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London, Thursday, March 17, 1994 


No. H538 


Clinton’s China Policy 
Otider Attack at Home 

Human Rights Issue Is Only One Part 
Of Complex Relationship , Experts Say 


. . 


I VI f !; 

U. c 


■ r ;L: ^ By Thomas W. Lippman 

. /S' II \ukiagtotl Pnfi Sen-H. c 

^ WASHINGTON — Much of the American 
7 / : foreign policy establishment including three 
.'.‘'former secretaries of state and other former 
'-senior officials of both parties, has turned a 
collective thumbs down on the Clinton admin- 
'•' a 'Vi5iralion , s policy of linking trade with China to 
- * a Beijing's human rights performance. 

According to them, the policy is counterpro- 
ductive. harmful to larger U.S. interests in Asia. 
, unacceptable to China and probablv doomed 
•./- to failure. 

“ The strong sentiment for abandoning the 

- ^policy, expressed in the aflermalh of Secretary 

of Stale Warren M. Christopher's return from a 

' *■ — 1 ■" ■I i — ■ » 

-7 Mr. Cfcnton expressed confidence that the 
' : Sg China dispute would be worked out. Page 2. 

^ iSily fruitless trip to Beijing to press the 

- rights issue, could complicate the administra- 
tion's position as ii approaches a June 3 dead- 

y v.line for deciding whether to extend China's 
- • trading privileges. 

j. V The more domestic opposition there is to the 
administration’s approach, the freer Beijing 
• - may feel to continue resisting President Bill 
•. J Clinton's demands. 

At the same time, key members of Congress 
- . are likely to oppose any notion of weakening 
.... the administration's insistence on human rights 
" improvements. 

In recent years. Congress repeatedly has 
r— j* sought to write into law a link between China's 
Ytt trading rights and its human rights, but Presi- 
I) dent George Bush vetoed such legislation in 
' 1992 and* Mr. Ginton has bought lime by 
i L adopting such linkage on his own. 

At a forum sponsored Tuesday by the Coun- 
=*■ cil on Foreign Relations, many participants 
expressed doubt about whether the administra- 
tion was really prepared to cut off China's 
• trading pnyfleges over human rights. 

Former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissin- 
ger warned that even if China was bludgeoned 

— into making human rights gestures that would 
allow the administration to claim success for its 

policy, Beijing was likely to harbor grudges for 

— years to come, potentially limiting Chinese co- 
operation on other issues such as nuclear prolif- 

sgh (ration on the Korean Peninsula. 


“How many victories can we afford?" he 
asked. 

^ Another former secretary of state. Lawrence 
S. Eaglcburger. said. “If what we care about is a 
China that respects human rights, the best poli- 
cy' is a policy that maintains as many contacts 
as possible.** 

Yet another former secretary of slate. Cvtus 
R. Vance, said the United States “should not 
make one interest determinative" in a compli- 
cated relationship that also involves issues of 
nuclear proliferation, the environment, eco- 
nomic development and Asian regional securi- 
ty- 

Mr. Vance served in the administration of 
President Jimmy Carter, which was the first to 
makethe human rights issue a cornerstone of its 
relations with other nations. 

Participants in the forum agreed that China’s 
neighbors by and large supported Beijing's re- 
sistance to what appear to Asians to be efforts 
by the United States to impose its values on 
them. 

C. Fred Bergsten. director of the Washing- 
ton-based Institute for International Econom- 
ics. said there was widespread support in Asia 
for China’s policy of putting economic develop- 
ment first and leaving political reform for late. 
This was especially because of the uncertainty 
in Beijing over who will run the country after 
the death or Deng Xiaoping. China's senior 
leader. 

A policy that jeopardizes the entire U.S.- 
China relationship over a single issue makes 
Washington “a captive of the other side's re- 
sponseT said Michael Oksenberg. a prominent 
China scholar and president of the East- West 
Center in Honolulu. 

He said that (he Clinton administration will 
have to choose between “the path of engage- 
ment. which every administration has taken 
since 1972, and isolation from its allies in the 
region.” 

The participants emphasized that they sup- 
ported the objective of encouraging democracy 
and human rights in China. Their argument, 
they said, is with the administration's tactics. 

“We do have a long-term interest in seeing 
China become more open and more democrat- 
ic. but we won’t achieve that" by cutting off its 
mosl-favored-nation trade status, said Paul D. 
Woi/owitz, dean of the School of Advanced 
Internationa] Studies at Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity and a former senior government official. 



1‘jvkI Srfumun Rrtiki. 


Jewish settlers praying Wednesday at the grave of Dr. Baruch Goldstein, who killed at least 29 Palestinians in Hebron on Feb. 25. 

Arabs Say Army Fire Hit Mosque Crowd 


By Chris Hedges 

AW >»«nt Times Serrhe 

HEBRON. Israeli-Occupied West Bank — 
Interviews with dozens of Palestinian witnesses 
support assertions that at least one. Israeli sol- 
dier opened fire on the crowd trying to escape 
the massacre in a Hebron mosque last month, 
and that the army fire killed at least one Pales- 
tinian. 

The witnesses* accounts of those chaotic min- 
utes in the early morning of Feb. 25. when a 
Jewish settler entered the mosque in the Cave of 
the Patriarchs and began spraying the worship- 
ers with bullets from his assault rifle, vary 
widely in many details. 

But the accounts of almost all of the witness- 
es interviewed — more than 40. several .of 


whom were wounded that day and remain in 
their hospital beds, unable to compare notes 
directly — have these elements in common: 

• The Israeli soldiers guarding the building 
were not involved in the initial attack. 

• Three Israeli guards fired their weapons in 
a passageway outside the main exit of the Cave 
of the Patriarchs as the corridor filled with 
screaming, bleeding Palestinians. 

• Two of the soldiers may have fired only at 
the ceiling, in an attempt to prevent a stam- 
pede. But the third fired into the crowd. 

• At least one person was killed by these 
shots, and at least two others were wounded. 

These accounts contradict the Israeli Army’s 
insistence that soldiers never shot at anyone' at 
the shrine, and that all the killing there was 


done by the Jewish settler who opened fire. 
Baruch Goldstein. All of the bullet casings 
found inside the shrine, the Israelis say. came 
from the same weapon. Dr. Goldstein's. 

Army officials repeated that assertion on 
Monday. Questioned about the Palestinian 
charges, they cited declarations by Major Gen- 
eral Danny Yatom. the commander for the 
West Bank, who in public statements and in 
testimony before the Israeli commission inves- 
tigating ihe killings said that soldiers stationed 
at the eastern door to the shrine — its main 
entrance — had fired only in the air to restore 
order after Dr. Goldstein’s rampage. 

Israeli officials acknowledge that shell cas- 
ings were found outside the shrine, on the floor 

See MOSQUE, Page 6 


Norway Cuts Deal With EU, but Hurdles Remain for All Candidates 



By Barry James 

fiilcrnanonol Herald Tribune 

Its public deeply divided over the prospect. Norway 
followed Finland. Sweden and Austria on Wednesday in 
settling terms for membership in the European Union next 
year. 

But whether the 12-nation Union is ready to receive the 
four was in doubt after the failure of foreign ministers late 
Tuesday to settle a new brouhaha by Britain. the communi- 
ty's traditional odd man out. The British government fears 
that proposed voting arrangements in the enlarged Union 


Kiosk 

Reformists Join 
Slovakia Cabinet 

BRATISLAVA. Slovakia (Reuters) — 
President Michal Kovac on Wednesday 
swore in a cabinet split among the five oppo- 
sition parties that united to bring down the 
government or Prime Minister Vladimir Me- 
ciar last week. ... ... 

Leaders of the brood, coalition, which 
Lchose former Foreign Minister Jozef Morav- 
rVilr to replace Mr. Meciar on Monday, made 
several last-minute changes in the cabinet list. 

A commercial lawyer. Milan Janiana, be- 
came privatization minister. Ruldolf F ulcus, a 
former ambassador to Austria, was named 
fi nance minister. Both are reformists. 
i Analysts saw the government as a compro- 
I mise until elections are set later this year. 


will impioge on its sovereignty — a view not shared by the 
majority. 

The foreign ministers will return to the problem next 

The EU is revising its policies toward die Eastern nations 
to strengthen economic and political reforms there. Pago 2L 

week, but ihe delay threatened the carefully worked -out 
timetable to admit the new members by Jan. 1. 

Resolution of a dispute about fishing quotas cleared ihe 
way for Norway to join. Now ihe task of governments in all 


the candidate countries is to persuade their publics to 
support membership in separate referendums. 

This ma> nut be easy. A poll published in the Norwegian 
daily Verdcns Gang on Wednesday indicated that 44 per- 
cent of the population opposed membership, only 29 per- 
cent was in favor and 27 percent was undecided. In 1972. 
Norwegians narrowly voted against membership after the 
government had agreed to entry terms, and judging from 
the poll figures, the same tiling could happen again unless 
the government makes a convincing case. 

The Norwegians fear loss of control over natural re- 


sources. like fish and oil, and only concern over being 
isolated in the Nordic world seems to be impelling them 
toward EU membership. Inge Lonning, of the European 
Movement in Norway, warned that if people again reject 
the union, they may Hve to regret it ^because “better condi- 
tions than this we will never gpL~ Prime Minister Gro 
Harlem Brundiland urged Norwegians to “seize this histor- 
ic opportunity.” 

Public opinion in Sweden is also divided over the mem- 
bership issue. A recent poll in that country showed 52 

See EUROPE, Page 6 


Rabin Hints 
He’ll Return 
Golan Heights 
To Syrians 

He Asks Assad to Make 
Own i Painful Decisions ' !? 
Pressure on PLO Rises 

By Paul F. Homtz 

Intenhi/irwiiJ HtTiiiil Tnhuie 

WASHINGTON — In an apparent gesture 
to President Hafez Assad of Syria. Prime Min- 
ister Yitzhak Rabin said Wednesday that Israe- 
lis were ready to make “painful decisions'* and 
“do what is required of us*' to achieve peace 
with their Syrian neighbors. 

His statement was made at a news conference 
with President Bill Ginton in which the Israeli 

Rabin's promise on settlements woos back 
party to gain a parliamentary majority. Page 1 


leader also called on Palestinians io live up to 
their commitment to negotiate an interim peace 
agreemenl with Israel. 

in the complex web of Middle East diploma- 
cy, Mr. Rabin's comments could be taken to 
mean that Israel is prepared to give up the 
Golan Heights in return for a peace treaty’ with 
Syria. Mr. Assad has demanded the return of 
the Golan, which Israeli troops occupy. 

But Mr. Rabin made ir clear that similar 
painful decisions would have to be made by Mr. 
Assad, presumably an agreement that provides 
Israel with concrete and lasting security guar- 
antees. 

“There must be give and lake on both sides." 
Mr. Rabin said after a day of talks at the White 
House on Mideast issues. “Painful decisions 
will have to be made.” 

“We will not compromise on our security " 
he added. “But we will stand ready to do what is 
required of us if the Syrians are ready to do 
what is required of them.” 

The prime minister's comments may also 
serve to put pressure on ihe Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization, which could lose consider- 
able momentum and support in its quest for 
self-determination if Israel and Syria sirike an 
accord separately. 

Mr. Rabin made no concessions on Wednes- 
day to pressure from the PLO for major 
changes in the way the West Bank and Gaza 
Strip are administered. The PLO chairman. 
Yasser Araht. broke off negotiations on an 
interim peace agreemenl with Israel following 
the Feb. 25 massacre by an Israeli settler of at 
least 29 Arabs in a Hebron mosque. 

The prime minister, however, did noi rule out 
concessions once the talks on an interim accord 
are resumed, although he said Israel had al- 
ready taken “unprecedented" measures, an ap- 
parent reference to the banning of Israeli ex- 
tremist groups calling for the expulsion of 
Arabs. 

In Jerusalem. Foreign Minister Shimon Peres 
raised ihe possibility dun Israel would take 
additional unspecified steps to holster security 
for Palestinians in Hebron. 

Both sides appeared to be determined to 

See ISRAEL, Page 6 


U.S. Cancels North Korea Talks 

Nuclear Agency Expected to Issue Ultimatum 






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Book Retie w 
Bridge 

Crossword 

Wealher 


Page 10. 
Page 10. 
Page 10- 
Page 22, 


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Down 

i 144 

2*3.843.15 

The Dollar 


Up 

0.25% 

1T4.46 






By Michael R. Gordon 

Vm Yvrk Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The United States on 
Wednesday canceled high- level talks with 
North Korea scheduled for next week and 
stepped up planning for military exercises with 
South Korea after Pyongyang’s refusal to per- 
mit international monitors to complete their 
inspection of a key nuclear installation. 

The actions have brought Washington full 
circle in its lengthy negotiations over efforts to 
determine whether North Korea is stiU working 
on developing a nuclear weapon. 

When North Korea allowed international 
inspectors to visit its sites last week, the admin- 
istration presented ihe move as a breakthrough. 


But ihen Pyongyang prohibited the officials 
from taking critical samples of radioactive ma- 
terial inside the plutonium reprocessing facility 
at Yoogbyon. Now, even optimists within the 
Ginton administration have begun to lose hope 
that a diplomatic solution will be found to 
resolve the dispute. 

Envoys to the International Atomic Energy 
Agency, an arm of the United Nations, are 
planning to take up the North Konst refusal on 
Monday at a meeting of the agency’s board of 
governors. 

Administration officials said the agency 
would issue an ultimatum: Let the inspectors 
return to finish their work or it will refer the 

See NAZIS, Page 6 



A Blunt Italian Separatist 
Seeks the Levers of Power 


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n OWNING MOMENT -Three delegates to the International Clowns' Convention in Bognor Regs, Engtond. talang a weP- 
SSwaS on Wednesday. More ttS) of their colleagues have gathered at the seas.de r*ort to get senous about slapshch. 


In Burma, Japanese Veterans Seek to Heal War Scars 

f Adi Drawn hv a mixture of nostalgia, alone- of Burma in 1«42 before making a corn 




By William Branigin 

H'teJuagtPR Servux 

RANGOON — The last ume Katsushiro 
Rangoon- the year was 1942 and 

Newsstand Prices 

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DenmarlciAOO D- on 2n?!. i i,ooo Riois 

Finland 11 F-M. q^,. 8.00 Rials 

Gibraltar. £ O- 85 pep. iretendlR £ 1 -M 

Great Britain^ 0.85 Saudi Arabia 9.00 R 

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Kenya..,.*. SH- ISO U.S. Mil. fEur. J|1W 
Kuwait. .500 Fils Zimbabwe. 2im.S20.tW 


he was a young sergeant in the Japanese Imperi- 
al Army. .... 

Wounded by a British artillery shell that 
blasted the flesh off his left forearm, he was 
brought to a hospital in this capital, which was 
cccupied by Japanese iroops. He remembers 
lying awake listening to the loud croaking of 
frogs when the noise suddenly stopped and 
British warplanes began bombing. 

Mr. Waianabe was soon evacuated, although 
his war was Tar from over. Now 78, he recently 
returned to Rangoon with a tour group, his 
memories and his scars, to pray for his best 
friend, who died in Mandalay. 

More than 50 years later, many Japanese 
World War II veterans are reluming to visit 
battlefields and memorials across Southeast 


Asia. Drawn by a mixture of nostalgia, atone- 
ment and a desire to honor fallen comrades, 
they can be seen at many of the scenes oi 
triumphs and defeats. 

As Europe prepares to mark the 50th anni- 
versary of D-Day. Asians also are commemo- 
rating events that led to the end of the war in 
the Pacific in August 1945. In the minds of 
many veterans on both sides, Burma remains a 
land bound inextricably with World war It. 

h was here that U.S. fighting generals battled 
Japanese forces on the Asian mainland -- men 
such as Joseph W. (Vinegar Joe) Stilwell. the 
first foreigner to lead regular Chinese : troops m 
combat, and Frank Merrill head of the Ameri- 
can commandos known as Merrill's Marauders. 

The embittered StihvdL who was omen out 


of Burma in 1942 before making a comeback 
two vears later, excoriated his Japanese enemies 
in his diaries as “bowlegged cockroaches," al- 
though he reserved his harshest comments for 
his supposed allies. “Pigheaded." “ignorant" 
and “grasping" were some of his kinder de- 
scriptions of Cniartg Kai-shek, the Chinese gen- 
eralissimo. 

Some survivors remain bitter to this day. In 
Thailand, scene of the infamous “Death Rail- 
way" to Burma and ihe Bridge on the River 
Kwai. visiting Japanese and allied war veterans 
often give each other a wide berth. 

“If 1 saw a Japanese soldier here now. 1 
would kill him," a former British prisoner of 

See RANGOON, Page 6 


By John Tagliabue 

•V?w York Times Service 

MILAN — Umberto Boss seemed to be 
wanned less by the loden topcoat that protect- 
ed him from the Alpine cold than by the fervor 
of his. accustomed conviction. 

“1 can assure you of this much," (be slight 
tousled leader of the separatist-minded North- 
ern League told a crowd in ihe mountain town 
of Aosta early this month. “We will be the 
linchpin of any government that is formed in 
this country." 

The elections on March 27 and 28. which 
Italians view as the most crucial since the 1948 
vote that kepi ibe Communists from govern- 
ment at the start of the Cold War, are boiling 
down lo a test between a conservative coalition 
and a leftist , bloc led by the former Commu- 
nists. now the Democratic Party of the Left. 

Mr. Bossi is perhaps the most vocal member 
of the conservative coalition, which is led by a 
media magnate. Silvio Berlusconi. Mr. Bossi. a 
blunt-spoken politician, has gained the most 
attention by demanding that Italy be divided 
into three dr more republics. 

Bui the Northern League, the movement he 
called into life in the 1980s. has also provided 
political cover for the investigators who have 
undertaken to clean up corruption in business 
and politics. The investigation has destroyed 
the dominant Christian Democratic and Social- 


ist parties, thus recasting the political land- 
scape. 

From his perch as leader of the Northern 
League. Mr. Bossi is central lo any hope of 
tackling Italy's vast problems, like overhauling 
its finances and providing jobs. Mr. Berlusconi 
acknowledged Mr. Bossi's role when he asked 
the Northern League to join his Forza Italia 
movement, named for the sports cheer “Let's 
Go. Italy!** 

On the campaign trail through northern Ita- 
ly, Mr. Bossi offered ample evidence of his 
message: the Northern League brought down 
die old regime, and that accomplishment gives 
it the moral authority to define the new. 

Although Mr. Berlusconi's fortune was 
amassed under the old system. Mr. Bossi says 
the businessman is acceptable as a partner 
because “no revolution can succeed without 
part of the old regime being, let’s say, recycled." 

But woe to Mr. Berlusconi if he grahs for too 
much.- 

“What a shame." Mr Bossi says as a crowd 
roars approval, “if Marie Antoinette, after the 
French Revolution, got the idea to be queen 
again." 

A March 3 poll by the Cinn organization put 
Mr. Berlusconi out front with about 27 percent 
with 8 percent for his ally Mr. Bossi. Among 

See ITALY, Page 6 






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lYFEKNAT.. ».YAL IIEK \LU TRIBUNE. THl'RSDAT. MARCH 17, 1991 


Pact to Keep Settlements, for Now, Wins Rabin a Majority world briefs 



By Clyde Haberman 

.Vin Twbfy Service 

JERUSALEM — While trying to sal- 
vage the sagging Middle East peace talks in 
Washington. Prime Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin shored up his political base at home on 
Wednesday with legislative maneuvers that 
should bring back into the Told an errant 
religious party that had left his governing 
coalition. 

It means that Mr. Rabin will soon have 
what he has lacked for months, an assured 
parliamentary majority, something he says 
is essential for crucial' decisions in the fu- 
ture on peace. It was '“unthinkable.” he 
said recently, for the minority government 
he now leads to take steps oh such impor- 
tant issues. 

As part of the price for winning back the 
ardently Orthodox Shas party, the prime 
minister reportedly promised that Jewish 
settlements in the occupied territories 
would not be dismantled during the inter- 
im period of Palestinian self-rule that he 
has been negotiating with the Palestine 
Liberation Organization. 


In addition, he is said to have written to 
the Shas spiritual guide. Rabbi Ovadia Yo- 
sef. that he would not agree to a Palestinian 
state, to a redivision of Jerusalem or to an 
Israeli withdrawal from the Golan Heights 
without first putting the matter to a nation- 
al referendum. 

While all of [hat merely restates familiar 
government positions, the reported pledge 
on settlements takes on extra significance 
given the pressures on Mr. Rabin — from 


Asked Wednesday on a Public Broad- 
casting Service program whether he was 
ready to order the Hebron settlers to move. 
Mr. Rabin replied: “Not at this stage. I'm 
not saying what will happen once well 
have a permanent solution.” 

He noted Hebron's demographics and 
added. “I believe the figures speak for 
themselves.” 

Wooing Shas h35 consumed much of Mr. 
Rabin's time in the last few weeks, and it is 


outside and from within his cabinet — to a sign of how tenuous he considers his 
evacuate the small but militant Jewish en- political position as he puts Israel's future 
claves in the West Bank town of Hebron, on the lint He has been ready to give Shas 
where a settler massacred at least 29 Mus- just about anything it wants on domestic 
Jims at prayer on Feb. 25. The letter to issues — esneciallv a ban on iimonine 
Rabbi Yosef puts him on record as oppos- 


ing any tinkering with settlements now, a 
position that presumably includes the 
more than 400 Israelis in Hebron. 

But Mr. Rabin has also described the 
presence of those few Jews among perhaps 
100.000 Palestinians as “an unnecessary 
time bomb." and he has not excluded the 
possibility that some day he may insist they 
leave. 


issues — especially a ban on importing 
nonkosher meat — to persuade it to return 
to the coalition it left months ago when its 
temporal leader. Aiyeh Deri, was indicted 
on corruption charges. 

In a sense. Mr. Rabin's political prob- 
lems are the flip side of troubles facing 
Yasser Arafat the PLO chairman, who is 
under enormous pressure from angry Pal- 
estinians not to resume peace talks until he 
has wrested greater concessions from Israel 


to rein in militant settlers, especially in 
Hebron. 

After the Hebron massacre, the Rabin 
government began cracking down on radi- 
cal settlers, including declaring the anti- 
Arab Kach and Kahane Chai groups this 
week lo be terrorist outlaws. These moves 
have intensified ami-government protests 
by the political right, which turned out in 
large numbers in Tel Aviv on Tuesday 
night to denounce Mr. Rabin's policies. 
There were perhaps as many as 50.000 
demonstrators, according to’ some esti- 
mates. 

All along, (he prime minister has sensed 
be is vulnerable on the right. That feeling 
grew stronger after Shas walked out leav- 
ing him assured of only 56 votes among the 
Knesset's 120 members — 44 from his 
Labor Party and 12 from its leftist ally. 
Meretz. To his discomfort, he has had to 
depend on five Arab party votes for a 
majority on peace issues. 

Mr. Rabin's unease with this situation 
became plainer after the massacre. He tried 


two weeks ago to hring in a far-right partv. 
TsomeL but could not figure out how to do 
it without losing Meretz and throwing the 

peace talks into even more turmoil than 
they are in now. 

That left Shas and its six parliamentary 
seats — actually, this was his main target 
all along. 

As is often the case in Israeli politics, the 
main issues Tor the religious party were not 
the PLO talks but rather access to govern- 
ment power and funds. 

Ln the end. it turned into pork-barrel 
politics, literally, with Mr. Rabin agreeing 
to a ban on nonkosher meat imports that 
Shas had demanded. 

Just before leaving for Washington on 
Tuesday, he initialed a new coalition agree- 
ment with Mr. Deri, and on Wednesday 
the secutaT Meretz and Labor politicians 
reluctantly went along, voting the ban into 
law. 

Formal signing of the deal awaits Mr. 
Rabin's return from abroad, but it seems 
he now can hank on Shas's six seats, giving 
him 62 votes and his majority. 


EU Will Revise Policy on East 
To Strengthen Reforms There 


RtWiTi 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Union is preparing a wide-ranging 
overhaul of its policies toward 
Eastern Europe to bolster econom- 
ic and democratic reforms at a time 
of growing uncertainty, officials 
said. 

The issue will first seriously 
come up at a special European 
Commission meeting next Wednes- 
day to consider (he need for a re- 
view of its priorities for helping 
Eastern neighbors advance in their 
transition to market economies. 

Commission sources said the 
meeting would look at such matters 
as aid programs to the former 
Communist countries, which have 
been criticized for concentrating 
too much cm sending W'estem ex- 
perts to the aid-receiving countries 


instead of building up their infra- 
structure. 

There would also be discussion 
of the respective roles of the Union 
and or multilateral bodies such as 
the International Monetary Fund 
in providing financial help. 

Anxieties about the future are 
creating a new mood of impatience 
in the "wailing room” of Western 
institutions, not only for the L'nion 
but also the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization and the Western Eu- 
ropean Union. 

Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus of 
the Czech Republic, on 3 visit to 
the commission last week, chal- 
lenged the generally held idea thal 
the more advanced East European 
countries could hope for EU mem- 
bership around the end of the cen- 


tury by brusquely saying Prague 
had to be admitted much earlier. 

As trade between the two pans 
of the Continent opens up. espe- 
cially in areas such as agriculture 
where the EU producers have tradi- 
tionally been highly protected, the 
EU will be faced increasingly with 
pressure to make thorough reforms 
of its own policies. 

Farm Commissioner Rene Stei- 
chen said last week the EU must 
help Ceniral and East European 
countries to reform farming or risk 
growing unrest there. 

EU foreign ministers have made 
dear they would like the Eastern 
countries to speak with one voice 
by having a single rotating repre- 
sentative to coordinate policy with 
the Union. 


Neo-Nazis Welcon 
Holocaust Filling 


Vtn Vt-rk Time * Serin c 

BONN — The reversal by Ger- 
many’s highest appeals court of a 
far-right leader's conviction on a 
charge of inciting racial haired by 
repeating claims denying the Holo- 
caust was welcomed on Wednesday 
by neo-Nazis and condemned by 
Jewish groups as a boon to the 
forces of intolerance. 

The far-right leader. Gunter 
Decker t, chairman of the National 
Democratic Party, said he was 
pleased with the verdict, but was 
cautious about its broader signifi- 
cance. “The ruling does not make it 
possible to say without fear or pun- 
ishment thai there was no mass 
extermination of Jews in the Third 
Reich.” he said. 

The Federal Court of Justice in 
Karlsruhe reversed Mr. Decked V 
conviction by a lower court in 1992 
for translating and commenting on 
a speech by an American neo-Nazi 
Fred Leuchter. 

The speech, at a rally in Wein- 
heim a year earlier that was orga- 
nized by Mr. Decked, cast doubt 
on the historical veracity of war 
crimes at the Auschwitz concentra- 
tion camp. For translating and em- 
bellishing iL Mr. Decked was given 
a one-year suspended sentence and 
a 10.000 Deutsche mark (56-000 1 
fine. 

The appeals court said Tuesday 
that it was “too much of a general- 
ization" to assume that repealing 
Mr. Leuchter's assertions meant 


that Mr. Decked was guilty of in- 
citement to racial haired in Germa- 
ny. and ordered a retrial to re- 
examine his own statements. Mr. 
Leuchter. free on bail in the United 
Stales, is to be tried separately. 

The court dismissed Mr. Deck- 
en's claim that the mass murder of 
Jews in the gas chambers needed to 
be proven lo convict anyone of a 
crime for casting doubt upon iL 
Still, critics of the ruling feared that 
it could make it more difficult for 
the authorities to move vigorously 
against neo-Nazi and extreme- 
rightist groups. 

“Finally, a sensible court deci- 
sion.” said Ursula Muller, who 
with her husband. Kurt, has repeat- 
edly been charged with organizing 
neo-Nazi rallies near Mainz. 

Michael Friedmann, a Frankfurt 
lawyer whose parents survived the 
Holocaust, said. “The decision is a 
wrong signal at a time when right- 
wing radicals are trying to relaliv- 
ize history.” 

Neo-Nazi and other extreme 
rightist groups have been repeated- 
ly charged with inciting violence 
against foreign asylum-seekers. 

Seven persons, including two 
small children, were killed in a fire 
early Wednesday morning in a 
building in Stuttgart that sheltered 
about 50 people, many of them 
foreigners. The police said the 
cause of the fire was unknown, but 
did not rule out arson. 

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Hong Kong 
Links China 
To Bulk of 
SeaPiracy 

By Kevin Murphy 

Inremanonal Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG —Chinese secu- 
rity forces led nearly half the pirate 
attacks on shipping reported in the 
South China Sea in the past IS 
months, the Hong Kong govern- 
ment told a visiting United Natioris 
maritime official Wednesday. 

Of almost 100 incidents in an 
area recently described as the 
world's most dangerous lor ship- 
ping by the Internationa] Maritime 
Authority. 42 dearly implicated 
Chinese security forces and govern- 
ment officials, according to the 
Hong Kong govern men l 
Local newspapers reported 
Wednesday that a Hong Kong gov- 
ernment briefing for Admiral E/th- 
imios Mitropolous, chairman of the 
UN-backed International Mari- 
time Organization’s safety commit- 
tee, was the first to detail its deep 
concerns about China's role in a 
growing menace to regional ship- 
ping lanes. 

Admiral Mitropolous arrived in 
Hong Kong on Tuesday after meet- 
ing with officials from China's 
Communications. Transport and 
Foreign ministries. 

Nearly 80 percent of the world's 
most serious piracy cases in 1993 
occurred in Asian ’waters, accord- 
ing to international shipping indus- 
try records. 

Increasingly, pirate activity has 
shifted northward from the Strait 
of Malacca between Malaysia and 
Sumatra, the Philippines' western 
coasts and the seas between Viet- 
nam and Malaysia. 

The seas between China and the 
Korean Peninsula. China and Tai- 
wan and Hong Kong and Vietnam 
have become 'particularly danger- 
ous in recent months with some 
ships being ordered illegally into 
Chinese ports, where their cargoes 
have been unloaded before their 
release was allowed. 

The confidential Hong Kong re- 
port. culled from incidents moni- 
tored by its Maritime Rescue Coor- 
dination Center, identifies Chinese 
police, customs, naval and army 
officers and the serial numbers of 
individual paired vessels involved 
in the attacks. 

Many incidents look place just 
beyond Hong Kong waters, with 
the rest farther out to sea 



l-icv Ur A-vukd Pfc. 

Mr. Qian enjoying tea Wednesday more than he apparently enjoy ed his talks with Mr. Christopher. 

Clinton Is Upbeat Over China 


Rioters 

Washington — President 

Bill Clinton said Wednesday he 
was confident the United States, 
would be able to work through dif- 
ference. with China on human 
rights. 

Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher's talks with Chinese 
leaders this week were marked by a 
sharp confrontation over human 
rights, which Washington says 
must be improved if Beijing's pref- 
erential trade status is to be extend- 
ed in June. 


During his three-day visit Mr. 
Christopher was lectured on the 
dangers of linking the two issues 
and was warned thal the United 
Stales would suffer as much as Chi- 
na if it revoked Beijing's most-fa- 
vored- nation trade status. 

“I’m confident that we will be 
able to work through this and 
strengthen our relationship and our 
advocacy of human rights over the 
long run." Mr. Clinton said. 
"That's what i think will happen." 

In Beijing. Foreign Minister 
Qian Qichen of China expressed 


disappointment over his meetings 
with Mr. Christopher, but said he 
hoped that there was still lime to 
prevent the trade issue from falling 
victim to the dispute over human 
rights. 

“I am somewhat disappointed,*' 
Mr. Qian said. “My talks with 
Christopher have not produced as 
many results as previously expect- 
ed.” But Mr. Qian said both sides 
were working hard to f ind a way to 
narrow their differences and that 
he hoped for a satisfactory out- 
come. 


UN Plans to Lift Serb Siege of Maglaj 

SARAJEVO (Reuters] — The United Nations plans to lift the nine- 
month Serbian siege of Maglaj Ln ventral Bosnia, preferably with Serbian 
consent, but using a “more muscular" approach if necessary, UN officials 
said Wednesday. 

“We want to open the enclave to aid convoys and freedom of move, 
meat with the consent of the Serbs." said a senior military official. “W e 
hope they volunteer their cooperation, but we wouldn't mind if they were 
coerced by Churkin or by some other outside pressure.” He was refefiog 
to the Russian special envoy. Vital! I. Churkin. 

About 20.000 people in the Muslim town of Maglaj have been surviv- 
ing on air-dropped food for months. Bosnian Serbs have blocked numer- 
ous UN attempts to deliver aid to the pocket by road, most recently 
refusing permission for a convoy that would have set -off on Wednesday. 

French Mayor Balks at Inviting Kohl 

CAEN. France (AP) — The mayor of Caen said Wednesday that he 
wanted to invite Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany to a June 6 peace 
commemoration marking the 50th anniversary of D-Day, but coded up 
asking only the German ambassador to come. 

"Helmut Kohl at Omaha Beach, it's not easy. But at the Peace 
Memorial of Caen, in the evening, it is natural to shake hands," said 
Mayor Jean-Marie Girault. 

Mr. Girault met Wednesday with the German ambassador. Jfirgen 
Sfldboff. inviting him to the event but backing down on his invitation to 
Mr. Kohl. He told French radio be was not authorized to do so. The 
Veterans Ministiy's organizing committee for the events said that only 
the president's or prime minister’s office could decide which heads of 
state would attend. 

Touvier Case a 'Detail,’ Le Pen Says 

PARIS (AP) — The far-right leader Jean-Marie Le Pen said Wednes- 
day that the trial of the former Nazi collaborator Paul Touvier, which is 
due to start Thursday, was unnecessary and suggested that the case was a 
“detail” or France’s pasL 

Mr. Touvier. who served as intelligence aide to Klaus Barbie, the 
Gestapo chief of Lyon, is the first Frenchman to be prosecuted for crimes 
against humanity during World War II. He is charged with complicity for 
his role in the killings of seven Jewish hostages. 

“I find it sad that 50 years after the war. we are not capable of 
pardoning the former German adversary." Mr. Le Pen said in an 
interview. “France has enough other problems without worrying about 
the details of its pasL" Mr. Le Pen. head of the National Front, has often 
been accused of racism and anti-semitism. His reaction to the trial 
recalled a 1987 remark that outraged France, when he referred to Napi 
gas chambers as a “detail of history." A court fined him for the remari 

Brazilian Prisoners Free Cardinal 

FORTALEZA. Brazil (AP) — Prisoners who held sharpened spoons to 
the throats of a Roman Catholic cardinal and human rights activists fled 
into the woods of northeastern Brazil after freeing the hostages unharmed 
Wednesday. 

In escaping with hostages from a maximum security jail 13 inmates 
broke a deal they made with authorities in exchange for the police 
providing weapons and an armored car for their getaway. The hostages, 
including Cardinal Dom AJoisio Lorscheider. a candidate for Pope in 
1978, were seized Tuesday during a visit to check on reports of over- 
crowding and abuse- at the prison. 

The police kept their side of the bargain, but the convicts packed the 
armored car with 13 hostages before they sped away Tuesday night from 
(he Paulo Sarasate prison near Fortaleza. The hostages were later released 
in small groups as about 120 police officers, including sharpshooters, 
followed the getaway vehicle. The convicts abandoned it after crashing 
into a car Wednesday morning and ran into the w*oods near Quixadi 
about 160 kilometers from Fortaleza, the capita! of the state of Ceara. 

70 Killed in New Haiti Repression 

PORT-AU-PRINCE. Haiti (Reuters) — Almost 70 Haitians have been 
killed in a new wave of repression against supporters of the ousted 
president, the Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aristide, officials said Wednes- 
day. 

Nineteen bodies have turned up so far in March. 16 in the pro-Aristide 
neighborhood of Cite Soldi, according to an official from the human 
rights observer mission run by the United Nations and the Organization 
of American States. Fifty people were killed in February , the official said. 

“We reckon it's a cleanup campaign.” a UN source said. “1 think they 
are trying to wipeout all opposition” to the country's rightist military. ib« 
source added. > ' 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


KLM Royal Dutch Airlines announced 28 more US. destinations from 
Amsterdam for the 1994 summer peak season. The carrier also said it 
would add Osaka, Japan, to its schedule with biweekly flights starting in 
September. Service to Ho Chi Minh City will also increase to biweekly 
instead of weekly. ( 4 Pj 

Passenger traffic at SdaphoL the Netherlands* main airport, jumped 1 1 
percent in 1*93 to more than 21 million passengers, officials said. (AP) 
Trains between Hong Kong and Guangzhou in southern China were 
running normally on Wednesday after workmen cleared a landslide on 
the track that stranded about 1.800 passengers on two trains for more 
than 10 hours. (Reuters) 

USAir said it has paid $8.1 million to the family of an Akron. Ohio, 
surgeon who died in a 1992 plane crash at New York's La Guardia 
Airport. The amount was the highest ever for a single death in an 
American airline disaster. ” f Return t 

Complaints from foreign and Chinese tourists about overcharging and 
other swindles surged Iasi year, but China's National Tourism Adminis- 
tration has vowed to improve service, ihe China Daily reported. (AFP) 


A 2d Genetic Defect Is Linked to Colon Cancer 


By Natalie Angier 

Veil Yi*k Tin if-i Senite 

NEW YORK — Keeping up the fast 
pace that has distinguished colon cancer 
research over the Iasi few months, scien- 
tists have identified another generic defect 
able to vandalize healthy colon cells und 
start a tumor growing. 

The newjv discovered gene accounts for 
a large percentage of cases of hereditary 
colon cancer, as well as many cancers that 
do not appear to have □ familial connec- 
tion. It is die second example found of a 
so-called mutator gene, an insidious mech- 
anism Ay causing cancer. 

The discovery follows the first finding 
by three months. And the same two com- 
peting teams that announced the earlier 
revelation ure claiming credit for simulta- 
neously detecting the latest gene. 

Together, the two mutator genes ore 
thought to he behind up to 95 percent of 
all cases of hereditary colon cancer, which 


themselves make up about 20 percent of 
the 160.000 cases or colon cancer diag- 
nosed each year in the United Suites. 

Scientists also have evidence that the 
genes are responsible for many seemingly 
spontaneous cases of colon tumors, as well 
as some malignancies of the ovaries, uterus 
and other organs. They estimate that 
about one million Americans carry one of 
the two genetic defects. 

Scientists said that within a year, they 
should have a Wood test able to screen for 
mutant versions of the two genes to alert 
people that they have a high probability of 
contracting colon cancer. Once identified, 
carriers could then be counseled lo have 
yearly colonoscopic examinations to de- 
tect and excise liny polyps before the wart- 
like growths turn malignant. 

By catching colon cancer at the earliest 
possible Maze, researcher, hope to make a 
.significant dent in the number of fatalities. 
About 64.000 people a year die of the 


disease, making it the second greatest 
cause of death by cancer after Jung tu- 
mors. 

Bui researchers emphasized that the 
blood test is likely lo be limited for the 
near future to those known to come from a 
family with a history or colon caned, a 
syndrome formally called hereditary non- 
polyposis colon cancer. To fall into this 
category, a person must have at least two 
dose relatives who have been afflicted 
with colon cancer, one of them before the 
age of 50. 

Scientists say the development of an 
effective lest for the broader public will 
require more work before it will be practi- 
cal and reliable enough for use bv the 
average physician. 

“If you consider all the people who have 
a mutation in one of these genes, along 
with their extended families, we're talking 
about a few million people who. in the best 


of ail possible worlds, we’d want lo test." 
said Dr. Bert V’ogelstein of the Johns Hop- 
kins Oncology Center in Baltimore. “TTie 
thought of how to lest all those people is 
mind-boggling, and it way outstrips our A 
current technological approaches to these 
matters." 

Dr. Vogelstein is the senior scientist on 
the report that will appear on Friday in the 
journal Nature. The other paper, from the 
laboratories of Richard Kolodner of the 
Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. 

Dr. Richard Fishy! at (he University of 
Vermont in Burlington and researchers 
from the Oregon Health Sciences Univer- 
sity in . Portland, appears Wednesday in 
the British journal Nature. 

"This is one of the most important and 
exciting things going on in genetics to- 
day.” said Dr. Francis S. Collins, director 
of the Center lor Human Genome Re- 
search in Bethesda. MarvJand. 


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hardware and software - an accomplishment that tapped the 
combined engineering expertise of both companies. 
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Evelyn Nightingale, 
Who Was Married 
To Waugh, Is Dead 


The Associated Press 

? LON DON |AP) — Evelyn 
Nightingale, 90, the first wife of 
Evelyn Waugh and a model for 
women in his novels, died Friday. 

'Mrs. Nightingale's friends in- 
cluded Nancy Milford, the novelist 
Anthony Powell and other bright 
sparks or the 1920s. 

, Lady Pansy Lamb wrote in The 
Doily Telegraph that news of her 
friend’s doth “takes me back al- 
most 70 years to a vanished world 
of debutantes, dances, chaperones 
and clandestine engagements.'' 

Evelyn Florence Margaret Wini- 
fred Gardner was bom SepL 27, 
1903. the youngest daughter of 
Lord Burghdere and the former 
Lady Winifred Herbert. 

As a young woman. Mr. Powell 
wrote, she “seemed in her person to 
exemplify aU thought of as most 
‘modern.’ She possessed the looks 
and figure of the moment, slight, 
boyish, an Eton crop." 

She married Mr. Waugh in June 
1928 — they were known as “She- 
EvdyiT and “He-Evdyn.” Barely a 
year later, she informed Mr. 
Waugh that she was having an af- 
fair with John Heygate, who be- 
came her second husband in 1930. 

Mr. Waugh was bitter about ihe 
split, and die is the likely model for 
the adulterous Lady Brenda Last in 
“A Handful of Dust.” Characters 
in “Scoop” and “Black Mischief” 
also appear to be inspired by her. 

Through all their lives, she and 
Mr. Waugh said little about each 
other. Mr. Waugh, who died in 
1966. once said that he “went 
through a form of marriage and 
traveled about Europe for some 
months with this consort." She. in 
turn, rebuffed requests for inter- 
views about him. 


Her third husband was Ronald 
Nightingale. 

Kenneth Neill Cameron, 85, 
A Scholar of Shelley, Dies 
NEW YORK (NYT) — Ken- 
neth NdU Cameron, 85, a leading 
American scholar of Shelley and 
English Romantic poetry, died of 
pneumonia Monday. 

Mr. Cameron’s work as an au- 
thor and editor threw new light on 
the life and poetry of Shdiey and 
his circle 

Sandra Paretti, a Novelist 
Commits Suicide in Zurich 
ZURICH (AP) — Sandra Par- 
etti, 59, a popular German-lan- 
guage novelist, has committed sui- 
cide Saturday to prevent further 
suffering from cancer. 

Mrs. Parelri wrote her own obit- 
uary. which appeared in the Neue 
Zurcher Zeitung on Monday, 
thanking the pro-euthanasia group 
Exit for its support. “1 had an easy 
and beautiful life,” she wrote in her 
obituary. “Like a Mozart sympho- 
ny. it led to an easy and beautiful 
finale, untainted by reelings of 
guilL” 

Jiro Enjop, 86, a former presi- 
dent of the Nihon Keizai Shimbuo. 
a leading Japanese economic jour- 
nal, died or breathing difficulties 
Monday in T0L70, the newspaper 
said. Mr. Enjoji served as head of 
the newspaper’s economic division, 
managing editor and chief editor 
before becoming president in 1968. 
He then was chairman of Nihon 
Keizai from 1976 until 1980. 

Charles Brink. 86. a classical 
scholar at Cambridge University 
and author of a three-volume com- 
mentary on the verse of Horace, 
died March 2. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBiTVE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994 


U.S. and Russia Reach Accord 
On Inspecting Plutonium Sites 










Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States and Russia have agreed to 
permit each other to inspect stor- 
age sites where they keep plutoni- 
um triggers from dismantled nucle- 
ar warheads. US. officials said. 

The agreement would remove 
one of the thorniest issues dividing 
the two nuclear superpowers as 
they reduce their areenals. Neither 
country has ever permitted inspec- 
tors into the facilities where it 
keeps its stockpile of plutonium 
triggers. 

American and Russian officials 
had been discussing a complicated 
arrangement under which each 
would have access to some parts of 
dismantled warheads and would 
calculate from that bow much plu- 
tonium had beea removed. The 
new agreement will eliminate the 
need for such calculations by per- 
mitting direct inspection, adminis- 
- tration officials said. 

American officials told Congress 
last week that Russia's recent deci- 
sion to allow Ukraine to inspect 


storage sites give them hope that 
the United States would eventually 
gain access. 

“This is a big deal,” one official 
said, because it would put an end to 
a situation in which Washington 
and Moscow have had no way to 
verify that each was doing what it 
said it would do, or to check on 
whether plutonium from warheads 
was being stored safely. 

The inspection agreement was 
negotiated by Energy Secretary 
Hazel R. O’Leary. Defense Depart- 
ment officials and the Russian 
atomic energy minister, Viktor N. 
Mikhailov, officials said. 

Under the agreement, Russian 
inspectors will be allowed into the 
Energy Department's Pantex facili- 
ty near Amarillo. Texas, and Amer- 
ican inspectors will be granted ac- 
cess to Russian plutonium facilities 
at Tomsk, officials said. 

The inspection agreement is a 
bilateral arrangement, with no role 
provided for the International 
Atomic Energy Agency, officials 
said. 


But an administration official 
said the agreement represented^ 
“the beginning of an international 
control regime over, phtibahinj,” 
the base building block of auden; 
weapons. 'f\ 

The United Slates and; Russia 
are dismantling thousands of war- 
heads and putting the phitouram 


triggers into storage while deri ding 
what to do with them. . 

A report by the congressional 
Office of Technology Assessment 
in September noted that “the Unit- 
ed Slates has not verified specific 
warhead dismantlement activities 
and accomplishments in . Russia, 
and has no direct cooperative, pro- 
cess for developing accurate 1 infor- 
mation about Russian dismantle- 
ment status and capabilities " 

That was a dangerous sftaatipo, 
the report said, because it takes 
only about 15 pounds {7 kilograms) 
of plutoninm to make a crude nu- 
clear explosive, and the materia] & 
highly toxic. 

— THOMAS W. UPPMAN 


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Yeltsin Foes Unite in New Movement 


jsgl,.--. ; • - 

,-A. ' '• *, ■*’**’• **./•* 

Rjol Quura Agon FtaaccPreor 

A RAMADAN SHOWER FOR THE YOUNGEST— Fahd Abduf-Rahman. nine months old, 
of Kuwait, surrounded by dinar notes worth about 510,000. The child was the beneficiary of a 
custom of showering the youngest with gifts of money at the end of Ramadan in his country. 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — ‘ Leading oppo- 
nents of President Boris N. Yeltsin, 
who is out of Moscow on vacation, 
moved on Wednesday to wrest the 
political initiative from him by an- 
nouncing they had formed a united 
front. 

A joint statement signed by lead- 
ers of conservative and nationalist 
groups announced the formation of 
a movement called Accord for Rus- 
sia. Its purpose, they said, was to 
save Russia from the painful results 
of radical economic reforms. 

In a separate development, for- 
mer Vice President Alexander V. 


Rutskoi who was released from 
prison against Mr. Yeltsin's will 
and is seen as a potential presiden- 
tial candidate, suggested that peo- 
ple in former Soviet republics 
should consider forming a new type 
of union. 

Mr. Rutskoi did not sign the 
joint statement but Vasili Lipitsky. 
a leader of Mr. RutskoTs Popular 
Party of Free Russia, was a signato- 
ry. 

“Active consultations are being 
held with different forces to form a 
coalition aimed at the next presi- 
dential election campaig n," Mr. Li- 
pitsky told Itar-Tass. 


Mr. Rutskoi said the successor 
Commonwealth of Independent 
States could not survive. 

“We are destined by Lord God 
himself to live as one' family, one 
nation, one state — a great power,” 
he said. 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — A Russian mili- 
tary commission has begun to as- 
sess the possibility of building a 
new space launching facility near 
the Chinese border to replace the- 
aging Baikonur site in Kazakhs tan, 
officials said Wednesday. 




/- 


Anil nf J i 


011 n 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


Spreading a Global Vision 


Direct o r o f C o r p o rate C o m m l n i c 


London based 



^ le.nlinp provider nf ylokil mobile communications 
service* vi:i sirdlirc In users ill m.\i, on lanj and ill the 


EH iiir. Inmarsat is mi intermit iimally-i turned cuopc-r.invv 
Kicked by 71 cnuntritM The Inmarsat fiarrncnhip i' a complex 
series iif internal mid cxtvrii.il inter-relliHonxliipx made up of- 
•investor., service providers, man ufnc Hirers, povermnenr 
adiiMrostr.it jnn> and the directorate represent ini' a broad 
.spectmm nt perceptions and interests. 

The r.ipijh ih.mj.rinu telecommunication* environment and 
the i'ixavuI!* realm ol competition ate creariny new ihallencc* »i>r 
the oryanhurkin. To meet (hem. Inmarsat's cninniunitarii ms .mJ 
I’ublic ncl.itK ms time lions must continue to evolve - this will form a 
inajur pan Hirbrief.es Pinxlor oi’Liirpnnirv (.anuniunic.itionv 

Reporting ro the Vice-President tor Corporate 
Oinuiumic.it mns. you will he play .in .tciive and impnnant parr 
in the inan.iifcnient and Ji reel ion of Inmarsat's worldwide 
corporate communications and puhlic relations policies and 
pn wiinmiis. Tins is ill principally involve: 

• major public rvlathuv* aetiviiies anJ, 

• establish mu anJ mam tammy channels ol corumiinic.it 1011s 
herween Inmarsat, organisations and imli vldiliils on .1 
worldwide basis. 


Your fnens is to be on developing and implement inj: 
coiiimumc.irmiis programmes to help Inmarsat achieve its 
business objectives in this emery ini' environment. The 
proynimmes w ill call for 

• the effective employment of PR and media Technkpics, 

• informal inn anJ p rumor 101 ul pn duct perndital puhlidiiny, 

• exhibitions, special events, sponsorships and other 
pn 'motional tools. anJ. 

• the impleincntalioii of Inmarsat’s corporate idem in and 
brands. 

You will have direct management ropimsibilm t.ir a team of 
50 pnitessii mills within the department and ri -yet her vmi will 
ensure that approved protects are cartiej out on time and within 
htklyct. 

In return, there is a hiylilv coinpetiiive salary anJ benefits 
package which reflect- the hiyh level of compel cnee, experience 
and pntfvssion.il qii.ililk.it ions required. 

To a/iply, plciiu 1 fiiT ur muif y.mr full caiccr Jcr.iiK 
in Yn.iriic Surc/i. S+T+l" ScUvinui. 54 Jennyn Nir»vf. 
Umjun NTIl ni\. I ■ntieJ kmyJmn. /■’,«: +44 71 754ti. 


Inmarsat 



tory Technician 

it Mss/on Contract 


l US BAMC a ISOKB 

based in ftvB. aVjoteng far 
AN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 
to pin its back office team. 
Gvx&date should be Fhwrt in Engfah, 
Genwn and French, possess a pKaxn 
penoraWy and work wed under 
pressure. A previous experience in the 
banfang/seamMS mdutfry would be at 
odvoriaga Phase send a hendwntten 
cover letter. CV & photo to Bov 355S. 

1 .KT, 92531 Ntuiy Cede-. Fiance. 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


GENERAL MANAGEMENT 
FAR EAST BBTOBtTAnVt 
Senior Excouivb, over 25 *eors mkuss- 
M mf I experience [USA, CerticT 
Araenca, Asia) n totabfa^g. operahig 
& erpmtng safes ' marketing > odoc- 
non Mbxkvies of nx^or mtl ^roup 
seehng new chrfitnge »«h u *e « «» u iv 
tHy rwided or ywui w wishing to nt 
luLWi or eipod in Asa. &orfcm 
contacts, reanibudder. hont^on man- 
ager. w*ng to reteerfe, longlefTn or 
controcfual bass. Fax to (852) 525-Wfi 


In the context o» j.ire-/aunc/i operations and under the fttvi/fmefll .Manager s rvspi‘n<ihilln will 
priM oed to /.ihcvjfrin .iikKv cm-firfr/ measurint,* and nutnirt trine ut en\ in <ntiKrU.il jur.im'ien and to 
ihe nUMtfen.u r 1 .1 ml inxfitx /tmi of the rtjuijwuen/. 

EthjL.ttmn . PAL * - >nr equn a/enp. pteterab/i m pfnyu-.il tnivNjMwnN or pfcctrit.nl ciipiiicrrinti 
Eurufie.in national excejs! french m.ilinfM/tr> quol.i s 1 uv are fluent huf/i in French And Entihyh and vus h 
In ut ft. in an hichleih .1 n<l motfi.irinn.i/ nn irnnttemcnt. 

k pie. in* sent/ 1 our resume, photo and iVtieifuUlftl! Ititet /iftn indic-Uion m 1. urtont rrmuner.i/ion to A 
MCRCURI L«l -U .Hi .flier fcxin tiutes tWOti TOULOUSE f 

under reu+ff.u e -it! I P-f > H T. • m teller a or/ » *m elofU’. 





US ATTORNEY. \1M tax, 14 *vr, 
e-paoence. htl European MBA, RuerU 
go men, US & EC cJnenshps seeks 
posVon. Tet'Fa* Pans 23-1 **3 ?<87 


FASHION RB> BASH) IN NY enced m 
design.' produtt devetopmenl. mork ol - 
mg. and dwfautan seeks sahs/mar- 
kehia nstmogemeni poSton wrihres- 
Kbufied fasfvan/accoHOnes firm E<- 
tngua! SptneK&dith. WBm to 

inml T«k 516-761®! USA. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


HOTH. CONTROLLER 

Laadng five Par heed m Lebw. 

Eon of Beirut, seeks a tughty moU wit e d 
Controller wufi excsBent rterperSanal 
shfa to oyenee tmonce. occsuir fa n mf 
internal attid. Portion aw^oSe 
u nme dm ety. Gmfdato mini have a 
Bachelors Degree as occo >e * n g. ce 
hail 5 fears expenence m hotel 
accounting monogemerA. ad sokd 
knowfadge of camputeuaed accounting 
systems and hotel uifarmcMn sySents 
covering Fnxe Office. Food & Beverage 
and Pomtj of Sde. Fluency m Engish 
and French 'nguaed; Germon m 
odd i no i i d languages an od- m e uy e 
Send CV weh photo, in fe rences and 
sgkxy reqwrementa la 
(JMTH) GfiOtfP CONSULTANTS 
7. ree de JHanttvidta. 751 16 Pais 


OVBtSEAS FRENCH TERRITORIES 
(D0MT0MI & ABROAD, bbeneious 
jobs andafale To recenw mformonon 
0" the moazene Foneftore. write b 
(021 0P 344,75365 PAfSS CH33 06 


PACIFIC CM CONSULTANTS 
Inteinu tonal mvafmeni firm represent- 
mg a nemfy formed cons atxcn seeks 
quofified amsubaia to p ghopcle n 
o risk analysis of buvness ccpc»rot«>es 


m eoteang high ask roakets in the 
Poafic fSm Otf currant focus n North 
Korea Irxfandudb should ho* current 
cff*xh. mea egje-tse and ertensme 
wenente m ihs reg<on Comperncoan 
“** be o otnn te ns urore vmh qucfifico 
"“O. Propels anty. Ccifidenaclirr 
mured, nease swd resume v 
Or. David OratfieW 
P.O. Bex 6060 
1211 Ge n ova 6 

Geneva Switzerland 


HAUTE COUTURE 
. FASHON ACCBOOSS 

Ftendi ccmpony seeks independent 
Conmeod agents, well mrroduced n 
rtxs field as repres-etaa^, f a p 0 ^ f. 
promces. <Wy expenefKfd serexo 
motnrrted pmsons wen coad 

preieniunon need aoov. 

Send Ot to MEIZ MOSUtUP. 

25 AYE DE IAMBA11L 75016 PARS 


RND WORK M AM&1CA. Jabs 
CraUfa n sofas, connwters afcxu v 
fnd*on, tntAnA. fac to r vs, hundreds at 
pOBtxvB awfable. Ca5 kts fateina- 
sond Inc W +21 3LC3 505« HoL 
land 


SALES POSmOfWAJtN $100,000+ 
Ui FV-Tech Seaetfy Manufocfwrmg Co 
has openng. Prestigious London & Pare 
stswfpoito. Strong dosing & itfa- 
marlrelmg skills a must Career 
Oaorljrt* Sdary + Hi CommdSton 
S Benefits. Dare you pau Itvs by! 

Fax Mr. Mrie* 212^-178 USA. 


PERSONAL TRAVEL EXECUTIVE 
ASSISTANT mwn 5 vears seae- 
land e-perancr based r<s>sLcndon- 
Aihens Phone Fa>c 1+5 72 19 X or 
London 71-5B4 05 57 


^il 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 


YOUNG GERMAN EXECUTIVE 

Secretory (28} ■ eduanrd >n hotel Buv 
nms, now em pi uy e d ■" a personnel 
oarouhng ogencr » taokaig fa a 
quakfied pcsmgn m or rtemahend 
campany m UAIY. Preferably Mifar or 
Bone Languages: Gemon - 
tongue. Engkh ffaent. French good. 
Oner- di ffer e nt FC^ystenq. I cm Ivghfy 
m cft vt a ed ond fienbe and uxU start 
01.0?. 1994 

Please ropiy Bon 3557 fNT. Fned- 
ridntr. li 0^0323 F-onkfiH Mon. 
Germonr 


Our client is an outstanding multinational company with excellently positioned products. The company is a major 
player in the business of selling and servicing of long-life installations of high technical standard. Revenues are US$ 
3 billion and the number of employees exceed 30’000. 

The Total Quality Management Division has the main purpose to complete and maintain the TQM organization and 
standards throughout the group in accordance with corporate policies and business strategies. The future Head of the 
division will be a member of the Corporate Management reporting directly to the Chief Executive Officer. 


Main tasks: The qualifications: 

■I To further develop, recommend and ensure implemen- 8 Good education and high intellect with a university 
tation of short and long term objectives and strategies degree in engineering or informatics 

' m riT in +i nd ° ptimize the 5yStemS = Worki "9 experience in a comparable environment i.e. 

and procedures of the TQM in the group first class multinational company and relevant industries 

* To monitor and ensure efficiency of the TQM process in such as automotive, aircraft aerospace, defence etc; 

terms of organization and leadership and to ensure that industries with zero defect products 
group companies receive the necessary and timely sup- s Worki ience in benchmark ^ engineer . 

port and guidance from corporate services ing * 

a To manage Corrective Actions (CAT) if appropriate in a Knowledgeable in TQM on all levels and in the ISO 
co-operation with the group companies concerned Standard related procedures 

S To obtain the European Quality Award for the group 
B To execute quality audits regularly 

Candidates who want to combine living in Switzerland with the challenging function providing leadership and support 
for all aspects of TQM should immediately apply. Please send your confidential information to K/F ASSOCIATES. C.F.- 
Meyer Strasse 14. CH-8027 Zurich, reference number 63007-10. Should you need any additional information, please call 
Ms Kristina Rippstein (Tel. ##41-1-281 01 00). 


The qualifications: 

jlemen- 8 Good education and high intellect with a university 

’ategies degree in engineering or informatics 

systems g working experience in a comparable environment, i.e. 

first class multinational company and relevant industries 
Dcess in such as automotive, aircraft, aerospace, defence etc; 
tre that industries with zero defect products 

ely sup- s working experience in benchmark process engineer- 
ing 

nprf n ® Knowledgeable in TQM on all levels and in the ISO 
nea Standard related procedures 


K/F ASSOCIATES 


* fe Pari;: 

lies Com i »i 


Cranfield 

I UNIVERJ 


I UNIVERSITY 

FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING 
AT CRANFIELD 

Due lo (he dynamic expansion of our activities in degree 
programme*.. n«*HMrc-h and particularly short executive 
pn^nuYimes, Crantield School «>| Management is seeking hi 
expand and develop its Finance and Accounting Croup at all levels 
including at rmfcsiiiiin.il level. 

I*rt»speetive candidates may come I mm either academic or business 
backgrounds. th*>sc I mm academia should be able to demonstrate 
a strong track record in research jnd publications, while those from 
business should have a career progression leading to a senior 
financial management pi»sition. All candidates should be 
experienced across the range of financi.il management and 
accounOng but should he able to demonstrate specialism in one or 
more or the following areas: 

FINANCIAL STRATEGY 
STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING 
INTERNATIONAL FINANCE 
CLOBAL FINANCIAL SERVICES 
STRATEGIC BRAND MANAGEMENT 
TREASURY MANAGEMENT 

If you wish to discuss in confidence the opportunities, please 
contact rrojexsor Keith Ward. Head of tin* Finance and Accounting 
Group, on +4 ( 11 ) 2 U- 754 .Vs V 

Formal appRcations are invited in writing addressed 
to the Personnel Department, Cranfield University. Cranfield, 
Bedford, MK43 OAL, England, quoting reference 4Q37B/IHT. 

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 





r^m 


mesttzi 



BJXOFEAN BORN Aiwnctr ofizen, 20 
)WI successful moftcWQ and nnx 
ogenmK mdujtod podA, For an 
ond Loan Anenca. Resdere Mdayso 
«e 1OT0 *eta sitoUe porton w 

conjuJtonsy asamert. Fox. 4M- 
241775 or wrte to FO Box 10636. 


