 of 
20 by Illinois (15-9. 8-7). Deon 
Thomas, a 74 percent free- throw 
shooter, missed 8 of 12. 

Henderson, who did not score at 
Minnesota, had 20 points, II re- 
bounds, four blocks and four as- 
sists. The only problem he had was 
at the free- throw line, where he 
accounted for all of Indiana's 

mi say 

Indiana also got a lift from the 
return of Pat Graham, who had 
missed two games with a foot inju- 
ry. He had 21 points. 

Kiwane Garris hit rive 3-pomiers 
and scored 22 points to lead Illi- 
nois. 

No. 14 Syracuse 71, Msam 69: 
The visiting Orangemen (20-5, 12-5 
Big East), having trailed most of 
the second half, took the lead for 
good at 70-69 on Lawrence Mo- 
ten’s three- point play with 42 sec- 
onds left The Hurricanes (7-18, 0- 
17) missed two shots in the final 10 
seconds and lost their 15th straight 
game. 

No. 23 Boston College 95, St 
John's 76: Bill Curley had 30 points 
and 1 1 rebounds in his final borne 



Cl 

G 

No 

A«g 

scows. Southn 

SR 

25 

368 

147 

Lambert, Boviar 

JR 

21 

307 

144 

Kubet, nw La 

SR 

26 

341 

ttl 

Rase. Drexel 

SO 

25 

310 

U* 

Warren, VCU 

SR 

24 

294 

123 

Vaughn. MemnSl 

SO 

24 

293 

122 

am —t unlv 

SO 

18 

219 

122 

Jackson, NlchSt 

JR 

34 

291 

111 

Simon, NewOrl 

SR 

26 

307 

118 

Trent. Ohio 

SO 

27 

318 

118 

Smith. Prov 

SR 

23 

366 

iu 

Mayberry, FresSJ 

SR 

25 

30* 

1U 

Worley, St Joe 

SR 

25 

28* 

114 

Dyson. Lamar 

SR 

25 

283 

113 

Rogers. Tennst 

SR 

27 

3*5 

I1J 

Rosier. Lvtlie 

JR 

33 

304 

115 

Wright. Oemsn 

JR 

27 

2V0 

110 

Payne. BaltSt 

JR 

22 

334 

HU 

A wot Oil. BU 

FR 

25 

245 

188 

ASSISTS 





CL 1 

S 

NO 

Avg. 

Kidd. Col 

SO 

25 

34* 

M 

Miner, Morale 

JR 

38 

238 

85 

Edwards, TexA&M 

SR 

24 

202 

&l 

CBrvont, Nev 

JR 

25 

301 

U 

Nathan, NE La 

SO 

21 

187 

10 

Abdullah, Prov 

SR 

23 

163 

7 a 

Smart. SanFm 

SR 

24 

181 

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DeCuirc, Mont 

SR 

26 

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Pogue, Cmpbel 

SO 

25 

183 

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Black. UTPA 

JR 

35 

183 

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Santiago, FresSi 

SR 

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182 

74 


3 POINT FC PERCENT 



Cl 1 

B SFG JF6A 

Pa. 

Kell, Eytlle 

SO 

23 

57 1D2 

SSJ 

Born, UTC 

JR 

28 

61 116 

516 

Crass. Fla 

JR 

27 

43 85 

506 

Thomason, OktaSt SR 

17 

90 184 

48 S 

Donnelly. RobMor JR 

26 

63 129 

488 

Barn hard SDIego SR 

25 

58 US 

487 

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JR 

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SR 

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66 137 

402 

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49 102 

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26 

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480 

TEAM OFFENSE 



G 

w- 

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Avg. 

Southern U. 

25 

15- 

10 2549 

1020 

Tray SI. 

26 

13- 

13 2545 

*72 

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24 

23- 

2 2290 

HA 

Murray ». 

26 

33- 

4 2377 

*1 A 

Texas 

26 

19- 

7 2372 

912 

San Francisco 

25 

16- 

9 2248 

907 

Arizona 

27 

23- 

4 2449 

*0.7 

Nlehofta SI. 

36 

18- 

8 2336 

892 

Kentucky 

27 

22- 

5 2396 

807 

Oklahoma 

24 

14- 

10 2119 

803 

George Mason 

26 

18- 

16 2288 

OBJ) 

North Carolina 

28 

23- 

5 2463 

800 

Nebraska 

24 

18- 

8 3093 

■72 

UCLA 

23 

19- 

4 1*97 

062 

Comecttcui 

38 

25- 

3 2430 

882 

lowa SI. 

24 

13- 

11 2067 

84.1 

IIL-Oilcogo 

28 

18- 

8 2239 

88.1 

Baylor 

24 

14- 

10 2858 

852 

Alabama St. ■ 

27 

IB- * 2309 

BAS 


TEAM DEFENSE 


game as the Eagles (20-8, 11-6 Big 
mark 


Miducl r<»m».1V AMoutd Prsv. 

Oiffonf Robinson halted a pass to Dale Davis, but die Trail Blazers fared less wefl against the Pacers. 


East) reached the 20- victory 
for the fim lime since 1984-85. 
which was also the last time they 
made the NCAA tournament field. 

Curley and fellow seniors How- 
ard Eisley, Malcolm Huckaby and 
Gerrod Abram scored 68 of Boston 
College's first 78 pants. Charles 
Miniend had 25 points for the Red- 
men (11-15, 5-12), who lost their 
fifth straight 



G 

W- 

L 

Pts. 

Awe. 

Princeton 

•23 

16- 

7 

1208 

525 

Wls-Green Bay 

29 

23- 

8 

1593 

54.9 

Temple 

26 

20- 

£ 

1443 

555 

AJa-BIrmlnghom 

26 

20- 

6 

1541 

59-3 

Marquette 

28 

21- 

7 

1736 

620 

SW Missouri St. 

26 

12- 

14 

1638 

630 

Gem we town 

24 

16- 

8 

1517 

632 

Pennsylvania 

23 

21- 

2 

1471 

840 

Pepperdlns 

26 

14- 

10 

1663 

640 

Cong In St. 

28 

21- 

7 

1801 

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SW Texas St. 

28 

22- 

6 

1811 

647 

OrexM 

25 

21- 

4 

1623 

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New Orleans 

26 

18- 

8 

1608 

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Setan Hall 

25 

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Bradley 

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1894 

6SJ 

Coll, of Charleston 

27 

24- 

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17*5 

65.4 

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9 

1768 

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Massachusetts 

29 

23- 

6 

1*05 

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Arkansas St. 

26 

15- 

11 

1714 

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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 




Page 19 


Point Lo s * ^ n ° u ^ 8 Orioles Hope an Underachiever Puts Them Over the Top 


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, ' The Associated Prat 

MILTON KEYNES, England 
J— Disappointed by their Olympic 
experience, Jayne Torvill and 
Christopher Dean announced 
Wednesday that they were retiring 
from competitive skating. 

• The British ice dancers, who Fin- 
ished third in Norway amid contro- 
versies over the sport's rules, said 
they would not take part in this 
■month's world championships in 
Japan but instead would concen- 
itraie on a fund-raising event for 
Sarajevo, where they won the 
Olympic title in 1 984 with the raes- 
‘ meriting “Bolero** routine. foU 
. lowed by another professional tour. 

“We have had a long hard think 
'about it and we have decided that 
-we will not, repeat not, be going** to 
Japan, Dean said. “We couldn't 
skate any better than we skated" at 
Jhe Olympics. It was one of those 
■memorable performances. We were 
[disillusioned a little bit about how 
•it happened but we were elated by 
[the reaction. The audience were our 
.judges." 

“I think it was a good note for us 
. to end on,” Torvill said. “That is 
- V what we will remember about our 
return to competition skating.” 

■ World champions from 1981-84, 
Torvill, 36. and Dean, 35, turned 

S rofessional after winning the 
ilympic title 10 years ago. They 
‘were reinstated as amateurs for this 
■'year’s Olympics and world champi- 
'-onships under a new International 
Skating Union rule. 

They were awarded the bronze 
medal in Lillehammer, behind the 
-Russian couples Oksana Gritscfauk 
'and Evgeni Piatov and Maya 
.Usova and Alexander Zhulin. 

' The judges' verdict outraged 
.Torvill and Dean fans around the 
world. The 1SU was ordered to 
[hold a press conference to explain. 

! among other things, why the Rus- 
‘sian winners had not been penal- 
■ized for lengthy separations that 
.appeared to violate the rules. 

» • In Toronto, four-time world 
champion Kurt Browning an- 
nounccd Wednesday that he was 
'retiring from competitive figure 
[ skating and will not defend his title 
in the world championships. 

*T mtxatbd about moving on.” 
[Browning said. “I will now have the 
-opportunity to really show every- 
• one ray skating.”-- 

•* • The U.S. Figure Skating Asso- 
ciation has delayed, by one day, the 
'start of next week’s hearing to con- 
sider disciplinary action against 
'^figure skater Tonya Harding. 

[ Harding’s attorneys had asked 
.for an indefinite postponement of 
the hearing, which previously was 
scheduled for March 9. But the * 
■ USFSA was willing only to move it 
[back to March 10. 

: ‘They wanted more time, but 
'this was the best we could do to 
-accommodate them. We’ve got the 
world championships coming up.” 
said Bill Hybl who chairs the five- 
member panel that will bold the 
bearing. 