SALES ewigaK. xtf moimnd, 30 
year old E nd *# "* 1 wffi ?«*• «* 
record wels poaSon m w y iew . 
erpnteto Wrejony WS Irow t«l 

44 734 aZzOTfe 44 243 537171 


FRB4CM WOMAN. 33, &dBk^xnjh 
ptyxre tfrctfion of intema w nd nude 
fjota and asames] yreks pesuan m 
Fmo. W= rf)46 67 33 91. 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

. CBITRAL HBIOPIAN VP 

r”* 1 

fo» cnolenar^ bared pounon. 
EngW, momsr tongvu, Ruenr Frendi 
esemca, w cH te i* coounmueohore ond 
presto or Hk esiMnL 
4 rears nnan rentuun reqwed 

wrth sound bu re fadne of word process- 

«g. Heare bwj CV and photo to- 
So, 3544. LH T. F.9257I Codex 

SECRETAR IES AVAIL ABLE" 

TOP Ltm SECRETARY 
Wfi«r WGLSH/ITAUAN/fSH4CH 
VAfa opma. wel edueered. med- 
Wjwwm faQh score of rwpon- 
reodr » " 0*1 fer busmea 

4BTI3SRSX’®®. 


T ELEC0MMUNICAT10NS 

ENGINEER Pm Base 


\ . Your mission ts to contribute 
• : V to the development of the 
Aeronautical Tefecom- 
V • munications Network (ATN) 

.V designed to provide World-wide 
" ; irner-necworkrog services 
. to Airlines and Cirvrf Aviation 
'• ■. Authorities. 

: \‘7j Your Tasks: 

Within (he framework of 
* ■ V a System development team. 

■ you will : 

* - Analyse and consolidate the 
ATN Systems and Services 
requirements 

■ • v - Produce functional specific a - 
. tions of the ATN components 
,^'s - Develop software 

,•1:7. architecture design 


Pm Base 


Your Prom: 

An engineenng degree with 3-5 
years'experience in development 
of solutions for inter-networking 
Fixed and mobile date telecom- 
munications services. 

- Knowledge of OSI Inter- 
networking standards 

- Excellent written and oral 
communication skills 

- Good teamwork and 
interpersonal skids 

For consideration, please forward 
your resume including your 
salary requirements, and quoting 
rel. 485 on the envelope, to 
COMMUNIQUE • 50/54 rue de Silly 
92513 BOULOGNE-BILLANCOURT 
Ca?Ex - FRANCE. 


77n- FR.4NKUN AUNT FRANCE n dn-rdtc tm 

ANALYSTE MARKETING/VENTES QgP 

Noiix xniiuiu-x tin dex It-aderN monJiaiix cn niarkctius; direct 
Nw,w wfinchniix un jnalxMc nurkornij; avtv de fon^v competence 
Jiult nqiie: pour cmimhuer .i none %ucci-x on France. 

Voux sent jinene ,i lam.- da reLonuiundaiioir. proiiKitioiiiwHex «ir 
n.jnv hulnrr clumix et cn media. Vuito ereu hilm-nic An a bi»/Fra,| 1 ; d is, 
vou» *vcs 1-.^ .mu ten il'irxpencncc. urn- 1r.nrc.non d ccole de cranmerce. 

• ?M ‘idoniuriquc. et voux ws la.rc parlcr lex dirlfres. 
fcxpcnnicc ai .iurk™ V dircxt apprenre. Si x,««s jvcz L-s qrcilnw requixus, 
nierci it envnver voire do«icr de candidature e„ Anulai: avee 
rciiiuiimiion .iciiicUc -i : 

Nuk Hcyx. LE MEIiAILLIEIL FKANKLIN. 

A avenue de I'Evouvnrr '»52'>7 Sarcellci i.'edcx. 





Se t Pi^r 


P O YOU ND FULLY BRJNGUM. 
SECRET ABES? Cdl GS Inienm. Pare 
(11 42 61 82 II 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


IANOIACE SOfOOlh. PARS 

mso^tod m &5fah hr Professonab 
smb HEAD TEAOER Iw qwAfitd Waff 

• KA «Moan a eqmdeni dmenenca. 
Ffaert wnTTBti 8 ippken French. 

- Knortfadae Pare mW 8. bunsi 

coma 

CV & handwrilgn falter to Box 
LH.T, 92521 Nadb Coder. Fima 


WWOIAGE SCHOOL PARS, Maori 
B fa erwad Engfah faadm 
**o ore capdAe of gnmn (anas to 
Avoiobfa mow. Sand CV 
wm hanwntton faKer & photo to 

WMCUES. m 16 bd do 

45020 Ptm. Tof (Ij 40 34 1 1 55 


International 
Herald Tribune 
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CIA Vows to Clean f Systemic’ Woes 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

JlioAwjfft/n Put! Service 

WASHINGTON — The director of central 
intelligence. R. James Woolsey, said he would 
compel all employees to make annual financial 
disclosure statements and would freeze the pro- 
motions or pay raises of “certain categories" of 
workers who may have overlooked alleged espi- 
onage by a ClA employee. Aldrich Hazen 
Ames. 

Promising to clean up “systemic" security 
problems brought to tight by the Ames case. 
Mr. Woolsey also said the agency- was reviewing 
past polygraphs of Central Intelligence Agency 
employees as welt as its “overreliance" on the 
polygraph as a method of ferreting out poten- 
tial spies. 

Mr. Woolsey made the pledges in an unusual 
hour! on g interview with reporters at his CIA 
headquarters office on Tuesday. In the inter' 
view, he accused congressional' critics of mis- 


taking his “penchant for care and precision" in 
discussing the Ames case as a sign of his resis- 
tance to necessary reforms. 

Noting that he became director after the 
investigation of Mr. Antes was well under way. 
Mr. Woolsey said he had recognized quickly 
that '‘there were some systemic things wrong 


On 2 Sides 


with Cl A security." He said if the CIA’s inspec- 
tor general concluded after reviewing the Ames 
case that some individuals had "performed 
poorly, disciplinary steps will be taken." 

Mr. .Ames, a former chief of Soviet counter- 
intelligence in the agency, was arrested last 
month along with his wife. He i$ accused of 
spying for Moscow during a nine-year period. 
The proposal on financial statements is meant 
to answer criticism that the CIA failed to notice 
or to investigate diligently lavish spending by 
Mr. Ames between 1985 and 1993. using more 
than S2 million allegedly obtained from Mos- 
cow. 

Mr. Woolsey declined to discuss details of 
the Ames case, however, including what impact 
the alleged espionage had on US. security and 
whether tbe government suspected other CIA 
employees may have collaborated with Mr. 
Ames. He said a “damage assessment" would 
be conducted by Richard Haver, the CIA’s 
executive director of intelligence community 
affairs, and completed according to a schedule 
set by Justice Department officials managing 
tbe prosecution of Mr. Ames. 

Mr. Woolsey also declined to say whether the 
government's 'investigation of Mr. Ames had 
been hampered by poor relations between the 


CIA and the FBI before his arrival at the CIA, 
as lawmakers hare charged. He said the two 
agencies currently had a smooth relationship. 

Offering his first detailed public comment on 
the scandal, Mr. Woolsey said the espionage 
charges had “stunned and shocked” CIA em- 
ployees, But he said agency morale bad since 
improved and that he was now Hying to deal 
with the public's “understandable anger and 
shock." 

Mr. Woolsey declined to discuss repons that 
the CIA has curtailed some of its operations 
following Mr. Ames's arrest last month, but 
added that “the CIA is still very much in 
business around the world.” 

Several of the steps announced by Mr. Wool- 
sey were calculated to soothe congressional 
criticism that CIA employees wouid be taking 
too active a role in a series of internal investiga- 
tions provoked by the Ames case. He said a 
sweeping review of CIA security and counterin- 
telligence procedures will not be staffed by the 
agency, contrary to statements by House and 
Senate lawmakers last week. 

Tbe review is to be headed by Washington 
lawyer Jeffrey H. Smith, a former Senate 
Armed Services committee aide who beaded the 
Clinton administration’s transition team at the 
Defense Department after tbe dec lion. 


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_ , , _ _ < Eugrnc Careu, Agcm Framt-Piev* 

Representative Dan Rostenkowski, with his wife, Laveme, after he overcame fraud allegations to win renomi nation. 

Rostenkowski Slogs On to Win Primary | Trust for 

Media News 


Radio Free Europe Near Deal 
Of Atlantic, With American Financier 


By Don Terry 

A'pic York Tunes Service 

CHICAGO — Representative Dan Ros- 
tenkowski. President Bill Clinton’s chier arm 
twister and cajoler in Congress, has won 
renomination in one of the most important 
primary elections anywhere in the nation this 
year. 

The fate of Mr. Clinton's ambitious agenda 
of health care and welfare reform was largely 
tied to the fate of Mr. Rostenkowski, who has 
had to contend with a federal investigation of 
Jus financial dealings with the House post 
office. 

A beaming Mr. Rostenkowski thanked his 
supporters and promised to wort: day and 
night for Mr. Clinton’s reform package. 

"I’m proud to be soldier in the president's 
inarch for change," he said Tuesday night 

• Mr. Clinton's visit to Oiicago earlier this 
month was “a pivotal moment" in the cam- 
paign, said Mr. Rostenkowski, who called tbe 
president a “gutsy, honorable, courageous 
man.” 

With nearly all. tbe ballots counted, Mr. 
Rostenkowski had 50 percent of the vote, 
state Senator John CuUerton had 30 percent, 
a former Chicago alderman, Dick Simpson, 
had 14 percent, and two others split the 
remaining 6 percent. 


Victory in the primary has been tanta- 
mount to re-election in heavily Democratic 
Chicago. 

Once considered invincible, Mr. Rosten- 
kowski, 66. was not considered a sure bet this 
time around because of the investigation. 
Sensing danger to Mr. Rostenkowski, Mr. 
Clinton Jed a parade of Democratic politi- 
cians into Mr. Roslenkowski’s Chicago dis- 
trict to save a fellow Democrat who. after 35 
years in Congress and 15 years as tbe chair- 
man of the Ways and Means Committee, is 
able to deliver tbe rewards and the punish- 
ments. 

Mr. Rostenkowski's travails have some- 
what obscured a piece of Illinois history. The 
state comptroller. Dawn Gark Netsch, won 
the Democratic gubernatorial primary, be- 
coming the first woman in the state to rim for 
governor on a major party ticket 

In November, she wiD face the slate’s Re- 
publican governor. Jim Edgar. 

This year. Mr. Rostenkowski entered his 
19th congressional campaign after being bat- 
tered and bloodied for nearly two years by 
the scent of scandal and the sung of the 
investigation into possible embezzlement and 
payroll padding. 

A federal grand jury in Washington began 
investigating him after reports that he had 


embezzled 522.000 from the post office by 
exchanging stamp vouchers drawn on his 
office account for cash. 

But the inquiry has apparently gone far 
beyond those initial reports. He" still faces 
possible indictment and disgrace. 

Seeing him stumble, several candidates 
rushed into the race against him. including 
Mr. Simpson, who calls Mr. Rostenkowski 
“the symbol of political corruption in the 
nation." 

Mr. Rostenkowski's biggest challenge this 
time, however, came from another machine 
loyalist. Mr. Cullerton. who trailed him by 
only a few percentage points in recent polls. 

• For most of the campaign. Mr. Cullerton 
seemed to attack Mr. Simpson as often than 
he did Mr. Rostenkowski leading some in 
this city of cynics to label him a straw man in 
the race to split the opposition vote and 
enable Mr. Rostenkowski to win. 

Mr. Cullerton. 45. initially said he would 
run only if Mr. Rostenkowski did noL Then 
he said he was running because, if he did not, 
Mr. Simpson would win — something the 
Chicago machine did not want to happen. 

Mr. Cullerton said voters had overlooked 
Mr. Rostenkowski’s troubles because "he 
brings home the bacon." 

“It's a great victory for him.” he said. 



Ethics Complaint Against HubbeQ 


A. F ASs. 


IUNICATION! 
GINEER mu 


YasPK r -‘: 


By David Johnston 

year York Tinies Senior 

WASHINGTON — Following 
the abrupt resignation of Webster 
L. Hubbefl, the third-ranking offi- 
cial at the Justice Department, his 
former law partners in Little Rock, 
Arkansas, have tentatively decided 
to file an ethics complaint against 
him," according to lawyers involved 
in the inquiry. 

Mr. Hubbell announced Mon- 
day that he was resigning as asso- 
ciate attorney general. He said he 
was stepping aside to avoid embar- 
rassing his longtime friends, Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton and Hillary Rod- 
ham Clinton, as be faced an inquiry 
into whether he improper (y billed 
his former law firm for time and 
expenses. , 

Justice Department officials said 
they expected Mr. HubbelTs for- 
mer partners at the Rose Law Firm 
to file a complaint with thc_ Arkan- 
sas Supreme Court Committee on 
Professional Conduct, a seven- 
member pand that investigates eth- 
ics violations. 

But lawyers who have followed 
the internal inquiry at the law firm 
/where Mr. Hubbell and Mrs. Clin- 


ton were partners said senior part- 
ners at Lhe firm had decided to go 
forward. They said the decision 
came after others at Rose threat- 
ened to file individual complain is' 
against Mr. Hubbell if the firm 
failed to act. 

Friends of Mr. Hubbell have 
portrayed tbe inquiry into his bill- 
ing practices as an effort by dis- 
gruntled former partners to pres- 
sure Mr. Hubbell into persuading 
Seth Ward, his father-in-law. to 
pay legal bills amounting to nearly 
51 million that were left unpaid 
after Mr. Hubbell represented Mr. 
Ward's parking meter company in 
an unsuccessful lawsuit in 1991. 

Other administration officials 
have suggested that Mr. Hubbell’s 
problems are more serious. They 


■ Hearings Are Urged 

Representative Lee H. Hamil- 
ton. Democrat of Indiana, has sug- 
gested that congressional hearings 
on the Whitewater affair might be 
the best course for President Clin- 
ton. The Washington Post report- 
ed. 

. While most Democrats contin- 
ued to resist such hearings, Mr. 
Hamilton said the president “must 
get all tbe facts out quickly and 
completely." He said hearings 
would be '“one possibility for get- 
ting this information out." 

Mir. Hamilton, who was House 
chairman of the Iran-contra inves- 
tigation, said Tuesday he knew of 
“no evidence that the president or 
the first lady has done an> ' ' 
wrong,” but that he was i 


said the billing inquiry had expand- that people might think the White 


ed to include scrutiny of Mr. Hub- 
bell’s time charges and expenses in 
several matters, including one in 
which he represented federal regu- 
lators in a case involving Madison 
Guaranty Savings & Loan Associa- 
tion, the failed institution owned 
by the Clinton's Former business 
partner in the Whitewater real es- 
tate deal. 


House was withholding informa- 
tion. That, he said, was the “worst 
impression that can be created.*’ 
Representative Dan Rostenkow- 
ski, Democrat of Illinois and chair- 
man of the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee, said Wednesday he thought 
there would be congressional hear- 
ings, but Tm not enthusiastic 
about that." 



d 

rise ven rt> ■ 


... 

■ * . . 


H*rJ# 1 . 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Close Tally I n Health Care Vote Michigan Finds School Funds 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton won 
a victory when a congressional subcommittee vot- 
LTS'sTapportte proposal to rcoutreaU 
employers to helpbuy health insurance for their 

OT In'SeT«r'5 first vote on health care. Dotcoms 
on the House Wavs and Means Subcommittee on 
Health defeated a Republican 
nate the requirement known as an employe man- 
date from a comprehensive bill intended to gua - 
anti* health insurance for all Americans. 

Son was not decisive. At least four other 

committees vote on 

ommittee on Health is oi ten ue: 


SWni.teionflealihisof.ee deeoibed 

ST-Saj; 

R ^bw igftd-B udqe* Plan Fatte n 

WASHINGTON — Supporters of a balanced 

•sfeSeSssS 

House prepares fora slowdown budgets 

JS C r^was^rfSii^dieS«iate^ly 
K h ,n ^ WhiTe House strongly opposes it. 
this month, me wim ■ _ „ n d^r pressure 

Now the 

in the House, a " d votes short of lhe w 

a voostire- 

ffiSeSt'SlMehopeofclosinB.he 


DETROIT— Michigan voters have approved a 
constitutional amendment to raise the state sales 
tax and cigarette tax to replace property taxes as 
the means or supporting the state's schools. 

The measure on the ballot required people to 
vote “yes” or “no’ 1 on the plan, which raises the 
state sales tax to 6 percent from 4 percent as of 
May 1 and triples tbe tax on a pack of cigarettes to 
75 cents from 25 cents. 

The proposal also slightly decreases Michigan's 
fiat-rate income tax. from 4.6 percent to 4.4 per- 
cent and limits property assessment increases to 
the inflation rate or a maximum of 5 percent a 
year. (NYTi 

Hew York Republican to Retire 

GARRISON, New York — Representative 
Hamilton Fish Jr_ the New York state Republican 
who followed his father, grandfather and great- 
grandfather into the U.S. Congress, announced 
that he would retire when Ins 13th term ends in 
January because he is hauling a recurrence of 
cancer. (NIT) 

Quote/ Unquote 

Following a tirade by President Clinton against 
the Republican opposition, which he described as 
a “party that just stands up and says ‘no. no, no. 
no, no, no, no. do. no,'” Bob Dole, the Senate 
Republican leader, had this advice Tor Mr, Clin- 
ton; “I t’s been a long, cold winter here in Washing' 
ton, and maybe the weather has mode everyone a 
little cranky. But it fioally looks like spring is here. 
So take a few minutes to relax. Go outside. Take a 
walk; Enjoy the sun. Remember that the election is 
over and you won.” IAP) 


Away 

From Politics 


• Michael Jackson's mother, 
who has steadfastly pro- 
claimed her son's innocence in 
tile face of allegations that he 
sexually molested a 13-year- 
old boy. has been ordered to 
testify before a Los Angeles 
County grand jury, a lawyer 
for Mr. Jackson said. 

• Most Americans dunk drag 
abuse is getting worse and 
three-quarters favor spending 
more money on prevention 
and treatment than on law en- 
forcement to combat the prob- 
lem, a survey said Wednesday. 

• A Roman Catholic priest in 
Brockton. Massachusetts, has 
been convicted of two counts 
of raping an altar boy and two 
counts of assaulL The Rever- 
end John Hanlon could re- 
ceive a life sentence. 

• Cofin Ferguson, accused of 
killing six persons on a crowd- 
ed suburban New York com- 
muter train, was driven insane 
by racial injustice, William M. 
ICunstier, his new lawyer, said. 

• Tbe nation's top military of- 
ficers have warned that young 
people appear to be losing in- 
terest in joining die armed 
forces, a trend they said bodes 
ill for the future quality of the 
aJI-volunteer military. 

• A Supreme Court justice has 
turned down an emergency re- 
quest aimed at excluding gay 
groups from die St. Patrick’s 
Day parade Thursday in Bos- 
ton, virtually assuring there 
will be no parade this year. 

LIT. Reuters. SYT. WP.AP 


By Stanley Meisler 

Los Angeles Tunes Service 

NEW YORK. — North Ameri- 
cans and West Europeans trust 
newspapers and television news so 
much that many readers and view- 
ers pronounce the media more be- 
lievable as an institution than even 
their churches. 

Yet, despite this trust, substan- 
tial majorities would like to restrict 
press freedom to protect military 
secrets, stamp out terrorism and 
cut down stories dripping with sex 
and violence. 

These contradictory attitudes 
surfaced os a major finding of the 
Times Mirror Center for the People 
& the Press in a comprehensive 
survey of opinion about the media 
in eight nations: the United States, 
Canada, Mexico. Britain. France. 
Germany, Spain and Italy. The poll 
collated the views of a sample of 
more than 10.000 Europeans and 
North Americans. 

Among the findings: 

• More people get their news 
from television than from any other 
medium. Substantial majorities 
watch TV news in aU right coun- 
tries, but only in Germany. Britain 
and Canada did more than 50 per- 
cent of those polled say they had 
read a newspaper the day before. 
(It was 49 percent in the United 
States.) 

• Majorities in most countries 
believe that TV and newspapers are 
unfair and one-sided in the way 
they cover the news and that the 
media lend to invade the privacy of 
people. 

• Huge majorities -believe tbe 
media keep politicians honest, help 
democracy and generate a good in- 
fluence on society. 

• Americans know less about 
current events than any of the na- 
tionalities polled. Asked a series of 
five questions, 37 percent of the 
Americans polled got all five 
wrong, while only 3 percent of tbe 
Germans, who did best on the lest, 
failed all five. 

Yet. differences did appear, 
rooted in local tradition. The gap in 
trust between TV news and news- 

E apers. for example, was greatest in 
ritain. an obvious reflection of the 
prestige of BBC broadcasts and 
low regard for London's strident 
mass tabloids. Spaniards, living in 
a country that emerged from dicta- 
torship less than two decades ago. 
were less enthusiastic about press 
restrictions than almost all Lhe oth- 
ers. 

Majorities in each country found 
TV news and newspapers believ- 
able. in mosL cases more so than 
churches and their country's lead- 
er. The only exception was Mexico, 
where the church and President 
Carlos Salinas de Gortari were con- 
sidered about as believable as 
newspapers and TV news. 

Without exception, heavy major- 
ities said they did not find govern- 
ment officials, legislators and ad- 
vertisers believable. 


On April 25th, the IHT will publish a Special 
Report on 


Chile 


Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Chile’s trade with NAFTA nations. 

■ Prospects for continued rapid economic 
expansion. 

■ Efforts to preserve Chile’s natural 
resources. 

■ Profile of the world's largest copper 
producer. 

■ A gas pipeline from Argentina to Chile’s 
main cities. 

For information about advertising in this Spatial 
Report, please contact Juanita Caspari in Paris at 


(33-1) 46 37 S3 76. 

LYrERMTH^Jjf 


HoralbSStribunc 


i i*r » w *■<* no .JOtiuii not 


By Craig R. Whitney 

.Ven York Times Service 

BONN — Radio Free Europe, 
the U.S.-funded broadcaster whose 
budget has been slashed, said 
Wednesday that it expected to 
agree soon with the Hungarian- 
born financier George Soros to pri- 
vatize its research operations and 
archives and move them from Mu- 
nich to Prague. 

A 100-member staff would be- 
come part of a new institute that 
would continue to provide services 
to Radio Free. Europe and Radio 
Liberty and help train journalists 
in a brand) of Mr. Soros's Central 
European University. Radio Free 
Europe broadcasts to former Com- 
munist countries of Eastern Eu- 
rope, Radio Liberty to Russia and 
the former Soviet Union. 

“I expect that we could reach 
agreement on this within a month.” 
said Ross Johnson, acting presi- 
dent of RFE/RL Inc, the stations' 
umbrella organization in Munich. 

Other officials said that the 
Board for Independent Broadcast- 
ing. the supervisory organization in 
Washington, also would probably 


decide by mid-April whether to 
move the broadcasting facilities to 
Prague where President Vaclav 
Havel and the Czech government 
have offered to house them in the 
former parhament building. 

The archives, believed to be tbe 
world's most extensive collection of 
works published and circulated 
clandestinely during the Cold War. 
would remain the property of the 
radios or any eventual successor 
organization. Mr. Johnson said. 

“The institute is not for sale, and 
RFE/RL is not for sale,” he said. 
“What we expect to do is set up a 
new entity in October with very 
generous support from George 
Soros.” 

Officials at the radio said that 
Mr. Soros’s foundations and uni- 
versity, most of which is in Buda- 
pest. would act as trustees or custo- 
dians, not as owners. 

Mr. Johnson said that the re- 
search operations cost $16 million 
a year in Munich, but were expect- 
ed to cost about $10 million in 
Prague, where expenses and wages 
are Tower. Mr. Soros's foundations 
would cover about half tbe operat- 


ing costs of a privatized Research 
Institute, and the radios would 
contract for services, probably be- 
tween S4 million and £5 million a 
year. Mr. Johnson said. 

Tbe Clinton administration has 
mandated cuts in tbe radios’ bud- 
gets from $208 million this fiscal 
year to S75 million, by fiscal 1996, 
officials said, and 300 of the 1,500 
staff members in Munich have al- 
ready been dismissed. 

■ Slovakia Curbs Radio 

The authorities in Slovakia have 
disconnected two Radio Free Eu- 
rope medium-wave transmitters in 
a dispute between supporters of the 
ousted prime minister, Vladimir 
Meriar. and the media, the CTK 
news agency said Wednesday in a 
report carried by A grace France- 
Presse. 

Mr. Medar's government had 
tried last December to cancel Ra- 
dio Free Europe broadcasts on me- 
dium wave, a measure that was 
widely criticized and finally over- 
turned. A journalist at Radio Free 
Europe said the station was con- 
tinuing to transmit programs orr 
short wave. 


Clinton Wears 
Brace for Back 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent BID Clinton aggravated a 
back injury this week and tried 
a back brace to ease the pain. 

White House aides sought 
to make light of the injury, but 
Mr. Clinton clearly was walk- 
ing stiffly as he returned from 
a three-day trip. 

“His back is a little sore; be 
strained it,” said the White 
House press secretary. Dee 
Dee Myers. 

Mr. Clinton called off a 
morning jog in Nashua. New 
Hampshire, on Tuesday be- 
cause of the stiffness of his 
back. 

On Air Force One, Mr. 
Clinton could be seen by re- 
porters moving around in a 
white brace. 



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Tiger KiUs a Cameraman 
At Zoo in Angolan Capital 

Realm 

LUANDA, Angola — A tiger killed a South African news camera' 
man while he was filming the evacuation of starving animals from a 
zoo in the .Angolan capital Luanda. 

The cameraman, Rick Lomba, 44, was filming tigers in an enclo- 
sure on Tuesday when a male tiger slipped through an opened safety 
gate. 

“He was killed on the spot." said a Belgian photographer, Marco 
Vercrysse. who saw the attack. “He didn’t stand the slightest 
chance." 

Quinton Coeizee, who is coordinating the evacuation of about 30 
animals from the Luanda zoo, killed the animal with a guard's rifle. 

The animals, including tigers, lions, ostriches, buffalos and hye- .. 
nas, are being evacuated from Angola because they have been 
starving since funds for their upkeep dried up. Most will be taken to 
zoos in South Africa. 


EUROPE# Norway Cuts a Deal 


Continued from Page 1 
percent against membership and 
only 4$ percent in favor. 

Of the Nordic countries, Finland 
is the most enthusiastic about EU 
membership. It sees in the Union a 
bulwark against neighboring Rus- 
sia, where the nationalist politician. 
Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, has spo- 
ken of reabsorbing Frnland- 

A poll conducted after Helsinki 
settled membership terms indicat- 
ed that 45 percent of voters favored 
membership, with 27 percent op- 
posed and the rest undecided. 

In the latest EU dispute. Foreign 
Secretary Douglas Hurd of Britain 
said his government supported en- 
largement But it opposed a pro- 
posed voting procedure that would 
make it more difficult for Britain to 
block EU legislation. Spain, al- 
though it settled a dispute on fish- 
ing rights with Norway, supported 
the British position because it fears 
that enlargement could jeopardize 
the position of the poorer Mediter- 
ranean countries. 


Other member countries were 
not impressed by the British grand- 
standing. 

The Danish foreign minister, 
Nids Helveg Petersen, said that 
“the reality now is that Britain is 
blocking enlargement and that is 
unsustainable." Prime Minister 
Poul Nyrup Rasmussen of Deo-' 
mark said Britain's action was 
“simply not acceptable.” Foreign 
Minister Willy Claes of Belgium 
said the last-minute action by the 
British and Spaniards was “a black 
day for Europe." 

Jean-Pierre Cot of Belgium, 
leader of the large Socialist bloc in 
the European Parliament, said that 
“Britain wants to widen and weak- 
en" the Union. 

. Under current voting procedures 
in the European Council of Minis- 
ters. wo large nations and one 
small one can veto decisions. But 
this so-called “blocking minority" 
would be raised under the enlarge- 
ment proposals, in an attempt to 
streamline decision-making. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRJBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994 




MOSQUE; Did Soldier fire, Too? 


Continued from Page 1 

of the exterior corridor. But prelim- 
inary reports by the Israeli Army 
say that the number of bullet holes 
in the ceiling of the passageway 
match the Dumber of casings found 
on the floor. 

Even though the Palestinians’ ac- 
counts suggest that the Israeli 
Army was not a conspirator in the 
attack, the different versions of the 
incident have compounded the 
mistrust between the army and the 
Palestinians. 

They also reinforce Palestinians' 
insistence that their security cannot 
be guaranteed by the army if heavi- 
ly armed Jewish settlers are allowed 
to remain in the occupied territo- 
ries, The issue of restricting armed 
settlers is the key obstacle to re- 
suming peace talks between Israel 
and the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization. The talks have been sus- 
pended since the killings. 

In all General Yatom testified to 
the commission, the settler killed 
29 people and wounded about 90 
others. Three other Palestinians 
were trampled to deatb at the 
mosque as worshipers stampeded, 
he said. Other Palestinians killed in 
Hebron that day, he said, died out- 
side the Patriarchs' compound in 
riots set off by the killings. 

But Palestinian witnesses have 
insisted all along that they saw one 
or more soldiers Ore into a crowd 
that built rapidly in a passageway 
outside the eastern entrance to the 
shrine after Dr. Goldstein started 
to shoot. 

Most of the Palestinians inter- 
viewed did not accuse the soldiers 
of complicity in the killings. In- 
stead, they suggested that the Israe- 
li soldiers had fired in panic amid 
the confusion that had gripped the 
crowd. 

Two Palestinian committees and 
one Israeli committee are investi- 
gating the killings. The Israeli in- 
quiry began interviewing Arab wit- 


ty. The 
Palestinian investigative Commit- 
tee. which is linked to the Palestine 
Liberation Organization, has inter- 
viewed about 35 people. And the 
Islamic Investigation Committee, 
which is tied to the Islamic militant 
movement, appears to be just get- 
ting off the ground. The two Pales- 
tinian committees have so far been 
denied access to the Cave of the 
Patriarchs, where the attack took 
place. 

“We believe tbe soldiers sta- 
tioned at the mosque fired on tbe 
crowd,” said Mustafa Nats be, tbe 
former mayor of Hebron, who is on 
the 1 1-man committee. “We have 
interviewed several witnesses who 
say they saw soldiers shooting on 
tbe crowd. We now divide the mas- 
sacre into three pans. The first is 
tbe shooting inside the mosque by 
Goldstein, the second is the shoot- 
ing in the passageway outside the 
mosque by the soldiers, and the 
third is the shooting around A1 Ahli 
Hospital by the soldiers.” 

A week of interviews of witness- 
es in Hebron produced a consensus 
that at least three people were shot 
by soldiers in the passageway. 

It was difficult to determine the 
exact number of people killed or 
wounded by the soldiers there. 
Some in Hebron say that two Pales- 
tinians were killed, but only one 
death was affirmed by people who 
say they actually saw the shooting. 

■ 60 Palestinians Wounded 

Israeli troops shot and wounded 
at least 60 Palestinians in clashes in 
tbe occupied Gaza Strip and in 
Hebron on Wednesday, Reuters re- 
ported, quoting hospital officials 
and Palestinian sources. 

In Hebron. Israeli soldiers 
fought street battles with demon- 
strators when the army briefly lift- 
ed a curfew imposed since the mas- 
sacre at the mosque. Palestinians 
said another 30 were wounded dur- 
ing daylong dashes 



ISRAEL: Hints on Golan Heights 


Conthroed from Page 1 

avoid a perception of making con- 
cessions in the face of new de- 
mands from their adversary. 

Mr. Rabin seemed to suggest 
that further talks in the context of 
the interim Israeli-PLO accord rep- 
resented the only avenue he would 
travel toward new security mea- 
sures in the West Bank mat the 
PLO seeks. 

“I call on Chairman Arafat,” be 
said, “to resume talks ^immediately 
and act like me — to fight terror as 
if there were no negotiations and 
conduct the negotiations as if thee 
was not terror.’! 

At another point, he said: “I am> 
sure that we shall find the right 
solutions once tbe negotiations are 
renewed." 

Asked about the possibility of a 
PLO police force in Hebron, Mr. 
Rabin recalled that the interim Is- 
raeli-PLO agreement called for up 
to 9,000 Palestinian police officers 
m Jericho and the Gaza Strip. He 
did not specifically suggest that 


such a force could be broadened to 
include Hebron, however. 

In a prepared statement at tbe 
news conference and in response to 
reporters’ questions, Mr. Rabin 
said that the window of opportuni- 
ty for achieving peace in the Mu# 
die East in 1994 was narrowing. He 
said he hoped to achieve peace with 
Syria by the end of the vear 

For his part, Mr. Clinton s£j 
that after his “extended conversa- 
tion” with Mr. Rabin on Syria and 
after a recent telephone call to Mr. 
Assad, be believed both leaden 
wanted to make peace. But he gave 
no details of his discussion with the 
Syrian president and did not com- 
ment on Mr. Rabin's statement on 
Syria. 

Mr. Clinton said he wanted Isra- 


the 

PLO not to use Hebron as an “ex- 
cuse” to avoid further peace talb 
with Israel 


KOREA: U.S. Calls Off Meeting 



Dual Milu Th* Auodated pn» 

Mr. Rabin and Mr. Clinton after Oval Office talks Wednesday. 


Continued from Page 1 

issue to the UN Security Council 
with tbe recommendation that eco- 
nomic sanctions be imposed. 

Meanwhile, American and South 
Korean officials met Wednesday to 
discuss Team Spirit, the joint mili- 
tary exercise tbe two countries cus- 
tomarily hold in the spring Tbe 
exercise was suspended cm tbe con- 
dition that the North allowed the 
inspections to proceed And agreed 
to exchange envoys with the South, 
neither of which has occurred. 

Providing details about the in- 
spections, officials said they were 
barely under way when North Ko- 
rea refused to allow the inspectors 


to lake the needed plutonium sam- 
ples. Adding to tbe suspicions, one 
of the seals that inspectors had 
placed on nuclear equipment in the 
reprocessing facility was- discov- 
ered to have been broken. 

That raised the possibility (hat 
the North Koreans had used the 
facility to handle plutonium it had 
produced in the past or had repro- 
cessed plutonium from a secret 
cache of fuel rods it had previously 
removed from the reactor. 

Washington complained about- 
the restrictions on the inspecting 
hoping the North Koreas would 
allow them to finish their work be- 
fore they left North Korea. But the 
North refused 


RANGOON; Japanese Veterans Return to Burma to Remember War MILAN; Outspoken Northern League Chief Reaches for Levers of Power 


Continued from Page 1 

war, Arthur Lane, said recently at a cemetery 
containing the graves of 7,000 Allied-prisoners 
in Thailand's Kanchanaburi Province. Mr, 
Lane. 68. was a teenager when he was forced to 
work on the railway by his Japanese captors. 

In Burma, the reluming veterans seem to be 
mostly Japanese. For Mr. Walanabe, a retired 
Tokyo bank teller, (he pilgrimage was one he 
had always wanted to make. While on his visit, 
the first since the war, he revealed mixed emo- 
tions. 

During the war, his unit entered Burma from 
northwestern Thailand and made its way 
'through heavy jungle, crossing paths with tigers 
and elephants, he recalled. He was wounded in 
battle at Yeoangyairog, a key town on tbe 
Irrawaddy River bordering Burmese oil fields, 
which the British destroyed before withdraw- 
ing. He was evacuated to Rangoon, then to 
Singapore. Vietnam and finally Japan after his 


ship evaded a U-S. submarine off Vietnam. 
After six months of operations, skin grafts and 
recoveiy, he was sent to Japanese-occupied 
Korea. 

At the end of the war. Soviet soldiers took 
him prisoner and shipped him to a Soviet pris- 
on camp. “Robot, robot." meaning “work, 
work.” is a command that slicks in his mind to 
this day. 

Mr. Walanabe. was finally repatriated in 
1947, he said, and only then did he learn of the 
atomic bombs (hat had ended the war. in the 
Pacific. Unlike many Japanese, however, he 
does noi condemn the bombing. 

“It's better that the Americans used the 
bomb, or the fighting would have gone on 
longer and more people would have died.'* he 
said. 

He has no criticism of the instances of Japa- 
nese cruelty during the war and spoke with a 
certain pride about the accomplishments erf the 
Imperial Army. Many Burmese welcomed the 


Japanese invasion, he said, because they want- 
ed to be free of British colonialism. 

It is perhaps because so many things here 
have not changed, due to decades of self-im- 
posed isolation that have made Burma a verita- 
ble time capsule, that Mr. Watanabe's emotions 
are so raw. 

“Some people hated the past and didn't want 
to come back,” be said. “I always wanted to 
come. So many friends of mine were killed. I 
want to pray for them.” 

Above alL he said, be has come to honor 
Toshio Naganuma, his wartime comrade and 
confidant. 

“He always hated righting, and I agreed with 
him," Mi. Walanabe said. “1 hated war. I didn’t 
like fighting. I could not tell the general but I 
could tell my friend. 

“He died in Mandalay. He died from cholera 
and lack of food. He was 27. I will go to 
Mandalay and pray for him.” 


Continued from Plage 1 

their opponents, the Democratic Party of the 
Left lea with 21 percent. 

What has been lost over tbe years in his 
outcry about splitting up Italy is how success- 
fully Mr. Bossi parlayed a taxpayer revolt into a 
successful political movement,' said Giuliano 
Procacd a historian. 

“You have to look for the League's roots in 
the 1980s and the fundamental fact was the 
economic recession," Mr. Procacci said. “As 
long as money was easy, the cost of corruption 
was supportable. The moment it became un- 
bearable, you had resentment on tbe part of the 
classes hit hardest: small businesses, industry, 
commerce.” 

By the last national elections, in 1992, the 
League had emerged as the most powerful force 
in the north, with 23 percent of the regional 
vote. 

The outrage peaked last fall when Mr. Bossi 
publicly urged his followers to' stop paying 


taxes and organize a referendum on splitting 
from Italy, and the chief of the Italian General 
Staff. General Goff redo Canine, warned that 
the military would not tolerate the breakup of 
the nation. President Oscar Luigi Seal faro in- 
tervened to quiet the feud, and Pope John Paul 
II, in an unusual plea, called for the preserva- 
tion of Italy's “sacred unity.” 

Mr. Bossi was recruited into politics in the 
1970s by Bruno Salvadori, a leader of tbe au- 
tonomy movement in VaJ cT Aosta, the French- 
speaking enclave in northwestern Italy that has 
long been a hotbed of separatist fervor. 

Increasingly, Mr. Bossi resorted to populist, 
sometimes coarse, language to rally his sup- 
porters and castigate his opponents. 

When Milan magistrates began investigating 
League officials for corruption, be warned that 
“they should know their life is worth a bullet, 
which for us costs 300 lire," about 18 cents. 

“I can back him about 60 percent,” said Luigi 
Miriello. an Aosta shopkeeper who braved 


mountain cold to hear Mr. Bossi harangue for 
two hours on tbe town square in the shadow of 
Mont Blanc. “1 don't like the idea of dividing 
up Italy.” 

But Renato Mannheimer, a University of 
Pavia sociologist who has studied tbe League 
for years, says that Mr. Bossfs oratory has been 
his most potent weapon. 

“He says the most incredible things just to 
stay at the focus of debate,” he said. “He 
considers negative publicity fantastic also be- 
cause people say, ‘If the old politicians are 
attacking him, he cannot be bad.’ " 

■ Judge Bars Arrest of 6 

A Milan judge on Wednesday rejected a 
request for the arrest of six business executives, 

( including three officials in Mr. Berlusconi's 
(communications - group Fininvest, Agence. 
I France- Presse reprated. But Judge Anna In- 
.troini ruled that investigations into the accused 
.would continue. Judicial sources said this was 
■“because of serious indications of guilt.” 



WHAT'S WRONG MERE? 


Look at these nice happy people. 
Notice that each one has something: 
a tool or implement here, a bicycle or a 
briefcase there. All completely normal 
and unremarkable. 

But wait Something’s amiss. That 
nice fellow near the bottom — third 
row down, second from the right He 
doesn’t seem to have anything. 

Indeed. You see, he's a refugee. 
And as you can see. refugees are just 
like you and ine except for one thing: 
everything they once had has been 
destroyed or taken away, probably at 


gunpoint Home, family, possessions. 
aD gone. 

They have nothing. 

And nothing is all they’ll ever have 
unless we help. 

Of course, you can’t give them back 
what's been destroyed, and we re not 



v.'u ' ;IJ l :.vU U 

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 


asking for money (though every cent 
helps). But we are asking you to keep 
an open mind. And a smile of welcome. 

It may not seem much. But to a 
refugee it can mean everything. 

UNHCR is a strictly humanitarian 
organization funded only by voluntary 
contributions. Currently it is responsible 
for more than 19 million refugees 
around the world. 

UNHCR Puhfic Information 

P.O. Box 2500 

1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland 


The International Herald Tribune 
and the State Commission for 
Restructuring the Economic 
Systems of the PRC are delighted 
to welcome Asea Brown Boveri, 
Caltex Petroleum and 
Peregrine Investments Holdings a s 
official Summit Sponsors of the 
1994 China Summit Meeting. 


The International Herald Tribune and the 
.State Commission for Restructuring the Economic 
Systems of China are inviting the world’s 
business leaders to an unprecedented summit 
meeting on China's ec« >n> unie roll irm. 

Its aim is to foster a dialogue as well as 
business development i ipportunities at the 
highest levels amongst the leaders of die Chinese 
government and the international business 
community. 

Tlie Summit. "The Socialist Market 
Economy of the People's Republic of China. 
199+-2U0H: Implications for Global Business”, will 
lx* held in Beijing on May 1 lib. I2th and Ijkh of 
this year. 

Participating will lie the major figures of the 
Government « if China as well as key pn ivincial 
government and stale industry leaders. It will lie 
are opportunity to hear and personally meet the 
people who are Jri\ ing China's economic 
direction into die next millennium. 


Confirmed Summit Sponsors 


As you would expect with an event of diis 
stature, it will be a closed-door meeting and will 
hot be open to die general public. 

'Ihe International Herald Tribune is inviting 
a limited number of the largest multinational 
corporations with a stake in the future of the 
Chinese economy to participate as sponsors. The 
three levels of sponsorship offer corporations die 
opportunity to express, at the higliest level, dteir 
commitment to China's economic development, 
gain worldwide exposure and advertising 
Ixrnefits, and learn first hand alTout the latest 
changes in China's reform program. 

For a complete information package 
please tax Mr. Richard McClean. Publisher! 
at +33 i i > 46372133. Or call on +33 1 1 ) 46379301. 

The 1994 China Summit will he the most 
significant gathering of international business and 
tito Chinese government in recent history. 



I 5 M 3 GBINE 


... ^ u . ,n, V' 1 •'|r K ‘p* die lop level of participation, is limited to four 
f-omp.irm--. ,nrm.-rcd ,n .Ik- hail M.nrm.r V>n„.r slut should a!n„c, the IHT no Inter L n ISth March 1994. 


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Page 8 


THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994. 

OPINION 


Reralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH TUB NEW YORK TIMES A NO THE WASHINGTON POST 



When dealing wilh China, it sometimes 
helps to see matters through Chinese eyes. As 
Bdjing views it a great power must always 
insist on being treated with due respect. To 
behave otherwise is to acknowledge inferior- 
. ity and therefore to forfeit influence. 

During Secretary of State Warren Christo- 
pher's weekend visit to Beijing. Chinese lead- 
ers aggressively asserted what they see as the 
prerogatives of China. They deliberately hu- 
miliated America’s highest-ranking diplomat 
by temporarily rounding up some of the coun- 
try's most prominent dissidents, and by de- 
taining several Western correspondents trying 
to report cm the crackdown. The purpose of 
the roundup was to prevent Mr. Christopher 
from hearing any independent views on the 
h uman rights issues be is required to evaluate 
before making a recommendation by June on 
renewing China’s access to the ipost favorable 
American tariff schedules. 

; For the sake of a healthy U.S.-Chinese 
relationship, Washington is now obliged to 
respond with equal firmness. To kowtow to 
Chinese bullying would be to repeat the 
- mistakes of the Bush administration, which 
squandered American influence by its con- 
sistent refusal to press human rights issues. 
That was what first provoked Congress to 
force annual showdowns over linking con- 
tinuation of China's trade privileges to pro- 
gress on human rights. 

The Clinton administration needs instead 
to be forthright about its continued determi- 
nation to insist on human rights progress. It 
especially needs to dispel China's impression 
that it can exploit differences between various 
policymakers in the administration. Congress 
and the buriness community. Snch miscalcu- 


lation can only increase the likelihood of a 
rupture that both sides would prefer to avoid. 

China, despite its pose of cod indifference; 
desperately needs the $20 billion hard curren- 
cy surplus that it earns from its trade with the 
United States to carry on with its ambitions 
economic development plans. And U.S. busi- 
ness frankly wants to maintain access to one 
of the world's largest and fastest-growing 
economies. For their part human rights advo- 
cates recognize that China’s continued eco- 
nomic growth and openness contribute to 
domestic pressures for more responsive, less 
dictatorial government 

Even so. die Clinton administration has a 
clear right under international law, and an 
obligation under U.S. law, to Jink China’s 
trade status to minimum human rights goals. 
The administr ation has demanded nothing 
unreasonable or demeaning, for the most part 
asking only compliance with international 
agreements to which China already sub- 
scribes. Washington seeks an end to the ex- 
port of goods produced by slave labor, freer 
emigration for relatives of exiles and detain- 
ees, humane and lawful treatment of prison- 
ers. and respect for the cultural traditions of 
Tibet. On most of these issues it has not set 
rigid benchmarks but is looking for “overall 
significant progress.” 

The administration can use the remaining 
two and a half months provided by last year's 
executive order to give China the greatest posa- 
ble incentive to demonstrate progress. But 
President Bill Clinton must make dear that if 
Beijing continues to try to blow past the whole 
issue with deliberate human rights provoca- 
tions, it will be making a very big mistake. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



Governments used to think that they knew 
how to remedy high ^employment. Now 
they are not so sure. President Bill Clinton’s 
international conference on jobs in Detroit 
this week was not about the effects of reces- 
sions, recent and current. It was about the 
pattern of the past IS years or so — a pattern 
in which unemployment has risen steadily 
while societies got richer. 

Industrial democracies have all had plenty 
of experience with recessions and the land of 
unemployment that rises or falls with their 
economies' growth rates. But the decade of 
the 1 980s was mostly a time of strong growth, 
and the United States ended it with only a 
very modest improvement in employment In 
all of the industrial countries, output per capi- 
ta has risen substantially since 1980. but in 
Western Europe and Canada unemployment 
increased greatly — far beyond anything that 
the recessions can explain. 

Behind those unemployment figures lies 
the deeply troubling trade-ofr between indi- 
vidual security and jobs. The rules that gov- 
ernments enact to improve the security of 
working people’s lives also make labor more 
expensive and labor markets more rigid. 

"Most of the democracies expanded their so- 
ld al protection systems in the 1970s. but the 
Europeans, led by Germany, expanded them 
enormously. That is why European unem- 


ployment rates, lower than in the United 
States before 1970, have been strikingly 
higher in recent years. American benefits are 
now thin and stingy by European standards. 

This trade-off evidently was not much dis- 
cussed at the Detroit conference. The mini* , 
ters of labor and finance assembled there were 
fully aware of it, but none of them wanted to 
attack the social commitments. Properly, they 
moved on to a further question: how to put 
everybody to work in societies in which labor 
is costly and hard to lay off, and in which 
unemployment benefits are generous. That 
led back to the subjects of education, voca- 
tional training and ensuring that training 
leads to jobs that actually exist. 

No ringing call for action came from the 
Detroit meeting, but there is no barm in 
talking, even inconclusively, about a topic 
that is going to be central to the development 
of these wealthy societies over the next gen- 
eration. It is not only the economic loss that 
unemployment represents. There are many 
other kinds of costs incurred when a country 
begins to develop a population of the perma- 
nently unemployed. Public policy is now 
searching for ways to reconcile the high lev- 
els of social benefits that industrial democra- 
cies want and need with low unemployment 
rates to keep them healthy. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Victory lor South Africa 


In South Africa. “Bop” is short for Bo- 
phnthatswana, a black homeland known. for 
its cumbersome name, its platinum mines, 
and for Sun City, a Las Vegas-style resort. 
Created in 1977 and scattered in six uncon- 
nected pockets of land. Bop was one of 10 
“independent" nations meant to confer legiti- 
macy on Pretoria’s denial of a vote to a huge 
blade majority. The specious argument was 
that all blacks enjoyed citizenship rights in 
“nations" recognized only by South Africa. 

But Bop will now be remembered instead as 
the rite of the first real clash over the country's 
new democratic order. Its ruler. Lucas Man- 
gopc fearing loss of power and profits, chose to 
boycott South Africa’s first all-races election 
next month and tried to prevent campaigning 
ip his homeland. Rushing to his support were 
his while separatist allies, who within 48 hours 
sent 400 tracks and cars' Tilled with aimed 
commandos to Mmabatho. Bop’s capital. 

Auspiciously, the rebellion fizzled. A transi- 
tional regime led by President F. W. de Klerk 
deposed “President” Mangope. confirming his 
puppet status. And Nelson Mandela supported 
use erf - the South African armed fences, erst- 


while pillar of apartheid, to quell the revolt A 
surprise awaited the white storm troopers, 
who believed that they would be welcomed by 
the homeland’s defense forces. 

Instead, soldiers joined civil servants in 
deserting Mangope, in a rout that claimed 40 
lives and triggered some looting. But the most 
striking result was the humiliation of the 
white separatists, who fefl out among them- 
selves as the less extreme faction, headed by 
retired General Cons land Viljoen, decided to 
join the election campaign. 

So instead of wrecking the election, the bat- 
tle of Bop has strengthened its promoters and 
split the spoilers. Chief Mangosulhu Butheiea, 
the leader of the Zulu-based inkatha Freedom 
Party, remains as an important holdout. 
Doubtless well-armed and fanatic white ex- 
tremists still threaten South Africa’s democrat- 
ic transition: so does ethnic rivalry between 
Zulus and other groups. Still, the first armed 
dash before the election has scattered its oppo- 
nents and enhanced the authority of Mr. de 
Klerk and Mr. Mandela. The tide is running 
favorably for South Africa's great experiment 
— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Comment 


A U.S. -China Dil emma 

China is often driven by a pragmatic self- 
interest that transcends ideology and time. 
That pragmatism was aptly demonstrated 
during Beijing's frosty and disappointing re- 
ception of the American secretary of stale. 
Warren Christopher. Dissidents were round- 
ed up before and during Mr. Christopher’s 
visit, which, ironically, focused on human 
rights and trade. Nice touch. 

A large measure of mutual pragmatism is in 
order. Face-saving gestures ore needed from 
both Beijing and Washington. U-S.-Chinese 


relations need not be irretrievably soured. Be- 
fore he left Beijing, Mr. Christopher tried to 
give his trip an upbeat spin. Beijing turned over 
new information about political prisoners and 
agreed to procedures for international inspec- 
tion of suspected prison labor sites. 

_ Beijing will have to demonstrate human 
rights progress to satisfy the Clinton condi- 
tions on most-favored-nation trade status. 
But even if it does, both sides need to explore 
ways to decouple the rights issue from trade 
— without the United Stales abandoning its 
commitment to human rights. 

— Los Angeles Tones. 



International Herald Tribune 

FSTABUSHED IXK7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Ci>-Cflt»nw» 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher & Chief Exevwive 
JOHN VINCXTUR. Entwiiir Bfliw & l.yf WW t 

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Pf*4. hamteund Htiiil TrBw. AB rides mrrvnl ISSN: P2Ut-NJ51 






The Jobs Question Is the Big One for Democracies 


W ASHINGTON — The latest 
twists on the Whitewater story 
have swamped news of the jobs sum- 
mit in Detroit. That was inevitable, 
but also a shame. The Detroit meet- 
ing of the top economic officials of 
the wealthy democracies has not pro- 
duced any quick fixes, but the issues 
at stake are the most important fac- 


By E. J. Dionne Jr. 


ers. substantial social benefits and a 
large private sector that controlled 
most investment decisions. 

In what became a virtuous cycle, 
economic growth was fueled by the 
spending or increasingly affluent bhie- 
and white-collar workers. Those in 


Societies where the going wage is flan hour and 
workers can be hired and fired at will certainly have 
'flexible labor markets. 5 But that is no solution. 


the democratic countries. They 
) explain why so many of the 
democracies are mired in voter disil- 
lusionment and why political leaders. 
President Bill Clinton included, can’t 
get much respect these days. 

The centra] issue is whether the 
social bargain that the wealthy 
countries worked out after World 
War II is doomed to come unrav- 
eled. That bargain involved rising 
living standards for average work- 


charge of the Western economies 
gleefully proclaimed that Marx had 
been all wrong and that his ideas 
would be buried not by the bosses but 
by a satisfied working class. 

It largely worked out that way, but 
the buna! of communism was fol- 
lowed by anxiety. In practically til 
the Western democracies, voters are 
in revolt. The Germans have invented 
a wonderful word for this weariness 
with politics, Politikverdrossenhat. 


Politicians produce enough real 
corruption that voter anger is often 
explained away as a reaction to the 
immediate failings of particular indi- 
viduals. But as President Clinton’s 
pollster Stan Greenberg has argued 
— long before Whitewater, it should 
be noted — scandals are not just the 
cause of disillusionment; they are 
also tiie result of disillusionment 

If things are going well voters wQI 
often cut their leaders considerable 
slack, and scandals dissipate quick- 
ly. When things go badly, voters 
take no prisoners. In most of the 
democracies, voters are in a one- 
strike- an d-you 're-out mood. 

The primary cause is the deteriora- 
tion ot living standards for signifi- 
cant segments of the population, par- 
ticularly the young just entering the 
labor force and iess-sJtiUed and less- 
educated workers generally. But this 
problem has different effects in 
America and in Western Europe. 

The United States has produced 
piles of jobs — something over 35 


The Poor Princess Adelaide Is Unwell 


By Bill Henderson 

W AlNSCOTT, New York — Driven by our obses- 
sion to compete, we have embraced the electron- 
ic god with a frenzy. Soon, blessed with fax, voice- and 
E-maiL computer hookups and television sets with 
hundreds of channels, we won’t have to leave our 
lonely rooms — not to write a check, work, visit, shop, 
exercise or make love. We will have raced at incredible 
speeds to reach our final destination — nothing. 
Henry David Tboreau said it first in 1849: 

“We are in great haste to construct a magnetic 
telegraph from Maine to Texas, but Maine and Texas, 
it may be, have nothing important to communicate 
... We are eager to tunnel under the Atlantic and 
bring the Old World some weeks nearer to the New, 
but perchance the first news that will leak through into 
the broad, flapping American ear will be that the 
Princess Adelaide has the whooping cough." 

Thoreau wrote that statement with a pencil he made 
himself. He worked with his father, John Thoreau, 
founder of the first quality pencil manufacturer in 
America. Here are other things he had to say about the 
information superhighway of his day: 

So with a hundred “modem improvements"; there is an 


illusion about them; there is not always a positive ad- 
vance. The devil goes on exacting compound interest to. 
the last for his early share and numerous succeeding 
investments in them. Our inventions are wont to be pretty 
toys, which distract our attention from serious things. 
Tnev are but improved means to an unimproved end 

— “Walden” 

The man whose horse trots a mile a minute does not 
carry the most important messages; he is not an evangelist, 
nor does he come round eating locusts and wild honey. 

—“Walden" 

It is said that knowledge is a power and the like 
. . . What is mast of our boasted so<al!ed knowledge but 
a conceit that we know something which robs us of the 
advantages of our actual ignorance. 

— Journal. 1851 

If I am to be a thoroughfare, l prefer that it be of the 
mountain brooks, the Parnassian streams. 

— “Life Without Principle” 


The writer is a director of the Lead Pencil Club, a 
subsidiary of the Pushcart Press publishing house. He 
contributed this comment to The New York Times. 


The Little Rock Perspective Is Clearer 


1 TITLE ROCK. Arkansas — Reii- 
• able sources tell me that the word 
“incestuous” is coded into the com- 
puters of all news media people writ- 
ing about Arkansas and Whitewater. 
Press the FI key and a reflexive sen- 
tence win describe the Midi political 
and financial culture from which the 
president of the United States sprang. 

So lone have Arkansans endured 
the hillbilly caricature that defensive- 

The White House created 
a genuine crisis from a 
pathetic little investment 
fiasco and one of the 
smallest S&L belly flops 
in the country. 


ness is part of their genetic code. They 
know why the incest metaphor seems 
so natural ro Washington reporters, 
whose picture of Arkansas is of an 
ethical Dogpatcb where savings-and- 
loan schemers bed their sisters and 
then get thdr idiot spawn appointed to 
the state regulatory agencies. 

The coziness of Arkansas politics, 
government and finance has been a 
staple news theme since reporters 
came to Little Rock in the presiden- 
tial camp ai g n and discovered what a 
small place it was. You could stroll 
down the sidewalk and see all sorts of 
local big fish. In a little plate-lunch 
cafe a block from campaign head- 
quarters you could see bankers. Su- 
preme Court justices and what passed 
locally for big-time lawyers forking 
down meat loaf and tossing jolly ri- 
postes across the tables. 

Much ot the reporting has focused 
on (he connections of (he staid old 
Rose Law Firm, where HU] ary Rod- 
ham Clinton and three other Clinton 
administration officials worked — 
including Webster Hubbefl. the now 
departed associate attorney general. 

The political-incest theory, in which 
the Rose firm plays a large part, might 


By Ernest Dumas 

appear lo be a reasonable explana- 
tion of why the fumbling White 
House would create a genuine crisis 
from a pathetic little investment fias- 
co and one of the smallest S&L belly- 
flops in the country — in neither of 
which does the known record suggest 
any wrongdoing by the Clintons. 

Dr by anyone else in the govern- 
ment in Arkansas. And that is the 
trouble wilh the explanation. 

TTi ere is no doubt that Bill Clinton 
hired cronies like Mr. Hubbell and 
that the White House sprang into a 
defensive crouch when questions be- 
gan to be asked about (he Clintons' 
financial dealings. Bui the idea that 
the wreck of Madison Guaranty Sav- 
ings and Loan and the scheming of its 
erstwhile chief. James McDougai, 
were shielded by friendly state offi- 
cials is a myth. Despite Mr. McDou- 
gal’s support for Mr. Clinton, the 
government's demeanor toward turn 
was anything but friendly. 

A former aide to Senator John L. 
McClellan and Senator J. William 
Fulbrigbt, Mr. McDougai had been 
Governor Clinton’s economic devel- 
opment adviser in his first term, in 
1979 and 1980. He believed that hide- 
bound Arkansas bankets — who in- 
vested in U.S. securities rather than 
lending to local entrepreneurs who 
might nave created jobs and growth 
— were at the root of the state’s 
woeful poverty. When be left govern- 
ment and went into the banking and 
savings- and-!oan business, be set out 
to prove his theory. Everyone {or at 
least every good Democrat) deserved 
a loan, whether needed or not: from 
that would flow abundance for alL 
A couple of years later, with Mr. 
Clinton back in office the bonk com- 
missioner. Marlin Jackson, drove up 
into the Ozark woods to tell the 
directors of Mr. McDougal’s tiny 
bank to curb his freewheeling lend- 
ing outside its territory* specifically 
including loans to the Clintons for 
the Whitewater development project. 
And it was Mr. Clinton’s securi- 


ties commissioner. Beverly Bassett 
Schaffer, who along with the Federal 
Hone Loan Bank Board forced Mr. 
McDougal’s removal from control of 
Madison Guaran ty after an account- 
ing firm’s examination condemned 
its lending and investment practices 
in 1988. She petitioned for a federal 
takeover of the company in 1987. 

It is widely accepted that in 1985 
Mrs. Schaffer approved an unprece- 
dented issuance of preferred stock 
after a plea from Hillary Clinton on 
Madison's behalf. But this “approv- 
er was a little different from the way 
news accounts have painted iL 

The Dallas regional office of the 
Federal Home Loan Bonk Board had 
encouraged the troubled savings and 
loans in the region to recapitalize. 
Madison talked about issuing pre- 
ferred stock, and a lawyer at the Rose 
firm wrote a memorandum asserting 
that stare law did not bar such an 
issuance by a state-chartered savings 
and loan. The memo noted at the 
bottom that a copy had been sent to 
Hillary Rodham Clinton. 

Mrs. Schaffer replied, in a now fam- 
ous “Dear Hillary" letter, that pre- 
ferred stock was not barred by state 
law. But an issuance would have had 
to be approved by Mrs. Schaffer, and 
Madison never proposed one — either 
because it could not have withstood 
the disclosure requirements or because 
it could not have found buyers. 

The caricature of an incestuous 
government seems to be based on Bill 
Clinton's practice of hiring friends, 
some of whom turn out to be compe- 
tent. others knaves. Bui no example 
comes to mind of a contrary policy 
anywhere in this country. 

That too many people know each 
other and have business and social 
relationships is an indictment or 
small cities everywhere. Bur the real 
difference is that in small places the 
little secrets are known, while in 
places like Washington. Chicago and 
New York ihq? are unknowable. 