The committee will meet in Col- 
orado Springs to determine wheth- 
er Harding should be kicked out of 
the association for her role in the 
^an. 6 attack on Nancy Kerrigan. 

After an earlier bearing, the com- 
[mi Uee decided there were reason- 
table grounds to believe Harding 
•was in on or knew of the plot to 
'attack Kerrigan. It ordered second 
‘hearing to determine what disci- 
iplinary action, if any. should be 
Jimposed. 


By Claire Smith 

.Vnv York Times Service 

SARASOTA. Florida — Major league 
bpeball teams, executives and managers 
always expected the world of Sid Fernan- 
dez when he was young. Now. the Balti- 
more Orioles expect even more. 

Fernandez is the left-hander with the 
unhutable stuff, the pitcher who is unpar- 
alleled in the modern-day era when it 
comes to holding batters to minuscule 
averages (.204 for his career, lowest 
among active pitchers with a minimum of 
750 inningsj. For years, he both bedaz- 
zled and baffled National Leaguers — 
both those who opposed him and those 
who played alongside him with the New 
York Mets. 

Now Fernandez, with his stinginess on 
the mound, h is strikeouts, his minuscule 
hits allowed but lack of decisions posted, 
is pitching for the Orioles. 

The American League club has paid a 
hefty sum for the free agent's service — 
$9 million for three years. For that, the 


Players’ Head 
Says Walkout 
Is Possible 

The Associated Press 

WEST PALM BEACH. Florida 
—The bead of the Players Associa- 
tion says it may be difficult to reach 
a labor agreement with the owners 
of major league baseball’s teams, 
making a walkout by the players 
later in the season a strong possibil- 
ity 

Don Fehr made his comments 
Tuesday at the start of his tour of 
major league spring training 
camps. He met for nearly two hours 
with the Montreal Expos. 

Fehr said be discussed (he new 
television contract antitrust hear- 
ings. revenue-sharing and the lack 
of a commissioner with the players. 

The union and the owners 
haven’t met formally since Jan. 25, 
1993. Hie next meeting is sched- 
uled for Monday in Tampa. 

“It'D be preliminary. I don’t ex- 
pea a proposal,” said Fehr. “What 
we do know is that (he owners have 
done a number of things which 
could be construed as pretty mili- 
tant” 

• The Chicago White Sox have 
lost pitcher Jose DeLeon for three 
to six weeks after be tore a knee 
ligament during fielding drills. 

■ Leonard Coleman, the bead of 
baseball’s marketing staff the last 
two years, was unanimously elected 
president of the National* League, 
and immediately replaced Bill 
White, who held ihejob-for 4 years. 
II months. ' 

Coleman, like White, becomes 
the highest-ranking black official 
in U.S. professional sports. 


Orioles want the dazzle without the baf- 
flement They want the victories many 
have long suspected are welled up in the 
hard-throwing left-hander. 

In essence, they need Fernandez to be. 
pejhaps more than all their other high- 
priced newcomers, the last key piece 
needed to solve the puzzle that is the 
American League East, which Baltimore 
has not won since 1983. 

“U started ofr our winter," Roland 
Hemond, the general manager of the Ori- 
oles, said of the signing that touched off a 
winter of high-spirited spending by the 
club's new owner, Peter Angelos. '“He 
was the first signing of our free agents 
and definitely a step in the right direction 
toward getting better.” 

It was Angelos who urged Hemond to 
get the Fernandez signing done soon after 
the 1993 season ended so as to rend a 
signal of the Orioles' intent to make im- 
pressive moves. And so they did. After 
Fernandez was signed, the Orioles signed 
three more free agents: first baseman 


Rafael Palmeiro (to a five-year, S 30.35 many time-released holiday treats for 
million contract) by Christmas, third Manager Johnny Oates. Now. the Orioles 
baseman Chris Sabo (one year, 52 mil- and Oates have the kind of experience 
lion) and pitcher Lee Smith, the major they feh they lacked in their recent ptir- 

Sid Fernandez may be just what Baltimore needs, 
if he can produce victories to go along with his 
dazzling, nnhittable pitches. 


October). They are also convinced that 
the quiet, make-no-waves approach that 
served him well in New York for more 
than nine years will play even better in 
more sedate Baltimore. 

Fernandez is grateful for the challenge 
of helping a franchise rediscover its win- 
ning ways. He and most of the Mets, 
riddled by injury, controversies and just 
plain poor baseball, had lost their ability 
to do so. 


the National League's eighth-best earned 
run average (236) and hdd opposing 
hauers to a. 182 average in 13 starts. That 
he was only 4-6 Illustrates not only how 
troubled the *93 Mets were, but also bow 
Fernandez, the quintessential six-inning 
pitcher, and the Mets’ offense were never 
a good match. 

The Mets did not make much of an 
effort to re-sign Fernandez. Perhaps they 
simply knew that a team that lost 103 


league's career saves leader (one vear, 
$1.5 million), a few weeks after New 
Year's Day. 

. “I remember Bill Veeck would always 
say, 'Lei's make a deal before the holi- 
days, as a gift to our fans,' ” Hemond, the 
one-time general manager for Veeck’s 
Chicago white Sox, recalled. “In that 
case, we couldn't always get it done. In 
this case, we celebrated with something 
new every holiday.” 

Indeed, the influx of players was like so 


suits of the Toronto Blue Jays, winners of 
the last two World Series. 

“We like bringing in players who have 
been in postseason play, in the World 
Series,” said Hemond, referring to the 
October plateaus readied by Fernandez. 
Sabo and Smith. “When players have 
been through II it always helps because 
they can pass on knowledge to other 
players who have not.” 

As for Fernandez, the Orioles like his 
relative youth (he will not turn 32 until 


“I missed the winning in New York the games could no longer afford a Feman- 
last couple years,” said Fernandez, who dez when a complete rebuilding was 


starred last season as one of only three 
players remaining from the 1986 World 
Series championship team. “It was 
rough.” 


ly three needed. 

i World So the pitcher with the 98-79 career 
It was record and 3.15 ERA has moved on. 
bringing with him the still-tantalizing 


The Orioles hope to change that for the possibility that be may bloom into the 
pitcher as much as he hopes for aebange dominating winner his arm has always 
in fortune. The club also hopes that For- suggested he could be. 
nondez can reproduce some of the num- “It’s a little weird, after almost 10 years 
bers that jump at you. as he did last with one dub” Fernandez said. “But a 
season after recovering from a knee inju- different league, a new team, it should be 
iy. interesting. There's a lot of talent here. It 

From July 29 on, Fernandez recorded should be fun.” 








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Arsenal and Karlsruhe 
Tie Cup Away Matches 


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Compiled by Our Staff Frm Dispatches Mario Bosler, from the penalty 

Arsenal held on for a 04) draw area edge, caught goalie Sebastiano 
Wednesday against Torino as the Ross* surprise. 

•visiting English club put itself in a record of two wins and a Anoenecm j, rono m l.uc nous 

good position to reach the semifi- ^ in three ma tche s- Milan has 5 scored two minutes from the end of 
nalsofthe Cup Winners' Cup tour- points. Werder Bremen had two the match to give Anderlecht the 
nament points out of three games. victory in Brussels. 

__ . , ..... Monaco 3, Galatasaray 0: Mona- Nilts hammered a low 20-meter 

The scwnd-leg match is to be ^ I0an ^ t0 10 p o rou p A on shot into the far comer of net for 
played in London on March 13. Wednesday with a ixmvincing vie- his seventh goal in the competition. 
Arsenal which put on a disci- tory Bt ho ^.. reviving the Belgians’ hopes of 

phned defensive display, survived a Monaco got fiTSt-half goals from reaching the semifinals, 

scare in the final seconds when To- midfielders Enzo Scifo and Youri Anderlecht moved past Porto 
nno substitute Marco Sinigaglia [Wfcaeff and a goal by Jurgen into second place in group B with 
hooked a shot that just went over shortly after halftime, three points, 

the bar after a free kick went to MonaK) ^ Barcelona each (AP. Reuters. AFPi 

him. 

Arsenal, which, like Torino, has 

been eliminated from its domestic 

UEFA Cook on Havelanee 

during the first half. u 

Fust, fullback Lee Dixon saw his The Associated Press 

shot hacked off the line, then the BERN, Switzerland — In a rare move. European soccer authori- 
t cam’s captain. Tony Adams, just ties on Wednesday criticized the power struggle at the head of the 
faded to slide the ball home after international body. FIFA, and indicated they might withdraw sup- 
Kevin Campbell had flicked it port for FIFA's long-reigning president, 
across the goal mouth. UEFA, in a statement, said it “is extremely concerned about the 

Boarista 1, Karlsruhe 1: The Por- alleged conflict between” Joseph Blatter. FIFA’s general-secretary, 
tuguese team scored first, but and Joao Havdange. die president of FIFA, 

couldn’t keep the German club H said UEFA's executive committee would hold talks with other 
from gaining a draw in the UEFA continental soccer confederations before deciding whether to back 

Cup quarterfinal match played in Havelange, 78, in his bid for reelectioo in June to a sixth term as 

Oporto. president. 

The tie gives Karlsruhe the ad- “The outcome of these discussions will then determine whether 
vantage going into the second-leg UEFA puts forward its own candidate for election to the highest 

match, scheduled for March 16 in administrative post in world football” said the statement, issued 

Germany. _ _ after an executive committee meeting in the Netherlands. 

Boavista's Nigerian striker. There has been speculation that Blatter wants the top job for 
Ricky (Daddy) OwubikirL to ok a himself. UEFA's own president. Lennart Johansson, is also said to 
swift crossing pass from the left be interested in becoming FIFA’s president 

and headed the ball past goalkeep- 

er Oliver Kahn in the 38th minute. 

But Karlsruhe struck back in the 1 

77th minuie, on a bard shot from SIDELINES 

backfi elder Michael Wittwer. - 

In Champions League marches: _ « m i • w i, • ^r. , , . 

Spartak Moscow 2, Barcelona 2: j>OW It S loklO Leading 1H Whitbread 

Ihe Russian team, plavine at ^ _ . , ” . v , 

home, staged an impressive come- SOUTHAMPTON. England (AP) — The Japanese-New Zealand 
back with two goals in the last 13 J 31 * 1 Tofcio took the lead Wednesday in the third leg of the Whitbread 
minutes in the match that was ’Round the World Race, becoming the leg’s third leader in as many days, 
played in temperatures of minus 9 European entry Intnun Justilia fell from first to second. 10 

degrees centigrade (16 degrees nautical miles behind Tokio, which is the overall leader, and just two 
Fahrenheit). miles ahead of Spain's Galicia 93 Pescanova. All three yachts are 

Barcelona appeared to have vie- Whitbread 60s. 

tory in hand after Bulgarian striker I? fourth place was the leading Maxi New Zealand Endeavor. 24 miles 
Hristo Sioichkov and Brail’s Ro- behind Tokio. 

mario scored easily in the 10th and i ■ m _ . . 

66th minutes. Strawberry Reported in lax 1 rouble 

But the Russians got a goal back •> ( 

in the 77th minute when Barcelona NEW YORK ( AP) —Outfielder Darryl Strawberry of the Los Angeles 

goalkeeper Andoni Zubizarreta Dodgers is facing indictment for federal income tax evasion, it was 
fumbled a cross into the path of reported Wednesday 

Sergd Rodionov, who scored from According to the New York Daily News, sources familiar with the case 
eiffhi me ten nut say government investigators have accumulated evidence that Strawber- 

. — -SI w* f CiftA A/Vlri • J ! If 


have four points from three match- 
es, but Monaco is on top because of 
a superior goal difference. 

Andertecht t, Porto 0: Luc Nilis 
scored two minutes from the end of 
the match to give Anderlecht the 
victory in Brussels. 

Nilis hammered a low’ 20-meter 
shot into the far comer of net for 
his seventh goal in the competition, 
reriving the Belgians* hopes of 
reaching die semifinals. 

Anderlecht moved past Porto 
into second place /□ group B with 
three points. 

(AP. Reuters, AFP I 









Lbd Sdinadi-RnMns 

Emin Sanchez of Boavista, top, and Edgar Schmitt of Karlsnihe had a dose enooutter in Oporto. 


Kerrigan’s Knee Deep in Corny, China’s Feeling Its Oats 


The Associated Press 

BOSTON — U.S. figure skater Nancy Kerrigan having lost out on a 
gold medal her agents are now trying to save her golden image. 

While wailing to be awarded the silver medal in Noway. Kerrigan was 
told, mistakenly, that the ceremony had been delayed because gold 
medalist Oksana Baiul of Ukraine Baiul redoing her makeup. An an- 
noyed Kerrigan was heard on television saying: “Oh, come on. So she’s 
going to get out here and cry again. What’s the difference?” 

Wbule sailing next to Mickey Mouse at a Disney World parade Sunday 
in Florida, she was recorded saying. “This is so coray, this is so dumb. I 
hate it. This is the most corny thing I’ve ever done." 

Dewey Blanton of ProServ issued a statement Tuesday night saying 
Kerrigan was disappointed at the “negative reaction and misinterpreta- 
tion some of her recent comments had received." 

Of the remark about Baiul. Kerrigan said: “I was afraid the crowd was 
losing its enthusiasm and was starting to leave. It was not meant as a 
slight toward Oksana." 

Of the “coray” comment she said: “What I was commenting on to my 
mother was her insistence that 1 wear my medal during the parade. Since I 
was a liule girL I was told not to brag. I was afraid that it might look like 
bragging, and I’m cot comfortable with that" 


BEUING — The official People's Daily said Wednesday that a dispute 
over a speed-skating race in Norway showed colonial prejudice and the 
West's refusal to recognize China’s hew strength. 

In an editorial titled “Can We Be Stopped?” the newspaper said China 
was sick of being treated like a second-class member of the international 
community and would prove to the world it deserved respect. 

“Don't believe us? Wait and see.” it vowed. 

Zhang Yarnnei of China, the silver medalist in the women’s 3.000- 
meter relay, claimed U3. skater Cathy Turner had grabbed her leg and 
thrown her off balance. She stormed off the podium and ripped the medal 
from her neck, while China filed an official protest. It was denied. 

“The people ail saw a foreign athlete use her arm to impede Chinese 
athlete Zhang Yanmei and the fact that the judgment on this was unfair,” 
the People's Daily said. 

“Certain foreigners have deep prejudices against Chinese, that is 
something we frequently reel.” ns editorial said. “And this certainly 
carries aspects of a colonialist mentality." 

China was “moving toward a glorious 21st century," it said “This 
might make you happy, or it might make you unhappy, but none of you 
can stop it.” 


UEFA Cook on Havelange 

The Associated Press 

BERN. Switzerland — In a rare move. European soccer authori- 
ties on Wednesday criticized the power struggle at the head of the 
international body. FIFA, and indicated they might withdraw sup- 
port for FIFA's long-reigning president. 

UEFA, in a statement, said it “is extremely concerned about the 
alleged conflict between” Joseph Blatter. FIFA's general-secretary’, 
and Joao Havelange. the president of FIFA. 

H said UEFA's executive committee would hold talks with other 
continental soccer confederations before deciding whether to back 
Havelange. 78. in his bid for reelection in June to a sixth term as 
president. 

“The outcome of these discussions will then determine whether 
UEFA puts forward its own candidate for election to the highest 
administrative post in world rooibalL" said the statement, issued 
after an executive committee meeting in the Netherlands. 

There has been speculation that Blatter wants the top job for 
himself. UEFA's own president. Lennart Johansson, is also said to 
be interested in becoming FIFA’s president 


SIDELINES 

Now It’s Tokio Leading in Whitbread 

SOUTHAMPTON. England (AP) — The Japanese-New Zealand 
yacht Tokio took the lead Wednesday in the third leg of the Whitbread 
’Round the World Race, becoming the leg's third leader in as many days. 
The European entry Inirum Justilia fell from first to second. 10 


[SCOREBOARD 

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NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
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• San Antonio * ™ v* 

• Utah " MW M 

1 Denver 27 28 % 

‘Mhwesata 16 38 z. 

• ' pacific Division 

- Seattle * u - 7 AL ,i- 

; Phoenix 36 17 ^ ^ 

i Portland 34 * -^L 

i Gotten Shite 32 23 

> la. users 20 33 J J 

i somxnenro 22 

: ULCHocers « 30 ■“ 

?ueSDAVS RESULTS 

Nh jmw * 37 27 **-■« 

j D: Durrore W19 W 1»- Thon»g *\\ g % 
Inn Morris M2 1-2 21 f ’ 

aniam 6-8 Ml 21. Ret«xmd^— 
(GAndenon n. New Jenev 
Jtesbls— Oelrott 30 1 Thames Ml. No* Jenon 
. 23 IlLAixtefson Bl. a- 1Q9 

•5222a 5 » » 3a_, “ 

‘ W°S21 Ml 1-3 19. S3 

; "I Woaflwwoon 11-18 +5 M. ^"“5; ^ 

• 30. Roaooods— Washinsiw* 40 I 

{ mi PhiHOrttihla* 9 ,Wo ® fW ^fTn.(a- 
J arnfate-washirsten 3* «««-« "»■ pn "^ 
.datoWo II tBarrosil- ^ „ 

‘ : ssr* s s i 

\ ^bbUnarM! i 

v’A: Manning M3 W V. ^ 

t* 39 (Wills 01- « s ^^TlDl 

1 30 20 33 2S— I*® 

• "?CR0H«onB-»l-2l7.Mv"‘> v6 - ,12 ' S, ‘ ; 


Detroit 

Toronto 

DWtos 

Si. Lou Is 

Chicago 

Wbndpes 


-Houston 
' Son Antonio 
'UU 
'Denver 


; Seattle 
t Ptwerfx 
• Portland 
i Golden State 
\ LA. Utters 
isacrememo 
I ULOInners 


i: Sffliis 9-16 6-7 26. Miller 6-12 frB 20. Re- watffingmn 3i » * « w 

Bound * — Por t land 61 iCRolrfnsonS). Indiana PhHadelonxi 19 31 4 6* 34 

a) (Smlis >3). Assists— Portiond 27 tStrlek- nertda^ 26 26 10 B W in 

land 13). Indiana 26 (Miner 7). N Y IsK mtfcrs 27 79 6 60 ?W 2M 

Miami 26 V 33 T»— 119 Totnoo Bor S* 33 8 56 172 »1 

MUwaoftee 23 IS 27 M-W2 Northeast DWIsten 

M: Long 7-10 M 22. Rice 10-18 2-2 25; M: Bos ton 2 2! ’I 2 5“ II? 