The writer, a columnist for The Ar- 
kansas Times, contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


million since 1973 — including lots of 
good ones. Bui it las seen a decline in 
wages, especially at the bottom of the 
skills ladder. In Europe, the jobs that 
have been produced tend to cany 
higher wages and benefits, but there 
are not many of them — only about 8 
motion new ones have been created in 
the same period. Western Europe has 
rising wages, but almost double Amer- 
ica's rate of unemployraenL 

The success of the American “jobs 
machine” has produced a new conven- 
tional wisdom: that Western Europe’s 
problem is excessive “rigidity,” too 
much vacation lime; too many social 
benefits and taxes. If this is true, there 
is a simple answer: Cut the cost of 
labor, and dismantle many of the so- 
cial benefits that European Social 
Democrats and Christian Democrats 
alike have supported over the years. 

As is the case with many conven- 
tional wisdoms, there are grains of 
truth in this one. Laura D’ Andrea 
Tyson, chairman of Mr. Clinton's 
Council of Economic Advisers, ar- 
gues that regulations in Europe can 
make it much harder to start a new 
business and harder to lay off work- 
ers. Highly generous unemployment 
benefits can make people reluctant to 
take new jobs. Employers who know 
that it will be hard to trim their pay- 
rolls when they need to are reluctant 
to take on new workers, which places 
a particular burden on young people 
just entering the labor force. 

But Ms. Tyson also asks the right 
question: How far does a society 
want to push this argument? Societ- 
ies where the going wage is SI an 
hour and where workers can be 
hired and fired at will certainly 
have “flexible labor markets.” But 
that is no solution to the unemploy- 
ment problem in the United States. 
Fiance or Germany. The issue for 
Western societies is not only more 
jobs, as Mr. Clinton said on Mon- 
day. but more well-paying jobs. 

Think of it this way. A family will 
have the same income if one person 
earns SI0 an hour for a 40-hour week, 
or if two people earn $5 an hour for 
each of their 40-bour weeks. The sec- 
ond scenario involves the creation of 
two jobs, the first only one. Would 
anyone argue that the second family 
is better off for haring to work an 
extra 40 hours for the same money? 
Consider, loo, that the $10-an-hour 
job probably includes health cover- 
age and the $5-an-hour job doesn’L 
Telling Europe that all it need do is 
slash benefits for its workers is thus 
not an answer for unemployment 
Western democracies need to grap- 
ple wilh three big questions: Can 
they coordinate their economic poli- 
cies to produce more overall growth? 
Are fears of inflation getting in the 
way of reasonable steps to get the 
world economy moving? How can the 
well-off democracies improve the liv- 
ing standards of their least-skilled 
workers when hundreds of millions in 
the Third World are eager to work for 
a tiurd or even a tenth of what work- 
ers in the rich countries are paid? 

These are among the questions that 
the Detroit conferees discussed, and 
getting the answers right should be the 
central issue of Western politics. They 
happen to be the questions that most 
animate President CEmon. which is 
why it is unfortunate that the adminis- 
tration helped create (he conditions in 
which Whitewater could nearly wash 
(he jobs summit away. 

The Washington Post. 


Hot Money 
Can Cause 
Trouble 3 

Philip Do wring ^ 

H ONG KONG — New struggles 
between markets and govern- 
ments are brewing as big interna- 
tional money moves in on hitherto 
ignored currencies. The Malaysian 
nnggit is providing evidence of how 
this could both sour attitudes to 
open markets and draw the atten- 
tion of a U.S. government concerned 
about its trade deficit to perceived 
currency undervaluations. 

Malaysia has offered one of the 
world's most open middle-income 
economies. For years it had only 
nominal exchange controls, accept- 
ing the inevitability of some capital 
outflow for political reasons while 
welcoming inflow to develop manu- 
facturing, particularly for export, or 
into the stock market. Malaysia’s is 
ODe of the most mature of the 
“emerging’* markets. 

Yet recent weeks have seen a series 
of measures to stem capital inflow 
which has, according to recent figures 
■ released by the central bank. Bank 
Negara, created 40 billion ringgit 
($15 billion) of excess liquidity that 
had to be mopped up. 

The bank's assault on speculators 
started late last year with an attack on 
the ringgit by Bank Negara that drove 
the currency, which bad been steady 
for most of (he year, down by almost 8 
percent, from 2.60 to Z80 against the 
dollar. Since then, the rin ggi t has fluc- 
tuated erratically, requiring further oc= 
casional intervention by the centrc 
bank to posh it back to Z70. The 
objective of the assault was to hurt 
foreigners — and locals — who had 
been speculating on a rise in the ring- 
git, which was sending up share prices 
and threatening monetary stability. 

The initial measures to penalize 
speculators were draconian enough, 
but they have been followed by even 
tighter controls affecting almost ev- 
ery form of capital movement except 
share purchase. The plain fact is that 
most market participants believe the 
ringgjt lo be more undervalued than 
ever, so it can only be a matter of time 
before it rises again. Meanwhile, the 
arm wrestling between the markets 
and Bank Negara could bring unde- 
sirable and unforeseen consequences. 

It might, to begin with, draw atten- 
tion to the fact that Malaysian com- 
petitiveness, as measured by the 
trade-weighted real exchange rate, 
has been rising fairly steadily since 
1987. The ringgit has now retraced 
almost the whole of an advance made 
in 1992 and is back to its 1989 level 
against a much weakened U.S. dollar. 
Trade performance has-been strong. 
The trade surplus is running at 
around $2 billion, with exports up 17 
percent from a year ago despite lower 
commodity prices. Even (he current 
account is now in overall surplus. *- 
The recent devaluation, if main- 
tained, should result in further ex- 
pansion of manufactured exports and 
curtailment of imports, while the bar- 
riers to foreign money will tend to. 
push up local interest rates. 

All this raises the possibility that 
the United States, which takes 20 
percent of all Malaysian exports and 
a higher proportion of its manufac- 
tured ones, might try to force up the 
ringgit in the same way it previously 
leaned on the Taiwan and South Ko- 
rean governments to revalue. 

In Malaysia's case, any pressure 
would likely be less severe because, 
unlike Taiwan and South Korea, a 
large proportion of its manufac- 
tured exports are produced by 
American companies. Bui the possi- 
bility cannot be ignored. 

There are those in Malaysia who 
feel that a stronger currency would be 
highly beneficial, as it was for Tai- 
wan. It would dampen inflationaty 
expectations and encourage invest- 
ment in higher-value-added manu- 
facturing processes. In the longer 
terra. Malaysia cannot compete with 
lower-wage neighbors like Thailand, 
let alone Indonesia or Viet nam. So it 
should force itself upmarket now. 

This kind of long-ienn argument 
may not cut much ice with Bank Ne- 
gara as it tries to show that it can 
control short-term monetary move- 
ments. But if the speculators were 
right about the long-term direction oV 
the ringgit, either the bank will losr 
face or the open nature of the econo- 
my will be jeopardized. As Malaysia 
ponders this problem, the investment 
banks sit waiting to throw billions at 
any crack in Bard; Negara's defenses. 

The central bank may not have 
played its cards very well, but it de- 
serves sympathy as it confronts what 
some may regard as the unacceptable 
face of international capital markets 
— a face that is clearly deterring 
Taiwan and South Korea, to name 
just those two countries, from further 
liberalization. 

International Herald Trihune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1894: Naval Secrets 


LONDON — in the House of Com- 
mons yesterday afternoon [March 
16]. Mr. Hanbury tried to discover 
from the Secretary to the Admiralty 
whether copies of drawings of the 
torpedo boat destroyer Havock had 
been stolen, but though Sir U. K_ 
Shuuleworth said that certain repre- 
sentations had been made (o the Ad- 
miralty by Messrs. Yarrow, he be- 
trayed a considerable reluctance to 
give an answer in the direct question. 
Finally, when cornered, he admitted 
that Messrs. Yarrow had informed 
the Government that some copies of 
the plans had fallen into the hands of 
people who ought not to have them. 

1919: Captive Children 

PERA — The Allied High Commis- 
sion recently ordered the Turks to 
return the Christian children taken 
by them during the atrocities in Ar- 
menia. whereupon the Turks have 
begun turning the children out before 


the Christians are ready to receive the 
two thousand who were given up at 
Malatia, where the Armenian popu- 
iauoo was frightfully decimated. The 
American Relief Commission is ask- 
ing that the Turks be required to 
provide food for three months for 
the children, restore stolen property 
and evacuate the Armenian houses 
they are occupying. 

1944: A Grave Mistake 

WASHINGTON — [From our New 
York edition:] The War and Navy 
Departments, in a joint statement is- 
sued tonight [March I6J. disclosed 
that 410 American paratroopers lost 
their lives when twenty-three Ameri- 
can C-47 transport planes were sboi 
down by United Slates Army and 
Navy forces who mistook them for 
enemy craft on July 10, 1943. the first 
mghi of the invasion of Sicily. The 
paratroopers were being sent to sup- 
port the Americans engaged in Sicily, 
^War Department said, and were 
to he dropped inside American lines. 








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At Least They’re Talking 
About Women’s Rights 


By Col man McCarthy 

'cSFR^r* 8 * 1 * S3 

porteur — an official monitor — to 
, sather documentation on violent 

. agatmt women. UamonU, a similar 

r bratahrough occurred when, for the bnftdmuk 
. Bret tone, Se State Department in its TorerfS 

v ff'£L, r '?° n on . t, ™ ai > rights practices thehTolentK. 
- detailed international violence and dis- in* the Golf W 

‘ TJ“S WOmttL or abortta ir 

t Last June m Vienna represen tatives of amity tests in 

180 governments at the World Confer- dScrLinaiion 
« eoce on Human Rights voted their ap- 0 f war in Pe; 


.■ As recently as five years 
: ago, none of the militant 

■ human rights groups 

" considered that women’s 
rights violations ivere severe 
or numerous enough to be 
\ decried separately'. 

' proval of this pact: “ Gen d er- based vio- 
lence and all forms of sexual harassment 
' and exploitation . . . must be eliminat- 
ed. This can be achieved by legal mea- 

■ sures and through national action and 
. international cooperation in such fields 
, as economic and social development. 

* education, safe maternity and health 
" care and social support." 

~j Before heaping that onto the dull 
, language pile, it is worth recalling that 
; at least the talking stage has been 

- reached. As recently as five years ago, 
1 none of the militant H uman rights 
| groups — Helsinki Watch, Amnesty 

International, Human Rights Watch — 
considered that women's human rights 

* violations were sufficiently severe or 
numerous to be decried separately. In 
1990 a shift occurred when Human 

] Rights Watch, Aryeh Neier’s New 
, York group, created an international 
! women’s rights project. 

In much of the world, abusing women 
; is justified because the culture sanctions 
it: the male-dominated culture, that is. 

In Brazil, judicial leniency prevails in 
courts when men are prosecuted for loll- 
ing their wives. Murders are often ex- 
cused as “privileged homicides," not in- 
tentional ones, because the husband 
caught his wife having an affair and had 
; to kill her as a matter of honor. 

In former Yugoslavia, Serbian sd- 
; diers rape as a routine policy of war and 
“ethnic cleansing.” Rape camps were 
; established. A Croatian woman told hu- 
man rights investigators of being im- 
pregnated in one camp by a reserve 
‘ captain in the Serb militia and being 

- lectured “that I needed to give birth to a 
. Serb — that I would then be different" 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994 

opinion 


Ihc supreme court has 

WrERMlNEDTMAT&^&rtG 

\ti CbN'fERSWtON WITH /v 

female <x >- worker can 
BE HKSAROOLS T&’fcuftHWJU. 


Page 9 


In Thailand an estimated 20,000 to 
30,000 Burmese women and girls ore 
believed to be held as prostitutes b 
“debt bondage” in brothels. The State 
Department reported in 1992 that Thai 
police can earn as much as $200 a month 
in protection fees — protecting Thai 
brothel owners, not Burmese women. 

More than 2,000 Asian maids fled 
their violent Kuwait employers follow- 
ing the Gnlf War. Forced sterilizations 
or abortions in China, mandated vir- 

a tests in Turkey, statutory sex 
ination in Poland, rape as a tac- 
tic of war in Peru and Pakistan, genital 
mutilation in more than 20 African 
countries, state- sanctioned discrimina- 
tion in Saudi Arabia: These are a few of 
the abuses documented in the past four 
years by investigators of the women’s 
rights project. Its reports rival those of 
Amnesty International for thorough- 
ness and understated moral alarm. 

Much of the credit for creating the 
new visibility of violence to women goes 
to Dorothy Thomas, who persuaded 
Human Rights Watch to establish the 
women's rights project. She became its 
first director. Ms. Thomas, who did un- 
dergraduate and graduate work at 
Georgetown University, said in her 
Washington office the other afternoon 
that she has traveled the world for the 
past four years helping transform once 
underground or timid women's groups 
into political forces. 

In Pakistan, for one example of a 
success, she worked with women's 
groups to document that no police offi- 
cer was ever criminally punished for 
sexually or physically abusing women 
held in custody, even though 70 percent 
of the detained said that they had suf- 
fered those assaults. 

Last month Ms. Thomas wrote to Sec- 
retary of State Warren Christopher ask- 
ing what action he plans to take against 
the Thai government — alf.S. aid recip- 
ient — for its complicity in the sexual 
slavery of Burmese women. 

Mr. Christopher has called the pro- 
motion of women's rights “a moral im- 
perative.” A heartened Ms. Thomas is 
wondering if that morality will find its 
way into the U.S. government's trade 
ana financial relationship with Thai- 
land and other international abusers 
of women. She is grateful for Mr. 
Christopher's words but with no sign 
yet of follow-through action, her mes- 
sage to the h uman rights community is: 
Hold back the cheers for now. 
Washington Post Writers Group. 

Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer’s sig- 
nature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and cue subject to 
editing. We cannot be responsible for 
the return of imsoticited manuscripts. 


Sftnrfe 

TMjATjttz. 

Uwraw 

write* , 
Q£ Conner 1 
\ 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Hie Seeds of Conflict 

Regarding the editorial “ Greece Has It 
Wrong" (March 9): 

Given the Soviet Union's formidable 
military might as recently as 10 years 
ago, who could have predicted its dis-. 
mantling and Russia's relative weakness 
today? Similarly, who can predict what 
the balance of power will be in the 
Balkans 10 years from now? 

The wisest policies to guarantee last- 
ing peace are preventive policies. Nations 
rcfy on the myths that they create. If two 
neighboring countries feed on conflict- 
ing myths, or even suggestions, about 
their past, ample ground is left for insta- 
bilities (and even war) to be fermented 
by ill-advised future rulers. 

A preventive policy for lasting peace 
most lay grounds where instabilities 
cannot grow. The Former Yugoslav Re- 
public of Macedonia must not allow the 
slightest suggestion in the minds of its 
people that it is in any way related to the 
province or Macedonia in Greece. 

CHRISTOS VASS1L1COS. 

Cambridge, England. 

Cost of Privatization 

Regarding Privatized UK. Industry 
Rebounds ” (Business/ Finance, Feb. 24) 
by Richard W. Stevenson: 

The writer reports on the proliferation 
of industries privatized by recent British 
governments. What has’ happened in 
nearly all the cases he lists is that the 
company has drastically reduced its 
staff by cutting marginally profitable or 
money-losing activities, leaving the re- 
mainder firmly in the black. 

Jolly though this is for new sharehold- 
ers, tlie real cost has been a huge addi- 
tional burden on taxpayers through un- 
employment payments to the dismissed 
staff, so that the government has found 
public expenditure higher than before. 
The new companies are seeking maxi- 


mum profits at the expense of the country 
as a whole. The net effect is that taxes are 
higher and services are reduced. As a 
result, both past and proposed future 
privatizations (ror example, of British 
Rail) have proved tremendously unpopu- 
lar in British opinion polls. 

Privatization has turned out to be just 
another cure-all ideological fashion 
which leaves the basic problem un- 
touched. It is alarming to see Western 
advisers propagating it as the answer to 
all problems in Eastern Europe. 

NICHOLAS PALMER. 

Basel. Switzerland. 

life and Death 

Regarding “ For Texas Death Row In- 
mates, There’s Life on the Job" (Jan. 13) 
by Francis Clines: 

The author misses the essential prob- 
lems and thus distorts the fate of death 
row prisoners. The work program of Elhs 
Unit is not comparable to a regular work- 
place. Ellis Unit transforms a world 
where you work to live into a world where 
you work while waiting to be killed. Such 
a transformation indeed deserves to be on 
your front page — but it should have 
been told in a very different way. 

CLAUDIA von TROTHA. 

Freiburg, Germany. 

Misplaced Protest 

Regarding “ Singapore Commits A mer- 
ican Vanda)" ( World Briefs, March 12): 

Perhaps I have been out of the United 
States for too long, but I cannot under- 
stand the hubbub over Singapore’s sen- 
tencing an American youth to six 
strokes of the cane for vandalism. 

In particular, I do not see what justi- 
fies President Bill Clinton's issuing a 
“strong protest" I accept protesting a 
clearly egregious, inhumane sentence 
(e.g. severing a limb). But I hardly be- 
lieve caning meets that definition. 


This Boisterous Male-Basher 
Sees Much in Men to Love 


By Elizabeth Austin 


We Americans, alas, have precious 
little to teach the world about effective- 
ly deterring crime. Perhaps a few judi- 
cially scarred buttocks in the United 
States would make a modest contribu- 
tion in that direction. 

MICHAEL CALINGAERT. 

Brussels. 

Accentuating die Positive 

Regarding “ What’s cm Alitalia Manag- 
er to Do?” (Business/ Finance, Jan. 25): 

I applaud the sense of humor dis- 
played in the article on Alitalia. Such 
things as sale-and-leaseback operations 
(for some of which management is under 
investigation), asset sales and account- 
ing creativity are called “reducing 
losses”: gaining market share on the 
least profitable of all routes (the North 
Atlantic) is depicted in a positive light. 
It is even suggested that a company 
burdened with debt whose equity base 
will probably have to be slashed follow- 
ing this year’s losses could be privatized! 
Thank you for adding this new dimen- 
sion to one of my favorite newspapers. 

FLA VI O PARJNI. 

London. 

No Bother at All 

Regarding “ World of a Florentine 
Prince" (Features, Feb. 12): 

The otherwise thorough review of the 
Aocademin I Uliana’s “Renaissance Flor- 
ence: The Age of Lorenzo de’ Medici 
(1449-1492).” states that, after Savonaro- 
la’s execution in 1498. “the denunciation 
of corruption in private morals and poli- 
tics, in Florence and in Rome, by the 
Dominican friar Girolamo Savonarola 
would no longer bother Lorenzo.” But it 
hadn't been bothering him at aD. As the 
title of the exhibition suggests, Lorenzo 
had gone to his rest six years previously. 

THOMAS BOURKE 
Florence. 


O AK PARK, Illinois — Over lunch 
a few weeks ago, 1 complained 
mildly to a friend that my daily life 
has become almost exclusively femi- 
nine. As a writer working at home and 
raising two small daughters, I can go 
for weeks at a time and never see an 
adult male during daylight hours. 
There are long stretches when my hus- 
band is literally the only man in my life. 

I miss the camaraderie of men, 1 
told my friend. 1 miss the gnys in the 
office, the Monday morning updates 

MEANWHILE 

on bachelor weekends spent in relent- 
less pursuit of anecdotal material. I 
miss the arcane debates over which 
songs truly should be classified as 
rock anthems. I even, abashedly, miss 
the rough talk, the blatantly sexist 
comments delivered barely within ear- 
shot, with a slanted glance to gauge 
whether I would rise to the bait. 

I just miss the little darlings, 1 ad- 
mitted to my friend. 

“That's because you're a male-iden- 
tified woman,” she commented airily. 

“What's that?" I responded. “A slut 
with a philosophy degree?" 


But I knew exactly what she meant, 
and she is right. If I am having one of 
my rare lunches with a male friend, I 
always wear more makeup. If a 
friend's early-returning hnsband in- 
terrupts an afternoon of tea and con- 
versation in her kitchen, my hands fly, 
of their own volition, to smooth my 
good-enough-for-carpool hair. 

It is a bit embarrassing for a femi- 
nist to admit that her sense of herself 
as a woman is defined by men. Yet I 
would bet my entire Lancome skin- 
care regimen that I am not alone. 

After all, women only got to be 
wonderful in the last decade or so. 
When I was growing np. in the '60s 
and early "70s, women were not seen 
as nurturing and warm and relational 
and life-affirming. They were gossipy 
and small-minded at best; more likely, 
they were unprincipled schemers who 
would stop at nothing in the endless 
competition for male attention. 

My mother warned me again and 
again that other girls were two-faced 
back-biters, that only men were brave, 
straightforward and true. Her vision 
of women was confirmed by an end- 
less stream of crafty heroines in mov- 
ies and TV shows that I eagerly de- 
voured. like satin-covered boxes of 
bonbons. It’s no wonder I grew up 
longing to be one of the guys. 

Most of my school friends were 
boys. 1 was deeply flattered that they 
felt comfortable telling me about their 
highly questionable conquests. I fell 
privileged to listen in as Mike and Jeff 
debated the pressing question of 
whether Valerie staffed her bra with 
Kleenex — and 1 felt no sense of trea- 


son when I was dispatched, undercov- 
er as it were, to the girls’ locker room 
to finally settle the issue (she didn’t). 

I always felt like I had to stand bn 
tiptoe to prove myself worthy of my 
male friends. I remember one night 
when Greg and Andrew came to pick 
me up for yet another aimless evening 
of wandering around our hangouts, 
looking for something to do. “To- 
night, we're going to be cute, clever 
and quick,” Greg announced as be 
walked in the door. I can still feel the 
sinking sensation that ! might be the 
one who would lei down the side — 
the girl. And when I heard, a few 
weeks later, that Greg had proclaimed 
that girls just weren't as funny as guys. 
I was relieved to hear he didn’t dis- 
agree when someone mentioned my 
name as the notable exception. 

Now that I've found sisterhood and 
got religion, I can barely recognize my- 
self in that girl who felt so proud when 
her husband’s college chums compli- 
mented him on finding a woman who 
could tell dirty jokes just like a man. 
But I know she is still lurking in there 
somewhere, waiting to show off with 
some shrewd comment about the Cubs' 
chronic dearth of left-handed relievers. 

I think about this sometimes, as my 
girlfriends and 1 revel in a few boister- 
ous rounds of male-bashing. Just as 1 
short-changed women in my girlhood, 

I wonder if we are now underestimat- 
ing men. As my girlfriends and I nod 
sagely over yet another example of 
smart wife, foolish husband, or as I 
swiftly channel-surf past the monoto- 
nous parade of Peter Pans and Don 
Juans trotted out on the talk-show 
stages, 1 fear we have swung the pen- 
dulum a bit too far. I know now that 
loyalty, strength, courage and affec- 
tion are genderless. But if we sing the 
praises of the feminine virtues, should 
we not look to see whether there aren't 
still a few male ones as well? 

Although it is not fashionable to 
admit it, f sometimes like the way men 
ignore the personal to focus on the big 
picture. It may be a drag when my 
husband does it, but it seems manly 
when President Bill Clinton flies 
straight from his mother's graveside 
to the Kremlin. 

After spending hours engaged in the 
feminine task of emotional dissection, 
I sometimes find it soothing to be 
around a man who feels more than he 
expresses. And there is a species of 
male sweetness that I cannot define, 
but that I cherish. 

So all right. I am male-identified, 
and likely to stay that way. And any- 
one who wants to make something of 
it should remember that I have some 
very muscular friends. 

Ms. Austin is a writer living in Oak 
Park, Illinois. She contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Fast 


EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST 


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The Provisional Airport Authority (PAA) has been 
established by the Hong Kong Government to design, 
construct, commission and operate Hong Kong's 1 new 
airport at Chek Lap Kok. The PAA will put out to tender 
a number of contracts for construction, buildings, 
specialist systems, materials, equipment and services for 
which it intends to maintain a register of approved 
contractors, manufacturers and suppliers who are 
financially and technically capable of undertaking this 
work. 

The PAA presently is inviting contractors, manufacturers 
and suppliers to pre-qualify for the following: 


Infrastructure Mechanical and 
Electrical Works 

-Water Pumping Stations 
-Sewage Pumping Stations 
-Oil Interceptor Pumping Stations 
-High Voltage Systems 
-Low Voltage Systems 
-Emergency Power Systems 
-Street Lighting 

-Telephone and Communications Cabling 


Special Airport Works 


-Aircraft Loading Bridges 

-Aircraft Pre-conditioned Air Systems 

-Aircraft Fixed Ground Power Supply Systems 

-Aircraft Parking Aids 
-Airfield Lighting System 
-High-mast Apron Lighting System 
-Airfield Concrete Pavements 
-Airfield Flexible Pavements 
-Airfield interlocking Block Pavements 

-Airfield Markings 


Architectural and Fit-out Works 

-External Cladding 
-Curtain Walls 
-Glazing and Skylights 
-Roofing and Accessories 
-Metal Decking 
-Metal Doors and Windows 
-Sheet Metal Work 
-Waterproofing 
-Insulation 
-Expansion Control 
-Drywall Partitions and Doors 
-Ironmongery 
-Architectural Panels 
-Ornamental Metal Work 
-Plastering, Painting and Wall Covering 
-Block and Tile Masonry 
-Finish Carpentry and Joinery 
-Customised Cabinet Work, Consoles and Work 
Stations 
-Casework 
-Floor Coverings 

-Hard StonefTerrazzo Floor Finishes 
-Special Elevated Floor Systems 
-Signs and Graphics 
-Office Furniture and Fittings 
-Public Area Seats and Fittings 


Building Services Works 

-Potable and Flushing Water Distribution 
-Sanitary Piping 

-Plumbing and Washroom Fixtures 

-Fire Extinguishing Systems 

-Ventilation and Air-conditioning 

-Refrigeration Plants and Chilled Water Distribution 

-High and Low-Voltage Distribution Systems 

-Lighting Fixtures and Wiring 

-Lifts 

-Escalators 

-Travelators 


Electronic and Control Systems 

-Right Information System 
-Gate/Stand Allocation 
-Public Address 
-Trunked Mobile Radio 
-Closed Circuit TV 
-Access Control & Detection 
-Building Management System 
-SCADA System 

-Passenger & Bag Security Screening 

-Master Systems Integrator 

-Information Network 

-Network Management 

-ISO Structured Query Language Database 

-Voice & Data Cabling 

-Time Generation & Display 

-Cable Management System 

-Integrated Digital Switching/Transmission Systems 

-Host LAN (Local Area Network) 

-Master Antenna TV System 
-PABX System 


Materials and Equipment 

-Transformers 

-Chillers 

-Air Handling Units 
-Power Cables 
-Fibre Optic Cables 

-Electrical and Lighting Fittings & Fixtures 

-Water Piping & Fittings 

-Structural Steel 

-Chlorination Equipment 

-Water Screening 

-Cast Iron Products 

-Pumping Equipment 

-Triculators & Compactors 

-Street Furniture and Signage 

-Underground Ducts 

-Pre-cast Concrete Products 

-Diesel Generator Sets 

-HV & LV Switchboards 


Ancillary Works and Construction 
Plant 

-Compacting Equipment 
-Proof Rollers 
-Concrete Plant 
-Asphalt Plant 
-Pre-stressing Systems 
-Bridge Bearings 
-Landscaping 
-Fences and Gates 
-Material Testing and Sen/ices 

In addition, the PAA encourages responses from 
companies with modularisation and/or pre-fabrication 
abilities for the above. 

All companies, with a proven track record, interested in 
obtaining a pre-qualification questionnaire from the PAA 
should do so in writing (post or fax) not later than Friday, 
8 April 1 994, 5:00 pm (Hong Kong time) to the following 
address: 

The Project Director 
Provisional Airport Authority 
25/F Central Plaza 
18 Harbour Road 
Wan Chai 
Hong Kong 

Attention : Ms. Stella Fok 
Tel : (852) 824-7724 
Fax: (852) 802 8231 

Questionnaires should subsequently be returned by 
Monday, 25 April 1994, 5:00 pm (Hong Kong time). 

All contractors, manufacturers and suppliers must be pre- 
qualified with, and approved by, the PAA to be eligible for 
receipt of tender documents and participation in bidding 
for the works. Joint ventures will be considered for pre- 
qualification. 


g:&B' k « « 




Page 10 


EVTERJNATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994 

HEALTH /SCIENCE 


Tiger in Danger of Extinction 


By John F. Bums 

New York Tima Seme? 

ANTHAMBHORE, India — 
When this reach of dry fonsst and 
lotus-covered lakes in central In- 
dia was a private hunting reserve 
of the Maharajah of Jaipur, the beaters' cries 
of “Bagh! Bam!" — tiger, tiger — sounded 
the death knell for the anim al considered by 
many as the greatest of the cats. 

The tigers that fell here to the hunters’ 
guns were among tens of thousands 
“bagged" during the period of British rule in 
India alone. 

Now, in the forest stillness, it is die shrill 
calls of the langur monkeys and the sambar 
deer that signal a tiger’s approach. But it is a 
call that is heard with increasing rarity, for 
Ramhambbore's tigers, like all India's tigers 
in the wild, are threatened more than they 
ever were in the era of the maharajahs and 
the British sahibs who made sport of shoot- 
ing tigers from hunting lowers and the safe- 
ty of elephants' backs. 

The Bengal tigers that roam India's for- 
ests and grasslands, and the five other sur- 
viving tiger species elsewhere in Asia, are in 
danger of becoming extinct. 

At the turn of the century, after at least a 
millennium of tiger-hunting, perhaps 
100,000 tigers remained in the mid, ranging 
across a vast triangle from the Caspian Sea 
in the west to Sumatra in the east, and to 
Siberia in the north. Now, wildlife experts 
believe there may be fewer than 5,000 tigers 
left, two-thirds of them living with growing 
precariousness in India. 

After two decades of official assurances 
that tiger populations in India's reserves 
were on a healthy rebound, a series of 
poaching scandals, starting here in Rantb- 
ambbore two years ago. has prompted the 
government to declare a “tiger crisis" and 
promise urgent action to save the animal 
that serves as a national symbol. 

For India, where the tiger has been alter- 


nately worshiped and feared for miHennia, 
and where it serves as a major tourist attrac- 
tion. the realization that the tiger could die 
out has come as a national shock. 

At an international conference in New 
Delhi this month, Kamal Nath, India's envi- 
ronment minister, won agreement from 9 of 
the 14 “tiger range" states in Asia — coun- 
tries where at least some tigers survive in the 
wild — to join in establishing a new organi- 
zation, the Global Tiger Forum, that will co- 
ordinate measures to combat poaching and 
to preserve tiger habitats. 

But as the conference ended with ambigu- 
ous commitments from many of the coun- 
tries that attended, and with none from 
China, which was among the countries that 
shunned the meeting, Mr. Nath echoed fears 
that tigers could soon disappear in the wild. 

“If there are no new efforts made now." 
be said, “it will not take more than a decade 
to see the tiger go." 

In the bid to save the tiger, India finds 
itself in an undeclared alliance with the 
United States, where President Clinton has 
lent his support to steps that could place 
U. S. trade sanctions behind the battle to 
stop the tiger poaching. 

At a meeting beginning next Monday in 
Geneva. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt is 
exported to announce what action, if any, 
the United Slates plans to take after issuing 
warnings last Tall to China and Taiwan, 
which have have been identified as the prin- 
cipal culprits in an underground trade driv- 
en by the use or tiger parts in traditional 
Chinese medicine. 

For centuries the tigers' main enemies 
were hunters, who coveted them as tro- 
phies, and later a fashion industry that 
made an expensive accessory of the tiger- 
skin coat. 

But with the banning of tiger hunting as a 
sport in India and most other tiger-range 
nations nearly a quarter of a century ago 
and the outlawing of the trade in tiger skins, 
the threat to the tigers has shifted to poach- 


ers who have targeted them for the parts 
hunters once left as carrion: the skull and 
bones, the whiskers, sinews and the blood. 

The trade is driven by booming markets 
for ancient Chinese medicines and potions 
made from tiger parts. In Hoag Kong, Chi- 
na and Taiwan, and in Chinatowns across 
Europe and North America. Chinese apoth- 
ecaries do a steady trade in tiger wines, tiger 
balms and tiger pills, celebrated among Chi- 
nese and other Asian peoples for their sup- 
posed powers to treat rheumatism, to restore 
failing energy and to enhance Gagging sexu- 
al prowess, as well Tor the treatment of rat 
bites, typhoid fever and dysentery, among 
other ailments. 

Among conservationists, Mr. Babbitt is 
seen as standing at a turning point not only 
for the tiger, but in the wider battle for the 
survival of wildlife. 







S AM LaBUDDE, an Indiana-born 
biologist who has traveled widely 
| in the Asian nations engaged in 
the tiger trade, gathering evidence 
for the Earth Island Institute, a conserva- 
tion group based in San Francisco, sent a 
letter to Mr. Babbitt after attending the 
New Delhi conference, saying the interior 
secretary's stand in Geneva would be a 
bellwether for the conservation movement 
as a whole. 

In the letter, Mr. LaBudde argued strong- 
ly for punitive actions against Taiwan, say- 
ing evidence he gathered on a visit there last 
month, including visits to 15 apothecaries in 
Taipei and three other cities where tiger 
bone preparations were freely available, 
showed that Taiwan's compliance wiLb U. S. 
demands was cosmetic. 

“Beyond the very real question of whether 
tigers survive in the wild," Mr. LaBudde 
said, “the entire east Asian community is 
waiting to see whether the issue of species 
conservation is something that must be ad- 
dressed substantively, or simply dismissed 
as a trifle." 


Haunts of the Tiger p i 

Caspian tiger RUSSIA ' V . 5 Y>' • / 

Extinct \ 

Stoeriantiger |jA^-S r \\ ’ 

“ ' - MONGOLIA / 


j^JRAQ ^ IRAN 

\ir' \PAKist?q# : v : " 

'\ SAUDI — ‘Lr " 

\ ARABIA \ ' . .' ***■'*, 

' v J ' f 


r ; '/V* «■ 

i South China tiger K- . -. 

25-50 :• ^ S.KOREA_ 

" v-t *r 

CHINA ; *1 

•’ r. v..?' i / 


if- *— 

Bengal tiger 
27970-4.300 

■t i 


Indo-Chinese tiger 
800-1,200 




u3 Former range Sumatran tiger 

l~~> Current fragmented range 250-400 


SowceKfotematkinal Union 
for Conservation of Mature, Geneva; 
Earth bland tnstitVta 


i 

StMKTRA . f r~f j 

r / s 


Javan tiger 

Bali tiger 

Extinct 

Extinct 


' NYT/IHT. Kl) joik- 


Pre-Columbian Mummy Shows Signs of Tuberculosis 


By John Noble Wilford 

New York Tima Service 

EW YORK — One thousand 
years ago. a woman in southern 
Peru died at the age of 40 to 45 
and was buried in a stone tomb in 
a river valley near what is now the coastal 
community of Ilo. 

As sometimes happened in the desiccated 
climate of the Atacama Desert, her body 
dried out and was spontaneously mummi- 
fied. Now, scientists have conducted a re- 
vealing post-mortem examination of the 
well-preserved body. 

Thor research offers new evidence that 
pre-Columbian Americans may already 
have been infected with some of the devas- 
tating diseases that were thought to have 
been brought to the New World by Colum- 
bus and other early explorers. 

In the mummy’s right lung and a lymph 
node, the scientists found scars of disease. 
These were small, calcified lesions typical 
of tuberculosis. Extracting fragments from 
the tissue, molecular biologists Isolated ge- 
netic material betraying the presence of 
Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The woman 
probably died of something else, but she 


had harbored the infectious agents of the 
dreaded communicable disease. 

“This prorides the most specific evidence 
possible for the pre-Columbian presence of 
human tuberculosis in the New World." the 
scientists reported in The Proceedings of 
the National Academy of Sciences. 

For medical historians the results pose 
the problem of explaining how tuberculosis, 
thought to have evolved only in the pre- 
Columbian Old World in association with 
the domestication of cattle, could have aris- 
en in the Americas centuries before 1492. 
Cows in the New World were an early 
European import 

For anthropologists, the existence of tu- 
berculosis in prehistoric Peru serves as im- 
portant indirect evidence of living condi- 
tions in a society that many centuries earlier 
had made the transition from migratory 
hunter-gatherers to the sedentary life of 
agriculture. 

Although there had been some previous 
evidence ior tuberculosis among prehistoric 
Americans, it was based largely on lesions 
in bones that could have been caused by 
other afflictions, like fungi and parasites, as 
well as tuberculosis. 

The excavation was pan of a comprehen- 
sive archaeological survey of the Chiribaya, 


BRAZIL 


PERU 


plv. 


Thr Km Y«k Tunes 

a fanning people who occupied the lower 
Osmore River" valley from about A.D. 1000 
to 1300. 

They were descendants of people who 
had moved at least 2,000 years earlier from 
the highlands into such coastal valleys, 
where Andean meltwater flowed through 
the desert to the Pacific Ocean. They settled 


in villages, worked irrigated fields and pro- 
duced distinctive textiles and ceramics. 

The Chiribaya ceramics disappeared be- 
fore the rise of the Inca Empire, which 
occurred in the .Andes about a century be- 
fore European contacL but other cultures 
continued in the valley, perhaps under In- 
can hegemony. 

About five miles inland from the sea. the 
archaeologists found a cluster of nine ceme- 
teries and opened 600 graves, at least one- 
fourth of which contained naturally mum- 
mified bodies. 

They called in Dr. Arthur C. Aufderheide 
of the School of Medicine at the University 
of Minnesota at Duluth, who for more than 
a decade has specialized in studies of mum- 
mies from the desert of southern Peru and 
northern Chile, seeking new ways to deter- 
mine the health of these ancient people. 

In one of the 140 mummies he examined. 
Dr. Aufderheide detected no skeletal ab- 
normalities or any evidence erf disease in the 
heart, liver, bowel or other preserved soft 
tissue — until he inspected the intact, col- 
lapsed lungs. He immediately noticed the 
lesions and decided to make a more detailed 
study of the woman who, according to ra- 
diocarbon dating of liver tissue, died 1,000 
years ago. 


As a pathologist. Dr. Aufderheide sus- 
pected tuberculosis. Typically, the disease 
spreads when people inhale the infectious 
microbes. In an otherwise healthy person, 
the body's defenses envelope the infection 
in scar tissue, containing the disease and 
preventing its spread. 

Since there was no evidence of skeletal 
deformities associated with a full-blown 
cose. Dr. Aufderheide concluded that the 
woman's disease had been contained. He 
could not determine the cause of death 
from the parts of the body that were well 
preserved. 

Because previous evidence of pre-Colum- 
bian tuberculosis has been controversial 
the researchers decided to submit some of 
the lesion tissue to a test using a technique 
known as polymerase chain reaction, or 
PCR. From minute amounts of tissue, the 
technology creates billions of copies of 
some selected segment of genetic material 
known as DNA. 

Analyzing these results. Dr. Wilmar L 
Salo, a molecular biologist at Duluth, deter- 
mined that inside the lesions were preserved 
"a DNA segment unique to Mycobacte- 
rium tuberculosis" and that the lesions were 
caused by that infection. 


Natural Swings 
Seen in Species , 
Population , 

By Carol Kaesuk Yoon 

New York Times Sen-ltx 

N EW YORK — From sudden plagues of locusts to 
mysterious declines in sought-after creatures like 
the Dun sen ess crab, the booms and busts of nature 
have puzzled researchers. A new study suggests that 
scientists may sometimes have difficulty finding an environ- 
mental cause simply because there is not one. 

In the study, published in the journal Science, researchers at 
the University of California at Davis found evidence that many 
animals, even when they are unperturbed by unusual weather or 
any other alterations in their environment, can undergo wildly 
unpredictable changes in their numbers. 

Using a computer model inspired by the life cycle of the 
Dungeness crab, the researchers round that instability and 
change are the rule for these animals rather than the exception, 
that their population numbers whirl along through time, never 
settling down, even after tens of thousands of generations. The 
results, they say. suggest that nature is more unpredictable and 
unstable — and difficult to study — than researchers had 
guessed. 

Researchers found that knowing how these populations 
change over a few or even a few hundred generations allows no 
insights into the populations’ past or future behavior. 

This presents a thorny problem for field ecologists and 
natural resource managers. Aiming to understand and often to 
control population fluctuations in the wild, these scientists may 
be at a loss, confined to just a few summers to do their work. 

Inspired by the biology of the Dungeness crab, the research- 
ers modeled a world in which one might expect simplicity if 
ever it were to be found. Along a theoretical coast, adults 
produce young, which disperse from one of hundreds of 
subpopulations to others, where the young form new groups 
of adults, which produce young the* next year, and so on. _ 
When there are too many or too few adults in one subpopula-P 
don, that group produces fewer juveniles for the next genera- 
tion. But the environment never changes. 

Despite the model's simplicity, over time the total number 
of iodtriduals along the coastline fluctuated wildly. Most 
disturbing of all total population numbers could remain 
steady for thousands of generations, then without wanting 
suddenly boom or crash. They could even cycle nicely up ana 
down, then revert to chaotic behavior — and back and forth 
— over as many as 20.000 generations. Because no environ- 
mental changes are allowed in the model, the only causes for 
the increases and decreases are the internal dynamics of the 
population, like migration or competition for food or space. 


T HOUGH inspired by the Dungeness crab, whose 
young can disperse widely along a coast, researchers 
said these dynamics could be expected of any quickly 
reproducing animal with a sedentary life phase and a 
dispersing life phase, including many marine creatures, insects 
and even some small mammals like mice or voles. 

“Of course from a pest insect point of view, it's a real 
problem," said Dr. William Murdoch, a population ecologist 
at the University of California at Santa Barbara. “If this is 
really what real populations are like, it presents a big difficulty 
in analyzing and predicting how they're going to behave. It 
makes things even harder than they were before." 

Dr. Louis W. Botsford, a professor of wildlife and fisheries 
biology at the Davis campus, said that while it remains unclear 
how to translate the findings into management practice, the 
study is useful since it provides a potential explanation for the 
mysterious booms and busts to which many marine creatures 
are subject 

For example, be said, in the late 1950s. the crab population 
in central California declined from a catch of 12 million ^ 
pounds a year to less than 1 million pounds. On the other ’■ * 
hand, in the last few years, lobster catches in Maine have been 
about 50 percent higher than usual for no obvious reason, 
reaching a high for the century in 1990. 

Some biologists cautioned that the new study, while a useful 
’ tool for understanding how populations might behave under 
some conditions, does not mean all populations are doomed 
to instability. How much of a role these dynamics play in the 
real world, they said, remains to be seen. 



-MV 


■T-- > r * 

.a 


BOOKS 


IN BRIEF 


THE RECKONING: 

The Murder of Christopher 
Marlowe 

By Charles Nicholl Illustrated. 
413 pages. $24.95. Honour t 
Brace & Co. 

Reviewed by 
Michiko FCakutani 

I T was, even by Elizabethan stan- 
dards. “a sudden and fearful 
end": on Wednesday. May 30. 1593, 
at the age of 29, the playwright 
Christopher Marlowe was stabbed 
to death, through his right eye, as he 
sat at supper with three men. 

According to the official story, 
Marlowe and the man who stabbed 
him, one Ingram Frcurr, had quar- 
reled over the bill. Ingram, who 
claimed be had killed Marlowe in 
self-defense, subsequently received 
a pardon from the queen, while 
Marlowe — the celebrated author of 
“Tamburiaine the Great," “Dr. Fau- 
stus” and “The Jew of Malta" — 
was buried in an unmarked grave. 

These are the bare bones of the 
story and the jumping-off point for 
the dazzling detective work on dis- 
play in “The Reckoning," a fasci- 
nating new book by the English 
scholar Charles NicholL As Nicholl 
notes in his introduction, the story 
is a jigsaw puzzle that's missing 
many pieces, and his book “is an 
attempt to fill in the spaces." 


WHAT THEY’RE READING 


By Alan Truscott 

J AMES E. CAYNE of Manhat- 
tan, president of Bear, Stearns 
Inc, the brokerage bouse, and 
Kathie Wei-Sender of Nashville, 
competed in Beijing in a one-table 
- duplicate game And that, by defi- 
nition, is impossible. 

The results were scored by a 
committee of judges. The players 
gained points if they did better 
than a result determined by the 
committee as “normal" and lost 
points correspondingly. 

Cayne won the event with con- 
siderable help from the diagramed 
deaL As South he made a rather 
remarkable balancing bid of three 
no-trump when rite opening three- 
dub bid came around in him. This 
would have failed, barring a friend- 
ly diamond lead. 

Wd-$eader as North retreated 
to four beans, and East tried four 


• Barbara Cartland is reading the 
manuscript of her own noveL “A 
Prayer for Love." 

“I have just dictated a new book 
and now 1 am revising the book 
before LhaL I have written a book a 
fortnight for 20 years, which is a 
world record. I dictate to a secre- 
tary. lying on the sora with my eyes 
shut and just go straight through." 

(Barry James. IHT) 



The result is not a conventional 
work of history’ or biography but an 
adroitly reasoned historical hy- 
pothesis: an absorbing account of 
what probably or possibly hap- 
pened to Christopher Marlowe, 
and in the process, a minutely de- 
tailed portrait erf the dark side of 
Elizabethan politics. 

Marlowe, of course, is best re- 
membered today Tor his plays, for 
his darkly lyrical poetry and for his 
bleak, frequently brutal portraits of 
single-minded heroes obsessed with 
money or status or power. He is also 
remembered, by some, as an atheist 
and blasphemer, a homosexual 
“roaring boy" who lived too fast and 
hung out with a bad crowd. 

Less frequently remarked upon is 
Marlowe's subterranean life as a spy 
?nd his supposed involvement both 
m governmental efforts to subvert 


spades. Now Cayne emerged from 
the bushes with a leap to six dia- 
monds. a rare sequel to a bid of 
three no-trump. 

It would have paid East to save 
in six spades, but that was certainly 
hard to judge. He passed, and West 
led the spade ace. He shifted to a 
heart, and South won with the ace, 
ruffed a club in dummy and led the 
heart king. 

East was now helpless. He chose 
to cuff with the diamond king, al- 
lowing for the possibility that his 
partner held a singleton diamond 
queen. South overruffed and led a 
trump to dummy’s ten. He was now 
able to throw one dub loser on the 

bean queen, and a trump remained 
in the dummy to ruff the other. U 
would not have helped East to ruff 
the heart king low, for South would 
have Overrun ed, cashed the dia- 
mond ace and made the slam simi- 
larly. 


Catholic insurgents and in rivalries 
among the queen's ministers. 

As Nicholl describes it. Elizabe- 
than England was a hotbed of 
spies, informers, provocateurs and 
double and triple agents. “The 
political situation was volatile," 
Nicholl writes. “The Spaniards 
were threatening to engulf Europe, 
the queen was aging, the question 
of the succession was unresolved. 
England had reverted to Catholi- 
cism a generation ago, under 
'Bloody Mary,’ with attendant 
burnings, imprisonments and se- 
questrations. There was a real pos- 
sibility of this happening again. 
The spy kept a foot in bom camps 
and was ready to jump either way." 

Why would Marlowe want to 
join this “wilderness of mirrors"? 
Advancement, Nicholl suggests: 
money, entree to influential circles, 
perhaps an emotional disposition 


For this effort the committee 
awarded Cayne and Wei-Sender 13 
imps. 


NORTH 
* 10 7 4 
O KQ76343 
0 10 9 3 


WEST(D) 

• A 

O J 10 9 8 

O 4 

* K J96943 


V A 

A AQJ 
4b A 10 7 


EAST 

4KQB86532 

O 2 
O KB 
*QS 


J 9 7 6 2 
172 


North and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding! 


West 

North 

■ East 

South 

3*' 

Pass 

Pass 

3 N.T. 

Pans 

4? 

4 * 

6 « 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 


Vest led the spade ace. 



toward intrigue. In any case, the 
playwright seems to have been re- 
cruited during his student years at 
Cambridge for the intelligence ser- 
vice run by the queen’s spy master. 
Sir Francis Walsmgham. 

It addition, Nicholl argues, the 
three men who were present at 
Marlowe’s death also had connec- 
tions with this subterranean world 
of spies: Frizer, the man who sup- 
posedly slabbed the playwright, 
was a servant of Thomas Wal- 
singham. who had been employed 
in the secret service by his cousin 
Sir Francis; and the two witnesses 
to the killing, Nicholas Skeres and 
Robert Poley, were directly in- 
volved in intelligence work. 

It is Nicboirs contention that 
Marlowe's death was not an acci- 
dental killing, resulting from a quar- 
rel over a bill but an act of murder, 
resulting from Marlowe's political 
and intelligence affiliations. As Ni- 
choll describes it, Marlowe was 
closely linked to Sr Waller Raleigh, 
the famous Elizabethan courtier and 
poet who was contending with the 
Earl of Essex for the coveted posi- 
tion of queen’s “favourite." 

Meanwhile. Skeres appears to 
have been working for the faction 
supporting the Earl of Essex, a fac- 
tion that wanted to discredit Mar- 
lowe as a means of discrediting his 
friend Raleigh. 

Nicholl further suggests that 
when efforts to slander Marlowe as 
a dangerous atheist foiled, the Es- 
sex faction decided to take further 
steps. In Nicholl’s opinion, it mat- 
ters little whether Skeres — or 
Frizer — actually struck the blow 
that killed the playwright: as he 
sees it. Skeres remains the villain 
responsible for Lhe deed. 

Poley, the third man present at 
Marlowe's death, would have os- 
tensibly been on Marlowe's side, 
Nicholl says, since he. like Mar- 
lowe, had done intelligence work 
for Sir Robert Cecil, another rival 
of the Earl of Essex. 

This highly convoluted narrative 
along with dozens of further compli- 
cations is laid out by Nicholl in 
dear. lively prose. In the end. Ni- 
dioll's glittering reconstruction of 
Marlowe's murder is only one of the 
many fascinating aspects of this 
boob. Indeed. “The Reckoning" is 
equally convening for its masterly 
evocation of a vanished world, a 
world of Elizabethan scholars, po- 
ets. con men, alchemists and spies, a 
world of Machiavellian malice, in- 
trigue and dissent. 

Michiko Kakuiant is on the staff 
of The New York Times- 


A 2 ,500- Year-Old Mummy 

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian scientists have 
found the frozen mummy of a Scythian noble- 
woman who died 2,500 years ago and was 
buried high in the mountains of Siberia, accord- 
ing to an JT.AR-Tass report. 

The news agency called the find in the Altai 
Mountains “sensational," noting it also includ- 
ed wood, leather and felt ornaments buried 
with the woman and still in excellent condition. 
But few details were available. 

“To have a body that's preserved in a frozen 
slate and that also has the articles associated 
with the individual would be a pretty signifi- 
cant find." said David Hunt, an anthropologist 
at the National Museum of Natural History at 
the Smithsonian Institution, in Washington. 

The Scythians were an ancient Slavic people 
who inhabited the steppes of eastern Europe 
and Siberia. 


Addiction: One-Gene Theory 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A single gene may 
lie behind an addiction to food, alcohol or 
drugs, according to researchers' findings pub- 
lished in the Journal of Eating Disorders. 

“The environment shepherds people one way 
or another." said Dr. Ernest P. Noble, a profes- 
sor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the 
Llniversity of California. Los Angeles. “If 
they're in a home that uses a lot of alcohol, they 
become alcoholics. If cocaine is around, they 
become cocaine users. If there’s food as a way 


CROSSWORD 


of giving a reward, those children might grow 
up to be obese." 

His findings center on a dopamine receptor 
gene that is responsible for sensations of plea- 
sure or reward. A particular form erf that gene, 
previously linked to alcohol and cocaine abuse, 
may also cause adults to crave carbohydrates 
and eat too much, he found. 

Dr. Harvey Kaslow, a member of the physi- 
ology department at the University erf Southern 
California School of Medicine, called Dr. No- 
ble's finding “another example of a hereditary 
association with obesity, which implies a genet- 
ic basis that contributes to obesity." 


TB Cases Drop In New York 

NEW YORK (API — New cases of tubercu- 
losis dropped 15 percent in New York City last 
year, the first decline in a decade for the United 
States's most-infected city, but health officials 
warned that the decline did not mean the city's 
epidemic had been reversed. 

“It's not Lhe end of the battle but in many 
ways only the bejtinning. We recognize that this 
may just be a blip on the radar screen.” said 
Margaret Hamburg, the city health commis- 
sioner. 

Tuberculosis, a lung disease transmitted by 
airborne bacteria, was once thought to be under 
contrcL But it resurged sharply about 15 years 
ago and has reached epidemic levels in New 
York City, especially among some immigrant 
and low-income groups. The proliferation of the 


disease has been helped by the appearance erf 
strains resistant to known drug treatments. New 
York City has about 400 patiems.with so-called 
“multi-drug resistant" TB — 61 percent of the 
national total according to the federal Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Passive Smoke; Heart Risk 

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) — Passive 
smoking caused a significant increase in the 
severity of heart attacks suffered by laboratory 
rats, according to a study researchers at the 
University of California at San Francisco. 
Their findings bolster other studies indicating 
that exposure to other people's tobacco smoke, 
known as passive smoking increases the risk of 
heart disease death by 30 percent 

“People who experience relatively brief expo- 
sure to secondhand smoke arc adversely affect- 
ing their hearts.” said Stanton Glontz. a co- 
author of the study. The team's findings are 
reported in the American Heart Association's 
journal. Circulation. 

Hormone May Inhibit Tumor 

LONDON (Reuters) — A by-product of 
human hormone production could be used to 
block tumor growth. European researchers re- 
port in the science journal Nature. The Ger- 
man, Swiss and Finnish researchers said they 
Found that 2-meihoxvoestradiol. a by-product 
of estrogen production stopped the growth of 
new blood vessels. 


ACROSS 

i On which Irish 
linens are made 
g Chase (lies 
io Krazy 

13 Fort Knox 
deposit 

14 Part ofUNC.F 
18 'Foucault' 5 

Pendulum" 
novelisi 
it Festive 

IB “The Informer' 
author 
20 Not (air 


22 Bits of history 

23 Ye Shoppe 

34 Mob 

27 Stallone 
namesakes 

28 Vex 

29 Muddy 

33 Mayberry 
losident 

34 European 
capnai 

35 Draw on 

38 Date 

41 Sisal and 
Bombay, e.g 


Solution to Puzzle of March 16 


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email maanr 
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nnmn musaa 000 
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edeh □□□a anas 
□HaanHiDDii 11 Canaan! 

□ESS DHEJB 
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42 Bucks lor 
captives 
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cartoonist 

47 Conlorm 

48 Yokel 

52 Look lor Haws 
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Me- 
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pop 

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1 03d Congress 
59 Oufly ol San 
Quenhn ' star 
G2 Bubbling 

83 Remote 

84 Circumspect 
65 Donnybrook 

86 To' 5 opposite 

87 Alphabet 
sequence 

68 Pul to 

DOWN 

1 Some dance 
contests 

2 Jo&e Hogan 
creator 

3 'Sweet Rnsre 

4 Samuel and 
Robert 


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eye? 

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fAspen vehicle) 
7 Playboy 
nickname 
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9 Most somber 

10 Larry who 
played Tony 

11 ol the 

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12 G.I Joe. e g 

15 Character actor 
□an 

19 Lock up 

21 Hardly a Prince 
Charming 

25 Rainbow 

2G Artist Georgia 

30 Sire's mate 

31 Slat lor Alan 
Greenspan 

32 All right 

33 Mysiery writer 
Lillian 

35 Wall Sireol 
operator, for 
short 

as Kind of graph 

37 Rock s Brian 

38 Turning 

40 Playwright 

Bogosran 

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NHL 


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(he architects of time 

Page II 



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™TRIB INDEX 114.™«i 

aO™Sonli r ^mS?l W S2 *“* lndex ®- compos eH 



IDO p-i 

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■ 


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N 

D J 

1993 



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1994 


Approx. weighting. 32% 
close. 130 17 Piev.. 129.56 E 


150 
140 
130 ^rr 
120 — 
110 T-. 

100 


A«*ox. a-aghfeig: 37% 
Close: 114.43 Prev.; 114.47 




80-~-i 


ONDJFM O N D J F M 
1993 1994 1393 1994 


Htorth America Latin America 


Approx, weighing: 26 % 

Close: 96.08 Prev.: 95.74 


, • . x.-- 



(50 
140 
130 
120 
f 10 
^00 

90 O N 0 J F M 
, , 1993 1994 

i:V Wald index 

The Index tracks US dollar yahies at stocks in. Tokyo, New York. London, and 
Argentina. Australia. Austria. Belgium. Brazil, Canada, Chile, Denmark. Finland, 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Nathartanda, Naw Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain. Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New York and 
London, the n dear is composed of the 20 lop issues In terms ot market atfxtaiGdt.cn. 
otherwise the ten top Slocks are tracked 


Pentagon — Friend of the Earth? 

Military Takes Interest in Low-Pollution Technology 


By Matthew L. Wald 

■Vpn York Tmhv Servin' 

NEW YORK — The urge to develop an 
electric car has become a holy quest Tor 
environmentalists, who seek an antidote for 
smog, traffic noise and reliance on oil. 

Bui lately, this technology has found an 
unexpected" pa iron: the U.S." Department of 

Defense, which sees battlefield uses for elec- 
tric-vehicle systems. 

Although some environmentalists express 
misgivings about the Pentagon's patronage, in 
(he Tost few months the American military has 
been dispensing money to various civilian elec- 
tric-ear ventures, including a company in 
Georgia working on a computer-controlled 
battery charger a maker of fuel cells in Con- 
necticut. and a Massachusetts company that 
has been converting gasoline cars to battery 
power and wwts lo design an dectrie vehicle. 

Where environmentalists see the possibili- 


ty of quieter traffic and cleaner air. military 
strategists imagine vehicles slipping stealthily 
over enemy terrain and armored personnel 
carriers that have no exhaust pipes and so 
cannot be spotted by infrared detectors. 

"At night, they tan'i see you, they can’t 
hear you. they don't know you’re there.” said 
Major Richard C. Cope, u Marine who is 
leading the military’s charge into electric- 
vehicle research. 

Major Cope is a project manager for the 
Advanced Research Pmjecis Agency, which 
was known during ihe fold War as the De- 
fense Advanced Research Projects Agency. 

Without fanfare, the jgcncy has become 
one of the major sources of funding for vari- 
ous tedi no logical pieces of the electric car — 
including electrochemical bat (cries, bui (cries 
powered by spinning flywheels, new types of 
charging systems, efectmnic controllers and 
various other ciHiiptmenls, 


Between tlie beginning of 19V 3 and the end 
of 1 995. the agency iu*elf expects to spend S6S 
million, and private industry somew hat more, 
for research into electric and hybrid vehicles. 

This technology transfer can make for 
strange partners. Environmentalists tend to 
he ’’the same people who in the l%Us were 
protesting a war." said Sheila Lynch, who 
heads the Northeast Alternative Vehicle Con- 
sortium. But in peacetime, she said, if a big 
civilian project needs government help, there 
arc advantage* to working with the military. 

“No one can expedite a project faster than 
the Defense Department.” die said, "because 
they have a battle attitude.” 

The warriors return the compliment. In 
many areas. Major Cope said, the "commer- 
cial guys are so far ahead of us” that he was 

See MILITARY. Page 15 


Chevrolet’s New Campaign Skips the 'Heartbeat’ 


By James Ben net 

A 'tv Ymi Times Smite 

DETROIT — With its strong products and 
canny marketing, (he Chevrolet Motor divi- 
sion for decades meant affordable style, pow- 
er and patriotism to its customers. It also 
meant big profits for the company it domi- 
nated and defined. General Motors Corp. 

So it was no coincidence that GM’s earn- 
ings suffered as Chevrolet's image rusted af- 
ter the late 1 970s. Chevrolet sells as many 
cars and trucks as all of GM’s other divisions 
combined. 

But customers just would not buy dull or 
ugly cars like the instantly forgettable Corsi- 
ca and that regrettably unforgettable whale, 
the Caprice. 

While people who bought Bel Airs in the 


'50s or Impalas in the ’60s or Caprices in the 
'70s used to seem cool or sexy or sensible, in 
the ’80s those attributes gave way to some- 
thing a Jot less wholesome. 

"It would have been a little bit socially 
unacceptable at times to have some person 
drive up to pick up your daughter in front of 
your house in a Chevrolet “ said Jim C. Per- 
kins. the blunt Texan whom GM lured back 
from Toyota Motor Corp. to be Chevrolet's 
general manager and a GM vice president. 
“We weren't on many consideration lists ” 

Chevrolet is still huge: Last year it sold 
more vehicles than Chrysler Corp. But in 
1978 it sold 3.7 million cars and trucks, com- 
pared with 2.3 million lost year. 

Restoring Chevrolet's sales power is vital 
to GM’s' comeback, which is why (he division 


is in the middle of the fastest product over- 
haul in its historv. 

From 1 99 2 to 1997. Chevrolet intends to 
introduce 19 car and truck impels, replacing 
almost jls emire line. At the same time, it is 
trying to irain its dealers to provide consis- 
tent, friendly serv ice ihrouahout the life of its 
vehicles. 

To convince buyers that Chevrolet is re- 
turning to its old glory, the division plans to 
drive u stake through its eighi-yeur-old adver- 
tising theme. “The Heartbeat of America ” in 
favor of a new slogan intended to evoke the 
good times: "Genuine Chevrolet.'' 