Baker 7-12 8-9 26. Day 9-18 4-ft 23. R e boo n d i Montreal 33 22 9 75 214 181 

Miami S3 (Lena 12). Milwaukee 50 (Barry 8>. Plttshurgh 31 20 12 74 226 223 

A^lsbts— -Worn) 26 (Shaw IS), Milwaukee 22 Buffalo 31 26 7 69 211 171 

(Baker 4. MovBerry 4). 9 um ^f x . ~ m 

Jjw—a- 23 14 38 re— IS Horttord 71 35 7 49 177 214 

27 23 28 re-97 Ottawa 10 46 8 28 1S7 294 

Escort 8-18 2-3 21. O’Neal 8-19 3-12 19; H : WESTERN CONFERENCE 

Olaiuwon 12-20 2-4 76, Cassell 7-15 1-1 16. Re- CMtrt Wvlsloa 

Detroit 5 » S 

s .1 , «- »«— * , SE* s : ! s s 

21 33 27 31-112 St. Louis 32 24 8 72 209 210 

C rBrlCkowskl 9-16 2-2 20. Hawkins M4 7-9 Chicago V V 7 65 W 177 

~ - c. sin W17 3-5 21, Povtan 9-13 2-320. Re- Wlntdpeg 17 A) B 42 190 269 

bound^-Ctioriatte 39 (Briekowskl 9). Seattle Padfic DtvHioa 

a (Ketm> 10). Assists— CnarJoMe 261 Bowes Cahmrv 32 23 10 74 235 202 

12) seat! Ic 26 {Kemp, Gill. Pavtnn, Askew 5 J. Vancouver ? I! i f 12 m 

. » fnmn » 38 28 2B-1B9 San Jose 22 30 12 56 178 2t2 

24 35 14 29-1M Anaheim 24 35 S 53 1 BO 197 

LA^WlHdns 12-19 *4 29. Harper 9-21 2-4 22; U» Angeles 21 33 * St W 30 

MS 2-2 20. vwhber 13-2* M 26. Edmonton 18 38 w « 205 243 

Reboendl^Los Angete TUESDAY'S RE5ULTS 

^ /Wilkins n, Wiiltams 11). Golden State 55 SI. Louis 0 1 1-2 

(wrfjOcr 181 Assists— los A ngelesMlGrent N.Y. Wanders 2 o 1-4 

01 Gotoen Stole 30 (Johnson 8). Firs* Petfad; N-Y.-TutSWHt 24 (Thomas. 

mIJyotX 19 38 22 29— to* Kins); N.Y^Thanca X (Mokikhav. Kurvers) 

I! ” a menta 21 21 23 23— 88 (pa). Second Period: 5L-Hrioc 6 (Mackev. 

11-18 S-12 28. Anlhony 54 M 18; Baron). Third Period: N.Y.-Tt»moS 31 (Tur. 
c- u^mans 7-13 «« «• Rlctimond 8-23 13-n geoaMatokbov) lopl?SL-(fall«lMontpom- 
i irrUTnimil t i — - York 63 ( EtrtoO 211. SOC- 6TYl IMt N-Y.-Hogutf 28 ( Hotler) (PP). Shots 
!I-!«*rMiTrsdato. Polyrrtce 9). Assists- on goat: ll_ (on Hexlall) l»Mt N.Y. ton 
^TySaZHH arper 4). satromeitto 13 Joseph) i>wi4^6. 


Grieve 5 (WeJom. CXousson) Inn): E-Wefatrt 
22 (Broktn. Grieve); V -Carson 9 (Murzyn 


TORONTO— Added Dovkl Sacco, right 
wlng.and Matt Martin, defensemon.trom US. 


MonresM). Shots rat 


(on McLean) 7-8- Olympic Teem and Alexei Kudashov. center. 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central Division 

W L T Pts'GF GA 

38 20 5 8t 277 213 

34 19 11 79 213 100 

34 21 8 76 223 198 

% 32 24 8 72 209 210 

i 29 27 7 65 187 177 

■a 17 40 8 42 190 269 


Pacific Dtvdiea 

Calgary 32 23 10 74 235 202 Stevens. 

Vancouver 30 29 3 63 299 206 Bure. Va 

Sim Jose 22 30 12 56 178 212 Undras. 

Anaheim 24 35 S 53 180 197 Sofcfc Qi 

Las Angeles 71 33 9 51 227 347 Jamev. ! 

Edmonton 18 38 » « 205 243 Robiiailk 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS ‘ RelcnaL 

SI. Laois 0 1 1—2 Me»*er, 

N.Y. Kteaden 2 0 2-4 BrhuTAir 

First Period: N.Y.-Twoeon 24 (Thomas. Jaor. Pll 

King); N.Yj-Thomas» (Mofakhov. Kumers) 

(pa). Second Period: SL-Hrtoc » (Mackev. j/.- •. 
Baron). Third Period: N-Y.-Thomas 31 (Tur- .r-. -t.a 
geoaMatokbov) (ppl r SL-Hull « (Montpcm- 


60 210 TOO 9—24. V (an Ranfard) 15-IM0— A. 

54 173 1,1 NHL Scoring Leaders 

77 210 175 

75 214 1B1 Threoah February 38 

74 226 223 Moyer, Team GP B A pts PIM 

69 211 171 Gretzky, LA 63 32 76 108 16 

53 200 215 Fedorov. Oef 67 41 57 «8 30 

49 177 214 Gilmour. Tor 64 23 65 88 83 

28 1S7 294 Oates. BOS 56 25 59 84 43 

CE Andreychuk. Tor 63 45 37 82 86 

Shanahan, StL 62 39 41 BO 140 

Hs* GF GA RecctiL Phi 64 33 47 SO 26 

81 277 213 Hull StL 60 43 36 79 36 

79 213 100 Roenlcfc, Chi 63 33 44 77 108 

76 223 19fi Sheppant Det 61 45 30 7S 16 

72 209 210 Francis. PU 62 70 54 74 50 

65 187 177 Bowaue, Bos 62 16 57 73 40 

42 190 269 Modano. Dal 57 39 33 72 44 

Nleuwendvk. Cav <0 36 36 72 51 


74 235 202 Stevens. PH ■ 62 
43 239 206 Bure. Van S3 
56 178 212 Undras. PM 50 
53 180 197 Sokle. Que 62 
51 327 247 Jannev. StL S9 
46 205 243 Robllallle. LA 62 
S ' RdeneL Cay M 

r 1 1—2 Meswrr, NYR S6 

t 0 2—4 BrhufAmour, Phi 64 

I (Thomas. Jaor. Pll 59 


T!? 


New Yoni sc 

l Webb 7). 

M afor College Scores 

BKion College 95. St. John s 76 
B— ion U 74. Norfiwostem 68 
oi.ioers 76. St. gunovenfare 70 
jSllm.rv5.l0n 84. F^Ido AHonHc 66 
Syrocwse 71. Miami 

yanderom 84. Tennesseo 67 

Dorian 93. Detroit Mrt'W 

inliana B2, Illinois 77 

Wrlgnl SI. 71. N. IfimMs 66 

-avier. Ohio 98. Lovoto 

B^tor 95. Texos A&M *Z WT 

Houston 95. Ltmar 81 

Sen Dfago 95. Sacramento SI. « ^ 

... 

NHL Standings 

eastern CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DhfHloo 

Yi L T PI* OF OA 

40 W 4 84 221 163 

N Y Ranoers 9 75 223 170 

He* jersey “ 


Tampa Bar 2 2 8-4 , 

Washlnstoo 2 8 1-3 Intttr Milan 1 Bonissf 

First Period: T-SavordlO (GaJlortl; T-Cote Ca P ,lor! ^ Jww«« 0 


DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
»=eyenoora Rotterdam 0. SC Heerenwoen 0 
UEFA CUP 

ToetdoYs quorterflnals 
Inter Milan 3. Barussia Dortmund 1 


16 (Eivnuik. Grottonl; w^ay 4 (Jones); W- 
RWtey 22 (PS>J. Second Period: T -Grafton 11 
(Tucker. Cole] [gg); T-Gtdtam 3 (Hamrilk. 
Chambers). TUrd Period: W.Burr)dge 19 
erne 66 (Col*. Hgnter), snots on goal: T (on Beauore. 

Kobig) M 1-7-26, W (on Pgppa] 13-17-15 — «. 
Cateorv 8 1 1—2 

Detroit 2 2 1-5 

First Ported; D-Koxiav 30 (pm; D-Fedorw 
fi(Yiermaa Cottey) {ppj.SecHd Period: D- 
Fcdorov 43 (Coffer); C-Otto II (Ronhehti) 
(sni; D- Fedorov 44 (Halkklb. Howe). Third 
Period: C- Roberts 20 (Suterl; (po). !>PrF 
meou 20 i HNi, Yzermon) (op). Shots aa 
— .. — . goal: C ton Osgood) 2-11-11—34. D (on ver- 
«m» ll-ll-W-35. 

*'■’ Edawntoa 2 3 2-7 

Vancouver 2 1 1—4 

^ _ First Parted: v-Courtnoii 71 (Unaea 

Lunvne) (pa); E-WelghtZ] (Grieve, Olamr 
ce tan) (po): E-Amatt 25 (StaMetan. Krav- 

dtuk); V-Lumme 11 (Craven), second Peri- 
fi GF OA Od: E-Byafcin7 IWefgMI (pp): E-RI ch ordson 
84 221 163 Z E-Otousson 6 (Stapfeton. Arnett) (pp); V- 
75 223 170 Otflldc 15 (BabyOt. Bure). Thin) Period: E- 


5' * - v ; O^-' ? 9 ' 


BASKETBALL 

NafloDol Basketball Ascoclottea 
NBA-Fined Charies Bark ley, Phoenle W- 
ward,S5J»a. ond Otorles Oak lev. N. Y. Knlcks 
forward. 0000. lor an oJterartion Feb. 27. 
CHICAGO— Waived Dove Johnson, guard. 
GOLDEN STATE— Signed Todd UcWL 
guard. 10 lBriav contract. Pui Jud Buechler, 
guard- farward. on Iniured list. 

FOOTBALL 

Kortenof FoPfbaO League 
N.Y. GIANTS — Signed Brian Willtoms. cen- 
ter. to muitlyear cant rod. 

HOCKEY 

National Hodur Loagae 
ANAHEIM— Assigned Lonnie Loach, left 
wing, la San Dteaa, IHL. 

hart FORD— Added Ted Crawley, ®- i 
fensemaaf ram UA. otvmotc Team aid Rob- 
ert Petravldty.emler. from Slovoktan Olym- 
pic Team, 


from Russian Olympic Team. Som Chris 
Snell, oetenteman, to St. John’s. AHu 
COLLEGE 

ARKANSAS- Named David Mitchell ond 
Jim Washburn assistant football coaches. 

OREXEL— Scott Pcrmewiil women’s voi- 
levboli caoch. resigned. 

KEAN— Named Fred Napoli women’s soc- 
cer conch. 


• . <3;- -iri-f 5 j 

THIRD ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL 
West indies n. England 
Wednesday, ht Arnos vote, si. vtocent 
West Indies inrvtmn: 3134 (50 overs) 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

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Fahrenhei t) miles ahead of Spain’s Galicia 93 Pescanova. All three yachts are 

Barcelona appeared to have vie- Whitbread 60s. 

tory in hand after Bulgarian striker I? fourth place was the leading Maxi. New’ Zealand Endeavor. 24 miles 
Hristo Sioichkov and Brail’s Ro- behind Tokio. 

mario scored easily in the 10th and i ■ m m i i 

66th minutes. Strawberry Reported in lax 1 rouble 

But toe Russians got a goal back •> t 

in the 77th minute when Barcelona NEW YORK ( AP) —Outfielder Darryl Strawberry of the Los Angeles 

goalkeeper Andoni Zubizarreta Dodgers is facing indictment for federal income tax evasion, it was 
fumbled a cross into the path of reported Wednesday 

Sergd Rodionov, who scored from According to the New York Daily News, sources familiar with the case 
agin meters out. say government investigators have accumulated evidence that Strawber- 

Witb just two minutes left, Valeri ty 31 . failed to disclose “in excess of S 300.000” of income derived from 
Karpin scored after receiving a signing autographs at baseball card and memorabilia shows. The player 
pass from striker Igor Ledvakiwv. could not be reached for comment; federal officials declined to comment. 

Barcelona has four points from "H** newspaper also noted that, under new sentencing guidelines 

three matches in Group A, while ad $P led ® 19 “ 7> a sentence is virtually mandated when more than 

Spartak has two points. The teams $i 20,000 is owed, 

meet again in Barcelona in two ^ in i 

weeks. for the Kecord 

AC MBan 2, Werder Bremen 1: u . . , . 

In Milan, forward Dejan Savicevk Howton, Seattle and Toronto joined the American Professional Soccer 
gave the home team the victory and L«gue. which will have eight teams for the season that opens July 1. (A Pi 
an undisputed lead in the Group B KHMdo Ponsalan, 21, the brother of U.S. Olympic ice dancer Elizabeth 
standings. Punsalan, pleaded innocent by reason of insanity in the stabbing death of 

Savicevic scored the decisive r „ . ... ...... . , J AP> 

goal in the 67th minuie after out- wflfredo Vfequez of Puerto Rico knocked down Yuichi Kasai of Japan 
dribbling goalkeeper Oliver Reck lhree times for a first round knockout and retained his WBA junior 
outside die penalty area. featherweight title in Tokyo. (A Pi 

Following a hard-fought, goal- 
less first half. Milan's defender (hlOtsblG 

Paolo Maldini opened the scoring x , . . „ , „ . _ . . _ . _ 

with a header in the 48th minute. • Archie Gnffin. the two-urae Heisman Trophy winner at Ohio State. 

Werder tallied six minutes later on ***s coach, the face Woody Hayes: “He didn’t know anything about 
when a powerful shot by midfielder drugs. thought uppers were dentures. 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD. TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


To Spy or Not to Spy 


m 


\rL 


W ASHINGTON - When ihe 
news broke of the arrest of 
Ihe CIA employee for spying for 
ihe Russians, all of Washington 
was shocked. 

The While House could not be- 
lieve that the Russians would hire a 
“mole” io pass along American se- 
crets. The Stale Department also 
found itself in a state of disbelief as 
did the Justice 
Department, the 
Small Business 
Administration 
and the Depart- 
ment of Agricul- 
ture. 

No matter 
where you went 
there was gloom 
in the air. One of 
the president’s „ . , , 

lop advi-ers. Badnrald 

“Mister X." told me. “How could a 
nation like Russia spy on the Unit- 
ed Slates, the only friend and ally it 
has in the world?” 

“Maybe it was some oter-the-hill 
KGB typo who hired Ames just to 
keep in practice.” 

“We don't accept that. Spying is 
a hostile act. and Yeltsin knew 
when he met with President Clin- 
ton that Moscow had u mole in 
Langley.” 

“One tiling really puzzles me." I 
said. "What had the Russians 
planned on doing with the informa- 
tion?" 

“They wanted to make them- 
selves look good again in spy nov- 
els. Whai hurts is that they say 
Ames was paid with the money that 
we gave Yell. sin to straighten out 
his country. You don'i use USAID 
funds to spy on the country that 
gave it to you in the first place." 

"What possessed Ames to work 
for the other side?" 


“Greed, plus a feeling that he 
wasn’t appreciated hv his own side 
and a 1992 Jaguar." 

“He wanted a Jaguar that had?' 

“Doesn't everybody?" 

I then asked the nuclear ques- 
tion: “Do you think that we still 
spy on the Russians?" 

The aide was horrified. “Do you 
expect me to answer that ques- 
tion?" 

“I think I do." 

“The United States would con- 
sider it an intrusion into that coun- 
try's internal affairs if we had 
agents there on our payroll." 

“Are you sure?" 

“We have nobody working for as 
in Moscow with the possible excep- 
tion of one or two cabinet mem- 
bers. a half-dozen generals and 
Yeltsin's tennis pro. But we are 
only gathering information that is 
in the public domain. The CIA- has 
strict orders not to accept any Rus- 
sian intelligence if it is given to 
them on microfilm." 


“Do you think double agents 
should be punished severely?" 

“They should get the works 
which includo u good whack on 
the knees from Tonya Harding's 
associates." 

“What does the United States 
expect Yeltsin to do to make 
amends?" 

“He has to bring to trial the peo- 
ple who hired the American tum- 
coab and use them as a lesson to 
other Russian ugent> who might be 
tempted to discover our secrets." 

“What about Ames's wife? Do 
you think it's nice for a woman to 
spy on her own country?" 

“We can't do anything about 
her. The CI.A is an equal opportu- 
nity employer." 


Rome Arch Misnamed, Experts Say 


Reuteri 

R OME — The Arch of Con- 
stantine. as much a Roman 
landmark as the Colosseum, was 
built nearly 200 years earlier than 
previously thought, according to It- 
aly's Central Restoration Institute. 

The arch, at the south end of the 
Imperial Forum, was long thought 
to have been erected in the year 3 1 5 
in honor of the Emperor Constan- 
tine’s military victory over rival 
Maxenlius three years earlier. But 


after more than 10 years of excava- 
tions and surface studies, archaeol- 
ogists now say (bey have deter- 
mined the origin of antiquity's 
most famous triumphal arch. 

“The entire bottom half — that is. 
the arch itself — was constructed in 
the first half of the second century, 
most likely under the Emperor Ha- 
drian." said Angela Maria FerronL 
one of three members of the excava- 
tion team. 


Caught Between Hip, Hep and Hip-Hop 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — The Sunrise Mall in Corpus 
Christi. Texas, has banned the wear- 
ing of baseball caps backwards. You are 
what you wear. You heir what you s«. 
How you say it is more important than 
what you say. New formats, shifting ter- 
minology. fluctuating symbols. Can you 
wear a beret backwards? 

Is rap a culture, an art form, a lifestyle 
or a marketing ploy? Hip-hop and bebop 
are approaching each other. Or is it rap 
and jazz? Did rap produce hip-hop. did 
bebop produce hipsters, or are they inter- 
changeable? Never mind. Both featured 
headgear and established their personality 
by brandishing language with a sort of 
first-past-the-post waving of the colors. 
Start with groovy, like. man. outasight and 
Slim GaillardV"Vouf language, which 
went something like this: “Voutie oroony 
maevoosy ohfoosimo." Then segue effort- 
lessly into (hang. hoyz. hood, gangsta and 
II meaning two. 

Now the music is coming to follow the 
language. Rap language sold the product. 
Rappers accepted bebop us a legitimate 
ancestor, paying homage through samples 
and replays. But while rappers are praised 
for incorporating the paM. jazzmen who 
try to incorporate the future have to duck 
from both sides. 