The theme is part of GM’s effort to differ- 
entiate its seven marketing divisions, many or 

See CHEVROLET. Page 15 


1 Industrial Sectors 1 


teed. Ptbv. % 


fifed 

Piw. 



dose dose dungs 


dose 

dan 

dungs 

Energy 

111 JO 112.09 -026 

CapWGoodi 

115.04 

114.96 

+0.07 

Utflfttes 

128J2 12747 +0^2 

Rawlfeteriats 

123.17 

122.53 

+0S2 

Hnince 

118.13 117J6 40.48 

Coraumer Goods 

100.15 

99.99 

40.16 

Services 

121.83 121.63 +0.16 

MtsceTbmeoas 

129.01 

12953 

-0.40 

For nMmfnfonrtatlon about the Index, a booklet b avaMtte irm ol charge. 


Write to frit} Index. 161 Avenue Chariasde GauBe. 9ZS2! NeuBy Cedex. France. 


U.S. Puts Off JAL Hawaii Route Request 


Qlntematonal Herald Tobune 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tnhme 

TOKYO — In a gesture meant 
to step up pressure on Japan to 
improve U.S. access to ib aviation 
market, the Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration has deferred a deci- 
sion on whether to gram Japan Air 
Lines Co. permission to fly a new 
route between Honolulu and Sen- 
dai in northeastern Japan. 

• A U.S. embassy official in Tokyo 


said Wednesday the move reflected 
frustration that American carriers 
were being denied adequate access 
to the Kansai International Airport 
in Osaka, which will open in Sep- 
tember. 

Kansai will be the country's first 
24-hour facility and is meant to 
boost the number of flights into 
Western Japan. But American car- 
riers have complained that the 
Ministry of Transport is thwarting 


their effort, to add flights at the 
new airport. 

In addition, the decision reflects 
dissatisfaction that Northwest Air- 
lines and United Airlines were de- 
nied approval to fly without restric- 
tions between the United Stales 
and Australia via Japan last year, 
the official said. 

Washington believes its 1952 bi- 
laieral air accord with Tokyo gives 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

Amatil Thirsty for Markets 


R 


By Michael Richardson 

Intemathmai Herald Tribune 

SYDNEY — On a hot summer day. when Dean 
... Wills, chairman and managing director of 
Coca-Cola Amatil Lid., looks out his office win- 
dow onto Sydney harbor, he can see some of the 
water, beaches and yachts that have helped make 
Australians among the largest per-eapila consum- 
ers of Coca-Cola products and other soft drinks 
outside the United Stales. 

These days, however. Mr. Wills spends a good 
deal of his lime thinking about the growth poten- 
tial of emerging soft-drink markets in Central 
Europe and the Asia-Pacific region and how Coca- 
Cola Amatil can best exploit them. 

In Indonesia, where the company manages three 
joint-venture bottling operations covering almosj 
Lhe whole country, the soft-drink market grew 15 
percent in 1993 "as lhe economy expanded and 
consumer purchasing power increased. 

Coca-Cola Amatil took control of its third Indo- 
nesian franchise, covering Jakarta and surround- 
ing areas, in October. 

Coca-Cola franchise products are the market 
leaders in Indonesia, with a share of more than 70 
percent. 

Chine the country's youthful population or al- 
most 190 million, the year-round equatorial heat, 
the Muslim ban on consumption of alcoholic 
drinks and a record of economic expansion. Mr. 
Wills said in a recent interview that the growth 
prospects for Coca-Cola Amaul in Indonesia were 
"enormous, almost unfathomable. 

Australia’s per-capita consumption of soft 
drinks was 99 liters (104.? quarts) in IWa but 
Indonesia's was less than two biers — vrell below 
that of other industrializing nations m Sdutheasj 
Asia such as Malaysia (5.7 liters) and Thailand (7.5 

we can increase our Indonesian sales by 15 


percent annually, we will double current consump- 
tion in five years.” Mr. Wills said. 

Over the past five years. Coca-Cola Amatil, 
which a, 51 percent-owned by Coca-Cola Co. of 
the United Slates, has divested itself or its tobacco, 
printing-packaging, poultry and snack-foods busi- 
ness to concentrate on producing and selling non- 
alcoholic cold drinks. 

Ai the same lime, with the encouragement of its 
American parent. Coca-Cola Araaiu has devel- 
oped an overseas empire by acquiring Coca-Cola 
franchises, building bottling plants ana developing 
distribution and marketing networks in Austria, 
Hungary’, the Czech and Slovak republics, and 
most recently in Indonesia. 

The company now supplies 600.000 retail cus- 
tomers in tuue countries, including Australia. New' 
Zealand. Papua New Guinea and Fiji, that have a 
consumer base of more than 250 million people. 

In its first step to test the market in the former 
Soviet Union. Coca-Cola Amatil has agreed to 
form a joint venture in Belarus to produce and 
distribute Coke products there, storting this 
month. 

In 1993. Coca-Cola Amatil. which is listed on die 
Australian stock exchange, had a 23 percent in- 
crease in net profit, to 95 million Australian dollais 
($68 million), on sales of nearly 2 billion dollars. 

Coca-Cola Amatil had an extraordinary profit 
of just over 242 million dollars, reflecting the sale 
of its snack-food operations to United Biscuits 
(Holdings) PLC of Britain in January 1993. 

Richard A. Beaurepane. director of industrial 
research af Bain & Co., a unit of Deutsche Bank 
AG. said he expected Coca-Cola Amalfi's earnings 
to rise strongly over the next few years as the 
company's Central European, and later its Indone- 
sian, operations became increasingly profitable. 

Ux ~ ' 


Mr. 


lurepaire said that all Coca-Cola Ama- 
See COKE, Page 15 


Inflation Victory Pushes 
Mexico Into a Recession 


By Anthony DePalma 

Sew York Timer Semie 

MEXICOCITY —The battered 
Mexican economy has slipped from 
slow growth into a formal recession 
with hardly a word of acknowledg- 
ment from government officials. 

Figures just revised on Mexico’s 
gross domestic product show that 
the economy declined in the third 
and fourth quarters of 1993. This is 
the first lime that there have been 
(wo quarters of overall economic 
shrinkage, which is how U.S. econ- 
omists define a recession, since 
President Carlos Salinas de Gortari 
took office in 19S8. 

Although Mexican officials are 
reluctant to say so. the figures 
strongly indicate’ that their strategy 
orbringing down inflation to single 
digits by cooling off the economy 
has been loo successful. 

Before Mr. Salinas took over in 
1988. Mexico’s annual rate or infla- 
tion was running above 150 per- 
cent Last year, it was 8 percent 
after the government restricted the 
money supply and controlled 
wages and prices. But the belt- 
tightening hurt manufacturing. 

"It’s clear they overshot” said 
Lawrence D. Kiohn. chief Latin 
American economist for Lehman 
Brothers. 

The downturn conies at a sensi- 
tive lime. Mexico is in the final year 
of its six-year presidential cycle, a 
time of when the government is 
usually at its weukest In the past 
those "years have seen such events 


as nationalization of banks, a peso 
devaluation, and. in the 1°SS elec- 
tion. cries of malfeasance when 
government computers mysterious- 
l\ broke down as lhe leftist opposi- 
tion candidate. Cuauhtemoc Car- 
denas Solorzano. was reportedly 
leading Mr. Salinas. 

U.S. investment accounts for i»4 
percent of the $44 billion in foreign 
capital that has poured into Mexico 
during Mr. Salinas's administra- 
tion. The economic slump, and. 
more recently, a decline in .stock 
prices, has made Mexico a less de- 
sirable place to invest. 

Whether foreign investors ride 
out a market correction, or decide 
to pull out of Mexican stocks, may 
be determined by how quickly the 
government can remove the con- 
straints used to suppress inflation 
and start reviving the economy. 

The revised GDP figures, con- 
tained in a report released by the 
government statistics agency rather 
than the Treasury Ministry, con- 
trast with preliminary year-end fig- 
ures released at the end of Febni- 
ary. Thaw: figures showed a decline 
in" the third quarter followed by a 
small rise at the end of the year". 

Mexico’s overall growth for 1993 
was 0.4 percent. Officials ignored 
(he glum results of the last two 
quarters and simply reported that 
1993 was the seventh consecutive 
year of growth. 


Russia Expects 
IMF Loan Deal 
Within Days 

Rk liter, 

MOSCOW — Russia ex- 
pects to reach agreement with 
i he Interuatinual Monetary 
Fund in the next Tew days on 
an economic reform program 
and a 51.5 billion loan, a 
nior Russian official said 
Wednesday. 

Konstantin Kagalovsky. 
Russia's representative at the 
Fund, said a deal would be 
sealed over the weekend in 
Moscow, afier meetings be- 
tween Michel Camdessus, the 
managing director of the 
Fund, and Prime Minister 
Viktor Chernomyrdin. 

Agreement on a $1.5 billion 
loan would be good news for 
both sides. Moscow wants the 
Fund’s endorsement of its cre- 
demiaks as a reformist govern- 
ment after the departure earli- 
er this year or the policy- 
makers who were lhe 
architects of reform. 

The Fund, meanwhile. Is 
seeking io juMiry its position as 
one or the leading institutions 
in helping Russia fashion a 
free- market economy after U.S. 
criticism that it has not been 
aggressive enough in promot- 
ing reform. The Fund has al- 
ready lent Russia $2.5 billion. 



CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 

C DJ4. 

mi i.rat 

SIM 305*13 
Ufft ism — “ 
i« — 

UM» 2P.IE HOT 
i^nw t*! 4 ® ,w# 


March 16 


Anntenfeira 
Brunets 
FraWwl 
London (ft) 


s 

l.ff 

KM S 


Milan hOTMae | 

New York ib) — 

Pwb ~4» U" 2 

Tokyo «W5 15M! 

Toronto USa W® 

r.4H LW U® 

i ecu ion Ui» 

ism utr aw uo 

Ooslms, in Amsterdam. LC^drm. 
rates of J Am. ^ 

a: To ho* «*■ pound, o to 

Ovoitabte 

Other Dofiar Values 

CwT ” CT ?£ci 24700 

AnwotwM awr wm" ( J J7Ai 

Austro). S 1JW J*** JHZ81 

Asstr.seWL ti.W» it* 

BrazHcrof- IlSo. rupWi 2 144 ®* 

Chinese yuan WJW 04*7* 

Cmchkonma 2W* iDck. 

srrs’S? H-r'™ 

FbLnwrkKO **** MflW ' rW 

Por " ardBa ^L <«■* «*» 

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sasr s 


FJ=. Lira 
IW MW* 
iJF van' 
umi oiou* 
05843 VM.ft 
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s.ic liiSfl) 

u«e* 

14» 6 

02372 MS'S* 
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BS1S "A 
Mfir York and 


DJI B.F. S.F. v «" CS 

IJJ5 LW* 1JB 

.gjS -jtVi MSN lUffi 

JJ9 (0!’ 1 17B IJIO* > Dot 

2«U Sl.*» I.® ID." 10J17 

rjrbl 1W7J “(lSO I313P-NMU 
rUO 47 JOS UWO U7N 1,220.15 

LAW Ji» W» XWB5 13*0 

1B357 C.105T MU* WW* 

55*2 KB4? 7343 — 77.73 

OJTO 1X3- am ia»* — 

02545 4.11*1* 13S*7* USB 

2.1714 nm 1*370 11UM 

Ulit *JJK> MW 140071 1.4046 

Zurich. Minos in other cenbfai 


Peseta 

u*»s* 

soar 

UM’ 

Tfcj? 

11807 

130* 

4.141* 

07U3 

0 * 4 * 

m* 

IS044S 

104441 

Toronto 


f Deposits 

Swiss 

D-Mark Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

March 16 

ecu 

5 B «-5 a - 

4^4'. 

5 vS«- 

6 W. - 

ft? 1 ! 


5 *V5 

3 “'-'4 

5 '*-5 *>■ 


S's-S** 


SM5MI 

3V4 

S 'v5 

5 ''w -6 


s ■-« • 

5 -5 - 

3 'S 

SVfi-S'u 


24e-2's 



Dollar 

1 month 3 V3 •* 

3 months 3to-37« 

(months 4-4v e 
l year 4 ‘»-4 •. 

Sources: Reuters. Uovds Sent 

Rales awf/caMe to Interbank deaoslK of a mutton minimum tor ew/raienf <■ 


aoitar: *. Units ol W0; NA; nuthod: NJk: n ot 


Currency 
mm. peso 

fj. Zealand S 
Mono, krone 
PhH,PM« 
polish aot» 

port, escudo 

russ. ruble 
Saudi rtrat 
5lno-S 


per 5 

1,734 

7J43S 

VA9 
21M2. 
174J4 
172400 
XW 7 
15855 


Currency PwS 
S.Afr.rartd 34515 
S.Kor.wofl B0&JM 

MWL krOM 7 8715 
TcriMOtS 2*41 

TtUUhcdrt 2529 

Turkish nro 28179. 
UAE (Britain 14715 
venez.DoUv. 11345 


Sr ss s s 


" dMert " q • 1JO07 17933 1-70W 

Sifn**** 1-4393 143,3 r Brussels >•' Corrmerctotc llotlono 


Key Money Rates 

United States Close 

Mscount rate 3J0 

Prime rate 

Federal funds 300 

3-moathCDs 3'h 

Comm, paper in dmrs 3.07 

3-monttt Treasury bW 320 

hfW Trwnvry MU *04 

Mftur Treoswv note 4*i 

5-rear Tmnry note 5^2 

7-recr Traawrv note S.9B 

wvearTramurvuato 436 

M-rrar Trea sur y band iffl 

MorrtB Lynch H-dav Ready asset na 
Jwm 

DbaMoirata 1% 

Outl money 2'* 

T-raonm (ntsuank 2 Vj 

3-montb Interbank 2 'fc 

frmamh interbank 2 >. 

10-year Government bond 101 

Germany 

Lombard rate 63k 

Con money 5 £5 

!*noolti Interbank SM 

34 RMWi mtertimk 5M 

t-nwaih Interbank 145 

11HW Bund *11 


Prev. 
100 
4J» 
3S 
1 26 
190 
150 

4.70 

4.94 

&JBS 

Ml 

4J9 

ua 

2 ‘. 

Wt 

2V. 

24 

<07 

6 *. 

5.95 
&M 
SOS 

5.70 

4iM 


Britain 

Book Base rale 
Call money 
1 -month kaierhank 
Xnontt intafbank 
«Hhontti Interbank 
te-yoarem 
France 

Intervention rate 
Can money 
1 -mofltfi interbank 

3- month interbank 

4- ntDafti interbank 

lO^rtMTOAT 


5'4 

5>« 

S'- 

54 

5‘. 

721 

4.10 

44 

6'. 

64 

5 *. 

*17 


5'j 

na 

s-^ 

5«. 
S - 
7B2 

4.10 

6^ 

4 

6'» 

5 '» 

k.19 


Sources: Reuters. Bloomberh. Merritt 
Lynch, Bank at Totro, Commeribont. 
Greenwell Montaaa. CradBt L remw<S 

Gold 

AJVL FJW. Ctvae 

Zurich 387.25 W “» 

London 38U0 »S50 

NewYor* 386.10 365J0 

US. donors oer ounce, London oHidal M 

Inns; Zurich and New York oecmW and cm- 
manners; New York Come* i Aorllf 
Sourer ; Reuters. 


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Saudi Sheikh 
Buys Sweden’s 
Top Oil Firm 


its carrier.-, ihc right to fly beyond 
Japan to other points in Asia with- 
out restrictions. But Japan and 
Australia, alarmed b> the growing 
presence uf U.S. carriers in the 
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market, forced Washington to ac- 
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The Astoria ted Pms 

STOCKHOLM - Corral Petro- 
leum Holding, owned by Sheikh 
Mohammed Amuudi of Saudi Ara- 
bia, embarked on what it called a 
"strategic concentration" in north- 
ern Europe on Wednesday by buy- 
in® Sweden's largest oil concern, 
OK Petroleum AB. 

Corral paid 9.5 billion kronor 
($1 billion) for OK Petroleum. 
Scandinavia's largest oil refiner, 
handling about 25 percent of the 
region's capacity. 

The costs include 3.6 billion kav 
nor to make payments on OK Pe- 
troleum’s debts, the Swedish na- 
tional news agency reported. 

Statements from Corral and OK 
Petroleum announcing the deal did 
not mention the debt payments. 
They said only that Corral paid 5.9 
billion kronor" buying 52 percent of 
the shares from "the Swedish con- 
glomerate Koopcraliva Forbundet, 
24 percent from (he Swedish state, 
and 24 percent from Nexie Oy of 
Finland. 

OK Petroleum is one of Swe- 
den’s top 10 exporters, with petro- 
leum product exports accounting 
for about half of the company’s 19 
billion kronor in annual sales. 

"We intend for OK Petroleum to 
grow within ii< area of operations, 
in Sweden as well as the rest of 
Europe," said Ghazi Habib, a 
spokesman for the buyer. 

The transaction includes all of 
the Swedish company's petroleum 
operations, ranging from prospect- 
ing, production and refining of raw 
oil through delivery of products. 

"I am convinced the buyer is 
good for the group, our customers 
and our suppliers." said Sven- Erik 
Zachrisson. president of the Swed- 
ish concern. The OK management 
will remain in place and its 2,200 

a foyees will not face job cuts, he 
:d. 

Sweden’s Ministry of Industry 
and Commerce said that Corral in- 
tended to continue developing OK 
Petroleum as an independent com- 
pany and to reinvest a "large por- 
tion" of profit in the company. 
“This is a good deal for the 


Swedish stale as wdl as OK Petro- 
leum,” said Per Westerbtnrg, the in- 
dustry and commerce minister. 

Sweden will earn about 1.4 bil- 
lion kronor on the sale of its OK 
Petroleum slake, plus 125 million 
kronor in repaid state loans, the 
ministry said. 

Swedish equity dealers, speaking 
on condition of anonymity, said 
that OK Petroleum's majority own- 
er. Koopcraliva Forbundet. de- 
layed the sale io take advantage of 
more favorable Swedish rules on 
capital gains which came into effect 
at the beginning of 1994. 


German Rate Cut 
Has Investors 
Hoping for More 

Reuters 

FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank on Wednesday extended its 
recent cautious policy of interest 
rale cuts, and investors speculated 
the move might be followed up by 
another easing of monetary policy 
as early as Thursday. 

The" central bank sanctioned a 
decline in a key money market rate, 
allowing its minimum securities re- 
purchase rate, or repo rate, to fall 
to 5.88 from 5.94 percent last week. 

The cut was smaller than inves- 
tors had hoped for, but the reduc- 
tion of 6 basis points was steeper 
than the cuts of 3 points seen in the 
previous two weeks. 

Markets quickly swallowed ini- 
tial disappointment that the rate 
had not been cut more drastically 
and started focuMng on the 
Bundesbank council meeting on 
Thursday when a cut in the 6.75 
percent Lombard fending rate, the 
effective ceiling on official rates, 
was viewed a possibility. 

“There is speculation of a quar- 
ter poi n l of f Lombard," said Annin 
Kayser, an economist with Swiss 
Bank Corp. He ruled out any re- 
duction in the discount rate, the 
floor for official rates. 


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Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994 


MARKET DIARY 


Subdued Inflation 
Lifts Wall Street 


Gmqtiled fry Ov Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Government 
data showing US. inflation under 
control sent most stock prices and 
Treasury bond prices higher 
Wednesday. 

On the New York Stock Ex- 
change. advancing issues led de- 
diners by a 13-to-8 ratio on moder- 
ate volume of 2782 million shares, 
down from 30328 million Tuesday. 
But the Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age slipped \M points, to 3.848. IS. 

ILS..SIocfcg 

after a last-minute sell-off; the in- 
dex had been higher Tor much of 
the session. 

The Labor Department reported 
that consumer prices rose 03 per- 
cent in February, largely because of 
a jump in energy prices that was 
seen by analysts as unsustainable. 
Tim subdued inflation should give 
the Federal Reserve Board little 
reason to rush to raise interest 
rates, bond traders said. 

In late trading, the price of the 
benchmark 30-year Treasury bond 
rose 1 1/32 points, to 93 1/32, 
which lowered the yield to 6.80 
percent from 6.89 percent Tuesday. 

The strength in bonds shored up 
stocks. 

Tetefonos de Mexico's American 
depositary receipts led the New 
York Stock Exchange's most-active 
list, rising ft to 61ft on some bar- 
gain-hunting after the stock fell 


sharply in the past week in line with 
the Mexican stock market Mexi- 
co’s Balsa index also posted gains 
Wednesday. 

U.S. Surgical rose 2ft to 18% in 
active trading, lifted by the compa- 
ny's expectation for its first-quarter 
loss to narrow from the fourth 
quarter and for profitable returns 
for the rest of the year. 

Mergers and acquisitions in the 
technology industry moved small- 
capitalization stocks. In over-the- 
counter trading. Adobe Systems 
lost 3 to 29% after Uumcning a 
$5 1 5.8-million bid for Aldus Corp. 
on Tuesday. Aldus surged 6ft to 
32ft in active trading. 

California Microwave Derices 
soared 7ft to 21 W after news Hita- 
chi Metals plans to buy a 10 per- 
cent stake in the maker of electron- 
ics used for mobile computing and 
wireless communications. 

Nike jumped 3 to 57%. with low- 
er third-quarter earnings offset by 
an increase in orders for the first 
time in more than a year. The 
world's largest athletic-shoe maker 
earned $632 million in the quarter, 
compared with $89.5 million a year 
ago, while revenue slumped 10 per- 
cent Bui orders extending into the 
first quarter of 1995 rose 4 percent 
the company said. 

An upgrade from Smith Barney 
also gave Nike stock a lift. 

(Bloomberg, Knight -Ridder, AP) 


Dollar Slips on Report 
Of Moderate Inflation 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — The dollar turned 
lower Wednesday after the latest 
American inflation data reduced 
speculation that the Federal Re- 
serve Board would push up interest 
rales in the near term. 

Traders said the Deutsche mark 
also found some strength against 

Foreign Exchange 

the dollar ahead of Thursday's 
Bundesbank council meeting, as 
die market did not expect the Ger- 
man central bank to cut its dis- 
count rate. 

Nick Parsons, head of the trea- 
sury advisory group at CISC in 
London, said the “early lightening" 
camp, those expecting the U3. cen- 
tral bank to raise rates again soon, 
was undermined by the report that 
U.S. consumer prices had risen a 
moderate 03 percent in February, 
including the effect of higher ener- 
gy costs resulting from harsh win- 
ter weather. 

The dollar, which began easing 
before trading ended in Europe, 
continued lo fall in New York trad- 
ing. where it closed at 1.6890 DM, 


down from 1.6973 DM the previ- 
ous day. The currency also slipped 
to 106.055 yen from 106.130 yen. 

Against other major currencies, 
the dollar eased to 1.4323 Swiss 
francs from 1.4440 francs and lo 
5.7420 French francs from 5.7730. 
The pound rose to $1.4948 from 
51.4906. 

The inflation report was in line 
with the expectations of many on 
Wail Street, however. In the previ- 
ous month, the overall consumer 
price index showed no increase, 
and the core index which excludes 
food and energy prices crept up just 
0.1 percent. 

Peter Luxton, an economic ad- 
viser at Barclays Bank, said the 
dollar's failure lo break through 
resistance at 1.70 DM before the 
report had sparked some specula- 
tive selling. 

“The dollar is now looking very 
tired," be said. 'There is no real 
upward momentum." But he said 
he still expected the U.S. central 
bank to indicate a tightening in 
rates at its Federal Open Markets 
Committee meeting Tuesday. 

(Reuters. AFX) 


reAMwmlAn 


The Dow 


Daify dosings of the 
Dow tktfteajridu^hial average 



m 


m 


S ON D J 

1393 


F M 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Opes rtgh Low Lost Ghg- 

main 3851 23 386629 3S36A3 3848.1 5 —IX 
THW 173621 175+38 1777.00 17 SUM i 17 — 
UM 707JH 207.*? 20+44 207.42 -0J* 
Como 137+22 138l.4« 136941 137800 


Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


Wgt u 

fndustriab S3L32 54530 54 9 JO +113 

Transit. 42+84 41928 42+99 +3JB4 

Utilities 18141 16092 16134 +876 

Finance 4+49 4391 4441 +040 

SP500 48995 46548 4894* +241 

SP100 43523 43149 435.18 +240 


NYSE Indexes 


Mgh Low Last Chg. 

OanMSilt 28033 •>uun 3+034 - 135 

InduStrioK 321.80 319.31 32133 -139 

Transit. 27034 38739 770.72 *230 

urmtv 21635 214.90 21428 +0.7? 

Finance 215.70 21114 31544 *2.99 


NYSE Most Actives 



VoL 

HM 

Law 

Last 

Chg. 

TefMex 

99*05 

63'.. 

6 OM- 

61*4 

t 5* 

Hanson 

41028 

21 

TOta 


~Vta 

US Sura 

30649 

iota 

17>A 

iota 

J 3te 

AMO 

27982 

29 V. 

28V. 

399+ 

- to 

StrUSAn 

34918 

265+ 

35W 

3Ste 


AT&T 

74429 

+3 

S2ta 

5714 

* to 

AmExp 

33482 

30 V, 

29te 


-ito 

Kemper 

22607 

61V. 

S9H 

59 V. 

-2 

WalMrts 

32671 

37H 

37 

27H 

tfc 

R JR Nab 

223+8 

6*t 

6ta 

6'4 

♦ to 

Merck 

23026 

JIM 

31 Mt 

3ita 

—to 

DuPont 

31513 

57 Vn 

15*. 

57 

* 1 to 

Digfl* 

21130 

33W 

32 V, 

3314 

-M 

Oricorp 

30948 

41 V. 

39Ai 

41 

1 1 

Amoco 

20399 

S456 

S3V> 

S4Vk 

»2to 



tfigh 

Low 

Last 

Chg. 

Composite 

798.93 

79+72 

798.93 

• +41 

industrials 


842.7* 

84+54 

*+42 

Books 

68833 

66334 

68023 

‘471 

insurance 


91+99 

92+62 

-142 


09536 

890.48 

89+54 

-634 


80+4* 

799 44 

803.71 

>235 

Telecom 

171.01 

16935 

171.81 

*110 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


CnnlxTI 

4-down S 

Aldus 

Adobe* s 

Pwwos 

Mias 

snaps vs 

3Com 

Intel & 

OcArt 

SunTVs 

CntMO 

Pyxis s 

TdetMex 

Chnctes 


VoL Mgb 

Law 

Last 

are. 

124794 lav. 

9'A 

loto 

*5to 

57916 25 to 

2?*i 

23 

-2to 

51939*34% 

31 

32 V. 

*6 

51788 31 'A 

28 Va 

39to 

—3 

49764 24 

22to 

2314 



24to 

2 Sto 


34637 23'A 

21 to 

22to 



NASDAQ Indexes 


AMEX Stock Index 


Wi Lour Laa □+ 
46934 467.94 48934 > 121 


Dow Jones Bond A 


2D Bonds 
10 UHI Mies 

10 industrials 


arae 
10235 +0.18 

10043 +0.1? 

10+28 +0.18 


NYSE Diary 


34246 6348 
33999 72 to 
31853 204u 
28319 U'A 
22888 31te» 
18978 304- 
18243 3*V, 
II 


61 >8 62 ft 
7118 719» 

27 Vi 28V. 
10 1045 


£2 


*244 

-W 

♦ 148 
— Vt 
-7'A 
— 2'~ 

♦ Vp 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoL 

Mob 

LOW 

Last 

CM. 

TaaSroe 

7308 

8 

7to 

7« 

r to 

EN3CO 

6323 3'V„ 

3Vu 

3to 

— Vh 

CTadel s 

5A3S 

5 

4 to 

S 

♦ to 

ThreeFS 

5110 

50 V. 

so 

50 

—to 

IvoxCp 

476G 37 to 

3ito 

31V. 

—to 

ChrlMed 

4*23 

36*k 

25* 

26to 

—to 

SPOft 

45+5 47ta 

4* y. 

47 U, 

♦ to 

AmctJ 

4550 

6to 

6to 


_ 

CheyStt 5 

3901 

4415 

42to 

43*6 

, 1 

ExpLA 

3721 

lto 

lto. 

1Vi» 

— 


Market Sales 


NYSE 

Ann 


Today 
4 p.m. 
30+12 
17 J? 
302X3 


In mill tons. 


39088 

19.21 

229.27 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
Newwwts 
New Lows 


dose prey. 

1348 1131 

804 100G 

832 857 

2782 2795 

85 93 

89 79 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
NewHtehs 
New Lows 


31? 308 

273 203 

258 342 

841 831 

21 20 

2D 24 


NASDAQ Diary 


Adv raced 
Declined 
Unawnged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


1736 1600 

1387 I486 

1709 1750 

4827 4823 

123 113 

54 54 


Spot Commodities 


Commodity 
Aluminum, lb 
Coffer. Braz. lb 
Copper electrolyllc R> 
Iran fob, ton 
Lead, lb 
Si Ivor, troy u 
Steel (scrap), ton 
Tin. lb 
Zinc lb 


Today 

+96 

+70 

0-93 

213-00 

0-34 

541 

13+33 

15938 

04378 


0578 

070 

092 

213311 

034 

543 

13333 

3.581 

04421 


• Metals 

Close 

Spot 129180 129280 

Forward 131+50 131580 

COPPER CATHODES (Hiph 
.p°Uars per metric ton 
: 5ect 194380 194580 

Forward 195880 195780 

LEAD 

peon per metric foe _ 
Scat 45380 45980 

Forward 47280 47380 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric Ion 
Spot 59580 556580 

Forward 562080 583080 

Doifan per metric ton 
Spot 543080 544000 

Forward 548080 548580 

ZINC (Special High Grade) 


P i e»t ou» 
BM Aik 


1Z72JO 12 7050 
130180 130280 


Spot 
Forward 


194080 190 80 
195580 195+00 


45380 45480 
46780 46880 


553080 553380 
599*80 560*80 


543080 546*80 
54B580 548980 


93180 93280 92980 93080 

95080 95180 94780 94880 


Financial 

HIpB Low 
3-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 
BMan-ptsoriMpct 


Mar 

9+83 

9+81 

9+01 

— 831 

Jen 

9+95 

9436 

9+57 

— 033 

Sep 

9+05 

9472 

9+75 

— 0JM 

Dec 

9+65 

94^9 

9+53 

— 038 

Mar 

9+38 

9472 

9+22 

— 0,14 

Jan 

9409 

9331 

9193 

-0.12 

Sep 

9170 

9361 

9161 

— 0.15 

Dec 

9147 

9112 

9132 

— 113 

Mar 

9119 

93JJ5 

93JM 

— 114 

Jen 

92.90 

9276 

9176 

— 114 


-ten 

9539 

9+68 

9+69 

Sap 

9+29 

9+20 

9+29 

Dec 

MJB 

9+67 

9437 

Mar 

9+63 

9+63 

9+A4 

Jim 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9+36 

Sea 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9+13 


E*t. volume: 94J30. Open ini.: 842877. 
3-MO NTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

81 mllOon - eta eMM act 

+ 081 
Urvch. 
— Ml 
Until, 
linen. 

_ Unch. 

Est. volume: 39+ Open ini.: +571. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM1 minion - pts of 1M pet 


unch. 
+ 085 
+ 087 
+ 083 
+ 083 
+ 086 
+ 082 


Est. volume: H 1.367. open ltd.: 87+143. 
3-MONTH PRENCH FRANC (MAT1F) 


Joa 

9+60 

9436 

9+57 

Sep 

9+89 

9+53 

9435 

Dec 

9+87 

9+01 

9+04 

Mar 

9+16 

95.10 

9+13 

Jot 

9+13 

95D6 

9+11 

sea 

9+99 

9431 

9+90 

Dec 

9+79 

9+73 

9+70 

Mar 

9440 

9433 

9+58 

Job 

9+39 

9+31 

9+30 

Sip 

9+24 

9+22 

9+23 

Dec 

9+10 

9+10 

9+07 

Mar 

9199 

9190 

933* 


FFJmiUloa 

• pts Of 108 PCt 

9+25 


Jam 


9+24 


sea 


9+55 

9435 

—051 

□ec 

9478 

9+71 

9+73 

— 101 

Mar 

9439 

9450 

9434 

Unch. 

Joa 

9+83 

9+77 

9+79 

+ 841 

SCJ> 

9+70 

9+63 

9434 

+ 101 

Dec 

9449 

9+45 

9+46 



9+32 

9+27 

9+29 



Est. volume: 5+39+ Open tel.: 241800. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

«SMM - pts & 32nds OM00 PCt 
Mm- 11301 111-10 111-24 — i-w 

Jim 112-11 1 10-05 119-24 — 1-09 

Sep N.T. NT. 109-20 —Ml 

Ed. volume: 1158+5. Open tat.: 150842. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 25+000- pts otieepo 
Jtm 9*85 9752 978* — 020 

Sep 9770 9752 97 M —022 

EsL volume: 187.147. Open hit.: 213825. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS 1MAT1F) 
FF500800.pt] oflMpCt 


Oct 


Jmi 

Feb 


Moll Low Los) Sctlfo Oi'se 

14185 14050 14*50 14050 — +25 

N.T. N.T. H.T. 14275 — ft2S 

14+80 14559 14550 14550 —050 

14880 14*80 14*80 14750 —050 


14775 14950 
K.T. t+T. 
N.T. N.T. 
N.T. NT. 


14950 — 050 

N.T. 15050 — 050 
NT. 15080 — 050 
N.T. 14980 — 050 


Est. volume: 11816 . Open ini. 109855 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IRE) 

111 dolkxs per aarret-MK of 


1+16 

HOT 

U.1I 


1185 

1335 

IP 1ft 



1334 

|iji 


nos 

1160 



1330 

1174 

1131 

Sep 

1190 

1154 

13.91 


1+20 

1338 

1+2( 

Nkv 

1+10 

1+10 

M.!( 

EsL volume: 51*85. 

Open 


1+12 +087 
1*82 +0.11 
1381 ++1I 
1388 + 088 

1350 —081 

1*90 1+05 + 082 


Stock Indexes 

FTSE 100 (LIFFE) 

OS per Max paint 
Mar 3Z728 32308 32388 —3+0 

Joa 32798 32428 3305 — 3+5 

Sep N.T. N.T. 32468 — 355 

Est. volume: 33.9*5. Open ML: 67556. 

CAC e* IMAT1F) 

E^ 8 " r ^r^445 0 228080 -S«j 

^8 SSI8 =S8 

Jan 226280 224+00 225750 —550 

Sap 227150 226780 227580 —580 

Dec 230250 230080 230750 —350 

Est. volume; 3+933. Open lal.: 87865. 
Sources.- Mo tit. Associated Press. 
London tnt'l Financial Futures Exchange. 
Inti Petroleum Eeehanga. 


Dividends 


Per Amt Pay Rec 


3-31 5-1 

3-21 Ml 
3-34 4-20 
3-24 S-5 

3-34 4-11 
3-18 >31 
3-16 M) 
3-34 7-11 
3-24 5-13 


IRREGULAR 

CenterpaM Prep - 575 

Qtteens NH Corp - .136 

Fietch Choll ADR a .425 

imperial Chem b 12S8 

Pilgrim Regional - 81 

Pioneer E cutty . .14 

Pioneer Fund . .11 

RTZ Corp PLC b 5267 

Zeneca Group b 843 

o-approx amount per share, 
bapprax omounl per ADR. 

STOCK 


Southwest Natl _ 20% +15 6-3 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Gcrant Indus! I lor 100 reverse spilt. 
INCREASED 

CFSB Bancorp Q .10 3-31 4-15 

Eagle Bncsbrs 0 88 84 4-19 

Keystone inti Q .1*5 5-4 5-18 

Scientific Tech Q 85+4+11 

Urdtd DomtnlonRfty O .193 4-15 4-29 

CORRECTION 

Metropolitan Rlty 52 3-22 331 

Correcting amount 

INITIAL 

FietehOUl Forest 8237 321 4-20 


Mar 

12648 

126.12 

126J0 

+ 106 

Joa 

12630 

12+66 

12+02 

+ 044 

Sep 

12+30 

12+00 

12+10 

+104 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

unch. 


EsL volume: 26+266. Open Ini.: 229871. 


Industrials 

High Low Last Settle Ofge 
GASOIL (IRE) 

U5. dates per metric loo-tots et 188 tons 
Apr 13*50 13785 13785 13785 —050 

May (3750 13+50 13+75 13650 -050 

Jon 13785 13+75 13780 13780 —085 

Jel 1X85 13*50 13*50 1X80 — +25 


AT&T 

Amer meoHold 
Amerttech Corp 
CIGNA Hi incoShr 
CiMHi YidSecur 
Castle Conv 
Central Jersey Fin 
Detroit Cdo 
Fifth Third 
FtfFtaBncshPollc 
Fst Leesporl 

P.-lerhe ne a I 

I mau Key 
Gibson CR 
Gwinnett Bncsftra 
Kranai Rectty 
Londouer Inc 
Liberty Term 99 
Marsh Super A&B 
Measure* Cora 
Mtl Bncp Alaska 
Natl Fuel 


88 

875 

J7 

.40 

.10 

.125 

87 

.» 

.10 

86 

.04 

.15 

M 

82 

as 

.n 

.11 

85 


30) 5-2 

3-31 4-IS 
3-31 4-15 
3-28 4-8 

3-25 4-4 

3-31 4-15 
3-23 3-31 
+15 +25 
3-31 +15 
341 +15 
+1 +15 
3-28 +8 

+1 +29 
+1 +15 
3-30 +12 
301 +14 
3-34 +| 

+15 54 

300 +13 
+1 44 

3-31 +15 


♦ * 


monthly^ epwtttr; HU M— al 


O’Reilly Says Heinz Plans Baby-Food Takeovers 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — Tony O’Reilly, the Irish 
investor and chairman of HJ. Heinz Co., said 
Wednesday that the American company would 
acquire baby food businesses in Europe, India 
and South America in the next few weeks in a' 
plan to achieve “double-digit” growth in the 
next financial year. • - 

The acquisitions and investments to expand 
Heinz s sizable share of the baby food market 
win exceed $250 million, Mr. O'Reilly told the 
New York Society of Investment Analysts. 


Heinz r anks second to Gerber Products Co. 
m worldwide baby food sales, with annual sales 
of $631 million, or about 90 percent of Gerber’s 
total baby food sales. 

Heinz will make its first new investment in 
South America in 25 years and is considering 
possible expansion into Argentina. Brazil and 
Chile, Mr. O'Reilly said. 

Mr. O'RdDy has been active in acquisitions 
from his Irish base this year. Although Indepen- 
dent Newspapers PLC of Dublin, of which Mr. 


O’Reilly also is chairman, failed in a bid to take 
over the Independent newspaper of Britain, it 
did acquire 67 percent of Capital Newspapers 
PLC, a local newspaper publisher, for £4.8 mil- 
lion ($7 million) last month. It also bought a 31 
percent stake in Argus Newspapers of South 
Africa for 2d million punts ($28 million). 

The Heinz acquisitions are part of a growth 
plan that Mr. O'Reilly saiij also included a 
stock buyback, cost cutting, and increased sales 
volume and prices. 


U.S. Consumer Price Index Up 0.3% * 

WASHINGTON (AP) —Wimer-rdated demand for fuel bdped drive ‘ 
consumer prices up 0.3 percent in February, the largest gain in three : 
months, the government said Wednesday. 

The increase was led by a 1.0 percent jump in energy prices in ' 
February. The “core" rate, which excludes the volatile food and energy . 
components, also rose 03 percent, led by a 03-percent increase in the jj 
cost of housing. 

If prices continued to rise at the February pace, it would mean a . 
consumer inflation rate of 33 percent in 1994. _ .■ 

In a separate report, the Commerce Department said housing starts ; 
rose 4. 1 percent in February. The Labor Department also reported ibi^T. 
average weekly earnings, adjusted for inflation, fell 1 3 percent in Febru- • 
ary, the largest decline since September 1992. ! 

Northrop Would Consider a Buyout j 

LOS ANGELES (Bloomberg) — The chairman of Northrop Corp., ■ 
Kent Kresa, who started a bidding war Tor Grumman Corp. last week. J 
said Wednesday he would consider offers for his own company. 

“If there was a serious bid for us, we would look at it," Mr. Kresa said. • 
“Our preferred solution is to stay independent." ■ 

Wall Street analysts have suggested that Martin Marietta Corp. or ; 
another company might try to swallow Northrop to prevent it from . 
taking over Grumman. Northrop’s unsolicited bid for Grumman is worth • 
$60 a share, or $2.04 billion in cash. It topped a $55-a-share offer that ‘ 
Martin Marietta made earlier last week. 

Northwest Cuts Stock-Price Outlook j 

NEW YORK (AP) — Lukewarm interest in Northwest Airlines' i 
upcoming slock offering has forced the company to slash its price 5 
expectations by about 35 percent, sources close to (he deal said. ■ 

The offering, which had been expected as early as this week, has been , 
pushed back until at least next week, the sources said. The harsh winter, a 1 
recent spate of fare sales and expectations for further discounting in the \ 
spring have prompted several Wall Street airline analysts to lower their ; 
expectations for airline earnings and have put off prospective investors. • 

Northwest had initially planned to raise at least $380 million from the 
stock deal at a price of $19 to $2) per share. The new price of $13 to $14 f 
per share means the airline would raise between $260 million and $280 • 
million before paying underwriter fees. 

U.S. Surgical Corp. to Slash 900 Jobs : 

NORWALK, Connecticut (Bloomberg) — Doited Stales Surgical 1 
Corp. said Wednesday that 900 jobs would be cut by tbe end of March.® 
including those of nine of its 28 top executives. ; 

The job cuts are tbe second round of a restructuring that already ■ 
included 700 layoffs last year. The maker of surgical instruments said the 
restructuring, which should be completed this month, should save $150 : 
million annually. 

The company said it expected to post a loss in the first quarter but to be ! 
profitable in the remaining quarters this year. U.S. Surgical Stock rose ■ 
$235 to $18375. 


For The Record 

Wastangoa Post Co. said its Digital Ink Co. unit was planning an > 
online news and information service that will allow computer users to ; 
access news from the Washington Post. The service will be part of Ziff- [ 
Davis Publishing Co.’s Interchange Online Network, a national service 
expected to be available by the end of the year. The Washington Post '■ 
owns hair of the International Herald Tribune. (Bloomberg) ' 

Die Associated Press appointed Stephen Ciaypole, editor of Reuters 
Television, as the managing director and chief executive of its new ; 
international news video division. APTV. The new enterprise will begin ■ 
transmitting daily TV news services in November. (AP) \ 

Oorox Co. said its directors would consider raising the 45-cent-a-share - 
quarterly dividend at their July meeting. The company set a regular ; 
quarterly payout of 45 cents on Wednesday, payable May 1 3 to holders of • 
record on April 29. (Reuters) • 

Gerant Cos. declared a 1-for- 100 reverse stock split as part of its plan to . . 
reorganize under Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Gerant filed for .- 
Chapter 1 1 on March 4 because of the imminent foreclosure of a real •’ 
estate limited partnership it agreed to buy. Gerant, based in Beverly Hills, ' r 
California, buys troubled companies and restructures them in effort to - 
return them to profitability. (Bloomberg) ; 

Loon Industries Inc, which makes fiber-reinforced plastic structures. -V 
said Wednesday Edwin Phelps, its president and chief executive, resigned • 
and was replaced by Alan Baldwin. Lunn also said it sold its Norfidd •* 
Corp. unit to Mr. Phelps. (Reuters) ' 



WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agancfl Franco P>*ua Mordi 16 
Chm Prav. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HU 
ACF Holding 
Aeoan 
AhoM 
Man Nobel 
AMEV 


69 6980 
5450 5140 
96 97 

5080 50 

22+60 22880 
7750 78.90 


Bate-Wessonen 4230 CM 


CSM 
DSM 
ElHviar 
Fofckar 
Gls+Brocadas 
HBG 
Helnckan 

Hoogovans _ 

Hunter Douokci 8+80 
IHCCaland 42J0 

inter Mueltor 


72.10 7180 
12650 12+40 

181 JO 18180 

1+50 1+40 
55.40 5+80 
308 301 JO 
232.10 232.70 
66 6UJ0 
85 
43 

8+30 8+70 


wn Nederland 85.10 85 

KLM 47.90 4+79 

KNPBT 5DJQ 50.10 

NMHIard 72 7Z30 

Oc« Grinten 8250 «L20 

Poktood 5380 5150 

WH— 5430 5+80 

Polygram 7950 8080 

Rooeto 12780 12+30 

Rodnmco 62J0 63 

RoUneq 12+20 12+50 

Rorento *580 95J8 

Royal Dulcti 19+60 IOTJ0 

Start 46J0 4+80 

Unltever 20+70 2iaiD 

VanOmmeren SL60 4950 

SXwKlurteriSSiSS 


Brussels 


Aeec-UM 

AG Fin 

ArtteU 

Barra 

Betaerf 

Cadcarlll 

CObapa 

DUhabe 

Efectrabei 

GIB 

GBL 

Gavoert 

KraJMbaik 

Pelrallno 


2580 2605 
28® S10 
4830 4680 
2300 2308 
23875 23625 

190 106 

6058 5950 

1436 1436 

6360 6380 
1625 1635 

«nD 4585 

9900 9900 
7700 7420 

10425 10500 

l-rwi gin 

Roval Beige 5800 sum 
SocGen Banque *590 M90 
Sac Gen Bctgkmo 2750 2755 
Safina 15200 15200 

sotvav 14500 146® 

Tractebai nooo in® 

UCB 2352S 23600 


Frankfurt 

AEG IML70 159 JO 

Alllora Hold 2625 2591 

Altana 627 641 

A*o 1089 1060 

BASF 31431638 

Bayer 375-6037550 

Bay. Hvno bank 463 455 

Bov vereinsbk 500 49S 

BBC 700 700 

BHF Bank 437 437 

BMW 874 870 

Commerzbank 34+5036430 
Continental 29029180 

Daimler Benz 854 JO 849 

Deginaa 51230 so 

Dt Babcock 26*5026530 
Deutscbe Bank B34j08i7.40 
Douglas 55030 560 

DreodnerBank 41580 4S7 

FeMmuehle 335 330 

F Krutm HOesch 20*5019930 
Harponw 35535280 

Henkel 645JTJ 641 

Hochltef 1035 1057 

HonchS* 322.1032+20 

Hotinxjrnl 939 960 

Horten 230 230 

IWKA 397 399 

Kail Sab 14930 152 

Karstodt 567 5M 

Kaufliet 496490 JO 

KHD 1448014120 

KkMOonerWerke 13713+50 
Unde 877 885 

Ludbansa 1931963a 

MAN 4® 457 

Monnes*nonn 42941720 
MefaUaeseii 1® 192 

Muandi Rueck 33BD 3240 

Porsche 919 912 

Preussag 489 488 

PWA 229 J8 23030 

RWE 46230 461 

RtwJnmctal! 328 329 

sawing 1074 1073 

5EL 405 411 

Skamans 70+50 705 

TtiYssen 274® 27+30 

Vartg 369 375 

VetH 49780 497 JO 

VEW 35130 353 

Vk» 46130 467 

ValfcswagHn 482 490 

WflUd 825 810 

: 217*73 


doMPre*. 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhlyma 

135 

149 

EnsaGutzeit 

4030 ALSO 

Hutitamaki 

2tB 

200 

KjOJ». 

13.10 

1170 

Kvmmene 

122 

119 

Metro 

220 

218 

Nokia 

399 

385 

Pohkrta 

90 

■7 

Retxita 

9950 

101 

Stockmann 

300 

275 




Hong Kong 


Bk East Asia 
Caitiav PacHIc 
Cbeimg Kane 
China Light Pwr 
Dairy Farm Inn 
Hong Lung Dev 
Hang Seng Bonk 

Henderson Land 

HK Air Eng. 

HK China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Lend 
HK Realty Trust 
HSBC Holdings 
HK ShangHtts 

HKTetecomm 

HK Ferry 
Hutch Whamroo 
Hvsan Dev 
JanflneMattL 
JtVdlno sir Hid 

Kow loan Motor 

Mandarin Orient 
Miramar Hotel 
New World Pew 
SHK Praps 
Stetux 
&»lre Pac A 
Tal Cheung Pros 
TVE 

Wharf Hold 
Wing On Co inti 
Wlnsor ind. 


33 3338 
1240 124* 
4075 4130 
4225 42 

1230 12.90 
1530 1580 
57 57 

4730 4725 
4025 42 

I9J0 1 9 JO 
2280 2280 
25.10 2530 
2280 23 

99 9930 
1180 12J0 
1X90 1+10 
10J0 1080 
JI30 33 
2+30 2+80 
5730 6030 
30 3830 
14.70 1480 
II JO 11.10. 
2+30 2+20 
30 3125 
57 5+50 
460 +70- 
54 55 

12 1220 
333 330 

3125 3125 
13 IX2D 
1230 1230 
972*61 


Johannesburg 


AECI 
Ailech 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 

Blyvoor 
Bulfels 
DeBoers 
Drietanleln 
Gencor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Hlghveld Steel 
Kloof 

Nodbonk Grp 
Randfonleln 

Ruaotal 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasot 
Welkom 
Western Dean 
Carnal ^^522^ 


23 23 

90 94 

226 225, 

30 2985 
+75 9 

48 49 

11+5011230 
5230 579^ 
9.9D 1020 
97 98 

2530 2530 
2230 2125 
4630 4+50 
2*75 2+75 
4330 4225 
87 8*50 

91 90 

44 44 

2+25 24 

4130 4185 
187 190 


London 


Abbey Nan 

+81 


Allied Lyons 

+22 

+30 

Ario Wiggins 

255 

259 

Argyll Group 







9.9S 


BAe 

3.13 


Bank Scotland 



Bardavs 

535 

+52 

Bass 

+34 

+26 




BET 



Blue Circle 






Boots 



Bowater 

■LI 

+03 


K r 1 

160 

Brit Airways 

+25 

427 

Bril Gas 

3.T0 

115 

Bril Steel 

143 





BTR 

155 

190 




Cadbury Sdi 

+95 

+94 

Caradan 


453 

Coats Virol la 

240 

252 


+75 

+59 

Cauftaukts 

+36 

538 

ECC Group 

+10 

+20 

Enterprise Oil 

+10 

+15 

Eurotunnel 

+47 

546 



L30 




GEC 

ITS 


Gwil Aee 

6.10 

659 

Glaxo 

6.75 

677 

Grand Met 

+71 

+85 

GRE 

135 

131 




GUS 

573 

571 

Man? an 

279 

251 




HSBC Hides 

157 

175 

ICI 

773 

7.78’ 


Inchcape 

Kingfisher 

Ladbroke 

Land Sec 

Laaorte 

Lasmo 

Legal Gen Gra 
Lloyds Bank 
Marks Sp 
ME PC 
Non Power 
NaTWesJ 

Nitiwst water 


P&O 
Pllklnoton 
PowerGan 
Prudent ki I 
Panic Oro 
Rock Itt Cot 
Rwftand 
Reed inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Royce 
Roltunn (unit) 
Royal Scat 
RTZ 

5amsburv 
Scot Newsxis 
Seal Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

Slebe 

Smith Nephew 
SmllhKIIne B 
smith (WH) 
Sui Alliance 
Tate & Lyle 

Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TS8 Group 
Uni lover 
UM BlSCU ltS 

War Loan 3V4 
Wellcome 
Whiteread 
wm loins Hdoo 
Willis Canaan 


5M 

685 

285 

787 

*80 

189 

580 

584 

+23 

+90 

+64 

+95 

583 

+72 

687 

135 
533 
122 
+18 
+36 
+73 
983 

Tnnc 

9.71 

189 

+20 

+35 

+50 

383 

543 

33* 

1.19 

535 

+76 

535 

183 

136 
+17 
126 
+31 
133 

118* 

233 

2J6 

10.73 

140 

535 

4786 

+28 

531 

3.96 

281 


545 

+11 

286 

781 

+03 

1J2 

434 

Sl9* 

+24 

+97 

+61 

+9S 

+45 

+92 

683 

135 

534- 

124 

+25 

+48 

568 

980 

2042 

968 

187 

+20 

+37 

+53 

385 

543 

+05 

120 

+77 

688 

+06 

164 

3.97 

520 

3J0 

+31 

222 

1164 

236 

261 

1082 

334 

522 

4731 

660 

531 

+06 

222 


S : | 


Madrid 

BBV 3220 3260 

Bco Centre! H Iso. 2*50 2850 

Banco Santander 6870 6900 

CEPSA 3015 3045 

Dragodas 2510 2510 

Em»sa 7«0 7590 

Ercros 161 162 

Iberdrola I 1090 1105 

Rensol 4790 4900 

Tobocalera 4075 4055 

Tetefontca 1925 1965 

index : 39+91 


Milan 


Banco Comm 
Boston) 

Benetton group 

Ctoa 

CIR 

Crea i tal 
E n4 chem 
FwHn 
Ferfln Risp 
Flat SPA 
Flnmcc c onico 
C^eraH 

«ss 

lialmoblltare 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

S* 5 

Rlnoscente 
SMpanr 


6259 6330 
82 84 

26675 26900 
680 690 

2386 2379 

2578 26*7 

2470 245D 
17*3 1005 
795 795 

499* 5081 
1850 1835 
38738 39170 
20518 19*58 
11708 11770 
5651 5627 
38820 39010 
15950 160*0 
1258 1208 
mi save 
4388 4385 
24995 25308 

18050 10018 

3059 3855 


s«m Paok) Torino 10650 1D7S0 


SIP 
SME 
Snla 
Strata 
SM 

Toro ASS] Rfap 

mwnur 


4524 4*00 

3800 387* 
2070 2005 
35000 34700 
4*37 5003 
26810 2*600 


Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum 33W 32*4 
Bank Montreal 29 
Bell Canada 45W 53te 
Bombardier B 22te 3 
Conte lor 20te 2He 

Cnudn 74 

Dominion Text A bvh Ste 
Donohue A m 27 

MacMillan Bl 23 2) 

Noll Bk Canada 10 9te 
Power Cora. 25te 23 
Quebec Tel 23 aw 

QuettecorA 21% 20H 
Ouebecor B 21 W 21*. 

Teksktee 23te 21 
(Jnivo m 

Video rr o n I6W I6te 

tatestr lots Index : 201+96 

mStom : biud 


Paris 

Accor no 73 

Air Llnulde 867 872 

Alcatel Alstltom 729 72* 

Axa 1441 1 

Banco! re (Cle) 632 637 

BIC 1300 1120 

BNP 26060 267.50 

711 720 

923 925 

4209 4173 
261 261 
14414438 
1498 1487 
399 39840 
40530 40SJ0 
4106041188 
1090 1101 
3+15 3+70 
2767 2770 
48340 487.40 
629 629 

473 475 


BSN-GD 
Colour 

Sens' 

Chargetirs 
C [men is Franc 
Club Med 
EJf-Aouttatne 
Eif-Scmofi 
Euro Disney 
Gan.Eoux 
Havas 
I metal 

Latin ue Capped 
Leorand 6070 

Lyon. Eaux 606 592 

Oreal CL') 1301 1313 

L.VJAH. 4181 4160 

Mat rD-Hochette 15+ 20 15730 
NUChelln B 261 259 

Moulinex 14+20 14638 

Paribas 486 49+S0 

Pechlrwy lirlt 194 19+90 
Pernod-Rloord 41060 414 

Prln^ps (Aul 9B TO 

RodJofechrteiue 5S0 553 

RtePoutencA 14*40 147 

Rati. St. Louis 1715 1722 
RedoulelLa) 850 850 

Sojnt Gobrdn 701 712 

51b GenercriB 

Suez 


674 57B 

340.58 34TJD 
Thotnson-CSF 199.W 201 


Total 

UJ+P. 

voteo 


333 33530 
195 203 30 
1430 1469 




Sao Paulo 

Bones do Brasil 


Brohmo 
Poronapanemo 

was? 

VoteRteOncn 

SS^’ 


T9 1+60 
931 930 
1240 1240 
1M 198 
20 1+50 
16214938 

*2 S 

130 145 


Singapore 

» 740 735 

CilV Dev. +55 645 

DBS 11.10 11.40 

Fraser Meow 1740 1740 

Genlhw 1+10 1640 

Golden Hope PI 248 248 

Haw Par 3.16 123 

Hume Indusirtas 545 540 

Indienw 540 +40 

Kennel 945 940 

KLKeaong 102 298 

Lwn Chana 1 J* 1-77 

Matavtm Bonkg 845 +70 

OCBC 1240 12J0 

OUB 740 IBS 

OUE 745 7.10 

Semb o w nnw IT 40 1140 

Stnmrflo 5J0 530 

5 1 me Dortty 3.7B X76 

5fA 730 730 

Staore Land +20 +25 

STwte press 1+30 1+49 

Sing Steamship 342 336 

Smore Telecomm 334 *54 

strain Trading *74 3J0 

UOB TO 1+20 

UOL 1.94 1.96 

SlroHs TIP— < - 
Previses: 


Stockholm 

AGA 421 422 

Asea A 427 428 

Astra A 170 172 

Altos Capes 508 513 

Electron* B 409 411 

Ericsson 364 357. 

EssMte-A 116 113 

Hfeteefcbanta, 123 124 

Investor B 191 194 

Norsk Hydra 25230 250, 
Praeemna AF ns lie, 

5cravlkB 123 123 

SCA-A 136 135, 

S-E Banked 6*50 62 

ftamdlo p 165 163 

Skmuko 206 198 

|J6F 141 135 

Slorci 437 428 

vra*»" BF J? JJ 

ftSSSSWSK “ 


Sydney 

Amcor TOXU 946 

ANZ 5J4 5 39 

BMP 1730 1740 

Bora I +22 444 

Booaalavtlle 1 

Cotes Myar +92 +94 

Comal co 5 +95 

CRA 1736 1730 

CSR +79 440 

Fosters Brew I H L2< 
Goodman FleW 138 141 
ICI Australia KU8 1040 
Magellan 2.10 Z10 

MIM 3J0 *14 

Mat First Bank 1146 1134 
News Corp 939 939 

Nine Network +33 525 
N Broken Hid ' 337 IS 

Poc Dun ton 5J5 540 

Pioneer in IT 344 321 
Nmndy Paaektan 2J2 235 
OCT Resources 142 1J1 
Sanies 448 +08 

TNT 735 733 

western Mining 733 732 
WestPU Banking 5.16 +18 
Mftm&We 4 


Tokyo 


Akol Electr 
Asatti Chemical 
Asodl Glass 
Bank ot Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Casio 

Dai Nippon Print 
Daiwa House 
Daiwa Securities 
Fonuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 


ItoYokado 

Itochu 

Japan AlrUneo 
Kailma 
Konsai Power 
Kawasaki Sleet 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Intfs 
Matsu Elec Wks 
Mitsubishi Bk , 
Mltsubtate Kasel 
Mitsubishi Etec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Corp 
Mitsui rad Co 
MtsukosM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NOK Insutonrs 
Nlkko Securities 
Nippon Koaoku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 

Olympus Optical 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sanyo Elec 

Sharp 

Shlrrtaxu 

Shine tsu Chem 

Sony 

Sum Homo Bk 
Sumttamo Chem 
Sum I Marin e 
Sum/ tome Metal 
Tats*! Cora 
Tatsho Marine 
TakedoOiem 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pi* 
Toopan Printtos 
Toroy Ind. 

Tosh no 
Toyota 
Yamaknisec 
a: x la* 


513 514 
71* 700 

1208 1188 
1640 1630 
1580 1590 
1700 1720 
1350 1348 
1680 I860 
1650 1630 
1740 1760 
+310 4300 
2280 2260 
«70 2460 

10S0 1040 

957 954 

799 795 

1730 1770 
5800 5660 
70* 701 

tm 4si 

950 950 
2810 2790 

373 363 
1260 1268 

951 972 

700 695 

6780 6730 

1810 1B40 

1200 1790 
2860 7850 
490 463 

6 06 607 

705 704 

1100 1060 
775 773 

955 960 
2170 2160 
1080 1070 
1110 1090 

1390 1380 

1080 1060 
748 750 

356 354 

599 599 

913 911 

2370 2390 
9410a 9520a 
1128 MHO 
2740 2738 

512 512 

173) 1700 
725 788 

2190 2190 
6350 6338 
2200 2180 
489 468 

910 m 
264 2B0 

679 681 

843 855 

1348 1320 

4450 4450 

400 460 

1330 1290 
3370 OTO 
1360 1370 
*78 677 

802 795 

2110 2DP0 
909 9T2 


Toronto 


AWtHtf Price 
Agntco Eagle 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Am Banrfck Res 
BCE 

Bk Novo ScoHa 

BC Gas 
Be Telecom 
BF Realty Hdi 
Bromoteo 
Brananlck 
CAE 
Comdev 
CISC 


ista me 

14 1*te 

7M 7V. 