First, attacks from those who defend the 
ramparts of “true" jazz are becoming more 
vicious and vociferous. 1 have heard aca- 
demics call jazzmen who court rap “pa- 
thetic." When Miles Davis made a nobly 
failed attempt to move jazz toward rap on 
his final unfinished album “Doo-Bop" 
(WBl. a newspaper critic called it a “per- 
version." and an "unvaried crashing and 
blurting of percussion machines" drown- 
ing “real music" under the "tyranny of the 
hip-hop beat." Changing the vocabulary 
slightly, /he same riling could haw been 
written SO \eaT> ago by a defender of 
another “real thing." 

Second, from the other direction, rappers 
consider jazz tame and establishment-ori- 
ented Catering to jazz involves selling out 
their culture to foundation-supported intel- 
lectuals. Their success is based on their 
image as outlaws. They are in their way 
successors to The Gunfighter and Superfiy. 
Or at least that's the wav they want to be 
regarded by their millions or young white 
customers. It's an image that sells. They 
prefer not to be “civilized" — although they- 
do not mind bang a product. 

It takes a dedicated artist to brave the 
crossfire. Saxophonist GrcgOsby. who calls 
himself an “instrumental rapper." is in the 
trenches. He has a record contract (Blue 
Note) and a new album t“3-D Lifestyles^. 



Greg Osby: “I have nobody to refer to, no point of reference." 


His is not a music for closed minds: even 
open minds may have trouble. 

He has “broken bread and collaborated 
and hobnobbed with hip-hop artists" for 
years, he Lx “well versed in their lingo." He's 
comfortable with them and. he says, they 
with him. Still, few of them dare enter the 
jazz arena: "It’s partly fear. Call it fear of 
the unknown. It’s also peer pressure." 

Rappers are wary of being ostracized for 
not being “tme to the game.** an expression 
that is not logical to Osby because one of 
rap's strongest cards is that it is based on so 
many elements, it's such a synthesis that 
there is as yet no particular “game" to be 
"true" to. How can you betray something 
that has not yet formed its own personality? 
He had expected that they would jump at 
the chance to collaborate with a brother 
with arms open and something new to say. 

He was wrong: “Rappers can he as dose- 
minded as rhe most high- brow classical or 
jazz musician. Us very clannish and culiish. 


If you don't think and act and dress a 
certain way it's like . . . well, it reminds 
me oT beboppers in the '40s. IF you didn't 
wear a zoot suit or a pork-pie hat you 
weren't considered ‘down.' It was hard to 
remember whether you should be hip or 
hep. Remaining ‘in the flow' was hard 
work.” 

The hip-hop people he wants to collabo- 
rate with do not understand musical ter- 
minology. They talk about “feeT and 
“vibe” "rather than chords and form. A 
certain amount or paranoia Is just under the 
surface. They take snippets of tape from 
here and there and make collages out of 
them, but when Osby added live improvisa- 
tion there was mutual mistrust instead of 
spontaneity. 

With all his imperfections and trials and 
errors. Osby is on to something. He believes 
he is being more true to the spirit of the 
tradition than the “pantomimic emulation 
of these so-called 'young lions' who copy 


the past and consider themselves trailblaz- 
ers." 

During the last decade or so. there has 
been an explosion of young whizzes who 
improvise faster and with more variation — 
but with a lot less personality — than the 
hall of fame heroes they emulate. They have 
been hailed as the future of the form; they 
are featured at festivals and workshops. 
Their de facto leader is Wynton Marsalis, 
who has accumulated a great degree of 
power by being articulate, playing and com- 
posing with originality, and holding down 
the post of director of the Lincoln Center 
jazz program. 

Osby chose to leave the ranks of this 
historical continuum, in which he is perfect- 
ly capable or holding his own. thus losing a 
certain amount of trust from both old and 
new peers. To rap or not to rap has come to 
appear like a battle for the soul of jazz. 
Osby. and a few others who have taken the 
route with him. have been attacked, he says. 
by “people with narrowly defined parame- 
ters who insist we have to perform only a 
certain repertoire. These people say there 
will never be another John Coltrane so let's 
act with a certain specific measured de- 
meanor and that’s all there is and ever will 
be." 

Osby has the “utmost respect" for Mar- 
salis. but adds; “He loses me with his lack 
of tolerance for other forms of expression. 
A lot of people regard what he says os 
gospel. He's celebrated as an authority. But 
he's stuck in a time warp. He's like a young 
old guy. 

“I don’t know- if he even respects me, but 
that’s O.K. These so-called “young lions' 
who follow him are liuie more than ghosts. 
They're possessed by the spirit of the dead 
people they idolize. At least, for belter or 
worse. T m still evolving. In my opinion. I'm 
actually closer to the tradition than they 
are. 1 may be rough but I'm unpredictable, 
which is the name of the game. I am looking, 
for a form, a tonal center, some kind of 
composite structure to work within. And I 
have nobody to refer to. no point of refer- 
ence. I take the lumps myself." 

His stage band consists of a rapper who 
can in fact be compared in kind to a scat 
singer of yore. There are also bass and 
drums and a DJ scratching away in the 
sound booth. Before listening, it helps to 
know that Osby Lx “investigating pivot- 
points, caiapulis. re-registration" and “dou- 
ble-diminished and double-augmented 
chromatic approaches." He tries to go to “a 
different destination every nighL“ It's an- 
other vocabulary, another slang. 

Tm into bong articulate," he says. “1 
don't warn to just bulldoze my way through 
music. A lot of people make a career by 
meandering through the same mistakes ev- 
ery night pretending it's a concept. At least 
Tm trying to eke out a direction." 


PEOPLE 


W7u£ney Houston Takes 
Top Grammy Awards 

Whitney Houston will always 
love the Grammes. Houston and 
the soundtrack for her film “The 
Bodyguard" woo top honors at the - 
36th annual Grammy music wards ® 
in New York. She was named best 
female vocalist for her hit single “I 
Will Always Love You." The song 
was also named record of the ye&£- 
aud “The Bodyguard” soundtrack 
album was named album of year. 
Sting won three awards, including 
best male vocal. Tbe evening was 
not without controversy. The Irish 
rock group UTs lead singer Bono 
used a vulgar word in accepting an 
award for best alternative album, 
and tbe show cut to a commercial 
before a teary-eyed Frank Sinatra 
could finish accepting his “Gram- 
my Living Legend Award." Tori 
Braxton was named best new artist 
and best female R&B vocialist. 
Dwight Yoakum won best country 
male vocal, and Natalie Cob won 
the jazz vocialist award. Rock sing- 
er Meat Loaf won best rock vocal 


Lorens Bobbitt isn't letting the 
grass grow under her feet. Released 
from a psychiatric hospital on 
Monday, where she had been un- 
dergoing evaluation since being ac- 
quitted for cutting off her hus- 
band’s penis, she is already going 
over movie offers. One posable six- 
figure deal could even be finalized 
before week's end, says her publi- 
cist, AbnHauge. 

□ 

Ted Tomer's new production 
company has made a multi-year 
movie deal with one of Holly- 
wood’s toughest ladies: Dawn 
Steel, the former Columbia Pic- 
tures president. The terms were not 
announced. 

□ 

Princess Diana was described as 
an easy-going, helpful friend by her 
former riding instructor. Major 
James Hewitt. Continuing his reve- 
lations in the Daily Express, be said 
that Diana shipped out lavish food 
hampers to him while be served in 
the Gulf War. He added, “She Is a 
very understated person who wants 
to be as normal as passible and be 
with her friends, having fun.” 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on rages 4 . <fr IS 


v„ 


0* 1 
If S the 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 


Mound 

Amvcnfero 

AnUra 

Athena 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weaiher. 


rocky 

High Low W 
C/F OF 
IftlM 13/5& ti 

9/48 2/35 ah 

14/57 1/34 pc 

19/06 9/48 s 

1?«Z 10/50 « 

12/53 2/35 rii 

7/44 2/35 sh 

BcUBKb 12/53 104 pc 11/52 6/43 pc 

ButfapMl 8/48 0/32 6 8/46 0/32 pc 

Copenhagen 307 1/34 ■ 5/41 1/34 c 

Coda Del Sol !9*6 13/55 a 21/70 13/56 a 

DU*> 9/46 205 pc 14/57 6/43 c 

Edrtargh 8/46 2/35 9h 11/52 BMJ C 

Horen* 17/ffl 6/46 pc 16/81 7/44 1 

FmnMurf 7/44 3/37 Sh 7/44 0/32 pc 

Genova 13/55 307 sh 1305 4/39 * 

HefcWu -11/13 -aa/-3 s -504 -13/9 e 

tantol 14*7 5/41 pc 13/56 4/39 * 

LMMnas 23/73 15/59 a 24/75 17«Z pc 

U*ai 17101 13/55 * 20/68 1305 4 

London 9/48 307 pc 12/53 8/46 pc 

Madrid 16/61 11/52 s 22/71 9/48 s 

Wten 1801 8/43 oh 1407 6/43 » 