1946 T9V. 
329b 33W 
SZW 52Vb 
31 3t*b 
15% 16 

26ta 2646 

OjO T wn 

0J9 D45 
9U, ne 
7vy 69k 
439 +90 
35 346S 


47*4 
+35 +35 
Pi aw 
4ta +90 
20*4 21 

* a 

l*s 


CanodJra Pacific 23*4 7SH 
Col Tire A 11% 1196 

Cantor 
Cora 

CCLIndB 
CIneptox 
Comlnco 
Conwest Expl 
DentsooMlnB 
Dickenson Min A 
OafascQ 
Dylex A 0.91 032 

Echo Bov Minn 16*6 17 

faulty Silver A 0.90 *92 
FCA inn 346 3*6 

Fed Ina A 8 79k 

Fletcher Chall A 20*6 »■- 
FPI 5 5 

Gentra 037 036 

GoldCorp IT'S 11*6 

GuM Cda Res +35 +48 
Hoes Inti 15V* isw 

HemtoGW Mines TJta 139k 


U.S. FUTURES 


Mwdi 16 


*36 

81+ 


HoilLu __ 
Horshom 
Hudson's Bay 
Imasco 
inco 

Inierarov pipe 
Jon nock 
Latiott 
Lob law Co 
Mackenzie 
Magna Inti A 
Maple Lest 
Maritime 
Mart Res 


I5*e isvt 
19*6 19*6 
30 30 

38 3896 
34 32*6 
32 32* 
2116 21V» 
21*6 TV* 
2416 249k 
12 12 
72 71 *k 
13 13 

2S*fc 2596 
74h TV, 


MocLian Hunter 17V> 17V. 


Motion A 
Noma Ind A 
Norando Inc 
Narando Forest 
Norcen Energy 
Nfhern Telecom 
Nova Carp 
OteawQ 
Papurtn A 
Placer Dome 
po« Petrateum 
PWA Carp 


Renaissance 

Rogers B 

Roth mans 
Royal Bank Con 
Sceptre Rh 
S cotrsHasp 
Seaoram 
Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sherri IT Gordon 
SHLSvstemhse 
Southern 
Soar Aerospoce 

S telco A 
Talteman Energ 
TockB 

Thomson News 

Toronto Damn 

Torstar B 
Transatta Util 

Untcara Energy 


27 26*6 
696 6*6 
25% 25*6 
14 14W, 
14*6 14V6 
41 41 

10 996 

22*6 23 

3*6 3*6 

32 32*1 
9*6 9*6 
ne mo 
1796 1794 
29*6 39 

23*6 23*6 
83*6 83*7 
29*6 29*6 
1317 7397 
8*6 8*6 
40 3**i 
7*. 7*6 

39*6 39*6 
1296 12*6 
llfti 1K6 
20 *. 21 
18 1864 
96 9*6 

31 3W6 
25*6 25. 

1896 18*4 
23** 22*6 
25*6 25*6 
15*4 ISH 
20*6 2D 
5 5*6 

14*6 17 

(LBS (LB 5 
U. 2 


R&i55, , ?S^f as " 


Zurich 

Adla inti B 245 2S7 

Aknutae B new 645 648 

BBC Boon Bov B 1220 1234 
884 907 

645 650 

3940 4030 
1290 1310 
2500 2490 
87? 87? 

950 930 

440 440 

1248 1273 
142 171 

1540 1540 
7150 7198 
125 132 

3960 39*8 
7100 7800 
rase 1057 
2100 2100 
435 440 

427 635 

790 785 

1238 1240 
740 750 

1385 1387 


ClbaGeigvB 
CS Housings B 
ElektrawB 
Fischer B 
laterdlscnunl B 
Jebnali B 
Landis GvrR 
Maev enr ict. B 
NestieR 
Oerilk. Buehrle R 
Pargesa ma B 
Roche Hdg PC 
Sofia Republic 
Sandaz B 
Scftindler B 
smzer pc 
S urvelllonce B 
SwteeBn+CaraB 
Swiss ReJnsur R 
Swtssair R 
UBS B 
Winterthur B 
Zurich Ass B 


ft's easy to 

faVmr/ 




155 57 ST 


Season 

Season 





Koh 

LOW Open HMl 

LOW 

Oase 

Oio 

OpJnt 


Grains 




WHEAT 





IMVj 

350 M(X«4 373 1J4V, 

133 

1361* 

-awto 

307 

372 

300 Muv*4 137V, 142V, 


1*2V, 

-055 


156 



129to 



157to 

352 Sep *4 3285. 131 to 

128to 

130 V, 

-051V, 

7351 

345 

159 Dec 94 Ul'i 140 

134 to 

140 

-tun 

4347 

156 “1 

134 Mor 95 139V, 141 

139 to 

141 

* n m 

3 

342to 

111 JuISS 


177 

• 057 

45 

EF.steos 1.500 Tue-LSOkR 8415 





Tub’s ran mt 4+830 up 610 





WHEAT 


a^rspcrbuVKl 



192 

730 Mor 94 330 151 to 

14*Vj 

151 

• 054 

998 

179 V, 

291 May 94 117 140 


U9to 

•052 

VJ2I 

135 

2.97 JU 94 326to 179V, 

3J6to 

12*to 

-057to 

1+634 

ISSto 

107 V, top 94 121 131 

378 

12941 

*053to 

1945 

140 

3.17toDec94 135 136'fc 

134to 

uro 

•aovi 

1338 

153'x. 

13) Ma-95 138 138 

138 

138 

-0.B7H 

163 

E n.«wn 3,943 Tut"*, srie* 4J54 





Tue’sapenlnt 25.90* oH 12*7 








111V. 

23IKMcr»4 274to 211 '6 

274to 

739 VS 

-a«?v, 

1,703 

Xld’k 

2J8V, 6tay 94 254 251 

233 to 

286'A 

+07 

20,749 

+164 

141 All 94 247to if] 

237to 

JWl 

052 to 11 5540 

293'i 

240 to Sep 94 776 179 to 

174 

278 V: *052 

7+985 

273* 

774 to Dec 9J 244 '6 245to 

J64'« 

164%. 

1 850ft 99.144 

2.79V, 

2J3toMar 95 2705, 271V, 

Z7V.S 

270ft 


3,733 

252 

2491, Mov 95 275 175'* 

275 

275 

•050ft 


2B3'/J 

Z70toJul95 274V, 276to 


734)9 



2.5Sto 

LSI Dec 95 133 733 

232 

257V, 

-050V, 


Est. sales S2000 Tub's, sates 50 .*57 




TUB'S Open inf 378456 up 3357 







734 

5J9V>Mar*4 637 693 to 

654 

692 

055V, 

1.783 

7.51 

577toMoy94 63BV, +97 

687to 

694ft 

-005 

4+/J4 

730 

+94V>Jv<94 +91 698 


695’* 


7J5 

678 Auo*J 633V, 690 

637 

657V, 

- 054»t 

73+7 




678ft 



7SPr, 

SJStoNavM 636 659 to 

4. 54 VI 

656ft 

OOOto 3+539 

+70 

61 B to Jan 95 662 664 


+62to 


2*353 

6.73V, 






636 

653 Mav 95 670 670 

670 

670 

CL02 

1 

675 


669 

6*9 


244 

6J0to 

+JlV',t4ov9S 625 625 

622'-', 

+27 ft -050ft 

988 

Esl. soles 65400 Tup’s. safcM 4831? 




Tub's open w 154453 oH 795 

km 











19690 

197.10 

-150 29.7*3 

ZJOM 

1 9030 JJ 94 19+70 191.90 


197.70 

-1.00 2+ 887 

22350 

10950 Aug 94 19650 19740 

19650 

19670 

-0.20 

6514 


18170 SOP 94 19+30 19+70 

19450 

19+W 

-070 

+546 


!B7,T0Oct«4 19JJ0 19170 

I92JO 

19736 

-aw 

7.985 


+40 Dec 94 19100 19350 


1*1.90 

— 1.10 

8306 




19150 




187 50 Mor 95 192.50 1*2® 


19230 

-050 

ZJ 






1 

Esi. sates 70500 Tub’s, satas 22.162 













30.75 

21.13MW94 7832 29.15 

2+52 

79.14 

•0*1 

1548 

3045 


78« 

»« 



2135 Jv! 94 78J7 7950 

2+35 

7+98 

< +65 2+346 








22.40 Set, 94 27.40 2+12 













2641 

7635 

>018 IJ5S7 







J4JS 

2530 Mar 95 


*637 

■ 017 

53 







EsL sates 23500 Tue'vsries 11476 




Toe's open ini 9L7U on 417 






Livestock 






to 











7192 

7+17 





7230 

7732 

o» 

2.11/ 









7180 

7+02 















EsLso^ 

NA Tup's, sdtes 12324 




















8550 



8155 



8+40 





































NA Two’s sates 1*41 





Tub's ooen kit 12354 up 252 





















































41*0 Apr 9} 47.10 47.15 












NA Tub’s, sates 5J1* 






























025 



OWAU094 53 55 54 75 












S&OOMar 95 5050 5+00 












NA Tueta sole* 2310 





lue’scpsnue *733 ua 18 






Food 

COFFEE C «4C®_F.i44W»-2«*r- 
90JS 6U0MOT94 7930 80.95 

90.50 4X25 MOV 94 81J8 B3D 

H7JC 6+90JlH9J 8238 8US 

OX tfJDSalH 8400 8518 

»1P0 rilODeCW *+* 6*20 

030 t+9S Mar« 8+2* Ota 

8735 «2JDMay95 5730 B7J8 

8790 tUOJultf _ 

Ea «•« 1X215 Tuo*+ SONS 7.793 
Toe's ran Ini 5+N4 up 193 


7980 

8080 

>130 

144 

+ 30 

BUB 

*+» UMO 

8155 

euo 

• 0JS 

9.730 

*130 

8455 

• an 

5341 


1*35 

-1.15 

+470 

8530 


■ +95 

1.099 


l/.*5 

• 0*9 

i-n 


i+n 

■ I3S 

1 


Financial 


V u> 
95 IS 
9543 
9515 


1 003 14.095 
•084 6.706 
-085 2.940 
004 I 


UST.BAXJ (OWERl iirtn-maMKi 

ta74 9+87jfanM WOT 6+71 U.W 

9+4* *5-65 Sep *4 *574 9575 9571 

9+10 9VJIOCCM *5^1 954J 9541 

Mr 9S 

Es4«4es HA. Tue'v sates +901 
Tire’s oral W 4X243 up 679 
* yR. TREASURY tCBOT) uaunm n-.4oami«pe 

11J-OSSID6-07 Mir94ia*-to 108-74 168-17 108-74 . 0* 40J90 

£S2i l07 ‘” 10M0S ,#7 -« o*s 164.709 

1 10- 195106-79 Sep 94 167-07 m 435 

Ed-Wta 6+ «0 Tup’s Him 50.533 

Tup’s open .m 205.114 up urn 

llVtoTKE^URY tCBOTI 1IN nconm- rt-.i KSpr, 

' fi? SS’SS «•»" ,,MB ,OT -'9 110-00. 16 35.H6 

-IS-*! A>n 94 108-19 108-31 108-16 169-30 . 16 25X7a 

Mnw 107-78 108-01 IDT-23 168-03 16 2AI7 

if'I! 2S"2 107-13 187-07 107-13 , 16 IS 

111- 67 I08-D9 Mar 96 106-77 , 16 , 

Ed seen i«ooa Tue-s won no m* 1 3 

Tue 6 open H 791483 up AC 

tdWTJ ilpr unatlu'.. nu-uiiup^i 

!?f"2 Mor 94110-84 111-00 118-07 110-31 . jj YS 

Si'S to"**»09-« 10* -30 189-00 102-1* 

!!5"5 Sep9. lae-ia IO*-OI isa-cu im-oo 

Its DccMIO-a 108-13 107-00 108-1] 

'£■?! Mar 95107-05 107-22 107-01 107-27 

115-19 98-15 JunH 107-06 

113-15 104-7* Septs 

113-14 104-03 Dec 95 HIS- 10 105-76 105-16 105-7* • JU ;; 

EH. idles 8+800 TOOtaSOOS 509.96/ 

Tue'iOoenM 477J98 up 2727 

M5RBpPM.BONOS ICBOT) lloaonnar.-on + iTnOKy w>i»-i 
IS tS 98-JO W-08 **-» , x fi3n 

to"« 95-05 96-03 9S-0S «6-OI . 31 75 j»l 

»J14 94-14 SOP 94 94-14 95-04 94-l« *5-03 jV 

Ed. sales 94U TuCssrar. 1+120 
■ 34SD4 HD 7U 

ICMERI ii,rai>vi.i».iviaann 

95890 *0.400 Jipi 94 95400 95720 95470 95710 40496.767 


30 


371.999 
38 39404 
33 23-346 
30 1.135 


1 Season Season 






Moh 

Low Open 

rton 

Low 

Close 

aw 

<te.m» 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSEI 

lilaeOtec-aMSBc. I* 



1+47 

+30 Mav 94 1+18 

1+20 

1237 

1+17 

.0346X392 

12J0 

9I5AH94 1+37 

1+35 

1+17 

1229 



1195 


II 8* 

11.71 

1181 

.002 79.01* | 

1132 


11.40 

M27 

IU6 

.0 05 12347 

>138 

1+57MOV95 



11J4 

1 005 

1^57 

1137 

1+57 At 95 



IIJ1 

•0l0? 

1,007 

1130 

1037 Oct 95 



1176 

-001 

xs 

ESL soles 17.818 Tue'LSOttii 19.578 




1 Toe’s open ini 141.434 up 9*3 





COCOA tNCSE) 

- Ipe* Vki 




1495 









1250 

177? 

1743 

■0 41.125 | 

1345 

999Jul«4 1157 

1775 

1241 

1270 

. 17 18.906 

1377 

1 an Sep 94 1777 

1794 

1261 

1797 

. 10 

+974 

1389 

1041 DK 94 1305 

1376 

1300 

1323 

• 10 

6430 

1383 

1077 Mir 95 1341 

1354 

1340 

1356 

• 5 

9.737 

1400 

1111 May 9S 13« 

1364 

1344 

1374 

• 5 

5JS9 

1407 

IT25Jul95 1380 

1380 

1310 

139* 

>5 

3-716 

1150 

I275S6P95 



1415 

• 5 

681 

1637 

1338 Dee 95 




-5 

205 

1 Esi uses 7314 Toe’s itees 






Toe’s open Bit 9+857 aft 631 





ORANGE JUICE (NCTTO iLooobm.- 

-Ms Berts 




84307«r94 109.10 

109.10 

18850 


—040 

298 

13L0B 

89J0May 94 111.40 

111+0 

1I0J5 

11150 

-010 

+*« 


10350 Jul 94 it+ra 

11425 




5278 








13+00 

10+00 Mov 94 1I54U 

11500 

11+00 

11+00 


1.767 

13100 

18475 

10350 JOT 95 M605 
10600 Mor 75 11650 

11535 

1 1650 

11650 

11675 

•020 

.025 

1.657 

174 

Esi. sales NA Tue's.sNes 
| Tub's open W >9^46 uo B3 

1,100 






Metals 





feJSOKr, t> 




7+00 Mar 94 9130 

9150 

9135 

*350 

■ 120 

3425 


7+50 Apr 94 9225 

9X25 

97 75 

9X30 

. 1.11 

l.Ul 


7160 Mav M *150 

9120 

9120 

9115 

<130 3+306 

89.70 

7+KJJOT94 9150 

9150 

9150 

*255 

• 7.10 


107.95 

7+70 Jul 94 9+70 

9? JO 

9050 

9725 

11.15 1+569 

10X30 

74.taSep94 9+40 

9150 

9040 


• IJ» 

3.7S3 


7+75 DK 94 90 45 

91.90 

9130 


-0.95 

X7S3 

B9J0 

7698 Jan 95 



91.75 

'+95 



71 CC Feb 9S 9+95 




• un 



6+70 Mar VS *100 

91.00 

*1.00 

91.90 

i +95 

1^7* 


7635 Mav 95 *170 

91 70 

»l.70 

9235 

> 090 

447 

*+« 

7+00 A4 *5 




•0*5 


8870 

7SJ0AUD9S 



9+10 

•1.10 



791QSet>95 



97 J5 

• 080 


8930 

7+2000 95 



7185 

• UO 


aaja 

7775 Nw 95 




► 135 



4+JOOec9S 




•025 

143 


Jan 94 



9720 

-+70 


EO. soles 12300 Tueta sates 10-SC 




TurtoiOPOT ln» *5673 up 1707 





SLVE 

; (NCMXJ SAOPiravai 

- creihi 

r* lr«re oi_ 



5563 

3*60Mtr94 5415 

5433 

083 

537.7 

-85 

1437 

548J1 

SI 60 Apr 94 



S3+2 

—85 

16 

55+5 

3713 May 94 54X5 


5395 


—85 

1,573 

56+0 

3713+4 94 5«75 

5513 

MU 

54+1 

-82 175*1 

56I.S 

376SSCPW 5525 

SS25 

S4»5 

5484 

-85 

+717 

57+0 

380 Q Dee 94 5S90 


555 0 


—88 



4010 Jon 9 5 56+0 

VulO 

55*3 




57+5 

4165 Mar 75 

S633 

5633 

561.4 










59+0 

4703 Jut 95 S7+0 

5750 

5710 

5713 

--BS 


56+0 

49)35*0 95 



5764 

— 88 


5860 

D93Dec95 590.0 

590 0 

5900 

5*43 

— 85 

»5 


Jan 9ft 



5864 

—85 



17373 




TuCiepenuU 113323 all 717 





RJkTINUM p m Mil rorar -Mill 

viret or. 


47610 

3S7AQ Ari 94 40500 

40600 

40*30 

AUD 

— inn 


41100 

34830 Oct 94 40730 

40700 

40500 

314 90 

-350 


41230 

37 4 M Jon 95 



4O5J0 



41+00 




«64D 



EsLstea na Tw'vsates 

UM 










COLD 


riwnr 




39130 




364.90 










37+50 May 94 






41730 

J3940jun94 38+80 

309 JO 




41500 

341.50 Auu 94 39050 

391 JO 

39850 

39+30 



417410 

3*430 Od 94 






47650 

34330 Dec 94 396.70 

396.70 











417.08 

3M50 Apr 9S 







361J0jun»5 404 JO 

04 JO 

40+50 

40+30 









627 







477.00 

+17-00 DOC 95 41450 

114 SO 



-7 10 

X567 

Es». sates 7+000 tub's, sates 

30.795 


Tutriaponln 147.387 ott 45 






Season Season 
hfish Low 


Open tfah Low Oase Chg Oatot 


9S370 

9+180 

9+580 

9+7M 

94320 

94220 


'5037+548 
,50282307 
-407503177 
'9191358 
* 9 151.764 
•9)21.02? 
■ 910+080 


90 360 SeP 94 9+280 9+320 9+260 9+310 
90.710Dec«4 9+ 970 9+910 9439 9+900 
902* MPT 95 9+430 9+470 9+810 9+670 
90.710 Jim 95 94340 94400 M3* 94J90 
9IJI0SCP95 94 130 94 1*0 94.110 9+140 
Pi 1*0 Dec *5 93360 93390 91330 93390 
*0-750 Mar +5 *17711 91320 *3.770 93320 
Esi. safes NA Toe's, sales 430.788 
Tue'5 open ini 2375.37* all 7*1525 
BRtTTSH POUND tCMER) n^r wd- I urinuk lOAOii 
1+19 13474 Jun 94 1.4860 13914 13812 >3907 

13500 1 3440 Sep *4 1.4824 1 4884 1 4790 1 4174 

13*90 13500 Dec M 13858 

Est. sows NA Toe’S, satos 10,701 
Tue's open irt 45J75 un 880 
CANADIAN DOLLAR tCMER) iurP-Ippond 
0.5717 IU338fJlar94 02298 

0280S 0.2J8Jim94 +7335 0.73M 0J322 17377 

02740 L7J15Sep94 0.7370 D.7331 17313 07317 

07670 0.73 10 D« 94 02313 0 7319 0 7308 07307 

073? 07795 Am 9S 0 7794 

Fa sofcn n*. Tie's sales 3.909 
TWs oPWtM 5+39* up 835 
GERMAN MARK (CMEH) tpcriw-lmTlraPiHMl 
83133 836073x194 03887 03W OJB59 03895 1 32 85,717 

06065 0.5600 Sep 94 03849 15880 0JB49 03878 '37 2703 

05810 . 03590 Dec 94 15160 03869 03860 0+871 *33 131 

Esi. sales NA Tub's, sates 42.07s 
Toe’S Open mt IJ»^60 up 1577 

JAPANESE TEN tCMER) idt* »ru- 1 pcMnuXtURMtl 


-40 7+787 

•40 

586 j 

*40 

Lk»l 

30 \ 

—2 

153 ’ 

-7 4X086 

—7 

919 ’. 

— 7 

406 - 

—7 

iB : 


00 09*4303068 7 1 Jun 54 00094+610094910 SOM50DJUM66 
OflOWOlllOOBWTSep *4 0 M9 5700X09+350.009 51 MlJ09+li 
10098U2Lfl0957SDcc 94 1009570 

Est sales NA Tub’s, sales 70.8? I 
Tue*S open nl 94.943 oH 648 

un Sm- imrinuiiHflOi 
0M * 7 “-S®* 4 0-6*74 

07 1 OS 0 6950 Dec M 06990 0.7010 06990 02000 

Est. sides na Tub's, sales 2+800 
Tuc’sooen kit 53473 oft 470 


' 10 47347 
• 9 1392 
>7 403 


►47 37327 
>46 7+3 

-45 3S 


Industrials 


7400 73 SO Tut 9+ 

EsI sales NA Tut - 

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77.17 

7640 

7693 

• +16 2+486 

, 

77.® 

77.70 

7758 

-0.11 13546 


7+70 

7+83 

7+05 

-OH 2542 


77.85 

7X46 

7+56 

— +29 1+209 


7355 

73 45 

7147 

—058 582 


7400 

7+oa 

7405 

—025 <84 

• 

7+60 

S 9,176 
68* 

7460 

7457 

—023 37 



48 TDAuafS 4875 
49^0 Sep 95 


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*^1-tav94 1+83 l+oe 1+69 
li^tonM 14.91 1+16 14 77 

"I 1+97 1+27 14.88 

14 13 15 38 14.99 

4+70 I5_u IS u 

I+H0094 1+20 I +J3 1578 

JJlTJkwW 144+ 1547 1+41 

1+75 Dec 94 1+56 15 *0 1+50 

|SiJto?95 1+75 1+75 i+2 

■564 Feb 9+ ISA* I5M 15*0 
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1+27 1+7* 

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[AMDoctS 1*60 1+80 1+80 

I" 28 17.20 

■ 18.750 


MAS 

070 

4*47 

-0.16 38576 s 


1 020 

4+85 

4X54 

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4350 

4+95 

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4150 

4+15 

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1 4460 

4+AO 

4+90 

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1 4+90 

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if’JtonW 4+75 47.21 46 45 

4+JSJte94 46 SB 47 BB JOC 

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•044 18323 . 

■ 149 45733 ’ 

• 142 72.130 ; 

* 0-37 7371- 
-023 +7W 
■028 3.947 
■028 1203 

■ 028 2A« 


Stock Indexes 

SAP COMP. INDEX tCMER] m . 

£on S«2 , |? a,M M6U> 47030 mck 46*70 
M+C0 44860 Jun*4 4*7*0 4714, 4*411 pn'm 

47744 -77525 47125 S+00 
ESI sales NA. Tuus jo^, J J+741 
Ti«c sepen mi 738.143 iu 
NTSC COMP. INDEX (IOT£1~wh- 
•jjjj 747 60 lUr 9J 2+9.10 260 90* 75850 «n« 

li ss ail 11 a 

slKSSS » — “ 



■ 2 *0 71.707 

■3JJ5IS8J7B 

■ 100 +155 
>111 44)11 


■190 1167 

■ 1.90 2.M8 

■ 1.90 31 

0 90 la 


Moody? 

Reuters 
Dj. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity indexes 

Close Previous 

■209-00 1,20730 

132+30 132200 

US-37 14501 

2293? 229J1 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994 


Page 13 


ABC INVESTMENT A SERVICES ca in r . 
MoMn»BonraRU>Q J8«J* t , iS&t 
JwABC Futures Funa £BZL1 j* Tl “J? 
m AflC Islamic Fund ( ecTZs 

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■ Trans Europe Fund fi fi 

■Trans Europe Fundi, j 

WAjfMHO - p i 

"f .^"O «MNAGEMEIIT Ltd 
rf MG Amcr.Eq.Tn«i « 

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WAIG Eurscv Fund « e _ Eeil 

wAIG Euro Small Ca Fa P!c_s 
■AjG Eiroera Plc l 

;S A!G LatMAmp^ca Fd Ptc J 




d H loll Life Fund. 


-Ecu 


rf UBZ EmOotimmr Fund .Ecu 
rf UBZUaukfiry Fum, « 

rf UBZ Ltoukflfv Fund DM n u 

■ WBZ U au Idlly Funa EcuHecu 
. JOBZ LkwMilv Fund SF_ZSF 
ALFRED BERG 

if AKraa Berg Noraen < 

Alfred Ben Sicor 

tf For Eant ... J 

rf Germany .- nwi 

if filahnl « 

rf mnnri y 

d rumertonds—. F > 

d Nartti America. s 

tf Switzerland, 
d ux. 


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1129979 

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1244241 

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1226930 

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197A0 

79.14 


ALPHA FUND MANAGEMENT. LTD 
« PMMmilHMHNHH Bermuda 
w Alntra Asia Heave i Morons 
mAIMia Europe Fd lFeb2BI_Ecu 
mAMta Future* Fd IF* hi j 
mAkta guu Prp Trad Feans 

m Aloha Global Fd I Fee 281 s 

m a tuna Hedge Fd <»=« 2BI s 

mAJBha Japan Spec (Feo 2B| A 
m Alnhs Latin Amer (Feb 28) s 
m Aloha Pacific Fd (Feb 28) .a 

m Alpha SAW « 

nt Aloha Snarl Fd (Fean) j 

mAbmSM-TRjtliic(FM>2BlS 
mAMta TllWcHe Fd <Fco 201 -S 
mAleho Worthington [Feb ms 
mBoch-AtPha EurHag Feb 28 Ecu 
raCWT-AtohO Him Cr Feb2B_S 
m Gtobalvatt Value I Feb 28) _ft 
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m Hemisphere Neutral Feo 285 
rnLaDnvest Value I Jan 31 ) s 

m NichAoiH Aurelia (Fed 28) _s 

rnPodt RIMOooBVI Mar 09 A 
mRMvoen int'i Funa (Feb 281ft 

ffiSooe infl Fd I Feb 2 *> s 

m Solus Inll Fd iFehni s 

ARRAL ASSOCIATES LTD 
w Arrat Amer Icon Quanl Fd_A 
wArral Aslan Funa. .. « 

wArrod Inn Hedge Fond s 

BAIL n Place VeRdome.7SH1 Pori* 
m Inlermarket Fund % 

I Interim Convert Bds FF 

I intcratff Inti Bds j 

r imerutti Odii camiartIMwif 
tnlermarket MuUtcurrenct Fund 

nj Class A ff 

mCtoss B t 

mCktssC - Y 

BANK BRUSSELS LAMBERT (32*) 547 2U7 


27440 

20923 

96.13 

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46400 

296.81 
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109.47 
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11548 
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8937 
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22474 

S99.17 

287955 

50148 

47460 

242X01 

23545 

5389200 


tf bBl invest America, 
tf BBL Invest BeWum. 
d BBL Invest Far Easl. 
d BBL Invert Asm. 


-BF 


tf BBL Invert Lathi Amer. 

tf BBl invest uk 

tf BBL Renta Fd Inti 

d Patrimonial. 


421.12 
13355JJ0 
3790058 
*4X07 
571.99 
254.79 
405000 
2130280 
12302100 
3061.73 
571X29 
13935 
1501580 
1141 LOO 
386880 


tf Renta Cash S-Meaium BEF BF 
d Renin Cush S-Medhwn DEM DM 
V Renta Cash 5- Medium (/so i 

d BBL (LI inv Goldmines LF 

d BBl (U invest Europe LF 

d BBL (L) Inv Euro-1 mmo LF 

d BBL <U invert World LF _ 

BANQUE BELGE ASSET MGMT FUND 
Share DStrtoutar Guernsey 0481 726414 

■ Infl Eavflr Fund (Sicav)— ft 7315 

■ mil Band Fund tftkav) 5 1636 

w Dollor Zone Bd Fa ISIcovl-S 11.93 

■ Stoning Eaultv Fa isicavu 1306 

■ Sterling Bd Fd (Sicav) £ 1516 

■ Asia Pacific Revlon Fd S 11.15 

BANQUE IN DOS UBZ 

■ The Dragon Fund Slam 5 

m Japan Gld Fd A (2a/Q2/V4)_3 
m Japan Gld Fd B (28/02/941-5 
mDuai Futures Fd Cl A unites 
m Dual Futures Fd a C Units! 
m Maxima Ful. Fd Sar. I CL AS 
m Maxima Fid. Fd Ser. 1 CL BS 
in Maxima Put. Fd Ser. 2 Cl. CS 
m Martina Ful. Fd Ser. 3 O. DS 

m indasuez Curr. a a units S 

m indesuez Curr. Ci b Units S 

IV 1PNA • J 5 


d ISA Asian Growth Fund.. 

0 ISA Japan Reg. Growth Fd.Y 

tf ISA Pacific GoM Fund S 

a ISA Aslan income Fund .5 

a Indasuez Korea Fund 5 

v» Shanghai Fund- ... * 

tv Himalayan Fund. S 

■V Manila Fund 5 

ir Malacca I 


’ Slam Fund . 


d indasuez Hong Kona Fund -5 

d Oriental Venture Trust S 

d North American Trust S 

d Stagop & Malay Trust— _S 

d Pacific Trust— _HK* 

if Tasman Fund S 


d Japan Fund. 
■Managed Trust. 
d Jaoan Warrant Fund. 


d Worldwide Growth Fund — 5 
» Indasuez High YW Bd Fd A! 
tv indasuez HtahYWBdFdB! 
b Maxi France ..FF 


tv Maxi Fiancees. 


-FF 


17783 

12*85 

10982 

12932 

11144 

127346 

11639 

102894 

10X745 

106845 

111.192 

/KM 

76.91 

92780 

1984 

11.94 
1183 
1X38 

19.94 
7444 
1965 
5592 

JUK 

41788 

3731S 

34345 

new 

4845 

17840 

J65W 

085 

487 

9888 

tauo 

534431 

531037 


BAMOUE SCAHDIHAVE A LUXEMBOURG 
BSS UNIVERSAL FUND (SICAV) 

d Eurosee ECU A (Otvl Ea» 

tf Euroscc ECU B (Cap) Ecu 

tf lalefsec USD A (Dht) 5 

a irtetsec AJSO B (Cap) 5 

tf Intettmnd OSD A (D(y)__S 

tf Ifrtetbond U5DB (Cap) J 

tf Flnnsec Global FM A (DM) FM 
d Flnnsec GWwl FM B (Cap) FM 

d Intel band FRF A <D4v> FF 

d inMbandFRF B (Cool FF 

tf Far East USD A (Dtv) * 

tf Far East USD B (Cap) S 

d Japan JPY A (Dlv). Y 

d Japan JPY B I Col — — Y 
tf Parsec FRF B I Cop) FF 


1498614 
1498616 
XZA736 
2X981 
17.1708 
203609 
2378841 
2378841 
12X9328 
1533818 
248428 
268742 
118X9182 
1 18X9182 
1255248 
2X5174 
253174 
17.M92 
17.1492 


2 cISS!**" Jbimns Euro D -Ecu 
d ■ C * urt Ter me E^FF 

LuSiTti — m 

laSiSfiK J-"" 1 -; 

;££B=g=a 

Z eSSSST L ws Hoo,,h 

rSuSSST. S * H * G W* 1 IF 

IBERMUDA) LTD 

w GIM lnsttiul)«xa 1 18 Feb) < 

E A r !“°‘ A ” 'NTERNATIOHAL GROUP 
2 Cl Conadtan Growth Fd CJ 

a r't *"**«*» Ffl-TZq 

tf Ct Pacific Fund a 

tf Cl Global Fund -. £ 

tf Cl Enters Marten Fd q 

tf CIEwoMon Fund Cs 

tf Canada Guar.Mongaoe Fd CS 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

w camiai (fill Fund j 

ycpBifaf moa sa % 

CDC INTERNATIONAL 
wCEP Court Terme .. . cc 
*.GFI Long Terftv. e p 


179A79 

P9I20 

>068.94 

13X54 
14983 
1371 J3 
969400 

7535 

15684 


899.1J 

433 

8.11 

1783 

984 

?51 

408 

lUt 

13*53 

4X13 


-DM 


CINDAM BRAZIL FUND 

tf Clndom Equity Fund % 

tf wndnm BottJncrd Fund s 

?nn fLUXEMBOURfliiA. 
PUB 1373 Luvemaourp Tel. 477 95 71 
d ai nuest Gtobo) Bond . .1 
tf Clllnvest FGP USD— j 
tf Cltlnvert FGP ECU— —Ecu 
tf CU Inven stmat r. ■ZZZZj t 
tf CHcurreoclesuSO. * 

tf ClWcurrenoes OEM. 
tf CJ lieu r reticles &BP_ 

tf CltKuneiKies Yen V 

tf C it toon ha Eautty -8 

tf Clitoart Coni, Euro Eoutlv.Eeu 
d Oltoorr UK Emjliv t 

tf Clljearl French Edully~FF 
2 Gerttnm Eavrfv— OM 

tf Oflpari Jaoan Equity — Y 

tf ailport IAPEC 4 

d CUIoorl Ernnec 1 

tf OHnorl NJL s Band * 

tf CIHaort Euro Band Ecu 

tf Managed Currency Funa_4 
CITIBANK (PARIS) SJL 

trCHi 96 Cap Gld * 

crriTRUST 

tv US s Eauliln S 

tv US 5 Money Market 5 

ir us s Bonn 4 

IV at I tana 


17244487 

151728880 


1463700 

1660689 


10203 

126001 

133730 

141X31 

161939 

14X97 

16113 

1214400 

24483 

19135 

14830 


mailpertormance PIN SA.. 

■* TIM Good Earth Fund 

COMGEST (33-1) 447* 75 18 
wCcmges* Asia. 


-5F 


tvComgesl Eurooe 

CONCEPT FUND 

b WAM Global Heaee Fd * 

b WAM inti Bd Hedge Fd S 

COWEM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Cowm Enferprbe Fund N.V. 
tvCkxaA Bvt . l 

iv Class BShs. 


CREDIT AGRICOLE 
INDEXI5 

tf Indexls USA/SAP 500— 

tf indexls Japon/Nikkd 

tf Indents G Bret/FTSE 

tf Indexls France/CAC 4B_ 

tf Indexls CT 

MONAXIS 
tf Court Terme uso. 


15J282S 

1X41482 


1296.79 

124486 


111*30 

102508 


1307.91 

1625.42 


_FF 

-FF 


-Eat 


tf Court Terme DEM. 
tf Court Terme JPY_ 
d Court 7 error GBP _ 
tf Court Terme frf _ 
tf Court Terme ESP- 
d Court Terme ECU - 
MOSAIS 
d Actions Inn Dlvervliees_-FF 
d Actions Hunt Amertcahiea-S 

d Actions Jmmotoes Y 

d Act loos Anghitses t 

d Actions A Hem antfos. 
d Acilans Francoises— —FF 

d Actions Esn. & Port Pfn 

tf Actions llalienncs- Ui 

d Actions Bassbi Pocltlaue 5 

d Obdg inri CHversiflees ff 

d omiq Nord-Americatnes 8 

tf Obi ig jopenaises Y 

tf Oohg Angtatses E 

d OWiu Ailemondes DM 

d Obi la FnmeMses- 
tf Oblig Esp. Si Port.. 


-FF 


tf Oblig Convert. Inie m. . 

tf Court Terme Ecu 

tf Court Terme USD. 
d Court Term* FRF . 


-FF 

-Ecu 


tf Sam AcUcasn USD B. 
CREDIT SUISSE 
tf CSF Bands. 


d Bond Valor Swt 

d Bond VOtor US • Dollar- 
d Bond Volor D- Mart— 
d Bond Valor Yen. 


SF 


-SF 


d Bond Voter 4 Sterling . 
d Convert Valor Swf. 


-SF 


a Laibt America USD A (Dhr)S 

d Lq«n Americo U5DBICOP15 
a North Americo USD At DM5 
d North Amer USD B (Cool— 5 
BANQUE SCANDINAVE EN SUISSE-GENEVA 

iv Inlelband Chf SF 8*82 

w intetsecChf— _SF T2L# 

w Swlsrtund Oil .SF 17937 

BANQUE SCS ALLIANCE-CREDIT BANK- 
(41221 144-1 281, Geomra 

w Plelode North Am EoulHes 4 l«.w 

»v Piclade 6 trope Eauiiies — Ecu 13X23 

irPtatofleAstoPortncEq * 

iv Plefode Environment Ea — s wji 

w Plelode Dollar Bomfs 5 

iv Plelode ECU Bonds. §a» idam 

iv PiekXM FF Bonds 

wPtelooe Euro Conv Bonds -SF 

w Plelode Donor Reserve 5 oa.16 

iv Plriotfe ECU Reserve Ecu 10187 

w Plelode SF Reserve SF 10186 

iv Plelode FF Reserve — — -FF WR 

BARCLAYS INTL FUND MANAGERS 
Hong Kona, Tel: 1852) 8261900 

d China [PRC I 3 9897 

d rtong Koop -- f 

11087 
1X119 
26837 
25837 
16809 
33361 
37.108 

5287.10 
605030 
S029JA 
555*87 
717186 
5105.14 
637033 
160182 
1070.06 
1I0W2I 
969X91 

132X31 
103449 
79980 
10573* 
105531 



if ThoOond 
d South East As to. _ 

BOO GROUP OF FUNDS 

WBDOUSS Cash Fund » 

w BDD ECU Cosh Fund ECU 

w BDD Swiss Franc Cash - — sf 
iv BDD Int. Bond Fund-USS — 5 
tv BDD int. Bond Fund-Ecu—Ecu 
w BDD N American Ewih F« 
w BDD EuTOPeon Equily FimdECu 
1.1 BDD Asian Equtlv Fund — » 
m BDD US Small Cop Fund —5 

iv Eurotlnonclefe Fixed Inc — FF 
w Eurofln MoltKv BdFd— -FF 
BELINVEST MOMT C6SY) LTD 

m BeUnvesi-Brazll » 

w Belhtvesi -Global — » 

w Bellnvest-lsraet r -5 

n Betlnvest -Mud ttond * 

mt Bellnvert-Superjor— » 

BNP LUXEMBOURG 
INTER CASH 
I France Monetolre- 
I FrwiceSecurtte— 

/ Inter Cash dm 


-FF 


I taler Cash Ear 
I inter Cash GBP . 


r taler Cash USD. 
f taler Cash Yen 


INTER MULTI INVESTMENT 
■v Privatisations Inti invest —5 
iv T Mecom Invert -* 

INTER OPTIMUM 

iv Interoond USD — * 

nr BEF/LUF 


rMullWev*5«DM_ 

wUSD — 

w FRF 

iv ECU— 

INTER STRATEGY 
w Aasirotle— — — 


-DM 

-S 

— FF 


1466580 

1749905 

273034 

190287 

147106 

123586 

1*5044 

1334734 

102285 

1*2835 

10736904 

302A.lt 

135182 

1576782 

125006 

125786 

1239AM 

1306.18 

288634 

96X20 

1218M 

\§OM 

1699.44 

34282 


w France 

wEiroaeduNOro nu 

tv Eurooe At Centre— — ST 

tf Europe *» Sud — 

iv Japan. J 

w Amerlaue du NOfd— — | 

wSud-Ert AtWlQtif — — % 

BUCHANAN FUND LIMITED 

c% Book of Bermuda Ltd. (809) 

i Global Hedge usd -» 14i43 

r Global Hedge GBP- ■* jx /2 

/ Euroeeon L Alkmlt— f I4J0 

I Pacific.— , - 4 yis 

I EmHTjJng MOritW-^r-rriQucs pop. 
CAI5SE CENTRALE DCS BANOUts 

d Frudllux ■ Fses L 15768 1 

tf FrudllBX - 0 0L Eu f? jry c b* 974X56 

» Frwflhw ■ Acftons Fses C-F f 


1880 
IB53J* 
1173 
14107 
11484 

1488 
3881 
227183 
IX2Z 
13630 
2927.9* 
19.74 

131.71 
2X91 
194430 
14*7 
4X48 
15101 
398X05 
3444431 
3581 
12431 
1138 
229X79 
1X84 
39*2 
15684 
275389 
155.10 
2184 
1737 
14039 

CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE PRANCE 

tf ElyseesMonetalre FF 8897X82 

109985 

KJ5 
11634 
12430 
11483 
1077582 
10031 
17299 
20885 
1«88 
86281 
24235 
15002 
14115 
15237 
114180 
18784 
18*8) 
10153 
15554 
2288X00 
335*400 
10488 
I5Z8D 
244.W 
35589 
42684 
>06. M) 
10481 
10782 
2H85 
30405 
271 JH 
285.98 
275*2 
287*4 
10139 
159.15 
10113 
156.1* 
178434 
173131 
232X75 
14478983 
129186 
137X44 
579231 
119270 
281299.12 
*115.17 
T23222.M 
5*50337 
24982 
2718* 
255.13 
36X08 
12085 
12X97 
1111.99 
117X03 
10137 
257*8880 
2*594150 
<3481 
111281 
11*23* 
15440* 


ADVERTISEMENT' 


The mteGbelqmfeabh 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

C hntttefn — H q qill i il by jpbdt BMed. Net n«s*l HRbm guoteMoM «rq Tp ll ed by Die Funde fated vrtth the M c qp tiB a of tome gwot— bwd oa iMMO prieaA. 


March 16, 1994 


I fcp i pi i noy b| qao Wt e n e ru ppft wti (d) ■ dpEy; (w) • w— My; M ■ b L « auutt dy; (f) tartniglilty | — r y two em eki ) ; |r) ■ reguteriyi (1) - twice we n M / ifra)- monibty. 


41.11 

12182 

FIHMANAGEMENT SA -UgoBOl 41 J 1039312) 
i* Delta Premium Cam — — 5 117700 


tf Special Growth Fund — 
O worm Fund- 


FOXUS BANK Ai 472O05SS 
nr Scarrfanas mrl Growth Fd J 
FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 
PC Bov 301. HamUion. Bwnuta 

m FMG Global (20 Feo I S 

m FMG N. Amer. 121 F*hl — 5 

in FMG Europe (28 Feb) 5 

m FMG EMG MKT 128 Feb) _S 

mFMGO (SBFebl 1 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 

w Concept? Forex Fund S 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

wGaio Heap* n — 5 

■vGaktHetfueiil. 


ir Goto SWISS Fronc Fd SF 

iv GAIA F* 5 

mGatoGuorontcedCL I 5 

mGolo Guoranteed CL H 
GARTMORE INOOSUEZ FUNDS lSrtl/94 
Tgl ; (3521 445424470 
Fa* : 11521445423 

bond portfolios 

tf DEM Band 0)5585 — DM 

d Diverbead— _Dfs38l SF 

d Dollar Bend Dis 230 s 

d European Bd Dis 131 Ecu 

tf French Fronc— Dis 105B FF 

d Global Band— .Dis 2.19 s 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

tf ASEAN —8 


1*79 

1131 

1130 

13*1 

1089 

10.73 

13408 

1484 

5X35 

TUSS 

0686 

0685 


«tw 

581588 

23633 

0 Cor linen lol Europe— 




FF 

18X15 

161.73 

15931 

0 Ge/manv 

DM 



14139 




CfT 

9988225 



77181477 

15.91489 

177*426 

RESERVE FUNDS 

0 DEM Dis 534 DM 

d Dollor Dh 138 — — S 


d Yen Reserve _ 

OSFINOR FUNDS 
London : 071-4*94171. Geneva ; 41-22355530 


681 

119 

Z40 

US 

1X45 

2*6 

8.17 

484 

184 

*81 

1281 

583 

2*6 

28080 

3L70 

391 

183 

6323 

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12*3 

2B63 


tv East Investment Fund- 
iv Sen n an World Fund — 
w State Si. American — 
GBNESEE FUND Ufl 
w (A) Genesee Ecste— 
iv (El Genesee Short. 


■v (C I Gonesee OFPOriuitJfv . 
iv IF) Genesee Mon-Eauity- 
GEO LOGOS 

w II StrmaM Bonds 

II Paclllc BandB. 


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w GAM Australia— 
tv GAM Boston. 


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» GAM Europeon -——5 

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ir GAM Franc -vbL 
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-SF 


m gam East Asia me. 
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nr GAM MlFGtebal USS 5 

w GAM Mortet neutral j 

iv GAM Trading DM— -DM 

w GAM Trading USs 5 

ir GAM Overseas— — S 


d Convert Valor US - Do«or_» 

d CSF Int emotional SF 

d Actions Subtes — SF 

tf Europa vaiov -SF 

d Enerole- voter 
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tf CS Prime Bands DM 

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CS Fixed I DM IX 1/96 DM 

CS Fixed I Ecu 03/4% 1790-Ecu 
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CS Germany Fund B DM 

CS Euro Blue CMOS A DM 

CS Euro Blue CbtPS B DM 

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CSSbort-T. Bonds B 5 

CS ShPrt-T. Bond DM A DM 

CS Shori-T. Bam DM B DM 

CS Money Market Fd 5 S 

CS Money Mortal Fd DM— DM 

CS Money Mwket Fd s 1 

tf CS Money Martel Fd Yen— Y 
tf CS Money Market Fd CS — CS 
tf CS Money Martel Fd Ecu_Ecu 
tfCS Money Market FdSF — SF 
tf CS Money Merkel Fd HFI-FI 
tf CS Money Market Fd Lit — Ut 
tf CS Money Market Fd FF — FF 
tf CS Money Martel Fd Pta— Pto 
tf CS Money Market Fd BEF.BF 

tf CSOefco-P rotecA— DM 

d CS Oeko-Protec B DM 

tf CS Mortb-Ameriam A_ — 5 

tf CS North-Amerlcon B 5 

d CS Fund A 

d CS UK Fund B 

tf CS France Fund A. 
d CS F ranco F uad B_ 

tf CS itafv Fund A. 


_FF 

-FF 


tf cs Italy Fund B 

tf CS Nettie rlonds Fd B_ 
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tf CS FF Bond B 

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tf C5 CowltDt DM200a_ 
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tf CSCOPtlOl FF 2006- 


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d CS Japan kdegatrend Yen __Y 

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tf CS Port* Growth SFR. 


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J CS Port! Drowtt) USB S 

d CS Ea Fd Emerg MklS- 5 

tf CS Eq Fd Small Cap U S A . 5 
tf CS Ea Fd Small Eur .——-DM 
DARIER HENTSCH GROUP 
Tel 41-22 70048 37 
tf DH Molar Markets Fund — SF 
tf Henlsch Treasury Ftf SF 

tf Samurai Porilolla— — — SF 
DISCOUNT BANK GROUP 

wMuiticurr. Bond SF 

w Dotval Bond -S 


w Eurovnl Eaurtv 

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a Concentra + . ■ . , — - 

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109181 

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ir gam Value 5 

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IV GAM Bond USs Special. 

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n GAM Bond Yen. 
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w GAM Band £ . 


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iv gam Universal uxs 

tv GSAM Composite 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1-4222426 
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tf GAM ICH) America SF 1405*0 

tf GAM (CH) Europe SF 10102 

tf GAM (CH) Mondial SF 174782 

tf GAM (CHI Pacific SF 2*3480 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

13S East 57rd SlreeLNY 1 002X21 2-088-»200 

•tv GAM Europe S *1.13 

Mr GAM Global 5 151.77 

■v GAM International S 1*9-53 

w GAM North America S 883C 

tv GAM Pacific Basin 5 107.10 

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Eorittert Terrace JJublln X l£H -47 60-630 

■v GAM Americana ACC DM 9432 

w GAM Europe Acc DM 135*7 

trCAM Orient Acc DM URd* 

Mr GAM Tokyo ACC DM 17X4* 

■v GAM Total Bond DM ACC— DM 11034 

IV GAM Universal DM Acc — DM 101.14 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda :(W9) 29*4000 Fax: 10091 2*54180 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 

iv 1C) Financial & Metals s 

ID) KT Global S 


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m FFM Inl Bd Progr-CHF a -SF 10080 
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w GS Adi Rate Mori. Fdil 

m GS Global Currency 

iv GS Global Eaultv — 1 


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9.94 

125857 

1235 

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120237 


ty GS World income Fund S 

GOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 
»G. Swop Fund _■ Ecu 

GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 

iv Granite Capllai Equity 5 iJtSeO 

i v Granite Capitol Mkt NeulroiS 08976 

w Granite CcsJtal Mortgovo-S 0.9&957 

GT ASSET MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 
Tel : (*4> 77 - 7704547 
tf GT Aseon Fd a snares— S 

tf GT Aifion Fd B Shares S 

tf GT ASkj Fund A Shor es S 

tf GT Asia Fund B Shores— 3 
if GT Asian Small Comp A Sh3 
tf GT Askm SmaN Como B Sh A 
tf GT Australia Fd A Shores— S 
tf GT Australia Fd B Shores-3 
tf GT Austr. Smell Co A Sn — S 
tf GT Austr. Small Co BSh — s 
tf GT Berry Japan Fd A Sh — S 
tf GT Berry Jopan Fd B Sh — S 

d GT Bond Fd A Shores S 

tf GT Bond FdB Snares s 

tf GT Dollar Fund A Sh S 


DU BIN 6 5WIECA ASSET MANAGEME NT 
Tel : (0091 945 1400 Fo* : (00*1 »« 
b Htohbridge Capitol Corp__S 

m Over look Pertormonce Fd -S 

/n pacific RIM Op FO _m . : . - 5 lilleE 

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EBCTRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD 

tf Capitol \ 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

d Long Term. ■ - — 3 

tf Long Term - DMA ■ ... .DM 

ERMITAGE LUX (352*07330) 
iv Ermlloge Seta Fund — -——5 
m Ermitage firton HedB* M_j 
wErmltoge Eu« Hedge Fd —DM 
w Ermlloge CntaMto Fd-j 
w Ermitage Amer Hdo Ftf- — 5 
w Ertnlto* Rmer * 

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d Amerlcon Equltv Fund. — 5 
d American Opllon Ftmtf-— _3 
w Aston Eouity M-— s 

■r Europeon EwdtyFd—^ 

EVEREST CAPITAL (8W 292 Z2M 
m Everest CwiionnlJLW~S 

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d Dl*ciwirY_Fi»l ; 

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tf Fid. Amer, Assets -- 
tf FUL Amer. Values IV - 
d Frontier Fund. 


tf Globe! Ind J 

tf Global Sri seller Fund S 

d mtematlonol Fund — } 

tf NOW Eurooe Fund J 

tf Orient Fund- 
tf Pacific Fund- 


7937 

79.90 

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2430 
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3X77 

2987 

2937 

2336 

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1932 

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7950 

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1127 

1134 

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tf GT Emerging Mkts A Sn — 5 
d GT Emerging MkKBSh—S 
tf GT Em Mkt Smoll C» 4 Sh Jl 
tf GT Em Mkt Small Co B5h .5 
■v GT Euro Small Co Fd A Sh J 
iv GT Euro SrooD Co Fd B Sn_5 
tf GT Mono Kang Fd A Shares* 
tf GT Hong Kong Fd B Shores! 
d GT Honshu Poiftflnder a Sh* 
a GT Honshu P o mttnder b Sh* 
wGT Joa OTC Stacks Fd A ShS 
w GT Job OTC Slocks Fd B ShS 
w GT Jan Small Co Fd a sn_* 

IV GT JOP Smalt Co Fd i ■ Sh_3 

w GT. Latin America Fa 5 

tf GT Strolegic Bd Fd A Sh _* 
a GT Strategic Bd FdB sh_» 
d GT Telecomm. Fd A Shares* 
d GT Telecomm. Fd B Shores* 
r GT Technology Fund a Sh_* 

r GT Technology Fund B 3ft- * 

GT MANAGEMENT PLC (4471 719 45471 
tf G.T. Biotech/ Health Fund_s 2437 

tf G.T. Deutscntond Fund 5 1113 

tf G.T. Europe Fund S H80 

w G.T. Global Small Co Fd — * 29.JS 

tf G.T. Investment Fund S 2533 

tv G.T. Korea Fund 5 584 

tv G.T. Newly ind Countr Fd _S 4484 

w GT. US Smell Comnonles J 
GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

I GCMGIobOlSeCEq. % 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MNGRS CGMtrt Ltd 
GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 

tf Monaned Currency 5 »34 

d Global Bond — — — * J7-« 

tf Glooai High income Bond -5 2X75 

tf Gift & 1 Bond 1 1158 

0 Euro High Inc. Bond ( 2163 

tf G robot E«niv S 9330 

tf American Blue Chip . , 3 29JQ 

tf Japan end Peal to- J5 13189 

0 UK .t 2739 

d European. . ■- j— 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INT L ACCUM FO 

0 Deulsenemnrt Money DM 88368 

If US Dollar Money -S 

0 US Dollar High Yd Bond — S 2583 

tf inn Eto«n«d Gnti™ * 3 a52 

MAXEN8ICHLER ASSET MANGT CeLmbH. 

w Hosenbtohler Com AG 5 557630 

w Hasenbichler Com Inc S 113JM 

w Hosenbldtler ON S 115.13 

w AFFT 5 134735 


HEFT AGON FUND NV (599M15555) 

f Heotagan OLBFwto » 


10530 

1 »J6 


m Heptagon CMO Fluid S 

HRRMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: (809)295 4000. Lu> : (352)404 64 61 
Estimated Prices /Bend Final 
r» Hermes Suraewt Fund — Ecu 36475 

m Hermes North American HIS 301, T7 


m Hermes Aston Fund.. -* 4(1151 

mHerWi Emerg Mkis FohdJ* 141N 

m Hermes strotegies Fund — * wo. J3 

m Hermes Neutroi Funa— S 11982 

m Hermes Global Fund 5 aSXM 

m Hermes Bond Fund—..— Ecu 129*89 

m Hermes Sir/Juig Fa C 114.10 

m Hermes Gold Fund—— _S 4I7 U 

INCOME PARTNERS (ASIA) LIMITED 

■v Aston Fined Income Fa s I03is 

INTER INVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/o Bonk ot Bermuda. Tel : 009 295 4000 
m Hedge Mag A Conserve FdJ 
INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
Z Bd Royal, L-2449 Luxembourg 

w Europe Sud E Ecu 9781 

INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 
0 Amer Ique du NorO._ . X 10089 

tf Europe Contlnentoie dm 100.19 

0 nolle LH 70026? JC 

tf ZflWAsoitow— — V 1(00380 

1NVESCO INTL LTD, FOB 221, Jersey 
Tel; 44 S34 73114 

0 Maximum Income Fund £ 

0 Sterling Mned Pill I 

d Pioneer Markets —( 

d Okasan Gtobat 5 1 rates? —5 

0 Asia Super Growth 5 

d Nippon Worronl Fund 3 

tf Asks Tiger warrants— -5 

0 European Warrant Fund % 

d GtatlLW.lTH. 


PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 
0 American Grc 


13400- 
23881 
43300 
178300' 
243700 
28400 

4.9400 
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98100 

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10.1500 
113500 
53500 
53900 
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9538 
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5.7800 

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JARDINE FLEMING , GPO Bos 11441 He Ke 

0 JF ASEAN Trust S 5839 

0 JF For Eosl Wml Tr 5 34.12 

0JFGtoOOIConv.Tr S 1531 

0 JF Hong Kong Trust 3 2057 

0 JF Joaon Sm.Co Tr Y 5087730 


d American Enterprise, 
tf Asia Tiger Growth, 
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a European Growth , . . 

0 European Enterprise. 

0 Global Emerami Markets-* 

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0 Nippon Enterprise. .* 

tf Nippon Growth s 

ff UK Growth. I 

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0 Norin American Worronl 5 

0 Greater OUna Opr*. S 

ITALFORTUNE INTL. FUNDS 
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ivCUss B IC-kJbcJ Equity) S 

tv Class C I G total Band) J. 

rt Class D (Ecu Bond). Ecu 


tf JF Japan Trust. 

0 JF Malaysia Trust. 

tf JF poeJtic me Tr.. 
tf JF Tirol Land Trust. 


JOHN GOVETT MART (J.OJHJ LTD 
Tel: 44*34 • 629420 

iv Govet t Mon. Ful tires 1 

w Gave 1 1 Man. Ful. USS 5 

tv Covert S Gear Curr — S 

v Govett S GIM Bol Hdge 5 

JULIUS BAER GROUP 

tf Boer bond SF 

a Conbar. 


1340480 

2476 

1236 

3X7J 


tf Eammer America. 

tf EuulDorr Europe — 

tf SFR- BAER 

tf StecfcOor. 


tf Swtssbar. 
tf Llouibaer. 
tf Europe Bond Fum 
tf Dollar Bond Fund 
tf Ausfrn Bond Fund 
0 Swiss Bond Funa 
d DM Bond Fund 
0 Convert Bond Fund 
d Gtoool Bond Fund 
d Euro Start Fund. 
d US Start Fund. 



-Ecu 


d Pocffte Stock Funa_ 
tf Swiss Stock Fund— 
d Special Swiss Start, 
a Jonon Slock Funo_ 
d Gorman Sloe* Funa 
tf Korean Start Fund, 
d Swiss Fronc Cosh _ 

tf DM Cash Fund 

tf ECU Cosh Fund 

tf Sterling Cash Fund . 
tf Donor Cosh Fund. 


_SF 

-DM 


-FF 


1X45 

934 

13*4 

11.1414 

98830 

210780 

250630 

171130 

113130 

241130 

319130 

J252D0 

15780 

13050 

1271.90 

12480 

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10450 

10070 

11980 

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I4O30 

172-30 

145.90 
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101.90 
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119580 

134430 

126X00 

10*130 

103930 

118530 

10105430 

27476 

14771 

14583 

249855 

109X60 

128630 

164X13 


tf French Franc Cosn__ 

w Mulltadvisor Forex Fd 5 

KEY ASSET MARAGEMENT INC 

m Key Global Hedge s 

m Key Meter Fund Inc S 

m Key Hedge investments. 

KIDDER, PEABODY 

b Chesapeake Fund Ltd 5 

b III Fund Ltd- 5 

b inn Guaranteed Fund— — * 

b Stonehenge Lid S 

LATIM AMERICAN SECURITIES 
Tel: London 071438 1234 
tf Argentinian invest Co SIcovS 

tf Brazilian Invest Co Sicav 5 

0 Colombian invest Co Sicav 5 
tf Latin Amer Extra y letd Fd S 
tf Latin America income Co.A 
tf Latin American Invest Co_ S 

tf Mexican invest Co Sicav 5 

tf Peruvian Invest Co Siam — S 
LEHMAN BROTHERS 
d Aston Dragon Port NV A— Jf 

d Aston Dragon Peri NV B 5 

0 Global Advisors II NV A — S 
a Global Advisors il NV B — S 
d Global Advisors Port NV AJ 
d Global Advisors Port NV B J 

tf Lehman Cur Adv. A/B S 

tf Premier Futures Adv A/B-5 
LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
24/F Uppo Tower Centre. 89 Oumaswov.hk 
T et (352) 867 6381 Fax 1152)5960388 
tv Java Find. — * 


2773 

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1134 

4133 

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987 


1177 

1172 

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w Asean Fixed Inc Fd 

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w USD Money Market Fd S 

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or Aston Growth Fteid 5 

w Aston Warrant Fundu 


1044 
973 
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2176 
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LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT UBVM5MH 

tv Antenna Find * 1770 

m LG Aslan Smelter Cos Fd— * 19.7443 

w LG India Fund Lid. S 1488 

LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS) Ud 
Llovds Americas Porttolto 13091 32X8711 
w Balanced Moderate Risk Fds 1X13 

LOMBARD, ODIER & CIE ■ GROUP 
OBUFLEX LTD (Cl) 
tf MuMkurrencr-- * 


tf Dollor Medium Term. 

0 Dollor Long Term. 

0 JmmeseYen — 

tf Pound sterling 

0 Deal idle Mark 

tf Ouich Florin. 


-DM 


tf HY Euro Currencies- 
d Swiss Franc. 