Moscow -9/16 -22/-7 S -802 -14/7 *1 
Minch 10/W 2/a> C 8/«6 1/34 S 

Itee- 16/81 7(44 Sh 17/62 10B0 V 

OUo 002 -6/22 on e/39 -1/31 C 

Patou IDA! 1253 s 18/54 1355 a 

Pm 10-50 307 pc 1355 9/46 pc 

Wag ua 6/42 002 z 5t41 -1/31 pc 

Roylgjv* 4/39 -lOI r 2/35 3/27 pc 

Rome 18.54 8/48 * 18164 8M6 ■ 

S) PcMnhag -eMB -22/-7 ■ -4/25 -14/7 c 

StocUnbn -1/S1 -10»\5 m 104 -3/77 «t 

Sbnrixug 13/56 2/36 pc 12/53 EMI s • 

Totem -10/15 -19/ 2 a -5/24 -13/9 c 

Venice 14/57 8/48 pf 12/53 8H3 s 

Vienna «/46 2/35 c 8/48 104 pc 

Warsaw 307 -1/31 i 409 -3/27 c 

In** 13/55 307 c 12/53 4/39 a 

Oceania 

Auckland 21/79 14/57 pc 22/71 15/59 pc 

Sydney 25/77 IBAH pc 26/77 17/62 pc 


Tomorrow 
Klgfi Low W 
OF OF 
22/71 1457 » 
0/48 4/39 pc 
13*5 -1/31 Jh 
18/54 7/44 * 

HAW 1253 » 
12/53 0/32 pc 

7/44 2/35 C 

11/52 6/43 pc 

8/46 0/32 pc 

5/41 |/34 c 

21/70 13/55 a 
14/57 6/43 C 

11/52 BI4J c 
18/61 7*44 1 

7/44 0/32 pc 

13/55 409 1 
-504 -13/9 e 
13/56 409 * 
24/75 17*2 pc 
20*68 1305 4 
12/53 8*46 pC 

Uni 9*48 6 
1407 6/43 » 

■8*22 -14(7 *1 

e/«6 1/34 * 

17/52 lOOO (. 
<09 -1/31 e 
ISAM 1355 a 
law 9/46 pc 
Bi41 -lOI pc 
205 3/27 pc 

18*4 fl*<6 a 

-4/25 -14/7 c 
1134 -307 «t 
12/53 6/41 i / 

-504 -13/9 e 
12/53 8*43 s 

8*48 104 pc 

409 -3/27 c 
12(53 409 a 



! Unreasonably 
Cold 


North America 

Heavy snow wfll banket the 
Martrmes Friday irrio Sun- 
day. Guay winds will butt el 
ihe Northeast Friday, but Ihe 
heavy rams and snows of 
oarirer this week win have 
ended. The central Plains 
wil have dry. milder weather 
Friday mio the weekend. 
Heavy rams will reach San 
Francisco th® weekend. 


Europe 

Heavy rains wSi spread from 
northern Scotland to western 
Norway later Ihls week. 
Heavy snows will fall over 
the interior ot Scandinavia. 
London to Pans wil be mid 
late this weekend with a lew 
showers across London. 
Spam to Italy wilt have 
springlike warmth through 
the weekend. 


Asia 

Tokyo will have seasonable 
weather late this weak. 
Showers are possible by 
Sunday. Sapporo v*ai haw 
snow and strong, gusty 
winds Friday. Seoul and Bel- 
ling wfH be mild with some 
sun. Rain may spread back 
into Shanghai later in the 
weekend. The Philippines 
w« be maWy dry and warm. 


Bangkok 
B*ng 
Hong None 
Mania 
New (Mii 
Scot 
Shanghai 
Stogwu* 


Today 
High Low 
C/F OF 
32 m 29777 
9/46 -1/31 
19(86 15/59 

am ana 
am 18/51 

4/39 -405 
11/62 3/37 

31/88 M/75 
20/08 11/52 
9/48 0(32 


Middle East 


Today Tomorrow 

High Low W High Low W 


OF OF C/F OF 

Ban I a/71 1263 • 22/71 1365 pc 

Caro 27/BO 9*48 1 27/80 1366 pc 

□wnoscus 1864 4/38 * 19*88 7/44 pc 

JenjMtam 18*84 0«& • IflflM 10/50 pc 

Linear 31/80 7*44 i 32/89 1060 pc 

IVyaOi 24/75 9M8 * 26/T9 1162 pc 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

Hgh Low W Wgh Low W 
C/F OF c)F OF 
Bueno* Ara, 31/08 22/71 pc 3269 21/70 pc 

Caracas 29/84 20*6 s 29*4 1S/B5 pa 

Lima 26/75 2068 O 2760 21/70 pc 

UnraoCky 21/70 1060 c 22/71 7/44 pc 

Rtodajnnaaa 3168 25/77 1 3269 23/77 pc 

Santiago 3168 1762 a 38/37 1864 pc 


Laund: s-sunny. pc-partty doudy. c -cloudy. sMnmn. HhmderatonTO. r-ra/n, flLanow Partes, 
En-snow. Wee, W-Weamer. AS maps, toracaors and dote provided by Accu-Woather, Inc. 0 1 994 


Ntfon I960 1i 

C4pe Town 23/73 n 
C esoMu c a 2068 ! 
Harare 28/71 V 
Lagos 31/88 7 
Namfal 24/78 t: 
Tut** 24/75 1 

North America 

Anchorage -11/13 -II 
Arena 10/50 : 

Boston 1(34 4 

Chfcarp 9/48 i 
Danvar 21,70 : 
DaMM 6/43 4 

Honofcdn 2760 21 
Houston 24/75 I 
LnaAngaiea 86/79 c 
Maori 22/71 I 

MrtoOflpafa 8*48 1 

Matin* -2/29 4 


Taartia 

htariwigton 


2068 1467 pc 
26/79 1661 pc 
23/73 1263 pc 

28/B2 (1/52 pc 

3269 27/00 pc 
27/BO 1467 pc 
23/73 (365 pc 


I -20/-3 pc 

• 5*4! a 

i -A/S at 

• -1/31 pc 

> 1/34 s 

1 -3/27 pc 
! 2068 pc 

I EMQ ■ 
i (1/52 a 
r 1365 l 
I -307 pc 
’ -8/18 an 
I 1966 pc 
I -2*29 st 
I 13/95 a 
■ 9MB pc 
I 307 tto 

-7/20 at 
I 0732 pc 


fl **\ 


Ctsd var 1/3 Aaarner (uum good 
Fair Var 1.3 Upper stapes good 
Open Var 1 3 AO lilts open, upper runs good 
Worn Var 25*2 GMd above me) st Mens 
Far var 1*3 Pteo/y otgood siding jyada&le 


Depth- Htn. Res. Snow Last 
Resort L U Ptotoo PMea State Snow Cr 

Andorra 

Pas de la Casa iaoiqo Good OpenSprng 1.3 G oodstomg 
SQfcteu 130 220 Good Open PcM 1 3 At) Ms open 

Austria 

Igts 0 50 Far Ctsd Var t.-3 Axomeriu urn 

Kilzbuhel -40140 Goad Fair Var 1.3 Upper slopes 

Saalbach 40130 Far Open Var 1-3 asms open. 

Schladmmg 40 ISO Fair Worn Var 25*2 Gox/ above i 

StAnton 50 2UQ Good Far Var 1.-3 Pfenryotgoc* 

France 

Alped'Huer 150290 Good Fair Var 28 2 Good stung n 
Lea Arcs 105 330 Good Far Var 1-3 Runs 8 Ulte & 

Avonaz ISO 230 Good Fair Var 1 -3 Good Sluing. , 

Chatel 30150 Far open Var 1.3 Lftpersfcpes 

Chamonix 45 370 Good Fair spring 13 .40 wts open i 

Courchevel 150 180 Good Good Var 1-3 At lots, and pk 

Les Deux Alpas 70 no Good Ooen Var 2* 2 oils open to* 
Flarne 100 3I0 Good Fair Hvy 13 Snow 5/Ushv , 

Isote 250 320 Pwdr Good Pwdr 1 -3 Greaishmga 

Mfifibel 60 190 Good Fair Hvy 13 Good slung, t 

La Ptagne 160 300 Good Fan vat 1 *3 AnmgtKrskx 

Sene Chevalier 50 175 Good Open var 28- 2 Besr above m 

Ttgnes 155 300 Good Good Mat 13 Son good star, 

Val cn&fire 125 340 Good Good Va> 1,3 Gooflskwig. s 

ValThorens MO 300 Good Good Var 1.3 Goodstengw. 