Ecu 


tf US Dollar Starr Term * 

tf HY Euro Curr Ohrid Pay — Ecu 
0 Swiss Multicurrency— —SF 

tf European Currency Ecu 

d Be/gtan Franc ... .BF 
d Cenverttbie — — S 

tf French Franc FF 

tf Swiss MullFOtvldend SF 

tf Swiss Franc Stton-Tenm — SF 

0 Canadian Dollar CS 

tf Duleti Florin Multi FI 

d Swiss Fronc DMa Pay SF 

0 CAD Multtour. Dlv- 


0 Med Herraneon Curr. 
tf Convertibles 


1359 
2X27 
2130 
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1X35 
79.11 
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1187 
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1234 
1776 
2170 
14070 
15*9 
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MALABAR CAP MGMT (Bermuda) LTD 

m Mo labor Inti Fund. * 2(1*5 

MAN ItfTE RN AT IONAL FUTURES 
mMtalLlmlird- Ordinary — S 49.77 

m Mint Limited - income * 14.74 

at Mint Gld Ltd- Spec Issue S 3XP 

mMlM Gld Ltd -NOv 2002 S 24.99 

mMJnt GW Ltd - Jan 1V94 S 2X14 

m Mint Gid Ud- Dec 1994 s 19*7 

TOMrfll Gld Ltd- Aug 1995 5 1475 

mMlnl Gld Currencies — S 1071 

mMtnl GW Currencies 2001 — S 10*5 

m Mint Sp Res Lid (BNP) > 11072 

m Athene Gtd Futures S 1233 

m Atnena Gld Currencies, * *71 

m Athena Gld F taondols- inc_S 1057 

mAiheno GW Flnanelols Cop5 1789 

mAHL CaoHol Mkis Fd * 1274 

mAHL ComnwBiy Fund * 1X45 

mAHL Currency Fund * 974 

mAHL Real Time Trod Fd — S 1X11 

mAHL Gld Rtol Time Trd — 5 1073 

m mop Guaranteed l*9e Lid— * *36 

mMop Leveraged Recov. Ltd5 113S 

mMAP Guarantreq 2000 * 1182 

m Mint GGLFMi 20(0 -J 133 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Front St Homlllon Bermuda 1001)2*29789 
iv Maritime Mil-Sector I Ltd-S 107984 

w Maritime Gtol Beto Sertes-l Ml^ 

w Maritime Glbl Delta Series 5 36X19 

w Maritime Glbl Tou Series— 5 85X07 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MOT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

m Cass A S 1203* 

0 Class B * iix» 

m Pocillc Convert, srrot — — ~S **je 

MAVERICK (CAYMAN) (03*) *49-7942 
m Maverick Ftf s 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD _ ^ 

nt The Canalr Fimtf LNf 5 12450 

MEESP1ERSON 

Rokln SX nnax Amsierdom (20-5211 1*0) 
w Asia Poe. Growth Ftf N.v.-S 

w Aston CQPitol Holdings 5 

w Aston SetedUm Fd N.V FI 

» DP Amer. Growth Fd N.V—S 
w EMS OtWiore FO N.V.——— FI 
w Europe Growth Fund N,v — Fi 
ur Japan DiveaHled Fund — A 

w Leveraged Coe Hold- ■ * 

w Tokyo Poc Hold. N.V » 

MERRILL LYNCH 

tf Dollar AS5CIS Per tKH k). s 

tf Prime Rote PadhliO— 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

d Cta* A S 

0 Class B — * 

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AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
tf Coltwr^ a Ai 

CANADUM DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
tf Category A—— — O 


4288 

428* 

1(7781 

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6776 

5539 

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130 

i m 


885 

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1852 

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tf CtanA-1 S 

tf Clan A 7— 3 

a ClOKB-1 5 

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OEUT5CHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
tf Colcgorv A 


1037 
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tf CUSS A- 1 8 1X39 

tf cktss 4-i « ixso 

tfClOSSB-l S 1571 

tf Class B-7 S 167* 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (USS) 


tf Category B- 


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rf Class A -1. 

0 CMS A-2- 

0 Class B-1 5 

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POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

tf Category A [ 

0 Category fi- 


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rf Category A 

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YEN PORTFOLIO 
tf Cotegor* A— 
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tf Class A s 

rf Class B S 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

0 CtossA S 

tf Cto»B 5 

MERRILL LYNCH 

EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 

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0 Class A 5 

a UnsB 5 

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0 Class A 5 

d Class B 5 

global allocation ptfl tuss) 

tf Class A S 

tf Class 8 $ 

global eouity portfolio 

u Class a s 

a Class B l 

EURO EOUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A S 

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LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A 5 

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to* 

1X89 

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1484 
1475 

1X82 
1057 

1X11 
957 

147? 
1331 

1X78 
1687 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

0 Class A 1 1X13 

0 Ckns B S 1186 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A 

a Class B. 


M3? 

1S31 

921 

971 

921 


MERRILL LYNCH INC 5 PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A 5 

0 Class B 5 

O Ooss C 5 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

a Mexican me S pin O a I 9.97 

a Me < I can me I Ptfl G B 5 W 

0 Mexican Inc Peso Pill Cl A 5 973 

a Mexican me Peso phi a B5 971 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
w Momentum Novell tor Peri_S 10385 

m Momentum Robinow Fd 5 12873 

mMomenhjfn RxR R.U S 8951 

mMomenlixn Siortmaste* 5 1*I5H 

MORVAL VONWILLER ASSET MGT Ce 


w wiilertunds-WiiteriMnd cops 
» wiltertvnds-wmerband Eur Ecu 
w Wl Uerfunds-Wi llerea Eur —Ecu 
wWilleriunOs-Wniereq Italy -L.il 
w WIllertikKb-Wlllerea NA — S 
MULTIMANAGER N.V. 
w Cash Enhancer 


1183 
1285 
1X12 
1284830 
1187 

1X3* 
24.11 
1X97 
1370 
879 
1177 

1131 

NICMOLAS-APPLEGATE CAPITAL MGT 

tr NA FlevlWf Growth Fa S 1578268 

WNA Hedge Fend s 13X20 

NOMURA INTL. (HONG KONG) LTD 

0 Nomura Jakarta Fund S X95 

MORIT CURRENCY FUND 
mNCF USD — —3 


w Emerging Markets Fd- 
m Eurogean Growth Fd — 

ivHeape Fund 

tr Japanese Fund 

w Morkel Neutral 

a World Bond Fund. 


-Ecu 

-5 


-Ecu 


mNCF DEM. 
mNCF CHF- 
fflNCFFRF- 
mNCF JPY— 
mNCF BEF. 


-DM 


-SF 


-FF 

-Y 

-BF 


82X95 
8958 9 
924.79 


8769X00 

2203330 


ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grasvenor StXdn Wl X 9FE84-71 -499 29*3 


d Oder European. 
w Ode v European. 


12084 


w Odev Eurae Growth Inc— DM 15484 

w Daev Euroo Growth Act — DM >5571 

■vOOev Euro GnhSter Inc 1 61.12 

w Odev Euro Grill Ster acc — t 6)75 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
Williams House, Hamilton HMll, Bermuda 
Tel: 80*2*2-1018 Fax: 809 r9S-23C6 

w Finsbury Group 3 

w Olympia Secwlte SF SF 


w Olympia Slurs Emerg Mkts S 

iv Wlncn. Eastern Droaon * 

w Winch. Frontier— —3 


iv Wlncn. Fut. Olympia Star— S 
w Winch. Gi Sec Inc PI l A) — S 
» Winch. Gl See ine Pt (C) — 5 
m Winch. Hkto Inti Madison —Ecu 

i* Winch. Hide inn ser D Ecu 

» winch. Hkto In rt Ser F Ecu 

» Winch. Khta Otv Star Hedges 
V Winch. Reeer. Multi. Gv Bd-S 

rv Winchester Thailand 1 

OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front SI. Ha ml Aon. Bermuda 109 2*586B 


22)89 

171.4 

*6172 

1750 

11585 

149.10 

«3I 

972 

146983 

172037 

171583 

112084 

2034 

30M 


w Optima Emerotd Fd Lid. 
w Optima Fund- 


w Oollmo Futures Fund. 
m Oalbno Glottal Fund- 


iv Oollmo FerlaAo Fa Ltd— S 
» Oph mo Shon Fund . 
FACTUAL 

0 Elemlly Fund Lid. 
if Infinity Fund Lid — 

d Star Hum Yield Fd Ltd » 

PAR1BAS-GROUP 

w Luxor * 

<f pnrvest usa B- 


rf Parvest Japan B— 
tf Parvest Asia Padi B_ 
tf Porvesf Europe B — 

tf Parvest Holtond B 

d Porvesi France B— 
tf Parvest Germany B — 
rf Porvesf OOh-Ooifor B- 
0 Parvest OblVOMB. 


-Ecu 

-FI 


JIM 


tf Porvesf OblLVenB Y 

tf Porvesi ObiLGukkn B FI 

rf Parvest OMI-Franc B — — FF 

d ParveS DbH-Ster B — A 

d Parvest Obll-Ecu B Ecu 

d Parvest OblhBeltn B . 1 F 

0 Parvest S-T DeHar B. 5 

a Parvest S-T Europe B— Ecu 

tf Parvest S-T DEM B DM 

d Porvesi S-T FRF B FF 

0 Pon/est S-T Bet Plus B BF 

d Parvest Gleool B LF 

d Parvest int BandB * 

d Porvesi Oblt-Uro B Lit 

d Parvest Int Eaullte* 8 — J 
rf Porvesi UK B. 


d Porvesi USD Plus B . 
d Porvesi S-T CHF B. 


-SF 


tf Parvest OWFCanodo B CS 

tf Parvest Obd-DKK B DKK 

PERMAL GROUP 

f Commodities Ltd. * 

f Drokkor Growth N.V 5 

I Emerging MkfsHlttes 5 

1 EuraMir (Ecu) Ltd Ecu 

f Investment hubs N.V S 

I MedtaiComnuBhculiOTH— S 

/ Noscol ltd s 

PICTET B CIE -GROUP 

wPC-FUKVol (Lu«) 1 

arP.CF Germoval (Lux) DM 

w P.CF Norom vat ( Lux I S 

wPX-F voliber (Lux) — PtOS 


wP.CF Volllolto (Lin) Lit 

w P.CF Voltronce (Lux) FF 

w P.U.F. VoOond SFR (Luxl -SF 
ur P.U.F. volband USD tlu*U 
•r P.U.F. Volbond Ecu (Lux) -Ecu 
W P U.F. VO (bond FRF (Luxl-FF 
w p.u.F. volbond GBP lLu*i.t 
w P.U.F. Volband DEM (Lux) DM 
w P.U.F. USS Bd PHI (Lin)— S 

iv P.U.F. Model Fd. Ecu 

• PUT. Emerg Mkts ILux)_S 
wP.U.T Eur. O ppotI ILuxt— Ecu 
b P.U.T. Gtobol Value (Luxl -Ecu 

w P.U.T. Euroval I Luxl Ecu 

tf Picrel Vobuisa CCMl sf 

mintl Small Cap MOMl. 


9.92 
1178 
1780 
I486 
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477 

1449413 

53X1275 

1223012 

133 

2572 

595930 

7A1B 

2773 

14152 

13263* 

617.14 

778577 

1*2271 

161X330 

145182 

210*7* 

16752 

140.10 

1720300 

12038 

13080 

54153 

180777 

1043X00 

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218) 

tawnn 

11184 

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9939 

230.94 

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2981 

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114*6230 

14063* 

29034 

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15X86 

15333 

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PREMIER INVESTMENT FUND5 LTD 
c/o PD. Bo* 1 100, Grand Covmon 
Fox: 1 809)9493*93 

m Premier US Equity Fund —5 JSJi? 

m Premier Eo RbkMgt Fd — S 134J.J5 

to Premier Inti Eq Fimd_ — S 
m Premier Sovereign BdFd _3 12847* 

m Premier Gtabol Bd Fd S 50X17 

m Premier Total Reruro Fd — S 11*2.77 

PUTNAM „ _ 

0 Emerging Hlth Sc. TruSI — S 4X«0 

■ Putnam Em. Into. 5c. Trus48 fXJO 

tf Pumom Glob. High Growth* 7U1 

tf PutnomHlgn Inc GNMA FdS 885 

0 Pumom Irc'l Fund 5 'iTJ 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

iv Emerging Growth FdN.V._3 , 

■ Quantum Fund N.V. * 1*0052 

■ Ouantom Reairv Trwsl-— — 5 JJ*8I 

■ Quanl um UK Realty Fimtt-t 104.74 

w Quasar Irtl Fund N.V 1 ]47.« 

w Quota Fund N SI . — 5 i 5S75 

QUARRY MANAGEMENT LTD 
TetoPhone:8»- 94*3050 
Foo.mii8:8D9-94M042 

0 Altos Aroilrooe Fd Ltd 5 W79 

0 Hesoerte Fund Ltd s ]t*.*0 

d Meridian Hedge Fd Ud s/55 l JJ5* 

ff Zenith Fund Ltd s/s 5 8*82 

REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

■ New Korea Growth Fd 5 

» Nova Lai Paclllc mv Co — S 

w Pacific Arbitraoe Co .5 

m R.L. Country wmt Fd S 

tf Resent Glbl Am GrthFd_J 
d Regent Glbl EuroGrth F0_i 
a Regent GW Inn Grin id- * 
a Regent Gw Jap Grin Fd. 
tf Regent Gtw Podf Basin — S 
d Regen I GW Reserve 5 


tf Regent Glbl Rwources- 
0 Regent Glbl Tiger 


1230 

4,945 

970 

27274 

AVftS 

43838 

27298 

10288 

45900 

11*42 

27*05 

14969 


tf Regent CM UK Grin FO. S 1390S 

w Regent MogiwlFdUd 5 HUB 

m Regent PocHic Hdg Fa s 11X829 

tf Regent Sri Lanka Ftf 5 1230 

ir Undervalued Assets Ser l_j 1137 

ROBECO GROUP 

pob 97UD00 az RmkrdontiTiill 27012=0 


d RG Amn lea Fund - 

tf RG Europe Fund 

0 RG Poc l«c Fond 

0 RG Dtvirnte Fund 

tf RG Money PkAFFL- 
d RGMdtevPtoFV. 


tf RG Money WusF DM— -DAS 

a RG Money Pius F SF SF 

More Robeco see Amsterdam Stocks 
ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
IK-HOUSE FUNDS 
IV Aston OndM HOMHngs Fa-S 

w Doing LCF Rothschild Btf _S 

wDotwoLCF RothSCh Eq S 

w Fora Cosh T rotation CHF -SF 
a Lei com 


15070 

17550 

148.90 

5458 

11277 

10251 

111.93 

10674 


w Leveraged Css Holdings __s 
b Pri Challenge Swiss Fp- — &F 

o Prtequttv Fo- Europe —Ecu 

b Prtequttv Fd-Hetvelio- SF 

0 Prieoufiv Ftf- Led ki A m — s 

0 Pri bond Fund Ecu £eu 

0 Pnbonfl Fund U50.-..-,.„S 
O Prtaond Fd HY Emer Mklsi 

w Seteciive invest SA S 

0 Source s 

■v US Bond Plus J 

w Vortoplos —Ecu 


ROTH5CH ILO (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
OTHER FUNDS 
tf Asto/Joaon Emerg. Grontns 
» Essrii Eur Porin inv TsI-^Ecu 
w Euros Slroieg invesim Ifl^Ecu 
0 integral Futures S 


4289 

101384 

114X47 

1030277 

247770 

4X22 

11*471 

II72S0 

114794 

146782 

121934 

113847 

117567 

35A341 

18.94850 

9*8.124 

115489 


ff Opttoesl Giabai Fd General DM 
O OpIHkv Gtaoo/ Fit incomeDM 

d Pacific Nles Fund S 

w Per mol drokkor Growth NVS 

r Selection Henson — FF 

0 VI do! re Artone. 


177400 
144579 
106881 
105070 
194047 
1A7.J9Z 
935 
306837 
avmji 
5069 J* 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (CD LTD 

m Nemrod Leveraged HU s 94* jo 

SAFDIE GROUP/KEY ADVISORS LTD 
mxer DiversillealncFa Lnu 118*801 

SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 

w ReputrfiC GAM. J 14X94 

» Republic GAM America s 122*8 

w Rep GAM Em Mkts Gtobol J 151.75 

IV Rep GAM Em Mkts Lai AmS 12S.16 

w Republic GAM Ernope SF -SF 1219* 
tv Republic GAM Europe USSJ 1 1Z3S 

w Republic GAM Grwttl CHF JF UXri 

iv Republic GAM Growth f __C 10X97 

n Rewubhc GAM Growth USS S 15*33 

ir Republic GAM Opportunity s 11753 

■ Republic GAM Poclfto i 15438 

■ ResitaUc Gnsev Dol me. 5 1083 

w Republic Gnsev Eur Inc DM 1081 

■ Repuotto Lot Am Alloc s lOrj* 

■ Republic Lot Am Argent.— 5 10X36 

w Republic Lot Am Brazil S 1 10*1 

■ Republic Lai Am Mexico s 10183 

w Republic Lot Am Venez. S 10255 

■ Rep Solomon Sirat Fd LM-S *X7* 

SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 

TOCemmsnder Fund S 70*73* 

m Explorer Fimtf S 120337 

SKANDINAVISKA EMSKILDA BANKEN 
S-E-BANKEN FUND 

tf Europe Inc 

tf Flarron Os tern Inc. 

0 Gtobol Inc — 

tf Lokamraei wc 

0 variant tnc - — 

d jaoan Inc. — 

ff Milloinc. 


0 Sverige tnc — 

0 Nordomertka tnc . 
0 Teknotagl 10 c. 


0 Sverige Ranfetond t 
SKANDIFONDS 

d Equity ini'i acc 

0 Equity inti Inc 

0 Eouity Global 

0 Equity Nat. Resown 

d Equity Japan 

d Eaultv Norato. 

d Equity UX. 


0 Equity Mertterraneoa- 
0 Equity North Americo. 
0 Equity For East . 


tf tail Emerging Markets. 

0 Bond liar Acc - 

0 Send inti tnc 

0 Bond Eurooe Acc 

tf Band Europe Inc 
0 Band Sweden Acc. 


tf Bend Sweden lrtc_ 

tf Band DEM Acc 

tf Bona DEM Inc 

tf Bond Dollar USAcc- 
<f Bond Dollar US Inc - 
tf Curr. US Dollar. 


tf Curr. Swedish Kronor . 


SOGELUX FUND (SF) 
■ SF Bonds A U5 jA_ 


■ SF Bands BGermtmV. 

■ SF Bonds C France — 

■ SF Bonds E G.B 

■ SF Bands F Japan. 


wSF Bonds G Europe— 
w SF Bonds H World wide. 
■ SF Bonds J Belgium 


■ SF Eq. M Poclfto Basin. 


■ SF Ex R World wide 

■ SF Short Term S France. 

■ SF Short Term T Eur. — 

50DITIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC. 



132 


898 


134 


1.05 


108 


100*3 


136 

ek 

1033 


132 


1.1] 

6k 

1082 


1756 


1438 


131 


177 


11322 


136 


135 


172 


133 


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474 


152 


1150 


784 


129 


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1733 

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129 

DM 

894 


183 


137 


125 

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132.78 


1239 

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2341 

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1835 


1857 

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BVSIVI 

S 

1838 

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1X88 

Y 

1400 


1881 


3438 


1X0? 

FF 

14923*3 

Ecu 

1*27 


■ SAM Brazil. 

■ SAM Diversified 

■ SAM/McGarr Hedge - 

■ SAM Opportunity 

■ SAMSIrotegy 

m Alcita SAM- 


■ GSAM Composite 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

mSR European- 

rn SR Aston. 


mSR 1 nte mot tonal S 

SVENSKA HAN DELS BANKEN SA. 

146 Bd de to Peirosse. L-2J30 Luxembourg 


21333 

14331 

11352 

12785 

12196 

13X52 

3475* 

9783 

10078 

9832 


0 SMB Bond Fund. 

■5vawka Set FdAmer Sn — S 

■ Svenska Set Fd Germany -5 

■ Svenska SeL Fd tall Bd Sh-S 

w Svenska SeL Fd Inl'l Sh S 

■ Svensica SeL Fd Jopan Y 

■ Svenska SeL Fd Mltl-Mkt _Sek 

■ Svenska Set. Fa Podi Sn — S 

■ Svenska SeL Fd 5 wed Bds_Sefc 

■ Svenska Sel. Fd Srlvla Sh— Ecu 
SWISS BANK CORP. 

tf SBC 100 index Fund SF 

tf SBC Eaultv RIII AustraHa_AS 
d SBC Eouity Plfl-Cafuxfcj — CS 

tf SBC Eouity Pth- Eurooe Ecu 

tf SBC Ea Ptfl-Netnerlwws— FI 

tf SBC Govern Bd A/B S S 

0 SBC Bond Ptft-Aastrt A — AS 
tf SBC Band Pttl-Amfr S B — AS 

d SBC Bond PNMmIA, CS 

0 SBC Band Ptft-ConA B CS 

ff SBC Bond Plfi-DM A. —DM 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-OM B DM 

tf SBC Bend PHWJutch G. A_F1 
d sac Bond Pm-Dutch G. B— FI 

d 5 BC Bond PttFEcu A Ecu 

0 SBC Bond PHI- Ecu B Ecu 

tf SBC Bond Prtl-FF A FF 

0 SBC Bond Ptfl-FF B FF 

0 SBC Bond Ptn-Pios aib , — Pirn 
0 SBC Bond PIB-Sterimg A —I 
0 SBC Bond Ptff-Slerimg B _c 
tf SBC Bond Porttollo-SF a — SF 
0 SBC Bond Porltaho-SF B — SF 

0 SBC Bond Pt«-U5S A S 

tf SBC Bond PttMJSS B S 

0 SBC Bond PUL Yen A Y 

tf SBC Bond pitt- Yen B Y 

rf S8CAUMF-A1 — AI 

rf SBC MMF • BFR BF 

d SBC MMF -Cons CS 

rf SBC DM Short-Term A DM 

rf SBC DM Short-Term B DM 

tf SBC MMF • Dutch G. — _F1 
0 SBC MMF • Ecu Ecu 


- Esc — 
■FF_ 
• Lit.— 
PtDS. 


tf SBC MMF - 
0 SBC MMF ■ 
d SBC MMF - 
tf SBC MMF ■ 
tf SBC MMF - Schilling — 

tf 5BC MMF - Sterling 

tf SBC MMF -SF 

d SBC MMF - US - Dollor . 
rf SBC MMF-USS/tl — — 
d SBC MMF - Y*n- 


-FF 


0 SBC Gibt-PItl SF Grttl SF 

0 SBC Glbl- Pin Ecu Grth Ecu 

0 SBC GlW-Pin USD Grth S 

0 SBC Glbl-PIII SF YI0 A SF 

0 SBC Glbl Pill SF Yltf B — -SF 

0 SBC Glbl-PtH ECU YW A ECU 

0 SBC Gtbl-Ptn Ecu YW B Ecu 

0 SBC GU-Pttf USOYIdA S 

0 SBC GIH-PIII USD Via B — S 

rf SBC Glbt-FW SF Inc A SF 

if SBC GbPPifl SF Inc B 5F 

0 SBC Glbl-Ptft ECU tnc A— ECU 

d SBC Glbl- PHI Ecu tnc B Ecu 

d SBC GIM-PW USD MCA — » 

0 SBC Glbl-PIII USD Inc B — S 
0 SBC Glbl PHPDM Growth— DM 
0 SBC Glbl Ptfl DM YW A/B -DM 
tf SBC Glbl PIIVDM inc a/B-DM 
tf SBC Emerging Markets — 5 
0 SBC Small & Mid Caps Sw_SF 
rf AmerlcaVaur S 


0 Anotovalor . 

0 AstoPorrtoilo- 




ff Convert Bond Setedion SF 

d D-Mark Bond Seteciton — — DM 

tf Dot tor Band Seleclion s 

tf Ecu Band Selection— Eat 

a Florin Bond Selection .——Fi 
tf FranceVolor — ff 


0 GermanlaValar- 

tf GoMParltolio— 
tf iberiaVobr 


-DM 


-Pta 


0 jopanpwlfalio- 


Y 

tf Sterling Bond Selection— t 
tf Sw. Foretgn Bond Setoff Ion _SF 

tf Swiss Valor. SF 

tf Universal Bond Seleaun_SF 

tf Universal Fund &F 

tf Yen Bona Seledion— .Y 


5587 
life 
1135 
1283 
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402 
116.12 
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1439.90 
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11257 

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12111 

2239.98 

53/55 
38955 
6570000 
473X5030 
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117.92 
111J5 
40930 
79 J5 
12451 
1179100 


TEMPLETON W.WIDR INVESTMENTS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A I . 5 

tf ChnsA-2 S 

tf Class A3— ... 5 


ff Class B-1. 
fl Class B-: 


INCOME PORTFOLIO 

tf Pass A 5 

d Class B — S 

THORNTON MANAGEMENT LTD 

tf Poclf Hurt Fd SA C — — c 

ff PacH I mri Fd SA DM DM 

tf Eastern Cneetfer Fund. — 5 
tf Thar. Uttl Dragons Fa Ltd J 
tf Thornton Orient int Fd Lid S 

tf Thornton Tiger Fd Ltd 3 

tf Managed Seteciton 
■ Jakarta. - A 
d Korea. 


NEW TIGER SEL FUND 
a Hang Kars — — — . 
tf Jaoan- 


tf Philippines. 

tf Thailand 

d Malaysia- 
ff indonnta- 


0 ussLtammtv- 

tf China. 


tf Snooocre -■-» 

THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 

tf Equity Income s 

tf Equity Growth — , S 

tf Liquidity - t 


UEBER3EEBANK Zurich 
tf B - Fund. 

tf E- Fund — 

0 j - Fund 

0M-Fund. 


-SF 


_SF 


_5F 


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if UBZ Euro- Income Fund SF 

ff UBZ Work) income Fund— Ecu 

tf UBZ Gold Fund S 

tf UBZ Nippon Convert SF 


ff Asm Growth Convert SFR _5F 
a AsJo Growth Convert USS— 5 

tf UBZ DM - Bend Fund DM 

tf UBZ 0- Fund DM 

tf UBZ Swiss Eouity Fund — 5F 

ff UBZ American Ea Fund S 

ff UBZS- Bond Fund- S 

UNION BANCO >RE ASSET MOT f l/BAM) 
INTERNATIONAL NASSAU 

■ ArdMlnves! 

■ Armlnvest 
’Bocofin 


1X34 

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w Beck Invest — 

■ Bnjctavest— 

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■ Dtafuiiires— 

■ Dinvest- 


■ Din vest Asia S- 


■ D invest I nit Fh Inc Strut S 

w Joglnvest. 5 

w Larontavest - S 

■ Mensinvem— * 

■ Martinuest S 

ur uaurtnvest ■ 


w Maurinvest Camlngted - 

■ Mourtnvesl Ecu 

■ Pulsar. 


iv Pulsar Ovenv- 

■ QuBirinvesi — 

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■ Turf Invest. 

wUrs Invest. 


259480 1 
120883 z 
115721 Z 
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273531: 
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30*734 2 
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313*371 
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UNION BANCAIRE ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL LUXEMBOURG 


w UBAM 3 Bond . 
tv UBAM DEM Bond. 


-DM 


■ UBAM Emerging Growth _» 

■ UBAM FRF Bond FF 

■ UBAM Germany—. !dm 

■ UBAM Gtabol Bend Ecu 

■ UBAM Japan v 

■ UBAM Slatting Bond c 

■ UBAM 5th Poclf & Asia S 

■ UBAM US Equities . 


117X1* z 
11153* r 
TfJl.16 I 
55l*30z 
11*838 z 

141429: 

180*229: 

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UNION BANK OF SWlTZERLAND/INTRAG 


ff Bantf-invesi- 
tf Brll-tnvesl — 
ff Canoe. 


d Convert- Invest . 
a D-Mark- Invest _ 

d Doltor-lnvesl 

ff Enerole- Invest, 
ff Esaoc 


-DM 


rf Francii 

a Germoc—. 
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ff Gohf-i 


it Gulden- invert _ 
0 Helvetlnvest . — 
0 Holtond- Invrrt. 
0 III 


-SF 

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0 JcmaivlRvert— 
ff Pocihc-lnvtsi. 
tf SoUi. 


ff Skandbunnen-lnvesi. 

ff Sterling-invert 

d Swiss Franc- invest _ 

tf Stain 

ff Swtareol. 


_SF 


-SF 


ff UBS America Latino -_SF 

ff UBS America Latino S 

tf UBS Asia New Horizon— SF 

ff UBS Asia New Horizon S 

ff UBS Small C. Europe SF 

0 UBS Small C Europe -DM 

0 UBS Pari Inv SFR Inc SF 

d UBS Pari inv SFR CaaG— SF 

0 UBS Port inv Ecu Inc SF 

ff UBS Port Inv Ecu Inc Ecu 

d UBS Port inv Ecu Cop G — SF 
tf UBS Part inv Ecu Cap G — Ecu 

tf UBS Port inv USS Inc S 

0 UBS Port inv USS Inc — SF 
0 UBS Pari inv USS Cap G — 3F 
0 UBS Pari Inv U5S Cap G--S 

rf UBS Part Inv DM Inc SF 

ff UBS Port inv DM me DM 

tf UBS Port Inv DM COP G — SF 
tf UBS Part Inv DM Cop G — DM 

d Yen-invert v 

rf UBS MM invert-USS— » 

rf UBS MM invest-: St — - ~1 

tf UBS MM Invert-Ecu Ecu 

tf UBS MM Invert-Yen -Y 

tf UBS MM Invert- Lit. 


rf UBSMMinvert-SFRA SF 

if UBS MM Invcrt-SFN T SF 

rf UBS MM invert-FF FF 

d UBS MM Invesl-HFI —FI 

0 UBS MM invert -Can s CS 

rf UBS MM invert-BFR BF 

rf UBS Short Term Irrv-DM DM 

rf UBS Bond Inv-Ecu a Ecu 

rf UBS Band Inv-Ecu T Ecu 

0 UBS Bond InvSFR SF 

d UBS Bond mv-DM DM 

rf UBS Bond Jnv~U5S — S 

rf UBS Bond lflv-FF FF 

tf UBS Bond Inv-Con S CS 

0 UBS Band Inv-LIl L« 

tf UBS fil-USS Extra Yield — s 
d UBS Fix Term inv-uSS 94 _5 
tf UBS Fix Term inv-cSiM — c 
d UBS Fix Term lnv-SFR94_SF 
d UBS Fl> Term lnv-DM96_DM 
0 UBS Fix Term inv-lai 9A_Ecu 
d UBS Fix Term Inv-FF 96— FF 

tf UBS Eq inv-Euroee A DM 

d UBS Eq Inv-Eurape T DM 

tf UBS Eq tav-S Cop USA - — S 
0 UBS Part 1 Fix Ine 1SFR)_5F 
ff UBS Perl I Fix Hie (DMJ — DM 
d UBS Pori 1 Fix Inc (Ecu)— Ecu 
0 UBS Port I Fl* inc (US«— » 
rf UBS Cop inv-90/10 SFR — SF 

rf UBS Cap lnv-90/10 USS J 

if UBS Cop lnv-90/10 Germ— DM 
WORLDFOLIO MUTUAL FUNDS 
0 S Doily income . .3 

tf DM Daliv Income DM 

a 5 Bend income S 

rf Non -S Bands S 

tf Gtobol Bands- 


0 Globoi Balanced— —3 

0 Global Eaullles S 

0 US Conservative Eaulltot— J 

0 US Agresrtve Eaufltes S 

rf European Equities — — .3 

d Pacific Eauiiies S 

rf Natural Resources. 


47 JS v 

60.10 v 
15X50 V 

8635 v 
14B50V 
711*0v 
11538* 
11*30 v 
1*030 y 

177M1 
33*30 v 
23030* 
26430V 
17230v 
27030 V 
285 00 y 
10530 V 
34730 V 
1*530 v 
24730 V 
49230V 
22130* 
279.08 y 
231 JO V 
2124* 
2413d 
19130 
11738 V 
8185 v 
*5-30 V 
6423 v 
104.98 V 
12380 V 
1 1095 v 
11270* 
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16835 v 
6X17 y 
74*9 v 
107.90* 
10885 * 
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100J0V 
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121.10 v 
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1010.14 

rams 
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551.14 

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14128 v 
10484 V 
10784 V 
101J7* 
1135 JO v 
106J1V 
117584330 V 
97 J6v 
11034 V 
11136 y 
11182* 
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255.14 y 
13480v 
10131* 
10415 v 
10588V 

100.10 y 
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UM 

T3C 

173 : 

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2034 
1830 
1X96 
1531 
ISJ5 
1124 
1X78 
027 


YIELD ENHANCEMENT STRATEGISTS 
rf Enhanced Trees. Returns— S 


Other Funds 

w Achcrolsaonca Sicav F F 

■ Actlfinonce Sicav S 

■ Act itutures Ltd S 


■ Act toesf Ion Sicav _ 

■ Act 1 vest Inti Sicav. 
Arte la (de. 


-FF 


m Advanced Latin Fd Ud ■ 3 

mAavonced Pacific sirot— S 

■ Advanced Strategies Lid — 5 

■ AlG Taiwan Fund 3 

ai Amo investment,..,.. _.S 

■ ARulta inlernottenal Fund -3 

■Arfctim invertmew ... S 

■ Argus Fund Batanced— SF 

w Argus Fund Bend SF 


5408* 

92137 

102138 

481.77 

27.98 

104220 

189.10 

10430 

14384 


0 Asia Oceania Fund- 
wASS lASlen) AG. 

■ ASS 1 Derivative) ; 

■ ASS (Zeros) AG. 


-DM 


mAssodaied investors tat— 3 

■ Athena Fund Ltd S 

■ ATO Nikkei Fund. 


v Bixizal Hedged Growth Fa A 

■ Beckman nw Cop Acc s 

■ BEM International Ltd S 

tf BlkubeivMorval EEF Ecu 

0 Bfecmar Glbl Fd (Carman IS 
ff Blecmor Gtobol l Batramrel S 

rf CCI.I 1 

mCM Euro Leverage Fd Ltd_s 
m Capital Assured India Fd — 5 
0 CB German index Fund— -DM 
mCtrvin Grovrih Fund— — — S 
m Chilian Inti (BVI) LW 5 

■ Citadel Limited — 3F 

■ CM USA 

■ CM! investment Fund 1 

m Cohmibus HoMBngs — - — S 
m Concorde inv Funa * 

■ Conllvert Actions I mi BF 

wCoMhrertObii Beiu* CT. — BF 

■ Canllvesl Obll World DM 

w Conven. Fd mri a Crns — S 

■ Convert Fd inti fi Certs— S 

m Crate Drill Cop. S 

mCresool Asian Hodge Fd — 5 
mCRM Futures Fond Ltd— S 

■ Cumber mriN.v.. 


■ Curr. Conceal MOO— — » 
rf D. Wilier Wd wide Ivt Trt-S 

■ DjBlC l 

tf Dalwa Japan Fund. J 

ff DB Argentina Bd Fd — — 3 
ff DBSC / Nofln Banff Fund— S 


971X07 
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52986 

10088 

2980 

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a Deflvattvr asm) Alloc 5 '*2-2? 

rf Drevtas America Fund— 3 ZXZ7 

1 dvt Performance Fd —. — % «»-33 

■ Eos Overseas Fund Ud— 5^ 

m Elite World Fund Ltd SF 10W1JB 

tf Eml Beta. Ind. Pur, A BF 1139230 

ff Eml Beta ind. P«n B SF ISSUO 

ff Eml France ind. Plus A— FF 10389* 

ff Eml France (M Pirn 8 FF 16*7.22 

rf Eml Germ, ina Plus A DM 10X8? 

d Eml Germ, ina Plus B_ DM 1UU* 

rf Eml Meta, Index Plus A Fl eei.94 

tf Eml Netn. index Plus B Ft 70X23 

tf Eml Saelnlnd.PhnA Pto 1285330 

rf Eml Saain ina Plus B. —Pta 1 J* 02 J 0 

rf Eml UK Index Plus A — * 13X44 

d Eml UK inde> Pius B c 145 W 

mEqulsiar Othhore Lid 5 11X15 

■ Ewlr, Sto inv. M Ecu Bd FdEcv Hx35 

■ Esoir. SIO inv &th Eur Fd_5 X99 

ff Europe 1992 S 1133 

ff Europe Obligations Ecu 10SJ4 

■ FJ.T. Fund FF FF I HOO 

■ FJVLP. Portfolio.. 

■ FalrfieW inti Ltd. 


tr Fairfield Sentry Lta___ 
w Fairfield Slrolegies Ltd . 
mFaiuxn FuntL- 


m Firebird Overseas Lid- 
s' First Ea tde Fund 

w First Ecu Ltd- 


m First Frontier Fund. 
m First inti Invert men) 
w fl Trust Asto- 


» FL Trust Switzerland—- 

rf FendHotto 

tvFcnlux 1 Money 

■ Fonhix 2 Devise 

nr Forrtux 3 - Inti Bond 

■ Formula Selection Fd. 


m Future GeneraHon Lid — 

TO GEM Generation Ltd 

TO Gemini Cars Lid 


111 GFMC Growth Fund. 

■ Global 93 Fund Lid 5. 
w Global Arbitrage Ltd. 
b Global Cop Fd BVI 

■ Gtobol Futures Mgi Lid S 

m Gtobol Monetary Fd Ltd 5 

■ Gcnnord . — 3F 

rf Greenune France FF 

TO Guaranteed Capital Imm 94 LF 

w Harbtager Laibi Amer 5 

1 Haussmann Hides N.v. S 

■ HB Invert merits Lid 1 

m Hemisphere Neutral Feb 21 s 
tf Heritage Cap Growth FdLftfS 

iv Hcrtta Funa s 

b Htohbridge Cool nil Carp S 

w Horizon Fund. FF 

■ ibex Hold mgs LW SF 

■ l FDC Jaenn Fund Y 

b ila-iGB S 

b ILA-JGF i 

b 1LA-INL. 


ft 

07146 


21930 


31930 


BA20 


135824 


15839 


4177935 


41.17 


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191 


15155 

F 

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8437 

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94536 

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*54 SS 

.SF 

1000.79 

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51.77 

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ft 

3 

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ft 

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ft 

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ft 

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■v Indtec Currency Fd Lid S 

r Inti Securities Fund Ecu 

a iniertund SA — — S 

a InvesraDWS. - DM 

iv Japan Pacllic Fixid 5 

to Japan Selection Asses. v 

Hr Japan Selearan Fund S 

wKenmarGtd.Series2 S 

a Kenmor Guaranteed S 

rnKi Asia Pacific Fd LM S 

» KM Gtobol— — Jf 

a KML - II High Yield 8 

1 * Korea Dynamic Fund — s 

■ Korea Growth Trust S 

mLF. Yield & Growth Fd s 

■ La Fmetle Holdings Ltd — i 
m La Jolla lid Grin Fd Ud — S 
b Laterman: Dlfshere Sfrai—S 

■ Leal Sicav S 

m Leu Performance Fd 3 

LF International . 


to London Portfolio Service 

m LPS mil ILP.B 

■ Luxtand. 


rnLvnx SeL Holdlngs- 
■ M i Mulh Slraie 


-SF 


■ MA kngdon Offshore, N.V — 5 
m Master Cop A Hedge Fd — s 

■ Atafferoom Offshore Fd — I 

■ MBE Japan Fund LF 

mMcGtnnls Global (Feb 281— S 
■nMCM tat. Limned -3 

w Millennium Internal lonal s 

TOMJM inlernotlanal Lid S 

mMomemum Guild Lid 5 

■ MuWlluJ tires FF 

tf Net; Millennium Fut. Lid — 1 

d Newtxui* DebenlurES— S 

niNMT Aston Sef. Portfolio s 

w Noble Partners tall Ud. S 

mNSP F.I.T.LM 


m Ocean Strategies Llmlied S 

■ Old Ironside Inti Ltd 1 

fflOmego Overseas Partners A 

mOppenheimer U3. Arb. S 

w Optimal Eftect Ful. Lid A -3 
w Optimal Effect Ful. Ltd B -SF 
m Optimum Fund ft 

■ Oracle Fund Ltd- 


m Over look Performance ft 

TO Pad/ RIM Onp BVI Mar 0*3 
to Pun Fi*ed Inc Ftf (Jan 311— S 

m pan internalionol Ud ft 

■ Pancurri Inc.— ft 

w Panda Fund Pk_ 


mPanMPes Oftrtiora ( Feb 281 ft 

m Paragon Fund Umiled ft 

to Parana. Fund Do S 

mPeauol Infl Fund 3 

■ Phorma/Whtahh ft 

v* PkirWestton Ptar'rtorex FF 

• PtorteesHon piurlvoieur — FF 

■ Plurivert Sicav FF 

mPambov Overseas Ud % 

to Portuguese Smaller Co 1 

m Prlma Band Plus Fd Ud —3 
mPrima Capital Fund Lid— S 

to Prime MullLinvest 8 

m Prlmeo Fund. S 

rf Prottreni S A., 


w Pvronva inv Fa Cora 3 

tf PAD inl inv. Fd -—3 

ff Renal intt Fund Ltd — S 

I Rie Inovrsl Fund A S 

t Pic moves! Fund 8 ft 

■ Richctw rl Beiivmy inc S 

■ RM Futures Fund Sicav — 3 

w Sailor'S tail Eaulrv Ecu 

■ Sailor's tall Fired .Ear 

rf Sanyo Kie Spain Fd — - — 5 

a Sorakree* Holding N.v 3 

■ Sorum Fund. 


m Savoy Fund Ltd. 3 

m SC Fundom.vol BVI Ltd— J 
ff SCI ' Tech. SA Luncmbourgs 

mSclmllor Guar. Curr Fa 3 

m Scimitar Guaranteed Fd — J 
to Sel ec to Global Hedge FO— 3 

ff Selective Ful PIH Ltd 3 

mSe modes 3 

■ Sinclair Muliilixid Lid s 

it SJO Global i <0*1*21-6595 — S 

■ Smith Barney Wrtdml 5ec-S 
w Smith Barney WrkJwd Snec s 

■ SP International SA A SH — S 
w SP International SA B Sh — A 

TO SPUD Hedge Hid S 

TOSntrll Neutral hw. 


■ Stonier Russ Futures Fund.FF 

■ Stoinhanll 0-seas Fd Ltd —5 

■ Slelnnortfi Itealtv Trust 3 

mStrtder Fund. 


mStrome Offshore Ltd. 



ff Sunsei Gtobol ill Ltd 
ff Sunsei Gtobtri One 
mSussex McGarr 
mTas Curroncy 

■ Techno Growth Fund - 

rf Term, lelon Global me S 

mThe Brtdge Fund n.v s 

m The Geo-Global O/trtiore — 5 
0 The insin Muin Advisors — s 

mThe J Fund B.V.I. Ltd 3 

w The jaguar Fund N.V ft 

d The Latin Equities Fa — S 

ff The M'A* R*SFd Sicav a — 1 

ff The M'A -R *5 Fd Sicav I DM 

m The Seychelles Fa Ltd 3 

m The Smart Bond Ltd — SF 

w Theme M-M Futures — — 3 
to Tiger Selec Hob) NV Bid — S 
m Tiger Selec Hold NV Otter .3 
0 TiiC IOTC) Jap-Fd SKOv—S 
b Tokyo lOTC) Fund Srcnv — S 

■ Tran* Gtabol invi Ltd S 

0 Transpacific Fund Y 

■ T r tally Futures Fd Ltd ft 

m Triumph I ft 


m Triumph ill. 

m Triumph iv. 
rf Turuuofse Fund.. 


mTwtedv Browne InlT nv — i 
w Tweedy Browne n.v. Cl A — ft 
■ Tweed/ Browne n.v. Ci B — t 

ff obaFuiures FF 

0 Ubo Futures Dollar ft 

f Ultima Growth FdLid- 


tf umbreiio Deb) Fixid Lid — ft 
tf Umbreln Fund Lid— 3 

■ uni Bond Fund Ecu 

■ urn Capital Aliemogne—DM 

to Uni Capital Convertibles — Ecu 
to UnLGtabol Skav DEM DM 

■ Ifiu-Gtoooi Sicav Ecu Ecu 

•ft UnLGtobOl Sicav FRF FF 

w Um-GUbai Skm FS ~AF 

1 * UnMKaCal Sicav USD ft 

tf Unico Equity Fund DM 

ff Unico inv. Fund— —DM 

m umtrodes CH F sf 

mUnllrodes CHF Reg. 

m umtrodes frf 

to Uni trades USD 

w Ursus Inti Lid— 
mVolbonne- 


-FF 


m Vidor Futures Fund ft 

b voyager mveetmenis Pic — 1 
w Vufiure Ltd . .—.-3 

m Welles Wilder intt Fd— 5 
■ Winer Japon. 


■ Wilier South East Asm S 

■ Wlltawfariaw tail CFM s 

rf Win Glabei Fd Bd. PHI Ecu 

tf Win Gtabol FdEa PHI Ecu 

tf wm Global Fd Res pi 11 SF 

d World Bakwed Fund 5A-S 
m Worldwide Limited S 

■ WPG Farfier O’seos Pan 
mWW Capitol Grth Fd Ltd— 3 

m Young — ,.. sf 

mzeoftvr Hedge Fund ft 

mZwetg lali Ud S 


10572X13 
1351 JO 
97633 
2718 

*89.79 
58844800 
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To sufaserfee in France 

just coH, toll Free, 

05437 437 





For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


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Page 15 


EUROPE 


Nervous Britons 
Working More, 
^Spending Less 


ftoam 

LONDON — The British econo- 
my is expanding hui consumers are 
nervous, data released on Wednes- 
day indicated. 

The government said unemploy- 
ment fell a seasonally adjusted 
38,300 in February, to 175 million 
as thejobless rate fell to 9.8 percent 
from 9.9 percent. 


But although average earnings 
rose 3.25 percent in January, Feb- 


Schroders Posts 
Surge in Profit 


Reuters 

LONDON — Schroders 
PLC said Wednesday its 1993 
pretax profit rose 85 percent, 
to £195.8 million ($292 mil- 
hon), as turbulence in curren- 
cy and stock markets boosted 
its fee income. 

The report marked the first 
time the merchant banking 
concern had disclosed its pre- 
tax profit figure, in line with 
new European banking regula- 
tions. The number was above 
analysts' expectations. 

Profit after taxes and minor- 
ity interests, the figure tradi- 
tionally released, more than 
doubled, to £140.3 million. 


maty retail sales fell by 0.5 percent, 
compared with expectations of a 
0.2 percent rise. January sales, 
however, were revised upward to 
0.9 percent from the previously re- 
ported 0.6 percent 

Analysts said the data were con- 
sistent with a recent trend that 
showed wary British consumers 
spending freely during discount pe- 
riods — which was the case in Jan- 
uary — then slaying away from 
stores immediately afterwards. 

The February fall in sales may 
point to consumer caution ahead of 
the massive £9 billion ($13 billion) 
worth of tax rises taking effect in 
April, and pose a threat to the gov- 
ernment's 2.5 percent growth rore- 
cast for 1994, analysts said. 

' Securities markets took the re- 
ports badly, focusing on the earn- 
ings rise as a harbinger of inflation. 
The yield on the benchmark 10- 
year government bond issue 
jumped to 7.17 percent in late trad- 
ing from 7.02 percent on Tuesday. 

Slock prices were sharply lower 
'as hopes faded for a near-term cut 
in interest rates. Hie Financial 
Times-Siock Exchange 100-sbare 
index fdl 24.5 points, to 3,242.9. 

The pound rose to $1.4932 from 
$1.49 23 in late London trading, 
supported by the outlook that bank 
base lending rates would remain at 
5.25 percent for the present. But 
sterling fell to 15223 Deutsche 
marks from 25296. 


What a Difference 13 Years Make 

This Time, ILK. Tax Rise has Economists Guessing 


-Bluontfotj; Business News 

LONDON — In a memorable display or 
consensus. 364 British economists published 
an open letter in 1981 warning that a major 
tax increase scheduled for April of that year 
would be a disaster for the economy. 

Thirteen years later, Britons face another 
tax increase of roughly the same size. But this 
time, there is no consensus among econo- 
mists. Few have firmly forecast fallout from 
the tax increase without sprinkling their opin- 
ions with caveats. 

“No one is really willing to put their heads 
above tbe parapet," said Paul Johnson, an 
economist at the government's Institute of 
Fiscal Studies. 

If time is anything close to consensus, it is 
this: Growth rates will stay at current levels 
only if consumers are ready to dip into sav- 
ings to pay the taxes while leaving their in- 
come free to spend. 

The savings ratio, which is the amount of 
disposable income consumers save versus 
what they spend, is crucial — and unknown. 
If people stop spending to pay for new taxes. 


economic growth could suffer, economists 
generally agree. 

“The success or failure of the government’s 
economic policy depends largely on consum- 
ers’ willingness to save less," said Reger Boo- 
tle, an economist at Midland Global Markets. 

Some analysts said the drop in consumer 
credit in January and sluggish retail sales in 
February are evidence that consumers are 
already lightening thdr belts in anticipation 
of April’s tax increase. 

Nigel Whittaker, with the Confederation 
of British Industry, said February's sales fig- 
ures indicate consumers are “holding bock 
until they are sure just how much their pay 
packets are affected." 

The Bank of England said in a recent 
report that it expected Britain's savings ratio 
to fall, although it was reluctant to put a 
figure on how far. 

British consumers are facing nearly £9 bil- 
lion ($13 billion) of tax increases next month 
and £5.5 billion more in 1995. The net in- 
crease will knock about 3 percent orr total 
personal disposable income. Id terms of the 


economy, this is a tightening of about 25 
percent of gross domestic product ova the 
next 2 years. 

The London Business School recently add- 
ed its voice to those expecting the tax increase 
to slow the economic recovery. 

David Currie, Andrew Sentence and An- 
thony Garran, economists at the school's 
Center for Economic Forecasting, said Brit- 
ain’s GDP growth would falter to 12 percent 
in 1995 from a forecast 25 percent in 1994 
because of the biggest rise in taxes since 1981. 

In another report, the National Institute of 
Economic Research said tax rises will slow 
the pace of the recovery, but not for a year to 
18 months. 

Even Chancellor of the Exchequer Ken- 
neth Clarke said Britain's economic recovery 
could be “checked” by the tax increase. 

For this reason, many economists said they 
thought the quarter-point cut in interest rates 
in February was merely the Fust of at least 
two rale cuts that the government would use 
to offset the impact of the tax increase on 
consumers. 


Investor’s Europe 


, : '"■* Paris..- 



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Sources: Reuters. AFP 


lmmuitwu) IknUTrihuu 


Klockner Sees Profit in 1994 Very briefly: 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupatcha 

DUISBURG, Germany — 
Klockner-Werke AG said Wednes- 
day its net loss narrowed for its 
1993 financial year to a third of its 
level in the previous year and that it 
expected to return to profit this 
year after selling two sted units. 

The company said it posted a net 
loss of 1955 million Deutsche 
marks ($115 million) for the year 
that ended on SepL 30, narrowed 
from a loss of 560.3 million DM in 


the previous year. Sales Tor the year 
fell 14 percent, to 6.1 billion DM. 

The company said its operating 
loss in the year had widened to 375.6 
million DM from 1 119 million. 

Klockner sold KlOdkner Edd- 
stahl GmbH last summer and sold 
two- thirds of Klockner Stahl Gmbh 
in February. The company said it 
planned to cut its work force to just 
under 19.000 by the end of the cur- 
rent year from 27,721 at the end erf 
last September. (Bloomberg. AFX ) 


• Sotieit des Gineots Franfab SA, the French cement company, posted a 
net loss of 685 million French francs (SI billion) in 1993, compared with a 
loss of 1.3 billion francs in 1992. 


• France's budget deficit in 1993 was 315.7 billion French francs, 40 
percent higher than in 1992 but less than the government's initial forecast 
of 317 billion francs. 


■ The European Commission approved a Basque regional government 
plan to take a 15 percent stake in a Spanish steel merger between Acero y 
Forjas de Azcoitia SA and Corporedon Partkio Echevarria. 

• VDO Adolf Sdumfling AG. the German auto pans and electronics 
company, said its 1993 results were a “dear loss.” but did not detail the 
figures. The company also said sales fell 2 percent in the year. 


• Coats Vlyefla PLC, the British textiles concern, earned £150.3 million 
($224 million) before taxes in 1993. up from £109.1 million earned in 
1992, primarily because restructuring efforts have begun to pay off. 

• Crotch NV posted fiat net profits for 1993, at 435 million guilders ($23 
mi) lion), but predicted it would shrug off lough economic conditions to 
push profits higher this year. 

• Western German wholesale prices rose 0J percent in February from a 
year ago and rose 05 percent from January. 

• The Paris Court of Appeals sharply reduced a fine for insider trading 

against Pierre Beige, manager of two companies in the Yves Saint 
Laurent Groupe; the Fine was slashed to 1.0 million French francs from 
3.0 million. AFX. AP. Bloomberg, AFP. Reuters 


MILITARY: Pentagon Takes Interest in Pollution- Cutting Technology 

Continued from Page 11 


happy to let private industry con- 
centrate on components for the 
electric car. 

“We can take the same motors, 
the same controllers, and put them 
in a humvee." he said, using the 


Biology of Natural Systems at 


Queens College, part of the City 
University of New York. 

But if scientists and engineers 


future Desert Storm or Gulf War way to help comply with Cal if or- destruction." said Barry Common- 
type of operation. nia’s increasingly strict air-quality er. director of the Center for the 

Even as the anticipated spin-off laws, 
of military technology into civilian 1 Quiet and reliable, such cdls 
products seems to be disappearing could also provide electrical power 
like the atomic fallout shelter, a for remote bases. On the civilian 

significant trend has developed in side, such fuel cells are bang used avoided any work that had militaiy 
... . . . . m t - . the opposite direction — from ci- for experimental pollution-free uses, he said, “that would slop you 

mihtary abbreviation tor the togh- vjyan workshop to military lab — buses. from working on almost anything" 

mobility muitiouroose vehicle ^ ^ has a name. The Advanced Research Projects The militaiy, in turn, sees little 

“They call it ‘spin-on,’ " a gov- Agency sponsors six regional con- strategic danger from a batiery- 
emraent scientist, Roger W. Weme sodiums, including the one headed powered truck possibly falling into 
of the Lawrence Livermore Na- by Ms. Lynch, made up of equip- the wrong hands, 
tional Laboratory in California, meat manufacturers, electric utui- “Thinking of bow potential ad- 
said. Long a leading weapons lab- ties, government agencies and oth- versaries of the United States 
oratory, u vennore now is lining up er groups interested in electric cars, would be able to use this stuff mili- 
For example, $300,000 from the joint nonmilitary projects with pri- Funding through these groups has tarily a g ai n st us, the world has 
Advanced Research Projects Agen- vate industry. made possible projects such as de- changed," said Lennie Siegel, di- 

Meanwhile, the Army’s Con- signing an electric car. rector of the Pacific Studies i Center 

struction Engineering Research Solectria Inc. of Wilmington, In Mountain View, California. 
Laboratory in Champaign. Illinois, Massachusetts, is at work on such a “There is no one. who if you gave 
is spending $18 million for a dozen design, which may cost $13 million them a few key secrets, would be- 
fuel cells from ONSI Corp. of — a trivial amount by military come an adversary of the United 


mobility multipurpose 
that has replaced the jeep. 

It is little wonder, then, that the 
military has quietly become a re- 
search patron for dozens of small 
civilian projects in important elec- 
tric-vehicle technologies. 


cy helped Electronic Power Tech- 
nology of Norcross, Georgia, de- 
velop a computer-controlled 
battery charger. 

Last month at the Atlanta Motor 
Speedway, .the battery charger 
helped set a world record for dis- 
tance traveled by an electric vehicle 
in 24 hours. 

While' the company hopes its 


South Windsor. 'Connecticut The 

devices combine hydrogen and ox- 
ygen to make electricity, with water 
as a byproduct. 


standards, it could have been an States, 
enormous burden for a struggling Indeed, there are important dec- 
civilian enterprise. . trie technologies that the military 

Some environmentalists are would love to see American private 


The Pentagon is installing one at wary about Pentagon aid, even if industry develop before anyone 
charger will lead to electric “filling Van den berg Air Force Base in Cal- they are resigned it. else. Major Cope cited energy stor- 

sta lions" for battery-powered cars, iforoia to provide electricity for in- “It troubles me that any of our age. which rould be mechanical, as 

struroeots that track missiles. Base resources should be used for the in a flywheel, or electrochemical, as 
commanders see fuel cells as one purposes of preparing widespread in a battery. 


the Pentagon is thinking about 
dec trie fueling depots in case of a 


CHEVROLET: GM Division’s New Campaign Invokes Its Glory Days 


Continued from Page 11 

which in recent years have sold 
look-alike, similarly priced cars." 

For Chevrolet, combining its 
new image-building campaign with 
the rollout of its new cars and 
trucks is essential. 


Prizm sedan that are selling as fast 
as the factories can make them. Mr. 
Perkins has also made a few quick 
Fixes to bolster the sexiness of the 
brand. 

He took the unloved Chevrolet 
Caprice (a car be derided as “the 


Chevrolet has phenomenal 

_nd recognition, but it obviously F»odtfled Corvette enjgme. ^paimcd 
hasan image problem," said Clive « Made, pul on o^medtirwand 
SjS. dSnian of Uppincott A resurrected the fabled ImpakJB 




Margulies, an identity and image 
consulting firm in New York. “Co- 
inciding image changes with reality 
changes like new styling and new 
cars and whatever is the way" to fix 
that problem, he said. 

Whether Chevrolet can resusci- 
tate itself, Mr. Chajet said, ulti- 
mately depends on whether its new 
cars are up to speed. “If the reality 
doesn’t match the image, they’re 
really damaging the brand, he 
said. 

Chevrolet has introduced some 
relatively low-volume products 
such as the sleek Camaro. the Blaz- 
er sport utility vehicle and the Geo 


label from a generation ago to pro- 
duce a limited-edition. 260-horse- 
power car that is sure to thrill some 
auto buffs, or at least some would- 
be state troopers. 

But that is just a Band-Aid. Now. 
GWs crucial division is about to 
introduce a crucial product — - a 
restyled Lumina sedan with which 
Chevrolet and GM hope to begin 
their march back into the heart of 
tbe market, the family sedan busi- 
ness. That market is dominated by 
Ford Motor Co.’s Taurus and 
Honda Motor Co.’s Accord. 

The Lumina. which is expected 
in showrooms in May. will also be 


available as a coupe. For that mod- But the Lumina is clearly an iro- 
el, Mr. Perkins has reached back to provexneni on the sedan it is rcplac- 
another classic name: Monte Car- mg, if only because it has two air 
to. Thai car is intended to compete bags. That change automatically 
with Ford’s Thunderbird. mak es it a candidate for business 

Chevrolet sold 219,683 Luminas fleets, a large market tor the Tau- 
in 1993, while Ford sold 360,448 of rus - 

S 6 TauT ^-^^? , !IL S t b! 5 {he The L™ 13 also shows that GM 
Mercury divisions version or the ^ ^ altcnliori w 

car - details that customers like in Japa- 

Chevrolei hopes to sell more nese cars. The car’s developers an- 
than 300,000 of the new Lumina, gJcd the radio and ventilanon con- 
and 100,000 Monte Carios, in 1995. trols toward the driver, added 
For this year, the production storage compartments behind the 
changeovers will probably result in seats and increased the size of the 
a further slide in Chevrolet’s mar- glove compartment, 
kei share. 


Some critics have called the Lu- 
mina’s styling too conservative, 
even for the staid family-sedan 
market 

"From what Tve seen of tbe Lu- 
mina’s styling, it isn’t a dramatic 
enough change,” said Susan Ja- 


ins lead of the old Lumina's oily, 
shiny interior, the new one has the 
low-gloss look that buyere asso- 
ciate with luxury cars. 


But the car does not appear to 
leapfrog its competitors the way 
the Taurus did in 1986 and Chiys- 


cobs. president of Jacobs & Asso- ler’s aggressively styled LH sedans 
dates, an automotive consulting did more recently. It s a couple of 
firm in Rutherford. New Jersey. years late. Mr. Knoll said. 




‘ HI v 

Mr 


• r? i 
#*-’ ■ 


COKE: Company Sees r Almost Unfathomable 9 Growth Prospects in Asia 

r th>nrA from Paw 1.1 But Jonathan Rabinovitz, an an- Analysts said that in all its main are its three major sources of sale 

connnueo uvu t al p oltCT Warburg Securities markets, Coca-Cola Amatil had es- 

had"the capacitylor U<L ^ed a nole of caution. taUished a dominant share,j>ladng 
1 * He said that while the potential Coca-Cola’s arch rival. 


til's markets 
substantial expansion, 
its Australian base. 


and profit at present 

Until the 1980s, it was rare to 
find a singje Coca-Cola franchise 


i Australian base. of ^ Central European and Asian ^ ^ other soft-drink suppliers bottler servicing a whole country. 

SStfMCMS ssffl--n SNS- but 


-MS . 


!.** 

: Ksi ; 


.■» ■ 

4'-i 
. M ; 

: r» . 



foods division “wiD enable me aei*™^ », stands that to fight a global war 

company to fund both Us current "^.^' h L c 4is h Coca-Cola Amatil has around 60 with Pepsi it must have powerful 

inStructure investment and a Amen percent of the soft-drink market m bottling groups with solid manage- 

reasonable rate of new franchi* 45 f*rccni in Austria ment Mketing Alb." Mr. 

expansion, without resort o ThereKso the Pepsi threat. and 50 percent in Hungary. These Beaurepaire said. 

equity raising." ne said. 


NYSE 


Wednesday’s Closing 

Tables indude the nationwide prices up to 
trie cfosing on Wan Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


(Continued) 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994 


* * 


Power Outages Plague U.S. Control Towers I NASDAQ 

o D Wednesday’* Price* 


13 Monti 
Hon low stock 


By Martin Tolchin 

New York Times Serrtce 
WASHINGTON — - Air traffic 
controllers were guiding airplanes 
in and out of Dallas-Fort Worth 
International Airport at 9:3 9 AM 
on Feb. 22 when they suddenly 
found themselves staring at blank 
radar screens. The radios used to 
communicate with pilots had also 
gone dead. 

A computer glitch had caused an 
extensive power failure, and back- 
up systems, which are usually auto- 
matically activated at such times, 
had failed as well. 

Radio contact was restored in 
two minutes, but it was IS minutes 
before the radar screens began 
working. 

Ten days later, on March 4. a 
contractor enlarging an air traffic- 
control center near Sealtle-Tacoma 
International Airport caused a 
power surge that blacked out all 
radar screens for four minutes. It 
took more than an hour to put the 
system back in operation. 

These were not isolated inci- 
dents. Power failures occur hun- 
dreds of times a year at air traffic 
centers, providing a daily test of the 
nerves and inventiveness of flight 
controllers who find that they have 
suddenly lost contact with pilots 
who depend on them from takeoff 
to landing. 


Administration officials cite the centers, which direct arriving and 
frequency of these power failures departing aircraft 
as an argument for their proposal Transportation Secretary Feder- 
to revamp the air traffic-control ico F. Pena says that creating a 
system by putting daily operations corporation to manage air traffic 
in the hands of a government-sub- will not only make it easier to rood- 
si dized corporation rather than the emizc the system but will also fos- 
Federal Aviation Administration, ter a change in culture to one that 
The officials say many of these fad- rewards initiative and efficiency, 
ures are causal by antiquated But others say that it is in the 
equipment whose modernization nature of mechanical equipment to 
has been delayed by onerous gov- fail and that disasters can best be 
ernmenl regulations that will be prevented by having adequate 
lifted if the system is removed from backup plans. They note that no 
government control. scheduled commercial airliner has 

But members of Congress who had a fatal accident in the United 
oppose the reorganization plan say States since March 22, 1992. 
tha [President Briiciinton has the Stanley Rivers, the aviation ad- 
authority to wipe out these reguia- mmistraaon s acting deputy asso- 
tions by an executive order. ciate administrator for airway facil- 


“But we do have failures, and the . 
controllers are trained to accom- 
modate them. There is redundancy 
built into the system, and there are 
procedural means to accommodate 
failures when they occur." 

At Dallas-Fort Worth Interna- 1 
tional, a spokesman for the FAA'sJ 
southwest region. Debra M} 
described the atmosphere cm 


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Air traffic controllers say the 
power failures can be harrowing. 

“It’s like driving down a winding 
road at 60 miles an hour, and clos- 
ing your eyes for a couple of min- 
utes/’ said Wiil Favilie. director of 
safety and technology for the Na- 
tional Air Traffic Controllers Asso- 


ities, said the power failures were 
mostly caused by equipment fail- 
ure, loss of outside power, impaired 
telephone lines, interference from 
outside sources, and glitches in 
computer software. 

These failures seldom undermine 
aviation safety, Mr. Rivers said, 
because emergency procedures and 


were told to fly in a holding pattern j I? 1 * ft* §*£«?* M 
until the radar began to operate 
ag a i n. 

At Sea ttl e-Tacoroa Internation- 
al, air traffic controllers without 


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nation. "You have planes out there backup systems usually take up the 


03 Keeps Bosporus Closed 


that are pointing at each other. 

Federal officials said that power 
failures occurred 126 times last 
year at the agency's 20 air route- 
control centers, which direct traffic 
between airports, and 495 times at 
the agency's 181 airport-approach 


slack. At Dallas, however, a com- 


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pater failed to have power trans- waterway remained closed for a 


l erred to the backup system: in third day on Wednesday following !i*ff 
Seattle, the power surge disabled a collision between an oil tanker “S 1 i* A Amg^j s 
the backup system. and a freighter, although the burn- ^ ‘ 

“We very seldom have earn- ing tanker was towed into the Black 3 * v ‘ib* 
strop hie failures.” Mr.' Rivera said. Sea. 225 S* 




10 * II 
IB* 18 


IB* _ 



EUROPEAN 


TOPICS 


France Weighs Its Appetite 
For Booze and Tranquilizers 


The French are. according to some statis- 
tics, the world’s biggest consumers boLh ol 
alcohol and prescription anti-depressive 


drugs. But voices are increasingly being heard 
for the reform of a system that encourages 


this. 


encourages 


In all. French doctors wrote out 60 million 
prescriptions last year for sedatives, tranquil- 
izers and anti-depressants — more than for 
any other class of pharmaceuticals but antibi- 
otics and pain killers. 

Sales of the popular new mood regulator 
Prozac were up 16 percent last year from 
1992. amounting to one-sixth of all ami- 
depressives sold. Meanwhile, alcohol con- 
sumption averaged an alarmingly high 1 1.9 
titers of pure alcohol. 

The costs to society are dear: French roads 
are among the world’s most dangerous, with 
nearly half of fatal accidents involving alco- 
hol; 60 percent of crime is alcohol-related; 
and mood-affecting drugs are subsidized ai 
immense cost to die state. 

/to eminent French psychiatrist. Edouard 
Zarifian, has taken aim at the easy reliance on 
drugs in a new book. “Des Paradis Plein la 
Tile" (“Headful of Paradise”). To prescribe 
an anti-depressant to a jobless person whose 


benefits are running out may seem normal, be 
says. But when the practice is repeated hun- 
dreds of thousands of times it amounts to a 
sort of society-wide medical treatment of 
unemployment. What's more, the person tak- 
ing the drugs “loses his ability to examine the 
situation and liy to gain control over it,” he 
told L’Ex press. 

What can be done? Dr. Gerard Masse, a 
psychiatrist, says that 30 percent of prescrip- 
tions are for relationship problems better 


dealt with through counseling. The great ma- 
i-a/Te 


jority of mood-affecting drugs are prescribed 
by generalists. Dr. Zarifian says prescription 
practices need tighter controls. 

As to the alcohol problem, the National 
Association for the Prevention of Alcoholism 
has proposed five points, according to the 
daily InfoMatin: tighter enforcement of the 
advertising ban; a pricing system in bars and 
restaurants that would make nonalcoholic 
drinks less expensive than alcoholic bever- 
ages; a lowering of the legal blood-alcohol 
level for drivers; and creation of new alcohol- 
ism treatment centers. 

Bad as it is, France's problem is not nearly 
what it was: Die average Frenchman drinks 
less than half the alcohol he did in I960. And 
in the ’30s, ads in the Metro suggested: “Nev- 
er drink more than two liters of wine a day.” 

Around Europe 

In Sweden, a sharp rise m tobacco taxes has 
contributed to a 21 percent decline in the 
number of smokers. Tobacco taxes rose 39 
percent at the end of 1992, raising the cost of 
a pack of cigarettes to 32 kronor (about $4). 
Though anti-smoking campaigns in Sweden 
have become more aggressive — one ad 


shows the slogan of a U.S. cigarette-maker 
primed over a graveyard — the taxes appear 
to be the main cause for the drop in smoking. 
Before the tax rise, the number of smokers 
had been declining by 1 percent to 2 percent 
annually. 


Faced with severely overcrowded prisons, 
Spain has begun expelling foreigners charged 
with or sentenced for minor crimes. The 
move should have considerable impact: 3.000 
of the 6.500 people serving terms of six years 
or less are non-Spaniards. Public Prosecutor 
Eligio Hernandez hopes the move will also 
persuade some foreign misc reants, who had 
ling ber 


counted on slipping between the slow wheels 


of Spanish justice, to leave. 
Belgium, to 


Igium, too. has begun early releases. Its 
prisons have a capacity of 5,900 but now 
house 7,550 inmates, Lbe highest number in 
50 years. Cases will be examined individually 
before release. 


The unending campaign to maintain 

purity of the French language drew a con- 
structive response in Le Figaro's letters col- 
umn. Yvonne Lassagne-Sicard of Paris notes 
(hat, in the past, foreign wends like fuel. 


riding coat and packet boat were painlessly 


absorbed into the language, but with Frenci 
spellings: fiouL redin gote and paquebot 


Why not, she suggests, similarly transform 

chewinr 


such useful words as sandwich, cnewmg gum 
and blue jean? All right, let's uy it; “Hold my 
sandouiche, s’il vous plait, while 1 scrape the 
chouraegomme off my bloudegme." 


Brian Knowlton 



The second Washington & World Business conference will take 
place in Washington, D.C., on April 21 - 22 , 1994 . 

The conference format of plenary sessions and small working 
groups offers you a unique opportunity for in-depth discussion 
with a distinguished group of speakers including: 


Warren M. Christopher 


U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE 


Ronald H, Brown 


U.S. SECRETARY OF COMMERCE 


Robert D. Hormats 

VICE CHAIRMAN, GOLDMAN SACHS INTERNATIONAL 


Robert E* Rubin 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR ECONOMIC POLICY 


H. Ormo Ruding 

VICE CHAIRMAN, CITICORP/CITIBANK 


Lawrence H. Summers 

U-S. UNDER SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY FOR 
INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 


Ambassador Rufus Yerxa 

DEPUTY U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVE 


For further information, please contact: Jane Benney, International 
Herald Tribune, 63 Long Acre, London WC 2 E 9JH. 

Tel: (44 71) 836 4802. Fax: (44 71) 836 0717. 


CO-SPONSORED BY 


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liNTKKMATlONAMIERAU) TKIBILNE' THl RSUAY. MARCH IT. 1994 


Page 1 ‘ 


ASIA/PACIFIC 




!;""• *> 


‘•“V 


■as 




01 




U- 


U.S. Firms Sell 
A Quarter of PCs 

Bought in Japan 




•sr*l 


Cly 






Bloomberg Butinas A'nn 

TOKYO — Nearly one of every 
four personal computers bought 
Iasi year m Japan was made in the 
United Stales. 


,'7‘Mk 
'• icr ?*/.■ 


Me, 


Will. 

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E s 


Low prices and strong marketin ' 5 
helped American personal-com- 
puter makers nearly double their 
share of the Japanese market in 
1993. according to the market-re- 
search company DaiaquesL 

Computers from leading Ameri- 
can companies such as Apple Com- 
puter Inc.. International Business 
Machines Corp. and Compaq 
Computer Corp. accounted for 
-4.2 percent of sales in the Japa- 
nese market for personal comput- 


of Po 


ire 


•• ■ -'itjSft. 

• -U* ••! 


I * _ 

- % i..?;/: 

. 1 ,r ,- \ . • 


Exports Lift 
Australia GDP 


Reuters 

SYDNEY — Australia’s 
Bureau of Statistics said 
Wednesday that the country’s 
gross domestic product surged 
4 percent in 1993. its best per- 
formance in over four years as 
exports swelled and as corpo- 
rations built up their inven- 
tories. 

The bureau also said that its 
GDP rose 1.7 percent in the 
last quarter of 1993. the stron- 
gest growth rate for any quar- 
ter since 1989. 


Only Turkey, with a growth 
rate of 7 percent, and New 
Zealand, with a rate of 4.2 per- 
cent. exceeded Australia’s per- 
formance among the members 
of the Organization for Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and De- 
velop men l 


ers in 1993. compared with 15.1 
percent in 1991 Dataquest said. 

“Foreign makers like Compaq 
were the first to introduce the idea 
of affordable personal computers 
to the Japanese market,** said Kat- 
sushi Shiga, computer-indu.vuy an- 
alyst at Nihon DaiaquesL the Japa- 
nese arm of the American 
technology-research company. 

Sales were helped by IBM’s 
launching of a new operating sys- 
tem in 1992. Mr. Shiga said. Before 
then. American imports were un- 
able to run Japanese-] a nguage soft- 
ware and so were used primarily for 
projects that required English. 

With the introduction of IBM’s 
DOS/V system, however, inexpen- 
sive American computers became 
bilingual, resulting in much-im- 
proved sales. Mr. Shiga said, 

■ Nations Check Chip Sales 

U.S. and Japanese officials be- 
gan meetings in Hawaii to deter- 
mine how American semiconduc- 
tor companies fared in Japan in the 
fourth quarter of 1993. Bloomberg 
Business News reported. 

Industry officials said figures on 
market share would probably be 
released next week. 

The wo countries agreed in 1991 
to set a target of 20 percent for 
foreign companies' share of the 
Japanese semiconductor markeL 
Tokyo, however, rejects Washing- 
ton’s position that the accord actu- 
ally committed Japan to ensure 
that foreign manufacturers ob- 
tained that share. 

Although news reports have 
speculated that fourth-quarter data 
may show foreign companies with 
more than a 20 percent share. Rog- 
er Madras. executive director of the 
U.S. Semiconductor Industry As- 
sociation. said. “ It’ll fall under 20 
percent for the year, no matter 
what happens.” 


Trying to Be Switzerland 

Malaysian Island Seeks Offshore Funds 


Lm Angeles Tumi Sen lie 

LABUAN. Malaysia — First. 


a short geography quiz; You may 
have heard of Grand Cayman. 


Malta and even Guernsey. But 
can you find Nauru. Vanuatu 
and Labuan? And what do they 
have in common? 

Yes, they are all islands. But 
all six also are up-and-coming 
JOFCs. an acronym in the bank- 
ing industry for international 
offshore financial centers. They 
may epitomize the term backwa- 
ter, but they are attracting bil- 
lions or dollars in investments 
and deposits. 

The original such center was 
Switzerland. But with the Swiss 
market now more regulated and 
less secretive, big depositors are 
looking elsewhere, and Labuan 
is one of the latest to try to 
accommodate them. It lies'just 
off the north coast of Borneo, 
about 80 miles from the city of 
Kota Kinabalu. 

The Malaysian government 
decided in 1989 to turn Labuan 
into nn offshore financial center, 
enacting hank-secrecy laws, 
making the island a duty-free 
port and imposing a corporate 
tax of just 3 percent compared 
with 40 percent in the rest of 
Malaysia. 

Ramli Olhman. an official 
with the Malaysian Industrial 
Development Board, said the 
government chose the island be- 
cause it had no natural resources 
and little industry to proride 
jobs for its 50.000 inhabitants. 

Malaysia wrested control of 
the island from the state of Sa- 
bah in 1984. and it is now ruled 
as a federal territory directly 
from Kuala Lumpur, so the gov- 
ernment of Prime Minister Ma- 
hathir bin Mohamad had a rea- 
son for wanting to pump 
development dollars into it 

A more cynical view of the 
government's motives, expressed 
by critics on Lahuam is that offi- 


cials hud bought land on the is- 
land at bargain prices and now 
stand to make large profits. In a 
recent court case, for example, it 
was revealed that a former chief 
minister of Sabah, Harris Mo- 
hammed Satich, claimed to be 
the owner of the island's only 
golf course. 

Before offshore bunking came 
along, much of the island’s in- 
come was related to its roles as a 
port for ships serving the oil in- 
dustry off Borneo and as a rest- 
and-recreation spot for expatri- 
ates living in Brunei, which is 
Islamic and allows no akohol. 
The main town of Labuan has a 
large number of crowded disco- 
theques. 

The government figures that 
its location may help Labuan 
catch on among foreign banks; it 
occupies the same time zone as 
Hong Kong and Singapore, just 
two hours behind Tokyo time. 
The hope is that customers will 
prefer to deposit their cosh in a 
bank in the same time zone as 



these major financial centers 
rather than In one halfway 
around the world. 

“The location of Labuan is 
ideal, in the heart of the Asia- 
Pacific region." said Mainor 
Au-ang. general manager of the 
Labuan Development Authority. 
After three years as an active 
financial center. Labuan has at- 
tracted 16 banks, he said, and 
about 250 companies have regis- 
tered there. 

The government hopes those . 
numbers will swell afler comple- 
tion of a S 148 million financial- 
services park, two nearby five- 

star hotels and a $50 million 
marina project. 

The Malaysian government is 
trying to he selective about 
which banks are given licenses to 
operate in Labuan. because it 
will be up to the banks to decide 
which customers can use the is- 
land’s facilities. The government 
hopes prominent banks would 
weal out suspicious characters 
so that Labuan would not be- 
come known as a repository for 
drug money or other unsavory 
transactions. 

“If we confine ourselves to big 
banks that will not do something 
which nil] smear their name, that 
in itself is a protective measure.’’ 
Mohammed Ibrahim, the repre- 
sentative of Bank Negara. Malay- 
an's ccatiul bonk. said. According 
to Malaysian news reports. Labu- 
an banks have an estimated $ 1.8 
billion in deposits. 

Anthony Ginsberg, a Los An- 
geles accountant who publishes a 
newsletter on offshore banking 
centers, said Labuan had great 
potential because of its location 
but was not yet competitive with 
some other centers. 

For instance, he said, while 
Labuan’s 3 percent corporate tax 
— and its maximum levy of 
$7,800 a year —may be small, the 
British Virgin islands and Grand 
Cayman hare no taxes at alL 


Seoul Sees 
Trade Cut 
By EU Move 


Bloomberg Busmen Vf»'S 

SEOUL — The European 
Union's decision to stop giving 
preferential treatment to exports 
from South Korea in the second 
half of 1994 will slash about $500 
million from Seoul’s exports to the 
region. South Korean officials said 
Wednesday. 

The EU is cutting South Korea 
out of the so-called Generalized Sys- 
tem of Preferences, which gives de- 
veloping countries exemptions on 
tariffs because of its advanced eco- 
nomic status. The move will subject 
South Korea’s expons to the EU to 
an average larifT of 5.8 percenL 

“The tariffs will sharply weaken 
price competitiveness of Korean 
products in the EC/.’’ said Rha 
Chang Yup. an official at the Euro- 
pean division of the state-nm Korea 
Trade Promotion Corp. "Goods 
from Singapore. Hong Kong. Tai- 
wan and other competitors will still 
enjoy the trade benefit.” 

After decades of rapid growth. 
South Korea is now one of the 
world’s 12 largest economies. Ac- 
cording to the Promotion Corp.’s 
Brussels office, the EU’s decision 
also was based on South Korea's 
decision to join the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation and De- 
velopment bv 1996. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hpriglton^ r/. Singapore-' ' 
Times 

13 v 


Tbfcyo 
Nikkei 325 






zm 


... now 

.17000 


~q ti d Tf'iw 

■ 1993. ■■ 1994 



o:rrmr 

'.1993 ' „ ••1994 • 



indaik* • ■ •. . . 

. Wednesday Prev. 
\pooB ■ Ctoae 

9 j 72 Q .$1 . 9 ,flfl 3 ; 56 - 

■%: ■■■. 

Change 

- 1 i 46 

Sirisapwe : «■: 

■SS^ts.T^iieS' 

;XWA 1 

2 , 189.95 

- 0.19 - 

sy*i 6 y::. 

•^flOrdH^ies . 

247350 

2 , 172.50 . 

4 ^). 0 S 


■NB*^ 825 .;.. 

20 , 677.77 

20 . 508 . 8 S 

♦ 0:62 ■ 

Koala Loaipur. cppipoftte ; 

Closed 

Closed . 

- 

Bangkok 

PET.- c ;; 

1 J 293:07 

1 . 302.13 

- 0.70 

Seoul • ; 

StwA 

006 , 53 ; 

911.43 . 

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WaigHtedfYice 

5 , 331.34 

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2 , 642^0 

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' Closed 

Closed 

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New Zealand 

N 2 S& 40 -. :■ 

2 ^ 53.24 

2249 . 41 . 

+ 0.17 


National Index 

1,82326 

1 , 810.05 

+ 0.73 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 


liwtOiliiiajJ HnaU Tnhuw 

Very briefly: 


• Caterpillar Inc. said it signed a joint venture agreement with Shanghai 
Diesel Engine Co. to build engines in China. 


• Philips Electronics NV said Step Co. of Japan had agreed to sell Philips 
.personal computers in the Japanese market. 


Expons of autos, electronics, 
textiles and footwear will be hard- 
est hdu since they are the biggest 
beneficiaries of die preferential tar- 
iff treatment. 


• China ’s budget deficit, forecast to double in real terms this year to 
nearly 70 billion yuan ($8.07 billion), will continue to grow in coming 
years, said Finance Minister Liu Zhongli. 


spot 

the EU. for example, rose by more 
than 20 percent last year, to $1 
billion, thanks to the tariff benefits 
and the appreciation of the Japa- 
nese yen. The strong yen drove up 
the price of Japanese cars in over- 
seas markets. 


• Hong Kong office rents could rise 30 percent to 80 percent in 1994. but 
such increases may cause some businesses to leave, said the real estate 
consulting company Jones Lang Wootton inc. 


• Nedbank opened a representative office in Beijing, becoming the first 
South African bank to do so despite a lack of diplomatic relations 
between tbe two countries. 


• Sbeazben has unveiled plans to set up a giant industrial park devoted to 
i omcia ‘ 


“The retraction of the trade ben- 
efit could completely offset the ad- 
vantage of the stronger yen.” Mr. 
Rha said. 


auto construction. An official said Shenzhen has invited several Japanese 
and South Korean carmakers to establish plants. 


• American Telephone & Telegraph Co. said it would help build the first 
undersea fiber-optic cable system linking Vietnam. Thailand and Hong 

Kong. Reuters. Bloomberg. .-I FL 


AMEX 


12 Month 
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Dtv vm P6 IPOs Hoh LcLaaiOi'ac 


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Wednesday’s dosing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
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Financial Copy Editors 


The International Herald 
Tribune is looking for senior copy 
editors to fill important roles on 
die business and financial copy 
desk in its Paris newsroom. 


A minimum requirement 
is several years’ experience 
editing business and financial copy 
in the newsroom of one or more 
major English-language, daily 
newspapers. 


The successful candidates 
will have a sophisticated interna- 
tional perspective based on jour- 
nalistic experience in Asia and/ or 
continental Europe, as well as a 
full understanding of the 
American financial markets. 


Interested applicants 
should fax resumes Jo the busi- 
ness/finance editor in Paris 
at (33-1) 46 37 93 38, or mail to: 


Business/Fuiance Editor 

International Herald Tribune, 181, Avenue Giaries-de-Gaulle 
92521 Neuilly Cedex/France 


Henilb^Sribune 




• n> ,«•» nr. "M 


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Page 1,8 


International Herald Tribune 



A Special Report 


Thursday, March 17 , 1994 
Part II 


Information 


For U.S. Industry, a 



0 


Beautiful 


By J ohn Bugess 

W ASHINGTON — For 
months it looked as if no one 
In the UJS. communications 
and entertainment industry 
had heard that the 1980s were over. Single- 
handedly, its executives were keeping alive 
that decade's romance with the big-ticket 
merger. 

One after another, com panies that were 
already big struck multibiwon dollar deals 
to combine into still larger ones. The goal 
was to assemble tbe capital, mix of skills 
and economies of scale said to be needed 
to build the coming information super- 
highway. 

No one wanted to proceed alone down 
this wide-gauge digital network that would 
pipe films, video letters, music, mail , docu- 
ments and more into mOlions of homes 
and offices. As John Gendenin, chairman 
of regional phone company BellSouth 
Corp., told a conference in Washington 
recently: “When the music stops, if you 
don’t have a dance partner you don't have 
a chance to sit down." 

Then one evening in February miw 
news that the biggest deal of alL the $26 
billion merger of regional phone company 
Bell Atlantic Coip. and cable TV giant 
T eJe-Comm unica tioos Inc, was off. The 
twoparties had failed to agree on price. 

Thai has the industry wondering: Has 
the romance with mergers peaked? 


Patrick McGovern, chairman of re- 
search firm International Data Corp, says 
yes. Chief executives of companies con- 
templating mergers now “know the risks 
are high and chore may be disappointment 
at the end of the trail,’' be said. They will 
also have, pause to consider whether big 
companies will be spry enough to compete 
in inis fast-evolving market 
Others call it a temporary blip that the 
still unmarried companies will soon forget: 
“To compete, they need multiple mean? of 
delivery and broader reach," said Richard 
Iverson, president of the American Elec- 
tronics Association. 

Tbe U.S. technology industry has long 
taken pride in having large numbers of 
small companies accomplish great things 
on their own. The best ideas, the fastest 
responses, people say, often come from the 
lean new ventures, not the bureaucracy- 
bound giants. 

But as the information superhighway 
vision takes shape many executives say 
that the small- is-good model can’t wort 
They turn aside many studies that show 
that mergers often don’t achieve those 
“synergies" that are always promised at 
the outset. . 

For one thing, this thinking goes, a 
national transmission network is required 
and that means investment in volumes 
that snail companies can’t afford. Once 
(hat network is buOt, companies need 
something to put on it. Hence a race to 
control the film libraries of HoDywood. 


Since digital technology was erasing tra- 
ditional differences between cable and 
telephone industries — there was no rea- 
son a single circuit couldn't cany phone 
calls and movies — it seemed to maky 
sense for companies to explore getting into 
aD aspects of the information business. 

And having a few big companies run- 
ning things, proponents said, would sim- 

Has the industry’s 
romance with 
mergers peaked? 

pliiy the job of selecting technical stan- 
dards that woakl allow all networks to link 
to all others. 

In 1993, as talk of the superhighway 
intensified and the Clinton administration 
made .easing its construction a top priori- 
ty. the hunt for partners picked up dra- 
matically. Companies began worrying that 
if they didn’t move qinddyTthe best would 
be snapped up. 

U.S. telephone companies, which are 
strong on technology and finan cially 
sound, were on the lookout for cable com- 
panies, which often controlled studios or 
libraries of films. Cable companies, which 
were in need of capital and the technical 
know-how to “switch" a video signal from 


one point to another, were often anxious 
to talk. 

The move toward consolidation led to 
concern in the U.S. Congress that the new. 
media world, meant to be open to all, 
would be oligopolistic. 

That, it seemed, would reverse tbe de- 
centralization that began in the United 
States with the 1984 breakup of the Bell 
telephone system. 

Now it may be that the companies will 
address that concern by going off more on 
their own. But many executives don’t 
count on that. The death of the Bell Atian- 
tic-TCI deal aside, to many people in the 
industry it's still the 1980s. 

They point out that although tbe biggest 
deal announced so far has been re» n*TT Iftl, 
a number of major deals remain on the 
books. 

They include: 

* AT&T's S13 billion purchase of the 
United States' largest cellular phone com- 
pany. McCaw Cellular Communications 
Inc. This will give AT&T a chance to 
integrate its long-distance network with 
wireless communications and to bypass 
for some customers the local phone com- 
panies with which it often feuds. 

• MCI Communications Corp.'s SIJ 
billion purchase of a 17 percent stake in 
Nextd Communications Inc, which is as- 
sembling a nationwide wireless network. 
This deal is widely seen as a response by 
MCI, the second-largest LLSL long-dis- 


tance company, to rival AT&T’s acquisi- 
tion of McCaw. 

■ British Telecommunications PLCs 
S4J billion investment in MCI. Tbe tie-in 
gives the American company a new spring- 
board to the outside world and BT special 
entrte to the American market. 

• US West's S2L5 billion investment in ' 
the cable TV and entertainment subsidiar- 
ies of Time Warner Inc. 

• Viacom Inc/s S10 billion purchase of 
Paramount Communications Corp. fol- 
lowing a lengthy bidding war with QVC 
Inc. Plans call for the new entity to be 
combined with Blockbuster Entertain- 
ment Corp, which would create an entity 
with cable television systems, broadcast 
stations, studio production and a nation- 
wide rental store chain. 

Then there is Pacific Bell, the California 
telephone company, which has announced 
that it will go it alone on a S16 billion 
investment to build its own network for 
voice, data and video services, without the 
benefit of a cable-television partner. 

Pacific Bell said it plans to seek 
permission in the United States to offer 
customers a “video dial tone" that would 
bring a wide choice of video services into 
their homes and offices on request. 


JOHN BURGESS is on the staff of The 
Washington Post. 



More than ever dedicated 
to bringing you the world closer. 


* Smart’: Europe Is 
At the Forefront 


By Brandon Mitcbener 


As corporate networks are key to the development of business Worldwide, 
France Telecom lias always been providing advanced 
telecommunication solutions, every where business requires them. 

Through a strategic alliance. France Telecom and 
Deutsche Telekom want to go further in better serving major internationardients. 
Already partners in Eucom and Eunetcom, France Telecom and 
Deutsche Telekom signed, on December 'di. 1993. an agreement to set up a joint venture 
to provide companies with absolute quality telecommunication solutions. 

This new joint venture, designed as a dedicated structure with worldwide presence, 
will propose a global homogeneous network offer, allowing firms, 
wherever they are, to hat e access to even more adv anced telecommunication services. 

II you want to know more about our initiatives on the imernationn! scene. 

.. during the 0 feBIT'94 March lb 23. lfaH j.6, stand ( 2_>. 




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F rankfurt — 

Whether they're talking 
about a phone card, a 
bus card, a social securi- 
ty card or a cash card, Europeans 
are agog over the so-called smart 
card even though it is years from 
becoming a widespread reality. 

Even trash collectors and 
churches are studying ways of us- 
ing the devices to collect fees and 
donations and keep track of users. 

| A : credit card-sized piece of 
I plastic containing a powerful mi- 
crochip, smart cards are just be- 
ginning to make themselves felt in 
Europe. Eventually, however, they 
hold the potential to change the 
way people identify themselves 
and pay for simple services. 

• Germany, one of the most back- 
ward countries in terms of credit 
card density, is among the most 
aggressive in implementing a tech- 
nology that it hopes wfli set a new 
world, or at least a European stan- 
dard. 

“The standard with the biggest 
support will prevail," said Klaus 
Mofler, the focal sales manager for 
the microchips division of Motor- 
ola GmbH. “Right now this is a 
European domain, but when they 
see that it works, I expect the 
Untied States and Asia will come 
aboard," he said. 

■ Industry sources estimate that 
the number of smart cards m use 
in Europe will soar from 46 mil- 
lion in 1993 to 250 million in 1995 
and 425 million in 1997. 

Compared with such great ex- 
pectations. the smart card’s begin- 
nings were modest. French banks, 
a Swedish retailer and tbe German 
stale telephone monopoly were 
1 among the first to install’ raicro- 
I Chips in plastic cards to improve 
security or replace coins and small 
diange in everyday transactions. 
British pay-TV companies use 
cards to bill customers for each 
program they watch. 

In all these systems, bills are 
quickly debited to the card- 
holder’s account, bypassing credit 
card companies that typically 
chaise a percentage for' similar 
services. Abuse has also declined 
because the chips are harder to 
fake or tamper with than tradi- 
tional magnetic-strip technology. 

The German telephone compa- 
ny, Telekom, was the first to sell 
mobile phones that use a smart 
rard with a programmable chip 
that not only identifies the user 

but encrypts conversations, re- 
cords telephone numbers and 
keeps track of the cost of a call 
Some of the cards can also be used 
in normal telephones. 

The German state health insur- 
ance system is issuing smart cards 
to its 70 million participants con- 
taining basic personal identifica- 
tion, replacing an inefficient paper 
system. 

Denmark and several other 
countries are developing nation- 
wide electronic cash systems. 

As chij» become more powerful 
and fall tn price, the appeal of 
storing large amounts of personal 
data on plastic cards is growing 
quickly, raising consumers’ hope 
or replacing a wallet Tull of plastic 
and paper cards with just one or 
two cards that serve as universal 
forms of both payment and identi- 
fication. 

A variety of multipurpose cards 
are already transforming the way 
pwple use plastic and showing 
where the technology is leading: 

• Lufthansa AG, the government- 
controlled German airline, recent- 
ly began marketing a “megacard" 
that acts as credit cord, telephone 


card and frequent flier identifica- 
tion. 

• Several German cities and War- 
saw are now testing a prepaid 
“city card" containing a chip that 
permits electronic payment of bus, 
tram and subway fare as weD as 
bills at downtown retailers and 
restaurants and also grants admis- 
sion to city facilities such as sports 
complexes and libraries. 

• The European Union is consid- 
ering issuing a standardized driv- 
er’s license on a smart card that 
might also be used to pay fines, 
tolls and parking fees, keep track 
of penalty points and give fttfor- ■ 
mation on the driver's blood type, ‘ 
allergies and willingness to donate 
organs. 

“In the future you'll probably 
carry just two or three cards." said 
Mr. Mttller. A unit of the U.S. 
company of the same name. Mo- 

Card abuse has 
declined because the 
chips are harder to 
fake or tamper with. 


torola is one of the biggest produc- 
ers or computer chips. 

Siemens AG. the German elec- 
tronics giant that is another major 
producer of chips, estimated the 
market could grow to as much as 5 
billion Deutsche marks (S3 bil- 
lion) by 2000. 

“We are doing what is rechni- 
cmy possible." said KJaus Knapp, 
a Siemens spokesman. 

Unfortunately for consumers, 
what is technically possible is not 
always welcome to countries and 
companies afraid or going ahead 
with competing and often incom- 
patible systems. 

About 26 million French bank 
cards with an integrated micro- 
chip are expected to be in circula- - 
uon by the end of this year, but 
they can only be used in France. 

G ERMANY, mean- 
while. is quietly ped- 
dling its own chip sys- 

. f e , m in neighboring 
countries, with some success. Ger- 

w °* in the 
jn ^ the end of the year 
and Dutch cards will work in Ger- 
many- "We're going to make the 
telephone European.” said a 
spokesman for Telekom, the 
Phone company. 

For once, the United Slates and 
Japan are no competition because 
usaqg magnetic-strip teefa- 
50 wide| y ^ there 

SldSS? 1 * wilh ,he * 

?ve1f?V pr ° Wb *‘ively expen- 
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A Superhighway in 

For Once, 

Monopolies 
Are a Help 



By Conrad de Aenfl e 

P ARIS — The informa- 
tion superhighway is 

considered a very Ameri- 
can idea: bold, visionary, 
idealistic. In some ways, though, 
bedding a massive communica- 
tions infrastructure may actually 
be an easier task in Europe, and 
the concept has caught on. 

The European Commission has 
been swept up in the spirit and is 
studying how best to develop what 
has come to be called the Trans- 
European Network. 

“The call for action has been 
launched,” declared Andrew Page, 
president of the European Com- 
munity Telework /Telematics Fo- 
rum, a think tank composed of 
’and supported by member state 
governments and industrial con- 
cerns. “We will be seeing a lot of 
action as a result of the Commis- 
sion's stand. We’ve got a Europe- 
an parallel to the American plan. 
What we are now seeing in Europe 
is parallel approaches being 
adopted. We're garnering the po- 
etical will.” 

What politicians in Europe of- 
ten have the will to do is become 
involved in many aspects of their 
citizens' lives. The Trans-Europe- 
an Network envisioned by the 
Commission. Mr. Page said, is an 
entity that will “benefit the larger 
community .” One goal of plan- 
ners. he said, is “ensuring the con- 
tinued enfranchisement of the dis- 
abled and elderly in society by 
providing access to health care m- 
lormalion and training and educa- 
tion.” What is not a goal is “shop- 
ping and 50 channels of cable 
TV,” he said. 

“The key question is what role 
should government play” Mr. 
Page said. “The consensus is that 
government should play the role 
of ensuring standards, setting' 
roles for the ball game as to how 
European telecommunications 
companies proceed on their in- 
vestment. which is basically an in- 
vestment in a fiber-optic net- 
work." 

I N MOST of Europe, the 
government controls the te- 
lecoms. and so the role of 
the state is bound to be 
huge. Thar circumstance may fa- 
cilitate the establishment of such a 
• network. 

“For’ the information super- 
highway to be realized, there needs 
to be a strong central oversight- 1 
think that will have a major influ- 
ence on its development.” said 
Mark Windier, vice president of 
telecommunications at Link Re- 
sources Corp. “In toms of the 
telecommunications infrastruc- 
ture, you’re dealing with one com- 
pany per country. In some ways 
that will make it easier than in the 
U.S. market, where there are al- 
ways new carriers. A competitive 
environment is not necessarily 
conducive to the building of an 
information superhighway.” 

Neither is a recessionary envi- 
ronment. and that’s why others 



believe European governments, 
which are strapped for cash and 
face structural economic problems 
not likely to disappear for a gener- 
ation. will not be able to come up 
with the funds for such an ambi- 
tious project. 

“The government can’t do 
something with a 50-year time 
frame if there are elections every 
four years.” argued Alistair Smel- 
lie, a media and leisure analyst for 
Lehman Brothers. “The magni- 
tude of investment is huge. I don’t 
think the government's going to 
dip into its own pockets to do it. 
Us going to be funded in the pri- 
vate sector or not at all ” 

Mr. SmeEie thinks this is best 
understood in Britain, where regu- 
lators have something of a laissez- 
faire altitude about the telecom 
industry. It is the only country, he 
said, where a single company can 
operate cable television and tele- 
phone systems. This is inspiring a 
number of companies, foreign and 
domestic, to enter the markeL 
He noted that British Telecom- 
munications PLC bas committed 
£7 billion, or more than $10 bil- 
lion, to build a communications 
infrastructure, but he expects the 
bulk of the work to be performed 
by Americans. This more than 
anything else may help Britain 
catch up and even move ahead in 
the provision of information ser- 
vices. ' 

“You’ve got a number of North 
American telecommunications 
and cable companies that have 
been outright encouraged to buDd 
the information superhighway, 
taking that fiber-optic loop right 
into the house,” he said. “Three- 
quarters of the work will be done 
by U.S. and Canadian companies. 
They can’t believe they’re allowed 
into the U.K.. It’s a huge arena to 
show what they're best aL” 

They will have plenty of oppor- 
tunity because the state of British 
telephone and cable television sys- 
tems is so poor. Because the Brit- 
ish fell so Far behind is installing 
cable TV, Mr. Smellie asserted, it 
will actually give them an advan- 


tage in developing a new network. 

“From a technological perspec- 
tive, the U.K. has an advantage 
over many other places in Eu- 
rope," he said. “They are building 
an archetypal information super- 
highway. They have a tremendous 
advantage over the U.S- France. 
Belgium — countries that built ca- 
ble networks some time ago but 
have limited capacity.” 

To Chris Lewis, of CIT Re- 
search. the crux of the problem is 
not in building the hardware, but 
in creating the software to go with 
it and then having customers fig- 
ure out how to use it. 

“The information superhigh- 
way is just the latest way of saying 
broad-band communications,” he 
explained. “They're trying to get 
people to bring communications 
into the business and home envi- 
ronment. to get than to use more 
information, to use more of this 
band width. There’s enough ca- 
pacity there for current require- 
ments. The best way of using it is 
generating more information ser- 
vices. eliminating paper.” 

T HEN it becomes a mat- 
ter of showing people 
bow to make their way 
through the services that 
will be offered to them. “The tech- 
nology is there to deliver these 
things, but on the user sde. how 
does the user get to the right pro- 
gram?” he said. 

Returning to the popular meta- 
phor, be said: “You’ve got a mas- 
sive motorway running through 
the country, but they haven’t built 
any access roads, or else they’re all 
random wiih a wall around it s6 
you don’t know what’s on the oth- 
er side. 

“The U.S. is in a slightly advan- 
tageous position because people 
are used to having this choice in' 
programming. Also, the U.S. is 
more computer literate. They’re 
trying to get the same cultural 
change Throughout the EU. The 
only place where there is hope is 
France, where the Minitel genera- 
tion is now coming through into 
business. They’re used to getting 
information from a screen. The 
government took a risk giving 
away those Minitel terminals, but 


Cui»J SowJlHT 

in the long run it’s going to pay 
off.” 

Mr. Lewis said he expects the 
United States to lead the way in 
the development of information 
services, followed by Britain and 
then Continental Europe. In each 
place the long run may prove not 
to be so long, after all! 

“Ten years out you will certain- 
ly have the beginnings of the infor- 
mation-access era in your home 
and office,” he predicted. “Then I 
think it will all be down to the 
interface between you and your 
computer.” 

CONRAD DE AENLLE is a jour- 
nalist who specializes m business 
and finance. 


New Asian Data Networks 
Focus on Business Customers 


By Mic hael Richardson 

S INGAPORE — Spurred 
by demand from busi- 
nesses for reliable high- 
speed communications, 
construction has begun on an 
Asia- Pacific trunk of the global 
information superhighway. 

However, analysts say it will 
take quite a few' years before a 
region-wide superhighway carry- 
ing voice, data and images is futiy 
operational. Thai is because of the 
vast differences in levels of tele- 
communications development and 
regulatory standards among East 
Asian nations. 

For the time being, Japan.- 
South Korea. Australia. Singapore 
and Hong Kong —which have the 
most advanced infrastructure and 
the strongest commitment to cus- 
tomer service — will be at the 
forefront of efforts to develop 
such a network. They will develop 
aalional communications net- 
works that that are likely to lmk 
with one another and with similar 
national services elsewhere in the 
world via undersea fiber-optic ca- 
ble networks and satellite chan- 
nels that are already largely in 
place. 

Apart from providing rapid ex- 
change of data and video images 
between businesses, the multime- 
dia superhighways will allow con- 
sumers access to a wide array oi 
cable television channels and new 
telecommunication services such 

as home shopping and electro^ 
banking. But analysts say that the 

development of *•**"“£ 
Asia wtJ! be driven mainly by bus^ 
ness, rather than consumer de- 
mand. 

Japan, South Korea. Australia- 

sssctags 


consumers are receptive to the 
concept” 

As multinational companies 
that have flooded into the Asia- 
Padfic area to take advantage of 
high growth markets and relative- 
ly low production costs for exports 
become increasingly decentral- 
ized, the operational units of each 
company need to be linked tooth- 
er by an ever greater volume of 
information, said Robert Plotke. a 

The development 
of new sen-ices in 
Asia will be driven 
mainly by business. 

senior manager in the technology 
integration services group of An- 
dersen Consulting in Singapore. 

“A common communication in- 
frastructure is required to effec- 
tively support this information ex- 
plosion, ”ne said. _ 

Just as companies in the past 
relied heavily on phones and Tax 
machines. Mr. Plotke said that the 
next step for future business oper- 
ations will be a common data net- 
work infrastructure. 

A number of telecoaununka- 
tions service providers are moving 
to tap this demand. 

British Telecommunications 
PLC recently extended its global 
network data service to Indonesia 
in cooperation with IndosaL an 
Indonesian telecommunications 
company. Australia, Japan. Hong 
Kong, South Korea. New Zealand 
and Thailand already have the BT 
service, which provides customers 
with access to more than 1300 
cities in more than 120 countries. 

The British phone company 
plans to extend the service to In- 
dia. China and Taiwan later this 
year. 

Benny Kan, marketing manager 
of British Telecom services in Sin- 
gapore. said that American, Japa- 
nese and European multinational 


companies that accounted for 
much of the foreign investment in 
Asia “need advanced telecommuni- 
cation services to manage their 
businesses in and across regions." 

Mr. Kan said that the BT pro- 
gram, which includes network 
management and centralized sin- 
gle-currency billing, not only pro- 
vided subscribers with improved 
intracompany connections but 
also helped them expand their 
business links to suppliers, cus- 
tomers and partners. 

Several multinationals are field 
testing a new “seamless” voice and 
data communications service for 
business in die Asia- Pacific region. 

Singapore Telecommunications 
Pie Lidl American Telephone & 
Telegraph Corp- of the United 
States and Kokusai Densbin 
Denwa Co., Japan's main interna- 
tional telecommunications carrier, 
are developing the service, which 
offers common features and stan- 
dards of performance around the 
world. 

“From the way they respond, 
the multinationals are very enthu- 
siastic about it,” said Sth Hang 
Boon, vice president of business 
communications at Singapore Te- 
lecom. 

The consortium, known as 
Worldpartners Company, was 
formed in May to provide corpo- 
rate customers with a angle ad- 
vanced telecommunications ser- 
vice, bypassing the need to deal 
with multiple carriers who have dif- 
fering standards and equipment. 

Customers can appoint any 
member carrier as a angle point of 
contact. This carrier then arranges 
for services provided by other 
member carriers in their respective 

countries. 

Mr. Sin said that five or six 
other carriers based in Europe. 
Australia. Canada and Asia were 
negotiating to become members of 
the WoridPartners group. 


MICHAEL RICHARDSON is 
Asia editor of the International 
Herald Tribune. 






Japan Lags in Multimedia Race 


By Andrew Pollack 

T OKYO — Two of Japan’s elec- 
tronics giants. Fujitsu Ltd. and 
Toshiba Corp, announced this 
week moves to position themselves 
to be players in the multimedia industry of 
the future. They each made an investment in 
a small Silicon Valley software company 
named General Magic Inc. 

For Japanese companies, participating in 
multimedia increasingly means collabora- 
tion with American companies. In the con- 
vergence of computers, communications, 
consumer electronics and publishing that is 
multimedia, it is the American companies 
that have been setting the pace, something 
that- has alarmed and puzzled Japan's audio 
and video equipment producer*. 

A stark reminder of that came last month 
when a Japanese government official struck 
a raw nerve by stating that Japan's analog 
high-definitiori television system was becom- 
ing obsolete and that the nation should 
switch to a digital standard like the one being 
developed in The United Stales. 

One reason for Japan’s Jag is that over- 
regulation has stifled the growth of telecom- 
munications services here. Cable television 
barely exists in Japan, because of regulatory 
restrictions and a policy to favor satellite 
broadcasting. Computer networks here are 
said to be as much as 10 years behind those 
in the United Slates. 

The result has been that the United States, 
and to a lesser extent Europe, have become 
the hotbeds of experimentation in services 
such as video on demand and interactive 
home shopping. Japan, meanwhile has re- 
mained a relative backwater. 

Another factor is Japan's traditional 
weakness in software, which has allowed 
American companies such as Apple Com- 
puter Inc. and Microsoft Corp. to define the 
way computers and video will merge to form 
multimedia. 

“Tire software is based upon the English 
culture." said Hisashi Yamada. deputy gen- 
eral manager of the multimedia engineering 
laboratory at Toshiba. Collaborating with 


American companies “is the fundamental 
strategy for Japanese companies." 

So Japanese companies have taken on 
their role as hardware suppliers, building the' 
products deigned by American companies. 
Sharp Corp. is making (be much maligned 
Apple Newton, a hand-held information ap- 
pliance. and Maisushiut the new 3 DO video 
game machine. 

Japanese companies' excel at components 
whose sales will grow as multimedia catches 
i'd. Japanese companies have a virtual mo- 
nopoly on advanced color liquid-crystal dis- 
play s.Sales of CI>-ROM players are soaring. 
And Fujitsu Corp. and NEC Corp. are 
among the leaders in new. high-capacity tele- 
communications switches that will be used to 
deliver reams of video information. 

Bui the danger for Japanese companies is. 
that hardware alone can become a profitless 
commodity, especially as companies in 
South Korea and Taiwan, which have shaved 
profit margins in computer hardware by 
inexpensively mass-producing equipment, 
enter the markets. 

To be sure, there is multimedia activity, 
including software, in Japan. One need look 
no further than video games, dominated by 
Nintendo and Sega and by some software 
specialists like Osaka-based Capcom. whose 
Street Fighter series has spawned a whole 
new genre of entertainment. 

Fujitsu’s FM-Towns computer was one of 
the first in the world to come with a CD- 
ROM drive. And every night throughout 
Japan, salarymen and office ladies unwind 
with video karaoke, singing along to back- 
ground music while lyrics and appropriate 
imagery are shown on a television screen. 

To move into software, Sony and Matsu- 
shita made splashy acquisitions of Hollywood 
studios in the laie l 980s. But the purchases do 
not appear to have led to the anticipated 
synergies with their hardware business, and 
the companies have experienced some diffi- 
culties marrying Hollywood culture to their 
own. Nevertheless, the value of the studios, 
and film libraries, has risen because of the 
anticipated need for software to fill 500-cable 
television channels. Sony concedes now it is 
thinking of selling a stake in its studio, in part 


fester 













to achieve an alliance with a cable company. 
Matsushita denies any intention to do so. 

Japan, which has been spooked by the 
developments in the United States, is now 
moting to catch up. The government has 
recently relaxed restrictions on the cable- 
television industry. The Ministry of Posts 
and Telecommunications in January an- 
nounced a new plan to foster development of 

advanced networks and interactive services. 

Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp, the 
mam phone company, is already building a 
nationwide fiber-optic network and experi- 
menting with such things as transmitting 
super-high-definition digital images of 
X-rays or cell cultures to allow' remote diag- 
nosis of diseases. Toshiba and Matsushita 
recently announced development of sophisti- 
cated chips for digital video processing. 

Japanese companies will have some time. 
The multimedia age probably mil not arrive 
as fast as its boosters think. 

“It’s only in tbe stage of the press release 
right now . said Yoshiaki inamoio. a spokes- 
man for NHK, Japan's public broadcasting 
corporation. 

The recent cancellation of the planned 
merger between Bell Atlantic and cable giant 
Tele-Comrauni cations Inc. points to the po- 
tential obstacles along the information su- 
perhighway. 

Indeed, it is still undear what the uses will 
be of computerized video and sound. Last 
week, NEC said it had found one possible 
answer — a system to help people relax by 
presenting soothing images and sounds on a 
personal computer. ' 

' “The system creates a multitude of envi- 
ronments to suit various temperaments and 
in tests has been shown to significantly re- 
lieve stress and help users become re- 
freshed,” die company said. One arena in 
which Japan is clearly not behind is in its 
puzzlement about what to do with the new 
technology. 

ANDREW POLLACK is a correspondent in 
the Tokyo bureau of The New York Times. 


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SPORTS 


Barcelona Trounces 
Moscow, 5-1, With 
An 11-Minute Blitz 


Compiled ftp Our Staff From Dispatches 

The Dutch international Ronald 
Koenrnn scored twice and his team- 
mates Guillermo Amor and Ro- 
mano also scored — four goals in 
Lhe span of 1 1 minutes late in the 
second half — to lift Barcelona 
over Moscow Spartak 5-1 on 
Wednesday in a Champions 
League match in Barcelona. 

With the match tied. Amor made 
it 2-1 in the 75th minuie from eight 
meters out when Bulgarian Hnsto 
Stoicbkov gave him a perfect pass 
after heating the Spartak defense. 

Koemanmadeit3-l two minutes 
later when he scored on a direct 
kick from 20 meters. Three minutes 
later — in the 80th minute — Koe- 
man scored again on an almost 
identical direct kick making it 4-1. 

Romano capped the goal out- 
burst in Lhe 86th minute when he 
scored on a penalty. ■ 

Spartak broke on top 1-0 in the 
third minute when Valeri Karpin 
caught the Barcelona defense nap- 

§ ing to give his dub the lead, but 
tachkov tied the match in the 33d 
minute when he took a crossing 
pass intended for Romano and 
drove the bah into the net from 10 
meters. 

The victory gives Barcelona six 
points in four games in Group A. 
Spartak has two points in four 
matches in the same group. 

In Bremen, Germany, Defan Sa- 
vicevic crowned a good perfor- 
mance with a late goal that gave 
AC Milan a 1-1 draw against 
Werder Bremen in a Champions 
League Group B match on 
Wednesday. Milan leads the group 
standings. 

Bremen took the lead in the S3d 
minute when striker Wynton Rufer 
converted a penalty. 

Savicevic tied the score in the 
75tfa minute, slotting home a right- 
foot drive from six meters follow- 
ing a period of intense Milan pres- 
sure. 


The referee. Kim Milton Nielsen 
of Denmark, awarded the penalty 
when Filippo Gafli. playing for sus- 
pended Milan sweeper Franco Bar- 
est brought down striker Berad 
Hobsch following a fast break by 
the Germans. 

Rufer calmly seat Milan's goal- 
keeper. Sebastiano Rossi, to the 
right and placed a weak shot into 
the left corner. 

In Istanbul, Enzo Sd/o capped a 
superb performance with a crucial 
opening goal as Monaco earned a 
rare victory in Galatasaray’s in- 
timidating All Sami Yen stadium 
on Wednesday. 

After Scifo had given Monaco 
the lead nine minutes into the sec- 
ond period, substitute Jerome 
Gnako volleyed home a Laurent 
Viaud cross in injury time to give 
the French club a 233 victory that 
leaves ibem within touching dis- 
tance of the European Cup semifi- 
nals. 

Running on to a loose ball on the 
edge of the box, Scifo placed a 
precise sidefoot shot into the cor- 
ner of tbe net and beyond the reach 
of the sprawling Demirbas Hayret- 
tin. 

The Galatasaray keeper bad 
been equally helpless in the 35th 
minute when Scifo’s crisp left-foot 
drive hit the crossbar and bounced 
track. 

Minutes earlier the midfielder 
had released Lflan Thuram with a 
neat pass into the box. But the 
defender fired into the side netting 
as Hayrettin narrowed the angle. 

Galatasaiy’s best chance to 
equalize came 20 minutes from tbe 
end when striker Erdem Arif met a 
corner with a powerful downward 
header only to be denied by a reflex 
save from Jean- Luc Ettori, who de- 
flected tbe ball onto the bar. 

The victory left Monaco tied 
with Barcelona at the top of Group 
A in tbe Champions League. Both 
sides need only a single point from 



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Foer MKSer/RnOen 


Jeos Nowotny got tangled 19 Wednesday with Mamadn BiaJo of Boa vista as Karisrobe claimed a semifinal berft in the UEFA Cup. 


their r emaining two matches in the 
group (o book their place in the 
semifinals. 

In the day's fourth Champions 
League game, FC Porto scored a 2- 
0 victory over Anderiecht of Bel- 
gium in Porto, Portugal. 

The Portuguese side, stuck at the 
bottom of Group B before tbe 
game and needing a victory to stay 
m contention, got a goal from Lju- 
bimko Dndovic af ter nine minutes. 

Tbe borne side was forced to go 


into the encounter without the sus- 
pended striker Emil Kosiadinov, 
but benefited from the Belgians’ 
frailty at the back, sealing (he 
match in the final seconds as Secre- 
tary scored. 

The result saw Porto move into 
second place in the group, with 
four points, two behind the leader, 
AC Milan. 

In a Cup Winners’ Cup quarter- 
final in Rome, Parma, the defend- 
ing champion, cruised to a 2-0 ag- 


gregate win over Ajax Amsterdam. 

The Italians took just 15 minutes 
to break the 0-0 deadlock from the 
first leg as tbe captain, Lorenzo 
Minoui, who missed tbe Amster- 
dam game through suspension, sur- 
prised goalkeeper Edwin van der 
Sar with a low swerving free lack. 

In a UEFA Cup quarterfinal, 
Karisrobe restored some of Germa- 
ny's battered European pride with 
a 13) victory over PortugaTs Boa- 
vista in Karisrobe, Germany. 


After Emtracbt Frankfurt and 
Bayer Leverkusen were dumped 
otu of the UEFA Cup and Cup 
Winners' Cup respectively on 
Tuesday, Karlsruhe maintained 
German representation with an 
edgy 1-0 win, courtesy of an own 
goal, for a 2-1 aggregate victory. 

Tbe result was a startling success 
for tbe unfashionable side, 7-0 vic- 
tors over Spain’s Valencia in the 
second round. 

(AP, AFP. Reuters) 


World League Set 
For a Comeback 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Thanks to an evolving 
partnership with an international 
television broadcaster, tbe World 

sbrfmerican football teams in Eu- 
rope to begin play in April 1995. 

Viacom and KPN, the Ameri- 
can television sports network, were 
originally rumored to become part- 
ners in the World League’s reincar- 
nation. but they appear to have 
been replaced in the equation by 
Rupert Murdoch. His Fox network 
recently paid a record $138 billion 
to televise National Football 
League games in the United States 
for the next four years. 

The partnership with Murdoch 
could be announced next week at a 
meeting of NFL owners in Orlan- 
do. Florida, providing the fust 
credible reason to believe in a re- 
vival of American football overseas 
following the NFL’s abandonment 
of the World League in 1992, its 
second season. At that time, the 
NFL owners were both apathetic 
and unwilling to commit money 
overseas while battling over the 
players' issue of free agency at 
home. Tbe World League budget is 
expected to be aboutSlO million a 
year for 1995 and 1996/ 

Murdoch has suddenly become 
an international caretaker of 
American football. An internation- 
al football league would provide his 
television networks in Asia and Eu- 
rope with programming suitable 
for the young audiences he is trying 
to attract. In return, he might help 
keep the league's focus upon its 
target audience with an ul tima te 
goal of expanding the World 
League to Asia, home of his STAR 
TV network- 

In any case, it is difficult to imag- 
ine any new league trying to make 
it anywhere without tbe in-house 
participation of television. It is 
when the two sides don’t work to- 
gether — witness the recent one- 
sided relationship between Ameri- 
can network TV and major league 


baseball, resulting in damage to 
both — that problems arise. 

Tbe World League will try to 
export the entertainment formula 
used by its dub in Frankfiut — 
preganie parties, American-style 
cheerleaders and a disc jockey 
blasting music in between play. 
Some in the NFL, misunerp reting 
Frankfurt's success, are suggesting 
that the World League place three 
of its six teams in Germany next 
year. To do so would be to risk 
tuning out the rest of Europe. 

Franchises will be revived ia 
three previous European markets 
— Frankfurt, London ami Barcelo- 
na — with a second German team 
likely to be based in Berlin, Ham- 
burg, Dtisseldorf or Munich. Al- 
though Madrid is a candidate, the 
last two franchises arc likely to 
based in Paris, Amsterdam or Scot- 
land {most likely Edinburgh). This 
should be decided by May. 

The question of Paris is the trick- 
iest. The NFL fears that the prob- 
lems of the Euro Disney thwn e 
park near the French capital repre- 
sent a popular anti-American senti- 
ment that would doom football in 
the city. On the other hand, an 
annual exhibition of arena football 
games does well in Paris, and the 
French youth have taken to basket^ 
ball and other examples of Ameri- 
can pop culture. 

Driving the World League's 
comeback is the NFL’s under- 
standing that Lhe sport is bogged 
down internationally. NFL exhibi- 
tion games are planned for Berlin 
and Barcelona next summer, but 
the annual game at Wembley Stadi- 
um in London is in doubt So so- 
phisticated are the British fans that 
they are no longer willing to put up 
with a token first-quarter appear- 
ance by NFL stars, followed by 
three quarters of anonymous back- 
ups and rookies fighting to win a 
place on the teams. The game has 
reached the point where growth can 
resume only with a significant in- 
vestment 


tlH 


O 


For Olympic Skiers 9 a Final Shot at Glory 


The Associated Press 

VAIL, Colorado — Tommy Moe 
has his feet under him again, insert- 
ed firmly into ski boots on ultra- 
quick skis. 

’ Moe, gold medalist in downhill 
and silver medalist in super-giant 
slalom at tbe Olympics last month, 
foundered under waves of fan ado- 
ration and media attention at 
World Cup races two weeks ago in 
Aspen, Colorado. He finished 55th 
and 20th in a pair of downhills. 

Bui the American regained his 
focus and his form last week at 
Whistler, British Columbia. Moe 
placed third in a downhill and then 
won a super-G — his first triumph 
on the World Cup circuit. He is 
riding a crest heading into the 
Worid Cup Finals, which began in 
Vail on Wednesday. 

How does he feel about his skiing 
now? 

“Anytime I’m in the start for a 
downhill or a super-G, I fed like J 
can win,' 1 Moe said Tuesday. “I feel 
more confident now than I ever 
have. 


“I woo the race by a wide mar- 
gin, by Worid Cup standards.” be 
said, referring to nis super-G time 
that was .71 of a second faster than 
anyone elsc’s. “It kind of complet- 
ed my rfisumi for the year." 

It’s not quite over, however. 

Moe; 24. will be one of tbe skiers 
to beat in the downhill, although he 
isn’t a factor in the race for the 
discipline title. He also is within 
striking distance of die super-G 
standings leader, Marc Girardelli 
of Luxembourg. 

Nine of 10 World Cup titles are 
up for grabs here this week, indud- 
ingtbe women’s overall crown. 

The concluding stop on the 
Worid Cup circuit for 1993-94 will 
feature other Olympic stars, in- 
cluding Diane Roffe-Stemroiter, 
Alberto Tomba, Kjetil Andre Aa- 
roodt, Yreni Schneider, Katja Sd- 
zinger and Pemiila Wiberg. 

The men’s and women’s down- 
hill races kicked off the finals on 
Wednesday, with the super-giant 
slaloms on Thursday, giant slaloms 
on Saturday and slaloms on Sunday. 


Much of the focus of the week- 
long competition Mil be on the 
women’s overall, where Schneider, 
the veteran Swiss standout, leads 
Wiberg, of Sweden, by just 41 
points, 1384-1 J43. The winner of 
each race this week earns 100 
points, with 80 points going to the 
runner-up, 60 to the third-place 
finisher, and lesser points through 
30 places. 

In the men's overall standings, 
however, Aamodt has an almost 
insurmountable lead over Girar- 
delli at 1318 to 945. 

In the downhills. Seizin ger. the 
Olympic gold medalist from Ger- 
many, leads the women’s stand- 
ings. Girardelli is in Hist place in 
the men’s standings, despite not 
winning a downhill this season. 

Men and women each had two 
downhill training runs on Tuesday. 

Pacing the first men’s run was 
Peter Runggaldier of Italy, who 
was docked in 1:39.78. Moe was 
second in 1:40.36, and Girardelli 
was third. 


In the second run. Switzerland’s 
Franco Cavegn was fastest In 
1:38.38, followed by Girardelli and 
Moe. 

In women’s training, Seizinger 
paced both runs, as she did two 
training runs on Monday. She was 
docked in 1:49.08 in the first, 
ahead of Michelle Ruthven of Can- 
ada and Svetlana Gladishiva of 
Russia. 

In the second, Seizinger' s 1 :47.7 1 
was ahead of Picabo Street of the 
United States, who was timed in 
1:4836, and Martina Ertl of Ger- 
many. 