P er miu i y 

Garmisch 5 230 Gooa Some var 1*3 Good upper m 

Ofaenadort 5 1 70 Good Some var Z.-3 Upper stung » 

l«» 

Bormio 10 150 Fair (Open PcXd I -3 BOctnsnowat 

Cenrinla 70 350 Good Good Var i --3 Good stow 01 


Far Var 28 3 Good slung most pates 
Fair Var I -3 Rum 8 Ufa slushy beto* 2000m 
Fair Var 1-3 Good siting, esp above tSOOm 
Open Var 1.3 Upper slopes slung *e» 

Fair spring 1 3 AO Uts open ntoefa good 
Good V8r l - 3 At ims and pts/as open 
Own V» 24 2 Otis open to 3400m goM 

Fair Hvy 13 Snow stoshv at tower levels 
Good Pwdr 1-3 Great 6kxng afar heavy srnwtaBS 
Fair Hvy 13 Good slung, fast + 1800m 
Faw Var 1*3 AH togner gapes very good 
Open var 28'2 Best atwe md stations 
Good Var 13 SM good stung most pistes 
Good Var 1,3 Good sltuig. stushvknr down 
Good Var 1. 3 Good slung with recent new snow 


5 230 Gooa 
5170 Good 


10 150 Fair 
70 350 Good 


Some var 1*3 Good upper slopes, patchy lower 
Seme Mar Z.-3 Upper stung well 

Open PcXd 1-3 80cm snow at bormo 2000 
Good Var i.-3 Good stow on mosr pastes 


Depth Mtn. Rn. Snow Late 

Reamt L U Ptalea Ptatee State Snow Coremania 

Cortina 15 1 1O Fair Open Var 6*2 At 40 Ms even, good sktng 

Courmayeur 1 10 250 Good Some Var 1*3 abUIs open, generally good shmg 

Selva 40 100 Fair Open Pckd 24*2 AB ktts and seta ronta open 

Sestnfere 1 20 250 Good Gooo Fchd 1 -3 Good Mmg.milky way inks open 

Norway 

UHehammer 60 80 Good Open Pckd 12*2 Good sKhng on packed snow 

Spain 

La Molina 30100 Good Open spring 20*2 Typ/ad spnng conebtons 

Switzerland 

Arona 95 105 Good Open Pwdr 1/3 Good skiing with besh snow 

Crana Montana 40 160 Fair Fair Var 1/3 Good above 2000m 

Davos 75 165 Good Far Var 1,3 Good, sugary snow lower 

GrtndetwaJd 10 100 Far Worn Var 24/2 Sta good above 1 SOOm 

Si. Moritz 120 250 Good Open Pwdr 1/3 £*ce*tenf sAing ate* nej,y s*v?w 

verb/er 20 360 Good Far Var 1/3 Lowest runs a Mb shjs/ty 

Wengen 20 80 Far Worn Hvy 1/3 Upper slopes holding out wet 

Zermatt 6Q210 Good Open Var 28'2 Good siting mom paten lower 

US. 

Aspen 145 1 55 Good Open Var 28 2 AB 3 Mrs open 

Heavenly 105 245 Gooo Open Pckd 1*3 27 -2dlrilsopen 

Mammoth 165210 Good Open Pckd 27 2 24 SOWS open 

park City 105 185 Good Open pwdr 1-3 la utsooen 

Tell unde 135 155 Goad Open Pm» 1/3 AO wimsopen 

Vail 128 158 Good Open Pwdr 1.3 AB 25 hits and bach ix/wls open 


Open Pwdr 1/3 
Fair Var 1/3 
Far Var t*3 
Worn Var 24/2 
Open Pwdr 1 /3 
Far Var 1.-3 
Worn Hvy 1 /3 
Open Var 28 2 


Good skiing with hash snow 
Goal aDove 2000m 
Good, sugary snow lower 
StU good above iSOOm 
Eroeden skiing afar Heavy snow 
Lowest runs a Ufa SHjshr 
upper slopes nobrng out weff 
Good skiing worn paten lower 


145 155 Good 
105 245 Gooo 
165 210 Good 
105 195 Good 
135 155 Goad 
128 158 Good 


Open Vo 1 28 2 AB3Mtsopen 

Open Pckd i*3 21 -2* Mis open 

Open Pckd 27 2 34 30 Mis open 

Open Pwdr 1 -3 la utsooen 

Open Pm» 1/3 AH Wimsopen 

Open Pwdr 1.3 AB25 bus and back bowls open 


Whistler 55 285 Good Open Var 1 3 General^- good pest -* 1800m 

Key LU'Depth m cm on lower and upper slopes. Min PtetarMountamside pistes. Item. 
Plotea-Runs leading lo resort milage. Arr Arbhpai snow 

Reports stBJpfad by the Ski Gub ot Great Britan 


Kiosk 

iPfmiiv-* • 1-r- 

tf-te. \i»t \v 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


83t 


camgcont i Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

reach the US. directly from over 1 25 countries. Converse with someone who doesn ’i speak your 
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^ ' >' our vo ^ ce at 3 more polite hour. All this is now possible with ARsST ! 

To use tliese services, dial che A R£T Access Number of the country you're in and you’ll get all the 
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convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


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(flier Access Numbere. 

How to call around the world. 

1. Lisina ihe chan hetrm . find the country >tiu are calling from 

2. Dbil the corresponding .*aW Avvess Number. 

3. An .fljrr EnglL-li -shaking Opemior w voice pri/mpi will ask |i *r the phone numher you wish hic.iU nr cunncv.1 vi kj ro .1 
tustomcr .semce represencjiii e 

To receive your free wallet card of AR^.\ccess Numbers, iust dial ihe access number of 
the country >tiuYc in and ask for Customer Service. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
ASIA/PACIFIC 


Australia 
ChlrejraO** 
Guam 
Hoag Kong 

India* 

I m tonegb* 

Japan* 

Korea 

Kotoua 

Matoysur 

NewZeabnd 

SMa ppinea* 

Saipan* 

Singapore 

Srt Lanka 

Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


Hdgiunr 

liulgaria 

Croatia**^ 

Cze ch Re p 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

Germany 

Greece* 

Hungary* 

IcdamTu 


0014-881-011 

10811 

018*72 

800-1111 

000-117 

001^801-10 

0039-U1 

009-11 

ir 

8000011 

000-911 

105-11 

05-2872 . 

HOQ-0111-111 

430-130 

0080-1028841 

0010-991-1111 

EUROPE 

8*14111 

022-903-0U 

(P8-1 1-0010 

QCMHOCKiqiO 

99-38-0011 

0842080101 

8001-0010 

9800-100-10 

19*-0011 

01300010 

00800-1311 

Q0A-80CMHl'll 

999-001 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

Ireland 1-800-350-000 

Italy* 172-1011 

Ucchtetigacta* 153-00-11 

Lithuania* 8 a196 

Luxcmhmug O-rtOQ-om 

Mala* 0800-690-110- 

fltooaco* ISa-OOU 

Netfaerta n da* 064122-9111 

Wdnur 800-190-11 

PobtraT*- 0*01»4804qu 

PWngtid- 05017-1-288 

Entrant* 01^00-4288 . 

Bossla^tMoscow) 155-5042 

ShwM* 004204)0101 

Spain 900-99-00-11 

Sweden* 020-795-611 

Sw ta er LuMl * ' 1954W-11 

UK- oy»B9-mn 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bahrain 80&-Q01 

Cyprus-* 0HQ-9Q0IU ; 

tod 177-1Q0-Z727 

Kuwait „ 600-268 

htow OBeto) 4364901 

Saudi Arabia 1-flOO-lOO 

TPffccy* 00^00- 12Z77 1 

AMERICAS 


Potaml**- 


RP88ta*fMoscox*) 

Shrrato 

Spain 

Sweden* 

Swft aflm d* 

UK. 


Argentina* 
Bdfae» ’ 
BolMa* 
aonfl 
Chile 


001-800.200-1111 

555 

0000-1111 

000*010 

• 00A-031Z 


COUNTRY 

Colombia 

JCosaRka'te 

Ecuador* 

a Salvador* 

■Guaiemaia* 

Guyana*** 

Honduras** 

MeXlCOAAA 


ACCESS NUMBER 

980-11-0010 

114 

U9 

190 

190 

169 

123 

95-OXH62-4240 


NjcaragaafManagmQ 

Para maw 

pair 

Suriname 

Uruguay 

Vaiezuda** 


174 

109 

191 

156 

00-0410 

80011-120 


■ Bermuda* 
■ British VI 
Cayman Islands 
Grenada* 

Ham* 
jamaicr- 
Ncth. Antfl 
iSt-Klns/N'evu 


CARIBBEAN 

1-800-872-2881 

1-800-872-2881 

1 -£00-872-2881 

ads 1-800-872-2881 

1-300-872-2881 

001-800-972-2883 

0300372-3881 : 

I 001-800-872-2881 


1-800872-2881 


AFRICA 

EgypTfCdro) 

Grtoff 

fawrikfat 

Kenya* ’ 

Utete ■ ~ 

Maiawr 


5103200 

OOe-OOl' 

00111 

0800-10 

797-797* 

101*1992 


-.IfisT 1 JluiKijid i> « iii j» jiiltii- ni jlummirk-. (&T VarUOxipn<-\TnL' 
l>-iiiik.,,viitn nn'inr vJlrt;i>Ta,rn[>m Uun-1i.t«ar*-. .0*1 LuqMmt 

MntinuiuiHt 

C*r World Coraatfr- sen i,en J ,*lrf*.-ln«iamlnila.-i,»i,itni-»il«ti l /*i.Hv 

r.Vil Uortd Coaocrr vnurpus^i* . 

•ttsr 15UNKCI 1 miwip jwiIjNi- Uitoi aB ihH, ikmix- Ihirsl jl- 
"I'ul'fc- p(» «s iw n»n ifcr>«r iti i • an iht* mr .an) h >, JbI ii tto. 

j4»«wswpti«sk.T»*«‘ti,,«nw ? 4v'a,-, J nH™dWv’ac Hulnin-d«unll 

li>mnpir , a jnre htirt. 


■Hi' i»tih(>,s^LI,h-h>ag,vsvnt)(kaii- 

• -O tikvt ulhnp mih 

— -1‘iiHii Itinm-s mpvic hs-JU.,11 fS4, m, ■« rnr I jB iim-.ihin. 

* N- s a Mid tic tn m Ttit-rv- 

*i« «si4>aljhk-(r,ini jE jii^- 

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AAl’PnnptHu. (. w J lii 

1-tilHlgh. *n |t«|)4i. pIn«R.->. loX? <>.- nuiiol LnhU l 
■ r,*-UU VOrU CaaaMe svn>vimmndiav,4fl-,toh 


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© 1994 AEST