The finals, first staged last year 
in Sweden, are limited to the 20 
top-ranked aiders in each disci- 
pline. with some junior champions 
From North America and Europe 
thrown in. Any Olympic champi- 
ons not in the top 20. including 
Roffe-Stein rotter, also are racing. 

The skiers are competing for 
$220,000 in prize money, with 
$16,500 for first place. S8350 for 
second and $2,750 for third in each 
race. 



Ml* Ndw Apra Fnm-fttx* 

Tommy Moe, in training for the Worid Cup Finals in Colorado. 


M MU 


Buser Sets Record in Iditarod Race 

NOME, Alaska ( AP) — Martin Buser won the 22d Iditarod Trail Sled 
JDog Race in record time, becoming the third person to win the 1,100-mile 
( 1,770-kilometer) mushing marathon more than once. 

Buser and his dog team trotted under the buried arch on Nome’s 
historic Front Street on Tuesday night at 10:02 P.M.. 10 days, 13 hours, 
two minutes and 39 seconds after the March 5 start in Anchorage. The • 
Swiss-born m usher also won in 1992. He beat the previous record of -" 
10: 15:38. set in 1993 by Jeff King. 

World Cup Rethinking Alcohol Ban 

NEW YORK. (AP) — The chief U-S. World Cup organizer backed off 
his request tokeep alcohol from being sold before games in (he nine cities 
where the soccer tournament will beplayed this summer. 

Alan Roth en berg, chairman of World Cup USA 1994, went even 
further, saying he wasn’t in favor of banning alcohol inside lhe stadiums 
where the games will be played Alcohol was banned from the 12 Worid 
Cup stadiums in Italy four ydars ago. and some Italian authorities 
stopped sales in cities before the games. 

For lhe Record 

Rebecca Brown set a worid record for the women's 200-meter breast- 
stroke on Wednesday night at the Australian national championships in 
Brisbane. She swam the distance in 2 minutes, 24.76 seconds, trimming 
039 seconds from the mark set bv Anita Nall of the United Slates in 
1992, {AP) 

John Kruk, the Philadelphia Phillies first baseman, who had a cancer- 
ous testicle removed last week, will start a month of radiation therapy 
next week. /A/ 5 ) 


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SPORTS 

Pwking the Final 4 by (Psycho) Analysis 

By Tony Komheiser “* 

fore we gei lo the buniing question Robinson Tops AH- America List 

of “Who 10 pick in the Final Four 1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994 


Page 21 


By Tony Komheiser 

K'tzjfarr?:an Post Smuv 

‘jLANDOVER, Maryland — Be*- 
fore we get 10 the buniing question 
oT “Who to pick in the Final Four 
pool?” let us take a brief moment to 
give thanks for the bounty the Na- 
tional Collegia te Athletic Associa- 
tion basketball tournament has giv- 
en to USAir Arena here this week. 
What a collection of coaches: El 
Deano, Bobby Knight. John 
Chaney and Jerry Falwell. (What 
do you mean Falwell isn’t the 
coach of Liberty? I watched Fal- 
well cut down the net after the Big 
South championship; he didn’t 
even need a ladder to reach it — he 
just levitated. How odd h’s going to 
seem to Falwell after so many years 
of saying he had God cm hisside to 
now see Him on the opposite 
bench.) This is some subregional. 
With their recent track records. 
Knight may accidentally kill a 
player. And Chaney may threaten 
10 kill Knight. 

O.K.. here’s who we don’t pick: 

Georgia Tech. 

I love people who are screaming 
that Georgia Tech got hosed. I 
know who Georgia Tech beat: Car- 
olina twice, and Temple. I also 
know Tech was 7-10 in the Atlantic 
Coast Conference, and if you can’t 
go .500 in your conference bow 
dare you expect to be invited to a 
championship tournament? (Don’t 
ask me about Set on Hall. 0/ how 
. the Big East got six bids. Maybe 
Mike Tranghese has photos we 
don’t know about.) 

Here's who else we don't pick: 

Missouri, Arizona. UCLA. 

Los Chokos. See ya, wouldn’t 
wanna be ya. 

OJC-, who do we like? 

Well, we love the College of 
Charleston. (I'm applying to grad 
school at their Hilton Head campus 
to study lawn bathing.) It took 
courage for the NCAA to select the 
Cougars at 24-3 and deny a seventh 
Big East Learn a chance at the na- 
tional title it so richly deserved. 

We love legitimate sleepers — 
teams seeded below No. 4 that 
could reach the Sweet 16: These 
include Wake Forest, Texas, Vir- 
ginia and anybody playing in Mis- 
souri's portion of the draw. 

We love players like Shon Feck- 
Love from Alabama, Ochiel Swaby 
of Central Florida. LaZelle Durden 
of Cincinnati. Tony (Boney) Mar- 
oney of Hawaii and Canoncbet Ne- 


The Axsoriaied Press 

Purdue's Glenn Robinson, the leading U.S. col- 
lege basketball scorer, was a unanimous selection 
to The Associated Press All-America basketball 
learn, and California's Jason Kidd was named on 
all but one ballot. 

They were joined on the first team by Don yell 
Marshall of Connecticut and Grant Hill of Duke, 
both three votes shy of unanimous, and Clifford 
Rozier of Louisville. 

Robinson was the first unanimous selection 
since Christian Lacitner of Duke in 1992. He 
averaged 30.3 points and JO.J rebounds and shot 
49 percent from the field, including 36 percent 
from 3-point range. 

Kidd was selected to the first team by 64 of the 
65 voters on a national media panel and finished 
with 323 points, two behind Robinson. The sopho- 
more guard, considered an outstanding defender, 
led the nation in assists at 9.1 per game but the 
other numbers showed his all-around game: 16.8 
points, 6.8 rebounds and 3.1 steals. 

Marshall, who had 319 points, is the first Huskie 
to be named to the first team. Ihe junior forward 
led Connecticut to its highest ranking ever (No. 2) 
and the regular-season Big East championship. He 


averaged 25.8 points and 8.9 rebounds, was named 
the league’s player of the year and defensive player 
of the year. 

Hill, a third- learner last year and the national 
defensive player of the year, is the third straight 
first-team selection from Duke, two short of the 
record set by UCLA from 1971-75. The swingman 
was the only senior on the first team after getting 
317 points. He averaged 17.3 points, 6.5 rebounds 
and 5.1 assists and did everything the team needed, 
from directing the offense to taking over the game 
at both ends of the floor. 

Rozier got 26 first-team votes and 198 points. 
The Metro Conference player of the year the last 
two seasons, Rozier averaged 19.1 points and 1 1.2 
rebounds to lead the Cardinals to the league title. 

The second team includes Jalen Rose of Michi- 
gan, Corliss Williamson of Arkansas, Khalid 
Reeves of Arizona, Eric Montross of North Caroli- 
na and Melvin Booker of Missouri. It was Mon- 
trass’s second year in a row on the second team. 

The third team had Bryant Reeves of Oklahoma 
State. Lamond Murray of Cal B J. Tyler of Texas. 
Juwan Howard of Michigan and Damon Bailey or 
Indiana. 


ves of New Mexico. Don't forget 
DeJuan Wheal of Louisville. H 
Waldman (that's right, just H; I 
guess his folks were in a hurry) of 
Sl Louis, Dugan Fife of Michigan, 
Shea Seals of Tulsa, apparently 
named after two baseball stadiums, 
and Dana Dingle of Massachu- 
setts. 

And now for some exotic combi- 
nations: 

The all-car Final Four: Blazers 
(University of Alabama- Birming- 
ham). Broncos (Boise State), Bob- 
cats (Southwest Texas Sl) and 
Cougars (College of Charleston). 

The natural disaster Final Four. 
Flames (Liberty). Hurricanes (Tul- 
sa), Waves (Pepperdine), Crimson 
Tide (Alabama). 

The all-dog Final Four: Huskies 
(UConn). Salukis (Southern Illi- 
nois). Greyhounds (Loyola of 
Maryland) and the Big Dog. Pur- 
due’s Glenn Robinson. 

The ecumenical Final Four; De- 
mon Deacons. Friars, Quakers, 
Temple. 

The Men at Work Through the 
Ages Final Four: Boilermakers, 
Cornbuskers, Midshipmen, 
Knights. 


The Kodak Final Four: Blue 
Devils, Orangemen. Cardinals and 
the Rainbows. 

The You Can Look It Up Final 
Four: Hoyas, Bil likens. Hoosiers. 
Hilhoppers. 

The Small Hideous Animals Fi- 
nal Four: Gophers, Wolverines. 
Badgers. Razorbackx. 

The Predator Final Four: Ga- 
tors, Pirates. Lobos, Dragons. 

The Snappy Military Uniforms 
Get the Gills Final Four Cava- 
liers. Minutemen. Midshipmen and 
North Carolina, because Alexan- 
der Julian designed them. 

The all-Mon arch Final Four: 
Maryland. Georgetown . Louisville. 
Duke. 

The all-Sutton. all-Gary, all- 
Lefty, all- Ricky. all-Bartow- Final 
Eight: Arkansas. Kentucky. Bos- 
ton College, Providence, Mary- 
land, James Madison. UAB. 
UCLA. 

The all-Philly Final Four: Tem- 
ple. Drexel. Penn, Rasbeed Wal- 
lace. 

The all-D.C. Final Four: 
Georgetown, George Washington, 
Lawrence Moten. Michael Smith. 

The Billboard Final Four Arizo- 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AttanNc DMslM 



W L 

Pet 

SB 

NewYork 

<3 19 

JBA 

— 

Orlando 

V 25 

J97 

6 

Miami 

35 27 

3&5 

8 

New jersey 

32 29 

-S2S 

10Vj 

Boston 

22 39 

J41 

SOW 

PhUatfeipfito 

21 42 

333 

22*7 

yvasntnaton 

W 43 

J06 

24 


Central DtvMaa 



Allan la 

43 IB 

.70S 

— 

Cblcaao 

40 22 

.M5 

3*7 

Cleveland 

34 7t 

sn 

a 

Indiana 

32 28 

J33 

10*7 

Charlotte 

24 34 

.433 

16*7 

Mllvvaul.ee 

17 45 

2H 


Detroit 

17 44 

J70 

17 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 



MJdwesJ DlvlSto* 




W L 

PCt 

OB 

Houston 

43 17 

.717 

— 

SanAnlonio 

44 1* 

JN 8 

V4 

Utah 

43 21 

672 

2 

Denver 

» 31 

An 

)3*7 

Mirmesolo 

17 45 

3H 

Z7 

Dallas 

8 54 

.129 

36 


pacific Division 



Seattle 

«5 16 

738 

— 

Phoeta* 

41 20 

-672 

4 

Portland 

38 25 

na 

B 

Golden State 

34 26 

581 

9*7 

LA. Lakers 

34 34 

.400 

2017 

LA. Clippers 

23 38 

J77 

22 

Saeramania 

21 41 

J39 

2417 


Strickland 9-19 1-2 1*. H: Thorpe 11-16 2-2 24. 
OtaJu won 17-24 7-8 41. Rebound*— Portland 44 
IWiniwm 9}. Houston 56 (Thorpe 16). As- 
Ship— P ori land 27 fSIrfchlond ». Houston 21 
t Horrv, Otojuwon 6 ). 

Detroit 11 23 27 21— « 

Seattle II h » W— «7 

D: Thomas 8-12 2-3 20 , Hunter 4-124-413. 5; 
Kamp 9-17*^24. Gin 5-13 3-8 U Perfclns*-U >4 
1J. Robouods— Detroit 55 IffUlb 11), Soottlo 54 
(Ken® ID. As*i*»— Detroit 34 ( Elliott. Milts. 
Hunter 4). Seattle 23 (McMillan 9V 
Utah 35 2* 21 23-10* 

LA. Clippers 21 25 » 36—108 

U: Malone 14-266-6 34. Homacefc 6-164-4 2 ). 
LA.: wilhlns 7-30 13-14 31. Harper 10-21 M 31 
Rehoamfe— Utah 55 (Malone, FSpcncer 14). 
Las Angeles 55 (Morilnll). 44nlsts— Utah 33 
(Stockton 161. Loo Anodes 18 Utockoon 10). 
MtaShlaotae » 24 » W— «J 

Golden State » a » 23—133 

W; MocLeon 11-1* 13-123S. Chapman 4-10 3-4 
12. G: Werner 64 S4 17. Gatins 8 -* « 20 . 
Rebounds— WosfHnol on 43 (MocLeon 8 ), Gold- 
en State 55 1 Galling 13). Assists— ' wasnington 
23 (Price 5). Golden Stale 33 {Jenrtngi 7). 

-«V^» -'tj + .- wr 

NHL Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



Indiana ® ” 17 21—82 

new York 17 21 22 18-80 

1 : Ml Uer 6-14 ?-» 22. Fleming 5-7 1 -2 1 1. N.Y.: 

Ewing 11-21 4-5 26. Hamer 5-13 6-10 17. Re- 
bounds: Indiana 50 IDAovks 13). Now York 57 

l Oak lev 12). Assists— Indiana 201 Richardson 

4) , New York 24 (Horper 12>. 

Milwaukee 29 23 28 »- « 

Miami 29 20 23 29—101 

M: Baker 5-8 4-6 14. Murdock 11-21 10-12 32. 
M: Rice 9-18 8-10 28. Smith 9-13 9-11 27. Re- 
bounds — Milwaukee 44 (Baker B>. Miami 53 
(Seikoiv 14). Assists— Milwaukee 19 (Barry 

5) . Miami 23 (Show 12). 

Pboenlx 27 25 42 13-119 

Cleveland 26 23 27 30—186 

P: Ceballos 10-16 5-7 25, Malerie 13-21 1-1 M- 
C: williams 8-13 M 22. Wilkins 8-13 1-2 19. 
Rebounds— phoenix 54 (Ceballos 12). Cleve- 
land 42 (Hleshtt 71. Assists— Phoenix 34 
(K— Wtnson 10). Cleveland 31 (Brandon lOL 
Orlando 22 28 25 23— 98 

CMaow 26 22 29 31—108 

O: O'Neal 10-183-8231 Anderson 6-124-6 19.C: 
Pippen 10-21 4-6 25. Grorrt 10-17 4^ 24. Re- 
bounds— Ortondo 53 (O'Neal 13), Chicago 50 
(Grant 16). AssWi-orknido 19 ISottt 
Hardaway 4). Chicago 32 (PlPoefWl. ^ ^ 
P&HadelpMo n M 21 2W/ 

Minnesota 22 29 20 25-w 

P: Wecttierspoon 7-1-1 2-4 

415.M: Rider B-!fl 3-421. Kino 6-11 *-4 16- Baliev 

9-10 0-0 18. Reoomds— PhtlodeiPhla sa 
(Lecfcner 771. Mirmesolo 53 I Person 9). as- 
iftn^FhllodelPhhi 27 I Bom* 8). Minnesota 
31 (Williams ID- „ „ „ - 

Portland 27 “ 2 

u__j_ 34 16 27 lfr-185 

P: Gronl 11-20 l-l 25. C. Robhwon 8-17 3-3 19. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

“TOSSES" 

UK 071 589 5237 

FERRARI 

Q71 589 8200 

10 mxw7mSb&s»« e 

071 266 0586 

»»PAB5«»a3UlH Of PRANCE T * 

BSPS®®®!?*'"* 

DAILY 

WME TIME TOWT »VJCE 
bMarWton DnyVEyeimgi 
212-279-8522 USA. 



W 

L 

T 

Pts GF 

GA 

N.Y. Ranaers 

43 

21 

6 

92 

249 

193 

New Jersey 

39 

21 

10 

88 

251 

185 

WaiMnaton 

32 

30 

e 

72 

226 

217 

Ptittadeiptila 

31 

32 

7 

69 

250 

262 

Florida 

29 

29 

10 

68 

189 

189 

N.Y. islanders 

29 

32 

B 

66 

239 

226 

Tampa Bov 2S 37 9 

wrfltaut Mrliisn 

59 

190 217 

Boston 

34 

22 

12 

B4 

238 

199 

Montreal 

36 

22 

12 

84 

241 

19 9 

Pittsburgh 

35 

23 

12 

82 

254 

244 

BuHoLo 

36 

26 

B 

80 

235 

183 

Quebec 

28 

34 

7 

63 

226 

233 

Hartford 

23 

39 

8 

54 

190 

233 

Ottawa 

10 

53 

8 

28 

166 

338 


x-D&trolt 

•-Toronto 

Dallas 

Chlcogo 

51. Louts 

Winnipeg 


Central DWUboo 

W L T Pts GF GA 

41 23 5 87 302 232 

38 21 11 87 233 197 

35 25 10 BO 236 219 

34 28 8 76 210 191 

33 26 9 75 219 228 

19 44 8 46 210 295 

Pacific Division 

35 26 IT 81 258 226 

34 32 3 71 235 Z27 


Calgary 35 » n 8) 258 226 

Vancouver 34 33 3 71 235 227 

San Jose 25 31 13 63 196 223 

Ananeim 26 40 5 57 193 219 

Las Armeies 2S 36 ID 56 240 266 

Edmonton 19 4t 10 48 215258 

k-cllncned otavaH spot. 

TUESDAY’S RESULTS 
Washington 1 * * 

pmsmrtn * 1 

First Period: W-Burrktae Sl (Rldlev. PL 
vonka); (pp). P-Stevens 34 (Murphv. Josr). 
(ppiseawd period: W-JOhansson 6 (Jones. 
Rldlev*: P -Mullen 35 ( fronds. McEadiOffll. 
(pp) Third Period: W+(un1er 8 ( KhrtSIICtL Jo- 
hann) ; 6. WOSWngtoto. Bw-|idoe 22 

Ridley); 7. PlMuurgh, SandsTrom I* (Joae. 
Morphy): P-Stevens 35 (Strdw, JOOr). tPP). 
OvertimeiW-Burrldge 23 (Phnmka RkKev). 
Shots on goal; W (on Bar rosso) 7-1H2-1— TL 
P ion waupre) 14-7-6-0-27. 


New Jersey 10 1—2 

N.Y. ishnden I 2 0-2 

First Period: N.Y .-Kaminsky 2 iMeinnrs. 
vaske); NJ.-Zelepuicin 26 (Niedermaver. 
Stevens). lool-Second Period: N.Y.-Turgeon 
31. N-Y.-Turoeon 32 (Thomas). Third Period: 
N_).-Richer2L Snots no goal: NJ. (an McLen- 
nan) 9-9-10—28. N.Y. ion Terrerl) 4-11-9— 24. 
Calgary 4 2 1-7 

Tampa Bar 3 • 0—1 

First Period: C-Nvtander 12 iFteucv); T- 
Sovard 13 (Poeschefc); C- Roberts 32 (Stem); 
T-Crr(gtiton » ( Bradley. E lynuik) ; C-Sullfvon 
3. C-FJeurv 30 (Roberts. Nylander); T-Cham- 
bers 10 (Savara DIMalo). (po)Sccond Peri- 
od: C-Raberts 33 (Nylander. Dohtaulsi); C- 
RoDerh 34 (Relchel). Third Period.- 1C- 
RobertsSS (Zoiopskl.Mocinnis). (op). SIMs 
on goal; C ion Puppa. Young) 11-1B-8 — 37. T 
(on Vernon] u- 9-5—28 
Vancouver 2 0 0-3 

Detroit I 1 3-5 

First Period; V-Mcintyre 2 tHunler); D- 
Fedorov 50 IPrlmeau, Howe I ; (sh)v-Bure45. 
(sb|. Second Period: D-Howee. Thhd Period: 
D-Burr 8 ( Draper, LWstrom),-(sh)D-Fedonjv 
5) (Konstantinov l ; (en)D-Stieppartj«(Yxer- 
man).(en). Shots on goat: v ion Osgood) 104- 
6—34. D (on McLean) 12-5-14—31 
Ottawa 0 B 0-4 

los Angeles 4 12-7 

First Period: l_A.-Btake 17 (Gretzky. Rool 
MO e): (w>). i_A.-Conaeher 11 (DonneUy); LA- 
Btoke U (Kurrt Gretzky); LA-Kurrl 29 
( Gretzky, Gronatol. Second Period: LArLang 7 
(Sydor. Dorvwtty). TMrd Period: LA. -Gretzky 
31 (Long, Druceli LArDruoe V (Shuchuk. 
Huddy). stmts on goal: O (an Hrvdov) 9-17- 
13-31 LA Ion LnForcsl, BHJIngtanl 10-10-12— «L 

^•-ry -• r£:7g5;T-r‘s 

UEFA CUP 
Quarterfinal. 2d Lea 

Ekrtraeht Frankfurt. Germany I, Casino Salz- 

Durg, Austria D oet 

Aagreaaie scare l-l : Salzburg win W on 
penattles 

Juvenms, Italy I. Cagliari. Italy 2 
Cagliari win 21 on aggregate 
CUP WINNERS' CUP 

Qearterflaal, 2d Leg 

Bayer Leverkusen. Germany 4. Benftca. Por- 
tugal 4 

Aggregate score 5-5; Bent ton win on awav 
goals 

Arsenal, England 1, Torino, Italy 0 
Arsenal win 1-0 on aggregate 
Paris Sl.-Germoln, France 1. Real Madrid. 
Saoln 1 

Paris win 2-1 on aggregate 

ONE DAY INTERNATIONAL 
Pakistan w New Zeatond, Last Day 
Wednesday, la Cfcrtetchwcn, New Zeotond 
Pakistan Innings: 145 all out (50 overs) 

' how Zealand Innings: 146-3 (34 overs) 

New Zeeland wan try seven wickets. 

•• 

•r, t - Vrt : L - ■ ’ ; /up 

BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON— Released Scott Tartar, pi Idler. 
CALIFORNIA — Sen) Mike Fitzgerald, 
cotener, ant Garret Anderson, ouHtalder, to 
their minor-lean ue came tor reasshminent. 


CLEVELAND— Agreed to lerais with Mark 
Clark, pitcher, an 2- year contract. Sen) John 
Carter, Cartas Crawford. Alan Embree and 
Kevin Logsdon, pitchers, la their minor- 
leooue camp tar reassigntncnl. 

DETROIT— Put Tom Bo Hon and Mark 
Letter, pitchers, on waivers tor purpose o! 
granting their unconditional releases. 

MINNESOTA— Sent Ran Corldod ml Jose 
Correa. W itchers, and Marty Cordova, out- 
Iteuer. to Ibelr mtfi or- league cams tar roas- 
slgnmenL 

TORONTO— Sen! Dennis Gray and Lee 
Daniels, pitchers. In their minor-league camp 
tor reassignmenL 

National League 

ATLANTA— Put Ron Gaol, outfielder, an 
Mivers tar Purpose sl granting his uncondl- 
Nanai release. 

LA.— Sen) Billy A shier. out/kMer; Jerrr 
Brooks, catcher; Mike Busch. Eddie Pveond 
Ran Owner, intteMers. and Ben VanRyn, 
Todd win toms and Jose Parra pitchers, to 
Albuquerque of Pacific Coast League. Sam 
Go rev Ingram and Henry Blanco. Inheldors. I 
and Fella Rodriguez, niicner. to 5on Antonio 
oi Texas League. ! 

N.Y. ME TS— Released Doue Dascenzo. out- 
fielder. Sent Juan Castilla, Pete Walker. Jason 
jacome. Mike Rgmilnger. and Tom wogmann, 
pitchers. Brooks Fordvce and Alberto Cm) II to 
colchers: Alan zintar. Qullvta Veras. Butcn 
Huskev and Pablo Martinez, inf le idem, and 
Pal Howell and Troev Sonden, autde'darv to 
thetr minor -leogue camp tar reasslonmenl. 

BASKETBALL 

Mot) sow Basketball Association 

BOSTON— Stoned Tony Harris, guard, to 2d 
10-dav aonlracr. 

CHICAGO— Pul Will Perdue, center, on In- 
lured list. Activated Bill Cartwright, center. | 
from Inlured list. 

N.Y j— P ut John Storks, guard, an inlured 
Bsi. Acttvoied Eric Anderson, forward, from 
inlured lisL 

FOOTBALL 

Haltooai Football League 

Cl NCINNATI— Signed Louis Oliver, safety, 
la 2-year con Trod. Claimed John BranHev. 
linebacker, off waivers from Washington. 

LA RAIDERS— signed Albert Lewis, cor- ! 
nfifbock, 

NEW ENGLAND— Signed Mike Kerr, line- 
backer. 

WASHINGTON— Released Charles Mann, 
defensive end. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 

DALLAS— Sen) Dave Barr, center, to Kala- 
mazoo of the ihl 

EDMONTON— Traded Dave Manson. de- 
lansemon, and o sixth-round Pick in 1 W4 draft 
to Winnipeg tor Mars Llndgren. center: Baris 
Mironov, defenseman: and first- and fourth- 
round picks in 79W Oran. 

N.Y. RANGERS— Sent Corey Hlrsch. goal- 
ie. to Blngnamton of me AHL 

OTTAWA— Signed Dan Quinn center. 

PHILADELPHIA — Signed Chris Therien. 
defenseman, to a 4-vectr contract and as- 
signed him to Hershey of the AHL Recalled 
Tammy Soderstrom, goalie, from Hershev. 
Sent Frederic Qiabol. goalie, to Herslwy. Re- 
leased Randv Skarda. defensemen 
COLLEGE 

ATLANTIC id— X avier, Ohio, has aenmd 
an in viral ton lo torn conference beginning 
with the 1995-96 basketball season. 

BIG EIGHT— Named Robvn Sharp assis- 
tant commissioner. 



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na (Mark Lindsay), Massachusetts 
(Bee Gees). Nebraska (Bruce 
Springsteen). Kansas. 

The Dropped Off ihe Face of 
The Earth Final Four: UNLV. Sl. 
John’s, N.C. Slate, LSU. 

The all-AAA Final Four: Cen- 
tral Florida. Southern Illinois. 
Southwest Texas Slate, Western 
Kentucky. 

The Various Stales of Being Fi- 
nal Four: Providence. Liberty. 
Wake. California. 

And here, ai the end d 1 the col- 
umn. something you can bank on: 
the prediction of Syracuse’s Jim 
Boeheim. Boeheim is now two-for- 
two in this column — which couJd 
gee him into the White Sox outfield. 
Before [he 1 cum ament two years 
ago, Boeheim predicted, “Duke, by 
miles.” Last year, Boeheim said, 
“North Carolina has too many 
weapons." This year. Carolina has 
even more weapons with fabulous 
freshmen Rasheed Wallace and 
Jerry Stackhouse, which is why the 
Tor Heds are on my dance card. 
Boeheim has Carolina going to the 
Final Four again. But he has anoth- 
er familiar team winning it all. 

Michigan. 


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Jon Dm6.»4(tlkc Frjnof-Phw 


Isiah Thomas of the Pistons got his pass past the defenare efforts of the SuperSooics' Shawn Kemp. 


Pistons 
Upset 
The Sonics 


The Assvt iiitai Press 

The Detroit Pistons pulled off 
one of the more stunning upsets of 
the season by beating the Super- 
Son ics. 89-87. in Seattle. 

The SuperSonics entered the 
game with the NBA’s best home 
record. 25-3. while the Pistons had 
the fifth-worst road record. 7-21. 
Detroit trailed. 86-80. with 2:30 
left but closed ihe game with a 9-1 

NBA HIGHLIGHTS 

run to end Seattle's seven-game ho- 
mecoun winning streak. 

Rookie Lindsey Hunter had five 
points during the spun, and Terry 
Mills's long jumper from ihe corner 
with 43 seconds left proved to be 
the game winner. 

Sims 1 19, Cavaliers 106: In Rich- 
field, Ohio, Dan Majerle scored 34 
points and Phoenix made 18 of 20 
in the third quarter. Cleveland 
played without all three of its 1993 
All-Stars — Mark Price (back 
spasms). Brad Daugherty (back in- 
jury) and Larry Nance (bad knee) 
— and Iosl its third in a row since 
matching the franchise record with 
1 1 straight wins. 

Knicks 88 , Pacers 82: In New 
York. Patrick Ewing scored 26 
points and Hubert Davis and 
Derek Harper made key plays. 

The Knicks led. 70-57. late in the 
third quarter before a 19-4 ran put 
the Pacers ahead. 76-74. with 5:03 
lefL Davis then pul ihe Knicks 
ahead with a 3-pointer and Harper 
followed with a three-point play, 
making it 80-76 with 4:09 lefL 

Butts 108. Magic 98: In Orlando, 
Florida, the qection of Coach Phil 
Jackson sported Chicago's 10-1 
run at the end of the third quarter 
and the P Is pulled away in the 
fourth. 

Scottie Pippen scored 25 points, 
Horace Grant had 24. BJ. Arm- 
strong IS and Bill Wennington 16, 
including six in the |ame-turning 
run. The Bulls won Tor the third 
time in their last four games. 

Rockets 105, TraO Blazers 99: In 
Houston. Hakeem Olajuwon had 
41 points and the Rockets out- 
scored Portland. 28-12, in the 
fourth quarter. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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LOOKING FORA 
SUMMER CAMP 
IN NORTH AMERICA? 

Don't Mss Our Adverting Swtan 
North America) Summor Comp* 
Saturday, Modi 19 


AARO 20* ANNIVERSARY and 
AM'JUAL MttiiNG ai th« Aikkoi 
A mbassador's tawtence. Tuesday, 
MoicH 29. 1994 Welcome by /vnfcc*- 
sodot Pamela HARBMAN. Wenmn- 
mert by angei Jem MANSON. 
Meeting; 6J0 pn* cadtafc: 7 pm. 
Eeservcnons open lo ci members and 
guests DeaCne March 24th. Send 
dw* (nZS.'pemon) la AARO, BE 
127, 92l54 Swesws Cede*. F01 Artak 
ooL (33-1) 42 04 09 38. 


MOVING 



SWITZERLAND 


10 US HELP YOU SdMl a lovely 
HW ta u nt Lake Genova Southern 
area aad mountain*. AttradBv* 
price* Complete confidence. Sam 
NnancU Tgfc 41-27-329 00 49. 

Fax; 41-21-329 00 5Z 

REAL ESTATE 
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speaakH in hvrashrd apjrtnierti, 
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Teb {1} 42 25 32 25 

Fax (11 45 63 37 09 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

PARIS A SUBURBS 

ISA cent SUPERB HOUSE « ears 
Wesl Pan* 5 mre Montfort TAnwy 
m*an. Ided mam residence, 360 
sq.nL. oomplmlv lenovcwd. land- 
sccaied pork. 0 *tv>. ti»H -4^5 3024 

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mUNG knrt? — having oiMmadt 
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Spnooui 2 o> 3*0001 epo nm enb 
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C „ inmedan Reswvalwra 

Tel: (33-1) 41 25 1616 
✓ to (33-1) 41 25 1615 


Embassy Service 
YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT N PARIS 
Tel: (1) 47.20.304)5 


AT HOME IN PAMS 

PARIS PROMO 

apartments to rert Fumshed or not 
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Tel: (1) 45 63 25 60 


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CLAR 1 DGE 

FOR 1 wrac OR MORE hrgh das 
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Tel: (1) 44 13 33 33 


Today's 

CNTEKVAIWIVAL 


Appears an 
JRage 4 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


LAMY, 75116 PARIS 

5 Ave. nerre lm de Serbs 
Tot 140 70 18 B4« 147 23 53 14 
Short and long Term fariefa 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


PARS ISth. Modem 1 bedroan Bat 

Top floor Terraco. Veranda : 
Broumuty decor atai. Parqun floor. 

Tat 1-47 53 80 13. to 45 51 75 77 I 


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BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SAFE AND HIGHLY 
PROFITABLE INVESTMENT: 

Land avaiable tor sole n beautM rural 
area of England EneOeni investment - 
your inbal imestmen) *1 never 
d e p reaato. you could sell your pkrt at 
any tsne with an moease m ds vobe 
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considernfaly if pfcming penwaton u 
granted far your tad (even if ifu a not 
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Price E750 ta VWO sq. h. plcn. 

Tet 44 71 493 14» Fw 44 71 4R3I96I . 


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to 51B4N1-35B8 USA. 

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HONGKONG 

COMPAMES US $350 

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Tel. 51+341-7237 fa 5T+34 1-7998 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


F08 SALE 

CHAMPS aYSSS: 500 SQM. 

El OIL 190 SQM 
NEUUY. mdeperdert buiUiQ. 
1,500 SQM + par long. 
BBWAIS 
ETCOt 400 SQM 
CHAM’S ars£& 183 SQM 
SUE MABGNAM 360 SQM 
(ordessend rertok) 
LEVAUOiS/doee NEUILLY. 1» 5QM 
COUBBEVOE 450 SQM 
Bh. BJE DC MAHGNAN: 

Near pafak patong Francois let. 
360 scjo. profess«r>d prnnscL 
Eeoepnon. 10 cHiees. S* floor 
aid character bukCng. 

ACHARD (1)47 2331 51 
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PAfiTNKS Tefc nj 46 14 B2 11. Fax. 

(1)47 72 30 96. 

MARAIS, view on gardens, sunny, 
quel 85 sqM DauQe tang room, 
bedroom, large tactefi. For 7-9 mra. 
FI 1.500 including garage. Tel- 
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LATIN QUAKlkR, 2<oom flat m town 
house, enhance, Vilcherv'barh. sunny, 
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U SAKT LOUS, Lunury tage studu. 
tatty fumrthed. Mad. Free irmned- 
aciy.Tdk CW 11)4634 19 25. 


5B90NG MOOBN, OUtET iqxvlnw 
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EDUCATION 


MISSIVE GOMAN COURSE n 
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r 


Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Can’t Check Everything 


Sweets Edison: This Is a Time to Reap 


PEOPLE 


W ASHINGTON — The CIA 
has been taking a bad rap Tor 


m 



YY has been takinga bad rap Tor 
alleged spy Aldrich Ames who was 
arrested for whispering U.S. se- 
crets to the Russians. Critics of the 
intelligence agency maintain that 
the chaps out at Langley should 
have known Ames was up to no 
good from his lifestyle, which was 
far more lavish ' amn 
than anything a 

CIA counterin- 
telligence officer 
could afford. 

One of the 
people assigned 
to investigate 
what went 
wrong was Ted 
Tarr. He told 
me, “In retro- 
sped, there were BucnwaM 
signs that Ames was not exactly 
what he appeared to be. But we had 
to take ius word that he was 
straight, because he had taken an 
oath that be would uphold the law 
of die land." 

□ 

“Weren't you suspicious when he 
started tooling around Northern 
Virginia in a Jaguar?" 

“He told us that he bad won it at 
an American Legion balL" 

“What about the S 540.000 in 
cash dial he paid for a new house? 
Surely that should have raised a red 
flag,” 

“It did until he explained that he 
had won it in Ed McMahon’s pub- 
lisher’s sweepstakes. He told us 
that he was as surprised as anyone 
when Ed showed up at the house 
and took pictures of Ames and his 


wife crying as they were handed the 
money." 

“You didn't pursue his story to 
see if it was true or not?" I asked 
Tarr. 

“Not exactly. But we did give 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


Ames a party. There aren’t many 
people at the CIA who win a mil- 


people at the CIA who win a mil- 
lion dollars for doing nothing." 

“Did Ames own a yacht?” 

“We’re looking into that. By it- 
self it doesn’t mean anything be- 
cause we have a saying in the CIA 
— ’Just because a man buys a 60- 
foot boat for himself doesn’t neces- 
sarily make him a double agent* " 
Tarr stud defensively. 


P ARIS— Harry Edison, who doesn’t look a day over 70, 
was bom in 1915 and is one of the few signatu re players 
who go back that far. Come to think of it take five more 
years off the appearance. Lester Young named him Sweets. 

He was wearing a ponytail and a pair of spanking snow- 
white bomebpy Reeooks. a gift from his daugh ter. A liny 
10-gram bar of Swiss “fine gold" and a golden Assump- 
tion amulet were on chains around his neck. Sweets named 


Frank Sinatra Sportin’ life. 

This is Kilometer Zero. Hie lobby of his hotel under- 


looks Notre- Dame, directly up and across the quai. He 
was working in LeCaveau de la Hue beue. a jazz cave from 
the old days around the comer which undertook* them 
both. Nothing underlooks Le Caveau de La Huchetle. 
except maybe a catacomb. The place is packed with 
dancing tourists tooling clumsily around. Our hero has 
been on more heroic missions. Never mind, this is a time 
to reap. 

After be heard Louis Armstrong for the fust time, his 
mother bought him a trumpet for 50 cents down and a 
dollar a month. It took her 10 years to pay off the Getz 
music store in downtown Columbus. Ohio. He played his 
way out of Columbus with Alphonso Trent, into New 
York City with Lucky MDlinder and be couldn't believe 
his luck to be hired by Count Basie for $6 a nighL 

The first thing he did in New York was to look for his 
sound. It was a matter of pride to have your own signature. 
They don't bother with that sort of thing so much any 
more: “Society ba* changed, people are afraid to stand out 
from the crowd." His roeflow voice resembles the sound he 
found: “Lester Young was my roommate with Basie. He 
had his own sound. Prez loved his own playing, yes be did. 
The old cliche goes that if you don't love yourself no one 
else is going to. Thousands of tenor saxophone players and 
one of them plays just one note and you say. That’s Lester 
Young.’ That’s quite an achievement.” 

Sweets achieved his sound in Harlem. They jammed 
until noon after working until 4: “We were tike scientists 
looking for a cure for something. After-hours joints were 
our laboratories. We injected our own ideas into some- 
body else s ideas. That way we gradually learned bow to 
think for ourselves. Then we got to the place where we 
could play what we were thinking . Today people play 
what other people have already thought They imitate 
rather than originate. It’s easier." 

When he hears a young trumpet player trying to imitate 
him. be recommends imitating somebody else more suc- 
cessful: “I’m a firm believer in God. so I’m grateful. I will 
achieve what He has in store for me. But I don’t think l 
achieved that much. There are a lot of things 1 never 
learned how to do. I'm still trying. Actually, the way 1 look 
at it is that when you’re respected by peers you respect, 
you’re successful.” 

Singers love to hear Sweets behind them. His distinctive 
vibrato sings in its own way, and he knows when to start and 
stop with one take. His muted, elegant, uncluttered and 
witty obligati framed Billie Holiday (often) and Nat King 
Cole and he was a trademark with ^xxtin' Life for 1 2 years. 

Never having studied formally. Sweets had trouble 
reading Nelson Riddle’s arrangements. He would ask the 
other trumpeters to bdp him decipher this or that. But 
nobody told him when to solo or stop. He was on his own. 
In more ways ihnn one. He was the only blade musician 
with Sinatra back when “that wasn't too kosher." When 


French Curators Picked 
For 2 Major Art Shows 


New York Times Serrice 
French curators will be in charge 
of the next incarnations of Eu- 


rope's two most important surveys 
of international con temporary art. 


of international contemporary art. 

Catherine David. 39. curaior of 
the Galerie Nationals du Jeu de 
ftume in Paris, is to be the comnus- 
amra of “Documents 10." the pres- 
tigious survey of contemporary art 
in Kassel Germany, in 1997. Jean 
Gair, 54, an art historian who is 
director of the Muste Picasso in 
Paris, has been chosen commission- 
er of visual arts, the biggest pan of 
the Venice Biennale, fix 1995. 


“Ted, apparently every time 
Ames was questioned about his 
wealth be had an explanation, in- 
cluding the story about his wife's 
extraordinary inheritance. Did 
anyone at the CIA think to check it 
out?" 

"Of course, we did. We insisted 
that Ames swear on a Bible. He did 
as we asked. and the Bible indicat- 
ed that he was telling the truth. 
Believe me, well never take his 
word for anything again." 

“Ted is there any truth to the 
rumor that Ames tipped bis superi- 
ors $100 every time they parked his 
car for him?"’ 

“1 don’t think so. Word about 
that would have gotten around the 
office pretty fast." 

“I still don't understand how 
Ames was able to move so much 
money into different banks around 
the world without anyone finding 
out what he was up to.” 

“He did iton his lunch hour, and 
we never check on our agents when 
they go out to lunch. It wouldn't be. 
ethical." 

□ 

“Mrs. Araes is also allegedly a 
spy. Did anyone at the CIA ques- 
tion her lifestyle?" 

“A few people made comments 
about the designer jeans she wore 
to the CIA touch football games. 
Look, no one in the spy business is 
perfect, and if Ames and bis wife 
fell through our security cracks, it 
was an honest mistake. We have 
closed all the loopholes to make 
sure that it doesn't happen again " 

“How’s that?” 

“if you show up in the parking 
lot in a new Jaguar you have to 
submit to urinalysis before you can 
use the agency's cafeteria." 



Pavarotti in Manila: 
Action-Packed Arrival 

The arrival of Luciano Pavarotti 
in Manil a triggered a brawL As re- 

porters swarmed around the opera 
star, a photographer grappled with 
one of the singer’s aides aa& 
punched him cm the jaw. The aide’ 
retaliated by hurting bis radio at the 
photographer. Hie concert has been 
criticized as a needless extravagaqse 
in a poor country. Top seats cat 
25,000 pesos (5900) each. 

a 

Leona Hehnstey, the so-caBed 
Queen of Mean, is being blamed by 
several top executives for their dis- 
missals over the last two months, 
Crain’s New York Business reports. 
The riigmiccfik coincide with Hehns- 
tey’s release from prison after die 
served 21 months on a tax charge, 
but a spokesman for Hdmsley de- 
nied that she ordered the firings 

□ 

Charles Kuratt, 59, the anchor of 
the CBS News program “Sunday 
Morning," has announced his re- 
tirement from the network on May 
1, after almost four decades mi the 


dL‘» 








i Ji: s* 

Trumpeter Edison: “When you're respected by peers you respect, you're successful.' 


promoters acted strange, Sinatra said: “If Sweets can't get 
a room in this hotel thee won’t be a concert tonight.” It 
may seem tike condescension, but you use what you got 
And be had already been well conditioned to that territo- 
ry. ‘Tell me about it," be said. 

Twenty years with Count Basie, as many as 275 one- 
nigh lers a year, mostly in the South. Five shows a day for a 
week in the Apollo Theatre was virtually a vacation. And 
he was lucky, that was just about the only work a blade 
musician could find. If He saw some sort of scene down the 
street, he would take a detour. He moved over when while 
people were occupying the sidewalk. When there was no 
other choice he used service entrances. 

He tells about it: T figured there wiB always be another 


“This doesn’t look like One O’clock Jump.' ” he said 
later looking at the music, “and I’ve been plajn'ng ii all ray 
life.” Trouble is he'd never seen One O'Qock Jump.” Ever. 
Nothina had been written down. They were called head 


night and another place. This may sound strange but 
suffering was a big reason why black players played with 


suffering was a big reason why black players played with 
more expression in those days. Sure. Pain and suffering 
made you play better.” 

Not that he’s recommending it, that’s justthe way be sees 
it: “Suffering gave you a certain intensity. Guys who start 
out today make $500-5600 a nighL That’s great but they’ve 
got to find their emotion some other place. You don't learn 
suffering in school It’s more complicated now." 

imagine three straight days of insults, provocation, 
poverty, discomfort, bad food and not sleeping in a bed. 
All that fear and loathing in the segregated South. But the 
magic was such that with the first note he’d forget all of iL 
The thrill of silting in Count Base’s trumpet section 
would rattle his bones. Fatigue was vanquished. It was not 
theoretical There were no awareness seminars. You 
fought for your territory. 


Nothing had been written down. They were called head 
arrangements. During his first mouths. Sweets would still be 
sitting there with his bom in his lap at the end of a lutti. if he 
tried to grab a now. he’d hear somebody else already 
playing it He was so frustrated he pul in his notice. But 
Basie said: “Don’t wony. Sooner or later you'll find a note 
that nobody has. Just play that same note every 'nighL' ” 

Tunes change, he learned to sight-read and worked in 
the studios, he no longer needed Sportin' Life in order to 
stay in a decent hotel. Which is a good thing because he’s 
traveling again. Recently in Carduf, Wales, the band he 
found waiting for him included a streetcar conductor, a 
postman and a taxi driver. Fortunately, Sweets can play 
any standard in any key, the audience could not tell they’d 
never played together before. He’s proud of being "profes- 
sional’’ a word he pronounces often and with reverence. 
Being professional m Wales and sitting on top of Kilome- 
ter. Zero in Paris are not to be taken lightly. 

Now his life is a series of long commutes, in the 
company of all-star old-timers or alone, often halfway 
around the world to play in underlooking places with 
postmen. He's been doing it for almost 60 years so he has 
friends wherever he goes. If he had it to do all over again, 
he wouldn't change a thing. Because everywhere he goes 
he sees people dragging themselves to then jobs. They 
can’t wait to retire. He cannot understand people who are 
anxious to get old. He can’t wait to play tonight 


Tom Braxton won awards for 
best single and best album and 
Whitney Houston was named en- 
tertainer of the year at the eighth 
annual Soul Tram Music Awards. 

□ 

Dan Quayle, the former U.S. vice 
president, plans to write a weekly 
newspaper column Tor worldwide 
distribution, according to Creator 
Syndicate. Quayle's column, which 
will debut around May l, will cover 
national politics, world affairs and 
other topics. 

□ 

The Los Angeles Philharmonic 
Orchestra under Finnish director 
Esa-Pekka Salonen begins a two- 
week tour of four Asian cities this 
week, witlr the first of seven con- 
certs in Taipei. 

O 

Veteran actor Tony Curtis, 68, 
launched the first British show of iris ' 
pointings this week at the Catto 
Gallery in Hampstead. Sales have 
been brisk, the gallery says. 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages 4 & 21 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weaiher. 


Corfu Dol Sol 

Dubfti 

Edrturgh 


Tmlw Toamraw 

»afi Low W High Low V 

GIF OF Of CIF 

10«0 12153 1 21 HO 13« ■ 
SMS 2/35 pc SMS 40? sH 

15/68 307 pc 11*2 -2/29 pc 

1UM 8/48 PC 17*2 9M0 & 

17«: 7 M4 S 1804 1 1/52 1 

12/53 -1/31 ah 9/48 104 , 

4/3B -4/3 c S/43 ■?«» * 

7/44 3137 J* 10150 2/35 c 

SMS -1/3! ah 6/43 104 ■ 

20S -4C5 C 2/35 -3/27 c 

19/B3 It/52 « 20 08 13/55 ■ 

7/44 8/43 * 3148 -2/2# c 

8/43 SO 7 ah 8*43 -7/37 ah 

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33/91 2700 
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20*8 17*2 
33/91 22/71 
35/B5 1904 
11/52 -405 
14*7 7/44 

31/M 24/7G 
21/70 1702 
1102 -3/27 


Depth Mtn. Res. Snow Last 
L U Pistes Pistes Stale Soon 


Depth Man. Res. Snow Last 
L U Nates Pistes Stale Snow 


Pas da la Casa 1 00 150 Far Open Vai 3-13 Resort tufty open, moony good 
SoWeu 100 200 Far Open Var 3'13 Reeon ttMy opengood UpKp 


Courmayeur 

Seh/s 

Sestribre 


70 140 Far Some Spmg 3/3 AH 27 Ua open, good above 3km 

10 75 Fair Open Sprng 3*4 72 '75 Htts open, bare erees low - 

80 200 Good Open Pchd 3/3 « ?'2i Ms qpan. good spmg sftTg ' 


FoiMil 

7/44 

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pc 

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11/52 

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14/57 

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11/52 

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LaxFMnn 

24/75 

14/57 

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23173 

16*1 a 

Lkbon 

IWW 

11/52 

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12*3 pc 

London 

AM 

2/36 

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11/52 

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MnMd 

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e/*3 

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21/70 

9 40 , 

Mfan 

12/53 

104 

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BM1 

>3/27 

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16/61 

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12* > a 

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9/48 

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307 pc 


am 

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■539 pe 

nrfamtk 

104 

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10/61 

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1601 

409 a 


.'ctstraam 


I Un ra m o n nh l)/ 

CcM 


techgl 

Wtzbuhel 

Obergurgl 

Saalbadi 


35 180 Far Open 
0100 Spring Cted 
70 140 Good Stah 
20 70 Sprng gome 


Var 3/4 AM40hftsopen. good above 1 Sun 
Hvy 3*4 57 ‘64 tltls open, good upper runs 
Var 3/b AH 22 UK ooen. some worn spots 


Mor w y 

Geito 


80 155 Good Open Var 3/12 AB IB Ms open. good, new enow 


North America 

Cold weather and a bit or 
rain and wel snow in the 
Northeast Friday wilt break 
lor partly sunny and milder 
weather over (he weekend. 
Mild weather Irom Kansas 


Europe 


The northern halt ol Europe 
wflyiave chOy weather Fri- 
day into the coming week- 
end. Snow is I kafy horn Oslo 


C«y. Mo, w Chicago Friday 
w* ow way 10 clouds and a 


and Copenhagen lo near 
Warsaw Saturday into Sun- 
day. Northern Scandinavia 
will (urn quite cold. Madrid 
and Lisbon wifi have sunny. 
m*J weather Brts weekend 


wa gum nay 10 clouds end a 
bt ol rata ihS weekend Rain 
will also spread Into San 
Francisco Bnd Portland 


Asia 

Be^ng through SeoU wfl be 
dry and cool Friday- Tha 
weekend will be dry and 
graduaty milder. Hong Kong 
wfl have ctouds and a show- 
er or two Friday the week- 
end will turn partly sunny 
and milder Tokyo wiH turn 
dry and milder lius weekend. 
Bangkok wi»: have Watering 
twM taler nils week. 


Mpn 

CBpaTowi 


1702 8/48 t 18*4 13*5 « 

28/79 15/59 3 28/79 14/57 pc 
22/71 10«0 * 22m 12/M s 
22/71 10*0 pc SXB2 1102 pc 
si/88 2700 pc 3209 2700 pc 
24/75 11/52 pc 28/79 1305 I 
18*4 r*4 pc ieoa moo ■ 


North America 


SLPUntug -2/29 -S/24 an -2/29 -9/18 »l 

SUcttokn 2/35 -3/27 at 1-34 -4/25 at 

Sfenabowp 7/44 1/34 pe 1102 1/34 pc 

Tnfcm -3/27 -6C2 an -2/29 -9/18 rf 

Von/ca 1203 3/37 a 12/53 7/44 s 

Vienna 8/43 -20* e 6 <43 0/32 pe 

Mhrmw IBM -8/22 an 205 -4/25 c 

Zunch 8/48 I.T4 pc 12/53 4 <39 s 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Oceania 

AucKenS 23/73 14/57 S 2T/7I 1702 pc 
Sydney 21/70 14*7 pe 23/73 1801 pe 



Tratay 


Tomonw# 


Today 



Lo m 

W 


Low W 


WbK 

Low 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 


OF 

CIF 

Band 

21/70 

12/53 


21/70 

14*7 8 

Buenos Aires 

23173 

14*7 

Cmo 

24rt5 

11« 


24 ns 

12/53 * 

Creacto 

29*4 

19*6 

Oamncto 

1702 

4/39 


1702 

B/4B 9 

Lkns 

26/79 

21/70 

Janoslnn 

17*2 

846 


17*2 

loeo « 

IfarfraCdv 

25/77 

11/52 

Unei 

29*4 

7M4 


32*9 

12/53 9 

RwdsJarwan 32*9 

240 5 

«vadh 

20133 

7/44 


25/77 

11*2 « 


sera 

W«T 


Legend: S- sunny, pc -party doutfy. cc/oudy. sh-showera. t-tajrxterstonns, r-rata. 
srvsww. Moa, W-Weuhor. M maps, torecatta and <Mta provkfed by Acra>-' 


W W Low W 

OF OF 
c 23*73 1702 pc 
pc 29184 19)88 a 
pc 27/80 2I/7D 1 
pc 25/77 11/52 pc 
pc ffi/B9 34/75 pc 
pc 27/BO 1801 a 

sFsnowfcmas. 

WmUw, Inc. 1994 


Hourfan 
U nSnytei 


SLAnton 

30270 

Far 

SWi 

Hvy 

36 

39 35 hits open low runs not great 

franea 

Alps d'Huaz 

125 300 

Fair 

Open 

Hvy 

3/3 

74 '86 UK open 

Las Ares 

95 310 

Far 

Open 

Hvy 

3/3 

57- 64 has open, best above am 

Avorlaz 

160 200 

Fair 

Open Spmg 

3/3 

AM 41 UKepen. ipper slopes good 

Cbamonir 

20 320 

Far 

Steti 

Hw 

3'3 

40/46 UK opn Grd MoM good 

Courchevel 

120 160 

Fair 

Open 

Hvy 

3'13 

AH has and pons open 

L8S Deux Alpes 4Q 310 

Good 

Ctad 

var 

3/4 

55 '63 Ws opn. / 20cm at higher 141 

Isota 

I2fl200 

Fair 

Open Spmg 

3/1 

35726 UK open spring slung 

Mftibel 

45 175 

Fair 

Opan 

Hvy 

3/3 

48 49 Hits open, heavy conbbons 

La Plagne 

130 265 

Far 

Opwi 

Var 

3/3 

IQS- 1 12 has coon n slopes test 

Sene Chevalier 

20 140 

Fair 

Stah 

HW 

2 '28 

73.77nnscpn.gcvdtever slopes 

■ngnes 

130 265 

Far 

(*wi 

Var 3/13 

SB 61 has open, grd mode exceHm 

val tfteere 

105 315 

Far 

Stah 

var 

3/12 

50 SI Us opn. lots ol good std'g 

Vai Thorens 

100 250 

Fak 

Open < 

3>VJ5t 

3/6 

M 29 Ms open 


Germany 

Garmisch 

Obwstdort 


Far Ctsd Sprng 3>16 26 33 Ms opn. snow above I 7km 
Far Cted Sprng 3/16 S 27 fcffs. snow pn upper stapes 


Spain 
La Molina 
Switzerland 

Arosa 

Crans Montana 

Davos 

GrtndetwBM 

SLMontr 

Verbier 

Wengen 

Zermatt 

UA 

Asper 

Heavenly 

Mammoth 
Park City 
Steamboat 
Tefluride 
vail 


20 70 FatT Open Sprng 2-20 9/15 litis open, twsi early morning 


fioioo Far 

20 ISO Fan 

50 185 Good 

O 90 Fan 

50 190 Fak 

10 300 Fair 

10 80 Fair 


10110 Good 


Open Spmg 3.13 
Worn Sprng 3/2 
Open Var 3/13 
Ctsd Hvy 3«6 
Qoen Spmg 3/4 
Steh Hvy 3/6 
Ctsd Hvy 3'6 
Soma Var 3-3 


All 16 Zrfrs open good above 3km 
AH 40 Ms open, best above Him 
All 36 urts open, sugary below 3m 
26 a3«tsopen. teal above 1 ten 
AH 6* Ms open, good pole siting- 
37 39tttsopn. met S mi tod good 
18733 Ms open upper slopes of 
70. 73 hits open best above 1 9km 


'] to Sum 

i 

t 

pnM jrtit 


13U 145 Far 
110 210 Good 
150 180 Good 
90 1 85 Good 
120 175 Good 
125 145 Good 
115 MS Good 


Open Sprng 3<9 
Open Var 3 8 
Open Pckd 3/9 
Open Var 3/13 
Open Sprng 3 ‘9 
Open Vai 3/12 
Open Pckd 3/9 


AH 8 01k open 
31 24 m open 
26- 30 Ms open 
n hits open 
1 9' 20 Hits open 
At 10 hits open 
AH 35 Hits open 


Sanfrwt 

S«wn» 

Ton**} 

VUarffepon 


Italy 

Bomuo 

Cervmta 

Cortina 


5140 For Some Hvy 3/14 15-' 17 Alts open, good above ten 

45 2Sfe Good Open Sprng 3/3 All Ms open, upper stapes good 

5 80 Fw Ctoo Spmg 2/6 38 WMtsopen lower slopes ootn 


Canada 

Whistler 5Q 260 Go od Open Var 3- 13 AO kits and pistes open 

Key Ml Depth « cm on lower ana upper stapes. Mtn. Males Mountainside pistes. Has. 
Plates ftjns to-uing to ream vmage An ArtfnaJ snow 

Reports supphed t»y me te CM} d Greet Bream 


Iravel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ART Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1 Using tin? fliari heb mr, find tl ie I'rHinuy you are calling Inm 
2. Util the iT*TTes ponding Alts' Aece» Number. 

i An b'nglish-spudtiiifi OpcRilurnr voice prompt will :bk for die ph. »nc number v< hi wish v > call or connect you to a 

aisiumcr service representative. 7 

To receive your free wallet card of ABSTs .Access Numbers, just dtd the axes number of 
the country you’re in and ask for Customer Service. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUM BER 
ASIA/PACDFIC 

Australia 0014-881-011 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
Ireland 1-800-5504)00 


Cbta9Lrao~ 

Gram 

Hong Kong 


JayucT 

Korea 

Korea** 


New Zealand 


Saipan* 
Singapore 
Sri Lanka 
Taiwan’ 
Tha feral* 


Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
• B3b language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they’ll get the message in 

i your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with ADSL 1 

To use these services, dial the ARET Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and vpur AKF Calling Card international calling has never been easier. 

If you don't have an A RET Calling Card or you'd like more information on ATS3T global services, fust call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 


Belgium’ 

Uujgrti 

Croatia** 

Q=ccb Hep 

Denmark* 

Hnlaod* 

Prance 

Ge rman y 

Greece* 

Songary 

tcdjncFta 


1 0811 

018-872 

800-1111 

000-117 

001^801-10 

0039-111 

009-n 

ir 

aofroon 

000-911 

105-11 

235-2872 : 

800-0111-111 

43<M30 

0080-10288-0 

0019-99t-UU 

EUROPE 

8*14111 

022-903-011 

078-1 1 -00 10 

OjMggtMjQlO 

99-38-0011 

00-420-00101 

8001-0010 

9800-100-10 

194,-0011 

0130-0010 

00-800-1311 

004-800-01111 

wool 


Italy* 172-1011 

liechtcnstein* 155-OO-Tl 

Lithuania* 8*196 

tuxcmtetuiy 0-800-0 l7T 

Mata- 0800-890-110 

Monaco* 194-0011 

Net haki odB* 06022-9111 

Norway* 800-190-11 

Poland**** 0*010-480-0111 

PortngaT 05017-1-288 

Romania 01-8004288 - 

RPWfc'tMosoow) 155-5042 

Slovakia 0042000101 

Spain 9009900-11 

Srmkar 020^795-611 

Swtazrianrf* 1554)0-11 

UJC- 0506890011 

MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain 809001 

Cypres* OW-guuia 

hod 177-100-2727 

KiWaft 800-288 

rrhtnoa(BdnM) 426-601 

Saudi Arabia 1-800-100 

Torfcgy* 08800-12277 * 

AMERICAS 

Ariadna* 001-800-200-1111 

~ ~55S 

BoUvfa* 0-800-1111 

0008010 

Chile . O0*-0312 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

980-11-0010 

i Co3oMca*i lU . 

E c u a d or* 119. 

El Salvadors 190 

■ Guareroah* t9o ‘ 

Gtayara— 165 

Honduras’* 12> 

Mcdco*** ~ 95-800462-4240 

Ntearagaa (Managua) 174 

Panamas 109 

PenT ~ 191 - 

Suriname 156 

Uruguay 000410 

Yen ernefar* ~ 80011-120 

CARIBBEAN 

BabMona ~ I-80Q-872-2881 . 

■ Bermuda* 1-800872-2881 

■ BffatahV-I. 1-B0P872-2881 . 

Cayman Islands l-aOO-872-288* 

Grenada* ~ 1-800-872-2881 

Hrid* 001-800-972-2883 

SHtttalcar 0-800-872-28B1 ■ 

Neth-AnUl 001-800-072-2881 

■ SLKUP/Nevta 1-800-872-2881 

AFRICA 

Egypt* (Cabo) gtogio 

004-QQl 

fi a m fata* opin' 

0800-iQ 

^ eria ' 797-797* 

Malaw{ ** 101-1992 


ART 


’40 L4n«Uiilip4<n »aU4( m 41 munc. «0 Wold Cooiaia • icn, , 
p,-nnv,.i,iiiu> iu.-mn uBnehl«nii aM>-ilui1iinjniik-L Har |jn«u* 
[n’‘m*i-<i4lCT,Ai-|4lvplH»-Vir7s>'Uin«, in ,4,tliiiLnpur> 

4tST WorldCi>aiieri~x<nlcri‘W4lU4c(n a i,jnli>.rtir,.,Mn?aih*1rfa>i. 

-..Mtr World Cnorecr S,T>% v JTT*r - 

-WriSADlRn'’iiT«ln-*w>alLihlL-lRini4llilviT4iinV7>l>4nl4'->i,- 
*ruHh-|4i'*iL-.ir<|ulH’>k-{iMli4L,4iii« |4»«-> *nl hViUhn- 
T'rtl iIl]> Hi ■/. r/li . f |il, ,r ■JUIliV I<ci1ni|l->t.ii| I 


1*0 Ita- JV^rtihk nltr«‘ 

-*0 4K, « i-jUuif- 1 vilr 

**• “-4 ra j.^A/ 1 *' Innjtnu 
* taitv.nj.uiqr 

- ■«*«*-. rarfha 

* ^UrtdCjrfWm -tlVdl'inrauMiKljIhiint; 


© 1994 ASST